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This set of yearbooks was compiled 
by the staff of the 1967 Massachu- 
setts Index and donated in the 
interest of paying tribute to those 
who have created the history and 
traditions existing at the University 
of Massachusetts. 

Alexander Dean, Editor-in-chief 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/index1890univ 



Jan. 19. — Loving calls on the Hash House waiter at 8P.M. 

HENRY ADAMS. Phae. D., 

No. 1, Cook's Block, AMHERST, MASS. 



Drugs, Medicines, Perfumery, Toilet articles, Park and 
Tilford's Cigars, — Imported, — Cigarettes and Smoking 
Tobaccos. Headquarters for Sporting Goods, 
Powder, Shot, Primers and Gun Wads. Me- 
tallic and Paper Shells. Metallic Car- 
tridges. — Fishing Tackle. 



"Sunday and Night Calls responded to at residence, 1st door west of 
Wood's Hotel. 



+4ET. L. PAlGE,^ 

AMHERST HOUSE 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable. 



Omnibuses, Hacks, Double and Single Teams, to 
let at Reasonable Rates. 



Office at Stable, Rear of Amherst House. 

' ' Davy " is quite interested in skunk's oil. 



LIBRARY 

<&jiot^ Castro hit" Tutsey" with the lamp? 




^Emkepst * ©pamge * §t©pe 




AND DEALERS IN 

Crockery, Lamps, Stone Ware, Seeds, Farming 
Tools, Wooden Ware. 

We carry the Largest Assortment of American and Imported Grass Seeds 
in Hampshire County. 

AMHERST CO-OPERATIVE ASSOCIATION, AMHERST, MASS. 
W. G. TOWNE, Agent. 



Because he went through the door so quickly. 



May 12. — Stoioe goes barefoot. 



■* AT * THE *■ 

mkep^t @a^h i§h©e ^t©pe, 

You can get the most for your money in 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, 
SLIPPERS, TRUNKS AND BAGS. 

j^- REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 

HAWES & STINSON. 

Cash Row, AMHERST, MASS. 

Litres ami Feed Stable* 

HACKS, CARRYALLS, DOUBLE and SIHGLE 
TEAMS, to Let at Fair Prices. 

BARGE for the use of Small Parties. 

^p" Accommodations for Transient Feeding. 

Rear of Phoenix Row, AMHERST, MASS. 

GEO. M. CHAMBERLAIN, Proprietor. 



J. M. WA1TE & SON 



ittisiFs mMA Wwwwim 



AND DEALERS IN 

Hats, Caps, Furs, Trunks, Bags, Furnishing Goods. 
Latest Styles in Furnishings. Agents for Knox's 
and Youman's Hats. Sole Agents for Rog- 
ers, Troy Laundry. Hats Repaired. 
Furs Renovated. Students' 
Repairing. 

No. 5 Phoenix Row, . . AMHERST, Mass. 

When did Brooks go barefoot to iSugarloaf? 



T 




I 1 " " '1 




Massachusetts Agricultural College, 



A RARE CHANCE for young men to obtain a thorough practical edu- 
cation. The cost reduced to a minimum. Tuition free to residents of Massa- 
chusetts. An opportunity to pay a portion of expenses by work in the farm 
and horticultural departments. 

REQUISITES FOR ADMISSION. Candidates must be fifteen years 
of age or over, and pass satisfactory oral and written examinations in Eng- 
lish Grammer, Geography, History of the United States, Arithmetic, Alge- 
bra to Quadratic Equations, and the Metric System. 

EXPENSES. Board in clubs is about $2.50 per week, and in families 
$3.50 to $5.00. Room rent, $5.00 to $16.00 per term. Fuel, $7.00 to $20.00 per 
year. Washing, 40 to 50 cents per dozen. Military suit, $17.75. Books at 
wholesale prices. Furniture, second-hand or new, for sale in the town. 

INSTRUCTION. The Course of Study is intended to give thorough and 
practical instruction in the five departments, assisting to give a better under- 
standing of : 

1. Agriculture, theoretical and practical, stock-breeding, drainage and irri- 
gation, special crops, etc. 

2. Botany, including horticulture, market gardening, arboriculture, care 
of greenhouses, etc. 

3. Chemistry in its application to agriculture and the industries. Practice 
work in the laboratory. Geology and mineralogy, so far as relating to the 
composition of soils, mineral constituents, etc, 

4. Animal life, zoology, entomology, veterinary science, human anatomy 
and physiology. 

5. Mathematics and physics; including practical work in surveying, road- 
making, laying of tiles, etc. ; Meteorology in the relation of climate to crops, 
etc. 

MILITARY INSTRUCTION. Under the law by which the College 
was founded, instruction in military drill is required, and each student un- 
less physically debarred, drills under direction of a regular army officer three 
hours per week. 

ADVANTAGES. The facilities for instruction and illustration are of the 
best, and include a working library of 8000 volumes, properly classified and 
arranged ; the state collection of birds, insects, reptiles and rocks of Massa- 
chusetts; the Knowlton Herbarium of 10,000 species of named botanical 
specimens; the 1500 species and varieties of plants, types of the vegetable 
kingdom, cultivated in the Durfee plant bouse; the large collections and li- 
brary of Amherst College within easy access; a farm of 383 acres divided 
between the agricultural, horticultural and experimental departments, em- 
bracing every variety of soil, from meadow, pasturage and lowland, to 
swamp, hillside and woodland; a chemical laboratory, commodious and am- 
ply equipped, the State Agricultural Experiment Station upon the college 
farm, and the experiment station established under the provisions of the 
Hatch bill, offering splendid opportunities for observing the application of 
science to the problems of agriculture. 

Catalogues and further information can be obtained on application to the 
President. 

HENRY H. G00DELL, Amherst, Mass. 



Oct. 15. — Russell starts a moustache. 



College Album Manufacturers 

LARGEST IN THE UNITED STATES. 
Save manufactured for the following colleges almost without intermission : 

Amhersfc College, five years in succession; Brown University, eight years; 
Bowdoin College, seven years; Colby University, seven years; Dartmouth 
College, five years; Mass. State College, seven years; Maine State College, 
two years; Mass. School of Pharmacy, Trinity College, five years; Williams 
College, eight years; Wesleyan University, nine years; Tufts College, eight 
consecutive classes; Bates College, five classes; Boston University, six classes; 
School of Technology, four classes; Madison University, Wis., one class; 
Wellesley College, one class. 

P. S. — Sample circulars and all necessary information free of charge. 

J. G. ROBERTS & CO., - BOSTON. 

NO. 17 PROVINCE STREET. 



G. S. GATES, D. D. S.. 

Cutler's Block, AMHERST, MASS. 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 
OFFICE HOURS, 9 A. M. to 5 P. M. 



F. H. BUDDING & CO., 

Tailors and Importers. 

STUDENT WORK A SPECIALTY. 

AMHERST, - • MASS. 



Why was " Cope '' looking in a drain on June \bth. 



Mr. Hubbard. — How many kinds of hair lias a caff 



MASSACHUSETTS" "A GRiCULTURAL""COLLEGE!Q il 



BOTANICAL DEPARTMENT. 
AMHERST, MASS. 



We would inform the friends of the College, and the public generally, that 
we are prepared to supply 

Fruit and Ornamental Trees and Shrubs, Small Fruits 

and Plants, Cut Flowers and Designs, all true 

to name and at the Lowest Price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address 

Prof. S. T. MAYNARD, Amherst, Mass. 

CHARLES DEUEL, 

Druggist and Chemist 



IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS, FANCY 

AND TOILET ARTICLES, SPONGES, 

BRUSHES, Etc. 

Jlmlxerst JEToizse Unzg Store 

AMHERST, MASS. 

Two ; the hair on her back and her whiskers. 



tfov. l6.—Mtrrar has his hair cut. 



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iVcw. 24. — Simonds goes home sick. 




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* 






BOARD OF. EDITORS. 
6. A. 600DARD. Q, T. V. D. BARRY, Q. T, V. 



J. M, HERRERO, D. G. K. 
Artist 



W. E, TAFT, D. G. K, 
Editor-in-Chief. 



E. GREGORY, C, S. C. 

Business Manager. 



F. W, MOSSMAN, C, S. C. 



C, H. JONES, Q. T. V, 



Vol. XX. No. i. 



.•^^^s^ar-.- 



* TtfE jjWEX * 



Massachusetts Agricultural College, 



PUBLISHED BY if '@6, \ JUNIOR CLASS. 



*^^@^5*?-»- 



AMHERST, DECEMBER, 1888. 



Press of (i*>n : ;:ttc printing dTomuann, llortbamulon, |Hass. 
18S8. 




To ft^ose ^vl^o lo^e ±<erq±i|iscer|ces of Col- 
lege life, qi|cL -Wljo ^^e ir^ei'esfed ix| ifs 
pleqsqi'es, qs ^ell qs iq ifs dqfies, flje |:q- 
de:£ I'espeetfqlly dedicqfes ifs pqges. 




Editorial. 



IT is said that every year the Index grows poorer in quality. Perhaps 
the present issue will help confirm this opinion, yet we present this to 
the public hoping it may be found as nmch better as it is larger, than 
our immediate predecessors. 

Our labor has been arduous, with trials such as losing two members 
of our board in the midst of our work, but we shall feel amply repaid 
if our critics decide that the perusal of this, the twentieth volume of 
the Index has been one of pleasure and perhaps of profit. 

Our purpose has been to prepare a book containing something more 
than a mere compilation of facts, and in this endeavor we have made a 
few, perhaps radical, changes from previous issues, among which we may 
mention the simple style of cover we have adopted. It was thought 
more fitting to spend our time and money on the inside rather than to 
expend so much on a fanciful cover, to the beauty of which, but few 
would give a second thought. 

Our college has been unusually prosperous the past year, and has 
taken a long step in the front rank of Agricultural institutions. The 
faculty, with one exception, remains unchanged. Prof. Alvord, the for- 
mer Professor of Agriculture, resigned at the close of the winter term to 
accept the position of President of the Maryland Agricultural College. 
Ex-President Stockbridge kindly consented to take his chair until a new 
professor could be secured, and many have expressed the wish that he 
could be induced to remain permanently. 

During the first portion of the year, the instruction in Agriculture 
was necessarily much broken, but now all seem to feel that they have 
received so much valuable and practical information during the short 
time that Prof. Stockbridge has been instructor, that it is hard to be 
reconciled to the thought of having to change to a new professor in 
January. Prof. Brooks of the Agricultural College of Japan has been 
secured by the Trustees to take the position vacated by Prof. Alvord, 
and he is expected to assume his duties in January. 

(5) 



THE INDEX 



Many improvements have been made on the farm during the year, 
though the work has been much hindered by the lack of a permanent 
head. The land in the valley west of the campus has been cleared of 
stumps and seeded to grass, while the land on the border of the creek 
running through the farm, has been ploughed for the purpose of growing 
corn next season. A substantial wire fence has been built by the edge 
of the road on the western side of the farm and the land graded, giv- 
ing it a much more finished appearance. Under the efficient supervision 
of Mr. Wright the farm is fast approaching a state which may make it 
a model for all good farmers. 

Prof. Maynard is still filling our minds with horticultural knowledge 
and yet finds time to steadily improve the appearance of his department. 
W. M. Shepardson '88 now holds the position formerly held by S. B. 
Green, '79, who resigned, to become Prof, of Horticulture in the Minneso- 
ta Agricultural College. New varieties of fruit are constantly being add- 
ed and thoroughly tested as to their value. A new plant house has been 
built near the site of the old rose house, one part of which is to be 
devoted to experimental work under the direction of L. F. Kinney, '88, 
and the remainder to the general work of the department. 

Prof. Fern aid steadily holds us spell-bound as he discourses on the 
strange behavior of certain animals called Protoza. The only fault we 
find in relation to his department, is that we can only be instructed by 
him three hours a week, when we would all prefer a dozen. 

Uuder the direction of Prof. Wellington, we have been endeavoring 
to get the principles of mineralogy into our brains, though to many it 
seems as if they knew less and less about it each day. We could work 
to much better advantage in the "Lab" if we could have two hours a 
day for a part of the week instead of working one hour every day. We 
no sooner get fairly under way in our tests than we hear the sound of 
"Johns" No. 10 shoes as he crosses the "Gym." giving us warning that 
the bell is about to ring. 

With Prof. Warner's help, and by our many noble efforts at the end 
of each term, we have passed with honor (?) from Algebra through Sur- 
veying and are now "dissipating our energies" in attempting to under- 
stand the "composition of forces" which constitutes the wonderful sci- 
ence of Mechanics. 

Dr. Walker, our college pastor, is laboring hard to convince us that 
a knowledge of the art of Rhetoric should be the chief aim and end of 
man. Yet, thus far, it appears as if each man considered the calcula- 
tion of whether he was going to be so fortunate (?) as to be called upon 
to recite, a far more important consideration than the knowledge of the 
art itself. 



THE INDEX, 



Pres. G-oodell gives the two lower classes thorough instruction in the 
Latin and French languages as far as the limited time will allow, but it 
would seem of more use to the students if these languages could be drop- 
ped and a two years' course of study in the German language given in 
their place. 

At the beginning of this term an effort was made to give the stu- 
dents a better opportunity to obtain a knowledge of declamation and 
composition. Previous to this, each class has been under the instruction 
of four professors during their course, which has resulted in a confused 
jumbling of ideas without much benefit to any one. Prof. Lane now 
has charge of this department, and there is no doubt but what he will 
succeed in his attempt to raise the literaray standard of the college. 

The cadets under the command of Lieut. Sage are obtaining a fair 
idea of military science and tactics. They have had an opportunity this 
term to show their skill in drilling at the Belchertown and Springfield 
fairs. Most of the term has been devoted to company drill, no artillery 
nor mortar practice having been ordered. There is hardly the interest 
taken in drill that there should be. The majority go on drill with the 
feeling that the more "place rest" there is, and the sooner the drill is 
over, the better off tbey are. 

During the year Col. W. S. Clark's picture has been given to the 
College by some of the Alumni. The Trustees have also presented us with 
a complete collection of Japanese agricultural implements which will be 
brought here by Prof. Brooks. The old gymnasium is to be fitted up as 
an agricultural museum of which these tools will form the nucleus. 

The interest in athletics is not what it should be. Both the Base-ball 
and Foot-ball Associations have been well supported financially, but the 
students can hardly be induced to go out and practice as they should. 
They seem to think that the teams should win all the games played with very 
little or no practice. While this sort of feeling lasts, we must not expect 
our teams to do good work. If we cannot have a ball nine that will do 
better work than that of last year, we had better have none at all. The 
foot-ball team has done fairly well considering the number of men to 
choose from, but still it should do better. Tennis seems to be our most 
popular sport, and the four society courts are occupied the greater part of 
the time. 

At last it seems as though a start has been made towards having a 
good gymnasium. By subscriptions from the students and others, about 
two hundred dollars was raised, which is being expended for clubs, dumb 
bells, chest weights, etc. The drill hall has been sheathed, and heating 
apparatus put in, and it is expected that by the first of January, it will 
be in readiness for use. A great impetus would be given if the Alumni 



THE INDEX 



would start an Athletic fund, the income of which should be used in the 
interests of athletics in general. 

We welcome our proteges, the class of '92, as by far the largest that 
has entered the college for a number of years. If some of them were 
only sensible enough to realize that it is not necessaiy to be fresh, though 
they are Freshmen, it would be a great improvement. It seems to us 
that a mild amount of hazing might be a good thing for these, and it 
would hardly be injurious to some of the members of '91. 

Classmates : We have now completed the undertaking with which you 
have honored us, though the poor business manager is still growing thin 
at the thought of the bills he must collect. We have tried to prepare an 
Index that shall be remembered hereafter as a credit to our class, and 
now we lay aside our pens with feelings of both joy and sorrow that our 
editorial days are over. 



^# 



OFFICERS 



JVUsS- <^$rk;ultural Qolle^e. 



1888-89. 



w 



Board of Trustees. 



MEMBERS EX-OFFICIO. 

His Excellency, Gov. OLIVER AMES, President of the Corporation. 
HENRY H. GOO DELL, President of the College. 
JOHN W. DICKINSON, Secretary of the Board of Education. 
WILLIAM R. SESSIONS, Secretary of the State Board of Agriculture. 

MEMBERS BY ELECTION. 



DANIEL NEEDHAM, of Groton, 
JAMES DRAPER, of Worcester, . 
HENRY S. HYDE, of Springfield, 
PHINEAS STEDMAN, of Chicopee, . 
JAMES S. GRINNELL, of Greenfield, 
JOSEPH A. HARWOOD, of Littleton, 
WILLIAM H. BOWKER, of Boston, . 
ARTHUR A. BRIGHAM, of Marlboro', 
THOMAS P. ROOT, of Barre Plains, . 
J. HOWE DEMOND, of Northampton, 
FRANCIS H. APPLETON, of Lynfield, 
WILLIAM WHEELER, of Concord, . 
ELIJAH W. WOOD, of Newton, . 
GEORGE A. MARDEN, of Lowell, . 



Term expires 1889. 
1889. 
1890. 
1890 
1891. 
1891. 
1892. 
" 1892. 

1893. 
1893. 
1894. 
1894. 
1895. 
1895. 



(10) 



Committees. 



Committee on Finance and Buildings. 

DANIEL NEEDHAM, Chairman 

JAMES S. GRINNELL, HENRY COLT, 

J. HOWE DEMOND, GEORGE A. MARDEN. 

Committee on Course of Study and Faculty. 

THOMAS P. ROOT, Chairman. 

WILLIAM H. BOWKER, WILLIAM WHEELER, 

FRANCIS H. APPLETON, JOSEPH A. HARWOOD. 

Committee on Farm and Horticultural Departments. 

WILLIAM R. SESSIONS, Chairman. 

PHINEAS STEDMAN, ELIJAH W. WOOD, 

ARTHUR A. BRIGHAM, JAMES DRAPER. 

Committee on Experimental Department of the College. 

WILLIAM R. SESSIONS, Chairman. 

JAMES DRAPER, THOMAS P. ROOT, 

PHINEAS STEDMAN, J. HOWE DEMOND, 

ARTHUR A. BRIGHAM, FRANCIS H. APPLETON, 

ELIJAH W. WOOD. 

Vice-President of the Corporation. 
JAMES S. GRINNELL, of Greenfield. 

Secretary. 
WILLIAM R. SESSIONS, of Hampden. 

Treasurer. 
FRANK E. PAIGE, of Amherst. 

Auditor. 
HENRY S. HYDE, of Springfield. 

Board of Overseers. 
STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

Examining Committee of Overseers. 
ATKINSON C. VARNUM, of Lowell, 

HENRY S. WHITNEY, of West Tisbury, 

SAMUEL B. BIRD, of Framingham, 
JOEL H. GODDARD, of Barre, 

VELORUS TAFT, of Upton, 

GEORGE S. TAYLOR, of Chicopee Falls. 
(11) 




The Faculty. 



President, 

HENRY H. GOODELL, M. A., 

Professor of Modem Languages and English Literature. 

LEVI STOCKBRIDGE, 
Professor of Agriculture (Honorary). 

CHARLES A. GOESSMAN, Ph. D., 
Professor of Chemistry. 

SAMUEL T. MAYNARD, B. Sc, 
Professor of Botany and. Horticulture. 

CLARENCE D. WARNER. B. Sc, 

Professor of Mathematics and Physics. 

CHARLES WELLINGTON Ph. D., 

Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

CHARLES H. PERNALD, Ph. D.. 

Professor of Zoology and Lecturer on Veterinary Science. 

REV. CHARLES S. WALKER. Ph. D., College Pastor, 
Professor of Mental and Political Science. 

WILLIAM P. BROOKS. B. Sc, 
Professor of Agriculture. 

GEORGE E. SAGE, 1st Lieut. 5th Art., U. S. A., 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

PRANK E. PAIGE, 

Lecturer on Farm Law. 

JOHN W. LANE, M. A., 

Instructor in Elocution. 



Librarian. 

HENRY H. GOO DELL, M. A. 

(12) 



Boston University. 



University Council. 

WILLIAM P. WARREN, S. T. D., LL. D., 

President and Dean of the School of Theology. 

EDMUND H. BENNETT, LL. D., 
Dean of the School of Law. 

I. TISDALE TALBOT, M. D., 

Dean of the School of Medicine. 

BORDEN P. BOWNE, LL. D., 

Dean of the School of All Sciences. 

WILLIAM E. HUNTINGTON, Ph. D., 
Dean of the College of Liberal Arts. 

EBEN TOURJEE, Mus. D , 
Dean of the College of Music. 

HENRY H. GOODELL, A. M., 
President of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 



(13) 




(14) 



;TODEOTi 



Glass Oemmuniealions. 




(15) 



Senior Class. 

'89. 



OFFICERS. 

President. 
B. L. HARTWELL. 

Vice-President. 
J. T. HUTCHINGS. 



Secretary. 




T 


reasurer. 


C. S. CROCKER. 


H. 


E. 


WOODBURY. 


Captain. Historian. 




A. M. NOURSE. P. W. 


DAVIS. 






MEMBERS. 








Name. 


Residence. 






Room. 


Blair, James Roswell, 


Warren, 






10, N. C. 


Bliss, Clinton Edwin, 


Attleborough, 






7, S. C. 


Copeland, Arthur Davis, 


Campello, 






13, S. C. 


Crocker, Charles Stoughton, 


Sunderland, 






Home. 


Davis, Franklin Ware, 


Tam worth, N H. 






2, S. C. 


Hartwell, Burt Laws, 


Littleton, 






Boarding House. 


Hubbard, Dwight Lanson, 


Amhei-st, 






Home. 


Hutchings, James Tyler, 


Amherst, 






Mr. Dana's. 


Kellogg, William Adams, 


North Amherst, 






Home. 


Miles, Arthur Lincoln, 


Rutland, 






29, N. C. 


North, Mark Newell, 


Somerville, 






Tower. 


Nourse, Arthur Merriam, 


Westborough, 






25, N. C. 


Sellew, Robert Pease, 


East Longmeadow, 




1, S. C. 


Whitney, Charles Albion, 


Upton, 






Boarding House. 


Woodbury, Herbert Elwell, 


Gloucester, 
(16) 






25, N. C. 



8 9 . 



Class Colors —Cardinal and Dark Blue. 

Class Yell — Rah, Rah, Rah; Rah, Rah, Rah; Rah, Rah, Rah; '89. 

" Fly, envious Time, till thou run out thy race; 
Thy speed is like the fiery coursers pace." 

" And in their nightly watchful spheres, 
Lead in swift rounds the months and years." 

UvOW fast time flies! It seems but yesterday that, as Freshmen, we first 
*-L came to begin our college life amid new scenes and new surround- 
ings. 

Yet now, in the words of the old song: "As grave and reverend Seniors 
gaze we on the verdant past ;" and we realize that soon four of the pleasantest, 
and we hope most profitable, years of our lives will have gone by forever ; that 
soon the bright scenes and pleasant occupations of our college days will exist 
for us only as cherished memories of what we once enjoyed. 

Since we entered, our ranks have kept thinning, until but half our original 
number are left to graduate. We cannot but miss the absent ones, yet at the 
same time we would heartily wish them success. 

During the past year our time has been partly occupied by an investigation 
of Physical phenomena and electricity; but our experiments with the latter 
often had shocking results. 

With net in hand we have explored the country in search of new or strange 
Insects, with which to prove our knowledge of Entomology. 

Our proficiency in Chemistry is quite remarkable, as evinced by the won- 
derful reactions, and peculiar formulas we have been able to produce; while 
oar talent for understanding and solving deep and intricate Psychological 
problems, though as yet not completely developed, is never-the-less remarkable. 

It augurs well for the future of the college to see the numbers increasing as 
they do from year to yeai\ May they continue to increase until these buildings 
shall not suffice to contain them; and let each man as he pursues his course in 
college remember the advice of Sir Thomas Buxton to his sons, — "What you 
know, know thoroughly," and success will crown his efforts. 
3 (17) 



THE INDEX. 



lb is not without a feeling of sadness that we send our last communication 
to the Index; for in doing so we feel it is to say good-bye to old friends with 
whom we soon must part, perhaps never to meet again; but the memory of our 
pleasant associations will be with us always. 

And now, Classmates: Let us not be discouraged because our numbers are 
not as large as we had hoped to have in our last year. Let us rather emulate 
the worthy deeds of our ancestors, the little band of Pilgrims, who years ago 
landed on our coast where, " The breaking waves dashed high; " and, like them, 
make each obstacle only another incentive to push on, and we shall succeed 
at last. 

As upper classmen it devolves upon us to be leaders and mentors of the 
college in all its workings. May our example be such as can be safely followed, 
and may our remaining days here at college be so spent as best to fit us for the 
work that lies before us when we leave our Alma Mater; and let us bear 
in mind that as the world moves, so must we, or be left behind ; that there is 
always room (it the top ; and, that if we desire an open road to prosperity and 
happiness, we must make it ourselves. 

Our college duties soon must end. As the curtain falls and '89 retires from 
this stage of action, may hers be the welcome plaudit, " Well done." 

T>. 




Junior Class. 

90. 



OFFICERS. 

President. 

G. A. GODDARD. 

Vice-President. 
F. W. MOSSMAN. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 

J. S. WEST. 

Class Captain. Historian. 

A. C. McCLOUD. F. J. SMITH. 



Names. 
Barry, David 
Castro, Arthur de Moraese 
Dickinson, DwightWard 
DuBois, Cornelius Mcllvaine 
Felton, Truman Page 
Goddard, George Andrew 
Haskins, Henry Darwin 
Gregory, Edgar 
Herrero, Jose' Maria 
Jones, Charles Howland 
Loring, John Samuel 
McCloud, Albert Carpenter 
Mossman, Fred Way 
Russell, Henry Lincoln 
Simonds, George Bradley 
Smith, Fred Jason 
Stowe, Arthur Nelson 
Taft, Walter Edward 
Taylor, Fred Leon 
West, John Sherman 
Williams, Frank Oliver 



MEMBERS. 

Residences. 

Southwick, 

Juiz de Fora Minas, Brazil, 

Amherst, 

Keen Valley, K Y., 

Berlin, 

Turners Falls, 

North Amherst, 

Marblehead, 

Jovellanos, Cuba, 

Downer's Grove, 111., 

Shrewsbury, 

Amherst, 

Westminster, 

Sunderland, 

Ashby, 

Had ley, 

Hiidson, 

Dedham, 

North Amherst, 

Belchertown, 

Sunderland, 

a 9) 



Rooms. 

6, N. C. 

Tower. 

Home. 

1, S. C. 

Plant House. 

Mrs. Baker's. 

Home. 

9, N. C. 

Tower. 

Mrs. Howland's. 

5, N. C 

Home. 

Prof. Brooks'. 

S, N. C. 

Boarding House. 

21, N. C. 

22, N. C. 
5, N. C. 

Home. 
21, N. C. 
12, N. C. 



90. 



Class Coloks— Navy Blue and Old Gold. 

Class Yell— Ching, Chang, Chong; Ching, Chang, Chong; Ra, Ra, Ra; 

Ra, Ra, Ra; '90. 

TT CAIN the time has come for the the class of '90 to send its greet- 
@s 1 ing to the readers of the Index, but now, having reached the age 
of Juniors, we cannot appear as in former times when we were full of 
stratagems so characteristic of the lower classes. 

So far upon our College course our experience has been wide and vari- 
ed, each year bringing forth new elements with which to test our ability. 

Yet many members of the class who entered are not now with us, death 
has taken one, others are engaged in their pursuits for life, and only one 
has joined us from the class lower. 

We sincerely regret the loss of '88 and their kind advice always given 
for our benefit. 

Many pleasant memorials recall to us past associations with them. 
Knowing we had many friends in '88, we heartily wish them prosperity in 
whatever profession of life they may follow. 

Notwithstanding our losses, we have a bright side to our history. We 
are now the next to the largest class in College, and a well-organized class 
it is. Experience has taaght us that in order to accomplish our purposes, 
we must work together, and this unity is only gained by placing the great- 
est confidence in each; then we can accomplish wonderful results. 

In the class-room our instructors have, without doubt, realized our effi- 
ciency in the sciences, after having faithfully studied the laws which govern 
the universe or establishing by calculus the distance from earth to infinity, 
as well as other hidden secrets of nature that have proved worthy of our 
investigation. 

Many of our men have taken a lively interest in the athletics of the 
College and have occupied very prominent positions, but we hope more 
interest will be taken yet, as there is much room for improvement. 

In our class games we won a good score from '89 in base-ball, but did 
not succeel so well in foot-ball, although we are well satisfied with the 

(20) 



THE INDEX. 



21 



result. Our base-ball game with '91 was lost through the absence of some 
of our best players. 

Now that we have a gymnasium there should be more ball players 
among us, for a gymnasium affords an excellent training for all our ath- 
letic sports. 

Among the many improvements which have been made this term is the 
establishing an observatory on the top of South College tower, thus giving 
the Juniors an excellent opportunity for star-gazing, saving them the 
trouble of going down town. 

By permission of the President, we celebrated Arbor Day by setting 
two very choice trees between North and South College, replacing those set 
by '72, for the reason that their trees had grown very irregular and injured 
the beauty of the College grounds. 

Classmates: Two very important years of our life have passed, and we 
have entered far upon our third year, soon our College life will end. Amid 
the scenes of reflections let us see wherein our mistakes have been made, 
that by so doing we may correct our future by the experience of the past 
and spend the rest of our College days with profit to ourselves, our friends 
and those who follow after us. S. 




Lv% EnkC» Boston 



Sophomore Class. 
'91. 



OFFICERS. 

President. 
A. M. BELDEN. 

Vice-President. 
H. T. SHORES. 



Secretary. 




Treasurer. 


M. RUGGLES. 




J. B. 


HULL. 


Historian. 


Captain. 




W. W. GAY. 


A. M. BE 


ILDEN. 






MEMBERS. 




Names. 


Residences. 




Rooms. 


Arnold, Frank Luman 


Belchertown, 




21, N. C. 


Belden, Allen Montgomery- 


East Whately, 




7, S. C. 


Brown, Walter Augustus 


Feeding Hills, 




Mrs. Baker's. 


Carpenter, Malcolm Austin 


Leyden, 




28, N. C. 


Eames, Aldice Gould 


North Wilmington, 




13, N. C. 


Eaton, Henry Newell 


South Sudbury, 




32, N. C. 


Field, Henry John 


Leverett, 




Home. 


Gay, Williard Weston 


Georgetown, 




2, N. C. 


Gorham, Frederick Seeley 


Westport, Conn., 




14, S. C. 


Horner, Louis Fred 


Newton Heights, 




28, N. C. 


Hull, John Byron 


Stockbridge, 




12, S. C. 


Johnson, Charles Henry 


Prescott, 




6, S. C. 


Lage, Oscar Vidal Barboza 


Juiz de Fora Minas, 


Brazil, 


7, S. C. 


Legate, Howard Newton 


Sunderland, 




Home. 


Lindsey, Ernest 


Marblehead, 




15, S. C. 


Paige, Walter Cary 


Amherst, 




Home. 


Phillips, John Edward 


Brooklyn, Conn., 




12, S. C. 


Ruggles, Murray 


Milton 




6, S. C. 


Sawyer, Arthur Henry 


Sterling, 




3, S. C. 


Shores, Harry Towle 


West Bridgewater, 




13, S. C. 


Tuttle, Harry Fessenden 


Jamaica Plains, 
v22) 




14, S. C. 



9i. 



Class Colors— Peacock Blue and Old Gold. 
Class Yell— Wah hoo, Wah hoo, Wah hoo, Wall: Zip boom bah: '91. 

J I T HE thought arises as we send this, our second, communication to the 
i- Index, how rapidly our Freshman days have glided by, bringing us 
around to the enviable position of Sophomores, which is always looked for- 
ward to with interest by the Freshmen. 

The feelings with which we came back to College this year are entirely 
different from what we experienced last year at this time, for our Fresh- 
man shyness has passed away and more confidence in ourselves has been 
aroused, causing us to feel that we are indispensable to the institution. One 
must not for a moment think we intended to be conceited, as there can be 
no such trait of character attributed to us, for the Class of '91 is not char- 
acterized by that overwhelming sense of importance common to the pre- 
ceding Sophomore classes; but, on the contrary, has attained a great degree 
of (gravity), of which kind it is not necessary to (specify). 

Ten of those who entered with us upon the trials and vicissitudes of the 
Freshman year have not returned, and as the class was a small one, their 
loss is keenly felt; but their loss is partially made up by the addition of 
four new members. It is hoped that those remaining have the determina- 
tion to finish their course and graduate with the honor due to '91. 

In regard to our intellectual development there is but little to say, 
except that we certainly have had the chance to broaden our mental facul- 
ties if we so desired, and without doubt the opportunity has been embraced 
by every one, so that there has been quite a perceptible addition to our 
store of knowledge; and now as we come into our Sophomore year there 
should be a closer application to work, as we find the studies more difficult, 
and therefore requiring more time and thought. 

In athletics, '91 has been prominent in furnishing men for the College 
foot-ball and base-ball teams, and although not having had the experience 
which comes from three years' practice, as the upper classmen have, yet 
they take hold with a proficiency which does credit to them and their class. 

The subject of athletics is coming to be one of great importance in the 

(23) 



£4 



THE INDEX 



College, and it is absolutely necessary to have the sympathy of every 
student to ensure success in this matter, and it depends upon us in a large 
measure to promote this interest. 

The ins and outs of College life have been learned with a proficiency 
quite excelling anything in the line of our regular studies, and we can now 
converse with the Juniors when they speak of going to see their cousins at 
Hamp. or Hadley. 

We would like to ask the Freshmen if they are waiting for their men 
to grow in order that they may be strong enough to have a rope-pull ? If 
so we would advise them to try Dr. Barrows' Phosphate, as that is good for 
young and growing bones, and perhaps they will be strong enough by their 
Junior year. 

Now, Class of '91, gather around while we renew the hopes and ambitions 
with which we started out so resolutely upon our College course, and may 
we realize more fully the possibilities which lie before, the chances that we 
have here to make the most of ourselves. We have now fairly started in 
upon our course, and all that is necessary is diligence to obtain what is 
more valuable than gold or silver, and that is a cultivated mind. G. 




Freshman Class. 



Secretary. 
B. SEDGWICK. 



92. 



OFFICERS. 

President. 
C. A. MAGILL. 

Vice-President. 
G. B. WILLARD. 



Treasurer. 
H. C. CRANE. 



Historian. 
H. F. STONE. 



Captain. 
A. R. WOOD. 



MEMBERS. 



Names. 
Bardin, James Edgar 
Boynton, Walter 
Chamberlain, Pierce Annesley 
Clark, Edward Thornton 
Condit, Charles De Hart 
Crane, Henry Everett 
Davidson, Royal Page 
Deuel, James Edward 
Emerson, Henry Bennett 
Faneuf, Arthur Gelis 
Parrar, Frederick Allen 
4 



Residences. 
Dalton, 

North Amherst, 
Sao Paulo, Brazil, 
Granby, 

Troy Hill, N. J., 
Weymouth, 
Highland Park, 111., 
Amherst, 
Gloucester, 
Amherst, 
Ware, 
(25) 



Rooms. 

18, S. C. 

Home. 

8, S. C. 

9, N. C. 
13, N. C. 
17, S. C. 

Mr. Bangs'. 

Home. 

9, S. C. 

Mr. Canavan's. 

Mrs. Gilbert's, 



26 



THE INDEX 



Field, Judson Leon 

Fletcher, William 

Goldthwait, William Johnson, Jr. 

Graham, Charles Sumner 

Haley, George Williams 

Hoar, Thomas 

Holland, Edward Bertram 

Howard, Henry Merton 

Hubbard, Cyrus Moses 

Hull, Henry Banks 

Lyman, Richard Pope 

McDonald, Frederick John 

Magill, Claude Albion 

Nauss, Charles Strum 

Rogers, Elliot 

Saville, James Richardson 

Sedgwick, Benjamin 

Smith, Robert Hybe 

Stockbridge, Francis Granger 

Stone, Harlan Fisk 

Taylor, George Everett 

Thompson, Henry Mardin 

Tyng, George McAlpine, 

Tyng, Charles 

Weed, Wallace Dana 

West, Homer Cady 

W ilia id, George Bartlett 

Williams, Milton Hubbard 

Wood, Augustus Roswell 



Leverett, 


Home. 


Chelmsford, 


15, S. C. 


Marblehead, 


16, S. C. 


Holden, 


29, N. C. 


Stonington, Conn., 


10, N. C. 


Amherst, 


Home. 


Amherst, 


Home. 


Franklin, 


17, S. C. 


Sunderland, 


12, N. C. 


Hampstead, 


5, S. C. 


Boston, 


11, S. C. 


Glenaladaly, P. E. Island, 


16, S. C. 


Amherst, 


Home. 


Gloucester, 


9, S. C. 


Boston, 


2, S. C. 


Rockport, 


Frank Wood's. 


Cornwall Hollow, Conn., 


18, S. C. 


Shelborn, 


Home. 


Northfleld, 


8, S. C. 


Amherst, 


Home. 


North Amherst, 


Home. 


Monterey, 


32, N. C. 


Victoria, Texas, 


10, S. C. 


Victoria, Texas, 


10, S. C. 


Marblehead, 


11, s. c. 


Belchertown, 


23, N. C. 


Waltham, 


4, S. C. 


Sunderland, 


12, N. C. 


Centre Village, 


3, S. C. 




92. 



Class Colors. — Maroon and Yellow. 
Class Yell.— Badger '92. 

IN submitting an article for the Index to the public gaze, we beg that 
in her criticisms it may be remembered that this is our iirst con- 
tribution to the pages of the Index and that we have not as yet, the 
experience in this form of journalism which comes only by familiarity 
with the work. 

The class of '92 is one of the largest which has entered the college 
for several years. This seems not only to be indicative of the value of 
the class to the college, but to show the gradually increasing interest 
which the public is taking in the institution. Many members of the 
class are taking a lively interest in athletic sports and we have succeed- 
ed in organizing a very fair foot ball team which in the class game 
played a better game against the sophomores than has any freshman 
eleven for several years. 

There is an excellent prospect for a good base ball team in the spring, 
and we have plenty of good material to put at work in that direction. 

The rope pull is, as yet, a matter of conjecture. It is hoped, how- 
ever, that '91 will in time gain sufficient backbone to pull us on equal 
terms, and should that time arrive, we shall be happy to return the 
compliment, and do all we can to make the contest interesting. 

The sophomore class which last year lacked, (as a '90 man remarked) ; 
the silica to take part in a rush, seemed to have gained a little of the re- 
quisite matter this year, but when they had been distributed over the hall 
and the walk one morning after chapel, the silicious materials seemed to 
leak out of their boot heels, and such a thing as a rush hasn't been heard 
of since. 

But of greater importance than these minor affairs of college life, is the 
fact that we now stand at the threshold of one of the most important 

(27; 



28 



THE INDEX 



epochs of our lives. It is here that many of us will finish our education, 
and complete the final preparations for life's struggles. As we stand at 
the beginning of this period of such infinite worth not only to us, but to 
our friends and associates in future life, may we be impressed with its val- 
ue and enter faithfully and energetically into the duties as well as the 
pleasures of college life, with the hope that four years hence we may grad- 
uate a goodly number, whose careers in after life shall not only be an hon- 
or to the M. A. C, but shall give credit to ourselves, s. 




"^•Co Boston 



The Christian Gentleman. 



The art of pleasing is essential to success in life. Without it the 
highest worth is defrauded of its rightful glory, and real merit is rob- 
bed of its power. By means of it the man of moderate ability multi- 
plies his influence a thousand fold ; the man of genius cannot do without 
it. 

Of this art every young man should make himself master. A sancti- 
fied art of pleasing is the substance of the golden rule, and is that 
which makes godliness profitable for this life, as well as for the world to 
come. Simon Stylites on the top of his pillar, disgusting men with his 
agonizing corruption is not the representative character of our religion ; 
but Jesus Christ, going about among men exerting himself to please. 

In what does the art of pleasing consist, and how may it be acquir- 
ed ? This question may best be answered by presenting for our contem- 
plation a sketch of the Christian gentleman. 

The disposition of the Christian gentleman is good will to men. He 
has a benevolent heart. He loves his neighbor as himself, and is pos- 
sessed of a genuine desire to please. A true simplicity is his. He is 
free from a propensity to cunning or stratagem. He will have nothing 
to do with those base and deceitful arts with which the man of the 
world steals the hearts of the confiding. He hates duplicity. He is al- 
ways sincere. Whatever may be his rank or station, however great may 
be his wealth and worth, he is neither proud nor arrogant. The lowly 
man may approach him with ease and feel at home in his presence. He 
is no egotist. Unconsciousness of self is one of his most beautiful traits. 
He thinks and cares for others, sympathizing with them and looking at 
things from their point of view. 

The manners of the Christian gentleman are such as become his real 
character. They are a part of himself. They are natural, the outward 
manifestation of the man. He understands that he ought to seem to be 

(29) 



SO THE INDEX. 



what he is. He knows that it is just as bad, if not worse, for one who 
is a real gentleman to disguise himself in the manners of a boor, as it 
is for the clown to assume the manners of a gentleman. So he makes it 
his study to give the best possible expression to what he is. The Christ- 
ian gentleman proclaims himself by the carriage of his body, by the 
glance of his eye, by the varied expression of the face, by the motion 
of his head, by the grasp of his hand, by his walk, by the intonation of 
his voice, and by a thousand other movements which defy analysis; his 
manners are themselves a song, a poem, eloquence. 

The Christian gentleman pays proper attention to dress; "the apparel 
oft proclaims the man." You can tell a coxcomb as far as you can see 
him ; he is a man who has degraded God's image into an effigy on which 
to exhibit fine clothes. The Christian gentleman feels himself to be of 
more importance than his wardrobe. The dress is subordinated to the 
man and not the man to the garment. Neither warmth, nor comfort, nor 
convenience, nor beauty is sacrificed to fashion, or cost or vanity. His 
great aim is to so arrange his dress as to make himself and others forget 
it entirely. He does not dress extravagantly, for that would excite envy. 
He does not dress shabbily, for that would call forth pity. He avoids 
everything grotesque. He dresses with perfect taste. Above all things 
he avoids whatever is a sham. He wears no paste for diamonds. His 
dress is as simple, as honest, as beautiful as his manners and his character. 

The Christian gentleman is known by his conversation. He despises 
gossip and hates slander. His speech is pure ; he tells no story and ut- 
ters no word that he would blush to have understood by the most 
chaste. He deems it ungentlemanly, as well as wicked, to emphasize 
his talk with profane oaths. He respects the feelings of others too much 
to speak lightly of Jesus Christ, or God, whom the Christian loves better 
than the dearest friend or the nearest relative. He speaks his native lan- 
guage in its purity. He avoids slang ; for be knows that false syntax, 
mixed idioms, the prostitution of sublime words to mean uses and slang 
phrases, betray want of culture, and vulgarity in spite of all disguises ; 
that they frequently indicate a lack of moral character. The conversa- 
tion of the Christian gentleman is truthful. He never utters for any 
purpose a falsehood. He would not lie to escape any difficulty, or to se- 
cure any reward or emolument. He guards against exaggeration and 
careless errors. He speaks always with authority, for his declarations 
may always be relied upon. His conversation never degenerates into an- 
gry disputation. He is free also from that overbearing dogmatism which 
mars the character of so many men of real talent. At once instructive 
and entertaining, with no assumption of airs, he teaches you as though 
he taught you not. He interests himself in those things which interest 



THfi iNDtiX 



31 



you. He discovers your best thoughts and gives to them beautiful ex- 
pression. He excites those emotions of your heart which please you, and 
then shares your enjoyment. And, if perchance, he strike a tender chord 
that reminds you of your grief, he heals the wound with his genuine 
sympathy. He strengthens your good resolutions with new motives that 
you had not discovered. Avoiding base ridicule and biting ssrcasm, he 
cheers you with his genial humor and banishes gloom with his sparkling 
wit. 

The Christian gentleman is welcome wherever he goes, for at the head 
of the table, or the center of the drawing-room, he is the life of the 
company, and the joy of the social circle. He is recognized and loved 
wherever seen. All men delight to honor him. If one, then, would make 
himself master of the art of pleasing, he should take the Christian gen- 
tleman for his ideal, and strive earnestly to attain to his perfect realiza- 
tion of the golden rule. c. s. w. 





\))C EnG- Co- Boston 




(B4) 



D. G. K. 



Aleph Chapter, 1869, D. G. K. 

Incorporated, 1886. 



C. S. Crocker, 



SENIORS. 
A. D. Copeland, 



C. E. Bliss. 



A. de M. e Castro, 

W. E. Taft, 



JUNIORS. 

J. M. Herrero, H. L. Russell, 

J. S. Loring. 



A. M. Belden, 
W. C. Paige, 
H. T. Shores, 
J. E. Phillips, 
F. S. Gorham, 



R. P. Davidson, 

B. Sedgwick, 

C. Tyng, 



SOPHOMORES. 



O. V. B. Lage. 
FRESHMEN. 



W. J. Goldthwait, Jr. 
(35) 



J. B. Hull, Jr., 
W. W. Gay, 
H. F. Tuttle, 
H. N. Legate, 
C. H. Johnson, 



F. G. Stockbridge, 
J. E. Bardin, 
F. J. MacDonald, 




(36) 



Q. T. V. 



Amlierst Chapter. 



Founded in 1869. 



SENIORS. 
J. R. Blair, M. N. North. 

JUNIORS. 



D. W. Dickinson, 
H. D. Haskins, 
C. H. Jones, 
A. C. McCloud, 
A. N. Stowe, 



F. L. Arnold, 



W. Boynton, 

P. A. Chamberlain, 

J. E. Deuel, 

J. L. Field, 

G. W. Haley, 



F. O. Williams. 

SOPHOMORES. 
A. H. Sawyer, 

FRESHMEN. 



F. N. Taylor, 

G. A. Goddard, 
F. J. Smith, 

J. S. West, 
David Barry, 



H. J. Field. 



G. E. Taylor, 
H. C. West, 
M. H. Williams, 
A. R. Wood, 
R. P. Lyman, 



C. M. Hubbard. 



(37) 



Phi Sigma Kappa. 



Pi Chapter. 



SENIORS. 

P. W. Davis, J. T. Hutchings, 

W. A. Kellogg, R. P. Sellew. 

JUNIOR. 
C. M DuBois. 

SOPHOMORE. 
A. G. Eames. 

FRESHMEN. 
G. B. Willard, G. R. Tyng, H. B. Hull. 



(39) 



What of the College ? 



7~j S in the varied departments of the world's work agricultural industry 
®fi is the basis on which all else rests, and the existence of which makes 
all else profitable and even possible, so in the College of Agriculture, sci- 
ence, culture and discipline are but the accessories in securing the end for 
which such an institution is endowed and conducted, and but for which it 
could have no standing before the public. 

The standard by which the Agricultural College is to be measured, by 
which it is to be finally judged as a success or failure, is not the rank it 
may secure among our older educational institutions, but by its influence in 
elevating the industry of agriculture and increasing its products, through 
the men it educates as students, and the principles affecting plant growth 
which its officers may discover, elucidate and make public property. There- 
fore its system of instruction, its curriculum, however comprehensive and 
extended, has one main, final object in view, and that is to make the edu- 
cation, culture and discipline it gives a practical industrial force, and its 
farms, farm crops and stock, its conservatories, nurseries and fruiteries, its 
laboratories, cabinets, apparatus and libraries are only the means for secur- 
ing the desired end. 

It is believed that the Trustees of our College, when accepting the great 
trust committed to them, fully understood and appreciated its intent, and 
that through good and evil report, when assailed by enemies from without 
and injudicious friends within, when hindered and thwarted in their efforts 
by want of pecuniary means, and when supported by legislative favor or 
private aid, have, without swerving or hesitation, kept that intent in view 
as their guiding star, and in this course have been ably supported by their 
faculty corps. 

It is a little more than twenty-one years since our doors were first 
opened for the admission of students, nineteen years since agricultural 
investigations were fairly inaugurated, and seventeen years since the grad- 
uation of the first class. 

(40) 



THE INDEX. 41 



Results ai - e now apparent, and our Trustees could with pride and satis- 
faction give an account of their stewardship. 

Since 1868 there has been no advance in agricultural science, no positive 
discovery of principles in any department of agricultural effort, no demon- 
stration of improved methods to secure the advantage of natural law, no 
effort made to elevate the farmer and secure him from fraud on the right 
hand and on the left, but what the College has led the way or been an 
active co-worker, until at the present time, by general consent, it is the 
ai-biter of contested questions of science and practice. 

The number of students who have pursued the full curriculum course 
and received the State diploma is 288, and the specials who have taken the 
agricultural course 470. making a total of 758 who have here received 
preparation for their field of labor. A large proportion of these men are 
now engaged in their life work. This is quite varied, but it is overwhelm- 
ingly agricultural. Forty per cent, are engaged in practical agriculture, 
and a very large number in pursuits intimately connected therewith. Many 
are teachers of the science and practice of agriculture in tbe field and in 
the younger agricultural colleges in all parts of our own country and in 
foreign lands, while many others are officers in the experiment stations of 
the different States. 

In one season of financial distress the College farm in its improvement 
has been the greatest sufferer, yet there has been a steady advance. 

The grass fields, which in 1868 produced barely 100 tons of hay, have 
the present year yielded 300 tons. The pasture lands nave increased their 
feed in the same proportion, and the same may be said of the other farm 
crops. 

The botanical, horticultural and floral department, which had no exist- 
ence in 1868, has grown to large proportions. By the introduction, im- 
provement, propagation and dissemination of sbrubs, fruit and flowers, it 
has given a great movement in this direction over a wide extent of 
country, improving the tastes and beautifying the homes of our people. 

The College has become an acknowledged power for usefulness in other 
directions, though strictly attentive to the prime object of its organization, 
and these results it is believed are but the precursor of still greater ones 
which the future will unfold. S. 



A Chemical Analysis. 



Blair: 

Possessions — Five feet tail in his boots. 

Business — Raising (Hal — y). 

Future — Populating Warren. 
Usual Expression — There's a girl. 
Common Name — Jimmy. 

Brown: 

Possessions — A doll's face. 

Business — Instructing his seniors. 

Future — Ballet dancing. 
Usual Expression — By the great horn spoon ! 
Common Name — Towhead. 

Copeland: 

Possessions — A mosquito netting. 

Business — Tucking himself under it. 

Future — Taking care of babies. 
Usual Expression — Hang it! 
Common Name — Cope. 

Davis: 

Possessions — A wind pipe. 
Business — Treading on eggs. 
Future — Hand-organ and monkey. 
Usual Expression — Chestnuts! 
Common Name — Chestnut Davy. 
(42) 



THE INDEX. 43 



Eames: 

Possessions— Great freshness. 

Business — Eating. 

Future — Warm climate, according to his hair. 
Usual Expression — Don't say anything about freshness. 
Common Name— Kizer. 

Holland: 

Possessions — A green smile, 

Business — Hand raising. 

Future — Mormon elder. 
Usual Expression — Forty 'leven gumption cute. 
Common Name — Tutti Frutti. 

Hull, '92: 

Possessions — Wash bowl and pitcher. 

Business — Not using them. 

Future — To lie abed. 
Usual Expression — Darn it ! 
Common Name — Sleepy. 

Loring : 

Possessions — Corn-cob pipe and three feet of rubber tubing 

Business — Hunting English (sparrows). 

Future — A wife and ten girls. 
Usual Expression — By George! 
Common Name — Jack. 

Mills : 

Possessions — A heavenly smile. 

Business — Preaching. 

Future — Behind him. 
Usual Expression — I say ! 
Common Name — Dock. 

North : 

Possessions — A horse's laugh. 

Business — Showing Lieut, his excuse from drilling. 

Future — Getting married. 
Usual Expression — Gee whitaker! 
Common Name — Alias Pete. 



44 THE INDEX. 



Russell: 

Possessions — Plants. 
Business — Killing Jones. 
Future — Professor of Agr. 
Usual Expression — Dumit! 

Sellew : 

Possessions — Pipes. 
Business — Raising whiskers. 
Future — Telling what he used to do. 
Usual Expression — By gosh ! 
Common Name — Bob. 

Stowe: 

Possessions — Freshness and a cane. 
Business — Carrying a cane. 
Future — To carry a cane. 
Usual Expression — I have a cane ! 
Common Name — A. N. IStowe. 

Tuttle: 

Possessions — A terrible gaul. 

Business — Eating macaroni. 

Future — A long ways off. 
Usual Expression — By gee ! 
Common Name — Tutsey. 

West, '90: 

Possessions — A. Prince Albert. 
Business — Bargaining with Freshmen. 
Future — Wheeling brimstone. 
Usual Expression— Oh ! my ! 
Common Name — Johnny. 

Whitney: 

Possessions —Agricultural reports. 

Business — Selling them to Freshmen. 

Future — Ward politician. 
Usual Expression — Oh! you mustn't! 
Common Name — Chawles. 



The College Herd. 



] I [ HIS herd consists of forty-seven animals all told, representing five dif- 
1 ferent herds— Holstein, Freisians, Jerseys, Devons, Guernseys and Ayr- 
shires. Only the most prominent animals will here receive special mention. 
The Holstein Bull, Pledge's Empire, two years and eight months old the 
10th of November, is a very promising creature ; sired by Empire 588, he 
by Billy Boelyn 189, and out of Empress 339. Billy Boelyn won seventeen 
first prizes, and sold for $10,000. Sire's Dam, Empress, has a record of giv- 
ing 19,714 pounds 14 ounces of milk in one year, a trifle over 54 pounds per 
day, as an average for the whole year. 

Dam, Pledge 1,506 H. H. B., during the past summer has given the largest 
yield of milk on record in the world. During July and August she gave a 
total of 6,105>£ pounds, an average of over 98 pounds per day. For 36 con- 
secutive days, from July 6 to August 10, she gave 3,601% pounds, or a trifle 
over 100 pounds per day. The largest yield for any one day was 110)^ 
pounds, July 31st. During this time she ran at large in a pasture where 
there was plenty of good feed and drinking water from a stream that ran 
through the lot. No additional food was given her except 16 quarts of 
grain per day up to July 19th ; from then on 20 quarts. Grain fed dry and 
mixed in the following proportions: 4-9 ground oats, 4-9 coarse middlings, 
1-9 corn meal. Occasionally a little oil cake was fed with the grain. Pledge 
is seven years old, sired by Billy Boelyn, and out of Plenty 542. 

Among the Jerseys is Edithson, 8,948 A. J. C. C, six years old ; sired by 
Ramapo 4,679, who took the double gold medal at the New York State 
Fair in 1885. Dam, Lass Edith 6,290, half Alphea blood. She has a record 
of 17 pounds 8 ounces of butter in seven days, after second calf. Sire's dam, 
Eurotas, has a record of 22 pounds 7 ounces butter in seven days, and 778 
pounds in eleven months. 

There is nothing to attract attention among the Devons, except, per- 
haps, the size of Bull Senator. He weighs just one ton. 

Among the Guernseys the chief attraction is Fanny 410, aged 10 years. 
Sire and Dam both on the Island of Guernsey. She has a record of 16)^ 
pounds butter in seven successive days, on feed from an average pasture, 
with two quarts of corn meal per day. She has won two silver medals, be- 
sides taking first and second premiums at different State and County fairs. 
During the past summer it was estimated that four quarts of her milk 
would produce one quart of cream, she having no feed except what she 
could get from an ordinary pasture. 

There is nothing worthy of special mention among the Ayrshires. 

(45) 



Meteor olgical. 



A Brief Outline of the Work to be Conducted by Prof. 
C. D. Warner at Mass. Agricultural College. 



TT7 HE extreme top of the tower of South College has been removed, and a 
-L platform 10-4 square substituted. The room immediately beneath, 
which heretofore was used only as a store-room occasionally, has been finished 
off, and is to contain the instruments to be used in this work. This observatory 
is patterned after the general plan of the one at Central Park, New York, con- 
ducted by Dr. Daniel Draper, though, of course, on a much less elaborate plan. 
The following instruments will be used; made and patented by said Dr. Draper: 
Draper's Self -Recording Thermometer, which will give a permanent and con- 
tinuous record of the temperature at all times; Draper's Sun Thermometer, 
registering the amount of sun-light ; Draper's Self -Recording Mercurial Bar- 
ometer; Draper's Direction of Wind, Velocity of Wind, Force of Wind and 
Rain Guage. Space will not permit of a description of these instruments. 
Suffice it to say they are the best obtainable. 

As far as possible, a complete record of all meteorological phenomena will 
be kept. The temperature and pressure of atmosphere, quantity of sun-light, 
direction, velocity and force of wind, amount of rain-fall and depth of snow 
will be noted. All electrical phenomena, quantity of electricity in the atmos- 
phere, magnetic disturbances, and the general appearance of the heavens will 
be recorded. 

Daily, weekly and monthly records will be kept, bound and placed among 
the archives of the station for future reference. 

Especial attention will be given to the subject of dews, which is occupying 
so much attention at present. Various experiments will be tried in connection 
with this subject. 

The reason why we have so many late, cold, north winds some springs, and 
not others, will be looked into. Also the causes of various disturbances of 
the atmosphere — for instance, the turning of a storm from the track in which 
it started, compelling it to travel in an entirely different direction from that in 
which it moved at the outset, will be investigated, and brought to light as far 
as possible. 

(46) 



Class Poem. 



CLASSMATES, almost three years we've spent 
In our pursuit of knowledge, 
And only one more year is left 
Before we're done with College. 

And as we pass without these doors 

Into our work of life, 
Let us all try to fit ourselves 

To the burden of the strife. 

Each man must fashion his own life ; 

We'll find it always so, 
But if each one will help himself 

The Lord will help, we know. 

We'll scatter over all the world, 

In many different lands, 
While some among us may be known 

In undertakings grand. 

Some will go North and some go South, 

Yet no one can foresee 
But what he'll soon be called upon 

To dwell in eternity. 

Then let us act from day to day 

With purpose clear and wise, 
So when this fleeting life is done 

We'll meet above the skies. 
(47) 



Not Lost, But Gone Before. 



^ TT7HE marriage choice of others is the inscrutable puzzle of those 
1 who have no eye for the fact that such choice is the great 
match of cajolery between purpose and invisible hazard, with the 
blessedness of many lives for stake, as intention happens to cheat acci- 
dent or to be cheated by it." 

Charles F. Coburn (78), 2d November, 1887, to Fanny Lane, at 
Nashua, N. H. 

Joseph L. Hills ('81), 11th September, 1888, to Kate E. Conover, at 
New Brunswick, N. J. 

Austin Peters ('81), 20th October, 1888, to Frances H. Lee, at Jamaica 
Plain. 

Joseph B. Lindsey ('83), 20th June, 18S8, to Fanny H. Dickinson, at 
Amherst. 

Osgan H. Ateshian ('86), 12th June, 1888, to Leila E. Dewey, at Cam- 
bridge. 

Frederick H. Fowler ('87), 21st June, 1888, to Martha Scott, at North 
Hadley. 

Edward R. Flint ('87), 26th November, 1884, to Maude Hatch, at 
Keene, N. H. 



(48) 



JNon §eepei §0eielies. 



(49) 



College Shakesperian Club. 

Organized September 20, 1879. 



Secretary. 
E. P. FELT. 

C. A. WHITNEY, 



B. L. Hartwell, 

D. L. Hubbard, 
A. L. Miles, 

T. P. Felton, 

E. Gregory, 

E. P. Felt, 
L. F. Horner, 

H. N. Eaton, 



H. E. Crane, 



OFFICERS. 

President. 
B. L. HARTWELL. 

Vice-President. 
H. E. WOODBURY. 



Directors. 
M. RUGGLES. 

MEMBERS. 
Seniors. 



Juniors, 
Sophomores. 

M. Ruggles. 
Freshmen. 

(50) 



Treasurer. 
L. F. HORNER. 

F. W. MOSSMAN. 



C. A. Whitney, 
A. M. Nourse, 
H. E. Woodbury. 

F. W. Mossman, 

G. B. Simonds. 

W. A. Brown, 
M. A. Carpenter, 
E. Lindsey, 



E. T. Clark. 



Young Men's Christian Association. 



OFFICERS. 

President. 
A. M. NOURSE, '89. 

Vice-President. 
T. P. FELTON, '90. 

Recording Secretary. Corresponding Secretary. 

E. P. FELT, '91. J. S. WEST, '90. 

Treasurer. 
W. W. GAY, '90. 

Devotional Committee. 
A. L. MILES, '89, F. O. WILLIAMS, '90, J. B. HULL, '91. 

Membership Committee. 
F. W. MOSSMAN, '90, E. P. FELT, '91, 

W. A. BROWN, '91, H. T. SHORES, '91, 

A. M. BELDEN, '91. 



MEMBERS. 



Active. 

Rev. Charles S. Walker, Ph. D. 

18S!>. 

A. L. Miles, A. M. Nourse, F. W. Davis. 

(51) 



52 



THE INDEX. 



1890. 

T. P. Felton, F. O. Williams, F. J. Smith, 

F. W. Mossnian, J. S. West, 

1891. 

A. M. Belden, E. P. Felt, W. A. Brown, W. W. Gay, 

L. F. Horner, J. B. Hull, H. T. Shores. 

1892. 

P. A. Chamberlain, E. T. Clark, G. W. Haley, 

C. De H. Condit, R. P. Davidson, J. E. Bardin. 



H. E. Woodbury, 



A. H. Sawyer, 
Murray Ruggles, 



Assoeiate. 

1889. 

1890. 

Edgar Gregory. 

1891. 



C. E. Bliss. 



F. L. Arnold, 
H. F. Tuttle. 



1893. 



H. M. Howard, 
H. E. Crane, 
H. N. Eaton, 
Wm. Fletcher, 
Ernest Lindsey, 



F. G Stockbridge, 
W. J. Goldthwait, Jr. 
H. M. Thompson, 
W. B. Emerson, 
C. S. Nauss. 





Washington Irving Literary Society. 



Established 1868. 



OFFICERS. 

President. 
C. A. WHITNEY, '89 

Vice-President. 
T. P. FELTON, '90. 



Secretary. 
F. L. ARNOLD, '91. 



Treasurer. 
G. B. SIMONDS, '90. 



Directors. 

B. L. HARTWELL, '89, W. E. TAFT. '90, 

M. A. CARPENTER, '91. 

(53) 



54 



THE INDEX 



" 



MEMBERS. 



B. L. Hartwell, 
A. L. Miles, 

T. P. Felton, 
F. J. Smith, 

J. S. West, 
A. N. Stowe, 

E. P. Felt, 
J. E. Phillips, 
W. A Brown, 



>90. 



'91. 



A. M. Nourse, 
C. A. Whitney. 



W. E. Taft, 
J. S. Loring, 
G. B. Simonds, 
C. H. Jones. 



F. L. Arnold, 
M. A. Carpenter, 
H. N. Eaton. 



C. De H. Condit, 
H. M. Howard, 



'92. 



F. G. Stockbridge. 



J. E. Bardin, 

P. A. Chamberlain, 




Jjlisedlarjeeu 



^ 
^ 






Op|ai^izali0^s. 



^55) 




Foot Ball Association. 



OFFICERS. 

President. 
A. M. NOURSE. 



Business Manager. 
A. D. COPELAXD. 



Secretary and Treasurer. 
E. GREGORY. 



A. D. COPELAND, 
A. M. BELDEN, 



W. A. Kellogg, 
B. L. Hartwell, 
M. A. Carpenter, 



A. D. Copeland, 



Directors. 

AGGIE ELEVEN. 
Rushers. 

J. T. Hutchings. 

Quarter-Back. 
E. Gregory. 

Half-Backs. 
(56) 



A. C. McCLOUD, 
H. E. CRANE. 



C. S. Crocker, 
J. S. Loring, 
M. Ruggles, 



A. M. Nourse, Capt. 



The index. 



57 







Full-Baek. 








T. Hoar. 








Substitutes. 




J. 


M. Herrero, 




J. B Hull, 


c. 


M. DuBois, 




H. N. Legate. 






CLASS TEAMS. 








'89. 








Rushers. 




c. 


S. Crocker, 




W. A. Kellogg, 


B. 


L. Hartwell, 




C. A. Whitney, 


D, 


L. Hubbard, 


J. T. Hutchings. 

Quarter-Back. 
J. R. Blair. 

Half-Backs. 


H. E. Woodbury, 


A. 


M. Nourse, 


Full-Baek. 
A. L. Miles. 

Substitutes. 


A. D. Copeland, Capt. 


M. 


North, 




R. P. Sellew. 






'90. 








Rushers. 




J. 


S. Loring, 




G. B. Simonds, 


C. 


M. DuBois, 




T. P. Felton, 


D. 


Barry, 


G. A. Goddard. 

Quarter-Back. 
A. C. McCloud. 


F. L. Taylor, 



£8 



The index 



E. Gregory, 



A. M. Castro, 



M. Ruggles, 

M. A. Carpenter, 

W. A. Brown, 



J. B. Hull, Capt., 



H. M. Howard, 
C. S. Graham, 
J. E. Bardin, 



T. Hoar, 



Half-Backs. 

Full-Back. 

J. S. West. 

Substitutes. 
C. H. Jones, 



J. M. Herrero, Capt. 



W. E. Taft. 



'91. 








Rushers. 










F. 


S 


Gorliam, 




J. 


E. 


Phillips, 




C. 


H. 


Johnson 


H. J. Field. 








Quarter-Back. 








W. C. Paige. 








Half-Backs. 










H. 


N. 


Legate. 


Full-Back. 








A. M Belden. 









'92. 
Rushers. 



C. A. Magill. 

Quarter-Back. 
H. F. Stone. 

Half-Backs. 

Full-Back. 
W. Fletcher. 



C. De H. Condit, 
B. Sedgwick, 
H. E. Crane, 



G. B. Willard, Capt. 







Base Ball Association. 



OFFICERS. 

President. 
J. T. HUTCHINGS. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 
G. A. GODDARD. 



A. M. NOURSE, 
J. B. HULL, 



Directors. 



A. C. McCLOUD, 
T. HOAR. 



COLLEGE NINE. 
T. Hoar, p. 



D. W. Dickinson, c, Capt. 
H. L. Russell, 1 b. 
M. Ruggles, 2 b. 
F. A. Parrar, 3 b. 



A. C. McCloud, s. s. 
J. B. Hull, 1. f. 
E. Gregory, c. f. 
W. C. Paige, r. f. 



(59) 



60 



THE INDEX. 



CLASS NINES. 

'89. 
T. Hutchings, Capt., p. 



C. A. Whitney, c. 
A. M. Nourse, 1 b. 
H. E. Woodbury, 2 b. 
W. A. Kellogg, 3 b. 



C. S. Crocker, s. s. 

A. D. Copeland, 1. f. 

B. L. Hartwell, c. f. 
A. L. Miles, r. f. 



A. C. McCloud, c. 
H. L. Russell, 1 b. 
E. Gregory, 2 b. 
A. N. Stowe, 3 b. 



J. S. Loring, 



W. C. Paige, c. 
M. Ruggles, 1 b. 
H. N. Legate, 2 b. 
A. M. Belden, 3 b. 



M. A. Carpenter, 



'90. 
D. W. Dickinson, Capt., p. 



Substitutes. 

Scorer. 
C. H. Jones. 

'91. 
J. B. Hull, Capt., p. 



Substitutes. 



O. M. V. Lage. 



J. M. Herrero, s. s. 

F. L. Taylor, 1. f. 

G. A. Goddard, c. f. 
D. Barry, r. f. 



F. J. Smith. 



J. E. Phillips, s. s. 
H. F. Tuttle, 1. f. 
L. F. Homer, c. f. 
C. H. Johnson, r. f. 



H. J. Field, 



A. M. Castro, c. 
T. P. FHton, 1 b. 
R. P. Sellew, 2 b. 
J. R. Blair, 3 b. 



'92. 
A. N. Stowe, Capt., p. 



C. A. Whitney, s. s. 
J. S. West, 1. f. 
A. G. Eames, c. f. 
J. E. Phillips, r. f. 




M. A. C. Tennis Association. 



OFFICERS. 

President. 
M. NORTH, '89. 



Secretary and Treasurer. 
G. A. GODDARD, '90. 



C. S. CROCKER, '89, 
H. L. RUSSELL, '90, 



Directors. 

W. C. PAIGE, '91, 

W. J. GOLDTHWAIT, Jr., '92. 



MEMBERS. 

The whole College. 
(61) 



M. A. C. Wheel Club. 



OFFICERS. 

President. 
J. T. HUTCHINGS, '89. 

Vice-President. 
W. E. TAFT, '90. 

Captain. 
E. GREGORY, '90. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 
A. M. BELDEN, '91. 



Sub-Captain. 




Machine Cleaner. 


J. E. DEUEL, '92. 




E. 


LINDSEY, '92 




MEMBERS. 






Name. 


Size of Machine. 




Make. 


J. T. Hutchings, '89. 


52 inch. 




Columbia. 


U. W. Dickinson, '90. 


54 " 




Columbia. 


E. Gregory, '90. 


54 " 




Columbia. 


W. E. Taft, '90. 


56 " 




Harvard. 


J. S. West, '90. 


48 " 




Columbia. 


A. M. Belden, '91. 


52 " 




Columbia. 


E. Lindsey, '91. 


50 " 




Rudge. 


J. E. Deuel, '92, 


50 " 




Rudge. 


A. G. Faneuf, '92. 


52 " 




Rudge. 


G. M. Hubbard, '92. 


50 " 




Springfield Roadster 


R. P. Lyman, '92. 


48 " 




Star. 


C. A. Magill, '92. 


52 " 




Columbia. 


H. C. West, '92. 


48 " 




Columbia. 



(62) 



T H te INDEX. 63 



E. Gregory. — Easy rider on a split machine. 

J. S. West. — High-flyer with a kerosene can aboard. 

J. T. Hutchings. — Expert rider with half a handle. 

II. C. West. — Fancy performer of the side-pedal mount. 

W. E. Taft. — Long-legged racer. 

A. M. Belden.— The ladies' darling. 

C. M. Hubbard. — Sunderland's great and only. 

A. G. Faneuf. — Barnum's Baby Elephant rider. 

C. A. Magill.— A shape . 

J. E. Deuel. — Skating-rink artist. 
E. Lindsey. — New green member. 
R. P. Lyman. — The only man who can't take headers. 





M. A. C. Athletic Association. 



OFFICERS. 

President. 
A. D. COPELAND, 



Secretary and Treasurer. 
H. L. RUSSELL, '90. 



Directors. 



H. E. WOODBURY, '89, 
W. E. TAPT, '90, 



M. RUOGLES, '91, 

P. J. MacDONALD, '92. 



MEMBERS. 

The whole College. 



(G4) 




M. A. C. Polo Club. 



OFFICERS. 

President. 
T. RICE. 



Secretary and. Treasurer. 
E. GREGORY". 

Manager. 
A. C. McCLOUD. 



COLLEGE TEAM. 

E. Bush, Capt., centre rush. 
C. E. Bliss, 1st rush. T. Rice, half-back. 

G. E. Newman, 2nd rush. G. E. Richards, goal. 



SECOND TEAM. 

W. H. Pond, centre rush. S. N. Braman, 2nd rush. 

E. Gregory, 1st rush. C. H. Jones, hall-back. 

A. C. McCloud, Capt., goal. 



H. T. Sanderson, 
9 



Substitutes. 

(05) 



J. M. Herrero. 




Musical Association. 



COLLEGE CHOIR. 



B. L. Hartwell, 1st Tenor. 
a. B. Willard, 1st Tenor. 
A. M. Belden, 2nd Tenor. 

C. S. Nauss, 2nd Tenor. 



Organist. 
F. W. Davis. 



C. H. Johnson, 1st Bass. 
W. A. Brown, 1st Bass. 
A. M. Nourse, 2nd Bass. 
H. E. Woodbury, 2nd Bass. 



COLLEGE QUARTETTE. 



B. L. Hartwell, 1st Tenor. 
H. F. Tuttle, 2nd Tenor. 



A. M. Belden, 1st Bass. 

H. E. Woodbury, 2nd Bass. 



(60) 





-RJI LLtaY^pRACTl C£ 




(61 



Military. 



BATTALION ORGANIZATION. 

Commandant and Instructor. 

1st Lieut. Geo. E. Sage, 5th Artillery, U. S. A., 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

Commissioned Staff. 

First Lieutenant and Adjutant H. E. Woodbury. 

First Lieutenant and Quartermaster, . . . C. A. Whitney. 
First Lieutenant and Acting Adjutant, . . A. L. Miles. 

Non-Commissioned Staff. 

Sergeant-Major, A. N. Stowe. 

Quartermaster-Sergeant, J. S. West. 



COMPANY A. 

Officers. 

Captain, J. R. Blair. 

First Lieutenant, D. L. Hubbard. 

Second Lieutenant, J. T. Hutchings. 

First Sergeant, D. Barry. 

Duty Sergeant, E. Gregory. 

Corporal, A. C. McCloud. 

(68) 



THE IN DEX. 



69 



Arnold, 

Bardin, 

Castro, 

Clark, 

Davidson, 

Eames, 

Parrar, 

Field, 



Privates. 

Gay, 

Graham, 

Haskins, 

Herrero, 

Hubbard, 

Johnson, 

Lindsey, 

MacDonald, 



Mossman, 

Ruggles, 

Stockbridge, 

Stone, 

Tuttle, 

Tyng, G. R., 

Willard, 

Williams. 



COMPANY B. 

Officers. 

Captain, B. L. Hartwell. 

First Lieutenant, F. W. Davis. 

Second Lieutenant, C. S. Crocker. 

First Sergeant, T. P. Felton. 

Duty Sergeant, 

Corporal, C. M. Du Bois. 

Privates. 

Belden, Gorham, Paige, 

Boyuton, Holland, Rogers, 

Condit, Horner, Sawyer, 

Deuel, Hull, Simonds, 

Dickinson, Jones, Taylor, 

Emerson, Magill, Thompson, 

Faneuf, Nauss, Williams, 

Felt, North, Wood. 



COMPANY C. 

Officers. 

Captain, A. M. Nourse. 

First Lieutenant, W. A. Kellogg. 

Second Lieutenant, A. D. Copeland. 

First Sergeant, H. L. Russell. 

Duty Sergeant, 

Corporal, G. B. Simonds. 



70 



THE INDEX 



Carpenter, 

Chamberlain, 

Crane, 

Eaton, 

Field, 

Fletcher, 

Goddard, 

Goldthwait, 



Privates. 




Hoar, 


Sedgwick, 


Howard, 


Shores, 


Hull, 


Smith, 


Lage, 


Taft, 


Legate, 


Taylor, 


Loring, 


Tyng, C, 


Lyman, 


Weed, 


Phillips, 


West. 



ARTILLERY DRILLS. 

Assistant Instructors, . . . Cadets of Senior Class. 

Cannoneers, Cadets of Junior and Sophomore Classes. 

SABRE DRILLS. 

Assistant Instructors, . . . Cadets of Senior Class. 

Detachments, Cadets of Junior and Sophomore Classes. 

MORTAR DRILLS. 

Assistant Instructors, . . . Cadets of Senior Class. 

Cannoneers, Cadets of Junior and Sophomore Classes. 



APPOINTMENTS. 

Staff and Commissioned Officers are selected from the Senior Class. 

Non- Commissioned Staff and Sergeants are selected from the Junior 
Class. 

Corporals are selected from the Junior and Sophomore Classes. 

All members of the Senior Class are required to act as instructors at 
the various drills, and as such, are subject to regular details. 




College Reading Rooms. 



OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION. 



President. 
C. A. WHITNEY, '89. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 

J. S. WEST, '90. 

Directors. 



J. R. BLAIR, 'S9, 
W. E. TAFT, '90, 



A. M. BELDEN, '91. 
A. R. WOOD, '92. 



(71) 



^2 



THE INDEX 



NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS. 



Boston Journal, 
Boston Herald, 



Dailies. 

New York Tribune. 
Springfield Republican. 



Popular Weeklies 

Puck, 

Time, 

Youth's Companion, 

Leslie's Illustrated Weekly, 

Harper's Weekly, 



Judge, 

Texas S if tings, 

The Nation, 

Illustrated London News, 

Chicago Weekly News. 



Harper's, 

Scribner's, 

North American Review, 
Contemporary Review, 
Popular Science Monthly, 
Quarterly Journal of Economics, 



Magazines. 
Outins 



Forum, 

Century, 

Chautauquan, 

Nineteenth Century, 

Political Science Quarterly. 



Brunonian, 
Williams Weekly, 
Amherst Student, 



College Publications. 



Dartmouth, 

Yale Record, 

Harvard Daily Crimson. 



Agricultural. 



The Hog, 
Dairy World, 
Farmers' Review, 
Farm Journal, 
Rural New Yorker, 
Nebraska Farmer, 
Colorado Farmer, 
Southern Cultivator, 
Live Stock Journal, 
Southern Planter, 
Pacific Rural Press, 
American Cultivator, 
American Agriculturist, 
American Veterinary Review, 



The Industrialist, 
Breeders' Gazette, 
Country Gentleman, 
Massachusetts Ploughman, 
New England Homestead, 
Our Grange Homes, 
Column's Rural World, 
Swine Breeders' Journal, 
Holstein-Friesian Register, 
American Sheep Breeder, 
National Live Stock Journal, 
New England Farmer, 
Poultry Monthly (No. 3). 
Journal of Agriculture (Quebec). 



THE INDEX. 



73 



Botanical and Horticultural. 



Garden (London), 
American Florist, 
Canadian Horticulturist, 
Journal of Horticulture, 
Horticultural Art Journal, 



Revue Horticole, 
Gardener's Chronicle, 
Garden and Forest, 
Botanical Gazette, 
Bulletin of Torrey Botanical Club, 
American Garden. 



Scientific. 
Scientific American (with supplement), Nature, 



American Naturalist, 
Journal of Morphology, 
Agricultural Science, 
Popular Science News, 
Entomological Americana, 
Journal of the Chemical Society, 



Science, 
Analyst, 
Chemical News, 
American Chemical Journal, 
Canadian Entomologist, 
Journal of Comparative Medicine 
and Surgery. 



Congregationalist, 
Christian Register, 
Missionary Herald, 
New Church Messenger, 
Illustrated Christian Weekly, 



Religious. 

Watchman, 

Intercollegian, 

Independent, 

Sunday School Times, 

Christian Union. 



Miscellaneous. 



British Bee Journal, 
American Agriculturist, 
American Bee Journal, 
Bee Keepers' Guide, 
Bee Keepers' Magazine, 
Canadian Bee Journal, 
Canadian Honey Producer, 



Woman's Journal, 
Amherst Record, 
^Egis and Gazette, 
Gazette and Courier, 
Farmington Chronicle, 
Our Dumb Animals, 
Western Resources, 



Gleanings in Bee Culture. 



10 



Respites. 



TVT OT least among the pleasures of the "Aggie" student, are the visits 
©/ i to the annual cattle shows, which occasions are hailed as gala days, 
in the midst of the dreary routine of college life. During the present year 
we have been more highly favored than in previous ones, as to the number 
and quality of shows exhibited. 

Of course, we had a day off to attend our own county show at Amherst, 
and despite the dampening effects of rain, and a postponement, it proved to 
be one of the finest exhibits the society ever held. 

" Later on" we were pleased to accept a cordial invitation, sent us 
by the committee in charge, to attend, as a military company, the cattle 
show to be held at Belchertown on Oct. 2nd; the number of men to be 
limited to fifty, the expenses of coming and going to be defrayed by them, 
and a dinner to be furnished free of charge. Of our entertainment there 
we can speak only in the highest terms. A prominent feature was the 
turkey dinner, served by the ladies of the M. E. Church. Words fail us in 
our attempt to express the satisfaction we experienced while partaking of 
the abundance there provided, either as to the quality of the viands, the 
manner in which we were served, or the refreshing glimpses of the intelli- 
gent and attractive faces of our entertainers, that we occasionally caught as 
they moved about among the tables and to and from the kitchen while 
waiting upon us. In the afternoon we were to have given an exhibition 
drill, but owing to the inclement weather nothing but dress parade was at- 
tempted. After supper we fell into line, the company was put in motion, 
and to the tune of "The Girl I Left Behind Me" turned our backs to the 
scene of the day's pleasures, with a mixture of feelings, the predominant 
one being that, despite the disagreeable state of the weather, the day had 
been an enjoyable one. 

Six days after this trip occurred the nee plus ultra of our anticipa- 
tions, namely, a trip to Springfield to attend the second exhibition of the 

174) 



THE INDEX. 75 



Bay State Agricultural Society. At seven o'clock on the morning of Oct. 
8th the assembly was sounded, and the battalion formed in line, then 
marched to the Central Massachusetts station and took the train for Spring- 
held, via Northampton. On board the cars military restrictions were 
relaxed and our trip enlivened by many an old "chestnut" college song. 
We arrived at Springfield about ten o'clock, and falling into line the bat- 
talion marched to Hampden Park to the lively music of the drum corps. 
After stacking arms near the grand stand the battalion broke ranks, a 
guard was detailed to take charge of the equipments, and we were at liberty 
to ramble at will about the grounds, examining the fine stock, machinery, 
etc., on exhibition. At two o'clock the assembly was sounded, the battalion 
formed and marched to the track in front of the grand stand, where dress 
parade was formed under the inspection of Gov. Ames and staff, followed 
by a sabre drill, which was well applauded by the spectators. Then came 
the long tramps through Horticultural Hall, which were enjoyed and 
appreciated to a greater or less extent by all. As we looked at the dis- 
play of fruit from the "Aggie" farm we could not help wondering from 
what part of the college domains such enticing looking fruit had been 
gathered, for, during our rambles over the farm, we had never met with 
anything half so tempting. Of course, not having made special search for 
anything of the kind, such an oversight on our part is excusable; still, we 
could not help "wondering" for all that. In the evening some went to see 
a presentation of "McKenna's Flirtation" at the Opera House, while others 
visited with friends in or about the city. 

The next day, after visiting various points of interest or taking another 
look at the exhibits, we boarded the train at about five o'clock and were, 
all too soon, obliged to wend our way back to our college quarters. Thus 
it is we enjoy the short respites from the tedium of college routine, and for 
the sake of those that come after, we earnestly hope that trips to various 
points of interest, as a college, will become an established custom in the 
years to come. 





Tale of the Cannon Racket. 

IN THREE PARTS. 



PART I. 

You whose hearts are full of mischief, 
While your College life are living, 
Who believe that in all ages 
Each and every heart is human, 
That in every student's bosom 
There are longings, yearnings, strivings, 
To put up little rackets 
On the simple, silly Freshmen. 
You, who once have felt these yearnings, 
Though your College life's completed, 
You, who now start in upon it, 
Listen to this simple story; 
Listen to the " Cannon Racket." 
In a peaceful, placid valley, 
Where a pleasant water courses, 
Lies a quiet little village; 
And about a mile beyond it 
Stands the grand old Aggie College. 
There it is an honored custom 
(76) 



THE INDEX. 77 



For the Freshmen, 'ere the year ends, 

To attempt a celebration. 

Now the reckless Sophs, who dwell there 

Do not wish to hear the booming 

Of the Lieut's two big brass cannon, 

As they echo o'er the campus 

At about the hour of midnight. 

So one Wednesday, 'ere the term closed 

All the Freshmen got together, 

And the Juniors came to help them, 

To prepare a mighty scheme there, 

Which would balk the class of '90 

In the bold, bad undertaking 

Which 'twas thought they would engage in. 

'Twas the stealing of their cannon 

That the Freshmen wished to hinder. 

When the hour of drill was over 

They were gathered on the campus. 

Quick they seized upon a cannon, 

Braced their muscles all together. 

Billy Pond was head director 

With the help of Woodbury Junior, 

And the line of march was taken 

Bapidly across the campus 

To the Armory, barred and bolted. 

Deacon Gay was there, with glasses, 

Watching, lest that class of '90 

Should make one last, bold endeavor 

To obtain the sole possession 

Of, at least, the sponge and rammer. 

But the Sophs, were out of hearing 

Quiet all, as on a Sunday. 

So they pushed it through the doorway, 

Ruggie heaving on the rear wheel, 

Long-legged Carpenter assisting. 

Even Kizer, Mike, and Tutsy, 

Came around to do the bossing. 

And at last they rolled it in there, 

Saw that all the locks were fastened 

Then departed, well contented 

That the Sophs, they'd circumvented 

By this easy undertaking. 



78 



THE INDEX. 




PART II. 



'Twas a Thursday eve in June time, 

Dark and foggy were the heavens; 

All the students there were sleeping, 

And the Freshmen, ail were dreaming 

Of the way they'd beat poor '90 ; 

When, a little after midnight, 

Each on tiptoe softly stepping, 

Noiseless forms passed down the stairway, 

Out across the campus glided 

To the Armory, barred and bolted, 

Where was safely placed the cannon. 

Jack was out and so was John S ; 

Marblehead was represented, 

Hadley, Berlin, Westfield, Dedham, 

Ashby, Littleton, and Cuba. 

All the towns that could be thought of, 

Had sent out a delegation. 

Quickly to a window went they, 

Raised it up and then they entered, 

Tried the door, and soon it yielded 

To the unknown code of tactics 

Which the men had come prepared with. 

Softly now a few went in there 

By the side of the lone cannon. 

While without, the rest were watching, 

Lest some poor belated student 

Should by chance come wandering by there. 



THE INDEX. 79 



Many times they started moving, 

But some sudden noise would stop them. 

Rich, was hindered by his best girl 

Prom retiring to his slumbers 

At his usual early hour. 

But at last all was auspicious 

And the time for action coming, 

Gently back — the door — they pushed it, 

Fearing, lest the creaking hinges 

Should disturb the peaceful slumber 

Of the unsuspecting Freshmen. 

Seized they then the brazen field piece, 

Seized they every one upon it, 

And with greatest care, preventing 

E'en the slightest sound escaping 

Rolled they it upon the greensward. 

Then the line of march was taken 

Down the roadway, towards the barnyard, 

Round the corner by the sheep-pen 

Where they stopped, and gathered quickly 

All the implements for digging. 

Then, within the sheep-pen going, 

They commenced their task of labor. 

Soon a grave was dug as deeply 

As would hold a class of Freshmen. 

Then "dismounting piece," they laid it 

Gently in the grave's wide bosom. 

Back again, they took the limber, 

Quietly placed it in the Armory 

And the other piece they drew off, 

Which they put with its companion 

In the grave prepared so well there, 

In the sheep-pen by the barnyard. 

Carefully they threw the earth back, 

Scattered straw with skill upon it, 

Stamped it down, then drew the sheep-rack 

O'er the place of excavation, 

Lest the Freshmen, in their searching, 

Should discover signs of burial. 

To destroy all trace of wheel tracks, 

Went those men into the milk-room, 

Took the hose and sprinkled water, 

O'er the earth for yards about there. 



JO THE INDEX 



Now at last their labor ended 
As the dawn was coming fast. 
To their bedrooms they ascended 
And again all slumbered sound. 
Thus it was that '90 " got there," 
And, with skill no craft could beat, 
Spoilt the "racket" of the Freshmen 
And returned in peace to sleep. 




PART III. 

Gleefully arose the Freshmen, 

Thought they then with great delight 

Of the way they'd saved their cannon 

By the Juniors' good advice. 

Soon they started out for breakfast, 

They must eat strong food to-day, 

For to-night 's the celebration, 

And their strength must be kept up. 

As they walk along the campus 

Lo! they see one piece is gone, 

But of course the other's ready, 

Kept by two or three strong locks; 

Still they think they'll take a peep in 

Just to see how nice it looks. 

But one glance has made them shiver, 

For they see their cannon's gone. 

Consternation rises quickly, 

Where? How? When? What shall we do ? 

Are the questions that come pouring 



THE INDEX 



As they gather in a crowd. 

Richy says, " Class meeting quickly." 

There they talk, 'tis little good, 

For they cannot be decided 

On the thing they'd better do. 

Out they come and then they scatter, 

O'er the country far and near, 

Looking in the strangest places 

For the means to shoot this evening. 

Down the drains, and in the cornfield, 

In the swamp, and 'round the barn, 

Wander the heart-sickened Freshmen, 

As they try to find their gun. 

Farmer Wright, who knows their greenness, 

Gives them each a fork in hand, 

And down cellar quickly speed they 

Where they labor, but in vain. 

Thus the day is spent in looking 

For the guns they never found, 

And by evening they are tired, 

Both in body and in mind. 

Still they think that noise they must have, 

And they to the mortal's go; 

But again they are disheartened, 

For the noise their powder made 

Did not reach the ears of students 

Who near by in slumber lay. 

Thus the Freshmen's night was ended, 

And 'tis said by all around 

'Twas the poorest ever held here, 

Thanks to '90's skill so sound. 




Annales. 



1887. 

DEC. 1. Labor on the '90 Index begins. 
8. Prof. Warner wears a straw hat. 
Dee. 15. The '88 Index appears; aclde parum pano, magnus acervo erit. 

16. Pall Term closes. 

1888. 

Jan. 4. Winter Term begins. 

21. Polo, Aggie lis. Amherst; 8 to 7. 

26. '91 bolts on Prof. "Sammy." 

Feb. 10. Major returns from Washington. 

11. Prex. inspects — death to cobwebs. 

11. Polo, Aggie vs. Reads; 2 to 3. 

IS. Polo, Aggie vs. Reads; 5 to 4. 

25. Polo, Aggie vs. Reads; 6 to 3. 

Mar. 9. Major goes to Washington. 

11. Prof. Walker forgets his necktie. 

18. Rev. A. B. Bassett, former Professor of Mathematics, preaches in 

the chapel. 

19. The Freshmen have their ropes stolen. 

20. '89 bolts on Prof. Wellington. 
April 11. '90 bolts on Prof. Warner. 

13. '90 bolts on Prex. 

13. Base-ball, '88 vs. '90 ; 9 to 6. 

17. '89 bolts on Prex. 

18. '90 bolts on Prof. Warner. 

21. Base-ball, Aggie vs. Northampton ; 6 to 4. 
24. Base-ball, '88 vs. '91 ; 21 to 18. 

28. Arbor Day. '90 and '91 set out class trees. 
20. Prof. Wellington bolts on '89. 

(82) 



THE INDEX. 83 



May 2. Prof. Wellington bolts on '89. 

2. '89 waits for Prof. ' ' Sam " on account of rain. 

3. '90 cuts Prof. "Sammy" to see base-ball game. 
5. Base-ball, Aggie vs. Williston ; 23 to 22. 

8. '90 put on probation for cutting May 3rd. 

31. Base-ball, Aggie vs. Williston ; 12 to 14. 

June 1. Base-ball, '89 vs. '90 ; 7 to 35. 

5. Base-ball, Aggie vs. Holyoke ; 7 to 9. 

13. '91 puts the cannon in the Armory. 

14. '90 buries both cannon in the sheep-pen. 

15. Freshmen hunt cannon. 



Commencement Exercises. 

17. Baccalaureate Sermon by Dr. Walker ; address before the Y. M. 

C. A. by Rev. Calvin Stebbins, of Worcester, at 8 p. M. 

18. Grinnell Prize Examination of the Senior Class in Agriculture. 
Standing Gun Drill, Mortar Practice and Bayonet Exercise at 

4:30 p. M. 
Kendall Prize Speaking at 8 p. m. 

19. Alumni Meeting at 8:30 a. m. 
Graduating Exercises at 10 a. m. 

20. Examination of candidates for admission at the Botanic Museum. 



Sept. 4. Examination of candidates for admission at the Botanic Museum. 

5. Fall Term begins. 

13. Foot-ball, '89 vs. '90 ; 20 to 5. 

14. '90 released from probation. 

16. New order of service in chapel. 

17. Invitation to Bay State Fair. 
21. '91 bolts on Prof. "Sammy." 

30. Rev. Mr. Dickerman preaches in the chapel. 

Oct. 2. Go to fair at Belchertown. 

6. Foot-ball, Trinity vs. Aggie ; 28 to 0. 
9. College attends the Bay State Fair. 

13. Foot-ball, Aggie vs. Williston ; 27 to 0. 

25. Foot-ball, '91 vs. '92 ; 20 to 4. 
'89 bolts on Prof. Wellington. 

28. F. K. Sanders, general secretary of the Intercollegiate Y. M. C. A., 

delivers an address in the chapel. 

30. Prex. gives some practical advice on the use of the gymnasium. 

Nov. 17. Foot-ball, Aggie vs. Williston ; 18 to 9. 



An Ideal Love Letter. 



TYT Y DULCINEA : 

* Here you have at your feet, Oh Queen of Beauty, a 

mortal who adores you and in whose heart there has been an aching void, 
since the very first moment that he had the good fortune of gazing at your 
majestic countenance. I have seen in you the angel of my secret adorations 
and words are a little less than nothing to express my feelings. 1 love you 
as the butterflies love the sweet flowers from which they suck the honey. 
I love you as Abelardo loved Eloise ; Paulo, Virginia, and Romeo, Juliet. 
As a wrecked mariner clings to the life-preserver, which in the dark tem- 
pest and among the turbulent waves is his only hope of salvation, so my 
darling, do I cling to you. Fail me, Oh fail me not. Let thy love buoy up 
my soul. Take me for thine own, and by your acceptance of my all, save 
me from a dark fortune, turning fear into gladness, earth into heaven! 

Don Quixote. 



Stray Whiskers. 



EROF. ALVORD. — "Eight times nine are sixty-two." (Applause.) "No, 
sixty-four." (Increased applause.) 

Prof. Fernald (four minutes after bell rings;. — "You gentlemen are pro- 
verbially late, if it continues you must consult the President." 

Prof. Walker (to Barry). — " In monosyllabic words, on which syllable 
does the accent fall ?" 

Barry. — "On the first." 

Prof. W. — "Why not on the last." 

Barry.—" Don't know." 

(84) 



THE INDEX. 85 



Prof. Maynard. — " Mr. Tyng, what is an aerial root ?" 
Tyng. — "A subterranean root." 

Lieut. Sage. — (Gregory, straddling a beam at the top of the drill hall) — 
"Why in the d — 1 can't Gregory lift up that beam?" (Beam weighed 500 
pounds.) 

Prex. — " Belden, what gender is cousin in French?" 

Belden. — "I don't know." 

Prex. — " Why, it is like a South Hadley cousin." 

Prof. Stock. — " Some of them farm folks have stolen my coulter." 

Prof. Warner. — " Gentlemen, I had forty logarithm books which cost 
fifty cents apiece, and now I have only four. It is strange where they 
have all gone." 

Prof. Wellington. — "Mr. DuBois, are you tired?" 

DuBois. — " No, sir." 

Prof. W. — "Then please not look as though you were." 

Notice. — For further information regarding the Junior class communi- 
cation of last year, see the '78 Index. 

Mossman does not believe that you can get thirteen two-cent stamps for 
a cent and a quarter. 

Prof. Fernald puts the roots of the Protozoan tree way down in the 
deep subsoil of our ignorance. 

Notice. — It is forbidden to ask "Mac" to go to the barn for a quart of 
milk with only five cents in his pocket. 

Gregory — (giving his orders to another guard). — "If the nuisance is 
great discharge your piece." 

Attention. — Laughing gas will be furnished for these jokes by applying 
to the Business Manager of the Index, 



Quotations. 



ii TZELL is empty and all the devils are here." 

*- / — Shakespeare. 

Faculty. — " For we are animals no less, although of different species." 

Carpenter. — "At each step I feel my advanced head knock out a star in 
heaven." 

Castro. — "My friends, I'll tell you his chief passion; 
It was a girl to be a mashinV 

'89. — "A mighty power is passing from us." 

'90. — "'Sub hoc signo vinces." 

'91. — "Ex nihilo nihil fit." 

'92. — "The maternal milk scarce dry upon their lips." 

Tyng. — " The soul of this man is in his clothes." 

McCloud, Farrar, Tyng. — "All Gaul is divided into three parts." 

"Mac." — "Oh, midnight specter that I am, in many a dreary bower I've 
lingered round a cigarette and oft did beg to 'puff an hour.'" 

Condit. — "Thou com'st from Jersey meadows fresh and green." 

Brown. — "I am a sweet-faced youth." 

Felton.— "Much could have been made of him, 
Had he been caught young." 

Felt. — "He seldom smiles." 

Hull, '92. — " Thou, Bertha, thou hast metamorphosed me, 
Made me neglect my studies, lose my time." 

Farrar. — "What's your name, Master Tapster?" "Bum, sir." 

Smith, '90. — "I know it is a sin, 

For me to sit and grin." 

Prof. "Stock."— "In short, in matters vegetable, animal and mineral, 

I am the very model of a 'soft snap' Prof-in-gineral." 

Russell. —"Neither a borrower or a lender be." 

(86) 



THE INDEX 



87 



Gorham. — "His frame is huge, and thus beguiles 
The nature gentle as a child's." 

Jones. — "He thought, and thought, and thought; till at last he grew so 
thin, 
That there was nothing left of him but just his bones and skin." 

Davidson. — "Talks as familiarly of roaring lions as maidens of fifteen do of 
puppy dogs." 

Choir. — "Good people, but bad musicians." 

Hoar. — "A lank, lean, mercurial youth who looked like a barometer." 



The following bill has come to our notice, supposed to have been 
dropped by some harmless lunatic of the milder type: 

BILL. 

To chemicals wasted on '91 and '92, .... $ 7.995 

Chemicals wasted by Juniors, ..... 2.005 



Put your name down here! 



To one matrass, . . . 

Two quarts alcohol (watered) @ 65c, 

One alcohol bottle (Warner's Safe Cure), 

Two test tubes (cracked), 

Gas (unlimited, concentrated, insuppressible), 

Use of gasoline, ..... 

Use of one-quarter of a Bunsen burner (begrudged) 

Wear of threshold, oil for door hinges, etc., 

Other indispensables, .... 



Private account with 



To instruction past and "later on," 

Not being plucked, .... 

Unlimited gall expended for various purposes, 



Total, 
Interest 3 mo., 



$10.00 



.02 
1.30 

.05 
.10 

.99 

.75 

.18 

1.50 



$4.89 



1.50 

7.00 

.10 



$8.60 



Grand total, 



$23.99 
.35985 

$24.349S5 



Warning to Freshmen : When you play with a Tabby cat, don't stroke 
its fur the wrong way, or pull its tail, as such cruelty to animals can't be 
allowed at this institution and must invariably result in the suspension of 
the offender. 



Wanted. 



M 



TAR walk to town. 



The recipe for '92's paint. 

More than two bath tubs for one hundred students. 

A pair of tweezers to pull Mac's and Greg's moustache out. 

To know how West got Taft's drying paper. 

A. horse-car route to North Amherst to accommodate Jack, Stowe and 
Blair. 

Something to stop Freshmen from growing sluggers. 

To know how all the fellows got so many girls' pictures in their rooms. 

A kitten and cream by two-thirds of the fellows. Apply to Jack. 

A mowing machine for Freddie McDonald to shave with. 

A patent on Lage's jaws. 

A pedometer on John S. West's gait. 

Freshmen for instruction in singing at No. 21 N. C. 

To know the scientific names of the new Weed, Crane, and Wood, which 
have just been discovered. 

A porous plaster to get the "Charley" off of Mac's back. 

A man to take care of the College grounds in Summer. 

A currycomb and brush to comb Castro's hair, 

(88) 



THE INDEX. 89 



A man to open the fire-escapes an hour before the fire. 

A barrel of heavenly dew and a siphon for Castro. 

A Badger and whistle for Pat. 

A patent self-washer for Hull, '92. 

To know if Felton is going to take the class cup. 

A lady type- writer for the next "Index" board. 

To know why the resident graduates at the Ex. Station have to go 
down town every night. 

A healthy red-headed girl, weighing 300 pounds, to (Nourse) Woodbury. 



EDITORIAL WANTS. 
Three inches more on Greg's military pants. 
Something to gum Taft's ears to his head. 
A lady pianist to accompany Herrero on the banjo. 
A tin razor and a paint brush for Goddard's beard. 
A whisker invigorator for Jones. 
An inspiration to compose poetry for Mossman. 
A good temperance drink for Barry. 

To know if Field, Felt, Ruggles and Eaton are not ashamed of hav- 
ing voted for themselves to be on '91's Index board, and if Shores, Hull 
and Legate, who did not vote for themselves, are not ashamed of their 
associate editors. 



12 



Historical Reminiscence. 



0UR special detective has presented us with the following, which he 
is said to have clipped from historic faculty records during his re- 
cent investigation of the most interesting and instructive proceedings of 
that most highly honored board. 

April — , 

Whereas, It is generally understood and acknowledged that the farmer 
is a brute, and by his profession wholly and utterly incapable of enjoying 
or in the slightest degree appreciating those pleasures of life which are 
known among men as social, and 

Whereas, In times past efforts have been made which, if continued, are 
likely to dangerously alter public sentiment in this respect. 

Resolved, That WE, the undersigned members of 

on this day of April of the year of our Lord one thousand eight 

hundred and do hereby denounce and abolish from this time forth 

and forever all efforts to improve in any way shape or manner, by any 
means whatsoever, the social life and privileges of the students of the Mas- 
sachusetts Agricultural College; and, further, 

Resolve, That as an aid to the above humane sentiment, we throw 
open the gateway which leads to the slums of the street. And be it further 

Resolved, That in so doing we are not only saving OURSELVES much 
needless trouble and anxiety for our respected and beloved proteges, but 
are doing an act worthy of gentlemen of our standing and pulling wool 
over the eyes of the public in general. 
Signed, 

Members of 



Notice. — We are happy to announce that the sentiment expressed in 
the above has to some slight degree been modified during recent years, but 
there is still further opportunity for improvement in this direction.— Ed. 

(90) 



Stolen Thunder. 



1 I T HERE is a youth whose eyes and hair 
-L Are of a darkish hue, 
Whose face was always bland and bare, 
Till after studious thought and care, 
A gentle moustache grew. 

In the seclusion of his room 

He studies night and day; 
His modest features ne'er assume 
Ecstatic joy or dreary gloom, 

Nor arrogance display. 

His time-piece on his table lies: 

With measured promptitude, 
Each moment's duties he descries, 
And Time's demands at once supplies, 
In steady working mood. 

His task it is the bell to ring, 

To call the classes in; 
Upon the bell-rope doth he cling, 
Before 'tis time the bell to swing, 

And at the dot begin. 

And as the bell rings out its cbimes, 

Then tolls its steady stroke, 
Then rings again its half-way rhymes, 
Then tolls along, and lastly mimes 
Rush of a rapid brook. 

It seems the manner to resound 
Of him who rings the bell; 

To place in order duties found, 

And only in its proper round 
Upon each one to dwell. 
(91) 



ISM MEMORY 

OF 

LEWIS CALVERT LEARY, 

Class of '85, 
DIED APRIL 3, 1888. 



(93) 



IN MEMORY 

OF 
OTJIt CLASSMATE, 

WHO 

DIED SEPTEMBER 8, 1888. 



T V s ) HEREAS, It has pleased G-od in His infinite wisdom to remove 
Mil from our midst our beloved friend and classmate, Arthur S. 
Williams, and 

Whereas, We recognize in him one who, as a student, was esteemed 
and respected by all, for . his manly conduct and Christian character, 
therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we mourn his loss, and that we extend our heartfelt 
sympathy to his bereaved parents in their affliction, and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to his parents and 
also be published in the Gazette and Courier. 

E. GREGORY, 

W. E. TAFT, ! '..mmiHc*. 

P. H. PLUMB, 



(93) 



Prize Men, 1888. 



GRINNELL PRIZES. 
Robert B. Moore, First Prize. Yataro Mishima, Second Prize. 



CLARK PRIZE. 
C. S. Crocker, '89. W. W. Gay, '91. 



KENDALL PRIZES. 

Fred W. Mossman, '90, 1st. George E. Richards, '91, 1st. 

David Barry, '90, 2nd. Harry T. Sanderson, '91, 2nd. 



HILLS PRIZES. 

William Shepardson, 1st. Lorenzo F. Kinney, 2nd. 



PRIZE FOR PLANTS FROM THE COLLEGE FARM. 
Lorenzo F. Kinney. 



COLLECTION OF NATIVE WOODS. 
Lorenzo F. Kinney. 



(94) 



Calendar for 1889-90. 



1889. 

Winter Term begins, 

Winter Term closes, 

Spring Term begins, 

Baccalaureate Sermon, 

Address before the Christian Union, 

Kendall Prize Speaking, 

Grrinnell Prize Examination of the 

Senior Class in Agriculture, 
Military Exercises, 
Meeting of the Alumni, 
President's Reception, 
Commencement Exercises, 
Meeting of Trustees, 
Examinations for Admission, Botanic 

Museum, 
Examinations for Admission, Botanic 

Museum, 
Fall Term begins, 
Fall Term closes, 



Wednesday, Jan 2, at 8 15 A. M. 
Friday, March 22, at 10.30 A. m. 
Tuesday, April 2, at 8.15 A. m. 
Sunday, June 16. 
Sunday, June 16. 
Monday, June 17. 

Tuesday, June 18. 
Tuesday, June 18. 
Tuesday, June 18. 
Tuesday, June 18. 
Wednesday, June 19. 
Wednesday, June 19. 



Thursday, June 20, at 9 a. m. 

Tuesday, Sept. 3, at 9 a. m. 
Wednesday, Sept. 4, at 8.15 am. 
Friday, Dec. 13, at 10.30 A. m. 



Winter Term begins, 
Winter Term closes, 



1890. 



Thursday, Jan. 2, at 8.15 A. M. 
Friday, March 21, at 10.30 a. m. 



^95) 



The Mass. Agricultural College Club of New 
York and Vicinity. 

December 10, 1886. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

SAMUEL CLARENCE THOMPSON, '72, 

HENRY FRANCIS HUBBARD, '78, 

JOHN ASHBURTON CUTTER, M. D., '82. 



The Club was called into existence by seven graduates and two non- 
graduates, who met at the ARISTON October 27, 1886. December 10 the 
organization became permanent by vote of over twenty-five graduates and 
non-graduates at a dinner at Martinelli's. The second dinner followed in 
December of 1887 at Clark's, where the Club will hereafter dine. These 
dinners are a success. Some travel comparatively Jong distances to attend, 
and all present are busy men, who take it to be a delight to come together 
as children of our dear Alma Mater, meet those who have not been seen for 
years, recall memories of past glorious days, hear an account of the actual 
condition of the institution, rejoice over its progress, and finally part say- 
ing that the best thing they ever did was to "enter the M. A. C." 

All guests of the Club are considered its honorary members, and all 
graduates and non-graduates who dine with the Club its active members. 
Fees are assessed at the time of the dinner for the expenses of printing and 
per plate, but there is no constitution, neither are there any by-laws. 

The next dinner will be held December 14. The Club usually dines at 
7:30 o'clock, to accommodate those coming late from business, and hereafter 
arrangements will be made so that the parlors at Clark's will be open in 
the latter part of the afternoon for social intercourse. 

It is earnestly desired that all graduates and non-graduates of the 
M. A. C. who have not before received notice of the Club's dinners, or who 
have changed their addresses, will communicate with the Secretary-Treas- 
urer, Dr. J. A, Cutter, The Ariston, Broadway and 55th Street, New York. 

November 12, 1888. 

(96) 



the index 



97 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 

President Henry H. Goodell, Amherst. 

Ex-Professor and Captain Charles Morris, U. S. A., Governor's Island. 

Ex-President Levi Stockbridge, Amherst. 

Ex-Professor Henry E. Alvord, President Maryland Agricultural College. 

Ex-Professor Charles L. Harrington, New York. 

Dr. P. M. Hexamer, American Agriculturist. 



ACTIVE MEMBERS. 



'71 
'71 
'71 

'72, 
'72. 
'72 
'72. 
'74, 
'74 
'74, 
'74 
'75, 
'75' 
'75 
'76, 
'76, 
'77 
'78, 
'78 
'78 
'78 
'79 
'81 
'82. 
'82 

'82; 

'82 
'82. 
'82, 
'83 

'84 
'85 
'85 
'85 

'85 



Andrew Lewis Bassett, Brooklyn. 

William Henry Bowker, Boston. 

George Clark Woolson, Superintendent Public Parks, New York. 

William Ebenezer Bullard, M. D., 112 East 40th St., City. 

Frederick William Morris, 72 Astor Place, City. 

Frederick Maxwell Somers, 35 Wall St. , City. 

Samuel Clarence Thompson, 832 East 161st St., City. 

Frank Edgar Adams, 8S South Oxford St. , Brooklyn. 

John Mitchell Benedict, M. D., Waterbury, Conn. 

Asa Williams Dickinson, 1 Montgomery St., Jersey City, N. J. 

William Lyman, Middlefield, Conn. 

Joseph Fx-ancis Barrett, 29 Beaver St., City. 

John Atherton Barri, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Henry Stranahan Jackson, Brick Church, N. J. 

Willis Wasburn Cary, Fishkill, N. Y. 

Charles Herbert Phelps, 42 Elizabeth St., City. 

Frank Gordon Urner, 70 Warren St., City. 

Sanford D wight Foot, 101 Chambers St., City. 

Henry Francis Hubbard, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Charles Elihu Lyman, Middlefield, Conn. 

Frederick Tuckerman, M. D., Amherst. 

Edgar Davis Chittendon, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Benjamin Salter Smith, Orange, N. J. 

Charles Edward Beach, Hartford, Conn. 

Harry Kirke Chase, 148 South Elliot Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

John Ashburton Cutter, M. D., The Ariston, etc., City. 

Samuel Judd Holmes, 19 Murray St., City. 

John Cheney Piatt, 333 Fourth Ave., City. 

James Stoddard Williams. Glastonbury, Conn. 

Alfred Armand Hevia, 232 Lexington Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Alfred William Lublin, 19 William St., City. 

George Holcomb Barber, M. D., Glastonbury, Conn. 

Hezekiah Howell, Monroe, N. Y. 

Benoni Tekirion, 1 Broadway, City. 

George Gouge Woodhull, Monroe, N. Y. 



13 



Alumni. 



Edwin W. Allen, '85, Goettinger, Germany, Student. 

Francis S. Allen, M. D., D. V. S., '82, Corner 5th and Locust streets, 
Philadelphia, Pa., Veterinary to the People's Mutual Live Stock In- 
surance Co., Pa. 

Gideon H. Allen, '71, Richfield, Kansas, Town Clerk. 

Augusto Luis de Almeida, '87, Agenda des Tres Barras, Bananal de Sao 
Paulo, Brazil, Planter. 

Luciano J. Almeida, '85, Agencia des Tres Barras, Bananal de Sao Paulo 
Brazil, Planter. 

George T. Aplin, '82, East Putney, Vt., Parmer. 

Osgan H. Ateshian, '86, 68 Boylston street, Boston, Mass., Importer of 
Oriental Goods. 

William H. Atkins, '86, Little Silver, N. J., Clerk, Office Monmouth Nur- 
sery. 

Winfred Ayres, '86, Oakham, Mass. 

David A. Bagley, '76, Address unknown. 

Sidney C. Bagley, '83, 35 Lynde street, Boston, Mass., Cigar Packer, Bos- 
ton Co-operative Association. 

David E. Baker, '78, Newton Lower Falls, Mass., Physician. 

George H. Barber, '85, 313 West 47th street, New York City, N. Y., Stu- 
dent, College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

Edward W. Barrett, '87, Agawam, Mass., Teacher. 

Joseph F. Barrett, '75, 29 Beaver street, New York City, N. Y., Travel- 
ing Salesman Bowker Fertilizer Co. 

John A. Barri, '75, Corner of Water street and Fairfield avenue, Bridge- 
port, Conn., Fertilizer Manufacturer in the firm of Chittenden, Barri & 
Sanderson. 

Andrew L. Bassett, '71, Pier 36 East River, New York City., N. Y., 
Transfer Agent, Central Vt. R. R. Co. 

(98) 



THE INDEX. 99 



Charles E. Beach, '82, West Hartford, Conn., Parmer, C. E. Beach & Co., 
"Vine Hill" and "Ridge Farms." 

Edward H. Belden, '88, Hatfield, Mass., Farmer. 

Burleigh C. Bell, '72, Corner 16th and Howard streets, San Francisco, 
Cal., Druggist. 

John Bellamy, '76, 657 Washington street, Boston Mass., Hardware Dealer, 
Nichols, Bellamy & Co. 

John M. Benedict, M. D., '74, 18 North Main Street, Waterbury, Conn., 
Physician. 

David H. Benson, '77, North Weymouth, Mass., Chemist and Superintend- 
ent of Chemical Works, Bradley Fertilizer Co. 

Eugene P. Bingham, '82, 40 Pritchard street, Fitchburg, Mass., Manager of 
Rowlstone Creamery, Lunenburg. 

William P. Birnie, '71, Springfield, Mass., Paper and Envelope Manufac- 
turer. 

Edgar A. Bishop, '83, Talladega, Ala., Superintendent Agricultural De- 
partment, Talladega College. 

William H. Bishop, '82, Agricultural College P. O., Maryland, Horticul- 
turist, Mai-yland Agricultural Experiment Station. 

William H. Blanchard, '74, Westminster, Vt., Farmer, Putney, Vt. 

Herbert C. Bliss, '88, Attleboro, Mass., Traveling Salesman for Bliss Bros., 
Jewelry Manufacturers. 

Willie L. Boutwell, '78, Leverett, Mass., Farmer. 

William H. Bowker, '71, 43 Chatham street, Boston, Mass., President 
Bowker Fertilizer Co. 

Charles A. Bowman, '81, 7 Exchange Place, Boston, Mass., Assistant En- 
gineer with Aspinwall & Lincoln. 

Charles E. Boynton, '81, Syracuse, N. Y., Student, Medical Department 
Syracuse University. 

Everett B. Bragg, '75, Tremont Bank Building, Boston, Mass., Chemist for 
G-lidden & Curtis. 

Domingos H. Braune, '83, Nova Friburgo, Province of Rio Janeiro, 
Brazil, Planter. 

William F. Brett, '72, Danbury, Conn., Merchant. 

Charles Brewer, '77, Pelham, Mass., Farmer. 

Arthur A. Brigham, '78, Sapporo, Japan, Professor of Agriculture, Impe- 
rial College of Agriculture. 

Henry S. Brodt, '82, Rawlins, Wyoming Territory, Clerk, J. W. Hugus 
& Co. 

Frederick K. Brooks, '88, Haverhill, Mass., Mail Carrier. 

William P. Brooks, '75, Mass. Agricultural College, Amherst., Mass., Pro- 
fessor of Agriculture, 



1 OO THE INDEX. 



Charles W Brown, S5, Temple, N. H., Farmer. 

Madison Bunker, D. V. S., '75, Newton, Mass., "Veterinary Surgeon. 

William H. Caldwell, '87, State College, Centre County, Pa., Assistant 

Agriculturist, Pennsylvania State College Agricultural Experiment 

Station. 
Thomas R. Calender, '75, Wellesley Hills, Mass., Florist. 
Frederick G. Campbell, '75, West Westminster, Vt., Farmer. 
David F. Carpenter, '86, Millbury, Mass., Teacher. 

Frank B. Carpenter, '88, Raleigh, N. C, Assistant Chemist, North Caro- 
lina Agricultural Experiment Station. 
Walter F. Carr, '81, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Secretary and Treasurer 

"Union Construction Co." 
Herbert S. Carruth, '72, Ashmont, Mass., Real Estate. 
Lilley B. Caswell, '71, Athol, Mass., Civil Engineer. 
Edward P. Chandler, '74, Fort Maginnis, Montana, Farmer. 
Everett S. Chandler, '82, address unknown. 
Henry E. Chapin, '81, Tilton, N, H., Teacher. 
William E. Chase, '87, Redlands, San Bernardino County, Cal. 
Darius O. Chickering, '76, Enfield, Mass., Farmer. 
Edward C. Choate, '78, Cheyenne, Wyoming Territory, Horse Breeder, 

Davis & Choate. 
Charles W. Clapp, '86, Montague, Mass., Farmer. 
Atherton Clark, '77, 140 Tremont street, Boston, Mass., Clerk with R. H. 

Stearns & Co. 
John W. Clark, '73, Columbia, Mo., Horticulturist, Agricultural Experi 

ment Station of the University of Missouri. 
Xenos Y. Clark, ('75) '78, Amherst, Mass., Scientist. 
*Jabez W. Clay, '75. 
Charles F. Colburn, '78, Lowell, Mass., Associate Editor of Lowell Daily 

Citizen and Teller of Five Cent Savings Bank. 
Fred S. Cooley, '88, Sunderland, Mass., Teacher, North Amherst. 
James W. Cooper, Jr., '82, Plymouth, Mass., Druggist. 
Frank C. Cowles, '72, Superintendent of Construction, firm of Norcross 

Bros., Contractors and Builders. Present address, New Haven, Conn., 

Superintending construction of Yale College "Memorial Hall." 
Homer L. Cowles, '71, Amherst, Mass., Farmer. 
*Wolfred F. Curtis, '74. 
John A. Cutter, M. D., '82, The Ariston, Broadway and 55th street, New 

York City, N. Y., Physician. 
John C. Cutter, '72, Address care Herr Dr. Brauns, Am Kirchthor 7 Halle, 

Germany, Student in Germany. 



*Deceased. 



THE INDEX. lOl 



Samuel C. Damon, '82, Lancaster, Mass., Farmer. 

Fred A. Davis, '87, Lynn, Mass. , Harvard Medical School, Student. 

Charles F. Deuel, 76, Amherst, Mass., Druggist. 

Edwin H. Dickinson, '88, North Amherst, Farmer. 

Richard S. Dickinson, '79, Columbus, Platte County, Neb., Farmer. 

George R. Dodge, '75, Brighton, Mass., Superintendent Bowker Fertilizer 
Co.'s Works. 

Richard F. Duncan, '86, 12 High street, Albany, N. Y, Student in Albany 
Medical College. 

Edward N. Dyer, '72, North Weymouth, Mass., Clergyman. 

Isaac H. Easterbrook, '72, Box 491, Webster, Mass., Farmer in Dudley, 
Mass. 

William A. Eaton, '86, 1131 North 18th street, Omaha, Neb., Express Agent, 
E. B. Wood & Co. 

Frederick C. Eldred, '73, 128 Chambers street, New York City, N. Y., Mer- 
chant. 

Emory A. Ellsworth, '71, Whiting Street Building, Holyoke, Mass., Archi- 
tect and Civil Engineer. 

Frank H. Fairtield, '81, Saco, Me., Poultry Raiser. 

Charles F. W. Felt, '86, Topeka, Kan , Care of Engineering Department, 
A. T. & S. F. R. R, Civil Engineer. 

Samuel H. Field, '88, Hatfield, Mass. , Farmer. 

Jabez F. Fisher, '71, Fitchburg, Mass., Paymaster Cleghorn Mills. 

Cyrus W. Fisherdick, '87, Lincoln, Neb., Law Student, Webster & Holmes. 

Edward R. Fisk, '72, 625 Chestnut street, Philadelphia, Pa., Merchant, Fol- 
well Bro. & Co. 

Charles O. Flagg, '72, Abbott Run, R. L, Farmer. 

Charles L. Flint, Jr., '81, 25 Congress street, Boston, Mass., Stock Broker, 
Dole & Flint. 

Edward R. Flint, '87, Amherst, Mass , Assistant Chemist, State Experiment 
Station. 

*Charles W. Floyd, 82. 

Sanford D. Foot, '78, 101 Chambers street, New York City, N. Y, File 
Manufacturer, Kearney & Foot Co. 

Francis H. Foster, '88, Andover, Mass., Student, Boston Conservatory of 
Music. 

Alvan L. Fowler, '80, San Domingo City, Island of San Domingo, Civil En- 
gineer. 

Fred H. Fowler, '87, Commonwealth Building, Boston, Mass., Clerk to Sec- 
retary of the State Board of Agriculture. 

George E. Fuller, '71, Address unknown. 



^Deceased. 



102 THE INDEX 



Frederick E. Gladwin, '80, 413 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., J. P. 

Mighell & Co., Writing Machines. 
Joel E. G-oldthwait, '85, Marblekead, Mass., Student at Harvard Medical 

School. 
David Goodale, '82. Marlboro', Mass., Farmer. 
Samuel B. Green, '79, St. Anthony Park, Minn., Horticulturist, Experiment 

Station of the College of Agriculture, University of Minnesota. 
Richard B. Grover, '72, 11 Durham street, Boston Mass., Associate Pastor, 

Old South Church. 
George W. M. Guild, '76, 46 Chauncy street, Boston, Mass., Merchant, C. H. 

Farmer & Co. 
Henry Hague, '75, 6 Princeton street, South Worcester, Mass., Clergyman. 
Josiah N. Hall, M. D., '78, Sterling, Weld County, Col., Physician. 
Peter M. Harwood, '75, Barre, Mass., Farmer. 
Boonzo Hashiguchi, '81, Tokio, Japan, President Government Sugar Beet 

Company, Department of Agriculture. 
*Frank W. Hawley, '71. 

Josepk M. Hawley, '76, Berlin, Wis., Banker, C. A. Mather & Co. 
Albert I. Hay ward, '88, Agricultural College, Md., Agriculturist, Maryland 

Agricultural Experiment Station. 
Henry G. K Heath (formerly Koch), L. L. B., '78, Aldrich Court, Broad- 
way, New York City, Lawyer, firm of Heath, Hamilton & Lucas. 
Charles Herms, '84, O'Bannon Station, Jefferson County, Ky., Farmer. 
*Frederlck St. C. Herrick, '71. 
Alfred A. He via, '83, 120 Broadway, New York City, N. Y, or O'Reilly, '38, 

Havana, Cuba, Spanish Department Equitable Life Assurance Society 

of U. S. 
Joseph R. Hibbard, '77, Stoughton, Wis., Farmer. 

Charles D. Hillman, '82, Fresno City, Cal., Nurseryman and Stock-raiser. 
Joseph L. Hills, '81, Burlington, Vt., Chemist, Vermont State Agricultural 

Experiment Station. 
Daniel G. Hitchcock, '74, Warren, Mass. 
J. A. Hobbs, '74, Bloomington, Neb., Special Agent Omaha Loan and Trust 

Company. 
Harry D. Holland, '84, Amherst, Mass., Dealer in Hardware, Holland & 

Gallond. 
Samuel M. Holman, Jr., '83, 11 Pleasant street, Attleboro, Mass., Coal and 

Wood Dealer. 
Lemuel Le B. Holmes, '72, New Bedford, Mass., Lawyer. 
Johnathan E. Holt, '88, Andover, Mass., Farmer. 
Joseph H. Howard, '82, Minnesota, Dak., Cattle-raiser. 

*Deceased. 



THE INDEX. 103 



Charles S. Howe, '78, Akron, O., Professor of Mathematics, Butchel Col- 
lege. 

Clinton S. Howe, '87, Marlboro', Mass., Farmer. 

Elmer D. Howe, '81, Marlboro', Mass., Farmer. 

George D. Howe, '82, North Hadley, Mass., Book-keeper and Mechanic, 
C. Dickinson & Son. 

Waldo V. Howe, '77, Newburyport, Mass., Farmer. 

Hezekiah Howell, '85, Monroe, Orange County, N. Y., Farmer. 

Henry F. Hubbard, '78, 94 Front street, New York City, N. Y., with J. H. 
Catherwood & Co., Tea Importers. 

John F. Hunt, '78, Sundeiland, Mass., Market Gardener. 

Elisha A. Jones, 'S4, Logan Station, Philadelphia, Pa., Farmer. 

Hiram Kendall, '76, Providence, R. I., Kendall Manufacturing Co. 

Francis E. Kimball, '72, Worcester, Mass., Book-keeper, E. W. Vail, 15 
Union street. 

Morris B. Kingman, 'S2, Amherst, Mass., Florist. 

Burton A. Kinney, '82, Portland, Me., Photographic Publisher and Artist, 
Jackson & Kinney. 

Lorenzo F. Kinney, '88, Amherst, Mass., Assistant Horticulturist, Hatch 
Experiment Station. 

Edward E. Knapp, '88, Amherst, Mass., Assistant Chemist, State Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station. 

Walter H. Knapp, '75, Newtonville, Mass., Florist. 

Henry G. H. Koch, '78, See Heath. 

Thomas H. Ladd, '76, Care Wm. Dadmun, Watertown, Mass. 

*Lewis C. Leary, '85. 

Lauren K. Lee, '75, Valley Springs, Dak., Proprietor of Valley Springs 
Roller Mill. 

William G. Lee, '80, 590 Plainfield street, Brightwood. Mass., Architectural 
Draughtsman. 

Walter S. Leland, '73, Warnerville, Mass., Officer in the Massachusetts Re- 
formatory. 

George Leonard, LL.B., '71, Springfield, Mass., Lawyer. 

Edgar H. Libby, '74, 751 Broadway, New York City, N. Y., Editor and 
Publisher American Garden. 

Joseph B. Liudsey, '83, Pawtucket, R. I., Chemist and Chemical Agent, 
L.-B. Darling Fertilizer Co. 

Russell W. Livermore, LL.B., '72, Pates, Robeson County, N. C, Farmer, 
Merchant, Manufacturer of Turpentine, and Lawyer. 

Charles O. Lovell, '78, Northampton, Mass., Photographer. 

Asahel H. Lyman, '73, Manistee, Mich., Druggist. 



*Deceased. 



104 THE INDEX 



Charles E. Lyman, '78, Middlefield, Conn., Farmer. 

♦Henry Lyman, '74. 

Robert W. Lyman, LL.B., '71, Belchertown, Mass., Lawyer. 

George Mackie, M. D., '72, Attleboro, Mass., Physician. 

Richards B. Mackintosh, '86, Peabody, Mass., Superintendent of J. B. 
Thomas' Wool Washer. 

William A. Macleod, B. A., L.L. B., '76, 60 Devonshire street, Boston, Mass., 
Patent Solicitor. 

George H. Mann, '76, Sharon, Mass., Superintendent Cotton Duck Mills. 

James M. Marsh, '87, 167 Chestnut street, Lynn. Mass., Salesman, G. E. 
Marsh & Co. 

Charles L. Marshall, '87, Corner Chelmsford and Plain streets, Lowell, Mass., 
Market Gardener and Florist. 

William E. Martin, '76, Excelsior, Minn , Martin & Sigafoos, Grocers. 

Frederick G. May, '82, Orlando, Orange County, Fla., Orange Grower. 

Samuel T. Maynard, '72, Amherst, Mass., Professor of Botany and Horticul- 
ture, Mass. Agricultural College. 

Charles W. McConnel, D. D. S., '76, 170 Tremont street, Boston, Mass., 
Dentist. 

Charles M. McQueen, '80, 92 Commercial Bank Building, Chicago, 111., 
President of Progressive Publishing Company. 

Thomas F. B. Meehan, '87, 3451 Washington street, Boston, Mass., Student 
at Harvard Law School. 

George M. Miles, '75, Miles City, Mont., Hardware Merchant and Stock- 
raiser. 

George W. Mills, M. D., '73, Medford, Mass., Physician. 

John B. Minor, '73, New Britain, Conn., Folding Paper Box Manufacturer, 

J. H. Minor & Co. 

Charles W. Minott, '83, Burlington, Vt., Horticulturist, Vermont State Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. 

Yataro Mishima, '88, Keishichi, Tokio, Japan. 

Arthur H. Montague, '74, South Hadley, Mass., Farmer, Gran by. 

Robert B. Moore, '88, Amherst, Mass., Assistant Chemist, State Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station. 

Herbert E. Morey, '72, 49 Haverhill street, Boston, Mass., Merchant, Morey, 
Churchill & Morey. 

*James H. Morse, '71. 

William A. Morse, '82, Natick, Mass., Farmer. 

Herbert Myrick, '82, Springfield. Mass., Agricultural Editor, New England 
Homestead. 



*Deceased. 



THE INDEX. 1 OS 



Lockwood Myrick, '78, Northboro, Mass., Gen. Eastern Agent, Williams & 
Clark Co., Fertilizers. 

George E. Newman, '88, Newbury, Mass., Farmer. 

Lewis A. Nichols, '71, Portland, Oregon, Civil Engineer, in charge of 
Railroad Construction, O. R. & H. Co. 

Arthur D. Norcross, '71, Monson, Mass., Merchant. 

David O. Nourse, '83, Blacksburg, Va., Horticulturist, Virginia Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station. 

Frank F. Noyes, '88, Lynn, Mass., Electrical Engineer at Thompson & 
Houston's Electrical Works. 

George E. Nye, '77, 70 Exchange Building, Union Stock Yards, Chicago, 
111., Book-keeper, G. F. Swift & Co. 

Frederick H. Osgood, M. R. C. V. S., '78, Springfield, Mass., Veterinary 
Surgeon. 

J. Clark Osterhout, '87, Lowell, Mass., with The Ingalls Medical Co. 

Harry P. Otis, '75, Florence, Mass., Superintendent Northampton Emery 
Wheel Co., Leeds, Mass. 

Joel B. Page, '71, Conway, Mass., Farmer. 

James B. Paige, D. V. S., '82, Northampton, Mass., Veterinary Surgeon. 

George A. Parker, '76, Halifax, Mass. , Landscape Gardener, Old Colony R. R. 

George L. Parker, '76, Washington, corner Rockwell street, Boston, Mass., 
Florist. 

Henry E. Parker, LL. B., '77, 115 Broadway, New York City, N. Y., Solic- 
itor of Patents. 

William C. Parker, '80, Room 42, 28 School street, Boston, Mass., Real Es- 
tate and Insurance Agent. 

Wilfred A. Parsons, '88, Amherst, Mass., Assistant in the Field Department 
of the State Agricultural Experiment Station. 

William R. Peabody, '72, Atchison, Kansas, in service of Atchison, Topeka 
& Santa Fe" R. R. 

David P. Penhallow, '73, Montreal, Canada, Professor of Botany and Vege- 
table Physiology, McGill University. 

Dana E. Perkins, '82, 79 and 81 Spring street, New York City, N. Y., As- 
sistant Manager, Publishing House of Selmar Hess. 

Austin Peters, D. D. S., M. R. C. V. S., '81, 23 Court street, Boston, Mass., 
Veterinarian to the Mass. Society for promoting Agriculture. 

Charles H. Phelps, '76, 42 Elizabeth street, New York City, N. Y., Clerk. 

Charles S. Phelps, '85, Mansfield, Ct., Vice Director Storrs School Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station. 

Henry L. Phelps, '74, Southampton, Mass., Farmer. 



14 



106 THE IttDfiX. 



Charles S. Plumb, '82, Knoxville, Tenn., Professor of Agriculture and As- 
sistant Director in charge of Field and Feeding Experiments, Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station of the University of Tennessee. 

William H. Porter, '76, Agawam, Mass., Farmer. 

Raymundo M. da S. Porto, '77, Para, Brazil, S. A., Teacher. 

William S. Potter, '76, Lafayette, Ind. , Lawyer, Rice & Potter. 

Charles H. Preston, '83, 161 Tremont street, Boston, Mass., Chemist, with 
State Analyst. 

Edward B. Rawson, '81, Baltimore, Md., Student, Johns Hopkins University. 

James B. Renshaw, B. D., '73, Plainview, Wabasha County, Minn., Pastor 
Congregational Church. 

Frank H. Rice, '75, Hawthorn, Esmeralda County, Nev., Book-keeper, with 
J. W. Hogan. 

Thomas Rice, '88, Shrewsbury, Mass. 

Evan F. Richardson, '81, Millis, Mass., Farmer. 

Samuel H. Richmond, '71, Linadale, Marion County, Fla., Surveyor and 
Orange Grower. 

Henry N. W. Rideout, '87, 23 Howe street, Somerville, Mass., Season Ticket 
Agent, B. & P. R. R. 

George A. Ripley, '80, 1 Wyman street, Worcester, Mass., Traveling Sales- 
man. 

Joseph E. Root, M. D., '76, 839 Asylum avenue, Hartford, Conn., Physician. 

Charles Rudolph, '79, St. Paul, Minn., Lawyer and Real Estate Agent. 

William D. Russell, '71, Turners Falls, Mass., with Montague Paper Co. 

Frank B. Salisbury, '72, Beaconsfield Diamond Fields, South Africa, Trader. 

Kingsbury Sanborn, '86, Riverside, Cal. 

John M. Sears, '76, Monson, Mass., Officer, State Primary School. 

Elliot D. Shaw, '72, Holyoke, Mass., Florist. 

William M. Shepardson, '88, Amherst, Mass., Assistant Horticulturist, Hatch 
Experiment Station, Mass. Agricultural College. 

Walter A. Sherman, M. D., D. V. S., '79, 182 Central street, Lowell, Mass., 
Veterinary Surgeon. 

B. Luther Shimer, '88, Redington, Pa., Stock-raiser and Fruit Culturist. 

Asa F. Shiverick, '82, Wood's Holl, Mass., Chemist and Assistant Manager 
Pacific Guano Company's Works. 

Henry B. Simpson, '73, Stafford Court House, Va., Farmer. 

Edwin B. Smead, '71, 394 Park street, Hartford, Conn., Principal Watkin- 
son Juvenile Asylum and Farm School. 

Frank S. Smith, '74, Albany, Wis., Manufacturer, Albany Woolen Mills. 

George P. Smith, '79, Sunderland, Mass., Farmer. 

Hiram F. M. Smith, M. D., 'SI, Orange, Mass., Physician. 

Llewellyn Smith, '84, 43 Chatham street, Boston, Mass., Traveling Sales- 
man, Bowker Fertilizer Co. 



THE INDEX. 107 



Thomas E. Smith, '76. West Chesterfield, Mass., Manufacturer. 

George H. Snow, '72, Leominster, Mass., Farmer. 

Frederick M. Somers, '72, 47 Exchange Place, New York City, N. Y., 
Journalist. 

*John E. Southmayd, '77. 

Andre A. Southwick, '75, Taunton, Mass., Farm Superintendent, Taunton 
State Lunatic Hospital. 

Abel W. Spalding, '81, 712 Lumber Exchange, Minneapolis, Minn., Land- 
scape Architect and Civil Engineer. 

Lewis A. Sparrow, '71, 38 South Market street, Boston, Mass., Manufacturer 
of Fertilizers, Judson & Sparrow. 

Amos L. Spofford, '78, Georgetown, Mass., Mechanic. 

Horace E. Stockbridge, '78, Lafayette, Ind., Director of Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station of Purdue University. 

Almon H. Stone, '80, Santee, Neb., Teacher, Santee Agency. 

George S. Stone, '36, Otter River, Mass., Farmer. 

Winthrop E. Stone, '82, Knoxville, Tenn., Chemist of Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station of University of Tennessee. 

George P. Strickland, '71, 850 Courtland street, St. Paul, Minn., Machinist, 
St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba R. R. 

Roscoe W. Swan, M. D., '79, 32 Pleasant street, Worcester, Mass., Physi- 
cian. 

Cyrus A. Taft, '76, Whitinsville, Mass., Draughtsman. 

Levi R. Taft, '82, Agricultural College P. O., Mich., Professor of Horti- 
culture, Agricultural College of Michigan. 

Alfred H. Taylor, '82, Burnett, Neb., Dealer in Live Stock. 

Frederick P. Taylor, '81, Athens, Coke County, East Tenn., Farmer. 

Isaac N. Taylor, Jr., '85, 513 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., with 
Thompson & Houston Electric Co. 

Benoni Tekirian, '85, 1 Broadway, New York City, N. Y., Merchant. 

Edgar E. Thompson, '71, Brockton, Mass., Principal Whitman School. 

Samuel C. Thompson, '72, 2775 Third avenue, New York City, N. Y., Civil 
Engineer. 

Wilbur H. Thurston, '82, Stouts P. O. , Adams County, O., Partner and 
Manager, "Tusculum Farm," Rome, O. 

William N. Tolman, '87, 60 Devonshire street, Boston, Mass., with E. W. 
Bowditch, Sanitary Engineer. 

Firmino de S. Torelly, '87, Cidade do Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul, Bra- 
zil, Stock-raiser. 

George H. Tucker, '71, West Spring Creek, Pa., Civil Engineer. 

Frederick Tuckerman, M. D., '78, Amherst, Mass., Physician, 



'^Deceased. 



108 THE INDEX 



George P. Urner, '76, Melville, Gallatin County, Mon., Sheep-raiser. 

Albert T. Wakefield, B. A., M. D., 78, 301 Main street, Peoria, 111., Physi- 
cian. 

Hiram E. B. Waldron, 79, North Rochester, Mass., Parmer. 

Willard C. Ware, '71, 255 Middle street, Portland, Me., Manager, Boston 
and Portland Clothing Co. 

Clarence D. Warner, '81, Amherst, Mass., Professor of Mathematics and 
Physics, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Seth S. Warner, '73, Northampton, Mass., Traveling Salesman for Bowker 
Fertilizer Co. 

John H. Washburn, '78, Gottingen, Germany, Student. 

Charles H. Watson, '87, 122 Tremont street, Boston, Mass., Law Student. 

James H. Webb, L. L. B., '73, 69 Church street, New Haven, Conn., Attor- 
ney and Counselor at Law, Ailing & Webb. 

Charles Wellington, Ph. D., '73, Amherst, Mass., Associate Professor of 
Chemistry, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Henry Wells, '72, 211 Home Insurance Building, Chicago, 111., Representa- 
tive of the Missouri Car and Foundry Co. 

Howard G. Wetmore, M. D., '76, 41 West Ninth street, New York City, 
N. Y., Physician. 

Homer J. Wheeler, '83, Gottingen, Germany, Student of Chemistry. 

William Wheeler, '71, 75 State street, Boston, Mass., Civil and Hydraulic 
Engineer. 

Frank Le P. Whitney, '71, 2179 Washington street, Boston, Mass., Boot and 
shoe Dealer. 

Wm. Channing Whitney, '72, Minneapolis, Minn., Architect. 

Arthur Whitaker, '81, Needham, Mass., Farmer. 

Henry H. Wilcox, '81, Lihue, Kauai, H. I., Sugar Planter. 

John E. Wilder, '82, 179 Lake street, Chicago, 111., Wholesale Leather 
Dealer, Wilder & Co. 

James S. Williams, '82, Glastonbury, Conn., Farmer. 

John E. Williams, '76, Amherst, Mass., Editor Amherst Record. 

John F. Winchester, D. V. S. , '75, Lawrence, Mass., Veterinary Surgeon. 

Joseph L. Windsor, '82, Auburn, N. Y., Superintendent Auburn City Rail- 
way Co. 

Frank W. Wood, '73, Address unknown. 

Rufus P. Woodbury, '78, Kansas City, Mo., Editor, Kansas City Daily 
Times. 

Edward E. Woodman, '74, Dan vers, Mass., Florists' and Garden Supplies, 
E. & C. Woodman. 

George C. Woolson, ('71) '86, Passaic, N. J., Superintendent of Parks, New 
York City, N. Y. 



THE INDEX. 1 09 



Joseph Wyman, '77, 126 Washington avenue, Chelsea, Mass., Book-keeper, 

P. O. Squire & Co., Boston. 
Harrie McK. Zeller, '74, Hagerstown, Md. 



DECEASED. 

Jabez W. Clay, '75, October 1, 1880, of pneumonia, at New York City, N.Y. 
Wolfred F. Curtis, '74, November 8, 1878, of inflammation of the brain, at 

Westminster, Mass. 
Charles W. Floyd, '82, October 10, 1883, of consumption, at Dorchester, 

Mass. 
Frank W. Hawley, '71, October 28, 1883, of apoplexy, at Belchertown, 

Mass. 
Frederick St. C. Herrick, '71, January 19, 1884, at Methuen, Mass. 
Henry Lyman, '74, January 8, 1879, of pneumonia, at Middlefield, Conn. 
James H. Morse, '71. June 21, 1883, of Bright's disease, at Salem, Mass. 
John E. Southmayd, '77, December 11, 1878, of consumption, at Minneapolis, 

Minn. 
Lewis C. Leary, '85, April 2, 1888, of Heart Disease, at Cambridge, Mass. 




Graduates Holding Positions in Agricultural 
Colleges and Experiment Stations. 

Bishop, William H., '82, Horticulturist, Maryland Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. 

Brigham, Arthur A., '78, Professor of Agriculture, Imperial College of 
Agriculture, Sapporo, Japan. 

Brooks, William P., '75, Professor of Agriculture, Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College, Amherst. 

Caldwell, William H., '87, Assistant Agriculturist, Pennsylvania State 
College Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Carpenter, Frank B., '88, Assistant Chemist, North Carolina Agricultural 
Experiment Station. 

Clark, John W., '72, Horticulturist, Missouri State Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. 

Flint, Edward R. , '87, Assistant Chemist, State Agricultural Experiment 
Station, Amherst. 

Green, Samuel B., '79, Horticulturist, Experiment Station of the College 
of Agriculture, University of Minnesota. 

Hay ward, Albert I., '88, Agriculturist, Maryland Agricultural Experiment 
Station. 

Hills, Joseph L., '81, Chemist, Vermont State Agricultural Experiment 
Station. 

Kinney, Lorenzo F., '88, Assistant Horticulturist, Hatch Experiment Sta- 
tion, Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst. 

Knapp, Edward E., '88, Assistant Chemist, State Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, Amherst. 

Maynard, Samuel T., '72, Professor of Horticulture and Botany, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College. 

Minott. Charles W., '83, Horticulturist, Vermont State Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station. 

Moore, Robert B., '88, Assistant Chemist, State Agricultural Experiment 
Station, Amherst. 

Nourse, David O., '83, Horticulturist, Virginia Agricultural Experiment 
Station. 

Parsons, Wilfred A., '88, Assistant in Field Department, State Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station, Amherst. 

Phelps, Charles S., '85, Vice-Director Storrs School Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, Mansfield, Conn. 

Plumb, Charles S., '82, Assistant Director in charge of Field and Feed- 
ing Experiments, Agricultural Experiment Station of University 
of Tennessee. 

Shepardson, William M., '88, Assistant Horticulturist, Hatch Experiment 
Station, Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst. 

Stockbridge, Horace E, '78, Probably Director of Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station of Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind. 

Stone, Winthrop E., '82, Chemist of Agricultural Experiment Station 
of University of Tennessee. 

Taft, Levi R., '82, Professor of Horticulture, Agricultural College of 
Michigan. 

Warner. Clarence D., '81, Professor of Mathematics and Physics, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, Amherst. 

Wellington, Charles, '73, Associate Professor of Chemistry, Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, Amherst. 




TO OUR ADVERTISERS : 

We desire to express our thanks for 
your liberality which has so materially aided 
ns in making the Index a financial success. 



TO THE STUDEHTS : 

The Editors politely request you to 
patronize, as far as possible, only those who 
haYe ghren us their support. 




Carpenter to " Cope." — How often does the Boston Herald comet 





9 No, 7 CIGARETTES. 



Cigarette Smokers who are willing 
to pay a little more than the price 
charged for the ordinary trade Cigarettes 
will find THIS BRAND superior to all 
others. 



THE RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT NO. 7 CIGARETTES 

are made from the brightest, most delicately flavored, and highest cost 
GOLD LEAP grown in Virginia. This is the Old and Original brand of 
Straight Cut Cigarettes, and was brought out by us in the year 1875. 

BEWARE OF IBVUTATBONS, 

And observe that the firm name as below is on every package. 

ALLEN & OTEE, Manufacturers, RICHMOND, U. 



H. O. PEASE, 




COOK'S BLOCK, UP STAIRS, 



AMHEEST, 



MASS. 



" Mac" sends Fletcher down town for a gas wick. 



Dec. 15. — Major A. locked out of examinations. 




E. & H. T. ANTHONY & 00., 

Manufacturers and Importers of 



PHOTOGRAPHiclNSTRUMEN TSit[)> 



Apparatus and Supplies. 

£50 1 Broadway, - New York. 

Sole proprietors of the Patent Satchel Detective, Schmidt 
Detective, Fairy, Novel, and Bicycle Cameras, and sole agents 
for the Celebrated Dallmeyer Lenses. 

Amateur Outfits in great variety from $9.00 upward. Send 
for Catalogue or call and examine. 

More than forty years established in this line of business. 

T. W. SLOAN, 

DEALER IN 

Ladies' and Gentlemen's FINE BOOTS AND SHOES. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO REPAIRING. 
See our Reliable Goods, which are warranted to give satisfaction. 

No. 2, Phoenix Row, AMHERST, MASS. 

Furniture ond Carpet Rooms, 

MAKES A SPECIALTY OF 

STUDENTS' FURNITURE, CARPETS, RUGS, 
DRAPERIES, BEDDING, Etc. 

Book Cases, Blacking Cases, Desks, Window Shades, Picture Frames, 
Cord, Etc., at Lowest Prices. 

Save Freight and Cartage. Save money by purchasing here. 

10 Phoenix Row, AMHERST, MASS. 



Jan. 9. — Tabby and Barry have a set-to on the stairs. 




March 1st. — Base-ball on the snow crusi. 



MIXTURES FOR PIPE OR CIGARETTE : 
THREE KINGS, Turkish, Periqtie and Virginia. 
MELIOW MIXTURE, TtuJtish and Perique. 
TURKISH and VIRGINIA. 

JPERIQUE and VIRGINIA.. 
GENUINE TURKISH. 

FLAKE CUTS, ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE PIPE. 



Vanity Fair, Virginia Flakes. Old (MI. 

MONTE CRISTO, THE EATESI MIXTURE. 

Salmagundi, Granulated Mixture. 

K TM B J^TL, JL'S 
STRAIGHT CUT CIGARETTES. 

Unsurpassed in quality. Used by people of refined taste. 

Highest Award at Brussels, 1888. 

The Finest Smoking Mixtures are of our Manufacture. 

WM. S. KIMBALL & CO., 

Fifteen First Prise Medals. ROCHESTER, N. T. 

J. L. LOVELL'S, 

The Oldest and Most Reliable in Hampshire County. 



Portraits, Lantern Stifles, and. Window Transparencies, 

OF THE FINEST QUALITY. 



CO 
-^ 



Almost Forty Years in the Business. 

El SEND FOR 
J CATALOGUE. 

JAMES J. H. GREGORY, 

MARBLEHEAD, . MASSACHUSETTS. 





>S 

CO 

8- 



Sept. 20. — Sellew arrives and College legins. 



Sept. 30th. — West, '90, goes off on a "peanut drunk." 



fc*^*^^^*^^^^^^^^a^^*!*!*IB*aBia&^^^*t***WlW4»^ \ 



^\JY THE B£ S:r 



ACCIDENTS OF 



Travel, Sport, or Business 



ARE INSURED AGAINST BY 




ORIGINAL 
ACCIDENT 

COMPANY 
OF AfilERSCA, 



LARGEST IN THE WORLD; 



^°, BEST OF LIFE COMPANIES. 



LOWEST RATES CONSISTENT WITH SECURITY. 

FUIjIj PMIKCIPJLX, SUM paid for loss of hands, feet, hand 

and foot, or sight, by accident ; ONE-THIRD same 

for loss of single hand or foot. 

NO EXTRA CHARGE for European Travel and. Residence. 

8TC RiPQfiSSRPFQ are sufficient to pay AT ONCE the 
1 10 liEDUUnuLO most enormous mass of claims 
that even great railroad and steamboat accidents can "bring 
upon it. PATS ALL CLAIMS, without discount, immedi- 
ately on receipt of satisfactory proofs. MOST LI.BEEAL NON- 
FOKFEITTJKE provisions in all its Policies. 

Paid Policy-holders, $15,500,000. 

ASSETS, $9,847,000. SURPLUS, $1,944,000. 



Jas. G. Batterson, Pres. Rodney Dennis, Sec. 

John E. Morris, Ass't Sec. 



■ACCIDENTS "^TIXjXj IHI.A-IPrF'IEIfcT." 



"Moral: Insure In The Travelers." 



Sept. 3lst. — He comes hack with a " brick " in his hat. 



Oct. 3d. — Smith, '90, puts on a clean collar. 

The Boys all know that Prank's is the 
place to get a Square Meal, and a Good Bed, 
and a First-class Rig for Hamp. Everything 
in the Game Line can he had at short no- 
tice. 

FRANK P. WOOD. 
W. E. STEBBINS, 



A few good horses to let to Careful Drivers. 
Pleasant Street, AMHERST, MASS. 

The North British and Mercantile Insurance Company, 

OP LONDON AND EDINBURGH. 

The Phoenix Insurance Co., of London, 



The Commercial Union Assurance Co., of London 

Give Sound and Reliable Insurance, and Pay every 
HONEST CLAIM when due. 

E. A. Thomas, Agt., 5 Cook's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



Goddard, try Soajrine, 



Prof. Walker gets his heard trimmed, Saturday. 

Elegant Goods for the Holidays 

AT 

O. G. COUCH & SON'S, 

Consisting of DECORATED ENGLISH WARE, from the Minton, Doulton 
and Copeland Potteries. FRENCH. GERMAN, and JAPANESE PORCE- 
LAIN. A splendid variety of LAMPS, and in every way the best selected 
stock we have ever offered our customers in Amherst. 

Wc JHL IBE C MOIE&C&^.r^ 

Druggist and Apothecary 

SELLS THE BEST 

PERFUMERY, FANCY and TOILET GOODS, CHOICE CONFECTION- 
ERY, POCKET CUTLERY, RAZORS, VIOLIN, GUITAR, and 
BANJO STRINGS, IMPORTED and DOMESTIC CIGARS, 
BEST QUALITY CIGARETTES, CHEWING and 
SMOKING TOBACCOS, SMOKERS' GOODS. 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 



BORDER YOUR COAL HERE. 

No. 6 Phoenix Row, AMHERST, MASS. 

ML ML SIPia^IF& 9 

Bookseller, Stationer and News Dealer, 

PAPER HANGINGS and BORDERS, 

TOYS, FANCY GOODS, CUTLERY, &c. Agents for E. Reynold's Rubber 
Stamps. Second-hand Text Books bought and sold. 

AMHEKST, - MASS. 

Sunday, no Chapel exercises. 



Nov. 1st. — Prof. "Sammy" gets a shave. 



SELLS AT LOW PRICES 

^Wqtcl|GS, l^iijgs, Je"\vteli<y.-J* 

CLOCKS AND SILVER WARE, 
OPTICAL GOODS and MUSICAL MERCHANDISE. 

FINE WATCHES Repaired and Warranted by 

E. K. BENNETT, next to Post Office. 
^EDWIN NELSON,** 



DEALER IN 



Classical, Miscellaneous Books, 

COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS, New and Second-hand. SCHOOL BOOKS, 
STATIONERY and FANCY GOODS. 

HSIT'Cash Paid for Second-hand Text Books. 

No. 3 Post Office Block, AMHEKST, MASS. 

J. E. KELLEY, 

MERCHANT TAILOR. 

Kellogg's Block, AMHERST, MASS. 

A Complete line of Fine Cloths always on hand. 

Students' patronage solicited and satisfaction guaranteed. 

DEALER IN 

Fancy Groceries, Crockery, 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, CIGARETTES, 
FRUITS and CONFECTIONERY, LAMP GOODS and KEROSENE OIL. 

Merchants' Row, AMHERST, MASS. 

McCloud wants to know how many pounds in a hundred iveiyJd. 



Oastro breaks a slide and thinks it cost $200. 

G. W. BLODGETT & CO. 



DEALERS IN FINE 



Ready-made Clothing, 

GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS, 

HATS, CAPS, BA&S A.ND VALISES. 
We always have the Latest Styles in the New York and Boston Markets. 



YOU MAN and DUN LAP HATS always in stock. 

P. S.— AGENTS TROY LAUNDRY. GOODS TAKEN TUESDAY 
AND RETURNED SATURDAY. 

C. H. SANDERSON, 



• cash dealer in 






GENTS 1 FURNISHING GOODS, 
Hate, @ap^, TsTmfepella^, (&®. 

AGENT FOR STEAM LAUNDRY. 
Dickinson's Block, - AMHERST, MASS. 

Mac. — I slept last night in the arms of Murphy. 



Feb. 5. — Doctor forgets Jn's necktie. 



Wood's House Hair Dressing Rooms. 



Soaps, Oils, Bay Rum, and the Celebrated Bay State 
Tonic for Dandruff, for sale. 

H. E. MESSENGER, Proprietor. 
A.. J3. CULVER, 



■PROPRIETOR OP 



CULVER'S DOMESTIC BAKERY : 

Pleasant St., AMHERST, MASS. 
Next north of Lee & Phillips' Store. 

JTOEEN" METLTJLJLilEI^J 



DEALER IN 




i-mf 




kT 



MEAT, (iAME, «fee. 
Palmer's Block, - - AMHERST, MASS. 

FlfcAJ^K O. PLUMB, 

air Ireiifajf Booiul 

No. 3, Phoenix Row, upstairs. 



Razors Concaved and Honed in short order. 
Oct. 23. — Weed swallows a tooth pick in prayer meeting. 



Why do the girls call "Pkip" "The Innocent?" 




Acid Phosphate. 

Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. Horsford. 
ESPECIA^LLT RECOMMENDED FOR 

Dyspepsia, Nervousness, Exhaus- 
tion, Headache, Tired Brain. 

And all Diseases arising from Indigestion and Nerve Exhaustion. 

This is not a compounded "patent medicine." but a preparation of the phosphates 
and phosphoric acid in the form required by the system. 

It aids digestion without injury, and is a beneficial food and tonic for the brain 
and nerves. 

It makes a delicious drink 'with water and sugar only, and agrees with such stim- 
ulants as are necessary to take. 

Dr. E. W.Hill, Glens Falls, N. Y., says : "An excellent remedy for atonic 
dyspepsia, nervous and general debility, or any low state of the system." 

Dr. D. A. Stewart, Winona, Minn., says : "Entire satisfaction in cases of per- 
verted digestion, loss of nerve-power, mal-nutrition and kindred ailments." 

Dr. G-. H. Leach, Cairo, 111., says: "Of great power in dyspepsia and nervous 
prostration." 

HSU" Descriptive pamphlet free. 

Rum ford Chemical Works, Providence, R. I. 

BEWARE OF SUBSTITUTES AND IMITATIONS. 

Be sure the word "Horsford's" is printed on the label. All others are spurious. 
Never sold in bulk. 

Prof. Maynard. — Who are the best strawberry pickers, Toft — girls. 



Whiskers ! five a bag. 



The Cooley Creamers! 





Ten Gold Medals and Nineteen Silver Medals 

Awarded for 

Superiority of Process and 

Product. 

Are used by the Leading 

Dairymen of this country and 

Europe, and over 

65,000 others. 

The Higgius Sweepstakes of $250, at International 
Dairy Fair, New York, 1878. 

The Ashton Sweepstakes of 1125, at International Dairy 
Fair, New York, 1878. 

Gold Medal, London, 1879. 

Gold Medal, Paris, France, 1882. 

13 Premiums out of a possible 21 New York Dairy and 
Cattle Show, May 10-14. 1887. 

Gold Medal and 5 First Premiums out of a possible 7 

at Bay State Fair, Springfield, Mass., Oct. 4-11, 1888. 

Gold Medal, Delaware State Fair, Dover, Del., 1888. 
And many others too numerous to mention. 

Full line of Creamery and Dairy Apparatus. 




SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CIRCULARS. 

Vermont Farm Machine Co 

BELLOWS FALLS, YT. 



'! 



Say Woodbury, any whiskers on your teeth 



Goddarcl looking over Indexes. Who is Miss Alge Bra? 



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S 
STEEL PENS. 

THE MOST PERFECT OF PETVS. 

For Artistic Use in Fine Drawings, Nos. 659 

(The celebrated Crowquill), 290 and 291. 
For Fine Writing, Nos. 303, 604, and Ladies', 

170. 
For Broad Writing, Nos. 294, 389, and Stub 

Point, 849. 
For General Writing, Nos. 404, 332, 390, and 
604. 

JOSEPH GILLOTT &> SONS, 

91 John Street, N. Y. 
HENR Y HOE, Sole Agent. 






Awarded First Premium and Special 
Prize of Silver Medal at ML 
Holly Fair. 
Extremely large, very late, exquisitely beau- 
tiful, (bright yellow and carmine) a heavy 
and sure cropper; the only large, late, hand- 
some Free Stone Peach. Flesh yellow, su- 
perb quality, very free and small pit — the 
most profitable for market, invaluable 
for the home garden, and unsurpassed for 
canning or evaporating— just what every- 
body wants. Descriptive circular with tes- 
timonials of practical fruit-growers and col- 
ored plate free. 

300,000 trees standard varieties of Peaches 
— a large stock of Apple, Pear, Plum, Cherry, 
Quince, and other Orchard Fruits, and an 
immense stock of Blackberries, Strawber- 
ries, Raspberries, Grapes and other small 
Fruits. Headquarters for Monmouth and 
Gandy (the best early and late) Strawber- 
ries, Erie Blackberry, Golden Queen 
Raspberry, Spaulding and Abundance 
(curculio-proof) Plums, Meech's Quince, 
Lawson (Comet) Pear Delaware Winter 
Apple and Nut-Bearing Trees. 
Lovett'sJCatalogue for Fall of 1888, giving plain and practical instructions for cul- 
ture and management, with honest descriptions (telling the defects as well as the 
merits) of all worthy varieties of Orchard and Small Fruits, both new and old, gratis. 

•J. T. IjOVETT CO., Zittle Silver, JV. <T. 



Prof. Femald. — That West needs watching. 



Oct. 15. — Freshman Howe runs away. 



WEB! 



WITH OR WITHOUT PATENT INDEX. 



VEBSTEffi&f the 
mOT10NAn]M THEBEST k ' 



Besides many otner vaiuaule tables trie latest is- 
sue of this work contains 



of 118,000 Words, 3000 Engravings, 

A Gazetteer of the World 

locating and describing 25,000 Places, 

A Bioyraptoicaf Dictionary 

of nearly 10,000 Noted Persons, 

A Dictionary of Fiction 

found only in Webster, 



Webster excels in SYNONYMS which are appro- 
priate!/ found in the body of the work. 

It is an invaluable companion in every School, 
and at every Fireside. 



IT IS THE STANDARD 

Authority in 

The Government Printing Oflice, 

and with the 

United States Supreme Court. 

Recommended by the 

State Supt's Schools of 36 States, 

and by 

Over Fifty College Presidents. 

For supplying Schools, 

Every State Purchase 

has been of Webster. 

The London Times of England, 

Says: It is the best Dictionary of the 
language. 

Hon. Geo. Bancroft, the Historian, 

Says : It is superior to all others. 

Toronto Globe, Canada, says : 

Its place is in the very highest rank. 
Similar testimonials have been given 
by hundreds of the best American and 
European Scholars. GET THE BEST. 



The work now has 3000 more Words and nearly 2000 more Illustrations than found in 

any other American Dictionary. Sold by all Booksellers. Illustrated Pamphlet free. 

Published by G. & C. MEBKIAM & CO., Springfield, Mass., U. S. A. 



JAMES W. BRINE 

UNIVERSAL COLLEGE 




Importer, Manufacturer and Dealer in all 

Spoi^fiqg qijd S^le^ic Qoocls. 

Special Terms to Clubs and Associations. 
BASE BALL, TENNIS, FOOT BALL. 

JAMES W. BRINE. 



10 and 11 Harvard How, \ 
130 Harvard Street, f 



CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 



1U06 CHAPEL STREET, NEW HAVEN, CONN. 
SEiF" Send for Catalogue free. 



Nov. 26. — '91 Index Board elected. 



Philips. — When is the Index to come out? 
I^Eli: Ac PHILLIPS, 

P ] lumbers, Steam, and Gas Fitters. 

HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 

ALSO DEALERS IN 

I3TSTOVES, FURNACES, TIN WARE =» 

AMIIKR^T, MASS. 



Headquarters for " LAUGHING GAS." Teeth extracted positively with- 
out pain. All operations in Dentistry performed in a skill- 
ful and satisfactory manner. 

LEACH & DICKINSON, Dentists, Kellogg's Block. 




TaDMC Suiiva^, 



143 Main Street, Northampton. 




The Leading Photographic Studio in the country. 
Special Rates to M. A. C. Students. 

CALL AND SEE OUR WORK. 



Stowe. — Give me something to eat and I am happy. 



Prof. Wellington calls Lage, Lager. 



L. L. CLARK, D. D. 8., 
ct mr rm a w .-. itb in* jo* m/i 



Williams Block, AMHERST, MASS. 



All operations performed in a thorough, careful man- 
ner, and at very reasonable prices. Nitrous Ox- 
ide, Gas and Ether, given when desired. 

The undersigned is pleased to announce to 
his former patrons and others desiring Game 
Spreads or Dinners, that he is now prepared 
to accommodate "at short notice," large or 
small parties. Ample Dining Room capacity 
for 200 people. 

AMHERST HOUSE, AMHERST, MASS. 

J. B RYAN, Proprietor. 

Oo 3D. HIlJr^TPs 

RETAIL DKALER IN 

Coal and Wood of all kinds. 



FIRE INSURANCE AGENT. 

Office in Hunt's Block, - - AMHERST, MASS. 

Nov. 12. — Prof. Lane gets locked out. 



Wanted, a rubber baby for Phillips. 



BART LETT BROTHERS. 



55 D wight Street, 

HOLYOKE, MASS. 



near Post Office, 

BELCHERTOWN, MASS. 



All operations performed in a careful and thorough manner, and fully war- 
ranted. JBelchertown Office open the first three days each week. 




8. F. MERRITT, 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



We are the authorized manufacturer of the 

0. T. V. FRATERNITY PINS. 



Any letter addressed as above will receive prompt attention. 



Why does Hull, '91, go to Smith College? 



riS'^S 




'•J863 



DATE DUE 




































































































UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
LIBRARY 



LD 
3234 

N25 
v.20 
1890 
cop # 2 

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