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i.': 



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This set of yearbooks ivas compiled 
by the staff of the 1967 Massachu- 
setts Index and donated in the 
interest of paying tribute to those 
tvho have created the history and 
traditions existing at the University 
of Massachusetts. 

Alexander Dean, Editor-in-chief 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/index1891univ 



7X. 



Headquarters for Everything for the 

FARM, GARDEN AND LAWN. 



H' 



.q 




POU1.TRY SUPPLIES, 

Excelsior Ground Beef Scraps, Excelsior Ground Oyster Shells, Dole's Des- 
sicated Fish, Haven's Condition Powders, Rust's Egg Producer. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAiL DEALERS IN 

Farming Tools, Seeds and Wooden Ware. 

PLANTS, VINES, TREES, SHRUBS. 

PARKER & WOOD, 



No, 49 North Market St., 



BOSTON, MASS. 



LIBRM 



WRY A. 



.OTS 



-Wd: -1-, COOK'S BLOCK, 

AMHER^i. MASS. - 



AMS, PHAR.. D. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



DRUGS, MEDICINES, 
PERFUMERY, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 
PARK AND TILFORD'S 
CIGARS, IMPORTED 
CIGARETTS AND 
SMOKING TOBACCOS, 
FISHING TACKLE. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

SPORTING GOODS, 

POWDER, SHOT, 

PRIMERS AND GUN 

WADS, METALLIC AND 
PAPER SHELLS, 
METALLIC CAR- 
TRIDGES. 



' Sunday and Night Calls responded to at residence, first door west of 
Wood's Hotel. 

TEN GOLD MEDALS, 

WERE AWARDED TO 

Butter Made by the COOLEY CREAMER PROCESS. 

During the Fall Fairs of 1888, as follows : 

Kansas State Fair, Gold Medal, F. 0. Miller. 

Minnesota State Fair, Gold Medal, . . . . C. LeVesconte. 

Iowa State Fair, Gold Medal, . . . . A. M. Bingham. 

Virginia District Fair, Gold Medal, ... M. Erskine Miller. 

Main State Fair, Gold Medal B. F. & F. H. Briggs. 

Bay State Fair, Gold Medal, .... H. E. Cummings. 

New .Jersey State Fair, Gold Medal, . . . Holly Grove Farm. 

Delaware State Fair, Gold Medal, .... C. Frear & Son. 

Va. Agricultural and Mercantile Ex"n, (Jold Medal, J. R. Anderson, Jr. 
Stafford, Ct., Ag'l Society, Gold Medal, Lebanon, Ct., Creamery Ass'n. 

No otlier Creamery can show a record tliat will begin to compare with 
the Coolcy ("reamer. Its products for ten years has taken the leading pre- 
miums in this ('ountry and Europe. 

MANUFACTUUED I?Y THE 

VERMONT FARM MACHINE CO.. - BELLOWS FALLS, VT. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



We would iiiforiu the friends of tlie College, and tlie public generally, 
that we are prepared to supply 

Fruit and Ornamental Trees and Shrubs, Small Fruits 

and Plants, Cut Flowers and Designs, all true 

to name at the Lowest Price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address 

Prof. S. T. MAYNARD, Amherst, Mass. 



CHARLES DEUEL, 



Dpufgisl ai^d GbemisI 



Toilef ^i^ticles, S|9origes, Bi'qstiGs, e^c. 

►^AMHERST .•. H0USE /. DRUG .-, ST0RE, 
AMHERST, MASS, 



C. H. SANDERSON, 



-CASH DEALER IN- 



Ready-made Glofel^ing, 

<- 6EN¥g' 4 FaR]V[IgpiN6 ^ 600Dg, 4^ 
HATS, CAPS, UMBRELLAS, ETC. 

AGENT FOR STEAM LAUNDRY. 

Cash Row, - - AMHERST, MASS. 
E. R. BEN^TETT, 

SELLS AT LOW PELCES 

\iJ3te\)e% # 1^19^5, # Jeu/elery, 

CLOCKS A IV D SILVEl! WARE, 
OPTICAL COODS AND MUSICAL ME l!(IIA N f)l SK. 

FINE WATCHES KEPAIHED AND WAHRANTED BY 

E. R. BENNETT,, next to Post Office, - AMHERST. 



-JE\\^ELER^ 



Si] |9 plies, JZc^c. 
WOODS' BLOCK, - - . AMHERST, MASS. 



AB9_kep^t ©ask ^h©e ^t©pe, 

You can get tlie most for your money 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, 
SLIPPERS, TRUNKS AND BAGS. 



^REPAIRING •:• NEATLY ■> DONE-S^- 



HAWES & STINSON, 

CASH ROW, - - _ _ AMHERST, MASS. 

Liitertj atttl Feed Stalile. 

GEO. M. CHAMBERLAIN, Proprietor. 



HACKS, CARRYALLS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS, TO LET AT 

FAIR PRICES. 

St^= BARGE for the use of Small Parties. 

5!^" Accommodations for Transient Feeding. 

Rear of Phoenix Row, - AMHERST, MASS. 

F. If. BUDDIPTQ (^ CO., 

JaiIor5 apd lmporter3. 

Samples Sent on Application. Dress-suits to Let. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



Massachusetts llpicultural Colle 



A RARE CHANCE for young men to obtain a thorough practical edu- 
cation. The cost reduced to a minimum. Tuition free to residents of Massa- 
chusetts, An opportunity to pay a portion of expenses by work in the farm 
and horticultural departments. 

REQUISITES FOR ADMISSION. Candidates must be fifteen years of 
age or over, and pass satisfactory oral and vviitten examinations in English 
Grammar, Geography, History of tlie United States, Arithmetic, Algebra to 
Quadratic Equations, and tlie Metric S.ystem. 

EXPENSES. Board in clubs is about ip2..50 per week and in families $3.50 
to $5.00. Room rent, *5.00 to $16.00 per term. Fuel, $7.00 to 20.00 per year. 
Washing, 40 to 50 cents per dozen. Military Suit, $17.75. Books at whole- 
sale prices. Furniture, second-hand or new, for sale in town. 

INSTRUCTION. The Course of Study is intended to give thorough and 
practical instruction in the five departments, assisting to give a better undei-- 
standing of : 

1. Agricultural, theoretical and practical stock-breeding, drainage and 
irrigation, special ci'ops, etc. 

2. Botany, including horticulture, market gardening, arboriculture, care 
of greenhouses, etc. 

8. Chemistry in its application to agriculture and the industries. Practice 
work in the laboratory. Geology and mineralogy, so far as relating to the 
composition of soils, mineial constituents, etc, 

4. Animal life zoology, entomology, veterinary science, human anatomy 
and physiology. 

5. Mathematics and physics; including practical work in surveying, road- 
making, laying of tiles, etc. ; Meteorology in the relation of climate to crops, 
etc. 

MILITARY INSTRUCTION. Under the law by which the College was 
founded, instruction in military drill is required, and each student unless 
physically debarred, drills under direction of a regular army officer three 
hours per week. 

ADVANTAGrES. The facilities for instruction and illustration are of the 
best, and include a working library of 8000 volumes, jjroperly classified and 
arranged; the state collection of birds, insects, reptiles and rocks of Massa- 
chusetts; the Knowlton Herbarium of 10,000 species of named botanical 
specimens ; the 1500 species and varieties of plants, types of the vegetable 
kingdom, cultivated in the Durfee plant house; the large collections and li- 
brary of Amherst College within easy access; a farm of 383 acres divided 
between the agricultural, horticultural and experimental departments, em- 
bracing every variety of soil, from meadow, pasturage and lowland, to 
swamp, hillside and woodland; a chemical laboratory, commodious and amply 
equipped, the State Agricultural Experiment Station upon Che college fai-m, 
and the experiment station established under the provisions of the Hatch 
Bill, offering splendid opportunities for observing the application of science 
to the problems of agriculture. 

Catalogues and further information can be obtained on application to the 
President. 

HENRY H. GOODELL. Amherst. Mass. 



Tlie Nortl Britist aM lercaiitile Insurance Coinpaif, 

OF LONDON AND EDINBURGH. 

The PhcBFiix Insurance Co., of London, 



Thr, Commercial Union Assurance Co., of London 

Give Sound and Reliable Insurance, and Pat every 
HONEST CLAIM when due. 

E. A. THOMAS, Agt., 5 Cook's Block, Amherst, Mass. 
C. E. HUTCHINSON, 

IriveFy and T^aveleFs Supplies. 

HARNESS AND TRUNKS MADE TO ORDER. 

^. E. STEBBINS, 



A few good horses to let to Careful Drivers. 
Pleasant Street, AMHEUST, MASS. 

D WIGHT MOORE. 



Billiard a^d pool parlor5. 



3 Phcenix Row, (Up Stairs,) - AMHERST, MASS. 



Vol, XXI. 



No. 1. 



^♦•'H 



^m^m * iNmE 






T*^ 



■t)-i<yi-fi 



^ ^/ ^^ ^€l€^^ . 



Published by | 9 ^ \ Junior Class. 



' ' ^ ^ \ -^ '° ^'^ ^ A ^ T . 



AMHERST, DECEMBER 1889, 



PRESS OF GAZETTE PRINTING COMPANY, NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 
1889. 



Vol. XXI, No. 1. 



■t i a . ( .M. ) ■ p ^i «- 



^q^^um * INDEX 






Massachusetts Agricultural College, 



l:^i«^•■^-:?«t^J 



Published by | 9 M Junior Class. 



^ ■^ \ ■ v '' .-)^ —^ . . V. ^ 



AMHERST, DECEMBER 1889, 



PRESS OF GAZETTE PRINTING COMPANY, NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 
1889. 




DEDICAT 



To those who have watched our 
course through college with loYing 
anxiety, happy at whatCYer of good, 
and pained at whatever of evil we 
may have acquired. To our friends at home 
we would m kind remembrance dedicate this 
Yolume of the Index. 







(4) 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

H. T. SHORES, Editor-in-Chief. 
E. P. FELT, Business Editor. 
J. B. HULL, Artist. 



MURRAY RUGGLES. 



H. J. FIELD. 



A. G. EAMES. 



H. N. LEGATE. 






[f "tl^(3i<e's c\ l]olc ii\ c\' 3^oqi< coq"|;s, 
I ±<edG ye \eic\\ ±-[ ; 

iL cl]iel's qrriqqg ye "(ql^ii]' i|o{cs, 
ilq' fqitl] l^c'll loi'crit if." 



EDITORIAL, 



'isr placing before the public the inner life of another event- 
^'i^^ fill year of the M. A. C, we have presented matters just 

?m as we found them. We could not manufacture truths and 
_ T have not tried. 

This issue of the Index introduces no new custom, but 
merely continues an old one. The present board of editors 
have been surrounded by the usual college influences, such as 
the Faculty, chapel and class exercises, athletics, the Junior's 
Beloved, and the usual amount of perils and midnight adven- 
tures of the Freshmen. Thus situated, it will not seem 
strange, notwithstanding our exhausting attempts to be origi- 
nal, if the present volume follows in many respects the ruts 
made by our predecessors. But originality has not been our 
only aim. As loyal students we have endeavored to represent 
that, which to a gi'eat extent moulds our character while 
here, and to show the magnitude and development of the 
college. 

And now, dear reader, hoping there is nothing left out 
from within these pages which should go to make up the 
history of the past year, we present this, the twenty-first vol- 
ume of the Index, with these few words of advice, which we 
beg of you not to treat lightly. 

Your fifty cents paid, betake yourself and book to the in- 
nermost seclusion of your room and fortify yourself against 
all expectations either good or bad. If in looking through 
the results of our labor, you find aught to please you, we 
shall be well paid. If things be found which otherwise affect 
you, it is your misfortune, and we are sorry for you. If you 
have erred and we have found you out, then blame yourself, 
not us, and go correct yourself. If truth seems overdrawn, 
blame truth for stretching. 

With this we offer our production. May peace and joy be 
with you as we hope it may with us. 

(7) 




(8) 



OFFICERS 



,^^ ^^. 



"!MASS rAGRiCULTURAL"CQLLEGEl > 



(9) 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



MEMBERS EX- OFFICIO. 

His Excellency, Gov. OLIVER AMES, President of the Corporation. 
HENRY H. GOODELL, President of the College. 
JOHN W, DICKINSON, Secretary of the Board of Education. 
WILLIAM R. SESSIONS, Secretary of the State Board of Agriculture. 

MEMBERS BY ELECTION. 



HENRY S. HYDE, of Springfield, . 
PHINEAS STEDMAN, of Chicopee, 
JAMES S. GRINNELL, of Greenfield, 
JOSEPH A. HARWOOD, of Littleton, 
WILLIAM H. BOWKER, of Boston, 
J. D. W. FRENCH, of Boston, 
THOMAS P. ROOT, of Barre Plains, 
J. HOWE DEMOND, of Northampton, 
FRANCIS H. APPLETON, of Lynfiold, 
WILLIAM WHEELER, of Concord, 
ELIJAH W. WOOD, of Newton, 
CHAS. A. GLEASON, of New Braintrcc 
DANIEL NEEDHAM, of Groton, 
JAMES DRAPER, of Worcester, 



Term expires 1890 
1890 
1891 
1891 
" 1892 
" 1892 
1893 
1893 
1894 
1894 
1895 
1895 
1896 
1896 



(10) 



COMMITTEES. 



Oommittee on Finance and Buildings. 

DANIEL NEEDHAM, Chairman. 
JAMES S. GRINNELL, HENRY S. HYDE, 

J. HOWE DEMOND, J. D. W. FRENCH, 

Committee on Course of Study and Faculty. 

WILLIAM WHEELER, Chairman. 
WILLIAM H. BOWKER, THOMAS P. ROOT, 

FRANCIS H. APPLETON, CHAS. A. GLEASON. 

Committee on Farm and Horticultiiral Departments. 

WILLIAM R. SESSIONS, Chairman. 
PHINEAS STEDMAN, ELIJAH W. WOOD, 

JOS. A. HARWOOD, JAMES DRAPER. 

Committee on Experiment Department of the College. 

WILLIAM R. SESSIONS, Chairman. 
JAMES DRAPER, WILLIAM WHEELER, 

DANIEL NEEDHAM, ELIJAH W. WOOD. 

Vice-President of the Corporation. 
JAMES S. GRINNELL, of Greenfield. 

Secretary. 
WILLIAM R. SESSIONS, of Hampden. 

Treasurer. 
FRANJ;?: E PAIGE, of Amherst. 

Auditor. 
HENRY S. HYDE, of Springfield. 

Board of Overseers. 
STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

Examining Committee of Overseers. 

SAMUEL B. BIRD, of Pramingham. 

GEORGE CRUICKSHANKS, of Lunenburg, Chairman. 
VELORUS TAFT, of Upton. 

GEORGE S. TAYLOR, of Chicopee Fails. 
ATKINSON C. VARNUM, of Lowell. 

Prof. NATHANIEL S. SHALER, of Cambridge. 
(11) 



THE FACULTY. 



President, 

HENRY H. GOODELL, M. A., 

Professor of Modern Languages and English Literature. 

LEVI STOCKBRIDGE, 
Professor of Agricidture (Honorary). 

CHARLES A. GOESSMAN, Ph. D., 
Professor of Chemistry. 

SAMUEL T. MAYNARD, B. Sc, 
Professor of Botany and Horticidture. 

CLARENCE D. WARNER, B. Sc, 
Professor of Mathematics and Physics. 

CHARLES WELLINGTON, Ph. D., 

Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

CHARLES H. FERNALD, Ph. D., 

Professor of Zoology and Lecturer on Veterinary Science. 

Rev. CHARLES S. WALKER, Ph. D., College Pastor, 
Professor of Mental ayid Political Science. 

WILLIAM P. BROOKS, B. Sc, 

Professor of Agi-icidture. 

LESTER W. CORNISH, 1st Lieut. 5th Cav. U. S. A., 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

FRANK E. PAIGE, 
Lecturer on Farm Law. 

JOHN W. LANE, M. A., 
Instructor in Elocution. 



Librarian, 

HENRY H. GOODELL, M. A., 
(12) 



BOSTON UNIVERSITY. 



University Council. 



WILLIAM F. WARREN, S. T. D., LL. D., 

President and Dean of the School of Theology. 

EDMUND H. BENNETT, LL. D., 
Dean of the School of Law. 

I. TISDALE TALBOT, M. D., 

Dean of the School of Medicine. 

BORDEN P. BOWNE, LL. D., 

Dean of the School of All Sciences. 

WILLIAM E. HUNTINGTON, Ph. D., 

Dean of the College of Liberal Arts. 

EBEN TOURJEE, Mus. D., 
Dean of the College of Music. 

HENRY H GOODELL, M. A., 

President of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 



(13) 



Senior Appointments. 



WALTER E. TAFT, 
Historian. 

EDGAR GREGORY, 

Poet. 

CHARLES H. JONES, 
Prophet. 

ARTHUR M. CASTRO, 
Pro])heVs Prophet. 

ARTHUR N. STOWE, 
Orator. 

FRED. W. MOSSMAN, 
Toast-Master. 

JOSE M. HERRERO, 
Odist. 



(14) 



^^STUJDEJ^TS^- 



Class Coiiiniunications, 



(15) 



SENIOR CLASS, 



OFFICERS. 

p. W. MOSSMAN, President. 

F. O. WILLIAMS • . Vice-Prestdent. 

J. S. WEST, Secretary and Treasurer. 

W. E. TAFT, Historian. 

D. E. DICKINSON Class Captain. 



NAMES. 



RESIDENCES. 



ROOMS. 



Barry, David 
Bliss, Clinton Edward 
Castro, Arthur de Moraese 
Dickinson, Dwight Edward 
Felton, Truman Page 
Gregory, Edgar 
Haskins, Henry Darwin 
Herrero, Jose Maria 
Jones, Charles Howland 
Loring, John Samuel 
Mc-Cloud, Albert Carpenter 
Mossman, Fred Way 
Russell, Henry Lincoln 
Simonds, George Bradley 
Smith, Fred Jason 
Stowe, Arthur Nelson 
Taft, Walter Edward 
Taylor, Fred Leon 
West, John Sherman 
Williams, Frank Oliver 



Southwick, 
Attleborough, 
Juiz de Fora Minas, Brazil, 
Amherst, • 
Berlin, 
Marblehead, 
North Amherst, 
Jovellanos, Cuba, 
Downer's Grove, 111., 
Shrewsbury, 
Amherst, 
Westminster, 
Sunderland, 
Ashby, 
Hadley, 
Hudson, 
Dedham, 
North Amherst, 
Bek-hertown, 
Sunderland, 
(IG) 



6 N. C. 

14 S. C. 

Tower. 

Home. 

Plant House. 

8 S. C. 

Home. 

Tower. 

Mrs. Howland's. 

17 S. C. 

Home. 

Prof. Brooks. 

Home. 

Boarding House. 

21 N. C. 

22 N. C. 
5 N. C. 

Home. 
25 N. C. 
12 N. C. 



Class Colors. — Navy Blue and Old Gold. 

Class Yell — Ching, Chang, Chong ; Ching, Chang, Chong , 

Ra, Ra, Ra ; Ra, Ra, Ra ; '90. 



UR college life is nearly finished, and our final communication to the 
Index is herewith presented. In looking back over our four short 
years here, what varied experiences we must recall. We can see again how 
green we looked and felt, when in the fall of 1886, we fii'st beheld oui- college ; 
and we can trace oui- progress through the wearisome Freshman days, along 
the wicked road of the Sophomore and the lazy one of the Junior, until we 
have, as Seniors, reached our last stage of college life. In a few short months 
we shall disappear among the people as Alumni, never probably to meet again 
as a whole class. 

Reviewing our course, we recognize how many opportunities we have lost, 
and how much more we might make of our course if we could begin it again. 
But the past can only be recalled in our thoughts, while the future lies before 
us, full of opportunities which we may seize and use for our good or evil. 

As a class, we might perhaps style ourselves as no better or worse than the 
average. While we may not have any man among us whose brilliancy will 
overturn the world, yet we may console ourselves with the thought that 
neither is there any one of us who is not able, with the training that we have 
received, to make his mark in the world. 

We have generally been foremost in the athletic contests in which it has. 
been our fortune to engage. We were the last class to enjoy the danger and 
excitement of the cane rush, in which of course we were victorious. Carrying 
off the rope in our Freshman pull, we have kept up our good record as leaders, 
even till to-day. 

The Faculty seems to have got along with us very well on the whole, the 
only occasion when we have differed, being in regard to our preferring to at- 
tend a base-ball game instead of a recitation. For that we suffered the severe 
(?) penalty of " probation," yet we managed to bear up under this fearful pun- 
ishment. 

2 (17) 



18 



tltE INbEl. 



Prom the forty odd men with which we entered, we have diminished until 
but twenty are left, but of course these are the cream of the class. Our class- 
mates have left us for various reasons. Some have withdrawn of their own free 
will, and some from the free will of the Faculty. Some have turned to the 
educational privileges of other institutions, while others, feeling that they 
needed two years in which to do one year's work, have become discouraged and 
left. The majority of these have perhaps been of no real loss to the class, 
though many were fellows whose presence would have been of honor and value. 

Years hence, as we retm'n to our class and society reunions, we shall get to- 
gether and talk over the good old times we used to have in college, wonder 
what has become of all our lady friends, tell of our various victoi'ies and ad- 
ventures, and live again those dear old days, now so neai'ly ended. 

But Classmates, the period is approaching when we must leave our boyish 
pursuits and ei\ter into the great whirlpool of life. A few months only are 
left in which to make our final preparations for the strife. 

Each of us has the power to make something of himself, if he only chooses 
to improve it. Two roads are open to us, one leading to Agi'iculture and For- 
tune, and the other to dishonor and destruction. Let us choose the former, so 
that when our days are ended, it may be said that the world is better for our 
having lived in it. T. 







JDNIOR CLASS. 
^ '91, 



OFFICERS. 

H. T. SHORES, President. 

L. F. HORNER, Vice-President. 

P. L. ARNOLD, Secretary. 

M. A. CARPENTER, Treasurer. 

W. W. GAY, Historian. 

W. C. PAIGE, Captain. 



names. 


residences. 


ROOMS. 


Arnold, Frank Luman 


Belchertown, 


21 N. C. 


Belden, Allen Montgomery 


East Whately, 


7 S. C. 


Brown, Walter Augustus 


Feeding Hills, 


Mr. D. K. Bangs. 


Carpenter, Malcolm Austin 


Ley den, 


28 N. C. 


Eames, Aldice Gould 


North Wilmington, 


13 N. C. 


Felt, Ephraim Porter 


North boro. 


Plant House. 


Field, Henry John 


Loverett, 


Home. 


Gay, Willard Weston 


Georgetown, 


3 N. C. 


Horner, Louis Fred 


South Framingham, 


' 2 N. C. 


Howard, Henry Merton 


Franklin, 


Boarding House. 


Hull, John Byron 


Stockb ridge. 


2 S. C. 


Johnson Charles Henry 


Prescott, 


13 S. C. 


Lage, Oscar Vidal Barbosa 


Juiz de Fora Minas, Bi 


razil, Prank Wood's. 


Legate, Howard Newton 


Sunderland, 


Home. 


Magill, Claud Albion 


Amherst, 


Home. 


Paige, Walter Cary 


Amherst, 


Home. 


Phillips, John Edward 


Brooklyn, Conn., 


2 S. C. 


Ruggles, Murray 


Milton, 


13 S. C. 


Sawyer, Arthur Henry 


Sterling, 


3 S. C. 


Shores, Harvey Towle 


West Bridgewater, 


7 S. C. 


Tuttle, Harry Fessenden 


Jamaica Plain, 
(19) 


14 S. C. 



^C\A 



Class Colors. — Peacock Blue and Old Gold. 
Class Yell— TFa/i hoo, Wah hoo, Wah hoo, Wah ; Zip boom bah ; '91. 



^♦T|7 ERY few events of importance have transpired since our last communi- 

-^^ cation to the Index, and there has been but little change in the class, 
one only having dropped out, while two have been admitted and fully adopted 
by the glorious class of '91. The months have rapidly passed by, bringing us 
to our Junior year, and the middle of our college course. We gladly assume 
the position of Juniors with the responsibilities which arise from bringing the 
Freshman class up in the way they should go, yet we shall never cease to regret 
the loss of our old friends of '89, who fostered us through our college childhood ; 
and shall always have a special regard for those of whom we thought so highly, 
and trust that we may be able to fill their places with fitting dignity. 

There seemed to have been an inpression among us that when we should be- 
come Juniors there would be a relaxation in our work and we could take life a 
little more easily. Alas for all such expectations. Instead of a decrease 
there was so decided an increase (especially in certain species of polyps, and in 
the number of pages of Rhetoric), that we concluded "life was not all a 
dream," though a song to the contrary has often been heard about college. 

In athletics, '91 has held its own in every case, although in the class game of 
hase hall with the Seniors the score was a tie, nevertheless had the game con- 
tinued we sliould without doubt have been victorious. 

Ill foot ball, as usual, we furnish some of the heaviest men on the team, and 
are ready at any time to dispute the championship. 

There seems to be a decided tendency toward tenuis this year. The game 
appears to have won universal favor among tlie fellows, for they begin to see 
there is as much skill in the game as there is in any field sport, and we think 
110 one will dispute us, when we say that '91 contributes some of the finest play- 
ers in college to this game. 

(20) 



THE INDEX. 



21 



Out of consideration for the classes who follow us, we should like to give a 
little advice, and that is, work diligently on that sixth of an acre ; till the soil, 
and you will see grand results, either on your hands or in the increase of your 
vocabulary. "We have all been there before, many a time," so we can safely 
advise in regard to the matter. 

One of the pleasantest occasions we have ever had, and one that will always 
be remembered by us, is the trip we took under the direction of Prof. Maynard 
to the vineyards about Fitchburg and the market gardens around Boston. 

We have now reached the third stage in our intellectual development, and 
begin to wind around us the fine thread of experience and knowledge, which 
goes to make up the firm fabric of our education. May we so weave our web 
that it will stand criticism from the keen eyes of the world, for the slightest 
flaw will be detected. 

The next two years will fly by only too quickly, therefore let us settle down 
to the work set before us, determined to gain all we can that will help us bring 
honor upon ourselves and upon our friends. Gt. 




SOPHOMORE CLASS, 
'92, 



OFFICERS. 

G. E. TAYLOR, President. 

H. M. THOMPSON, Vice-President. 

F. G. STOCKBRIDGE, Secretary. 

E. B. HOLLAND, Treasurer. 

G. B. WILLARD Class Captain. 

H. P. STONE, Historian. 

names. residences. room 



Baldus, Gustave 
Bardin, James Edgar 
Beals, Alfred Tennyson 
Boynton, Walter 
Clark, Edward Thornton 
Crane, Henry Everett 
Deuel, James Edward 
Emerson, Henry Bennett, 
Field, Judson Leon 
Fletcher, William 
Goldthwait, William Jolmson, Jr. 
Graham, Charles Simmer 
Holland, Edward Bertram 
Hubbard, Cyrus Moses 
Lyman, Richard Page 
MacDonald, Frederick Joliii 
Nauss, Ciias. Stnmi 



Belchei-town, 


23 N. C. 


Dalton, 


12 S. C. 


Greenfield, 


Tower. 


North Amherst, 


Home. 


Granby, 


9 N. C. 


Weymouth, 


•J N. C. 


Amherst, 


Home. 


Gloucester, 


S N. C, 


Leverett, 


Home. 


Chelmsford, 


Mr. Bangs. 


Marblehead, 


16 S. C. 


Holden, 


25 N. C. 


Amherst, 


Home. 


Sunderland, 


Home. 


Boston, 


4 S. C. 


GlenakwhUc, P. E. Island, 


16 S. C. 


Gloucester, 


8 N. C. 



(23) 



tSE INDEX. 



n 



Rogers, Elliot 
Smith, Robert Hyde 
Stockbridge, Francis Granger 
Stone, Harlan Flsk 
Taylor, G-eorge Everett 
Thompson, Henry Mardin 
Tyng, Charles 
Tyng, George McAlpine 
West, Homer Cady 
Willard, George Bartlett 
Williams, Milton Hubbard 



Boston, 

Amherst, 

Northfield, 

Amherst, 

Shelburne, 

Monterey, 

Victoria, Texas, 

Victoria, Texas, 

Belchertown, 

Waltham, 

Sunderland, 



15 S. C. 
Home. 

2 N. C. 
Home. 
Tower. 
26 N. C. 
10 S. C. 
10 S. C. 
10 N. C. 
15 S. C. 
12 N. C. 




'92. 



Class Colors — Magenta and Old Gold. 

Class YmA.—Rah-Rah-Rah ; Oo-Ah-Oo ; Oo-Ah-Oo ; '92. 

Class Tax— SI. 60. 



■n] n^^ ^^®* year of college life, with its joys and sorrows, its trials and 
^vU^ vicissitudes, has passed away, and we have emerged from the chrysalis 
state of Freshmen into that of full iledged Sophomores. 

It is true that we are much diminished in numbers, yet it is to be remembered 
that it is only the laggards who fall behind, while the " strong men and true " 
keep to the front, and although our ranks have been pretty well thinned during 
the past year, yet our associations have bound us all the more closely together, 
and we have perhaps become stronger rather than the weaker by our loss. 

In the matter of sports and athletics, that factor so important in every col- 
lege, our class has shown great enthusiasm. Not only have our representatives 
been prominent in the college foot-ball and base-ball teams, but the class has 
been first and foremost with financial aid, and has contributed heartily to their 
support. In the base-ball field, our men have done particularly fine work, botli 
in class games and with the regular team. 

After being disappointed in our hopes for a rope-pull last year, we had antic- 
ipated our contest with '93 all the more eagerlJ^ The Freshmen for some time 
were indisposed to give us a trial, but finally concluded to enter into a contest 
in which we were the easy victors, being the first Sophomore class to carry off 
the rope pull honors for several years. 

Our class game of foot-ball is still a matter of uncertainty, but unless our 
Fi-eshnian friends an^ ti'oubled with another attack of weakness, we shall en- 
deavor to make tlieir entertainment a cordial one and give them plenty to do. 

So classmates, let us extend the hand of good fellowship as we look over the 
past of our collogo, and as we remember that but three sliort years must pass 

(24) 



Thr index. 



25 



ere our dream of life's battles become realities, and college life with its pleas- 
ures and duties alike becomes but a chimei'a of the past. May we estimate 
the remainder of our work here at its true worth, and may we accomplish it 
in a manner woi'thy of its value. s. 




FRESHMAN CLASS, 
'93, 



OFFICERS. 

E. LEHNERT, Prksident. 

J. R. PERRY, Vice-President. 

J. H. KELLOGG, .... Secretary and Treasurer. 

G. F. CURLEY, . Historian. 

J. H. GREGORY, Captain. 



names. 



residences. 



rooms. 



Barrus, Sheridan Ezra 
Bartlett, Fred Goff 
Clark, Henry Disbrow 
Curley, George Frederick 
Davis, Herbert Chester 
Faneuf, Arthur Gelis 
Goodrich, Chas. Augustus 
Gregory, James Howard 
Green, Carlton Dewitt 
Harlow, Harris James 
Harlow, Francis Turner 
Hawkes, Ernest Alfred 
Henderson, Frank Howard 
Higgins, Nelson F. 
Hoyt, Franklin Shernian 
Harvoy, I)avi<l Pierce 
Kellogg, John Hawkes 
Knight, Jewell Burnett 



Goshen, 
North Hadley, 
Plainfield, 
Upton, 
Amherst, 
Amherst, 
Hartford, Ct., 
Marblehead, 
Belchertown, 
Shrewsbuiy, 
Marshfield, 
Williamsburg, 
Lynn, 

Easthiinii)ton, 
Newton, Conn., 
Townsend, 
Hartford, Conn. 
Belchertown, 
(26) 



Mr. 



11 S. C. 
Home. 

9 S. C. 

6 N. C. 

Home. 

27 N. C. 

17 S. C. 

8 S. C. 
25 N. C. 

6 S. C. 

6 S. C. 
14 N. C. 
32 N. C. 

12 S. C. 

10 N. C. 

11 N. C. 
4 S. C. 

Howard's. 



TIIR INDEX. 



27 



Lehnert, Eugene Hugo 
Melendy, Alfonso Edward 
Parker, Charles Henry 
Pember, William Stephen 
Perry, John Richard 
Smith, Cotton Atwood 
Smith, Fred Andrew 
Smith, Luther Williams 
Soule, George Wingate 
Staples, Franklin 
Tinoco, Luiz Antonia Perreira 
Walker, Edward Joseph 
Wells, Louie E., 
Woodbrey, Gilpin Brooks 



Clinton, 

Sterling, 

Hold en, 

Walpole, 

Boston, 

North Hadley, 

Lynn, 

Westfield, 

Dedham, 

Berlin, 



11 S. C. 
3 S. C. 

26 N. C. 
14 N. C. 
17 S. C. 
21 N. C. 
32 N. C. 
9 S. C. 
13 N. C. 
23 N. C. 



Campos City, Rio de Janiero, Frank Wood's. 
West Boylston, 29 N. C. 

Palmer, 11 N. C. 

Brighton, 23 N. C. 




'93, 



Class Colors — Pink and Garnet. 
Class Yell— Fa^roo, Yazoo; Yazoo; Zi Za Zi ; Rah, Rah, Rah; '93. 



Krt/ rt/ ^ *^° sincerely hope that in submitting this, our first literary work to 

*9^-'^ the public, that you will in criticising it take into consideration that 

it is our first attempt, and that we have been in such a whirl of excitement 

since entering upon the duties of college life, that we are unable to give a very 

thrilling report of ourselves. 

Our class is a medium sized one, there being thirty-seven members at present, 
although a number of others took their entrance examinations with us, but 
thought it to be for their advantage to wait another year before commencing 
their college life. Although we fell behind '93 a little in numbers, yet we trust 
to make up in quality what we lack in quantity. 

Cane rushing, we are happy to say, is a thing of the past. Nevertheless the 
Sophomores appeared on the campus, during a ball game, with a stick, when 
but few Freshmen were present, but finding our numbers were fast increasing, 
the cane soon disappeared-. 

The annual rope-pull is as yet an uncertain thing, but we shall have one with 
out doubt if the two classes can agree upon suitable terms. 

Not much has been done as yet in the foot-ball line, but we are hopeful of 
making a good showing against the upper class men, which we certainly can if 
each member of the class who has any foot-ball in him whatever, will only give 
a few minutes each day to its practice. The class as a whole contains material 
that is unusually good, onlj' lacking in the knowledge and practice of the game. 

The base-ball material is at present undeveloped. But we hope to be able 
to put a comparatively good team upon the campus for the purpose of holding 
uv> our end of the national game with the upper classes. 

We have not yet had the ojiportunity of measuring our strength and silica 
(as '9i terms it), with that of the Sophomores in rushes, as the schedule of exer- 

(28) 



THE INDEX. 



29 



cises prevents us from meeting on eitlier the stairs in the old chapel or on the 
botanic museum path. 

There has been but a very little of the usual room stacking. And as for 
hazing (that terror of Freshmen), none whatever has been indulged in, we are 
bappy to say. 

Some of our number have already undergone those unlocked for tortures and 
withstood the fury of that mysterious goat, and are now enjoying unexpected 
pleasures and privileges. 

But let us pass from these, our trials and tribulations, to the real purpose of 
college life. Most of us very likely have entered college with a purpose in 
view ; let us then ever keep this purpose before us and especially let us make a 
good beginning, " for a thing well begun is half done." Many a student has 
failed in attaining his purpose in college simply because he did not work in the 
beginning, and finding himself behind, did not have the courage to make good 
the deficiency. Then let us take heed, so that after having spent our four years 
here, we can look back and see that we did justice to ourselves and Professors. 
And if we do justice to ourselves we will become worthy alumni of the M. A. 
C, and also worthy citizens of the Commonwealth. C. 




Agriculture as She is Taught. 



WE have found it ! We have unfolded and are about to present to the 
public a fact, which but for the very observing powers of the class of 
'91, might and probably would for centuries to come, have remained among the 
many mysteries of science. 

But we should do great injustice to ourselves if we should develop so valuable 
knowledge without relating what vve experienced in acquiring it, for no one 
can truly appreciate the worth of a contribution to science without knowing 
something of its cost ; so it well becomes us to give you simply an outline of 
the troubles we were called upon to endure. 

On the morning of March .5th, 1889, the class of '91 was a happy body ; happy 
because the winter term with its confinements was nearly over, and soon to be 
followed by one which suggests to the minds of every student one more suited 
to out-door sports than for the study of books; but above all, happy when they 
contrasted their present condition with that of those students who in the earlier 
history of the college were obliged by the college authorities to work a certain 
number of hours each week upon the farm ; a practice which was not slow in 
showing its foolishness. 

But upon entering Prof. Brooks's recitation j-oom on that day all was changed 
for as we saw him standing, chalk in hand, writing upon one corner of a large 
blackboard, which still remained unmarked, we fairly shook at the idea of 
copying so much into our note books. Words cannot describe our astonish- 
ment and no one who was not there can even imagine the expression which 
sprang to our faces when Prof. Brooks moderately informed us that what we 
observed upon the board were the rules and regulations to be followed in the 
cultivation of one-sixth of an acre, which, as he said, was to be set off west of 
the dormitories for that siiecial purpose. Tlie pride of each man was abased, 
and was not only superseded by a feeling of anger, but (strange to say) each 
man could not help wishing that Japan had not allowed to have slipped away 
from her an idea peculiarly adapted to inexperienced agriculturists. 

Having recovered from our first attack, we were told that we should be com- 

(30) 



fim li^DF.t. 31 



pelled to prepare plans, containing our system of work intended in detail, which 
must be handed to him at a short time hence. During this discussion, Prof. 
Brooks even dared to poi-tray a man in full dress tugging away upon a plot a 
second season, should he fail to attain a certain standard the first year. 

He informed us that the profits would be divided into two unequal parts, two- 
thirds of these to be again divided among the entire class, while the remaining 
one-third was in turn to be separated into three prizes — first, second and third — 
to be granted to such members as held these respective places in this work. He 
said the land would be free, the tools furnished, and that he saw nothing to hin- 
der us from making a fortune even while attending college. 

At last the bell rings, we during that hour, having passed through the success- 
ive stages of amazement, provocation, anger and fiattery, were glad to see the 
outside of that room again. Although we would not for an instant have any 
one suspect that a member of this class when not excited could break the third 
commandment, we fear as we now think of it that the pure air was tainted with 
words, during the remainder of that day, not to be found in a dictionary. 

For a few successive days each man made an experiment in the ground of 
fallacy, to see if he could find a reason satisfactory to Prof, by which he might 
escape the common law, but each man attained the same result, viz: — " as seed 
sown upon a poor soil " for whatever the Professor in charge agreed to, the 
President was sure to veto. 

Strange questions naturally arose as we went into the agricultural recitation 
room from day to day ; sonie wishing to know how any one who is working his 
way through college can spend his time upon such nonsense, while one man 
even dared ask who was going to do the work upon the plots. 

At last the day for the plans to be handed in dawned, and with them came a 
variety of ideas. Each one showed marks of great thought on the authoi's part 
in securing that crop which would require little or no labor. 

Quite a number select potatoes, one selects beets, others ensilage corn or field 
corn, while Brown is fully persuaded that nothing short of a good plot of corn 
would warrant to him the first prize. Hull and Field can imagine nothing more 
beautiful than a field of squashes, while Lage thinks there is an immense hid- 
den pasture to be disclosed only when his would-be crop of rice is grown. Gay 
thinks that a slovenly culture is well-suited both to the conditions of himself 
and to those of a crop of pop corn, so he wastes no time in selecting that crop. 

Paige having dreamed of beans for three nights in succession, forthwith 
chooses that. 

At length the land is fitted and seed-time is at hand, but not a student ap- 
pears upon the plots. Finally, Johnson, fearing lest his conscience would be- 
come irrecoverably hardened if he should much longer disobey its teachings, went 
down and dedicated the field on a Saturday morning and by the next Tuesday 
night one care-worn man is stricken from the list of would-be-planters. Duiing 



32 tHEjlNDEX\ 

this same week Tuttle made an extra effort to plant his oats, but since the 
weeks were so short and the days as merely nothing, the Saturday following 
sees some of his oats unplanted. Sawyer, after having worried for two weeks 
after planting time about "what might have been" concludes that there is no 
time like the present, and his crop is sown beneath the sod. 

So it goes, crop after ci-op is planted, nothing unusual happening, unless it be 
that Arnold, Belden, Gay and Phillips arose one morning soon after cock-crow- 
ing and planted the latter's crop. 

Well, owing to some reason or other the crops were left for nature to bring 
up, and as might reasonably be expected the aspect looking west from the 
dormitories suggested to the Sophomore class, at least, a "go as you please " 
system. 

Since the race was open to all, both weeds and the respective crops entered 
for the contest. IS^o hoes were allowed upon the track, and although the crop 
had all the advantage that Prof. Brooks's encouragement could give them, they 
had the good-will of the Sophomore class against them, and so we honestly be- 
lieve that each stood an equal chance to win. Nevertheless, it did not take 
long to see that the weeds had not only got the inside track, but were also get- 
ting in the way of the crop. A few students having got a little feeling of re- 
spect remaining for the impression which the present condition of the crops 
would leave upon any who might see them, went down even on Commencement 
week and hoed them a trifle. 

Prof. Brooks took a few friends down to visit them during Commencement, 
but a word concerning them escaped not from the mouths of, nor was a friend 
invited to visit them by a member of '91 during that time. 

No one experiences any sorrow at being called upon to leave the crop in 
somebody else's care during the vacation, but all have a desire that before they 
come back as Juniors their crop may all be harvested. 

Upon Brown fell the care of them during the summer, and he passed away 
his time, in counting smutty blades of straw, spending his half hours examining 
the crops, hoeing a little occasionally, now and then picking bugs, etc. By the 
way : — although a matter of minor importance, it might be well to remark just 
here that this work was to be carried out in the form of an experiment. 

At length the vacation is over and we come back, onlj' to see most of our crops 
standing in the field. Days roll by and finally it is time for them to be shel- 
tered. Let us notice the crops which were gotten. 

Johnson gets twenty-four bushels of potatoes. Sawyer and Phillips a crop 
ea('h of weeds with a few potatoes as a supplement; Homer, a few beets; Field 
and Hull respectivel}^ a bushel, and a bushel and a half of squashes; Legate 
gets what corn the domestic animals l)clonging to the farm don't; and Lage 
gets— left. 

It undoubtedly would ))(■ interesting to some to know how the experiments 



THE INDEX. 33 



came out. Well, Tuttle proved that his (wild) oats were sowed too early and 
too thick ; Johnson, that he wasn't made for a farmer ; Shores, that green fod- 
ders cannot be had without labor; Sawyer, a firm believer of the command, 
' ' let your moderation be known unto all men ; " Lage proved a failure ; Belden, 
that Freshmen help is essential in harvesting crops ; Eames, that work and him- 
self are no friends; Magill, that of the two kinds of help, hired help is the best; 
and Brown attained two results, viz: that his summer's job was an easy and 
paying one, and in carrying on these experiments he got the best end of the 
bargain, looking at it from a financial standpoint. 

Now after having given a small part of our experience, we are prepared to 
amplify our first sentence. It is a fact that when any one performs a great 
work or makes a valuable discovery, that he or she will generally keep silence 
about it until after insuring themselves a life-long benefit from it. Not so with 
us; we offer unhesitatingly and unreservedly to the public the benefit of our 
discovery, and it applies especially to the farmers. 

It is as follows: — That in the future as there has been in the past there are 
two paths ; the former has for its Eastern star the results obtained at the college 
experimental stations which leads on to success. The latter has at one corner 
publications of the above experiments, set up as a guide-board, and this road 
leads to utter failure. Choose ye the former. 





(84) 




(35) 




(36) 



D. G, K. 



Aleph Cliapter, 1869, D. G. K. 

Incorporated 1886. 



C. E. Bliss, 

J. S. Loring, 

A. de M. e Castro, 



SENIORS. 



H. L. Russell, 
J. M. Herrero, 
W. E. Taft. 



A. M. Belden, 
J. E. Phillips, 
H. F. Tuttle, 
W. C. Paige, 
J. B. Hull, Jr., 



JUNIORS. 



H. N. Legate, 
H. T. Shores, 
W. W. Gay, 
C. H. Johnson, 
O. V. B. Lage. 



J. E Bardin, 

P. G. MacDonald, 



SOPHOMORES. 



C. Tyni 



F. G. Stockbridge, 
W. J. Goldthwait, 



S. E. Barrus, 
F. H. Henderson, 
J. H. Kellogg, 
J. R. Perry, 



FRESHMEN. 



(37) 



F. T. Harlow, 
N. F. Higgins, 
E. H. Lehnert, 
L. A. F. Tinoco, 




(38) 



Q. T, V. 



Amherst Chapter. 





Founded in 1869. 






SENIORS. 




D. W. Dickinson, 




A. N. Stowe, 


A. C. McCloud, 




J. S. West, 


F. J. Smith, 




C. H. Jones, 


H. D. Haskins, 


David Barry. 

JUNIORS. 


F. N. Taylor, 


P. L. Arnold, 


H. J. Field. 

SOPHOMORES. 


A. H. Sawyer, 


W. Boynton, 




H. C. West, 


G. E. Taylor, 




C. M. Hubbard, 


R. P. Lyman, 




J. L. Field, 


J. E. Deuel, 


Beals. 

FRESHMEN. 


M. H. Williams, 


H. C. Davis, 




C. D. Green, 


A. E. Melindy, 


J. B. Knight. 
(39) 


C. A. Smith, 



^*;,l^^S&i 



i'J/S\ 






</ 



(40) 



Phi Sigma Kappa. 



Pi Chapter. 



JUNIOR. 

A. Gr. Eames. 

SOPHOMORES. 

G. B. Willard, G. M. Tyng, 

Elliot Rogers. 

FRESHMEN. 

J. H. Gregory, 
D. P. Harvey, L. W. Smith. 



(41) 



An Obstacle to Progress, 



" If the earth is small, America is large, and the Americans are immense!" 

fUCH is one of the opening sentences in a recent work on America by one 
, ,. of the most acute of French observers, who throughout his work makes 
evident everywhere how stronglj' the over-weening self-pride of our country- 
men impressed him. This should afford wholesome food for reiiection to every 
American. Do we as Americans have too great an opinion of our country and 
of ourselves ? It is a fact, well known to all perhaps, that the natives of every 
country hold a sufficiently good opinion of themselves. Even the Chinaman, 
whom we look upon as unfit to mix with our people and whom we pass Acts of 
Congress to exclude, when at home, dwells in the " Flowery Kingdom," the 
"Celestial Empire," and looks upon those unfortunate enough to be born else- 
where as "outside baibarians." Fortunate is it, no doubt, for the spirit of 
patriotism, nay even for individual human happiness, this characteristic of 
thinking well of ourselves and that which pertains to us. It is only when we 
allow our self-satisfaction to blind our eyes to the possibility of anything bet- 
ter, to make us slow to look aromid us for it, or even to receive it when we see 
it, that this characteristic becomes undesirable. Are we as American citizens, 
farmers and agricultural students, open to the charge of being too conceited, 
too apt to remain satisfied with things American, and to think there can be no 
need of studying the ways and methods of other countries ? Fortunately we 
have among us a considerable number of cosmopolitan minds; we have, too, 
natives of all countries; we are not therefore, likely to stagnate or to 
remain in ignorance of the world about us : but the average American f ai'mer 
or farmer's son is slow to conceive or to admit new ideas. Yet how should we 
expect anything different when only a very few years since one of our national 
representatives was heard to exclaim in the halls of Congress, " what do we 
care for abroad ? " 

Is not the spirit displayed according to the storj^ by the Boston lady in 
heaven, between whom and a friend still on earth telephonic communication 
had been established and who in response to a query as to how she liked it up 
there, replied in effect that it was all very well but ended, " it isn't Boston you 
know," a spirit far too common not only in that city but also in the states of 
which it is the commercial center ? 

Not long since the secretary of one of our leading Agricultural Societies was 
heard to remark after thanking an exhibitor for a contribution of some rare 
and certainly most excellent foreign beans and grains to the display : — "They 
are no doubt very fine, but the American farmer is loyal to his own beans." 
Yes — " loyal to his own beans," — " stuck in his own ruts," — do not these phrases 

(43) 



THE INDEX. 43 



express the condition of far too many among our farmers ? A Chicago gentle- 
man, after an animated discussion with an acquaintance, also American, who 
ventured against the indiscriminate praise of things American by the former, 
to offer a few criticisms and to suggest some points in which perhaps Ameri- 
cans might learn of other Nations, remarked beyond the hearing of his oppo- 
nent to another acquaintance : — " I don't think much of that man, I like to see 
an American stand up for his own country." Is not the spirit displayed by this 
remark typical of many New England farmers ? May we not find among us, 
almost in the shadows of our college, farmer prototypes of the countryman 
who balanced the grain in one end of the bag with a rock in the other ? 

A good illustration of the spirit against which I write is afforded by the his- 
tory of the attempts to reclaim the Green Harbor Salt Marsh in South Marsh- 
field. The exclusion of the salt water by a dike and flood-gates, and the drain- 
age of the marsh could not be looked upon in the light of experinaents. Pre- 
cisely similar things had been done in Europe, and even in our own country; 
and the surveyor's level had demonstrated their possibility at Green Harbor- 
Nay more, nature had made the work easy. It was known beyond a peradven- 
ture that if the salt could be got rid of this soil must be uncommonly produc- 
tive ; the salt had been got rid of in numerous similar cases and these reclaimed 
soils had proved their almost boundless capacity for production. It would seem 
that here was a clear case, an evident chance for improvement and largely en- 
hanced profits ; but what happened ? Did the farmers, confronted by indis- 
putable evidence, take hold of the business in the right spirit after the improve- 
ment was fairly voted and push it each according to his ability and opportu- 
nity ? No ! a large minority, whose fathers had always cut a few loads of poor 
salt hay from broad acres of marsh, were ambitious only to follow in the an- 
cestral foot-prints. The dike once constructed, was twice blown up, and 'ts de- 
struction a third time attempted by similar means. Every possible technicality 
was seized upon and one legal obstacle after another was interposed, only to be 
one by one adversely decided upon ; but still with superb stupidity the oppo- 
nents of the dike fight on, and the case is even yet in the courts. Thanks, how- 
ever, to the splendid championship of a few able men, the victory for progress 
seems now near. 

Space will not allow the numerous other illustrations of blind conservatism 
on the part of farmers which might be given. A word to farmers' sons, to 
agricultural students, and this essay shall close. Do we as students read 
enough, especially of foreign agriculture ? True, many of the details of such 
agriculture must be inapplicable here, but we should find such reading rich in 
suggestions. If we would be leaders, promoters of progress, we must have 
ideas. These are more likely to present themselves when we are confronted 
with something new. There are many who delve in native fields; let us extend 
our observations also broader and deeper. B. 



Local Glossary. 



" Adjutant." — A bundle of conceit tied with red tape. 

"Athlete." — A conglomerate mass of bruises, sprains, contusions, cuts, bro- 
ken bones, black eyes, bloody noses, split cheeks, bandages, slings, 
arnica, sticking plaster, liniment, and Kendall's Spavin Cure. 

"Bath-tub." — A grimy place teeming with animal life. 

" Bum."— See " Fast Set." 

" Bum.-' — A person who borrows various wants in small quantities without the 
slightest intention of making adequate return. In fact, a parasite. 
See — well we forbear to mention any names on account of their 
relatives. 

"Bicycle." — An antediluvian tip-cart wheel, which H. West rides half the 
time, and which rides H. West the other half. 

" Cane." — The Junior's joy and pride. 

" Chemistry." — Smells closely connected with Tabby. 

" Crank." — Every one who doesn't think just as you do. 

" Crib." — A moral boomerang, which rebounds on the user's own head. The 
foregoing is the result of personal experience. 

" Faculty." — Creatures of impulse. 

" Fakir." — See John West. 

" Fast Set." — Those fellows in college who don't tell you all about their private 
affairs. 

"Flunk." — The inevitable result of the foolish sj'stem of compulsory recita- 
tions. 

" Fountain."— A physic warranted to remove freshness. 

" Fresh." — See Wells; if you can't see him you can hear him. 

" Goat." — A mysterious creature, whose chief delight is to banquet on the ver- 
dant Freshman. 

" Grind.' — A misguided youth who spends all his time in study. 

"Grub."— Something we are always growling about, but are always anxious 
to get. 

" Hose."— See advertisement in back of Index. 

" Janitor." — A jjcrson who is never to be found when wanted. 

"Junior." — A rare combination, never found in other classes, of the toughj 
the gentleman, the dude, the masher and the student. 

" Man." — r, lis word signifies an individual designated for the exemplification 
of humanity in the abstract. 

(44) 



T II E I N I) E \ , 45 



" Mathematics."— Everything between zero and infinity. 

" Mail Carrier." — Tlie slowest man in college. 

"Mashers."— Fellows of gigantic gall and small personal attractions. See 
Stowe, Magill and Bliss. 

" Moustache." — Three straight hairs and one cm-ly one. See Paige's. 

"Meal." — (For Perry) : eight slices of bread, two glasses of milk, a cup of tea, 
four glasses of Pelham, a dish of preserves, three tarts, two pieces of 
pie, and six pieces of cake. 

" Prex."— 92's Nemesis. 

"Prof, of Elocution." — A person whose hideous and unearthly howls great- 
ly disturb the classes above him. 

" Rats." — A favorite expression with the Freshmen of all classes. 

" Rhetoric." — Nonsense unspeakable in the dry est form. 

" Sand." — A much talked of substance which is seldom found except in the 
ears of certain individuals. 

" Sawbd-off." — For particulais inquire of McCloud and Fletcher. 

"Senior." — A haughty individual breathing forth dignity and tobacco smoke 
at every stride, with the fiery lightning of recently uncorked ambition 
flashing from his eye, and a battered silk hat perched on his broad and 
wrinkled brow. 

'•Sharps and Flats." — Sharps; The Index Board. Flats; the rest of the 
College, 

"Sluggers." — Indescribable objects which may be seen, under favorable con- 
ditions of light, on the faces of certain Seniors, but which are usually 
indistinguishable from dirt. 

"Slugging." — Striking, with intent to "lay out," in utter disregard of all 
science. Justifiable in a gentleman only under the influence of the 
most violent excitement, such as a foot-ball game. 

"Sophomore." — Gall! Gall! Gail! Inexpressible, irrepressible, indivisible, tre- 
mendous, unlimited, infintesimal, awful, grand, abysmal, unnatural, 
extraordinary and vast. For further adjectives see Webster's Una- 
bridged. 

" Sophomore Experiments." — Foolishness imported direct from Japan. 

" Sport." — One who bets sodas and never pays them. 

" Target." — Something which we seldom hit. 

" Vineyard." — A constant temptation to break the eighth commandment. 

"Zoology." — An infernal (d) science. 



CLASS POEM. 



So swiftly time has sped away 
Since first we gathered here, 

That hardly can we think to-day. 
We stay but one more year. 

With earnest work and purpose high, 
We've filled the passing hour; 

For time gone past we need not sigh, 
Since the present still is ours. 

As brothers bound by friendship's tie. 
With hearts both warm and true, 

We each one hope to gain the prize 
That knowledge brings the few. 

In one short >ear we scatter wide 

O'ei' all our native land ; 
And at our Alma Mater's side 

Perchance we ne'er shall stand. 

But what our work in life may be 
Or where may lead our ways. 

In memory we shall ever see 
Our happy college days. 



(48) 



Non-Secret Societies 



(47) 



College Shakesperian Club, 



Organized Sept. 20, 1879. 



OFFICERS. 

T. P. FELTON, President. 

G. B. SIMONDS^ .... Vice-President. 

C. S. NAUSS, Secretary. 

W. FLETCHER, Treasurer. 

F. W. MOSSMAN, '\ 

M. A. CARPENTER, [■ .... Directors. 

H. M. THOMPSON, ) 

MEMBERS. 

Seniors. 

T. P. Pelton, F. W. Mossnian, 

E. Gregory, G. B. Simonds. 

Juniors. 

E. p. Felt, M. A. Carpenter, 

L. F. Horner, M. Ruggies, 

W. A. Brown, H. M. Howard. 

Sophomores. 

H. E. Crane, W. Fletc-ber, 

E. T. Clark, C. S. Graham, 

H. B. Emerson, C. S. Nauss, 

H. M. Tliompson. 

Freshmen. 

C. H. Parker, H. F. Staples, 

p. A. Smith, E. J. Walker, 

G. B. Woodbury. 
(48) 



Young Men's Christian Association. 



OFFICERS. 





F. W. MOSSMAN, '90, 




President. 




L. F. HORNER, '91, . 


Vice-President. 




J. E. BARDIN, '92, . 


. Recording Secretary. 




H. T. SHORES, '91, . 


. Corresponding Secretary. 




E. T. CLARK, '93, . 


Treasurer. 




J. S. WEST, '90, \ 






J. B. HULL, '91, [• 


Devotional Committee. 




W. W. GAY, '91, ) 






F. 0. WILLIAMS, '90, 


■ 






W. A. BROWN, '91, 








F. J. SMITH, '90, 




i- . Membership Committee. 




E. P. FELT, '91, 








J. E. BARDIN, '93, 


. 






T. P. FELTON, '90, 


} 




A. M. BELDEN, '91, 


. Nominating Committee. 




R. P. LYMAN, '93, 


) 




MEMBERS. 






Active. 




Rev. Charles S. Walker, Ph. D. 






1890. 


T. 


P. Felton, 


F. 0. Williams, 


F. 


J. Smith, 


F. W. Mossman 
J. S. West. 


7 






(49) 



50 



THE INDEX. 



A. M. Belden, 
W. A. Brown, 
L. F. Horner, 



E. T. Clark, 



L. W. Smith, 
W. S. Pember, 



1891. 

H. T. Shores. 
1892. 

R. P. Lyman. 
1898. 

E. A. Hawkes. 



E. P. Felt, 
W. W. Gay, 
J. B. Hull, 



J. E. Bardin, 



C. A. Smith, 
J. B. Knight, 



C. E. Bliss, 



A. H. Sawyer, 
M. Ruggles, 



H. E. Crane, 
F. G. Stockbridge, 
H. M. Thompson, 
C. S. Nauss, 
C. S. Graham, 



H. D. Clark, 

C. D. Green, 

D. P. Harvey, 



Associate. 
1 890. 

1891. 

H. M. Howard. 
1892. 



1893. 



E. Gregory. 



F. L. Arnold, 
H. F. Tuttle, 



Wm. Fletcher, 
W. J. Goldthwait, 
W. B. Emerson, 
H. E. Deals, 
G. E. Taylor. 



J. B. Woodbrey, 
H. F. Staples. 
F. G. Hoyt. 



Washington Jrving Literary Society. 



OFFICERS. 

T. P. FELTON, '90, President. 

E. P. FELT, '91 Vice-President. 

J. E. BARDIN, '93, Secretary. 

H. M. THOMPSON, '92, .... Treasurer. 
W. E. TAFT, '90, ^ 

H. M. HOWARD, '91, [ . . . . Directors. 

F. S. STOCKBRIDGE, '93, ) 



T. P. Pelton, 

E. G-regory, 

P. W. Mossman, 



MEMBERS. 
'90. 



C. H. Jones. 
'91. 



G. B. Simonds, 
F. J. Smith, 
W. E. Taft, 



F. L. Arnold, 




E. P. Felt, 


W. A. Brown, 




H. M. Howard. 


M. A. Carpenter, 


'92. 


M. Ruggles. 


J. E. Bardin, 




R. P. Lyman, 


J. E. Deuel, 




H. M. Thompson, 


W. J. Goldthwait, Jr., 


E. B. Holland. 
•93. 


F. G. Stockbridge, 


A. D. Clark, 




C. H. Parker, 


F. T. Harlow, 




F. A. Smith, 


D. P. Harvey, 




L. W, Smith, 


E. A. Hawkes, 




H. F. Staples, 


F. H. Henderson, 




G. B. Woodbrey, 



P. S. Hoyt. 
(51) 



A TRIP TO THE HUB. 



tT was already understood that the college was to attend the " Bay State 
Fair " f I'om Thursday the tenth to Saturday the twelfth of Octobei', when 
on the previous Friday, Prex announced in chapel that on Wednesday the class 
of '91 would be excused from all college exercises, in order to visit with Prof. 
Maynard the vineyards of Dr. Fisher and Mr. Andrews at Fitchburg, and other 
places of interest in that vicinity, and that we could then proceed to Boston, 
there to await the arrival of the others. 

Accordingly, at about six o'clock Wednesday moi-niug the class assembled at 
the Central Mass. depot, each man with traveling satchel, cane, and a look of 
serene dignity. There we watched the sun-rise, a sight which to some of us was 
a novelty. In due time the train arrived, and '91, canes, dignity, plug hats and 
all, were en route for Fitchburg. 

After our fares had been collected, and Lagehad satisfied himself that he was 
actually awake, and " clothed and in his right mind," we began to "Hooper- 
up," much to the disgust of the conductor, and much to the surprise of some of 
our staid fellow travelers. Reaching Oakdale, the ticket agent's remark that 
he "hadn't tickets enough for the whole crowd," was greeted with a shout of 
derision. Arriving at Fitchburg, we took a barge and drove to the vineyards 
of Mr. Andrews and Dr. Fisher, and you may be sure that, although most of 
the fruit had been gathered, we thoroughly appreciated the quality of what 
was left, if not the respective merits of different methods of pruning. Through- 
out the trip we made the welkin ring with the yells of "Aggie " and "91 on the 
slightest provocation. 

In the car which took us from Fitchburg to Clinton, sat a most interesting 
fellow passenger. Our descriptions of her varied, but all seemed to agree that 
she was ])retty, and that she carried a violin case. Being a musician, the 
young lady seemed to appreciate our attempts to render college songs, and 
when we g )b oft" the train at Clinton it was to the tune of " Farewell Forever." 

Takin;.? a harge we drove to Lancaster, and visited the estate of Mr. J. E. 

(53) 



THE INDEX. 53 



Thayer, and there we saw over eighty thousand dollars' worth of about the 
ugliest looking dogs that it will fall to the human lot to see in so short a time. 
After listening to a small pandemonium for fifteen or twenty minutes, we came 
to the conclusion that "too much dog is worse than no dog at all." 

Re-embarking, we drove to Mr. Thayer's stable, and thence to the farms of 
Mr. Hawkins and Mr. Damon. The latter gentleman is an alumnus of M. A. 
C, and showed his patriotism by bringing out about half a bushel of pears and 
grapes for our regalement. Coming down the hill by the " Lancaster Gingham 
Mills," in Clinton, the bolt, which held the tongue to the barge, broke, and we 
were obliged to stop and dismount to see what could be done. Somebody ex- 
claimed, " If we only had one of those bolts that we used to get on ' Tabby,' we 
should be all right. " Further observation disclosed the fact that we were on 
Chestnut Street. 

Well ! in a few minutes a bolt was obtained, the pole fixed, and on we went, 
and after a short drive farther we came to the South Clinton station, where we 
alighted and dismissed the barge and our genial driver and footman with a 
ringing yell. When we had boarded the train once more for Boston, we began 
to make ourselves decidedly at home, and when the conductor came to collect 
our fares we plied him with questions until he was fain to consign all student 
kind in general, and ' ' Aggie " students in particular, to misery unspeakable. 

Finally our journey drew towards its end, and somebody expressed a fear 
lest the train might not stop at Boston, but at last the Pilgrim City was 
reached, and we separated to go in different directions to spend the night. 

Thursday afternoon the majority of our class visited various places of inter- 
est in the suburbs, notably the new green-houses of Hittenger Brothers in Bel- 
mont, and the farm of W. W. Rawson in Arlington. Friday at 10.30 we were 
required to meet Prof. Fernald at the Aggassiz Museum at Cambridge, and 
when again at liberty we visited the Hemenway G-ymnasium and other build- 
ings of Harvard University, and returned to Boston at about noon. 

If space were unlimited, we would go on to relate how " Jim " Gregory and 
"Billy " Goldthwait, after vainly trying to walk through a mirror, past their 
own reflections, at last gave it up, but politely lifted their hats to the image of 
a young lady whom they thought they recognized. Moreover it would be very 
irreverent to our e. c. '90 to give it away that " Jack " ran against a lamp post 
and exclaimed, "excuse me, madam." 

But everything must have an end, and on Saturday nearly all the fellows 
came back to Amherst, leaving only a small minority to come back Sunday, 
and we think that all will agree that the trip to the " Hub " was a very pleas- 
ant change from the routine of the class room. 



EXASPERATION. 



And now that autumn's come again 
With its winds that wildly sweep, 

And its fallen leaves so bi'own and sere 
That beside the roadways heap. 

The Junior doth his great coat don, 

And taking up his cane, 
Up the Botanic path he toils, 

With sighs and groans of pain. 

But when in Sammy's room he sits. 

He stares with vacant eye. 
Or else some playful deviltry 

Is planning on the sly. 

Perhaps some novel slyly hid 

Helps pass the time away, 
Or he may chance to study up 

On lessons for next day. 

A sudden start; his name is called; 

His dreams all rudely break. 
And all at once he's wondering 

How big a flunk he'll make. 

Er — well — er — yes the soil is light, 

And sometimes heavy too. 
And — well — I think the fact is, that 

Most any soil will do. 
(54) 



THE INDEX. 



Is the crop early or late ? 

Well — I can hardly say. 
I think it's late, but then I guess 

You can grow it either way. 

The profit ? Then he names a price 
That would riches quickly bring. 

Not quite so much, the Prof, replies, 
Just half would be the thing. 

At every question asked of him, 

A plucky guess he'll make; 
Both pleased and happy will he be 

Should his answer chance to take. 

And so it goes from day to day, 

No lessons perfect said ; 
Each fellow with gigantic gall 

Depends on Fortune's aid. 

But when the day of reckoning comes. 
Their marks at last they see ; 

We fear that some unlucky guessers 
In the tureen will be. 




Rules Regarding Athletic Sports, 

At the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 



After the base-ball game between '91 and '90, in which '90 had four men in- 
jured, the following- rules in regard to athletic sports were drawn up and ap- 
proved by the Faculty : 

Rule I. All base-ball games are hereafter forbidden to be played on the 
campus or college farm. 

II. All foot-ball playing among students is hereafter forbidden. 

III. All athletic sports are hereby forbidden except croquet and marbles. 

IV. All students seen or discovered, engaged in any other sport than croquet 
or marbles, shall by order of Lieut. Cornish, be put on short rations (bi-ead and 
water) for three weeks. 

V. Any student discovered in the act of exciting others into said prohibited 
sports shall be at the disposal of the Faculty. 

VI. Such members of the M. A. C. as become injured in participating in 
said prohibited sports, either wilfully or otherwise, shall not be allowed the ser- 
vices of a physician and shall be fed through the key hole on saur kraut, cheese 
and a little water. 

VII. If a foot-ball or base-ball or any equipments, used in the pui'suit of 
said games, is discovered in any cadet's room by the inspector on Saturday 
mornings, the occupant of said room shall be suspended fi'om all college exer- 
cises for a length of time not exceeding four years and not less than five min- 
utes. 

VIII. If students are caught misusing the marbles or the balls used in the 
game of croquet, the said students will forfeit their right of playing said games 
(croquet and marbles). 

IX. All implements such as mallets, balls, marbles, etc., etc., shall be, as far 
as possible, made of a material having a consistency not greater than that of 
rubber, so as to insure the lives and limbs of those participating in the sports, 
because all students absent fi-oni recitations on account of bruises received from 
the careless use of said implements will not be able to obtain excuses from the 
President. All implements nuist be first carefully examined and tested by 
Lieut. Cornish before being employed in playing any game. 

X. If the students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College will conduct 
themselves atn-ording to the above rules, the Faculty of said institution will 
attribute the sunv of :ift9.!)99 towards the attaining of approi)riate trophies to be 
awarded to those excelling in said sports. 

(50) 



'OTHER"COLLEGE"ASSOCIATiONS: fft] 



(57) 




Foot Ball Association. 



OFFICERS. 

J. M. HERRERO, President. 

E. GREGORY, .... Business Manager. 
L. F. HORNER, . . Secretary and Treasurer. 
J. S. LORING, ^ 

M. RUGGLES, [ 

F. J. MACDONALD, | 
J. H. GREGORY, J 



Directors. 



G. B. Willard, 1. e. 
C. S. Graham, I. t. 
M. Ruggles, 1. g. 



COLLEGE TEAM. 

Rushers. 



H. N. Legate, c. 

Quarter-Bach. 
A. C. McCloiul. 



C. S. Crocker, r. e. 
M. A. Carpenter, r. t. 
F. S. Cooley, r. g. 



F. J. Ma<Doiial(l, 



Half-Backs. 
(58) 



J. B. Hull. 





THE INDEX. 


59 




Full-Back. 






J. M. Herrero, Capt. 






Substitutes. 




J. S. Perry, 




E. H. Lehnert. 




CLASS TEAMS 






'90. 






Rushers. 




F. J. Smith, 1. e. 




D. W. Dickinson, r. e. 


D. Barry, 1. t. 




J. S. Loring, r. t. 


G. B. Simonds, ]. g. 


C. E. Bliss, c, Capt. 

Quarter- Back. 
A. C. MoCloud. 

Half- Backs. 


T. P. Felton, r. g. 


J. M. Herrero, 


Full-Back. 
H. L. Russell. 

Substitutes. 


E. Gregory. 


J. S. West, 


H. D. Haskins. 


P. L. Taylor, 




'91. 






Rushers. 




M. Ruggles, 1. e. 




H. M. Howard, r. e. 


M. A. Carpenter, 1. t. 




C. H. Johnson, r. t. 


H. J. Field, 1. g. 




W. A. Brown, r. g. 



C. A. Magill, c. 



J. B. Hull, 



Quarter- Back. 

J. E. S. Phillips. 

Half- Backs. 



W. C. Paige. 



60 


THE INDEX. 






Full- Back. 






H. N. Legate. 






Substitutes. 




0. V. B. Lage, 




A. G. Fames. 




'92. 






Rushers. 




E. Rogei-s, 1. e. 




R. P. Lyman, r. e. 


W. Fletcher, 1. t. 




C. S. Graham, r. t. 


H. E. Crane, 1. g. 


C. Tyng, c. 

Quarter- Back. 

H. F. Stone. 

Half- Backs. 


J. E. Bardin, r. g. 


F. J. MacDonald, 


Full- Back. 

C. S. Nauss. 

Substitutes. 


G. B. Willard. 


F. G. Stockbridge, 


H. B. Emerson. 


H. C. West, 




'93. 






Rushers. 




W. S Pember, 1. e. 




E. H. Lehnert, r. e. 


G. W. Soule, 1. t. 




F. G. Bartlett, r. t. 


E. P. Harvey, 1. g.. 




G. P. Woodbury, r g. 



J. R. Perry. 



L. W. Smith. 



P. H. Henderson, c. 

Quarter-Back. 
J. H. Gregory. 

Half- Backs. 
Full-Back. 

H. C. Davis. 
Substitutes. 

C. H. Parker. 



F. Staples. 



A. E. Melendy, 




Base Ball Association. 



OFFICERS. 



A. C. McCLOUD, 
J. C. S. PHILLIPS, . 
D. W. DICKINSON, ^ 
G. B. WILLARD, I 



W. C. PAIGE, j 

E. H. LEHNERT, J 



. . . President. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 



Directors. 



P. A. Parrar, c. 
T. Hoar, p. 
M. Ruggles, 1 b. 
T. Rice, 3 b. 



COLLEGE TEAM. 



W. C. Paige, 3 b. 
A. C. McCloud, s. s. 
J. B. Hull, Jr., c. f. 
D. W. Dickinson, 1. f., Capt. 



H. L. Russell, r. f. 
(61) 



62 



THE INDEX. 









GLA8S TEAMS. 










'90. 










D. W. Dickinson, c, Capt. 




A. 


N. 


Stowe, p. 


A. 


C. McCloud, s. s 


C. 


E. 


Bliss, 1 b. 


E. 


Gri-egory, 1. f. 


J. 


M 


Herrero, 2 b. 


D. 


Barry, c. f. 


H. 


L. 


Russell, 3 b. 


F. 


J. Smith, r. f. 



W. C. Paige, o. 



J. B. Hull, p. 

M Ruggles, 1 b. 

J. E. S. Phillips, 2 b., Capt., 

H. P. Tuttle, 3 b. 



H. N. Legate, s. s. 
M. A. Carpenter, 1. f. 
A. M. Belden, c. f. 
L. P. Horner, r. f. 



H. E. Crane, p. 
P. G. Bald us, 1 b. 
C. S. JSfauss, 3 b. 
W. Pletcher, 3 b. 



'92. 
G. B. Willard, c, Capt. 



G. A. Tyng, s. s. 
P. J. McDonald, 1. f. 
R. P. Lyman, c. f. 
H. C. West, r. f. 



L. A. P. Tinoco, p. 
N. P. Higgins, 1 b. 
C. D. Greene, 2 b. 
A. G. Paneuf, 3 b. 



'93. 

L. E. Wells, c, Capt. 



E. J. Walker, s. s. 
L. W. Smith, 1. f. 
E. H. Lehnert, c. f. 
E. H. Henderson, r. 




Tennis Association. 



OFFICERS. 
C. H. JONES, President. 



O. V. B. LAGE, 

F. L. TAYLOR, 1 

W. W. GAY, ! 

A. a PANEUF, [ 

N. P. HIGGINS, j 



Secretary and Treasurer. 



Directors. 



MEMBERS. 

The whole College. 



GLASS CHAMPIONS. 

A. C. McCloud, '90. J. B. Hull, '91. 

W. J. Goldthwait, '92. 
(63) 




Athletic Association, 



OFFICERS. 



D. W. DICKINSON, 
F. L. ARNOLD, 
J. M. HERRERO, 1 

A. G-. EAMES, I 

W. J. GOLDTHWAIT, •'' 
S. E. BARRUS, J 



. President. 
Secretary and Treasurer. 

. Directors. 



MEMBERS. 

The whole College. 



(64) 




Marble Association* 



General Manager. 

LIEUT. CORNISH. 

Bufiiness Manager. 

ARTHUR N. STOWE. 

Guardian of Marbles. 
JOHN S. WEST. 

Ring Scrateher. 
TABBY. 

Sharp Shooters. 
M. A. CARPENTER. F. J. MACDONALD. 

Tally Keeper. 
W. W. GAY. 

Ladies' Escort and Talkers. 

C. A. MAGILL, H. P. STONE. 

Members. 

THE FRESHMAN CLASS. 



*See Rules for Athletics, page 56. 
9 (65) 




SAFETY CLUB. 



Commodore, 

Physician, 

Road Clearer, 

Bill Settler, 

Tii(;k Rider and Coaster 

Machine, 

Fiiiancial Backer, . 

Uniform, 

Annual Meet, 

Colors, 



SPORTS. 

C. Wellington. 

Doctor Wellington. 

Prof. Wellington. 

Charles Wellington. 

the Tar Walk, . . Tabbv. 

IS Inch. 

Professor Wellington. 

Cutaway and Derby. 

. April 1st. 

Green and Sky Blue. 



MEMBERS. 

All are invited to Join. 




Musical Association, 



COLLEOE OHOIR. 

Organist, S. C. Nauss. 

Leader, A. M. Belden, 1st Tenor. 
H. F. Tuttle, 1st Tenor. W. A. Brown, 1st Bass. 

G. B. Willarrl, 1st Tenor. F. G. Stockbridge, 1st Bass. 

C H. Johnson, 2nd Tenor, G. B. Simonds, 2nd Bass. 

L. F. Horner, 2nd Tenor, H. D. Clark, 2nd Bass. 



' •' A RION " QUAR TETTE. 



B. L. Hartwell, 1st Tenor. 
H. F. Tuttle, 2nd Tenor. 



A. M. Belden, 1st Bass. 
H. E. Woodbrey, 2nd Bass. 



Mac. 



West. 



Joe. 



SINGING SCHOOL CHORIST. 

Leader, Prof. Chamberay. 
First Tenor. 

Taft. Barry. 

Second Tenor. 
Jones. Russell. 

First Bass. 
Bardin. Williams. 



Second Bass. 

Simonds. Gregory. Carpenter. 

(67) 



Smith. 



Phip. 



Gay. 



Howard. 



Banjo and Guitar Club, 



BANJO. 

J. M. Herrero. S. C. Nauss. 

S. C. Barrus. 

GUITAR. 

H. T. Shores, W. Fletcher. 



Cords and Dischords, 



Crane Wood Saw. 

TuTTLE, . Vioh'n. 

CuRLEY, Violin. 

Bliss, Cornet. 

SouLE, Cornet. 

Lehnert, Sliding Trombone. 

Pembkr, Psaltery. 

Mac, Tin Whistle. 

Stowe Piano. 

Castro, Harp. 

Gay, Zithern. 

J. West, Organ. 

Takt, Accordion. 

Felton, Flute. 

Johnson, Bellows. 

(08) 



^^. 







MILITARY. 



CLARCK CADETS. 
B A TTA LION ORG A NIZA TIO N. 

Commandant and Instructor. 

1st Lieut. LESTER W. CORNISH, 5th Cavalry, U. S. A., 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

Commissioned Staff. 

First Lieutenant and Adjutant, . . . . A. N. Stowe. 

First Lieutenant and Quartermaster, . . . . J. S. West. 
First Lieutenant and Fire Marshall, ... E. Gregory. 

Noil- Commissioned Staff. 

Sergeant-Ma j or, A. M. Beldbn. 

Quartermaster-Sergeant, W. W. Gay. 



COMPANY A. 

Officers. 



Captain, D- Barry. 

First Lieutenant, J- M. Herrero. 

Second Lieutenant, • . A. C. McCloud. 

First Sergeant, ■ • M. Ruggles. 

Duty Sergeant, . ■ . W. A. Brown. 

Corporal, C. A. Magill. 

(69) 



70 



THK INDEX. 



Bardin, 

Bliss, 

Clark, 

Dickinson, 

Deuel, 

Eames, 

Gold th wait, 



Privates. 

Haskins, 

Henderson, 

Holland, 

Howard, 

Loring, 

Lyman, 

Perry, 



Smith, 

Stockbridge, 

Stone, 

Taylor, 

Tyng, C. 

Tyng, G. M. 

Woodbrey. 



COMPANY B. 

Officers. 

Captain, H. L. Russell. 

First Lieutenant, G. B. Simonds. 

Second Lieutenant, F. W. Mossman. 

First Sergeant, M. A. Carpenter. 

Duty Sergeant, H. N. Legate. 

Corporal, G. B. Willard. 



Privates. 



Barrus, 

Beals, 

Clark, 

Crane, 

Davis, 

Felt, 

Goodrich, 



Green, 


Parker, 


Harlow, 


Smith, C. A. 


Harvey, 


Smith, L. W. 


Hoyt, 


Smith, JR. H. 


Hull, 


Staples, 


Knight, 


Thomi^son, 


MacDonald, 


West. 



COMPANY C. 

Officers. 

Captain, S. P. Felton. 

First Lieutenant, F. O. Williams. 

Sec;ond Lieutenant, . F. L. Taylor. 

First Sergeant, H. F. TuTTLE. 

Duty Sergeant, W. C. Paige. 

Corporal, H. J. Field. 



TttE Index. 



^1 



Bartlett, 

Boynton, 

Curley, 

Emerson. 

Paneuf, 

Field, 

Fletcher, 



Privates. 

Graliam, 
Gregory, 
Harlow, 

Hawkes, 
Kellogg, 
Meleudy, 
Pember, 



Sawyer, 

Shores, 

Smith, 

Soule, 

Walker, 

Williams. 



M0RRI8' DRUM CORPS. 

First Sergeant and Chief Musician. 
L. F. Horner. 



C. H. Jones, 
C. H. Johnson, 



Fifers. 



F. L. Arnold, 
C. M. Hubbard. 



L. F. Horner, 
C. S. Nauss, 



Drummers. 



J. E. S. Phillips, 
F. G. Baldus, 



E. H. Lehnert, 



Bass Drum and Cymbals. 



L. E. Wells. 



Appointments. 

staff and Commissioned Officers are selected from the Senior Class. 
Non-Commissioned Staff and Sergeants are selected from the Junior Class. 
Corporals are selected from the Junior and Sophomore Classes. 
All members of the Senior Class are required to act as instructors at the va- 
rious drills and as such are subject to regular details. 



College Reading Room. 



OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION. 



W. E. TAFT, . 

E. P. FELT, 

P. W. MOSSMAN, '90, 1 

A. M. BELDEN, '91, [ 

H. B. EMERSON, '92, j 

F. H. HENDERSON, '93, J 



President. 
Secretary and Treasurer. 



Directors. 



NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS. 

DailieSi 



Boston Journal, 
Boston Herald, 



New York Tribune, 
Springfield Republican. 



Popular Weeklies. 



Puck, 

Time, 

Youth's Companion, 

Leslie's Illustrated Weekly, 

Harper's Weekly, 



Judge, 

Texas Sit'tings, 

The Nation, 

Illustrated London News, 

Chifago Weekly News. 



(73) 



THE INDEX 



73 



Magazines. 



Harper's, 

Scribner's, 

North American Review, 

Contemporary Review, 

Popular Science Monthly, 

Quarterly Journal of Economics, 



Outing, 
Forum, 
Century, 
Chautauquan, 
Nineteenth Century, 
Political Science Quarterly. 



Brunonian, 
Williams Weekly, 
Amherst Student, 



College PaUications. 



Dartmouth, 

Yale Record, 

Harvard Daily Crimson. 



Agricultural. 



The Hog. 
Dairy World, 
Farmers' Review, 
Farm Journal, 
Rural New Yorker, 
Nebraska Farmer, 
Colorado Farmer, 
Southern Cultivator, 
Live Stock Journal, 
Southern Plantei-, 
Pacific Rural Press, 
American Cultivator, 
American Agriculturist, 
American Veterinary Review, 



The Industrialist, 
Breeders' Gazette, 
Country Gentleman, 
Massachusetts Ploughman, 
New England Homestead, 
Our Grange Homes, 
Colman's Rural World, 
Swine Breeders' Journal, 
Holstein Priesian Register, 
American Sheep Breeder, 
National Live Stock Journal, 
New England Farmer, 
Poultry Monthly, 
Journal of Agriculture (Quebec). 



Bokmical and Horticultural. 



Garden (London), 
American Florist, 
Canadian Horticulturist, 
Journal of Horticulture, 
Horticultural Ait Journal, 

10 



Revue Horticole, 
Gardener's Chronicle, 
Garden and Forest, 
Botanical Gazette, 
Bulletin of Torrey Botanical Club, 
American Garden. 



74 



THE INDEX. 



Scientific. 
Scientific American (with supplement), Nature, 



American Naturalist, 
Journal of Morphology, 
Agricultural Science, 
Popular Science News, 
Entomological' Americana, 
Journal of the Chemical Society, 



Congregationalist, 
Christian Register, 
Missionary Herald, 
New Church Messenger, 
Illustrated Christian Weekly, 



Science, 
Analyst, 
Chemical News, 
American Chemical Journal, 
Canadian Entomologist, 
Journal of Comparative Medicine and 
Surgery. 

Religious. 

Watchman, 

Intercollegian, 

Independent, 

Sunday School Times, 

Christian Union. 



Miscellaneous. 



British Bee Journal, 
American Agriculturist, 
American Bee Joui'nal, 
Bee Keepers' Guide, 
Bee Keepers' Magazine, 
Canadian Bee Journal, 
Canadian Honey Producer, 



Woman's Journal, 
Amherst Record, 
Hampshire Co. Gazette, 
Gazette and Courier, 
Earmington Chronicle, 
Our Dumb Animals, 
Western Resonrces, 



Gleanings in Bee Culture. 




New Publications. 



"Thou Shalt Not." By W. S. Pember. A good and intensely moral 
work, designed to accom])lish the entire reformation of tiiiman kind. We es- 
pecially recommend it to the lower classes. For sale by J. S. West, No. 25, 
N. C. 

"Pathfinder and Pocket Map of Northampton." By Charles Tyng. 
This gentleman's acknowledged familiarity with this great metropolis is a suffi- 
cient guarantee of the accuracy of the work. 

"Education Without a Teacher." By Geo. W. Soule. A complete man- 
ual of the best methods of instruction in the elements of the classical and math- 
ematical branches. For sale by J. H. Gregory. 

"Care of the Moustache." By A. M. Belden. The author of this inval- 
uable little work is fully conversant with his subject, and gives many valuable 
hints to beginners. W. W. Gay, General Agent. 

"How(e) I Saved the Bel,l-rope." By A. N. Stowe. Afresh littl ■ book 
of piquant verse, filled with tales of blood curdling adventures and midnight 
raids in "old chapel." Any person buying a copy of "Thou Shalt Not "will 
be entitled to a copy of this free. 

"Bliss' Base-ball Guide." The author of these inaccurate rules is utterly 
unfit for the task he has chosen, as he is entirely inexperienced in this line. We 
cannot recommend it to any one. 

" ' The Course of True Love never did run Smooth,' or a Summer 
Flirtation in the Adirondacks." By C. A. Magill. Being well acquainted 
with the decidedly harmless character of the writer, we can safely assert that 
this is a safe book to put into the hands of the young. 

"Fresh Greens." By H. F. Stone. This charming little narrative, involv- 
ing as it does many phases of the writer's own life and ex} ei fence, is well 
adapted to aid in passing an idle hour. 

(75) 



CO-EDUCATION. 



HE purpose of this article is to present to the reader the advantages of 
co-education in all colleges, and particularlj- in our agricultural colleges. 
There are now several institutions, particularly in the Western States, where 
both sexes ma}- attend on terms of equality, so far as educational privileges are 
concerned, and thus enjoy the greater social advantages which must be afforded 
by such a system. 

The co-educational system as carried out at Cornell is the standard of 
which all others are more or less modifications. At that institution, Sage Col- 
lege was erected especially for young ladies, and will accommodate one hun 
dred students, who are presided over by a lady principal of high character and 
attainments. Young ladies are not admitted until seventeen years of age. 
They are granted two evenings a week in vrhich to receive their friends, a priv- 
ilege which is doubtless appreciated and enjoyed by all. At Cornell the lady 
students substitute calisthenics for military drill, and as they go through the 
rapid and graceful movements, their ruddy cheeks and bright eyes doubtless 
attract more attention than the brass buttons and martial pomp of the Cornell 
Cadet Battalion. 

Out of the thii-ty-four colleges, which reported to the Commissioners of Edu- 
cation, eight refused admittance to young ladies. Of the remaining twenty- 
six, there were only a few that had made any provision for their attendance, 
although their doors were open to them. Young ladies attending such colleges 
must therefore find accommodation in the nearest town, which is often incon- 
venient and disagi-eeable. How can we under such conditions expect young 
ladies to attend college. 

In accordance with a vote of the trustees, Prof. Levi Stockbridge, when pres- 
ident of M. A. C, invited the fair sex to attend this college. Only one young 
lady accepted this invitation, but if there could be acconmiodations for them in 
the shape of a dormitory erected for their special use, and presided over by a 
lady principal, as at Cornell, there would be little doubt of its being filled. 

Then what an attraction there would be at Aggie ! For in this ladies' dormi- 
tory might be spent two pleasant evenings a week. A j'oung man might tlien 
gratify his desire for lady's society without the trouble of going to Hamp, and 
his character would be far less likely to suffer in the estimation of the public. 

Co-education is the most natural method, and the young ladies and gentle- 
men thus educated together make truer, nobler, and less sentimental men and 
v(romeii. It is radically different from what the higher institutions of the Old 

(70) 



THE INDEX, 77 



World recognize as the proper system of education, but the time will come 
when even these conservative institutions must yield to popular opinion and 
open their doors to both sexes. 

Co-education would have a marked influence on the athletics in our colleges. 
The tendency with college men now is, to make heavy athletics a specialty, and 
to strive to row the fastest, catch the best and lift the most. All of which phy- 
sicians inform us is decidedly injurious, and dangerous to the health. With 
the advent of young ladies in our colleges would come lighter gymnastic ap- 
paratus and lighter games, which will develop a man physically, as well as 
heavier work. The aim of the athlete would then be to cultivate graceful 
movements and a well proportioned body, by the modei-ate and equal use of all 
the muscles. The natural sciences would acquire new interest in the eyes of all 
the students. Botanical exhibitions would be more frequent, and the fields and 
forests would be diligently explored for specimens of rare beauty. The zoologi- 
cal department would be rendered very interesting, though at times the highest 
species might receive more attention than the insects and lower animals. 
Howevei", as students are not confined to the text book, but attend college to 
learn all they can, this would do but little harm. 

Now all this argues powerfully for the speedy and more perfect introduction 
of co-education into our own college, and if the reader has not long since com- 
prehended the benefits which are to be derived from it, we must say that we 
pity his ignorance or bigotiy. As for ourselves, we feel it to be our duty as 
true and loj'al men, to chamjjion every good cause however small and insignifi- 
cant its beginnings may be. Therefore, we wish to express our hearty thanks 
to, and admiration foj-, the only member of our Faculty who is endeavoring to 
do anything for the advancement of the cause of co-education. That he has, 
in the face of all the opposition which he must inevitably encounter, succeeded 
in making even so small a beginning in this direction, is a source of congratula- 
tion to all those who have the good of the college at heart. It is our hearty 
wish that he may meet with success in his undertaking, and that the classes 
which follow us, may enjoy as great advantages over us as we have over those 
preceding. 





First twins of our Alumni : 

Ralph Lewis Easterbrook, 
Ruth Davis Easterbrook. 
Born October 5th, 18S9. Weight 7'.^ and 6}{ pounds. 



Mrs. B-l-us to young B whose room had just been stacked. — "I should 

have thought that Johnnie W would have been a sort of father to 

you! " 

Prof. L-n- to Tuttle who rooms in South College. — "How far away do you 

room ? " 
T-ttl-.— " About half a mile." 
Prof. L. — " Well, can you get your composition in five minutes if you hurry ?" 

F-lt-n to J. West. — " Johnny, you may think you are an angp], but your wings 
haven't grown yet." 

G-o. T-ng to St-w-.— " Who is adjutant ? " 
St-w-.— "I am ! ! ! !" 

Prof. W. — " What is the product of H.^S ? " 

Ph-ll-ps.—" Chickens." 

Prof. W. — " Please give the reaction." 

R-ss-11. — "Waiter, please pass me the hand-bill." 

Prof. B ks, incjuiring about tlie foot-ball game. — " And how many innings 

did thoy play ?" 

Graham (at foot-ball supper). — " My only regret is that I liave no more room." 

Eames. — " Did that man have two twins ? " 

W-ll-rd. — "Now hear me swear, and this is what I mean : Henceforth I do my 
courting out of town, and love shall be no more a dream." 

m 



THE iNDfiX. 'i'9 



Prex to Freshman class, who are setting off matches. — " Come! come! some of 
you will smell sulphur soon enough without doing that. 

G--clr-eh. — "Say, 1 don't see what molecules have to do with chemistry. I 
thought that molecules were those little bugs you see under the micro- 
scope. " 

P-ge to Prof. W-l-er. — "If you expect to catch that man you better watch 

somebody besides me all the time." 
Prof. W. — "I haven't been watching you all the time." 
P-ge.— "Oh! come off!" 

Settees. — The Freshmen wondered why the Faculty re-arranged the seats in 
Chapel one morning. 

Prof. F. — "Describe the Ctenophora." 

Student. — " The male is pinkish and the female transparent." 

Prof. F. — " I suspect you get that idea fiom the genus Homo." 

J. W-st. — " What kind of a Christian are you ? " 

Stowe just after inspection. — " Where is your general order ? " 
R-g-r. — " Oh! kicking around somewhere." 
Stowe. — " You must put it up." 

Prof. M. — " There are races of men." 
Perry. — " Yes, and races of monkeys." 

Prof. L, to C. T-ng,—" Some people have the gift of gab." 

Senior on drill to Freshman. — " Keep your fingers closed and your mouth 
ditto." 

Lieut. C. to B-l-us. — " How do you gentlemen happen to be off this hour." 
B-l-us, who doesn't know him. — "Got a bolt on the Lieut." 

B n, clearing up the botanical library after the Freshmen have been study- 
ing structural botany. — "Professor, there is a microscope and a razor 
missing." 

Prof. S. — " Well, perhaps some Freshman thinks he is getting big enough to 
shave." 

Oh why does the poet rave, 

And why does he tear his hair. 
And why do the poet's eyes protrude 

With a wild and unearthly stare ? 
Oh, why does he gasp for breath, 

And vrhy does he act so queer ? 
He isn't crazy, or even boozy, 

But he's trying to find an idea. 



MARRIAGES, 



Charles. — " Ah, dearest Anna of your love Fm dying, 

and at your feet I lie. " 
Anna. — '^ I see you are lying." 



Richard B. Grover ('73), May 8th, 1SS9, to Eva I. Broughton, at Jamaica 
Plains, Mass. 

Edward P. Candler ('74), June 17th, 1SS9, to Louisa E. F. Hilger, at Helena, 
Montana. 

Winthrop E. Stone ('82), June 2-4th, 1889, to Victoria Heitmiiller, at Knox- 
ville, Tenn. 

O Dr. Luciano Jos^ de Almeida ('85), e D. Maria Ophelia Nogueira Ramos de 
Almeida participam seu casamento. Sananal de S. Paulo, 27-6-1889. 

Richard F. Duncan ('86), June 5th, 1889, to Jessie Collier, at Albanj^, N. Y. 

William H. Caldwell ('87), December 25th, 1888, to Jessie A. Rice, at North 
Hadley, Mass. 

Frank B. Carpenter ('87), October 24th, 1889, to Elizabeth G. Kirkland, at 
Amherst, Mass. 

Frederick K. Brooks ('88), June 4th, 1889, to Abbie I. Nelson, at Kingston, 
N. H. 



^80) 



DIARY. 



1888. 

Thanksgiving vacation commences. 
Dec. 14. Pall Term ends with great rejoicing. 

1889. 

Jan. 3. Winter Term begins. 

5. Mac. breaks through the ice. 

7. '92 bolts on Brooks. 

10. G-ame of base-ball on campus. 

10. Prof. Warner institutes a reform. 

16. Drill on campus. 

21. 7.30 P. M., singing school begins, with sixty -two present. 
23. Prof. Brooks appears with a clip on his hair. 

27. Castro looking for his pie. 

Feb. 1. '91 bolts on Prof. Warner. 

5. Prof. Brooks explains his plan of experiments, to the great disgust 
of '91. 

Mar. 1. Stacking rooms once more becomes popular. 

5. '90 has another female addition to their class. 

7. Mock trial in W. I. L. S. Verdict of jury: " Prisoner guilty for not 

killing plaintiff, who was Hon. A. N. Stowe, '90." 

8. Taft forces the season with a straw hat. 

9. Prof. Lane preaches in chapel. 

18. '91 and '92 bolt on Prof. Wellington. 

22. Winter Term closes. 
Apr. 2. Spring Term begins. 

3. Prof. Fernald takes '89, studying geology, to cellar of his new insec- 
tory to show layers of strata as deposited by water, which Mr. 
North finds to be composed of concrete, tin cans, etc. 
11 (81) 



83 THE IKDEX. 



19. Prof. Wellington and F. Taylor have a contest on the stairs. 

20. Two pigs killed by lightning. 

21. No chapel. 

22. Base-ball on the campus, M. A. C. vs. Northampton: 28 — 1. 

23. '91 and '92 bolt on Tabby. 

24. Kendall prize men announced. 
24. M. A. C. vs. Amherst '92. 18—3. 
26. M. A. C. vs. Amherst '92. 8—0. 
30. Bay State vs. M. A. C. 17—0. 

May 3. '91 and '92 bolt on Prof. Wellington. 

4. M. A. C. vs. Williston. 13—7. 

5. Prof. Walker in Chapel. — " Punishment will be as hard as those seats 

to the slumberers." 
14. '89 plants class tree. 
18. Williston vs. M. A. C. 3-7 
20. Aggie '92 via Amherst H. S. 24—1. 
24. Aggie vs. Whately. 18 — 5. 

28. Chapel seats on campus, and prayer in new chapel for the " fools." 

29. Desk in chapel missing. 

30. Dr. Walker tries to read scripture from an encyclopedia. 
June 1. Aggie vs. Wesleyan Academy. 9—2. 

10. Senior vacation begins. 

11. '91 and '92 rush. 

12. Effigy of Tabby on flag pole, followed by funeral services conducted 

by A. N. Stowe, and prayer by Jack Loring. 

12. Prof. Fernald starts for Europe. 

13. 12 P. M. '91 fire cannon while '92 are guarding it. Fletcher appears 

in full dress. 

14. '92 cuts examination to guard cannon. 

14. Freshmen night. Smith gets wet and Stowe stays on chapel all night 

and Jack takes a bath. 
18. Baccalaureate sermon by Rev. C. S. Walker, Ph. D., Prof, of Mental 

and Moral Science, at 10,45 A. M. Address before Young Men's 

Christian Association, by President Wm. F. Warren, LL. D., of 

Boston University. 

17. Kendall Prize Speaking of Freshmen and Sophomore classes at 8 P.M. 

18. Grinnell Prize examination of Senior class in Agricultural Hall at 10 

A. M. and 2 P. M. Alunmi meeting at 1.30 P. M, Military drill 
at 4.30 P. M. President's reception at 8 P. M. 

19. Graduating exercises at 10 A. M. 
Sept. 3. Examination for admittance. 

4. Fall Term begins. 



THE INDEX. 



83 



Sept. 5. 

6. 

7. 
Oct. 1. 

15. 
16. 
23. 
39. 
29. 

Oct. 3. 



Nov. 



7. 
21. 
16. 

22. 



Hawkes hunting for a nest. 

Mass Meeting. 

Juniors test grapes. 

Base-ball— '91 vs. '90. 5—5 (4 innings). '90 gives up championship to 

'91. 
Jones has his first shave. 
New concrete walk. 
G-round broken for D. G. K. house. 
Rope pull, '92 vs. '93, and '92 gets thei'e. 
C. Tyng goes to see his girl but is disappointed ; feels better when he 

knows his brother wrote the letter. 
Attempt made to dam ravine. 
Juniors go on a bum. 
College goes to Bay State Fair. 
Foot-ball— Aggie vs. Williston— 12 to 8. 
-Juniors enter laboratory. 
Foot-ball- '92 vs. '93—44 to 0. 

Willard sends Perry down town for some squash turnovers. 
Foot-ball — Aggie vs. Williston — 18 to 6. Aggies go to Williston by 

special train. Nearly ninety Aggies there. 
Foot-ball— '91 vs. '92—18 to 8. 



CASH ACCT, OF JUNIOR'S PLOT, 



PAID. 








For Ploughing and Harrowing, 




$0.50 




Fertilizer and Seed, 




5.60 




Cultivation of Crop, 




2.00 




Summer vacation : 








In picking bugs, .... 


. 0.98 






Counting smutty kernels. 


. 1.15 






Cultivating crops. 


. 2.00 






Miscellaneous ways, 


.60- 


- 4.78 




For Harvesting Crop, .... 




2.00 




Damage to Clothing, 




1.00 




Corruption of Morals, 




.15— 


15.98 


RECEIVED. 








From Sale of Crop, .... 




$8.50 




' ' Overalls and Jumper, . 




.15— 


8.68 


Balance, 






, $7.33 



In the bole, 



$7.33. 



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(84) 



Gastronomical Athletics. 



.BRIIAPS there is nothing connected with college life in which the stu- 
dents of M. A. C. are more proficient than in this work. But, how 
could it be otherwise, being called as thej' are to pass through so violent exer- 
cise, in what are known as boarding houses, but which might, in some cases, 
better be termed " refuse dispensaries." 

About these boarding houses, we do not know what to say; sometimes we 
wish that the streets were lined with them, but when we consider how few good 
meals we have ever enjoyed an undisputed title to, in one of them, we are al- 
most persuaded that they are not indispensable, and we cannot but believe that 
the managers of them are trying to hasten on the time when man will be able 
to exist without eating. 

Although we do not say but that the food is good enough, what there is of it, 
we do say that there is enough of it such as it is. 

But it would be unfair to lay all of the blame upon the keepers of the board- 
ing-houses, for each boarder has many peculiarities. Watch one of them while 
he is eating a dinner, and you will immediately be impressed with the feeling 
that either be has missed meals when he did not design to, or that his digestive 
system extends throughout the length and breadth of his body. 

When a student first enters a boarding-house, he feels a little delicate about 
developing his digestive capabilities, and for this reason he gets along for a 
while, but after a little while his delicacy leaves him, and it matters not what 
is set before him, whether hulled coi'ii or oat meal, boiled rice or tooth-picks, he 
leaves nothing in his tracks but empty dishes. His appetite is not affected by 
long eating and so his demand is greater than the supply. Thus it goes ; the 
student living upon the hope that the next time there will be something better 
and more of it for him. 

The varieties of food used are extremely few, and so it would take but little 
space to give a bill of fare for any boarding-house. Hash is the old standby, 
although each student is required to eat a plate of oatmeal once per day 

(85) 



86 THE INDEX. 



thj-oughout the college year. Beef steak is sampled once per week. One of 
our senses seems to tell us that the onion is frequently indulged in. Pies and 
puddings are a rarity, while such a thing as cake is entirely out of the ques- 
tion. 

Experimental work is made in cooking at these houses, and so the boarders 
must suffer the consequence; the hash is but half-cooked, the oatmeal has a me- 
tallic lustre, the so-called pies are floating upon the juice, the bread has the 
cojisistency of dough, the toothpicks will have both ends blunt, and everything 
else necessary to make him think evil thoughts. 

Having seen that the tendency of the boarding house is toward a lower stan- 
dard rather than a higher one, we naturally wonder what the coming students 
will have to eat. They can live upon faith for a while, but that will not last 
always. What the future will be we refrain to say, but we believe that there 
is occasion for great rejoicing upon the boarding-house keepers' part, when he 
thinks that his resources of oatmeal will continue as long as that crop is raised, 
but a feeling of sorrow must come over him when he sees the rapid destruction 
of the forests in the United States, for this means that his hitherto never fail- 
inj^- supply of toothpicks must go. 



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES, 



Prof. Walker waits while '91, gets measured for uniforms. 

Foot-ball game. Freshmen wait while Nauss kicks gools. 

We are all waiting to receive an invitation to Felton's wedding the last of June. 

Brown waits for his moustache to grow. 

A. N. Stowe waits on a young lady down East street, 

While Gregory waits on one who lives nearer college. 

'90 measured themselves with '91 in base-ball ; found they were a size smaller. 

Our wait. For a pond to skate on. 

No more waits in class room. Dr. W-lk-r, after a pause, to Brown, picking 

toothpicks out of his coat collar. — " Is that Mr. Felt ? " 
Br-wn. — '' It looks like broken toothpicks.'' Next man is (]uickly called on to 

recite. 
Will Avait in vain. Prof. M y d, hearing of tlie Williston foot-ball 

game. — "Wish you had got beat so bad you would have never wanted to 

play foot-ball again." 
Prex's motto in his detective department, " A patient waiter is no loser," 



CALENDAR FOR 1890-91, 



1890. 



Winter Term begins, 

Winter Terra closes, 

Spring Term begins. 

Baccalaureate sermon, 

Kendall Prize Speaking, 

Grinnell Prize Examination of the Senior 

Class in Agriculture, 
Military Exercises, 
Meeting of the Alumni, 
President's Reception, 
Commencement Exercises, 
Meeting of Trustees. 
Examinations for Admission, Botanic 

Museum, 
Examinations for Admission, Botanic 

Museum, 
Fall Term begins, 
Fall Term closes, 



Wednesday, Jan. 2, at 8.15 A. M. 
Friday, March 21, at 10.30 A. M. 
Tuesday, April 8, at 8.15 A. M. 
Sunday, June 15. 
Monday, June 16. 

Monday, June 16. 
Tuesday, June 17. 
Tuesday, June 17. 
Tuesday, June 17. 
Wednesday, June 18. 
Wednesday, June 18. 

Thursday, June 19, at 9 A, M. 

Tuesday, Sept. 2, at 9 A. M. 
Wednesday, Sept. 3, at 8. 15 A. M. 
Friday, Dec. 19, at 10.30 A. M. 



Winter Term begins, 
Winter Term closes. 



1891. 



Thursday, Jan. 6, at 8.15 A. M. 
Friday, March 20, at 10.30 A. M. 



(87) 



IN MEMORY OF 

XENOS YOUNG CLARK, 

Class of '75, 
DIED JUNE 4, 1889. 



" Judge not; the workings of his brain 

And of his heart, thou can'st not see; 

What looks to thy dim eyes a stain. 

In God's pure light may only be 

A scar, brought from some well-won field 

Where thou wouldst onl}^ faint and yield." 



IN MEMORY OF 

JOSEPH HENRY HOWARD, 

Class of '82, 
DIED FEBRUARY 13, 1889. 



(88) 



Mass, Ag'l College Club of Boston 
AND Vicinity. 



Organized November 1, 1886. 



Dr. AUSTIN PETERS, '81, President, 23 Court St., Boston. 

Dr. MADISON BUNKER, '75, Secretary and Treasurer, Newton, Mass. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

CHARLES L. FLINT, '81, 25 Congress St., Boston. 

FRED H. FOWLER, '87, Commonwealth Building, Boston. 

WILLIAM COLVARD PARKER, 'SO, 28 School St., Boston, 



This club was founded for the mutual benefit and good fellowship of our 
Alumni, and for the promotion and advancement of the general interests of the 
college. It consists of over one hundi'ed and fifty meinbers, most of whom re- 
side in or about Boston. All graduates and former students may become mem- 
bers by sending their names te the Secretary. At all the meetings, the Faculty 
and olFicers of the college are invited, and have been well represented. The 
only expense of membership is an assessment from those present at a meeting, 
to cover the expenses of the dinner and the necessary pi-inting. 

Thei'e are no regular times for its meetings, which are held whenever it is 
thought convenient for a sufficient number of its members to attend. Still it is 
the general intention to hold two annually. They are called by notices sent to 
each man. If over thirty respond to the call, a meeting is held and a dinner 
provided. 

The club has held eight meetings, each of which has been a success. The first 
seven of these meetings were held in a comparatively short time after its 
founding. The seventh one was at the time of the Bay State Fair in Boston, in 
1887. Since then there have been no meetings up to the meeting at the time of 
the Bay State Fair this year. 

This meeting, held at the Parker house, Friday evening, Oct. 11, was a grand 
success. Nearly ninety members and invited guests sat down to the dinner. 
Dr. Austin Peters, now President, presided. Among the guests and speakers of 
the evening were Prof. Levi Stockbridge, Prof. W. P. Brooks, Prof. C. H. Fer- 
nald. Prof. C. C. Walker, and Lieut, C. H. Cornish, all instructors in this col- 
lege. The agricultui'al press was also well repi'esented. This was not only one 
of the largest but also one of the most interesting meetings our Alumni has ever 
held. 

13 (89) 



The Mass. Ag'l College Club of New 
York and Vicinity. 

Founded Dec. 10, 1886. 



OFFICERS. 

JOHN ASHBURTON CUTTER, M. D., '83, . . . President. 
SAMUEL CLARENCE THOMPSON, 72, . . Vice-President. 
ALFRED WILLIAM LUBLIN, '84, Secretary and Treasurer. 
SANDFORD DWIGHT FOOT, '78 Choragus. 



At the third annual dinner held in December, 1888, it was voted that the an- 
nual membership fee shall be five dollars, the payment of which entitles the 
member to a ticket to the annual dinner. All graduates and non-graduates of 
the institution are eligible to membership; the club is the only organization out 
of Massachusetts, of past students and graduates of the M. A. C. All wisliing 
to join will please forward the fee, their names and addresses to the Secretary- 
Treasurer, Mr. A. W. Lublin, No. 66 Beaver Street, New York. The next din- 
ner will be held Dec. 17th, 1889, but notice of place will be sent out. 

PAST GUESTS OF THE CLUB. 

President H. H. Goodell, Amherst. 

Ex-Professor and Captain Charles Morris, U. S. A., Governor's Island. 
Ex-President Levi Stockbridge, Amherst. 

Ex-Professor Henry E. Alvord, C. E., Director Maryland Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. 
Ex-Professor Charles L. Harrington, New York. 
Dr. F. M. Hexanier, American Agriculturist. 
Ex-Professor Henry W. Parker, D. D., Iowa College. 

(90) 



THE INDEX. 91 



ACTIVE MEMBERS. 

'71, Andrew Lewis Bassett, Brooklyn. 

'71, William Henry Bowker, Boston. 

'71, George Clark Woolson. Superintendent Public Parks, New York. 

'72, William Ebenezer Bullard, M. D., 112 East 40th St., City. 

'72, Frederick William Morris, 72 Astor Place, City. 

'72, Frederick Maxwell Somers, 35 Wall St., City. 

'72, Samuel Clarence Thompson, 832 East 161st St., City. 

'74, Prank Edgar Adams, 88 South Oxford St., Brooklyn. 

'74, John Mitchell Benedict, M. D., Waterbury, Conn. 

'74, Asa Williams Dickinson, 1 Montgomery St., Jersey City, N. J. 

'74, William Hr)race Doubleday 151 Green St., City. 

'74, William Lyman Middlefleld, Conn. 

'75, Joseph Francis Barrett, 29 Beaver St., City. 

'75, John Atherton Barri, Bridgeport, Conn. 

'75, Henry Stranahan Jackson, Brick Church, N. J., 

'76, Willis Washburn Cary, Fishkill, N. Y. 

'76, Charles Herbert Phelps. 42 Elizabeth St., City. 

'76, Joseph Edward Root, M. D., Hartford, Conn. 

'77, Frank Gordon Urner, 70 Warren St., City. 

'78, Sanford D wight Foot, 101 Chambers St., City. 

'78, Henry Francis Hubbard, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

'78, Charles Elihu Lyman, Middlefield, Conn. 

'78, Predei-ick Tuckerman, M. D., Amherst. 

'79, Edgar Davis Chittendon, Bridgeport, Conn. 

'81, Benjamin Salter Smith, Orange, N. J. 

'82, Charles Edward Beach, Hartford, Conn. 

'82, Harry 7:Cirke Chase, 148 South Elliott Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

'82, John Ashburton Cutter, M. D., The Ariston, etc.. City. 

'82, Samuel Judd Holmes, 19 Murray St., City. 

'82, John Cheney Piatt, 383 Fourth Ave., City. 

'82, James Stoddard Williams, Glastonbury, Conn. 

'83, Alfred Armand Hevia, 232 Lexington Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y, 

'84, Alfred William Lublin, 19 Williams St., City. 

'85, George Holcomb Bai-ber, M. D., Glastonbury, Conn. 

'85, Hezekiah Howell, Monroe, N. Y. 

'85, Benoni Tekirion, 1 Broadway, City. 

'85, George Gouge Woodhull, Monroe, N. Y. 



Slips in all Directions. 



Prof. W. to class in Chemistry.—" Iodine vapour has a deep violet oder." 

Prof. W".— " That would be right if it only was right." 

Prof. Br- -ks-— "Four quarts divided by three equals are one and one-half 
quarts.'' 

Prof. W-lk-r.— " What is the object of dividing a play into Acts i " 
C-rp-ut-r. — " To give the audience a rest." 

J. Gr-g-ory. — " There are two genders (genera) of corn." 

Prof. W-lk-r, after a brilliant guess.— "Your powers of association are not 
very trustworthy this morning." 

C-i-l-y says that La(r)ge is small. 

Prof. W-rn-r.—" You know, gentlemen, that you must compare like to like, 
you can't say an apple is to a potato as an apple tree is to a potato tree." 

C-rp-nt-r looking at the electric light wires. — "Say Crane, how long has that 
telephone been in the Chapel ? " 

J. Gr-gg. — " Won't it be time to cut asparagus soon ?" 

Gr-gg, looking over herbarium. — "Monkey -flower! Guess Sammy never saw a 
monkey, any way ! " 

Prof. Brooks thinks it a hard show for a Freshman class whicii has only one 

Soul(e). 
Ch-s. T-iig. — " The Eurooka machine is the best in the world." 

G-l(ltliw-it. — " How much potassium would there be in a chargeof gunpowder?" 
T-bby. — "That would depend on the size of the charge." (Applause.) 

Prof. Sam. — " What time do you plant peas ?" 

F-lt. — " As soon as possible. " 

Prof. — " How can their growth be hastened ? " 

F-lt.—" By planting late in the fall." 

Prof. M-yn-rd. — " When would you sow tomato seed for early plants ? " 

E-m-s.—" About the 1st of July." 

T-ft. — " I wear out my tennis shoes on the palms of my feet," 



THE EDITOR'S DREAM, 



The editor sat at a table large, 
Piled up with manuscript, paper and books. 
A flickering oil lamp burnt close by his hand, 
And despair was stamped in his haggard looks. 
For tomorrow the Index must go to press. 
All day he had slaved with feverish toil, 
But had no respite from his labors found, 
And now he must waste the midnight oil. 
Before his eyes danced unnumbered ideas, 
But indefinite, vague, and between them and him. 
Like the mist on some far distant mountain, a veil 
Seemed to hang, and beyond roved his phantasies dim. 
The editors head on his arms was laid. 
When, through the window, the midnight hour 
The village bell with its clangor wierd 
Began to sound from the First Church tower. 
Twelve times the bell sounded, but stopped not there. 
But with rapid,- clanging, double stroke, 
Rang on, and more near seemed to grow the peal. 
The sound the editor's re very broke. 
" Could it be a fire ? " He sprang to his feet. 
Room, manuscript, table, were nowhere seen, 
But he stood beneath a mighty elm 
Beside a campus, level and green. 
On every hand edifices rise. 

Built of brownstone, granite, and marble white. 
And a flight of white marble stairs led up 
To two massive oaken doors at his right. 
The walls of a vast recitation hall 
Seemed to hold these antique, carven doors of oak, 
While within an ivied tower above 
A bell faintly sounded its dying stroke. 
Amazed, half afraid, but all curious 
To see what is hid by that ponderous door, 
He mounts the stair, opens it, steps inside 
On an inlaid, burnished, mosaic floor. 
Astonished, he gazes across the hall ; 
An agate stair leads to a gallery 
(93) 



94 THK INDEX. 



Which curves like a horse shoe along the wall. 

Supported by pillars of porphyry. 

To this gallery, up the second stair, 

All ardent and eager, he almost bounds, 

But scarce has he reached the gallery's height. 

When he hears of feet the pattering sounds. 

He hears a bang of an opening door 

And a noise like students from class let out. 

When through a door way they madly pour 

And break for out doors with rush and shout. 

Nearer and nearer the noise seems to come. 

The editor sees a door opened wide. 

And into the gallery there is poured 

A boisterous and most motley tide. 

There were blow pipes, blast lamps, note books and pens. 

Books, of all sizes, of studious lore. 

Each formed like a biped, with legs and arms, 

And each a long gown and a " trencher" wore. 

The editor counted full thirty-five, 

When a door behind him wide open flew ; 

And toward the stairway, with clangor and shout, 

There is thronging a still more motley crew. 

Hei'e were base-balls, foot-balls, racquets and bats, 

"Clubs'' and " bells," padded gloves, a plug hat and cane, 

A skeleton, coffin, and strange to say, 

A reverend goat with a tangled mane. 

The first group the student would hail as foes; 

The second he holds proverbiably dear, 

And as toward the stairway both columns spring, 

Our hero perceives that a rush is near. 

The party fii'st out gains the stair case first. 

Brief triumph ! upon them eager for fray 

Quick spring the others, and forward and back, 

As each side receives additions, they sway. 

By a foot- ball a Rhetoric is knocked down, 

The blowpipe is slugged by a boxing glove stout; 

The former squawks as he falls with a clatter. 

" Mr. , I wish you would please go out." 

Louder the racket! Fiercer the trampling! 
When — Crash, the gallery falls with a shock; 
And the editor — wakes up at his table, 
As the First Church bell tolls one o'clock. 



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(95) 



Amateur Detective Work, 



UR special reporter by listening at key holes with tireless patience, and 
by unwearied labor with the jimmy, pick-lock and dai-k lantern has at 
last unearthed the following resolutions from the college archives. However, 
it will not be a surprise to most of our readers, as all must have long since sus- 
pected that a record of some such proceedings must be extant: 

On this th day of ISS— , A. D. 

Whereas, We, the Faculty of the Mass. Ag'l College, do consider it our privi- 
lege and duty to intei-iere as much as possible with the private affairs of the 
students, and especially by means of tyri-anical rules and regulations concern- 
ing minor matters, and 

Whereas, We consider that the military department is a most fitting and 
convenient vehicle for this species of meddlesomeness, 

Be it Resolved, That Lieut. Cornish be instructed to do all in his power to 
carry out the spirit of the foregoing preamble. And be it further 

Resolved, That in pursuance of these instructions he shall be as ofHcious and 
obtrusive as possible. 



On the th day of 1S8— , A. D. 

We, the Faculty of the Mass. Ag'l College do extend our hearty congratula- 
tions to Lieut. Cornish for his faithful carrying out of the instructions given 
him on the th day of 188 — , A. D., and do herewith request him to con- 
tinue the same course indefinitely. 



^96) 



HONOR MEN, 1889. 



GRIN NELL AGRICULTURAL PRIZE. 

B. L. Hartwell, Isfc prize. C. A. Whitney, 2nd prize. 

HILL'S BOTANICAL PRIZE. 

W. A. Kellogg, 1st prize. 

KENDALL ORATORY PRIZE. 

Sophomores. 



KENDALL NINE. 



A. M. Belden, 
W. A. Brown, 
M. A. Carpenter, 
A. G. Eames, 



E. P. Pelt, 
W. W. Gay, 
L. P. Horner, 
H. N. Legate, 



E. Lindsey. 



KENDALL POUR. 
A. G. Eames, 1st prize, W. W. Gay, 

W. A. Brown, 2nd prize, L. P. Horner. 

Fi'eshmen. 
KENDALL NINE. 



J. A. Bardin, 
E. T. Clark, 
R. P. Davidson, 
E. B. Holland, 



H. P. Stone, 1st prize, 
C. A. Magill, 2nd prize, 
13 



G. E. Taylor. 



KENDALL FOUR. 



H. M. Howard, 
C. A. Magill, 
E. Rogers, 
H. H. Stone, 



E. T. Clark, 
R. P. Davidson. 



(97) 



ALUMNI. 



Edwin W. Allen, '85, Goettinger, Germany, Student. 

Francis S. Allen, M. D., D. V. S., '88, corner 5th and Locust streets, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. , Veterinary to the Peoples' Mutual Live Stock Insurance Co. 

Gideon H. Allen, '71, Richfield, Kan., City and Agricultural Editor of the Rich- 
field Republican. 

Augusto Luis de Almeida, '87, Agenda des Tres Barras, Bananal de Sao Paulo, 
Brazil, Planter. 

Luciano J. Almeida, '85, Agenda des Tres Barras, Bananal de Sao Paulo, Bra- 
zil, Planter. 

George T. Aplin, '82, East Putney, Vt., Farmer. 

Osgan H. Ateshian, '86, 68 Boylston street, Boston, Importer of Oriental Goods. 

William H. Atkins, '86, Hartford, Conn. 

Winfred Ayres, '86, Oakham, Mass. 

David A. Bagley, '76, Address unknown. 

Sidney C. Bagley, '83, 35 Lynde street, Boston, Mass., Cigar Packer. 

David E. Baker, '78, Newton Lower Palls, Mass., Physician. 

George H. Barber, M. D., '85, Assistant Surgeon U. S. N., care Navy Dept., 
Washington, D. C. 

Edward W. Barrett, '87, Agawam, Mass., Teacher. 

Joseph P. Barrett, '75, 29 Beaver street. New York City, N. Y., Traveling 
Salesman Bowker Fertilizer Co. 

John A. Barri, 75, corner of Water street and Fairfield avenue, Bridgeport, 
Conn., Fertilizer Manufacturer in the firm of Chittenden, Barri & Sander- 
son. 

Andrew L. Bassett, '71, Pier 36 East River, New York City, N. Y., Transfer 
Agent, Central Vermont R. R. Co. 

Charles E. Beach, '82, West Hartford, Conn., Parmer, C. E. Beach & Co., 

"Vine Hill" and " Riilge Farms." 
Edward H. Belden, '88, Lynn, Mass., emploj'cd at Tliompson & Houston's Elec- 
trical Woik«. 

(98) 



THE INDEX. 99 



Burleigh C. Bell, '72, corner 16th and Howard streets, San Francisco, Cal., 
Druggist. 

John Bellamy, '76, 657 Washington street, Boston, Mass., Hardware Dealer, 
Nichols, Bellamy & Co. 

John M. Benedict. M. D., '74, IS North Main street, Waterbury, Conn., Physi- 
cian. 

David H. Benson, '77, North Weymouth, Mass., Chemist and Superintendent 
of Chemical Works, Bradley Fertilizer Co. 

Eugene P. Bingham, '82, 40 Pritchard street, Fitchbui'g, Mass., Manager of 
Rowlstone Creamery, Lunenburg. 

William P. Birnie, '71, Springfield, Mass., Paper and Envelope Manufacturer. 

Edgar A. Bishop, '83, Talladega, Ala., Superintendent Agricultural Depart- 
ment Talladega College. 

William H. Bishop, '82, Agricultural College P. O., Maryland, Horticulturist, 
Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station. 

James R. Blair, '89, Boston, Mass., with C. Brigham & Co., 386 Tremont street. 

William H. Blanchard, '74, Westminster, Vt., Parmer, Putney, Vt. 

Herbert C. Bliss, '88, Attleboro, Mass., Traveling Salesman for Bliss Brothers, 
Jewelry Manufacturers. 

Willie L. Boutwell, '78, Leverett, Mass., Farmer. 

William H. Bowker, '71, 43 Chatham street, Boston, Mass., President Bowker 
Fertilizer Co. 

Charles A. Bowman, '81, 7 Exchange place, Boston, Mass., Assistant Engineer 
with Aspinwall & Lincoln. 

Charles E. Boynton, '81, Medical Superintendent at Onondaga County House 
and Insane Asylum, Onondaga Hill, N. Y. 

Everett B. Bragg, '75, Tremont Bank Building, Boston, Mass., Chemist for 
Grlidden & Curtis. 

Domingos H. Braune, '83, Nova Friburgo, Province of Rio Janeiro, Brazil, 
Planter. 

William F. Brett, '72, Dan bury, Conn., Merchant. 

Charles Brewer, '77, Pelham, Mass., Farmer. 

Arthur A. Brigham, '78, Sapporo, Japan, Professor of Agriculture, Imperial 
College of Agriculture. 

Henry S. Brodt, '82, Rawlins, Wyoming Territory, clerk J. W. Hugus & Co. 

Frederick K. Brooks, '88, Haverhill, Mass, Mail Carrier. 

William P. Brooks, '75, Mass. Agricultural College, Amherst, Mass. , Professor 
of Agriculture. 

Charles W. Brown, '85, Temple, N. H., Farmer. 

Madison Bunker, D. V. S., '75, Newton, Mass., Veterinary Surgeon. 

William H. Caldwell, '87, State College,' Centre County, Pa., Assistant Agricul- 
turist, Pennsylvania State College Agricultural Experiment Station. 



100 THE INDEX. 



Thomas R. Calender, '75, Wellesley Hills, Mass., Florist. 

Frederick G. Campbell, '75, West Westminster, Vt., Farmer. 

David F. Carpenter, '86, Willington, Mass., Travelling Agent for Western Pub- 
lishing Co., Boston Office 50 Bromfield street. 

Frank B. Carpenter, '88, Raleigh, N. C, Assistant Chemist, North Carolina 
Agricultui'al Experiment Station. 

Walter F. Carr, '81, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Secretary and Treasurer "Union 
Construction Co." 

Herbert S. Carruth, '72, Ashmont, Mass. , Real Estate. 

Lilley B. CJaswell, '71, Athol, Mass., Civil Engineer. 

Edward P. Chandler, '74, Fort Maginnis, Montana, Farmer. 

Everett S. Chandler, '82, address unknown. 

Henry E. Chapin, '81, Tilton, N. H., Teacher. 

William E. Chase, '87, Portland, Oregon. 

Darius O. Chickering, '76, Enfield, Mass. , Farmer. 

Edward C. Choate, '78, Cheyenne, Wyoming Territory, Horse Breeder, Davis 
& Choate. 

Charles W. Clapp, '86, Montague, Mass., Parmer. 

Atherton Clark, '77, 140 Tremont street, Boston, Mass., clerk with R. H. Stearns 
& Co. 

John W. Clark, 73, Columbia, Mo., Horticulturist, Agricultural Experiment 
Station of the University of Missouri. 

*Xenos Y. Clark, ('75) '78. 

*Jabez W. Clay, '75. 

Charles F. Coburn, '78, Lowell, Mass., Associate Editor of Lowell Daily Citizen 
and Teller of Five Cent Savings Bank. 

Fred S. Cooley, '88, Sunderland, Mass., Assistant Agriculturist at Hatch Ex- 
periment Station, Amherst, Mass. 

James W. Cooper, Jr., '82, Plymouth, Mass., Druggist. 

Frank C. Cowles, '72, Asst. Sup't of Construction and Civil Engineer, firm of 
Norca-oss Bros. , Contractors and Builders, Court and Washington streets, 
Boston, Mass. 

Arthur D. Copeland, '89, Campello, Mass., Market Gardener. 

Charles S. Crocker, '89, Sunderland, Mass., Assistant Chemist at Mass. Experi- 
ment Station, Amherst, Mass. 

Homer L. Cowles, '71, Amherst, Mass., Farmer. 

*Wolf red F. Curtis, '74. 

John A. Cutter, M. D., '82, The Ariston, Broadway and 55th street. New York 
City, N. Y., Physician. 

John C. Cutter, M. D., '73, 497 Main street, Clark building, Worcester, Mass. 

Samuel C. Damon, '82, Lancaster, Mass., Farmer. 

Fred A. D ivis, '87, Lynn, Mass., Harvard Medical School, Student. 
*Deceased. 



THE INDEX. 101 



Franklin W. Davis, '89, Tamworth, N. H. 

Cbarles F. Deuel, '76, Amherst, Mass., Drnggi&t. 

Edwin H. Dickinson, '88, North Amherst, Mass., Farmer. 

Richard S. Dickinson, '79, Columbus, Platte County, Neb., Farmer. 

George R. Dodge, '75, Brighton, Mass., Superintendent Bowker Fertilizer Co.'s 
. Works. 

Richard F. Duncan, M. D., '86, Pleasant Valley, Duchess Co., N. Y. 

Edward N. Dyer, '72, EastHolliston, Mass., Clergyman. 

Isaac H. Easterbrook, '7a, box 491, Webster, Mass., Farmer in Dudley, Mass. 

William A. Eaton, '86, Nyack, N. Y., with the Electric Construction and Sup- 
ply Co., office 18 Cortland St., N. Y. 

Frederick C. Eldred, '73, 128 Chambers street. New York City, N. Y. Merchant. 

Emory A. Ellsworth, '71, Whiting Street Building, Holyoke, Mass., Architect 
and Civil Engineer. 

Prank H. Fairfield, '81, Walpole, Mass., Poultry Raisez-. 

C. F. W. Felt, '86, Civil Engineer, Sonera, Sinaloa and Chihuahua Railway, 
Sinaloa, Mexico. 

Samuel H. Field, '88, Hatfield, Mass., Farmer. 

Jabez P. Fisher, '71, Fitchburg, Mass., Paymaster Cleghorn Mills. 

Cyrus W. Fisherdick, '87, Lincoln, Neb., Law Student, Webster & Holmes. 

Edward R. Fisk, '72, 625 Chestnut street, Philadelphia, Pa., Merchant, Folwell 
Bro. & Co. 

Charles O. Flagg, '72, Kington, R. I., Director pro tern, at the State Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station. 

Charles L. Flint, Jr., '81, 25 Congress street, Boston, Mass., Stock Broker, Dole 
& Flint. 

Edward R. Flint, '87, Amherst, Mass., Assistant Chemist State Experiment 
Station. 

^Charles W. Floyd, '82. 

Sanford D. Foot, '78, 101 Chambers street, New York City, N, Y., Pile Manu- 
facturer, Kearney & Foot Co. 

Francis H. Foster, '88, Andover, Mass., Student at the Mass. Institute of Tech- 
nology, Boston, Mass. 

Alvan L. Fowler, '80, 137 Centre street, with W. B. Smith & Co., N. Y. City. 

PredH. Fowler, '87, Commonwealth Building, Boston, Mass., Clerk to Secre- 
tary of the State Board of Agriculture. 

George E Fuller, '71, address unknown. 

Frederick E. Gladwin, '80, 413 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., or 31 
Stark street, Portland, Oregon. F. E. Gladwin & Co., Agents for the 
Yost Writing Machine. 

Joel E. Goldthwait, '85, Boston, Mass., Physician at City Hospital. 



*Deceased. 



102 THE INDEX. 



David Goodale, '83, Marlboro', Mass. , Farmer. 

Samuel B. G-reen, '79, St. Anthony Park, Minn., Horticulturist, Experiment 
Station of the College of Agriculture, University of Minnesota. 

Richard B. Grover, '72, 11 Durham street, Boston, Mass., Associate Pastor, Old 
South Church. 

George W. M. Guild, '76, 46 Chauncey street, Boston, Mass., Merchant C. H. 
Farmer & Co. 

Henry Hague, '7.5, 6 Princeton street, South Worcester, Mass., Clergyman. 

Josiah N. Hall, M. D., '78, Sterling, Weld County, Col., Physician. 

Burt L. Hartwell, 89, Amherst, Mass., Assistant Chemist, State Experiment 
Station. 

Peter M. Harwood, '75, Barre, Mass., Farmer. 

Boonzo Hashiguchi, '81, Tokio, Japan, President Government Sugar Beet Com- 
pany, Department of Agriculture. 

*Prank W. Hawley, '71. 

Joseph M. Hawley, '76, Berlin, Wisconsin, Banker, C. A. Mather & Co. 

Albert I. Hay ward, '88, Agricultural College, Md., Agriculturist, Maryland 
Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Henry G. K. Heath (formerly Koch) L.L. B., A. M., '78, Attorney and Coun- 
selor at Law, 54 Wall street, New York City, N. Y. 

Charles Herms, '84, O'Bannon Station, Jefferson County, Ky., Parmer. 

*Frederick St. C. Herrick, '71. 

Alfred A. Hevia, '83, 120 Broadway, New York City, N. Y, or O'Reilly, '38, 
Havana, Cuba. Spanish Department Equitable Life Assurance Society 
of U. S. 

Joseph R. Hibbard, '77, Stoughton, Wis., Parmer. 

Charles D. Hillman, '82, Fresno City, Cal., Nurseryman and Stock-raiser. 

Joseph L. Hills, '81, Burlington, Vt. , Chemist, Vermont State Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station. 

Daniel G. Hitchcock, '74, Warren, Mass. 

J. A. Hobbs, '74, Bloomington, Neb., Special Agent Omaha Loan and Ti-ust 
Company. 

Harry D. Holland, '84, Amherst, Mass., dealer in Hardware, Holland & Gal- 
lond. 

Samuel M. Holman, Jr., 'S3, 11 Pleasant street, Attleboro, Mass., Coal and 
Wood Dealer. 

Lemuel Le B. Holmes, '73, New Bedford, Mass. , Lawyer. 

Jonathan E. Holt, '88, Andover, Mass., Farmer. 

*Joseph H. Howard, '83. 



♦Deceased. 
14 



TUK INDEX. 103 



Charles S. Howe, '78, Cleveland, O., Prof, of Mathematics at Case School of 

Applied Sciences. 
Clinton S. Howe, '87, Marlboro', Mass. , Farmer. 
Elmer D. Howe, '81, Marlboro', Mass., Farmer. 
George D. Howe, '82, North Hadley, Mass., Book-keeper and Mechanic, C. 

Dickinson & Son. 
Waldo V. Howe, '77, Newburyport, Mass., Farmer. 
Hezekiah Howell, '8.5, Monroe, Orange County, N. Y., Farmer. 
Henry F. Hubbard, '78, 94 Front street, New York City, N. Y., with J. H. 

Catherwood & Co., Tea Importers. 
D wight L. Hubbard, '89, Holyoke, Mass., Civil Engineer, with E. A. Ellsworth. 
James T. Hutchings, '89, Amherst, Mass., with the Electric Light Co. 
John F. Hunt, '78, Sunderland, Mass., Market Gardener. 
Elisha A. Jones, '84, Selkirk, N. Y., Stock Farm. 
William A. Kellogg, '89, Wood's Holl, Mass. 

Hiram Kendall, '76, Providence, R. I., Kendall Manufacturing Co. 
Francis E. Kimball, '72, Worcester, Mass., Book-keeper, E. W. Vail, 8 John 

street. 
Morris B. Kingman, '82, Amherst, Mass. , Florist. 

Burton A. Kinney, '82, Portland, Me., Jackson & Kinney, proprietors Lam- 
son Studio, Photographers. 
Lorenzo F. Kinney, '88, Kingston, R. I., Horticulturist at the State Experi- 
ment Station. 
Edward E. Knapp, '88, Amherst, Mass., Assistant Chemist, State Agricultui-al 

Experiment Station. 
Walter H. Knapp, '75, Newtonville, Mass., Florist. 
Henry G. H. Koch, '78, see Heath. 

Thomas H. Ladd, '76, care Wm. Dadmun, Watertown, Mass. 
*Lewis C. Leary, '85. 
Lauren K Lee, '75, Valley Springs, Dak., proprietor of Valley Springs Roller 

Mill. 
William G. Lee, '80, Birmingham, Conn., Architectural Draughtsman. 
Walter S. Leland, '73, Warnerville, Mass., Teacher in the Mass. Reformatory. 
George Leonard, LL.B., '71, Springfield, Mass., Lawyer. 

Edgar H. Libby, '74, 751 Broadway, New York City, N. Y., Editor and Pub- 
lisher American Garden. 
Joseph B. Lindsay, '83, Goettinger, Germany, Student. 
Russell W. Livermore, LL.B., '72, Pates, Robeson County, N. C, Farmer, 

Merchant, Manufacturer of Turpentine, and Lawyer. 
Charles O. Lovell, '78, Northampton, Mass., Photographer. 
Asahel H. Lyman, '73, Manistee, Mich., Druggist. 



*Deceased. 



104 TitE INDEX 



Charles E. Lyman, '78, Middlefield, Conn. , Farmer. 

*Henry Lyman, '74. 

Robert W. Lyman, LL.B., '71, Belchertown, Mass., Lawyer. 

George Mackie, M. D., '72, Attleboro, Mass., Physician. 

Richards B. Mackintosh, '86, Peabody, Mass., Foreman and Inspector of Grades 

at J. R. Thomas' Wool Pulling Establishment. 
William A. Macleod, B. A., LL.B., '76,60 Devonshire street, Boston, Mass., 

Patent Solicitor. 
George H. Mann, "76, Sharon, Mass., Superintendent Cotton Duck Mills. 
James M. Marsh, '87, 167 Chestnut street, Lynn, Mass., Salesman G. E. Marsh 

&Co. 
Charles L. Marshall, '87, corner Chelmsford and Plain streets, Lowell, Mass., 

Market Gardener and Florist. 
William E. Martin, '76, Excelsior, Minn., Martin & Sigafoos, Grocers. 
Frederick G. May, '82, Leicester, Mass. 
Samuel T. Maynai'd, 72, Amherst, Mass., Prof, of Botany and Horticulture 

Mass. Agricultural College. 
Charles W. McConnel, D.D. S., '76, 170 Tremont street, Boston, Mass., Dentist. 
Charles M. McQueen, '80, 92 Commercial Bank Building, Chicago, 111., Presi- 
dent of Pi-ogressive Publishing Company. 
Thomas F. B. Meehan, '87, 3451 Washington street, Boston, Mass., Student at 

Harvard Law School. 
Arthur L. Miles, '89, Rutland, Mass., Farmer. 

George M. Miles, '75, Miles City, Mont., Hardware Merchant and Stock-raiser. 
George W. Mills, M. D., '73, Medford, Mass., Physician. 
John B. Minor, '73, New Britain, Conn., Folding Paper Box Manufacturer, J. 

H. Minor & Co. 
Charles W. Minott, '83, Burlington, Vt., Horticulturist, Vermont State Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. 
Yataro Mishima, '88, Ithaca, N. Y. , Student at Cornell. 
Arthur H. Montague, '74, South Hadley, Mass., Farmer, Granby. 
Robert B. Moore, '88, Amherst, Mass., Assistant Chemist State Agricultural 

Experiment Station. 
Herbert E. Morey, '72, 49 Haverhill street, Bo.ston, Mass., Merchant, Morey, 

Churchill & Morey. 
*James H. Morse, '71. 

William A. Morse, '82, Natick, Mass., Farmer. 
Herbert Myrick, '82, Springfield, Mass., Agricultural Editor Netv England 

Homestead. 
Lo(!kwood Myrick, '78, Northboro, Mass., Gen. Eastern Agent Williams & 

Clark Co., Fertilizers. 



*Deceased, 



THE INDEX. 105 



George E. Newman, '88, Newbury, Mass., Farmer. 

Lewis A. Nichols, '71, Portland, Oregon, Civil Engineer, in charge of Railroad 
Construction, O. R. & H. Co. 

Arthur D. Norcross, '71, Monson, Mass., Merchant. 

Mark N. North. '89, Somerville, Mass., with North's Pork Packing House. 

David O. Nourse, '83, Blacksburg, Va., Horticulturist, Viiginia Agricultural 
Experiment Station. 

Arthur M. Nourse, '89, San Francisco, Cal. 

Frank F. Noyes, '88, Newport, R. I., Electrical Engineer. 

George E. Nye, '77, 70 Exchange Building, Union Stock Yards, Chicago, 111., 
Book-keeper G. F. Swift & Co. 

Frederick H. Osgood, M. R. C. V. S., '78, Springfield, Mass., Veterinary Sur- 
geon. 

J. Clark Osterhout, '87, Lowell, Mass., The Ingalls Medical Co. 

Harry P. Otis, '7.5, Florence, Mass., Superintendent Northampton Emery Wheel 
Co., Leeds, Mass. 

Joel B. Paige, '71, Convray, Mass., Farmer. 

James B. Paige, D. V. S., '82, Northampton, Mass., Veterinary Surgeon. 

George A. Parker, '76, Halifax, Mass. , Landscape Gardener, Old Colony R. R. 

George L. Parker, '7(i, Washington, corner Rockwell street, Boston, Mass., 
Florist. 

Henry F. Parker, LL.B., '77, 115 Broadway, New York City, N. Y., Solicitor of 
Patents. 

William C. Parker, '80, Room 42, 28 School street, Boston, Mass., Real Estate 
and Insurance Agent. 

Wilfred A. Parsons, '88, Amherst, Mass. , Assistant in the Field Department of 
the State Agricultural Experiment Station. 

William R. Peabody, '72, 165 Walnut street, Cincinnati, Ohio, General Agent 
for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe R. R. 

David P. Penhallow, '73, Montreal, Canada, Prof, of Botany and Vegetable 
Physiology, McGill University. 

Dana E. Perkins, '82, 79 and 81 Spring street, New York City, N. Y., Assistant 
Manager, Publishing House of Selmar Hess. 

Austin Peters, D. D. S., M. R. C. V. S., '81, 23 Court street, Boston, Mass., Vet- 
erinarian to the Mass. Society for promoting Agriculture. 

Charles H. Phelps, '76, 42 Elizabeth street. New York City, N. Y., Clerk. 

Charles S. Phelps, '85, Mansfield, Conn., Vice Director Storrs School Agricul- 
tural Expei-iment Station. 

Henry L. Phelps, '74, Southampton, Mass., Farmer. 

Charles S. Plumb, '82, Knoxville, Tenn., Pi'of. of Agriculture and Assistant 
Director in charge of field and Feeding Experiments. Agricultui'al Experi- 
ment Station of the University of Tennessee, 
14 



106 THK INDEX. 



William H. Porter, '76, Agawam, Mass., Farmer. 

Raymando M. da S. Porto, '77, Para, Brazil, S. A., Teacher and Planter. 

William S. Potter, '76, Lafayette, Ind., Lawyer, Rice & Potter. 

Charles H. Preston, '83, 151 Tremont street, Boston, Mass., Chemist, with State 

Analyst. 
Edward B. Rawson, '81, Baltimoi-e, Md., Student Johns Hopkins University. 
James B. Renshaw, B. D., '73, Plainview, Wabasha County, Minn., Pastor Con- 
gregational Church. 
Frank H. Rice, '75, Reno, Washoe County, Nevada, Book-keeper with Folsoni 

& Wells. 
Thomas Rice, '88, Shrewsbury, Mass. 
Evan F. Richardson, '81, Millis, Mass., Farmer. 
Samuel H. Richmond, '71, Linadale, Marion Dounty, Fla. , Survej^or and 

Orange Grower. 
Henry N. W. Rideout, '87, 23 Howe street, Somerville, Mass., Season Ticket 

Agent, B & P. R. R. 
George A. Ripley, '80, 1 Wyman street, Worcester, Mass. , Traveling Salesman. 
Joseph E. Root, M. D., '76, 839 Asylum avenue, Hartford, Conn., Physician. 
Charles Rudolph, '79, St. Paul, Minn., Lawyer and Real Estate Agent. 
William D. Russell, '71, Turners Falls, Mass., with Montague Paper Co, 
Frank B. Salisbury, '73, Beaconsfleld Diamond Fields, South Africa, Trader. 
Kingsbury Sanborn, '86, Riverside, Cal., Assistant Engineer for the Riverside 

Water Co., Box 227. 
John M. Sears, '76, Monson, Mass., Officer State Primary School. 
Robert P. Sellew, '89, Springfield, Mass., with the New England Homestead. 
Elliot D. Shaw, '73, Holyoke, Mass.. Florist. 
William M. Shepardson, '88, Amherst, Mass., Assistant Horticulturist Hatch 

Experiment Station, Mass. Agricultural College. 
Walter A. Sherman, M. D., D. V. S., '79, 182 Central street, Lowell, Mass., 

Veterinary Surgeon. 
B. Luther Shimer, '88, Redington Pa., Stock- raiser and Fruit Culturist. 
Asa F. Shiverick, '82, Wood's Holl, Mass., Chemist and Assistant Manager 

Pacific Guano Company's Works. 
Henry B. Simpson, '73, Stafford Court House, Va., Farmer. 
Edwin B. Smead, '71, 394 Park street, Hartford, Conn. , Principal Watkinson 

Juvenile Asylum and Farm School. 
Prank S. Smith, '74, Albany, Wis., Manufacturer, Albany Woolen Mills. 
George P. Smith, '79, Sunderland, Mass., Parmer. 
Hiram F. M. Smith, M. D., '81, Ballston, N. Y. 
Llewellyn Smith, '84, 43 Chatham street, Boston, Mass., Traveling Salosmnn 

Bowker Fertilizer Co. 
Thomas E. Smith, '76, West Chesterfield, Mass., Manufnctm-er. 



THE INDKX. 107 



George H. Snow, '72, Leominster, Mass., Farmer. 

Frederick M. Somevs, '72, 47 Exchange Place, New York City, N. Y., Jour- 
nalist. 

*John E. Southmayd, '77. 

Andre A. South wick, '75, Taunton, Mass., Farm Superintendent Taunton State 
Lunatic Hospital. 

Abel W. Spalding, '81, 712 Dumber Exchange, Minneapolis, Minn., Landscape 
Architect and Civil Engineer. 

Lewis A. Sparrow, '71, 38 South Market street, Boston, Mass., Manufacturer of 
Fertilizers, Judson & Sparrow. 

Amos L. Spofford, '78, Georgetown, Mass., Mechanic. 

Horace E. Stockbridge, '78, Lafayette, Ind., Director of Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station of Purdue University. 

Almon H. Stone, '80, Santee, Neb. , Teacher, Santee Agency. 

George S. Stone, '86, Otter River, Mass., Farmer. 

WinthropE. Stone, '82, Lafayette, Ind., Prof, of Chemistry and Director of 
Chemical Laboratory, Purdue University. 

George P. Strickland, '71, 850 Courtland street, St. Paul, Minn., Machinist, St. 
Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba R. R. 

Roscoe W. Swan, M. D., '79, Pleasant street, Worcester, Mass., Physician. 

Cyrus A. Taft, '76, Whitinsville, Mass., Draughtsman. 

Levi R. Taf t, '82, Agricultural College P. O., Mich., Prof, of Horticulture, 
Agricultural College of Michigan. 

Alfred H. Taylor, '82, address unknown. 

Frederick P. Taylor, '81, Athens, Coke County, East Tennessee, Parmer. 

Isaac N. Taylor, Jr., '85, 513 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., with 
Thompson & Houston Electric Co. 

Benoni Tekirian, '85, 1 Broadway, New York City, N. Y., Merchant. 

Edgar E. Thompson, '71, Brockton, Mass., Principal Whitman School. 

Samuel C. Thompson, '72, 2775 Third avenue. New York City, N. Y., Civil En- 
gineer. 

Wilbur H. Thurston, '82, Stouts P. O., Adams County, O., partner and manager 
" Tusculum Farm," Rome, O. 

William N. Tolman, '87, 60 Devonshire street, Boston, Mass., with E. W. Bow- 
ditch, Sanitai'y Engineer. 

Firmino de S. Torelly, '87, Cidade do Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, 
Stock-raiser. 

George H. Tucker, '71, West Spring Creek, Pa., Civil Engineer. 

Frederick Tuckerman, M. D., '78, Worcester, Mass., connected with Clark 
University. 



^Deceased, 



108 THE INDEX. 



George P. Urner, '76, Melville, Gallatin County, Mon., Sheep-raiser. 

Albert T. Wakefield, B. A., M. D., '73, 301 Main street, Peoria, 111., Physician. 

Hiram E. B. Waldron, '79, North Rochester, Mass., Farmer. 

Willard C. Ware, '71, 255 Middle street, Portland, Me. , Manager Boston and 
Portland Clothing Co. 

Clarence D. Warner, '81, Amherst, Mass., Prof, of Mathematics and Physics, 
Mass. Agricultural College. 

Seth S. Warner, '73, Northampton, Mass., Traveling Salesman for Bowker Fei-- 
tilizer Co. 

John H. Washburn, Ph. D., '78, Kingston, R. I., Prof, of Chemistry at the Ag- 
ricultural College. 

Charles H. Watson, '87, 123 Tremont street, Boston, Mass., Law Student. 

James H. Webb, LL.B., '73, 60 Church street, New Haven, Conn., Attorney 
and Counselor at Law, Ailing & Webb. 

Charles Wellington, Ph.D., '73, Amherst, Mass., Associate Prof essor of Chem- 
istry, Mass. Agricultural College, 

Henry Wells, '72, 310 North 3d street, St. Louis, Agent for the Canadian 
Southern line. 

Howard G. Wetmore, M. U., '76, 41 West 9th street, New York City, N. Y., 
Physician. 

Homor J. Wheeler, Ph. D., '83, Kingston, R. I., Chemist at the Agricultui-al 
Experiment Station. 

William Wheelei-, '72, 89 State street, Boston, Mass., Civil and Hydraulic En- 
gineer. 

Prank Le P. Whitney, '71, 2179 Washington street, Boston, Mass., Boot and 
Shoe Dealer. 

Wm. Channing Whitney, '72, Minneapolis, Minn., Architect. 

Chai-les A. Whitney, '89, Upton, Mass., Farmer. 

Arthur Whitaker, '81, Needham, Mass., Farmer. 

Henry H. Wilcox, '81, Libue, Kauai, H. 1., Sugar Planter. 

John E. Wilder, '72, 179 Lake street, Chicago, 111., wholesale Lumber Dealer, 
Wilder & Co. 

James S. Williams, '82, Glastonbury, Conn., Farmer. 

John E. Williams, '76, Amherst, Mass., Editor Amherst Record. 

John F. Winchester, D. V. S.,'75, Lawrence, Mass., Veterinary Surgeon. 

Joseph L. Windsor, '82, Auburn, N. Y., Superintendent Auburn City Rail- 
way Co. 

Prank W. Wood, '73, Address unknown. 

Rufus P. Woodbury, '78, Kansas City, Mo., Editor Kansas Citi/ Daihj Times. 

Herbert E. Woodbury, '89, Amherst, Mass., Assistant Horticulturist at the 
Hatch Experiment Station. 



THE INDEX. 109 



E'lward E. Woodman, '74, Danvers, Mass., Florists' and G-arden Supplies, E. & 

C. Woodman. 
George C. Woolson, ('71) '86, Passaic; N. J., Superintendent of Parks, New 

York City, N. Y. 
Joseph Wyman, '77, Arlington, Mass., Book-keeper P. O. Squires & Co., Boston. 
Harrie McK. Zeller, '74, Hagerstown, Md. 



DECEASED. 



Jabez W. Clay, '75, Oct. 1, 1880, of pneumonia, at New York City, N. Y. 
Wolf red P. Curtis, '74, Nov. 8, 1878, of inflammation of the brain, at West- 
minster, Mass. 
Charles W. Floyd, '82, Oct. 10. 1883, of consumption, at Dorchester, Mass. 
Prank W. Hawley, '71, Oct. 28, 1883, of apoplexy, at Belchertown, Mass. 
Frederick St. C. Herrick, '71, Jan. 19, 1884, at Methuen, Mass. 
Henry Lyman, '74, Jan. 8, 1879, of pneumonia, at Middlefleld, Conn. 
James H. Morse, '71, June 21, 1883, of Bright's disease, at Salem, Mass. 
John E. Southniayd, '77, Dec. 11, 1878, of consumption, at Miniieapolis, Minn. 
Lewis C. Leary, '85, April 2, 1888, of heart disease, at Cambridge, Mass. 
Joseph H. Howard, '82, Feb. 13, 1889, of pneumonia, at Minnesota, Dak. 
Xenos Y. Clark, '75, June 4, 1888, of Bright's disease, at Amherst, Mass. 




ADDENDA. 



mM/ITH the last flash of an expiring intellect, the over-wrought editors 
■I5»-4{S»- wish to exoress their a-ratitude to the noble few who have never ex- 



■^ wish to express their gratitude to the noble few who have never ex- 
pressed any curiosity as to " when the Index is coming out." 

To the '92 " Index '' Board we bequeath these results of a hard experience. 

You will expect to enjoy a fat sinecure, but credit us, the remainder of your 
class, who have to pay for publication, but have no further concern, have a 
picnic compared with you. You will be assailed from day to day by fiends 
who want to know when the Index is going to press, how big a book it will be, 
or what kind of a cover it will have, or who — worse still — have something 
"good enough for the Index." When you have written copy all the evening, 
not expecting to be called on in class next day, the Faculty will single you out 
to recite, with relentless persistency, and to crown all, when j'ou have seen an 
Index rewai'd your labors, you will not have made as large a fortune as you 
expected, far from it. 

To all whom, it may concern : — Until the present excitement dies out, we 
shall dispense copies of the Index from behind a breast-work of " Libel Stat- 
utes." By special arrangement with the authorities at Springfield, we have 
been able to secure an unlimited supply of ball cartridge; the Queen has kindly 
offered us the loan of seven complete suits of armor from the " Tower of Lon- 
don," and a detachment of Chicago police, of Haymarket Square riot fame, 
has been engaged to escort the Index Board to and from recitations during the 
remainder of the winter. 



(110) 



^:5^ETc.^v^^v>\\\^^^ , 




The Editors earnestly request all loyal 
Students of Aggie to patronize only those 
isrho patronize ns. ********* 



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are made from the brightest, most delicate flavored, and highest cost 
GOLD LEAF grown in Virginia. This is the Old and Original brand of 
Straight Cut Cigarettes, and was brought out by us in the year 1875. 

BEWARE OF IMITATIONS, 

And observe that the firm name as below is on every package. 

ALLEN & mm, Mtmm, RICHMOHD, VA. 



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MANUFACTUEERS OF 

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Importer. Manufacturer and Dealer in all 

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BOSTON, MASS 



K^lTEl^ST # t[OUSE. 

LIVERY, FEED AND SALE STABLE. 








Onmibtises. Hacks, Double and Single Teams, 
to let at Reasonable Rates. 



Office at Stable, 



Rear of Amherst House. 



T. W. SLOAN, 

DEALER IN 

Qadies and CCenllemen s Pine l^oots and C)ooes. 



SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO REPAIRING. 
See Our Reliable Goods, which are Warranted to give 

Satisfactioi;, 
No, 3, Phgeiiix Row, . - AMHERST, MASS, 




fff"'' 



/if).T^ere! 



iPi^i^/qi^e £li~icl Selecf Glqsses i^ IDqrjciris. 
Seqso:q "begiiris Oc-|;ol9ei< Isf, q£|d eqels il|9i<il 

S^DSciql^y. Office l:)oq±<s f±<oo:| ^ fo 8. 

Kellogg's Hall, Amherst Mass. 

HOLLAND & GALLOND, 

(SUCCESSORS TO HENRY HOLLAND.) 



-DEALERS IN- 



0P0eeFies, Ha^dwape, Bainis, Oils, 



STUDENTS^ SUPPLIES. 



HELIOTYPE PRINTING CO., 

21 I Tremont St., Boston. 

(DONALD RAMSAY, Treasurer.) 



MOST APPROVED PHOTO-MECHANICAL, 
PHOTO-LITHOGRAPHIC AND 

PHOTO-ENGRAVING PROCESS. 



Yiews of College Buildings, Portraits of the Faculty 
and Illustrations for College Journals. 



CUTS FOR COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS. 



COPIES OP ARCHITECTURAL, MECHANICAL, SCIENTIFIC AND 

OTHER DRAWINGS, MAPS, PLANS AND DIAGRAMS, 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMMES, INVITATIONS, 

MENU CARDS, DANCE ORDERS, Etc. 



Kstimates Furnished on Application. 

HELIOTYPE PRINTINCi CO. 
P. J. MAGUIRE, & CO., 

SUCCESSORS TO MAGUIRE & SULLIVAN. 

ilitary apd poliee Jailors. 

243 WASHINGTON, ST., BOSTON. 



An experience of twenty-five years in this class of work recomends this 
firm above all others, to parties wishing Uniforms or Police outfits. 

They are recomended by the U. S. Army Officers, Militia and the Police- 

LEWIS J. SPEAR, 



-AND- 



HORSE «* *sh:oer 

PLEASANT STREET, AMHEltST, MASS. 



DO YOU BELIEVE IX GRANGE LITERATURE? 

Do you "belieYe in liaYing a Hew England paper 
witli the Grange Banner on its outer YiaMs ? 

If so, get up a Club for 

Among your neighbors and friends. Samples free, liberal commissions 
and premiums. 



34 Merchants' Row, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



THE PLACE TO BUY STUDENT GOODS IS 

O. G. COUCH & SONS, 

EYerytliing you want for nice Spreads and 
Lunclies. Oil for your Lamps, w^itli cans to 
put it in and tlie finest stock of Lamps in the 
county. Goods delivered at the College Mon- 
days, Wednesdays and Fridays. 



WEBSTER'S UNABRIDGED. 



WITH OR WITHOUT PATENT INDEX. 



THE BEST 

INVESTMENT 

for the Family, the 
School, or the Pro- 
fessional or Public 

Library. 
3000 more Words, 
and 2000 more En- 
gravings than any 
other American 
Dictionary. 




Among; the supplementary features, original 

with Webster's Unabridged and unequaled for 

concise and trustworthy information, are 



ALWAYS A 

CHOICE GIFT 

for Pastor, Parent, 

Teacher, Chile' or 

Friend. Elegance 

and usefulness 

combined. 
In quantity of mat- 
ter, it is believed to 
be the largest book 

published. 



A BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY 

giving brief facts concerning nearly 10,000 Noted 
Persons of ancient and modern times, 

A GAZETTEER OF THE WORLD 

locating and briefly describing over 2.5,000 places, 
and a Vocabulary of the names of Noted 

FICTITIOUS PERSONS AND PLACES. 

The latter is not found in any other Dictionary. 

Webster is Standard Authority in the Government Printing Office, and with the U. S. 

Supreme Court. It is recommended by the StateSupt'sof Schools of 36 States, and 

by the leading College Presidents of the U. S. and Canada. 

Published by G. & C. MERRIAM & CO., Springfield, Mass. Illustrated Pamphlet free. 



16 




RESTAURANT! 

Just' what the people and students have longed for evei-y day since 
"Frank" Wood closed his business. We are located in the "American 
House " Block and go by the name of the "American House Restaurant." 
Electric lamps are soon to be put in and everything will be found in first-class 
condition. 

We have constantly on hand, ready to serve, a choice line of meats, 
FOWLS, FISH and oysters, which can be set before you, in any style, at very 
short notice. Chocolate, milk, tea, coffee and new cider alwa5's on hand. 
Ice cream made for private families and delivered at times wanted. 

Light catering for Societies done at reasonable rates. Come and give us 
a call. Open all hours. There is only one place. Don't miss it. 

THE AMERICAN HOUSE RESTAURANT. 



lie \] E EiT ' B 



pi7oto(^rapl7ie # Stddio, 

1 43 Main St., Northainpton, Mass. 

* * Got]i||;y. * 

SPECIAL RATES TO M. A. C. STUDEKTS. 

Call and see our ^A/^o^k. 




Every kind of hardy Fruit and Ornamental Tree or Plant 
(new or old, true to name and strictly first class), at half the 
price of most traveling agents and other nurseries. 

Lovett's Guide to Horticulture tells about them (defects 
and merits, prices, planting, culture, pruning, &c). It is a hand- 
some book of nearly loo pages, finely printed, over 200 engrav- 
ings. Mailed, with colored plates, loc; without plates free. 

Headquarters for Wonderful Peach (far superior in beauty and merit to all other late yellow- 
kinds) ; Gandy Strawberry, bears the season planted, very large and excellent and the latest of 
all ; Monmouth, the earliest large strawberry ; the two remarkable plums (Abundance and Spauld- 
ing), Carlough Apple, Lawson Pear, Meech's Quince, etc. All fully illustrated and described in 
the Guide. 200,000 Peach Trees, Apple, Pear and other fruit trees ; Strawberry, Blackberry, 
Raspberry, Grape Vines and other Small Fruits ; Evergreen and Deciduous Ornamental Trees, 
Plants and Vines and Nut Bearing Trees in almost unlimited numbers and great variety. 

Plants by mail to all points of tke Continent Sk specialty. 
*'''^"°aU'K«!wmteS°/ri^'''"' J- T. LOVETT CO., Little Silver, N.J. 



Bookseller, Stationer and Newsdealer. 

PAPER HANGINGS AND BORDERS, TOYS, FANCY GOODS, CUTLERY. 
AGENT FOR E. REYNOLD'S RUBBER STAMPS. 
Second-hand Text Books, Bought and Sold. 
AMHERST, MASS. 



EDWIN NELSON, 

DEALER IN 

CLASSICAL AND MISCELLANEOUS BOOKS, 

COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS, NEW AND SECOND HAND, 

SCHOOL BOOKS, STATIONERY AND FANCY GOODS. 

Cash Paid for Seeond-Hand Text Books 

AMHERST, MASS. 



No. 3 Post Office Block, 



WATCHES! WATCHES! 

TIFFA^NY & CO., 

UNION SQUARE, NEW YORK., 

Particularly request attention to their line of low- 
priced Watches, which they confidently recommend 
as the best yet produced for the money. The move- 
ments are sound, stem-winding anchors, and are cased 
in i8-kt. gold in variety of Styles. 

Large size, for Gentlemen, .... $75.00 

Medium size, for " .... 65.00 

Large size for Ladies, 60.00 

Small " " " 50.00 

Each watch is stamped ^A^ith the name of the 
house, thereby carrying its guarantee. 

W. H. H. MORGAN, 

. AND DEALER IN 

TOILET GOODS, CONFECTIONERY, PERFUMERY, 

PLAYING CARDS, VIOLIN, GUITAR, AND 

BANJO STRINGS, IMPORTED AND 

DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, 

TOBACCO AND SMOKERS 

SUPPLIES. 

PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY. 



.Also i:>ealer in. COAL and WOOD. 
7 PlKBiiix Row, Aiiilierst, Mass. 




DEALER IN 

FANCY GROCERIES, CROCKERY, CIGARS, TOBACCO CIGARETTES, 

FRUITS AND CONFECTIONERY, LAMP GOODS AND 

KEROSENE OIL. 

Merchants' Row, - - AMHERST, MASS. 

Razors Honed and Shears Sharpened at Short Notice. 

FERD FANEUF, 

AMHERST, - - - MASS. 

A. B. CULVER, 

BIKER xtND CONFECTIONER. 

PROPRIETOR OF 

Culver's Domestic Bakery, 

Pleasant St., Next North of Lee & Pliilliiis, Amherst. 



JOHN MULLEN, 



-DEALER IN- 



FliO VISIONS, 

&AME, 

FRUIT, Etc. 

CHOICE LINE OF CANNED GOODS. 
PALMER'S BLOCK, - - AJIHEKST, MASS. 

LEACH & DICKINSON, 

Headquarters for " LAUGHING GAS." Teeth extract- 
ed positively \vithout Pain. All Operations in Dentistry 
performed in a skillful and satisfactory manner. 

KELLOGG'S BLOCK. 



FRANK C. PLUMB. 

Haip Dpcssinq nooms. 

No. 3 Phoenix Row, Up Stairs. 
RA/ORS COD/CAVED AND HONED IN SHORT ORDER. 



INPORTERS, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Hand-Books of Instruction on all Art Subjects. Supplies for Oil Color, Water 
Color, China, Lustra and Tapestry Painting. Mathematical Instru- 
ments, Drawing Paper and T Squares. Architects' and 
Engineers' Supplies in general. 
Catalogue free upon application. Mail orders receive prompt attention. 

37 CORNHILL, ■ - - BOSTON, MASS. 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. - 

HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIATY. 

ALSO DEALERS IN 

STOVES, FURNACES AND TEST ^VARE. 




JT^HE undersigned is pleased to announce to his former 
^ patrons and others desiring Game Spreads or Dinner's 
that he is now prepared to accommodate (at short notice) 
large or small parties. Ample Dining Roona capacity 
for 200 people. 

J. B. RYAN, Proprietor, 

AMHERST HOUSE, AMHERST MASS. 




14 




Q/^ AMATEUR-PHOTO 



j^^ 




.^^OUTFIT^.^ 



i^,^^ 




We are the authorized manufacturers of the 

Q. T. V. FRATERNITY PINS. 

Any letter addressed as above will receive i^ronipt attention. 



FRANK WOOD'S LIVERY, 

Tl^e Boys ^'v^ill fiqd qs good l^igs, ■^^?l']Cl] 
qiiyAvt]Gi<e ii| iIir\l]Gi«s"j;, "[1^3^ l]iiq c^qd see. 



J. L LOVELL'S 

AND 

DRY i^l^te: b^aotory. 

THE FINEST PHOTOGRAPHS, LANTERN SLIDES, AND WINDOW 

TRANSPARANCYS. ORTHOCHROMATIC PLATES, AND 

CHEMICALS, READY PREPARED, ESPECIALLY 

ADAPTED TO AMATEUR USE. 



S. F. M ERR ITT. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



.d^-'^-^&. 




'i89Z 



DATE DUE 



































































































UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
LIBRARY 
LO 

3234 
1*125 • 
v. 21 
1891 
cop. 2