(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Index"


< 


>«>^>4><S><^<^^^>^<^<»^><S><®«S>^^«^«>^><»^^><g^<S>^^>^^ 


> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 

> : 
> 

> 
> 
> 

> 1 
> 

> 
> 
> 
> 


i 


> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 


This set of yearbooks teas compiled 
by the staff of the 1967 Massachu- 
setts Index and donated in the 
interest of paying tribute to those 
who have created the history and 
traditions existing at the University 
of Massachusetts. 

Alexander Dean, Editor-in-chief 


< 
< 




■^ 


/> 

>« 


^^^>^^^^^/^/^>^^^<^^^;r^^^^^><^'^^^^^^;><$r<^^^^^^^>^/^^^>^^;r^^^;>^^>^ 


^< 



f(r^j€^^_^^. 



._^^.^^ /r. 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/index1883univ 



I s>^/ 



HENRY ADAMS, PiiAii. D., 









^ N^|^^^#^ ■^SSii (m^j 



DRUGS, MEDICINES, PERFUMERY. 



AND 



Toilet Articles, 



Park & Ttlfordl's Imp.(])rt(eil Cigars^ 



ciG^REWEg m TpE pepaii^i^ b^^Nd^, 



^P0KIN6 T0B^CC0, ^C. 



No. 1 Phoenix Ro^A^, 



^Eimlhieir^^tci IMLaL^^c 



LIBRARY 



.,,. Messrs, ,T,XKFA|NY <.' 
.ctepH^'tinents of I desi^-n connected 



fe Go's various 



-"'Wtfe-4fe:43^^4ifferje,Dt branches of their 



business, enable them to produce 
original and successful drawings for 
Prizes, Class Cups, Society Badges, 
Medals and other articles. 

In their Stationery Department the 
facilities for designing forms for Com- 
mencement and other invitations, and 
executing the w^ork in the most ele- 
gant manner are unequaled in this 
country. 

Correspondence invited. 

UNION SQUARE, New York. 



<00'I;^TLJM[Ti3Tl,^^ 3BircDY(niL.3S ^. 



Made of the very 
Best ^Material, 

EXPRESSLY 

"Columbias" 

With,; Riders, 

SUPERIORITY 

STRUCTURE 

Is acknowledged ^ 

Send 3c stamp for 24 page cat 

alogue, with price-lists and 

full information. . 




By the most Skilled 
Workmen, 

FOH ftOAU USE 

are the Favonte 

And their 
IN BEAUTY, 
AND FINISH 
, by All. 

'?T,lli"n'*^r^THE Pope M'fg. Company, 

L '' I \\\W 

I \i \\ 597 Washington Street, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



MASSASOIT HOUSE 

M, & E. S. CHAPIN, Proprietors. 
NEAR THE DEPOT. 

J. J. VINCENT, D. M. D., 

DENTIST. 



GRADUATE OF HARVARD DENTAL COLLEGE. 

ETHER, NITROUS OXIDE, AND NARCOTIC SPRAY 
administered when desired. 

E STABLISHED 184 3. 



Prmdicatores et pliiloso'plii, 
PuMici liomines et oratoi^es. 
Curate dentihus vestris. 



Palmer's Block, 



Amherst, Mass. 



BLODGETT & SEAYEY, 



DEALEKS IN 



Fine Reafly-Mafle CMMiiGsit's FnrnisliiiiE Goods, 

HATS, CAPS, TRUNKS, and TALISES. 

We always have tlie latest styles in the New York and Boston markets. 

BLODGETT & SEAVEY. 

P. S. — Agents for Laundry. Goods taken on Mondays and Wednesdays; 
returned Thursdays and Fridays 



GEORGE CUTLER, 

Offers for sale the largest stock in town of 



''M'W 



Hats and Gaps and Table Linens, 



CHOICE FAMILY GROCERIES A SPECIALTY. 



YY E M: ^ K E 
^ SFEOIA^LTY, 

And give particular attention to Bicycle Suits for individuals and clubs. 
We have a special circular with samples and prices, which we will send 
with rule for self-measurement to any correspondent. 

We have imported this season a line of English Bicycle Suits, made' to 
our special order by the leading house in England, and would be pleased 
to show them. 

YacMiii, Boatiii, Himtini Bicycling Foot-Ball, Base-Ball, 
Lawn Teniiis ai dymasiii Suits, Etc. 

O A.Ii H[ ALL, 

BOSTON,- - ■ - MASS. 








Faculty Mass, Agricultural College. 



Hon. Levi Stockbridge. 

H. H. GOODELL. C. A. GOESSMANN. 

S. T.- Maynard. C. a. Harrington. 

V. H. Bridgman. 



.VOL, XIII, 



NO, i, 



'4W, 



H 



H 



OF THE 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Agricultural College, 



Published by '83 Junior Class, 



Amherst, Nov, issi. 



-^■■♦ O ■ P >! <- 



llortljnmjjton, ||tnss.: 
Strain "^xtss of (Sa^tttc |Jrinting Compunii, 

ass:. 



BOARD OF editors; 



J. B. LINDSEY, S, M, HOLMAN, 

(gbitor ill €h'ui. Snsinrss COitor. 



C, H. Preston, ^||JIS^|^ C, W. Minott, 



^■^-i: •' 



H, J, Wheeler, ^I^^^^^I^ A, A. Hevia, 



C. T, Conger. 




EDITORIAL 




MNOTHEK year has rolled away. The class of '83 is called 
upon for the thirteenth volume of the Index. At fii-st 
^^ the class seemed to feel, owing to the many disconrage- 

^ nients they met with, and the comparatively small num- 
ber in the claPs, as if they had better not assume the responsibility. 
Energy and perseverance however at last triumphed, and the 
result of this is now presented. 

This book founded for the purpose of keeping a record of the 
many organizations of the college, and also recording the inci- 
dents and events of the year, so interesting, especially to the 
student, and Avhich may be kept to be looked upon in after years 
as a remindci' of the many pleasures and associations formed at 
M. A. C, should be made as interesting as possible, and fi'ce 
from anything that would in any way injure the character of the 
students or college. If this contribution is found to be in any 
way dry, or lacking in many of those essential qualities which 
are needed in a work of this kind, we trust the critic will be 
lenient, and remember at least, that the past year has been very 
quiet in compaiison with previous ones, giving the Editors very 
little material to draw from. 

Criticism is a harsh thing, and in reviewing the various parts 
of the college, nothing will be said except that which is for its 
best interest, and will seek to promote its futher ujDbuilding, and 
permanent welfare. The college, as is well known, has for the 
past few years, been in some what of an unsettled condition from 



different causes, especially from lack of sufficient means, to carry 
out the design for which it was established. But this is not at 
all surprising, for the same thing has taken place, in all our 
older and most celebrated institutions of learning, in their early 
struggle for existence. The college also being to a certain ex- 
tent dependent upon successive legislatures for its support, has 
suffered much from the different opinions and actions of different 
bodies. It is at present self-supporting, although somewhat 
crippled in its usefulness. It now needs a fund similar to other 
institutions, and which we have great hopes it will obtain in the 
near future. Let us hope that the worst is past, and may we 
see a glorious future open before our beloved alma mater. We 
agree with a former editor to a certain extent, as regards 
the low standard of admission. This however we believe will be 
raised as the college grows older. 

There has been much dissatisfaction manifested towards our 
President, and while grumblers are found in every walk of life, 
still we are compelled to say we believe it is not all without 
foundation. 

The farm in connection with the college, in our opinion, is in 
a very unsatisfactory condition, and is far from what it was in- 
tended it should be. We are not among those who believe in 
the flaunting statements often made before the public, by per- 
sons entirely ignorant of the circumstances, that it should be 
made to pay as a business enterprise. The farm is, or should be 
for the purpose of illustrating in the best possible way, the prac- 
tical part of agriculture and should have sufficient means to 
so do. 

The horticultural department of Prof. Maynard is in a flourish- 
condition, which reflects great credit upon the manager. It is 
plainly evident however that the Professor is, much overworked 
in attending to the very laborious duties in that direction, as 
well as those of a regular professor in tlie college, and it is lioped 
that he will soon be relieved. 

An experimental station is one of the things very much need- 
ed and which of necessity must soon be established. It is hardly 



fitting in a work of this kind, to go into an argument pointing 
out the various reasons why this should be established ; indeed 
it seems to ns as if they were self-evident. If the gentlemen 
who are appointed by the people of the state to act as their ser- 
vants, and who are supposed to work for their best interest 
would look the subject squarely in the face as true sons of the 
old Bay State, they could not fail to see the benefits that would 
be derived from it. Let them remember that agriculture, an 
industry of such vast importance to the state, and also laying at 
the foundation of our national prosperity, should be fostei'ed 
and encouraged, instead of being looked upon with a feeling of 
indifference, as is now to often the case. Professor Goessmann 
with such a wide experience, is most admirably fitted to stand at 
the head of such a department, and we know the result would 
be highly gratifying to the people. 

Professor Goodell owing to poor health, has been obliged to 
leave his duties once during the year, and while his loss was 
much felt we would willingly grant it, rather than that his 
health be further impaired. 

During the summer vacation our much beloved Professor in 
Mathematics resigned his position after faithfully filling the 
chair for seven years. We believe we speak for every student of 
the college, when we say that his loss is keenly felt by all of us. 
We heartily wish him success in his future labors, and for his 
encouraging words and earnest work in our behalf, his name will 
ever find a place in our memory, as one of our truest friends. 
The chair has been filled by the appointment of Professor Har- 
rington, and we extend to him a cordial welcome, and earnestly 
hope that he will have the same success as the one who preceded 
him. 

Lieut. Morris' term of office having expired, his place has 
been filled by the appointment of Lieut. Bridgman. By the 
interest that our new Lieut, has already manifested, and by the 
"business like " energy he displays, we are sure that his efforts 
will meet with success, and that our military department will be 
one of the most successful of its kind in the country. 



At tlie beginning of the present term, another Freshman class 
unfurled its banner to the breeze, and recorded its name in the 
history of the college, as the class of '85. We welcome this class 
as it for the first time commences its labors among us. Its num- 
bers were not as large as we had wished, but certainly it is a 
great improvement on the one which preceded it. Class 
of '85, freshmen indeed you are, but four years of college train- 
ing are before you, and we trust that you will emblazon upon the 
walls of this, our college home, a name wliich you may always 
be able to look upon with feelings of pride and admiration. 

The chair of mental and moral science has for the last few 
years been abolished, owing to the lack of the necessary funds to 
sustain it. Of its value, yes, its necessity in our course of in- 
struction, no one will for a moment deny, and the editors hope 
the day is not far distant, when this will again be established. 

We trust that college sports will not be allowed to die out, for 
besides being of great value to ourselves, they are one of the 
things which make a college popular. 

And now fellow students, we place this work in your hands, 
trusting that you will not be too severe in your criticisms. That 
our work is imperfect we do not doubt : but remember as you 
turn its pages, that perfection is difficult to attain by mortal 
man. To the class who comes after us, and whose duty next it 
will be to take up the editorial pen, we would say, do not give 
up the Index, but strive to improve it, until it may attain even 
a wider popularity than at present. To you members of the 
class of '83, we your servants dedicate it, trusting that in the 
future it may serve to bring back to our minds, burdened with 
the cares of the world, pleasures which will make our pathway 
brighter, and may it serve to awaken within us, remembrances of 
one of the happiest periods of our life. 




dn 9TC<2^14iO't^lcH4/l. 



^'Cvyn^'Q.^^ Ql. &cvz^$lQytb^ 



fE'^ei^i-be^n-t ol th'O' ^tVite-b S-tci/tec^, 



3)i<2/C> Sepl^e-Hn/^Gi:^ 19^ 1881. 










OFFICERS^ 




0F ¥PE 




rAGRICULTURAL'COLLEGE^ ^l 



Kl881-82.1:R 






11 




BOARD OF TRUSTEES."! 




MEMBERS EX-OFFICITS. 
His Excellency, JOHN D. LONG. 

Hon. LEVI STOCKBRIDGE, 

President of the College. 

JOHN E. RUSSELL, Esq., 
, Secretary Board of Agriculture. 

Hon. J. W. DICKINSON, 

Secretary Board of Education. 



MEMBERS BY ELECTION. 



Hon. MARSHALL P. WILDER, 
Hon. CHARLES G. DAVIS, 
HENRY COLT, Esq., . 
RHINE AS STEDMAN, Esq., 
JAMES S. GRINNELL, Esq., 
GEORGE NOYES, Esq., 
Hon. DANIEL NEEDHAM, 
Hon. WILLIAM KNOWLTON, 
Hon. JOHN CUMMINGS, 
WILLIAM WHEELER, Esq., 
O. B. HAD WEN, Esq., 
BENJ. P. WARE, Esq., 
JAMES H. DEMOND, Esq., 



Boston. 
Plymouth. 

PiTTSFIELD. 

Chicopee. 

Greenfield. 

Boston. 

Groton. 

Upton. 

WOBURN. 

Concord. 
Worcester. 
Mabblehead. 
Northampton 



12 



\ 



^ 



c[ lIlEXECUTiVE "COMMiTTEEj! }> 



Pres. LEVI STOCKBRIDGE. JOHN E. RUSSELL, Esq. 

Hon. WILLIAM KNOWLTON. PHINEAS STEDMAN, Esq. 

O. B. HADWEN, Esq. 



SECRETARY. 



Hon. CHARLES L. FLINT, 



Boston. 



A UDITOR. 



HENRY COLT, Esq. 



PiTTSFIELD. 



TREASURER. 



Hon. JOHN CUMMIN GS, 



WOBURN. 



BOARD OF OVERSEERS. 
THE STATE BOARD OP AGRICULTURE. 



EXAMINTNQ COMMITTEE OF OVERSEERS. 



JOHN P. LYNDE. 
JOHN B. MOORE. 



JOHN P. BROWN. 
AVERY P. SLADE. 



E. F. BOWDITCH. 



13 




F ACULTY. 
w — ^^' 




Hon. LEVI STOCKBRIDGE, 

President and Professor of Agriculture. 

HENRY H. GOODELL, A. M. 

Professor of Modern Languages. 

CHARLES A. GOESSMANN, Ph. D. 
Professor of Chemistry. 



CHARLES A. HARRENGTON, A. B., 

Professor of Physics and Civil Engineering. 

SAMUEL T. MAYNARD, B. S., 
Professor of Botany and Horticulture. 

VICTOR H. BRIDGMAN, 2nd Lieut. 2nd Artillery, U. S. A. 
Professor of Military Science ayul Tactics. 



JOHN F. WINCHESTER, V. S., 
Lecturer on Veterinary Science and Practice. 



BEN J. K. EMERSON, Ph. D., 

Lecturer on Geology. 

JOHN TYLER, A. M., 
Lecturer on Entomology and Zoology. 

JOHN W. CLARK, B. S., 

Superintendent of Nurseries. 



14 




BOSTON - university: 



-^^^^#j^' >=<t ^ 





UNIVERSITY COUNCIL. 

'w — ^ "^ 




WILLIAM F. WARNER, S. T. D., LL.D. 
President. 



JAMES E. LATIMER, S. T. D., 
Dean of the School of Theology. 

EDMUND H. BENNETT, LL.D., 
Dean of the School of Law. 

I. TISDALE TALBOT, M. D., 

Dean of the School of Medicine. 

JOHN W. LINDSEY, S. T. D., 
Dean of the College of Liberal Avis. 

EBEN TOURGEE, Mus. D., 
Dean of the College of Music. 

Hon. LEVI STOCKBRIDGE, 
President of Mass. Agricultural College. 



15 



-^-r 



■»■ 1 q^i ^r> !y~^~^ f 



-1-^ 




APPOINTMENTS. 



, President. 

BISHOP, Historian. 

BINGHAM, . . . . Poet. 

STONE, . . . ^ . . . . . . . . . Prophet. 

COOPER, . . Prophet's Prophet. 

DAMON, Orator. 

WILDER, Toastmaster. 

MAY, Odist. 






16 



^ 






^^y-'^^^^^^^T i S 






>5|C)«JVfD5l^ 




c 




,® ® 



CATIONS. 







17 



'8£. 



" Setnel et Siimiel." 

OFFICERS. 

W. E. STONE, President. 

E. S. CHANDLER, . . . Vice-President. 

G. D, HOWE, Secretary. 

G-. T. APLIN, Treasurer. 

W. H. BISHOP, Historian. 

W. A. MORSE, .... Class Captain. 



Allen, Frauds Sherwin 
Aplin, George Thomas 
Beach, Charles Edward 
Bingham, Eugene Percival 
Bishop, William Herbert 
Brodt, Harry Siiowdea 
Chandler, Everett Sawyer 
Cooper, James Willard 
Cutter, John Ashburton 
Damon, Samuel Chester 
Floyd, Charles Walter 
Goodale, David 
HlUman, Charles Dexter 
Howard, Joseph Henry 
Howe, George Dickinson 



residences. 


ROOMS. 


Medfield, 


No. ISS.C. 


EastPutnexj, VL, 


26 S. C. 


Hartford, Conn., 


25 S. C. 


Fitchburg, 


21 S. C. 


Diamond Hill, R. L 


21 N. C. 


Dansville, N. Y., 


5S. C. 


Coldwater, Mick., 


Mrs. Chandler. 


East Dridgewater, 


D . G. K. House. 


N. Y. City, 


13 N. C. 


Lancaster, 


11 S. C. 


Boston, 


14 S. C. 


Marlboro, 


10 S. C. 


Hardwick, 


9 S. C. 


Hyanni.'i, 


5 S. C. 


North Hadley, 


25 N. C. 



18 



Kingman, Moi-ris Bird 
Kinney, Burton Ariel 
Ma_y, Fi'sderick Godrlard 
Morse, William Austin 
Myrick, Herbert 
Paige, James Breckenridge 
Perkins, Dana Edson 
Plumb, Charles Sumner 
Shiverick, Asa Frank 
Stone, Wintlirop Ellsworth 
Taft, Levi Rawson 
Taj'lor, Alfred Rowland 
Thui'ston, Wilbur Hei'bert 
Wilder, John Emery 
Williams, James Stoddard 
Windsor, Joseph Libbey 
Total, 



Amherst, 

Lowell, 

Boston, 

Boston, 

Concord, 

Prescott, 

Lynn , 

Westfield, 

Wonils Holt, 

Amherst, 

Mendon, 

Yarmoiithport, 

Upton, 

Lancaster, 

Olastonhvry, Conn., 

Grafton, 



Mr. Kingman's. 

5 N. C. 

6 S. C. 

7 S. C. 
26 S. C. 
13 S. C. 

5 N. C. 

13 S. C. 

D. G K. House. 

Mr. Stone's. 

21 S. C. 

D. G. K. House. 

9 S. C. 

11 s. c. 

9 S. C. 
18 S. C. 
31. 



Abercrombie, F. N. 
Allen, G. D. 
Brown, C. H. 
Casparian, G. 
Chandler, W. M. 
Chase, H. K. 
Clarke, H. L. 
Clay, C. M. 
Cochran, R. A. Jr. 
Cummins, W. H. 
Crafts, 6. E. 
Currier, G. F. 
Smith, H. R. 
VVheelock, V. L. 



LEFT COLLEGE 
Delano, J. J. 
Duel, F. D. 
Dutton, C. K. 
Fish, C. S. 
Gowdy, H. M. 
Harris, L. L. 
Hill, C. H. 
Holmes, S. J. 
Jackson, A. 
Johnson, F. P. 
Jones, E. S. 
Jones, F. W. 

Wneeler, H. L. 



FROM '82. 

Kenfield, C. R. 
Knowles, W. F. Jr. 
Crauss, A. A. 
Leonard, A. 
Lindsey, F. B. 
Livermore, N. L. 
Luques, E. C. 
Meade, W. G. 
Miller, W. E. 
Parsons, H. A. 
Perkins, C. B. 
Porter, R. L. 
Palnam, H. A. 
Wilmarth, F. A. 






19 




t^jOiOR the last time the class of '83 is called upon for its con- 
^Jyy tribution to the Index. We have begun the year with less 
^W/ than half of those, who the Fall of '78 srathered here for 
'i* the first time as Freshmen. We can hardly realize that three 
eventful years have since passed, and that we have now arrived at 
that point which then seemed so far beyond us, when, as Seniors, 
our opinion in .college matters should be listened to with attention 
and respect. It is only a few short months hence when we must 
leave our college home, with all its work and pleasure, and step 
forth into other scenes of action, as yet untried by most of us. 

We have long looked forward to the time when we should take 
our places among those who are struggling for a position in the 
world. It is with joy that we cherisji the thought that that time 
is so near, when equipped for the battle we shall strike out boldly, 
and earn for ourselves recognition as a man among men. But this 
joy is not a little tempered by the rellection that we shall tlien have 
left behind us four of the pleasantest years of our lives, and that 
we must then be separated from those whom during those ypars, 
have been toiling over the same road with us, and striving for the 
same objects. 

And now during our last year in college, is it not fitting that we 
should look back over those already passed and consider whether 
they have been profitably spent? Although we may on the whole 
feel satisfied, we find also, that we have made some mistakes which 
it will now be our endeavor to correct, so that as we go on in our 
journey through life, we shall be as well prepared as possible to 
prove the real value of [education as an assistant in attaining true 
success and arriving as near as we may to the stage of perfect man- 
hood. 



30 



We sincerely liope that on going out from this institution, which 
has" done so much lor us, we may leave behind us a remembrance 
and an example worthy of the respect and imitation of those who 
come after us. 

During our stay here many changes have taken place ij:i the ad- 
ministration of the college. Three Presidents have successively occu- 
pied the chair, and now it is with real sorrow that we record the 
resignation of that genial Professor, who so patiently endeavored to 
instill into our . minds the principles, of that much hated science, 
Mathematics. We wish him success in his present field of labor, 
and shall always remember him as one who took a deep interest in us. 

Thus far '82 has sustained a good record; in the future let each 
one do his duty so faithfully that he may be an honor to the class, 
and to his Alma Mater. B. 




* Members of Charity Class. 



21 




'83. 



D. O. NOURSE, 
D. H. BRAUNE, 
C. W. MINOTT, 



OFFICERS. 

President. 

. Vice-President. 
Secretary and Treasurer. 
Historian. 



A. A. HEVIA. 


Class Captain. 


NAMES. 


RESIDENCES. 




ROOMS. 


Bagley, Sidney Currier 


BoKton, 




8 N. C. 


Bishop, Edgar Allen 


Diamond Hill, R. I. 




21 N. C. 


Braune, Domingos Benriqiie 


Nora Fiber, Brazil, 


D 


G. K. House. 


Conger, Charles Thompson 


New York City, 




13 N. C. 


Davis, Arthur Emmons 


Amherst, 




Mr. Davis's. 


Fletcher, Frank Howard 


Toumsencl, 




22 S. C. 


Hevia, Alfred Armand 


Havana, Cuba, 




3 S. C. 


Holman, Samuel Morey 


Attlehoro, 




12 N. C. 


Ijindsey, Joseph Bi-idgeo 


Marblehead, 




12 N. C. 


Minott, Charles Walter 


West'tninster, 




22 S. C. 


Nourse, David Oliver 


Bolton, 




12 S. C. 


Owen, Henry Willard 


A mherst, 




Mr. Owen's. 


Preston, Charles Henry 


Danvers, 


D 


G. K. House. 


Wheeler, Homer Jay 


Bolton, 




12 S. C. 


Total, 






14. 



LEFT COLLEGE FROM '83. 



Chaplin, J. D. H. 
Manton, W. J. 



Selden, J, H. 



Smith, W. E. 
Tryon, C. O. 




;T is with pleasure that we present our tliird contril)ution to the 
Index, for does not that signify that we are in our Junior 
year, and one step nearer tlie goal. We have passed tlie 
middle point of our college life, and as we crossed the line it 
was but natural for us to try and throw off all outward semblance 
of reckless Sophomore habits, and take upon ourselves the dignity of 
Juniors ; to what extent we have succeeded, we leave for others to 
judge. 

The new Freshman class although not as large as we had hoped, 
seems well worthy of our patronage, and as they mount upward in 
the college course, will always carry with them the esteem and best 
wishes of '83. So much superior in numbers to the Sophomores, 
they certainly will have little trouble in sustaining their rights. We 
hope to see them striving to cultivate those qualities which go to 
make up the educated man, and fitting themselves to fill the places 
made vacant by those who will be leaving their Alma Mater. 

As Juniors one of the important questions we should ask ourselves 
at this juncture is, do we feel fully repaid for the time and money 
spent thus far in our college course ? In asking this question of my 
classmates, I receive the invariable answer, yes I We have here 
formed many new ideas and resolutions, and the mental training and 
discipline we shall have passed through, will make us the better fit- 
ted to occupy positions of trust and honor, among those with whom 
we shall come in contact after leaving these walls. It behooves us 
then to be industrious and let none of the valuable time which it is 
our great privilege to spend in this institution, pass by without leaving 
some thought which may be of use to us in after life. The remain- 
der of our college course will glide swiftly away and we shall be 
thrust out upon the great sea of life, to battle with its waves and 
storms, and then will come the time when the world at large can 
fairly judge how we occupied our time in college. 



33 



In chemistry our class seems destined to distinguish itself, as almost 
half of the class are taking, from one to two years of extra practical 
work in the laboratory, outside of the regular course, and in later 
years we may expect to hear of nlany new discoveries being made by 
members of '83. 

When we first entered these walls as Freshmen, we felt for awhile 
a little disheartened at the seeming smallness of our numbers as com- 
pared with '83, but looking about us to-day, we find '82 diminished 
by more than half of its original members, while our class stands 
with no decrease. This gives us courage and we fervently hope that 
we may be able to march forward to graduation day, with firm and 
unbroken ranks, an honor to ourselves and our Alma Mater. B. 




24 




'84. 



OFFICERS. 
W. P. MAYO, 
G. H. CUTLER, Jr., . 
H. E. V. G-OESSMANN, 
C. HERMS, . 
E. A. JONES, 
H. D. HOLLAND, 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 

Historian. 

Class Captain. 



NAMES. 



residences. 



ROOMS. 



Cutler, Geo. H. Jr. Anthcrst, Mr. Cutler's. 

Goessmann, Henry Edward Victor Amherst, Prof. Goessmann's. 

Herms, Charles Louisville, Ky., 10 S. C. 

Holland, Harry Dickinson Amherst, Mr. Holland's. 

Jones, Elisiia Adams Rockville, 8 S. C. 

Kenfleld, Charles Robert Amherst, 6 N. C. 

Mayo, Walter Parker Wellesley, 8 S. C. 

Redding, Merton J. Amherst, Mr. Redding's. 

Smit"h, Llewellyn - Amherst, Mrs. Smith's. 



Total, 



LEFT COLLEGE FROM '84. 



Brown, H. C. 
Dickinson, H. W. 
Smith, W. H. 



Dwight, E. W. 
Lublin, A. 
Smith, W. R. 



25 





"[ff^OR the second lime in lier brief life, the class of '84 appears in 

t^^i the Index with her history. Many changes have taken place 
in the class since we first set foot on Aggie soil Six of 

our class mates have left college, and among them, alas ! was 
that cherished babe, " our- class infant." 

Although our class is small, yet we may say that it has more life, 
good-fellowship and flunktitude, than can be found in any of the 
other classes. , 

That 84 can still hold her own, was proved to the entire satis- 
faction of the Freshman on the night of the rush. Moreover, the 
Freshies were so exhausted on that memorable occasion, that they 
sought relief in partaking of the usual allowance of milk, which had 
been duly prepared for them. 

How proud we were when we entered the walls of our college 
home, to begin the studies of our Sophomore year under its gentle 
care. 

Our relations with the Faculty, during the first year, were not all 
that could be desired, owing probably to the independant air we 
assumed. But now that we have reached the dignity of the Sopho 
more, we trust that our last year's verdancy has wholly disappeared 
under the shining rays of our newly awakened intellectual fire. 



•JO 



We would not, liowever, go into piirticiilars in rc^-anl to our men- 
tal powers, for we believe modesty is the best policy. Thus far 
our college life has been so full of new and varied experiences that, 
the time has passed very quickly, and we are reminded that grad- 
uation day, which once seemed so far away in the dim future, is 
rapidly approaching, and the honors that we shall then receive, de- 
pend upon our present attention to the duties which every succeed- 
ing day imposes upon us. 




27 




freshmanJ^ass. 




'85. 



OFFICERS. 



C. O. BUFFINGTON, 
H. HOWELL, 
P. C. P. BROOKS, 
G. H. PUTNAM, . 
C. S. CUTTER, 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 

Historian. 

Class Captain. 



names. 



residences. 


ROOMS. 


Amhemf, 


8N. C. 


Sao Paulo, Brazil, 


29 S. C. 


N. Glastonbury, Conn., 


9N. C. 


Bonton, 


24 S. C. 


Salom, 


20 S. C. 


Ware, 


32 N. C. 


Arlington, 


14 N. C. 


Warren, 


14 N. C. 


Amherst, 


20 S. C. 


Blooming Grove, N. Y., 


23 S. C. 


Amherst, 


8N. C. 


Millbury, 


28 N. C. 


Dan vers. 


20 S. C. 


Millbury, 


28 N. C. 


Amherst, 


14 N. C. 


Leicester, 


32 N. C. 


Bloom.ing Grove, N. Y., 


23 S. C. 


17. 





Allen, Edward West 
Almaida, Luciano Jose 
Barber, George Holcomh 
Brooks, Paul Culf Phelps 
Brown, Charles William 
Buffington, Charles Owen 
Cutter, Charles Sumner 
Day, William Lyman 
Dickinson, John Frances 
Howell, Hezekiah 
Kendall, Charles Irving 
March, William Marriam 
Nichols, Andrevr Jr. 
Putnam, '.George Herbert 
Spaulding, Charles Plumt) 
Whittemore, Jos. Sidney 
Woodhull, George Gouge 

Total, 



28 





'E feel proud of and highly appreciate the honor of present- 
ing our first contribution to the Index, and we hope it will 
meet the expectation of our fellow students. The tender 
care which the class of "84 bestowed upon us on our 
arrival, in seeing that we had plenty of refreshments, and retired at 
an early hour, was met by a few of us with a spirit of rebellion 
which checked the enemy for awhile, but reinforcements appearing, 
we were obliged to submit and go quietly to bed. 

The next and more important event in our career, was the "grand 
rush." Here let us thank the Juniors for their friendly instruction 
concerning this and other matters relating to the college life. We 
were formed, and at the word we started forward to victory or dre- 
feat we knew not which, and with a crash we came together, but 
after a struggle were forced back, by means of the greater skill and 
experience of '84. 

Another contest occurred one afternoon when all were assembled 
for drill, in which '85 showed its courage. A Sophomore had the 
audacity to appear with a cane, but it was quickly seized by a 
Freshman and the cries of '85 and '84, responded to with alacrity by 
the restless Freshmen and Sophomores standing around, brought on 
a contest lasting a few moments and resulting in a tie, the cane 
breaking and each getting a part of it. 



29 



Classmates after running the gauntlet of laundry agents, furniture 
and uniform venders and society men, we settle down to steady work, 
to our duties and our pleasures. 

We look forward to our course in the college with a great deal of 
pleasure, hoping the days may pass pleasantly and profitably, and 
knowing that if the work laid out for us here is done thoroughly, 
the deep well of knowledge accumulated thereby, will be a never 
failing source of profit to us throughout our whole life. As old time 
goes on in its flight let us keep with it, never lagging behind, never 
loosing a moment, but always pressing forward toward the goal of 
Honor. P. 







30 




jlL POST « GRADUATES. ^ 




Washburn, John H. 
Stockbridge, Horace Edward 
Fairfield, Frank Hamilton 
Hills, Joseph Lawrence 
Smith, Hiram Fred. Maikley 



RESIDENCES. 



ROOMS. 



West Bridgewater, D. G-. K. House. 
Amherst, Pres. Stockbridge's. 

Boston, 14 S. C. 

Boston, . 7 S. C. 

Korth Hadley, 25 N. C. 



SPECIALS IN'CHEMISTRY."^ 



RESIDENCES. 



Jaqueth, Samuel 
Cardozo, Peleusio 



Liverpool, N. T. 
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 



[ ?summary'"by"states.^ 



Massachusetts, 61 

New York, 5 

Connecticut, ........ 3 

Brazil, 3 

Rhode Island, 3 

Vermont, 1 

Michigan, 1 

Cuba, 1 

Kentucky, 1 

Total, 78 



31 



> i>=^ w^^i' 




mjutary^-department: 





[fr MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAl'COLLEGRp 



> t>=: #-^^f> 



33 




^^ 



GENERAL-ORGANIZATION. 



'* 



M 



-^ 



COMMANDANT AND INSTBUCTOR. 
2nd Lieut. V. H. BRIDGMAN, 2nd Art., U. S. A., Prof. Mil. Science & Tactics. 



COMMISSIONED STAFF. 



ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS, ARTILLERY AND INFANTRY. 

J. E. WILDER, Cadet, Captain and Adjutant. 

S. C. DAMON, Cadet, 1st Lieut, and Quartermaster. 



NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 



A. A. HEVIA, Cadet, 
D. 0. NOURSE, Cadet, 



Sergeant- Ma j or . 
Quartermaster Sei'geant. 



COLOR-GUARD. [ I j 



Cadet H. J. WHEELER, 
C. W. MINOTT, 
" . G. CUTLER, Jr., 
C. HERMS, . 



Color Sergeant, National Colors. 
Color Sergeant, State Colors. 

1st Corporal Colors. 

2d 



[?[ M0RRlS'"DRUM"C0RPS4 ll 



Cadet J. B. PAIGE, 

D. E. PERKINS, 
S. C. BAGLEY, 



Cadet, G. H. PUTNAM. 



Drum Major. 
Cadet E. S. CHANDLER. 
. " W. P. MAYO. 



34 




INFANTRY ORGANIZATION, 




Mass. Agricultural College.— Corps of Cadets. 
Statf and Commissioned Officers chosen from Senior Class. 
Non-Coramissioned Staff and Sergeants chosen from Junior Class. 
Color Sergeants chosen from Junior Class. 
Corporals chosen from Sophomore Class. 



COMMANDANT AND INSTRUCTOR. 
2d Lieut. V. H. BRIDGMAN, 2d Art., U. S. A., Prof. Mil. Science & Tactics. 



J. E. WILDER, 
S. C. DAMON, 



A. A. HEVIA, 
D. O. NOURSE, 



COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

Cadet Captain and Adjutant. 

Cadet 1st Lieut, and Quartermaster. 



NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

Cadet Sergeant Major. 

Cadet Quartermaster Sergeant. 



Cadet Captain, B. A. Kinney. 

" 1st Lieutenant, F. G. May. 

" 1st Lieutenant, D. Good ale. 

"2d " CD. HiLLMAN. 

" 1st Sergeant, . . E. A. Bishop. 

"2d " H. J. Wheeler. 

"3d " F. H. Fletcher. 

" 4th " C. T. Conger. 

" 1st Corporal, G. Cutler, Jr. 

"2d " C. Herms. 

" 8d ^ " W. P. Mayo. 

24 Privates. 



Cadet Captain, A. H. Taylor. 

1st Lieutena.nt, W. H. Bishop. 

" " A. F. Shiverick. 

2d " J. S. Williams. 

1st Sergeant, C. H. Preston. 

2d " C. W. Minott. 

3d " S. C. Bagley. 

1st Corporal, H.E.V.Goessmann. 

2d " E. A. Jones. 

24 Privates. 



35 




$artillery'organization.¥ 



LIGHT BATTERY. 



COMMANDANT AND INSTRUCTOR. 
Second Lieut. V. H. BRIDGMAN. 

ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS. 
Cadets of the Senior Class. 

CANNONEERS, Cadets of the Junior and Sophomore Classes. 



SABRE DETACHMENT. 

COMMANDANT AND INSTRUCTOR. 
Second Lieut. V. H. BRIDGMAN. 

ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS. 
Cadets of the Senior Class. 

DETACHMENT, Cadets of the Junior and Sophomore Classes. 



MORTAR DETACHMENT. 

COMMANDANT AND INSTRUCTOR. 
Second Lieut. V. H. BRIDGMAN. 

A SSISTANT INSTR UCTORS. 

Cadets op the Senior Class. 

CANNONEERS, Cadets of the Junior and Sophomore Classes. 



86 







'COLLEGE CHRISTIAN UNION- \^ 




►^c:«]V[D3}rr 



QDCS) (2> 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 




® ®a 




^S® 




COLLEGE CHRISTIAN UNION. 




W. H. BISHOP, President. 

Gr. T. APLIN, Vice-President. 

E. A. BISHOP, Secretary. 

C. T. CONGER, Treasurer. 

J. B. LINDSEY, j 

E. A. JONES, >• Directors. 

C. D. HILLMAN, ) 

E. S. CHANDLER, Organist. 



G. T. Aplin, 
W. H. Bishop, 
H. S. Brodt, 
E. S. Chandler, 
J. A. Cutter, 

D. GOODALE, 
C. D. HiLLMAN, 



POST GRADUATES. 
H. F. M. Smith. 

SENIORS. 



G. D. Howe, 
F. G. May, 
D. E. Perkins, 
A. H. Taylor, 
W. H. Thurston, 
J. S. Williams, 
J. L. Windsor. 



JUNIORS. 



E. A. Bishop, 
C. T. Conger, 

F. H. Fletcher, 



J. B. LiNDSEY, 

D. O. Nourse, 
H. J. Wheeler. 



SOPHOMORES. 
E. A. Jones. 
FRESHMEN. 



H. Howell, 
W. M. March, 



G. H. Putnam. 

J. S. Whittemore. 



38 




¥college"shakespearian"club; 




Organized September 20, 1879. 



OFFICERS. 



E. S. CHANDLER, 

C. W. MINOTT, 
E. A. BISHOP, 
S. C. DAMON, 
L. R. TAPT, 

D. O. NOURSE, 



President. 

Vice-Presidek T. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 



Directors. 



P. S. Allen, 
E. P. Bingham, 



MEMBERS. 
SENIORS. 

L. R. Taft. 
JUNIORS. 



E. S. Chandler, 
S. C. Damon, 



E. A. Bishop, 
P. H. Pletcher, 
J. B. Lindsey. 



C. W. MiNOTT, 

D. 0. NoURSE, 

H. J. Wheeler. 



FRESHMAN. 
W. M. March. 



39 



c (BWASHlNGTON"lRViNG'LlTERARY"SQCiETY; 






OFFICERS. 

S. C. DAMON, President. 

H. J. WHEELER, . Vice-President. 

C. T. CONGER, . . . . , Secretary. 

E. A. BISHOP, Treasurer. 

J. E. WILDER, ) 

D. GOODALE, V Directors. 

W. H. BISHOP, ) 

P. S. ALLEN, . . Librarian. 



MEMBERS. 



POST GRADUATE. 
J. L. Hills. 



SENIORS. 



P. S. Allen, 
G. T. Aplin, 
E. P. Bingham, 
W. H. Bishop, 
J. A. Cutter, 
S. C. Damon, 

D. GOODALE, 
C. D. HiLLMAN, 



E. A. Bishop, 
C. T. Conger, 

S. M. HOLMAN, 



W. M. March, 



J. L. Windsor. 
JUNIORS. 



FRESHMEN. 



S. H. Howard, 

G. D. HoM^E, 

P. G. May, 

H. Myrick, 

A. P. Shiverick, 

L. R. Taft, 

W. H. Thurston, 

J. E. Wilder, 



J. B. Lindsey, 
C. W. Minott, 
H. J. Wheeler. 



G. H. Putnam. 



40 




Founded in 1868. 



42 





• ^^ 



ALEPH CHAPTER. 



J. H. Washburn, 



C. E. Beach, 
J. W. Cooper, 

C. W. Floyd, 

I 

D. H. Braune. 



POST GRADUATES. 

J. L. Hills. 
SENIORS. 



JUNIORS 



H. E. Stockbridge, 



A. F. Shiverick, 
A. H. Taylor, 
J. E. Wilder. 



C. H. Preston. 



L. J. DE Almaida, 



SOPHOMORE. 
Geo. Cutler. 

FRESHMEN. 
Peleusio Cardozo. 



C. O. BUFFINTON, 



48 




4MHERST CHAPTER.' 




\\^M 



\^ 



\ 



\ 




rn^^. 



i"^ 1 u^ii I iimmm 
i.lilii II' II III II II 1 1 1 li 




GRAND LODGE. 

Fotinded in 1869. 



44 




H. S. Erode, 



C. Herms, 



POST QRADUATE. 
F. H. Fairfield. 

SENIORS. 

J. S. Williams. 

JUNIOR. 
A. E. Davis. 

SOPHOMORES. 

FRESHMAN. 
G, H. Barber. 



D. GOODALE, 



W. P. Mayo, 



45 



"PHfSlGMA KAPPArt ft 




4<\ 



$. 2. K. 



PI CHAPTER. 



"V 



SENIORS. 



F. (J. May, 
W. H. Bishop, 
B. A. Kinney, 



A. A. He VIA, 



G. H. Putnam, 
C. S. Cutter, 



JUNIORS. 

S. C. Bagley. 

SOPHOMORE. 
E. A. Jones. 

FRESHMEN. 

C. W. Browne. 
47 



J. A. Cutter, 
C. D. Hillman, 
J. H. Howard. 



C. T. Conger, 



H. Howell, 

J. S. Whittemore, 




PRIZESj^^ 




FARNSWORTH RHETORICAL MEDALS. 



Sophomore Class, '83. 

C. T. Conger Gold Medal. 

H. J. Wheeler, Silver Medal. 



Freshman Class, '84. 

Geo. Cutler, Jr., Gold Medal. 

E. A. Jones, . Silver Medal. 



GRINNELL AGRICULTURAL PRIZES. 



H. H. Wilcox, . . . . . . . . . First Prize, $50. 

A. Peters, Second Prize, $30. 



MORRIS MILITARY PRIZES. 



C. L. Flint, Jr., First Prize. 

A. Peters, Seeond Prize. 



48 






J" 



-MiSCELLANE0US"QRGANiZATI0NS7] > 







^^ . ._ ^ 

" FOOT BALL ASSOCIATION. [ 



-^ 





B. A. KINNEY, . .• President. 

W. A. MORSE, Secretary and Treasurer. 

D. GOODALE, Senior D. 

S. M. HOLMAN, Junior D. 

H. E. V. GOESSMANN, Soph. D. 

L. J. DE ALMAIDA, Fresh. D. 



50 




AGGIE TEAM. 



J. S. WILLIAMS, 



Captain. 



A, H. TAYLOR, 
A. F. SHIVERICK, 
C. S. PLUMB, 



J. S. WILLIAMS, 



QUARTKR-BACK. 

W. A. MORSE. 

HALF-BACKS. 

J. B. PAIGE. 

TEND. 

W. p. MAYO. 
1st Sub., A. E. DAVIS. 



J. E. WILDER, 
F. S. ALLEN, 
H. F. SMITH. 



G. T. APLIN, 



\k 



r SECOND~ TEAM![> 



S. C. DAMON, 



Captain. 



S. C. DAMON, 

H. E. V. GOESSMANN, 

H. D. HOLLAND, 

J. H. HOWARD, 



HALF-BACKS. 



H. S. BRODT. 

TEND. 

C. S. CUTTER. 
1st Sub., C. W. BROWNE. 



A. E. DAVIS, 
L. SMITH, 
C. HERMS. 

G. H. BARBER, 



51 




BASE BALL ASSOCIATION. 







A. F. SHIVERICK, President. 

A. A. HEVIA, Secretary. 

B. A. KINNEY, ^ 
J. B. LINDSEY. ! 

C. R. KENFIELD, \ ■••••.•• Directors. 

G. H. BARBER, j 



AGGIE NINE. 




B. A. KINNEY, Captain, c. 
J. H. HOWARD. L. J. S. "WILLIAMS, s. 

G. T. APLIN, A. G. R. KENFIELD, p. 

W. P. MAYO, B. W. A. MORSE, h. 

H. D. HOLLAND, r. L. SMITH, m. 




Srt 'i-JDr 

: CLASS NINES J 



^ 




'82. 



B. A. KINNEY, Captain, h. 



J. H. HOWARD, p. 
G. T. APLIN, A. 
W. A. MORSE, B. 
W. H. THURSTON, c. 



J. S. WILLIAMS, L. 
J. B. PAIGE, s. 
A. H. TAYLOR, M. 
W. E. STONE, R. 



'83. 



S. M. HOLMAN, Captain, a. 



S. C. BAGLEY, h. 
C.W. MINOTT, B. 
F. H. FLETCHER, c. 
D. O. NOURSE, p. 



H. W. OWEN, s. 
A. A. HEVIA, L. 
H. J. WHEELER, m. 
C. H. PRESTON, R. 



'84. 



C. HERMS, H. 

C. R. KEN FIELD, p. 

G. CUTLER, R. 

H. D. HOLLAND, s. 



M. J. REDDING, Captain, c. 



L. SMITH, A. 

W. P. MAYO, B. 

H. E. V. GOESSMANN,M. 

E. A. JONES, L. 



'8S. 



G. H. BARBER, Captain, h. 
J. DICKINSON, p. J. S. WHITTEMORE, a. 

C. S. CUTTER, B. H. HOWELL, c. 

C. SPALDING, s. C. BROWNE, r. 

P. C. P. BROOKS, M. G. H. PUTNAM, L. 



53 




GYMNASIUM. 




J. S. WILLIAMS, 
A. F. SHIVERICK, 
A. A. HEVIA, 
C. W. MINOTT, 
C. HERMS, 
W. P. MAYO, 
C. S. CUTTER, 
G. H. BARBER, 



President. 
Senior Director. 
Junior 



Sophomore 



Freshman 



MEMBERS. 
ALL THE COLLEGE, 



54 




RIFLE ASSOCIATION. 




OFFICERS. 



A. F. SHIVERICK, Ppesident. 

H. J. WHEELER, Vice-President. 

C. H. PRESTON, . . ■ . . . . Secretary and Treasurer. 

B. A. KINNEY, ^ 

E. A. BISHOP, t Directors. 

GEO. CUTLER, Jr., ) 

MEMBERS. 



W. H. Bishop, 
H. S. Brodt, 
S. C. Damon, 
J. H. Howard, 
B. A. Kinney, 



E. A. Bishop, • 
D. H. Braune, 

F. H. Fletcher, 



Geo. Cutler, Jr. 



SENIORS. 



JUNIORS. 

H. J. Wheeler. 
SOPHOMORES. 

Charles Herms. 



W. A. Morse, 
J. B. Paige, 
A. P. Shiverick, 
W. H. Thurston, 
J. E. Wilder. 



S. M. HOLMAN, 

J. B. Lindsey, 
JC. H. Preston, 



W. P. Mayo, 



55 



tJ ^MUSlCAUSSOClATlONS.^ ) 




COLLEGE QUARTETTE. 



J. E. Wilder, | 

C. T. Conger, \ 

J. A. Cutter, ) 

H. S. Brodt, C 



1st Tenor. 



S. M. HoLMAN, Leader, 

D. E. Perkins, 

D. GOODALE, 



1st. Bass. 



2d Tenor. 



E. S. Chandler, i 
W. H. Bishop, 



d Bass. 



COLLEGE CHOIR. 
H. S. Brodt, 1st Tenor. P. C. P. Brooks, Air. 



J. A. Cutter, 1st Tenor. 
D. E. Perkins, Air. 
C. T. Conger, Air. 



D. GoODALE, 1st Bass. 
W. H. Bishop, 2d Bass. 
G. H. Barber, 2d Bass. 



E. S. Chandler, Organist. 



CLASS QUARTETTES. 



W. B. Kingman, 1st Tenor. 

B. A. Kinney, 2d Tenor. 

C. T. Conger, 1st Tenor. 
C. W. MiNOTT, 2d Tenor. 

C. R. Kenfield, 1st Tenor. 
W. P. Mayo, 2d Tenor. 

G. H. Barber, 1st Tenor. 
P. C. P. Brooks, 3d Teiior. 



'82. 



'83. 



'84. 



'85. 



L. R. Taft, 1st Bass. 
J. L. Windsor, 2d Bass. 

S. M. Holman, 1st Bass. 
H. W. Owen, 2d Bass. 

L. Smith, 1st Bass. 
C. Herms, 3d Bass. 

C. S. Cutter, 1st Bass. 
E. W. Allen, 3d Bass. 



56 



"^ORCHESTRA.^ 





H. S. Brodt, Leader. 
H. S. Brodt, 1st Violin. C. E. Beach, Cornet. 

F. H. Fairfield, 2d Violin. G. H. Putnam, Flute. 

P. Cardozo, Trombone. E. S. Chandler, Double Bass. 

G. H. Barber, Pianist. 



[yl f '83 ORCHESTRfllt f ^ 



J. B. LiNDSEY, Leader. 
S. C. Bagley, Violin. S. M. Holman, Flute. 

F. H. Fletcher, Cornet. C. W. Minott, Clarionet. 



57 



f^MASSACHUSETTS'AGRlCULTURAfCQLLEGE,^"^ 



CANOEING ASSOCIATION. 




Founded Sept. 9, 1881. 



Colors, Maroon and White. 
OFFICERS. 



FRED. G. MAY, 
L. SMITH, 
GEO. CUTLER, Jr., 
C. R. KENFIELD, 



E. W. ALLEN, 
GEO. CUTTER, Jr., 
A. E. DAVIS, 
CHARLES HERMS, 
H. D. HOLLAND, 
C. R. KENFIELD, 
FRED. G. MAY, 
W. P. MAYO, 
C. S. PLUMB, 
L. SMITH, 



HONORARY MEMBER. 
JOHN A. CUTTER. 



President. 

. . . Vice-President. 

Secretary akd Treasurer. 

Commodore. 



MEMBERS AND BOATS. 



Fleetwing. 
Aggie. 

Crystal Wave. 
Kafoozleum. 
Mohawk. 
Naiad. 

A NNE. 

Red Rover. 

MOQUIS. 



r)H 



<eMASSACHUSETTS""AGRlCULTURAL"COLLEGL^) ) 



\VHEEL CLUB. 



OFFTGERS. 

A. H. TAYLOR, '82, President. 

C. E. BEACH, 'S3, .* Captain. 

A. A. HEVIA, '83, . . . '. . . . . Sec. and Treas. 

C. T. CONGER, '83, Sub-Captain. 



ACTIVE MEMBERS. 





name. 


size of 


machine. 


MAKE OF MACHINE. 


c. 


E. BEACH, '82, 


54 


inches. 


Columbia. 


A. 


A. HEVIA, '83, 


50 


" 


Columbia. 


C. 


T. CONGER, '83, 


50 


" 


Columbia. 


A. 


H. TAYLOR, '82, 


56 


" 


Special Union. 


W 


E. STONE, '82, 


54 


" 


Columbia. 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



H. C. BROWN, 
B. HASHIGUCHI, 
F. P. TAYLOR, 
A. WHITAKER, 
F. A. WILMARTH, 



Pittsfield Club, Pittsfield, Mass. 
ToKio Club, Tokio, Japan. 

Comet Club, Needham, Mass. 



Grey Cap, Grey Coat, Grey Shirt, stitched and laced with maroon cord, 
Maroon Belt, Grey Knee-breeches, and Maroon Stockings. 



59 




COLLEGE READING 




OFFICERS. 

H. MYRICK, President. 

C. W. MINOTT, . . . . . . . . . Sec. and Treas. 

D. GOODALE, 1 
D. O. NOURSE, I 

W. P. MAYO, j" • • • Directors. 

C. S. CUTTER, I 



NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS. 



Boston Advertiser, 
New York Herald, 
Boston Herald, 



Dailies. 



Magazines. 



Harper's Monthly, 
American Naturalist, 
Popular Science Monthly, 

Agricultural. 

New England Farmer, 

Cultivator and Country Grentleman, 

Rural New Yorker, 

New England Homestead, 

National Live Stock Journal, 

Mirror and Farmer, 

Home and Farmer, 

Journal of Agriculture, 

Farm and Fireside, 

Colorado Farmer. 



Springfield Republican, 
New York Graphic, 
Boston Daily Post. 



Scribner's Monthly, 

Californian, 

Appleton. 



Cultivator, 

Mass. Ploughman 

Poultry Yard, 

Am. Agriculturist, 

Am. Dairyman, 

Ky. Live Stock Journal. 

Western Rural, 

Farmers Review, 

Pacific Rural Press, 



60 



Harvard Lampoon, 
Princetonian, 



College. 



Acta Columbiana. 



Yale Record, 
Amherst Student, 



Miscellaneous. 



Puck, 

Scientific American, 

Scientific Supplement, 

Harper's Weekly, 

Leslie's Illustrated Weekly, 

Forest and Stream, 

Amherst Record, 

Vick's Monthly, 

Army and Navy Register, 

Conn. Weekly Courant, 

N. O. Picayune, 



Zion's Herald, 
The Advance, 
The Alliance, 



Religious. 



Woman's Journal, 
Journal of Chemistry, 
Burlington Hawrkeye, 
American Bee Journal, 
Turf, Field and Farm, 
Am. Journal of Education, 
Gazette and Courier, 
Our Dumb Animals, 
Toledo Blade, 
St. Louis Globe Democrat, 
Nevs^ York Clipper. 



Investigator, 

New Jerusalem Messenger, 

Zion's Watch Tower. 



61 










J, C^tC S Byron has pathetically expressed it, 
Tr^^^*!, "The melon-colic days have come, 

^ojj»/^ The saddest of the year." 

And so they have, and it is a well known fact among college boys, as 
many a worthy watch dog can testify. 

It was only in the latter part of last September, that we called on one 
of our prominent farmers, and he showed us an extensive collection of 
— stern realities — which his dog had gathered from one time to another, 
during the last three years, while engaged in guarding his melon-patch. 

About this time every year, old Clytie decends from the confines of 
Sunderland, bringing with him his luscious melons, for which most of 
the boys gladly exchange their shekels. Now, whenever he drives his 
fiery untamed steed near the college, there is at once exhibited an un- 
usual interest in the fruit question. A minute inspection of the tail- 
board often results in its fall, and a consequent shower of melons to 
the ground, at which unexpected accident everj^ one at once help% 
themselves, simply saying as a kind of apology, " I say old man, 
don't suppose you want this piece, do you ? at the same time grabbing 
an entire melon. This method of obtaining melons at last became so 
frequent, that Clytie exchanged his old wagon for one with a station- 
ary tail-board. Then the agency racket commenced. Any quantity 
of young men at once offered their valuable services to act as sole 
agent for him, saying, that the only stock in-trade they would need, 
would be half a dozen melons, to be used only as samples. The old 
man, however, actually disregarded such excellent offers. Then sev- 
eral said they would give their services to him, but still Clytie shook 
his head. 



62 



A.t last one young man so longed to be his agent, that cal'- 
ried away by enthusiasm, or something else, made a grab at the 
largest water-melon on the load, tucked it securely under his arm, and 
made a quarter miile dash for his room, thereby making the fastest 
time on record, for this distance. This last act proved too much for 
the ancient melon vender's patience, and after shaking his list at, and 
making dire thi-eats of vengeance against the rapidly retreating form 
of the would be agent, he seized the reins, and goaded on his steed, 
to some place which knew not college boys or agents. 




A FRESHMAN CLASS SUPPER. [ 




^T was one of those clear, cold, starlight evenings last winter, 
when happening to be back of North College, our attention 
^^^ was attracted by a bright light, which shone forth from one 
of the unoccupied rooms. After much consideration and due 
deliberation as to its cause, my friend remembered that there was 
something very mysterious going on among the Freshmen that day. 
Summing the entire matter into tangible form, we very naturally 
concluded that the Freshmen were going to have a class supper. 

Our brains already over-tasked by the huge cloud of mathematical 
theories and suppositions enforced upon us, by the one whose shiny 
head had long since become a victim to their direful influences, and 
also weighed down by the gigantic pile of unexcused absences which 
commenced to rest heavily upon our consciences, were, we feared, 
almost to weak to make a plan whereby we could more fully inves- 
tigate the matter without being disturbed. But something must be 
done, and so we did it. Silently we stole over the rafters, through 
the darkness, now and then broken by the vivid flash of the "dark- 
lantern," until we were directly over the head of what seemed to us 
to be a' crowd of Indians, making the night hideous with their terri- 
ble war-hoops. The mystery was quickly solved ; all things were 
being made ready ' for a bountiful repast. 

Doors served as tables, news papers as table-cloths. The Kentuck- 
ian's room appeared to be the place of rendezvous, where the guests 
completed their toilet before entering the supper hall, where the 
savory viands were awaiting them. Among the most noticeable guests 
of that wonderful class, who appeared to be the stars of the occa- 



63 



sion, were Idiot, Goosie, Cobbler, Pete, Pat, and we believe tlie 
Vitalized Phosphate man canae in later. It appeared that the eat- 
ables for the occasion, were obtained from that most excellent estab- 
lishment, known as the " Hasl^ House.' The guests becoming 
•impatient, the repast commenced. 

The first coarse served, was oyster stew, (slightly decayed bivalves 
-I- H 2 0), if our friends will allow us to call it such, and if it 
proved to be as inviting as those obtained at that magnificient res- 
taurant on Sunday morning, we must say we envied them. 

We did not notice any "quail on toast" but probably it was reserved 
for dessert, owing to its superior- nourishing qualities and excellent 
flavor. 

The popping of corks was heard, as the cork screw penetrated the 
neck of the bottles, and the sparkling beverage flowed freely down 
the throats of the apparently happy youths. 

Dwight was toast-master, and he opened his remarks by informing 
the guests to eat and drink all they could, for it was not every day 
that they were able to obtain such a treat, and at such a compara- 
tively low price.* As time went on things became more lively, the 
uproar increased, and one of the number, noticeable by his small 
physical stature, managed to stammer out after several unsuccessful 
attempts that he " was'nt drunk." To make a long matter short, 
the first course was concluded, and speeches were in order. 

Skedink being called upon for a speech, mounted a chair, amid 
tremendous applause and said, "gentlemen it gives me mach pleas- 
ure to address this vast and brilliant assembly," when at that 
moment the "pepper" went flying through the air. Stealthily but 
surely it penetrated to their nasal appendages, and caused them to 
vibrate in such a way, that music, sweet but slightly inharmonious, 
flowed out upon the still night air. The toast-master, after a vig- 
orous rubbing of his eyes, managed to declare that some one had 
upset the pepper-box,' and other similar exclamations were indulged 
ill by diflierent members. Finally some one managed to discover a 
hole in the ceiling, and light broke in at once upon their half 
stupefied brains. With a yell and a rush they all started for the 
attic, but alas ! the scuttle would not yield to their ponderous blows, 
and they turned their vengeance upon " Brain Food," who having 
neglected to partake of his customary portion was slightly weak- 
minded, and could not seem to realize the perilous situation in which 
lie was placed. 

*Which advice was heeded. 



64 
















65 




ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS. 




Mrs. PAIGE, 
NELLIE AND :EDXA, 



Tamer. 
Aide-de-camps. 



Bagley, 

Barber, 
Bingham, 

Brodt, 

Brown, 

Cooper, 

Howell, 

March, 

Perkins, 

Taft, 

Wood hull, 
Lindsey. 

Beach, 

Brooks, 

Damon, 
Taylor, 

Wilder, 

Thurston, 

Williams, 

Shiverick, 

Howe, 

Goessmann, 

Dickinson, 

Mayo, 

Braune, ) 

Almaida, ) 

Washburn, 

Hills, 

Nichols, 

Preston. 



EDENTATA. 

With ease and grub at hand, you hear no 

groans, for these are Bagley's only wants. 

.A journeyman barber. 

A fat ham sandwich. 

Endeavors to make an analysis of butter by 

the use of his olfactory nerves. 

Champion grabber, practicing for the next 

grab-bag at the church fair. 

Believes in cracker pudding, it strengthens the stomach. 

Sleek is and fat this jolly Freshman. 

The great apple-sauce wrestler 

Eats his way to fame. 

Better late than never. 

Silent and sly 

But loves his pie. 

RODENTIA. 

He loves the maidens with all his heart 
and thinks of naught besides. 

. Tries to pass himself off for a Brazilian, 

. but it does not work. 

End men, expert players of the bones. 

. "A single maiden in his arms 

.Is worth a hundred far away " 

Scavenger. Has a pup to feed. 

A sheep in wolfs clothing. 

Happy when the " hash-day " conies. 

Time to him is nothing while he eats. 

. Where goest thou with that goosie lookV 

Lives from hand to mouth. 

Fresher than most of the "grub " he devours. 

South American snake eaters. 

An escaped convict. 

Breakfasts late in order to chat with the waiter. 

A patient from the Danvers Insane Asylum. 



66 




KELLOGG'S RESTAURANT D'ELITE. 



w 



May. "Secluded from domestic strife, 

Fred. G. May led a college life ; 

He dranlc his milk and cracked his joke, 

And Freshmen wondered as he spoke." 
Cutter. " Woe to him who cuts the blessing, 

Want and hunger for him wait ; 

Soon he finds this for his lesson, 

I must never be too late." 
HiLLMAN. "In faith there's nothing so becomes this man. 

As modest stillness and humility." 
Kinney. "While words of learned length and thundering sound, 

Amazed his startled table-mates around ; 

As for the dishes, each with ponderous name 

He called; and calling oft, they came." 
Howard. " Mid scenes of confusion, and heaps of passed plates, 

Our Joe keeps on joking while everyone waits ; 

At last he is done, and all breathe an ' amen !' 

And hope he'll not turn to his joking again." 
Putnam. \ "If they have any faults, they have left us 

V in doubt, 

Whitemore. ) At least so far we have not found them out." 
C. S. Cutter. "What calmness of assurance, 
Is in this Freshman here ; 
Alas ! Alas ! What will he be, 
When he reaches Senior year." 
Conger. Hevia. 




WAY OFF HOUSE. 



^ 




Aplin, 



Bassett's lone guest. 



^1^. 



ANTl MONOPOLISTS. 



ff 



^ 



NORTH COLLEGE. 



No 21. Bishop. Lives on the fragments which his brother left be- 
hind. 
No. 25. Smith, H. F. M. Fares sumptously upon such morsels, as are 

contributed by the natives of Hadley. 
No. 32. Buffington. He left in disgust 

The noted Hash -House, 
And is ridding his room 
Of bed-bug and mouse. 



SOUTH COLLEGE. 



No. 18. Allen and Windsor. All pork they detest and this shows a 
good mind, 
None but cannibles ever eat much of their kind. 

No. 22. Fletcher. A mighty stomach for a little man. 



Q8 



No. 26. Myrick. Has been living for the last year on surplus copies 

of the '83 Index. 
No. 8. Jones. Milkman: eats the odds and ends contributed by the 

Hash House. 
No. 12. Nourse. Is trying to grow " siders " and feeds accordingly. 
No. 13. Plumb. What he lives on no one knows, with the exception 

of "Hoods Sarsaparilla " for dessert. 
No. 12. Wheeler. 
No. 22. Minott. 



5^BANGJR^}) 



"Good enough, what there is of it," 

Herms. "All the infections that the sun sucks up from bogs, fens, 

flats, make him by inch-meal a disease." . 
Fairfield. "Can lay to bed forever." 
Floyd. "Wherefore this ghastly looking being." 

Goodale. "Where are you by night, I beseech you," 



~ iw m 



"BflNG'P OWNj ffi 



" Enough of it, such as it is." 



Morse. 
Hoi man. 



I drink the air before me. 



69 






^ ^ i \^V 




70 




TECHNICALITIES. 



^' 



F. S. 

Ned. 

Zack. 

Jimmy. 

Johnnie. 

Goss. 

Dave. 



Syd. 

New York. 

Napoleon, 

Pete. 

Goosie. 

Kentuck. 



Bealy. 

Gig Lamps. 



'82. 

Fatty. 

Smiley. 

Bert. 

Fred. 

Perkie. 

Luddy. 

Moses. 

'83. 



Pard. 

Seedy. 

Asa. 

Taffy. 

A. H. 

Creeper. 

Joe. 



Heavy. 


Yawcub 


Sam. 


Olivette 


Bones. 


Seex. 


'84. 




Dick. 


Fid. 


Skedink. 


Croaker. 


Eob. 


Pat. 


Idiot. 




'8S. 




Flannel Mouth. 


Match. 


Cuffy. 


Kiah. 



[» [ relics'of'the'past^H 



PRESIDENT'S DECREE. 



Brown. 
Lublin. 



" Get ye from me, ye breakers of College Lmvs." 



VICTIMS. 

Dickinson. 
Smith, W. H. 



D wight. 
Smith, W.R. 



^ ^VEHEMENT EXPRESSION S^^}) 



PRESIDENTIAL SAYINGS. 



No. 1. — Seen Professor Maynard around, this "Shebang" to-day? 

No. 2. — Somebody's " rantankerous " old keow got into my orchard 

and chawed my apples all up. 
No. 3. — Seen anything of my d-r-nd old boss around here ".' 
No. 4. — I know within "six men" who did it. 
No. 5. — Wbo slobbered tliat apple all over the tioor? 
No. 6. — When yeou are feverish, the best thing to do is to stick horse- 
radish on your " hide." 
G-D-ALE. — " Grave he is in his appearance, 
As the local preacher be ; 
But you cannot find in college, 
One more full of fun than he." 
B-G-LY. — Any one desiring information concerning C. C. U. — Y. M. 
C. A. Bible societies, etc., can be accommodated at his private 
• office. No. 8, N C, between the hours of 8 and 9 P. M. 
B-FF-NGT-N. — " This is our jolly Freshman king. 
Whose word no man relies on ; 
He never says a foolish thing. 
Nor ever does a wise one." 
C-TT-K. — J. — Afraid to sing for fear of hurting his voice. 
Br-ks. — Would have been a distinguished musician, if he had lived 

before notes were invented. 
D-Y. — "He was so 'fresh' that full grown blades of grass; 

Turned pale with envy as he chanced to pass." 
Nou-SE. — "Honest and brilliant, solid, keen and smart, 
All these he is and has a real good heart. 
On him our praise;; we full well may pour. 
For he is modest, modest, evermore." 



Sm-th. — "One of the immortal names that were not born to die." 
W-L-DR. — "I glory in my mightiness, but my life is shadowed, when I 

reflect, what will the world do without me." 
M-Y. — "There never was a local preacher 
In all the range of Adam's sons, 
Nor any two or four legged creature, 

Who could beat this man on beastly puns." 
Tn-R-T-N. — "My office is gone, 'I will speak to the President,' No, I 

will leave. college." Come Floss. 
W-N-s-R. — Another victim. High private in the rear rank. 
P-K-NS. — Cultivating a mustache ; does not want to die (dye), and leave 

us all. 
W-D-H-L. — A rival of smileys. 
Ba-b-r. — " He fancies in his vanity. 

With common Fresh insanity, 
That every girl that doth perchance. 

Upon him cast a passing glance ; 
By such a single act doth prove. 

With him she's surely 'dead in love.'" 
R-D-NG. — "So lean and so ugly, so horrible thin, 

Like the spoke of a wheel, or the bone of a shin ; 
A lean picture of leanness still fading away, 

A dry bundle of bones, hardly covered with clay." 
Fl-y-d. — "You pull off my'yubber boots' and 111 pull off your yubber 

boots." 
J-N-s. — The only man of his class who has any morals. 
B-s-p. '83. — When last seen, was pulling down his dress coat. 
B-A-NE. — "I do not like yankee land." 
H-LL-MN. — A frail youth, with the hay-seed still lingering amid his 

beautiful locks. 
"TOWNIES" — Small choice in rotten apples. 
Fl-t-ch-r. — Lives on Turkey Hill. 



73 




CENSUS OF THE^COLLEGE 




CLASS OF '82. 






F. S. Allen, 26 158 5-9X Unitarian. 

G. T. Aplln, 19 131 5,7 Congregational. 
C. E. Beach. 20 133 5-9X Episcopal. 

E. P. Bingham, 20 150 5-7 Congregational. 

W. H. Bishop, 22 169 5-10 Methodist. 

H. S. Brodt, 18 1431^ 5.9 Presbyterian. 

E. S. Chandler, 20 151^ 5-11 14 Presbyterian. 
J. W. Cooper, 20 13.5>^ 5-1 03^ Methodist. 

J. A. Cutter, 18 125^ 5-7>i Congregational. 

S. C. Damon, 22 165 5-8>^ Unitarian. 

C. W. Floyd, 22 140 5-6>^ Congregational. 

D. Goodale, 21 ]57i^ 5-103^ Congregational. 

C. D. Hillman, 21 164 5-10>^ Universalist. 

J. H. Howard, 18 132 5-9)^ Congregational. 

G. D. Howe, 18 140 5-6)^^ Congregational. 

M. B. Kingman, 19 135 5-9% Congregational. 

B. A. Kinney, 20 163i^ 5-lli^ Congregational. 

F. G. May, 20 145}^ 6-OX Unitarian. 
W. A. Morse, 20 145 6-0 Unitarian. 
H. Myrick, 21 146)^ 5-6 Episcopal. 

J. B. Paige, 20 148>^ 5-7>^ Congregational. 

D. E. Perkins. 20 142)^ 5-7>^ Baptist. 

C. S. Plumb, 21 149 5-9 Atheist. 
A. P. Shiverick, 20 162^ 1-103^ Episcopal. 

W. E. Stone, 19 145 5-103^ Congregational. 

^- ^- Taft, 22 143 5-7 Unitarian. 

A. H. Taylor, ' 20 186^ 6-0>^ Congregational. 

W. H. Thurston, 21 128 5-6 Congregational. 

J. E. Wilder, 20 170>^ 5-113^ Unitarian. 

J. S. Williams, 22 1.57 5-9 Congregational. 

J. L. Windsor, 20 137i^ 5-7^ Congregational. 

Average age, 203^ 

Average weight, 1473/ 

Average height 5-93^ 



75 



CLASS OF '83. 






S. C. Bagley, 19 150 5-9^ Baptist. 

E. A. Bishop, 20 1553^ 5-8i^ Congregational. 
D. H. Braune, 22 143)^ 5-6 Ind. Catholic. 
C. T. Conger, 18 1383^ 5-8 Methodist. 

A. E. Davis, 18 155 6-03^ Congregational. 

F. H. Fletcher, 23 120>^ .5-6 Congregational. 
A. A. Hevia, 20 1503^ .5-73^ Catholic. 

S. M. Holman, 19- 146>^ 6-13^ Methodist. 

J. B. Lindsey, 19 1.59 5-103^ Congregational. 

C. W. Minott, 22 143 5-83^ Universalist. 

D. O. Noiirse, 20 153 5-11 Unitarian. 

H. W. Owen, 21 135i^ 5-11 Congregational. 

C. H, Preston, 18 12.S>^ 5-103^ Congregational. 

H. J. Wheeler, 20 127 5-9% Congregational. 

Average age, 20 

Average Weight, 143 

Average height, 5-93^ 



CLASS OF '84. 









QfQ 


2 


2 


2. 














o 
a 


G. Cutler, Jr., 






18 


131 


5-7 


Congregational 


H. E. V. Goessmann, 






16 


136 


5-9 


Catholic. 


C. Herms, 






18 


1481^ 


5-83^ 


Congregational 


H. D. Holland, 






18 


151K 


5-11% 


Congregational 


E. A. Jones, 






23 


147 


5'7}4 


Congregational 


C. R. Kenfield, 






20 


118 


5-5K 


Congregational 


W. P. Mayo, 






20 


148 


5-lOK 


Unitarian. 


M. J. Redding, 






16 


99 


5-53^ 


Episcopal. 


L. Smith, 






18 


1.52 


6.0 


Episcopal. 


Average 


age 










18>^ 


Average 


weight. 








136 7-9 


Average 


heig 


ht, 








5-8 5-9 



76 



CLASS OF '85. 



B 

CD 




2 


K 
2 


5' 

|3 


E. W. Allen, 


16 


143 


5-7H 


Congregational. 


L. J. Almaida, 


20 


168 


Q-0}{ 


Ind. Catholic. 


J. H. Barber, 


16 


146X 


5-6M 


Congregational. 


Panl C. P. Brooks, 


19 


145 


5-61^ 


Episcopal. 


Chas. 0. Buffington, 


21 


136 


5-7 


Congregational. 


C. W. Brown, 


16 


129 


5-73^ 


Congregational. 


C. S. Cutter, 


17 


145 


5-7K 


TJniversalist. 


W. L. Day, 


19 


136K 


5-6K 


Congregational. 


J. F. Dickinson, 


15 


125 


5-6K 


Congregational 


H. Howell, 


17 


1481^ 


5-8K 


Congregational 


W. Kendall, 


18 


135)^ 


5-9K 


Congregational 


W. M. March, 


16 


138 


6-0 


Congregational 


A. Nichols. 


19 


126K 


5-7K 


Univei'salist. 


G. H. Putman, 


16 


132 


5-7% 


Congregational 


C. P. Spaulding, 


17 


124>^ 


5-7% 


Congregational 


G. G. Woodhull, 


16 


128 


5-8% 


Episcopal. 


Average age, 








17M 


Average weight. 








138 


Average height, 








5-8 5-16 



77 




CAFE AGRICULTURAL. 



'^ 



TnN this brief account, my friends, I shall endeavor to give you a 
®^ slight synopsis of the rules and regulations of our boarding-house- 

f Breakfast is served at this cafe at 7.15, and is heralded in by the 
ringing of the chapel bell, by the old and reliable bell-ringer. 
This curious individual, some one remarked, appears similar to the one 
of '76, who rung out the independence chimes, under the title of 
"grand-father." This is a welcome sound to which the students res- 
pond to attend to the duties of the inner man. You enter the house; 
before you is spread two large tables, covered with an abundant supply of 
cracked dishes. Your cup is taken, and some dark material, which some 
one has dared to give the name of coffee, is poured into it. The best de- 
scription I can give you of this, is a remark that a certain esteenaed friend 
made, who now resides among the isles of the sea, that this compound was 
produced "by some one endeavoring to cleanse their hands with the exclu- 
sive aid of warm water." The supply of that sweet, pure, Asyhire milk, 
direct from Farmer Tillson's dairy, is somewhat limited just now, but an 
abundant supply of water is close at hand, and it holds its color remarkably 
well. The rest of the breakfast consists of crackers, ad infinitum, bread with 
'a slightly acid twang to it, and a nameless material, which some of the fel- 
lows call "quail." The bread is brought from the cooking room on a plate, 
at the rate of three slices per time, and silently disappears for want of some- 
thing better. After the first three slices have taken wings, the waiter takes 
the plate, and in a short time produces three more for the ten hungry mouths. 
This disappears in like manner, and you having by this time finished your 
bountiful repast, depart for the laborious duties of the morning. Long be- 
fore the dinner hour arrives, you endeavor to remember whether or not 
you ate your breakfast in the morning. After thinking earnestly for some 
time, you conae to the conclusion you did not, and when at last the goal is 
reached, you quickly wend your way to the cafe. 

The dinner usually consists of what is termed veal, and thanks to the 
generosity of the boarding-mistress, plenty of "murphys," as the fellows call 
them. This excellent veal deserves further notice. I would say that 
owing to a contract made with the meat vender, we are enabled to have it 
constantly throughout the year, except for a limited time during the winter 
months, when pork supplies its place. I neglected to say that on Friday, for 



79 



the sake of variety, a substance which once bore the name of fish, takes the 
IDlace of the veal. This prepared compound is served in a semi-liquid con- 
dition, for v^hat reason we cannot say, but some have surmised that it con- 
tains ingredients which are very valuable as a " brain food." 

The desert usually consists of pumpkin pie, three inches square, according 
to the latest measurement, using the metric system as a standard. 

Very few incidents occur to mar the harmony of the occasion, excepting 
an occasional precipitation of the gravy upon the table cloth by a freshman, 
which is responded to by a scowl from the waiter, or perchance the break- 
ing of a plate, for which the unlucky individual is obliged to pay the sum of 
" seventeen cents." 

The supper is very light, as the proprietor does not believe in injuring the 
health of the students by pampering them with too much rich food. However 
a limited supply of apple-sauce is allowed twice per week, as there is an 
abundant supply of apples grown upon the college farm. The proprietor 
has had the good fortune to secure the services of the illustrious Brecken- 
ridge, the retired " American actor," for one of the waiters of the establish- 
ment. This gentleman, as is well known has rendered himself distinguished 
in a great many ways, which it is not necessary to speak of here. 

With the excellent management of this establishment, the close economy 
practiced, and the services of the distinguished waiter, we see no 
reason why this department should not be successful in a financial point of 
view. But the boarders ! alas ! beware, O mortals, beware. 



<^ ^Y"DlALOGUES"FOR"TWO"PERSONS.y > 



SCENE IN THE LECTURE ROOM. 

Pres. Stockbridge.— Well Mr. Redding as far as relationship is concerned, 
you are related to the homliest monkey in Africa. 
Mr. Redding.— Well Mr. Pres., we are all brothers. 



Senior Instructor in Artillery, W-n-s-r to Sophomore, (in low voice)— How 
do you hitch the thing up ? 
Sophomore. — Limber Rear. 
S. I. {Loudly).— lAmber Rear. 



80 



Scene in Chapel. TimeS. 10 A. M., the choir gathered round and Perkins 
smoking, enter Prof. Goodell. 
Prof. G. — This is no place for smoking. 
Verdant P-r/c-H.s.— Wonder if he means me. 



1st Fresh, to 2d Fresh. — Who is that fellow in the choir, who seems to be 
trying to ci-eate a delnge. 
2d Fresh. — Uh ! That's P-i'k-ns, but what do you mean. 
1st Fresh. — Why !. He tries to drown everybody else out. 



Prof. Harry. — Mr. May, do you know anything about my paper basket 
that was stolen ? 

May. — Yes sir, and I wish you would get it down, for it is on top of the 
liberty pole and I cannot run the flag up. 

Prof. Harry. — Thinks he will have to shin up. 

Native illustrating to iSenior on what principles the M. A. C. is running. 

Waal ye see its jest like this. I take out my pocket-book and gin it to my 
boy, and tell him to git a suit ordothes, but not to spend any money. D'ye 
see ? Senior sees. 



Scene, a Freshman's room well filled with tobacco-smoke. 

Jones. — I say Dwight ! The "Sophs." got a little the best of us the other 
n-n-night, if we did have three to their one, they made our canes look sick, 
d-d-didn't they ? 

Dwight. — Well we did'nt do enough after all, so but what we had better 
keep still about it. 

Jones. — I wish we could g-ge-get a cane from them, it would be hnmense, 
wouldn't it ? 

Divight. — I wish so too. 

Jones. — Let's try. 

Divight. — ril tell you what I'll do Jones, if I see a Sophomore out with a 
cane 1 will go for him if you will back me up. 

Jones. — Will you ? D-d-dun-n-no, I g-guess we had better let the Sopho- 
mores alone. 

Divight. — Well I guess so after all, unless 

Jones (softly). — Keep still Dwight, somebody's coming up stairs. 

Scene ends. 



Myi'ick, trying to sell a book to Freshman Nichols. 
Myrick. — Now Nichols, this is just what you want. 

Nichols. — No ! It don't contain archaeological researches deep enough for 
me. 
Myrick. — Although pretty "hefty " on big words, starts for his unabridged. 



81 




HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE. 




^N the following pages may be found a concise history of the college, 
from the time the institution was established, down to the present 
time. The Editors have gathered the most important facts which 
they believed would be of interest, and trust it will meet the appro- 
val of their fellow-students, 



1862. 

July 2. — An Act "donating public lands to the several states and territories, 
which may provide colleges for the benefit of Agriculture and 
the Mechanic Arts, together with Militai'y Science," passed Con- 
gress and was signed by President Lincoln. 



1863. 
The Legislature of Massachusetts accepted the grant, with its conditions. 
An act incorporating the trustees of the M. A. C. was also passed, and four- 
teen persons selected. The Governor, Secretary of the Board of Agriculture, 
the Secretary of the Board of Education, and the President of the Faculty 
were appointed memioers, " ex-offlcis." 



1864. 

The towns of Springfield, Chicopee, Northampton, Amherst and Lexington 
conapeted for the location of the college, each raising the required $75,000. 
Amherst received the unanimous vote of the Trustees, for the following 
reasons ; 1st superiority of the farm ; 2d situated in an agricultural region ; 
3d, near a thriving accessible village ; 4th, near Amherst College ; 5th, the 
" Bussy Fund " provides for an agricultural school near Boston. 

310 1-2 acres of land were bought as a college farm, cost $35,000. 

The Legislature appropriated $10,000 to defray the necessary expenses of 
establishing and maintaining the college. 

Hon. H. F. French, of Cambridge, elected president. 



1865. 
,000 granted to aid in establishment. 



1866. 

President French resigned. 

Prof. P. H. Chadbourne of Williams College, elected president. 
$10,000 given by Dr. Nathan Durfee, of Fall River, and $10,000 by L. M. & 
H. F. Hills of Amherst. 



83 



1867. 
Hon. Levi Stockbridge becomes farm superintendent. 
President Chadbourne resigned. 
Col. W. S. Clark elected president. 
E. S. Snell, elected professor of mathematics. 
H. H. Goodell, elected professor of modern languages. 
South Dormitory completed. 
Laboratory completed. 
South Boarding house completed. 
Oct. 2d, First class entered ; numbered 47. 
Washingion Irving Literary Society founded. 
Seventy-three acres of land added to the farm. 
Quarry in Pelham purchased. 



1868. 
Botanic Museum completed. 
Green House completed. 

C. A. Goessmann elected professor of chemistry. 
E. S. Snell resigns professorship of mathematics. 
North Dormitory built. 
North Boarding house built. 
Class of '72 entered 41. 
College Christian Union founded. 

J, #. S« founded. 



1869. 

Farm house and barn built. 

$2,000 for the purchase of the Knowlton Herbarium, given by Wm. Know^l- 
ton, Esq. 

Vineyard started. 

Capt. H. E. Alvord, U. S. A., B. S., professor of military science and tac- 
tics, appointed. . 

College colors green and white. 

Class of '73 entered 24. 

A. S. Packard, Jr., elected as lecturer on entymology. 

Q. T. V. founded. 



1870. 
A section of artillery arrived. 
Prof. S. F. Miller died. 

M. H. Fish elected professor of mathematics. 
H. W. Parker elected professor of mental science. 
M. F. Dickinson elected lecturer on rural law. 
Edward Everett Literary Society founded. 



83 



Class of '74 entered 24. 

Aggies beat the Amherst's at boating. 

College colors maroon and white. 



1871. 

$50,000 allowed by the Legislature, to pay all debts and current expenses. 

$150,000 allowed by the Legislature, to be added to the permanent fund of 
the college. 

140 stands of infantry arms, with equipments received. 

July 21st, Aggies win in the inter-collegiate regatta at Ingleside. Time 16 
min., 46 1-2 sec. ; distance 3 miles, straight-away. 

S. H. Peabody elected professor of mathematics. 

H. J. Clark elected professor of veterinary science and zoology. 

Miss Mary Robinson left $2,000 to found scholarships. 

Class of '75 entered 38. 

Prof. Groessmann submits his first report upon beet experiments. 



1872. 

A. H. Merrill appointed professor of military science and tactics. 
Prof. Goessmann submits first report on fertilizers. 
Class of '76 enters 37. 



1873. 
Prof. Goessman elected agricultural chemist and state inspector of fertil- 
izers. 
Second report on fertilizers submitted. 
Flag pole erected. 

Parnsworth prizes for excellence in declamation founded. 
Hon. Wm. Claflin founded the Grinnell agricultural prizes. 
Phi Sigma Kappa society founded. 
Prof. H. J. Clark died. 
Prof. N. Cressy elected. 
'77 entered 23 members. 



1874. 

Two brass cannon arrived. 

Prof. Goessmann's third report upon fertilizers. 

M. A. C. becomes the Agricultural College of the Boston University. 
S. T. Maynard, B. S., becomes gardner and assistant professor of horti- 
culture. 

Prof. Peabody resigns professorship of mathematics. 

Class of '78 enters 25 members. 

The Associate Alumni of the M. A. C. formed. 



84 



1875. 
Lieut. A. H. Merrill's term of office expires. 

Lieut. C. A. L. Totten appointed as pi-ofessor of military science and lacLicfc 
Class of '79 entered 31 members. 
West Point uniform introduced. 
Rifle Association formed. 
Prof. Stockbridge publishes his formula for fertilization. 



1876. 
Prof. N. Cressy leaves. 

President Clark, with Messrs. Wheeler and Penhallow, leave for Japan, to 
found an Agricultural College. 
Class of '80 entered 33 members. 
A. A. Southwick becomes farm superintendant. 
Mortars arrived. 
Military diploma issued. 



1877. 

Centennial battery and magazine completed. 

Pres. Clark arrives home from Japan. 

Class of '81 entered 34 members. 

Nev7 green-house built by Wm. Knovsrlton, Esq. 

Base ball uniform chosen. 



1878. 

Whiting street among other bequests, left the college $1,000. 

$1,000 was given for the purpose of forming an experinaental station. An 
association was formed and the money divided as follows : $500 to test the 
feasibility of raising Sorgum and manufacturing Sugar and syrup from it ; 
$200 to test the nutritive value of Corn, raised in different sections of the 
Union ; $100 to test the purity and germinating power of seeds ; $100 for 
making practical tests with the lycimetre. The remaining $100 to be spent 
in ascertaining the effects of different kinds of green fodder in the quality of 
butter. 

A lycimetre put in on the field in front of Prof. Stockbridge's. 

Trustees offer one hundred and fifty scholarships. 

Lieut. Totten leaves. 

Class of '83 entered 82 members. 

Capt. Smith acts temporily as commandant and is succeeded by Lieut, 
Morris. 



1879. 
Legislature votes to pay the debt of the College. 
Prof. Maynard elected to a full professorship. 



85 



Pres. Clark resigned. 

Hon. Charles L. Flint, Secretary of the State Board of Agriculture, elected 
President. 
Class work on the " no pay" system. 
Professorship of Mental and moral science abolished. 
Class of 'S3 entered 13 members. 
Tuition reduced from $75 to 136 per year. 
System of leasing rooms introduced. 
Shakespearean club formed. 
A. A. Southwick farm superintendent resigns. 



1880. 

Hon. Levi Stockbridge resigns the professorship of agricultui'e, but it is 
not accepted. 

The resignation of Pres. Flint is accepted, and Prof. Stockbridge is made 
President, and with the beginning of the Spring term he entered upon the 
duties of that office, together with those of his department. 

Pelham w^ater let into the pipes on the ground. 

Concrete walks laid about the buildings. 

Freshma.n class entered sixteen members. 

X. Y. Clark engaged as professor of Physiology, Greology, Veterinary and 
Entomology. 

Prof. X. Y. Clark resigns and Prof. Tyler engaged as instructor in Natural 
Sciences. 

IJov. 19. — A game of foot-ball between the Willistons and " Aggies." 

Nov. 13. — Game of foot-ball between the "Aggies" and Amherst Fresh- 
men. 

Nov. — Freshies " sold " three times trying to haze the Sophomores. 

Dec. 1. — First good sleighing of the season. 

Dec. 25. — Holiday — a quiet day about college. 



1881. 
Jan. 1.— Holiday. 

Jan. 8. — Farmer's Institute in the chapel, considerable discussion advoca- 
ting the establishment of an experimental station at the college. 
Two dignified Seniors get into trouble from borrowing a farm- 
er's team without permission. 
Jan. 12. — New heating apparatus placed in the chapel. 
Jan. 25. — Carr receives a fall in the " Gym." 
Feb. 11. — The W. I. L. S. holds a mock trial which jDroves to be a complete 

success. 
Feb. 22.— HoHday. 

Feb. 15 &' 16. — Skating parties on the college pond, in which fifteen young 
ladies aid the students in making the occasion an enjoyable 
one. 



86 



Feb. 16.— College orchestra give a concert at N. Hadley. 
" 25. — Prof. Goodell leaves for Georgia for the benefit of his health. — 
Pres. Stockbridge lets the cat out of the bag, retreats and leaves 
the Juniors to make terms of peace if possible vpith the lovable 
feline. 
Mar. 1. — End of ninety days good sleighing. 
" 3. — Excursion to the "Roller Skating Rink," Springfield, and in 

spite of the disagreeable weather, all w^ho went enjoyed them- 
selves. 
" 7. — Post Graduate A. H. Stone leaves college for a ministerial career. 
" 9. — Vacation of two weeks. 
" 24. — Winter term commences. 

" 30. — The "Roll of Honor" delivered in the chapel by the President 
amid the prolonged applause of the audience. 
April 1. — The only one that was "fooled" was the one who rang the 
breakfast bell one half hour before the time, expecting to de- 
ceive the rest. 
" 6. — The windows take flight from the chapel during the night, and 

Myrick, owing to ill health, is excused fi'OJi sitting in the icy 
air during prayers. 
" 7.— Fast. 

" 8. — The " Sophs " obtain a bolt on Prof. Emerson. — A number of 

pigs unceremoniously take possession of the chapel during the 
night. 
11. — Glass work commences under John W. Clark. 
" 14. — Drill commences. 

" 31-22. — '82 plant class trees and end their labors by indulging in a strict- 
ly temperance supper. 
May 3.— Funeral of Mrs. S. T. Maynard. 

" 10. — Prof. Goodell returns from his southern trip improved in health. 
" 20. — Our Boys in college hall. 

" 30. — Game of base ball between the " Aggie " Freshmen and Amherst 

High School. The game was hotly contested on both sides, when 

rain interrupting the game stood 13 to 13, eleven innings having 

been played. 

June 6.— Base ball. Juniors vs. Freshmen, score. Freshmen 22 Jimiors 21. 

" 9. — All the Junior class excepting Taft, bolt on Pres. Stockbridge. 

" 11. — Many students watch the total eclipse of the mioon and as a 

result, breakfast late next morning. 
" 20. — A very little decoration done in the chapel for commencement 
exercises. — Farnsworth prize speaking at 8 P. M. Music by 
Meekin's orchestra, Northampton. 
" 21. — Public exercises of the College Shakespearean Club. — Public ex- 
amination of graduating class in Agriculture for the Grinnell 
prizes, at 9 A. M. — ^President's Levee at 8 P. M. 



87 



June 32. — Commencement, Gov. Long and staff present. Trustees meet- 
ing in President's office at 9 A. M., at 10.30 A. M. i-eview of the 
Battalion before the Grovernor. Graduating exercises at 2. 30 P.M. 
Vacation of nine weeks commejices. 
Aug. 25. — During the summer Prof. Graves resigns, and Prof. Harrington 
is secured to take his place. 
" 24. — Rush between '84 and '85, won by '84. — Grand hazing time, in 
which a number of Seniors assist the Sophomores in endeavor- 
ing to haze the Freshmen. 
Sept. 5. — Juniors bolt on Pres. Stockbridge. 

" — Lieut. Morris whose term of office expires is succeeded by Lieut. 

Bridgman, who enters upon the duties at once. 
7. — First drill of the term. * 

15. — Cane rush "Fi'eshies" and "Sophs "the combatants are sepa- 
rated by Lieut. Bridgman at the sounding of the assembly. 
16. — Plant house being put in a thorough state of repair, a large por- 
tion of the work being done by the students. 
19. — Death of Pres. Garfield. College exercises suspended for the 
day. 
33-33. — Holidays for the benefit of those students who wish to attend 
the fair. 
26. — No exercises on account of the funeral of Pres. GariDsld. 
Oct. 15. — Willistons beaten at foot-ball by the " Aggies." 
18.— Junior class suspended from all college exercises. 
19. — Junior class taken back by the Faculty. The settees disappear 

from the chapel. 
30. — Bolt from chapel by the whole college. 
33.— Aggie foot-ball team play Amhersts, even game. 
29. — Game of foot-ball between Yales and Amhersts on Aggie 

grounds. Won by Yales. 
31. — Game of foot-ball between Wesleyans and Aggies at Middle- 
town, Conn. Won by Aggies, score, one goal and three touch- 
downs, in favor of Aggies. 



88 




A SCARE-CROW. 




Whereas on the 17th of Oct. inst., the room in the Museum building was 
defiled by somie member of my class, and whereas on the 18th inst., sundry 
depredations were committed, which might be construed as an insult to a 
college ofBcer, I hereby truthfully affirm I did not aid, abet, assist, or com- 
mit either of the above acts, and that I heartily disapprove of such conduct. 

Signed by entire class of '83. 



We are begged to announce that Mr. Kingman has a valuable lecture on 
hygiene, consisting of facts selected from his own experience, together with 
choice selections from valuable scientific works, which he wishes to dispose 
of a,t a reasonable rate. 

It is rumored that Nourse is still diligently in search of his dress coat. 

Any information concerning the same will be gratefully rece.ved. 

It is reported " officially " that Howe has contracted with a Texas cattle 
driver, to furnish leather to cover those plantations wherein resideth his 
understanding. 

Last term Kinney and Spalding were obliged to return to the study of 
mortar drill, and it was with feelings of pity that the Sophs, watched them 
laboriously shoveling the material ofl: their nearly ruined carpet, while Kin- 
ney slowly muttered words of vengeance upon the perpetrator of such a deed . 

Visit Bagley's smoking emporium ; choice smoking materials constantly on 
hand and to loan. 

Messrs. Kinney and Perkins have lately opened a store at 5 N. C, where a 
first-class assortment of old clothes, military uniforms, and decidedly old 
furniture, may be purchased at advanced prices. These gentlemen gratuit- 
ously offer their services at any water-melon, grape, cake, or apple soiree, 
where talent, good looks, and mustaches are appreciated. 



90 



^SpS^I)^^d 




^alumni.m WI 







91 




ALUMNI. 




fT seems sti'ange to be called on as Alnmni to contribute to the 
Index. There was a time not long ago with many of us, when 
pil we contributed to the Index personally, and directly through our 
@)% own participation of the life of which this publication is a reflex. 
That time has passed for us. No more do we have our names printed 
twenty or moi'e times, as members of our class, secret and literary 
society, grub-club, military department, etc., or hyphenated in the 
"Grrinds," or nicknamed in the personal references. No more for us 
the call to prayers, or recitation, no more trips "over the bridge to 
the Hash-house," no more the pomp and glorious circumstance of mili- 
tary evolution, no more class work, and no more fun, anyway. For 
we are staid and sober citizens, we are : and yvhj should we be asked 
to contribute to the Index ? Because the boys at alma mater want to 
hear from us. Because they need sound encouragement and advice to 
lighten up the w^eary hours of college life. Because the editors kno"v^ 
w^e are the ones whose words will give tone and soliditj^ to the an- 
nual Junior production. Hence we write. There is little to write 
about, but we write just the same. We might go on to shed a few 
word-tears on the subject of our regrets at leaving college to battle 
alone with life's storna, as it were ; but we refrain from harrowing up 
the feeling of our gentle readers. 

We are not sorry that we have left college, but we are glad we 
graduated from it. Glad that we spent four years at the M. A. C. 
Glad of that, but not sorry that we are now on life's highway, as 
men, traveling towards the future, with the lessons of the past be- 
hind us, and the prize for well-doing in front. 

Think of life, you who are yet in college, as a movement towards 
an end. The movement may be forward or backward as you choose 
the road, but the end will come just the same in either case. Think 
then as to what end you wish to reach, and make your college life a 
preparation for the journey. Make your college course benefit you 



92 



mentally, physically, morally, if possible, that you may be armed at 
all points for the struggle that is to come. Do not be alarmed by so 
much cautionary advice, but believe that a man's college course means 
more to his after life than he is inclined to believe while a stude'nt. 
And so great a proportion does not depend on your studies, or your 
teachers, as on yourselves and your self-training. 

It may be said vt^ith much truth that what a man is when he leaves 
college, such will he remain. It ^makes not so much difference how he 
enters college, be he good, bad, or indifferent ; it is the man as he 
graduates who is the man you meet or hear of, one, three, or ten 
years after. The man who goes from good to bad, or perhaps from 
bad to worse, during the four year?, keeps on in that direction in- 
definitely in the future. He who rises from good to better, or from 
bad to good it may be, through the influence of college training, may 
be found on that line in the years to conae. See that you set your 
faces toward the right point, and swerve not. Be not alarmed, dear 
readers still students ; the quality of mercy is not strained, neither is 
the language of good advice. Life perhaps you will not find so bad as 
painted. Fortunately for you if so. But it is our duty, having gone 
over the road before, to warn you of obstacles and pitfalls, that your 
journey may be easier. 

To brother Alumni there is but one word : Subscribe regularly for 
the Index, and like Scotty Briggs, never shake your alma mater. 

Aggie. 



93 




ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 




0F TJIE 



c[¥massaghusetts"agricultural'college.«> 



OFFICERS FOR 1881-82. 



W. D. RUSSELL, '71. 
E. N. DYER, '72. 
H. B. SIMPSON, '73. 
J. M. BENEDICT, '74. 



PRESIDENT. 

J. H. WEBB, '73. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS. 



E. E. THOMPSON, '71. 
J. H. MORSE, '71. 



TREASURER. 

H. E. STOCKBRIDGE, '78. 

CORRESPONDING SECRETARY. 

S. T. MAYNARD,'72. 

RECORDING SECRETARY. 

P. M. HARWOOD, '75. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 
AUDITING COMMITTEE. 

ATHERTON CLARK, '77. 



T. E. SMITH, '76. 
J. VVYMAN, '77. 
C. O. LOVELL, '78. 
W.A.SHERMAN, '79. 



J. W. CLARK, '72. 



H. L. PHELPS, '74. 



94 




ALUMNI STATISTICS. 




Allen, Gr. H., '71, Winfield, Cowley Co., Kan., Agent Adams Express Co. 

Bagley, D. A., '76, Winchendon, Farmer. 

Baker, D. E., '78, Franklin Student, Harvard Medical School. 

Barrett, J. F., '75, 84 Broad St., New York City, Traveling Salesman, Bow- 
ker Fertilizer Co. 

Barri, J. A., '75, 65 Austin St., Cambridgeport, Student. 

Bassett, A. L., '71,Nev,' York City, Clerk, Vermont C. R. R. & Steamship Co. 

Bell, B. C, '72, Cor., Sixteenth and Howard St., San Francisco, Cal., Drug- 
gist and Chemist. 

Bellamy, J., '76, 659 Washington St., Boston, Nichols, Bellamy & Co. 

Benedict, J. M., '74, 2 Park Place, New York City, Bowker Fertilizer Co. 

Benson, D. H., '77, 3 Park Place, New York City, Chemist and Superintend- 
ent Works Bowker Fertilizer Co., at Elizabethport, N. J. 

Birnie, W. P., '71. Springfield. Conductoi-, Conn. Central R. R. 

Blanchard, W. H., '74, Westminster, Vt., Farm Laborer. 

Bowman, C. A., '81, Billerica, Mass. 

Boynton, C. E., '81, Office of Edgely, Copeland & Getchell, Law Firm, 
Great Falls, N. H. 

Boutwell, W. E., '78, Leverett, Farmer. 

Bowker, W. H,, '71, 43 Chatham St., Boston, President, Bowker Fertilizer Co. 

Bragg, E. B., '75, With Bowker Fertilizer Co., 84 Broad St., New York City. 

Brett, W. P., 72, Brockton, Clerk, B. H. White & Co., Boston. 

Brewer, C, '77, Northampton, Mass., Milk Business. 

Brigham, A. A., '78, Marlborough, Farmer. 

Brooks, W. P., '75, Sapporo, Japan, Professor of Agriculture and Farm Su. 
perintendent, Japan Agricultural College. 



95 



Bunker, M., '75, D. V. S., House Physician, Amerioan Veterinary College, 

New York City. 
Callender, T. R., '75, Grantville, Florist. 
Campbell, F. G., '75, West Westminster, Vt., Farmer. 
Caswell, L. B., '71, Athol, Civil Engineer and Farmer. 
Chapin, H. E., '81, of Boylston, Teacher. 
Carr, W. F., '81, Student, Institute os Technology, Boston. 
Chandler, E. P., '74, Abilene, Kan., Farmer. 
Chickering, D. O., '70, Enfield, Farmer. 
Choate, E. C, '78, Southborough, Farmer. 
Clark, A., '77, Assistant Manager Menlo Mine, Grass Valley, Nevada, Co., 

Cal. 
Clark, J. W., '72, Amherst, Superintendent of Nurseries, Agricultural College. 
Clark, X. Y., '78, San Franciso, Cal. 
*Clay, J. W., '75. 
Coburn, C. F., '78, Lovrell, Teller Five Cents Savings Bank, and Paragraph- 

er, "Daily Citizen." 
Cov^les, F. C, '72, Amherst, Farmer. 
Covsrles, H. L., '71, Hadley, Farmer. 
tCurtis, W. P., '74. 
Cutter, J. C, '72, Sapporo, Japan, Professor of Natural Science, Japan Agri 

cultural College. 
Deuel, C. P., '76 Amherst, Druggist. 
Dickinson, R. S., '79, Odell, Livingstone Co., 111., Farmer. 
Dodge, G. R. , '75, Brighton, Foreman Works Bowker Fertilizer Co. 
Dyer, E. N., '72, Kohala, S. I., Teacher. 
Easterbrook, J. B., '72, Diamond Hill, R. I., Farmer. 

Eldred, F. C, '73., 119 Chambers St., New York City, Salesman, D. W. Wil- 
son & Bro. 
Ellsworth, E. A., '71, Holyoke, Architect, Civil and Mechanical Engineer, 

with D. H. & A. B. Tower. 
Fairfield, F. H., Amherst, M. A. C, Post Graduate in Chemistry. 
Fisher, J. P., '71, Fitchburg, Local Freight Agent, Fiichburg Railroad., 
Fiske, E. R., '72, Philadelphia, Penn., Merchant, Pol well, Bro. & Co., G29 

Chestnut St. 
Flagg, C. O., '72, Diamond Hill, R. I., Farmer. 
Flint, C. L., Jr., Boston. 

Foote, S. D., '78, Springfield, Hampden Watch Co. 
Fowler, A. L., 'SO, Supt. Woronoco Mining Co., Tombstone, A. T. 
Fuller, G. E., '71. 

Gladwin, F. E., '80, Assayer, Cochise Co., Tombstone, A. T. 
Green, S. B., '79, Middleton, Mass., J. J. H. Gregory's Seed Farm. 
Grover, R. B., '72, Ludlow, Vt., Minister. 

*Died Oct. 1, 1880, at New York City. 
tDIed Nov. 8, 1878, at Westminster. 



96 



Guild, G. W. M., '76, New York City, employ of Adams Express Company. 

Hague, H., '75, Manville, R. I., Clergyman. 

Hall, J. N., '78, House Physician, City Hospital, Boston. 

Harwood, P. M., '75, Barre, Farmer. 

Hashiguchi, B., '81, Tokio, Japan. 

Hawley, F. W., '71, Fayettville, Ark., with S. A. Brown, Lumber Dealers. 

Hawley, J. M., '7G, Berlin, Wis., Banker, C. A. Mather & Co. 

Herrick, F. St. C, '71, Methuen, Farmer. 

Hibbard, J. R., '77, Stoughton, Wis., Farmer. 

Hills, J. L., '81, Amherst, M. A. C. Post Graduate in Chemistry. 

Hitchcock, D. G., '74, Agt. American Ex. Co. Warren, Mass. 

Hobbs, J. A., '74, Bloomington, Neb., Farmer. 

Holmes, L. Le B., '72, Mattapoisett, Lawyer. 

Howe, C. S., '78, New Albuquerque, N. M., Mining. 

Howe, E. D., '81, Marlboro, Farmer. 

Howe, W. v., '77, Framingham, Superintendent Framingham Brick Co. 

Hubbard, H. F., '78, New Rochelle, N. Y., with J. H. Catherwood, Importer 

of Teas. 
Hunt, J. F., '78, Laredo, Texas, Civil Engineei", I. and G. N., R. R. 
Kendall, H., '76, Providence, R. I., Chemist and Superintendent, Kendall 

Manufacturing Co. 
Kimball, F. E., '72, Worcester, Clerk, B. B. & G. R. R. 
Knapp, W. H., '7.5, Grantville, Florist. 
Koch, H. G. H., '78, Sixth Avenue and Twentieth St., New York City, H. C. 

F. Koch & Son. 
Ladd, T. H., '76, care Wm. Dadmuu, Watertown, Student. 
Lee, L. K., '75, Des Moines, la.. Agent, Kellogg & McDougal, Buffalo Linseed 

Oil Works. 
Lee, W. G., '80, Georgetown, El Dorado Co., Cal., Miner. 
Leland, W. S., '73, Concord, Officer, State Prison. 
Leonard, G., '71, Springfield, Lawyer. 
Libby, E. H., '74. Chicago, 111., Editor Farmer's Review. 
Livermore, R. W., '72, 9 and 11 Chamber of Commerce, Toledo, O., Attorney- 

at-Law. 
Lovell, C. O., '78, The Doty Plaster Mfg., Co., 113 Maiden Lane N. Y. City. 
Lyman, A. H., '73, Manistee, Mich., Druggist and Bookseller. 
Lyman, C. E., '78, Middlefleld, Conn., Farmer. 
*Lyman, H. '74. 

Lyman, R. W., '71, Belchertown, Lawyer. 
Mackie, G., '72, Attleborough, Physician. 
Macleod, W. A., '76, 60 Devonshire St., Boston, Lawyer, with J. E. May- 

nadier. 
Mann, G. H., '76, Sharon, Manufacturer. 
Martin, W. E., '76, Excelsior, Minn., Post Office, Clerk. 
*Died Jan. 8, 1879, at Middlefleld, Conn. 



97 



Maynard, S. T., '72, Amherst, Professor of Botany and Horticulture, Massa- 
chusetts Agi'icultural College. 
McConnel, C. W., '76, Lonsdale, R. I., Dentist. 
McQueen, C. M., '80, Longmeadow, Mass., in Business with W. G. Medlicott 

& Co., Springfield. 
Miles, Gr. M., '7.5, Miles City, Montana, Ter., Hardware Merchant. 
Mills, G. W., '73, Medford, Physician. 
Minor, J. B., '73, New Britain, Conn., Clerk, Russell & Erwin Manufacturing 

Co. 
Montague, A. H., '74, South Hadley, Farmer. 

Morey, H. E., '72, 49 Haverhill St., Boston, Merchant, Morey, Smith & Co. 
Moi'se, J. H., '71, 251 Essex St., Salem, Civil Engineer. 
Myrick, L., '78, Tremont Bank Building, State St., Boston, Clerk, Soluble 

Pacific Guano Co. 
Nichols, L. A., '71, Headquarters, San Diego, Cal., Southern R. R. 
Norcross, A. D., '71, Monson, Postmaster. 
Nye, G. E., '77, 70 Exchange Building, Union Stock Yards, Chicago, 111., 

Bookkeeper, G. L. Swift. 
Osgood, F. H., '78, 10 Albany St., Edinburg, Scotland, Veterinary Student. 
Otis, H. P., '75, Leeds, Superintendent Northampton Emery Wheel Co. 
Page, J. B., '71, Conway, Farmer. 

Parker, G. A., '76, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Farm Superintendent. 
Parke 1-, G. L., '76, Dorchester, Florist. 
Parker, H. F., '77, With Briesen & Betts, Law Firm, 229 Broadway, New 

York City. 
Parker, W. C, '80, Wakefield, Farmer. 
Peabody, W. R., '72, Atchison, Kan., General Agent, Atchison, Topeka, & 

Santa Ffe Railroad. 
PenhalJow, D. P., '73, Botanist, 85 Brattle St., Cambridge. 
Peters, A., '81, American Veterinary College, N. Y., City, 141 West 54 St., 
Phelps, C. H., '76, South Framingham, Florist. 
Phelps, H. L., '74, Northampton, Dealer in Fertilizers. 
Porter, W. H., '76, Hatfield, Farmer. 
Porto, R. M. da S., '77, Para, Brazil, Planter. 

Potter, W. S., '76, Lafayette, Ind., Lawyer, firm of W. De Witt Wallace. 
Rawson, E. B., '81, Wilcox, Elk Co., Pa., Civil Engineer. 
Renshaw, J. B., '73, Hutchinson, Minn., Clergyman. 
Rice, F. A., '75. Aurora, Nev., Clerk. 

Richmond, S. H., '71, Planter, Lindale, Fla., P. O. address, Altoona, Orange Co. 
Ripley, G. A., '80, Dealer in Grain, 5 Franklin and 6 Green St., Worcester, 

Mass. 
Root, J. E., '76, Barre, Student of Medicine, New York City. 
Rudolph, C, '79, Columbia Law School, New York City. 
Russell, W. D., '71, in business with Montague PajDer Co., Tui'ner's Falls, 

Mass. 



98 



Salisbury, P. B., '73, Kimberly Diamond Fields, South Africa, Clerk. 

Sears, J. M., '76. Ashtield, Faj-mer. 

Shaw, E. D., '73, Holyoke, Florist. 

Sherman, W. A., '79, 343 Clinton St., Brooklyn, N. Y., Student, L. I., Medical 

College. 
Simpson, H. B., '73, Centreville, JVId., Farmer. 

Smead, E., '71, 333 North Carey St., Baltimore, Md., Dealer in Scrap Iron. 
Smith, P. S., '74, Hampden, Woolen Manufacturer. 
Smith, G-. P., '79, Sunderland, Farmer. 

Smith, H. F. M., '81, Amherst, M. A. C, Post Graduate in Chemistry. 
Smith, T. E., '76, West Chesterfield, Manufacturer. 
Spalding, A. W., '81, St. Louis, Mo., with Ripley & Kimball, 907-9-11 North 

Main St. 
Snow, G. H., '73, Leominster, Farmer. 

Somers, P. M., '73, San Francisco, Cal., Editor "Argonaut." 
*Southmayd, J. E., '77. 
South wick, A. A., '7.5, Talladega, Ala., Instructor in Agriculture, Talladega, 

College. 
Sparrow, L. A., '71, 43 Chatham St., Boston, Chemist, Bowker Fertilizer Co. 
Spoiiord, A. L., '78, Georgetown, Shoe-cutter. 

Stockbridge, H. E., '78, Amherst, Post Graduate, Agricultural College. 
Stone, A. H., '80, Phillipston, Mass. 

Strickland, G. P., '71, Stillwater, Minn., Machinist, Seymour, Sabin & Co. 
Swan, R. W., '79, Framingham, Student, Harvard Medical School. 
Taft, C. A., '76, Whitinsville, Machinist. 
Taylor, F. P., '81, with Beach & Co., Hartford, Conn. 
Thompson, E. E , '71, East Weymouth, Teacher. 
Thompson, S. C, '73, Natick, Civil Engineei'. 
Tucker, G. H., '71, Grandin Farm, Dakota, Farmer. 

Tuckerman, F., '78, Hotel, Brunswick, Student, Harvard Medical School. 
Urner, G. P., '76, 116 Franklin' St., New York City, Superintendent Magic 

Ruffle Company, 
Wakefield, A. T., '73, Peoria, 111., Physician. 
Waldron, H. E. B., '79, North Rochester, Farmer. 
Ware, W. C, '71, 3.55 Middle St., Portland, Me., Manager Boston & Portland 

Clothing Company. 
Warner, C. D., '81, Teacher, State Reform School, Providence, R. I. 
Warner, S. S., '73, Traveling Agent, Bowker Fertilizer Co., Northampton. 
Washburn, J. H., '78, Post Graduate, M. A. C, Amherst, Mass. 
Webb, J. H., '73, 30 Exchange Building, New Haven, Conn., Attorney-at- 

Law. 
Wellington, C, '73, Washington, D. C, Chemist, United States Agricultural 

Department. 
Wells, H., '73, Rochester, N. Y., Clerk, "Blue Line," Fast Freight Office. 
*Died Dec. 11, 1878, at Minneapolis, Minn. 



99 



Wetmore, H. G., '76, 3 Easst Seventeenth St., New York City, Physician. 

Wlieeler, W., '71, Concord, Civil Engineer and Inventor. 

Whitney, F. Le P., '71. 

Whitney, W. C. , '72, Minneapolis, Minn, , Architect. 

Whitaker, A., '81, Needham, Mass., Parmer. 

Wilcox, H. H., '81, Nawilih, H. I., Sugar Industry. 

Williams, J. E., '76, Amherst, Editor "Record." 

Winchester, J. F., '75, Lawrence, Veterinary Surgeon and Lecturer, M.assa- 

chusetts Agricultural College. 
Wood, F. W., '78, Providence, R. I., Civil Engineer. 
Woodbury, R. P., '78, Kansas City, Editor Kan. City Daily Times. 
Woodman, E. E., '74, Dan vers. Florist, E. & C. Woodman. 
Wyman, J. '77, Arlington, Produce Dealer. 
Zeller, H. McK., '74 Hagerstown, Md., Student of Telegraphy. 




100 




How swiftly Lave passed two years at our College, 
With all the excitement attendant on each, 
As each of our classmates is striving for knowledge. 
Which here is so bountifully placed in his reach. 
How sweet to remember this valley, 'twill be, 
Where the grand old Connecticut sweeps to the sea ; 
As lost deep in reverie, in some future times, 
Our classmates are found in far distant climes. 

When, one in Brazil, another in Cuba, 

Is selling his coffee or making his sugar. 

Another way back in a far distant town. 

For thrift and good farming is winning renown. 

While others as chemists the discovery will make, 

How the farmer from air can nitrogen take 

And apply to his land in such available form 

As will take our old farmers completely by storm. 

But now let 's return from mere speculation 
And come down to facts with solid foundation. 
We entered as Freshmen but two years ago. 
But ah ! when we pause it hardly seems so. 
As resting a moment in the midst of the stream, 
We glance all around us at what may be seen. 
Our relations as Freshmen, with the Faculty all. 
Were peaceful and pleasant, as each may recall. 

But when we, as "Sophs," the " Freshies " would haze. 

Our relations with the " Fac " took a different phase. 

For threats of expulsion then rang in our ears. 

Which were, of themselves, as vague as our fears. 

In Junior year our troubles come 

Mounting upward, one by one, 

But not 'till suspended, one and all. 

Did we feel assured that "Prexy 'd " "crawl." 

Small in numbers, we should be 

Each in honor to '83, 

For the time is drawing nigh 

When we must say a last good bye, 

To our classmates true and tried. 

With whom we've struggled side by side 

Up the hill of knowledge, for four years' time. 

Which seems to grow higher as upward we climb. 



101 



1881^82.1 1 



Winter Term begins 

Holiday, 

Holiday, 

Holiday, 

Winter Term ends 



December 8th, '81. 

December 25tli, '81. 

January 1st, '82. 

February 22d, '82. 

March 8th, '82. 



Spring Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring Term begins .' . . ' . March 23d, '82. 
Holiday, ...... Fast. 

Holiday, May 30th, '82. 

Farnsworth Prize Speaking, . . June 19th, '82. 

Eutrance Examination, . . June 20th, '83. 

Review of M. A. C. C. C. by the Governor, June 21st, '82. 

Commencement, ..... June 21st, '82. 

Summer Vacation of nine weeks. 

Fall Term begins .... August 24th, '82. 

Entrance Examination, . . . August 24th, '82. 

Fall Term ends November 22d, '82. 

Fall vacation of two weeks. 



102 










103 



"^CONTENTS^t 



Advertisements, 

Artotype of the Faculty, 

Frontispiece, 

Editorial, 

In Memoriam, 

Officers of the College, 

Senior Appointments, 

Students and Class Communications, 

Cut "Absence d'esprit" and "Cuts," 

Military Department, 

College Christian Union and Literary Societies, 

Secret Societies, 

Prize Awards, 

Miscellaneous Organizations, 

College Reading Room, 

Water-Melon Agent, 

A Fresiiman Class Supper, 

Boarding Houses, 

Cut, 

Technicalities, 

"Vehement" Expressions, 

Census of the College, 

Cut " A Broken Umbrella," 

Cafe Agricultural, 

Easy Dialogues for Two Persons, 

History of the College, 

A Scare-Crow and All Sorts, 

Alumni, 

Class Poem, 

Calendar, 

Ending Cut, 

Table of Contents, 

Advertisements, 



3 

5-8 

9-10 

11-15 

16 

17-31 

32 

33-36 

37-40 

41^7 

48 

49-59 

60-61 

62-63 

63-64 

65-69 

70 

71 

72-73 

75-77 

78 

79-80 

80-81 

82-88 

90 

91-100 

101 

102 

103 

104 



104 



J. A. RAWS ON, 

Watchmaker, Jeweler P) Optician 

AND DEALER IN 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, JEWELEY, SILYER WARE, 

PLATED WARE, 

Toys mid Waney Goods, 



J. H. BEALS, D. D. 8. 

CUTLER'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

All operations upon the teeth performed in 
a careful and thorough manner. Ether and 
Nitrous Oxide Gas given when desired, for 
the painless extraction of teeth. 




F. H. BfOA^TE, 



DEALER IN 






CrocSery, CMua, Glass Ware, Cutlery, 

LAMP GOODS AND KEROSENE OIL. 

Merchants Kow, Amherst, Mass. 



m:. k. mtjzzey's 







MEALS AT ALL HOURS OF THE DAY OR EVE/HHUG. 

IN EVERY STYLE, TO ORDER. 

Catei^trLg to FcLTttes. 

PRIVATE SUPPERS A SPECIALTY. 



O. G, COUCH, 

Will call at the Agricultural College Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 
to deliver such Goods as may be ordered by the Students. 

J^STRAL cLiid COMMON OILS. 

TOBACCO, 

And the best assortment of goods for Students' use in Amherst. 



lOG 



OoUege IPImabir^innigtLcoys 

NO. G PHOENIX ROW. 

FANCY AND TOILET GOODS, 

FROM WALLACE & CO., NEW YORK. 

JlrampoirttcBdL ai/iridL 3EJ>oiniii<B@t£([3 (Di^eLirSg 
CIGAMETTE8 and TOBAVVO. 

'^^ Physicians' ^J^W Prescriptions 'IW Accurately ^^W Compounded. 
W. H. H. MORGA]^, Proprietor. 

B.H.WILLIAMS, 

AND DEALEE IN 

GENTS^ FURNISHING GOODS. 

FI/\IE SHIRTS TO ORDER. 

Williams' Block, Amherst, Mass. 



At tJ-he Drixg StoTe, 



107 



T. W. SL O A I^, 



DEALER IN 



LADIES' & GENTS FINE BOOTS & SHOES. 

Especial attention paid to repairing. 
See our reliable goods which are warranted to give satisfaction. 



IVo. a PHOEIVIX liOT^, 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



TAKE THIS OUT AND READ IT. 



ifQl 



Is the place to get a good Meal and all kinds of game in its season. 
OYSTERS, ICE CREAM, CAKE, &c. 



r^^ 

(=:i 



PC 



UJ 



^<^ 




GO 
t 



m 

GO 



DO 



r-^ 






OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE & SINGLE TEAMS. 



TO LET AT REASONABLE RATES. 



OFFICE AT STABLE. REAR OF AMHERST HOUSE. 

tu- . ■.■•Ji TT. E. STEBBIIVS. 



108 



MARSH & YOUNG 

MAKE A SPECIALTY OF 

TODEpg'^Fai^ITni^E, 



Be€ffltil,^'a et® 



mmm§ 

Book Cases, Blacking Gases, Desks, Curtains, Picture Frames, 
Cord, etc.. Constant ly on hand at Low Prices. 

AMHERST, Mass. 



Pleasant Steet, 



J. M. WAITE & SON, 



9) 
> 



H 





pTTErtg! '^ pwEi^gifj 



AND DEALERS IN 



Hats, CaDsJurs&Furnisliiog Goods 



Q 



Where may be found the largest assortment in town. 

THE LATEST AND H/IOST DESIRABLE STYLES. P 

Discounts made to Clubs and on all large Sales. 

Our motto is : "THE BEST." Students, please call and examine 

before piirchasing elsewhere. Sign of the 

GOLDEN HAT. Latest and best styles always on hand. 



y 



js:^aisE(R's 




inouth:am:f»to]x, imcass. 



m 



F. & M. Schaefer's Vienna Lager Beer, New York, on draught. 
Choice Wines, Liquors and Cigars. 

Hampshire Steam Dyeing and Cleaning Wokks connected. 

P. W. KAISER, Proprietor. 



109 



PoLYOKE House 




CITY OF HOLYOKE. 

BUSH & CHASE, Proprietors. 



Amherst Beetal KoiDms. 

ESTABLISHED 1861. 

No. 6 Wm. Kellogg' s Block, Phoenix Row. 



V. W. LEACH, DENTIST. 

Personal atteution given to all operations 
on the teeth. 

E^°Entire Satisfaction Gruaranteed.°®a 



110 



AMHERST PICTURE GALLERY. 

THE BEST PHOTOGRAPHS, AND THE FINEST 

LINE OF yEiyET AND COMBINATION FRAMES. 

CALL AND SEE US. 



J, L, LOVELL, 



0MYEl^*fO}HIiIiED^PIi6W. 

Oyer 5000 Soli In New EiiElaiid since Soyeiiikr, 187], 




AchowleflEeS tlie Best Plow in tlie Maiiel for all Muds of Land. 

Especially adapted for Meadow* Plowing, as the whole team can walk on 
the sod. We claim for it perfection in the following points: Economy, 
Durability, Lipht -Draft, Ease of Handling, Simplicity, Adjustability, 
Non-choking, Quality of Work, and Perfect Fitting Repairs. 

CAS AD AY SULKY PLOW. We call particular attention to the New 
CHAMPION RAKE, sold with the express understanding that if not better 
than any other in the country, we will pay the freight and order away. 

Chain Pumps, with Patent Rubber Buckets, Cucumber Pumps with Pat- 
ent Rubber Buckets. [[^"Circulars sent on ajaplication. 

WHITTEMORE BROS. 
Agricultural Warehouse and Seed Store, 80 & 83 So. Market St., Boston. 



Ill 



JAMES PARNELL, 

BILLIARD HALL, 

Opp. N. H. & N. R. R. Depot. Northampton, Mass. 

CHOICE REFRESHMENTS & CIGARS. 

O. H. PEENTISS, 

DRAPER AND TAILOR 

H. H. CARTER, 
LIYERY, HACK, BOARDING AND SALE STABLE, 

Office 29 Main St., Rear Holyoke House. 

HOL^k^oiiE, - - = - m:ass. 

S T TJ 13 E ISr T S 

When in Northampton will find 

Barr's Dining Rooms 

Tlie Best Place to pt tlielr Refresliiiients. 



(Wfl^^#^« 




Spr^ectds § Class Sixpper's 

RECEIVE SPECIAL ATTENTION. 

Private BiBiiig KoidmSj Up-Stairg, 

I 113 



.^ *r ■'' i< n^ 



c^ 



CO 02 



CO 



C3 hj 






» cS 3 



C/3 C/} O .S 



w s ;^ p-( cc H 



•s ^ a « * 

o eq H S 's 

^^ ^-- nn 



N O cc 



p^o<i3Qp2wmo 



a S ■-' '^ 



3 5 o 



fe fq 



^ 


Q 


"S 


CJD 


Co 


o 

CQ 

< 


■u 

en 

O 


a 


PQ 


CO 


CD 






cx5 




<D 


„ 


g 




Qc 


o 




o 

a 


CZJ 

Pl3 


C5 


c3 


s 


cS 


Ci3 




pq 


d5 


w 







J. S. GUILFOED & CO, 
Good Horses and Carriages to let with Careful Drivers. 

CENTER STREET, REAR FIRST NATIONAL BANK BD1LD1N6. 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



a 



iul Wtm 



EECEIVED THE GOLD MEDAL, 

Paris Exposition, 1878. 
His Celebrated N'umbers, 

303-404- i 70-35 1 -332, 

and his other styles may be had of all dealers 
throughout the world. 

Josept Gillott & Sons, New York. 



113 



CHARLES DEUEL, 



^'^ ^^i 



lit ^ 6fc§Miita 



Imported and Domestic Cigars, Fancy and Toilet Articles, 
Sponges, Brushes, &c. 



Amherst House Drug Store, 



Amherst, Mass. 



mWE C. HA¥1E§ & CO., 




IMPORTERS OF 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 



STEIMS, SHEET MOSIC, BOOKS, &C, 



3S Court St., 



Opp. Court House, 



BOSTON. 



H/\CKS, CARRYALLS, 

Stylish Double and Single Teams 

TO LET AT FAIR PRICES. 



Accommodations for Transient Feeding. 



Rear of Phoenix Row, - AMHERST, MASS. 

GEO. M. OHAMBERLAIIsr, Prop¥. 



114 



sx 



J.:M.-BPN^WICKv§vB^IiKE 






)® 



H. A. COOK, Proprietor. 



FROST & ADAMS, 
MATHEMATICAL INSTRUMENTS, &c. 




i^T' Cornhill, 



BOSTON. 



Catalogues furnished gratis upon application. 






EDWm NELSOIi, 



[Successor to J. S. & C. Adams, House Established 1S26.1 
DEALER IN 

►^•CLASSICAL m IISCELLANEOUS BOOKS 

College Text Books (new and second-hand), School Books, and 
Stationery and Fancy Goods. 



m^" Cash paid for second-hand Text Books. =,^11 
No. 3 Post-Office Block, - - Amherst, Mass. 

115 



AMES PATEIT CHIllEB 



CENTENNIAL SWIVEL PLOWS. 

TRIUMPHANT EVERYWHERE! 

VICTORIOUS OVER ALU 



SUPERIOR TO ANY FOR LEVEL LAP AND HILLSIDE. 





..^.r^'^^^'"'' 



Jm^WmW^ 



mk 



law 



80J1,£; MAKERS, 

Qtiincy Hall, BOSTON, & 153 Beekman St., NEW YORK. 

Liberal Discounts to Dealers and Agents. 

SEND FOR IL^LUSTRATED CIRCULAR. 

1.16 



A fine assortment of Gents' Toilet Articles, Razor Strops, Combs, Hair and 
Lather Brushes, Fine Toilet and Shaving Soaps, and Imported Cosmetics 
Constantly on hand. 

AL. FANEUF, Proprietor. 

G. W. PAOH & BEOS., 

841 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 

E. O. OLIVER 



S' ^cr5r^\s>^ 



Ml' 



iiji^imija* 



Prices Reasonable, Work Guaranteed. 

Small Jobbing of every description. Saws Filed, and all kinds of Edged Tools 
Sharpened. Picture Frames made to order. Pocket Knives re-bladed 
Bicycles made a Specialty. Upholstering done to order. 

No. 4, Kellogg's Block, - AMHEKST, MASS. 

ALSO GUNS AND REVOLVERS REPAIRED. 



fflassaclisetts Apiciiltiiral College, 

P.NICAL §EPiRTMENT. 

AMMEMST, MASSo 



We would inform the friends of the College, and the public generally, that 
we are prepared to supply 

SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

All warranted true to name, at the lowest Prices. 



For Trees, SWs, elc, Address 

J. W. CLARK, 

Amherst, Mass. 



For Plants, Flowers, small Fruits 

Addre.^s Prof. S. T. MAYNARD. 

Amherst, Mass. 



11^ 



BOWRER'S 





FOfi PLANTS, 



m DOOR AND OUT. 



A Fertilizer, almost entireh" soluble in water, free from odor, 
and as clean as sugar to handle. It is made expressly for flow- 
ers grown in the house or garden. It contains nearly the same 
plant-food as stable dressing, and produces the same results, 
without giving off in the room that offensive and unhealthy odor 
which arises from the application of stable dressing. It pro- 
duces a healthy, luxuriant growth, and induces early and gener- 
ous flowering, and cannot in any way harm the plants if applied 
according to directions, which are very simple, and accompa- 
ny each package. No lady who delights in flowers, and likes to 
see them do well and bloom abundantly, should be without the 
"^ Ammoniated Food." A table-spoonful dissolved in a gallon 
of water is a sufficient quantity for twenty ordinary plants like 
geraniums, applied once a week for three or four weeks ; after 
that, not oftener than once a month. Trial packages sent by 
mail, post paid, 25 cents. 



Bowker Fertilizer Company. 



43 Chathain Street, Boston ; 3 Park Place, New York ; 
2 1 No. Water St., Rochester, N. Y. 



lis 



83 



,.0^-M4* 




JS63 



DATE DUE 1 



































































































UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
LIBRARY 

LD 
3234 

M25 
V.13 
1883 
cop, 2 

+