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This set of yearbooks luas compiled 
by the staff of the 1967 Massachu- 
setts Index and donated in the 
interest of paying tribute to those 
who have created the history and 
traditions existing at the University 
of Massachusetts. 

Alexander Dean, Editor-in-chief 



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DATE DUE 




HIGHSMITH #45115 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/index1880univ 



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Vol. X. 



No. 1 



THE 






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INDEX. 



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Noveiiiber, 187S. 



AMHERST, MASS. : 
ROBERT A. MARSH, BOOK & JOB PRINTER. 

1878. 



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t HRRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF 
M 

AMH 







Editorial, . 

Officers and Instructors, . 

Students and Class Communications, 

Senior Appointments, 

Secret Societies, .... 

College Christian Union, 
Washington Irving Literary Society, 
College Reading Room, . 
Prize Awards, .... 

Miscellaneous Organizations, . 
Commissary Department, 
Shakespeareanisms, 
Characteristics, .... 

A Roast, . . . . 

Shorts, ..... 

Roasts, ...... 

History of the College, , . 

Military Department, 

Alumni Association, 

Calendar, ..... 

Finis Cut, . ... 

Advertisements, .... 



9 
17 
34 
35 
44 
46 
48 
49 
51 
68 
71 
74 
77 
79 
82 
85 
87 
95 
110 
112 
113 



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^• 






CHIEF. 



Qr. Endicott, 
C. M. McQueen, 
G. A. Ripley, 



F. E. Gladwin, 

W. C. Parker 
A. II. Stone. 






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" A mighty hand from an exhaustless Urn, 

Pours forth the never-ending flood of years 
Among tlie nations. 

!l|HAT flood has borne us into the editorial chair, and we 
^^ ^ have the pleasure of presenting to all friends of the M. 

(S *^ • 

A. C, the tenth annual volume of the Index. 

We have endeavored to perpetuate all the valuable features of 
former issues, and to introduce such new ones as seemed advisable. 
We wish, not only to make the Index a full and exact catalogue, but 
also to make it a reliable exponent of student life. 

The publication of the Index is fast coming to be the anticipated 
event of the Junior year, to all under-classmen. May each year add 
new interest to the work. Let every volume be an advance, in sym- 
metry and perfection, upon the preceding, and the Index will be 
an honor both to the college and to the class publishing it. 

The growth of the Index has been rapid, not only in size but in 
quality. The first volume was published in 1869-70. This was a 
thin pamphlet of twenty-eight pages, containing only the class com- 
munications, the members of the college societies, and those of the four 
classes. It was entirely lacking in all that miscellaneous matter, 
which forms such a prominent part of later numbers. 

Time has marked out its usual changes during the year, but hap- 
pily most of these have been to our own advantage. We have had 
a live head, whose invigorating influence has been felt by college and 
student. Order and neatness have sprung into life, the grass grows 
greener and the flower takes on a more delicate tint now that its 
lover is near. Ay, and even we cannot fail to catch the inspiration 
and love the music of the flowers. Students ! we can well be proud 
of our Prex, and in every mental, moral and natural field, strive by 



ii- 



■* -#- 

6 THE INDEX. 

our faithfulness to win the esteem of him, whose worth is felt in 
other lands than our own. 

Our college has lost this year the services of Dr. Packard, "Lec- 
turer upon Useful and Injurious Insects," the Doctor having been 
called to anew field of labor. We feel the loss keenly as the oppor- 
tunity of hearing his lectures was one of the privileges of the Junior 
year. It is earnestly to be hoped that the Trustees will soon fill his 
place, although they cannot make it good. After glancing at the 
amount of damage annually wrought on a few farm crops only, by the 
ravages of such insects as the potato beetle, phylloxera, the grasshop- 
per and the cabbage fly, whicli cause an annual loss of tens of mil- 
lions of dollars, no one in the Commonwealth is able to say that the 
study of the habits of these insects, and of the means of protecting 
ourselves from their attacks, is not of the most vital importance in 
the education of the " embryo farmer." 

Lieutenant Totten left college at the ^ end of the Summer term, 
and is now with his regiment on the " Plains." He was an officer 
who thoroughly understood his duties, and one who was ever on the 
alert to execute thgm in a manner most beneficial to the interests of 
the college. One does not have to search far to discover improve- 
ments introduced by him in and around college. Whatever he 
touched seemed instinctively to drop into mathematical form and ar- 
rangement. Most flattering to himself were the changes that he 
introduced in the dress and appearance of the cadets. No, military 
discipline and study is one of the most essential parts of the educa- 
tion gained at the M. A. C. 

No successor having been appointed by the Government at the 
commencement of the Fall term, the Faculty secured the services of 
Captain Smith. He adopted a most excellent practice by requiring 
all upper classmen to act as squad drill masters of the Freshmen. 
By this course those men that assist in the drill will be made more 
careful and reserved in their conduct, and far better fitted to per- 
form their duties in the Battalion. Captain Smith was subsequent- 
ly relieved by Lieutenant Charles Morris, detailed for this 
place by the President of the United States. Commandant Morris 
has varied somewhat from the methods of Lieut. Totten, decreas- 



« ■ [ «• 

THE INDEX. 7 

ing the number of companies and bringing the entire organization 
into as simple and compact form as possible. 

The Editors would here express their regret that no more time is 
devoted to the study of the mental sciences. We most cordially 
indorse the words of the Professor of those sciences, that the su- 
preme object of the Agricultural College is to " make farmers, men" 
in every sense of the word. Popular opinion has complained that 
such studies ought not to be in the curriculum of an agricultural 
college, that it would be of no after use to the graduates. We, as 
students, indignantly reject such comments, and demand of the col- 
lege that facilities for such study be enlarged, rather than con- 
tracted. Most of us are from the farms, we are acquainted with the 
practical side of agriculture, we want to study the theory here, to 
gain a liberal education. If the design of the institution was to 
turn out ploiigh -joggers, it has been a costly experiment. That class 
of farmers is in the majority already. Nothing further is required 
to fit a young man for that position than horny hands and an empty 
head. But a progressive farmer has other things to become ac- 
quainted with. He mui3t not only be versed in physical philoso- 
phy, but, as he is dealing all the time with other men, buying and 
selling, he must understand human nature; and what is that but a 
department of mental or social philosophy. 

The establishment of a nursery in connection with the Horticul- 
tural Department, should be noticed as a valuable source of instruc- 
tion to the students. This was a needed supplement to the oral in- 
struction in horticulture. Every one, during the Junior year at 
least, has "field practice" in all the different branches of fruit 
culture. « 

The students will not forget that they have lost one pleas- 
ant and genial friend this term, Mr. Johnson. Long and faith- 
fully did belabor at the college. Always readjT- to take and return 
a joke, his team was a favored seat with every one. May success go 
with him in his new home. 

The editorial would be incomplete were it to fail to speak of the 
departure of '78. Faculty and student may well think of that 
class with pride. Strong in numbers and vigorous in intellect, it 

■* # 



8 THE INDEX. 



maintained its precedence in college life to the end. The college was 
ably represented at the Boston University commencement, by Mr. 
C. F. Coburn of the graduating class. He was pronounced by com- 
petent critics to have been the best speaker of the day. The power 
with which he handled his subject, " Tlie Poetry of Science," clearly 
proved that the students of an " Agricultural and Mechanical Col- 
lege " are not without poetic sentiment. '78 has many good friends 
among us yet. Let us remember the injunction of the poet, 

" The friends thou hast and their adoption tried, 
Grapple to thy soul with hooks of steel." 

In losing '78, we gained '82. By reason of the munificence of 
the Trustees in remitting tuition, '82 even surpasses her name in 
extent of numbers. As a class, they are bracing up under their du- 
tiess right manfully, althougli 

" His awkward gait, his introverted toes, 

Bent knees, round shoulders, and dejected looks. 

Procure him many a curse." 

The Editors are sorry to send out the Index without the "class 
poem." Nature has not bestowed upon us the gift, vouchsafed to 
. Homer, of expressing our tlionghts in numbered sentences; neither 
do we feel it honorable to plagiarize the original meter of the pre- 
ceding poet ; and finally, if we were dishonest enough for that, we 
should still be without that grand inspiration of "those arithmetic 
signs, among the pines," that led on Seventy-nine to victory. 

The editorial pen must now be laid aside and other duties taken 
up. If our friends are amused or instructed in looking through 
these pages, we shall have received our reward. 

Many pleasant hours have been spent together by the Editors in the 
preparation. Hours and work, the recollection of which will long 
be stowed away in memory. Now we send it forth as a fitting 
souvenir of the class of '80. 



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INSTRUCTORS. 






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MEMBERS EX-OFFICIIS; 

His Excellency ALEXANDER H. RICE. 
Col. WM. S. CLARK, Ph. D., LL. D., President of College. 
Hon. J. W. DICKINSON, Secretary of Board of Education. 
Hon. CHAS. L. FLINT, Secretary of Board of Agriculture. 



EMBERS BY ELECTION. 



Hon. MARSHALL P. WILDER, 
Hon. CHARLES G. DAVIS, 
HENRY COLT, Esq., . 
PHINEAS STEDMAN, Esq., . 
JAMES S. GRINNELL, Esq., . 
Prof. HENRY L. WrilTING, 
HENRY F. HILLS, Esq., . 
Hon. DANIEL NEEDHAM, . 
Hon. WILLIAM KNOWLTON, 
Hon. JOHN CUMMINGS, 
Hon. RICHARD GOODMAN, . 



Boston. 
Plymouth. 

, PiTTSFIELD. 

Chigopee. 

Greenfield. 

Cambridge. 

Amherst. 

. Groton. 

Upton. 

. WOBURN. 

Lenox. 



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Pre"S. WM. S. CLARK, HENRY COLT, P:sq., 

HENRY F. HILLS, Esq., Hon. WM. KNOWLTON, 
RHINE AS STEADMAN, Esq. 



Secretary. 
Hon. CHAS. L. FLINT, 



Boston. 



ATiditor. 



HENRY COLT, Esq., 



PiTTSFIELD. 



Treasurer 
GEO. MONTAGUE, Esq., . ' 



Amherst. 



Board, of Overseers. 
THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

Exaxnining Coramittee of Overseers. 

O. B. HADWEN, Esq., CHAS. S. SARGENT, Esq., 

Capt. JOHN B. MOORE, J. N. BAGG, Esq., 
Dr. JAMES R. NICHOLS. 



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WILLIAM S. CLARK, Ph. D., LL. D., 

President, and. Professor of Botany and Horticulture. 

Hon. LEVI STOCKBRIDGE, 

Professor of Agriculture. 

HENRY H. GOODELL, M. A., 

Professor of Modern Languages. 

CHARLES A. GOESSMANN, Ph. D., 

Professor of Chemistry. 

HENRY W. PARKER, M. A., 

Professor of Mental, Moral and Social Science. 

WILLIAM B. GRAVES, M. A., 

Professor of Physics and Civil Engineering. 

CHARLES MORRIS, 1st Lieut. 5th Artillery, U. S. A., 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

A. S. PACKARD, Jr., M. D., (State Entomologist), 

Lecturer on Useful and Injurious Insects. 

M. FAYETTE DICKINSON, Jr., 

Lecturer on Rural Law. 

CHARLES P. LYMAN, V. S. Edin., 

^ Lecturer on Veterinary Science and Practice. 

GEORGE MONTAGUE, 

Instructor in Book.- Keeping. 

SAMUEL T. MAYNARD, B. S., 

Gardener and Assistant Professor of Horticulture. 

* ■ A. A. SOUTH WICK, B. S., 

Farn^i Superintendent. 



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WILLIAM F. WARREN, S. T. D., LL. U., President. 
J. E. LATIMfe, S. T. D., Dean of School of Theology. 



E. H. BENNETT, LL. D., 
I. T. TALBOT, M. D., 
L. B. MONROE, A. M., 
J. W. LINDSAY, S. T. D., 
EBEN TOURJEE, Mus. D., 



Law. 

Medicine. 

Oratory. 

Liberal Arts. 

Music. 



WM. S. CLARK, LL. D., President Mass. Ag'l College. 
DAVID PATTEN, S. T. D., Registrar of the University. 



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'DUM VIVIMUS VIVAMUS." 



OFFICERS. 



W. A. SHERMAN, 
R. W. SWAN, . • . 
H E. B. .WALDliON, 
R. S. DICKINSON, 
G. P. SMITH. . 



President. 

Vice President. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 

. Historian. 

Class Captain. 



•RESIDENCES. 



ROOM? 



Dickinson, Richard Storrs Amherst., 

Green, Samuel Bowdlear Chelsea, 

Rudolph, Charles Amherst, 

Sherman, Walter Alden Loioell, 

Smith, George Parmenter Su7iderlcind, 

Swan, Roscoe Willard Framinghdm, 

Waldron, Hiram Edmond Baylies Rochester, 

Total, 7. 



3 S. C. 

3 S. C. 
Holland's Block. 

3 S. C. 

6 S. C. 

25 S. C. 

21 S. C. 



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■ffi-H 




UE Senior year has flashed upon us like the sudden glare 
of a meteor, bringing with it tlie thought that in a few 
short months, we shall be launched into the great mass of humanity, 
fliaping our destinies from its labyrinth. Its approach we have an- 
ticipated, and have been enlarging our resources for the last 
three years, to meet its responsibilities. Although we have not gone 
as far in our preparations as we might, nevertheless we are ready to 
face our tasks and perform our duties without faltering. 

Fellow students ! whether there be few or many, our good examples 
only, we ask you to follow ; while our bad precepts, we .beseech you, 
strive to avoid, and leave the way with at least one less stain for 
your successors. 

We fully realize, as all must who have spent three years at the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, that farming is thehighestoccu- 
pation of man. Commanding little respect as a calling, owing to 
the ignorance and lack of opportunities of its followers, agriculture 
needs the most zealous and well disciplined men, to raise it to a proper 
standard. To this end has our Alma Mater been established, and 
her sons are those to whom the plodding throng around us, are look- 
ing for help, to lift them from their undeserved abasement. 

Our college has achieved so much already, that we may consider it 
a complete success ; and triumph will follow triumph, if we work, 
remembering that the failures we encounter are but the guides which 
will lead us on to a more brilliant victory. 

Many more duties devolve upon each individual since our class it 
so small. No one will deny but that our class badge ( our lenses ) is 



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20 



THE INDEX. 



unique as well as useful. We have also departed from the prevailing 
custom, by planting class vines instead of trees. 

Through the enterprise of our President a large and promising 
Freshman class has entered this year. This experiment shows that 
there are many young men, desirous of our agricultural education if 
it were brought within tlieir reach, by free tuition. We trust that 
our Legislature will see wherein it errs and try to amend. 

Already we look back upon the greater part of our college days 
with pleasure, and as years roll by, that pleasure will ever increase. 
A kind remembrance, shall we always cherish for our Faculty. We 
bid all a hearty farewell, for soon, 

" We leave like those volcanic stones our precious Alraa Mater, 
But will keep dropping in again to see the clear old crater. " 




>-ii- 



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OFFICERiS. 

A. L. PROWLER, President. 

G. ENDICOTT, ....... Vice President. 

C. M. McQueen, . Secretary. 

G. A. RIPLEY, Treasurer. 

W. G. LEE, Historian. 

W. C. PARKER, ....... Class Captain. 



■Or 



NAME. 


RESIDENCES. 


ROOMS. 


Codman, Fraiicis 


Boston, 


5S. C. 


Endicott, Geoi'ge 


Netv York City, 


9 S. C. 


Fowler, Alvan Luther 


Westfielcl, 


9 N. C. 


Gladwin, Frederick Eugene 


Westjield, 


13 N. C. 


Lee, William Gilbert 


Amherst, 


Mr. Lee's. 


McQueen, Charles Manjie 


Longmeadoio , 


9 N. C. 


Parker, William Colverd 


Wakefield, 


28 S. C. 


Riplej', George Arms 


Worcester, 


9 S. C. 


Stone, Almon Humphrey 


PMllipston, 


ION. C. 


Wood, Lewis 


West Upton, 
Total, 10. 


' 5 N. C. 



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f^/^ 'l lrtfe EFE.ESHED by our long rest from stud_y, again we enter 
%-M. m upon the duties of college life, with new zeal for the work 
before us. The routine of duty comes so natural that we scarcely 
realize the interruption of vacation, save from its beneficial results, 
and the change wrought in our absence. Yes, there are changes, 
we do not find everything as wlien we left. This is most noticeable, 
first, in our own class. While it was permitted us to welcome to our 
ranks one or two new members during the past year, still our 
numbers are perceptibly diminished. In vain we look for all the old 
familiar faces to reappear, and for a moment, a shade of sadness 
steals over the bright horizon of our hopes, as we realize how many 
of the little band who first plighted faith and honor in the cause of 
Eighty, have fallen by the way. But there is no time for repining. 
The necessity of the hour only demands a stronger effort and more 
strenuous action on the part of those who are left. It remains for us 
to decide whether we shall, or shall not, attain tlie summit of our 
ambition, and realize the consummation of the hopes which have 
ever been the beacoii of our class, guiding' us on our coarse by its 
strong, steady and unceasing light. 

Another change, a source of deep regret, is the loss of our former 
commandant. We mention this with all honor due him, who now fills 
his place, but it would be impossible for us to transfer, at once, the 
esteem and regard formed by so long, pleasant and profitable relations 
as existed between commandant and cadets, to one ever so worthy of. 
the same. 

And now we note another change, a source of pleasure rather than 
of regret, namely, our new title, the result of our past year's labor. 



^J- 



THE INDEX. 



23 



It gives us great pleasure also to welcome so large a Freshman 
class, and we hope, as year by year they are elevated in college ranh, 
that the advantages of education and culture, which it is their good 
fortune to enjoy, may tend to develop that trait of character, so 
pleasing in those on whom the world has bestowed its honors, a just 
appreciation of the worth and merits of their fellows ; not disdaining 
nor patronizing those who are still below them. And in the spirit of 
progress rather than of self glory, we urge them to greater achieve- 
ments than we have made, or indeed any preceding class, since we 
can point thein to nothing short of perfection. 




K-It 



OFFICERS. 

C. L. FLINT, Jr., President. 

A. 0. HALL, Vice President. 

W. WOOD, ■ . . Secretary. 

E. D. HOWE, Treasurer. 

J. L. HILLS, Historian. 

A. WHITAKEE, Class Captain. 



NAMES. 



RESIDENCES. 



rooms. 



-J Brooks, William Cummings 
-^ Clark, Wallace Valentine 
- Fairfield, Frank Hamilton 
^ Flint, Charles Louis, Jr. 
M Hall, Albert Oliver 
'^ Hills, Joseph Lawrence 
V Howe, Elmer Dwii^lit 
^ Howe, Winslow Brigham 

McKenna, James Petei* 
'^ Perry, Alfred D wight 
/^ Peters, Austin 

Smith, John Leland 

Smith, Benjamin Salter 
^ Sattler, Hermann Charles 
^ Whitaker, Arthur 
/\ Wilcox, Henry 
--' Wolfe, Walter Madson 
-^Wood, Wilbur 

Youug, Charles Elisha 



Boston, 
Amherst, 

Waltham , 
Boston^ 
Chelsea^ 
Boston, 
Marlboro, 
Marlboro, 
Amherst, 
Worcester, 
Boston, 
Barre, 

East Orange, JV". 
Baltimore, Md., 
Needham, 
Honolulu, S. I., 
Montclair, N. J.. 

West Upton, 
Amherst, 
Total, 19. 



Mr 



J; 



11 S. C. 
Mt. Pleasant. 
14 S. C. 
14 S. C. 
29 S. C. 

8 S. C. 
14 K C. 
14 N. C. 

McKenna's. 
29 S. C. 
21 S. C. 

11 S. C. 

9 K C. 
J3S. C. 

. 24 S. C. 

24 S. C. 

26 S. C. 

5K C. 

12 S. C. 



T 



■it-H 



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S we sit down to contribute our little item to your inter- 



«^^^ esting colHums, memories of our eventful Freshman year 
& — ^i — * 

crowd upon us. But lest we weary you, we will refrain from enum- 
erating tliose events, which are of interest only to us, and cite those 
which are of more general importance. 

Of the twenty-four, who tremblingl}' sought admission to our class, 
only two have left; three others, dissatisfied with the result of 
their labors, have decided to review their studies with Eighty-two. 
Success be with jou, brothers, and may your industry enable you to 
regain a place in our ranks. Our best wishes go with those, whose 
aspirations were too great, and whose brains were too powerful to keep 
them within our limits. 

After considerable debate we decided upon a cane, as a class em- 
blem ; and now, were it not that the greed of the Freshman is greater 
than his modesty, you might see several of our number gracefully 
swinging the finest canes that ever college boys possessed. No, 
"Freshie," you must not be too A^entursorae. Have compassion on 
our pockets. They are already only too well filled with the pieces of 
jouv walking sticks. We are glad to see so many of you, coming to 
fill our places, and we note with pain that one of your number has left 
you. We tried hard to make it pleasant for him, packing him off to 
bed with' the tenderness of a mamma ; and when one poor fellow 
was shedding tears of homesickness, we kindly extinguished his 
light, that he might not see himself cry. 

Dear college mates, take example from us, and when another class 
shall enter, be tender vrith them, remembering that version of the 



T 



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I 



26 



THE INDEX. 



Golden Rule which says, ''As others do unto you, even so do ye unto 
them J' 

And now, classmates, we have fairly commenced our Sophomore 
year. To manj^ of us, it is the last in college. Who knows but 
that it is our last on earth ! Let us then be up and doing, and may 
each moment add a polish to the monument of our character. 

H. 




i: 



1 



I 



OFFICERS. 

F. P. TAYLOR President. 

P. S. ALLEN, Vice President. 

E. B. RAWSON, Secretary. 

F. P. JOHNSON, Treasurer. 

C. D. WARNER, Historian. 

F. N. ABERCROMBIE, Class Captain. 



NAMES. 


residences. 


ROOMS. 


Abercrombie, Fred Norman 


Boston, • 


7S. C. 


Allen, George Dickinson 


Amherst, 


25 S. C. 


Allen, Frank Sherman 


Medfield, 


2K C. 


Aplin, George Thomas 


East Ptitney, Vt. 


26 S. C. 


Beach, Charles Edward 


Hartford, Conn., 


25 S. C. 


Bingham, Eugene Percival 


Fltchburg, 


7K C. 


Bishop, William Herbert 


Diamond Hill, B 


/., 32 KC. 


Bowman, Charles Abel 


Billerica, 


22 K C. 


Boynton, Charles Enoch 


Groveland, 


27 K C. 


Brodt, Harry Snowden 


Dansville, N. T., 


6K C. 


Brown, Charles Henry 


Taunton, . 


5S. C. 


Carr, Walter Frank 


Clinton, 


22 S. C. 


Casparian, Gregory 


Nicomedia, Turkey in Asia, 26 N. C. 


Chandler, Everett Sawyer 


Coldwater, Mich., 


Mrs. Chandler's. 


Chandler, Willard Mayne 


South Natick, 


22 S. C. 



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28 



THE INDEX. 



NAMES. 



RESIDENCES. 



ROOMS. 



Chase, Harry Kirk 
Clarke, Henry Little 
Clay, Cassias Morey 
Cochran, Robert Armstrong, Jr. 
Comins, William Henry 
Crafts, George Eben 
Currier, George Francis 
Cutter, John Ashburton 
Damon, Samuel Chester 
Delano, Julius Joaquin 
Deuel, Frank Dennis 
Doyle, John Joseph 
Dutton, Charles Kitteridge 
Fish, Charles Sumner 
Floyd, ^harles Walter 
Goodale, David 
Govvdy, Harrj^ Morgan 
Harris, Louis Lincoln 
Hashiguchi, Boonzo 
Hill, Charles Henry 
Hillman, Charles Dexter 
Holmes, Samuel Judd 
Howard, Joseph Henry 
Howe, George Dickinson 
Jackson, Andrew 
Johnson, Frank Prescott 
Jones, Nathaniel Nelson 
Joyner, Frank Hall 
Kenfield, Charles Robert 
Kingman, Morris Bird 
Kinney, Burton Arial 
Knowles, William Fletcher, Jr. 
Krauss, Alonzo Augustus 
Leonard, Arthur 
Lindsey, Frank Benjamin 
Livermore, Nathaniel Lyon 
Luques, Edward Childs 



Boston, 
New Bedford, 
Westminster, Vt., 
Maysville, Ky., 
North Hadley, 
North Hadley, 



20 S. C. 

21 N. C. 

26 S. C. 

13 S. C. 

28 N. C. 
20 N. C. 



Amherst, Mr. Currier's. 

Boston, 19 S. C. 

Lancaster, 23 S. C. 

Valpariso, Chili, Mrs. Clark's. 

Amherst, Mr. Deuel's. 

Sunderland, 28 N. C. 

Hatfield, Mr. Lee's. 

Boston, 11 N; C. 

Boston, 18 S. C. 

Marlboro, 25 N. C. 

Westfield, 28 N. C 

Westfield, 24 N. C. 

Tokio, Jajyan, 29 N. C. 

North Amherst, 7 N. C. 

Hardioick, 27 S. C. 

Montclair, N J., 25 K C. 

Hyannis, Mrs. Clark's. 

NoHh Hadley, 20 N. C. 
San Francisco, Gal., 31 N. C. 

Waltham, 6 N. C. 

Georgetoion, 8 N. C. 

Egremont, 23 N. C. 
Amherst, Mrs. Kenfield's. 
Amherst, Mr. Kingman's. 

Lowell, 11 N. C. 

Cambridge, 7 S. C. 

Boston, 12 S. C. 

Rock, . 19 S. C. 

Clayton, 32 N. C. 

Clinton City, Iowa, 24 N. C. 

Biddeford, Me., 6 S. C. 



■iJ- 



4 


v 






T 


n 








THE 


INDEX. 


29 




NAME. 


RESIDENCES. 


ROOMS. 




^ 








May, Frederick Goddard 


Boston, 


8 K C. 




Meade, William George 


Springfield, 


29 K C. 




Miller, Willie Smith 


South Hadley, 


4 S. C. 




Morse, William Austin ■ 


Boston, 


8 S. C. 




Myrick, Herbert 


Concord, 


19 N. C. 




Paige, James Breckenridge 


PresGott, 


11 K C. 




Parsons, Howard Albert 


Enfield, Conn., 


10 N. C. 




Perkins, Dana Edson 


Lynn, 


Prof. Parker's. 




Perkins, Charles Brookhouse 


Salem, 


21 K C. 




Plumb, Charles Sumner 


Westfield, 


24 K C. 




Porter, Royal Luther 


Brooklyn, N. T., 


Prof. Parker's. 




Putnam, Henry Anderson 


Worcester, 


17 N. C. 




Rawson, Edward Briggs 


Brooklyn, JSf. T., 


12 S. C. 




Shiverick, Asa Frank 


Wood's Hole, 


12 X. C. 




Smith, Hiram Fred Markley 


Cleveland, 0., , 










Smith, Herman Kellogg 


Hadley, 


20 K C. 




Spaulding, Abel Walter ^ 


Billerica, 


22 K C. 




Stone, Winthrop Ellsworth 


Amherst, 


Mr. Stone's. 




Taft, Levi Rawson 


Mendon, 


27 S. C. 




Taylor, Frederick Patterson 


Boston, 


18 S. C. 




Taylor, Alfred Howland 


Yarmouth, 


2K C. 




Thurston, Wilbur Herbert 


Upton, 


30 N. C. 




Warner, Clarence Duane 


Granby, 


4 S. C. 




Wheeler, Henry Lewis 


Great Barrington, 


23 N. C. 




Wheelock, Victor Lamont 


North Amherst, 


7 K C. 




Wilder, John Emery 


Lancaster, 


23 S. C. 




Willard, Daniel 


North Hartland, Vt. , 15 N. C 




Williams, James Stoddard 


Glastonbury, Conn. 


12 N. C. 




Wilmarth, Fred Augustus 


Upton, 


30 N. C. 




Windsor, Joseph Libbey 


Grafton, 


20 S. C. 


4 


Total, 82. 

+ 




* 









^l-H 



►—it- 






^^?i^\/^^ITH pleasure, do we present our first contribution to 
% V ¥ the Index. Our stay in the M. A. C. has been so 

a) ~-a • 

short, that we scarcely have been initiated into the common routine 
of college life. But the ''greenness," which cliaracterizes all Fresh- 
men, and which is greatly magnified by the compound microscopic 
lens of a Senior's eye, begins gradually to wear off, and if nothing 
serious happens, we expect soon to take up a contribution to procure 
wooden tooth-picks for the Senior class. 

Our number exceeds eighty. We are mostly men whose thirst for 
knowledge brought us here ; rather than the desire to pass away time. 
Our muscular power, we think, offsets our "greenness." This was fully 
demonstrated in the " Grand E,ush, " where Sophomore refinement 
was overpowered by Freshman muscle. Just here we would thank 
the Juniors for their instruction in some of the arts of college life. 
We appreciate their kindness. 

One tiling very noticeable here, is Sophomore bravery, as exhibited 
in monopolizing Freshman canes. We admire true courage. It is 
an honor to every one. But does manly courage consist in oppress- 
ing the weak ? Our most worthy Sophomores seem to have consid- 
ered it as such, wlien two or three of tlieir number pounced upon one 
poor Freshman, relieving him of his cane, and sawing it into "match- 
blocks. " However the class of Eighty-two has a great deal of 
charity, and is patiently waiting for the time, when Sophomore 
knowledge shall become so extensive, as to enable them to under- 
stand that the word "Hero, " has a deeper signification, than "put- 
ting Freshmen to bed" and " snagging" canes. 

Friendship is very valuable. It strengthens the weak, urges for- 



>-^ir 



THE INDEX. 



31 



ii-^ 



ward the disheartened, brings one student in closer sympathy with 
his classmates ; in short, it makes men. Let us furbish this golden 
link by which the human race is united. As Freshmen, we have 
looked around on tlie vastness of the work before us ; but we cherish 
deeply the hope that it may be done well. Often we wish that the 
veil of futurity might be swept away and disclose that which is in 
store for us ; but kind Providence has forbidden it, and we must wait 
for the turning of Fortune's wheel. 

We hope and trust that the class of Eighty-two will chisel her 
name in tablets of honor, that when she shall lay aside her mantle, 
and throw down her mask and foils, other classmen may seize the 
tried blades, and perpetuate the glory of our Alma Mater. 

Let other classmeu cheer their band. 

With armor tried and true, 
Let poets chant their praises bland ; 

We'll shout for Eighty-two. 




■JJ-H 



>— it 



J 



NAMES. 



RESIDENCES. 



ROOMS. 



Benson, B. S., David Henry Bridgewater, 

Bragg, B. S., Everett Burt Amherst, 

Clark, B. S. Atherton Amherst, 

Howe, B. S., Charles Sumner Boston, 
Stockbridge, B. S., Horace Edw'd Amherst, 

Total, 5. 



10 s. c. 

H. 0. Bragg's. 

Pres. Clark's. 

13 KC. 

Prof. Stockbridsre's. 



■iPEciAiLa m 



NAMES. 



Chittenden, Edgar Davis 
Lovell, Henr}' Lyman 



RESTDENOES. 



Sunderland, 
Amherst, 
Total, 2. 



ROOMS. 



•28 S. C. 
Prospect St. 



H^t 



t 



ICAPIfUlLATB 

BY STATES. 



■JI-H 



Massachusetts. 
New York, 
Connecticut, . 
New Jersey, 
Vermont, 
Maine, . ■ 

Ilhode Island, 
Marj'land, 
01)io, . 
Michigan, . 
Iowa, 

Keiitucky,[ 
California, 
Japan, 

Sandwich Islands, 
Chili, 
Turkey, ^ . 

Total. . 



100 
4 
3 
3 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

. 1 
1 

. 1 
1 

125 



■li-H 



►— Jt- 



■ih 



>-* 



^ l^ ^—^-T 'h' 



m 



\h ) ■ U i*~ 



DICKINSON, 
SHERMAN, 
SWAN, . 
SMITH, . 
RUDOLPH, . 
WALDRON, 



President. 

Historian. 

Poet. 

Prophet, 

Orator. 

Toastmaster. 

Odist. 



-*i ^ • ( 'h' 



'.f , -rT-^ i . 




^i- 



W-H 

i 



ii- 



j'a %M<& JIm.i> 



ALEPH CHAPTER. 



Post Grx*acliiates. 

A. Clark, • H. E. Stock bridge. 

Seniors. 

■ E.. S. Dickinson. S. B. Green, 

W. A. Sherman. E. W. Swan, 

G. y. Smith. 

Juniors. 
W. G. Lee. 

Sophomores. 
W. G. Brooks. J. L. Hills, 

W. V. Clark, J. L. Smith, 

H. Wilcox, A. Whitaker. 

Freslimen. 

G. D. Allen, C. E. Beach, 

F. P. Taylor, E. B. Eawson, 

C. D. Warner, J. E. Wilder. 



i. 



a jf. 



K-lt- 



-0^ * 







FOXJNDED i]sr iseg. 



V-^ir 



a 



■ii-H 



P*ost Grraduates, 

D. H. Benson. 

Ptesident Grraduates. 

C. 0. Lovell. 



H. E. B. Waldron, 



G. Endicott, 



F. H. Fairfield, 



H. L. Clarke, 
A. Jackson, 
C. H. Brown, 



Seniors. 

E. D. Chittenden. 
Juiiiors- 
E. Codman. 

Soph.orn.ores. 
A. Peters. 

Freshraen. 

«■ 
. J. J. Delano. 



C. Rudolph, 



G. A. Ripley, 



C. L. Flint, Jr., 



R. A. Cochran, Jr., 
C. B. Perkins, 
A. A. Krauss, 



•Jl-H 



►-Hf 



[I Wim 




FOTJISTDEID TIST \ & '7 3- 



K-lt 



$. 2. K. 



PI CHAPTER. 






C. M. McQueen, 
A. L. Fowler, 



E. D. Howe, 
W. B. Howe, 



F. G. May, 

H. K. Chase, 

F. N. Abercrombie, 

W. F. Knowles, Jr., 



Fost Grrad-Tiates. 

C. S. Howe. 

Junioi's. 



W. C. Parker, 
F. E. Gladwin, 



L. Wood. 
Soi^lioinores. 

A. 0. Hall. , 
^Preslnnen. 



A. D. Perry, 

B. S. Smith, 



N. N. Jones, 
W. H. Bishop, 
F. P. Johnson, 
B. A. Kinny, 



J. A. Cutter. 



il- 



iHH 



ii- 



■it-H 







Et 



"f J" H 



K-Jt 



OFFICERS. 

CHARLES M. McQUEEN, . . . . . . President. 

ELMER D. HOWE, Vice President. 

BENJAMIN S. SMITH. Secretary. 

WINSLOW B. HOWE, * . Treasurer. 

WILBUR WOOD, Librarian. 

GEORGE P. SMITH, 

ALVAN L. EOWLER, ^ Directors. 

HOWARD A. PARSONS, . . . . 



Samuel B. Green, 
Walter A. Sherman, 



Seniors. 



Roscoe W. Swan, 
George P. Smith, 



Hiram E. B. Waldron. 



Jimiors 



Alvan L. Fowler, 
Frederick E. Gladwin, 
William G. Lee, 
Charles M. McQueen, 



William C. Parker, 
George A. Eipley, 
Almon H. Stone, 
Lewis Wood. 



Frank H. Fairfield, 
Charles L. Flint, Jr., 
Albert 0. Hall, 
Elmer D. Howe, 
Winslow B. Howe, 
Austin Peters, 



Sophomores. 



Hermann C. Sattler, 
Benjamin S. Smith, 
Arthur Whitaker, 
Charles E. Young, 
Henry Wilcox, 
Wilbur Wood, 



Walter M. Wolfe. 



H-Jt 



THE INDEX. 



43 



Freslirrieii. 



Frank S. Allen, 
George T. Aplin, 
William H. Bishop, 
Cliarles A. Bovvniim, 
Charles H. Brown, 
Harry S. Brodt, 
Gregory Casparian, 
Everett S. Chandler, 
Harry K. Chase, 
Cassius M. Clay, 
John A. Cutter, 
Samuel C. Damon, 
David Goodale, 
Harry M. Gowdy, 
Louis L. Harris, 
Boonzo Hashiguchi, 
Charles D. Hillman, 
Samuel J. Holmes, 
George D. Howe, 
Frank P. Johnson, 



Nathaniel N". Jones, 
Burton A. Kinny, 
Arthur Leonard, 
Frank B. Lindsey, 
Nathn'l L. Livermore, 
Frederick G. Maj'^, 
William A. Morse, 
Howard A. Parsons, 
Charles S, Plumb, 
Royal L. Porter, 
Henry A. Putnam, 
Asa F. Shiverick, 
Herman K. Smith, 
Abel W. Spalding, 
Levi R. Taft, 
Alfred H. Taylor, 
Wilbur H. Thurston, 
Daniel Willard, 
James S. Williams, 
Fred A. Wilmarth. 






:^«jLi 



m^ir 



il-H 



K-l^ 



^3 




OFFICEIiS. 

G. P. SMITH, . . . ... . . President. 

A. L. FOWLER, Vice PitESiDENT. 

A. U. PERRY, Secretary. 

C. L. FLINT, Jr., Treasurer. 

F. E. GLADWIN, Librarian. 

R. W. SWAN, 

c. M. McQueen, ;. directors. 

E. D. HOWE, 



R. S. Dickinson, 
W. A. Sherman, 



F. Codman, 
A. L. Fowler, 
F. E. Gladwin, 



C. L. Flint, Jr., 
J. L. Hills, 
E. D. Howe, 
W. B. Howe, 



Seniors. 

H. E. B. Waldron. 
Juniors. 

L. Wood. 
Sophomores. 

H. Wilcox. 



G. P. Smith, 
R. W. Swan, 



C. M. McQueen, 
W. C. Parker, 
A. H. Stone, 



A. D. Perry, 
A. Peters, 
W. Wood, 
C. E. Young, 



K-iJ- 



"»- 



THE INDEX. 



FreshmerL. 



F. N. Abercrombie, 

F. S. Allen, 

G. E. Beacb, 
H. K. Cbase, 
J. A. Cutter, 
S. C. Damon, 
S. J. Holmes, 
F. P. Johnson, 



47 



; 



W. F. Knowles, Jr., 

E. C. Luques, 

F. G. May, 

C. B. Perkins, 
C. S. Plumb, 
H. A. Putnam, 

E. B. Rawson, 

F. P. Taylor, 



C. D. Warner. 



^s.^Ss..^Mt^ 



■j^>. 



■Jf-H 



1 



^^i 



DIR^ECTORS. 

G. P. SMITH, 79, E. D. HOWE, '81, 

F. E. GLADWIN, '80, W. F. KNOWLBS, JR., '82, 

A. WHITAKER, Treasurer. 



PAPERS. 



Boston Journal, 
Boston Herald, 



Amherst Transcript, 
Christian Register, 
Harper's Weekly, 
Independent, 

N. E. Journal of Education, 
New England Farmer, 
Scientific American, 
Yale Courant, 
Californian Farmer, 



Daily. 

New York Herald, 
Daily Graphic, 
Springfield Republican. 
AVeekly. 

Country Gentleman, 
Harvard Advocate, 
Mass. Ploughman, 
Rural New Yorker, 
Woman's Journal, 
Army and Navy Journal, 
Toledo Blade, 
The Husbandman, 
Amherst Record, 



The Illustrated Christian Weekly. 
Bi-MontWy. 



Amherst Student. 
IVIonthly. 



Agriculturist, 
Journal of Chemistry, 
Our Dumb Animals, 
Farmer's Review, 



Scientific Farmer, 
Scribner's Monthly, 
Harper's Monthly, 
Atlantic Monthly, 



Popular Science Monthly. 



>^-ih 



-li-H 



m 




^ 



FARNSWORTH RHETORICAL MEDALS. 

'80. 



William G. Lee, 
Alvan L. Fowler, 

Charles Rudolph, 
Charles L. Flint, Jr., . 



'81. 



. Gold Medal. 
Silver Medal. 

. Gold Medal. 
. Silver Medal. 



GRINNELL AGRICULTURAL PRIZES. 



'78. 



Charles F. Coburn, 
Horace E. Stockbridge, 



First Prize, 
. Second Prize, $30. 



^i-H 



K- « H^ 

BO THE INDEX. 



HILL'S BOTANICAL PRIZE. 

William L. Boutwell, . . . '. First Prize, $15. 

Horace E. Stockbridge, . . . . . Second Prize, $10. 



TOTTEN MILITARY PRIZE. 

Charles F. Coburn, Prize Essay. 

Subject : The American Military Problem. 






>— * * 

1 



(5 r^C'^^7) £> 



i-. 



ijCjella!tie0Mi 



i 



*^ #=^ i--^i#4- T"^"^ » 






^J-H 



K- i^ 



;aoti 




THE "AGGIE" GLEE CLUB. 



OFFICERS. 



R. W. SWAN, 

R. A. COCHRAN, .JR., 

W. F. CARR, 

C. H. BROWN, . 

W. C. BROOKS, . 

J. E. WILDER, 



Prksidknt. 

Secrktary. 

Treasurer. 

Leader. 

I Directors. 



College Choir. 

W. C. Brooks, First Bass, Organist. 

A Hall Air W. B. Howe, First Tenor. 

J." A.' Cutter, Alto. ' C. H. Brown, Second Tenor. 

C. L. Flint, Jr., First Tenor. E. D. Howe, Second Bass. 

F. H. Fairfield, First Bass. 



>-it- 



■Jt-H 



THE INDEX. 



S3 



College Orchestra. 

R. A. Cochran, Jr., Leader. 
H. S. Brodt, First Violin. P. P. Taylor, Second Flute. 

F. H. Fairfield, Second Violin. F. N. Abercrombie, Flageolet. 

C. L. Flint, Jr., First Flute. W. G. Lee, Clarionet. 

R. A. Cochran, Jr., First Flute. F. S. Allen, Cornet. 

C. W. Floyd, Piano. 



G. D. Allen, 
W. H. Bishop, 
H. S. Brodt, 
G. Casparian, 
J. A. Cutter, 
H. K. Chase, 
H. L. Clarke, 
R. A. Cochran, Jr., 

F. Codman, 

G. Endicott, 

F. H. Fairfield, 
C. L. Flint, Jr., 
H. M. Gowdy, 
A. 0. Hall, 



Aggie Griee Club. 
J. L. Hill, 
S. J. Holmes, 

A. Jackson, 

B. A. Kinny, 

W. F. Knowles, Jr., 
F. G. May, 
A. A. Krauss, 

E. C. Luques, 

C. B. Perkins, 
A. Peters, 

R. W. Swan, 

F. P. Taylor, 
C. D. Warner, 
W. M. Wolfe. 




^i-H 



►—It 



'79 G-lee Cliab. 
S, B. Green, First Tenor. R. W. Swan, First Bass. 

H. E. B. Waldron, Second Tenor. W. A. Sl)erman, Second Bass. 



'80 G-lee Club. 
C. M. McQueen, First Tenor. F. E. Gladwin, First Bass. 

W. C. Parker, Second Tenor. A. L. Fowler, Second Bass. 



'81 G-lee CUib. 
A. 0. Hall, First Tenor. W. B. Howe, Second Tenor. 

C. L. Flint, Jr., Second Tenor. F. H. Fairfield, First Bass. 

E. D. Howe, Second Bass. 



'82 G-lee Oliab. 
C. H. Brown, First Tenor. F. S. Allen, First Bass. 

C. D. Warner, Second Tenor. F. P. Taylor, Second Bass. 



# 






^* 



K^i- 



Ei- 



^J-H 




■K-H 



1 



K-if- 



OFFICERS. 

R. W. SWAN, . President. 

H. E. B. WALDRON, '79, Sec. axd Trk.vs., ] 

R. S. DICKINSON, '79, | 

C. M. McQueen, '80, I directors. 

A. D. PERRY, '81, j 

F. N. ABERCROMBIE, '62 J 



Agg:ie Nine. 
W. A. Sherman, Captain, b. 
B. A. Kinny, h. A. L. Fowler, s. 

J. P. McKenna, p. A. 0. Hall, 1. 

F. Codman, a. W. C Brooks, m. 

F. P. Taylor, c. G. D. Allen, r. 



« CLASS NINES. 



'7Q. 
W. A. Sherman,- Captain, p. 
R. W. Swan, h. G. P. Smith, s. 

S. B. Green, a. C. Rudolph, 1. 

R. S. Dickinson, b. R. Storrs, m. 

H. E. B. Waldron, c. E. Baylies, r. 



h-tt 



THE INDEX. 



if-H 



57 



'80. 

A. H. Stone, Captain, h. 
C. M. McQueen, p. A. L. Fowlev, s. 

F. Codman, a. G. Endicott, 1. 

L. Wood, b. F. E. Gladwin, m. 

W. C. Parker, c. G. A. Ripley, r. 



A. D. Perry, h. 
W. C. Brooks, a. 
W. B. Howe, b. 
W. V. (JIark, c. 



'81. 

J. P. McKenna, Captain, p. 

A. 0. Hall, s. 
F. H. Fairfield, 1. 
J. L. Smith, m. 
E. D. Howe, r. 



'82. 



F. P. Taylor, Captain, h. 
B. A. Kinny, p. G. D. Allen, s. 

F. IST. Abercrorabie, a. J. S. Williams, 1. 

A. W. Spalding, b. A. A. Krauss, m. 

S. J. Holmes, c. W. F. Knowles, Jr., r. 



(2 r-,-_ ^ 9, 



it- 



ii-H 



K- it 




OFFICERS. 

A. L. FOWLER, 

R. W. SWAN, 

F. CODMAN, 

A. WHITAKER, . . . . 

F. P. TAYLOR, Secretary and Treasurer. 



PRESrOENT. 



DlliECTOKS. 



A. Whitaker, 

F. P. Taylor, 

G. D: Allen, 

J. J. Delano, 
F. H. Fairfiekl 
W. A. Sherman, 
F. I'. Johnson, 



College Fifteen. 

BACKS. 

F. Codman, Capt., 



HALF BACKS. 



FORWARDS. 



W. B. Howe. 

H. L. Clarke, 
J. S. Williams. 

R. W. Swan, 
A. D. Perry, 
A. A. Krauss, 
W. C. Brooks. 



t 



l^ 



THE INDEX. 



59 



#-H 



FreslirQaii Fifteen. 



H. K. Chase, 



C. E. Beach, 
S. J. Holmes, 



P. S. Allen, 
S. C. Damon, 
A. F. Shiverick, 



BACKS. 

C. W. Floyd, Capt., 

K K Jones. 

HALF BACKS. 

V. L. Wheelock. 

FORWARDS. 



G. F. Currier, 



W. F. Knowles, Jr., 
W. A. Morse, 



A. H. Taylor, 
C. D. Warner, 
A. Leonard. 



-Wt:- 



OFFIOEPtS. 

W. A. SHERMAN, President. 

F. H. FAIRFIELD, Vice President. 

W. C. PARKER, .... Secretary and Treasurer. 

R. W. SWAN, ] 

H. L. CLARKE, ^ Directors. 

A. WHITAKER, J 

Members. 

• All the College. 



Ji- 



■^I-H 



h-ii- 



■ia 



OFFIOEI?,S. 



H. E. B. WALDRON, 
L. WOOD, 
G. ENDICOTT, . 
W. C. PARKER, . 

F. E. GLADWIN, . 
A. H. STONE, . 

G. A. RIPLEY, 



President. 
Secretary. 
Treasurer. 

Directors. 



R. S. Dickinson, 
S. B. Green, 
W. A. Sherman, 



F. Codman, 

G. Endicott, 
A. L. Fowler, 
F. E. Gladwin, 
W. G. Lee, 



Seniors. 

G. Rudolph. 
Juniors. 



G. P Smith, 
R. W. Swan, 
H. E. B. Waldron, 



C. M. McQueen, 
W. C. Parker, ' 
G. A. Ripley, 
A. H. Stone, 
L. Wood. 



K^t 



■i^H 



PROF. BILLY FRAZIER, 



Instructor. 



F. Codnian, 

G. Endicott, 
G. A^. Ripley, 



Miemlbers. 



A. Peters, 
C. W. Floyd, 
H. Myrick. 



W. G. LEE, 'SO, 



Instructor. 



E. S. Chandler, 
J. L. Hills, 
E. D. Howe, 



IVTero-lDers. 



A. A. Krauss, 
W. A. Morse, 
L. R. Taft. 



^l-H 



K- it 



H^t 









♦-ii-g 



At^^ 



^^M* 






^j 



K^f- 



MARY, 
KATE, . 
JOS IE, 
WARNEK, 
WILDER, 
CARR, . 



OFFICERS. 

Presides over the Stove. 

Director of Eooi), ajsD Dispenser of Blushes. 

Kate's Assistaijt. 



Wait on Josie, while the 
Boarders wait for their Plates. 



Refre sliment s . 

We respectfully ask all those interested, to judge of our merits 
to their patronage, by the following list of eatables, which we pub- 
lish for the first time. We will warrant everything to be fully as 
represented. 



Graham Rolls,* 

Butter,** 
Coifee, t 
Steak, ft 



Potatoes, t 
Apple Sauce, tt 
Apple Pie, W 
Beef boiled, 



* We have substituted flour biscuit to prevent the enormous consump- 
tion. ** Slightly rancid, t Coutains a large amount of tannin, ft Rai'e. 
J The potato bugs bit off tlieir noses which accounts for their small size. 
XX We are happy to say that tlie bountiful crop of apples enables us always 
to have this delicious fruit on the table in some form or other. 



K- It 



1 



■ii—* 



THE INDEX. 



6S 



Soups,* 

" Tomato,** 

" Beef, 
OysterSjJ 



Apple Puddiiig.§ 



Soups, Mutton, 

" Italian Paste,t 
Rice Pudding,tt 
Pudding(no name),|$ 



Brown, 

Codman, 

Benson, 

Perkins, 

Rawson, 

Clarke, 

Cochran, 

Jackson, 

Plint, 

Krauss, 

Plumb, 

Fairfield, 

Swan, 

Warner, 

Wilder, 

Com ins, 



Table orator. 

Takes liis pie whole. 

Chemist, filters snakes out of his milk. 

Sweet child, unused to being away from home. 

Takes his soup with dignity. 

Keeps his head in his plate for econom3\ 

Would like to be introduced to Josie. 

Likes game. 

Most graceful eater. 

Sauer. 

Champion blunderbuss. 

His lips are ever open in anticipation. 

Vis-a-vis the post graduate. 

Sits side of Kate. 

Waits to eat. 

Furnishes chin music free gratis. 



* Our soups are made thiu lest the taking of too much solid material 
into the stomach should produce symptoms of Dyspepsia. ** Once in a 
'while, t Lesseus the size of the stomach, ft Adeliciously insipid dish. 
J Owing to our distance from the coast we are unable to obtain them abso- 
lutely free of taint. J J Something purely original with our house. § See 
reference to apple pie. 



«■ 



^^-H 



H-it 



66 



THE INDEX. 



Boynton, 

Allen, 

Carr, 

Abercronibie, 

Hashiguchi. 

Cutter, 

Clay, 

Hail, 

Parsons, 

Wilraartli, 

Perry, 

Brooks, 

Wilcox, 

Whitaker, 

Hills, 

Smith, 

Eipley, 



Uses his own essences. 

Believes in the one-meal-a- day system. 

Waits with politeness. 

Stomach of large capacity. 

Has his chopsticks with him. 

Digestive powers inversely as his height. 

Green as the hills he came from. 

Many words maketh a light stomach. 

vRed at the top. 

Fond of fat. 

Runs to length. 

^ Thick of speech. 

Fond of birds. 

Speak a little louder. 

Barre Plains. 

Stone. 



Aplin, 

Beach, 

Bishop, 

Williams, 

AVindsor, 

Casparian, 

Chandler, 

Willard, 

Gowdy, 



Orts. 

Hilhnan, 

Holmes, 

Joyner, 

Bowman, 

Brodt, 

Livermore, 

Chase, 

Morse, 

Fish, 

Shiverick. 



Taft, 

Thurston, 

Leonard, 

Lindsey, 

Luques, 

Miller, 

Damon, 

Harris, 

Spalding, 




K-it 




■li— < 



Waldroii, 

Sherman, 

Johnson, 

Floyd, 

May, 

Jones, 

Goodale, 

Howe, E. D. 

Howe, W. B. 

Putnam, 

Knowles, 

Howe, C. S. 

Wood, 

Fowler, 



Pass the cake to Sherman.* 
Sits beside a "Chinny" Freshman. 
"I "Gus" and discuss Stock's lectures for 
) benefit of Seniors: "Hire a hall." 
Talks so much he is growing poor. 
Spofford's successor in bean consumption. 
Takes his rations modestly. 
Milk. 
Posts for Butler. 
Chins with learned men occasionally. 
Looks at Mary. 
Maynard, 
Parker, 
McQueen, 
Gladwin. 



Worn out joke. 






■if-H 



►— ii- 



-Vr,- 



'iCKi; 



Smith, 

Wood, 

Sattler, 

Taylor, 

Wolfe, 



Driver — drives for pie.* 

Nigh horse — nigh dead. 

Off horse — off his base.f 

Wagon — holds the load.$ 

Little dog under the table. 



LOAD. 

Soup- 
Ox E^y, Whale Bone, Mock Herring. 

Fish. 

Cross Eyed Herring, Scaled Herring, Blind Herring. 

Roast. 

Chicken — died of old age, Turkey — stuffed with Rubber shoes, 

Gander — a la Goose sauce. Beef — ver}'- muscular. 

Entries. 

Spiders toes, breaded. Locusts, on the half shell, 

Stewed Cat, St. Louis style, Tree Toads, fried and stuffed with mice. 

Pastry. 

Apple Pie, left handed, Rubber Pie, Goodyear's Patent, 

Leather Pie, with buckles. Round shouldered Pie, 

Saw Dust Pudding, a la pine sauce. 

Xjiquids. 

Ice Water, Soft Water, Cold Water, 

Salt Water, Hot Water, Hard Water. 

* Ought to be waited ou flrist. f Since he left the Hash house. { Aud 
asks for more. 



►—if- 



■if-H 



!ak©S^ 



mwi. 




Howe, 
Smith, 



I Successors to Billy and Chit, 

j only one of them goes home to roost. 



Polly, 



Endicott, 



Peters. 



■ii-^ 



h-^ir 



Boynton, 

Myrick, 

Bingham, 

Plumb, 

Spalding, 

Allen. 



Imbibes the juice of the cow. 

My brother taught me how. 

His savory odors come floating through the hall. 

Eats the empty air for food. 

Doing well for his fai'e. 

Best cookist of them all. 



Dickinson, 

Lee, 

Dutton, 

Rudolph, 

McKenna, 

Young, 

Chandler, 

Deuel, 

Kenfield, 

Kingman, 

Stone, 

Hill, 

Wheelock, 

Perkins, 

Porter, 

Allen, 

])oyle. 



[t 



"Left foot, backward, ground, halt." 

Boards with Honey, 

Honey. 

A big shaver. 

Bezenas. 

Walks too far for his age. 

My home is far away. 

Too old to walk. 

Still a Freshman. 

Townie. 

Greenstone. 

I Come from where lovely maidens abound. 

[■ Susie's children. 

Currier. 
Look out for that proboscis some cold winter morning. 






■JJ— < 



Clark, 

Delano, 

Howard,' 



Sun Flower, 
Chili Flower. 
May Flower. 



W. H. C. "My hoiu-is alniosrcome, when I to sulphurous and 
tormenting flames, must render up myself." 

A. A. S. " Let me be no assistant for a state, but keep a farm and 
carters." 

F. S. M. " Words without thoughts never to Heaven go." 

H. C. S. " Stay, give me drink." 

E. S. D. " Is your name Shylock? " 

C. H. B. " If she be black and thereto^have a wit, 

She'll find a white that shall her blackness fit." 

F. L. W. "She never yet was foolish that was fair, 

For even her folly helped her to an heir." 
N. L. L. '' I have seen the day, that, with this arm, and this good 
sword, I have made my way through more impedi- 
ments than twenty times you stop." 
E. C. L. " I am a feather for each wind that blows." 



■JI-H 



72 



THE INDEX. 



E. B. E. " Too noble for this place." 

C. E. B. " Yet nature might have made me as these are." 

C. W. F. " I am that merry wanderer of the night." 

C. L. F. " And the green corn hath rattled, ere his youth attained 

a beard." 
I "Lo we grew together like a double cherry, seeming 
) parted ; but yet a union in partition." 
" I am so dwarfish and so low." 
" I am falser than vows made in wine." 
" He wears his honor in a box unseen." 
" Your face is as a book, where men may read strange 

matters." 
" Tongue, nor heart, cannot conceive, nor name thee." 
^' Ay, in the catalogue ye go for men, a bold one' that 

dare look on that which might appall the Devil." 
"The times bave been, that, when the brains were out, 

the man would die ; but now they rise again." 
"Thou hast no speculation in those eyes which thou 

dost glare with." 
"I am so much a fool, should I stay longer it would be 

my disgrace." 
"And when I ope my lips, let no dog bark." 
" Repair thy wit good youth, or it will fall." 
" What a mental power this eye shoots forth, how big 

imagination moves in this lip." 

C. D. H. " He is a man, setting his fate aside, of comely virtues." 
W. G. L. " For bounty that makes Gods does still mar men." 

F. C. "It is noised, he hath a mass of treasure." 

A. P. " Thou canst not paint a man so bad as is thyself." 

W. C. B. " From all such Devils, good Lord deliver us." 
A. 0. H. "If I be waspish, best beware my sting." 

D. E. P. "'Tis meet, that noble minds keep ever with their like." 
D. H. B. " The wine of life is drawn, and the mere lees is left 

this vault to brag of." 
C. S. P. " You are abused beyond the mark of thought." 

H. M. G. "I will go and seek some ditch wherein to die." 
S. J. H. "His legs bestrid the ocean. " 
C. Iv. K. " I had rather seal my lips, than, to my peril, speak that 

which is not." 



H.E.B.W 


W 


. A 


.S. 


S. 


E. 


c. 


J. 


J. 


D. 


c. 


W 


F. 


F. 


H. 


F. 


B. 


H 




A. 


J. 




C. 


R. 


K. 


J. 


S. 


S. 


H 


c. 


S. 


S. 


B. 


G. 


E. 


D. 


•H. 


F. 


D. 


D. 



K-*t- 



THE INDEX. 



73 



it-H 



W. M. W. 
R. A. C. 



F, P. J. 



E. 


D. 


H. 


W 


. F 


. K 


c. 


E. 




F. 


B. 


L. 


C. 


H. 


B. 


R. 


A. 


C. 


F. 


N. 


A. 


S. 


J. 


H. 


E. 


M. a 



B. F. 



" Pray you, who does the Wolf love? " 

" that you could turn your eyes to the napes of your 

necks and make but an interior view of your good 

selves." 
"You are well understood to be a perfect giber for the 

table." 
" Bid them wash their faces and keep their teeth clean." 
" But I am weaker than a woman's tear.'* 
" And yet he loves himself; is it not strange." 
'• While others fish with craft for great opinion, 1 with 

great truth catch mere simplicity." 
"Now crack thy lungs and split thy brazen pipe." 
" May I, sweet lad}"-, beg a kiss of you." 
" With roo much blood and too little brain." 
" Words, words, mere words, no matter from the heart." 
"Great men may jest with saints; 'tis wit in them; 

but in the less, foul profanation." 
" The tempter or the tempted who sins most." 






Crafts, 
Brodt, Howe, 

Gutter, . . Howard. , 

One of these little wonders has reached the height of four feet 
nine inches and seventy-five one hundredths. Prospects good. 



4J-H 



k.. .2 




^ 




1 


r- -f 


1 




-:l 


t 



>— II 



Beach, 

Bingham, 

Bishop, 

Bowman, 

Brodt, 

Brown, 

Carr, 

Chandler, 

Chandler, 

Clay, 

Cochran, 

Crafts, 

Currier, 

Cutter, 

Delano, 

Deuel, 

Fish, 

Goodale, 

Hashiguichi, 

Hill, 

Holmes, 

Howe, 

Johnson, 

Joyner, 

Lindsey, 

Luques, 

May, 

Morse, 

Plumb, 



Sandy. 

Should leave out the n. 

Without a gown. 

Never shoots. 

Good enough to eat. 

Near black. 

Horse. 

And' soap boilers. 

Retentive, strong. 

But did not catch up. 

Handy. 

And tanner. 

Sharp. 

Chili. 

Never fights. 

Can't swim. 

Don't drink. 

Served cold. 

A little one. 

Sweet home. 

Small he is. 

Knows enough to be his father. 

And carpenter. 

Woolsey. 

Spelled wrong.* 

Talk but please don't. 

Botanical specimen. 

Half ripe. 



* Should be " low cus. 



Rawson, 

Stone, 

Taylor, 

Taylor, 

Thurston, 

Spalding, 



■ii— < 



THE INDEX. 



7S 



Well seasoned. 
A liard one. 

>■ ji of a man^ 

Thirst ever. 
Glue. 



i 



-*^ 



^^ 



K-ffi- 



— ,^,^^ 




El'ii iSHi I uJllllll'iiiniiili lipijie 

^iHl||yiip^p||j^B|| 




Parents should be ver}^ careful about giving their children firearms, 
when they start oif for college, although it is the common opinion 
that pistols are needed in the collei^e outfit. A serious afi'air happened 
here, not long ago, as seen from the above. The little Freshman, 
becoming alarmed, discharged his pistol, the ball passing through the 
door and the partition of the adjoining room and lodging in a pair of 
pants. We might logically prove what the result might have been, 
had the owner been in in the aforesaid pants. The result was however, 
that on the following night, a big boulder came crashing through 
into the room, completely demolishing the door. Damage, $5.00. 
Charge it. 



K-it 



^i-H 



^OW when the days of pleasure and sport werfe all uura- 
^M_ ^J bered and ended, there were gathered together a goodly- 
number of youths, in so much that they chinned among themselves, 
saying, "where shall we abide this night," for there was no room in 
the building, and it came to pass in those days there went out a 
decree from William the Great, that every man should take unto 
niraself a chum. jSTow there was at this time living in No. 6 S. C, a 
Senior, short of stature but goodly to look upon, to him was meted 
out a Freshman, Luke by name, the same did not grow in wisdom 
nor did he find grace in the eyes of the Senior. Now when two 
weeks had already passed the Senior's wrath was kindled within him 
and he bethought himself, saying, " what shall I do that I may rid 
myself of this evil ?" This will I do, I will pull up his carpets and 
cast his furniture from among mine, yea, I will cause him to take up 
his bed and walk, and the thought pleased him so he set himself 
to accomplish the task, and labored till the going down of the sun. 
Now it so happened that there was at this time living in the room 
above a trusty servant of William the Great, David by name, a man 
after his own heart, a man of valor and discretion, one in whom his 
soul delighted and whom he had made ruler over all things from the 
ash pan to the enlightened Senior. Behold while it was yet day 
this same David heard the rumor of a great noise coming from be- 
low, and stirred himself and went down and stood in the door-way, 
and cried with a loud voice, saying, "what do'st thou here, hast thou 
not read the decree, that has been decreed, do'st thou not fear him 
who can read thy character even by the way thou wearest thy hat, 
hast power over all thy future life whether thou shalt prosper in this 



4t 



78 



THE INDEX. 



world or not, yea verily, who can send the hence by his slightest 
breath, dost thou not fear him I say? But why stand ye here idle? 
bestir thyself to make amends for the evil thou hast done, but I will 
have respect to thine age and position, I will give till the going down 
of the morrow's sun to put back all thy Freshman's goods, his furni- 
ture, his carpet, yea all that thou has moved, but woe be to thee oh 
Senior, if when I come thou shalt not have obeyed my commands 
that I commanded thee, it were better for thee if thou hadst never 
been. For I swear by the life of William the Great, that if at my 
coming, everything be not replaced, be it even a tack, thou and thy 
furniture, thy books and everything that that thou hast shall be re- 
moved, that this room that knows thee now shall know thee no more 
forever." And it came to pass when he had made an end of speak- 
ing that the Senior's knees smote one against the other and his tongue 
clove to the roof of his mouth, so that what he would say he could 
not. Now the next day very early in the morning, he rose up even 
while it was yet dark and labored hard and long so that the sweat 
stood out upon him, that it might be well with him, when David 
should again appear, for he feared both William the Great and his 
servant David. Selah. 




ih 



Dickie, 
Sam, 



Endy, 

Mac, 

Billy, 



Hannah, 
The Dog, 
Twenty, 

Pat, 



Baby, 
Aby, 
Hal, 
Penny, 

Casperine, 
Kalamazoo, 
Stuffy, 
Spotty, 
Kentuck, ^ 
Bob, I 



'79. 


• 


Nibsie, 


John Smith, 


Ros, 


Rudy. 


'80. 




Fowl, 


Rip, 


Alma, 


Glad, 


Lewis, 


Coddy. 


'81. 




Pete, ] 
Crazy, J 


Win, 


Elmer, 


Bennie, 


Jack, 


Billy, 


Joe. 


'82. 




Johnnie, 


Smilie, 


Bantam, 


Moses, 


Chili, 


Perk, 


Harry, 


Old Put, 


Hovey, 


Mutual, 


Beans, 


Ip-fi-udi, 


Josie, 


Taffy, 


Hashy, 


Honey, 


Aaron, 


Burke, 


Jack, 


Bob, 


Irrepressible, 


Fred. 



►-Hf- 



* 




This is a Wolf. The Wolf has stolen a cane. The boys do not 
like the Wolf for he has stolen their cane. 



h-ii- 






The commanders of the two opposing forces met on Sunday, Sept. 
7,1878. Stipulations were, drawn up, whereby both armies are 
allowed to carry Canes unmolested on the Sabbath. 

We are to settle all differences by means of Arbitration. No 
more Wae.(?) 



P-rs-ns, 
C-m-ns, 

P-rs-ns, 



" Where did you come from ? " 

" Hades." 

" What, Hades, Massachusetts ! " 



K-ntf~ld, (to other Freshies). "I will teach you a new movement, it 
is called Parade Rest. You come to an about face, only 
you don't about face, and put your hands just so, (illus- 
trates). 

Other Freshies, . "Oh-h-h-h-!" 



P-rry, 
Br-wn, 



'•'Gimme that cane." 
" What yer giving us ? " 



* We were prevented from hearing the remainder of this dialogue, by 
carriage wheels passing over the two actors, but when the dust cleared 
away the Soph, had the cane. 



■ti-H 



%- 



■it-H 



Mt 



Bi'— ks, Tliere is room for improvement in music. 

H-lm-s, His words like Itis body, long, without weight. 

C-m-ns, " If you go home with L— 11- again I'll shoot you." 

R-ynt-n, Phrenologist. 

Ab-rcr-mb-, ■ One of our solid men. 

Cr-fts, Too small to be roasted. 

C-tt-r, The pet of til e family. 

T)-m-n, He went where the woodbine twineth.- 

McK-nn-, Didn't anybody ever tell you, you were a fool? 

Y— ng, Good year for siders. 

J^ — 1, None but himself is his equal. 

D-tt-n, Ignorance is bliss. 

Fl-nt, A name carries the day. 

H-llm-n, An ex-school teacher. 

Wh-t-k-r, . Oh for a foot ball ! 

H-rr-s, "I know nothing about it." 

J-n-s, Takes the eye of the North Amherst Ki. 

Kr— ss, Turns up his nose at everything. 

J'-rt-r, Is going to run a forty-acre Market Garden. 

R-d-lph, Lo, what conceit doth dwell in that form. 

P-t-rs, 01) Endy ! 

Cl-y, Has begun to smoke. 

L-v-rm-r-, Great American Phenomena.* 

♦Seven times mortally wounded; four times scalped; been through 
three Secret Societies ; escaped dangers of fire, flood and field ; and still 
lives to tell the tale. 



>^h 



Ih- 



■it-H 



SCENE 




The Surx^rir-je. 



ii- 



■ll-H 




ii-H 






a) -^ • 



E gladly contribute what we are able, to the perpetua- 
tion of the history of the M. A. C. A yearly schedule 
of events can not but be of interest to all connected with the college. 
Especially must this be the case with those who are to becouie 
connected with the college in future years. 1878 has been a year 
barren in some respects of those occurrences which one would expect 
to find in a college history. 

Farmers institute held at the college. 

Seniors visit tlie United States Armory at Springfield. 

C. F. Coburn delivers the oration at the Boston University 
commencement. 

A. A. Brigliam valedictorian, subject : ''Rizpah." 

C. F. Coburn takes the Totten Military prize and also the first 
prize in Agriculture. 

Whiting Street, among other bequests, left the college $1,000. 

$1,000 was given for the purj;)ose of forming an experimental 
station. An association was formed and the money divided up as 
follows: $500 to test the feasibility of raising Sorghum and manu- 
facturing sugar and syrup from it. $200 to test the nutritive value 
of Corn raised in different sections of the Union. $100 to test the 
purity and germinating power of various seeds. $100 for making 
practical tests with the lycimetre. The remaining $100 to be spent 
in ascertaining the effect of different kinds of green fodder in the 
quality of the butter. 

A lycimetre was put in on the field in front of Prof. Stockbridge's. 

Trustees offer one hundred and fifty scholarships. 



■Ji-H 



K-it- 



86 THEyNDEX. 



Lieut. Totten leaves. 

'82 enters with upwards of eighty men. 

'82 wins the rush with '81, 

Captain Smith acts temporarily as Commandant and is succeeded 
by Lieut. Charles Moi-ris of the 5th U. S. Artillery. 

Grand illumination and bonfire in honor of the election of Gov. 
Talbot. 



■•f^-<^rr>, 






^I {] 



ILI 




1- 



**^ 



^J-H 



►—if- 



►i^^=J^^=-s||. 



xtili^Kw »ti^ Itdmniv] 



TWO COMPANIES. 



Design ATioisr, 



iTifstmctor. 
1st Lt. CHARLES MORRIS, 5th Artillery, U. S. A., 

Professor of Military Science and. Tactics. 



►Ss— ^fN-.^ 



►—it 



K: ^ '■ It-H 



OFFICERS. 



Oomniissioned.. 

Captain, H. E. B. Waldron, ( Cadet, 1st Class). 

LIEUTENANTS, ( CADETS, IST CLASS). 

1st Lieutenant, S. B. Green. 

2nd " W. A. Sherman. 



ISJ'oii-Coiiinaissioiied. 

Quartermaster Sergeant, Lewis Wood, ( Cadet, 2nd Class). 

SERGEANTS, (CADETS, 2nD CLASS). 

A. L. Fowler. 

C. M. McQueen. 

W.C.Parker. 

G. Endicott. 

CORPORALS, ( CADETS, 3rD CLASS). 

F. H. Fairfield. 

A. Whitaker. 

A. D. Perry. 

J. P. McKenna. 

46 Privates. 



1st S 


ergeant. 


2nd 


(I 


3rd 


ii 


4th 


(I 


1st Corporal, 


2nd 


(( 


3rd 


i< 


4th 


a 



n li-H 



OFFICERS. 



Cominissioned. 

Ciiptain, R. W. Swan, (Cadet, 1st Class). 

LIEUTENANTS, ( CADETS IsT CLASS). 

1st Lieutenant, G. P. Sniitli. 



2n(l 



R. S. Dickinson. 



1st S( 


jrgeant. 


2nd 


(( 


3rd 


a 


4tli 


a 


1st Corporal, 


2nd 


a 


3rd 


i( 


4th 


a 



ISToii-Coiniiiissioiied. 

SERGEANTS, ( CADETS, 2nD CLASS). 



CORPORALS, ( CADETS, 3rD CLASS). 



A. H. Stone. 

F. E. Gladwin. 

W. G. Lee. 

G. A. Ripley. 

C. L. Flint, Jr. 

W. V. Clark. 

A. 0. Hall. 

E. D. Howe. 



46 Privates. 



►—If- 




OF THE 



■ih-< 



«» m. 



/A(sm Ijf^ii) EMEMBERING with pleasure our experiences at Camp 

■^M % William Knowlton, upon reassembling this Fall, the 
p ^ • — 
desire was early expressed of renewing the enjoyments of camp life. 

Many difficulties seemed to block the way to the fulfillment of this 
wish. Daily meetings were held to enkindle enthusiasm, and to 
work out some definite plan of operation. After having become 
thoroughly in earnest ourselves, we laid siege to the President, to ob- 
tain his consent and sanction. Here we encountered many objections. 
The people of the state were already looking with displeasure upon 
the extent of the Military influence at the college, this would in- 
crease their distrust ; an expedition of this kind would sadly interfere 
with regular duties, etc., etc. 

Wearied out with waiting, we fell asleep, and w^hile we slept our 
thoughts were woven into a vivid dream. It seemed as if the Presi- 
dent had granted our request and that we were making preparations 
for departure. 

But it must still be a longtime before we could go, for here were 
eighty Freshmen who must be broken into military duties. With 
such incentives before them, however,, they worked with alacrit}'. 
Special drills were instituted and private rooms were turned into 



^^ 



>— It 



92 



THE INDEX. 



drill halls, and such progress made that in a few weeks time, we felt 
that in the eternal fitness of things, we were ready to go into camp. 
As the previous year we had shunned the abodes of men, in pitching 
"our camp, Springfield was now selected as our camp ground. 

What a bustle and confusion of preparation ! what a host of little 
orticles must be looked up and put in readiness ! Then there were 
our military trappings, that must be made spic and s^an ; guns, 
cartridge boxes and bayonets that must be cleaned and burnished. At 
last all was ready, and on the morning of October 10, we fell into 
line in the best spirits. The signal gun was fired and the march to 
the cars commenced. 

At Springfield we pitched camp near a shady grove, just outside 
the city limits. Special squads were detailed to clean up the grounds 
and mark out the limits of the camp. Soon the snowy tent and the 
measured tread of the sentinel indicated to the stranger, that he 
was in the presence of a military camp. In such employment the 
remainder of the day was spent, until darkness brought his blessings 
of rest. But we were in too new and unusual a condition to enjoy 
much sleep. What with mounting sentinels, and the attempts to 
run the guard, sleep was pretty thoroughly banished from camp tliM 
night. 

With day-break came the summons to arise and fall in for soup, 
around the camp-kettle. This was the only whole day we should be 
there. The battallion was formed at 9 A. M., and marched into the 
city, where it was reviewed and inspected by the Mayor. The re- 
mainder of the day was spent in visiting points of interest in the 
city. Especially did we keep our weather-eye open to the object of 
the expedition, and strive to increase our stock of military and 
scientific knowledge. We believe that in this respect, our success is 
full}^ equal to that attending our stay at Camp William Knowl- 
ton. 

Night once more came, but it was not to be undisturbed. Some 
city roughs who had noted our arrival, determined to play a practical 
joke upon the Aggies. During the still small hours, the camp was 



K-it 



THE INDEX. 



93 



■If- 



suddenly awakened, by tlie slirill cry, "Corporal of the guard, post 
No. 1." In wild excitement, the men scrambled for their guns and 
equipments. A detachment was sent out to look into the origin of 
the disturbance. A charge was made on the marauders, who were 
making towards our stores, three or four were captured and taken 
back to the guard tent, and placed under close watch. 

Camp was broken the next morning and we departed with our 
captives, but not till the camp had been christened, "Camp Morris." 
At the depot, we took leave of our prisoners, with many earnest 
wishes that they would not forget us. The train was boarded, and 
camp and camp-life were left behind. Happy were we to be once 
more on our waj' home. Songs and music, made the car resonant, 
and helped to wile away the time. The other passengers might not 
have been favorably impressed by our boisterous mirth. Be that as 
it may, we believed in "a time to laugh and a time to cry," and that 
the present was a suitable occasion to practice the former part of 
this maxim. But the moment was fast approaching when the time 
"to cry" would be at hand. We were bounding along at a rapid 
rate, when just ahead, a freight train came in sight, the distance 
was too short for either train to slacken its speed, and with one 
dreadful crash, they came together. Music and song ceased, and 
thought and action alike died away. 

'Twas all a dream. Imagination had been busily at work in the 
drowsy body, but this fatal termination of the story could not be 
borne in quietness; the limbs once more obeyed the will, and sense 
returned. The car was transformed into a bed-room; the collision 
'had occurred between a window and a rock. And now with shiver- 
ing limbs, the idle dreamer was investigating the damage, and 
meditating upon " how vain a delusion " had been preying upon 
him. 

Suffice it to say, that although our attempts to go on a military 
expedition, have failed this Fall, still it is our earnest hope, that 



-I f J 



►—It- 



94 



THE INDEX. 



ill the sunny days of the coming Spring, our Commandant will 
allow us to realize some of these visions of the night. 




»— »■ 



(3 , 



SI 



^^Hl't-^F^^^^ 



OF THE 



^J-H 



■CILIilClLXl 



*ar 



egi 






^I-H 



>—ii — • ■ —n 



President. 
E. H. Libby, '74. 

Vice Presidents. 
L. A. Sparrow, '71, E. E. Woodman, '74, 

E. N. Dyer, '72, J. W. Clay, '75, 

D. P. Penhallow, '73. J. E. Boot, '76, 

J. R. Hibbard, '77. 

Corresponding Secretary. 

S. T. Mayiiard, '72. 

Recording Secretary. 
P. M. Harwood, '75. 

Treasurer. 

A. A. Soutbwick, '75. 

Executive Committee. 

S. T. Maynard, '72, A. A. Soutbwick, '75, 

P. M. Harwood, '75, L. A. Nichols, '71, 

H. Hague, '75. 

Auditing Committee. 

H. Lyman, '74, E. B. Bragg, '75, 

H. Kendall, ' 76. 



h-ih 



ii—^ 



PREAMBLE. 



[Plll|HE Alumni of the Massachusetts Agricultural College 
I herebj'- constitute themselves as an association, to be known 



by the name of the Associate Alumni of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural college ; and do ordain and establish this constitution. 

CONSTITUTION. 
Article I- 

OBJECT. 

The object of this association shall be to promote, in every proper 
way, the interests of the college, to cultivate among the graduates a 
sentiment of mutual regard, and to promote and strengthen their 
attachment to their Alma Mater. 

Article II. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

All graduates of this college, upon whom a regular degree has 
been conferred, thereby will become members of this association on 
payment of the sum of one dollar, ($1.00). All members of the 
Faculty of this college are honorary members of this association. 
Article III.. 

OFFICERS. 

Sec. 1. The officers of this association shall consist of a Presi- 
dent, one Vice President from each graduated class, a Corresponding 
Secretary, a Recording Secretary, a Treasurer, an Executive Com- 
mittee, consisting of five members, and an Auditing Committee of 
three members. 

Sec. 2. These officers shall be elected annually at the regular 
meeting of the Association, and shall continue in office one year 
from and after their election, or until their successors are chosen. 

13 

k 1 : i. 



v-lt- 



98 



THE INDEX. 



Sec. 3. The President shall be chosen by a majjority of the votes 
of all the members present. Each class shall elect the Vice Presi- 
dent to which it is entitled. The Corresponding Secretary, the 
Recording Secretary, and the Treasurer shall be elected, each by a 
majority of the votes of all the members present. Of the Executive 
Committee, the Corresponding Secretary of the association shall be 
ex-officio Secretary, the Treasurer of the association shall be ex- 
officio Treasurer, and the other members shall be elected at one bal- 
lot, the two receiving the highest number of votes to be chosen. 

Sec. 4. The officers of this association are charged with the 
duties, and entitled to the rights and privileges, which belong b}' 
general consent and parliamentary custom to tlieir respective offices. 

In the absence of the President, the right and duty of a Vice 
President to assume the position of President sliall be according to 
the seniority of the classes to which the Vice Presidents belong. 

The Corresponding Secretary shall keep a classified list of the 
members of the association and their post office addresses; shall 
notify each member elected to an office of the new board of officers, 
and shall send to each member a notification of all meetings and 
exercises to take place under the auspices of the association. 

Amendment. The Treasurer of this association shall collect all 
monies due the association, and pay out the same as may be directed 
by the association or its IJxecutive Committee. The Treasurer of 
each class shall be constituted an Assistant Treasurer of the associ- 
tion, and shall collect all monies due the association from their respec- 
tive classes, and pay the same over to the Treasurer of the association. 

Article IV. 

MEETINGS. 

Sec. 1. This association shall meet annually, during Commence- 
ment week, previous to the graduating exercises, at such time and 
place as the President shall a^ppoint. 

Sec. 2. Special meetings may be called at the option of the 
Executive Committee with the concurrence of the President. 

Sec. 3. At all meetings, the members present shall constitute a 
quorum. 



K-lf- 



■il-H 



THE INDEX. 



99 



Article V. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Any proposition to alter or amend this Constitution, or to adopt 
any By Laws or Standing Rules, must be made at a regular meeting, 
and require the assent of two-thirds of the members present for its 
adoption. 

BY-LAWS. 

No. 1. The order of exercises at each regular meeting shall be 
as follows : 

(a). The Secretary shall ascertain the names of the members 
present by roll call. 

(b). Reading of the minutes of the last meeting and report of 
the Secretary. 

(c). Report of the Treasurer and referred to the Auditing Com- 



mittee. 

(d). 

(9)- 
(h). 



Report of Executive Committee. 
Report of the Auditing Committee. 
Reports of Special Committees. 
Miscellaneous business. 
Election of officers. 



No. 2. Each graduate of the college shall pay into the treasury, 
upon becoming a member of the association, the sum of one dollar, 
($1.00), and in case the amount thus paid into the treasury be in- 
sufficient to cover the expenses and liabilities of the current year, 
the Executive Committee shall levy an additional tax, to be paid, on 
demand, to the Treasurer. 



-*?5= 



5-i-^+' 



■If-H 



THE FUTURE. 




LMA Mater ! dear to the heart of the Alumnus are the 
^^ memories associated with the name : never from his mind 



can the recollections of his college career be eifaced ; and in living 
over again the days passed at the old college home he is led to muse 
upon its future, and with interest rekindled, resolve that no lack of 
support on his part shall detract from the glory of his loved Alma 
Mater. 

Students, it is by you that our college is to be judged and her 
future will be largely what you make it; the time rapidly approaches 
when you will leave her hospitable walls, and take your places in 
the niche, long waiting, for men educated in the science of agricul- 
ture, able to read understandingly the books of nature. Now is the 
time for preparation, neglect it not. 

Though financial causes have necessitated a reduction in the corps 
of instructors, remember that the institution is in the hands of those 
who have your, and its greatest good at heart, and that they feel the 
loss as deeply as you, and will surely fill the vacancies in the Facul- 
ty at the earliest practicable moment. Whatever may be your per- 
sonal estimate of a professor's proficiency in his department., re- 
member that he received the instruction he seeks to impart to you, 
while you were still under the maternal care ; and may, except in 
rare instances, be supposed qualified to teach you. The Faculty 
are sowing the seed, if your preparation was sufiScient, and your cul- 



■it- 



^^H 



THE INDEX. 



101 



tivation is thorough, there are abundant harvests in store for you. 
Undergraduates, see to it that you so repay the fostering care of 
Alma Mater, that in after years she may not only never be asliamed 
of your relationship to her, but may be pi-oud of her sons. 

Alumni of the M. A. C, the time will come when the mantles of 
the present officers of the college will fall on you ; already two of 
your members are connected with the institution as instructors. 
None are so well acquainted with the resources, needs .and possibili- 
ties of our college as we, and surely, no one can be more interested 
in its success; it is therefore not only our right, to be represented on 
the Board of Trustees, but the welfare of the college demands it, 
the present members, have been surrounded with difficulties almost 
insurmountable ; their duties have been arduous, yet'too often thank- 
lessly received, in some instances their self sacrificing interest in 
the college commands oiir highest praise ; yet the greatest success of 
the institution can only be secured through the concerted action of 
the Alumni and Trustees ; such action can best be secured through 
Alumni representation on the Board. The time has already arrived, 
when vacancies should be tilled from our number; bear this fact in 
mind, that when called upon to select a guardian for our Alma Mater 
the best man, the one having the deepest interest in her success, and 
best able to carry his, and our ideas into force, may be chosen. 

There are rumors, and we fear not groundless ones, that the Presi- 
dent who has presided over the affairs of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College from its infancy, is about to leave us; should the 
rumors result in facts, where can a successor be found V Alumni this is 
a question deeply interesting to you, give it the thought its impor- 
tance demands, for on its successful solution may depend the future 
weal or woe of our cherished institution. 

The Trustees have -generously granted a free scholarship to each 
Alumnus, and thus to a certain extent placed the responsibility for the 
welfare of our Alma Mater upon us, and events have already 
proved the wisdom of this course; nobly have the Alumni responded 
to this call for a manifestation of their interest in the college, and 
as a result, the class of '82 is nearly double the size of any predeces- 
sor. The complaint can uo longer be made, that there is no call for 



^i-H 



■If- 



102 



THE INDEX. 



the institution ; that farmers' sons refuse to enter its halls, or that it 
fails in its object, and does not educate farmers. Fully twenty-five 
per cent, of its graduates are actively engaged on the farm, while 
others are occupied with such kindred pursuits, as teaching agricul- 
ture, or editing agricultural papers; and many others will eventually 
return to the farm to put into practice the knowledge acquired at the 
M. A. C. In view of these facts it is possible that the college may 
soon ask the Legislature to place the farmers' institution on a firm 
basis, that it may be self-supporting while furnishing free tuition to 
the young men of Massachusetts. If such action should be crowned 
with success, the Alumni must see that two so important chairs as 
those of Veterinary, and Mental Science be reestablished. 

" Our College" has experienced botli cloud and sunshine; but we 
believe that it has demonstrated its worth, that the public appre- 
ciates the work it has accomplished, and recognizes the fact that it 
supplies a need long felt, till now never satisfied; that the Massa- 
chusetts College of Agriculture is worthy of the old " Bay State." 

The maroon and white, the emblem of ''an institution which 
teaches young men how to feed themselves, and how to defend them- 
selves," must ever wave triumphant. 

Alumnus. 




^ 



WAMSTICS, 



Fax'm.ei'S. 



li—i 



NAMES. 



CLASS. 



ADDRESS. 



John Bellamy, 
W. H. Blanch ard. 
Charles Brewer, 
A. A. Brigham, 
F. G. Campbell, 

E. P. Chandler, 

D. 0. Chickering, 
J..W. Clay, 

F. C. Cowles, 
H. L. Cowles. 

E. A. Ellsworth, 
I. H. Esterbrook, 
C. 0. Flagg, 

P. M. Harwood, 

F. St. C. Herrick, 
J. K Hibbard, 

J. A. Hobbs, 
H. a H. Koch, 
J. F. Hunt, 
L. K. Lee, 
W. S. Leland, 
C. E. Lyman, 
H. Lyman, 
A. H. Montague, 
A. D. Norcross, 
Geo. E. Nye, 



'76, 

'74, 
'77, 
'78, 
'75, 
'74, 
'76, 
'75, 
'7'2, 
'71, 
'71, 
'72, 
'72, 
'75, 
'71, 
'77, 
'74, 
'78, 
'78, 
'75, 
'73, 
'78, 
'74, 
'74, 
'71, 
'77, 



BrooMine.'" 

Putney, Vt. 

Pelham. 

Marlboro. 

West Westminster., Vt. 

Abiline, Kan. 

Enfield. 

Westminster, Vt. 

IXadley. 

Amherst. 

Northampton . 

Diamond Hill, R. I. 

Bar re. 

Methuen. 

Chester, Vt. 

Bloomington, Neh. 

Holstein, Germany. 

Amherst. 

Perth, N. Y. 

Sherhorn . 

Mkldlefield, Conn. 

South Hadley. 

Monson. 

Sandwich. 



■It-H 



K-if- 



104 



THE INDEX. 



NAMES. 



CLASS. 



ADDRESS. 



J. B. Page, 
C. H. Phelps, 
H. L. Phelps, 
W. H. Porter, 
R. Porto, 
P. H. Rice, 
J. M. Sears, 
H. B. Simpson, 
G. H. Snow, 
J. E. Southmayd, 
A. A. South wick. 
G. P. Urner, 
J. Wynifin, i 
H. McK. Zeller, 



'71, 

'76, 
'74, 
'76, 

'77, 
'75, 
'76, 
'73, 

'72, 
'77, 
'75, 
'76, 

'77, 
'74, 



Conway. 

South Framingham. 

Southampton. 

Hatfield. 

Para, Brazil. 

Chicago, 111. 

Ashfield. 

Centreville, Ind. 

Leominster. 

Minneapolis., Minn. 

Ag'l Col., Amherst. 

Woodbridge, N. J. 

Arlington. 

Hagerstown, Md. 



Civil Ens-ineert^ 



NAMES. 



CLASS. 



ADDRESS. 



L. B. Caswell, 
a. E. Fuller, 
R. W. Lyman. 
J. H. Morse, 
L. A. Nichols. 
G. P. Strickland, 
S. C. Thompson, 
G. H. Tucker, 
F. W. Wood, 



'71, 

'72, 
'71, 
'71, 
'71, 
'71, 
'72, 
'71, 
'73, 



AtJwl. 

Greenfield. 

Northampton . 

Salem. 

Chelsea. 

Amesbury. 

Natick. 

West Springfield. Pa. 

Providence, R. I. 



NAMES 



jVCiscellaneo^is. 



CLASS. 



RESIDENCE. 



BUSINESS. 



Agent 
Adams' Express Co, 



G. H. Allen, '71, Leave^iworth, Kan., 

D. A. Bagley, '76, Winchendon, Medical Student 

J. F. Barrett, '75, Boston, Dealer in Fertilizers 



t 



■tl-H 





THE 


INDEX. 


lOS 


NAMES. 


CLASS. 


RESIDENCE. 


BUSINESS. 


J. A. Barri, 


'75, 


Cambridgeport, 


Banker. 


A. L. Bassett, 


'71, 


New York City, 


Clerk. 
V. C. R. R. & S. 8. Co. 


B. C. Bell, 


'72, 


Bakersfield, CaL, 


Druggist. 


J. M. Benedict, 


'74, 


SpringjieM., 


Produce Dealer. 


D. H. Benson, 


'77, 


Amherst, 


Janitor, M. A. C. 


W. P. Birnie, 


'Tl, 


Springfield, Conductor on Railroad. 


W. H. Bowker, 


'71, 


Boston, Dealer in Fertilizers. 


E. B. Bragg, 


'75, 


Boston, 


Chemist. 


W. ¥. Brett, 


'72, 


Fall River, 


Merchant. 


W. P. Brooks, 


'75, 


Sapporo, Japan, 


Prof, of Agriculture, 
and Farm Supt. Ag'l Collei^e. 


D. E. Baker, 


'78, 


FranMin, 


Teacher. 


M. Bunker, 


'75, 


Neio York City, Dealer in Fertilizers. 


T. E. Callender, 


'75, 


Athol, 


Horticulturist. 


E. C. Choate, 


'78, 


Cambridge, 


No business. 


J. W. Clark, 


'72, 


Amherst, Nurseryman, Ag'l College. 


X. Y. Clark, 


'78, 


San Francisco, Ca 


L, Teacher. 


C. F. Coburn, 


'78, 


Lowell, 


Assistant Editor 
Lowell Daily Citizen. 


J. C. Cutter, 


'72, 


Warren, 


Physician. 


C. F. Deuel, 


'76, 


Amherst, 


Druggist. 


G. R. Dodge, 


'75, 


Boston, Dealer in Fertilizers. 


E. N. Dyer, 


'72, 


North Weymouth, 


Teacher. 


F. C. Eldred, 


'73, 


New York City, 


Insurance Agent, 


J. F. Fisher, 


'71, 


Fitchburg , CI e rk Fi tch bu rg R. R . 


E. R. Fisk, 


'72, 


Philadelphia, Penn 


., Merchant. 


S. D. Foot, 


'78, 


Springfield, 


No business. 


R. B. Grover, 


'72, 


Andover, Th 


eological. Student. 


G. W. M. Guild, 


'76, 


Lawrence, 


Merchant. 


H. Hague, 


'75, 


Manville, R. I., 


Minister. 


F. W. Hawley, 


'71, 


Springfield, 


Produce Dealer. 


J. M. Hawley, 


'76, 


Berlin, Wis., 


Banker's Clerk. 


D. G. Hitchcock, 


'U, 


Warren, 


Merchant. 


J. N. Hall, 


'78, 


Revere, 


Medical Student. 


L. L. Holmes, 


'72, 


Mattapoisett, 


Lawyer. 


C. S. Howe, 


'78, 


Amherst, 


Post Graduate. 


W. V. Howe, 


'77, 


Framingham, 


Manufacturer. 


H. F. Hubbard, 


'78, 


Netv Rochelle, N. 


Y., No business. 


H. Kendall, 


'76, 


Providence, R. L, 


Chemist. 



^i-H 



K- it- 



106 



THE INDEX. 



NAMES. 



CLASS. 



KESIDENCE, 



BUSINESS. 



F. E. Kimball, 
W. H. Knapp, 
T. H. Ladd, 

G. Leonard, 
E. -H. Libbj, 

H. W. Livermore, 
C. 0. Lovell, 
A. H. Lyman, 

E. W. Lyman, 
G. Mackie, 

G. H. Mann, 
W. E. Martin, 
S. T. Maynard, • 
C. W. McConnell, 
W. A. McLeod, 

C. Mead, 

G. M. Miles, 
G. W. Mills, 
J. B. Minor, 
H. E. Morey, 
H. P. Otis, 

F. H. Osgood, 
H. F. Parker, 

G. A. Parker, 
G. L. Parker, 
Wm. R. Peabody, 

D. P. Penhallow, 
W. S. Potter, 

J. B. Renshaw, 
S. H. Richmond, 
J. E. Root, 
W. D. Russell, 
F. B. Salisbury, 
J. M. Sears, 

E. D. Shaw, 

F. S. Smith, 
T. E. Smith, 



'72, 

'75, 

'76, 

'71, 

'74, 

'72, 

'78, 

'73, 

'71, 

'72, 

'76. 

'76, 

'72, 

'76, 

'76, 

'71, 

'75, 

'73, 

'73, 

'73, 

'75, 

'78, 

'77, 

'76, 

'76, 

'72, 

'73, 

'7j6, 

'73, 

'71, 

'76, 

'71, 

'72, 

'76, 

'72, 

'74, 

'76, 



Worcester, Clerk B. B. & G. R. R. 

South Orange, 'Horticulturist. 

Boston, Student of Mechanics. 

Springfield, Lawyer. 

New York, Editor Am. Agriculturist- 



Lawyer- 

Photographer. 

Physician. 

l-aw Student, 
Boston University. 

Physician. 
Manufacturer. 
Law Student. 



Toledo, Ohio, 
Amherst, 
Westhampton, 
Boston, 
Attleborough, 
Sharon, 

Ann Arbor, Mich,, 
Amherst, 

Woonsocket, R. I., Medical Student. 
Boston, 

Baltimore, Md 
Tongue River, Mont. 
Medford, 

New Britain, Conn., 
Europe, 
Leeds, 

Edinburgh, Scotland, 
WJiitinsville, 



Y., 



Coal Merchant. 

Cliief Clerlv 
• 5 Q. D„ U. S. A. 

Physician. 

Clerk Union 
Manufactm'lng Co. 

Traveling. 

Manufacturer. 

Vet, Student. 

Macliinist. 

Gardener, 
Vassar College. 

Florist. 



Poughkeepsie, N. 

Bost07i, 

Atchison, Kan., 

Sapporo, Japan, 

La Fayette, Lid., 

Oberli7t, 0., Theological Studeut. 

Tio'^fntl Prof, of Peninanship at FVench's Business 



Prof. Chem'i and Botany Ag'l. 
College. 

Grain Broker. 



Barre, 

Turner's Falls, 
Diamond Fields, S. 
Ashfield, 
Chicopee, 
Hampden, 



Teacher. 

Chemist. 

Africa, Clerk. 

Teacher. 

Florist. 

Wool Dealer. 



West Chesterfield, Prof, of Elocution. 



h-it- 



•If-H 



THE INDEX. 



107 



NAMES. 



CLASS. 



RESIDENCE. 



BUSINESS. 



F. M. Somers, '72, 

L. A. Sparrow, '71, 

A. L. Spofford, '78, 

H. E. Stockbridge, '78, 

C. A. Taft, '76, 

E. E. Thompson, '71, 

F. Tuckerman, '78, 
A. T. Wakefield, '73, 
W. C. Ware, '71, 
S. S. Warner, '73, 
J. H. Washburn, '78, 
J. H. Webb, '73, 
C. Wellington, '73, 
H. Wells, '72, 
H. a Whetmore, '76, 
W. Wheeler, '71, 
F. Le P. Whitney, '71, 
J. E. Williams, '76, 
J. F. Winchester, '75, 
R. P. Woodbury, '78, 
E. E. Woodman, '74, 



Kansas City, Mo., 
Boston, 
Georgetown, 
Amherst, 
WhitinsviUe, 
Brockton, 



Editor. 

Chemist., 

Medical Student. 

Post Graduate. 

Machinist. 

Druggist. 



Tunhridge Wells, Eng., No business. 
Peoria, III., Physician. 

Boston, Clothier. 

Northampton, Dealer in Fertilizers. 
West Bridgewater, Teacher. 

New Haven, Conn., Attorney-at-Law. 
Washington, D. C.', '"'"''^'V^^nLtt''''''- 
Rochester, N. Y., Clerk. 

New York City, Medical Student. 

Sapporo, Japan, Prof.omathematics 

Boston, Architect. 

Amherst, Editor. 

Lawrence, Veterinary Surgeon. 

Norwalk, Conn.., 
Jersey City, Florist. 






^f-H 



"li,- 






a) 



Farmers, 

Civil Engineers, 

Miscellaneous, 

Total, 



40. 

9. 

98. 

147. 




^^ 



H-it- 



hHi- 



1878-9. 



Second Term, begins 

Vacation, 

Third Term, 

Vacation, 

First Term, 

Vacation, 

Examinations, 

Farnsworth Prize Declamations, 
Grinnell Prize, 
Graduation Day, 



Dec. 12, 


1878. 


March 12, 


'79. 


March 27, 


'79. 


June 25, 


'79. 


Aug. 28, 


'79. 


Nov.- 25, 


'79. 


( June 24, 


'79. 


< and 




( Aug. 28, 


'79. 


June 23, 


'79. 


June 24, 


'79 


June 25, 


'79 




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112 



THE INDEX. 




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J. J. VINCENT, D. M. D., 

D^ K M T 1 S T* 

Graduate of Harvard Deutal College. 

Ktlier, Nitrous Oxide and Kai-cotic Spray administered 'wlieii desii'ed. 

ESTABLISHED 1843. 

PrmcUcatores etphilosopld, 
Puhlici homines et oratores^ 
Curate dentibus vestrfs. 



A GOOD LINE OF THE ABOVE WITH 

Cigarettes, Cigarette and Cigar Holders, 

PIPES, Etc., Etc., 

Ctin lj(j found at No. 7 PlIGENIX ROAV, 

C H A R L E; 8 PE U E L, 

Physicians' Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

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DEVLIN & CO., 

LEADING FINE CLOTHING, 

Broad wiLj', CoriK^r (Inind Stn^^t, 

]^rf)adway, C'oriiei' Warrc^ii Street, 

. NEW YORK. 



Our stock contains at all times the 
Choicest Variety of Fine Clothing for Men 
and Boys, and piece goods for custom 
orders. 

I IN VARIETY, 

STYLE and 

CHEE^PISrESS, 

p. O. BOX 2256, NEW YORK. 



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ASSORTMENT OF 



Mens' Ladies' Misses' and Childrens' 



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To be found in Western Massaeliusetts, at 

FAY'S ONE PRICE STORE, 

382 Main Street, 

Springfield, - JVIass., 

AND 
DWIGHT STREET, 



EDWIN NELSON, 

Successor to J. S. & C. Adams, House Established 1826, 

DEALER IN 

Classical and Miscellaneous Books. 

College Text Books — uew and second-hand. School Books and 

Stationery, Foreign and Domestic Paper Hangings, 

and Fancy Goods. 

3d Door South Post Office, - Amherst, Mass. 

MAIN STREET DINING ROOMS, 

FRANK P, WOOD, Proprietor, 

Meals at all hoiii'8 of the Day and Evening-, 

Served to Order. 

Special attention given to catering for class and society suppers. 



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DRY G^OODS 

AND 

Gents' Furnishing Goods, 

AT 

'. T, W. SLOAN, 

DEALER IN 

Ladies' and Gents' Custom WonK. 

No. 2 Phoenix How, - Amherst, Mass. 



DEALKR TX 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, JEWELRY, 

Fine Pocket Cutlery, Silver and Plated Ware, 

OPTICAL GOODS, CANES, BASE BALLS AND FANCY GOODS. 
Repairiug neatly aud promptly doue. Hair Jewelry made to order. 

No. 4 Post Office E-ow, - Amherst, Mass, 
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BOWKER'S 



AMMOHIATED- 



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I ^-D OORS A^D OUT. 



A fertilizer, almost entirely solii'ble in water, 

free from odor, and as clean as 

sng'ar to handle. 



It is made expressly for flowers growu in the liouse or garden. It con- 
tains nearly the same plant-food as stable dressing, and produces the same 
results, without giving off in the room that offensive and unhealthy odor 
whidi arises from the application of stable dressing. It produces a 
healthy, luxuriant growth, and induces early and generous flowering, and 
cannot in any way harm the plants if applied according to directions, 
which are very simple, and accompany each package. No lady who de- 
lights in flowers, and likes to see them do well and bloom abundantly, 
should be without the "Ammoniated Food." A table-spoonful dissolved 
iu a gallon of water is a sufficient quantity for twenty ordinary plants like 
geraniums, applied once a week for three or four weeks; after that, not 
oftener than once a month. Trial packages sent by mail, post paid 25 

CENTS. * 

-V^. H. BO"W^K:Ert & OO; 

43 Chatham Street, BOSTON ; 3 Park Place, NEW YORK; 21 No. Water 
Street, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

OLIYER D. HUNT, 

DEALER IN 



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OFFICE, HUNTS STOVE STORE, 
Amherst, - - Mass. 



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Livery and Feed Stable, 



HACKS, CARRYALLS, 



T El .^ im: s. 

To Let at Fair Prices. 

Sd(ion]ir(odk,tioi|^ foi' Tfan^ient Speeding. 

REAR OF PHOENIX ROW. 

^mLerst, - ]Sd^ass. 



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PROPRIETOR. 



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^HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 



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A^ _Ev TC _E ©5 



SHPtXJBS, S:]S/I^^nL.]_. inptXJITS, 



PLANTS, FLOWERS, 

Plain and Fancy Flower Pots 



Send for Prices to 



S. T. MAYNARD, or JOHN W. CLARK. 



O. G. COUCH, 



DEALER IN 



Choice Cigars, Tobaccos, 

In Their Season, 



ab 



"Pratt's Astral," "Pratt's Radiant," and Common Oil. 

(Jans left in the Reading Room will be called for, filled and re- 
turned the same day. 



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THE MOST FOR YOUR MONEY! 

Ever}' man wants his money to ,ii,o as far as possible, and will usually 
buy his Clothing where he can get 

THE BEST STYLE, 

THE BEST FIT, 

THE BEST MADE. 
For the least money. Ilaynes & Co., think they are prepared to do all 
this, either on tine Ready-made (which they make themselves) or on Cus- 
tom-made garments, and we refer with pleasure to their many patrons 
l)oth in the city and neighboring towns to verify the statement. 
When in the city please look over our stock and satisfy yourself. 



324 MAIN STREET, 



SPEINGFIELD, MASS. 



Or 



MARSH & YOUNG/ 

MAKE A SPECIALTY OF 



BOOK GASES, BLACKING CASES, DESKS, 

CURTAINS, PICTURE FRAMES, CORD, ETC., 

Constantly on liancl at Lo^\^ Prices. 



Pleasant Street, 



Amherst, Mass. 



J, ]VI. ^V^A^ITE & SON, 



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AND DEALERS IN" 



Hats, Caps, Furs, Trunks, Bags and Gents' Furnishing Goods. 

Here may be found the largest assortment in town of the latest and 
most nobby styles. Liberal discounts made to clubs ou all large sales. 
Silk hats renovated at short notice. Students, please call and ex- 
amine before purchasing elsewhere. 

Agents for Amherst Laundry. Goods called for Mondays. 

SIGN OF THE GOLDEN HAT. 

No. 5 PHOBNIX ROW, - AMHERST, MASS. 



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Permanent Photographs in Carbon. 



J. L. LOYELL, 



A ^m V Jl V W Am im. JT JIIL J^ A^ I 

^mlierst, ]VIass. 

Has, had nearly twenty years experience as Class Photographer. 
Correspondence Solicited. We invite the attention of Students, es- 
pecially, to the Porcelains and Transparencies made by the 

CARBON PROCESS. 



Job Printer and Stationer. 



AMHERST. 



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Ifo. 3 Palmer's Itlock. 



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The undersigned would respectfully ask all who 
have fine work to be done to give him a call. 
Engraving upon wood for newspaper and book illus- 
trations done promptly and accurately. Specimens 
of work can be seen in the Index. 

Designs for engraving executed from a verbal 
description. 



Mass. x\gl College. 



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PARK'&TILFORD'S IMPORTED CIGARS, 

di^kfette^ of tl\e f^o|)ulki' ©fkiid^, 



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JL W JU» ^ta. lU HJ W9 
FOK SALE AT 



HENRY ADAMS' DRUO STORE, 

ISTo. 1 Phoenis: R.oa^, Amlierst, Mass. 

J. F. PERKINS. 

PAPER HANGING AND GRAINING. 

White Lead, Oil, Yarnisli, Mixed Paint, Kalsomine and Glass. 

Shop, Basement of Building occupied by A. F. Cowles & Co., 
10 1-2 Phoenix EoW. 



LIVERY & SALES STABLE. 

Omnibuses, Wacks, Double Sj Single 
To Let at Reasonable Rates. 

W. E. STEBBINS, - Proprietor. 



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DEALERS m 

Furnaces, Steam Heating 

AND VENTILATING APPARATUS, 

Cooking and Heating Stoves, 

Win Wurj^^ Vt^il^t te^rje^ 

Coal Hods and Japaned Ware, Drain Pipe and Land Tile, 

PUMPS, BATH TUBS, ETC. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Tin, Sheet Iron and Copper Ware. 

Special attention given to 

Jobbiiig and Repairing. 

DON'T FORGET THE PLACE. 

Dickinson & Lee, 

No, 3 PLEASANT STREET. 

STTJnDElsrTSI 

Your attention is invited to the fact that I am selliuff 







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AT OREATLY REDUCED PRICES. 

No Humlbug-, Prices Are Dcwn. 
CALL AlSrn EXAIVCINE MY STOCK. 



B. H. WILLIAMS, 



Cutler's Block. 



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MASSACHUSETTS 



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Amherst, IVEass. 



The Massachusetts Agiucultuhal CoLLErrE has been in successful 
op^eration since lSfi7. The studeuts reside on the Colleg-e farm, which is 
beautifully situated in the town of Amherst, about three miles from the 
Connecticut river, and contains nearly four hundred acres. The course of 
study and trainini*' contiimes four years, special at/tention l)eing given to 
Agriculture, Hoi-ticulture, Veterinary Medicine, Chennstry, Botany, and 
Civil Engineering. Graduates receive the Degree of Bachelor of Science 
from the College, the Diploma bearing the signature of the Governor of 
tlie State, and those who desire it may also take a corresponding diploma 
from Bostou University. The expenses are moderate, and the education 
thorough and practical. For a copy of the Fifteenth Annual Report, con- 
taining scientific papers of interest, and full particulars concerning the 
Institution, address ' 

W. S. CLARK, Pkesident. 



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DATE DUE 





































































































UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
LIBRARY 

I LD 
3 234 

n25 

' v.lO 
1880 
cop. 2 
+