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This set of yearbooks was compiled 
by the staff of the 1967 Massachu- 
setts Index and donated in the 
interest of paying tribute to those 
who have created the history and 
traditions existing at the University 
of Massachusetts. 

Alexander Dean, Editor-in-chief 



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PUBLISHED BY THE JUNIOR CLASS, 



Noyember, 1876. 



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EDITORS : 



D. E. BAKER. 
A. A. BRIGHAM. 
C. E. COBURN. 



J. N. HALL. 
C. S. HOWE. 
C. O. LOVELL. 



H. E. STOCKBRIDGE. 



Frontispiece, 
Table of Contents, 
Editorial, 

Communications, . 
Officers and Students. 
Memorials, 
Senior Appointments, 
Secret Societies, 
Literary Societies, 
Military Department, 
Rifie Association, . 
Fencing Association, 
Base Ball Association, 
Athletic Association, 
Musical Organization, 
Reading Room, 
Alumni Association, 
Alumni Statistics, 
Alma Mater, . 
Prizes Awarded, 
Eating Clubs, 
Miscellaneous, 
Calendar, 
Finis (Cut), . 



3 

4 
5 
9 
17 
28 
30 
31 
37 
42 
47 
48 
48 
50 
52 
53 
54 
55 
59 
61 
62 
66 
71 
72 






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Deak Keaders of the Index : 

It is now '78's turn, and now it is that she rouses her slumbering 
editorial talent, takes up the pen and the responsibility at the 
same time, and proceeds, with great hopes, and as great misgiv- 
ings, to the compilation of a work, " sure some to vex, but never 
all to please.' 5 And, Eeaders, before we go on, let us beg your 
kind consideration. Whate'er there be of good in our little 
volume, kindly acknowledge it as such, and mercifully pass over 
our faults, if that be possible. Mercy such as this is indeed twice 
blessed, even if it is a little strained. 

The "Indexical" year, just passed, has been fraught with 
loss to the College in divers ways. Our beloved and respected 
President left us in early Spring, for a new field of useful labor 
at the antipodes, otherwise Japan. At first, this seemed to us a 
loss, and yet, the thought that our College, after due deliberation 
and comparison with similar institutions of learning, was chosen 
from the many, by the government of that far off nation, as a 
model for the Agricultural College of Japan, and that our 
honored President, from the fact of his being such, and also, of 
course, from his own superior qualifications for the position, was 
selected as the most proper man to found such an institution, and 
to foster it in infancy, reconciles us to our loss of him, and we 
count it to ourselves as gain. Ere another twelvemonth has 
gone by, we hope to welcome his safe return, after a period of 
labor crowned with perfect success. 

The College and its'friends have good cause for honest pride 
in the selection of two of its Alumni as Professors, the one of 
Chemistry, the other of Mathematics, in this College at Sapporo. 



6 THE INDEX. 



The second loss sustained by the College, and one not likely 
soon to be made up, is that of the Professorship and the Professor 
of Veterinary Science. We deeply regret that the financial status 
of the College was not in sufficiently good repair to warrant the 
continuance of the chair of this most useful and too little appre- 
ciated portion of the curriculum. It has been said by some few, 
however, that it was not so much the lack of gold, that brought 
this about, as the great proficiency of the students in this branch. 
They have even presumed to say that the average student knew, 
at the end of his Sophomore year, more Veterinary Pathology 
than the Professor himself. If such was the case, it is easy to 
see that the immense amount of money annually expended upon 
this department was wasted, as it were. Whichever explanation 
of the phenomenon was the correct one, the truth remains ; the 
Professor has gone, and has taken the chair with him, "which 
same" is to be regretted. {Exit Prof., followed by Parkinson, 
loitli basket.) 

The last loss to be regretted is that of the men of '76. 
Individually and as a class are they mourned by those they left 
behind. With us, their former under-classmen, the memories of 
our early College days will always bring with them pleasant 
remembrances of each and all of that splendid class, the like of 
which we hardly expect to see again while we are yet undergrad- 
uates. Some of them we know to be engaged in various pursuits, 
all with favorable promise of success, and if each has upon and 
around him the old class " spirit of '76," success is certain. 
We now drink (imaginarily) "to their good health and their 
families' ; and may they all live long and prosper ! " 

"There's no great loss without some small gain," and our 
small gain came in the shape of the class of '80. And not so 
very small a gain, either, for they entered with seventeen men, 
and several new comers have augmented their roll to the goodly 
number of twenty. 

The several departments of the College have prospered, in the 
past year, exceedingly well. In the Chemical and Agricultural 
Departments, the work of experiment and practice has gone on 
as of yore, and with good results. In the Military Department, 
completeness and perfection in everything appertaining to the 
education of young men in the deadly, yet politically necessary, 
science of war, has been aimed at, and great progress made 
toward the attainment thereof. We were all sorry to lose our 



TEE INDEX. 



former Farm Superintendent, for under him the farm prospered 
well. Visitors were always charmed by his genial, cheerful man- 
ner, and his kindly welcome lent a touch of pleasure to the 
otherwise somewhat dull ceremony of "looking round the place." 
His connections with the students were of the most pleasant 
character, and now, at times, we miss the familiar sight of his 
sturdy figure, clad in robes of blue, striding through the blos- 
soming fields, doggedly followed by his faithful canine friend. 
We wish him all success in the new profession he has chosen. 
May he increase in this world's goods, and lay up treasures in 
Heaven. Under the wise supervision and fostering care of our 
newly installed Farm Superintendent, South wick, the Farm has 
put on a better appearance than it ever before possessed. Great 
improvements have been made in the way of grading and drainage, 
where these operations were most necessary to the appearance of 
the farm and the condition of the soil, and a large amount of 
land has thus been fitted for cultivation. The crops have all 
turned out well, both in quality and quantity. The Superin- 
tendent has good reason to be proud of having obtained so great 
success in so short a time, and yet greater successes and improve- 
ments are to be looked for in the near future. 

The social life of the College, it seems to us, has been improved 
in many respects. Classes and individuals hold not so much 
aloof from each other as formerly. Students of all classes mingle 
together in relations of the most friendly nature, and to such an 
extent have the restrictions of caste been removed, that the 
tender Freshmen and the hardened Post-graduate dwell together 
in unity, forming a veritable happy family. Truly, the Golden 
Age is at hand ! 

(Tn the matter of Athletic Sports, a great advance has been 
made. An association, properly officered and constitutioned, has 
been formed, having a board of directors, composed of represent- 
atives from each of the several classes, whose duty it is to arrange 
and direct the annual series of games. This fall, our success 
was as marked as that of last year. Eecords were made in many 
of the sports that stand on par with the achievements of the 
"mighty men" of the other Colleges of the country, — institu- 
tions much larger numerically than our own, and more generous- 
ly supplied with the apparatus and the opportunities necessary 
for the practice of such exercises. As the association formed is 
to be a permanent one, and composed of all the students in 



TBE INDEX. 



College, it is more than probable that the custom of having Fall 
Athletics will be kept up in years to come. 

Aud now, since the province of the Editorial is limited to a 
review of the year and gossip of a general character, we pause. 
To our readers, who have patiently followed us thus far, we would 
say : If in the succeeding pages be found anything that is not as 
it should be, impute it to the devoted editors of the work, and 
give all the honor of whatsoever is well done to our beloved 
class. Those who will succeed us in the year to come, we would 
thus advise : Avoid our faults, and profit by whatever of good 
you may find herein: If we fail, be not dismayed. Mark but 
our fall and that that ruined us, — fail not to publish the Index. 
We would here take occasion to thank all those who have, in any 
way, aided us in our work. The compilation of these pages has, 
indeed, been a pleasant task, and it is not without much regret 
that we relinquish the pen, doff the editorial robes, exchange the 
sanctum for a study, and relapse into the calm seclusion of 
private life. 




When Time, who steals our years away 

Shall steal our pleasures, too, 
Then mem'ry of the past will stay 

And half our joys renew. 

How swiftly the years glide by ! How short seems the time 
since we were Freshmen, looking forward longingly to the day 
when we should be Seniors ! How impatient to have completed 
our college course, to walk forth with honors crowned, to join 
the madening crowd ! How eager to reap, giving no thought to 
the sowing ! How hasty to cry victory, not thinking of the 
hard-fought battle ! 

Well, time has left us at the coveted station. We are Seniors. 
The day is very near when we shall be cast loose from our Alma 
Mater. Not without some sinking at the heart, do we now think 
of that hour when we must bid farewell to scenes and faces made 
dear by four years of close relationship. We review with 
feelings of regret those plans unfinished ; those wishes not con- 
summated. We ask ourselves, "Has it been all for naught, — 
our college life? Is the harvest worth the seeding? Is the vic- 
tory worth the battle?" The answer conies reassuringly. Our 
garner consists of full measures of healthy knowledge well suited 
to feed vigorous minds; sound bodies, enlarged ideas, with capac- 
ity to expand them ; a higher appreciation of a manly and self- 
sustaining character ; a closer acquaintance with God through 
His matchless works. We are well pleased with the harvest. 

Our years here have been full of activity. Many subjects have 
claimed our attention and interest. Language, with its awful 
intricacies ; Philosophy, with its dreary formulas ; Chemistry, 
with its magical reactions ; Botany, with its wonderful revela- 



10 THE INDEX. 



tions ; and Discipline, with its stern front and order. We have 
touched all these subjects and many others no less interesting. 
We have learned that agriculture is a science, and not the brain- 
less employment that many make of it. Intelligent observation 
and practice will always find, in this field, their greatest reward. 
Nothing can be more salutary than the study of nature and her 
laws ; it creates liberal views, and tends to form anti-conservative 
minds. We look upon her designs ; we see the harmony prevail- 
ing all her works ; We contemplate grand results wrought out by 
simple processes with marvellous precision. Such training qual- 
ifies the mind to entertain great possibilities, and progress, which 
is but the weaving together of right ideas, is the result. 

Our classmates have been dropping away from term to term, so 
that now, less than one half the original number remain. We 
have just bidden farewell to one of our most respected members, 
who was obliged to leave us on account of ill-health. He was a 
faithful scholar, who gained the good will of Faculty and stu- 
dents and made many fast friends during his stay in college. 
We wish him a speedy recovery. 

During the last term of junior year we were called upon to 
sustain a great loss. Our honorable president was invited to 
other fields of labor. Perhaps no other man in the country was 
so well qualified to accomplish the undertaking upon which he 
is engaged ; it is certain that his work here has met with widely 
extended approval. We miss his energetic appearance, his ring- 
ing voice, his valuable instruction, and, above all, his example of 
ceaseless industry. We were proud to send away such a man, 
and we support our loss with equanimity. 

We are not of those who are inclined to fall into the distaste- 
ful habit of enumerating class exploits and excellencies, — of try- 
ing to shine on paper. If we have not anything to boast of, well 
and good ; if we have, it will be much more meritorious to say 
nothing about it. We hope that the motto which has been 
adopted by the class of '77 while in college, will cling to its 
members through life, — "Aim at the Highest." 



B. 






Who of us, classmates, has not been impressed by the thought 
that, with this term's duties we enter upon a new era in college 
life ? For with Junior year come new experiences and new 
responsibilities, which are fully realized only when we reach this 
welcome period. Our journey hither has been quickly and 
pleasantly accomplished. As we proceed on the latter half of 
our course, our only regret is that not quite all are with us now 
who started under the banner of '78. Yet we bid the missing - 
ones a hearty "God speed" in the paths where destiny leads 
them, and hope that others will come to fill the vacant places. 
We are very happy in welcoming back our classmate who has 
returned to us almost from the jaws of death, and yet is as 
reckless and jolly as ever. 

'76, in departing, has taken from us many esteemed college 
mates. We feel deeply the loss of our colleagues, but hope for 
their highest success in the courses they may pursue. What 
they were to us, from the time when first we trod Aggie domains 
till their graduation, we will endeavor to be, in the fullest degree, 
to our fresh colleagues. And the new class appears worthy of 
our friendship. We trust they will grow in all that improves 
and cultivates the man, so that when our class shall quit its 
Alma Mater, they may make its absence less apparent. 

Tnstead of boasting of our superiority in everything, we only 
ask you to look to the records and they will testify to the high 
and honorable position which '78 holds in studies, athletics, and 
in supporting the several student associations of our institution. 

When our honored President returns from hin distant mission, 
he will find, we humbly hope, that those he left as wild Sopho- 
mores have become dignified and respected Seniors. We will 



12 THE INDEX. 



earnestly strive, fellow classmates, that his anticipations may be 
fully realized in so far at least as we are concerned. We must be 
active. Quickly the remaining less than half of our course will 
speed away, and then we shall go out to do our part in the great 
work of life. Then will it be seen how well we spent our col- 
lege days. 

In this centennial year of our glorious republic, may it be our 
determination that the advance of our country, in every desira- 
ble line, during the next ten decades, shall owe an honorable 
part to our having lived. 

Look higber, comrades! endeavor to subdue all within that 
tends to weaken or debase us. God, wbose mercy is infinite, will 
help and strengthen us, so that our lives here below shall be 
prosperous and happy, and, if faithful to the end, we shall re- 
ceive a reward good beyond all conception and altogether price- 
less. 

B. 




9. 



In beginning our second year at college, we are once more 
called upon for our communication to the Index. Instead of 
being the lowest class in college, as last year, we have risen one 
stage higher in the course, and have become Sophomores. But 
a year ago, how distant the time of our graduation seemed, and 
yet a year passed ere we were aware of it. 

We are happy to state that we have done away with the dis- 
graceful custom, which nearly all Sophomore classes follow, of 
hazing Freshmen. We hope that the practice is done away with 
entirely in this college, and that a Freshman will always be 
treated as well as an upper-class man. For what pleasure can 
there be in a number of fellows getting together and besmearing 
their faces so that they may resemble savages as much as possible, 
arousing a " single Freshman," if one can be found by himself, 
and hazing him ? The notion has been, and is still entertained 
by many students, that Freshmen should not be allowed to carry 
canes. Why have they not as good a right as any one ? 

Our class numbers sixteen , having lost six men during the past 
year, three of whose places are now filled by new comers. We 
will not boast of our scholarship, although we have very good 
reason to believe that our rank, as a class, is fully up to the aver- 
age. One thing, however, may be remarked, that one of our 
men, on entering, passed a better examination than any previous 
applicant for admission to the college. 

[Tn the Athletic Sports last year, our class was very poorly 
represented, although we had at the time men who would, 
with a little practice, have been equal to the best of them. Last 
year we furnished two men to the Wilder Base Ball Nine, besides 
having a nine of our own, which, it was stated, was able to give 



14 THE INDEX. 



the nine of '76 a "good rub." Howsomever, it was not put 
to the test, either because they did not wish to risk their reputa- 
tion, or for some other good reason. 

In the latter part of last winter's term we were called to mourn 
the loss, by death, of one of our number — a classmate, esteemed, 
respected and looked up to by us, almost as an elder brother. 
He was taken from us in all the strength and ambition of youth, 
and his loss was felt, not only by his own classmates, but by the 
whole college. In him we have an example which we should all 
strive to follow : that is, pay strict attention to our duties, and 
always stand up for the right ; for, by so doing, we not not only 
earn the respect of our immediate friends, but of all with whom 
we have any connection. By application to our studies now, 
while we have the opportunity, we shall have no. cause, in after 
life, to regret the non-improvement of our advantages. May it 
not be said of any of us, either by our professors, or any one 
else, that we are passing through college with just as little study 
as possible — our only object seeming to be a diploma. For of 
what use is a " sheepskin," without the knowledge to back it 
up ? We should be something like " the wolves in sheep's 
clothing," not what we pretend. Therefore, let us do all in our 
power to acquire knowledge, that we may be better fitted to ful- 
fill the obligations which we owe to our country and to our fel- 
low men. 

L. 




We are called upon to give a sketch of our experiences, that 
they may be embalmed in the Index. With diffidence we pro- 
ceed to the task. Our antecedents being unknown, you may 
naturally ask for our credentials. Our class, as far as numbers 
are concerned, is fully up to the average. Twenty of us there 
are — enough to prevent any feeling of isolation, but not so many 
but that each member may retain his own individuality. Our 
homes are widely scattered. We have representatives from Min- 
nesota and far off Chili, thus securing that element of the uni- 
versal which fits us for the assimilation of knowledge. The 
preparatory examination was the first obstacle to our entrance ; 
but, after having a blank charge fired in our faces, we entered the 
portal. A short rest now followed, but it was the lull that pre- 
cedes the storm. Certain garrulous Juniors prepared us for the 
Freshman's "ordeal," yet, from certain conscientious scruples, we 
hesitated. 

This lasted not long. The insolent Sophs soon brought us to 
action. Victory was ours ! One strong push sent them flying 
like jackstraws. 0, the leering, jeering, window-smashing Soph- 
omores ! Bullies, as they are, they have to receive a sound thrash- 
ing before they can be brought to respect the rights of Freshmen. 
Our connection with the Faculty has been a pleasant one — the 
Professors are kind, genial, and of the right stuff, generally. 
Their lectures are both practical and popular ; they even allow 
a few jokes as fireworks, for the amusement of the students, and 
actually have been known to explode a few themselves. On the 
whole, we are highly satisfied with this part of college life. 
Nourishment is absolutely essential to the physical man that he 



16 



THE INDEX. 



may be in a proper condition to receive mental food. The pic- 
ture would be very incomplete did I not tell how we are crammed 
stomachically, as well as intellectually. The class generally take 
their meals at the College boarding establishment. There are, 
however, a few who, we presume, follow the Scripture maxim, 
" Better is a morsel with quietness," &c. As for the former, 
they prefer to follow Shakspeare's maxim, "A hearty laugh 
helpeth the digestion." But we modestly withold from asking 
further space. As Freshmen, we remember our position in col- 
lege life, and seek not to overstep it. In future years we may 
be again called upon for contributions to the Index, when a more 
liberal culture, and a larger experience will the better fit us for 

the task. 

8. 




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MEMBERS EX-0FFWII8. 

His Excellency ALEXANDER H. RICE. 

Col. WILLIAM S. CLARK, Ph. D., L.D.D., President of College. 
Hon. JOSEPH WHITE, L.L.D., Secretary of Board of Education. 
Hon. CHARLES L. FLINT, Secretary of Board of Agriculture. 



MEMBERS BY ELECTION. 



Hon. MARSHAL P. WILDER, 
Hon. CHARLES G. DAVIS, . 
Dr. NATHAN DURFEE,*. 
HENRY COLT, Esq., 
Rev. CHARLES C. SEW ALL, . 
PHINEAS STEADMAN, Esq., . 
Hon. ALLEN W. DODGE, 
Hon. GEORGE MARSTON, 
Hon. WILLIAM B. WASHBURN, 
Prof. HENRY L. WHITING, . 
HENRY F. HILLS, Esq., . 
Hon. DANIEL NEEDHAM, 
WILLIAM KNOWLTON, Esq., 
Hon. JOHN CUMMINGS, . 



Boston. 

Plymouth. 

Fall River. 

Pittsfield. 

Medfield. 

Chicopee. 

Hamilton. 

New Bedford. 

Greenfield. 

Cambridge. 

Amherst. 

Groton. 

Upton. 

Woburn. 



♦Deceased. 



lEsmittt)* Committee, 



President WILLIAM S. CLARK. HENRY COLT, Esq. 

Hon. JOSEPH WHITE. WILLIAM KNOWLTON, Esq. 

PHINEAS STEADMAN, Esq. 



SECRETARY. 



Hon. CHARLES L. FLINT, 



Boston. 



A UDITOR. 



HENRY COLT, Esq. 



PlTTSFIELD. 



TREASURER. 



GEORGE MONTAGUE, Esq. 



Amherst. 



BOARD OF OVERSEERS, 
THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 



EXAMINING COMMITTEE OF OVERSEERS . 
EDMOND H. BENNETT, Esq. CHARLES S. SARGENT, Esq. 

O. B. HADWEN, Esq. Capt. JOHN B. MOORE. 

Hon. PAUL A. CHADBOURNE, D.D., LL.D. 



WILLIAM S. CLARK, Ph. D., LL.D., 

President, and Professsor of Botany and Horticulture. 

Hon. LEVI STOCKBRIDGE, 

Professor of Agriculture. 

HENRY H. GOODELL, M. A., 

Professor of Modem Languages. 

CHARLES A. GOESSMANN, Ph. D., 

Professor of Chemistry. 

HENRY W. PARKER, M. A., 

Professor of Mental, Moral, and Social Science. 

WILLIAM B. GRAVES, M. A., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

C. A. L. TOTTEN, First Lieutenant Fourth Artillery, U. S. A. 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

SAMUEL T. MAYNARD, B. S., 
Gardener, and Assistant Professor of Horticulture. 

A. S. PACKARD, Jr., M. D. (State Entomologist), 

Lecturer on Useful and Lr.jurious Insects. 

M. FAYETTE DICKINSON, Jr., Esq., 

Lecturer on Mured Law. 



ANDRE A. SOUTHWICK, B. S., Farm Superintendent. 




tost*!* ltai»m 



W. F. WARREN, S. T. D., LL.D., 



President. 



J. W. LINDSAY, S. T. D., 
EBEN TOURJEE, Mus. D., 
W. S. CLARK, Ph. D., LL.D., 
J. E. LATIMER, S. T. D., 
GEORGE S. HILLARD, LL.D., 
I. T. TALBOT, M. D., 
L. B. MUNROE, A.M., 
J. W. LINDSAY, S. T. D., Acting 



Dean of College of Liberal Arts. 

" " Music. 

President of Mass. Ag. College. 

Dean of School of Theology. 

" " Law. 

" " Medicine. 

" " Oratory. 

" " All Sciences. 




>tniot &m$* 



AIM AT THE HIGHEST.' 



OFFICERS. 

W. V. HOWE, President. 

J. WYMAN, Vice President. 

G. E. NYE, Secretary. 

J. E. SOUTHMAYD, Treasurer. 

J. K. MILLS, Historian. 

C. BREWER, Class Captain. 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCES. 




ROOMS. 


Benson, David Henry 


Bridgewater, 




10 s. c. 


Brewer, Charles 


Pelham, 




27 S. C. 


Clark, Atherton 


Amherst, 


Mt. 


Pleasant. 


Hibbard, Joseph Robinson 


Chester, Vt., 




9 S. C. 


Howe, Waldo Vernon 


Framingham, 




10 s. c. 


Mills, James Kellogg 


St. Louis, Mo., 




11 s. c. 


Nye, George Everett 


Sandwich, 




6 S. C. 


Parker, Henry Fitch 


Amherst, 


Mt. 


Pleasant. 


Porto, Raymundo M. S. 


Para, Brazil, 




28 S. C. 


Sonthmayd, John Edwards 


Middletown, Ct. 


} 


7 S. C. 


Wyman, Joseph 


Arlington, 




6 S. C. 


Totai 


,, 11. 







(Si 



OFFICERS. 



D. E. BAKER, . 
F. TTJCKERMAN, 
J. F. HUNT, 
M. D. CARNEIRO, 
C. F. COBURN, . 
A. L. SPOFFORD, 



President. 
Vice President. 
Secretary. 
Treasurer. 
Historian. 
Class Captain. 



NAMES. 



RESIDENCES. 



KOOMS. 



Baker, David Erastus 
Boutwell, William Levi 
Brigham, Arthur Amber 
Carneiro, Manuel Dias 
Choate, Edward Carlile 
Cobnrn, Charles Francis 
Foot, Sandford Dwight 
Hall, Josiah Newhall 
Howe, Charles Sumner 
Hubbard, Henry Francis 
Hunt, John Franklin 
Koch, Henry Gnstave Heath 
Lovell, Charles Otto 
Spofford, Amos Little 
Stock bridge, Horace Edward 
Tuckerman, Frederick 
Washburn, John Hosea 

Tot Ai 



Cambridge, 


14 S. 


Lowell, 


5 N. 


Spri fig field, 


14 S. 


Revere, 


29 S. 


Ayer Junction, 


13 N. 



Franklin, 13 N. C. 

Leverett, 25 S. C. 

Marlboro, 29 S. C. 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 24 N. C. 

C. 

C. 

C. 

C. 

c. 

New Rochelle, N Y, 21 S. C. 
Amherst, Lincoln Avenue. 
New York City, 25 S. C. 
Amherst, 10 S. C. 

Georgetown, 24 S. C. 

Amherst, Prof. Stockbridge's. 
Boston, 21 8. C. 

Bridgewater, 3 S. C. 

, 17. 



wphonwtt Cfass, 



" IiVM VIVIMUS VirAMVS." 



OFFICERS. 

W. A. SHERMAN, President. 

J. G. LINCOLN, Vice President. 

S. B. GREEN, Secretary. 

R. S. DICKINSON, ...'.. Treasurer. 

C. H. CAMPBELL, Historian. 

R W. SWAN, Class Captain. 



NAMES. 



RESIDENCES. 



KOOMS. 



Chittenden, Edgar Davis 
Cook, Eoland Chittenden 
Dickinson, Richard Storrs 
Green, Samuel Bowdler 
Howard, Joseph Clark 
Hunt, Elisha Hubbard 
Knox, Eeuben 
Lincoln, Joseph Gardiner 
Lyman, Charles Elihu 
Myrick, Lockwood 
Osgood, Frederick Huntington 
Pierce, William Arthur 
Sherman, Walter Alden 
Smith, George Parmenter 
Swan, Roscoe Willard, 
Waldron, Hiram Edmund 



Sunderland, 5 S. C. 

Guilford, Conn., 26 S. C. 

Amherst, 29 N. C. 

Chelsea, 21 N. C. 

West Bridgewater, 3 S. C. 

Sunderland, 25 N. C. 

New York City, 22 N. C. 

Woburn, 23 S. C. 

Middlefield, Conn., 29 N. C. 

Concord, 29 N. C. 

Cambridge, 20 S. C. 

Boston, 22 N. C. 

Lowell, 21 N. C. 

Sunderland, 5 S. C. 

Framingham, 23 S. C. 

Rochester, 20 S. C. 



Total, 16. 



'vtshnmu Class, 



OFFICERS. 

C. T. PEASE, President. 

H. M. TOWNSLEY, Secretary. 

C. M. McQUEEN, Treasurer. , 

A. H. STONE, Historian. 

W. C, STEWART, Class Captain. 



NAMES. 



RESIDENCES. 



ROOMS. 



Atwood, Horace Ward 
Bristol, Frank Edwin 
Cary, Willis Washburn 
Endicott, George 
Fowler, Alvan Luther 
Goodale, Edwin Titus 
Hall, Alfred Sigourney 
Heighway, Sheridan Culbertson 
Mattocks, Euao Edward 
McQueen, Charles Manjie 
Parker, William Edward 
Pease, Charles Truman 
Plaza, Enguerrando 
Richardson, Benjamin Parker 
Ripley, George Amos 
Stewart, William Clark 
Stone, Almon Humphrey 
Townsley, Herbert Milton 
Warner, William Edward 
Wood, Lewis 
Zabriskie, Frank Hunter 



Orange, 13 S. C. 

Harwinton, Ct., 6 N. C. 

Fishkill, N Y, 6 N. C. 

New York City, 18 S. C. 

Westfield, 9 N. C. 

Boston, 24 S. C. 

Revere, 29 S. C. 

Cincinnati, 0., 12 S 

Lyndon, Vt., 22 S 

Longmeadow, 9 N 

Wakefield, 13 S 

Bridgeton, Me., 9 S 

Arauco, Chili, 28 S. C. 

Boston, 7 S. C. 

Worcester, 22 S 

Stillwater, Minn., 9 S. 

Pliillipston, 10 N. 

De Kalb, N. Y, 4 S. 

Newton, 5 N 

Upton, ION, 

New York City, 4 S. 

Total, 21. 



C. 
C. 

c. 
c. 
c. 



c. 
c. 
c. 
c. 
c. 
c. 
c. 



RESIDENT GRADUATES. 



NAMES. 



RESIDENCES. 



ROOMS. 



Bragg, B. S., Everett Burt 
Brooks, B. S., William Penn 
Kendall, B. S., Hiram 
Libby, B. S., Edgar Howard 



Amherst, H. 0. Bragg's. 

South Scituate, 9 N". C. 

Providence, Mr. Bassett's. 

Ashland, Mr. Bassett's. 



Total, 4. 



SUMMARY 



Seniors, 
Juniors, 
Sophomores, 
Freshmen, . 
Eesident Graduates, 

Total, 



11 
17 
16 
21 

69 



IN MEIVIORIAM. 



DR. 1VATMA1V DURFEE, 

OF FALL RIVER, 
DIED APRIL 6, 1876. 



TO THEIR LATE TRUSTEE, FRIEND, AND BENEFACTOR, 

THE STUDENTS OF THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

DEDICATE THESE LINES, 

AS AN HUMBLE TRIBUTE TO HfS MEMORY. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



CLASS OF 79. 



MARTIN BAKER, 



DIED MARCH 10, 187( 



TO OUR LATE ESTEEMED FRIEND AND FELLOW-STUDENT, 

WHOSE PROFICIENCY IN STUDIES, WHOSE COURTEOUS, MANLY BEARING, 

AND WHOSE EMINENTLY CHRISTIAN CHARACTER 

EVER COMMANDED OUR ADMIRATION, 

AND WHOSE MANY VIRTUES WILL LONG BE CHERISHED IN OUR MEMORY, 

WE DEDICATE THIS MEMORIAL OF RESPECT. 



& 



, President. 

J. E. SOUTHMAYD, .... Orator. 

J. K. MILLS, Historian. 

J. WYMAN, Prophet. 

A. CLARK, Odist. 

D. H. BENSON, - - . - - Toastmaster. 






ttxti J^cwtws 



OF THE 




1 * 



m* JlD 



Pill 



>**le*r 0f tfojeiv If stoMfBtojjewi 






I. ft. & 



ALEFH CHAPTER. 



MEMBERS. 



RESIDENT GRAB TJA TE. 
Hiram Kendall. 

SENIORS. 

G. E. Nye, J. K. Mills, 

Atherton Clark. 

SOPHOMORES. 
W. A. Sherman, S. B. Green. 



> 



^rst Ch a ^ 




GRAND LODGE. 



a. m. 



& 



MEMBERS. 



seniors. 

D. H. Benson, W. V. Howe. 

JUNIORS. 

C. F. Coburn, • H. F. Hubbard, 

C. 0. Lovell, F. Tuckerman, 

S. D. Foote, E. C. Choate. 

SOPHOMORES. 
F. H. Osgood, H. E. B. Waldron. 

FRESHMEN. 

W. E. Warner, S. C. Heighway, 

G. A. Ripley. 




MEMBERS. 



RESIDENT GRAB UA TE. 
Wm, P. Brooks. 

SENIORS. 
J. E. Southmayd, R. M. S. Porto. 



JUNIORS. 



D. E. Baker, 
0. S. Howe, 



A. A. Brigham, 
M. D. Carneiro, 



J. N. Hall. 



FRESHMEN. 

C. M. McQueen, A. L. Fowler, 

W. C. Parker. 



OF THE 



/PMCip* 



ffc/pSS ^ 



^^^f^Mp&ar 



rntiul Union* 



OFFICERS. 
PEESIDENT, 

J. E. SOUTHMAYD. 

VICE PRESIDENT, 

A. A. BRIGHAM. 

SECRETARY, 

J. N. HALL. 

LIBRARIAN, 

D. E. BAKER. 

DIRECTORS, 

C. S. HOWE, H. E. STOCKBRIDGE, 

J. WYMAN. 



MEMBERS. 

The Washington Irving and Edward Everett 
Literary Societies. 



KSjtfttgttfu gtmus* 



OFFICERS. 



CHARLES BREWER, President. 

C. S. HOWE, Vice President. 

H. B. STOCKBRIDGE, Secretary. 
A. A. BRIGHAM, Treasurer. 

D. E. BAKER, ) 

M. I). CARNEIRO, [-Directors. 
H. M. TOWNS LEY, ) 



MEMBERS. 



SENIOR. 
Charles Brewer. 

JUNIORS. 

D. E. Baker, C. S. Howe, 
A. A. Brigham, J. F. Hunt, 

M. D. Carneiro, A. L. Spofford, 

H. G. H. Koch, H. E. Stockbridge, 

W. L. Boutwell. 

SOPHOMORES. 
J. G. Lincoln, R. W. Swan. 

FRESHMEN. 

E. F. Bristol, H. M. Townsley, 
W. W. Cary, L. Wood, 

A. S. Hall, A. H. Stone, 

A. L. Fowler, F. H. Zabriskie, 

E. T. Goodale, C. M. McQueen. 



OFFICERS. 

J. E. SOUTHMAYD, President. 
JOSEPH WYMAN, Vice-President. 
J. N. HALL, Secretary. 
J. K. MILLS, Treasurer. 
D. H. BENSON, 



J. H. WASHBURN, ( Doctors. 



MEMBERS. 



SENIORS. 
D. H. Benson, J. E. Southmayd, 

J. K. Mills, Joseph Wyman. 

JUNIORS. 
J. N. Hall, J. H. Washburn. 

SOPHOMORES. 

R. S. Dickinson, Reuben Knox, 

W. A. Pierce. 

FRESHMEN. 

H. A. Atwood, C. T. Pease, 

S. C. Heigh way, W. 0. Stewart, 

W. C. Parker. 



dMlegje ©kristiaw Wluwn< 



OFFICERS. 



JOHN E. SOUTHMAYD, President. 
TALL K. WUYESUGI, Vice-President. 
ARTHUR A. BRIGHAM, Secretary. 
JOSIAH N. HALL, Treasurer. 
CHARLES BREWER, Librarian. 
ALFRED S. HALL, \ 

CHARLES M. McQUEEN, (. Directors. 
CHARLES E. LYMAN, J 



MEMBERS. 



SENIORS. 

John E. Southmayd, Tall K. Wuyesugi, 

Charles Brewer. 



JUNIORS. 

Charles S. Howe, Arthur A. Brigham, 

Josiah N. Hall, Horace E. Stockbridge. 

SOPHOMORES. 

Charles E. Lyman, Reuben Knox, 

William A. Pierce. 

FRESHMEN. 

Charles M. McQueen, Alfred S. Hall, 

Frank H. Zabriskie. 



csp 



imtBtiimntQUB wt 



:f 



MILITARY DEPARTMENT. 







OEINfERAL ORGANIZTION. 



Commandant, 1st Lieut. C. A. L. TOTTEN, 4th Art. U. S. A. 



THE INDEX. 43 



COMMISSIONED STAFF. 



First Lieutenant and Adjutant and Assistant Instructor in Infantry, 
D. H. BENSON. 

First Lieutenant and (Quartermaster and Assistant Instructor ih Signaling, 
ATHERTON CLARK. 

First Lieutenant and Assistant Instructor in Ordnance and Artillery, 
J. K. MILLS. 



NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 



Sergeant-Major, S. D. FOOT. 

Quartermaster-Sergeant, . . J. N. HALL. 



IINTFAIVTIiY OlfcOAlVIZAI'IOlV. 



MASS. AG. COLLEGE CORPS OF CADETS. 

Staff and Commissioned Officers chosen from Senior Class. 
Non-Commissioned Staff and Sergeants chosen from Junior Class. 

Color Guard " " 

Corporals ....."" Sophomore " 

Battallion of Cadets, entire college, organized in two companies. 



COMMANDANT AND INSTRUCTOR, 
First Lieut. C. A. L. TOTTEN, 4th Artillery, U. S. A. 

ASSISTANT INSTRUCTOR, 
First Lieut. D. H. BENSON, M. A. C. 



COMMISSIONED STAFF. 



ADJUTANT, 
D. H. BENSON. 

Q UARTERMASTER, 

ATHERTON CLARK. 



44 THE INDEX. 



NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 



Sergeant-Major, S. D. FOOT. 

Quartermaster-Sergeant, . . . J. N. HALL. 

CAPTAINS. 
Co. A, J. E. Southmayd. Co. B, J. Wymam 

FIRST LIEUTENANTS. 
Co. A, G. E. Nye. Co. B, R. M. S. Porto 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS. 
Co. A, J. R. Hibbard. Co. B, H. F. Parker. 

THIRD LIEUTENANTS. 
Co. A, W. V. Howe. Co. B, C. Brewer. 

FIRST SERGEANTS. 
Co. A, D. E. Baker. Co. B, C. F. Coburn. 

SECOND SERGEANTS. 
Co. A, A. A. Brigham. Co. B, H. G. H. Koch. 

THIRD SERGEANTS. 
Co. A, C. 0. Lovell. Co. B, H. F. Hubbard. 

COLOR GUARD. 

Sergeants E. C. Choate and C. S. Howe.. 

Lance Sergeants H. E. Stockbridge and J. H. Washburn. 

CORPORALS. 
Co. A, 1st, H. E. B. Waldron. Co. B, 1st, W. A. Sherman. 

Co. A, 2d, C. E. Lyman. Co. B, 2d, H. F. Osgood. 

Co. A, 3d, E. H. Hunt. Co. B, 3d, R. W. Swan.. 

Co. A, 4th, J. G. Lincoln. Co. B, 4th, S. B. Green. 



OUTFIT. 



150 breech-loading Springfield rifles (cadet model), with all 
necessary infantry equipments— drums, colors, &c,, &c, 



THE INDEX. 



45 



ARTILLERY ORGANIZATION. 



LIGHT BATTERY. 



Commandant, 

Assistant Instructor, 

Captain, 

1st Lieutenant, 

Second " 

Third " 

1st Sergeant, . 

Second " 

Third " 

Gunner, 1st Piece, 

" 2d " 

3d " 

Caisson Corporal, 1st Piece, 
'" 2d " 

" " 3d 

Battery — Cadets of Junior 



Lieut. C. A. L. TOTTEN. 

1st Lieut. J. K. MILLS. 

A. A. BRIGHAM. 

D. E. BAKER. 

S. D. FOOT. 

J. H. WASHBURNE. 

W. L. BOUTWELL. 

C. S. HOWE. 

C. 0. LOVELL. 

H. E. B. WALDRON. 

S. B. GREEN". 

J. G. LINCOLN. 

R. S. DICKINSON. 

R. C. COOK. 

G. P. SMITH. 

and Sophomore Classes. 



OUTFIT. 



Two Light 12-pounders and Caissons with complete Equip- 
ments, and one 6-pounder, with Limber and Equipments, and 
Sabres, &c. 



MORTAR SECTION. 



Commandant, . . C. A. L. TOTTEN, U. S. Army. 
Assistant Instructor, . . J. K. MILLS, M. A. C. 
1st Lieutenant and Chief of Section, H. F. HUBBARD. 
1st Sergeant and Chief of Detachment, . J. F. HUNT. 
*d " " " " " H. E. STOCKBRIDGE. 

Gunner First Detachment, . . H. G. H. KOCH. 

Second " J. N. HALL. 

Section — Cadets of Junior Class. 



OUTFIT. 



Two 8-inch Siege Mortars, Platforms with full sets of Imple- 
ments and Equipments — " Centennial Battery," just started, 
built by college. 



46 



THE INDEX. 



SIGNAL DEPARTMENT. 

(VOLUNTARY.) 



Instructor, . . . C. A. L. TOTTEN, IT. S. Army. 
Assistant Instructor, ATHERTON CLARK, M. A. C. 



Atherton Clark, 
J. K. Hibbard, 



MEMBERS. 



SENIORS. 

J. K. Mills, 
H. F. Parker, 
E. M. S. Porto, 



J. E. Southmayd, 
Joseph Wyman. 



D. E. Baker, 
W. L. Boutwell, 
A. A. Brigham, 
C. F. Coburn, 



JUNIORS. 

S. D. Foot, 
J. N. Hall, 
C. S. Howe, 
H. F. Hubbard, 



H. G. H. Koch, 
C. 0. Lovell, 
A. L. Spofford, 
H. E. Stockbridge. 



F. H. Osgood, 



SOPHOMORES. 



H. E. B. Waldron. 



SIGNAL STATIONS. 



Mt. Toby, 
Mt. Sugarloaf, 



Mt. Warner. 



Mt. Holyoke, 
Mt. Tom, 



EQUIPMENTS. 



Four complete signal kits and flags for thirty men. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Chief Engineer, .... GEORGE E. NYE. 
Co. A — Force Pump, Reservoirs and Buckets, 
Co. B — Hook and Ladder and Buckets, 



THE INDEX. 



47 



TOTTEN MILITARY PRIZE, $2S. 

Peize Militaky Essay, .... '76, McLeod. 

Subject: "Military Future of America." 
Subject for Class '77 : " The Military Resources of America. " 
Prize for best set of notes on senior essays, '76, D. E. Baker, '78. 



RIFLE ASSOCIATION. 



G. E. NYE, President. 

C. E. COBURN, Vice-President. 

C. S. HOWE, Secretary. 

H. E. STOCKBRIDGE, Treasurer. 

S. D. FOOT, \ 

A. CLARK, >■ Directors. 

J. N. HALL, ) 



MEMBERS. 



Atherton Clark, 



A. A. Brigham, 
C. F. Coburn, 
J. N. Hall, 



J. C. Howard, 



SENIORS. 

J. K. Mills, 
C. E. Nye. 

JUNIORS. 

A. S. Howe, 
C. 0. Lovell, 
A. L. Spofford, 
H. E. Stockbridge. 



SOPHOMORES. 



H. E. B. Waldron. 



OUTFIT. 



One Sharp's Rifle, Creedmoor. One Winchester Rifle, Military. 
One Remington Rifle, Military. Springfield Rifles, Military. 
One Spencer Rifle, Military. Targets and Equipments, &c. 



48 



TEE INDEX. 



FENCING ASSOCIATION, 



C. F. COBURN, President, 
C. 0. LOVELL, Secretary 
W. V. HOWE, Treasurer. 
C. S. HOWE, 



J. H. WASHBURN, 



Business Committee. 



MEMBERS. 



C. Brewer, 
W. V. Howe, 

D. E. Baker, 
W. L. Boutwell, 
A. A. Brigham, 
C. F. Coburn, 

E. C. Choate, 
J. N. Hall, 



SENIORS. 



H. F. Parker, 
R. M. S. Porto. 



JUNIORS. 

C. S. Howe, 
H. G. H. Koch, 
C. 0. Lovell, 
F. Tuckerman, 
A. L. Spofford, 
H. E. Stockbridge, 
J. H. Washburn. 



WILDER BASE BALL ASSOCIATION 



OFFICERS. 



GEORGE E. NYE, President. 

J. K. MILLS, Secretary and Treasurer. 

J. WYMAN, '77, ) 

E. C. CHOATE, '78, [ Directors. 

W. A. SHERMAN, '79, ) 



WILDER NINE. 



G. E. NYE, Captain, c. 
J. K. Mills, p. W. A. Sherman, 3d b. 

H. Kendall, s. s. H. F. Hubbard, 1. f. 

D. E. Baker, 1st b. A. L. Spofford, c. f. 

R. W. Swan, 2nd b. S. D. Foot, r. f. 



THE INDEX. 49 



CLASS NINE, '77. 



GEORGE E. NYE, Captain, c. 
J. K. Mills, p. D. H. Benson, 3d b. 

A. Clark, s. s. J. Wyman, 1. f. 

W. V. Howe, 1st b. J. E. South mayd, c. f. 

J. R. Hibbard, 2nd b. H. F. Parker, r. f. 



CLASS NINE, '78. 



A. L. SPOFFORD, Captain, s. s. 
H. F. Hubbard, c. F. Tuckerman, 3d b. 

E. C. Choate, p. J. F. Hunt, 1. f. 

D. E. Baker, 1st b. H. E. Stockbridge, c. f. 

S. D. Foot, 2nd b. C. F. Coburn, r. f. 



CLASS NINE, '79. 



W. A. SHERMAN, Captain, p. 
R. W. Swan, c. * E. H. Hunt, 3d b. 

J. G. Lincoln, s. s. F. H. Osgood, 1. f. 

R. Knox, 1st b. S. B. Green, c. i 

J. C. Howard, 2nd b. R. S. Dickinson, r. i 



CLASS NINE, '80. 



W. C. STEWART, Captain, c. 
C. M. McQueen, p. H. M. Townsley, 3d 

A. L. Fowler, s. s. W. C. Parker, 1. f. 

W. E. Warner, 1st b. H. A. Atwood, c. f. 

L. Wood, 2nd b. C. T. Pease, r. f. 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 



OFFICERS. 

J. E. SOUTHMAYD, President. 
S. D. FOOT, Vice-President. 

C. F. CO BURN, Secretary and Treasurer. 

D. H. BENSON, '77, 1 

E. C. CI10 ATE, '78, I 

W. A. SHERMAN, '79, f DlRECT0RS - 
H. M. TOWNSLEY, '80, j 



MEMBERS. 
All students of the college. 



Second Annual Series Fall Athletics, Held on the Col- 
lege Grounds, Wednesday, October 18th, 1876. 



SPORTS. 

Putting weight (20 lbs.) — E. Plaza. Distance 24 feet. 

Standing long jump — W. E. Warner; 9.6 feet. 

One hundred yards dash — G-. E. Nye, 11 seconds ; first prize. 

Pierce, 11£ seconds ; second prize. 
Throwing hammer (weight 18 lbs.) — Warner, 67.7 feet. 
Running high jump — E. C. Choate, first prize, 5. 15 feet ; A. L. 

Fowler, second prize, 4.85 feet. 
One mile walk — J. K. Mills, first prize, 9 minutes 21 seconds ; 

C. S. Howe, second prize, 9 minutes 23 seconds. 
Running hop, step and jump — Nye, 38.1 feet. 
Sack race — J. N. Hall, 1 minute 38 seconds. 



TEE INDEX. 51 



Throwing ball distance — Nye, first prize, 370| feet ; S. D. Foot, 
second prize, 320 feet. 

Wheelbarrow race (blindfolded) — J. Wyman, first prize ; Fowler, 
second prize. 

Standing high jump — D. H. Benson, 4.6 feet. 

Throwing ball at mark — K. W. Swan, first prize ; H. E. Stock- 
bridge, second prize. 

One mile run — J. N. Hall, first prize, 5 minutes 25 seconds ; H. 
F. Parker, second prize, 5 minutes 26 seconds. 

Running long jump — Foot, 17.8 feet. 

Hurdle race (250 feet over 8 hurdles) — Mills, first prize, 13 sec- 
onds ; J. F. Hunt, second prize. 



W. P. BROOKS, '75, ) 

E. B. BRAGG, '75, !■ Judges. 

H. KENDALL, '76, ) 




MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS. 



COLLEGE CHOIR. 



S. D. FOOT, Organist. 
H. F. Hubbard, Air. J. Wyman, Air. 

E. H. Hunt, Air. D. H. Benson, Tenor. 

S. D. Foot, Second Bass. J. K. Hibbard, Second Bass. 



"7"^ GLEE CLUB. 



D. H. Benson, First Tenor. J. Wyman, Second Tenor. 
R. S. Porto, First Bass. J. R. Hibbard, Second Bass. 



'T'S GLEE CLUB. 



S. D. FOOT, Pianist. 
D. E. Baker, First Tenor. H. F. Hubbard, Second Tenor. 
J. K. Hall, Second Tenor. C. F. Coburn, First Bass. 
A. A. Brigham, Second Bass. 



"T^O GLEE CLUB. 



E. H. Hunt, First Tenor. F. H. Osgood, Second Tenor. 
J. 0. Howard, First Bass. J. G. Lincoln, Second Bass. 



'SO GLEE CLUB. 



E. T. GOODALE, Pianist. 
C. M. McQueen, First Tenor. W. C. Stewart, First Tenor. 
W. E. Warner, Second Tenor. A. S. Hall, Second Tenor. 
A. L. Fowler, First Bass. H. W. Atwood, Second Bass. 



THE READING ROOM. 







OFFICERS. 




D. 


H. 


BENSON, '77, 1 




E. 
W. 


C. 
A. 


CHOATE, '78, 1 
SHERMAN, '79, f 


Directors. 


w. 


E. 


WARNER, '80, 




c. 


S. 


HOWE, Tkeasurer. 








PAPERS. 








DAILIES. 




Boston Journal 


, New 


York Times, 


Daily Graph 


ic, 


Springfield Republican 






AGRICULTURAL 





New England Farmer, Massachusetts Ploughman, 

American Agriculturist, California Farmer, 

Western Agriculturist, The Cultivator, 
Moore's Rural New Yorker. 

MISCELLANEO US. 

Scientific American, Frank Leslie's Weekly, 

Christian Register, Yale Courant, 

Harper's Monthly, Our Dumb Animals, 

American Naturalist, Amherst Record, 

Scribner's Monthly, Army and Navy Journal, 

Harvard Ad vocate, Boston Journal of Chemistry. 

Amherst Student, N. E. Journal of Education, 

New York Independent, Harper's Weekly. 



ALUMIi ASSOCIATION 



OF THE 



OFFICERS FOR 1876-7. 



PRESIDENT, 

G. H. SNOW, 72. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS, 

E. A. ELLSWORTH, '71, E. P. CHANDLER, '74. 
G. W. MILLS, '73, P. M. HARWOOD, '75. 

RECORDING SECRETARY, 

W. P. BROOKS, '75. 

CORRESPONDING SECRETARY, 

F. S. SMITH, '74. 

TREASURER, 

S. T. MAYNARD, '72. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, 

F. S. SMITH, '74. S. T. MAYNARD, '72. 
W. P. BROOKS, '75. E. H. LIBBY, '74. 

F. C. ELDRED, '73. 

AUDITING COMMITTEE, 

J. B. MINOR, '73. W. H. BOWKER, '71. 

W. F. CURTIS, '74. 



ALUMNI STATISTICS. 



We desire to make the following a permanent department of 
the Index, but this can only be accomplished by the co-operation 
of the Alumni themselves. To aid in the fulfillment of our inten- 
tion, we respectfully request the members of our Alumni chang- 
ing their occupations or addresses during the year, to notify the 
editors of the fact. We think the following statistics are per- 
fectly correct ; all notification of errors will be thankfully received. 
Our Alumni number one hundred and nineteen, of whom the resi- 
dences and occupations of one hundred and seventeen are known. 
Of the one hundred and seventeen, sixty- two have changed their 
residences since graduating. Among them the different pursuits 
are divided as follows : Farmers, thirty-seven ; civil engineers, 
ten ; physicians and surgeons (including veterinary), six ; chem- 
ists and druggists, six ; teachers, eight ; lawyers, four, and a few 
representatives in almost all honorable callings. We sincerely 
thank all our friends who have aided us in gathering information 
in regard to our Alumni. 



CLASS OF "M 



NAME. 



RESIDENCE. 



OCCUPATION. 



G. H. Allen, 
A. L. Bassett, 
W. P. Birnie, 
W. H. Bowker, 
L. B. Caswell, 
H. S. Cowles, 

E. A. Ellsworth, 
J. F. Fisher, 

G. E. Fuller, 

F. W. Hawley, 

F. St. C. Herrick, 
George Leonard, 



South Deerfield, 

N. Y. City, 

Springfield, 

Boston, 

Athol, 

Hadley, 

Barre, 

Fitchburg, 

Greenfield, 

Lawrence, 
Springfield, 



Farmer. 
C. E. Vt. C. E. R. 

Contractor. 

Importer and 
Manufacturer of Fertiliiers. 

Civil Engineer. 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Clerk Fitchburg R. R. 

Real Estate Agent 
and Civil Engineer. 

R. R. Conductor. 
Farmer. 
Lawyer. 















56 


THE INDEX. 








NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


OCCUPATION. 






R. W. Lyman, 


Northampton, 


Civil Engineer. 






J. 11. Morse, 


Salem, 


it a 






A. D. Norcross, 


Monson, 


Farmer. 






L. A. Nichols, 


Chelsea, 


City Engineer. 






J. B. Page, 


Conivay, 


Farmer. 






S. H. Richmond, 


Boston, 


Professor of Penmanship 
French's Business College. 






W. D. Russell, 


Turners Falls, 


Chemist. 






Edwin Smead, 


Baltimore, Md., 


Clerk. 






L. A. Sparrow, 


Boston, 


Chemist. 






G. P. Strickland, 


Amesbury, 


Civil Engineer. 






E. E. Thompson, 


Brockton, 


Druggist. 






G. H. Tucker, 


W. Spring Creek, Pa., 


Civil Engineer. 






W. C. Ware, 


Boston, " Clothier (OakHall). 






William Wheeler, 


Sapporo, Japan, 


Professor of Mathematics 
Agricultural College of Japan. 






F. Le P. Whitney, 


Boston, 


Florist. 






CLASS OF ,f 7"2. 






NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


OCCUPATION. 






B. C. Bell, 


Cambridge, 


Druggist. 






W. F. Brett, 


Brockton, 


Farmer^ 






J. W. Clark, 


Brenham, Tex., 


Farmer. 






F. C. Covvles, 


Amherst, 


Farmer. 






J. C. Cutter, 


Boston, M. D. Mass. < 


jreneral Hospital. 






E. N. Dyer, 


North Weymouth, Prin 


. of High School. 






I. H. Esterbrook, 


Diamond Hill, R. I., 


Farmer. 






E. R. Fisk, 


Philadelphia, Pa., 


Salesman. 






C. 0. Flagg, 


Diamond Hill, R. L, 


Farmer. 






R. B. Grover, 


Boston, 


Ticket Agent 
Boston & Providence R. R. 






L. Le B. Holmes, 


Mattamoisett, 


Lawyer. 






F. E. Kimball, 


Worcester, Clerk W. B. & G. I 






R. W. Livermore, 


Toledo, 0., 


Lawyer. 






George Mackie, 


Attleboro, 


M. D. 






S. T. Mayn,ard, 


Amherst, 


Assistant Professor of 
Horticulture, M. A. C. 






H. E. Morey, 


Europe, 


Traveling. 






W. R. Peabody, 


Boston, General Agent 


A. T. & S. R. R. 






F. B. Salisbury, 


Diamond Fields, So. Africa, Clerk. 






D. E. Shaw, 


Chicopee, 


Gardener. 






G. H. Snow, 


Providence, R. L, S 


upt. State Farm. 






F. M. Sommers, 


Sacramento, Cat, 


Editor. 






S. C. Thompson, 


Natick, 


Civil Engineer. 






Henry Wells, 


Rochester, N. Y., 


Merchant. 






W. C. Whitney, 


Boston, 


Architect. 















THE INDEX. 



57 



CLASS OF '^3. 



NAME. 



RESIDENCE. 



OCCUPATION. 



F. C. Eldred, 
W. S. Leland, 
A. H. Lyman, 

G. W. Mills, 
J. B. Minor, 

D. P. Penhallow, 
J. B. Renshaw, 
H. B. Simpson, 
A. T. Wakefield, 
S. S. Warner, 
J. H. Webb, 
Charles Wellington, 
F. W. Wood, 



N. Y. City (6 Wall 

Sherbom, 

N. Y. City, 

Medford, 

Neio Britain, Ct., 

Sapporo, Japan, 

Oberlin, 0., 

Centerville, Md., 

La Harpe, III., 

Florence, 

New Haven, Ct., 

Washington, D. C, 

Providence, R. I., 



Insurance Agt. 
Farmer. 

Student of Medicine 



St.), 



of P. & S. 

Student of Medicine. 
Supt. in Factory. 

Professor of Chemistry and Botany 
Agricultural College of Japan. 

Student of Theology. 

Farmer. 
Student of Medicine. 

Farmer. 
Law Student, Yale. 

Chemist in 
U, S, Patent Office. 

Civil Engineer. 



CLASS OF 5 ^4. 



NAME. 



RESIDENCE. 



OCCUPATION. 



J. M. Benedict, 
W. H. Blanchard, 
E. P. Chandler, 
W. F. Curtis, 

D. G. Hitchcock, 
J. A. Hobbs, 

E. H. Libby, 
Henry Lyman, 
A. H. Montague, 
H. L. Phelps, 

F. S. Smith, 

E. E. Woodman, 
H. M. Zeller, 



Springfield (25 Hampden 

Putney, Vt., 

Abilene, Kansas, 

Westminster, ' 

Warren, 

Bloomington, Nebraska, 

AmJierst, 

Middlefield, Ct., 

South Hadley, 

Southampton, 

Springfield, 

Jersey City, 

Hagerstoion, Md., 



St.,) 



Dealer 
in Produce. 

Farmer. 
Farmer. 
Farmer. 
Clerk. 
Farmer. 

Editor Scientific Farmer. — 
Post-Graduate M. A. C. 

Farmer. 
Farmer. 
Farmer. 
Lumber Dealer. 
Florist. 
Farmer. 



CLASS OF 9 VS. 



NAME. 



RESIDENCE. 



OCCUPATION. 



J. F. Barrett, 
J. A. Barri, 
E. B. Bragg, 



Chicago, III., 

Northtield, 

Amherst, 



Milk Business. 

Farmer. 

Post-Graduate M. A. C. 



58 



THE INDEX. 



NAME. 



RESIDENCE. 



OCCUPATION. 



W. P. Brooks, 
Madison Bunker, 
T. E. Callender, 

F. G. Campbell, 
J. W. Clay, 

G. B, Dodge, 
Henry Hague, 
P. M. Harwood, 
W. H. Knapp, 
L. K. Lee, 

G. M. Miles, 
H. P. Otis, 
F. H. Rice, 
A. A. Southwick, 
J. F. Winchester, 



Amherst, 

Boston, 

Northfield, 

West Westminster, Vt., 

Westm inster, Vt. , 

Hamilton, 

West Philadelphia, Pa., 

Barre, 

N. Y. City, 

Perth, N. Y., 

Department of the West, 

Florence, 

Chicago, III., 

Amherst, 

New London, Ct 



Post-Graduate M. A. C. 

Fertilizer Business. 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Theo. Student. 

Farmer. 

Teacher. 

Farmer. 

Q. M. U. S. A. 

Manufacturer. 

Milk Business. 

Farm Supt. M. A. C. 

Veterinary Surgeon. 



CLASS OF '^<3. 



i\ A M E. 



RESIDENCE. 



OCCUPATION. 



D. A. Bagley, 
D. 0. Chickering, 
C. F. Deuel, 
G. W. M. Guild, 
J. M. Hawley, 
Hiram Kendall, 
T. H. Ladd, 
G. H. Mann, 
W. F. Martin, 
G. W. McConnell, 
W. A. McLeod, 
G. A. Parker, 
G. L. Parker, 
W. H. Porter, 
W. S. Potter, 
J. M. Sears,** 
T. E. Smith, 
(J. A. Taft, 
G. P. Urner, 
H. G. Wctmore, 
J. E. Williams, 
John Bellamy, 
J. E. Eoot, 
C. H. Phelps, 



Winchendon, 
Enfield, 
Amherst, 

Portsmouth, N. H, 
N. F., 



Student of Medicine. 
Farmer* 

Druggist. 

Second Lieutenant 
United States Army. 

Banker. 



Amherst, Post-Graduate M. A. C. 

Holliston, Farmer. 

/Sharon, Farmer. 



Lonsdale, R. L., 

Amherst, 

Pougheekpsie, N. Y., 

Dorchester, 

Hatfield, 

Lafayette, Ind., 

Ashfield, 

Boston, 

Whitinsville, 

Elizabeth, N. J., 

N. Y, 

Amherst, 

Boston, 

Barre, 

South Framingham, 



Senior Class A. C. 

Landscape Gardener 
at Vnssar College, 

Florist. 

Farmer. 

Law Student. 

Farmer and 
Principal of Aahfield Academy. 
Student in 
B. U. School of Oratory. 

Manufacturer. 

Superintendent 

Chemical Dye Works. 

Student, Medical Department 

University of New York. 

Newspaper Correspondent 

and 1'ost Office Clerk. 

Clerk. 



Gardener. 



Love of country has been placed, by the past philosophers of 
all ages, as the highest human sentiment next to the love of 
God — higher than filial love, higher than fraternal love, higher 
than the love of sex It seems not to be acquired with advanc- 
ing years, but is born in the individual ; the toddling boy feels 
the thrills of patriotism, as soon, almost, as he can talk or hear. 
Somewhat thus with the love of Alma Mater. The student, in 
college, is notorious for the anomaly in his character which 
impels him to " cut '' a professor, as if it were a good joke on 
his instructor ; a good joke it may be, but one strongly tainted 
with hibernianism. 'Tis like buying a costly article of the shop- 
keeper with money of your own, added to that of a friend, and 
then running off without taking the purchase. Students will 
oppose a college law, and vilify its originators : but, let those 
same students be placed in the breach, woe to the man who does 
gainsay "our college," or any of its belongings. The associa- 
tions and experiences of student life are among the dearest mem- 
ories the mind of the graduate possesses. He lives over again 
many times the pleasant hours of his green Freshmanhood, of 
his wild Sophomore career, of more studious Junior days, and of 
the earnest sedateness and dressy dignity of Senior year. The 
feeling of loyalty keeps fresh as time rolls on, and the fast de- 
veloping man preserves his interest in, and aids with his might, 
every step of his Alma Mater. 

The maroon and white is now worn in the hearts of six gradu- 
ated classes, the members of which number one hundred and 
nineteen. And what are the one hundred and nineteen doing ? 
Are they a credit to the institution which has been their training 
school ? Taken together, we claim that they are. Among them 
are many rising farmers, teachers of agriculture, editors, chem- 
ists, engineers, and a few merchants, lawyers, and clergymen. 
No great men among them yet, but they are becoming notice- 
able in a niche long unoccupied, without which society is 
markedly incomplete — the niche set apart for men possessing 
knowledge of and power over matter. The cry of the times is 
for men educated in the industrial sciences, especially in im- 
proved agriculture, and this cry the agricultural college must 
answer with well drilled men. What the Alumni are, so will the 
college be adjudged. Then see to it, Alumni of the M. A. C, that 
your record in the world's work be such as to place high in the 
roll our loved Alma Mater, But, not by example alone, can we, 



60 THE INDEX. 



the Alumni, hope to win credit for the intellectual workshop 
whence we came. We know the wants of our college as well as 
any ; it is for us to press its claims, by tongue and pen, at every 
opportunity. It needs students ; none so well fitted, as we, to 
induce young men to examine the advantages of our institution. 
It needs money of all things ; ah, this, few of us possess, but 
we may be able to influence the possessors. No thought can, 
seemingly, be more dear to a college graduate, than that, soma 
day, he may be able, in part, to return what his Alma Mater 
has given him, which no amount of tuition can repay. " Some- 
day" is present every day. Let us begin the payment. 

To quote from a recent article :* " This new educational move- 
ment has wonderfully diversified the resources and opportunities 
of the calling. It has opened up new careers for youthful ambi- 
tion Education no longer consigns a man, of necessity, to law, 
medicine, or the ministry. The youth in sympathy with rural 
pursuits, and of a literary turn of mind, can find no richer field 
for his talents than here. The tempting career of authorship 
and journalism, no longer of necessity claims its aspirant to 
spheres of action, removed, by long intervals, from the field and 
farm ; no department of literature now offers a wider range, 
than the agricultural. Those inclined to the teacher's calling 
have opportunities here offered, until now unknown. Medicine, 
in the human practice, is crowded full ; the veterinary is virtually 
unworked. To the youth born for eminence as an original inves- 
tigator of nature, here is a field white with the harvest, for 
which the reapers are all too few. To use the words of Presi- 
dent Warren : ' In the direction of mechanical invention and 
appliance, in the direction of broad studies and broad improve- 
ment, in the direction of new forms of agricultural manufac- 
tures and agricultural commerce, numberless new opportunities 
and new employments have been opened, which all go to diver- 
sify, to enrich, and to render attractive the farm life, once so 
monotonous.' " 

On the undergraduate we would impress the fact, while, by- 
earnest application in the regular course he will be fitted to 
accomplish much in the battle of life, yet, when he leaves, at 
the end of four years, he is really but fitted to begin. Post-grad- 
uate study, in special branches, is to him who would go to his 
work fully equipped, what a full supply of arms and ammuni- 
tion is to the soldier. The fields of agricultural chemistry, bot- 
any, veterinary, and of special investigation, offer rich rewards to 
the right men. But the right men are only those who fit them- 
selves for the work by special study. Undergraduates, think 
of it. 

Alumnus. 

* Soribner's Monthly for October. 



'n**s 3 



FARNSWORTH RHETORICAL MEDALS. 



'78. 

David E. Bakee, Gold Medal. 

Hokace E. Stockbridge, .... Silver Medal. 

'79. 

Joseph G. Lincoln, Gold Medal. 

Lockwood Myrick, Silver Medal. 

GRINNELL AGRICULTURAL PRIZES. 

'76. 

George A. Parker, First Prize. 

John M. Sears, Second Prize. 

HILL'S BOTANICAL PRIZES. 

'76. 

Joseph M. Hawley, Eirst Prize. 

George H. Mann, Second Prize. 

George L. Parker, Third Prize. 

TOTTEN MILITARY PRIZES. 

William A. McLeod, '76, .... Prize on Essay. 
David E. Baker, '78, Prize on Notes. 



The Centennial Hotel and Restaurant, 




Corner of Bridge Street and Princess' Avenue, 

Opposite G-ravefs back-) yard, is now open for the season for the accommo- 
dation of a limited number of guests. We would respectfully 
invite your attention to our 

BULL OF F^lR-E. 



All articles warranted to be at least 100 years old. 



SOUPS. 

Mock Turtle,* Tomato,* Green P,* Julienne.* 

ROASTS. 

Beef,* Lamb (Mary's little one, with capers), Turkey.* 

BOILS. 

Ham,* Tongue, Steel Spring Chicken, Corn Beef and Cabbage. 

GAME. 

Codfish, Venison,* Ked Herring, Sardines. 

VEGETABLES. 

Turnips, Lobster Salad,* Onions, Chicken Pie, Lettuce,* Bologna 

Sausage, Potatoes,* Devilled Crabs, Graham Bread 

(very old), and Dried Beef, ditto, 



TBE INDEX. 



63 



SIDE DISHES. 
Cheese, Ice Cream,* Bread and Butter. 

WINES. 

Chateau Dillon,* Vin de Graves,* Mumm's Extra Dry, Heid- 
sieck's Extra Wet.* 

N. JB. Articles checked not served this day. 



REFERENCES. 

By special permission we refer to the following extinguished gentlemen, who 
are our constant customers : 

J. E. Southrnayd, .... Postmaster- General. 

Joseph Wyman, Esq., the celebrated wit from Eastern Massa- 
chusetts. 

J. R. Hibbard, Sr., "The (only) man who laughs" — at Wy- 
man's jokes. 

Ray m undo Martinho da Silva Porto, By Gad ! 

Charles S. Howe, Esq., of the firm of Brooks & Hbwe, Whole- 
sale Book and Stationery lmposters.* 

C. F. Coburn, . . Editor-in-chief of the M. A. C. Index. 

Joseph C. Howard, . . Inspector General of Milk. 

And others too numerous to mention, among whom are 

Warner, head of the table, says grace in a concise and touch- 
ing manner. 

Grape Snatcher (caught in the act). 

Green. 

Heavy Weight. 

the Freshman with the whiskers. 

Midday Burglar. 

. Pal to the " Burglar." 

. He of the " Ghastly Grin." 

A "Vile Fellow," in love with the Waiter. 



Stewart, 

Pease, 

Plaza, 

Townsley, 

Atwood, 

Parker, 

Goodale, 

Stone, 

Fowler, 

McQueen, 

Wood, 

Heighway, 

Ripley, 

Richardson, 

Mattocks, 



The Post-Graduate's Pets. 

Saw it in the Claripedia. 

The Walking Fossil. 

Muchest Eater. 

alias " Turtle." 

The Great Historian. 



* Should read Importers.— Ed. 



KELLOGG ENGLISH OPERA TROUPE. 



" Such music as 'tis said, 
Before was never made." 



REHEARSALS WITH -REFRESHMENTS THREE TIMES A HAT. 



Brooks, ........ Director. 

Baker, . . . . . . . Baritone- Inferno. 

Signor Waldron(i), . . Bas(e) very, }^^35^tJ?SSj-«.- 
Green, . But. talented, bids fair to become a Prima Donna. 

Sherman, Falsetto Excruciata. 

Herr Von Spofe (Little Amie), . Tenor Doloroso Dulciana. 
Brigham, . . . . . - . Great Hibernian Warbler. 

Hall, J. N. — Tenor Robusto, Basso Furioso, Crescendo, Dimin- 
uendo, Ornamenti, ad libitum, etc., etc. 
Lincoln, — A b , would Bl, — . . Pomposo Inexpressible. 

Swan, ....... Singus* American us. 

Washburn, — Second Bass, Basest of the base, 

"Marked you his lip." — Shak. 
Koch-erel — . . . Tremolo-so, Murmur, (Ob) so. 

Maynard, Mealy Bug Minstrel. 

Hall (Fresh), A. S.(S) Bill Poster, Scene Shifter and Boot Black. 



(G) ASTRONOMERS. 



Observatory, Riley Mansion. 

Instrument Manipulator, Ben. 

INSTRUMENTS. 

Telescope, Lyman. 

Transit (Rapid, 11 sec.) Bill Nye. 

CONSTELLATIONS. 

Southern Cross (between Mercury and Venus). - Carneiro. 
Great Dipper, - - - - - - - - Hub. 

Little Dipper, ----__-. Tuuk. 

Pole Star, --_..-__ Choate. 

MINOR PLANET. 

Fiigga, ...- Osgood. 

Nebulous Matter, - Foot and W. V. Howe. 

♦Should read cygnus. 



THE BANG(S) UP CLUB. 



Billy Boutwell, " Chit," Knox. 

Bang's Soliloquy.— Six days shall I labor and do all my work. 
But the seventh is the Sabbath. In it I shan't do no work, nor my 
wife, nor my man servant, nor my maid servant, etc., etc. There- 
fore, Billy and Chit go home to roost on Saturdays. 



THE PILGRIMS. 



Kendall, H. F. Parker, Peirce. 



COOKIES. 



Smith & Hunt, '79, Bristol & Carey, ( M 1^ k c e r y ' 3 ) 

" Charlie" Brewer. 



SHUCKS. 



" There is no place like home !" 

Bustah, Hunt, '78, ' Lovell, Stockbridge, Dickinson. 



REFUGEE. 



Zabriskie. 



PRIVATE INDIVIDUAL. 



J. K. Mills, Esq., . . Successor to J. K. Mills, Jr. 

" Alone in his glory." 
Personal expenses, exclusive of all charities, $1250 per annum. 
During his sojourn in Amherst, he may be found on the estate of 

M. F. Dickinson, Esq. 



car 



PERSONALS. 



'Absent in body, but present in spirit." 

' He draweth out the thread of his verbosity. " . 

'A soft, meek, patient, bumble, tranquil spirit ? 

'A merry heart maketb a cheerful countenance.' 

' Meet nurse for a poetic cbild." . 

'" My life is one dem'd horrid grind." 

' So witty, wicked and so thin." 

'A midnight reveller. " 

' Vex not thyself because of evil doers 

' He is a man, setting his fault aside, of comely virtues 

' Get thee away, and take thy beetles with thee 

' Crack the lawyer's voice, that he may never more 



false 



plead. 



eyed 



. H 
. H. 
. B. 
. J. 
H. G, 
. W 
. M, 
. J 
. J. 
. E 
. J. 
. J. 



R. H. 
J. W. 
E. M. 
W. C. 



E. H. 
S. H. 
C. B. 

F. H. 



' The hairs of thy head are all numbered. " 

' Go shake your ears." F 

' To the barber with thy beard." . ...... J. 

'A little learning is a dangerous thing." 

'A living dead man." ......... E 

'The fatted calf." W. 

' I am called away by particular business, but I leave my 

character behind." G. 

'Am I my brother's keeper ? " . . . . . .A. 

'Remote, unfriended, melancholy, slow." . 
'Push on the reins." ...... 

'Much study hath made him lean and pale and leaden 
'Poor prattler, how thou talkest ! " . 
'None but himself can be his parallel." 
'A lion among ladies is a most dreadful thing." . 
'0, wonderful son, that can so astonish a mother." 
'Full of strange oaths, and bearded like a pard." 
'With spectacles on nose, and pouch on side." 
'Very like a whale." ...... 

' He is a soldier, fit to stand by Cassar and give direction." . E. F. B. 

' He doth bestride the narrow world like a Colossus." . . J. C. H. 

' I'd rather be a dog and bay the moon, than such a Roman." . J. K. M. 

* "Better be damned than mentioned not at all." 



title 



W 

H. 

C. 

H. 



. S. C. 

L. S. 

H. G. 

A. G. 
W. P. 



W. 

C. A, 
S. 
A 
A 

M. 



N. C. 
B. G. 
L. T. 
T. M. 

A. S. 
S. P. 



F. D. 
G M. 
H. Z. 



W. A. 
P. R. 
G L. 
H. K. 
L. B. 

D. C. 

E. S. 
H. W. 



MORTAR PRACTICE AT THE M. A. C, 




DEADJOY ACCURACY AT LONG RANGES. 



The Slaughter Actually Commenced — Miraculous Escape of Mr. D. Decem- 
lineata from a Horrible Death. 



' ' Our embryo farmers are exterminating potato bugs by mortar practice. " 

Amherst Student. 
P. S. Our embryo Orthodox preachers turn out to see the cruel sport. 



FAMILIAR HAUNTS. 



Sanctum, 

Old Curiosity Shop, 

Vienna Bakery, 

Paris Restaurant, . 

Brewery, 



5 N. C 
19 S. C. 

25 N. C. 

6 N. C. 

27 S. C. 



Milk Depot, . . . 19 N. C. 

Organ Grinders' Home, . 9 S. C. 

Turtle Shell, . . . 7 S. C. 

Turkish Bazaar . . 20 S. C. 



A TAIL. 



THE ItOJLSTED TURTLE. 



Once upon a time a certain turtle, pausing by the wayside, saw 
many pilgrims impatiently pursuing their way towards the Great 
Temple of the West. He said to one of them : "Whither goest 
thou, and wherefore ?" In a sepulchral voice the traveller said : 
"Come with me and thou shalt see." And he went and saw. 
He witnessed the operations of the pilgrim, and beheld him de- 
positing his sacrifice upon the altar, and incense filled the place. 
And after all these things it came to pass that the High Priest 
passed that way, and accosted him, saying : "Who art thou ?" — 
"Why, my name is Richardson ; I'm drawing cider." 



A BUNCH OF BEETS. 



Hib. Hen. Joe. Jim. 



A CARD. 



Mons. Le Prof. Howard, having returned after the completion 
of a summer's engagement at "Fantastic Beach," is now pre- 
pared to give concerts on the pickle ! 




A OEEEUS STOEY. 



"What now wilt thou do, poor withered night bloomer ? " "I 
know not. I was torn from my happy home by the cruel hand 
of a green-eyed, hairy monster. He would have me to live with 
him, but had not wherein to keep me. So he sought to find a 
new abode for me : that I might continue near him and cheer his 
gloomy hours. With this object he plundered a neighboring 
castle of pestilential fame, deserted now by all except dynamite 
fiends, bone-setters and modellers. In this infernal place my 
new master found a beautiful little glass palace, in which, he 
said, I should reign Queen of Beauty. But on retreating from 
this unheavenly place, an apparition suddenly appeared befoi'e us 
in materialized form, and a sonorous voice exclaimed in tones of 
terrible portent, 'Put it bach ! I'll report you to the Faculty, 
Sir!!!' And he put it. Now, all my hopes are smashed. I 
must ' waste my sweetness on the desert air,' and finally go ' where 
the woodbine twineth.'" 



Fall Term begins Aug. 24, 1876. 

" ends Nov. 28, 1876. 

Winter Vacation of three weeks. 

Winter Term begins Dec. 21, 1876. 

" ends . • . . . . March 14, 1877. 
Spring Vacation of ten days. 

Summer Term begins March 24, 1877. 

" ends June 22, 1877. 

Summer Vacation. 



AD VERTISEMENTS. 



73 



" G !EJ T THE: IB 33 S T ." 




THE 

Empire Slate 

MILK 
PAN 



t^mmcooLER. 



Pat. Dec. 17, 1872. 



MANUFACTURED BY 



DICKINSON & LEE, 

AMHERST, MA.SSS3.-, 

Dealers in Stoves, Furnaces and Tin Ware. Also, Plumbers, Steam and Gas 

Fitters. Buildings heated by steam or hot air. Parties desiring their 

houses furnished 'with the modern improvements will do well 

to get our figures before engaging city parties. 



SPBINGFIELD 



PIANOS, ORGANS, SHEET MUSIC, BOOKS, 

AND EVERY VARIETY OF MUSICAL MERCHANDISE. 

Gen. Agt's for lie Estey .Cottage Organs & Hazelton Bro's. Pianos. 

HUNT BROTHERS, 

402 MAIN STREET, SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

KLUZODONT ! ! KLUZODONT ! ! 

FOR THE TEETH. 



An elegant preparation for cleansing and preserving the teeth, hardening 

the gums, and imparting a delightful fragrance to the breath. 

PRICE, 25 CENTS. 

PREPARED AND SOLD BY 

ADAMS BROTHERS, PHARMACISTS, 

Dealers in Drugs, Medicines, Fancy and Toilet Articles of all kinds. 

No. 1 Phoenix Row, Amherst, Mass. 



H AD VEM TlSEMEfrTS. 



DEVLIN & CO. 

Broadway and Grand Street, 

Broadway and Warren Street, 

NEW YORK. 



LEADING NOVELTIES IN 

FINE CLOTHING 

FOR MEN AND BOYS, 

READY-MADE AND TO ORDER. 



Military and Naval Clothing 



A. SPECIALTY. 



AD VER TISEMEN1 8. 75 

"THE LARGEST" 

ASSORTMENT OF 

MEN'S. LADIES', MISSES' # CHILDREN'S 

FINE 

BOOTS AND SHOES 

To be found in Western Massachusetts, at 

FAY'S ONE PRICE STORE, 

382 Main Street, 

SPRINGFIELD, - MASS. 

GRAND CENTRAL' 

CLOTHING HOUSE, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

MEN'S AND BOYS' 
CLOTHING! CLOTHING! 

JLi .A. 3E& ®- JK @ T 
ONE PRICE CLOTHING HOUSE IN SPRINGFIELD. 

A. L. DESPEAITX, 

3^S MAIN STREET, SPRINGFIELD. 



76 AD VEB TI8EMENTS. 



NEW ENGLAND FARM AGENCY. 



CONNECTICUT RIVER BRANCH, 

UNDER THE MANAGEMENT OP 

JOHN C. DILLON, AMHERST, MASS. 

Tobacco, Stock and Vegetable Farms, of all sizes and prices. Village 
Residences, convenient to churches, schools and colleges, Wood Lots, Mill 
Privileges, and other Country Property, for sale at great bargains. 

" COUNTRY HOMES," 
A hundred and twelve page book, mailed to any address for 10 cents, or four 
three-cent stamps. Address JOHN C. DILLON, Amherst, Mass., 

Or GEORGE H. CHAPIN, New England Farm Agency, Boston. 

J. M. WAITE & SON, 

HATTEES, HATTEBS, 

AND DEALERS IN 

HATS, CAPS, FURS, AND FURNISHING GOODS, 

Where may be found the largest assortment in town, of the latest and most 
desirable styles. Discounts made to Clubs, and on all large sales. 
Silk Hats renovated at short notice. 
Our motto is— "The Best." Students, please call and examine before pur- 
chasing elsewhere. Sign of GOLDEN HAT, 

No. 5 Phoenix H-o^r, Amherst, Mass. 

BEST OF 

CUSTOM-MADE CLOTHING, 

AT HARD TIMES PRICES! 

TO BE FOUND AT 

B. H. WILLIAMS, 

CUTLER'S BLOCK, ----- AMHERST, MASS. 

T. W. SLOAN, 

DEALER IN 

Boots & Shoes, Rubbers, Gaiters, &c. 

LADIES' AND GENTS' CUSTOM WORK. 
No. 2 Phoenix Row, Amherst, Mass. 



AD VER TI8EMENTS. 77 



M. N. SPEAR, 
BOOKSELLER, STATIONER AND NEWSDEALER. 

ALSO, DEALER IN 

PAPER HANGINGS, BORDERS, 

Curtains, Curtain Fixtures, Pictures, Picture Frames, Cord, Tassels, &c, &c. 
Any book senu by mail on receipt of publisher's price. 

No. 14 Phoenix Row, Amherst, Mass. 

OLIVER D. HUNT, 

DEALER IN 

COAL AP03 WOODo 

OFFICE, HUNT'S STOVE STORE, 

AMHERST, ... - MASS. 

ROBERT A. MARSH, 

Card and Job Printer, 

AMERICAN HOUSE BLOCK:, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

Special attention paid to College Work. A full line of Stationery 
constantly on hand. 

AMHERST HOUSE 
MVEKY All SALES STABLE. 



OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS. 

TO LET, AT REASONABLE RATES. 

W. E. STEBBINS, Proprietor. 



78 



AD VER TISEMENT8. 



AMHEEST PICf UffiE ©AILLEKY, 



PHOTOGRAPHS AND PHOTOGRAPHIC ENLARGEMENTS, 

OF EVER Y DESCRIPTION, PROMPTL Y EXECUTED. 

Twenty years' experience in College work. Class Photographs made upon 

the most reasonable terms. We have a very large and fine assortment 

of Frames, Cases, Passepartouts and Frame Materials, 

which we are selling at very low figures. 

N. B. — Every kind of Pictures framed to order. 

Amherst, December, 1876. J. L. LOVELL. 



G. B. GALLOND, 



if Hill 

PROSPECT STREET, 



AMHEUST, 



MASS. 



HI 



TILL & WILSON'S 
Removed from Grain's Bloct to old. Sayings Bant Block. 



W 



All work in our line promptly and neatly executed. Special terms 
for work by the month. 



CHARLES DEUEL, PHARMACIST, 



No. 7 Phoenix Row, 



Amherst, Mass., 



KEEPS CONSTANTLY ON HAND A FULL LINE OF 

fVfe f)fu$, Medidineg, (^envidkl^ toilet & tfkqdy Sftidle^ 

Such as Hat, Cloth, Hair, Nail and Tooth Brushes, Perfumery. Soap, Sponges, &c, &c. 

Physicians' Prescriptions carefully compounded. Cigars. Cigarettes, Cigarette 

Papers and Holders. Also, Durham, Vanity Pair, Perfection, Straight 

Cut and Lone Jack Smoking Tobacco, Ruby and May Flower 

Chewing Tobacco. Soda and Mineral Waters in their 

season. Sunday hours from 9 to 10, A. M. 

and 4>4 to 5% p. M. 



AD VEB TtSEMENTS. 79 




Science, on the farm, which is knowledge, 

Cannot fail to produce profitable results 

In every case when intelligently used. 

Jflrrors may be avoided through others' experience. 

No man is too wise to be helped. 

This is the experience of the world, 

In the practice of the farm, and in trade. 

Forgetfulness of truths which should apply 

In the cultivation of the soil, or the raising of stock, 

Can best be avoided by perusing a live and accurate paper. 

Farmers, our paper is for you, who wish gainful results, 
And are not above learning from the wisdom of others. 
Reason caunot err, when intelligently founded on facts. 
]\/[ere mention is faulty for purpose of instruction. 
Errors and loss it is our purpose to correct and prevent. 
Ringing our changes on facts and their applications. 



One dollar, only, sent to the Scientific Farmer, will 

secure a year's subscription, which, we trust, will 

he of more profit to you than to us. 

Address SCIENTIFIC FARMER COMPANY, 
Boston, Mass. 

Clubs with all publications. 



80 



AD VERTISEMENT8. 




j&vASL&j-'jxr 



MASSACHUSETTS 

AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

AMHERST, MASS. 




|he Massachusetts Agricultural College has been 
in successful operation since 1867. The students re- 
^PiS^ s ^ e on ^ ie College farm, which is beautifully situated 
in the town of Amherst, about three miles from the Connecticut 
river, and contains nearly four hundred acres. The course of 
study and training continues four years, special attention being- 
given to Agriculture, Horticulture, Veterinary Medicine, Chem- 
istry, Botany, and Civil Engineering. Graduates receive the 
Degree of Bachelor of Science from the College, the diploma 
bearing the signature of the Governor of the State, and those 
who desire it may also take a corresponding diploma from Boston 
University. The expenses are moderate, and the education 
thorough and practical. For a cojjy of the Thirteenth Annual 
Report, containing scientific papers of interest, and full particu- 
lars concerning the Institution, address 

Prof. Levi Stockbridge. 






^B 






D 



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*iS63 



DATE DUE 



































































































UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
LIBRARY 



LD 

3234 

H25 

v.8 

1878 

cop. 2 

+