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Full text of "Index"

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This set of yearbooks luas compiled 
by the staff of the 1967 Massachu- 
setts Index and donated in the 
interest of paying tribute to those 
ivho have created the history and 
traditions existing at the University 
of Massachusetts. 

Alexander Dean, Editor-in-chief 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/index1882univ 



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HENRY ADAMS, Phar. D, 




liSil M.jMM-l'iSllSiJOljl.r 



DRUGS, MEDICINES, PERFUMERY, 



AND 



Toilot ^^I'tioles^. 



Park and Tilford's I reported Cigars, 



CIGARETTES OF THE POPULAR BRANDS, 



SMOKING TOBACCO, &e. 



No. 1, Phoenix Row, 



AMHERST, MASS, 



m^ 



fFANt 



if^W>1>-tO their 



., Jewelers, Union 

iquare^.a^ew i orK| City, invite atten- 

%riclge movement 

Stem Winding Watches in 18 carat 

gold hunting cases at One Hundred 

Dollars each. 

They are carefully finished in every 

particular, adjusted to heat and cold, 

and are confidently guaranteed as the 

I best value for the money attained in 

a watch. 

Correspondence invited. 

Address, 

TIFFANY & CO., 

New York. 



DEVLIN & CO., 



F I N E O 



CLOTHING 



Ready Made and to Order. 



BROADWAY AND WARKEN ST., 

« 

NEW YORK. 



CHARLES DEUEL, 



Imported and Domestic Cigars, Fancy and Toilet Articles, 
Sponges. Brushes &c. 



Amherst House Drug" Store, 



Amherst, Mass. 



GEORGE CUTLER, 

Offers for sale the largest stock in town of % 

Hats and Gaps and Table Linens. 

CHOICE FAMILY GROCERIES A SPECIALTY. I 



J. J. VINCENT, D. M. D., 



GRADUATE OF HARVARD DENTAL COLLEGE. 



Ether, Nitrous Oxide, and Narcotic Spray administered when desired. 



Established 1843. 

Py'oedicatores et pliilosoplii, 
Puhlici homines et oratores, 
Curate dentibus vestris. 



Palmer's Block, 



AMHERST, MASS. 











Hon. H. F. French, 1S64-6. Hon. P. H. Chadbourne, 1866-7. 

Coi.. W. .S. Ci.ARK, 1867-79. Hon. C. L. Flint, 1879-80. 

Hon. Le\i .Stockhridgh, 1880. 



Presidents Mass, Ag'l College, 



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Hon. C. ( 

IDCK. tS8o. 



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Vol. XII. 



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No. 1 



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PQBItl^pED BY 



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1880. 



CX- 






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EDITOR IN CHIEF, BUSINESS EDITOR. 



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B. Ji. KIJVINEY. 



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HE first volume of the Index was published in 1869. 
It was simply a thin pamphlet of twenty-eight pages, 
containing in a very compact form some of the more 
important facts of the college. Since that time its 

publication has become a marked feature of the Junior 

year. 

From the efforts of different classes to surpass their pre- 
decessors, the Index, indeed, has become an index of valua- 
ble information. Former editors have seemingly followed one 
beaten track ; and while we may adopt the general plan of 
all college productions of this kind, we shall, however, 
depart as far as possible from the idea of a borrowed model, 
and yet make the Index what a college publication should 
be. Heretofore the cuts have been= of wood and poorly 
desigrvid, but you will notice a costly artotype of the presi- 
dents of the college; also, one of '82 class fountain — the 
description of which is minutely given on another page — and 
many other cuts of equal importance, and carefully prepared. 
The past year has gone by very quietly. Under the lead- 
ership of Fres. Stockbridge things have progressed with 
anything but too much life. Some improvements have been 
made. — The buildings received a coat of paint during summer 
vacation, and tar walks were laid about the grounds ; but the 
** college in general has not been kept up to that standard 
which should dignify a State institution. While we look at 
the way in which some things are managed, we do not wholly 



I 



- blame our President. He is under the watchful eye of a 

i board of trustees who work ignorantly against the college ; 

£ but we do think, that, with a little extra effort, his influence 

I might be felt more keenly. 
At the opening of the present college year we expected a 

I large Freshman class ; but our expectations were far from 

i; being realized when less than a score of freshmen unfurled 

i the banner of '84. Why the applications for admission were 

i 

? so few we cannot say positively, but probably it was largely 

I due to a lack of advertising. There are free scholarships, 

f and no state college can boast of a more practical and scien- 

i, tific course than is laid down in the catalogue of our Insti- 
tution ; but the community at large are unacquainted with the 

; fact. If a little more money was expended in this direction, 

I we think the college would be in a better condition. 

f^ The standard, too, has always been too low. Candidates 

!• for admission should, at least, be obliged to pass an examina- 

[ tion in all those studies which compose the curriculum of the 

t freshman year. The general discipline, also, has been sadly 

I neglected. Hazing has become a nuisance, and church going 

I is confined to a few. Again, that respect which is due to 

I chapel exercises should be observed more strictly by the 

I students, and enforced by the Faculty. The applause and 

^. wild demonstrations during oratorical exercises are uncalled 
for and have become — more than out of place. ♦ 

The farm is under fair management, but greater returns 
might be realized, and greater improvement made. The 

? horticultural department, under the supervision of Prof. 

I Maynard, is constantly improving. The Professor has an 

I eye for natural as well as artistic beauty, and the plant house 

I and adjoining grounds have become a place of pleasure and 

I interest I0 all, as well as a source of profit. 

I What the college needs most is an experimental station. >* i 

I It is well known that no person is more capable of directing 

'^ such a work than Prof. Goessmann. His extensive knowledge 



I 



10 



I 



of chemistry, wide experience, and implicit confidence which 
scientific men place in his decisions, amply fit him for such a 
position. The common people need to become better 
acquainted with natural laws, and the State should appropri- 
ate a sum sufficient to defray the expenses of such a depart- 
ment, in order that the community at large may have the 
benefit of experimental knowledge. We hope the day is not 
far distant when the name Agricultural College will be asso- [' 
ciated with that of an experimental station. | 

The military' department, under the command of Lt. Morris, 
is a success. While some few have manifested signs ol dis- 
satisfaction from the first, the majority of cadets deem him 
a competent instructor, and have ever found him friendly and 
obliging. It is expected that the close of the present year 
will terminate his stay at M. A. C. We can only wish him 
success, and hope that in the future his efforts may be appre- a 
ciated by others as they have certainly be„en by the corps of 
cadets. 

We are glad to see Prof. Goodell in his accustomed place. 
At one time it was thought that his health would not per- 
mit him to attend to his duties. His many friends at Amherst 
very much desired that he should leave New England and 
spend a year in the West ; so much so did they deem it nec- 
cessary, that several professors at Amherst College volunta- 
rily offered to do his work and allow Prof. Goodell his whole 
salary during his absence. During the summer the Profes- 
sor made his home in the Adirondacks, returning with a sun- 
burned face and an apparent healthy look, but far from being 
restored to perfect health. While we dislike very much to 
lose for a season the instruction of so valuable a teachei", we 
would not be so entirely given to selfishness as to induce him 
to stay a moment at M. A. C. if there is the least danger of 
greater impairment of his health, but most willingly would 
bid him go. 

Owing to the pressure of work, the interest formerly taken 



11 



in college sports is hardly kept up. The foot and base ball 
I teams have not participated in any match games this season, 
I while the rifle club has seemingly forgotten its former popu- 
1 larity. Bicycling, however, has become almost a mania, and 
I we trust the interest will not lessen until the crowning point 
is reached. Several prizes have already been given at the 
recent fairs in favor of the college, and we hope the time 
will soon come when the heroes of Ingleside may envy the 
laurels won by the Aggie wheel club. 

We are sorry to state that one of the editors, Mr. Kinney, 
was prostrated by sickness soon after his election, conse- 

\ quently was unable to perform his part of the work, and 
many of the imperfections of the present issue are doubtless 

IJ due to his absence. 

[' We now send forth the Index with an earnest hope that 

I those following us will endeavor to raise its standard and 
i further its interests* Of its merits say little: its defects over- 

i^ look. Some of the cuts illustrate the varied scenes of college 

I 

I life, while others show the flight of imagination. Some may 

I find themselves portrayed in a style '• unique in itself," but it 
is done with the kindest feelings toward all and disrespect to 
none. And to you, classmates, who have stood by us in our 
efforts, we sincerely hope the Index of '82 will be a memento 
worth keeping; that in after years it may serve to recall 

I pleasant experiences and happy associations formed at 
M. A. C. 




12 



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13 



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MEMBERS EX-OFFICIIS: 
His Excellency, JOHN D. LONG. 

Hon. LEVI STOCKBRIDGE, 

President of College. 

JOHN E. RUSSELL, Esq., 
Secretary Board of Agriculture. 

^HoN. J. W. DICKINSON, 
Secretary Board of Education. 



MEMBERS BY ELECTION : 

Hon. MARSHALL P. WILDER, Boston. 

Hon. CHARLES G. DAVIS, Plymouth. 

HENRY COLT, Esq., Pittsfield. 

PHINEAS STEDMAN, Esq., Chicopbe. 

JAMES S. GRINNELL, Esq., Greenfield. 

GEORGE NO YES, Esq., Boston. 

Hon. DANIEL NEEDHAM, . . . . . . . Groton. 

Hon. WILLIAM KNOWLTON, Upton. 

Hon. JOHN CUMMINGS, Woburn. 

WILLIAM WHEELER, Esq., Concord. 

O. B. HADWEN, Esq., Worcester. 

BEN J. P. WARE, Esq., Marblehead. 

JAMES H. DEMOND, Esq., Northampton, 



14 



§)oceci4^iH'V^i2y Soi^H/i/Ht/ttee. 



Pres. LEVI STOCKBRIDGE. HENRY COLT, Esq. ; 

Hon. WILLIAM KNOWLTON. PHINEAS STEDMAN, Esq. 

O. B. HADWEN, Esq. 



SECRETARY. 
Hon. CHARLES L. FLINT, Boston. 

AUDITOR. 
HENRY COLT, Esq., Pittsfield. 

TREASURER. 
Hon. JOHN CUMMINGS, Woburn. 

BOARD OF OVERSEERS. 
THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 



EXAMINING COMMITTEE OF OVERSEERS. 

JOHN P. LYNDE. JOHN F. BROWN. 

JOHN B. MOORE. AVERY P. SLADE. 

E. F. BOWDITCH. 



15 



S]^ei4i^'C''e^^ ol ^ho^ ^.ciouttu. 



Hon. LEVI STOCKBRIDGE, 
President and Professor of Agriculture. 



HENRY H. GOODELL, M. A., 
Professor of Modern Languages. 

CHARLES A. GOESSMANN, Ph. D. 
Professor of Chemistry. 



WILLIAM B. GRAVES, M. A., 
Professor of Physics and Civil Engineering. 

SAMUEL T. MAYNARD, B. S., 
Professor of Botany and Horticulture. 



CHARLES MORRIS, 1st Liecjt. 5th Artillery, U. S. A., 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 



JOHN P. WINCHESTER, V. S., 
Lecturer on Veterinary Science and Practice. 



JOHN TYLER, A. M., 
Lecturer on Geology and Biology. 

J. W. CLARK, B. S., 

Superintendent of Nurseries. 



16 



W^o^'Uyyiy ^^^yiiv^z^-yiUA^. 



^tviivd't^c^itu (^oiiyi^cil. 



"WILLIAM F. WARREN, S. T. D., LL. D. 
President. 

JAMES E. LATIMER, S. T. D., 
Dean of the School of Theology. 

EDMUND H. BENNETT, LL. D., 
Dean of the School of Law. 

I. TISDALE TALBOTT, M, D., 
Dean of the School of Medicine. 

JOHN W. LINDSAY, S. T. D., 
Dean of the College of Liberal Arts. 

EBEN TOURJEE, Mus. D., 
Dean of the College of Music. 

HojJ. LEVI STOCKBRIDGE, 
President of Mass. Agricultural College. 



Ill 





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(Bla:>^ (Bo^M44i^u4^ic<^Uon^. 



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19 



( 

^ 


















• 


^ P 












V 










• 


'SI. 




- 






OFFICERS. 






C. L. FLINT, 




President. 










J. L. HILLS, 




Vice-President. 






^- 




H. H. WILCOX, 




Secretary. 










A. PETERS, 




Treasurer. 










E. B. RAWSON, 




Historian. 










A. WHITAKER, 




Class Captain. 










NAMES. 




residences. 


rooms. 






Bowman, Charles Abel 




Billerica, Mr. 


Bangs'. 






Boynton, Charles Enoch 




Groveland, No. 


38 S. 


C. 






Chapin, Henry Edgarton 




Springfield, 


29 S. 


c. 






Carr, Walter Frank 




Clinton, 


22 S. 


c. 






Fairfield, Frank Hamilton 




Walthani, 


14 S. 


c. 






Flint, Charles Louis, Jr. 




Boston, 


14 S. 


c. 






Hashiguchi, Boonzo, 




Tokio, Japan, D. G. K 


. House. 






Hills, Joseph Lawrence 




Boston, 


7S. 


c. 






Howe, Elmer Dwlght 




Marlboro, 


17 N. 


c. 






Peters, Austin 




Boston, 


10 S. 


c. 






Rawson, Edward Briggs 




Brooklyn, D. G. K 


House. I 






Smith, Hiram Fred. Markley 




North Hadley, 


2.5 N. 


c. 






Spalding, Abel Walter 




Billerica, 


5N. 


c. 






Taylor, Frederick Patterson 




Boston, 


18 S. 


c. 






Whitaker, Arthur 




Needham, 


21 S. 


c. 






Wilcox, Henry Harrison 




Naivilili, H. L . D. G. K 


House. i 






TOTAL, 




16. 










LEFT 










COLLEGE FROM '81. 






Bissell, C. H. 




Howe, W. B. 










Brooks, W. C. 




« McKenna, J. P. 








Bouncore, L. 




Perry, A. D. 










Clark, W. V. 




Sattler,'H. C. 










Courtney,' M. 




Smith, B. S. 










HaU, A. O. 


Yovmg, 


Wood, W. 
C. E. 












2C 















|HREE stages of our journey are passed and we are flying rapidly 
on to the fourth. Some of our number, perhaps, have already map- 
ped out their future course through life ; others have only decided 
upon the general direction in which they wish to advance, and have not 
yet chosen the roads by which they shall attain their object ; and some, 
again, are eagerly watching for the finger post which shall point to their 
ideal, still ignorant of the direction in which they are to travel. 

Let us hope that all may journey on, ever nearing but never reaching 
the goal for which they strive. 

As the time approaches for us to leave our Alma Mater and seek new 
means of progression, we begin to appreciate the advantages we have ex- 
perienced under her care and direction. And to many of us, the thought 
that we are so nearly through our course brings a shadow of regret for the 
pleasant realities which, so soon, shall become recollections. 

We have few changes to note in the afEairs of our college. The most 
important, and yet that which came most naturally, was the appointment 
of our new President. We had been so long aecustomed to look upon our 
senior professor as the chief of the powers that be, that when he became 
in name what he had been in reality, no one felt that a change had taken 
place. But the effects of his indefatigable energy, as applied to economy 
and improvement, are felt more and more every day. 

The return of one of our professors to the duties* which we feared he 
would be unable to perform for some time, is truly a cause of rejoicing. 
We are glad to be once more hard at work under his skillful direction. 



21 



Sincere thanks are due to another member of the faculty through whose 
disinterested efforts we are enabled to continue our mathematical studies 
beyond the prescribed limits of the course. Although but a few of us find 
time to improve this opportunity, the class recognize and appreciate the 
kindness of its author. 

And here, too, we might express our share of the universal joy caused by 
the evidences now seen, of our genial Doctor's determination to stand by us. 
Surely, if students can be found, the faculty will do their share toward 
making the college worthy of the Commonwealth whose name shei bears- 

But while our minds are busy with thoughts of the past and future, we 
must not forget the present. And this we would offer to our successors as 
the" best advice we know : Do willingly the duty of the moment, and then, 
as the future becomes the present, its difficulties will be met and overcome, 
one by one ; and as the present slips away into the irrevocable past, it will 
bear with it no regrets for the things which might have been. r. 




gs 



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a<><!v. 



'S^. 



" Setnel et Sitnul." 

OFFICERS. 

E. P. BINGHAM, President. 

J. W. COOPER, . . . . Vice-President. 

F. H. JOYNER Secretary. 

A. P. SHIVERICK, . . . , Treasurer. 

H. S. BRODT, Historian. 

H. L. WHEELER, . . . Class Captain. 



NAMES. 



residences. 



Allen, Francis Sherwin 


Medfield, 


No 


29 S. C. 


Aplin, George Thomas 


East Putney, Vt. 




25 S. C. 


Beach, Charles Edward 


Hartford, Conn. 




25 S. C. 


Bingham, Eugene Percival 


Fitchburg 




19 S. C. 


Bishop, William Herbert 


Diamond Hill, R. I., 




21 N. C. 


Brodt, Harry Snowden, 


Dansville, N. Y., 




5S. C. 


Chandler, Everett Sawyer, 


Coldwater, Mich., Mrs. 


Chandler's. 


Cooper, James WiUard 


East Bridgeiuater, 


No 


24 S. C. 


Cutter, John Ashburton. 


Boston, 




13 N. C. 


Damon, Samuel Chester 


Lancaster, 




11 S. C. 


Fish, Charles Sumner 


Boston, 




4S. C. 


Floyd, Charles Walter ' 


Boston, 




18 S. C. 


Goodale, David 


Marlboro, 




10 S. C. 


Hillman, Charles Dexter 


Hardwick, 




9S. C. 


Howard, Joseph Henry 


Hyannis, 




5S. C. 


Howe, George Dickinson 


North Hadley, 




25 N. C. 


Jones, Frank Waldo, 


South Scituate, 




8N. C. 



33 



Joyner, Frank Hall 
Kingman, Morris Bird 
Kinney, Burton Ariel 
May, Frederick Goddard 
Morse, William Austin 
Myriok, Herbert 
Paige, Jannes Breckenridge 
Perkins, Dana Edson 
Plumb, Charles Sumner 
Shiverick, Asa Frank 
Stone, Wiuthrop Ellsworth 
Taft, Levi Rawson 
Taylor, Alfred Howland 
Thurston, Wilbur Herbert 
Warner, Clarence Duane 
Wheeler, Henry Lewis 
Wilder, John Enaery 
Williams, James Stoddard 
Walmarth, Frederick Augustus 
Windsor, Joseph Libbey 

Total, . . . 



North Egremont, 

Amherst, 

Lowell 

Boston, 

Boston, 

Concord, 

Prescott. 

Lynn, 

Westfield, 

Woods Holl, 

Amherst, 

Mendon, 

Yarm outliport, 

Upton, 

Granby, 

Great Barrington, 

Lancaster, 

Glastonbury, Conn. 

Upton, 

Grafton, 



LEFT COLLEGE FROM '82. 



D. a K. House. 

Ml". Kingman's. 

No. 5 N. C. 

6S. C. 

7S. C. 

25 S. C. 

13 S. C. 

33 S. C. 

13 S. C. 

D. G. K. House. 

Mr. Stone's. 

No. 19 S. C. 

D. G. K. House. 

No. 9 S. C. 

D. G. K. House. 

No. 21 S. C. 

11 S. C. 

9N. C. 

Mr. Bassett's. 

No. 20 S. C. 

37. 



Abercrombie, F. N. 
Allen, G. D. 
Browa, C. H. 
Casparian, G. 
Chandler, W. M. 
Chdfee, H. K. 
Clarke, H. L. 
Clay, C. M. 
Cochran, R. A. Jr. 
Cummins, W. H. 
Crafts, G. E. 
Currier, G. F. 



Delano, J. J. 
Duel, F. D. 
Dutton, C. K. 
Gowdy, H. M. 
Harris, L. L. 
Hill, C. H. 
Holmes, S. J. 
Jackson, A. 
Johnson, P. P. 
Jones, E. S. 
Kenfleld, C. R. 
Knowles, W. P., Jr. 
Krauss, A. A. 



Leonard, A. 
Lindsey, P. B. 
Livermore, N. L. 
Luques, E. C. 
Meade, W. G. 
Miller, W. E. 
Parsons, H. A. 
Perkins, C. B. 
Porter, R. L. 
Putnam, H. A. 
Smith, H. R. 
Wheelock, W. L. 



24 









^IJ^HE clock that beats out the passing time for us has passed over 
^^ two long years since we stood on the threshold of our college 
2g^P^ life. But as we look back and glance over them, we find that 
their value cannot be over estimated. The experience we have passed 
tlirough, and our contact with the world, has been of as much benefit, per- 
haps, as the knowledge gained from books. At the present time we find 
ourselves on the border of that dark mysterious cloud that overhangs the 
last half of oar college life, and as it lifts we are having gradually unfolded 
before us, let us hope, a year that shall be fraught with happiness ; one 
that shall increase our mental faculties, preparing us the better to fight 
life's battles ; and one that we can look back upon with pleasant recollec- 
tions, and remember as containing some of the most delightful of our 
younger days. 

Our vacation, short though it may have seeihed to many, prepared us for 
the severer work of our course. We have come back ready to do our 
work well, and while we will share in, and fully sympathize with that 
strain handed down by tradition : 

" In Junior year we take our ease, 
■ Smoke our pipes and sing our glees," 

we cannot help feeling that for us the thoughts are out of place. For we 

find that increased labor has been mapped out for us, and our earnest 

advice to the lower classes is not to rely too much on the future, but to 

strive that they may be better able to grasp this part of their college life. 

During the first half of our course, many pleasant scenes and exciting 

events passed before us, the honor of originating many of which, we 

humbly lay claim to. And in putting aside our Sophmore sports, for the 

dignity so natural to a Junior, we feared that our successors could not 

equal us, and that the days of noisy college life had gone never to return. 



25 



But lately, rumors m warfare have readied our ears! The two lower classes 
are engaged in a conflict ! Canes are the weapons used, and the hedges on 
the road to the village are the scenes of great struggles! Judging from this 
our fears may have been groundless. 

Among the many improvements which we notice, is that change in our 
college duties, which allows us to do manual labor in the Horticultural 
Department. Anyone would prefer to work among grape vines and peach 
trees, or have their labor laid out for them in the orchards during Septem- 
ber, rather than spend their time in general work on the farm. And yet, 
not content with this advance, many of us are selfish enough to be antici- 
pating that time when class work, as far as we are concerned, shall be a 
thing of the past. 

And now, as the college bell is slowly but surely ringing out the hours 
that will return no more, as its daily calls remind us that we are here for 
mental development, let us glance for a moment into the future. To many, 
perhaps, the darkness that enshrouds it is impenetrable, to others, dim rays 
of light may now be illuminating its horizon, while to some their future 
paths may already be lighted by the rising sun. In either case, let us 
finish our course, with a view to be led on to our proper sphere, hoping to 
do our duty, and with the sincerest intentions to make the world better 
through our efforts. In this way, we shall be able to fulfill the designs of 
our Creator ; by this course we shall be able to reflect honor upon ourselves 
and upon our Alma Mater, and be able to take our stand among her most 
cherished and devoted sons. B 




Sopln 



0'1140't-C/ 



'83. 



OFFICERS. 



i-^ 



-a^y:^. 



C. H. PRESTOK, 
F. H. FLETCHER, 
H. J. WHEELER, 
S. M. HOLMAN, 
C. W. MINOTT, 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 

Historian. 

Class Captain. 



residences. 



Bagley, Sidney Currier 
Bishop, Edgar Allen 
Conger, Charles Thompson 
Fletcher, Frank Howard 
Hevia, Alfred Armand 
Holmau, Samuel Morey 
Lindsey, Joseph Bridges 
Minott, Charles Walter 
Nourse, David Oliver 
Owen, Henry Willard 
Preston, Charles Henry 
Selden, John Lincoln 
Wheeler, Homer Jay 
Total, . 



Boston, 


No. 8 N. C 


Diamond Hill, R, I., 


21 N. C 


New York City, 


21 N, C 


Town send, 


27 S. C 


Havana, Cuba, 


3S. C 


A ttleborough. 


28 ]sr. c. 


Marblehead, 


14 K C 


Westminster, 


22 S. C. 


Bolton, 


12 S. C 


Amherst, 


Mr. Owen's. 


Danvers, 


No. 27 S. C. 


Ashfield, 


12 S. C 


Bolton, 


12 S. C. 



LEFT COLLEGE FROM '83. 



13. 



Chapin, J. D. H. 
Manton, W. J. 



Smith, W. E. 
Tryon, C. O. 



37 



■'83. 



a. 



L pl^EFORE we are aware of it, our pleasant sunamer vacation has 
T M 9 passed and we have entered once more into another fall term, 
^ with all its attendant duties and pleasures, the former of which 
far outnumber the latter, although, as we have grown a year older, we have 
gradually found that duties really contain more pleasure than we at first 
imagined. 

As we glance back over our first year, it reminds us of what we often 
see at the close of a summer's day ; the entire west seems to be enveloped 
in a dark cloud, and as we gaze the horizon is suddenly illumined by a 
blinding sheet of lightning, which brings to view objects which before 
were invisible. So it was with our first year. When we entered, our lives 
were. comparatively dark, as far as knowledge was concerned, and our first 
year was but a grand lighting up of our minds, which enabled us to see 
things M4iich before were as dark and impenetrable as Vesuvius itself. 

With this mental illumination came also the power which enables us to 
find pleasure and instruction at times and in places where others might 
find neither. While others may pass flowers by unheeded and unnoticed, 
we immediately think of their structure and how wonderfully nature has 
developed each different part ; so, too, the rocks and boulders, scattered 
over oar hills, convey no idea of their origin to many, while to us they are 
like a library of the most interesting books, telling us not of the present 
or future, but of ages and ages ago, when our earth was in its primitive 
stage and unknown to man. And if in one year we have learned to enjoy 
so much more of life, what must we enjoy during a life-time of steadily 
increasing knowledge. 



38 



Now in this mental illumination we saw, just peering over the horizon, 
what seemed to be ashadaw of our old selves, with rough, ragged edges, 
which had never been worn off by contact with grave professors and reck- 
less Sophomores, and as the shadow became plainer we saw that it was the 
class of "84. And this class, like all Freshman classes, thought itself 
superior to everything and everybody, but how soon it found out its mis- 
take ! To begin with, it was not superior to force, especially the force of 
a battering-ram ; and how motherly we tucked them into bed, in order 
that they might sleep well, and gave them nourishment in the form of 
milk. 

During the course of our first year we lost many of our classmates whom 
we still remember and whose loss we mourn. Now we have commenced 
our second year's work, and with our hands and hearts in our studies, let 
us be able to say, "knowledge is power." h. 




S9 



GFr^:>-^141/CH4^ (B^<>^. 



OFFICERS: 

E. W. DWIGHT, 

L. SMITH, .... 

GEORGE CUTLER, Jr., . 

E. A. JONES, . 

W. P. MAYO, . 

H. D. HOLLAND, . 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 

Historian. 

Class Captain. 



RESIDENCES. 



ROOMS. 



Braune, Henrique Domingos 

Brown, Henry Clinton 

Cutler, George, Jr. 

Dickinson, Howard Wilmot 

Dwight, *Edwin Wells 

Goessmann, Henry Edward Victor 

Herms, Charles 

Holland, Harry Dickinson 

Jones, Elisha Adams 

Kenfield, Charles Robert 

Lublin, Alfred 

Mayo, Walter Park«r 

Redding, Merton J. 

Smith, Llewellyn 

Smith, William Henderson 

Smith, William Ratcliflfe, 

Total, . . . . 



No7-a Fibur, Brazil, 
Pittsfield, 
Amherst, 
Amherst, 
Pittsfield, 
Amherst, 
Louisville, Ky., 
Amherst, 
Rockville, 
Amherst, 
New York City, 
Wellesley, 
Amherst, 
A m,herst, 
Amherst, 
Amherst, 



No. 24 S. C. 

12 N. C. 

ION. C. 

34 N. C. 

8 S. C. 

Prof. Goessmann's. 

No. 29 N. C. 

6N. C. 

8S. C. 

6N. C 

2N. C. 

24 N. C. 

Mr. Redding's. 

Mrs. Smith's. 

Mr. Smith's. 

Mr. Smith's. 

16 



30 





ONORED Seniors, friendly Juniors, and motherly Sophomores, 
we, the Class of '84, greet you ! And are glad and proud to 
3 (^^ have the opportunity of so doing, in this, our first communica- 
cation to the Index. 

That we are Freshmen we know ; yet we honor the name of '84 ! Our 
chief disappointment is our small number, but occasional additions are 
being received, and even now we can say that we are by no means the 
smallest class, though the youngest in years and college experience. 

The motherly reception which we met at the hands of the Class of '83, 
we highly appreciate. We do not fear the Senior or the Junior, though 
we respect them ; but if we do not fear the Sophomores, we think " discre- 
tion the better part of valor," generally, in dealing with them. But some- 
times there are exceptions to this rule. So it was one evening as we were 
set upon by them by surprise, on our way back from town, their object 
being to snatch our canes. But their frantic efforts availed them naught, 
for the grasp of the Freshman defied them, and we carried our canes in 
triumph to the college, while the Sophomores slunk ofi to their rooms and 
were seen no more that night. 



31 



The next and more important event thus far in our course was the rush, 
when we were formed in solid phalanx by the friendly Juniors and by 
them instructed in the tug of war. Did we falter ? No ! But with set 
teeth and a determination to win or die, awaited the onset. At the word 
" Forward," we started, slow but sure, as did our adversaries also. We 
met, there was a crash, and among mingled cheers for '83 and '84, we suc- 
ceeded in pushing back the Sophomores, breaking their ranks, and so gained 
the victory. 

But the term advances, and by the time this meets the reader's eye, we 
shall have completed the first portion of^^our Freshman year. Our relations 
with the Faculty have thus far been pleasant and agreeable ; the studies 
which were at first so hard for our untutored minds are gradually becom- 
ing easier, and our college days brighter and more pleasant. May they ever 
continue so to do. M. 




83 






RESIDENCE. 



ROOM. 



Stone, Almon Humphrey 



Phillipston , 



No. 9 N. C. 



i pcciaE 114/ ^ho^vni-ytz^u. 



RESIDENCE. 



Lovell, Henry Lyman, A. M. 



AmJierst. 



\U')4^yf^i<:i'tM^ 



n- 



Seniors, . 
Juniors, . 
Sophomores, . 
Freshmen, 
Post Graduate, 
Special, 



16 
37 
13 
16 
1 
1 



Total, 



84 



33 



^t:^^> I- i >:a^rt^ 



r^'^^'^^^k 



iiviioz^ Qppoii4.l>^He4i.t"i^. 



, . . President. 

RAWSON, . . Historian. 

WARNER, Poet. 

HILLS, ' . . . . Prophet. 

HASHIGUCHI, Prophet's Prophet. 

HOWE, Orator. 

WILCOX, . . . TOASTMASTER. 

FLINT, . . . . . . . . . . . Odist. 



-^^^-l^.|^3^^.^^^^H^^i.^.^-4-^ 



84 



# 








Jci.5<5aO'fvt-K5-e'tt<5' ^azd^^uttui^at ©ol-Ccae. 



» t>=^ -# >=^t 4 



35 



[ii'^mz-ai &fui<:i4A.i^yCvU^<yn. 



COMMANDANT AND INSTRUCTOR. 
1st Lieut. CHAS. MORRIS, 5th Art., U. S. A., Prof. Mil. Science & Tactics. 



COMMISSIONED STAFF. 



assistant instructors, artillery and infantry. 
C. L. FLINT, Jr., Cadet, Captain and Adjutant. 
J. L. HILLS, Cadet, 1st Lieut, and Quartermaster. 



NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 



J. E. WILDER, Cadet, 
S. C. DAMON, Cadet, 



Sergeant-Major. 
Quartermaster Sergeant. 



£ni 



<}Z-Zd-<:> 



1) 



e* 



vuvn c^ot p.> 



?^ 



Cadet C. E. BEACH, . 
" W. F. CARR, 
" A. W. SPAULDING, 
" S. C. BAGLEY, 



Drum Major. 
Cadet F. W. JONES. 
J. B. PAIGE. 
" W. R. SMITH. 



Soloi^ GllCltb. 



Cadet C. D. WARNER, . . . Color Sergeant, National Colors. 

" W. H. BISHOP, . . . Color Sergeant, State Colors. 

" A. A. HEVIA, 1st Corporal, Colors. 

E. A. BISHOP, 2d 

D. O. NOURSE 3d 

C. H. PRESTON, ...... 4th 

H. J. WHEELER, 5th 

" C. W. MINOTT, 6th " 



36 



S^^fa^^xttu 0^ aa4^i z a t' 1 014 . 



Mass. Agricultural College.— Corps of Cadets. 
Staff and Commissioned Officers chosen from Senior Class. 
Non-Commissioned Staff and Sergeants chosen from Junior Class. 
Color Sergeants chosen from the Junior Class. 
Corporals chosen from the Sophomore Class. 

COMMANDANT AND INSTRUCTOR. 
1st Lieut. CHARLES MORRIS, 5th Art., U. S. A., Prof. Mil. Science & Tac. 

COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

C. L. FLINT, Jr., Cadet Captain and Adjutant. 

J. L. HILLS, Cadet 1st Lieut and Quartermaster. 

NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

J. E. WILDER Cadet Sergeant Major. 

S. C. DAMON, Cadet Quartermaster Sergeant. 

(Do. ^. 

Cadet Captain, E. D. Howe. 

" 1st Lieutenant, F. H. Fairfield. 

"2d " . . E. B. Rawson. 

" 1st Sergeant, • . . . B. A. Kinney. 

"2d " A. H. Taylor. 

"3d " . D. Goodale. 

" 4th " J. S. Williams. 

" 5th " W. H. Thurston. 

" 1st Corporal,. A. A. He via. 

"2d " ■ • . D. O. NouRSE. 

"3d " H. J. Wheeler. 

" 4th " S. C. Bagley. 

<DOo 33. 

Cadet Captain, A. Whitaker. 

" IstLieutenahl, . H. H. Wilcox. 

• " 2d " A. Peters. 

" 1st Sergeant, F. P. Taylor. 

"2d " F. Gr. May. 

"3d " CD. HiLLMAN. 

" 4th " . . . . A. F. Shiverick. 

" 5th " J. L. Windsor. 

" 1st Corporal, E. A. Bishop. 

"2d " C. H. Preston. 

"3d. " C. W. MiNOTT. 

" 4th " F. H. Fletcher. 



37 



*£lt^ti l/l'ei: t i '5) G tcic \\ \ \\ c lit. 



JL.IGS-HL'X IS^OrTJfflJaY. 



First Lieut. CHARLES MORRIS, 
COMMANDANT AND INSTRUCTOR. 

Cadets of the Senior Class, 
ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS. 

CANNONEERS, Cadets of the Junior and Sophomore Classes. 



^^i3EEia I>J3a^^<DIB[^XIBKT. 



First. Lieut. CHARLES MORRIS, 
COMMANDANT AND INSTRUCTOR. 

Cadets of the Senior Class, 
ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS. 

DETACHMENT, Cadets of the Junior and Sophomore Classes. 



]!vroiffiTrA.iffi ir}itaTA.ciEiM:iH:r^''j[:'- 



Pirst Lieut. CHARLES MORRIS, 
COMMADANT AND INSTRUCTOR. 

Cadets of the Senior Class, 
ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS. 

CANNONEERS, Cadets of the Junior Class. 
38 



s. 




Founded in 1868. 



40 




:^ i(Tl 



^' • 



ALEPH CHAPTER. 



SENIORS. 



B. Hashiguchi, 
E. B. Rawson, 

C. D. Warner, 



C. E. Beach, 
C. W. Floyd, 

F. H. JOYNER, 



H. H. Wilcox. 
JUNIORS. 



J. L. Hills, 
P. P. Taylor, 
A. Whitaker, 



A. F. Shiverick, 
A. H. Taylor, 
J. E. Wilder. 



Geo. Cutler, Jr., 



FRESHMEN. 



E. W. DWIGHT. 



H. C. Brown, 



41 



V V r 



iL/z, 




cFoim^cb ill 1869. 



43 







SENIORS. 




W. P. Carr, 

F. H. Fairfield, 



D. GOODALE, 

F. W. Jones, 



W. P. Mayo, 



JUNIORS. 



FRESHMEN. 



C. L. Flint, Jr., 
A. Peters. 



H. L. Wheeler, 

J. S. Williams. Si 



Charles Herms. 



43 



67>p • ,^- fip 



•^ 




cFoimbcb ivt- 1873. 



44 



. i^. iv. 



^i ©tvapt'et^. 



F. G. May, 
W^. H. Bishop, 



RESIDENT GRADUATE. 
X. Y. Clark. 

POST GRADUATE.' 
W. C. Parker. 

SENIOR. 
E. D. Howe. 

JUNIORS. 



B. A. Kinney, 
J. A. Cutter, 



C. D. Hillman. 



A. A. Hevia, 



SOPHOMORES. 



C. T. Conger. 



45 



^^fel 



■n jazzili: ■t- aJj)i'ioI'l( * ls 4>3^=Mw-- 



^ltil■<^i^^ ^fv^^vyti^avi^ ^^vii<yyi 



^Ca^bsie^ 



^ifc^O/^-tf pOCiil'tiiK^. 






47 



&oU-c^a<z^ &hi^i<^ti€i'Vi ^Vioi4^. 



ELMER D. HOWE, President. 

HENRY E. CHAPIN", Vice-President. 

H. FRED M. SMITH, Secretary. 

FRANK H. FLETCHER, Treasurer. 

JOSEPH L. WINDSOR, i 

GEORGE D. HOWE, I Directors. 

FRED. G. MAY, [ 

POST GRADUATES. 

Almon H. Stone. 

SENIORS. 



H. E. Chapin, 
C. L. Flint, Jr., 
B. Hashiguchi, 
E. D. Howe, 



A. Peters. 
H. F. Smith, 
H. S. Chapin. 
H. H. Wilcox. 



JUNIORS. 



G. T. Aplin, 
W. H. Bishop, 
H. S. Brodt, 
E. S. Chandler, 
J. A. Cutter, 

D. GOODALE, 

C. D. HiLLMAN, 



S. C. Bagley, 
E. A. Bishop, 
C. T. Conger, 



J. L. Windsor. 
SOPHOMORES. 



H. J. Wheeler. 
FRESHMAN. 
E. A. Jones. 



G. D. Howe. 
F. G. Mat, 
W. A. Morse, 
D. E. Perkins, 
A. H. Taylor, 
W. H. Thurston. 
J. S. Williams, 



F. H. Fletcher, 
D. O. Nourse, 
C. H. Preston, 



48 



1 



^a^Pvina^^oi4' St'Ulna ^i^c^a^-u poc-le ttj. 



oiPJFKDnaEss. 



J. L. HILLS, President. 

S. C. DAMON, Vice-President. 

C. D. HILLMAN, Secretary. 

A. P. SHIVERICK, Treasurer. 

E. B. RAWSON, \ 

D. GOODALE, (. Directors. 

L. R. TAFT, \ 

E. D. HOWE Librarian. 



]M:itCM:331ffiK.g. 



C. A. Bowman, 
C. L. Flint, Jr. 
J. L. Hills, 



W. H. Bishop, 

J. A. CtTTTER, 

S. C. Damon, 

D. CrOODALE, 

C. D. HiLLMAN, 

J. H. HOWARD, 



SENIORS. 



H. H. Wilcox, 
JUNIORS. 



J. S. Williams. 
SOPHOMORES. 
C. T. Conger. 

FRESHMAN. 

E. W. DWIGHT. 



E. D. Howe, 

A. Peters. 

E. B. Rawson, 



F. G. May, 
H. Myrick, 
A. F. Shiverick, 
L. R. Taft, 
C. D. Warner, 
J. E. Wilder, 



49 



BBBBBBD^^ 



eae pfiafic.>pGci^^lait §Cii&. 



Qtacivuzcb Scpl'cM4.6et 20, 1879. 



E. P. BINGHAM, President. 

E. S. CHANDLER, Vice-President. 

F. S. ALLEN, Secretary and Treasurer. 

J. W. COOPER, ^ 

H. J. WHEELER, I Directors. 

C. A. BOWMAN, J 

SENIORS. 

C. A. Bowman, H. E. Chapin. 

A. W. Spalding. 

JUNIORS. 

P. S. Allen, J. W. Cooper, 

E. p. Bingham, S. C. Damon. 

E. S. Chandler, L. R. Taft. 

SOPHOMORES. 

E. A.' Bishop, H. J. Wheeler. 

C. W. MiNOTT, D. O. Nourse. 

50 



^±^^^4- 






.--^7 






-^.— >^'t>5^-H--^--^i^^i'^^^4^ 



51 



^■iR^e^ ^i3^^oC'iatlo-i4^. 



0]F3PI<DlEIE^g. 



H. H. WILCOX, . . , President. 

S. C. DAMON, Vice-President. 

A. PETERS, Secretary and Treasurer. 

BOONZO HASHIGUCHI, ^ 

J. E. WILDER, I Directors. 

C. H. PRESTON, J 



m. 



'^^iili 



Wcci'vn. 



B. HASHIGUCHI, 
F. W. JONES, 



H. H. WILCOX. 

]M[3B ML33 IS K ^» 



E. B. RAW SON, 
A. P. SHIVERICK, 



P. H. Fairfield, 
C. L. Flint, Jr., 

B. HASHIGUCHI, 

A. Peters, 



SENIORS. 



E. B. Rawson, 

F. P. Taylor, 
A. Whitaker, 
H. H. Wicox, 



JUNIORS. 



C. E. Beach, 
S. C. Damon, 
B. A. Kinney, 
E. A. Morse, 
A. F. Shiverick, 
W. H. Thurston, 



J. E. Wilder. 
C. W. Floyd, 
F. W. Jones, 
A. H. Taylor, 
C. D. Warner, 
J. S. Williams. 



SOPHOMORES. 



F. H. Fletcher, 
S. M. Holman, 



C. H. Preston, 
H. J. Wheeler. 



53 



H 



'"^n^yiCl'MAAAA^. 




F. F. TAYLOR, President, 

E. B. RAWSON, Senior Director, 

J. S. WILLIAMS. , Junior 

A. F. SHIVERICK 

H. J. WHEELER " Sophomore. 

C. W. MINOTT, " 

W. P. MAYO, " Freshman. 

W. H. SMITH, 

MEMBERS. 
ALL THE COLLEGE. 

53 



90 X£>^ "'5^'' 




F P. TAYLOR, 
C. E. BOYNTON, 
C. S. FISH. 
t». O. NOURSE, 

E. A. JONES, 

F. W. JONES, 



President. 



Directors. 



.ggfje ^itij^. 



B. A. KINNEY, Captain, h. 



F. W. JONES, A. 
A. W. SPALDING, b. 
W. P. MAYO, c. 
J. H. HOWARD, p. 



J. S. WILLIAMS, s. 
A. H. TAYLOR, L. 
W. R. SMITH, R. 
E. W. DWIGHT, M. 



54 




'144^'C^:>-, 



A. W. SPALDING, p. 
F. H. FAIRFIELD, a 
A. WHITAKER, b. 
E. D. HOWE, c. 



'81. 



F. P. TAYLOR, Captain, h. 



H. H. WILCOX, s. 
H. F. SMITH, L. 
E. B. RAWSON, M. 
C. L. FLINT, Jr., r. 



'82. 



B. A. KINNEY, Captain, a. 



F. W. JONES, H. 
J. H. HOWARD, p. 
J. B. PAIGE, B. 
J. S. WILLIAMS, c. 



C. "VV. MINOTT, H. 

F. H. FLETCHER, p. 

D. O. NOURSE, B. 
S. C. BAGLEY, c. 



W. A. MORSE, s. 
A. H. TAYLOR, L. 
W. H. tHURSTON, M. 
W. E. STONE, R. 



'83. 



H. W. OWEN, Captain, a. 



A. A. HEVIA, s. 
S. M. HOLMAN, L. 
C. H. PRESTON, M. 
H. J. WHEELER, R. 



W. R. SMITH, H. 
L. SMITH, a. 
E. W. DWIGHT, B. 
W. P. MAYO, c. 



'84. 



C. R. KENFIELD, Captain, p. 

W. H. SMITH, s. 
H. D. HOLLAND, L. 
H. W. DICKINSON, m. 
GEO. CUTLER, Jr., r. 



55 







A. WHITAKER, President, 

F. H. FAIRFIELD, ^^^^"^ ^• 

B. A. KINNEY, Junior D. 

A. A. HEVIA, . .• ^°^^-^- 

W. P. MAYO, FRESH. D. 









A. WHITAKER, 


'(^aie .^ea^n. 




..... Captain 




F. S. ALLEN, 

F. H. FAIRFIELD, 

D. GOODALE, 

J. S. WILLIAMS, 
A. H. TAYLOR, 

S. C. DAMON, 


RUSHERS. 

J. B. PAIGE, 
J. E. WILDER, 
A. WHITAKER. 

HALF TENDS. 

F. P. TAYLOR. 
A. F. SHIVERICK. 

TENDS. 

F. W. JONES, 
ST Sub., F. H. SMITH. 




oovvb 'T^caHt. 




Captain. 




S. C. DAMON, 

. S. M. HOLMAN, 

W. A. MORSE, 

J H. HOWARD, 
C. E. BEACH, 


RUSHERS. 

H. H. WILCOX, 
A. W. SPALDING. 
W. H. SMITH. 

HALF TENDS. 

W. p. MAYO, 
H. C. BROWN. 

TENDS. 

C. S. PLUMB. 






57 






K a .> .> ac ft 1 1 .^ My (^ c\ric 1 1 ft" 1 1 ta t S o-Weci c . 



<Wl\a<ii (Bttvk 




OFFICERS. 



F. P. TAYLOR, '81, 
A. WHITAKER, '81, 
C. E. BEACH, '82, 



President. 

Captain. 

Sec. and Treas. 



H. C. BROWN, '84 Sub-Captain. 

MEMBERS. 



SIZE OP MACHINE, 



MAKE OF MACHINE. 



C. E. BEACH, 

H. C. BROWN, 

BOONZO HASHIGUCHI, 

A. H. TAYLOR, 

F. P. TAYLOR, 

A. WHITAKER, 

F. A. WILMARTH, 



52 
50 
46 

50 

50 
50 

TNIFORM. 

Grey Cap, Grey Coat, Grey Shirt, stitf-hed and laced with maroon, Mai-oon 
Belt, Grej'- Knee-breeches, and Maroon Stockings. 



Columbia. 

Columbia. 

Special Challenge. 

Special Union. 

Xtraordinary Challenge. 

Union. 

Columbia. 



58 



© K ivy i c at © ^q ati/ l^a t i cm ^ 




QoKcc^c^ Qhoiz. 



C. D. Warner, Isb Tenor. 
J. E. Wilder, 2d Tenor. 
F. S. Allen, 1st Bass. 



F. P. Taylor, 2dTenor. 

D. GooDALE, 2d Tenor. 

E. S. Chandler, 2d Bass. 



W. F. Carr, Organist. 



*^ fa y:i Q 11 ci zteU'c:^. 



•81. 



p. p. Taylor, 1st Tenor. 
C. L. Flint, Jr., 2d Tenor. 



P. H. Fairfield, 1st Bass. 
E. D. Howe, 2d Bass. 



C. D. Warner, 1st Tenor. 

D. GrOODALE, 2d Tenor. 



P. H. Joyner, Pianist. 

'83. 



C. T. Congee, 1st Tenor. 
C. W. MiNOTT. 2d Tenor. 



P. S. Allen, 1st Bass. 
W. H. Bishop, 2d Bass. 



S. M. HOLMAN, 1st Bass. 
H. W. Owen, 2d Bass. 



G. P. Cutler, 1st Tenor. 

H. E. V. Goessmann, 2d Tenor. 



W. H. Smith, 1st Bass. 
W. P. Mayo, 2d Bass. 



59 



^z^chc^yU>a^. 




p. H. JoYNER, Leader. 

H. S. Brodt, Isb Violin. W. F. Carr, Clarionet. 

F. H. JoYNER, Violoncello, C. L. Flint, Jr., Cornet. 

F. H. Fairfield, 2d Violin. E. S. Chandler, Double Bass. 



^ia-^^ij-l^nuo Stti/ivcj ^nazi'Mii. 



H. S. Brodt, First Violin. 
F. H. JoYNER, Violoncello. 



F. W. Jones, Second Violin. 
E. S. Chandler, Double Bass. 



60 



CXr 




jj oV i5fL a vbfij a oot rtccotL ohy 



Is't n.ot? 



61 






w 



^QyC\yQy 




'O^abii^a 



g* 



OO'VId^. 



OFFICERS. 

C. L. FLINT, Jr., President. 

P. H. FAIRFIELD, 1 

F. H. JOYNER, ! 

F. H. FLETCHER, |" ' " Directors. 

E. W. DWIGHT, j 

S. C. DAMON, . . . . • Treasurer. 



I^eru^paper:^ anb ^;CMobicci f^. 



Boston Journal, 
N ew York Herald, 
Springfield Republican, 



Daily. 



Agricultural. 



New England Farmer, 
Country Gentleman, 
Rural New Yorker, 
New England Homestead, 
National Live Stock Journal, 



Boston Herald, 
New York Grapkic, 
Albany Argus. 

American Cultivator, 
Mass. Ploughman, 
Farmers Review, 
Poultry Yard, 
Agriculturi.st. 



63 



Harper's Monthly, 
International Review, 
American Naturalist, 



Harvard Advocate, 
Vassar Miscellany, 
Princetonian, 



Magazines. 



College. 



Miscellaneous. 



Nation, 

Puck, 

Scientific American, 

Harper's Weekly, 

N. E. Journal of Education, 

Cincinnati Enquirer, 

Forest, Rod and Stream, 

Amherst Record, 

Woman's Journal 



Scribner's Monthly, 
Popular Science Monthly, 
Littell's Living Age. 
» 

Yale Courant, 
Amherst Student, 
Acta Columbina. 



London Punch, 
Spirit of the Times, 
Sci. American Supplement 
Army and Nayy Journal, 
Journal of Chemistry, 
Burlington Hawkeye, 
Am. Journal of Microscopy 
Christian Register, 
Musical Record. 




63 



6I> 



Dp 



^.a'XAV':>w<ytXh ^-Pvc/tor-ical ^^ebal^. 



Sophomore Class, '82. 

S. Chester Damon, ....... Gold Medal. 

John E. Wilder, ...-'... Silver Medal. 



Freshman Class. '88. 

David O. Nourse, --.._.. Gold Medal 

Homer J. Wheeler, - Silver Medal. 

Almon H. Stone, ------- First Prize, $50. 

William G. Lee, - Second Prize, $30. 



Almon H. Stone, .----.- First Prize, $15. 
William C. Parker, •-..--- Second Prize, $10. 




64 



W^hc' '82 (B{a:» ef£ou4i/tai/H/. 



-■(n 



" But here to day we plant a fount beneath the heavenly blue, 
And on it carve one simple word, the emblem '82." 

/'^^ LTHOUGtH acting in unison in most things, concerning the subject 

sai^i °^ ^ class emblem '82 was for a long time divided, and it was not 

Jjk until the third term of our Sophomore year that we finally con - 

^* Ifjcluded to manifest our class feelings, and interest in our college bj' 

ereicting a fountain as a gift to the institution, rather than by investing in the 

usual ring or pin. 

The honor of originating this idea belongs, we believe, to Mr. L. R. Taft, 
and it was first brought up at a class meeting held April 7, 1880, when it met 
with unanimous approval. At a subsequent meeting held April 15, plans 
and estimates were furnished, and a committe of five — Messrs. Cochran, 
Johnson, Myrick, Taft and Wilder — was appointed to take the matter in 
charge, raise the funds and erect the fountain. These gentlemen immedi- 
ately proceeded to business. The money, $250, was quickly subscribed, and 
a fountain ordered from the well known J. L. Mott Iron Works of New 
York, The minor details of the work were pushed with energy, and shortly 
before the end of the term the structure was completed. 

The dedication exercises were held on the grounds on Tuesday afternoon, 
June 22, in the presence of a large audience. Mr. Cochran, as chairman of 
the committee, delivered the fountain to the class with a few appropriate 
words, and the water being turned on as he closed, the sparkling jets, as 
they defined themselves against the sky, were greeted with cheer upon cheer. 
The oration was delivered by Mr. F. G. May, and was followed by the ode, 
by Mr. C. D. Warner. Then the class president, Mr. J. S. Williams, per- 
formed the last duties for the class by presenting the fountain to the college, 
and President Stockbridge, in accepting the trust, thanked the class for this 
emblem of their interest and affection, assuring them that it would always 
be preserved and respected. With three cheers for the President, and 
three for the Class of '82, the exercises were completed. 

The fountain is of the thistle and crane design, with boy and duck, as 
shown in the accompanying engraving. It is of bronze, eight feet six 
inches in height, with two basins. It stands in the centre of the oval green 
in front of South College, in a basin of masonry twelve feet in diameter 



65 



which is surrounded by a tasty iron railing, also bronzed. The inscription 
stone is of marble, set in the curbing of the basin, and reads : 

f relented try (^\^^^ 

o'f 

The water was obtained by tapping the main which supplies the labora- 
tory, and now that connection has been made with the Pelham water works, 
it makes a much finer display. Altogether the improvement is perhaps the 
most important ever made by any one class, and well may we exclaim, in 
the words of the gifted orator of the occasion : 

"We now^ have an added incentive to point out the way and hold us up 
to our duty, such as w^e have never had before ; for as the fountain throws 
its stream upward and never ceasing, so may our course be ever upward and 
onward, reflecting credit and honor upon the beloved institution, until at 
the last it may be truly said of each one of us, ' the world is so much better 
because he lived in it, and the foundation of his good work was laid at the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College.' " 



.C5_ 



.<j)S^^ 






■^^^♦■•^f>^N"^^'t4't^^^- 




The '82 CLASS Fountain. 



f rgfj*i4t.ia bu ^lu$^ 



-ing the main which supplies the labora- 
•.;i o=.'.i.-i= ji;.:- been made with the Peiham Wftter works. 
r diiiiplsy. Altogether the improveraent la perhaps the 
.;■.. cvsr made by any one clas^^ . 

.:rfT and never ceasing, so may our course be ever iipward and 

ouward, reaecting credit and honor upon the beloved institution, ilntil at 

: sp. i;i-v ;- ;;!■»-- h« rri-K- 'viid of each or« o? UR ' i-hi: -v.Arif! i? SO rtluch better 

- : the fouudatj was laid at the 




The '82 CLASS Fountain, 



> t>=: # ^=:fl 



:*- 



d dlcUc of ^loUC-l.l&Ct 2, 1880. 



LABOR-GREENBACK TICKET. 



For Representative to Congress, Tenth I)ist]-ict. 



OF AMHERST. 



^:ze^<y @o-VH--H4-e--H.to. 



Poor Levi Stockbridge I — Springfield RepiibUenn. 

Had he been the nominee of the Republican party, his popularity among 
the farmers would undoubtedly have secured his election. — Amherst Record. 

The impression appears to be prett3^ general that the head of the Agri- j; 
cultural College did not better his political future by indulging in this by- 
play. — JV. E. Homestead. 



•#■ 



•67 



(Et^44/t-H/S;> of (Bo't-H/lo't^-t. 




" The Nearer the Bone the S^A^-eeter the Meat." 



69 







e-t^ 



"^ 



BOSS STUFFER, . . Pretty Mrs. Paige. 

ASSISTANTS, [ j J^I^e. 

STUFFING FOR $2.§0. 

Bagley, Mouth always open for more. 

Brodt, Looks love at the pretty waiter. 

Cooper, "No soup to-day, hey ?" 

Howard, A mouth for everything. 

Howe, . " Crams and blasphemes his feeder. " 

Joyner, Dainty, turns up his nose at everything. 

Spalding, Appetite inversely as the size of his head. 

Wheeler, , . Still mourns the loss of Josie 

Warner, Taft. 

STUFFED: $3.§0. 

^ ) " I cannot eat but little meat, my stomach is not good. 

Beach, )■ 

) But sure methinks that I can drink with him that wears a hood." 

Braune, Openeth not his mouth to any idle prattling. 

Dwight, . . . Too fresh to roast. 

Flint, As fine grained as the beef he tackles. 

Hashiguchi, Rats a-la-mode, with oatmeal. 

Herms, . . . Wishes he could have some of mother's doughnuts. 

Hills, Should take in his sign if he does not drink. 

Holman, . . . . . Has a capacity in proportion to his eyes. 

Lublin, Sauerkraut and Limburger. 

Mayo,.. . . Built on the turkey buzzard style, and eats accordingly. 

Preston, Too busy to talk. 

Rawson, .... Like Oliver Twist, is always asking for more. 

Sliiverick, Eats, sleeps, and grows fat. 

Taylor, A. H A freak of nature. Got the eating disease. 

Taylor, P. P Finds fault unless he can kiss the cook. 

Whitaker, " Great Scott ! what coffee ! " 

Wilcox, .... Peejee Islander. Would like to eat his chums. 

) . . . , " With glances wild and face awry, 
Williams, > 

) . . . . He wades right through a big mince pie. " 

Wilder. 



^e^tto 



w 



& 



^o. 



For the benefit of the public, we would state that this corporation is 
limited, and that the shares are controlled by a board of self-appointed 
Directors, as follows : 

E. D. HOWE, . . . ■ ^ 

F. G. MAY, r Directors. 

J. A. CUTTER ) 



SHARE HOLDERS. 



Stone, . . . Bar tender for the Durfee Plant House. ^ second Parsons. 
Howe, . . . . . Mortgaged his character to buy one share. 

Cutter, .... A leading stockholder. Says little, but eats more. 

Hillman, " Another county heard from." 

Jones, ..... Very delicate, needs morning hours for slefp. 
May, .... He is laboring under the delusion that he is funny. 

Thurston, . . Preponderance of upper lip makes up for other wants. 
Conger, . . Breshman. An earnest advocate of Prayers and Petitions. 
Hevia, . A base (bass) drummer. Will do for want of something better. 
Damon, Kinney, Goodale- 



Bowman, On the fence. 

Fairfield, First experience in politics. 

Peters, Could stump the State for Hancock. 

Floyd .... A vile mouthed Democrat, du-ect from Cork. 



71 



^c^o-cli/eloV^ Mfi^, 



NORTH COLLEGE. 



No. 21. Bishop the Pious. Diets on his good looks. Sour grapes for dessert 
on Sunday. 

No. 25. H. F. M. Smith. A victim of many names. No wonder that he 
supes ; he lives on it. 



SOUTH COLLEGE. 



No. 4. Fish, base ball director. Lives on Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable 
Compound. 

No. 8. E. A. Jones, coal heaver. Lives by the sweat of his brow. Side 
dishes, coal shovels, scorched oat meal, and looking-glasses — ' 
cracked. 

No. 12. Wheeler and Nourse — the harmless twain. Their cupboard is lar- 
ger than their bellies. Bill of fare, scenery, boiled onions, one • 
pint of milk. 

No. 13. PI umb— the black-eyed beauty. Skunk skins three times a day, 
with pickles and arrowroot. 

No. 19. Bingham, the poet. "Oh! how fat he is." Bums a living* off his 
North Amherst relatives. 



73 



No. 20. Windsor, the old woman. Dines at the hash house ; breakfast and 
supper small as his soul. 

No. 22. Carr, Minott, Fletcher— "Birds of a feather," etc. Nobody knows 
what they live on, but the cat is fattening for Thanksgiving. 

No. 23. D. E. Perkins, pugilist. Gall (i. e. cheek) for breakfast, dinner at 
the stuflfery ; supper, choice selections from profane history. It 
makes muscle. 

No. 26. Myrick. 

No. 28. Boynton, a braced-up Senior. Lives better than he used to, but 
'tisn't saying much. 

No. 20. F. S. Allen, disinterested pawn-broker. Fleeces the Freshman and 
lives on the profits. Also, H. E. Chapin, entomologist. Midnight 
lunch, Cimex lectularis, served with kerosene and corrosive 
sublimate. No wonder he rises early. 



Morse, When Morse came in, Peters went out. 



Sck>-t cmh §fl»€-^-b. 



Wilmarth, 



The fiend of gastronomic powers, 
Who all of Bassett's food devours. 



73 



^vdyvvt oi thc^ ^a^cvz^. 




— V — r^^^ — 

ERE we have to record an event which will ever remain fresh in 

jff^ ^1 the memories of those who were participants. We refer to our 
•^ '"^^5^^^ trip to Boston, on the 17th of September, 1880, to take part in the 
great procession in honor of her two hundred and fiftieth anniversary. 

The idea of this undertaking was started at the close of the Spring term, 
because of the generous offer made by ex- President Flint and Mr. Farns- 
worth, to pay the transportation of the battalion to and from Boston, should 
everything convene to favor its going. 

Having received an invitation for the Cadets to occupy a position in the 
procession, Lieutenant Morris at once commenced the necessary preparations 
for the trip. Circulars were sent to all the students during the summer 
vacation, in order to get the general sentiment and their co-operation in the 
matter. On our return, at the beginning of the term, our hopes were some- 
what dampened by the appearance of so small a Freshman Class, as well as 
by^ the fact that the Faculty had not as yet decided the matter. 

But all doubts have an end sooner or later, and those on the latter score 
were soon sent to flight by the announcement in chapel one morning — that 
all exercises would be omitted, and leave of absence for three days given the 
battalion. The drill hall at the Institute of Technology was kindly offered 
us for barracks during our stay in the city. 

With these incentives before us all set to work with an unusual vigor to 
perfect themselves in military tactics, ample opportunity being given in the 
extra drills. The Freshmen made rapid progress, and, with but few excep- 
tions, w^ere soon assigned places in the companies. Suffice it to say, that at 
the end of three weeks of constant application, the whole battalion blossomed 
out into a well drilled corps of cadets, fully equipped for ev*ry emergency. 

At quarter of four on Thursday afternoon, September 16th, the assembly 
was sounded, and a little later the battalion might have been seen on its way 
to the depot, every man with burnished arms and a neatly packed knapsack, 
marching in the same order that was to be observed in the procession the 
following day, being as follows : The Drum Corps, consisting of six drum- 
ers, at the head of the column, four yards in rear of which marched the 
Lieutenant, followed by the four staff officers. In the rear of the latter 
marched the two companies, A and B, at their respective distances. On 
reaching the depot we boarded the train in waiting and were soon speeding 



75 



our Tvay to the metropolis. On board the cars military restrictions were 
somewhat lightened, and all went merry as a marriage bell. Stopping at 
Huntington Avenue, and falling into line, the battalion marched off to the 
lively music of the drum corps, to the barracks, where it arrived about ten 
o'clock. After assigning the men resting places for the night, and the 
necessary posting of sentinels, taps were sounded, and directly every man 
was supposed to have been wrapped in his blanket and stretched out on the 
floor. It was some time before the novelty of the situation wore off suffi- 
ciently to allow all to sleep, for long after the lights were out the musical 
voice of a cat, and the soothing bark of a dog, greeted the ears of the weary 
cadet, while now and then a wandering dumbell chimed in with a rolling 
strain, making the harmony more effective. 

In spite of the imprecations of the officer of the day and the vigilance 
of the sentinels, it was not until toward morning that quiet was fully 
restored. Breakfast was served the next morning about eight o'clock, after 
w^hich a careful inspection was made of the equipments and general §,pj)ear- 
ance of the companies ; this over, opportunity was given for a little exer- 
cise in the streets. 

At half past ten the assembly was sounded and the battalion passed out 
to join the procession. Headed by a band of thirty pieces and followed by 
the Medford Artillery, the corps took its position in the Third Division, in 
the immediate rear of the Boston School Regiment and School Boys of 1830. 
At precisely twelve o'clock one gun was fired, the signal for the head of the 
procession to move. When the battalion made its first wheel into Columbus 
Avenue, cheers filled the air, and in short there was not a single wheel made 
throughout the whole line of march that did not reflect credit upon the 
cadets. The cheers which at first seemed to send a thrill through every 
man's frame, were well kept up along the route, and finally reached the 
climax in the three hearty ones given us by the Boston Cadets while the 
battalion was passing in review. During the occasional rests along the line 
. of march, quantities of fruit were showered upon us, being as gratefully 
received as given. 

At half past four P. M., tired and hungry, we marched to the barracks 
and were soon ready to dispatch the hearty dinner awaiting us. Permission 
was then given all who desired it to spend the remaining time as they liked, 
provided that no one would by any act disgrace the college colors. Places 
of note in and about the city were visited, and all highly appreciated the 
efforts of the Boston people to make everything pleasant and agreeable. 

Precisely at three o'clock on Saturday, the battalion, headed by a posse 
of police, left the barracks for the Boston & Albany depot to take the four 
o'clock train for Amherst. Owing to the numerous excuses granted men 
who wished to spend Sunday with their friends, we reached Amherst with 
well thinned ranks, indicative of the return of troops from battle. With 



76 



T 



steady step the battalion passed through the town, reaching the college 
about ten o'clock, where, after three hearty cheers for Lieutenant Morris, 
the companies were dismissed. 

Thus ended the much anticipated trip to Boston ; a trip of which we 
may all feel justly proud, as it was fraught with such great success. And 
all the more may we take pride in it, since, for our military bearing and 
appearance, the chief marshal of the day considered us second only to the 
Twenty-third N. Y. Regiment. 

Let us not, however, rest contented on our laurels, but keep on in well 
doing, constantly striving for perfection in this important branch of our 
college course. 




!• 



77 



^^^hc^ Q^u^^iitvvv Q^ocizh^. 



V 



" The evil that men do lives after them ; 
The good is often buried with their bones." 



R-w-ON. — "His cogitative faculties are immersed in a cogibundity of 
cogitation." 

H-L-s. — " A. little, scaly, oily man of God." 

Wh-t-k-r. — "Unfit to hear moral Philosophy." 

W-LC-x.— "This gentleman has spent eight years upon a project for ex- 
tracting sunbeams out of cucumbers, which were to be put 
in vials hermetically sealed and let out to warm the raw, in- 
clement Hawaiian summers." 

T-YL-R. — " This man believes the Boston State House to be the hub of the 
universe." 

Sp-ld-ng. — " This man is much like a steam engine in trousers." 

H-LM-N. — " Thou art long and lank and brown,j^s the ribbed sea sand." 

Fl-yd. — "Hell from beneath is moved for thee, to meet thee at thy 
coming." 

W-NS-R. — " I think he is not a pick purse, nor a horse stealer, but for his 
verity in love, I do think him as concave as a covered goblet 
or a worm eaten nut." 

B-YNT-N. — "A little philosophy incline th a man's mind to atheism ; but 
depth of philosophy bringeth men's minds about religion." 

B-WM-N. — "Sent before his time into this breathing world scarce half 
made up." 

C-RR. — " His bark is worse than his bite." 

Ch-p-n. — " Brain as dry as the remainder biscuit." 



78 



Fl-nt. — " Deep versed in books but shallow in himself, female of sex he 
seems." 

F-SH.— " O flesh, flesh, how art thou fishified." 

H-WE, E. D. — "A sweet attractive kind of grace, 
A full assurance given by looks, 
Continual comfort in a face, 
Tlie lineaments of Gospel books. " 

P-EK-NS. — " Now will I show myself to have more of the serpent than the 
dove ; that is, more knave than fool." 

H-LL-ND. — "Here is everything advantageous to life ?" 

Fl-tch-r. — "A kind ot excellent dumb discourse." 

M-Y. — " That man that hath a tongue, I say, is no man, if with that tongue 
he cannot win a woman." 

K-NGM-N. — " I hold you as a thing enskied and sainted." 

Sh-ver-ck. — "One Pinch, a hungry lean faced villain, a mere anatomy." 

C-NG-R.^" Egregiously an ass." 

Pl-mb. — " Thou wilt depart and leave the world no copy." 

Ch-ndl-r. — " The baby figure of a giant mass." 

K-NPi-LD. — "Thou art proclaimed a fool ; methinks thou hast no more 
brain than I have in my elbow." 

L-BL-N. — " Green in judgment ; don't know a hawk from a handsaw." 

'81 — Index Board. — " Fellows of no marked likelihood." 






79 



^ei4/ §^h'C^tc^c^^, 




UST before going to press, an Index editor found the following 
letter in an ash pan in one of the halls, and thinking it too good to 
"(^^^^ be lost, even though the production of a Freshman, before return- 
ing it to the author, obtained a copy, which reads as follows : 

M. A. C, Nov. 8th, 1880. 
My Dear Friend : — You are probably waiting to hear from me, and 
anxious to learn how I am getting along. I am well settled at last, and find 
the Agricultural College a very pleasant place to pursue my studies. I will 
not weary you with a dull account of my daily routine, but perhaps you 
may be interested in learning something about my associates and the 
Faculty. 

One poor fellow they call " Megalops," for what reason I cannot say. 
Another is called " Fiend, " because he smokes so much. This I think is a 
very appropriate name for him. He has a wee bit of a moustache, the color 
of brick, and the boys say he is afraid to cut it off for fear it won't grow out 
again. But the fiend that beats them all is the "Fiddle Fiend." He hails 
from Berkshire, and plays at the piano, violin, bass viol, flute, tin horn, and 
I hear he has been trying to get music out of a corn stalk fiddle. This fellow 
will buy every old worn out instrument and all the second-hand music that 
he can lay hold of, and the infernal strains that come from this dilapidated 
source are a libel on the whole college. There are several other fellows 
nicknamed "Yarmouth," " H. F. M. Pinafore," "Cape Cod," etc., about 
whom I will say no more than to declare them freaks of human nature. 

As for the Faculty, I like them all very much. President Stockbridge 
appears to be a very pleasant, but rather a garrulous gentleman. They call 
him "Stock," for short. He is of medium height, has a sandy beard, and 
lisps a little when he talks. The boys say it is because his denticulated ori- 
fice has been undergoing repairs ; and the Sophs also say that his pedal 
extremities have an incline axis of sixty degrees. 

Professor Graves, aZi'as "Prof. Billy," I also like very much. He is a 
little bald, and full of stale jokes, but the greatest compliment he ever gave 
us was to tell us we were the poorest class he ever saw. 



81 



I don't know much about Professor Goodell, but I hear that he is actually 
so heartless and coldblooded as not to allow his students either to hang their 
feet over the chairs, whisper, or spit on the floor. 

In the little cottage on the hill — where the professor of Agriculture doles 
out the story o£ blasted crops, his own miraculous doings, his experiences 
with ice on the Connecticut river, and the prospects of a young man of sixty 
running for Congress on the Greenback ticket — Professor Maynard ("Prof. 
Sam."), a little red whiskered man, teaches botany. We have it in the 
spring, and I dare say 'we shall like him. very much. 

Professor Goessmann, about whom you have heard so much, appears to 
be a very jolly Dutchman. He has a great affinity for Chemistry, and seem- 
ingly delights in inflicting us poor Freshmen with that reaction of acid and 
iron which produces H2S, and the roguish grin that lights up his countenance 
as our olfactory nerves are affected, is indeed most trying. 

The military instructor, Lieutenant Morris, whom they call the 
" Lieut.," was formerly professor of elocution, but has lately been obliged to 
give up that chair on account of increasing family cares. He is a polite 
little man about four feet and a half high, and when in full dress uniform, 
is as " pretty as a little red wagon." 

Mr. Baker, or " Professor " Baker, as he is called, the janitor, is a dry 
sort of a chap, who has a meek way of attending to his duties that is very 
captivating. 

I wish I had time to tell you about some of the other fellows, but I am 
so busy just now "cramming" for the examinations that this will have to do 
for this time. 

Your Affectionate Friend, 



[Note. — As the newspapers say, we do not hold ourselves responsible 
for the opinions of our correspondent. — Eds. Index.] 







83 



M\^^toz-u op -tlW @-a-(^eac-. 



1879-80. 



^i^fi^T has been the endeavor to collect in this chapter such events as 
^ ^ Ml would not tind their way into print in any other place. The items 
n -^^ are such as have come to hand relating to the general interests of 
all. They may be unimportant in themselves, but taken as a whole they go 
to make up the pleasures and vicissitudes of college life. 



1879. 

Nov. 32. — A naatch game of football is played on the campus between the 
home team and one from the class of '83 of Amherst College. 
Won by the Aggie team. 

Dec. 14. — Clay, '82, returns after a prolonged vacation forced upon him by ' 
the Faculty. 
" 25. — A beautiful Christmas holiday. What villain perpetrated the vile 
deed of desecrating the Chapel with sorghum ? " Could we 
call down the malediction of heaven upon his head." 

" 28. — Perry leaves college for civil life. 
" 29. — Skating on the campus. 



1880. 

Jan. 1.— The students enjoy the holiday by making New Year's calls on 

their many Amherst friends. 
" 7. — Holmes, '82, leaves college for business in New York. 
" 10. — Hon. Levi Stockbridge resigns the professorship of Agriculture, 

but it is not accepted. 

" 31.— Several students "take in" the Farmers Institute, held at Sunder- 
land ; the subject of discussion being the Agricultural College. 
These Institutes are a good thing in the right direction, and we 
would advise the students to attend as many as possible the 
coining winter. 



83 



Feb. 10. — The surveyors on the Mass. Central pass through the farm and 
locate the road through the middle of the twenty acre field in 
rear of the college buildings. 

" 23. — Holiday. Grea.t excitement over the fact that the eagle must 
come off the bass drum. 
Mar. 3. — Excursion to the Springfield Roller Skating Rink. A very enjoy- 
able time to most of the college who took part. 

" 9. — Piatt, '82, leaves college for wild rancho life in the West. 

" 27. — By invitation of the students, who wished to repay the courtesy 
shown them during the winter, the Hampshire County Agri- 
cultural Society held their last Institute for the winter at the 
college. The students felt highly complimented by the attend- 
ance, which was three hundred, or four times that of any other 
meeting during the winter. The students voluntarily served a 
hot dinner to all. 

" 24. — The resignation of President Flint is accepted, and Prof. Stock- 
bridge is made President, and with the beginning of the Spring 
term he entered upon the duties of that office, together with 
those of his department. 
April 1. — The usual number of fools fooled. Some go to breakfast a half 
hour early and find they have been fooled by the bell ringer. 

" 8.— Fast. Holiday. 

" 9. — Pres. Stockbridge gives a reception to the Faculty and Students at 
his house. All had a good time and everyone says: "let the 
ball roll." 

" 14. — Drill out of doors commences. 

Mat 3.— Class work under John W. Clark. Prof. Goodell bolts on the 
History Class. 

" 13.— Mr. Austin Eastman gives a reception to the Faculty and Students. 

" 20. — Broke ground for '82 fountain. 

" 29.— Holiday on Decoration Day. Some one tries to enter Senior Par- 
ker's room (?) 
June 4.— Prof. Groodell is compelled to leave his studies, and will try to 
regain his health in the Adirondacks. 

" 5. — Fountain completed. 

" 18.— The Chapel is decorated with evergreen and bunting for Com- 
mencement exercises. 

" 21.— Farnsworth Prize Speaking in the Chapel. Music by College Or- 
chestra. 

" 22.— Public exercises and reunion of the Q. T. V. fraternity. Dedica- 
tion of '82 Fountain at 4.30 o'clock. In the evening, cremation 
exercises of Junior Class. 



84 



June 23. —Commencement Day. Gov. Long and staff present. 

Vacation. — During vacation the college buildings were put in thorougli re- 
pair inside and out. Pelham water was let into the pipes on the 
grounds. Concrete walks were laid about the buildings, and so 
at the opening of the College year, Aug. 26, everything has an 
air of primness very agreeable to the returning students. 

Aug. 26.— Freshman Class enter sixteen. X. Y. Clark is engaged as profes- 
sor of Physiology, Geology, Veterinary, and Entonaology, 
which establishes a chair long needed. 
" 31. — '84 rushes '83 on the campus; won by '84. 

Sbpt. 16.— Start for the " Hub." (See article by special reporter.) 
" 20. — Prof. Goodell resumes his labors. 
" 23-4. — Holidays, as usual, on account of the Pair. 

Oct. 7. — Prof. X. Y. Clark resigns, and Prof. Tyler is engaged as instructor 
in the Natural Sciences. 
" 15. — A husking bee si held at college barn, at which thirty young ladies 
assisted. The students husked 150 baskets of corn, and after- 
ward partook of refreshments, spending the remainder of the 
evening in social dancing. — President Stockbridge receives the 
nomination of the Greenback party as their representative to 
Congress from the tenth district. He accepts, and his letter of 
acceptance is printed in the Springfield Republican of Oct. 22d. 
The result of the election, however, gave him only some four 
hundred votes in the district. 

Nov. 2. — For the first time since the organization the foot ball team in 
coUege, are uniformed in a neat suit, consisting of a maroon 
and white cap, white canvass jackets, white canvass pants, 
and maroon stockings, provided for them by subscriptions 
among the students and faculty. 
•' 3. — The students were very sorry their favorite candidate to the legis- 
lature was not elected, so they could carry out their plans for a 
torch-light procession. But wishing to express their pleasure at 
the Republican victory, they organized two artillery detach- 
ments, took the two twelve, pound cannon down to the village 
common and fired twenty-one rounds to the success of Garfield 
and Arthur. 



85 



't^lVeci l>Mca f<3. 




; ji jg^N taking up one of that class of papers devoted to the discussion of 
gf theatrical matters and entertainments in general, we found some 

^^ criticisms on the series of performances given by the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College Opera Troupe, assisted by others. The following 
remarks w^ere among them : — 

"The series of entertainments which the management of the Agricul- 
tural Hall in Amherst is now presenting to the public, is of the best order, 
and the list of artists includes some of the most noted that the theatrical 
world knows at present. The immense audience that every Wednesday 
afternoon fills this huge building, is of the most refined class and the dlite 
of the city. Owing to repairs now going on in the galleries, they are not 
occupied at present, and consequently the class of people who would natur- 
ally seek the ' Nigger Heaven' is compelled to take the back seats in the 
body of the hall. This is unfortunate, as the noise of cracking peanuts and the 
occasional din caused by floods of tobacco juice emanating from these young 
men, is annoying in the extreme, especially as they are apt to come at a time 
w^hen the audience is most interested in w^hat is taking place on the stage. 
We would suggest to the management that this be stopped, and if necessary 
oblige these men to keep out entirely, for their criticisms are unjust and 
show that they have no power of appreciating true talent. 

" The people were fortunate in securing the services of Monsieur 
Leviathan Bridgestock as stage manager. This foreign gentleman spent the 
greater portion of his younger days in practice for this position, and it was 
only through the utmost exertions of the business manager and the prospect 
of an immense salary, tHat we can enjoy his services. The grace, dignity, 
and accomplished manner with which he performs his duty is truly remark- 
able, and enables him to gain the applause of the critical audience that at- 
tends these entertainments. % 

" The part of prompters, for which position Mile. Theresa Holmanes 
and Mr. Franklin Fletcherarium have spent so much time in preparing them- 
selves, is good, only we would suggest that they modulate their voices a 



87 



little, and not be too eager to assist. The attitudes which are taken at 
the times when prompting is necessary are most interesting, and so grace- 
ful and perfectly at home do the actors seem, that we would like more of 
this feature. 

"Among the most prominent artists who have appeared this season 
is Mr. H. Chapin Edgarton, in the character of Moses in the Oratorio, the 
return of Israel. The expression of feeling that he manifested was truly 
remarkable, and so finely did he appeal to the feelings of the people that 
many were moved to tears. We are sorry to learn that the stage is soon to 
be deprived of one of its most shining lights, and that journalism is to be so 
un-f ortunate as to have himi among its ranks. 

"The appearance of Madame Charlotte Minot^ on the stage in the 
part of Liberty, shows her excellent German training. The sternness and 
yet softness of her voice, and the easy and undulating manner which every 
movement on the stage so gracefully brings out, makes the goddess appear 
truly majestic. 

"Mr. Jameson P. Breckinridge, the celebrated American actor, took 
the part of the politician in the last act of the play, The Bloody Shirt. 
His actions as well as words portray in a forcible manner the American 
politician of to-day. 

" Senora C. Abelia Bowman, and Signor W. Francis Carrestices have 
been expected to delight the immense throngs that gather weekly in 
this magnificent building. They have not appeared yet, but the stage mana- 
ger confidently expects that " they will appear next week." The tragedy in 
w^hich they take a leading part is the celebrated one entitled " Rolling and 
Accumulating. " 

" On one occasion the people were agreeably startled by the "debut" 
of several persons aspiring for stage honors. They appeared in the comedy, 
" The Kindergarten," and in every particular and in all their actions on the 
stage, they showed their subjects in a brilliant light. The simple, 'childish, 
and we might indeed say infantile expression of voice, feature and positions 
which they manifested — and we think them perfectly natural — kept the 
audience in continual laughter, and was the cause of several ineffectual at- 
tempts at encore. Among these embryonic artists were Guttler G-eorge, 
Miss Redding Merton, Mr. D wight E. Wells, and Miss May O. Parker. 

"As it was the intention of the managers that something practical 
should form a part of these entertainments, they soured the services of Mr. 
Peter Austin, among other scientists and historians — like Mr. Fairfield Ham- 
ilton and Mr. J. Hills Lawrence — to lecture on the subject of the horse. The 
skillful manner in which li^ handled the topic, and the graphic way he had 
of describing the animals at times when they were in a critical condition, 
showed that he was fully conversant with the subject. The worth of his 
paper can be judged from the fact that Hon. Levi Stockbridge requested the 



i 



lecturer to allow him to use a copy in his lectures given at different times 
during the coming season." 

These are only a few of the many persons who have graced the stage 
this season, and we understand the course is to be kept up for some time to 
come. As now conducted they are a source of amusement to the audience, 
and gradually may become a farce, unless some limits are placed, and better 
order kept. The idea is excellent and no doubt those who take part will, 
after seeing the criticisms of the judges, strive harder to make a better ap- 
pearance when they next appear before such learned and superior audiences 
as are found in this enterprising place." 




89 




90 



»e/i4/>U'^ o 



f 1:4 



Qy 




Name 


2 

o 

O 

td 


( 




<B 
1 


c1- 


o 


u 

o' 



C. A. Bowman, 


Billerica, 


18 


144 


5-9>^ 


Rep. 


Episcopal. 


C. E. Boynton, 


Groveland, 


20 


155 


5-6 


Rep. 


Unitarian. 


W. F. Carr, 


Holyoke, 


19 


150 


5-101^ 


Rep. 


Unitarian. 


H. E. Chapin, 


Wilbraham, 


21 


1124 


5-6% 


Rep. 


Methodist. 


P. H. Fairfield, 


Waltham, 


20 


151 


5-9% 


Dem. 


Episcopal. 


C. L. Flint, Jr., 


Boston, 


19 


135 


5-10% 


Rep. 


Congregat'l. 


B. Hashiguchi, 


Kagosima, 


24 


137 


5-8 


Rep. 


Congregat'l 


J. L. Hills, 


Boston, 


20 


136K 


5-5% fRep. 


Unitarian. 


E. D. Howe, 


Marlboro', 


21 


153 


5-7% 


Rep. 


Congregat'l 


A. Peters^ 


Boston, 


21 


156K 


5-9 


Dem. 


Episcopal. 


E. B. Rawson, 


Dover, 


20 


147 


5-8% 


Rep. 


Unitarian. 


H. F. Smith, 


Whately, 


19 


153 


5-10% 


Rep. 


Congregat'l. 


A. W. Spalding, 


Billerica, 


21 


151 


5-10 


Rep. 


Baptist. 


P. P. Taylor, 


Boston, 


23 


136 


5-7% 


Rep. 


Episcopal. 


A. Whi taker. 


Southbridge, 


20 


170 


5-9 


Rep. 


Congregat'l 


H. H. Wilcox, 


Nawiliwili, S. I., 


2 


1 


152 


5-9 


Rep. 


Congregat'l. 



Average age, 20 7-16 

Average vs^eight, 145% 

Average height, 5-8% 



91 



■ 


ae 


a 

s 




s 




(Tt- 


o' 




^ p. S. AUen, 


Medfield, 25 


168 


5-9M 


Rep. 


Unitarian. 


1 G. T. Aplin, 


Putney, Vt., 18 


126 


5-6 


Rep. 


Congregat'l. 


C. E. Beach, 


Hartford, Ct. 18 


isiy. 


5-9}£ 


Dem. 


Episcopal. 


; E. P. Bingham, 


Lunenburg, 19 


162 


5-73^ 


Rep. 


Congregat'l. 


:| W. H. Bishop, 


Cumberland, R. I., 21 


170K 


5-9K 


Rep. 


Methodist. 


;i H. S. Brodt, 


Maysville, Cal., 17 


139K 


5-7^A 


Rep. 


Presbyterian 


'; E. S. Chandler, 


Coldwater, Mich., 19 


152 


5-111 


Rep. 


Presbyterian 


y J. W. Cooper, 


East Bridgewater, 19 


140 


5-9i 


Rep. 


Methodist. 


1 J. A. Cutter, 


Woburn, 17 


119K 


5-6K 


Rep. 


Congregat'l. 


111 S. C. Damon, 


Lancaster, 22 


183 


5-8K 


Rep. 


Unitarian. 


i C. S. Pish, 


Boston, 24 


145 


5-9X 


Rep. 


Congregat'l. 


[i C. W. Floyd, 
1 D. Goodale, 


Worcester, 


21 


140 


5-6K 


Dem. 


Congregat'l. 


Honolulu, S. L, 


19 


169 


5-10>i 


Rep. 


Congregat'l. 


I C. D. Hillman, 


Hardwick, 20 


173 


5-llM 


Rep. 


Universalist 


' J. H. Howard, 

'i 


Hyannis, 


17 


136 


5-8K 


Rep. 


Congregat'l. 


G. D. Howe, 


Waterbury, Ct., 


17 


133 


5-6M 


Rep. 


Congregat'l. 




P. W. Jones, 


South Scituate, 20 


163K 


5-8 


Rep. 


Universalist 




P. H. Joyner, 


North Egremont, 


18 


160 


5-llK 


Dem. 


Baptist. 




M. B. Kingman, 


Charlemont, 


18 


134 


5-9% 


Rep. 


Congregat'l. 




B. A. Kinney, 
P. G-. May, 


Lowell, ] 


9 


157K 


5-10% 


Rep. 


Congregat'l. 




Dorchester, 19 
Boston, 19 


147 


5-11% 


Rep. 


Unitaiian. 




W. A. Morse, 


145 


6-0 


Rep. 


Episcopal. 




H. Myrick, 


Arlington, 20 


148 


5-6 


•Rep. 


Episcopal. 


1 J. B. Paige, 


Prescott, 19 


151 


5-7K 


Rep. 


Congregat'l. 


D. E. Perkins, 


Wakefield, 


L8 


141 


5-7 


Rep. 


Baptist. 


C. S. Plumb, 


Westfield, 


19 


153 


5-8% 


Rep. 


Congregat'l. 


A. P. Shiverick, 


East Dennis, 


19 


163 


5-9% 


Dem. 


Episcopal. 


W. E. Stone, 


Chesterfield, N. H., 


18 


144K 


5-103^ 


Rep. 


Congregat'l. ^ 


''. L. R. Taft, 


Mendon, 


31 


143 


5-6>^ 


Rep. 


Unitarian. 




: A. H. Taylor, 


Yarmouth, 


18 


181 


6-1 


Rep. 


Congregat'l. 




' W. H. Thurston, 


Upton, 


20 


130K 


5-5K 


Grnbk 


Congregat'l. 




; C. D. Warner, 


Granby, 


26 


177 


5-93^ 


Rep. 


Methodist. 




■J H. L. Wheeler, 


Great Barrington, 


34 


131 


5-93^ 


Rep. 


Episcopal. 




. I J. E. Wilder, 


Lancaster, 


19 


173X 


5-113^ 


Rep. 


Unitarian. 




J. S. WilUams, 


Glastonbury, Ct. 


31 


156 


5-8% 


Rep. 


Congregat'l. 


f 


B P. A. Wilmarth, 


Hopedale, 


L9 


127X 


5-7% 


Rep. 


Unitarian. 


J. L. Windsor, 


Marion, la.. 


19 


136X 


5-83# 


Rep. 


Congregat'l. 




■\ Average age, 








19K 






i Average weight, . 






. 


149>^ 






Average height, 




• • 


• 


5-9 





93 



S. C. Bagley, 18 153 5-9^^ Republican. 

E. A. Bishop, 19 150 5-73^ Republican. 
C. T. Conger, 17 138 * 5-7 Republican. 

F. H. Fletcher, 22 128 5-6 Republican. 
A. A. Hevia, 19 151 5-7 Republican. 
S. M. Holman, 18 140>^ 6-0^ RepubHcan. 
J. B. Lindsey, 18 149 5-103^^ Democrat. 

C. W. Minott, 21 146 5-83^ Republican. 

D. O. Nourse, 19 154)^ 5-10>^ Republican. 
H. W. Owen, 17 Ul^ 5-10)4 Republican. 
C. H. Preston, 17 130 5-9% Republican. 
J, L. Selden, 17 127 5-7 Democrat. 
H. J. Wheeler, 19 127 5-9)^ Republican. 

Average age, 18 7-13 

Average weight, 1403^ 

Average height, 5-8% 



IBS 0f ^84, 



D. Braune, • 21 141 5-53^ Independ't. 
H. C. Brown, 18 1253^ 5-7)^ Republican. 
G-. Cutler, Jr., 18 129 5-6 Republican. 
H. W. Dickinson, 17 122 .5-10 Republican. 

E. W. Dwight, 17 160 6-03^ Republican. 
H. E.V.Goessmann 15 135 5-8 Republican. 
C. Herms, , ' 17 134 5-7^ Republican. 
H. D. Holland, 17 143 5-11 Republican. 
E. A. Jones, 21 151 5-63^ Repubhcan. 
C. R. Kenfield, 19 116 5-^X Republican. 
A. Lublin, 15 120 5-53^ Republican. 
W. P. Mayo, 19 149 5-103^ Democrat. 
M. J. Redding, 15 87 5-3 Republican. 
L. Smfth, 17 142 5-10% Repubhcan. 
W. H. Smith, ,16 140 , .5-7 Republican. 
W. R. Smith, 17 1453^ 5-5% Republican. 

Average age, 17 7-16 

Average weight, 133% 

Average height, 5-7% 



93 



¥ 



•a-vu mQcypvc^^. 



Taylor, A. H. The Gigantic. 

Wilcox. " My Fejee Chum." 

Shiverick. MiKih tall side ways. 

Mayo. " Put my little shoes away." 

Beach. The would be Wellesley masher. 

Brown. Merchant. Wholesale dealer in " G-all." 

When at leisure examine Cooper's side whiskers and chromos. 

Fish vs Spalding. G-raeco Roman wrestlers. Match decided a draw. 

Lublin. Beware of the effects of irregularity in taking "Uitalized 
Brain Pood." 

Frof. Baker. " I wish 1 had bought me a lumber wagon before they 
had riz so high." 

He via. Runs the Catholic fair in town. May well be called the Catholic 
" fair" masher. 

'83. It is not true that Mr. Lovell had to use a baby rattle when h^took 
the class pictures. 



BoYNTON. " Primeval Forest, 
the slimy herbageof my feet? ' " 



What uncouth creatures twine about 



Warner — In laboratory experiment gives a blue precipitate. The blow 
pipe gives a blue bead on charcoal. Lovell astonished and unable to account 
for it. Sequel: Warner had on blue glasses. 



95 



Ic^cUa^'Vc^' ^O'-t^^. 



Mr. Plumb is "sat on " by Prof. Emerson in being called "Darwin's 
missing link." 

Prof. Stockbridge: " Now I will ask Kingman a question that will stop 
his smiling." 

Prof. G-oessmann: "Tell us the why and wherefore, Mr. Flint." 
Mr. Flint. " Never mind the^ why and wherefore." 

Prof. G. : " Nah yes, Mr. Flint, 'hardly ever,' is't not.'" (Immense ap- 
I plause.) 

i Prof. Emerson: "I have no objection to the evolution theory, and in 

fact I rather like to entertain the idea that man is descended from monkeys. 
h for there has been considerable evidence of monkeyism since I entered the 
\i room." ("Hear!" "Hear! " Great excitement.) 



'-/t^ii^^^h^noAd^ ®e^a{>li4-a^ pocie^>u. 



^dh i^ 9lo. 6 91. e., 3amiart^ Ut, 1880. 



(Question — Resolved, That the College ought to have some money. 

DEBATERS. 

Affirmative. % Negative. 

1st— Smith. • 1st— Chaplin. 

2d— Manton. 2d— Holman. 

Smith sold out to Wheeler, one of the audience, for 10 cents. Wheeler 
transferred his claim to Holman, whereupon the President fined Mr. Holman 
10 cents for breach of parliamentary rules, and the meeting broke up in dire 
confusion. 

Debate decided in the negative — no money is needed. 

Nobody, Secretary. 



96 






te 




"XyI 



t 



■^^ 



s^ 



U4/H/14/1/. 



-^- 




^«»ft^ 



97 







S ■we gaze through the haze of years at events characteristic of the 
hves of our pilgrim -ancestors, hallowed and rendered less obtru- 
sive by time, none presents a scene of more interest, or appears 
'" more deeply wrought with romance, thaji the picture of the stern 
puritan eagerly scanning the horizon for the appearance of the infrequent 
vessel from the mother country, the arrival of which, laden perhaps with 
the necessities of life; certainly freighted with that often yet more dearly 
prized — news from home — tidings sent by friends in old England to absentees 
in the New, filled the quiet colony with excitement, and called forth from 
its inhabitants the remnant of poetry in their austere natui'es. Not always 
was the burden a wholly joyous one, but often, aye, very often, sorrow came 
to some member of the band which so anxiously watched the incoming sail, 
as the one link connecting the new life in the west with the old life across 
the sea, and uniting in thought friends separated perhaps forever. 

And now, when called upon to supply the usual Alumni contribution for 
the Index, this simile is irresistably presented to us ; perhaps the more for- 
cibly that these pages so often recalling only pleasant memories, will 
probably bear to many an Aggie Alumnus his first tidings of the death of a 
friend and brother, one whose memory will be ever cherished, whose loss we 
must, and the world might, mourn; and of whom each affirms: "A manlier 
man never lived." 

We, graduates and students, have entered upon a new pilgrimage, are 
devoted to a creed whose adherents are comparatively few. The belief in a 
new agriculture is ours, the principles for which our Alma Mater was created 
are ours; and tfiatthey are destined to accomplish the elevation of the "art 
of arts, without which, man is a savage and the earth a wilderness, " is the 
work in which we are engaged. We have already entered upon the life in a 
world for whose strifes you are still preparing. And the Index is the one 
ever recurring and returning vehicle through which we, who a few years ago 
filled your places, are in thought brought back to Alma Mater, there to re- 
new the friendships formed in college, and form new acquaintances among 
those who now tread the paths from which we have but just emerged. 



The graduate too frequently receives his only news from college, i^artic- 
ularly concerning its graduate life, through the annual appearance of this 
Junior publication. Is it strange that its yearly presence is eagerly watched 
for by many a busy man, and that when a% last the long awaited pages lie 
before him, all care is for a while forgotten in perusing tidings from the old 
college home, and recalling many a long passed scene suggested by some 
remembrance thus brought to mind. r^ 

That the reunion sought be most complete, it is exceedingly fitting that jd 
we as Alumni occupy a few lines in the publication bearing your impress as 
students. This, we believe, is the thought in your minds, and nothing more 
is either expected or desired of us. 

As we glance over the period that has elapsed since we as students re- 
ceived the first Alumni letter, the time seems wonderfully short, and we are 
impressed with the youth of our college, and with the absurdity of attempt- 
ing the offer of sage advice, or of relating the experiences of times. Indeed, 
gray hair is a thing of th% future among us, for the oldest alumnus is still a 
young man. Look upon us, therefore, as brothers seeking your welfare, and 
interested in the prospects before you, because you are, with us, sons of the 
M. A. C. 

We kQow you ai'e deeply anxious for her success, and that of the princi- 
ples of which she is the exponent; let us remind you that the way in which 

you can most certainly advance her cause, aid in her work, establish those ^ 

P 
principles and accomplish that for which she was founded, and for which | 

you have' been received to Her halls, is by availing yourselves of every ■' 

opportunity she offers for increasing knowledge or affording discipline, even ;^ 

though now failing to see the end, or unable to appreciate the reason. You | 

will hardly have passed from the protecting arms of Alma Mater ere you n 

encounter some obstacle more easily overcome, but for an opportunity ne- ■ i| 

glected, or an advantage allowed to glide by unheeded during your under- | 

graduate career. :| 

Gradually, but nevertheless constantly, America is espousing the princi- ; 
pies to which our college is dedicated ; compelled by the irresistable force of ;' 
necessity, our country stands ready to welcome the men educated in the ,j 
great principles which govern all nature, in the elements of the art on w^hich i 
prosperity rests, and from which all industries draw life ; and possessing a ,| 
knowledge of practical affairs. These are the w^eapons your college offers ^ 
you; your future depends on the ability with which you wield them, | 
and will be just what you make it. No mean place in history awaits men 
instructed in the union of theory and practice, in the application of true 
science to daily vocations. This position is yours if you care to claim 
it. Are you fully conscious of the near approach of the end toward which 
we urge you to strive ? A hundred years ago and not an institution in 
the world even professed to bestow the slightest attention upon the study of 
agriculture, and only dreamers thought of the possibility of an education 



adapted to the special requirements of agriculturists. To-day the civilized 
world accepts the truth of the visions they beheld. Half a century ago no 
country of Europe had introduced the study of agriculture to the pupils of 
its public schools. The system is now fast beconaing universal. It is barely 
a generation since the first agricultural college in the new world was strug- 
gling into a feeble existence; to-day every state in the Union has placed its 
sanction upon the movement then inaugurated. See to it then that when 
called iipon to assume your position in the sphere awaiting you, no opportu- 
nity whereby you might have been better prepared, has been allowed to 
pass unimproved. 

Another thing we would suggest. The limit of knowledge can not be 
reached in four years ; therefore, whenever practicable, give post-graduate 
study to your chosen profession. Other pursuits demand it, why not agri- 
culture? But be your life-labors in the realm of Ceres, or as far removed 
therefrom as thorium is from hydrogen, advantage is sure to accrue from 
additional time spent in professional work, or in broadening your views with 
a more extended culture. 

Both you and we are embarked on a craft which, though she has safely 
encountered many a storm, has not yet reached her haven. Though we have 
unbounded faith in the hands that hold the helm, remember that officers 
efforts can avail little except when supplemented by exertions of the crew. 
We are the standard by which the merits of the M. A. C. are ultimately 
to be estimated. Let, then, no fault of ours deti-act from her glory. 

Our college mother naturally comes in time to depend on her sons; hav- 
ing done her best to prepare us for the responsibility, she is entitled to our 
aid. May we ever show ourselves a brotherhood united in the faith, and 
strong in the teachings of our common parent. Alma Mater. 

Alumnus. 



100 




101 






of td 



|Kck5'i>CK>fv'U'<5ei''tiy Q-a^'i/CtivlX/^t-ai §oi^eae. 



Offi 



-t-cC''r'C^ poz- 



1880-81. 



PKESIDENT 
J. H. WEBB, '73. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS. 



W. D. RUSSELL, '71. 
E. N. DYER, '72. 
H. B. SIMPSON, '73. 
J. M. BENEDICT, '74. 



*J. W. CLAY, '75. 
T. E. SMITH, '76. 

J. WYMAN, '77. 
C. O. LOVELL, '78. 



W. A. SHERMAN, '79. 

TREASURER. 
H. E. STOCKBRIDGE, '78. 

CORRESPONDING SECRETARY. 
S. T. MAYNARD, '72. 

KECORDING SECRETARY. 

P. M. HARWOOD, '75. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 



E. E. THOMPSON, '71. 
J. H. MORSE, '71 



AUDITING COMMITTEE. 



ATHERTON CLARK, '77. 



J. W. CLARK, '72. 



H. L. PHELPS, '74. 



•Deceased. 



103 



JABEZ W. CLAY. 

M. ^. C, '75. (P 2' K 

Jan. 24th, 1852. Oct. 1st. 1880. 



J lli i iTnw »mm«!u»mgc=»3aimBlMiK^ji»uiMa3g; 



Memorial. 




jHEN, in the Fall of 1871, the strong and brave Class of '75 came 
to their ■work, the strongest and bravest member was Jabez 
W. Clay. This ascendency, a native gift, knit with the most 
thoughtful and kindly temperament, he maintained (in the 
consenting love rather than the defeated competion of his classmates,) thro' 
all the four college years ; and then, after graduation, he rose steadily to the 
highest position in trust and remuneration held by any member of the class. 
From every one who met him. Clay invited the most truthful regard ; yet 
nothing but the death of so quiet, so unostentatious a man could ever reveal 
to friends the depth of their attachment. And now he is dead. 

Last winter Mr. Clay had declined a professorship in the Japan Agricul- 
tural College, preferring to remain in charge of the extensive business for 
the Bowker Fertilizing Co., which he had built up in New York. In the 
Spring he met Miss Mary J. Evans of New York, to whom, some months 
later, he became engaged. Miss Evans, a truly gracious and capable lady, 
was in every way worthy of Mr. Clay. The wedding-day w^as fixed in Sep- 
tember, but the day before that appointed he was attacked suddenly by 
hemorrhage at the lungs. He hastily made his wiU and wrote words to those 
dear to him. But a physician brought relief. The next morning even his 
terribly strong will almost broke down under the hard fate which had come 
upon his faithful life ; calling a trusted friend to him, he sobbed from the 
bed, " I had expected this to be the happiest day of my life." Knowing in 
what stern mastery Clay held his emotions, his classmates can never forget 
these words. The marriage took place, however, and for a few days he 
rallied; then pneumonia set in severely, and rapid decline followed. To the 
last he suppressed his suffering, which was great. Life was inestimably 
precious to him; he had won his way frona boyhood against every obstacle, 
he had never allowed gloom to affect his actions, and at last he had succeed- 
ed, at last he commanded the future ; the revs^ard for twenty long years of 
faithful struggle was now to begin. Clay felt all this acutely, and set the 
strength of his long-trained will upon living; yet in the end, when the end 
became inevitable, .he died peacefully, resignedly, hopefully. 



103 



There were many to care for him. All -was done that could be done. 
Most especially will his Class always thank their member, Mr. Everett B. 
Bragg, the most intimate friend of Clay's last year, who before and after 
the sad death was ceaseless in helpful thought and action. He did every- 
thing, and the constant presence of so devoted and close a friend must have 
made the last days far more endurable. 

The character of the man we mourn was a rare one ; it combined ele- 
ments seldom found united ; though only in their union may f uU manhood 
exist. Clay was naturally gifted with a quick intellect and a mature, relia- 
ble judgment; but still more naturally was he an executor; to think a thing 
was to do it. His will was simply infallible; determination, constancy, per- 
formance were his natural gift, and he never fell out of it. The combina- 
tion of firm will with keen perceptive power is infrequent enough among 
men, whose failing it generally is to be able to do without knowing how, or 
to know how without being able to do; but yet more rare is the addition to 
these of an affectionate, tender temperament, making the true gentle-man. 
Clay invariably inspired the same quiet regard that he showed to all; his 
heart was very genuine, and simple, sincere friendship— too sincere for 
words— was its native attitude to those about him. Thus he was kind, he 
was clear-headed, and he had a will that clung to its purpose through sor- 
row, through peril and despair, and hard pain and dull monotony, as the iron 
ring clings to the sea-wall, through weather foul and fair, until the storms 
wash down the imbedding rock. Sometimes, way off on little New England 
farms, among the hills, are born men with stuff for Cromwells in them. 
Like the dark Lombardy poplars that grow by their homesteads, they point 
to the past, to the stern Pui'itan days when life was in earnest; they seem a 
message from sober ancestry to these careless days. Such a man was Clay. 

He is gone from the class, from the fraternity that loved him, and they 
find their regard too genuine for words. He was a quiet man himself, say- 
ing but little since he felt so much. So they must bear their regret silently, 
treasuring always a sad admiration for their vanished friend, whose influ- 
ence yet endures. Classmates. 



104 



(3( 1/1/1/ Vl^i44^i S ta I i^ tlC5 



OLA.SS OF "M 



RESIDENCE. 



OCCUPATION. 



G. H. Allen, 
A. L. Bassett, 
W. P. Birnie, 
W. H. Bowker, 
L. B. Caswell, 
H. L. Cowles, 

E. A. Ellsworth, 
J. F. Fisher, 

G-. E. Fuller, 

F. W. Hawley, 

F. St. C. Herrick, 
George Leoiaard, 
R. W. Lyman, 

J. H. Morse, 
L. A. Nichols, 
A. D. ISTorcross, 
J. B. Page, 
S. H. Richmond, 
W. D. Russell, 
Edwin Smead, 
Lewis A Sparrow, 
G-eo. P. Strickland, 
E. E. Thompson, 

G. H. Tucker, 
W. C. Ware, 
William Wheelei", 
P. Le P. Whitney, 



Winfleld, Cowley Co., Kan., Agent, Adams Ex. Co. 



Clerk Vt. C. R. R. & S. S. Co. 

Conductor, Conn. Central R. R. 

President Bowker Fertilizer Co. 

Civil Engineer and Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Civil Engineer. 

Local Freight Agent, F. R. R- 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Lawyer. 

Lawyer. 
Civil Engineer, 
Civil Engineer. 

Lawyer. 

Farmer. 

45 Milk St., Boston, Editor, office Mass. Ploughman. 

Montague Paper Co., Turners Falls, Chemist. 

83 Edmonson Ave., Baltimore, Md., Dealer in coal. 

Boston, Chemist, Bowker Fertilizer Co. 

Stillwater, Mich., Machinist, Seymour, Sabin & Co. 

East Wejrmouth, Teacher. 

GrandiD Farm, Dakota Ter., Farmer and Sheep Raiser. 
Portland, Me., Manager Boston & Portland Clothing Co. 
Concord, Civil Engineer. 

Chelsea, Nursery Business. 



N. Y. City, 

Springfield, 

Boston, 

Athol, 

Hadley, 

Northampton, 

Fitchburg, 

Hadley, 

Methuen, 

Springfield, 

Belchertown, 

251 Essex Street, Salem, 

Santa Fe, N ew Mexico, 

Monson, 

Conway, 



105 















CLASS OF "^S. 


I 




NAME. 


RESIDENCE. OCCUPATION. ' 






B. C. Bell, 


San Francisco, Cal., Druggist. 






W. F. Brett, 


Brockton, Clerk, B. H. White & Co. 






J. W. Clark, 


Amherst, Nurseryman, M. A. C. 






F. C. Cowles, 


Amherst, Parmer. 






J. C. Cutter, 


Sapporo, Jap., Prof, of Natural Science, Jap. Ag. Coll. 






E. N. Dyer, 


Kohala, S. I., Teacher. 






I. H. Easterbrook, 


Diamond Hill, R. I., Parmer. 






E. R. Piske, 


819-821 Market St., Phila., Pa., Merch., PolwellBro. & Co. 






C. 0. Flagg, 


Diamond Hill, R. I., Parmer. 






R. B. Grover, 


Andover, Student of Theology. 






L. Le B. Holmes, 


Matapoisett, Lawyer. 






P. E. Kimball, 


Worcester, Clerk, B. B. & G. R. R. 






R. W. Livermore, 


Toledo, Ohio, Lawyer, Bissell & Gorrill. 






George Mackie, 


Attleboro', Physician. 






S. T. Maynard, 


Amherst, Prof, of Botany and Horticulture, M. A. C. 






H. E. Morey, 


49 Haverhill St., Boston, Clerk, Morey & Smith. 






W. R. Peabody, 


Atchison, Kansas. Gen. Ag't, A. T. & S. F. R. R. 






F. B. Salisbury, 


Kimberly, Diamond Fields, So. Africa, Clerk. 






E. D. Shaw, 


Holyoke, Florist. 






G. H. Snow, 


Leominster, ^ Farmer. 






F. M. Somers, 


San Francisco, Cal., Editor "Argonaut." 




• - 


S. C. Thompson, 


Natick, Civil Engineer. 




Henry Wells, 


Rochester, N. Y., Box 499, Clerk, Blue Line Co. 






W. C. Whiting, 


Security Bank Building, Minneapolis, Minn., Architect. 






CLASS OF "^3. 






NAME. 


RESIDENCE. OCCUPATION. 




F. C. Eldred, 


119 Chambers St., N. Y,. Salesman, D. W. Wilson & Co. 






W. S. Leland, 


Concord, Overseer, State Prison. 






A. H. Lyman, 


Manistee, Mich. , Druggist and Book-seller. 






G. W. Mills, 


Medford, Phj^sician. 






J. B. Minor, 


New Britain, Conn., Clerk, Russell & Erwin Mfg. Co. 






D. P. Henhallow, 


Amherst, Student, 17 Green St., Charlestown, Mass. 






J. B. Renshaw^, 


Hutchinson, Mich., Clergyman. 




< 


H. B. Simpson, 
A T. Wakefield, 


Centreville, Md., Farmer. 






Morocco, Newton Co., Ind., Physician. 
Northampton, Farmer, 






S. S. Warner, 






J. H. Webb, 


16 Exchange Building, N. Haven, Ct., Attorney-at-Law. 






Chas. Wellington, 


Washington, D. C, Chemist, Ag'l. Department. ! 




i 


F. W. Wood, 


Providence, R. I., Civil Engineer. \ 

i 





106 



CLASS OF "5^4. 



NAJIE. 



RESIDENCE. 



OCCUPATION. 



J. M. Benedict, 
W. H. Blan chard, 
E. P. Chandler, 

D. G. Hitchcock, 
J. A. Hobbs, 

E. H. Libby, 

A. H. Montague, 
H. L. Phelps, 

F. S. Smith, 

E E. Woodman, 
H. McK. Zeller, 



3 Park Place, New York, 
Westminster, V^ 
Abilene, Kansas, 
Warren, 
Bloomington, Neb., 

South Hadley, 
Northampton, 
Hanapden, 
Danvers, 
Hagerstown, Md., 



Bowker Fertilizer Co. 
Farmer. 
Parmer. 
Merchant. 
Farmer. 
Agricultural Journalist- 
Farmer. 
Dealer in Fertilizers. 
Woolen Manufacturer. 
Florist. 
Ag't Singer Mfg. Co. 



CLA.S?^ OF ^'TS. 



RESIDENCE. 



OCCUPATION. 



J. F. Barrett, 3 Park Place, N. York, Salesman, Bowker Fertilizer Co. 

J. A. Barri, Boston, With H. M. Clark. 

E. B. Bragg, 3 Park Place, N. York, ^ Chemist, Bowker Fertilizer Co. 

W. P. Brooks, Sapporo, Japan, Prof, of Ag. and Farm Sup't, Japan Ag. Coll. 
Madison Bunker, New Yoi'k '.City, .Student, American Veterinary College. 

Grantville, Florist. 

West Westminster, Vt., Farmer. 



T. R. Callender, 

F. G. Campbell, 
*J. W. Clay, 

G. R. Dodge, 
Henry Hague, 
P. M. Harwood, 
W. H. Knapp, 



Brighton, Sup't Bowker Fertilizer Co's Works. 

Manville, R. I., Clergyman. 

Barre, Farmer. 

Grantville, Florist. 



L. K. Lee, Des Moines, la., Kellogg & McDougall Oil Works, Buffalo, N. Y. 
G. M. Miles, Miles City, Montana, U. S. Commissioner^of Courts. 

H. P. Otis, Leeds, Sup't Northampton. Emery Wheel Co. 

F. H. Rice, Aurora, Nevada, Meat.Business. 

A. A. Southwick, Mendon, Farmer. 

J. F. Winchester, Lawrence, Veterinary^Surgeon. 



107 



CLiAss or "re. 



RESIDENCE. 



OCCUPATION. 



D. A. Bagley. 
John Bellamy, 
D. O. Chickeriiig, 
C. F. Deuel, 
G. W. M. Guild, 
J. M. Hawley, 
Hiram Kendall, 
T. H. Ladd, 
G. H. Mann, 
W. E. Martin, 
C. W. McConnell, 
W. A. McLeod, 60 
G. A. Parker, 
Gr. L. Parker, 
C. H. Phelps, 
W. H. Porter, 
W. S. Potter, 
J. E. Root, 
J. M. Sears, 
T. E. Smith, 
C. A. Taft, 
G. P. Urner, 
H. G. Wetmore, 
J. E. Wilhams, 



Winchendon, 

659 Washington St., Boston, 

•Enfield, 

Amherst, 

Boston, 

Berlin, Wis., 

Providence, R. I., 

Boston, 

Sharon, 

Excelsior, Minn., 

Lonsdale, R. I., 



Medical Student. 

Nichols, Bellamy & Co. 

Farmer. 

Druggist. 

No Business. 

Banker (partner), C. A. Mather & Co. 

Chemist and Sup't, Kendall Mfg. Co. 

Student. 

Manufacturer. 

Clerk. 

Dentist. 

Devonshire St., Boston, with J. E. Maynardier, Pat. Law. 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Gardener. 

Dorchester, Florist- 

South Framingham, Florist. 

Hatfield, Farmer. 

Lafayette, Ind, Lawyer, firm of W. D. Wallace & Co. 
Barre, Student of Medicine, New York City. 

Ashfield, •• Farmer. 

West Chesterfield, Manufacturer. 

Whitinsville, Machinist. 

54 Leonard St., N. York, Sup't American Ruffle Works. 
New York City, Surgeon, St. Luke's Hospital. 

Amherst, Editor " Record.' 



CLA.SS Ol^ "r'T. 



RESIDENCE. 



OCCUPATION. 



D. H. Benson, 27 Kilby St., Boston, Gen. Ag't, Bradley Fertilizer Co. 

Charles Brewer, Pelham, Farmer. 

Atherton Clark, Georgetown, Eldorado Co., Cal, Mining. 

J. R. HibVjard, Stoughton, Wis., Farmer. 

W. V. Howe, Framingham, Clerk, Framingham Brick Co. 

G. E. Nye, Sandwich, Farmer. 
H. P. Parker, 239B'way, N.Y., Draughtsman, with A.V.Brinsen, Pat. lawyer. 

R. M. S. Porto, Para, Brazil, Planter. 

Joseph Wyman, Arlington, Farmer. 



108 



RESIDENCE. 



OCCUPATION. 



D. E. Baker, Franklin, , Student, H. U. Medical School. 
W. L. Boutwell, Leverett, Farmfer. 
A. A. Brigham, Marlboro', Farmer. 

E. C. Choate, Southboro', Farmer. 
X. Y. Clark, Amherst, Microscopist, Ag'l Dep't. Washington. 
C. F. Coburn, Lowell, Teller, .5-Ct. Sav. Bank, & paragrapher. Daily Citizen. 
S. D. Foot, Springfield, Hampden Watch Co. 
J. N. Hall, Revere, Student, H. U. Medical School. 
C. S. Howe, Albuquerque, N. M., Principal Albuquerque Academy. 
H. F. Hubbard, New Rochelle, Stock Broker, Old Post-Office, N. Y. City. 
J. F. Hunt, San Antonio, Texas. 

H. G. H. Koch, 133 West-20th St., New York City, Farmer. 

C. O. Lovell, Amherst, Traveling for John Gladding & Co., Phila. 

C. E. Lyman, Middlefield, Conn., Farmer. 

Lockwood Myrick, Brazil. 

F. H. Osgood, Edinburg, Scotland, 10 Albany St., Student of Vetei-inary. 
A. L. Spoflford, Georgetown, Student, H. IT. Medical School. 
H. E. Stockbridge, Washington, D. C, CJiemist, Ag'l Department. 
Fred'k Tuckerman, Box 350 Dedham, Student, H. U. Medical School. 
J. H. Washburn, Prov., R. I., Teacher, R. I. S. R. S., & Student Brown Unv. 
R. P. Woodbury, "Elkhorn, Elkhorn Co., Kansas, Druggist & News-dealer. 



CLASS OF 



'O. 



RESIDENCE. 



OCCUPATION. 



Farmer. 
Student, B. U. Law School. 



R. S. Dickinson, Odel, Livingston Co., 111., 

S. B. Green, Chelsea, 

Charles Rudolph, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

W. A. Sherman, New York City, Student, American Veterinary College 

G. P. Smith, Sunderland, Fai-mer 

R. W. Swan, Framingham, Student, H. U. Medical School, 



H. E. B. Waldron, North Rochester, 



Farmer. 



109 



CLASS OF *SO. 



RESIDENCE. 



OCCUPATION. 



A. L. Fowler, Westfield, Clerk, Smith, Ripley & Co., Contractors. 

F E. Grladwin, Lock Box U, Westfield, Surveyor. 

W. G-. Lee, Georgetown, Eldorado Co., Cal., Mining. 

C. M. McQueen, Longmeadow. Nursery Agent. 

W. C. Parker, Wakefield, Farmer. 

Gr. A. Ripley, Amherst, No Business. 

A. H. Stone, Amherst, Post- Graduate, M. A. C. 






110 







^^ 



Old time is turning swift his wheel, 

(Tis oiled so nicely none doth hear) 
Yet we with sorrow know and feel, 
That with two turnings of that wheel, 
Will come our parting year. 

Our Freshman days are not forgot, 

For we, like Age, who dreams of Youth, 
Oft love to dwell on what is not, 
And make the past our present lot, 
As if it was in truth. 

To hear again the bovine's bleat. 

From halls of worship trembling flow, 
The midnight stir of stealthy feet. 
The carol of the fish-horn sweet, 
The fisherman's weal of woe. 

Though much we dwell upon the past. 

Yet oft we to the present turn. 
And while the snow flakes thick and fast 
Are whistling through the wintry blast, 
And bright the fire doth burn. 

We gather round its genial glow, 
And then, as swells the storm without, 

From lip to lip in rapid flow, 

Old social songs and stories go — 
Loud rings the merry snout, 

O classmates, it is sad to know 

That we so soon must leave these walls. 
Turn slower. Time, O still moi'e slow. 
Let not thy sands so swiftly flow. 

The inward spirit calls. 

O memory, let thy sacred beam. 
Enhanced by friendship's glowing light, 

Flit ever onward down Life's stream, 

Illumine every darksom dream. 
And hold us to the right. 

So let us live, that men shall say, 

When we at last are wrapt in sleep — 
' ' Virtue and truth did sheer his way, 
He dwelt in peace, in peace doth lay. 
His soul at last — 'Tis meet. " 

B. 



Ill 



^aiiiyyiba/v-. 



)SS0-S). 



Winter Term begins December 9th. 

Holiday, December 25th. 

Holiday, January 1st. 

Holiday, February 22d. 

Winter term ends March 9th. 

Spring Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring Term begins March 24th. 

Holiday, Fast. 

Holiday, May 30th. 

Farnsworth Prize Speaking, .... June 20th. 

Entrance Examination, . . . .' . June 21st. 

Examination of Senior Class in Agriculture, June 21st. 

Review of M. A. C. C. C. by the Governor, . June 22d. 

Commencement, June 22d. 

Summer Vacation. 

Pall Term begins, August 25th. 

Entrance Examination, August 25th. 

Fall Term ends November 23d. 

Pall Vacation of two weeks. 



112 




113 



(^<yVlt'QA^t^. 



Advertisements, 1-4 

Artotype of the President, 

Frontispiece, i . . . . 7 

Editorial, 9-13 

Officers of the College, 13-17 

Cut — "Who's been here since I've been gone," 18 

Students and Class Communications, 19-33 

Senior Appointments, 34 

Military Department, 35-38 

Secret Societies, 39-45 

Cut, — Power of Words, 46 

College Christian Union and Literary Societies, 47-50 

Miscellaneous Organizations, . 51-60 

Cut, — Action and Reaction, 61 

Reading Room Association, 62-63 

Prize Awards, 64 

Artot3^e, — '82 Class Fountain, 

Account of '82 Class Fountain, 65-66 

Relic of November 2, 67 

Crumbs of Comfort, 69-73 

Double Cut, — "Parade is over," Plant House Specimens, ... 74 

Event of the Year, 75-77 

The Bulletin Board 7S-79 

Double Cut,— Go as You Please, " What is it ? " 80 

Pen Sketches, 81-83 

History of the College, 83-85 

Cut,— Theatricals, 86 

Theatricals, ' 87-89 

Census of the College, . 91-93 

Cut, — "There seems to be some local attraction here," ... 94 

Jaw Bones, 9.5-96 

Alumni , 97-110 

Class Poem, Ill 

Calendar, 113 

Final Illustration, 113 

Table of Contents, 114 

Advertisements, 115-128 



114 



OLYOKE 



OUSE 



CITY OF HOLYOKE. 

BUSH & CHASE, Proprietors. 




The Oldest Building now standing in Boston. 



piq 




►Td 






O. G. COUCH 

Will call at the Agriculturol College Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 
to deliver such Goods as may be ordered by the Students. 

ASTRAL AMD COMMON OILS. 

TOBACCO, FEUITS OF ALL KINDS, 

And the best assortment of Goods for Students' use in Amherst. 



A. WILLIAMS & CO, 
283 Washington St., cor. School, BOSTON. 

A. Williams & Co. respectfully invite the attention of students at the 
Agricultural College at Amherst and others, to their large and extensive 
assortment of Books devoted to Agriculture and Gardening, Farmers, Fruit- 
Growers, Horticulturists, and others, all of which are offered at exceedingly 
low prices. 

1^" Full Descriptive Catalogues sent free by mail. 



EDWIN NELSON, 

[Successor to J. S. & C. Adams, House Established 1826.] 
DEALER IN 

►^CLASSICAL AND MISCELLANEOUS BOOKS> 

College Text Books (new and second-hand). School Books, and 

Stationery and Fancy Goods. 

J^" Cash paid for second-hand Text Books. „^I 

No. 3 Post-Offiee Block, , . Amherst, Mass. 



116 



W. H. H. MORGAN, 



DEALER IN 




f 



Fancy and Toilet Articles, 
Cigars, Cigarettes and Tobacco. 



Choice Confectionery a Specialty. 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 




^0. 7 Phoenix Row, - AMHERST, MASS. 

WILLIAMS & CALLOND, 

I 



ftitit Mi 



And Dealers in 

G-eixts' FixrivislixTig Goods. 

FINE SHIRTS TO ORDER. 
"Williams' Block, - - Amherst, IVIass. 

OJKDERS FOK 

WOOD AND COAL 

^edeived kt ©I'ug ^toi^e. 

, W. H. H. MORGAN. 

117 



J. F. PERKINS. 



<^# 



fflRNAMENTAL PAINTING 



Wliite Leail, Oil, Varuisti, Mixed Paint* Ralsomine, and Glass. 

Shop, Basement of Building occupied by A. P. Cowles & Co. 

10 1-2 PHCENIX ROW, - - - - AMHERST, MASS. 

MERRITT CLARK & CO., 






AND DEALERS IN 



oii0THiN6 W^ mwWW 66003, 

^^NORTHAMPTON, MASSal^-^ 

MERRITT CLARK. ORMAN S. CLARK. 






PC 



UJ 



_1 



^^ 




GO 



m 






r^ 






OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE & SINGLE TEAMS, 



TO LET, AT REASONABLE RATES. 



OFFICE AT STABLE. REAR OF AMHERST HOUSE. 



118 




MARSH & YOUNG 

MAKE A SPECIALTY OF 



TUDEP'g-fFUl^PMP 



ill 



'|) (Ip'lBw©;^ 



Book Cases, Blacking Oases. Desks, Curtains, Picture Frames, 

Cord, etc., Constantly on hand at Low Pmces. 
Pleasant Street, AMHERST, Mass. 



9) 



J. M. WAITE & SON, H 

^ ■ AND DEALERS IN LJ 

^ Hats, Caps, Furs iFuroishing Goods 

Where may be found the largest assortment in town. 

f| THE LATEST AND MOST DESIRABLE STYLES. ^ 



n 

a 



Q 



;3 



y 



Discounts made to Clubs and on all large Sales. 
Ciir motto is : "THE BEST." Students, please call and examine 

before purchasing elsewhej-e. Sign of the 7A 

GOLD-TN HAT. Latest and' best styles always on hand. ^ 



I^/^IS^^'S 




F. & M. Schaefer's Vienna Lager Beer, New York, on draught. 
Choice Wines, Liquors and Cigars. 

Hampshire Steam Dyeing and Cleaning Works connected. 

F. W. KAISER, Proprietor. 



119 



G. W. BLODGETT, 

DEALER IN 



Rents' MMi Ml, Hats M Caps, 

AMHERST HOUSE BLOCK, 

J. .S. BEALS, D. D. S., 



CUTLER'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



All operations upon the teeth performed in 
a careful and thorough manner. Ether and 
Nitrous Oxide Gas given when desired, for the 
painless extraction of teeth. 



BOWKER'S AMMONIATED FOOD FOR FLOWERS, IN DOOR AND OUT.-A 
Fertilizer, almost entirely soluble in water, free from odor, and as clean as su- 
gar to handle. It is made expressly for flowers grown in the house or garden. It 
contains nearly the same plant-food as stable dressing, and produces the same re- 
sults, without giving off in the room that offensive and unhealthy odor which arises 
from the application of stable dressing. It produces a healthy, luxuriant growth, 
and induces early and generous flowering, and cannot in any way harm the plants if 
applied according to directions, which are very simple, and accompany each pack- 
age. No lady who delights in flowers, and likes to see them do wfU and bloom abun- 
dantly, should be without the •'Ammoniated Food." A table-sponuful dissolved in a 
gallon of water is a sufficient quantity for twenty ordinary plants like geraniums, 
applied once a week for three or four weeks ; after that, not oftener than once a 
month. Trial packages sent by mail, post paid, 25 cents. 

BOWKER FERTILIZER COMPANY, 

• 

43 Chatham Street, Boston ; 3 Park Place, New York ; 
21 No. Water St., Rochester, N. Y. 



E. O. OLIVER, 



Special aitent'wn to Bicycle Repairs. 

Small Jobbing and Repairing, of every description. Saws filed, Scissors 
and Edge Tools sharpened. Pocket-knives re-bladed, Razors honed and con- 
caved, Sewing machines and Band instruments repaired. Also, keeps for 
sale Revolvers, and a small line of Hardware. 

No. 4 Kellogg's Block, Main St., Amherst, Mass. 



120 



J. L. LOVELL & CO., 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 



) 



If yow want the finest '' Ccvrd-de-yisite ;" 
the best "Cabinet" Photograph, artistic ''Pan- 
els/' exquisite " Porcelains," and *' Carhon " 
enlargements {which never spot or fade), ele- 
gant Framxes, Passevartoats, etc., at reasona- 
ble prices, go to 

LOVELL & CO., 

AMHERST, - - _ MASS. 

WHITTEMORE BROTHEES, 

A&RICnLTUML WAREHOUSE AND SEED STORE, 

Uos. 128 and 130 South Market Street, Boston, Mass. 




OLIVER CHILLED PLOW. 

At a trial on Joseph Walker's Farm, in Concord, N. H., the draft on the 
Oliver was SOU, on the common cast iron 1150, on witch grass sod. 

We will send a Plow to any responsible farmer, and if it does not prove a 
better plow and of easier draft than he ever used or can buy, ■we Tvill pay 
the freight and order it away. It has a large Steel Marsh Point and will 
work perfectly with the horse in the furrow, or the whole team on the sod. 

Also, Whittemore's Chilled Swivel Plow, C a sad ay and Sulky Plow, 

Hamlin s Patent Self-Expanding 
Rubber Bucket Pump. 

Advantages of this Pump ovei^ all others. 

1st. It throws a constant stream of water. 

3d. It purifies the water, by keeping it in motion. 

3d. The water is drawn from the bottom of the well, and always fresh. 

4th. No wear of the tubing. 

5th. The wear of the Bucket is replaced by its self-expansion. 

6th. Draws a larger quantity of water, and with more ease than any other 
water drawer known. 

7th. No expense for repairs. 



121 




^"^^ISIT 



SPRINGFIELD. MASS.. 

Lately removed to the large, light and elegant store, recently occupied by 

McKnight & Co., without dispute the best Clothing Store 

in Western Massachusetts. Our 



b'J 



APllI 



(Made by ourselves) is unequalled. 

OTJPt custom: GAuiytEiVTS 

Are unsurpassed in style, and in every Department you will find the best 
at reasonable prices. 



HAYNES & CO., 



STUDEjS'TS 

When in Northampton will find 

Barr's Dining Rooms 

Tie Best Place to pt tieir Refrestaents. 




Spreads § Class Suppers 

RECEIVE SPECIAL ATTENTION AT 

BARR'S DINING ROOMS. 



133 



Massacliisetls A£riciilliiral College. 



mm, 



OTANICAL 




EPARTMENT, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



We would inform the friends of the College, and the public generally, that 
we are prepared to supply 

SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS. 

All warranted true to name, at the lowest prices. 



For Trees, SMs, etc., aMress 

J. W. CLARK, 
Amherst, Mass. 



For Plants, Flowers, small Fruits 

Address Prof. S. T. MAYNARD, 

Amherst, Mass. 



,a, 



s 



EECEIVED THE GOLD MEDAL, 

Paris Exposition, 1878. 
His Celebrated Numbers, 

303-404- i 70-35 1 -332, 

and his other styles may be had of all dealers 
throughout the world. 

Joseph Gillott & Sons, New Tork. 



123 



Amlierst Bemtri KDoms, 

ESTABLISHED 1861. 

No. 6 Wm. Kellogg's Block, Phoenix Row 
V. W. LEACH, DENTIST. 

Personal attention given to all operations 
on the teeth. 

St^^ Entire Satisfaction Guaranteed. .Ml 



134 



M. J. D. HUTCHIISrs, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in first-class 

General ' Agent for STEINWAY & SONS, CHICKERING & SONS, 
KRANICH & BACH & FISCHER PIANOS. MASON & HAM- 
LIN, ESTEY, and TAYLOR & FARLEY ORGANS. 
Sheet Music and Mtisical Merchandise. Meriting Pianos and Organs' 

First-class Tuner, 



402 Main Street, 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



FROST & ADAMS, 
MATHEMATICAL INSTRUMENTS, &c. 




37^ Cornliill, 



BOSXOIN, 



Catalogues furnished gratis upon application. 



!^f if i W%%m Kllh| \ 
HACKS, CARRYALLS, ' 

Stylish Double and Single Teams. 

TO LET AT FAIR PRICES. 



Aeeonamodations for Transient Feeding. 

Rear of Phoenix Row, - AMHERST, MASS. 

GEO. M. CHAMBERLAIN, Prop'r. 

125 



ESTEY, 

GEO. WOODS, 

LORING & BLAKE, 

TABEK, 

WILCOX & WHITE, 
PELOUBET & CO.,. 





HAZLETON. 

FISCHER. 

HAINES. 

PEASE & CO. 

I^" Pianos and Organs to Rent. 

5^" Brass Band Instruments sold on installments and to rent. 

1^^ Second-hand Instruments taken in exchange for new. 

Accordeons, Concertinas, Flutes, Fifes, Piccolos, Flageolets, Violins, 
Guitars, Banjos, Stools, Covers, &c. 

Any piece of Music published mailed free on receipt of price. 
2^" Our Violin Strings are the best, and each string is warranted, 
1^" Catalogues and circulars mailed free on application. 

8 BANK ROW, GREENFIELD, MASS. 



mL. r^, 



iipaK..^3a. 



DEALER IN 






' Cash paid for second-hand School and College Text Books. 
14 Phoenix Row, Amherst, Mass. 

THE NEW EI\IGL/\ND HOMESTEAD 

Per annum $2.00 ; Six Months, $1 00 ; Three Months, 50 cents. 



The Liveliest Agricultural and Family Paper in Nevi? England, and the only 
one that publishes the College news of M. A. C. 



HERBERT MYRICK, .... 

Greneral A.gj'ent. 



No. 24 S. C, 



126 



FRANK WOOD'S 



Is where you can get 



THE BEST OYSTERS, ANB A TtOOD, SQUARE MEAL, 

For the least money hi Amherst. 

MARK THIS JJOWN ! 



Why Send to New York 

For books which you can buy as low, or lower, nearer home ? 

THE RAILROAD TO "HAMP." is not completed yet, but the stage runs 
daily, and all orders will be filled at once. 

Try us on College Text Books and College Stationery. 

BRIDGMAN & GHILDS, 

NORTHAMPTON. MASS. 



Description 

?/r & JOB PRINTING 

Neatly and I'rompth 

^&G(^^effe Printing Comp 



by 



anv, 



At the Steam Prlnti 



■Sts. 



tiny Establish ntent . 

^Corner Gothic & C 

Northai-nj 

s s 



137 




AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

The full course of study is four years, and includes 
French, German, Literary, Scientific and Mathematical Stud- 
ies. Graduates receive the degree of B. S. Scientific and 
practical branches relating to Agriculture and allied indus- 
tries can be taken as special courses. The paramount aim of 
all instruction, is to combine culture with thorough educa- 
tion for the active business of life. The first term of the 
college year commences Aug. 25th ; the second term, Dec. 
9th; the third term, March 25th and ends June 23u. Candi- 
dates for admission must be fifteen years of age, and pass 
examinations in Grammar, Arithmetic, Algebra through 
simple equations, and History of the United States. Labor 
on the Far-m or in the Horticultural Department is inquired 
' six houi's a week, and Military Drill three hours. Opportu- 
nity is given to labor for self-support. The necessary ex- 
penses are from $175, to $250 a year, one half of which the 
student can earn by his labor if he desires. Further informa- 
tion may be received by applying to 

LEVI STOCKBRIDGE, President. 



128 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
LIBRARY 

LD 

3 234 
1*125 
V.12 

1882 
cop. 2 

+