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This set of yearbooks ivas compiled 
by the staff of the 1967 Massachu- 
setts Index and donated in the 
interest of paying tribute to those 
who have created the history and 
traditions existing at the University 
of Massachusetts. 

Alexander Dean, Editor-in-chief 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/index1886univ 



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Ma/mfacturers of;^lie /Xner^ra^ies ofclgareites 
and smofcuiff iol^aocos, Ou/^popaioi^drarutof 

Richmond Straight Curt No. I Cigarettes. 

are mcute s^oj?2^ a, r/xre^ and/ a7sl£€/ fodacco^ 
the- ^laalctifofw/iic^iifTiole^juaied^i/ayi^olAer 
ci^a/etie^. Beware or Imitations. 



MASSACHUSETTS 



The age in which we live demands progress in the means and in 
the methods by which young men prepare for the duties of life. 

The course of study at the State College is not the result of tra- 
ditional methods. It recognizes the fact that the sciences are now 
applied in every department of practical affairs in a larger degree than 
ever before. The course makes due provision for the teaching of 
Physics, Chemistry, Botany, Zoology, Geology and Mathematics. 
Since the dead languages ■ are not required, the time devoted to the 
study of Latin and Greek in many of our higher institutions, can here 
be given to other studies. 

The study of the English Language and Literature, and of Modern 
Languages, and the frequent exercises in Elocution, furnish excellent 
opportunities for developing the powers of expression. The study of 
the Modern Languages also enables the graduate of the State College 
to avail himself of the latest scientific results reached by French and 
German scholars. 

But the course is not limited to the Natural Sciences, Languages, 
and Mathematics. History, Political Economy, and the Science of 
Government, with special relations to the government of the United 
States, receive large attention. Nor are those studies in any sense 
neglected that are adapted to give one a knowledge of himself and of 
his highest interests. 

Mental and Moral Science constitute an important part of the cur- 
riculum. While these ample opportunities are offered at this College 
to every young man, whatever may be his vocation, the student who 
wishes to engage in any department of field work, whether farming, 
market gardening, the care of hot-houses, or any other kindred em- 
ployment, here finds special aids. 

It is the aim of the College to teach every science, as far as may 
be, in its relations to Agriculture, and to give all the technical instruc- 
tion in this department that our facilities allow. The ample grounds 
of the College, comprising nearly four hundred acres, furnish wide 
and increasing means of illustration and practical teaching. 

Physical training and discipline are promoted by the instruction 
and training in the military department, under an officer who is a 
graduate of West Point. 

In brief, the object of the course is to form the true man and the 
effective workman. 

The expenses are moderate that the advantages of the State College 
may be enjoyed by a large number of young men. 



Catalogues furnished upon application to the President. 




FRAGRANT VANITY FAIR 



AND 



CLOTH OF COLD 
CIGARETTES. 

Our Cigarettes cannot be surpassed. If you do not use 
them, a trial will convince you that they have no equal. 

13 First Prize Medals Awarded. 

WM. S. KIMBALL & CO. 



BE SURE YOU VISIT 

WARE, PRATT & CO. 

THE ORIGINAL 

"ONE PRICE" CLOTHIERS, 

408 and 412 Main Street, 

WORCESTER, MASS. 

Largest, Finest and Most Complete Assortment 

OF 

Men's, Boys' and Children's 

o Sb lO) ^ ^g s ^r o> 

AND 

TO-BE FOUND IN THE CITY. 

Our Store is Lighted by the Fuller Electric Light. 



POND'S Extract. 



Price 50 Cents, 






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Ixi 



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^^^ DIRECTIONS WITI-^^' 

-POWS'S'^D EXCLUSIVELY BY THE 



(limited.) 



Tln-e T'^ori.cLer 



SLea.lirLg' I 



INVALtTABLE FOE 

Sprains, Burns, Bruises, Scalds, Soreness, Rlieumatism, Boils, Ulcers, Old Sores, 

Toothache, Headache, Sore Throat, Asthma, Hoarseness, 

Neuralgia, Catarrh, etc., etc., etc. 

HEYWOOD SMITH, M. D., M. R. C. P., of England.—" I have used it with marked benefit." 
H. G. PRESTON, M. D., Brooklyn, N. Y. — " 1 know of no remedy so generally used." 
ARTHUR GUINESS, M. D., F. R. C. S., of England.— "I have prescribed POND'S EX- 
TRACT with great success." 

THE BEST KNOWN LOTION FOR ATHLETES. 

It prevents or removes, almost instantaneously, all Soreness, Stiffness, or Swelling, after 
rubbing or bathing the parts with the Extract, We have testimonials from all the leading 

CA UTIOIf.—PO'S'D'fi EXTRACT is sold only in bottles with the name blown in the glass. 
j!l^="lt is unsafe to use other articles with our directions. Insist on having POND'S EX- 
TRACT. Refuse all imitations and substitutes. 

New York, May 10, 1884. 
POND'S EXTRACT CO.— Dear Sirs: Since the first of the present athletic season I have used POND'S 
EXTRACT as a rubbing material, and find it to be the best article of the kind I have ever used. It removes 
stiffness and soreness of the mubcles like magic, and in my opinion is destined to be the liniment for athletic pur- 
poses in the future. Yours truly, L.. E. MYERS, Manhattan Athletic Club. 

New York, May 1, 1884, 
POND'S EXTRACT CO.— Gentlemen : I have been usinp POND'S EXTRACT for the past few months, 
and find it to be tlie Tjeat Liniment I have ever used for rubbinK purposes, soreness, strains, cuts, etc., and can 
recommend it to all athletes. Yours truly, HARRY FREDRICK8, Manhattan Athletic Club. 

Price, 50 cents, Cheap; $1.00, Cheaper; and $1.75, Cheapest. 
POND'S EXTRACT CO., 76 Fifth Avenue, New York. 







THE NEW CHAPEL, 
AS IT ^ArILL APPEAR WHEN COMPLETED. 



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MASS. AGRICULTURAL CDLLEQE 




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JANUARY, 1885. 












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Editor-in-Chief. 



6. B. W. RJf, 

Business Editor. 









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10 



^. ^ .3^ 

mm EDITDRIAL. 6i|g 



/'^^ OMING to our many readers and friends with the chronicles of 
^^^ our inner college life, we would first of all beg you to look 

<^ with great forbearance upon our work, remembering that a 
sufficient punishment is brought upon the rash and inexperienced 
Index Board when the liabilities are brought forth. However, we 
shall strive to fill our place in the unbroken line of those who, since 
the first Junior Class, have toiled and suffered in like manner, wring- 
ing from their inmost souls those wondrous productions only to hear 
the heartless remark — stale jokes. 

Thus anticipating our fate, we would only ask that those errors 
which may occur be kindly overlooked, and, furthermore, that a suffi- 
cient amount of pity be felt to induce every one to invest in a full 
stock of this number of the Index. 

Dviring the past year President Greenough has proved himself 
capable of not only governing the College, but also of raising its 
standard both in an intellectual and moral way. Although the ex- 
pulsion of men is no doubt an unpleasant duty and frequently excites 
strong feeling, it is often no more than just to those remaining, and 
when judiciously done must elevate the tone of the College. It is at 
the same time a serious matter, and should have good and definite 
reasons. 

The various unpleasant episodes and apparently foolish acts which 
have occurred all round the past year, and which have caused no end 
of trouble and ill-feeling, are, we hope, things of the past which may 
never occur aarain. 



11 



Perhaps the greatest misfortune which has befallen the College 
since the death of President Chadbourne is the resignation of our 
highly esteemed Professor of Mathematics. During his short stay 
with us, Professor Basset has gained such an unbounded respect, 
admiration, and affection from every student as lies in the power of 
but few men to command. His patience and kindness, his untiring- 
efforts in our behalf, have made him a model which all must desire to 
follow. In leaving his professorship here to pursue higher studies, 
we can assure him that he will always hold a place in the heart of 
every man who was in his classes, and that each and every one wishes 
him the best of success. Our best wish for our College shall ever be 
that he may sometime return to fill an honored place among the fac- 
ulty of this institution. 

We shall miss Professor Goodell, who has been called by a large 
vote to represent this district in the Legislature. 

Beside his usual duties, which are always so thoroughly performed. 
Professor Goodell has attended to the purchasing and recataloguing 
of the books of our rapidly increasing library. 

Professor Goessman's department, containing as it does the over- 
sight of both the College and Experiment Station work, has been 
steadily growing until he has finall}' been obliged to relinquish the 
recitation of the lower classes to Professor H. E. Stockbridge, attend- 
ing only to the upjDer classes and work of the laboratory and station. 

Besides Professor Stockbridge, whom the College has been fortu- 
nate in securing and we hope may succeed in retaining, we have 
during the past year received instruction in Physiology from Dr. 
Tuckerman of '78, and in Mathematics, Professor C. D. Warner of 
'81 has assumed the chair left vacant by Professor Basset. To all 
these we extend a hearty welcome, and hope their connection with 
the College may be a long and pleasant one. 

Of Dr. Miles there is need of much being said which it does not 
become us to say. That his services were secured by our late Presi- 
dent Chadbourne with the intention that he should hold a prominent 
place in the direction of the Farm and Experiment Station was a 
well-known fact. That he is most eminently fitted to fill such a place 
has been thoroughly proven to all unprejudiced minds. That it is 
the one place wherein his vast stores of knowledge and experience 



13 



have the least chance to show to the world his wonderful power of 
applying the theoretical to the practical is a matter to be most sin- 
cerely regretted by all who wish to see a strong union between the 
science and the practice of Agriculture. In addition to his regular 
duties as Professor of Agriculture and Instructor in Biology, Dr. 
Miles has this year instituted a very interesting series of experiments, 
involving extensive and accurate measurements of every man in Col- 
lege; Dr. Tuckerman assists Dr. Miles in this work. 

The Horticultural department is now better supplied with assist- 
ants and workmen than formerly, and is in a very prosperous con- 
dition. It is blessed this year with a handsome new barn and store- 
house. 

The President's house, so beautifully situated on the hill east of 
the Plant house, is an ornament to the place and affords a suitable 
residence for our President, at a convenient distance from the Col- 
lege. 

The general condition of affairs is excejDtionally favorable to the 
rapid advancement of the College. Ample means are now afforded 
here for a thorough scientific education and college training at a 
moderate expense, and we feel confident that, was the exact condi- 
tion of this institution more thoroughly understood, there would be 
more to enter each year than the College could accommodate. We" 
believe that a great change has been made within the last few years. 
Although all useless class-work has been abolished and only that 
which is most useful retained, yet the agricultural part of our train- 
ing is under such a thorough and skillful Professor that it is now one 
of the most instructive and popular branches in the course, as the 
experiences of the past year have shown conclusively. 

The Military department has been restricted to three drills a week, 
but it still seems too much to require of each Senior Class that it be 
obliged to spend about one-third of its time on military studies and 
drills. The last year of the course is far too valuable for literary or 
scientific work to be thrown away upon military. 

Athletic sports have been well sustained during the past year; our 
base-ball and foot-ball teams have been quite strong, although from 
lack of time we have played but few games. We can also boast of 
good tennis players and riders of the wheel. Our lack of a properly 



13 



arranged Gymnasium is strongly felt, especially during the winter 
term. 

There are many other matters which might be commented upon 
either to praise or to criticise, but we will forbear. The new Chapel 
is too large a subject to be treated of in as short a manner as would 
be necessary if undertaken here; its description will be treated of 
further on. Suffice it to say that it is a source of great rejoicing to 
see such a fine structure really making its appearance where it is so 
greatly needed and where it will be so thoroughly appreciated. It 
will be a fit place for the library, which, through the liberality of the 
Alumni and friends of the College, has obtained such a good start. 
The chapel building will furthermore be an honor to the place, and 
we hope that the end has come to the erection of cheap buildings 
on the College grounds, and that in future all may be substantial 
structures worthy of the State which builds them. 

Thus it is with great rejoicing that we record the progress of 
events. Thus, as in all progress, something must be left behind in 
the onward rush, and we assure you, dear reader, that it is with 
the greatest possible pleasure that the '86 Index Board drop out of 
the line and fall back into the regular duties of our course. In leav- 
ing this volume to your tender mercies, we would once more pray you 
to tread lightly above our ashes. 




14 















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1884-5. 



15 



BDARH DF TRUSTEES. 

e^^^ :r. ^^ 



MEMBERS EX-OFFICIIS. 

His Excellency, GEORGE D. ROBINSON, 
Governor of the Comtnonwealth. 

J. C. GREENOUGH, A. M., 

President of the College. 

JOHN E. RUSSELL, Esq., 
Secretary of Board of Agriculture. 

Hon. JOHN W. DICKINSON, 

Secretary of Board of Education. 



MEMBERS BY ELECTION. 

Hon. MARSHALL P. WILDER, ..... Boston. 

Hon. CHARLES G. DAVIS, Plymouth. 

HENRY COLT, Esq., Pittseield. 

PHINEAS STEDMAN, Esq., Chicopee. 

JAMES C. GRINNELL, Esq., Geeenfield. 

GEORGE NOYES, Esq., Boston. 

Hon. DANIEL NEEDHAM, Groton. 

HENRY L. WHITING, Esq., Cambridge. 

Hon. WILLIAM KNOWLTON, Upton. 

Hon. JOHN CUMMINGS, Woburn. 

EDWARD C. CHOATE, Esq., ...... Southborough. 

O. B. HAD WIN, Esq., Worcester. 

BENJAMIN P. WARE, Esq., Marblehead. 

JAMES H. DEMOND, Esq., Northampton. 



16 



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^ EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, m 

Q/H^ TT. -^^^Vi) 



Pres. JAMES C. GREENOUGH. JOHN E. RUSSELL, Esq. 
O. B. HAD WIN, Esq. JAMES H. DEMOND, Esq. 

BENJ. P. WARE, Esq. GEORGE NOYES, Esq. 

Secretary. 
Hon. CHAS. L. FLINT, Boston. 

Auditor. 
HENRY COLT, Esq., Pittsfield. 

Treasurer. 
O. B. had win, Esq., Worcester. 

-Board of Overseers. 
THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

Examining Committee of Overseers. 
WM. R. SESSIONS. JONATHAN BUDDINGTON. 

DANIEL E. DAMON. S. B. BIRD. 

A. C. VARNUM. J. HENRY GODDARD. 



17 






»#^ FACULTY. 



•o.^o« 



JAMES C. GREENOUGH, M. A., 
President. 

College Pastor and Professor of Mental and Moral Science, Provisional Instructor of 
Political Economy and History, and Farm Superintendent, 

LEVI STOCKBRIDGE, Honoeaey Pkof. of Agriculture. 

HENRY H. GOODELL, M. A., 
Professor of Modern Languages. 

CHARLES A. GOESSMANN, Ph. D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Director of Phperimental Station. 

SAMUEL T. MAYNARD, B. S., 

Professor of Botany and Horticidture, and Instructor in Draioing. 

A. B. BASSET, B. A., 
Professor of Physics and Civil Engineering. 

MANLY MILES, M. D., D. V. S., 

Professor of Agriculture and Biology. 

VICTOR H. BRIDGMAN, 1st Lieut. 2d Artillery, U. S. A., 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

HORACE E. STOCKBRIDGE, Ph., D., 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

CLARENCE D. WARNER, B. S., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

FREDERICK TUCKERMAN, M. D., 
Lecturer on Physiology. 

JOHN F. WINCHESTER, D. V. S., 
Lecturer on Veterinary Science and Practice. 

ROBERT W. LYMAN, Esq., 
Lecturer on Rural Law. 

LEVI R. TAFT, B. S., 
Bursar and Assistant Professor in Horticulture. 



18 



.^^ 



BDSTDN UNIVERSITY. ^ 



WILLIAM F. WARREN, S. T. D., LL. D., 

President. 

Jx\MES E. LATIMER, S. T. D., 

Dean of the School of Theology. 

EDMUND H. BENNETT, LL. D., 

Dean of the School of Law. 

I. TINSDALE TALBOT, M. D., 
Dean of the School of Medicine. ■ 

W. E. HUNTINGTON, Ph. D., 

Dean of the College of Liberal Arts. 

EBEN TOURJEE, Mus. D., 
Dean of the College of Music. 

JAMES C. GREENOUGH, A. M., 
President of Ifassachiisetts Agricultural College. 

THOMAS W. BISHOP, A. M., 
Registrar. 



19 




BENIDR APPDINTMENTB. m 




President. 



C.S. PHELPS, HisTORiAK. 

L. C. LEARY, Poet. 

B. O. TEKIRIAN, Prophet. 

H. HOWELL, . . . . « Prophet's Prophet. 

G. H. BARBER, Orator. 

J. E. GOLDTHWAIT, Toast-Master. 

E. W. ALLEN, Odist. 



20 



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31 



SENIDR CLASS. 



'85. 



COLOR— CRIMSON. 



OFFIGEES. 

G. H. BARBER, ........ President. 

I. N. TAYLOR, Vice-President. 

C. W. BROWNE, . . Secretary. 

H. HOWELL, Treasurer. 

E. R. FLINT, . . . . . . . Class Captain. 

C. S. PHELPS, Historian. 

name. residence. room. 



Allen, Edwin West 
Almeida, Luciano Jose de 
Barber, George Holcomb 
Browne, Charles William 
Flint, Edward Rawson 
Goldthwait, Joel Ernest 
Howell, Hezekiah 
Leary, Lewis Calvert 
Phelps, Charles Shepard 
Taylor, Isaac Newton 
Tekirian, Benoni Onnig 



Amherst, 21 N. C.- 
Sao Paulo, Brazil, 11 S. C. 
N. Glastonbury, Ct., Mrs. Riley's. 
Salem, 5 N. C. 
Boston, 10 S. C. 
Marblehead, 31 N. C. 
Monroe, Orange Co., N. Y., Mrs. Riley's. 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 9 N. C. 
W. Springfield, 35 S. C. 
Northampton, Dr. Taylor's. 
Yozgad, Turkey, 34 S. C. 



33 




^|T is with a feeling of commingled sorrow and joy that we, for 
y^ the fourth time, take up our editorial pen to contribute our 
^■^ mite to the Index. We cannot but regret that the pleasantest 
period of our lives is fast drawing to a close. Soon we must enter 
upon life's turbulent sea to battle with the waves. But with the 
moulding our honored professors have given to our intellects, the 
spirit of integrity that has been graven upon our characters, and the 
energy and push which the class has never lacked, life's battles will 
be ours. The storm waves may beat, but with a steady hand at the 
helm the ship of state will glide smoothly o'er the waves. 

We would take occasion to thank our instrvictors for the ardor and 
enthusiasm shown in guarding our interests, and in bestowing upon 
us their fruitful store of knowledge. We shall feel assured that 
their best wishes accompany us " where'er life's path we tread." 

We have at last reached the goal which three years ago seemed so 
distant, and the pressure of Senior life rests upon our shoulders. 
Let us sustain it with dignity, and, profiting by the mistakes of others, 
strive to hold that respect which our situation should command. Let 
it never be said, "The College lacks a Senior Class," while '85 remains 
within these walls. Forgetting the follies of the past, we should 
push forward with undaunted courage, improving to the best of our 
abilities the few short months that remain. 

The new Chapel, small though it be, yet grand in its design, 
promises to fill a link which has long been open, and one for which 
the College has waited with patient endurance, to have closed. It is 



34 



with pleasure that we look forward to the time when our friends and 
neigh boi's can gather with the College in its weekly worship and feel 
that they are enjoying the same privileges furnished in the best 
sanctuaries. 

Our genial Professor of Mathematics, who has but recently left us, 
carries with him the highest esteem of the whole College. Never 
shall we forget the noble truths he endeavored to instill into our 
minds, or the still nobler soul from whence they flowed. Whatever 
his vocation, or where'er on life's strand his banner may wave, he can 
rest assured that the best wishes of his former pupils accompany him. 

And now, in closing, we would say to our younger friends, do not 
feel that gaining knowledge from books is all that can be accom- 
plished in a college course. The mental and physical discipline, the 
experiences passed through by our contact with those around us, and 
with the world at large, cannot be too highly valued. The man 
imbued with sound and just principles, with integrity of character, 
and carrying within his breast a Christian heart, is what the world 
seeks to-day. Equip yourselves, then, for life's battles ! In the 
future, when active in the turmoil of life, you will look back with 
pleasure on the useful and happy days spent at your old College 

home. 

P. 




IjJ I-PLOM . A IP 
li ^ Th I S I S TO 

Certify th>\t 

THE CLASS ^ 
.^ 85' % 

. ,„. IS x> FA.T3 m 



35 



JUNIDR CLASS. 



'86. 



COLORS— ORANGK AND BLACK. 



OFFIGEBB. 

C. F. W. TELT, President. 

D. F. CARPENTER, Vice-Pkesident. 

R. F. DUNCAN, Secretary and Treasurer. 

R. B. MACKINTOSH, . . . . . . Class Captain. 

W. AYRES, Historian. 

NAME. residence. ROOM. 



Atkins, William Holland 
Ayres, Winfield 
Barker, John King 
Carpenter, David Frederic 
Clapp, Charles Wellington 
Duncan, Richard Francis 
Eaton, William Alfred 



Westfield, 
Oakham, 
Three Rivers, 
Millington, 
Montague, 
Williamstovpn, 
Nyack, Rockland Co., N. Y., 



Felt, Charles Frederic Wilson 
Fovrler, John Henry 
Kinney, Arno Lewis 
Mackintosh, Richards Bryant 
Sanborn, Kingsbury 
Stone, George Sawyer 
Wheeler, George Waterbiiry 



Northborougb, 

Westfield, 

Lowell, 

Dedham, 

Lawrence, 

Templeton, 

Deposit, N. Y., 



PAST MEMBERS. 



Bement, John Emery 
Copeland, Alfred Bigelo 
Doucet, Walter Hobart 
Leland, William Edwin 
Palmer, Robert Manning 
Smith, Walter Storm 
Stone, George Edward 
Win slow, Edgar Daniel 



North Amherst. 
Springfield. 

Boston. 
Brookline. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
Spencer. 
Ware. 



3 S. 
14 S. 
11 N. 

28 N. 

29 N. 
4S. 

12 S. 
29 N. 



3 S. C. 



9 N. 


C. 


4S. 


c. 


14 S. 


c. 




c? ^r^^ 



r^'^^^zT'^^^?^ 



'OR the third time the Class of '86 hands in her communi- 
cation to the Index, having attained the enviable position 
j^5^ of Junior, with the still more enviable position of Senior only a 
step in advance. We have passed the second mile-stone of our 
course at College, and in less than two years we shall be launched into 
the world to earn for ourselves a name, and put in practice the 
training we have here received. 

We began the year with only three members, who entered in the 
fall of '82; yet enough men entered last year, so that the number of 
men in the class has not decreased very much. 

The Class of '86 has always taken a lively interest in sports; 
although small in numbers, yet she has in her ranks one-third of the 
foot-ball players, and four-ninths of the base-ball players; she also 
takes the lead in tennis, which has become quite popular during the 
last year. 

We look forward with pleasure to the years remaining us at Col- 
lege, and when we leave our College home, the remembrance of the 
happy years spent here will act as a stimulus for each one to do his 
duty, and thus become an honor to his class and to his Alma Mater. 







*^"'*^'""%g^f 



^ /i/hii^Cr I'tl A. . 



27 



s — ■ : ■ — S 

•** SaPHQMDRE CLASS. *#• 



'87. 



COLORS— OLIVE GREEN AND OLD GOLD. 



OFFICERS. 

F. H. FOWLER, ' . . . . President. 

H. N. W. RIDEOUT, Vice-President. 

W. N. TOLMAN Secretary. 

J. M. MARSH, . ' Treasurer. 

A. L. ALMEIDA, Class Captain. 

A. W. PAINE, Historian. 



residence. 



ROOM. 



Allen, Fred Cunningham 
Almeida, Augusts Luiz de 
Ateshian, Osgan Hagope 
Ball, William Munroe 
Barrett, Edward William 
Bond, Richard Henry 
Brown, Herbert Lewis 
Carpenter, Frank Berton 
Chapin, Clinton Gerdine 
Chase, William Edward 
Clarke, Frank Scripture 
Davis, Fred Augustus 
Fisherdick, Cyrus Webster 
Fowler, Fred Homer 
Hathaway, Bradford Oakman 
Howe, Clinton Samuel 
Long, Stephen Henry 



West Newton, 


26 S. C. 


Sao Paulo, Brazil, 


7 S. C. 


Sivas, Turkey, 


24 S. C. 


Milford, 


6N. C. 


Brookline, Mass., 


14 N. C. 


Peabody, 


Mr Bang's. 


Leyden, 


22 N. C. 


Chicopee, 


8N. C. 


Warwick, 


24 N. C. 


Lowell, 


13 N. C. 


Lynn, 


25 N. C. 


Palmer, 


Mr. Bang's. 


North Hadley, 


6S. C. 


New Bedford, 


Mr. Kellogg's. 


Marlborough, 


8S. C. 


Shelburne, 


Mr. Bang's. 



38 



Marsh, James Morrill 

Marshall, Charles Leander 

Martin, Joseph 

Meehan, Thomas Francis Benedict 

Osterhout, Jeremiah Clarke 

Paine, Ansel Wass 

Rice, Thomas 

Rideout, Henry Norman Waymouth 

Shaughnessy, John Joseph 

Tolman, William Nichols 

Torelly, Firmino da Silva Rio Grande 

White, Herbert Judson 

FRESH SOPHOMORES 

Brown, Frederic Willard 
Richardson, Evan Fossil 
Worthington, Atvan Fisher 
Watson, Charles Herbert 



Lynn, 


25 N. 


C 


Lowell, 


8 N. 


C 


Marblehead, 


21 N. 


C 


Boston, 


9 S. 


C 


Lowell, 


12 N. 


c. 


Boston, 


26 S. 


c. 


Shrewsbury, 


8S. 


c. 


Quincy, 


22 S. 


c. 


St owe, 


6 N. 


c. 


Concord, 


7S. 


c 


do Sul, Brazil, Mr 


.Wentzel's 


Wakefield, 


14 N. 


c. 


ORES. 

West Medford, 


29 N. 


c. 


East Med way. 


20 N. 


c. 


Dedham, 


21 S. 


c. 


Groton, 


US. 


c. 



yrc 



Ti 



rSTS 






29 




^^jyOr^E have at last reached the second year of our College 
y^^^\^ course, and congratulate ourselves that we have passed 
^-^^~r^^- gJ through the trials and vastitude of our Freshman year, to 
the honor and dignity of Sophomores. 

We return from the long summer vacation, invigorated and ready 
for the year's v^ork. In the year that is passed we think we have 
learned the art of applying ourselves to our tasks, and therefore we 
look forward with a great deal of pleasure to the studies of this year, 
and expect to reap great benefit therefrom, and hope that we may 
not only show ourselves wise fools, as the title of our class implies, 
but wise men also. 

We were very much disappointed in returning to College not to 
find a larger class entering, expecting to find it analogous to eighty- 
seven in numbers, but do not find it analogous in pluck and spirit. 
They are so timid that we take pity on the dear little " freshies," 
knowing that they have not the protecting care of their dear mothers, 
and so are very careful not to bruise them in any way; yet we are on 
the lookout for some of the latent forces that may be found in their 
physiological units, and any day may make their appearance. 

Eighty-seven has of course carried everything before her thus far, 
namely, tug-of-war and cane rush; the former proved a very slim 
affair. 



30 



We welcome the new additions to the Faculty (though we miss our 
former Professor of Mathematics very much), and hope they may find 
a very pleasant and profitable residence with us. And now, class- 
mates, as we are settling down to the solid work of the year, let us 
do it well, so that we may feel that the second year of our course was 
not lost or trifled away. 




81 



.0 • — ss — ' i' 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 




COLORS— LAVENDER AND ORANGE. 



OFFICERS. 

E. J. DOLE, . . . President. 

E. H. BELDEN, . . . . " . . . . Vice-President. 

S. H. FIELD, Secretary and Treasurer. 

G. W. CUTLER, Class-Captain, 

F. ]8[. FOSTER, Historian. 

^ NAME. RESIDENCE. ROOM. 



Ayer, Warren 
Belden, Edward Henry 
Cooley, Fred Smith 
Cutler, George Washington 
Dickinson, Edwin Harris 
Dole, Edward Johnson 
Field, Samuel Hall 
Foster, Francis Homer 
Hayward, Albert Irving 
Hinsdale, Rufus Chester 
Johnson, Irving Halsey 
Kinney, Lorenzo Foster 
Knapp, Edward Everett 
Loomis, Herbert Russell 
Newman, George Edward 
Noyes, Frank Frederick 
Parker, James Southworth 
Rogers, Howard Perry 
Shepardson, William Martin 
Shimer, Boyer Luther 
Smith, Willis Philip 
White, Henry Kirke 



Lawrence, 
North Hatfield, 
Sunderland, 
Waltham, 
North Amherst, 
Chicopee, 
North Hatfield, 
Andover, 
Ashby, 
Greenfield, 
Newburyport, 
Worcester, 
East Cambridge, 
North Amherst, 
Newbury, 
South Hingham, 
Great Barrington, 
Allston, Boston, 
Warwick, 
Redington, Pa., 
Mechanicsville, N. 
Whately, 



13 N. C. 

2N. C. 

7N. C. 

22 N. C. 

29 S. C. 

Mr. Kellogg's. 

2N. C. 
18 S. C. 

28 S. C. 

27 S. C. 
32 N. C. 

Mr. Tilson's. 

18 S. C. 

7N. C. 

32 N. C. 

28 S. C. 

29 N. C. 
22 N. C. 
27 S. C. 

29 S. C. 
Y., 21 S. C. 

11 N. C. 



32 




fHE Class of '88 has twenty-six members, and though we 
are few in numbers,- we hope to hold together well. Some of 
our class, however, have already decided to take up studies 
with the Sophomores. 

Perhaps some of us were homesick at first, but, if so, this feeling 
was soon overcome. 

Although we did well in the cane rush, numbers told against us, 
and the " Sophs " got the cane. 

On the 25th of September, some of the '87 men tried to stop our 
class-meeting by throwing into our midst burning chemicals (a trick 
which '86 so successfully practiced on them, and from whom they 
learned it), but '87 did not succeed. 

One or two of our numbers have lately been relieve'd of a bath, 
and one or two of the Sophomores also. 

We think our lack of interest in out-door sports is made up in our 
studies. 

The class of '88 fully appreciate the favors the Juniors have shown 
us, and the points they have given us. 



33 



We understand the bill of fare ait the boarding-house has been 
improved this year, but, in our opinion, no harm would be done by 
a still greater improvement. Some of the class have proved that they 
can store up more pie and pudding in fifteen minutes than they can 
knowledge in two hours. 

The spring of '88 seems a great way off, but if the days and weeks 
fly past us as quickly in the future, as they have done in the short 
past, we shall be dignified Seniors before we can really comprehend it. 

This being our first communication to the Index, we hope any 
error will be overlooked, and believing that "practice makes per- 
fect," we will try and do better in the future. 



^^^^^^^^^ 




34 




KE8IDENCE. 



Lindsey, Joseph Bridgeo 
Smith, Llewellyn 
Stone, Winthrop Ellsworth 
Wheeler, Homer Jay 



Marblehead, 
Amherst, 
Amherst, 
Bolton, 



Paradise. 

Mr. Smith's. 

Mr. Stone's. 

Hermitage. 



Massachusetts, 

New York, 

Brazil, 

Turkey, 

Connecticut, 

Pennsylvania, 

Total, . 



71 
5 
3 
2 
1 
1 

83 



35 



Se^^-r-e^ Sooi/e-^ie^ 



of t^c 







Sw Oi^-bct^ ol ^i>'ta'&fi<>^'H4en'b; 




38 






AliEPH CHAPTER. 



L. J. Almeida. 
L. C. Leary. 



W. H. Atkins. 

W. Ayres. 

D. F. Carpenter, 



A. L. Almeida. 
F. W. Brown. 
W. H. Caldwell. 
C. G. Chapin. 



E. E. Knapp. 

F. F. Noyes. 



SEJSriOBS. 

JUJVIOBS. 

W. A. Eaton. 
SOPHOMORES. 



A. F. Worthington. 
FRESHMEN. 

J. S. Parker. 



C. S. Phelps. 
I. N. Taylor. 



J. H. Fowler. 

R B. Mackintosh. 

G. S. Stone. 



C. L. Marshall. 
T. F. B. Meehan. 
J. C. Osterhout. 
T. Rice. 



W. P. Smith. 
H. K. White. 



39 





nmrn'" ■'^mm^ "IP' 



^0h)h. 



-y^/D 



^ AMHERBT CHAPTER^ 



^^pJ5^ 



G. H. Barber. 



Founded in 1869. 



RESIDENT GRADUATES. 

C. O. Lovell. Fred Tuckerman. 

POST GRADUATE. 

Llewellyn Smith. 



SENIORS. 



E. R. Flint. 



SOPHOMORES. 

H. N. W. Rideout. G. P. Robinson. 

FRESHMAN. 

B. L. Shimer. 



41 





H. Howell. 



A. L.' Kinney. 
K. Sanborn. 



F. S. Clarke. 
A. W. Paine. 
, R. H. Bond. 



G. W. Cutler. 
E. J. Dole. 



PI CHAPTER. 



s:ejjviob's. 

JUNIORS. 

SOPHOMORES. 

E. F. Richardson. 
FRESHMEN. 

R. C. Hinsdale. 



C. W. Browne. 



G. W. Wheeler. 
R. F. Duncan. 



H. J. White. 
F. C. Allen. 
S. H. Long. 



H. P. Rogers. 
W. Ayer. 



48 




^ 



o-M-Se-G-t^ei^ 






The iCoLLEGE ^Shakesperian iCldb, 



FOUNDED SEPTEMBER 20, 1879. 



44 




■siis- 



OFFIGIJRS. 

E.W.ALLEN, . .. . . President. 

C. W.. CLAPP, Vice-President. 

C.S.HOWE, . . . .* Secretary, 

J. M. MARSH, Treasurer. 

J. E. GOLDTHWAIT Director. 

C. F. W. FELT, 

F. H. FOWLEP, 

POST GRADUATES. 
J. B. Lindsey. H. J. Wheeler. 

SENIORS. 

J. E. Goldthwait. E. W. Allen. 

B. O. Tekirian. 

JUNIORS. 

C. F. W. Felt. C. W. Clapp. 

J, K. Barker. 

SOPHOMORES. 

J. M. Marsh. J- Martin. 

H. L. Brown. " F. A. Davis. 

F. H. Fowler. F. B. Carpenter. 

C. S. Howe. C. W. Fisherdick. 

FRESHMEN. 
A. I. Havward. S. H. Field. 



45 




BRAZILIAN FRATERNITY. #► 



' to-- , -T^z ff o ' rpr- ■ I— ^- ' • 



Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst, Mass. 

Luciano Jose de Almeida. 
Augusto Luiz de Almeida. 
Fermino de Silva Torelly. 

Pennsylvania University. 

Emygdio Dias Novaes, Medical Department. 
Odorico Goncalves Lemos, Medical Department. 

Troy University. 

Jose Contreiras Martins. 
Jose Ferreira de Valle. 
Ch. P. de Olhucar Cintra. 
Antonio C de Agruar Melchert. 
Roberto de Souza Barros. 

Free Institute, Worcester, Mass. 

Alfredo Alexandre Franklym. 

Boston, Mass. 
Joao Fermino Marques (next year Cornell, Ithaca). 



46 



eo# 



ea^ 



'?' 



Q^h'^i^ticVi^ ^14/i014/ 



Si-te^i^a^-t^ SoGiiz^-tieiv. 



47 



aiiij^:f)"~HWV®:^^ifc=5! 



^e 



^ CDLLEEE CHRISTIAN UNION. ^ 



s. 



OFFICERS. 

J. E. GOLDTHWAIT, President. 

L. C LEARY, Vice-President. 

C. W. CLAPP, . Secretary and Treasurer. 

SENIORS. 
C. W. Browne. L, C. Leary. 

J. E. Goldthwait. C. S. -Phelps. 

^ B. Tekirian. 

JUNIORS. 

C. W. Clapp. W. A. Eaton! 

C. F. W. Felt. 

SOPHOMORES. 

R. H. Bond. C. L. Marshall. 

C. G. Chapin. J. Martin. 

W. E. Chase. , J. C. Osterhout. 

F. H. Fowler. T. Rice. 

C. S. Howe. H. J. White. 

J. M. Marsh. 

FRESHMEN 

S. H. Field. E. H. Belden. 

A. I. Hayward. F. F. Noyes. 

F. H. Foster. E. E. Knapp, 

H. P. Roaers. ' H. K. White. 



48 



^ washinetTdn iryinq literary * 

-m BDCIETY. ^ 



OFFICERS. 



G. H. BARBER, 
J. E. GOLDTHWAIT, 
G. S. STONE, . 
C. S. PHELPS, . 
L. C. LEARY, . 

B. TEKIRIAN, 

C. W. CLAPP, . 



C. S. Phelps. 

J. E. Goldthwait. 

B. Tekirian. 



W. A. Eaton. 
C. F. W. Felt. 
C. W. Clapp. 



J. C. Osterhout. 
C. G. Chapin. 
H. J. White. 
J. J. Shaughnessy. 
F. H. Fowler. 
W. E. Chase. 

F. H. Foster. 



SENIORS. 

JUNIORS. 

Gr. S. Stone. 
SOPHOMORES. 



FRESHMEN. 

F. F. Noyes. 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 

Director. 



L. C. Leary. 
G. H. Barber. 
H. Howell. 



W. Ayres. 

D. F. Carpenter. 

J. H. Fowler. 



W. H. Caldwell. 
C. S. Howe. 
F. A. Davis. 
F. W. Brown. 
O. H. Ateshian. 
J. M. Marsh. 

E. E. Knapp. 



49 



A new departure was taken by the Washington Irving Society 
during the past year in giving an exhibition of Oratory. This 
occurred near the end of the winter term, and the practice in speak- 
ing afforded by the society was shown by the excellent declamations 
given by Messrs. Leary, '85; Wheeler, Ayres, Sanborn and Kinney, 
'86; and Shaughnessy, '87. Music was furnished by the Aggie 
Quintette, consisting of Messrs. Barber and Brooks, '85 ; Mackintosh 
and Wheeler, '86; and White, '87. 

This year a prize debate will occur at the end of the fall term, 
which promises to be of considerable interest. 




50 



Military Department 



OF THE 




^''.^^M^%»>jv:C^,^^^i^W^M 



ii 



?TT 




T 



m mn. 



51 



*^^^ DRDANIZATIDN. '^-^^^ 



t 



•*->J-^I;d^^->^ t 



COMMAWBAN^T AND INSTRUCT OR. 

1st Lieut. VICTOR H. BRIDGMAN, 2d Art., U. S. A., 
Prof. Military Science and Tactics. 



BATTALION ORGANIZATIO:^. 

Coininissioned Staff. 

J. E. GoLDTHWAiT, Cadet, Captain, Brevet Major and Assistant In- 
structor in Tactics. 
G. H. Barber, Cadet, First Lieutenant and Adjutant. 
C. S. Phelps, Cadet, First Lieutenant and Quartermaster. 



]Von-Coinmissioiied Staff. 

G. W. Wheeler, Cadet, Sergeant-Major. 

D. F. Carpenter, Cadet, Quartermaster-Sergeant. 



Color Guard. 

Cadet K. Sanborn, Color Sergeant National Colors. 
" R. F. Duncan, " " State Colors, 

" W. H. Caldwell, 1st Color Corporal. 
" S. H. Long, 2d Color Corporal. 
" C. S. Howe, 3d Color Corporal. 



Morris Drxini Corps. 

Cadet R. F. Duncan, Drum-Major. Cadet F. W. Brown. 

" H. J. White. « C. H. Watson. 

" H. N. W. Rideout. " F. H. Fowler. 

Cadet G. W. Cutler. 



Company A. 

Cadet Captain, 

" First Lieutenant, 
" First Sergeant, 
" Second Sergeant, 
" Third Sergeant, 
" Fourth Sergeant, 
" First Corporal, 



Company B. 

Cadet Captain, 

" First Lieutenant, 
" First Sergeant, 
" Second Sergeant, 
" Third Sergeant, 
" First Corporal, 



Company C. 

Cadet Captain, 

" First Lieutenant, 
" First Sergeant, 
" Second Sergeant, 
" Third Sergeant, 
" First Corporal, 



J. E. Goldthwait. 
H. Howell. 
C. W. Clapp. 
A. L. Kinney. 
a S. Stone. 
W. H. Atkins. 
H. J. White. 



E. W. Allen. 
C. W. Browne. 
W. Ayres. 
K. Sanborn. 
R. B. Mackintosh. 
J. M. Marsh. 



E. R. Flint. 
A. L. Almeida. 
J. K. Barker, 
R. F. Duncan. 
C. F. W. Felt. 
J. J. Shaughnessy. 



Artillery Drills. 

LIGHT BATTERY. 

ASSISTANT IN^STB UCTOES. 

Cadets of Senior Class. 

CANI^rON'EERS. 

Cadets of Junior and Sophomore Classes. 



53 



Saber Drills. 

ASSISTANT INSTR UCTORS. 

Cadets of Senior Class. 

BIJTA CRMENTS. 

Cadets of Junior and Sophomore Classes. 



Mortar Drills. 

ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS. 
Cadets of Senior Class. 

CANNONEERS. 
Cadets of Junior Class. 



APPOINTMENTS. 

Staff and Commissioned Officers are selected from Senior Class. 
Non-Commissioned Staff and Sergeants selected from Junior Class. 
Corporals selected from Sophomore Class. 

All members of the Senior Class are required to act as instructors 
at the various drills, and as such are subject to regular details. 

4 




54 



Siti^ce-Kcu/i/eo-W/^ 



O'^a€vi4yi2y€vtion ^. 



55 



^iSh]^ 



-2^-€ 



RIFLE ABBDCIATIDN. ^■ 



OFFICERS. 

G. H. BARBER, '85, . . . . . . . President. 

H. C. HOWELL, '85, . . . . . . Vice-President. 

R. B. MACKINTOSH, '86, . . . Secretary and Treasurer. 

1st Liect. V. H. BRIDGMAN, Director. 

C. W. CLAPP, '86 

W. AYRES, '86, 



G. H. Barber. 

C. S. Phelps. 

W. Ayres. 
G. S. Stone. 
R. F. Duncan. 



SENIORS. 



JUNIORS. 



H. C. Howell. 
E. R. Flint. 



J. K. Barker. 

R. B. Mackintosh. 

C. W. Clapp. 



H. L. Brown. 
F. W. Brown. 
T. F. B. Meehan. 
C. G. Chapin. 



SOPHOMORES. 



W. E. Chase. 
F. B. Carpenter. 
A. F. Worthington. 
H. W. Noyes. 



G. W. Cutler. 
I. H. .Johnson. 



FRESHMEN. 



G. E. Newman. 



E. J. Dole. 
H. P. Rogers. 



HONORAR Y MEMBER. 

First Lieutenant V. H. Bridgman. 



m 



-^ BPDRTINQ CLUB. 




/rlcssi^c.CoA'l' 



OFFICERS. 



G. H. BARBER, 
H. C. HOWELL, 
E. R. FLINT, . 



G. H. Barber. 
E. R. Flint. 



C. W. Clapp. 



Pkesident. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 



SFJSriORS. 

JURIORS. 

R. F. Duncan. 
SOPHOMORFS. 



T. Rice. 



H. C. Howell. 
C. S. Phelps. 



R. B. Mackintosh. 



A. F. Worthington. 



57 






.sh) 




BASE BALL ASSDCIATIDN. 



%~ 



~^ 



y-r. 'K-. 






^^Msm^zS^y.}:''''''^ 




^/cfj^Vs (Toyr^ 



OFFICERS. 

L. C.LEAR Y, . President. 

C. W. BROWNE, Secretary. 

W. AYRES, Director. 

J. H. FOWLER, . 

F. H. FOWLER, 

B. L SHIMER, 

Aggie Nine. 

H. HOWELL, Captain, c. 

A. L. Kinney, p. W. Ayer, s. s. 

W. Ayres, lb. F. H. Fowler, 1. f. 

R. F. Duncan, 2 b. J. K. Barker, r. f. 

J. H. Fowler, 3 b. H. J. White, c. f. 



58 



Class Nines. 
'85. 

G. H. BARBER, Captain, p. 

H. Howell, c. E. W. Allen, s. s. 

C. S. Phelps, 1 b. E. R. Flint, 1. f. 

J. E. Goldthwait, 2 b. L. J. Almeida, r. f. 

C.W. Browne, 3 b. I. N. Taylor, c. f. 

'86. 

A. L. KINNEY, Captain, p. 
J. K. Barker, c. W. H. Atkins, s. s. 

W. Ayres, 1 b. K. Sanborn, 1. f. 

R. F. Duncan, 2 b. G. S. Stone, r. f. 

J. H. Fowler, 3 b. R. B. Mackintosh, c. 

'87. 

H. J. WHITE, Captain, 3 b. 
T. Meehan, c. ~ W. M. Ball, s. s. 

T. Rice, p. F. H. Fowler, 1. f. 

F. S. Clarke, 1 b. H. Rideout, r. f. 

J. Martin, 2 b. F. C. Allen, c. f. 

'88. 

W. AYER, Captain, c. 



R. C. Hinsdale, p. 
F. F. Noyes, 1 b. 
E. H. Belden, 2 b. 
E. F. Richardson, 3 b. 



H. P. Rogers, s. s. 
F. H. Foster, 1. f. 
B. L. Shimer, r. f. 
E. J. Dole, c. f. 



59 



^4 



■■^EZrii 



.^^ 



>po rDDT BALL ABBDCIATIDN. 



(i^S^ 



-^^S& 




J. E. GOLDTHWAIT, 
G. H. BARBER, 
E. W. ALLEN, 
C. S. PHELPS, 
W. H. ATKINS, 
W. H. CALDWELL, 
S. H. FIELD, . 



OFFIGJERS. 



President. 

Business Manager. 

Treasurer. 

Director. 



C. W. Clapp. 
W. M. Ball. 
F. S. Clarke. 



Aggie Team. 

W. AYRES, Captain. 

E USHERS. 



J. J. Shaughnessy. 



R. B. Mackintosh. 
A. L. Almeida. 
R. F. Duncan. 



W. Ayres. 



QUARTER BACK. 
C. W. Browne. 

HALF BA CKS. 



FULL BA GK. 
G. H. Barber. 



W. H. Atkins, 1st Sub. 



F. C. Allen. 



J. Martin, 2d Sub. 



60 



Class Elevens. 
'85. 

H. HOWELL, Captain. 
H UBHEBS. 



J. E. Goldthwait. 
E. W. Allen. 
I. N. Taylor. 



H. Howell. 



C. W. Clapp. 

D. F. Carpenter. 
G. S. Stone. 



W. Ayres. 



B. O. Tekirian. 

QUARTER BACK. 

C. W. Browne. 

HALF BA CKS. 



FULL BACK. 

L. C. Leary. 

'86. 

C. W. CLAPP, Captain. 
R USHERS. 



J. K. Barker. 

QUARTER BACK. 

W. H. Atkins. 

HALF BA CKS. 



FULL BACK. 
J. H. Fowler. 



L. J. Almeida. 
C. S. Phelps. 
E. R. Flint. 



G. H. Barber. 



K. Sanborn. 
C. F. W. Felt. 
R. F. Duncan. 



R. B. Mackintosh. 



H. J. White. 
W. M. Ball. 
J. Martin. 



'87. 

F. C. ALLEN, Captain. 
R USHERS. 



J. J. Shaughnessy, 



F. S. Clarke. 

W. E. Chase. 

A. F. Worthington. 



61 



QUARTER BACK. 

T. Rice. 

HALF BA CK8. 

F. C. Allen. A. L. Almeida. 

FULL BACK. 

F. H. Fowler. 

'88. 

G. W. CUTLER, Captain. 

BUSHFRS. 

F. F. Noyes, A. I. Hay ward. 

E. J. Dole. E. E. Knapp. 

E. F. Richardson. . G. W. Cutler. 

R. C. Hinsdale. 

QUARTER BACK. 

H. P. Rogers. 

HALF BA CKS. 
B. L. Shimer. E. H. Belden. 

FULL BACK 
G. E. Newman. 






63 



^ THE NATURAL HISTORY SnCIETY. ^ 



'z^Jl^^ 




OFFICERS. 



GEO. H. BARBER, 
E. R. FLINT, . 
C. W. BROWNE, 
W. H. CALDWELL, 
C. W. CLAPP, . 
K. SANBORN, . 



President. 

Vice-Pkesident. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 

Director. 



MEMBERS. 



H. Howell. 

E. R. Flint. 
Geo. H. Barber. 
W. Ayres. 

R. F. Duncan. 
C. W. Clapp. 

F. A. Davis. 



C. W. Browne. 
L. C. Leary. 
C. S. Phelps. 
K. Sanborn. 
W. H. Caldwell. 
J. M. Marsh. 
C. L. Marshall. 



63 



3- 



i.«z^T<5^X 



►^ 



^ MUSICAL ABBDCIATIDN. ^ 

•» . 5)Sr-^_-y^a_^— ■ — ;@ :,_ — . o- ' — • 




THE HOWLERS. 

THOMAS CHARMBURY, Conductor. 
, 1st Tenor. 



R. B. Mackintosh, 
F. S. Torrelly, '87, 

F. W. Brown, '87, 

C. W. Fisherdick, '87, 

J. E. Goldthwait, '85, 3d Tenor. 

C. F. W. Felt, '86, 

R. F. Duncan, '86, 

C. L. Marshall, '87, 

J. J. Shaughnessy, '87, 

B. L. Shimer, '88, 

E. E. Knapp, '88, 

G. W. Cutler, '88, 



M. B. King-man, 1st Bass. 
C. W. Clapp, '86, " 
K. Sanborn, '86, " 
F. F. Noyes, '88, " 
F. H. Foster, '88, " 
H. P. Rogers,' 88, " 

C. S. Phelps, '85, 2d Bass. 
J. K. Barker, '86, " 

D. F. Carpenter, '86, " 
J. M. Marsh, '87, 

R. C. Hinsdale, '88, " 

E. F. Richardson, '88, " 



64 



COLLEGE CHOm. 

G. W. CUTLER, Organist. 

G. H. Barber, 1st Tenor. E. W. Allen, 23 Tenor. 

W. Ayer, 1st Bass. A. W. Paine, 2d Tenor. 

H. J. White, 2d Bass. L. Smith, 2d Bass. 

'85 Quartette. 

G. H. Barber, 1st Tenor. E. W. Allen, 1st Bass. 

J. E. Goldthwait, 2d Tenor. C. S. Phelps, 2d Bass. 

'86 Quartette. 

R. B. Mackintosh, 1st Tenor. G. S. Stone, 1st Bass. 

G. W. Wheeler, 2d Tenor. W. Ayres, 2d Bass. 

'87 Quartette. 

F. W. Brown, 1st Tenor. H. J. White, 1st Bass. 

A. W. Paine, 2d Tenor. J. M. Marsh, 2d Bass. 

'88 Quartette. 

W. Ayer, 1st Tenor. F. H. Foster, 1st Bass. 

B. L. Shimer, 2d Tenor. F. F. Noyes, 2d Bass. 



H. C. Howell. 

R. F. Duncan (Special). 

F. H. Brown. 

J. E. Goldthwait. 



ORCHESTRA. 

VIOLINS. 



FL UTES. 



G UITAES. 

C. W. Clapp. 

CORNET. 
H. .1. White. 

BANJO. 
K. Sanborn. 

JEW SHARP. 

F. S. Cooley. 



G. S. Stone. 
F. H. Foster. 

F. M. Fowler. 

E. R. Flint. 



65 



>— |. %^gsMi^^h)^mii^ ^^ 

^ CDLLEBE READINQ RDDM. ^ 



J. E. GOLDTHWAIT, '85, President. 

G. S. STONE, '86, .... Secretary and Treasurer. 

E. R. FLINT, '85, Director. 

C. W. CLAPP, '86, 

T. F B. MEEHAN, '87, ....... 

I. H. JOHNSON, '88, 

NEWSPAPERS Al^D PERIODICALS. 

DAILIES. 

New York Tribune. Boston Journal. 

Boston Herald. New York Sun. 

New York Graphic. Springfield Republican. 

MA GAZINES. 
Popular Science Monthly, American Naturalist. 

Harper's Magazine. ■ North American Review. 

Century. Veterinary Review. 

COLLEGE. 
Yale Record. Amherst Student. 

Princeton ian. 
AGRL CULTURAL. 
New England Farmer. American Cultivator, 

New England Homestead. ~ American Dairyman. 

Massachusetts Ploughman. Farmers' Review. 

American Agriculturist. Nebraska Farmer. 

Purdy's Fruit Recorder. Home and Farm. 

Colorado Farmer. 

MLSCELLAJSTEO US. 
Puck. Amherst Record. 

Harper's Weekly. Forest and Stream. 

Leslie's Illustrated Weekly. Lowell Journal. 

Burlington Hawkeye. . . Gazette and Courier. 

Army and Navy Register. American Bee Journal. 

Scientific American. Canoeist. 

Scientific American Supplement, 

BELIGLO US. 
Zion's Herald. Weekly Witness. 

New Jerusalem Messenger. 




^, m 3a 

PRIZES. 

^g 

% ^ ^ 




FARNS WORTH RHETORICAL PRIZES. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS, '86. 
W. A. Eaton, First Prize, $30 worth of books. 
G. S. Stone, Second Prize, $20 worth of books. 

FRESHMAN CLASS, '87. 
E. W. Barrett, First Prize, $30 worth of books. 
A. H. Ateshian, Second Prize, $20 worth of books. 

GRINNELL AGRICULTURAL PRIZES. 

E. A. Jones, First Prize, $50. 
C. Herms, Second Prize, $30. 

MILITARY PRIZE. 

C. Herms. 

FRESHMAN DRILL PRIZES. 

E. W. Barrett, First Prize. 

F. S. Clark, Second Prize. 



67 



»#^- THE NEW CHAPEL. ^^' 



'-X^' 




T last the much needed library and chapel building is about to 
become a reality. In response to Prof. Goodell's earnest 
appeals at commencement in 1883, a committee was chosen 
by the Alumni to look the matter up and enlarge the library, which 
was at that time wholly inadequate to the wants of the students and 
agriculturists who will in time make it a center for investigation and 
research. 

President Greenough eagerly joined in the work, and through his 
efforts the Legislature appropriated $25,000 for a chapel building, 
the lower story of which should be used as a library. 

The corner-stone was laid November 6, 1884. As the weather 
was very cold and disagreeable the exercises accompanying it were 
held in the old chapel, where addresses were made by the Alumni 
and gentlemen interested, among them, Hon. C. L. Flint, O. B. 
Hadwin, Esq., and ex-President Stockbridge. Beneath the corner- 
stone were laid a copy of the original charter of the college, an '82 
Index, which contains the pictures of the Presidents, a copy of the 
last Cycle, and several daily papers. 

The building will be of a simple Romanesque style of architecture, 
two stories in height, with a tower ninety-six feet high on the south- 
east corner. It is being constructed of Pelham granite, from the 
quarry owned by the college, and trimmed with brown sandstone. 
There is a gable on each side. The first story will be used for a 
library and reading-room, and the upper as a chapel. The whole 
will be finished in ash and hard pine. 

Much has been done already toward placing the books, numbering 
about twenty-seven hundred, in an available condition. 

Under Prof. Goodell's watchful eye, they have been re-catalogued 
this summer, and owing to the present accessibility three times as 
many books have been taken out this last term than during any other 
sinirle term. 



68 




M. 



CHRONICLES. 




FIRST BOOK OF SAMUEL. 



CHAPTER LXXXVI. 

Vee. 1-4, The Learning qf'8&. 5-6, 
The Field of ye Station. 7-1 6, Ye 
'86 (]o there. 17-19, They do their 
Magic Arrs. 20-25, They seek the 
Garden of Samuel. 2Q-29, Cometh 
the Scribe. 30, He yieldeth to the 
Devil. 31, Levi Cometh forth. 32-36, 
He sendeth them out. 37-40, Ye 
consequences. 

1. AND it came to pass in 
the first year of the reign of 
James the Green'ite, 

2. That a -^certain of the 
elders had taught ^those who 
were sojourning at the temple 
of learning for the second 
year, 

3. The uses of many cu- 
rious instruments, machines, 
and tools, with which they 
did much sorcery in dividing 
land; 

4. Thus causing the ^young- 
er men who were ignorant of 
these practices, to greatly 
stare. 

5. Now, near the tent of 
*Levi the Bursarite (at whose 



1 Some- 
times 
known as 
Austin. 



2 In short, 
Soplio- 



3 Common- 
ly called 
the 
"Freshies." 



4 Now a 

Father in 

Israel. 



5 Bulletins 
sent on 

application 
to J. B. 
Lindsay. 



6 The same 
as was 

stridden 
with fever 

at Lal<e 
Pleasant. 



marriage feast music did so 
loudly swell) was a parcel of 
land 

6. Which belongeth unto 
that ^Station which doth vast 
Experiments in the land of 
Aggie. 

7. And it came to pass one 
day that the elder, which was 
learned in all sorcery, called 
unto him "Sanborn, the Law- 
rencite, and Mackintosh, the 
Dedhamite, 

8. And John, the Fowler- 
ite, and Kinney, the Lowel- 
ite; and George surnamed 
the Stony. 

9. And lo, they were men 
of might and of goodly stat- 
ure and bold in all daring. 

10. And he spake unto 
them, saying, "Gird up your 
loins for, behold, ye have 
much hard labor before you, 
and take ye, each, one of 
these instruments." 

11. And he straightway 



69 



giy^eth unto each one some 
machine of magic. And he 
commanded them again, say- 
ing, 

12. " Go ye to a field near 
the house of ^Levi the Bur- 
sarite which doth belong to 
that Station which perform- 
eth wondrous researches in 
our land." ^ 

13. "And when ye shall 
find it, deal ye with it in all 
manner as I have before 
taught you, and find ye the 
length thereof with the 
breadth also." 

14. " And when ye shall 
have performed this thing I 
will come unto you and see 
that ye have done all things 
even as I have commanded." 

15. And they ^spat upon 
their hands and did lift their 
burdens everyone to his 
shoulder and departed unto 
the land of Samuel toward 
the tent of ^°Levi; 

16. And when they had 
found the parcel of land of 
which the learned man had 
warned them, they did com- 
mence their magic art. 

17. And lo, the day was 
hot and the labor heavy, but 
they halted not nor "blas- 
phemed. 

18. And when they had 
done in all things even as 
they had been commanded, 
they did gather up their in- 
struments of magic and sor- 
cery; 



7 Also 
called the 
Dulcet- 
Voiced. 



8 A cold- 
wave flag 
it doth also 
unfurl 
when the 
weather 
doth mod- 
erate. 



a For their 

burdens 

were 

heavy and 

might 

slip from 

their 

hands. 



10 And it 
is ever said 

that they 
did see 

Levi kiss 

the sister 
of Samuel 
in his tent. 



n A won- 
derful 
thing in 
Aggie. 



12 For the 

break- 
fast hour 
was long 
since 
passed. 



13 This is 
doubted by 
some 
authori- 
ties. 



14 For he 

had a 
big head 
and imme- 
diately 
mistrusteth 

where 

they have 

gone. 



19. And when they had 
placed them together in a 
mass, they did sink upon the 
ground from ^%unger and 
thirst. 

20. And when they were 
a little rested they com- 
muned one with another as 
to how they might get re- 
freshment, for they were sore 
an hungered. 

21. And one said unto 
them, " Lo, yonder is the 
garden of Samuel. Let us 
go there and eat." 

22. But another saith, " It 
is forbidden fruit and we may 
not touch it." ^^ But they 
heeded not his word. 

23. And when he behold- 
eth they will not hearken 
unto him, he saith, " Lo, me- 
thinks I will not delay lest I 
faint, but will share with 
them the dangers of the gar- 
den." 

24. And he did run and 
overtake the brethren. 

25.. And as they all came 
to the garden they entered 
softly therein and did eat and 
became much refreshed. 

26. In the meantime com- 
eth the wise man and finding 
not the disciples goeth forth 
to find them. 

27. And lo, he searcheth 
for them straight toward the 
^*garden of Samuel. 

28. And when he findeth 
them he saith unto them, 
"• Little Bo-Peep has lost her 



70 



sheep and knows just where 
to find them." ^^ 

29. For lo, he was learned 
in ancient lore also. 

30. And he looketh and 
beholdeth the garden to be 
full of fruit and goodly and 
he yieldeth to the Devil and 
picketh and ^^eateth. 

31. And when by chance 
Levi, the servant of Samuel, 
seeth the devastation of the 
garden of his master he 
rusheth forth like the wind, 
even like the chariot of Jehu 
rusheth he forth. 

32. And when he is yet a 
long way off he calleth 

.^^aloud unto the learned 
scribe saying, 

33. " How is this that thou 
not only allow these young 
men to eat of the forbidden 
fruit but doth eat thereof 
thyself and bringeth great 
devastation ! " 

34. And when he ap- 
proacheth nearer he deliv- 



15 Free 
translation 
of Homer. 



IS Behold, 

none are 

without 

sin. 



17 But he 
could not 
be heard, 
owing to 
his dulcet 
voice. 



18 Also 
written 
"Tatty." 



19 Even 

unto 

James the 

Green'ite. 



20 But the 

youth 
wish him 
back most 
heartily. 



21 Long 
life to '86 



ereth unto them exceeding 
rebuke and giveth them 
'^baos. 

35. So that the learned 
scribe is very much ashamed 
and blusheth even to the 
roots of his mustache. 

36. And he confesseth his 
transgression and depart- 
eth ashamed and the youth 
also. 

37. But when Samuel 
heard of it he was exceed- 
ing wroth and goeth to the 
'^king and complaineth of 
the devastation of his gar- 
den. 

38. And the king was an- 
gered against his servant the 
scribe. 

39. And when the scribe 
had fulfilled the term of his 
office, lo, the king dismisseth 
him and driveth him away in 
^"anger. 

40. But the youth remain 
in the kingdom of Aggie 
^^even to this day. Selah. 




71 




There was a sound of deviltry by night, 

And Aggie's warlike drum had mustered out 
Her boldness and her bravery; and dark 

The night closed round, mysterious, dread. 
Three-score or more of hearts beat happily; and when 

Music arose, with its voluptuous swell, 
Bold eyes looked hope to eyes which spake again, 

And all went meiTy as a marriage bell. 
But hush! Hark ! A voice breaks in upon the startled ear. 

Saying in tones so soft, so low, and yet so clear, — 
^^ Levi, have you got the drmnf " 



72 



s^- 



(^te 



•2^^ 



.<^. 



HEN WARE'S HOTEL. 



-^=^' 



e^&^- 



-s^S£ 



IfilPiM^ill 




> >, I 




' tiOlpftvo'" ^^si^Q. =^^^- 



Flint. — Hash-house feed is not his greatest enticement. 

Taylor. — Sits with the Freshmen. " Birds of a feather — " 

Caldwell. — The butter is rank, but ranker far his puns. 

Browist (Chinners). — Like a bird, he casts his eyes toward heaven 
after every swallow. 

Barrett.— 
Chapin. — ■ 
Marshall.- 



On one meal a day they survive, but, oh, what a 
meal is that one! 



OsTERHOUT. — An encyclopedia on wheels, — gets his axle grease 
at the hash house. 

Shaughnesst. — ^Eats all that is set before him, and more than 
half of what is not. 

Tolman. — His jaws work automatically, and when swill goeth not 
in, his gas surely comes out. 

ToRRELLT. — A Brazilian gormandizer. 

Foster. — " Ma says I must not eat hot biscuit." 

Knapp. — Too fresh to roast. 

Watson. — Give him a sugar-tit. 

Shimmy. — Fits the new waiter. 

Parker. — "Veal — half-cooked, and no salt on it." 

Ateshian. — H2 S 4 Garlic -f- Cabbage -f Ottar of Roses = the 
Turk. 



73 



i 



^^^^ DUERTINIANS. ♦^^^- 



\^ 




^Vheeler. — A dapper Post-graduate youngster, 
Was such an inveterate punster, 
That when asked to take tea. 
He said, " Why not take D ? " 
This inveterate Post-graduate youngster. 

LiNDSEY. — " Fills up his silo with ' hey? ' " "Tweedle-de-dee! " 

GoLDTHWAiT. — ^(This red necktie means So. Hadley.) " Onions? " 
"No, thank you!!" 

Phelps. — "By my faith, I think he would consume a bullock at a 
meal." 

Tekieian. — '" Int?ependent ' as a pig on ice." 

Marsh. — A long and sober-faced devil, but oh, how he can eat ! 

FoWLBK. — A bird of prey; has to turn his head sidewise to see 
his plate. 

Brown. — A first premium Essex bore. 

Howe. — Grub becomes minus. 

RiDEOUT. — Even a fool, when he holdeth his peace, is counted 



74 



^ KELLDBDIANB. 







HowBLL. — " Hell has ope'd his ponderous and marble jaws to cast 
thee up again." 

Beowke. — His soul is small, his mouth is great, 
His appetite's insatiate. 

Sanbor>'. — Trying to make up for lost time. 

Allen. — He takes too much " cold stew " between meals. 

DuTsrcAisr. — Eats calves' head and pluck. 

Long, — Oh where's my little high chair? 

Paine. — " Please, Mrs. Kellogg, may I have some menu f " 

Cutler. — His baby voice is often heard — 

In tones as sweet as a bkie jay bird. 

Dole. — This Freshman Harpy defiles everything he cannot eat. 

Richardson. — A fool — a motley fool. 

Ayee. — Last and most " shipperyy 



75 



..^=^ 



QRINIIINQ5. 




GoLDTHWAiT. — " He hugs up closer than an old woman on a sus- 
pension bridge." 

Phelps. — Oh wearisome condition of humanity! 

Browne. — '85's Freshman. 

Fid. — He has mastered the science of bad smells. 

Leary. — " Esthetic bard, of truth the magnifier," 
Once esteemed by those who knew him. 

He would look you in the eye, 
Now too many friends he 's bitten, 

And he '11 snake-like pass you by. 

ShOnny Hossy. — "I cannot tell what the dickens his name is." 

ToLisiAN. — If thou anything wouldst know. 
In the earth, sky, water, air. 
Town or city, hill or plain. 
Field or forest, — anywhere, 
Go to him ; he '11 tell it thee. 

Johnson. — "One Pinch, a hungry, lean-faced villain, — a mere 
anatomy." 

NoYES. — His mother says, " Call him Frankie." 

Pardie Allen. — "A hard case." (Prof. Stock.) 

Paine. — (Lieut.) " Mr. Paine, what com23oses the axle ?" 
(Mr. P.) "Linch-jiin and washer, sir. 

Doc. GoESSY. — " You go down der street, you see a leetle yaller 
house mit der garten. Dot 's mine." 



76 



Marsh. — There was a crooked man, 

And he went a crooked mile 
Upon a crooked wheel, 

In a very crooked style. 
He took a crooked header 

Upon a crooked stick, 
And his crooked exclamations 

Made the air demnition thick. 

PfiEX (In Mental Science). — " I'm a man, (?) therefore I'm mortal." 

Barker. — " My back isn't very strong this morning." 
Prof. H. H. G. — " That's just the way I feel. I don't know 
where you've been, but I know where I've been." 

Doc. Manly. — "This is a metre, but not a 'meet 'er by moon- 
light !' " 

Prop. Stock. — "Mr. Ayres, what are the Lamellibranchiata ? " 
Mr. Ayres. — " I don't know, sir." 
. Prof. S. — " Mr. Stone, what are the Lamellibranchiata ? Now 
pay attention, Mr. Ayres, to what Mr. Stone says." 
Mr. Stone. — " I don't know, sir." {Ajij^lause.) 

Prof. Warner. — Zero divided by zero equals anything except 
infinity and seventeen. 

Dr. Tuckeeman (In Physiology, showing human brain to class). — 
" Gentlemen, this is a fine specimen, probably the first human brain 
ever brought into this room." 

Lieut. V. H. B. — "Mr. Atkins, in giving commands you should 
always cut off all superfluous superfluity of words. What was your 
last enxinclation f " 

Lieut. V. H. B. — " I anticipate that there is sufficient material 
forthcoming to transform this heterogeneous squad into an organiz- 
ation analogous to that at West Point." 

Prof. C. D. W. — " Why, gentlemen, C represents the Crank." 



g^-T^S JO >f^^-7^, 




Moss EHX .Cj%N-y 



77 



dehicateh td the alumni. 



BY THE EDITORS. 



How dear to my heart are the haunts of old Aggie, 

As fond recollection presents them to view; 
The drill hall, the chapel, the temple, the campus. 

And every loved spot which my college days knew. 
And now far removed from the fair town of Amherst, 

I think with regret of the bright days of yore, 
And remember the school in the village below us, 

And e'en the knee breeches the Intellects wore; 
The skin-fitting breeches, the old-fashioned breeches, . 

The primeval breeches the Intellects wore. 



78 




^" -"^ - ^"^^^^^ „ - — -^i 









i-yfi-fi <r<, ^>^ 



79 




ig^sS^y@i^i6==S 



HIBTDRY QF THE CDLLEDE. 




Nov. 28. — Thanksgiving recess begins. 
Dec. 4. — Thanksgiving recess ends. 

" 18.— Term closed. 
Jan. 10. — Term began. 

Feb. 1. — Legislators came to see about the needs of the college. 
Examined the rooms and saw the drills. Speeches in 
the afternoon in the chapel. 

" 8. — A new pump inaugurated. 

" 11. — '85 Indexes at last arrive. 

" 16. — Prof. Baker's cart found on the flag-pole. New guns 
issued. 

" 22. — Sabre detachment goes to Springfield and gives exhibition 
drill in skating rink. 

" 26. — G. E. Stone, '86, kicked off drill and gun taken away by 
Lieut. Y. H. B. 

" 28. — '85 cuts bayonet drill and finally crawl. 
Mar. 3. — Mass meeting in chapel to discuss the action of the Lieut, 
in regard to Stone, '86, and the position of '85. Com- 
mittee apjDointed and a petition drawn up and pre- 
sented to Prex. After consulting with Lieut, and the 
Freshman class, he decides on the merits of the peti- 
tion. 

" 5. — Freshmen fined twenty-five cents apiece for the bonfire. 
Sabre detachment goes to Northampton and drills in 
the skating rink. 

" 6. — Cutter, '85, kicked out of college. No reason given. 

" 8. — Freshman fine reduced from twenty-five cents to fifteen 
cents, two for a quarter. 

« 20. — Lecture before the Natural History Society, by Charles 
W. Eddy, illustrated with the stereopticon. 

" 29. — Winter term closes. 
Apr. 9. — Spring term- begins. Mass meeting in chapel. A large 
sum pledged for support of base ball team. Campus 
and ball field fixed up. lioads repaired. 

" 19. — Base ball game between '87 and High school. Score, 16 
to 29. 



80 



May 3. — Aggie vs. Wilbraham. Score, 10 to 31. 

" 9. — '85 Class Tree set out, Prex turning the first sod. The 
tree died. 

" 10. — Cannon drawn in front of colleges at night, fired and left. 
Battalion ordered out for extra drill next morning as 
punishment. Rain, however, prevents. 

" 19. — Class of '86 begins the work of laying out flower-beds, 
mowing the grass and fixing the lawn around '82's 
fountain. 

" 23. — This morning, settees gone from chapel. Pulpit brought 
back and one settee " for the faculty." Students sat 
on the floor. Trustees meet here and a petition from 
the college requesting that the dismissal of Dr. Miles 
be well considered, was read before them. Dr. Miles 
was engaged for another year. In the evening the 
event was celebrated by serenading Dr. Miles. 

" 24. — Desk and singing books gone. Students stand up in their 
places. Pictures of the battalion taken for '84. Sabre 
detachment also photographed. 

" 25. — (Sunday.) Carried in easy chairs, etc., and listened to a 
sermon by Prex. 

" 26. — Settees and desk brought back by Mr. Baker. 

" 30. — Holiday, Decoration Day. 
June 2. — Scrub game between two divisions of '87. 

" 3. — Three calves which appeared at the college were placed in 
the chapel for safe keeping. They were removed next 
morning all right, but died off afterward one by one. 

" 4. — Prex and Carpenter had their hair cut. 

" 10. — L. R. Taft returns to Prof. Maynard's with his bride. In 
the evening a company of students go up and give 
them a drum and horn concert, which being duly ap- 
preciated, Levi was presented with the bass drum with 
compliments. Then followed a short dialogue : Mrs. 
T. — "Levi, have you got the drum?" Levi — "Yes, 
dear." Mrs. T. — " That's good, come in now, love." 
Then followed a song by the company, entitled " What 
shall the harvest be ? " A bonfire on the other side at 
1 A. M., concluded the services. 

" 12. — The prophecy of the late lamented J. W. C. has come to 
pass. " Young gentlemen, the day of reckoning has 
come." Prex cross-examines each man in college with 
regard to " calf-racket," bonfire, etc. Nourse and Rob- 
inson are threatened with expjtilsion, '87 gets mad and 
" won't play." 



81 



June 13. — Freshmen attend only part of their recitations. 

" 14. — P. C. P. Brooks is expelled and sent home at once. R. I. P. 

" 15.— '87 cuts chapel. 

" 16. — '87 declines to accept '86's challenge for base ball. 

" 22. — Baccalaureate sermon in the chapel. Address before the 
Young Men's Christian Association, by Rev. H. W. 
Lathe of Northampton, in the evening. 

" 23. — Farnsworth prize declamations in the Drill Hall, at 8 P. 
M. Declamations by Ayres, Eaton, Kinney and Stone, 
'86; and Ateshian, Barrett, Nourse, Shaughnessy and 
White, '87. 

" 24. — Public examination of the graduating class, in Agriculture, 
for the Grinnell prizes at 8.30 A. m. — Examination of 
candidates for admission to college in the Botanic 
Museum, beginning at 9 A. M. — Revievp of cadets b}- 
Gov. Robinson at 10 A. m. — Addresses by his Excel- 
lency, Geo. D. Robinson, and others, in the Drill Hall 
at 11 A. M. — Alumni dinner at 2 P. M. — President's 
reception, 8 to 10 P. M. 

" 25. — Alumni meeting in the Laboratory Lecture Room at 8.30 
A. M. — Graduating exercises in the Drill Hall at 10 
A. M., address by C. C. Coffin, Esq. Thesis, with Val- 
edictory Address, written by Elisha A. Jones, delivered 
by Prex. " Mr. Jones, your Valedictory shall be read, 
it shall be well read, and X shall read it." 
Sept. 10. — Fall Term begins. '88 enters with twenty-six men, five 
of whom enter the Sophomore class. 

" 12. — Cane rush between '87 and '88. '87 captures the cane 
belonging to Phelps '85. 

a l5._Rope pull, '87 vs. '88. '87 being afraid to pull induce the 
referee (an '83 man) to give them the rope without a 
pull. — Ground broken for new chapel. 
Oct. 11. — Foot-ball game, Aggie vs. Wilbraham. Score: Aggie, 8; 
Wilbraham, 0. 

" 18. — Aggie vs. Williston, foot-ball. Game won by Williston. 

" 29. — Aggie vs. Amherst, foot-ball. Game won by Amherst; 
score, 13 to 0. 
Nov. 5.— Foot-ball, '87 vs. '88; won by '87. 

« 10.— Foot-ball, '88 vs. High School. Score: '88, 32; High 
School, 0. 

" 26. — Thanksgiving recess begins. 
Dec. 1. — Thanksgiving recess closes. 

" 18. — Fall term ends. 



83 




*- 



•O^O" 



-#^ CALENDAR. 



• ©■^O'' 



1885-6. 



Winter Term ends 
Spring Term begins 
" " closes 

Fall Term begins 



Mar. 31, '85. 

April 8, '85. 

June 33, '85. 

Wednesday, Sept. 9, '85. 



Thanksgiving Recess of 5 days, Nov. 25 to Nov. 31. 



Fall Term closes 

Winter Term begins 

" " closes 

Entrance Examinations, 
(( <( 

Farnsworth Prize Speaking, 
Graduation Exercises, 



Dec. 17, '85. 

Jan. 6, '86. 

Mar. 31, '86. 

Wednesday, June 34, at 9 A. m. 

Tuesday, Sept. 8, at 9 a. m. 

Monday, June 33. 

Tuesday, June 23. 



83 



ALMA MATER. 



•» .—J SXs ^—^ "• 



" monstrous ! hut one half-pennyv^orth of bread to this intolerable 
deal of sack ! " — King Henet IV. 

|NE thought has comforted us in assuming to be the mouth- 
piece of the Alumni. What we shall say will be carefully read 
by the compositor, proof-reader, and the editors of the Index, 
but beyond this point our thoughts will be undisturbed — by rude 
and disagreeable criticism. None ever read the Alumni contribution 
save those who are obliged to. It is overshadowed, buried, lost be- 
neath the excruciatingly funny and highly interesting matter with 
which the volume is otherwise replete. 

Contributors of previous years have left a well-worn path behind 
them, along which we must proceed with great caution to avoid a 
species of plagiarism. But none of them ever offered their contri- 
bution at a time when their congratulations to the college students 
and Alumni were more sincere or better grounded than at present. 
To-day there are signs giving hope and confidence to those familiar 
with the College history. Many of us remember its dark days all too 
well, and to such the present outlook is thrice welcome. 

The evidences of prosperity are many, but none is more promis- 
ing than the increased interest in the College expressed by the agri- 
cultural community. This means a better appreciation of the insti- 
tution, and then, inevitably, a better support. It is encoitt-aging to 
feel that men are willing to know something of us — that we are able 
to attract their attention. Once it was difficult to find a farmer out- 
side of those who had labored directly for the College who had any- 
thing like a correct idea of it, and, what was worse, they evinced no 
desire to learn. The College was never vigorously antagonized, but 
it has suffered through the apathy and indifference of the very class 
whose direct interests are involved in its success or failure. Even 
farmers whose homes are in sight of the College have exposed a 
woful ignorance of its affairs. Now a change is working. We have 



84 



gained many friends and more acquaintances, and it goes without 
saving, that every intelligent person who has become even in a slight 
degree familiar with the College, finds much good in its aims and 
efforts. This state of affairs is the most natural thing to be ex- 
pected. There is a growing appreciation of all advanced ideas in 
agriculture, of which the College aims to be the exponent. The 
labors of devoted men in the past are beginning to bear fruit, and 
over two thousand copies of every bulletin from the Experiment 
Station sent to actual applicants are oft recurring reminders of what 
the College exemplifies. The increasing numbers and influence of 
the Alumni are working for the College to a degree hard to estimate. 
Each individual has an influence on the popular view of the College, 
and a greater one than he realizes. In distant villages the whole 
community has an interest in the young man who has graduated 
from the farmers' college and come back to toil among them, and 
their views of the institution will be modified by their unconscious 
estimate of his character in after life. It behooves every alumnus, 
therefore, to first realize his responsibility in the matter, and then 
live up to it. And so from all the sage advice which we are sup- 
posed to offer you as students, we only urge you to be loyal to the 
College that has fostered and educated you, after you have borne 
away her last gift. 

As Alumni we watch with gladness the tangible evidence of 
growth at our college home, — the new buildings, free scholarships, 
new instructors from the ranks of graduates, and the realization of 
Alumni efforts in the new library. At last comes the assurance of 
Alumni representation upon the board of trustees, a progressive 
step, but one for which it would seem the time had arrived. The 
confidence thus displayed in our body will not be misplaced. None 
can act with greater interest or sympathy in the affairs of the Col- 
lege than its graduates. 

The radical changes in the curriculum during the past year do not 
meet with our approval. They practically make the study of Agri- 
culture in the abstract optional, allowing the student to substitute 
History and Languages. One who wishes to make agricultural 
science a life work, finds himself obliged to choose a course which 
shall omit Agriculture, or omit French, German, Mineralogy, and 
Microscopy, any or all of which are essential to his progress. No 
student can escape military exercise, but all can reject Agriculture. 
In short, the very feature which should lend individuality and char- 
acter to the College is bereft of its importance, and even relegated 
to a secondary position. At this time, however, we only criticise in 
a general way, and endeavor to point out what seems to us an un- 
wise change. 



85 



The College of Ag-riculture is pre-eminently a college of the natural 
sciences, and even if we modify its plan to the scope of a liberal 
scientific education, the sciences related to Agriculture must still 
constitute the leading lines of study. We sincerely hope, therefore, 
that the day is near at hand when Chemistry, Botany, Geology, 
Zoology, and Physiology may be represented by departments of first 
and equal importance in the course of instruction. English should 
be taught first, last, and continually, as an incessant drill, so that at ' 
least the graduating theses may be written correctly and expressed 
clearly; and, finally, as an aid to advanced scientific or literary study, 
let the modern languages receive thorough consideration. 

These suggestions seem to us to be in harmony with the acknowl- 
edged educational tendencies of the times, and with the plan and 
scope of the College. 

In conclusion, we offer to College, faculty, and students, in behalf 
of former pupils and associates now scattered through our own and 
foreign lands, hearty and sincere greetings, with wishes for your 
highest prosperity. 

ALUMNUS. 



^1^ 



86 



-^ ALUMNI ABBDCIATIDN ^- 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



OFFICERS FOR 1884-5. 



President. 
J. F. Barrett, '75. 

Vice Presidents. 

E. E. Thompson, '71. J. Hibbard, '77. 

L. L. Holmes, '73. C. O. Lovell, 'T8 

J. B. Miner, '73. C. P. Smith, '79. 

D. G. Hitchcock, '74. ' A. H. Stone, '80. 

J. A. Barri, '75. H. Peters, '81. 

J. E. Root, '76. C. E. Beach, '82. 

C. H. Preston, '83. 

Corresponding Secretary. 
S. T. Maynard, '72. 

Recording Secretary. 
C. F. Deuel, '76. 

Treasurer. 
^Atherton Clark, '77. 

Executive Committee. 
W. H. BowKER, '71. C. F. Deuel, '76. 

S. T. Maynard, '72. Atherton Clark, '77. 

L. Myrick, '78. 

Auditing Committee. 

E. A. Ellsworth, '71. H. P. Otis, '75. 

T. E. Smith, '75. 



87 




brahuates. 




Allen, Francis S., '82, House Surgeon Am. Vet. College, 141 W. 54th 
St., New York City. 

Allen, Gideon H., '71, Winfield, Cowley Co., Kan., Agent Wells, 
Fargo & Company's Express. 

Aplin, George T., '82, East Putney, Vt., Farmer. 

Bagley, David A., '76. 

Bagley, Sidney C, '83. 

Baker, David E., '78, Newton Lower Falls, Physician and Surgeon. 

Barrett, Joseph F., '75, 27 and 29 Beaver St., N. Y. City, Traveling 
Salesman Bowker Fertilizer Co. 

Barri, John A., '75, Water St. and Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport, Conn., 
Chittenden, Barri & Sanderson. 

Bassett, Andrew L., '71, N. Y. City, Clerk Vermont C, R. R. & 
Steamship Co. 

Beach, Charles E., '82, care Beach & Co., Hartford, Conn., Farmer. 

Bell, Burleigh C, '72, corner 16th and Howard Sts., San Francisco, 
Cal., Druggist and Chemist. 

Bellamy, John, '76, 659 Washington St., Boston, Nichols, Bellamy 
& Co., Hardware & Cutlery. 

Benedict, John M., '74, Commercial Block, Bank St., Waterbury, 
Conn., Physician. 

Benson, David H., '77, North Weymouth, Analytical and Consulting 
Chemist and Superintendent of Chemical Works Bradley Fer- 
tilizer Co. 

Bingham, Eugene P., '82, 13 Foster Wharf, Boston, Maker of Em- 
balming and Disinfecting Fluids. 

Birnie, William P., '71, Springfield, Salesman Birnie Paper Co. 

Bishop, Edgar A., '83, Arnold Mills, R. I., Farmer. 

Bishop, William H., '82, Tougaloo, Miss., Superintendent of Agri- 
cultural Department Tougaloo Univ. 

Blanchard, William H., '74, Westminster, Vt., Farmer. 

Boutwell, William L., '78, Leverett, Farmer. 

Bowker, William H., '71, 43 Chatham St., Boston, President Bowker 
Fertilizer Co. 

Bowman, Charles A., '81, Billerica, Civil Engineer. 

Boynton, Charles E., '81, Groveland, Lecturer. 



88 



Bragg, Everett B., '75, Glidden & Curtis, Tremont Bank Building, 
Boston, Chemist. 

Braune, Domingos H., '83, Nova Friburgo, Province of Rio de 
Janeiro, Brazil, Planter. 

Brett, William F., '72, Brockton, Clerk R. H. White & Co., 518 
Washington St., Boston, 

Brewer, Charles, '77, 30 Court St., N. Y. City, Florist. 

Brigham, Arthur A., '78, Marlborough, Farmer. 

Bi'odt, Harry S., '82, Surveying, Central Association of Wyoming, 
Rawlins, Wyo. Territory. 

Brooks, William P., '75, Sapporo, Japan, Professor of Agriculture, 
Japan Agricultural College. 

Bunker, Madison, '75, Newton, Veterinary Surgeon. 

Callender, Thomas R., '75, Everett, Florist. 

Campbell, Frederick G., '75, West Westminster, Vt., Farmer. 

Carr, Walter F., '81, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering and 
Physics, Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Caswell, Lilley B., '71, Athol, Civil Engineer and Farmer. 

Chandler, Edward P., '74, Fort Maginnis, Montana, Wool Grower. 

Chandler, Everett S., '82, 20 Orchard- St., North Cambridge, Student 
Harvard Law School. 

Chapin, Henry E., '81, Raleigh, N. C, Assistant Editor " North Caro- 
lina Farmer." 

Chickering, Darius O., '76, Enfield, Farmer. 

Choate, Edward C, '78, Southborough, Farmer. 

Clark, Atherton, '77, 131 Tremont St., Boston, Clerk. 

Clark, John W., '72, Superintendent of Deep River Orchard, Deep 
River, Conn. 

Clark, Xenos Y., '78, P. O. Box 2244 San Francisco, Cal., Scientist. 

*Clay, Jabez W., '75. 

Coburn, Charles F., '78, Lowell, Teller Five Cents Savings Bank, 
and Editor "Daily Citizen." 

Cooper, James W., Jr., '82, East Bridgewater, Drug Clerk. 

Cowles, Frank C, '72, City Engineers' Office, Worcester, Civil En- 
gineer. 

Cowles, Homer L., '71, Amherst, Farmer. 

t Curtis, Wolf red F., '74. 

Cutter, John A., '82, 213 West 34th St., N. Y. City, Student at Al- 
bany Medical College. 

Cutter, John C, '72, Sapporo, Japan, Consulting Physician Sapporo 
Ken. Hospital and Professor of Physiology and Comparative 
Anatomy, Imperial College of Agriculture. 

Damon, Samuel C, '82, Lancaster, Farmer. 

Deuel, Charles F., '76, Amherst, Driiggist. 

Dickinson, Richard S., '79, Columbus, Neb., Farmer. 

Dodge, George R., '75, Brighton, Superintendent of Factory Bow~- 
ker Fertilizer Co. 

Dyer, Edward N., '72, Kohala, S. I., Pastor Native Church. 

Easterbrook, Isaac C, '73, 128 Chambers St., N. Y. City, New York 
Manager of Montpelier Carriage Co. 



*Died October 1, 1880, of pneumonia, at N. Y. City. 

tDied November 8, 1878, of inflammation of the brain, at Westminster. 



Ellsworth, Emory A., '71, 164 High St., Holyoke, Architect and Me- 
chanical and Civil Engineer. 

Fairfield, Frank H., '81, 30 Kilby St., Standard Fertilizer Co., 
Chemist. 

Fisher, Jabez F., '71, Fitchburg, Freight Cashi&r Fitchburg R. R. Co. 

Fiske, Edward R., '72, 625 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa., Folwell 
Bro. & Co., Merchant. 

Flagg, Charles O., '72, Diamond Hill, R. I., Farmer. 

Flint, Charles L., Jr., '81, 29 Newbury St., Boston, Student Sawyer's 
Commercial College, Boston, Mass. 

*Floyd, Charles W., '82. 

Foot, Sanford D., '78, Paterson, N. J., Kearney & Foot, File Manu- 
facturers. 

Fowler, Alvan L., '80, Tombstone, Arizona, Superintendent 
Woronoco Mining Co. 

Fuller, George E., '71. 

Gladwin, Frederic E., '80, Tombstone, Arizona, Assayer Woronoco 
Mining Co. 

Goodale, David, '82, Marlborough, Farmer. 

Green, Samuel B., '79, Mountainville, N. Y., Superintendent Horti- 
cultural Department Houghton Farm. 

Grover, Richard B., Ludlow, Vt., Clergyman. 

Guild, Geo. W. M., '76, 17 and 19 Cornhill, Boston, wire business. 

Hague, Henry, '75, South Worcester, Rector St. Matthews. 

Hall, Josiah N., '78, Sterling, Weld Co., Col., Physician. 

Harwood, Peter M., '75, Barre, Farmer. 

Hashiguchi, Boonzo, '81, Department of Commerce and Agriculture, 
Tokio, Japan, President Government Sugar Beet Co. 

jHawley, Frank W., '71. 

Hawley, Joseph M., '76, Berlin, Wis., C. A. Mather & Co., Banker. 

Herms, Charles, '84, 1223 Third Ave., Louisville, Kentucky, Stock 
Breeder. 

JHerrick, Frederic St. C, '71. 

Hevia, Alfred A., '83, care of New York Insurance Co., Apartado 77, 
Gautemala, Central America. 

Hibbard, Joseph R., '77, Stoughton, Wis., Farmer. 

Hillman, Charles D., '82, Fresno City, Cal., Nurseryman. 

Hills, Joseph L., '81, New Brunswick, N. J., Assistant Chemist 
N. J. Agricultural Experimental Station. 

Hitchcock, Daniel G., '74, Warren, Agent American Express Co. 

Hobbs, John A,, '74, Bloomington, Neb., Farmer. 

Holland, Harry D., '84, Southborough, Assistant Superintendent Deer- 
foot Farm. 

Holman, Samuel M., Jr., '83, Attleborough, Farmer. 

Holmes, Lemuel Le B., '72, Mattapoisett, Lawyer. 

Howard, Joseph H., '82, Springfield Meter Inspector, Springfield 
Gaslight Co. 

Howe, Charles S., '78, Akron, Ohio, Buchtel College, Professor of 
Mathematics. 



♦Died October 10, 1883, of consumption, at Boston. 

tDied October 28, 1883, of congestive apoplexy, at Belchertown. 

jDied January 19, 1884, at Methuen. 



90 



Howe, Elmer D., '81, Marlborough, Farmer. 

Howe, Geo. D., '82, North Hadley, C. D. Dickinson & Son, Clerk. 

Howe, Waldo V., '77, Newburyport. 

Hubbard, Henry F., '78, 94 Front St., N. Y. City, with John H. 

Catherwood & Co. 
Hunt, John F., '78, Sunderland, Market Gardener. 
Jones, Elisha A., '84, 3627 Warren St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Kendall, Hiram, '76, Providence, R. T., Superintendent and Chemist 

Kendall Manufacturing Co. 
Kimball, Francis E., '72, 15 Union St., Worcester, Book-keeper E. 

W. Vail. 
Kingman, Morris B., '82, Post Graduate M. A. C. 
Kinney, Burton A., '82, Portland, Maine, Signal Corps U. S. Army. 
Knapp, Walter H., '75, Wellesley Hills, Florist. 
Koch, Henry G. H., '78, Sixth Avenue and Twentieth St., N. Y. 

City, H. C. F. Koch & Son. 
Ladd, Thomas H., '76, care Wm. Dadmun, Watertown. 
Lee, Lauren K., '75, Valley Springs, Dakota, Dealer in Flax Seed. 
Lee, William G., '80, Holyoke. 

Leland, Walter S., '73, Concord, Officer State Prison. 
Leonard, George, '71, Springfield, Lawyer. 

Libby, Edgar H., '74, Rochester, N. Y., Agricultural Journalist. 
Lindsey, Joseph B., '83, Amherst, Assistant Chemist Experiment 

Station. 
Livermore, Russell W., '72, Pates, Robeson Co., North Carolina, 

Lawyer. 
Lovell, Charles O., '78, Amherst, Photographer. . 
Lyman, Asahel H., '73, Manistee, Mich., Druggist and Apothecary. 
Lyman, Chas. E., '78, Middlefield, Conn., Farmer. 
*Lyman, Henry, '74. 

Lyman, Robert W., '71, Belchertown, Lawyer. 
Mackie, George, '72, Attleborough, Physician. 

Macleod, William E., '76, 60 Devonshire St., Boston, Patent Lawyer. 
Mann, George H., '76, Sharon, Superintendent of Cotton Duck 

Mills. 
Martin, William E., '76, Excelsior, Minn., Postmaster. 
May, Frederic G., '82, Conway, Orange County, Florida, Orange 

Grower. 
Maynard, Samuel T., '72, Amherst, Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege, Professor of Botany and Horticulture. 
McConnel, Charles W., '76, 59 North Pearl St., Albany, N. Y., 

Dentist. 
McQueen, Charles M., '80, Dearborn and Monroe Sts., Chicago, 111., 

Standard Book Co., Treasurer. 
Miles, George M., '75, Miles City, Montana, Miles & Strevell, Jobbers 

of Hardware. 
Mills, George W., '73, Medford, Physician. 

Minor, John B., '73, New Britain, Conn., Russell & Erwin Manufact- 
uring Co., Clerk. 
Minott, Charles W., '83, Three Rivers, Mass., Ruggles & Minott, 

Small Fruit Growers. 



*Died January 8, 1879, of pneumonia, at Middlefield, Conn. 



91 



Montague, Arthur H., '74, South Hadley, Farmer. 

Morey, Herbert E., '72, 49 Haverhill St., Boston, Morey, Smith & 
Co., Merchant. 

*Morse, James H., '71. 

Morse, William, '82, 19 Milk St., Boston, with Dennison Manufact- 
uring Co. 

Myrick, Herbert, '82, Springfield, Assistant Editor " New England 
Homestead." 

Myrick, Lockwood, '78, Concord, Chemist. 

Nichols, Lewis A., '71, Danvers, Civil Engineer. 

Norcross, Arthur D., '71, Monson, Postmaster. 

Nourse, David 0., Berlin, Conn., Superintendent of Berlin Orchard, 
Conn. Valley Orchard Co. 

Nye, George E., '77, 70 Exchange Building, Chicago, III, G. P. 
Swift & Co., Book-keeper. 

Osgood, Frederic H., '78, Springfield, Veterinary Surgeon. 

Otis, Harry P., '75, Leeds, Superintendent Northampton Emery 
Wheel Co. 

Page, Joel B., '71, Conway, Farmer. 

Paige, James B., '82, F. B. Paige & Son, Mellen Valley Fruit Farm. 

Parker, George A., '76, Tunis Mills, Talbot County, Md., Superin- 
tendent Farwein Farm. 

Parker, George L., '76, Dorchester, Florist. 

Parker, Henry L., '77, 5 Beekman St., N. Y. City, Mechanical En- 
gineer. 

Parker, William C, Wakefield, Dealer in Agricultural Implements. 

Penhallow, David F., '73, Montreal, Canada, McGill Univ., Professor 
of Botany and Vegetable Physiology. 

Perkins, Dana E., '82, care C. M. Winchell, U. S. Survey Boat 
^ " Tennessee," Miss. River Commission. 

Peters, Austin, '81, Royal Veterinary College, West London, En- 
gland. 

Phelps, Austin, '81, South Framingham, Florist. 

Phelps, Henry L., '74, Northampton. 

Plumb, Charles S., '82, Geneva, N. Y., Assistant Director N. Y. Ex- 
periment Station. 

Porter, William H., '76, Watertown, Foreman S. R. Payson's Farm. 

Porto, Raymundo M. da S., '77, Para, Brazil, Planter. 

Potter, William S., '76, Lafayette, Ind., Rice & Potter, Lawyer. 

Preston, Charles H., '83, Chemist, with Milk Inspector, 1151 Wash- 
ington St., Boston. 

Rawson, Edward B., '81, Lincoln, Loudoun County, Va., Farmer. 

Renshaw, James B., '73, Spokane Falls, Washington Territory, Cler- 
gyman. 

Rice, Frank H., '75, Hawthorne, Nev., County Recorder and Auditor 
of Esmeralda County. 

Richmond, Samuel H., '71, Ocala, Marion County, Fla., Magistrate 
and Deputy Clerk of Circuit Court. 

Ripley, George A., '80, Amherst, Clerk Amherst House. 

Root, Joseph E., '76, 72 Pearl St., Hartford, Conn., Physician and 
Surgeon. 



♦Died June 21, 1883, of Bright's disease, at Salem. 

92 



Rudolph, Charles, '79, Mitchell, Dakota, Lawyer. 

Russell, William D., '71, Turner's Falls, Montague Paper Go. 

Salisbury, Frank B., '72, Kimberley Diamond Fields, South Africa, 
Trader. 

Sears, John M., '76, Ashfield, Farmer. 

Shaw, Elliot D., '72, Holyoke, Florist. 

Sherman, Walter A., '79, 182 Central St., Lowell, Veterinary Sur- 
geon. 

Shiverick, Asa F., '82, corner Meeting and Hudson Sts., Charleston, 
S. C, Chemist Pacific Guano Co. 

Simpson, Henry B,, '73, Centreville, Md., Farmer. 

Smead, Edwin, '71, 3 Cable St., Baltimore, Md., Clerk Bushey, Carr 
&Co. 

Smith, Frank S., '74, Hampden, Woolen Manufacturer. 

Smith, George P., '79, Sunderland, Farmer, 

Smith, Hiram F. M., '81, 42 Austin St., Cambridgeport, Student 
Harvard Medical School. 

Smith, Llewellyn, '84, Post Graduate M. A. C, Amherst. 

Smith, Thomas E., '76, West Chesterfield, Manufacturer. 

Snow, George H., '72, Leominster, Farmer. 

Somers, Frederick M., '72, 49 Broadway, N. Y. City, Watson & Gib- 
son, Broker. 

*Southmayd, John E., '77. 

Southwick, Andre A., '75, care Beach & Co., Hartford, Conn., 
Superintendent " Vine Hill and Ridge Farms." 

Spaulding, Abel W., '81, 907 Main St., St. Louis, Mo., Ripley & Kim- 
ball,'"Clerk. 

Sparrow, Lewis A., '71, 19 South Market St., Boston, Judson & 
Sparrow, Dealers in Fertilizer. 

Spofford, Amos L., '78, Georgetown, Shoe-cutter. 

Stockbridge, Horace E., '78, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College. 

Stone, Almon H., '80, Phillipston, Farmer. 

Stone, Winthrop E., '82, Amherst, Assistant Experiment Station. 

Strickland, George P., '71, Stillwater, Minn., Seymour, Sabin & Co., 
Machinist. 

Swan, Roscoe W., 32 Pleasant St., Worcester, Physician. 

Taft, Cyrus, '76, Whitinsville, Machinist. 

Taft, Levi R., '82, Amherst, Bursar and Assistant Professor of Hor- ' 
ticulture. 

Taylor, Alfred H., '82, Burnett, Neb., Live Stock Dealer. 

Taylor, Frederick P., '81, Athens, East Tennessee, Farmer. 

Thompson, Edgar E., '71, East Weymouth, Teacher. 

Thompson, Samuel C., '72, N. Y. City, Department Public Works, 
Annexed District Assistant Enginefer. 

Thurston, Wilbur H., '82, Mountainville, Orange County, N. Y., 
Experimental Department " Houghton Farm." 

Tucker, George H., '71, Fargo, Dak., Civil Engineer. 

Tuckerman, Frederick, '78, Amherst, Physician and Lecturer Agri- 
cultural College. 

Urner, George P., '76, Sweet Grass, Montana, Sheep-raiser. 



♦Died December 11, 1878, of consumption, at Minneapolis, Minn. 

93 



Wakefield, Albert T., '73, Peoria, TIL, Physician. 

Waldron, Hiram E. B., '79, North Rochester, Farmer. 

Ware, Willard C, '71, Middle St., Portland, Me., Manager Portland 
& Boston Clothing Co. 

Warner, Clarence D., '81, Amherst, Professor of Mathematics 
M. A. C. 

Warner, Seth S., '73, '43 Chatham St., Boston, Traveling Salesman 
Bowker Fertilizer Co. 

Washburn, John H., '78, Mansfield, Conn., Professor of General and 
Agricultural Chemistry, Storrs Agricultural School. 

Webb, James H., '73, 69 Church St., New Haven, Conn., Ailing and 
Webb, Attorn ey-at-Law. 

Wellington, Charles, '73, Germany, Student. 

Wells, Henry, '72, 105 North Third St., St. Louis, Mo., Contracting 
Agent West-bound freight, " Blue I^ine " Fast-freight Office. 

Wetmore, Howard G., '76, 41 West 9th St., New York City, Physi- 
cian. 

Wheeler, Homer J., '83, Amherst, Assistant Chemist Experiment 
Station. 

Wheeler, William, '71, Boston Highlands, Dealer in Shoes. 

Whitney, Frank Le P.,'71, Westminster St., Providence, R. I., Whit- 
ney & Kimball, Dealers in Oil Stoves and Kerosene Fixtures. 

Whitney, William C, '72, Minneapolis, Minn., Architect. 

Whittaker, Arthur, '81, Needhara, Farmer. 

Wilcox, Henry H., '81, Nawiliwili, S. I., Sugar industry. 

Wilder, John E., '82, 179 Lake St., Chicago, 111., with Wilder & Hale, 
Dealers in Leather. 

Williams, James S., '82, North Glastonbury, Conn., Farmer. 

WilUams, John E., '76, Editor "Amherst Record." 

Winchester, John F., '75, Lawrence, Veterinary Surgeon and Lect- 
urer, M. A. C. 

Windsor, Joseph L., '82, St. Paul, Minn., Secretary Local Treasur- 
er's Office Northern Pacific R. R. Co. 

Wood, Frank W., '73. 

Woodbury, Rufus P., '78, Kansas City, Mo., News and Telegraph 
Editor of " Kansas City Daily Times." 

Woodman, Edward E., '74, Danvers, Florist. 

Wyman, Joseph, '77, Cambridgeport, Book-keeper at 52-60 Black- 
stone St., Boston. 

Zeller, Harrie McK., '74, Hagerstown, Md., Baltimore & Ohio Tele- 
graph Co., Manager of Commercial Office. 



94 



% 

CL5SS PDEM. ^^^ 





Not to the oak, whose aged limbs 

The shock of wintry blasts withstand, 

Nor to the fragrant sandal tree. 
Whose odor fills the Eastern land, 

Nor to the lily, beauteous, fair. 

Free from all tinga of earthly stain, 

Nor to the blessed herbs, whose powers 
Are potent to relieve from pain, 

But to a very common tree. 

Although in blossom wondrous fair 

Since promising of future fruit, — 
Would I our class compare. 

The apple tree, a common thing. 
But, useful as it has been made 

To please and profit all mankind. 
It puts all others in the shade. 

The seedling's size at first was small. 
But strong of root and full of life; 

At one year old the bud was set. 

Yet parent stock ne'er knew the knife. 



95 



So, onward from that time they grew, 
Seedling and bud toward the skies, 

Still reaching up into the light 

E'en though held down by earthly ties. 

Its roots are long. They stretch away 
Across a broad expanse of ground, 

From Williamstown to Boston Bay 

And clear to Hudson's banks they'rq found. 

But what shall be their ripened fruit. 
When, from the tender, fostering care 

Of Alma Mater's nursery row. 

They seek a wider field elsewhere ? 

"We cannot tell. In after years 

Some branch may slowly wither down. 

The axe of Time will thin her limbs 
And mar the beauty of her crown. 

Still, let us hope that kindly Fate 
Will all her vigorous shoots preserve, 

And in our onward pilgrimage 
Make beauty unto use subserve. 






■ayyiyck^ -t^-cL-Zi ■^A.-ad-e ^t.^i'^^^d ■a.€t-zji.-e.4.^Ctd^.'i^-a. -tu-c-z^'n, ■ud y ^^^ 
■tA^ Cy^T-t-cZ-e^ i/^^e'^t-c/d 'Ca-t-a-e-c^ ^<i--l -t'/d du^i^-a^-^ ■a'l^ 
-(.'■td ■d^c-ue-^'t-id-edd^ -cz-i^tx -C-H-e-^ ^t^'t.^^ 'T^v -to^^ne-i- co-'i^-ti-'i^u-e 

THE EDITORS. 



Established 1839. 

Tiie AMERICAN CULTIVATOR, 

BeSfe Pgifisultaffal Sapep ii^ Mn^ewsa. 

250,000 Readers of Ea ch Weekly Issue. 

UPWARDS OF 300 PRACTICAL CONTRIBUTORS. 
AN ILLUSTRATED AGRICULTURAL WEEKLY. 
LARGEST CIRCULATION IN AMERICA OF ITS CLASS. 
A SPECIALTY OF ACCURATE MARKET REPORTS. 
BRIGHT, NEWSY, INTERESTING, AND INSTRUCTIVE. 
NO PRACTICAL FARMER CAN DO WITHOUT IT. 
A SPECIAL HORSE DEPARTMENT. 
DEVOTED TO AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE. 
SPECIMEN COPIES SENT FREE ON APPLICATION. 
WE RECOMMEND YOU TO WRITE FOR A SPECIMEN. 
AN EXAMINATION WILL CAUSE YOU TO SUBSCRIBE. 

Only $2.00 per Year, $1.00 for Six Months, and 50c. for Three Months. 

Address all communications to 

GEO. B. JAMES, 

259 Washiugton Street, BOSTON, MASS. 



¥. B. GLAME & CAMTJTH, 





MlB/lB/l^Mfei y. 



340 Washington Street, BOSTON. 



Be Sure and Visit our Establishment when in Boston, 

as we afford every facility to those intending to purchase. 

Correspondence Solicited and Promptly Attended to. 



99 



E. a BENNETT. 



Watchmaker^ ^ 



^ Optician and ^ 



^ Jeweler, 

SELLS THE RUDGE AND VICTOR BICYCLES. 

AND OTHER POPULAR MAKES. 

Fine Watches Repaii-ed and Perfect Satisfaction Guaranteed. Eyes care- 
fully fitted with Eye-Glasses and Spectacles, by E. R. Bennett, 

NEXT DOOR TO POST-OFFICE. 

C, S, GATES, D, D, S. 






Formerly with J. J. Vincent, D. M. D. 



WILLIAMS^ Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours, 9 A. M. to 5 p. m. 



NITROUS OXIDE ADMINISTERED W^HEN DESIRED. 

• 

GEO. S. WHITBECK & CO. 

DEALERS IN 

PIANOS,^alii^ORGANS, 

AND MUSICAL MERCHANDISE OF ALL KINDS. 
124 MAIN ST., NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Geo. S. Whitbeck. Louis B. Graves. 



100 



i^otto : '-rnivd: iro'X' to be ttiit^ehsoiijE). 



STUDENTS 

Will find it to their advantage to call on me before purchasing, as I have 
on hand constantly, a full assortment of 




ALSO ALL Styles of Rubber Goods. 

I keep the Best Quality of Goods there is in the market. 

■^TPEveNE-PRIOEvC^gPvgJieEvgiFe^E.^- 

W. WILBUR, 

PROPRIETOR, 
MAIN ST., JUST BELOW THE DEPOT, AMHERST, MASS. 



WEBSTER'S UNABRIDGED. 



In Sheep, Russia and Turkey Biadings. 




Get tlie Standard. 



g*i X'T AVebster— it lias 118,000 Words, 
XJCXa ^ 3000 Ellgl•a^^ngs, and a New 
* ^^ Biogi-aiiliical Dictionary. 

inn TT ^^ Standard in f4ov't Printing Office. 

XXXXi 33,000 copies in Public Schools. 

^^^^ ^^ Sale 30 to 1 of any other series. 

^3TP*C!^1^ f^if^ t<^ make a Familv intelligent. 

J3£il9X Best help for 8CHOLAKS, 

TEACHERS and SCHOOLS. 

It is Standard Authority with the li. S. Su- 
preme Court, and is recommended by the 
State Sup'ts of Schools in 36 States. 
9^ The vocabulary contains 3000 more words 
than are found in any other American Dictionary. 

The Unabridged is now supplied, at a small ad- 
ditional cost, with DENISON'S 

PATENT REFERENCE INDEX. 

"The greatest improvement in book-making that 
nas been made ni a hundred years." 

Published by G. & C. MERKIAM 



A Liirarj ii Itself. 

In the quantity of matter it contains, 
is believed to be the largest volume 
published, being suificient to make 
75 12mo volumes that usually sell for 
$1.25 each. 



Tie Fainllf Eincator. 

It will answer thousands of questions 
to the wide-awake child. It is an ev- 
er-present and reliable School- 
Master to the whole family. 

S. S. Herald. 



to Bm It. 



" Every Farmer should give his 
sons two or three square rods of 
ground, well prepared, with the avails 
of which they may buy it. Every Me- 
chanic should put a receiving box 
in some conspicuous place in the 
house, to catch the .stray pennies for 
the like purpose. — Mass. Life Boat. 
& CO., Springfield, Mass. 



101 



J. A. RA^VSON, 

WATCHMAKER, JEWELER and OPTICIAN, 

AND DEALER IN 

TOYS AND FANCY GOODS, 
AMHERST, MASS. 

J. L. LOWELL, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



Photographer to AMHERST, DARTMOUTH, and 
MASS. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGES, 

AND TILDEN SEMINARY in '84. 

Mr. Lovell has been elected Photographer by Twenty Classes out of the 
last twenty-five that have graduated from Amherst, and by Fourteen (all) 
that have graduated from Massachusetts Agricultural College. 



M lull @&ll@@l@n[ @i ^al@i@ ikms eenslceatllf &m bcxni. 

AMHERST ART AND NOVELTY STORE 

Is the Place to find a Fine Selection of 

ABTISTB^^ MATBHIALB9 

Hand-Painted Novelties, Books, Toys, &e. 

Call and see 'me. 

-*- I. S. JAQUETH, ~^.- 

KELLOGG'S BLOCK, PHOENIX ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



102 



WATCH ES 



TIFFANY & GO. 

UNION SQUARE, NEW YORK, 

Particularly request attention to their line of 
low-priced Watches, which they coniSdently 
recommend as the best yet produced for the 
money. The movements are sound, stem- 
winding anchors, and are cased in 18-kt. 
gold in variety of styles. 

Each watch is stamped with the name of 
the house, thereby carrying its guarantee. 

Large size, for Gentlemen, - - - $75 

Medium size, for ^' - - - 65 

Large size, for Ladies, - - - - 60 

Small size, for " - - - - 50 

Cuts showing sizes and styles of the 
watches, and patterns of chains suitable to 
be worn with them, sent on request. 



103 



S^ELLOWS ! 

Call at the 

Amherst ^i^ Cash ^ Shoe ^ Store 

For Correct Styles and Prices. 

TRY THE ENGLISH WAUKENPHAST ' 

All Grades, from |4 to $6. 

HERBERT L. COE, <Pro.p'r. 




MONARCH 



No. 1, up one flight. Cook's Block, 

A. LIBERTY, Proprietor, 

Students, give me a call and I ^vill Use You Well. 

Cash Dealer in 

Ready -Made Clothing, 

-^^ GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS,^^^^^ 



HATS, CAPS, UMBRELLAS, &c., &e. 

DICKINSON'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 
104 



RHEUMATISM, 

GOUT, AND 

NEURALGIA 

QUICKLY AND PERMANENTLY CURED BY THE 

Common-Sense Remedy 

SALICYLIC A. 



Immediate Relief Warranted. 

Permanent Cure Guaranteed. 

Six Years established and never known to fail in a single case, 
acute or chronic. 



S ]E3 O XI. £3 "XT ! 

THE ONLY DISSOLVER OF THE POISONOUS URIC ACID WHICH 

EXISTS IN THE BLOOD OF RHEUMATIC AND 

GOUTY PATIENTS. 

SALICYLICA is known as a common sense remedy, because it strikes 
directly at the cause of Rheumatism, Gout, and Neuralgia, while so many 
so-called specifics and supposed panaceas only treat locally the effects. 

It has been conceded by eminent scientists that outward applications, 
such as rubbing with oils, ointments, liniments, and soothing lotions, will 
not eradicate these diseases, which are the i-esult of the poisoning of the 
blood with Uric Acid. SALICYLICA works with marvelous effect on 
this acid, and so removes the disorder. 

REMEMBER that SALICYLICA is a certain cure for Rheumatisnn, 
Gout, and Neuralgia. The most intense pains are subdued almost in- 
stantly. Give it a trial. Relief guaranteed or money refunded. 

Thousands of testimonials sent on application. 

$ I a Box. 6 Boxes for $5. 

Sent free by mail on receipt of money. 

ASK YOUR DRUGGIST FOR IT, 

But do not take imitations or substitutes, or something recommended as 
"just as good." Insist on the genuine with the name of WASHBURNE & CO. on 
each box, which is guaranteed chemically pure under our signatiire, an 
indispensable requisite to insure success in the treatment. Take no other, 
or send to us. 

WASHBURNE & CO., Proprietors, 
287 Broadway, corner Reade Street, NEW YORK. 



105 




THE 



COOUY CR[IIM[RS. 




OVER 31,000 IN DAILY USE. 



Five Gold and Fourteen Silver Medals awarded 

FOR SUPERIORITY OF PROCESS AND PRODUCT. 

Their butter record has never been equaled by any creamery, pan or sep- 
arator. They carried off tlie premium for the greatest per cent, of yield in 
the great dairy States of Iowa and Wisconsin. The combined product of 
butter and cheese exceeds that of any other apparatus. 

They are used exclusively at the Amherst, Mass.. Creamery. 



m DAYIS SWING CHURN 

Is now acknowledged to be the easiest churn to oper- 
ate ever upon the market. It makes more butter and 
of better quality. It is the easiest cleaned. It has no 
floats or paddles to injure the grain of the butter. It 
is always right side up. 





[URfKA BUTHR WORK[R 

Works very rapidly and salts evenly, without 
injuring the butter. Combines all the best 
points of the lever and roller workers, with 
none of their objectionable features. 



NISBITT BUTUR PRINHR 

Makes friends wherever used, because it prints tastily 
and easily. 




A full line of Butter Making Utensils for Dairies and Factories. 

|^"° Send for Illustrated Circulars. 







BELLOWS FALLS, VT. 



106 



R, W. STRATTON, 
Students' Boot i Shoe Store. 

Having studied the wants of the Students for over thirty yeai-s, I am bet- 
ter able to supply the same than any dealer in Hampshire Count}'. I have 
all my goods direct from the manufacturers, wliich enables me to sell them 
15 per cent, less than other dealers. Do not mistake the place. 

Merchants' Row, fourth door from P. 0., Amherst, Mass. 

WILLIAMS & BUDDING, 




ii^iwfg, 




MERCHANTS' ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 

Dr. G. R. ENGLAND^ 

Successor to J. J. Vincent, D. M. D. 



B)-S-W-^'''l-g-l'g, 



Cas and Ether Administered. 
PALMER'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

EDWIN NELSON, 

Dealer in 

Classical * and * Miscellaneous ^ Books, 



COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS, (New and Second Hand,) 

School Books, Stationery, and Fancy Goods. 

Cash. Paid for Second Hand Text Books. 
No. 3 POST OFFICE BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



107 



W. H. H. MORGAN, 



• m.iat]0ftte]cacr 



PERFUMERY, FANCY AND TOILET GOODS. 

Imported and Domestic Cigars, Tobacco, and Smokers' Goods. ? 

PRESCRIPTIONS CAREFULLY COMPOUNDED. 



Orders for COAL will receive prompt attention. 



No. 6 Phoenix Row, Amherst, Mass. 



STUDENTS 

When in NORTHAMPTON, HOLYOKE, or SPRINGFIELD, 
will find 

BARR'S * DINING * ROOMS 

The best place to get Refreshments. 
SPREADS AND CLASS SUPPERS RECEIVE SPECIAL ATTENTION. 

E- O. B-A-I^ie 6Z OO. 

T. W. SjOO^JV, 

Dealer in 
LADItS' AND GENTLEMEN'S 

F£flie « B©ots « iiiidl - itoeei. 

Special Attention paid to Repaibing. 

See our Reliable Goods, which are Warranted to Give Satisfaction. 

No. 2 PHOENIX ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



109 



G. I. BLODGETT & CO. 



Dealers in 



■J**)W "J! 



J- 



kiW 




m 



AND 



GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS, 



We always have the Latest Styles in the New York and Boston markets. 



YOUMAN AND DUNLAP 

HATS 

Always in Stock. 



P. S. Agents Troy Laundry. 

Goods taken Tuesday, 

returned Saturday. 



G. M. Blodgett & Co. 



'^'S 






sIrIIBsabs^ 



ESTABLISHKD 1861. 



Dr. V. W. LEACH 

Has had Twenty-Five Years' Experience in the practice 

of Dentistry. 
Special Terms made with Students coming to Amherst and giving him 
the care of their teeth for the College course. Personal attention given to 
all operations on the teeth. Entire Satisfaction guaranteed. 



ANTHRACITE * 



O. D. HUNT, 

Retail Dealer in 

COAL 



^' BITUMINOUS 



Of all kinds. 

^FIRE^ INSURANCE ^AOENT^ 

OFFICE IN HUNT'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



109 



F. H. HOV^TES, 

Dealer in 

-^ CIGARS, TOBACCO, CIGARETTES,^ 

Fruits and Confectionery, 

LAMP GOODS AND KEROSENE OIL. 

MERCHANTS' ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 

M. N. SPEAR, 

Bookseller, Stationer and ITewsdealer, 

PAPER HANGINGS AND BORDERS, 

m^wMf wMiffmw mmQmm9 QWT^ELmmits m^€« 

Agent for E. Reynolds' Rubber Stamps. 
AMHERST, MASS. 




Apothecary, 



)m 




ri 




PARK & TILFORD'S 



ll' 



Hp SSI 



-IMPORTED- 



CIGARETTE S of the popular brands CIGARETTES 

NO. 1 PHOENIX ROW, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



•^^ii^eoif^® 



iW^i 




nm 



J^W^^wmv§ia ^i 






Shaving, Hair Dressing and Shampooing done in the best 
possible manner. 

CH-A-ISIjES "\77"I3LiS02Sr, Proprietor, 

Under Frank Wood's Hotel, AMHERST, MASS. 






AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN PLAN, 



FRANK P. WOOD, Proprietor, 

AMHEEST, MASS. 



Ill 



CHARLES DEUEL, 



(^.TNliJI 



IMPORTED AND (^SS'^&^SS DOMESTIC 

KANCY and jg^OILET ARTICLES, 

SPONGES, BRUSHES, Etc. 

AMHERST HOUSE DRUG STORE, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

E. D. MARSH 

Makes a Specialty of 

BEDDING, Etc. 

Book Cases, Blacking Cases, Desks, Window Shades, Picture Frames, 
Cord, Etc., constantly on hand, at Low Prices. 

PHOENIX ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



I^tif 



I Wlmm 



^^i^^^'^rt ^\a» 



HACKS, CARRYALLS, 

Stylish Double and Single Teams 

To Let at Fair Prices. 

Accommodations for Transient Feeding. 

IRear of IPl5.oe3n.i2c Tlo-^^r, -A-znlLerst, ^s/Tass. 

GEO. M. GH&MBERL&IN, Proprietor. 



113 



mm 



Wk 



vvAwwm W55SSSW" wsss\w" wsi« ^SNJTOi m*.v» 



^mm 



\\VWWW\ VvVWV^^ 'WJ^M. ^^!^\^' 



,pnirjg|ield Wlothieps, 



Will give as a benefit to the young men of the Massachusetts Agricultural 

College, on 

Purchases of $10 or over, Car Fare One lay, and on $20 Sales, Both Ways. 



FOR YOUNG MEN, 



Suit, krcds, Eats, ai ki f lisi^ 



BABBITT & CHAPIN 



347 MAIN STREET, SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 






AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the Friends of the College, and the Public generally, that 
we are prepared to supply 

FMT AND OiMENTAL TREES, 

AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

All Warranted true to name, at the LOWEST PRICE. For Trees, Shrubs, 
Plants, Flowers, and Small Fruits, address 

Prof. S. T. MAYNARD, AMHERST, MASS. 



113 



THE 

FLORENCE 



*iW=^^^' 



OIL 




PliiTillii 




^P W W ^ w^ 



ilSSii 




mmi * ffliii * BiicA 



') 



-) 



L, 



JUST WHAT IS WANTED. 



NATIONAL SAILORS' HOME. 

QuiNCY, Mass., August 23, 1881. . 
Florence Machine Co. — My Dear Sirs: I have used three No. 3 Florence 
Oil Heating Stoves for heating in mid-winter a room 40x40 feet, vs^hile the 
steam was shut off for i-epairs, with perfect success. 

Yours truly, W. L. Faxon, M. D., Supt. 



(jj^^ If not for sale in your city, send to the manufacturers, 

Florence Machine Co.,Florence, Mass., U.S.A. 



114 



NOURSE & McCAMMON, 

The Most Prominent Dealers in 

|)entbmc« !5 1 J urnisliin^ | |)oofc, 

FINE CI.OTHING, 
STYLISH * HATS * AND * CAPS. 



Affording to Students visiting Holyoke 

A GRAND OPPORTUNITY FOR SATISFACTORY BARGAINS. 

WINDSOR HOTEL BLOCK, 

Corner Dwight and Front Sts., HOLYOKE, MASS. 



UW%fJmA f ©@i it 




H^OKS, CARRYALLS, 

STYLISH DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS 

To Let at Moderate Prices. 

REAR OF WOOD'S HOTEL. 

AVERT L. CHAMBERLAIK, 

PROPRIETOR. 



115 



T 



RE:]^J:I]^^G^TO]N^ 




If you are not familiar with its advantages, 
permit us to mail you a Pamphlet acquainting 
you with its history, its uses, and the esteem 
in which it is held by the thousands who em- 
ploy it. 

WYCKOFF, SEAMANS & BENEDICT, 

281 & 283 Broadway, 

NEW YORK CITY. 
Also Chicago, Boston, Washington, St. Louis, 
Philadelphia, St. Paul. 



JOSEPH CI LLOTTS 

STEEL PENS 

EEOEIVEB THE GOLD MEDAL, 

Paris Exposition, 1878. 

Eis Celebrated Numbers, 

30-3-404-170-351-332, 

a)id 7iis other styles may be had of all 
dealers throughout the world. 

Joseph Gillott & Sons, New York. 



5K- 



J. M. WAITE & SON, 

Wfl 




And Dealers in 

HATS, CAPS, FURS, TRUNKS, BAGS, AND FURNISHING GOODS, 

Latest Styles in Furnishings. 

Agents of Knox the Hatter. Agents for Youman. Sole Agents for Rogers 

Troy Laundry. 

Give us a call before Purchasing. 

5 PHOENIX ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



116 



H 



mST CHOICE 



rfeporr) r)eW lir)es ot -N>Gtll Cilofr)ir)Gf 
IS r)©w ©r[<£i?e<a wt very ir)0Gle.rlffe 
prices, etr)d. ir) excmsive siyles. 



DEVLIN & CO. 



BROADWAY, COR. WARREN ST. 





rZ7^^f€^/?-^ 




U 



O^-^^SC^^'^^'^^^ CI?r\)t 



Cldd. 






!<S^ 



€>^€t'7^e 



7 



-^t?-^^^^. 



■t-aft^'Ce^iSL^,, 



117 










A. STTPERB stock: 



Selected with Special Reference to the 



Fall and 




INTER 



I\_ADE 



AXMINSTERS, MOQUETS, WILTONS, AND BODY BRUSSELS WITH 
BORDERS TO MATCH. 



^ 



DOMESTIC^ 



WILTONS, BRUSSELS, TAPESTRIES, THREE-PL YS, and INGRAINS. 



llollis, iipiims, iinolsms, I'attinp, iis,Etc. 



.(^.1 



PERSIAN, TURKISH, AND INDIA, ALL SIZES. 

Every incoming Steamer brings us the 
LATEST AND CHOICEST FOREIGN STYLES. 

All Depot Horse Cars pass our door, and two elevators furnish easy access 
to any department. 

JOEL GOLDTHWAIT & CO. 

No. 169 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 



118 



Established 1822. 







AND 

MILITARY FURNISHERS, 

387 WASHINGTON STREET, 

BOSTOlSr, M^SS. 



11 "la ei 



^ HO 



i^$^, &uh mh Md$ M>hU$, 




Mk, Ms, Boiille and Single fciiis to h 

At Reasonable Rates. 
OFFICE AT STABLE, REAR OF AMHERST HOUSE, 

PAIGE BROS. 



119 



PATRONIZE 






¥^ 



'^EmMm. 





-M-M\V y-' 




^^^^^^^ 







mm0 ""i^^m^^i^^^ w^ ^5S^ w ■^jsjsm'sjs;^^ w \"w^'~ 



y') S<s'Nb>^ =Sfe ^VgVeV& ; 



Sg^j^'^ 








tore, 




I 




m, wwi 



EXTENSIVE -f i^ggei^TJdEP 



In All Departments, 



tiRlWRiiBJ 



>^ , -v^ ^; -^^ Q^-^^f 'r: 



]=f ; if5f ^ 



^\\^.\^\^^■^^'v^o \\\\\\\\vv^/\S,V\\\\\\\\\s> vjkSS* ^;^;5:^TO\ '?f?';w^ ^\\\\\\\» V\\\\\\\\\\\ ^ 



LOW PRICES. 



120 



.0^-M4^^ 




'is 63 



DATE DUE 1 




































































































UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
LIBRARY 



LD 
3234 

n25 

v. 16 

1886 
cop. 2 

+