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Full text of "The Imperial gazetteer of India"

v.--'^ 



MAR Am?,- 



!^ 






THE 



IMPERIAL GAZETTEER 
OF INDIA 



VOL. XXV 

INDEX 



NEW EDITION 

PUBLISHED UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF HIS MAJESTY'S 
SECRETARY OF STATE FOR INDIA IN COUNCIL 



OXFORD 

AT THE CLARENDON PRESS 
1909 



HENRY FROWDE, M.A. 

PUBLISHER TO THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD 

LONDON, EDINBURGH, NEW YORK 

TORONTO AND MELBOURNE 



PREFACE 

This Index to the twenty-four volumes of the Gazetteer 
has been compiled, under the supervision of the Engh'sh 
editor, by Miss Petherbridge and her staff of assistants, 
among whom special mention may be made of the services 
of Miss D. K. Bloxam. 

In the main, the plan adopted in the last edition has 
been followed ; but, while local references to headings of 
almost universal occurrence — such as Christians, Districts, 
History, &c. — are now omitted, space has been found for 
the insertion of many more personal names and words of 
only occasional mention. Thus, though the body of the 
work is increased from thirteen to twenty-four volumes, 
the number of pages of the Index has only risen propor- 
tionately from 350 to 631. 

The general rule has been to place first under each 
heading any references in the four volumes of The Indian 
Empire,' and then to follow with the references in the 
other volumes in alphabetical sequence, thus occasionally 
producing chronological disorder. In the arrangement of 
names common to more than one person, chronology has 
been the chief consideration, though rulers of the same 
dynasty have been kept together, and Englishmen come in 
the order of their Cliri.stian names. Some inconsistency 
may be detected in the order of composite words, as to 
which there seems to be no absolute agreement among 
index-makers, especially when dealing with Oriental com- 
pounds. So far as possible, the principle adopted has been, 
not to follow all the letters alphabetically through such 
a word, but to place first any word appended but not 
joined to the leading word, and then the compounds: 
e.g. Muhammad, Muhammad Shah, Muhammadabad. 



iv PREFACE 

The Glossary prefixed to the Index has been compiled 
by Mr. R. Bum. the Indian editor. 

Its object and its plan differ from those of more elaborate 
Indian Glossaries, of which a list ^ may be found in the 
second edition of Yule and Burnell's Hobsott-Jobson 
(pp. xxiii, xxiv). Throughout the Gazetteer the use of 
vernacular terms has been generally avoided, except where 
they could not be translated concisely, or where they were 
intentionally introduced for the benefit of readers in India. 
Such vernacular terms are explained in the Glossary, which 
also includes English expressions that have acquired 
technical meanings in official use. Where it seemed desir- 
able to give further information than the brief definition in 
the Glossary, a reference has been added to the volume 
and page of the Gazetteer at which a fuller explanation will 
be found. The different senses in which the same term is 
sometimes used in different parts of India, or in different 
connexions, have been distinguished. In the case of certain 
crops of wide distribution and a {^.w official designations, 
synonyms have been appended. Ordinarily, the main 
heading for a vernacular term is the Hindustani form, 
where this is the form used in the publications of the 
Government of India. 

^ To that list may be added the Index volume by E. Thurston to 
Watt's Dictionary of Economic Products (Calcutta, 1896), and the 
Hindustani-English Vocabulary of Indian Birds by Lieut. -Colonel 
D. C. Phillott and Gobin Lai Bonnerjee {/.A.S.B. 1908, pp. 55-79). 



GLOSSARY 



Abkari. Excise of liquors and drugs. 

Adad. A pulse, Phaseolus radiatus. 

Agar. A perfume distilled from the resinous sap of the agar 

tree, Aquilaria Agallocha. 
Agrahara. A free grant of land for the upkeep of Hindu 

temples. 
Ahar. A reservoir attached to an artificial irrigation channel, 

Bihar (xii, p. 202). 
Ahu. Summer rice, Assam (vi, p. 54) ; syn. aus. 
Ain. A timber tree, Terminalia tomentosa. 
Ain-i-Akbari. A comprehensive account of India under the 

Mughal emperor Akbar, compiled in 1590 by Abul Fazl. 
Ajlaf. Low-class Muhammadans. 
Akunwun. A subordinate revenue official, Burma. 
Al. A plant, the root of which produces a rich red dye, 

Morinda tinctoria (iii, p. 183). 
Alsi. Linseed, Linum usitatissimum. 
Aman. The late rice crop, Bengal ; syn. sali, Assam. 
Ambadi. Name in ^^'estern Lidia for the fibre plant. Hibiscus 

cannabinus ; syn. patsan. 
AmiL A subordinate executive official under native rule ; in 

Sind the name is still applied to Hindus of the clerical class 

(xxii, p. 407). 
Anicut. A dam or weir across a river for irrigation purposes, 

Southern India (iii, p. 326). 
Anjan. A timber tree, Hardivickia binata. 
Arhar. A pulse, Cajanus indicus; syn. tur, Bombay; tuar. 

Central Provinces and Central India ; rahar, Bengal. 
Aruga. Name in Southern India for a small millet, Paspalum 

scrobiculatmn ; syn. kodon. 
Assets. See Net Assets. 

Aus. The early rice crop, Bengal ; syn. ahu, Assam. 
Avare. A pulse, Dolichos Lablab. 
Avatar. An incarnation of Vishnu. 

Babar. A grass used for making paper. 

Babul, babul. A common thorny tree, the bark of which is 
used for tanning, Acacia arabica. 



vi GLOSSARY 

Bafta. Formerly the name of a kind of fine calico ; now used 

for silk fabrics. 
Baghla. A native boat. 
Bairagi. A Hindu religious mendicant. 
Baisurai, baisuri. A weed which spreads in dry weather 

and hinders cultivation, Phichea lanceolata. 
Bajra. The bulrush millet, a common food-grain, Penniseium 

typhoideum ; syn. cambu, Madras. 
Band. A dam or embankment. 
Bandh. A dam. 
Bane. An open glade, Mysore. 
Bangar. Upland country as opposed to land liable to 

flooding (khadar), Northern India. 
Banteng. See Tsine. 

Banti. Name in Gujarat for a small millet, Paiiiatm flavidum . 
Banyan. A species of fig-tree, Ficus hidica. 
Bao. Long-stemmed rice grown in low-lying land, Assam 

_(vi, p. 54). 
Barahdari. A summer-house ; lit. ' having twelve doors.' 
Barasingha. The swamp deer, Cervus dtivauceli (i, p. 236). 
Basti. (i) A village, or collection of huts ; (2) a Jain temple, 

Kanara. 
Batta. Lit. ' discount,' and hence allowances by way of 

compensation (iv, pp. 341, 372). 
Bavto. Name in Gujarat for a small millet, Panicum friimen- 

taceutn. 
Bazar. (1) A street lined with shops, India proper; (2) a 

covered market, Burma. 
Beheda, behera. A tree, Termi?ialia be/erica. 
Ber. A thorny shrub bearing a fruit like a small plum, Zizy- 

phus Jujuba. 
Bewar. Name in Central Provinces for shifting cultivation 

in jungles and hill-sides; syn. taungya, Burma; jhum, North- 

Eastern India. 
Bhadoi. Early autumn crop, Northern India, reaped in the 

month Bhadon. 
Bhaiyachara. A variety of land tenure in Northern India 

(xxiv, p. 230). 
Bhang. The dried leaves of the hemp plant, Cajinabis sativa, 

a mild narcotic (iv, p. 259). 
Bhan"war. Light sandv soil ; svn. bhur. 
BharaL A Himalayan wild sheep, Ovis iiahura (i, p. 233). 
BhiJm. K class of tenure in Rajputana (v, p. 160 ; xxi, p. 148). 
Bhumia. The holder of a bhQm tenure. 



GLOSSARY vii 

Bhumiat. (i) Land held on the bhum tenure; (2) a petty 

chiefship in Central India (viii, pp. 146, 147). 
Bhiar. Light sandy soil. 
Bhusa. Chaff, for fodder. 
Bidri. A class of ornamental metal-work, in which blackened 

pewter is inlaid with silver (viii, p. 167; xiii, p. 264); 

named from the town of Bidar, Hyderabad. 
Bigha. A measure of land, varying widely ; the standard 

bigha is generally five-eighths of an acre. 
Bil. Name for a swamp in Bengal ; syn. jhil. 
Black cotton soU. A dark-coloured soil, very retentive of 

moisture, found in Central and Southern India (iii, p. 9) : 

syn. regar. 
Board of Revenue. The chief controlling revenue authority 

in Bengal, the United Provinces, and Madras (iv, p. 47). 
Bobabaing. Land held on an hereditary freehold tenure, 

Puirnia. 
Boll. Form of speech, or dialect. 
Bor. A thorny tree producing a fruit like a small plum, Zizy- 

phiis Jujuba. 
Boro. Summer rice, Bengal. 

Boya. A grass from which rope is made, Saccharutn ciliare. 
Brinjal. A vegetable, Solanum Melougena ; syn. egg-plant. 
Bunder, bandar. A harbour or port. 
Burhel. See Bharal. 

Cadjan. Palm leaves, used for thatch. 

Cambu. Name in Southern India for the bulrush millet, 

I\)iniseium typhoideum ; syn. bajra. 
Chabiitra. A platform of mud or plastered brick, used for 

social gatherings. Northern India. 
Chadar. A sheet worn as a shawl by men, and sometimes 

by women. 
Chaitya. An ancient Buddhist chapel (ii, p. 162). 
Chakla. (i) A subdivision of territory under native rule; 

(2) the prostitutes' quarter in a town. 
Chalisa. Forty. Used as a contraction for 1S40, the Samvat 

year corresponding to a. d. 1783-4, when a great famine 

prevailed throughout Northern India. 
Chalka. A finely pulverized reddish soil (xiii, p. 251). 
Chambeli. Jasmine, Jasmitmm grandijloruin. 
Champak. A tree with fragrant blossoms, Mkhelia Champaca. 
Chapari. Land liable to flooding on the bank of a river, 

Assam (vi, p. 54 \. 



viii GLOSSARY 

Chapati. A cake of unleavened bread. 

Chaprasi. An orderly or messenger, Northern India ; syn. 

pattawala, Bombay ; peon, Madras. 
Char. Land thrown up in the bed of a river, Eastern Bengal 

and Assam. 
Charas. The resin of the hemp plant, Catniabis sativa, used 

for smoking (iv, p. 259). 
Chattram. A resthouse for pilgrims or high-caste travellers, 

Madras. 
Chaudhri. Under native rule^ a subordinate revenue official ; 

at present the term is applied to the headman or represen- 
tative of a trade guild. 
Chaukidar. The village watchman and rural policeman (iv, 

p. 390). 
Chaung. A stream, Burma. 
Chaunkhar. A thorny tree. Acacia ai-abica. 
Chauth. The fourth part of the land revenue, exacted by 

ihc Marathas in subject territories. 
Chela. A pupil, usually in connexion with religious teaching. 
Chena. A small millet, Panicum iniliaceum \ syn. vari, 

Bombay. 
Chhaoni. A collection of thatched huts or barracks ; hence 

a cantonment. 
Chhatri. A dome or cupola ; hence a domed building such 

as a cenotaph. 
Chhiul. See Dhak. 
Chief Commissioner. The administrative head of one of 

the lesser Provinces in British India (iv, p. 29). 
Chikan. Fine embroidery, usually in silk or cotton (iii, p. 221). 
Chikcr. A kind of partridge, Caccabis chucar (i, p. 258). 
China. A tuber used for food, Dioscorea sativa. 
Chinar. A plane tree, Flafanus orientalis. 
Chinkara. The Indian gazelle, Gazella bennetti, often called 

* ravine deer ' (i, p. 235). 
Chir. A limber tree, Finns longifolia. 
Chironji. A medium-sized tree producing edible fruit, 

Ihtchanania latifolia. 
Chital. The spotted deer, Cennis axis (i, p. 236). 
Cholam. Name in Southern India for the large millet, Andro- 

pogon Sorghum ; syn. jowar. 
Choli. A kind of short bodice worn by women. 
Chunam, chiina. Lime plaster. 

Circle. The area in charge of— (r) a Conservator of forests 
(iii, p. 108) ; (2) a Postmaster- or Deputy-Postmaster-General 



GLOSSARY ix 

(iii, p. 425) ; (3) a Superintending Engineer of the Public 
Works department (iv. p. 319). 

Civil Surgeon. The officer in medical charge of a District 
(iv, p. 461). 

Cognizable. An offence for which the culprit can be arrested 
by the police without a warrant. 

Collector. The administrative head of a District in Regula- 
tion Provinces (iv, p. 49), corresponding to the Deputy- 
Commissioner in non-regulation areas. 

Commissioner, (i) The officer in charge of a Division or 
group of Districts (iv, p. 49) ; (2) the head of various de- 
partments, such as Stamps, Excise, &c. 

Conservator. The supervising officer in charge of a Circle 
in the Forest department (iii, p. 108). 

Council Bills. Bills or telegraphic transfers drawn on the 
Indian Government by the Secretary of State in Council 
(iv, p. 194). 

Count. Cotton yarns are described as 20's, 30's, &c., counts 
when not more than a like number of hanks of 840 yards 
go to the pound avoirdupois. 

Court of Wards. An establishment for managing estates 
of minors and other disqualified persons (iv, p. 50 and note). 

Crore, karor. Ten millions. 

Da. .5*^^ Dah. 

Dacoit, dakait. A member of a gang of robbers. 

Daffadar. A non-commissioned native officer in the army 

or police. 
Dah or dao. A cutting instrument with no point, used as 

a sword and also as an axe, Assam and Burma, 
Dahiya, dahi. Name in Central India and Orissa for 

shifting cultivation in the jungles and hill-sides ; syn. 

taungya, Burma. 
Daitya. In Hindu mythology an evil spirit. 
Dakaiti, dacoity. Robbery by five or more persons. 
Dal. A generic term applied to various pulses. 
Dam. An old copper coin, one-fortieth of a rupee. 
Daman. The skirt of a hill range. 
Dani. A palm, AUpa fruticans, the leaves of which are used 

for thatching, Burma. 
Dao. See Dah. 
Darbar. (i) A ceremonial assembly, especially one presided 

over by the ruler of a State ; hence (2) the government 

of a Native State. 



X GLOSSARY 

Dargah. A Muhammadan shrine or tomb of u saint. 

Dari. A rug or carpet, usually of cotton, but sometimes of 
wool. 

Darogha. The title of ofificials in various departments : now 
especially applied to subordinate controlling officers in the 
police and jail departments. 

Darwan. A door-keeper. 

Da^^vaza. A gateway. 

Debottar. Land assigned for the upkeep of temj)les or 
maintenance of Hindu worship. 

Deodar. A cedar, Cedrus Libajii or C. Deodara. 

Deputy Commissioner. The administrative head of a 
District in non-regulation areas (iv, p. 55), corresponding 
to the Collector in Regulation Provinces. 

Deputy Magistrate and Collector. A subordinate of the 
Collector, having executive and judicial (revenue and criminal) 
powers (iv, p. 54) ; equivalent to Extra Assistant Com- 
missioner in non-regulation areas (iv, p. 55). 

Desai. A revenue official under native (Maratha) rule. 

Desh. (i) Native country ; (2) the plains as opposed to the 
hills, Northern India ; (3) the plateau of the Deccan above 
the Ghats. 

Deshmukh. A petty official under native (Maratha) rule. 

Deva. A deity. 

Dhak. A tree, Buteafrondosa, with brilliant salmon-coloured 
flowers, used for dyeing, and also producing a gum ; syn. 
palas, Bengal ; chhiul, Central India. 

Dharmsala. A charitable institution provided as a resting- 
place for pilgrims or travellers. Northern India. 

Dhatiira. A stupefying drug, Datura fasiiiosa. 

Dhavda, dhaora. A large handsome tree, Anogeissus 
laiifolia. 

Dhenkli. Name in Northern India for the lever used in 
raising water ; syn. picottah. 

Dhoti. The loincloth worn by men, 

Diara. Alluvial land in the bed of a river. Northern India. 

Dighi. A tank, Bengal. 

District. The most important administrative unit of area 
(iv, p. 48). 

Division, (i) A group of Districts for administrative and 
revenue purposes, under a Commissioner (iv, p. 49) ; (2) the 
area in charge of a Deputy-Conservator of Forests, usually 
corresponding with a (revenue) District ; (3) the area under 
a Superintendent of post offices (iii, p. 43S) ; (4) a group 



GLOSSARY xi 

of (revenue) Districts under an Executive Engineer of the 

Public Works department (iv, p. 318). 
DiWan. The chief minister in a Native State. 
Di"wani. Civil, especially revenue, administration ; now used 

generally in Northern India of civil justice and courts. 
Doab. The tract between two rivers, especially that between 

the Ganges and Jumna. 
Dry crop. A crop grown without artificial irrigation. 
Dry rate. The rate of revenue for unirrigated land. 
Dun. A valley, Northern India. 

Ekka. A small two-wheeled conveyance drawn by a pony, 

Northern India. 
Endi, eri. A semi-domesticated silkworm, Attacus ridni, 

Eastern Bengal and Assam. 
Eng or in. A timber tree in Burma, Dipterocarpus tiiber- 

culatus. 
Extra Assistant Commissioner. See Deputy Magistrate 

and Collector (iv, p. 55). 

Famine insurance grant. An annual provision from 

revenue to meet direct famine expenditure, or the cost of 

certain classes of public works, or to avoid debt (iv, 

p. 1S8). 
Farman. An imperial (Mughal) order or grant. 
Faujdari. Under native rule, the area under a Faujdar, or 

subordinate governor; now used generally of Magistrates' 

criminal courts. 
Financial Commissioner. The chief controlling revenue 

authority in the Punjab, Burma, and the Central Provinces 

(iv, p. 55)- 

Gabrtin. Cotton drill (cloth). 

Gaddi. The cushion or throne of (Hindu) royalty. 

Ganja. The unfertilized flowers of the cultivated female 

hemp plant. Cannabis sativa, used for smoking (iv, p. 259). 
Gaonbura. Name in Assam for the village headman; syn. 

patel, Bombay. 
Gauda. A leading cultivator or headman, Mysore (xviii, 

p. 228). 
Gauli-raj, The rule of the 'cowherd' dynasty, Central 

Provinces. 
Gaur. Wild cattle, commonly called 'bison,' Bos gaurus 

(i, p. 231). 



xii GLOSSARY 

Gayal. A species of wild cattle, Bos frontalis^ domesticated 

on the North-East frontier (i, p. 232); syn. mithan. 
Ghariyal. The long-nosed crocodile, C. gavialis (i, p. 266). 
Ghat, (i) A landing-place on a river ; (2) the bathing steps 

on the bank of a tank ; (3) a pass up a mountain ; (4) in 

European usage, a mountain range. In the last sense 

especially applied to the Eastern and Western Ghats. 
Ghatwal. A tenure-holder who originally held his land on 

the condition of guarding the neighbouring hill passes 

(ghats), Bengal (vi, p. 389). 
Ghi. Clarified butter. 

Gingelly. An oilseed, Sesamum indicum ; syn. til. 
Gola. A warehouse or storehouse. 
Gopuram. A gateway, especially applied to the great temple 

gateways in Southern India (ii, p. 171). 
Gorait. A village watchman, Northern India. 
Goral. See Gural. 
Gorat. Light alluvial soil, Gujarat. 
Gosain, goswami. A (Hindu) devotee ; lit. ' one who 

restrains his passions.' 
Gosha. Name in Southern India for 'caste' women; lit. 'one 

who sits in a corner ' ; syn. parda. 
Gotra. An exogamous subdivision among Hindus ; lit., 

' cattle-yard.' 
Gram. A kind of pea, Cicer ariethium (iii, p. 34). In 

Southern India the pulse DoHchos bijlonis is known as horse 

gram. 
Guaranteed, (i) A class of Native States in Central India 

(ix, p. 375); (2) a class of railways (iii, p. 367). 
Gur. Crude sugar ; syn. jaggery, Southern India ; tanyet, 

Burma. 
Gural. A Himalayan goat antelope, Cemas goral {\, p. 234). 
Gurjan. A tree producing timber and a valuable oil, Diptcro- 

carpus turbinatus. 
Guru, (i) A Hindu religious preceptor: (2) a schoolmaster, 

Bengal. 

Hakim. A native doctor practising the Muhammadan system 

of medicine (iv, pp. 457-8). 
Halalkhor. A sweeper or scavenger ; lit. ' one to whom 

everything is lawful food.' 
Hali. Current. Applied to coin of Native States, especially 

1 lyderabad. 
Hamsaya. A neighbour. 



GLOSSARY xiii 

Hamun. An inland salt swamp or lagoon, Baluchistan. 
Hangal. The Kashmir stag, Cervi/s cashniriamis (i, p. 236). 
Hacr. A marshy depression, Assam (vi, pp. 15, 55, 60). 
Harik. Name in Bombay for a small millet, Paspalum scrohi- 

adatiim ; syn. kodon. 
Hemadpanti. An ancient style of architecture in the Central 

Provinces, Berar, and Bombay, in which buildings were built 

of stone without mortar (viii, p. 296). 
Hilsa. A kind of fish, Clupea ilisha. 
Hiver. A small tree. Acacia leucophhea, Deccan ; called 

hiwar in Berar. 
Hobli. A minor subdivision of a District, Mysore (xviii, 

p. 228). 
Hti. An iron pinnacle placed on a pagoda in Burma. 
Hukka. The Indian tobacco pipe, incorrectly spelt 'hookah.' 

Idgah. An enclosed place outside a town, where Muham- 

madan services are held on festivals known as the Id, &c. 
Ijara. Land leased to a contractor, ijaradar. 
Ikra. A reed, Saccharufii arunditiaceum. 
Ilaka. Territory ; hence used as a term for a subdivision, 
Imti. The tamarind, Tamarindiis indica. 
In or eng. A timber tree in Burma, Dipterocarpus tuberculatus. 
Inam. Lit. 'reward.' Hence land held revenue free or at 

a reduced rate, often subject to service. (For Madras see 

xvi, p. 324.) 
Indaing. Undulating upland country, Burma. 
Inundation CanaL A channel taken off from a river at a 

comparatively high level, which conveys water only when 

the river is in flood (iii, p. 327). 
Istimrari. Lit. ' perpetual.' Applied to certain land tenures, 

in Ajmer, (S:c., held by an istimrardar (v, pp. 159, 160). 

Jaggery, jagri. Name in Southern India for crude sugar ; 

syn. gur. 
Jagir. An assignment of land, or of the revenue of land, 

held by a jaglrdar. 
Jagni. An oilseed, Guizoiia okifera. 
Jakhanacharya. A style of architecture in the Kanarese 

country (xi, p. 306). 
Jambul, jamun. A tree bearing an edible fruit, Eugenia 

Jambolana. 
Jand. A tree, Prosopis spicigera. 
Janmam. A land tenure on the west coast of Southern 



xiv GLOSSARY 

India, by which land is held revenue free or at light rates 

(xxiv, p. 1 8). 
Jarau. See Sambar. 
Jarib. Lit., a measuring rope or chain. Used as a measure of 

length, and hence of area, varying in different parts of India. 
Jatra. A Hindu pilgrimage or festival. 
Jemadar. A native officer in the army or police. 
Jhangora. See Sanwan. 
Jhil. A natural lake or swamp, Northern India ; syn. bil. 

Eastern Bengal and Assam. 
Jhiim. Name in North-Eastern India for shifting cultivation 

in the jungle and hill-sides ; syn. taungya, Burma. 
Jihad. A religious war undertaken by Musalmans. 
Jirga. A council of tribal elders, North-West frontier (vi, 

p. 321). 
Jola. See Jowar. 
Jotdar. A tenant of land, holding directly under Government, 

Northern Bengal. 
Jowar. The large millet, a very common food-grain, Afidro- 

pogon Sorghum, or Sorghum vulgare (iii, p. 32) ; syn. 

cholam and jola, in Southern India. 
Judicial Commissioner. An officer exercising the functions 

of a High Court in the Central Provinces, Oudh, and Sind 

(iv, p. 56). 

Kacheri, kachahri. kw office (jr office building, especially 

that of a Government official. 
Kachhar. Low-lying land in river beds, Northern India. 
Kaing. Alluvial crops, Burma. 

Kakar. The barking-deer, Cervulus ituintjac (i, pp. 235, 236). 
Kala azar. An obscure form of epidemic fever, rife in Assam 

(i, p. 462 ; vi, pp. 38, 40). 
Kalar, kallar. Barren land covered with salt or alkaline 

efflorescences, Northern India. 
Kamaisdar, kamaishdar. See Kamasdar. 
Kamarband. A waistcloth or belt. 
Kamasdar or kamavisdar. A subordinate revenue official 

under IMaratha rule (xii, p. 432). 
Kamdar. An administrative officer in a Native State. 
Kami. A grass from which rope is made, Saccharum ciliare. 
Kamil, Complete or full. Kamil assessment = a rack-rent. -, 
Kammar. A useful iiml)er tree, Ilardwickia bi)iata\ syn. 

iinjan. 
Kanazo. A small evergreen tree, Baccaurea sapida. 



GLOSSARY XV 

Kangar. A kind of portable warming-pan, carried by persons 
in Kashmir to keep themselves warm. 

Kankar. Nodular limestone, used for metalling roads, as 
building stone, or for preparation of lime (i, p. loo). 

Kans. A coarse grass which spreads and prevents cultiva- 
tion, especially in Bundelkhand, Sacchariim spontaneiim. 

Kanungo. A revenue inspector (iv, p. 53). 

Karait. A very venomous snake, Bungarus candldi/s or 
caernkus (i, p. 271). 

Karanj. A tree bearing beans which yield oil, Pongamia 
glabra. 

Karbhari. A manager. 

Kardar. A native official, especially in the Punjab. 

Karewa. Alluvial deposits in Kashmir (i, p. loi ; xv, p. 76). 

Karez. Underground tunnels near the skirts of hills, by 
which water is gradually led to the surface, for irrigation, 
especially in Baluchistan (iii, p. 343 ; vi, p. 301). 

Karkun. A clerk or writer, Bombay. 

Karma. The doctrine that existence is conditioned by the 
sum of good and evil actions in past existences. 

Karnam. A village accountant, Madras ; syn. patwari. 

Karvand. A fruit-bearing tree, Crataeva religiosa. 

Katil. Name for shifting cultivation in the jungles and hill- 
sides, Himalayas (xii, p. 167); syn. taungya, Burma. 

Kaukkyi. Rice grown in the cold season, Burma. 

Kazi. Under native rule, a judge administering Muhammadan 
law. Under British rule, the kazi registers marriages between 
Muhammadans and performs other functions, but has no 
powers conferred by law. 

Keora. The screw pine, Patidanus odoratissimiis, from the 
flowers of which a perfume is obtained. 

Khadar. Low-lying land on the banks of a river, Northern 
India. 

Khair. A tree from which catechu (cutch) is obtained, Acacia 
Catechu. 

Khal. A water-channel, Bengal. 

Khalasi. A native fireman, sailor, artilleryman, or tent- 
pitcher. 

Khalsa. Lit. 'pure.' (i) Applied especially to themselves 
by the Sikhs, the word Khalsa being equivalent to the 
Sikh community; (2) land directly under Government as 
opposed to land alienated to grantees, &c., Northern India 
(xxi, p. 147). 

Kharab. A gravelly poor soil, Bombay. 

VOL. XXV. b 



xvi GLOSSARY 

Khari. An impure sulphate of soda, obtained from efflo- 
rescences on the soil, Northern India (iii, p. 158). Also 
applied in Rajputana to earth-salt used for industrial 
purposes. 

Kharif. The harvest reaped in late autumn (iii, p. 4). 

Kharua. A coarse cotton cloth, generally red in colour. 

Khas. Special, in Government hands. Khas tahsildar, the 
manager of a Government estate. 

Khasadar. Local levies of foot soldiers, Afghanistan (v, 

P- 63)- 
Khas-khas. A grass with scented roots, used for making 

screens which are placed in doorways and kept -wet to cool 

a house by evaporation, Andropogon muricatus. 
Khedda, kheda. A stockade into which wild elephants are 

driven ; also applied to the operations for catching. 
Khesari. A pulse, Lathyrus salivus, the consumption of 

which causes paralysis (lathyrism). 
Khilat. A robe of honour. 
Khulat. A pulse, Dolichos biflorus. 
Khutba. The weekly prayer for Muhammadans in general 

and for the reigning sovereign in particular. 
Kiari. Divisions made in fields for convenience in watering, 

and hence seed-beds for rice intended to be transplanted. 
Kikar. A thorny tree, Acacia eburnia. Also applied to 

Acacia arabica ; syn. babul. 
Kiladar. The commandant of a fort (kila). 
Kincob, kamkhwab. Silk textiles brocaded with gold or 

silver (iii, p. 209). 
Kodali. The implement like a hoe or mattock, in common 

use for digging (iii, p. 15) ; .syn. mamuti. Southern India. 
Kodon. A small millet, Paspalum scrobiculatmn ; syn. harik, 

Bombay ; kodra, Gujarat. 
Koh. Hill or mountain, especially on the North-West frontier. 
Korra. A small millet, Sctaria italica. 
Kos. A variable measure of distance, usually estimated at 

about two miles. The distance between the kos-minars or 

milestones on the Mughal imperial roads averages a little 

over 2 miles, 4 furlongs, 150 yards. 
Kothi. A large house. 
Kot'wal. The head of the police in a town, under native 

rule (iv, p. 282). The term is still used in Hyderabad and 

other parts of India. 
Kotwali. The chief police station in a head-quarters town. 
Kulith. Sec Kulthi. 



GLOSSARY 



XV] 1 



Kulkarni. A village accountant, Bombay Deccan ; syn. 
patwari. 

Kulthi. A pulse, Dolichos biflonis ; syn. khulat. 

Kumri. Name for shifting cultivation in the jungles and hill- 
sides, Western Ghats (viii, p. 312), Mysore (xviii, p. 210); 
syn. taungya, Burma. 

Kutki. A small millet, Panicum miliare or psilopodiuin. 

Kwin, The lands attached to a village in Burma, corre- 
sponding roughly to a mauza in Northern India (ix, p. 232). 

Kyaung. A Buddhist monastery, which always contains a 
school, Burma (ix, p. 226). 

Lakh, lac. A hundred thousand. 

Larabardar. The representative of the co-sharers in a zamin- 
dari village, Northern India (iv, p. 280; xxiv, p. 380). 

Langur. A large monkey, Semnopithecus entellus (i, p. 2 1 6). 

Lantana. A genus of rambling shrubs, three species of 
which are natives of Southern India. These spread rapidly, 
and are a plague to cultivation. 

Lat. A monumental pillar. 

Laterite. A vesicular material formed of disintegrated rock, 
used for buildings and making roads ; also probably valu- 
able for the production of aluminium (i, p. loi). 

Lingam. The phallic emblem, worshipped as the repre- 
sentative of Siva. 

Longyi. A waistcloth, Burma. 

Loquat. A fruit, Eriobotrya japonica. 

Lota. A small brass water-pot. 

Lugade. A woman's dress (vii, p. 381). 

Lungi. (i) A turban ; (2) a cloth worn by women. 

Madrasa. A school, especially one of higher instruction for 
Muhammadans. 

Mag. See Mung. 

Magar. The snub-nosed crocodile, C. palustris (i, p. 266). 

Mahajan. A native merchant or banker. 

Mahal, (i) Formerly a considerable tract of country ; (2) 
now a village or part of a village for which a separate 
agreement is taken for the payment of land revenue 
(xxiv, p. 230); (3) a department of revenue, e.g. right 
to catch elephants (vi, p. 20) or to take stone (xxiv, p. 200). 

Mahalkari. A subordinate revenue official, Bombay. 

Mahant. The head of a Hindu conventual establishment. 

Maharaja. A title borne by Hindus, ranking above Raja. 

b 2 



xviii GLOSSARY 

Mahseer, mahasir. A large carp, Barbits tor (i, p. 277) 

(lit. 'the big-headed'). 
Mahua. A tree, Bassia lafifoh'a, producing flowers used 

(when dried) as food or for distiUing Hquor, and seeds 

which furnish oil. 
Maidan. An open space of level ground ; the park at 

Calcutta. 
Major works. Irrigation works for which separate accounts 

are kept of capital, revenue, and interest (iii, p. 330). 
Majum, properly majun. A confection made from the hemp 

plant. 
Maktab. An elementary Muhammadan school. 
Malguzar (revenue payer), (i) The term applied in the 

Central Provinces to a co-sharer in a village held in ordinary 

proprietary tenure (x, p. 73) ; (2) a cultivator in the 

Chamba State (x, p. 131). 
Malikana. The allowance from land revenue taken by the 

landowner. 
Mamlatdar. The officer in charge of a taluka, Bombay, 

whose duties are both executive and magisterial ; syn. 

tahslldar. 
Mamuti. The implement like a hoe or mattock, in common 

use for digging, Southern India ; syn. kodali. 
Mandal. A village accountant, Assam (vi, p. 90); syn. patwari. 
Mandap or mandapam. A porch or pillared hall, especially 

of a temple. 
Mandua. A small millet, Eleusi/ie coraca/ia, Northern India ; 

syn. marua. 
Mansabdar. An officer of rank under the Mughal empire. 
Mantapam. See Mandap. 
Markhor. A wild goat in North-^^^estern India, Cap-a 

Jalconeri (i, p. 233). 
Marua. A small millet, used as a food-grain, Eleusiiie 

coraaina ; syn. mandua, Northern India; nagli, Bombay; 

ragi, Madras and Mysore. 
Masab. Red soil, Deccan (xiii, p. 251). 
Mash. A pulse, Phaseolus Mungo ; syn. urad. 
Masjid. A mosque. Jama Masjid, the principal mosque in 

a town, where worshippers collect on Fridays. 
Masnad. Seat of state or throne, Muhammadan ; syn. gaddi. 
Masur. A pulse, Ervum Lens. 

Math. A Hindu shrine or conventual establishment. 
Maulvi. A person learned in Muhammadan law. 
Mauza. (i) The whole land of a village, Northern India; 



GLOSSARY xix 

(2) a number of villages grouped for administrative purposes, 

Assam (vi, p. 83). 
Mauzadar. An ofificer who contracts to pay the land revenue 

for the area called a mauza, Assam (vi, pp. 83, 92). 
Mauzawar. Organization by villages. 
Maya. Sanskrit term for delusion. 
Mayin. Rice grown in the hot season, Burma. 
Mediatized. A class of Native States in Central India (ix, 

P- 375)- 
Mehwasi. A tenure in Central and Western India under 

which an allowance is given in lieu of blackmail formerly 

levied (xvii, pp. 12 and 273). 
Mela. A religious festival or fair. 
Mihrab. The niche in the centre of the western wall of a 

mosque. 
Mimbar. Steps in a mosque, used as a pul[)it. 
Minar. A pillar or tower. 
Minor works. Irrigation works for which regular accounts 

are not kept, except, in some cases, of capital (iii, p. 330). 
Misl. A term applied to several confederacies among the Sikhs. 
Mithan. A species of wild cattle, Bos frofttalis, domesticated 

on the North-East frontier ; syn. gayal. 
Mohtarfa. A tax levied on professions, trades, or houses. 
Monsoon. Lit. ' season,' but generally applied to the 

rainy season, or to the regular moisture-laden currents of 

air prevailing at certain seasons (i, p. 109). 
Moth. A pulse, Fhaseolus aconitifolius. 
Muafi. Land held free of revenue. 
Mufassah The outlying parts of a District, Province, or 

Presidency, as distinguished from the head-quarters (= Sadr). 
Mufti. An expounder of Muhammadan law on cases sub- 
mitted to him. 
Muga. A wild silkworm in Assam, Antheraea assama. 
Muhurtam. An auspicious moment. 
Mukaddam. A representative or headman. 
Mukhtar (corruptly mukhtiar). A class of legal practitioner 

(iv, p.^156). 
Mukhtiarkar. The officer in charge of a taluka, Sind, whose 

duties are both executive and magisterial ; syn. tahsildar. 
Multani mitti. Fuller's earth. 

Miing, mug. A pulse, Phaseohis radiatus ; syn. mag, Gujarat. 
Muni. An inspired saint, Hindu. 
Miinj. A grass used for making paper, string, or rope, 

Saccharum. cilia?^. 



XX GLOSSARY 



Munsif. Judge of the lowest court with civil jurisdiction 

(iv, p. 150). 
Munsifi. The courthouse of a munsif. 
Murum. Gravel, used for metalling roads. 

Nad. A division of territory, Mysore and Coorg (xi, p. 39 ; 

xvii, p. 68). 
Nagarkhana, nakkarkhana. A place where drums are 

l)eaten. 
Nagli. A small millet, Ekitsiiie coraca?ia, Bombay; syn. 

marua. 
Naib. Assistant or deputy. 
Naik. A leader, hence: (i) a local chieftain, in vSouthern 

India (xvi, p. 249 ; xviii, p. 176) ; (2) a native officer of the 

lowest rank (= corporal) in the Indian army. 
Nat. A demon or spirit, Burma. 
Navane. Italian millet, Setaria italica, Mysore. 
Nawab. A title borne by Musalmans, corresponding roughly 

to that of Raja among Hindus. 
Nazar, nazarana. A due paid on succession or on certain 

ceremonial occasions. 
Nazim. Under Muhammadan rule, the chief officer em- 
powered to decide criminal cases. 
Net assets, (i) In Northern India, the rent or share of the 

gross produce of land taken by the landlord ; (2) in Madras 

and Lower Burma, the difference between the assumed value 

of the crop and the estimate of its cost of production 

(iv, p. 217). 
Ncwar. Broad tape woven across bedsteads instead of iron 

slats. 
Ngapi. Pressed fish or salted fish paste, largely made and 

consumed in Burma. 
Niabat. The territory in charge of a naib or deputy-governor. 
Nilgai. An antelope, BoselapJius iragocamclus (i, p. 235). 
Nim. A tree, Melia Azadirachfa, the berries of which are 

used in dyeing. 
Nirganti, The village servant in charge of water-channels 

for irrigation, Mysore. 
Nizam. .A. title borne by the ruler of Hyderabad State. 
Nizamat. A subdivision of a Native State, corresponding to 

a B>ritisli District, chiefly in the Punjab and Biiopal. 
Non-cognizable. An offence for which the culprit cannot 

be arrested by the police without a warrant. 
Non-occiipancy tenants. A (lass of tenants with few statutory 



GLOSSARY xxi 

rights, except in Oudh, beyond the terms in their leases 
or agreements (iii, p. 450). 

Non-regulation. A term formerly applied to certain Pro- 
vinces to show that the Regulations or full code of legislation 
was not in force in them (iv, pp. 34, 54). 

Notified area. Small towns administered as embryo munici- 
palities (iv,p. 295 ; for Punjab see xx, p. 356, • and for 
United Provinces xxiv, p. 243). 

Nullah, nala. A ravine, watercourse, or drain. 

Occupancy tenants. A class of tenants with special rights 
(iii, p. 448), in Central Provinces (x, p. 75), in United 
Provinces (xxiv, p. 230). 

Pachwai. A kind of beer brewed usually by the hill tribes 

from rice. 
Padao. A native boat, Bombay. 

Pad auk. A valuable timber tree in Burma, Pterocarpus indicus. 
Paddy. Unhusked rice. 
Paga. A troop of horse among the Marathas. 
Pagi. A tracker of strayed or stolen animals. 
Paigah. A tenure in Hyderabad State. See article on 

Paigah Estates (xix, p. 314). 
Paik. (i) A foot soldier ; (2) in Assam formerly applied to 

every free male above sixteen years (vi, p. 86). 
Pain. An artificial irrigation channel, Bihar (xii, p. 202). 
Palampore. Chintzes made in Southern India (iii, p. 187). 
Palas. A tree, Bii/eafrofidosa, with brilliant salmon-coloured 

flowers ; syn. dhak. 
Palki. A palanquin or litter. 
Pan. The betel vine, Fiper Betle. 
Panchama. Low caste, Southern India. 
Panchayat. (i) A committee for management of the affairs 

of a caste, village, or town (for Bengal see vii, p. 288) ; 

(2) arbitrators. Theoretically the panchayat has five (panch) 

members (i, p. 341 ; iv, p. 280). 
Pandan. A box for holding betel-leaf, areca-nut, lime, &c., 

which are mixed together for chewing. 
Pandit. A Hindu title, strictly speaking applied to a person 

versed in the Hindu scriptures, but commonly used by 

Brahmans. In Assam applied to a grade of inspectors of 

primary schools. 
Parda. (i) A veil or curtain; (2) the practice of keeping 

women secluded ; syn. gosha. 



xxii GLOSSARY 

Pardesi. Foreign. 

Pargana. Fiscal area or petty subdivision of a tahsil, 

Northern India. 
Parha. The hog-deer, Cervus porcinus (i, p. 237). 
Pashm. The fine wool of the Tibetan goat (ii, p. 212). 
Paso. A waistcloth. 
Pat. A stretch of firm, hard clay. 
Patel. A village headman, Central and \\estern India 

(iv, p. 279); syn. reddi. Southern India; gaonbura, Assam ; 

padhan, Northern and Eastern India. 
Pathsala. A village school for Hindus. 
Patidar. A co-sharer in a village, Gujarat (xiv, p. 285). 
Patni. 'Jlie name of a subordinate tenure in Bengal 

(ix. p. 98). 
Patsan, patsan. A useful fibre plant. Hibiscus cannabinus ; 

syn. ambadi, Western India. 
Pattidari. A variety of land tenure in Northern India 

(xxiv, p. 230). 
Patwari. A village accountant (iv, pp. 53, 281) ; syn. 

karnam, Madras ; kulkarni, Bombay Deccan ; talatl, Gujarat ; 

shanbhog, Mysore, Kanara, and Coorg ; mandal, Assam. 
Pegya. A kind of pulse, Phaseolus haiatus. 
Peshkar. A subordinate revenue official, also known as 

naib-tahsildar. 
Peshkash. A tribute, or offering to a superior. 
Petha. A subdivision of a taluka, Bombay. 
Pharha. See Parha. 

Phiilkari. An embroidered sheet ; lit. flower-work. 
Pice, paisa. A copper or bronze coin worth one farthing ; 

also used as a generic term for money. 
Picottah. A lever for raising water in a bucket for irrigation. 

Southern India ; syn. dhenkul, dhenkli, or dhiklT, Northern 

India (iii, p. 319). 
Pinda. A cake or ball of rice or flour offered to ancestors. 
Pipal. A sacred tree, Ficus religiosa. (See especially ix, p. 43.) 
Pir. A Muhammadan religious teacher or saint. 
Pishanam. Superior white rice, taking six months to mature, 

Madras. 
Pleader. A class of legal practitioner (iv, p. is^)). 
Pode or podu. Name for shifting cultivation in the jungles 

and hill-sides — pode in Hyderabad (xiii, 260) ; podu in 

Godavari (xii, 288) ; syn. taungya, Burma. 
Poligar. A local chieftain. Southern India (x\ i, pp. 249, 389 ; 

xviii, J). 176). 



GLOSSARY xxiii 

Pongyi. A Buddhist monk or priest, Burma. 

Postin. A coat or rug of sheep-skin tanned with the wool 

on, Afghanistan. 
Prant. An administrative subdivision in Maratha States 

corresponding to a British District (Baroda) or Division 

(Gwalior) ; also in Kathiawar. 
Prayag. The name given to the confluence of two or more 

rivers ; especially applied to Allahabad city. 
Presidency. A former Division of British India (iv, p. 29 

and p. 30 note). 
Protected. Forests over which a considerable degree of 

supervision is exercised, but less than in the case of 

'reserved' forests (iii, p. 106). 
Province. One of the large Divisions of British India 

(iv, p. 29). 
Puja. Worship, Hindu. 
Pundit. See Pandit. 
Purana. Lit. 'old,' Hindi; (i) applied to certain Hindu 

religious books (ii, p. 236); (2) to a geological 'group' 

(i, p. 54) ; (3) also to 'punch-marked' coins (ii, p. 136). 
Purohit(a). A domestic chaplain or spiritual guide, Hindu 

(i. P- 405). 
Pwe. An entertainment, Burma (ix, p. 148). 
Pyingado. A timber tree in Burma, Xylia dolabriformis. 
Pyinnia. A timber tree in Burma, Logersfroemia Flos 

Reginae. 

Qazi. See Kazl. 

Rabi. The harvest reaped in the spring. 

Ragi. A small millet, used as a food-grain. Southern India ; 

syn. marua. 
Rahar. A pulse, Cajanus india/s, Bengal ; syn. arhar, tuar. 
Raja. A title borne by Hindus and occasionally by Musal- 

mans, corresponding roughly to that of Nawab, which is 

peculiar to Musalmans. 
Rameli. An oilseed, Guizotia abyssmica. 
Rana. A title borne by some Rajput chiefs, equivalent to 

that of Raja. 
Rani. The wife or widow of a Raja. 
Rao. A title borne by Hindus, either equivalent to, or 

ranking below, that of Raja. 
Rauza. (i) A garden ; (2) a tomb. 
Ravine deer. An incorrect term for the Indian gazelle, 

Gazella bciuictti. 



xxiv GLOSSARY 

Reddi. A village headman, Southern India ; syn. patel. 
Regar. Name for a black soil in Central and Southern India, 

which is very retentive of moisture, and suitable for growing 

cotton. 
Regulation. A term formerly applied to certain Provinces 

to show that the Regulations or full code of legislation applied 

to them (iv, pp. 33, 46). 
Reh. Saline or alkaline efflorescences on the surface of the 

soil, Northern India (iii, p. 158). 
Reserved. Forests intended to be maintained permanently 

(iii, p. 106). 
Rohu. A kind of fish, Labeo rohita. 
Rusa. A sweet-scented oil, extracted from the tikan grass, 

. hidropogon schoenanthiis. 
Ryotwari. The system of tenure in which land revenue 

is imposed on the actual occupants of holdings (iv, p. 207 ; 

xvi, p. 318). 

Sabai. A grass, the fibre of which is used for making paper 
and rope, Ischoemum angustiffllium. 

Sadabart. (i) Daily distribution of alms or food; (2) an 
endowment for providing such. 

Sadr. Chief (adjective). Hence the head-quarters of a 
District ; formerly applied to the Appellate Courts. 

Sagun. Teak, Tedona grandis. 

Sail. Transplanted winter rice. Eastern Bengal ; syn. sali. 

Sajje. Name for the bulrush millet in Mysore, Pennisetian 
typhoideum ; syn. bajra. 

Sajji. An impure carbonate of soda, obtained from efflo- 
rescences on the soil (iii, p. 158). 

Sakhwa. See Sal. 

Sal. A useful timber tree in Northern India, Shorea robusia. 

Salai. A timber tree, Boswellia thiirifera. 

Sali. Transplanted Avinter rice, Assam and Bengal. 

Salim Shahi. A silver coin current in Western Rajputana. 

Salutri. A veterinary assistant. 

Saman. See Sanwan. 

Samasthan. A tributary estate, Hyderabad (xiii, p. 273). 

Sambar. A deer, Cennts unicolor (i, p. 236) ; syn. jarau. 

San. Bombay hemp, Crofa/aria Juncea. 

Sanad. A charter or grant, giving its name to a class of 
States in Central India held under a sanad (ix, p. 375). 

Sandhya. Morning or evening prayers, Hindu. 

Sane. Rich black soil, Burma. 



GLOSSARY XXV 

Sangam. The confluence of two rivers, therefore sacred. 
Sanwan. A quick-growing millet, Panicum frumentaceiim ; 

syn. jhangora. 
Sarai. A Muhammadan inn, usually consisting of small cells 

in the sides of a quadrangle. 
Saras. A species of crane, Gn/s antigone (i, p. 259). 
Sardeshmukhi. K share, one-tenth, of the land revenue 

levied by the Marathas in subject territory (viii, pp. 290, 346). 
Sarf-i-khas. Privy purse. 
Sarguja. An oilseed, Guizotia abyssinica. 
Sari. A long piece of cloth worn by women as a shawl 

(iii, p. 198). 
Sarkar. (i) The government; (2) a tract of territory under 

Muhammadan rule, corresponding roughly to a Division 

under British administration. 
Sarson. Rape or mustard, Brassica campestris. 
Sati. Suicide by a widow, especially on the funeral pyre of 

her husband. 
Saundad. A valuable tree, Terminalia tome?ifosa. 
Sava. See Sanwan. 
Save. See Sanwan. 

Sa"wbwa. A title borne by chiefs in the Shan States, Burma. 
Sayar. A term applied to miscellaneous dues or items of 

revenue. 
Semal or cotton-tree. A large forest tree with crimson flowers 

and pods containing a quantity of floss, Bombax malabarician. 
Serow, sarau. A goat antelope, Nemorhaedus bubalinus 

(i, P- 234). 
Settlement, (i) The preparation of a cadastral record, and 

the fixing of the Government revenue from land (iv, p. 208) ; 

(2) the local inquiry made before forest Reserves are created 

(iii, p. in); (3) the financial arrangement between the 

Government of India and Local Governments (iv, pp. 191- 

192). 
Shahna. A watchman or village ofticial who watches the 

crops. Northern India. 
Shanbhog. A village accountant, Mysore, Kanara, and 

Coorg ; syn. patwari. 
Shastras. The religious law-books of the Hindus. 
Shatranji. A chequered cotton rug. 
Sha"w. A tree from which fibre is obtained in Burma, 

Sttixulia sp. 
Shikakai. A tree, the pods of which are used as a dye, soap, 

or medicine. Acacia concinfja. 



xxvi GLOSSARY 

Shisham or sissu. A valuable timber tree, Dalbergia 

Sissoo. 
Shola. The name given to a glade of indigenous forest in 

the Nilgiris and other hills of Southern India (i, p. i88). 
Shrotriem. Land held at a reduced rate of revenue, 

originally as a reward for service, Madras. 
Sikhara. The spire of a Hindu temple. 
Silladar. A native trooper who furnishes his own horse and 

equipment (iv, p. 337). 
Simul. See Semal. 

Singhara. A water-plant bearing edible nuts, Trapa bispinosa. 
Siris. A large tree, Albizzia odoratissima. 
Sisi. A kind of partridge in Northern India, AinmoperdLv 

boiihami (\, p. 258). 
Sissu. See Shisham. 
Sitalpati. A reed of which fmc mats are made in Bengal 

Phrynium dichotomum. 
Smarta. A Saiva sect in Southern India (i, p. 421); also 

used as an appellation by non-sectarian Hindus. 
Sola. A water-plant with a valuable pith, Aeschynoviene aspera. 
Sowar. A mounted soldier or constable. 
Spring level. The depth below the surface at which a 

permanent supply of water is found. 
Sraddha. A Hindu ceremony in memory of the dead. 
Station. A place administered as a minor municipality, Assam 

(vi, p. 97) ; also applied to hill sanitaria. 
Sthamba. A pillar. 
Stupa or tope. A Buddhist tumulus, usually of brick or 

stone, and more or less hemispherical, containing relics. 
Subah. (i) A province under Muhammadan rule; (2) the 

officer in charge of a large tract in Baroda, corresponding 

to the Collector of a British District ; (3) a group of 

Districts or Division, Hyderabad. 
Subahdar. (i) The governor of a province under Muham- 
madan rule ; (2) a native infantry officer in the Indian army 

(iv, p. 369) ; (3) an official in Hyderabad corresponding to 

the Commissioner in British territory (xiii, p. 272). 
Subdivision. A portion of a District in charge of a junior officer 

of the Indian Civil Service or a Deputy-Collector (iv, p. 53). 
Sundri. A species of tree giving its name to the Sundarbans, 

Jferitiera liiioralis. 
Sup. A small basket used for winnowing by hand. 
Superintendent, (i) The chief police officer in a District 

(iv, p. 52) : (2) the official in charge of a hill station ; (3) the 



GLOSSARY xxvii 

official, usually of the Indian Medical Service, in charge of 

a Central jail (iv, p. 400). 
Surki, surkhi. Brick dust or broken brick. 
Susi. Striped cloth for trousers. 
Suyurghal. (i) An assignment of land revenue for charitable 

purposes; (2) a grant without conditions. 
Syce, sais. A groom. 

Tabi. The hot-season crop. 

TabiJt. See Tazia. 

Tahsil. A revenue subdivision of a District (iv, p. 53) ; syn. 

taluka, Bombay ; taluk, Madras and Mysore ; township, 

Burma. 
Tahsildar. The officer in charge of a tahsil ; syn. mamlat- 

dar, Bombay (viii, p. 341) ; township officer or myo-ok, 

Burma; mukhtiarkar, Sind ; vahivatdar, Baroda. His duties 

are both executive and magisterial (iv, pp. 53, 54). 
Tahsili. The office buildings at the head-quarters of a tahsil. 
Takavi. Loans made to agriculturists for seed, bullocks, or 

agricultural improvements (iii, pp. 91, 321); syn. tagai, 

Bombay. 
Tal. A kind of mustard, Sesaiiium indicum. 
Talaiyari. A village watchman, Madras. 
Talati. A village accountant, Gujarat ; syn. patwari. 
Talav or talao. A lake or tank. 
Tali, (i) A valuable timber tree, Dalbergia Sissoo ; (2) the 

token of the marriage bond in Southern India (xviii, p. 192). 
Talipot. A palm, the leaves of which are used as writing 

material, Corypha sp. 
Taluk, taluka. The estate of a talukdar in Oudh. (For 

Bengal see vii, p. 306.) 
Taluk, taluka. A revenue subdivision of a District, in 

Bombay, Madras, and Mysore ; syn. tahsil. 
Talukdar. A landholder with peculiar tenures in different 

parts of India. (For Bombay see v, p. 104 ; for Oudh, 

xix, p. 287, and xxiv, p. 228.) 
Talukdar. (i) An official in the Hyderabad State, corre- 
sponding to the Magistrate and Collector (First Talukdar) or 

Deputy-Magistrates and Collectors (Second and Third Taluk- 

dars) (xiii, p. 272) ; (2) a landholder with a peculiar form of 

tenure in Gujarat (v, p. 104; viii, p. 352). 
Tank. In Southern, Western, and Central India, a lake 

formed by damming up a valley ; in Northern India, an 

excavation holding water. 



xxviii GLOSSARY 

Tanka. A species of tribute (ix, pp. 376, 379). 

Tarai. A moist swampy tract ; the term is specially applied 

to the tract along the foot of the Himalayas. 
Tari. The sap of the date, palmyra, or coco-nut palm, used 

as a drink, either fresh or after fermentation. In Northern 

India the juice of the date is called sendhi. 
Tarvar. A tree, the bark of which is used for tanning. Cassia 

auriculata. 
Tasar. Wild silkworms, A?itheraea paphia ; also applied 

to the cloth made from their silk. 
Taungya. Name for shifting cultivation in the jungles and 

hill-sides, Burma (iii, p. 24; ix, p. 150) ; syn. jhiim, North- 

Eastern India (vi, p. 55; vii, p. 273; x, p. 321); dahiya, 

Central India (ix, p. 359); katil, Himalayas (xii, p. 167); 

kumri. Western Ghats (viii, p. 312); bewar. Central Provinces; 

walra or walar, Rajputana (xxi, p. 120); pode, Hyderabad 

(xiii, 260) ; podu, Godavari (xii, p. 288). The name is also 

applied in Burma to a system of jungle cultivation under 

which teak seed must be sown (ix. pp. 169, 170). 
Taze. Crops grown on land liable to inundation by a river, 

Burma. 
Tazia. Lath and paper models of the tombs of Hasan and 

Husain, carried in procession at the Muharram festival ; 

syn. tabut. 
Teak. A valuable timber tree in Southern and Western India 

and Burma, Tectoiia grandis. 
Telegraphic transfers. See Council bills. 
Tendu. A tree producing hard timber, Diospyros iomeniosa. 
Teri. Wind-blown deposits of sand in Southern India 

(i, p. 10 1 ; xxiii, p. 363). 
Thagl. Robbery after strangulation of the victim. 
Thakur. (i) The modern equivalent of the caste name 

Kshattriya in some parts of Northern India; (2) a title 

of respect applied to Brahmans; (3) a petty chief; (4) a 

hill tribe in the Western Ghats. 
Thakurat. A petty chiefship, Central India. 
Thamin. The brow-antlered deer, Burma, Cervus eldi(\, p. 236). 
Thana. A police station, and hence the circle attached 

to it. 
Thanatpet. The outer wrapping of a cigar, Burma, made 

from the leaves of Cordia Myxa (= thanat). 
Thar. A Himalayan wild goat, Hemitragus jemlaicus (i, p. 234). 
Thathameda. A rough income or house tax levied in Upper 

Burma (iv, p. 270; ix, pp. 204, 207). 



GLOSSARY xxix 

Thitsi. An oleo-resin, obtained from Melanorrhoea usitata, 
and used in Burma for making lacquer (iii, p. 175). 

Thugyi. A headman, Burma (ix, p. 193). 

Tika. (i) Ceremonial anointing on the forehead; (2) 
vaccination. 

Tikhur. Arrowroot, Curcuma angustifolia. 

Til. An oilseed, Sesamum indicum ; also known as gingelly 
in Madras. 

Tindal, tandel. A foreman, subordinate officer of a ship. 

Tinsa. A valuable timber tree, Ougenia dalbergioides. 

Tiura. A pulse, Lathyrus sativus. 

Tivas, tiwas. A timber tree, Ougeftia dalbergioides^ or 
D. ougeinensis. 

Tol. A Sanskrit school. 

Tola. A weight equivalent to 180 grains (troy). 

Torana. An architectural gateway. 

Town. In official literature includes all municipalities, 
'notified areas' (q.v.), cantonments, and continuous groups 
of houses inhabited by at least 5,000 persons (i, p. 455). 

ToAVHship. A revenue subdivision of a District, in Burma. 

Tsine. Wild cattle found in Burma and to the southward, 
Bos sondaicus (i, p. 232) ; syn. hsaing and banteng. 

Tuar. A pulse, Cajanus i?idicus, Central Provinces and Cen- 
tral India ; syn. arhar. 

Tun. A valuable timber tree, Cedrela Toona. 

Tur or tuver. A pulse, Cajanus indicus, Bombay ; syn. arhar. 

Udid. A pulse, Phaseolus Mutigo ; syn. urd. 

Unclassed. Forests in which there are few restrictions, but 

which are to some extent conserved (iii, p. 106). 
Union. See Village Union. 
Unit. A term in famine administration, denoting one person 

relieved for one day (iii, p. 485 tiote). 
Urad, urd. A pulse, Phaseolus Mungo ; syn. mash. 
Urial. A wild sheep in North-Western India, Ovis vignei 

(i, P- 233)- 
Usar. Soil made barren by saline efflorescence, Northern 

India. 

Vahivatdar. Officer in charge of a revenue subdivision, with 
both executive and magisterial functions, Baroda; syn. 
tahslldar. 

Vaid or baidya, Bengal. A native doctor practising the 
Hindu system of medicine. 



XXX GLOSSARY 

Vakil, (i) A class of legal practitioner (iv, p. 155) ; (2) an 
agent generally. 

Vari. A small millet, Fanicum Jiiiliaceum, Bombay ; syn. chena. 

Varkas. Light and poor upland soil, Konkan. 

Vihara. A Buddhist monastery. 

Village. Usually applied to a certain area demarcated by 
survey, corresponding roughly to the English parish 
(i, p. 455. But for Assam see vi, p. 37). 

Village Union. An area in which local affairs are adminis- 
tered by a small committee (Bengal, vii, pp. 316-7 ; Madras, 
xvi, p. 331 ; Mysore, xviii, p. 237). 

Vimana. A temple. Southern India. 

Viss. A weight used in Southern India ( = 3 lb. 2 oz.), and 
in Burma ( = 3 lb. 5 oz.). 

Wakf. A Muhammadan religious or charitable endowment. 
Walar or walra. Name for shifting cultivation in the jungles 

or hill-sides, Rajputana (xxi, p. 120); syn. taungya, Burma, 
Wazarat. A subdivision of territory. Western Himalayas. 
Wazir. The chief minister at a Muhammadan court. 
Wet rate. The rate of revenue for land assured of irrigation 

(iii, p. 348). 
Wun. A Burmese official, under native rule. 

Ya. Upland country, Burma. 
Yogasana. The practice of austerities, Hindu. 
Yogi. A Hindu ascetic. 
Yoma. A hill range, Burma. 

Yunani. Lit. Greek ; the system of medicine practised by 
Muhammadans. 

Zaildar. The headman of a group of villages, Punjalj (xx, 

P- 333)- 
Zamindar. A landholder. See also next article. 

Zamindari. (i) An estate (for special meaning in Madras 
see xvi, ]). 317, and in the Central Provinces, x, p. 73); 
(2) the rights of a landholder, zamindar ; (3) the system of 
tenure in which land revenue is imposed on an individual or 
community occupying the position of a landlord (iv, p. 207 ; 
xxiv, p. 230). 

Zanana. The women's quarters in a house ; hence private 
education of women, 

Ziarat. A Muhammadan shrine, North-Western frontier. 

Zila. A District. 



IMPERIAL GAZETTEER 
OF INDIA 



VOLUME XXV 



' A. K.,' native surveyor in Tibet, iv. 499, 

xvii. 410. 
Aba Shelukar, campaign against, in Gu- 
jarat, by Govind Rao Gaikvvar, vii. 36. 
Abajl Sondeo, SivajI's general, took Kal- 

yan (1648), xiv. 323. 
Abar Hills and Tribe. See Abor. 
Abazai, fort in North-West Frontier 

Province, v. i. 
Abbas, descent of the Kalhoras from, 

xxii. 397. 
Abbas Khan, Khattak, Raja of Shahpur, 

put to death, and Bhera seized, xxii. 214. 
Abbasi Daudputras, rule in Bahawalpur, 

vi. 196. 
Abbassids, rule in Aden, v. 1 1 ; in Sukkur, 

xxiii. 120. 
Abbott, Major James, first Deputy-Com- 
missioner of Hazara (1847-53), v. i; 

his settlement of Hazara District 

(1847-S), xiii. 77, 83. 
Abbottabad, taksil in North-West 

Frontier Province, v. i. 
Abdali. See Durrani. 
Abdalis, Arab tribe near Aden, v. 14. 
Abdals, tribe in Quetta-Pishin, xxi. 14. 
Abdul AzTz, Saiyid, Aurangabad Saiyid 

founded by (1704), vi. 150. 
Abdul Aziz, Shaikh, shrine at Pal ur, xx. 76. 
Abdul Farsh Wasiti, Saiyid, Bara Sadat 

founded by, xv. 51. 
Abdul Gani, Nawab, Sir, contribution to 

Dacca water-works, xi. 118. 
Abdul Ghafur, Akhund of Swat, rule in 

Upper Swat, xxiii. 185 ; shrine at 

Saidu, xxiii. 187. 
Abdul Ghafur, Saiyid, traditional founder 

of PihanI, xx. 136. 
Abdul Ghafur Khan, Nawab of Kohat, 

XV. 344; Khan of Teri, xxiii. 281-282. 
Abdul Hamid, entered service of Ghulam 

Kadir Khan and settled in Rohilkhaiid, 

xiv. 63. 
Abdul Jawar, mosque in Dera Ghazi 

Khan town, xi. 258. 

. VOL. XXV. B 



Abdul Kadir, son of Ihdad, returned to 

Tirah, xxiii. 389. 
Abdul Kasim, Saiyid, rule over Gujrat, 

xii. 366. 
Abdul Kuddus, saint, Gangoh founded 

by, xii. 139, xxi. 369; mausoleum at 

Gangoh, xii. 139. 
Abdul Latif, Shah, shrine at Bhit Shah, 

xxii. 411. 
Abdul MajTd Khan, grandfather of 

Ghafur Khan of Swat, xiv. 63. 
Abdul Malik, Khalif, Muhammadan 

merchants sent to Sind by, xxii. 394- 

Abdul Momin. See Lakshadir Dalpat 
Rao. 

Abdul Rauf Khan, founder of reigning 
family of Savanur, xxii. 155. 

Abdul Wahhab, first governor of Kurnool, 
xvi. 45. 

Abdul Wahhab, Imam of Yemen, aque- 
duct built by, at Aden, v. 12, 18. 

Abdul Wahhab Khan, Chandragiri fort 
held by (1758), x. 169. 

Abdullah, governor of GhazTpur, tomb 
at GhazTpur, xii. 31. 

Abdullah, Kutb Shahi king of Golconda, 
ii. 390, xiii. 239. 

Abdullah, Mir, rule in Baluchistan 
(1715-6), vi. 277-278; slain by Kal- 
horas at the battle of Jandrlhar, xiv. 249. 

Abdullah, Saiyid, appointed Wazir of the 
empire, xviii. 85. See also Saiyid 
Brothers. 

Abdullah, Shaikh, GhazTpur District com- 
manded by, xii. 224. 

Abdullah Khan, besieged Allahabad 
(1624), xxiv. 152; mosque and tomb 
at Ujhani, xxiv. 112. 

Abdullah Khan Talpur, seized upon 
government in Sind, xxii. 399. 

Abdullah Mirza. See Shah Alam. 

Abdullah Shah Changal, Muhammadan 
saint, mausoleum at Dhar, xi. 295. 

Abdun Nabi Khan, rule in Sind, xxii. 399. 

Abdun Nabi Sarai, appointed governor 
of Leiah, xvi. 159. 



INDEX 



Abdur Rahim, Khan-i-Khanan, shrine at 

Patur repaired by (1606-7), -^''- 77- 
Abdur Rahim Khan, rule in Budaun, 

Jx. 35- 
Abdur Rahman, Pashtu poet (seventeenth 

century", v, 48. 
Abdur-Rahman Ghazi, Shah, legendary 

war with Raja II, xii. 19; shrine at 

KUichpur, xii. 21. ^ 

Abdur Rahman Khan, hanged for share 

in the Mutiny in Rohtak District, xiv. 

loS. 
Abdur Rahman Khan, Amir of Afghani- 
stan, recognized by the British (1880), 

ii. 518, xiv. 244 ; routed Ayub Khan, 

ii.519; agreement with (1893), ii. 524; 

death (1901), ii. 527; British relations 

with, iv. 1 1 6-1 1 7. 

Local notices : Rule in Afghanistan, 

V. 40-43; improvements in breed of 

horses in Afghanistan, v. 53 ; rule in Ba- 

dakhshan, vi. 175; Hazaras conquered 

by (1890-3), xiii. 85; improvements 

carried out in Kabul city, xiv. 244, 245 ; 

submission of Maimana to (1883-4), 

xvii. 32. 
Abdur Ras, entered ser\ice of Ghulam 

Kadir Khan and settled in Rohilkhand, 

xiv. 63. 
Abdur Razzak, Wazir of Mahmud of 

Ghazni, governor of Sind, xxii. 395. 
Abdur Razzak, Persian ambassador to 

Deva Raya II of Vijayanagar (1443), 

ii. 345,xviii. 174. 
Abdus Samad Khan, governor of Kashmir, 

defeat of the Sikhs by, xx. 271 ; rule in 

Lahore (171 2-7), xvi. no. 
Abdus Samad Khan, Nawab, Fatehpur 

town extended by, xii. 83 ; tomb at 

Fatehpur, 83. 
Abdus Samand Khan, Nawab of Dujana, 

xi. 376. 
Abercromby.General, meeting with Dodda 

Vira Rajendra in Coorg, xxiv. 319. 
Abercromby, Lieut., translated histoiy of 

Coorg Rajas, xi. il. 
Abhai Chand, rescuer of Gautam Rani of 

Argal, vi. 218. 
Abhai Singh, Raja of Jodhpur, appointed 

viceroy of Ajmer and Ahmadabad 
(i73o)> V. 142, vii. 32; capture of 
I5aroda (1732), vii. 33; rule in Jodhpur 
State, xiv. 185. 
Abhai Singh, Raja of Khetri, Kot Putli 

first granted to (1803), xvi. 4. 
AbhaisinghjT, Lakhtar tdluka granted to, 

xvi. 130. 
/^/'//a;/^"-ai,the,orMarathihymns,ofTuka- 

ram, ii. 424. 
Abhidhaua-iatnamdla, Sanskrit diction- 
ary by Habayudha, ii. 264. 
Abhidharma-pitaha, the third ' basket' of 
the Pali Buddhist canon, ii. 259. 



Abhimanyu, earliest king of Rashtra clan, 
xiv. 182. 

Abhiram Singh, Kunwar of Saraikela, in- 
vited by Lord Wellesley to assist in war 
against Raghuji Bhonsla (1803), xxii. 82, 

Abhiras. See Ahirs. 

Ab-i-Istada, lake in Afghanistan, v. 2. 

Abid Reza, founded Baniyachung in 
Sylhet, vi. 380 ; Laur abandoned by, 
xvi. 155. 

Abington, Major, siege of Tellicherry 
raised by (1782), xxiii. 277. 

Abiramam, town in Madura District, 
Madras, v. 2. 

Abisares, submission to Alexander (326 
B.C.), ii. 276; Hazara identified with 
country of, xiii. 76. 

Abjebonga, secret god of the Santals, 
xxii. 67. 

Abli Mini, favourite mistress of Mukand 
Singh of Kotah, xviii. 17. 

Ablur stone, with important inscription, 
ii. 51, 58. 

Abohar, town in Ferozepore District, 
Punjab, V. 2. 

Aboo. See Abu. 

Abor Hills, in Assam, v. 2-3. 

Abor-Miri language, i. 3S7. 

Aboriginal races and languages of India, 
probably Dravidian, i. 298-299, and 
Munda, 382-383 ; Santals, 296, 431 ; 
tribes of Chota Nagpur, 296, 308, 309 ; 
Khonds of Orissa, 309 ; Mongoloid 
tribes of the Assam Hills, 309, 387 ; 
a leaf-clad Munda tribe, speaking 
Juang, 384; Gonds, 428 ; their nature- 
worship found in the Mahabharata, 
418, 432, in the cult of .Siva, 420, in 
Animism, 432, 433. Sec also special 
tribes and languages. 

Abors, tribe of Tibeto-Burman origin, 
V. 3, xiii. 133; in Assam, vi. 14,44; 
on banks of the Dihang, xi. 345. 

Abras, tribe in Larkana District, Sind, 
xvi. 139. 

Abu, British station and sanitarium in 
Rajputana, v. 3-7 ; physical aspects, 
3-4; military station, 5 ; administra- 
tion, 5-6; Jain temples, 6-7. 

Other references: ^Ieteorology, i. 155 ; 
Jain temples, ii. 124, 179; mythical 
origin of the Rajputs on, ii. 309. 

Abu, Mir, tomb at Ahmadabad, v. 108, 

Abu liakr, Tughlaq king of Delhi (1389- 
90), ii. 369 ; prince liumayun defeated 
by, in neighbourhood of Panipat, xix.397. 

Abu Bakr, Kandahari, Bijaigarh fort 

stormed by, vii. 137. 
Abu Nasir, Nawab, mosque at Jajpur 
built by (seventeenth century), xiv. 11. 
Abu Rai, appointed Chaudiiri of Burdwan, 
(1657), ix. loi ; founded Burdwan Raj, 
ix. 93. 



INDEX 



Abu Road, town and railway station in 
Rajputana, v. 7-8. 

Abu-Bakr-i-Ayaz, Taj-ud-din, rule in 
Multan (1241), xviii. 26. 

Abul Fateh Khan, rule in Paigah Estates 
of Hyderabad (1749), xix. 315. 

Abul Fateh LodI, governor of Multan, 
reduced by Mahmud of Ghazni (1006, 
loio), XX. 263 ; revolts of, xviii, 25 ; re- 
leased by Masud, xviii. 25 ; Karmatian 
tenets abandoned by, xviii. 25. 

Abul Fazl, Akbar's finance minister and 
historian, quoted on Akbar's patronage 
of painting, ii. 1 30-131; murdered, 
ii. 39S; details concerning government 
and administration in Ain-i-Akbarl, 
ii. 398, iv. 3-4, 69, 283-284, 481. 

Local notices : Born at Agra, v. 91 ; 
Gawllgarh fort captured by (1597-8), 
xii. 193 ; murder of, by Bir Singh Deo, 
near Gwalior Gird, xii. 438 ; tomb at 
Gwalior Gird, xii, 438 ; residence at 
Jalna, xiv. 29; fort on Kedar Parbat 
mentioned by, v. 133; quoted on Kona- 
rak, XV. 392; description of Marvvar, 
xvii. 213; Narnala fort captured by 
(i597-8)> xviii. 380; Ratlam State men- 
tioned by, xxi. 240; Srlnagar city men- 
tioned by, xxiii. 99; Vadnagar mentioned 
by, xxiv. 292. See also Ain-i-AkbarJ. 

Abul Fida, Arab geographer (1273- 
1331), Honavar mentioned by, xiii. 
160 ; a Sefareh in India and a Sefareh 
in Africa mentioned by, xxiii. 69. 

Abu'l Hasan, or Tana Shah, Kutb Shahi 
king of Golconda, ii. 390, viii. 19, xiii. 
239; imprisoned in Chini Mahal by 
Aurangzeb (16S7), xi. 201 ; tomb at 
Khuldabad, xv. 285 ; construction of 
Mecca mosque at Hyderabad con- 
tinued by, xiii. 309; Gosha Mahal 
palace at Hyderabad built by, xiii. 309. 

Abul Karim Khan, chief of Pathari State, 
XX. 20. 

Abul Kasim, Saiyid. See Alam, Mir. 

Abul Maall, Shah, tomb at Ambahta,v. 2 76. 

Acacias, in Bhaunagar, Kathiawar, viii. 
95 ; Ceylon, i. 193 ; Dera Ismail 
Khan tahstl, xi. 26S ; Etawah, xii. 38 ; 
Gurgaon, xii. 402; Jhansi, xiv. 143; 
Kala-Chitta Hills, xiv. 292 ; Karauli, 
XV. 29; Kohat, XV. 347; Loralai, xvi. 
173) 177; Makran, xvii. 49; Minbu, 
xvii. 352; Montgomery, xvii. 409; 
Mymgyan, xviii. 127; Mysore, xviii. 
217; Nellore, xix. 8; Pab Hills, xix. 
296; Punjab, XX. 254, 309; .Shahpur, 
xxii. 218; Shevaroy Hills, xxii. 274; 
Sitapur, xxiii. 55 ; Southern WazTristan, 
xxiv. 38 1, 

Accountant, village {patwari, karnam, 
karkim, killkarni')^ his functions and 
remuneration, iv. 53, 273, 281, 503. 



Accountants-General, iv. 26. 
Acha, of Sinda family of Yelburga, de- 
feated the Hoysalas and Kadambas 

(f. II 17), ii. 338. 
Achakzai Afghans, nomadic tribe, in 

Chaman, x. 128; Quetta-Pishin, xxi. 

14; Toba-Kakar Range, xxiii. 405. 
Achal Singh, received territories now 

forming Alipura State from Raja 

Hindupat of Panna (1757), v. 222. 
Achaleshwara, temple at Chanda, Central 

Provinces, x. 161 ; shrine at Tiruvalur, 

Madras, xxiii. 400. 
Achanta, town in Kistna District, Madras, 

V. 8. 
Achar-tree fruit, trade in Central Pro- 
vinces, X. 56. 
Acharj (Brahman sect), in Hissar District, 

Punjab, xiii. 149. 
Achharaj Singh, Diwan, migrated to Sandi 

at end of eighteenth century, married a 

daughterof Raja Jagat Raj, and received 

Sijagi>% viii. 3. 
Achhnera, town in Agra District, United 

Provinces, v. 8. 
Achhut BlbI,mosque at Ahmadabad,v. i oS, 
Achugi. See Acha. 
Achyutadeva Raya, king of Vijayanagar 

(1529 or 30-42), ii. 347, xvi. 45, xviii. 

175, xxiv. 311 ; invaded Travancore 

(1534), xxiv. 6. 
Achyutananda, Oriya writer, ii. 432. 
Achyutappa, Naik of Tanjore, said to 

have rebuilt temple of Vishnu at Srl- 

mushnam, xxiii. 99, 
Actors, Muhammadan, Mohan in Oudh 

celebrated for, xvii, 383. 
Adalat, court of justice, iv. 144. 
Adam, John, acting Governor-General 

(1823), ii. 496. 
Adam, Mr., computation of population of 

Bengal by (1S35), vii. 225. 
Adam, Pir, tomb in Dacca, xi. 105. 
Adam Baba, or Adam Shahid, tomb at 

Rampal, xxi. 1S2, 
Adam Khan, Gakhar chief in Rawalpindi, 

xxi. 264. 
Adam Khan Marri, Tando Adam in Sind 

founded by (1800), xxiii. 222. 
Adam Khor. See Sri Badat. 
Adam Shah, chief of sect of mendicants, 

Chanduka (i,';58), xxii. 397. 
Adam-jo-Tando, town in Sind. See Tando 

Adam. 
Adam's Bridge, ridge of sand and rocks 

near Ceylon, v. 8. 
Adam's Peak, Ceylon, i. 47, 
Adams, Major, Mir Kasim defeated by 

(1763), ii. 479, xxiv. III. 
Adams, Colonel, defeated the Peshwa 

(1818), xxiv. 390. 
Adams, Captain, Satara surveyed by 

(1821-9), xxii. 127. 



B 2 



INDEX 



Adamzadas, tribe in Chitral, x. 303. 

Adas (or Arras), battle-field in Kaira 
District, Bombay, v. 8-9. 

Adavad, town in East Khandesh District, 
Bombay, v. 9. 

AdbudjT, temple at Nagda, xxiv. 104. 

Addanki, town in Guntiir District, Madras, 
V. 9. 

Additional members of legislative coun- 
cils, iv. 130, 131. 

Aden, peninsula, isthmus, and fortified 
town in Arabia, under the Government 
of Bombay, v. 9-2 1 ; physical aspects, 
10; history, 1 1-13; population, 14-1 5; 
water-supply, wells, aqueduct, tanks 
or reser\oirs, condensers, 16-19; com- 
merce, 19; administration, 20-21 ; edu- 
cation, 21. 

Other references: Cyclone (1885), 
i. 120; languages, i. 389, 394; British 
relations with, iv. 107-108, 122-123; 
legislation, iv. 131 ; port trust, iv. 304. 

Adliam Khan, Sarangpur taken by (1562), 
xxii. 96. 

Adi Samaj, Theistic sect, i. 429. 

Adi-banjigs, traders, in Belgaum District, 
Bombay, vii. 149. 

Adi-Graiith, STicrcd book of the Sikhs, ii. 
417; burnt by Ahmad Shah at Kartarpur 
(1756), XV. 61. 

Adichanallur, village in Tinnevelly Dis- 
trict, Madras, v. 21-22; prehistoric 
cemetery, ii. 97- 

Adikanada. See D'Souza, Father Joachim. 

Adil Khan, Faruqi king of Khandesh 
(i437-4i)> ii- 392, 393; tomb at Bur- 
hanpur, ix. 105. 

Adil Khan, Mlran, besieged in Laling 
(i437),xvi.i32; tomb at Thalner, xxiii. 
287. 

Adil Khan Miran GhanT, Faruqi king 
of Khandesh (1457-1503"!, ii. 393. 

Adil Shahi, Muhammadan dynasty at 
Bijajiur in the Deccan (1490-1686J, ii. 

385-387. 

Local notices : Bhlr conquered by, 

viii. 113; Chera seized by (1640), x. 

193 ; overthrown by Aurangzeb (16S6), 

xi. 306; Goa under, till 1510, xii. 251 ; 

rule over Gulbarga, xii. 382 ; Naldnig 

seized by (14S2), xviii. 337; Raichur 

conquered by, xxi. 39; Rairi made 

over to, xxi, 47. 
Adilabad, District in Hyderabad, v. 22-23. 
Adilabad, tdliik in Hyderabad, v. 23, 
Adilabad, town in Hyderabad, v. 23-24. 
Adlna I'eg, Sikhs defeated by, in Amritsar, 

V. 321 ; Dinunagar founded by (1750), 

xi. 355; governor of Jullundur, xiv. 223; 

governor of Lahore (175S), xvi. ui. 
Adina Masjid at I'andua, in Maldah 

District, ]iengal, ii. 189-190, vii. 322, 

xix. 393-394- 



Adinath, first Jain Tirthankar, Kirtti 
Stambh, or 'tower of fame,' at Chitor 
dedicated to, X. 299; shrine on Maiskhal 
island, in Chittagong District, xvii. 42 ; 
temple at Rakhabh Dev, in Rajputana, 
xxi. 168-169; Shetnmja hill in Kathi- 
awar, sacred to, xix. 361. 

Adirampatnam, town and port in Tanjore 
District, Madras, v. 24. 

Adisura, Raja of Bengal, Brahmans sent 
to, from Kanauj, i. 319-320. 

Aditya, statue of, at Dalml in Manbhum 
District, Bengal, xi. 127. 

Adityas, divine beings in the Vedic 
Hymns, ii. 216. 

Adivara Raman, Pandya king (1562- 
1610), Adirampatnam c.illed after, v. 24. 

Administration : Afghanistan, v. 59; 
Ajmer-Merwara, v. 158 ; Andaman and 
Nicobar Islands, v. 353 ; Assam, vi. 82- 
84; Baluchistan, vi. 316-321 ; Baroda, 
vii. 60; Bengal, vii. 2S6-292; Berar,vii. 
.398, 399; Bombay, viii. 339-342; Burma, 
ix. 192-196 ; Central India, ix. 375-377 ; 
Central Provinces, x. 65-67 ; Coorg, xi. 
37-39 ; Eastern Bengal and Assam, xi. 
395-396; Gwalior, xii. 432; Hyder- 
abad, xiii. 271-273; Kashmir, xv. 136- 
143; Madras, xvi. 307-310; Mysore, 
xviii. 227-229; Nepal, xix. 53-55; 
North-West Frontier Province, xix. 
18S-206; Punjab, XX. 331-37S ; Raj- 
putana, xxi. 142-143; United Pro- 
vinces, xxiv. 219-257. See also each 
District and larger State article under 
Administration. 

Administrative Divisions of India, iv. 46- 
57; major Provinces, 46; regulation 
and non-regulation Provinces, 46-47 ; 
head-quarters offices in regulation Pro- 
vinces, 47-48; territorial subdivisions 
— Districts, 48-49 ; Commissioners of 
Divisions, 49; the Collector-Magistrate, 
49 ; duties of the Collector, 49-50 ; 
duties of the Collector as District 
Magistrate, 50 ; other duties of the 
Collector, 50-5 2 ; other District officials, 
52 ; subdivisions, ta/isFls, Sec, and 
villages, 52-54; judicial administra- 
tion, 54 ; non-regulation Provinces, 54- 
56 ; minor Provinces, 56-57. 

Adoni, subdivision in Bellary District, 
Madras, v. 24. 

Adoni, tdlui in Bellary District, Madras, 
v. 24. 

Adoni, town in Madras, with historic fort, 
V. 24-26 ; muslins, iii. 202, 

Adoption, Hindu theory of, ii. 506; Lord 
Dalhousie's refusal to recognize it in 
political successions, ii. 509; recog- 
nized by Queen Victoria's proclamation 
(1858-, ii. 515. 

Adrampet. See Adirampatnam. 



INDEX 



Advocates, of the High Courts, iv. 155. 

Advocates-General, iv. 157. 

Adwant Singh, Thakur rebellion in Mirza- 
pur (1857), xvii. 369. 

Adyar Club, in Madras City, xvi. 366. 

Aeng. See An. 

Aerated waters, manufactured at Aska, 
vi. 13 ; at Monghyr, xvii. 398. 

Affonso, Martin, Governor of Goa (1543), 
xii. 252. 

x\fghan tribes, i. 309, 310. 

Afghan War, first (1838-42), ii. 500-502. 

Local notices : Ghazni, xii. 232 ; 

Jalalabad, xiv. 13; Kabul city, xiv. 243; 

Kachhi, xiv. 249. See also Afghanistan, 

history of. 

Afghan War, second (187S-80), ii. 51S. 

Local notices: Jalalabad, xiv. 13; 

Kandahar, xiv. 376, 377 ; North- West 

Frontier Province, xix. 156. See also 

Afghanistan, history of. 

Afghan-Baloch Boundary Commission, 
Chagai included in British sphere of 
influence by, x. 117. 

Afghanistan, State between North- Western 
India and Eastern Persia, v. 26-65 ; 
boundaries, 27; physical aspects, 27- 
33 ; rivers, 29 ; lakes, 30 ; geology, 
30-31; flora, 31-32; fauna, 33; 
climate, 33-34; history, 34-46; anti- 
quities, 44-45 ; population, 46-48 ; 
marriage customs, 49-50; agriculture, 
51-54; minerals, 54-56; trade and 
communications, 56-58 ; postal system, 
58 ; famine, 5S-59 ; administration, 59- 
60; taxation, 61 ; currency and coinage, 
61-62; weights and measures, 62; 
military forces, 62-64 ! j^'ls, 64 ; educa- 
tion, 64; medical, 64-65. 

Other references : Physical aspects, i. 
1 1-14 ; cold season, i. 1 14 ; meteorology, 
i. 122, 140; Shiahs in, i. 436; area 
and- population, i. 449 n. ; emigra- 
tion from, i. 469 ; under the Durranis 
(1747-1826), ii. 499; Elphinstone's 
mission to (1809), ii. 493, 502 ; Shah 
Shuja put upon throne and kept there 
(1839-41) by British force, ii. 500; 
Kussian influence, ii. 500; popular 
rising and massacre of British army, ii. 
500, 501 ; the army of retribution (1842), 
ii. 501 ; Lord EUenborough's proclama- 
tion and the ' gates of Somnath,' ii. 
501,502; treaty of Gandamak (1878- 
So), ii. 518; Boundary Commission 
(1885), ii. 519; campaign of Lord 
Roberts, ii. 519; Panjdeh incident 
(18S6), ii. 521, 522 ; demarcation of 
boundaries (1893), ii. 524; trade with, iii. 
299-300, 313; relations with Persia, and 
with British Government, iv. 11 3-1 15 ; 
delimitation of Perso-Afghan frontiers 
(1S72-1903), iv. 115-117; relations 



with Persia, Russia, and British Govern- 
ment, iv. 116, 117; delimitation of 
Russo- Afghan frontier, iv. 117; Pamir 
Joint Commission, iv. 117; army, iv. 
376; surveys, iv. 497, 498; Boundary 
Commission (1884-6), iv. 498. 

Afghans, in Aligarh, v. 210; in Baluchi- 
stan, vi. 288, 289, 290, 330 ; Bombay 
City, viii. 413 ; in the Brahui range, ix. 
15; held Bukkur, ix. 47; Delhi ciiy 
raided by (in the eighteenth century), 
xi. 236; Dipalpur held by (till 1807), 
^•' 359 ; Gaur ruled over by, xii. 186 ; 
Ghazlpur, ruled by, xii. 224 ; in Ghazni, 
xii. 232; Hazara taken by, xiii. 77; 
Kashmir under, xv. 93 ; rule in Katehr, 
xxi. 306 ; of Kurram, xvi. 49 ; defeated 
by Humayun at Machhlwara (1555), 
xvi, 224; Multan overwhelmed by 
(1343), XX. 266; Murshidabad plundered 
by (1696), xviii. 53; rule in Northern 
India, xix. 151, 153; rule in Orissa, 
xix. 250 ; Partabgarh held by, xx. 16; 
risings in Peshawar, xix. 152 ; Quetta- 
Pishin, xxi. 14; Rohilkhand, vii. 4; 
in Sibi District, xxii. 339 ; inTanavval, 
xxiii. 219; invasions of United Pro- 
vinces, xxiv, 154; Upper Sind Frontier, 
xxiv. 2S0 ; Zhob, xxiv. 431. See also 
Pathans and Rohillas. 

Afghan-Turkistan, province of Afghani- 
stan, v. 65-69; physical aspects, 66; 
history, 67-68 ; population, 68; indus- 
tries and products, 68-69. 

Afiz Bagh, building at Junnar, xiv. 240. 

Afrasiab of Turan, Matuan taken from, 
xvii. 46. 

Africa, trade with, iii. 311, 312. 

Africans, in Bombay City, viii. 413. 

Afrldis, Afghan tribe in the Khyber Pass, 
V. 69 ; conflicts in Khyber Pass, xv. 
300-303 ; Landi Kotal attacked by 
(1897), xvi. 134, 135; Mughals de- 
feated by, in Peshawar valley (1673, 
1674), xix. 153 ; British expeditions 
against (1853 and 1S97-8), xix. 15S, 
159,208,210; revolt in Tirah (1897-8J, 
xxiii. 3S9, 390. 

Afsar, village in Gaya District, Bengal, 
V. 69. 

Aftab Chand, Maharaja of Burdwau 
(1881-5), ix. 101. 

Afzal, Shah, Mehtar of Chitral (1854), 
ally of Maharaja of Kashmir in war 
with Gauhar Aman, x. 301. 

Afzal Ganj, suburb of Hyderabad, xiii. 
310. 

Afzal Khan, Bijapur general, killed by 
Sivaji at Pratapgarh (1659), ii. 440, 
xix. 391, XX. 217, xxii. 119; march 
through Parghat, xx. 2. 

Afzal Sagar, tank and drain, Hyderabad 
State, xiii. 257, 288. 



INDEX 



Afzalgarh, town in Bijnor District, United 
Provinces, v. 69. 

Afzal-ud-daula, Nizam of Hyderabad 
(1857-69), xiii. 242, xix. 315. 

Afzal-ul-mulk, son of Aman-nl-mulk, 
throne of Chitral usurped by, x. 302. 

Agam Pass (Safed Koh range), Kurram 
Agency, xvi. 48. 

Agamudaiyans, in Madura District, 
Madras, xvi. 393. 

Agar, petty State in Rewa Kantlia, Bom- 
bay, V. 69, xxi. 290. 

Agar, British military station in Central 
India, v. 70. 

Agar attar, perfume made in Sylhet 
District, xxiii. 19^). 

Agaria, Munda dialect of Kherwarl 
language, i. 383, 

Agarias, iron-workers, in Gangpur, xii. 
141 ; Gondwana, xii. 323. 

Agartala, administrative division, Hill 
Tippera State, Eastern Bengal, xiii. 
121. 

Agartala, capital of Hill Tippera State, 
Eastern Bengal, v. 70-71. 

Agarwals, trading and banking caste, in 
Ajmer-Merwara, V. 145; ]5Ikaner, viii. 
209 ; Central India, ix. 353 ; Jodhpur, 
xiv. 1S9 ; Rajputana, xxi. 1 12. 

Agasas, washermen, in Dharwar District, 
Bombay, xi. 308. 

Agashi, port in Thana District, Bombay, 
V. 71. 

Agashiv caves, at Kale, Bombay, xiv. 306. 

Agastya, Brahman saint, traditional 
founder of Tamil literature, ii. 434 ; be- 
believed to live still on Agastyamalai, 
V. 71; Vishnu Pushkarni Tirth pond 
said to have been constructed by, xviii. 
360. 

Agastyamalai (or Agastyakutam), moun- 
tain in Travancore State, Madras, 
V. 71. 

Agate manufactures, iii. 242, 243 ; 
in Banda, vi. 353 ; Cambay town, ix. 
297. 

Agates, iii. 162,163; found in Ahmad- 
abad, v. loo; Ahmadnagar, v. 118; 
Aurangabad, vi. 145 ; l>ombay Presi- 
dency, viii. 323 ; Cambay State, ix. 294 ; 
Central India, ix. 367 ; Central Pro- 
vinces, X. 52; Dhar State, xi. 2S8 ; 
Jubbulpore, xiv. 212 ; Kaira, xiv. 282 ; 
Kapadvanj, xiv. 406 ; Kalhiaw ar, xv. 
179; Poona, XX. 176; Rewa Kantha, 
xxi. 292, 293; Sural, xxiii. 152, 160. 

Agatti, one ot Laccadivc Islands, xvi. 85. 

Agave fibre cleaned, Thana District, xxiii. 
298. 

Age, statistics for India generally, i. 
478, 479, 493, 514; mortality, and 
expectation of life at different ages, i. 
514-516; population classified accord- 



ing to, sec each Province, District, and 

larger State article tinder Population. 
Agencies, groups of Native States, iv. 

89. 
Agha Jafar, Mastung acquired from, by 

Mir Ahmad of Kalat, xxii. 99. 
Agha Khan, chief of Khoja community, 

Bombay, and head of Maulai sect, i. 

438, X. 303. 
Aghoresvara temple, at Ikkeri, Mysore, 

xiii. 329. 
Aghoris, Saiva sect, i. 421. 
Agnew, Colonel, administration of 

Chhattisgarh by, viii. 224, x. 77. 
Agnew, Mr. Vans, murdered at Multan 

(1848), xviii. 37 ; demarcated boundary 

between Spiti, Ladakh, and Chinese 

Tibet (1846), xxiii. 93. 
Agnew, Mr. Vans, settlement of Mont- 
gomery District begun by, xvii. 416, 

417. 
Agni, god of fire, i. 403, ii. 212, 214, 

215- 
Agnikula Rajput clans, legend of, ii. 309 ; 

in Rajputana, xxi. 113. 

Agnikunda, excavation at Rampat, in 
l)acca District, Eastern Bengal, xxi. 
182. 

Agra, Province, v, 71-72 ; rents, iii. 449, 
4.=^o, 451. 453; prices, iii. 458; wages, 
iii. 472, 473, 474; famine, iii. 484, 
485, 487, 488; administration, iv. 47- 
54; legislation and justice, iv. 146, 
147; land revenue, iv. 206, 207, 221, 
222, 227, 229, 239; land cess, iv. 272 ; 
police system, iv. 387, 3S8. 

Agra, Division in United Provinces, v. 72- 

Agra, District in United Provinces, v. 73- 
81 ; physical aspects, 73-74 ; history, 
74-76; population, 76-77 ; agriculture, 
77-78; minerals, 78; trade and com- 
munications, 78-79 ; famine, 79 ; ad- 
ministration, 79-Si ; education, 81 ; 
medical, 81. 

Agra, tahsll in United Provinces, v. 81- 
82. 

Agra, city in United Provinces, v. 82-91 ; 
population, 82; history, 82-S4 ; de- 
scription, 84 ; historic buildings, 84- 
89; administration, 89 ; manufactures, 
trade, &c., 89-90; education, 90-91. 

Other references : Meteorology, i. 
124, 149, 152, 154; Taj Mahal, ii. 
127, iii. 151, v. 86-88; Itimad-ud- 
daula's tomb, ii. 127, 200, v. 88; arts 
and manufactures, iii. 190, 192, 199, 
210, 216, 217, 220, 222, 242, 243, 
V. 90; roads, iii. 403; prices, iii. 455, 
456 ; water-supply, iv. 473, v. 89. 

Agra Barkhcra, tluikurat in Central 
India, v. 91, xii. 41 7. 

Agra Bhil, settlement on site of Agar in 



INDEX 



Central India, founded in tenth century, 



V. 70. 



Agra Canal, iii. 332, 341, 357, v, qi. 

Agrahara Bacbahalli, temple in Mysore 
District, xviii. 254. 

Agricultural Banks, or co-operative credit 
societies, ii. 525, iv. 523. 

Agricultural Colleges and Schools, iv. 
440; Cawnpore, ix. 321 ; Central Pro- 
vinces, X. 39, 94 ; Nagpur, xviii. 321 ; 
Saidapet, xxi. 383-384. 

Agricultural Department, ii. 520; ori- 
ginally formed by Lord 5layo, iii. 
266-267 ; re-established by Lord Ripon, 
ii. 520 ; present organization of, iv. 24, 

2.=;- 

Agricultural Farms : Poena, xx. 175-176 ; 
Pusa, XX. 422; Saidapet, xxi. 383; 
Samalkot, xxii. i. 

Agricultural Implements, manufactured 
in Basti, vii. 129; Bhutan, viii. 160; 
Hanthawaddy,xiii. 33 ; Hazaribagh, xiii. 
95 ; Khasi and Jaintia Hills, xv. 263 ; 
Khyrim, xv. 304 ; Lushai Hills, xvi. 220, 
Mabarara, xvi. 435 ; the Nilgiris, xix. 97 ; 
Noakhali, xix. 133; Sylhet, xxiii. 196; 
Nongstoin, xxiii. 136 ; Punjab, xx. 317 ; 
SirpurTandur, xxiii. 43; Sylhet District, 
xxiii. 196; Tippera, xxiii. 384; United 
Provinces, xxiv. 203. 

Agricultural Implements, in use in India 
generally —ploughs, scarifiers, seed- 
drills, bullock-hoes, harrows, levellers 
and clod-crushers, carts, hand-tools, 
sickles, winnowing sieves, &c., iii. 11- 
15 ; statistics of ploughs and carts, iii. 

lOI. 

Local references : Anantapur, v. 342 ; 
Baluchistan, vi. 297; Bellary, vii. 164; 
Bengal, vii. 250; Burma, ix. 153, 154; 
Central India, ix. 362 ; Central Pro- 
vinces, X. 38; Darjeeling, xi. 172; 
Garo Hills, xii. 178; Hyderabad State, 
xiii. 254, 255 ; Kashmir, xv. 112, 113; 
Lushai Hills, xvi. 219; Madras, xvi. 
269 ; Mergui, xvii. 299 ; Minbu, xvii. 
349; Mysore State, xviii. 210; Naga 
Hills, xviii. 292 ; Punjab, xx. 297 ; 
Sambalpur, xxii. 13 ; Sanaur, xxii. 
27; Thayetmyo, xxiii. 347; United 
Provinces, xxiv. 184 ; ^^'ardha, xxiv. 
370. 
Agriculture, in India generally, iii. i-ioi ; 
proportion of the population engaged 
in, I ; agricultural population, climate, 
and soils, i-ii ; methods of cultivation, 
11-25; tillage implements, 11-15; 
tillage and tilth, 15-16 ; defective seed 
selection, 16; irrigation specially neces- 
sary in India, 16-17 ; facilities for 
irrigation in the three soil-divisions, 
17 ; canal- and well-irrigation in the 
alluvial tract, 17-18; tank-imgation 



in the crystalline tract, 18-19 ; irriga- 
tion in the Deccan trap tract chiefly 
from wells, 19; high farming under 
well-irrigation, 19-20; manures, 20- 
23; fallows, 23; cultivable land left 
waste, 23-24 ; intermittent cultivation 
in virgin soils, 24; nomadic or shifting 
cultivation, 24-25 ; rotation of crops, 
25 ; mixed crops, 25 ; principal crops, 
26-76 ; rice, 28-29 '> wheat, 29- 
32; millets, 32-34; pulses, 34-36; 
oilseeds, 36-39 ; sugar-cane, 39-41 ; 
cotton, 42-46 ; jute, 46-49 ; tobacco, 
49-52; poppy, 52-54; pepper, 54- 
56; tea, 56-63; coffee, 63-66; cin- 
chona, 66-69 ! indigo, 69-75 ; vege- 
tables, 75 ; fruits, 75-76 ; agricultural 
live stock, 76-89; cattle, 76-Si ; 
buffaloes, 81-83 '> exports of hides, 
83 ; dairying on European principles, 
83-84; difficulty of improving Indian 
cattle, 84 ; effects of crossing, 84 ; 
Civil Veterinary department, 84-85 ; 
general schemes for cattle improve- 
ment, 85 ; preservation of cattle in 
famine, S5-86 ; need of storing fodder, 
86 ; sheep and goats, 86-87 ; horses, 
87-8S ; mules and donkeys, 88-89 '■> 
camels, 89; tenures, credit, research and 
administration, 89-95 ; bibliography, 
96 ; table of classification of areas in 
the larger Provinces (1903-4), 97; 
table of principal crops cultivated in 
India, 98-99 ; areas (in square miles) 
under principal crops in the larger 
Provinces (1903-4), 100; table of 
number of live stock, and of ploughs 
and carts (1903-4"!, loi ; takdvi 
advances, 321 ; payment of wages in 
kind, 467-468 ; average monthly wage 
of agricultural labourer, 472 ; de- 
pendence of India on, 475-476 ; 
Department of Revenue and Agri- 
culture, iv. 24-25 ; Government loans 
to cultivators, and agricultural banks, 

523- 
Agri-Horticultural Society, Alipore, v. 

221 ; Madras, xvi. 374. 
Agris, salt-makers and cultivators, in 

Bombay, viii. 304, 305 ; Janjira State, 

xiv. 59 ; Kolaba, xv. 360 ; Thana, 

xxiii. 294. 
Agroha, ancient town in Hissar District, 

Punjab, V. 91-92. 
Agror, valley in Hazara District, North- 

West Frontier Province, v. 92-93. 
Agumbi, pass in Western Ghats, xii. 219. 
Ahalya Bai, Maratha regent of Indore, 

widow of Khande Rao Holkar, Bish- 

eshwar temple built by, vii. 191 ; rule 

in large part of Central India, ix. 341 ; 

temple at EUora erected by, xii. 21 ; 

erection of Vishnupada temple at Gaya 



8 



INDEX 



assigned to, xii. 210 ; Inclore State 
administered by (1767-95), xiii. 336; 
Chevalier Dudrenec engaged by, to 
raise battalions (1792), xiii. 347 ; 
capital of Indore State, removed by, 
to Indore city, xiii. 349 ; rule in 
Maheshwar, xvii. 9, 10 ; palace of, and 
shrine to, at Maheshwar, xvii. 9, 10; 
rule in Nimbahera, xix. 119; Puntamba 
Ghat built by, xx. 398 ; Sultanpur 
temple bnilt by, xxiii, 139 ; Tarana 
under, xxiii. 250. 
Ahams. See A horns. 
Ahar, town in Bulandshahr District, 

United Provinces, v. 93. 
Ahar, village in Rajputana, v. 93. 
Ahariya, name of ruling family in Dun- 

garpur State, xi. 381. 
Ahars, agriculturists, in Budaun, ix. 37 ; 
Moradabad, xvii. 424 ; Rohilkhand, 
vii. 6, 7, xxi. 308. 
Ahavamalla. See Somesvara I. 
Aherias, criminal tribe, in Aligarh, 
V. 215; Bulandshahr, ix. 52; Muttra, 
xviii. 67. 
Aiiibaran, traditional founder of Buland- 
shahr, ix. 58. 
Ahichhattra, niins in Bareilly District, 

United Provinces, v. 93. 
Ahirani dialect. See Khandeshi. 
Ahirs, or Goalas, grazing and cultivating 

caste, in Northern India, i. 498 ; 

in Agra, v. 77; Ajaigarh, v. 131; 

Allahabad, v. 231; Alwar, v. 2(5o; 

Assam, vi. 157; Bahraich, vi. 208; 

Ballia, vi. 252 ; Banda, vi. 350 ; BaonI, 

vi. 415 ; Bara Bank!, vi. 420; IJasti, 

vii. 127; Behror, vii. 143; Iknares, 

vii. 182 ; Bengal, vii. 233 ; Berar, vii. 

366; Betul, viii. 10; Bhagalpur, viii. 

30; Bhopal, viii. 133, 134; Bijawar, 

viii. 189; Bilaspur,viii. 226; Bombay, 

viii. 304, 305 ; Budaun, ix. 37; Calcutta, 

ix. 26S ; Cawnpore, ix. 309 ; Central 

India, ix. 337, 353 ; Central Provinces, 

x. 26; Champaran, x. 140; Chanda, x. 

153; Charkharl, x. 178; Chhatarpur, 

X. 200; Chhindwara, x. 208, 210; 

Chhuikhadan, x. 216; Darbhanga, xi. 

155 ; Delhi, xi. 226 ; Etah, xii. 30, 32 ; 

Etawah, xii. 42 ; Farrukhabad, xii. 67 ; 

Fatehpur, xii. 78; Fyzabad, xii. 112; 

Gaya, xii. 200; Ghazlpur, xii. 225; 

Gonda, xii. 314; Gorakhpur, xii. 335; 

Gurgaon, xii. 405 ; Gwalior, xii. 428 ; 

Hamlrpur, xiii. 16; IlardoT, xiii. 45; 

Hazaribagh, xiii. 90; Ilissar, xiii. 149; 

Jalaun, xiv. 21; Jashpur, xiv. 68; 

Jaunpur, xiv. 77 ; Jessore, xiv. 95 ; 

Jhansi, xiv. 140; Jind, xiv. 170; Ka- 

thiawar, xv. 177, 178; Khniragarh, xv. 

208; Kherl, xv. 271 ; Khuria, xv. 296; 

Korea, xv. 400; Lucknow, xvi. 183; 



Mainpuri, xvii. 35; Mandla, xvii. 163 ; 
Meenit,xvii. 257; Mirzapur, xvii. 370 ; 
Monghyr, xvii. 395; Murshidabad, xviii. 

48; Muzaffarpur, xviii. 98; Nabha, xviii. 
265 ; Nadia, xviii. 276 ; Nandgaon, xviii. 

357; Oudh, xix. 287; Palaman, xix. 339; 

Panna, xix. 402; Partabgarh, xx. 17; 

Patiala, xx. 41 ; Patna, xs. 59 ; Punjab, 

XX, 288; Pumea, xx. 416 ; Kae Bareli, 

xxi. 28 ; Raipur, xxi. 52 ; Rampur, xxi. 

185 ; Ranch!, xxi. 203 ; Rohtak, xxi. 

314; Saran, xxii. 87; Seoni, xxii. 119; 

Shahabad, xxii. 190; Shalijahanpur, 

xxii. 204 ; Singhbhum. xxiii. 7 ; Sironj, 

xxiii. 38 ; Sitapur, xxiii. 56 ; Sultanpur, 

xxiii. 133; Surguja, xxiii. 172; Sylhet, 

xxiii. 193 ; Twenty-four Parganas, xxiv. 

73; Unao, xxiv. 125 ; United Provinces, 

xxiv. 170. 
Ahirwali,dialect of Western Hindi, spoken 

in JInd, xiv. 170; Punjab, xx. 286- 

287. 
AhivasTs, caste claiming to be Brahmans, 

in Baldeo, vi. 247 ; Muttra, xviii. 67. 
Ahl-i-Nadls, in Assam, vi. 48. 
Ahmad, Mir, of Baluchistan (1666-7'^, vi. 

276-277. 
Ahmad, Mir, II, of Baluchistan (i 713-4), 

vi. 277. 
Ahmad, Shams-ud-dln, king of Bengal 

(1431), vii. 216. 
Ahmad All Khan, rule in Rampur State, 

xxi. 184. 
Ahmad All Khan, Sahibzada, regent 01 

Maler Kotla, xvii. 85. 
Ahmad Bakhsh Khan, Firozpur tahsll 

assigned to, xii. 100; founder of 

Lohani State, xvi. 169; attempt on life 

of (1824), V. 258. 
Ahmad Kablr, Saiyid. See Badr-ud-din 

Shah. 
Ahmad Kattal, Saiyid Sultan, Muham- 

madan saint, pilgrim, and missionary, 

tomb at Jalalpur, xiv. 16. 
Ahmad Khan, grandson of Ala-ud-dln 

Bahman Shah, rebellion of (1397), 

xiii. 237. 
Ahmad Khan, Bhatti chief, defied prince 

Bayazld, but defeated and killed, viii. 

92. 
Ahmad Khan, Sur emperor. See Sikandar 

Shah. 
Ahmad Khan, of Farrukhabad, vii. 4, 13, 

xii. 65; attacked Allahabad and burnt the 

town, but withdrew on news of a Maratha 

advance on his own State 'i75i),v. 238 ; 

conflicts with Marathas near Fatehgarh, 

xii. 65, 75 ; regained Farrukhabad 

territories, xxi. 306. 
Ahmad Khan, of the Daudputra tribe, 

founded Ahmadpur West {c. 1800), 

V. 1 27. 
Ahmad Khan, Sial chieftain, Ranjit Singh 



INDEX 



marched on Jhang but was bought off 
by, xiv, 127; recovered a large part 
of his previous dominions in Jhang, 
xiv. 127. 

Ahmad Khan, Isa Khel town founded 
by (iS3o),_xiii. 371. 

Ahmad Khan, Kharral leader (1857), 
xvii. 410-41 1. 

Ahmad Khan, Sir, Saiyid, Muhammadan 
Anglo-Oriental College at AlTgarh 
founded by, v. 219, xxiv. 251. 

Ahmad Khan Abdali. See Ahmad Shah 
Durrani. 

Ahmad Malik, founder of Ahmadnagar 
dynasty, ii, 389 ; Chakan fort taken by 
(i486),x. 122; head-quarters at Junnar, 
ii. 388, XX. 168. 

Ahmad Sad-ud-din, Khan of Agror, v. 92. 

Ahmad Samarkandi Khwaja, mausoleum 
erected by, in Bhagalpur (16 15), viii. 
29. 

Ahmad Shah I, king of Gujarat (141 1- 
43)>"- 376, 378, xii. 351 ; Ahmadabad 
founded by, v. 106, 107 ; tomb and 
mosque at Ahmadabad, v. 108; tomb of 
queen of, at Ahmadabad, ii. 1 26, v. 108 ; 
stone wall built round Ahmadnagar 
in Gujarat, v. 125 ; Gujarat flourished 
under, viii. 284 ; Maheshwar captured 
by (1422), xvii. 9; invasion of Malwa, 
ii. 379 ; Sadra fort built by, xxi. 348. 

Ahmad Shah II, king of Gujarat (1451- 
9), ii. 378. 

Ahmad Shah III, king of Gujarat (1554- 
6i), ii. 378. 

Ahmad Shah, Ala-ud-din, Bahmani king 
(1435-58), ii. 384, 385, xiii. 237 ; com- 
pelled Bairi chiefs to pay tribute, xxi. 

47- , 

Ahmad Shah II, Bahmani king (1519- 
20), ii. 385, xiii. 23S. 

Ahmad Shah I, founder of Nizam Shahi 
dynasty of Ahmadnagar (1490-1508), 
ii- 388, 3S9, V. 123; tomb at Ahmad- 
nagar, v. 1 24 ; Lohogarh taken by, xvi. 
176. 

Ahmad Shah II, Nizam Shahi king 

(1595-6), ii- 389- 
Ahmad Shah, Mughal emperor (1748- 

54), ii. 409, 410, 413; sent against 

Ahmad Shah Durrani (1747-8), ii. 409 ; 

All Muhammad received confirmation 

of territory from, xxi. 183. 
Ahmad Shah, last Raja of Baltistan, vi. 

262 ; death near Lhasa, vi. 262. 
Ahmad Shah, Saiyid, doctrine of the 

Wahhabis introduced into India by, i. 

437 ; founded colony of Hindustani 

fanatics in Amarzai country (1829), 

xxiii. 184-185 ; attacks on Peshawar 

border, and death, v. 2 89. 
Ahmad Shah, Saiyid, Nawab of Sardhana, 

xxii, 105. 



Ahmad Shah, king of Dinajpur {c. 1440), 
xi. 348. 

Ahmad Shah Durrani, or Ahmad Khan 
Abdali, king of Afghanistan (1747- 
73), ii. 499; took Sirhind (1748), ii. 
409; proclaimed king at Delhi (1757); 
ii. 410 ; advance on Muttra and Agra, 
and retreat, ii. 410 ; defeated Marathas 
at Panipat (i 761 ), ii. 441 , iv. 70 ; supre- 
macy established over Kalat, iv. 64. 

Local notices: Rule in Afghanistan, 
v. 26, 36; Amritsar destroyed by 
(1762), V. 321 ; established cantonments 
at Anupshahr in 1757 and returned to 
them in 1759, v. 3S8 ; Balkh subject to, 
vi. 248 ; Baluchistan subject to, vi. 276 ; 
army led through Bannu,vi.394 ; attempt 
on Delhi (1748), xi. 236, xxiv. 154; Hot 
family in Dera Ismail Khan reduced to 
vassalage (1750), xi. 262; Gujrat ra- 
vaged, xii. 366; rule in Hazara, xiii. 
77 ; Herat, xiii. 115; Kabul, xiv. 243; 
Kalat withstood three assaults by 
(1758), xiv. 305; Kandahar refounded 
by, xiv. 376 ; tomb at Kandahar, v. 45, 
xiv. 374 ; Adi-Grantk burnt by, at 
Kartarpur (i756),xv. 61 ;Khyber passed 
through, XV. 300; invasion of Lahore, 
xvi. iio-iii ; of Ludhiana, xvi. 200; 
deprived Safdar Jang of his office 
as Wazir of the empire (1754), xix. 
2S1, xxiv. 155 ; engagement with Nasir 
Khan I, at Mastung (175S), xxii. 99; 
Muttra plundered by cavalry of (1757), 
xviii. 73 ; invasions of Northern India, 
xxi. 183, 306, 307; Nurmahal and 
Kartarpur sacked (1757), xiv. 223; 
Marathas defeated at battle of Pani- 
pat (1761), vii. 34, viii. 291, xi. 289, 
xix. 397, 398 ; rule in Peshawar valley, 
xix. 153; Punjab nominally ceded to, 
by the Mughals, xx. 272; defeat of 
the Sikhs in the Punjab (1762), v. 321, 
XX. 134, 272 ; Shahdara plundered by 
soldiers of, xxii. 200; Sind became 
tributary to (1748), xxii. 398; ap- 
pointed Zain Khan governor of Sirhind 
(1761), xxiii. 21 ; hold on Swat, xxiii. 
184; Talamba plundered, xxiii. 211; 
invasion of Hindustan (1757, 1760), 
xxiv. 155, 156; conferred title of Zhob 
on Bekar Nika, xxiv. 430. 
Ahmad Shah Wali, Bahmani king (1422- 
35), ii. 384, 385, xiii. 237 ; Baglan laid 
waste by (1429), vi. 191 ; forts in 
Berar captured, vii. 367 ; Bidar town 
founded, viii. 164, 170; tomb at 
Bidar, ii. 195 ; halted at Ellichpur 
(1425-8), and possibly builder of shrine 
there, xii. 20, 21 ; traditional builder 
of Gawilgarh fort (1425-8), xii. 193; 
rule over Gulbarga, xii. 3S2 ; Kalam 
captured by (1425), .xiv. 297 j Narnala 



lO 



INDEX 



fort repaired, xviii. 379; Wun attacked 
(i425),_xxiv. 389-390. 

Ahmad YarKhan, Na\vab,Khushab man- 
aged by, xxii. 213. 

Ahmad Yar Khan, joint holder of Haji- 
wah estate in Multan District, xiii. 8. 

Ahmadabad, District in Bombay, v. 93- 
106 ; physical aspects, 94-96 ; forests, 
95; history, 96; population, 97-99; 
agriculture, 99-100 ; minerals, 100 ; 
trade and communications, 100-102 ; 
natural calamities, 102-103; adminis- 
tration, 103-105; education, 105 ; medi- 
cal, 105-106. 

Ahmadabad, city in Bombay, v. 106-1 1 1 ; 
population, 106; description, 106-107; 
history, 107; architecture, 107-109; 
manufactures, 109-1 10; education, 1 10- 
III ; medical, iii ; bibliography, ill. 
Other references : Tomb of Ahmad 
Shah's queen, ii. 126; Shah Alam's 
tomb, ii. 129; mosques, ii. 184; sewage 
farms, iii. 20 ; spinning and weaving 
mills, iii. 197; arts and manufactures, iii. 
1S6, 1S8, 190, 191, 192, 193, 200, 209, 
210, 2X1, 216, 222, 230, 231, 234, 

2.^9- 

Ahmadabad kings, rule in Broach, ix. 
20; Kathiawar, xv. 176; Palanpur 
(1403-1573), xix. 347; attempts to 
take Pavagarh fort, xx. So ; rule in 
Kewa Kantha, xxi. 294 ; Sunth tribu- 
tary to, from 1443, xxiii. 147. 

Ahmadabad-Dholka Railway, iii. 372. 

Ahmadabad-Parantij Railway Company, 
iii. 371. 

Ahmadiyas, strange sect of Islam, founded 
by Mulla Ghulam Ahmad {ob. 1908), 
i. 438 ; in Bombay, viii. 307 ; Gurdas- 
pur, xii. 395. 

.Vhmadnagar, District in Bombay, v. 1 1 1- 
122; physical aspects, 11 1-112 ; history, 
113; population, 114-115; agriculture, 
116-117; forests, 117-11S; minerals, 
118; trade and communications, 11 8- 
119; famine, 119-120; administration, 
120-122 ; education, 122 ; medical, 
122. 

Other references : Meteorology, i. 
142 ; famine, iii. 497 n, 

Ahmadnagar, /rt/wi^-a in Bombay, v. 12 2- 
123. 

Ahmadnagar, city in Bombay, v. 123- 
125; population, 123; history, 123- 
124; architecture, 124-125 ; industries, 
125 ; schools, 125 ; manufactures, iii. 
217. See also Nizam Shahis. 

Ahmadnagar, town in Idar State, Bom- 
bay, V. 125-126. 

Ahmad pur, tahsll in Bahawalpur State, 
Punjab, V. 126. 

Abmadpur town. East, town in Bahawal- 
pur State, Punjab, v. 1 26, 



Ahmadpur Lamma, tahsil'm Bahawalpur 
State, Punjab, v. 127. 

Ahmadpur town. West, town in Bahawal- 
pur State, Punjab, v. 127. 

Ahmadpur, town in Jhang District, 
Punjab, V. 127. 

Ahmad-ullah Shah, Fyzabad Maulvi, 
Tarawali Kotbi at Lucknow the head- 
quarters of, during Mutiny, xvi. 190. 

Ahmadzais, rule in Western Baluchistan, 
vi. 276; Bannn, vi. 390; Kalat State, 
xiv. 300, 305. 

Ahmedabad, District and city in Bombay. 
See Ahmadabad. 

Ahmednagar, District, tdluka, and city 
in Bombay. See Ahmadnagar. 

Ahobilam, village with temple in Kurnool 
District, Madras, v. 127-128. 

Ahoms, former rulers of Assam, biblio- 
graphy of language, i. 401 ; degenera- 
tion, i. 447 n. ; coins, ii. 149; litera- 
ture, ii. 438. 

Local notices : Assam, vi. 26-33, 43 ; 
raid on Bengal, xi. 105 ; grant given to 
satlra (religious foundation) at Gara- 
mur, xii. 159; Gauhati, xii. 184; Jaintia 
Raja taken by (eighteenth century), 
xiii. 3S0 ; Jorhat capital of, xiv. 
202 ; struggles in Kamrup, xiv. 332 ; 
rule in Lakhimpur, and present popu- 
lation, xvi. 120; Nazira capital of, 
from middle of sixteenth to end of 
seventeenth century, xix. i ; march 
tiirough Patkai (thirteenth century), xx. 
51 ; in Sibsagar, xxii. 346, 348. 

Ahraura, town in Mirzapur District, 
United Provinces, v. 128. 

Ahsan-ullah, Sir, contribution to Dacca 
electric lighting, xi. 1 18. 

Ahsan-ullah Khan, Nawab of Basoda, 
vii. 105 ; State divided between his 
sons (1753), xviii. 16. 

Ahrdanas, in Delhi District, xi. 226. 

Ahuti. See Avati. 

Ai, river of Assam, v. 12S. 

Aibak, Saif-ud-din, governor of Bengal 
(1229), vii. 216. 

Aieshwara, temple at Sinnar, Bombay, 
xxiii. 14. 

Aihole, village with ruined temples in 
Bombay. See Aivalli. 

Aijal, subdivision of Lushai Hills District, 
Eastern Bengal and /Vssam, v. 12S. 

Aijal, village in Lushai Hills District, 
Eastern Bengal and Assam, v. 128- 
129. 

Ain-i-Akbarl, by Abul Fazl, quoted on 
Akbar's patronage of painting, ii. 130- 
131; details concerning Akbar's govern- 
ment and administration, ii. 398, iv. 3- 
4, 283-284,481. 

Ain-ul-inulk, Mandu taken by (1304), 
xvii. 171. 



INDEX 



II 



Aitareya Brdhmana, connected with the 
Rigveda, ii. 230. 

Aitchison, Sir Charles, president of Public 
Service Commission (18S6-7), iv. 43 ; 
Chief Commissioner of Lower Burma 
(1878), ix. 192; Lieutenant-Governor 
of Punjab (1882-7), ^'^^ 33^ > improve- 
ment of education in Punjab, xx. 368- 

369- 

Aitchison, Surgeon-Major J. E. T., 
F.R.S., i. 208. 

Aitchison Hospital, at Lahore, xvi, 105, 
114. 

Alton, langunge of Tai group of Siamese- 
Chinese branch, i. 394. 

Aivalli, or Aihole, village with ruined 
temples in Bijapur District, Bombay, v. 
129; inscriptions, ii. 55,69,70; temples, 
ii. 168, 775, 178. 

Aja Raja, traditional founder of Ajmer 
((-. I45),v. 140. 

Ajab Singh, Diwan of Rajgarh, xviii. 382, 
xxi. 69. 

Ajabpura, petty State in Mahl Kantha, 
Bombay, v. 129, xvii. 13. 

Ajai Singh, Rana of Mewar, took refuge 
in Kelwara (fourteenth century), xv. 
198. 

Ajaigarh, sanad State in Central India, 
V. 129-132. 

Ajaigarh, capital of State in Central 
India, V. 132-133. 

Ajaipal, image of, on horseback at Anjar, 
in Cutch, v. 383 ; said to have built 
temple of NUkanth Mahadeo at Para- 
nagar, xxi. 71. 

Ajanta, village with cave-temples in 
Hyderabad, v. 134-137; caves, ii. 112, 
162, 163; paintings, ii. 34, 117-121. 

Ajanta Hills, v. 133-134. 

Ajatasatru, Bimbisara deposed, impri- 
soned, and starved to death by (fifth 
century B.C.), ii. 273, 274; traditional 
founder of Patna, xx. 66-67. 

Ajaya Pala, petty chiefs in Garhwal re- 
duced by (fourteenth century), xii. 165. 

Ajbar Sen, Raja of Mandl, Mandi town 
founded by (1527), xvii. 153, 158. 

Ajeygarh, town in Central India. See 
Ajaigarh. 

Ajimganj, town in Bengal. Sec Azimganj. 

Ajit Singh, Raja of Jodhpur (1678-1724), 
seized Ajmer, v. 142 ; rule in Jodhpur, 
xiv. 184, 185 ; built Fateh Mahal, 
Jodhpur, xiv. 199 ; cenotaph at 
Mandor, xvii. 171. 

Ajit Singh, Ballabgarh estate given to, 
by Delhi emperor (1775), vi, 256. 

Ajit Singh, chief of Bilndi (i 770-3), ix. 81. 

Ajit Singh, chief of Kotah (1756-9), xix. 

.4' 3-. 

Ajit Singh, Raja of Kulu, xvi. 16, 17 ; 

took refuge in Sangri (1840), xxii. 55. 



Ajit Singh, rule in Raghugarh (1843-57), 
xxi. 35. 

Ajit Singh, Thakur, signed treaty of 1818 
between Udaipur and the British, vi. 1 2. 

Ajivika sect, caves in Barabar hills dedi- 
cated to, ii. 161. 

Ajja, fell at battle of Khanua (1527), vii. 
19. 

Ajlals, Muhammadan caste in Khulna, 
XV. 288. 

Ajmer, British Province, District, and 
city in Rajputana. See Ajmer-Merwara 
and Ajmer city. 

Ajmer, city in Rajputana, v. 170-174; 
population, 170; description, 170; 
antiquarian remains, 170-172; com- 
merce and industries, 172 ; administra- 
tion, 172 ; education, 173. 

Other references : Inscriptions, ii. 
50 jt.; mosque, ii. 182 ; manufactures, 
iii. 186, 215; road to Agra, iii. 403; 
Chiefs' College, iv. 435. 

Ajmer-Merwara, British Province in Raj- 
putana, v. 137-169; physical aspects, 
137-139 ; history, 140-143; population, 
143-149; agriculture, 149, 150; rents, 
wages, and prices, 151-153; material 
condition of the people, 153; forests, 
153-154; mines and minerals, 154 ; arts 
and manufactures, 154; commerce and 
trade, 154-155 ; communications, 155- 
156; famine, 156-157 ; administration, 
157-158; legislation and justice, 158- 
159 ; finance, 159; land revenue, 159- 
162; miscellaneous revenue, 162-163; 
local and municipal, 163-164; public 
works, 164; army, 165; police and 
jails, 165-166; education, 166-168; 
medical, 168-169 ; surveys, 169 ; biblio- 
graphy, 169. 

Ot/ier references : Number of live 
stock, and of ploughs and carts (1903- 
4), iii. loi ; factory statistics, iii. 247 ; 
irrigation, iii. 325, 332, 343, 346 ; famine, 
491 ; administration, iv. 56, 57; legis- 
lation, iv. 131 ; land revenue, iv. 211 /i., 
216, 239; duty on hemp drugs, iv. 260. 

Ajmiriganj, market in Sylhet District, 
Assam, v. 174. 

Ajniila, fa/isF/ in Amritsar District, Punjab, 
V. 174. 

Ajodhya, estate in United Provinces, v. 

174-175- , ^. . 

Ajodhya, sacred town in Fyzabad District, 

United Provinces, v. 175-176. 
Ajiaoda, t/ia/cunK in Central India, v. 176, 

xvii. 99. 
Ajudhia, town in United Provinces. See 

Ajodhya. 
Aka Bai, basalt temple at Parli fort 

built by, XX. 5. 
Aka Hills, on northern frontier of Assam, 

v. 177. 



12 



INDEX 



Aka language, i. 387, 392, 400. 
Akadia, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, V. 176, XV. 165. 
Akal Bungah, building at Amritsar, v. 

329- 

Akalanka, writer of Sonthern India (eighth 
century), ii. 329. 

Akalavarsha, king. See Kannara. 

Akalgarh, town in Gujranwala District, 
Punjab, V. 177. 

Akalkot, State forming the Sliolapur 
Agency in Bombay, v. 178-179. 

Akalkot, capital of State in Bombay, v. 
179. 

Akanna, minister of Kutb Shahi dynasty, 
fixed head-quarters at Bezwada in seven- 
teenth century, viii. 19. 

Akarah. See Akra. 

Akas, tribe in Assam, v. 177, vi. 14; 
Balipara, vi. 248. 

Akasamukhins, Saiva sect, i. 421. 

Akauktaung, Burmese fortifications, Hen- 
zada District, xiii. 104. 

Akazai, Afghan clan in Black Mountain, 
Major Battye and Captain Urmston 
and sepoys surprised and killed by 
Gujar dependents of, viii. 252 ; raids 
committed iti Agror valley, viii. 251, 
252; expeditions against (1S88, 1891 , 
xi.x. 210. 

Akbar the Great, founder of the Mughal 
empire (1556-1605), ii. 3977399! 4i3; 
Persian inscription of, on iron pillar 
at Dhar (1591-2), ii. 23; mosque at 
I'atehpur Sikri, ii. 127; tomb at Sikan- 
dra, ii. 127; painting introduced by, as 
architectural decoration, ii. 129; archi- 
tecture, ii. 199; patronage of painting, 
ii. 130-131; coins, ii. 146, iv. 514; 
conquest of Bengal (1576), ii. 373 ; con- 
quest of Kashmir (1586), ii. 374; con- 
quest of Gujarat (1572), ii. 377, 378; 
]SIalwa surrendered to (1564), ii. 380; 
Ahmadnagar attacked (i 596; and finally 
captured (1600), ii. 388-3S9; sub- 
mission of Faruql king of Khandesh 
to (1599), ii. 392 ; succeeded his father, 
Ilumayun, at the age of fourteen (1556), 
ij- .^97 i victory at Panlpat over his 
Afghan rival (1556;, ii. 397; shook 
off the tutelage of Bairam Khan (1560), 
ii. 39S ; put down domestic rebellion, 
ii. 398 ; uninterrupted career of conquest 
over Northern India (1567-94), ii. 398 ; 
his trouble with his eldest son, Jahan- 
glr, ii. 39S ; his eclectic religion, the 
Divine Faith, ii. 146, 398 ; conciliation 
of the Hindus and rejiression of bigo- 
t''y> "■ 398 ; general administration as 
depicted in the Ain-i-Akbarl oi Abul 
Fazl, ii. 398, iv. 3-4, 69, 283-284,481 ; 
system of land revenue organized by 
his Hindu financier, Todar Mai, ii. 



399, iv. 215; administration, iv. 69; 
wars and conquests, iv. 69 ; revenue 
statistics, iv. 238; criminal system, i v. 

397- 

Local notices: Agra founded by, v. 74, 

82; death of, at Agra, v. 82; allegi- 
ance of Bhil chiefs in Gujarat tendered 
to (1572), v. 96 ; Ahmadabad subju- 
gated by (1572), v. 107; pilgrimages 
to Ajmer, v. 141-142 ; Ajmer mosque 
and fort built, v. 171, 172 ; Allahabad 
fort built, V. 238 ; passed through 
Alwar city (1579), ii. 26S ; Aslrgarh 
taken (1600), vi. 12; Attock founded, 
and fort built, vi. 133, 138 ; seven years' 
siege of fortresses in Baglan, vi. 191 ; 
Bandhogarh, legendary birth-place of, 
vi. 359; Banera taken (1567), vi. 
360 ; rule in Bannu District, vi. 394 ; 
Banur town, a viahal of Sirhind under, 
vi. 414 ; Bari Doab named by, vii. 
17; taxation of Basim under, vii. loi- 
102 ; Batala granted to Shamsher Khan, 
vii. 133; in Benares, \ii. 180; Bengal 
finally annexed to the Mughal empire, 
vii. 213; land revenue of Berar under, 
vii. 407 ; troops marched through Bha- 
galpur (1573 and 1575), viii. 27, 36 ; 
Bhilsa mosque built (1583), viii. 105; 
Kalyan Singh and his son Rai Singh 
waited on, at Nayaur (1570), and 
emperor married Kalyan Singh's daugh- 
ter, viii. 205 ; Broach city surrenderee! 
to (1573), ix. 30 ; Bukkur granted to 
Keshu Khan (1574), ix. 47; Bundel- 
khand taken (1569), ix. 70; Burhanpur 
annexed (1600), ix. 104 ; Cambay re- 
duced, ix. 293 ; Central India invaded 
(1558), ix. 340; Chitor fort taken 
(1567), V. 292, vi. 179, X. 299; Chota 
Nagpur annexed, vii. 215 ; Chunar fort 
taken (1575), x. 333; in Damoh, xi. 
136; Daulatabad taken from Nizam 
Shabis, xi. 200 ; Dhar under (1560), xi. 
289, 294; traditional builder of mosque 
at Didwana, xi. 343; in Etawah, xii. 
39 ; Fatehpur built, xii. 84, 85 ; 
Gagraun fort reached (about 1562), 
xii. 122; Gangoh mosque built, xii. 
139; in Guier, xii. 310; Sdrkar of 
Gorakhpur formed by, xii. 333 ; Gujarat 
conquered by, and rule in, viii. 284, 
xii. 352; settlement of tract in Punjab 
called Gujrat, xii. 365 ; Gujrat town 
probably founded by, xii. 373 ; Gurdas- 
pur taken from Sikandar Shah. .Suri 
(1557)) xii. 393; Gwalior fort held 
(1558), xii. 440; Ilajipur taken by 
troops of (1572, 1574). xiii. 7 ; Afghans 
in Hardol subdued, xiii. 44; Ilazari- 
bagh overrun by troops of, xiii. 87; 
Jahazpur taken (1567), xiii. 379; mar- 
riage of, to daughter of Bahar Mai 



INDEX 



13 



of Jaipur, xiii. 385 ; Jalalabad founded 
(1570), xiv. 13; invasion of Jodhpur, 
xiv. 184; Jumna Canal re-excavated 
(1568), xiv. 234; in Kabul, xiv. 243; 
Kaithal renovated, and fort built by, 
xiv. 288; at Kalanaur, xiv. 297; in 
Kanauj, xiv. 371 ; Kangra fort occupied 
(1556), xiv. 383 ; Karauli State held, xv. 
26 ; Kashmir conquered (1586), xv. 90, 
93; Khairabad under, xv. 207; Khan- 
desh under, viii. 286, xv. 229; Raja of 
Kokrah subdued (1585), xxi. 200; at 
Lahore (1584-9S), xvi. 108; Maham 
given in jagir to Shahbaz Khan, xvi. 
430; expedition into Mainpurl, xvii. 34; 
Mandu visited and dismantled (1564, 
1598), xvii. 172; Merta taken (1562), 
restored to Raja Udai Singh {c. 1582), 
xvii. 308-309 ; Murshidabad town 
said to have been founded by, xviii. 53 ; 
lamp tower at Nagari, x. 300; Nagaur 
granted to BIkaner chief, xviii. 298 ; 
Narnala fort captured by officers of 
(1597-8), xviii. 380; Nimar annexed 
(1600), xix, 108 ; in Nimar Zila, xix. 
118; force sent against Bir Singh Deo 
of Orchha, xix. 243 ; in Oudh, xix. 
280 ; Ghazni Khan Jhalor of Palanpur 
imprisoned, xix. 353; defeat of Himu 
at Panipat (1556), xix. 397 ; Patna re- 
duced, XX. 68; Pavagarh held (1573)) 
XX. 80; in Peshawar, xx. no; in the 
Punjab, XX. 26S ; establishment of 
settled government in Rae Bareli, xxi. 
26; tribute imposed on RajpTpla, xxi. 
So ; settlement of Rajputana, xxi. 97 ; 
Ranthambhor passed to {c. 1569), xxi. 
236 ; Adam Khan of Rawalpindi de- 
posed by, xxi. 264 ; Rewah fort cap- 
tured, xxi. 282 ; Sheopur surrendered to 
(1567), xxii. 272 ; tomb at Sikandra, v. 
75', 76, xxii. 363 ; Sind united with 
Delhi empire, xxii. 397 ; stopped at Slpri 
to hunt elephants (1564), xxiii. 15; 
built wall round fort at Srlnagar, xxiii. 
99; Surat captured (1573), xxiii. 154; 
Talgram imder, xxiii. 213; Tarana 
under, xxiii. 249 ; Tatta destroyed 
during invasion of Sind (1592), xxiii. 
255 ; visit to Thanesar fair (1567), xxiii. 
30£ ; Uch annexed, xxiv. 82 ; Ujjain 
fell to (1562), xxiv. 114; born at 
Umarkot (1542), xxiv. 118; marched 
through Umarkot to conquer Sind 
(1591), xxiv. 118; rule in Hindustan 
(1556-1605), xxiv. 152. 

Akbar, Mulla Saiyid, Aka Khel Afrldi, 
rebellion in Tirah under (1S97), xix. 
158. 

Akbar All, Nawab of Pataudi, loyal 
behaviour of, in Mutiny, xx. 27. 

Akbar Khan, Korwai State in Central 
India seized by (1820), xv. 405. 



Akbar Khiin, son of Dost Muhammad, 

Sir William Macnaghten murdered by 

(1S41), V. 38, xiv, 244. 
Akbar Khan, of Lalpura (1880-96), xvii. 

386. 
Akbar Shah II, Mughal emperor (1806- 

37), ii. 412, 413. 
Akbar Shah, Saiyid, Hindustani fanatic, 

colony established at Sittana under, v. 

289. 
Akbarnagar, old name of Rajmahal town, 

in Bengal, v. 179. 
Akbarpur, tahsil in Cawnpore District, 

United Provinces, v. 179-180. 
Akbarpur, tahsil in Fyzabad District, 

United Provinces, v. 180. 
Akbarpur, town in Fyzabad District, 

United Provinces, v. 180-181. 
Akbarpur Ghat, famous ford across the 

Narbada. See Nimar Zila. 
Akcha, town in Afghan-TurkistJin, v. 

181. 
Akhai Raj, Kushalgarh obtained by, xvi. 

Akhas, hill tribe in Burma, v. 181, ix. 

139; Kengtung, xv. 201; Southern 

Shan States, xxii. 256. 
Akheri, village in Mysore. See Ikkeri. 
Akik stones, exported from RajpTpla, 

xxi. 81. 
Akka, peak in Anaimalais, Madras, v. 

3.^2. 

Akola, District in Berar, v. 182-188; 
physical aspects, 1 82 ; history, 182-183 ; 
population, 183-184; agriculture, 184- 
185 ; industries, 185 ; forests, 185 ; 
famine, 186; trade and communica- 
tions, 186; administration, 1 86-1 88 ; 
education, 188; medical, 188. 

Akola, taluk in Berar, v. 188-189. 

Akola, tow^l in Berar, chief centre of 
the cotton trade, v. 189 ; cotton manu- 
factures, iii. 200. 

Akola, taliika in Ahmadnagar District, 
Bombay, v. 189-190. 

Akor Malik, Kohat protected by, xv. 

343- 

Akos, tribe of Kengtung, in Burma, prob- 
ably connected with the Akhas, v. 181. 

Akot, taluk in Akola District, Berar, 
v. 190. 

Akot, town m Akola District, Berar, 
V. 190-191. 

Akozai, Afghan tribe. See Akazai. 

Akra, ancient site in North-West Fron- 
tier Province, v. 190-191. 

Akrabi, tribe in Aden, v. 15. 

Akshay Kumar Datta, Bengali writer, 

ii- 433- 
Akshayyatritya, festival in Berar, vii. 

382. 
Akyab, District in Lower Burma, v. 

191-201 ; physical aspects, 191; his- 



14 



INDEX 



tory, 192-193; population, T93-194; 
agriculture, 194-195; forests, 195- 
196 ; mines and minerals, 196 ; trade 
and communications, 196-197 ; ad- 
ministration, 197-200 ; education, 200 ; 
medical, 200-201 ; petroleum field, iii. 
140. 

Akyab, subdivision in Lower Burma, 
V. 201. 

Akyab, township in Lower Burma, v. 
201. 

Akyab, town and port in Lower Burma, 
V. 201-203. 

Al, vegetable dye, cultivation, iii. 183, 
184. 

Al Idrisi, mention of Sanjau (twelfth cen- 
tury), xxii. 56. 

Al Masudi, Arab geographer, description 
of Multan (tenth century), xviii. 24. 

Ala Gohar. See Shah Alam. 

Ala Singh, Raja of Patiala, history of, 
XX, 34, 133-135; Barnala rebuilt 
(1722), vii. 24 ; Bhatinda captured 
(i 754), viii. 90 ; struggle for supre- 
macy in Hissar, xiii. 146 ; attack on, 
by chief of Maler Kotla (1732), xvii. 
84 ; built fort on site of Patiala, 
XX. 50 ; Sanaur conquered (1748), xxii. 
27 ; Sirhind conquered (1763), xxiii. 21. 

Alabaster, found or quarried in Baluchi- 
stan, vi. 307, x. 115, 120; Burma, ix. 
173, xvii. 133, xxiii. 12. 

Aladad Khan, Navvab of Tank, xxiii. 244. 

Alaf Khan, general of Ala-ud-din, king- 
dom of Dholka subdued, viii. 283 ; 
Sanjan attacked and stormed, xxii. 
56; Kalyan rebelled against (1325), 
xiv. 307. 

Alaf Khan, son of Gulgar Khan Thoke, 
Lasur fort restored to, by the Nimbalkar 
of Yaval, xvi. 153. 

Alagadri Naik, traditional builder of 
Hindu temple at Perur, Coimbatore 
District, Madras, xx. iii. 

Alagarkovil, temple in Madura District, 
Madras, v. 203-204. 

Alahyar-jo-Tando, town in Sind. See 
Tando Alahyar. 

Alai, widow of Ihdad, return to Tirah, 
xxiii. 389. 

Alaipur, village in Khulna District, 
Bengal, v. 204. 

Alakhana, king, traditional rule over 
Gujrat, xii. 365. 

AlakhgTrs, religious sect in Eikaner, viii. 
208, 

Alam, Mir, minister at Hyderabad, xxi. 
394 ; tank al I lyderabiid constructed 
by, xiii. 311 ; sarai at Nalgonda built 
by, xviii. 345 ; sarai at Nundcr built 
by, xvii]. 355. 
Alam, Shah, Ala-ud-din, tomb at Tijara, 
ii. 183, ■■■ " 



Alam, Shah, .Saiyid king of Delhi (1445- 
53), ii. 369; Alapur said to have been 
founded by, v. 205 ; life at Budaun, ix. 
42 ; tomb at Budaun, ix. 42 ; capital at 
Budaun (1448), xxi. 305. 

Alam, Shah (Prince Mu'azzam) Mughal 
emperor (1707-17 12). See Bahadur 
Shah. 

Alam, Shah, Mughal emperor (1759- 
1S06), ii. 410-412, 413; tomb at Ah- 
madabad, ii. 129, v. 108; attempt to 
conquer Bihar, ii. 411, 478; residence 
at Allahabad (1765-71), ii. 411, 479, 
v. 229, 238 ; seized and blinded (1788), 
ii. 412, xiv. 63; reign at Delhi (1771- 
1803), ii. 412, xi. 236; grant of Diwani 
of Bengal to Company (1765), ii. 4S0, 
vii. 218 ; death (1806), iv. 78. 

Local notices : Invasion of Bengal 
(1763), vii. 180; restored to Cawnpore, 
ix. 308 ; Northern Circars granted to 
East India Company (1765), x. 336, xxiv. 
326 ; Fatehpur handed over to (1765), 
xii. 77 ; Sindhia reinstated on throne of 
Dellii by (1785), xii. 422 ; received by 
Shuja-ud-daula, xix. 281 ; Pahasu con- 
ferred on Begam Sumru for the support 
of her troops, xix. 314. 

Alam Malik, mosque at Ahmadabad, 
v. 108. 

Alam Prabhu, temple at Alta in Kolha- 
pur State, v. 253. 

Alam Saiyid, mosque at Ahmadabad, 
V. 108. 

Alam Singh, Balanwali fell to (1751), 
xiv. 166. 

Alambadi cattle, bred in Coimbatore, 

X. 363- 
Alamgir I. See Anrangzeb. 
Alamgir II, Mughal emperor f 1754-9), 

ii. 410-411, 413; rule in Delhi, xi. 

236, xxiv. 155; murder of (1759), 

xi. 236. 
Alamgir Hill, peak of the Assia range 

in Orissa, v. 204. 
Alamglri Darwaza, gate in Gwalior Fort, 

xii. 441. 
Alampur, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, V. 204, XV. 165. 
A\a.mpuT, /lar^aiia in Central India with 

cenotaph of Malhar Rao Holkar, v. 204. 
Alampur, /cj/ie/: in Raichur District, 

Hyderabad, v. 204. 
Aland, town in Gulbarga District, Hyder- 
abad, V. 204-205. 
Alandi, town in Poona District, Bombay, 

V. 205. 
Alang, hill fort in Bombay. See Kulang 

and Alang. 
Alapulai, port in Travancore. See AUep- 

pey. 
Alapur, town in Budaon District, United 

Provinces, v. 205. 



INDEX 



15 



Alatis, tribe on north-west frontier, ex- 
pedition against, xix. 156. 
Ala-ud-din, saint, tomb and shrine at 
Bangarmau, vi. 380, xxiv. 123; Raja 
of Nawal cursed by, xxiv. 123. 
Ala-ud-dln, established as Sultan at 

Dipalpur (1524), XX. 268.^ 
Ala-ud-dln, Nawab of Loharu (1869- 

84), xvi. 169. 
Ala-ud-dln, Bahmani king (1521-2), ii. 
385 ; assassination of, by Amir Barld, 
xiii. 238. 
Ala-ud-dTn, Pir Saiyid, Muhammadans 
assisted by, to conquer Nandurbar, xviii. 
363. 
Ala-ud-dln, Ahmad Shah. See Ahmad 

Shah. 
Ala-ud-din, Alam Shah. See Alam Shah. 
Ala-ud-dTn, Humayun Shah. See Hu- 

mayun. 
Ala-ud-dTn, Imad Shahi king (1504- 

c. 1527-8), ii. 391, vii. 368, xii. 20 n. 
Ala-ud-dTn, Muhammad KhaljT. See 

Muhammad KhaljT. 
Ala-ud-dTn AlT. See All. 
Ala-ud-dTn Piroz. See Firoz. 
Ala-ud-dTn Hasan. See Hasan. 
Ala-ud-dTn Husain. See Husain. 
Ala-ud-dTn JanT. See JiinT. 
Ala-ud-dTn Mardan. See Mardan. 
Alaungdaw Kathapa, pagoda in Lower 

Chindwin District, Burma, x. 231. 
Alaungpaya (Alompra), founder of the 
modern Burmese empire (1752-60), ii. 
496, ix. 122, 123 ; in Amherst, v. 295, 
296; in Ava, vi. 152; Bassein taken 
by (1755), vii. 118; territory in Bassein 
ceded by, to East India Company (1757), 
vii. 108 ; in Dagon, xxi. 214 ; Kengtung 
town fortified by, xv. 201 ; Mergui 
invaded, xvii. 297 ; Myanaung captured 
(1754), xviii. loS ; Pegu taken (1757), 
XX. 86 ; Peguans of Prome overthrown, 
221; Rangoon founded by, xxi. 214; 
Yun Shans said to have been brought 
away from Salween by, 416-41 7 ; Shwe- 
bo fortified by, xxii. 312 ; Shwebo the 
birth-place and capital of, xxii. 323; 
buildings at Shwebo, xxii. 323 ; Tavoy 
surrendered to (1759), xxiii. 260; rise 
of, in Tenasserim, xxiii. 279 ; Tenas- 
serim destroyed by (1759), xxiii. 280; 
Mons in Thaton conquered, xxiii. 

340- 

Alaungsithu, Pagan king in Arakan, 
xviii. 123; said to have improved 
Minbu irrigation systems in twelfth 
century, xvii. 347 ; founded Shwegugyi 
pagoda (1141), xix. 313; Shwegu 
pagoda on site of shrine erected over 
grave of his queen, xix. 322. 

Alawakhawa, fair in Dinajpur District, 
Eastern Bengal, v. 205. 



Alawal Khan, Nawab of Bahraich, slain 
by Gonda Raja, xii. 312. 

Alawalpur, town in Jullundur District, 
Punjab, V. 205. 

Albert College, Calcutta, ix. 283. 

Albert Hall, museum, Jaipur, xiii. 402. 

Albert Presses, Karachi city, xv. 12. 

Albert Victor Anglo-Vernacular High 
School, Abbottabad, v. 2. 

Albert Victor Hospital, Madura, xvi. 
403, 407. 

AlbirunT, Arab geographer (970-1039), 
ii. 81-82 ; account of India (a.d. 1030), 
referred to, ii. 208 ; mention of Nema- 
war, xix. 25 ; gives Rander (Rahan- 
jhour) as capital of South Gujarat, xxi. 
211 ; mention of Sunam, xxiii. 139. 

Albuquerque, Affonso de, second Por- 
tuguese Viceroy, expedition to India 
(1503), ii. 447 ; took Goa (1510) and 
Malacca, ii. 448 ; policy of conciliation, 
ii. 448-449. 

Local notices: Attacked Aden (1513), 
v. 12 ; attacked Calicut (1510), ix. 290 ; 
built Manuel Kotla at Cochin (1503), 
X. 354; Goa captured (1510), xii. 252, 
259, 266 ; statue of, at New Goa, xii. 
268-269; Mirjan visited by (1510), 
xvii. 364; landed at Perim (1513), xx. 
108. 

Alcock, Major, I. M.S., principal zoologi- 
cal results obtained by the marine sur- 
vey, iv. 510-512. 

Aldworth, Thomas, Broach visited by, 
ix. 20; factory at Surat founded by 
(1612), ii. 457. 

Aleinma, governor of Martaban, Burma, 
xxiii. 331. 

Alexander the Great, coinage not affected 
by progress of, through India, ii. 137 ; 
expedition into India (326-325 B.C.), 
ii. 274-279. 

Local notices : Campaigns in Afghan- 
istan, v. 34 ; Atari taken by, vi. 121 ; 
Indus crossed near Attock, vi. 138; re- 
turn march through Baluchistan, vi. 275; 
traditional founder of Herat, xiii. 114; 
march down Indus (325 B. c), viii. 279 ; 
Jhang scene of operations of, against 
the Malli (325 B.C.), xiv. 126; Kabul 
believed to be Ortospanum of, xiv. 243 ; 
Kamalia one of the towns of the Malli 
taken by, xiv. 325 ; Kandahar prob- 
ably one of the cities founded or rebuilt 
by, xiv. 375 ; Las Bela marched through 
(325 B.C.), xvi. 145 ; invasion of Mul- 
tan, xviii. 24; advance into Peshawar 
valley (327 B.C.), xix. 148-149; cam- 
paign in the Punjab, xx. 260 ; fort at 
Sehwan ascribed to, xxii. 163, 403; 
led army through Kunar, Bajaur, Swat, 
and Buner (326 B.C.), xxiii. 183- 
184. 



i6 



INDEX 



Alexandra School for native Christian 

girls, Amritsar, v. 323. 
Alexandria Avion, ancient name of Herat, 

xiii. 114. 
Alguada Reef Lighthouse, Bassein Dis- 
trict, Burma, vii. 116. 
Alha, legendary warrior of the Chandels, 

xxii. 138. 
All, son in-law and cousin of Muhammad, 

tomb of, xvii. 244-245. 
All, Barld Shahi king (1538-S2). ii. 391, 

viii. 170, xiii. 23S ; tomb at BIdar, viii. 

170. 
All, Barld Shahi king (1592-r. 1599), ii- 

391, xiii. 288. 
All, Raja, Faruqi king of Khandesh (1576- 

97)> "• 393. 
AIT, Sadik, siibahddr of Tatta, persuaded 

to make Tatta over to Kalhora prince 

(1737), xxii. 398. 
All, Sadik, districts seized by Nagpur 

forces under and advance to Bhopal 

(1807), viii. 129. 
All, Shaikh, attempt to take DIpalpur 

(1431), si. 359; Lahore taken by 

(1433), but surrendered, xvi. 107. 
All, \VazIr, Nawab of Oudh, dethroned 

and removed to Benares, vii. iSi ; 

murder of Mr. Cherry, vii. 181 ; rule in 

Oudh, xix. 283. 
Ali Bahadur, Nawab of Banda, Ajaigarh 

fort taken (1800), v. 132 ; confirmed Di- 

wan Pratap Singh in the joglr of Ali- 

pura, V. 222; rule in Banda, vi. 349; 

mosque built at Banda, vi. 357 ; efforts 

to crush Bundelas, ix. 71 ; invasion of 

Bundelkhand (1789), x. 177, xix. 401 ; 

territory in Hamirpur annexed by 

(1790), xiii. 15 ; jiigiy of Jaso fell to, 

xiv. 70 ; slain at siege of Kalinjar, vi. 

349 ; besieged Kalinjar, xiv. 312 ; Kul- 

pahar fort' taken by (1790), xvi. 15; 

Kunwar Son Sah Ponwar tributary to, 

X. 198 ; relations with Maihar State, 

xvii. 28 ; Maudahii fort built by, xvii. 

232 ; Tej Singh dispossessed of Sarila 

by, xxii. 108. 
All Bahadur, son of Chhatar Singh. See 

Arjun Singh. 
Ali Beg, Mongol governor of Kabul, 

power felt in Punjab, xix. 151. 
All Gauhar, prince. See Shah Alam II. 
All Gauhar, son and successor of Ata 

Muhammad, removed from Agror 

(1888), v. 92. 
All Jah Bahadur, governor of Ellichpur 

(1762), xii. 20. 
Ali Kasim Khan, sent to quell Rajas in 

Gorakhpur (i75o\ xii. 334. 
AIT Khan, traditional founder of Gujrat 

town, xii. 373. 
All Khan, Nahar prince of Sitpur, AlT- 

pur in Muzaffarpur District, Punjab, 



said to have been founded by, v. 
221. 

AlT Khan, Muhammadan freebooter, 
Utraula seized by {c. I5.=;2), xxiv. 288 ; 
tomb at Utraula, xxiv. 288. 

AlT Khan, invaded Berar (1590), xxi. 304 ; 
Jama Masjid at Burhanpur built by 
(I588\ix. 105. 

AlT Khan I (surnamed Kathuna), Jam 
of Las Bela (1742-3, 1765-6), xvi, 
146. 

AIT Khan II, Jam of Las Bcla (18 18- 
c. 1S30), xvi. T46. 

AIT Khan III, Jam of Las Bela (iSSS- 
1896), xvi. 146. 

AlT Khan, Nizam, proclaimed (1761), 
xiii. 240 ; visit to YadgTr, xxiv. 400. 

AIT Khan, uncle of Tipu Sultan, MTr Raja, 
tomb at Gurramkonda, xii. 413. 

AlT Khan, Nawab, Raja of Mahmudabad 
(1850), xvii. 22. 

AlT kulT Khan, governor of Bareilly 
(1628). vii. 4. 

All KulT Khan, Dod-Ballapur in Mysore 
held by, xi. 366. 

AlT Mardan Khan, ceded Kandahar to 
Mughal emperor (1637), "• 4° "> Hasli 
Canal constructed by, vii. 16; Western 
Jumna Canal undertaken (1626), xiv. 
234 ; governor of KashmTr, xv. 93 ; 
rule in Lahore, xvi. 109 ; Rohtak Canal 
said to have been begun by (1643), xxi. 
311; Shalamar gardens and pleasure 
ground near Lahore laid out by (1667), 
xvi. 109-110; erected hunting-seat of 
Badshah Mahal, xxi. 369 ; Rechna Doab 
sarkar entrusted to, xxii. 328. 

AlT Masjid, fort in the Khyber Pass, v. 
220. 

AlT Mirza, Sultan, tomb built to AlT, son- 
in-law and cousin of Muhammad, at 
Mazar-i-SharTf, xvii. 244-245. 

AlT Muhammad Khan (of the Khakwani 
family), appointed siihahddroi llajiwah 
under Ahmad Shah Durrani, xiii. 7. 

AlT Muhammad Khan, Rohilla chief, rule 
in Almora, v. 245, 246 ; procured the 
assassination of Duja Singh and made 
Aonla his residence, vi. 389; rule in 
Bareilly, vii. 4, 13; acquisitions in 
Bijnor, viii. 194 ; rule in Moradabad, 
xvii. 423 ; invasion of NainT Tal (1744), 
xviii. 325 ; Safdar Jang, Nawab of 
Oudh, quarrelled with (1745), x'x- 281 ; 
rule in Rohilkhand, xxi. 183, 306, xxiv. 
155 ; central portions of Shahjahanpur 
acquired by, xxii. 203. 

AlT Muhammad Khan, Raja of Mahmud- 
abad (1903), xvii. 22. 

AlT Murad, Talpur, MTr, convicted of 
forgery and fraud (1852), xiii. 314, 
xxiii. 120, 121 ; nile in Khaiqjur State, 
XV. 212, xxii. 401; MTrpur Khas built 



INDEX 



17 



by (1S06), xvii. 365; Burdis became 

subject to (1S43), xxiv. 279. 
All Paru, Shaikh, tomb in I3ombay City, 

viii. 402. 
All Rajas, Muhammadan ' Sea Kings ' and 

heads ot the Mappillas in Malabar, rule 

in Cannanore, ix. 29S ; in Laccadive 

Islands, xvi. 87, 88. 
All Sarwar, shrine at Viahror in Multan 

District, Punjab, xiv. 273. 
Ali Shah, Adil Shahi king (1558-80), ii. 

386, 387, viii. 187; march against 
Dharwar fort (1573), xi. 316; Goa 
besieged (1570), xii. 252; Naldrug 
fortilications added to, and dam erected 
across the Bori (1558), xviii. 337. 

All Shah, Adil Shahi king (1656-73), ii. 

387, viii. 187, xxi. 394. 

All Sher, Gialpo, rule in Baltistan 
(sixteenth century), vi. 262. 

Ali Vardi Khan, Mughal general, Dhodap 
surrendered to (1635), xi. 320. 

Ali Vardi Khan, Nawab of Bengal (1740- 
1756), ii. 474. vii. 217, xviii. 54; 
defeated Nawab Sarfaraz Khan at Giria 
(1740), xii. 245; defeated Marathas at 
Katwa, XV. 190 ; ceded Orissa to the 
Marathas (1751), vii. 214, xix, 250; 
revenue settlement of Shahabad, xxii. 
194. 

All Zaman, Munir-ul-Mulk II, xxi. 394. 

Alibag, tdliika in Kolaba District, Bom- 
bay, V. 206. 

Alibag, town and port in Kolaba District, 
Bombay, with magnetic observatory, v. 
206. 

Allganj, tahsil in Etah District, United 
Provinces, v. 207. 

Allganj, town in Etah District, United 
Provinces, v. 207. 

Allganj, town in Bombay. See Siwan. 

Allgarhj/ar^ifrt^/a in Kajputana, v. 207-208. 

Aligarh, District in United Provinces, v. 
20S-217 ; physical aspects, 208-209; 
history, 209-211 ; population, 211- 
212; agriculture, 212-213; minerals, 
214; trade and communications, 214- 
215; famine, 215 ; administration, 215- 
217; education, 216; medical, 217. 

AlTgarh, tahs'il in United Provinces, v. 2 1 7. 

Aligarh (or Koil), city in United Provinces, 
v. 217-219; stormed by Lord Lake 
(1803), V. 218 ; a Muhammadan Anglo- 
Oriental College, iv. 129, V. 219; arts and 
manufactures, iii. 217, 229, 244, 245; 
road to Delhi, iii. 403. 

Aligarh, tahsil in Farrukhabad District, 
United Provinces, v. 219-220. 

Alijah Club at Morar, Gwalior State, 
xviii. 2. 

Alikhel, tribe of Pathans, xix. 241. 

Alikher, town in Bidar District, Hyder- 
abad, V. 220. 

VOL. XXV. ( 



Alipore, subdivision in Twenty-four Par- 
ganas District, Bengal, v. 220. 

Alipore, suburb of Calcutta, and head- 
quarters of Twenty-four Parganas Dis- 
trict, Bengal, v. 220-221. 

Allpur, subdivision in Jalpaiguri District, 
Eastern Bengal, v. 221. 

Alipur, village in Jalpaiguri District, 
Eastern Bengal, v. 221. 

Allpur, tahsil in Muzaffargarh District, 
Punjab, V. 221. 

Allpur, town in Muzaffargarh District, 
Punjab, V. 221-222. 

Allpur, peak in Bharatpur State, xxi. 86. 

Allpura, petty Siviad State in Central 
India, v. 222. 

Ali-Rajpur, guaranteed chiefship in Cen- 
tral India, v. 223-225. 

All-ul-hakk Imam, tomb at Sialkot, xxii. 

335. 

Aliwal, battle-field (1846) in Ludhiana 
District, Punjab, v. 225-226. 

Allyar Khan, assassinated by Arabs at 
Lasur in Khandesh, xvi. 153. 

Alizai, Afghan tribe, xvii. 25, xix. 241. 

Allah Yar Muhammad Khan, Awan 
Malik of Kalabagh, xiv, 290. 

Allahabad, Division in United Provinces, 
V. 226-227. 

Allahabad, District in United Provinces, 
V. 227-236 ; physical aspects, 227-228 ; 
history, 228-230; population, 230-231 ; 
agriculture, 231-233 ; trade and com- 
munications, 233-234; famine, 234; 
administration, 234-236; education, 
236 ; medical, 236. 

Allahabad, tahsil in United Provinces, 
V. 236-237. 

Allahabad, or Prayag, city and seat of 
government in United Provinces, v. 
237-241 ; population, 237 ; history, 
237-238 ; Mutiny, 23S-239 ; situation 
and buildings, 239-240 ; municipality, 
240; trade, 241; education, 241. 

Otlier referemes: Meteorology, i. 
113, 124, 126, 152; Asoka pillar and 
edicts, ii. 42, 43, 50, 109 ; ' Salvation ' 
assembly (a.D. 644"), ii. 297 ; roads, 
iii. 403, 405; High Court, iv. 146, 147; 
University, iv. 426-430 ; water-supply, 

iv- 473- 
Allahabad, tahsil in Bahawalpur State, 

Punjab, V. 241-242. 
Allahabad, town in Bahawalpur State, 

Punjab, V. 242. 
Allalcr Gharer Dtilal, Bengali novel, by 

Pyari Chand Mittra, ii. 433. 
Allan, Major, frontier line at AUanmyo 

demarcated by (1854), v. 242. 
Allanmyo, township in Burma. Sec 

Myede. 
Allanmyo, town in Thayetmyo District, 

Burma, v. 242. 



i8 



INDEX 



Allasani Peddana, Telugu poet at Vi- 
jayanagar (sixteenth century), ii. 

437- 

AUbless Obstetric Hospital, Bombay 
City, viii. 379. 

AUeppey (Alapulai), port in Travancore 
State, ^Iad^as, v. 242-243. 

Alliance Bank of Simla, branch at 
Ambala, v. 287; Lahore, xvi. 102, 
113; Murree, xviii. 43; 'Rawalpindi, 
xxi. 273; Sialkot, xxii. 336. 

Allur, town in Nellore District, Madras, 
V. 243. 

Allur-t«;/^-Kottapatam, town and port in 
Madras. See Kottapatam. 

Alluvium, geological, in Agra, v. 74 ; 
Ahmadabad, V. 94-95 ; Ajmer-Merwarn, 
V. 139; Akyab, v. 191 ; Aligarh, v. 209; 
Allahabad, v. 228 ; Ambala, v. 277 ; 
Amritsar, v. 319; South Arcot, v. 421 ; 
Assam, vi. 18; Azamgarh, vi. 155; 
Backergunge, vi. 165, 166; Bahawal- 
pur, vi. 195 ; Bahraichjvi. 206; Bareilly, 
vii. 2, 7; Barind, vii. 18; Baroda, vii. 
26, 27, 45, 54; Baslrhat, vii. 104; 
Bassein, vii. 106; Basti, vii. 125, 
127; Batala tahsll, vii. 132; Beas 
river, vii. 138; Begusarai, vii. 142; 
Benares District, vii. 179; Bengal, vii. 
194> 195) 197, I99> 201, 202, 241, 242, 
264; Berar, vii. 363, 382; Bhagalpur, 
viii. 26 ; Bhamo, viii. 46 ; Bharatpur, 
viii. 73; Bihar, viii. 172; Bijnor, viii. 
193; Bilin, viii. 236; Bilugyun, viii. 
237; Birbhum, viii. 240: Bogra, viii. 
256 ; Budaun, ix. 34 ; Bulaudshahr, ix. 
48 ; Burdwan, ix. 91-92, 95 ; Cawnjiore, 
ix. 307; Central India, ix.326-32S. 330; 
Central Provinces, x. 5, 32 ; Champaran, 
^' J37> 1.^8; Chanda, x. 153; Chandor, 
X. 166; Chandpur, x. 167; Chapra, x. 
174; CharkharT, x. 176; Chhatarpur, x. 
198 ; Chhibraman, x. 203; Upper C'hind- 
win, X. 243 ; Chmnur, x. 2S5 ; Chitta- 
gong, .\. 310-311; Comilla, x. 375; 
Cooch Behar, x. 380; Dacca, xi. 102 ; 
Darbhanga, xi. 152; Delhi, xi. 224; 
Dc-ra Ghazi Khan, xi. 249 ; Dera Ismail 
Khan, xi. 260 ; Dholpur, xi. 322 ; Dina- 
pore, xi. 355 ; Etah, xii. 29 ; Eliiwah, 
xii. 38 ; Farldpur, xii. 53 ; Farrukhabad, 
xii. 63 ; Fatehpur, xii. 76 ; F'azilka, xii. 
86; Fenny river, xii. 87 ; Fyzabad, xii. 
110; Ganjam, xii. 144, 151; Gauhati, 
xii. 1S3; Gaya, xii. 195-196; Ghatal, 
xii. 214 ; Ghazipur, xii. 232 ; Goalpara, 
xii. 270; Gonda, xii. 311; Gorakhpur, 
xii. 332 ; Gujarat, xii. 349 ; Gujranwala, 
xii. 354; Gujrat, xii. 364; Gurdaspur, 
xii. 392 ; Gurgaon, xii. 402 ; Gwalior, 
xii. 419; Iladgaon, xiii. 4; Ilajipur, 
xiii. 6; Handia, xiii. 23; Ilardoi, xiii. 
43, 46; Ilazaiibagh, .\iii. 90-91 ; Hen- 



zada, xiii. 105; Hingoli, xiii. 142; 
Hooghly, xiii. 163, 166, 171 ; Hoshang- 
abad, xiii. 180; Hoshiarpur, xiii. 193; 
Howrah, xiii. 207; Huzur, xiii. 226; Hy- 
derabad, xiii. 229,232, 312 ; Itimadpur, 
xiii. 373 ; Jahanabad, xiii. 378; Jaipur, 
xiii. 383; Jalalabad, xiv. 14; Jalalpur, 
xiv. 15 ; Jalaun, xiv. 18 ; JalpaigurT, xiv. 
31 ; Jaunpnr, xiv. 73; Jessore, xiv. 91 ; 
Jhang, xiv. 125; Jullundur, xiv. 222; 
Kaira, xiv. 276 ; Kalat, xiv. 299; Kam- 
rup, xiv. 331 ; South Kanara, xiv. 354 ; 
Karachi, xv. 2 ; Karnal, xv. 49; Karwar, 
XV, 65 ; Kashmir, xv. 1 10 ; Kathiawar, 
XV. 173; Kendrapara, XV. 199; Khair- 
pur, XV. 211; Khandesh, xv. 227 ; Kherl, 
XV. 269 ; Khulna, xv. 286 ; Khurda, xv. 
295 ; Kolaba, xv. 361 ; Kotah, xv. 41 1 ; 
Krishnagar, xvi. 8 ; Kurigiam, xvi. 29 ; 
Lahore, xvi. 97; Larkana, xvi. 137 » 
Las Bela,xvi. 145 ; Lucknow, xvi. 181 ; 
Ludhiana, xvi. 200; Madarlpur, xvi. 
228; Madhubani, xvi. 232 ; Madras, xvi. 
242 ; MainpurT, xvii. 33 ; Malda, xvii. 
75 ; the Meghna, xvii. 267 ; Meiktiln, 
xvii. 276; Minbu, xvii. 345; Mirzapur, 
xvii. 367 ; Monghyr, xvii. 390 ; Mont- 
gomery, xvii. 409 ; Moradabad, xvii. 
421; Multan, xviii. 23; Murshidabad, 
xviii. 45 ; Muttra, xviii. 63; Muzaffar- 
garh, xviii. 75, 78; Muzaffarnagar, xviii. 
84; -MuzafTarpur, xviii. 95; Myaungmya, 
xviii. 109 ; Myingyan, xviii. 120; My- 
mensingh, xviii. 149; NainI Tal, xviii. 
323; Naiinilam, xviii. 366; Naral, xviii. 
371; NarsTngh])ur, xviii. 3S6 ; Noakhali, 
xix. 1 29 ; North-\\est Frontier Province, 
xix. 144; Nowgong, xi.x. 222; Oudh, 
xix. 277 ; Pabna, xix. 297; Pakokku, xix. 
320 ; Palamau, xix. 336; Partabgarh,xx. 
15 ; I'athri,xx. 31 ; Paliala, .xx. 32 ; Patna, 
XX. 55 ; Pegu, XX. 84 ; Peshawar, xx. 112; 
Pilibhit, XX. 137 ; Punjab, xx. 246, 248 ; 
Puri, XX. 399, 402; I'urnea, xx. 413; 
Pyapon, xxi. 3 ; Rae Barell, xxi. 25 ; 
Rajshahi, xxi. 159, 161; Rampur, xxi. 
182; Rangpur, x.xi. 223; Rewah, xxi. 
280; Rohtak, xxi. 311; Ruby Mines 
District, xxi. 327; Sagaing, xxi. 352; 
Samlhar, xxii. 24 ; Santal Parg.nnas, xxii. 
61 ; Shahabad, xxii. 187 ; Shalijahanpur, 
x.xii. 202; Shahpur,xxii. 212; Shahpura, 
xxii. 223;SiaIkot, xxii. 327; Singhblium, 
xxiii. 2 ; .Sitapur, xxiii. 54;.Sukkur, xxiii. 
119; Sullanpur, xxiii. 131 ; Surat, xxiii. 
152; Swat, xxiii. 183; Sylhet, xxiii. 190; 
Tanjore, xxiii, 225, 226; Thana, xxiii. 
291 ; Thayetmyo, xxiii. 343; Tinnevelly, 
xxiii. 363 ; Tijjpera, xxiii. 381 ; Tonk, 
xxiii.4o8;Toungoo, xxiii. 422; Trichino- 
poly, xxiv. 26 ; Twenty-four Parganas, 
xxiv. 68 ; Unao, xxiv. 122 ; Uniteil Pro- 
vinces, x.xiv. 141 ; Upper Sind Frontier 



INDEX 



19 



District, xxiv. 27S ; Vizagapatam, xxiv. 

323; Warangal, xxiv. 357. 
Almas All Khan, minister of Nawab 

Saadat Ali Khan of Oudh, settlement of 

Etawah District based on accounts of 

(i8oi-2),xii. 45 ; engaged directly with 

village occupiers, xix. 2S9. 
Almeida, Francisco de, first Portuguese 

viceroy of India (1505-9), ii. 447-44S ; 

built a fort at Cannanore (1505), ix. 298 ; 

viceroy of Cochin (1505), x. 354; 

dei'eated Gujarat fleet (1509), xii. 351. 
Almeida, Lourenfo de, killed in battle 

with Admiral Husain (1508 , xii. 351. 
Almond trees, found or cultivated in 

Afghanistan, v. 52; Baluchistan, vi. 297; 

Jhalawan, xiv. 109; Kalat, xiv. 301; 

Kashmir, XV. 126; Larkana, xvi. 137; 

Quetta-Pishm, xxi. 12; Sarawan, xxii. 

98. 
Almora, District in United Provinces, v. 

243-252; physical aspects, 243-244; 

history, 245-247; population, 247-248; 

agriculture, 248 ; minerals, 249 ; trade 

and communications, 249-250; natural 

calamities, 250; administration, 250- 

252 ; education, 251-252 ; medical, 

Almora, tahsd'm. United Provinces, v. 252. 

Almora, head-quarters of District, with 

cantonment, in United Provinces, v. 

252-253- 
Almora group of Himalayan passes, i. 1 8. 
Aloes, cultivated in Anantapur, v. 344 ; 

Dharwar, xi. 311; Hyderabad State, 

xiii. 253. 
Alompra. Sec Alaungpaya. 
Alor, ruined town in Bombay. See Aror. 
Alp Khan, of Malwa. See Hoshang Shah. 
Ahi. See Linseed, 
Alta, village in Kolhapur State, Bombay, 

V. 253. 
Altamsh, or lyaltimish. Slave king of Delhi 

(1214-36), ii. 358-359> 36S, 37°, 37i ; 

builder of the Kutb Minar, near Delhi, 

ii. 126 ; tomb, ii. 182 ; coins of, ii. 244, 

iv. 5»3- 

Local notices : Rule in Baluchistan, 
vi. 275 ; Bhatiah taken, xxiv. 82 ; 
Bhilsa attacked and sacked (1235), 
viii. 106 ; rule in Budaun, ix. 35 ; built 
mosque at Budaun, ix. 42 ; in Cen- 
tral India, ix. 338 ; tomb in Delhi, xi. 
234 ; rule at Delhi, xx. 264 ; Gvvalior 
fort captured (1232), xii. 440; Jalor 
surrendered to, xiv. 30 ; raids in 
Jhansi (1234), xiv. 137 ; Kubacha over- 
thrown by, xxii. 396 ; Lahore taken by, 
xvi. 107 ; destruction of towns in Mal- 
wa (1235), xvii. 103; Nandana con- 
quered by, and entrusted to one of his 
nobles, xviii. 349 ; Narnaul assigned as 
fief to Saif-ud-din by, xviii. 380; Paii- 



hiirs expelled from Narvvar (1231), 
xviii. 397 ; expedition against Banian 
(ii236), xix. 151 ; Hemhel repulsed, 
XX. 132 ; rule over the Punjab, xx. 264, 
265 ; army of, defeated by Jalal-ud-din 
in the Punjab, xx. 265 ; Ranthambhor 
seized by (1226), xxi. 235; Shamsabad 
founded by (c. 122S;, xxii. 229; de- 
feated Taj-ud-din Yalduz near Tarain, 
xxiii. 390 ; sacked Ujjain and destroyed 
temple (1235), ^^iv. 113, 114. 
Alum,iii. 156-157 ; found in Afghanistan, 
V, 55; Cutch, xi. 80; Dera Ismail Khan, 
xi. 265; Ganjam, xii. 149; Garhwal, xii. 
168; Kalabagh, xiv. 291 ; Larkana, xvi. 
141 ; Mianwali, xvii. 321-322 ; Naini 
Tal, xviii. 329; North- West Frontier 
Province, xix. 181 ; Shahabad,xxii. 192 ; 
Sirmur, xxiii. 26. 
Aluminium, iii. I48. 
Aluminium utensils, manufactured in 

Madras, xvi. 375. 
Alur, taluk in Bellary District, Madras, 

v. 253-254. 
Alva, Count de, administration of Gon, 

xii. 256. 
Alvar Tirunagari, town in Tinneveliy 

District, Madras, v. 254. 
Alves, Colonel, wounded in riot at Jaipur 
city (1835), xiii. 3S7 ; Agent to Gover- 
nor-General in Rajputana, xxi. 142. 
Alvor, Count of, preparations to make 
Marmagao the capital instead of Goa, 
xvii. 209. 
Aiwa, petty State in Rewa Kantha, Bom- 
bay, V. 254, xxi. 290. 
Alvvar, State in Rajputana, v. 254-267; 
physical aspects, 254-255 ; history, 256- 
259; population, 259-261 ; agriculture, 
261 ; forests, 262 ; minerals, 263 ; trade 
and communications, 263 ; famine, 264 ; 
administration, 264-267 ; education, 
267 ; medical, 267 ; area, population, 
revenue, and administration, iv. 95. 
Alwar, capital of State in Rajputana, v. 
267-269 ; arts and manufactures, iii. 
186, 191, 192, 231, 240, 244. 
Alwaye, town in Travancore State, 

Madras, v. 269. 
Alwi, tribe in Hyderabad, xiii. 315. 
Amala, petty State in the Dangs, Bombay, 

V. 269, xi. 147. 
Amalapuram, taluk in Godavari District, 

Madras, v. 269-270. 
x\malapuram, town in Godavari District, 

Madras, v. 270. 
AmalTyara, petty State in Mahi Kantha, 

Bombay, v. 270, xvii. 13. 
Amalner, taluka in East Khandesh Dis- 
trict, Bombay, v. 270. 
Amalner, town in East Khandesh District, 

Bombay, v. 270. 
Aman Singh, Bundela, rule in Panna 



C 2 



20 



INDEX 



(1752-8), xix. 401 ; Jogir of Sarila 
obtained by (1765), xxii. 108. 

Aman Singh, Kais of ijahawal (1809), 
xxiii. 71. 

Amaniganj Hat, silk mart in Malda Dis- 
trict, Eastern Bengal, v. 270-271. 

Aman-uUah, Rfiptas given to, xxi. 340. 

Aman-ul-mulk, son of Shah Afzal, ruler 
of Chitral, Mastuj, Vasin, and Ghizr 
(1880-92), \. 301-302. 

AmarDas, third Sikh Guru, lived in Amrit- 
sar, V. 320. 

Amar Niwas palace, near Kotah city, 
Rajputana, xv. 425. 

.Vmar Singh, I'aramara ruler of Idar 
State, xiii. 325. 

Amar Singh I, Rana of Mevvar, submis- 
sion to Mughal court (1614), xxi. 
97 ; ancestor of Shahpura family, xxii. 
223; ruler of Mewar (1597-1620), 
xxiv. 90. 

Amar Singh II, Rana of Mewar (1698- 
1710), xxiv. 91 ; cenotaph at Ahar, v. ' 
93; Mandalgarh recovered by (1706), j 
xvii. 149; Sipri granted to, xxiii. 15. 

.\niar Singh of Orchha, Khaniadhana 
granted to (1724), w. 243. 

Amar Singh, ousted from Raipur (1750), 
x.xi. 51. 

Amar Singh, Raja of Patiala (1765- 
1781), XX. 34; took Banur town 
fromMughal empire, vi. 414 ; concjuered 
Bhattiana (1774), but was unable to 
hold it, viii. 92 ; in Ilissar, xiii. 146, 
156 ; attack on Maler Kotla, and sub- 
sequent peace, xvii. 84; Sirsa taken 
(1774), xxiii. 45. 

Amar Singh, Raja Dhiraj, of Shahpura 
(i 796-1827), xxii. 223. 

Amar Singh, Thappa, Gurkha general in 
Nepal NVar, xix. 35 ; temple at Gango- 
iri erected by, xii. 1 39 ; defeat and death 
(1821), xiii. 77. 

Amar Singh, Rao Bahadur, chief of Khil- 
chipur State (1869), xv. 278. 

Amar Singh, Raja .Sir, brother of Maha- 
raja of Kashmir, palace at Jammu, xiv. 
50; vice-president of Kashmir Adminis- 
trative Council (1891), XV. 136. 

Aniara-ko'sa, Sanskrit dictionary, ii. 264. 

Amarapura, subdivision in RIandalay 
District, Upper Burma, v. 271. 

Amarapura, township in Mandalay Dis- 
trict, Upper Burma, v. 271. 

Amarapura, former cajutal of Burma 
(1783-1857 , V. 271^272. 

yVmaravati, village with ruined stupa in 
Ncllore District, Madras, v. 272-273; 
description oi stupa, ii. 115-117, 161. 

Amarchinta (or Atmakur), tributary 
estate in Hyderabad, v. 273. 

Amargarb, District in Tatiala Stale, 
Punjab, V. 273. 



Amargarh, tahsti in Patiala State, Pun- 
jab, v. 273-274. 

Amarkantak, sacred spot in Rewah State, 
Central India, containing the sources 
of the Narbada and the Son, v. 274, 
xvii. 159. 

Amarnaih, Dlwan, temple of. at Mirpur, 
Kashmir, xvii. 364. 

Amarnath (or Ambarnath), village with 
old temple in Thana District, Bombay, 

V- 274-275- 
Aviaiu-'salaka, the, collection of Sanskrit 

lyrics, ii. 243. 
Amazais, Pathans, on Mahaban mountain, 

xvi. 428. 
Arab, village in North-West Frontier 

Province, v. 275. 
Amba, td/tt/c in Bhir District, Hyderabad, 

V. 275. 
Amba (or Mominabad ', town in Bhir 

District, Hyderabad, v. 275-276. 
Amba, goddess, legends of, xiv. 203, xv. 

23 ; temple at Karmala, Bombay , xv. 47. 
-Vmba Bhawani, shrine and place of pil- 
grimage, in Bombay. Sec Arasur Hills. 
Amba Mata peak, temple at Girnar, 

Kathiawar, xii. 247-248. 
Ambahta, town in Saharanpur District, 

United Provinces, v. 276. 
Ambajheri, reservoir near Nagpur, xviii. 

319- 

Anibaji, shrine and place of pilgrimage 
in Bombay. See Arasur Hills. 

Ambajl Inglia, Gohad governed by (1784), 
xii. 304 ; district round Gwalior seized 
from, by Daulat Rao Sindhia (1810), 
xvi. 150. 

Ambajidurga, detached hill in Mysore, 
v. 276. 

Ambal Mutiappa, temple of, at Boblesh- 
war,Bijapur i)istrict, Bombay, viii. 254, 

Ambala, District in Punjab, v. 276-2S7; 
physical aspects, 276-277 ; history, 
278-279 ; population, 279-281 ; agricul- 
ture, 281-2S2; forests, 2S2-283 ; trade 
and communications, 283-284 ; famine, 

284 ; administration, 285-286; revenue, 

285 ; education, 286 ; medical, 286. 
Ambala, taksilin Punjab, v. 2S7. 
Ambala, city and cantonment in Punjab, 

v. 287-288. 
Ambala, tank at Ramtck, near Nagpur, 

xxi. 195. 
Ambalakarans, cultivators in Trichino- 

poly District, xxiv. 31. 
Ambalapulai, head-cjuarters of td/uk in 

Travancore .State, Madras, v. 288. 
Ambalavasis, temple servants, in Cochin 

State, Madras, x. 345. 
.Vmbar, Malik, Abyssinian minister of 

Ahmadnagar (1610-26;, ii. 389; re- 
venue system, iv. 206 //. 
Local notices : Ahmadnagar indepen- 



INDEX 



21 



dent uncier, v. 113 ; revenne system 
in Ahmadnagar, v. 120; Aurangabad 
city founded, vi. 143, 148; Jama 
Masjid at Aurangabad built, vi. 150; 
water-supply introduced into Aurang- 
abad city, vi. 150; Berar held, vii. 
369; Bidar plundered, viii. 165, 170; 
rule in Dcccan, viii. 2S7-2S8 ; Todar 
Mai's revenue system introduced into 
Hyderabad State, xiii. 299; mosque 
built at Nander, xviii. 350 ; revenue 
system in Osmanabad, xix. 274 ; 
captured fort at Ovvsa, xix. 294 ; 
revenue system in ParLhani, xix. 414- 
415; settlement of Poona, xx. 178; 
revenue system in Raichur, xxi. 42 ; 
sacked Surat (1610), viii. 287; revenue 
system in Thana, xxiii. 301. 

Ambarh, tdAitk in Aurangabad District, 
Hyderabad, v. 28S. 

Ambarnath. See Amarnath. 

Ambarpet, ' crown ' taluk in Atraf-i-balda 
District, Hyderabad, v. 288. 

Ambasamudram, taluk in Tinnevelly 
District, Madras, v. 288-289. 

Ambasamudram, town in Tinnevelly Dis- 
trict, Madras, v. 289. 

Ambastha, son of a Brahman by a Vaisya 
woman, i. 332. 

Ambatlrtha, bathing-place at Kalasa, in 
Kadilr District, Mysore, xiv. 299. 

Ambela, mountain pass in North-West 
Frontier Province, scene of severe 
fighting in 1863, v. 2S9-290. 

Amber, ancient capital of Jaipur State, 
Rajputana, v. 290-291 ; description of 
palace, ii. 129, iii. 140-141 . 

Amber, value of amber produced in India 
(1S9S-1903), iii. 130; found or mined 
in Burma, ix. 170, 173; UpperChindwin, 
X. 246; Hukawng valley, Myitkyina, 
xviii. 143 ; Nicobars, xix. 6r, 

Ambeyla, mountain pass in North-West 
Frontier Province. See Ambela. 

Ambhi, king of Taxila. See Omphis. 

Amboli, sanitarium in Savantvadi State, 
Bombay, v. 291. 

Amboyna, massacre of (1623), ii. 456. 

Ambur, town in Nortli Arcot District, 
Madras, v. 291 ; battle (1749), v. 291 ; 
tablet in memory of ahero'sdeath,ii.5i. 

America, trade with, iii. 311, 312. 

American Missions. See under Protestant 
Missions. 

American Unsectarian Mission (Disciples 
of Christ), at MungelT, Bilaspur Dis- 
trict, Central Provinces, xviii. 40. 

Amet, town in Udaipur State, Rajputana, 
V. 291-29?, 

Amethi, tahsll in Sultanpur District, 
United Provinces, v. 292. 

AmelhT, town in Sulianpur District, 
United Provinces, v. 292. 



Amethias, rule in Rae BarelT, xxi, 26. 

Amethysts, found in Madras Presidency, 
xvi. 240 ; SeonI District, Central 
Provinces, xxii. 171. 

Amherst, Lord, Governor-General (1823- 
8), ii. 496-497 ; spent summer at 
Simla (1827), xxii. 3S3, 

Amherst, District in Lower Burma, v. 
292-304; physical aspects, 292-294; 
history, 294-296; pagodas and caves, 
295-296 ; population, 296-297 ; agri- 
culture, 297-299 ; forests, 299-300 ; 
minerals, 300 ; trade and communica- 
tions, 300-301; administration, 301- 
304 ; education, 303 ; medical, 303-304. 

Amherst, subdivision in Lower Burma, 
v. 304. 

Amin Khan, governor of Bengal, vii, 
216. 

Amln Khan, Nawab, appointed ndziiii of 
Hissar (1761), xiii. 146, 

Amina SatT, deity of the Pachpiriyas, 

i. 436. 

Amindivi Islands, in Laccadive group, 
attached to South Kanara District, 
Madra?, v. 304-305- 

Ammgarh, town in Bijapur District, 
Bombay, v, 305. 

Amln-ud-dln Khan, ruler of Loharu 
estate, xvi. 169. 

Amir, Barld Shahi king of Bidar {\~,o\- 
39), ii, 194, 391, vii. 368, viii, 170, xiii. 
238 ; rule in Gulbarga, xii. 382 ; minis- 
ter of Mahmud Shah, xiii. 238. 

Amir, Barld Shahi king {c. 1599), ii. 391, 
viii. 170. 

Amir AIT, Maulvi, led attack on temple 
at Ajodhya but defeated and killed 
by the king of Oudh's troops, v. 292. 

Amir Khan, Pindari captain, submitted 
to Lord Hastings (1817), ii. 494-495; 
AlTgarh District (Rajputana), together 
with town and fort, made over to 
(18 1 9), V. 208 ; Berasia conquered by, 
vii. 423 ; Central India invaded by, ix. 
342 ; Chhabra District made over to 
(1816), x. 195; assistance rendered 
to Thakur of Churu by, x. 335 ; 
Dampur town sacked (1S05); xi. 284; 
Gwalior ravaged, xii. 423 ; Hapur 
attacked (1805), xiii. 40 ; Indore 
ravaged, xiii. 337 ; Jaipur ravaged, xiii, 
386 ; married daughter of Ayaj Khan of 
Jaora and took Ghafur Khan into his 
service, xiv, 63 ; marched on Jodhpur, 
and assumed management for two 
years, xiv, 198; Lawa under, xvi. 156; 
Mandawar ravaged (1S05), xvii, 151 ; 
raids in Moradabad, xvii. 423, 426, 429- 
430 ; Naglna sacked (1805), xviii. 299 ; 
rule in Nimbahera, xix. 120; Pirawa 
under, xx. 151 ; in Rajputana (1814), 
xxi, 100, 10 1 ; Sambhal, the birthplace 



22 



INDEX 



of, xxii. 19; Sambhar Lake owned by, 

xxii. 20 ; Sanger sacked, xxii. 138 ; 

Sherkot sacked (1805), xxii. 273 ; rule 

in Sironj, xxiii. 39 ; founder of Tonk 

State, xxiii. 409 ; part of Udaipnr State 

laid waste, xxiv. 92. 
Amir Khusru, poet, took refuge in India 

with Balban, ii, 361 ; captured by 

Mongols (1285), xi. 359, xvi. 107. 
Amir Singh (son of Shiv Singh), Bayad 

seized by, xiii. 326. 
Am!r-ud-din Ahmad Khan, Sir, Nawab of 

Loliaru (1884), xvi. 169. 
Amii-ul-mulk, rule in BaonI (181 5), vi. 

414. 
Amir-ul-mulk, son of Amiin-ul-mulk, 

intrigues of, in Chitral, x. 302, 303. 
Amjad All Shah, king of Oudh ('1S42-7), 

xix. 283; buildings at Lucknow, xvi. 

191. 
Amjhera, District in Gwalior State, 

Central India, v. 305. 
Amjhera, village in Gwalior State, 

Centr.1l India, v. 305. 
Amliyara, petty Slate in MahT Kantha, 

Bombay, v. 305, xvii. 13. 
Amloii, District in Nablia State, Punjab, 

V. 306. 
Amma II, Eastern Chalukva king, grant 

by, ii. 5S. 
Amman, MTr, Urdn author, ii. 429. 
Ammapatam, port in Tanjore District, 

Madras, v. 306. 
Ammunition factory at Dum-Dum, near 

Calcutta, iii. 86, xi. 376. 
Amod, taliika in Broach District, Bombay, 

V. 306. 
Amod, town in Broach District, Bombay, 

V. 306. 
Amog Chand, rule in Kanethi, xiv. 380. 
Amoghavarsha I, Rashtrakuta king (814- 

77), decrees of (a. n. 866),ii.6o; history 

of, ii. 331, xviii. 171 ; patron of Jain 

literature, viii. 28 1. 
Aviohwd, dark-green cloth, made in Nar- 

singhpur District, Central Provinces, 

xviii. 391. 
Amou Darya, river in Central Asia. See 

Ox us. 
Ampthill, Lord, acting Viceroy (1904), 

ii. 529. 
Amrabad, idbik in Mahbubnagar District, 

Hyderabad, v. 306-307. 
Amrabad cattle, in Hyderabad State, 

xiii. 255. 
Amraoti, District in Berar, v. 307-313; 
))hysical aspects, 307-30S ; history, 308 ; 
population, 308-309; agriculture, 309- 
310; forests, 310; trade and com- 
munications, 310-311; famine, 311 ; 
administration, 311-313; education, 
313 ; medical, 313. 
Amraoti, tCilttk in Berar, v. 314. 



Amraoti, town in Berar, of commercial 
importance as a cotton mart, with two 
municipalities, v. 314-315. 

Amrapur, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, V. 315, XV. 167. 

Amrapur, petty State in Rewa Kantha, 
Bombay, v. 315, xxi. 291. 

Amravati, hill in Bengal. See Chatia. 

Amravati, hill in Madras. See Amaravati. 

Amreli,/rrt;// or District in Baroda. State, 
V. 315-318; physical aspects, 315-316 ; 
history, 316; forests, 317; agriculture, 
317; population, 317; trade and com- 
munications, 317; administration, 318. 

Amreli, taltika in Baroda State, v. 318. 

Amreli, town in Baroda State, v. 31S-319. 

Amrit Mahal, breed of cattle in Mysore, 
iii. 78-79 ; breeding establishment at 
Hunsur, xiii. 225. 

Amrita Bazar, village in Jessore District, 
Bengal, v. 319. 

Amrita-sarovara, tank on Nandidroog, 
Mysore, xviii. 359, 

Amriteshwar, temple at Annigeri, Dhar- 
war District, Bombay, v. 386, 

Amritsar, District in Punjab, v. 319-327 ; 
physical aspects, 319-320; history, 320- 
321; population, 321-323; forests, 324; 
minerals, 324 ; trade and communica- 
tions, 324-325 ; famine, 325 ; administra- 
tion, 325-327 ; education, 327 ; medical, 

327- 
Amritsar, ialisTI in Punjab, v. 327. 
Amritsar, city in Punjab, with golden 

temple of the Sikhs, manufacture of 

carpets and silk and flourishing trade, 

V. 328-330; arts and manufactures, iii. 

186, 192, 210, 215, 217, 218, 229, 241. 
Amritsar-Patti Railway, iii. 372. 
Amroha, tahsil in Moradabad District, 

United Provinces, v. 330. 
Amroha, town in Moradabad District, 

United Provinces, v. 330-331 ; pottery, 

iii. 244. 
Amta, village in Howrah District, Bengal, 

V. 3.31- 

Amta-Howrah Light Railway. See How- 
rah-Amta Light Railway. 

Anniktainalyada, Telugu poem ascribed 
to Krishna Raya,of Vijayanagar, ii.437. 

Amusements and games, in Rigr>eda, ii. 
227 ; of the Afghans, v. 51 ; in Ajmer- 
Merwara,v. 148; of the Andamanese, v. 
36S-369 ; of the Assamese, vi. 52-53 ; 
in Baluchistan, vi. 293 ; Baroda, vii. 45 ; 
Bengal, vii. 240-241 ; Bombay, viii. 
310; of the Burmese, ix. 148; in Central 
India, ix. 357 ; Central Provinces, x. 31 ; 
Hindu Kush Mountains, xiii. 139; Hy- 
derabad .State, xiii. 250; Kashmir, xv. 
106-107; Madras Presidency, xvi. 266; 
' JelHcuts,' in Madura District, xvi. 396 ; 
Mysore Stale, xviii. 20S; Nepal, xix. 45; 



INDEX 



23 



Nicobars, xix. 77 ; Norlh-West Frontier 
Province, xix. 169; Punjab, xx. 294; Raj- 
piitana, xxi. iiS ; Sind,xxii. 410-41 1 ; 
United Provinces, xxiv. 175. 

Amwa Khas, village in Gorakhpur Dis- 
trict, United Provinces, v. 331. 

Amyatt, Mr., dispatched against Mir 
Kasim in Patna (1763), xx. 56. 

Amzera, District and village in Central 
India. See Amjhera. 

An, township in Kyaukpu District, Lower 
Burma, v. 331-332. 

Ana, constructed Anasagar embankment 
at Ajmer V. 1150), v. 140. 

Anahadgarh, District in Patiala State, 
Punjab, V. 332. 

Anahadgarh (or Barnala), tahsTl'm. Patiala 
State, Punjab, v. 332. 

Anaimalais, section of the Western Ghats 
in Madras and Travancore, v. 332- 
334; physical aspects, i. 40; cold season, 
i. 114; peat bogs, i. 1S9; zoology, i. 
216, 227. 

Anaimudi, peak of the Western Ghats in 
Travancore State, Madras, v. 334. 

Anakapalle, tahsll in Vizagapatam Dis- 
trict, Madras, v. 334-3.^5- 

Anakapalle, town in Vizagapatam Dis- 
trict, Madras, v. 335. 

Anamalais, mountain range in Madras. 
See Anaimalais. 

Anambar, river in Baluchistan. See Nari. 

Anand,/rt /«/{'(? in Kaira District, Bombay, 

V. 3.3.V 
Anand, town in Kaira District, Bombay, 

V. 335- 
Anand Deo. See Ude Deo. 
Anand-Godhra Railway, extension of, to 

Ratlam, vii. 20. 
Anand Kishor, Raja of Bettiah in Bihar, 

title of Maharaja Bahadur conferred on 

(1830), viii. 6. 
Anand Mahal, building at Bijapur, viii. 

186. 
Anand Pal, defeated by Mahmud of 

Ghazni, vi. 133, xiv. 311, xvi. ic6, xx. 

263, xxi. 264. 
Anand Rao, Gaikwar, of Baroda (1800- 

19), vii. 36-38 ; handed Kaira over 

to 13ritish (1803), xiv. 286. 
Anand Rao I, Ponwar, fief of Dhar given 

to, by the Peshwa (1742), xi. 2S9 ; rule 

in Dhar State (1742-9), xi. 289 ; in part 

of Central India, ix. 340. 
Anand Rao II, treaty with British (1818), 

xi. 278; rule in Dhar State, xi. 289. 
Anand Rao III, rule in Dhar State (1857), 

xi. 290. 
Anand Singh, Idar State conquered by 

(1728), xiii. 325. 
Ananda temple at Pagan, Burma, xix. 

3I3- 
Ananda Raz I, ruler of Northern Circars 



under French, Circars surrendered to 

English by,x. 336; rule in Vizianagram, 

xxiv. 340. 
Ananda Raz II, rule in Vizianagram, 

xxiv. 341. 
Anandl Bai, refuge taken in Dhar fort 

(1774), xi. 289. 
Anandi Swami, temple at Jalna, Hj'der- 

abad, xiv. 29. 
Anandpur, petty State in Kathiawar, 

Bombay, v. 335, xv. 167. 
Anandpur, village in Keonjhar State, 

Orissa, v. 335-336- 
Anandpur, town in Hoshiarpur District, 

Punjab, V. 336. 
Anandrao market, built at Talikota by 

Rastia, xxiii. 214, 
Anang Pal I, Tomar king, traditional 

founder of Delhi (r. 736), ii. 312 ; of 

Hansi,xiii. 25; of Tohana, xxiii. 407. 
Anang Pal II, Delhi turned into a fortress 

{c. 1052), ii. 312, xi. 233; iron pillar 

moved from Muttra to Delhi, xi. 233; 

rule of, xi. 234. 
Ananga Bhima, traditional builder of 

Jagannath temple at Purl, ii. 11, xx. 

410. 
Ananta, wife of Chikkappa Udaiyar, 

Anantapur in Madras named after, 

V. 349- 
Ananta Basudeva, temple at Bhubnn- 

eswar, Orissa, viii. 150. 
Ananta Gumpha, cave at Khandgiri, 

Orissa, xv. 240. 
Ananta Padmanabha, legends of, xxiii. 

399, xxiv. 49 ; shrine at Trivandrum, 

Travancore State, xxiv. 50. 
Anantadeva, court astrologer under king 

Singhana (1210-47), ii. 341. 
Anantagiri, fort in Elgandal District, 

Hyderabad, xii. 6. 
AnantaphandT,MarathTpoet(i744-i8i9), 

erotic lyrics of, ii. 432. 
Anantapur, District in Madras, v. 336- 

349 ; physical aspects,336-339; history, 

339-340; population, 340; agriculture, 

341-343; forests, 343-344; minerals, 

344 ; trade and communications, 344- 

345; famine, 345; administration, 345- 

349; education, 348; medical, 34S-349. 
Anantapur, subdivision in Madras, v. 349. 
Anantapur, taluk in Madras, v. 349. 
Anantapur, town in Madras, with a great 

tank, v. 349-350- 
Anantapur, village in Shimoga District, 

Mysore, v. 350. 
Anantasagaram, tank at Atmakur, Madras, 

vi. 124. 
Anantasayana, temple at Undavalle, 

Madras, xxiv. 130. 
Anantavarma- Chodaganga - Gangesvara, 

Jagannath temple at Purl built by 

(A.D. 1075-1141), ii. II. 



24 



INDEX 



Anantnag, Hindu name of Islamabad, 
Kashmir, xiii. 371. 

Anantnag, spring at Islamabad, Kash- 
mir, xiii. 371. 

Anappa Ashwarao, rule in Paloncha, 
Hyderabad, xix. 373. 

Anarkali, building at Batala, Gurdaspur 
District, Punjab, vii. 133. 

Anarkali, tomb at Lahore, xvi. 108. 

Anarkali, suburb of Lahore, xn. 112. 

Anawrata, emperor of Pagan, revived 
Buddhism in Upper Burma, ix. 121 ; 
Hlaingdet founded by (i03o),xvii.277'; 
rule over Katha, xv. 154 ; pagodas built 
in Kyaukse, xvi. 72, 82 ; Sutaungbyi 
pagoda, Madaya township, built, xvii. 
128; name Matila said to have been 
given to present town of Meiklila by, 
visited Meiktila and made 



xvn 



= //. 



embankment, xvii, 277 ; pagodas in 
Jileiktila founded by, xvii. 278; rule of, 
xviii. 122-123; pagoda at Nyaungu 
begun, xix. 313; king Manuka taken 
captive to Pagan, xix. 313 ; Tangyiswe- 
daw pagoda supposed to be built by, 
xix. 322; pagodas in Southern Shan 
States built by, xxii. 254; Thatontown 
sacked, xxiii. 331, 341. 

Ancestor-worship, among Jats in Punjab, 
XX. 290. 

Anchor IJne of steamers, Bengal served 
by, vii. 280. 

Ancient capitals : Ahar, v. 93 ; Ajodhya, 
v; 175-176; Amber, v. 290-291; Aror, 
vi. 4-5 ; Asarur, vi.9-10; Ava, vi. 151 ; 
Avasgarh, vii. 90; Balkh, vi. 248; 
Banavasi, vi. 346, 347 ; Bandalike, vi. 
357; Bastar,vii. 121; Belgami, xii.i^4- 
145; Bhandak, X. 150; Bidar, viii. 169- 
170; Bijapur,viii. 186-188; Bikrampur, 
xxi. 182; Bishnupur, viii. 248-249; 
Brahmanabad, ix. 8-9 ; Burhanpur, ix. 
104; Calingapatam, ix. 291-292; Con- 
jecvernm, x. 377-378; Dacca, xi. 116- 
1 20 ; Dankhar, xi. 1 48 ; Daosa, xi. 149 ; 
Daulatabad, xi. 200; Delhi, xi. 233- 
241; Deogiri,vii. 366; Deolia, xi. 247 ; 
Devlkot, xi. 276 ; Dhar, xi. 293 ; Dima- 
pur, xi. 346-347 ; DTpalpur, xi. 359 ; 
Dorasamudra, vii. 366 ; Ellichpur, xii. 
19-21 ; EUore, xii, 23 ; Fatehpur Sikri, 
xii. 84-86; Gandikota,xii. 127; Gauhati, 
xii. 184-186 ; Gaur, xii. 1S6-191 ; Gol- 
conda, xii. 309; Ilalebid, xiii, 11; 
Ilumchi, xiii. 223-224; Idar,xiii, 327- 
328; Ikkeri, xiii, 329; Indraprastha, 
xiii- 331 ; Jaunpur, xiii. 82-84; Kanauj, 
xiv, 370-372 ; Kanchi, x. 255; Kayan- 
kulam, XV. 195; Khaspur, xv, 265; 
Kherla, vi. 179; Khoh, xviii, 302; 
Lahore, xvi. 105-114; Madura, xvi. 
404-407; Mandawar,xvii. i5i;Mandor, 
xvii. 171; Mandu, xvii. 171-J73; Mel- 



kaya, xvi. 72 ; Murshidabad, xviii, 53- 
58 ; Myinzaing, xxi. 354 ; Alyohaung, 
v. 392; Nabadwip, xviii. 261-262; 
Nagar, xiv. 70 ; Nagarbastikere, xii. 
212; near Nazira, vi, 36; Padavedu, 
xix. 308-309 ; Padmanabhapuram, xix. 
310; Pagan, xix. 312-313; Paithan, 
xix. 317; Pandua, xix. 392-394; Para- 
nagar, xxi. 71; Parenda, xx. 1-2; Patali- 
putra, ii. 281-282; Patan,vi.409,xx. 24; 
Pedda Vegi, xxiv, 306 ; Pegu, xx, 96- 
98; Pinle, xvi. 72; Pinya, xxi. 354; 
Pushkatavati, x. iSi; Rajglr, xxi. 72- 
73 ; Rajmahal, xxi. 77-78 ; Ratnapuri, 
xvi. 132; Sabhar, xxi. 344; Sanklsa, 
xxii. 59-60; Seringapatam, xxii. 179- 
180; Sitpur, xxiii. 62; Sonargaon, xxiii, 
81; Sopara, xxiii. 87; Tagaung, xxi. 
329; Taikkala, xxiii. 205 ; Tamluk, xxiii, 
217-218; Tanda, xxiii. 221; Tanjore, 
xxiv. 242-245; Tanot, xiv. 4; Thana, 
xxiii. 303-304 ; Thaton, xxiii, 340 ; 
Uraiyar, x. 326 ; Vamansthali at Girnar, 
xii. 247 ; Venugrama, vii. 147. 

Ancient kingdoms or dynasties : Andhra, 
ii. 112, 113, 324, 326, xxiii. 275-276, 
coins, ii. 152; Anhilvada, v, 381, 3S2 ; 
Anga, V. 373; Banga, vii, 210; Cha- 
lukya, ii. 327-332, inscriptions, ii. 8, 13, 
18, 27, coins, ii. 151, 152, architecture 
and sculpture, ii. 123, 174-177 ; Chera, 
ii. .^21, 322, 324, X. 192-193; Cliola, 
ii. 331-344, X. 326, inscriptions, ii. 12, 
coins, ii, 152 ; Chota Nagpur, vii, 215 ; 
Kalinga, ii. 8, 53, 80, 283^ 333, xiv. 310, 
inscriptions, ii. 8, 14; Kamarujia, vii. 
209-210, X. 381 ; Kanauj, ii. 310, 313- 
314; Kama Suvarna, vii. 210; Maga- 
dha, vii, 20S, 221; Mithila, xvii. 3S1; 
Panchala,xix. 377-378; Pandya,ii. 331- 
344, xix. 394-39.^. coins, ii. 150, 152, 
inscriptions, ii. 12 n. \ Pataliputra, vii. 
209; Pundra, vii. 210 ; Tamralipta, vii. 
210; Vaisali, vii. 208; Vakataka, x. 
150; Vidarbha, vii. 361; Videha, vii. 
208. 

Andaman and Nicobar Islands, group 
of islands in the Bay of Bengal, v. 350- 
354 ; physical aspects, 350-351 ; popu- 
lation, 351-353; administration, 353; 
surveys, 354. 

Andaman basin, zoological results of 
marine survey, iv. 510-512. 

Andamanese, colour of skin, i, 283 ; hair, 
i. 284. 

Andamanese language, i. 389, 394, 401, 

V. 361-363- 
Andamans, group of islands in the Bay 
of Bengal, with penal settlement, v. 
3.=;4-372 ; physical aspects, 355-356; 
liistory, 360; population, 360-372. 

Other references ; Geology, i. 94, 99 ; 
botany, i. 203-204; ethnology, i. 292; 



INDEX 



25 



sickness and mortality among prisoners, 
i. 531 ; forests, iii. 103, 105 ; Jarawars 
of, iii. 125 ; minerals, iii. 157 ; adminis- 
tration, iv. 56-57 ; legislation, iv. 131 ; 
zoology, i. "225, 237, 238, 251, 253, 
255, 260, 266. 
Andaw pagoda, Sandoway, Burma, xxii. 

33-34- 
Anderson, Col., destroyed \\ andiwash 

(1757), xxiv. 353. 
Anderson, Lieutenant, murdered at Mul- 

tan (1848), xviii. 37. 
Anderson, Mr., Resident at court of 

MahadjI Sindhia, xii. 415. 
Anderson, Rev. John, General Assembly's 

School, Madras, started by (1837), xvi. 

339- 

Andhasura, Anaatapur in Mysore named 
after, v. 350. 

Andher, inscribed vase from, ii. 44-45. 

Andhra, ancient kingdom in Southern 
India. See Telingana and Berar. 

Andhra dynasty, history of, ii. 325-326 ; 
embassies to Rome, ii. 112-113, 325; 
coins of, ii. 138, 152, 

Local notices : In Berar, vii. 366 ; 
Bhir included in kingdom, viii. 112 ; in 
Carnatic, ix. 301 ; in Central Provinces, 
X. 12 ; Chandravali held by, x. 297; in 
Chitaldroog, x. 291; in Deccan, ii. 112, 
xi. 207, xiii. 235; in Ganj.im, xii. 145 ; 
in Godavari, xii. 284 ; in Khandesh, xv. 
228 ; in Kistna, xv. 321 ; in Kolaba, xv. 
357 ; in the Konkan, xv. 395 ; in north- 
ern part of Madras, xvi. 24S ; in north 
of Mysore, xviii. 169 ; in Nasik, xviii. 
400; in Poona, xx. 167; Satara prob- 
ably held by, xxii. 118 ; .Shimoga ruled 
by, xxii. 2S3 ; Sholapur part of terri- 
tories of, xxii. 296 ; in Thana, xxiii. 292 ; 
in Vizagapatam, xxiv. 325 ; Warangal 
formed part of kingdom, xxiv. 358. 

Andhra, name for group of Dravidian 
languages, including Telugu, i. 379. 

Andol, /d/id- in Medak District, Hyder- 
abad State, V, 372. 

Andola, ta/ie/c in Gulbarga District, 
Hyderabad State, v. 373. 

Andrews Library, at Surat, xxiii. 16S. 

Andrews, Lieutenant, fort near Satya- 
mangalam defended by, xxii. 135. 

Andro, language of the Kuki-Chin group, 

i- 393- 

Androth, one of Laccadive Islands, xvi . 85 . 

Anebiddasari (or Anebiddajari), former 
town on Devarayadurga hill, Myso:e, 
xi. 274. 

Anegundi, old town and fortress in Hyder- 
abad State, the residence of the last 
representative of the Vijayanagar dy- 
nasty, v. 373. 

Anekal, /a/itA; in Bangalore District, My- 
sore, v. 373. 



Anekal, town in Bangalore District, My- 
sore, v. 373. 

Anekdrtha- samuchchaya, Sanskrit dic- 
tionary by Sasvata, ii. 264. 

Anga, ancient kingdom in Bengal, v. 373. 

Anga, son of king Bali, and legendary 
founder of a kingdom in Bengal, vii. 
194. 

Angad, second Sikh Guru, inhabited a 
village near Amritsar, and died there 
(1552), V. 320. 

Angadi, village in Kadur District, Mysore, 

V. 374- 

Angadipuram, village in Malabar Dis- 
trict, Madras, v. 374. 

Angami, group of Naga languages, i. 387, 
393, 400 ; spoken in the Naga Hills, 
xviii. 287. 

Angamis, tribe of Nagas, in Naga Hills, 
XV. 353, xviii. 287, 288-289, 290, 
292. 

Angarias, tribe in Las Bela, Baluchistan, 
xvi. 146. 

Anghad, petty State in Rewa Kantha, 
Bombay, v. 374, xxi. 291. 

Anglican Church. See under Churches. 

Anglican Missions. See under Protestant 
Missions. 

Anglicans, in India, i. 443 ; population 
statistics, i. 475, 477. _ 

Angrezabad. See English Bazar, 

Angria, Maratha pirate, ii. 441, 462, xxi. 
248 ; Devgarh traditionally fortified by, 
xi. 275; Jaigarh taken (1713), xiii. 
379; Khanderi under, XV. 225 ; Kolaba 
imder, xv. 358 ; in the Konkan, xv. 395 ; 
Lohogarh seized (1713), xvi. 170; 
Rajmachi surrendered to (17 13), xxi. 
76; Suvarndrug made over to (1713), 
xiii. 57 ; part of Thana subdued, 
xxiii. 292 ; Vijayadrug made capital of 
a territory (169S), xxiv. 310. 

Angul, District in Orissa, Bengal, v. 374- 
381 ; physical aspects, 374-375; history, 
375-37^5'; population, 376-377; .ngri- 
culture, 377-378 ; forests, 37S ; mine- 
rals, 378 ; trade and communications, 
378-379; famine, 379 ; administration, 
379-381 : education, 3S0-381 ; medical, 

381. 
Angul, subdivision in Orissa, Bengal, v. 

381. 
Angul, village in Orissa, Bengal, v. 381. 
Anhila, Anhilvada said to have been 

named after, v. 382. 
Anhilpur, ancient name of Patau, xx. 24, 
Anhilvada, ancient kingdom in Gujarat 

(746-1295), v. 381-382; Ahmadabad 

lands first brought under tillage by, v. 

96; Broach included in, till 1298, ix. 

20 ; Champaner a stronghold of, xix. 

38 2 ; in Kaira, xiv. 277. 
Anhilvada, ancient name of Patan, xx. 24. 



26 



INDEX 



Anicuts and Dams : Sillserh lake, Alwar, 
V. 269 ; stone, at Baro, Gwalior, vii. 24 ; 
in Bellary, across the Tungabhadra, vii. 
166; Bhojpur, Bhopal, viii. 121-122; 
on the Cauvery, i. 45, iii. 327, ix. 306 ; 
across the Musi at Chadarghat, Hyder- 
abad, X.115 ; in the Bur Nullah, Chagai, 
Baluchistan, x. r 1 8 ; Mari Kanave, on 
the Vedavati, Mysore, x. 290 ; by the 
Chola kings, x. 326; in Cochin, x. 347 ; 
in Coimbatore, x. 363 ; on the Coleroon, 
i. 45, i\'. 306, X. 374; on the Palar, 
at Conjeeveram, x. 377 ; at Dowlaish- 
weram, on the Godavari, xi. 368 ; on 
the Enamakkal lake, Malabar, xii. 
24; on the Ghaggar, Punjab, xii. 212 ; 
in Godavari District, xii. 281 ; on the 
Godavari river, i. 45, xii. 2S5-2S6, 
299 ; on the Gundlakamma, Madras, 
xii. 387 ; in Gurgaon tahsil, xii. 41 1 ; 
on the Yagachi, Mysore, xiii. 70 ; at 
Heggadadevankote, Mysore, xiii. 100- 
loi ; on the Hemavati, Mysore, xiii. 
1 01, 159 ; on the Honnu-hole, Mysore, 
xiii. 162; in Hyderabad State, xiii. 229, 
256; in Khandesh District, xv. 234; 
on the Kistna river, xv. 336 ; on the 
Baran torrent at Kotri, Sind, xvi. 5 ; on 
the LakshmantTrfha, Mysore, xvi. 131 ; 
remains found in Loralai, Baluchistan, 
xvi. 175; on the Luni, Rajputana, xvi. 
212; on the Kiiiyar, Chingleput, xvi. 
408 ; on the Nalganga, Berar, xvii. 91 ; 
at Mamdapnr, Bijapur District, xvii. 
106; in Meiktila District, Burma, xvii. 
281-282 ; on the Kfdi Nad!, Saran Dis- 
trict, xvii. 363 ; on the Bori at Naldrug, 
Hyderabad, xviii. 337 ; for the Periyar 
Project, Travancore, xx. 109; on the 
Poini, North Arcot District, xx. 157- 
158; on the Ponnaiyar, Mysore and 
Madras, xx. 164; on the Pulicat lake, 
Madras, xx. 242 ; on the DatunT, 
near Satvvas, Central India, xxii. 134 ; 
on the Tambraparni, Tinnevelly, xxiii. 

Animals, exports of, iii, 309. See also 

particular names. 
Animal-worship, in Central Provinces, 

X. 27. 
Animism, in its purest form, i. 431 ; 

enumeration, i. 432; origin, i.432; effect 

on Islam, i. 435. 
Animists, marriage, i. 448-449; population 

statistics, i. 472-473 ; polygamy among, 

i. 482 ; education statistics, i. 484. See 

also Population section in each Province, 

District, and larger .State article. 
Anirudh, rule in Panna (1777-9), xix. 

401. 
Anirudii Singh, rule in Rewah (1690- 

1700), xxi. 282. 
Aniseed, cultivation of, in Bengal, vii. 



247; in Mfiler Kotla State, Punjab, 
xvii. 85. 

Anjan {Terminalia Arjnna), valuable 
timber tree, in the Central Provinces, 
X. 48. 

Anjanas, class of KunbTs in Ahmadabad 
District, v. 98. 

Anjaneri, flat-topped hill with cave- 
temples in Nasik District, Bombay, 

V. 382-38.^- 
Anjaneyaswami, temple to, near .Sholin- 

ghur, North Arcot District, xxii. 308. 
Anjangaon, town in Amr.aoti District, 

Berar, v. 383. 
Anjar, town in Cutch State, Bombay, 

v.. 383-384- 
Anjengo, British village and historic 

settlement within Travancore State, 

V. 384. 
Anjidiv, island off North Kanara District, 

forming part of Portuguese possessions, 

V. .^84-385. 
Anjni, temple at Kaithal, Kamal District, 

Punjab, xiv. 288. 
Anjuman school for Musalmans, Madras, 

xvi. 343 > 384- 
Anjumani industrial school at Vellore, v. 

418. 
Ankai, hill-fort in Nasik District, Bombay, 

Ankevalia, petty State in Kathiawar, 

Bombay, v. 385, xv. 167. 
Anklesvar, tdhika in Broach District, 

Bombay, v. 385. 
Anklesvar, town in Broach District, 

Bombay, v. 3S5-386, 
Anklets, made of copper at Dabhoi, 

Baroda, xi. 100. 
Ankli math, in Chitaldroog District, 

Mysore, x. 297. 
Ankola, A?/?//'a in North Kanara Distiict, 

Bombay, v. 386. 
Ankushkhan of Lakshmeshwar, Shirhatti 

fort said to have been built by, xxii. 

292. 
Annadani Mallikayuna, temple on Bettad- 

pur hill, Mysore, viii. 5. 
Annajl Dnttu, general of SivajT, Ilubli 

plundered by (1673), xi. 306, xiii. 

222 ; lands in Thana divided into 

twelve classes by, xxiii. 301. 
Annakut, ancient name for Giri Raj, 

sacred hill near Muttra, xii. 247. 
Annam Deo, traditional founder of family 

of Rajas of Bastar, vii. 122. 
Annapota Nayadu, rule in Jatpel, Hyder- 
abad (thirteenth century), xiv. 72. 
Annigeri, town in Dharwar District, 

Bombay, v. 386. 
Annpurna, temple of, at Benares, %ii. 191. 
Anrudh Chand, rule in Kangra, xiv. 385. 
AnsarTs, Bahraich invaded by (thirteenth 

century), vi. 207. 



INDEX 



27 



Ansman, legend of, in connexion with the 

Ganges, xii. 135. 
Ansu Varman, rule in Nepal, xix. 31. 
Anta Dhura, pass on Tibetan frontier, 

United Provinces, v. 386-387. 
Antariksha Parsvanatha, temple at Ba- 

sim, Berar, vii. 97 ; at Sirpur, Berar, 

xxiii. 40. 
Antarvedl, ancient name of a tract of 

country in the United Provinces. See 

Doab. 
Antarvedl language, spoken in central 

portion of Doab tract, xi. 364. 
Antelopes, four species of, in India, i. 

234-235- 
Antelopes, four-horned {Tctracems ipiad- 

ricornis), i. 235; in Berar, vii. 364; 
Central India, ix. 332 ; Ganjam, xii. 
144; Gaya,xii. 196; Hyderabad State, 
xiii. 233; Jhansi, xiv. 136; Madras 
Presidency, xvi. 244 ; Sambalpur, xxii. 
7 ; Singhbhum, xxiii. 3 ; United Pro- 
vinces, xxiv. 144. 

Antelopes, goat (^serow and gural), i. 234 ; 
in Assam, vi. 20; Chamba, x. 129; 
Pakokkn Chin Hills, x. 2S0 ; Darjeel- 
ing, xi. 167 ; Kashmir and Jammu, xv. 
87; Lushai Hills, xvi. 213; Mandi, 
xvii. 153; Manipur, xvii. 185 ; Mying- 
yan, xviii. 121 ; Myitkyina, xviii. 136; 
Naga Hills, xviii. 285 ; NainI Tal, 
xviii. 324 ; North-West Frontier Pro- 
vince, xix. 146; Patiala, xx. 33; Ra- 
walpindi, xxi. 263; .Saharanpnr, xxi. 
368; Sikkim, xxii. 367; Simla, xxii. 
377 ; Tavoy, xxiii. 259 ; Tehrl, xxiii, 
270; Thaton, xxiii. 330. 

Angteng pagoda, Yawnghwe State, Burma, 
xxii. 254. 

Anthracite, found in Attock District, Pun- 
jab, vi, 135. 

Anthropometry, as applied to ethnology, 
i. 284-285; conditions favourable to, 
and its peculiar value in India, 285- 
286, 287-289; data of, 286-287; 
methods of, applied to head, 288- 
289; nose, 289-290; orbit of eye, 
291 ; stature, 292. 

Antimony, found in Afghanistan, v. 55 ; 
Ganjam, xii. 151 ; Hazara, xiii. 81 ; 
Hazaribagh, xiii. 93 ; Kangra, xiv. 392 ; 
Lahul, Kangra, iii. 145 ; Lakhi Hills, 
Sind, xvi. 118; North-West Frontier 
Province.xix. 181 ; Sambalpur, xxii. 12. 

Antiochns the Great, king of Syria, 
invasion of India by {c. 208 B.C.), ii. 
286, XX. 261 ; Buddhist missionaries 
from Asoka to, ii. 284; siege of Balkh 
(206 K.c), vi. 248. 

Antiquarian remains : Adichanallur, Tin- 
nevelly, v. 21-22 ; Adoni, Bellary, 
v. 25 ; Afghanistan, v, 44-45 ; Agra, 
v. 76; Ahmadnagar, v. 114; Ajaigarh 



State,v.l30-i3i; Ajmer,v. 172; Ajodh- 
ya, V, 176; Akola, v, 183; Akyab, v. 
193; Aligarh, v. 211 ; Allahabad, v. 230; 
Almora, v. 247 ; Amaravati, Guntur, v. 
272-273 ; Amber, Rajputana, v. 290- 
291; Amritsar, V. 321 ; Amroha,Morad- 
abad, v. 331; Anantapur, v. 340; 
Angadi, Mysore, v. 374 ; North Arcot, 
v. 407 ; South Arcot, v, 424-425 ; Asa- 
rur, Gujranwala, vi. 9-10; Assam, vi. 
35-36 ; Assia, Cuttack, vi, 121 ; 
Aurangabad, vi. 143 ; Bacchon, v. 130 ; 
Badrihat, Murshidabad, vi, 179 ; Bagh, 
Gwalior, vi, 183-184; Bangalore, vi, 
363 ; Bapanattam, North Arcot, vi, 
415 ; Bara Bank!, vi, 419 ; Bareilly, vii, 
6 ; Barkur, South Kanara, vii. 22 ; Barwa 
Sagar, Jhansi, vii. 93 ; I3asarh, Muzaf- 
farpur, vii. 94 ; Basim, vii. 97 ; Bassein, 
Thana, vii. 121 ; Bastl, vii. 126; Bayana, 
Rajputana, vii. 137 ; Belgaum, vii. 148 ; 
Bellary, vii. 162; Benares, vii. 178; 
Bengal, vii. 221; Berar, vii. 374-375; 
Bettiah, Champaran, viii. 5 ; Betid, viii. 
9 ; Bezwada, Kistna, viii. 19 ; Bhabua, 
Shahabad, viii. 20 ; Bhagalpur, viii. 25, 
28-29, 36; Bhamo, Burma, viii.48-49 ; 
Bhandak, Central Provinces, viii. 59 ; 
Bhandara, viii. 63 ; Bharatpur, viii. 79 ; 
Bhavsari, Poona, viii. 98-99; BhTlsa, 
Central India, viii. 104-105 ; Bhlnmal, 
Rajputana, viii. iil ; Bhitrl, GhazTpur, 
viii. iiS; Bhopal,viii. 132; Bhrij,Cutch, 
viii. 151 ; Bidar, Hyderabad, viii. 165, 
170; Bihar, viii. 172 ; Bijapur, viii. 178- 
179, 186; Bijnor, viii. 195; Bilaspur, 
viii. 224; Bilgram, HardoT, viii. 235; 
Bithur, Cawnpore, viii. 251; Bogra, 
viii. 258 ; Bombay Presidency, viii. 296- 
297 ; Borivli, Thana, ix. 6 ; Budaun, ix. 
36 ; Buddh Gaya, ix. 43-45 ; Buner, ix. 
88-89 ; Calingapatam, Ganjam, ix. 29 ; 
Central India, ix. 344; Central Pro- 
vinces, x. 18-19 ; Champaner, Ranch 
Mahals, x. 136, 139 ; Chanda, x. 151 ; 
Chandpur, Jhansi, X. 168 ; Chandragiri, 
North Arcot, X. 169 ; Chari, Kangra, x. 
176; Charra, Manbhum.x. 180; Char- 
sadda, Peshawar, X. i8i;Chaul,Kolaba, 
185 ; Chhatarpur, Central India, x. 199, 
200 ; Chhindwara, x. 207 ; Chingleput, 
X- 254, 255, 256 ; Chiplun, Ratnagiri, 
X. 287 ; Chitaldroog, x. 291-292, 297 ; 
Chitor, Rajputana, X. 299; Chota Nag- 
pur, X. 330 ; Cochin, x. 343-344 ; Coim- 
batore, x. 359 ; Coorg, xi. 18-19 > Cos- 
simbazar, Murshidabad, xi. 53 ; Cud- 
dapah, xi. 62 ; Dabhoi, Baroda, xi. 99, 
100 ; Dacca, xi. 102 ; Damoh, xi. 137 ; 
Darrang, xi. 1S4 ; Deogarh, Santal Par- 
ganas, xi. 244-245 ; Devikot, Dinajpur, 
xi. 276 ; Dhamnar, Central India, xi. 
283; Dhar, xi. 290,295; Dharwar, xi. 



28 



INDEX 



306 ; Dimapur, Sibsagnr, xi. 346-347 ; 
Dinajpiir, xi. 349; Ellicbpur, xii. 12 ; 
Etah, xii. 31 ; Etawah, xii. 41 ; Fatehpur, 
xii. 78 ; Fatehpur Sikri, Agra, xii. 86 ; 
Fyzabad, xii. 1 1 1 ; Gangaikondapuram, 
Trichinopoly, xii. 128-130; Ganjam, 
xii. 146-147; Garhwal.xii. 166; Gaur, 
Malda, xii. 1 88-191 ; Gaya, xii. 198- 
199; Ghodbandar, Thana, xii. 233; 
Ghor, Afghanistan, xii. 235; Gingee, 
South Arcot, xii. 243-244; Godavari, xii. 
286 ; Gwalior, xii. 426-427 ; Gyaraspur, 
Central India, xiii. i ; Halebid, Mysore, 
xiii, II; Hamlrpur, xiii. 15; Hantha- 
waddy, Burma, xiii. 28 ; Harappa, 
Montgomery, xiii. 41 ; Harchoka, Cen- 
tral Provinces, xiii. 42 ; Hardol, xiii. 
45 ; Hariana, Punjab, xiii. 54 ; Haris- 
chandragarh, Ahmadnagar, xiii. 56 ; 
Harrand, Dera Ghazi Khan, xiii. 58 ; 
Hassan, xiii. 64, 70 ; Hassan Abdal, 
Attock, xiii. 70 ; Hazara, xiii. 77-78 ; 
Hazaribagh, xiii. 89 ; Hissar, xiii. 14-;, 
156 ; Hukeri, Belgaum, xiii. 222 ; Huli- 
yar, Mysore, xiii. 223; Hyderabad State, 
xiii. 243 ; Hyderabad District, xiii. 314 ; 
Hyderabad city, Bombay, xiii. 322 ; 
Indore State, xiii. 340; Indiir District, 
xiii. 352; Jahanabad, Gaya, xiii. 378; 
Jaintiapur, Sylhet, xiii. 381 ; Jaipur 
State, xiii. 388 ; Jaso, Central India, 
xiv. 70 ; Jaunpur, xiv. 76 ; Jhalawar, 
xiv. 117; Jhang, xiv. 127; Jhansi, xiv. 
139; Jhelum, xiv. 153; JhfisI, Allah- 
abad, xiv, 165; Jind, xiv. 169; Jodh- 
]nir,xiv. 187; Jubbulpore, xiv. 208-209; 
JuUundur, xiv. 224; Junilgarh, xiv. 337; 
Kabul Province, xiv. 242 ; Kachhi, 
Baluchistan, xiv. 249 ; Kadur, Mysore, 
xiv. 264; on Kaimur Hills, xiv. 275; 
Kaira, xiv. 278 ; Kalal State, xiv. 300; 
Kalyandrug, Anantapur, xiv. 323 ; 
Kaman, Rajputana, xiv. 326; Kamrup, 
xiv. 333 ; North Kanara, xiv. 343-344 ; 
South Kanara, xiv. 357-358 ; Kanauj, 
Farrukhabad, xiv. 371 ; Kangra, xiv. 
386; Kapadvanj, Kaira, xiv. 406; 
Kapurthala, xiv. 410; Konnur, Bel- 
gaum, XV. 390; Kosigi, Bellary, xv. 
409; Knlii, ii. 133; Lahore, xvi. 98 ; 
Madras Presidency, xvi. 255-256; 
Madura, .xvi. 391 ; Maham, Rohtak, 
xvi. 430; Malabar, xvii. 58; Manbhum, 
xvii. 113-114; Mettupfdaiyam, xvii. 
311; Midnapore, xvii. 330; Minbu, 
Burma, xvii. 348 ; Mirzapur, xvii. 369- 
370; Monghyr, xvii. 394; Montgomery, 
xvii.411; Muttra,xviii. 66; Myingyan, 
Burma, xviii. 124; Mysore State, xviii. 
186-188; Nagar Parkar, Sind, xviii. 
298; Nagod, Central India, xviii. 301- 
302 ; Nagpur, xviii. 30S ; Nalgonda, 
Hyderabad, xviii. 339; Naltigiri, Cut- 



tack, xviii. 347 ; Narod, Central India, 
xviii. 381 ; Narsinghpur, xviii. 388 ; 
Nasik, xviii. 400-401 ; Nellore, xix. 
lo-ii ; Nepal, xix. 39-40; the Nll- 
giris, xix. 90; Nimar, xix. 109; 
North-West Frontier Province, xix. 
161-162; Nowgong, xix. 223; Orissa, 
xix. 251 ; Orissa Tributary States, xix. 
256; Osmanabad, Hyderabad, xix. 270; 
Oudh, xix. 285 ; Pakokku, Burma, xix. 
322; Panch Mahals, xix. 3S2-383; 
Parbhani, Hyderabad, xix. 41 1 ; Patna, 
XX. 58; PoUachi, xx. 160; Punjab, 
XX. 277-279; Quetta - Pishin, xxi. 
14; Rae Barell, xxi. 27; Raichur, 
Hyderabad, xxi. 39; Raipur, xxi.51-52; 
Rajputana, xxi. 103-104; Ramnagar, 
Bareilly, xxi. iSi ; Ranch!, xxi. 
202 ; Rangamati, Murshidabad, xxi. 
212; Rangpur, xxi. 225-226; RaprI, 
Mainpuri, xxi. 236; Ratanpur, Bilas- 
pur, xxi. 239 ; Rath, Hamlrpur, xxi. 
240; Ratnagiri, xxi. 248-249; Rawal- 
pindi, xxi. 265 ; Rewah, xxi. 282-283; 
Rohtak, xxi. 313; Rohtasgarh, Shah- 
abad, xxi. 323 ; Ruby Mines District, 
Burma, xxi. 329-338 ; Rudarpur, Go- 
rakhpur, xxi. 338; .Sagaing, Burma, 
xxi. 3?4-355; Saharanpur, xxi. 371- 
372 ; Salem, xxi. 398 ; .Salsette, Thana, 
xxi. 411 ; Sanglawiila, Tibba, xxii. 52 ; 
SankTsa, Farrukhabad, xxii. 59-60 ; 
Saugor, xxii. 139; Seven Pagodas, 
Chingleput, xxii. 182-185; Shahabad, 
xxii. 188-189; .Shahdheri, Rawalpindi, 
xxii. 201 ; .Shimoga, Mysore, xxii. 2S5 ; 
286; Sind, xxii. 402 ; Singhbhum, xxiii. 
6; Sirohi, Rajputana, xxiii. 32; .Siron, 
Jhansi, xxiii. 37; SirpurTandHr, Hyder- 
abad, xxiii. 41, 42 ; Sirsa, Hissar, xxiii. 
45-46 ; Sitapur, xxiii. 56 ; Sonpur, Ben- 
gal, xxiii. 86; .Sugh, Ambala, xxiii. 
115-1 16; Sukkur, xxiii. 121; Sultanpur, 
xxiii. 132; Surat, xxiii. 157; Surgujii, 
Central Provinces, xxiii. 172; Sylhet, 
xxiii. 192 ; Tinnevelly, xxiii. 365 ; 
Toungoo, Burma, xxiii. 424; Travan- 
core, xxiv. 8 ; Trichinopoly, xxiv. 29- 
30; Tumkur, Mysore, xxiv. ^}, ; Ujjain, 
Central India, xxiv. 112; Unao, xxiv. 
124; United Provinces, xxiv. 159-161 ; 
Uttaramerur, Chingleput, xxiv. 289 ; 
Vengi, Madras, xxiv. 306; Warangal, 
Hyderabad, xxiv. 359 ; Waidha, xxiv. 
367-36S ; Wun, xxiv. 391. See also 
Mosques, Temples, &c. 
Antiquarian remains, prehistoric, ii. 89- 
100; introductory, S9-90; stone age, 
89, 90-97 ; ])aIaeolithic implements, 
90-92 ; neolitiiic imi)lements, 92-97 ; 
pygmy flints, 92-93; implement fac- 
tories, 93-94 ; ' cinder-mounds,' 94 ; 
' cup-marks,' 94 ; ruddle drawings, 94- 



INDEX 



29 



'95 ; tombs, 95-97 ; copper imple- 
ments, 97-98 ; iron, 98 ; bibliography, 

99-100. 
Ants, white, in Mysore, wiii. 167; Punjab, 

XX. 256. 
Antur, ancient fort in Aurangabad 

District, Hyderabad, v. 387. 
Ann, language of the Southern Chin sub- 
group, i. 393. 
Anup Giri, Gosain of Moth, Jhansi city 

wrested from Shuja-ud-daula by, xiv. 

148. 
Anup Rai, Anupshahr founded by, v. 

288; Jahangirabad built by, xiii. 37S. 
Anup Singh, Raja of Rewah, Bandhogarh 

restored to (1658), vi. 359; rule in 

Rewah (1640-60), xxi. 282. 
Anup Singh, chief of Bikaner (1669-98), 

viii. 206 ; fort at Anupgarh named 

after, v. 387. 
Anup Singh, Kachwaha, Narvvar granted 

to, xxiii. 15. 
Anupgarh, tract in Bikaner State, Raj- 

putana, v. 387. 
Anupshahr, tahsilm BulandshahrDistiict, 

United Provinces, v. 387. 
Anupshahr, town in Bulnndshahr District, 

United Provinces, v. 387-3S8. 
Anus, Vedic tribe, ii. 222. 
D'x\nville, French geographer, map of 

India (1751-2), iv. 4S1-482. 
Anwar Shah, Khoja, tomb at Burdwan, 

ix. 102. 
Anwar-ud-din, Nawab of the Carnatic, 

xxiv. 28 ; defeated and killed at Ambilr, 

V. 291, 406 ; Saadat Bandar fort built 

by, at Covelong, xi. 54. 
Anyai Khera, mound near Shikarpur. 

See Talpat Nagari. 
Ac, language of the central Naga sub- 
group, i. 387, 393, 400. 
Aonla, iaiisil in Bareilly District, United 

Provinces, v. 388-389. 
Aonla, town in Bareilly District, United 

Provinces, v. 389. 
Aos, Naga tribe, xviii. 287, 288, 289, 

290, 291, 292. 
Apabhramsa, ' decayed ' forms of Prakrit, 

ancestors of the modem vernaculars, 

i. 361-362. 
.Vpapapuri. See Pawapuri. 
Aphsanr. See Afsar. 
Apoji Ram, rule at Davangere, Mysore, 

xi. 204. 
AjJoUodotus, Graeco-Bactrian king, ii. 

28 7 ; probable rule over Sind, 394; 

coins found in Udaipur State, xxi. 94. 
ApoUonius of Tyana, Taxila visited by 

(c. 50), xxii. 201. 
Apozai, native name for Fort Sandeman, 

xii. 103. 
Appa, Tamil hymns of, addressed to Siva, 

ii. 426. 



Appa Khande Rao, rule in Kanaud, 
Punjab, xiv. 370 ; Narnaul taken by 
(1795), xviii. 381. 

Appa Sahib. See MadhujI Bhonsla. 

Appaji, assassination of, by his brother, 
the Raja of Coorg, xi. 15. 

Apples, grown in Afghanistan, v. 52; 
Baluchistan, vi. 297 ; Himalayas, xiii. 
130, 133; Kabul, xiv. 246; Kafiristan, 
xiv. 270; Kalat, xiv. 301; Karachi, 
XV. 2; Kashmir, xv. 124-125; Khair- 
pur, XV. 212; Kurram Agency, xvi. 
51; Mysore, xviii. 210; Nepal, xix. 
47; Quetta-Pishin, xxi. 12; Sarawan, 
xxii. 98; Shevaroy Hills, xxii. 274; 
Sukkur, xxiii. 119. 

Aprameyaswami, temple of, at Malur, 
Mysore, xvii. 96. 

Apricots, grown in Afghanistan, v. 52; 
Baltistan, vi. 264 ; Baluchistan, vi. 297 ; 
Himalayas, xiii. 130; Jhalawan, xiv. 
110; Kabul, xiv. 246; Kafiristan, xiv. 
270; Kalat, xiv. 301; Kandahar, xiv. 
375; Kashmir, xv. 87, 124; Loralai, 
xvi. 173, 176; Nepal, xix. 47; Pesh- 
awar, XX. 118; Quetta-PishIn, xxi. 12 ; 
Rajputana, xxi. 121; Sarawan, xxii. 
98; Sind, xxii. 413; Zhob, xxiv. 432. 

Apsaras, celestial water-nymph, in the 
Vedas, ii. 216. 

Aqueduct, at Aden, v. 16-17. 

Ar, village in Rajputana. See Ahar. 

Ara, town in Bengal. See Arrah. 

Arab conquests of Multan and Sind, ii. 

3.=iO-35i- 

Arab dynasty, rule in Western Afghan- 
istan, V. 35 ; Balkh^ vi. 248 ; 
Jhalawan, xiv. no; Kabul attacked 
by, as early as thirty-fifth year of the 
Hijra, xiv. 243 ; rule in Kalat State, 
xiv. 300; Kandahar, xiv. 375; Punjab, 
XX. 263; Sind, xxii. 396. 

Arab pirates, Portuguese possessions in 
Thana devastated by, xxiii. 292. 

Arabian coast, British relations with, iv. 
109-111. 

Arabian sea, cyclonic storms, i. 120-121 ; 
monsoon current, i. 123, 134; zoo- 
logical results of marine survey, iv. 
510-512. 

Arabic language, i. 394. 

Arabis, Porali river in Baluchistan identi- 
fied with, XX. 188. 

Arabs, in Aden, v._ 14, 15 ; Afghani- 
stan, v. 47 ; Afghan-Turkistan, v. 68 ; 
Baluchistan, vi. 275 ; Bijapur, viii. 179 ; 
Bombay City, viii. 412,413; traditional 
occupation of Chagai, x. 117 ; settled 
in Cutch, xi. 78 ; Diu plundered (1670), 
xi. 304 ; Herat city captured (661), xiii. 
115; in Hyderabad, xiii. 315; Jalal- 
abad, xiv. 12; despoiled Kandabil, Ba- 
luchistan, xiv. 249 ; in Khairpur State, 



INDEX 



XV. 212 ; invasions of Multan, xviii. 25, 
35 ; of Muzaffargarh (664), xviii. 76 ; 
attacked and expelled Jains at Rander 
(thirteenth century), xxi. 211 ; inSava- 
nur, xxii. 156; Sind, viii. 305, 306, 
406; Sukkur, xxiii. 122. 

Araga, village in Shimoga District, 
Mysore, v. 389. 

Arains, market gardeners and cultivators 
in the Punjab, i. 498 ; in Ambala, v. 
280; Amritsar, v. 322; Bahawalpur, 
vi. 198; Dera Ismail Khan, xi. 263; 
Ferozepore, xii. 92 ; Gujranwala, xii. 
357; Gujrat, xii. 368; Gurdaspur, xii. 
396 ; Hissar, xiii. 149 ; Hoshiarpur, 
xiii. 196; Jhang, xiv. 128; JuUundur, 
xiv. 225; Kapurthala, xiv. 410; 
Lahore, xvi. 98 ; Ludhiana, xvi. 202 ; 
Montgomery, xvii. 412 ; Multan, xviii. 
28 ; Muzaffargarh, xviii. 78 ; Patiala, 
XX. 41 ; Punjab, xx. 288 ; Shahpur, 
xxii. 216; Sialkot, xxii. 329. 

Arakan, Division of Lower Burma, v. 

389-392- 
Arakan District, Northern (or Arakan 
Hill Tracts), in Lower Burma, v. 392- 
397 ; physical aspects, 392-393 ; his- 
tory, 393-394 ; population, 394 ; agri- 
culture, 394-395 ; forests, 395 ; trade 
and communications, 395-396 ; admin- 
istration, 396-397 ; education, 397 ; 
medical, 397; meteorology, i. 141, 
142. 

Arakan Flotilla Company, service to 
Akyab, v. 197, 395. 

Arakan Yoma, hill range in Burma, v, 
397-39^; rainfall, i. 104. 

Arakanese. See Maghs. 

Arakanese, Burmese dialect, i. 388, v. 
390-391; spoken in Akyab, v. 193; 
Burma, ix. 137 ; Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, x. 320 ; Kyaukpyu, xvi. 63 ; 
Sandoway, xxii. 34. 

Arakhs, tribe in Hardol, xiii. 45-46 ; 
Sandila town said to have been founded 
by, xxii. 30. 

Arakottara, ancient name of Chamraj- 
nagar, Mysore, x. 147. 

Aral Canal, in Larkana District, Sind, 
xvi. 141. 

Aram, son of Qiitb-ud-din, ii. 368. 

Arambagh, subdivision in Hooghly 
District, Bengal, v. 39S. 

Arambagh, town in Hooghly District, 
Bengal, v. 398. 

Arang, town in Kaipur District, Central 
Provinces, v. 398-399. 

Arantangi, town in Tanjore District, 
Madras, v. 399. 

Ararfij, village with Asoka i)illar in 
Champarau District, liengal, v. 399. 

Araria, subdivision in Purnca District, 
Bengal, v. 399. 



Araria, village in Pumea District, Bengal. 

See Basantpur. 
Arasibidi (or 'The Queen's Route';, 

ruined village in Bijapur District, 

Bombay, v. 400. 
Arasur Hills, in Mahi Kantha, Bombay, 

v. 400. 
Arava language. See Tamil. 
Aravalli Hills, in Rajputana, v. 401- 

402 ; antiquity and degradation, i. 1-2 ; 

divide Indian Desert from South Raj- 

]nit5na, i. 33, 35; meteorology, i. 123. 
Aravalli geological system, in Jaipur, xiii. 

3S3; Jodhpur, xiv. 180; Sirohi, xxiii. 

29 ; Tonk, xxiii. 40S. 
Aravanghat, hamlet in tlie Nilgiri District, 

Madras, with cordite factory, v. 402- 

403- 
Arayans, fishermen and boatmen, m 

Cochin, X. 345. 

Arbail pass, in Western Ghats, xii. 219. 

Arbalzadas, inhabitants of Chitral State, 

X- 303- 

Ar-budha. See Abu. 

Arbuthnot & Co., Messrs., Palkonda, 
Madras, leased to, xxiv. 334. 

Archaean era (geological), i. 57-59- 

Archaeology and art of the historical 
period, ii. 101-134 ; transition from 
prehistoric times, 101-102 ; earliest 
Indian building, 102 ; state of civiliza- 
tion, 102-103; wooden architecture, 
103; early period of Indian art, 250 
n.c. to A.D. 50, 103; distribution of 
remains of early period, 104 ; evolution 
of the stnpa, 104; stone railings, 104- 
105 ; Hellenistic and Persian influence, 
105-106 ; Bharhut, 106-108 ; SanchI, 
108-109 ; monolithic pillars of Asoka, 
109 ; sculpture in the round, 109-1 10 ; 
Mathura, no; Jain s/fi/>as, iio-iii ; 
decoration of stfipas, in; sculpture in 
! the early caves, 111-112; the second 
or Kushan period, 112; history, 112; 
influence of Roman rule, 112-113 ; two 
principal schools of sculpture, 113; 
abundance of Gandhara sculptures, 
113-1x4; general description of Gan- 
dhara sculptures, 114-115; the sculp- 
tures illustrating Buddhism, 114-115; 
chronology of the Gandhara school ,115; 
Amaravati, 115-117; Ajanta paintings, 
117-121 ; decline of the art of sculp- 
ture, 121 ; religion and sculpture, 121- 
1 2 2 ; art of the Gupta jieriod (A.D. 320- 
480), 122-123; Mamallapuram sculp- 
tures, 123; Chalukya sculpture, 123; 
the towers of Chitor, 123-124; Bhu- 
vanesvar, Khajuraho, and Mount Abu, 
124; temples of the South, 124-125; 
Vijayanagar, 125; Hindu decoration 
on early Muhammadan Inuldings, 125- 
ij6; foreign modes of decoration, 126; 



INDEX 



31 



mother-of-pearl inlay, 126; geometric 
marble inlay, 127; pictra dura, 127- 
1 28 ; tomb of Jahanglr at Lahore, 1 28 ; 
early examples of enamelled tiles, 128 ; 
theChini-ka-RauzanearAgra,'i28-i29; 
glass mosaics, 129; paintings of the 
early Mughal period, 129-130; paint- 
ings in Chinese style, 130; the so-called 
'Annunciation,' 130; Akbar's patron- 
age of painting, 1 30-1 31 ; failure to 
found a national school of Indian 
painting, 131; Mughal sculpture: the 
elephants at Delhi, 131-132; bas-reliefs 
at Nurmahal, 132; pictured tiles at 
Lahore, 132; rarity of specimens of 
minor arts, 132-133; jewelled jade, 
133; rock crystal, 133 ; jewellery, 133- 
134; bibliography, 3 34. .S^e a/jo Anti- 
quarianRemains, Architecture, Mosques, 
Temples, &c. 
Architecture, ii. 155-205; wooden, 103, 
156-15S; conversion into stone, 157- 
161; stone ^//T/a^, 15S-161; cave tem- 
ples, 161-165 ; Gandhara school in 
connexion with the newer Buddhism, 
165-167 ; Gupta period, 167-168 ; 
Kashmir, 16S-170; Jain temples in 
Kanara, 170; Jain, 170, 179; Dra- 
vidian, 170-174 ; Chalukyan, 174-177 ; 
Indo- Aryan, 177-181 ; Muhamma- 
dan, 181-185 ; IVIuhammadan, Hindu 
influence, 125-126; its special cha- 
racteristics in Jaunpur (Sharkr, 184- 
185, Malwa, 1S5-18S, Bengal, 188- 
193, Gulbarga and I3idar, 193-195, 
Gujarat, 195-196, Bijapur, 196-198; 
Mughal Saracenic, 19S-200; later and 
modern, 200-201 ; bibliography, 201- 
205; Rajput, 315-316. 

Local notices : (i) Brahmanical : 
Hyderabad State, xiii. 243. (2, Buddh- 
ist : Hyderabad State, xiii. 243. (3) 
Chalukyan (eleventh and twelfth cen- 
turies' ; in Hassan District, Mysore, xiii. 
64. (4; Dravidian: Madras Presidency, 
xvi. 256 ; Mysore State, xviii. 18S. (5) 
Gondi: CentralProvinces,x.i9 ; Chanda, 
x. 150. (6) Hinayana style: at Bedsa, 
Boona District, vii. 141. (7) Hindu: 
Gupta temple at Afsar, Gaya District, 
V. 69 ; Agra, v. 76, 86 ; Ahmadabad, v. 
107, loS; Badanii, Bijapur District, n. 
1 77; in Gadarmal temple at Baro,Central 
India, vii. 24; Baroda, vii. 41 ; Barwani, 
Central India, vii. 93 ; Bengal, vii. 235 ; 
Broach, ix. 21 ; Dabhoi, Baroda, xi. 99- 
100 ; palace of Bir Singh Deo, Datia, 
Central India, xi. 199 ; Dhar, xi. 295 ; 
Halebid, Mysore, xiii. 11; Hyderabad 
State, xiii. 243 ; Konarak, Orissa, xv. 
392; Malabar, xvii. 58; Punjab, xx, 291. 
(8) Hindu-Saracenic modern style, in 
Lakshmi Vilas palace, Baroda, vii. 83. 



(9)Indo-Ar)'an : Mukhalingam,Ganjam, 
xviii. 18. ( 10) Jain : Ahmadabad, V. 107, 
108; Baroda, vii. 41; Broach, ix. 21 ; 
Conjeeveram, x. 377-378 ; Hyderabad 
State, xiii. 243; Punjab, xx. 291. (11) 
Muhammadan, including Pathan and 
Mughal: Agra, v. 76, 84-S8 ; Ahmad- 
abad, V. 96, 107, 108 ; Bengal, vii, 221- 
222; Berar, vii. 380; Broach, ix. 21; 
Central Provinces, x. 19 ; in Bhadar 
fort, Champaner,x. 136; Dabholmosque, 
Ratnagiri, xi. 100-101; Daulatabad,xi. 
201 ; mosque at Delhi, xi. 234 ; Dhar, xi. 
294; Hyderabad State, xiii. 243; Mala- 
bar, xvii. 58 ; Mysore State, xviii. 188. 
(12) Kashmir: temples at Katas, xv. 
ijO- C'o) I^^jpi^t : palace at Amber, V. 
290-291. 

Arconum, railway junction in Madras. See 
Arkonain. 

Arcot, North, District in Madras, v. 
403-419 ; physical aspects, 403-405 ; 
natural calamities, 405 ; history, 405- 
406 ; population, 407-409 ; agriculture, 
409-41 2 ; forests, 412-413 ; mines and 
minerals, 413 ; trade and communica- 
tions, 413-415 ; famine, 415; adminis- 
tration, 415-419; education, 417-418; 
medical, 418-419. 

Arcot, taluk in North Aroot District, 
Madras, v. 419, 

Arcot, historic town in North Arcot Dis- 
trict, Madras, v. 419-420; defence by 
Clive (1751). ii. 472. 

Arcot, South, District in Madras, v. 420- 
437; physical aspects, 420-423; natu- 
ral calamities, 422-423; history, 423- 
424; population, 425-426 ; agriculture, 
426-428; forests, 429-430; minerals, 
430 ; trade and communications, 430- 
432; famine, 432-433 ; administration, 
433-437 ; education, 436 ; medical, 

436-437- 
Ardhamagadhi, Prakrit dialect, spoken in 

early times in Oudh and Baghelkhand, 

i. 361, 369- 37°- 
Areca nuts, trade statistics, iii. 314. 
Areca- or betel-nut palms(/4;-^c"a Catechu), 

in Akalkot State, v. 178 ; Amherst, v. 

29S ; Ankola, North Kanara, v, 386; 

Arkalgud, Mysore, vi, 2; Assam, vi. 57; 

Atur, Salem, vi. 1 39 ; Backergunge, vi. 

170; Bombay Presidency, viii. 275; 

Burma, ix. 152 ; Challakere, Mysore, x. 

128; Chamrajnagar, Mysore, x. 147; 

Chiknayakanhalli, Mysore, x. 223; 

Cochin, X. 340, 346; Cooch Behar, x. 

3S0; Daulatkhan, Backergunge, xi. 201 ; 

Daulatpur, Ivhulna, xi. 201 ; Dharwar, 

xi. 309; Eastern DuarSjxi. 371; Goa,xii. 

261 ; Farldpur, xii. 54; Goalpara, xii. 

273; Goribidiiur, Mysore, xii. 343; 

Hanthawaddy, Burma, xiii. 31 ; Hassan, 



32 



INDEX 



Mysore, xii. 66; Jalpaigurl, xiv. 31-32, 
35 ; Janjira State, xiv. 59 ; Jessore, xiv. 
91 ; Kadur, Mysore, xiv. 266 ; Kalasa, 
Mysore, xiv. 299; Karlmganj, Sylhet, 
XV. 41 ; Karkala, South Kauara, xv. 44 ; 
Kasaragod, South Kanara, XV. 68; Khasi 
and Jaintia Hills, xv. 261 ; Khulna, xv, 
2S6, 2S9, 294 ; Kod, Dharwar, xv. 337 ; 
Kolaba, xv. 362 ; Koppa, Mysore, xv. 
398 ; Kumta, North Kanara, xvi. 23 ; 
Laccadive Islands, xvi. 86 ; Lakhimpur, 
xvi. 123 ; Malabar, xvii. 62 ; Malaisoh- 
mat, Khasi Hills, xvii. 72 ; Malgaon, 
Southern Maratha Country, xvii. 86 ; 
Mandya, Mysore, xvii. 17,^; Mangalore, 
xvii. 176; Maodon, Khasi Hills, xvii. 
204 ; Maolang, Khasi Hills, xvii. 204 ; 
Mergui, Burma, xvii. 300 ; Mongnai, 
Burma, xvii. 405 ; Mudgere, Mysore, 
xviii. 1 1 ; Murshidabad, xviii. 45 ; Alysore 
State, xviii. 210,216, 260; Nadia, xviii. 
373; Nagar, Mysore, xviii. 296; Nicobar 
Islands, xix. 61 ; Noakhali, xix. 1 29, 1 32 ; 
North Kanara, xiv. 347 ; Pegu, Burma, 
XX. 85 ; Pyapon, Burma, xxi. 5; Rangpur, 
xxi. 223; Ratnagiri, xxi. 252; Sagar, 
Mysore, xxi. 365 ; Salem, xxi. 400 ; Sal- 
wecH, Burma, xxi.4iS ; Sandur, Madras, 
xxii. 45 ; Sheila, Khasi Hills, xxii. 271 ; 
Shimoga, Mysore, xxii. 281, 287, 290; 
Sibsagar, xxii. 345,349; Siddapur. North 
Kanara, xxii. 356; Sirsi, North Kanara, 
xxiii. 47 ; Sorab, Mysore, xxiii. 88 ; South 
Kanara, xiv. 355, 362 ; Southern Shan 
States, xxii. 257; Tavoy, Burma, xxiii. 
263;Thaton, Burma, xxiii. 334 ; Tippera, 
xxiii. 38 [ ,384; Tirthahalli.Slysore, xxiii. 
391 ; Toungoo, Burma, xxiii. 427 ; Tra- 
vancore,xxiv. 5,10; Uppinangadi, South 
Kanara, xxiv. 285 ; Ycdatore, Mysore, 
xxiv. 417 ; Velandur, Mysore, xxiv. 419 ; 
Yellapur, North Kanara, xxiv. 420. 

Argaon, village and battle-field in Berar 
(1803), vi. I. 

Arghuns, rulers of Kandahar and Sin'd 
(1520-54), ii. 370 ; in Kachhi, xiv. 249; 
Karachi under (1521-1554), xv. 3; 
Multan taken (3527), xviii. 26; rule in 
Sukkur, xxiii. 120; .Sind, xxii. 396- 

397- 
Arguns, half-casles in Ladakh, xvi. 92. 

Arhai-din-ka-Jhonpra, mosque at Ajmer, 
V. 170. 

ArhariCajanus imlictis), pulse, cultivated 
in Ahmadnagar, v. 116; Akalkot, v. 
178; Azamgarh, vi. 158; Basti, vii. 127 ; 
Berar, vii. 383, 384-385 ; Belgaum, vii. 
151; Bhopal, viii. 134; Bijapur, viii. 
181 ; Central India, ix. 359-360 ; Cen- 
tral Provinces, x. 35, 36, 37 ; Chhind- 
wara, x. 209 ; Farrukhal)ad, xii. 67 ; 
Fyzabad, xii. 1 1 3 ; Garo Hills, xii. 1 78 ; 
GhazTpur, xii. 226; Gonda, xii. 3 14-315; 



Gwalior State, xii. 429 ; Hamlrpur, xiii. 
17 ; HardoT, xiii, 46 ; Hyderabad, xiii. 
251, 253, 254; Indore, xiii. 342 ; Jakiun, 
xiv. 22; Jaunpur, xiv. 78; Lingsugur, 
xvi. 164; Nasik, xviii. 404; Panch 
Mahals, xix. 385; Parbhani, xix. 412; 
Partabgarh, xx. iS; Poona, xx. 173; 
Rae Barell, xxi. 29; Rajpipla, xxi. 81 ; 
Rewa Kantha, xxi. 296 ; Satara, xxii. 
122 ; Savanur, xxii. 156 ; Sholapur, 
xxii. 300 ; Surat, xxiii. 159 ; Unao, xxiv. 
125; United Provinces, xxiv. 181. 

Arhat Parasnath, temples to, at Gohana, 
Rohtak District, xii. 305, 

Ari Singh II, Rana of Mewar (1761-73), 
xxiv, 91. 

Ariankavu, village, pass, and shrine in 
Travancore, vi. i, 

Ariyalur, subdivision in Trichinopoly 
District, Madras, vi. i. 

Ariyalur, town in Trichinopoly District, 
Madras, vi. 1-2 ; manufactures, iii. 211. 

Ariyalur stage, in geology of Coromandel 
coast, i, 78, 79. 

Arjun, Pandava brother. See Arjuna. 

Arjun, fifth Sikh Guru, Adi-Granth com- 
pleted by (1601), ii. 417; completed 
temple at Amritsar begun by Ram Das, 
V. 320, 328, XX. 270 ; founded Kartarpur, 
XV. 61 ; quarrelled with the impeiial 
governor of Lahore, and died a prisoner 
in that city (1606), v. 320, xvi. 108, 
XX. 270; shrine at Lahore, xvi. loS; 
founded Srigobindpur, xxiii. 97 ; said to 
have dug sacred tank at Tarn Taran, 
xxiii. 252. 

Arjun Pal, most of Karauli State retaken 
by(i 327), XV. 26; founded Karauli town, 
XV. 34. 

Arjun Singh, chief of Kotah State (1720- 
4), XV. 413, 

Arjun Singh, parga)ia of Amargarh as- 
signed for maintenance of, xxii, 24, 

Arjun Singh, Porahat, Raja (1857% xx, 
187, 

Arjun Singh, rule in Tori-Fateh pur (1880), 
xxiii. 420. 

Arjun Singh, Raja of Narsinghgarh (1896), 
xviii. 3S3. 

Arjuna, one of the Pandava brothers, Bha- 
gadatta killed by, vi. 24 ; legend of tlie 
source of the Banganga river, vi. 379 ; 
traditional founder of Karnal, xv. 58. 

Arjuna, throne of Northern India usurped 
by, on death of Harsha V648), ii. 301. 

Arjuna, Senapali, Thanesar taken by, 
xxiii. 305, 

' Arjuna's Penance,' bas-relief. Seven Pa- 
godas, xxii, 182-1S3. 

' Arjuna's Kath^ Seven Pagodas, xxii. 
185. 

Arkalgud, taluk of Hassan District, My- 
sore, vi. 2. 



INDEX 



33 



Arkavati, tributary of Cauvery, vi. 2-3. 

Ark-i-Nao, or ' new citadel,' Herat city, 
xiii. 114. 

Arkonam, town with railway junction, in 
North Arcot District, Madras, vi. 3. 

Annabal, ancient name of Bela, vii. 143. 

Armael, ancient name of Bela, vii. 143. 

Armag;on, early Ens^lish settlement in 
Nellore District, Madras, vi. 3. 

Armenians, tombs of, at Gaursamudram, 
Indur District, Hyderabad, xiii. 352. 

Arms, manufactured at Ajnigarh, v. 
131; lihutan, viii. 160; Grrhi Ikhtiar 
Khan, Bahawalpur State, \ii. 162 ; 
Hyderabad State, xiii. 264; Hyderabad, 
Sind, xiii. 317; Khairpur, xv. 216; Mon- 
ghyr, xvii. 397, 462 ; Nortli-West 
Frontier Province, xix. 183; Twenty- 
four Parganas, xxiv. 75. 

Arms, ammunition, &c., imports, iii. 308. 

Anns and ammunition factory, Kirkee, 
liombay, xv. 30S. 

Armugam, village in Madras. See Ar- 
magon. 

Armur, tahik in Nizamabad District, 
Hyderabad State, vi. 3. 

Armur, town in Nizamabad District, 
Hyderabad State, vi. 4. 

Army: vital statistics, i. 525-£;3o; com- 
parison of European and native troops 
as regards disease, i. 532-533 ; cholera 
statistics of troops in Bengal, i.533-534; 
Presidency army system abolished 
(1895), ii. 523; reform, under Lord 
Curzon, ii. 528-529; armies of Native 
States, iv. 85-87, 375-376; military 
law, iv. 141 ; expenditure, iv. 185-188, 
202, 377 ; Presidency armies under the 
Company, iv. 326-342; first beginnings, 
iv. 326-327 ; origin of the Presidency 
armies, iv. 327 ; Clive's reforms, iv. 327- 
328 ; extension of the Company's rule 
and concomitant development of the 
army, iv. 328-329; constitution of the 
Company's native armies at the end of 
the eighteenth century, iv. 329- 330; na- 
tive armies of the period , iv. 330-333 ; re- 
organization of the Presidency armies 
in I 796, iv. 333-335 ; further expansion, 
iv. 335; local mutinies ( I So6-24),iv. 335- 
336; reorganization of 1824, iv. 336- 
337; local corps, iv. 337-33S; strength 
of, on eve of the Mutiny, iv. 338 ; Mutiny 
of 1857 and its causes, iv. 338-342; 
armies of India under the Crown, iv. 
342-353; amalgamation of the Com- 
pany's European forces with those of the 
Crown, iv. 342-343 ; conditionsofservice 
of British troopsin India, iv. 343 ; charges 
for British troops paid in India, iv. 343- 
344; reorganization of native armies, iv. 
344-345; organization of theStaff Corps, 
iv. 345-346; ArmyCommissionof 1879, 

VOL. XXV. D 



iv. 347 ; reduction in number of native 
regiments and British batteries, iv. 347 ; 
other changes, iv. 347-348 ; increase of 
the British and Native armies (1S85-7), 
iv. 348-349; introduction of linked bat- 
talion and reserve systems in (lative army, 
iv. 349-350 ; constitution of Burma mili- 
tary police and Burma battalions of the 
Madras army, iv. 350-35 i ; constitution 
of Imperial Service troops, iv. 351 ; other 
changes, iv. 351-352 ; Military Works 
Service, iv. 35 1 ; departments of Adjutant- 
General and Quartermaster- General 
amalgamated, iv. 351 ; changes in native 
army, iv. 351-352; recruiting depots 
established, iv. 352 ; abolition of the 
separate Presidency armies, iv. 35 2-353 ; 
unification of the armies and present 
military organization, iv. 353-379 ; or- 
ganization of the old Presidency armies 
into four commands (now only two), iv. 
353-354; changes from 1895 to I903,iv. 
354-359; subsequent changes in the com- 
position of commands and regiments, 
iv. 354-355 ; amalgamation of medical 
services, iv. 355-356 ; withdrawal of 
regular troops from outlying frontier 
posts, iv. 356 ; additions to Staff Corps 
and change of name to Indian Army, iv. 
356 ; transport improvement, iv. 356 ; 
re-armament, iv. 356-357 ; increase in 
pay of British troops, iv. 357 ; reform in 
Artillery, iv. 357 ; other reforms, iv. 
357-358 ; separation of Burma from 
Madras command, iv. 358 ; improve- 
ment in health of troops, iv. 358 ; dis- 
tribution and strength (1903), iv. 358- 
359 ; new organization of main ami 
divisional commands, iv. 359-360; Army 
and Military Supply Departments, iv. 
360 ; former Military Department, iv. 
360 ; Supply and Transport corps, iv. 
361-362 ; Army Clothing department, 
iv. 362 ; Ordnance department, iv. 362 ; 
Military Accounts department, iv. 362- 
363 ; Medical Store department, iv. 363 ; 
Indian Medical Service, iv. 363 ; Re- 
mount department, iv. 363 ; Military 
Works Services, iv. 363-364; Army 
Head-quaiters, iv. 364; powers of the 
Commander-in-Chief, iv. 365 ; Lieu- 
tenant-Generals of commands, iv. 365; 
military districts, &c.,iv. 365-366; new 
organization by divisions and brigades, 
iv. 366-367 ; distribution of commands 
between British and Indian services, &c., 
iv. 367; training of officers, iv. 367-368 ; 
organization and strength of British 
regiments, i&c., iv. 368; composition of 
native army, iv. 368-369 ; organization 
of regiments, &c., iv. 369 ; powers of 
commanding officers, &c., iv. 370; pay 
and promotion of officers, iv. 370-371 ; 



34 



INDEX 



languages of native troops, iv. 371 ; 
difhciilty re supply of officers, iv. 371 ; 
pay and pension of native soldiers, iv. 
371-372 ; uniform and armament of 
native troops, iv. 372 ; auxiliary forces : 
volunteers, iv. 372-373, 380; Imperial 
Service troops, iv. 373-374, 380; Im- 
])erial Cadet Corps, iv. 374 ; frontier 
Militia, &c., iv. 374-375, 380 ; military 
police, iv. 375, 3S0 ; mobilization ar- 
rangements and special defence expen- 
diture, iv. 376-377; incidence of ex- 
penditure on Indian troops employed 
for Imperial purposes, iv. 377-378 ; 
bibliography, iv. 379 ; statistics, or- 
ganization, and distribution of the British 
and Native army and auxiliary forces 
(January, 1906), iv. 380; strength of 
British and Native regular troops, iv. 
381 ; Royal Indian Marine, iv. 382-383; 
military police, iv. 389. See also Ar- 
senals, Cantonments, European Army, 
a7id Native Army. 

Army boot and equipment factory,Cawn- 
pore, ix. 319. 

Army and ^Iilitary Supply Departments, 
iv. 28, 360. 

Arna Kali Devi, Rani, Berhampore San- 
skrit tol managed by estate of, viii. 2. 

Ami, subdivision in North Arcot District, 
Madras, vi. 4. 

Ami, tahsil in North Arcot District, 
Madras, vi. 4. 

Ami, town and former cantonment in 
North Arcot District, Madras, vi. 4 ; 
manufactures, iii. 202, 211. 

Arnoraja, Ciiauhan king (eleventh cen- 
tury), ii. 314. 

Aror, ruined town in Sukkur District, 
Sind, vi. 4-5. 

Aroras, trading and money-lending caste, 
in Amrilsar, v. 322 ; Attock, vi. 134 ; 
Bahawaipur State, vi. 198 ; Bannu, vi. 
396 ; Dora Ghuzi Khfm, xi. 252 ; Dera 
Ismail Khan, xi. 263; Ferozepore, xii. 
92 ; Gujranwala, xii. 357 ; Gujrat, xii. 
368 ; Ilazara, xiii. 78 ; Jhang, xiv. 12S ; 
Jhelum, xiv. 154; Kohat, xv. 345; 
Lahore, xvi. 99; Mianwali, xvii. 319; 
Montgomery, xvii. 412; Multan, xviii. 
29 ; Muzaffargarh, xviii. 78 ; North- 
West Frontier Province, xix. 166 ; 
Peshawar, xx. 117; Punjab, xx. 288; 
Rawalpindi, xxi. 266 ; Shahpur, xxii. 
216 ; Sialkot, xxii. 329. 

Arra river, tributary of Hingol, Baluchi- 
stan, xiii. 142. 

Arrack. Sec Intoxicating Liquors. 

Arrah, subdivision in Shahabad District, 
vi. 5. 

Arrah, town in Shahabad District, Bengal, 
bravely defended during the Mutiny 
(1857), vi. 5-6- 



Ar-Raji, Arab physician, iv. 457. 

Arras, battle-field. See Adas. 

Arrian, Greek historian, mention of 
Surasena, xxiii. 149 ; of Surat, xxiii. 
183 ; Taxila described by, xxi. 264. 

Arrow-heads, manufactured in Bhutan, 
viii. 160 ; Pakokku Chin Hills, Burma, 
X. 283. 

Arrowroot, found in Ganjam, xii. 149; 
Mandla, xvii. 166. 

Arrowsmith's maps, iv. 504. 

Arsakes, king of Pakhli in time of 
Alexander, xix. 318. 

Arsala Khan of Lalpura, revolt against 
Timur Shah {c. 1782), xvii. 386; exe- 
cuted (1791), xvii. 386. 

Arsalan Khan Sanjar-i-Chast, Uch and 
Multan bestowed on, xviii. 26. 

Arsenals: Bidar, Hyderabad, viii. 170; 
Cliitaldroog, Mysore, x. 297 ; Diu 
(Portuguese), xi. 363; Ferozepore, xii. 
98-99; Goa (Portuguese), xii. 267; 
Karachi, xv. 13 ; Narnala, Berar, xviii. 
379; Poona, XX. 184; Rawalpindi, 
xxi. 268, 273; Sind, xxii. 418. 

Arsenic, found in Ballistan, vi. 264 ; 
Garhwal, xii. 168. 

Arsikere,/^/?//' in Hassan District, Mysore, 
vi. 6-7. 

Arson, prevalent in GhazTpur, xv. 228 ; 
Gorakhpur, xii. 339; Kasegaon, Salara, 
XV. 69 ; Kurram Agency, xvi. 52 ; Noa- 
khali, xix. 133; Rangpur, xxi. 229. 

Art Colleges and Schools, iv. 438-439 ; 
Agartala, v. 71; Ahmadabad, v. 110; 
Backergunge, vi. 174; Bankura, vi. 
393 ; Bareilly, vii. 7, 12, 14 ; Burdwan, 
ix. 100, 103 ; Calcutta, ix. 2S4; Chitta- 
gong, xi. 316, 318; Comilla, x. 376; Cut- 
tack, xi. 97, 99 ; Dacca, xi. 115, 119 ; 
Daulatabad, xi. 201 ; Hill Tippera, xiii. 
122; Ilooghly, xiii. 170; Hyderabad, 
xiii. 294; Jaipur, xiii. 399, 401 ; Kathia- 
war, XV. 1S5 ; Khulna, xv. 293 ; Lahore, 
xvi. 105, 114; Madras, . xvi. 343, 3S4 ; 
Madura, xvi. 407 ; Nagpur, xviii. 317, 
320 ; Sialkot, xxii. 334, 336 ; Sylhet, 
xxiii. 200, 203; Tanjore, xxiii. 241, 
243 ; Tippera, xxiii. 3S7; Trichinopoly, 
xxiv. 42, 47-48. 

Art Industrial Mission in Tinnevelly, xxiii. 
368, 378. 

Artaxerxes, proclaimed king at Balkh 
after Parthian dynasty, vi. 248. 

Artichokes, grown in Rajpuiana, xxi. 121. 

Artillery park, at Ilowrah, xiii. 213. 

Arts and Manufactures, iii. 168-256; 
progress of India as a manufacturing 
country, 168 ; hand and steam factories, 
168; communities concerned in Indian 
arts and manufactures, 169 ; local dis- 
tribution of industries, 169-170; in- 
dustries derived from gums, resins, oleo- 



INDEX 



35 



resins, inspissated saps, &c., 171-177; 
cutch and gambier, 1 71-172; lac and lac 
turnery, 172-176; varnish and varnished 
wares. 176; gesso, 176; wax and its 
uses, 176-177; industries derived from 
oilseeds, oils, fats, and perfumeiy, 177- 
181 ; industries connected with dyes 
and tans, i8i-i88 ; decline of dyeing 
industry, 181-182 ; indigo, 182-183; 
safflower, 1S3; turmeric, 1S3; dl, 1S3- 
1S4; lac-dye, 184; myrabolams, 184; 
dyeing and calico-printing dye-works, 
184-185; plain dyeing, 185-1S6; 
calico-printing with wooden blocks, 
186; tie-dyeing, 186-1S7 ; ;naslu-fi, 
187 ; painting and waxing of calicoes, 
187-188; tinsel-printing, 188; in- 
dustrial products derived from the 
animal kingdom, 1S8-194; hides, 
skins, leather, and manufactures, 189 ; 
tanneries, 189-190; boot and shoe trade, 
190 ; artistic manufactures, 190-191 ; 
ivory, 191-192 ; ivory carving, 191- 
192; ivory turning, 192; ivory in- 
laying, 192 ; marquetry, ivory boxes, 
&c., 192-193 ; miniature painting, 193 ; 
horn, 193; bristles, 193; feathers, 193; 
coral, 193-194; shell industries, 194; 
fibres, textiles, and textile industries, 
194-222 ; classification of materials, 
194; foreign trade, 194-195; industrial 
interests, 195; cotton, 195-203; long- 
cloth and damasks, 196-197 ; muslins, 
201-202 ; twists and yarn, 202-203 ; 
piece-goods, 203 ; jute, 203-206 ; 
paper-making, 206 ; printing, 206 ; 
silk, 206-212; wool and pashm, 212- 
218; carpets, 214-217; shawls and 
chddars, 217-218; embroideries, 218- 
222 ; kincob borders, &c., 222 ; drugs 
(other than narcotics), medicines, and 
chemicals, 222-223 > edible substances 
(including narcotics) and the industries 
connected therewith, 223-226 ; agri- 
cultural interests, 223-224; industrial 
interests, 224; trade, 224-225; ice 
and aerated waters, 225 ; wine and 
spirits, 225; brewing, 226; milling, 
226; provisions, 226; timber and 
woodwork industries, 226-232 ; metals 
and minerals, and their associated 
industries, 232-246 ; village industries, 
234; coal, 234-235 ; gold mines, 235 ; 
petroleum, 235 ; iron, 235-236 ; salt, 
236; saltpetre, 236; borax, 236-237; 
brass and copper, 237 ; artistic indus- 
tries, iron and steel, 237 ; tinned metal, 
237 ; lac-coloured metal, 237-238 ; 
enamelling, 238-239 ; niello, 239; gold 
and silver plate, 239-240; damascened 
and encrusted wares, 240 ; copper and 
brass wares, 240-241 ; stone-carving, 
241-242 ; carving of small articles. 



242 ; lapidary work, 242-243 ; glass- 
ware, 243 ; inlaid stone- work, 243 ; 
pottery, 243-245 ; plaster of Paris and 
cement work, 245 ; glass mosaics, 245- 
246 ; Indian Factory Act, 246-247 ; 
statistics regarding occupations, 24S- 
25 1 ; bibliography, 252 ; trade in gums, 
resins, &c., 253 ; trade in oilseeds, oils, 
and perfumery, 253 ; trade in dyes and 
tans, 254 ; trade in animal products, 
254 ; trade in fibres, textiles, &c., 255 ; 
trade in edible substances, 255 ; trade in 
metals and minerals, 256. See also for 
each Province, mider Arts and Manu- 
factures, andlox each District and larger 
State tinder Trade. 

Ariiga, grown in Kanigiri, Nellore, xiv. 
400; Udayngiri, Nellore, xxiv. 108. 

Arumuga Mudaliyar, assisted East India 
Company in Nellore, xix. 10. 

Aruppukkottai, town in Madura District, 
Madras, vi. 7. 

Arvi, tahsTl in Wardha District, Central 
Provinces, vi. 7. 

Arvi, town in Wardha District, Central 
Provinces, vi. 7-8 ; special breed of 
cattle, iii. 79. 

Arya Naik Mudali, building at Madura, 
xvi. 405. 

Arya Samaj, modern Theistic sect, i. 429- 
430 ; population statistics, i. 473-474 ; 
followers of, or Aryas, in Agra, v. 76 ; 
Ahar, v. 93; Central Provinces, x. 27 ; 
Lahore, xvi, 98 ; Moradabad, xvii. 424, 
430; Punjab, XX. 290-291 ; Shahjahan- 
pur, xxii. 204, 216; United Provinces, 
xxiv. 172; orphanage maintained by, at 
Bareilly, vii. 14. 

Aryabhata, Sanskrit astronomer (b. 476), 
ii, 265-266. 

Aryalur, subdivision and town in Madras. 
See Ariyalur. 

Aryan geological era, i. 68-103. 

Aryan languages, i. 351-353. 

Aryan races, possible existence, physical 
characteristics, and original liabitat, i. 
299* 352 ; division into Indo- Aryans 
and Eranians, i. 353 ; migration by Jax- 
artes and (Jxus to Khokand and Badakh- 
shan, i. 353 ; invasion of the Deccan, xi. 
207, xiii. 235; supposed to have set- 
tled in Goa, xii. 25 1 ; Indraprastha sup- 
posed to have been founded by, xiii. 331. 

Aryan religion, i. 402 ; in Bijnor, viii. 
196; Bikaner, viii. 217; Bulandshahr, 
ix. 51; Meerut, xvii. 252, 257, 266; Mu- 
zaffarnagar, xviii. 87. 

Arya-sura, author of the Jdtaka-mdld, 
a Buddhist work, ii. 260. 

Aryo-Dravidian or Hindustani type of 
race, i. 347 ; ethnology, i. 294, 303-304. 

As Kaur, Maharani, regent of Patiala 
State, XX. 36. 



D 2 



36 



INDEX 



Asad All Khan, Saiyid, Mughal general, 
defeated by the Sikhs, xx. 133. 

Asad All Khan, Nawab of Basoda, some- 
time minister of Bhopal State, vii. 105. 

Asad Khan, Anur-ul-Umara, walls of 
Akola and the idgdli built by, v. i S9. 

Asad Khan, dargdh of, at Belgaum, vii. 

157- 

Asaditya, traditional fotmder of an ancient 
city in Rajputuna, v. 93. 

Asad-ullali Khan, resident at Agra, v. 91. 

Asad-ullah I'athan, saiiad for Birbhum 
gvnnlcd to, viii. 241. 

Asaf Jah, Nizam-ul-mulk, governor of 
the Deccan (1720-48;, relations with 
Mughal emperors, ii. 406-407 ; made 
terms with Marathas, ii. 406. 

Local notices: In Aurangabad, vi. 
149; Saiyid brothers defeated by (1720), 
near Balapur, vi. 234; struggle with 
Raghuji Bhonsla for supremacy in Berar, 
vii. 370 ; victory over Mubiiriz Khan, 
vii. 370, ix. 61, xii. 86; arrival in Deccan 
(1724), viii. 290; raised Musalman com- 
mandant at Broach to rank of Nawab 
(1736), ix. 31 ; in Buldana, ix. 61 ; 
Daulatabad in possession of, xi. 201 ; in 
Dhar, xi. 2S9 ; gave name to Fathkhelda, 
xii. 86; rule over Godavari, xii. 285 ; 
Gujarat ravaged by order of, xii. 352 ; 
dynasty of Nizams of Hyderabad 
founded by, vii. 370, xiii. 239 ; Mal- 
har Rao Holkar employed against 
(1738), xiii. 335; Khandesh annexed 
(1720), XV. 229 ; Khuldabad, xv. 285 ; 
governor of Malwa (i7i9\ xvii. 104; 
Moradabad ruled, xvii. 429 ; Nimar, 
xix. 108 ; surrender of Trichinopoly to, 
xxiv. 28. 

Asaf Khan, brother of Nur Jahan and 
father-in-law of Shah Jahan, Bandho- 
garh invested (1563), vi. 359; Damoh 
invaded (15641, xi. 136; tomb at 
Lahore, xvi. loS ; Mandla territories 
invaded and Chauragarh taken ('1564), 
xvii. 161, xviii. 387; founder of 
Miani, in Shahpur District, xvii. 316; 
Shahryar's rebellion quelled by, xx. 
269; Kampura seized by (1567), xxi. 
192 ; hold on Wun District, xxiv. 390. 

Asafnagar, ' crown ' tahik in Atraf-i-balda 
District, Hyderabad State, vi. 8. 

Asafoetida, found in Cliagai, Baluchistan, 
X. 117, itS; Kalat State, xiv. 302; 
Kashmir and Jammu, xv. 86 ; Kharan, 
Baluchistan, xv. 247. 

Asaf-ud-daula, Nawab of Ondh (1775- 
179S), (ihazTpurceded to British (1775), 
xii. 224; buildings at Lucknow, xvi. 
1S9, 195 ; bazar .at Mallkab.ad built by, 
xvii. 90 ; rule in Oudh, xix. 2S2-283. 

Asandi, village in Kadur District, Mysore, 
vi. 8, 



Asansol, subdivision in Burd'Aan District, 
Bengal, vi. 8. 

Asansol, town with railway junction, in 
Burdw.in District, Bengal, vi. 8-9. 

Asapuri, image of, in .Sri Ilingalaj temple 
atChaul, Bombay, x. 185. 

Asar Mahal, building at Bijapur, viii. 1S6, 

Asar Mir, Orakzai chief, xxiii. 389. 

Asar Mubarak, building at Bijapur, ii. 19S. 

As.aris, caste in Travancore State, xxiv. 9. 

AsarOr, ancient site in Gujranwiila District, 
Punjab, vi. 9. 

Asars'a, ancient well of Mata-Bhawani, 
near Ahmadabad, v. 108. 

Asbestos, iii. 154; found in Ajmer-Mer- 
warn, v. 1 54 ; Andamans, v. 356 ; Central 
India, ix. 367 ; Garhwal, xii. 16S ; Hin- 
dubagh, Baluchistan, xiii. 136; Jobat, 
Central India, xiv. 178-179; Mysore, 
xviii. 257 ; Toba-Kakar Range, Balu- 
cliistan, xxiii. 406; Vindhya Hills, xxiv. 
317 ; Zhob, Baluchistan, xxiv. 429, 432. 

Ashaval, ancient city, on site of Ahmad- 
abad, V. 106. 

Aslija-ul-mulk, Dlwan of the Deccan 
Sftbahs. See Ghayur Jang. 

Ashnagar, name given by Raverty for 
Hashtn.igar, xiii. 60, 

Ashrafpur-Kichhaunchha. See Kichhaun- 
chha. 

Ashta, town in Satara District, Bombay, 
vi. 10. 

Ashta, town in Bhopal State, Central 
India, vi. lo-ii. 

Ashta, village in Sholapur District, Bom- 
bay, with battle-field (1818), and large 
reservoir, vi. 10. 

Ashtagram, Division in Mysore, vi. 11. 

Ashtami, village in Kolaba District, Bom- 
bay, vi. II. 

Ashtanga-hridaya, Sanskrit medical work 
by Vagbliata the Elder, ii. 266. 

Ashti, town in Wardha District, Central 
Provinces, vi. 1 1. 

Ashti, town in Bhir District, Hyderabad 
State, vi. 11. 

Ashti, lake in Sholapur District, xxii. 
300-301. 

Ashur Khana, old building at Plyder- 
abad (1594), used for the Muharram, 
xiii. 309; building at Mudg.nl, Raichur 
District, also used for the Muharram, 
xviii. II. 

Asia, trade of India with other countries 
in, iii. 31 1, 312. 

Asiatic Steam Navigation Company, 
Ikngal, vii. 281 ; Burma, ix. 188-189; 
Chittagong, X.313; Tuticorin, xxiv. 66. 

Aslgarh, seal of king Sarvavarman found 
at, ii. 28. 

Asind, town in Rajputana, vi. 12. 

Asirgarh, historic hill- fort in Nimar Dis- 
trict, Central Provinces, vi. 12-13. 



INDEX 



37 



Asiwan, town in Unao District, United 
Provinces, vi. 13. 

Aska, tahsll in Ganjam District, Madras, 
vi. 13. 

Aska, village in Ganjam District, Madras, 
with sugar refinery and distillery, vi. 13. 

Aske-myin-anauk-myin, peak in Southern 
Shan States, xxii. 249. 

Askot, estate in Almora District, United 
Provinces, vi. 14. 

Asman Jah, Sir, minister of Hyderabad 
State (1888-93), xiii. 243; palace of, 
at Hyderabad, xiii. 310 ; rule in Paigah 
estates, xix. 314, 315, 316. 

Asmanjas, legend of, in connexion with 
the Ganges, xii. 135. 

Asmar boundary commission (1894), xix. 
160, xxiii. 186. 

AsnT, ruined fort near Jaunpur, United 
Provinces, xxiv. 426. 

Asni, Rani, mosque at Ahmadabad, v. loS. 

Asoka, king of Magadha or Bihar (272- 
231 i!.c.), history of, ii. 2S3-285; the 
Buddhist Constantine, i. 411 ; date ac- 
cording to epigraphy, ii. 16, 22, 23, 24 ; 
abdicated 2 2 7 B. C, and became Buddhist 
monk in cell of mountain Suvarnngiri, 
ii. 24 ;/. ; rock and pillar edicts, topics 
and objects of, ii. 35, 53-54; records 
of, in cave inscriptions at Barabar and 
Nagarjuni Hills, ii. 47, 57; stfipas, ii. 
Ill, 157, 158, 159; pillars, i. 109, ii. 
158-159; caves dedicated to Ajivika 
sect by, ii. 161 ; conquest of Kalinga 
(261 B.c.),ii. 283, vii. 209; conversion to 
Buddhism, ii. 53-54, 283-284, vii. 209 ; 
Buddhist propaganda, ii. 284-285 ; mis- 
sionaries sent out by, ii. 324-325. 

Local notices : Edicts and pillars of: 
Allahabad, ii. 35, 42, 43, 50,109, v. 
230, 237; Araraj, v. 399; Basarh, vii. 
94; Brahmagiri, ix. 8; Champaran, x. 
139; Chitaldroog, X. 290 ; Delhi, ii. 35, 
43, xi. 235; Dhauli, ii._4i, xi. 318; 
Girnar, ii. 41, 42; Hazara, xiii. 77; 
Jatinga Ramesvara, xiv. 72 ; Jaugada, 
ii. 41, xiv. 72-73; Jubbulpore, x. 12; 
Kalsl, ii. 41, xi. 212, 214; Lauriya- 
Naadangarh, ii. I09,xvi. 155-156; Man- 
sehra, ii. 41, xvii. 203 ; Mnthia, ii. 43 ; 
Pataliputra (Patna), ii. 109; Radhia, 
ii. 43 ; Rampuiwa, ii. 43 ; Rummindei, 
ii. 43, 54-55 ; Sanchi-Kanakheda, ii. 
159, 161; Sarnalh, ii. 109 n.; Shahbaz- 
garhi,ii. 41 ; Uzina Kyaikpadau pagoda, 
Amherst District, alleged to have been 
erected by, v. 295 ; empire of, viii. 279 ; 
temple erected at Buddh-Gaya, ix. 43 ; 
in Central India, ix. 335 ; Ganjam con- 
quered (260 B.C.), xii. 145; inscriptions 
at Giriiar, xii. 248; in Godavari,xii. 284 ; 
introduced Buddhism into valley of the 
Indus, xix. 149; inscription at Kalsi, 



xi. 212,214; sent missionaries to North 
Kanara, xiv. 342-343 ; inscription in 
Kathiawar, xv. 176-177; inscriptions 
at Kolhapur, xv. 387 ; pagoda at foot 
of Kyaukse hill, alleged to have been 
built by, xvi. 72, 82 ; Magadha domi- 
nion extended by, xvi. 408 ; missionaries 
sent to Maharashtra, xvi. 435 ; mission- 
aries sent to Mysore, xviii. 169, 253 ; 
conquest of Orissa, vii. 211, xix. 250; 
mention of Pandya, xix. 394 ; in Patna, 
XX. 67 ; sent missionariestothePetenikas, 
xix. 317; in Punjab, xx. 261; domi- 
nions extended to Rajputana, xxi. 93 ; 
inscriptions at Sasaram, xxii. 1 1 1 ; pago- 
das in Southern Shan States alleged to 
have been built by, xxii. 254; stftj^a at 
Siri-ki-pind built by, xxii. 201 ; Taxila 
taken by, xxii. 201 ; pagodas in neigh- 
bourhood of Toungoo over certain relics 
of Buddha alleged to have been built by, 
xxiii. 423 ; sent as viceroy toUjjain, xxiv. 
113; date of coronation, xxiv. 147-148. 

Assaji, disciple of Buddha, ii. 37. 

Assam, Province in North-East India 
(now part of Eastern Bengal and As- 
sam), vi. 14-119 ; physical aspects, 15- 
23; rivers, 15-16, 23; mountains, 17; 
geology, 1S-19; climate, 20-22; his- 
tory, 23-36 ; Chief Commissioners, 35 ; 
archaeological remains, 35-36 ; popula- 
tion, 36-53 ; sanitary conditions, 39- 
40; diseases, 40-41; marriage customs, 
41-42; languages, 43; religions, 44- 
49 ; dress, 50-51 ; burial customs, 52 ; 
festivals, 52 ; nomenclature, 52 ; agri- 
culture, 53-64 ; irrigation, 56, 60, 61 ; 
rents, wages, and prices, 64-66 ; forests, 
67-69; mines and minerals, 69-72; 
arts and manufactures, 72-75; com- 
merce and trade, 75-77 ; communica- 
tions, 77-82; administration, 81-84; 
legislation and justice, 84-86 ; finance 
and revenue, S6-95, 1 16 ; public works, 
97-98 ; army, 98-99 ; police and 
jails, 99-101; education, 101-105; 
medical, 105-107 ; surveys, 107- 
109; bibliography, loS. Tables : tem- 
perature, 110; monthly rainfall, no; 
distribution of population, in ; prices 
of food-grains, 112; agriculture, 112; 
rail and river-borne trade, 113 ; foreign 
land trade, 114; criminal and civil 
justice, 115; provincial revenue, 116; 
provincial expenditure, 116; income 
and expenditure of local boards, 117; 
income and expenditure of municipali- 
ties, 117; civil and military police, iiS; 
jails, 118; colleges, schools, and scho- 
lars, 119. 

Other refcycnces : Geology, i. 51, 74, 
92-93, 97 ; earthquake (1897),' i. 98, 
99; meteorology, i. 117, iiS, 123, 127, 



\8 



INDEX 



130, 136, 140, 141, 142; zoolOg>', i. 
219, 222, 224. 227, 228, 231, 234, 240, 

241, 242, 247, 250, 254, 258, 2-^(j, 260, 

261, 262, 265, 268, 273, 282 ; ethnology, 
i. 289, 291, 292, 294, 295 ; languages, i. 

359' 37'J-378> 387- 39°-394; Chuslians 
in, i. 444, 476; area and population, 
i. 450; density of population, i. 451, 
452; character of villages, i. 456; 
growth of population, i. 462 ; immigra- 
tion, i. 467; animism in, i. 472 ; Mu- 
hammadanism in, i. 474; sex statistics, 
i. 479; birth-rate statistics, i. 506, 510, 
511 ; mortality statistics, i. 512, 517, 
521, 531 ; coinage of Ahom dynasty, ii. 
149; king of, tributar}' to liarsha of 
Kanauj, ii. 299 ; Ahom literature, ii. 
438 ; ceded by treaty of Yandabu 
(1826), ii. 497 ; agriculture, iii. 3, 24, 

2*5, 45. 47. 49. 56, 58-63. 97. 100 ; 
forests, iii. 103, 105, 106, 113, 125; 
rubber plantation, iii. 118 ; coal-fields, 
iii. 136-137 ; petroleum springs, iii. 
139-140; minerals, iii. 148; number 
of live slock, and of ploughs and carts 
(1902-3), iii. 151 ;artsand manufactures, 
iii. 169; cultivation, iii. 184; factory 
statistics, iii. 247 ; trade, iii. 304 ; trade 
statistics, iii. 314; 315; postal and 
savings bank transactions (1903-4), iii. 
42^. 435; wages, iii. 469, 470, 472, 
473) 4/4 ; administration, iv. 29-30, 
32 ; statistics of Native States, iv. 103 ; 
legislation and justice, iv. 131, 150; 
land revenue, iv. 170, 192, 207, 208, 
210, 211-212, 239, 239; consump- 
tion of opium, iv. 244-247 ; opium 
excise, iv. 246-247; country spirits, 
iv. 255 ; hemp drugs, iv. 260, 261 ; 
income tax, iv. 270 ; land cess, iv. 271, 
272 ; nature of villages, iv. 279 ; mimi- 
cipal government, iv. 292, 293; local 
government, iv. 300-301 ; military 
police, iv. 375 ; education, iv. 416, 447 ; 
normal schools, iv. 443; medical, 477. 

Assam-Bengal Railway, ii. 79, iii. 370, 
388-389, 414,415. 

Assam Oil Company, Digboi works taken 
over by (1899), xi. 344. 

Assam Range, east and west between 
Ikahmaputra and Surma Valleys, vi. 
120. 

Assam Valley, Division in Eastern Bengal 
and Assam, vi. 1 20-1 21. 

Assamese: food, vi. 50; amusements, vi. 
52-53; names, vi. 53 ; clothing, vi. 66 ; 
commercial abilities of, displayed at 
linrjieta, vii. 85 ; on banks of Noa 
Dihing, xi. 346. 

Assamese language, i. 359, 364, 373, 378, 
398 ; spoken in Darrang, xi. 185 ; Kam- 
rOp, xiv. 333; Lakhini]nir, xvi. 122; 
Nowgong, xix. 224; SiLsagar, xxii. 348. 



Assamese literature, ii. 434. 

" Assassins," connexion of Mughlis in 

the Hindu Rush with, xiii. 13S. 
Assaye, battle-field (1S03) in Aurangabad 

District, Hyderabad State, vi. 121. 
Asses. See Donkeys, wild. 
AssI Khamba, building at Mahaban, 

Muttra District, xvi. 427. 
Assia, range of hills in Cuttack District, 

Bengal, vi. 121. 
Astes, chieftain of Pushkalavati at time 

of Alexander's invasion, x. 181. 
Asthanji, standard of the Rathors planted 

in Mallani (thirteenth centurj'), xvii. 

93- 
Astrachan, trade in, with Herat, xiii. 

114. 
Astronomy, enrly Hindu, ii. 265-266. 
Asura, rule of, in Assam, vi. 23. 
Asuri, dialect of the Rherwari language 

of the Munda family, i. 3S3. 
Asvaghosha, author o{ Bitddha-chanta,z. 

Sanskrit Life of Buddha (second cen- 
tury A. n.), ii. 260. 
Asvins, twin gods of the morning, in the 

Vedas, ii. 214. 
Aswa, mountain peak in Hazaribagh, Ben- 
gal, xiii. 85-86. 
Asylums. See Leper Asylums and Lunatic 

Asylums. 
Ata Muhammad, chief of Agror, on North- 

Wesl Frontier, v. 92. 
Ata Muhammad Rhan, owner of part of 

Tanawal, North-West Frontier, xxiii. 

219. 
Ata Ullah. 6V,? Ata-iid-dln. 
Atagada. See Rallikota and Atagada. 
Atak, District, tahsil, and town in Punjab. 

See Attock. 
Atakur, inscribed stone, ii. 58,59, 60. 
Atala Masjid (mosque), at Jaunpur, ii. 

1S4-1S5, xiv. 83. 
Atalik Ghazi \ akub Rhan, ruler of Rash- 
gar, commercial treaty with (1874), 

iv. 1 1 8. 
Atari, village in Multan District, Punjab, 

vi. 121. 
Atash l.ahram, fire temple at Navsari, 

Baroda, xviii. 425. 
Ata-ud-din, shrine at Devikot, Dinajpur 

District, xi. 276. 
Ata-ul-hakk, tomb at Pandua, Malda 

District, xix. 393. 
Athaide, Luis de, Portuguese viceroy 

(1568-71 and 157S-S1),' ii. 450-451; 

Goa settlement defended by (1570), 

xii. 252. 
Atharamura, hill range in Hill Tippera, 

Eastern Bengal, xiii. 117. 
Athai-va-vcda, the latest of the four Vedas, 

dealing with sorcery, i. 403, ii. 229. 
Athegyi, f|uarler in Bassein town, Burma, 

vii. 1 17. 



INDEX 



39 



Athgarh, tributary State in Orissa, Ben- 
gal, vi. 121. 
Athgarh, chief village in Athgarh State, 

vi. 12 2. 

Athin Khaya, made himself independent 
of Shan kingdom of Pinya (1315), 
xxi. 365. 

Ath-khamba, remains of temple atGyaras- 
pur, Central India, xiii. i. 

Athmallik, tributary State in Orissa, 
Bengal, vi. 122. 

Athni, taluka in Belgaum District, Bom- 
bay, vi. 123. 

Athni, town in Belgaum District, Bombay, 
vi. 123. 

Athpadi. See Atpadi. 

Atkinson, Major, Oktama driven from 
Salin in Burma by (1886), xxi. 409. 

Atmakur State, ^d-^ Amarchinta. 

Atmakur, subdivision in Nellore District, 
Madras, vi. 124. 

Atmakur, tdltik in Nellore District, 
Madras, vi. 1 24. 

Atpadi, village in Aundh State, Bombay, 
vi. 124. 

Atraf-i-balda, District in Hyderabad 
State, vi. 1 25- 1 2 S ; physical aspects, 1 2 5- 
126; history, 126; population statis- 
tics, 126-127 ; agriculture, 127 ; forests, 
127; trade and communications, 12S; 
famine, 128 ; administration, 128-130. 

Atranji Khera, identified witli Pi-lo-shan- 
na visited by Iliuen Tsiang (seventh cen- 
tury), xii. 31. 

Atrauli, tahsll in AlTgarh District, United 
Provinces, vi. 130. 

Atrauli, town in AlTgarh District, United 
Provinces, vi. 1 30. 

Attapadi valley, tract in Malabar District, 
Madras, vi. 131. 

Attigundi, Mysore, tomb of Baba Budan 
at, vi. 164. 

Attingal, village in Travancore State, vi. 

131- 

Attock, District in Punjab, vi. 131-138; 
physical aspects, 131-132 ; history, 
133; population, 133; agriculture, 
134-135; forests, 135 ; manufactures, 
135; trade and communications, 136; 
administration, 136-137. 

Attock, iahsil in Punjab, vi. 137-138. 

Attock, fort in Punjab, at the historic 
passage across the Indus, vi. 13S. 

Alumashi, Buddhist monastery at Manda- 
lay, xvii. 143. 

Atur, tdltik in Salem District, Madras, vi. 

138-139- 
Atur, town in Salem District, Madras. 

vi. 139. 
Atyngrapura. ^«?^ Agror. 
Auckland High School for girls, Simla, 

xxii. 385. 
Auckland, Lord, GoYemor-General (1836- 



42), ii, 499-501 ; in United Provinces 

(1838-40), xxiv. 219. 
Audich Brahmans, in Kathiawar, xv. 177 

Rewa Kantha, xxi. 295. 
Augar, British cantonment in Central 

India. See Agar. 
Augustas, Nossa Senhorades, imageof, at 

Dahanu, Bombay, xi. 122. 
Augusto, Dom, sent to quell rebellion in 

Goa (1S71), xii. 257. 
Augustus, Roman emperor, embassy sent 

to, by Indian king, xix. 394. 
Aundah, village with temple in Parbhani 

District, Hyderabad State, xiii. 143. 
Aundh, Native State in Bombay. See 

Satara Agency. 
Aungier, Gerald, President of Surat and 

Governor of Bombay (1669-77), ii. 

459 ; founder of Bombay City, viii. 

404-. 

Auniati, village in Sibsagar District, As- 
sam, vi. 139. 

Auiad, former tdhik in Bidar District, 
Hyderabad State. Sec Karamungi. 

Auraiya, /rt//^/'/ in Etawah District, United 
Provinces, vi. 139-140. 

Auraiya, town in Etawah District, United 
Provinces, vi. I40. 

Aurangat ad, Division in Hydeiabad State, 
vi. 140-141. 

Aurangabad, District in Hyderabad State, 
vi. 141-14S; physical aspects, 141-142; 
history, 142-143; population, 143; 
agriculture, 144-145; forests, 145; 
minerals, 145 ; trade and communi- 
cations, 145-146; famine, 146; ad- 
ministration, 146-148. 

Aurangabad, tdluk in Hyderabad State, 
vi. 148. 

Aurangabad, city in Hyderabad State, 
capital of Deccan under Aurangzeb, 
vi. 148-150 ; arts and manufactures, 
iii. 193, 210, 217, 218, 222, vi. 145, 
149. 

Aurangabad, subdivision in Gaya District, 
Bengal, vi. 150. 

Aurangabad, town in Gaya District, 
Bengal, vi. 150. 

Aurangabad Saiyid, town in Bulandshahr 
District, United Provinces, vi. 150. 

Aurangabad Spinning and Manufacturing 
Company, Hyderabad State, xiii. 264. 

Aurangzeb (Alamglr I), Mughal emperor 
(165S-1707), ii. 401-404,413; coins 
of, ii. 147-148; Bidar taken (1656), 
ii. 194; architecture of, ii. 200; attack 
on Bijapur (i6S6\ ii. 387; attempted 
to undermine Kutb Shahi dynasty of 
Golconda, ii. 390; struggle for Mughal 
throne, ii. 401 ; besieged in Balkh, ii. 
401 ; contest with the Marathas, ii. 
446; submission of English in India to 
(1690), ii. 460 ; embassy of Sir William 



40 



INDEX 



Norris to court of (1699-1702), ii. 462 ; 
declipie of Mughal empire under, iv. 5, 
70; revenue statistics, iv. 23S; wars, iv. 
69 ; mints, iv. 514. 

Local notices • General sent to take 
Adoni, V. 25; rule in Agra, v. 83; 
Agra palace built by (16S5), v. 85 ; 
burial-place of heart and viscera in 
Ahmadnagar, V. 125; death at Ahmad- 
nagar (1707), vi. 149; defeated his 
brother Dara near Ajmer, v. 142 ; 
mosques built at Ajodhya, v. 176; said 
to liave presented a footstool to temple 
of Alam Prabhu in Kolhapur State on 
occasion of a visit, v. 253 ; Govind 
Singh defeated at Anasdpur, v. 335 ; 
adopted kamil land settlement in 
Anantapnr, v. 346; annexed Antur in 
Hyderabad State, v. 387 ; power of 
Arakan crushed by viceroy of, v. 391 ; 
rule at Aurangabad, vl. 141, 149-^ war 
with English in Balasore, vi. 246; in 
]ialkh, vi. 248 ; Bellary annexed, vii. 
161 ; mosque at Benares, vii. 190, 191 ; 
in Berar, vii. 369 ; Bidar besieged and 
taken, viii. 165, 170; Bijapur taken 
(i6S6j, vii. 148, viii. 1S7; encamped 
at 15ralimapuri (1695), ix. 10; Broach 
fortifications destroyed and rebuilt, ix. 
30, 31 ; Rao Raja Chhatarsal of Bundi 
killed in fighting against (1658), ix. 
So ; Chakan fort restored to Sivajl 
(1667), X. 122 ; Chandor taken ^1665), 
X. 166 ; Chandravati said to have been 
destroyed in time of, xiv. 123; Abdul 
Hasan imprisoned in Chini Mahal 
(16S7), xi. 201 ; Conjeeveram taken by 
army of, x. 377 ; Cuddapah overrun by 
(1688), xi. 60; officer sent to Debl 
Patan by, who slew priests, broke 
images, &c., xi. 205 ; appointed viceroy 
of Deccan, vi. 149 ; attempted con- 
quest of Deccan (1684), viii. 2S9; 
Jaswant Singh defeated at Dharmatpur 
(165S), ix. 340 ; Dharwar fori captured 
(1685), xi. 316; DIpalpur under, xi. 
359 > sarai at Dohad restored by order 
of, xi. 366-367 ; Elgandal annexed 
to Delhi empire, xii. 6 ; mosque built 
at Elgandal, xii. 6 ; Shuja defeated 
in Fatchpur District (1659), xii. 77 ; 
Giilna taken (1705,1, xii. 125; Ganjam 
under (1687), xii. 145 ; Sulaiman 
Shikoh delivered up to, by Raja 
rirthi Shah, xii. 166; Golconda rule 
in Godavari overthrown by (1687), xii. 
285 ; Gola shrine endowed by, after 
failure of attempt to destroy liugam, xii. 
308; Golconda taken (1687), -"^'i- 309) 
xiii. 239; Gulbarga under, xii. 377; 
Aundah temple destroyed by, xiii. 143 ; 
invasion of Hyderabad (1655), -"^i"- 
239; Mecca mosque at Hyderabad, 



completed by, xiii. 309 ; Indur annexed 
by, xiii. 352 ; said to have visited Jalna, 
xiv. 29; invested Kalyain (1656^, xiv. 
324; Kimala recaptured, xv. 59; visit 
to Kashmir, xv. 93 ; effect of death of, 
on histoi7 of Katehr (Rohilkhand), 
vii. 4; Khandesh ravaged, xv. 229; 
tomb at Khuldabad, near Aurangabad, 
xv. 285; Kistna under (1687), xv. 
321 ; Kondapalli surrendered to troops 
of (16S7), XV. 393 ; buildings at Lahore, 
xvi. no, 112; mosque built at Luck- 
now, xvi. 195 ; Madras threatened by 
(1687, xvi. 369; Mandalgarh taken by 
(i68o), and made over to Jujhar Singh 
(1700), xvii. 149; war with Jaswant 
.Singh, of Marwar, xiv. 184-1S5; treaty 
with Jai Singh of Mewar (1681), xxiv. 
90-91 ; mosque at Multan, xviii. 
36-37 ; visited Muttra and changed 
name to Islamabad (1669-70), xviii. 
73 ; mosque at Muttra (1669), xviii. 
73 ; Nalgonda taken h^, xviii. 339 ; 
mosque at Narnala built by, xviii. 
379; in Nimar, xix. 118; Ban- 
davgarh fort surrendered to officers of 
(1701), xix. 3S9 ; Parcnda fort reduced 
by, XX. I ; Parli fort renamed Naura- 
stara by, xx. 5 ; in Peshawar, xix. 153, 
XX. n6; Poona restored to Sivajl by 
(1667), XX. 182; in the Punjab, xx. 
269-276 ; took Raigarh (1690), xxi. 
48 ; in Riijputana, xxi. 98 ; Sambhal 
included in territory of Katehr, xxi. 
306; capture of Salara, xxii. 119; 
revenue system in Satara, xxii. 126- 
127 ; Bharat Singh of Shahpura given 
title of Raja by, xxii. 223; Sinhgarh 
besieged (1703), xxiii. 13; invasion of 
Southern India (16S6), xvi. 250; 
brought up at Sultanpur, xxiii. 138; 
Tlianesar shrine desecrated, xxiii. 
305 ; buildings destroyed in Udaipur 
State, Rajputilna, xxiv. 90; defeated 
Jaswant Singh at Ujjain (1658), 
xxiv. it4; rule in Hindustan (United 
Provinces), xxiv. 153 ; occupied factory 
at Vizagapatam (1689), xxiv. 337. 

Auriferous sand, Bilaspur, viii. 228; 
Madura, xvi. 397. 

Ansa, taluk and town in Hyderabad. Set 
Owsa. 

Ausalas, smiths, in Elgandal, Hyderabad, 
xii. 7 ; Nalgonda, Hyderabad District, 
xviii. 340. 

Australasia, trade of India with, iii. 311. 

Austrian scientific cxpedilion to the 
Nicobars, xix. 64. 

D'Auteuil, Ercnch under, tried to take 
Trichinopoly (1756), xxiv. 29. 

Auveiyar, Tamil poetess, ii. 435. 

Ava, old capital in Upper Burmn, vi. 
151-152- 



INDEX 



41 



Av.ichar, petty State in the Dangs, Bom- 
bay, vi. 152, xi. I47i._ 

Avadhendra Singh, Kaja Bahadur, chief 
of Kolhi (1895), xvi. 2. 

Avalanche Peak, in the Kundahs, Nllgiri 
District, xvi. 25. 

Avalanches, in Gilgit, xii. 242. 

Avalapalle Drug, peak in North Arcot 
District, Madras, v. 403. 

Avalokita, Buddha's Bodhi-Satwa or son, 
xix. 43. 

Avani, sacred village and hill in Kolar 
District, Mysore, vi. 152. 

AvantT, Apabhramsa formerly spoken in 
Ujjain, the parent of modern Rajasthani, 
i. 362. 

Avanti, old name of Ujjain in Central 
India, vi. 152, xvii. 101. 

Avasgarh, former name of Barwani State, 
Central India, vi. 152. 

Avati, village in Bangalore District, My- 
sore, vi. 152-153. 

Avdhut Singh, rule in Rewah (1700-55), 
xxi. 282. 

Avitabile, General, governor of Pesha- 
war under Ranjit Singh, xx. 116, 125 ; 
head-quarters at Wazirabad, xxiv. 378. 

Avlingva, math at Shirhatti, Southern 
Maratha Country, Bombay, xxii. 292. 

Awa, estate in United Provinces, vi. 153. 

Awadhi, dialect of Eastern Hindi spoken 
in Oudh, i. 370 ; Bahraich, vi. 208 ; Bara 
Banki, vi. 420 ; Central India, ix. 351 ; 
Champaran, x. 140; Gaya, xii. 200; 
Oudh, xix. 286; Partabgarh, XX.17 ; Rae 
Bareli, xxi. 28; Saran, xxii. 87 ; Shah- 
abad, xxii. 190; Sitapur, xxiii. 56; 
.Sullanpur, xxiii. 132 ; Unao, xxiv. 125. 

Awadhia Kurmis, agricultural tribe in 
Bihar, i. 322. 

Awan Maliks, rule in Kalabagh, Punjab, 
xiv. 290. 

Awankari dialect, spoken in Punjab, xx. 
286. 

Awans, agricultural tribe in Punjab : 
Attock, vi. 133-134; Banmi, vi. 396; 
Dera Ismail Khan, xi. 263 ; Gujrat, xii. 
368 ; Hazara, xiii. 78 ; Hoshiarpur, xiii. 
106; Jhelum, xiv. 152,154; JuUundur, 
xiv. 226; Kohat, xv. 345; Mianwali, 
xvii. 318-319; North- West Frontier 
Province, xix. 166 ; Peshawar, xx. 117 , 
Punjab, XX. 2 88 ; Rawalpindi, xxi. 266 ; 
Shahpur, xxii. 216; Sialkot, xxii. 329. 

Axe-heads and axes, manufacture of: 
Chittagong Hill Tracts, x. 322 ; Pala- 
mau, xix. 342 ; Sylhet, xxiii. 196. 

Ayarpatha, peak in NainI Tal District, 
United Provinces, xviii. 333. 

Ayaz, Malik, Lahore left in charge of 
(1042), xvi. 106. 

Ayaz Khan, of Godhpur. See Muhammad 
Ayaz Khan. 



Ayiri, artisan caste in Coorg, xi. 28. 
Ayodhia Kurmis. See Awadhia Kurmis. 
Ayodhya, town in the United Provinces. 

See Ajodhya. 
Ayogava, son of a Sudra by a Kshattriya 

woman, i. 333. 
Ayub Khan, of Afghanistan, captured 

Knndahar, ii. 519; rout of, by Lord 

Roberts, ii. 519. 
Ayudha Puja, festival in Madras, xvi. 266. 
Ayyampettai, town in Tanjore District, 

Madras, with weaving industry, vi. 153 ; 

manufactures, iii. 211, 216. 
Ayyankere, artificial lake in Mysore, vi. 

154- 
Ayyas, Lingayat priests in Belgaum, vii. 

149; Bijapur,viii.i79; Dharwar,xi.3o7. 
Azad Khan, chief of Kharan, Baluchistan, 

XV. 248. 
Azad Khan, rebelled against Timur 

Shah, xix. 319. 
Azam Ali Khan, revenue manager in 

Nalgonda District, Hyderabad (1840), 

xviii. 343. 
Azam, Ghiyas-ud-dln, king of East Ben- 
gal (13S9), vii. 216. 
Azam Humayun, Mahmud, Khalji. See 

Mahmud II, king of Malwa (15 11-31). 
;\.zam Khan, tomb at Ahmadabad, v. 108 ; 

built fort of Shahapur (1640), xxi. 235. 
Azam Khan, Azamgarh town founded by 

(1665), vi. 162. 
Azam Shah, son of Aurangzeb, defeated 

and slain (1707), ii. 404 ; tomb at 

Khuldabad, xv. 285 ; born at Tirawari, 

xxiii. 390; killed in battle at Jajan, 

xxiv. 153. 
Azamabad-i-Talawari, village in the Pun- 
jab. See Tirawari. 
Azamgarh, District in United Provinces, 

vi. 154-162 ; physical aspects, 154- 

155; history, 155-156; population, 

156-157 ; agriculture, I57-I59; trade 

and communications, 159 ; famine, 160 ; 

administration, 160-162. 
Azamgarh, tahsil in United Provinces, 

vi. 162. 
Azamgarh, town in United Provinces, 

vi. 162 ; arts and manufactures, iii. 210, 

211, 244. 
Azim, grandson of Aurangzeb, governor 

of Patna, xx. 68. 
AzIm Khan, palace at Ahmadabad, v. 108. 
AzTm Khan, governor of Bengal, subject 

to Delhi (1582), vii. 217. 
Azim Khan, governor of Bengal, subject 

to Delhi (1632), vii. 217. 
Azim Khan, Sardar, Nawab Khan killed 

by, at Tanawal (1818), xxiii. 219. 
Azim Khan, Kandahar under (1S67), xiv. 

.^76. 
Azim Shah, Ghiyas-ud-din (1390-7), 

alleged tomb of, at Pandua, ii. 190. 



42 



INDEX 



AzTmabad. See Patna city. 

AzTmganj, town in Mnrshidabad District, 

Bengal, with Jain merchants, vi. 163. 
AzTm-ud-daula, Xawab of the Camatic, 

North and South Arcot ceded to the 

British by, in full sovereignty (1801), 

V. 406, 424 ; Nellore ceded, xix. 10. 
Azim-iish -shan, contest for Mughal 

throne and death of, ii. 405 ; governor 

of Bengal, subject to Delhi (1697), vii. 

217; defeated and drowned near Lahore, 

xvi. no. 
Aziz Himar, Dhar under, xi. 295. 
Azmeriganj, trade centre in Assam. See 

Ajmiriganj. 
Azz-ud-din, Farrukhsiyar defeated by 

(1712), xii. 77, XV. 220. 

B. 

Baba Atl, seven-storeyed tower at Am- 
ritsar, v. 329. 

Baba Budan mountains, in Mysore, vi. 
163, xiv. 262. 

Baba Sahib, chief of Nargund. See Bh.as- 
kar Rao. 

Baba-Budan-giri, peak in Baba Budan 
mountains, Mjsore, xiv. 262. 

Babar, Barlas Turk, Mughal emperor 
(1526-1530), history ofj ii. 394-39.^' 
413; Ibrahim defeated by (1526), ii. 
145 ; campaigns, ii. 367. 

Local notices : In Afghanistan, v. 
36 ; made Agra his capital and died 
there, v. 82, 83 ; mosque built .nt 
Ajodhya, v. 176 ; Allahabad wrested 
from Pathans (1529), v. 229; Badakh- 
slian given to his son, vi. 175; 
Baniir mentioned in memoirs, vi. 414; 
remarks on Bangash river, vi. 398 ; 
held libera to ransom (1519), viii. 100 ; 
fort of Bijaigarh mentioned by, vii. 
137; Rudra Pratap recognized by in 
Bundelkhand, xiv. 137 ; attack . on 
Chanderi, X. 163 ; entered Delhi (1526), 
xi. 235; Miranis submitted to, xi. 
270; IJholpur surrendered to (1526), 
xi. 332; DTpalpur stormed, xi. 359; 
Etawah conquered, xii. 39; visit to 
Fyzabad, xii. in; Ghazlpur conquered, 
xii. 223; Gwalior fort taken (1526), 
and visited (1529), xii. 440, 443; 
Afghans expelled from IlarduT, xiii. 
44 ; invasion of Jaswan Dun in Ilosliiar- 
pur, xiii. 194 ; raid into India and 
control of valley of Indus, xix. 151-1-; 2 ; 
Gakhar chieftains loyal to, ia Jhelum, 
xiv. 152 ; made himself master of 
Kabul (1504), xiv. 243; tomb and 
mosque at Kabul, v. 45, xiv. 244 ; 
bridge at Kabul built by, xiv. 246 ; in 
KalpI, xiv. 318; Kandahar recovered 
(1512), xiv. 376; battle of Khanua, 
vii. 19, XV. 245, xxi. 96 ; Khyber 



Pass traversed, xv. 300 ; Kohat raided 
(1505), XV. 343 ; Lahore plundered 
by troops of (1524), xvi. 107; Luck- 
now taken (1528), xvi. 1S9 ; Malot 
surrendered to (1526), xvii. 94 ; Mewar 
invaded, xxiv. 89 ; Multan handed 
over to (1528), xviii. 25, 26, 36 ; in 
Oudh, xix. 279-280; defeat of Ibrahim 
LodI at Panipat (1526), xiv, 75i '^i'^- 
397, XX. 267-268, xxiv. 151 ; Peshawar 
invaded (15 19), XX. 115; Ranthambhor 
made over to (152S), xxi. 235-236; 
conferred the Potwar country on Sultan 
Sarang, xxi, 264 ; marched across Sa- 
haranpur (1526), xxi. 369; Humayun 
appointed governor of Sambhal, xxii. 
18; rule over Swat, xxiii. 184. 

Babariadhar, hill in Kathiawar, crowned 
by stone fort, xxi. 168. 

Babarkhana, ruins in Rawalpindi District, 
identified with site of Taxila, xxii. 201. 

Babars, division of the Jats in Upper 
Sind Frontier District, xxiv. 280. 

BahayycLsdar^a/i, at Penukonda, Madras, 
XX. 105. 

Baberu, ta/isti in Banda District, United 
Provinces, vi. 164. 

Babhans, military Jirahmans, i. 498 ; in 
Bihar, \ii. 233; Chaniparan, x. 140; 
Darbhanga, xi. 155; Gaya, xii. 200; 
Monghyr, xvii. 395; Muzaffarpur, xviii. 
98; Patna, XX. 59; Saran,xxii. 87 ; Shah- 
abad, xxii. 190. See also Bhuinhars. 

Babhulna jiass, in Western Ghats, xii. 218. 

Babis, Gujarat ravaged by, xii. 352 ; rule 
in Kaira, xiv. 286 ; Radhanpur, xix. 348, 
xxi. 23 ; Tharad, xix. 348. 

Babra, petty State in Kathiawar, Bombay, 
vi. 164, XV. 165. 

Babu, Shaikh, shrine at Balapur, Berar, 
\i. 234. 

Babul trees {^Acacia arabica), Akola, v. 
185; Allgarh,v. 209; Allahabad, v. 228; 
Amraoti, v. 310 ; Anantapur, v. 338 ; 
Bardoli iiiltika, Surat, vi. 432 ; Baroda, 
vii. 52; Basim, vii. 96, ico ; Belgaum, 
vii. 152; Bharatpur, viii. 82; Blkaner, 
viii. 203 ; Bombay Presidency, viii, 
321; Bulandshahr, ix. 48; Buldana, 
ix. 60; Central India, ix. 331 ; Challa- 
kere, Mysore, x. 128; Cuddapah. xi. 
59; Cutch, xi. 77; Dharwar, xi. 304; 
Elgandal, Hyderabad, xii. 6 ; Ellichpur, 
xii. 1 1 ; Ktah, xii. 29 ; Etawah, xii. 38 ; 
Farrukliabad, xii. 63 ; Fatehpur, xii. 
76; Gayil, xii. 196; Gulbarga, Hyder- 
abad, xii. 376; Hyderabad, .Sind, xiii. 
312, 317 ; Indur, Hyderabad, xiii. 354 ; 
Jaipur, xiii. 391; Jalaun,xiv.i8; Jamner 
idliika. East Khandesh, xiv. 51; Jaun- 
pur, xiv. 73 ; Jessore, xiv. 91 ; Jodhpur, 
xiv. 180; Junagarh, xiv. 237; Kadur 
(dluk, Mysore, xiv. 269; KalpI, Jalaun, 



INDEX 



43 



xiv.319; Karachi, XV. 2,7; Karimnagar, 
Hyderabad, xv. 42; Kathiavvar, xv. 179; 
Khaiipur, xv. 213 ; Khandesh, xv. 235 ; 
on banksofKistna river, XV. 335; Kotah, 
XV. 418; Kudchi taliika, Belgaum, xvi. 
1 1; Larkana,xvi.i37; Lingsugur, Hyder- 
abad, xvi. 163; Mursliidabad, xviii. 45 ; 
Muttra, xviii. 63 ; Mysore, xviii. 252 ; 
Nalgonda, Hyderabad, xviii. 339; Nasik, 
xviii. 399; Osmanabad,H)-derabad, xix. 
269 ; Parbliain, Hyderabad, xix. 411 ; 
Partabgarh, xx. 1 1, 15; Poona, xx. 166; 
Punjab, XX. 309 ; Santal Parganas, xxii. 
63; SataraAz/w/J'^, xxii. 128; Sliahjalian- 
pur, xxii. 202 ; Shiahpiira chiefship, xxii. 
224; Sliolapur, xxii. 296, 301; Sind, 
xxii. 393; Sukkur, xxiii. 119, 123; Surat, 
xxiii. 153 ; Tasgaon talttka, Satara, xxiii. 
253 ; Thar and Parkar, xxiii. 307 ; 
Udaipur, xxiv. 96; Unao, xxiv. 123; 
Upper Sind Frontier District, xxiv. 2 78, 
282. 

Babulikhera, original name of Barwaha, 
Central India, vii, 90. 

Bachajl Duvaji, Idar State seized by, for 
Peshwa, xiii. 325. 

Bachan Pal, traditional founder of Gujrat, 
xii. 373. 

Bachgotis, clans of Rajputs in Partabgarh, 
XX. 17; Sultanpur, xxiii. 133. 

Bachha Raja, traditional founder of re- 
mains of town near Bachhon, Ctnlral 
India, v. 130. 

Bachhraon, town in United Provinces, 
Moradabad District, vi. 164-165. 

Backergunge, District in Eastern Bengal, 
vi. 165-174; physical aspects, 165-166; 
history, 167; population, 167-169; 
trade and communications, 170-171 ; 
administration, 171-174; revenue, 
173; education, 174; cyclone (1S76), 

i- 1.35- 
Bactrian Greek kingdom, coins of, ii. 

137-13^; ™le in India, viii. 279; 

overthrown by Parthians, xii. 365 ; in 

Rajputann, xxi. 94; in Shahpur, xxii. 

213; invaded Punjab {c. 200 B.C.), 

xxii. 394. 
Bada Talao (' great lake '), artificial lake 

at Champaner, Panch Mahals, x. 136. 
Badaga, dialect of Kanarese, i. 3S1 ; 

spoken in the Nilgiris, xix. 92. 
Badagara (North Bank), town in Malabar 

District, Madras, vi. 174. 
Badagas, tribe in the Nilgiris, xix. 92. 
Badakhshan, province of Afghanistan, vi. 

174-176. 
Badal-chshis, tribe in Badakhshan, vi. 175 ; 

Hindu Kush mountains, xiii. 138. 
Badal Mahal, building at Kumbhalgarh, 

Rajputana, xvi. 22. 
Badamgarh, peak in Bonai State, Bengal, 

vi. 176. 



Badami, tdltika in Bijapur District, 
Bombay, vi. 176. 

Badami, village with cave temples in 
Bijapur District, Bombay, vi. 176-177. 

Badan Singh, captured Thun, and was 
proclaimed Raja of Dig (1722), viii. 
75 ; palace and fort of Kumher built 
by (c. 1724), xvi. 22 ; proclaimed him- 
self leader of the Jats (1712), xviii. 64; 
distribution of possessions, xviii. 64 ; 
founded Wer, xxiv. 3S5. 

Badaneh Tal. See Bakhira Tal. 

Badarayana, the Brahiiia-si'ttra of, text- 
book of Vedanta \ hilosophy, ii. 254. 

Badarpur, village and railway junction in 
Sylliet District, Assam, vi. 177. 

Badat Sri, rule in Gilgit, xii. 239. 

Badausa, tahsil in Banda District, United 
Provinces, vi. 177-178. 

Badayun, District in United Provinces. 
See Budaun. 

BadayunT, historian, born at Budaun, ix. 
42, 

Baden-Powell, B. H., types of Indian 
villages, iv. 279-280; quoted concern- 
ing village officers and servants, iv. 280- 
281. 

Badgers, i. 222; Hyderabad, Sind, xiii. 
313; Kangra, xiv. 3S2 ; Moradabad, 
xvii. 421 ; Punjab, xx. 255. 

Badhaksor Bagris, criminal tribe in Cen- 
tral India, ix. 384. 

Badhantola, highest peak in Gagar range, 
Almora, xii. 121. 

Bndikayalipalle, tank in Madanapalle 
taluk, Cuddapah, xvi. 227. 

Badin, tdliika in Hyderabad District, 
Sind, vi. 178. 

Badin, village in Hyderabad District, 
Sind, vi. 178. 

Badnera, town in Amraoti District, Be- 
rar, vi. 178. 

Badni Sar, peak in Safed Koh range, 
Kurram Agency, xvi. 47-48. 

Badnor, town in Rajputana, vi. 178-179. 

Badnur, head-quarters of Betul District, 
Central Provinces, vi. 179. 

Badri Narayan, temple at Pushkar, Aj- 
mer, xxi. i. 

Badrihat, ruins in Murshidabad District, 
Bengal, vi. 179. 

Badrlnath, peak in Garhwal District, 
United Provinces, vi. 179-180. 

Badrpur. See Badarpur. 

Badr-ud-din. Sec Budhan, Baba. 

Badshah Mahal, hunting-seat erected by 
All Mardan Khan, xxi. 369. 

Badsliahpur, town in United Provinces. 
See Mungra-Badshahpur. 

Baduria, town in District of Twenty-four 

Parganas, Bengal, vi. 180. 
Badvel, taluk in Cuddapah District, 
Madras, vi. 180-iSi. 



44 



INDEX 



Badvel, town in Cuddapah District, 
Madras, vi. i8i. 

Baffa, town in Hazara District, North- 
west Frontier Province, vi. i8i. 

Baga caste. See Beda. 

Bafjalkot, idlitka in Bijapur District, 
Bombay, vi. i8i. 

Bagalkot, town in Bijapur District, Bom- 
bay, vi. 181-182. 

Bagar, tract in Hissar, xiii. 149-150. 

Bagasra, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, vi. 182, XV. 169. 

Bagasra, town in Kathiawar, Bombay, 
vi. 182. 

Bagdi, ancient name for South Bengal. 
See Bagri. 

Bagdis, semi-aboriginal tribe in Bengal, 
i. 328, 498, vii. 233; in Bankura, vi. 
3S6; Birbhum, viii. 243; Burdwan, 
ix. 94; Ilooghly, xiii. 165; Howrah, 
xiii. 208; Midnapore, xvii. 331-332; 
Murshidabad, xviii. 48; Nadia, iviii. 
276; Presidency Division, xx. 218; 
Twenty-four Parganas, xxiv. 73. 

BagepalH, tdhik in Kolar District, My- 
sore, vi. 1S2. 

P>ageshwar, village in Almora District, 
United Provinces, vi. 182, 

Bageshwara, temple at Arang, Central 
Provinces, v. 399. 

Bagevadi, village in IMjapur District, 
Bombay, vi. 1S3. 

Bilgh, village with Buddhist caves, in 
Central India, vi. 183-184; paintings 
found at, ii. 117. 

Bagh geological beds, i. 80, 86. 

Bagh Deo, tiger god of theGonds,xii. 325. 

Bagh Gumpha cave, Khandgnri, Orissa, 
XV. 240. 

Bagh Jahanara, Jhajjar, xiv. 108. 

Bagh Bahar, by Mir Amman, standard 
work in Urdu prose, ii, 429. 

Bagh Singh, Rajgarh founded by, in 
middle of second century, xxi. 71. 

Bagh Singh, Raja, possessor of Bagh, 
Central India, vi. 183. 

Baghal, Simla Hill State, Punjab, vi. 1S4. 

Baghat, Simla Hill State, Punjab, vi. 
184-185. 

Baghat, taluk in Medak District, Hyder- 
abad, vi. 185. 

Baghda tank, near Rajgarh, Rajputana, 
xxi. 71. 

Baghelas (Baghels or Vaghelas), Rajput 
clan, ii. 312, 318; in Ahmadabad, v. 
104 ; Anhilvada, v. 38 2 ; Baghelkhand, 
vi. 187 ; Bandhogarh, vi. 358-359; 
Dabhoi fortified by (thirteenth cen- 
tury), xi. 99; in Gujarat, xii. 350; 
Moradabad, xvii. 412; Panna fell to 
(thirteenth or fourteenth century), xix. 
403 ; P.itan in Gujarat under, xx. 24 ; 
in Radhanpur,xix. 348, xxi. 23; Rcwah, 



xxi. 280; Sohawal, xxiii. 70 ; Tharad, 
xix. 348 ; Wadhwan, xxiv. 346. 

BaghelT, dialect of Eastern Hindi, i. 370 ; 
spoken in Bilaspur, viii. 225; Bundel- 
khand, ix. 72 ; Central India, ix. 351 ; 
Central Provinces, x. 24 ; Hamirpur, 
xiii. 16; Jubbulpore, xiv. 209; Mandla, 
xvii. 163. 

Baghelkhand, tract forming part of Cen- 
tral India Agency, vi. 1 85-1 88; language, 
i- 369-370; pygmy flints found, ii. 92. 

Baghelkhand Agency, political charge in 
Central India, vi. 188-189; irrigation, 
iii. 324. 

Baghelkhand!, language of Eastern Hindi, 
spoken in Baraunda, vi. 431 ; Nagod 
State, xviii. 302 ; Sohawal, xxiii. 71. 

Baghels. See Baghelas. 

Bagherhat, subdivision in Khulna Dis- 
trict, Bengal, vi. 1S9. 

Bagherhat, village in Khulna District, 
Bengal, vi. 1 89- 190. 

Baghpat, tahsil in Meerut District, United 
Provinces, vi. 190. 

Baghpat, town in Meerut District, United 
Provinces, vi. 190. 

Baghsawar, Raja, fair at Yamnur, Bom- 
bay, held in honour of, xxiv. 412, 

B.iglan, historic tract in Bombay, vi. 190- 
192. 

Baglan, tdluka in Nasik District, Bombay, 
vi. 192. 

Bagll, thakiirdt in Malwa, Central India, 
vi. 192, xvii. 99. 

Bagni, village in Satara District, Bombay, 
vi. 192-193. 

Bas^ni palm, Shimoga, xxii. 281 ; Sorab, 
xxiii. 88. 

Bagor, head-quarters oi pargana in Raj- 
putana, vi. 193. 

Bagpur, former name of Multan, xviii. 35. 

Bagri, ancient division of Bengal, vii. 211. 

Bagri language, spoken in Ferozepore, 
xii. 92 ; Hissar, xiii. 148; Jaipur, xiii. 
389; jTnd, xiv. 170; Rajputana, xxi. 
111. 

Bagri Rajputs, in Seoni, xxii. 169. 

Bagru, town in Rajputana, vi. 193. 

Bags, manufactured at Jhalawan, Baluchi- 
stan, xiv. 112; Jaisalmer, xiv. 6; Kal.it, 
xiv. 302; Pilibhit, xx. 141 ; Thar and 
Parkar, xxiii. 313. 

Bagyidaw, Burman king ( 1 S 1 9-37), Amar- 
apura deserted by (1S22), v. 271 ; pa- 
goda near Amarapura built by, v, 272 ; 
Avamade capital (1822), vi. 152 ; rule 
in Burma, ix. 123-125. 

Bah, tahsil in Agra District, United Pro- 
vinces, vi. 193, 194. 

Bahadran, tahsil in Rajput.ana. See 
Bhadra. 

Bahadur, governor of Eastern Bengal 
(1324-30), vii. 216. 



INDEX 



45 



Bahadur, king of Bengal (1554), vii. 216. 

Bahadur, Faruqi king of Khandesh (1597^ 
9^, ii. 392, 393 ; sent to Gwalior by 
Akbar, xv. 229. 

Bahadur, Muin-ud-din Khan, rule in 
Paigah estates, Hyderabad, xix. 316. 

Bahadur Gilani, Bahmani governor of the 
Konkan, established head- quarters at 
Sankeshwar (14SS), xxii. 59. 

Bahadur Jang, Nawab, Dadri governed 
by (1857), xi. 121. 

Bahadur Khan, Afghan, joint founder of 
liahlolpur in Ludhiana, vi. 205. 

Bahadur Khan, governor of Bihar and 
Jaunpur, asserted independence (1526), 
xiv. 75. 

Bahadur Khan I, Nawab of Junagarh, 
said to have granted Jetpur to Vala 
Vira, xiv. loi. 

Bahadur Khan, Bahadurgavh given to 
(1754), vi. 194. 

Bahadur Khan, Bhattiana divided between 
Zabita Khan and (1803), viii. 92. 

Bahadur Khan, Babi, appointed /(7?(/(/ir7r 
of Tharad, xxi. 23. 

Bahadur Khan, Nawab, founder of Shah- 
jahanpur, xxii. 202 ; tomb and mosque 
at Shahjahanpur, xxii. 210. 

Bahadur Khanji, Dlwan, built wall round 
Palanpur, xix. 354. 

Bahadur Nahar, founder of the Khanzadas, 
xvii. 3i3._ 

Bahadur Nahir, Namaul in possession of 
(141 1), xviii. 380. 

Bahadur Shah, king of Gujarat (1526-37), 
ii. 377, 378; Bassein ceded to Portu- 
guese (1534), vii. 120; Bhilsa plun- 
dered (1532), viii. 106; Bombay ceded 
to Portuguese ([534), viii. 403 ; Chitor 
fort taken (1534), x. 299, xxiv.89 ; Por- 
tuguese allowed by, to occupy Diu, 
where he was killed, xi. 364, xv. 176; 
war with Humayun, xi. 364; Gagraun 
fort held by, xii. 122; rule over Gujarat, 
xii. 351 ; mausoleum at Halol built 
by, xiii. 12 ; Mahmud II of Malwa 
taken prisoner, xvii. 104; driven out 
of Malwa (1535), xvii. 104; Malwa 
annexed to Gujarat (1531), xvii, 172; 
defeated by Humayun near Mandasor 
(1535), xvii. 150, xxiv. 89; rule in 
Nimar, xix. 118. 
Bahadur Shah, Nizam Shahi king (1596- 
1600), ii. 389 ; placed on throne of 
Ahmadnngar under influence of his 
great-aunt, Chand Bibl, v. 123-124; 
Chakan fort granted to Maloji Bhonsla 
by, x. 122. 
Bahadur Shah, Mughal emperor, son and 
successor of Aurangzeb (1707-12), ii. 
404-405, 413, xxiv. 153; attacks on 
Bijapur, ii. 402, 403 ; imprisonment of 
(1687-94), ii. 403-404- 



Local notices ; Journey through Daur, 

when viceroy of Kabul (i7oo),xi. 202 ; 

marched to Lahore (1712), xvi. no; 

campaign against the Sikhs in the 

Punjab, XX. 271. 
Bahadur Shah, last nominal Mughal 

emperor (1837-57), transported after 

Mutiny to Rangoon, where he died 

(1862), ii_. 412, 413. 
BahadurShah, regent of Nepal (1786-95), 

xix. 33. 
BahadurSingh, chief of Ballabgarh (1803), 

vi. 250. 
Bahadur Singh, rule in part of Kishangarh 

State, XV. 311. 
Bahadur Singh,rulcrofRaghugarh, xxi. 35. 
Bahadur Singh, rule in SItaniau State, 

xxiii. 52. 
Bahadurgarh, former name of Isagarh Zi/a, 

Gwalior State, Central India, vi. 194. 
Bahadurgarh, town in Rohtak District, 

Punjab, vi. 194. 
Bahalda, village in Mayurbhanj State, 

Orissa, vi. 194. 
Bahapuja, festival of the Santals, xxii. 68. 
Baliar Mai, chief of Amber Stale, Jaipur, 

Mughals courted by, xiii. 385. 
Baharah, Shah, military officer, tomb at 

Larkana, xvi. 144. 
Baha-ud-din, Malik, Khokhar, became 

chief of Sanaur, xxii. 27. 
Baha-ud-dIn Arts College, at Junagarh, 

Kathiawar, xiv. 239. 
Bahawal Hakk, saint, massacre at Mnltan 

prevented by, xviii. 26 ; shrine and tomb 

at Multan, ii. 128, xviii. 36, 
Bahawal Khan I, Nawab, founder of 

Bahawalpur State (174S), vi. 204. 
Bahawal Khan II, Nawab, Ahmadpur 

given in dower to (1782), v. 126; Garhi 

Ikhtiar Khan annexed (1S06), xii. 162 ; 

Khanpur founded (1806), xv. 245; 

Muzaffargarh invaded, xviii. 76-77 ; 

Sitpur annexed (1 790) , xviii. 76, xxiii. 62. 
Bahawalpur, State in Punjab, vi. 194-203 ; 

physical aspects, 194-196; history, 

196-197 ; population, 197; agriculture, 

198; trade and communications, 199- 

200; famine, 200; administration, 

200-203; revenue, 201-202; education, 

203 ; medical, 203. 

Other references : Irrigation, iii. p,2'/ ; 

non-interference of British in civil war 

of 1850, iv. 79; area, population, 

revenue, and administration, iv. 100. 
Bahawalpur, tahsJl of State in Punjab, 

vi. 204. 
I'.ahawalpur, capital of State in Punjab, 

vi. 204 ; arts and manufactures, iii. 210, 
211,217, 238-239, 244. 
Bahelias, Chunar fort held by, x, 333. 
Baheri, tahsll in Bareilly District, United 

Provinces, vi. 204. 



46 



INDEX 



Bahing, language spoken in Nepal, i. 
391,400. 

IJahiri, temple of, at Gad-Hinglaj, Bom- 
bay, xii. 120. 

Bahlol Khan, Lodi, king of Delhi (145 1- 
89), ii. 367, 369; defeated Jaunpur 
troops, ii. 375. 

Local notices : Bahlolpurin Ludhiana 
founded by, vi. 205 ; rule in Delhi, xiv. 
75, xix, 151, xxi. 305 ; DTpalpur and 
Lahore entrusted to (1441), xvi. 107, 
XX. 267 ; rule over Mainpurl, xvii. 34 ; 
Multan held by, xviii. 26 ; rule in 
Punjab, XX. 267 ; death at Sakit (1489), 
xii. 30; tomb of daughter at Sirhind, 
xviii. 21 ; assumed title of Sultan at Sir- 
hind (1451), xxiii. 21; Sitpur founded 
under grant made by (1450), x\iii. 76. 

Bahlolpur, village in Ludhiana District, 
Punjab, vi, 205. 

Bahlolzai, branch of Mahsuds, xvii. 25. 

Bahman Shah. Sec Ala-ud-din Hasan. 

Bahmani dynasty (1347-1526), ii. 193, 
344-346, 3S3-38.5, xvi. 249, xviii. 174- 
175; tombs at Gulbarga and Bidar, 
ii. 194-195, viii. 170; in Ahmad- 
nagar, v. 1 13; in Baglan, vi. 191 ; 
Belgaum taken by (1.^73), vii. 147 -14S; 
Bhir fell to, viii. 113; capital .at Bldar, 
viii. 170; in Deccan, viii. 284-285, 
xi. 207, xiii. 236 ; Golconda held by, 
xii. 309; Indiir included in kingdom, 
xiii. 352; at Kalyani, xiv. 324; in 
Kolaba, XV. 357 ; in Mahbubnagar, 
xvii. 2 ; in Nasik, xviii. 400 ; in 
Osraanabad, xix. 270; in Parbhani, 
xix. 411 ; in Poona, xx. 16S; in Rai- 
chur, xxi. 39; in Rajahmundry, xxi. 64; 
in Ratnagiri, xxi. 247 ; in Satara, xxii. 
118 ; in \Vai, xxiv. 348. 

Jjahnas, caste in Dera Ghilzi Kh.in Dis- 
trict, Punjab, xi. 252. 

Bahraich, District in United Provinces, 
vi. 205-212 ; physical aspects, 205-206; 
history, 206-208 ; population, 20S ; 
agriculture, 208-210; forests, 2ro; 
trade and comnninications, 210; famine, 
211 ; administration, 211-212 ; educa- 
tion, 212 ; medical, 212. 

Bahraich, tahsll in United Provinces, vi. 
212-213. 

Bahraich, town in United Provinces, with 
shrine of Saiyid Salfir MasOd, vi. 213 ; 
manufactures, iii. 213. 

Bahram, king of Delhi (1240-2), ii. 3i;9, 
368. 

Bahram, governor of Bengal (1324-8), 
vii. 216. 

Bahram, Mir, officer of the Kalhora kings, 
Sind, xxii. 398. 

Bahram Khan, Burj-i-Bahram bastion of 
Gawilgarh fort constructed by (1577), 
xii. 193. 



Bahram Khan, founded R.ajhan (r. 1825), 
xxi. 323. 

Bahram Loth, family, sometime owners of 
Barnagar, vii. 23. 

Bahram Shah, revolt of governor of La- 
hore against (11 19), xvi. 106. 

Bahram .Shah of Ghazni, contest with Saif- 
ud-dln and Ala-ud-din, xii. 234 ; fled 
to Kurram (1148), xvi. 49. 

Bahram Shah, son of Altamsh, deposed 
by Turkish Amirs, xx. 265. 

Bahram Shah PIr, tomb at Burdwan, ix. 
102. 

Bahramghat, village in Bara Bankl Dis- 
trict, United Provinces, vi. 213. 

Bahrampur, subdivision in Bengal. Sec 
Berhampore. 

Balirein, island in Persian Gulf, British 
relations with, iv. 111-112. 

Bahr-i-Garr. See Makran Coast Range. 

Bahtis, local name of Ghirths, in Iloshiiir- 
pur District, Punjab, xiii. 196. 

Bahu Begam, of Oudh, lived at Fyzabad, 
xii. 117 ; tomb at Fyzabad, xii. 118. 

Bahu Sen, settled at Manglaur, xvii. 153. 

Bahubalin (Gomata, Gomateswara), Jain 
saint, statues of, ii. 48 ; near Barwani, 
vii. 93 ; Karkala, xv. 44 ; Sravana Bel- 
gola, xiii. 63, 64, xviii. 187, xxiii. 96, 

97- 

Bai lal, lake at Biinswara, vi. 413. 

Baibhar, hill near Rajglr, xxi. 72. 

Baidya, piiysician caste in Bengal, i. 327; 
Chittagong, x. 310; Dacca, xi, 107. 

Baidyabati, town in llooghly District, 
Bengal, vi. 214. 

Baidyanath, site of temples in Bengal. See 
Deogarh. 

Baiga, piimilive Dravidinn tribe in Cen- 
tral Provinces, frccjuently priests to the 
Gonds,vi. 214-216, X. 26 ; in lialaghat, 
vi. 227; Biliispur, viii. 226; Mandlfi, 
xvii. 163 ; Satpur.a Hills, xxii. 132. 

Bal Harir, step- well of, ii. 196. 

I'aihar, tahsll in llal.aghat District, Cen- 
tral i'rovinces, vi. 216. 

l!aiji Ram, Bhop.'d .State administered by, 
viii. 128. 

Baijnalh, site of temples in Santal Par- 
ganas District. See Deogarh. 

Baijnalli, village in Kangra District, 
Punjab, with historical inscriptions, 
vi. 216-217. 

Baijniith, village in .Vlmora District, 
United Provinces, vi. 217. 

Baikal, village in Madras. See Bekal. 

Bail Hongal. See Hongal. 

Baillie, Colonel, defeated by Haidar All 
(17S0), ii. 485, V. 406, XX. 106. 

Baillie, ^L^jor, capture of Aden (1839), 

y- 13. 

Bairagis, Vaishnavite sect and religious 
mendicants, hereditary chiefs of Chhwi- 



INDEX 



47 



khadan, Central Provinces, x. 216; part 

played by, in religious riots at Hardwar 

(1760), xiii. 53; in Midnaporc, xvii. 

332 ; Nadia, xviii. 276 ; Nandgaon 

State, xviii. 356 ; Punjab, xx. 290. 
Bairagnia, village in Muzaffarpur District, 

Bengal, vi. 217. 
Bairam Khan, Humayun's general and 

Akbar's tutor (1554-60), ii. 397-39.8; 

defeat of, at Jnllundur (1560), xiv. 

223 ; assassinated in Gujarat, xx. 24. 
Bairam Shah, Balan chief, reduced to 

position of vassal by Aurangzeb (1637), 

vi. 191. 
BairamjT Jijibhoy High School, Thana, 

Bombay, xxiii. 304. 
Bairamji Jijibhoy Hospital, Matheran, 

Bombay, xvii. 221. 
Bairat, ancient town in Rajpulana, vi. 217. 
Bairatgarh, near Badnor, Rajputana, vi. 

178. 
Baird-Smith, Colonel, estimate of mor- 
tality from Agra famine of 1838, iii. 

485 ; inquiry into famine of 1860-1, iii. 

485-4S6 ; quoted on results of famines, 

iii. 497 // ; on famine inquiry in United 

Provinces, xxiv. 217-218. 
Baire Cauda (of the Avati family), builder 

offortat Holavanhalli, Mysore,xiii. 158. 
Bairi Sal, rule in Jaisalmer (1864-91), 

xiv. 4. 
Bairi Sal, Rao, killed at taking of Bundi 

(1457), ix. 79. 
Bairia, town in Ballia District, United 

Provinces, vi. 21 8. 
Bais, Rajput clan, their rule in Rae Bareli, 

xxi. 26. 
Bais, measuring cups, made in Santal 

Parganas, xxii. 73. 
Baisakh Bihu, festival in Assam, vi. 52, 
Baisakhi, festival in Amritsar, v. 328 ; 

North-West Frontier Province, xix. 
169 ; Punjab, xx. 294. 
BaisgazI wall, at Gaur, Malda, xii. 1S9. 
Bais-hazarl, building of Jaliil-ud-dln 

Tabriz!, at Pandua, Malda, xix 393. 
Baishnabs. See Bairagis. 
Baishtam, caste in Bengal, i. 328. 
Baiswara, tract in United Provinces, 

called after the Bais Rajputs, vi. 218. 
Baitarani, river in Bengal, vi. 218-219. 
Baiza Bai, widow of Daulat Rao Sindhia, 

in Gwalior, xii. 424. 
Bajana, State in Kathiawar, Bombay, vi. 

219, XV. 167. 
Bajar Khan, Mir, traditional founder of 

Jatoi, Muzaffargarh, xiv. 72. 
Bajaur, tract of country in North-West 

Frontier Province, vi. 219-220. 
Baj-Baj, town in Bengal. See Budge- 
Budge. 
Bajgis, singers and musicians, in Dehra 
Dun, xi. 215. 



BajT Prabhu, Purandhar hill defended 
by (1665), XX. 397. 

Bajl Rao I, Peshwa (1720-40), ii. 441 ; 
treaty with (1739^ iv. 75 ; intrigues of, 
against PilajT Gaikwar, vii. 32 ; 
Chhatarsal bequeathed part of territories 
in Bundelkhand to, xi. 136; at Delhi 
(17.^7)1 ^i- 2.^6; zani^xx^A pargajias on 
Tukoji and JiwajT Ponwar, founders of 
Devvas State, xi. 27S ; Dharwar devas- 
tated by (1726), xi. 306 ; Malhar Rao 
Holkar raised to command of five 
hundred horse by (1724), xiii. 335 ; in 
Poona, XX. 168; Rajmachi fort ceded 
to (1730), xxi. 76; Saugor conferred 
on (1731), xix. 400 ; in Sironj, xxiii. 
39; in Thana, xxiii. 292 ; treaty with 
Jagat Singh II (1736), xxiv. 91. 

Bajl Rao II, seventh and last Peshwa 
(1796-1818), ii. 443-444, _ 507; sur- 
render of dominions to British, iv. 76; 
treaty of Bassein (1802), ii. 491 : 
attack on Resident at Poona, ii. 495 ; 
defeat in last Maratha War, ii. 495. 

Local notices: Defeat at Ashta,vi. 10; 
Biigalkot relinquished to Nllkanth 
Rao (iSio), vi. 182; Bankapur ceded 
to the British (1802), vi. 382; failure 
of negotiations of Gangadhar Sastri 
respecting lease of Ahmadabad, vii. 37 ; 
independence of Gaikwars from, es- 
tablished (1817), vii. 38; ceded to 
British his claims in Gujarat, vii. 38 ; 
flight through Berar (1818), vii. 97; 
effect of revenue system in Belgaum, 
vii. 154 ; loss of Belgaum fortress 
(1818), vii. 157; banished to Bithiir, 
viii. 251 ; accession to Peshvvaship, 
viii. 293 ; surrendered when infant to 
Ragliuba's opponents, xi. 289 ; born at 
Dhar (1775), xi. 295 ; territories of, in 
Saugor and Damoh, ceded to British 
(1S17), X. 17; acquisition by British of 
territories in Gujarat (1S18), xii. 353; 
battle at Koregaon (1818), xv. 402; 
treaty with, at Mahad (1796), xvi. 429 ; 
battle at Pandharpur (1817), xix. 391; 
SandTir estate granted by, to Jaswant 
Rao, xxii. 43 ; attempt to take Sandur 
from Siva Rao, xxii. 44 ; farming or 
contract system introduced into Satara, 
xxii. 127 ; Saugor ceded by, to the 
British (1818), xxii. 13S; encamped 
at Sindkhed (1818), xxii. 434 ; posses- 
sions in Thana ceded by (181 7), xxiii. 
292. 
Bajitpur, town in Mymensingh District, 

Enstern Bengal, vi. 220. 
Bajra or ca?iibu{Pennisetu>n typhoidciim), 
(spiked millet), cultivation in India 
generally, iii. 33 ; retail prices, iii. 458. 
Local notices: In Agra, v. 77 ; Ah- 
madnagar, v. 116; Ajmer-Merwara, v. 



48 



INDEX 



149, 152; Akalkot, V. 17S; Allahabad, 
V. 232; Ahvar, V. 261; Amreli /r(7«/, 
V. 317; North Arcot, v. 410; South 
Arcot, V. 427; l^ahawalpur, vi. 198; 
Banda, vi. 351; Banganapalle, vi. 
374; Bannu, vi. 397; Bareilly, vii. 7; 
Baroda, vii. 46. 48, 79, 8 1 ; Barwani, vii. 
91 ; Belgaum, vii. 150; Bellarj', vii. 174; 
BeiiareSjvii. 183; Bengal, vii. 245; I'erar, 
vii. 384-385 ; Bharatpur, viii. 81 ; Bhir, 
viii. 114; Bhopal, viii. 134; Bldar, viii. 
166; Bijiipur, viii. 180; Bijnor, viii. 197; 
lilkaner, viii. 210; Broach, i.x. 24; Bu- 
daun, ix. 37 ; Bulandshahr, ix. 53 ; Cawn- 
pore, ix. 31 1 ; Central India, ix. 359, 390 ; 
Central Provinces, x. 36 ; Chingleput, 
X. 259 ; Coimbatore, x. 362, 371 ; Cudda- 
pah, xi. 65 ; Cutch, xi. 80; Dera Ismail 
Khan, xi. 264; Dhar, xi. 291 ; Dholpur, 
xi. 326; Dill, xi. 362; Etah, xii. 33; 
Elawah, xii. 43; Farrukhabad, xii. 67; 
Gaya,xii. 201 ; Ghazipur, xii. 226; Gul- 
barga, xii. 378 ; Guni, xii. 387 ; Gwalior, 
xii. 429 ; Hala, xiii. 9; Hamlrpur, xiii. 1 7; 
HardoT, xiii. 46 ; Hyderabad State, xiii. 
251, 252, 253, 254; Hyderabad, Sind, 
xiii. 316; Indore, xiii. 342; Jaipur, xiii. 
389, 390 ; Jaisalmer, xiv. 5 ; Jalaun, xiv. 
22 ; Jhansi, xiv. 142 ; Jhelum, xiv. 154 
Jodhpur, xiv. 190; Kachhi, xiv. 250; 
Kadi pnhtt, xiv. 256 ; Kaira, xiv. 280 ; 
Karachi, xv. 6, 11; Karauli, xv. 29; 
Khairpur, xv. 212 ; Khandesh, xv. 232 ; 
Kishangarh, xv. 313-314; Kistna, xv. 
326; Kohat, xv. 346; Kolhapur, xv. 
384; KotahjXV. 417 ; Kurnool, xvi. 37 ; 
Lingsugur, xvi. 164; Lucknow, xvi. 184; 
Ludhiana, xvi. 203 ; Madras Presidency, 
xvi. 274, 352 ; Madura, xvi. 394 ; Mahi 
Kantha, xvii. 18; Mainpuri, xvii. 36; 
Manbhum, xvii. 116 ; Medak, xvii. 247 ; 
Mianwali, xvii. 320; Mirzapur, xvii. 37 1 ; 
Montgomery, xvii. 413; Moradabiid, 
xvii. 424, 425 ; Multan, xviii. 30 ; Mut- 
tra, xviii. 68; Muzaffargarh, x\iii.79; 
Nabha, xviii. 266; Nalgonda, xviii. 
340 ; Nander, xviii. 352 ; Nasik, .xviii. 
403; Navatiagar, xviii. 420; Navsari 
pratit, xviii. 423; Nellore, xix. 14; 
North-West Frontier Province, xix. 173 ; 
Okhamandal, xix. 236; Osmanabad, 
xix. 271; Panch Mahals, xix. 385; 
Parbhani,xix. 412 ; Partabgarh, xx. 18; 
Patiala, xx. 42; Pillbhlt, xx. 140; 
Poona, XX. 172; Porbandar, xx. 1S9; 
Pudukkottai, xx. 234 ; Punjab, xx. 29S ; 
Raichur, xxi. 40; Rajplpla, xxi. 81 ; 
Rfijputana, xxi. 120; Rawalpindi, xxi. 
266; Rewah, xxi. 284; Rewa Kantha, 
xxi. 295 ; Rohilkhand, xxi. 305 ; Rohtak, 
x.xi. 315 ; Saharanpur, xxi. 373 ; Salem, 
xxi. 400; .Siitara, xxii. 122; .Shahabad, 
xxii. 191; Shahdadpur, xxii. 200; 



Shahjahanpur, xxii. 205 ; Shahpur, xxii, 
217; Shahpura Chiefship, xxii. 224; 
Shckhawati, xxii. 269 ; Sholapur, .x.xii. 
299 ; Sind, xxii. 412 ; Sirohi, xxiii. 33 ; 
Sujawal, xxiii. 118; Sukkur, xxiii. 122 ; 
Surat, xxiii. 159; Tanjore, .\xiii. 233, 
242 ; Thar and Parkar, xxiii. 31 1 ; Tin- 
nevelly, xxiii. 369; Tonk, xxiii. 417; 
Trichinopoly, xxiv. 32 ; Unao, xxiv. 
125 ; United Provinces, xxiv.iSi; Upper 
Sind Frontier District, xxiv. 281 ; Viza- 
gapatam, xxiv. 329; Warangal, xxiv. 
360. 

Bajranath, temple at Gyaraspur, Central 
India, xiii. i. 

Bajrangbilas. See Naya Bagh. 

Bajranggarh, fort in Central India, vi. 
220. 

Bajwara, ancient town in Hoshiiirpur Dis- 
trict, Punjab, vi. 220-221. 

Baka Bai, widow of Raghuji II, Bhonsla, 
xviii. 30S. 

Bakar All Khan, Navvab, mosque and 
tomb of, at Fatehpur, xii. S3. 

Bakarganj, District in Eastern Bengal. 
Sec Backergungc. 

Baka-uUah Khan, Nawab of Basoda, vii. 
105, xviii. 16. 

Baker, Sir William, Sirhind Canal pro- 
posed by (1S41), iii. 333 ; secretary for 
department of Public Works (1854), iv. 

309. 
Bakhar, island in the Indus. Sec Bukkur. 
Bakhira Tal, lake in Basti District, 

United Provinces, \'i. 221. 
Bakhsh Singh, Maharaja, rule in Dum- 

raon Raj (1844), x'- .^78' 
Bakhshi BakI, Muhammad Khan, married 

Shah Jahan, Begam of Bhopal (1855), 

viii. 131. 
Bakht Buland, Gond Raja of Deogarh, 

incursions in Berar (1698), vii. 369; 

extension of Chhindwara under, x. 206 ; 

Gondwana territories developed, x. 13, 

15 ; Nagpur founded by, xviii. 306, 318 ; 

Seoni ceded to, xxii. 167; ravaged Wun, 

xxiv. 390. 
Bakht Mai, Raja, chief of Pathankot, xx. 

28. 
Bakht Singh, of Banda, v. 1 29-1 30. 
Bakht Singh, Rao of Bedla, Rao P.ahadur, 

vii. 140. 
Bakht Singh, fort built at Awa by, vi. 

Bakht Singh, Maharaja of Jodhpur, Did- 

wana held by, xi. 343; rule in Jodhpur, 

xiv. 185. 
Bakht Singh, son of Kunwar Sone Sah 

Ponwar, settlement of estate of, x. 199. 
Bakht Singh of Kolah. Sec Jalim Singh. 
Bakhtiiwar Singh, rule in Ahvar (1791- 

181 5), V. 257 ; tomb at Ahvar, v. 26S ; 

Govindgarh fort built by (1S05), xii 



INDEX 



49 



344 ; Khanzadas of Govindgarli ousted 
by (1803), xii. 344; Kathumar fort 
held, XV. 186. 

Bakhtawar Singh, founder of Ajodhya 
estate, v. 174. 

Bakhtawar Singh, Raja of Amjhira, re- 
belled in 1857, was caught and exe- 
cuted, V. 305. 

Bakhtgarh, thakurdt in Central India, vi. 
221, viii. 147. 

Bakloh, cantonment in Gurdaspur District, 
Punjab, vi. 221. 

Bakreswar, hot sulphur springs in Blr- 
bhum District, Bengal, vi. 221. 

Bakr-Id, Muhammadan festival, held in 
Hyderabad, xiii. 250; Mysore, xviii. 209; 
Sind, xxii. 411. 

Baksar, battle-field in Bengal. See Buxar. 

Baktiyarpur, village in Patna District, 
Bengal, vi. 221. 

Bala Hisar (Acropolis), remains of, found 
at Charsadda, Peshawar, x. 181 ; 
former citadel of Kabrd city, xiv. 244, 
245 ; fort in Peshawar city, xx. 125. 

Bala Pir, tomb at Kanauj, Farrukhabad, 
xiv. 371. 

Bala Rama Varma, Raja of Travancore 
(179S-1810), xxiv. 7-S. 

Bala Varman, early king of Assam, vi. 24. 

Bdla-bhdrata, Sanskrit drama, by Raja- 
sekhara, ii. 249. 

Balagai, ' right-hand' faction in Mysore, 
xviii. 199. 

Balagami, stone inscription, ii. 32 ; temple, 
ii. 176. 

Balaganj, village in Sylhet District, 
Assam, vi. 221-222. 

Balagarh, village in Ilooghly District, 
Bengal, vi. 222. 

Balaghat, upland country of Berar, vi. 
222. 

Balaghat, name given by the Musalmans to 
upland districts in the Carnatic con- 
queretl by them from Vijayanagar, vi. 
222. 

Balaghat, range of hills in western half 
of Hyderabad State, vi. 222. 

Balaghat, District in the Central Pro- 
vinces, vi. 222-232; physical aspects, 
222-225 ; history, 225-226 ; popula- 
tion, 226; agriculture, 227-229; forests, 
229-230; trade and communications, 
230-231 ; famine, 231 ; administration, 
231-232 ; education, 232 ; medical, 
232 ; minerals, including manganese, iii. 
146, 147, vi. 230. 

Balaghat, iahsil in Central Provinces, vi, 

233- 
Balaghat, town in Central Provinces, vi. 

233- 

Balaghat Mission, founded by Rev. J. 

Pampard, vi. 227. 
Balais, village menials, in Ajmer-Mervvara, 

VOL. XXV. 



V. 146; Bhopaljviii. 133; Gwalior, xii. 
428; Hoshangabad,xiii.i83;Indore, xiii.. 
341; Jaora, xiv. 64; Jhalawar, xiv. 
118; Jodhpur, xiv. 189; Mallani, xvii. 
92; Kajgarh, xxi. 69; Sambhar Lake, 
xxii. 21 ; Udaipur, xxiv. 94. 

Balaji, of Shekhawati, xxii. 269. 

Balajl, tank at Basim, Berar, vii. 104. 

BalajT, temple of, at Deulgaon Raja, 
Buldana, xi. 272. 

Balajl, temple, at Vambori, Ahmadnagar, 
xxiv. 298. 

BalajT Baji Rao, third Peshwa (1740-61), 
ii. 441, iv. 70; Bagalkot taken (1755), 
vi. 182 ; Balasinor tributary to (1768), 
vi. 235; Belgaum taken (1754), vii. 
157; territory in Berar ceded to, by 
Nizam (1760), vii. 370; position in 
Deccan (1710), viii. 291 ; subjection of 
Handia (1742), xiii. 182; invasion of 
Mandla (1742), xvii. 161; Muddebihal 
came under {c. 1764), xviii. 11 ; in- 
vasion of Mysore (1757), xviii. 180; 
Navalgund ceded to (1747), xviii. 419; 
at Poona, xx. 168; Savda ceded to 
(1763), xxii. 157; Thalner received by 
_(i750), xxiii. 287. 

Balajl P.alwant, in Dhulia, xi. 338. 

Balajl Vishvanath, first Peslnva (1718- 
20), ii. 441 ; besieged at Pandavgarh 
by Chandrasen Jadhav's troops (17 13), 
xix. 389. 

Baland tribe, rule in Bandliogarh, vi. 358. 

Balapur, taluk in Akola District, Berar, 
vi. 233-234. 

Balapur, town in Akola District, Berar, 
scene of victory of Asaf Jah (1720), 
vi. 234. 

Balaram or Balarama, brother ot 
Jagannath, image of, in Jagannath 
temple at PuiT, xx. 411 ; said to have 
given name of Koil to AlTgarh, v. 209 ; 
demon Kol slain by, v. 209, 217; 
traditional founder of Harduaganj, xiii. 
51 ; slept at Siyana one night, xxiii. 67. 

Balarama,Oriyawriteri^sixteenth century), 
ii. 432. 

Bdla-ranidyana, .Sanskrit drama, by 
Rajasekhnra, ii. 249. 

Balasinor, Slate in Rewa Kantha, Bombay, 
vi. 234-235, xxi. 290. 

Balasinor, capital of State in Rewa 
Kantha, Bombay, vi. 235-236. 

Balasore, District in Orissn, Bengal, vi. 
236-245 ; physical aspects, 236-23S ; 
history, 238; population, 238- 240; 
agriculture, 240 ; trade and communi- 
cations, 241-242; famine, 242-243; 
administration, 243-245 ; land revenue, 
243-244 ; education, 245 ; medical, 245. 

Balasore, subdivision in Bengal, vi. 245. 

Balasore, town in Bengal, early English 
settlement, vi. 245-247. 



5<^ 



INDEX 



Balawa, tribe in the Audamans, v. 361. 
Ealban, Ulugh Khan, or Ghiyas-ud-din, 

Slave king of Delhi (1266-S6), ii. 359- 

361, 36S ; coins of, ii. 144. 

Local notices: Arrival in Amroha 

(1266), to put down a rebellion, v. 330 ; 

rebellion of Mughis-ud-din Tughril 

against, vii. 212; governor of Bengal 

(1258), vii. 216; in Central India, ix. 

338-339; Chanderl captured (1251), 

X. 164; visit to Etah, xii. 30; mosque 

built by, at Garhmuktesar (1283), 

xii. 163; Hariana granted in fief to 

(c. 1254), xiii. 145 ; in Kimpil, xiv. 328 ; 

tomb built in memory of Bu-All Kalan- 

dar at Karnal, \v. 59; Lahore rebuilt 

by (1270), xvi. 107; mosque at Mang- 

laur built by (1285), xvii. 178; rule 

over Punjab, xx. 265 ; in Hindustan 

(United I'rovinces) (1265-87), xxiv. 

150. 
Ba'ban Izz-ud-din, or Kashlu Khan, ii. 

360; Uch and Mullan recovered by 

(1252), xviii. 26; rebellion (1257), 

xviii. 26. 
Balbhadra Singh, ruler of Nagod (1S18- 

31), xviii. 3oi_. 
Balbir Sen, Raja of Keonthal, xv. 203. 
Balbir Singh, Raja of Mantli, xvii. 154. 
Balcha Dhura, pass across the Himalayas, 

xiii. 134. 
Balchadhura, peak in United Provinces, 

xxiv. 140. 
Baldaeus, visit to Gulf of Cambay (1672), 

XV. 170. 
Baldeo, town in Muttra District, United 

Provinces, vi. 247. 
Baldeo Singli, Raja of Bharatpur (1823-5), 

viii. 78; tomb at Gobardhan, xii. 280. 
BaldeojT, Sii, tenq)lc at I'anna, xix. 404. 
P>aldevajl, temple at Baroda, vii. 83. 
Bale-llonnur, town in Kadur District, 

Mysore, vi. 247. 
Baleswar, river of Bengal. Sec Madhu- 

mati. 
Balfour, General, report on cotton trade 

of Herar, vii. 393. 
Balgaon, town in Berar. See Walgaon. 
Balgram, Peshawar city refounded by, 

XX. 125. 
Bali, legendary king of the Lunar race in 

Bengil, vii. 194. 
I'ali, town in Bengal. See Bally. 
Bali, village in Hooghly District, Bengal, 

vi. 247. 
Bali, head-quarters of District in Raj- 

pulana, vi. 247-248. 
Bali Narayan, rule in part of Assam, vi. 

28; in Darrang, xi. 183. 
Balia, village in Eastern Bengal. See 

Alawakhawa. 
Baliapal, village in Balasore District, 

Bengal, vi. 24S. 



Balijas, Telugu trading caste, i. 498 ; in 
North Arcot, v. 409 ; South Arcot, v. 
426 ; Cuddapah, xi. 63 ; Madras Presi- 
dency, xvi. 372 ; Trichiiiopoly, xxiv. 31. 

Balipara, village in Darrang District, 
Assam, vi. 248. 

Balipura, old name of Belg.ami, vii. 144. 

Balisna, town in Baroda State, vi. 248. 

Baliya, District and iahsil. See Ballia. 

Balkh, ruined city in Afghan-Turkistan, 
vi. 248-249. 

Balkonda, jaglr town in Nizamabad 
District, Hyderabad, vi. 249. 

Ball, Dr. Valentine, visit to Nicobars 
(1869), xix. 61. 

Ballabgarh, iahstl in Delhi District, Pun- 
jab, vi. 249-250. 

Ballabgarh, town in Delhi District, Pun- 
jab, vi. 250- . 

Ballabh, Raja Raj of Rajnagar, Portuguese 
Christians invited by, to Backergunge, 
vi. 167. 

Ballabhpur, suburb of Serampore, Bengal, 
xxii. 178. 

Ballal Sen, king of Bengal, South Bengal 
called Bagri by, vi. 193 ; Baiendra 
named by, vii. 15, xx. 244 ; caste system 
reorganized, and ]3engal partitioned, 
vii. 210-211, viii. 220; ruins of palace 
of, at Gaur, xii. 1S8; Mithila subju- 
gated by, xvii. 380. 

Ballala I, Hoysala king, ii. 335. 

Ballala H, Hoysala king (1191-2 — 
1 211-2), ii. 339, xiii. 63 ; at village on 
site of Bangalore, vi. 368 ; Brahmagiri 
taken, ix. 8 ; Ilangal conquered (i 200), 
X. 24; war against Changalvas (1174), 
xi. 10; cajjital established .^t Lakkundi 
(1192), and forces of the Yadava king 
lihillam defeated near, xvi. 130-131 ; 
rule in Mysore, xviii. 173. 

Ballala Hi, Hoysala king (1291-1342), 
Kolar under, xv. 371 ; defeat and im- 
prisonment (1310), xiii. 236; rule in 
Mysore, xviii. 173-174. 

Ballala IV, Hoysala king (i 342), xviii.i 74. 

Ballala dynasty. Sec Hoysala. 

Ballal-bari, ruined palace at Rampal, 
Eastern I'engal, xxi. 182. 

Ballalrayaudurga, fortilied hill in Mysore, 
vi. 250, xiv. 232, xviii. 162. 

Ballantyne, Col., fust Political Agent at 
Siidra, xxi. 34S. 

Ballar Sahi, family of Gondi kings of 
Chanda, x. 150. 

Ballia, District in United Provinces, vi. 
250-257 ; physical aspects, 250-151 ; 
history, 251-252; population, 252-253; 
agriculture, 253-254; trade and com- 
munications, 254-255 ; administration, 
255-257 ; police, 256; education, 256- 
257; medical, 257; high density of 
population, i. 454. 



INDEX 



51 



Ballia, tahsil in United Provinces, vi. 257. 
Ballia, town in United Provinces, vi. 257- 

258. 
Balligamve. See Belgami. 
Balliguda, subdivision in Ganjam Dis- 
trict, Madras, vi. 25S. 
Balliguda, taluk in Ganjam District, 

Madras, vi. 258. 
Bally, town in Howrah District, Bengal, 
with manufacturing industries, vi. 258. 
Bally Khal, navigable channel in Howrah 

District, Bengal, xiii. 211. 
Ballygunge, suburb of Calcutta. See 

Calcutta. 
Balmer, town in Rajputana. See Barmer, 
Balmudia, name of Dal Khonds in Orissa 

States, XV. 281. 
Baloch or Baluchi, Eranian language, 
i- 353-354.395 ; spoken in Baluchistan, 
vi. 287-288; Bombay, viii. 300; Chagai, 
X. 117; Dera Ghazi Khan, xi. 252; 
Jhalawan, xiv. 11 1 ; Kachhi, xiv. 250; 
Khairpur State, xv. 212 ; Kharan, xv. 
248 ; Las Bela, xvi. 146 ; Makran, xvii. 
48 ; Punjab, xx. 2S6 ; Sarawan, xxii. 99 ; 
Sibi,xxii. 339 ; Sind, xxii. 406; Sukkur, 
xxiii. 121; Upper Sind Frontier District, 
xxiv. 279. 
Baloch tribe (Baluchis), i. 310-311,498; 
ethnology, i. 293; in Bahawalpur State, 
vi. 198; Baluchistan, i. 330, vi. 288- 
289, 290; Chenab Colony, x. 187; Dera 
Ghazi Khan, xi. 250, 252 ; Dera Ismail 
Khan, xi. 263 ; immigration into Dera- 
jat (fifteenth century), xi. 270 ; in Gur- 
gaon, xii. 405 ; Hyderabad, Sind, xiii. 
315; Indus inundation canals con- 
structed by chiefs of, xiii. 364 ; Jhala- 
wan, xiv. 1 1 1 ; Jhang, xiv. 128; Kalanaur, 
xiv. 298 ; Kalat, xiv. 301 ; Kambar 
plundered (1848), xiv. 32S ; in Karachi, 
XV. 5 ; Khairpur, xv. 212; Kohistau, 
XV. 354; Larkana, xvi. 139; Leiah 
taken from the Miraai rulers by (c. 
1620), and held till 1787, xvi. 159; 
Makran, xvii. 47, 48 ; Mankera formerly 
the stronghold of Jaskani Baloch, xvii. 
198 ; defeat by Sir C. Napier at Miani 
(1843), xvii. 315 ; Mianwali taken pos- 
session of, xvii. 318, 319 ; Montgomery, 
xvii. 412; Multan,xviii. 28; Muzaffar- 
garh, xviii. 76, 77, 78 ; North-West 
Frontier Province, xix. 166; Patiala, 
XX. 46; Punjab, xx. 288; Shahpur, 
xxii. 216; Sibi, xxii. 339; Sind, viii. 
305! 306, xxii. 406-407 ; Sukkur, xxiii. 
122; Sulaiman Range, xxiii. 129; 
Thar and Parkar, xxiii. 310 ; Upper 
Sind Frontier District, xxiv. 280. 
Balochistan. Sec Baluchistan. 
Baloda Bazar, tahsTl in Raipur District, 

Central Provinces, vi. 259. 
Balotra, town in Rajputana, vi. 259. 



Balram Das, town of Balrampur founded 
by, vi. 260. 

Balram Das, Raja Bahadur Mahant, of 
Nandgaon State (1883-97), xviii. 
357 ; spinning and weaving mills at 
Raj-Nandgaon erected by, xviii. 357 ; 
contribution to Raipur waterworks, xxi. 
60. 

Balram Deo, rule in part of Patna State, 
XX. 71. 

Balrampur, largest talukddri estate in 
Oudh, vi. 259-260; loyalty of Raja Drig- 
bijai Singh during the Mutiny, vi. 260. 

Balrampur, town in Gonda District, 
United Provinces, vi. 260, 261. 

Balrampur Hospital, Lucknow, xvi. 188, 
197, xxiv. 255. 

Balsam, in Malay Peninsula, i. 206. 

Balsan, Simla Hill State, Punjab, vi, 261. 

Balthasar Bourbon, son of Salvador Bour- 
bon, minister to Wazir Muhammad 
of Bhopal, treaty with British signed 
by (1818), xiii. 324. 

Balti, language of Tibetan group, i. 390. 

Baltis, tribe in Baltistan, vi. 262 ; inva- 
sions of Ladakh, xvi. 90. 

Baltistan, Himalayan tract in Kashmir, 
vi. 261-265 ; physical aspects, 261-262 ; 
history, 262-263 ; population, 262-263 J 
agriculture, 263-264 ; trade and com- 
munications, 264; administration, 265. 

Balu Mia,'Sidi, rule in Sachin State, xxi. 

345- 

Baluchi language. See Baloch or Baluchi. 

Baluchis. See Baloch tribe. 

Baluchistan, tract of country on north- 
western frontier of India, vi. 265-342 ; 
physical aspects, 266-274; history, 274- 
284; population, 284-293, 341 ; agri- 
culture, 293-301 ; fisheries, 301-302 ; 
rents, wages, and prices, 302-304 ; 
forests, 304-306 ; mines and minerals, 
306-307 ; arts and manufactures, 307- 
309; commerce and trade, 309-311; 
communications, 311-315 ; famine, 315- 
316; administration, 316-336; legis- 
lation and justice, 320-321; finance, 
323-324; land revenue, 325-328; mis- 
cellaneous revenue, 328-330 ; local and 
municipal, 330-331 ; public works, 
331-333; army, 333-335; poHce and 
jails, 335-336, 342; education, 336- 
337; medical, 338-340; surveys, 340; 
bibliography, 340. 

Other references : Physical aspects, 
i. 6-9; geology, i. 51, 75, 87, 88, 90, 
92, 93; meteorology, i. 113, 114, 117 «., 
122, 132, 140, 145, 153 ; botany, i. 209, 
210; zoology, i. 222, 228, 230, 231, 
235, 240, 242, 262 ; ethnology, i. 2S9, 
290, 292, 293 ; absence of caste system, 
i. 3-9-330; marriage customs, i. 330; 
language, i. 353-354, 381 ; area and 



E 2 



52 



INDEX 



population, i. 450 ; character of villages, 
i. 456 ; sex statistics, i. 479 ; minerals, 
iii. 139, 147, 156; arts and manufac- 
tures, iii. 213, 215-216, 230; trade 
with, iii. 313; irrigation, iii. 332, 343, 
346 ; postal and savings banks transac- 
tions, iii. 428, 435; British territory 
formed into Chief Commissionership 
(1887), iv. 30; administration, iv. 56, 
57 ; statistics, iv. 61 ; distribution of 
States, with particulars of area, popu- 
lation, revenue, &c.,iv. 96 ; land revenue, 
iv. 208 ; excise on country spirits, iv. 
255; duty on hemp drugs, iv. 260; 
legislation, iv. 131. 

Baluii, cantonment in Gurdaspur District, 
Punjab, vi. 343. 

Bahirghat, subdivision in Dinajpur Dis- 
trict, Eastern Bengal, vi. 343. 

Balurghat, village in Dinajpur District, 
Eastern Bengal, vi. 343. 

Balwant Singh, Raja of Benares (1739- 
64, 1765-70), vii. 180-181, 188; inva- 
sion of Bengal (1763), vii. 180; Chakia 
granted to, vii. 188 ; Fazl All expelled 
from Ghazlpur, xii. 224; Mirzapur 
acquired, xvii. 368 ; fort built at Ram- 
nagar, xxi. 180. 

Balwant Singh, Raja of Ratlam, xxi. 242- 

243- 
Balwant Singh, Raja of Raghugarh, xxi. 

34 ; Maksudangarh granted to liudh 

Singh by (1776;, xvii. 52. 
Balwant Singh, claimant to throne of 

Alwar, V. 258-259 ; rule in Tijara, 

xxiii. 358. 
Balwant Singh, Maharaja of Bharatpur 

(1835-53), viii. 78. 
Balwant Singh, Raja of Awa, vi. 153. 
Balwant Singh, native soldier, heldGirishk 

for the British (1842), xii. 247. 
Balzai, clan in .Swat, xxiii. 186. 
Bam Sah, Gurkha commander, Lieut. -Col. 

Gardner deputed to hold a conference 

with (1815), v. 246. 
Bamanbore, petty State in Kathiawar, 

Bombay, vi. 343, xv. 167. 
Bamanghati, tributary State in Orissa, 

Bengal, vi. 343. 
Bamanwas, head-quarters of tahsll in 

Rajputana, vi. 343. 
Bamba, tribe in Kashmir, xv. 94, 101 ; 

in Pakhli, xix. 319. 
Bamboo baskets. See Baskets. 
Bamboo mats. Sec Mats. 
Bamboos, i. 160; number of sjiecies, i. 

162 ; in Sikkim, i. 167 ; Western Hima- 
layan region, i. 172; Indus plain, i. 

177; Bengal jiropcr, i. iSi ; Upper 

Gangetic plain, i. ibi ; none in Sundar- 

bans, i. 184; Malabnr region, i. 187; 

Nilgiri Sholas, i. 188; Deccan, i. 192; 

Ceylon, i. 195; Burma, i. 199-201; 



Andamans, i. 204 ; Malayan Peninsula, 
1. 206-207 ; yield, iii. 119. 

Local notices: Ahmadabad, v. 95; 
Akyab, v. 192 ; Alwar, v. 262 ; Am- 
herst, v. 294 ; Anantapur, v. 343 ; 
Andamans, v. 357 ; Angul, v. 375, 
378 ; Northern Arakan, v. 395 ; As- 
sam, vi. 19, 69; Bangalore, vi. 365; 
Bankura, vi. 384; Banswara, vi. 410; 
Bareilly, vii. 3; Baroda, vii. 52; Bas- 
sein, vii. 112; Bastar, vii. 122; Basti, 
vii. 125; Helgaum, vii. 156; Benares, 
vii. 179; Bengal, vii. 259, 260; Berar, 
vii. 391; Betiil, viii. 12; Bhamo, viii. 
46, 52 ; Bhandara, viii. 67 ; Bijnor, 
viii. 198; Birbhum, viii. 240; Bom- 
bay, viii. 274, 321 ; Burdwan, ix. 92 ; 
liUrma, ix. 168-169 ! Central Provinces, 
^' 7> 47) 5^' Champaran, x. 13S; 
Chanda, x. 156, 157 ; Chhindwara, x. 
210; Lower Chindwin District, x. 233 ; 
Upper Chindwin District, x. 239, 246, 
247; Chin Hills, x. 276; Chittagong, 
X. 312 ; Chittagong Hill Tracts, x. 319, 
322 ; Cooch Beliar, x. 380; Coorg, xi. 
35; Cuttack, xi. 88; Dacca, xi. 104; 
Damoh, xi. 135 ; the Dangs, xi. 145 ; 
Darjeeling, xi. 174; Dehra Dun, xi. 
217 ; Dharampur State, xi. 290 ; Dliar- 
war, xi. 304 ; 1 )inajpur, xi. 348 ; East- 
ern Bengal and Assam, xi. 394 ; East- 
ern Duars, xi. 371 ; Ellichpur, xii. 15 ; 
Faridpur, xii. 54 ; Fenny river, xii. 
87; Fyzabad, xii. no; Ganjam, xii. 
151 ; Garhwal, xii. 168 ; Garo Hills, 
xii. 172, 179; Western Ghats, xii. 21S, 
220 ; Ghazlpur, xii. 222 ; Goalpara, 
xii. 269 ; Gurdaspur, xii. 398 ; (Jwalior, 
xii. 420; Haliyal /^/«/^(7, xiii. 11-12; 
Hanthawaddy, xiii. 30 ; Hapur, xiii. 
40 ; Hardol, xiii. 43 ; Hazaribagh, 
xiii. 92 ; Hill Tippera, xiii. 117, 120, 
121; Hooghly, xiii. 163; Hoshang- 
abad, xiii. 186; Hoshiarpur, xiii. 199; 
Jaipur, xiii. 391 ; Jalpaigurl xiv. 32 ; 
Jessore District, xiv. 91 ; Jubbul- 
pore, xiv. 207 ; Kallakurchi, xiv. 314; 
North Kanara, xiv. 341, 349; South 
Kanara, xiv. 355 ; Kangra, xiv. 392 ; 
Kashmir, xv. 130; Katha, xv. 159; 
Khairagarh, .\v. 208 ; Kharsawan, xv. 
253 ; Khulna, xv. 286 ; Kolhapur, .\v. 
381; Korea, xv. 400; Kumool, xvi. 
39; Kyaukpyu, xvi. 64; Lushai Hills, 
xvi. 213, 220; Magwe, xvi, 418; Mahl 
Kantha, xvii. 18 ; Maibang, xvii. 27 ; 
Malabar, .xvii. 55 ; Malda, xvii. 75 ; 
Mandalay, xvii. 1 33 ; Mandla, xvii. 
160; Manipur, xvii. 191; Meiktila, 
xvii. 276 ; Minbu, xvii. 352 ; Mongmit, 
xvii. 404; Mysore State, xviii. 166, 217 ; 
Mysore District, xviii. 257 ; Mying- 
yan, xviii. 121 ; Myitkyina, xviii. 136 ; 



INDEX 



53 



Mymensingh, xviii. 150; Nadia, xviii. 
273 ; Nagpur, xviii. 312 ; Narsinghpur, 
xviii. 390; Nepal, xix. 49; the 
Nllgiris, xix. 96; Oudh, xix. 27S; 
Pachaimalais, xix. 305 ; Pakokku, xix. 
320, 326 ; Palanpur Agency, xix. 350 ; 
Patiala, xx. 43 ; Pegu, xx. 90 ; Poona, 
XX. 175; Punjab, xx. 310, 311 ; PniT, 
XX. 404; Raichur, xxi. 41 ; Raipur, xxi. 
55 ; Rajputana, xxi. 128; Rampa, xxi. 
182 ; Rampur, xxi. 182 ; Rangpur, 
xxi. 223; Ratnagiri, xxi. 246; I\.ewah, 
xxi. 2 85; Ruby Mines District, xxi. 
332; Salween, xxi. 416, 419; Sambal- 
pur, xxii. 12 ; Santal Parganas, xxii. 71 ; 
Satara, xxii. 123; Saugor, xxii. 137, 
143; SeonI, xxii. 171; Shahabad, 
xxii. 187 ; Shahjahanpur, xxii. 202 ; 
Northern Shan States, xxii. 232 ; 
Shevaroy Plills, xxii. 274 ; Shimoga, 
xxii. 281, 287; Shvvebo, xxii. 311-312, 
316 ; Sibsagar, xxii. 345 ; Sikkim, 
xxii. 366; Singhbhum, xxiii. 3: Sirohi, 
xxiii. 33 ; Sirsi tdliika, xxiii. 47 ; 
Sitapur, xxiii. 55 ; Talakona, xxiii. 
209; Tanjore, xxiii. 226; Tarikere 
taluk, xxiii. 251; Thana, xxiii. 297; 
Tharrawaddy, xxiii. 322 ; Thaton, 
xxiii. 335; Thayetmyo, xxiii. 349; 
Tippera, xxiii. 38 1 ; Toungoo, xxiii. 
429 ; Trichinopoly, xxiv. 34 ; United 
Provinces, xxiv. 196 ; Warangal, xxiv. 
358 ; Wun, xxiv. 394. 

Bambor Hill, in Sibi District, Palncliistan, 
xxii. 337. 

Bamian, remains of mediaeval city, 
Afghanistan, v. 44. 

Bamjur, frontier post in Assam. See 
Bomjur. 

Bammera Potaraja, translator of the 
Bhagavata into Tamil, ii. 425. 

Bamniawas. See Bamanwas. 

Bamra, feudatory State, Bengal, vi. 
343-345 ; area, population, revenue, 
and administration, iv. 102. 

Bamun, a snake, who became lord of the 
Dun, on Nagsidh Hill, Dehra Dun, 
xi. 212. 

Ban Raja, giant, Devlkot the fortress of, 
in Dinajpur, xi. 276. 

Ban Sen, Rana of .Seokot, Punjab, xvii. 

153- 
Bina, author of the Harshacharita (an 

accouiU of king Harsha), ii. 18-19, 

2 3> 30 ; author of the Kddambari, 

ii. 241. 
Bana Raja, Asura king of Kamarupa, 

litigant placed on Barabar Hills by, 

vi. 425 ; Tezpur said to have been 

capital of, xxiii. 282. 
BanajT Nayak, of Phaltan, Bombay 

(iS27),xxii. 113. 
Banajigas, trading caste in Gubbi, Tum- 



kur, xii. 345 ; Kolar, xv. 372 ; Mysore, 
xviii. 196, 19S-199, 222. 

Banamas, name of Brahmans in Kashmir, 
who are said to be descended from 
returned fugitives, xv. 106. 

Bananas, iii. 76 ; grown in Southern 
Shan States, xxii. 257; Wardha, xxiv. 
370. See also Plantains. 

lianapharl, dialect of Bundelkhandl, 
spoken in Baoni, vi. 415; CharkharT, 
X. 178 ; Chhatarpur, x. 200. 

Banaras. See Benares. 

Banas, river of Rajputana, vi. 345-346. 

Banas, river of Western India, vi. 346. 

Banashankari, goddess of forests, wor- 
shipped by Lambanis in Mysore, 
xviii. 200. 

Banasura, legend of, at Gangaikonda- 
puram, Trichinopoly, xii. 128. 

Banavasi, province in Mysore, vi. 346. 

Banavasi, village in North Kanara 
District, Bombay, former capital of 
province, vi. 346-347. 

Banbir, ruler of Mewar, xxiv. 89. 

Bancoora, District, subdivision, and town 
in Bengal. See Bankura. 

Band Virah Tappa, plateau in Kohistan, 
XV i. 5. 

Banda, Sikh Guru, returned to Amritsar 
(1708), and preached a religious war 
against the Muhammadans, v. 320 ; 
Gurdaspurfort built by (171 2), xii. 393, 
40T ; Kalanaur plundered by, xiv. 297 ; 
incursion into Karnal (1709), xv. 50, 
58 ; Lahore threatened by insurrection 
of, xvi. no ; taken prisoner by Abdur 
Samad Khan, xvi. no; rebellion in 
the Punjab under, xx. 271; Samana 
sacked by (170S), xxii. 2 ; sacked 
Sirhind and killed Bazid Khan (1708), 
xxiii. 21. 

Bands, District in United Provinces, vi 
347-356 ; physical aspects, 347-348 ! 
history, 348-349 ; population, 349- 
350; agriculture, 350-353; forests, 
352 ; trade and communications, 353 ; 
famine, 353-354 ; administration, 354- 
356; education, 356; medical, 356. 

Banda, tahsll in United Provinces, vi. 356. 

Banda, town in United Provinces, former 
capital of a Nawab, vi. 356-357 ; stone 
implements found at,ii. 92. 

Banda, tahsll in Saugor District, Central 
Provinces, vi. 357. 

Banda Nawaz, Kwaja, shrine at Giil- 
barga, Hyderabad, ii. 194, xii. 377, 

383. 
Bandalike, ruined and deserted village 

in Mysore, vi. 357. 
Bandamurlanka, village in Godavari 

District, Madras, vi. 357. 
Bandar, coal-field in Central Provinces, 

X. 50. 



54 



INDEX 



Bandar (= 'harbour'), /«/?//^ in Kistna Dis- 
trict, Madras, including MasuHpatam, 

vi. 357-538. 
Bandarban, village in Chittagong Hill 

Tracts, Eastern Bengal, vi. 35S. 
Bandas, beggars, in Kistna District, 

Madras, xv. 324. 
Bandaullah Khan, Gingee captured by 

(1638), xii. 244. 
Bande's temple at Baroda, vii. 83. 
Bandel, suburb of Hooghly town, Bengal, 

with old Roman Catholic church, 

vi. 358. 
Bandhalgotls, Rajput clan in Sultanpur 

District, xxiii. 133. 
Bandhavapura, ruined and deserted 

village in Mysore. See Bandalike. 
Bandhogarh, old fort in Rewah State, 

vi- 358-359- 
Bandia Beli, shrine at Than, Kathiawar, 

xxiii. 288, 
Bandi-Baian, branch of Koh-i-Baba 

mountains, Herat, xiii. 113. 
Band-i-Turkistan, branch of Koh-i-Baba 

mountains, Herat, xiii. 113. 
Bandra, town in Thana District, Bombay, 

almost a suburb of Bombay City, vi, 

359-360. 
Banduk. See Bandia Beli. 
Baned, capital of Suket State, Punjab, 

vi. 360. 
Bancra, chief town of estate in Rajput- 

iina, vi. 360. 
Baneshwar, Mahiidco, temple of, at 

Balasore, Orissa, vi. 245 ; in Dungar- 

pur State, xi. 379; at Mohol, Sholapur, 

xvii. 187. 
Banga, ancient name for tract in Bengal, 

which has given its name to the 

Province, vi. 360, vii. 210, 211, xiv. 

92, XX. 217, 218. 
Banga, son of king Bali, legendary 

founder of kingdom of Bengal, vii. 

194-195. 
Banga, town in Jullnndur District, 

Punjab, vi. 360-361. 
Bangabasi College, Calcutta, ix. 283. 
Banga-/>/ias/id o Sfxhitya, history of Ben- 
gali literature, by Dines Chandra Sen, 

ii. 434. 
Bauga-darsati^ Bengali magazine, edited 

by Bankim Chandra Chatterji, ii. 433. 
Bangahal, canton in Kangra District, 

Punjab, vi. 361. 
Bangalore, District in Mysore State, vi. 

361-367; physical aspects, 361-362; 

history, 362-363 ; j^opulation, 363- 

364 ; agriculture, 364-365 ; forests, 

365 ; trade and communications, 365- 
366; famine, 366; administration, 366. 

Bangalore, taluk in Mysore, vi. 367-36S. 

Bangalore, seat of government in Mysore 

State, and also British civil and military 



station, vi. 368-371; meteorology,!. 154; 
manufactures, iii. 201, 213, 216, 239. 

Bangalore Woollen, Cotton, and Silk 
Mills Company, Bangalore, xviii. 222. 

Banganapalle, State in Madras, vi. 371- 
378; physical aspects, 371-372; his- 
tory, 372-374 ; population, 374 ; agri- 
culture, 374-375 ; trade and communi- 
cations, 375 ; famine, 376 ; administra- 
tion, 376-378. 

Banganga, river of Northern India, vi. 

378-379- 
Banganga, old bed of the Ganges in 

United Provinces, vi. 378. 

Panganga, hill stream in United Provinces, 

vi^. 378. 
Bangaon, subdivision in Jessore District, 

Bengal, vi. 3797380. 
Bangaon, village in Jessore District, Ben- 
gal, vi. 3S0. 
Bangar, breed of cattle in Hardoi District, 

xiii. 47. 
Bangarmau, town in Unao District, 

United Provinces, vi. 380. 
Bilngaru, dialect of Western Hind!, i. 366, 

367 ; spoken in Hissar, xiii. I48 ; in the 

east of the Punjab, xx. 286. 
Bangash, Afghan tribe, in Hangu iahsil, 

Kohat, xiii. 24 ; in Kohat District, xv. 

342-343* 345 ; »" Kurram Agency, xvi. 

49, 51- 
Bangavadi, tablet in memory of dead 

hero, ii. 51. 
Bangles, manufactured in Jawad, Central 

India, xiv. 86 ; North- West Frontier 

Province, xix. 182. 

Brass, manufactured at Ganjiim, xii. 

151; 

Coco-nut sliells, manufactured at 
Shahpura, Rajputana, xxii. 224. 

Glass, manufactured in Alwar, v. 
263 ; Anantapur, v. 344 ; Balaghat, vi. 
230 ; Bharatpur, viii. 82 ; Bombay 
Presidency, viii. 325-326 ; Central Pro- 
vinces, X. 52 ; Channapatna, Mysore, 
X. 174; Dharwar, xi. 312; Garhwal, 
xii. 168; Gurgaon, xii. 407; Indur, 
Hyderabad, xiii. 354 ; Jalesar, Etah, 
xiv. 27 ; Jubbulpore, xiv. 213; Kadur, 
Mysore, xiv. 267 ; Kittur, Belgaum, 
^v. 337 ; Mainpuri, xvii. 37 ; Marahra, 
Ktah, xvii. 205 ; Nasirabad, East Klian- 
desh, xviii. 413 ; Punjab, xx. 317 ; R.ae 
Barell, xxi. 30; Raigarh, Central Pro- 
vinces, xxi. 47; Riimpur, Saharanpur, 
xxi. 190; Ratanpur, Central Provinces, 
xxi. 239; .Saugor, xxii. 143; SconT, xxii. 
171 ; Trichinopoly, xxiv. 35; United 
Provinces, xxiv. 204. 

Ivory, manufactured in Goi.dal, 
Kathifiwar, xii. 320; Gujriinwiila, xii. 
3*'3 ; Gurdaspur, xii. 398 ; Lahore, xvi. 
loi ; Multan, xviii. 31 ; Punjab, xx. 318. 



INDEX 



55 



Lac, manufactured in Tianswara, 
Rajputana, vi. 411; Belul, viii. 16; 
Bhagalpur, viii. 32 ; Bimratpur, viii. 82 ; 
Jessore, xiv. 96 ; Panch Mahals, xix. 
386 ; Santal Parganas, xxii. 73 ; SeonI, 
xxii. 171. 

Shell, manufactured in Bankura, 
vi. 3S8 ; Bengal, vii. 269 ; Dacca, xi. in; 
Murshidabad, x\ iii. 50 ; Sylhet, xxiii. 
196, 203. 

Bangru, or DeshwalT, dialect of Punjabi, 
spoken in Hissar, xiii. 148 ; jTnd State, 
xiv. 170. 

Bangulzai, division of the Brahuis, ix. 15 ; 
in Kachhi, xiv. 250 ; Sarawan, xxii. 
99. 

Bnni, book containing precepts of Dadu, 
founder of the Dadupanthi sect, in 
Rajputana, xviii. 370. 

Bani Abbas, tribe in Hyderabad Dis- 
trict, Sind, xiii. 315. 

Banias (or Vanis), trading caste, i. 498, 
iii. 302 ; in Agra, v. 77 ; Ahmadabad, 
V. 97,98; Ahmadnagar, V. 119 ; Akal- 
kot, V. 178; Allgarh, v. 212 ; Ambala, 
V. 2S0; Assam, vi. 157 ; Aurangabad, 
vi. 144; Ballia,vi.252; Baroda, vii. 56; 
BastI, vii. 127; Bhir, Hyderabad, viii. 
113; Bidar, Hyderabad, viii. 166; 
Bilaspur, viii. 226; Bombay Presi- 
dency, viii. 303, 305, 412 ; Broach, ix. 
22 ; Bulandshahr, ix. 51 ; Central India, 
ix. 353; Central Provinces, x. 23, 25-26, 
57, 96; Chhaprauli, Meerut, x. 196; 
i)elhi, xi. 226; Etawah, xii. 42 ; Feroze- 
piore, xii. 92 ; Fyzabad, xii. 112; Gaya, 
xii. 204; Ghotki, Sind, xii. 237 ; Gonda, 
xii. 314; Gorakhpur, xii. 335; Gulao- 
thl, Bulandshahr, xii. 374 ; Gulbarga, 
Hyderabad, xii. 378 ; Gurgaon, xii. 405 ; 
Halol, Panch Mahrds, xiii. 12 ; Hissar, 
xiii. 149 ; Hyderabad State, xiii. 265 ; 
Indur, Hyderabad, xiii. 353 ; Jaunpur, 
xiv. 77 ; Jubbulpore, xiv. 209 ; JuUundur, 
xiv. 226; Kaira, xiv. 279; Karnal, xv. 
52 ; Kathiawar, xv. 177 ; Khandesh, xv. 
231 ; Kolaba, xv. 360 ; Mahi Kantha, 
xvii. 17; Mandla, xvii. 163; Meerut, 
xvii. 257; Muzaffarnagar, xviii. 87; 
Nander, Hyderabad, xviii. 351 ; Nar- 
singhpur, xviii. 388; Nirnar, xix. no; 
Osmanabad,Hyderabad, xix.271 ; Panch 
Mahals, xix. 384 ; Parbhani,Hyderabad, 
xix. 412 ; Partabgarh, xx. 17 ; Punjab, 
XX. 288; Raipur, xxi. 52; Ratnagiri, 
xxi. 249 ; Rohtak, xxi. 314 ; Savant- 
vadi, Bombay, xxii. 153 ; SeonT, xxii. 
169; Sind, viii. 307; Sirpur Tandur, 
Hyderabad, xxiii. 42 ; Surat, xxiii. 
158; Tarapur-Chinchani, Thana, xxiii. 
250; Thana, xxiii. 294; United Pro- 
vinces, xxiv. 170; Vambori, Ahmad- 
nagar, xxiv. 298. 



Bani-Israil, or Jews, i. 441 ; in Bombay 
City, viii. 412; JanjTra, xiv. 59; Ko- 
laba, XV. 360-361 ; Konkan, xv. 395. 

Baniyachung, village in Sylhet District, 
Assam, vi, 380. 

Baniyas, trading caste. See Banias. 

Banjara, Gipsy dialect, spoken in Berar, 
vii. 378; Hyderabad State, xiii. 246- 

Banjaras(Vanjaras,Lambadis,Lambanis), 
grain carriers, cattle graziers, and 
nomad tribe, in Ahmadnagar, v. 115, 
118; Anantapur, V. 341 ; Aurangabad, 
Hyderabad, vi. 144; Balaghat, vi. 227 ; 
Bangalore, vi. 363 ; Bareilly, vii. 7 ; 
Basim, vii. 98 ; Bellary, vii. 163 ; Berar, 
vii. 379, 419 ; BhIr, Hyderabad, viii. 
113; Bombay Presidency, viii. 304, 305 ; 
Buldana, ix. 62 ; Chitaldroog, Mysore, 
X. 293; Hassan, Mysore, xiii. 65 ; Hy- 
derabad State, xiii. 247, 297 ; Indiir, 
Hyderabad, xiii. 353; Kadur, Mysore, 
xiv. 265; Khandesh, xv. 231, 232; 
KherT, XV. 271 ; Kolaba, xv. 360; Kolar, 
Mysore, xv. 372 ; Kurnool, xvi. 35 ; 
Mysore, xviii. 199-200, 246; Nasik, 
xviii. 402 ; Pilibhlt, xx. 139; Rampur 
State, xxi. 185; Saharanpur, xxi. 373; 
Shimoga, Mysore, xxii. 286; Sirpur 
Tandur, Hyderabad, xxiii. 42 ; Tanda, 
Fyzabad, xxiii. 221; Harangal, Hyder- 
abad, xxiv. 360; Wun, xxiv. 392. 

Banjigs, traders, in Belgaum, vii. 149; 
Bijapur, viii. 1 79 ; Dharwar, xi. 307. 

BanjogI, language of Central Chin sub- 
group, i. 393. 

Bank of Bengal, branch in Hyderabad 
city, xiii. 311; Lahore, xvi. 114; Moul- 
mein, xviii. 9; Narayanganj, Dacca, 
xviii. 374. 

Banka, subdivision in Bhagalpur District, 
Bengal, vi. 3S0-381. 

Banka, village in Bhagalpur District, 
Bengal, vi. 381. 

Banka Ishri Singh, Diwan, holder ot 
Banka-Paharl estate, vi. 381. 

Banka-PaharT, petty State in Central 
India, vi. 38 1, ix. 77. 

Bankapur, tdlitka in Dharwar District, 
Bombay, vi. 381. 

Bankapur, ancient town in Dharwar 
District, Bombay, vi. 381-3S2. 

Bankibazar, village in District of Twenty- 
four Parganas, Bengal, settlement of 
the Ostend Company in the first half of 
the eighteenth century, vi. 382. 

Bankim Chandra Chatteiji (1838-94), 
Bengali novelist and magazine editor, 

"• 43.3- 
Bankipore, subdivision in Patna District, 

Bengal, vi. 382. 

Bankipore, town and civil station in Patna 

District, Bengal, vi. 382-383, 



56 



INDEX 



Bankot or Fort Victoria, village in Rat- 
nagiri District, Bombay, earliest 
English possession on the mainland, vi. 

383- 

Banks, Major, succeeded to civil com.mand 
of Lncknow on death of Sir H. Law- 
rence (1857), xvi. 192. 

Banku Rai, Bankura called after, vi. 391. 

Bankura, District in Bengal, vi. 383-390 ; 
physical aspects, 383-384 ; history, 
385 ; population, 385-386 ; agriculture, 
386-3S7 ; trade and communications, 
387-38S ; famine, 388 ; administration, 
388-390 ; education, 390 ; medical, 390. 

Bankura, subdivision in Bengal, vi. 390- 

391- 

Bankura, town in Bengal, with leper 

asylum, vi. 391 ; silk manufacture, iii. 
211. 

Banmauk, subdivision and township in 
Katha District, Upper Burma, vi. 391. 

Bannagar, Devlkot in Dinajpur legendary 
citadel of, xi. 275. 

Banne Singh, chief of Rajgarh, xxi. 69. 

Bannerman, Major, force sent to Tinne- 
velly under {c. 1799}, xxiii. 365. 

Banni Bilas, palace and gardens in Alwar, 
V. 268. 

Banni Singh, Maharao Raja, rule in 
Alwar (1824-57), V. 258; built 
palace at Alwar, v. 268; built dam 
at Alwar (1844), v. 269; added town 
wall and ditch to Rajgarh, xxi. 71. 

Bannu, District in North- West Frontier 
Brovince, vi. 392-402 ; physical aspects, 
392-393; history, 393-395; population, 
395-396 ; agriculture, 397-39^ ; trade 
and communications, 398-399 ; famine, 
399; administration, 399-402; geology, 

1- 73- 

Bannu, tahsil in North- West frontier 
I'rovince, vi. 402. 

Bannu , or Kdwardesabad , town and canton- 
ment in Norlh-West Frontier Province, 
vi. 402 ; manufactures, iii. 190, 213. 

Bannuchis, Bathan tribe in Bannu District, 

vi- 394. 396. 
Bannur, town in Mysore, vi. 402-403. 
Bannuwals. See Bannuchis. 
Banpas, village in l^urdwan District, 

Bengal, vi. 403. 
Bansah, in Gujarat, capture of, by Damajt 

Gaikvvar, vii. 33. 
Bansbaria, town in Ilooghly District, 

Bengal, vi. 403. 
Bansda, State in Surat Agency, Bombay, 

vi. 403-405. 
Bansda, chief town of State in Bombay, 

vi. 405. 
Bansdih, tahsil in Ballia District, United 

Provinces, vi. 405. 
Bfinsdlh, town in Ballia District, United 

Provinces, vi. 405. 



Bansgaon, tahsil in Gorakhpur District, 
United Provinces, vi. 405-406. 

Bansgaon, town in Gorakhpur District, 
United Provinces, vi. 406. 

Bansgawa, village in Gorakhpur District, 
United Provinces, vi. 406. 

Banshankari, fair held in honour of, Ilkal, 
Bijapur, xiii. 329. 

Bans!, tahsil in Ijasti District, United 
Provinces, vi. 406. 

BansI, estate and town in Rajputana, vi. 
407. 

Bansror, estate in Rajputana. See Bhains- 
rorgarh. 

Banswada, former tdhik in Hyderabad 
State, vi. 407. 

Banswara, State in Rajputana, vi. 407- 
413; physical aspects, 407-408; his- 
tory, 408-409; population, 409-410; 
agriculture, 410 ; forests, 410 ; trade 
and communications, 411; famine, 411; 
administration, 411-413; area, popu- 
lation, revenue, and administration, iv. 

95- 

Banswara, town in Rajputana, vi. 413. 

Banteng {Bos so/itlaicits). See Tsine. 
Baiiti {Paiiicum spicatiifii), grown in 

Amreli /;'(?;//, Baroda, v. 317; P>aroda, 

vii. 46; Kadi^rrtw/, xiv. 256; Rajpipla, 

xxi. 81. 
Bantva, petty State in Kathiawar, Bombay, 

vi. 413, XV. 169. 
Bantva, town in Kathiawar, Bombay, vi. 

4'3. 
Bantva-Manavadar. See Manavadar. 
Banu, Akra, in Bannu, traditionally held 

by, as apanage, v. 190. 
Banur, tahsil in Patiala State, Punjab, vi. 

4>3-4M- 

Banur, town in Patiala Slate, Punjab, vi. 
414. 

Banyan trees, cultivated or grown in 
Baroda, vii. 25; Belgaum, vii. 157; 
Broach, ix. 19 ; Buldaiia, ix. 60; Burd- 
wan, ix. 92; Central Provinces, x. 8; 
Cutch, xi. 77; Damoh, xi. 135 ; G.iya, 
xii. 196; HardoT, xiii. 43; Ilooghly, 
xiii. 163; Jessore, xiv. 91 ; Jubbulpore, 
xiv. 207; Kadi /;vf«/, xiv. 256; Khan- 
desh, XV. 227; Khandpara, Orissa, xv. 
241; Main Kantim, xvii. 15; Malda, 
xvii. 75; Midnapore, xvii. 328; Minbu, 
Ijurma, xvii. 345 ; Monghyr, xvii. 392 ; 
Murshidabad,xviii.45; Nasik, xviii. 399; 
Navsiiri, Baroda, xviii. 423 ; Orissa 
Tributary States, xix. 260; Panch Ma- 
hills, xix. 3S1 ; Purl, xx. 400; Satara, 
xxii. 117; Sind, xxii. 393 ; Surat, xxiii. 
152; Taiijore, xxiii. 226; Udaijuir. State, 
xxiv. 96 ; Wardlia, xxiv. 367. 

Bnoli, or well, excavated in rock at 
Dharmjaygarh, Central Provinces, xi. 
300. 



INDEX 



57 



BaonI, sanad State in Central India, vi. 
414-415. 

Baoris. See Baurias. 

Bapa Rawal, lionse of Udaipur founded 
by, ii. 312, vii. 90; temple built at 
Eklingji, xxiv. 104 ; Chitor fort taken 
(734), X. 299. 

Bapanattam, village in North Arcot Dis- 
trict, Madras, vi. 415-416. 

Bapatla, idliik in Gunlur District, Madras, 
vi. 416. 

Bapatla, town in Guntur District, Madras, 

. vi. 416. 

Bappairao, historical poem in Prakrit by, 
ii. 268. 

Baptiste, Colonel Jean, Deogarh fort, 
Jhaiisi, taken for Sindhia by (1811), xi. 
246 ; Lalitpur the head-quarters of 
(1812), xvi. 133; Talbahat captured 
(181 1), xxiii. 2TI. 

Baptists, in India, i. 443 ; population 
statistics, i. 475, 477. See also in each 
Province, District, and larger State 
article under Population. 

Baptist Missions. See under Protestant 
Missions. 

Bapu Gokhale, general of the Peshwa, 
defeated by Colonel Burr at Kirkee, 
XV. 308, XX. 182. 

Bapu Naik, defeated by Muhammad Abul- 
Khair Khan (1743), xix. 315. 

Bapu Sindhia, ravaged Ratlam State, 
xxi. 241 ; Agar overrun and devastated 
by (1801), V. 70. 

Bara or Mech, language of the Bodo 
group, spoken in the Assam Valley, 
i' 387, 393, 4C0; Goalpara, xii. 272; 
Jalpaigurl, xiv. 35. 

Bara, river in North-West Frontier Pro- 
vince, utilized for a canal, also giving 
its name to a fort, vi, 416-417. 

Bara, tahsil in Allahabad District, United 
Provinces, vi. 417. 

Bara, town in Ghazipur District, United 
Provinces, vi. 417 ; first indigo factory 
in Champaran built by Colonel Hickey 
at (1813), X. 143. 

Bara Bank!, District in United Provinces, 
vi. 418-424; physical aspects, 418; 
history, 419; population, 420; agri- 
culture, 420-422 ; trade and communi- 
cations, 422 ; administration, 423-424; 
education, 424 ; medical, 424. 

Bara BankT, town in United Provinces, 
vi. 424. 

Bara Gali, small cantonment in North- 
West Frontier Province, vi. 425. 

Bara Khambha, building at Sandila, 
Hardoi, xxii. 31 ; near Shikarpur, Sind, 
xxii. 278. 

Bara Lacha, mountain pass in Kilngra, 
Punjab, vi. 426. 

Bara Mahal, palace at Bhopal, viii. 144. 



Bara palace, at KarwT, Coimbatore, xv. 

Bara Sadat, Shiah organization of Saiyids 
in Karnal, xv. 51. 

Bara Talao. See Jet Sagar. 

Bara TopT, or ' twelve hats,' seditious 
organization discovered at Nihtaur, 
Bijnor, xix. 84. 

Bara Wafat, festival in Punjab, xx. 294. 

Barabakund, temple at Sitakund, Chitta- 
gong, xxiii. 50. 

Barabar Hills, in Gaya District, Bengal, 
with antiquarian remains, vi. 424-425; 
caves, ii. 47, 57, iii, 161-162. 

Barabati Kila, fort in Cuttack, Orissa, 
xi. 98. 

Barada Kanta, rule in Jessore, xiv. 93. 

Bdradaris (palaces), in Hyderabad, xiii. 
310; Khajuha, Fatehpur, xv. 219-220; 
Kora, Fatehpur, xv. 398 ; Lahore, xvi. 
Ill; Lucknow, xvi. 195; Madhi, 
Ahmadnagar, xvi.231 ; Narnala, Berar, 
xviii. 379; Patiala, XX. 51; Shahganj, 
Jaunpur, xxii. 201 ; Shekhupura, Guj- 
ranwala, xxii. 270. 

Baraduari, or BaradarwazT, of Ramkel, 
' golden mosque ' at Gaur, Malda, vii. 
222, xii. 190. 

Baraganda, Hazaribagh, copper found, iii. 
144. 

Baragaon, village in Patna District, Ben- 
gal, vi. 425. 

Baragaon, town in United Provinces. See 
Chit Flrozpur. 

Baragara salt, iv. 249, viii. 327. 

Baragharia Nawabganj, town in Eastern 
Bengal. See Nawabganj. 

Barail, range of hills in Assam, vi. 425- 
426. 

Barak, river of Assam. See Surma. 

Barakar, river in Bengal, vi. 426. 

Barakar, village in Burdwan District, 
Bengal, vi. 426; coal and iron works, 
iii. 133, 146, iv. 317-318, vii. 265. 

Barakzais, Durrani clan of Afghans, rule 
in part of Baluchistan, vi. 276 ; Pesha- 
war, xix. 153. 

Baramahal, historic name of north-eastern 
corner of Salem District, Madras, vi. 
427. 

Baramati, town in Poena District, Bom- 
bay, vi. 427. 

Baramba, tributary State in Orissa, Ben- 
gal, vi. 427-428. 

Baramula, town in Kashmir, vi. 428. 

Baran, town with railway junction, in 
Rajputana, vi. 428. 

Baran, old name of Bulandsliahr, United 
Provinces, vi. 428. 

Baran, Shaikh, mosque at Jafarabad, 
Jaunpur, xxiv. 426. 

Baran Lak, pass in Pab Mountains, Balu- 
chistan, xix. 296. 



58 



INDEX 



Baranagar, town in District of Twenty- 
four Parganas, Bengal, vi. 429. 

Barani, Dhar fort mentioned by, xi. 294. 

Barapahfiri, ruins at Asobhuk in Patna 
city, XX. 68. 

Barapole, river of Southern India, vi. 
429. 

Barappa, founded a subordinate dynasty 
in Soutliern Gujarat, viii. 2S2. 

Barars, caste employed in manufacture of 
salt, Sambhar Lake, xxii. 21. 

Barasat, subdivision in District of 
Twenty-four Parganas, Bengal, vi. 429- 

43°- 

Barasat, town in District of Twenty-four 

Parganas, Bengal, vi. 430. 
Piaraset-Basirhat Railway, iii. 415. 
Barasingha. See Deer, Swamp. 
Barauda, village in Rohtak District, Pun- 
jab, vi. 430. 
Baraunda, sanad State in Baghelkhand, 

Central India, vi. 430-431. 
Baraut, town in Meerut District, United 

Provinces, vi. 431. 
Barbak Shah, erection of Dakhil Darwiiza 

at Gaur ascribed to, xii. 189. 
Barbak Shah, son of Bahlol, rule in 

Jaunpur as governor, xiv. 75. 
Barbets (Capitonid.ae), i. 247. 
Barbosa, Portuguese traveller, description 

of Rander (1514^ xxi. 211 ; of Surat, 

xxiii. 154. 
Barclay, Colonel, marched against Kho- 

sas and expelled them from Gujarat 

(1819', xxi. 24. 
Barda Hills, in Kathiawar, vi. 431. 
Bardhamana. See Burdwan Town. 
I5aidl, tahsTl in Rewah State, Central 

India, vi. 432. 
Bardoli, tdlttka in Surat District, Bombay, 

vi. 432. 
Baidoli, town in Surat District, Bombay, 

vi. 432. 
Bardwan, Division, District, sulxlivision, 

estate, and town in Bengal. See Burd- 
wan. 
Barehta, Narsinghpur, sculptures from, 

xviii. 387. 
Bareilly, Division in United Provinces, 

vii. 1-2. 
Bareilly, District in United Provinces, 

vii. 2-12; physical aspects, 2-3; 

history, 3-6; population, 6-7; agri- 
culture, 7-9 ; trade and comnumica- 

tic)ns, 9; administration, 10-12. 
Bareilly, tahsU in United Provinces, vii. 

12. 
Bareilly, city in United Provinces, vii. 

12-14; history, 13; general description 

and industries, 14. 

(?///£•;■ ;vyt'>T;/(T.f;Mtteorology,i. 152; 

arts and manufactures, iii. 217, 229; 

water-supply, iv. 473. 



Barel Deo, traditional foimder of Bareilly 

city, vii. 4, 13. 
Barendra, ancient division of Bengal, vii. 

14-15,210-211; named by king Ballal 

Sen, XX. 244. 
Barga Bhuna, goddess. See Kali. 
Bargnrh, tahsJl in Sambalpur District, 

Bengal, vii. 15. 
Bargarh, village in .Sambalpur District, 

Bengal, vii. 15. 
Bargis, division of the Dhangar caste in 

Sholapur, xxii. 298. 
Bargista, tribe in Waziristan, their lan- 
guage, OrmurT, akin to Pashto, i. 355. 
Bargur, breed of cattle in Coimbatore, 

^- 363- 

Barh, subdivision in Patna District, Ben- 
gal, vii. 15. 

pjarh, town in Patna District, Bengal, 
vii. 15. 

Barha Saiyids. See Saiyids. 

Barhais, carpenters, in Bulandshahr, ix, 
52; Gaya, xii. 200; Moradabad, xvii. 
424. 

Barhaj,town in United Provinces, vii. 16. 

Barhalganj, town in Gorakhpur District, 
United Provinces, vii. 16. 

Barhampur, subdivision and town in Ben- 
gal. See Berhampore. 

Bai hut, ancient site in Central India. See 
Bharhut. 

liiiri, town in Dholpur Slate, Rajputana, 
vii. 16. 

Barl Deorhi, palace at Shahabad, xxii. 
196. 

Bari Doab, tract in the Punjab, vii. 16-1 7. 

Bari Doab Canal, Punjab, iii. 331, 333, 
335, vii. 17-18. 

Bar! Kacheri, cave in Dhamnar, Central 
India, xi. 283. 

Bar! Sadri, town in Rajputana, vii. 18-19. 

Bari.^r Sah, Janwar Rajput, founder of 
families in Oudli, vi. 207, 260, 

I'arld .Shaliis of lildar (1492-1609), ii. 
391, viii. 164. 

Barind, elevated tract in Eastern liengal, 
vii. 18. 

Baring, Sir Evelyn. See Cromer, Earl of. 

J'aring High School, Batala, Gurdasjiur, 
vii. 1 33. 

ISaiipada, cajiital of Mayiirbhanj Stale, 
Orissa, vii. 18. 

Barisal, subdivision in Bnckergunge Dis- 
trict, Eastern Bengal, vii. 19. 

Barisal, head -quarters of Backergunge 
District, Eastern Bengal, vii. 19-20. 

Barisal, navigable river in Eastern Bengal, 
vii. 19. 

Bariya, chief town of B.lriya State, Bom- 
bay, vii. 21. 

Ijiiriyal, .State in Rewa Kantha, Bombay, 
vii. 20-21. 

Barjorji MerwanjI Frazer, Khan Bahad\ir, 



INDEX 



59 



clock tower at Surat erected by (1871), 
xxiii. 168. 

Barkal, market in Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
Eastern Bengal, vii. 21. 

Barkalur. See Basrur. 

Barker, Sir Robert, marched to guard 
frontiers of Oudh and Kohilkhand 
(1773), xix. 282; meeting with Shuja- 
ud-daula (1772), xxiv. 156-157. 

Barkhan, taJistl in Loralai District, Balu- 
chistan, vii. 21-22. 

Barkhera, name of four thakiirats in 
Central India, vii. 22, viii. 147, xvii. 
99. 

Barkhurdar, Mian, shrine at Pasrur, xx. 

Barkur, village in South Kanara District, 
Madras, vii. 22. 

Barley ox jati {Hordetun viilgare^, iv. 98 ; 
retail prices, iii. 458 ; cultivated in 
Afghanistan, v. 51 ; Agra, v. 77; Ajai- 
garh, v. 131 ; Ajmer-Merwara, v. 149, 
152 ; Allahabad, v. 232 ; Almora, v. 
248; Ahvar, V. 261 ; Amritsar, v. 323; 
Ballia, vi. 253; Baltistan,vi. 263; Balu- 
chistan, vi. 295; Banda, vi. 351; 
Banswara, vi. 410 ; Bara BankI, vi. 
421 ; BastT, vii. 127 ; Benares, vii. 1S3 ; 
Berigal, vii. 243, 244, 245, 251, 347; 
Bhagalpur, viii. 31 ; Bharatpur, viii. 
81; Bhopal, viii. 134; Bijawar, viii. 
190; Bijnor, viii. 197 ; Budaun, ix. 37 ; 
Eulandshahr, ix. 53 ; Bundi, ix. 83 ; 
Cawnpore, ix. 311 ; Central India, ix. 
359; Champaran,x. 141, 142; Chhatar- 
pur, X. 200 ; Pakokku Chin Hills, x. 
282; Chitral, x. 303; Cutch, xi. 80; 
Darbhanga, xi. 156; Daur, xi. 202; 
Dehra Dun, xi. 215; Delhi, xi. 227; 
Dera Ghazi Khan, xi. 253; Dholpur, 
xi. 326; Dungarpur, xi. 382 ; Etah, xii. 
33 ; Etasvah, xii. 43 ; Farldpur, xii. 
57 ; Farrukhabad, xii. 67 ; Fatehpur, 
xii, 79; Ferozepore, xii. 93; Fyzabad, 
xii. 113; Garhwal, xii. 167; Cava, xii. 
201; Ghazipur, xii, 226; Ghorabari, 
xii, 236; Gilgit, xii, 241; Gonda, xii. 
314-315; Gorakhpur, xii. 336; Gujran- 
wala, xii. 357 ; Gujrat, xii. 369 ; Guni, 
xii. 387 ; Gurdaspur, xii. 396; Gurgaon, 
xii. 406 ; Gwalior, xii. 429; HamTrpur, 
xiii. 17; HardoT, xiii. 46; Hazara, xiii. 
80 ; Hazaribagh, xiii. 91 ; Himalayas, 
xiii. 133; Hissar, xiii. 150; Hoshiarpur, 
xiii. 197-198, 199; Hyderabad, xiii. 
25i> 252; Jaipur, xiii. 389, 390; 
Jalaun, xiv. 22 ; Jati,xiv. 71 ; Jaunpur, 
xiv. 78; Jhalawan, xiv, ill; Jhansi, 
xiv. 142 ; Jhelum, xiv. 154 ; jTnd, xiv. 
171; Jodhpur, xiv. 190; Jullundur, 
xiv. 226; Kachhi, xiv. 250; Kadi 
prant, xiv. 256; Kalat, xiv. 301; 
Kangra, xiv. 390 ; Karachi, xv, 6, 1 1 ; 



Karauli,'xv. 29 ; Karnal, xv. 53 ; Kash- 
mir, XV. 115, 1 1 9-1 20; Kharan, xv. 
249; KherT, XV. 271 ; Kishangarh, xv. 
313-314; Kohat, XV. 346, 417 ; Kurram 
Agency, xvi. 51 ; Ladakh, xvi. 89, 93; 
Lahore, xvi. 100; Lahul, xvi. 116; 
Lucknow, xvi. 184; Ludhiana, xvi. 
203; Mahaban iahsil, xvi. 427 ; Mak- 
ran, xvii. 48; Malda, xvii. 7^» 79 5 
Manbhum, xvii. 116 ; Mandi, xvii. 155 ; 
Mianwali, xvii. 320; Midnapore, xvii. 
333 ; near MTlam, xvii. 342 ; Mlrpur 
Sakro, xvii. 366; Mirzapur, xvii, 371; 
Monghyr, xvii. 396 ; Moradabad, xvii. 
424, 435 ; Moro, xviii. 2 ; Multan, xviii. 
29; Murshidabad, xviii. 48; Muttra, 
xviii. 67 ; Muzaffargarh, xviii. 79 ; 
Muzaffarpur, xviii. 99; Mymensingh, 
xviii. 153 ; Nabha, xviii. 266 ; Nagod, 
xviii. 302; Naini Tal, xviii. 327; 
Nalagarh, xviii. 336 ; Nepal, xix. 47 ; 
the Nllgiris, xix. 95 ; Orchha, xix. 245 ; 
Pabna, xix. 300; Palamau, xix. 340; 
Partabgarh, xx. 11, 18; Patiala,xx. 42 ; 
Patna, xx. 60; Peshawar, xx. 118; Pili- 
bhit, XX. 139, 140; Punjab, xx. 297, 
298 ; Quetta-Pishin, xxi. 15 ; Rae Bareli, 
xxi. 29; Rajputana,xxi. 120; Rajshahi, 
xxi. 164; Rawalpindi, xxi. 267; Rewah, 
xxi. 284; Rohtak,xxi. 315; Saharanpur, 
xxi- 373; Santal Parganas, xxii. 70; 
Saran, xxii. 88; Shahabad, xxii. 191; 
Shahbandar/'rt/7</^a, xxii. 199 ; Shahpur, 
xxii. 217 ; Shahpura chiefship, xxii. 
224; Sialkot, xxii. 330; Sikkim, xxii. 
370; Simla, xxii. 379 ; Sind, xxii. 412 ; 
Sirohi, xxiii. 33; Sitapur, xxiii. 57; 
Spiti, xxiii. 96; Sultanpur, xxiii. 134; 
Surguja, xxiii. 172; Tando Bago, xxiii. 
223; Tatta tahika, xxiii. 2 54 ; Tonk, 
xxiii. 417 ; Udaipur, xxiv. 95 ; Unao, 
xxiv. 125 ; United Provinces, xxiv, 180 ; 
Southern Waziristan, xxiv. 384. 

Barliyar, village in the Nllgiri Hills, 
Madras, vii. 22. 

Barlow, Sir George, Governor-General 
(1S05-7), ii. 492- 

Barmanda, petty State in Mahi Kantha, 
Bombay, vii. 22, xvii. 14. 

Barmer, head-quarters of Mallani District, 
Rajputana, vii. 22-23. 

Barmer, estate in Mallani, Rajputana, vii. 

23- 

Barmhan, Narsinghpur, place of pilgrim- 
age, xviii. 387-3S8. 

Barna Brahmans, i. 326, 331. 

Bamadl, river of Assnm, vii. 23. 

Barnagar, town with railway station in 
Central India, vii. 23. 

Barnagar, ancient site in Central India. 
See Baro. 

Barnagore, town in Bengal, See Bara- 
nagar. 



6o 



TNDEX 



Barnes. Sir Hugh, Lieutenant-Governor of 
Burma (1903), ix. 192. 

Baro, village and ancient site in Central 
India, vii. 24. 

Baroda, State in Gujarat, vii. 25-78; 
physical aspects, 26-27 ; history, 31- 
41; population, 41-44; agriculture, 
45-50 ; material condition of the 
people, 52 ; forests, 52-53 ; mines and 
minerals, 54; arts and manufactures, 
54-56 ; commerce and trade, 56 ; com- 
munications, 56-58 ; postal arrange- 
ments, 58 ; famine, 58-60 ; adminis- 
tration, 60-62 ; legislation and justice, 
60-61; finance and revenue, 62-69; 
land revenue, 64; public works, 69; 
army, 69-70; police, 70-71 ; education, 
71-75, 78; medical, 75-76; surveys, 
76 ; bibliography, 76. Tables : distri- 
bution of population, 77; agriculture 
and irrigation, 77 ; education, 78 ; Gaik- 
wfirs of, see that title. 

Other references : Parsls in, i. 440 ; 
population and density, i. 454 ; mor- 
tality through famine, i. 466; Animism, 
i. 472; railways, iii. 372; famine, 
iii. 492 ; statistics, iv. 61 ; historical 
sketch, iv. 66; subsidiary force, iv. 86; 
contingent force, iv. 86; area, popu- 
lation, revenue, and administration, iv. 
92; education, iv. 416, 455. 

Baroda, praiit in Baroda State, vii. 79-81. 

Baroda, talnka in Baroda State, vii. 81. 

Baroda city, capital of Baroda State, vii. 
81-S4; description, 81-83; camp or 
British cantonment, 83-84; arts and 
manufactures, iii. 186, 192, 193, 216, 
2.^o, 239, 241. 

B>aroda, town in Central India, vii. 84. 

Baroda, village in Punjab. Sec Barauda. 

Baroda Railway. Sec Bombay, Baroda, 
and Central India Railway. 

Barot, town in United Provinces. See 
Baraut. 

Barpeta, subdivision in Kamrup District, 
Assam, vii. 84-85. 

Barpeta, town in Kamrup District, Assam, 
vii. 85. 

Barr, Sir David, Agent to Governor- 
CJeneral in Central India (1S94-1900 , 
ix. 376. 

Barr High .School, Jaora State, xiv. 65. 

Barrackpo;e, subdivision in District of 
Twenty-four Parganas, Bengal, vii. 85- 
86. 

Barrackpore, town in District of Twenty- 
four Parganas, Bengal, suliurban resi- 
dence of Viceroy, vii. 86-87 • Mutiny 
in 1S24 and 1857, 86. 

Barren Island, island in the Andaman 
.Sea. Sec Andaman Islands. 

Barros, de, quoted concerning .S.itgaon, 
xxii. 129. 



Barsana, town in Muttra District, United 

Provinces, vii. 87-8S. 
Barsi, talnka in .Sholapur District, Bom- 
bay, vii. 8S. 
Barsi, town in Sholapur District, Bombay, 

with trade in cotton, vii. 88. 
Barsi Light Railway, iii. 371, 415. 
Barsi Takli, town in Akola District, Berar, 

vii. 88. 
Barsoi, village in Purnea District, Bengal, 

vii. 88-89. 
Bartolomeo, Fra Paolo, Kolachel referred 

to by, .XV. 368. 
Barton Female Training College, Rajkot, 

Kathiawar, xxi. 75. 
Barui, festival held at TribenT, Hooghly, 

xxiv. 25. 
Baruipur, town in Twenty-four Parganas 

District, Bengal, vii. 89. 
P.aruis, betel-leaf growers, in Baruipur, 

Twenty-four Parganas, vii. 89 ; Sylhet, 

xxiii. 193. 
Barul, village in Burdwan District, Bengal, 

vii. 89. 
Barur, town in Berar. See Warud. 
Barur tank, Madras, iii. 332, 339. 
Baruva, port in Ganjam District, Madras, 

vii. 89. 
Barwa Sagar, town in Jhansi District, 

United Provinces, vii. 93. 
Barwaha, town in Central India, vii. 89- 

90. 
Barwaik, sect of Rajputs in Chanda, i. 

320-321. 
Barwalas, village watchmen, in Amritsar, 

V. 323; Gujraiiwala, xii. 357 ; Gurdas- 

pur, xii. 396 ; Sialkot, xxii. 330. 
Barw.^nT .State, guaranteed chiefship in 

Central India, vii. 90-92. 
BarwanI, capital of State in Central India, 

vii. 9.^- 
Barwars, criminal tribe, in Gonda, xii. 

314- 
Baryam, intendancy of waste country 

south-west of Delhi granted to, xx. 

133; killed (1560), XX. 133. 
Basalat Jang, brother of Nizam All, nile 

at .\doni, v. 25 ; tomb at Adoni, v. 25 ; 

Bellary tributary to, vii. 175; Guntur 

helil by, x. 336, xii. 390 ; Koliir held 

by, XV. 371 ; threatened Nellore (1760), 

xix. ID. 
I'asalt, found in Ahmadnagar, v. ilS; 

Amraoti, v. 307 ; Atraf-i-balda, vi. 

128; Aurangabad, vi. 145; Beiar, vii. 

382 ; Bhandara, viii. 61 ; Bhaunagar, 

viii. 93; 15hTr, lljderiibad, viii. 114; 

Bhopal, viii. 126; Bidar, Ilydcrabad, 

viii. 167 ; Central Provinces, x. 32 ; 

EUichpnr, xii. 1 1 ; Western (Jhats, xii. 

218; Jh.insi, xiv. 136; Jun.igarh, xiv. 

236; Katiiiiiwixr, XV. 172-173 ; Khan- 

desh, XV. 227; Niinder, Hyderabad, 



INDEX 



6i 



xviii. 352; Nimar, xix. 107; Osman- 
abad, Hyderabad, xix. 272 ; Orchha, 
xix. 242 ; Palamau, xix. 336 ; Parbhani, 
Hyderabad, xix. 413 ; Poona, xx. 166, 
175; Rajinahal Hills, xxi. 77 ; Ratlam, 
xxi. 241 ; Ratnagiri, xxi. 246; Rewa 
Kanlha, xxi. 292; Satara, xxii. 117; 
Sholapur, xxii. 301; Sural, xxiii. 152; 
United Provinces, xxiv. 141 ; Wardha, 
xxiv. 371. 

Basant Bagh, ghat at Srinagar city, 
Kaslimlr, xxiii. 100. 

Basant Panchmi, feast held in the Punjab, 
XX. 294. 

Basant Rai, Allgarh said to have been 
founded by (1644), v. 208. 

Basant Rai, of Palamau (1784), xix. 

338. 
Basaiiii piijd, festival held at Kamakhya, 

Kamrup, xiv. 325. 
Basantia, village in Jessore District, 

Bengal, vii. 93. 
Basantpur, village in Purnea District, 

Bengal, vii. 93. 
Basappa, New Hubli built by (1727), xiii. 

222. 
Basappa, temple of, at Shiggaon, Dhar- 

war, xxii. 275. 
Basappa Lingasvvami, guru, life at Kot- 

turu, xvi. 7 ; tomb at Kottfiru, xvi. 7. 
Basarh, village with ancient remains in 

Muzaftarpur District, Bengal, vii. 94. 
Basava, prime minister of the Kalachuri 

king Bijjala (c. 11 50); founder of the 

Lingayat sect, i. 422, vi. 183, xi. 307, 

xviii. 201-202 ; resided at Kalyani, xiv. 

324; resided at Sangameshwar, xxii. 50 ; 

shrine at Ulvi, xxiv. 1 16. 
Basavapatna, deserted town in Shimoga 

District, Mysore, vii. 94. 
Basavrajdurg, island off Haldipur, North 

Kanara, xiii. 10; lighthouse near, xvi. 

_2 3- 

Bas Deo, Kushan king, xxiv. 148. 

Bas Deo, Bareilly city founded by (1527), 
vii. 4, 13. 

Bas Deo, chief of Pathankot, Gurdaspur, 
XX. 28. 

Basdeo, KalpI founded by (fourth cen- 
tury), xiv. 31S. 

Basel German Evangelical or Lutheran 
Mission. See wwo'lfrProtestant Missions. 

Baseshvvar, temple and shrine in Bagevadi 
valley, Bijapur, vi. 183. 

Basevi, Captain, R.E., pendulum opera- 
tions, iv. 489. 

Bashahr, Simla Hill State, Punjab, vii. 

94-95- 

Bashgali, Kafir dialect, i. 356. 

Bashkarl, language spoken in North-West 
Frontier Province, xix. 165. 

Bashkars, tribe in I^Tr, North-West Fron- 
tier Province, xi. 361. 



Basi, talisil and town in Kalsia State, 
Punjab, vii. 95. 

Basi, town in Patiala State, Punjab, vii. 95. 

Basic rocks and dikes, in Bijawar, viii. 
188; Birbhum, viii. 240; Chagai and 
Ras Koh Hills, Baluchistan, x. 120; 
Manblium, xvii. 11 1; Mirzapur, xvii. 
367 ; North-West Frontier Province, 
xix. 141. 

Basim, District in Berar, vii. 95-103 ; phy- 
sical aspects, 95-96; history, 96-97; 
population, 97-98; agriculture, 98-100; 
forests, 100; trade and communications, 
loo-ioi ; famine, loi; administration, 
101-103. 

Basim, subdivision in Akola District, 
Berar, vii. 103. 

Basim, taluk in Akola District, Berar, 
vii. 103. 

Basim, town in Akola District, Berar, 
vii. 103-104. 

Basirhat, subdivision in Twenty-four Par- 
ganas District, Bengal, vii. 104. 

Basirhat, town in Twenty-four Parganas 
District, Bengal, vii. 104. 

BasTrhat-Baraset Railway, iii. 415. 

Basket-making and basket work, in An- 
gul, Orissa, v. 378 ; Northern Arakan, 
V. 395 ; Bengal, vii. 269 ; Bhandara, viii. 
67; Chin Hills, x. 277; Lower Chind- 
win District, x. 234; Chittagong, x. 
312; Cuttack, xi. 92 ; Daman, xi. 130; 
Dharampur, xi. 296 ; Garhwal, xii. 168; 
Garo Hills, xii. 179; Goalpara, xii. 274; 
Hooghly, xiii. 167 ; Jessore, xiv. 96 ; 
Kangra, xiv. 392 ; Khasi and Jaintia 
Hills, XV. 263 ; Madras Presidency, xvi. 
294 ; Manipur, xvii. 192 ; Meiktila, 
Burma, xvii. 283 ; Mianwali, xvii. 322 ; 
Monghyr, xvii. 397 ; Muzaffargarh, 
xviii. 80; Myingyan, Burma, xviii. 128; 
Mylliem, Khasi Hills, xviii. 14S ; 
Najibabad, Bijnor, xviii. 335 ; Nicobars, 
xix. 76; Noakhali,xix. 132-133; Now- 
gong, xix. 226; Parlakimedi, Ganjam, 
XX. 5: Peshawar, xx. 120; Poona, xx. 
176, 185; Punjab, XX. 318; Purl, xx. 
404; Rajpipla, xxi. 81 ; Rewa Kantha, 
xxi. 296 ; Santal Parganas, xxii. 73 ; 
Savantvadi, xxii. 153; Northern Shan 
States, xxii. 243 ; Southern Shan States, 
xxii. 261 ; Shwebo, Burma, xxii. 317; 
Sibi, Baluchistan, xxii. 340 ; Simla, 
xxii. 380 ; Tippera, xxiii. 384 ; Upper 
Sind Frontier District, xxiv. 282. 

Basmal, taluk in Parbhani District, 
Hyderabad, vii. 105. 

Lasmal, town in Parbhani District, Hyder- 
abad, vii. 105. 

Basoda, mediatized chiefship in Central 
India, vii. 105-106. 

Basors, village menials, in Hamlrpur, xiii. 
16 ; Jalaun, xiv. 21 ; Jhansi, xiv. 140. 



62 



INDEX 



Basrur, village in South Kanara District, 
Madras, vii. io6. 

Bassein, District in Lower Burma, vii. 
106-I17; physical aspects, 106-108; 
history, ioS-109 ; population, 109- 
iio; agriculture, no; fisheries, 112; 
forests, 112; minerals, 112 ; trade and 
communications, 112-114; administra- 
tion, 114-116. 

Bassein, subdivision in Lower Burma, vii. 

Bassein, township in Lower Burma, vii. 
117. 

Bassein, town and port in Lower Burma, 
vii. 1 17-X19. 

Bassein, navigable river in Burma, one of 
the channels of the Irrawaddy, vii. 1 19. 

Bassein geological system, i. 94, 95. 

Bassein, taluka in Thana District, Bom- 
bay, vii. 119. 

Bassein, town in Thana District, Bombay, 
former Portuguese settlement, vii. 120- 
121. 

Bassein, Treaty of, between Peshwa and 
British (1S02), ii. 443, 491, xiii. 337, 
xiv. 278, XX. 182, xxiv. 157. 

Bastar, feudatory State in Central Pro- 
vinces, vii. 1 21-124; physical aspects, 
121-122; history, 122-123; population, 
123; forests, 123-124 ; administration, 
124. 

Other references : Language spoken 
in. i- .^73, 374; -irea, population, 
revenue, and administration, iv. 102 ; 
survey, iv. 495-496. 

Basti, District in United Provinces, vii. 
124-131; physical aspects, 124-125; 
history, 125-126; population, 126-127; 
agriculture, 127-129; trade and com- 
munications, 129-130; famine, 130; 
administration, 1 30-131 ; irrigation, iii. 

325- 
Basti, tahsll in United Provinces, vii. 

131-132. _ 

Basti, town in United Provinces, vii. 132. 

Basils, Jain temples in Southern Maratlia 
Country: Kavlapur, xv. 192; Laksh- 
meshwar, xvi. 131. 

Basva Ling, Sonda chief (1697-1745), 
fort at Chitakul, Noith Kanara, sup- 
posed to have been built by, x. 289. 

Baswa, town and tahsil in Rajputana, vii. 

132. 

Batala, tahsll in Gurdaspur District, Pun- 
jab, vii. 132-133. 

Batala, town in Gurdaspur District, 
Punjab, vii. 133 ; manufactures, ii. 215, 
229. 

Batals, gipsies, in Kashmir, xv. 104. 

Batavia, foundation by the Dutch (1619), 
ii. 452. 

Batesar, village in Agra District, United 
Provinces, vii. 133-134. 



Bateswar cave, at Patharghata, Bhagal- 
pur, XX. 29. 

Bathing festivals, at Allahabad, v. 237, 
239, xii. 134; near Badarpur, Sylhet, vi. 
177; Bheraghat, Jubbulpore, xvii. 206; 
Bhimkund, Panch Mahals, viii. 109; 
Bhuban Hills, Cachar, viii. 149; Bi- 
thur, Cawnpore, viii. 251; Bombay 
Presidency, viii. 310; Calcutta, ix. 279; 
Point Calimere, Tanjore, ix. 291 ; 
Cauvery river, ix. 203 ; Chilmari, 
Rangpur, xvi. 30 ; Giriak, Patna, xii. 
246 ; Kadiri, Cuddapah, xiv. 260 ; 
Nangalband, Dacca, xviii. 373; Push- 
kar, Rajputana, xxi. i ; Rajapur, Banda, 
xxi. 67 ; Rushikulya, Ganjam, xxi. 341 ; 
Sagar Island, Twenty-four Parganas, vii. 
201, xii. 134, xxi. 366 ; Sonpur, Saran, 
xii. 126, 134, xxiii. 87; Soron, Etah, 
xxiii. 89; Thanesar, Kurnal, xxiii. 305; 
Tosham, xxiii. 421 ; Tribeni, Hooghly, 
xxiv. 25 ; Muttra, xii. 307. 

Bathing places, Agashi, Thana, v. 71 ; 
Badriiath, Garhwal, vi. 180; 15asim, 
Berar, vii. 104; Bauri, Bhagalpur, vii. 
136; Gokarn, Muttra, xii. 307 ; Kalasa, 
Mysore, xiv. 299; Santipur, Nadia,xxii. 
79; .Saptashring hill, Nasik, xxii. Si. 

Baths, ruined, Chaul, Kolaba, x. 185; 
Deolia, Rajputana, xi. 247; Hyder- 
abad, Sind, xiii. 309 ; Sialkot, xxii. 335. 

Bathudis, tribe in Keonjhar, xv. 202 ; 
Mayurbhanj, xvii. 242; Orissa Tributary 
States, xix. 257. 

Batrachians, i. 272-274. 

Bats, i. 225-226. 

Battles in which Asiatics only were en- 
gaged : Adas (1723, 1775), V. 8; 
Aurangabad (1853), vi. 149; Bayana 
(r. 1050), vii. 137; Balapur, vii. 32; 
Bhilapur (1731), vii. 33 ; Charaon 
(1804), xxi. 371 ; Chausa (1539), vi. 
417, X. 1S6 ; Dablana (1745), xi. loi ; 
Damalcheruvu (1740), ii. 471, xi. 128; 
Dharmatpur (1658), xxi. 241, xxiv. 
114^ Dhodap (176S), vii. 34,xi.32o; 
Dipalpur (1285% xi. 359; Dunyapur, 
xi. 3S6 ; Fathkhelda (1724), vii. 370, 
xni. 239; Giria (1740), xii. 245; 
Jandrlhar, xiv. 249 ; Kalpi (1477), 
xiv. 318; Kanauj (1539-40), vii. 213; 
Kanwa (15:^7), ii- 394 ; Kardla 
(1795) vii. 370, xiii. 347; Khanua 
(1527), vii. 19, XV. 245-246, xxi. 96; 
Lakheri (1793), xiii. 347; Lalsot 
(Tonga) ((-. 1787), xvi. 134 ; Mangrol 
(1821), xvii. 180; Mastung, xxii. 99; 
Merta (1790), xvii. 309; near Multan 
(1748), xviii. 27 ; Nehawend (642), 
V. 35; Nimb (1751), vii. 34; Pan- 
dharpur (1774), xix. 391 ; Pangal 
(1417, 1513), xix. 395 ; PanTpat (1526, 
1556. 1761, 1767). "• 394> 408, 411, 



INDEX 



63 



441, iv. 70, vii. 34, xi. 279, xiii. 335, 
xix. 281, 397-398, xxiv. 151, 156; 
Ponabalia Shamrail (1748), xx. 160; 
Rawalpindi, xxi. 272 ; Rokankhed 

(1437. 1590)' x^i- 304; Samogarh 
(1658), xi. 323; Satwas (1801), xxii. 
134-135; Sirhind (1763), v. 321; 
Sukkur (1833), xxiii. 127; Talikota 
(1565). ii- 347. 386, V. 25, 339, vii. 
148, 161, X. 169, xiii. 223, 238, xvi. 
249, xviii. 175, xxiii. 214, xxiv. 6, 312; 
Tanda (1660), xxiii. 221 ; Taraien 
(Tarawari), ii. 353, 354, 358; Thalner 
(1566), xxiii. 287; Udgir (1760), vii. 
370, xxiv. III. 
Battles in which Europeans were en- 
gaged: Adas (1775), V. 8-9; Aliwal 
(1846), ii. 503, V. 225-226; Ambur, v. 
291 ; Argaon (1803), vi. I, xiii. 241 ; 
Ashta (1818), vi. 10; Assaye (1803), 
vi. 121, xiii. 241 ; Bhitaixra or Fateh- 
ganj (West) (1794), vii. 5, xv. 190; 
Buxar (1764), ii. 479, v. 238, vii. 180, 
188, 218, ix. 248, xix. 281, xxiv. 156 ; 
near Cawnpore (1857), ix. 30S ; Chaul 
harbour, x. 184; Chichamba (1859), 
vii. 371 ; Chilianwala (1849), ^^- 5°5> 
X. 224; Chota Udaipur, x. 331; Dig 
(1804), xiii. 337; Ferozeshah (1845), 
ii. 503, xii. 99 ; Giria (1763), xii. 245 ; 
Golden Rock, xxiv. 29; Jajmau (1765), 
xix. 281 ; Kaveripak (1752), xv. 192 ; 
Kirkee (1817), xv. 308, xxiv. 301 ; 
Koregaon (1818), xv. 402 ; Laswari 
(1803J, xvi. 153-154; Maharajpur, 
xiv. 138, xvi. 434-435 ; Maiwand 
(1880), vi. 282; Mehidpur (1817), 
xiv. 63, xxii. 270; Miani (1843), ii. 
502, xiii. 314, 321, xvii. 315 ; Mudkl 
(1845), ii. 503, xviii. 13 ; Mukandwara 
pass (1804), xiii. 337 ; Padmanabham, 
(1794), xix. 310, xxiv. 341 ; Pandhar- 
pur (1817), xix. 391; Pegu, xx. 
86; Plassey (1757), ii. 475,-476, vii. 
218, XX. 156; St. Thomas's Mount 
(1759), xxi. 389; Satyamangalam 
(1790), xxii. 136; Sholinghur (1781), 
xxii. 308; Silabaldl (1817), x. 16; 
Sobraon (1846), ii. 503, xxiii. 68; 
Sugar-loaf Rock, Trichinopoly (1753), 
xu. 107-108; Udhua Nullah (1763), 
xxiv. iii; Wandiwash (1760), ii. 72, 
473, xvi. 252, xxiv. 353. 

Battye, Captain W., expedition against 
Utman Khel (1878), xix. 209. 

Battye, Major, surprised and killed by 
Gujar dependents of the Akazai, viii. 
252. 

Batwals, village watchmen, in Sialkot, 
xxii. 330. 

Baud, State in Orissa, Bengal, vii. 134-135. 

Baud, chief place of State in Bengal, vii. 

135- 



Baugh, archaeological site in Central 

India. See Bagh. 
Bauliari, seaport in Bombay. See Bav- 

liari. 
Baura, village in Jalpaiguri District, 

Eastern Bengal, vii. 135. 
Bauri, semi-Hinduized tribe in Bengal, 

i. 32 8 ; Bankura, vi. 386 ; Burdwan, ix. 

94; Cachar, ix. 252; Manbhum, xvii. 

115 ; Purl, XX. 402. 
Bauriyas, criminal tribe, in Cawnpore, ix. 

310; Muzaffarnagar, xviii. 87-88, 91; 

Nanta, Rajputana, xviii. 367 ; Paliala 

State, XX. 46. 
Bausi, village with ruins, in Bhagalpur Dis- 
trict, Bengal, vii. 135-136. 
Bava Malang, hill fortress in Bombay. 

See Malanggarh. 
Bavda, petty chiefship feudatory to Kol- 

hapur State, Bombay, vii. 136. 
Bavisi Thana, petty State in Mahi Kan- 

tha, Bombay, vii. 1 36. 
Bavliari, port in Ahmadabad District, 

Bombay, vii. 136. 
Baw, State in Burma. See Maw. 
Bawa Malang, hill fortress in Bombay. 

See Malanggarh. 
P,awafan, Muhammadan saint, shrine at 

Malgaon, Southern Maratha Country, 

xvii. 86. 
Bawal, district in Nabha State, Punjab, 

vii. 136. 
Bawal, town in Nabha State, Punjab, vii. 

136. 
Bawangaja, hill near Barwani, Central 

India, vii. 93. 
Bawarias, division of the Korku tribe in 

Central Provinces, xv. 403. 
Bawaris, criminal tribe, in Ferozepore 

District, xii. 93. 
Bawa-Vala, Captain Grant kept prisoner 

by, on Gir, Kathiawar, xii. 245. 
Bawgyo, Northern Shan States, pagoda 

at, xxii. 235. 
Bawlake, Karenni State, Burma, vii. 

136. 
Bawnin, State in Burma. See Mavvnang. 
Bawzaing, State in Burma. See Maw- 
son. 
Bax, John, Resident at Holkar's court 

(1834-40), ix. 376. 
Baxa, military cantonment in Eastern 

Bengal. See Buxa. 
Baxar, subdivision and town in Bengal. 

See Buxar. 
Bay leaves, Khasi and Jaintia Hills, xv. 
201 ; Maharam, xvi. 435 ; Malaisoh- 
mat, xvii. 72; Maodon, xvii. 204; 
Nongstoin, xix. 136. 
Bayalshime, open country in Mysore 

State. See Maidan. 
Bayana, ancient town in Bharatpur State, 
Rajputana, vii. 137. 



64 



INDEX 



Bayars, semi-Hincluized aboriginal tribe, 
in Mirzapur, xvii. 370. 

Bayazid, king of Bengal (1572), vii. 
216. 

Bayazid, prince, defied by Ahmad Khan, 
Bhatti chief, viii. 92. 

Bayazid, ruler of Malwa. See Baz Baha- 
dur. 

Bayazid Khan, founder of Kotla (1656, 
xvii. 86. 

Bayazid Shah, Shahab-ud-din, king of 
Bengal (1409), vii. 216. 

Bayin Naung, king of Toungoo, Ava 
taken by (1554), vi. 151 ; invasions of 
Mergui (1548-69), xvii. 296; rule in 
Sittang Valley, xx. 86. 

Bayley, C. .S., Agent to Governor-General 
in Central India (1900-5), ix. 376. 

Bayley, Mr., Commissioner, Kurnool, 
scheme of field assessment prepared 
by, xvi. 43. 

Bayley, Sir Steuart, Lieutenant-Governor 
of Bengal (1S87-90), vii. 220 ; Chief 
Commissioner of Assam, vi. 35. 

Bayley-Gobind Lai Technical Institute, 
Kangpur, xxi. 232. 

Baz Bahadur, ruler of Malwil (1554- 
64), ii. 380, 381 ; driven out of Cen- 
tral India by Akbar (1562), ix. 340; 
rule over Malwa, xvii. 104; rule in 
Mandu, xvii. 172; palace at Maiidu, 
ii. 187, xvii. 173; flight from Sarang- 
pur to Delhi, xxii. 96 ; buried at Uj- 
jaiii, xii. 96. 

Baz Bahadur, Chand Raja, rule in NainI 
Tal (1638-78), xviii. 324-325 ; ac- 
knowledged Mughal emperor, xviii. 
235 ; built temple at Bhim Tal, xviii. 

325- 
Bazar, valley in Nortli-W est Frontier 

Province, vii. 138. 
Bazars : Colonelganj, x. 375 ; Dliarm- 

kot, xi. 301 ; Dera tjhazi Khan, xi. 

258 ; Dera Ismail Khan, xi. 269 ; 

Faizabad, Afghanistan, xii. 49; Ilar- 

duaganj, xiii. 51 ; Ilenzada, xiii. 112; 

Herat, xiii. 114; Hyderabad, xiii. 310; 

Impiial, xiii. 330; Indore, xiii. 351; 

Jhenida, xiv. 163; Kyaukse, xvi. 78; 

Lashio, xvi. 150; Lalganj, xvi. 132; 

Lingsugwi, xvi. j66; Madakasira, xvi. 

226 ; Mahabaleshwar, xvi. 426 ; Mallk- 

abad, xvii. 90; Mandalay, xvii. 144; 

Manikarchar, xvii. 182; Maymyo, xvii. 

240 ; Mazar-i-Sharlf, xvii. 245 ; Meh- 

madabad,xvii. 272; Meiktila, xvii. 288 ; 

Mogok, xvii. 382 ; Moram, xviii. i ; 

Muhammadabad, xviii. 16; Multfin, 

xviii. 36 ; Myingyan, xviii. 134; Myit- 

kyina, xviii. 147; Nander, xviii. 355; 

NainI Tal, xviii. 333 ; Sendurjana, xxii. 

164; Shikarpur, x.xii. 276; Siiillong, 

xxii. 28 1. 



Bazid, religious reformer in DTr, xxiii. 

1 84. 
Bazid Khan, governor of Sirhind, Fateh 

Singh and Zorawar Singh bricked up 

alive by (1704), xxiii. 21 ; killed by 

Banda Bairagi (1708), xxiii. 21. 
Bea, tribe in the Andamans, v. 361. 
Beadon,Sir Cecil, Lieutenant-Governor of 

Bengal (1862-7), vii. 220. 
Beads, found among ruins at Gudivada, 

Kistna, xii. 347 ; made at Karnal, xv. 

54'; Sambalpur, .xxii. 13; Saugor, xxii. 

Bean, Captain, appointed first Political 
Agent in Shal, Baluchistan (1839), 
xxi. 13. 

Beans, cultivated in Afghanistan, v. 52 ; 
Baltistan, vi. 263 ; Baluchistan, vi. 295 ; 
Burma, ix. 50, 52, 152 ; Chin Hills, x. 
276 ; Pakokku Chin Hills, x. 282 ; 
Upper Chindwin, x. 244 ; Kalat, xiv. 
301; Kashmir, xv. 115; Ladakh, xvi. 
93 ; Makran, xvii. 48 ; Manbhum, xvii. 
116; Meiktila, xvii. 2S0, 281; My- 
ingyan, xviii. 125; Northern Shan 
States, xxii. 239; Southern Shan States, 
xxii. 257; Shwebo, xxii. 314; Taung- 
tha, xxiii. 257 ; Tippera, xxiii. 384. 

Bear Hill, peak in the Kundahs, Madras, 
xvi. 25. 

Bears, i. 223, 224 ; Adilabad, Hyderabad, 
v. 23 ; Afghanistan, v. 33 ; Almora, v. 
245 ; Ambala, v. 277 ; Anaimalais, v. 
333 ; Anantapur, v. 338 ; Angul, v. 375 ; 
Northern Arakan, v. 393 ; Aravalli 
Hills, V. 402; North Arcot, v. 404; 
South Arcot, v. 422; Assam, vi. 20; 
Atraf-i-balda, Hyderabad, vi. 125; 
Aurangabad, vi. 142; Bahraich, xi. 
206 ; Balasore, vi. 237 ; Baluchistan, 
vi. 272 ; Banda, vi. 348 ; Bankura, vi. 
384; Bannu, vi. 393 ; Baroda, vii. 30 ; 
Basim, vii. 96 ; Bassein, Burma, vii. 
108; Bellary, vii. 160; Bengal, vii. 
204 ; Berar, vii. 364 ; Bhagalpur, viii. 
27; Bhir, Hyderabad, viii. 112 ; lihutfin, 
viii. 155 ; Biligiri-Rangan Hills, viii. 
236 ; Bonai, Chota Nagpur, ix. 2 ; Bul- 
dana, ix. 60; BCiidi, Rajputana, ix. 
79; Cachar, ix. 250; Central India, ix. 
332 ; Central Provinces, x. 9 ; Chnmba, 
X. 129 ; Champarnn, x. 138 ; Chanda, x. 
I49; Chang Bhakar, Central Province:, 
X. 171 ; UpperChindwin,x. 240; Ching- 
leput, X. 254 ; Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
X. 319; Cochin, x. 342; Cooch I'eh.ar, 
X. 380; Coorg, xi. 7; Cudda])ah, xi. 
59; Cuttack, xi. 88; Darjceling, xi. 
167 ; Darrang, xi. 182 ; Dehra Dun, xi. 
211; Dera Ghazi Khiin, xi. 249; 
Dharwar, xi. 305 ; Dholpur, Raj- 
putana, xi. 322 ; Elgandal, Ilydcrabad, 
xii. 6; Fllichpur, xii. 11 ; Ganjiim, xii. 



INDEX 



65 



144; Garhwal, xii. 165; Garo Hills, 
xii. 172; Gaya, xii. 196; Gilgit, xii. 
239; Goalpara, xii. 270; Gonda, xii. 
311 ; Gorakhpur, xii. 332 ; Gulbarga, 
Hyderabad, xii. 376 ; Gwalior, xii. 421 ; 
Hazara, xiii. 76 ; Hazaribagh, xiii. 87 ; 
Hindu Kush, xiii. 138; norsleykonda, 
Cuddapah, xiii. 17S; Hyderabad, xiii. 
233 ; Indore, xiii. 335 ; IndCir, Hyder- 
abad, xiii. 352; Jaipur, xiii. 384; Jal- 
paiguri, xiv. 32 ; Jashpnr, Central Pro- 
vinces, xiv. 68 ; Jhalawan, Baluchistan, 
xiv. no; Jhansi, xiv. 136; Jodlipur, 
xiv. 181 ; Kafiristan, xiv. 270; Kala- 
hasti, North Arcot, xiv. 295; Kalat, 
xiv. 300 ; Kamrup, xiv. 331 ; North 
Kanara, xiv. 342 ; South Kanara, xiv. 
355; Kangra, xiv. 382 ;_ Karauli, xv. 
26; Karimnagnr, Hyderabad, xv. 42; 
Kashmir and Jammu, xv. 87 ; Katha, 
Burma, xv. 153; Khandesh, xv. 228; 
Kharsawan, Chota Nagpur, xv. 253; 
Khasi and Jaintia Hills, xv. 255 ; 
Kherl, xv. 269; Kirthar Range, xv. 
309 ; Kohar, xv. 342 ; Kolhapur, xv. 
381 ; Korea, Central Provinces, xv. 
400; Kotah, XV. 411; Kumool, xvi. 
32 ; Kyaukpyu, xvi. 62 ; Lakhimpur, 
xvi. 119; Larkana, x\'i. 137; Ling- 
sugur, Hyderabad, xvi. 163; Loralai, 
Baluchistan, xvi. 173; Lushai Hills, 
xvi. 213-214; Madras Presidency, xvi. 
245 ; Madura, xvi. 388 ; Mahbubnagar, 
Hyderabad, xvii. 2 ; Mahl Kantha, 
Bombay, xvii. 15 ; Malabar, xvii. 55 ; 
Manbhum, xvii. 112 ; Mandalay, xvii. 
127; Tklandi, Punjab, xvii. 153; Mani- 
pur, xvii. 185 ; Meiktila, xvii. 276; Mid- 
napore, xvii. 328; Minbu, x\-ii. 346; 
Monghyr, xvii. 392 ; Myitk}ana, xviii. 
136; Mysore, xviii. 166; Naga Hills, 
xviii. 285 ; NainI Tal, xviii. 324; Nal- 
gonda, Hyderabad, xviii. 339 ; S'ander, 
Hyderabad, xviii. 350 ; Narsinghpur, 
xviii. 386; Nellore, xix. 8 ; Nepal, xix. 
30; Nizamabad, Hyderabad, xix. 124; 
North-West Frontier Province, xix. 
146 ; Nowgong, xix. 222 ; Orissa Tribu- 
tary States, xix. 254 ; Pachaimalais, xix. 
305; Pakokkii, xix. 320; Palamau,xix. 
336; Palkonda Hills, xix. 367; Panna, 
xix. 399 ; Parbhani, Hyderabad, xix. 
41 1 ; Partabgarh, Rajputana, xx. 9 ; 
Fatna, xx. 55; Poona, xx. 166; Pun- 
jab, XX. 255; Ranch!, xxi. 199; Rai- 
chur, Hyderabad, xxi. 38; Rajputana, 
xxi. 91 ; Ratnagiri, xxi. 246 ; Rewa 
Kantha, Bombay, xxi. 293 ; Rewah, 
xxi. 280? Saharanpur,xxi. 368 ; Salem, 
xxi. 397; Salween, xxi. 416; San- 
doway, xxii. 32 ; Santal Parganas, xxii. 
63; Satara, xxii. 117; Savantvadi, 
Bombay, xxii. 151 j Shahabad, xxii. 

VOL. XXV. 



187 ; Northern Shan States, xxii. 233 ; 
Southern Shan States, xxii. 251; Shi- 
moga, Mysore, xxii. 296 ; Sibi, Balu- 
chistan, xxii. 337 ; Sibsagar, xxii. 345 ; 
Sikkim, xxii. 367; Simla, xxii. 377! 
Sind, xxii. 393; Singhbhum, xxiii. 3; 
Sirmur, xxiii. 22 ; Sirohi, xxiii. 29 ; 
Sirpur Tandur, Hyderabad, xxiii. 40 ; 
Siwalik Hills, xxiii. 66 ; Surat, xx;ii. 
153 ; Surguja, Central Provinces, xxiii. 
171; Tavoy, xxiii. 259; Tehrl, xxiii. 
270 ; Tharrawaddy, xxiii. 317 ; Thaton, 
xxiii. 330 ; Thayetmyo, xxiii. 344 ; 
Toungoo, xxiii. 422 ; Travancore, xxiv. 
5; Trichinopoly, xxiv. 27; Udaipur, 
Central Provinces, xxiv. 83 ; Udaipur, 
Rajputana, xxiv. 87 ; United Provinces, 
xxiv. 144 ; Warangal, Hyderabad, xxiv. 
358; Southern Wazlristan, xxiv. 38 1 ; 
Won, Berar, xxiv. 389 ; Yamethin, 
Burma, xxiv. 402. 

Beas, one of the five rivers in the Punjab, 
i. 32, vii. 138-139. 

Beauleah, head-quarters of Rajshahi 
District, Eastern Bengal. See Rampur 
Boalia. 

Beawar, head-quarters of Merwara Dis- 
trict, Ajmer-Merwara, with trade in 
cotton and a cotton-mill, vii. 139. 

Bebejiya, Mishmi tribe, xvii. 378. 

Beche-de-mer, s,tdi-s\Mgs, Mergui, xvii. 299, 
301. 

Becher, Major, tranquillity of Hazara 
maintained by, during Mutiny, xiii. 77. 

Bechrajl, temple at Baroda, vii. S3, 140. 

Bedadanuru coal-field, Godavari District, 
Madras, vii. 140. 

Bedas (Bedars, Berads, or Boyars), hunt- 
ing tribe, in Anantapur, v. 341 ; Banga- 
napalle, vi. 374 ; Bellary, vii. 163 ; 
Bijapur, viii. 174, 179; Bombay Presi- 
dency, viii. 304, 305 ; Chitaldroog. x. 
293, 297 ; Dharwar, xi. 308 ; Kolar, 
XV. 372 ; Kumool, xvi. 35 ; Lingsugur, 
Hyderabad, xvi. 164; Mysore, xviii. 
196, 197 ; Raichur, Hyderabad, xxi. 40 ; 
Rayadrug, xxi. 275 ; Sandur, xxii. 44- 
45 ; Shimoga, xxii. 286 ; Tumkur, xxiv. 

55- 
Beddome, Colonel, Conservator of Forests, 

Madras, xvi. 2S6 ; work on botany of 

Madras, xvi. 243. 
Bedi Bikrama Singh (Sikh prelate), 

feudal chief, Hoshiarpur, xiii. 194, 195 ; 

rebellion of, xiv. 3S6. 
Bedi Sahib Singh, of Una, Ludhiana in- 
vested by (1798}, xvi. 200. 
Bedingfield, Lieutenant, killed near Nong- 

khlao, Assam (1829), xix. 136. 
Bedis, descendants of Baba Guru, Nanak, 

Dera Nanak built by, xi. 271. 
Bedla, town in Rajputana, vii. 140. 
Bednor, estate in Rajputana. See Badncr. 



66 



INDEX 



Bedsa, village with cave-temples in Poona 
District, Bombay, vii. 140-141 ; caves, 
ii. 162. 

Bedsteads. See Furniture. 

Bee-eaters [Meropes., i. 248. 

Beehea, village in Bengal. See Bihiya. 

Beer, from rice and millet, iv. 257-258. 
See also Breweries. 

Beerbhoom, District in Bengal. See Bir- 
bhum. 

Bees, in Mysore State, xviii. 167. 

Beeswax, product and trade, Chin Hills, 
X. 277; Pakokku Chin Hills, x. 283; 
Upper Chindwin, x. 247 ; Jalpaiguri, 
xiv. 37 ; Jashpur, Central Provinces, 
xiv. 68 ; Madhupur Jungle, Eastern 
Bengal, xvi. 234 ; Orissa Tributary 
States, xix. 260 ; Palanpur Agency, xix. 
349 ; Peint, Nasik, xx. loi ; Santal Par- 
ganas, xxii. 72 ; Singhbhum, xxiii. 8. 

Beg, Shah, Arghun, ruler of Kandahar 
and Sind '1520-2), ii. 370, xxii. 396- 
397; rule over part of Karachi (1521), 
XV. 3 ; Quetta-Pishin conferred on, xxi. 
13; Sibi taken by, xxii. 338. 

Begam Bazar, suburb of Hyderabad city, 
xiii. 310. 

Begam lake, at Bijapur, viii. 186. 

Begampur, village in Sholapur District, 
Bombay, with tomb of daughter of 
Aurangzeb, vii. 141-142. 

Began, town in Rajputana, vii. 142. 

Begari Canal, Sind, iii. 331, 336, vii. 142, 
xvi. 141. 

Begur, stone inscription, ii. 60. 

Begusarai, subdivision of Monghyr Dis- 
trict, Bengal, vii. 142-143. 

Begusarai, village in Monghyr District, 
Bengal, vii. 143. 

Behar. See Bihar. 

Behii. See Baihar. 

Behnas, cotton-carders, in Bahraich, vi. 
208; Bara BankI, vi. 420; Fatehpur, 
xii. 79 ; Fyzabad, xii. 112 ; Gorakhpur, 
^''- 335 ' Jaunpur, xiv. 77 ; KherT, xv. 
271; MainpurT, xvii. 36; Mirzapur, 
xvii. 371 ; Pillbhit, xx. 139; Sitapur, 
xxiii. 56; Unao, xxiv. 125; United 
Provinces, xxiv. 170. 

Bebror, town in Rajputana, vii. 143. 

Beji, river in Baluchistan. See Nari. 

Bekal, village in South Kanara District, 
Madras, vii. 143. 

Bekar Nika, rule in Zhob, Baluchistan, 
xxiv. 430. 

Bela, capital of Las Bela State, Baluchi- 
stan, vii. 143-144. 

Bela, head-quarters of Partabgarh District, 
United Provinces, vii. 144. 

Bela Bhawani, temple at Bela, Partabgarh, 

vii. 144. 
Belagulli, village in Shimoga District, 
Mysore, vii. 144. 



Belapnr, village in Ahmadnagar District, 
Bombay, vii. 144. 

Belaturu, inscription of early sati, ii. 52. 

Belbag, palace at Poona, xx. 184. 

Belfast lax Company, Sialkot, xxii. 331. 

Belgaum, District in Bombay, vii. 145- 
156; physical aspects, 145; history, 
147-148; population, 14S-150; agri- 
culture, 150-152; forests, 152; trade 
and communications, 153-154; famine, 
154; administration, 154-155 ; educa- 
tion, 155-156 ; medical, 156 ; minerals, 
ii. 147. 

Belgaum, tdluka in Bombay, vii. 156. 

Belgaum, town and cantonment in Bom- 
bay, vii. 156-158; manufactures, iii. 
201, 217. 

Beliaghata Canal, through the Salt Water 
Lakes, near Calcutta, ix. 288. 

Beliapatam, village and river in Madras. 
See Vallarpattanam. 

Belkar, peak in Sirohi, Rajputana, xxiii. 
29. 

Bellamkonda, hill fortress in Guntur Dis- 
trict, Madras, vii. 158. 

Bellary, District in Madras, vii. 158-174; 
physical aspects, 1 58-161 ; history, 
161-162; population, 162-163; agri- 
culture, 164-166; forests, 167; trade 
and communications, 167-169; famine, 
169-170; administration, 170-171; 
revenue, 171-172; police, 173 ; educa- 
tion, 173; medical, 173-174. 

Other references : Meteorology, i. 
142; Chalukyan temples, ii. 123. 

Bellary, subdivision in Madras, vii. 174. 

Bellar)', idlui in Madras, vii. 174. 

Bellary, town and cantonment in Madras, 
vii. 175-176; wood-carving, iii. 230. 

Bellavi, town in Mysore, vii. 176-177. 

Bell-casting, Myingyan, xviii. 128, 133; 
Northern Shan States, xxii. 243. 

Bellew, Dr., on old name of Jalalabad 
Valley, xiv. 12. 

Bell-metal work, manufactured in Angul, 
Orissa, v. 378 ; Asansol, Burdwan, vi. 
8; Assam, vi. 74; Balaghat, vi. 230; 
Bankura, vi. 387 ; Banpas, Burdwan, 
vi. 403 ; Bansbaria, Hooghly, vi. 403 ; 
Bhinmal, Rajputana, viii. 1 1 1 ; Bhuban, 
Orissa, viii. 149; Bilaspur, viii. 229; 
Burdwan, ix. 97 ; Central Provinces, x. 
52, 53; Coimbatore, X. 366 ; Cuttack, xi. 
92; Dainhat, Burdwan, xi. i23;Damoh, 
xi. 140, 145; Darrang.xi. 187; DTgnagar, 
Burdwan, xi. 345 ; Drug, xi. 370 ; Goal- 
para, xii. 274; flardoT, xiii. 48; llissar, 
xiii. 152; Hooghly, xiii. 167; Jalor, Raj- 
putana, xiv. 29; Kamrijp, xiv. 336 ; Ka- 
mudi, Madura, xiv. 340 ; Kharar, Mid- 
napore, xv. 251 ; Mallanwan, Hardoi, 
xvii. 94 ; Mfinbhum, xvii. 118 ; Mandla, 
xvii. 166, 170; Meherpur, xvii. 269; 



INDEX 



67 



Mysore, xviii. 220; Nowgong, xix. 226; 
Orissa Tributary States, xix. 261 ; Pabna, 
xix. 301; Pithapuram, Godavari, xx. 
155; PurT, XX. 404; Raipnr, xxi. 55; 
Rajshahi, xxi. 165 ; Ramjibanpur, Mid- 
napore, xxi. 177 ; Ranchi, xxi. 206 ; 
Rangpur, xxi. 228; Rasipur, Salem, 
xxi. 238 ; Ratanpur, Bilaspur, xxi. 239 ; 
Sambalpur, xxii. 13 ; Saraikela, Chota 
Nagpur, xxii. 83; Sibsagar, xxii. 351 ; 
Tinnevelly, xxiii. 372. 

Eelonia, administrative division, Hill 
Tippera, xiii. 121. 

Belpir, Muhammadan shrine at Dhodap, 
Nasik, xi. 320. 

Belur, taluk in Hassan District, Mysore, 
vii. 177. 

Belvedere, residence of Lieutenant-Gover- 
nor of Bengal, near Calcutta, ix. 278. 

Bern, caste. See Tolbay Riks. 

Bemetara, tahsll in Drug District, Central 
Provinces, vii. 177-178. 

Bemmattanakalln, or Bemmathanuru, 
ancient name of Chitaldroog, Mysore, 
X. 297. 

Ben Chakrabartti, traditional emperor of 
India, xv. 204. 

Benares, Division in United Provinces, 
vii. 178-179. 

Benares, District in United Provinces, vii. 
179-187; physical aspects, 179-180; 
history, 180-182; population, 182- 
1S3 ; agriculture, 183-184; trade and 
communications, 184-185 ; famine, 185 ; 
administration, 185-186; medical, 187; 
permanent settlement, iv. 229. 

Benares, tahsil in United Provinces, vii. 
187. 

Benares, estate in United Provinces, vii. 
187-189. 

Benares, city, cantonment, and religious 
and manufacturing centre, in United 
Provinces, vii. 189-193. 

Other references: Punch - marked 
coins and found near, ii. 1 36 ; arts manu- 
factures, iii. 193, 199, 202, 209, 210, 
222, 234,241; roads, ill. 403,404,405; 
water-supply, iv. 473 ; former mint, iv. 

515- 

Bendamurlanka, village in Madras. See 
Bandamurlanka. 

Bengal, Province in British India, vii. 
193-360 ; origin and history of name, 
194-195; physical aspects, 195-207; 
hill system, 197-198 ; river system, 198- 
199 ; marshes and lakes, 200-201 ; 
islands, 201 ; ports, 201-202 ; geology, 
202; botany, 203; fauna, 203-204; 
meteorology, 204-206 ; history, 207- 
221 ; Muhammadan governors and 
kings (1202-1573), 216-217; gover- 
nors under Delhi (1576-1765), 217; 
history under British, 217-220; Lieu- 



tenant-Governors, 220; antiquarian 
remains, 22 1 ; population, 222-241; dis- 
tinctive features of villages, 224-225 ; 
vital statistics, 228-230; marriage laws 
and customs, 230-231,236; languages, 
232; religions, 234-238; food and 
dress, 239; funeral customs, 240; 
amusements, 240 ; nomenclature, 241 ; 
agriculture, 241-254 ; agricultural im- 
provements, 249 ; indebtedness of the 
cultivators, 249-250; agricultural im- 
plements, 250 ; cattle, 250; irrigation, 
251-253; fisheries, 253-254; rents, 
wages, and prices, 254-256; forests, 
257-261 ; mines and minerals, 261- 
265 ; arts and manufactures, 266- 
271 ; jute industry, 266, 269-270 ; 
factories, foundries, mills, &c., 270; 
commerce and trade, 271-274; foreign 
trade, 274; communications, 274-282; 
railways, 274-277; roads, 277-278; 
canals, rivers, and river-borne traffic, 
279-280; postal arrangements, 281- 
282; famine, 282-285 ; administration, 
285-292 ; Native States administered 
or supervised by, 288-292 ; legisla- 
tion and justice, 292-297 ; finance, 
297-300; land revenue, 300-309 ; mis- 
cellaneous revenue, 309-315; opium, 
309-310 ; excise, 310-312 ; salt, 
312; stamps, 313; income tax, 313- 
314 ; customs, 314; local and municipal 
administration, 315-319; public works, 
319-321; army, 321-322; police, 
322-325; education, 327-336; news- 
papers and periodicals, 336-3.^7 5 
medical, 337-339 ; surveys, 339- 
341 ; bibliography, 341 ; tables : tem- 
perature and rainfall, 342 ; popu- 
lation, 343-345 ; canals, 346 ; prices 
of staples, 347 ; trade with other 
Provinces and States in India, 348; 
foreign maritime trade, exclusive of 
Government stores and treasure, 349 ; 
foreign land trade, 350 ; railways, 351- 
352 ; provincial revenue, 353 ; pro- 
vincial expenditure, 354 ; income and ex- 
penditure of District Boards, 355 ; in- 
come and expenditure of municipalities, 
356 ; jails, 357 ; educational expen- 
diture, 358 ; colleges, schools, and 
scholnrs, 359 ; hospitals, lunatic asylum, 
and vaccination, 360. 

Other references : Meteorological 
department started (1865), i. 105 ; 
meteorology, i. 116-119, 123, 124, 
126, 127, 130, 132, 136, 138, 140, 141 ; 
botany, i. 181-182 ; zoology, i. 219, 231, 
249, 252, 270, 271, 272, 278, 279, 280 ; 
ethnology, i. 289, 290, 294, 295, 297, 
304, 319 ; seven main classes among 
Hindus, i. 326-328; language, i. 359, 
376-378, 383. 390, 391. 393, 394; 



F 2 



68 



INDEX 



Buddhism, i. 413; Mnhammadanism, 
i- 435 ; Pachpiriyas, i. 435-436 ; Chris- 
tians, i. 442 ; area and population, i. 
450 ; density of population, i. 452 ; 
character of villages, i. 456; growth 
of population, i. 462-463 ; internal 
migration, i. 468 ; Animism, i. 472 ; 
Muhammadanism, i. 474 ; Christianity, 
i. 476 ; Eurasians, i. 477 ; age sta- 
tistics, i. 47S ; birth-rate statistics, i. 
506, 510, 511 ; sickness and mortality 
statistics, i. 512, 517, 519, 522, 525, 
526,528-5291530-53!) 533-534; archi- 
tecture, ii. 1SS-193; history — under 
Samudragupta (350^, ii. 291 ; under 
Harsha 606), ii. 299-300 ; its four me- 
diaeval kingdoms, ii. 316-317; Hindu- 
ized by the Sen dynasty, ii. 31 7 ; under 
Muhammadan rule, ii. 318, 355, 359; 
imder independent Muhammadan kings 
(1202-1576), ii. 371-373; Portuguese, 
ii. 449; first English settlement (1633), 
ii. 458 ; Muhammadan Nawabs (1707- 
56), ii. 474 ; DivvanI granted to Com- 
pany (1765), ii. 480; reduction of 
Nawab's allowance, ii. 483 ; Permanent 
Settlement (1793), ii. 486-487; Bengal 
Tenancy Act, ii. 521; abolition of 
separate army, ii. 525; separation of 
Eastern Bengal (1905), ii. 529 ; agri- 
cultural statistics, iii. 3, 97, 100 ; culti- 
vation of rice, iii. 7, 27, 29; of wheat, 
iii. 30; of linseed, iii. 37 ; of oilseeds, 
iii. 38 ; of sugar-cane, iii. 38, 41 ; of 
cotton, iii. 45 ; of jute, iii. 47 ; of 
tobacco, iii. 49 ; of opium, iii. 53 ; 
of tea, iii. 58 ; of cinchona, iii. 67 ; 
indigo, cultivation and trade, iii. 70, 
71, 75; cattle, iii. 81 ; goats, iii. 87; 
agricultural tenures, iii. 89 ; forests, iii. 
113 ; coal-fields, iii. 132, 163-164 ; arts 
and manufactures, iii. 169, 186, 190, 
200, 2C2, 205, 208, 209, 216, 230 ; trade 
in skins, iii. 189; factory statistics, iii. 
247 ; trade, iii. 272, 304-305, 314- 3^5 ; 
irrigation, iii. 324-326, 330, 332, 340- 
341, 346, 351 ; inland navigation dues, 
iii. 362 ; road control, iii. 404-405, 
407 ; postal and savings bank trans- 
actions (1903-4), iii. 428, 435 ; experi- 
mental telegraph lines, iii. 437 ; rents, 
iii. 449, 450, 451,453 ; prices, iii. 458 ; 
wages, iii. 468, 469, 470, 472, 473, 
474; famine, iii. 484,485. 490 ; govern- 
ment and administration, iv. 7, 9-16, 
47-54 ; extension of British rule in, iv. 
74-75 ; statistics of Native States, iv. 
98 ; legislation and justice, iv. 135, 144, 
145, 146-147, 150, 151, 157; revenue, 
iv. 170, 192 ; land revenue, iv. 206, 
207, 208, 210, 211, 221, 226, 227, 
228-229, 236, 238, 239; opium, pro- 
duction of, iv. 242-243; revenue from, 



iv. 243-244; consumption of, iv. 244; 
receipts and charges, iv. 275 ; salt lax, 
iv. 250, 251, 275; intoxicating liquors, 
iv. 255, 256, 258 ; distilleries, iv. 256 ; 
hemp drugs, iv. 260 ; licence tax, iv. 
268; income tax, iv. 270; land cess, 
iv. 271, 272, 273 ; District post cess, iv. 
273; municipal government, iv. 2S6- 
287, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293 ; local 
government, iv, 298, 299, 300, 301, 
303; village unions, iv. 304; military 
board, iv. 307 ; public works organiza- 
tion, iv. 3ii-3'2, 3'6, 318, 318-319; 
marine, iv. 3S2 ; police system, iv. 390, 
392? 394; education, iv. 41 1-41 2, 414, 
416, 418, 419, 420, 435, 439, 441, 442, 
443, 445, 447; publications, iv. 452, 
453; medical, iv. 459, 461, 462,464, 
466, 477-479 ; sanitation, iv. 467, 469, 
470-471 ; agricultural banks, iv. 523. 

Bengal, Bay of, cyclonic storms, i. 120, 
125-126; monsoon current, i. 122- 
123; zoological results of marine sur- 
vey, iv. 510-512. 

Bengal Bonded Warehouse Association, 
Calcutta, ix. 271. 

Bengal Central Railway, iii. 370, 393, 
vii. 276-277. 

Bengal Chamber of Commerce (founded, 
1834), vii. 272, ix. 271. 

Bengal Coal Company, output of, vii. 263. 

Bengal delta, rainfall data, i. 153. 

Bengal-Dooars Railway, iii. 414, 415. 

Bengal-Nagpur Railway, iii. 370, 389- 
391, 414, 415, vii. 274, 275. 

Bengal-Nagpur Spinning and Weaving 
Mills, at Raj Nandgaon, Central Pro- 
vinces, xviii. 357. 

Bengal and North- Western Railway, iii. 
370, 389, 414, 415, vii. 274, 275, 276. 

Bengal Sappers and Miners, workshops at 
Roorkee, xxi. 325. 

Bengali language, i. 362, 364, 373, 376- 
378, 397-398 ; spoken ia Akyab, v. 
193 ; Bogra, viii. 2 58 ; Cachar, ix. 252 ; 
Calcutta, ix. 268 ; Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, x. 320 ; Chota Nagpur, x. 329 ; 
Dacca, xi. 107; Darjeeling, xi. 170; 
Darrang, xi. 185 ; Dinajpur, xi. 350; 
Faridpur, xii. 56; Goalpara, xii. 272; 
Hill Tippera, xiii. 119; Hooghl)', xiii. 
165 ; Howrah, xiii. 208 ; Jessore, xiv. 
95 ; Khulna, xv. 2S8 ; Lakhimpur, xvi. 
122 ; Malda, xvii. 78 ; Midnapore, xvii. 
331; Murshidabad, xviii. 48; Nadia, 
xviii. 275; Orissa Tributary States, xix. 
257 ; Pabna, xix. 299; Purnea, xx. 416 ; 
Rajshahi, xxi. 163 ; Santal Parganas, 
xxii. 67 ; Sibsagar, xxii. 34S ; Singh- 
bhum, xxiii. 6 ; Sylhet, xxiii. 193 ; 
Twenty-four Parganas, xxiv. 72; United 
Provinces, xxiv. 168-169. 

Bengali literature, ii. 415, 432-434. 



INDEX 



69 



Bengali type or race. See Mongolo- 
Dravidian. 

Bengalis, in Akyab, v. 201. 

Bengalische Handelsgesellschaft, or Emb- 
den Company (founded 1753), ii. 466. 

Ben! Hazurl, rule in Panna, xix. 401. 

Beni-Israel, tribe of Jewish descent. See 
Bani-Israil. 

BeniMadlio,defeatedatAzamgarh(i857), 
vi. 1 56. 

Beni Madho Bakhsh, Rana, conduct dur- 
ing Mutiny in Rae Bareli, xxi. 27. 

BenI Prasad Kuari, Maharani, in Dum- 
raon Raj, xi. 378. 

Beni Singh, Gawilgarh fort held by, for 
Raghuji Bhonbla in second Maratba 
War, xii. 193. 

Beni Singh, founder of Maihar State, 
Central India, xvii. 28; killed (1788), 
xvii. 28. 

Bentinck, Lord William, Governor-Gene- 
ral (1828-35), ii. 497-499; financial 
reforms, ii. 497-498 ; abolition of salt 
(1829), ii. 498 ; suppression of thagl, 
ii. 498. 

Local notices : Opposition to Govern- 
ment policy in Bellary, vii. 171; fos- 
tered education in Bengal, vii. 328; 
deposed Vira Raja of Coorg, xi. 16 ; 
suppression of thagl, ix. 3S4-385 ; 
Raja of Mysore deprived of ruling 
power, xviii. 184; meeting at Rupar 
with RanjTt Singh (1S31), xxi. 339; 
Rao Krishna Rao presented with gold 
medal and estate, xxii. 148 ; English 
education in United Provinces fostered 
in accordance with minute of, xxiv. 
247. 

Bentinck Island, Mergui Archipelago, xvii. 

293- 
Bera, village in Pabna District, Eastern 

Bengal, vii. 361. 

Berads. See Bedas. 

Beralukoduva, section of Hokkaligas in 
Mysore, xviii. 194. 

Berar (Hyderabad Assigned Districts), as- 
signed to British (1853), and attached 
to Central Provinces (1903), vii. 361- 
423; physical aspects, 361-365; history, 
365-374; population, 375-382; food, 
dress, and dwellings of people, 381-382, 
390-391; agriculture, 382-388; rent, 
wages, and prices, 3S8-391 ; forests, 
391-392; mines and minerals, 392; 
arts and manufactures, 392-393 ; com- 
merce and trade, 393-394 ; communi- 
cations, 394-396 ; famine, 396-398 ; 
administration, 398 ; legislation and 
justice, 399-401 ; finance, 402-403 ; 
land revenue, 403-408 ; miscellaneous 
revenue, 40S-410 ; local and municipal 
administration, 410-412 ; public works, 
412-413; police and jails, 413-416; 



education, 416-421 ; medical, 421-422 ; 
surveys, 422; bibliography, 422-423. 
Other 7'eferences : Meteorology, i. 
112, 115, 132, 145; botany, i. 190; 
language, i. 373, 374, 3S1, .3945 
density of population, i. 453 ; area 
and population, i. 453 n. ; child mar- 
riage, i. 4S2 ; birth-rate statistics, i. 
506, 510, 511; mortality statistics, i. 
512, 517, 519, 522, 531 ; assigned 
(1853), ii. 507, iv. 13 ; perpetual lease 
(1902), ii. 529; cotton cultivation, iii. 
45; forest law, iii. no; minerals, iii. 
156; arts and manufactures, iii. 187, 
200; trade statistics, iii. 314, 315; 
irrigation, iii, 344, 346 ; famine, iii. 
491 ; administration, iv. 30 ; land re- 
venue, iv. 216, 239; education, iv. 417 ; 
sanitation, iv. 467 ; medical, iv. 477. 

Berar Manufacturing Company, Limited, 
cotton spinning and weaving mill at 
Badnera, vii. 392. 

Berasia, town in Bhopal, vii. 423. 

Berhampore, subdivision in Murshidabad 
District, Bengal, viii. i. 

Berhampore, town in Murshidabad Dis- 
trict, Bengal, former cantonment and 
scene of mutiny (1857), with lunatic 
asylum, viii. 1-2. 

Berhampur, subdivision of Ganjam Dis- 
trict, Madras, viii. 2. 

Berhampui-, taiuk in Ganjam District, 
Madras, viii. 2. 

Berhampur, town in Ganjam District, 
Madras, former cantonment, and head- 
quarters of District Judge, viii. 2-3. 

Beri, sanad State in Central India, viii. 

3-4. ix- 77- 

Beri, town in Rohtak District, Punjab, 
viii. 4. 

Beri Sal KhIchI, installed as chief of 
Maksudangarh (1816), xvii. 52, xxi. 34. 

Bernard, Sir Charles, Chief Commissioner 
of Burma, Bemardmyo called after, 
xvii. 382 ; took charge of civil adminis- 
tration in Upper Burma (1885), ix. 128 ; 
Chief Commissioner of Lower Burma 
(18S0), ix. 192. 

Bemardmyo, near Magok, ruby mines, 
xvii. 382. 

Bernier, M., French traveller, quoted on 
sculptured elephants at Delhi, ii. 132. 

Beryls, iii. 161-162 ; found in Coimbatore, 
X. 365; Hazaribagh, xiii. 92; Nellore, 
xix. 8; Rajputana, xxi. 130. 

Beschi, Father, Jesuit missionary and 
Tamil scholar, ii. 436 ; in Madura, 
xvi. 264, 394 ; Tinnevelly, xxiii. 368. 

Besh Gate, Bhilsa, Central India, viii. 105. 

Besnagar, female statue found at, ii. no. 

Best, Thomas, Portuguese fleet defeated 
off Surat by (161 2), ii. 455. 

Bestas, cultivators and fishers, in Coorg, 



70 



INDEX 



xi. 63; Mysore, xviii. 196, 197-198, 
255 ; /rt/zJ^Z-bearers in Indur, Hyderabad, 

xiii. 353- 

Eesud, district in Afghanistan, xiii. 85. 

Betavolo, ancient name of Jaggayyapeta, 
Kistna, xiii. 377. 

Betawad.town in West Khandesh District, 
Bombay, viii. 4. 

Betel-boxes, manufactured in Bhutan, viii. 
160; Ganjam, xii. 152; Kishangarh 
town, XV. 318. 

Betel-nut cutters, manufactured in Baroda 
State, vii. 55 ; Hoshangabad, xiii. 187 ; 
Kadi p-atit, Baroda, xiv. 257; Kaim- 
ganj, Farrukhabad, xiv. 274; Nagpur, 
xviii. 313; Patan, Baroda, xx. 25. 

Betel-nut palms. See Areca-nut Palms. 

Betel-vines or fan (Piper tetle),c\i\\.\\sXtA 
in Ahmadnagar, v. 117; North Arcot, 
V. 411; Assam, vi. 57; Backergunge, 
■vi. 169; Baiuipur, Twenty-four Par- 
ganas, vii. 89; Bassein, Thana, -vii. 119; 
Bengal, vii. 247 ; Bhongir, Hyderabad, 
viii. 124; Burma, ix. 152 ; Chamrajnagar, 
Mysore, x. 147; Chittagong, x. 311; 
Cochin, X. 346; Cuttack,xi. 91 ; Dacca, 
xi. no; Damoh, xi. 139, 145; Dmg, 
xi. 371; Gaya, xii. 201; Goalpara, xii. 
273 ; Gundalpet, Mysore, xii. 386 ; 
Hamirpur, xiii. 17, 18; Hooghly, xiii. 
166; Hoshangabad, xiii. 185; Howrah, 
xiii. 210; Hyderabad, xiii. 254; Jubbul- 
pore, xiv. 211; North Kanara, xiv. 347; 
South Kanara, xiv. 355 ; Karkamb, 
Sholapur, xv. 44; Khandesh, xv. 234; 
Khulna, xv. 289 ; Kolaba, xv. 362 ; 
Krishnarajpet, Mysore, -xvi. 10 ; Kumba- 
konam, Tanjore, xvi. 20; Lakhimpur, 
xvi. 123; Mahoba, Hamirpur, xvii. 23; 
Mahuva, Kathiawar, xvii. 27; Malabar, 
ivii.62; Mandalay, xvii. 131; Mandla, 
xvii. 165, 170; Mangrol, Rajputana, 
xvii. 180; Jkieiktila, xvii. 280; Midna- 
pore, xvii. 333 ; Islinbu, xvii. 350 ; 
Molakalmuru, Mysore, x\ni. 385 ; My- 
mensingh, xviii. 155; near Mysore city, 
xviii. 260 ; Nachna, Central India, v, 
131; Nagpur, xviii. 311; Namakhal, 
Salem, xviii. 347 ; Nasik, xviii. 404 ; 
Nellikuppam, South Arcot, xix. 6 ; 
Nimar, xix. 112; Pakokku, xx. 324; 
Partabgarh,Oudh, xx. iS; Puri, xx 403; 
Rajshahi, xxi. 164; Ramtek, Nagpur, 
xxi. 195 ; Saugor, xxii. 142 ; Savaniir 
State, xxii. 1 56 ; Seoni-Malwa, Hoshang- 
abad, xxii. 176; Shimoga, xxii. 290; 
Siddapur, North Kanara, xxii. 356 ; 
Sinnar, Nasik, xxiii. 13 ; Sohagi^ur, 
Hoshangabad, xxiii. 70; Wardha, xxiv. 
370; Yawnghwe, Burma, xxiv. 416; 
Yelandur, Mysore, xxiv. 419, 
Bethune College, Calcutta, ix. 283. 
Betling Sib, peak in Hill Tippera, xiii. 1 1 7. 



Betmangala, town in Kolar District, My- 
sore, viii. 4-5. 

Bettadakote chiefs. See Kote. 

Bettadpur, hill, with temple, in Mysore, 
viii. 5. 

Bettarasa, Hoysala general, Changalvas 
defeated by (11 74), xi. 10. 

Bettiah, subdivision in Champaran Dis- 
trict, Bengal, viii. 5. 

Bettiah, town in Champaran District, 
Bengal, with Roman Catholic mission 
(1740', viii. 6. 

Bettiah Raj, estate in Bengal, viii. 5-6. 

Bettur, village in Chitaldroog District, 
Mysore, viii. 6. 

Betul, District in Central Provinces, viii. 
6-16; physical aspects, 6-8; history, 
8-9 ; population, 9-to ; agriculture, 10- 
12 ; forests, 12 ; minerals, 12 ; trade and 
communications, 12-13; famine, 13-14; 
administration, 14-16; education, 15; 
medical, 15-16. 

Betul, tahsilin Central Provinces, viii. 16. 

Bctul, town in Central Provinces, but not 
head-quarters of District, viii. 16. 

Betwa, river of Northern India, viii. 16-17. 

Betwa Canal, iii. 332, 341-342. 

Beville, Captain, killedatChinbyit, Lower 
Chindwin District (1887), x. 230. 

Beypore, river of Southern India, viii. 17. 

Beypore, village in Malabar District, 
Madras, viii. 17. 

Beyt Shankhodhar, sacred islet in the Gulf 
of Cutch, attached to Baroda, viii. 1 7- 1 8. 

Bezwada, subdivision in Kistna District, 
Madras, viii. 18. 

Bezwada, idluk in Kistna District, Madras, 
viii. 18. 

Bezwada, town in Kistna District, Madras, 
witli anicut across the river, railway 
bridge, and railway junction, viii. 1 8-19. 

Bghai (Red Karens), tribe in Burma, ix. 
140, XV. 37, 38. 

Bhabar, petty State in Palanpur Agency, 
Bombay, viii. 20, xix. 346, 

Bhabar, portion of Naini Tal District, 
United Pro\inces, viii. 19-20. 

Bhabeswar Rai, rule in Jessore, xiv. 93. 

Bhabras, mercantile community in Jan- 
diala Guru, Amritsar, xiv. 55. 

Bhabua, subdivision in Shahabad District, 
Bengal, viii. 20. 

Bhabua, town in Shahabad District, Ben- 
gal, \\\\. 20. 

Bhadar, ancient fort at Champaner, Panch 
Mahals, built by Mahmud Begara, x. 
136. 

Bbadarva, petty Slate in Rewa Kantha, 
Bombay, \-iii. 21, xxi. 290. 

Bhadaur, town in Patiala State, Punjab, 
viii. 21. 

Bhadaura, mediatized chiefship in Central 
India, viii. 21, xii. 417. 



INDEX 



71 



Bhadauria Rajputs, Ehind originally chief 
seat of, viii. no; Gohad held by 
(1707-39), xii. 304. 

Bhadgaon, town in East Khandesh Dis- 
trict, Bombay, viii. 21. 

Bhadli, petty State in Kathiawar, Bombay, 
riii. 21, XV. 165. 

Bhadohl, tahsil in United Provinces, See 
Korh. 

Bhadr, palace at Ahmadnagar, Mahi Kan- 
tha, V. 126. 

Bhadra, town in Rajputana, viii. 21-22. 

Bhadra Kalika Mata, temple at Dabhoi, 
Baroda, xi. 100. 

Bhadrabahu, legendary Jain leader, Jains 
led by, into Hassan, Mysore, xiii. 63 ; 
directed migration to proceed to Pun- 
nata, xx. 395 ; death at Sravana Belgola, 
xviii. 169, 252, xxiii. 96. 

Bhadrachalam, subdivision and taluk in 
Godavari District, Madras, viii. 22. 

Bhadrakali, temple at Bhadrakh, Balasore, 
viii. 23. 

Bhadrakh, subdivision in Balasore Dis- 
trict, Bengal, viii. 22. 

Bhadrakh, town in Balasore District, Ben- 
gal, viii. 23. 

Bhadran, town in Baroda, viii. 23. 

Bhadrapur, village in Blrbhum District, 
Bengal, viii. 23. 

Bhadreswar, town in Hooghly District, 
Bengal, viii. 23. 

Bliadreswar (or Bhadrawati), site of an 
ancient city, now a petty village, in 
Cutch, Bombay, y\\\. 23-24. 

Bhadva, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, viii. 24, XV. 166. 

Bhadvana, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, viii. 24, XV. 167. 

Bhag Singh, Raja of JInd, Ludhiana given 
to (1S06), xvi. 208 ; rule in jTnd (1789- 
1819), xiv. 167 ; Kila Sobha Singh 
founded by, xv. 305. 

Bhag Singh, son of Gajpat Singh, Karaal 
lost by (1787), XV. 59. 

Bhaga, one of the sun-gods in the Vedas, 
i. 403. 

Bhagadatta, legendary king of Kamarupa, 
vi. 24, vii. 209, xiv. 331-332, xviii. 
151 ; said to have built residence at 
Rangpur, xxi. 224, 232. 

Bhagalpur, Division in Bengal, viii. 24-25. 

Bhagalpur, District in Bengal, viii. 25-36 ; 
physical aspects, 25-27; history, 27- 
28 ; population, 29-30 ; agriculture, 
30-31 ; minerals, 32 ; trade and com- 
munications, 32-33; famine, 33-34; 
administration, 34-36 ; education, 35- 
36 ; medical, 36. 

Bhagalpur, subdivision in Bengal, viii. 36. 

Bhagalpur, town in Bengal, viii. 36-38. 

Bhagavadgita, philosophical episode of 
the Mahdbharata, ii, 258. 



Bhagavata Purdna, the, ii. 237 ; other 

versions, ii. 425, 432, 434. 
Bhagavatas, religious sect in Mysore, xviii. 

203. 
Bhagavati, festival, held in Coorg, xi. 27. 
Bhaglrath, legend of, connected with the 

Ganges, xii. 135. 
Bhaglrath Mahendra Bahadur, in Dhen- 

kanal State, Orissa, xi. 319. 
Bhaglrath Rao. See JayajT Rao Sindhia. 
Bhagirathi, river of Bengal, an oflshoot of 

the Ganges, also name of main source 

of the Ganges in the Himalayas, viii. 

38-39, xii. 132, 133. 
Bhagirathi, statue of, at Gangotri, Tehri 

State, xii. 139. 
Bhagnagar, original name of Hyderabad, 

xiii. 308. 
Bhagnari, breed of cattle in Multan, xviii. 

30. 
Bhagoji, leader of Bhil riots in Khandesh, 

XV. 229. 
Bhagsu Nath, temple at Dharmsala, 

Kangra, xi. 302. 
Bhagvat SinhjT, Thakur Sahib, Sir, in 

Gondal State, Kathiawar, xii. 320. 
Bhngwan Das, son of Bahar Mai, chief of 

Amber State (Jaipur) and governor of 

Punjab under Akbar, xiii. 385. 
Bhagwan Das, hospital presented to 

Churu, Bikaner State, by, x. 335. 
Bhagwan Rao, rule in Datia Stale (1626- 

56), xi. 195. 
Bhagwan Singh, Raja of NaLha (1863- 

71), xviii. 264. 
Bhagwangola, river mart in Murshidabad 

District, Bengal, viii. 39. 
Bhagwant Rai, drove Raksel Rajputs out 

of Palamau (1603), xix. 337. 
Bhagwant Raj Bahadur, chief of Sohawal, 

Central India (1899), xxiii. 71. 
Bhagwant Singh, Raja of Mursan, United 

Provinces, xviii. 44. 
BhagAvant Singh, rule in Dholpur State 

(1836), xi. 324. 
Bhagwat Singh, rule in Orchha State 

(1684-9), xix. 244. 
BhagwatI Prasad, Maharaja, Sir, possessor 

of Balrampur estate, vi. 260. 
Bhai Desu Singh, Kaithal, Punjab, fell 

into hands of (1767), xiv. 2S8. 
Bhai Gurbakhsh Singh, Bhatinda taken 

by,_xx. 134. 
Bhainas, forest tribe in Bilaspur, viii. 

226. 
Bhainsa Sah, Bhainsrorgarh fort, Rajput- 
ana, said to have been built by, viii. 40. 
Bhainsa Sur, the buftalo, worship of, in 

Central Provinces, x. 27. 
Bhainsbana, black marble quarry, Raj- 
putana, xvi. 4. 
Bhainsrorgarh, village and fort in Rajput- 
ana, viii. 39-40. 



72 



INDEX 



Bhaira, Raja of Panna, Sikandar LodI 

advanced against (1494), xxi. 281. 
Bhaira Devi, of Gersoppa, xii. 212. 
Bhairab, image of, at Masar, Shahabad, 

xvii. 214. 
Bhairab, old river of Bengal, viii. 40-41. 
Bhairab Bazar, village in Mymensingh 

District, Eastern Bengal, viii. 41. 
Bhairab Jhamp, precipice near Kedar- 

nath, Garhwal, xv. 196. 
Bhairabi, river in Eastern Bengal. See 

Bhareli. 
Bhairabknnd, pool in Dhansiri river, 

Darrang, xi. 286. 
Bhairagnia, village in Bengal. See Bair- 

agnia. 
Bhairani Konda, peak in the Nallamalais, 

xviii. 345. 
Bhaira V, temple and image of, at Raj- 

machi, Poona, xxi. 75, 
Bhairav Jap, rock at Gimar, Kathiawar, 

xii. 247. 
Bhairava, temple at Porumamilla, Cud- 

dapah, xx. 215. 
Bhairavdeo, temple at Dhond, Poona, 

xi- 332-333- 

Bhairon. See Siva. 

Bhairon Deo, Raja of Bastar, Central 
Provinces, death of (1891), vii. 122. 

Bhaironath, temple of, at Benares, vii. 191. 

Bhaironghati, temple and pass in Tehri 
State, United Provinces, viii. 41. 

Bhaisa, former taluk in Nandcr District, 
Hyderabad, viii. 41. 

Bhaisa, town in Nander District, Hyder- 
abad, viii. 41. 

Bhaisakho, thakurat in Central India, 
viii. 41, 147. 

Bhaisaunda, Chaube Jagir in Central 
India, viii. 41-42. 

Bhaisola, thakurat in Central India, viii. 
42, 147. 

Bhaiya Mahabir Singh, chief of Chang 
Bhakar, Central Provinces, x. 171. 

Bhaja, village with caves in Poona Dis- 
trict, Bombay, viii. 42-43; caves, ii. 
112, 162, 163, 164. 

Bhajji, .Simla Hill State in Punjab, \-iii. 43. 

Bhakar, State in Central Provinces. See 
Chang Bhakar. 

Bhakkar, fortified island in the Indus, 
Sind. See Bukkur. 

Bhakkar, subdivision in Mianwali Dis- 
trict, Punjab, viii. 43. 

Bhakkar, tahsii in Mianwali District, Pun- 
jab, viii. 43. 

Bhakkar, town in Mianwali District, Pun- 
jab, viii. 44. 

Bhakras, tribe in Pab Range, Baluchistan, 
xix. 296. 

Bhaktavatsala, shrine to, at Sholinghur, 
North Arcot, xxii. 308. 

Bhakti, Hindu doctrine of, i. 425,11.414. 



Bhalala, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, viii. 44, XV. 167. 

Bhalgam Baldhoi, petty State in Kathia- 
war, Bombay, viii. 44, xv. 167. 

Bhalgamda, petty State in Kathiawar, 
Bombay, viii. 44, xv. 167. 

Bhalki, town in Bidar District, Hyderabad, 
viii. 44. 

Bhalsand, to\vn in Ballia District, United 
Provinces, viii. 44. 

Bhalusna, petty State in Mahl Kantha, 
Bombay, viii. 44, xvii. 14. 

Bhambore, ruined city in Karachi District, 
.Sind, viii. 44. 

Bhamo, District in Upper Burma, viii. 
45-57 ; physical aspects, 45-47 ; his- 
tory, 47-49 ; population, 49-50; agri- 
culture, 50-51; fisheries, 51 ; forests, 
52 ; minerals, 52 ; trade and commu- 
nications, 52-55 ; administration, 55- 
57 ; education, 56-57 ; medical, 57. 

Bhamo, subdivision in Upper Burma, 
viii. 57. 

Bhamo, town on the Irrawaddy, in Upper 

■ Burma, frontier station for Chinese 
trade, viii. 57-59. 

Bhampta, criminal tribe in Central India, 
ix. 384. 

Bhana, BhTl, foundation of Bhanpura, 
Central India, ascribed to, viii. 72. 

Bhana Mari, suburb of Peshawar city, 
XX. 125. 

Bhandak, village with ancient remains, 
in Chanda District, Central Provinces, 
viii._59. 

Bhandara, District in Central Provinces, 
viii. 59-71 ; physical aspects, 60- 
62 I histor)-, 62-63; population, 63- 
65; agriculture, 65-67; forests, 67; 
minerals, 67 ; trade and communica- 
tions, 67-68 ; famine, 68-69 ; adminis- 
tration, 69-70; education, 70; medical, 
70-71; minerals, iii. 147. 

Bhandara, tnhsil in Central Provinces, 
viii. 71. 

Bhandara, town in Central Provinces, 
with industry of brass- work, viii. 71. 

Bhandaria, petty State in Kathiawar, 
Bombay, viii. 72, xv. 165. 

Bhandaris, toddy-drawers, in Bombay Pre- 
sidency, viii. 304-5, 329; Kolaba, xv. 
360; Ratnagiri, xxi. 249-250; Savant- 
vadi, xxii. 153 ; Thana, xxiii. 294. 

Bhandarkar, Dr., description of death of 
Somesvara I, ii. 336; books of Manbhau 
sect placed at disposal of, xxi. 302. 

Bhander, town in Central India, viii. 72. 

Bhandhias, embankments in Narsinghpur 
District, xviii. 390. 

Bhands, minstrels in Kashmir, xv. 104- 
105. 

Bhaneshwar. See Baneshwar. 

Bhafi^^hem'^ drug,iv. 259, 260; cultivated 



INDEX 



73 



in Chhibramau, Farrukhabad, x. 204 ; 

Farrukhabad, xii. 68 ; Gwalior, xii. 

429; Punjab, XX. 299; warehouse for, 

at Bubak, Broach, ix. 32. See also 

Hemp Drugs. 
Bhangi confederacy of Sikhs, Kasur, 

Lahore, held by, xv. 149 ; rule in Mul- 

tan (i 771-9), xviii. 27. 
Bhangis, sweepers, in Agra, v. 77 j Meerut, 

xvii. 257. 
BhanjI, founder of house of Vlrpur, 

Kathiawar, xxiv. 320. 
Bhanpura, town in Central India, with 

cenotaph of Jaswant Rao Holkar, viii. 

72. 
Bhanu Gupta, of Malwa, ix. 336, xvii. 

102. 
Bhanwar Pal, Maharaja, chief of Karauli 

Slate (18S9), XV. 27. 
Bhao Phansia, Raja, minister of Hari 

Rao Holkar, Indore State, xiii. 338 ; 

in Tarana, xxiii. 250. 
Bhao Singh, of Bundi, appointed governor 

of Aurangabad by Aurangzeb, ix. 80. 
Bhaos, tribe in Kashmir, xv. 101. 
Bharamurio, hill in Central Provinces, 

viii. 72. 
Bharat Chandra Rai, Bengali poet, author 

of the Bidyd Sundar, ii. 427. 
Bharat Pal, adopted by Narsingh Pal, 

Raja of Karauli (1852), xv. 27. 
Bharat Sah, Raja of Chanderi, fort and 

palace at Talbahat, Jhansi, built by 

(1618), xxiii. 211. 
Bharat Shah, chief of Makrai. See Lachu 

Shah. 
Bharat Singh, Raja of Shahpura, xxii. 

223. 
Bharata, author of the Ndtya-sastra, a 

Sanskrit treatise on dramatic art (sixth 

century A.D.), ii. 264. 
Bharatas, Vedic tribe, ii. 222. 
Eharatpur, State in Rajputana, viii. 72- 

86 ; physical aspects, 72-74 ; history, 

74-79 ; population, 79-80 ; agriculture, 

80-S2 ; forests, 82 ; minerals, 82; trade 

and communications, 82-83; famine, 

83 ; administration, 83-86 ; revenue, 

84-85 ; education, 86 ; medical, 86. 
Other references : Irrigation, iii. 348 ; 

area, population, revenue, and adminis- 
tration, iv. 94. 
Bharatpur, city in Rajputana, viii. 86-87 > 

Lord Lake repulsed (1805), ii. 492 ; 

taken by Lord Combermere (1826), ii. 

497 ; arts and manufactures, iii. 193, 

242. 343- 

Bharatpur, head-quarters of Chang Bhakar 
State, Central Provinces, viii. 87-88. 

Bharatvarsha, earliest recognizable term 
for India, i. 4. 

Bharauli,/^r^a«a in Simla District, Pun- 
jab, viii. 88. 



Bharavi, author of the Kirdtdrjtintya 
(sixth century A.D.), ii. 240. 

Bharejda, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, viii. 88, XV. 167. 

Bhareli, river of Assam, viii. 88. 

Bhargav Brahmans, in Broach city, ix. 29. 

Bhargavapuri. See Hiremugalur. 

Bharhut (Bharaut), ancient site in Central 
India, viii. 88 ; inscriptions, ii. 45-47, 
55, 57 ; sculptures, ii. 106-108 ; stupa, 
ii. io6-ioS, 160. 

Bharmal, rule in Cutch, xi. 78. 

Bharpur Singh, Raja of Nabha (1847- 
63), xviii. 264. 

Bhars, aboriginal tribe, at one time domi- 
nant in United Provinces,vi.i57; ruins of 
forts attributed to, in Azamgarh, vi. 1 56 ; 
Baghelkhand, vi. 187 ; Bahraich, vi. 
206; Ballia, vi. 251, 252; BastT, vii. 127; 
Benares, vii. 183; Bundelkhand, ix. 70; 
Etah, xii. 30; Fyzabad, xii. 112; Ghazi- 
pur, xii. 225; Gorakhpur, xii. 333,335; 
Jaunpur, xiv. 77 ; KakorT, Lucknow, 
xiv. 289; Lucknow, xvi. 182; Oudh, 
xix. 279; Partabgarh, xx. 1 6 ; Rae Barell, 
xxi. 26; Salon, Rae Bareli, xxi. 411; 
Southern Oudh, xxiv. 150; Sultanpur, 
xxiii. 131. 

BharSand, town in United Provinces. 
See Bhalsand. 

Bharthana, tahsil in Etawah District, 
United Provinces, viii. 88. 

Bharti Chand, son of Chhatarsal, Jaso 
and Bandhora/^^frj' assigned to, xiv. 69. 

Bharti Chand I, rule in Orcbha (1531- 
54), xix. 243 ; founded Orchha town 
(1531), xiv. 137, xix. 247; cenotaph at 
Orchha, xix. 248. 

Bharti Chand II, rule in Orchha (1775- 
6), xix. 244. 

Bhartpur, State in Rajputana. See Bha- 
ratpur. 

Bhartrihari, Sanskrit poet and gramma- 
rian (ob. 651), ii. 240, 242, 243, 252. 

Bhartrlnath, brother of Vikramaditya of 
Ujjain, hermitage of, gt Ciiunar, Mirza- 
pur, X. 333. 

Bharuch, District in Bombay. See Broach. 

Bharudpura, thakurdt in Central India, 
viii. 89, 147. 

Bharukachha, town in Bombay. See 
Broach. 

Bharutia, former name of Sardarshahr 
tahsil, Bikaner State, xxii. 104. 

Bharvads, shepherds and herdsmen, in 
Bombay, viii. 303, 305. 

Bharwain, sanitarium in Hoshiarpur Dis- 
trict, Punjab, viii. 89. 

Bhasawar, town in Rajputana, viii. 89. 

Bhasawar Khan, Bhasawar supposed to 
have been founded by, and named after, 
viii. 89. 

Bhaskar Pant, invasion of Chhattisgarh 



74 



INDEX 



by Marathas under (1741), viii. 224; 
took Ratanpur (1741), xxi. 51. 

Bhaskar Rao, chief of Nargund, Dharwar, 
rebelled during the Mutiny (1857), 
xviii. 378. 

Ehaskara Bhupati Lakshmlkantaswami, 
temple at Porumamilla, Cuddapah, 
said to have been repaired by, xx. 215 ; 
tank at Porumamilla constructed by, 
XX. 215. 

Bhaskaracharya, Sanskrit astronomer 
(bom II 14), ii. 266, 339. 

Bhaskara-Ravivarman, Cochin grant of, 
ii. 58. 

Bhaskareswar temple, at Bhubaneswar, 
Orissa, viii. 150. 

Bhat Kund, reservoir at Somnath, Kathi- 
awar, xxiii. 74. 

BliatbarsI Deota, god of hunting, wor- 
shipped by Khonds, xv. 282. 

Bhatgaon, capital of former kingdom in 
Nepal, viii. 89. 

Bhatghora. See Baghelkhand. 

Bhathan, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, viii. 89, XV. 167. 

Bhatiah, Uch in Punjab identified by 
Raverty with, xxiv. 82. 

Bhatias, money-lenders and traders, in 
Bannu, vi. 396 ; Gujrat, xii. 368 ; Ka- 
rachi, XV. 5 ; Khandesh, xv. 231 ; Mul- 
tan, xviii. 29 ; Ratnagiri, xxi. 249 ; 
Sialkot, xxii. 329; Thana, xxiii. 294. 

Bhatinda, tahsil in Punjab. See Govind- 
garh. 

Bhatinda, town and railway junction in 
Patiala State, Punjab, viii. 89-90. 

Bhatkal, town and historic port in North 
Kanara District, Bombay, viii. 90-91. 

Bhaikherl, thakurdt in Central India, viii. 
91, xvii. 99. 

Bhatkull, village in AmraotI District, 
Berar, viii. 91. 

Bhatnair, town and fort in Rajputana. 
See Ilanumangarh. 

Bhatpara, town and seat of Sanskrit learn- 
ing in Twenty-four Parganas District, 
Bengal, viii. 91. 

BhatrT, dialect spoken in Bastar, Central 
Provinces, vii. 123. 

Bhatta Narayana, author of the Venlsam- 
Aara, a Sanskrit drama (ninth century), 
ii. 249. 

Bhattasaka, Vallabhi dynasty founded 
by, XV. 175. 

Bhatti, Muhammadan tribe of Rajput 
origin, Bhatner fort held by,xiii. 38-39; 
in Bhattiana, viii. 91-92 ; Bikaner, viii. 
205; Ferozepore,xii. S9;Gujranwala,xii. 
355; Ilissar, xiii. I46, 149; Jaisnlmer, 
xiv. 2 ; Merwara, xvii. 309 ; Phulkian 
States, XX. 1 33, 1 34 ; Pindi Hhattian the 
stronghold of, xx. 146; in Rajputana, 
xxi. 94, 112-113; Sirsa, x.xiii. 45. 



Bhattiana, tract of country in the Punjab, 
viii. 91-92. 

Bhattikavya, Sanskrit grammatical poem, 
by Bhartrihari, ii. 240. 

Bhattiprolu, village in Guntur District, 
Madras, with Buddhist stupa, viii. 92 ; 
inscriptions from stupa, ii. 25, 36; in- 
scribed relic receptacles, ii. 45, 57. 

Bhau Sahib, adopted child of Lakshml 
Bai. See Ramchandra Savant. 

Bhaun, town in Jhelum District, Punjab, 
viii. 92. 

Bhaunagar, State in Kathiawar, Bombay, 
viii. 92-96; physical aspects, 92-93; 
history, 93-94 ; population, 94-95 ; 
agriculture, 95 ; forests, 95 ; industries, 
95 ; communications, 95 ; administra- 
tion, 95-96; area, population, revenue, 
and administration, iv. 97. 

Bhaunagar, capital of State in Kathia- 
war, Bombay, and seaport, viii. 96 ; 
wood-carving, iii. 230. 

Bhaur, hills in Sarawan, Baluchistan, 
xxii. 98. 

BhausinghjT, founded town of Bhaunagar 
(1723), viii. 93, 96; Vala fell into 
hands of, xxiv. 296. 

Bhavabhuti, Sanskrit dramatist (eighth 
century), ii. 24S-249. 

Bhavaneshwari, temple of, near Bhilavdi, 
Satara District, viii. 104. 

Bhavani, river in Southern India, tribu- 
tary of the Cauvery, viii. 96-97. 

Bhavani, tdhtk in Coinibatore District, 
Madras, viii. 97-98. 

Bhavani, town in Coimbatore District, 
Madras, viii. 98. 

Bhavnagar, State in Kathiawar, Bombay. 
See Bhaunagar. 

Bhavnagar - Gondal - Junagad - Porbandar 
Railway, iii. 415, viii. 331. 

Bhavsari, village with stone monuments 
in Pooiia District, Bombay, viii. 9S-99. 

Bhavsars, cloth traders, in Baroda.vii. 56. 

Bhawalpur, State in Punjab. See Baha- 
walpur. 

Bhawan Singh, joint founder of Kalanaur, 
Rohtak, xiv. 298. 

Bhawan Singh, son of Shiv Singh, acces- 
sion of, to Idar State (1791'), xiii. 
326. 

Bhawani, town in Punjab. See Bhiwani. 

]5hawani, Rani, Rajshahi fell under man- 
agement of, xxi. 162. 

Bhawani Kaln, general of the Bhonslas, 
Balajl tank at Basim constructed by, 
vii. 104. 

Bhawani Sen, Raja of Mandi, Punjab, 
xvii. 155. 

Bhawani Shah, rule in Tehii State 
(1859-72), xxiii. 270. 

Bhawani Singh, rule in Datia State 
(1857)7 xi- 196. 



INDEX 



75 



Bhawani Singh, chief of Khilchipur State 

(1899), XV. 278. 
Bhawani Singh Bisen, acquired Bhinga 

{c. 1720), viii. III. 
Bhawani Singh Kunwar, chief of Jhala- 

war State (1S99), xiv. 117. 
Bhawani temple, at Thana Bhawan, Mu- 

zaffarnagar, xxiii. 304. 
Bhawaniganj, rainfall, i. 144. 
Bhawanigarh, tahsil in Patiala State, 

Punjab, viii. 99. 
BhawanTpur College, Bengal, maintained 

by London Missionary Society, vii. 

329- 

Ehawanishankar, temple to, at Hubli, 
Dharwar, xiii. 222. 

Bhayavadar, town in Kathiawar, Bombay, 
viii. 99. 

Bheels, tribe in Western India. See Bhils. 

Bhelsa, town in Central India. See Bhilsa. 

Bhelsarh, town in United Provinces. 
See Bhalsand. 

Bhera, tahsil m Shahpur District, Punjab, 
viii. 99-100. 

Bhera, town in Shahpur District, Punjab, 
viii. too; arts and manufactures, iii. 
21 1, 229, 242. 

Bheraghat, site of the Marble Rocks on 
the Narbada in Central Provinces, viii. 
100. 

Bherundesvara pillar, Shimoga District, 
Mysore, xxii. 285. 

Bhikan Khan, king of Jaunpur. See Mu- 
hammad Shah. 

Bhikan Khan, Nawab of Maler Kotla, 
xvii. 84. 

Bhikhi, tahsTl in Patiala State, Punjab, 
viii. loo-ioi. 

Bhikna Kunwar, worship of, at Patna 
city, XX. 67. 

Bhiknapahari, artificial hill in Patna city, 
XX. 67. 

Bhil dialects, broken forms of Gujarat!, i. 
369 ; spoken inBarwani, vii.91 ; Central 
India, ix. 351-352; Navsari/r««/, xviii. 
423; Banswara, vi. 409; Dungarpur, xi. 
382 ; Nimar, xix. 110; Sailana, xxi. 3S6; 
Udaipur, Rajputana, xxiv. 94. 

Bhilalas, mixed Bhil and Rajput tribes, in 
Rajputana and Central India, viii. 104; 
in AlT-Rajpur, v. 224 ; Barwani, vii. 91 ; 
Dhar,xi. 290; Indore, xiii. 34I ; Jhabua, 
xiv. 105 ; Jobat, xiv. 178 ; Nimar, xix. 
108, 1 1 o- 1 1 1 . See also Bhils. 

Bhilapur, battle of (1731), vii. 33. 

Bhilat, deified cowherd, worship of, in 
Central Provinces, x. 27. 

Bhilavdi, village in Satara District, Bom- 
bay, viii. 104. 

Bhillama I, Yadava king, ruler in Aurang- 
abad (1187-1191), vi. 142; Yadava 
dynasty founded by, vii, 366 ; tra- 
ditional founder of Deogiri, xi. 200 ; 



forces of, defeated by Ballala II, near 
Lakkundi, and death, ii. 339, 340, xvi. 

131- 
Bhilodia Chhatrasinghjl, petty State in 

Rewa Kantha, Bombay, viii. 104, xxi. 

290. 

Bhilodia Motisinghji, petty State in Rewa 
Kantha, Bombay, viii. 104, xxi. 290. 

Bhilolpur, town in Punjab. See Bahlolpur. 

Bhils, aboriginal tribe in Rajputana, 
Central India, and Bombay, i. 498, 
viii. 101-104; in Ahmadabad, v. 96; 
Ahmadnagar, v. 115; Ajanta Hills, v. 
134; Ali-Rajpur, v. 224; Banswara, 
vi. 410 ; Bariya, vii. 20 ; Berar, vii. 
371 ; pilgrimage to Bhimkund, viii. 
109 ; Bombay Presidency, viii. 303, 305; 
in Chopda tdlitka, Khandesh, x. 327; 
the Dangs, xi. 145; Dhar, xi. 290; 
at Dharangaon, Khandesh, xi. 297 ; 
in Dungarpur, xi. 380-382 ; Hyder- 
abad, xiii. 247, 297 ; Gwalior, xii. 42S ; 
Jhabua, xiv. 105; Jhalod, xiv. 122; 
Jobat, xiv. 178; Khandesh, xv. 229, 
231; Khilchipur, XV. 278; Kotah, xv. 
424; Mahl Kantha, xvii. 16, 17; 
Mallani, xvii. 92; Manpur, xvii. 201, 
202; Mehwas estates, xvii. 273; Nasik, 
xviii. 402; Naslrabad, Khandesh, xviii. 
413 ; Navsari prdnt, Baroda, xviii. 
423 ; Nimar, xix. no, 1 1 1, 118; Panch 
Mahals, xix. 383 ; Partabgarh State, xx. 
1 1 ; Rajputana, xxi. 115; Rewa Kantha, 
xxi. 293, 295 ; Sailana, xxi. 386; Satpura 
range, xxii. 132; bind, viii. 307 ; Sirohi, 
xxiii. 32; Sukkur, Sind, x.xiii. 121 ; Thar 
and Parkar, Sind, xxiii. 310; Udai- 
pur, Rajputana, xxiv. 94. See also 
Bhilalas. 

Bhilsa, district in Central India, viii. 104- 

105. 
Bhilsa, town with Buddhist remains, in 

Central India, viii. 105-107. See also 

Sanchl. 
Bhilwara, town in Rajputana, viii. 107. 
Bhim, chaori o\'\\2X\. of,near Mukandwara, 

Rajputana, xviii. 17. 
Bhim Deo, Rae, wars with Muhammad 

Ghorl, ii. 353, 354. 
Bhim Karan, Gagraun fort supposed to 

have been in possession of (1519% xii. 

122 ; put to death by Mahmud Khiljl, 

xii. 122. 
Bhim Rao, Koppal, Hyderabad, held by, 

during the Mutiny (1857), •'^^- 39^- 
Bhim Sen, Pandava brother, footprints of, 

shown at Falls of Rapildhara, v. 274; 

Vanga conquered by, vii. 195 ; Chitor 

fort ascribed to, x. 298 ; block of 

grey granite at Devi Dhura sacred to, 

xi. 275; god of Gonds, xii. 325. 
Bhim Sen Thappa, minister of Nepal, 

xix. 34 ; rule of Rajendra Bikram 



76 



INDEX 



Sah under guardianship of (1816- 

37), xix. 36. 
Bhiin Singh, given Banera, Rajputana, by 

Aurangzeb, vi. 360. 
Bhim Singh, thirty-sixth chief of Bar wani. 

Central India, vii. 90. 
Bhim Singh, Maharao of Kotah (o(5. 1721), 

XV. 412-413; Gagrann obtained by, xii. 

122, xxi. 34. 
Bhim Singh, Rani of Gohad (1739-84% 

xii. 304; Gwaliorfort seized by (1761), 

xi. 324. 
Bhim Singh II, Rana of Mevvar (1778- 

1828), xxiv. 92. 
Bhim Singh, Raja of Jodhpur (1793- 

1803), xiv. 186. 
Bhim Singh's lath, Asoka pillar at 

Lauriya Nandangarh, Champaran, xvi. 

155-156- 

Bhim Singhji, Rana, Lunavada town 
founded by (1434), xvi. 211. 

Bhim Tal, temple in Nairn Tal (seven- 
teenth century), xviii. 325. 

Bhim's Bazar, Buddhist cave at Dhamnar, 
Central India, xi. 283. 

Bhima, river of Bombay and Hyderabad, 
tributary of the Kistna, viii. 107-108. 

BhIma, Raja of Vidarbha, vii. 366. 

Bhima I, l<ing of Gujarat (A. D. 1022-63), 
ii. 313 ; rule in Anhilvada, v. 382 ; fled 
before Mahmud of Ghazni to Kandh- 
kot (1023), xi. 78. 

BhIma II, Eastern Chalukya king, inva- 
sion of Mysore by (between 934 and 

938), ii- 332. 

Bhima, Raja, founded Mahikavati (Ma- 
hlm), in Bombay Island, viii. 403. 

Bhima Bai, daughter of Jaswant Rao Hol- 
kar and wife of Govind Rao Bolia, 
country round Kunch granted ixijdgir 
to (i8o5),xiii. 337. 

Bhimasamudra, tank in Chitaldroog, 
Mysore, x. 296-297. 

Bhimashankar, liill-fort in Poona District, 
Bombay, with source of Bhima river, 
viii. 10S-109. 

Bhimavaram, taluk in Kistna District, 
Madras, viii. 109. 

Bhimavarman, Maharaja, record of, on 
base of sculptured group at Kosam, 
ii. 48. 

Bhimbar, torrent in Gujrat District, Fun- 
jab, viii. 109. 

Bhlmkiind, basin formed by a waterfall 
of the Khan river in Panch Mahals, 
Bombay, place of pilgrimage for Bhils, 
viii. 109. 

Bhimnalh, temple at Baroda, vii. 83. 

Bhimor, name of Old Morvi, Kathiawar, 
xviii. 4. 

Bhimora, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, viii. 109, XV. 167. 

Bhimrao Nadglr, ruler of Mundargi, 



Dharwar, rebelled during the Mutiny 
(1 85 7), xviii. 39. 

Bhimsena, river in Assam. See Surma. 

Bhimthadi, tdluka in Poona District, 
Bombay, viii. 109-110. 

Bhind, District in Gwalior, Central India, 
viii. no. 

Bhind, town in Gwalior, Central India, 
terminus of light railway, viii. no. 

Bhindar, town in Rajputana, viii. iio- 
III. 

Bhinga, town in Bahraich District, United 
Provinces, viii. in. 

Bhingar, town in Ahmadnagar District, 
Bombay, viii. in. 

Bhinmal, town with antiquarian remains 
in Rajputana, viii. in-112. 

Bhir, District in Hyderabad State, viii. 
112-117; physical aspects, 1 1 2 ; history, 
II 3-1 13; population, II 3-11 4 ; agri- 
cxihure, 114; famine, 115; trade and 
communications, 115; administration, 
115-116; education, 116; medical, 116- 
117. 

Bhir, taluk in Hyderabad State, viii. 
117. 

Bhir, town in Hyderabad State, viii. 117 ; 
ruins, xxii. 201. 

Bhishtis, water-carriers, at Agra, v. 77. 

Bhitargarh, ruins of ancient city in Eastern 
Bengal, viii. 117. 

Bhitarl, inscribed bricks found at, ii. 40 ; 
pillar inscription, ii. 57-58- 

Bhitaria Tal, tank at Bachhon, Central 
India, v. 130. 

Bhitrl, village with antiquarian remains 
in Ghazlpur District, United Provinces, 
viii. 117-118. 

Bhittanni, tribe in North-West Frontier 
Province, viii. 118; in Bannu, vi. 396; 
Dera Ismail Khan, xi. 263 ; expedition 
against (1S80), xix. 210. 

r)hiwandi,/rt/«/ta in Thana District, Bom- 
bay, viii. 118-119. 

Bhiwandi, town in Thana District, Bom- 
bay, viii. 1 19. 

Bhiwani, tahsil in Hissar District, Pun- 
jab, viii. 119. 

liliiwani, town and centre of trade in 
liissar District, Punjab, viii. 1 19-120. 

Blioga Nandlsvara, temple of, at Nandi, 
Mysore, xviii. 359. 

Bhogdai, river of Assam, viii. 1 20. 

Bhognlpur, tahsil in Cawnporc District, 
United Provinces, viii. 120. 

Bhogtas, aboriginal tribe in Hazaribagh, 
xiii. 90 ; Palamau, xix. 339. 

Bhoika, jietty .State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, viii. 120, XV. 167. 

Bhoj, village in Belgaum District, Bom- 
bay, viii. 121. 

Bhoj II of P.inhala (1178-93), Pandav- 
garh fort said to have been built by, 



INDEX 



77 



xix. 389 ; Ratnagiri forts said to have 
been built by, xxi. 248 ; Vasota altri- 
buted to, xxiv. 301. 

Bhoj Raj, Sahanis descended from, xxii. 
269. 

Bhoja, Chamar leader, Bhojpur named 
after, xxi. 177. 

Bhoja I, in Central India, ix. 337; Gwalior 
fort held by, xii. 440 ; in Pehowa, xx. 
100. 

Bhoja, Paramara king {c. A. D. ioro-50), 
ii. 311, 336; in Dhar (1010-53), xi. 
293; Malwa, xvii. 103. 

Bhoja, Raja, Unchahra obtained by 
(1478), xviii. 301. 

Bhojakhen, thakta-dt in Central India, 
viii. 121, xxii. 99. 

Bhojavadar, petty State in Kathiawar, 
Bombay, viii. 121, xv. 165. 

Bhojeswara, temple at Samayapuram, 
Trichinopoly, xxii. 3, 4-5. 

Bhojpur, village with antiquarian remains 
in Central India, once site of a f^reat 
lake, viii. 121-122; inscribed earthen- 
ware relic receptacles found at, ii. 
40. 

Bhojpnrl, dialect of the Bihar! language, 
spoken in east of United Provinces and 
in Bihar, i. 375-376 ; in Ballia, vi. 252 ; 
Champaran, x. 140; GhazTpur, xii. 
225; Saran, xxii. 87; Shahabad, xxii. 
190. 

Bhokar, State in Central Provinces. 
See Chang Bhakar. 

Bhokardan, taluk in Aurangabad District, 
Hyderabad, viii. 122. 

Bhola, head-quarters of subdivision in 
Backergunge District, Eastern Bengal, 
viii. 122. 

Bhola Nath Bose Hospital, at Barrack- 
pore, Twenty-four Parganas, vii. ^7. 

Bholath, iahstl in Kapurthala State, 
Punjab, viii. 122-123. 

Bhomoraguri, place of archaeological 
interest in Assam. See Tezpur. 

Bhorigaon, iahsil in Mainpuri District, 
United Provinces, viii. 123. 

Bhongaon, town in Mainpuri District, 
United Provinces, viii. 123. 

Bhongir, taluk in Nalgonda District, 
Hyderabad, viii. 123-124. 

Bhongir, town in Nalgonda District, 
Hyderabad, viii. 124. 

Bhonslas, family name of the Maratha 
chiefs of Nagpur, ii. 443, 444, 491, 
495; in Berar, vii. 270; Chhindwara, 
X. 206-207 5 Kherla passed to (middle 
of eighteenth century) , viii. 8 ; lapse of 
dominions to the British (1854), '^^ 
208; Maratha Subahs of Saugor dis- 
placed by, in Narsinghpur (1796) xviii. 
3S7; Orissa held by (1751-1803), vii. 
214; Sirpur Tandur said to have passed 



to, xxiii. 41, See also Janoji, Mud- 
hojl, and Raghuji I, II, III. 

Bhopal Agency, political charge in 
Central India, viii. 124-125. 

Bhopal, State in Central India, viii. 125- 
142; physical aspects, 126-128; his- 
tory, 128-132; population, 133-134; 
agriculture, 134-135; wages and prices, 
135^^36; forests, 136; minerals, 136- 
137; trade and communications, 137- 
138 ; famine, 138 ; administration, 
138-142 ; education, 142 ; medical, 142 ; 
surveys, 142. 

Other references : Opium cultivation, 
iii. 52 ; postal arrangements, lii. 
424-425 ; contingent force, iv. 86 ; 
area, population, revenue, and adminis- 
tration, iv. 93. 

Bhopal, city in Central India, with lakes, 
forts, and mosques, viii. 142-I45; 
manufactures, iii. 221. 

Bhopal Battalion, iv. 354. 

Bhopawar Agency, political charge in 
Central India, viii. 145-146. 

Bhor, State in Bombay, viii. 146-149 ; 
physical aspects, 146-147; popula- 
tion, 148; agriculture, 148; forests, 
148; trade and communications, 14S ; 
famine, 148; administration, 148-149. 
Other references : Postal arrange- 
ments, iii. 424-425 ; area, population, 
revenue, and administration, iv. 97. 

Bhor, capital of State in Bombay, viii. 
149. 

Bhor Ghat, pass in Bombay. See Bor- 
ghat. 

Bhosari, village in Bombay. See Bhavsari. 

Bhotia, general name for Tibetan group 
of languages, i. 386, 390 ; spoken in 
Almora, v. 247 ; Sikkim, xxii. 369. 

Bhotias (Bhots), Tibetan tribe, in Almora, 
V. 248; Assam, vi. 14; Assam Duars 
usurped by, depredations in British 
territory, and expeditions against, viii. 
156-157; Bhutan formerly belonged 
to, viii. 156; in Cooch Behar, viii. 156, 
X. 382; Darjeeling, xi. 170; Dewangiri, 
xi. 277; Goalpara, xii. 271; Ladakh, 
xvi. 91 ; Milam summer residence of, 
xvii. 342 ; in NainI Tal, xviii. 326 ; 
Nepal, xix. 41, 43 ; Sikkim, xxii. 369 ; 
Tehrl State, xxiii. 271. 

Bhots. See Bhotias. 

Bhowal, petty State in Khasi Hills, 
Assam, viii. 149. 

Bhowani, river in Madras. See Bhavani. 

Bhoyars, cultivating caste, in Betul, viii. 
9 ; Chhindwara, x. 208. 

Bhoyi, section of the Bestas in Mysore, 
xviii. 197-198. 

Bhramu, language of the Tibeto-Hima- 
layan sub-branch, i. 392 ; spoken in 
Nepal, xix. 41, 



78 



INDEX 



Ehrigu, sage, legendary founder of 
Broach, ix. 30; temple at Broach, ix. 30. 

Bhn Deb, legend of, at Rangamati, Mur- 
shidabad, xxi. 212. 

Bhuban, town in Dhenkanal State, Orissa, 
viii. 149. 

Bhuban Hills, range in Assam, viii. 

149- . ^ . 

Bhuban Mohan Rai, Raja of Chakma, 

Chittagong Hill Tracts, x. 125. 
Bhubaneswar, temple city of Siva in Purl 
District, Orissa, Bengal, viii. 149-150; 
ancient temples, ii. 124, 179,180; stone- 
carving, iii. 242. 

Ehudav Kishor Das, son of Sham Kishor 
Das, chief of Chhuikhadan, Central 
Provinces (1903), x. 216. 

Bhuila, disputed site of Kapilavastu, vii. 
125. _ 

Bhuinhar Brahman College, Muzaffarpur, 
xviii. 106. 

Bhuinhars, military Brahman caste, now 
agriculturists. United Provinces, i. 294, 
321 ; in Azamgarh, vi. 155, 157 ; Ballia, 
vi.252; Benares, vii. 182-183; Ghazipur, 
xii. 225; Gorakhpur, xii. 335; Narhl, 
Ballia, xviii. 37S ; owners of Tamkuhl 
estate in Gorakhpur, xxiii. 216. See 
also Babhans and Bhuiyas. 

Bhuiyas, aboriginal tribe, in Bamra, vi, 
344; Bengal,viii.i5o-i5i; Bonai,ix.3; 
Cachar, ix. 252; Farldpur, xii. 54; 
Gangpur, xii. 141 ; Gaya, xii. 200; 
Hazaribagh, xiii. 90, 94; Keonjhar, 
XV. 202; Lakhimpur, xvi. 122; ^lan- 
bhum,xvii. 115; Mayurbhanj,xvii.242; 
Orissa, vii. 2i5,xix. 254, 257; Palamau, 
xix. 339; Raipur, xxi. 51 ; Santal Par- 
ganas. xxii. 68 ; Sibsagar, xxii. 348 ; 
Singhbhum, xxiii. 4, 7 ; Surguja, xxiii. 
172 ; Udaipur State, Central Provinces, 
xxiv. 84. 

Bhuj, capital of Cutch, Bombay, viii. 151; 
arts and manufactures, iii. 220, 23S. 

Bhujabalin, Jain saint. See Bahubalin. 

Bhukarheri, town in Muzaffamagar Dis- 
trict, United Provinces, viii. 151. 

Bhulias, caste, in Sonpur State, xxiii. 85. 

Bhulua, old name of a District in Eastern 
Bengal, viii. 152. 

Bhwti, hereditary tenure of land by Raj- 
puts, in Ajmer, i. 160, 161 ; Rajputana, 
xxi. 147, 1 48. 

Bhumara, pillar with inscription as a 
boundary mark, ii. 51. 

Bhumias, aboriginal tribe in Jubbulpore, 
xiv. 210; Sitamau, xxiii. 54; N'izaga- 
patam, xxiv. 328 

Bhumij, aboriginal tribe found mainly in 
Bengal, viii. 152 ; conversion into 
caste, i. 313 ; in Chota Nagpur, x. 329 ; 
Manbhum, xvii. 113, 115; Mayurbhanj, 
xvii. 242 ; Orissa Tributary States, xix. 



257; Singhbhum, xxiii. 7; Surguja, xxiii. 

Bhumij, Munda dialect, i. 383 ; spoken in 

Lakhimpur, xvi. 122 ; Orissa Tributary 

.States, xix. 257. 
Bhumka, priests of Korkus, xv. 404, 405. 
Bhup Deo Singh, chief of Raigarh State, 

Central Provinces (1894), xxi. 45. 
Bhup Singh, Badrukhan obtained by 

(1789), xiv. 167. 
Bhup Singh, Raja of Goler, Kangra, xii. 

310. 
Bhup .Singh, Faizullahpuria, Sirdar, 

Bajwara held by, vi. 220-221. 
BhOpal, State in Central India. 6'^^BhopaI. 
Bhupati Raya, sent by Vijayanagar king 

to reduce Bedars to submission, and 

became raler of Rayadrug, xxi. 275. 
Bhupindar Singh, Maharaja of Patiala 

(1900), XX. 39. 
Bhuri Singh, Sir, Raja of Chamba (1904), 

X. 130. 
Bhurtpore, State in Rajputana. See Bharat- 

pur. 
Bhusawal, taluka in East Khandesh Dis- 
trict, Bombay, viii. 152-153. 
Bhusawal, town and railway junction in 

East Khandesh District, Bombay, viii. 

Bhutal Pandya, ruler of Barkur (1250), 
vii. 22. 

Bhutan, .State in Eastern Himalayas, viii. 
154-162; physical aspects, 154-155; 
history, 156-157 ; population, 157- 
159; agriculture, 159-160; trade and 
communications, 160-161 ; administra- 
tion, 161-162; zoology, i. 238, 240. 

Bhutan War of 1865, 'i- S'^, xi. 277, xiv. 

Bhutankush, said to have built Torgal, 
Kolhapur State (c. iioo), xxiii. 420. 

Bhutnath, temple at Torgal, Kolhapur 
State, x.xiii. 420. 

Bhutra, stone implement found at, ii. 91. 

Bhuvaneswar, temple city in Orissn. See 
Bhubaneswar. 

Bhuvarahaswami, idol of, at Srimushnam, 
South Arcot, xxiii. 99. 

Biana, town in Rajputana. See Bayana. 

Bians, revenue division in .\lmora District, 
United Provinces, viii. 162-163. 

Biaora, town in Central India, viii. 163. 

Bias, one of the five rivers of the Punjab. 
See Beas. 

Bibhishana, brother of Ravana, legend of, 
at Rangamati, Murshidabad, xxi. 212. 

BiblZarina, tomb of, at Dholpur, xi. 332. 

Bibiapur, palace of, near Lucknow, xvi. 
189. 

Bibiyana, river in Assam. See .Surma. 

Bichrand, name of two thaktirdts in Cen- 
tral India, viii. 163, xvii. 99. 

Bickaneer, State in Rajputana. .S^^Blkaner. 



INDEX 



79 



Bida, Sujangarh taken from the Mobil 
Rajputs by, xxiii. 117. 

Bidar, former Division in Hyderabad State, 
viii. 163-164. 

Bidar, District in Hyderabad State, viii. 
164-169; physical aspects, 164; history, 
164-165; population, 165-166; agri- 
culture, 166; minerals, 166-167; trade 
and communications, 167 ; famine, 168 ; 
administration, 168-169. 

Bidar, taluk in Hyderabad State, viii. 169. 

Eidar, town in Hyderabad State, capital 
of the later Bahmani kings, has given its 
name to an inlay work in metal (jbidri), 
viii. 169-170 ; mosque, ii. 194 ; tombs of 
Bahmani kings, ii. 194-195. 

Bidaruhalli, old name for Nagar, Mysore, 
xviii. 296. 

Biddulph, General, force under, sent to 
explore Loralai (1879), "^^^^ ^74- 

Bidhuna, tahsil in Etawah District, United 
Provinces, viii. 170-171. 

Bidie, Dr., founder of Madras Herbarium, 
xvi. 244. 

Bidri, inlaid or encrusted metal-work, 
named from Bidar in Hyderabad, Ben- 
gal, vii. 269; Bidar, viii. 167, 170; 
Hyderabad, xiii. 264; Purnea, xx. 417. 

Bidyd Siindar, Bengali love-poem by 
Bharat Chandra Rai, ii. 427. 

Bidyasagar Memorial, Sanskrit tol, Karan- 
garh, Bhagalpnr, xv. 22. 

Bighota dialect. See Mewatl. 

Bihar, historic name of one of the four 
sub-provinces which make up the old 
Province of Bengal, viii. 171-172. 

Other references : Meteorology, i. 124, 
132, 145; ethnology, i. 289, 290, 294; 
language, i. 359 ; density of popula- 
tion, i. 452 ; character of villages, i. 
456 ; population, i. 462, 463 ; Hinduism 
in, i. 472 ; child marriage, i. 482 ; 
histon,', ii. 316-317 ; cultivation of to- 
bacco, iii. 50 ; of opium, iii. 53 ; 
of indigo, iii. 71-72, 73 ; agricultural 
tenures, iii. 89 ; irrigation, iii. 325 ; 
postal and savings bank transactions 
(1903-4), iv. 428, 435 ; wages, iii. 46S ; 
famine, iii. 488, 490 ; land revenue, iv. 
228-229. 

Bihar, subdivision in Patna District, Ben- 
gal, viii. 172. 
Bihar, ancient town in Patna District, 
Bengal, viii. 172-173; Buddhist statu- 
ary, ii. 122. 
Bihar-Bukhtiarpur Railway, iii. 415. 
Bihar School of Engineering at Afzalpur, 
Patna, xx. 69. 

Bihar Scientific Society, school supported 

by, at Muzaffarpur, xviii. 107. 
Bihar, South, Railway Company, iii. 371. 
Biharl Lai, of Jaipur, lyric poet, ii. 423. 
Biharl language, i. 362, 364, 373, 374, 



Vj^t 397 ; spoken in Ballia, vi. 252 ; 

Benares, vii. 182 ; Bengal, vii. 232 ; 

Bhagalpur, viii. 30; Fyzabad, xii. 112 ; 

Gorakhpnr, xii. 335 ; Jaunpur, xiv. 76; 

Malda, xvii. 78 ; Mirzapur, xvii. 370 ; 

Santal Parganas, xxii. 67 ; United Pro- 
vinces, xxiv. 168, 169. 
Biharl literature, ii. 423-424, 432. 
Bihat, sanad State in Central India, ^•iii. 

173, ix. 77. 
Bihiya, village in Shahabad District, 

Bengal, noted for manufacture of iron 

sugar-cane mills, viii. 173. 
Bihora, petty State in Rewa Kantha, 

Bombay, viii. 173, xxi. 290. 
Bija, Gauli chief, built Bijagarh fort, xix. 

118. 
Bija, Simla Hill Stale, Punjab, viii. 173. 
Bijai Bahadur Singh, rule in Datia State 

u839-57),xi. 196. 
Bijai Bikramajit Bahadur Singh, Raja of 

Charkharl (1782), x. 177. 
Bijai Chand of Kanauj, builder of temple 

at Jaunpur (twelfth century), xiv. 82. 
Bijai Pal, founder of reigning family of 

Karauli, fort of Bijaigarh built by, vii. 

137 ; rule in Karauli (eleventh century , 

XV. 26. 
Bijai Sen, Raja of Keonthal (1901), xv. 

203. 
Bijai Singh, Gond chief, founded Bijawar 

town (seventeenth centurv'), viii. 191. 
Bijai Singh, made over Ajmerto Marathas 

as ' blood-money ' for the murder of Jai 

Appa Sindhia. v. 142. 
Bijai Singh, military command in Awa 

estate, vi. 153. 
Bijai Singh, rule at Jodhpur, xiv. 185-186. 
Bijai Singh, rule in Garha (1843), xii. 

161, xxi. 35. 
Bijai Singh, rule in Ajaigarh State (1853- 

5). V. 130. 
Bijai Singh, Raja, holder of Baroda town, 

Central India (1865), vii. 84. 
Bijai Singh, rule in All-Rajpur fiSSi- 

90), v. 224 ; Dungarpur (1898), xi. 

381. 
Bijai Singh, Thakur of Rian, Rajputana, 

xxi. 301. 
Bijaigarh, fort at Bayana, Rajputana, vii. 

137- 
Bijainagar Sagar, lake at Mahoba, Hamlr- 

pur, xvii. 23. 

Bijapur Agency, political charge in Bom- 
bay, viii. 173-175- 

Bijapur, District in Bombay, viii. 175-1 85 ; 
physical aspects, 175-176 ; history, 177- 
179; population, 179-180; agriculture, 
180-1S1 ; forests, 182 ; minerals, 182 ; 
trade and communications, 1S2-183 ; 
famine, 183-184; administration, 184- 
185 ; meteorology, i. 142. 

Bijapur, taluka in Bombay, viii. 1S5-180. 



So 



INDEX 



Bijapur, town in Bombay, with buildings 
of former Muhammadan capital, viii. 
186-1 88 ; architecture and buildings, ii. 
196, 198 ; arts and manufactures, iii. 
200, 234, 239, 241. 

Bijapur kingdom, founded 1492, ii. 196- 
197; Adoni captured (1568), v. 25; 
in Ahmadnagar, viii. 285; Arcot, v. 
405, 423; Belgaum held by, vii. 148; 
Bodihal taken, ix. 46 ; Dharwar con- 
quered, xi. 306 ; Dod-Ballapur town 
held, xi. 366; Gulbarga taken (1504), 
xii. 3S2 ; Jaigarh fort built, xiii. 379 ; 
Kolar subdued, XV. 371, 378; Penu- 
konda taken (1577), xx. 105; in Rat- 
nagiri, xxi. 247 ; Southern Maratha 
Country, xsiii. 91. See also Adil 
Shahis. 

Bijar, Mir, Talpur chief, rebellion of, xxii. 

.399- 
Bijawar, sanad^i2X& in Central India, viii. 
188-191 ; physical aspects, 1 88; history, 
189; population, 189; agriculture, 189- 
190; forests, 190; minerals, 190 ; com- 
munications, 190; administration, 190- 

.^91- 

Bijawar, capital of State in Central India, 

viii. 191. 
Bije Sen, Raja, of Nandl (i 851-1902), 

xvii. 154-155. 
Bijjala, Kalachurya king of Kalyani (<r. 

A.D. 1145-67), i. 422, ii. 22; revolt 

(1156), ii. 338. 

Local notices : Made Annigeri his 

capital (i 161), V. 386 ; set up as an in- 
dependent ruler at Kalyani, viii. 283 ; 

rule in Kalyani, xiv. 324 ; Chalukyasin 

Mysore supj^lanted by (1155), xviii. 

172 ; Chalukyasin Shimoga supplanted 

by (1 155), xxii. 284. 
Bijna, sanad State in Central India, \"iii. 

191, ix. 77- . 
Bijnaur, District in the United Provinces. 

See Bijnor. 
Bijni, estate in Assam, viii. 191-192. 
Bijnor, District in United Provinces, viii. 

192-201 ; physical aspects, 192-193; 

history, 194-195 ; population, 195-196; 

agriculture, 197; forests, 198; trade 

and communications, 198-199; famine, 

J99 ; administration, 199-201. 

Other references : Rainfall statistics, 

i. 144 ; canals, iii. 342. 
Bijnor, tahsil in United Provinces, viii. 

201. 
Bijnor, town in United Provinces, viii. 

30I-202. 

Bijnot, ancient fort in Bahawalpur State, 

Punjab, viii. 202. 
Bijolia, town, with antiquarian remains, in 

Rajputana, viii. 202. 
Bijoy Manikhya, Raja of Hill Tippera, 

victories of (sixteenth century), xiii. 1 18. 



Bijrani, Marri clan in Baluchistan, xvii. 
211. 

Bika, Bikaner State founded by, viii. 204- 
205 ; fort of Bikaner built by, viii. 205, 
218; cenotaph at Bikaner, viii. 218. 

Bika, Deolia built (1561), xi. 247. 

Bika, Partabgarh State founded (1553), 

XX. 9. 

Bikaner, State in Rajputana, viii. 202-2 1 7 ; 
physical aspects, 202-203 ; history, 
204-207 ; population, 208-209 » agri- 
culture, 209-210; minerals, 211 ; trade 
and communications, 2 1 1-2 1 2 ; famine, 
212-213 ; administration, 213-217 ; re- 
venue, 214-216 ; police, 216-217 ; edu- 
cation, 317; medical, 217. 

Other references : Geology, i. 1 00 ; 
language, i. 367; coal-field, iii. 137, 
138 ; area, population, revenue, and 
administration, iv. 94. 

Bikaner, capital of State in Rajputana, 
viii. 217-220; arts and manufactures, 
iii. 176, 190, 191, 215, 217, 241, 242, 

245- 
Bikaner- Jodhpur Railway, iii. 372, 401, 

406. 
BikapuT, tahsilin Fyzabad District, United 

Provinces, viii. 220. 
Bikram Singh, Raja of Baghol (1904), vi. 

184. 
Bikram Singh, rule in Saraikela, xxii. 82. 
Bikrama Singh, ruler of Kulu, xvi. 16. 
Bikramajit Singh, rule in Raghugarh, xxi. 

35- 
Bikrampur, pargana in Dacca District, 

Eastern Bengal, seat of Sanskrit learn- 
ing, viii. 220. 

Bilara, town in Rajputana, viii. 220. 

Bilarl, tahsU'm MoradabadDistrict,United 
Provinces, viii. 220-221. 

BilasI Singh, founded Bilsl, Budaun, to- 
wards close of eighteenth century, viii. 

237- 

Bilaspur, District in Central Provinces, 
viii. 321-232 ; physical aspects, 221- 
222; forests, 222-223; history, 223- 
224; population, 225-226 ; agriculture, 
326-227 ; forests, 228; minerals, 228- 
229; trade and communications, 229- 
230; famine, 230; administration, 231- 
232. 

Bilaspur, tahsil in Central Provinces, viii. 
232-233. 

Bilaspur, town in Central Provinces, viii. 

233- 
Bilaspur, Simla Hill State in Punjab, 

viii. 233-234. 
Bilaspur, capital of State in Punjab, viii. 

2_34- 
Bilaspur, tahsil in Rampur State, United 

Provinces, viii. 234. 
Bilaud, thakurdt in Central India, viii. 

234, xvii. 99. 



INDEX 



8r 



Bilawal, Shiih, shrine on Pab Mountains, 

Las Bela State, xix. 296. 
Bilbari, petty State in the Bangs, Bombay, 

vlii. 234, xi. 147. 
Bildi, petty State in Kathiawar, Bombay, 

viii. 234, XV. 165. 
Bilgram, ta/isil in Hardo! District, United 

Provinces, viii. 234-235. 
Bilgram, town in Hardoi District, United 

Provinces, famous for Muhammadan 

authors, viii. 235. 
Bilhana, Sanskrit writer, poet and his- 
torian (eleventh century), ii. iS, 19, 

.23, 242, 335. 336, 337- 
Eilhaur, tahsil in Cawnpore District, 

United Provinces, viii. 235-236. 
Bilhaur, town in Cawnpore District, 

United Provinces, viii. 236. 
Biligiri-Rangan Hills, range in Southern 

India, viii. 236. 
Eilimora, town in Baroda, viii. 236. 
Bilin, township in Thaton District, Lower 

Burma, viii. 236-237. 
Bilkharias, clan of Rajputs in Partabgarh, 

XX, 17. 
Billamore, Major, Marri-Bugti country, 

Baluchistan, penetrated by, xvii. 211. 
Billaras, caste in South Kanara, xiv. 

360. 
Billesvara Betta, sacred hill in Mysore, 

viii. 237, 
Billiard balls, turning of, at Jagraon, 

Ludhiana, xiii. 377, xvi. 205, 208. 
Biloli, taluk in Nander District, Hyder- 
abad, viii. 237. 
Bils. See Marshes. 
Bilsl, town in Budaun District, United 

Provinces, viii. 237. 
Bilugyun, island at the mouth of the 

Salvveen river in Amherst District, 

Lower Burma, viii. 237-238. 
Bimala, shrine at Purl, Orissa, xx. 410, 

411. _ 
Bimbisara, fifth Magadhan king, ii. 273- 

274. 
Bimgal, former talitk in Hyderabad State. 

See Armur. 
Eimlipatam, tahsil in Vizagapatam Dis- 
trict, Madras, viii. 238. 
Bimlipatam, town and port in Vizaga- 
patam District, Madras, viii. 2 38. 
Bina, railway junction in Saugor District, 

Central Provinces, viii. 238-239. 
Biudhachal, town and shrine in Mirzapur 

District, United Provinces, viii. 239. 
BindkT, town in Fatehpur District, United 

Provinces, viii. 239. 
Bindra-Nawagarh, Gond conquest of, 

xxi. 51. 
Binds, fishers and cultivators, in GhazTpur, 

xii. 225. 
Bindn Sagar or Gosagar, sacred tank at 

Bhubaneswar, Orissa, viii. 150. 

VOL. XXV. 



Bindu Sarovar, tank at SidhpUr, Baroda, 
xxii. 359. 

Bindusara, second Manryan emperor 
(297-272 B.C.), ii. 282-283 ; in Punjab, 
XX. 261. 

Binjhals, aboriginal tribe, in Central 
Provinces, x. 26 ; Sambalpur, xxii. 9. 

Bipula, hill near Rajgir, Gaya, xxi. 72. 

Bir, District in Hyderabad State. See 
Bhir. 

Bir Bikram Singh, Major, commanded 
Sirmur Sappers and Miners in lirah 
Expedition (1897), xxiii. 24, 27. 

Bir Bikram Singh, Rajput, Gidhaur 
founded by, xii. 237-23S. 

Bir Kishor, decennial settlement made 
with, of Bettiah estate, Champaran 
(1791), viii. 6. 

Bir Mitrodaya Singh Deo, Raja, rule in 
Sonpur, xxiii. 85. 

Bir Parkash, rule in Sirmur, xxiii. 23. 

Bir Shamsher, rule in Nepal, xix. 37- 
38. 

Bir Singh, Rajput, Rana of Balsan, Pun- 
jab, vi. 261. 

Bir Singh, Rawal, Dungarpur founded by, 
and temples erected, xi. 381, 385. 

Bir Singh Deo, Raja of Orchha, Basoda 
founded by, vii. 105 ; instigated by Ja- 
hanglr to murder Abul Fazl, ix. 70 ; 
Datia State granted to his son Bhagwan 
Rao (1626), xi. 195; palace of, at 
Datia, xi. 197, 199 ; Abul Fazl mur- 
dered by, near Gwalior Gird, xii. 438 ; 
in Jalaun District, xiv. 19 ; on accession 
of Jahanglr was pardoned and rose to 
great favour (i6o5\ xiv. 137; built a 
fort at Jhansi (1613), xiv. 148; rule in 
Orchha (1605-27), xiv. 137, xix. 243; 
buildings at Orchha, xix. 247-248; 
cenotaph at Orchha, xix. 248. 

Bir Singh Deo, Bijawar given to (1769), 
viii. 189. 

Bir Singh Deo, Raja of Rewah, fort at 
Marhas built by (sixteenth century), 
xvii. 29. 

Bir Singh Deo, Maharaja of Samthar, 
Central India, xxii. 24. 

Birbal, Raja, Akbar's favourite, killed in 
expedition against Roshanias {c. 1587), 
xix. 152 ; fetched Ram Chandra to 
Delhi court (15S4), xxi. 281. 

BIrbhum, District in Bengal, viii. 239- 
246 ; physical aspects, 239-240 ; his- 
tory, 241-242; population, 242-243; 
agriculture, 243 ; trade and communi- 
cations, 244; famine, 244; administra- 
tion, 244-246. 

Bird, Rev. Handley, mission at Nimach, 
Central India, xix. 105. 

Bird, R. M., revenue system in Agra, iv. 
206. 

Birds of India, i. 239-266. 



82 



INDEX 



Birds'-nest caves, Tavoy Island, Burma, 
x\-ii. 293. 

Birds'-nests, edible. See Edible Birds'- 
nests. 

Birdwood, Sir George, quoted on South 
Indian carpets, xviii. 219. 

Birhar, dialect of Munda, i. 383. 

Biijia, dialect spoken in Palamau, xix. 339. 

Birnagar (or Ula), town in Nadia District, 
Bengal, viii. 246. 

Biroda Devi, temple at Jajpur, Orissa, 
xiv. 10. 

Birsa Munda, leader of rising of Mundas 
(1899), xxi. 2or. 

Birth-rate, statistics, i. 478, 479, 
506-507 ; how affected by marriage 
customs, i. 507-508 ; by agricultural 
distress or prosperity, i. 508-509; by 
normal seasonal variations, i. 509 ; 
higher among Muhammadans than 
Hindus, i. 510; proportion of male 
and female births, i. 510-51 1; urban 
and rural birth-rates, i. 51 1 ; proportion 
of still-births, i. 511-512. See also in 
each Province under Population. 

Birupa, tributary of the MahanadI, xvi, 

432. 
Birur, town in Kadur District, Mysore, 

viii. 246. 
Bisaldeo. See Visaldev. 
Bisale, pass in Western Ghats, xii. 219. 
Bisalpur, tahstl in Pilibhit District, 

United Provinces, viii. 246-247. 
Bisalpur, town in Plllbhit District, 

United Provinces, viii. 247. 
Bisan Chand, oppression of, at Ritpur, 

Berar, xxi. 301. 
Eisari Devi, temple of, at Sanklsa, Far- 

rukhabad, xxii. 60. 
Bisaull, tahsTl in Budann District, United 

Provinces, viii. 247. 
Bisaull, town in Budaun District, United 

Provinces, viii. 247-248. 
Bisen Rajputs, power of, in Gonda, xii. 

312; Partabgarh, xx. 17; PasI prin- 
cipality in Oudh overthrown by, xi. 318. 
BishaharT.Muhammadangod. .S^^Manasa. 
Bishan Chandra Janamuni, rule in Raira- 

khol State, Bengal, xxi. 61. 
Bishan Singh, Raja of Bundi (1773-1821), 

ix. 81, xxi. 91. 
Bishan Singh, ruler of Malhar State (1826), 

xvii. 28. 
Bishan Singh, Thakur, chief of Ghund, 

Punjab, xii. 237. 
Bishenpur, town in Bengal. .T^^Bishnupur. 
Bisheshwar or Golden Temple, at Benares, 

\\\. 190. 
Bishnois, Hindu sect, at Jodhpur, xiv. 

189; Moradabad, xvii. 424; Rohil- 

khand, xxi. 308. 
Bishnupur, subdivision in Banknra Dis- 
trict, Bengal, viii. 248. 



Bishnupur, town and ancient capital . in 

Bankuia District, Bengal, viii. 248-249. 

Bishop's College, Calcutta, ix. 283, xiii. 

Bishop's School, Nagpur, xviii. 320. 
Bishor puja, festival held in Sylhet, vi. 

52. 
Bison, or Gaur {Bos gaurus^, i. 231-232 ; 
in Akyab, V. 192; Amherst, v. 294; Anai- 
malais, v. 333 ; Anaimudi, Travancore, 
V. 334; Angul, Orissa, v. 375; Northern 
Arakan, v. 393; North Arcot, v. 404; 
Assam, vi. 20; Balaghat, vi. 224; Bas- 
sein, Burma, vii. 108 ; Betul, viii. 8 ; 
Bhandara, viii. 62 ; Bilaspur, viii. 223; 
Blligiri-Rangan Hills, Mysore, viii. 2 36 ; 
Bombay Presidency, viii. 275; Burma, 
ix. 118; Cachar, ix. 250; Central India, 
ix. 332; Central Provinces, x. 9; Chanda, 
X. 149; Chin Hills, X. 271; Chhindwara, 
X. 205 ; Upper Chindwin, x. 240 ; Chit- 
tagong, X. 307 ; Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
X. 319; Cochin, x. 342 ; Coorg, xi. 7; 
Darrang, xi. 183 ; Dharwar, xi. 305 ; El- 
lichpur, xii. 11 ; Gangpur, Chota Nag- 
pur, xii. 140; Ganjam, xii. 144; Garo 
Hills, xii. 172; Western Ghats, xii. 
220; Goal para, xii. 370; Godavari, xii. 
283; Hanthawaddy, Burma, xiii. 27; Ho- 
shangabad, xiii. 181 ; Hyderabad State, 
xiii. 233; Indore, xiii. 335; Jalpaiguri, 
xiv. 32 ; Jashpur, Central Provinces, 
xiv. 68 ; Javadi Hills, Madras, xiv. 85; 
Kamrup, xiv. 331 ; North Kanara, xiv. 
342; South Kanara, xiv. 355; Katha, 
Burma, xv. 153; Khandesh, xv. 228; 
Khasi and Jaintia Hills, xv. 355; Ko- 
laba, XV. 356; Kolhapur, xv. 381 ; Korea, 
Central Provinces, xv. 400; Lakhimpur, 
xvi. 119; Lushai Hills, xvi. 213; Madras 
Presidency, xvi. 245; Madura, xvi. 388; 
Magwe, Burma, xvi. 413; Malabar, 
xvii. 55 ; Mandalay, xvii. 127; Mandla, 
xvii. 160; Manipur, xvii. 185; Meiktila, 
Burma, xvii. 276 ; Mergui, Burma, xvii. 
295; Minbu, Burma, xvii. 346; Myit- 
kyina, Burma, xviii. 136; Mysore, xviii. 
166; NagaHills, xviii. 285; Narsinghpur, 
xviii. 386; the Nilgiris, xix. 88; Now- 
gong, xix. 2 2 2; Orissa Tributary States, 
xix. 254; Pakokku, Burma, xix. 320; 
Palamau, xix. 336; Pegu, xx. 85; Poona, 
XX. 166; Raipnr, xxi. 50; Rairakhol, 
Bengal, xxi. 61 ; Rewa Kantha, xxi. 293 ; 
Ruby Mines, xxi. 32 7 ; Sambalpur, xxii. 
7; Savanlvadi, xxii. 151; Northern Shan 
States, xxii. 233 ; Southern Shan States, 
xxii. 251 ; .Shwebo, Burma, xxii. 312 ; 
Sibsagar,xxii. 345 ; .Singhbhum,xxiii. 3; 
.Surguja, xxiii. 171 ; Thana, xxiii. 291 ; 
Tharrawaddy, Burma, xxiii. 317; Tha- 
yetmyo, Burma, xxiii. 344; Travancore, 
xxiv. 5 ; Udaipur State, Central Pro- 



INDEX 



83 



vinces, xxiv. 83 ; Warangal, xxiv. 358 ; 
Yamethin, Burma, xxiv. 402. 

Bison Hill, Godavari District, Madras, 
viii. 249. 

Bisrampur, chief place of Surguja State, 
Central Provinces, with coal measure, 
viii. 249. 

Bissamcuttack, iahsil in Vizagapatam 
District, Madras, viii. 249. 

Bissau, town in Rajputana, viii. 249-250. 

Bissoyis, hill chiefs, Ganjam villages 
plundered by, xii. 146. 

Bist Jullundur Doab, dodb in Punjab be- 
tween the Beas and Sutlej rivers, viii. 
250. 

Bisura SankrantT, festival at Tribeni, 
Hooghly, xxiv. 25. 

Biswa Singh, founder of Koch dynasty, 
in Assam, vi. 25, vii. 214, 289, x. 381, 
xii. 271, xiv. 32, xxi. 224; built 
capital in Cooch Behar, vi. 25. 

Biswan, tahsil in Sitapur District, United 
Provinces, viii. 250. 

Biswan, town in Sitapur District, United 
Provinces, viii. 250. 

Bithur,town in Cawnpore District, United 
Provinces, with bathing festival, resi- 
dence of the last Peshwa, viii. 250-251. 

Bitti Deva, Hoysala king. See Vishnu- 
vardhana. 

Bittiga, Hoysala king. See Vishnuvar- 
dhana. 

Bitumen, found in Afghanistan, v. 55 ; 
Himalayas, xiii. 130. 

Bizanjau, Brahui tribe, ix. 15 ; in Jhala- 
wan, xiv. ill ; Makran, xvii. 47. 

' Black Hole ' of Calcutta (i 756), ii. 474- 
475, ix. 264. 

Black Mountain, range in North-West 
Frontier Province, the scene of several 
military expeditions, viii. 251-252 ; ex- 
peditions sent against (1868, 1888, 
1891, 1892), xiii. 77, xix. 156, 209. 

Black Pagoda, at Konarak, Orissa, vii. 
211. 

Black Town, native quarter of Madras 
City, xvi. 365 ; name officially changed 
to George Town (1906), xvi. 365 «. 

Black-wood trees {Dalbergta), found in 
North Arcot, v. 413; South Arcot, v. 
422 ; Banswara, vi. 410; Belgaum, vii. 
152; Bombay Presidency, viii. 274,321; 
Cochin, X. 347 ; Coimbatore, x. 364 ; 
Dhar, xi. 28S ; Dharampur, xi. 296 ; 
Elgandal, Hyderabad, xii. 6 ; Western 
Ghats, xii. 218, 220; Haliyal, North 
Kanara, xiii. ri-12 ; Hyderabad, Sind, 
xiii. 312, 317 ; Indore, xiii. 335 ; Indur, 
Hyderabad, xiii. 352, 354; Junagarh, 
Kathiawar, xiv. 237 ; South Kanara, 
xiv. 364 ; Karimnagar, Hyderabad, xv. 
42 ; Karjat, Kolaba, xv. 43 ; Khandesh, 
XV. 235; Kolaba, xv. 363-364; Kolha- 



pur State, xv. 384 ; the Nilgiris, xix, 
96; Nizamabad, Hyderabad, xix. 124 ; 
Pachaimalais, xix. 305 ; Palamau, xix. 
341 ; Palni Hills, xix. 372 ; Partabgarh, 
XX. 1 1 ; Rajpipla, xxi. 80 ; Rewa Kantha, 
xxi. 293 ; Salem, xxi. 402 ; Savantvadi, 
xxii. 151 ; Shevaroy Hills, Madras, 
xxii. 274; Shimoga, Mysore, xxii. 282 ; 
Surgana, Nasik, xxiii. 169; Travancore, 
xxiv. II ; Trichinopoly, xxiv. 34; Upper 
Sind Frontier District, xxiv. 278 ; 
Wynaad, Malabar, xxiv. 399. 
Blair, Archibald, Port Blair established 
by (1789), XX. 192 ; commissioned to 
start a settlement on Andamans,v. 360; 
partial charts of Andaman Islands, v. 

Blake, Martin (Assistant to Governor- 
General's Agent in Rajputana), death 
of, in riot at Jaipur (1835), xiii. 387. 

Blane, Mr., early course of Indus explored 
by, xiii. 358. 

Blanford, W. T., investigation of mon- 
soon and Himalayan snowfall, i. 129; 
estimate of variability of rainfall, i. 
144-145, 146; decrease in rainfall in 
Central Asia and Persia, i. 301. 

Blankets and rugs manufactured, Aligarh, 
V. 214; Almora, v. 249; Anantapur, v. 
344; Anupshahr, v. 388; South Arcot, 
V. 431; Atpadi, Bombay, vi. 124; Bah- 
raich, vi. 210; Balrampur, Oudh, vi. 
261; Baluchistan, vi. 308; Bannu, vi. 
398 ; Bara Banki, vi. 422 ; Barkhan, 
Baluchistan, vii. 22 ; Batala, Gurdaspur, 
vii. 133; Bellary, vii. 168; Berar, vii. 
392-393; Bhir, Hyderabad, viii. 115; 
Bhopal, viii. 137; Bhutan, viii. 160; 
Bidar, Hyderabad, viii. 167; Bijapur, 
viii. 182; Bikaner, viii. 219; Central 
Provinces, x. 52, 53; Chagai, Baluchi- 
stan, x. 118; Champaran,x. 143; Chhin- 
dwara, x. 211 ; Chintamani, Mysore, x. 
286; Chitaldroog, x. 294; Cochin, x. 
348 ; Dandnagar, Gaya, xi. 200 ; Da- 
vangere, Mysore, xi. 204 ; Deoband, 
Saharanpur, xi. 243 ; Dera Ghazi Khan, 
xi. 255 ; DInanagar, Gurdaspur, xi. 355 ; 
Fatehpur, xii. 84; Ferozepore, xii. 94; 
Garhwal, xii. 168; Gaya, xii. 203; 
Godavari, xii. 291 ; Gulbarga, Hyder- 
abad, xii. 379 ; Gurdaspur, xii. 398 ; 
Hardoi, xiii. 48 ; Harpanahalli, My- 
sore, xiii. 58 ; Hassan, Mysore, xiii. 67 ; 
68; Hazara, xiii. 81; Hazaribagh, xiii. 
95, 100; Hindupur, Anantapur, xiii. 
140; Hunsur, Mysore, xiii. 225 ; Hy- 
derabad, Sind, xiii. 263, 318; Jaisal- 
mer, xiv. 6 ; Jamkhandi, Southern 
Maratha Country, xiv. 46 ; Jandiala 
Guru, Amritsar, xiv. 55 ; Jhalawan, 
xiv. 112 ; Jhansi, xiv. 143, 149; Jodh- 
pur, xiv. 192 ; Kadur, Mysore, xiv. 267; 



G 2 



84 



INDEX 



Kalat, xiv. 302 ; Karachi, xv. 7 ; Kash- 
mir, XV. 132; Katihar, Pumea, xv. 187 ; 
Khandesh, xv. 235 ; Kharan, Baluch- 
istan, XV. 249; Kolar, Mysore, xv. 374, 
378 ; Kongnoli, Belgaum, xv. 394 ; 
Kurnool, xvi. 40 ; Lachung, Sikkim, 
xxii. 370-371 ; Lahore, xvi. 113; Lar- 
kana, xvi. 141 ; Las Bela, Baluchistan, 
xvi. 147; Leiah, Mianwali, xvi. 159; 
Lingsugur, Hyderabad, xvi. 166 ; Ma- 
dura, xvi. 398 ; Mahbubnagar, Hyder- 
abad, xvii. 5 ; MaindargT, Southern 
Maratha Country, xvii. 32 ; Mallani, 
Rajputana, xvii. 93 ; Mandya, Mysore, 
xvii. 174; Miranpur, Muzaffarnagar, 
xviii. 362 ; Molakalmuru, Mysore, xvii. 
388 ; Monghyr, xvii. 397 ; Motihari, 
Champaran, xviii. 5 ; Murshidabad, 
xviii. 50; Muzaffarnagar, xviii. 89, 93; 
Mysore, xviii. 257; Najibabad, Bijnor, 
xviii. 335; Nellore, xix. 17; Nepal, 
xix. 50 ; North-West Frontier Province, 
xix. 182; Palamau, xix. 342; Partab- 
garh State, xx. IJ, 19; Pathankot, 
Gurdaspur, xx. 28; Peshawar, xx. 120 ; 
Poona, XX. 176; Punjab, xx. 315; 
Quetta-Pishin, Baluchistan, xxi. 16 ; 
Rajapur, Ratnagiri,xxi. 68; Rajputana, 
xxi. 131; Ratnagiri, xxi. 253; Rohtak, 
xxi. 317; Rojhan, Dera Ghazi Khan, 
xxi. 323; Salem, xxi. 404; Sandi, 
HardoT, xxii. 30 ; Sandur, Madras, 
xxii. 46; Sankeshwar, I'elgaum, xxii. 
59; Sarawan, Baluchistan, xxii. 100; 
Satara, xxii. 124; Shahabad, xxii. 192 ; 
Shall pur, xxii. 218 ; Northern Slian 
States, xxii. 242; Sherkot, Bijnor, xxii. 
273 ; Shimoga, Mysore, xxii. 2S8 ; 
Sliolapur, xxii. 301 ; Sikkim, xxii. 370- 
371 ; Sind, xxii. 418 ; Sira, Mysore, xx;ii. 
16; Sirmur, Punjab, xxiii. 26; Songir, 
Khandesh, xxiii. 84; Talbahat, Jhansi, 
xxiii. 212; Tando Muhammad Khan, 
Sind, xxiii. 223; Terdal, Southern 
Maratha Country, xxiii. 281; Thar and 
Parkar, Sind. xxiii. 313; Tharrawaddy, 
xxiii. 323; Tonk, xxiii. 412 ; Trichino- 
poly, xxiv. 35 ; Tumkiir, Mysore, xxiv. 
57; Turuvanur, Mysore, xxiv. 64; 
United Provinces, xxiv. 202 ; Soutliern 
Wazlristan, xxiv. 384. 

Blind Schools, at Moulmein, v. 303; 
Mysore, xviii. 246 ; Palamcottah, xix. 
345, xxiii. 36S ; Ranch!, xxi. 209, 211. 

Blindness, statistics, i. 485 ; prevalent in 
Baluchistan, vi. 286 ; Central India, ix. 
349; Gujranwala, xii. 354; Manbhum, 
xvii. 114; Punjab, xx. 282; Shahabad, 
xxii. 1S9; United Provinces, xxiv. 167. 

Block, A., killed in Mutiny at Sultanpur, 
xxiii. 1 32. 

Blood, Sir Bindon, Mohmand country 
invadtd (1S97), xvii. 386; expedition 



against Swatis and Utman Khel C1S97"), 
xix. 210. 
Bloodstone, found in Kathiavvar, xv. 179. 
Bloomfield, Col., Balaghat settlement 

made by, vi. 225. 
Boad, State in Bengal. See Baud. 
Boalia, town in Eastern Bengal. See Ram- 
pur Boalia. 
Boars, wild, i. 237. 

Boat-building, Akyab, v. 196 ; Assam, vi. 
72 ; Attock, vi. 136; Barpeta, Kamrup, 
vii. 85 ; Bombay, viii. 326 ; Burma, 
ix. 177; Chittagong, X. 312; Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, x. 322; Dacca, xi. in ; 
Dumria, Khulna, xi. 379; Faridpur, xii. 
58; Jhelum, xiv. 156, 159; Kamrup, 
xiv. 336; Monghyr, xvii. 397; Nicobars, 
xix. 76, 79 ; North-West Frontier Pro- 
vince, xix. 183; Pakokku.xix. 327, 331 ; 
Pind Dadan Khan, Jhelum, xx. 146 ; 
Soalkuchi, Kamrup, xxiii. 68 ; Sukkur, 
Sind, xxiii. 127; Sylhet, xxiii. 196. 
Boats, bridges of. See Bridges. 
Bobbin, estate in Vizagapatam District, 
Madras, viii. 252-253. 

Bobbin, tahsil in Vizagapatam District, 
Madras, viii. 253-254. 

Bobbili, town in Vizagapatam District, 
Madras, viii. 254. 

Bobleshwar, village in Bijapur District, 
Bombay, viii. 254. 

Bod, State in Bengal. See Baud. 

Boda-no-nes, petty State in Kathiawar, 
Bombay, viii. 254, xv. 165. 

Bodawpaya, king of Burma (1781-1819), 
vii. 108, ix. 123; Amarapura founded 
at (1783), V. 271, vi. 152; received 
first British embassy under Captain 
Symes at Amarapura, v. 271 ; image of 
Buddha brought from Arakan to Slan- 
dalay (1784), xvii. 141 ; palace built at 
Meiktila (1796), xvii. 278 ; Mingun pa- 
goda begun, xxi. 355 ; in Pegu, xx. 
97 ; rising in Rangoon quelled, xxi. 
215 ; Shwegugyi pagoda built, xv. 155 ; 
Siam invaded (1786), xvii. 297. 

Bodh Gaya, village in Bengal. See Buddh 
Gaya. 

Bodhan, taluk in Nizamabad District, 
Hyderabad, viii. 254. 

Bodlian, town in Nizamabad District, 
Hyderabad, viii. 254. 

Bodhano, image of RanchodjT taken from 
Dwaika to Dakor, Kaira, xi. 124. 

Bodhisaltva, images on Udayagiri Hill, 
Orissa, xxiv. 109. 

Bodhi-satwas, or Buddha's sons, xix. 43. 

Bodinayakkanur, town in Madura District, 
Madras, viii. 255. 

Bodlas, Muhammadan ascetics in Feroze- 
pore District, xii. 92-93. 

Budo, group of l.nnguages of the Assam- 
Burmese sub-branch, i. 387, 392-393 ; 



INDEX 



85 



spoken in Darrang, xi. 185 ; Goalpara, 
xii. 272 ; Kamrup, siv. 333. 

Bodos, aboriginal tribe in Assam, i. 295, 
vi. 43, xi. 393 ; Garos section of, in Garo 
Hills, xii. 173. 

Eodvad, town in East Khandesh District, 
Bombay, viii. 255. 

Bofata, part of Daman conquered by Por- 
tuguese (1559), xi. 128-129. 

Bogale, Indian pirate according to Bur- 
mese tradition, v. 296. 

Bogale, township in Pyapon District, 
Lower Burma, viii. 255. 

Bogams, dancers, in Kiitna, xv. 324. 

Eogapani, river in Assam, viii. 255-256. 

Bogle, Mr., obtained consent of the Deb 
Raja to free trade between Bhutan and 
territories of the East India Company 
(1775), viii. 160, 

Bogra, river of Assam. See Bogapani. 

Bogrn, District in Eastern Bengal, viii. 
256-262; phj'sical aspects, 256; history, 
258; population, 258-259; agricul- 
ture, 259-260; trade and communica- 
tions, 260-261 ; administration, 261- 
262. 

Bogra, town in Eastern Bengal, viii. 263. 

Bohras, Mohammedan sect in Western 
India, i. 438 ; in Ahmadnagar, v. 115 ; 
Baroda, vii. 56; Bombay, viii. 413; 
Broach, ix. 22 ; Dhandhuka, Ahmad- 
abadjxi. 286; Kaira, xiv. 279; Kashmir, 
XV. 106; Kathiawar, xv. 178; Kathor, 
Baroda, xv. 186; Panch Mahals, xix. 
384; Surat, xxiii. 158, 164. 

Boigne, Benoit de, Savoyard general in 
Sindhia's service, raised siege of Agra, 
V. 83 ; defeated Rajputs at Merta and 
retook Ajmer, v. 142; organized his 
battalions at Allgarh, v. 210; part of 
Gurgaon held by, xii. 403; Maralha 
supremacy established in Gwalior, xii. 
422 ; sent a force against Kanaud under 
Perron (1792), xiv. 369-370; Holkar's 
troops defeated at Lakheri (1793), 
xiii. 347; defeated at Lalsot (Tonga), 
{c. I'jS'j), xvi. 134; Rathors defeated at 
Merta and Patau, xiv. 186, xvii. 209; 
parganas of Palwal and Hodal once 
held by Marathas under, xxiv. 157, xix. 

375- 
Boileau, Col. S. B., expedition agamst 

Bori Afrldis (1853), xix. 208; killed in 

Gonda (1856), xii. 313. 
Boisragon, Col. H. F. M., expedition 

against Powindas, Sulaiman Khel, and 

others (1S78), xix. 209. 
Boisragon, Colonel T. W. R., expedition 

against Mohmands (1880), xix. 210. 
Boisragon, Lieutenant, Gujars defeated at 

Gangoh (1857), x"- i39- 
Bojigyab, tribe in the Andamans, v. 361. 
Bokaro coal-field, vii. 134, xiii. 95. 



Bokpyin, township in Mergui District, 
Lower Burma, viii. 263. 

Boksas, caste in Naini Tal, xviii 326; 
Nepal, xix. 41. 

BoJai, local name of a channel of the 
Jadukata river, Assam, xiii. 374. 

Bolai's temple, at Baroda, vii. 83. 

Bolan Pass, District of Baluchistan, viii. 
263-266. 

Bolarum, British cantonment, Hyderabad, 
viii. 266. 

Bolpur, village in Birbhum District, Ben- 
gal, viii. 266. 

Bolts, William, Imperial Company of 
Trieste chartered through exertions of 
(1781), ii. 466 ; appearance of the Dutch 
in the Nicobars through, .xix. 64. 

Bolundra, petty Slate in Mahi Kantha, 
Bombay, viii. 266, xvii. 13. 

Bom Jesus Church, erected at Goa (1594), 
and consecrated (1603), xii 267. 

Bombay, Presidency in British India, viii. 
266-397; physical aspects, 266-27S ; 
general description, 267-269 ; moun- 
tains, 270 ; rivers, 270-271; lakes, &c., 
271; islands, 272; ports, &c., 272; 
geology, 272-273 ; flora, 273-275 ; 
fauna, 275 ; meteorology, 276-277 ; 
natural calamities, 278 ; history, 278- 
297 ; antiquities, 296-297 ; population, 
297-311 ; age statistics, 298 ; birth and 
death rates, 299 ; languages, 300-302 ; 
castes and tribes, 302-307 ; religions, 
307; food, dress, &c., 308-310 ; nomen- 
clature, 311; agriculture, 311-318; 
agricultural improvements, 314 ; cattle, 
&c., 315-316; irrigation, 316-318; 
fisheries, 318 ; rents, wages, and prices, 
318-321; forests, 321-323; mines and 
minerals, 323 ; arts and manufactures, 
323-328 ; factories and mills, 327-328 ; 
commerce and trade, 328-330 ; com- 
munications, 330-333 ; railways, 330- 
332 ; tramways, 332"; roads, 332-333; 
post office, 333; famine, 333-339; 
administration, 339-342 ; Native States, 
341-342; legislation and justice, 342- 
346 ; finance, 346-349 ; land revenue, 
349-354 ; miscellaneous revenue, 354- 
363; opium, 354-355; salt, 355-357; 
excise, 357-362 ; stamps, 362 ; income 
tax, 362; customs, 363; local and 
municipal, 364-367 ; District boards, 
364 ; municipalities, 365-366 ; Port 
Trusts, 366 ; public works, 367-36S ; 
army, 368-369 ; police and jails, 369- 
371; police reorganization, 371-372; 
education, 372-379; medical, 379- 
38 1 ; surveys, 381-382 ; bibliography, 
382. Tables : population, 383-3S4 ; 
agriculture, 385 ; prices of chief 
grains, 386 ; foreign maritime trade, 
386-387; trade with other Provinces 



86 



INDEX 



and States, 388 ; provincial revenue, 
3S9 ; provincial expenditure, 390 ; 
annual gross yield of import duties, 391 ; 
income and expenditure of District 
municipalities and District boards, 392 ; 
police statistics, 393 ; crime, 393 ; jails, 
393; colleges, schools, and scholars, 
394 ; University results, 395 ; educa- 
tional finance, 396 ; medical statistics, 

397- 

Other references : Meteorology, i. 
116, 117, 122, 124, 130, 132, 136, 138, 
140, 149; botany, i. 190; geology, i. 
263-264 ; zoology, i. 266 ; languages, 
i; 373, 381, 394; Parsis, i. 440; Chris- 
tians, i. 444, 476; population and 
density, i. 452-453; immigration, i. 
469; Hinduism, i. 472; growth of 
population, i. 463 ; Muhammadanism, 
i. 474 ; Eurasians, i. 477 ; age statistics, 
i. 47S ; birth-rate statistics, i. 506, 510, 
511 ; sickness and mortality statistics, 
i- 512, 517, 519- 522, 526, 529, 530- 
531 ; megalithic tombs, ii. 96 ; trouble 
from Marathas, ii. 441, 462; policy 
towards Marathas, ii. 441, 442 ; failure 
to support a Peshwa, ii. 442, 485 ; 
rescue by Warren Hastings, ii. 44 J, 
485 ; Presidency constituted after' last 
Maratha War, ii. 493 ; abolition of 
separate army, ii. 525; agricultural 
statistics, iii. 3, 97, 100; agricultural 
implements, iii. 12, 14, 15; cultivation 
of rice, iii. 26, 27, :8 ; wheat, iii. 30; 
millets, iii. 32 ; oilseeds, iii. 38; cotton, 
iii. 45 ; tobacco, iii. 49 ; number of 
live stock, and of ploughs and carts 
(1901-2), iii. loi ; forests, iii. 122; 
manganese ore, iii. 147 ; arts and 
manufactures, iii. 187, 190, 197, 200, 
202, 216, 241 ; factory statistics, iii. 
247; trade, iii. 272, 280, 285, 305, 
3'4> 315; cotton trade, iii. 281-282; 
irrigation, iii. 318-319, 32 X, 323, 324, 
346, 349 ; postal and sa\ings bank 
transactions (1903-4), iii. 428, 435 ; 
prices, iii. 458; wnges, iii. 470, 472, 
473, 474 ; famine, iii. 488-489, 490, 
491 ; government, iv. 8, 11, 14, 30-31, 
47; supremacy of Bengal over, iv. 14, 
15; administration, iv. 47-54; Court 
of Wards, iv. 50 n. ; historical sketch 
of Native States, iv. 66 ; statistics 
of Native States, iv. 97 ; legislative 
functions of PomLay Government with- 
drawn (1833), iv. 129; legislation and 
justice, iv. 130, 135, 145-147, 151, 
157; revenue, iv. 170, 192; land 
revenue, iv. 207, 209, 210, 211 n., 
217, 224, 225, 226, 227, 230, 233, 
239; consumption of opium, iv. 
245; salt production and trade, iv. 
2 48, 249, 250, 251, 275; inloxicating 



liquors, iv. 255, 256-257, 358; hemp 
drugs, iv. 260, 261 ; licence tax, iv. 
268; income tax, iv. 270.; land cess, 
iv. 271, 272, 273; village officials, iv. 
281, 282 ; municipal government, iv. 
286, 287, 289, 291 ; local government, 
iv. 298, 299, 300, 301, 303, 304; Port 
Trust, iv. 304-305 ; public works 
organization, iv. 312, 314, 316, 318- 
319 ; marine, iv. 382 ; police reform, 
iv. 387, 388, 389, 390; education, iv. 
411, 414, 416, 418, 419, 420, 421, 432, 

434> 437, 439, 44°, 44i, 442, 443, 
449; publications, iv. 453; medical, 
iv. 459, 461, 462, 463, 464, 466, 477- 
479 ; sanitation, iv. 469-470, 472 ; 
plague, iv. 475, 476 ; surveys, iv. 491 ; 
Survey department, iv. 504. 

Bombay City, capital of Presidency of 
Bombay, viii. 39S-421 ; description, 
398-402; history, 402-410; popula- 
tion, 410-413; agriculture, 413-414; 
industiies, 414; commerce, 414-415; 
administration, 415-420; education, 
418; newspapers, 418; medical, 418- 
420 ; municipal revenue and expendi- 
ture, 421. 

Other references : Observatory, i. 105 ; 
meteorology, i. 126, 154; growth of 
population, i. 457-458; infantile mor- 
tality, i. 518; overcrowding, i. 520; 
deaths from plague, i. 525 ; acquisi- 
tion, ii. 459 ; seat of Presidency trans- 
ferred to, from Surat ^1684-7), ii. 459 ; 
arts and manufactures, iii. 186, 192, 
213, 231,241,245; port, iii. 273; trade, 
iii. 303 ; municipality constituted, and 
its success, iv. 296, 297; improvement 
schemes, iv. 297, 29S ; University, iv. 
426-430; school of art, iv. 438; medical 
college, iv. 441; EljihinstoneCollege.iv. 
445; water-works, iv. 472 ; sanitation, 
iv. 473; mint, iv. 514-515. 

Bombay, Baroda, andCentrallndia Rnil- 
way,'iii. 376, 381, 385, 391-392, 414, 

41.5- 

Bombay- Burma Trading Corporation, iii. 
121 ; murder of assistants of, in Upper 
Chindwin District (1885'), x. 240; teak 
of Upper Chindwin District exported 
by, X. 247. 

Bombay port, trade, iii. 315; tidal ob- 
servations, iv. 490. 

Bombay Telephone Co., telephone system 
at Hyderabad organized by (1884), 
xiii. 2S8. 

Bomjur. frontier police outpost inLakhim- 
pur District, Assam, ix. i. 

Bomml Reddi, traditional builder of 
Vellore fort, xxiv. 304. 

Bomong, circle in Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
Eastern Bengal, ix. i. 

Bonai, State in Orissa, Bengal, ix. 1-4; 



INDEX 



87 



physical aspects, i-a ; history, 3 ; 

population, 2-3; agriculture, 3; trade 

and communications, 3-4. 
Bonaigarh, head-quarters of Bonai State, 

Bengal, ix. 4. 
Bondoyas, division of the Korku tribe, xv. 

403- 

Bone -mills, and bone-grinding, Agra, 
V. 79, 90 ; Bally, Hovvrah, vi. 258 ; 
Karachi, xv. 8 ; Madras Presidency, 
xvi. 296 ; Maniktala, Twenty-four 
Parganas, xvii. 183; Sind, xxii. 418; 
Thana, xxiii. 298; Twenty- four Par- 
ganas, xxiv. 75 ; United Provinces, 
xxiv. 205, 

Bongong, subdivision and village in 
Bengal. See Bangaon. 

Bookbinding, at Lahore, xvi. 113; Nar- 
singhpur, xviii. 395. 

Books, statistics of publication, iv. 453- 

454- 

Boondee, State in Rajputana. See Bundi. 

Boondelcund, historic area in United 
Provinces and Central India. See 
Bnndelkhand. 

Boone, Governor, of Bombay, opened 
St. Thomas's Church on Christmas Day, 
1718, viii. 405. 

Boot and shoe trade, iii. 190. 

Boots and shoes, manufacture of, Agra, v. 
90; Ahmadabad, V. no, 126; Akyab, 
V. 196 ; Almora, v. 249 ; Amarapura, 
Burma, v, 272 ; Anupshahr, Buland- 
shahr, v. 388 ; Bairia, Ballia, vi. 218 ; 
Bhutan, viii. 160 ; Bilgram, Cawnpore, 
viii. 235; Chakwal, Jhelum, x. 126; 
Gadarwara, Narsinghpur, xii. 120; 
Gujrat, xii. 374; Janjira, xiv. 60; 
Kamal, xv. 54, 59 ; Khairpur, Sind, 
XV. 213; Lahore, xvi. 113; Lucknov/, 
xvi. 198 ; Manjhand, Karachi, xvii. 
197 ; Multan, xviii. 37 ; Najibabad, 
Bijnor, xviii. 335 ; Narowal, Sialkot, 
xviii. 382 ; Navsari, Baroda, xviii. 426 ; 
North- West Frontier Province, xix. 
184 ; Purwa, Unao, xx. 422 ; Kajapur, 
Ratnagiri, xxi. 68; Rawalpindi, xxi. 
268; Reoti, Ballia, xxi. 279; Santal 
Parganas, xxii. 73 ; Sarawan, Baluch- 
istan, xxii. 100; Shahdara, Meerut, xxii. 
200; Shikarpur, xxii. 278; Sialkot, xxii. 
336 ; Talagang, Attock, xxiii. 207 ; 
Tando Muhammad Khan, Sind, xxiii. 
223 ; Twenty-Four Parganas, xxiv. 75 ; 
Upper Sind Frontier District, xxiv. 282; 
"Wankaner, Kathiawar, xxiv. 354. 

Bor Abors. See Abors. 

Bora Chaoba Singh, expeditions against 
Raja Sur Chandra Singh, of Manipur, 
xvii. 187. 

Boram, village in Manbhum District, 
Bengal, ix. 4. 

Borax, iii. 157-158, 236-237; found in 



the Himalayas, xiii. 130; at Jagadhri, 

xiii. 376 ; Ladakh, xvi. 93. 
Bore, or tidal wave, in the Gulf of Cambay, 

ix. 297; the Hooghly river, xiii. 172 ; 

the Meghna, xvii. 267 ; the Sittang, 

xxiii. 63. 
Borgaon, village in Satara District, 

Bombay, ix. 4. 
Borgaon, village in Belgaum District, 

Bombay, ix. 4-5. 
Borghat, pass in Western Ghats, traversed 

by railway from Bombay to Deccan, 

i- 39. ix. 5-6- 

Bori, subdivision and tahsil in Baluchi- 
stan, ix. 6. 

Bori Afrldis. See Afrldis. 

Borias, caste in Assam, xix. 45 ; Nowgong, 
xix. 224. 

Borivli, village in Thana District, Bombay, 
with antiquarian remains, ix. 6. 

Borkhera, thakurdt in Central India, ix. 
6, xvii. 99. 

Boro. See Rice. 

Borsad, tdluka in Kaira District, Bombay, 
ix. 6-7. 

Borsad, town in Kaira District, Bombay, 
ix. 7. 

Borugulti, preparation of rice, made at 
Rayadrug, Vizagapatam, xxi. 276. 

Boscawen, Admiral, attack on Pondi- 
cherry (1748), ii. 472, xx. 161. 

Botad, town in Kathiawar, Bombay, ix. 7. 

Botanical gardens. See Gardens. 

Botany, i. 157-212; introductory, 157- 
162 ; botanical regions of British India, 
162-166 ; Eastern Himalayan region, 
166-170; tropical zone of Sikkim, 
167-168; temperate zone of Sikkim, 
168-169; alpine zone of Sikkim, 169- 
170 ; Western Himalayan region, 170- 
1 76 ; tropical zone of Western Hima- 
layas, 172-173; temperate zone of 
Western Himalayas, 173-174; alpine 
zone of Western Himalayas, 174-175 ; 
Tibetan valleys of Western Himalayas, 
175-176 ; Indus Plain region, 176-179 ; 
Gaugetic Plain region, 179-181 ; Bengal 
proper, 181-182; Sundarbnns, 182- 
184; Western Peninsula (the Deccan 
and Malabar regions), 184-187; 
Nilgiris, 187-189; Laccadive Archi- 
pelago, 189; Deccan, 189-193; Coro- 
mandel sub-region, 193; Ceylon region, 
193-196 ; Maldive Archipelago, 196 ; 
Burma, 196-203 ; Andaman Islands, 
203-204; Nicobar Islands, 204-205; 
Malayan Peninsular region, 205-207 ; 
Penang Islet, 207 ; Cocos and Keeling 
Islets, 207 ; Kurram Valley, 208 ; 
British Baluchistan, 209-210; biblio- 
graphy, 211-212. See also in each Pro- 
vince, District, and larger State article 
under Physical Aspects. 



88 



INDEX 



Botataung pagoda, Rangoon, xxi. 216. 
Bottadas, cultivating Oriya caste in Viza- 

gapatam, xxiv. 32S. 
Bongh, Lieut., attempted murder of, by 

Mangal Pande at Barrackpore (1857), 

v;i. 86-87. 
Boughton, Dr. Gabriel, English estab- 
lished at Hooghly through (1651), ii. 

458, vii. 217. 
Boulnois, Lieut., killed by Mohmands 

while constructing Michni fort (1851), 

xvii. 326. 
Boundary pillars made, Mirzapnr, xvii. 

372. 

Bourbon cotton. See Cotton. 

Bourbons, history of, in Bhopal, xiii. 324. 

Bourdillon, Sir James, Lieutenant-Gover- 
nor of Bengal (1902-3), vii. 220. 

Bourquin, Louis, Sindhia's French general, 
part of Gurgaon held, xii. 403; defeat 
of George Thomas (1801, 1802), xii. 
210, xiii. 146-147, xxi. 312; Georgegarh 
fort taken (1801), xii. 210; Pinjaur fort 
dismantled, xx. 148. 

Bower manuscript, from Kashgar, ii. i o. 

Bowring, Lewin, head of Mysore Com- 
ir,ission (1862), x\-iii. 184. 

Bowringpet, tdhik in Kolar District, 
Mysore, ix. 7-8. 

Bows and arrows, manufacture of, Sirohi 
State, xxiii. 34; Tilhar, Shahjahanpur, 
xxiii. 360. 

Bowser, Colonel, Gooty captured by 
(1799), xii. 329. 

Boxes, manufactured in Assam, vi. 74 ; 
Bhaunagar, Kathiawar, viii. 96 ; Bhutan, 
viii. 160; Karauli, xv. 30; Kartarpur, 
Jullundur, xv. 61 ; Kiratpur, Bijnor, xv. 
308; Mymensingh, xviii. 156; Prome, 
XX. 226, 230; Savantvadi, xxii. 153; 
Ria'.kot, xxii. 331, 336; Tilhar, Shah- 
jahanpur, xxiii. 360. See also Betel- 
boxes. 

Boya, village in North-West Frontier 
Province, ix. 8. 

Boyas. See Bedas. 

Boyd, Major, expedition against Sara- 
bhudan (_i8S2), ix. 251-252; death at 
Maibang, xvii. 27. 

Boyle, Vicars, defence of Arrah (1857), 
vi. 5-6. 

Brackenbury, Lieut., killed at Manipur 
(1 891), xvii. 188. 

Bradford, Colonel Sir E., Agent to the 
Governor-General in Rajputana (1878), 
xxi. 143. 

Bradshasv, Lieut. -Col. J., expedition against 
Baeza, Swat (1849), xix. 208. 

Braganza, Constantino de, Portuguese 
Viceroy of India (1558-61), ii. 450; 
conquered part of Daman (1559), xi. 
128-129. 

Brahma, third member of the Hinda triad, 



i. 420, ii. 233; shrines devoted to wor- 
ship of, i. 420. 

Local notices : Hill of Barsana,Muttra, 
originally dedicated to, vii. 87 ; horse 
sacrifices performed by, at Dasashwa- 
vaz^ghdt, Benares, vii. 191 ; at Bithur, 
Cawnpore, viii. 251 ; sculpture of, in 
Payech temple, Kashmir, xv. 98 ; shrine 
at Kumbakonam, Tanjore, xvi. 20; 
temple at Pushkar, Rajputana, xxi. 
I ; performed j'a;'«a sacrifice at Pushkar, 
xxi. I ; legend assigning origin of the 
Son and Narbada to two tears dropped 
by, xxiii. 7^~77' 
Brahma ktiud, at Sibor, Kathiawar, xxii. 

360. 
Brahmadeo temple, at Savdi, Dharwar, 

xxii. 157. 
Brahmagiri, hill in Mysore, with Asoka 

edicts, ix. 8. 
Brahmagiri, range in Southern India, ix. 8. 
Brahmagupta, Sanskrit astronomer (bom 

598), ii. 266. 
Brahmakund, pool in the Brahmaputra, 

Assam, ix. 8. 
Brahmanabad, ruined city in Sind, ix. 8-9 ; 

jars for urn burial found, ii. 96. 
Brdhntanas, the, ritual and speculative 
textbooks of Vedic sacrifice (800-500 
B.C.}, ii. 209, 229, 230. 
Brahmanbaria, subdivision in Tippera 

District, Eastern Bengal, ix. 9. 
Brahmanbaria, town in Tippera District, 

Eastern Eengal, ix. 9-10. 
BrahmanI, river in Orissa, Bengal, ix. 10. 
Brahmanical threads. See Janeo. 
Brahmanism, birth-place in the Madhya- 
desa, i. 404 ; ritualistic and philo- 
sophical development of Vedism, i. 404; 
the Brdhntanas, i. 404 ; supremacy of 
the priestly class, i. 404-405 ; system of 
ritual and worship rather than of reli- 
gion, i. 405 ; life after death, i. 405 ; 
its vague eschatology, i. 405 ; human 
sacrifice, i. 405-406 ; reaction against, 
in Buddhism and Jainism, i. 406-407 ; 
subjection of other classes, i. 407 ; ex- 
clusion of all but Brahmaus from the 
ascetic fraternities, i. 408, 414; com- 
patibility of Hinduism with both, i. 40S, 
415-416; evolution of modem Hindu- 
ism from, i. 412, 417; Vedanta philo- 
sophy, ii. 253-255. See also Hinduism. 
I'rahmans, i. 498 ; Konkanasth, of Bom- 
bay, colour of eyes, i. 284; ethnology, 
i. 2S6, 293-295 ; wide diffusion and 
mixed descent, i. 331 ; theories as to 
origin of caste or Brahmanical system, 
i- 332-347; mythical origin, i. 332; 
suppression of the Kshatti iyas, i. 407 ; 
more oithodox and powerful in South- 
ern than in Northern India, i. 422 ; 
number of, in all India, i. 498. 



INDEX 



8g 



Local notices : Agra, v. 77 ; Ahmad- 
abad, v. 98; Ahmadnagar, v. 115, 123 ; 
Ajaigarh, v. 131 ; Ajmer-Mervvara, v. 
146; Akola, V. 184; Aligarh, V. 212; 
Allahabad, v. 231; Almora, v, 247; 
Alwar, V. 260; Ambala, v. 280; Am- 
raoti, V. 309 ; Amritsar, v. 322 ; Assam, 
vi. 24,44; Aurangabad, vi. 144; Back- 
ergunge, vi. 168; Bahraich, vi. 208; 
Balasore, vi. 239 ; Ballia, vi. 252 ; 
Banda, vi. 350 ; Bangalore, vi. 363 ; 
Bankura, vi. 386; Banswara, vi. 410; 
BaonI, vi.415 ; BaraBanki, vi.420; Bar- 
eilly, vii. 6; Basim, vii. 98; Benares, vii. 
182; Bengal, ill. 302, vii. 233; Berar,vii. 
379,419; Betul,viii. 9; Bhandara, viii. 
64 ; Bharatpur, viii. 79-80 ; Bhir, viii. 
113 ; Bhopal.viii. 133 ; Bhor, viii. 148 ; 
Bijapur, viii. 174, 179; Bijawar, viii. 
189; Bijnor, viii. 196; Bikaner, viii. 
209; Bilaspur, viii. 226; Bombay Pre- 
sidency, viii. 303, 3o^s ; Budaun, ix. 37 ; 
Bundijix. S3 ; Burdvvan, ix. 94; Burma, 
ix. 141 ; Cawnpore, ix. 309 ; Central 
India, ix. 352; Central Provinces, x. 
23, 25-26, 96 ; Chanda, x. 153 ; 
Charkhari, x. 178; Chhabra, x. 195; 
Chhatarpur, x. 200 ; Chhindwara, x. 
208 ; Chitaldroog, x. 293 ; Chitta- 
gong, X. 310; Cochin, x. 345; Coimba- 
tore, X. 361 ; Conjeeveram, Chingleput, 
X- 377 ; Coorg, xi. 29, 63 ; Cuttack, xi. 
89 ; Dacca, xi. 107 ; Darbhanga, xi. 
155 ; Darrang, xi. 185 ; Datia, xi. 197 ; 
Dehra Dun, xi. 215; Delhi, xi. 226; 
Dhar, xi. 290; Dharwar, xi. 308, 316, 
317; Dholpur, xi. 325; worship of 
rocks and temple as Mahadeo, at Dub- 
rajpur, Blrbhum, .xi. 374; Dungarpur, 
xi. 3S2 ; Elgandal, Hyderabad, xii. 7 ; 
EUichpur, xii. 13 ; Etah, xii. 32 ; Eta- 
wah, xii. 42 ; Farldpur, xii. 56 ; Far- 
rukhabad, xii. 67 ; Fatehpur, xii. 78 ; 
Ferozepore, xii. 93 ; Fyzabad, xii. 112 ; 
Ganjam, xii. 148; Garhwal, xii. 167; 
Gaya, xii. 200; GhazTpur, xii. 225; 
Goa, xii. 258; Goalpara, xii. 272; 
Godavari, xii. 287; Gonda, xii. 314; 
Gorakhpur, xii. 335 ; Gujranwala, xii. 
3.S7; Gujrat, xii. 368; Gulbarga, Hyder- 
abad, xii. 378 ; Gurdaspur, xii. 396 ; 
Gwalior, xii. 42S ; Hamlrpur, xiii. 16; 
Hardol, dii. 45 ; agrahara of, at Hari- 
har, Mysore, xiii. 54-55; Hassan, My- 
sore, xiii. 65 ; Hazara, xiii. 78 ; Hoogh- 
ly, xiii. 165; Hoshangabad, xiii. 1S3; 
Hoshiarpur, xiii. 196-197 ; Howrah, 
xiii. 20S ; Hyderabad State, xiii. 247 ; 
Indore, xiii. 341 ; Indur, Hyderabad, 
^'ii- 353 ; Jaijur, xiii. 3S9 ; Jalaun, xiv. 
21 j JanjTra, xiv. 59; Jessore, xiv. 95; 
Jhalawar, xiv. 118; Jhang, xiv. 128; 
Jhansi, xiv. 140; Jhelum, xiv. 154; 



Jodhpur, xiv. 1 89 ; Jubbulpore, xiv. 
209; Jullundur, xiv. 226; Kadur, My- 
sore, xiv. 265; Kaira, xiv. 279; Kalli- 
daikurichi, Tinnevelly, xiv. 314; Kam- 
rup, xiv. 333-334; North Kanara, xiv. 
344; South Kanara, xiv. 360 ; Kangra, 
xiv. 387 ; Kapurthala, xiv. 410 ; Kara- 
chi, XV. 5 ; Karauli, xv. 28 ; Karnal, 
XV. 51; Kashmir, xv. 99, 105, 106; 
Kathiawar, xv. 177; Khandesh, xv. 
231; Kheil, XV. 271; Khulna, xv. 
288 ; Kishangarh, xv. 313 ; Kistna, 
XV. 324 ; Kolaba, xv. 360 ; Kolar, 
Mysore, xv. 372 ; Kolhapur, xv. 383 ; 
Kotah, XV. 416 ; Lahore, xvi. 99 ; 
Larkana, xvi. 139; Lucknow, xvi. 183; 
Ludhiana, xvi. 202 ; Lunavada, xvi. 
210 ; Madras Presidency, xvi. 261-262 ; 
Madras City, xvi. 372 ; Mahbubnagar, 
Hyderabad, xvii. 3 ; Mahi Kantha, xvii. 
17; Mainpurl, xvii. 35; Mallani, xvii. 
92 ; Mandi, xvii. 155 ; Maudla, xvii. 
163; Medak, Hyderabad, 247; Mer- 
wara, xvii. 309 ; Midnapore, xvii. 332 ; 
Mirzapur, xvii. 370 ; Monghyr, xvii, 
395; Montgomery, xvii. 412; Morad- 
abad, xvii. 424 ; Murshidabad, xviii. 48 ; 
Muttra, xviii. 66 ; Muzaffarnagar, xviii. 
87; Muzaffarpur, xviii. 98; Mysore, xviii. 
196, 203, 255; Nadia, xviii. 276 ; Nag- 
pur, xviii. 309; Naini Tal, xviii. 326; 
Nalgonda, xviii. 340 ; Narsinghgarh, 
xviii. 383 ; Narsinghpur, xviii. 388 ; 
Nayagarh, xviii. 430 ; the Nilgiris, 
xix. 92 ; Nimar, xix. 110; North-West 
Frontier Province, xix. 166; Nowgong, 
xix. 224; Orchha, xix. 245; Orissa 
Tributary States, xix. 257 ; Osmanabad, 
Hyderabad, xix. 271 ; Oudh, xix. 287 ; 
Palanpur Agency, xix. 349 ; Panna, 
xix. 402 ; Parbhani, Hyderabad, xix. 
412; Partabgarh State, xx. 11, 17; 
Patiala, xx. 41 ; PilTbhit, xx. 139 ; Pun- 
jab, XX. 263, 288; Purl, XX. 402 ; Rae 
Bareli, xxi. 28; Raipur, xxi. 52; Raj- 
putana, xxi. 11 1; Rampur, xxi. 185; 
Ratanpur, xxi. 239; Rawalpindi, xxi. 
266; Rewah, xxi. 284; Rewa Kantha, 
xxi. 295 ; Rohtak, xxi. 314 ; Saharan- 
pur, xxi. 372 ; Salem, xxi. 399 ; Sam- 
balpur, xxii. 9 ; Samthar, xxii. 25 ; 
Sandur, xxii. 45 ; Saran, xxii. 87 ; Sa- 
tara, xxii. 121 ; Saugor, xxii. 140; Sa- 
vantvadi, xxii. 153; Shahabad, xxii. 
190; Shahjahanpur, xxii. 204; Shah- 
pura chiefship, xxii. 224; Shimoga, 
Mysore, xxii. 286; Sholapur, xxii. 298; 
Sialkot, xxii. 329; Sibsagar, xxii. 348; 
Sind, viii. 306, 307, 407; Sironj, xxiii. 
38 ; Sirpur Tandur, Hyderabad, xxiii, 
42 ; Sitamau, xxiii. 53; Sitapur, xxiii. 56 ; 
Sonpur, xxiii. 85 ; Sultanpur, xxiii. 
133; Surat, xxiii. 158; Sylhet, xxiii. 



90 



INDEX 



193; Tanjore, xxiii. 231; Tehri, xsiii. 
271; Tippera, xxiii. 383; Tonk, xxiii. 
410 ; Travancore,xxiv. 9; Tumkur, My- 
sore, xxiv. 55 ; Twenty-four Parganas, 
xxiv. 73; Udaipur, xxiv. 94; Unao, xxiv. 
125; United Provinces, xxiv. 170; 
W'arangal, Hyderabad, xxiv. 360; 
Wardha, xxiv. 369; Wun, xxiv. 392. 

Erahmapura, village in Punjab. See 
Brahmaar. 

Erahmapura temple of Jagannath, Sam- 
balpur, Bengal, xxii. 17. 

Brahmapurl, tahsil in Central Provinces. 
See Bramhapurl. 

Brahmapuri, village in Sholapur District, 
Bombay, cantonment of Aurangzeb's 
grand army (1695-1700), ix. 10. 

Brahmaputra, or Tsan-po, great river of 
Tibet and North-Eastern India, i. 25, 
27-28, ii. 360-361, ix. 10-14; course 
and confluents, ix. la-ii ; exploration 
cf upper course, ix. 11; silt islands, ix. 
13 ; traffic, ix. 13-14; crocodiles, i. 267; 
dolphins, i. 238. 

Brahmaputra-Sultanpur Railway, iii. 372. 

Brahmaputra Valley, Assam, importance 
of, i. 19-20 ; rainfall data, i. 152 ; 
density of population, i. 451. 

Brahma-sphuta-sidJhdnta, astronomical 
treatise by Brahmagupta (seventh cen- 
tury), ii. 266. 

Brahnia-siUra, Vedanta treatise by Bada- 
rayana, ii. 254. 

Brahmaur, village in Chamba State, 
Punjab, with ancient temples and in- 
scriptions, ix. 14. 

Brahmeswar, temple at Bhubaneswar, 
Orissa, viii. 150; Kudali, Mysore, xvi. 
10. 

Brahmo Samaj, modem Theistic sect, i. 
429; statistics of numbers, i. 473-474; 
members of, or Brahmos, in Bengal, 
vii. 238; Presidency Division, Bengal, 
XX. 217. 

Biahmotsavam, festival held at Tiruvot- 
tiyiir, xxiii. 402. 

Brahui Central Range, Baluchistan, ix. 

14-1.5- 

Brahui language, of the Dravidian family, 
i- 379) 381-382, 398; spoken in Balu- 
chistan, vi. 2S7-288 ; Chagai, x, 117; 
Jhalawan, xiv. 11 1 ; Kharan, xv. 248; 
Quetta-Pishin, xxi. 14. 

Brahui tribe, i. 310-311, 393, ix. T5-17; 
in Baluchistan, i. 330, vi. 288, 290 ; 
Brahui Range, ix. 15; Chagai, x. 117; 
Jhalawan, xiv. ill; Kachhi, xiv. 249, 
250; Kalat, xiv. 301 ; Karachi, xv. 5 ; 
in I-arkana, xvi. 139; defeated by Mir 
Khudadad Khan near Mastung (1871), 
xxii. 99; conquest of Nushki, x. 117; 
in Pab Range, xix. 296 ; Quetta handed 
over to {c. 1740), xxi. 13; in Quetta- 



Pishln, xxi. 14; Sarawan, xxii. 99; Sind, 
viii. 305, 306, xxii. 406 ; Upper Sind 
Frontier District, xxiv. 280. 

Braithwaite, Colonel, Pondicherry cap- 
tured (1793), XX, 161. 

Braj Bhasha, dialect of Western Hindi, 
i- 366-367 ; spoken in Bareilly, vii. 
6 ; Bharatpur, viii. 79 ; Bndaun, ix. 
37 ; Bulandshahr, ix. 51 ; Etah, xii. 31 ; 
Gurgaon, xii. 405 ; Mainpuri, xvii. 35 ; 
Muttra, xviii. 66; Rajputana, xxi. iii. 

Braj Mandal, or country of Krishna, 
sacred territory round Muttra, Kaman, 
Bharatpur, one of the twelve holy 
places, xiv. 326, xviii. 64. 

Bramhapuri, tahsil in Chanda District, 
Central Provinces, ix. 17. 

Brandis, Sir Dietrich, Superintendent of 
Forests in Pegu (1856-1862;, iii. 107; 
first Inspector - General of Forests 
(1S64-83), iii. 107; visit to Madras 
(1881), xvi. 286. 

Eranfil, Lieut.-Col., kistvaens at Bapa- 
nattam. North Arcot, explored by, vi. 
416. 

Brass and copper work, iii. 240-241 ; 
Ahmadnagar, v. 125; Amritsar, v. 324, 
329; Angul, Orissa, V. 37S; North Arcot, 
V. 414 ; Asansol, Burdwan, 'vi. 8 ; Assam, 
vi. 74; Atraf-i-balda, Hyderabad, vi. 128; 
Balaghat, vi. 230; Bali, Hooghly, vi. 
247; Banga, Jullundur, vi. 360; Banga- 
lore, vi. 365; Bankura, vi. 3S7; Ban pas, 
Burdwan, vi. 403 ; Baroda, vii. 55, 56, 
80; Basti, vii. 129; Bellary, vii. 16S; 
Benares, vii. 184, 192; Bengal, vii. 267- 
268, 270; Betul, viii. 12; Bhadaur, 
Patiala, viii. 21 ; Bhagalpur, viii. 32 ; 
Bhampur, Bijnor, xi. 2S4; Bhandara, 
viii. 67; Bhaunagar, Kathiawar,viii. 95 ; 
Bhind, Central India, viii, no; Bhiwani, 
Hissar, viii. 120; Bijapur, viii. 182; 
Bilgram, Cawnpore, viii. 235 ; Bombay 
Presidency, viii. 325 ; Burma, ix. 175 ; 
Calcutta, ix. 369 ; Central Provinces, x. 
52, 53; Chamba, x. 132; Chanda, 
X. 157; Chandor, Nasik, x. i66; 
Chhatarpur, x. 202 ; Chhindwara, x. 
211; Lower Chindwin, X. 234; Chiniot, 
Jhang, X. 285 ; Chitaldroog, Mysore, 
X. 295 ; Coimbatore, x. 366 ; Cuttack, 
xi. 92; Dainhat, Burdwan, xi. 123; 
Daska, Sialkot, xi. 193; Daudnagar, 
Gaya, xi. 200; Delhi, xi. 239, 2^0; 
Dera Ghazi Khan, xi. 25S ; Dhampur, 
Bijnor, xi. 2S4; Dhrangadhra, xi.334; 
Dignagar, Burdwan, xi. 345 ; Dubrajpnr, 
Birbhum, xi. 374; Dungarpur, xi. 3S3; 
Elgandal, Hyderabad, xii. 9; Faridpur, 
xii. 58; Farrnkhabad, xii. 73; Ganjam, 
xii. 152 ; Gaya, xii. 203 ; Goalpara, xii. 
274; Gondal, Kathiawar, xii. 320; 
Gujranwala, xii. 363; Gurgaon, xii. 



INDEX 



9r 



407 ; Hapur, Meerut, xiii. 40 ; Harda, 
xiii.43; Hardoi, xiii.48; Harpanahalli, 
Mysore, xiii. 58 ; Hassan, Mysore, 
xiii. 68; Hissar, xiii, 152; Hooghly, 
xiii. 167; Hoshangabad, xiii.43, 187, 
191 ; Hoshiarpur, xiii. 199 ; Hospet, 
Bellary, xiii. 204; Ham Bazar, Birbhum, 
xiii. 329; Indur, Hyderabad, xiii. 354; 
Jagadhri, Ambala,xiii. 376; Jaipur, xiii. 
392, 401 ; Jandiala Guru, Amritsar, xiv. 
55; Jaswantnagar, Etawah, xiv. 71; Jes- 
sore, xiv. 96; Jhalawar, xiv. 119; Jhang, 
'^'v. 135; Jhansi, xiv. 143, 149; Jhelum, 
xiv. 156; Jodhpur, xiv. 192,199; Jubbnl- 
pore, xiv. 213, 219; Jullundur, xiv. 228; 
Kadi, Baroda, xiv. 257, 259; Kamudi, 
Madura, xiv. 340 ; Kamrup, xiv. 336 ; 
Kantilo, Orissa, xiv. 405 ; Karauli, xv. 
30; Karnal, xv. 54; Karur, Coimbatoie, 
XV. 63 ; Kelod, Nagpur, xv. 198 ; 
Kesabpur, Jessore, XV. 204; Khairagarh, 
Central Provinces, xv. 208; Khajuha, 
Fatehpur, xv. 220; Kharar, Ambala, 
XV. 251 ; Kolar, Mysore, xv, 374 ; Kum- 
bakonam, Tanjore, xvi. 21 ; Lakhim- 
pur, xvi. 124; Lingampet, Hyderabad, 
xvi. 162; Lucknow, xvi. 198; Madras 
Presidency, xvi. 292 ; Mahmudabad, 
Sitapur, xvii. 22; Mallanwan, Hardoi, 
xvii.94; Man blium, xvii. 118; Manda- 
lay, xvii. 146 ; Mau-Ranipur, Jhansi, 
xvii. 233; Mirzapur, xvii. 377; Mont- 
gomery, xvii. 415 ; Moradabad, .xvii. 
430; Mukher, Hyderabad, xviii, 18; 
Muttra, xviii. 74 ; Myingyan, Burma, 
xviii. 134; Mysore, xviii. 220, 257; 
Nabadwip, Nadia, xviii, 262; Nabha, 
xviii. 267; Nadia, xviii. 278; Nadiad, 
Kaira, xviii, 282 ; Nagaur, Rajpulana, 
xviii. 298; Nander, Hyderabad, xviii. 
352; Narowal, Sialkot, xviii. 382; Nasik, 
xviii. 406, 412 ; Navsari, Baroda, xviii, 
424 ; Nellore, xix. 17 ; Nepal, xix. 51 ; 
North-West Frontier Province, xix. 
183; Nowgong, xix. 226 ; Orissa Tribu- 
tary States, xi.x. 261 ; Pabna, xix. 301 ; 
Pakokku, Burma, xix. 327; Palamau, 
xix. 342 ; Panlpat, Karnal, xix. 398 ; 
Pattukkottai, Tanjore, xx. 76; Pesha- 
war, XX. 120; Petlad, Baroda, xx. 127 ; 
Pind Dadan Khan, xx. I46 ; Poona, 
XX. 1S5; Punjab, xx. 317; Purl, xx. 404; 
Quetta-Pishin, Baluchistan, xxi. 16; 
Raipur, xxi. 60; Raj-Nandgaon, Central 
Provinces, xviii. 357 ; Rajputana, xxi. 
132 ; Rajshahi, xxi. 165 ; RanchI, xxi. 
206; Rangpur, xxi. 228; Rasipur, Salem, 
xxi. 238; Rewari, Gurgaon, xxi. 300; 
Sailana, xxi. 386; Sambalpur, xxli. 13 ; 
Saraikela, Chota Nagpur, xxii. 83 ; 
Saran, xxii. 89 ; Satara, xxii. 124; Sau- 
gor, xxii. 143, 148 ; Sawai Madhopur, 
Rajputana, xxii. 158; Shahjahanpur, 



xxii. 266; Northern Shan States, xxii. 

343 ; Sherghati, Gaya, xxii. 272 ; Shi- 

moga, Mysore, xxii. 288 ; Sialkot, xxii. 

331; Sibsagar, x.xii. 351, Siddipet, 

Hyderabad, xxii. 356; Sihor, Kathiawar, 

xxii. 360 ; Sivaganga, Madura, xxiii. 

64 ; Siwan, Saran, xxiii. 67 ; Sojitra, 

Baroda, xxiii. 72 ; Songir, Khandesh, 

xxiii. 84 ; Sonpnr, Saran, xxiii. 86 ; 

Sravana Belgola, Mysore, xxiii. 97 ; 

Srinagar, Kashmir, xxiii. 103; Tando 

Muhammad Khan, Sind, xxiii. 223; 

Tanjore, xxiii. 235; Tinnevelly, xxiii. 

372; Tippera, xxiii. 384; Tirupati, North 

Arcot, xxiii. 395 ; Trichinopoly, xxiv. 

35; Unao, xxiv. 126; Vaso, Baroda, 

xxiv. 300; Visnagar, Baroda, xxiv. 322 ; 

Yelandur, Hyderabad, xxiv. 419. See 

also Bangles. 
Breeks, Mr., cairns and barrows on the 

Nllgiris opened by, xix. 90. 
Breeks Memorial School, Ootacamund, 

Nllgiris, xix, 103, 
Brennen, Mr., college at Tellicherry 

founded by (1862"), xxiii. 276. 
Brereton, unsuccessful attack on Wandi- 

wash (1759), xxiv. 353. 
Bres, division of the Karen tribe in 

Burma, ix. 140, xv. 36, 38. 
Breton, Francis, President of Surat, tomb 

at Surat, xxiii. 167, 
Brett, Mr., Collector (1859-62), official 
bungalow at Hosur, Salem, built by, 
xiii. 205-206. 
Breweries: Almora, v. 249; Aravanghat, 
Nllgiris, V. 403 ; Baluchistan, vi. 309, 
329; Bangalore, vi. 365 ; Bareilly, vii, 
9; Burma, ix. 177; Central Provinces, 
X. 54; Chakrala, Dehra Dun, x. 126; 
Darjeeling, xi. 175; Dehra Dun, xi. 
217; Jubbulpore, xiv. 213,219; Kasauli, 
Ambala, xv. 69 ; Lucknow, xvi. 198 ; 
Mandalay, xvii. 146; Murree, Rawal- 
pindi, xviii. 43 ; Mussoorie, Dehra Dun, 
xviii. 61 ; Myitkyina, Burma, xviii. 143; 
nearNainI Tal, xviii. 329 ; tlie Nllgiris, 
xix. 97; Poona, xx. 176; Punjab, xx. 
320 ; Quetta-Pishin, Baluchistan, xxi, 
16; Rawalpindi, xxi, 268,273; United 
Provinces, xxiv. 205. 
Brewing and breweries, iii. 226, 
Brick-making- Akyab, v. 196-197; Allah- 
abad, V. 241 ; Assam, vi. 75 ; Backer- 
gunge, vi, 170; Bangalore, vi, 369; 
Banicura, vi, 391 ; Bansbaria, Hooghly, 
vi. 403; Benares, vii. 184, 193; Bulsar, 
Surat, ix. 68; Burma, ix. 175-176; 
Central Provinces, x, 54 ; Chanda, x. 
157; Cochin, X. 348-349; Hooghly, 
xiii. 167; Howrah, xiii. 210; Khardah, 
Twenty-four Parganas, xv. 251 ; 
Kotrang, Hooghly, xvi. 4 ; Lahore, 
xvi. loi, 113; Madras Presidency, xvi. 



92 



INDEX 



296 ; Panruti, South Arcot, six. 405 ; 
Sandoway, Burma, xxii. 37 ; Santal Par- 
ganas, xxii. 73; Serampore, Hooghly, 
xxii. 178; Tliana, xxiii. 298 ; Twenty- 
four Parganas, xxiv. 75 ; United Pro- 
vinces, xxiv. 205 ; Warora, xxiv. 377. 

Brick tablets and inscriptions, found at 
Bhitarl, ii. 46 ; Gopalpiir, ii. 46 ; in 
Jaunpur, ii. 46 ; at Shorkot, ii. 46. 

Bridges : of boats : across the Jumna, in 
Ambala District, v. 284; across the 
Gogra at Bahramghat, vi. 213; across 
the Peas, vii. 138, 139; across the Swat 
river, x. 180; across the Ravi, Lahore 
District, xvi. 102 ; across the Hooghly at 
Calcutta, xiii. 1 76, 2 1 2, 2 1 3 ; across the 
Indus at Attock, xiii. 359; across the 
Jhelum, xiv. 161; across the Kabul river, 
xiv. 247, xviii. 417; across the RaprT, 
xxi. 236; across the Mahandi at Sambal- 
pur, xxii. 17; in United Provinces, 
xxiv. 215. 

Iron : across the Barna at Benares, 
vii. 191 ; across the Gumti at Lucknow, 
xvi. 191 ; across the Pegu river at Pegu, 
XX. 97; across the TTsta in Sikkim, 
xxii. 371 ; across the Tambrapami 
river at Srivaikuntam, xxiii. ill. 

Railway : across the Barak at Badar- 
pur, vi. 77, 78 ; across the Kapili in 
Assam, vi. 78 ; across the Sutlej at 
Bahawalpur, vi. 204 ; across the Indus 
at Attock, vi. 138 ; across the Narbada, 
near Barwaha, vii. 89 ; across the Beas 
at Beas station, vii. 139; across the 
Hagari in Bellar}', vii. 160, 169 ; 
across the Ganges at Benares, vii. 
184; across the Bhogdai, Assam, viii. 
I2C; across the Barak, Cachar, ix. 
256 ; across the Brahmani, Orissa, ix. 
10 ; across the Indus at Bukkur, i.x. 47 ; 
across the Chenab, x. 1S9; across the 
Coleroon, x. 374 ; across the Palar, x. 
263; across the Burhi Dihing, Assam, xi. 
345-346; across the Chambal, xi. 327; 
across the Dhansiri, Assam, xi. 286 ; 
across the Dikho, Assam, xi. 346 ; across 
the Disang, Assam, xi. 362 ; across the 
Great Gandak, xii. 126; across the 
Ganges, at six places, from near Roor- 
kee to Benares, xii. 136; across the 
Garai, Eastern Bengal, xii. 159 ; across 
the Gogra, xii. 303 ; across the Son at 
Gaya, xii. 195; across the Godavari, 
xii. 298; across the Gumti at Lucknow, 
xii. 3S5 ; across the Rupnarayan at 
Howrah, xiii. 212 ; across the Indus 
at Sukkur, xiii. 359, 361 ; across the 
Jhanzi, Assam, xiv. 150; at Karachi, 
XV. 12 ; across the Kistna at Bezwada, 
XV. 336 ; across the Kosi near Katihar, 
XV. 408 ; across the Indus at Kotri, xvi. 
5 ; across the Kiul at Luckeesarai, xvi. 



180; across the Ravi in Lahore, 
xvi. 102; across the Shimsha at Mad- 
dur, xvi. 230 ; across the Hooghly near 
Naihati, iii. 384; across the Kabul river 
at Xaushahra, xviii. 417; across the 
Sutlej at Phillaur, xx. 130; in Punjab, 
XX. 327; across the Kosi in Purnea, xx. 
419 ; across the Rupnarayan, xxi. 341 ; 
across the Indus at Sukkur, iii. 3S4. 

Stone: in Sila Sindurighopa, Assam, 
vi. 36; at Bandra, Thana, vi. 359 ; across 
the Vishwamitri, Baroda,vii. 83; across 
the Barna at Benares, vii. 191 ; near 
Bhatkal, North Kanara, viii. 90-91 ; 
across the Bhavani, viii. 98 ; across the 
Burhiganga, xxiii. 89 ; across the Cau- 
very, viii. 98, ix. 303 ; across the Lan- 
gulya at Chicacole, x. 218 ; across the 
Gambhir at Chitor (fourteenth century), 
X. 298 ; across the Coleroon, x. 374 ; 
across the Panjhra at Dhulia, xi. 337 ; 
across the Gumti at Jaunpur (sixteenth 
century), xii. 385, xiv. 83 ; across the 
Isan at Mainpurl, xvii. 41-42 ; across 
the Sai at Mohan, xvii. 383 ; at Mud- 
bidri, xviii. 10; across the Rushikulya, 
xxi. 341 ; across the Jhelum at Srinagar, 
xxiii. loi. 

Suspension : across the Beas at Mandi, 
vii. 1 38; across the Jahnavi, viii. 41; 
across the Sutlej at Seoni, viii. 43 ; 
across the Taping at Bhamo, viii. 54; 
across the Pao and Manipur rivers, Chia 
Hills, X. 27S ; across the Gilgit river, xii. 
238 ; in Hazara, xiii. 82 ; in the Hima- 
layas, xiii. 134; across the Jhelum, xiv. 
161 ; in Manipur, xvii. 193. 

Wooden : on Falam-Tyao road, 
Chin Hills, x. 278; at Mahe, xvii. 8; 
across the Sind, x.xii. 432. 

Briggs, Captain, Dhulia chosen as capital 
of Khandesh (1819), xi. 338; money 
advanced to Thoke family, and Lasur 
fort occupied, xvi. 153. 

Brihaddranyaka Upanishad, the, in San- 
skrit prose, ii. 231-232. 

Brihadlswaraswami, temple at Tanjore, 
xxiii. 242. 

Brihat-kathd, collection of stories in 
Piakrit by Giinadhya (first or second 
century), ii. 267. 

Brihat-katha-nianjarl, fables in Sanskrit 
verse, by Kshemendra Vyasadasa 
(1037), ii. 252. 

Brihat-samhitd, astronomical treatise in 
Sanskrit by Varaha-mihira {pb. 587), 
ii. 266. 

Brij Bilas, palace near Kolah city, xv. 

425- 
Brij Gopal, Chaube, Taraon under (i894\ 

xxiii. 250. 
Brij Indar Singh, Raja of Farldkot, xii 

52- 



INDEX 



93 



Brijh, founder of Bharatpnr, killed in the 
beginning of the eighteenth century, 
viii. 75. 

Brijmohan, cavalry trooper, mutiny started 
by, at Meerut (1857), xvii. 256. 

Brindaban, sacred town in Muttra District, 
United Provinces, traditional residence 
of the youthful Krishna, ix. 17-18, 

Brinjals, or egg-plant {Solanwn Melon- 
gena), iii. 75, 99 ; cultivated in Baroda, 
vii, 48; Hooghly, xiii. 166; Meiktila, 
Burma, xvii. 280; Orissa Tributary 
States, xix. 259 ; Santal Parganas, xxii. 
70; Northern Shan States, xxii. 239; 
Shwebo, Burma, xxii. 314; Tharra- 
waddy, Burma, xxiii. 321. 

Bristle-work, iii. 193, 254. 

Bristles and fibre, exports, iii. 309. 

British administration of India. See 
Administration. 

British India Steam Navigation Company, 
Akyab, v. 197 ; Bengal, vii. 280, 281 ; 
Bombay, viii. 332 ; Chittagong, x. 313 ; 
Kyaukpyu, Burma, xvi. 65 ; Madras 
Presidency, xvi. 304, 377 ; Mergui, 
Burma, xvii. 304 ; Moulmein, Burma, 
xviii. 8 ; Tuticorin, xxiv. 66. 

British rule in India (1707-1905), ii. 
470-530 ; to the battle of Wandiwash 
and the fall of French power (1760), 
470-474; first French War (1744-8), 
471-472 ; second French War (1750-4), 
472-473; third French War (1756-631, 
473 ; European head-quarters in Bengal, 
474; Black Hole of Calcutta (1756), 
474-475 ; grant of Twenty-four Par- 
ganas, 477 ; Lord Clive (1758-60, 
1765-7), 478, 479-480; mismanage- 
ment (1760-5), 478-479; grant of 
Diwani of Bengal (1765), 480; reor- 
ganization of the Company's serA'ice 
by Clive (1766), 4S0 ; dual system of 
government (1765-72), 481 ; first My- 
sore War, 481 ; Warren Hastings (1772- 
85), 481-486; sale of Allahabad and 
Kora to Oudh, 483 ; Rohilla War, 483- 
484 ; Maratha Wars (1775-82), 4S5 ; 
Treaty of Salbai (1782), 485; second 
Mysore War (1780-4), 485-486 ; Lord 
Cornwallis (1786-93, 1S05), 486-487, 
492 ; third Mysore War (1790-2), 487; 
Sir John Shore, Lord Teignmouth 
(1793-8), 487-488 ; Marquess Welles- 
ley (179S-1805), 48S-492; fourth My- 
sore War, 490 ; Treaty of Bassein 
(1802), 491 ; third Maratha War 
(1802-4), 491-492 ; Sir George Barlow 
(1805-7), 492 ; Lord Minto (1S07- 
13), 492-493 ; Lord Moira, Marquess 
of Hastings (1814-23), 493-496 ; 
Nepal War (1 814-5), 493-494 ; Treaty 
of Sagauli (1816), 494; last Maratha 
War (181 7-8), 495-496 ; Lord 



Amherst (1823-8), 496-497 ; first 
Burmese War (1824-6), 496-497 ; 
capture of Bharatpur (1826 , 497 ; 
Lord William Bentinck (1S2S-35), 
497-499 ; Mysore administered 1^1831), 
49S ; Coorg annexed (1S34), 498- 
499; Sir C. Metcalfe (1835-6}, 499; 
Lord Auckland (1836-42}, 499-501 ; 
first Afghan War (1839-42, 500, 
501; Lord Ellenborough (i842-4\ 
501-502 ; conquest of Sind (1S43), 
502 ; Gwalior outbreak (1843), 502 ; 
Lord Hardinge (1844-8), 502-503; 
first Sikh War (1845), 503; Lord 
Dalhousie (1848-56), 504-50S ; second 
Sikh War (1848-9), 504-505; Punjab 
annexed (1849), 505 ; second Burmese 
W'ar (1852), 505; Lower Burma an- 
nexed (1852), 505; lapsed states, 506; 
Berar assigned (1853), 507 ; an- 
nexation of Oudh (1856), 507-508; 
Lord Canning (1856-62), 50S-516; 
Sepoy Mutiny (1857-8), 509-513 ; 
downfall of the Company (1858), 
514; India transferred to the Crown, 
515; Queen's proclamation (Nov. i, 
1858), 515; cost of the Mutiny, 
515-516; financial and legal reforms, 
516 ; Lord Elgin (1862-3), 516 ; Lord 
Lawrence (1864-9), 516 ; Lord Mayo 
(1869-72), 516-517 ; Lord Northbrook 
(1872-6), 517 ; Prince of Wales's tour 
(1875-6), 517 ; Lord Lytton (1876- 
80), 517-518 ; proclamation of Queen 
Victoria as Empress of India (1877), 
517; second Afghan War (1878-80}), 
518, 519 ; Lord Ripon (18S0-4), 518- 
521 ; Mysore restored to hereditary 
dynasty (1881), 519 ; Lord Dufferin 
(1884-8), 521-522 ; third Burmese 
War (1S85), 521 ; Russian attack on 
Afghans at Panjdeh (1885), 521-522 ; 
Queen Victoria's Jubilee (1887), 522 ; 
Lord Lansdowne (1888-94), 522-525; 
Manipur disturbances (1891), 523- 
524; Russian aggression on the Pamirs, 
524; Lord Elgin (1894-9), 525-526 ; 
Presidency army system abolished 
(1895), 525; Pamir agreement with 
Russia (1895), 525; Chitral (1895), 
525; Tirali campaign (1897-8), 525- 
526; Lord Curzon (1899-1905% 526- 
530; North- West Frontier policy, 526- 
527 ; Norlh-West Frontier Province 
formed (1901), 527; Tibet mission 
(1904), 527; death of Queen Victoria 
and proclamation of Edward VII, 
529 ; partition of Bengal (1905), 529; 
Lord Minto (1905), 530; bibliography, 
530; periods in history of, iv. 5; 
capture of Pondicherry (1761), iv. 8; 
Lord Clive, iv. 8-9 ; Warren Hastings, 
iv. 9-10; Lord Cornwallis, iv. 10; Lord 



94- 



INDEX 



Wellesley, iv. lo-ii; Lord Hastings, 
iv. 12; transfer to the Crown (1858), 
iv. 13. 
Britto, John de, Jesuit missionary in 
Madura, xvi. 264, 394 ; martyred at 
Madura (1693), i. 442. 
Broach, District in Bombay, ix. 18-28 ; 
physical aspects, 18-20; history, 20-21 ; 
population, 21-23 ; agriculture, 23-24 ; 
trade and communications, 24-26 ; 
famine, 26 ; administration, 26-28 ; 
education, 28; medical, 28. 

Other references : Geology, i. 93 ; 
agriculture, iii. 23 ; cotton cultivation, 
iii. 43, 44, 45. 
Broach, taluka in Bombay, ix. 28. 
Broach, city and port in Bombay, ancient 
centre of trade, ix. 2S-32 ; calico print- 
ing, iii. 186. 
Broadbills (Eurylaemi), order of birds, 

i. 246-247. 
Broadfoot, Major, revenue settlement in- 
troduced into Amherst (1842-3), v. 
302 ; acre system introduced into Tha- 
ton (1842-3), xxiii. 338-... 
Brocade, or silk textiles, iii. 209, 210; 
made in Hyderabad State, xiii. 263 ; 
Surat, xxiii. 1 60, 1 6 1 ; United Provinces, 
xxiv. 201; Yeola, xxiv. 422. See also 
Kincobs. 
Brocklebank Line of steamers, Bengal, 

vii. 280. 
Broeck, Van den, visited Aden on behalf 
of Dutch East India Company (f. 1614), 
V. 12. 
Bronze work, at Kumbakonam, Tanjore, 
xvi. 21 ; Madras Presidency, xvi. 292. 
Brooke, Sir Victor, large elephant shot 

by, in Coimbatore (1863), x. 357. 
Broughton, Captain, description of Mer- 

wara, xvii. 309. 
Brown, David, Gaung Gyi driven from 

Tharrawaddy (1855), ^^iii- 3i8- 
Brown, Captain James, led expedition into 

Hazaribagh (1774), xiii. 88. 
Brown, Captain Lewis, besieged in Kahan, 
Baluchistan (1840), vi. 281 ; expedition 
against the Marris (1840), xvii. 211. 
Brown, General, Jawacl attacked and 
taken by, in 1819, but subsequently 
restored to Sindhia, xiv. 86. 
Browne, Colonel Horace, mission into 
Yiiiinan (1875), viii. 47; land settle- 
ment introduced into Thaton (1867-8), 
xxiii. 338. 
Browne, Sir James, Agent to Governor- 
General, Baluchistan, vi. 283; death 
(1896), vi. 283. 
Browne, General Samuel, All Masjid in 
the Khyber Pass taken (i878),xv. 302. 
Browne, Captain, political officer in Lushai 
Hills, xvi. 215 ; killed by Lushais^i 890), 
xvi. 215. 



Brownrigg, Major, encounter with Jas- 
want Rao Holkar at Satwas (1801), 
xxii. 134-135. 

Bruce, Robert, tea plant discovered in 
Assam (1821), iii. 56, vi. 61. 

Bruce, Captain, capture of Gwalior fort 
(1780), xii. 441. 

Brush and cabinet-making factory, 
Cawnpore, ix. 319. 

Brydon, Dr., survivor of British force 
from Afghanistan (1842), ii. 501, v. 38, 
xiv. 244. 

Bu-All-Kalandar's tomb at Kamal, xv. 59. 

Bubak, town in Larkana District, Sind, 
ix. 32. 

Bubaria tank, near SeonI, xxii. 176. 

Bubonic plague. See Plague. 

Buchanan, E. M., botany of the Andaman 
Islands, i. 204. 

Buchanan-Hamilton, Dr. Francis, quoted 
on jute, iii. 203-204; account of increase 
in practice of opium-eating, vi. 93 ; 
remarks on Gauhati (1809), xii. 185; 
visit to Gaur (1810), xii. 188 ; to Hal- 
dipur. North Kanara (1801), xiii. 10 ; 
iron mine at Jorhat mentioned, vi. 74; 
Buddhist images discovered at Masar, 
xvii. 314 ; visit to the Nilgiris (1800), 
xix. 89 ; stone from Panna diamond 
mines mentioned (1813), xix. 402; 
estimation of population of Patna, xx. 
66 ; report on Sibsagar, xxii. 346. 

Buchara hand, embankment in Jaipur 
State, xiii. 391. 

Buckingham Canal, in Madras, ix. 32-33. 

Buckingham Mills, Madras City, xvi. 375. 

Buckwheat, cultivated in Almora, v. 248 ; 
Baltistan, vi. 263; Bhutan, viii. 159; 
Garhwal, xii. 167 ; Gilgit, xii. 241 ; 
Himalayas, xiii. 133 ; Kangra, xiv. 
390; Kashmir, xv. 115, 117; Ladakh, 
xvi. 93 ; near Milam, Almora, xvii. 
342 ; Nepal, xix. 47 ; Northern Shan 
.States, xxii. 239; Sikkim, xxii. 370; 
United Provinces, xxiv. 182. 

Budal, pillar in Dinajpur District, xi. 349. 

Budalin, township in Lower Chindwin 
District, L^pper Burma, ix. 33. 

Budan, Baba, Muhammadan saint, coffee 
plant brought to India, iii. 63, vi. 164, 
xiv. 266 ; shrine and tomb on Baba 
Budan mountains, vi. 164; cenotaph at 
Mangrul, xvii. 181. 

Budani, Kurram overrun by, traditionally, 
xvi. 48-49. 

Budaun, District in United Frovinces, ix. 
33-41 ; physical aspects, 33-34 ; history, 
34-36; population, 36-37; agriculture, 
37-38 ; trade and communications, 38- 
39 ; famine, 39 ; administration, 39- 
41 ; education, 41 ; medical, 41. 

Budaun, taksTl'm United Provinces, ix. 41. 

Budaun, town in United Provinces, a 



INDEX 



95 



former Muhammadan capital, ix. 41- 
43 ; woodwork, iii. 229. 

Budbud Tale, or ' bubble well ' at Ulvi, 
North Kanara, xxiv. 116. 

Buddh, Ahar prince, traditional founder 
of Budaun (tenth century), ix. 34. 

Buddh, Raja, mythical founder of Budaun 
(A.D. 905), ix. 41-42. 

Buddh Gaya or Mahabodhi, village in 
Gaya District, Bengal, with temple and 
sacred tree of Buddha, ix. 43-45 ; 
statues of Buddha, ii. 47, 48 ; Jarasan- 
dha-kl baithak, or basement of temple 
with rail, ii. 104, 158, 160, vii. 221. 

Buddh Yaya, outlaw in Magwe, Burma, 
xvi. 414. 

Buddha-charita, or Life of Buddha, by 
Asvaghosha (second century, A. D.), 
ii. 260. 

Buddha (Gautama\ {c. 596-508 B. cO, 
life, i. 407-408 ; date of death, ii. 70-7 1 ; 
stupas constructed for relics of, ii. 159. 
Footprints: at Kuluha, Hazaribagh, 
xvi. 17; Minbu, Burma, xvii. 357; Sagu, 
Burma, xvii. 347. 

Images : Barabar Hills, Gaya, vi. 
425 ; Bhandak, Chanda, viii. 59; Buddh 
Gaya, ii. 47, 48; Ceylon, i. 48; Po- 
wundaung hill, Lower Chindwin Dis- 
trict, X. 231 ; Dhamnar, Central India, 
xi. 283; Gaya, ii. 25-26; Hashtnagar, 
Peshawar, ii. 47 ; Karkala, South Ka- 
nara, XV. 44; Kasia, Gorakhpur, ii. 40, 
48 ; Khajraho, Central India, xv. 217 ; 
Mandalay, xvii. 142, 143 ; Mankeswar, 
ii. 48 ; Manuha pagoda at Pagan, xix. 
313; Nasik caves, xviii. 411; Pakangyi, 
Pakokku, xix. 322 ; Pegu town, xx. 
97; Piram Island, Ahmadabad, xx. 
150 ; Sanchi, xxii. 28. 

Life in Bahraich, vi. 206 ; preaching 
commenced near Benares, vii. 190 ; 
Kalaw pagoda at Bilugyun supposed 
to be erected over a hair of, v. 295 ; 
Vajrdsana, or adamantine throne, at 
Buddh Gaya, ix. 44 ; birthplace at 
Kapilavastu, xiv. 406-407 ; relics in 
Kyaikkauk pagoda, xiii. 39; legen- 
dary visit to places in Minbu, xvii. 
347, 348 ; religion already introduced 
among Newars on his legendary visit 
to Nepal, xix. 43 ; Padrauna identi- 
fied as last resting-place before death, 
xix. 311 ; offering of eyes at Pushkala- 
vati, x. 181 ; Rajglr identified with 
residence of, xxi. 72 ; on Ratnagiri hill, 
xxi. 72; Sanhlsa said to be place of 
descent from heaven of, xxii. 59-60 ; 
relics in Shwesandaw pagoda, xiii. 29 ; 
Bodhisattva of Sopara in a former birth, 
xxiii. 87 ; periods of retreat spent at 
Sravasti, xix. 278, xxii. 181 ; Tangyi- 
swedaw pagoda supposed to be built by 



Anawrata to enshrine tooth of, xix. 322 ; 
Taxila the scene of head-offering of, 
xxii. 201 ; Udayagiri hill, xxiv. 109 ; 
connexion with United Provinces, xxiv. 
147; Vaisali visited by, vii. 94, xxiv. 294. 

Buddha Raja, Katachchuri king, defeated 
by Mangalesa (r. 600), ii. 327, vi. 187. 

Buddhaghosha, traditional visit to Taik- 
kala in fifth century, xxiii. 205. 

Buddhism, origin, i. 408-413; relation to 
caste, i. 408-409 ; ethics of, i. 409 ; theo- 
logy and psychology, i. 409 ; way of sal- 
vat ion, i. 409 ; causes of spread of, i. 409- 
410 ; the Sangra, or Congregation of 
Monks, i. 410 ; made a State religion by 
Asoka, i. 410-41 1 ; as a missionary re- 
ligion, i. 411 ; later Indian Buddhism, 
i. 411-412 ; in decay, i. 412, ii. 289-299, 
317; causes of decline, i. 412-413; its 
idealism and the reform of Brahmanism, 
i. 41 2 -41 3, 42 1 -42 2 ; at the present time, 
i. 413, 473 ; survivals in Bengal, i. 413 ; 
comparison with Jainism, i. 414 ; down- 
fall, i.431 ; its philosophy, ii. 258; under 
Asoka, ii. 284-285; development under 
Kanishka, ii. 289 ; 'salvation' assembly 
at Prayag, ii. 297 ; assembly at Kanauj, 
ii. 297 ; second Buddhist council, vii. 94, 
xxiv. 295 ; development of, in Magadha, 
vii. 208, 221 ; synod first held at Satta- 
panni Cave, Rajgir (543 B.C.), xxi. 72. 

Buddhist antiquities : Afghanistan, v. 
44; Afghan-Turkistan, v. 68 ; Ajodhya, 
V. 175-176; Allahabad, V. 230; Ama- 
ravati, v. 272-273; Amherst, v. 295- 
296 ; Araraj, v. 399 ; Asarur, vi. 9- 
10; Assia, Orissa, vi. 121; Aurang- 
abad, vi. 143 ; Bagh, vi. 183-184 ; 
Bahraich, vi. 207-208 ; Bara Bankl, 
vi. 419; Barabar Hills, vi. 424-425; 
Barkur, vii. 22 ; Benares, vii. 182 ; 
Bezwada, viii. 19; Bhagalpur, viii. 28; 
Bhilsa, viii. 105; Bihar, viii. 172; 
Borivli, Thana, ix. 6 ; Buddh Gaya, 
ix. 43 ; Ceylon, i. 48 ; Champaran, x. 
139; Chaul, X. 185; Chiplun, Ratna- 
giri, X. 287; Dalml, xi. 127; EUora, 
xii. 21; Eran, xii. 25-26; Gaya, xii. 
199; Ghazlpur, xii. 224; Gorakhpur, 
xii- 334; Jaggayyapeta, Kistna, xiii. 
377; Jalalabad, xiv. 12; Jhang, xiv. 
127 ; Junagarh, xiv. 238 ; Junnar, 
Poona, xiv. 240; Kamrup, xiv. 333; 
Khandgiri, Orissa, xv. 240 ; Kolhapur, 
XV. 387 ; Manikiala, xvii. 183; Meerut, 
xvii. 256 ; Muttra, xviii. 66 ; Nalti- 
giri, Orissa, xviii. 347 ; North-West 
Frontier Province, xix. 161 ; Oudh, 
xix. 285 ; Padrauna, Gorakhpur, xix. 
311; Patna, xx. 58; Peshawar, xx. 
114; Rajglr, xxi, 72; Set Mahet, 
xxii. 181 ; Sanchi, xxii. 27-28 ; San- 
klsa, xxii. 59-60 ; Sarnath, Benares, 



96 



INDEX 



xxii. 109; Seven Pagodas, xxii. 182- 
185; Shahdheri, Rawalpindi, xxii. 201; 
Shivner, Poona, xxii. 294 ; Sitakund, 
Monghyr, xxiii. 50; Tamliik, xxiii. 
217-218 ; Udayagiri, Orissa, xxiv. 109. 
See also Antiquarian Remains, Caves, 
Monasteries, Stupas, &c. 

Euddliist Lenten Festival, held at Shwe- 
zedi pagoda, Bhamo, viii. 58 ; in 
Burma, ix. 148, 149. 

Buddhist literature, ii. 259-260 ; Pali 
canon of the South, 259 ; Sanskrit 
canon of the North, 259 ; Hinayana 
or Lesser Vehicle, and Mahayana or 
Greater Vehicle, 260; legendary works, 
260 ; the Mahavastii, 260. 

Buddhist tradition of India, Gandhara, 
and Kashmir, seventh century, ii. 70- 
71 ; Ceylon, ii. 71. 

Buddhists, marriage, i. 448-449 ; popula- 
tion statistics, i. 473 ; polygamy a- 
mong, i. 4S3 ; education statistics, i. 484. 
See also each District and larger State 
article in Burma, 7(nJcr Population. 

Buddhpokhar,t?.nk at Buddh Gaya, ix. 44. 

Buddhpur, village in Manbhum District, 
Bengal, ix. 45. 

Buddravanti, ruins of, near Khuldabad, 
Hyderabad State, xv. 285. 

Budge-Budge, town in Twenty-four Par- 
ganas District, Bengal, ix. 45. 

Budh Paikash, rule in Sirmur, xxiii. 23. 

Budh Singh, chief of ]iundi (1707), made 
Maharao Raja for services to Aurang- 
zeb, ix. 81. 

Budh Singh, Divvan, rule in Dhurwai 
(1823), xi. 339. _ 

Budh Singh, rule in Jullundur, xiv. 223. 

Budh Singh, Maksudangarh granted to 
(1776 ., xvii. 52. 

Budha Gupta, king of Mahva, conquered 
by White Huns, ix. 336, xvii. 102 : 
record of, at Eran (a. d. 484), ii. 43. 

Budhaghosha, Thaton identified as land- 
ing-place of, when visiting Suvanna 
Bhunii, xxiii. 341. 

Budhana, tahsil'm Muzaffamagar District, 
United Provinces, ix. 46. 

Budhana, town in Muzaffamagar District, 
United Provinces, ix. 46. 

Budhwara, suburb of Katol, Nagpur, xv. 
189. 

Budigunta, 'cinder-mound,' ii. 94. 

Budihal, village in Chilaldroog District, 
Mysore, ix. 46. 

Budikote, village in Kolar District, My- 
sore, birthplace of Haidar All, ix. 46. 

Budubudukalas, beggars, in Kistna Dis- 
trict, XV. 324. 

Buffalo, wild {Bos bubalus), i. 231 ; 
in Bengal, vii. 203-204 ; Bhandara, viii. 
62 ; Central Provinces, x. 9 ; Chanda, 
X. 149; Chhindwara, x. 205; Cuttack, 



xi. 88 ; Indore, xiii. 335 ; Jhansi, xiv, 
136 ; Khasi and Jaintia Hills, xv. 255 ; 
Khnlna, xv. 286; Korea, Central Pro- 
vinces, XV. 400; Lakhimpur, xvi. 119; 
Madras Presidency, xvi. 245 ; Malda, 
xvii. 76; Midnapore, xvii. 328; My- 
mensingh, xviii. 150; Pyapon, Burma, 
xxi. 3. 

Bufialoes, i. 231-233 ; general character- 
istics, iii. 81-82 ; breeds, iii. 82-83 '< 
employment in forest operations, iii. 
1 26. See also in each District and larger 
State article tinder Agriculture. 

Buffaloes, sacrifice of, in Hill Tippera, xiii. 
120 ; Raipur, xxi. 50; Rairakhol, Ben- 
gal, xxi. 61 ; Sambalpur, xxii. 7; Sib- 
sagar, xxii. 345 ; Sundarbans, xxiii. 
141 ; Surguja, xxiii. 171 ; Thayetmyo, 
Burma, xxiii. 344; United Provinces, 
xxiv. 143 ; Vizagapatam, xxiv. 324. 

Bughra, Shahab-ud-din, governor of 
Western Bengal (1318), vii. 216. 

Bughra Khan, Nasir-ud-din, governor of 
Bengal (1282), ii. 372, vii. 212, 216. 

Bugti Country, tribal area in Baluchistan. 
See Marri-lJugti Country. 

Bugtis, Baloch tribe, xvii. 210-213; i^i 
Sibi, xxii. 339 ; Sind, xxii. 407 ; Upper 
Sind Frontier District, xxiv. 278. 

Building stone, in India generally, iii. 
148-150; trade, iii. 256; found or 
quarried, in Anantapur, v. 344 ; Anda- 
mans, v. 356 ; Bombay Presidency, viii. 
323; Delhi, xi. 229; Dhar, xi. 291; 
Dhrangadhra State, Bombay, xi. 334- 
335 J Dowlaishweram, xi. 368 ; Dun- 
garpur, xi. 382-383 ; Hazara, xiii. 81 ; 
Himalayas, xiii. 130; Hoshangabad, 
xiii. 187 ; Idar, xiii. 327 ; Indore, xiii. 
343; Indur,_ Hyderabad, xiii. 354; 
Jafarabad, Kathiawar, xiii. 375 ; Jaipur, 
xiii. 391; Jamkhandi, xiv. 46; Jhansi, 
xiv. 143; Karachi, xv. 7; Kathiawar, 
XV. 179; Khandesh, xv. 235; Kotah, 
XV. 418 ; Madras Presidency, xvi. 288, 
289; Mahbubnagar, Hyderabad, xvii, 
5; Mianwali, xvii. 322; Mirzapur, xvii. 
372 ; NainI Tal, xviii. 329 ; Nasik, 
xviii. 405 ; Poona, xx. 175 ; Porbandar, 
Kathiawar, i. 100; Rajkot, Kathiawar, 
xxi. 75; Rajula, Kathiawar, xxi. 16S ; 
Saraikela, Bengal, xxii. 83 ; Satara, xxii. 
124; Saugor, xxii. 143; Savantvadi, 
xxii. 153; Surat, xxiii. 160. See also 
Gneiss, Granite, ami Marble. 

Buildings and roads, organization and 
control in India generally, iv. 307, 309, 

3i5-3i(>> 318, 3'9- 
Bukhari, Shah, tomb at Phaphund, Eta- 

wah, XX. 1 29. 
Bukhtiarpur-Behar Railway, iii. 415. 
Bukka I, founder of Vijayanagar empire, 

ii- 57. 343-344> ^viii. 174. 



INDEX 



97 



Bukka II, Vijayanagar king (1399-1406), 

ii- 345- 

Bukkur, fortified island in the Indus, Sind, 
ix. 46-47. 

Buland Darwaza, gateway at Fatehpur 
Sikri, Agra, xii. 85. 

Bulaki, Dyalpura fell to (1751), xiv. 
166. 

Bulandshahr District, in United Provinces, 
ix, 48-57; physical aspects, 48-49; 
history, 49-51; population, 51-52; 
agriculture, 52-54 ; trade and communi- 
cations, 54 ; famine, 54-55 ; adminis- 
tration, 55-57; education, 56-57; medi- 
cal, 57. 

Bulandshahr, tahsU'va. United Provinces, 
ix. 57. 

Bulandshahr, town in United Provinces, 
iii. 199, ix. 57-59 ; seal found at, ii. 39 ; 
carpets, iii. 217 ; woodwork, iii. 229. 

Bulbuls (^Brachypodinae), i. 241-242. 

Buldana, District in Berar, ix. 59-67 ; 
physical aspects, 59-60 ; history, 60- 
61 ; population, 61-62 ; agriculture, 62- 
64 ; forests, 63 ; trade and communica- 
tions, 64; famine, 64-65; administration, 
65-67 ; education, 66 ; medical, 66. 

Buldana, town in Berar, ix. 67. 

Buledis, tribe. See Burdis. 

Bullion, exports and imports, iii. 269, 291. 

Bulsar, taliika in Surat District, Bombay, 
ix. 67. 

Bulsar, town and port in Surat District, 
Bombay, ix. 67-68. 

Bumbra-ke-Thul, ruined city in Sind. See 
Brahmanabad. 

Bundala, village in Amritsar District, 
Punjab, ix. 68. 

Bundelas, Rajput tribe, in Ajaigarh, v. 1 2 9, 
131; Allahabad, V. 229; invasion of Ban- 
da, vi. 348; Baoni, vi. 415 ; Beri, viii. 
3; Bihat, viii. 173; Bundelkliand, ix. 
70-72; Chanderi taken by (1586), x. 
164; in Charkhari, x. 178; Deogarh 
fort held by, xi. 246 ; power in Jhansi 
(fourteenth century), xiv. 137; Jhansi 
city held by, till 1742, xiv. 148; in Jigni, 
xiv. 165 ; Kalinjar, xiv. 312; Khania- 
dhana, xv. 244; Orchha, ii. 318, xix. 
242, 244 ; Panna, xix. 400 ; Saugor, 
xxii. 138, 140 ; raids in United Pro- 
vinces, xxiv. 153. 

BundelT, dialect of Western Hindi, i. 366- 
367 ; spoken in Bijavvar, viii. 189 ; Cen- 
tral India, ix. 351 ; Central Provinces, 
X. 24; Chhindwara, x. 208 ; Damoh, xi. 
138 ; Gwalior, xii. 427 ; Hamirpur, xiii. 
i6; Hoshangabad, xiii. 183; Jhansi, xiv. 
140; Narsinghpur, xviii. 388; Saugor, 
xxii. 140; SeonT, xxii. 168. 

Bundelkhand (British), tract in United 
Provinces, ix. 6S-74 ; physical aspects, 
68-69 ; history, 69-70 ; the Bundelas, 

VOL. XXV. H 



70-71; population, 72; agriculture, 
72-74 ; bibliography, 74. 

Other references : Density of popula- 
tion, i. 454 ; language, i. 367 ; Jain 
statues, ii. 122 ; irrigation, iii. 325, 
352 ; lakes, iii. 342 ; cholera (1897), 
iii. 481 ; famine (1868-70), iii. 487 u. ; 
land revenue, iv. 211 n. 

Bundelkhand Agency, political charge in 
Central India, ix. 74-77 ; physical 
aspects, 74-75 ; history, 75-76 ; States 
in, 77 ; Charkhari subordinate to, x. 
176 ; invasion of, by Bijai Bikramajit 
Bahadur Singh (1789), x. 177; Chhatar- 
pur subject to, x. 198 ; Hasht-Bhaiya 
Jagirs subject to, xiii. 60. 

Bundelkhand!, dialect spoken in Char- 
khari, X. 178; Chhatarpur, x. 200; 
Datia, xi. 197; Khaniadhana, xv. 244; 
Orchha, xix. 245 ; Sohawal, xxiii. 71. 

Bunder, tdhik in Madras. See Bandar. 

Bundh pass. Western Ghats, xii. 219. ' 

Bundi, State in Rajputana, ix. 'J'j-S'j ; 
physical aspects, 77-79; history, 79- 
82 ; population, 82-83 ; agriculture, 
83-84 ; trade and communications, 84 ; 
famine, 84-85 ; administration, 85-87 ; 
military force, 86 ; revenue, 86 ; educa- 
tion, 87 ; medical, 87. 

Other references : Area, population, 
revenue, and administration, iii. 95 ; 
postal arrangements, iii. 424-425. 

Bundi, capital of State in Rajputana, ix. 
87-88. 

Bundu, town in RanchI District, Bengal, 
ix. 88. 

Buner, tract of country in North-West 
Frontier Province, with Buddhist re- 
mains, ix. 88-89 ; Pashto language 
spoken in, i. 354 ; expedition into 
(1897), xxiii. 186, 210. 

Bunera, town in Rajputana. See Banera. 

Bunerwals, tribe on North-West Frontier, 
expedition against (1897), xxiii.i86, 210. 

Bungahs or hospices built by Sikhs, at 
Amritsar, v. 329. 

Buniad, rule over Tekari Raj, xxiii. 273. 

Bupaya pagoda. Pagan, xix. 313. 

Bura Deo, god of Raj Gonds, in Gond- 
wana, xii. 323, 325. _ 

Bura Gohain, Moamarias in Assam con- 
trolled by, vi. 32. 

Buralla Canal, branch of Lower Chenab 
Canal, x. 190. 

Buiasa, forest god, worshipped in Hill 
Tippera, xiii. 120. 

Burdis (Buledis), Baloch tribe in Balu- 
chistan, vi. 290; Hyderabad (Sind), 
xiii. 315; Kachhi, xiv. 250; Khairpur, 
XV. 212 ; Makran, Baluchistan, xvii. 46 ; 
Sind, xxii. 407; Sukkur, xxiii. 122; 
Upper Sind Frontier District, xxiv. 
278, 279, 280. 



98 



INDEX 



Burdwan, Division in Bengal, ix. 89-91. 

Burdwan, District in Bengal, ix. 90-100; 
physical aspects, 91-92 ; floods, 92 ; 
histon,-, 92-93 ; population, 93-95 ; 
agriculture, 95-96 ; minerals, 96-97 ; 
trade and communications, 97-98; 
famine, 98; administration, 98-100; 
revenue, 99 ; education, 100 ; medical, 
100; wages, iii. 468 n. 

Burdwan, subdivision in Bengal, ix. 100- 
loi. 

Burdwan, town in Bengal, ix. 102-103 ; 
roads, iii. 405. 

Burdwan fever. See Fever. 

Burdwan Raj, estate in Bengal, ix. 101- 
102. 

Burgess, Dr., description of Ajanta cave 
monasteries, v. 135-136; quoted on 
Elephanta, xii. 3-4; Kailas Temple, 
Ellora, xii. 22 ; description of Sita's 
Chavdi, at Modhera, Baroda, xvii. 381 ; 
on temple hill of Shetrunja, Kathia- 
war, xix. 362-365. 

Burglary and house-breaking, prevalent in 
Akola, v. 186; Amraoti,v. 311 ; Cuttack, 
xi. 94; Dehra Dun, xi. 218; Delhi, xi. 
231 ; EUichpur, xii. 17 ; Ferozepore, xii. 
96 ; Gaya, xii. 205 ; Gorakhpur, xii. 
339; Gujranwala, xii. 360; Gujrat, xii. 
371; Gurdaspur, xii. 399 ; Gurgaon, xii. 
409 ; Hanthawaddy, Burma, xiii. 35 ; 
Kaira, xiv. 284; Xhandesh, xv. 237; 
Kheri, xv. 374; Kurnool, xvi. 42; 
Madura, xvi. 401 ; Meerut, xvii. 261 ; 
Muzaffargarh, xviii. 81 ; Muzaffarnagar, 
xviii. 91; Monghyr, xvii. 399; Mont- 
gomery, xvii. 416; Nalgonda, Hyder- 
abad, xviii. 343 ; Nasik, xviii. 408 ; 
Noakhali, xix. 133; Partabgarh, xx. 20; 
Patiala, xx. 46 ; Patna, xx. 63 ; Poona, xx. 
178 ; Pudukkottai, xx. 237 ; Purnea, xx. 
418 ; Pyapon, Burma, xxi. 7 ; Rae BarelT, 
xxi. 31 ; Ranch!, xxi. 207 ; Rangpur, 
xxi. 229; Rawalpindi, xxi. 269; Rohtak, 
xxi. 319; Sambalpur, xxii. 14; Saran, 
xxii. 91 ; Shahabad, xxii. 194 ; Siiapur, 
xxiii. 59; Sylhet, xxiii. 198; Thana, 
xxiii. 300. 

Burha, former name of Balaghat town, 
Central Provinces, ix. 103. 

Burhan, Imad Shahi king (1562-8), ii. 
391, vii. 368, xii. 20 n. ; confined in 
Namala by Tafal Khan, xviii. 380 ; 
captured at Namala by Murtaza Nizam 
Shah (1572), and subsequently put to 
death, xviii. 380. 

Burhan, Shah, Muhammadan saint, shrine 
at Chiniot, Punjab, x. 285. 

Burhan Shah, Nizam Shahi king (1508- 
53-4;, ii. 389 ; rule over I3ahmani 
kingdom, v. 123 ; war with Ala-ud-dln 
Imad Shah, vii. 368. 

Burhan Shah II, Nizam Shahi king, 



(1590-4), ii. 388, 389 ; became king of 
Ahmadnagar, v. 123; invaded Berar 
(1590), xxi. 304. 

Burhan Shah, Gond Raja of Nagpur, 
xviii. 306. 

Burhana, tahsTl and town in United 
Provinces. See Budhana. 

Burhanpur, tahstl in Nimar District, Cen- 
tral Provinces, ix. 103. 

Burhanpur, town in Central Provinces, 
former Muhammadan capital, with in- 
dustry of silk embroidery, ix. 104-106, 
iii. 199. 

Burhi Dihing, river of Assam. See Dihing, 
Burhi. 

Burhwal, railway junction, Bara BankI 
District, United Provinces, ix. 106. 

Euriya, town in Ambala District, Punjab, 
ix. 106. 

Burlton, Lieutenant, massacred near 
Nongkhlao,Khasi Hills (i829),xix.t36. 

Burma, British Province on east of Bay 
of Bengal, ix. 106-246 ; area, 106- 

107 ; origin of name ' Burma,' 107- 

108 ; physical aspects, 108-120; mete- 
orology, 109-110, I18-120; moun- 
tains, 1 1 i-i 13 ; rivers,! 13-1 15 ; botany, 
117 ; fauna, 1 17-118 ; natural calami- 
ties, 120; history, 120-130; archae- 
ology, 130; population, 130-149; 
marriage customs, 137 ; languages, 
137-138 ; tribes and castes, 139-141 ; 
religion, 142-145 ; occupations, 145- 
146 ; food, dress, and houses, 146- 
148; amusements, 148; festivals, 
148-149; nomenclature, 149; agricul- 
ture, 149-162 ; agricultural implements, 
1.S3-154; cattle, 157-158; irrigation, 
159-162; fisheries, 162-163; rents, 
wages, and prices, 163-167 ; forests, 
167-170; mines and minerals, 170- 
173; arts and manufactures, 174-178; 
factories and labour supply, 177-178; 
commerce and trade, 178-183; mari- 
time trade, 181 ; trans-frontier trade, 
182-183; communications, 183-190; 
railways, 183-185; tramways, 185- 
186; roads, 186-188; inland naviga- 
tion, 188-189; postal arrangements, 
189-190; famine, 190-192; adminis- 
tration, 192-196; Native States, &c., 
194-196; legislation and justice, 196- 
200; registration, 200; finance, 201- 
203 ; land revenue, &c., 203-208 ; 
capitation tax, 207 ; ihathairieda, 207- 
208 ; fisheries, 20S-209 ; miscellaneous 
revenue, 209-213; opium, 209; salt, 
210; excise, 211-212; stamps, 212; 
income tax, 213; customs, 213; local 
and municipal, 213-215; public works, 
215-217; army, 217-218; police and 
jails, 218-222; education, 222-230; 
medical, 331-232; surveys, 232-233; 






INDEX 



99 



bibliography, 233; tables: tempera- 
ture, 234; rainfall, 234; agriculture, 
235; population, 236-237; trade by 
sea with other Provinces, 238 ; foreign 
maritime trade, 239 ; foreign land 
trade, 240; criminal justice, 241 ; civil 
justice, 241 ; Provincial revenue, 242 ; 
Provincial expenditure, 243 ; income 
and expenditure of municipalities, 244 ; 
police, 245 ; jails, 245 ; colleges, 
schools, and scholars, 246 ; medical 
statistics, 246. 

Other references : Physical aspects, i. 
20-21 ; geology, i. 51, 62-63, 67, 70, 
74, 87, 89, 92-97, 1 01 ; meteorology, 
i. 114, 117, 122, 127, 130, 132, 136, 
137, 141, 142-143, 153; absence of 
caste system, i. 330; botany, i. 196- 
203; forests, i. 197-199; zoology, i. 
315, 217, 218, 219, 220,221, 222, 223, 
224, 225, 226, 227, 22S, 229, 231, 232, 
234, 236, 237, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 
244> 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 
252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 257, 258, 259, 
260,261, 262, 264, 265, 266, 267, 26S, 
270,271,272,273, 274, 282; ethnology, 
i. 289, 295 ; languages, i. 386, 390, 393, 
394; spread of Buddhism to, i. 411 ; 
Buddhism in, i. 413; Christians in, i. 
444-445, 476 ; area and population, 
i. 450; population and density; i, 453 ; 
growth of population, i. 463-464 ; im- 
migration, i. 467-468; Animism, i. 
472 ; Eurasians, i. 477 ; sex statistics, i. 
479 ; education statistics, i. 483-484 ; 
birth-rale statistics, i. 506, 510, 511 ; 
mortality statistics, i. 512, 517, 519, 
.:;22,53i; annexation (1852) of Pegu, 
ii. 505 ; progress, under Sir Alexander 
Mackenzie, ii. 524 ; made Lieutenant- 
Governorship (1897), ii. 526 ; agricul- 
tural statistics,iii. 3, 97,100 ; intermittent 
cultivation, iii. 24 ; taungya cuhiva- 
tion, iii. 24-25 ; cultivation of rice, iii. 
26, 29 ; oilseeds, iii. 38 ; cotton, iii. 
45; jute (insignificant), iii. 47; tobacco, 
iii. 49; number of live stock, and of 
ploughs and carts (1903-4), iii. 101 ; 
forests, iii. 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, no, 
III, 113,118, 119, 120-121, 122, 125; 
rubber planting, iii. iiS; petroleum 
wells, iii. 139, 140, 235 ; amber, iii. 
140-141; graphite, iii. 141 ; gold, iii. 
142-143 ; tin, iii. 144 ; antimony, iii. 
145 ; manganese, iii. 147 ; mineral 
pigments, iii. 152 ; rubies, iii. 161 ; 
tourmaline, iii. 162; jadeite, iii. 163; 
arts and manufactures, iii. 170; Bur- 
mese lacquer, iii. 175 ; glass mosaic, 
iii. 175-176; use of wax, iii. 177, 200- 
201 ; dl cultivation (insignificant), iii. 
184 ; cotton weaving, iii. 201 ; silk 
industry, iii. 208, 209 ; kalagas, iii. 



221 ; wood-carving, iii. 230-231 ; 
factory statistics, iii. 247 ; trade, iii. 
272, 286, 305 ; rice trade, iii. 284-285 ; 
irrigation, 322, 325, iii. 332, 343-344, 
346, 349 ; navigable rivers, iii. 361- 
362 ; navigation dues, iii. 362 ; postal 
and savings bank transactions (1903-4), 
iii. 428, 435 ; wages, iii. 470, 472, 473, 
474; famine, iii. 490; Upper Burma 
acquired (1886), iv. 13; administra- 
tion, iv. 29, 32, 33, 54-56; statistics 
of Native States, iv. 101 ; legislation 
and justice, iv. 130, 131, 157-158; 
revenue, iv. 170; land revenue, iv. 
207, 208, 210, 214, 217, 219, 222, 223, 
227, 239 ; opium, iv. 247 ; intoxicating 
liquors, iv. 255, 256, 257, 258 ; taxes, 
iv. 270; land cess, iv. 271; village 
officials, iv. 281 ; municipal govern- 
ment, iv. 287, 292, 293; public works 
organization, iv. 312, 314, 316; con- 
stitution of military police and bat- 
talions of Madras army for, iv. 350-351 ; 
army, iv. 358, 359 ; military police, iv. 
375 ; firmy division, iv. 367, 369, 380, 
381 ; education, iv. 416, 418, 419, 432, 
447 ; publications, iv. 453 ; medical, 
iv. 462 ; sanitation, iv. 472 ; compul- 
sory vaccination, iv. 478 ; magnetic 
survey, iv. 490. 

Burma Oil Co., prospecting licence in 
Lower Chindwin obtained by, x. 234 ; 
at Magwe, xvi. 419 ; factory of, in 
Hanthawaddy, xiii. 33. 

Burma Railway, iii. 392, 414, 415. 

Burma Railway Company, workshops at 
Insein, xiii. 365. 

Burma Ruby Mines Company, xxi. 333, 

334- 
Burmese, language of Tibeto-Chinese 

family, i. 388, 394, 401. 
Burmese literature, ii. 437-438. 
Burmese War, first (1824-6), ii. 496-497, 
iv. 12, ix. 124-125. 
Local references: Arakan, v. 192-193 ; 

Bassein,vii. ii8;Cachar,vi. 177, ix. 251; 

Chittagong, x. 309; Henzada, xiii. 103- 

104; Myohaung, xviii. 160; Prome, xx. 

221 ; Rangoon, xxi. 215; Sibsagar, xxii. 

347; Tharrawaddy, xxiii. 318. 
Burmese War, second (1852), ii. 505, ix. 

125-126. 

Local references: Bassein, vii. 118; 

Danubyu, xi. 149; Moulmein, v. 295 ; 

Prome, xx. 221; Rangoon, xxi. 215; 

Tharrawaddy, xxiii. 318; Totmgoo, 

xxiii. 424. 
Burme.se War, third (1885), ii. 521, ix. 

127-128. 
Burn, Colonel, Sikh invasion of Muzaffar- 

nagar suppressed by (1804), xviii. 86 ; 

surrounded by Marathas near Shamll 

(1804), xxii. 228. 



H 2 



100 



INDEX 



Bumeby, Richard, appointed governor of 
Mergni by the King of Siam (1683), 
xvii. 296. 

Burnell, Dr., quoted on St. Thomas's 
Mount, xxi. 388. 

Buines, Sir Alexander, mission to Dost 
Muhammad, ii. 500, v. 37 ; in Balu- 
chistan, vi. 278 ; murdered at Kabul 
(1841), ii. 500, V. 38, xiv. 243 ; Saiyids 
expelled from Paghman for services ren- 
dered to, xxii. 105 ; permitted to follow 
up course of Indus (1S30), xxii. 400. 

Burr, Colonel, Bapu Gokhale defeated by, 
at Kirkee (1817), xv. 308, sx. 183, 

Burrow, Reuben, quoted on Gaur, xii. 187. 

Burton, Major, murdered in Kotah State, 
XV. 414. 

Eurushaski, language of uncertain family, 
spoken in Hunza-Nagar, i. 389, 394, 
401. 

Busch, — , sent in an English ship to re- 
sume possession of Nicobars (1845), 
xix. 64. 

Bushby, G. A., Resident at Hyderabad, 
tomb of, xiii. 310. 

Bussy, Marquis de, French general, initi- 
ated policy of subsidiary alliances, ii. 

472 ; victory over Marathas, ii. 473 ; ad- 
ministration of Northern Circars, ii. 

473 ; taken prisoner at Wandiwash, ii. 

473- 

Local ?iolices : Marched to Bobbili 
with a European force to restore order, 
viii, 252-253 ; governor of Northern 
Circars (1753), x. 336 ; visit to Ganjam 
to reduce it to order (1757), xii. 145 ; 
Gingee captured (1750), xii. 245 ; the 
Char Minar, Hyderabad, occupied 
(1756), xiii. 308; Kurnool taken ;i75i), 
xvi. 33 ; Rajahmundry head-quarters of 
(i754-7)> ^xi- 64; Vizagapatam surren- 
dered to (1757), xxiv. 325, 337. 

Bustards {Etipodotis), i. 260. 

Butana, town in Rohtak District, Punjab, 
ix. 247. 

Buthidaung, subdivision in Akyab Dis- 
trict, Lower Burma, ix. 247. 

Buthidaung, township in Akyab District, 
Lower Burma, ix. 247. 

Butler, Captain, in charge of Naga Hills 
(1869), xviii. 286; killed (1875I, xviii. 
286. 

Butter-making, iii. 83-84. See also Dairy- 
ing. 

Butterworth, Colonel, Straits Settlements 
Penal Regulations of, xx. 194. 

Butuga H, Western Ganga prince, grant 
to, ii. 59 ; Chola sovereign murdered by, 
ii. 332 ; Kannara placed on the throne 
and Chola invasion stopped by, xviii. 
171 ; lands granted to, xviii. 171. 

Buxa, cantonment in Jalpaigurl District, 
Eastern Bengal, ix. 247. 



Buxar, subdivision in Shahabad District, 
Bengal, ix. 247. 

Buxar, town and battle-field in Shahabad 
District, Bengal, ix. 247-248 ; victory 
of Sir Hector Munro over Shuja-ud- 
daula (1764), ii. 479, vii. 180, 188, 213, 
218. 

Buzzards {Biited), i. 253-254. 

Byadgi, town in Dharwar District, Bom- 
bay, ix. 248. 

B) angsi, language of the Tibeto-Chinese 
family, spoken in Western Himalayas, 
i. 392. 

Byans, tract in Almora District, United 
Provinces. See Bians. 

Byanyakin, rule in Dagon, xxi. 214. 

Byinnya Ran, king, built pagoda at Ten- 
asserim, xxiii. 280. 

Bysakhs, founders of village on site of 
Calcutta, ix. 262. 



Cabbages, iii. 75; grown in Afghanistan, 
V. 52 ; Bengal, vii. 248 ; Hooghly, xiii. 
166 ; Rajputana, xxi. 121 ; United Pro- 
vinces, xxiv. 183. 

Cabinet work. See Carpentry. 

Cabral, Pedro Alvares, voyage to Calicut 
(1500), ii. 447 ; founded factory at 
Calicut (1500), ix. 290; andatCanna- 
nore (1501), ix. 298; visit to Cochin 
(1500). x. 354. 

Cachar, District in Assam, ix. 248-259; 
physical aspects, 248-250; history, 250- 
252; population, 252-253; agriculture, 
253-254; forests, 254-255; administra- 
tion, 256-259; trade and communica- 
tions, 255-256; education, 259; medi- 
cal, 259. 

Other references: Rainfall statistics,!. 
144; languages, i. 377; tea plant dis- 
covered (1855), iii. 56; tea cultiva- 
tion, iii. 58, 59. 

Cachar, North, subdivision in Cachar 
District, Assam, ix. 259-260. 

Cadastral record, iv. 20^-213. 

Cadastral surveys, iv. 501-503. 

Calcutta, capital of Lidian Enspire, ix. 
260-286 ; description, 260-262 ; history, 
262-267 ; founded by Job Charnock 
(1690), 263; the 'BlackHole' (1756), 
264; recaptured by Clive and Watson 
(1767), 264; population, 267-269 ; in- 
dustries, 269 ; commerce, 269-272 ; 
communications, 271-274; administra- 
tion, 264-267, 274-276; municipality, 
276-278; public buildings, &c., 278- 
281 ; army, 281-282 ; police, 282-283 ; 
education, 2S3-285; medical, 285-286; 
bibliography, 286. 

Ol her references : Geology, i. 100; 
observatory, i. 106; meteorology, i. 



INDEX 



lOI 



126, 144, 154; cyclone (1864), i. 
1 35 ; mission founded by Kiernan- 
der, i. 443 ; foundation of episcopal 
see (18 1 4), i. 443 ; growth of popula- 
tion, i. 457; Chinese in, i. 469; sta- 
tistics of still-births, i. 511; infantile 
mortality, i. 518; deaths from plague, 
i. 525 ; the "Black Hole" (1756), ii. 
474-475; manufactures, iii. 221,234; 
silver-work, iii. 239 ; jute industry, iii. 
205; port, iii. 273,274-275; jutetrade, iii. 
274-275;trade, iii. 302,303, 315; roads, 
iii. 404,405 ; continuous delivery postal 
system, iii. 430 ; import prices, iii. 462- 
463 ; export prices, iii. 463-465 ; muni- 
cipality, history of, iv. 284-290; muni- 
cipality, constitution and schemes, iv. 
295-297, 298; improvement schemes, 
iv. 298 ; Port Trust, iv. 304, 305 ; Univer- 
sity, iv. 426, 430; school of art, iv. 
438-439 ; medical college, iv. 441 ; 
Presidency College, iv. 445 ; sanita- 
tion, iv. 473, 474 ; tidal observations, 
iv. 490 ; mint, iv. 515. 

Calcutta, Suburbs in, subdivision of Twen- 
ty-four Parganas District, Bengal, ix. 
286. 

Calcutta, South Suburbs, tovra in Twenty- 
four Parganas District, Bengal, ix. 286- 
287. 

Calcutta and Eastern Canals, system of 
navigable channels in Bengal and East- 
ern Bengal, iii. 358-359, ix. 287-289. 

Calcutta-Hongkong Line of steamers, vii. 
281. 

Calcutta Steam Company, ix. 272. 

Caldecott, John, astronomer (1837-49); 
at Trivandrum, Travancore, xxiv. 50. 

Caldwell, Bishop, on the term ' Carnatic,' 
ix. 301-302 ; shrine at Tanjore thought 
to be a copy of temple at Gangaikon- 
dapuram, xii. 128; Indian king who 
sent an embassy to Augustus at Rome 
considered to be a Pandya sovereign, 
xix. 394 ; hostel for students at Trichi- 
nopoly, xxiv. 48, 

Calendars, used in Nicobars, xix. 81-82. 

Calicoes, painting and waxing of, iii. 187- 
188. 

Calico-printing with wooden blocks, iii. 
186 ; at Agra, v. 90 ; Farrukhabad Dis- 
trict, xii. 73 ; Gautampura, Central 
India, xii. 192; Jahangirabad, Buland- 
shahr, xiii. 378 ; Jambusar, Broach, 
xiv. 45 ; Kadi, Baroda,xiv. 259; Kaira, 
xiv. 282 ; Kairana, Muzaffamagar, xiv. 
287; Kanauj, Farrukhabad, xiv. 372; 
Modasa, Ahmadabad, xvii. 380 ; Mon- 
ghyr, xvii. 397 ; Moradabad, xvii. 430 ; 
Sankheda, Baroda, xxii. 59 ; Srinagar, 
Kashmir, xxiii. 102 ; tJnao, xxiv. 
126; Upper Sind Frontier District, 
xxiv, 283. 



Calicut, tdluh in Malabar District, Ma- 
dras, ix. 289. 

Calicut, city and port in Malabar Dis- 
trict, Madras, former capital of the Za- 
morin, and first place in India visited 
by the Portuguese, ix, 289-291 ; voyages 
of Vasco da Gama to (1498, 1502), ii. 
446-447 ; voyage of Pedro Alvares 
Cabral to (1500), ii. 447; pottery, iii, 

245- 

Calimere, Point, promontory in Tanjore 
District, Madras, ix. 291. 

Calinga, name of ancient kingdom in 
Madras. See Kalinga. 

Calingapatam, port in Ganjam District, 
Madras, ix. 291-292. 

Call, Colonel, surveyor, iv. 482, 

Callender, Mr., erected fort at Jambusar 
when it was held by British (1775-S3), 
xiv. 45. 

Calliaud, General, Kondapalli taken 
(1766), XV. 393; army under, moved 
against Najib-ullah (1762), xix. 10; 
battle of St. Thomas's Mount (1759), 
xxi. 389; relief of Trichinopoly (1756), 
xxiv, 29. 

Calpee, See Kalpl. 

Calve College, Pondicherry, xx. 162. 

Cama Hospital for Females, in Bombay 
City, viii, 379, 

Camac, Captain, in second Maratha War, 
ii. 442 ; Gopal Rai presented to, as heir 
to Palamau Raj, and assistance of, xix. 
337; Gwalior attacked by, xii. 421; 
assistance given to Tej Singh by (i 771), 
xiii. 88. 

Cambay, State in Bombay, ix. 292-296 ; 
physical aspects, 292 ; history, 292- 
293; population, 293-294; agriculture, 
294; trade and communications, 294- 
295; famine, 295; administration, 295- 
296, 

Other references : Cutting of agates 
and carnelians, iii, 162-163; manufac- 
tures, iii. 217. 

Cambay, capital of State and former port 
in Bombay, with carnelian industry, ix. 
296-298. 

Cambay, Gulf of, separating peninsula of 
Kathiawar from mainland of Gujarat, 
ix, 296. 

Cambrian geological epoch, i. 64-67. 

Cambii. See Bajra. 

Camel fairs, Agra, v. 78 ; BIkaner, viii. 
210. 

Camels and camel breeding, iii. 89 ; sta- 
tistics, iii. loi. 

Local notices: Afghanistan, v. 53; 
Ahmadabad, v. 100; Attock, vi. 135; 
Bahawalpur, vi. 199; Baluchistan, vi. 
299; Bannu, vi. 398; BIkaner, viii. 
210; BOndi, ix. 83; Chagai, Baluchi- 
stan, X, 1 18 J Cutch, xi, 80; Dera 



I02 



INDEX 



Ghazi Khan, xi. 254, 265 ; Ferozepore, 
xii. 94 ; Gurdaspur, xii. 397 ; Hazara, 
xiii. 80; Hissar, xiii. 151 ; Hyderabad, 
Sind, xiii.316; Jaipur, xiii. 389; Jaisal- 
mer, xiv. 5 ; Jhalawan, Baluchistan, xiv. 
112; Jhang, xiv. 130; Jhelum,xiv. 155; 
JInd, xiv. 171 ; Jodhpur, xiv. 191 ; 
Kalat, Baluchistan, xiv. 301 ; Karachi, 
XV. 6 ; Khairpur, Sind , xv. 2 1 3 ; Kharan, 
Baluchistan, XV. 249; Kohat, xv. 346; 
Makran, Baluchistan, xvii. 48 ; Mian- 
wali, xvii. 321; Muzaffargarh, xviii. 
79; Nabha, xviii. 266; Punjab, xx. 
302; Rajpntana, xxi. 123; Shahpur, 
xxii. 217 ; Sibi, Baluchistan, xxii. 339 ; 
Sind, xxii. 413. 

Campbell, General Sir Archibald, invasion 
of Burma (1824), ix. 124; attack on 
Danubyu (1825), xvii. 225; Moulmein 
selected as capital of Tenasserim 
(1827), xviii. 6; Burmans defeated at 
Prome (1825), xx. 221 ; Tavoy handed 
over to (1824), xxiii. 261 ; advance into 
Tharrawaddy, xxiii. 318. 

Campbell, Sir Colin (Lord Clyde), relief 
of Lucknow (1857), ii. 512, ix. 308, 
xvi. 193, 194, xix. 284, 285 ; re- 
duction of Oudh (1857-8), ii. 513; 
routed Gwalior mutineers at Cawnpore 
(1857), ix. 309, 317; expedition against 
Kohat Pass Afridis (1850), xix. 208; 
expedition against Mohmands, Ranizai, 
and Utman Khel (1851-2), xix. 208. 

Campbell, Sir George, Famine Commis- 
sion, iii. 485, 487 ; Lieut.-Govemor 
of Bengal (1871-4), vii. 220; impetus 
given to education in Assam, vi. loi. 

Campbell, Scarlett, Straits Settlements Re- 
gulations of 1871 discussed by, xx. 193. 

Campbell, Major R. B. P. P., e.xpedition 
against Ranizai (1878), xix. 209. 

Campbell, Colonel, Mangalore defended 
by (1784), xvii. 177. 

Campbell, Dr., Superintendent of Darjeel- 
ing, accompanied Dr. Hooker on visit 
to Darjeeling, xi. 169 ; seized while tra- 
velling in Sikkim, xxii. 36S. 

Campbell Hospital, Calcutta, ix. 285. 

CampbeDpore, civil head-quarters and 
cantonment in Attock District, Punjab, 
ix. 298. 

Camphor, experiments in cultivation of, 
at Barliyar, Nilgiris, vii. 22. 

Campier Hall, Gorakhpur city, xii. 342. 

Canadian Missions. See under Protestant 
Missions. 

Canal workshops and iron foundry, 
Roorkee, xxi. 325. 

Canals for irrigation, iii. 325-344; small 
private canals, 325-326 ; perennial and 
inundation canals, 326-327; canalsmnde 
by former rulers of the country, 327- 
328 ; attempts to construct large irri- 



gation works by private enterprise, 328- 
329; construction ofnew irrigation works 
by the State, 329; major works, 329- 

330 ; principal works in the several Pro- 
vinces, 330-345 ; minor works for which 
capital accounts have been opened, 330 ; 
total outlay on irrigation and results, 330 ; 
detailed statement of major works, 330; 
table of capital expended, area irrigated, 
and revenue returned upon each major 
work and npon total minor works in 
each Province, with totals for each and 
all, 331-332 ; area irrigated by, 345. 

Canals, navigable, iii. 354-360 ; also irri- 
gation works, 355-358; not used for 
irrigation, 358-359 ; general results ob- 
tained on navigation works, 359-360 ; 
compared with railways, 362-363. 

Canals and irrigation woiks: Agra, iii. 
332, 341. 357. V. 91 ; Bari Doab, iii. 
331, 333> vii. 17-18; Barur Tank, iii. 
332; Begari, iii, 331, 336, vii. 142; 
Betwa, iii. 332, 341-342, viii. 17, xiii. 
18, xiv. 22, 142 ; Bijnor, iii. 342, viii. 
198, Buckingham, iii. 358, ix. 32-33; 
Calcutta and Eastern, iii. 358-359, ix. 
287-289 ; Cauver}% iii. 332, 338, ix. 306 ; 
Chenab.iii. 331, 33.^-^34. x- 190-192 ; 
Conolly, X. 379; Dad, iii. 331 ; Dera 
Ghazi Khan, iii. 350, xi. 254; Desert, iii. 
33i.33'5>xi. 272; Dun, iii. 342, xi. 216; 
Eden, xi. 403; Ekruk Tank, iii. 331, 
xxii. 301, 307 ; Fnleli, iii. 336, 358, 362, 
xii. 108; Ganges, iii. 332, 341, 357, 
xii. 136-139; Ghaggar, xii. 213-214; 
Godavari, iii. 332, 338, 355,_xii. 299- 
300; Grey, xii. 344-345; Hathmathi, 
iii. 331 ; Hijili, iii. 356, xiii. 1 16; Indus 
Inundation, xiii. 364-365 ; Jamrao, iii. 
331 , 336, xiv. 52 ; Jhelum, iii. 331, 334, 
xiv. 161-163 ; Jumna, Eastern, iii. 332, 
341, xiv. 233-234; Jumna, Western, 
iii- 331, 333. 357-35«, xiv. 234-236; 
Kabul River, xiv. 247-248 ; Kadra 
River Works, iii. 331 ; Ken, iii. 342- 
343, XV. 199; Kistna, iii. 331, 332, 338, 
355, XV. 336-137 ; Kurnool-Cuddapah, 
i'ij 332, 338-339- 356, xvi. 46-47; 
Lakh, iii. 331 ; Mahi Wah Project, iii. 

331 ; Mandalay, iii. 332, 343, xvii. 
148; Mhasvad Tank, iii. 331; Mid- 
napore, iii. 332, .356,357, xvii. 340-341 ; 
Mon,iii. 344; Multan, iii. 350; Mutha, 
iii- 331, 337, xviii. 62; Muzaffargarh, iii. 
350, xviii. 83; Nara, Eastern, iii. 331, 
336, 358, xviii. 368, 369; iS'Ira, iii. 
33J, 337, xix. 122; Orissa, iii. 332, 
340, 356, xix. 266-269 ; Panjhra, 
Lower, River Works, iii. 331 ; Pegii- 
Sittang, iii. 359, 362, xx. 99 ; Penner 
River, iii. 332, xx. 103, 104; Pcrijar 
Project, iii. 332, 338, xx. 109, iio; 

i Rohilkhand, iii. 342 ; Ru^hikulya Pro- 



INDEX 



103 



ject, iii. 332, 339, xxi. 342 ; Shahpur, 
xxii. 221-222; Shetphal Tank, iii. 331 ; 
Shwebo, iii. 343, 344 ; Shwetachaung, 
iii. 362; Sidhnai, iii. 331, 333, xxii. 
357; Sirhind, iii. 331, 333, 357, xxiii. 
18-20; Sittang-Kyaikto, iii. 359, xxiii. 
63 ; Son, iii. 332, 340, 357, xxiii. 78- 
80; Srivaikuntam Anicut System, iii. 
332; Sutlej, iii. 331, 333-334' x-^'"- 
179-182; Swat River, iii. 331, 333, 
xxiii. 187-189; Tolly's Nullah, xxiii. 
407; Tribenl, iii. 340-341, xxiv. 24- 
25; Twante, xxiv. 66-67; Unar Wall, 
iii- 331. 336; Vedaranniyam, iii. 358, 
xxiv. 302. 

Canara, Colonel, Sikh officer, murder of, 
at Haripur, North- West Frontier Pro- 
vince (1848), xiii. 55. 

Canara. See Kanara. 

Candahar. See Kandahar. 

Candle trade, iii. 178 ; at Digboi, Assam, 
xi. 344-345; Lahore, xvi. 113. 

Cannanore, town and port in Malabar 
District, Madras, early Portuguese and 
Dutch settlement, ix. 298-299. 

Other references : Zoology, i. 267 ; 
pith-work, iii. 232. 

Canning, George, nominated Governor- 
General (1823), but appointed Secre- 
tary for Foreign Affairs, ii. 496. 

Canning, Lord, Governor-General and 
first Viceroy (1856-62), ii. 50S-516; 
viceregal progress, ii. 515 ; cabinet 
administration, inaugurated by, iv. 20 ; 
policy concerning Native States, iv. 
87-88. 

Local notices : Visit to Lucknow 
(1858), xvi. 194; description of taluk- 
ddrs in Oudh, xix. 28S; administered 
United Provinces (1858-9), xxiv. 219. 

Canning, Lady, visit to Lucknow (1858), 
xvi. 194. 

Canning College, Lucknow, xvi. 198. 

Canning, Port, unsuccessful port in 
Twenty-four Parganas District, Bengal, 
ix. 299-300. 

Cannon, Mr., coffee planted in Kadur, 
Mysore, by, xiv. 266. 

Canoy, Alexis, S.J., first Vicar Apostolic 
of Trichinopoly (1846), xxiv. 31. 

Cantonments and military stations : 
Mount Abu, Rajputana, v. 5 ; Aden, 
v. 21 ; Agar, Central India, v. 70; 
Agra, V. 84, 89 ; Ahmadabad, v. 109 ; 
Ahmadnagar, v. 125; Ajmer, v. 165; 
Alipore, Twenty-four Parganas, v. 230; 
Allahabad, v. 240-241 ; Almora, v. 
253; Ambala, v. 287; Amritsar, v. 
330; Ami, North Arcot (abandoned), 
vi. 4; Assam, vi. 98,99; Attock, vi. 
138 ; Aurangabad, Hyderabad, vi. 149 ; 
Bakloh, Guidaspur, vi. 221 ; Baliin, 
Gurdaspur, vi. 343 ; Bangalore, vi. 369, 



370 ; Bara Gali, Hazara, vi. 425 ; 
Bareilly, vii. 14; Baroda, vii. 69, 83- 
84 ; Barrackpore, vii. 86 ; Belgaum, vii. 
^5^) ^.^7; Bellary, vii. 175; Benares, 
vii.igi, 192; Bengal, vii. 321-325; 
Berar, vii. 413; Berhampore, Murshid- 
abad (abandoned), viii. i ; Bhamo, 
Burma, viii. 58; Bombay City, viii. 416 ; 
Buxa, Jalpaigurl, ix. 247 ; Calcutta, ix. 
281, 282; Campbellpore, Attock, ix. 
298; Cawnpore, ix. 308; Central India, 
ix. 383 ; Central Provinces, x. 88 ; 
Chagai, Baluchistan, x. 119; Chak- 
darra, North-West Frontier Province, x. 
122; Chakrata, DehraDun.x. 125-126; 
Chaman, x. 128 ; Cherat, Peshawar, x. 
193 ; Chittoor, North Arcot (aban- 
doned), x. 325; Cochin (abandoned), x. 
352 ; Colonelganj, Gonda (abandoned), 
x. 375 ; Cuddapah (abandoned), xi. 72- 
74 ; Cuttack, xi. 99 ; Dagshai, Simla, 
xi. 122 ; Dalhousie, Gurdaspur, xi. 125- 
126; Dapoli, Ratnagiri (abandoned), 
xi. 150; Darjeeling, xi. 178, 180; 
Deesa, Palanpur, Bombay, xi. 209 ; 
Dehra, xi. 222 ; Delhi, xi. 237, 239 ; 
Deolali, Nasik, xi. 246 ; Deoli, Raj- 
putana, xi. 246-247 ; Dera Ghazi Khan, 
xi. 259 ; Dera Ismail Khan, xi. 26S- 
269 ; Dhari, Baroda, xi. 299 ; Dharm- 
sala, Kangra, xi. 301 ; Dinapore, xi. 
355, 356; Dum-Dum, Twenty-four Par- 
ganas, xi. 376, 377 ; EUore, Kistna 
(abandoned), xii. 23; Erinpura, Raj- 
putana, xii. 26-27; Fatehgarh, Farrukh- 
abad, xii. 75 ; Ferozepore, xii. 98; 
Fort Lockhart, Kohat, xii. loi ; Fyz- 
abad, xii. 11 7-1 18; Ghora Dakka, 
Hazara, xii. 236; Gorakhpur (aban- 
doned), xii. 342 ; Guna, Central India, 
xii. 386; Hangu, Kohat, xiii. 24; Hansi, 
Hissar (abandoned), xiii. 25, 147; Ran- 
goon forts, Hanthawaddy, xiii. 37 ; 
Harrand, Dera Ghazi Khan, xiii. 58; 
in Hazara District, xiii. 78; Hazaribagh 
(abandoned), xiii. 99 ; Hingoli, Hyder- 
abad, xiii. 143; Hubli, Dharwar, xiii. 
222; Hyderabad State, xiii. 288; 
Hyderabad, Sind, xiii. 322 ; Igatpuri, 
Nasik, xiii. 328 ; Imphal, Manipur, xiii. 
330; Indore, xiii. 350, 351; Jacobabad, 
xiii. 373-374 ; Jalapahar, Darjeeling, 
xiv. 17; Jalna, Hyderabad (abandoned), 
xiv. 29 ; Jamrud, North-West Frontier 
Province, xiv. 52; Jhelum, xiv. 159; 
Jubbulpore, xiv. 219; JuUundur, xiv. 
232; Jutogh, Simla, xiv. 240; Kadi, 
Baroda, xiv. 259; Kalabagh, Hazara, 
xiv. 290 ; Kamptee, Nagpur, xiv. 329- 
330; Karachi city, xv. 13; Kasauli, 
Ambala, xv. 68-69 ! Kengtung, Burma, 
XV. 201-202 ; Khaira Gali, Hazara, xv. 
207; Kherwara, Rajputana, xv. 275- 



I04 



INDEX 



276; Kirkee, Poona, xv. 308; Kotra, 
Rajputana, xvi. 4 ; Lahore, xvi. 1 14-1 1 5 ; 
Landour, Dehra Dun, xvi. 135 ; Lans- 
downe, Garhwal, xvi. i35-i£6; Lash- 
kar, Gwalior, xvi. 152-153; Libong, 
Darjeeling, xvi. 158; Loralai, Biluch- 
istan, xvi. 179-180; Lucknow, xvi. 
197; Maler Kotla, Punjab, xvii. 86; 
^landalay, xvii. 144; Manora, Sind, 
xvii. 200, 201 ; Mardan, Peshawar, xvii. 
206 ;Maymyo, Burma, xvii. 239; Meerut, 
xvii. 263-266 ; Meiktila town, xvii. 
287-288; Mhow, Central India, xvii. 
314-315 ; Morar, Gwalior, xviii. 1-2 ; 
Multan, xviii. 37 ; Murree, Rawalpindi, 
xviii. 42-43 ; Muttra, xviii. 72-74 ; 
Naini Tal, xviii. 333-334; Nasirabad, 
Rajputana, xviii. 414 ; Naushahra, 
Peshawar, xviii. 417 ; Nlmach, Central 
India, xix. 105 ; Nowgong, Central 
India, xix. 230 ; Palanpnr Agency, 
Bombay, xix. 352; Pallavaram, Chingle- 
put, xix. 370; Peshawar, xx. 124-126; 
Poona, xx. 183-184 ; Poonamallee, 
Chingleput, XX. 1S6; Port Blair, Anda- 
mans, xx. 213; Quetta, Baluchistan, 
xxi. 20; Ranchi, xxi. 210; Rangoon, 
xxi. 219; Ranlkhet, Almora, xxi. 233; 
Ranipet, North Arcot (abandoned), xxi. 
234; Rawalpindi, xxi. 272-273; Roor- 
kee, Saharanpur, xxi. 326 ; Sabathu, 
Simla, xxi. 344 ; St. Thomas's Mount, 
Chingleput, xxi. 388-389; Sardarpur, 
Central India, xxii. 103-104 ; Saugor, 
xxii. 148; Secunderabad, Hyderabad, 
xxii. 159; Sehore, Central India, xxii. 
160-162; Shahjahanpur, xxii. 210; 
Shwebo, Burma, xxii. 322 ; Sialkot, 
xxii. 336; Sitapur, xxiii. 61-62 ; Solon, . 
Simla, xxiii. 73 ; Thayetmyo, Burma, 
xxiii. 354 ; Trichinopoly, xxiv. 44 ; 
Trivandrum, Travancore, xxiv. 50 ; 
Vizagapatam, xxiv. 338; Wellington, 
Nllgiris, xxiv. 384-385. 

Caoutchouc or india-rubber, iii. 118: grown 
in Assam, vi. 69 ; Bengal, vii. 260 ; 
Burmai, x. 168 ; Cachar, ix. 255 ; Char- 
duar forests, Assam, x. 176; Darrang, 
xi. 187 ; Hanthawaddy, Burma, xiii. 32 ; 
Hill Tippera, xiii. 121 ; Jirang, Khasi 
Hills, xiv. 177; Kamriip, xiv. 336; 
Kurnool, xvi. 40 ; Mergui, Burma, 
xvii. 302 ; Nilambfir, Malabar, xix. 
85 ; Nowgong, xix. 226; Sikkim, xxii. 
370 ; Southern Shan States, xxii. 260. 

Capes and headlands : Point Calimere, 
Tanjore,ix. 291 ; Comorin, Travancore, 
X. 376 ; Divi Point, Kistna District, xi. 
364 ; Dolphin's Nose, Vizagapatam, 
xi. 367; False Point, Orissa, xi. 51; 
Harnai, Ratnagiri, xiii. 57 ; Manora, 
Karachi, xvii. 200-201; PalmyrasPoint, 
Orissa, xix. 370-371. 



Capitals, ancient. See Ancient Capitals. 

Capitation tax in Burma. See Thatha- 
meda. 

Capper, Lieutenant-Colonel, Huli, Bel- 
gaum, taken by (1800), xiii. 223. 

Capsicum (or chillies), iii. 99; grown in 
Akyab, v. 195; Almora, v. 248; Arsi- 
kere, Mysore, vi. 7; Assam, vi. 55; 
Baroda, vii. 48 ; Bengal, vii. 247 ; 
Berar, vii. 385 ; Burma, ix. 152; Chakla 
Roshnabad, Tippera, x. 124; Chin 
Hills, Burma, x. 276; Chittagong, x. 
311; Dehra Dun, xi. 216; Dharwar, 
xi. 309; Goa, xii. 261; Hassan, My- 
sore, xiii. 70; Hill Tippera, xiii. 120; 
Hyderabad State, xiii. 253, 301 ; Kadi, 
Baroda, xiv. 257; South Kanara, xiv. 355 ; 
Kashmir, xv. 123; Khandesh, xv. 234; 
Kolhapur State, xv. 384 ; Kyaukse, 
Burma, xvi. 75; Mandalay, xvii. 131; 
Mangalore,South Kanara,xvii.i 76 ; Ma- 
ubin, Burma, xvii. 227; Meiktila, Bur- 
ma, xvii. 280, 281 ; Mysore, xviii. 210 ; 
Nadia, xviii. 277 ; Naga Hills, x\aii. 
291; Nagpur, xviii. 311; Nepal, xix. 
47 ; Nicobars, xix. 62 ; Punjab, xx. 
299 ; Rapur, Nellore, xxi. 237 ; Ratna- 
giri, xxi. 252 ; Rewa Kantha, xxi. 296 ; 
Sagaing, Burma, xxi. 357 ; Sandoway, 
Burma, xxii. 35; Satara, xxii. 122; 
Southern Shan States, xxii. 257 ; Shola- 
pur, xxii. 300 ; Sibsagar, xxii. 349 ; 
Tippera, xxiii. 384. 

Car festival, held at Banavasi, Mysore, vi. 
346; Haldipur, North Kanara, xiii. to; 
Jammalamadugu, Cuddapah, xiv. 49 ; 
Purl, xx. 411, 412 ; Rayachoti, Cudda- 
pah, xxi. 274; Suchindram, Travancore, 
xxiii. 115; Tiruppur, Coimbatore, xxiii. 

396. 

Car Nicobar, northernmost of Nicobar 
Islands, i.x. 302. 

Caragola. See Karagola. 

Caraways, cultivated in Hyderabad State, 
xiii. 253 ; Kashmir and Jammu, xv. 86. 

Carbonate of soda, generally found in an 
impure form known as sajji, iii. 158; 
found and prepared in Anupgarh, Raj- 
putana, V. 387 ; Atraf-i-balda, Hyder- 
abadjvi. 128; Azamgarh,vi. 159; Ballia, 
vi. 254; Baluchistan, vi. 309 ; BTkaner, 
viii. 204; Chitaldroog, Mysore, x. 294; 
Dera Ghazi Khan, xi. 255 ; Ferozepore, 
xii. 89 ; Ghazlpur, xii. 227, 230; ^Iah- 
bubnagar, Hyderabad, xvii. 5 ; Mont- 
gomery, xvii. 415; Multan, xviii. 31; 
Poona, XX. 176; Punjab, xx. 312; 
Shalipur, xxii. 218. 

Carbuncles, found at Bhilwara, Raj- 
putana, viii. 107. 

Cardamom Hills, Travancore, ix. 300- 
301. 

Cardamoms {^Elettaria Cardar/iomit/fi), 



INDEX 



105 



iii. 54, 99 ; cultivated or grown in 
Cochin, X. 342 ; Coorg, xi. 31-32 ; 
Darjeeling, xi. 172 ; Western Ghats, 
xii. 220; Hassan, Mysore, xiii. 65, 67 ; 
Haveri, Dharwar (brought for wash- 
ing), xiii. 74; North Kanara, xiv. 347; 
Kodaikanal, Madura, xv. 338 ; Kolha- 
pur, XV. 384 ; Koppa, Mysore, xv. 39S ; 
Madras Presidency, xvi. 284 ; Manjar- 
abad, Mysore, xvii. 196; Mudgere, My- 
sore, xviii. II ; Mysore, xviii. 166, 216 ; 
Nagar, Mysore, xviii. 296 ; Sagar, 
Mysore, xxi. 365 ; Shimoga, Mysore, 
xxii. 287 ; Siddapur, North Kanara, 
xxii. 356; Sikkim, xxii. 370; Sirsi, North 
Kanara, xxiii. 47 ; Tavoy, Burma, xxiii. 
263 ; Tirthahalli, Mysore, xxiii. 391 ; 
Toungoo, Burma, xxiii. 429 ; Travan- 
core, xxiv. 10; Uppinangadi, South 
Kanara, xxiv. 285. 

Carey, Rev. W., founder of Baptist 
Mission at Serampore (1799), i. 443, 
iv. 410, xxii. 177. 

Caribal, old name for Karwar, xv. 65. 

Carlleyle, A. C, pygmy flints discovered 

by, ii. 92, 93. 

Carnac, Captain, engagement concluded 
with the Gaikwar (1813), xxi. 24. 

Camatic, incorrect historical name for 
part of Madras Presidency, ix. 301, 302. 
See also Southern Maratha Country. 

Other references : Meteorology, i- 145 ; 
zoology, i. 224; density of population 
(Bombay), i. 453 ; decrease of popu- 
lation (Bombay), i. 463 ; English and 
French rivalry and wars in, ii. 471- 
473 ; war of succession in, iv. 71-74 ; 
struggles between French and English 
in, iv. 71-73. 

Camatic Mills, Madras City, xvi. 375. 

Camatikgarh, peak in North Arcot Dis- 
trict, Madras, v. 403. 

Came, Mr., Assistant-Collector of Ma- 
hoba, asylum given to, by Ratan Singh 
during Mutiny, x. 177. 

Carnegy, Mr., Superintendent of Naga 
Hills, killed (1877), xviii, 2S6. 

Carnelians, carved at Cambay, ix. 294, 
297. 

Carnelians, iii. 162 ; found in Aurang- 
abad, Hyderabad, vi. 145 ; Rajpipla, 
xxi. 81. 

Caron, M., President of French East India 
Company, French factory founded at 
Sural (1668), ii. 463, xii. 104 ; St. 
Thome seized from Dutch (1672), re- 
stored (1674), xii. 104; Trincomalee 
seized from Dutch, xii. 104. 

Carpenter, Commander A,, chart of 
Andaman Islands, v. 354. 

Carpentry, cabinet work, &c., exports 
and imports, iii. 228 ; the industry 
generally, iii. 228-232. 



Local notices : Akyab, v. 1 96 ; Am- 
bala, V. 283 ; Amherst, v. 300 ; Bengal, 
vii. 268-269 > Central Pro^^nces, x. 53; 
Chaul, Kolaba, x. 184 ; Dinapore, 
Patna, xi. 356 ; Gurdaspur, xii. 398 ; 
Hissar, xiii. 152 ; Hooghly, xiii. 167 ; 
Hoshiarpur, xiii. 199 ; Jhang, xiv. 131 ; 
Jullundur, xiv. 228, 231 ; Manglaur, Sa- 
haranpur, xvii. 178 ; Maurawan, Unao, 
xvii. 234 ; Monghyr, xvii. 397 ; Moul- 
mein, xviii. 7; Muzaffarpur, xviii. 100; 
Nepal, xix. 51; Nicobars, xix. 79; 
North-West Frontier Province, xix. 183 ; 
Travancore, xxiv. 12 ; Southern Wazlr- 
istan, xxiv. 384. 
Carpet-weaving, iii. 214-217 ; Northern 
India, 2i5;Sind and Baluchistan, 215- 
216; United Provinces and Bengal, 
216; Rajputana and Central India, 
216; Bombay and Baroda, 216; South- 
era India, 216-217; cotton, 217. 

Local Jiotices : Adoni, Bellary, v. 
26 ; Afghanistan, v. 56; Agra, v. 78, 90; 
Ahmadnagar, v. 125; Akot, Berar, v. 
190; Aligarh, V. 214; Ambala, v. 283; 
Amritsar, v. 324, 329 ; Ayyampettai, 
Tanjore, vi. 153 ; Baluchistan, vi. 308 ; 
Bareilly, vii. 9; Batala, Gurdaspur, vii. 
133 ; Bengal, vii. 267, 269; Berar, vii. 
392; BIkaner, viii. 211, 219; Bubak, 
Sind, ix. 32; Burdwan, ix. 103; Cam- 
bay, ix. 294 ; Coimbatore, x. 365 ; 
Cooch Behar, x. 3S5 ; Cumbum, Kur- 
nool, xi. 74 ; Daudnagar, Gaya, xi. 200; 
Dera Ghazi Khan, xi. 255 ; Dharwar, 
xi. 311 ; Dholpur, Rajputana, xi. 332 ; 
EUichpur, Berar, xii. 21 ; Ellore, Kistna, 
xii. 23 ; Fatehpur, Bara Banki, xii. 84 ; 
Fatehpur Sikri, Agra, xii. 86 ; Godavari 
District, xii. 291 ; Hyderabad State, 
xiii. 263 ; Jaipur, xiii. 399 ; Jaisalmer, 
xiv. 6 ; Jewar, Bulandshahr, xiv. 102 ; 
Jhalawan, Baluchistan, xiv. 112; Jha- 
lawar, xiv. 119; Jubo, Sind, xiv. 220; 
Kalat, Baluchistan, xiv. 302 ; Kamalia, 
Montgomery, xiv. 325 ; Karachi, xv. 7 ; 
Khairpur, Sind, xv. 216 ; Kurnool, xvi. 
39-40, 46 ; Lahore, xvi. 102 ; Larkana, 
Sind, xvi. 141 ; Madras Presidency, xvi. 
292 ; Majitha, Amritsar, xvii. 43 ; Mir- 
zapur, xvii. 377 ; Moradabad, xvii. 426 ; 
Multan, xviii. 31 ; Muzaffarpur, xviii. 
100; Mysore State, xviii. 219; Naval- 
gund, Dharwar, xviii. 419; Palamcottah, 
Tinnevelly, xix. 345; Punjab, xx. 316; 
Raichur, Hyderabad, xxi. 41 ; Rajput- 
ana, xxi. 131 ; Rangpur, xxi. 228 ; Sau- 
di, Hardoi, xxii. 30 ; Sarjapur, Mysore, 
xxii. 109; Sehwan, Sind, xxii. 163; 
Shahabad, xxii. 192 ; Shikarpur, Sind, 
xxii. 277 ; Shimoga, Mysore, xxii. 2S8 ; 
Sibi, Baluchistan, xxii. 340 ; Sind, xxii. 
418; Talikota, Hyderabad, xxiii. 214; 



io6 



INDEX 



Tinnevelly, xxiii. 372 ; United Pro- 
vinces, xxiv. 203 ; Upper Sind Frontier 
District, xxiv. 282 ; VValajapet, North 
Arcot, xxiv. 352 ; Warangal, Hyder- 
abad, xxiv. 361-362 ; Zhob, Baluchi- 
stan, xxiv. 432. 

Carriage and coach building, Ambala, 
V. 283 ; Bhannagar, Kathiawar, viii. 96; 
Indore, xiii. 343. 

Carriage ornaments, made at Dhampur, 
Bijnor, xi. 284. 

Carrots {Daucus Carotd), iii. 75, 99 ; 
grown in Afghanistan, v. 52 ; Baroda, 
vii. 48 ; Punjab, xx. 299 ; Rajputana, 
xxi. 121 ; United Provinces, xxiv. 183. 

Carts, in India generally, iii. 14; statis- 
tics, iii. loi. 

Carts and cart-wheels, manufactured, 
Atur,Salem,vi. 139; Bengal,vii. 278-2 79, 
Bhandara, viii. 67 ; Bombay Presidency, 
viii. 326 ; Burma, ix. 177 ; Dharapuram, 
Coimbatore, xi. 299; Erode, Coimba- 
tore, xii. 29 ; Ferozepore, xii. 94 ; 
Hadiaya, Punjab, xiii. 4 ; Jessore, xiv. 
96; Katha, Burma, xv. 160; Kishanganj, 
Purnea, XV. 310; Magwe, Burma, xvi. 
420; Myingyan, Burma, xviii. 133; 
Namaul, Punjab, xviii. 381 ; Nellore, 
xix. 17; Pail, Punjab, xix. 316; Pa- 
kokku, I3nrma, xix. 327 ; Panvel, Thana, 
xix. 406; Pegu, Burma, XX. 91 ; Pllibhit, 
XX. 141,144; Rohtak, xxi. 317; Taloda, 
Khandesh, xxiii. 215; Taungdwingyi, 
Burma, xxiii. 256; Tinnevelly, xxiii. 372 ; 
Tumsar, Bhandara, xxiv. 60 ; Vambori, 
Ahmadnagar, xxiv. 298. 

Cartwright, Ralph, opened first factory 
in Bengal (1633), ii. 458. 

Carving. See Sandal-wood Carving, 
Stone-carving, and Wood-carving. 

Cashew-nut, cultivation of: Belgaum, vii. 
146 ; Dharwar, xi. 304 ; Goa, xii. 261 ; 
South Kanara, xiv. 355; Kistna, xv. 320; 
Savantvadi, x.xii. 151 ; Tavoy, Burma, 
xxiii. 263. 

Cashmere. See Kashmir and Jammu. 

Caskets and vases of rock crystal, relic 
deposits in Buddhist stupas, ii. 36, 37, 

133- 

Cassergode. See Kasaragod. 

Caste, development of, in Penal Settle- 
ment at Port Blair, xx. 203-205. 

Castello Novo, Marquis of, Bhonslas of 
Savantvadi repulsed from Goa by, xii. 
256. 

Castes, distribution of, in Andamans, 
XX. 203-205 ; Baroda, vii. 44 ; Ben- 
gal, vii. 233 ; Bombay, viii. 303-307 ; 
Burma, unknown as an indigenous in- 
stitution, ix. 1 39 ; among Hindus in Bur- 
ma, ix. 141 ; Central India, ix. 352, 353; 
Central Provinces, x. 25, 26 ; Hyderabad, 
xiii. 247; Kashmir, xv. 99-106; Madras 



Presidency, xvi. 261-262; Mysore, xviii. 
193-200; Punjab, XX. 287, 28S ; Rajput- 
ana, xxi. 111-115. .S^^ a/jo Ethnology 
and Caste a7id special names, and each 
Province, District, and larger State 
article under Population. 

Castle Rock, railway station in North 
Kanara, Bombay, ix. 302-303. 

Castles : Aonla, Bareilly, v. 389 ; Barwa 
Sagar, Jhansi, vii. 93 ; Bombay City, 
viii. 400; Chaul, Ratnagiri, x. 185; 
Patri, Ahmadabad, xx. 73; Sural city, 
xxiii. 165 ; Tirwa, xxiii. 403. See also 
Forts. 

Castor-oil manufacture and factories, 
Baranagar, Twenty-four Parganas, vi. 
429 ; Maniktala, Twenty-four Parganas, 
xvii. 183 ; Raipur, xxi. 55. 

Castor-oil plant {Ricinus communis), 
grown in India generally, iii. 36, 38, 98 ; 
Afghanistan, v. 52 ; Anantapur, v. 342 ; 
Atraf-i-balda, Hyderabad, vi. 127 ;Bala- 
ghat, vi. 228; Baroda, vii. 46; Bellary, 
vii. 165; Bengal, vii. 246; Bhagalpur, 
viii. 31 ; Bhongir, Hyderabad, viii. 123 ; 
Bijapur, viii. 181 ; Bonai, Orissa, ix. 3 ; 
Challakere, Mysore, X. 128; Cuddapah, 
xi. 65 ; Dharmavaram, Anantapur, xi. 300 ; 
Hadagalli, Bellary, xiii. 4 ; Harpana- 
halli, Bellary, xiii. 57; Hassan, Mysore, 
xiii. 70; Hyderabad State, xiii. 253, 254; 
Jalpaiguri, xiv. 35 ; Kankanhalli, My- 
sore, xiv. 401; Kistna, xv. 326; Kudligi, 
Bellary, xvi. 1 2 ; Madras Presidency, xvi. 
274 ; Madura, xvi. 395 ; Mahbubnagar, 
Hyderabad, xvii. 4 ; Mysore, xviii. 
210; Nagpur, xviii. 311 ; Nalgonda, 
Hyderabad, xviii. 341 ; Orissa Tributary 
States, xix. 259 ; Panch Mahals, six. 385 ; 
Puri, XX.403 ; Rajpipla, xxi. 81 ; Rajput- 
ana, xxi. 121 ; Rewa Kantha,xxi. 296 ; 
Santal Parganas, xxii. 70 ; Sirsi, North 
Kanara, xxiii. 47; Surat, xxiii. 159; 
Tavoy, Burma, xxiii. 259; Udayagiri, 
Nellore, xxiv. 108; United Provinces, 
xxiv. 182. 

Castro, Joao de, Portuguese Viceroy of 
India (1545-8), ii. 450 ; Fort Diu con- 
structedby(i545), xi.363; Ibrahim Adil 
Shall repulsed by, xii. 252 ; mention of 
Mahad (1538), xvi. 429; routed Mah- 
mud II at Diu, xi. 364 ; inscribed stone 
from Elephanta Island taken to Europe 
by (1540), xii. 4. 

Casuarina plantations, in Bangalore, vi. 
365 ; Baruva, Ganjam, vii. 89; Ennore, 
Chinglepnt, xii. 25 ; Faridpur, xii. 54 ; 
Ganjam, xii. 144, 151 ; Godavari, xii. 
291 ; Gopalpur, Ganjam, xii. 330 ; 
Gudur, Nellore, xii. 348; Jessore, xiv. 
91 ; Karachi, xv. 2 ; Karwar, North 
Kanara, xv. 66; Kathiawar, xv. 179; 
Kavali,Nellore,xv. i9i;Kislna,xv. 327; 



INDEX 



107 



Kolar, Mysore, xv. 369 ; Kottapalam, 
Guntiir, xvi.6; Madras Presidency, xvi. 
286 ; Nellore, xix. 16 ; Nicobars, xix. 
62 ; Pudukkottai, Madras, xx. 234 ; 
Ratnagiri, xxi. 246 ; Shevaroy Hills, 
xxii. 274 ; Trichinopoly, xxiv. 34. 

Cat-bear {Aelurtts), i. 223 ;. Darjeeling, 
xi. 167; Sikkim, xxii. 367. 

Catechu. See Cutch. 

Cathedrals, Agra (Roman Catholic), v. 
88 ; Allahabad (Anglican and Roman 
Catholic), V. 240 ; Bassein (Roman 
Catholic, ruined), vii. 121; Borivli, 
Thana (Portuguese), ix. 6 ; Calcutta 
(St. Paul's and Roman Catholic), ix. 
280; Chadarghat, Hyderabad (Roman 
Catholic), x. 115; Se Matriz, at Diu 
(Jesuit), xi. 363; Goa (Roman Catho- 
lic), xii. 267 ; Lahore (of the Resur- 
rection), xvi. 114; Madras (Roman 
Catholic), xvi. 367 ; Mandalny (Roman 
Catholic), xvii. 144; Mussoorie (Ro- 
man Catholic, under construction), 
xviii. 62 ; Nagpur (Roman Catholic), 
xviii. 320 ; Pondicherry (Roman Catho- 
lic), XX. 162 ; Cochin, Santa Cruz 
(1557)) X. 354; Sardhana (Roman 
Catholic), xxii. 107 ; Simla (Roman 
Catholic), xxii. 384; Thana (Roman 
Catholic), xxiii. 303. 

Cats {Felidae), i. 217. 

Cats, jungle {Felis chaus), i. 217, 219; 
Coorg, xi. 7 ; Kherl, xv. 269 ; Myit- 
kyina, Burma, xviii. 136 ; Northern 
Shan States, xxii. 233 ; Sitapur, xxiii. 
55 ; Thar and Parkar, Sind, xxiii. 307. 

Cats, wild, i. 217-219; in Berar, vii. 364; 
Bhagalpur, viii. 27 ; Chittagong, x. 307 ; 
Gurdaspur, xii. 392 ; Janjira, xiv. 58 ; 
Jhang, xiv. 125; Kangra, xiv. 382; 
Kathiaw^ar, xv. 174; Lahore, xvi. 97; 
Mahi Kantha, xvii. 15 ; Montgomery, 
xvii. 409 ; Patiala, xx. 33 ; Punjab, xx. 
255 ; Sandoway, Burma, xxii. 32 ; Sind, 
xxii. 393; Tippera, xxiii. 381. 

Cattle, in India generally, iii. 76-86 ; 
number, 76, 101 ; general character- 
istics, 76 ; in Peninsular India, 77 : 
in Gujarat, 78-80; in Northern India, 
78 ; Amrit Mahal breed, 78 ; Nellore 
and Arvi, 79 ; Malwi and Kherl, 79 ; 
Gir, 79; Hansi, 80; Lower Sind, 80; 
Montgomery, 81 ; Bengal, 81 ; buffa- 
loes, 81-83; export of hides, 83; 
dairying on European principles, 83 ; 
grass farms, 83 ; increase in butter- 
making, 83 ; effects of crossing, 84 ; 
Civil Veterinary department, 84 ; 
schemes for cattle improvement, 85 ; 
preservation of cattle in famine, 85 ; 
need of storing fodder, 86. 

Special breeds of: Hissar, xiii. 151 ; 
Indore State, xiii. 342 ; Madras Presi- 



dency, xvi. 269-271; Madura, xvi. 
396; Mysore State, xviii. 212-213; 
Nagaur, Rajputana, xviii. 299 ; Nal- 
gonda, Hyderabad, xviii. 341 ; Nasik, 
xviii. 404 ; Navalgund, Dharwar, xviii. 
419 ; Palanpur Agency, xix. 349; Raj- 
putana, xxi. 124; Rohtak, xxi. 316; 
Shalijahanpur, xxii. 205 ; Southern Shan 
States, xxii. 258; Thayetmyo, Burma, 
xxiii. 348 ; United Provinces, xxiv. 
186-187 ; Warangal, Hyderabad, xxiv. 
361 ; Wun, Berar, xxiv. 393. 

Cattle diseases, in India generally, iii. 84 ; 
Baroda, vii. 50 ; Central Provinces, 
X. 41 ; Madras Presidency, xvi. 272 ; 
Mysore State, xviii. 213; Punjab, xx. 
302 ; Southern Shan States, xxii. 258 ; 
United Provinces, xxiv. 187. 

Cattle fairs and markets, held at Agra, 
V. 78; Ajmer-Merwara, v. 150; Ala- 
wakhawa at Balia village, Dinajpur, v. 
205 ; Batesar, Agra, vii. 134 ; Bengal, 
vii. 251 ; Berar, vii. 387 ; Buiar, Hyder- 
abad, viii. 167; Central India, ix. 363 ; 
Central Provinces, x. 41 ; Coimbatore, 
X. 363 ; Deoli, Wardha, xi. 246 ; 
Digras, Berar, xi. 345 ; Ferozepore, xii. 
94 ; Garhakota, Saugor, xii. 161 ; 
Georgegarh, Rohtak, xii. 210; Gudi- 
yattam, North Arcot, xii. 348; Harpa- 
nahalli, Bellary, xiii. 57 ; Hissar, xiii. 
151 ; Hyderabad State, xiii. 256 ; 
Itarsi, Hoshangabad, xiii. 372; Jaito, 
Punjab, xiv. 10; Kharda, Ahmadnagar, 
XV. 251 ; Khurai, Saugor, xv. 295 ; 
Madras Presidency, xvi. 271 ; Madura, 
xvi. 396 ; Mau-Ranlpur, Jhansi, xvii. 
233 ; Narkher, Nagpur, xviii. 379 ; 
Nekmard, Dinajpur, xix. 4-5 ; Nipani, 
Belgaum, xix. 121; Gogameri, Nohar, 
Rajputana, xix. 135 ; Pithapuram,Goda- 
vari, XX. 155; Punganuru, North Arcot, 
XX. 245 ; Punjab, XX. 303; Quetta-Pishln, 
Baluchistan, xxi. 15; Rajputana, xxi. 
124 ; Ramtek, Nagpur, xxi. 196 ; Roh- 
tak, xxi. 316; Sankaranayinarkovil, 
Tinnevelly, xxii. 58 ; Saoner, Nagpur, 
xxii. 80 ; near .Sausar, Chhindwara, xxii. 
150; .Sarad, Rajputana, xi. 326; Sibi, 
Baluchistan, xxii. 339 ; Sirsa, xiii. 151 ; 
Sonpur, Saran, xxiii. 87; Subrahmanya, 
South Kanara, xxiii. 115; Suri, Blr- 
bhiJm, xxiii. 174; Sursara, Rajputana, 
xxi. 340; Tinnevelly, xxiii. 370; Tirup- 
piir, Coimbatore, xxiii. 396 ; Twenty- 
four Parganas, xxiv. 74; United Pro- 
vinces, xxiv. 186-187. 

Cattle-poisoning, prevalent in Gorakhpur, 
xii. 339; Kasegaon, Satara, xv. 69; 
Noakhali, xix. 133; Raipur, xxi. 57. 

Cattle-theft, prevalent in Akola, Berar, 
V. 186; Aligarh, v. 215; Amherst, 
Burma, v. 301 ; Amraoti, v. 311 ; 



io8 



INDEX 



Bellary, vii. 171 ; Bulandshahr, ix. 
55; Chindwin, x. 241; Cuttack, xi. 
95 ; Dera Ghazi Khan, xi. 256 ; 
Dera Ismail Khan, xi. 266 ; EUichpur, 
Berar, xii. 1 7 ; Etah, xii. 35 ; Etawah, 
xii. 45 ; Ferozepore, xii. 92, 96 ; Gan- 
jam, xii. 155 ; Gaya, xii. 205 ; Gujrat, 
xii. 371 ; Gujranwala, xii, 360 ; Gul- 
barga, Hyderabad, xii. 380 ; Gurgaon, 
xii. 409 ; Hanthawaddy, Burma, xiii. 35 ; 
Hoshangabad, xiii. 189; Jaipur State, 
xiii. 398 ; Kachhi, Baluchistan, xiv. 
252 ; Kaira, xiv. 284 ; Karachi, xv. 9 ; 
Karnal, xv. 56 ; Las Bela, Baluchistan, 
xvi. 148; Madura, xvi. 401 ; Magwe, 
Burma, xvi. 422; Mahbubnagar, Hyder- 
abad, xvii. 6 ; Mahi Kantha, xvii. 20 ; 
Main purl, xvii. 38 ; Medak, Hyder- 
abad, xvii. 249; Meerut, xvii. 261; 
Meiktila, Burma, xvii. 285 ; Mont- 
gomery, xvii. 416; Multan, xviii. 32; 
Muttra, xviii. 70 ; Muzaffargarh, xviii. 
Si ; Muzaffamagar, xviii. 91 ; Myingyan, 
Burma, xviii. 130; Nander, Hyder- 
abad, xviii. 354 ; Osmanabad, Hyder- 
abad, xix. 274; Patiala, Punjab, 
XX. 46; Palanpur Agency, xix. 351; 
Pegu, Burma, xx. 93; Prome, Burma, 
XX. 227; Punjab, xx. 338; Raichur, 
Hyderabad, xxi. 42 ; Raipur, xxi. 57 ; 
Saharanpur, xxi. 376; Santal Parganas, 
xxii. 75 ; Saugor, xxii. 145 ; Shahabad, 
xxii. 194; Shahpur, xxii. 219; North- 
era Shan States, xxii. 247 ; Southern 
Shan States, xxii. 265 ; Sind, xxii. 430 ; 
Singhbhum, xxiii. 9 ; Sirmur, Punjab, 
xxiii. 27; Sukkur, Sind, xxiii. 124; 
Thar and Parkar, Sind, xxiii. 314; 
Tharrawaddy, Burma, xxiii. 325 ; 
Thaton, Burma, xxiii. 338 ; Thayet- 
myo, Burma, xxiii. 351; Upper Sind 
Frontier District, xxiv. 283. 

Cauldrons, made in Bhutan, viii. 160. 

Cauliflowers, grown in Bengal, vii. 248 ; 
Hazaribagh,xiii. 91 ; Hooghly, xiii. 166; 
Mysore State, xviii. 210 ; Rajputana, 
xxi. 121 ; United Provinces, xxiv. 183. 

Cautley, Sir Proby, Ganges canal designed 
and constructed, iii. 341, xii. 138, xiv. 

233- 
Cauvery, sacred river in Southern India, 

with waterfalls harnessed for supplying 

electricity, and great irrigation works, 

ix. 303-306 ; legendary history, xi. 8- 

9 ; course, i. 45. 
Cauvery delta, canal system, iii. 332, 338, 

ix. 306 ; irrigation works, iii. 327. 
Cavagnari, Sir Louis, Resident at Kabul, 

murdered (1879), ii. 518, v. 40, vii. 

138, xiv. 244. 
Cave inscriptions. See Inscriptions. 
Caves and cave or rock-hewn temples : 

sculpture in the early caves, ii. iii- 



112; painting in the later caves, ii. 
117-121 ; cave-temples, ii. 161-165. 

Local notices : Afghanistan, v. 44-45, 
68 ; Ahmadnagar, v. 1 14 ; Aivalli, Bija- 
pur, V. 129; Ajanta, Hyderabad, ii. 112, 
117-121, 162, 163, V. 134-136; Ram- 
ling, near Alta, Kolhapur,v. 253; Amba, 
Hyderabad, v. 275 ; Amherst, Burma, 
V. 296; Anjaneri,Nasik, v. 382; Ankai, 
Nasik, v. 385; Aror, Sind, vi. 4, 5; 
Aurangabad, Hyderabad, vi. 142, 150; 
Badami, Bijapur, vi. 176, 177; Bagh, 
Central India, vi, 184; Baghelkhand, 
vi. 187; Sattapanni, in Baibhar hill, 
Patna, xxi. 72 ; Baluchistan, vi. 283, xvi. 
146; Bamian, Afghanistan, V. 44; Banda, 
vi. 349; Barabar Hills, Gaya, ii. 11 1, 
161,162, vi. 425 ; Bedsa, Poona, ii.162, 
vii. 140, 141 ; Undavalle, near Bezwada, 
Kistna, viii. 19; Bhaja, Poona, ii. 112, 
162-164, viii. 42-43 ; near Bhandak, 
Chanda, viii. 59 ; Bhopawar Agency, 
viii. 145 ; Bhor State, Bombay, viii. 
148; Borivli, Thana, ix. 6; Borra, 
Vizagapatam, xix. 312 ; Pragbodhi, 
Buddh Gaya, Gaya, ix. 45 ; Central 
India, ix. 345 ; Chandor, Nasik, x. 167 ; 
Chatia hill, Orissa, x. 181 ; Chaul, 
Kolaba, x. 185 ; Lower Chindwin, 
Burma, x. 229, 231 ; Chingleput, x. 269 ; 
Cochin State, x. 343 ; Colgong, Bha- 
galpur, X. 375 ; Observatory Hill, Uar- 
jeeling, xi. 178; Sidhgupha, Deogarh, 
Jhansi, xi. 246; Bhim's Bazar, Dham- 
nar, Central India, xi. 283 ; Bhaii 
Kacheri, Dhamnar, Central India, xi. 
283 ; Dhodap, Nasik, xi. 320 ; Ele- 
phanta Island, Bombay, xii. 2-5 ; 
Ellora, Hyderabad, ii. 163, 170, 173, 
xii. 21-22; Galna, Nasik, xii. 124; 
Gaorara, Chanda, viii. 59 ; Western 
Ghats, xii. 218 ; Gondrani, Baluchi- 
stan, vi. 2S3, xvi. 146; Guntupalli, 
Kistna, ii. 163, xii. 388 ; Haibak, 
Afghan-Turkistan, v. 44 ; Harischan- 
dragarh, Ahmadnagar, xiii. 56; Hazari- 
bagh, xiii. 89, xviii. 26 ; Hindu Kush, 
xiii. 1 38; Hoshangabad, xiii. 182; Hy- 
derabad, xiii. 243 ; near Idar, Mahl 
Kantha, xiii. 327-32S; Jogeshvari, 
Thana, xiv, 200 ; Jogighopa, Assam, 
xiv. 201 ; Junagarh, Kathiawar, ii. 
164, xiv. 238 ; Junnar, Poona, xiv. 
240; Agashiv, Kale, Satara, xiv. 306; 
Kalinjar, Banda, xiv. 312; Kalugu- 
malai, Tinnevelly, xiv. 321 ; Kanheri, 
Thiina, ii. 162-163, x''^'- 399! Karad, 
Satara, XV. 19-20; Karanja, Kolaba, 
XV. 23; Karli, Poona, ii. 163, 
163, XV. 44-47 ; Khandgiri, Orissa, 
XV. 240; Khed, Ratnagiri, xv. 267; 
Khatama, Hoshangabad, xiii. 182 ; 
Kondane, Kolaba, ii. 162, xv. 392 ; 



INDEX 



log 



Kuda, Kolaba, xvi. lo ; Lalpahar, near 
Bharhut, Central India, xviii. 302 ; 
Lomas Rishi, Bihar, ii. 162 ; Lonad, ii. 
164; Magathan, Thana, xvi. 410; 
Pale and Kol, near Mahad, Kolaba, xvi. 
429 ; Mahudi Hill, Hazaribagh, xiii. 
89, xviii. 26 ; Pando Lena, near Mahur, 
xxiii. 41 ; Mamallapuram, see Seven 
Pagodas ; Mamandur, North Arcot, 
xvii. 105-106 ; of the Hngetpjattaung 
kyaung nzdx East Nyaungu, Myingyan, 
Burma, xviii. 124; Nagaur, Rajputana, 
xviii. 298-299; Nasik, ii. 162, xviii. 
411-412 ; Orissa, ii. 164-165 ; Osman- 
abad, Hyderabad, xix. 276 ; Pach- 
marhl, Hoshangabad, xix. 307; Pan- 
davgarh, Satara, xix. 389 ; Parasar, 
Panhala, Kolhapur,xix. 397 ; Bateswar, 
Patharghata, Bhagalpur, xx. 29 ; Patur, 
Berar, xx. 76; Pitalkhora, ii. 112, xix. 
317; Poona, XX. 184; Ramandrng, 
Bellary, xxi. 171 ; Ramgarh Hill, Cen- 
tral Provinces, xxi. 176; Satara, xxii. 
120 ; Rishi, Seringapatam, Mysore, 
xxii. 179; Seven Pagodas, Chingleput, 
ii. 123, 163, 171, 172, xxii. i8j^, 185; 
Gupteswar, near Shergarh, Shahabad, 
xxii. 272 ; Shetrunja hill, Kathiawar, 
xix. 362; Shivner, Poona, xxii. 294; 
Takht-i-Rustam, Afghanistan, v. 45, 
68; Udayagiri, Orissa, ii. 112, 164, 
xxiv. 108, 109 ; Undavalle, Kistna, 
xxiv. 130, 131 ; Vidyadharapuram, ii. 
163 ; Wai, Satara, xxiv. 348. 
Cawnpore, District in United Provinces, 
ix. 306-314 ; physical aspects, 306- 
308; history and antiquities, 308-309; 
population, 309-310 ; agriculture, 310- 

311 ; trade and communications, 311- 

312 ; famine, 312 ; administration, 312- 
314; education, 314; medical, 314; 
cotton cultivation, iii. 44. 

Cawnpore, tahsil'wi United Provinces, ix. 

314-315- . 
Cawnpore, city in United Provinces, with 
large industries and commerce, ix. 315- 
320; description, 315; history, 315- 
317; administration, 317-318; com- 
merce, 318; industries, 318-319; educa- 
tion, 319-320. 

Other references: Mutiny narrative 

(1857). i'- 512, ix. 308, 309, 315-317 ; 

manufactures, iii. 190, 213, 214; water- 
supply, iv. 473. 

Ceded and Conquered Provinces, tract of 
country in Northern India acquired by 
British in 1801 and 1803, and now 
forming part of United Provinces, ix. 
320. 

Ceded Districts, term applied to the 
territory in the Deccan ceded to the 
British by the Nizam (1800), ix. 320. 

Cement works, iii. 245 ; in Howrah, xiii. 



210; Madras Presidency, xvi. 296, 
375 ; Sankrail, Howrah, xxii. 60. 

Cemeteries, at Adichanallur fprehistoric), 
ii. 97, V. 21, 22 ; Ami (European), vi. 
4 ; Barh, Patna (European), vii. 15 ; 
Convent of St. John of God, Diu, xi. 
363 ; Gooty, Anantapur (European), xii. 
328; Gwalior Fort, Central India (Eu- 
ropean\ xii. 442 ; Hyderabad city, 
(Muhammadan) xiii. 309, (European) 
310, 311 ; Kedgeree, Midnapore (Euro- 
pean\ xv. 196 ; Khushbagh, near Mur- 
shidabad (Muhammadan), xviii. 57- 
58 ; Kumarkhali, Nadia (European), 
xvi. 18 ; Mashalli (prehistoric), ii. 
95 ; near Mehidpur (European), \\\\. 
270; near Mirzapur (prehistoric), ii. 
95; Multan (European), xviii. 37; 
Narwar, Central India (Roman Catho- 
lic), xviii. 397 ; Pallavaram, Chingleput 
(prehistoric), ii. 95-96; Poona (Euro- 
pean), XX. 184; Pulicat, Chingleput 
(Dutch), XX. 242; Sehwan, Sind (Euro- 
pean), xxii. 163 ; Shikarpur, Sind (Euro- 
pean), xxii. 276; Tuticorin, Tinnevelly 
(Dutch), xxiv. 65. 

Cenotaphs. See Tombs, Mausoleums, and 
Cenotaphs. 

Central Criminal Intelligence department, 
formerly Thagi and Dakaiti depart- 
ment, iv. 395. 

Central Division (Bombay), from Sat- 
puras to Bhlma river, ix. 320-321. 

Central Division (Southern Shan States), 
Burma, ix. 321-322. 

Central India, group of Native States 
under Agent to Governor-General, ix. 
322-392; physical aspects, 322-334; 
hill system, 323; river system, 323; 
scenery, 324 ; geology, 325-331 ; 
botany, 331; fauna, 331-332 ; meteor- 
ology, 332-334; history, 334-344; 
antiquarian remains, 344-346 ; modern 
buildings, 347; population, 347-357; 
languages, 350-352 ; castes, &c., 352 ; 
religions, 353, 354 ; occupations, 355 ; 
food, dress, and dwellings, 355-356 ; 
amusements, &c., 357; nomenclature, 
357 ; agriculture, 357-363 ; cattle, 363 ; 
irrigation, 363; rents, wages, and prices, 
364-365 ; forests, 365-366 ; mines and 
minerals, 366-367 ; arts and manufac- 
tures, 367-368 ; commerce and trade, 
368-369 ; communications, 369-373 ; 
railways, 369, 371 ; roads, 371, 372 ; 
post and telegraphs, 373 ; famine, 373- 
375 ; administration, 375-377 ; legisla- 
tion and justice, 377-378; finance, 378- 
379 ; land revenue, 379-381 ; miscel- 
laneous revenue, 381-382 ; local and 
municipal, 383 ; public works, 383 ; 
army, 383-384 ; police and jails, 384- 
385; education, 385-386; medical. 



no 



INDEX 



386-387 ; sun-eys, 3S7-388 ; tables : 
population, 389; agricultural statistics, 
390 ; revenue statistics, 391 ; educa- 
tion statistics, 391 ; medical statistics, 

392. 

Other references : Physical aspects, 

i. 35-36; cold season, i. 113-115; 

meteorology', i. 117, 122, 124, 130, 132, 

136, 137. 140. 141. 142, 148, 150, 153 ; 

botany, i. 190; zoology, i. 235, 261; 
ethnology, i. 296 ; languages, i. 379 ; 
Jainism, i. 415; area and population, 
i. 450 ; population and density, i. 
454; Hinduism, i, 472; Animism, i. 
472 ; deaths from plague, i. 525 ; 
agriculture, iii. 15, 24, 25 ; wheat culti- 
vation, iii. 30; buffaloes, iii. 82 ; forests, 
iii. 103 ; manganese ore, iii. 146 ; 
dyeing, iii. 186 ; arts and manufactures, 
iii. 186, 187, 202, 216, 230; trade 
statistics, iii. 314, 315; irrigation, iii. 
348; historical sketch, iv. 65-66; 
Imperial Service troops, iv. 87; dis- 
tribution of States, with particulars as 
to area, population, revenue, &c., iv. 
93; land revenue, iv. 228; ThagI and 
Dakaiti department, now Central 
Criminal Intelligence department, iv. 
395 ; education, iv. 416. 

Central India Horse, iv. 354. 

Central India Railway. See Bombay, 
Baroda, and Central India Railway. 

Central Provinces, Chief Commissioner- 
ship, x. 1-114; physical aspects, i-il ; 
hill system, 1-3 ; riversystem, 3 ; scenery, 
4 ; geology, 5-7 ; botany, 7-8 ; fauna, 
8-10; meteorology, lo-ii; history, 
ii-iS; antiquities, 18-19; population, 
19-32; castes and languages, 24-25; 
religions, 26-28; occupations, 28; food, 
dress, and dwellings, 28-30 ; amuse- 
ments, 31 ; nomenclature, 32 ; agricul- 
ture, 32-43 ; irrigation, 39-40 ; cattle, 
40-42 ; rents, wages, and prices, 43-47; 
forests, 47-50 ; mines and minerals, 
50-52 ; arts and manufactures, 52-54 ; 
commerce and trade, 53-58 ; communi- 
cations, 58-61 ; railways, 58-59 ; roads, 
60; postal, 61; famine, 61-64; 
administration, 64-67; legislation and 
justice, 67-70; finance, 70-72; land 
revenue, 72-80 ; miscellaneous revenue, 
80-84 ; local and municipal, 84-86 ; 
public works, 87-88; army, 88 ; police 
and jails, 88-91; education, 91-96; 
medical, 96-98; surveys, 98-99; 
bibliography, 99. Tables: meteorology, 
100; population, loi, 102; agricul- 
ture, 103, 104; trade, 105 ; postal, 106 ; 
civil justice,io6 ; criminal justice, 107 ; 
revenue, 107; expenditure, 108-110; 
police. III; jails, 112; educational, 
113; medical, 114. 



Oiker references: Physical aspects, 
i- 36-37 ; Meteorological Department 
started (1868), i. 106 ; meteorology, i. 
112, 113-115, ii6«., 117, 124, 130, 132, 
141, I46; botany, i, 190; zoology, i. 
218, 248; ethnology, i. 290, 296; 
languages, i. 367, 370, 373, 374, 376, 
383) 394; a-rea and population, i. 450 ; 
population and density, i. 453; growth 
of population, i. 464 ; Animism, i. 
472; Hinduism, i. 472; age statis- 
tics, i. 478 ; birth-rate statistics, i. 506, 
510, 511; mortality statistics, i. 512, 
51?) 519. 522, 525. .531; agriculture, 
iii. 3, 12, 24, 97, 100; cultivation of 
rice, iii. 26,28; wheat, iii. 30 ; millet, 
iii. 32 ; cotton, iii. 44, 45 ; linseed, 
iii. 37 ; oilseeds, iii. 38 ; number of 
live stock and of ploughs and carts 
(1903-4), iii. loi ; forest law, iii. no, 
I20-I2I ; manganese ore, iii. 146, 147 ; 
minerals, iii. 147 ; dl cultivation, iii. 
183-184; dyeing, iii. 1S6; arts and 
manufactures, iii. 190, 199-200, 203, 
230 ; factory statistics, iii. 247 ; trade, 
iii. 305; trade statistics, iii. 314, 315; 
irrigation, iii. 323, 324, 325, 344, 346; 
postal and savings bank transactions 
(1903-4), iii. 428, 435 ; prices, iii. 458 ; 
wages, iii. 469, 470, 472, 473, 474; 
famine, iii. 488-4S9, 490-491, 491- 
493; rents, iii. 449-450, 451, 453; 
administration, iv. 29, 54-56 ; Court 
of Wards, iv. 50 «. ; Native States, 
iv. 67 ; statistics of Native States, 
iv. 102; revenue, iv. 170, 173, 192; 
land revenue, iv. 207, 210, 211-212, 
216, 217, 218, 222, 225, 226-227, 228, 
230, 239; opium trade, iv. '246 ; in- 
toxicating liquors, iv. 255, 257, 258 ; 
distilleries, iv. 256 ; hemp drugs, iv. 
260, 261 ; pandhari tax (abolished, 
1902-3), iv. 266 ; income tax, iv. 270; 
land cess, iv. 271, 273; municipal 
government, iv. 286, 287, 291 ; local 
government, iv. 300, 303, 304 ; educa- 
tion, iv. 416, 421-422,440; medical, 
iv. 462, 477-47S; sanitation, iv. 469, 
470 ; surveys, iv. 495-496, 502. 

Ceratites, Salt Range, xxi. 413. 

Cereal crops. See each Province, District, 
and larger State article under Agricul- 
ture, also particular crops. 

Ceylon, physical aspects, i. 47-49 ; moun- 
tains, i. 47 ; rivers, i. 48 ; peat bogs, i. 
189; botany, i. 193-196; zoology, i. 
215, 216, 217, 220, 221, 223, 227, 22S, 
229, 230, 231, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240, 
241, 243, 246, 24S, 249, 250, 251, 252, 
256,257, 258, 260, 262, 263, 264, 266, 
269, 272, 273, 274; language, i. 380; 
Buddhism, i. 411; immigration to, i. 
46SJ relations of war and peace with 






INDEX 



III 



the Pandyas and Cholas, ii. 331-333, 

340; tea industry, iii. 57. 
Chabharia, petty State in Kalhiavvar. See 

Samadhiala. 
Chabua, village in Lakhimpur District, 

Assam, x. 115. 
Chabutra of Jarasandhaat Giriak, Patna, 

xii. 246. 
Chach, plain in Attock, Punjab, x. 115. 
Chach, Rai, of Sind, conquest of Makran, 

Baluchistan, xvii. 46; throne of Multan 

usurped (631-671), xviii. 24-25, 35; 

minister in Sind, xxii. 394. 
Chachana, petty State in Kathiawar, 

Bombay, x. 115, xv. 168. 
Chachars, tribe in Upper Sind Frontier 

District, xxiv. 280. 
Chach-Hazara, ancient name of Chach, 

Punjab, X. 115. 
Chachik of Jaisalmer, Rawal, battle with 

Langah princes at Dunyapur, Punjab 

(beginning of sixteenth century), xi. 386. 
Chachro, idluka in Thar and Parkar 

District, Sind, x. 115. 
Chadarghat, suburb of Hyderabad city, 

Hyderabad, x. 11 5-1 16. 
C/z(?(/ia:rj-, manufacture of, iii. 217-218. See 

also Shawls. 
Chadchat, petty State in Palanpur Agency, 

Bombay, x. 116, xix. 346. 
Chagai, District in Baluchistan, x. 116- 

120; physical aspects, 116; history, 

117; population, 117; agriculture, 118; 

famine, 119; trade and communications, 

118-119; administration, 1 19-120. 
Chagai, sxih-tahsU \n Baluchistan, x. 120. 
Chagai and Ras Koh Hills, Baluchistan, 

x. 120-121. 
Chagatais, visit to Makran (i223),vi. 275. 

See also Mongols. 
Chahada Deva, Narwar fort surrendered 

to Nasir-ud-din by (1251), xviii. 397. 
Chnhal Situn, palace at Ghazlpur, xii, 

230. 
Chahar Aimaks, race in Afghanistan, v. 

47 ; Herat, xiii. 113. 
Chahngs, local name of Ghirths in 

Hoshiarpur, xiii. 196. 
Chaibasa, head-quarters of Singhbhum 

District, Bengal, x. 121. 
Chail, sanitarium and summer residence 

of Maharaja of Patiala, near Simla, 

x. 121. 
Chain Singh, Phulkian chief, assassinated 

by his cousin (seventeenth century), xx. 

1.^3- 
Chain Singh, Raja, capital moved to 

Nagod from Unchahra (1720), xviii. 

301. 
Chain Singh, rule in Narsinghgarh (1819- 

24), xviii. 3S3. 
Chainpur, village in Shahabad District, 

Bengal, x. 121. 



Chains, aboriginal tribe, in Malda, xvii. 
78; Murshidabad, xviii. 48. 

Chairs. See Furniture. 

Chaitanya, Vaishnav preacher of bhakti, 
in Bengal (1485-1527), i. 426; shrine 
at Dhakadakshin, Sylhet, xi. 282 ; life 
at Katwa, Bnrdwan, xv. 190; visit to 
Khetur, Rajshahi, xv. 277 ; born at 
Nabadwip, Nadia, xviii. 262 ; sect of, 
xviii. 276. 

Chaitra Sankranti, festival held at Tara- 
keswar, Hooghly District, xxiii. 249. 

Chaityas, Buddhist halls or churches, ii. 
161-164 ; at Dhamnar, Central India, 
xi. 283 ; SanchI, Central India, ix. 345, 
xxii. 28. 

Chaj (Jech) Doab, in Punjab, between 
the Chenab and Jhelum, x. 1 21-122. 

Chakalas, or washermen, in Warangal, 
Hyderabad, xxiv. 360. 

Chakan, village in Poona District, Bom- 
bay, with old fort, x. 122. 

Chakansur, ruined city in Afghanistan, 

^'- 45- 

Chakar, Mir, conflict with Gwahram 
Lashari, celebrated in Baloch ballads, 
vi. 276, xiv. 249. 

Chakcharan, administrative division of 
Herat province, Afghanistan, xiii. 113. 

Chakdaha, town in Nadia District, Ben- 
gal, X. 122. 

Chakdarra, military post, North-West 
Frontier Province, x. 122. 

Chaki Raja, Rashtrakuta viceroy (813), 
xviii. 171. 

Chakia, iahstl in Mirzapur District, 
United Provinces, x. 122-123. 

Chakki -no- Aro ('Grindstone Bank'), 
place of pilgrimage in Panch Mahals, 
Bombay, x. 123. 

Chakkiliyans, leather-workers in Ma- 
dras, i. 331 ; South Arcot, v. 426 ; Coim- 
batore, x. 361 ; Trichinopoly, xxiv. 

31- 
Chakks, driven from Kashmir by Zain- 

ul-abidin, xv. 93. 
Chakia Roshnabad, estate of Raja of Hill 

Tippera in Tippera District, Eastern 

Bengal, x. 124. 
Chaklasi,town in Kaira District, Bombay, 

x. 124. 
Chakma, administrative circle in Chitta- 

gong Hill Tracts, Eastern Bengal, x. 

124-125. 
Chakma, aboriginal tribe, in Chitta- 

gong Division, Eastern Bengal, in 

Chakma, X. 124-125 ; Chittagong Hill 

Tracts, x. 320; Hill Tippera, xiii. 120. 
Chakma, debased dialect of Bengali 

spoken in Chittagong Hill Tracts, i. 

.377- 
Ckakmukhi, nodules of flint, found in 
Mysore, xviii. 357. 



112 



INDEX 



Chakradhara, Manbhan sect founded by, 
xxi. 302. 

Chakradharpnr, village in Singhbhflm 
District, Bengal, X. 125. 

Chakradhwaj, rule in Jalpaiguri, xiv. 32 ; 
Rangpur, xxi. 224. 

Chakrata, tahsil in Dehra Dun District, 
United Provinces, x. 125. 

Chakrata, cantonment in Dehra Dun Dis- 
trict, United Provinces, x. 125-126; 
meteorology, i. 151, 155. 

Chaksu,/a^if/ in Rajpntana. See Chatsu. 

Chakwal, tahsil in Jhelum District, Pun- 
jab, X. 126. 

Chakwal, town in Jhelum District, Pun- 
jab, X. 126. 

Chalan Bil, lake in Eastern Bengal, x. 
126-127. 

Chalisgaon, tdluka in East Khandesh 
District, Bombay, x. 127. 

Chalisgaon, town in East Khandesh Dis- 
trict, Bombay, x. 127. 

Chalk Hills, in Salem District, Madras, 
i. 89, X. 127. 

Challakere, taluk in Chitaldroog District, 
Mysore, x. 1 27-1 28. 

Chalmers, General Sir John, Coimbatore 
defended by (1791), x. 371. 

Chalt fort, Hunza-Nagar, Kashmir, xiii. 
225. 

Chalukyas, dynasty of Southern India, 
from fifth century, ii. 327-330; the 
Eastern or younger branch, at Vengi 
(615-960), 328-334 ; coalition with the 
Cholas (1070), 334-335 ; finally con- 
quered by the Ganpatis of Andhra 
(1300), 382 ; the Western or senior 
branch, at Badami and Kalyan (615- 
760), 328-329; overthrown by the 
Rashtrakutas, whom two centuries later 
they in their turn overwhelmed, 333 ; 
revival of their prosperity (960-1160), 
335-338 ; finally overthrown by the 
Yadavas and Hoysalas (1192^ 339; 
records of, ii. 13; sculpture of, 123; 
coins, 150-152 ; architecture, 174- 
177. 

Local notices : Anantapur, v. 350 ; 
Aurangabad, Hyderabad, vi. 142 ; Ba- 
dami, Bijapur, vi. 177; Belgami, My- 
sore, vii. 145; Belgaum, vii. 147; Bel- 
lary, vii. 161 ; Bemmattanakallu, My- 
sore, X. 297; Berar, vii. 366; BhTr, 
Hyderabad, viii. 112, 117; Bombay 
Presidency, viii. 402, 403; Carnatic,ix. 
301 ; Chitaldroog, Mysore, x. 291 ; 
Deccan, viii. 280, 282, 283 ; xi. 207, 
xiv. 182; Dharwar, xi. 305 ; Gadag, 
Dharwar, xii. 119 ; Ganjam, xii. 145 ; 
Godavari, xii. 284; Hyderabad, xiii. 
235; Kanara, xiv. 343; South Kanara, 
xiv. 356; Khandesh, xv. 22S; Kistna, 
XV. 321 ; Kolaba, xv. 357 ; Konkan, xv. 



395 ; Kumool, xvi. 33 ; Madras Presi- 
dency, xvi. 248 ; Mysore, xviii. 170-172; 
Nasik, xviii. 400; Poona (850-760, 
973-1 1 84), XX. 168; Rajahmundry, xxi. 
64; Ratnagiri, xxi. 247 ; Satara, xxii. 
118 ; Savantvadi, xxii. 151 ; Seven Pago- 
das, xxii. 182 ; Shimoga, Mysore, xxii. 
283-284; Sholapur, xxii. 296-297; 
Southern Maratha Country, xxiii. 91 ; 
Thana, xxiii. 292; Vengi, xxiv. 306; 
Vizagapatam, xxiv. 325. 

Chalvadis, caste, in Dharwar, xi. 308. 

Chalybeate waters, BIdar, Hyderabad, 
viii. 164. 

Chama, grown in Malabar, xvii. 62. 

Chama Raja IH, of Mysore (1513-52), 
partition of dominions between sons, 
xviii. 178. 

Chama Raja IV, of Mysore (1552), 
xviii. 178. 

Chama Raja VI, of Mysore {c. 1630), 
xviii. 178. 

Chama Raja, sent to Kabbaldurga with 
his wife (1734), xiv. 241. 

Chama Rajendra Wodeyar, Maharaja of 
Mysore (1881-1894), xviii. 185-1S6. 

Chaman, subdivision in Quetta-Pishin 
District, Baluchistan, x. 128. 

Chaman, cantonment and railway termi- 
nus, in Qnetta-Pishln District, Balu- 
chistan, X. 128-129. 

Chamarajesvara temple, Chamrajnagar, 
Mysore, x. 148. 

Chamardi, petty State in Kathiawar, 
Bombay, x. 129, xv. 165. 

Chamargonda, town in Bombay. See 
Shrigonda. 

Chamarlakota, town in Madras. See 
Samalkot. 

Chamars, leather-workers and shoe- 
makers, in Northern India, i. 32S, 331 ; 
total number, i. 498. 

Local notices : Agra, v. 77 ; Ah- 
madnagar, v. 115; Ajaigarh, v. 131 ; 
Allgarh, Rajpulana, v. 208 ; Allgarh 
District, v. 212 ; Allahabad, v. 231 ; 
Alwar, V. 260; Arabala, v, 280; Assam, 
vi. 157 ; Atraf-i-balda, Hyderabad, 
vi. 127; Bahraich, vi. 208; Ballia, 
vi. 252 ; Banda, vi. 350 ; Bara Bank!, 
vi. 420 ; Bareilly, vii. 6 ; BastT, vii. 127; 
Benares, vii. 182; Bengal, vii. 233; 
Bhagalpur, viii. 30 ; Bliaratpur, viii. 
79; Bhir, Hyderabad, viii. 1 13 ; Bbo- 
pal, viii. 133; Bijapur Agency, viii. 
174; Bijnor, viii. 196; Bikaner, viii. 
209; Bilaspur, viii. 226; Bombay Presi- 
dency, viii. 303, 305 ; Bndaun, ix. 37 ; 
Bondi, ix. S3; Cachar, ix. 252 ; Calcutta, 
ix. 268 ; Cawnpore, ix. 309 ; Central 
Provinces, x. 26; Chamba State, x. 131 ; 
Champaran, X. 140; Charkhaii State, 
X. 178; Chhabra, Central India, x. 195; 



INDEX 



113 



Chhatarpur State, x. 200 ; Damoh, xi. 
138 ; Darbhanga, xi. 155 ; Datia State, 
xi. 197; Dehra Dun, xi. 215; Delhi, xi. 
226; Dliolpur State, xi. 325; Etah, xii. 
32 ; Etawah, xii. 42 ; Farrukhabad, xii. 
67 ; Fatehpur, xii. 78 ; Ferozepore, xii. 
92; Fyzabad, xii. 112; Gaya, xii. 200; 
GhazTpiir.xii. 225; Gorakhpur,xii. 335 ; 
Gurdaspnr, xii. 396 ; Gwalior, xii. 428 ; 
Hamlrpur, xiii. 16; Hardol, xiii. 45; 
Hazaribagh, xiii. 90, 94 ; Hissar, xiii. 
149; Hoshangabad,xiii. 183; Hoshiar- 
pur, xiii. 197 ; Indore,xiii. 341 ; Indur, 
Hyderabad, xiii. 353 ; Jaipur, xiii. 389 ; 
Jaisalmer, xiv. 4 ; Jalaun, xiv. 21 ; Jaora 
State, xiv. 64 ; jaunpur, xiv. 77 ; Jhala- 
war State, xiv, iiS; Jhang, xiv. 128 
Jhansi, xiv. 140; JuUundur, xiv. 226 
Kail a, xiv. 279; Kangra, xiv. 389 
Kapurthala State, xiv. 410 ; Karauli 
State, XV. 28; Karnal,xv.52; Kawardha 
State, XV. 193 ; Khiairagarh State, 
XV. 208 ; Khandesh, xv. 231 ; KherT, xv. 
271; Khilchipur State, XV. 278 ; Kotah 
State, XV. 416; Lingsugur, Hyder- 
abad, xvi. 164; Lucknovv, xvi. 183; 
Ludhiana, xvi. 203 ; Mahbubnagar, 
Hyderabad, xvii. 3; Mahl Kantlia, 
xvii. 17; MainpurT, xvii. 35; Mandl 
State, xvii. 155; Meerut, xvii. 257; 
Mirzapur, xvii. 370 ; Mongiiyr, xA-ii. 
395; Montgomery, xvii. 413; Morad- 
abad, xvii. 424 ; Muttra, xviii. 66 ; 
Muzaffarpur, xviii. 98 ; Nainl Tal, 
xviii. 326 ; Nandgaon State, xviii. 357 ; 
Narsinghgarh State, xviii. 383 ; Nar- 
singhpur, xviii. 389; Nimbahera, xix. 
119; Orchha State, xix. 245; Osman- 
abad, Hyderabad, xix. 271 ; Oudh, xix. 
287; Palanpur Agency, xix. 349; Panna 
State, xix. 402 ; Patiala State, xx. 41 ; 
Patna, xx. 59 ; Partabgarh State, xx. 1 1 ; 
Partabgarh District, xx. 17; Pilibhit, 
XX. 139; Pirawar, XX. 151; Poena, xx. 
171 ; Rae Barell, xxi. 28 ; Raipur, xxi. 
52; Rajgarh State, xxi. 69 ; Rajputana, 
xxi. 112; Ramgarh, xxi. 177; Rampur 
State, xxi. 1S4; Ratnagiri, xxi. 250; 
Rewah State, xxi. 284; Rohtak, xxi. 
314; Saharanpur, xxi. 372; Samthar 
State, xxii. 24 ; Saran, xxii. 87 ; 
Satara, xxii. 12 1 ; Shahabad, xxii. 
190; Shahjahanpur, xxii. 204 ; Shola- 
pur, xxii. 298; Sironj, Central India, 
xxiii. 38; Sitapur, xxiii. 56 ; Sultanpur, 
xxiii. 133 ; Tonk State, xxiii. 410, 416 ; 
Unao, xxiv. 125; United Provinces, 
xxiv. 170. 

Chamarwa, Brahman sect, in Hissar, xiii. 
149. 

Chamba, State in Punjab, x. 129-133; 
physical aspects, 129-130; history, 
130; population, 1 30-1 31; agriculture, 

VOL. XXV. 



131 ; trade and communications, 132 ; 
administration, 132-133. 

Other references : Brass images, ii. 
26 ; postal arrangements, iii. 424 ; area, 
population, revenue, and administra- 
tion, iv. 100. 

Chamba, capital of State in Punjab, with 
ancient temples, x. 133-134. 

Chambal, river in Central India, x. 134- 

135. 

Chamberlain, John, visited Delhi (1814), 
xi. 227. 

Chamberlain, Sir Neville, column under, 
occupied Ambela Pass (1863), v. 290 ; 
besieged at Chichawatni (1857), xvii. 
411 ; first military adviser in Kashmir, 
XV. 140 ; Kurram valley entered by, 
(1856), xvi. 56; mission to Sher AH, 
Amir of Afghanistan, repelled at All 
Masjid in the Khyber Pass (1878), xv. 
302 ; expeditions against Rabia Khel 
Orakzais (1855), xix. 208 ; Turis 
(1856), xix. 208; Hindustani Fanatics 
(1863), .xix. 209; Kabul Khel Wazirs 
(1859-60), xix. 209; Mahsuds (i860), 
xix. 209, xxiv. 382 ; Miranzai (1855), 
xix. 208. 

Chambers of Commerce, establishment 
of, iii. 267-268. 

Chambhar caves, atNasik, xviii. 411,412. 

Chambiall, language spoken in Chamba 
State, X. 130. 

Chamkannis, tribe in Kurram Agency, 
xvi. 51. 

Chamlawal, expedition against (1897), 
xix. 210. 

Chammak, inscription, ii. 59, 

Champa Gate, bridge across the Musi, 
Hyderabad city, xiii. 308. 

Champakasarasu,pond at Sivachara math, 
Anantapur, v. 350. 

Champamati, tributary of the Brahma- 
putra, Assam, x. 135. 

Champaner, ruined city in Panch Mahals, 
Bombay, .x. 135-136. 

Champaran, District in Bengal, x. 136- 
147; physical aspects, 1 37-1 38; history, 
138-^39; population, 139-141 ; agri- 
culture, 141-142 ; minerals, 142-143 ; 
trade and communications, 143-144; 
famine, 144; administration, 144-147 ; 
education, 146 ; medical, 146-147 ; 
Roman Catholic Mission, i. 444, x. 

Champas, division of the Ladakhis, xvi. 

Champat Rai, Bnndela chief, ix. 71, xiv. 

137, xix. 400. 
Champawat, tahsll in Almora District, 

United Provinces, x. 147. 
Champawat, tribe in Jodhpur, xiv. 189. 
Champraj, Jetpur, Kathiawar, conquered 

from, by Shams Khan, xiv. loi. 



114 



INDEX 



Chamrajnagar, tdhik in Mysore District, 
Mysore State, x. 147. 

Chamrajnagar, town in Mysore District, 
Mysore State, x. 147-148. 

Chamund, king of Anliilvada, legend of 
visit to Suklatirtha, xxiii. 129. 

Chamnnda, goddess, temple on Sunda 
hill, Rajputana, viii. 111-112. 

Chamunda Pahar, hill in Dewas, Central 
India, xi. 281. 

Chamunda Raya, minister and general 
to Ganga king Rachamalla, xxiii. 97 ; 
image erected at Sravana Belgola 
(983>, xiii. 63, 64, xviii. 186. 

Chanakya, king of Ujjain, legend of, xxiii. 
128. 

Chanasma, town in Baroda, with Jain 
temple, x. 148. 

Chand, Pandit I3!wa.n, school of, at Shah- 
pnr, xxii. 221, 222. 

Chand dynasty in Almora, v. 245, 252; 
attempt to take Garhwal (seventeenth 
century), xii. 166 ; rule in Naini Tal, 
xviii. 324, 325. 

Chand BardaT, author of the Pnthirdj 
Rdsait, a bardic chronicle of Rajput 
chivalry (twelfth century), ii. 427 ; 
Khajraho called Khajurapura by, xv. 
217 ; Pavagarh referred to by, xx. So. 

Chand Bibl, queen and regent of Bijapur, 
ii. 386, vii. 368 ; defended Ahmad- 
nagar against Akbar's army (1596), 
ii. 388. 

Local notices : Bahadur Shah placed 
on throne of Ahmadnagar under in- 
fluence of, V. 124; management of 
affairs in Bijapur, viii. 187 ; murdered 
(1600), vi. 143; Sholapur given to 
Bijapur as dowry of (1562), xxii. 306. 

Chand Minar, pillar at Daulatabad, 
Hyderabad, xi. 201. 

Chand Rai, Bara Bhuiya,rulein Farldpur, 

xii- 54-55- 
Chand Sultan, of Deogarh, capital moved 

to Nagpur, x. 206, xviii. 306 ; death 

(1739), X. 15. 
Chanda, District in Central Provinces, 

X. 148-160; physical aspects, 1 48- 150; 

history, 1 50-1 51 ; population, 152- 

153; agriculture, 153-155 ; forests, 

I56"i56 ; minerals, 156; trade and 

communications, 1 56-T 58; famine, 158; 

administration, 158-160 ; education, 

160 ; medical, 160. 

Other references : Barvvaik sect of 

Kajputs in, i. 320-321 ; minerals, iii. 

145 ; arts and manufactures, iii. 190, 

191. 
Chanda, iahsil in Central Provinces, x. 

160. 
Chanda, town in Central Provinces, with 

old walls, temples, and images, x, 161- 

162. 



Chanda dynasty, in Central Provinces, x. 
1 3 ; device of, discovered at Gawilgarh, 
X. 150. 

Chanda Husain, Pir, tomb at Gugi, Hy- 
derabad, xvi. 163. 

Chanda Sahib, Nawab of the Camatic, 
defeated and killed Anwar-ud-din at 
Ambur (1749), v. 406 ; occupied Din- 
digul, xi. 357; grant of Karikal to 
the French obtained through (1739), 
XV. 40 ; Karur besieged (1736), xv.63 ; 
Madura obtained by, xvi. 390 ; Tanjore 
besieged (1749), xxiii. 242 ; Trichino- 
poly besieged, xxiv. 28 ; tomb at Trichi- 
nopoly, xxiv. 47. 

Chandadanda, defeat of Pallavas under 
(fifth century), ii. 336. 

Chanda - kausika, Sanskrit drama, by 
Kshemlsvara (tenth century), ii. 249. 

Chandal, son of a Brahman woman by a 
Sudra, i. 333. 

Chandals or Namasiidras, aboriginal caste 
of Eastern Bengal, i. 328 ; in Backer- 
gunge, vi. 168; Bengal, vii. 233; Cachar, 
is. 252 ; Dacca, xi. 102, 107 ; Farld- 
pur, xii. 56 ; Khulna, xv. 388 ; My- 
mensingh, xviii. 153 ; Nadia, xviii. 
276; Noakhali, xix. 131; Pabna, xix. 
299-300 ; Presidency Division, xx. 
218; Rajshahi, xxi. 164; Sundarbans, 
xxiii. 142 ; Sylhet, xxiii. 193 ; Tippera, 
xxiii. 383. 

Chandan Raja, Baroda said to have been 
taken from Jains by, vii. 25. 

Chandanavati, ancient name of Baroda, 
vii. 25. 

Chandap, petty State in Mahi Kantha, 
Bombay, x. 162, xvii. 14. 

Chandarnagar, French settlement near 
Calcutta. See Chandernagore. 

Chandaull, tahstl in Benares District, 
United Provinces, x. 162. 

ChandausT, town in Moradabad District, 
United Provinces, important trading 
centre, x. 162-163. 

Chandbali, port in Balasore District, 
Bengal, x. 163. 

Chandels, Rajput clan, temples of, ii. 
124, 179-1S0, 312 ; coins, ii. 142. 

Local notices: Banda, vi. 348; 
Central India, ix. 338 ; Central Pro- 
vinces, x. 12 ; ChanderT, Central India, 
x. 164; Chandpur, Jhansi, x. 168; 
Chhatarpur, x. 199-200; Damoh, xi. 
136; Gyaraspur, Central India, xiii. 
i; Hamirpur, xiii. 13; Jhansi, xiv. 
137; Kalinjar, ii. 312, xiv. 311 ; 
Madanpur, Jhansi, xvi. 227 ; Mungaoli, 
Central India, xviii. 40. 

ChanderT, town and historic fort in 
Central India, with industry' of muslins, 
x. 163-164; manufactures, iii. 202, 
211. 



INDEX 



"5 



Chandernagore, French settlement on 
the Hooghly, above Calcutta, founded 
(c. i6S8), captured by Clive (1757), 
finally restored to the French (1816), 
X. 164-165. 

Chandi Amma, bronze female figure at 
Yan, North Kanara, xxiv. 413. 

Chandi Das, Bengali poet (fifteenth 
century), ii. 424. 

Chandi Pahar, hill near Hardwar, Saha- 
ranpnr, xiii. 52. 

Chandias, tribe in Sind, xxii. 407 ; Hyder- 
abad, xiii. 315 ; Khairpur, xv. 212 ; 
Larkana, xvi. 139; Sukkur, xxiii. 122; 
Upper Sind Frontier District, xxiv. 280. 

Chandikabai, temple, at Dabhol, Ratna- 
giri, xi. loi, xxi. 248. 

ChandTpur, village in Balasore District, 
Bengal, x. 165. 

Chandi3'ana, governor of fortress, death 
commemorated by an inscription, ii, 

Chandkhali, tributary of the Sangu, 
Eastern Bengal, xxii. 56. 

Chandney Hospital, Calcutta, ix. 2S5. 

Chandod, sacred village on the Narbada, 
in Rewa Kantha, Bombay, x. 165-166. 

Chdndogya Upanishad, the, ii. 232. 

Chandola, tank at Ahmadabad, v. 108. 

Chandor, tdluka in Nasik District, Bom- 
bay, X. 166. 

Chandor, town in Nasik District, 
Bombay, with temples and caves, x. 
166-167. 

Chandor flills. See Ajanta Hills. 

Chandor Yadavas, dynasty in the 
Northern Deccan (801-1073), x. 166; 
Nasik, xviii. 400. 

Chandpur, subdivision in Tippera Dis- 
trict, Eastern Bengal, x. 167. 

Chandpur, town and river port in 
Tippera District, Eastern Bengal, x. 

Chandpur, town in Bijnor District, 
United Provinces, x. 167-168. 

Chandpur, village with antiquarian re- 
mains, in Jhansi District, United Pro- 
vinces, X. 168. 

Chandra, second son of Rahup, Rana of 
Udaipur, xxi. 191. 

Chandra Bahadur Sah, Gurkha general, 
offered to treat for the evacuation of 
Kumaun (1815), v. 246-247. 

Chandra Bhan Singh, Diwan, ruler in 
Garrauli, Central India, xii. 1S2. 

Chandra Gupta, grandfather of Asoka, 
known to the Greeks as Sandrokottos 
(321-297 B. c), importance of the iden- 
tification, ii. 24 ; first Maurya emperor 
of India, ii. 137; accession (321 B.C.), 
ii. 280 ; severity of government, ii. 
280-281 ; revolt against the Greeks 
(321 B.c.),ii. 280; relations with Seleu- 



cus Nikator, ii. 281 ; death (297 B.C.), 
ii. 282 ; system of government, iv. 1-3; 
traditional rule at Bandalike, Mysore, 
vi. 357, xviii. 297. 

Local notices: Gujrat, xii. 365; tra- 
ditional visit to Hassan, Mysore, xiii. 
63 ; Magadha, vii. 209, xvi. 408 ; Patna 
XX. 67 ; Peshawar valley, xx. 114; Pun- 
jab, XX. 261 ; traditional visit to Sravana 
Belgola, Mysore, xviii. 169, xxiii. 96; 
traditional visit to Suklatirtha, Broach, 
to be cleansed from the guilt of the 
murder of his eight brothers, xxiii. 128 ; 
territories in Swat made over to, by 
Seleucus, xxiii. 184. 

Chandra Gupta I, of the Gupta dynasty, 
capital fixed at Pataliputra, ii. 146; 
foundation of Gupta dynasty (a.d. 
320-6), ii. 290. 

Local notices : Kingdom of, xix. 149, 
xxiv. 147, 148-149; in Patna, xx. 68. 

Chandra Gupta II [c. a.d. 375-413), 
epitaph on iron pillar at MeharaulT, 
ii. 25, 51 ; reign of, ii. 292-294. 

Local notices: In Central India, ix. 
336 ; Malwa, xvii. 102 ; Patna, xx. 68 ; 
Ujjain passed to (a.d. 400), xxiv. 114. 

Chandra Kanta, Ahom king in Assam, 

vi. 32-33- 

Chandra Kirtti Singh, Raja of Manipur 
(1851-86), xvii. 187. 

Chandra Sah, Raja of Mandla, xvii. 161. 

Chandra Sen, Dor Raja, defence of 
Bulandshahr against Kutb-ud-din, and 
death (1193), ix. 49, 58. 

Chandra Sen, rule in Jodhpur {c. 1581), 
xiv. 184. 

Chandra Sena, Raja of Malwa, Chandra- 
vali said to have been built by, xiv. 123, 

Chandra Shamsher, rule in Nepal, xix. 38. 

Chandra Singh, forty-first chief of Bar- 
wanl, vii. 90 ; supposed founder of 
Barwani town, vii. 93. 

Chandra Varmma, Kalinjar fortified by, 
xiv. 311 ; sacrifice by, xvii, 23. 

Chandrabansi or Lunar race of Rajputs, 
in Rajputana, xxi, 112. 

Chandradityapur, probable ancient name 
of Chandor, Nasik, x. 166. 

Chandra-Drona. See Baba Budan. 

Chandragiri (or Payaswani) , river in South 
Kanara District, Madras, x. 168. 

Chandragiri, taluk in North Arcot Dis- 
trict, Madras, x. 168, 

Chandragiri, town in North Arcot, Madras, 
with hill-fort, the last refuge of the 
Vijayanagar kings, x. 16S-169. 

Chandragomin, author of Sanskrit gram- 
mar {c. 480), ii. 263. 

Chandragutti, peak in Shimoga, Mysore, 
xii. 219, xxii. 282. 

Chandrakona, town in Midnapore Dis- 
trict, Bengal, x. 169-170. 



I 2 



ii6 



INDEX 



Chandramauli, temple of. See Nilkanth- 

eshwar. 
Chandranath, temple, at Mudbidri, South 

Kanara, xviii. lo; Sitakund, xxiii. 50. 
Chandraprabha, Jain saint, image at 

Chandor, Nasik, x. 167. 
Chandrasen Jadhav, Balaji Viswanath 

besieged, at Pandavgarh (1713), xix. 

389- 
Chandravali, ancient city, Chitaldroog, 

Mysore, x. 297. 
Chandravarma, Kadamba prince, Coorgs 

descended from, xi. 8. 
Chandrawat Thakurs, rule in Rampura- 

Bhanpura, viii. 72, xxi. 191. 
Chandraya Drug, hill composing part of 

fortress of Gingee, xii. 243. 
Chandu Lai, Raja, Hyderabad minister, 

disastrous finance of Berar by, vii. 372 ; 

resignation (1843), xiii. 241. 
Chandu Tal lake, BastT, United Provinces, 

vii. 125. 
Chandur, peak in Ajanta Hills, v. 1 34. 
Chandur, taluk in Amraoti District, Berar, 

X. 170. 
Chandur, town in Amraoti District, Berar, 

x. 170. 
Chandur Bazar, town in Amraoti District, 

Berar, x. 1 70. 
Chandvad, town in Bombay. See Chan- 
dor. 
Chang Bhakar, State in Central Provinces, 

X. 170-173. 
Changadeva, court astrologer under king 

Singhana (1210-47), ii. 341. 
ChangalovadevI, temple at Hebli, Dhar- 

war, xiii. 100. 
Changalva, dynasty in Coorg, xi. 9-10 ; 

Piriyapatna, Mysore, xx. 152. 
Changanacheri, town in Travancore, Ma- 
dras, X. 170. 
Changars, labouring caste, in Sialkot,xxii. 

33°- 

Changdev, temple at Puntamba, Ahmad- 
nagar, xx. 395. 

Changez Khan, of Gujarat, Miran Mu- 
hammad Khan defeated by (1566% 
xxiii. 287. 

Changla Gali, hill station in Hazara Dis- 
trict, North-West Frontier Province, 
X. 173. 

Chank fisheries, iii. 194. i'^^a/j^' Fisheries. 

Channa Basava, joint founder of Lingayat 
sect, xviii. 202. 

Channa Raya, temple at Channarayan 
Betta, Mysore, x. 1 74. 

Channabhaira Devi, Jain princess (1450), 
stone bridge at Bhatkal, North Kanara, 
said to be built by, viii. 91. 

Channagiri, taltik in Shimoga District, 
Mysore, x. 173. 

Channapatna, taluk in Bangalore District, 
Mysore, x. 1 73. 



Channapatna, town in Bangalore District, 
Mysore, x. 174. 

Channaravadurga, peak in Tumkur Dis- 
trict, Mysore, xxiv. 52. 

Channarayan Betta, hill in Kolar District, 
Mysore, x. 1 74. 

Channarayapatna, taluk in Hassan Dis- 
trict, Mysore, x. 174. 

Chansama, town in Baroda. See Chan- 
asma. 

Chantapilli, village and lighthouse in 
Madras. See Santapilly. 

Chantrey, statue of Sarabhojl by, at Tan- 
jore, xxiii. 242. 

Chanwarpatha, pargana in Narsinghpur 
District, Central Provinces, xviii. 387, 
388. 

Ckaort, or hall, of Bhim, near Mukan- 
dwara, Rajputana, xviii. 17. 

Chapra, subdinsion in Saran District, 
Bengal, x. 174-175. 

Chapra, town and centre of trade in Saran 
District, Bengal, x. 175. 

Chaprot, fort in Hunza-Xagar, Kashmir, 
xiii. 225. 

Char Kaman, arches in Hyderabad city 
(1593), xiii. 30S. 

Char Minar, building in Hyderabad city, 
xiii. 308. 

Charados, caste in Goa, xii. 258. 

Charaka, author of medical work (first 
century A. D.), ii. 266, iv. 457. 

Charan, State in Kathiawar. See Sama- 
dhiala. 

Charan Das, Ramsanehi sect founded by, 
xxii. 227. 

Charans, caste in Cutch, xi. 78 ; Sind, 
viii. 307. 

Charas, hemp drug, iv. 259, 266. See 
also Hemp Drugs. 

Charat Singh, dispossessed Mughal em- 
perors of Eminabad (1760), xii. 24; 
Gujranvvala taken, xii. 355 ; Wazirabad 
fell into hands of \c. 1760), xxiv. 378. 

Charduar, forest reserve in Darrang Dis- 
trict, Assam, .x. 176. 

Chargola Tea Association, Singla valley, 
Assam, xxiii. 195. 

Charhoas, washermen. See Dhobis. 

Chari, village with antiquarian remains, 
in Kangra District, Punjab, x. 176. 

Chari. See Jowar. 

Chariars, tribe in Andamans, v. 360. 

Charikar, town in Afghanistan, British 
garrison cut off (1841 1, x. 176. 

Charitabali , Bengali work, by Iswar 
Chandra (born 1820% ii. 433. 

Charkha, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, X. 176, XV. 169. 

Charkhari, State in Central India, x. 176- 
179 ; postal arrangements, iii. 424-425 ; 
area, population, revenue, and adminis- 
tration, iv. 93. 



INDEX 



117 



Charkhari, town in Central India, x. 179- 
180. 

Charles II, king of England, Bombay 
ceded to, under terms of marriage treaty 
with the Infanta of Portugal, viii. 404. 

Charlo Rani-jo-kot, fort in Sind, xxii. 

403- 
Charlton, Captain, discovered tea plant 

in Assam, iii. 56. 
Charmwati, ancient Sanskrit name of 

Chambal river, x. 135. 
Chamock, Job, founder of Calcutta ( 1 690), 

i. 457, ii. 460, iv. 6, ix. 263, xxiv. 70 ; 

Balasore sacked by, when driven out of 

Hooghly (1687), vi. 246; Chief Agent 

at Cossimbazar (1681), xi. 52; HijilT 

occupied (1687), xiii. 116; temporary 

settlement in Howrah (1687), xiii. 207 ; 

temporary head-quarters at Sutanuti, 

vii. 217; settled at Ulubaria (1687), 

xxiv. 116. 
Charnockite, rock found in Ganjam, xii. 

144 ; Madura, xvi. 387. 
Charra, village in Manbhum District, 

Bengal, x. 180. 
Charrat Singh, obtained Rupar (1792), 

xxi. 339. 
Charsadda, tahsJl in Peshawar District, 

North-West Frontier Province, x. iSo. 
Charsadda, town in Peshawar District, 

North-West Frontier Province, x. 180- 

181. 
Charsu, building in Herat, Afghanistan, 

xiii. 114. 
Char-su-ka-Hauz, cistern in Hyderabad 

city, xiii. 308. 
Charthawal, town in Muzaffarnagar Dis- 
trict, United Provinces, x. 181. 
Charvakas, materialistic school of, ii. 

261. 
Chasas, cultivating caste in Orissa : 

Angul, v. 377; Athgarh, vi. 122; 

Bamra, vi. 344 ; Baramba, vi. 427 ; 

Baud, vii. 1 34 ; Cuttack, xi. 89 ; Das- 

palla, xi. 194 ; Dhenkanal, xi. 319 ; 

Hindol, xiii. 135; Narsinghpur, xviii. 

385 ; Nayagarh, xviii. 430 ; Orissa 

Tributary States, xix. 257 ; Pal Lahara, 

xix. 369 ; Purl, xx. 402 ; Rairakhol, xxi. 

62; Ranpur, xxi. 234; Talcher, xxiii. 

212; Tigiria, xxiii. 357. 
Chasaiio, grown in Kadi, Baroda, xiv. 

256. 
Chasatis, caste in Malda, xvii. 78. 
Chashtana, Satrap, rule over Malwa, xvii. 

lOI. 

Chasi Kaibartta, caste in Bengal, i. 327- 

328. 
Chata, town in United Provinces. See 

Chhata. 
Chatarpur, State in Central India. See 

Chhatarpur. 
Chatarshingi, hill near Poona, xx. 184. 



Chatgaiya, dialect of Bengali, spoken in 
Chittagong, x. 310; Noakhali, xix. 131. 

Chathas, power in Gujranwala, xii. 355. 

Chatia, hill, with antiquarian remains, in 
Cuttack District, Bengal, x. iSi. 

Chatra, town in Hazaribagh District, 
Bengal, x. 181-182. 

Chatrapur, subdivision in Ganjam Dis- 
trict, Madras, x. 182. 

Chatrapur, administrative head-quarters of 
Ganjam District, Madras, x. 182. 

Chatsu, town in Rajputana, x. 1S2. 

Chattagram, District in Eastern Bengal. 
See Chittagong. 

Chattar Singh, Salt Range overrun by 
(1763), xxii. 214. 

Chattar Singh, laid down arms at Rawal- 
pindi (1849), XX. 274, xxi. 272. 

Chattar-khai, or ' kitchen-eaters,' caste, 
origin of, iii. 483 «. 

Chattar-singh, peak in Bombay. See 
Saptashring. 

Chatu Vitthala-natha, translator of the 
Bhagavata Parana into Kanarese, ii. 

425- 
Chaturbhuj, Jadon Rajput, migration of, 

to Awa estate, Etah District (eighteenth 

century), vi. 153. 

Cliaturbiiuja, four-armed Vishnu, wor- 
ship of, in Orissa, i. 413; temple at 
Gwalior, xii. 441 ; at Orchha, xix. 24S. 

Chaturmukhya Mahadeo, temple at 
Nachna, Central India, v. 131. 

Chatursringi, image in Sri Hingalaj 
temple, Chaul, Kolaba, x. 185. 

Chaube Jagirs, petty sanad States, 
Central India, x. 182-183. 

Chauburji, gateway at Lahore, xvi. 109. 

Chauburji, citadel of Mangalvedha, 
Southern Maratha Country, xvii. 178. 

Chaudah devaia, family gods of Rajas 
of Hill Tippera, xiii. 120. 

Chaudangsi, language of Tibeto-Hima- 
layan sub-branch, i. 392. 

Chaughat, village in Madras. See 
Chowghat. 

Chauhans, Rajput clan, ii. 314; coins, 
ii. 143 ; round the Sambhar Lake, 
ii. 312. 

Local notices: Ajmer-Merwara, v. 
146; Aslrgarh, x. 12; Baghelkhand, 
vi. 187; Bariya, vii. 20; Behror, 
vii. 142 ; Bijnor, viii. 196 ; Cham- 
paner, vii. 20, xix. 3S2 ; Chhabra, x. 
195 ; Chota Udaipur State founded by 
(1484), vii. 20, X. 330-331 ; DIdwana, 
xi. 343 ; Dungarpur, xi. 380 ; Gagraun 
Fort, xii. 122; Haldaur, xiii. 9-10; 
Harduaganj,xiii. 51 ; Hissar, xiii. 145, 
149; Karnal, XV. 51; Khandesh, xv. 
228 ; Mainpuri, xvii. 41 ; Nadol, Raj- 
putana, xviii. 283; Nimar, xix. 108; 
Palanpur repeopled by (fourteenth 



ii8 



INDEX 



century>, xix. 348, 355 ; Patna, xx. 
7 1 ; i'avagarh seized by, xx. 80 ; South- 
East Punjab under (1151), xx. 262; 
RajpiUana, xxi, 94, 113; Sambalpur 
held by, xxii. 7 ; Sambhar the first 
capital of, ia Rajputana, xxii. 22 ; 
Tharad, xix. 348 ; Ujjain fell to 
(elevenlh century), xxi v. 114. 

Chauka, river of Oiidh, branch of the 
Sarda, x. 183-184. 

Chaul (Cheul), historic town in Kolaba 
District, Bombay, x. 184-185 ; sea- 
fight between Portuguese and Musal- 
mans (1508), x. 184. 

Chaulis, workers, in Bombay, x. 184. 

Chaulukyas, kings of Solankis-, ii. 311. 

Chaumahalla, Nizam's palace at Hyder- 
abad city, xiii. 309. 

Chaumu, town and estate in Rajputana, 
X. 185. 

Chaumukb, temple at Shetrunja hill, 
Kathiawar, xix. 361, 363. 

Chaunam. See Salons. 

Chaungthas, Arakanese tribe, v. 194, 394. 

Chaungu, township in Sagaing District, 
Upper Burma, x. 185. 

Chaungzon, township in Amherst Dis- 
trict, Lower Burma, x. 185. 

Chaunsat JoginI, temple at Khajraho, 
Central India, xv. 218 ; on hill beside 
the Narbada, at the Marble Rocks, 
Jubbulpore, xvii. 205-206. 

Chaur, peak near Simla, x. 185-186, 
xxii. 386, xxiii. 21 ; observatory, i. 
106. 

Chaur Tal, lake in Bast! District, vii. 125. 

Chauradadar, hill in Mandla District, 
xvii. 159. 

Chauragarh, hill-fort in Narsinghpur Dis- 
trict, Central Provinces, xviii. 3S6-387. 

Chaurapanchdsikd, the, lyric by the 
Kashmir poet Bilhana (eleventh cen- 
tury), ii. 242. 

Chaurasi, taluka in Bombay. See 
Chorasi. 

Chaurasi Gumbaz, tomb at KalpJ, Jalaun, 
xiv. 319. 

Chaurasi Khainba, mosque at Kaman, 
Rajputana, xiv. 326. 

Chaurasi Sunni, sculptures at Pathar- 
ghata, Bhagalpur, xx. 28. 

Chausa, village in Shahabad District, 
Bengal, x. 186. 

Chautang, river in Punjab, x. 186. 

Chavada dj'nasty, founded first kingdom 
of Anhilvada '746), viii. 281 ; inCutch, 
xi. 78; Mahl Kantha, x.vii. 16; Patau, 
Gujarat, xx. 24; Somnath, Kathiawar, 
xxiii. 75. 

Chavakkad, village in Madras. See 
Chowghat. 

Chaw, language of the Kuki-Chin group, 
'• 393- 



Chawar, the cow's tail, god of Gonds, 

Gondwana, xii. 325. 
Chawinda, village in Sialkot District, 

Punjab, X. 186. 
Cheap, Mr., Commercial Resident at 

Surul, Birbhum, xxiii. 178. 
Chechijna, old name of Chinchani, xxiii. 

250. 
Chedi Samvat, era of Kalachuri dynasty, 
which commenced in A. D. 249, xiv. 207. 
Chedis. See Kalachuris. 
Chedoba, shrine at Bhavsari, Poona, viii. 

99. 
Cheduba, island off coast of Arakan, 

Lower Burma, x^ 1S6-187. 
Cheduba, township in Kyaukpyu District, 

Lower Burma, x. 187 ; volcanoes, xvi. 

62. 
Cheetah (hunting leopard^ i. 219. 
Cheluvapillerava. See Krishna. 
Chemical factories, at Benares, vii. 184, 

193; Cawnpore, ix. 319. 
Chemical industries, decline, iii. 128. 
Chemicals, trade, iii. 223, 256 ; imports, 

iii. 277 ; import duties, iv. 376. 
Chempakasseri Rajas, Ambalapulai ruled 

by, till middle of eighteenth century, 

v. 288. 
Chenab, river of Kashmir and Punjab, x. 

189-190; course, i. 32; passage of, 

by Alexander (B.C. 326), ii. 276. 
Chenab Canal, iii. 331, 333, 334; irriga- 
tion by, iii. 317. 
Chenab Canal, Lower, Punjab, x. 190- 

192. 
Chenab Colony, in Punjab, x. 187-189; 

density of population, i. 454. See also 

Jhang District and Sangla. 
Chenab Inundation Canals, Punjab, x. 192. 
Chen-Chu, kingdom in the neighbourhood 

of GhazTpur, described by Hiuen Tsiang 

(seventh century), xii. 223. 
Chenchus, tribe in Eastern Ghats, xii. 

217; Kurnool, xvi. 35; Nallamalais, 

xviii. 346. 
Chendrayya, leader of Rampa rebellion, 

Godavari (1S79), xxi. iSi. 
Cliendwar, mountain peak in Hazaribagh, 

xiii. 85. 
Chcngalpat, District in Madras. See 

Chingleput. 
Chenna Kesava, temple in Hassan, My- 
sore, xiii. 64 ; Somnathpur, Mysore, 

xxiii. 75. 
Chennagiri, tdliik in Mysore. See Channa- 

gin. 
Chennakeswaraswami, temple at Som- 

palle, Cuddapah, xxiii. 75. 
Chennappapattanam, name given to 

original settlement near Madras, and 

now applied to the whole city by the 

natives, xvi. 369. 
Chcnniyats, tribe in Jodhpur, xiv. 189. 



f 



INDEX 



119 



Chera (or Kerala), ancient kingdom in 
Southern India, ii. 321, 322, 324, x. 
192-193, xvi. 248; legendary rule of, 
in Kolkai, xv. 387 ; Malabar, xvii. 
56 ; Travancore said to have formed 
part of, xxiii. 5. 

Cheraman Perumal, king of Chera ic. A, D. 
827-31), ix. 289, X. 342, xvii. 56; in 
Travancore, xxiv. 5. 

Cherat, hill sanitarium and cantonment 
in Peshawar District, North- West 
Frontier Province, x. 193. 

Cberial, taluk in Nalgonda District, 
Hyderabad, x. 193-194. 

Cheros, aboriginal tribe, in Korea, Central 
Provinces, xv. 400; Palamau, vii. 215, 
xix. 337-339 ; former rule in Shahabad, 
xxii. 1 88; Surguja, xxiii. 172; image 
at Tilothu, Shahabad, said to have 
been placed there by, xxiii. 360. See 
also Cherus. 

Chen a, petty State in Khasi Hills, Assam, 
x. 194. 

Cherrapunji, village in Khasi Hills, Assam, 
with heaviest recorded rainfall in the 
world, X. 194; rainfall, i. 104, 142, 144. 

Cherry, Mr. George, Agent of Governor- 
General, murdered at Benares (1799)) 
vii. 181. 

Cherry trees, in Afghanistan, v. 52 ; 
Baluchistan, vi. 297 ; Black Moun- 
tain, viii. 251 ; Himalayas, xiii. 133; 
Kabul, xiv. 246; Kashmir, xv. 124; 
Kurram Agency, xvi. 51 ; North-West 
Frontier Province, xix. 180; Northern 
Shan States, xxii. 232 ; Sikkim, xxii. 
366. 

Cherumans, agricultural caste in Mala- 
bar, i. 326 ; Cochin, x. 345 ; Malabar, 
xvii. 59. 

Cherus, aboriginal tribe, formerly in 
Ballia, vi. 251 ; Mirzapur, xvii. 368, 
376. See also Cheros. 

Chesney, Sir G., quoted on want of roads 
in India, iii. 402-403. 

Chesson, John, began farming at Panch- 
gani, Satara (1854), xix. 379. 

Chet Singh, Raja of Benares (1770-81), 
vii. 181, 188; rebellion, ii. 484 ; con- 
test with, X. 333, xvii. 369 ; in Ghazi- 
pur, xii. 224; holder of Jaso, Central 
India, xiv. 70 ; built tank and temple 
at Ramnagar, Benares, xxi. 1S0-181 ; 
rule in Benares territory, xxiv. 157. 

Chetichand, festival held in Sind, xxii. 
411. 

Cbetpat, European quarter of Madras 
City, xvi. 365. 

Chettis, Tamil trading caste, iii. 302 ; 
in Coimbatore, x. 366 ; Madura, xvi. 
393; the Nilgiris, xix. 92. 

Chetvvai, village in Malabar District, 
Madras, x. 195-196. 



Chevi Reddi, origin of Venkatagirisaw/";/- 
ddri, Nellore, traced to, xxiv. 307. 

Cheyur, town in Chingleput District, Ma- 
dras, with temples and inscriptions, x. 

195- 
Chezarta, cave-temple, ii. 163. 
Chhabra, pargana in Tonk State, Raj- 

putana, x. 195-196. 
Chhabra, town in Rajputana, x. 196. 
Chhachch, plain in Punjab. See Chach. 
Chhachhrauli, capital of Kalsia State, 

Punjab, X. 196. 
Chhaddars, pastoral tribe in Chenab 

Colony, X. 187. 
Chhai Champa, early settlement of Santals 

in Hazaribagh, xiii. 87. 
Chhaja, river in United Provinces. See 

Hindan. 
Chhaju, nephew of Balban, attempted to 

obtain throne of Delhi (1291), ii. 361. 
Chhalala, petty State in Kathiawar, 

Bombay, x. 196, xv, 168. 
Chhaliar, petty State in Revva Kantha, 

Bombay, x. 196, xxi. 291. 
Chhanals, tribe in Kharan, Baluchistan, 

XV. 248. 
Chhapar, salt lake near Sujangarh, Raj- 
putana, xxiii. 117. 
Chhapia, village in Gonda District, 

United Provinces, birthplace of Swami 

Narayan, x. 196. 
Chhaprauli, town in Meerut District, 

United Provinces, x. 196. 
Chharodi, cattle farm, iii. 85. 
Chhata, iahsil in Muttra District, United 

Provinces, x. 196-197. 
Chhata, town in Muttra District, United 

Provinces, x. 197. 
Chhatak, village in Sylhet District, Assam, 

X. 197. 
Chhatar Singh, rule in Rajgarh State {pb. 

1661), xxi. 69. 
Chhatar Singh, rule in Jodhpur (18 17), 

xiv. 186. 
Chhatar Singh, Maharaja, rule in Sam- 

thar State (pb. 1896), xxii. 24, 25 ; 

Samthar town reconstructed by, xxii. 26. 
Chhatardhari, MewatI clan, Chhatari, 

Bulandshahr, founded by, x. 198. 
Chhatardhari Sahi, Maharaja of Hathwa, 

xiii. 73. 
Chhatari, town in Bulandshahr District, 

United Provinces, x. 197-198. 
Chhatarpur, sanad State in Central In- 
dia, X. 198-201 ; postal arrangements, 

iii. 424-425 ; area, population, revenue, 

and administration, iv. 93. 
Chhatarpur, capital of State in Central 

India, x. 201-202. 
Chhatarpura, palace near Kotah, Rajpu- 
tana, XV. 425. 
Chhatarsal, Rao Raja, son of Rat?n 

Singh, rale in Bundi, ix. 80 ; Ratlam 



I20 



INDEX 



State, xxi. 241 ; killed fighting against 
Aurangzeb (1658), ix. 80. 

Chhatarsal, ruler of Bundelkhand {c. 167 1- 
1734), vi. 348, ix. 71, xix. 400; divi- 
sion of territory, v. 129, x. 177, xi. 
136; Baro sacked, vii. 24; Bijawar 
taken, vlii. 189, 191; Chhatarpur 
founded (1707), x. 202 ; Damoh taken 
from Mughals, xi. 1 36 ; rule in 
Hamirpur, xiii. 14; in Jalaun, xiv. 
19; extended authority over part of 
Jhansi, xiv. 138: conquered part of 
Mandla, x. 15; Panna founded, xiv. 
69, xix. 404 ; acquired parganas of 
Rasin and Badaus, xiv. 165. 

Chhatarsal, received thahirat of Dhar- 
naoda (1843), xxi. 35. 

Chhatarsal I, chief of Kotah State (1759- 
66), XV. 413. 

Chhatarsal II (1866-89), chief of Kotah 
State, XV. 414-415. 

Chhatarsal Prasad Ju, Pandit Sri, holder 
of Bhaisaunda, viii. 42. 

Chhatrapati Singh, rule in AlTpnra (1871), 
v. 222. 

Chhatrapati Singh, Diwan of Lugasi 
(1902), xvi. 209. 

Chhatrapati Singh, Rana, palace at Go- 
had built by, xii. 304. 

Chhatra-prakds, poetical history of Bun- 
delkhand, by Lai Kavi, ii. 428. 

Chhatiis. See Chhattris. 

Chhattar Manzil, Great and Lesser, pa- 
laces at Lucknow, xvi. 190, 196. 

ChhattTsgarh, Division in Central Pro- 
vinces, X. 202-203 > language, i. 369- 
370, X. 203. 

ChhatlisgarliT, dialect of Eastern Hindi, 
i. 370; spoken in Balaghat, vi. 226; 
Bilaspur, viii. 225; Central Provinces, 
X. 24 ; Chanda, x. 1 53 ; Chhattisgarh, x. 
203 ; Chhuikhadan State, x. 216 ; Ran- 
ker State, xiv. 402 ; Kawardha State, 
XV. 193; Khairagarh State, xv. 208; 
Nandgaon State, xviii. 357 ; Raigarh 
State, xxi. 45 ; Raipur, xxi. 52 ; Sa- 
rangarh State, xxii. 94. 

Chhattris, landowners and cultivators, in 
Assam, vi. 157; Belgaum, vii. 149; 
Bhopal, viii. 133; Burma, ix. 141; 
Orchha, xix. 245; Rae Bareli, xxi. 28. 
See also Rajputs. 

Chhibramau, tahsil in Farrukhabad Dis- 
trict, United Provinces, x. 203-204. 

Chhibramau, town in Farrukhabad Dis- 
trict, United Provinces, x. 204. 

Chhika ChhikI holi, dialect spoken in 
Bhagalpur, viii. 30; Santal Parganas, 
xxii. 67. 

Chhlmbas, washermen, in Amritsar, v. 323 ; 
Dera Ismail Khan, xi. 263; Ferozepore, 
xii. 92 ; Gujranwala, xii. 357 ; Gurdas- 
pur, xii. 396; Jullundur, xiv. 226; La- 



hore, xvi. 99; Mianwali, xvii. 320; 
North-West Frontier Province, xix. 
167; Sialkot, xxii. 329-330. 

Chhindwara, District in Central Pro- 
vinces, x. 204-214; physical aspects, 
204-206; history, 206-207; popula- 
tion, 207-20S ; agriculture, 208-210; 
forests, 210; trade and communications, 
211-212; famine, 212; administration, 
212-214. 

Chhindwara, tahsil in Central Provinces, 
X. 214. 

Chhindwara, town in Central Provinces, 
X.214-215. 

Chhindwara, town in Narsinghpur Dis- 
trict, Central Provinces, x. 215. 

ChhTpas, dyers, in Chanda, x. 157; Man- 
grol, Rajputana, xvii. 181. 

Chhitari, town in United Provinces. See 
Chhataii. 

Chhota Jami Masjid, at Mandu, Central 
India, ii. 187. 

Chhota Nagpur, Division and group of 
Native States in Bengal. See Chota 
Nagpur. 

Chhota Sinchula, peak in Eastern Ben- 
gal. See Chota Sinchula. 

Chhota-Gadarwara, former name of Nar- 
singhpur, xviii. 395. 

Chhote Khan, appointed minister in Bho- 
pal by Mamullah (1779), viii. 129; 
Damon lakes in Bhopal constructed by 
(1794), viii. 143. 

Chhoti Bhagirathi stream. See Bhagi- 
rathi. 

Chhoti Sadri, town in Rajputana, x. 215. 

Chhoti Sona Masjid, Gaur. See Khwaja- 
kl Masjid. 

Chhuikhadan, State in Central Provinces, 
X. 215-217. 

Chibhall, dialect of Western Punjabi, 
spoken in Punjab, xx. 286. 

Chibs, tribe in Chibhal, Kashmir, xv. 100 ; 
Gujrat invaded by, xii. 367. 

Chicacole, subdivision in Ganjam District, 
Madras, x. 217. 

Chicacole, tahik in Madras, x. 217. 

Chicacole, town in Madras, with muslin 
industry, x. 217-218. 

Chichamba, in Berar, battle of (1859), V"- 

371- 

Chick-pea. See Gram. 

Chidambara Rahasyam, worship of, at 
Chidambaram, South Arcot, x. 219. 

Chidambaram, subdivision in South Arcot 
District, Madras, x. 218. 

Chidambaram, tahik in South Arcot Dis- 
trict, Madras, x. 218. 

Chidambaram, town in South Arcot Dis- 
trict, Madras, with great Siva temple, x. 
218-220. 

Chiengmai, chief of, Karens subjugated 
by, xxi. 417. 



INDEX 



121 



Chikalda, sanitarium in Amraoti District, 

Berar, x. 220. 
Chikan-woxV, \\\.22\. ^^^cA^ Embroidery. 
Chik-Ballapur, taluk in Kolar District, 

Mysore, x. 220-221. 
Chik-Ballapur, town in Kolar District, 

Mysore, with silk industry, x. 221. 
Chikhli, taluk in Buldana District, Berar, 

X. 221. 

Chikhli, town in Buldana District, Berar, 
x. 221. 

Chikhli, taluk in Surat District, Bombay, 
X. 221-222. 

Chikhli, estate in Bombay. See Mehwas 
estates. 

Chikka Deva Raja, king of Mysore, xviii. 
1 79 ; Coimbatore taken, x. 358 ; Coim- 
batore surveyed, x. 368 ; Devaraya- 
durga captured (^r. 1696), xi. 274; Ma- 
dura invaded, xvi. 390 ; Mysore revenue 
system due to, xviii. 234-235 ; whole 
of Salem absorbed by (1688-90), xxi. 
398 ; seized Jadakanadurga (i696),xxiv. 
64; captivity at Hangala, xxiv. 419. 

Chikka mosque, at Gaur, xii. 189-190, 
191. 

Chikka Naik, Hagalvadi chief, Chik- 
nayakanhalli named after, x. 223. 

Chikka Vlrappa, rule in Coorg, xi. 12. 

ChikkappaUdaiyar,built Anantapurtown, 
and tank said to have been constructed 
by (1364), V. 349. 

Chikmugalur, taluk in Kadur District, 
Mysore, x. 222. 

Chikmugalur, town in Kadur District, 
Mysore, x. 222. 

Chiknayakanhalli, taluk in Tumkur Dis- 
trict, Mysore, x. 222-223. 

Chiknayakanhalli, town in Tumkur Dis- 
trict, Mysore, x. 223. 

Chikodi, tdluka in Belgaum District, 
Bombay, x. 223. 

Chikodi, village in Belgaum District, 
Bombay, x. 223-224. 

Chiks, aboriginal tribe in Central Pro- 
vinces : Jashpur State, xiv. 68 ; Udaipur 
State, xxiv. 84. 

Chiktiabar, thakurat in Central India, 
X. 224, viii. 147. 

Chilambaram, town in Madras. See 
Chidambaram. 

Chilas, slave raids in Gilgit, xii. 239. 

Child, Sir John, President of Surat and 
Governor of Bombay (1682-90), ii. 459. 

Child, Sir Josia, Governor of East India 
Company, declaration of new and ag- 
gressive policy (1686), ii. 459-460; new 
charter procured by (1693), ii. 461 ; 
municipal government in Madras ini- 
tiated by, xvi. 379. 

Child marriage, statistics for India, i. 482. 
See also Marriage Customs. 

Chilianwala, battle-field in Gujrat Dis- 



trict, Punjab, X. 224 ; battle (1849), ii. 
505. 

Chilka Lake, on coast between Orissa and 
Madras, x. 224-226. 

Chillies. See Capsicum. 

Chilmari, place of pilgrimage in Rangpur 
District, Eastern Bengal, xvi. 30. 

Chimna Patel, zaminddr of Kamtha, 
rebellion of (1818), viii. 62-63. 

Chimnabai Nyaya Mandir, court at Ea- 
roda, vii. 82. 

Chimnajl Appa, Maratha general, Bassein 
besieged and taken by (1739), vii. 120. 

Chimolo, name of Chaul according to 
Hiuen Tsiang (seventh century), x. 
184. 

Chin, language of the Kuki-Chin group, 
number of speakers, i. 394 ; spoken in 
Burma, ix. 137-138; Kyaukpyu, xvi. 
63; Prome, xx. 223; Sandoway, xxii. 
34 ; Thayetmyo, xxiii. 346. 

Chin geological system, i. 95. 

Chin Hills, tract of mountainous country 
in Burma, x. 270-279; physical as- 
pects, 270-272; histoiy, 272-273; 
population, 273-275; agriculture, 275- 
276; forests, 276; minerals, 276-277; 
trade and communications, 277-278; 
administration, 278-279; education, 
279 ; language, i. 388. 

Chin Hills, Pakokku, tract of hilly 
country in Burma, .x. 279-284; physical 
aspects, 280; history, 281 ; population, 
281-282; agriculture, 28 2 ; trade and 
communications, 283; administration, 
283-284. 

Chin Kilich Khan. See Asaf Jah. 

China, trade with, iii. 297, 300, 311, 312, 
313; British relations with, iv, 1 20-1 21 ; 
military aid of British solicited by Gur- 
khas against, xix. 33-34. 

China, peak in Naini Tal District, United 
Provinces, xii. 121, xviii. 333. 

China, or chend,. a small millet {Patii- 
cum iniliaceu7)i), iii. 98 ; grown in 
Amreli, Baroda, v. 317; Baltistan, vi. 
263 ; Bengal, vii. 245 ; Kangra, xiv. 
390 ; Kashmir, xv. 117; Orissa Tribu- 
tary States, xix. 258 ; Punjab, xx. 298; 
Simla, xxii. 380; Sylhet, xxiii. 194. 

China Bakir, lighthouse in Hanthawaddy 
District, Burma, xiii. 36-37. 

Chinab, river in Kashmir and Punjab. 
See Chenab. 

Chinapati, of Hiuen Tsiang, Palti town 
identified with, xx. 74. 

Chinboks, subdivision of Chin tribe in 
Pakokku Chin Hills, Burma, x. 281- 
282. 

Chinbons, subdivision of Chin tribe, in 
Pakokku Chin Hills, Burma, x. 281-282. 

Chinchani, village in Bombay. See Tara- 
pur Chinchani. 



122 



INDEX 



Chinchkhed. See Maheji. 

Chinchli, village in Kolhapur State, Bom- 
bay, X. 226. 

Chinchli-Gadad, petty State in the Dangs, 
Bombay, x. 227, xi. 147. 

Chincholi, taluk in Gulbarga District, 
Hyderabad State, x. 227. 

Chinchvad, village in Poona District, 
Bombay, with an incarnate deity, x. 
227-228. 

Chindiya Deo, (local) Hindu god, wor- 
shipped in Berar, vii. 380. 

Chindwin District, Lower, in Upper 
Burma, x. 228-238 ; physical aspects, 
228-230; history, 230-231; population, 
231-232 ; agriculture, 232-233 ; forests, 
233 ; minerals, 233 ; trade and com- 
munications, 234-235 ; famine, 335 ; 
administration, 235-238. 

Chindwin District, Upper, in Upper 
Burma, x. 238-251; physical aspects, 
238-240 ; history, 240-241 ; popula- 
tion, 241-243; agriculture, 243-245; 
forests, 245-246 ; minerals, 346 ; trade 
and communications, 346-348; admin- 
istration, 248-251. 

Chindwin River, tributary of Irrawaddy, 
Burma, iii. 361-362, x. 251-252. 

Chinese, invasion of India, i. 384-385 ; in 
Akyab, v. 201 ; Amherst, v. 297 ; Bas- 
sein, Burma, vii. 1 10, 117; Bhamo, 
viii. 47-50; Burma, ix. 141; Calcutta, 
ix. 26S ; Hanthawaddy, xiii. 30; North 
Hsenwi, xiii. 218; South Hsenwi, 
xiii. 219; invasion of Indo-China, 
xxii. 233-234; Irrawaddy Division, 
xiii. 367; Katha, xv. 154; Keng- 
tung, XV. 200 ; Lashio, xvi. 149 ; 
Mandalay, xvii. 145 ; Manglon, xvii. 
179; Maymyo, xvii. 239; Mergui,xvii. 
298, 308; Myitkyina, xviii. 140; Sa- 
gaing Division, xxi. 351 ; Northern 
Shan States, xxii. 236, 237 ; Southern 
Shan States, xxii. 256 ; Taunggyi, 
Southern Shan States, xxiii. 257 ; 
Thaton, xxiii. 333 ; Toungoo, xxiii. 
425; Yawnghwe, xxiv. 416. 

Chinese varnish, forest product, Southern 
Shan States, xxii. 260. 

Chingama, inscriptions at, ii. 52. 

Chinglz Khan (1162- 1 2 27), pressure of his 
conquests on India, ii. 358 ; Afghanistan 
overrun by Mongol hordes of, v. 35 ; in 
Afghan-Tnrkistan,v. 67; Balkh,vi. 248; 
destruction of Balkh, vi. 249 ; raids on 
Baluchistan (1223), vi. 275; Bhera 
sacked by Mongol armies, viii. 100; 
legendary attacks on Chitral, x. 301 ; 
Farrah, Afghanistan, sacked, xii. 62 ; 
Jalal-ud-din defeated (1221), xviii. 349, 
xix. 151, XX. 265, xxii. 396; rule in 
Jhalawan, Baluchistan, xiv. no; cap- 
tured Kandahar (1223), xiv. 375 ; estab- 



lished loose supremacy over Pesha- 
war (1221), XX. 115 ; origin of Arghun 
dynasty in Sind traced to, xxii. 396. 

Chingleput, District in Madras, x. 252- 
268; physical aspects, 252-254; his- 
tory, 254-256 ; population, 256-258 ; 
agriculture, 258-260; forests, 260-261 ; 
minerals, 261 ; trade and communica- 
tions, 261-263; famine, 263-264; 
administration, 264-268 ; education, 
267 ; medical, 267-268. 

Other references : Terra-cotta sarco- 
phagi found, ii. 96 ; tanks, iii. 322. 

Chingleput, subdivision in Madras, x. 
268. 

Chingleput, td/uk in Madras, x. 268. 

Chingleput, town in Madras, important 
in the Camatic Wars, with reformatory 
school, X. 368-270. 

Chingrikhali, fort near Diamond Harbour, 
Twenty-four Parganas, xi. 340. 

Chini, head-quarters of Kanawar, or Chini 
tahsil, Punjab, x. 2 84. 

Chini Mahal, palace at Danlatabad, Hyder- 
abad, xi. 201. 

Chlnl-ka-Rauza, tomb near Agra, ii. 128- 
129, V. 84. 

Chiniot, tahsil in Jhang District, Punjab, 
X. 284-285. 

Chiniot, ancient town in Jhang District, 
Punjab, X. 285 ; wood-caiving, iii. 229 ; 
metal inlaying, iii. 231. 

Chinkdra. See Gazelle. 

Chinna Ranga Rao, invested with chief- 
ship of lands in Bobbili estate, Vizaga- 
patam, viii. 253. 

Chinnatippasamudram, tank near Madan- 
apalle, Cuddapah, xvi. 227. 

Chinnia Chetti, fort at Fort St. David 
built by, xii. loi. 

Chinnur, taluk in Adilabad District, 
Hyderabad, x. 285. 

Chinnur, town in Adilabad District, 
Hyderabad, x. 285-286. 

Chins, forest tribe of Burma and Assam, 
iii. 125; in Akyab, v. 193; An, 
Kyaukpyu, v. 331; Arakan, v. 394; 
Arakan Yoma, v. 398 ; Assam, vi. 
44; Burma, ix. 139; Cachar, ix. 253; 
Upper Chindwin, i. 241, 242 ; Chin 
Hills, X. 274; Pakokku Chin Hills, x. 
281-282 ; raids of, in Pakokku Chin 
Hills, X. 281 ; Gangaw, Pakokku, xii. 
131 ; Gwa, Sandoway, xii. 414; Hen- 
zada,xiii. 105; Hill Tippera, xiii. 120; 
raids of, in Hill Tippera (1826-62), 
xiii. 118; in Irrawaddy Division, xiii. 
367 ; Kanaung, Henzada, xiv. 372 ; 
Kyangin, Henzada, xvi. 60; Kyaukpyu, 
xvi. 63 ; driven from Lushai Hills 
(beginning of nineteenth century), xvi. 
214; in Magwe, xvi. 415; Manipur, 
xvii. 189; Minbu, xvii. 343, 348; Min- 



INDEX 



123 



bya, Akyab, xvii. 358; Mindon, Tha- 

yetmyo, xvii. 359 ; Myebon, Kyauk-pyu, 

xviii. 118; Myede, Thayetmyo, xviii. 

I i9;Paukkaung,Prome, xx. 77; Pakok- 

ku, xix. 323 ; Pegu Yoma, xx. 100; 

Prome, xx. 223 ; Sandoway, xxii. 34 ; 

Satthwa, Magwe, xxii. 134; Saw, 

Pakokku,xxii. 158; Sidoktaya, Minbu, 

xxii. 360 ; disturbances in Sylhiet (1844, 

1849), xxiii. 192 ; in Tamu, Upper 

Chindwin,xxiii. 218; Thayetmyo, xxiii. 

346; raids in Tippera (i860), xxiii. 382 ; 

Yamethin, xxiv. 404. 
Chinsura, town in Hooghly District, 

L'engal, old Dutch settlement, with 

Armenian church and Hooghly College, 

X. 286; attacked by Clive (1759), ii. 

452,478. »S'£^ a/f (7 Hooghly Town. 
Chintabor, ancient name of Chitakul, 

North Kanara, x. 289. 
Chintalaraj'aswami, temple at Tadpatri, 

Anantapur, xxiii. 204. 
Chintaman, son of Moroba, incarnation 

of Ganpati in person of, at Chinchvad, 

Poona, X. 227; temple at Kalam, 

Berar, xiv. 297. 
Chintaman Bakkal, Narod granted to 

(seventeenth century), xviii. 381. 
Chintaman Rao, ruler of Sangli, Southern 

Maratha Country, xxii. 53. 
Chintdmani, Tamil epic by an unknown 

poet, ii. 435. 
Chintamani, ialuk in Kolar District, 

Mysore, x. 286. 
Chintamani Tripathi, Western Hindi 

poet, of Cawnpore (1650), ii. 428. 
Chintpurni, mountain range in Punjab. 

See Sola Singhi. 
Chintz, manufacture of, at Anantapur, 

v. 344 ; Ayyampettai, Tanjore, vi. 153 ; 

Bagru, Rajputana, vi. 193 ; Basti, vii. 

129; Batala, Gurdaspur, vii. 133; 

Jaipur, xiii. 392 ; Kishangarh, xv. 314 ; 

Sanganer, Rajputana, xxii. 51 ; Shah- 

jahanpur, xxii. 206 ; Shimoga, Mysore, 

xxii. 288; Tiruppur, Coimbatore, 

xxiii. 396. 
Chiplnn, tdluka in Ratnagiri District, 

Bombay, x. 287. 
Chiplun, town in Ratnagiri District, 

Bombay, home of the Chitpavan Brah- 

mans, x. 287. 
Chipurupalle, tahsil in Vizagapatam 

District, Madras, x. 287-288. 
Chiragh-ud-din, Fakir, repaired Upper 

Sutlej Canals, xxiii. 180. 
Chirakkal, tcihik in Malabar District, 

Madras, x. 288. 
Chlrala, town in Guntur District, Madras, 

x. 288. 
Chirawa, town in Rajputana, x. 288. 
Chirbitya La, pass. See Mana. 
Chirelta, See Forest Produce. 



Chirkharee, State in Central India. See 
CharkhaiT. 

Chiroda, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, x. 288, XV. 165. 

Chisholm, Mr., Christ Church, Cuddapah, 
designed by, xi. 73. 

Chishti, Muin-ud-din, Muhammadan 
saint, Nandurbar town conquered by, 
xviii. 362 ; tomb at Ajmer, v. 171. 

Chistiyas, Sunni Muhammadan sect, 
Sufiism accepted by, i. 437. 

Chit Ambalam. See Chidambaram. 

Chit Firozpur, town in Ballia District, 
United Provinces, x. 298. 

Chitakul, village in North Kanara Dis- 
trict, Bombay, with historic fort, x. 
28S-289. 

ChTlal. See Deer, spotted. 

Chitaldroog, District in Mysore, x. 289- 
296 ; physical aspects, 289-290 ; his- 
tory, 290-291; population, 292-293; 
agriculture, 293-294 ; forests, 294 ; 
minerals, 294 ; trade and communica- 
tions, 294-295 ; famine, 295 ; admin- 
istration, 295-296. 

Chitaldroog, tdhik in Mysore State, x. 
296-297. 

Chitaldroog, town in Mysore State, with 
historic fort, x. 297. 

Chitaldroog Hills, in Mysore State, x. 
398. 

Chitambareshwar, fairs in honour of, at 
Murgod, Belgaum, xviii. 42. 

Chitapolan, original name of Chiplun, 
Ratnagiri District, Bombay, x. 2S7. 

Chitari. See Chhatarl. 

Chitarkot, hill in United Provinces. See 
Chitrakut. 

Chitartala, tributary of the Mahanadi, 
xvi. 432. 

Chitekula, ancient name of Chitakul, x. 
289. 

Chitor, town in Rajputana, former capital 
of Mewar, with historic foit, x. 298- 
300; towers or stambhas at, ii. 123- 
124; stormed by Akbar (1568), ii. 398 ; 
battle (i534\ vii. 19. 

Chitpavan Brahmans, home of, at Chip- 
lun, Ratnagiri, x. 287 ; in Kolaba, 
XV. 360 ; Kolhapur, xv. 383 ; Poona, 
XX. 170; Ratnagiri, xxi. 249 ; Thana, 
xxiii. 294. 

Chitpur, suburbs of Calcutta. See Cossi- 
pore-Chitpur. 

Chitra Sen Rai, Raja of Burdwan (1741), 
ix. loi. 

Chitra Singh, rule over Khaniadhana, 
Central India (1869), xv. 244. 

Chitradi, village in Chamba State, Pun- 
jab, x. 300. 

Chitrakaldurga. See Chitaldroog. 

Chitrakot, ancient name of Chitor fort, 
Rajputana, x. 298. 



124 



INDEX 



Chitrakut, hill and place of pilgrimage 
in Banda District, United Provinces, 
X. 300. 

Chitral, State in North-West Frontier 
Province, x. 300-304 ; physical aspects, 
300-301; history, 301-303; popula- 
tion, 303 ; agriculture, 303 ; minerals, 
304 ; administration, 304. 

Other references : Devonian fossils, 
i. 67 ; language of, i. 356. 

Chitral, capital of State in North-West 
Frontier Province, x. 304. 

Chitral expedition (1895), ii. 525, xiii. 
226, xix. 157, xxiii. 186. 

Chitralis, race in Jalalabad, Afghanistan, 
xiv. 12. 

Chitrang, chief of Mori Rajputs, ruler of 
Chitor (seventh century), x. 298-299. 

Chitravas, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, X. 304, XV. 165. 

Chittagong, Division in Eastern Bengal, 
X. 304-305. 

Chittagong, District in Eastern Bengal, x. 
305-316 ; physical aspects, 306-308 ; 
history, 308-309; population, 309-310; 
agriculture, 310-312; forests, 312 ; trade 
and communications, 312-313 ; admin- 
istration, 313-316; education, 316; 
medical, 316. 

Other references : Meteorology, i. 
149-154; zoology, i. 218; language, a 
corrupt form of Bengali, i. 377 ; tea 
industry established about 1862, iii. 56 ; 
cotton goods, iii. 200 ; Port Trust, iv. 

304- 

Chittagong, subdivision in Eastern Ben- 
gal. X. 317. 

Chittagong, town and port in Eastern 
Bengal, terminus of Assam-Bengal 
Railway, X. 317-318. 

Chittagong College, x. 318. 

Chittagong Hill Tracts, District in East- 
ern Bengal, x. 318-325 ; physical as- 
pects, 318-319; history, 319 ; popula- 
tion, 319-321; agriculture, 321-322; 
forests, 322 ; trade and communica- 
tions, 322-323; administration, 323- 
325; education, 324; medical, 324- 
325; Mongoloids of, i. 309. 

Chittang. See Chautang. 

Chittavadigi, residential suburb of Hos- 
pet, Bellary, xiii. 204. 

Chittikula, ancient name of Chitakul, 
X. 289. 

Chittoor, subdivision in North Arcot Dis- 
trict, Madras, x. 325. 

Chittoor, tahii in North Arcot District, 
Madras, x. 325. 

Chittoor, head-quarters of North Arcot 
District, Madras, former cantonment, 
X. 325- 

Chittiir, tovfn in Cochin Stale, Madras, x. 

325- 



Chltu, Pindari leader, ii. 494 ; death 
(1818), ii. 495, xix. 109; supported 
by Jaswant Rao Bhau, xiv. 86 ; Satwas 
and Nemawar principal places of resi- 
dence, xix. 25, xxii. 135. 

Chitursing, brother of Sahu II, defeated 
Rastia near Satara (1799), xix. 333. 

Chivil, Chaul mentioned as, by Athanasius 
Nikitin (1470), x. 184. 

Chad. See Forest Products. 

Chobari, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, X. 325, XV. 168. 

Chocolate, manufactured at Baroda, vii. 
56 ; Bilimora, Baroda, viii. 236. 

Choda. See Chola. 

Choda Ganga, king, possible builder of 
Jagannath temple at Purl (twelfth 
century), xx, 410. 

Chodavaram, td/u^ in Godavari District, 
Madras, x. 325-326. 

Chodhras, wild tribe in Bansda State, 
Bombay, vi. 404 ; Navsari, Baroda, 
xviii. 423; Surat, xxiii. 158. 

Chok, petty State in Kathiawar, Bombay, 
x. 326, XV. 165. 

Chokarana, established himself in Pipla, 
xxi. 80. 

Chokkanatha, Pudukkottai State re- 
covered by {c. 1664), XX. 231 ; Tanjore 
Naik besieged by (1662), xxiii. 228 ; 
removed capital to Trichinopoly and 
erected the Nawab's palace, xxiv. 28,44. 

Choi Maradi, near Ranibennur, Bombay, 
xxi. 233. _ 

Chola, ancient dynasty in South India, 
with capital at KanchI, x. 326 ; inscrip- 
tions, ii. 12 ; coinage and device, ii.152 ; 
defeat of the Pandyas and Singhalese 
(c. 930), ii. 331-333 ; took Kalinga and 
Ceylon (1002), 333 ; repulsed by West- 
ern Chalukyas, ii. 333, 336; conquered 
Vengi, ii. 334 ; final coalition with the 
Eastern Chalukyas (1070), ii. 334, 339. 
Local notices : North Arcot, v. 405 ; 
South Arcot, v. 433; in Bangalore till 
II 16, vi. 362 ; in Carnatic, ix. 301 ; inde- 
cisive wars carried on with Chalukyas, 
viii. 282 ; conflicts with Western Chalu- 
kyas, xviii. 172; in Chera (ninth or tenth 
to eleventh century), x. 193 ; Ching- 
leput taken, x. 255 ; Conjeeveram 
taken (eleventh century), x. 377 ; in 
Cuddapah, xi. 60; in the Deccan, xi. 
207 ; Gangaikondapuram residence of 
(IOII-III8), xii. 128; in Godavari, xii. 
284; conquest of Hassan (1004), xiii. 
63 ; Hassan town founded under, xiii. 
70; in Kistna {c. 999), xv. 321; 
Kolar (998), XV. 371 ; legendary rule of, 
in Kolkai, xv. 3S7 ; Konga country 
ruled by, x. 358 ; Kurnool probably 
under, xvi. 33; rule in Southern Madras, 
xvi. 247-248; in Madura, xvi. 389; 



\ 



INDEX 



125 



Manne taken by (beginning of eleventh 
century), xvii. 200; rule in Mysore, xi. 
9-10; invasions of Mysore, xviii. 172, 
253 ; expulsion from Mysore, xviii. 173 ; 
in Nellore, xix. 9 ; Nidugal, xix. 84 ; 
connexion with the Pandyas, xix. 395 ; 
Pudukkottai State, xx. 231 ; Rajah- 
mundry, xxi. 64 ; collision with the 
Rashtrakutas, xviii. 171 ; in Salem, xxi. 
398 ; in Southern India, xvi. 248-249 ; 
dam constructed below Srlrangam 
Island, ix. 306 ; Talakad taken, xxiii. 
208 ; Travancore conquered (eleventh 
century), xxiv, 5 ; capital originally at 
Uraiyur, now a suburb of Trichinopoly, 
xxiv. 28, 44 ; Vilinjam capital of, 
xxiv. 314; rule in Vizagapatam, xxiv. 
325 ; in Yelandur, xxiv. 419. 

Chola, pass in Chola Range, Eastern 
Himalayas, x. 327. 

Chola Sahib, Sikh temple at Dera Nanak, 
Gurdaspur, xi. 271. 

Cholakulavailipattinam temple. See 
Kayarohanasvvami. 

Cholani, Southern Indian name iox jowar 
{Andropogon sorghum), iii. 98 ; culti- 
vated in Adoni, Bellary, v. 24 ; Anan- 
tapur, V. 342 ; North Arcot, v. 410; 
Banganapalle State, vi. 375 ; Bhadra- 
chalam, Godavari, viii. 22; Cuddapah, 
xi. 65 ; Dharmavaram, Anantapur, xi. 
3C0 ; Godavari, xii. 288-289 ; Gooty, 
Anantapur, xii. 327 ; Jammalamadugu, 
Cuddapah, xiv. 48 ; Kadiri, Cuddapah, 
xiv. 260; Kistna, xv. 326; Kumool, 
xvi. 37; Madanapalle, Cuddapah, xvi. 
226 ; Madras Presidency, xvi. 274, 
352; Madura, xvi. 394, 395; Nellore, 
xix. 14; Ongole, Guntur, xix. 237 ; 
Palladam, Coimbatore, xix. 369 ; 
Penukonda, Anantapur, xx. 104; Pu- 
dukkottai State, XX. 234 ; Puli- 
vendla, Cuddapah, xx. 243; Rapiir, 
Nellore, xxi. 237 ; Sandur State, xxii. 
45 ; Tadpatri, Anantapur, xxiii. 204 ; 
Tinnevelly, xxiii. 369 ; Trichinopoly, 
xxiv. 32 ; Udayagiri, Nellore, xxiv. 
108 ; Yernagudem, Kistna, xxiv. 424. 
See also Jowdr. 

Cholera, death statistics, i. 521, 52a, 526, 
527. 529. 530, 531; statistics among 
troops and prisoners in Bengal, i. 533- 
534; Bundelkhand (1897), iii. 481. 

Local notices: Afghanistan, v. 51, 
58; Ajmer-Merwara, v. 144; Ambala, 
V. 279 ; Amindivi Islands, Laccadives, 
V, 304; Angul, Orissa, v. 377; Balasore, 
vi. 239 ; Baluchistan, vi. 339 ; Bankura, 
vi. 3S5 ; Baroda, vii. 42, 60; Bengal, 
vii. 229; Berar, vii. 373; Bhagalpur, 
viii. 29 ; Bhandara, viii. 62 ; Bilaspur, 
viii. 223 ; Birbhum, viii. 242 ; Bombay 
Presidency, viii. 295, 299; Bubak, Sind 



( 1 869), ix. 32 ; Bundelkhand, ix. 72 ; Bun- 
di, ix. 84; Burdwan, ix. 93; Burma, ix. 
I34> 135; Calcutta, ix. 267; Central 
India, ix. 349 ; Central Provinces, x. 
21; Champaran, X. 139 ; Chittagong,x. 
309 ; Cooch Behar, x. 383 ; Cuttack, 
xi. 89 ; Darbhanga, xi. 154 ; Elgandal, 
Hyderabad, xii. 7, 9; Fyzabad, xii. 
110; Ganjam, xii. 154; Gauhati, As- 
sam, xii. 183; Hardwar, Saharanpur, 
xiii. 52-53 ; Hazaribagh, xiii. 89 ; 
Hooghly, xiii. 164; Howrah, xiii. 208; 
Hyderabad State, xiii. 245, 311, 313; 
Imphal, Manipur, xiii. 330; Jaipur,xiii. 
388, 400 ; Jessore, xiv. 94 ; Karlmnagar, 
Hyderabad, xv. 42 ; Khed, Poona, xv. 
267 ; Khondmals, xv. 283 ; Khulna, xv. 
288; Kurigram, Eastern Bengal, xvi. 
29; Madras Presidency, xvi. 258, 372; 
Makran, Baluchistan, xvii. 51 ; Malda, 
xvii. 77 ; Midnapore, xvii. 330 ; Moul- 
mein, xviii. 9 ; Murshidabad, xviii. 47 ; 
Muzaffarpur, xviii. 106 ; Mymensingh, 
xviii. 152 ; Noakhali, xix. 129; North- 
West Frontier Province, xix. 164; Panch 
Mahals (1900), iii. 4S1 ; Punjab, xx. 
283; Purl, XX. 401 ; Raipur, xxi. 50; 
Rajputana, xxi. 108 ; Rajshahi, xxi. 
163; Rangoon, xxi. 220-221; Rangpur, 
xxi. 226; Rohtak, xxi. 319; Salem, xxi. 
408 ; SandwTp, Noakhali, xxii. 49 ; San- 
tal Parganas, xxii. 64; Shahabad, xxii. 
189 ; Simla, xxii. 378 ; Sind, xxii. 405 ; 
Srinagar, Kashmir, xxiii. loi ; Taloda, 
Khandesh, xxiii. 214; Thayetmyo, xxiii. 
344 ; Twenty-four Parganas, xxiv. 71 ; 
United Provinces, xxiv. 165 ; Walajabad, 
Chingleput, xxiv. 351. 

Choleswara temple, Sholinghur, North 
Arcot District, xxii. 307. 

Choli-Maheshwar. See Maheshwar. 

Cholistan, tahstl in the Punjab. See Nahr 
Sadiklyah. 

Choliya, Chola mentioned as, by Hiuen 
Tsiang, x. 326. 

Cholunga Range, Andamans, xx. 192. 

Chomiomo, peak in Sikkim, xxii. 365. 

Chonda, Rao, Mandor taken by (1381), 
xiv. 183, xvii. 171. 

Chondawat family of Sesodia Rajputs of 
Mewar, holders of Begun estate, Raj- 
putana, vii. 142. 

Chopard (1844), mention of Nicobars 
referred to, xix. 65. 

Chopda, tdltika in East Khandesh Dis- 
trict, Bombay, x. 327. 

Chopda, town in East Khandesh Dis- 
trict, Bombay, x. 327. 

Chopdai, shrine on Jotiba's Hill, Kol- 
hapur, xiv. 203. 

Chor, peak in Punjab. See Chaur. 

Chora, Chola mentioned as, by Asoka, x. 
326. 



126 



INDEX 



Chora Ganga of Kalinganagar, rule in 
Orissa and dynasty founded by, vii. 
211, xix. 250. 

Chorai, Chola mentioned as, by Ptolemy, 
X. 326. 

Chorangla, petty State in Rewa Kantha, 
Bombay, x. 327, xxi. 290. 

Q\\(ytz.s\,tdhika in Surat District, Bombay, 
x. 327-328. 

Chota Nagpur, Division of Bengal, x. 
328-330; meteorology, i. 116; botany, 
i. 190, 191; zoology, i. 250; ethno- 
logy, i. 290, 294, 296, 308-309 ; lan- 
guages, i. 375, 379, 383; density of 
population, i. 452 ; growth of popula- 
tion, i. 462 ; internal migration, i. 4O8 ; 
Animism, i. 472 ; tea industry estab- 
lished {c. 1862), iii. 56; ancient gold 
workings, iii. 142 ; minerals, iii. 142, 
144, 147, 148; copper, iii. 144; irri- 
gation, iii. 324; Native States, iv. 67; 
land revenue, iv. 211 n. 

Chota Nagpur, group of States in Bengal, 

X. 330- 
Chota Sinchula, peak in Sinchula range, 

Eastern Bengal, x. 330, xxii. 388, 
Chota Udaipur, State in Rewa Kantha, 

Bombay, x. 330-331, xxi. 290. 
Chotapahari, ruins at Asobhuk in Patna 

city, XX. 68. 
Chotila, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, X. 331, -xv. 167. 
Choultry Plain, near Madras city, xvi. 370. 
Chowbe Jagirs, collection of estates in 

Central India. See Chaube Jagirs. 
Chowghat (Chaughat), town in Malabar 

District, Madras, x. 331-332. 
Christian College, Madras City, xvi. 339, 

383. 
Christian Training Institute, Sialkot, xxii. 

336. 

Christianity in India, history, i. 441-442 ; 
statistics, i. 443-445 ; progress, i. 445 ; 
population statistics, i. 475-477 ; mor- 
tality among native Christians, i. 521. 
See also Protestant Missions and Roman 
Catholic Missions and each Province, 
District, and larger State article titidcr 
Population. 

Christopher, Lieut., survey of Pamban 
Channel (1837), ^ix. 376. 

Chromite, found in Andamans, v. 356 ; 
Madras Presidency, xvi. 240; Quetta- 
Pishin, Baluchistan, xxi. 16. 

Chromium, iii. 147. 

Chuadanga, subdivision in Nadia District, 
Bengal, x. 332. 

Chuadanga, village in Nadia District, 
Bengal, x. 332. 

Chuda, State in Kathiawar, Bombay, x. 
332, XV. 167. 

Chuda, chief town of State in Bombay, x. 
332- 



Chudasamas, Hindu class of former rulers 
in Gujarat : in Ahmadabad, v. 104 ; pa- 
lace at Girnar, Kathiawar, xii. 247 ; rule 
in Junagarh, Kathiawar, xiv. 236; wells 
at Junagarh said to have been built by 
slave-girls of, xiv. 238 ; collisions with 
Solankis {c. 409-1125), viii. 282. 

Chudesar, petty State in Rewa Kantha, 
Bombay, x. 332, xxi. 290. 

Chuharkhel Dhana Pass, in Sulaiman 
Range, xxiii. 129. 

Chuhras, scavenger class in Punjab, total 
number, i. 498; in Ambala,v. 280; Am- 
ritsar, v. 322 ; Bannu, vi. 396 ; Delhi, xi. 
226 ; Dera Ismail Khan, xi. 263 ; Feroze- 
pore, xii. 92; Gurdaspur, xii. 396; Guj- 
ranwala, xii. 357 ; Gujrat, xii. 368 ; Gur- 
gaon, xii. 405 ; Hissar, xiii. 149 ; Ho- 
shiarpur, xiii. 197; Jhang, xiv. 128; 
JuUundur, xiv. 226; Kapurthala State, 
xiv.410; Kamal, XV. 52; Kohat, xv.345; 
Lahore, xvi. 99 ; Ludhiana, xvi. 203 ; 
Mianwali, xvii. 320; Montgomery, xvii. 
413; Patiala State, XX. 41 ; Peshawar, 
XX. 117; Rawalpindi, xxi. 266; Rohtak, 
xxi. 314; Shahpur, x.xii. 216; Sialkot, 
xxii. 329. 

Chuhru, Jat, traditional founder of Churu, 
Rajputana (1620), x. 335. 

Chukhsa, or Chuskha, identification of, 
with Chach, Attock, x. 115. 

Chulikatta, Mishmi tribe, Assam, xvii. 

377-378. 

Chumalhari peak, between Tibet and 
Bhutan, x. 332. 

Chumbul, river in Central India. See 
Chambal. 

Chumurchi, village in Bhutan, x. 332. 

Chunar, tahsTl in Mirzapur District, 
United Provinces, x. 332-333. 

Chunar, town in Mirzapur District, United 
Provinces, with historic fort, formerly 
a military station, x. 333-334 ; pot- 
tery, iii. 244. 

Chunchangiri, hill in Mysore, xviii. 163. 

Chuuderi, town in Central India. See 
Chanderi. 

Chungll, language spoken in the Naga 
Hills, xviii. 287. 

Chunian, tahstl in Lahore District, Pun- 
jab, X. 334. 

Chunian, town in Lahore District, Pun- 
jab, x. 334. 

Chunnambukuli, limekilns at Gangai- 
kondapuram, Trichinopoly, xii. 130. 

Chunvaliyas of Viramgam, division of 
Kolis in Gujarat, xv. 3S8. 

Chupra, town in Bengal. See Chapra. 

Chura Chand, Maharaja of Manipur( 1891), 
xvii. 188. 

Churaman, rule in Bharatpur, viii. 75. 

Churiiman Rai, rule in Palamau (1784- 
1813), xix. 338. 



INDEX 



127 



Church Missionary Society. See under 

Protestant Missions. 
Church of Scotland Ladies' Association, 

mission maintained by, in Chamba, x. 

Churches and chapels, at Akyab (Anglican 
and Roman Catholic), v. 202 ; Am- 
herst (Roman Catholic), v. 297 ; Am- 
matti, Coorg (Roman Catholic and 
Basel Mission), xi. 30 ; Anekal, Mysore 
(Roman Catholic), vi. 364 ; Anjengo, 
Travancore (Roman Catholic), v. 384 ; 
Asansol (Roman Catholic), ix. 95 ; 
Bandra, Thana (Anglican and Roman 
Catholic), vi. 359 ; Bangalore, Mysore 
(Anglican and Scottish), vi. 364 ; 
Bareilly, vii. 14 ; Barisal, Backer- 
gunge (Anglican, Baptist, and Roman 
Catholic), vii. 20 ; Baroda, vii. 84 ; 
Bassein, Thana (Anglican and Roman 
Catholic), vii. 118, 121 ; Bellary, vii. 
175 ; Bhusawal, Khandesh (Roman 
Catholic), XV. 232 ; Calcutta (Anglican, 
Roman Catholic, Greek, Armenian, and 
Scottish), ix. 280; Changanacheri, Tra- 
vancore (Syro-Roman) x. 170; Chinsura, 
Hooghly (Armenian, 1695), x. 286 ; 
Chittoor,NorthArcot (Roman Catholic), 
X. 325 ; Chowghat, Malabar (Romo- 
Syrian), x. 332 ; Cocanada, Godavari 
(Roman Catholic), x. 339 ; Cochin State, 
X. 344; Cochin, Malabar (Anglican), x. 
354 ; Comilla, Tippera, x. 376 ; Coo- 
noor, Nilgiris (Roman Catholic and 
Anglican), xi. 2 ; Covelong, Chingle- 
put (Roman Catholic), xi. 54; Cudda- 
lore. South Arcot (Protestant and 
Roman Catholic), xi. 56 ; Cuddapah 
(Christ Church), xi. 73 ; Dacca (Roman 
Catholic and Protestant), xi. 119; Da- 
man (Portuguese), xi. 128, 130 ; Dapoli, 
Ratnagiri (Anglican), xi. 150 ; Darjee- 
ling (Wesleyan, Scottish, and Roman 
Catholic), xi. 180; Delhi (St. James's), 
xi. 237, 238 ; Dhar, Central India 
(Canadian Presbyterian Mission), xi. 
290, 295 ; Dharangaon, Khandesh 
(Roman Catholic,) xv. 232 ; Dhubri, 
Assam, xi. 336 ; Dhulia, Khandesh 
(Roman Catholic), xv. 232 ; Dibrugarh, 
Assam, xi. 342 ; Dindigul, Madura 
(AmericanMissionandRomanCatholic), 
xi. 357 ; Diu (Roman Catholic), xi. 363 ; 
Dum-Dum, Twenty-four Parganas(Pro- 
testant and Roman Catholic, xi. 376 ; 
Dunga GalijHazara, xi . 379 ; Ernakulam, 
Cochin (Roman Catholic), xii.2 8; Fateh- 
garh, Farrukhabad (memorial), xii. 75 ; 
Ferozepore (memorial to those w^ho 
fell in Sutlej campaign, i845-6\ xii. 
98 ; Fraserpet, Coorg (Roman Catho- 
lic), xi. 30; Gaya, xii. 208; Goa (Roman 
Catholic), xii. 259, 267; Gudalur, Nil- 



giris (Protestant and Roman Catholic), 
xii. 346 ; Grama, Mysore (Roman 
Catholic), xiii. 65 ; Hubli, Dharwar 
(German Mission and Roman Catholic), 
xiii. 222 ; Hyderabad city (Roman Ca- 
tholic and Protestant), xiii. 311 ; Indore 
(Roman Catholic), xiii. 351 ; Kaira 
(Protestant), xiv. 280 ; Karachi (Angli- 
can, Roman Catholic, and Presby- 
terian), XV. 1 2, 13 ; Karanja (Portuguese, 
ruined), xv. 23 ; Kayankulam, Travan- 
core (Syrian), xv. 195-196; Khandwa, 
Nimar (Roman Catholic and Methodist 
Episcopal), XV. 242 ; Kodaikanal, Ma- 
dura, XV. 339; Kolaba (Portuguese), 
XV. 359 ; Kolar, Mysore (Anglican and 
Wesleyan), xv. 372 ; Kolar Gold Fields, 
Mysore, xv. 378 ; Kottar, Travan- 
core (Roman Catholic), xvi. 6 ; Kott- 
ayam, Travancore (Syrian Christian), 
xvi. 7; Kunnamkulam, Cochin (Syrian), 
xvi. 27; Lonauli, Poona (Protestant 
and Roman Catholic), xvi. 172 ; Ma- 
dras City, xvi. 367 ; Mahe (Roman 
Catholic), xvii. 8 ; Mapu9a, Goa 
(Roman Catholic), xvii. 204 ; Meerut, 
xvii. 265 ; Meiktila, Burma (Anglican 
and Roman Catholic), xvii. 288 ; Mer- 
cara, Coorg (Roman Catholic and Basel 
Mission), xi. 30, 31, xvii. 292 ; Mid- 
napore, xvii. 340 ; Moradabad, xvii. 
430 ; Moulmein, Burma, xviii. 7 ; 
Multan (English and Roman Catholic), 
xviii. 38 ; Nagari, Dacca (Roman 
Catholic, 1664), xi. 108 ; Nirmal, 
Thana (Roman Catholic), xix. 123; 
Ootacamund, Nilgiris (St. Stephen's), 
xix. 240 ; Patna (Roman Catholic), 
XX. 70 ; Pulicat, Nellore (Roman 
Catholic), XX. 242 ; Punganuru, North 
Arcot (Roman Catholic), xx. 245 ; 
Ramnad, Madura (Roman Catholic 
andS.P.G.),xxi.i79; Sadras, Chingle- 
put (Dutch), xxi. 348 ; St. Thomas's 
Mount, Chingleput (Portuguese), xxi. . 
387-388 ; Sattankulam, Tinnevelly 
(Roman Catholic and Protestant), 
xxii. 133 ; Sehore, Central India (Pro- 
testant), xxii. 162 ; Serampore, Hooghly 
(Danish and Roman Catholic), xxii. 
178 ; Shahapur, Thana (Protestant and 
Roman Catholic), xxii. 199; Shw^ebo, 
Burma (Roman Catholic and S.P.G.), 
xxii. 322 ; Siddapur, North Kanara 
(Roman Catholic), xi. 30 ; Simla, xxii. 
384; Sukkur, Sind, xxiii. 127 ; Sunti- 
koppa, Coorg (Roman Catholic), xi. 
30 ; Surat (English, Portuguese, and 
Armenian), xxiii. 166 ; Tellicherry, 
Malabar, xxiii. 2 76; Tezgaon, near Dacca 
(Roman Catholic), xi. 108 ; Toungoo, 
Burma, xxiii. 433; Tranquebar (1718), 
xxiii. 435 ; Trichur, Cochin (^Protestant, 



128 



INDEX 



Chaldean Syrian, and Romo-Syrian), 
xxiv. 48 ; Trombay, Thana (Portu- 
guese, ruined), xxiv. 51 ; Tuticorin, 
Tinnevelly (Catholic), xxiv. 65 ; Vayit- 
tiri, Malabar (Roman Catholic and 
Anglican), xxiv. 302 ; Vellore fort, 
North Arcot, xxiv. 305 ; Verapoli, Tra- 
vancore (Carmelite), xxiv. 308 ; Vira- 
rajendrapet, Coorg (Roman Catholic), 
xxiv. 319 ; Vizagapatam, xxiv. 338 ; 
Vypln, Cochin, xxiv. 344 ; Whitefield, 
Mysore (Protestant and Roman Catho- 
lic), xxiv. 387. See also Cathedrals. 

Churi, pass in Pab Range, Baluchistan, 
xix. 296. 

Churni, river of Bengal. See Matabhanga. 

Churu, town in Rajputana, x. 335. 

Churuwal Banias, in Khurja, Bulandshahr, 
XV. 297. 

Chuta Khan, mosqne at Dera Ghazi Khan, 
xi. 258. 

Chutia, village in RanchI District, Bengal, 
giving its name to Chota Nagpur, x. 335. 

Chutia, language of the Bodo group, i. 

393. 400. 

Chutia Nagpur, Division in Bengal. See 
Chota Nagpur. 

Chutiyas, former ruling race in Assam, 
final overthrow by Ahoms (1523% 
vi. 26, 43 ; rule in Lakhimpur, xvi. 122, 
126; in Sibsagar, xxii. 346, 348. 

Chutturpore, State in Central India. See 
Chhatarpur. 

Cigars, cigarettes, &c., manufactured in 
Bombay Presidency, viii. 326 ; Chingle- 
put, X. 261-262 ; Danubyu, Burma, xi. 
149 ; Dindigul, Madura, xi. 357 ; Khaira- 
garh, Central Provinces, xv.208; Madras 
Presidency, xvi. 296, 375 ; Parlakimedi, 
Ganjam, xx. 5; Trichinopoly, xxiv. 36. 

Cinchona, iii. 66-69 ! history of its intro- 
duction into India, 66 ; prodiiction, 66- 
67 ; varieties and soils, 67 ; seed-beds 
and nurseries, 67 ; permanent planta- 
tion, 67-68 ; weeding and pruning, 68 ; 
methods of harvesting, 68 ; time and 
mode of harvesting bark crop, 68-69 ; 
manufacture, 69 ; qualities of barks, 69. 
Local notices : Coorg, xi. 34 ; Dar- 
jeeling, xi. 173; Dodabetta, Nilgiris, 
xi- 365 ; Western Ghats, xii. 220 ; 
Madras Presidency, xvi. 275 ; Govern- 
ment plantations and factory at Nadu- 
vattam, Nilgiris, xviii. 284 ; Ootaca- 
mund, Nilgiris, xix. 237 ; Ouchterlony 
Valley, Nilgiris, xix 277. See also 
Quinine. 

Cinco Chagas Chapel, at Goa, xii. 267. 

Cinnamon, cultivated in Malabar, xvii. 
62 ; Ruby Mines District, Burma, xxi. 
332 ; Southern Shan States, xxii. 257 ; 
Shimoga, Mysore, xxii. 281 ; Tavoy, 
Burma, xxiii. 259. 



Cintabor, Cintacola, Cintacura, Cintapor, 
ancient names of Chitakul, North Ka- 
nara, x. 289. 
Circars, Northern, five Northern Districts 
of Madras Presidency, x. 335-336 ; 
meteorology, i. 133, 145; conquered 
from the French (1758), finally acquired 
by the British (1767), ii. 478. 
Cis-Indus Swatis, expedition sent against 
(1888), xix. 156. 

Cis-Sutlej States, group of States in Pun- 
jab, taken under British protection 
(1809), X. 336-338. 

Cisterns, rock-cut, at Galna, Nasik, xii. 
124; Kuda, Kolaba (Buddhist), xvi. 1 o ; 
Magathan, Thana, xvi. 410; Narnala, 
Berar, xviii. 379. 

Cities, ruined. See Ruined Cities. 

Citron, cultivated in Belgaum, vii. 146 ; 
Chin Hills, Burma, x. 276 ; Dharwar, 
xi. 304 ; Southern Shan States, xxii. 
257; Shevaroy Hills, xxii. 274; Sind, 
xxii. 413 ; United Provinces, xxiv. 183. 

Civets (F?'f^rr/a?a^), twenty-one species in 
India, i. 219-220 ; in Balasore, vi. 238 ; 
Coorg, xi. 7 ; Northern Shan States, 
xxii. 233 ; Sikkim, xxii. 367. 

Civil Engineering College. See tinder 
Colleges. 

Civil Service, its organization, iv. 40-45 ; 
its predecessors, 7, 14, 15, 40, 41 ; 
reforms by Lord Clive and Warren 
Hastings, 40 ; reorganized by Lord 
Comwallis, 40-41 ; by Lord Welles- 
ley, 41 ; Haileybury College estab- 
lished (1805), closed (1858), 41 ; first 
public competition (1855), 41 ; quali- 
fications of candidates, 41 ; course after 
appointment, 41 ; employment of na- 
tives, 42-43 ; lower and higher posts, 
42-43 ; failure of the Statutory Civil 
Service, 43 ; division into three branches, 
Indian, Provincial, and Subordinate, 
43-44 ; specialized departments, 44-45. 

Civil Surgeon, duties, iv. 52. 

Clare, Lord, Governor of Bombay, con- 
ciliatory measures respecting Baroda, 
vii. 38. 

Clark, Robert, missionary, xxiii. 105. 

Clarke, C. B., botanical sub-areas of 
British India, i. 165. 

Clay figures, manufactured at Krishnagar, 
Nadia, xvi. 8 ; Lucknow, xvi. 198 ; 
Poona, XX. 176, 185. 

Cleghorn, Dr., Conservator of Forests in 
Madras (1856), iii. 107, xvi, 286. 

Clement XII, Pope, apostasy amongst 
Christians of Coimbatore caused by 
Bull of (1739), X. 361. 

Clement XIV, Pope, Society of Jesus sup- 
pressed by (1773), X. 361. 

Clevland, Augustus, Collector of Bhagal- 
pur (1780), viii. 28 ; monuments to 



INDEX 



129 



memory of, in Bhagalpur, viii. 29, 37, 
XV. 22 ; Hill Rangers organized (1780), 
viii. 37, XV. 22 ; Paharias reduced 
(1779-84), xi. i3i,xxii. 64. 

Clewer Sisters, girls' schools in Simdar- 
bans maintained by, xxiv. 73. 

Clibborn, Major, sent to Kahan, Baluchi- 
stan, to relieve Captain Lewis Brown 
(1840), vi. 281. 

Climate, influence of forests on, iii. 104. 
See also in each Province, District, and 
larger State article under Physical 
Aspects. 

Clive, Lord, defence of Arcot (1751), ii. 
472; recapture of Calcutta (1757), ii. 
475 ; Chandernagore captured (1757), 
ii. 475 ; battle of Plassey (1757), ii. 
475-476, iv. 9; jdgir of Twenty-four 
Parganas granted to, ii. 477 ; Governor 
of Bengal (1758-60, 1765-7), ii. 478, iv. 
9 ; partition of Gangetic Valley ( 1 765) , 
ii.480; reorganization of the Company's 
service (1766), ii. 4S0, iv. 40; vote of 
censure in Parliament (1773), ii- 480; 
death (1774), ii. 480 ; control of manu- 
facture and sale of salt introduced by, 
iv. 248 ; army reforms, iv. 327-328. 

Local notices : Allgarh fort taken 
(1756), xii. 160; capture and defence 
of Arcot (1751), V. 406, 419; 'dual 
system ' of government introduced into 
Bengal (i765\ vii. 218-219; Budge- 
Budge fort captured (1756), ix. 45; 
Calcutta recaptured (1757), ix. 264 ; 
Chandernagore captured (1757), x. 
164; Chingleput taken from French 
(1752), x. 269 ; Conjeeveram taken 
(1752), X. 377 ; Covelong invested 
(1752), xi. 54 ; siege of Devikottai, xi. 
276 ; first commission at Fort St. David 
received (1747^ xii. 102 ; governor of 
Fort St. David (1756), xii. 102 ; victory 
over Raja Sahib and his French allies 
at Kaveripak (i752),xv. 192; Fordesent 
to Northern Circars (1760), x. 336; 
stayed at Motijhil, Murshidabad (1765, 
1766), xviii. 57; honours bestowed on 
Raja of Nadia, xviii. 274; victory at 
Plassey (1757), vii. 218, xx. 156; contest 
with French at Samayapuram and sur- 
render of French, xxii. 3-4 ; in Carnatic 
Wars at Trichinopoly, xxiv. 28 ; jagJroi 
Twenty-fourParganns granted to ( 1 759\ 
xxiv. 70 ; Vijayadrug fort (Gheria) taken 
(1756% viii. 405, xxiv. 310. 

Close, Sir Barry, appointed Resident at 
Mysore (1799), ^- 33^' xviii. 183. 

Closepet, town in Bangalore District, 
Mysore, named after Sir Barry Close 
_ (1800), X. 338. 

Clothing, imports and exports, iii. 277, 
29.'5, 308, 309. 

Clothing, manufactured, Dharlwal, Gur- 

VOL. XXV. K 



daspur, xi. 299 ; Katha, Burma, xv. 
160 ; Khasi and Jaintia Hills, xv. 263 ; 
Kehsi Mansam, Burma, xv. 197; Lora- 
lai, Baluchistan, xvi. 177 ; North-West 
Frontier Province, xix. 184; Nowgong, 
Assam, xix. 226 ; Raver, Khandesh, xxi. 
260 ; Sangli State, Southern Maratha 
Country, xxii. 53; Sara wan, Baluchistan, 
xxii. 100; .Southern Shan States, xxii. 
261 ; Sibi, Baluchistan, xxii. 340. See 
also Boots and Shoes, Dress, Saris, 
&c. 

Club Hill, peak near Ootacamund, NTl- 
giris, xix. 238. 

Clyde, Lord. See Campbell, Sir Colin. 

Coal and coal-mines, value of coal pro- 
duced (1898-1903), iii. 130, 131; con- 
sumption by railways, iii. 131 ; imports 
and exports, iii. 131 ; total consumption, 
iii. 131-132 ; sources, iii. 132 ; Gond- 
wana, iii. 132-138; Bengal, iii. 132, 
164; Ranlganj, iii. 132-133; Jherria, 
iii. 133-134; Bokaro, iii. 134; Ram- 
garh, iii. 134; Karanpura, iii. 134; 
Daltonganj, iii. 134; Glridih, iii. 134; 
Satpura, iii. 134-135; Mohpani,iii. 135; 
Warora, iii. 135, 164; Singareni, iii. 
135; Umaria, iii. 136; Darjeeling, iii. 
136; Cretaceous and Tertiary, iii. 136 ; 
Assam, iii. 136-137 ;Makum, 137, 165; 
.Shwebo, iii. i37;Lashio, iii. 137; Nam- 
maw, iii. 137; Khost, iii. 137-138, 
164, 165 ; Sor Range, iii. 138; Mach, 
iii. 138; Punjab, iii. 138; Dandot, iii. 
138, 164, 165 ; Pidh, iii. 138; Mianwali, 
iii. 138 ; Bikaner, iii. 138 ; effect of coal- 
mining on the population, iii. 163, 164 ; 
source of the colliers, iii. 164 ; average 
output by Indian colliers, iii. 164 ; hours 
of work and wages, iii. 164-165 ; 
methods of mining, iii. 165 ; death-rale 
from accidents, iii. 165-166; produc- 
tion and consumption, iii. 233-235 ; 
trade statistics, iii. 308, 309, 314; 
import prices, iii. 463 ; exempted from 
duty, iv. 264 ; Government control, iv. 

31 7-3' 8- 

Local notices : Afghanistan, v. 55 ; 
Afghan-Turkistan, v. 69 ; Akyab, Bur- 
ma, V. 196 ; Andamans, v. 356 ; Asan- 
sol,Burdwan, vi. 8, 9; Assam, vi. 69-72; 
Attock, vi. 135 ; Baghelkhand, vi. 186 ; 
Baluchistan, vi. 306 ; Banganapalle, 
Madras, vi. 375 ; Bankura, vi. 384, 387 ; 
BedadanurUjGodavari, Madras, vii. 140; 
Bengal, vii. 202, 261-263, 264 ; Berar, 
vii. 363, 392 ; Betul, Central Provinces, 
viii. 12; Bikaner, Rajputana, viii. 203, 
211 ; Bilaspur, Central Provinces, viii. 
228 ; Birbhum, viii. 240, 244; Bisram- 
pur. Central Provinces, viii. 249 ; Bolan 
Pass, Baluchistan, viii. 265 ; Brahui 
Range, Baluchistan, ix. 15 ; Burdwan 



13© 



INDEX 



Division, ix. 90, 91, 96 ; Burma, ix. 170- 
171, 173 ; Central India, ix. 366-367 ; 
Central Provinces, x. 50-51 ; Chanda, 
Central Provinces, x. 149, 156 ; Cherra, 
Assam, x. 194 ; Cherrapunji, Assam, x. 
194 ; Chhindwara, Central Provinces, 
X. 205, 210-211 ; Upper Chindvvin, 
Burma, x. 239, 246; Chin Hills, Burma, 
X. 276 ; Chola Xagpur, Bengal, x. 329- 
330; Cutch, xi. So; Dallonganj, Pala- 
mau, Bengal, xi. 128, 263. 264 ; Darjee- 
ling, xi. 174; Darrang, Assam, xi. 187; 
Dera Ghazi Khan, xi. 255 ; Gangpur, 
Orissa, xii. 142 ; Garo Hills, Assam, 
xii. 179 ; Gaya, xii. 196 ; Giridih, Ha- 
zaribagh, xii. 246 ; Goalpara, Assam, 
xii. 274; Gobindpur, Manbhum, xii. 
280; Godavari District, xii. 291; Hazara, 
North-West frontier Province, xiii. 8i ; 
Hazaribagh. xiii. 94-95; Himalayas, xiii. 
130; Hyderabad State, xiii. 232, 261, 
265, 266; Jaipur, Lakhimpur, Assam, 
xiii. 402 ; Jalpaigurl, xiv. 38 ; Jhelum, 
xiv. 151; Kalat, Baluchistan, xiv. 302; 
Kashmir, xv. 131 ; Khasi Hills, Assam, 
XV. 255, 262 ; Khyrim, Khasi Hills, 
Assam, xv. 304 ; Kila Saifulla, Balu- 
chistan, xv. 305 ; Lakhimpur, Assam, 
xvi. 124 : Langrin, Khasi Hills, Assam, 
xvi. 135; Loralai, Baluchistan, xvi. 177; 
Madras Presidency, xvi. 241, 289, 300, 
354; Makum, Assam, xvii. 207; Man- 
bhum, xvii. 111-112, 117; Mandalay, 
Burma, xvii. 133 ; Maodon, Khasi Hills, 
Assam, xvii. 204 ; Maoflang, Khasi 
Hills, Assam, xvii. 204 ; Maolong, 
Khasi Hills, Assam, xvii. 204; Mao- 
sanram, Khasi Hills, Assam, xvii. 204 ; 
Meiktila, Burma, xvii. 283 ; Mergui, 
Burma, xvii. 304 ; Mianwali, xvii. 322 ; 
Minbu, Burma, xvii. 352 ; Mirzapur, 
xvii. 372-373 ; Naga Hills, Assam, 
xviii. 293 ; Narsinghpur, xviii. 390-391; 
Nicobars, xix. 61 ; Nongstoin, Khasi 
Hills, Assam, xix. 136; North-West 
Frontier Province, xix. 181 ; Nowgong, 
Assam, xix. 226; Orissa Tributary 
States, xix. 260 ; Pakokku, Burma, xix. 
326; Palamau, xix. 335, 336, 341; Pun- 
jab, xx. 313; Quetta-Pishin, Baluchistan, 
xxi. 16, 20; Kaigarh State, Central Pro- 
vinces, xxi. 46 ; Kajmahal Hills, Bengal, 
xxi. 77; Rajputana, xxi. 89, 128; Rani- 
ganj, Burdwan, xxi. 233; Kewah State, 
Central India, xxi. 2S0, 286 ; Salt 
Range, Punjab, xxi. 41 3; Sambalpur, 
xxii. 12 ; Sandoway, Burma, xxii. 36 ; 
Santal Parganas, xxii. 62, 72; Sarawan, 
Baluchistan, xxii. 100; Seoni, xxii. 171; 
Northern .Shan States, xxii. 232, 240; 
Southern .Shan .States, xxii. 260 ; .Shil- 
long, Assam, xxii. 279; .Shwebo, Burma, 
xxii. 311, 316-317; Sibsagar, Assam, 



xxii. 350; Singareni, Hyderabad, xxiv. 
420 ; Singrauli, East Satpnras, xxii. 
133; Sirpur Tandur, Hyderabad, xxiii. 
43 ; Surguja, Central Provinces, xxiii. 
171, 172 ; Talcher, xxiii. 212 ; Thayet- 
myo, Burma, xxiii. 349 ; Toungoo, 
Burma, xxiii. 422 ; Udaipur State, 
Central Provinces, xxiv. S3 ; Umaria, 
Rewah, Central India, xxiv. 116-117; 
United Provinces, xxiv. 141 ; Warangal, 
Hyderabad, xxiv. 357, 361 ; Warora, 
Central Provinces, xxiv. 377 ; Wun, 
xxiv. 388-389, 394; Zhob, Baluchistan, 
xxiv. 432. 

Coasting trade, iii. 303. 

Cobalt, iii. 147. 

Cocanada, subdivision in Godavari Dis- 
trict, Madras, x. 338. 

Cocanada, tiihik in Cjodavari District, 
Madras, x. 338. 

Cocanada, town and seaport in Godavari 
District, Madras, with special exports 
of cotton, x. 338-340. 

Cochin State, Madras, x. 340-353 ; phy- 
sical aspects, 340-342 ; history, 342- 
343 ; population, 344-346; agriculture, 
346-347 ; forests, 347-34S ; minerals, 
348 ; trade and communications, 348- 
349; administration, 349-353; edu- 
cation, 352-353 ; medical, 353. 

Other references: Jewish colony, i. 
441 ; density of population, i. 454 ; 
Christianity, i. 475-476 ; grant of 
village to Jews, ii. 58; Portuguese 
settlement (1503), ii. 447 ; postal ar- 
rangements, iii. 424-425 ; subsidiary 
force, iv. 86 ; area, population, revenue, 
and administration, iv. 96. 

Cochin, taluk in Malabar District, 
Madras, x. 353. 

Cochin, town and port in Malabar Dis- 
trict, Madras, early Portuguese and 
Dutch settlement, x. 353-355. 

Cockerell, Mr., Joint-Magistrate of Kar- 
wi, murdered at Banda (1857), vi. 349. 

Cocks, Mr., Special Commissioner for 
Etah and Aligarh during the Mutiny 
(1857), xii. 31. 

Coco nut carving, Madras Presidency, 
xvi. 294. 

Coco-nut fibre or coir, Amindlvi Islands, 
Laccadives, v. 305 ; Cochin, x. 348 ; 
Kolaba, xv. 364 ; Madras Presidency, 
xvi. 297, 299. 

Coco-nut oil. Sec Oils. 

Coco-nut palms, grown or cultivated in 
Akalkot State, Bombay, v. 1 78 ; Ali- 
bag, Kolaba, v. 206 ; Amherst, Burma, 
V. 298 ; Amindlvi Islands, Laccadives, 
v. 305; Andamans, v. 358; .Arsikere, 
Mysore, vi. 7; Backergunge, vi. 170; 
Bengal, vii. 248; Bijapur, viii. 176; 
Bombay Presidency, viii. 275 ; Bombay 



INDEX 



131 



City, viii. 413 ; Southern Carnatic, viii. 
317; Challakeie, Mysore, x. 12S; 
Chamrajnagar, Mysore, x. 1 47 ; Channa- 
patna, Mysore, x. 173; Chiknayakan- 
lialli, Mysore, x. 223 ; Chitaldroog, 
Mysore, x. 293, 294; Cochin, x. 341, 
342,346; Cocos Islands, X. 356 ; Con- 
jeeveram, Chingleput, x. 377 ; Coonda- 
poor. South Kanara, xi. i ; Dharvvar, 
xi. 304, 309 ; Diu, xi. 362 ; Gersoppa, 
North Kanara, xii. 211 ; Goa, xii. 261 ; 
Godavari, xii. 289; Goribidnur, My- 
sore, xii. 343; Hassan, Mysore, xiii. 
66; Henzada, Burma, xiii. 106; Hon- 
navalli, Mysore, xiii. 162 ; Janjira 
State, Bombay, xiv. 59 ; Kadur, My- 
sore, xiv. 269 ; North Kanara, xiv. 
341, 347 ; South Kanara, xiv. 355, 362 ; 
Kankanhalli, Mysore, xiv. 401 ; Ka- 
saragod, South Kanara. xv. 68 ; Katlii- 
awar, xv. 173 ; Khulna, xv. 286, 294; 
Kolaba, xv. 364 ; Konkan, xv. 394 ; 
Krishnarajpet, Jilysore, xvi. 10; Kum- 
ta. North Kanara, xvi. 23 ; Kurnool, 
xvi. 32 ; Laccadive Islands, xvi. 86 ; 
Madakaslra, Anantapur, xvi. 226 ; 
Madurantakani, Chingleput, xvi. 407; 
Mahuva, Kathiavvar, xvii. 27; Mala- 
bar, xvii. 62,64 ; Mandalay, xvii. 131 ; 
Mangalore, South Kanara, xvii. 176; 
Mergui, Burma, xvii. 300 ; Minbu, 
Burma, xvii. 345, 356 ; Minicoy Island, 
Nicobars, xvii. 360; Mongnai, Burma, 
xvii. 405 ; Myaungmya, Burma, xviii. 
113; Mysore, xviii. 210, 260; Naga- 
mangala, Mysore, xviii. 295 ; Nagaram 
Island, Godavari, xviii. 297 ; Nama- 
khal, Salem, xviii. 347 ; Nelloie, xix. 
8 ; Nicobars, xix. 61 ; Noakhali, xix. 
129, 132; Pyapon, Burma, xxi. 5; 
Ratnagiri, xxi. 246, 252 ; Salem, xxi, 
400; Salsette, Thana, xxi. 411 ; San- 
doway, Burma, xxii. 35; Savantvadi 
State, Bombay, xxii. 150, 151 ; South- 
ern Shan States, xxii. 257 ; Sira, My- 
sore, xxiii. 16 ; Sirsi, North Kanara, 
xxiii. 47 ; vSiruguppa, Bellary, xxiii. 
48 ; Tanjore, xxiii. 225, 226 ; Tavoy, 
Burma, xxiii. 259 ; Tharrawaddy, Bur- 
ma, xxiii. 321 ; Tiptur, Mysore, xxiii. 
387 ; Tirutturaippundi, Tanjore, xxiii. 
397 ; Travancore, Madras, xxiv. 5,10; 
Vypin, Cochin, xxiv. 343 ; Yelandur, 
Mysore, xxiv. 419; Yellapur, North 
Kanara, xxiv. 420. 

Cocos, islands in Bay of Bengal, forming 
part of Tharrawaddy District, Burma, 
X. 355-:356; botany, i. 207. 

Codification in British India, iv. 138-141. 

Coffee, iii. 63-66; history, 63; produc- 
tion, 63 ; the plant, 63 ; cultivation, 
63-64; seed-beds, 64; plantations, 64 ; 
weeding and hoeing, 64 ; manures, 65 ; 



topping and pruning, 65 ; plucking, 65 ; 
manufacture, 65-66 ; out-turn, 66; ex- 
port trade, 255, 290-291. 

Local notices : Anaihialais, Coim- 
batore, v. 333 ; Anaimudi, Travancore, 
V. 334; Andamans, V. 358 ; BabaBudan 
Mountains, Mysore, vi. 164; Banga- 
lore, Mysore, vi. 365 ; Belur, Mysore, 
vii. 177; Bhamo, Burma, viii. 51; 
Burma, ix. 153 ; Chamrajnagar, My- 
sore, X. 147; Chikalda, Berar, x. 220; 
Chikmugalur, Mysore, x. 222 ; Cochin 
State, X. 342, 346 ; Coimbatore, x. 362 ; 
Coonoor, Nilgiris, xi. 2 ; Coorg, xi. 
17-18, 32-33, 34; Dindigul, Madura, 
xi. 356; Ellichpur, Berar, xii. 14; 
Western Ghats, xii. 220 ; Gudalur, 
Nilgiris, xii. 346; Hassan, Mysore, 
xiii. 65, 66-67, 70; Javadi Hills, 
Madras, xiv. 85 ; Kadur, Mysore, .xiv. 
266 ; Kodaikanal, Madura, xv. 338 ; 
Kolhapur State, Bombay, xv. 384 ; Kol- 
langod, Malabar, .XV. 390; Koppa, My- 
sore, xv. 397 ; Madras Presidency, xvi. 
275' 352; Madura, xvi. 395; Manjar- 
abad, Mysore, xvii. 196 ; Mercara, 
Coorg, xvii. 292; Mudgere, xviii. 11, 
12; Myitkyina, Burma, xviii. 141 ; My- 
sore State, xviii. |i 66, 212,216; Nelliam- 
pathis. Cochin, xix. 5 ; Nilgiris, xix. 94 ; 
Ouchterlony Valley, Nilgiris, xix. 277 ; 
Panchgani, Satarn, xix. 379 ; Ruby 
Mines District, Burma, xxi. 331 ; Salem, 
xxi. 400 ; Southern Shan States, xxii. 
257; Shencottah, Travancore, xxii. 
271 ; Shevaroy Hills, Salem, xxii. 274 ; 
Shimoga, Mysore, xxii. 282 ; Srungava- 
rappukota, Vizagapatam, xxiii. 112 ; 
Tarikere, Mysore, xxiii. 251 ; Tavoy, 
Burma, xxiii. 263 ; Ththahalli, Mysore, 
xxiii. 391 ; Toungoo, Burma, xxiii. 427 ; 
Travancore, Madras, xxiv. 10, 12; Wy- 
naad, Malabar, xxiv. 400 ; Yedenalk- 
nad, Coorg, xxiv. 418. 

Coffee-curing, Bangalore, Mysore, vi. 
369; Calicut, Malabar, ix. 291; Coim- 
batore, x. 372 ; Hunsur, Mysore, xiii. 
225 ; South Kanara, xiv. 365 ; Madras 
Presidency, xvi. 295 ; Mangalore, South 
Kanara, xvii. 177 ; Mysore State, xviii. 
221. 

Cogan, Andrew, Fort St. George founded 
by (1640), xvi. 368. 

Coimbatore, District in Madras, x. 356- 
370 ; physical aspects, 356-358 ; his- 
tory, 358-359 ; population, 360-361 ; 
agriculture, 361-363 ; forests, 363-365 ; 
mines and minerals, 365 ; trade and 
communications, 365-367 ; famine, 
367; administration, 367-370; educa- 
tion, 369-370; medical, 370. 

Other references: Old coins found, 
ii. 150 ; cotton cultivation, iii. 44 ; cur- 



ie 2 



13' 



INDEX 



tains, sheets, and handkerchiefs manu- 
factured, iii. i88 ; wood-carving, iii. 231. 
Coimbatore, subdivision in Madras, x. 

370- 
Coimbatore, taluk in Madras, x. 370-371. 

Coimbatore, city in Madras, of impor- 
tance in the Carnatic Wars, with cot- 
ton-mill and many factories, x. 371- 

373- 

Coinage, of Afglianistan, v. 44 ; Ahvar 
State, v. 265 ; Banswara State, vi. 
412; Baroda State (discontinued), vii. 
63 ; Bharatpur State (discontinued), 
viii. 84; Bhaunagar State (discon- 
tinued), XV. 185; Bhopal State (discon- 
tinued) , viii. 1 39 ; Bijawar State (discon- 
tinued), viii. 191; Bli<anerState(discon- 
tinued), viii. 214; Bondi State, ix. 85- 
86 ; States in Central India, ix. 378, 
379 ; Charkhari State (discontinued), 
X. 179; Chhatarpur State (discon- 
tinued), X. 201 ; Cochin State, x. 350; 
Datia State (discontinued), xi. 19S; 
Dewas States, xi. 278; Dhar State, xi. 
292 ; Dholpur State (discontinued), xi. 
329 ; Dungarpur State (discontinued), xi. 
384; GwaliorState,xii.435; Hyderabad 
State, xiii. 278 ; Indore State, xiii. 346- 
347 ; Jaipur State, xiii. 395 ; Jaisal- 
mer State, xiv. 8 ; Jhabua State (dis- 
continued), xiv. 107 ; Jhalawar State 
(discontinued), xiv. 120; Jind State, 
xiv. 175 ; Jodhpur Slate (discontinued), 
xiv. 195; Junagarh State, xv. 185; 
Karauli State (discontinued), xv. 32 ; 
Kashmir, xv. 137 ; Kathiavvar States, 
XV. 185; Kishangarh State, xv. 316; 
Kotah State (discontinued), xv. 421 ; 
Mysore State, xviii. 178, 181, 186-187 ; 
Nabha State, xviii. 269 ; Orchha .State, 
xix. 247; Partabgarh State, xx. 12-13; 
Patiala State, xx. 48 ; States in Raj- 
putana, xxi. 146, 147 ; Ratlam State, 
XXI. 244 ; Rewah State, xxi. 288 ; Sam- 
thar Slate, xxii. 25; .Shahpura Chief- 
ship, xxii. 2 2.^; Sirohi State, xxiii. 35 ; 
Tonk State, xxiii. 414, 415; Travan- 
core State, xxiv. 18 ; Udaipur State, 
xxiv. 99. See also Currency. 

Coins, found at Badrihat, Murshidabad, vi. 
179 ; Indo-Scythian and punch-marked, 
Baluchistan, vi. 284 ; Greek, found in 
Bannu, vi. 395 ; in Bara Bank!, vi. 
419; in Basti, vii. 126 ; at Beshnagar, 
Central India, viii. 106; at Bhambore, 
.Sind, viii. 44; in Bulandshahr, ix. 58 ; 
at Calingapalam, Ganjam, ix. 291 ; in 
Central India, ix. 344 ; in Chitaldroog, 
Mysore, x, 291 ; Andhra lead coins, at 
Chandravali, Mysore, x. 297 ; near 
Chitor, Rajputana, x. 299 ; Roman 
coins, in Coimbatore, x, 359 ; aureus 
of Trajan, in Cuddapah, xi. 62 ; old 



Hindu coins, in Cuddajiah, \i. 62 ; 
Indo - Scythian coins, at Dipalpur, 
Montgomery, xi. 359; Gupta coins, in 
Fyzabad, xii. in ; Andhra lead coins, 
at Gudivada, Kistna, xii. 347 ; at 
Harappa, ISIontgomery, xiii. 41 ; in 
Hazara, xiii. 77 ; Hindu, gold Roman, 
and Sassanian, near Jalalabad, Afghan- 
istan, xiv. 12; Graeco-Bactrian, at 
Jalalpur, xiv. 15-16; old copper, at 
Jaugada, Ganjam, xiv. 73 ; Gupta, gold, 
at JhusT, Allahabad, xiv. 165; Indo- 
.Scythian, in Karnal, xv. 49; at Karur, 
Coimbatore, xv. 62 ; at Kosam, Allah- 
abad, XV. 407 ; Indo-Parthian and 
Kushan, in Lahore, xvi. 97 ; of Caliph 
Marwan II, in Loralai, Baluchistan, xvi. 
175; Roman, in Madura, xvi. 391 ; Bud- 
dhist, in Madura, xvi. 391 ; at Mahas- 
than, Bogra, xvi. 437 ; Greek and 
Indo-Scythian, at Mong Rasul, Guj- 
rat, xvii. 3S9; at Narwar, Central India, 
xviii. 396 ; of Western Satraps, in 
Nasik, xviii. 401 ; copper, at Patan- 
cheru, Hyderabad, xx. 26; at Pathan- 
kot, Gurdaspur, xv. 28 ; at PoUachi, 
Coimbatore, xx. 159; in Pudukkot- 
tai, Madras, xx. 233, 237 ; at Ram- 
nagar, Bareilly, vii. 6 ; in Sandoway, 
Burma, xxii. 34 ; punch-marked, at 
Sarangpur, Central India,, xxii. 95; 
Roman, Chinese, and Persian, at Seven 
Pagodas, Chingleput, xxii. 185 ; at 
Sunet, Ludhiana, xxiii. 146; punch- 
marked, in Shirani country, Baluchistan, 
xxiv. 431 ; at Shorkot, Jhang, xxii. 
309 ; Indo-Bactrian, in Sialkot, xxii. 
328 ; at Tamluk, Midnapore, xxiii. 
217 ; cojiper, at Ujjain, Central India, 
x.xiv. 112. 
Coins and Numismatics, general observa- 
tions, ii. 75-76; ancient, of Northern 
India, ii. 135-143; use of, introduced 
seventh century b. c, ii. 135 ; ' punch- 
marked,' ii. 135-137, 150-151 ; cast, ii. 
137; Bactrian, ii. 137-138; Andhra, 
ii. 138 ; Kushan, ii. 138-140; Roman, 
ii. 138-139; Indo-Scythian, ii. 139; 
Kanishka, ii. 139-140; Huvishka, ii. 
140; Vasudeva,ii. 140; Gupta dynasty, 
ii.141-142; .Satraps, ii. 142 ; degraded, 
ii. 142-143; .Sassanian, ii. 142; Chan- 
del, ii. 142 ; ' Bull and Horseman ' 
type, ii. 143; Muhammadan and Indo- 
European, ii. 143-149 ; Ghazni, ii. 
143-144; Ghorl, ii. 144 ; of .Slave 
dynasty at IJelhi, ii. 144 ; Ala-ud- 
din, ii. 144-145 ; Kutb-ud-din Mu- 
barak .Shah, ii. 145 ; Tughlak, ii. 145 ; 
Suri, ii. 145-146 ; Akbar, ii. 146 ; 
Jahanglr, ii. 146-147; Shah Jahan, ii. 
147; Aurangzeb, ii. 147-148; East 
India Company, ii. 148-149, iv. 514- 



INDEX 



133 



516; modern Native States, ii. 14S, 
149, iv. 520, 521; European, ii. 149; 
of Southern India, ii. 149-153; gold 
coins of the Soutli, ii. 151-153; Cha- 
luicya, ii. 151-152; Chola, ii. 152; 
Vijayanagar, ii. 152 ; Mysore, ii. 153; 
Chinese pilgrims' erroneous denial of 
coins in Northern India, ii. 300 ; fall 
in the gold value of the silver rupee, ii. 
524-525, iv. 517; British sovereign 
made legal tender in India (1899), ii. 
5 28; Muhammadan coinage, iv. 513 ; 
native mints, iv. 514; coinage of the 
East India Company, iv. 514-516 ; 
unification of the coinage, iv. 516; fall 
in gold value of silver and closure of 
mints (1S93), iv. 517; introduction of 
a gold standard (iS99),iv. 518; reform 
of the currency, iv. 519; coinage of 
Native States gradually superseded by 
British rupee, iv. 520-521. 

Coir, or coco-nut fibre, exports, iii. 309. 

Coir rope and yarn manufactured in 
Amindivi Islands, v. 305 ; Baruva, Gan- 
jam, vii. 89 ; Cochin, x. 348 ; JanjTra 
State, Bombay, xiv. 60 ; South Kanara, 
xi^'- 365 ; Kolaba, xv. 364 ; Laccadive 
Islands, xvi. 88 ; Madras Presidency, 
xvi. 297, 299, 355 ; Travancore, xxiv. 12. 

Coke, Brigadier, entered Budaun during 
Mutiny (1858), ix. 36. 

Coke, Captain J., expedition against vil- 
lages of Miranzai (1851), xix. 208. 

Colaba, on Bombay Island, observatory, 
1. 106; rainfall statistics, i. 144. 

Colair, lake in Kistna District, Madras, 
X. 373-374- 

Colbert, founded French Compagnie des 
Indes (1674), ii. 463; reconstituted 
Company d'Orient (1664), xii. 103-104. 

Cold season, pressure conditions in Asia 
and the Indian Ocean during, i. iio- 
III ; sketch of air movement during, 
i. 111-112; storms of, i. 112-113 ; 
weather during, i. 1 13-1 14 ; rainfall and 
snowfall, i. 114; mean rainfall, i. 140 ; 
rainfall, i. 153. 

Cole, Hon. Arthur, visits Coorg, xi. 
15-16. 

Cole, Major, Coorg Grammar (1867), xi. 
23. 

Colebrook, Mr., computation of popula- 
tion of Bengal (1792), vii. 225. 

Coleroon, arm of Cauvery liver, Madras, 
utilized for irrigation, x. 374; anient, 

,i-45- 
Colgong, town in Bhagalpur District, 

Bengal, with rock-temple, x. 374-375. 
Collector and Magistrate, duties of, iv. 

49-54- 
Collegal, town in Madras. See Kollegal. 
Colleges : Thomason College, Roorkee, iv. 

321-322; Arts, iv. 428-430; statistics, 



iv. 456 ; chiefs', iv. 435 ; engineering, iv. 
439-440; agricultural and veterinary, 
iv. 440 ; medical, iv. 441-442 ; edu- 
cational and normal, iv. 442-444 ; 
statistics, iv. 456. 

Local notices: Agartala, Hill Tippera 
State, V. 71 ; Agra, v. 88, 89, 90, iio- 
III ; Ahmadabad, v. no; Ajmer ;^the 
Mayo),viii. 173,217; AlTgarb (Muham- 
madan Anglo-Oriental), v. 216, 219; 
Allahabad (Muir), v. 241 ; Almora 
(Ramsay), v. 253 ; Amritsar (Khalsa), 
V. 330; Assam,vi.ii9 ; Backergunge,vi. 
174; Bahawalpur (Sadik Egerton), vi. 
204; Bangalore (Central) , vi. 367, 369 ; 
Bankipore, Patna (Bihar National), vi. 
383 ; Bankura, vi. 390 ; Bareilly, vii. 
7, 12, 14; Barisal, Backergunge, vii. 20 ; 
Baroda, vii. 72, 82-83 ; Barpeta, As- 
sam (religious : fifteenth century), vii. 
85 ; Bellary (Wardlaw), vii. 176 ; 
Benares, vii. 191, 193; Bengal, vii. 
25 r> 329. 330, 331, 332,336 ; Berham- 
pur, Ganjam, viii. 3 ; Bhagalpur (Tejna- 
rayan Jubilee), viii. 36, 37 ; Bharatpur, 
viii. 87 ; BhawanTpur, Calcutta (London 
Missionary Society), vii. 329 ; Bidar, 
Hyderabad {Madrasa^, viii. 170; Bihar, 
Patna (ancient Buddhist vihdra), viii. 
172 ; Bombay Presidency (Deccan, 
Elphinstone, Grant Medical, Poona, 
^^'ilson, St. Xavier's, and Fergusson), 
viii. 373-374,418; Burdwan, ix. 100, 
103 ; Calcutta, ix. 283-284 ; Cawnpore 
(Christ Church), ix. 319 ; Bhopal, Cen- 
tral India (Sardars'), ix. 386 ; Central 
Provinces, x. 92-95 ; Chabua and 
Chadarghat, Hyderabad city, x. 115; 
Chandernagore (College Dupleix, 
1882), X. 165; Chingleput, x. 267; 
Chinsura (Hooghly), x. 286; Chitta- 
gong, X. 316, 318; Cocanada, Goda- 
vari (Pithapuram Raja's), x. 340 ; 
Coimbatore, x. 370, 373 ; Comilla, 
Tippera, x. 376 ; Cooch Behar State 
(Victoria, 1887), x. 389, 390; Cudda- 
lore, .South Arcot (St. Joseph's), v. .^36, 
xi. 57 ; Cuttack, xi. 97, 99 ; Dacca, xi. 
115, 119; Dakhinpat, Assam (re- 
ligious), xi. 123-124; Darjeeling (St. 
Joseph's, 1892), xi. 177, i8c-i8i ; 
Daulatpur, Khulna, xi. 201 ; Delhi, xi. 
227, 241 ; Deoband, Saharanpur 
(Arabic, 1876), xi. 243 ; Dharwar 
(Training), xi. 317 ; Diu (Jesuits'), 
xi. 363 ; Gauhati, Assam (Cotton, 
1901), xii. 186 ; Goa (Medical), xii. 
265, 267, 268 ; Gondal, Kathiawar 
(Girasia", xii. 320 ; Gorakhpur (St. 
Andrew's\ xii. 342 ; Gulbarga, Hyder- 
abad (built by Aurangzeb, 1687), xii. 
377 ; Hazaribagh (Dublin University 
Mission), xiii. 90, 98; Hill Tippera, 



134 



INDEX 



Eastern Bengal, xiii. 122 ; Hooghly, 
xiii. 1 70. 1 78 ; Howrah (Engineering' , 
xiii. 212; Hyderabad State (XizamV, 
xiii. 294, 311, 321; Indore (Daly), 
xiii. 348, 351 ; Jaipur, xiii. 401 ; 
JJnd, Punjab (Diamond jubilee), xiv. 
175; Junagarh, Kathiawar (Baha-nd- 
dln), xiv. 239 ; South Kanara (St. 
Aloysius), xiv. 369; Karachi, xv. 12, 
13, 18 ; Kathiawar, xv. 185 ; Khulna, 
XV. 293 ; Kolhapur, Bombay, xv. 386 ; 
Krishnagar, Xadia, xvi. 8; Kumba- 
konam, xvi. 21 ; Lahore, xvi. 99, 105, 
1 14 ; Lashkar, Gwalior (Victoria), xvi. 
151, 152; Lucknow (Reid Christian, 
Canning, and Martiniere), xvi. 187, 
196, 198, 199, xxiv. 251 ; Madras, 

xvi. 339> 340; 341 > 343> 344^ S'^i, 383- 
3S4 ; ^ladura, xvi. 407 ; Mangalore, 
.South Kanara, xvii. 177; Mannargudi, 
Tanjore (Findlay), xvii. 199; Masuli- 
patam, Kistna Noble), xvii. 217; 
Meerut, xvii. 266 ; Midnapore, xvii. 
340 ; Monghyr Diamond Jubilee , 
xvii. 400 ; Muzaffarpur, xviii. 106, 107 ; 
Mysore, xviii. 243-247, 261 ; Nager- 
coil, Travancore, xviii. 299 ; Nagpur, 
x\-iii. 310, 317, 320; Naral, Jessore 
(Victoria), xiv. 99, xviii. 371 ; Naslr- 
abad (Mymensingh), xviii. 414; Nel- 
lore (Ameiican Baptist Mission , xix. 
22; North- West frontier Province 
('Edwardes Church Mission), xix. 203; 
Palamcottah, Tinnevelly -Sarah Tucker, 
for Girls), xix. 345 ; Palghat, Malabar 
(Victoria), xix. 359 ; Patiala, Punjab 
(Mohindar), xx. 51 ; Patna, vii. 329, xx. 
69; Peshawar, xx. 126; Pondicherry 
(Calve), XX. 162 ; Ponnani, Malabar 
(Muhammadan), xx. 164; Poona (Dec- 
can, Science, and Fergusson), xx. 180, 
185; Pudukkotlai, Madras, xx. 241; 
Punjab (Veterinary), xx. 371, 372 ; 
Raipur 'Rajkumar), xxi. 59, 61, 94; 
Rajahmundry, Godav.iri, xxi. 65 ; Raj- 
kot, Kathiawar Rajkumar,, xxi. 74 ; 
Rajputana .Oriental), xxi. 155-156; 
Rampur Eoalia ^Rajshahi), xxi. 168, 
193; Rangoon (Baptist), xxi. 220; 
Ratlam, Central India (Central), xxi. 
244 ; Rawalpindi (American Mission , 
xxi. 271, 273; Ro&rkee, Saharanpur 
(Thomason Engineering), xxi. 325; 
Saidapet, Chingieput removed to Coim- 
batcre, (Agricultural), xxi. 383-384; 
Sangrur, Jind, Punjab (Diamond Jubi- 
lee), xxii. 55 ; Serampore, Hooghly, 
vii. 329, xxii. 178; Sialkot, xxii. 334, 
336; Sibpur, Howrah Engineering, 
xiii. 215, xxii. 344; Sind (Training), 
xxii. 431 ; Syll)et,xxiii. 200, 203 ; Tan- 
gail, Mymensingh (Pramatha Man- 
matha), xxiii. 224 ; Tanjore, xxiii. 241, 



243; Tinnevelly, xxiii. 368, 370, 380; 
Tippera, xxiii. 387 ; Travancore (Scott 
Christian, Holy Angels' Convent, and 
C.M.S. , xxiv. 23; Trichinopoly, xxiv. 
42, 47-48 ; United Provinces, xxiv. 249; 
Vellore, North Arcot (Arcot Mission), 
V. 418, xxiv. 304 ; Vizagapatam (Mrs. 
A. V. Narasinga Rao), xxiv. 336, 338 ; 
Vizianagram, Vizagapatam, xxiv. 342. 

Collett, Sir H., botanical collections, i. 
202-203. 

Colonelganj. town in Gonda District, 
United Provinces, x. 375. 

Colootolla, ward of Calcutta, ix. 267. 

Colvin. Sir Auckland, Lieutenant-Gover- 
nor of North-Western Provinces and 
Chief Commissioner, Oudh (1887), 
xxiv. 220. 

Colvin, Colonel, Ganges examined for 
irrigation on suggestion of (1836), xii. 

137-138. 

Colvin, E. G., Agent to the Governor- 
General in Rajputana (1905), xxi. 142. 

Colvin, J. R., Lieutenant-Governor of 
North-Western Provinces (1853), v. 
84, xxiv. 219. 

Colvin School, Lucknow, xvi. 198. 

Combaconum, town in Madras. See 
Kumbakonam. 

Combermere, Lord, capture of Bharatpur 
(1826), ii. 497, viii. 78, 87, xi. 344. 

Comercolly, town in Bengal. See Kumar- 
khali. 

Comilla, subdivision in Tippera District, 
Eastern Bengal, x. 375. 

Comilla, head-quarters of Tippera Dis- 
trict, Eastern Bengal, x. 375-376. 

Commander-in-Chief, made member of 
Council by Pitt's Act (1784), iv. 15; 
position and duties, iv. 18, 20, 28; 
powers enlarged since 1895, iv. 365. 

Commerce and Industry Department 
(formed in 1905), iii. 267, iv. 26-27. 

Commerce and Trade, iii. 257-315; his- 
tory of foreign trade, 257-271 ; early 
commerce, 257-25S; mediaeval peiiod, 
258 ; the Portuguese, 258 ; Dutch antl 
English, 25S-259 ; seventeenth and 
eighteenth centuries, 259 ; character of 
eaily trade, 259-260 ; growth of British 
trade, 260; changes in trade, 260-261 ; 
reasons for slow development, 261 ; 
imjirovenients after 1858, 262 ; cost of 
transit to Europe. 262-263 ; fiscal sys- 
tem : sea customs, 263 ; internal duties, 
263-264 ; exchange difiiculties, 264- 
266 ; imjjossibility of gauging effects 
of exchange, 266 ; Government rela- 
tions witli trade, 266 ; Commerce and 
Industry Department (established 1905), 
267 ; Chambers of Commerce, 267- 
268 ; general progress since 1834, 268- 
269; changes in nature of trade: bullion. 



INDEX 



135 



269; exports, 269-270; imports, 270; 
excess of exports over imports, 270; 
method of adjusting foreign payments, 
270-271 ; influence of freights on trade, 
271; the ports of India, 271-276; 
paucity of harbours, 271; chief ports, 
272-273; Port Trusts, 273 ; develop- 
ment of trade, 273-275 ; shipping, 275- 
276 ; description of modern trade, 
276-291 ; increased trade in merchan- 
dise, 276-277 ; imports, 277 ; nature 
of imports, 277-278 ; small demand for 
most foreign goods, 278 ; importance 
of cotton goods, 278 ; piece-goods, 
278-279 ; effects of Indian mills, 279 ; 
sugar and petroleum, 279 ; possibility 
of developing Indian manufactures, 
279-280; effects of a small market, 
280; transit trade, 2S0-281 ; exports: 
Indian merchandise, 281 ; manufactured 
goods, 281 ; cotton, 281-282 ; jute, 
2 82 -2 S3 ; hides and skins, 283 ; other 
manufactures, 283-284 ; food-grains, 
284 ; rice, 284 ; wheat, 284-285 ; 
markets for rice and wheat, 285 ; oil- 
seeds, 285-286; raw cotton, 2S6-287; 
raw jute, 287; tea, 287-288; sugar, 
288-290; indigo, 290; coffee, 290- 
291 ; lac, 291 ; wool, 291 ; teak, 291 ; 
vegetable oils, 291 ; imports and ex- 
ports of treasure, 291-292 ; distribution 
of foreign trade, 292-298 ; trade with 
United Kingdom, 293 ; reasons for its 
importance, 293-294 ; trade with other 
countries, 294; nature of trade with 
United Kingdom, 294-295 ; value of 
trade with United Kingdom, 295 ; trade 
with Germany, 296-297 ; with Japan, 
297-29S ; with China, 297 ; with France, 

298 ; with the United States, 298 ; 
with British Colonies, 298 ; external 
trade by land, 298-300 ; countries with 
which trade is carried on, 299; nature, 

299 ; obstacles to development, 299- 

300 ; internal trade, 301-306 ; general 
conditions, 301 ; methods of inland 
trade, 301 ; trading castes, 301-302 ; 
registration of internal trade, 302 ; 
trade with ports, 302 ; coasting trade, 
303 ; trade between Provinces and 
States, 303-304; bibliography, 306. 
Tables : value of imports and exports 
of merchandise, 307 ; foreign sea-borne 
trade of British India (imports) (1904 - 
5), 308-309 ; foreign sea-borne trade of 
British India (exports) (1904-5), 309- 
310 ; distribution of imports and ex- 
ports including re-exports) by countries 
in 1899-1900 and 1904-5, 311; dis- 
tribution of principal exports of raw 
produce in 1899- 1900 and 1904-5, 
312 ; land-borne foreign trade for five 
years ending 1904-5, 313; imports of 



principal articles into British Provinces 
and Native States from British Pro- 
vinces, Native States, and chief seaports 
in 1899-1900 and 1904-5, 314; trade 
of the provincial blocks (1903-4), 314 ; 
trade of ports with the provincial blocks 
^1903-4), 315 ; incidence of the value 
of trade, in rupees, on each acre of 
cultivation and each head of popula- 
tion (1903-4), 315 ; improvement of 
trade in consequence of railways, 
iii. 368. 

Commercial Bank of India, branch at 
Lahore, xvi. 102, 113; sub-agency at 
Lyallpur, Punjab, xvi. 224; branch at 
Rawalpindi, xxi. 273, 

Communication, Means of. See in each 
Province, District, and larger State 
article under Communications. 

Comorin, headland and shrine in Tra- 
vancore, Madras, x. 376. 

Compagnie des Indes, founded by Col- 
bert (1664), ii. 463 ; absorbed by Law's 
Company, ii. 464; reconstitution 1^1719), 
ii. 464. 

Condavid, historic fort in Madras. See 
Kondavld. 

Condition of the people. See in each 
Province, District, and larger State 
article under Agriculture. 

Conflans, Marquis de, left in command 
of Northern Circars, ii. 473 ; defeated 
by Colonel Forde at Condore (175S), 
ii. 473 ; retreated to Rajahmundry after 
defeat at Condore, xxi. 64. 

Conjeeveram, tdhik in Chingleput Dis- 
trict, Madras, x. 376-377. 

Conjeeveram {Kdncklpiira/ii), sacred town 
with many temples in Chingleput Dis- 
trict, Madras, important in Carnatic 
Wars, X. 377-378- 

Connaught, Duchess of, hospital for 
women at Peshawar, xix. 205. 

Connemara Public Library, Madras City, 
xvi. 374. 

Conner, Lieutenant, quoted on scenery of 
Travancore, xxiv. 1-2. 

Conolly, Mr., Collector of Malabar, 
ConoUy Canal constructed by, x. 379 ; 
murdered by Mappillas (1855), xvii. 
67. 

Conolly Canal, Malabar District, Madras, 

X. 379- 

Consolidated Tea and Lands Company, 
Balisira valley, Sylhet, xxiii. 195. 

Constantius, emperor, sent an embassy to 
Aden (a. D. 342), v. 11. 

Contai, subdivision in Midnapore Dis- 
trict, Bengal, x. 379. 

Contai, village in Midnapore District, 
Bengal, x.^ 379. 

Conti, Nicolo de', Bhamo located on old 
map made by Fra Mauro from the wan- 



136 



INDEX 



derings of (fifteenth century), viii. 58; 
account of Mysore, xviii. 174; visit to 
Xeythoma, xxiii. 341. 

Convents and convent schools (Roman 
Catholic), at Aden, v. 21 ; Asansol, 
Burdwan, vi. 9; Bandel, Hooghly, vi. 
358 ; Bandra, Thana, vi. 359 ; Bassein, 
Thana (ruins), vii. 121; Cocanada, 
Godavari, x. 339 ; Ernakiilam, Cochin, 
xii. 28 ; Goa, xii. 267 ; Kamptee, Nag- 
pur, xiv. 330 ; Multan, xviii, 38 ; Nag- 
pur, xviii. 320 ; Simla, xxii. 384, 385 ; 
Tinnevelly, xxiii. 368 ; Tuticorin,Tinne- 
velly, xxiv. 65. 

Conveyances, agricultural, iii. 14 ; sta- 
tistics, iii. 1 01 ; for trade, iii. 409. 

Cooch Behar, State in Bengal, x. 379-389 ; 
physical aspects, 379-381 ; history, 
Z^'^-Z^Z ; population, 383-384 ; agri- 
culture, 384; trade and communications, 
385-386 ; administration, 386-3S9 ; 
education, 389 ; medical, 389. 

Other references : Railways, iii. 372 ; 
historj', iv. 64 ; area, population, revenue, 
and administration, iv. 98. 

Cooch Behar, capital of State in Bengal, 
x. 390. 

Cooke, Humphrey, Bombay Island taken 
possession of on behalf of English 
Crown (1665), viii. 404. 

Coompta, town in Bombay. See Kumta. 

Coondapoor, subdivision in .South Kanara 
District, Madras, xi. i. 

Coondapoor, td/iii in South Kanara Dis- 
trict, Madras, xi. i. 

Coondapoor, village and port in Soutli 
Kanara District, Madras, xi. 1-2. 

Coonoor, ici/iii in Nllgiri District, Madras, 
xi. 2. 

Coonoor, town and sanitarium in Niigiri 
District, Madras, xi. 2-3. 

Cooper, Lieutenant, killed in battle with 
Kamchandra Ganesh at Dugad (17S0), 

Cooper, Mr., Deputy-Commissioner of 
Amritsar, mutineers destro)ed by force 
under (1857), v. 321, xvi. 97. 

Cooper's Hill College (now abolished), 
iv. 319-320. 

Coorg, Britisli Province in -Southern India, 
xi. 3-51 ; physical aspects, 3-7 ; moun- 
tain system, 4; river system. 5 ; geology, 
5 ; flora, 6 ; fauna, 6-7 ; meteorology, 
7; history, 7-19 ; antiquarian remains, 
18-19; population, 19-31 ; languages, 
22 ; Kodagas or Coorgs proper, 23-28 ; 
other tribes, 28-29 ! <^"hrislians, 29-31 ; 
agriculture, 31-35; cardamoTns, 31-32 ; 
coffee, 32-33 ; cattle, 34 ; irrigation, 
34; rents, wages, and prices, 35; forests, 
35-36 ; trade and communications, 36- 
38 ; postal, 37 ; administration, 37-40; 
finance, 40-45 ; police and jails, 46 ; 



education, 47-49 ; medical, 49-50 ; sur- 
veys, 50-51 ; bibliography, 51. 

Other references : Language, i. 380, 
381 ; sex statistics, i. 479 ; annexation 
(1834), ii. 498-499 ; coffee cultivation, 
iii. 63 ; number of live stock and of 
ploughs and carts (i 899-1900), iii. 101 ; 
forest law, iii. no; minerals, iii. 141 ; 
graphite, iii. 141 ; irrigation, iii. 346 ; 
administration, iv. 30, 56, 57 ; legisla- 
tion, iv. 131 ; land revenue, iv. 239. 

Coorgs, or Kodagas, i. 293-2945X1. 23-28. 

Coorla, town in Bombay. See Kurla. 

Coote, Sir Lyre, victory of Wandiwash 
(1760), ii. 473, iv. 72 ; defeated Haidar 
All (1781), ii. 486; Pondicherry cap- 
tured (1761), iv. 8. 

Local notices : Arcot taken (i 760), v. 
419; repulse of, at Chidambaram (1781), 
X. 219; Karunguli captured (1759), 
XV. 62 ; in second Mysore War, xvi. 
253; Pondicherry captured (1761), xx. 
161 ; battle with Haidar All near Porto 
Novo (1781), XX. 214; battle with 
Haidar All near -Sholinghur (1781), 
xxii. 308 ; French defeated at Wandi- 
wash (1760), v. 406, xvi. 252, xxiv. 353. 

Cooum, river in Madras City, xi. 51. 

Cope, Captain, retreat from Devikoltai 
(1749), X. 219, xi. 276. 

Copper and copper mines, iii. 237 ; x\fghan- 
istan, V. 55; Ajmer-Merwara, v. 139, 
154; Almora, V. 249 ; Alwar State, v. 
255, 263 ; Amritsar, v. 329 ; North 
Arcot, v. 413; Balaghat, vi. 230 ; Bal- 
tistan, vi. 264; Baluchistan, vi. 307; 
Banganapalle, Madras, vi. 375 ; Bara- 
ganda, iii. 144; Bengal, vii. 202, 265; 
Betul, viii. 12 ; Bharatpur State, viii. 
82; Bijapur, viii. 182; Bikaner State, 
viii. 211; Bilaspur, viii. 228; Bundi 
State, ix. 78 ; Burma, ix. 173; Central 
India, ix. 367 ; Central Provinces, x. 52 ; 
Chagai, Baluchistan, x. 118 ; Chamba, 
Punjab, X. 132 ; Chanda,x. 156 ; Lower 
Chindwin, Burma, x. 233; Ciiitral, x. 
304 ; Chota Nilgpur, iii. 144; Darjeel- 
ing, xi. 174; Dholpur, xi. 327; Dhran- 
gadhra, Kathiawar, xi.334 ; Dungarpur, 
xi. 382; Garhwal,xii.i68; Hazaribagh, 
xiii. 93; Himalayas, xiii. 130; Hyder- 
abad Slate, xiii, 262 ; Jaipur, xiii. 383, 
391; Jalpaiguri,xiv. 31, 38; Jiialawar, 
Rajputana, xiv. 119 ; Jhansi, xiv. 136 ; 
Jhelum, xiv. 156 ; Jubbulpore, xiv. 207, 
212 ; Katha, Burma, x v. 159-160; Kan- 
gra, xiv. 392 ; Kharsawan, Chota I^.ig- 
pur, XV. 252 ; Khetri, Rajputana, xv. 
277 ; Kolar, Mysore, xv. 374 ; Lakhi 
Hills, Baluchistan, xvi. 118; Naini Tal, 
xviii. 329; Narsinghpur, xviii. 391; 
Navanagar, Kathiawar, xviii. 421 ; Nel- 
lore, xix. 16 ; Nepal, xix. 50 ; Nicobars, 



INDEX 



137 



xix. 61 ; Pab Range, Baluchistau, xix. 
296; Palamau, xix.341 ; Pali. Rajputaiia, 
xix. 359 ; Punjab, xx. 314 ; Raipur, xxi. 
55; Rajputana, xxi. 88, 128-129; Sa- 
gaing, Burma, xxi. 359 ; Santal Par- 
ganas, xxii. 72 ; Saraikela, Chota Nag- 
pur, xxii. S3 ; Southern Shan States, 
xxii. 260; Sikkim, xxii. 370 ; Singhana, 
Rajputana, xxii. 435 ; Singhbhum, iii. 
144, xxiii. 8 ; Sirmur, Punjab, xxiii. 26 ; 
Sirohi, Rajputana, xxiii. 33 ; Toungoo, 
Burma, xxiii. 422 ; United Provinces, 
xxiv. 140, 199-200 ; Vinukonda, Guntur, 
xxiv. 318. 
Copper braziers, import prices of, iii. 462- 

463- 

Copper inscriptions, ii. 26-29. 

Copper work . See Brass and Copper Work. 

Coral and coral reefs, Amindivi Islands, 
Laccadives, v. 304-305 ; Andamans, v. 
356, 358 ; Kathiawar, xv. 1 79 ; Lacca- 
dive Islands, xvi. 85, 86 ; Madura, xvi. 
397 ; Nicobars, xix. 62 ; Pamban, Ma 
dura, xix. 375 ; Tinnevelly, xxiii. 371 ; 
Travancore, xxiv. 4. 

Coral trade, iii. 193-194, 254. 

Corbynwah Canal, Shahpur, xxii. 222. 

Cordite factory, at Aravanghat, Nilgiris, 
V. 403, xix. 97, 98. 

Coriander, cultivated in Bengal, vii. 
247 ; Chikmugalur, Mysore, x. 222 ; 
Khandesh, xv. 234; Mysore State, xviii. 
210 ; Tippera, xxiii. 384. 

Coringa, village in Godavari District, 
Madras, former Dutch settlement and 
place of ship-building, xi. 51. 

Cormorants {Fhalacrocorax), i. 263. 

Cornwallis, Marquis of, Governor-General 
(1786-93), ii. 486, 487, iv. 10 ; per- 
manent settlement of land revenue intro- 
duced in Bengal (i793\ ii. 486-487, 
iv. 206; Pondicherry taken (1793), ii. 
474; powers as Governor-General, iv. 
18-19; board system of administra- 
tion initiated, iv. 19 ; policy towards 
Native States, iv. 78 ; reform of Civil 
.Service, iv. 40-41, 42; administrative 
system, iv. 49 ; judicial reforms, iv. 

153- 

Local notices : Revenue settlement of 
Bengal (1793), vii. 307; Coorg occu- 
pied and Tipu driven back (1792), xi. 
13; Devanhalli, Mysore, taken (1791), 
xi. 273; tomb at GhazTpur, xii. 231 ; 
British support of Ran a of Gohad with- 
drawn, xii. 304 ; Hatliwa Raj restored 
to Chhatardhari Sahi (i79i),xiii. 73; 
benefit derived by Jaswant Rao Ilolkar 
from policy of, xiii. 337 ; Maddur fort, 
Mysore, dismantled (1791), xvi. 230; 
statue in Madras City, xvi. 367 ; Nandi- 
droog, Mysore, captured (1791), xviii. 
359 ; negotiation between Nepal and 



China offered, xix. 33 ; Savandurga, 
Mysore, captured (i79i),xxii. 150; war 
against Tipu Sultan, xvi. 253, xviii. 
182; Vellore made base for march on 
Bangalore, xxiv. 305. 

Coromandel Coast, east coast of Madras 
Presidency, xi. 51-52 ; climate and in- 
dustry, i. 41 ; physical aspects, i. 41 ; 
fossiliferous rocks, i. 77 ; meteorology, 
i- 114-133;. botany, i. 193; zoology, 
i. 279 ; Jainism, i. 415. 

Coroners, only in Calcutta and Bombay, 
iv. 155. 

Corrie, Bishop, gramnjar school at Madras 
City, xvi. 344. 

Corrie-Bird, Major-General, expedition 
against Darvvesh Khel Wazirs (1897-8), 
xix. 210. 

Cortlandt, General Van, appointed Kardar 
in Dera Ismail Khan (1847), xi. 271 ; 
settlement of Dera Ghazi Khan (1849), 
xi. 256; levies in Ferozepore during 
Mutiny, raised by (1857), xii. 91. 

Corundum, iii. 151 ; found in Anantapur, 
v. 338,344; North Arcot,v.4i3; Assam, 
vi. 72; Baghelkhand,vi.i86; Bangalore, 
Mysore, vi. 361 ; Central India, ix. 
367 ; Coimbatore, x. 365 ; Ganjam, xii. 
151 ; Gopichettipalaiyam, Coimbatore, 
xii. 330; Hyderabad .State, xiii. 262; 
Kadur, Mysore, xiv. 267 ; Madras Pre- 
sidency, xvi. 240, 290 ; Monghyr, xvii. 
397; Myitkyina, Burma, xviii. 143; 
Mysore, xviii. 218, 251 ; Rewah State, 
xxi. 280, 2S6 ; Salem, xxi. 403; Tum- 
kur, Mysore, xxiv. 57 ; Warangal, 
Hyderabad, xxiv. 361. 

Coryat, Thomas, walked from Jerusalem 
to Ajmer, v. 142, xxiii. 182; visited 
Hardwar, xiii. 52. 

Cosmas Indicopleustes (sixth century), 
mentions Kallianpur as the seat of 
a bishop, xiv. 314; mentions Kalyan, 
xiv. 322. 

Cosmin, ancient port, probably in Bas- 
sein, Burma, vii. i J7. 

Cossimbazar, town in Murshidabad Dis- 
trict, former site of commercial resi- 
dency, xi. 52-53 ; cotton goods, iii. 200. 

Cossipore-Chitpur, northern suburb of 
Calcutta, xi. 53-54. 

Cotton, Sir Arthur, irrigation works, iii. 
327-329, 338; constructed anient across 
the Coleroon (1S36-8), ix. 306; super- 
vised Godavari canals (1S47), xii. 300; 
survey of Pamban Channel, xix. 376 ; 
repaired dam across Penner river (1858), 
XX. 104. 

Cotton, Sir Henry, Chief Commissioner 
of Assam (1896-1902), vi. 35. 

Cotton, Major-General Sir J., expedition 
against Khudu Khel and Hindustani 
Fanatics (1859^ ^^^- 209- 



138 



INDEX 



Cotton, Col. S. J., expedition against 
Michni Mohmands (1854), xix. 208. 

Cotton, General, attack on Danubyu, 
Burma (1825), xvii. 225. 

Cotton, Colonel, passed through Muttra 
(1857), xviii. 66. 

Cotton, Major, Pegu attacked by (1852), 
XX. 87. 

Cotton, Bishop, school at Simla, xxii. 385. 

Cotton {Gossypiu»i), cultivation of, i. 177, 
193, iii. 42-46, 99, 100; late-ripening 
varieties, iii. 43 ; early-ripening varie- 
ties, iii. 43-44; deterioration, iii 44; 
exotics, iii. 44-45 ; areas of production, 
iii. 45 ; soils, &c., iii. 45 ; mode of cul- 
tivation, iii. 45-46 ; out-turn, iii. 46 ; 
exports, iii. 46 ; areas under, in impor- 
tant provinces (1903-4), iii. 100. 

Local notices : Cultivated in Afghan- 
istan, V. 52 ; Agra, v. 77 ; Ahmadabad, 
V. 99; Arimadnagar, V. 116; Ajaigarh, 
Central India, v. 131 ; Ajmer-Merwara, 
V. 149; Akola, Berar, v. 184; Akyab, 
Burma, v. 195 ; Aligarh, v. 21 3 ; Allah- 
abad, V. 232 ; Alwar, Rajputana, v. 
261 ; Ambala, v. 281 ; AmraotI, Berar, 
V. 309; Amreli, Baroda, v. 317; Am- 
ritsar, v. 323 ; Anantapur, v. 342 ; 
Northern Arakan, Burma, v, 395 ; As- 
sam, vi. 113; Atmakur, Nellore, vi. 
124; Attock, vi. 135; Aurangabad, 
Hyderabad, vi. 144; Balasinor, Bombay, 
vi. 235; Balasore, vi. 240 ; Baluchistan, 
vi. 295 ; Banda, vi. 352 ; Banganapalle, 
Madras, vi. 375 ; Bankura, vi. 387 ; 
Bannu, vi. 397 ; Baroda, vii. 46, 47 ; 
Basim, Berar, vii. 99, 100 ; Belgaum, 

j^ vii. 151 ; Bellary, vii. 164, 165 ; Bengal, 
vii. 243, 246-247 ; Berar, vii. 373, 383, 
384, .3S5. 393 ; Betul, viii. 11 ;_ Bhagal- 
pur, viii. 31 ; Bharatpur, Rajputana, 
viii. 81; Bhir, Hyderabad, viii. 114; 
Bhopal, Central India, viii. 134 ; BTdar, 
Hyderabad, viii. 166 ; Bijapur, viii. iSi ; 
Bijnor, viii. 197; BIkaner, Rajputana, 
viii. 210 ; Bombay Presidency, viii. 314- 
315 ; Bonai, Orissa, ix. 3 ; Broach, ix. 
23 ; Budaun, ix. 37 ; Bulandshalir, ix. 
53; Buldana, ix.63 ; Bondi, Rajputana, 
ix. S3 ; British Buiulelkhand, ix. 73 ; 
Burma, ix. 152; Cambay, Bombay, 
ix. 294; Cawnpore, ix. 311 ; Central 
India, ix. 361, 390 ; Central Provinces, 
X- 32, 34: 37> 10.1.105; Challakere, 
Mysore, x. 12S; Chanda, x. 154, 157 ; 
Chhatarpur, Central India, x. 200 ; 
Chhindwara, x. 208, 209 ; Lower Chind- 
win, Burma, x. 232 ; Upper Cliindwin, 
Burma, x. 244 ; Chitaldroog, Mysore, 
X. 293 ; Coimbatore, x. 362 ; Cuddapah, 
xi.65; I^arjeeling, xi. 172 ; Davangere, 
Mysore, xi. 204; Delhi, xi. 228; Dcra 
Ghazi Khan, xi. 253 ; Dero Mohbat, 



.Sind,xi.272; Dhandhuka, Ahmadabad, 
xi. 285 ; Dhar, Central India, xi. 291 ; 
Dharwar, xi. 309 ; Dholpur, Rajputana, 
xi. 326 ; Elgandal, H) derabad, xii. 8 ; 
Ellichpur, Berar, xii. 14 ; Etah, xii. 33 ; 
Etawah, xii. 43 ; Farrukhabad, xii. 67 ; 
Fatehpur, xii. 79; Garhwal, xii. 167; 
Garo Hills, Assam, xii. 178; Gondal, 
Kathiawar, xii. 320 ; Gujranwala, xii. 
358 ; Gujrat, xii. 369 ; Gulbarga, Hyder- 
abad, xii. 378; Gurgaon, xii. 406; 
Gwalior,xii.429; Hinganghat.Wardha, 
xiii. 141 ; Hissar, xiii. 1 50 ; Jalaun, xiv. 
22 ; Jalpaigurl, xiv. 36 ; Jhalawar, 
Rajputana, xiv. 118 ; Jhang, xiv. 129 ; 
Jhansi, xiv. 142 ; Jlnd, Punjab, xiv. 
171; Jodhpur, xiv. 190; Jubbulpore, 
xiv. 211 ; Jullundur, xiv. 227 ; Kachhi, 
Baluchistan, xiv. 250 ; Kadi, Baroda, 
xiv. 257 ; kadur, Mysore, xiv. 266 ; 
Kaira, xiv. 280; Kangra, xiv. 390; 
Karachi, xv. 6 ; Karauli, Rajputana, xv. 
29 ; Kamal, xv. 53 ; Kashmir and 
Jammu, xv. 115, 119; Kathiawar, xv. 
178 ; Kator, Nagpur, xv. 189 ; Kehsi 
Mansam, Burma, xv. 196; Kengtung, 
Burma, xv. 201 ; Khairpur, .Sind, xv. 
212; Khandesh, xv. 233; Khasi and 
Jaintia Hills, Assam, xv. 261; Khilchi- 
pur. Central India, xv. 278; Khurja, 
Bulandshahr, xv. 297 ; Khyrim, Assam, 
XV. 304 ; Kishangarh, Rajputana, xv. 
314; Kistna District, xv. 326; Kohat, 
XV. 346; Kolaba, xv. 362; Kolhapur, 
Bombay, XV. 384; Kurandvad, Bombay, 
xvi. 29 ; Kurnool, xvi. 37 ; Lahore, xvi. 
100; Lakhtar, Kathiawar, xvi. 130; 
Larl<ana, Sind, xvi. 140 ; Lawksawk, 
Burma, xvi. 157; Limixii, Kathiawar, 
xvi. 161 ; Lingsugur, Hyderabad, xvi. 
164, 165 ; Madras Presidency, xvi. 274, 
352 ; Madura, xvi. 395; Magwe, Burma, 
xvi. 417 ; Mahaban, Muttra, xvi. 427 ; 
MahT Kantha, Bombay, xvii. iS ; Mah- 
laing, Burma, xvii. 21; Mainpurl, xvii. 
37 ; Makrai, Central Provinces, xvii. 44; 
Nlakran, Baluchistan, xvii. 48 ; Malwa, 
xvii. 100 ;Manbhum,xvii. 1 16; Mandvi, 
Sural, xvii. 174 ; Mangrol, Kathiawar, 
xvii. 180; Mayurbhanj, Orissa, xvii. 
243 ; Meerut, xvii. 258 ; Meiktila, 
Burma, xvii. 280, 281 ; Midnapore, 
x^ ii- 333 ; Minbu, Burma, xvii. 350 ; 
Miraj, Bombay, xvii. 361, 362 ; Mong- 
pai, Burma, xvii. 406 ; Mongpawn, 
Burma, xvii. 40S ; Montgomery, xvii. 
413; ^Ioradabad, xvii. 425; Morvi, 
Kathiawar, xviii. 3 ; Mudhol, Bombay, 
wiii. 12; Multan, xviii. 30; Muttra, 
xviii. 72 ; Muzaffargarh, xviii. 79; Mu- 
zaffarnagar, xviii. 88 ; Myingyan, Burma, 
xviii. 126; Myitkyina, Burma, xviii. 
141 ; Mysore State, xviii. 210, 212; 



INDEX 



139 



Naga Hills, Assam, xviii. 292 ; Nagpur, 
xviii. 311 ; NainiTal, xviii. 327 ; Nal- 
gonda, Hyderabad, xviii. 341 ; Nander, 
Hyderabad, xviii. 352 ; Narsinghgarh, 
Central India, xviii. 384 ; Narsinghpur, 
xviii. 389, 390 ; Xasik, xviii. 404 ; 
Nasrat, Sind, xviii. 414; Natogyi, 
Burma, xviii. 416 ; Navanagar, Kathi- 
awar, xviii. 420 ; Navsari, Baroda, 
xviii. 423; Nellore, xix. 14; Nimar, 
xix. Ill; Nlmbahera, Rajputana, xix. 
120; North-West Frontier Province, 
xix. 173-174, 213; Nowgong, Assam, 
xix. 225 ; Orissa Tributary States, xix. 
259 ; Osmanabad, Hyderabad, xix. 
272 ; Pakokku, Burma, xix. 324 ; Pala- 
mau, xix. 340 ; Panch Mahals, xix. 
3S5 ; Parbliani, Hyderabad, xix. 413; 
Peshawar, xx. 118; Poona, xx. 176; 
Proddatur, Cuddapah, xx. 219 ; Punjab, 
xx. 296, 298-299, 382; Purl, XX. 403 ; 
Raichur, Hyderabad, xxi. 40 ; Raj- 
putana, xxi. 120; Rohtak, xxi. 315; 
Saharanpur, xmI. 373 ; Sambalpiir, xxii. 
II ; Samthar, Central India, xxii. 25 ; 
Sandoway, Burma, xxii. 35 ; Sangli, 
Bombay, xxii. 53; Santal Parganas, 
xxii. 70 ; Satara Agency, xxii. 1 14 ; 
Satara District, xxii. 122 ; Sattur, Tin- 
nevelly, xxii. 134; Sausar, Chhin- 
dwara, xxii. 150 ; vSavanur, Bombay, 
xxii. 156; .SeonI, xxii. 170; Shahdad- 
pur, .Sind, xxii. 200 ; Shahpur, xxii. 
217; Shahpura, Rajputana, xxii. 224; 
Northern Shan States, xxii. 239 ; 
Southern Shan States, xxii. 257 ; Shi- 
moga, Mysore, xxii. 287, 290 ; Shola- 
pur, xxii. 300 ; Shwebo, Burma, xxii. 
3f4, 315 ; Sibsagar, Assam, xxii. 349; 
.Sind, xxii. 412; .Sirohi, Rajputana, 
xxiii. 33; Sukkur, .Sind, xxiii. 122; 
Surat, xxiii. 159; Sylhet, xxiii. 194; 
Tadpatii, Anantapur, xxiii. 204; Tando 
Alahyar, .Sind, xxiii. 222 ; Thayetmyo, 
Burma, xxiii. 347 ; Tinneveliy, xxiii. 
369 ; Trichinopoly, xxiv. 33 ; Tumkur, 
Mysore, xxiv. 56 ; Udaipur, Rajputana, 
xxiv. 95; Unao, xxiv. 126; United 
Provinces, xxiv. 182, 262; Vizaga- 
patam, xxiv. 329; Wadhwan, Kathi- 
awar, xxiv. 346 ; Wankaner, Kathiawar, 
xxiv. 354 ; Warangal, Hyderabad, xxiv. 
360; Wardha, xxiv. 370, 375; Wun, 
xxiv. 393. 
Cotton Ginning and Pressing Factories, at 
Achhnera, Agra, v. 8 ; Agar, Central 
India, v. 70; Agra, v. 7S-79, 90 ; Ah- 
madnagar, V. 118; Ajmer-Merwara, v. 
154 ; Akola, Berar, v. 185, 189 ; Akot, 
Berar, v. 190; Allgarh, v. 214, 218; 
AUanmyo, Burma, v. 242 ; Alwar, Raj- 
putana, V. 263, 268 ; Amalner, Khan- 
desh, V. 270; Ambala, v. 283 ; Amraoti, 



Berar, v. 310, 315 ; Amreli, Baroda, 
■^'' 317) 319 ) Amritsar, v. 324; Anand, 
Kaira, v. 335; Anantapur, v. 344; 
Anklesvar, Broach, v. 386 ; Ariyalur, 
Trichinopoly, vi. i ; Arvl, Wardha, vi. 
7, 8; Ashti, Wardha, vi. 11 ; Atrauli, 
Allgarh, vii. 131 ; Auraiya, Etawah, 
vi. 140 ; Aurangabad, Hyderabad, vi. 
145 ; Bagalkot, Bijapur, vi. 181 ; Baha- 
walpur, Punjab, vi. 204 ; Baroda, vii. 
56, 80 ; Barsi, Sliolapur, vii. 88 ; Basim, 
Berar, vii. 100, 104; Batala, Gurdaspur, 
vii. 133 ; Bellary, vii. 168, 176; Berar, 
vii. 392 ; Bhadgaon, Khandesh, viii. 21 ; 
Bhaisa,Hyderabad,viii.4i ; Bhaunagar, 
Kathiawar, viii. 95 ; Bhihvara, Raj- 
putana, viii. 107 ; Bhind, Central India, 
viii. no; Bhir, Hyderabad, viii. 115; 
Bhiwani, Hissar, viii. 120; Bhopal, 
viii. 137; Bijapur, viii. 186; Bodvad, 
Khandesh, viii. 255; Botad, Kathiawar, 
ix. 7 ; Bulandshahr, ix. 54 ; Buldana, 
ix. 64 ; Burhanpur, Nimar, ix. 106 ; 
Burma, ix. 177; Cambay, ix. 294; 
Cawnpore, ix. 319; Central Provinces, 
X. 54; Chanda, x. 157; Chandausi, 
Moradabad, x. 163 ; Chandur, Berar, 
X. 170; Chhindwara, x. 211, 215; 
Chikodi, Belgaum, x. 224; Chitaldroog, 
Mysore, x. 294; Chopda, Khandesh, 
X. 327; Chunian, Lahore, x. 334; 
Coimbatore, x. 366, 372 ; Cutch, xi. Si ; 
Dattapur, Berar, xi. 199 ; Davangere, 
Mysore, xi. 204; Delhi, xi. 240; Dera 
Ghazi Khan, xi. 255, 25S ; Dharangaon, 
Khandesh, xi. 297, 298 ; Dharwar, xi. 
312; Dhrangadhra. Kathiawar, xi. 334; 
Dhulia, Khandesh, xi. 338 ; Dibai, 
Bulandshahr, xi. 341 ; Dlpalpur, Mont- 
gomery, xi. 360; Ellichpur, Berar, xii. 
15; Erandol, Khandesh, xii. 26 ; Etah, 
xii. 34; Etawah, xii. 44, 48; Feroze- 
pore, xii. 98; Firozabad, Agra, xii. loo; 
Gadag, Dharwar, xii. 119; Gadarwara, 
Narsinghpur, xii. 120; Garo Hills, xii. 
178; Gauhati, Assam, xii. 186 ; Gojra, 
Jhang, xii. 306 ; Gondal, Kathiawar, 
xii. 320; Gujranwala, xii. 359, 363; 
Guntakal, Anantapur, xii. 388 ; Guntur, 
xii. 390 ; Gwalior, xii. 430; Hafizabad, 
Gujianwala, xiii. 5 ; Hansi. Hissar, 
xiii. 25 ; Hapur, Meerut, xiii. 40 ; 
Harda, Hoshangabad, xiii. 42; Hardua- 
ganj, Allgarh, xiii. 51 ; Hathras, All- 
garh, xiii. 72 ; Hindaun, Mandawar, 
Rajputana, xiii. 135; Hinganghat, 
Wardha, xiii. 141 ; Hingoli, Hyder- 
abad, xiii. 143; Hissar, xiii. 152, 156; 
Hodal, Gurgaon, xiii. 158; Hoshang- 
abad, xiii. 187; Hyderabad, Sind, xiii. 
264, 318 ; Indur, Hyderabad, xiii. 355 ; 
Jaipur, xiii. 392, 401 ; Jalaun, xiv. 23 ; 
Jalesar, Etah, xiv. 27; Jalgaon, Berar, 



I40 



INDEX 



xiv. 27; Jalgaon, East Kliandesh, xiv. 
28; Jambusar, Broach, xiv. 45 ; Jam- 
ner, Khandesh, xiv. 51 ; Jhang, xiv. 131; 
Jhansi, xiv. 143, 149 ; JTnd, Punjab, 
xiv. 172 ; Kadi, Baroda, xiv. 257 ; Ka- 
dirabad, Hyderabad, xiv. 259 ; Kaithal, 
Karnal, xiv. 289; KalpI, Jalaun, xiv. 
319; Kamptee. Nagpur, xiv. 330; Ka- 
nauj, Farrukhabad. xiv. 372; Karachi, 
XV. 7, 12 ; Karvvl, Banda, xv. 67 ; Kas- 
ganj, Etah, xv. 70-71 ; Kasur, Lahore, 
XV. 150; Kathiawar, xv. 180; Katol, 
Nagpur, XV. 189; Kekri, Rajputana, 
XV. 197; Kelod, Nagpur, xv. 198; 
Khamgaon, Berar, xv. 221 ; Khandesh, 
XV. 235 ; Khandwa, Nimar, xv. 242 ; 
Khangah Dogran, Gujranwala, xv. 
243 ; Khangarh, Muzaffargarh. xv. 243 ; 
Khanna, Ludhiana, xv. 244 ; Khanpur, 
Punjab, XV. 245 ; Khurja, Bulandshahr, 
XV. 297 ; Kishangarh, Rajputana, xv. 
314-315.- 318; Ki'stna, xv. 328 ; KosI, 
Muttra, XV. 409 ; Kotri, Sind, xvi. 5 ; 
KukshI, Central India, xvi. 13 ; Kulpa- 
har, Hamlrpur, xvi. 15 ; Kurnool, xvi. 
40, 46; Lahore, xvi. loi, 102, 113; 
Latur, Hyderabad, xvi. 155 ; Limbdi, 
Kathiawar, xvi. 161 ; Ludhiana, xvi. 
205; Lyallpur, xvi. 224 ; Madras Presi- 
dency, xvi. 294--'95 ; Madura, xvi. 398 ; 
Mahoba, Hamlrpur, xvii. 23; Mahuva, 
Kathiawar, xvii. 27; Mainpurl, xvii. 42 ; 
Malegaon, Nasik, xvii. 83 ; Maler 
Kotla, Punjab, xvii. 85, 86 ; Malkapur, 
Berar, xvii. 92 ; Mandi, Punjab, xvii. 
156; Mahlaiiig, Meiktila, Burma, xvii. 
283 ; Mohgaon, Chhindwara, xvii. 384 ; 
Mohpa, Nagpur, xvii. 387 ; Mont- 
gomery, xvii. 419 ; Mors!, Berar, xviii. 
3; Morvi, Kathiawar, xviii. 3-4; Mu- 
kher, Hyderabad, xviii. 18; Multan, 
xviii. 31, 38 ; Murtazapur, Berar, xviii. 
59; Muttra, xviii. 69, 74 ; Muzaffar- 
garh, xviii. 80, 83 ; ^Iyingyan, Burma, 
xviii. 129; Nagpur, xviii. 313, 320; 
Nander, Hyderabad, xviii. 352 ; Nan- 
durbar, Khandesh, xviii. 362 ; Nand- 
gaon, Nasik, xviii. 358; Nandyal, Kur- 
nool, xviii. 363 ; Nasik, xviii. 406 ; 
Naslrabad, Khandesh, xviii. 41 3; Nimar, 
xix. 114; Nimbahera, Rajputana, xix. 
120 ; Nizamabad, Hyderabad, xix. 125 ; 
North-West Frontier Province, xix. 184; 
Osmanabad, Hyderabad, xix. 272 ; Pa- 
chora, Khandesh, xix. 308 ; Palanpur, 
Bombay, xix. 350 ; Palladam, Coimba- 
tore, xix. 369 ; Palwal, Gurgaon, xix. 
375 ; Pandhurna,Chliindwara,xix. 391 ; 
Panlpat, Kurnal, xix. 398; Parbhani. 
Hyderabad, xix. 413,416; Parli, Hyder- 
abad, XX. 6 ; Parola, Khandesh, xx. 7 ; 
Pathri, Hyderabad, xx. 31 ; Porbandar, 
Kathiawar, xx. 189; Proddatur, Cud- 



dapah. XX. 219; Pulgaon, Wardha, xx. 
241 ; Punjab, xx. 319 ; Raichur, Hyder- 
abad, xxi. 41, 45 ; Raipur, xxi. 55, 60 ; 
Raiwind, Lahore, xxi. 63 ; Rajkot, 
Kathiawar, xxi. 74, 75 ; Rajplpla, Bom- 
bay, xxi. 81; Rajputana, xxi. 132; 
Rewa Kantha, Bombay, xxi. 296 ; Roh- 
tak, xxi. 317, 322 ; Sadhaura, Ambala, 
xxi. 347; Saharanpur, xxi. 375, 379; 
Sangla, Gujranwala, xxii. 52 ; Saoner, 
Nagpur, xxii. 80 ; Sattur, Tinnevelly, 
xxii. 134; Savda, Khandesh, xxii. 157 ; 
Seram, Hyderabad, xxii. 177; Shahada, 
Khandesh, xxii. 198; Shahpura, Raj- 
putana, xxii. 224 ; Shegaon, Berar, xxii. 
267; Shendurni, Khandesh, xxii. 271; 
Shikohabad, Mainpurl, xxii. 279 ; Shir- 
pur, Khandesh, xxii. 293 ; Shujabad, 
Multan, xxii. 310; Sikandarabad, Bu- 
landshahr, xxii. 362 ; Sind, xxii. 418 ; 
Sindkheda, Khandesh, xxii. 434 ; .Sone- 
pat, Delhi, xxiii. 83; Tando Adam, 
Sind, xxiii. 222 ; Tando Alahyar, Sind, 
xxiii. 223; Thayetmyo, Burma, xxiii. 
350; Tinnevelly, xxiii. 372 ; Tiruman- 
galam, Madura, xxiii. 394; Tiruppur, 
Coimbatore, xxiii. 396 ; Tonk, Raj- 
putana, xxiii. 412 ; Trichinopoly, xxiv. 
36 ; Tuticorin, Tinnevelly, xxiv. 65 ; 
United Provinces, xxiv. 205 ; Virudu- 
patti, Tinnevelly, xxiv. 320; Wadh- 
wan, Kathiawar, xxiv. 346 ; Wankaner, 
Kathiawar, xxiv. 354; "\Varangal, Hy- 
derabad, xxiv. 362 ; Wardha, xxiv. 
376; Warora, Chanda, .xxiv. 377-378; 
Warud, Berar, xxiv. 378 ; Wun, Berar, 
xxiv. 394; Yaval, Khandesh, xxiv. 415. 
Cotton manufactures, iii. 195-203; histor)', 
195-196; production, 196-197; hand- 
loom weaving, 197-198; spinning and 
weaving mills, 197 ; ginning factories, 
197 ; longclolhs and damasks, 19S-199 ; 
clolhs of Northern India, 199; United 
Provinces, 1 99 ; Central Provinces and 
Berar, 199-200; Bengal, 200; Bombay, 

200 ; Madras, Mysore, and Burma, 200- 

201 ; import trade, 255 ; decrease, 279 ; 
export trade, 2S1-282, 286, 287 ; trade 
statistics, 30S, 309, 3r4 ; imports and 
exports, 308, 309 ; export prices, 464- 
465 ; customs duties, iv. 262-264, -'^S) 
276. 

Cotton Mills, at Agra, v. 79, 90 ; Ahmad- 
abad, v. loi; Amritsar, v. 324; North 
Arcot District, v. 413; Aurangabad, 
Hyderabad, vi. 145; Baroda, vii. 55- 
56, So, 83 ; Beawar, Rajputana, vii. 
139; Belgaum, vii. 153; Bellary, vii. 
168, 176; Bengal, vii. 270 ; Berar, vii. 
392; Bombay, viii. 327-328; Budge- 
Budge, Twenty-four Parganas, ix. 45 ; 
Calicut, ix. 291 ; Cawnpore, ix. 318; 
Central Provinces, x. 53-54 ; Coim- 



INDEX 



141 



batore, x. ^^d, 372 ; Dellii, xi. 240 ; 
Dhanvar, xi. 312 ; Garden Reach, 
Twenty-four Parganas, xii. 160 ; Garu- 
lia, Twenty-four Parganas, xii. 183 ; 
GhusurT, Howrah, xii. 237 ; Gokak, 
Belgaiini, xii. 307 ; Hathras, Allgarh, 
xiii. 72 ; Hinganghat, Wardha, xiii.141 ; 
Hooghly, xiii, 167 ; Howrah, xiii. 209, 
210; Hubli, Dharwar, xiii. 221; Hy- 
derabad State, xiii. 264 ; Indore, xiii. 
343 ; Jalgaon, East Khandesh, xiv. 28 ; 
Jubbulpore, xiv. 213, 219; Kaira Dis- 
trict, xiv. 282 ; Kisliangarh town, xv. 
318; Koilpatti, Tinnevelly, xv. 355; 
Kurla, Thana, xvi. 30 ; Lahore, xvi. 
102, 113 ; Madras City, xvi. 295, 375 ; 
Madura, xvi. 398, 406-407 ; Mirzapur, 
xvii. 377 ; Nadiad, Kaira, xviii. 282 ; 
Nagpur, xviii. 313; Papanasam, Tinne- 
velly, xix. 406; Poona, xx. 176, 185; 
Pulgaon, XX. 241 ; Punjab, xx. 319 ; 
Raj-Nandgaon, xxi. 79; Rajputana, xxi. 
132 ; Sholapur, xxii. 301-302 ; Surat, 
xxiii. 161, 168; Tuticorii), Tinnevelly, 
xxiv. 65 ; Twenty-four Parganas, xxiv. 
76 ; United Provinces, xxiv. 204-205 ; 
Viramgam, Ahmadabad, xxiv. 319; 
Wadhwan, Kathiawar, xxiv. 347. 

Cotton-tree {Bomhax uialabancum), 
grown in Balasore, vi. 237 ; Bankura, 
vi. 384 ; Bareilly, vii. 2 ; Baroda, vii. 50 ; 
Bhagalpur, viii. 26; Bogra, viii. 257; 
Burdwan, ix. 92 ; Central Provinces, x. 
7; Champaran, x. 138; Cooch Behar, 
X. 380 ; Cuttack, xi. 87 ; Dacca, xi. 104 ; 
Darbhanga, xi. 152 ; Dinajpur, xi. 348 ; 
Eastern Duars, xi. 371 ; Faridpur, xii. 
54; Gaya, xii. 196; Hooghly, xiii. 
163; Jalpaiguri, xiv. 31; Karauli, 
Rajputana, xv. 29; Khuina, xv. 286; 
Malda, xvii. 75 ; Midnapore, xvii. 328 ; 
Muzaffarpur, xviii. 95 ; Myitkyina, 
Burma, xviii. 142; Mymensingh, xviii. 
150 ; Orissa Tributary States, xix. 260 ; 
Pabna, xix. 297; Purl, xx. 400; Raj- 
shahi, xxi. 161; Rangpur, xxi. 223; 
Sambalpur, x?di. 6-7 ; Saran, xxii. 85 ; 
Northern Shan States, xxii. 240 ; Singh- 
bhiim, xxiii. 2. 

Couper, Sir G., Lieut. -Governor of North- 
western Provinces and Chief Commis- 
sioner of Oudh (1877), xxiv. 219-220. 

Courchant, Beauvallier de, Governor of 
Pondicherry (1723-6), ii. 464. 

Court, French general of RanjTt Singh, 
ii. 503 ; Manikiala stftpa explored by 
(1834^ xvii. 183. 

Courten, Sir William, licence for trade 
in the East granted to (1635), i'- 458 I 
factory opened at Karwar, North 
Kanara, xv. 65. 

Courten's Association, and union with 
East India Company (1649), "• 45^- 



Conrthope, defence of Pulo Run in the 

Spice Archipelago against the Dutch 

(1616-20), ii. 456. 
Courts of Justice, iv. 142-157; Courts of 

Requests, iv. 143 ; judicial expenditure, 

iv. 175. 
Couto, De, quoted on Elephanta rock- 
temples, xii. 4. 
Covelong, village in Chingleput District, 

Madras, of importance in the Carnatic 

Wars, xi. 54. 
Covilham, Portuguese adventurer, earliest 

recorded European traveller to Calicut 

(14S6), ix. 290. 
Cowan, Lieutenant, slain in Ramchandra 

Ganesh's attack at Dugad (17S0), xi. 

37.S.. 
Cowasji Jahanglr, Sir, lunatic asylum 

presented to Hyderabad, Sind, xiii. 

321. 
Cowcolly lighthouse, at Geonkhali, Mid- 

napur, xii. 210. 
Cowell, Professor E. B., report on tol^ 

of Nadia referred to, xviii. 281. 
Cox, Lieutenant, Cox's Bazar, Chittagong, 

named after (1799), xi. 55. 
Coxe, Captain, mutiny among troops at 

Dera Ismail Khan put down by (1857), 

xi. 262. 
Cox's Bazar, subdivision in Chittagong 

District, Eastern Bengal, xi. 54-55. 
Cox's Bazar, town in Chittagong District, 

Eastern Bengal, xi. 55. 
Craigie, Lieut.-Col. J. H., expedition 

against Aka Khel Afridis (1855), xix. 

208. 
Craigie, Captain, Kalat-i-Ghilzai, Af- 
ghanistan, held by sepoy garrison 

under (1842), xiv. 306. 
Cranes {Gruidae), i. 259. 
Cranganur, old Dutch fort. Cochin, x. 

343- 

Craniometry, inferior in ethnology to 
anthropometry, i. 284-286; but con- 
firmatory of its conclusions, i. 286. 

Crawford, Colonel, Surveyor - General 
(1814-6), attempts to measure Hima- 
layas, iv. 485. 

Creighton, ^Ir., quoted on Gaur, xii. 187, 
189. 

Cricket bats, polo and hockey sticks, &c., 
made at Sialkot, xxii. 331, 336. 

Crime, statistics, iv. T58 ; recent increase, 
iv. 396. See also in each Province, 
District, and larger State article under 
Population. 

Crochet work, Bela, Baluchistan, vii. 

-, '44- ... 

Crocodiles, in India generally, i. 266- 

267. 

Local notices : Backergunge, vi. 166 ; 

Banda, vi. 348 ; Bassein, Burma, vii. 

108; BastI, vii. 125; Burma, ix. 118 ; 



142 



IXDEX 



Canvery river, ix. 305 ; Cochin, x. 342 ; 
Coorg, xi. 7 ; Cuttack, xi. 88 ; Dar- 
bhanga, xi. 153; Etawah, xii. 39; 
Faridpur, xii. 54; Farrukhabad, xii. 
63 ; Fatehpur, xii. 76 ; Gonda, xii. 
312; Gorakhpur, xii. 333; Hantha- 
waddy, Burma, xiii. 28 ; Indus river, 
xiii. 364; South Kanara, xiv. 355; 
Karachi, xv. 2 ; Kathiawar, xv. 174 ; 
Khulna, xv. 287 ; Kurnool, xvi. 32 ; 
Magar Talao, or ' crocodile tank,' 
Karachi, xvi. 410 ; Malabar, xvii. 55 ; 
Malda, xvii. 76 ; Ma-ubin, Burma, 
xvii. 225; Muzaflfarpnr, xviii. 95-96; 
Myaungmya, Burma, xviii. no; My- 
sore State, xviii. 167 ; Nicobars, xix. 
62; Noakhali, xix. 129; Orissa Tribu- 
tary States, xix. 254 ; Pakhal Lake, 
Hyderabad, xix. 318 ; Punjab, xx. 256 ; 
Pyapon, Burma, xxi. 3 ; Sandoway, 
Burma, xxii. 32 ; Saran, xxii. 85 ; Sind, 
xxiii. 416 ; SItapur, xxiii. 55 ; Sundar- 
bans, xxiii. 141 ; Tliana, xxiii. 291 ; 
Twenty-four Parganas, xxiv. 69; Wun, 
Berar, xxiv. 389. 

Crole, Mr., description of antiquities at 
Seven Pagodas, Chingleput, xxii. 182- 
183. 

Cromer, Earl of, abolition of customs 
duties, ii. 520 ; financial reforms, iv. 
165-167. 

Cross, Lord, Act (1892), ii. 523. 

Crossbows, made in Nicobars, xix. 79. 

Crosthwaite, Sir Charles, Chief Commis- 
sioner, Burma (1887), ix. 192; Lieu- 
tenant-Governor of North-Western 
Provinces and Chief Commissioner of 
Oudh ^1892), xxiv. 220. 

Crosthwaite, Sir R., Agent to Governor- 
General in Central India (1891-4), ix. 
376 ; in Rajputana (1895), xxi. 142. 

Crows (Corv'idae), i. 239, 240. 

Crystal antiquarian remains : Bhattiprolu, 
ii. 36 ; Sonaii, ii. 36 ; Kolhapur, ii. 36. 

Crystal grinding, at Coimbatore, x. 365- 
366. 

Crj'stal manufactures, iii. 243. 

Crystal spectacles, beads, &c., made in 
Sladras Presidency, xvi. 294; Vallam, 
Tanjore, xxiv. 297. 

Crystals, in India generally, iii. 162 ; found 
in Ahmadnagar, v. 118; Aurangabad, 
Hyderabad, vi. 145 ; Bangalore, My- 
sore, vi. 361 ; Delhi, xi. 229; Kangra, 
xiv. 392 ; Madras Presidency, xvi. 240; 
Poona, XX. 176; Punjab, xx. 314; 
Rajputana, xxi. 130; Tanjore, xxiii. 

234- 
Cubbon, Sir Mark, head of Mysore 

Commission, xviii. 184; house of, 

on Nandidroog, xviii. 359. 
Cuckoos (Cuculidae;, i. 250-251. 
Cucumbers, in India generally, iii. 75 ; j 



grown in Afghanistan, v. 52 ; Baltistan, 
vi. 264; Chin Hills, Burma, x. 275, 
276; Chittagong Hill Tracts, x. 321 ; 
Goa, xii. 261 ; North Kanara, xiv. 347 ; 
Kashmir, xv. 122, 123; Meiktila, 
Burma, xvii. 280 ; Raigarh, xxi. 46 ; 
Rajputana, xxi. 121 ; United Provinces, 
xxiv. 182. 

Cuddalore, tdhtk in South Arcot District, 
Madras, xi, 55. 

Cuddalore, town and port in South Arcot 
District, Madras, xi. 55-57. 

Cuddapah, District in Madras, xi. 57-71 ; 
physical aspects, 57-60 ; history, 60- 
62; population, 62-64; agriculture, 
64-66 ; forests, 66-67 \ trade and com- 
munications, 67-68 ; famine, 68 ; ad- 
ministration, 68-71 ; education, 70- 
71 ; medical, 71. 

Other references : Geology, i. 6 1 -62 ; 
lava-flows, i. 89. 

Cuddapah, taluk in Madras, xi. 71-72. 

Cuddapah, town in Madras, former capi- 
tal of Nawab, xi. 72-73. 

Cuddapah-Kurnool Canal. See Kurnool- 
Cuddapah Canal. 

Cumbum, taluk in Kurnool District, 
Madras, xi. 73-74. 

Cumbum, town in Kurnool District, 
Madras, xi. 74. 

Cumin seed, grown in Bengal, vii. 247 ; 
Kalat, Baluchistan, xiv. 302 ; Mysore 
State, xviii.2io ; Rewa Kantha, Bombay, 
xxi. 296; .Sibi, Baluchistan, xxii. 337. 

Cunha, Nuno da, Portuguese Viceroy of 
India (1529-38). ii. 449-450. 

Cuningham, .Sir James, patent for Scottish 
East India Company by James I (1617), 
recalled 1618 , ii. 464. 

Cunninj^ham, Sir Alexander, quoted on 
Chandravati, xiv. 123; on Mau, xii. 
123; on bas-reliefs at Nurmahal, ii. 
132; theory about Sanglawala Tibba, 
xxii. 52 ; Sanklsa identified as site of 
capital of country called Sankasya or 
Kapiiha, xxii. 59 ; Sarwahl identified 
with Sudrai or .Sogdoi, xxii. 110; Set 
Mahet ruins examined, xxii. 181 ; ruins 
near .Shahdheri identified with Taxila, 
x.xii. 201 ; demarcated boundary between 
Spiti, Ladakh, and Chinese Tibet 
(1S46), xxiii. 93; description of Sugh, 
xxiii. 116; identifications made by, 
about Uch, xxiv. S2. 

Curlews {A'umentus), i. 261. 

Currency, iv. 513-522; Muhammadan 
coinage, 513-514; native mints, 514; 
coinage of the East India Company, 
514-516; unification, 516-51 7 ; conse- 
quences of the fall in the value of silver, 
517; introduction of a gold standard, 
518-519; gold reserve fund, 519; re- 
form, 519-520; coinage of Native 



INDEX 



143 



States, 520-521; paper, 521-522:; biblio- 
graphy, iv. 526. See also Coinage. 

Curtains, made in Cooch Behar, x. 385 ; 
Hardoi, xiii. 48 ; Muzaffarnagar, xviii. 
89 ; Punjab, XX. 315 ; Sandlla, HardoT, 
xxii. 31. 

Curtis, C, plants of Penang Islet, i. 207. 

Curzon, Lord, of Kedleston, Viceroy 
(1899-1905), ii. 526-530 ; North-West 
Frontier policy, 526-527 ; Tibet mis- 
sion, 527 ; improvement in finances, 
528 ; education reform, 528 ; army 
and police reforms, 528-529 ; dealings 
with feudatory States, 529 ; partition 
of Bengal (1905), 529; resignation 

(i905)> 530. _ 

Local notices : Manipur visited by 
(1901), xvii. 1S9; The Pamirs and 
the Source of the O.xus of, referred to, 
xix. 294. 

Curzon, Lady, Training School, at Patiala, 
Punjab, XX. 51. 

Cwsia.vA-s.T^Y'^es' Atwna sqtia?)iosa) ,\n. 75 ; 
grovfc'n in Baroda, vii. 48 ; Belgaum, 
vii. 146 ; Bengal, vii. 24S ; Burma, ix. 
152; Dharwar, xi. 304; Elgandal, 
Hyderabad, xii. 6 ; Goribidnur, Mysore, 
xii. 343 ; Kadi, Baroda, xiv. 256 ; Kaira, 
xiv. 277 ; Karimnagar, Hyderabad, xv. 
42 ; Lucknow, xvi. 182 ; Mandalay, 
xvii. 131 ; Nicobars, xix. 62 ; Nizam- 
abad, Hyderabad, xix. 124; Panch 
Mahals, xix. 381 ; Prome, Burma, xx. 
224; Rajputana, xxi. 90,121; Rewa 
Kantha, Bombay, xxi. 296 ; Southern 
Shan States, xxii. 257; United Pro- 
vinces, xxiv. 183. 

Customs duties : history of sea customs, iii. 
263 ; internal, iii. 263-264 ; revenue 
from, and sources, iv. 173, 201,261-265, 
276; import duties up to 1876, iv. 
261-262 ; abolition of import duties 
(1878-82), iv. 262-263; reimposition 
of import duties (i 894-6), iv. 263-264 ; 
goods exempted or charged at low 
rates, iv. 264; countervailing duty on 
bounty-fed sugar, iv. 264-265 ; revenue 
from the import tariff, iv. 265 ; export 
duties, iv. 265. 

Customs, manners, and mode of life, in 
the Rig- Veda, ii. 224, 225 ; of Afghans, 
vi. 292-293; in Ahmadabad, v. 106; 
Ahmadnagar, v. 1 1 5 ; of Akhas, Assam, 
V. 181 ; in Amindivi Islands, Lacca- 
dives, V. 304; of Kadans, on Anaimalais, 
V. 333-334 ; Andamanese, v. 361, 363- 
364, 364-365, 369-370 ; Astoris, xii. 
240; in Baloch, vi. 292-293; Jats, 
Baluchistan, vi. 293 ; of Baltis, vi. 262 ; 
Bhlls, viii. 102 ; in Bombay Presidency, 
viii. 309-310; of Brahuis, vi. 291-293, 
ix. 16; Burmans, ix.. 132-133, 149; 
Chibs, xv.ioi ; Coorgs, xi. 27 ; Dauris, 



Waziristan, xi. 202 ; Gaddis, Kash- 
mir, XV. 102 ; Garos, Assam, xii. 
176; Shins, Gilgit, xii. 240, 241; 
Girasias, ix. 22 ; Gonds in Gond- 
wana, xii. 323-325; Gujars, Kashmir, 
XV. loi ; Meos in Gurgaon, xii. 405 ; 
Kachhias, Gujarat, ix. 22 ; Kachins, 
xiv. 254; Kafirs, xiv. 270-271; 
Karens, Burma, xv. 37 ; in Kashmir, 
XV. 99, 103-106; Khasi and Jaintia 
Hills, XV. 258 ; of Kolls, ix. 22 ; Bani- 
Israil, Kolaba, xv. 360-361; in Lacca- 
dive Islands, xvi. 87 ; of Ladakhis, xvi. 
91-92 ; in Mysore State, xviii. 193-200; 
of Naga tribes, Assam, xviii. 288; in 
Nicobars, xix. 68-73, 78 ; at Pandhurna, 
Chhindwara, xix. 391 ; of Patidars, 
Gujarat, ix. 22; Santals, xxii. 68 ; Shra- 
waks, or Jains, Gujarat, ix. 22 ; Son- 
Kolls, XV. 389 ; native Christians, 
Thana, xxiii. 295 ; the Was, xxiv. 344 ; 
Yeravas, Coorg, xi. 28. 

Cutch, State in Bombay, xi. 74-84 ; 
physical aspects, 74-77 ; history, 77- 
79; population, 79-80; agriculture, 
80 ; minerals, 80-81 ; trade and 
communications, 81-82; famine, 82; 
administration, 82-84; education, 84 ; 
medical, 84. 

Other references : Geology, i. 75, 76, 
93^95; earthquake (1819), i. 99; 
meteorology, i. 123, 145; language, i. 
372 ; minerals, iii. 156 ; arts and manu- 
factures, iii. 234, 239 ; famine (1860-1), 
iii. 4S5 ; subsidiary force, iv. 86 ; area, 
population, revenue, and administra- 
tion, iv. 97 ; plague (1812), iv. 475. 

Cutch, Rann of, salt waste round State of 
Cutch, xi. 84-85, xxii. 391 ; physical 
aspects, i. 38. 

Cutch, found and prepared in Angul, 
Orissa, v. 378; Bilaspur, viii. 229; 
Coondapoor, South Kanara, xi. i ; 
Lower Chindwin, Burma, x. 233 ; 
Upper Chindwin, Burma, x. 246 ; 
Coimbatore, x. 364 ; Dharampur, 
Bombay, xi. 296 ; Gangpur, Bengal, 
xii. 142 ; Gorakhpur, xii. 337 ; Hazari- 
bagh, xiii. 95 ; Henzada, Burma, xiii. 
108; Kadur, Mysore, xiv. 267; North 
Kanara, xiv. 349 ; Katha, Burma, xv. 
159; Kyaukse, Burma, xvi. 77; 
Magwe, Burma, xvi. 418; Manbhum, 
xvii. 116 ; Meiktila, Burma, xvii. 282 ; 
Mergui, Burma, xvii, 302 ; Minbu, 
Burma, xvii. 352 ; Myingyan, Burma, 
xviii. 121 ; Pakokku, Burma, xix. 326; 
Plllbhit, XX. 141 ; Prome, Burma, xx. 
235, 226 ; Ratnagiri, xxi. 246 ; Rewa 
Kantha, xxi, 296 ; Ruby Mines District, 
Burma, xxi. 332 ; Sagaing, Burma, xxi. 
359, 360; Santal Parganas, xxii. 72; 
Southern Shan States, xxii. 260 ; 



144 



INDEX 



Shwebo, Burma, xxii. 316; Surguja, 
Central Provinces, xxiii. 172; Tharra- 
waddy, Burma, xxiii. 322 ; Thayetmyo, 
Burma, xxiii. 344, 349. 
Cutch induslr}-, iii. 119, 1 71-172, 253. 
Cutchl. See KachhI. 
Cutlery, made at Balrampur, Gonda, vi. 
261 ; Banpas, Burdwan, vi. 403 ; 
Bengal, vii. 267 ; Bhera, Shalipur, 
viii. loi ; Bijnor, viii. 202 ; Bombay 
Presidency, viii. 325 ; Burdwan, ix. 
102; Cawnpore, ix. 319; Coorg, xi. 
36; Damoh, xi. 140; Indur, Hyder- 
abad, xiii. 354-355 ; Jhalawar, Raj- 
putana, xiv. 119; Jlialida, Manbhum, 
xiv. 122 ; Kadi, Baroda, xiv. 257 ; 
Kaimganj, Farrukhabad, xiv. 274 ; 
Kallganj, Khulna, xiv. 307 ; Kanigiri, 
Nellore, xiv. 400 ; Khulna, xv. 290 ; 
Nagpur, xviii. 313; Nellore, xix. 17; 
Xllgiris, xix. 97 ; North-West Frontier 
Province, xix. 183; PanTpat, Kurnal, 
xix. 398 ; Petliapur, Mahl Kantha, xx. 
127; Rajputana, xxi. 138; Rampur, 
United Provinces, xxi. 189; Sirohi, 
Rajputana, xxiii. 34, 37 ; Shahpur, 
xxii. 218; Sojat, Rajputana, xxiii. 72; 
Sukkur, Sind, xxiii. 123; Sundarbans, 
xxiii. 143; Twenty-four Parganas, xxiv. 
75 ; United Provinces, xxiv. 203 ; 
WazTrabad, Gujranwala, xxiv. 378. 
Cuttack, District in Orissa, Bengal, xi. 
85-98 ; physical aspects, 85-S9 ; his- 
tory, 89; population, 89-90 ; agricul- 
ture, 90-92 ; trade and communications, 
92-93; famine, 93-94; administra- 
tion, 94-98 ; education, 97 ; medical, 
97-9S ; bibliography, 98. 

Other references: Arts and manufac- 
tures, iii. 190, 193, 231, 234, 239-240. 
Cuttack, subdivision in Bengal, xi. 98. 
Cuttack, city in Bengal, capital of Orissa, 

xi. 98-99. 
Cuttle-bones, economic product in Anda- 

mans, v. 358 ; Nicobars, xix. 62. 
Cyclones, Arabian Sea, i. 1 20-1 21 ; Bay 
of Bengal, i. 1 25-1 26; October cyclones, 
i- 134-135. 137, 141 ; ^^ ^^<^^en (1885), 
i. 120. 

Local notices : Akyab, Burma, v. 
192; Arakan, Burma, v. 393; North 
Arcot, v. 405 ; Backergunge (1876), 
vi. 166; Balasore, vi. 238; Bassein, 
Burma (1856-7 and 1902), vii. 108, 
109; Bellary (1871), vii. 161 ; Bengal, 
vii. 206, 283 ; Blrbhum, viii. 241 ; 
Bogra, viii. 257 ; Bombay Presidency, 
viii. 278; Burma, ix. 120; Calcutta 
(1737. 1842, 1S64, and 1867), ix. 262 ; 
Chicacole, Ganjam (1876), x. 218; 
Chingleput, X. 254, 263; Chittagong, 
X. 307-308; Cooch Behar, x. 381; 
Coringa, Godavari (1832), xi. 51 ; 



Cuttack, xi. 88 ; Dakhin Shahbazpur, 
Backergunge (1876), xi. 124; Dar- 
bhanga, xi. 153; Darjeeling, xi. 168, 
179; Daulatkhan, Backergunge (1893% 
xi. 201 ; Diamond Harbour, Twenty- 
four Parganas (1864), xi. 340 ; Eastern 
Bengal, xi. 391; Ganjam, xii. 145; 
Garo Hills, Assam, xii. 173 ; Goalpara, 
xii. 270; Godavari, xii. 284; Hatia 
Island, Xoakhali (1876', xiii. 73; 
Howrah, xiii. 207; Injaram, Godavari 
(1839), ^iii- .^65 ; Khulna, xv. 287, 
291 ; Kistna, xv. 321 ; Kutubdia Island, 
Chittagong, .xvi. 58 ; Laccadive Islands, 
xvi. 88 ; Madras, xvi. 246, 36S, 376, 
386 ; Madura, xvi. 3S9 ; Meghna 
estuary, xvii. 268 ; Midnapore, xvii. 
329; Myaungmya, Burma, xviii. 110; 
Nicobars, xix. 63 ; Noakhali, xix. 129 ; 
Pabna, xix. 298 ; Pudukkottai, Madras, 
XX. 231 ; Punjab, xx. 257-258 ; Purl, 
XX. 400; Rangpur, xxi. 224; Ratna- 
giri, xxi. 247; .Sagar Island, Sundar- 
bans, xxi. 366; Sandwlp Island, Noa- 
khali, xxii. 49 ; Sundarbans, xxiii. 141 ; 
Twenty-four Parganas, xxiv. 69 ; \'iza- 
gapatam, xxiv. 324. 

D. 

Dabha. petty State in Mahl Kantha, 
Bombay, xi. 99, xvii. 13. 

Dabhoi, town in Baroda State, xi. 99 
100. 

Dabhoi, port in Ratnagiri District, Bom- 
bay, xi. loo-ioi. 

Dablana, village in Bundi -State, Rajput- 
ana, xi. loi. 

Dabo, battle of (1843), xiii. 314. 

Dabri, thakiirat in IMalwa Agency, Cen- 
tral India, xi. loi.xvii. 99. 

Dabwali, %\i\i-tahsll in Hissar District, 
Punjab, xi. loi. 

Dacca, Division in Eastern Bengal and 
Assam, xi. 101-102. 

Dacca, District in Eastern Bengal and 
Assam, .xi. 102-116; physical aspects, 
102-105; history, 105-106; natural 
calamities, 104-105; population, 106- 
108; agriculture, 108-110 ; trade and 
communications, 110-113; administra- 
tion, 113-116; revenue, 11 3-1 14 ; edu- 
cation, 115 ; medical, 11 5-1 16 ; density 
of population, i. 451. 

Dacca, subdivision in Dacca District, 
Eastern Bengal and .\ssam, xi. 116. 

Dacca, city in Dacca District, and capital 
of Eastern Bengal and Assam, .xi. 116- 
120; arts and manufactures, iii. 193, 
194, 200, 201, 220, 221, 232, 239, 240. 

Dachina Bades (Dakshinapata), old name 
of the Deccan, xi. 207. 

Dacoity , or gang-robbery, in Ahmadnagar. 
v. 120; Akola, V. 186; Akyab, v. 198; 



INDEX 



145 



Aligarh, v. 215 ; Amherst, v. 301 ; Am- 
raoti, V. 311 ; Anantapur, v. 346; Be- 
nares, vii. 185; BuLindshahr, ix. 55; 
Central India, ix. 384, 3S5 ; Chingle- 
put, X. 264; Cuddapah, xi. 69; Cuttack, 
xi. 9_:; ; Darjeeling, xi. 176; Dinajpur, 
xi. 352; EUichpur, xii. 16-17; Etah, 
xii. 35 ; Etawah, xii. 45 ; Farrukhabad, 
xii. 70 ; Ferozepore, xii. 96 ; Ganjam, 
xii. 155 ; Gaya, xii. 205 ; Gonda, xii. 
317; Gorakhpur, xii. 339; Gulbarga, 
xii. 380 ; Hanthaw addy, xiii. 35 ; Hen- 
zada, xiii. 109 ; North Kanara, xiv. 
351 ; Khandesh, xv. 237; Kistna, xv. 
331 ; Kurnool, xvi. 42 ; Kyaukse, xvi. 
71-72 ; Madura, xvi. 401 ; Magwe, xvi. 
414; Main Kantha. xvii. 20; Mahbub- 
nagar, xvii. 6; MainpurT. xvii. 38; 
Manbhum, xvii. 120 ; Medak, xvii. 249 ; 
Meerut, xvii. 261; Meiktila, xvii. 278; 
Midnapore, xvii. 336 ; Monghyr, xvii. 
399 ; Muttra, xviii. 70 ; Mnzaffarnagar, 
xviii. 91; Myingyan, xviii. 123-124; 
Nalgonda, xviii. 343 ; Nander, xviii. 
354 ; Nellore, xix. 19; Orissa Tributary 
States, xix. 263; Osmanabad, xix. 274; 
Pegu, XX. 93; Port Blair, xx. 197; 
Pudukkottai, xx. 237; Purl, xx. 406; 
Purnea, xx. 418; Pyapon, xxi. 7; 
Raichur, xxi. 42 ; Sambalpur, xxii. 1 4 ; 
Satara, xxii. 126; Saugor, xxii. 1^5; 
Shahjahanpur, xxii. 208 ; Shahpur, xxii. 
219 ;Sholapur, xxii. 303 ; Sitapur, xxiii. 
59; Sylhet, xxiii. 198; Tharrawaddy, 
xxiii. 325 ; Thaton, xxiii. 338 ; Thayet- 
myo, xxiii. 351 ; Tinnevelly, xxiii. 374; 
Toungoo, xxiii. 431 ; Twenty-four Par- 
ganas, xxiv. 78 ; Vizagapatam , xxi v. 334 ; 
Yamethin, xxiv. 403, 409. 

Dad Canal, Sind, iii. 331. 

Dadabhai Kawasjl Tata school, Xavsari, 
Baroda, xviii. 425. 

Dadajl Rao, Nargund restored to, xviii. 

378- 
Dadhalia, petty State in Mahl Kantha,. 

Bombay, xi. 120, xvii. 13. 
Dadiga, Ganga prince, rule in Mysore 

(second century), xviii. 169-170; Gan- 

gavadi kingdom founded by, xviii. 

170. 
Dadri, tahsilm Jind State, Punjab, xi. 1 20. 
Dadri, town in Jind State, Punjab, xi. 

1 20-1 21. 
Dadii fair, Ballia, vi. 25S. 
Dadu, founder of sect of Dadupanthis, ii. 

4IJ, xviii. 370. 
Dadu, canal in Larkana District, Bombay, 

xvi. 141. 
Dadu, taliika in Larkana District, Bom- 
bay, xi. 121. 
Dadupanthis, sect of, ii. 417, xviii. 370 ; 

in Jaipur, xiii. 388-389 ; Jodhpur, xiv. 

188. 

VOL. XXV. 



Dadwals, Katoch family, settlement in 

Hoshiarpur District, xiii. 194. 
Dalla Hills, section of Himalayan range, 

Eastern 13engal and Assam, xi. 121- 

122. 
Dafla language, i. 387, 392, 400. 
Daflapur, petty State in Political Agency 

of Bijapur, Bombay. See Bijapur 

Agency. 
Dallas, tribe in Assam, vi. 14, 44; in Dafla 

Hills, xi. 121-122 ; Himalayas, xiii. 

133- 
Daggar, name of northern tract of Thai, 

North-West Frontier Province, xxiii. 

286. 
Daggers, manufacture of, in Bhera, viii. 

100; Bhutan, viii. 160; Chitral, x. 

304; Rajputana, xxi. 132; Sirohi, 

xxiii. 34, 37 ; Sojat, xxiii. 72. 
Dagis, tribe in Simla District, xxii. 379. 
Dagshai, hill cantonment in Simla Dis- 

tiict, Punjab, xi. 122. 
Dagshai stage of .Sirmur geological series, 

i. 91. 
Dagwin, ferry over Salween river, xxi. 

423- 
Dahanu, taluka in Thana District, Bom- 
bay, xi. 122. 
Dahanu town, seaport in Thana District, 

Bombay, xi. 122. 
Dahar Lake, in Hardol District, Oudh, 

xi. 122-123. 
Dahars, converts to Islam, in Sukkur 

District, Sind, xxiii. 122. 
Dahawar, channel of the Sarda river, 

xxii. 103. 
Dahi Lakshmi Library, Nadiad, xviii. 283. 
Dahida, petty .State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, xi. 123, XV, 169. 
Dahir, rule in Sind, xxii. 394-395. 
Dahiyas, Jat tribe, in Delhi District, xi. 

226. 
Dahmla, Brahman sect, in Hissar Dis- 
trict, xiii. 149. 
Dai Anga, wet-nurse of .Shah Jahan, 

mosque erected by, at Lahore (1635}, 

xvi. 169. 
Daidala, mound on which DIpalpur 

village stands possibly to be identified 

with, xi. 359. 
Daignets, triiae in Akyab, v. 194. 
Daimas, Brahman sub-caste, in Rajputana, 

xxi. III. 
Dainhat, town in Burdwan District, 

Bengal, xi. 133. 
Daira Din Panah, village in Muzaffar- 

garh District, Punjab, xi. 123. 
Daira-ki-Masjid, mosque at Alwar, v. 

268. 
Daire, Musalman sect, in Channapatna, 

Bangalore, x. 174; Mysore State, xviii. 

204. 
Dairying, iii. 83-84 ; Bandel, vi. 358 ; 



146 



INDEX 



liareilly, vii. 14 ; Damoh, xi. 145 ; 
Madras Presidency, xvi. 271 ; Mah- 
laing, xvii. 283 ; Meiktila, xvii. 288 ; 
Mymensingh, xviii. 155; United Pro- 
vinces, xxiv. 205. Sec also Gin or 
butter. 

Daitas, caste in Purl District, xx. 402. 

Dajal, town in Dera Ghazi Khan PJistrict, 
Punjab, xi. 123. 

Dajal cattle, in Multan, xviii. 30. 

Dakhil, or Salami gateway, at Gaur, ii. 
iQO, xii. 189, 191. 

Dakhin. See Deccan. 

Dakhin Shahbazpur, island in the Meghna 
estuary, xi. 124. 

DakhinI HindostanT language, i. 366. 

Dakhinpat, village in Sibsagar District, 
Eastern Bengal and Assam, xi. 123- 
124. 

Dakor, place of Hindu pilgrimage, in 
Kaira District, Bombay, xi. 124. 

Dakshina. See Southern Kosala. 

Dakshina Govardhangiri. See Gopal- 
swami Betta. 

Dakshina Kedara. See Belgami. 

Dakshina Pinakini river. See Ponnaiyar. 

Dal, or Dalkl, Bhar chief in Southern 
Oudh (12471, xxiv. 150. 

Dal Deva, traditional founder of Dalmau 
town, xi. 127. 

Dal fair, at Dharmsala, xi. 302. 

Dal Lake, Kashmir State, xi. 124-125. 

Dalel Khan. See P'aujdar Khan. 

Daleras, basket-makers and thieves, 
found only in Bareilly, vii. 7. 

Dalhousie, Lord, Governor - General, 
(1848-56), ii. 504-508 ; administrative 
reforms, 504 ; public works, 504 ; deal- 
ings with feudatory States, 505-506 ; 
death (i860), 508 ; work in India, 
508; minute on railways (1853), iii. 
366 ; policy towards Native States, iv. 

79- 

Local notices : Bethune College main- 
tained by, ix. 283 ; Chlni hill residence 
of, X. 284; visit to Mysore (1S55), 
xviii. 184; Talpurs allowed to return 
to Llyderabad (1S54), xxii. 402. 

Dalhousie, hill sanitarium in Gurdaspur 
District, I'unjab, xi. 125-126. 

Dalhousie Convent School, at Dalhousie, 
Punjab, xi. i 26. 

Daling coal-field, iii. 132. 

l^allp, legend of, xii. 135. 

Dalip Singh, CLE., Rana of Baghat, 
vi. 184. 

Dallp Singh, recognized as Raja of the 
Punjab (1845), ii. 503; allowance to, 
on annexation (1849), "• .^°.^ > govern- 
ment resigned to the British (1849), 
xvi. III. 

Dalipnagar. See Dhulipnagar. 

DalkT. See Dal. 



Dalku Rao, Bargujar Thakur, xxiii. 419. 
Dalma, hill in Manbhuin District, Bengal, 

xi. 126. 
Dalmau, iahsil in Rae Barell District, 

United Provinces, xi. 126-127. 
Dalmau, town in Rae Barell District, 

LTnited Provinces, xi. 127. 
DalmT, site of ruins, Manbhum District, 

Bengal, xi. 127. 
Dalpat Singh, chief of Partabgarh State 

(1844-64), XX. 10. 
1 'als, a class of plain-dwelling Khonds, 

XV. 280-281. 
Dalsagar tank, SeonT, xxii. 176. 
Dalton, Colonel, Dal tonganj named after, 

xi. 128. 
Dalton, Captain, night attacks on Llyya- 

kondantirumalai, near Trichinopoly 

(1753), xxiv. 290. 
Daltonganj, liead-quarters of Palamau 

District, Bengal, xi. 128; coal-field, 

iii. 132, 134, vii. 263, 264. 
Dalus, aboriginal tribe in Mymensingh 

District, xviii. 154. 
Daly, Lieutenant-General Sir IL, Agent 

to Governor-General in Central India 

(1869-81), ix. 376. 
Daly, Major H., Agent to Governor- 
General in Central India (1905), ix. 

376. 

Daly College, Indore, xiii. 351. 

DamajT Gaikwar I (1732-68), power in 
Ahmadabad, v. 107, xxi. 23, 24 ; in- 
cursions into Amreli, v. 316; history 
of, vii. 33-35 ; Dholka town under 
(1757), xi. 321 ; power in Gujarat, xii. 
352-353 ; territory in Idar taken by, 
xiii. 326; Kaira taken (1753), xiv. 286 ; 
married daughter of Thakur of I.atlii 
with Chabharia as dowry, xvi. 154; 
at battle of PanTpat, vii. 34; temple in 
memory of, at Savli, xxii. 157. 

Damal Chavada, Dhrol taken from, by 
Ilardolji, xviii. 420. 

Damalcheruvu Pass, North Arcot District, 
Madras, xi. 128 ; scene of battle (1740), 
ii. 471. 

Daman, Portuguese settlement and town 
in Gujarat, within Thana District, 
Bombay, xi. 128-131. 

Dfiman-i-koh, tract of hilly country in 
.Santal Parganas District, Bengal, xi. 
131-132. 

Diimanis, tribe in Chagai, Baluchistan, 
X. 117. 

Daniant, Mr., Political Officer, visit to 
villages in Naga Hills (1879), xviii. 
2S6; killed, XV. 284, xvii. 187, xviii. 
286. 

Damar Singh, rule in Etah District, xii. 

.^o-.?i. 37- 
Damaras, Kashmir plundered, xv. 92. 
Damascened work, ii. 240; Gujrat, xii. 



INDEX 



147 



370,374; Lucknow, xvi. 198 ; Sialkot, 

xxii. 331. 
Damayantl, wife of Raja Nala of Nar- 

war, vii. 366, xi. 144. 
Damayazika pagoda, Pagan, Burma, xix. 

313- 

Dambal tanks, at Gadag, Bombay, xii. 
119. 

Dam-Dama, cantonment and town in the 
Twenty-four Parganas, Bengal. See 
Dum-Dum. 

Damdama palace, Mandi, xvii. 158. 

Damodar, river in Bengal, xi. 132-134. 

Damodar Tande, Ran Bahadur Sah 
driven from Nepal by, xix. 34. 

Damodara-Misra, author of the //(?//«///(?;/- 
iiiltaka, ii. 249. 

Damodim, extinct volcano in the Chagai 
Hills, Baluchistan, x. 120. 

Damoh, District in Jubbulpore Division 
of Central Provinces, xi. 134-144; 
physical aspects, 134-136; history, 
136-137; population, 137-138; agri- 
culture, 138-140; forests, 140; trade 
and communications, 140-142 ; famine, 
142; administration, 142-144; revenue, 
142-143; education, 143-144; medical, 
144. 

Damoh, iahsil in Damoh District, Cen- 
tral Provinces, xi. 144. 

Damoh, town in Damoh District, Central 
Provinces, xi. 144-145. 

Dampier, — , mention of Nicobars 
(1688), xix. 64. 

Damra, village in Goalpara District, 
Eastern Bengal and Assam, xi. 145. 

Damri Masjid, Ahmadnagar, v. 124. 

Dams. See Anicuts and Dams. 

Damuda geological series, i. 82-83. 

Danapur, town in Bengal. See Dina- 
pore. 

Danaws, tribe in Burma, ix. 141 ; in Mye- 
lat Division of Southern Shan States, xi. 
149. 

Danayaks, Nanjangiid held by, early in 
eleventh century, xviii. 365. 

Dancing. See Amusements. 

Dandesh, former name of Khandesh Dis- 
trict, XV. 229. 

Dandeshwar, temple of, at Nargund, xviii. 
37s. 

Dandin, Sanskrit poet, ii. 241, 247, 264. 

Dandot coal-field, iii. 137, 138, 164, 165. 

Dandpani, temple of, at Benares, vii. 191. 

Dandra tribe, tasar silk gathered by, 
Hasanparti, Hyderabad, xiii. 59. 

Dane, Sir Louis, mission to Kabul, v. 44; 
Lieutenant-Governor of Punjab (1908), 
XX. 331. 

Danes in India : Kolachel formerly occu- 
pied by, XV. 368 ; Nicobars taken 
possession of, xix. 64 ; at Serampore, 
xxii. 177 : Tranquebar, xxiii. 434-435. 



Dangbhang, dialect of Western Hindi, 
spoken in Karauli State, xv. 28. 

DangT, dialect of Western Hindi, spoken 
in Jaipur, xiii. 389 ; Karauli, xv. 28. 

Dangis, caste in Central Provinces, x. 26; 
Khilchipur, XV. 278; Pirawar, xx. 151 ; 
Rajgarh, xxi. 69; Saugor, xxii. 140; 
Udaipur State, xxiv. 94. 

Dangiwara, Saugor sometimes called, 
xxii. 140. 

Dangs, the, tract of country in Surat 
Political Agency, Bombay, xi. 145- 
148. 

Dani palms i^Nipa fruticans), grown in 
Akyab, v. 195 ; Amherst, v. 294, 29S ; 
Bassein, vii. iii ; Kyaukpyu, xvi. 64; 
Mergui, xvii. 299, 300; Myaungmya, 
xviii. 109, 112 ; Sandoway, xxii. 32, 
35 ; Tavoy, xxiii. 263. 

Danish coins, ii. 149. 

Danish East India Companies (i6i6, 
1670), ii. 464; obtained grant of land 
at Tranquebar from Raja of Tanjore 
and built fort (1620), xxiii. 435. See 
also Factories. 

Danish Missions. See under Protestant 
Missions. 

Daniyal, Prince, built dar^'-d/i (1497-8), 
xvii. 394 ; repaired fortifications of 
Monghyr (1497), xvii. 402. 

Daniyal, Prince, son of Akbai, captured 
Ahmadnagar (1600), v. 124, vi. 143 J 
governor of Ahmadnagar, Khandesh, 
and Berar (1598-1605), vii. 369, xv. 
299; governor of Deccan, xix. 108. 

Dankaur, town in Bulandshahr District, 
United Provinces, xi. 148. 

Dankhar, ancient capital in Kangra Dis- 
trict, Punjab, xi. 148. 

Danta, petty .State in Mahi Kantha, Bom- 
bay, xi. 148, xvii. 13. 

Danleshvvarl, goddess, tutelary deity of 
Rajas of Bastar, vii. 122. 

Dantidurga, Rashtrakuta king, defeated 
the Western Chalukyas {e. 754), ii. 329. 

Dantiga, Ganga-Pallava king, defeated 
by Govinda III, ii. 331. 

Dannbyu, township in Ma-ubin District, 
Lower Burma, xi. 148. 

Danubyu, town in Ma-ubin District, 
Lower Burma, scene of fighting in first 
Burmese War, xi. 148-149. 

Danus, Shan-Burmese community, living 
between Shan States and Upper 
Burma, xi. 149; in Burma, ix. 139; 
Hsamonghkam, xiii. 217; Hsipaw, 
xiii. 220 ; Kyaukse, xvi. 76 ; Kyawkku, 
xvi. 83 ; Kyong, xvi. 84 ; Loi-ai, xvi. 
170; Loimaw, xvi. 171; Mandalay, 
xvii. 124, 129; Maw, xvii. 235 ; Maw- 
son, xvii. 237; Meiktila, xvii. 279; 
Pangmi, xix. 395 ; Pangtara, xix. 396 ; 
Southern Shan States, xxii. 256 ; Sin- 



L 2 



148 



INDEX 



gaing, xxii. 435 ; Yawnghwe, xxiv. 
416. 
Daosa, town in Jaipur State, Rajputana, 
xi. X49 ; stone implements found, ii. 

95- 

Daphabum, mountain ridge on NE. fron- 
tier of Assam, xi. 149. 

Daphla Hills. See Dafla. 

Daphlapur. petty State in Bombay. See 
Bijapur Agency. 

Dapoli, tahtka in Ratnagiri District, 
Bombay, xi. 150. 

Dapoli, town and former cantonment in 
Ratnagiri District, Bombay, xi. 150- 

Dara .Shikoii, brother of Aurangzeb, 
struggle for Mughal throne, ii. 401- 
402 ; defeated by Aurangzeb near 
Ajmer, v. 142 ; Dhar fort held by 
(1658), xi. 294; Duki occupied 1653% 
xvi. 174 ; cause espoused by people 
of Lahore, xvi. 109 ; village of 
HaslTmpur purchased and bestowed on 
Mullan Shah (Mian Mir), xvi. 115; 
flight through Multan, xviii. 27; built 
Pari Mahal for his tutor, xi. 125 ; con- 
structed canal at I'asrur, xx. 23 ; flight 
to the I'unjab, but captured and killed, 
XX. 269; buildings, &c., at Shekhupura, 
xxii. 270; name of Muhammadabad 
changed to Shikohabad in honour of, 
xxii. 279; brought up at Sultanpur, 
xxiii. 138. 

Darapur, idluk and town in Madras. See 
Dharapuram. 

Darasatha, king, rccoids of, ii. 47, 57. 

Darbar Baoll Sahib, well at Sialkot, xxii. 

Darbar Sahib, Sikh temple at Dera Nanak, 
xi. 271. 

Darbhanga, District in Patna Division, 
Ikngal, xi. 151-163 ; physical aspects, 
151-153; history, 153-154; popula- 
tion, 154-155; agriculture, 155-157; 
trade and communications, 157-159; 
famine, 159-160; administration, 160- 
163 ; revenue, 160-161 ; education, 
162; medical, 162-163. 

Darbhanga, subdivision ia Darbhanga 
District, Bengal, xi. 163. 

Darbhanga, town in Darbhanga District, 
Bengal, xi. 164-165. 

Darbhanga Raj, estate in Bengal, xi. 163- 
164. 

Dard tribes, in Gilgit. xii. 239 240; Hindu 
Rush mountains, xiii. 139. 

Dargahs. See Shrines and Tombs, 
Mausoleums, and Cenotaphs. 

Dargai, geology, i. 75. 

Daria Rherl, thakurat in Central India. 
xi. 165, viii. 125. 

DarTabad, town in United Provinces. See 
Daryabad. 



Darlba Masjid, at Jaunpur, xiv. 83. 

Dai-Js. See Blankets and Rugs. 

Darius (521-485 E.C.), attack on India, 
ii. 272-273 ; Scylax sent to explore 
course of Indus (516 B.C.) and races 
dwelling west of Indus subdued, xix. 
I48 ; Indus valley conquered, xxii. 394. 

Darjeeling, District in Bhagalpur Divi- 
sion, Bengal, xi. 165-178; physical 
aspects, 165-168 ; natural calamities, 
168; history, 16S-169; population, 
169-171 ; agriculture, 171-174 ; forests, 
174-175 ; trade and communications, 
175 ; administration, 175-178 ; revenue, 
176-177; education, 177; medical, 



'// 



-17s. 



Othe7- references : Ethnology, i. 295 ; 
tea industry established (1856), iii. 56 ; 
cinchona cultivation, iii. 66-67 ; coal- 
field, iii. 136. 

Darjeeling, subdivision in Darjeeling Dis- 
trict, Bengal, xi. 17S. 

Darjeeling, town and sanitarium in Dar- 
jeeling District, Bengal, xi. 178-181 ; 
meteorology, i. 154. 

Darjeeling-IIimalayan Railway, iii. 415. 

Darkoti, Simla Hill Slate, Punjab, xi. 
iSi. 

Darmiya, language spoken in Western 
Himalayas, i. 392. 

Darod, petty .State in Kathiawar, Bombay, 
xi. 181, XV. 168. 

Daroj, tank in Bellary, vii. 166. 

Darrang, District of Eastern Bengal and 
Assam, xi. 181-191 ; physical aspects, 
181-183; history, 183-184; popula- 
tion, 184-185; agriculture, 185-187; 
forests, 187; trade and communica- 
tions, 187-189; administration, 189- 
191.' 

Darshan Singh, rule in Ajodhya, v. 174 ; 
temple at Ajodhya, v. 176. 

Darsi, zaintnddri tahsil in Nellore Dis- 
trict, Madras, xi. 191. 

D.ar-ul-ulum, school at Hyderabad city, 
xiii. 292, 293. 

Dar-ush-shifa, hospital at Hyderabad city, 
xiii. 308-309. 

Darwaza-i-Lahauri, gate at Kabul, xiv. 
242. 

Daiwazgai, peak in Kurram Agency, xvi. 
48. 

Darwesh Khels, expeditions against 
(1897, 1897-8), xix. 210; in Northern 
Waziristan, xxiv. 379. 

Darweza Akhund, ]5aba, historian of the 
Vusufzai, xxiii. 184. 

Darwha, iiiluk in Veotmal District, 
Berar, xi. 191. 

Darwha, town in Veotmal llistrict, 
Berar. xi. 191. 

Darya Daulat, Tipu's summer palace at 
.Seringapalam, xviii. 188,254, >^^.ii.i8o. 



INDEX 



149 



Darya Imad Shah, Imad Shalii king of 

Berar {c. 1528-62), ii. 391, vii. 368, xii. 

20 n. 
Darya Khan, tomb at Ahmadabad, v. 

108. 
Daryabad, town in Bara Bank! District, 

United Provinces, xi. 191-192. 
Daryapur, taluk in Amraoli District, 

Berar, xi. 192. 
Daryau Singh, son of Ram Kislian, 

confirmed in possession of Kalinjar 

(1812), X. 1S3, xiv. 3i2._ 
Darzadas, aboriginal race in Makian, vi. 

288, xvii. 47, 48; in Kalat State, xiv. 

301. 
Darzis, tailors, in Bombay, viii. 304, 305 ; 

United Provinces, xxiv. 170. 
Das, cultivators, in Sylhet District, xxiii. 

193- 
Dasada, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, xi. 192, XV. 167. 
Dasahra, festival held in Ajmer-Mer- 
wara, v. 148 ; Baroda, vii. 45 ; Berar, 
vii. 382 ; observed by Bhlls, viii. 102; 
in Central India, ix. 357 ; Central 
Provinces, x. 31 ; Hyderabad State, 
xiii. 250 ; Mysore, xviii. 209 ; North- 
West Frontier Province, xix. 169 ; 
Punjab, XX. 294; Rajputaija, xxi. 118; 
Sind, xxii. 411; TiibenI, xxiv. 25; 
United Provinces, xxiv. 175. 

Dasaknindi'a-charita, Sanskrit romance 
by Dandin. ii. 241. 

Dasa-padas, Tamil hymns in honour of 
Krishna, ii. 425. 

Dasara, head-quarters of Manikganj sub- 
division, Dacca District, Eastern Bengal 
and Assam, xi. 192. 

Dasaratha, king of the Solar race, caves 
dedicated to Ajlvika sect by, ii. 161 ; 
Ajodhya capital of, v. 175 ; father of* 
Rama, xix. 278 ; rule in Kosala, xix. 
278. 

Dasashwamedh, ghat at Benares, vii. 
191. 

Dasbodh, the, by Ram-das, ii. 432. 

Dashapura, former name of Mandasor, 
xvii. 150. 

Dasharna river. See Dhasan. 

Dasht, river in Baluchistan, xi. 192. 

Daska, ta/isil in Sialkot District, Punjab, 
xi. 192. 

Daska, town in Sialkot District, Punjab, 
xi. 192-193. 

Daskroi, taliika in Ahmadabad District, 
Bombay, xi. 193. 

Dasnam ka Akhara, temple of Mahadeo 
at Pail, xix. 316. 

Daspalla, tributary State of Orissa, Ben- 
gal, xi. 193-194- 

Dastgir, Pir, shrine at Srinagar, xxiii. 
100. 

Dastgir, pretender, Basoda, vii. 105. 



Dastur Khan, mosque at Ahmadabad, 
V. 108. 

Dasuya, tahsil in Hoshiarpur District, 
Punjab, xi. 194. 

Dasuya, town in Hoshiarpur District, 
Punjab, xi. 194. 

Dat Prasad Singh, Raja of Mursan, 
xviii. 44. 

Dataganj, tahsil in Budaun District, 
United Provinces, xi. 194-195. 

Datana, thakiirdt in Malwa Agency, 
Central India, xi. 195, xvii. 99. 

Date palms {Phoenix), in Anantapur, v. 
338; Baluchistan, vi. 295-296; Bans- 
wara, vi. 410 ; Bardoli, Surat, vi. 
432 ; Bijapur, viii. 176 ; Bhopal, viii. 
136; Bombay Presidency, viii. 275; 
Central Provinces, x. 8 ; Challakere, 
X. 128; Champaran, x. 138; Cudda- 
pah, xi. 59 ; Darbhanga, xi. 153 ; Dera 
Ghazi Khan, xi. 249, 254 ; Farldpur, 
xii. 54; Gaya, xii. 196; Gundalpet, 
xii. 386; Hooghly, xiii. 163; Hyder- 
abad, xiii. 312; Jessore, xiv. 91, 95 ; 
Jhalawan, xiv. no, in; Jhang, xiv. 
125; Kadur taluk, xiv. 269; Kalat, 
xiv. 301 ; Karachi, xv. 2 ; Karnal, xv. 
48; Khairpur, xv. 212; Khanpur, xv. 
245 ; Kharan, xv. 249 ; Khulna, xv. 
286, 289 ; Kudligi, xvi. 11 ; Kurnool, 
xvi. 32 ; Larkana, xvi. 144 ; Makran, 
xvii. 48 ; Multan, xviii. 23, 31; Mur- 
shidabad, xviii. 45 ; Muzaffargarh, 
xviii. 75, So; Muzaffarpur, xviii. 95; 
Mysore, xviii. 217; Nagpur, xviii. 
305; Navsari, xviii. 425; Nellore, xix. 
8, 14; Nimar, xix. 107; North-West 
Frontier Province, xix. 174; Patna, 
XX. 55 ; Punjab, xx. 300; Sagaing, xxi. 
353; Saran, xxii. 85; Secunderabad, 
xxii. 160; .Shahabad, xxii. 187 ; Shor- 
kot, xxii. 309; Sind, xxii. 413; Suk- 
kur, xxiii. 119; Surat, xxiii. 152; 
Talakona, Cuddapah, xxiii. 210. 
Datejl Kur, canal in Bombay, xvi. 141. 
Datha, petty State in Kathiawar, Bombay, 

xi. 195, XV. 165. 
Datia State, treaty State in Central India, 
xi. 195-199; history, 195-197; popula- 
tion, 197; agriculture, 197; adminis- 
tration, 198 ; postal arrangements, iii. 
424-425 ; area, population, revenue, 
and administration, iv. 93. 
Datia town, capital of State in Central 

India, xi. 199 ; damascening, iii. 240. 
Datpaung Myezu, image of Buddha, at 

Pakangyi, xix. 322. 
Datt's Bazar, mart in Mymensingh Dis- 
trict, Eastern Bengal and Assam, xi. 
199. 
Datta Khel, expedition against, xix. 158. 
Dattapur, town in AmraotI District, 
Berar, xi. 199. 



15° 



INDEX 



Dattatraya, fair in honour of, held at ! 
Xarsoba Vadi, xxii. 292. 

Daud, king of Gujarat (1459), ii. 378. 

Daiid, Faruqi king (1503-10', ii. 393. 

Daud Khan, Pathan general, founder of 
Daudnagar, xi. 200. 

Daud Khan, son of Shah Alam, Rohilla, 
received grant of land near Budaun, 
xxi. 183; Kurnool District conferred 
on, xvi. 33 ; Madras fort blockaded 
(1702), x^-i. 369. 

Daud Shah, Bahmani king (1378), ii. 383, 
385, xiii. 236. 

Daud Shah, last Afghan king of Bengal 
(1573)1 "• 3735 '^'i- 215-216: defeated 
by Munim Khan (1575). xvii. 76. 

Daudnagar, town in Gaya District, Ben- 
gal, xi. 199-200. 

Daudnath, temple of, Malgaon, xvii. 86. 

Daudputras, tribe in Bahawalpur, vi. 198 ; 
Sind, xxii. 397; Sukkur, xxiii. 120; 
Lower Sutlej Inundation Canals con- 
structed by (eighteenth century), xxiii. 
181. 

Daudzai, settlement of, in Peshawar Dis- 
trict, XX. 115. 

Daula, Shah, residence and shrine at 
Gujrat, xii. 373, 374; Maner, vii. 222. 

Daulat Khan, Lodi, governor of the Pun- 
jab, xvi. 107, XX. 268 ; Malot surren- 
dered to Babar by (1526), xvii. 94. 

Daulat Khan,Sivajrs admiral, defeated off 
Khanderi, xv. 225; engagements with 
SIdl Kasim at Underi, xxiv. 131. 

Daulat Kai, Dlwan of Upper Derajat 
(1843), xi. 262, 271. 

Daulat Rao, Sindhia (1794-1S27), de- 
feated at Assaye and Laswari (1803', 
ii. 443, 491 ; association with the Pin- 
daris, ii. 444, 494, 495 ; troops dis- 
ciplined and led by Frenchmen, ii. 488 ; 
military head of the Marathas, ii. 48S, 
490 ; resented the Treaty of Bassein, ii. 
491 ; ceded territory and occupation of 
Delhi, ii. 491 ; cruel treatment of Raj- 
puts, ii. 492, 494 ; overawed by Lord 
Hastings's army (1817), ii. 495. 

Local notices : Agar restored by, v. 
70 ; Ahmadnagar ceded to the Peshwa. 
V. 113, 124; Ajmer ceded to the British, 
V. 142, xxi. 10 1 ; treaty signed with 
General Wellesley at Anjangaon, v. 
383 ; lands assigned to Jean Baptiste 
Filose, vii. 84; Basoda conquered, vii. 
105 ; chiefship of Bhadaura created by 
a grant of five villages from, viii. 21 ; 
in Central India, ix. 341, 342 ; Chan- 
derl taken by Jean Baptiste Filose for 
(1811), X. 164 ; Chopda handed over by 
(1820), X. 327 ; damage done by earth- 
quake at Devaprayag. repaired by, xi. 
274; Fathkhelda sacked 1803}, xii. 
86; Gohad under, xi. 324; designs 



against Gujarat, vii. 37 ; in Gwalior, 
viii. 129, xii. 421, 423-424; Gwalior 
fort made over to (1805), xii. 441 ; Hol- 
kar estates managed by, xiii. 336, 337 ; 
Jaurad taken by General Brown (1819), 
but subsequently restored, xiv. 86 ; 
temple of Kedareshwar built (1808), 
xiv. 203; Khurja resumed, xv. 297; 
founderof Lashkar, xvi. 150, 152 ; Nar- 
war guaranteed to, xviii. 397 ; Paran 
chiefs driven out by, xx. 7 ; Poona 
plundered (1798), xx. 168; Rajputana 
ravaged (i S03) , xxi. 99 ; Saugor sacked 
(1814), xxii. 138; mother of, given 
asylum at .Seondha, xxii. 164; Sheo- 
pur fell to (1808), xxii. 272; Siprl 
seized (1804'), xxiii. 15 ; mediation be- 
tween Raja Raj Singh of Sitamau and, 
by Sir John Malcolm, xxiii. 52 ; .Sunth 
overrun, xxiii. 147 ; Tank /r7//.v/7 held by, 
xxiii. 244 ; residence at Ujjain, xxiv. 

113. 

Daulat Shah Begam, Badnera dowry of, 
vi. 178 ; Karanja part of dowry of, xv. 

2.3- 

Daulatabad, hill-fort in Aurangabad Dis- 
trict, Hyderabad State, xi. 200-201. 

Daulatabad, suburb of Krishnagiri, .Sa- 
lem, xvi. 9. 

Dnulatkhan, village in Backergunge Dis- 
trict, Eastern 15engal and Assam, xi. 
201. 

Daulatpur, village in Khulna District, 
Bengal, xi. 201. 

Daulatzai, tribe of Pathans, xix. 241. 

Daunggyi town. See Ngathainggyawng. 

Daur, valley in Northern Waziristan 
Agency, Norlh-West Frontier Pronnce, 
xi. 201-204. 

Dauris, expedition against, xix. 209; in 
Northern Waziristan, xxiv. 379. 

Davana, rule in Assam, vi. 23. 

Davangere, tdhik in Chitaldroog District, 
Mysore, xi. 204. 

Davangere, town in Chitaldroog District, 
Mysore, xi. ^04. 

David, Fort St. See Fort St. David. 

Davies, Sir Hen r}', Lieutenant-Governor of 
the I'unjab '1871-7), xx. 331 ; quoted 
on Simla Hill .States, xxii. 386-387. 

Davies, Colonel Sir \Villiam, canal dug 
by, to supply water to civil station of 
Shahpur (1864), xxii. 221. 

Day , Dr. , account of Indian fishes, referred 
to, i. 274, 276. 

Day, I'rancis, Fort St. George founded 
(1639-40), ii. 457, xvi. 251, 368; 
Armagon, Nellore, founded, xix. 10. 

Day, Rev. S. S., visited Nellore (1840), 
xix. 12. 

Daya Bahadur, defeated by Udaji Ponwar 
(1729-30), xi. 289. 

Daya Ram, talnkdar of Hathras, insubor- 



INDEX 



151 



dination of, and expedition against, xiii. 
71, 72, xviii. 44. 

Dayal Sah, Jain temple at Kankroli said 
to have been built by, xiv. 404. 

Dayanand College and High School, 
Lahore, xvi. 105, 114. 

Dayanand SaraswalT (1827-53), founder 
of the Arya Samaj, i. 429, xx. 290: 
studied at Muttra, xviii. 66. 

Dayaram Jethmal Sind Arts College, 
Karachi, xv. 18. 

De Bude, Captain, scheme for utilizing 
waters of West KalT Nadi proposed 
(1827), xii. 137. 

De Havilland, Major, churches at Madras 
City designed, xvi. 367 ; Mysore Resi- 
dency erected, xviii. 261 ; survey of 
Pamban Channel recommended, xix. 
376. 

Deacon, I-ieut.-Col., Chakan fort taken 
by (1818), X. 122. 

Deaf-mutes, schools for, Mysore, xviii. 
246; Palamcottah, xix. 345; Tinne- 
velly, xxiii. 368. 

Deaf-mutism, statistics, i. 485 ; prevalent 
in Bhagalpur, viii. 29 ; Central India, 
ix. 349; Chamjiaran, x. 139; Cooch 
Behar, x. 383; Darbhanga, xi. 154; 
Jalpaiguri, xiv. 34 ; Muzaffarpur, xviii. 
97 ; Punjab, xx. 282 ; Purnea, xx. 415 ; 
Sikkim, xxii. 369 ; United Provinces, 
xxiv. 167. 

Deatli-rate, statistics, i. 512-513; causes 
affecting, i. 513; male and female, 
i. 516-517 ; infantile mortality, i. 517- 
518 ; comparison of urban and rural 
mortality, i. 518-519 ; Hindu nnd Mu- 
hammadan mortality, i. 520-521 ; 
causes of mortality, as registered, i. 
521-522; army, i. 525-530; prisoners, 
i. 530-532 ; from mining accidents, iii. 
165-166. See also each Province, Dis- 
trict, and larger .State article tinder 
Population. 

Deb Barman family, hereditary cliiefs of 
Hill Tippera, xiii. 119. 

Deb Pal, Kaja, Ganges crossed by armies 
of, at Monghyr, xvii. 393, 402. 

Deb Shamsher, rule in Nepal, xix. 38. 

Debar. See Dhebar. 

Debendra Singh, Raja of Manipur (1850), 
xvii. 187. 

Debendranatli Tagore, promoter of Brahmo 
Church, i. 429. 

Debhata, town in Khulna District, Ben- 
gal, xi. 205. 

Debi Chand, ruler of Naini Tal (1720-6), 
xviii. 325. 

Debi Patan, village in Gonda District, 
United Provinces, xi. 205. 

Deccan, or Southern India, xi. 205-208; 
physical aspects, i. 37, 42-43 ; meteoro- 
logy, i. 114, 116 n., 117, 124, 125 «., 



•32, 137. H3, 145, 150, 153; botany, 
i. 1S4-186, 1S9-193; zoology, i. 260; 
ethnology, i. 289 ; language, i. 365- 
366, 373; Lingayat sect, i. 422-423; 
density of population, i. 453 ; character 
of villages, i. 456 ; decrease of popu- 
lation, i. 463 ; rule by Andhras, ii, 112; 
influence on Rajput civilization, ii. 316; 
history during the eleventh and twelfth 
centuries, ii. 335-339 ; agricultural im- 
plements, iii. 12, 13; cotton cultiva- 
tion, iii. 46 ; buffaloes, iii. 82 ; sheep, 
iii. 87; wood-carving, iii. 230; irriga- 
tion, iii. 325, 326, 330, 331, 337-338, 
350> 351, 352; famine (1868-70), iii. 
487 «,; Chalukya dynasty, see that 
title. 

Deccan Club, Poona, xx. 186. 

Deccan College, Poona, viii. 373, 574, 
XX. 185. 

Deccan trap, origin, extent, depth, and 
composition, i. 2, 87, 88; age of, i. 
88-89, 91 ; ultra-basic relatives, i. 89; 
extent, iii. 9 ; crops of area of, iii. 10. 
Local notices : Adilabad, v. 23 ; Ah- 
madabad, v. 95; Ahmadnagar, v. 112 ; 
Akalkot, V. 17S; Berar, vii. 362, 363, 
382; Betid, viii. 7; Bhir, viii. 112; 
Bhopal, viii. 126; Bidar, viii. 164; 
Bijapur, viii. 176; Bombay Presi- 
dency, viii. 272-273; Central Pro- 
vinces, X. 5-6; Chhindwara, x. 205; 
Dhar, xi. 287; Ellichpur, xii. 11; 
Gawilgarh Hills, xii. 193; Himalayas, 
xiii. 127; Hyderabad, xiii. 229-230, 
231, 232; Indore, xiii. 334; Indur, 
xiii. 352 ; Jubbulpore, xiv. 207 ; Kalat, 
xiv. 299; Karachi, xv. 2; Kathi- 
awar, xv. 172; Khandesh, xv. 227; 
Khilchipur, xv. 278 ; Kolhapur, xv. 
381 ; Nander, xviii. 350; Nasik, xviii. 
399 ; Nimar, xix, 107 ; Nizamabad, 
xix. 124; Osmanabad, xix. 269; Pala- 
mau, xix. 336; Panch Mahals, xix. 
381 ; Panna, xix. 399 ; Parbhani, xix. 
410; Partabgarh, xx. 9; Quetta-Pishin, 
xxi. 12 ; Raglmgarh, xxi. 34; Rajgarh, 
xxi. 68; Rajputana, xxi. 88; Ratlam, 
xxi. 240-241 ; Ratnagiri, xxi. 246 ; 
Rewa Kantha, xxi. 292 ; Saugor, xxii. 
137 ; SeonT, xxii. 166 ; Sind, xxii. 392 ; 
.Sirpur Tandur, xxiii. 40; Southern 
Maratha Jagirs, xxiii. 92 ; Surat, xxiii. 
151, 152; Thana, xxiii. 291; Tonk, 
xxiii. 408 ; Vindhya Hills, xxiv. 
316; Wardha, xxiv. 367; Wun, xxiv. 
388. 

Deda Rawal, Galiakot seized from Para- 
maras, xi. 381. 

Dedan, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, xi. 208, XV. 169. 

Dedarda, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, xi. 208, XV. 165. 



152 



INDEX 



Dedaye, township in Pyapon District, 
Lower Burma, xi. 208. 

Dedaye, town in Pyapon District, Lower 
Burma, xi. 208. 

Dediirota, petty State in Mahi Kantha, 
Bombay, xi. 209, xvii. 14. 

Deeg, Diitrict and head-quarters thereof 
in Bharatpur State, Rajputana. See 
Dig. 

Deer, 1. 235-237. 

Deer, barking- [Cervidus mitntjac., i. 
235-236; Ahmadabad, V. 95 ; Akyab, 
V. 192; Ambala, v. 277; North 
Arcot, V. 404; Assam, vi. 20; 
Bahraich, vi. 206; Baroda, vii. 
30; Berar, vii. 364; Betul, viii. 8; 
Bhamo, viii. 46 ; Bhutan, viii. 155 ; 
Bijnor, viii. 194 ; Bombay Presidency, 
viii. 275 ; Burma, ix. 118 ; Chamba, x. 
129; Champaran, x. 138; Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, x. 319; Coorg, xi. 7; 
Dacca, xi. 104; Darjeeling, xi. 167; 
Ellichpur, xii. 11-12 ; Ganjam, xii. 144; 
Gaya, xii. 196; Klmlna, xv. 287; Ky- j 
aukse, xvi. 70; Madras Presidency, xvi, 
245 ; Magwe, xvi. 413 ; Mandalay, xvii. 
127; MandT, xvii. 159; Mandla, xvii. 
160; Mergui, xvii. 295; Minbxi, xvii. 
346 ; Monghyr, x\-ii. 392 ; Myaungmya, 
xviii. no; Myingyan, xviii. 121 ; Myit- 
kyina, xviii. 136; Mymensingh, xviii. 
150; Naga Hills, xviii. 285; NainTTal, 
xviii. 324 ; Nander, xviii. 350 ; Noa- 
khali, xix. 129; North- West Frontier 
Province, xix. 146; Pakokkii, xix. 320; 
Palamau, xix. 336 ; Patiala, xx. 33 ; 
Punjab, XX. 255 ; RanchT, xxi. 199-200 ; 
.Sagaing, xxi. 353 ; Saharanpur, xxi. 
368 ; Saiigor, x.xii. 137 ; Northern Shan 
States, xxii. 233 ; Southern .Shan States, 
xxii. 251 ; Sikkim, xxii. 367 ; Simla, 
xxii. 377 ; Singhbhum, xxiii. 3 ; Sun- 
darbans, xxiii. 141 ; Tavoy, xxiii. 259; 
TehrT, xxiii. 270; Thaton, xxiii. 330; 
Thayetmyo, xxiii. 344 ; United Pro- 
vinces, xxiv. 144. 

Deer, brow-antlered {l/iamin), i. 236; 
Burma, ix. 118; Lower Chindwin, x. 
229; Katha, xv. 153; Kyaukse, xvi. 
70; Magwe, xvi. 413; Minbu, xvii. 
346; Myingyan, xviii. 121; Sagaing, 
xxi. 353 ; Northern Shan States, xxii. 
233 ; Thayetmyo, xxiii. 344. 

Deer, four-horned (^Tetraceriis quadii- 
corms),\. 235 ; Bijnor, viii. 194; Damoh, 
xi. 135; Dhar\var, xi. 305; Khandesh, 
XV. 228 ; Palamau, xix. 336; Prome, 
XX. 220; Saugor, xxii. 137; Tharra- 
Avaddy, xxiii. 317. 

Deer, hog {Cervus porchius), i. 237 ; 
Akyab, v. 192; Ambala, v. 277 ; Baha- 
wnlpur, vi. 195; ]5ahraich, vi. 206; 
Bareilly, vii. 3; Bhamo, viii. 46 ; Bu- 



landshahr, ix. 48; Burma, ix. 118; 
Champaran, x. 138; Cuttack, xi. 88 ; 
Delhi, xi. 224; Dera Ghazi Khan, xi. 
249; Gorakhpur, xii. 332 ; Gujranwala, 
xii. 354; Gurgaon,xii. 403; Hyderabad, 
xiii. 233, 313 ; Kamal, XV. 49 ; Khulna, 
XV. 287; Larkana, xvi. 137; Magwe, 
xvi. 413; Minbu, xvii. 346; Moradabad, 
xvii. 421 ; Muzaffarnagar, xviii. 84 ; 
Myitkyina, xviii. 136 ; Mymensingh, 
xviii. 150; NainiTal, xviii. 324 ; North- 
West Frontier Province, xix. 146 ; 
Poona, XX. 167 ; Punjab, xx. 255 ; Pur- 
nea, xx. 414 ; Pyapon, xxi. 3 ; Sagaing, 
xxi. 353 ; Saharanpur, xxi. 368 ; North- 
ern .Shan States, xxii. 233 ; Southern 
Shan .States, xxii. 251 ; Shwebo, xxii. 
312; .Sind, xxii. 393; Sirmijr, xxiii. 22 ; 
Sukkur, xxiii. 119; .Sundarbans, xxiii. 
141 ; Tavoy, xxiii. 259; Thar and Par- 
kar, xxiii. 307; Thaton, xxiii. 330; 
United Provinces, xxiv. 144; Upper 
Sind Frontier District, xxiv. 278. 

Deer, mouse ( Tragiilus nteminna), i. 237 ; 
Chanda, x. 149; Damoh, xi. 135; 
Dharwar, xi. 305; Ganjam, xii. 144; 
North Kanara, xiv. 342 ; Madras Presi- 
dency, xvi. 245; Mandla, xvii. 160; 
Sambalpur, xxii. 7; Saugor, x.xii. 137. 

Deer, musk {Moschiis inoschifcriis), 
i. 237; Bhutan, viii. 155 ; Chamba, x. 
129; Kangra, xiv. 382; Kashmir and 
Jammu, xv. 87; Darjeeling, xi. 167; 
Hazara, xiii. 76; MandT, xvii. 153; 
Noith-West Frontier Pn.vince, xix. 
1^6; Punjab, xx. 255; Sikkim, xxii. 
367 ; Simla, xxii. 377 ; .Sirmur, xxiii. 
22 ; Tehrl, .xxiii. 270 ; United Provinces, 
xxiv. 144. 

Deer, ravine. See Gazelle. 

Deer, sambar or jarau iCefvus unicolor), 
i. 236 ; Adilabad, v. 23 ; Ahvar, v. 255 ; 
Ambala, v. 277; Anaimalais, v. 333; 
Anantapur, v. 338 ; North Arcot, v. 
404; South Arcot, v. 422; Bahraich, 
vi. 206; Banda, vi. 348; Baroda, 
vii. 30; 15assein, Burma, vii. 108; 
Belgaum, vii. 146; Berar, vii. 364; 
Betul, viii. 8 ; Bhamo, viii. 46 ; Bijnor, 
viii. 194; Biligiii-Rangan Hills, viii. 
236; Bombay Presidency, viii. 275; 
Buldana, i.x. 60 ; Bundi, ix. 79 ; Burma, 
ix. 118; Central India, ix. 331-332; 
Champaran, x. 13S; Chanda, x. 149; 
Upper Chindwin, x. 240; Chingleput, 
X. 254 ; Chitt.agong Hill Tracts, x. 319 ; 
Cochin, X. 342 ; Coorg, xi. 7 ; Cudda- 
pah, xi. 59; Dacca, xi. 104; Damoh, 
xi. 135; Dhar, xi. 2S8 ; Dholpur, xi. 
322; Diingarpur, xi. 3S0 ; Elgandal, 
xii. 6; I'^lliclijiur, xii. 11 ; Ganjam, xiii. 
144; Garhwal, xii. 165; Gayji, xii. 
196; Gwalior, xii. 421; Hamlrpur, 



INDEX 



153 



xiii. 14; Horsleykonda, xiii. 178; 
Hyderabad, xiii. 233 ; Indoie,xiii. 335; 
Indur, xiii. 352; Jaipur, xiii. 384; 
Jalpaigurl, xiv. 32 ; Javadi Hills, xiv. 
85; Jhalawar, xiv. 115; Jhansi, xiv. 
136; Jodhpiir, xiv. 181; Jubbulpore, 
xiv. 207 ; Nortli Kanara, xiv. 342 ; 
South Kanara, xiv. 355 ; Karauli, xv. 
26 ; Karlmnagar, xv, 42 ; Khandesh, 
XV. 228 ; Kistna, xv. 320 ; Kolaba, xv. 
356 ; Korea, xv. 400 ; Kotah, xv. 411 ; 
Madras Presidency, xvi. 245 ; Madura, 
xvi. 388 ; Mahbubnagar, xvii. 2 ; Mahl 
Kantha, xvii. 15; Malabar, xvii. 55; 
Mandalay, xvii. 127; Mandla, xvii. 
160 ; Medak, xvii. 245 ; Meiktila, xvii. 
276; Mergui, xvii. 295; Minbu, xvii. 
346; Monghyr, xvii. 392 ; Myaungmya, 
xviii. 110; Myitkyina, xviii. 1.^6; 
Mymensingh, xviii. 150; Naga Hills, 
xviii. 285; NainI Tal, xviii. 324; Nal- 
gonda, xviii. 339; Nander, xviii. 350; 
Narsinghpur, xviii. 386 ; Nellore, xix. 
8; Nepal, xix. 30; the Nilgiris, xix. 
88 ; Nimar, xix. 107 ; Nizamabad, xix. 
124; Pakokku, xix. 320; Palamau, 
xix. 336 ; Palkonda Hills, xix, 367 ; 
Panna, xix. 399; Parbhani, xix. 41 1; 
Partabgarh Slate, xx. 9 ; Poona, xx. 
166 ; Rajputana, xxi. 91 ; Ranch!, xxi. 
199 ; Ratnagiri, xxi. 246; Rewah, xxi. 
280 ; Rewa Kantha, xxi. 293 ; Ruby 
Mines District, xxi. 327 ; Saharanpur, 
xxi. 36S ; Sambalpur, xxii. 7 ; Sandur, 
xxii. 43; Satara, xxii. 117; Saugor, 
xxii. 137 ; Northern Shan States, xxii. 
233; Southern Shan States, xxii. 251 ; 
Shimoga,xxii. 2S1 ; Shwebo, xxii. 312 ; 
Sikkim, xxii. 367 ; Singhblium, xxiii. 
3 ; Sirmur, xxiii. 22 ; Sirohi, xxiii. 29 ; 
Talakona, xxiii. 209 ; Tavoy, xxiii. 
259; Tehrl, xxiii. 270; Tonk, xxiii. 
408 ; Travancore, xxiv. 5 ; Udaipur, 
Rajputana, xxiv. 87 ; United Provinces, 
xxiv. 144 ; Warangal, xxiv. 35S. 
Deer, spotted, or chttal {Cennis axis), i. 
236-237: Adilabad, v. 23; Ambala, 
V. 277 ; AmraotT, v. 307 ; North Arcot, 
V. 404 ; South Arcot, v. 422 ; Bahraich, 
vi. 206; Baroda, vii. 30; Basim, vii. 96 ; 
Bastl, vii. 125; Berar, vii. 364; Betul, 
viii. 8; Bijnor, viii. 194; Bombay, viii. 
275; Buldana, ix. 60; Central India, 
ix-_33i) 33^; Champaran, x. 138; 
Chanda, x. 149 ; Chingleput, x. 254 ; 
Chittagong Hill Tracts', x. 319 ; Coorg, 
xi. 7; Cuddapah, xi. 59; Cuttack, xi. 
88; Damoh, xi. 135; Dehra Dun, xi. 
211 ; Dharwar, xi. 305; Elgandal, xii. 
6; Ellichpur, xii. 11-12 ; Ganjam, xii. 
144; Gaya, xii. 196; Godavari, xii. 
2S3; Gorakhpur, xii. 332; Gwalior, 
xii. 421; Hamlrpur, xiii. 14; Hyder- 



abad, xiii. 233 ; Indore, xiii. 335 ; 
Indiir, xiii. 352 ; Javadi Hills, xiv. 
85; Jhalawar, xiv. 115; Jhansi, xiv. 
136; Jodhpur, xiv. 181; Jubbul- 
pore, xiv. 207 ; North Kanara, xiv. 
342 ; Karimuagar, xv. 42 ; Khandesh, 
XV. 228; Khulna, xv. 287; Kolaba, 
XV. 356 ; Kotah, xv. 411 ; Madras 
Presidency, xvi. 245 ; Madura, xvi. 
3S8 ; Mahbubnagar, xvii. 2 ; Mahl 
Kantha, xvii. 15 ; Malabar, xvii. 55 ; 
Malda, xvii. 76 ; Mandla, xvii. 160 ; 
Medak, xvii. 245 ; Monghyr, xvii. 392; 
Nairn Tal, xviii. 324; Nalgonda, xviii. 
339 ; Nander, xviii. 350 ; Nasik, xviii. 
400; Nepal, xix. 30; Nimar, xix. 107; 
Nizamabad, xix. 124; Palamau,xix. 336; 
Parbhani, xix. 41 1 ; Partabgaih State, 
XX. 9; Patiala, xx. 33; Poona, xx. 
166; Pudukkottai, XX. 231; Rajputana, 
xxi. 91 ; Ranch!, xxi. T99 ; Rewa 
Kantha, xxi. 293 ; Saharanpur, xxi. 
368 ; Sambalpur, xxii. 7 ; Santal Par- 
ganas, xxii. 63; Saugor, xxii. 137; 
Shahjahanpur, xxii. 202 ; Singhbhum, 
xxiii. 3 ; Sirmur, xxiii. 22 ; Sirohi, 
xxiii. 29 ; .Sirpur Tandur, xxiii. 40 ; 
.Sundarbans, xxiii. 141 ; Surat, xxiii. 
153; Tnlakona, xxiii. 209; Tanjore, 
xxiii. 226; Tehr!, xxiii. 270; Thana, 
xxiii. 291 ; Tonk, xxiii. 409 ; Udaipur, 
Rajputana, xxiv. 87 ; United Provinces, 
xxiv. I44 ; Warangal, xxiv. 358. 

Deer, swamp, or hdrasingha {Cervits 
dtivauceli), i. 236; Assam, vi. 20; 
Bahraich, vi. 206 ; Bilaspur, viii. 223 ; 
Chanda, x. 149 ; Chhindwara, x. 205 ; 
Dacca, xi. 104 ; Jalpaiguri, xiv. 32 ; 
Kheri, xv. 269 ; Khulna, xv. 287 ; 
Mandla, xvii. 160; NainI Tal, xviii. 
324; Southern Shan States, xxii. 251 ; 
United Provinces, xxiv. 144. 

Dcesa, cantonment in Palanpur Agency, 
Bombay, xi. 209 ; meteorology, i. 

154- 

Deglur, tdhik in Nander District, Hyder- 
abad, xi. 209. 

Deglur, town in Nander District, Hyder- 
abad, xi. 209. 

Deh Kundi, district in the Hazarajat, 
Afghanistan, xiii. 85. 

Deh Zangi, district in the Hazarajat, 
Afghanistan, xiii. 85. 

Dehgam, town in Kadi praiit, Baroda, 
xi. 209. 

Dehia, faction among non-Rajput tribes 
in Karnal District, xv. 52. 

Dehli. See Delhi. 

Dehra Diin, District in Mcerut Division, 
United Provinces, xi. 210-221 ; physi- 
cal aspects, 210-21 1 ; history, 211-214; 
population, 214-215 ; agriculture, 215- 
216; forests, 216-217; trade and com- 



^54 



INDEX 



munications, 217-218; administration, 

218-221 ; forest school, iii. 109. 
Dehra, tahsTl in Dehra Dun District, 

United Provinces, xi. 221. 
Dehra, town and cantonment in Dehra 

Dun District, United Provinces, xi. 

22r-222. 

Dehrl, village in Shahabad District, Ben- 
gal, xi. 222. 

DehwarT, language spoken by Dehwars of 
Kalat and Mastung in Baluchistan, 
vi. 287. 

Dehwars, tribe in Baluchistan, vi. 2S8 ; 
Sarawan, xxii. 99. 

Delamotte, General, Manohar taken 
(1845), xvii. 200; sent against rebels 
at I'auhala, xix. 396. 

Delath, petty State feudatory to Bashahr, 
Punjab, xi. 222-223. 

Delhi, Division in Punjab, xi. 223. 

Delhi, District in Delhi Division of Punjab, 
xi. 223-232 ; physical aspects, 223-225 ; 
history, 225; population, 225-227; 
agriculture, 227-229; trade and com- 
munications, 229-230; famine, 230; 
administration, 230-232. 

Other references: Christians in, i. 444; 
buffaloes, iii. 82-83 i levenue surveys, 
iv. 500. 

Delhi, tahsll in Delhi District, Punjab, 
xi. 232-233. 

Delhi, city in Delhi District, Punjab, xi. 
233-241; population, 233; history, 
233-237 ; description. 237-239 ; in- 
come and expenditure, 239 ; industries, 
239-240 ; commerce, 240-241 ; educa- 
tion, 241. 

Other references: Asoka pillar, ii. 
43; Kutb Minar, ii. 122-123, 126, 
182-183 ; tomb of Tughlak Shah, ii. 
T26 ; Kila Kohna mosque, ii. 1 26, 1 29 ; 
sculptured elephants at, ii. 132-133; 
coins, ii. 143; Kalan mosque, ii. 183; 
Jami Masjid, ii. 200; sack of, and 
massacre by Taimur, ii. 366 ; taken by 
Babar, ii. 394 ; rebuilt by Shahjahan, 
ii. 401 ; massacre by Nadir Siiah, ii. 
408-409 ; taken by Afghans, ii. 410; 
under the Marathas, ii. 410-412 ; oc- 
cupied by Lord Lake, ii. 412 ; out- 
break of mutiny atjii. 511 ; siege (1857), 
ii. 513 ; arts and manufactures, iii. 
191, 219, 220, 226, 231, 245; roads, 
iii. 403, 405. 
Delhi Empire, Muhammadan kings of, 
ii. 355-369; rule in Azamgarh, vi. 
155; Baluchistan, vi. 276; Bclgaum 
conquered (1320), vii. 147; Bengal 
a fief of, vii. 212; governors of 
Bengal under (1576-1765), vii. 217; 
annexation of Berar, vii. 367 ; rule 
in Bharatpur State, viii. 74 ; Bhir 
passed to, viii. 112 ; rule in Bijaigarh, 



vii. 137; Broach, ix. 20; Damoh, xi. 
136 ; Deccan restored to, xi. 207 ; 
rule in Ghazlpur, xii. 223; served by 
Bourbons (1560-1739), xiii. 324; 
in Osmanabad, xix. 270 ; Kajputana, 
xxi. 95; Katehr, Rohilkhand, xxi. 
305; Rohtak, xxi. 311 ; Sind part of, 
xxii. 396 ; Sirhind a stronghold of, 
xxiii. 20-21 ; Sultanpur incorporated 
with, xxiii. 131. Sec also Miighals. 
Delhi-Umballa-Kalka Railway Company, 

iii- 370, 394. 414- 

Delia Valle, visit to Gersoppa village 
(1623), xii. 212. 

Delly, Mount, headland in Malabar 
District, Madras, xi. 241. 

Deloli, petty State in Mahi Kantha, Bom- 
bay, xi. 241, xvii. 14. 

Delta Mission. See Plymouth Brethren 
nnder Protestant Missions. 

Delwara. town in Udaipur .State, Rajput- 
ana, xi. 241-242. 

Demb Hanz, half-amphibious paddlers 
in the Dal Lake, Kashmir, xv. 105. 

Demetrius, Bactrian king, invasion of 
India (f. 200 n. c), ii. 286 ; Gujrat 
District under, xii. 365 ; part of 
Northern India conquered {c. 190 
B.C.), xix. 149; invasion of Punjab, 
XX. 261, xxi. 264. 

Den-jong-ke, Tibetan language spoken in 
Sikkim, i. 390. 

Denning, I'.rig.-CJcn., D.S.O., expedition 
against Mahsiids (1901}, xix. 210. 

Density of population. See each Province, 
District, and larger State article under 
Population. 

Deo, village in Gaya District, Bengal, 
xi. 242. 

Deo Singh of Gagraun, received grant of 
land from the Delhi emperor (1203), 
xxi. 34. 

Deo Singh, ruler of Deogarh, xxiv. 82. 

Deobalpur, ancient town in Punjab. See 
Dipalpur. 

Deoband, lahsil in Saharanpur District, 
United Provinces, xi. 242. 

Deoband, town in Saharanpur District, 
United Provinces, xi. 242-243. 

Deodar trees {Cedrus Lihani var. Deo- 
dara^, in Cliakrata, x. 125; Chamba, 
x. 131; Chaur peak, x. 186; Dehra 
Dun, xi. 211, 217; Hazara, xiii. 81; 
Himalayas, xiii. 133; Kashmir and 
Jammu, xv. 86; Kashmir, xv. 129- 
130; Nepal, xix. 49; Patiala, xx. 43; 
Punjab, XX. 252, 310, 311 ; .Safed Koh, 
xxi. 349 ; Simla, xxii. 377, 384 ; Sir- 
mur, xxiii. 25 ; Swat, xxiii. 183 ; Tehrl, 
xxiii. 271 ; United Provinces, xxiv. 196; 
.Southern Waziristan, xxiv. 381. 

Dcodrug, taluk in Raichur District, 
Hyderabad State, xi. 243. 



INDEX 



155 



Deodrug, town in Raichur District, 

Hyderabad State, xi. 243. 
Deogaon, tahsil in Azanigarli District, 

United Provinces, xi. 243-244. 
Deogarh, old capital of Partabgarh State, 

Rajputana. See Deolia. 
Deogarii, subdivision in Santal Parganas 

District, Bengal, xi. 244. 
Deogarh town (t), in Santal Parganas 

District, Bengal, xi. 244-245 ; Baid- 

yanath temple, xi. 244, xii. 23S. 
Deogarh town (2), in Bamra Feudator}- 

State, Bengal, xi. 245. 
Deogarh town (3), chief town of estate 

of same name in Udaipur State, Raj- 
putana, xi. 245. 
Deogarh Fort (1), in Hyderabad. See 

Daulatabad. 
Deogarh Fort (2^1, in Jhansi District, 

United Provinces, xi. 245-246. 
Deogarh Peak, hill in Korea State, Cen- 
tral Provinces, xi. 245. 
Deogarh Bariya, petty State in Bombay. 

See Bariya. 
Deoghur Railway, iii. 415. 
Deogiri, hill-fort in Hyderabad .State. 

See Daulatabad. 
Deogiri Yadavas. See Yadavas. 
Deohars, inoculating' caste, in Darbbanga 

District, xi. 155. 
Deoindar Singh, Raja of Nabha (1840% 

xviii. 264. 
Deolali, cantonment in Nasik District, 

Bombay, xi. 246. 
Deoli, cantonment in Ajmer-Merwara, 

Rajputana, xi. 246-247. 
Deoli, town in Wardha District, Central 

Provinces,[xi. 246. 
Deoli Irregular P'orces, iv. 354. 
Deolia, old capital of State of Partabgarh, 

Rajputana, xi. 247. 
Deolia-Partabgarh, old name for Partab- 
garh State, XX. 9. 
Deonath Singh, Raja of Raigarh State 

(1833% xxi. 45. 
Deopatha, peak in Naini Tal District, 

xviii. 333. 
Deoprayag. village in United Provinces. 

See Devaprayag. 
Deoraj, built Deogarh and established 

himself there, xiv. 2 ; rule in Jaisalmer, 

xiv. 2. 
Deorha, capital of Jubbal State, Punjab, 

xi. 247. 
Deorl, town in Saugor District, Central 

Provinces, xi. 247-248, 
Deoria, subdivision in Gorakhpur District, 

United Provinces, xi. 24S. 
Deoria, tahsil in Gorakhpur District, 

United Provinces, xi. 248. 
Deo-Tibba, peak in Kangra District, xvi. 

115. 
Dera Gliazi Khan, District in Mullan 



Division, Punjab, xi. 248-257; physical 
aspects, 248-250; population, 251- 
253; history, 250-251; agriculture, 
253 ; forests, 254-255 ; famine, 255 ; 
trade and communications, 255 ; ad- 
ministration, 255-257. 

Dera Ghazi Khan, tahsil in Dera Ghazi 
Klian District, Punjab, xi. 257. 

Dera Ghazi Khan, town and cantonment 
in Dera Ghazi Khan District, Punjab, 
xi. 257-259; manufactures, iii. 190, 213. 

Dera Ghazi Khan Canals, iii. 350. 

Dera Gopipur, tahsil in Kangra District, 
Punjab, xi. 259. 

Dera Ismail Khan, District in North 
West Frontier Province, xi. 259-268; 
physical aspects, 259-261 ; history, 
261-263; population, 263-264 ; agri- 
cidture, 264-265 ; forests, 265 ; trade 
and communications, 265-266 ; famine, 
266 ; administration, 266-26S. 

Dera Ismail Khan, tahsil in Dera Ismail 
Khan District, North-West Frontier 
Province, xi. 268. 

Dera Ismail Khan, town and cantonment 
in Dera Ismail Khan District, North- 
West Frontier Province, xi. 268-269 ; 
meteorology, i. 149, 150, 154. 

Dera Nanak, town with .Sikh temple in 
Gurdaspur District, Punjab, xi. 271. 

Derajat, level plain between Indus and 
Sulaiman range, xi. 269-271 ; arts and 
manufactures, iii. 190, 199. 

Derapur, tahsil in Cawnpore District, 
United Provinces, ,xi. 271-272. 

Derbhavti, petty State in the Dangs, 
Bombay, xi. 147, 272. 

Derdi Janbai, petty State in Kathiavvar, 
Bombay, xi. 272, .w. 165. 

Deri Baghbanan, suburb of Peshawar city, 
XX. 125. 

Dero Mohbat, tdltika in Hyderabad Dis- 
trict, Sind, xi. 272. 

Derol, petty State in Mahi Kantha, Bom- 
bay, xi. 272, xvii. 14. 

Desa Singh Majlthia, appointed naziin of 
Hill States (1810), xvii. 154. 

Desabhaga, section of Madiga caste in 
Mysore, xviii. 196. 

Desais, Bhayavadar under, viii. 99 ; in 
Guledgarh, xii. 383 ; Kittur, xv. 337. 

Desert Canal, in .Sind, iii. 331-336, xi. 
272. 

Deshasths, Brahman subdivision in the 
Deccan, in Ahmadnagar, v. 115 ; Bel- 
gaum, vii. 149; Bijapur, viii. 179: 
Dharwar, xi. 308 ; Khandesh, xv. 231 ; 
Kolhapur, xv. 383 ; Nasik, xviii. 401- 
402 ; Poona, xx. 170 ; Sholapur, xxii. 
298. 

Deshmukhs, in Basim, vii. 104; Deolali, 
xi. 246. 

Desi MarathI dialect, i. 374. 



156 



INDEX 



Desing, Raja of Gingee, death of, in fight, 

and founding of town of Ranipet in 

honour of widow who committed satt, 

xii. 244, xxi. 234. 
Desu, Rani, regent of Nabha (1783-90), 

xviii. 263. 
Deswal, Jat clan, in Karnal, xv. 51 ; 

Khilchipur, xv. 27S. 
Detsung, Kachari ruler, death of, vi. 27. 
Deu Mini, female Khil chieftain. See 

DevT. 
Deulgaon Raja, town in Buldana District, 

Berar, xi. 272. 
Dev Dharm high school, Ferozejiorc, 

xii. 97. 
Dev Sainaj school, at Moga, Ferozepore, 

xii. 97, xvii. 381. 
Deva Raja, Dodda, king of Mysore, xviii. 

178-179. 
Deva Raya I, Vijayanagar king (1406), 

ii. 345, xviii. 174. 
Deva Raya II, Vijayanagar king, ii. 

34.5- 

Devakottai, town in Madura District, 
Madras, xi. 272-273. 

Devala, village in Nilgiri District, Ma- 
dras, xi. 273. 

Devalpalli, former name of Mirialguda 
taluk, Nalgonda District, Hyderabad 
State, xi. 273, xvii. 263. 

Devammaji, Rani of Coorg (1809), ^^• 

I.T-l6. 

Devangns, weavers, in Coimbatore, x. 

361 ; Sholapur, xxii. 298. 
Devanhalli, taluk in Bangalore District, 

Mysore, xi. 273. 
Devanhalli, town in Bangalore District, 

xi. 273. 
Devaprayag, village in Tehii State, 

United Provinces, xi. 273-274. 
Devaraj, Mysore minister, xviii. 180. 
Devara-kadu, sacred forests in Padinalk- 

nad, Coorg, xix. 309-310. 
Devarayadurga, fortified hill in Tumkur 

District, Mysore, xi. 274. 
Devarbctta, peak in Hassan District, 

Mysore, xiii. 61. 
Dcvargud, town in Bombay. Sec Gudd- 

guddapur. 
Devarkonda, taluk in Nalgonda District, 

Hyderabad State, xi. 274. 
Dcvdas, king of Benares, legend con- 
cerning daughter of, xviii. 360. 
Devgad Island, in Bay of Karvvar, xv. 66. 
Devgarh, taluka in Ratnagiri District, 

Bombay, xi 274-275. 
Devgarh vill.age (i), port in Ratnagiri 

District, Bomb.ay, xi. 275. 
Devgarh village (2), in Janjira State, 

Bombay, xi. 275. 
DevT, female Bhil chieftain, xi. 247. 
DevT, goddess, image at Chandor, x. 

167; statue at DalmT, xi. 127; temple 



at Deoband, xi. 242-243 ; Deolia 
named after, xi. 247 ; temple at Kan- 
gra, xiv. 397 ; natural jets of combus- 
tible gas at Jawala Mukhi believed to 
be a manifestation of, xiv. 86 ; legend 
of, in connexion with Mahakuta pond, 
xviii. 360 ; temple at .Saptashring, xxii. 
81. 

DevT, Great and Little, tributaries of the 
KatjurT river, xvi. 432. 

DevT Dhura, station between Almora 
town and Champawat in United Pro- 
vinces, xi. 275. 

DevT Kund, cremation tank of the chiefs 
of iSTkaner, viii. 219. 

Devi Singh, Gilgit fort taken (i860), xv. 

DevT .Singh, Raja, farm m Dinajpurheld 
(1782), xi. 353; Rangpur cultivators 
driven into rebellion, xxi. 225. 

DevT Singh, Bundela, governor of Chan- 
derT (1680), x. 164. 

DevTkot, ruins in Dinajpur District. East- 
ern Bengal and Assam, xi. 275-276. 

Dcvikottai, ruined fort in Tanjore District, 
Madras, xi. 277. 

DevTmane, pass in Western Ghats, xii. 
219. 

Devipalam, ancient name for Fort .St. 
David, xii. loi. 

Devil murders, in Nicobars, xix. 72, 83. 

Devlali, cantonment in Bombay. See 
Deolali. 

Devlia, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, xi. 277, XV. 168. 

DfcvojT, chief of Kotda, xvi. i. 

Devonian fossils of Chitral, i. 67. 

Deviukh. head-quarters of Sangamesh- 
war taluka, Ratnagiri District, Bom- 
bay, xi. 277. 

Devs of Chinchvad, sacred family, x. 
227. 

Dewa, R.io, Bundi State founded, ix. 79; 
Bundi town taken {c. 13.42), ix. 87. 

Dewa Singh, Sardar, Sir, <])resident of 
Council of Regency, Patiala State 
(1890), XX. 39. 

Dewal, village in PTlTbhTt District, United 
Provinces, xi. 277. 

Dewali, festival, held in Ajmer-Merwara, 
V. 148; Amritsar, v. 32S ; Central 
India, ix. 357 ; Central Provinces, x. 
31 ; Gobardhan, xii. 280; Nepal, xix. 
45; Punjab, XX. 294; Rajputana, xxi. 
uS. 

Dewangiri, village in Kamriip District, 
Eastern Bengal and Assam, xi. 277. 

Dewas States, twin treaty States in Mal- 
wa Political Charge, Central India 
Agency, xi. 277-2S1. 

Dewas, town in Central India, xi. 281. 

Dcvyanne Dewalc at Polonnaruwa, ii. 

;63. 



INDEX 



157 



Dhabla Dhir, ///«/'« ;vr/ in Bhopal Agency, 
Central India, xi. 281, viii. 125. 

Dhabla Ghosi, thakitrdt in Bhopal 
Agency, Central India, xi. 281, viii. 125. 

Dhadi, petty State under Jubbal, Punjab, 
xi. 281-282. 

Dhal-ka Mahal, at Mandogarh, ii. 187. 

Dhak or palas trees {Bntea froitdosa, 
in Allahabad, V. 228; Amritsar, v. 319 ; 
Azamgarh, vi. 155 ; Bara Bankl, vi. 
418 ; Bhagalpur, viii. 26-27 ; Budaun, 
ix. 34; Bulandshahr, ix. 48; Cawn- 
pore, ix. 307 ; Etah, xii. 29 ; Etavvah, 
xii. 38 ; Farrukhabad, xii. 63 ; Fateh- 
pur, xii. 76 ; Fyzabad, xii. no ; GhazT- 
pur, xii. 223; Gujrat, xii. 364, 370; 
Gurdaspur, xii. 392; Hardoi, xiii. 
43; Jhalawar, xiv. 119; Jodhpur, 
xiv. 180, 191; Karauli, xv. 29; 
Karnal, xv. 49 ; Kherl, xv. 269 ; 
Kotah, XV. 41S; Mainpuri, xvii. 34; 
Muzaffarnagar, xviii. 84; Partabgarh, 
XX. 15; Patiala, xx. 33; PIlibhTt, 
XX. 141 ; Punjab, xx. 309; Rae Bareli, 
xxi. 26; Sultanpur, xxiii. 131 ; Thane- 
sar, xxiii. 305 ; Udaipur, xxiv. 96. 

Dhaka. Sec Dacca. 

Dhakadakshin, village in Sylhet District, 
Eastern Bengal and Assam, xi. 282. 

Dhakads, tribe in Khilchipur, xv. 278. 

Dhakars, cultivating caste, in Chhabra, x. 
195 ; Kotah, xv. 416 ; Udaipur, xxiv. 94. 

Dhal tank, Devlkot, xi. 276. 

Dhaleswari, river of Assam, xi. 282. 

Dhaliwals, Jat tribe in Ferozepore Dis- 
trict, xii. 89. 

Dhalkisor river. See Rupnarayan. 

Dhalni, lake in Goalpara District, xii. 
269. 

Dhalya, class of Lambani outcastes in 
Mysore, xviii. 200. 

Dhamacheli, king, Kelatha peak pagoda 
built by (fifteenth century), xxiii. 332. 

Dhamathawka, king of Pagan, pagoda 
erected by, in Pauk township (1091), 
xix. 322. 

Dhami, Simla Hill State, Punjab, xi. 282. 

Dhamins, Brahmans in Gaya, xii. 200. 

Dhamma Thawka Min. See Asoka. 

Dhamnar, village in Indore State, Cen- 
tral India, xi. 2S3. 

Dhampur, fahsil in Bijnor District, 
United Provinces, xi. 283-284. 

Dhampur, town in Bijnor District, United 
Provinces, xi. 284 ; rainfall, i. 144. 

Dhamra, river and estuary in Bengal, xi. 
2S4. 

DhamtarT, tahstl in Raipur District, Cen- 
tral Provinces, xi. 284-285. 

Dhamtarl, town in Raipur District, Cen- 
tral Provinces, xi. 285. 

Dhanaks, scavengers, in P^elhi, xi. 226; 
Hissar, xiii. 149 ; Rohtak, xxi. 414. 



Dhanaula, town in Nabha State, Punjab, 
xi. 28.^. 

Dhandhuka, talitka in Ahmadabad Dis- 
trict, Bombay, xi. 285. 

Dhandhuka, town in Ahmadabad District, 
Bombay, xi. 2S6. 

Dhanga, rule of (950-99), ix. 69; battle 
of Lamghan (98S), ix. 338. 

Dhangar or GoUas, shepherds in the Dec- 
can, in Ahmadnagar, v. 115 ; Akalkot, 
V. 178; Akola,v. 184; Atraf-i-balda, vi. 
127; Aurangabad, vi. 144; Bangana- 
palle, vi. 374; Basim, vii. 98 ; Belgaum, 
vii. 149; Berar, vii. 379; Bhir, viii. 113 ; 
Bhor, viii. 148 ; Bidar, viii. 166 ; 
Bombay Presidency, viii. 303, 305 ; 
Chitaldroog, x. 293 ; Dharwar, xi. 
308 ; Elgandal, xii. 7 ; Hyderabad, 
xiii. 247 ; Indur, xiii. 353 ; Khan- 
desh, xv. 231 ; Kolhapur, xv. 383 ; 
Mahbubnagar, xvii. 3; Matheran, xvii. 
221 ; Medak, xvii. 247 ; Mysore State, 
xviii. 196, 198; Nalgonda, xviii. 340; 
Nander, xviii. 351 ; Nasik, xviii. 402 ; 
Xellore, xix. 11 ; Osmanabad, xix. 270; 
Parbhani, xix. 412; Poona, xx. 170; 
.Satara Agency, xxii. 114; Satara, xxii. 
121 ; Sholapur, xxii. 298; Sirpur Tan- 
dur, xxiii. 42 ; TumkOr, xxiv. 55 ; Viz- 
agapatam, xxiv. 328 ; Warangal, xxiv. 
360; Wun, xxiv. 392. 

Dhankas, aboriginal tribe, in Rewa 
Kantha, xxi. 295. 

Dhankorabai hospital, Nasik, xviii. 412. 

Dlianraj Sahu, murdered (1848), v. 314. 

Dhansiri (i), river of Assam, xi. 286. 

Dhansiri (2), river of Assam, xi. 286-287. 

Dhanuks, caste in Bhagalpur, viii. 30 ; 
Darbhanga, xi. 155 ; Monghyr, xvii. 
395 ; Muzaffarpur, xviii. 98. 

Dhanwars, forest tribe in Bilaspur, viii. 
226. 

Dhaola Dhar, mountain chain in Kangra 
District, Punjab, xi. 287. 

Dhar, State in Central India, under 
Bliopawar Agency, xi. 287-293; area, 
population, revenue, and administra- 
tion, iv. 93. 

Dhar, town in Central India, xi. 293- 
296 ; iron pillar, ii. 25 ; inscriptions, ii. 
50 n. 

Dhar forest, minerals, iii. 147. 

Dhar Rao, traditional founder of Dhar- 
war fort (1403), xi. 316. 

Dhara Singh, Raja, Naro fort seized 
(1344), xviii. 301. 

Dhara TTrth, spring of sulphurous water 
at Lakhi, Sind, xvi. 137. 

Dharala, leading class of KolTs, rising of 
at Chaklasi, Kaira (1898), x. 124; in 
Gujarat, xv. 388. 

Dharam Chand, or Shadi Khan, ancestor 
of the Chibs, Kashmir, xv. loo-ioi. 



158 



INDEX 



Dharam Pal, rule in Orchha (1817-34), 
xix. 244. 

Dharamandal tank, Pinjaur, Patiala, xx. 
148. 

Dharampur, State in Surat Political 
Agency, Bombay, xi. 296-297. 

Dharampur, capital of Dharampur State, 
Bombay, xi. 297. 

Dharangaon, town in East Khandesh Dis- 
trict, Bombay, xi. 297-298. 

Dharapuram, tahik in Coimbatore Dis- 
trict, Madras, xi. 298. 

Dharapuram, town in Coimbatore Dis- 
trict, Madras, xi. 298-299. 

Dharaseo, tdlnk and town in Hyderabad. 
See Osmanabad. 

Dhari (i), head-quarters ol tdliika of the 
same name in Baroda State, xi. 299. 

Dhari (2), petty State in Rewa Kantha, 
Bombay, xi. 299, xxi. 291. 

Dharlwal, village in Gurdaspur District, 
.Punjab, with woollen mill, xi. 299 ; 
manufactures, iii. 213. 

Dharla, river of Eastern Bengal and 
Assam. See Torsa. 

Dharm Parkash, rule in Sirmiir, xxiii. 23. 

Dharm Singh, //^J/v/r of Dhadi, xi. 281- 
282. 

Dharma Singh, Pari Nagar city said to 
have been founded by, xxiii. 309. 

Dharma Singh, Rajput, Narsinghpur 
State said to have been founded by, 
xviii. 385. 

Dharma Sutras, the, Vedic works on law 
and custom, ii. 232-323. 

Dharmagupta, Buddhist monk, ii. 327. 

Dharmakshetra, former name for Kuruk- 
shetra, xvi. 55- . 

Dharmanagar, administrative division, 
Hill Tippera, xiii. 121. 

Dhar7na-nihajtdhas , legal compendia of 
late date, ii. 262. 

Dharmapuri, taluk in Salem District, 
Madras, xi. 299. 

Dharmapuri, town in Salem District, 
Madras, xi. 299. 

Dharmaraj, worship of, by Muhamma- 
dans in Bengal, vii. 236. 

Dharmasagar, tank at Comilla, x. 376. 

Dharmasamaj, school supported by, at 
Muzaffarpur, xviii. 107. 

Dhaimalpur, battle of, xxi. 241. 

Dharmavaram, taluk in Anantapur Dis- 
trict, Madras, xi. 299-300. 

l^harmavaram, town in .Vnantapur Dis- 
trict, Madras, xi. 300. 

Dharmjaygarh, head-quarters of Udaipur 
State, Central Provinces, xi. 300. 

Dharmkot, town in Ferozeporc District, 
Punjab, xi. 300-301. 

Dharmsala, hill station and cantonment 
in Kangra District, l'unjab,xi. 301-302. 

Dkarmsdlas. See Rest-houses. 



Dharnaoda, thakurat in Gwalior Resi- 
dency, Central India, xi. 302, xii. 417- 

DharnT Deota, earth-god, chief god of 
Khonds, xv. 282. 

Dharwar Agency, the. See Savanur 
Stale. 

Dharwar, District in Bombay Presidency, 
xi. 302-315; physical aspects, 302- 
305 ; history, 305-306 ; population, 
306-308; agriculture, 308-311 ; forests, 
311; mines and minerals, 311; trade 
and communications, 31 1-312; famine, 
312-313; administration, 313-315; 
revenue, 314; education, 314-315; 
medical, 315. 

Other references : Konnur inscription 
from, ii. 9-10 ; cotton cultivation, iii. 
44; minerals, iii. 142-147. 

Dharwar, tdluka in Dharwar District, 
Bombay, xi. 315. 

Dharwar, town in Dharwar District, 
P)ombay, xi. 315-317 ; arts and manu- 
factures, iii. 187, 201, 217. 

1 )harwar geological system, i. 60 ; Bija- 
pur, viii. 176; Bombay Presidency, 
viii. 272; Deccan table-land, xi. 206; 
Kadur, xiv. 263; Lingsugur, xvi. 163 ; 
Madras Presidency, xvi. 239 ; Kaichur, 
xxi. 38 ; Sandur, xxii. 42. 

Dhasan, river of Northern India, xi. 317. 

Dhdtupdtha, the, or list of verbal roots, 
referred to by Panini, ii. 263. 

Dhaulagiii, peak in Nepal, xix. 26. 

Dhauli, hill in I'url District, Bengal, xi. 
317-31S ; Asoka edict, ii. 41. 

Dhaurahra, town in Khcri District, 
United Provinces, xi. 31S. 

Dhawal, Raja. See Dholan Deo. 

Dhebar Lake, in Udaipur State, Rajput- 
ana, xi. 318. 

Dhedias, cow-eaters, in Rajputana, xxi. 
114. 

Dlieds, or Dhers, scavenger caste, in 
Baroda, vii. 54: Hyderabad, xiii. 315 ; 
Jodhpur, xiv. 189. See also Mahars. 

1 )hema Nanda, king of Magadha, defeat 
and deatli, vii. 209. 

Dhenka, Dhenkanal State supposed to 
liave derived its name from, xi. 319. 

Dhenkanal, tributary State of Orissa, 
Bengal, xi. 319 ; area, jiopulation, 
revenue, and administration, iv. 98. 

Dlienkan.al, capital of State of same name 
in Bengal, xi. 320. 

Dheri Shahan, village in Rawalpindi 
District, Punjab. See .Shahderi. 

I )]icrs. See Dheds. 

Dhilu, Raja, traditional founder of Delhi, 
xi. 224, 233. 

1 >hi]wan, tahsil in Kapurthala State, 
Punjab, xi. 320. 

Dhimal language, i. 391, 40c. 

Dhimars, caste of various functions, in 



INDEX 



159 



Baoni, vi. 415 ; Chanda, x. 153 ; Dar- 

bhanga, xi. 155 ; Orchha, xix. 245. 
Dhind - deva Wagh, freebooter. See 

Dhundia. 
Dhinoj Brahmans, in Vadnagar, xxiv. 292. 
Dhir Lake, (ioalpara, xii. 269. 
Dhir Shamsher, commander-in-chief in 

Nepal, conspiracy against (1882), xix. 

Dliir Singh, Tekari Raj founded by, xxiii. 

Dhlraj Singh, Divvan, Lugasi confirmed 

to, xvi. 209; abdicated (1814), xvi. 

209. 
Dhlrat Singh, ruler in Garha (^1901), xii. 

161. 
Dhobis, washermen, in Amritsar, v. ,^23; 

Attock, vi. 134 ; Dera Ismail Khan, 

xi. 263 ; Gujranwala, xii. 357 ; Gurdas- 

pur, xii. 396 ; Jhang, xiv. 128 ; Jhelum, 

xiv. 154; JuUundur, xiv. 226; Lahore, 

xvi. 99 ; Mianwali, xvii. 320 ; Mullan, 

xviii. 29 ; Muzaffargarh, xviii. 78 ; 

North-West Frontier Province, xix. 

167; Peshawar, xx. 117; Sialkot, xxii. 

329-330; Soalkuchi, xxiii. 68. 
Dhodan, tahsll in the Punjab. See 

Bhawanigarh. 
Dhodap, fort in Nasik District, Bombay, 

xi. 320. 
Dhodias, aboriginal tribe in Navsari, xviii. 

423; Rewa Kantha, xxi. 295; Surat, 

xxiii. 158. 
Dhokal Singh, rule in Panna (1785-98), 

xix. 401. 
Dhola, petty State in Kathiawar, Bombay, 

xi. 320, XV. 165. 
Dholan Deo, Raja, traditional builder of 

Dholpur town, xi. 331-332. 
Dholarva, petty State in Kathiawar, 

Bombay, xi. 320, xv. 169. 
Dholera, seaport and cotton mart in 

Ahmadabad District, Bombay, xi. 320- 

321. 
Dholka, tahtka in Ahmadabad District, 

Bombay, xi. 32 1. 
Dholka, historical town in Ahmadabad 

District, Bombay, xi. 321-322. 
Dholpur, State in Rajputana, xi. 322-331 ; 

physical asjjects, 322-323 ; history, 

323-325 ; population, 325 ; agriculture, 

325-327; forests, 326-327; trade and 

communications, 327; famine, 327- 

328; administration, 328-331 ; revenue, 

329.. 330; police, 331 ; education, 331 ; 

medical, 331 ; area, population, revenue, 

and administration, iv. 95. 
Dholpur, capital of State in Rajputana, xi. 

331-332; inscription, ii. 56; brass- 

and copper-work, iii. 241. 
Dhond, head-quarters of pelha of same 

name in Poona District, Bombay, xi. 

332-333- 



Dhonda gate, Gwslior fort, xii. 440. 

Dhondiyas, sect of Jains, i. 417; in 
Bansda State, vi. 404. 

Dhond-Manmad State Railway, v. 119. 

Dhone, village in Kurnool District, 
Madras, xi. 333. 

Dhonkal Singh, disputes concerning suc- 
cession to Jodhpur, xiv. 186, 198. 

DhorajT, fortified town in Gondal State, 
Kathiawar, Bombay, xi. 333. 

Dhors, unclean caste in Dharwar, xi. 308. 

Dhotijodas, manufactured at Maheshwar, 
Central India, ix. 368. 

Dhotis or dholars, iii. 19S ; manufactured 
in Gadwal, Hyderabad, xii. 121 ; 
Hyderabad, xiii. 262-263 ; Lingsugur, 
xvi. 166 ; Mahbubnagar, xvii. 5 ; 
Maheshwar, xvii. 16 ; Mehkar, xvii. 
271 ; Memari, xvii. 291 ; Raichur, 
xxi. 41 ; Savanur, xxii. 156; Sholapur, 
xxii. 301 ; Terdal, xxiii. 281 ; Warangal, 
xxiv. 362. 

Dhotria, thakurat in Bhopawar Agency, 
Central India, viii. 147, xi. 333. 

Dhrangadhra, State in Kathiawar,Bombay, 

xi^ 333-334> x^- ^^^1- 

Dhrangadhra, capital of State in Kathi- 
awar, Bombay, xi. 334-335. 

Dhrol, State in Kathiawar, Bombay, xi. 
335, XV. 166. _ 

Dhrol, town in Kathiawar, Bombay, xi. 

335- 
Dhrun, mountain ridge, Baluchistan, xvii. 

51- 
Dhruva Shah, Raja, daughter cured by 

Father Joseph Mary, viii. 6. 

Dhubri, subdivision in Goalpara District, 

Eastern Bengal and Assam, xi. 335- 

336. 
Dhubri, head-quarters of Goalpara L')istrict, 

Eastern Bengal and Assam, xi. 336- 

337- 

Dhul Kot U), ruins near Udaipur, Raj- 
putana, v. 93. 

Dhul Kot (2), ruins near Dhar, Central 
India, xi. 293. 

Dhulaba, temple at Alta, Kolhapur, v. 253. 

Dhulatia, thakurat in Malwa Agency, 
Central India, xi. 337, xvii. 99. 

Dhulia, tdluka in West Khandesh Dis- 
trict, Bombay, xi. 337. 

Dhulia, head-quarters of West Khandesh 
District, Bombay, and centre of cotton 

trade, xi. 337-339- 

Dhulian, mart in Murshidabad District, 
Bengal, xi. 339. 

Dhulipnagar, name sometimes applied to 
Bannu town, North-West Frontier Pro- 
vince, xi. 339. 

Dhumnar, archaeological site in Central 
India. See Dhamnar. 

Dhundai, ancient name for Dibai, xi. 341. 

Dhfindari language. See Jaipurl. 



i6o 



IXDEX 



Dbundhar, ancient name of Daosa Dis- 
trict, xiii. 3S5. 
Dhundhgarh, name of Dibai in eleventh 

centur)-, xi. 341. 
Dhundhu, demon king, cave of, at Galta, 

Jaipur, xiii. 385. 
Dhundi dialect, spoken in the Punjab, xx. 

286. 
Dhundi Raj temple. See Ganesh, Temple 

of. 
Dhimdia Nagh, freebooter, overtaken by 

General Wellesley at Manoli, xvii. 200; 

pillaged Shimoga (1799, ^^"' -^5> 

290. 
Dhundias. Jain sect, in Bombay, \\\\. 307 ; 

Rajputana. xxi. 115. 
Dhunds, aboriginal tribe in Hazara, xiii. 

78 ; North-West Frontier Province, xix. 

166; Rawalpindi, xxi. 266. 
Dhunias, Muhammadan caste, in Dar- 

bhanga, xi. 155; Muzaffarpur, xviii. 98. 
Dhupgarh, highest point in Satpura 

range, xxii. 132. 
Dhurrumtolla. street and Eurasian quarter 

in Calcutta. See Calcutta. 
Dhurs, lower-class Gonds in Gondwana, 

xii. 323. 
Dhurwai, petty sanad State in Central 

India under Bundelkhand Agency, xi. 

339, ix. 77. 
Dhyan Singh, Raja of Jammu, Eminabad 

given vaJdgTr to, xii. 24 ; rule in Punch, 

XV. 94. 
Di Pa, disturbance in Sal ween, xxi. 

Diamond Harbour, subdivision in Twenty- 
Four Parganas. Bengal, xi. 340. 

Diamond Harbour, village in Twenty- 
Four Parganas, Bengal, xi. 340. 

Diamond Island, off. coast of Burma, 
with wireless telegraphy station, xi. 
340-341. 

Diamond Jubilee College, Monghyr, xui. 
400; Sangrur, xiv. 175 ; xxii. 55. 

Diamonds, iii. 160-161 ; found or mined 
in Ajaigarh, v. 131 ; Anantapur, v. 33S, 
344 ; Banganapalle. \\. 372. 375 ; 
Belgaum, vii. 152; Bijawar, viii. 188. 
190; Central India, ix. 367; Chanda, 
X. 156 ; Charkhari, x. 177, 178 ; Gang- 
pur, xii. 142 ; Golconda, xii. 309; 
Hyderabad, xiii. 232, 262 ; Kallur, Hy- 
derabad, xiv. 315 ; Madras Presidency, 
xvi. 241, 290; ilahbubnagar, xvii. 2; 
Nalgonda, xviii. 341 ; Nellore, xix. 1 7 ; 
Panna, xix. 399, 402-403 ; Sambalpur, 
xxii. 12 ; Vindhya Hills, i. 62. xxiv. 
317; Wajrakarur, xxiv. 350; Waran- 
gal, xxiv. 357. 

Diamper, town in Travancore State, 
Madras. See L'dayamperur. 

Dibai, town in Bulandshahr District, 
United Provinces, xi. 341. 



Dibalpur, ancient town in the Punjab. 

See Dipalpnr. 
Dibang. rivei of Assam, xi. 341. 
Dibru, river of Assam, xi. 341. 
Dibru-Sadiya Railway, iii. 415. 
Dibnigarh, subdivision of Lakhimpur 

District, Eastern Bengal and Assam, 

-xi. 341-342. 
Dibrugarh, town and cantonment in 

Lakhimpur District, Eastern Bengal 

and Assam, xi. 342-343. 
Didda, queen of Kashmir (950-1003), 

XV. 92. 
DIdwana. town in Jodhpur State, Raj- 
putana, xi. 343. 
Dig, town in Bharatpur State, Rajputana, 

stormed by British (i8o4\ xi. 343-344. 
Digambaras, sect of Jains, i. 4I4, 417; 

separation from Svetambaras, i. 414; 

in Bombay, viii. 307 ; Central India, ix. 

353; Rajputana, xxi. 115. 
Digaru, Mishmi tribe, xvii. 378. 
Digbijai Jugal Kishor Das, chief of 

Chhulkhadan (1898-1903", x. 216. 
Digbijaiganj, tahsTl in United Provinces. 

See Maharajganj. 
Digboi, oil-field in Lakhimpur District, 

Eastern Bengal and Assam, xi. 344- 

345- 

Dighton, Mr., appointed first Collector of 
Xellore, xix. 20, 24. 

Dighton, Mr., revenue manager in Nal- 
gonda District 1S40), xviii. 343. 

Dignagar, village in Burdwan District, 
Bengal, xi. 345. 

Digras, town in Yeotmal District, Berar, 

.xi- 345- 
Digru, river of Assam, xi. 345. 
Dihang, river of .\s5am. xi. 345. 
Dihing, Burhi, river of Assam, xi. 345- 

346- 
Dihing. Noa, river of Assam, xi. 346. 
Dikho, river of Assam, xi. 346. 
Dikshit, Bilheri family, landowners in 

Chhatarpur State, x. 199. 
Dikshitars, Brahman sect, managers of 

temple of Siva, Chidambaram, x. 

219-220. 
Dilal Raja, pirate in Sandwip, xxii. 49. 
Dilawar Khan. Ghorl, governor of Malwa 

[c. 13S9-1405;, ii. 379. 3S1, .xvii. 103; 

assumed independence (1401), ii. 1S5 ; 

in Dhar, xi. 294 ; erected Lat Masjid at 

Dhar, xi. 295 ; mosque at Mandogarh, 

ii. 187, xvii. 173 ; granted AntrT to Sheo 

Singh Chandrawat, xxi. 191. 
Dilawar Khan, Mughal general. Athni 

sacked 1679), vi. 124 ; Golconda State 

invaded ^1685-7), ii. 390; Jai Singh 

assisted by (1665;, x.x. 397; mosque 

and tomb at Khed, xv. 266. 
Dilawar Khan. Mughal governor of Slra 

(1724-56), -xxiii. 16. 



INDEX 



i6i 



Dilavvar Khan, chief of Maimana, sub- 
mission to Abdnr Rahman Khan (1883- 

4), xvii. 32. 
Dilazaks, in Peshawar valley, xx. 115. 
Diler Khan, Xawab, Shahabad founded 

by (1677% and buildings, xxii. 196-197. 
Diler Khan, Mughal general. See Dila- 

war Khan. 
Diler Khan, slain and buried at Mauda- 

ha (1730}, xvii. 232. 
Diler Khan, territories granted to, by the 

Durranis, but driven out of lands by 

Sikh chiefs, xvi. 27. 
Dilkusha palace, at Lucknow, xvi. 190, 

196. 
Dilli. ^-^^ Delhi. 
Dilniji, fort in Sind, xxii. 403. 
Dilsukh Rai, part of Colonel James 

Gardner's property held by, xv. 70. 
Dilwara, estate and head-quarters thereof 

in Rajputana. See Delwara. 
Dimapur, village in Sibsagar District, 

Eastern Bengal and Assam, xi. 346- 

.347- 
Dima-sa, language of the Bodo group, i. 

393; spoken in Cachar, ix. 252. 
Dimasas or hill Kacharis, inhabitants of 

Assam, vi. 44. 
Din Panah, tomb of, at Daira Din Panak, 

xi. 123. 
Dlna-bandhu-Mittra (1829-73;, Bengali 

play on indigo-planting by, ii. 433- 

434- 

Dinajpur, District in Rajshahi Division of 
Eastern Bengal and Assam, xi. 347- 
354; physical aspects, 347-349; his- 
tory, 349-350; population, 350-351; 
agriculture, 351 ; trade and communi- 
cations, 352; famine, 352; adminis- 
tration, 352-354. 

Dinajpur, subdivision in Dinajpur District, 
Eastern Bengal and Assam, xi. 354. 

Dinajpur, town in Dinajpur District, 
Eastern Bengal and Assam, xi. 354- 
355 ; broadcloths, iii. 200. 

Dina-krishna Das, Oriya works of, ii. 

424. 432. 

Dinanagar, town in Gurdaspur District, 
Punjab, xi. 355. 

Dinapore, subdivision in Patna District, 
Bengal, xi. 355. 

Dinapore, town and cantonment in Patna 
District, Bengal, xi. 3.-5-356- 

Dindigul, subdivision in Madura District, 
Madras, xi. 356. 

Dindigul, taluk in Madura District, Ma- 
dras, xi. 356. 

Dindigul, town in Madura District, Ma- 
dras, with industries of cigar-making 
and silk-weaving, xi. 356-357 ; tobacco, 
ii. 52 ; silk manufacture, iii. 211. 

Dindori, tdhika in Nasik District, Bom- 
bay, xi. 357-358. 
VOL. XXV. M 



Dindori, tahsil'm Mandla Distiict, Central 
Provinces, xi. 35S. 

Dines Chandra Sen, history of Bengali 
literature by, ii. 434. 

Dinga, town in Gujrat District, Punjab, 
xi. 358. 

Dinhata, head-quarters of subdivision of 
Cooch Behar State, Bengal, xi. 35S. 

Dinkar Rao, Sir, minister of Gwalior, xii. 
425, 432, 436; educational efforts, xxi. 
288. 

Dinsha, Edalji, Dnfferin Hospital built 
at Karachi by (190I;, xv. 19. 

Diodar (with Bhabar), petty State in 
Bombay. See Palanpur Agency. 

Diodorus, foundation of Palibothra attri- 
buted to Herakles by, xx. 66. 

Dipajl, revolt of Satari Ranis in Goa 
headed by (1852^, xii. 257. 

Dipalpur, iahsil in Montgomery District, 
Punjab, xi. 358-359- 

Dipalpur, historical village in Montgomery 
District, Punjab, xi. 359-360. 

Dipavali, festival, held in Madras, xvi. 
266 ; ]NIysore, xvnii. 209. 

Diple Lakes, Goalpara, xii. 269. 

Diplo, tdluka in Thar and Parkar Dis- 
trict, Sind, Bombay, xi. 360. 

Dir, territory under a Khan included in 
Dir, Swat, and Chitral Agency, North- 
West Frontier Province, xi. 360-361. 

Dir, Swat, and Chitral, Political Agency in 
North-West Frontier Province, xi. 361. 

Dirgh, ancient name of Dig, xi. 344. 

Disa, cantonment in Bombay. See Deesa. 

Disai, river in Eastern Bengal and Assam. 
See Bhogdai. 

Disang, river of Assam, xi. 361-362. 

Diseases and epidemics, i. 524; compari- 
son of European and Native troops and 
prisoners as regards disease statistics, 
i- 532-533- See also special names. 

Disoi, river of Assam. See Bhogdai. 

Dispensaries, history, iv. 462 ; classes of, 
iv. 462-463. See also in each Province, 
District, and larger State article under 
Medical. 

Distilleries, out-still and central distillery 
systems, iv. 255-257. 

Local notices : In Aravanghat, v. 403; 
South Arcot, v. 430; Aska, vi. 13; 
Bellar)', vii. 168, 176; Berar, vii, 409; 
Coimbatore, x. 373; Coorg, xi. 36; 
theDangs, xi. 148; FIrozpur-Jhirka,xii. 
100; Xabha, xviii. 269; Xavsari,xviii. 
425 ; Xellikuppam, xix. 6 ; the Xllgiris, 
xix. 98; Punjab, xx. 320; Raichur, 
xxi. 41, 45; Rewa Kantha, xxi. 296; 
Russa,v. 221 ; Salween,xxi. 419; Rosa, 
at Shahjahanpur, iv. 25S ; Toungoo, 
xxiii. 430, 434 ; Uran, xxiv. 286 ; Vizaga- 
patam, xxiv. 331-332, 338. 

District Boards. See Local Boards. 



l62 



INDEX 



Dill, island forming portion of Portuguese 
possessions in Western India, xi. 362- 
364; attack by Portuguese (1531), ii. 
377 ; Egyptians defeated by Portuguese 
(1509), ii. 377, 448 ; obtained by Portu- 
guese (1535, ii. 449; defence against 
Turks and Egyptians (153S , ii. 449- 
450. 

Divakar Gosavi, basalt temple built at 
Parii Fort by, xx. 5. 

Divakaram, Tamil dictionary, ii. 435. 

Divali, festivjl, held in Berar, vii. 
382 ; by Bhils, viii. 102 ; in Sind, xxii. 

Divi Point, headland in Kistna District, 
Madras, xi. 364. 

Divorce. See Marriage Laws, Customs, 
and Ceremonies. 

Divyavaddna, the, Buddhist work in 
Sanskrit, ii. 260. 

Diwangiri, outpost on Bhutan frontier in 
Eastern Bengal and Assam. See De- 
wangiri. 

Diwan-i-khas, 'hall of audience' at Delhi, 
xi. 238 ; Fatehpur Sikri, xii. 85, 86. 

Dixon, Colonel, irrigation works, iii. 
343; charge of Ajmer (1842), v. 
143; settlement of Ajmer-Merwara, v. 
161-162 ; schools established in Ajmer 
(1S51), V. 166; started construction of 
dispensary at Ajmer (1851), v. 168; 
Beawar (Nayanagar) founded (1835), 
vii. 139, xvii. 311 ; monument to, in 
Beawar, xvii. 311; superintendent of 
Merwara (1836), and Ajmer (1842), 
xvii. 310, 311; death (1857), xvii. 
316. 

Dnyanoba, Maratha writer (thirteenth 
century), ii. 431. 

Doab, tract between Ganges and Jumna, 
United Provinces, xi. 364-365. 

Docks and dockyards, at Bombay, viii. 
366-367, 417; Calcutta, ix. 272; Co- 
ringa, xi. 51 ; Daman, xi. 129 ; Garden 
Reach, xii. 160; Howrah, xiii. 210. 

Doctors, lady : Bhiwani, xiii. 149; Cochin, 
X. 353; Hoshiarpur, xiii. 197; Hyder- 
abad, xiii. 298; Nalgonda, xviii. 340. 

Doda Rajputs. See Dors. 

Dodabetta, highest peak of Nllgiri Hills, 
xi. 365, xix. 238 ; observatory, i. 105, 

Dod-Ballapur, taluk in Bangalore District, 
Mysore, xi. 365-366. 

Dod-Ballapur, town in Bangalore District, 
Mysore, xi. 366. 

Dodda Mra Raja. See Vira Raja. 

Doddahundi, inscription, ii. 59. 

Dodhas, caste, in Chhabra, x. 195. 

Dodvad, village in Sangli State, Bombay, 
xi. 366. 

Dogars, tribe in Ferozepore, xii. 90, 92 ; 
Hoshiarpur, xiii. 196 ; Lahore, xvi. 99 ; 
Mamdot, xvii. 107. 



Dogras, dominant tribe in Jammu, Kash- 
mir, XV, 100 ; in Gilgit, xii. 239. 

Dogrl, dialect of Panjabi, i. 369 ; spoken 
in Gurdaspur, xii. 395 ; Jammu, Kash- 
mir, XV. 99; Sialkot, xxii. 329. 

Dogs, revered by Bauris as their totem, i. 
328. 

Dogs, wild, i. 221-222; in Adilabad, v. 
23; Afghanistan, V. 33 ; Akola, v. 182; 
Almora, v. 245 ; Amherst, v. 294 ; An- 
gul, V. 375 ; Assam, vi. 20 ; Aurang- 
abad, vi. 142; Basim, vii. 96; Berar, 
vii. 364; Central India, ix. 332; Cen- 
tral Provinces, x. 9; Chanda, x. 150; 
Coorg, xi. 7 ; Ganjam, xii. 144 ; Garh- 
wal, xii. 165; Gaya, xii. 196; Gilgit, 
xii. 239; Hindu Kush mountains, xiii. 
138 ; Indur, xiii. 352 ; Jhansi, \iv. 136 ; 
Jodhpur, xiv. 181 ; North Kanara, xiv. 
342 ; Karimnagar, xv. 42 ; Khasi and 
Jaintia Hills, xv. 255; Kheri, xv. 269; 
Kolhapur, xv. 381; Kotah, xv. 411; 
Madras, xvi. 245 ; Madura, xvi. 388 ; 
Manbhum, xvii. 112; Mandla, xvii. 160 ; 
Medak, xvii. 245; Minbu, xvii. 346; 
Myingyan, xviii. 121 ; ISIyitkyina, xviii. 
136; Mysore, xviii. 166; NainI Tal, 
xviii. 324 ; Nander, xviii. 350 ; the Nil- 
giris, xix. 88 ; Nimar, xix. 107 ; Pala- 
mau, xix. 336 ; Raipur, xxi. 50 ; South- 
ern Shan .States, xxii. 251 ; .Shimoga, 
xxii. 281 ; Singhbhum, xxiii. 3 ; Sirmur, 
xxiii. 22; Sirpur Tandur, xxiii. 40; 
Tehrl, xxiii. 270; United Provinces, 
xxiv. 143. 

Dohad, tdluka in Panch Mahals District, 
Bombay, xi. 366. 

Dohad, town in Panch ^Mahals District, 
Bombay, xi. 366-367. 

Dohrighat, town in Azamgarh District, 
United Provinces, xi. 367. 

Doingnak tribe, subdivision of Chakmas, 
Chittagong Hill Tracts, x. 320. 

Dokcreek, Minbu, xvii. 357. 

Doktawaddy, river of Burma. See Myitnge. 

Dolai, river in Hill Tippera, xiii. 117. 

Dolmens. See Antiquarian Remains. 

Dolora Amrani, rule in Brahmanabad 
(eleventh century), ix. 9. 

Dolotsavam, festival held in Srikurmam, 
xxiii. 98. 

Dolphin's Nose, headland forming south- 
ern arm of Vizagapatam harbour, Ma- 
dras, xi. 367. 

Dolphins Plalanistd), i. 238. 

Dolu. tributary of the Sangu river, xxii. 
56. 

Domar, town in Rangpur District, Eastern 
Bengal and Assam, xi. 367. 

Domariaganj, tahsll in Bastl District, 
United Provinces, xi. 367. 

Domars, labouring caste, in Banda, vi. 
35°- 



INDEX 



i6 



Dombkis, tribe in Hyderabad, Sind, xiii. 

315 ; Kachhi, xiv. 250 ; Khairpur, xv. 

212 ; Sibi, xxii. 338 ; Sind, xxii. 407 ; 

Upper Sind Frontier District, xxiv. 

278, 279, 2S0. 
Dombos, weavers, in Vizagapatam, xxiv. 

328. 
Domel Island, Mergiii Archipelago, xvii. 

293- 

Dominicans, said to have built a chapel at 
Anekal (1400), v. 373. 

Dom-Patnis, caste in Cachar, ix. 252 ; 
Sylhet, xxiii. 193. 

Doms, caste, i. 328; in Almora, v. 247, 
248; Dehra Dun, xi. 215; Garhvval, 
xii. 167 ; Gonda, xii. 312 ; Hindu Kush 
mountains, xiii. 139; Kalahandl, xiv. 
294; Manbhum, xvii. 115; NainI Tal, 
xviii. 326; TehrT, xxiii. 271. 

Don, Colonel, capture of Aligarh fort and 
town (1804), V. 208. 

Donabyu, township and town in Lower 
Burma. See Danubyu. 

Dongar Deo, god of Korkus, xv. 404. 

Dongargarh, town in Khaiiagarh Feuda- 
tory State, Central Provinces, xi. 368. 

Dongari Kolis, tribe, xv. 389. 

Dongarpur, State and capital thereof in 
Rajputana. Sec Dungarpur. 

Dongkya, mountain between .Sikkim and 
Tibet, xi. 368. 

Donkeys, iii. 88-89. 

Donkeys, wild {Equiis hetnionus), in Af- 
ghanistan, v. 33; Baliawalpur, vi. 195 ; 
Baluchistan, vii. 272 ; Bombay Presi- 
dency, viii. 275 ; Broach, ix. 24 ; Chagai, 
X. 117 ; Cutch, xi. 77 ; Kalat, xiv. 300 ; 
Kharan, xv. 247 ; Ladakh, xvi. 89-90 ; 
introduced into Mysore for breeding, 
xviii. 213; Parkar, xxiii. 307. 

Dooars, tract in Eastern Bengal and 
Assam. See Duars. 

Dooars- Bengal Railway, iii. 414, 415. 

Doomka town. See Dumka. 

Door locks, wood and iron, manufactured 
at Somnath, xxiii. 74. 

Doran, Brigadier- General J., expedition 
against Mohmands (1880), xix. 210. 

Dorasamudra, ancient capital, Mysore, 
vii. 366; site of, at Halebid, xiii. 11 ; 
Hoysalas of, see Hoysalas. 

Doria Rajputs, Mughal Subahdar of Mal- 
wa assisted in conquest of Tal town by, 
xxiii. 206. 

Dorka, petty State in Rewa Kantba, Bom- 
bay, xi. 368, xxi. 291. 

Dors, Rajput clan of Baran (800-1 193), ii. 
312-313 ; Gagraunfort held by (twelfth 
century), xii. 122. 

Dorunda, cantonment in Bengal. See 
Ranchi Town. 

Dosa, town in Rajputana. See Daosa. 

Dosadhs, Hindu caste, in Bengal, vii. 233 ; 



Bhagalpur, viii. 30 ; Darbhanga, xi. 
155; Gaya, xii. 200 ; Hazaribagh, xiii. 
94; Monghyr, xvii. 395; Muzaffarpur, 
xviii. 98; Patna, xx. 59; .Saran, xxii. 
87; .Shahabad, xxii. 190. 

Dost All, Nawcib of the Carnatic, defeated 
and slain by the Marathas (1740), ii. 
47 1, V. 406, 419, xi. 128, xvi. 390; 
seat of government at Arcot, v. 419. 

Dost Mnhammad, Amir of Afghanistan, 
ii. 499-500; history, v. 37-39; rela- 
tions with Ranjit Singh, v. 37 ; expedi- 
tion to dethrone, v. 38 ; position at 
Kabul resumed, v. 39; death (1863), 
v. 39 ; breeding of Arab horses en- 
couraged, V. 53 ; Char Chatta re- 
stored (1850), xiv. 243; suzerainty 
established in Herat (1861), xiii. 115- 
116; Jalalabad seized and sacked (1834), 
xiv. 13; victory at Kandahar (1855', 
xiv. 376; Shah .Shuja defeated (1833), 
xxiii. 120. 

Dost Muhammad Khan, founder of Bhopal 
State (1709-40), vii. 423 ; built mosque 
at Berasia, vii. 423 ; history of, viii. 
128; Ginnurgarh fell to, xix. 125; Ni- 
zamat-i-Maghrib fellto (1716), xix. 126 ; 
built up State of Nizamat-i-Sliimal, xix. 
127. 

Double Island, liglithouse, v. 303. 

Doves (Columbae), i. 255-256. 

Doveton. General Sir John, Baji Rao 
Peshwa pursued (1S18), vii. 97 ; en- 
camped at Mehkar (1817), xvii. 271. 

Doveton College, Calcutta, ix. 283. 

Doveton College and High School, Ma- 
dras City, xvi. 344. 

Dow Hill Girls' School, Kurseong, xi. 
177, xvi. 54. 

Dow Memorial HospitaL Gujrat, xii. 

374- 

Dowlaishweram, town in Godavari Dis- 
trict, Madras, with anient, xi. 368. 

Dowlatabad, hill fort in Aurangabad Dis- 
trict, Hyderabad State. .5VtTMulalabad. 

Downes, Mr., of the Church Missionary 
Society, Srinagar, xxiii. 105. 

Downing, Captain, Erinpura named by, 
xii. 27. 

Downton, Nicholas, Portuguese defeated 
(1615), ii. 455. 

D'Oyley, Captain, Gaung Gyi driven from 
Burmese territory by (1855), xxiii. 318. 

Drafa, petty State in Kathiawar, Bombay, 
xi. 36S, XV. 167. 

Drama. See Sanskrit Literature. 

Dranjuk hills, in Baluchistan, xvii. 51. 

Draper, Eliza, home of, at Anjengo, v. 384. 

Draupad), wife of the five Pandava breth- 
ren, i. 419, 424, xiv. 328, xix. 378. 

Dravidian family of languages, i. 378- 
382, 398. 

Dravidian geological era, i. 64-67 



M 2 



164 



INDEX 



Dravidian Mission. See under Protestant 
Missions. 

Dravidians, aboriginal race, i. 308-309 ; 
colourof skin, i. 283; hair, i. 284; eth- 
nology, i. 289, 290, 296-297, 298-299 ; 
totemism among, i. 299; architecture, 
ii. 170-174 ; in iSouthern India, ii. 321- 
324 ; as soldiers, ii. 324 ; as mariners, 
ii. 324. 

Local notices : People of Bengal de- 
scended from, vii. 207, 208; physical 
characteristics, vii. 233 ; in Bhagal- 
pur, viii. 24 ; Bombay Presidency, viii. 
278; Central Provinces, x. 23; Chang 
Bhakar, x. 171; Hyderabad, xiii. 234; 
United Provinces, xxiv. 170-171. 

Drenashtar Narai, peak in Southern 
WazTristan, xxiv. 3S0. 

Dresden Society. See Leipzig Evangelical 
Lutheran ^lission, mider Protestant 
Missions. 

Dress, in \\\^ Rigveda,\\. 225 ; in Afghan- 
istan, v. 50-51 ; Ajmer-Merwara, v. 
147; of Akhas, v. 181; in Arakan, v. 
390; Assam, vi. 50, 51, 66; Baltislan, 
vi. 262 ; Baluchistan, vi. 292 ; Baroda, 
vii. 45, 52 ; Bengal, vii. 239 ; Berar, vii. 
3S1, 390-391 ; of BhTl-;, viii. 101-102 ; 
in Bhittanni, viii. 118; Bhutan, viii. 
158; Bombay Presidency, viii 309: of 
Braluiis, ix. 16; in Burma, ix. 147 ; Chin 
Hills, x. 274; Pakokku Chin Hills, x. 
282; Central India, ix. 356; Central 
Provinces, x. 29-30, 46-47 ; Coorg, xi. 
24, 28; of Danus, xi. 149; in Garo 
Hills, xii. 176; Gilgit,xii. 240 ; Hyder- 
abad, xiii. 249 ; of the Kachins, xiv. 
254; Kadus, xiv. 269 ; in Karenni, xv. 
.^7) 38 ) Kashmir and Jamniu, xv. 102 ; 
103,104; Khasi and Jainlia Hills, xv. 
258; Madras Presidency, xvi. 266; the 
Maliahs, xvii. 88 ; in Mysore State, 
xviii. 200, 206-208; Naga Hills, xviii. 
289 ; Nepal, xix. 44-45 ; North-West 
Frontier Province, xix. 168; of Palaungs, 
xix. 356; in Prome, xx. 223 ; Punjab, 
XX. 293 ; Kajputana, xxi. 117; Northern 
Shan States, xxii. 237 ; Sind, xxii. 409- 
410; of Son-KolTs, xv. 389; Taung- 
thus, xxiii. 258 ; Thana, xxiii. 295 ; in 
United Provinces, xxiv. 174 ; the Was, 
xxiv. 345. 

Drew, Lieut, killed in battle with Ram- 
chandra Ganesh at Dugad (1780), xi. 

374- 
Drew, Mr., on Gilgit, xii. 240 ; Kashmir, 

XV. 84-85; Ladakh, xvi. 92. 
Dridhaprahar,founderof ChandorYadava 

dynasty (801), x. 166. 
Dried fruits and nuts, trade statistics, iii. 

314 
Drigbijai Singh, Sir, Raja of Balrampur 
(1836-82;;, loyalty to British during 



Mutiny, vi. 260; statue of, erected at 
Balrampur town, vi. 261 ; rewarded by 
grant of Gonda District, xii. 313. 

Drigbijai Singh, Bais Rajput, survivors of 
Cawnpore massacre saved by (1857), 
vi. 21S. 

Drigbijaiganj, iaksil in United Provinces. 
See Maharajganj. 

Drogras, half-castes in Ladakh, xvi. 92. 

Drona, tutor of the Pandavas, xxiii. 117 ; 
traditional founder of Dankaur, xi. 148. 

Drona tank, at KashTpur, xv. 71. 

Dionacharj tank, at Dankaur, xi. 148. 

Drongos or king-crows (Dicruridae), i. 
242. 

Droughts, i. 127, 145-146; relation of 
droughts in India with droughts else- 
where, i. 126, 127 ; Mr. Blanford's em- 
pirical forecast of drought by Hima- 
layan rainfall, i. 129 ; areas liable to, i. 
141,145-146; double, i. 146. See also 
Famine. 

Drudvvanak, ancient name of DTdwana, 

xi. 343- 
Drug, District in Chhattisgarh Division, 
Central Provinces, xi. 368-370; phy- 
sical aspects, 369 ; population, 369 ; 
agriculture, 369-370 ; communications, 

370- 
Drug, tahsil of new District of same name 

in Central Provinces, xi. 370. 
Drug, town in Central Provinces, xi. 370- 

Drugs, indigenous, iii. 222 ; trade, iii. 
223 ; imports and exports, iii. 308, 309 ; 
import duties, iv. 376; manufacture of, 
in Baluchistan, vi. 310, 328-329; Ba- 
roda, vii. 66 ; Central Provinces, x. 82. 
See also Opium. 

Drugs, hemp. See Hemp Drugs. 

Drugs, medicines, and narcotics, exports, 
Madras Presidency, xvi. 354. 

Druhyu, son of Vayati, claims of Raja of 
Hill Tippera to descent from, xiii. 118. 

Druk|ms, celibate Buddhist sect in Ladakh, 
xvi. 92. 

Drummond, Hon. E., Lieutenant-Gover- 
nor of Nortli-\\'estern Provinces (1863), 
xxiv. 219. 

Drummond, Mr., characteristic plants of 
Indus Plain and Indus Valley, i. 178- 
179. 

Drupada, king of Panchala, rule in Kam- 
pil, xiv. 328; contest of Pandava 
brothers for hand of Draupadi, bis 
daughter, xix. 378. 

Druses of the Lebanon, connexion of 
Mughlis with, xiii. 13S. 

Dry season, transition to, i. 131 ; period 
of slowly retreating south-west monsoon 
currents, i. 132 ; changes of pressure, i. 
' 32- 1 33 ; recurvature of Bay current, i. 
133; rains, storms, and cyclones, i. 134- 



INDEX 



165 



135 ; pressure, weather, and rainfall in 
different parts from October, i. 135-137 ; 
mean rainfall, i. 140; rainfall, i. 153. 

Dua, the Chaghatai, raid on Lahore 
(1301), 107. 

Duar forests. See Tarai Forests. 

Duarabazar, trade centre and railway sta- 
tion in Eastern Bengal and Assam. Sec 
Dwara Bazar. 

Duarbasini shrine, Gaur, xii. 188. 

Duars, Eastern, tract in Goalpara District, 
Eastern Bengal and Assam, xi. 371- 
373 ; physical aspects, 371 ; agriculture, 
372 ; land revenue, 372 ; administration, 

372-373- 
Duars, Western, tract in Jalpaigurl Dis- 
trict, Eastern Bengal and Assam, xi. 

373- 

Duazdahum-i-sharif, festival, held in 
Hyderabad State, xiii. 250. 

Dublana, village in Rajputana. See Da- 
blana. 

Dublas, animistic tribe, in Navsari, xviii. 
423 ; Surat, xxiii. 158. 

Dublin University Mission. See under 
Protestant Missions. 

Dublin University Mission First Arts 
College, Haziiribagh, xiii. 98, 100. 

Dubois, Abbe, agriculturnl community in 
Hassan District established by (early 
nineteenth century), xiii. 65 ; work in 
Mysore, xviii. 205, 255; Christian com- 
munity of, at Sathalli, xxii. 130. 

Dubrajpur, village in Birbhum District, 
Bengal, xi. 374. 

Ducks, i. 265-266. 

Duda, fourth son of Rao Jodha, Merta 
founded by (c. 1488), xvii. 308. 

Dudaji, son of Dangar Singhjl of Rajgarh, 
post of dhudn or minister to his 
brother held, xxi. 68-69. 

Dudekulas, mixed race, in Bellary, vii. 
163; Coorg, xi. 63; Kurnool, xvi. 35. 

Dudhadari, temple, Raipur, xxi. 60. 

Dudhai, ruined town in Jhansi District, 
United Provinces, xi. 374. 

Dudhkumar, river in Assam. See Sankosh. 

Dudhnath, temple, Rudarpur, xxi. 33S. 

Dudhpur, petty State in Rewa Kantha, 
Bombay, xi. 374, xxi. 290. 

Dudhrej, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, xi. 374, XV. 168. 

Dudrenec, Chevalier (^French adventurer), 
Kashi Rao and Jaswant Rao Holkar 
assisted by, xiii. 337 ; Holkar State army 
organized by (1792), xiii. 347. 

Duff, Captain Grant. See Grant Duff, 
Captain. 

Duff, Dr., missionary of Church of Scot- 
land at Calcutta, i. 443, iv. 410; 
General Assembly's Institution, Bengal, 
founded (1830), vii. 329. 

Duff College, Calcutta, ix. 283. 



Dufferin and Ava, Marquess of, Viceroy 
(1884-8), ii. 521-522; opened Mayo 
College, Ajmer (1885^ v. 173. 

Dufferin ',,Lady) Fund, hospital at Am- 
raotl, V. 313; Victoria Hospital for 
'caste' and gos/ia (or pan/a] women, 
Madras, transferred to (1902), xvi. 347 ; 
dispensary in Quetta-Pishin, xxi. 19 ; 
Fort Sandeman, xxiv. 435. 

Dufferin Hospitals, in Alwar, v. 267, 268, 
269; Amraotl, v. 315; Bareilly, vii. 
14; Baroda, vii. 75, 82; Bhagalpur, 
viii. 37 ; Calcutta, ix. 285 ; Central 
Provinces, x. 96; Dacca, xi. 120; 
Delhi, xi. 232; Dhenkanal, xi. 319; 
Karachi, xv. 18-19; ^agpur, xviii. 321 ; 
Patiala, xx. 51 ; Rangoon, xxi. 221. 

Dufferin sarai, Lashkar, Gvvalior, xvi. 
152. 

Duffla Hills, Eastern Bengal and Assam. 
See Dafla Hills. 

Dugad, village in Thana District, Bom- 
bay, xi. 374-375. 

Dugarazupatnam, village in Madras. See 
Armagon. 

Dugari, village in Bundi State, Rajputana, 

X'- 375- 
Dugong, 1. 238-239. 

DugrT, thakurat in Bhopal Agency, Cen- 
tral India, viii. 125, xi. 375. 

DCija Singh, Katehi iya chief, assassination 
of, procured by All Muhammad, v. 389. 

Dujana, State in Punjab, xi. 375-376 ; 
rule of Nawab in Rohtak, xxi. 312. 

Dujana town, capital of Dujana Slate, 
Punjab, xi. 376, 

Duke of York's Nose, the, limestone 
eminence near Moulmein, xviii. 6. 

Dukhpa sect, in Spiti, xxiii. 94. 

Duki, subdivision in Loralai District, 
Baluchistan, xi. 376. 

Duki, tahsil in Loralai District, Baluchi- 
stan, xi. 376. 

Dul Chand, Bhati chief, Bhatner fort lost 

by (1398). -^iii- 39- 
Dule Singh, rule in Sailana State, xxi. 

385. 

Dulha Deo, deiiied human being, wor- 
shipped in Central Provinces, x. 27; 
by Gonds in Gondwana, xii. 325. 

Dulha Rahman. See Abdur-Rahman. 

Dulha Rai. See Tej Karan. 

Dulien language. See Lushai. 

Dum Duma, village in Lakhimpur Dis- 
trict, Eastern Bengal and Assam, xi. 

377- 
Dumals, caste, in Sonpur, xxiii. 85. 
Dumars, Afghan tribe, in Loralai, xvi. 

175; Sibi, xxii. 339. 
Dumas, Benoit, governor of Pondicherry 

(i735-40j.ii- 464. 470-471; created 
a Nawab, ii. 471 ; formation of native 
troops, iv, 326; Karikal acquired by 



i66 



INDEX 



French under government of (1739), 

xii. 104. 
Dumbura, waterfall, Ilill Tippera, xiii. 

117. 
Dumcaw town. See Dumka. 
Diim-Dum, town and cantonment in 

Twenty-four Parganas, Bengal, xi. 376- 

Dumka, subdivision in Sanlal Parg.mas 
District, Bengal, xi. 377. 

Dumka, head-quarters of Santal Parganas 
District, Bengal, xi. 377-378. 

Dumna-, caste, inChamba, x. 131 ; Gilgit, 
xii. 240 ; Gurdaspur, xii. 396 ; Kashmir, 
XV. 103, 104; Mandl, xvii. 155. 

Diimraon I\aj, estate in Shahabad District, 
Bengal, xi. 378-379. 

Dumraon, town in Shahabad District, 
Bengal, xi. 379. 

Dumria, village in Khulna District, Ben- 
gal, xi. 379. 

Dums, caste. Sec Dumnas. 

1 'un Canals, iii. 342. 

Dunjan, Jonathan, Resident at Benares, 
appointment (1787), vii. 185 ; re- 
forms in administration of Benares 
estate instituted, vii. 188 ; permanent 
settlement of Jaunpnr District car- 
ried out, xiv. 78 ; female infanticide 
found to be rife in Jaunpur 11789), 
xiv. So; negotiations opened by the 
Gurkhas with British tlirough, xix. 
33 ; autliorized to interfere in system 
of revenue management (178S), xxiv. 
231-232. 

Dunde Khan, Kohilla leader, built fort 
at Bisaull (1750), viii. 247; tomb at 
IjisaulT, viii. 247 ; death, xxi. 307 ; de- 
feat of Imperial forces at Dhampur 
^1750), xi. 284. 

Dundliu Pantii. See Nana Sahib. 

1 Huiga (Jali, sanitarium in Ha/.ara Dis- 
trict, Xorth-West Frontier Province, 
xi. 379. 

Dunga Hanz, boatmen in Kashmir, xv. 

1 )ungan, liill in Sibi District, Baluchistan, 

xxii. p,37. 
Dungar Singh, Bariya village founded by, 

vii. 21. 
Dungar Singh, ruler of Blkaner (1875- 

87;, viii. 207. 
Dungar SinghjT, ruler of Rajg.irh State 

(1853), xxi. 68. 
Dungaria, Bhil, assassinated by Rawal 

Bir Singh, and Dungarpur town named 

after, xi. 381, 385; temples erected at 

Dungarpur in memory of widows of, xi. 

385. . 

Dungarji, founder of Bhaunagar, xxi. 80. 

Dungarpur, State in Rajputana, xi. 379- 
385; physical asi)ects, 379-3S0; his- 
tory, 380-381 ; popuh-ition, 381-382 ; 



agriculture, 382 ; forests, 382 ; mines 
and minerals, 382-383 ; arts and manu- 
factures, 383 ; commerce and communi- 
cations, 383; famine, 3S3; administra- 
tion, 383 ; legislation and justice, 383- 
384 ; finance, 384 ; land revenue, 384 ; 
army, police, and jails, 384-385; 
education, 385 ; medical, 385. 

Dungarpur, capital of State in Rajputana, 
xi. 385-386. 

Dungri-la, pass. See Mana. 

Dunna Singh, founder of Bhadaur (1718), 
viii. 21. 

Dunyapur, town in Multan District, Pun- 
jab, xi. 386. 

Dup Raj, Nimrana said to have been 
founded by (1467), xix. 121. 

Dupleix, Joseph Fran9ois, governor of 
Pondicherrj' ^1741), ii. 471 ; wars with 
English, ii. 471-473 ; recalled to 
France (i 754% ii. 473, xii. 105 ; attempt 
to found French empire in India, iv. 8. 
Local notices : Administration in 
Chandernagore, x. 164; attack on Fort 
St. David (1746), xii. 102; defence of 
Pondicherry (1748), xii. 104; title of 
Nawab given to, by Mughal emperor, 
xii. 105 ; control established over Nizam 
of Deccan, xiii. 240 ; statue at Pon- 
dicherry, XX. 162. 

Dupleix College, Chandernagore, x. 165. 

Dupre, Josias, Governor of Madras, 
signed treaty with Haidar All at St. 
Thomas's Mount, xxi. 389. 

Durand, Sir Henry, Swat River Canal 
proposed by, iii. 333 ; officiating Agent 
to Governor-General, Indore, xiii. 350- 
351 ; retreat from Indore to Sehore 
(1857), "^^'i- 104; buried at Dera 
Ismail Khan, xi. 262 ; Lieutenant-Go- 
vernor of tlie Punjab, xx. 331 ; killed 
at Tank town, xi. 262. xxiii. 245. 

Duiand, Sir Mortimer, agreements witii 
the Amir of Afghanistan, ii. 524, iv. 
1 16-1 1 7 ; mission to Kabul to demar- 
cate Afglian boundary, xix. 160. 

Durbhang.i, District, subdivision, estate, 
and town in Bengal. See 1 )arbiiang.T.. 

Durduria, site of ruined fort in Dacca 
District, Eastern liengal and Assam, 
xi. 386. 

Duigil, or ParvatT, wife of Siva, i. 419, 
ii. 233; literature, ii. 426-427 ; temples 
to, at l»enares, vii. 191 ; Deogarh, xi. 
244; Kululia, xvi. 17; Nachna, v. 
131; Silghat, xxii. 375; Tukreswari, 
xxiv. 51 ; Gangor festival held in honour 
of return of, to jiarcnts, v. 148 ; legends 
of, XV. 90, xxiii. 401 ; sculpture of, 
I'ayech temple, xv. 98 ; shrine at Van, 
xxiv. 413. 

Durga Chand, Thiikur, Riija of Mailog 
(1902), xvii. 31. 



INDEX 



167 



Durga Das, Mahain sacked by Rajputs 

under, xvi. 430. 
Durj^a Puja, festival, held in Assam, vi. 

52; Bengal, vii. 235, 236; Kamakhya, 

xiv^325. 
Durga Sagar, tank in Backergunge, vi. 167. 
Durgapur, village in Myniensingh District, 

Eastern Bengal and Assam, xi. 386. 
Diirgavati, Rani, widow of the Gond 

Raja Dalpat Shah, defeated by Asaf 

Khan (1564), xi. 136, xvii. 161, xviii. 

387. 
Diirgesanancitnl, Bengali novel by Ban- 

kim Chandra Chatterji, ii. 433. 
Durjan Sal, rule in Kokrah, xxi. 200. 
Durjan Sal, chief of Kotah State (1724- 

56), XV. 413. 
Durjan Sal, rule in Maksudangarh (1795- 

iSii), xvii. 52. 
Durjan Sal, Balwant Singh's succession 

opposed by, but made prisoner and 

deported to Allahabad (1826), viii. 78. 
Durjan Shah, Dujana town founded by, 

xi. 376. 
Durjan Singh, Bandhora bequeathed to, 

xiv. 69. 
Durjan Singh, ruler of Mailiar, xvii. 28. 
Durlabh Narayan, ruler of Kamata, vi. 25. 
Durragh Nothani, Bugti clan in Marri- 

Bugti country, xvii. 21 r. 
Durrani empire, Daur under, xi. 202 ; 

Kohat part of (1747), xv. 343; in 

Mianwali, xvii. 31S ; Sikhs defeated 

by, XX. 134; in Quetta-Pishin, xxi. 13; 

Kalhoras ousted from Sibi (1714), xxii. 

338; Tanawal under, xxiii. 219. 
Durranis, tribe in Afghanistan, v. 46; 

Chiniot disturbed by inroads of, x. 285 ; 

in Herat, xiii. 113, 115 ; Balwant Singh 

attacked in Girishk by, xii. 247 ; in 

Lash-Jawain, xvi. 150. 
Durrung, District in Eastern Bengal and 

Assam. See Darrang. 
Durvinlta, twenty-seventh king of Gan- 

gavadi dynasty, xviii. 170. 
Duryodhana, Panipat one of five places 

demanded by Yudhishthira from, as 

price of peace, xix. 397. 
Dusadhs, caste, in Ballia, vi. 252. 
Dushak, ruined city in Afghanistan, v. 45. 
Dusht Nikandan .Sain, rule in Suket, 

xxiii. iiS. 
Dust-storms, i. 1 1 7 ; in Jalalabad, xiv. 12 ; 

Khairpur, xv. 211 ; Kharan, xv. 248 ; 

Larkana, xvi. 138 ; Peshawar, xx. 113. 
Dutabaung, king, traditional founder of 

Prome kingdom, Burma, xx. 221. 
Dutt, R. C, Controller of revenue, finance, 

and settlement departments, Baroda, 

vii. 60. 
Dutch in India (1602-1824) : coins, ii. 

149; Companies, ii. 451-452; settle- 
ments, ii. 452 ; wars with England and 



France (1652-1713), ii. 452; stripped 

of Indian possessions (i 759-1 811), ii. 

452-453 ; conflict with English East 

India Company, ii. 456-457; causes of 

failure, ii. 467 ; establishment of trade 

with India, iii. 25S. 

Local nolices : Ahmadabad, v. 108; 

Balasore, vi. 246; Baranagar, vi. 429; 

Bengal, vii. 217; Cannanore, ix. 299; 

Chetwai, x. 194-195; Chinsura, x. 

286; Cochin, X. 343, 355; Coringa, 

xi. 51 ; Covelong, xi. 54; Fort Mount 

Delly, xi. 241 ; English Bazar, xii. 24; 

Fort St. David, xii. 101 ; Goa (1603- 

3q), xii. 254; Godavari, xii. 2S5, 299; 

Kolachel, xv. 368 ; Madras, xvi. 250- 

251, 369; Malabar, xvii. 57; Masuli- 

patam, xvii. 216; Negapatam, xix. 3; 

Pondicherry, xii. 104, xx. 161 ; Pulicat, 

XX. 242 ; Sadras, xxi. 348 ; St. Thome, 

xii. 104; Surat, xxiii. 155; Tainga- 

patam, xxiii. 205 ; Tangasseri, xxiii. 

224; Tinnevelly, xxiii. 364; Trinco- 

malee, Ceylon, xii. 104; Tuticorin {c. 

1658), xxiv. 64; Vengurla, xxiv. 307. 

See also Factories. 
Duya, lake in Henzada District, xiii. 103. 
Dvaravatipura, ancient capital. See Dora- 

samudra. 
Dwara Bazar, market village in Sylhet 

District, Eastern Bengal and Assam, 

xi. 386. 
Dwara Nongtyrmen, petty State in Khasi 

Hills, Assam, xi. 387. 
Dwarahat, village in Almora District, 

United Provinces, xi. 386-3S7. 
Dwarf palms, in Hazaribagh, xiii. 87; 

Jhalawan, xiv. no; Kalat, xiv. 300; 

Kohat, XV. 347 ; Loralai, xvi. 173 ; 

North-West Frontier Province, xix. 1 80 ; 

Sibi, xxii. 337; Southern WazTristan, 

xxiv. 381. 
Dwarka, port and place of pilgrimage in 

Amreli//-(w/, Baroda, xi. 3S7. 
Dwarka Dhish, temple at Kankroli, xiv. 

404. 
Dwarkanath, temple of, at Dwarka, xi. 

.^87. 
Dyaus, Vedic sky god, i. 403, ii. 213. 
Dyce, Major J. R., expedition against 

Mohmands (1879), xix. 209. 
Dyce, Mr., married daughter of Zafaryab 

Khan, xxii. 107. 
Dyce Sombre, David Ouchterlony, xxii. 

107. 
Dyeing, iii. 1S1-182, 184-185, 254; lie- 
dyeing, iii. 186-187. 

Local tiotices : Ahmadabad, v. loi ; 

Alwar, v. 263; Amarapura, v. 272; 

Amreli, v. 319; Arantangi, v. 399; 

North Arcot, v. 413; Balotra, vi. 259; 

Baluchistan, vi. 309; Baran, vi. 428; 

Baroda, vii. 56, 80; Belgaum, vii. 153 ; 



i68 



INDEX 



Berar, vii. 392 ; Bhandara, viii. 67 ; 

Bombay, viii. 324, 414; Burdwan, ix. 

103 ; Chamba, x. 132 ; Chanda, x. 162 ; 

Damoh, xi. 140, 145; Ellichpur, xii. 

15; Fyzabad. xii. 114; Gadarwara, 

xii. 120; Gokak, xii. 306; Hooghly, 

xiii. 167; Hoshangabad, xiii. 1S7; 

Ilkal, xiii. 329; Jaipur, xiii. 401; 

Jalaun, xiv. 23 ; Jawad, xiv. 86 ; Jhaj- 

jar, xiv, 108; Jodhpnr, xiv. 192, 199; 

Jubbulpore, xiv. 213; Karauli, xv. 30; 

Karkamb, xv. 44; Khairpur, xv. 216; 

Kishangarh, xv. 318; Larkana, xvi. 

141 ; Lucknow, xvi, 1S5 ; Liulhiana, 

xvi. 208 ; Madura, xvi. 398 ; Manoli, 

xvii. 200; Modasa, xvii. 3S0 ; Monghyr, 

xvii. 397; Mowar, xviii. 10; Nagar 

Parkar, xviii. 298; Xagpur, xviii. 313; 

Narsinghpur, xviii. 395 ; Xavanagar, 

xviii. 421, 422 ; Nellore, xix. 24; Nih- 

taur, xix. 84; Padra, xix. 311; Pa- 

kokku, xix. 327; Pali, xix. 359; Rab- 

kavi, xxi. 22; Rajputana, xxi. 131; 

Rapur, xxi. 237; Rath, xxi. 240; 

Rohtak, xxi. 317; Saidapet, xxi. 383; 

Sankheda, xxii. 59 ; Saoner, xxii. 80 ; 

Saugor, xxii. 143; SeonT, xxii. 171; 

Shahapur, xxii. 199; Shahpura, xxii. 

224; Northern .Shan States, xxii. 242; 

Sholapur, xxii. 301 ; Sidhpur, xxii. 

359; Sihor, xxii. 360; Sohagpur, xxiii. 

70; Tanda, xxiii. 221; Turuv.nnur, 

xxiv. 64; United Provinces, xxiv. 202 ; 

Upper Sind Frontier District, xxiv. 283 ; 

Wadhwan, xxiv. 346 ; Walajapet, xxiv. 

352 ; Wardha, xxiv. 371. 
Dyes and tans, imports and exports, iii. 

308, 309; import duties, iv. 276; 

manufactured or found, Chitaldroog, 

X. 295; Eliore, xii. 23; Faizpur, xii. 

50; Ganjam, xii. 151 ; Godavari, xii. 

291 ; Sailana State, xxi. 386. See also 

Indigo, Myrabolams, &c. 
Dysentery, death statistics, i. 522, 526, 

527, 529, 530, 531 ; prevalent in Ajmer- 

Merwara, v. 144 ; Baluchistan, vi. 339; 

Baroda,vii.6o; ]iengal,vii. 229; Burma, 

ix. 135; Calcutta, ix. 267; Dacca, xi. 

106; the Dangs, xi. 146 ; Goa, xii. 251; 

Ilooghly, xiii. 164; Howrah, xiii. 208; 

Hyderabad, xiii. 245 ; Jessore, xiv. 94 ; 

Khulna, xv. 288 ; Nepal, xix. 40 ; Port 

Blair, xx. 207; Rajputana, xxi. 108; 

Rajshahi, xxi. 163; Rewii Kanlha, xxi. 

293; Shahabad, xxii. 189. 
Dyson, Mr., Assistant Commissioner, 

Magwe District, killed by dacoits 

(1889), xvi. 414. 

E. 

Eagles, i. 253. 

Ear-rings, use of, as currency, Pakokku 
Chin Hills, x. 283, 284. 



Earthenware. See Pottery. 

Earthquakes, i. 98 ; Andamans, v. 359 ; 
Arakan, v. 393 ; Assam, i. 98, 99, vi. 
22, 58, 71; Baijnath, vi. 217; Balu- 
chistan, vi. 274; Baramula, vi. 428; 
Barpeta, vii. 84 ; Bengal, vii. 196, 206- 
207; Bhagalpur, viii. 27: Bogra, viii. 
2-^7 ; Bombay Presidency, viii. 278 ; 
Brahmanabad, ix. 9; Burma, ix. 120; 
Cachar, ix. 250; Calcutta, ix. 262; 
Central India, ix. 334 ; Cherrapunji, 
X. 194; Chhatak, x. 197; Coimbatore, 
X. 358; Cooch Behar, x. 381; Cutch, 
i. 99, xi. 76-77; Rann of Cutch, xi. 
85 ; Dacca, xi. 105 ; Darjeeling, xi. 
168; Devaprayag, xi. 274 ; Dharmsala, 
xi. 301; Dinajpur, xi. 349; Eastern 
Bengal and Assam, xi. 391 ; Garo Hills, 
.xii. 173 ; Gauhati, xii. 183, 185 ; Goal- 
para, xii. 270, 278; Hajo, xiii. 8 ; Hill 
Tippera, xiii. 118 ; Howrah, xiii. 207 ; 
Jaintiapur, xiii. 3S1 ; JalpaigurT, xiv. 
32; Jhalawan, xiv. 110; Kaira, xiv. 
2S6 ; Kamrup, xiv. 331; Kangra, i. 
98-99, xiv. 382-383 ; Kanhiara, xiv. 
399 ; Kashmir and Jammu, xv. 89 ; 
Kathiawar, XV. 174; Khasi and Jaintia 
Hills, XV. 255 ; Madras Piesidency, xvi. 
247 ; Malda, xvii. 76 ; Manipur, xvii. 
1S6 ; Murshidabad, xviii. 46; Mymen- 
singh, xviii. 150-151 ; Naga Hills, xviii. 
2S5 ; Nagar, Kangra, xviii. 297; Nal- 
bari, xviii. 337 ; Nicobars, xi.x. 63- 
64 ; Nowgong, Assam, xix. 229 ; 
Pabna, xix. 298 ; Palanpur, xix. 347 ; 
Pathyar, xx. 31; Punjab, xx. 259; 
Purnea, xx. 4I4; Quetta-Pishln, xxi. 
1 2 ; Rajputana, xxi. 93 ; Rajshahi, xxi. 
161; Rangpur,xxi. 223-224, 232; San- 
tipur, xxii. 79; Shillong, xxii. 280; 
vSilchar, xxii. 374; Sirohi, xxiii. 30; 
Sirpur Tandur, xxiii. 41 ; SiTnagar, 
xxiii. loi ;SuUanpur, xxiii. 139; S\lhet, 
xxiii. 191, 202; Tliana, xxiii. 291; 
Twenty-four Parganas, xxiv. 69; United 
Provinces, xxiv. 146. 

East India Company, English, establish- 
ment of observatories, i. 105 ; coinage, 
ii. 148, iv. 514-516; inception (1599), 
ii. 454; mcorporated (1600), ii. 454; 
' separate voyages ' (i 601 -13), ii. 454- 
455; second charter (^1609), ii. 455; 
joint stocks, ii. 455 ; Portuguese oppo- 
sition, ii. 455-456 ; conflict with the 
Dutch, ii. 456-457; Captain Hawkins 
at Agra (1608), ii. 457; factory at 
Surat founded by Aldworlh (1612), 
ii. 457 ; Sir Thomas Roe's embassy 
(1615-9), ii. 457; Fort St. George 
founded ^1640), ii. 457-458; in Ben- 
gal 1633), ii. 458 ; difficulties at home, 
ii. 458 ; union with Courten's Associa- 
tion (1649), ii. 458; Cromwell's 



INDEX 



169 



charter (1657), ii. 458 ; charter of 
Charles II (1661), ii. 458-459 ; pros- 
perity (1660-83), ii. 459 ; acquisition 
of Bombay (1668), ii. 459 ; restora- 
tion wars with Holland (1665-7, 
1672-4), ii. 459; trouble in India, ii. 
459 ; adoption of policy of maintain- 
ing trade by military power and war- 
fare (16S7), ii. 459-460; war with 
Mughal empire (16S6-90), ii. 460; 
Calcutta founded (1690), ii. 460 ; 
monopoly attacked, ii. 460-461 ; new 
charter for old Company (1693), ii. 

461 ; the new Company, ii. 461 ; strug- 
gle between the Companies, ii. 461- 

462 ; union of the Companies (1708), 
ii. 462 ; Surman's embassy to Delhi 
(^1715-7)1 ii- 46-! ; contest with the 
Marathas, ii. 462 - 463 ; downfall 
(1858), ii. 513-515; history of, epito- 
mized (1773-1858), ii. 514; history 
of tea cultivation, iii. 56-57 ; history 
of indigo trade, iii. 70 ; foundation, 
iii. 258-259; close of monopolies, iii. 
259; growth of trade, iii. 259-260; 
changes in trade, iii. 260; attitude 
towards irrigation works, iii. 328, 333 ; 
attitude towards railways, iii. 365-366 ; 
history and growth, iv. 5-16 ; charter, 
iv. 6 ; establishment at Madras, iv. 6 ; 
Bombay, iv. 6 ; Hooghly, iv. 6 ; Cal- 
cutta, iv. 6 ; administration of affairs 
in England and in India, iv. 6-7 ; first 
conquests, iv. 8-9 ; Warren Hastings, 
the existence of British dominion im- 
perilled, iv. 9-10; Maratha and My- 
sore complications, iv. 10 ; extension 
of the power and territories of, iv. 10- 
II ; policy towards Native States, iv. 
12; annexations, iv. 12-13 ; Executive 
Government, Regulating Act (1773), 
iv. 14-15; Pitt's Act (1784), iv. 15; 
Charter Act (1833), iv. 15-16; transfer 
of government to the Crown, iv. 16, 
35-36 ; Board of Control, iv. 34-35 ; 
foreign relations, iv. 104-107; courts, 
iv. 143-144 ; history of its army, iv. 
326-342 ; payment of British troops, 
iv. 343 ; its navy, iv. 382 ; police 
system, iv. 386-387 ; system of jails 
and punishments, iv. 39S-399 ; reforms 
of indigenous education, iv, 409 ; 
political discouragement of missionary 
teaching, iv. 410; neglect of elementary 
education, iv. 412 ; Medical Board, 
hospitals and dispensaries, iv. 460-462. 
See also Factories. 

East India Company of Ostend, Imperial, 
Covelong trading station of, xi. 54. 

East India Irrigation and Canal Com- 
pany, iii. 329. 

East Indian Railway, iii. 373-374, 376, 
387, 389. 390> 394-396, 414* 416; 



coal-mines in Hazaribagh District 
worked by, xiii. 94. 

Eastern Bengal and Assam, xi. 387-401 ; 
physical aspects, 388-391 ; population, 
391-393; agriculture, 393-394; for- 
ests, 394; communications, 394-395; 
revenue, 395-396; administration, 395- 
397 ; expenditure, 397 ; education, 39S ; 
medical, 398; tables: distribution of 
population, 399-400 ; statistics of local 
boards and municipalities, 401 ; princi- 
pal sources of provincial revenue, 401 ; 
provincial expenditure under principal 
heads, 401 ; legislation, iv. 136. 

Eastern Bengal Railway, iii. 376, 392- 
394, 41 "5. 

Eastern Bengali. See Bengali. 

Eastern Division, Southern Shan States, 
Burma, xi. 402. 

Eastern Duars. See Duars, Eastern. 

Eastern Ghats. See Ghats, Eastern. 

Eastern Grove lighthouse, Haiithawaddy, 
xiii. 36-37. 

Eastern Hindi. See Hindi. 

Eastern Nara, water channel in Sind. See 
Nara, Eastern. 

liastern Punjabi. See Punjabi. 

Eastern Rajputana States Agency, xi. 
402. 

Ebony trees {Diospyros), in Adilabad, v. 
23; Angul, V. 378; Atraf-i-balda, vi. 
127; Banswara, vi. 410; Bastar, vii. 
122; Bhagalpur, viii. 27; Bombay 
Presidency, viii. 274; Central Pro- 
vinces, X. 7, 48 ; Cochin, x. 347 ; 
Damoh, xi. 135; Elgandal, xii. 6, 8; 
Ganjam, xii. 151 ; Hooghly, xiii. 167 ; 
Indur, xiii. 352, 354 ; Jashpur, xiv. 67 ; 
Jubbulpore, xiv. 207; Karimnagar, 
XV. 42 ; Mahbubnagar, xvii. 2 ; Mala- 
bar, xvii. 63; Mysore State, xviii. 216, 
217; Nalgonda, xviii. 338; Nander, xviii. 
352; Nizamabad, xix. 124; Orissa Tri- 
butary States, xix. 260 ; Palamau, xix. 
341 ; Raichur, xxi. 38, 41 ; Seoni, xxii. 
166 ; Shimoga, xxii. 282 ; Sirpur Tan- 
dur, xxiii. 40, 43; Tonk, xxiii. 412; 
Travancore, xxiv. 11 ; Warangal, xxiv. 
361. 

Ecclesiastical department, iv. 23. 

Ecclesiastical expenditure, iv. 175. 

Edappalli, estate in Travancore, Madras, 
xi, 402-403. 

Edelweiss, Sikkim, i, 170. 
Eden, Sir Ashley, Lieutenant-Governor of 
Bengal (1877-82), vii, 220; local self- 
government scheme drawn up by, vii. 
315 ; sent to Bhutan (1863), viii. 157 ; 
Chief Commissioner, Burma (1871), 
ix. 192 ; envoy to Sikkim, xxii. 368. 
Eden, Colonel W. F., Agent to the Gover- 
nor-General in Rajputana (1865), xxi. 
142. 



170 



INDEX 



Eden Canal, irrigation canal in Bengal, 
xi. 403. 

Eden Girls' School, Dacca, xi. 115, 119. 

Eden Hindu Hostel, Calcutta, ix. 284. 

Eden Hospital, Calcutta, ix. 285. 

Eden sanitarium, Darjeeling, xi. 180-181. 

Edible birds'-nests, Andamans, v. 358 ; 
Mergui, xni. 301-302 ; Nicobars, xix. 62. 

Edible pines, Fort Sandeman, xii. 102 ; 
Sulaiman Range, xxiii. 129. 

Edicts of Asoka. See under Asoka. 

Edlabad, town in Hyderabad. See Adil- 
abad. 

Edmonstone, Sir G. F., Lieutenant-Gover- 
nor of North- Western Provinces (1859), 
xxiv. 219. 

Edroos, Saiyid, mosque at Surat, xxiii. 
166. 

Education, statistics, i. 483-484, 495 ; 
Commission appointed by Lord Ripon, 
ii. 520; conference (1901), ii. 528; 
reorganization of governing bodies of 
Universities (1904), ii. 52S; agricultural, 
iii. 94 ; forest, iii. 109, 127; expenditure, 
iv. 175 ; indigenous systems, Hindu, iv. 
407-408; Muhammadan, iv. 408-409 ; 
early history of, under British rule, iv. 
409 ; early missionary work, iv. 409- 
410; controversy between the Angli- 
cists and the Orientalists, iv. 410- 
411 ; history up to 1854, iv. 411-412 ; 
dispatch of Directors (1854), iv. 412- 
413. 445> 447-448 ; history (1854-71), 
iv. 413-414; (i87i-i902),iv. 414-416; 
statistics of literacy, iv. 415-416; 
periodical review of the progress of 
education, iv. 416; primary education, 
iv. 417-422; secondary, iv. 422-426; 
collegiate, iv. 426-430; Muhammadan, 
iv. 430-431 ; female, iv. 431-432; of 
low-caste children, iv. 432-433 ; of 
Europeans and Eurasians, iv. 433-435 ; 
duels' colleges, iv. 435 ; technical, iv. 
435-444 ; in arts and crafts, iv. 438- 
439; commercial, iv. 440-441 ; medical, 
iv. 441-442; legal, iv. 442; normal, 
iv. 442-444 ; fin.ance, iv. 444-445 ; fees, 
iv. 445 ; scholarships, iv. 445-446 ; 
control, the educational services, iv. 
446-447 ; state and religious in- 
struction, iv. 447 ; state and private 
effort, iv. 447-448; Governmentemploy- 
ment and jiublic instruction, iv. 448 ; 
moral training, iv. 449-450 ; textbooks, 
iv. 450 ; public examinations in schools, 
iv- 450-451 ; newspapers, iv. 451-453; 
journalism and literature, iv. 451 ; 
books, iv. 453-454 ; bibliography, iv. 
455 > statistics of public instruction, iv. 
456. See also Colleges, Schools, &c., 
and in each Province, District, and 
larger State article under Adminis- 
tration. 



Edward VH, tour in India as Prince of 
Wales (1875-6), ii. 517; coronation 
darbdr, ii. 529; foundation stone of 
Albert Hall' Jaipur, laid by (1876), 
xiii. 402 ; statue in Madras, xvi. 367 ; 
opened bridge over Chenab at Wazir- 
abad (1876), xxiv. 379. 

Edward VH Hospital, Mandi, xvii. 15S. 

Edwardes, Sir Herbert, administration of 
Bannu Valley (1847-8), vi. 394; settle- 
ment of Bannu District (1847), ^'i- 
400 ; Bannu town founded (1848), 
vi. 402, xiv. 290; assessment of land 
revenue in Dera Ismail Khan Dis- 
trict (1847, xi. 262 ; tahsil of Dera 
Ismail Khan District leased to Nawab, 
xi. 266 ; Diwan Danlat Rai deposed, xi. 
271 ; force of local levies raised at Leiah 
on outbreak of second Sikh War, xvii. 
318; expedition against Multan ( 1 847- 
8), vi. 196; Bannuchis brought under 
direct control of the Lahore Darbar, 
xix. 153; Fateh Khan of Shahpur re- 
leased from prison and sent to Bannu 
to relieve Lieut. Reynell Taylor, xxii. 
214 ; Shujabad taken (^1848;, xxii. 310; 
Shah Xawaz Khan appointed governor 
of Tank, xxiii. 245. 

Edwardes Church ^lission College, North-. 
West Frontier Province, xix. 203. 

Edwardes Collegiate School, Peshawar, 
XX. 117, 126. 

Edwardesabad, name applied to Bannu 
town, North-West Frontier Province, 
xi. 403. 

Edwards, R. M., administration of Mu- 
zaffarnagar town taken charge of (1857), 
xviii. 86. 

Edwards, Mr., agency established at 
Ajmer (1614), v. 154-155. 

Ega, Count of, Viceroy of Goa, xii. 256. 

Egerton, Major-General Sir C. C, ex- 
pedition against Kabul Khel (1902), 
xix. 210. 

Egerton, Sir Robert, Lieutenant-Governor 
of Punjab (1877-82), xx. 331. 

Egerton Civil Hospital, Peshawar city, 
XX. 123. 

Egmore, European quarter of Madras 
City, xvi. 365. 

Egypt, mission of Asoka to, ii. 284 ; 
name of Khalifa on Tughlak coins, ii. 
145; Sultan combined with Turks in 
naval attack on Portuguese at Diu, ii. 

449- 
Eindawya pagoda, ^Llndalay, xvii. 142. 
Einme, north-west township of Myaung- 

mya District, Lower Burma, xii. i. 
lutpyet lake, Henzada District, xiii. 

103. 
Ekantada-Ramayya, grant to, ii. 58. 
Ekdil Sahib, Pir, fair held in honour of, 

at Barasat, vi. 430. 



INDEX 



171 



Eklakli, mosque or tomb at Pandua, ii. 
189, 190, xix. 393. 

Eknath, MarathI writer, ii. 431. 

Ekoji. See VenkojT. 

Ekruk tank, Sholapur District, iii. 331, 
xxii. 301. 

Eksambe, village in Belgaiim District, 
Bombay, xii. i. 

Eksar, alienated village in Thana Dis- 
trict, Bombay, xii. 1. 

Elephant stables, Xarnala, xviii. 379 ; 
Mjayanagar, xxiv. 312. 

Elephanta, island of Kolaba District, with 
cave-temples, Bombay Harbour, xii. 

1-5- 

Elephantiasis, prevalent in Balasore, vi. 
239 ; Cochin, x. 355 ; Dacca, xi. 106 ; 
Midnapore, xvii. 330; Murshidabad, 
xviii. 47 ; Nicobars, xix. 75 ; Rangpur, 
xxi. 226. 

Elephants, i. 230; employment in forest 
operations, iii. 126. 

Local notices : Akyab, v. 192; Al- 
mora, v. 245 ; Anaimalais, v. 333 ; 
Anaimudi, v. 334; Angul, v. 374; 
Northern xVrakan, v. 393; Assam, vi. 
20 ; Azamgarh, vi. 1 58 ; Bamra, vi. 
344 ; Bassein, vii. 108 ; Bengal, vii. 
203-204; Bhamo, viii. 46; Bhutan, 
viii. 155; Bijnor, viii. 194; Bilaspur, 
viii. 223; Biligiri-Rangan Hills, 
viii. 236 ; Bonai, ix. 2 ; Burma, ix. 
117; Cachar, ix. 250; Central India, 
ix. 331 ; Central Provinces, x. 8-9 ; 
Chamrajnagar, Mysore, x. 147; Chang 
Bhakar, x. 171 ; Lower Chindwin, 
X. 229; Upper Chindwin, x. 240; 
Chin Hills, x. 271 ; Chittagong, x. 
307 ; Chittagong Hill Tracts, x. 319; 
Cochin, X. 342, 348 ; Coimbatore, 
^' 357 ; Coorg, xi. 6 ; Darjeeling, xi. 
167; Darrang, xi. 182; Dehra Dun, 
xi. 211; Garhwal, xii. 165; Garo 
Hills, xii. 172; Ghats, Western, xii. 
220; Goalpara, xii. 270; Gorakhpur, 
xii. 336 ; Hanthawaddy, xiii. 27 ; Heg- 
gadadevankote, Mysore, xiii. 100; 
Henzuda, xiii. 103 ; Hill Tippera, xiii. 
117; Hyderabad, xiii. 233; Indore, 
xiii. 335 ; Jalpaiguii, xiv. 32 ; Kam- 
Tup. xiv. 331 ; South Kanara, xiv. 
355 ; Katha, xv. 153 ; Khamti Hills, 
XV. 222 ; Khasi and Jaintia Hills, xv. 
255; Kyaukpyu, xvi. 62 ; Lakhimpur, 
xvi. 119; Lushai Hills, xvi. 213; 
Madras Presidency, xvi. 245 ; Madura, 
xvi. 388; Magwe, xvi. 413; Mala- 
bar, xvii. 55; Mandalay, xvii. 127; 
Manipur, xvii. 185 ; Ma-ubin, xvii. 
225 ; Mayurbhanj, xvii. 242 ; Meiktila, 
xvii. 276; Mergui, xvii. 295 ; Midna- 
pore, xvii. 328 ; Miiibu, xvii. 346 ; 
Myaungmya, xviii. 110; Myitkyina, 



xviii. 136; Mymensingh, xviii. 150; 
Mysore State, xviii. 166 ; Naga Hills, 
xviii. 285; NainI Tal, xviii. 324 ; the 
INTlgiris, xix. 88; Nowgong, xix. 222 ; 
OrissaTributaryStates,xix.254;Pakok- 
ku, xix. 320; Panna, xix. 400; Pegu, 
XX. 85 ; Prome, xx. 220; Punjab, xx. 
255 ; Pyapon, xxi. 3 ; Rairakhol, xxi. 
61; Ruby Alines District, xxi. 327; 
Sagaing, xxi. 353 ; Saharanpur, xxi. 
368; Salem, xxi. 397 ; Sandoway, xxii. 
32 ; Northern Shan States, xxii. 233 ; 
Southern Shan States,xxii. 251 ; Shwebo, 
xxii. 312 ; Sibsagar, xxii. 345 ; Singh- 
bhum, xxiii. 3 ; Sirmur, xxiii. 22 ; 
Siwalik Hills, xxiii. 66 ; Sylhet, xxiii. 
190; Tavoy, xxiii. 259 ; Tharrawaddy, 
xxiii. 317; Thaton, xxiii. 330 ; Thayet- 
myo, xxiii. 344 ; Toungoo, xxiii, 
422 ; Travancore, xxiv. 5 ; Udaipur, 
Central Provinces, xxiv. 83; United Pro- 
vinces, xxiv. 143 ; Warangal, xxiv. 35S, 

Elephants, statues and figures of : 
Dhauli, xi. 318 ; Dhebar lake, xi. 
318; Elephanta Island (formerly), xii. 
2 ; Kailas temple, EUora, xii. 2 2 ; Karli, 
XV. 45 ; on steps of Ganesh Gumpha 
cave at Khandgiri, xv. 240 ; Konarak, 
XV. 392. 

Elgandal, District in Warangal Division, 
Hyderabad State, xii. 5-10 ; physical 
aspects, 5-6 ; history, 6 ; population, 
7 ; agriculture, 8 ; trade and com- 
munications, 8-9 ; famine, 9 ; adminis- 
tration, 9-10. 

Elgin, Earl of, Viceroy (1862-3), ii. 516, 
525-526; died at Dharmsala (1863), 
xi. 302. 

Elgin, Earl of. Viceroy (1894-9), "• 5-.^~ 
526. 

Elgin Club, Lashkar, Gwalior, xvi. 151. 

Elgin House, Nabha, xviii. 271. 

Elgin (Lady) Hospital at Jubbulpore, x. 
96, xiv. 220. 

Elk Hill, peak nearOotacamimd, xix. 238. 

EUenborough, Lord, Governor-General 
(1842-4), ii. 501-502 ; survey of Upper 
Ganges Canal stopped, xii. 138 ; battle 
of Maharajpur (i 843), xvi. 434-435 ; in 
United Provinces (1842-3), xxiv. 219. 

Elles, Sir Edmond, Mohniand country 
invaded (1897), xvii. 3S6, xix. 210; 
Mohmands defeated at Shabkadar 
(1897), xxii. 1S6. 

Elles, Major-General W. K., expedition 
against Hasanzai and Akozai (1891), 
xix. 210. 

Eliichpnr, District in Berar, xii. lo-iS ; 
physical aspects, 11-12; history, 12; 
population, 13-14 ; agriculture, 14-15 ; 
forests, 15 ; trade and communications, 
15-16; famine, 16; administration, 16- 
18; Imad Shahis of, see that title. 



172 



INDEX 



Ellichpur, subdivision of Amraoti Dis- 
trict, Berar, xii. 19. 

Ellichpur, tdliik in Ellichpur District, 
Berar, xii. ii). 

Ellichpur, town in Amraoti District, 
Berar, and former capital, xi. 19-21 ; 
cotton cloths, iii. 200, 

Elliot, Sir Henry, on the story of the 
Taga Brahmans, xi. 226. 

Elliot, Sir Walter, excavated portion of 
mound at Amaravati, v. 272. 

Elliott, Sir Charles, Chief Commissioner 
of Assam, vi. 35 ; Lieutenant-Governor 
of Bengal (1890-5% vii. 220; improve- 
ments in Farrukhabad, xii. 70; settle- 
ment of Hoshangabad (1865^, xiii. 189; 
Mysore Famine Commissioner (1877), 
xviii. 227; system of demarcating blocks 
of soils on village maps invented, xxiv. 

233- 

Elliott, Col. E. K., Agent to the Gover- 
nor-General in Rajputana (1864 , xxi. 
142. 

Elliott Madrasa hostel, Calcutta, ix. 284. 

Ellis, Mr., chief of Patna factory, xx. 56- 
57 ; murder of 1763), xx. 57. 

Ellora, village with cave - tem])les in 
Aurangabad District, Hyderabad State, 
xii. 21-22 ; cave-temples, ii. 163 ; slam- 
bhas or pillars, ii. 170; Kailas temple, 
ii. 170, 172. 

EUore, subdivision in Kistna District, 
Madras, xii. 22. 

Ellore, taluk in Kistna District, Madras, 
xii. 22-23. 

Ellore, town in Kistna District, Madras, 
and former capital, xii. 23 ; carpets, iii. 
216. 

Elmslie, Dr., missionary, xxiii. 105. 

Elphinstone, Mountstuart, embassy to 
Afghanistan, ii. 493, 500 ; Resident at 
Poona before last ^laratha War, ii. 495 ; 
duties of village headman, iv. 384-385. 

Local notices : Passed through Bl- 
kaner, viii. 206 ; settlement of Bombay 
completed by, viii. 294 ; education in 
Bombay under, viii. 373 ; Resident at 
Poona, XX. 169; quoted on .Sikli rebel- 
lion in the I'unjab, xx. 270. 

Elphinstone, General, commander of 
trooj^s in first Afghan War(i84i-2), ii. 
501. 

I'llphinstone, Captain, settlement of Mont- 
gomery District completed (1856), xvii. 
416, 417. 

Elphinstone College, Bombay, viii. 373, 
. 374, 4>8. 

Elphinstone Island, Mergui Archipelago, 
xvii. 293. 

I'.mbankments, control, iv. 318 ; Anasagar 
lake, Ajmer, v. 171 ; lirahmaputra, vi. 
61 ; Burdwan, ix. 99 ; Burhi Dihing, xi. 
345 ; Coniilla town, x. 376 ; Cuttack, 



xi. 97; Damalcheruvu Pass, xi. 128; 
Damodar, xi. 133-134; Danubyu 
xi. 148 ; Dera Ghazi Khan, xi. 250, 
258 ; Dhaleswari, xi. 282 ; Dhulia, 
xi. 338 ; Dikho, xi. 346 ; Disang, xi. 
362 ; English Bazar, xii. 25 ; Gangai- 
kondapuram, xii. 129 ; Gaur, xii. 189 ; 
Goalpara, xii. 2 78 ; Godavari river, xii. 
298 ; Henzada, xiii. 107 ; Hooghly, 
xiii. 163, 170 ; Hoshangabad, xiii. 185 ; 
Howrah, xiii. 207, 212; Ilkal, xiii. 
329 ; Kashmir, .xiii. 360, 362 ; Kolaba, 
XV. 362-363; Kutubdia, xvi. 58 ; Ravi, 
near Lahore, xvi. no; Lemyethna, xvi. 
159 ; Nabaganga, at Magura, xvi. 41 2 ; 
^ia-ubin, xvii. 224; Midnapore, xvii. 
337-338 ; along the Bhagirathi, Mur- 
shidabad, xviii. 52 ; Muzaffargarh 
canals, xviii. 83 ; ^luzaffarpur, xviii. 
105, 107 ; Narsinghpur, xviii. 390 ; 
Purl, XX. 400 ; Sanawan tahsil, xxii. 
27 ; Saran, xxii. 86; Tenali tdhik, xxiii. 
277; Thana, xxiii. 296-297; Twenty- 
four Parganas, xxiv. 79-80 ; Udaipur, 
Rajputana, xxiv. 102. 

Embden Company (Prussian), ii. 466. 

Embroideries, iii. 218-222 ; character, 
2\(j; phiilkdri work, 219; darn-stitch 
embroidery of Kashmir, 219-220; silk 
of Delhi and Agra, 220; Kathiawar 
choklas. 220 ; kasida work of Dacca, 
220; «aw(/(f^ of Kashmir, 220 ; chain- 
stitch work of Kathiawar and Bhuj, 

220 ; soznis of Peshawar, 220 ; chikan 
work, &c., 221 ; network of Southern 
India, 221 ; patchwork of Kashmir, 

221 ; kalagas of Burma, 221 ; gold and 
silver wire, 221-222. 

Local notices : Agra, v. 78, 90 ; 
AmxtW pnint, v. 317 ; Aurangabad, vi. 
145 ; Baluchistan, vi. 308 ; Bankura, 
vi. 387 ; Benares, vii. 1S4, 192 ; 
Bengal, vii. 267 ; Bombay Presidency, 
viii. 324-325 ; Burhanjnir, ix. 106 ; 
liurma, ix. 1 74 1 75 ; Cambay. ix. 294 ; 
Central Provinces, x. 52, 53 ; Cutch, xi, 
81 ; Dacca, xi. no, 11 1 ; Delhi, xi. 
239-240 ; Dinanagar, xi. 355 ; Hazara, 
xiii. 81-82 ; Hissar, xiii. 152 ; Hooghly, 
xiii. 167 ; Hyderabad, xiii. 263 ; Jhaj- 
jar, xiv. loS ; Kadi, Baroda, xiv. 257 ; 
Kalat, xiv. 302; Kashmir, xv. 132; 
Las Bela, xvi. 147 ; chikan, Lucknow, 
xvi. 198; Ludhiana. xvi. 208; Madras 
Presidency, xvi. 375 ; ^L'lkran, xvii. 
49; Murshidabad, xviii. 50; Navsari, 
Baroda, xviii. 424 ; North- West Frontier 
Province, xix. 182 ; Patan, Baroda, 
XX. 25 ; Punjab, xx. 316 ; Quetta- 
Pishln, xxi. i6 ; Savantvadi, xxii. 153 ; 
Southern Shan .States, xxii. 261 ; Sibi, 
xxii. 340; .Srlnngar city, xxiii. 102; 
Surat, xxiii. 161 ; Tanjore, xxiii. 243 ; 



INDEX 



17: 



Thar and Parkar, xxiii. 313; Twenty- 
four Parganas, xxiv. 75 ; Udaipur, 
Rajputana, xxiv. 103 ; United Pro- 
vinces, xxiv. 201-202. 

Emeralds, former export of, from Sanjan, 
xxii. 56. 

Emigration and immigration, Assam, i. 
467 ; Burma, i. 467-468 ; Ceylon, i. 
46S ; India, i. 469-471. 

Local notices : Baluchistan, vi. 285- 
286; Benares, vii. 178; Bengal, vii. 
226-227 i Berar, vii. 373 ; Bombay 
Presidency, viii. 298 ; Bonai, ix. 3 ; 
Broach, ix. 29; Burma, ix. 131-132; 
Champaran, x. 139, 140 ; Chenab 
Colony, x. 187-188 ; Lower Chindwin, 
X. 231 ; Upper Chindwin, x. 243 ; 
Dacca, xi. 107 ; Dinajpur, xi. 350 ; 
Ganjam, xii. 147 ; Godavari, xii. 286 ; 
Gonda, xii. 314; Hazaribagh, xiii. 89, 
90; Hill Tippera, xiii. 119 ; Hooghly, 
xiii. 164, 165 ; Howrah, xiii. 208, 214 ; 
Irrawaddy Division, xiii. 366-367 ; 
Jaunpur, xiv. 77 ; Karmala, Sholapur, 
XV. 47 ; Kashmir, xv. 99 ; Katha, xv. 
155 ; Kistna, XV. 323 ; Kyaukse, xvi. 73 ; 
Madras Presidency, xvi. 257 ; Magwe, 
xvi. 415; Mandalay, xvii. 129; Ma- 
ubin, xvii. 226; Maungdaw, xvii. 233; 
Meiktila, xvii. 278-279 ; Mokokchung, 
xvii. 3S7 ; Monghyr, xvii. 395 ;Myaung- 
mya, xviii. iii; Myede, xviii. 119; 
Myitkyina, xviii. 139 ; Mymensingh, 
xviii. 153 ; Orissa Tributary .States, 
xix. 257 ; Punjab, xx. 280 ; Pyapon, 
xxi. 4 ; Ranch!, xxi. 202-203 ; Rang- 
pur, xxi. 226-227 ; Sanlal Parganas, 
xxii. 66-67 > Saran, xxii. 87 ; Saugor, 
xxii. 139; Shevgaon, xxii. 275; Shwebo, 
xxii. 313 ; Thar and Parkar, xxiii. 309 ; 
Thayetmyo, xxiii. 346 ; Toungoo, xxiii. 
424-425 ; Twenty-four Parganas, xxiv. 
72; United Provinces, xxiv. 163-164; 
Upper Sind Frontier District, xxiv. 
280 ; Wardha, xxiv. 368. 

Eminabad, town in Gujranwala District, 
Punjab, xii. 24. 

Empeo, language of theNaga-Bodogroup, 

i- 393, 400- 
Empress market, Karachi city, xv. 13. 
Empress Mills, Nagpur, x. 54, xviii. 313, 

3^9- 

Enamakkal, lake, in Malabar District, 

Madras, xii. 24. 

Enamelling, iii. 238-239 ; Jaipur, xiii. 
39' . 392, 401 ; Multan, xviii. 31, 37 ; 
Partabgarh, xx. 14 ; Rajputana, xxi. 
131 ; Sind, xxii. 418; United Provinces, 
xxiv. 203. See also Gold- and Silver- 
work. 

Endogamy, of caste-system, i. 2S7, 311, 
317,318,322-323,334, 335> 348; tribal, 
i. 308, 309, 310; of Muhammadans, 



i. 329 ; Greek, i. 340 ; Roman, i. 340 ; 
under later period of Roman Empire, 
i. 343-344 ; probably later in time and 
thought tiian exogamy, i. 344; part of 
the pride of race and colour everywhere, 

'•.345-. 
Engineering Colleges and .Schools: Assam, 

vi. 104 ; Burma, ix. 228; Central Pro- 
vinces, X. 94; Hanthawaddy, xiii. 38; 
Howrah, xiii. 212 ; Hyderabad State, 
xiii. 296 ; Insein, Burma, xiii. 365 ; 
Madras, xvi. 343 ; Mysore, xviii. 245 ; 
Patna city, xx. 69 ; Punjab, xx. 371 ; 
Roorkee (Thomason), iv. 32 1-322, xxi. 
325 ; Sibpur, Bengal, xiii. 215, xxii. 

344- 

Engineering Workshops, Howrah Dis- 
trict, xiii. 210, 214; Salkia, xxi. 410; 
Sibpur, xxii. 3.44. 

Engineers, early supply of, iv. 309- 
310 ; functions, iv. 31 8-3 19 ; superior 
engineering establishment, iv. 319 ; 
supply from Cooper's Hill, iv. 319- 
320 ; Indian Engineering Colleges, iv. 
320-322 ; subordinate service, iv. 321. 

English Adventurers, early, failure to 
force the North-east and North-west 
passages, ii. 453 ; Stephens, the first 
Englishman in India, ii. 453 ; first mer- 
chant adventurers by overland route, ii. 
453-454 ; English voyages round the 
Cape, ii. 454; John Midnall (1599- 
1606), visit to Akbar at Agra, ii. 454. 

English Bazar, Malda District, Eastern 
Bengal and Assam, xii. 24-25. 

Ennore, village in Chingleput District, 
Madras, xii. 25. 

Enteric fever, death statistics, i. 527, 528. 
See also Fevers. 

Epidemics. See Diseases and Epidemics 
and particular names. 

Epigraphy, ii. 1-88; introduction, 1-3 ; 
value of the inscriptions, 3-5 ; ab- 
sence of ancient historical compilations 
in India, 5-7 ; pedigrees and succes- 
sions, 7-11; official records, II -12 ; 
dynastic archives and chronicles, 12- 
14; the Puranas, 14-15; the Rajata- 
ramgini, 16 ; general literature and his- 
torical romances, 17-19; introductions 
and colophons of literary works, 19-2 1 ; 
the inscriptions, 21-24; materials on 
which inscriptions recorded, 25-48 ; 
iron, 25; gold and silver, 25; brass, 
25-26 ; bronze, 26 ; copper, 26-29 ! 
seals of copper-plate records, 29-34; 
other substances than metal, 34-36 ; 
crystal, 36-37 ; clay, terra-cotta, and 
brick, 37-40 ; earthenware, 40-41 ; 
stone, 41 ; rocks, 41-42 ; columns and 
pillars, 42-43 ; relic-receptacles, 43-45 ; 
external parts of stupas, 45-47 ; caves, 
47 ; images and statues, 47-48 ; moulds 



174 



INDEX 



for making seals, 4S-49 ; topics of in- 
scriptions : plain statements of facts, 
50-52 ; records due to religious mo- 
tives, 52-57 ; records of religious en- 
dowments, 57-58 ; records of secular 
donations, 58-60 ; essential nature of 
the inscriptions, 60-62 ; great number 
of the inscriptions, 62-64 ; precise 
dating of inscriptions, 64-65 ; general 
observations and indications of future 
research, 65-67 ; the inscriptions, 67- 
70; tradition, 70-73; palaeography, 
coins, and art, 73-76 ; geography, 
76-83 ; other fields of work, 83-S5 ; 
concluding remarks, 85-87 ; list of 
abbreviations, 87-8S. See also Inscrip- 
tions. 

Episcopal Church of Scotland. See under 
Protestant Missions. 

Eijuitable Coal Company, Bengal, out- 
put of. vii. 263. 

Eran, village in .Saugor District, Central 
Provinces, xii. 25-26 ; sculptured boar, 
ii. 48, 55 ; pillar, ii. 51, 122 ; inscrip- 
tion, ii. 43, 56. 

Erandol, tdhika in East Khandesh Dis- 
trict, Bombay, xii. 26. 

Erandol, town in East Khandesh District, 
Bombay, xii. 26. 

Eranian (or Iranian) family of languages, 

i- 353. 3.56, 39.^- 

Ereyanga, son of Hoysala king, general 
under the Chalukyas, xviii. 173. 

Ereyappa, Ganga king, xviii. 171. 

Erinpura, British cantonment in Rajput- 
ana, xii. 26-27. 

Ernad, taluk in Malabar District, Madras, 
xii. 27. 

Emagudem, tahik in Kistna District. 
Madras. See Yernagudem. 

Ernakulam, capital of Cochin State, 
Madras, xii. 27-2S. 

Erode, subdivision and idluk in Coim- 
batorc District, Madras, xii. 28. 

Erode, town and railway junction in 
Coirnbatore District, Madras, xii. 28- 
29. 

Erskine, Major, head-quarters in Jubbul- 
pore District (1857), xiv. 208. 

Erskine, Mr., British Agent, moved to 
Ahmadnagar to prevent salt (1835), 
V. 126. 

Erskine, Mr., first Collector of Ongole 
and the Palnad region, xix. 20. 

Etah, District in Agra Division of United 
Provinces, xii. 29-36 ; physical aspects, 
29-30 ; history, 30-31 ; population, 31- 
32 ; agriculture, 32-33 ; trade and com- 
munications, 34 ; famine, 34-35 ; ad- 
ministration, 35-36. 

Etah, iahsil \\\ United Provinces, xii. 36- 

37- 
Etah, town in United Provinces, xii. 37. 



Etaiyapuram, zannnddri estate and town 
in Tinnevelly District, Madras. See 
Ettaiyapuram. 

Etawa, town in Saugor District, Central 
Provinces, xii. 48. 

Etawah, District in Agra Division of 
United Provinces, xii. 37-46 ; physical 
aspects, 37-39 ; history, 39-41 ; popu- 
lation, 41-42; agriculture, 42-43; 
trade and communications, 44 ; famine, 
44 ; administration, 44-46 ; revenue, 
45 ; education, 46; medical, 46 ; famine, 
iii. 497 n. 

Etawah, tahsll in United Provinces, xii. 
46-47. 

Etawah, city in United Provinces, xii. 

47-48- 

Ethersey, Lieutenant, survey of Pamban 
Channel (1837), xix. 376. 

Ethnology and caste, i. 2S3-348; data 
of ethnology or science of racial divi- 
sions, 283-308 ; indefinite physical 
characters, 283 ; colour of skin, 283- 
284 ; hair and eyes, 284 ; craniometry, 
284-285 ; anthropometry, 285-292 ; 
data now available, 286-287 ; measure- 
ment of head-form, 288 ; head-form, 
289 ; measurement of the nose, 289- 
290; nasal index, 290-291 ; orbito-nasal 
index, a test of Mongolian affinities, 
291 ; stature in Europe and India, 
292 ; seven main physical types, 292- 
297 ; limitatiaps of the type scheme, 
297-29S ; Dravidian type, 298, 299; 
Indo-.\ryan type, 299-303 ; Aryo- 
Dravidian type, 303-304; Mongolo- 
Dravidians, 304 ; Scytho-Dravidian 
type, 304-308 ; ethnography, the data 
of, or social divisions, 308-347 ; social 
divisions: the tribe, 308; Dravidian 
tribe, 30S-309 ; Mongoloid tribe. 309 ; 
Turko- Iranian triljes : the Afghan 
type, 309-310; IJaloch and Brahui 
type, 310-311 ; the word ' caste,' 311 ; 
definition of caste, 311 ; conversion of 
tribes into castes, 311-313; types of 
caste, 313-322; tribal castes, 314; 
functional or occupational type, 314- 
315; sectarian type, 315-316; castes 
formed by crossing, 316-318 ; national 
castes, 318-319; castes formed by 
migration, 319-321 ; castes formed by 
changes of custom, 321-322; totemism, 
322-323; classification of caste, 323- 
324; principles adopted in the 1901 
Census, 324-325 ; general results, 325- 
326 ; the seven main classes of Hindus 
in Bengal, 326-328 ; caste tendencies 
among Muhammadans, 328-329 ; ab- 
sence of caste system in Baluchistan 
and Burma, 329-330 ; distribution of 
social groups, 330-332 ; origin of caste 
theory, 332-347; the Indian theory, 



INDEX 



175 



332-33.1 ; its historic elements, 333- 
334; its probable origin, 334-335; 
Indian and Iranian classes, 335-336 ; 
Sir Denzil Ibbetson's theory, 336- 
337 ; Mr. Nestield's theory, 337-339 ; 
M. Senart's theory, 339-342 ; caste not 
merely occupation, 342 ; the guilds of 
mediaeval Europe, 342-343; caste ten- 
dencies under the Roman Empire, 343- 
344 ; castes not merely developed tribes, 
344 ; the genesis of caste, the basis of 
facts, 345-346 ; influence of fiction, 
346-347 ; summary, 347-34S ; biblio- 
graphy, 34S. 

Ettaiyapuram, estate in Tinnevelly Dis- 
trict, Madras, xii. 48-49. 

Ettaiyapuram, town in Tinnevelly Dis- 
trict, Madras, xii. 49. 

Eucratidcs, Graeco-Bactrian king, ii. 287 ; 
seized Bactria and defeated Demetrius 
in his eastern possessions, xix. 149; 
held Peshawar valley, xx. 114. 

Eudamos, general of Alexander, rule in 
country west of Indus, xix. 149; ad- 
ministration in Sind-Sagar Doab carried 
on by, XX. 261. 

Eurasians, population statistics, i. 477 ; 
mortality, i. 521. See also in each 
Province, District, and larger State 
article under Population. 

Europe, trade with, iii. 311, 312. 

European army, first Royal regiment 
(i754)> iv- 3^7; strength of, in 1796, 
iv. 333 ; in 1806, iv. 335 ; in 1824, iv. 
336-337; on eve of Mutiny, iv. 338; 
in 1S79, iv. 347; in 1887, iv. 348 ; in 
1903, iv. 359; amalgamation of the 
Company's troops with those of the 
Crown, iv. 342-343 ; conditions of ser- 
vice of British troops in India, iv. 343 ; 
increase (1885-7), i^'- 348 ; mess allow- 
ance granted, iv. 356 ; increase of pay, 
'^- 357 ; present distribution, organiza- 
tion, and strength, iv. 368, 380-381. 

European settlements, early, ii. 446-469 ; 
Portuguese (1498-1739), 446-451; 
Dutch (1602-1S24), 451-453; East 
India Company's (1600-1858), 454- 
463 ; French, 463-464 ; Scottish Com- 
panies (1617 and 1696), 464; Danish 
Companies, 464 ; Ostend Company, 
464-466; Swedish Company (1731), 
466 ; Imperial Company of Trieste 
(1781-4), 4.66; Prussian, 466-467; 
causes of failure of other nations and 
success of English, 467-468 ; biblio- 
graphy, 469. 

Europeans, population statistics, i. 477. 
^^if also in each Province, District, 
and larger State article tinder Popu- 
lation. 

Euthydemus, Greek power extended in 
India by, xx. 261, 



Evangelical Lutheran Mission of Sweden. 
See under Protestant Missions. 

Evans, Colonel, dispatched to quell re- 
bellion in Thar and Parkar, xxiii. 
309. 

Everest, Sir George, Surveyor- General 
and Superintendent of Trigonometrical 
Survey, iv. 484-485, 4S7, 492, 505; 
Mount Everest named after, xii. 49. 

Everest, Mount, in Nepal Himalayas, xii. 
49. 

Excise revenue, iv. 172-173, 201, 252, 
253, 276. Sec also in each Province 
and larger State article under Revenue. 

Exogamy, relations with the nasal index, 
i. 290 ; tribal, i. 308-309 ; of caste sys- 
tem, i. 313, 317, 348; totemistic, i. 
313, 322-323,344,348; early Roman, 
i. 340; more primitive than endogamy, 

, i- 344- 

Expeditions, military, against the Abors, 
V. 3 ; to Agror, v. 92 ; against Black 
Mountain tribes, v. 92, viii. 251, 252, 
xiii. 77; to Arabela pass, v. 289-290; 
in Assam, vi 27; to Makran (1883-4, 
1890-1), vi. 282 ; against Zhob Kakars 
(1884), vi. 282; to Gomal (1889^ 
vi, 283; against Zhob chiefs (1890), 
vi. 2S3 ; against Marathas in Banda 
(1776), vi. 349 ; against Zakka Khel in 
Bazar (1897), vii. 138; against Tibetans 
(1888), vii. 289; against Plpunkan 
Kachins, viii. 48 ; Chimna Patel, viii. 
63; Sawbwa, ix. 129; against Chins, 
Upper Chindwin District (1888-9, '^92, 
1894), X- 241 ; Chin Hill tribes (18S8, 
1889-90, 1891-2), X. 272; to Erode 
(1790), xii. 28; against the Garos 
(1848, 1861, 1872), xii. 174; Daya 
Ram (1817), xiii. 71-72 ; Bhatti chiefs, 
Hissar (1810, 1818), xiii. 147; chiefs 
of Nagar and Hunza {c. 1891), xiii. 
226; Turis in Kurram, xvi. 50; into 
Loralai (18S4), xvi. 174; Lushai 
Hills, xvi. 214-215; against Madda 
Khel, xvii. 42; to Manipur (1891), 
xvii. 1S8 ; against the Marris, xvii. 211, 
212; to Merwara, xvii. 310; against 
Mishmis, xvii. 378 ; Kachin tribes in 
Myitkyina, xviii. 138; into Naga Hills, 
xviii. 285,286; North-West Frontier 
Province, xix. 155-159; against fron- 
tier tribes since annexation of the 
Punjab, xix. 208-210; banditti in 
Rangpur, xxi. 225; in Southern Shan 
States, xxii. 253, 254; Swat, xxiii. 185- 
186; Tinnevelly (1755), xxiii. 364; 
Utman Khel (1S52, 1878, 1898), xxiv. 
287; Northern Waziiistan (1897), xxiv. 
380 ; against Mahsuds (i860, 1881, 
1894-5), xxiv. 382-383; Zhob Kakars 
(1S84), xxiv. 430. 

Expenditure, iv. 174-190; civil adminis- 



176 



INDEX 



tration, 174-175, 202; land revenue, 
175, 202; civil departments, 175-176, 
202; miscellaneous civil charges, 176, 
202 ; post office, telegraphs, and mint, 
176-177, 202; railway, 177-182, 202, 
203; irrigation, 182-183, 202, 203; 
civil works, 183, 202 ; the public 
debt, 183-185; interest charges, 185, 
202 ; military, 185-187, 202 ; extra- 
ordinary charges, 187 ; military opera- 
tions, 187-188; famine, 188-189; 
railway construction from provincial 
and local revenues, 189-190; pro- 
vincial and local surplus or deficit, 
193, 202 ; army, 377-37^- 

Exports and imports, iii. 128-129; sta- 
tistics (1834-1904), iii. 268; changes 
in nature of, iii. 269-270; excess of 
exports over imports, iii. 2 70 ; increase, 
iii. 276-277 ; exports of Indian mer- 
chandise, iii. 281 ; manufactured goods, 
iii. 281; cotton, iii. 281-282; jute, 
iii. 282-2S3 ; hides and skins, iii. 
283 ; other manufactures, iii. 283-284; 
food-grains, iii. 284; rice, iii. 284; 
wheat, iii. 284-285; markets for rice 
and wheat, iii. 285; oilseeds, iii. 285- 
286; raw cotton, iii. 286-287; raw jute, 
iii. 287; tea, iii. 2S7-2S8; sugar, iii. 
288-290; indigo, iii. 290; coffee, iii. 
290-291 ; lac, iii. 291 ; wool, iii. 291 ; 
teak, iii. 291 ; vegetable oils, iii. 291 ; 
gold and silver, iii. 291-292 ; nature 
of imports from United Kingdom, iii. 
294-295 ; value, to and from United 
Kingdom, iii. 295; German, iii, 296; 
exports to China, iii. 297 ; Japanese, 
iii. 298 ; French, iii. 298 ; United 
States, iii. 298; British Colonies, iii. 
298; value of imports and exports of 
merchandise, iii. 307; foreign sea-borne 
trade (imports) of British India (1904- 
5), iii. 308-309; foreign sea-borne trade 
(exports) of British India (1904-5), iii. 
309-310; distribution of imports and ex- 
ports (including re-exports) by countries 
(1899-1900 and 1904-5), iii. 311; dis- 
tribution of jirincipal exports of raw 
produce (1899-1900 and 1904-5', iii. 
312 ; imports of principal articles into 
British Provinces and Native States from 
British Provinces, Native States, and 
chief seaports (1899-1900 and 1904-5), 
iii. 314; of provincial blocks (1903-4), 
iii. 314 ; variations in price between 
1861 and 1903 of standard imports, iii. 
462-463. 

Eye diseases, prevalent in Afghanistan, 
V. 51; AmindTvi Islands, v. 304; 
Cnijranvvala, xii. 354 ; Las Bela, xvi. 
149; Makran, xvii. 51 ; Muzaffargarh, 
xviii. 76; Mysore State, xviii. 190; 
North- West Frontier Province, xix. 



164; Rajputana, xxi. 108; Rewa Kan- 

tha, xxi. 293. ^V^ also Blindness. 
Eye-fly, or mango-fly, Mysore, xviii. 

167. 
Eyre, Sir Vincent, relieved Arrah (1857), 

vi. 6. 
Ezra Hospital for Jews, Calcutta, ix. 285. 



Fa Hian, Chinese Buddhist pilgrim (399- 
413), i. 412; travels of, ii. 292-293; 
description of the state of Northern 
India under Chandragupta II, ii. 292- 
293, xxiv. 149. 

Local notices : Visits to Basarh , 
vii. 94; BastT, vii. 126; Gandhara, 
xii. 127 ; Kapilavastu, xiv. 407; Karnal, 
XV. 49 ; Nepal, xix. 39 ; Pataliputra, 
XX. 68 ; Patna, xx. 56 ; Peshawar, xx. 
114; Rajgir, xxi. 72; SravastI, xxii. 
181 ; Tamluk, xxiii. 217; Taxila, xxii. 
201. 

Factories, in India generally, the Indian 
Factory Act, iii. 246-247 ; statistics, 
iii. 247. See also Cotton, Silk, &c. 
Old Danish, at Calicut, ix. 290. 
Old Dutch, at Afzalpur, xx. 69 ; 
Ahmadabad, v. 109 ; Baranagar, vi. 
429; Broach, ix. 20, 30; Cambay, 
ix. 293; Chapra, x. 175; Dacca, xi. 
117; Ernakulam, xii. 28; Falta, xii. 
51; Ghatal, xii. 214; Jagannatha- 
puram, x. 338-339; Malda, xvii. 77; 
Narasapur, xviii. 372 ; Palakollu, xix. 
334 ; Vengurla, xxiv. 307. 

Old East India Company's, at 
Armagon, vi. 3 ; Bajitpur, vi. 2 20 ; 
Balasore, vi. 238, 246; Bandamurlanka, 
vi. 357; Broach, ix. 20; Calicut, ix. 
290 ; Cambay, ix. 293 ; Chapra, x. 
175; Cossimbazar, xi. 52-53; Cudda- 
lore, xi. 56, 57; Dacca, xi. 106, 117; 
Dliarangaon, xi. 298 ; English Bazar, 
xii. 24 ; Godavari District, xii. 285 ; 
liooghly, xiii. 177; Hubli, xiii. 222; 
Injaram, xiii. 365 ; Jahanabad, xiii. 
37S ; Jaleswar, xiv. 27; Karwar, xv. 
65-66; Kishorganj, xv. 319; Mada- 
poUam, xvi. 227-22S; Madras, xvi. 
251; Malda, xvii. 77; Malvan, xvii. 
97; Nandurbar, xviii. 362 ; Narasapur, 
xviii. 372 ; Nizampatam, xix. 128 ; 
Rajshahi, xxi. 165 ; Santipur, xxii. 79 ; 
Shahbandar, xxii. 199 ; Surat, xxiii. 
167 ; Tatta, xxiii. 255 ; Tellicherry, 
xxiii. 276 ; \'izagapatam, xxiv. 325, 

Old French, at Chapra, x. 175; 
Dacca, xi. 117; (Jodavari delta, xii. 
299 ; Vanam, xxiv. 414. 

Old Portuguese, at Chapra, x. 
175; Dacca, xi. 117; Kayankulam, 



INDEX 



177 



x^'- 195 j Qi^ilof) >^xi- 22 ; Surat, xxiii. 
167. 

Fadhli, tribe in Aden, v. 13, 14-15. 

Fairs, generally associated witii religious 
festivals: Adilabad, v. 24; Ahmad- 
abad, v. 106; Ajodhya, v. 176; Ala- 
vvakhawa, at Balia village, v. 205 ; 
Alipiir, V. 221 ; Alta, V. 253; Amalner, 
V. 270; Amarnath, v. 275 ; Amritsar, 
V. 328; South Arcot, v. 432 ; Aror, vi. 
4-5; Ashta, vi. 10; Badin, vi. 178; 
Bagherhat, vi. iSg ; Bahraich, vi. 213; 
Balaghat, vi. 226 ; Balasinor, vi. 236 ; 
Ballia, vi. 255, 258 ; Baluchistan, vi. 
293 ; Bansda, vi. 404 ; Banswara, vi. 
413 ; Barabar Hills, vi. 425 ; Barasat, 
vi. 430; Bardoli, vi. 432 ; Baswa, vii. 
132 ; Bausi, vii. 136 ; Bellary, vii. 168 ; 
Beri, viii. 4; Bhlmashankar, viii. 108 ; 
Bhopal, viii. 135; Bhutan, viii. 160; 
Budaun, ix. 39 ; Burdwan, ix. 96, 102 ; 
Cawnpore, ix. 31 1; Chanda, x. 162; 
Chatsu, X. 182; Chhapia, x. 196; 
Chinchli, x. 226; Chinchvad, x. 227- 
228 ; Chitrakut, x. 300 ; Dalmau, xi. 
127; Debl Patan, vi. 260, xi. 205; 
Dera Nanak, xi. 271 ; Deulgaon Raja, 
xi. 272 ; Devgarh, xi. 275 ; Devi Dhura, 
xi. 275 ; Dharmsala, xi. 302 ; Dhaunkal, 
xxiv. 379 ; Dholpur, xi. 332 ; Dhond, 
xi. 333 ; Dhulian, xi. 339 ; Dumraon 
Raj, xi. 37S-379 ; Dungarpur, xi. 379- 
380 ; Klephanta, xii. 5 ; Fllichpur, xii, 
21; Falakata, xii. 50; Farldpur, xii. 
57; Gad-Hinglnj, xii. 120; Garhmuk- 
tesar, xii. 163 ; Goa,xii.262; Gohana, 
xii. 304 ; Gokarn, xii. 307 ; Gubbi, 
xii. 345 ; Guddguddapur, xii. 346 ; 
Hala, xiii. 9 ; Haldipur, xiii. 10 ; 
Hardwar, xiii. 52 ; Harischandragarh, 
xiii. 56 ; Harua, xiii. 59 ; Hasanparti, 
xiii. 59 ; Hindaun, xiii. 135; Hongal, 
xiii. 161 ; Howrah, xiii. 209 ; Hyder- 
abad, xiii. 318; Ichalkaranji, xiii, 
323; Ilkal, xiii. 329; Jalalpur town, 
xiv. 16; Jalpaiguri, xiv. 38; Jalpes, 
xiv. 42-43 ; Janikhandi, xiv. 47 ; 
Janjira, xiv. 62; Jejuri, xiv. 89; on 
Jotiba's Hill, xiv. 204 ; Kadi, xiv. 259 ; 
Kagal, xiv. 272; Kakora, xiv. 2S9; 
Kalimpong, xiv. 309 ; Kapilmuni, xiv. 
408 ; Karagola, xv. 20 ; Karmala, xv. 
47 ; Karor Lai Isa, xv. 61 ; Kenduli, xv. 
199; Khairabad, xv. 207; Khairpur, 
XV. 214; Khangah Dogran, xv. 243; 
Kishanganj, xv. 310; Kishorganj, xv. 
518; Kudchi, xvi. 11 ; Kaluha, xvi. 17; 
Kundian, xvi. 26; Kutiyana, xvi. 57; 
Lakshmeshwar, xvi. 131 ; Lohajang, 
xvi. 169 ; Madha, xvi. 230 ; Madhi, xvi. 
231; Mahalingpur, xvi,43o; Mahasthan, 
xvi. 437; Maheji, xvii. 8; Mahuva, 
xvii. 27; Malanggarh, xvii. 73; Mal- 

VOL. XXV. 



gaon, xvii. 86 ; Mamdapur, xvii. 106 ; 
Manda, xvii. 1 23 ; Mandhata, xvii. 1 52 ; 
Maner, xvii. 175 ; Manora, xvii. 201 ; 
Mapuija, xvii. 204; Markandl, xvii. 
208; Matiari, xvii. 221 ; Melajpur, viii. 
13 ; Midnapore, xvii. 333 ; Moga, xvii. 
381 ; Mohol, xvii. 3S7 ; Mukhalingam, 
xviii. 18; Muktagiri, viii. 9; Munshi- 
ganj, xviii. 41 ; Murgod, xviii. 42 ; My- 
niensingh, xviii. 155; Nandl, xviii. 
359; Nargund, xviii. 378; Nasik, 
xviii. 406 ; Nirmal, xix. 123 ; Otur, xix. 
276; Pachaniba, xix. 306; Pal, xix. 333; 
Pandharpur, xix. 390; Parli Fort, xx. 5; 
Patna, XX. 70; Paiur, xx. 77; Peshawar, 
xix. 169; Peth, XX. 127 ; Phalauda, xx. 
128; Poona, XX. 184; Prakasha, xx. 
216; Punjab, XX. 294; Purwa, xx. 
422 ; Pushkar, xxi. i ; Rajapur, xxi. 67 ; 
Rajim, xxi. 73; Rajputana, xxi. 124; 
Rampur, xxi. 190; Ramtek, xxi. 195 ; 
Remuna, xxi. 278 ; RudaulT, xxi. 
338; Rupar, xxi. 339; Sadhaura, xxi. 
347 ; Safipur, xxi. 350 ; Sangameshwar, 
xxii. 50; Saptashring, xxii. 81 ; Saurath, 
xxii. 149; Serampore, xxii. 178; Shen- 
durni, xxii. 271 ; Shirhatti, xxii. 292 ; 
Shirol, xxii. 292 ; Sialkot, xxii. 335 ; 
Sind, xxii. 411; Sirsi, xxiii. 47; 
Sirur, xxiii. 48-49; Sitamarhi, xxiii. 
51; Sltapur, xxiii. 59; Sonpur, xxiii. 
86; Srivardhan, xxiii. in; Suban- 
khata, xxiii. 113; Suklatirtha, xxiii. 
128; .Sunel, xxiii. 146; Surat, xxiii. 
164; Talegaon Dhamdhere, xxiii. 213 ; 
Tarakeswar, xxiii. 249; Tarn Taran, 
xxiii. 252 ; Tilothu, xxiii. 360-361 ; 
Udalguri, xxiv. 106 ; Ujjain, xxiv. 
113; Ulvi, xxiv. 116; Unjha, xxiv. 
257; Urun-Islampur, xxiv. 286; Vaj- 
rabai, xxiv. 295 ; at source of Wain- 
ganga, xxiv. 349; Wun, xxiv. 398; 
Yaninur, xxiv. 412; Yan, xxiv. 413; 
Yellamma hill, xxii. 149. 
Faiyaz All Khan, Nawab, C.S.I., xix. 

314- 

Faiz All Khan, Nawab Sir, loyalty during 
Mutiny, xix. 314; appointed to ad- 
minister Kotah State (1874-6), xv. 
414-415. 

Faiz Muhammad Khan, succession to 
Bhopal (1754"), viii. 128. 

Faiz Muhammad Khan, Faizabad re- 
stored (1865), xii. 49. 

Faiz Muhammad Khan, rule in Khair- 
pur (1894), XV. 212. 

Faizabad, capital of Badakshan, Afghan- 
istan, xii. 49-50. 

Faizabad, in United Provinces. See Fy- 
zabad. 

FaizT, poet, born at Agra, v. 91. 

Faizpur, town in East Khandesh District, 
Bombay, xii. 50. 



N 



178 



INDEX 



Faiz-uUah, son of All Muhammad the 1 
Rohilla, parganas ceded to, by Shuja- 
ud-daula (1774), vii. 5; rule in Ram- 
pur, xxi. 183, 189, 30S; in Rohil- 
khand, xxi. 307. 

FaizuUahpuria confederacy, Jullundur 
captured (i 766), xiv. 223, 231. 

Fakhr-uddin Mubarak Shah, governor 
of Sonargaon, and afterwards king of 
Eastern Bengal (1338-49), ii.372, vii. 
212, 216. 

Fakirs, mendicants, in Agra, v. 77 ; Am- 
bala, V. 280; Amritsar, v. 323 ; Chi- 
tral, X. 303 ; Etah, xii. 32 ; Gujranwala, 
^^ii- 357; Gurdaspur, xii. 396; Gur- 
gaon, xii. 405 ; Jhang, xiv. 128; Lud- 
hiana, xvi. 202 ; Mainpurl, xvii. 36 ; 
Patiala, xx. 41 ; Rohtak, xxi. 314 ; 
.Sialkot, xxii. 330 ; United Provinces, 
xxiv. 170. 

Fakirswami, viatli at Shirhatti, xxii. 
292. 

Falakata, village in Jalpaigurl District, 
Eastern Bengal and Assam, xii. 50. 

Falaknuma palace, Hyderabad, xiii. 310. 

Falam, subdivision in Chin Hills, Burma, 
xii. 50. 

Falam, head-quarters of Chin Hills, 
Burma, xii. 50-51. 

Falam-Indin road, Chin Hills and Upper 
Chindwin, x. 2 78. 

Falcons, i. 254. 

False Point, cape, harbour, and light- 
house in Cuttack District, Bengal, xii. 

51- 
Falta, village in District of Twenty-four 

Parganas, Bengal, refuge of English 

after the ' Black Hole' (1756). xii. 51. 
de Falton, Father Louis Gamier, revived 

Jesuit ^Iission at Trichinopoly, xxiv. 

31- 

Famine, iii. 475-502; I. 'Ihe cause of 
famine, 475-477 ; famines periodic, 475 ; 
dependence of India on agriculture, 
475-476; tlie two monsoons, 476; 
south-west monsoon and the autumn 
harvest, 476 ; north-east monsoon and 
tlie spring harvest, 476-477 ; cause of, 
477. n. The famine problem, and 
modern relief, 477-4S3 ; removal of 
former checks on jiopulation, 477 ; 
statement of the famine problem, 477- 
478 ; modern relief policy, 478 ; prac- 
tical difficulties, 47S-479 ; modern plan 
of camjiaign, 479 ; standing prepara- 
tions, 479-480 ; danger signals, 480 ; 
preliminary action, 480; jjcriod of 
test, 480 ; period of general relief, 481 ; 
cholera, 481 ; rains policy, the begin- 
ning of the end, 481-482 ; closure of 
relief, 482 ; charitable relief funds, 4S2 ; 
Indian People's Famine Trust, 482 ; 
improved communications and greater 



knowledge, the main causes of efficiency 
in famine relief, 482-483 ; present elas- 
ticity in the relief system, 483. III. 
History of chief famines, and of famine 
relief, 483-495 ; famine during the ad- 
ministration of the East IndiaCompany, 
483-484 ; prices and food-supply, 484 ; 
relief, 484 ; mortality, 485 ; famines 
daring the administration of the Crown, 
before 1880, 485; famine of 1860-1, 
485 ; Colonel Baird-.Smith's inquiry, 
485-486; in Orissa, 486-487; Raj- 
putana, 4S7-4S8 ; Bihar, 4S8, 490 ; 
Southern India (1876-81, 4S8-489 ; 
Famine Commission of 1878-80, 489- 
490 ; Provisional Code and the famine 
wage, 490 ; famines during the admin- 
istration of the Crown after 18S0: 
famine of 1S96-7, 490-491 ; Famine 
Commission of 1898, 491 ; famine of 
1 899- 1 900, 491-493; Famine Commis- 
sion of 1 90 1, 493-494 ; mortality, 494- 
495. IV. Protection against famine, 
495-499 ; protective aspect of the 
famine problem, 495 ; system of intelli- 
gence, 495 ; productive and protective 
railways and irrigation works, 495 ; 
the famine relief and insurance grant, 
495-496 ; the place of railway and irri- 
gation works in famine insurance, 496 ; 
railways and irrigation works as they 
affect material progress, 496-497 ; other 
efforts to increase material prosperity, 
497 ; steadily increasing recuperative 
power of the country, 497-498; general 
progress, 498-499 ; the one excep- 
tion, 499 ; bibliography, 500 ; chrono- 
logical list of famines and scarcities 
from 1769, 501-502; 1899-1900, ii. 
527 ; areas immune from, or specially 
subject to, iii. 5-6 ; comparative merits 
of irrigation works and railways as a 
means of famine protection, iii. 353- 
354; effect of railways on, iii. 387- 
388 ; expenditure, iv. 188-189. 

Local tiolices : Adoni, v. 24 ; Afghan- 
istan, v. 58-59 ; Agra, iii. 484, 485, 
487-488, v. 79 ; Ahmadabad, v, 102, 
103 ; Ahmadnagar, iii. 497 «., v. 
119-120; Ajmer, iii. 491 ; Ajmer- 
Merwara, v. 143, 156-157; Akalkot, 
V. 179; Akola, v. 186; Allgaih Dis- 
trict, V. 215; Allahabad, v. 234; 
Almora, v. 250 ; Alur, v. 253; Ahvar, 
V. 264 ; Ambala, v. 284 ; Anibarh, v. 
288; Amraotl, v. 311 ; Amritsar, v. 
325; Anantapur, v. 338, 345 ; Angul, 
V. 379; North Arcot, v. 415; South 
Aicot, V. 432-433 ; Atraf-i-balda, vi. 
128; Aurangabad, vi. 146, 149, 150; 
Azamgarh, vi. 160 ; Bahawalj)ur, vi. 
200; Bahraich, vi. 311; Balaghat, vi. 
231 ; Balasore, vi. 242 ; Baluchistan, 



INDEX 



179 



vi. 315; Banda, vi. 353-354; I^an- 
galore, vi. 366 ; Banganapalle, vi. 376 ; 
Baniiura, vi. 38S ; Bannu, vi. 399; 
Banswara, vi. 411 ; Bara Bank!, vi. 
422-423; Bareilly,vii. 9-10 ; Barnagar, 
vii. 23 ; Baroda, iii. 492, vii. 53, 58- 
60 ; Basim, vii. loi ; Basmat, vii. 105 ; 
Bastl, vii. 130; Belgaum, vii. 154; 
Bellary, vii. 169-170; Benares, vii. 
178, 185 ; Bengal, iii. 484, 4 85, 490, vii. 
282-2S5 ; Berar, iii. 491, vii. 373, 387, 
396-398; Betul, viii. 13-14; Bhagal- 
pur, viii. 33-34; Bhandara, viii. 6S-69 ; 
Bharatpur, viii. 83; Bhir, viii. 115; 
Bhopal, viii. 138; Bhor, viii. 148; 
BIdar, viii. 167-168 ; Bijapur, viii. 174, 
183-184; Bijnor, viii. 199; Bii^aner, 
viii. 212-213; Bilaspur, viii. 230; Bir- 
bhum, viii. 244; Bogra, viii. 261 ; Bom- 
bay, iii. 48S-489, 490, 491, viii. 295, 
333-339; Broacli, ix. 26; Budaun, ix. 
39; Bulandshahr, ix. 54-55; Buldaiia, 
ix. 64-65 ; Bundelkhand Division, iii. 
487 ji., ix. 72, 73; Bundi, ix. 84-85; 
Burdwan, ix. 98 ; Burma, iii. 490, ix. 
190-192 ; Cambay, ix. 295 ; Cawnpore, 
ix. 312; Central India, iii. 490, 492, 
'•"'• 373-375 ; Central Provinces, iii. 
488-489, 490-493, X. 61-64; Chagai, 
X. 119; (Jhamparan, x. 139, 144; 
Chanda, x. 158; Chhindwara, x. 
212; Chhuikhadan, X. 216 ; Chicacole, 
X. 217; Lower Chindwin, x. 235; 
Chingleput, x. 263-264 ; Chota Udai- 
pur, X. 331 ; Coimbatore, x. 367 ; 
Cuddapah, xi. 68; Culch, iii. 4S5, xi. 
82 ; Cuttack, xi. 93-94 ; Dadri, xi. 1 20 ; 
Danioh, xi. 142; Darbhanga, xi. 159- 
160; North Deccan, iii. 4S7 n,\ Deg- 
lur, xi. 209 ; Delhi, xi. 230 ; Dera 
Ghazi Khan, xi. 255 ; Dera Ismail 
Khan, xi. 266 ; Dhandhuka, xi. 285 ; 
Dharwar, xi. 312-313; Dholpur, xi. 
327-328; Dinajpur, xi. 352; Dohad, 
xi. 366 ; Dungarpur, xi. 383 ; Elgandal, 
xii. 9 ; Eilichpur, xii. 16 ; Etah, 
xii. 34-35 ; Etawah, iii. 497 «., xii. 
44; Farrukhabad, xii. 69; Fatehpur, 
xii. 81 ; Ferozepore, xii. 95 ; Fyzabad, 
xii. 115; Ganjam, xii. 145, 153-154; 
Garhwal, xii. 169 ; Gaya, xii. 204-205 ; 
(jhazTpur, xii. 228 ; Goa, xii. 262-263 ; 
Godavari, xii. 293; Gonda, xii. 317; 
Gorakhpur, xii. 338-339; Gujarat, 
iii. 475 «., 487 n., 493, xii. 352- 
353 ; Gujranwala, xii. 360 ; Gujrat, xii. 
370-371; Gulbarga, xii. 380 ; Guntur, 
iii. 497 «. ; Gurdaspur, xii. 399 ; Gur- 
gaon, xii. 408-409; Gvvalior, xii. 432; 
Hamirpur, xiii. 19 ; Hansi, xiii. 25 ; 
HaraotiandTonk,xiii.4i ; Hazaribagh, 
xiii. 89, 96 ; Hissar, iii. 487 «., 490, 491, 
xiii. 146, 152-153, 156; Hyderabad, 



iii. 488-489, 490, 492, xiii. 269-271 ; 
Idar, xiii. 327; Indore, xiii. 344-345 ; 
Jaipur, xiii._388, 393-394; Jaisalmer, 
xiv. 6-7 ; Jalaun, xiv. 23-24; Janjira, 
xiv. 60 ; Jaunpur, xiv. 79-80 ; Jessore, 
xiv. 97 ; Jhalawan, xiv. 112 ; jhalawar, 
xiv. 119; Jhansi, xiv. 144; Jhelum, 
xiv. 157 ; Jind, xiv. 172-173; Jodhpur, 
xiv. 193-194; Jubbulpore, iii. 487 //., 
xiv. 214-215 ; JuUnndur, xiv. 229; 
Kachhi, xiv. 251; Kaira, xiv. 283; 
Kalat, xiv. 303 ; North Kanava, xiv. 
350; KapQrthala, xiv. 413; Karauli, 
XV. 30-31 ; Karlmnagar taluk, xv. 
42; Karjat, .\v. 43; Karnal, xv. ^^•, 
Kashmir, xv. 135-136; Kathiavvar, iii. 
492, XV. 181; Khandesh, iii. 497 «., 
XV. 236-237; Kheri, XV. 273; Khulna, 
XV. 291-292 ; Kishangarh, xv. 315 ; 
Kistna, xv. 330 ; Kohat, xv. 348 ; 
Kolaba, xv. 365-366: Kolar, xv. 374; 
Kolhapur, xv. 385 ; Kosigi, xv. 409 ; 
Kotah, XV. 420 ; Kurnool, xvi. 41 ; 
Lahore, xvi. 102 ; Las Bela, xvi. 148 ; 
Lingsngur, xvi. 166 ; Loralai, xvi. 
J77-i7S;Lucknow, xvi. 186; Ludhiana, 
xvi. 205; Lushai Hills, xvi. 220-221; 
Madras, iii. 486, 488-489, 490, 498 «., 
xvi. 304-307; Madura, xvi. 400; 
Magwe, xvi. 421-422; Mahbubnagar, 
xvii. 5 ; Mahl Kantha, xvii. 19 ; Main- 
purl, xvii. 38 ; Malabar, xvii. 66 ; 
Malwa, xvii. 105 ; Manbhum, xvii. 
119; Mandla, xvii. 167; Marvvar, iii. 
487 n. ; Meerut, xvii. 260 ; Mehkar, 
xvii. 271; Meiktila, xvii. 284; Mewar, 
xvii. 312; Midnapore, xvii. 335-336; 
Minbu, xvii. 354; Mirzapur, xvii. 373- 
374; Monghyr, xvii. 399; Montgomery, 
xvii. 415; Moradabad, .xvii. 426-427; 
Multan, xviii. 32 ; Murshidabad, xviii. 
51 ; Muttra, xviii. 69-70; Muzaffarnagar, 
xviii. 90-91 ; Muzaffarpur, xviii. 103 ; 
Myingynn, xviii. 129-130 ; Mysore 
(1876-8), iii. 488-489, xviii. 226-227; 
Nabha, .xviii. 267; Nadia, xviii. 279; 
Nagpur, xviii. 315; NainI Tal, xviii. 
330 ; Nalgonda, xviii. 342 ; Nander, 
xviii. 353 ; Narsinghpur, xviii. 392 ; 
Nasik, xviii. 407 ; Nellore, xix. 18-19 ; 
Nimar, xix. 114-115; North-West 
Frontier Province, xix. 1S7-18S; North- 
western Provinces, iii. 497 «.; Orissa, 
iii. 483 n., 484 «., 485, 486-487, xix. 
251, 262 ; Osmanabad, xix. 273 ; Pala- 
mau, .xix. 342 ; Palanpur, xix. 347, 350 ; 
Panch Mahals, xix. 386-387 ; Parbhani, 
xix. 414; Partabgarh, xx. 11-12, 19; 
Patiala, xx. 44-45 ; Patna, xx. 63 ; 
Pllibhit, xx. 141-142 ; Poona, xx. 177; 
Pudukkottai, xx. 236 ; Punjab, iii. 485, 
488, 490, XX. 328-331 ; Purl, XX. 405 ; 
Purnea, .\x. 418 ; Quetta-Pishin, xxi. 



N 2 



i8o 



INDEX 



17 ; Rae BarelT, xxi. 30-31 ; Raichur, 
xxi. 42 ; Raipur, xxi. 56-57 ; Rajputana, 
iii. 485, 487-488, 490, 491, xxi. 136- 
142 ; Rajshahi, xxi. 166; Rampur, xxi. 
186; Ranch!, xxi. 206-207; Rangpur, 
xxi. 229; Ratnagiri, xxi. 254; Rewah, 
xxi. 286-287; Rewa Kaiitlia, xxi. 297; 
Rohtaiv, xxi. 318-319 ; Sagaing, xxi. 
361-362 ; Sahaianpur, xxi. 376 ; Salem, 
xxi. 404; Sambalpur, xxii. 14; Santal 
I'arganas, xxii. 74; Saran, xxii. 89; 
Satara, xxii. 114, 125-126; Saugor, 
xxii. 144-145; Savantvadi, xxii. 154; 
Seoni, xxii. 172-173 ; Sliahabad, xxii. 
193-194; Stiahjahanpur, xxii. 207; 
Shahpur, xxii. 218; Shahpura, xxii. 
225 ; Shwebo, xxii. 318-319 ; Sholapur, 
xxii. 302-303; Sialkot^ xxii. 332; 
Sibi, xxii. 341 ; Singhbhum, xxiii. 9 ; 
Sirohi, xxiii. 34-35 ; Sirpur Tandur, 
xxiii. 43 ; Sitapur, xxiii. 59 ; Srinagar, 
xxiii. 101 ; .Sultanpur, xxiii. 135 ; Surat, 
xxiii. 161-162 ; Sylhet, xxiii. 197-19S ; 
Tanjore, xxiii. 237 ; Thana, xxiii. 299 ; 
Thayetmyo, xxiii. 35 1 ; Tinnevelly, 
xxiii. 373-374; Tonk, xxiii. 413; 
Trichiinopoly, xxiv. 38 ; Tnmkur, xxiv. 
58 ; I'daipur, xxiv. 98 ; Unao, xxiv. 
127; United Provinces, iii. 4S8-489, 
490-491, xxiv. 216-219; Vizagapatam, 
xxiv. 333 ; Warangal, xxiv. 362 ; 
Wardha, xxiv. 373 ; Wun, xxiv. 395 ; 
Yamethin, xxiv. 408-409; Zhob, xxiv. 

4.^3- 

Fans, of dwarf-palm, made in Peshawar, 
XX. 120. 

Fans, of ivory or sandal-wood. See Ivory- 
work and Sandal-wood. 

Fans, of k/ias-khas. made at Melukote, 
xvii. 290; Merta,xvii. 309; Poona, xx. 
176, 185 ; Savantvadi, xxii. 153 ; Upper 
Sind Frontier District, xxiv. 282. 

Farasdanga, French settlement in Balasore 
District, Bengal, xii. 51. 

Farash. See Tamarisk. 

Farazis. See Wahhabis. 

Farhat Bakhsh, palace at Lucknow, xvi. 
lyo, 196. 

Faria liagh, tomb of Ahmad Nizam Shah, 
at Ahmadnagar, v. 1 24. 

FarTd Khan. See Sher Shah, Sur. 

Farid, Shah, Miihammadan saint, tnehl 
held every year in honour of, at Dum- 
Dum, xi. 377 ; name given to Farld])ur, 
Eastern Bengal, xii. 61; tomb at Girar, 
xii. 61 ; shrine at Farldpur, xxiv. 

367.^ 

tarid, .Shaikh, Jahanglr's treasurer, Farld- 
abad, United Provinces, founded by 
and named after (1607;!, xii. 51, 62. 

Farldabad, town in Delhi District, Pun- 
jab, xii. 51. 

Farldkot, State in Pmijab, xii. 51-52; 



area, population, revenue, and adminis- 
tration, iv. 100. 

Farldkot, capital of FarTdkot State, Pun- 
jab, xii. 52. 

Faridnagar, town in Meerut District, 
United Provinces, xii. 52. 

Faridpur, District in Eastern Bengal and 
Assam, xii. 52-61 ; physical aspects, 
53-54; history, 54-55; population, ^i- 
56 ; agriculture, 56-57 ; trade and com- 
munications, 57-59; administration, 
59-61 ; revenue, 59-60 ; education, 60 ; 
medical, 60-61. 

Farldpur, subdivision in Eastern Bengal 
and Assam, xii. 61. 

Farldpur (1), town in Eastern Bengal 
and Assam, xii. 61. 

Farldpur, tahsil in Bareilly District, 
United Provinces, xii. 61-62. 

Faridpur (2), town in Bareilly District, 
United Provinces, xii. 62. 

Farid-ud-din Khan, Faridnagar founded, 
xii. 52. 

Farid-ul Hakkwa-ud-DIn, or Baba Farid- 
ud-dTn, Shakarganj, Muhammadan 
saint (l 173-1265), xiv. 126, xx. 2S9; 
shrine at Pakpattan, xix. 332. 

Farms, model, demonstration and experi- 
mental : Baroda, vii. 49; Bengal, vii. 
249 ; Central Provinces, x. 39 ; Chitta- 
gong, X. 311; Dumraon Raj, xi. 378, 
379; Hill Tippera, xiii. 120; IIo- 
shangabad, xiii. 192 ; Nadiad, xviii. 
283; Nagpur, xviii. 320; Poona, xx. 
173-174 ; Pusa, XX. 423; Songarh, vii. 
49; SrTpur, Hathwa Raj, xiii. 73. 

Farquhar, Colonel, occupied Bulandshahr 
, (1857), ix- 50. 

Farrah, capital of Farrah province, in 
Afghanistan, xii. 62. 

Farrukhabad, District in United Provinces, 
xii. 62-71; physical aspects, 62-64; 
history, 64-66 ; population, 66-67 > 
agriculture, 67-6S ; trade and com- 
munications, 68-69 ; famine, 69 ; ad- 
ministration, 70-71. 

Farrukhabad, tahsil in United Provinces, 
xii. 71-72. 

Farrukhabad, city in United Provinces, 
xii. 72-73; calico printing, iii. 186; 
woodwork, iii. 229; mint, iv. 515. 

Farrukhnagar, town in Curgaon District, 
Punjab, xii. 73. 

Farrukhnagar Xawabs, rule in North 
Gurgaon, xii. 403; Ilissiir (1737-61), 
xiii. 1 46; Rohtak, xxi. 311. 

Farrukhsiyar, Mughal emperor (1712- 
9), ii. 406, 413, xxi. 99, xxiv. 154; 
contest with jahandar Shah for Mughal 
throne, ii. 405-406 ; granted first per- 
mission to coin his money at Bombay 
(1 7 1 7), iv. 515. 

Local notices : Endeavoured to con 



INDEX 



i8i 



ciliate Chiiramaii and Khem Karan 
(1714), viii. 75 ; Farrukhabad city 
named after, xii. 72 ; Azz-ud-din de- 
feated near Khajuha (171 2), xii. 
77, XV. 220; daughter of Ajit Singh 
given in marriage to, xiv. 185 ; Tanda 
town granted to Muhammad Hayat, 
xxiii. 220. 

FariiqT kings of Khandesh (1388-1599), 
ii. 392-393 ; acknowledged Akbar's 
supremacy (1572), viii. 286; residence 
at Burhanpur, ix. 104 ; embankments 
at Dlirdia probably built by, xi. 338 ; 
rule in Nimar, xix. 108. 

Fatahabad, tnhsil in Hissar District, 
Punjab, xii. 73. 

Fatahabad, town in Hissar Distiict, 
Punjab, xii. 74. 

Fatahjang, tahsil in Attock District, 
Punjab, xii. 74. 

Fateh All Khan, Nawab of Banganapalle 
(iS68-i905),vi. 373-374. 

Fateh Ah Khan Talpur, MTr, first of 
Talpur line in Sind (1783-1801), xxii. 
399 ; rule over Khairpur, xv. 211. 

Fateh Jang, governor of Bengal, Hill 
Tippera invaded (1620), xiii. 118. 

Fateh Jang, tomb at Alwar, v. 26S-269. 

Fateh Khan, son of Firoz Shah, Fatah- 
abad town named alter, xii. 74. 

Fateh Khan, son of Sohrab Dodai, founder 
of Dera Fateh Khan, xi. 270. 

Fateh Khan, lieutenant of Akbar, built 
Jama Masjid at Kohri, xxi. 309. 

Fateh Khan, Sultan, Gakhar Mirpur said 
to have been founded by {c. 1700), xvii. 

364- 

Fateh Khan Baloch, rule in Radhanpur, 

xxi. 23. 
Fateh Khan, WazTr of Afghanistan, v. 

Sc- 
ratch Khan Tivvana, revenue collector 

of the Sikh government, fort built and 

garrisoned by, called Ihsanpur (1844), 

xvi. 136; DTwan Lakhi Mai opposed 

by, xi. 271 ; rule in Shahpur, xxii. 214 ; 

death, xxii. 214; Tank held, xxiii. 244. 
Fateh Khan, tomb at Chainpur, x. 121. 
Fateh Khan, tomb at Gaur, xii. 191. 
Fateh Mahal, portion of palace at Jodh- 

pur, xiv. 199. 
Fateh Muhammad, Faujdar of Kolar 

{c. 1720), XV. 371, 378. 
Fateh Muhammad, rebellion in Cutch 

headed by, xi. 79. 
Fateh Naik, distinguished conduct at 

Gandikota, xii. 127. 
P'ateh Parkash, rule in SirmCr, xxiii. 24 ; 

cash assessment imposed, xxiii. 27. 
Fateh Sagar, lake in Udaipur city, xxiv. 

103. 
Fateh Sagar, tank in Jaipur State, xiii. 

391- 



Fateh Sah, Raja of Garhwal, rule in 
Dehra Diin, xi. 212. 

Fateh Sahi, Maharaja of Hathwa, resisted 
East India Company's troops in Hathwa 
Raj, xiii. 72-73; family of Bhuin- 
hars of Tamkuhi founded by, xxiii. 216. 

Fateh Shah, rule in Kashmir and Jammu 
(i486"), XV. 90. 

Fateh Singh, Gaikwar of Baroda (1778- 
89), vii. 35 ; SayajT Rao assisted by, 
in quarrel with Govind Rao, vii. 35-36 ; 
fine levied on Nadiad for adhesion to 
cause of (177^), xviii. 282. 

Fateh Singh, Gaikwar, son of Govind 
Rao, regency in Baroda, vii. 37-3S ; 
services to British, vii. 38. 

Fateh Singh, Raja, rule in Jind (1819- 
22), xiv. 167. 

Fateh Singh, Sardar of Kapurthala, fled 
to cis-Sutlej territory for British pro- 
tection (1826), xiv. 409. 

Fateh Singh, rule in Shahpur, xxii. 214. 

Fateh Singh, son of Amar Singh of 
Rcwah, founded Sohavval, xxiii. 70. 

Fateh Singh, Sardar, Jhang territories 
farmed to, xiv. 127. 

Fateh Singh, bricked up alive at Sirhind 
(1704), xxiii. 21. 

Fateh Singh, Maharana of Udaipur, 
(1885), xxiv. 93. 

Fatehabad, ancient name of Gaur, xii. 
186. 

Fatehabad (i), tahsil in Agra District, 
United Provinces, xii. 74. 

Fatehabad (2), in Punjab. See Fatah- 
abad. 

Fatehbagh, ruined city in Sind, xxii. 

403. 

Fatehgarh, tahsil in Patiala State, Pun- 
jab, xii. 74. 

Fatehgarh town, head-quarters of Farrukh- 
abad District, United Provinces, xii. 
74-75; copper implements found, ii. 
98. 

Fatehjang, tahsil in Attock District, Pun- 
jab. See Fatahjang. 

Fatehnagar. See Aurangabad City. 

Fatehpur, District in United Provinces, 
^ii- 75-83 ; physical_ aspects, 75-77 ; 
history, 77-78 ; antiquarian remains, 
78 ; population, 78-79 ; agriculture, 
79-80 ; irrigation, 80; trade and com- 
munications, 80-81 ; famine, 81 ; ad- 
ministration, 81-83; revenue, 81-82; 
education, 82 ; medical, 83. 

Fatehpur, tahsil in Fatehpur District, 
United Provinces, xii. 83. 

Fatehpur, town in Fatehpur District, 
United Provinces, xii. 83. 

Fatehpur, tahsil in Para Bank! District, 
United Provinces, xii. S3-84. 

Fatehpur, town in Bara BankI District, 
United Provinces, xii. 84. 



l82 



INDEX 



Fatehpnr, town in Jaipur State, Rajpnt- 
ana, xii. 84. 

Fatehpur Sikri, town in Agra District, 
United Provinces, built for his residence 
by Akbar, xii. 84-S6 ; antiquarian re- 
mains, 85-86. 

Other refartices : Tomb of saint 
Salim Chishti, ii. 126-127 ; Akbar's 
mosque, ii. 127 ; palace paintings, 
ii. 129-130; frescoes in 'Miriam's 
House,' ii. 130 ; pavilions, ii. 199. 

FatehuUali, .Shaikh, settled at Unao, xxiv. 
129. • 

Fathkhelda, village in Buldana District, 
Berar, xii. 86 ; battle (1724), vii. 370, 
xiii. 239. 

P'athua, Raja, Gangoh threatened during 
Mutiny, xii. 139. 

Fathullah Imad-ul-mulk. See Imad-ul- 
mulk, Fathullah. 

Fats. See Oils and Fats. 

Fattiana, pastoral clan in Montgomery 
District, Punjab, xvii. 412. 

Fatwa. village in Patna District, Bengal, 
xii. 86. 

Faujdar Khan, Baloch chief (afterwards 
Dalel Khan and Nawab of Farrukh- 
nagar), Farrukhnagar founded, xii. 73 ; 
•rule in Hissar, xxi. 311. 

Faulad Khan, rule in Bhopal, viii. 129. 

Fauladia, tribe in Saugor District, xxii. 

137- 

Fauna. See Zoology. 

Faure, Jesuit, mention of Nicobars(i7i 1). 

xix. 64. 
Fazil Khan, besieged Vishalgarh (1661), 

xxiv. 321. 
Fazil Khan, supported by Jaswant Rao 

Bhau (1 8 1 8), xiv. 86. 
Fazilka, tahsll in Ferozepore District, 

Punjab, xii. 86-S7. 
Fazilka, town in Ferozepore District, 

Punjab, xii. 87. 
Fazl, .Saiyid, deported to Arabia (1852), 

xxiii. 397. 
Fazl All, rule in Ghazipur, xii. 224. 
Fazl-uUah, .Saiyid, building near Shikar- 

])ur, xxii. 278. 
Fazl-ullah Khan, general of Ilaidar Ali, 

Sadashivgarh fort taken by (1763), 

X. 289. 
Fcallicr trade, iii. 193, 254. 
I'ebrifugc, made in the Nilgiris, xix. 98. 
Federici, Cesare dc', Honavar fort men- 
tioned by, xiii. 160 ; quoted on emperor 

.Sinhyumyashin, xk. 86 ; description of 

Sandwip (156:;), xxii. 48; visit to 

\'ijayanagar (1567), xxiv. 312. 
Fell, Captain, SanchT slfipa described 

(1819), xxii. 29. 
Felspar, found in Anaimalais, v. 332 ; 

Bangalore, vi. 361 ; Chingleput, x. 261 ; 

Hassan, xiii. 62 ; Hazaribagh, xiii. 92 ; 



Kolar, XV. 369 ; Mergui, xvii. 295 ; 
Monghyr, xvii. 397 ; Nellore, xix. 8 ; 
Panch Klahals, xix. 381. 
Felt, made in Bahraich, vi. 210; Hyder- 
abad, xiii. 31S; Jhalawan, xiv. 112; 
Kharan, xv. 249; Kolhapur, xv. 384; 
Loralai, xvi. 177; Quett.i-Pishln, xxi. 
16; Sarawan, xxii. loo; Sibi, xxii. 340; 
Zhob, xxiv. 432. 
Female infanticide, among Rajputs of 
North- Western India, i. 480; practised 
in .^zamgarh, vi. 160 ; Bareilly, vii. 10 ; 
BnstT,vii. 130; Benares, vii. 185; Berar, 
vii. 377; Cawnpore, ix. 313; Central 
India, ix. 349 ; Jadejas of Cutch, xi, 78- 
80 ; Etah, xii. 35 ; Etawah, xii. 45 ; 
Farrukhabad, xii. 70; Fatehpur, xii. 81 ; 
Jaunpur, xiv. 80; Kashmir, xv. 100; 
MainpurT, xvni. 38 ; Meerut, xvii. 261 ; 
the Maliahs,xvii. 89; Partabgarh Dis- 
trict, XX. 20 ; Saharanpur, xxi. 376 ; 
United Provinces, xxiv. 166. 
Females, unusual preponderance in Lu- 
shai Hills, xvi. 216. See also in each 
Province, District, and larger State 
article iiitder Popul.ntion. 
Fenchuganj, villnge in Sylhet District, 

Eastern Ijengal and Assam, xii. 87. 
Fenjiy, river in Eastern Bengal and As- 
sam, xii. 87, xiii. 1 17. 
Fenny, subdivision in Noakhali District, 

Eastern Ikngal and Assam, xii. 87. 
Fenny, villnge in Noakhali District, 

Eastern Bengal and Assam, xii. 88. 
Fenugreek, cultivated in Chikmugalur, 

Mysore, x. 222. 
Fergusson, James, quoted on Abu, v. 7 ; 
Ahmadabad, v. 108; Alwar, v. 268; 
Amaravati, v. 272; Bhilsa, viii. 105-106; 
Conjeeveram,x. 378; Dhamnar, xi. 283; 
Elephanla,xii.4; Girnar, xii. 24S; Hale- 
bid, xviii. 1S7-188; Hassnn, xiii. 64 ; 
Karli, xv. 44-47; Madura, ii. 125 ; Perur, 
XX. lie; Rameswaram, xxi. 173-175; 
.Seven Pagodas, xxii. 183-185 ; Shetrunja 
hill, xix. 365-366 ; Sravana Bclgola, 
xxiii. 97 ; Tinnevelly. xxiii. 379, 399. 
Fergusson College, at Poona, viii. 374, 

XX. 185. 
Ferns and their allies, 600 species, i. 161 ; 
in Sikkim, i. 167 ; Indus plain, i. 178 ; 
s/io/as of the Nilgiris, i. 188; Chota 
Nag]iur, i. 192; Ceylon, i. 196; Burma, 
i. 197, 201 ; Penang, i. 207. 
Ferokh, village in Malabar District, Ma- 
dras, xii. 88; pottery, iii. 245. 
Ferozepore, District in Punjab, xii. 88-98 ; 
])hysical aspects, 88-S9 ; history, 89- 
91 ; ]iopulation, 91-93; agriculture, 93- 
94 ; trade and communications, 94-95 ; 
famine, 95 ; administration, 95-98 ; 
revenue, 96-97 ; education, 97; medi- 
cal, 97-98. 



INDEX 



183 



Ferozepore, talisll in Ferozepore District, 
Punjab, xii. 9S. 

Ferozepore, town and cantonment with 
arsenal, in Ferozepore District, Punjab, 
xii. 98-99. 

Ferozeshaii, battle-field (1S45) in Feroze- 
pore District, Punjab, xii. 99. 

Ferrieri, Jaconie, visit to the Nilgiris, 
xix. 89. 

Ferries, across the Swat at Abazai, v. i; 
across the Ai, v. 12S ; across the Irra- 
waddy at Allanmyo (steam), v. 242 ; 
across the Sutlej and Jumna in Ambala 
District, v. 284; across the Beas and 
Ravi in Amritsar, v. 325 ; across the 
Bhaglrathi at AzTmganj, vi. 163 ; across 
the Brahmaputra in Assam (steam), vi. 
8 1 ; across the BarnadI at Dumunichaki, 
vii. 23; across the Ambika, Vishwamitri, 
Tapti, Sabarmati, Narbada, Mindhola, 
and Mahl, in Baroda, vii. 58 ; across 
the Beas, vii. 138; in Bengal, vii. 281 ; 
across the Ganges at Bhagalpur (steam), 
viii. 33 ; across the Irrawaddy at Bhamo 
(steam\ xv. 164; across the Bhareli, 
viii. 88; across the Sutlej at Bilaspur, 
viii. 234; in Bogra, viii. 261 ; across 
the Burhi Dihing, xi. 346 ; across the 
Irrawaddy in Burma, ix. 184 ; across 
the Hooghly from Calcutta to Howrah, 
ix. 274; in Champaran, x. 144; across 
the '1 Tsta river in Cooch Behar, x. 3S6 ; 
across the Burhl Gandak and Baghmati 
in Darbhanga, xi. 159 ; across the Indus 
in Dera Ghazi Khan, xi. 255 ; across 
the Indus in Dera Ismail Khan, xi. 266 ; 
over the Dhansiri, xi. 286 ; across the 
Chambal in Dholpur, xi. 327; across 
the Brahmaputra at Dhubri (steam), xi. 
336 ; across HajTpur creek to Diamond 
Harbour village, xi. 340; across the 
Dikho, xi. 346 ; across the Disang, xi. 
362 ; across the Gogra at Dohrighat, xii. 
303 ; across the Sutlej in Ferozepore, 
xii. 95 ; across the Brahmaputra at 
Gauhati (steam), xii. 184; across the 
Son in Gaya, xii. 204 ; across Diamond 
Harbour, Geonkhall (steam), xii. 210 ; 
across the Ganges, Ghazipur .steam), xii. 
230, xxiv. 215 ; in Goa Settlement, 
xii. 250 ; across the Irrawaddy, between 
Henzada and Tharrawaw (steam), xiii. 
108, xxiii. 324; across the Hooghly 
(steam),vii.28i; across the Beas and Sut- 
lej in Hoshiarpur, xiii. 200; across Irra- 
waddy (steam), xiii. 370; in JalpaigurT, 
xiv. 39 ; JanjTra, xiv. 60 ; across 
the Jatinga, xiv. 72 ; across the Chenab 
and Jhelum in Jhang, xiv. 131 ; across 
the Jhanzi, xiv. 150; across the Jiri at 
Jirighat, xiv. 177; across the Brahma- 
putra at Jogighopa, xiv. 200 ; on the 
Kabul river, xiv. 247 ; across the Mahl 



in Kaira, xiv. 283 ; across the Kalang at 
Kuwarital, Nowgong, Raha, and Jagi, 
xiv. 29S ; across the Kosi from Anchra 
Ghat to Khanwa Ghat, xv. 408 ; across 
the Chambal in Kotah, xv. 411, 424; 
in Kyaukse, xvi. 79 ; across the Ravi 
and Sutlej in Lahore, xvi. 102 ; in 
Lakhimpur, xvi. 126; across the Irra- 
waddy in Magwe, xvi. 420-421 ; across 
the Manjra, xvii. 197 ; across theChenab, 
Sutlej, and Ravi in Multan District, 
xviii. 31-32; in Myingyan, xviii. 129; 
in Mymcnsingh, xviii. 157 ; across the 
Fenny and Little Fenny in Noakhali, 
xix. 133 ; across the Padma, connecting 
Sara and Damukdia (steam), xxii. 81 ; 
across Port Blair Harbour, xx. 211 ; in 
the Punjab, xx. 327 ; across the Kistna, 
Tungabhadra, and Bhima in Raichur, 
xxi. 42 ; across the Salween, Yunzalin, 
and Bilin in Salween District, xxi. 421 ; 
across the Salween, xxi. 423; connecting 
Sandwip and Hatia islands with main- 
land, xix. 133; across the Salween in 
Northern Shan States, xxii. 24=, ; across 
the Salween, Nam Pang, Nam Teng, 
and Nam Pawn in Southern Shan States, 
xxii. 263-264 ; across the Subansiri, 
xxiii. 114 ; across the MahanadI at 
Tikarpara, v. 379 ; across the Sittang 
in Toungoo, xxiii. 430 ; across the 
Cauvery and Coleroon in Trichinopoly, 
xxiv. 37 ; in the Twenty-four Parganas, 
xxiv. 77 ; United Provinces, xxiv. 215. 
Festivals, religious, held at Ahobilam, 
V. 127; Ajmer, v. 171-172; Ajmer- 
Mervvara, v. 148 ; Alagarkovil, v. 203; 
Allahabad, v. 237, 239, xii. 134; 
Alvar Tirunagari, v. 254 ; Amritsar, 
v. 328 ; Assam, vi. 52 ; Avani, vi. 152 ; 
near Badarpur, vi. 177; Banavasi, vi. 
346 ; Baroda, vii. 45 ; Bawgyo, xxii. 
235 ; Berar, vii. 382 ; Bhamo, viii. 58 ; 
Bheraghat, xvii. 206 ; of the Bhils, viii. 
102; in Bhilsa, viii. 106; Bhlmkund, 
viii. 109 ; Bhuban Hills, viii. 149 ; 
Bombay Presidency, viii. 309-310; 
Burma, ix. 148-149, 159; Calcutta, 
ix. 279 ; Point Calimere, ix. 291 ; on 
the Cauvery, ix. 303 ; Central India, 
ix. 357 ; Central Provinces, x. 31, 32 ; 
Chilmari, xvi. 30 ; Coorg, xi. 27 ; 
Dacca, xi. 112; Dum-Dum, xi. 377; 
Garhmuktesar, xii. 163 ; Giriak, xii. 
246; Gobardhan, xii. 280; Haldij ur, 
xiii. 10; Harischandragarh, xiii. 56; 
Hyderabad, xiii. 250, 251, 309; Jalpes, 
xiv. 42-43 ; Jammalamadugu, xiv. 49 ; 
Jawala Mukhi, xiv. 87 ; Kadiri, xiv. 
260; Kaliigumalai, xiv. 321; Kadod, 
xiv. 261 ; Kamakhya, xiv. 325 ; Kanta- 
nagar, xiv. 405 ; by Khonds, xv. 282 ; 
at Kishorganj, xv. 31 f? ; Kumbakonam, 



1 84 



INDEX 



xvi, 30-2I ; Kyankse, xvi. 72 ; Ladakh, 
xvi. 96 ; Madras, xvi. 266-267 ; Mailar, 
xvii. 30-31 ; Malwa, ix. 357 ; Manda, 
xvii, 123; Markandi, xvii. 208; Maya- 
varam, xvii. 238 ; Mongheng, xxii. 
235 ; Mudgal, xviii. 11 ; Mukhalingam, 
xviii. 18; Muktsar, xviii. 19; Myin- 
gyan, xviii. 124; Mysore, xviii. 208- 
209 ; Nabadwip, xviii. 262 ; Nagore, 
xix. 3 ; Nangalband, xviii. 373 ; Nepal, 
xix. 45 ; North-West Frontier Province, 
xix. 169 ; Piikpattan, xix. 333 ; I'an- 
dhurna, xix. 391 ; Patlisima, xx. 159; 
Periir, xx. 1 1 1 ; Podili, xx. 157 ; Ponnai- 
yar, xx. 164; Prome, xx. 222 ; Punjab, 
XX. 294 ; Purl, XX. 408, 41 1-4 12 ; Piisla- 
kar, xxi. i ; Rajapur, xxi. 67 ; Rajputana, 
xxi. 118 ; Rangoon, v. 296 ; Rayachoti, 
xxi. 274; Rushikulya river, xxi. 341 ; 
Sagaing, xxi, 355 ; Sagar Island, vii. 
201, xii. 134, xxi. 366; of Santals, 
xxii. 67-68; in Sanlipur, xxii. 79; Sind, 
xxii. 411; Sitakund, xxiii. 50; Siva- 
samudram, xxiii. 66; Sonda, xxiii. 82 ; 
Sonpur, xii. 126, 134, xxiii. 87 ; Soroii, 
xxiii. 89 ; Srikurmam, xxiii. 98 ; Srl- 
mustinam, xxiii. 99 ; Srirangam, xxiii. 
108; Srisailam, xxiii. no; Srivai- 
kuntam, xxiii. m; Subrahmanya, 
xxiii. 115; Sucbindram, xxiii. 115; 
Sylhet, vi. 52 ; Tarakeswar, xxiii. 249 ; 
Thamadaw, xix. 322 ; Thanesar, xxiii. 
305 ; Tiruchendur, xxiii. 391 ; Tirup- 
pur, xxiii. 396 ; Tiruvottiyur, xxiii. 
402 ; Tiruvannamalai, v. 428 ; Tosham, 
xxiii. 421 ; TribenI, xxiv. 25 ; Trimbak, 
xxiv. 49 ; Turaiyur, xxiv. 62 ; Udipi, 
xxiv. Ill ; United Provinces, xxiv. 
175-176 ; Vijayanagar, xxiv. 313-314. 
See also Pairs, generally associated with 
Religious Festivals. 
Fevers, death statistics, i. 521, 522, 
526, 527, .529, 530, 531 ; prevalent in 
Afglianistan, v. 51 ; Ajmer-Merwara, 
v. 144; Ambala, v. 279; Arakan, v. 
397; Assam, vi. 40 ; Balasore, vi. 239; 
Baluchistan, vi. 339; Banganapalle, vi. 
372 ; Bankura, vi. 385 ; Bannu, \ i. 393 ; 
IJanswara, vi. 408; Bariya, vii. 20; 
Baroda, vii. 60 ; Bassein, Tiiana, vii. 
1 19; Benares, vii. 17S ; Bengal, vii. 229 ; 
Berar, vii. 377; Bhagalpur, viii. 37; Bu- 
bhum, viii. 242 ; Bombay, viii. 295, 
299, 402 ; Bundi, ix. 79 ; Burdwan, ix. 
93, 102 ; Burma, ix. 134, 135 ; Calcutta, 
ix. 267 ; Central Provinces, x. 21 ; 
Champaran, x. 139; Chittagong, .\. 
309 ; Chittoor, x. 325 ; Dacca, 
xi. 106; Darbhanga, xi. 154; Dera 
Ghazi Khan, xi. 249 ; Dera Ismail 
Khan, xi. 261; Clhazipur, xii. 225; 
(Jhazni, xii. 232 ; Goa, xii. 251, 254; 
Gorakhpur, xii. 331, 334-335; ^"l- 



barga, xii. 376 ; Gurgaon, xii. 403 ; 
Hazaribagh, xiii. 89 ; Hooghly, xiii. 
164 ; Hoshiarpur, xiii. 193 ; Hos- 
pet, xiii. 204; Hyderabad, xiii. 313; 
JalpaigurT, xiv. 34; Jamner, xiv. 51; 
Jessore, xiv. 94 ; Jhansi, xiv. 144 ; Kan- 
gra, xiv, 3S2 ; Karnal, xv. 49 : Katha, 
XV. 153; Kathiawar, XV. 174; Khirpai, 
XV. 279; Khulna, XV. 2S8 ; Krishnagar, 
xvi. 8; Ludhiana, xvi. 200; Madras, 
xvi. 258-259 ; Magura, xvi. 41 1 ; Mak- 
ran, xvii. 51 ; Mewar, xvii. 3r2 ; Mont- 
gomery, xvii. 410 ; Muhammadpur, 
xviii. JJ ; Mymensingh, xviii. 152 ; Na- 
dia, xviii. 274; Nallamalais, xviii. 346; 
Nandikolkur, xviii. 361 ; North-West 
Frontier Province, xix. 164; Pakokku, 
xix. 320; Pcint, XX. loi ; Peshawar, 
XX. 113; PUlbhit, xx. 137; Punch, xx. 
244; Purl, XX. 401 ; Purnea, xx. 415; 
Radhanpur, xxi. 23; Raichur, xxi. 39; 
Raipur, xxi. 50; Rangoon, xxi. 220- 
221; Rohtak, xxi. 319; .Saharanpur, 
xxi. 369; Shahabad, xxii. 1S9; Shah- 
pur, xxii. 213 ; Shamli, xxii. 229 ; Siill- 
kot, xxii. 327 ; Siddapur, xxii. 356 ; 
Sikkim, xxii. 369; Sind, xxii. 405; 
Tatta, xxiii. 254; Thayctmyo, xxiii. 
344 ; Twenty-Four Parganas, xxiv. 71 ; 
United Provinces, xxiv. 165. See also 
Malaria. 

Fibres. Sec Cotton, Flax, Hemp, Jute, 
rtwflf Silk. 

Fidae Khan, Kablr's tomb at Maghar 
replaced or restored by, xvi. 411. 

Fidai Khan, governor of Bengal, subject 
to Delhi (,1627), vii. 217. 

P"idai Khan, governor of Bengal, subject 
to Delhi (1677), vii. 217, 

P"idai Khan, foster-brother of Aurangzcb, 
Pinjaur village fief of, xx. 148. 

P"ida-ud-din, Mughal viceroy, rise against 
DamajT Gaikwar, vii. 33-34. 

Fidwi Kliiin, traditional rule over Karauli 
Stale, XV. 26. 

1* ife, Lake. See Lake P'ife. 

Figs, iii. 76; cultivated in Afghanistan, 
V. 52 ; Northern Arakan, v. 393 ; 
Baroda, vii. 48 ; Bclgaum, vii. 146, 
152 ; Bengal, vii. 248; Burdwan, ix. 
92 ; Dharwar, xi. 304 ; Gonda, xii. 311 ; 
Gorakhpur, xii. 332 ; Gulbarga, xii. 
376; Ilardoi. xiii. 43; Plooghly, xiii. 
163; Hyderabad, xiii. 312; Jaunpur, 
xiv, 73; Jhansi, xiv. 143; Kandahar, 
xiv. 375; Karachi, xv. 2 ; Lingsugur, 
xvi. 163 ; Midnapore, xvii. 329 ; North- 
West Frontier Province, xix. 174; Par- 
trd)garh 1 )istrict, xx. 15 ; Poona, xx.i66; 
Rae Barcll, xxi. 26; l\ajinitana, xxi. 
90, 121 ; Salwcen, xxi. 416; Satara, 
xxii. 117; Sikkim, xxii. 366 ; Sind, xxii. 
413; Silapur, xxiii. 55 ; Tanjore, xxiii. 



INDEX 



185 



226; Thayetmyo, xxiii. 349; United 
Provinces, xxiv. 183. 
Filatures. See Silk-weaving. 
Filose, General Jean Baptiste, lands 
assigned to, by Danlat Rao Sindhia, 
vii. 84 ; Chanderi taken (i8ii~), x. 164 ; 
Beri Sal KhTchi installed as chief of 
Maksudan<^arh (1S16), xvii. 52, xxi. 
34; Sabalgarh fort taken (1809^ xxi. 
343 > fight with Jaswant Rao at Sehore 
(1814), xxii, 161 ; Sheopur and adjoin- 
ing tract granted to, xxii. 272. 
Filose, Sir Michael, Educational depart- 
ment in Gwalior founded under, xii. 436. 
Finance, iv. 160-203; growth of revenue 
and expenditure, 160-161 ; causes of 
the growth of revenue, 161 -162 ; ex- 
planation of the large total revenue, 
162; history of, 163-170; details of 
revenue, 170-174; details of expen- 
diture, 174-190; the public debt, 
1S3-185; Provincial finance; general 
features of the system, 190-191 ; 
periodical revision of Provincial settle- 
ments, 191-192 ; special contributions 
by the Provinces to the Supreme Gov- 
ernment, 192-193; Provincial and Local 
surplus or deficit, 193, 202 ; Home 
charges, 193-194; method of meeting 
the Home expenditure ; loss by 
exchange, 194-195 ; the Secretary of 
State's drawings, 196-197; ' ways and 
means,' 197; general review of the 
financial position, 198-199 ; bibliogra- 
phy, 199 ; tables : revenue and ex- 
penditure, 200 ; debt, 200 ; net revenue, 
201 ; net expenditure, 202 ; public 
works, 203 ; improvement under Lord 
Curzon, ii. 52S ; agricultural credit, 
iii. 90-92 ; education, iv. 444-445 ; 
medical, iv. 463. See also in each 
Province, District, and larger State 
article under Administration. 
Finance Department, iv. 25-26. 
Finches (Fringillidae), i. 244-245. 
Findlay College, at Mannargudi, xvii. 199. 
Fine Art Society, Madras, xvi. 374. 
Finfeet (Heliornithidae), i. 259. 
Fireworks, made in Shahpur, xxii. 21S. 
Fire-worship, in Hindu Kush mountains, 

xiii. 138. 
Firinghls, Portuguese outlaws, trouble 
caused by, in Chittagong and Sandwip 
Island, X. 308, xxii. 48-49. 
FiringTpet, town in South Arcot District, 

Madras. See Porto Novo. 
Firishta, on Ahmadabad, v. 107 ; Bellam- 
konda, vii. 15S; Kalinjar, xiv. 311; 
Kherla, viii. 8 ; Nagarkot, xiv. 397 ; 
Sirhind, xxiii. 20. 
Firoz, Jam, Samma king, rule in Sind, 

xxii. 396. 
Flroz, Langah, ruler of Multan, ii. 371. 



Firoz, Malik, supposed to have destroyed 
and rebuilt FIrozabad (sixteenth cen- 
tury), xii. 100. 

Firoz, .Saif-ud-dm,king of Bengal (i486), 
vii. 216; Minar at Gaur erected by, ii. 
191, xii. 190. 

Firoz, Shams-ud-dln (son of Bughra), 
governor of Bengal (1302), vii. 216. 

PTroz Khan, Malik, took Palanpur and 
Deesa, xix. 353. 

Firoz Kohis, tribe in Herat, xiii. 113. 

Firoz Minar, tower at Gaur, vii. 222, xii. 
190-191. 

Firoz Shah I, Rukn-ud-din, Slave king of 
Delhi (1236), ii._359, 368. 

Firoz Shah II, Jalal-ud-dm, Khalji king 
of Delhi (1290-6), ii. 361-362, 368, 
XX. 265-266; murdered by Ala-ud-dln, 
V. 229 ; said to have founded Jalalabad 
town, xiv. 14 ; invaded Katehr (1290), 
vii. 3-4; besieged Ranthambhor, xxi. 

2 3.=;- 
Firoz Shah III, Tughlak king of Delhi 
(1351-S8), ii. 365-366, 369. 370, 
xxii. 396; Kutb Minar repaired, ii. 
126 ; Jaunpur founded (1351), ii. 364, 
374 ; irrigation canal constructed, 
iii. 327-328, 333, 357-358, xiv. 234- 
236. 

Local notices : Ambahta established 
by, V. 276; tomb erected in Ban- 
garmau, vi. 380 ; Ijukkur retaken and 
Tamachi and his son carried captive to 
Delhi, xxii. 396 ; rule in Central 
India, ix. 339 ; founder of school 
at Dalmau, xi. 127; removed site of 
Delhi city to Firozabad, xi. 235 ; 
brought Asoka pillar to Delhi, xi. 
235 ; rule in Delhi, xi. 235 ; built 
mosque and made canal at DIpalpur, 
xi- 359 ; foimded Fatahabad (1352), xii. 
74, xiii. 146; built fort of Ferozepore 
(1370), xii. 89 ; Firozpur-Jhirka said to 
have been founded by, xii. 100 ; Gujarat 
granted to Zafar Khan, xii. 351 ; 
rule over Gurgaon, xii. 403 ; Hissar 
founded (1356), xiii. 146, 155 ; Jaunpur 
founded (1359), xiv. 74, 82 ; attempt 
to appropriate the Atala Devi temple 
at Jaunpur, xiv. 83 ; Western Jumna 
Canal originated by, xiv. 234; invasion 
of Kangra (1360), xiv. 3S3 ; ordered 
invasion of Katehr, xxi. 305 ; grant 
made for building Khurja, xv. 
297 ; Laharpur said to have been 
founded by (1374), xvi. 95; invasion 
of Orissa (1361), vii. 211, xix. 250; 
rule in the Punjab (1351-88), xx. 266; 
rule in Samana, xxii. 2 ; Afghan 
appointed by, to .Sambhal (1380), xxii. 
18 ; Sandlla visited and mosque 
built, xxii. 31 ; brought canal to 
Sunam, xxiii. 139; built fort at Surat 



186 



INDEX 



(1373), xxiii. 153; constructed canal 
from the Sutlej, xxi. 311, xxiii. 20; 
rule in Hindustan (1351), xxiv. 151 ; 
passed through Zafarabad (1359% ''xiv. 
426. 

Firoz Shah, Rozafzun, Bahmani king 
(1397-1422), ii. 383-384, 3S5; wars 
against Vijayanagar, ii. 345. 

Local notices : P.ankapur besieged 
(1406), vi. 381 ; halted at Ellichpur 
(1400), xii. 19; traditional builder of 
Abdur-Rahman's shrine at Ellichpur, 
xii. 21; proclaimed king '1397), xiii. 
236-237 ; defeated at Pangal by Rajas 
of Warangal and Vijayanagar (141 7), 
xix. 395. 

FTroz Shah, Sur (1554), ii. 412, 413. 

Firoz Shah, Sahibzada (185S ), escape 
to Bareilly, vii. 13; flight through 
Cawnpore, ix. 309 ; Etawah plundered 
(iS58),xii. 41 ; defeat of force collected 
at Mandsor, xvii. 151; Moradabad 
taken and relinquished 1,1858), vii. 6; 
Nimach hard pressed by, xix. 106. 

Firozabad, tahsilm Agra District, United 
Provinces, xii. 99-100. 

Firozabad, town in Agra District, United 
Provinces, xii. 100. 

Firozpur, District, tahsll, and town in 
Punjab. See Ferozepore. 

Firozpur, tcihsil in Gurgaon District, 
Punjab, xii. 100. 

Firozpur-Jhirka, town in Gurgaon Dis- 
trict, Punjab, xii. loo-ioi. 

Flruz Shah, battle- field in Punjab. See 
Ferozeshah. 

Fish, i. 274-282 ; Agra, v. 74 ; Ahmad- 
abad, v. 95 ; AlTgarh, v. 209 ; Almora, 
V. 245 ; Amritsar, V. 320 ; South Arcot, 
V. 422; Assam, vi. 20; Attock, vi. 
132; Banganapalle, vi. 372 ; Bareilly, 
vii. 3 ; Baroda, vii. 30 ; BastI, vii. 
125; Bengal, vii. 254; Bhandara, viii. 
62 ; l^ilaspur, viii. 223 ; Bombay, viii. 
275; Burma, ix. 118; Cawnpore, ix. 
307 ; Central India, ix. 332 ; Central 
Provinces, x. lO; Chalan Bil, x. 127; 
Chamba, x. 129; Chandipur, x. 165; 
Chhindwara, x. 205 ; Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, x. 319; Colair Lake, x. 374; 
Coondapoor, xi. 1-2; Coorg, xi. 7; 
Damoh, xi. 135; Dehra Dun, xi. 211 ; 
Dharwar, xi. 305 ; Dinajpur, xi. 348 ; 
Diu, xi. 362 ; Garhwal, xii. 165 ; 
GhazTpur, xii. 223; Gonda, xii. 312; 
Gorakhpur, xii. 332-333 ; Hardoi, xiii. 
43; Hazara, xiii. 76 ; Hyderabad, xiii. 
313 ; Tndawgyi, xiii. 332 ; Indus, xiii. 
364; Jalaun, xiv. 18; JalpaiguiT, xiv. 
32 ; Jauujnir, xiv. 74 ; Jhansi, xiv. 
136; Jhclum, xiv. 151; Kafiristan, 
xiv. 270 ; Kaira, xiv. 277 ; South 
Kanara, xiv. 355 ; Kauriala, xv. 191 ; 



Kashmir and Jammn, xv. 87 ; Kherl, 
XV. 269; Kistna District, xv. 320; 
Kohat, XV. 342 ; Kolaba, xv. 3.=.6-"357 ; 
Kotah, XV. 411; Mainpurl, xvii. 34; 
Malabar, xvii. 55; Manchhar Lake, 
xvii. 123; Mandl, xvii. 153; Mergui 
Archipelago, xvii. 295 ; Mlrzapur, xvii. 
368; Moradabad, xvii. 421 ; Mymen- 
singh, xviii. 150; Mysore, xviii. 167; 
NainI Tal, xviii. 324; Plllbhit, xx. 
137 ; Poona, xx. 167 ; Punjab, xx. 305- 
306 ; Sambalpur, xxii. 7 ; Saugor, 
xxii. 137; Tavoy, xxiii. 260. 
Fish-curing, in Ganjam, xii. 152 ; South 
Kanara, xiv. 365 ; Madras, xvi. 296 ; 
Malabar, xvii. 64 ; Tinnevclly, xxiii. 

372- 

Fisher, Colonel, killed during Mutiny, 
xxiii. 132. 

Fisheries, in Amarapura, v. 272 ; Balu- 
chistan, vi. 301-302 ; Bandra, vi. 359; 
Bassein, vii. 112; Bengal, vii. 253- 
254; Bhamo, viii. 51 ; Bombay, viii. 
318; Burma, ix. 162-163, 208-209; 
Upper Chindwin, x. 245 ; Chittagong, 
X. 312; Daman, xi. 130; Darjeeling, 
xi. 167; Ennore, xii. 25; Garo Hills, xii. 
173 ; Hanthawaddy, xiii. 32 ; Henzada, 
xiii. 107-108; Janjira State, xiv. 60; 
Kalat, xiv. 301 ; Karachi, xv. 7 ; 
Karanja, xv. 22; Khulna, xv. 289; 
Kyonpyaw, xvi. 84 ; Laccadive Islands, 
xvi. 88; Las Bela, xvi. 147; Madras, 
xvi. 280 ; Gulf of Manaar, xxiii. 372- 
373 ; Manchhar Lake, xvii. 123 ; 
Mandalay, xvii. 132-133; Ma-ubin, 
xvii. 228; Mergui, xvii. 300-301; 
Minbu, xvii. 351 ; Monghyr, xvii. 397 ; 
Myaungniya, xviii. 113; Myingyan, 
xviii. 127; Navanagar, xviii. 421; 
Pegu, XX. 90; Pyapon, xxi. 5; Ratna- 
giri, xxi. 258 ; Ruby Mines Dis- 
trict, xxi. 331, 334; Southern Shan 
States, xxii. 258-2^59; Sind, xxii. 416; 
Singu, xxiii. 12; Surat, xxiii. 160; 
Thana, xxiii. 297; Thar and Parkar, 
xxiii. 307; Tharrawaddy, xxiii. 321- 
322; Thaton, xxiii. 335 ; Thayetmyo, 
xxiii. 348 ; Touiigoo, xxiii. 42S ; United 
Provinces, xxiv. 190. 

Fisher-monkeys, i. 215 ; found in Mergui, 
xvii. 295. 

Fitch, Ralpii, first English trader to 
India (1583), ii. 453-454; visits to 
Bengal (1586), vii. 215, 217; Cochin 
(1585), X. 355 ; Akbar at Lahore, xvi. 
108; Mandu (1585), xvii. 172. 

Fitzgerald, Sir Seymour, (Governor of 
Bombay, opened Rajkumar College at 
R.ajkot, xxi. 74. 

Fitziiatrick, .Sir Dennis, Chief Commis- 
sioner of Assam, vi. 35; Lieutenant- 
Governor of Punjab (1892-7), xx. 331. 



INDEX 



187 



Flamingoes {Phoenicopteri), i. 265. 

Flax, . cultivated in Akyab, v. 195 ; 
Chitaldroog, x. 293 ; Kashmir, xv. 
115; Surgiija, xxiii. 172. 

Flaxman, statue of Lord Cornwallis by, 
at Ghazlpur, xii. 231. 

Flint, Captain, Tipu's attack on Tyaga 
Durgam repulsed (1790), xxiv. 81; 
held Wandiwash against Haidar All 
(1780), xxiv. 353. 

Floating festival, held at Turaiyur, xxiv. 
62. 

Floating fly-trap {Aldrovanda), i. 161, 
182. ' 

Floods and inundations, in Ahmadabad, 
V. 95-96, 102, 103; Almora, v. 250; 
Anklesvar, v. 3S5 ; Arambagh, v. 398 ; 
North Arcot, v. 405 ; South Arcot, v. 
422-423 ; Assam, vi. 21-22 ; Azamgarh, 
vi. 162; Barpeta,vii. 85; Bassein, Burma, 
vii. 106, 108, no; on Beas river, vii. 
138 ; in Benares, vii. 178 ; Bengal, vii. 
282, 283, 2S4 ; Bezwada, viii. 18; 
Bhadgaon, viii. 21 ; Bhagalpur, viii. 27; 
Bharatpur, viii. 74 ; on Bhavani river, 
viii. 97 ; in Birbhum, viii. 241 ; Bogra, 
viii. 257 ; Bombay Presidency, viii. 278 ; 
Burdwan, ix. 92 ; Burhi Dihing river, xi. 
345; in Burma, ix. 120, 190; Cachar, ix. 
249; Central India, ix. 334; Cham- 
paran, x. 138 ; Chanda, x. 161 ; Chapra, 
X. 175; Upper Chindwin District, x. 
240; Cooch Behar, x. 381 ; Cuddapah, 
xi. 60; Cutch, xi. 77 ; Rann of Cutch, 
xi. 85 ; Cuttack, xi. 88, 94; Dacca, xi. 
104; of the Damodar, xi. 133; in 
Darljhanga, xi. 153 ; Dataganj, xi. 195 ; 
Dera Ghazi Khan, xi. 250, 258 ; Dera 
Ismail Khan ( 1 82 3), xi. 269; Devikottai, 
xi. 276; Dhampur, xi. 284; Dhidia 
(1872), xi. 337; of the Dikho, xi. 346; 
of the Disang, xi. 362; in Etah, xii. 29, 
37; Farldpur, xii.54; Fyzabad,xii. 115; 
of the Ganges, xii. 136 ; Upper Ganges 
Canal, xii. 137 ; in Gangoh, xii. 139 ; 
Ganjam, xii. 145; Gauhati, xii. 184; 
Gaya, xii. 197; Ghatal, xii. 214; 
Ghotki, xii. 236; Gilgit (1841), xii. 
238; Goalpara, xii. 270, 277, 278; 
Godavari District, xii. 284; Gonda, xii. 
314; Gujranwala, xii. 362-363 ; of the 
GumtT, xii. 385 ; Gunnaur, xii. 38S ; 
Guntur, xii. 389; Hanthawaddy, xiii. 
28 ; Hardoi, xiii. 45, 46, 48 ; Hardwar 
(1894), xiii. 53; Henzada, xiii. 103, 
105, 107, 109; Hooghly Distiict, xiii. 
163; Hoshiarpur, xiii. 193, 198; 
Howrah, xiii. 207 ; of the Indus, 
xni. 359, 360, 361, 362; of the 
Jadukata, xiii. 374 ; in JalpaigurT, xiv.* 
32 ; Jamnialamadugu, xiv. 48-49 ; 
North Kanara, xiv. 342 ; Karatoya 
(1787), XV. 24; Karnal, xv, 52 ; Khan- 



desh, XV. 236; Khangarh, xv. 243; 
Kashmir and Jammu, xv. 89, 135 ; 
Katha, xv. 154; Keti (1853), xv. 205; 
Khulna, xv. 2S7 ; Kistna l3istrict, xv. 
32 1 ; Kolaba, xv. 366 ; Kurnool, xvi. 
33; Kyaukse, xvi. 71; Larkana, xvi. 
138; Madras, xvi. 246; Madura, xvi. 
389; Malda, .xvii. 76; Mandalay (1899), 
.wii. 127; Manikganj (1861), xvii. 
182 ; Meiktila,xvii.'277; Murshidabad, 
xviii. 46; Muzafifarpur, xviii. 96; Nadia, 
xviii. 271 ; Nasik, xviii. 407 ; Nellore, 
xix. 9; Orissa, xix. 254; Pabna, xix. 
298; Patiala, xx. 33; Patna, xx. 55; 
Punjab, XX. 259 ; Purl, xx. 399, 400, 
403 ; Purnea, xx. 414; Rajpntana, xxi. 
93; Rangpur, xxi. 224; Salem, xxi. 
398 ; Santal Parganas, xxii. 63-64 ; 
Saran, xxii. 86; Savantvadi, xxii. 154; 
Shahabad, xxii. 188 ; Shirpur, xxii. 293; 
Sirpur TandCir, xxiii. 41 ; .Srinagar, xxiii. 
loi ; Surat (1837, 1883), xxiii. 166; of 
Eastern Tons, xxiii. 418 ; in Tadpatri 
(1851), xxiii. 204; Tanakpur (1880), 
xxiii. 218; Tanjore, xxiii. 227 ; Tarab- 
ganj, xxiii. 248 ; Trichinopoly, xxiv. 
27; Twenty-four Parganas, xxiv. 69; 
United Provinces, xxiv. 145 ; Vaniyam- 
badi, xxiv. 299; Vizagapatam, xxiv. 324. 

Flora. See Botany. 

Fioris, Peter, Dutchman in English 
employ, sailed to Coromandel Coast 
(1611), xvii. 216. 

Flour-mills, in Agra, v. 79, 90 ; Allah- 
abad, v. 241; Ambala, v. 283; Balu- 
chistan, vi. 308 ; Bamra, vi. 344 ; 
Baroda, vii. 56; Bhopal, viii. 137; 
Calcutta, ix. 269; Cawnpore, ix. 319; 
Delhi, xi. 240; Farrukhabad, xii. 69, 
73 ; Gauhati, xii. 186 ; Gojra, xii. 306 ; 
Gujranwala, xii. 359; Hafizabad, xiii. 
5 ; Hazara, xiii. 82 ; Howrah, xiii. 
209; Jhang, xiv. 131; Jhelum, xiv. 
156; Jubbulpore, xiv. 213, 219; Jul- 
lundur, xiv. 228, 231 ; Lucknow, xvi. 
198; Ludhiana, xvi. 205; Lyallpur, 
xvi. 224; Meerut, xvii. 266 ; Murwara, 
xviii. 59; Poona, xx. 176; Quetta, 
xxi. 21 ; Sialkot, xxii. 331, 336 ; Sib- 
pur, xxii. 344 ; United Provinces, xxiv. 
205. 

Flower-peckers (Dicaeidae), i. 246. 

Floyd, Colonel Sir John, battles with 
Tipu at Satyamangalam (1790), x. 359, 
xxii. 136. 

Flycatchers (Muscicapidae), i. 243-244. 

Flying-fox {Ptei-opus), found in Ratnagiri, 
xxi. 246. 

Flying Lemurs {Galcopithicus), i. 225. 

Flying Squirrels. See Squirrels. 

Fodder, bran, cattle-food, &c., exports, 
iii. 309 ; areas under, in important 
Provinces (1903-4), iii. 100. 



1 88 



INDEX 



Fodder grass (or Lucerne), grown in 
Aghanistan, v. 52 ; Kalat, xiv. 301 ; 
Ladakb, xvi. 93 ; Las Bela, xvi. 147 ; 
Loralai, xvi. 176; Madras, xvi. 275; 
Nagpur, xviii. 311 ; Quetta-Pishin, xxi. 
15; Sarawan, xxii. 100; Zhob, xxiv. 

432. 

Food, effect on public health, i. 501 ; in 
Rigveda, ii. 227; in Aden, v. i.:;; of 
the Afghans, v. 50; of inhabitants of 
Ajmer-Merwara, v. 147; of Akhas, v. 
I Si, ix. 146; of Andamanese, v. 
367-36S ; Assamese, vi. 50; Ayiris, 
xi. 28 ; in Baluchistan, vi. 292 ; Baroda, 
vii. 44, 52 ; of Bengal cuUivators, vii. 
239; in Berar, vii. 381, 390-391; of 
the Bhils,viii.io2 ; Bhutanese,viii.i58 ; 
in Bombay, viii. 30S-309 ; of Burmese, 
ix, 146-147 ; in Central India, ix. 355- 
356 ; in Central Provinces, x. 28-29, 
46-47; of Cbins.x. 274; in Hyderabad, 
xiii. 249; of Karens, ix. 146; Kath- 
karis, xv. 360; Khasis, xv. 259; 
KolTs, XV. 388, 389; Ladakhis, xvi. 
93 ; in Madras, xvi. 265-266 ; of Marus, 
ix. 146 ; MIkirs, xvii. 341 ; in My- 
sore, xviii. 206; of Naga tribes, xviii. 
289; in Nepal, xix. 44; Nicobars, 
xix. 75 ; North-West Frontier Pro- 
vinces, xix. 16S ; of Paniyas, xi. 28 ; 
in Punjab, xx. 292-293 ; Rajputana, 
xxi. 117; Sind, xxii. 408-409; United 
Provinces, xxiv. 174; of Was, ix. 146. 

Food-grains, export trade, iii. 284 ; ex- 
empted from duty, iv. 264. 

Food-supply, iii. 223-224. 

Foote, iiruce, on prehistoric implement 
factories and cinder-mounds, ii. 93-94. 

Forbes, A. K., quoted on Rudra Mala, 
xxii. 3.^8-359. 

Forbes, James, details of battle on Adas 
Plain, V. 8-9; visit to Alibag (1771), 
v. 206 n.; to Banket (1771), vi. 
3S3 ; on Chandod, x. 166; defence of 
Dabhoi (1780), vii. 36 ; on Dabhoi, xi. 
100; on Deogarh, xi. 275; visit to 
Mahad (1771), xvi. 429. 

Forbes, Kinlocli, quoted on temple-hill of 
Shetrunja, xix. 361-362, 

Forbes, Major, defeated Marathas at 
Barmul pass, xix. 255. 

Forbesganj, village in Purnca District, 
Bengal, xii. loi. 

Forchhammer, Dr., archaeological sur- 
veys in I'urma (1S90 , ix. 130; re- 
marks on Thaton traditions, xxiii. 341. 

Forde, Colonel, victories over French 
ri759'), ii- 473. 478, xii. 285, xvi. 252 ; 
Masulipatam captured, xii. 145, xvi. 252, 
xvii. 216; Narasapur regaine<l from the 
French by, xviii. 372 ; commander of 
English force assisting Nawab of Arcot 
(1757), xix. 10, 24. 



Foreign Christian !NTissionary Society of 
America (unsectarian . See jinder Pro- 
testant Missions. 

Foreign relations, iv. 104-125; under 
the Company, 104-107 ; overlapping of 
Imperial and Indian diplomacy, 105 ; 
under the Crown, 106 ; division of 
powers, 106; present responsibilities of 
the Indian Government outside India, 
107-122; Aden and Perim, 107-108; 
Sokotra, 108-109; Arab coast from 
Bab el Mandeb to Maskat, 109 ; the 
' Trucial ' Chiefs, no; Odcid and 
Koweit, iio-iii; Turkish Arabia, 
III; islands in the Persian Gulf, in; 
Bahrein, 111-112; Persia, 112-113; 
Persia, Afghanistan, and India, 113- 
115; Afghanistan, 11 6-1 17; Kashgar, 
118 ; Tibet, 118-120 ; China, 120-1 21 ; 
Siam, 1 21-122 ; pecuniary liabilities of 
the Indian Government, 122-124; pos- 
sessions in India of France and Portugal, 
1 23-124; foreign consular agents in 
India, 124-125 ; bibliography, 125. 

Forester, Hon. Mary Ann, owner of 
Sardhana estates (1851), xxii. 107. 

Forests, iii. 102-127 ; natural classes, 102 ; 
classification by types, 102-104; deci- 
duous, 102-103 i evergreen, 103 ; dry, 
103; alpine, 103; tidal, 103; ripnrinn, 
103-104 ; influence on water-supply and 
climate, 104-105 ; value to the state, 
105; area of state forests, 105-106; 
departmental classification, 106-107 ; 
review of administration in the past, 
107 ; organization of the Forest service, 
107- loS ; recruitment and technical 
education, 108-109 ! employment of 
Indian Forest officers outside India, 
109 ; Indian forest law, 109-1 10 ; steps 
by which state forests are constituted, 
iio-iii; demarcation, in-112; sur- 
veys, 112; working pl.nns, 11 2-1 13; 
communications and buildings, 113; 
protection from man, 113; protection 
from fire, 113-115; protection from 
cattle, 115-116; natural regeneration, 
116-11S; cultural opeiations, 1 18 ; ar- 
tificial reproduction, 11S-119; yield of, 
119-120 ; methods of exploitation, 120- 
122 ; financial results, 122 ; free grants 
of produce, 122 ; Native State and 
private, 123-124; forest tribes: their 
general economic condition, 124-125; 
typical tribes, 125; employment of 
animals as carriers of forest produce, 
126; education of Conservators, 127; 
bibliography, 127; revenue, iv. 171, 
201 ; surveys, iv. 496-497. 

Local notices : Adilab.^d, v. 23 ; 
Afghanistan, v. 32 ; Ahmadabad, v. 95 ; 
Ahmadnagar, v. 117-118; Ajaigarh, 
V. 133; Ajmer-Merwara, v. 153-154; 



INDEX 



189 



Akola, V. 1S5; Akyab, v. 192, 195- 
196 ; Almora, v. 249 ; Alwar, v. 262 ; 
Ambala, v. 282-283 ; Amherst, v. 299- 
300; AmraotI, V, 310; Amieli, Baroda, 
V. 317; Amritsar, v. 324 ; Anaimalais, 
V- 333 ; Anantapur, v. 343-344 ; Anda- 
mans, v. 357 ; Angul, v. 375, 378 ; 
Arakan, v. 395 ; Aravalli Hills, v. 402 ; 
North Arcot, v. 412-413 ; South Arcot, 
V. 429-430; Assam, vi. 19, 67-70; 
Attock, vi. 135 ; Aurangabad, vi. 145 ; 
Backergunge, vi. 166 ; Bahraich, vi. 
210; Baluchistan, vi. 304-306 ; Bamra, 
vi. 344; Banda,vi. 352; Bankura, vi.384; 
Baroda, vii. 52-53; BarwanT, vii. 90; 
Basim, vii. 100; Bassein, vii. 112; Bas- 
tar, vii. 123; Belgaum, vii. 152; Bel- 
lary, vii. 167 ; Bemetara, vii. 177 ; Ben- 
gal, vii. 257-261 ; Berar, vii. 391-392 ; 
Betrd, viii. 7, 12 ; Bhadrachalam, viii. 
22 ; Bhamo, viii. 52 ; Bhandara, viii. 
67 ; Bharatpur, viii. 82 ; Bhaunagar, 
viii. 95; Bhopal, viii. 136; Bhor, viii. 
14S ; Bidar, viii. 166; Bijapur, viii. 
174, 182; Bijawar, viii. 190; Bijnor, 
viii. 198; Bilaspur, viii. 222-223, 228 ; 
Black Mountain, viii. 251 ; Bombay, 
viii. 321-323; Bonai, ix. 3; Buldana, 
ix. 63 ; Bundi, ix. 84 ; Burhanpur, ix. 
103; Burma, i. 197-199, ix. 117, 167- 
170 ; Cachar, ix. 254-255 ; Central 
India, ix. 331, 365-366; Central Pro- 
vinces, x. 7, 47-50 ; Chakrata, x. 125 ; 
Chamba, x. 131 ; Champaran, x. 138; 
Chanda, x. 149, 155-156; Charduar, x. 
176; Chindwara, x. 205, 210, 214; 
Lower Chindwin, x. 233 ; Upper Chind- 
win, X. 245-246 ; Chin Hills, x. 
276; Chittagong, x. 312; Chittagong 
Hill Tiacts, X. 322 ; Chodavaram, 
X. 326 ; Cochin, x. 346-347 ; Coim- 
batore, x. 363-365; <-'oorg, xi, 35- 
36; Cuddapah, xi. 66-67; Daman, xi. 
129; Damoh, xi. 135,140; Darjeeling, 
xi. 174-175 ; Darrang, xi.187; Deccan, 
i. 43-44 ; Dera Ghazi Khiin, xi. 254- 
255 ; Dera Ismail Khan, xi. 26 



> 



DhamtarT, xi. 285 ; Dharvvar, xi. 304, 
311; Dholpur, xi. 326-327; Digboi, 
xi. 344 ; DindorT, xi. 358 ; Drug, xi. 
369 ; Dumka, xi. 377 ; Dungarpur, xi. 
382 ; Eastern Bengal and Assam, xi. 
394 ; Elgandal, xii. S ; EUichpur, xii. 
15; Ernad, xii. 27; Ferozepore, xii.. 
94 ; Gadarwara, xii. 119 ; Ganjam, xii. 
151 ; Gangpur, xii. 142 ; Garhwal, xii. 
168; Garo Hills, xii. 172, 17S-179; 
Eastern Ghats, xii. 216 ; Goa, xii. 261 ; 
Goalpara, xii. 273-274 ; Godavari 
District, xii. 290-291 ; Gujrat, xii. 
370 ; Gundalpet, xii. 386 ; Gurdaspur, 
xii. 397-398; Gwalior, xii. 420, 430; 
Hanthawaddy, xiii. 32 ; Harsud, xiii. 



58-59 ; Hatta, xiii. 73 ; Hazara, xiii. 
80-81 ; Hazaribagh, xiii. 92 ; Hyder- 
abad, xiii. 259-261 ; Jalpaigurl, xiv. 
37 ; JanjTra, xiv. 60 ; Jhalawar, xiv. 
119; Jhansi, xiv. 143; Jhelum, xiv. 
155; JTnd, xiv. 172 ; Jobat, xiv. 17S ; 
Jodhpur, xiv. 191 ; Jubbulpore, xiv. 
212 ; Jullundur, xiv. 228; Kadur, xiv. 
266-267 ; Kalimpong, xiv. 308 ; Kam- 
rup, xiv. 336 ; Noith Kanara, xiv. 34S- 
349 ; South Kanara, xiv. 363-364 ; 
Kangra, xiv. 392 ; Karachi, xv. 7 ; 
Karauli, xv. 29-30; Katha, xv. 158- 
159; Kathiawar, xv. 179; Khandesh, 
XV. 235 ; Khulna, xv. 290 ; Kistna Dis- 
trict, XV. 327 ; Kolaba, xv. 363-364 ; 
Kudligi, xvi. 11-12 ; Kurnool, xvi. 39 ; 
Kyankpyu, xvi. 62 ; Kyaukse, xvi. 77 ; 
Lahore, xvi. loi ; Lakhimpur, x\i. 1 24 ; 
Larkana, xvi. 141 ; Lewe, xvi. 160 ; 
Loralai, xvi. 177 ; Madras, xvi. 243, 
284-288 ; Madura, xvi. 396-397 ; 
Magwe, xvi. 418-419; Mahbubnagar, 
xvii. 4-5 ; Malabar, xvii. 63-64 ; Man- 
bhum, xvii. 116; Mandalay, xvii. 133; 
MandT, xvii. 156 ; Mandla, xvii. 165- 
166; Manipur, xvii. 191 ; Meiklila, xvii. 
282-283; Mergui, xvii. 302; Mertipar- 
vat hill, xvii. 309 ; Mianwali, xvii. 321 ; 
Minbu, xvii. 351-352 ; Montgomery, 
xvii. 414; Muzaffargarh, xviii. 79-80; 
Myaungmya,xviii. ii3-ii4;Myitkyina, 
xviii. 142; Mysore, xviii. 216-217, 252 ; 
Naga Hills, xviii. 292 ; Nagpur, xviii. 
305, 312; Naini Tal, xviii. 328-329; 
Nalgonda, xviii. 341 ; Nellore, xix. 15- 
16; Nepal, xix. 4S-50 ; the Nilgiris, 
xix. 95-96 ; Nimar, xix. 113 ; Northern 
Shan States, xxii. 240; North- West 
Frontier Province, xix. 180; Nowgong, 
xix. 226 ; Orchha, xix. 246 ; Orissa, xix. 
259-260; Pakokku, xix. 325-326; Pala- 
mau, xix. 340-341 ; Palanpur, xix. 
349-350 ; Panch Mahals, xix. 385-386 ; 
Panna, xix. 402 ; Papanodanu-vana, 
Than, xxiii. 288; Parbhani, xix. 413; 
Patiala, xx. 43; Pegu, xx. 90-91; 
Pegu Yoma, Paukkanng, xx. 77 ; Port 
Blair, xx. 209; Prome, xx. 225; Pun- 
jab, i. 28-29, ^^- 309-312; Pyapon, 
xxi. 6 ; Quetta-Pishln, xxi. 16 ; Raichur, 
x.\i.4i ; Raipur, xxi. 55; Rajputana, xxi. 
127-128; Rawalpindi, xxi. 268 ; Rewa 
Kantha,xxi.296; Rewah, xxi. 285-2S6; 
Ruby Mines District, xxi. 331-333 ; 
Saharanpur, xxi. 374-375 \ Salem, xxi. 
402; Salween, xxi. 418-419; .Sando- 
way, xxii. 36 ; Sandur, xxii. 45 ; Santal 
Parganas, xxii. 71-72 ; Satara, xxii. 
123-124; Saugor, xxii. 143 ; Seoni, xxii. 
171; Shahpur, xxii. 218 ; Southern .Shan 
States, xxii. 259-260 ; Sholapur, xxii. 
301 ; Shwebo, xxii, 316 ; .Sibsagar, xxii. 



190 



INDEX 



350 ; Sikkim, xxii. 370 ; Simla, xxii. 
380; Sind, xxii. 417-418 ; Singhbhum, 
xxiii. 8 ; Sirmur, xxiii. 25-26 ; Sirohi, 
xxiii. 33 ; Sirpur Tandur, xxiii. 43 ; 
Sukkur, xxiii. 123; Suudarbans, xxiii. 
143; Sural, xxiii. 160; Syliiet, xxiii. 
195 ; Tarai, i. 43 ; Tavoy, xxiii. 
263 ; Thana, xxiii. 297-298 ; Tharra- 
waddy, xxiii. 322 ; Thaton, xxiii. 335- 
336 ; Tliayetmyo, xxiii. 349 ; Tinne- 
velly, xxiii. 371-372 ; Tonk, xxiii. 412 ; 
Toungoo, xxiii. 428-429 ; Travancore, 
xxiv. lo-ii; Trichinopoly, xxiv. 34; 
Tumkur, xxiv. 56 ; Twenty-four Par- 
ganas, xxiv. 75 ; Udaipur, xxiv. 96 ; 
United Provinces, xxiv. 196-199 ; Up- 
per Sind Frontier District, xxiv. 282; 
Warangal, xxiv. 361 ; Wardha, xxiv. 
371 ; \Yun. xxiv. 394; Yamethin, xxiv. 
407. 

Forest and jungle products, free grants, 
iii. 122-123. 

Local notices: Alwar, v. 262-263: 
Balucliistan, vi. 305 ; Chamba, x. 132 ; 
Champaran, x. 13S; Cochin, x. 348; 
Coimbatore, x. 365 ; Gwalior, xii. 430; 
Ilanthavvaddy, xiii. 32 ; Jalpaigurl, xiv. 
37 ; Malabar, xvii. 63 ; Manbhum, 
xvii. 116; Midnapore, xvii. 334; My- 
aungmya, xviii. 114; Mysore, xviii. 
217; Nellore, xix. 16 ; Orissa, xix. 260 ; 
Santal Parganas, xxii. 72 ; Saugor, xxii. 
143 ; .Singbtinm, xxiii. 8. See also Gum, 
Honey, Lac, Mahiid, Resin, Wax, &c. 

Forest school, at Dehra, iii. 109, xi. 222, 
xxiv. 251. 

Forests, submerged, at Tinnevelly, i. 99. 

Forman Christian College, at Lahore, xvi. 

99. io.=i- i.M- 
Forster, Major, command of Shekhawati 

15rigade, xxii. 269-270. 

Forsyth, Sir Douglas, mission to Hindu 
Rush (1873), xiii. 137; advant^ages of 
Pachmarh! as a sanitarium first dis- 
covered by, xix. 307. 

Fort Dufferiii. See Mandalay City. 

Fort Lockliart, in North-West Frontier 
Province, xii. 101. 

Fort Mackeson, in North- West Frontier 
Province, xii. loi. 

Fort Munro, in Punjab, xii. loi. 

Fortified Island, the. See Pasavrajdurg. 

Forts: Addanki, v. 9; Adoni, v. 25; 
Saiyidabad, in Afghanistan, v. 44 ; 
Agra, v. 76, 85 ; Agrohar, v. 92 ; 
Ahmadnagar, v, 114, 124; Ajaigarh, 
V. 130, 132-133; Ajanta Hills, v. 134; 
Ajmer, v. 172 ; Narnala, in Akola, 
V. 183; Rolaba, near AlTbag, v. 206; 
All Masjid, v. 220; Alwar, v. 268; 
Atmakur, at Amarchinta, v. 273 ; 
Amber, v. 291 ; Juna Kot, at Amreli, 
V. 318; Govindgarii, near Amritsar, 



V. 329 ; Gooty and Penukonda in 
Anantapur, v. 340 ; Anekal, v. 373 ; 
Anjaneri, v. 382; Anjengo, v. 384; 
Ankai, v. 385 ; Antur, v. 387 ; Anup- 
garh, V. 387 ; Arantangi, v. 399 ; 
Taragarh in Aravalli Hills, v. 401 ; 
Arcot, V. 420 ; Armagon, vi. 3 ; Arni, 
vi. 4; Ashta, vi. 11; AsTrgarh, vi. 
12-13; Assam, vi. 36; Atari, vi. 121 ; 
Attock, vi. 138 ; Atur, vi. 139; Awa, 
vi. 153; Azamgarh, vi. 155, 156, 162; 
Badami, vi. 177; Badarpur, vi. 177; 
Bairatgarh, near Badnor, vi. 178 ; 
Kherla in Badnur, vi. 179, viii. 8; 
Bagh, vi. 183 ; Baglan, vi. 191 ; Bagni, 
vi. 193; Balapur, vi. 234; Balkonda, 
vi. 249; Ballabgarh, vi. 250 ; Ballia, \i. 
251 ; kanthambhor and Khandhor, on 
the Banas, vi. 346 ; Bhuragarh at 
Banda, vi. 357 ; Bangalore, vi. 369 ; 
Banur, vi. 414; Bari, vii. 16; Barl 
Sadri, vii. 18 ; Bariya, vii. 21 ; Barkur, 
vii. 22 ; Barmer, vii. 23 ; Barnala, 
vii. 24 ; Juna Kot, Baroda, vii. 
82 ; Barwaha, vii. 90 ; Barwani, vii. 
90 ; Basarh, vii. 94 ; Basavapatna, vii. 
94; Basti, vii. 132; Basvva, vii. 132; 
Bijaigarh, Bayana, vii. 137 ; Begun, 
vii. 142 ; Behror, vii. 143 ; Bekal, vii. 
14.^; Belgaum, vii. 145, 14S, 157; 
Bellamkonda, vii. 158; Bellary, vii. 
162, 175; Rajghat, Benares, vii. 182; 
Bhadra, viii. 22; lihainsrorgarh, viii. 
39-40; Bhandara, viii. 71; Bharatpur, 
viii. 87; l?hatinda, viii. 90; Bliavani, 
viii. 98 ; Bhimashankar, viii. 108- 
109; Bhonglr, viii. 124; Fatehgarh, 
Bhopal, viii. 143, 144; Bhopawar, 
viii. 145 ; Bihar, viii. 172 ; Bijnot, viii. 
202; Blkauer, viii. 218; Bissan, viii. 
249 ; Bobbili, viii. 254 ; Bodvad, viii. 
255 ; Borsad, ix. 7 ; Jiroach, ix. 29 ; 
I'udaun, ix. 42 ; Budge-Budge, ix. 45 ; 
lifidihal, ix. 46 ; ]5ukkur, ix. 46-47 ; 
]}undelkliand, ix. 70 ; Bundi, ix. 88 ; 
Calcutta, ix. 263 , Central Provinces, x. 
18, 19 ; Cl)aiii]iur, x. 121 ; Chakan, x. 
122; Champiiner, x. 136, vii. 20; 
Chanda, x. 150, 151 ; Chandcri, x. 163- 
164; Chandor, X. 166-167; Cliandra- 
giri, X. 168, 169; Channapatna, x. 174 ; 
Channarayan Betta, x. 174; Chari- 
kar, X. 176; Mangalgarh, Charkhiiri, 
X. 179; Amravati, on Chatia hill, x. 
181 ; Kalinjar, in Chaube Jagirs, 
X. 183; Cliaumu, x. 185; Chiiabra, 
X. 195-196; Chikmugalur, x. 222; 
Chingleput, X. 268; Chiplun, x. 287; 
Chir.awa, x. 288 ; Sadashivgarh, Chi- 
tfikul, X. 289 ; Chitaldroog, x. 297 ; 
Chitor, X. 298-299 ; Chopda, x. 327; 
Chunar, X. 333-334; Churu, x. 335; 
Coondapoor, xi. 1 ; Saadat Bandar, 



INDEX 



191 



Covelong, xi. 54 ; Barabati Kila, Cut- 
tack, xi. 98 ; Dabhoi, xi. 99-100 ; 
Dacca, xi. 106, 117 ; Dagshai, xi. 
122; Dahanu, xi. 122; Dalmau, xi. 
127 ; Dalml, xi. 127 ; Daman, xi. 130- 
131; Singorgarh, Damoh, xi. 137; 
Dankhar, xi. 148; Danubyu, xi. 148- 
149; Daosa, xi. 149; Darblianga, xi. 
154; Dasuya, xi. 194: Daiilatabad, 
xi. 200-201 ; Sallmgarh, Delhi, xi. 
236, 237 ; Mount Deliy, xi. 241 ; Deo- 
band, xi. 242 ; Deodrug, xi. 243 ; 
Deogarh, xi. 245-246; Deori, xi. 
247; Devanhalli, xi. 273; Devaraya- 
durga, xi. 274 ; Dewangiri, xi. 277 ; 
Dhar, xi. 293 ; Dhari, xi. 299 ; Dliar- 
mapuri, xi. 299 ; Dharwar, xi. 306, 
316; Dhodap, xi. 320; Shergarh, 
Dholpur, xi. 324 ; Dliorajl, xi. 333 ; 
Dhulia, xi. 338 ; Chingrikhali, near 
Diamond Harbour, xi. 340 ; Dibru- 
garh, xi. 342 ; Dimapur, xi. 346- 
347 ; Dindigul, xi. 357 ; DIpalpur, xi. 
359 ; Dodvad, xi. 366 ; Drug, xi. 370 ; 
Durduria, xi. 386 ; Elgandal, xii. 6 ; 
Etawah, xii. 47 ; Falta, xii. 51 ; Farld- 
kot, xii. 52 ; Faridpur, xii. 62 ; Farrah, 
xii. 62 ; Gadwal Samasllian, xii. 121 ; 
Gagraun, xii. 121-122; Galna, xii. 
124-125; Gandikota, xii. 127-128; 
Garhakota, xii. 161 ; Garhmuktesar, 
xii. 162 ; Gaur, xii. 189 ; Gawllgarh, 
xii. 193-194; Georgegarh, xii. ?io; 
Western Gliats, xii. 218-219; Gho- 
raghat, xii. 236 ; Naulakhagarh, 
Gidliaur, xii. 237 ; Gingee, xii. 242- 
245 ; Girislik, xii. 247 ; Gohad, xii. 
304; Golconda, xii. 309-310; Gooty, 
xii. 326; Govardliangiri, xii. 343; 
(jovindgarh, xii. 344 ; Gujrat, xii. 
373-374; Ciulbarga, xii. 383; Guled- 
garli, xii. 383 ; Gurdaspur, xii. 401 ; 
Gurramkonda, xii. 412-413 ; Gwalior, 
xii. 439 ; Hajipur, xiii. 7 ; Hamlrpur, 
xiii. 21; Hansi,xiii. 25 ; Hantliawaddy, 
xiii. 37 ; Hanumangarh, >iii. 38-39 ; 
Harihar, xiii. 55 ; Haripur, xiii. 56 ; 
Hariscliandragarh, xiii. 56 ; Suvarn- 
drug island, off Harnai, xiii. 57 ; Har- 
panahalli, xiii. 58; Harrand, xiii. 
58; Abazai, Hashtnagar, xiii. 61; 
Channarayapatna, Hassan District, 
xiii. 63-64; Hathras, xiii. 71-72; 
Hazara, xiii. 77-78; Kunda, Ha- 
zaribagh, xiii. 89; Hebli, xiii. 
100 ; Akauktaung, Henzada, xiii. 104 ; 
Herat, xiii. 114; Hijili, xiii. 116; 
Hirekal Gudda Hills, xiii. 143 ; Hola- 
vanhalli, xiii. 158; Hole-Narsipur, xiii. 
T59; Gholghat, Hooghly town, xiii. 
176; Hoshangabad, xiii. 182 ; Malot, 
Hoshiarpur, xiii. 194; Hoskote, xiii. 
203; Hubli, xiii. 222; Huli, xiii. 223; 



Hunza-Nagar, xiii. 225 ; Hyderabad 
State, xiii. 243 ; Hyderabad city, Sind, 
xiii. 321 ; Ichliawar, xiii. 324; Indore, 
xiii. 340; Indur, xiii. 352; Indpe- 
garh, Monghyr, xiv. 53 ; Jagtial, xiii. 
377 ; Jahazpur, xiii. 379 ;^ Jaigarh, 
xiii. 379 ; Jaijon, xiii. 380 ; Nahargarh, 
Jaipur, xiii. 400 ; Jaisalmer, xiv. 4, 
9-10; Ghausgarh, near Jalalabad, 
xiv. 14; Jalesar, xiv. 26-27; Jalna, 
xiv. 29 ; Jalor, xiv. 29-30 ; Boda 
and Bhitargarii, Jalpaigurl, xiv. 33 ; 
Jamalabad, xiv. 43 ; Garh Jaripa, 
Jamalpur, xiv. 43 ; Jambusar, xiv. 45 ; 
Jamrud, xiv. 52 ; Janjira, xiv. 61-62 ; 
Jasdan, xiv. 66 ; Jaugada, xiv. 72-73 ; 
Jaunpur, xiv. 82, 83; Jawhar, xiv. 88; 
Jaynagar, xiv. 89; Jodhpur, xiv. 19S- 
199 ; Jodiya, xiv. 200 ; Jora, xiv. 201 ; 
Juba, xiv. 204; Jubo, xiv. 220 ; Junnar 
and Shivner, xiv. 239, 240; Kadi, 
xiv. 258; Kagal, xiv. 272; Kaimur 
Hills, xiv. 275; Kaithal, xiv. 2S8 ; 
Kalanga, xiv. 29S ; Kalat-i-Ghilzai, 
xiv. 306 ; Kalinjar, xiv. 310-313 ; Kal- 
meshwar, xiv. 315-316 ; Kalna, xiv. 
316; Kalpi, xiv. 319; Kalyandrug, 
xiv. 323 ; Kaman, xiv. 326 ; Kamla- 
garh, xiv. 328 ; Kampli, xiv. 329 ; 
Kanaud, xiv. 370; Kot Kangra, xiv. 
397 ; Kangundi, xiv. 399 ; Karad, xv. 
19; Karasgaon, xv. 24; Karnala, xv. 
59 ; Karwar, xv. 66 ; KashTpur, xv. 
71; Kathumar, xv. 186; Katol, xv. 
189; Katwa, XV. 190; Kelod, xv. 
198; Kerur, xv. 203-204; Khandela, 
XV. 224; Khaniadiiana, xv. 244; 
Kharda, xv. 251 ; Khuzdar, xv. 
298 ; Sobha Singh, Sialkot, xv. 305 ; 
Kishangarh, xv. 318 ; Kittiir, xv. 
337; Kolaba, xv. 359; Kondapalli, 
x'^' 393) Kondavid, xv. 393; Koppal, 
XV. 398; Krishnagiri, xvi. 9; Kulang 
and Alang, xvi. 13-14; Kumbhalgarh, 
xvi. 21-22 ; Kunda, xvi. 25 ; Kurnool, 
xvi. 45 ; Lahore, xvi. 109, 112 ; Laling, 
xvi. 132-133; Landi Kotal, xvi. 135; 
Lash-Jawain, xvi. 150; Lohogarh, xvi. 
170; Lucknow, xvi. 189; Ludhiana, xvi. 
208; Machhlishahr, xvi. 225 ; Madda- 
giridurga, xvi. 229-230; Madha, xvi. 
230; Mahasthan, xvi. 437; Maheshwar, 
xvii. 10 ; Maihar, xvii. 29 ; Maksudan- 
garh, xvii. 53; Malanggarh, xvii. 
72-73; Malot, Hoshiarpur, xvii. 94; 
Malot, Jhelum, xvii. 94 ; Padma- 
garh and Sindhudrug off Malvan, xvii, 
96; Mandalgarh, xvii. 149 ; Mandasor, 
xvii. 150; Mandor, xvii. 171 ; Mandu, 
xvii. 171-173; Mangalvedha, xvii. 178; 
Mankera, xvii. 19S ; Manki, xvii. 198; 
Mannargudi, xvii. 200 ; Manohar, xvii, 
200; Manoharpur, xvii. 200; Manoli, 



192 



INDEX 



xvii. 200; Marot, xvii. 210; Mastuj, 
xvii. 214; Masulipatam, xvii. 215; 
Maudaha, xvii. 232 ; Medak, xvii. 246, 
251; Meerut, xvii. 264; Jafarabad, 
^Iercara, xvii. 292 ; Michni, xvii. 326; 
Mirjan, xvii. 364 ; Mogalturrii, xvii. 
381 ; Mohindargarh, Kanaud, xvii. 
385 ; Monghyr, xvii. 402, 403 ; 
Muddebihal, xviii. il ; Mudgal, xviii. 
11 ; MuhamdT, xviii. 14; Miihaiiimad- 
piir, xviii. 17; Mundra, xviii. 39; 
Muttra, xviii. 73 ; Muzaffargarh, xviii. 
83; Myohaung, xviii. 161; Mysore, 
xviii. 261; Nablia, xviii. 271 ; Nadol, 
xviii. 283 ; Nagaur, xviii. 298; Nagina, 
xviii. 299, 300; Palthargarli, NajTb- 
abad, xviii. 334 ; Naldrug, xviii. 337 ; 
Namakhal Rock, xviii. 347-348 ; Nan- 
dana, xviii. 349 ; Nander, xviii. 350, 
355 ; Pratfipgarh, Nandgad, xviii. 356; 
NaiTiyanganj, xviii. 373; Narnala, xviii. 
379; Narsinghgarli, xviii. 385; Nai- 
war, xviii, 397; Nasik, xviii. 401; 
near Nichlaul, xix. 59; Nirmal, xix. 
123, xiii. 352 ; Nizamabad, xix. 125 ; 
Nurpur, xix. 232 ; Nuzvid, xix. 234 ; 
Orchha, xix. 248; Otur, xix. 276; 
Owsa, xix. 294 ; Padavcdu, xix. 309 ; 
Pakpattan, xix. 332 ; Palamcottah, xix. 
345; Palghat, xix. 358; Palladam, 
xix. 369 ; Panchet, xix. 378 ; Pandav- 
garli, xix. 389; Pangal, xix. 396; 
Panhala, xix. 396-397 ; Parenda, xx. 
I ; Paiichhatgaih, xx. 2 ; Parli, xx. 5 ; 
Parola, xx. 7 ; Partabgarh, xx. 21 ; 
PattI, XX. 74 ; Pattikonda, xx. 75 ; 
Pattukkottai, xx. 76 ; I'auin, xx. 79 ; 
Pavagarh, xx. 79 80; I'eddapiiram, 
XX. 82 ; Penukonda, xx. 105 ; Bala 
liisar, Peshawar, xx. 125; Plialodi, 
XX. 129; I'hillanr, xx. 130; Polur, xx. 
160; Poruiiiamilla, xx. 215; Pratap- 
garh, XX. 216-217; Pyapalli, xxi. 1 ; 
Rae BarelT, xxi. 33 ; Ragluigarh, 
xxi. 35 ; Rahman Garh, xxi. 36 ; 
Raicluir, xxi. 44-45 ; Raigarh, xxi. 
47 ; Raipur, xxi. 60 ; Raiseii, xxi. 63 ; 
Rajakhera, xxi. 65; Rajgarh, xxi. 71; 
Rajglr, xxi. 72 ; Rajiiagar, xxi. 7*^ > 
Pabariadhar, near Rajula, xxi. 168 ; 
Ramandriig, xxi. 170; Ramdiirg, xxi. 
172 ; Rampur, xxi. 189 ; Rangna, xxi. 
213; Kamilta])iir, Ranginir, xxi. 225- 
226 ; Ranpur, xxi. 235 ; Ranthambhor, 
xxi. 235-236; Ratangarh, xxi. 238; 
Rath, xxi. 240; Ratnagiri, xxi. 248; 
Ratlilialli, xxi. 259 ; Rilyadrug, xxi. 
275 •276; Rayakotlai, xxi. 276-277; 
Reni, xxi. 278 ; Rian, xxi. 301 ; Rohtas, 
xxi. 322, xiv. 159; Rohtasgarh, xxi. 
322-323; Rri|)nagar, xxi. 340 ; Rustak, 
xxi. 343 ; Sadiya, xxi. 347 ; .Sadra, xxi. 
348 ; SalemiHir-MajhaulI, xxi. 409 ; in 



Sambalpur, xxii. 6-7, 12 ; Sangli, xxii. 

54 ; Sangola, xxii. 54 ; Sanjan, xxii. 

56-57 ; Sankaridrug, xxii. 58 ; San- 

kheda, xxii. 59 ; .Saoner, xxii. 80 ; 

Sarawan, xxii. 98 ; Sardargarh, xxii. 

103; Sardarshalir, xxii. 104; Satara, 

xxii. 120, 129; Satwas, xxii. 134; in 

Saugor, xxii. 139, 148; Saundatti, xxii. 

149 ; Sehwan, xxii. 163 ; .Seondha, 

xxii. 164 ; Shabkadar, xxii. 186 ; 

.Sliekhupura, xxii. 270: .Shergarh, xxii. 

272, vii. 222 ; Sherghiiti, xxii. 272 ; 

Sliikarpur, xxii. 278 ; .Shirhatti, xxii. 

292 ; Shivner, xxii. 294 ; Sholapur, xxii. 

305-306, 307; Sialkot, xxii. 328, 335 ; 

Sibpur, xxii. 344 ; .Siddipet, xxii. 356 ; 

Sikandurpiir, xxii. 362 ; Sinhgarh, 

xxiii. 12 13; Slra, xxiii. 16; Mahur 

and Manikgarh, Sirpur Tandiir, xxiii. 

41 ; SitabaldT, xxiii. 49-50 ; Sohna, 

xxiii. 72; .Somnath, xxiii. 74; Sonda, 

xxiii. 82; Songarh, xxiii. S3, 288; 

Srliiagar, xxiii. 99; Siikkur, xxiii. 

127 ; .Sultanpur, xxiii. 138; Syamnagar, 

xxiii. 1S9; Talbahat, xxiii. 211; 

Tando Alahyar, xxiii. 223 ; Taiijore, 

xxiii. 242, 243; Tarana, xxiii. 250; 

Tatta, xxiii. 255-256; TeliagarliT, 

xxiii. 275 ; Tellicherry, xxiii. 276 ; 

Thai, xxiii. 287 ; Than, xxiii. 287 ; 

Thana, xxiii. 303 ; Tikamgarh, xxiii. 

359 ; Tirwa, x.xiii. 403 ; Trichinopoly, 

xxiv. 44-45; 'Irimbak, xxiv. 49; 

Trivandrum, xxiv. 50 ; Tyaga Durgaii), 

xxiv. 81 ; Udalguri, xxiv. 106; Udaya- 

giri, xxiv. 108; Udgir, xxiv. ill; 

Umarkot, xxiv. 118 ; Umrer, xxiv. 1 19; 

Vadi, xxiv. 292 ; Vallani, xxiv. 297 ; 

Vasola, xxiv. 301 ; Vellore, xxiv. 304- 

305; Vijayadrug, xxiv. 310; \'inu- 

konda, xxiv. 318 ; Vishalgarh, xxiv. 

321; V'izagapatam, xxiv. 3.30-331; 

Vyilra, xxiv. 343; Vypin, xxiv. 344; 

Khammamelt in Warangal, xxiv. 359; 

Yadgir, xxiv. 400; Zafargarh, xxiv. 359. 
Old Danish: Trancpiebar, xxiii. 435. 
Old Dutch: Chetwai,x. 195; Cochin, 

X. 342-343, .354; Pulicat, XX. 242; 

Sadras, xxi. 348. 

Old Elast India Company's : Devi- 

kottai, xi. 276; Fort St. David, xii. 

101-102; Fort St. George, ii. 457; 

Ganjam, xii. 158 159. 

Old Portuguese: 15assein, vii. 118, 

I 20 ; Cochin, x. 342-343, 354 ; Monak- 

bara in Diu, xi. 362, 363; Ilonavar, 

xiii. 160 ; Karanja, xv. 23. 
Fort .St. David, in .South Arcot District, 

Madras, xii. 101-102. 
Fort St. George. Sec Madras City. 
Fort .Sandeman, subdivision in Zhob 

District, Baluchistan, xii. 102. 
Fort Sandeman, head-quarters of Zhob 



INDEX 



193 



District, Baluchistan, and cantonment, 
xii. 102-103. 
Fort Victoria in Bombay. See Bankot. 
Fort William. See Calcutta. 
Fossil wood, found in Burma, i. 97. 
Fossils, scarcity of marine, in Peninsular 
India, i. 50; Neobolus, i. 65; Red- 
licbia, i. 65 ; Olenellus, i. 65 ; Olenidae, 
i. 66 ; Halysites catenularia, i. 66 ; 
Phillipsia, i. 66 ; Bryozoa, i. 66 ; 
Devonian, of Chitral, i. 67 ; Echino- 
sphaerites, i. 67 ; Ortlioceras, i. 67 ; 
Tentaculites, i, 67 ; Calceola sandalina, 
i. 67; Otoceras, i. 68; Ophiceras, i. 
68 ; Meekoceras, i. 68 ; in Permian 
boulder- bed, i. 71 ; of Lower Productus 
series, i. 71 ; Riciitofenia sinensis, i. 71 ; 
Oxytoma, i. 72 ; Nautilus peregrinus, i. 
72 ; Fusulina, i. 72 ; Schwagerina, i. 
72; Lyttonianobilis, i. 72 ; Xenodiscus 
caibonarius, i. 72 ; in Upper Productus 
limestones, i. 72 ; Bellerophon, i. 72 ; 
Ceratites, i. 73 ; Stephanites superbus, 
i. 73 ; Flemingites flemingianus, i. 73 ; 
Koninckites volutus, i. 73 ; Prionolo- 
bus rotundatus, i. 73 ; Celtites, i. 73 ; 
Gangamopteris, i. 73, 84 ; Megalodon, 
i. 74 ; Atliyris, i. 74 ; Productus, i. 74 ; 
Spiriferina, i. 74 ; Fusulina, i. 74 ; 
Coromandel coast, i. 77 ; in Trichino- 
poly area, i. 78-88 ; Inoceramus labia- 
tus, i. 79 ; Pachydiscus peramplus, i. 
79 ; Megalosaurns, i. 79 ; Baculites, i. 
79 ; Nautilus danicus, i. So ; Nerinea, 
i. 80 ; Ceratodus, i. 84 ; Hyperoda- 
pedon, i. 84 ; Parasuchus, i. 84 ; 
Estberia, i. 84 ; Glossopteris, i. 84- 
85; Lepidodendron, i. 84; Sigillaria, 
i. 84; Calamites,i. 84; Platacanthomys, 
i. fc6 ; Titanosaurus indicus, i. 88 ; 
Nummulites, i. 88, 92, 93; Cardita 
beaumonti, i. 91, 92 ; Velates Schmie- 
deliana, i. 95 ; Pelecypoda, i. 95 ; 
Gastropoda, i. 95 ; in the Siwaliks, i. 
96-97 ; of Irrawaddy system, i. 97. 

Local notices : Found in Chanda, x. 
149 ; Gwalior, xii. 419-420 ; Hima- 
layas, xiii. 127; Indore, xiii. 334; 
Jhelum, xiv. 151 ; Karachi, xv. 2 ; 
Kathiawar, xv. 173; Lushai Hills, xvi. 
213; Madras Presidency, xvi. 241; 
Piram, xx. 150-151 ; Punjab, xx. 249, 
251 ; Santal Parganas, xxii. 61 ; Shah- 
pur, xxii, 212; Northern Shan States, 
xxii. 232. 
Foul Island, off Sandoway District, Bur- 
ma, xxii. 31-32. 
Fouracres, C., system of sluices devised 

by, xxiii. 79, 
Foxes {Ftd/'es), i, 222; in Afghanistan, 
V. 33; Azamgarh, vi. 155; Baluchi- 
stan, vi. 272 ; Baroda, vii. 30; Central 
India, ix. 332 ; Cuttack, xi. 88 ; Far- 

VOL. XXV. 



rukhabad, xii. 63 ; Gurgaon, xii. 403 ; 

Hazara, xiii. 76; Hyderabad, xiii. 313; 

Kaira, xiv, 277 ; Karachi, xv. 2 ; 

Kathiawar, xv. 1 74 ; Khairpur, xv. 

211; Larkana, xvi. 1 37 ; Mahl Kantha, 

xvii. 15 ; Meerut, xvii. 254; Mirzapur, 

xvii. 368 ; Moradabad, xvii. 421 ; 

Multan, sviii. 23; North- West Frontier 

Province, xix. 146 ; Partabgarh, xx. 15 ; 

Patiala, xx. 33 ; Punjab, xx. 255 ; 

Quetta-Pishin, xxi. 13; Ratnagiri, xxi. 

246; Savantvadi, xxii. 151 ; Shahabad, 

xxii. 187; Northern Shan States, xxii. 

233 ; Sholapur, xxii. 296 ; Sltapur, 

xxiii. 55; Sukkur, xxiii. 119; Surat, 

xxiii. 153; Tanjore, xxiii. 226; Thar 

and Parkar, xxiii. 307 ; Upper Sind 

Frontier District, xxiv. 278; Zhob, 

xxiv. 429. 
Foxes, flying {Pteropi<s),m South Kauara, 

xiv. 355. 
France, trade with, iii. 29S. 
Francis, Philip, opposition to Warren 

Hastings, ii. 481, 482. 
Franciscans, Karanja in charge of (1535) 

XV. 23. 
Franks, Brigadier, arrival at Lucknow 

(1858, xvi. 194 ; force organized for 

reconquest of Oudh, xix. 285. 
Eraser, .Sir Andrew, Lieutenant-Governor 

of Bengal (1903), vii. 220. 
Eraser, William, murdered by Shams-ud- 

dln Khan (1836), xii. 100, 404. 
Eraser, Colonel, built and endowed school 

at Fraserpet, xi. 30, 47. 
Frazer, General, defeated Holkar's army 

near Dig (1S04), xi. 344. 
Frederick IV of Denmark, mission 

founded at Tranquebar under auspices 

of (1706), xxiii. 435. 
Free Church of Scotland. See under 

Protestant Missions. 
French in India, ii. 463-464, 470-474; 

coins, ii. 1 49; early voyages (1529, 1615), 

ii. 463 ; Richelieu's Compagnie d'Orient, 

ii. 463 ; Colbert's Company, ii. 463 ; 

first factory founded at Surat (1668), ii. 

463; Pondicherry founded (1674), ii. 

463 ; Colbert's Company taken over by 

Law, ii. 464 ; causes of failure, ii. 467- 

468; Dumas (1735-40. "• 47o-47i ; 
Dupleix (1 741), ii. 471 ; wars with, ii. 
471-472, iv. 71-73, viii. 405, xvi. 252- 
253; second French War (1750-4), ii. 
472-473 ; third French War (1756-63), 
ii. 473 ; influence in India, ii. 488 ; 
causes of failure, ii. 488-489 ; English 
compelled to intervene in Native politics 
owing to wars with, iv. 71-73; in 
Tongking, iv. 121-122 ; political, com- 
mercial, and legal position of French 
possessions in India, iv. 123-124. 
Local tiotices : settlement at Balasore, 



O 



194 



INDEX 



vi. 246 ; at Chandernagore, x. 164 ; 
the Char Minar at Hyderabad occupied 
(1756), xiii. 308; Chidambaram occu- 
pied (1753), X. 219; Chingleput taken 
(175 1), X. 269 ; Northern Circars ceded 
to (1750, 1753), X. 335, 336; forces 
landed at Cocanada (1 759-60), x. 
339; Conjeeveram attacked (1757), x. 
377; Covelong seized (1750), xi. 54; 
struggles with English for power in 
Deccan, xi. 208 ; Fort Mount Delly 
held, xi. 241 ; Devikottai taken '^1758), 
xi. 276; at English Bazar, xii. 24; 
settlement at Farasdanga, xii. 51 ; at 
Fort St. David, xii. loi, 102 ; French 
Rock occupied (1751), xii. 107; Gan- 
jam under (^1753), xii. 145; in Goda- 
vari District, xii. 285, 299 ; Guntur 
founded, xii. 390 ; support given to 
Muzaffar Jang, xiii. 239-240 ; Injaram 
taken (17.07), xiii. 365 ; Kondavid 
taken (1752), xv. 393; settlements in 
Madras Presidency, xvi. 251 ; Madras 
captured (1746), unsuccessfully attacked 
(1759), xvi. 369-371 ; settlement at 
Mahe, xvii. 7-8 ; Masulipatam seized 
(1750), xvii. 216; Jesuits in Nicobars 
(1835-46), xix. 64 ; Porto Novo 
captured, xx. 215; St. Thome taken 
and Triplicane fortified (1672), xvi. 
369 ; contest with Clive at Sama- 
yapuram and surrender, xxii. 3-4 ; 
settlement in Sural, xxiii. 155 ; wars in 
Tanjore, xxiii. 228, 242 ; Carnatic Wars 
at Tricbinopoly, xxiv. 28-29; Tyaga 
Durgam held, xxiv. 81 ; defeat at Wan- 
diwash, xii. 105. See also Factories, 
Old French. 

F"rench Possessions, xii. 103-107. 

French Rock, in Tricbinopoly District, 
Madras, xii. 107-108. 

Frere, Sir Bartle, Governor of Bombay 
(1862-7), viii. 294-295 ; Borghat 
railway incline opened (i860), ix. 5; 
Karachi Grammar School founded 
under auspices of, xv. 1 3 ; Commissioner 
in Sind (185 1-9), xxii. 402 ; cash pay- 
ments introduced into Sind, xxii. 423. 

Frere Hall, at Karachi, xv. 13; Maha- 
baleshwar, xvi. 426. 

Frescoes. See Paintings. 

Freshfield, D. W., quoted on Sikkim 
Himalayas, xiii. 125. 

F"riend-in-Need Society, Madras, xvi. 

374- 
Friends' Foreign Mission Association. 

See under Protestant Missions. 
Friends' Mission of Sehore. Sec under 

Protestant Missions. 
Frogmouths '^Batrac/iostomus), i. 250. 
Frogs, i. 273-274. 
Pruits, trade, iii. 255; cultivated in 

Ajmer-Merwara, v. 149'; Ambers;, v. 



294; South Arcot, v. 427; Central 
Provinces, x. 34, 37-38, 56 ; ChikhlT, 
Berar,x. 221; Cbikodi,Beigaum,x. 223; 
Chin Hills, x. 271 ; Dholka tdluka, xi. 
321 ; Hyderabad, xiii. 312 ; Jubbulpore, 
xiv. 211; Kangra, xiv. 390; Kolaba, 
XV. 364; Larkana, xvi. 140; Madras, 
xvi. 275 ; Mahabaleshwar, xvi. 426 ; 
Mergui, xvii. 299-300, 307 ; Mongnai, 
xvii. 405 ; Mongpai, xvii. 406 ; Muktes- 
war, xviii. 18; Naini Tal, xviii. 327; 
Narasapur, Kistna, xviii. 372 ; Shah- 
abad, xxii. 197 ; Surgana, xxiii. 169. 
See also particular names. 
Fruits and vegetables, imports and ex- 
ports, iii. 308, 310 ; exports from Madras 
Presidency, xvi. 354. 
Frushard, Mr., silk factories established 

at Ganutia by (1786), xii. 159. 
Fryer, Sir Frederic, Chief Commissioner 
of Burma (1895), ix. 192 ; Lieutenant- 
Governor of Burma (1897), ix. 192. 
Fryer, Dr., Ghodbandar called Grebondel 
by, xii. 233 ; quoted on Goa (1675), xii. 
255 ; Mirjan visited, xvii. 364 ; mention 
of Underi (i674\ xxiv. 131. 
Fuleli Canal, in Sind, iii. 336, 358, 362, 

xii. loS, xiii. 317. 
Fullarton, Colonel, Coimbatore taken by 
(17S3). X- 359> 371; Madura quieted 
(1783), xvi. 391 ; Palghat captured 
(1783), xix. 358-359 ; Panjalamkurichi 
taken (1783), xix. 398, xxiii. 364-365. 
Fuller, Sir J. B., Chief Commissioner of 
Assam, vi. 35 ; Lieutenant-Governor of 
Eastern Bengal and Assam, xi. 395. 
Fuller's earth, found near Barmer, vii. 23 ; 
Bikaner, viii. 211; Central Provinces, 
X. 51 ; Dera Ghazi Khan, xi. 255 ; 
Jaisalmer, xiv. 5; Jodhpur, xiv. 192; 
Jubbulpore, xiv. 212; Mallani, xvii. 93 ; 
Murwara, xviii. 59 ; Rajputana, xxi. 89, 
130 ; Sind, xxii. 41 8. 
Fulta, village in Bengal. See Falta, 
Funeral Customs and Ceremonies, ex- 
amples found of urn-burial, ii. 96; 
of the Afghans, v. 49 ; Andamanese, 
v. 365; in Assam, vi. 52; of Baiga 
tribe, vi. 215; in Baluchistan, vi. 
293; Bengal, vii. 240; Beiar, vii. 
382 ; of the BhTls, viii. 103; Burmese, 
ix. 148 ; in Central India, ix. 357 ; 
Central Provinces, x. 30-31 ; Coorg, 
xi. 27 ; of Garos, xii. 177 ; Gonds of 
Gondwana, xii. 325 ; in Hill Tippera, 
xiii. 120 ; Hyderabad State, xiii. 250 ; 
Jeypore, xiv. 103 ; of the Kachins, 
xiv. 254; Kafirs, xiv. 271; Khasis, 
XV. 259-260; Khonds, xv. 281-282; 
Kolis, XV. 389 ; Korkus, xv. 404 ; 
Lushais, xvi. 218-219 ; in Madras, xvi. 
266 ; of Naga tribes, xviii. 290-291 ; 
in Nepal, xix. 44; Nicobars, xix. 70-72; 



INDEX 



195 



Punjab, XX. 294 ; Rajputana, xxi. iiS; 

United Provinces, xxiv. 175. 
Furniture, manufactured in Allahabad, 

V, 241 ; Assam, vi. 74 ; Bareilly, vii. 

9, 14 ; Benjjal, vii. 268 ; Bhiwani, viii. 

120; Chaul, X. 184; Dungarpur, xi. 

385 ; Gaya, xii. 203 ; Gujrat, xii. 374 ; 

Hoshiarpur, xiii. 199 ; Janjira, xiv. 60; 

Jhang, xiv. 131 ; Jind, xiv. 172 ; Kar- 

taspur, XV. 61; Khairagarh, xv. 208; 

Lahore, xvi. loi, 113; Ludhiana, xvi. 

208; PilibhTt, XX. 144; Punjab, XX. 318; 

Raichur, xxi. 41 ; Ratnagiri, xxi. 253 ; 

Rawalpindi, xxi. 268; Sangrur, xxii. 

55 ; Sirmur, xxiii. 26 ; Suri, xxiii. 174 ; 

iSylhet, xxiii. 196, 203. 
Furriers, in Srlnagar, xxiii. 104. 
Fytche, General Albert, checked crime 

in Bassein, vii. 109 ; Chief Commis- 
sioner of Burma (1S67), ix. 192; re- 
captured Ngathainggyaung (1854), xix. 

58. 
Fyzabad, Division in United Provinces, 

xii. 108-109. 
Fyzabad, District in United Provinces, 

xii. 109-117; physical aspects, 109- 

iio; history, iio-iii; antiquarian 

remains, 1 1 1 ; population, 1 1 1 -i 1 2 ; 

agriculture, 11 2-1 14; irrigation, 114; 

trade and communications, 11 4-1 15; 

famine, 115; administration, 115-117; 

revenue, 1 16 ; education, 116; medical, 

116. 
Fyzabad, tahsTl in United Provinces, xii. 

"7- 
Fyzabad, city and cantonment in United 

Provinces, former Muhammadan capital, 

xii. 1 1 7- 1 18. 
Fyzabad, town in Afghanistan. See 

Faizabad. 



Gabat, petty State in Mahi Kantha, Bom- 
bay, xii. II 8, xvii. 13. 

Gabits, sea fishers and sailors, in Ratna- 
giri, xxi. 250. 

Gabrbands, embankments of fire-wor- 
shippers, in Baluchistan, vi. 283 ; Jha- 
lavvan, xiv. no. 

Gabruns, checked cloths, manufactured 
in Ludhiana, xvi. 205, 208 ; Nvirmahal, 
Jullundur, xix. 231. 

Gad Boriad, petty State in Rewa Kantha, 
Bombay, xii. 120, xxi. 290. 

Gad Hanz, fishers, in Kashmir, xv. 105. 

Gadaba, language of the Munda family, 
i. 383, 384 ; spoken in Madras Presi- 
dency, xvi. 261 ; Vizagapatam, xxiv. 
328. 

Gadag, tdhtka in Dharwar District, Bom- 
bay, xii. 118-119. 

Gadag, town in Dharwar District, Bom- 



bay, a centre of the cotton industry, 
xii. 119. 

Gadarias, shepherds, in Agra, v. 77 ; 
AlTgarh, v. 212 ; Central India, ix. 353; 
HardoT, xiii. 45 ; Muttra, xviii. 67. 

Gadarwara, tahsil in Narsinghpur Dis- 
trict, Central Provinces, xii. 1 19-120. 

Gadarwara, town in Narsinghpur Dis- 
trict, Central Provinces, xii. 120. 

Gaddhe Singh, Raja, traditional founder 
of Sanjan, xxii. 56. 

Gaddis, shepherds, in Chamba, x. 130; 
Kangra, xiv. 388-389 ; Kashmir, xv. 
102 ; Punjab, x.x. 288. 

Gadekeii Lake, reservoir in Belgaum 
District, Bombay, vii. 152. 

Gadh, Raja, traditional founder of GhazT- 
pur, xii. 223, 230. 

Gadhada, town in Kathiawar, Bombay, 
xii. 120. 

Gadhali, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, xii, 120, XV. 165. 

Gadhia, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, xii. 120, XV. 169. 

Gad-Hinglaj, town in Kolhapur State, 
Bombay, xii. 120. 

Gadhipur, original name of GhazTpur 
town, xii. 230. 

Gadhka, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay, xii. 121, XV. 166. 

Gadhoola, petty State in Kathiawar, 
Bombay, xii. 121, xv. 165. 

Gadras, tribe in Las Bela, Baluchistan, 
xvi. 146. 

Gadris, herdsmen, in Chhindwara, x. 210, 
211 ; Udaipur State, Rajputana, xxiv. 
94. 

Gaduns, tribe on North- West Frontier, 
expedition against (1898), xix. 158. 

Gadwal, town in Raichur District, 
Hyderabad, xii. 121. 

Gadwal Samasthan, tributary estate in 
Raichur District, Hyderabad, xii. 121. 

Gaebele Cotton Mill, Pondicherry, xx. 
162. 

Gaekwar. See Gaikwar. 

Gagan Mahal, building at Bijapur, ii. 
197, 198. 

Gagana Mahal, palace at Penukonda, 
Madras, xx. 106. 

Gagar, mountain range in Nainl Tal and 
Almora Districts, United Provinces, 
xii. 121. 

Gagrauu, fort and village in Kotah State, 
Rajputana, xii. 121-123. 

Gahinabai, Rani, Salher fort granted to, 
vi. 192. 

Gahlots, or Sesodias, Rajput clan, ii. 312, 
318 ; in Diiarampur, Bombay, xi. 296 ; 
said to have founded GulaothT, Buland- 
shahr, xii. 374 ; traditional rule in Idar, 
Bombay, xiii. 325 ; in Rajputana, xxi. 
94, 112, 113; in Salumbar, xxi. 414; 



O 2 



196 



INDEX 



Sunel held by, in eleventh century, xxiii. 
145; in Udaipur, Rajputana, xxiv. 87. 

Gahora, dialect of Bundelkhandl, spoken 
in Ajaigarh, v. 131. 

Gahras, Oiiya pastoral caste, in Bamra, 
vi. 344 ; KalahandT, xiv. 294 ; Patna 
State, XX. 72 ; Sambalpur, xxii. 9 ; 
Sonpur, xxiii. 85. 

Gahrur Sen, Raja of Suket, founder of 
Raned, vi. 360. 

Gaibanda, subdivision in Rangpur Dis- 
trict, Eastern Bengal, xii. 123. 

Gaibanda, town in Rangpur District, 
Eastern Bengal, xii. 123. 

Gaibi Plr, fair held in honour of, at 
Kagal, Bombay, xiv. 272. 

Gaighata Bakshi Khal, natural waterway 
in Ilowrah District, Bengal, xii. 123- 
124. 

Gaikwar, family name of the chief of the 
Maratha State of Baroda, Balasinor 
tributary to, vi. 235 ; history of, in 
Baroda, vii. 32-41 ; Deesa attacked, 
xi. 209 ; Gujarat ravaged, xii. 352 ; 
Kathiawar invaded, xv. 1 76 ; Luna- 
vada tributary to, xvi. 210. 

Gait, Mr., quoted on Chaitanya, i. 426. 

Gaj, Jadon Rajput, said to have built 
a fort called Gajni, xiv. 2, 

Gaj (geological) stage, i. 92, 93. 

Gaj Singh, rule in Jodhpur (1620-3S), 
xiv. 184, 

Gaj Singh, of Bikaner, built Rajgarh 
(c. 1766), xxi. 71. 

Gaj Singh, rule in Jaisalmer (1820-46), 
xiv. 3-4. 

GajalakshniT, image of, at Kotturu, 
Madras, xvi. 7. 

Gajapaii kings of Orissa, EUore town 
taken from (1515), xii. 23; parts of 
Ganjam held by, xii. 145 ; in Godavari 
District, xii. 284 ; Rajahmundry, xxi. 
64; Vizagapatam, xxiv. 325. 

Gajapatinagaram, tahsll in Vizagapatam 
District, Madras, xii. 124. 

Gajendra Singh, Paron, Central India, 
held by, xx. 8. 

Gajendragarh, town in Dharwar District, 
Bombay, xii. 1 24. 

Gajpat Singh, Raja of jTnd, xiv. 166- 
167 ; Jlnd town seized by (1755), xiv. 
177; Karnal seized (1763), xv, 58-59; 
SaiigrOr, Amloh, and Bhadson taken 
from Raja of Nabha (1774), xviii. 
263. 

Gakhars, Gujrat overrun by, xii. 366 ; 
portion of Hazara held by, xiii. 76, 
77; in Jhelum, xiv. 152, 154; Kash- 
mir, XV. 1 01 ; overlordship in Mian- 
wali exercised till 1748, xvii. 318; in 
North-West Frontier Province, xix. 
166; Punjab, XX. 288; Rawalpindi, 
xxi. 264, 266. 



Galawaus, horse-keepers, in Kashmir, xv. 
104. 

Galena, found in Baghelkhand, vi. 1S6; 
Bhagalpur, viii. 32 ; Central Provinces, 
X. 52 ; Hazaribagh, xiii. 93; Hoshang- 
abad, xiii. 186-187 ; Jhelum, xiv. 156; 
Jubbulpore, xiv. 212 ; Kangra, xiv. 
392 ; Khamti Hills, Assam, xv. 222 ; 
^lanbhum, xvii. 118; Maingy Island, 
Mergui, xvii. 304 ; Monghyr, xvii. 397 ; 
Punjab, XX. 314; Rewah, xxi. 280; 
Santal Parganas, xxii. 72 ; Udaipur, 
xxiv. 96. 

Galikonda, peak in Vizagapatam District, 
Madras, xxiii. 112. 

Galley, E., Collector in Surat, xxiii. 157. 

Galna, fort in Nasik District, Bombay, 
xii. 124. 

Galneshwar Mahadeo, idols of, at Galna, 
xii. 124. 

Galtesvara, temple of, in Gujarat, ii. 176. 

Gama, Vasco da, voyage to Calicut 
(1498), ii. 446-447, iii. 258, ix. 290, 
xvi. 250; second voyage to India 
(1502), ii. 447 ; third voyage to India 
(1524), ii. 448. 

Local notices: Anjidiv visited by 
(1498), V. 385 ; Cannanore visited 
(1498), ix. 298 ; treaty with Cannanore 
Raja (1502), ix. 298 ; factory at Cochin 
founded (1502), x. 354 ; landed in 
South Kanara (1498), xiv. 356 ; Mala- 
bar visited (1498), xvii. 57 ; landed at 
St. Mary Isles (1498), xvii. 94 ; fleet first 
cast anchornearQuilandi (1498), xix. 21. 

Gamanpnra, petty State in Mahl Kantha, 
Bombay, xii. 125, xvii, 13. 

Gambhir Singh, son of Bhawan Singh, 
Raja of Idar (1791), xiii. 326. 

Gambhir Singh, Raja of Manipur, vi. 35, 
xvii. 1 86. 

Gambier industry, iii. 172, 253. 

Games. Sec Amusements and Games. 

Gamits, animistic tribe in Navsari /;w//, 
Baroda, xviii. 423. 

Gamtas, tribe in Bansda State, Bombay, 
vi. 404. 

Gamvakkals, caste in North Kanara, xiv. 

345- 
Ganaks, caste in Darrang, xi. 185. 
Ganapatha, the, a 'list of word-groups,' 

quoted by Panini, ii. 263. 
Ganapatis of Andhra, with capital at 

Warangal (953-1322), overcame the 

Eastern Chalukyas (1300^ ii. 340, 382 ; 

friendly relations with the Vadavas, ii. 

341 ; overwhelmed in the Muhanimadan 

invasion, ii. 343, 363. 382. 

Local notices : In Godavari, xii. 284 ; 

Kistna, xv. 321 ; Kurnool probably 

under, xvi. 33 ; in Rajahmundry, xxi. 

64; in Southern India, xvi. 248, 249; 

Warangal, xxiv. 358. 



INDEX 



197 



Ganda, rule in Biindelkhand (999-1025), 

ix. 69 ; king of Kanauj defeated (102 1), 

xiv. 311. 
Ganda Maharaj, temple of, at Deglur, 

Hyderabad, xviii. 350. 
Gandak, Great, river in North Bihar, i. 

23, 24, xii. 125-126. 
Gandak, Little, river in United Provinces, 

xii. 126. 
(iandamak, Treaty of (1879), ii. 51S, v. 

_40, XV. 303, xix. 156. 
Gandas, Oriya caste, in Bamra, vi. 344 ; 

Patna State, xx. 72 ; Raigarh, xxi. 46; 

Rairakhol, xxi. 62 ; Sambalpur, xxii. 9. 
Gandevi, town in Baroda, xii. 126. 
Gandhamadan, peak in Orissa Tributary 

States, xix. 253. 
Gandhara, ancient name for tract on 

North- West Frontier, xii. 126-127; 

sculptures, ii. 165-167. 
Gandharvas, celestial musicians, ii. 216. 
Gandhi Gate, at BhTlsa, Central India, 

viii. 105. 
Gandhis, traders in native groceries and 

drugs, in Baroda, vii. 56. 
Gandhol, petty State in Kathiavvar, Bom- 
bay, xii. 127, XV. 165. 
Gandikota, ancient foitiess in Cuddapah 

District, Madras, xii. 127-128. 
Gandlas, oil-pressers, in North Arcot 

District, v. 409. 
Ganesa, or Ganesh, god of learning, ii. 

233 ; figures of, at Anjaneri, Bombay, 

V. 383 ; temple of, at Benares, vii. 191 ; 

shrine at Bhainsrorgarh,Rajputana,viii. 

40; shrine of, at Chidambaram, Madras, 

X. 219; at Doisanagar, Bengal, xxi. 202 ; 

figure of, in Gwalior fort, xii, 442 ; 

Mahavinyaka worshipped on peak in 

Orissa, as the union of Siva, Gaurl, 

and Ganesh, xvi. 438 ; Ramgarh Hill, 

Central Provinces, xxi. 176; shrine at 

Trichinopoly, xxiv. 45-46. See also 

Ganpati. 
Ganesh, Raja, throne of Bengal seized 

(1404), xi. 349; rule in Dinajpur, xi. 

349- 
Ganesh, caste. See Gangai. 
Ganesh ChaturthT, festival in Central 

India, ix. 357. 
Ganesh Flour-Mills, at Delhi, xi. 240. 
Ganesh Gate, in Gwalior Fort, xii. 441. 
Ganesh Gumpha cave, Khandgiri, Orissa, 

XV. 240. 
Gang, Raja, old quarter of Gangoh, 

United Provinces, founded and named 

by, xii. 139. 
Gang Deo, succeeded to A] i-Rajpur( 1862), 

deposed (1S71), v. 224. 
Ganga, goddess of Ganges river, statue 

of, at Gangotri, xii. 139; descent from 

heaven to save the souls of 60,000 sons 

of king Sagar, xxiv. 25, 



Ganga, Rao, chief of Jodhpur (1516-32), 

xiv. 183 ; tomb at Mandor, xvii. 171. 
Ganga Gobind Singh, at Kandi, Bengal, 

Ganga Narayan, rebellion in Chota 
Nagpur (1S32), viii. 152, xvii. 113. 

fJanga Raja, general of Hoysala king 
Vishnnvardhana, xxiii. 97. 

Ganga Raja, Ummattur chief, rebellion 
(1511), xviii. 253; expedition by Krish- 
na Raya against, xviii. 175. 

Ganga Raya, Mysore chieftain, Sivasa- 
mudram occupied by, xxiii. 65. 

Ganga River. See Ganges. 

Ganga Singh, succeeded as twenty-first 
chief of Bikaner, viii. 207. 

Gangabansi Rajputs, in Bamra, vi. 344. 

Gangadhar, eastern branch of Sankosh 
river, xxii. 60. 

Gangadhar, Pandit, Agra College esta- 
blished from funds left by (1823), xxiv. 
247. 

Gangadhar Rao, rule over Sangli and 
Miraj for Chintaman Rao, and Miraj 
finally taken by, xxii. 53. 

Gangadhar Rao, Jhansi entrusted to 
(1842), xiv._i38. 

Gangadhar Sastri, Minister in Baroda, 
appointment of (1812), vii. 37 ; murder 
of, vii. 37, XX. 168-169. 

Gangadharesvara temple, on Sivaganga 
Hill, Mysore, xxiii. 64. 

Gangadikaras, section of Wokkaliga 
caste, in Gangavadi, Mysore, xii. 131, 
xviii. 193-194. 

Gangadwara, historical Muhammadan 
name for Hardwar, xiii. 52. 

Gangai (Ganesh), caste in Malda, xvii. 
78 ; Purnea, xx. 416. 

Gangaikondapuram, village with temple 
in Trichinopoly District, Madras, xii. 
128-130. 

Gangakher, town in Parbhani District, 
Hyderabad, xii. 130. 

Gangamula, peak in Mysore, xiv. 262. 

Ganga-panl. See Coco-nuts. 

Gangapur, tdliik in Aurangabad District, 
Hyderabad, xii. 130. 

Gangapur, tow n in Jaipur State, Rajput- 
ana, xii. 130. 

Gangapur, tahsil in Benares District, 
United Provinces, xii. 130-131. 

Gangas, dynasty in Southern India (700- 
1000), ii. 7, S, 80, 330, 332, 333, 337, 
338 ; rule in Carnatic, ix. 301 ; Chingle- 
put, x. 255 ; Chitaldroog, x. 291 ; 
Coorg, xi. 9 ; Dharwar, xi. 305 ; Gan- 
jam, xii. 145 ; Hassan, xiii. 63 ; Hire- 
mugalur, xiii. 143; Kadur, xiv. 264; 
Kalinga, xiv. 310; Kolar, xv. 370- 
371 ; Mukhalingam site of the capital 
of, xviii. 18 ; rule in Mysore, xviii. 253 ; 
Nandidroog the stronghold of, xviii. 



198 



INDEX 



359; ruleinNirgunda,xix. i22;Punnata, 
XX. 395; Shimoga, xxii. 283-284; 
Southern Maratha Country, xxiii. 91 ; 
Talakad, xxiii. 208 ; Tumkiir, xxiv. 
54; Vizagapatam, xxiv. 325 ; Yelandur, 
xxiv. 419. 

Ganga-Sagar Island. Sec Sagar. 

Gangautas, caste in Bhagalpur, viii. 30. 

Gangavadi, territory of Ganga kings in 
Mysore, xii. 131. 

Gangavadi dynasty, rule in Mysore (second 
to eleventh centuries), xviii. 170. 

Gangaw, subdivision in Pakokku District, 
Upper Burma, xii. 131. 

Gangaw, township in Pakokku District, 
Upper Burma, xii. 131. 

Gangawali, tahik in Raicliur District, 
Hyderabad, xii. 131. 

Gangawati, town in Raichiir District, 
Hyderabad, xii. 131-132. 

Ganges, river in Northern India, iii. 360- 
361, xii. 132-136; course, 132; tribu- 
taries, 132-133; bed and mouths of, 
133; changes in course,i34; sanctity, 
135; traffic, I35-I3^>; bridges, 136. ' 

Other references : Geological division 
from the Indus, i. 22 ; system, i. 23-26; 
sanctity, i. 23 ; as factor in civilization 
of the world, i. 26 ; geology of delta, 
i. 100; dolphins, i. 238; crocodiles, 
i. 267. 

Ganges Canal, Lower, in United Pro- 
vinces, ii. 332, 341, xii. 136-137. 

Ganges Canal, Upper, in United Pro- 
vinces, xii. 137-139. 

Ganges Canals, iii. 332, 341, 357. 

Gansetic Doab, language, i. ',=,9, ',6;:;, 
36>. 

Gangetic plain, meteorology, i. 107, 117, 
123, 124, 130, 132, 136" 143, 145, 146, 
153; botany, i. 179-181; density of 
population, i. 454. Sec also Indo- 
Gangetic Plain. 

Gangetic Valley, copper implements found , 
ii. 98; dive's partition of (176^), ii. 
480. 

Gangeyadeva of Chedi, coin struclc by 
(eleventh century), ii. 142. 

Gangn! River. Sec Kalia. 

Gangoh, town in Saharanpur District, 
United Provinces, xii. 139. 

Ganger, festival, in Ajmer-Merwara, v. 
148 ; Malwa, ix. 3:^7; Rajputana, xxi. 
118. 

GangotrT, mountain temple in Tehrl State, 
United l^rovinces, xii. 139-140. 

Gangpur, tributary State in Orissa, Ben- 
gal, xii. 140-142; Language, i. 3S4 ; 
ancient gold workings, iii. 142 ; area, 
population, revenue, and expenditure, 
iv. 98. 

Gangtok, capital of Sikkim State, Bengal, 
xii. 142. 



Gangu, gold inscription from stiipa at, 
Ji- 25. 

Ganigs, oil-pressers, in Bijapur, viii. 179; 
Dharwar, xi. 307. 

Gaiija, hemp drug {Cannabis saiiva), iv. 
259, 260 ; cultivated in North Arcot, 
V. 411 ; Bengal, vii. 247; Naogaon, 
Rajshahi, xviii. 367, xxi. 165 ; Nimar, 
xix. 112. 

Ganjam, District in Madras Presidency, 
xii. 142-158: physical aspects, 142- 
145 ; history, 145-147 ; population, 
147-148; agriculture, 148-150; irri- 
gation, 150; forests, 150-151 ; trade 
and communications, 151-153; famine, 
153-154; administration, 154-157; re- 
venue, 155-156; education, 157-158; 
medical, 157; minerals, iii. 147; sur- 
vey, iv. 495-496. 

Ganjam, tahsll in Ganjam District, Ma- 
dras, xii. 1 58. 

Ganjam, town (but no longer head-quar- 
ters) in Ganjam District, Madras, xii. 

158-159- 
Ganjam, suburb of Seringapatam, Mysore, 

xxii. 180. 

Ganjni Masjid, mosque at Mandal, Bom- 
bay, xvii. 123. 

Ganjo hills, Hyderabad District, Sind, 
xiii. 312-321. 

Gannavaram aqueduct, Godavari Canals, 
xii. 300, xviii. 297. 

Ganpat Rao, son of Sayajl Rao II, 
Gaikwar of Baroda (1S47-56), vii. 
^9 ; share in Kurandvad State, xvi. 
28. 

Ganpati, Raja, rule in Wnrangal, xxiv. 35S ; 
commenced stone wall of Warangal, 
xxiv. 365. 

(ianpati, image of, at Chandor, Bombay, 
X. 167 ; liuli, Bombay, xiii. 223 ; 
shrines of, Bagevadi \'a]ley, Bombay, 
vi. 183 ; at Baroda, vii. 83; Chinchvad, 
Bombay, x. 227 ; Krandol, Bombay, 
xii. 26; Poona, xx. 1S4 ; Saptashring, 
Bombay, xxii. 81 ; Tasgaon, Bombay, 
xxiii. 253. Sec also Ganesa. 

Ganpati dynasty. See Ganapatis. 

Gantak, capital of .Sikkim State, Bengal. 
See Gangtok. 

Gantarawadi, Karenni State, Burma, xii. 

159- 

Ganutia, village in Birbhum District, Ben- 
gal, witli silk industry, xii. 159. 

Gaoli dynasty, holders of forts in Berar, 
vii. 366 ; Clihindwara, x. 206. 

GaolTs, grazing caste, in Wun, xxiv. 392. 

Garai, name of upper reaches of Madhu- 
mali river, liengal, xii. 159. 

Garamsur, peak in W'ardha District, 
Central Provinces, xxiv. 366. 

Garamur, village in Sibsagar District, 
Assam, xii. 159-160. 



« 



INDEX 



199 



Garas, cultivators, in Muzaffarnagar, 
xviii. 88 ; Saharanpur, xxi. 373. 

GaraiUha,A7/«/7in Jhans! District, United 
Provinces, xii. 160. 

Garbyang, station in Almora District, 
United Provinces, xii. 160. 

Garden Reach, town in District of Twenty- 
four Parganas, Bengal, suburb of Cal- 
cutta, xii. 160-161. 

Gardens, at Akalkot, v. 179; Alwar, v. 
26S ; Amalapuram, Madras, v. 270 ; 
Bangalore (botanical ', vi. 369 ; Barliyar 
(experimental), NTlgiris, vii. 22 ; Bas- 
sein, Bombay (public), vii. 118 ; Bund, 
Poona, XX. 184 ; Calcutta (Eden), ix. 
28 1 ; Chadarghat, Hyderabad (public\ 
X. 116; Darjeeling (Lloyd's Botanical) , 
xi. 180; Delhi (public), xi. 237; 
Delhi (Queen's), xi. 238-239; Deogarh, 
Bamra, Bengal, xi. 245 ; EUichpur, xii. 
21 ; Fyzabad (Gulab-barl), xii. 118; 
Ghazipur, xii, 230 ; Gondal, Kathiawar 
(public), xii. 320; Gulbarga, Hyderabad 
(public), xii. 3S2 ; Halol, Bombay, xiii. 
12 ; Hanthawaddy (market), xiii. 31 ; 
Hyderabad city (public;, xiii. 311- 
312 ; Ram Newas, Jaipur (public), xiii. 
402 ; Karachi (public), xv. 13 ; Kash- 
mir (floating), XV. 121-122 ; Shalamar, 
near Lahore, xvi. 109-110; Madaya, 
Mandalay, xvi. 229; Mahaban hill, 
Muttra, xvi. 428 ; Maniktala, Bengal 
(nursery), xvii. 183; Mowar, Nagpur, 
xviii. 16 ; Multan (public^, xviii. 37 ; 
Nabha, xviii. 271 ; Nagpur, xviii. 319 ; 
Namakhal, Salem (public), xviii. 348 ; 
Ootacamund (botanical), xix. 240 ; 
Shahi Bagh and Wazir Bagh, Peshawar 
city, XX. 125; Pondicherry (public), 
XX. 162; Poona, xx. 184; Porbandar, 
Kathiawar (public), xx. 191 ; Laksh- 
man Bagh, Rewah, xxi. 289; Saha- 
ranpur (botanical), xxi. 379 ; Sibpnr, 
opposite Calcutta (Royal Botanical), 
xxii. 344; Sira, Mysore (Khan Bagh), 
xxiii. 16 ; Udaipur city (Sajjan Ni- 
was), xxiv. 103. 

Garden produce, Chitaldroog, Mysore, x. 
294; Kyaukpyu, Burma, xvi. 64; My- 
sore, xviii. 256 ; Narasapur, Kistna, 
xviii. 372 ; Sliikarpur, Sind, xxii. 276 ; 
Shimoga, Mysore, xxii. 2S7. 

Gardner, Professor Ernest, description of 
Alexandrian bas-reliefs, ii. 105. 

Gardner, Lieut.-Col. James, deputed to 
hold personal conference with Gurkha 
general (1815), v. 246 ; Kasganj under, 
XV. 70- 

Gardner, Major, patrol led by, annihi- 
lated in second Burmese War (1852), 
xiii. 104. 

Gareris, blanket-weavers, in Hazaribagh, 
xiii. 95 ; Katihar, Purnea, xv. 187. 



Gargachal mountains. See Gagar. 

Gargaon, old Ahom capital of Assam. 
See Nazira. 

Gargasashtar, ancient name for Gagraun, 
xii. 123. . 

Garh Gajali, jungle in Eastern Bengal. 
See Madhupur. 

Garha, petty State in Gwalior Residency, 
Central India, xii. 161, 417. 

Garha Katanka tract. See Gondwana. 

Garhakota, town in .Saugor District, Cen- 
tral Provinces, stormed by Sir Hugh 
Rose (185S), xii. 161. 

Garha-Mandla dynasty, Bhandara nomi- 
nally under, viii. 62. See also Gonds. 

GarhchirolT, tahsJl in Chanda District, 
Central Provinces, xii. 161-162. 

Garhdiwala, town in Hoshiarpur District, 
Punjab, xii. 162. 

GarhT, thalairat in Bhopavvar Agency, 
Central India, viii. 147, xii. 162. 

Garhi Ikhtiar Khan, town in Bahawalpur 
State, Punjab, xii. 162. 

Garhi Yasin, town in .Sukkur District, 
Sind, xii. 162, 

Garhmuktesar, town in Meerut District, 
United Provinces, with temple and 
annual fair, xii. 162-163. 

Garhsliankar, tahsTl in Hoshiarpur Dis- 
trict, Punjab, xii. 163. 

Garhshankar, town in Hoshiarpur Dis- 
trict, Punjab, xii. 163. 

Garhwiil, District in Kumaun Division, 
United Provinces, xii. 163-171; physi- 
cal aspects, 163-165 ; history, 165- 
166; population, 166-167 ! agriculture, 
167-168; forest, 168; trade and com- 
munications, 168-169 ; famine, 169 ; 
administration, 169-171 ; education, 
171 ; medical, 171. 

Garhwal State. See TehrT State. 

GarhwTs, tribe in North-West Frontier 
Province, xix. 166; Swat, xxiii. 186. 

Gari Hanz, boatmen, in Kashmir, xv. 105. 

Garib Das, entered service of the Panna 
chief (1708), v. 222. 

Garispur village. See Gyaraspur. 

Garlapati Ramalingam, Tenali birth- 
place of, xxiii. 278. 

Garlic, cultivated in India generally, 
iii- 75; 99 > in Baroda, vii. 48 ; Bengal, 
vii. 247 ; Chikmugalur, Mysore, x. 
222; Kodaikanal, Madura, xv. 338; 
Maler Kotla, Punjab, xvii. 85 ; Mysore, 
xviii. 210; Nepal, xix. 47 ; Siruguppa, 
Bellary, xxiii. 48 ; United Provinces, 
xxiv. 183. 

Garmali-Moti, petty State in Kathiawar, 
Bombay, xii. 171, xv. 169. 

Garmali-Nani, petty State in Kathiawar, 
Bombay, xii. 171, xv. 169. 

Garnets, iii. 162 ; manufactures, iii. 243 ; 
found or quarried in Ajmer, v. 154; 



200 



INDEX 



Bhllwara, Rajputana, viii. 107 ; Dar- 
jeeling, xi. 175 ; Hyderabad State, 
xiii. 262 ; Jaipur, xiii. 383, 392 ; South 
Kanara, xiv. 364 ; Kumaradhaii river, 
Madras, xvi. 18; Madura, xvi. 397; 
Nellore, xix. 8, 16 ; Pur, Rajputana, 
XX. 395 ; Rajputana, xxi. 130 ; Sarwar, 
Rajputana, xxii. Iii ; Sikkim, xxii. 
370; Tinnevelly, xxiii. 371; Trichi- 
nopoly, xxiv. 34 ; Warangal, Hyder- 
abad, xxiv. 361. 

Garo, language of the Bodo group, i. 393, 
400; spoken in Garo Hills, xii. 174; 
Hill Tippera, xiii. 119. 

Garo Hills, District in Assam, xii. 171- 
181; physical aspects, 171-173; his- 
tory, 173-174; population, 174-178; 
agriculture, 178 ; forests, 178-179 ; 
minerals, 179; trade and communica- 
tions, 179-180; administration, 180- 
181 ; language, i. 387. 

Garos, aboriginal tribe in Assam, vi. 44, 
73; raids of (1852, 1856-9, 1866), in 
Garo Hills, xii. 174; origin of, xii. 
175; divisions of, xii. 175; houses, 
xii. 176 ; dress, xii. 176 ; marriage cus- 
toms and ceremonies, xii. 176-177 ; 
burial customs, xii. 177; religion, xii. 
177; in Goalpara, xii. 271, 272; Jal- 
paiguri, xiv. 35 ; Kamrfip, xiv. 334 ; 
Mymensingh, xviii. 154. 

Garot, town in Indore State, Central 
India, xii. 181-182. 

Garotha, tahsJl in United Provinces. See 
Garautha. 

Garrauli, petty State in Central India 
under Bundelkhand Agency, ix. 77, 
xii. 182. 

Garuda, kingofsnakes, legend of, xii. 135. 

Garuda, celestial kite, xvi. 11. 

Garudangiri, peak in Hirekal Gudda 
range, Mysore, xiii. 143. 

Garulia, town in District of Twenty-four 
Parganas, Bengal, xii. 182-183. 

Gani, petty State in the Dangs, Bombay, 
xi. 147, xii. 183. 

Gar\ok, Major- General J-, expedition 
against Hindustani P"anatics on North- 
West Frontier (1863), xix. 209. 

Garwa, town in Palamau District, 
Bengal, xii. 183, 

Gas, natural jets of combustible, at Ja- 
wala Mukhi, Kangra, xiv. 86. 

Gas-works, Mor\i, Kathiawar, xviii. 4; 
Moulmein, xviii. 9; Rawalpindi, xxi. 
268, 273. 

Gates and gateways, at Ahmadabad, v. , 
108; Ajmer, v. 172; Amanat Khan, | 
Amritsar, v. 321 ; Arcot, v. 420 ; Delhi, 
xi. 237; Fatehabad, v. 321 ; Fatehpur 
Sikri, xii. 85 ; Gaur, ii. 190, 193, xii. 
189, 191 ; GawTlgarh Fort, xii. 194; 
Golconda, xii. 309 ; Gwalior, xii. 439, 



441 ; Jaipur, xiii. 400 ; Jaunpur, xiv. 

S3 ; Jeur, Ahmadnagar, xiv. 102 ; 

Kabul, xiv. 242 ; Kadi, Baroda, xiv. 

258 ; Kalinjar, Banda, xiv. 312 ; 

Konarak, Orissa, xv. 391-392 ; Lahore, 

xvi. IC9 ; Lucknow, xvi. 195 ; Madura, 

xvi. 405 ; Nadol, Rajputana, xviii. 

283 ; Namala Fort, Berar, xviii. 380 ; 

Panhala, Kolhapur, xix. 396 ; Pava- 

garh, Panch Mahals, xx. 80; Purandhar, 

Poona, XX. 396-397 ; Radhanpur, 

Bombay, xxi. 25 ; Ramgarh Hill, 

Central Provinces, xxi. 176 ; Sanchi, 

xxii. 28. 
Gau Mukhi reservoir, at Gimar, Kathi- 
awar, xii. 247. 
Gaud .Saraswat, Brahman sub-caste, in 

North Kanara, xiv. 345. 
Gaudapada, commentator on the Sankhya 

philosophy, ii. 257. 
Gaudas, Tulu caste, in Coorg, xi. 17, 29; 

Ratnagiri, xxi. 249. 
Gatida-vaha, historical poem in Prakrit, 

by Bappairao {c. 750), ii. 268. 
Gauhar Aman, ruler of YasTn and Mastuj, 

invasion of Gilgit by (1854), x. 301 ; 

son of Tair Shah killed by, xii. 239. 
Gauhar Khan, outbreak in Jhalawan 

under (1893-5), xiv. 110. 
Ganhati, subdivision in Kamrup District, 

Assam, xii. 183-184. 
Gauhati,town in Kamrup District, Assam, 

former capital, with considerable trade, 

xii. 184-1S6. 
Gaulis, pastoral caste, in Belgaum, vii. 

149 ; Ratnagiri, xxi. 250 ; Thalner, 

Khandesh, in possession of (1128), 

xxiii. 287. 
Gauna Lake. See Gohna. 
Gaundis, craftsmen, in Belgaum, vii. 149. 
Gaundlas,toddy-drawers,in Atraf-i-balda, 

Hyderabad, vi. 127; Hyderabad State, 

xiii. 247 ; Warangal, xxiv. 360. 
Gaung Gyi, leader of disturbances in 

Tharrawaddy (1855), xxiii. 318. 
Gmir {Bos gaums). See Bison. 
Gaur, ruined city in Malda District, 

Eastern Bengal, xii. 186-191 ; former 

Hindu and Muhammadan capital, ii. 

188; mosques, ii. 1S9, 191-192, 192- 

193; Dakhil or Salami gateway, ii. 

190; miliar, ii. 190-191 ; gateway, ii. 

192. 
Gaur Rahman of Yasln, part of Kashmir 

under, xv. 96. 
Gaura, town in Gorakhpnr District, 

United Provinces, xii. 191. 
Gauramma, daughter of Raja of Coorg, 

life in England, xi. 16-17. 
Gaurang, tributary of the .Saralbhanga 

river, Assam, xxii. 84. 
Ganras, Oriya caste, in Balasore, vi. 239 ; 

Cuttack, xi. 89 ; PurT, xx. 402. 



INDEX 



20I 



Gauri. See Durga. 

Gauri Shankar, tahikddr of Maurawan, 

loyalty during Mutiny, xvii. 234. 
Gaurihar, petty State in Central India 

iTnder Bundelkhand Agency, ix. 77, 

xii. 191-192. 
Ganrinath Singh, rule in Assam, vl. 31- 

32 ; driven from Rangpur at end of 

eighteenth century, xiv. 202 ; in Sib- 

sagar, xxii. 347. 
Gauripur, estate in Goalpara District, 

Assam, xii. 192. 
Gaurisagar, tank in Assam, vi. 36. 
Gaurjarl, Apabhramsa parent of Gujarat! 

language, i. 362. 
Gauro Chandra Deo, rule in Rairakhol, 

xxi. 61. 
Gaurs, Brahman sub-caste, in Hissar, xiii. 

149 ; Rajputana, xxi. iii. 
Gaurs, Oriya tribe, in Angul, v. 377 ; 

Baud, vii. 134; Daspalla, xi. 194; 

Dhenkanal, xi. 319; Keonjhar, xv. 202 ; 

Mayurbhanj, xvii. 242 ; Nayagarh, 

xviii. 430 ; Orissa Tributary States, 

xix. 257. 
Gaurs, Rajput clan, Sheopur, Central 

India, founded by (1537), and held 

till 1809, xxii. 272. 
Gaursamudram, village in Indur District, 

Hyderabad, with tombs, xiii. 352. 
Gaurwars, Rajput clan, in Gurgaon, xii. 

405- 
Gautam Rajas of Argal, Kora held by, 

XV. 398. 
Gautam Rajputs, rule in Azamgarh, vi. 

155- 

Gautama. See Buddha. 

Gautama, the Rishi, sanctity of Godavari 

said to have been revealed to, by Rama, 

xii. 299 ; hermitage at Seringapatam, 

xxii. 179 ; caves at Seven Pagodas, xxii. 

^183. 

Gautama Bai, daughter of Narayanji and 

wife of Malhar Rao Holkar, xiii. 335 ; 

Gautampura founded, and temple built, 

xii. 192 ; Alartand Rao adopted as heir 

^ (1833), xiii- 338- 

Gautameshwar Mahadeo, temple at Pra- 
kasha, Khandesh, xx. 216. 

Gautampura, town in Indore State, Cen- 
tral India, xii. 192. 

Gavaras, cultivators, in Vizagapatam, 
xxiv. 328. 

Gavndad, petty State in Kathiawar, 
Bombay, xii. 392, xv. 166. 

Gawdawpalin, pagoda at Pagan, Burma, 
xix. 313. 

Gawilgarh, fort in AmraotT District, 
Berar, stormed by General Wellesley 
(1803-), vii. 367, xii. 193-194. 

Gawilgarh Hills, in Berar, xii. 192-193. 

Gawler, Colonel, expedition into Sikkim 

- (1861), xxii. 368. 



Gaya, District in Patna Division, Bengal, 
xii. 194-208 ; physical aspects, 194- 
197 ; history, 197-199 ; population, 
199-200; agriculture, 200-202; trade 
and communications, 203-204 ; famine, 
204-205 ; administration, 205-207 ; 
education, 207 ; medical, 207-208 ; 
language, i. 375. 

Gaya, subdivision in Gaya District, Ben- 
gal, xii. 208. 

Gaya, town in Gaya District, Bengal, 
sacred to Buddhists and Hindus, xii. 
208-210; image of Buddha near, ii. 
25-26 ; stone-carving, iii. 242. 

Gaya Prasad, Chaube, Taraon under 
(1812), xxiii. 250. 

Gay a I (^Bos frontalis), i. 231-232; in 
Assam, vi. 20 ; Lushai Hills, xvi. 214. 

Gayawals, Brahman sub-caste, in Gaya, 
xii. 200, 210. 

Gayetlami fisheries, Hanlhawaddy,Burma, 
xiii. 32. 

Gazelle, Chinkara, or ' ravine deer ' (6'a- 
zella bennetti), i. 235; in Afghanistan, 
v. 33 ; Agra, v. 74 ; Ahmadabad, v. 
95; Ajmer-Merwara, v. 139; Alwar, v. 
255 ; Ambala, v. 277; Amritsar, v. 320 ; 
Attock, vi. 132; Bahawalpur, vi. 195; 
Bannu, vi. 393 ; Baroda, vii. 30 ; Basim, 
Berar, vii. 96; Bellary, vii, 160; Berar, 
vii. 364 ; Betrd, viii. 8 ; Bolan Pass, 
viii. 264 ; Cawnpore, ix. 307 ; Cud- 
dapah, xi. 59; Delhi, xi. 224; Ellich- 
pur, xii. 12; Etawah, xii. 38 ; Fatehpur, 
xii. 76 ; Ferozepore, xii. 89 ; Ciaya, xii. 
196; Gujrat, xii. 364; Gurgaon, xii. 
403; Hissar, xiii. 144; Hyderabad, 
xiii. 233; Jaisalmer, xiv. I ; Jhalawar, 
xiv. 114; Jhang, xiv. 125; Jhelum, 
xiv. 151 ; Jodhpur, xiv. 181 ; Jubbul- 
pore, xiv. 207; Kachhi, xiv. 249; Kaira, 
xiv. 277 ; Kalat, xiv. 300 ; Karnal, 
XV. 49 ; Khairpur, xv. 211 ; Khandesh, 
XV. 228 ; Kharan, Baluchistan, xv. 247 ; 
Kishangarh, xv. 311 ; Las Bela, Balu- 
chistan, xvi. 145 ; Ludhiana, xvi. 200 ; 
Madras Presidency, xvi. 244 ; Mahi 
Kantha, xvii. 1 5 ; Makran, Baluchistan, 
xvii. 45; Mandla, xvii. 160; Mianwali, 
xvii. 318 ; MTrzapur, xvii. 368 ; Mon- 
ghyr, xvii. 392 ; Montgomery, xvii. 
409; Mullan, xviii. 23 ; Mutlra, xviii. 
63; Muzaffarpur, xviii. 76 ; Nimar, xix. 
107 ; North- West Frontier Province, 
xix. 146; Parlabgarh State, xx. 9; 
Patiala, xx. 33; Poona, xx. 167; Pun- 
jab, XX. 255 ; Rajputana, xxi. 91 ; Roh- 
tak, xxi. 311 ; Sambalpur, xxii. 7 ; Sa- 
tara, xxii. 117; Shahpur, xxii. 212; 
Sibi, xxii. 337 ; Sind, xxii. 393 ; Sirohi, 
xxiii. 29 ; .Sukkur, xxiii. 119; Thar and 
Parkar, xxiii. 307; Upper Sind Frontier 
District, xxiv. 278. 



202 



INDEX 



Gazelle, Persian {G. sul>£'iti/urosa), found 
in Baluchistan, i. 235 ; Chagai, x. 117. 

Gazgis, cultivators, in Jhalawan, Balu- 
chistan, xiv. III. 

Gaznis, Marri clan, in Marri-Bugti 
Country, Baluchistan, xvii. 211. 

Geb Sagar, lake at Dungarpur, Rajputann, 
xi. 385. 

Gedi, petty State in Kathiawar, Bombay, 
xii. 210, XV. 168. 

Geese, i. 265. 

Geldria fort, built by Dutch at Pulicat 
(1609), XX. 242. 

Gell, General, Raghuji Bhangrya caught 
at Pandharpur by (1847), xix. 391. 

Gell, Bishop, girls' school at ^Iadras, 
xvi. 344. 

Gelukpa, celibate sect of Buddhist monks, 
in Spiti, xxiii. 94. 

Gemarsinghji, rule in Rajplpla, xxi. 80. 

General Assembly's Institution, Calcutta, 
founded by Dr. Duff (1830), vii. 329. 

(jeneral Society, the, constituted (1698), 
ii. 461 ; practically merged in the new 
East India Compan)', ii. 461. 

Genguti, one of the inosculating mouths 
of the Mahanadi river, Orissa, xvi. 432. 

Genua, custom among Naga tribes, xviii. 
291. 

Geographical and topographical surveys, 
iv. 490-496. 

Geography, general observations and in- 
dications of future research, ii. 76-83; 
of Ptolemy, ii. 77-79 ; Hiuen-tsiang, ii. 
79-81 ; Albiruni, ii. 81-82. See also 
in each Province, District, and larger 
State article under Physical Aspects. 

Geology, of India generally, i. 50-103; 
introduction, 50-57 ; peninsular and 
extra-peninsular India, 50-5T ; variable 
rate of evolution in isolated land areas, 
51 ; difficulties of correlation of Indian 
strata with the European scale, 51-53 ; 
Olenellus zone, 53-54; classification 
of Indian strata, 53-55 ; four groups, 
54 ; Archaean group, 54 ; Puriina 
group, 54, 56 ; grouping of the fossili- 
ferous strata, 56 ; Upper Palaeozoic 
break, 56 ; Dravidian group, 56-57 ; 
Aryan group, 57; pre-Cambrian his- 
tory of India, 57-64; Archaean era, 57- 
59; Puriina era, 57-58,61-63; Epar- 
chaean interval, 58 ; the fundamental 
complex, 58-59; orthogneisses and 
paragneisses, 59; mixed gneisses, 59; 
divisions of the Archaean group, 59- 
6o; Dharwarian system, 60; Cudda- 
pah and Kurnool systems, 61-62 ; 
Vindhyan system, 62 ; possible ex- 
istence of the Purana group in the 
Himalayas, 63-64; Cambrian and Post- 
Cambrian history, 64-102 ; Dravidian 
era, 64 67; Cambrian of the Salt Range, 



64 ; jDurple sandstone and Neobolus 
beds, 64-65 ; Magnesian sandstone 
series and salt pseudomorph zone, 65 ; 
Palaeozoic of tlie Central Himalayas, 
65 ; Vaikritas and Haimantas, 65-66 ; 
Ordovician strata, 66 ; Gothlandian 
(Silurian), 66 ; conformable succession 
to the Carboniferous system, 66 ; De- 
vonian of Chitral, 67 ; Infra-Trias of 
Hazara, 67 ; older Palaeozoic in Upper 
Burma, 67 ; the Aryan era, 68-103 ; 
Central ^Himalayan succession, 68 ; 
trespass of a former central ocean, 
68-69 ' exotic blocks in the Central 
Himalayas, 69 ; Carbo-Trias of the 
Punjab, the North-West Frontier Pro- 
vince, and Burma, 70; the Salt Range, 
70; Permian boulder-bed, 70-71; 
speckled sandstone series, 71 ; Pro- 
ductus limestone series, 71-72; Upper 
Productus limestones, 72 ; gradual pas- 
sage from Permian to Triassic, 72-73; 
Ceratite formations, 73 ; Permo-Trias 
on the North-Western Frontier, 73 ; 
Trias of Hazara, 74 ; Permo-Carboni- 
ferous of Burma, 74 ; Jurassic of Balu- 
chistan and the PVontier Province, 75 ; 
Jurassic of Cutch, 75-76 ; Jurassic of 
Jaisalmer, 76 ; Jurassic of the Salt 
Range, 76 ; relics of the great ceno- 
manian transgression, 76 ; Coromandel 
Cretaceous, 77 ; Trichinopoly area, 77- 
80; Utatur stage, 78-79; Trichinopoly 
stage, 79 ; Ariyalur stage, 79 ; Nin- 
niyur beds, 79-80 ; Bagh beds, 80 ; 
Gondwana system, S0-S7 ; boulder- 
beds in Gondwana-land, 81 ; age of 
the Gondwana system, 81 ; distribution 
of the Gondwanas, 81^82 ; Talcher 
series, 82 ; Damuda series, 82 ; Bara- 
kar stage, 82-S3; Panchet series, 83; 
Rajmahal and .Mahadeva series, 83; 
marine beds of Upper Gondwana age, 
83-84; Kota-Maleri series, 84 ; charac- 
ters of the Gondwana fossil plants, 84 ; 
Glossopteris flora of Gondwana-land, 
8.1-85 ; existence of an old Indo-.\fricau 
continent, 85 : evidence from Jurassic 
fossils, 85 ; evidence from the Cretace- 
ous deposits, S5-86 ; persistence of the 
old continental ridge, 86 ; effects of 
the old continent on the modern dis- 
tribution of animals, 86 87 ; break-up 
of Gondwana-land, 87 ; the Deccan trap, 
87-88; Eameta series, 83; age of the 
Deccan trap, 88-89; ultra-basic rela- 
tives of the Deccan trap, 89; dunites 
of South India, 89; serpentines and 
jadeites in Burma, 89 ; igneous action 
in Baluchistan, 90; Tertiary gabbros 
and granophyres, 90 ; passage from the 
Cretaceous to the Tertiary, 90-91 ; the 
Tertiary period, 90-97 ; Cardita beau- 



INDEX 



203 



monti beds, 91 ; Himalayan Tertiaries, 
91 ; Sabathu stage, 91 ; Dagshai 
stage, 91 ; Kasauli stage, 91 ; wide 
extent of tlie Nummulitic stage, 92 ; 
Sind Tertiaries, 92 : Tertiaries in Balu- 
chistan, 92-93 ; rock-salt in the Lower 
Tertiaries, 93 ; Lower Tertiaries in 
Kashmir, Ladakh, and Assam, 93 ; 
miocene of Sind and Burma, 93-94 ; 
Tertiary records in Burma, 94-9" ; 
Chin series, 95 ; Yenangyaung series, 
95-96 ; Siwalik series, q6 ; Irrawaddy 
system, 97; fossil wood, 97; Tipam 
sandstones of Assam, 97 ; Post-Ter- 
tiary development, 97 ; recent vol- 
canic action, 98 ; earthquakes, 9S-99 ; 
recent rises and subsidences of the 
land, 99; Pleistocene alluvium in the 
Narbada and Godavari valleys, 99- 
100 ; Porbandar stone, 100 ; Indo- 
Clangetic alluvium, 100 ; upland river 
deposits, 10 r ; wind-blown deposits, !oi; 
laterite, 101-102 ; lateritesof past ages, 
102 ; bibliography, 102-103. 

Local notices : Adilabad, v. 23 ; 
Afghanistan, v. 30-31 ; Agra, v. 74 ; 
Ahmadabad, v. 95 ; iMimadnagar, v. 
112 ; Ajmer-Merwara, v. 139; Akalkot, 
V. 178; Akyab, v. 191-192 ; Allgarh, 
V. 209 ; Allahabad, v, 228 ; Almora, v. 
244-245 ; Alwar, v. 255 ; Ambala, v. 
277 ; Amherst, v. 294 ; AmraotT, v. 307 ; 
Anaimalais, v. 332 ; Anantapur, v. 337- 
33S ; Andamans, v. 356 ; Angul, v. 
375 ; Northern Arakan, v. 393 ; Ara- 
kan Yoma, v. 398 ; Aravalli Hills, v. 
402 ; North Arcot, v. 404 ; South 
Arcot, v. 421 ; Assam, vi. 18-19 ; 
Atraf-i-balda, vi. 125 ; Altock, vi. 132 ; 
Baghelkhand, vi. 1 85-1 86 ; Balu- 
chistan, vi. 268-270 ; Banganapalle, 
vi. 372; Bannu, vi. 392-393; Baroda, 
vii. 28-29 j Basim, vii. 96 ; Bassein, 
vii. 107, 112; Bastar, vii. 121-122; 
Belgaum, vii. 145, 152, 157 ; Bellary, 
vii. 160, 174; Benares, vii. 179; Ben- 
gal, vii. 195-202, 261-265 > Kerar, vii. 
362-364, 382 ; Betiil, viii. 7 ; Betwa 
river, viii. 17 ; Bhagalpur, viii. 26 ; 
Bhamo, viii. 46 ; Bhandara, viii. 61 ; 
Bharatpur, viii. 73 ; Bhaunagar, viii. 
93 ; Bhir, viii. 112 ; Bhopal, viii. 126- 
127; Bhor, viii. 147; Bhuban Hills, 
viii. 149; Bhutan, viii. 155: Bidar, 
viii. 164; Bijapur, viii. 176; Bijawar, 
viii. 18S; Bijnor, viii. 193; Bikaner, 
viii. 203; Bilaspur, viii. 220; Blrbhum, 
viii. 240 ; Bolan Pass, viii. 264 ; Bom- 
bay Presidency, viii. 272-273; Bundi, 
ix. 78; Burma, ix. 115-117; Central 
India, ix. 325-330 ; Central Provinces, 
X- 5-7-.32-33. 50-.=;2 ; Cha^^ai.x. 116; 
Chagai and Ras Koh Hills, x. 120, 



121 ; Champaran,x. 137-138; Chanda, 
X. 149; Chhatarpur, x. 198; Chhin- 
dwara, x. 205 ; Chin Hills, x. 271; 
Lower Chindwin, x. 229 ; Upper 
Chindwin, x. 239 ; Chingleput, x. 
253-254 ; Chitaldroog, x. 290 ; 
Coorg, xi. 5-6 ; Cuddapah, xi. 58-59 ; 
Cutch, xi. 76-77; Darjeeling, xi. 166- 
167; Darrang, xi. 182; Deccan, xi. 206 ; 
Dera Ghazi Khan, xi. 249 ; Dera Is- 
mail Khan, xi. 260-261 ; Dhar, xi. 287- 
288; iJharwar, xi. 304; Dungarpur, xi. 
380 ; Elgandal, xii. 5-6 ; Ellichpur, xii. 
11; Ganjam, xii. 144; Garhwal, xii. 
164; Gaya, xii. 195-196; Godavari, 
xii. 282-283; Gwalior, xii. 418-420; 
Himalayas, xiii. 126-30; Jaisalmer, 
xiv. i; Jalaun, xiv. j8; Jalpaigurl, 
xiv. 31 ; Janjira, xiv. 58 ; Jashpur, xiv. 
67 ; Taunpur, xiv. 73 ; Jessore, xiv. 91 ; 
Jhalawan, xiv. 109; Jhalawar, xiv. 1 14; 
Jhang, xiv. 125; Jhansi, xiv. 136; 
jhelum,xiv. 150; Jubbulpore, xiv. 206- 
207 ; Jullundur, xiv. 222 ; Kachhi, xiv. 
248-249 ; Kadur, xiv. 263 ; Kaira, xiv. 
276-277; Kalat, xiv. 299; Kamrup, 
xiv. 331 ; North Kanara, xiv. 341 ; South 
Kanara, xiv. 354; Kangra, xiv. 381 ; 
Katha, xv. 153; Kathiawar, xv. 172- 
173 ; Khandesh. xv. 226-227 ; Kistna, 
XV. 319-320; Kohat, XV. 341-342; 
Kolar, XV. 369 ; Kurnool, xvi. 32 ; 
Laccadives, xvi. 86; Laikana, xvi. 137 ; 
Lingsugur, xvi. 163 ; Madras Presi- 
dency, xvi. 23S-242 ; Magwe, xvi. 41 3 ; 
^Laklan, xvii. 45 ; Malabar, xvii. 54- 
'^i; Manbhum, xvii. II 1-112 ; Manda- 
lay, xvii. 126 ; Mandi,xvii. 153 ; Mand- 
la, xvii. 159; Mayfirbhanj, xvii. 243; 
Mianwali, xvii. 3.17 ; Mirzapur, xvii. 
367; Monghyr, xvii. 390-391 ; Mying- 
yan, xviii. 120-121; Mysore State, 
xviii. 164-166 ; Mysore District, xviii. 
251-252; Nagod, xviii. 300; Nagpur, 
xviii. 305 ; Naini Tal, xviii. 323 ; Nal- 
lamalais, xviii. 346 ; Nellore, xix. 7-8 ; 
Nepal, xix. 28-29 ; Nicobars, xix. 60- 
61 ; Nilgiris, xix. 87 ; Nimar, xix. 107 ; 
North-West Frontier Province, xix. 
14I-144; Nowgong. xix. 222; Orchha, 
xix. 242 ; Orissa Tributary States, 
xix. 253-254 ; Osmanabad, xix. 269 ; 
Oudh, xix. 277; Pakokku, xix. 320; 
Palamau, xix. 335-336 ; Panch 
Mahals, xix. 380-381 ; Parbhani, 
xix. 410-411 ; Peshawar, xx. 112; 
Prome, xx. 220; Punjab, xx. 248-252; 
Quetta-Pishin, xxi. 12; Raichur, xxi. 
38; Raipur, xxi. 50; Rajputana, xxi. 
S7-90; Ranch!, xxi. 199; Ratnagiri, 
xxi. 246; Rawalpindi, xxi. 263; Revvah, 
xxi. 2S0; Rewa Kantha, xxi. 292-293; 
Ruby Mines District, xxi. 327; Sagaing, 



204 



INDEX 



xxi. 352 ; Saharanpur, xxi. 368 ; Salem, 
xxi. 397; Salt Range, xxi. 413-414; 
Santal Parganas, xxii. 61-62 ; Northern 
Shan States, xxii. 232; Sikkim, xxii. 
366; Simla, xxii. 376-377; Sind, xxii. 
392 ; Singhbhum, xxiii. 2 ; Sirmur, 
xxiii. 22 ; Sirohi, xxiii. 29 ; Sirpur 
Tandur, xxiii. 40; Siwalik Hills, xxiii. 
66; Siikkur, xxiii. 119; Sulaiman 
Range, xxiii. 129; Surat, xxiii. 151- 
152; Sylhet, xxiii. 190; Tinnevelly, 
xxiii. 362 ; Tippera, xxiii. 3S1 ; Tonk, 
xxiii. 408; Toungoo, xxiii. 422; Tra- 
vancore, xxiv. 4 ; 'I'richinopoly, xxiv. 
26-27; Tiimkur, xxiv. 53; United Pro- 
vinces, xxiv. 1 39-141 ; Vindhya Hills, 
xxiv. 316-317; Vizagapatam, xxiv. 
323 ; Warangal, xxiv. 357 ; Zhob, xxiv. 
429. 

GeonkhalT, village in Midnapore District, 
Bengal, with lighthouse, xii. 210. 

George Town, name of Black Town, 
Madras City, officially changed to 
(1906), xvi. 365 n. 

Georgegarh, village in Rohtak District, 
Punjab, xii. 210. 

German Missions. See under Protestant 
Missions. 

Germany, trade with, iii. 296-297. 

Gersoppa Falls, on Bombay-Mysore 
Frontier, xii. 2 10-2 11. 

Gersoppa, village in North Kanara Dis- 
trict, Bombay, xii. 21 1-2 12. 

Gersoppa pass, Western Ghats, xii. 219. 

Gesso industry, iii. 176. 

Gevrai, taluk in Bhir District, Hyderabad 
State, xii. 212. 

Ghafur Khan {ob. 1825), rule in Jaora, 
xiv. 63, 66 ; Tulsi Hai murdered by 
(1817), xvii. 270; Tal town assigned 
to (1818), xxiii. 207. 

Ghaggar, river of Northern India, xii. 
212-213. 

Ghnggar Canals, in Punjab, xii. 213 2 14. 

Ghagra river. .SVv Gogra. 

Ghaibnalh, Siva temple at Sultanganj, 
xxiii. 1 30. 

Ghairat Khan, invasion of Tirah (seven- 
teenth century), xxiii. 389. 

Ghalchah languages, of the I*>anian family, 
spoken in the Pamirs, i. 35.1-39.i- 

Ghamand Chand, Raja of Kangra, aji- 
pointed governor of JuUundur Doab, 
xiv. 384. 

Ghanasyam Singh Deo, Raja of Porahat, 
tendered allegiance to ]5ritish Govern- 
ment (1818), XX. 1S7. 

Ghanaur, tahsll in Patiala State, Punjab, 
xii. 214. 

Ghanchis, dealers in oils, milk, ^w\gln, in 

Baroda, vii. 56; Bombay Prcsitlency, 

viii. 304; Jhrdod, Panch Mahals, xiv. 

122 ; Kaira, xiv. 279 ; Kathiawar, xv. 

s 



177-178; Mahl Kantha, xvii. 17; 
Panch Mahals, xix. 384 ; Surat, xxiii. 

158. 

Ghangra, god ot the Gonds in Gondwana, 
xii. 325. 

Ghansham Das, Chaube, tranquillity of 
Hathras maintained by, during Mutiny, 
xiii. 72. 

Ghantai temple, Khajraho, xv. 218-219. 

Ghar, canal in Larkana District, Sind, 
xvi. 141. 

Gharapuri, island in Bombay Harbour. 
See Elephanta. 

Gharbari sect, subdivision of the Dadu- 
panthi sect, peculiar to Jodhpur, xiv. 
189. 

Gharlb Das, Khlch! Chauhan of Raghu- 
garh, Sironj granted to, xxiii. 38-39. 

Gharlb Nawaz, I^aja of Manipur (I7I4\ 
converted to Hinduism, xvii. 186. 

Ghariyal, or fish-eating crocodile (Gavi- 
alis), i. 266, 267 ; ( jorakhpur, xii. 333. 

Ghasi Das, seventh niahant of Nandgaon 
State, xviii. 356. 

Ghasidas, promoter of Satnami sect among 
the Chamars (1820-30), i. 428. 

Ghasis, caste in Surguja, xxiii. 172. 

Ghatakaipara, the, Sanskrit lyric poem, 
ii. 242. 

Ghatalj subdivision in Midnapore Dis- 
trict, Bengal, xii. 214. 

Ghatal, town in Midnapore District, 
Bengal, xii. 214. 

Ghatamenin, peak in United Provinces, 
xxiv. 140. 

Ghatampur, tahsll in Cawnpore District, 
United Provinces, xii. 214-215. 

Ghateshwar, temple at Bhainsrorgarh, 
viii. 40. 

Ghats, or bathing steps, Benares, vii. 
190, 191; Brindaban, ix. iS; Buland- 
shahr, ix. 58 ; Central India, ix. 347 ; 
Tarpan, Dinajpur, xi. 349 ; Etawah, 
xii. 47 ; Gangakher, Hyderabad, xii. 
130; Sadullahpur, Gaur, xii. 18S-189; 
CJhazTpur, xii. 230; Harda, Hoshang- 
abad, xiii. 42 ; Hardwar, Sali.iranpur, 
xiii. 52 ; Ilunkarcshwartirtha, Broach, 
xxiii. 128; IchamatT river, xiii. 323; 
Jhang-Maghiana, xiv. 134; KavilTrlha, 
Broach, xxiii. 128; Kurandvad, Bom- 
bay, xvi. 29 ; Lalganj, Muzafi'arpur, 
xvi. 132 ; Mandla, xvii. 170; Mirzapur, 
xvii. 376 ; Muttra, xviii. 73 ; Nasik, 
xviii. 411; PaunT, Bhandara, xx. 79; 
Puntamba, Ahmadnagar, xx. 395 ; 
Basant Bagh, Srlnagar. xxiii. 100; Suk- 
latirlha, Broach, xxiii. 12S. 

Ghats, the, two ranges of mountains in 
Southern India, xii, 215-216; botany, 
i. 187. 

Gh.ats, Eastern, mountain range along 
the cast coast of India, xii. 216-217; 



I 



1 



INDEX 



205 



physical aspects, i. 41-42. See also 

Nallamalais. 
Ghats, Western, mountain range along 

the west coast of India, xii. 217-221 ; 

geology, i. 3 ; physical aspects, i. 38-40 ; 

rainfall, i. 104; zoology, i. 249-272; 

intermittent cultivation, iii. 24-25. 
Ghatwal, Jat clan, in Karnal, xv. 51. 
Ghatwals, or guards of the passes, caste 

in Hazaribagh, xiii. 90, 94. 
Ghaus Khan, held Koil or Aligarh during 

Mutiny, xxii. 364. 
Ghaus Muhammad Khan, opposition to 

appointment of WazTr Muhammad 

Khan as minister of Bhopal, viii. 129. 
Ghaus Muhammad Khan, rule in Jaora 

(1825-65), xiv. 63. 
Ghayur Jang, Safdar Khan, Diwan of the 

Deccan Silbahs (1782), xxi. 394. 
Ghazan Khan, Tham or chief of Hunza, 

murdered (1SS6), xiii. 225. 
Ghazi Beg Tughlak, governor of the 

Punjab, XX. 266. 
Ghazi Khan, Mirani chief, rule in Lower 

Derajat, xi. 250 ; founded Dera Ghazi 

Khan, xi. 257 ; mosque in Dera Ghazi 

Khan, xi. 258; wrested Dajal from the 

Nahars, xi. 123. 
Ghazi Malik. See Tughlak Shah. 
Ghazi Miyan, Muhammadan martyr at 

Bahraich (1034), i. 436. 
GhazT Shah, Chakh leader, usurped throne 

of Kashmir (1559), ii. 374. 
Ghaziabad, tahsTl in Meerut District, 

United Provinces, xii, 221. 
Ghaziabad, town and railway junction in 

Meerut District, United Provinces, xii, 

221-222. 
Ghazij geological beds, i, 92. 
GhazTpur, District in Benares Division, 

United Provinces, xii. 2 2 2-2 30 ; physical 

aspects, 222-223; history, 223-225; 

population, 225-230 ; agriculture, 226- 

227 ; trade and communications, 227- 

228; famine, 228; administration, 

228-229; education, 229; medical, 

230 ; bone implement found in, ii. 

Ghazlpur, town in United Provinces, xii. 
230-231 ; woodwork, iii. 230 ; opium 
factory, iv, 242. 

GhazTpur, tahsil in Fatehpur District, 
United Provinces, xii. 231. 

Ghazi-ud-din, son of Asaf Jah, WazTr of 
the Mughal empire, claimed Nizamat 
of the Deccan, xiii. 240 ; Ghaziabad 
founded (1740), xii. 221 ; fled to Mut- 
tra (1759), xviii. 65 ; blinded and 
deposed Ahmad Shah (1757), xxiv. 
155; murdered Alamgir II (1759), 
xxiv. 156. 

Gbazi-ud-din, grandson of Asaf Jah, made 
terms with Peshwa (1784), vi. 414. 



GhazT-ud-dIn Haidar, first king of Oudh 
(1814-27), xix, 2S3; buildings at 
Lucknow, xvi. 190, 196 ; iron bridge 
for Lucknow brought out from England, 
xvi. 191. 

Ghazni, town in Afghanistan, xii. 231- 
233 ; coins, ii. 143-144. 

Ghazni Khan, Faruqi king (1510), ii. 

393- 

GhaznT Khan, Muhammad GhorT. See 
Muhammad. 

Ghazni Khan Jhalor, rule in Palanpur, 
xix. 353- 

Ghazni Khan of Malwa, invested Sultan- 
pur (1417), xxiii. 138. 

Ghaznivid dynasty, in Afghanistan, v. 35 ; 
Balkh, vi. 248; Baluchistan, vi. 275; 
seat of, at Ciliazni, xii. 232; in Herat, 
xiii. 115; Jhalawan, xiv. 110; Kalat, 
xiv. 300 ; Kandahar, xiv. 375 ; Pesh- 
awar, XX. 115; Quetta-PishTn, xxi. 13; 
Hindustan (United Provinces), xxiv. 
1 50. See also Mahmud of Ghazni. 

Ghebas, tribe in Kot, Attock, xv. 409-410. 

GhebT dialect, spoken ia Western Punjab, 
XX. 286. 

Gheria, port in Bombay. See Vijayadurg. 

Ghetti Mudaiiyar, chieftain in Atur Fort, 
Salem (eighteenth century) , vi. 139. 

GhT, or clarified butter, trade statistics, 
iii. 84, 314; made at Ballia, vi. 258; 
Banganapalle, vi. 375 ; Central Pro- 
vinces, X. 56, 57; Chagai, x. 118; 
CharkharT, x. 180 ; Cocanada, Goda- 
vari, X. 339 ; Coimbatore, x. 366 ; 
Cooch Behar, x. 3S5 ; Etawah, xii. 44 ; 
Gujranwala, xii. 359 ; Gujrat, xii. 
370 ; HamTrpur, xiii. 18 ; Hathras, 
AlTgarh, xiii. 72 ; Hazara, xiii. 82 ; 
Ploshangabad, xiii. 186, 187 ; Jaswant- 
nagar, Etawah, xiv. 71 ; Kaira, xiv. 
282 ; KherT, xv. 273 ; Kurnool, xvi. 
40 ; Lahore, xvi. 101 ; Lalitpur, xvi. 
134; Las Bela, xvi. 147 ; Loralai, 
Baluchistan, xvi. 177; Lunavada, 
Rewa Kantha, xvi. 216 ; Monghyr, 
xvii. 398; Montgomery, xvii. 415; 
Morvi, Kathiawar, xviii. 4 ; Muzaffar- 
garh, xviii. 80; Muzaffarpur, xviii. 
102 ; Mymensingh, xviii. 155; Nadiad, 
Kaira, xviii. 282 ; Nagpur, xviii. 312 ; 
Namakkal, Salem, xviii. 348; Nander, 
Hyderabad, xviii. 352 ; Narsinghpur, 
xviii. 390-391 ; Palamau, xix. 342 ; 
Sambhal, Moradabad, xxii, 19 ; San- 
dila, HardoT, .xxii, 31 ; Santal Pai- 
ganas, xxii. 73 ; Sarawan, Baluchistan, 
xxii. 100 ; Satna, Central India, xxii. 
130; Saugor, xxii. 143; SeonT, xxii, 
172; Shahpur, xxii, 217-218; Shah- 
pura, Rajputana, xxii, 224; Sholapur, 
xxii. 302 ; Sibi, Baluchistan, xxii. 340. 

Ghilzai Powindas, winter visits to Duki, 



2o6 



INDEX 



xi. 376 ; Wana, xxiv. 353 ; Southern 

W'azTristan, xxiv. 383. 
Ghilzais, tribe in Afghanistan, v. 42, 46- 

47 ; Baluchistan, vi. 276, 289 ; Hazara- 

jat, xiii. 85 ; Herat, xiii. 113 ; Istalif, 

xiii. 371 ; Jalalabad, xiv. 12 ; Kabul, 

xiv. 242 ; Kurram Agency, xvi. 51 ; 

Zhob, Baluchistan, xxiv. 431. 
Ghiraths, cultivating tribe in the Hima- 
layas of the North-East Punjab, xx. 

288. 
Ghirths, landowning tribe, in Hoshiarpur, 

xiii. 196 ; Kangra, xiv. 388. 
Ghiswa, ancient name of Machhliihahr, 

from a Bhar chieftain, xvi. 225. 
Ghiyas-ud-din, Bahmani king (1397), ii- 

383. 3S5> xiii. 236. 
Ghiyas-ud-din, Balban. See Balban. 

Ulugh Khan, Slave king of Delhi. 
Ghiyas-ud-din, Pathan king of Gaur, 

buried at Badrihat, vi. 179, vii. 216. 
Ghiyas-ud-din, general of Aurangzeb, 

Kumool taken by (1687), xvi. 33. 
Ghiyas-ud-din Khalji, rule over Malwa 

(1475-1500), xvii. 104. 
Ghod, village in Poona District, Bombay, 

xii. 233. 
Ghodasar, petty State in Bombay. See 

Ghorasar. 
Ghodbandar, port in Thana District, 

Bombay, xii. 233. 
Ghodna, Simla Hill Stale, Punjab. See 

Balsan. 
Ghodnadi, to\vn in Bombay. See Sirur. 
Gholghat, town in Bengal. See Hooghly. 
Ghongre, merchant of Vairag, temples at 

Mohol and Vadval, Sholapur, built by 

{c. 1730), xvii. 387'. 
Ghoosery, suburb of Howrah, Bengal. 

See Ghusurl. 
Ghor, ruined city in Afghanistan, xii. 

233-235- 
Ghor dynasty (11 52-1 206), ii. 3.=^ 3-355 ; 
coinage, ii. 144 ; Herat taken by, xiii. 

"5- 

Ghora, State in Central India. See Jobat. 

Ghora Dakka, small cantonment in North- 
West Frontier Province, xii. 236. 

Ghorabari, tdliika in Karachi District, 
Sind, xii. 235-236. 

Ghoraghat, ruined city in Dinajpur Dis- 
trict, Eastern Bengal, xii. 236. 

Ghorai Khel, rule in Peshawar valley, xx. 

115- 
Ghorasar, petty State in Mahi Kantha, 

Bombay, xii. 236, xvii. 13. 
Ghorat, administrative division in Herat, 

Afghanistan, xiii. 113. 
Ghordaur, wall in Gaur. See Baisgazl. 
Ghorewaha Rajputs, Rahon captured by, 

xxi. 37. 
Ghorian, administrative division in Herat, 

Afghanistan, xiii. 113. 



Ghorids, rule in Baluchistan, vi. 275 ; 
Jhalawan, xiv. no; Kalat, xiv. 300; 
Kandahar, xiv. 375 ; Quetta-Pishln, 
xxi. 13; Hindustan (United Provinces), 
xxiv. 150. 

Ghoris of Junagarh, rule in Jasdan State, 
Kathiawar, xiv. 66. 

Ghorpade, Maratha family in Mudhol, 
xviii. 12 ; in Sandur, xxii. 43-44. 

Ghorupdeo temple, in Bombay City, viii. 
401. 

GhosT, tahsil in Azamgarh District, 
United Provinces, xii. 236. 

Ghotki, iahika in Sukkur District, Sind, 
xii. 236. 

Ghotki, town in Sukkur District, .Sind, 
xii. 236-237. 

Ghulab Singh. See Gulab Singh. 

Ghulam Ahmad, MuUa, leader of Ah- 
madiya sect, i. 438, xii. 395. 

Ghulam All, rule in Sind, xxii. 399, 400. 

Ghulam All YsMzxi, jagtrdar of Bangana- 
palle, settlement (1820), vi. 377. 

Ghulam AlT Khan, .Saiyid Nawab of 
Banganapalle '1905), vi. 374. 

Ghulam Haidar Khan, son of Dost Mu- 
hammad, governor of Kandahar (1855), 
xiv. 376. 

Ghulam Hasan, rule in Ellichpur (1846), 
xii. 2C. 

Ghulam Kadir Khan, Rohilla leader, held 
Aligarh, v. 210 ; attacked Sindhia, v. 
83 ; blinded Shah Alam, and executed 
by Sindhia (i 788), xiv. 63 ; in Saharan- 
pur (1785), xxi. 370. 

Ghulam Kadir Khan, NazTm of Shah- 
jahanpur (1857), xxii. 203. 

Ghulam Kadir Khan (of Khakwani 
family), Hajiwah canal completed by, 
xiii. 8. 

Ghulam Kutb-ud-din Khan, Nawab of 
Mamdot, xvii. 106. 

Ghulam Muhammad, Chatha chief, de- 
fended Ramnagar (1795), xxi. 180. 

Ghulam Muhammad, Prince, son of Tipu 
Sultan {pb. 1878), ii. 490 ; built mosque 
at Calcutta (1842), ix. 279. 

(ihulam Muhammad All, chief of Ban- 
ganapalle (1848-68), vi. 373. 

Ghulam Muhi-ud-din,. Shaikh, administra- 
tion of Hoshiarpur, xiii. 200 ; JuUundur, 
xiv. 224 ; governor of Kashmir (1.S42), 
XV. 94 ; reopened Jama Masjid at Sri- 
nagar, xxiii. 100. 

Ghulam Nabi Khan, niler of Sind (1777), 
Nxii. 399. 

Ghulam Shah, Jam of Las Bela (1765-6- 
76), xvi. 146. 

Ghulam Shah, Kalhora, invasions of 
Cutch (1762-5), xi. 78; capital at 
Hyderabad, .Sind, xiii. 313; Hyderabad 
city founded by (1768), xiii. 321 ; rule 
in Sind (1757-72), xxii. 398-399. 



I 



INDEX 



207 



Ghulams, menial class, in Peshawar, xx. 

Ghund, fief in Keonthal State, Punjab, 
xii. 237. 

Gliuram, ancient town in Patiala State, 
Punjab, xii. 237. 

Ghurghin Khan, Armenian general of 
MTr Kasim, established arsenal at 
Monghyr (1763), xvii. 402. 

Ghnsuri, suburb of Howrah city, Bengal, 
with factories, xii. 237. 

(jhwaria Khels, rule in Peshawar, xix. 152. 

Giandari, peak in Sulaiman Hills, xxi. 65. 

Gibbings, Captain, killed in Mutiny at 
Sultanpur, xxiii. 132. 

Gibson, Dr., Consers'ator of Forests in 
Bombay (1847), iii. 107. 

Gichkis, formerly dominant race in Mak- 
ran, xvii. 46-47, 47-48. 

Gidad, petty State in Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay. See Bantva. 

Gidar Dhor river. See Hingol. 

Gidhaur, village in Monghyr District, 
Bengal, xii. 237-238. 

Gidh-karai, precipice at Gagraun Fort, 
xii. 122. 

Gigasaran, petty State in Kathiawar, 
Bombay, xii. 238, xv. 169. 

Gigiani, Pathan clan, in Charsadda, Pesh- 
awar, X. 180; Peshawar valley, xx. 115. 

Gilgit, head-quarters of a mountainous 
tract in Kashmir, xii. 238-242 ; physi- 
cal aspects, 238-239; history, 239; 
population, 239-241 ; agriculture, 241; 
trade and commanications, 241-242 ; 
administration, 242 ; language, i. 356. 

Gill, Major, facsimile of paintings in 
Ajauta cave-temples made by, ii. 117, 
V. 136-137- 

Gillespie, General, repulsed and killed in 
Nepal War, ii. 493, xix. 35 ; fort on 
Kalanga attacked by (1815), xiv. 298 ; 
mutiny at Vellore put down by (1806), 
xxiv. 305. 

Gillespie tank, Shikarpur, Sind, xxii. 276. 

Gils, Jat tribe, in Ferozepore, xii. 89. 

Gingee, rock-fortress in South Arcot Dis- 
trict, Madras, famous in Carnatic Wars, 
xii. 242-245. 

Gingelly. See Sesamum. 

Ginger, grown in Almora, v. 248 ; Am- 
bala, v. 281 ; Baroda, vii. 48 ; Barwa 
Sagar, Jhansi, vii. 93 ; Bengal, vii. 247 ; 
Bhandara, viii. 66 ; Bilaspur, viii. 234 ; 
Chin Hills, x. 276; Cochin, x. 346; 
Dehra Dun, xi. 216 ; Garhwal, xii. 167 ; 
Garo Hills, xii. 178 ; Goa, xii. 261 ; 
Himalayas, xiii. 133; Hsipaw, Burma, 
xiii. 220; Jirang, Khasi Hills, xiv. 
177; Kalka, Ambala, xiv. 314; North 
Kanara, xiv. 347 ; Manipur, xvii. 190 ; 
Mysore, xviii. 210; Nepal, xix. 47; 
Patiala, xx. 42 ; Punjab, xx. 299 ; 



Simla, xxii. 380; Sirmur, Punjab, xxiii. 

25; fippera, xxiii. 384. 
Ginja hill, paint inscription, ii. 34. 
Gir, range of hills in Kathiawar, Bombay, 

xii. 245; lions found in, i. 21S ; cattle, 

iii. 79-80. 
Girasia College, at Gondal, Kathiawar, 

xii. 320 
Girasias, landholders, in Baroda, vii. 64 ; 

Broach, ix. 22 ; Sirohi, xxiii. 32. 
Girdhar Bahadur, rule in Dhar (1724- 

1729-30), xi. 289. 
Girdhar Das, Hindi poet (early eighteenth 

century), translation from, ii. 428-429. 
Giri Raj, sandstone hill in Muttra Dis- 
trict, United Provinces, xii. 247. 
Giria, site of battle-field in Murshidabad 

District, Bengal (1740 and 1763), xii. 

245- 
Giriak, village in Patna District, Bengal, 

xii. 245-246. 

Girldlh, subdivision in Hazaribagh Dis- 
trict, Bengal, xii. 246 ; coal-field, iii. 
132, 134, vii. 263, 264, xiii. 94. 

Girldlh, town in Hazaribagh District, 
Bengal, xii. 246. 

Girish Chandra Roy, Raja, college at 
Sylhet founded by, xxiii. 203. 

Girishk, old fort in Afghanistan, xii. 247. 

Girnar, sacred hill, Kathiawar, Bombay, 
xii. 247-248 ; Asoka edict and inscribed 
rock, ii. 41-42 ; temples, ii. 179. 

Girni Sar, peak in Southern Waziristan, 
xxiv. 380. 

Girvar, ancient name for Girnar, xii. 

.^47- 

Girwa, branch of Kauriala river in Nepal 
and Ondh, xii. 24S. 

Girwan, tahsil in Banda District, United 
Provinces, xii. 248-249. 

Girwar Singh, son of Jagat Raj Singh of 
Jaso, xiv. 70. 

GUagovinda, the, Sanskrit poem by Jaya- 
deva (twelfth century), ii. 243. 

Gitdvali, the, Hindi poem by Tulsl Das 
(sixteenth century), ii. 419. 

Glass and glass articles manufactured, 
Alwar, v. 263; Bara Banki, vi. 422; 
Bareilly, vii. 9 ; Bengal, vii. 26S ; 
Bhagalpur, viii. 32 ; Bijnor, viii. 198 ; 
Bombay Presidency, viii. 325; Chital- 
droog, Mysore, x. 295 ; Dalmau, Rae 
Bareli, xi. 127; Dehra Dun, xi. 217; 
Etah, xii. 34; Etawah, xii. 44; Hiriyur, 
Mysore, xiii. 144; Hoshiarpur, xiii. 199; 
Jubbulpore, xiv. 213 ; Kaira, xiv. 282 ; 
Kapadvanj, Kaira, xiv. 406 ; Madras 
Presidency, xvi. 296 ; Moradabad, xvii. 
426 ; Naglna, Bijnor, xviii. 300 ; Nar- 
singhpur, xviii. 391 ; Nimar, xix. 113- 
114; Panipat, Karnal, xix. 398 ; Par- 
tabgarh District, xx. 19 ; Rae BarelT, 
xxi. 30 ; Rajpur, Dehra Dun, xxi. 82 ; 



2o8 



INDEX 



Saharanpur, xxi. 375 ; Saugor, xxii. 
143; Sikandra Rao, Aligarh, xxii. 364; 
United Provinces, xxiv. 204. See also 
Bangles. 

Glassware, trade, iii. 256, 308. 

Glauber's salt, found in Saran, xxii. 89. 

Glausai, submission to Alexander (326 
B.C.), ii. 276. 

Gleeson, Mr., Assistant Commissioner, 
murder of, at Mingin, Burma (1886), 
X. 241. 

Gneiss, in India generally, i. 54, 55, 59-62 ; 
found or quarried in Adilabad, v. 23 ; 
Anaimalais, v. 332 ; Anantapur, v. 337 ; 
Angul, V. 375 ; Aravalli Hills, v. 402 ; 
North Arcot, v. 404 ; South Arcot, v. 
421 ; Bangalore, vi. 365 ; Bankura, vi. 
384 ; Banswara, vi. 408 ; Baroda, vii. 
29; Belgaum,vii. 146; Bengal, vii. 202- 
203, 241 ; Bhagalpur, viii. 26; Bhutan, 
viii. 155; Bidar, viii. 164; Bijapur, 
viii. 182, 188; Birbhum, viii. 240; 
Burma, ix. 116; Central India, ix. 
325-328 ; Central Provinces, x. 5, 7 ; 
Champaran, x. 137 ; Chanda, x. 149 ; 
Chhatarpur, x. 198 ; Chitaldroog, x. 
290 ; Coorg, xi. 5 ; Cuddapah, xi. 58 ; 
Cuttack,xi. 87,92 ; Darjeeling, xi. 166 ; 
Darrang, xi. 182; Deccan, xi. 206; 
Dharvvar, xi. 304 ; Dubrajpur, Bir- 
bhum, xi. 374 ; Dungarpur, xi. 380 ; 
Elgandal, Hyderabad, xii. 5; Ganjam, 
xii. 144; Garo Hills, xii. 172; Gaya,xii. 
195; Western Ghats, xii. 218, 219, 220; 
Goalpara, xii. 270 ; Godavari, xii. 282- 
283; Gulbarga, Hyderabad, xii. 376; 
Gwalior, xii. 419-420; Indore, xiii. 
334 ; Jashpur, Central Provinces, xiv. 
67 ; Jhansi, xiv. 136 ; Jobat, Central 
India, xiv. 178 ; Jubbulpore, xiv. 207 ; 
Kaira, xiv. 276; Kamrup, xiv. 331 ; 
South Kanara, xiv. 354 ; Karimnagar, 
Hyderabad, xv. 42 ; Khandesh, xv. 
227; Khaniadhana, Central India, xv. 
244 ; Khiisi and Jaintia Hills, xv. 254 ; 
Khurda, Orissa, xv. 295; Khuria, 
Central Provinces, xv. 296 ; Kishan- 
garh, Rajputana, xv. 310 ; Kistna, 
XV. 319-320; Kolar, Mysore, xv. 369, 
374 ; Kulittalai, Trichinopoly, xvi. 14 ; 
Lalitpur, Jhansi, xvi. 133; Lingsugur, 
Hyderabad, xvi. 163; Madras Presi- 
dency, xvi. 239 ; Madura, xvi. 387 ; 
Mahbubnagar, Hyderfibad, xvii. i ; 
Mainjial, Central Provinces, xvii. 33 ; 
Manbhum, .wii. iii ; Medak, Hyder- 
abad, xvii. 245 ; Mishmi Hills, Assam, 
xvii, 377 ; Monghyr, xvii. 390-391 ; 
Mysore State, xviii. 165, 166 ; My- 
sore District, xviii. 251 ; Nalgonda, 
Hyderabad, xviii. 338; Nandcr, 
Hyderabad, xviii. 350 ; Nowgong, 
Assam, xix. 222; Orchha, xix. 242; 



Orissa Tributary States, xix. 253 ; Pala- 
mau, xix. 335 ; Palanpur Agency, xix. 
347 ; Panna, xix. 399 ; Partabgarh, 
Rajputana, xx. 9; Peshawar, xx. 112; 
Puil, XX. 399 ; Raichur, Hyderabad, 
xxi. 38 ; Rajmahal Hills, xxi. 77 ; Raj- 
putana, xxi. 87; RanchI, xxi. 199; 
Ratnagiri, xxi. 246; Rewah, xxi. 280; 
Rewa Kantha, xxi. 292 ; Ruby Mines, 
Burma, xxi. 327 ; Sagaing, Burma, xxi. 
352; Salem, xxi. 397; Samthar, Cen- 
tral India, xxii. 24 ; Santal Parganas, 
xxii. 61 ; SeonI, xxii. 166 ; Southern 
Shan States, xxii. 250 ; Shimoga, My- 
sore, xxii. 282; Shwebo, Burma, xxii. 
311 ; Sibsagar, xxii. 345 ; Sikkim, xxii. 
366 ; Singhbhiim, xxiii. 2 ; .Sirohi, 
Rajputana, xxiii. 29 ; Sirpur Tandur, 
Hyderabad, xxiii. 40 ; Soi;thern Ma- 
ratha Jaglrs, xxiii. 92 ; Tanjore, xxiii. 
226; Tinnevelly, xxiii. 362 ; Toungoo, 
Burma, xxiii. 42 2 ; Trichinopoly, xxiv. 
26 ; Udaipur, Rajputana, xxiv. 86 ; 
United Provinces, xxiv. 140, 14I ; 
Vindhya Hills, xxiv. 316 ; Vizaga- 
patam, xxiv. 323 ; Warangal, Hyder- 
abad, xxiv. 357. 

Goa, Portuguese Settlement within Bom- 
bay Presidency, xii. 249-266; physical 
aspects, 249-251; history, 251-258; 
population, 25S-260 ; agriculture, 260- 
261 ; forests, 261 ; trade and com- 
munications, 262 ; famine, 262-263 ; 
administration, 263-265 ; education, 
265 ; medical, 266. 

Other references : Cold season, i. 114; 
language, i. 374 ; Inquisition founded 
1560, dissolved 1812, i. 442; taken by 
Portuguese (1510), ii. 448; defended 
by Portuguese (1570), ii. 450-451. 

Goa city, capital of Goa Settlement, xii. 
266-269. 

Goa Velha, name of original city of Goa, 
xii. 266. 

Goala, grazing caste in Bengal, i. 327- 
328. See aiso AhiTs. 

Goalanda, subdivision in Eastern Bengal. 
See Goalundo. 

Goaldes, peak in Orissa Tributary States, 
xix. 253. 

Goalpara, District in Assam, xii. 269- 
277; physical aspects, 269-270; history, 
271; population, 271-272; agriculture, 
272-273; forests, 273-274; trade and 
communications, 274-275; administra- 
tion, 275-276; education, 276-277; 
medical, 277. 

Goalpara, subdivision in Goalpara Dis- 
trict, Assam, xii. 277-278. 

Goalpara, town in Goalpara District, 
Assam, xii. 278. 

Goalundo, subdivision in Farldpur Dis- 
trict, Eastern Bengal, xii. 279. 



INDEX 



209 



Goalundo, river mart in Farldpur Disti ict, 

Eastern Bengal, xii. 279. 
Cloanese, in Bombay City, viii, 412, 
Goapuri, ancient name for Goa, xii. 251. 
Goats, iii. 86,87 ! statistics, iii. loi ; sacri- 
fice of, Hill Tippera, xiii. 120. 

Local notices: South Arcot, v. 42S ; 
Aurangabad, vi. 145 ; Azamgarb, vi. 
158; Baluchistan, vi. 299; Basti, vii. 
128; Bhandara, viii. 66 ; Bijapur, viii. 
181 ; Bilaspur, viii. 227 ; Central Pro- 
vinces, X. 41 ; Chhindwara, x. 210 ; 
Chin Hills, x. 271; Etawah, xii. 43; 
Gwalior, xii. 429 ; Jhansi, xiv. 142 ; 
Kachhi, Baluchistan, xiv. 250 ; Kherl, 
XV. 272. See also in each District and 
larger State article under Agriculture. 
Goats, wild {t/idrkhor, &c.), i. 233-234. 
Local notices : Afghanistan, v. 33 ; 
Almora, v. 245 ; Bannu, vi. 393 ; Dera 
Ismail Khan, xi. 261 ; Garo Hills, xii. 
172; Gilgit, xii. 23S ; Hindu Kush, 
xiii. 138; Kafiristan, xiv. 270; Kash- 
mir and Jammu, xv. 87 ; Loralai, xvi. 
173; Mandalay, xvii. 127; Mianwali, 
xvii. 31S ; North- West Frontier Pro- 
vince, xix. 146; Peshawar, xx. 113; 
Punjab, XX. 255 ; Quetta-Pishin, xxi. 
13; Northern Shan States, xxii. 233; 
Sibi, xxii. 337 ; Sulaiman Range, xxiii. 
129 ; Tehrl, xxiii. 270 ; Southern 
Waziristan, xxi v. 38 1. 
Goatsuckers {Capri mitlgus), i. 249-250. 
Gobardanga, town in Twenty-Four Par- 

ganas, Bengal, xii. 279-280. 
Gobardhan, town in Muttra District, 

United Provinces, xii. 280. 
Gobardhangiri, hill in Mysore. See 

Govardhangiri. 
Gobind, Raja of Laur, Sylhet, summoned 
to Delhi and embraced Muhammadan 
faith, xvi. 155. 
Gobind Chand, rule in Kanauj (i 115-55), 

xiv. 371. 
Gobind Chand, prince of Cachar, ix. 

251. 
Gobind Rao, of Jalaun, rule in KalpT 
(1804-6), xiv. 318 ; KalpI fort held, 
xiv. 19; submitted (1806) and was re- 
stored to his possessions, xiv. 19. 
Gobind Singh, GurQ. See Govind Singh. 
Gobindpur, subdivision in Manbhum 

District, Bengal, xii. 280. 
Gobindpur, village in Manbhum District, 

Bengal, xii. 281. 
Goda, another name for Godavari river, 

xii. 299. 
Godagari, river mart in Rajshahi District, 

Eastern Bengal, xii. 281. 
Godar Shah, Muhammadan saint, tomb 

at Mehidpur, xvii. 270. 
Godavari, District in Madras, xii. 281- 
297; physical aspects, 281-284; ^^is- 

VOL. XXV. 



tory, 284-286 ; population, 286-288 ; 
agriculture, 288-290 ; minerals, 291 ; 
trade and communications, 291-293 ; 
famine, 293; administration, 293-296; 
education, 296-297; medical, 297. 

Other refcre>ices : Minerals, iii. 141 ; 
arts and manufactures, iii. 188, 192, 
^ 200, 239. 
Godavari, river of Southern India running 
across the Deccan, iii. 361, xii. 297- 
299 ; course and tributaries, xii. 297- 
299 ; navigation, xii. 299 ; sanctity, 
xii. 299. 

Ot/ier references : Course, i. 44-45 ; 

pleistocene alluvium, i. 100; navigation 

works, iii. 358. 

Godavari belt of Gondwana rocks, iii. 135. 

Godavari Canals, in Madras, iii. 332, 338, 

355, xii. 299-300. 
Godavari valley, fossil remains, i. 84 ; 
agate flake found in, ii. 91 ; graphite, 
iii. 141. 
Godda, subdivision in Santal Parganas 

District, Bengal, xii. 300. 
Godda, village in Santal Parganas Dis- 
trict, Bengal, xii. 300-301. 
Goddard, Colonel, in second Maratha War 
(1778), ii. 442; Ahmadabad stormed 
( 1 780) ,v. 107,109; Bassein taken (1780), 
vii. 120; march from Bengal to Bom- 
bay, viii. 129; Gujarat conquered, ii. 
485 ; expedition into Hazaribagh under 
(c. 1771), xiii. 88. 
Godeheu, M., governor of Pondicherry 

(1754), ii. 473. 
Godhra, tdhika in Panch Mahals District, 

Bombay, xii. 301. 
Godhra, head-quarters of Panch Mahals 

District, Bombay, xii. 301. 
Godna, town in Bengal. See Revelganj. 
Godo Singh, Unao founded (eighth cen- 
tury), xxiv. 129. 
Godwin, General, Burman leader defeated 
in second Burmese War (1852), xx. 221, 
230 ; Martaban occupied (1852), xxiii. 

^331- 
Gogha, town in Ahmadabad District, 

Bombay, xii. 301-302. 
Gogra, river iu Oudh, i. 23, 24, xii. 302- 

303- 
Gogunda, town in Udaipur State, Raj- 

putana, xii. 303-304. 
Gohad, historic town in Gwalior State, 

Central India, xii. 304. 
Gohaditya, rule in south-west of Mewar, 

xxiv. 87. 
Gohana,/a/w/'/in Rohtak District, Punjab, 

xii. 304. 
Gohana, town in Rohtak District, Punjab, 

xii. 304-305. 
Gohels, Rajput clan, in Ahmadabad, v. 

104; Bhaunagar, viii. 93; conquests 

in Kathiawar (thirteenth century), xv. 



2IO 



INDEX 



175; Piram held, xx. 150; rule in Raj- 

pTpla, xxi, 80 ; dispute with Jains about 

Shetrunja hill, xix. 360 ; Vala conquered 

(1260), xxiv. 295. 
Gohelwar, prdnt or division of Kathiawar, 

Bombay, xii. 305. 
Gohna, lake formed by a landslip in 

Garhwal District, United Provinces, 

xii. 305-306. 
Goitre, prevalent in Assam, vi. 40 ; Chara- 

paran, x. 139 ; Jalpaiguri, xiv. 34; 

Kangra, xiv. 382 ; Mianwali, xvii. 318 ; 

Nepal, xix. 40 ; North-West Frontier 

Province, xix. 164; Purnea, xx. 415; 

Rangpur, xxi. 226 ; Ratanpur, Central 

Provinces, xxi. 239 ; Simla, xxii. 378. 
Gojra, town in Lyallpur District, Punjab, 

xii. 306. 
Gokak, taltika in Belgaum District, Bom- 
bay, xii. 306. 
Gokak, town in Belgaum District, Bom- 
bay, with waterfall and irrigation works, 

xii. 306-307. 
Gokalpura, petty State in Mahi Kantha. 

Bombay, xii. 307, xvii. 14. 
Gokarannath temple, Gola, Kheri, xii. 

308. 
Gokarn, town in North Kanara District, 

Bombay, with Siva temple, xii. 307. 
Gokhale, Dhundu Pant, Navalgund and 

Gadag taken by \c. 1800), xviii. 419. 
Gokhas, Oriya caste, in Balasore, vi. 239. 
Gokprosh, mountain ridge in Baluchistan, 

xvii. 51. 
Gokteik Gorge, Hsipaw, Burma, with 

railway bridge, xiii. 220. 
Gokul, village near Mahaban, Muttra, 

head-quarters of Vallabhacharya sect, 

xvi. 428. 
Gokulnath, poet, translation of the Mahd- 

bhdrata into Eastern Hindi (1829), xii. 

431- 
Gol Gumbaz, great dome at Bijapur, ii. 

197, viii. 186. 
Gol iSlahal, building at Udaipur, ii. 127. 
Gola, town in Gorakhpur District, United 

Provinces, xii. 307-308. 
Gola, town in Kherl District, United Pro- 
vinces, with Siva temple, xii. 308. 
Golaghat, subdivision in Sibsagar District, 

Assam, xii. 308. 
Golaghat, river mart in Sibsagar District, 

Assam, xii. 308-309. 
Golamattikanagara, Pali name for Taik- 

kala, xxiii. 205. 
Golapurabs, Brahman sub-caste in Nar- 

singhpur, xviii. 388. 
Golars, grazing caste, in Balaghat, vi. 

227. 
Golas, Oriya caste, in Balasore, vi. 239. 
Golas, rice-husking caste, in Surat, xxiii. 

158. 
Golconda, fortress and ruined city in 



Atraf-i-balda District, Hyderabad, xii. 
309-310; Kutb Shahis of, see that 
title. 
Gold, in India generally, iii. 141-144, 
235 ; value of gold produced (1898- 
1903), iii. 130; ancient workings, iii. 
142 ; allu\'ial, iii. 143 ; mines, iii. 235 ; 
imports and exports, iii. 291-292, 309, 

310. 

Local notices : Afghanistan, v. 55; 
Akyab, V. 196; Ambala, v. 283; North 
Arcot, v. 413 ; Assam, vi. 71, 72 ; At- 
tock,vi. 135; Balaghat, vi. 230; Balti- 
stan, vi. 264 ; Baroda, vii. 54 ; Bastar, 
vii. 124; Belgaum, \-ii. 152; Bellary, 
vii. 160, 167 ; Bengal, vii. 202, 265 ; 
Bhamo, viii. 52; Bhandara, viii. 67; 
Bijapur, viii. 182 ; Bilaspur, viii. 228 ; 
Bombay Presidency, viii. 323 ; Bonai, 
Chota Nagpur, ix. 3 ; Bowringpet, My- 
sore, ix. 8; Burma, ix. 170-171, 173; 
Central Provinces, x. 52 ; Champaran, 
X. 142; Chanda, X. 156 ; Chiknayakan- 
halli, Mysore, X. 223; Lower Chindwin, 
X. 233 ; Upper Chindwin, x. 246 ; 
Chitaldroog, Mysore, x. 294 ; Coim- 
batore, x. 365 ; Devala, Nilgiris, xi. 
273; Dharwar, xi. 311; Gangpur, 
Chota Nagpur, xii. 142 ; Garhwal, xii. 
168 ; Gilgit, xii. 241 ; Gurgaon, xii. 
407 ; Harpanahalli, Bellar}', xiii. 57 ; 
Hassan, Mysore, xiii. 62 ; Himalayas, 
xiii. 130; Hindu Kush, xiii. 138; 
Honnali, Mysore, xiii. 161 ; Hoshiar- 
pur, xiii. 199; Hutti, iii. 142-143; 
Hyderabad State, xiii. 232, 261-262 ; 
Irrawaddy Valley, iii. 143 ; Jashpur, 
Central Provinces, xiv. 67 ; Jhelum, 
xiv. 156; Jubbulpore, xiv. 212; Kadur, 
Mysore, xiv. 267 ; South Kanara, xiv. 
364 ; Kangra, xiv. 392 ; Kangundi, 
North Arcot, xiv. 398 ; Kashmir, xv. 
131 ; Katha, Burma, xv. 159, 160 ; 
Kauriala river. United Provinces, xv, 
191 ; Kharsawan, Chota Nagpur, xv. 
252 ; Kolar, Mysore, iii. 14I-142, xv. 
374> 376-378 ; Kyaukpazat, iii. 143 ; 
Ladakh, iii. 143 ; Lingsugur, Hyder- 
abad, xvi. 163 ; Madras Presidency, 
xvi. 239, 290; Manbhum.xvii. 111,118; 
Mayurbhanj, Orissa,xvii. 243; Mergui, 
Burma, xvii. 304; Mianwali, xvii. 322 ; 
Midnapore, xvii. 334 ; Myitkyina, Bur- 
ma, xviii. 143; Mysore, xviii. 217-218; 
Nainl Tal, xviii. 329 ; Nilambur, Mala- 
bar, xix. 85 ; Nilgiris, xix. 97; North- 
West Frontier Province, xix. 181 ; 
Oudh, xix. 277 ; Pakokku, Burma, xix. 
327; Peshawar, xx. 119; Punjab, 
XX. 313; Purl, XX. 404; RanchI, 
xxi. 199, 205; Ratnagiri, xxi. 253; 
Rawalpindi, xxi. 268; Salem, xxi. 403 ; 
Sahveen, Burma, xxi. 419; Sambalpur, 



INDEX 



211 



xxii. 12; Sandur, Madras, xxii. 46; 
Seoni, xxii. 171 ; Northern Shan States, 
xxii. 241 ; Southern Shan States, xxii. 
260; Shimoga, Mysore, xxii. 287-288; 
Sibsagar, xxii. 350; Singhbhum, xxiii. 
8 ; Sirmur, Punjab, xxiii. 26 ; Sirohi, 
Rajputana, xxiii. 29 ; Talcher, Orissa, 
xxiii. 212 ; Toungoo, Burma, xxiii. 422, 
429 ; Tnmkur, Mysore, xxiv. 57 ; Udai- 
pur State, Central Provinces, xxiv. 
83; United Provinces, xxiv. 140, 200; 
Urigam, Mysore, xxiv. 2S6 ; Wundalli, 
iii. 142. 

Gold and silver lace and thread manufac- 
tured, in India generally, iii. 199, 209; 
Agra, V. 90 ; Ahmadabad, v. 1 10; Baro- 
da, vii. 54, 80, 83; Bombay Presidency, 
viii. 324; Burhanpur, Nimar, ix. 106; 
Chanda, x. 157; Coimbatore, x. 365 ; 
Farrukhabad, xii. 73; Gondal, Kathi- 
awar, xii. 320; Hyderabad State, xiii. 
263; Kathiawar, xv. iSo; I.ucknow, xvi. 
198; Mandalay, xvii. 146; Murshid- 
abad, xviii. 50, 58 ; Nander, Hyder- 
abad, xviii. 352 ; Nasik, xviii. 405 ; 
Navanagar, Kathiawar, xviii. 422 ; Ni- 
mar, xix. 113; Rahon, JuUundur, xxi. 
37; Raver, Khandesh, xxi. 260; Sind, 
xxii. 418. 

Gold and silver plate, iii. 239-240. 

Gold- and silver-work: jewellery, ornaments, 
&c. : Akyab, v. 196; Amherst, Burma 
(silver), V. 300 ; Amreli, Baroda (silver), 
V. 317, 319; Aurangabad (silver), vi. 
145; North Arcot, v. 414; Assam, vi. 
72, 73, 74; Bankura, vi. 388; Bans- 
wara (silver), vi. 411 ; Baroda, vii. 80; 
Barpeta, Kamrup, vii. 85 ; Bassein, 

- Burma, vii. 112; Benares (silver), vii. 
184, 192-193; Bengal, vii. 267 ; Betul, 
viii. 12, 16; Bhamo (silver), viii. 52; 
Bhopal, viii. 137; Bombay Presidency, 
■viii. 325 ; Burhanpur, Nimar, ix. 106 ; 
Burma, ix. 175; Central Provinces, x. 
52, 53; Chanda, x. 157, 162; Cutch 
(silver), xi. 81 ; Cuttack (silver), xi. 92, 
98; Dacca, xi. 11 1; Delhi, xi. 239; 
Dungarpur, Rajputana (silver), xi. 383 ; 
Elgandal, Hyderabad (silver), xii, 9; 
Farldpur (silver), xii. 58; Ganjam (sil- 
ver), xii. 151, 152; Gopamau, HardoT 
(silver), xii. 330 ; Hamlrpur (silver), 
xiii. 18; Hardoi (silver), xiii. 48; Ha- 
zara (silver;, xiii. 82 ; Henzada, Burma, 
xiii. 108; Hoshiarpur (silver), xiii. 199; 
Hyderabad State (silver), xiii. 263-264; 
Hyderabad, Sind, xiii. 322 ; Jessore, xiv. 
96^ Jind, xiv. 172; Jorhat, Sibsagar, 
xiv. 202; JuUundur, xiv. 228; Kadi, 
Baroda, xiv. 257; Kamrup, xiv. 336; 
South Kanara, xiv. 365 ; Kangra (silver), 
xiv. 392 ; Karimnagar, Hyderabad, xv. 
43; Khairpur, Sind (silver), xv. 213, 



216 ; Khasi and Jaintia Hills, xv. 263 ; 
Kotah, XV, 425; Ladnun, Rajputana, 
xvi. 95 ; Lakhimpur, xvi. 124; Madras 
Presidency, xvi. 292, 375 ; Mandalay 
(silver), xvii. 146; Manipur, xvii. 192 ; 
Maurawan, Unao, xvii. 234 ; Monghyr, 
xvii. 397 ; Moulmein, xviii. 7 ; Multan, 
xviii. 31; Muttra (silver), xviii. 69; 
Myingyan, Burma, xviii. 128 ; Nabha, 
Punjab, xviii. 267 ; Nasik (silver), xviii. 
406 ; Nathdvvara, Rajputana, xviii. 415 ; 
Navsari, Baroda, xviii. 424 ; Nepal, xix. 
51 ; North-West Frontier Province, xix. 
182 ; Nowgong, Assam, xix. 226 ; Pa- 
kokku, Burma (silver), xix. 331 ; Pala- 
mau (silver), xix. 342 ; Pegu (silver), 
XX. 91; Poona, xx. 185; Punjab, xx. 
316; Purl (silver), xx. 404; Raipur, 
xxi. 60; Rajputana (silver), xxi. 132 ; 
Rampura, Central India (silver), xxi. 
192; Rangoon (silver), xxi. 216; Sa- 
gaing, Burma (silver), xxi. 359; Santal 
Parganas (silver", xxii. 73; Saraikela, 
Chota Nagpnr, xxii. 83 ; Saugor, xxii. 
143, 148; Northern Shan States, xxii. 
242-243 ; Southern Shan States, xxii, 
261 ; Sibsagar, xxii. 351 ; Sonpur, Ben- 
gal, xxiii. 86; Srinagar (silver), xxiii, 
103; Tanjore (silver), xxiii. 235, 243; 
Tavoy, Burma, xxiii. 268 ; Tharra- 
vvaddy, Burma, xxiii. 323 ; Thayetmyo, 
Burma, xxiii. 350, 355 ; Tirthahalli, 
Mysore, xxiii. 391 ; Trichinopoly, xxiv. 
35 ; United Provinces, xxiv. 202-203 > 
Southern WazTristan, xxiv. 384. 

Goldiiigham, John, astronomer, Madras 
(1792-1830), xvi. 373. 

Golgonda, taluk in Vizagapatam District, 
Madras, xii. 310-311. 

Goldsmid, Colonel (Sir F.\ boundary from 
Gwetter Bay to Kuhak settled by 
(1871), vi. 265 ; deputed to settle west- 
ern boundary of Makran (1879), xvii. 

47- 

Goler, estate in Kangra District, Punjab, 
xii. 310. 

Gollas. See Dhangars. 

Gomal Pass, from North-West Frontier 
Province into Afghanistan, i. 10, xvii. 
24. 

Gomal river. See Gumal. 

Gomanchala and Gomant, ancient names 
for Goa, xii. 251. 

Gomata or Gomatesvara, Jain saint or 
god. See Bahubalin. 

Gomati, river of the United Provinces. 
See Gumti. 

Gonda, District in Fyzabad Division, 
United Provinces, xii. 311-318; physi- 
cal aspects, 31 1-31 2 ; history, 312-313 ; 
population, 313-314 ; agriculture, 314- 
316; forests, 316; trade and communi- 
cations, 316; famine, 317; administra- 



P 2 



212 



INDEX 



tion,3i7-3iS; education, 318; medical, 
318. 

Gonda, tahsil in Gonda District, United 
Provinces, xii. 318-319. 

Gonda, town in Gonda District, United 
Provinces, xii. 319. 

Gondal, State in Kathiawar, Bombay, xii. 
319-321; area, population, revenue, 
and administration, iv. 97. 

Gondal, capital of State in Kathiawai', 
Bombay, with Giiasia college, xii. 321. 

Gondal Railway. See Bhavnagar-Gondal- 
Junagad-Porbandar Railway. 

Gondals, Jat caste, in Gujrat, xii. 367. 

Gondeshwar, Plemadpanti temple at Sin- 
nar, Nasik, xxiii. 13. 

Gondl, language of the Dravidian family, 
i. 379, 3S1; spoken in Balaghat, vi. 
226; Berar, vii. 378; Betul, viii. 9; 
Bhandara, viii. 64 ; Central India, 
ix. 351-352; Chanda, X, 153; Chhind- 
wara, x. 208 ; Gondwana, xii. 326 ; 
Hyderabad, xiii. 246; Jubbulpore, xiv. 
209 ; Ranker, Central Provinces, xiv. 
402 ; Madras Presidency, xvi. 261 ; 
Mandla, xvii. 163 ; Nagpur, xviii. 309 ; 
Narsinghpur, xviii. 3S8 ; Raipur, xxi. 
52; Seoni, xxii. 168; Wardha, xxiv. 
369; Wun, xxiv. 392. 

Gondia, village and railway station in 
Bhandara District, Central Provinces, 
xii. 321. 

Gondii {Panicuiii j/iiliaj-e), millet, culti- 
vated in Bengal, vii. 245 ; Hazaribagh, 
xiii. 91 ; Palamau, xix. 340 ; Ranch!, 
xxi. 204; Surguja, xxiii. 172. 

Gondophares, Parthian king of Lower 
Kabul Valley and Western Punjab 
{c. A.D. 21), Takht-i-Bahai inscrip- 
tion of, ii. 5, 56 ; traditional conversion 
by St. Thomas, ii. 288 ; Parthian sa- 
trapy founded by, xx. 262. 

Gondrani, cave-city in Baluchistan, vi. 
283. 

Gonds, Dravidian tribe, home of, i. 44 ; 
uncivilized condition of, i. 44-45 ; in 
Ajaigarh, v. 131 ; Ajanta Hills, v. 134; 
Baghelkhand, vi. 187; Balaghat, vi. 
226-227 ; Bamra, vi. 34^ ; Bastar, vii. 
123 ; Bcnaves, vii. 1S3 ; Berar, vii. 367, 
379; Betrd, viii. 8, 9, 10; Bhandara, 
viii. 64; Bhopal, viii. 134; Bijawar 
originally part of territory held by, viii. 
189 ; in Bilaspur, viii. 226 ; Bonai, ix. 3 ; 
Chang Bhakar, x. 171 ; Chhatarpur, x. 
300; Chhindwara, x. 20S ; Chhulkha- 
dan, x. 216; Chota Nagpur, x. 329; 
Damoh, xi. 136, 138; Gangpur, xii. 
141 ; rulers in Gondwana, xii. 323 ; 
Gyaraspur, xiii. i ; Hoshangabad, xiii. 
183; Hyderabad, xiii. 247,297; Jhansi, 
xiv. 137; Jubbulpore, xiv. 209; Kala- 
hanili, xiv. 294 ; Ranker, xiv. 402 ; 



Kawardha,xv. 193; Kelapur Aj/«/^, xv. 
197 ; Keonjhar, xv. 202 ; IChairagarh, 
XV. 208; Rorea, xv. 400; Mandla, xvii. 
163; Nagpur, xviii. 310; Nandgaon, 
xviii. 357; Narsinghpur, xviii. 3S9 ; 
Nimar Zila, xix. 118; Orissa, vii. 
215; in Orissa Tributary States, xix. 
255 ; Paloncha taluk ^ xix. 374; Panna 
originally settlement of, xix. 403 ; in 
Patna, xx. 72 ; Raigarh, xxi. 46 ; Rai- 
pur, xxi. 51, 52 ; Rairakhol, xxi. 62 ; 
Rewah, xxi. 284; SaktT, xxi. 393; 
Sambalpur, xxii. 9; Satpura Range, xxii. 
132; Saugor, xxii. 140; SeonI, xxii. 
168-169; Singhbhum, xxiii. 7 ; Sur- 
guja, xxiii. 172; Udaipur, Central Pro- 
vinces, xxiv. 84 ; Wardha, xxiv, 367, 
369 ; Wun, xxiv. 389, 392. See also 
Jhora Gonds and Nlaria Gonds. 

Gonds, dynasties of, in Central Provinces, 
X. 13, 14, 26; capital of, at Chanda 
town, X. 150, 153, 161; Chhindwara 
under, x. 206 ; rule in south of Damoh, 
xi. 136 ; Gondwana under, xii. 322- 
325 ; Gyaraspur held by, xiii. i ; in 
Hoshangabad, xiii. 181 ; Jubbulpore 
included in territories of (fifteenth cen- 
tury), xiv. 208 ; rule in Kherla, viii. 8 ; 
Lalitpur taken from (sixteenth century), 
x^'i- 133 ; in Makrai, xvii. 44; Narsingh- 
pur, xviii. 386-387; Nizamat-i-Janub, 
Bhopal, xix. 125; Seoni, xxii. 167; Sin- 
gorgarh fort held and enlarged, xi. 137 ; 
Sirpur Tandur said to have been under, 
xxiii. 41. 

Gondwana, tract in Central Provinces and 
Central India, xii. 321-326; coal-fields, 
iii. 132-138. 

Gondwana system of sub-aerial and fresh- 
water deposits, i. 2, 80-87; ^S^j ^^ ' 
distribution, 81-82 ; Talcher series, 82 ; 
Damuda series, 82 ; Panchet series, S3; 
Rajmahal and Mahadeva series, 83 ; 
marine beds of Upper Gondwana age, 
83-S4; character of fossil plants, 84; 
Glossopteris flora, 84-85; the break-up 
of Gondwana-land, 87 ; classification 
in the Ranlganj field, iii. 133. 

Local nolici's : Adilabad, Hyderabad, 
V. 23; North Arcot, v. 404; Bankura, 
vi. 3S4 ; Berar, vii. 363; Betul, viii. 7; 
Bhagalpur, viii. 26; Birbhum, viii. 240; 
Central Provinces, x. 5, 6 ; Chanda, x. 
149 ; Chhindwara, x. 205 ; Chingleput, 
X. 253; Deccan table-land, xi. 206; 
Hazaribagh, xiii. 86, 93, 94; Himalayas, 
xiii. 127; Hoshangabad, xiii. 180; 
Hyderabad State, xiii. 229, 231-232 ; 
Madras Presidency, xvi, 241 ; Man- 
bhum, xvii. iii; Orissa Tributary 
States, xix. 254; Palamau, xix. 335-336; 
RanchT, xxi. 199; Rewah, xxi. 2S0; 
Santal Parganas, xxii. 61-62; Sirpur 



INDEX 



213 



Tandur, x\iii. 40 ; Triclunopoly, xxiv. 
26; Warangal, xxiv. 357. 

Gongs, manufacture of, Lower Chindvvin, 
X. 234 ; Dhampur, Bijnor, xi. 2S4 ; 
Mandalay,xvii. 147 ; Myingyan, Burma, 
xviii. 128, 133. 

Gonrhis, aboriginal tribe, in Bliagalpur, 
viii. 30. 

Gonzales, Sebastian, Portuguese adven- 
turer, disturbances in Noakhali (seven- 
teenth century), xix. 130 ; Sandwip 
captured (1609', defeated (1616% xxii. 
48. 

Goodfellow Hospital, Palanpur Agency, 
Bombay, xix. 352. 

Goomsur, subdivision and taliik in Ganjam 
District, Madras, xii. 326. 

Goomsur-Udayagiri Agency taluk. Sec 
Udayagiri. 

Goona, cantonment in Central India. Sec 
Guna. 

Gooseberries, grown in Kashmir, xv. 1 24 ; 
NTlgiris,xix.87; Pachaimalais, xix. 305. 

Gooty, subdivision in Ananlapur District, 
Madras, xii. 326. 

Gooty, taluk in Anantapur District, Ma- 
dras, xii. 326-327. 

Gooly, town in Anantapur District, with 
historic hill-fort, xii. 327-329. 

Gopakapatanua and Gopakapur, ancient 
names of Goa, xii. 251. 

Gopal Bhawan, building at Dig, xi. 344. 

Gopal Das, Karauli cliief, favourite of 
Akbar, xv. 26. 

Gopal Hari, Maratha, invasion of Mysore 
(1759), xviii. 180-181. 

Gopal Lai Kayasth, grant of sanad to, 
X. 183; rule in Kamta-Kajaula, xiv. 

339- 
Gopal Rai, rule in Palamau(i 77o),xix.337- 

338; Sabalgarh fort built by, xxi. 343. 

Gopal Rao Mairal, banker and minister; 
Ganpati's Mandir and temple to Kashi 
Vishveshv.ir at Baroda built by, vii. 83. 

Gopal Singh, Raja of Chamba, abdica- 
tion of (1873), X. 130. 

Gopal Singh, rebel servant of Chet Singh, 
JdgTr of Jaso assigned to, xiv. 70. 

Gopal Singh, Raja, founder of Karauli, 
_ XV. 34. 

Gopal Singh Bundela, Dlwan, Garrauli 
granted to (1812), xii. 182. 

Gopala, king of Bengal, made himself 
master of Magadha and Anga (f. A. D. 
900), ii. 316. 

Gopalganj, subdivision in Saran District, 
Bengal, xii. 329. 

Gopalganj, village in Saran District, 
Bengal, xii. 329; temple, ii. 193. 

Gopalpur,port in Ganjam District, Madras, 
^ xii. 329-330; brick tablets found, ii. 40. 

Gopalpura, hill near Sujangarh, Rajput- 
ana, xxiii. 1 17. 



Gopalswami Betta, hill in Mysore District, 

Mysore, xii. 330, xviii. 163. 
Gopamau, historic town in Hardoi Dis- 
trict, United Provinces, xii. 330. 
Goparaja, follower of king Bhanugupta, 

cleath of, ii. 51. 
Gopi, Raja, traditional founder of Gopa- 
mau (eleventh century), xii. 330. 
Gopi, Hindu trader, settled at Surat 

(sixteenth century), xxiii. 154. 
Gopichettipalaiyam, head-quarters of Sa- 

tyamangalam taluk, Madras, xii. 330. 
Gopinath, shrine at Kaman, Rajputana, 

xiv. 326. 
Gora Chand, PTr, tomb at Harua, Twenty- 
four Parganas, xiii. 59. 
Goraghat, ruined city in Assam. See 

Ghoraghat. 
Gorai, Rajput sub-caste, in Narsinghpur, 

xviii, 388. 
Gorai river. See Garai. 
Gorakhnath, peak of Girnar, Kathiawar, 

xii. 247. 
Gorakhnath, saint, temples and walls on 

Turanmal. Khandesh, ascribed to, xxiv. 

64. 
Gorakhpur, Division of United Provinces, 

xii. 331. 
Gorakhpur, District in United Provinces, 

xii. 331 -341 ; physical aspects, 33 1-333 ; 

history, 333-334 ; population, 334-335; 

agricultuie, 335-337 ; irrigation, 337 ; 

trade and communications, 337-338 ; 

famine, 338-339 ; administration, 339- 

340; education, 340-341; medical, 341; 

irrigation, iii. 325. 
Gorakhpur, tahsil in Gorakhpur District, 

United Provinces, xii. 341. 
Gorakhpur, city in Gorakhpur District, 

United Provinces, xii. 341-342 ; em- 
broidery on leather, iii. 191. 
Goramur, place of religious interest in 

Assam. See Garamur. 
Gordon, Brig.-Gen. J. J. H., expedition 

against Kabul Kiiel (18S0), xix. 210; 

against Mahsuds (1881), xix. 210. 
Gordon, Captain, killed in storming 

Thalner fort, Khandesh (1818), and 

buried there, xxiii. 287. 
Gordon, Major, battle near Bisauli (1858), 



IX. 36. 



Gordon Arts College, Rawalpindi, xxi. 

273- 
Gordon Park, Mysore, xviii. 261. 
Gore Gangaya Ruddivaru, built fort at 

Raichur, xxi. 44. 
Gorge-fort, ancient fortress. See Gandi- 

kota. 
Goribidnur, taluk in Kolar District, My- 

sore,_xii. 342-343. 
Gorkhali, language of the Gurkhas, 

spoken in Naini Tal, xviii. 326; United 

Provinces, xxiv. 169. 



214 



INDEX 



Gorkhattri, building in Peshawar city, 
XX. 125. 

Gosains, Hindu mendicants, in Central 
Provinces, x. 30 ; Chhatarpur, x. 202 ; 
Garaniur, As^am, xii. 159; in reli- 
gious riots at Hatdwar ,1760, 1795), 
xiii. 53; in Kangra, xiv. 388. 

Gosainthan, peak in Nepal, xLx. 26. 

Gosha Mahal palace, Hyderabad, xiii. 

Gotama, author of the Nyaya-sutra., text- 
book of the Nyaya system of logic by, 
ii. 256. 

Gotamiputa-Satakani, record of, in cave- 
inscriplion, ii. 47 ; war of (a.d. 125), 

"• 325- 
Gotardi, petty State in Rewa Kantha, 

Bombay, xii. 343, xxi. 191. 
Gothra, or Godhda. petty State in Rewa 

Kantha, Bombay, xii. 343, xxi. 191. 
Gotiputa-Dudubliisara (or Dnmdubhi- 

sara), relics of, ii. 36. 
Gough, Lord, battle of Maharajpur 
(1843% xvi. 434-435; battles with 
the Sikhs (1845), ii. 503; victory of 
Gujrat, ii. 505. 

Local notices: Chilianwala (1849), 
X. 224; Ferozeshah (1845), xii. 99; 
Gujrat, xii. 366, 374; Gwalior cam- 
paign (1843% xii. 425 ; campaign 
against the Sikhs, xx. 274; Ramnagar, 
xxi. I So; Sobraon 1^1846", xxiii. 68. 
Gour, ancient capital of Bengal. See Gaur. 
Gourds, in India generally, iii. 75 ; culti- 
vated in Assam, vi. 55; Bengal, vii. 
24S ; Bombay, viii. 413; Burma, ix. 
152 ; Rajpulana, xxi. 121 ; United . 
Provinces, xxiv. 182. 
Gouria, plain-dwelling Khonds, in Orissa 

States, XV. 280-281. j 

Govardhangiri, fortified hill in Shimoga j 
District, Mysore, xii. 343. j 

Govardhan-Nathji, Gujarat temple, Ba- ! 
roda, vii. S3. ; 

Government of India, iv. 1-45; Hindu | 
system, 1-3 ; Mughal system. 3-5 ; | 
political condition of India in middle of | 
eighteenth century, 7-8 ; first conquests 
ol the East India Company, 8-9 ; peril 
of British dominion, 9-10 ; extension of 
the power and territories of the Company, 
10-11; acquisitions and annexations, 
12-13; the executive Government : the 
Regulating Act (1773% 14-15; I'itl's 
Act (I7S4).15; Charter .Act ,iS33\i5- ' 
16; transfer to the Crown (1858;, 16 ; 
relations of the Government of India 
with the Provincial Ciovemmcnts, 16- 
iS ; tiie Council of the Governor- 
General, 18-19; conduct of business, 
20-21 ; redistribution of Departments 
(1905), 21 ; Foreign Department, 21- 
33; Ecclesiastical, 23; Ho.-ne De- 



partment, 23-24 ; Department of Re- 
venue and Agriculture, 24-25; Finance 
Departm.ent, 25-26 ; Commerce and 
Industry- Department, 26-27 ; Legisla- 
tive Department, 27; Public \Vorks 
Department, 27-2S; Army and Mili- 
tarj' Supply D,;partments, 28 ; the Pro- 
vinces, 2^;-3o ; status of Local Govern- 
ments, 30 ; Madras and Bombay, 30- 
31 ; Lieutenant-Governorships, 31-32 ; 
Chief Commisiionerships, 32-33 ; regu- 
lation and non-regulation Provinces, 
33-34; Home Government, 34 ; Board 
of Control, 34-35; transferto theCrown, 
35-36 ; Queen Victoria's proclama- 
tion (185S), 36; Secretar)-of State, 36- 
38 ; Council of India, 38-39 ; establish- 
ment of the India Office, 39 ; control 
of Parliament, 39-40 ; Indian Civil 
Service, 40-45 ; bibliograpiiy, 45. 

Governor-General of Bengal, instituted 
1773. iv. 14; powers, iv. 15. 

Governor-General of India, created 1833, 
iv. 15; title of Viceroy, 16; appoint- 
ment by Royal Warrant, 16 ; tenure 
and salary of office, 16; duties, 19; 
Council of, 1S-21 ; provision for absence 
from Council, 19; may have authority 
to act alone, 19 ; powers in regard 
to foreign relations, 104 ; legislative 
powers, 130; Legislative Council, 131- 

135- 

Govind Bundela, Lalitpur taken by 
(sixteenth century, xvi. 133. 

Govind Deva, temple at Brindaban, ix. 17. 

Govind Rao, built temple of Gondeshvvar 
at Siniiar, Nasik, xxiii. 13. 

Govind Rao, son of Haribhat, Sangli 
yj^'/V granted to, xxii. 53. 

Govind Rao Gaikwar, capture of, by 
Madhava Rao, vii. 34; struggles of, for 
gaddi oi Baroda, vii. 35-36; rebellion 
of Malhar Rao against, xiv. 258. 

Govind Rao Pandit, rule in Danioh, xi. 
136; Saugor, xxii. 13S. 

Govind Rao Patvardhan, Miraj fort and 
thanis assigned to (1761^, xvii. 362. 

Govind Singh (1675-1708 , tenth Sikh 
gurfi, i. 426-427, ii. 502, V. 320; 
Anandpur stronghold of, v. 336 ; enter- 
tained by Raja Sidh Sen, at Mandl, 
xvii. 154; defeated at Midclsar (1705), 
xii. 90 ; festival at Muktsar commemo- 
rating battle, xviii. 19; murdered and 
buried at Nandcr, Hyderabad (1708), 
xviii. 350, 355, XX. 271 ; Sikh re- 
l^ellion under, xx. 271; asylum given 
to, by Raja ^Iit Parkash and permitted 
to fortify Paonta, xxiii. 23. 

Govinda III, Rashuakuta king {c. 784- 
814 , ii. 331, viii. 281. 

Govinda IV, RashlrakiJta king (<•. 918- 

34\"- 33'- 



IXDEX 



Govinda (or Prabhutavarsha\ Raslitra- 
kuta king, G.inga king placed on tlie 
throne by, xviii. 171. 

Govinda Deva, rule in Surma Valley, 
vi. 25. 

Govinda-khana, ruler of Indus region 
and Gandhara, xxiv. 130. 

Govindgarh, tahstl in Patiala State, 
Punjab, xii. 343. 

Govindgarh, town in Rewah State, Central 
India, xii, 343. 

Govindgarh, town in Alwar State, Raj- 
putana, xii. 344. 

Govindpur, subdivision in Manbhum Dis- 
trict, Bengal. Sti Gobindpur. 

Gowaras. grazing caste, in Balaghai, vi. 
227; Gondwana, xii. 323. 

Gowdie, Major, capture of Rayakottai 
fort ^1791}, xxi. 277. 

Gowhalty, subdivision in Kamrup Dis- 
trict, Assam. S(£ Gauhati. 

Grackles ( liulabetidae}. i. 243. 

Graeme, Mr., revenue survey and settle- 
ment of Northern Arcot (1805), v. 416. 

Graeter, Rev. A., Coorg songs published 
by, at Mangalore (1S70), xi. 23. 

Graham, Mr., assisted in revenue settle- 
ment of Salem, xxi. 405. 

Grain, trade in, exports from India, iii. 
310; centres of trade: Agra. v. 79; 
Ambala, v. 283 ; Annigeri, Dharwar, 
V. 3S6; Athgarh, Orissa, vi. 122 ; Bal- 
rampur estate, vi. 261 ; Bangalore, 
vi. 365 ; Barhaj, Gorakhpur, vii. 16 ; 
Barhalganj, Gorakhpur, vii, 16 ; Bar- 
nagar. Central India, vii. 23 ; Barnala, 
Punjab, vii. 24 ; Baroda, vii. 56; Basim, 
vii. loo; Basmat, Hyderabad, vii. 105; 
Batala, Gurdaspur, vii. 133; Bavliari, 
Ahmadabad, vii. 136; Begampur. 
Sholapur, vii. 141 ; Bellary, vii. 16S ; 
Bengal, vii. 272, 348, 349; Bhadran, 
Baroda, nii. 23 ; Biaora, Central India, 
viii. 163; Budaun, ix. 43; Burma, ix. 
23S, 239; Cawnpore, ix. 312; Central 
Provinces, x. 55, 56. 57, 105; Cham- 
paran, x. I43 ; Charkharl, Central 
India, x. 180; Chhatarpur, x. 200; 
Chhiudwara, x. 215; English Bazar, 
Malda, xii. 25 ; Fazilka, Ferozepore, 
xii. 87 ; Gadarwara, Narsinghpur, xiL 
120; Ghaziabad, Meerut, xii, 222; 
Gola, Kherl, xii. 30S ; Gorakhpur, xii. 
338 ; Gujrat, xii. 370 ; Hala, Sind, 
xiii. 9; Hamlrpur, xiii. 22; Hapur, 
Meerui, xiii. 40 ; Hardol, xiii. 48, 51; 
Harduaganj..\llgarh,xiii. 51; Haihras, 
Aligarh, xiii. 72; Hazara, xiii. 82; 
Hilsa, Patna, xiii. 123; Hindaun, Raj- 
putana, xiii. 135; Hindupur, Ananta- 
pur, .xiii. 140; Hubli, Dhanvar, xiii. 
221 ; Hyderabad State, xiii. 264, 303; 
Indore, xiii. 344, 349, 350 ; Jahanglr- 



abad, Bulandshahr, xiii. 378 ; Kanda- 
har, xiv. 375 ; Kot Kapura, Punjab, 
xvi. 3; Kulpahar, Hamlrpur, xvi. 15; 
Larkana, Sind, xvi. 144; Latur. Hyder- 
abad, xvi. 155; Limbdi, Kathiawar, 
xvi. 161 ; Ludhiana, xvi. 208; Madras 
Presidency, xvi. 297, 299 ; Madras City, 
xvi. 354, 355 ; Magra, Hooghly, xvL 
411 ; Mazalgaon, Hyderabad, xvii. 244; 
Slorar, Central India, xviii. 2 ; Mysore, 
xviii. 223, 257-258; Nandyal, Kumool, 
xviii. 363 ; Narahia, Darbhanga, xnii. 
369; Narsinghpur, xviii. 391 ; Nawab- 
ganj, Gonda, xviii. 428 ; Rajanpur, Dera 
Ghazi Khan, xxi. 66; Ramnagar, Ben- 
ares, xxi. 181 ; Savli, Baroda, xxii. 157 ; 
Sheikbpura, Monghyr, xxii. 26S ; Tala- 
gang, Attock, .xxiii. 207 ; Tumsar, 
Bhandara, xxiv. 60. 
Gram {Cic^r ariitinum), cultivation, iii. 
34-36; harvest and out-turn, iii. 36; 
exports, iiL 36 ; trade statistics, iii. 314 ; 
retail prices, iii. 458. 

Lo,al twtius: Cultivated in Agra, 
v. 77; Ahmadnagar, v. 116; Ajaigarh, 
V. 131; Akalkot, v. 178; Aligarh. v. 
213 ; Allahabad, v. 232 ; Alwar, v. :6i ; 
Ambala, v. 281 ; Amreli, Baroda, v. 
317; Amritsar, v. 323; Anantapur, v. 
342 ; North Arcot, v. 410; Assam, vi. 
112; Atmakur, Nellore,vi. 124; Atraf- 
i-balda, Hyderabad, vi. 127; Azamgarh, 
vi. 158; Bahawalpur, vi. 198; Bah- 
raich, vi. 209 ; Ballia, vi. 353 ; Baluchi- 
stan, vi. 295 ; Banda, vi. 351 ; Bangalore, 
vi. 365 ; Banganapalle, Madras, vi. 374- 
375 ; Bannu, vi. 397 ; Baia BankI, vi. 
421 ; Barcilly, vii. 7; Bariya, Bombay, 
vii. 21; Baroda, ^•ii. 46, 47; Bastar, 
vii. 123; Belgaum, vii. 151; Benares, 
vii. 183; Bengal, vii. 243, 244, 245; 
Berar, vii. 383, 384, 385, 391 ; Betul, 
viii. II ; Bhagalpur, viii. 31 ; Bhandara, 
viii. 65; Bharatpur, viii. Si; Bhopal, 
™i. 134; Bijapur Agency, viii. 174; 
Bijapur District, viii. 181 ; Bijawar, 
viii. 190; Bijnor, viii. 197; Bikaner, viii. 
210; Birbhum, viii. 243; Budaun, ix. 
37 ; Bulandshahr, ix. 53 ; Bundi, ix. 83 ; 
Burma, ix. 150, 152, 154, 155: Cav\-n- 
pore. ix. 311 ; Central India, ix. 359- 
360, 390 ; Central Provinces, x. 32, 34, 
36 ; Challakere, Mysore, x. 128 ; Cham- 
paran, x.141 ; Chanda, x. 153, 154, 157; 
Chandor, x. 166 ; Charkhari, Central 
India, x. 178 ; Chhabra, Rajputana, x. 
195; Chhatarpur, X. 200; Chikmugalur, 
Mysore, x. 222; Chin Hills, x. 276; 
Lower Chindwin, x. 232 ; Chitaldroog, 
X. 294; Coorg, xi. 35; Cuddapah, xi. 
65; Damoh, xi. 139; Darbhanga, xi. 
156; Dehra Dun, xi. 215; Delhi, xi. 
227; Dera Ghazi Khan, xi. 353; Dera 



!l6 



INDEX 



Ismail Khan, xi. 264; Dewas, xi, 280; 
Dhar, xi. 291 ; Dharampur, xi. 296 ; 
Dharmavaram, Anantapur, xi. 300 ; 
Dholpur, xi. 326; Dungarpur, xi. 382 ; 
Elgandal, Hyderabad, xii. 8 ; Etah, xli. 
33; Etawah, xii. 43 ; Farrukhabad, xii. 
67 ; Fatelipur, xii. 79 ; Ferozepore, xii. 
93; Fyzabad, xii. 113; Ganjam,xii. 149; 
Gaya, xii. 201; GhazTpur, xii. 226; 
Gorakhpur, xii. 336 ; Gujranwala, xii. 
357; Gujrat, xii.369; Gulbarga, Hyder- 
abad, xii. 378 ; Gurdaspur, xii. 396 ; 
Gurgaon, xii. 406; Gwalior, xii. 429; 
Hadagalli, Bellary, xiii. 4 ; Hamirpur, 
xiii. 17, 18; Hardoi, xiii. 46; Hassan, 
xiii. 67; Hazaribaghjxiii. 91 ; Henzada, 
xiii. 106; Hissar, xiii. 150; Hoshang- 
abad, xiii. 184, 185; Hoshiarpur, xiii. 
197; Hyderabad State, xiii. 251, 252, 
253, 254; Hyderabad, Sind, xiii. 321 ; 
Indore, xiii. 342 ; Jaipur, xiii. 390 ; 
Jaisalmer, xiv. 5 ; Jalalpur, Surat, xiv. 
15 ; Jalaun, xiv. 22 ; Jammalamadugu, 
Cuddapah, xiv. 46 ; Jaunpur, xiv, 78 ; 
Jessore, xiv. 96; Jhabua, xiv. 106; 
Jhalawar, xiv. 118; Jhansi, xiv. 142; 
Jhelum,xiv. 154; Jind.xiv. 171