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^ 



■J X* ^^ 







THE TWENTY-FIFTH VOLUME 



INDEX 



FCBLISHED BY THE JUNIOR CLASS OF THE MASSA- 
CH (/SETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

Will be ready for Delivery on and after December i8, 1893. 



TO FRIENDS OF THE COLLEGE who chiefly are interested in the pub- 
lication, we scarcely need outline its character. IT COMPRISES over 200 
pages : is as usual devoted entirely to college news and interests, and is as 
near as possible a mirror of college life. In offering it to alumni and friends, 
the Class of '95 are gratified in being able to say they are confident the work 
will be found up to the highest standard of its recent predecessors, while in 
some important points we believe we have been able to advance that standard. 

AS A DIRECTORY of the college and its graduates, brought up to date, 
it will be found of special value, comprising as it does full statistics of the 
Board of Trustees, Faculty and students ; including also all student organiza- 
tions, literary, athletic, class and society, with address, occupation and society 
of the alumni. 

THE LITERARY AND ARTISTIC FEATURES are particularly promi- 
nent. They include a wide range of subject, from grave to gay, and with the 
exception of the half-tones and a single contribution by an alumnus, tlie book 
is entirely the work of meml^ers of tlie class. Of its literary merits we leave 
our readers to judge. 

IN DESIGN, MECHANICAL EXECUTION AND GENERAL APPEAR- 
ANCE, the book has not been excelled. The cover is of maroon and white 
silk, tlie college colors, with lettering in gold, and the body of the book is 
printed in clear, handsome type on thick, wiiite, enamelled paper. We believe 
yon will be gratified with the appearance of the l)Ook as well as with the 
character of its subject matter. 

All correspondance will receive prompt attention. Price, $1.00 postage 

or express prepaid. 

Address, The Index, 

Lock \'>o\ 146, 

A mile 1st, .Ma*' 
" The Index Hoard,'" 

I'Or the Cla.ss of 95, M. A. C. , 




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^UlSiSA 



D HORtmUiTURAL WAREHOUSE 

arketSt., 



i©iT@i.i]Mi 



A 

FEW 
FACTS 

Regarding our estab= 

lishment, which will 

illustrate why we 

. . . claim . . . 

SUPERIORITY FOR 
OUR SEEDS. 



1st. MR. RAWSON has had thirty years' expe= 
rience as a seed grower. 

2d. WE GROW more of OUR SEEDS ON OUR 
OWN FARMS than any other seed house in NEW 
ENGLAND. 

3d. ALL SEEDS which are grown on contract 
MR. RAWSON PERSONALLY selects by first 
growing them at our farms, thus proving the 
RELIABILITY OF THE STOCK. 

4th. EVERY YEAR Mr. Rawson or the manager 
personally visits the crops grown on contract, as 
they are growing, so that we may know they are 
WHAT WE REPRESENT IN EVERY INSTANCE. 

5th. WE HAVE MORE LAND COVERED WITH 
GLASS, in which we CAN TEST OUR SEEDS at 
all seasons of the year, than any other house in 
this part of the country. 

6th. WE DO EXCLUSIVELY A SEED BUSI= 
NESS. 

7th. Mr. Rawson is a market gardener and 
knows what a market gardener wants. 

8th. WE HANDLE NO CHEAP GRADE OF 

SEEDS. CATALOGUE FREE. 



The ' ' Eel i pSe' ' Windmills. 

Both SSSSS 

Pumping and Geared 



THESE MILLS 

HAVE BEEN USED FOR OVER 

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS. 



Made in Sizes from lO to 60 feet 
in diameter. 



np^-g-^l^^ Both Round and 

I dillV^ • • • Square, 



FROST- PROOF STOCK 
AND CREAME 



S2SSSSS 




FOR STORAGE AND 

SPRINKLER SERVICE. 



RY . . . 1 diilV^* 



Hand, Steam, and 

.... Power Pumps. 



PIPE. ^ 
Pipe Fittings, 



AND WATER SUPPLY 
MATERIALS. 



ECLIPSE FRICTION CLUTCH 
PULLEYS. 



^^^^^ps We pay paTtiadar atten- 
jyi tion to the installation of 

^^^*,^ Water Supply 

Outfits 

For • Country • Residences. 



Catalogues and Prices 
sent upon application. 



JOHN MULLKN, 



DEALER IN 




^ Provisions, |VIeat, 




Fish, Oysters. 



$ Frqit, Game, Ete. 




CHOICK l^INK OF C^^NNBD GOODS 



•"^ju^r^' 



Palmer s Block, 



AIVLHKRST, 



MASS 



Have You Seen It? 

OUR NEW CATALOGUE OF 

DRAFTING INSTRUMENTS and SUPPLIES 

AND 

Hrtists' Materials- 



We will send a copy free by mail. 

WADSWORTH, HOAyLA:^D & CO. (Corp.), 
82 and 84 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON. 

C. B. WILKINSON, 

42 John St., New York City., 

MAKER OF 

CLASS PINS AND RINGS, 

SOLID SILVER AND 

SILVER-PLATED CUPS, 

Suitable for Class Gifts, Athletic Sports, etc., etc. 

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 



1880— 1894:— : 






'THoi/ 




AMERICAN PLAN. 



*:^2^^J^* 



s 

/ 



^2.5 PEIR DAY. 



■t o ■ oi l *- 



(^)\)\s \)oie\ b^s a first-class table, is lial^ted by electricity and 
aas, Ideated by steam ; l;)ot and cold water ; batl^rooms and all 
modern improvements, Qarae, airy Idilliard Mall, lOarber Spop 
and Qi 



verv. 

/ 



CAPACITY TWO HUNDRED GUESTS. 



(^o t^ose desirmp l^ame i|Spreads, or Dinners, tpe undersianed 
is pleased to announce tpat \)e is prepared to accommodate at sr^ont 
notice lame or small parties in tl^e most elaborate style. 



Cor. Main and Amity Sts., 
Amherst, mass. 



hORBNZO CHASM, Proprietor. 



noiui^ imodel FoMmg Kodaks^ These 

new Kodaks combine the desirable features of a complete view camera 
with the compactness of a Kodak, 

il Inl© 1L^©IIT1S covers the plate fully, even when the front is raised. 
It is instantly removable and can be replaced by a wide angle lens 
which fits the same shutter. 

II JH© ^lllllLJllLiL©iro The folding Kodaks are now fitted with an iris 
diaphragm shutter, having a pneumatic release and a range of auto- 
matic exposures from i-ioo of a second to 3 seconds. 

A DOMble Swlmg Back and sliding front are among 
the improvements. These Kodaks can be focused with the index or 
on ground glass ; can be used as hand or tripod cameras and are 
easily adapted to stereoscopic work. 



No. 4 (for 4x5 pictures) 
No. 5 (for 5x7 pictures) 
No. 6 (for 6)2 X 8)2 pictures) 



For Film and Glass, $60.00 
75.00 
100.00 



(( ti 



Sastmae Kodak Compaeys 



Send for Circular. 



ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



WILLIAM COLVARD PARKER, 



ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR 

AT LAW. 



53 TREMONT STREET, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



NOTARY PUBLIC, 



M. A. C. LL B. 

'80. BOSTON UNIVERSITY 

SCHOOL OF LAW. 



riassachMsetts ArrkMltMral Collegeo 



A rare chance to obtain a liberal and thoroughly practical education. 
The cost has been reduced to a minimum. Tuition is free to residents of the 
State. An opportunity is offered to pay a portion of expenses by work. 

Three courses of study are offered : A two year's' coii,7-se in agriculture 
and kindred sciences for special students ; a four years^ course leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science ; and a graduate course of two years leading to the 
degree of Master of Science. 

Instruction. The courses of study as at present constituted include: — 

1. Agriculture, theoretical and practical, stock-breeding, drainage and 
irrigation, special crops. 

2. Botany, including horticulture, market gardening, arboriculture, care of 
green-houses, types of cryptogamic orders, and histology. 

3. Chemistry. Practice work in the laboratories. Qualitative and quan- 
titative analysis, inorganic and organic. 

4. Zoology, entomology, the preservation of plants from destructive insects ; 
human anatomy, physiology, and hygiene. 

5. Veterinary science. The hygiene, anatomy, physiology, and diseases of 
domestic animals, giving the student requisite knowledge for the care of stock. 

6. Mathematics and physics, including practical work in surveying and 
road making. Meteorology in its relation to agriculture. Electrical engineering 
with problems, and practical work with instruments. 

7. English. Care is given to the study of English language and literature 
that the student may be able to understand his mother-tongue, and use it cor- 
rectly and efficiently in the expression and enunciation of thought. As a means 
to this and other ends, Latin is studied for one year. 

8. Modern languages. French and German are taught so as to give the 
student means of acquiring a sufficient mastery of the languages to have access 
to scientific authorities of France and Germany. 

9. Political Science. The course provides for instruction in political 
economy, that a knowledge may be gained of those established laws of the busi- 
ness world which control the market, finance, and the production and distribution 
of wealth. Especial attention is given to the economics of agriculture. Con- 



stitutional history is studied that the duties and privileges of the citizen may be 
understood. 

lo. Militar}- Science. Instruction and drill in military tactics are required 
of each student, unless physically debarred. 

Advantages. Facilities for illustration include a working library of 14,000 
volumes, properh^ classified and catalogued ; the State collection of birds, 
insects, reptiles, and rocks of Massachusetts, with many additions ; the Knowl- 
ton herbarium of 10,000 species of named botanical specimens; the 1,500 
species and varieties of plants and types of the vegetable kingdom, cultivated 
in the Durfee plant house, the large collections of Amherst College Avithin easy 
access ; a farm of 383 acres, divided between the agricultural, horticultural, and 
experiment departments, embracing every variety of soil ; the State Experiment 
Station, and also the Hatch Experiment Station, both located upon the college 
farm, offering splendid opportunities for observing the application of science to 
the problems of agriculture. 

Worthy of especial mention are the laboratories for practical work in 
chemistr}-, in zoology, and in botany, well equipped with essential apparatus. A 
new chemical laboratory for advanced students has just been finished. For 
illustration of veterinary science a plastic model of the horse and other additions 
to the museum have been secured. The Durfee plant house has been recently 
rebuilt and greatly enlarged, and a new tool house and workshop provided for 
the horticultural department. For the agricultural department, a model barn, 
containing the best facilities for storage of crops, care of horses, cattle, sheep, 
and swine, and management of the dairy, including also a lecture room for 
instruction, is soon to be completed. 

Electives. Out of eleven courses provided for the senior class, nine are 
elective. 

Expenses. Board in clubs is about $2.50 per week, and in families $3.00 
to S5.00; room rent, $8.00 to $16.00 per term; fuel, $7.00 to $13.00 per year; 
washing, 40c. to 50c. per dozen ; military suit, $15.75 ; books at wholesale 
prices : furniture, second-hand or new, for sale in town. 

Requisites for admission to the several courses, and other information 

may be learned from the catalogue, to be obtained by application to the 

President. 

HENRY H. GOODELL, 

AtnJierst, Mass. 



\v bo does yoUr 



We should be pleased to have YOU leave an order with US. 

FINE ILLUSTRATED BOOKS RECEIVE OUR SPECIAL CARE. 

We would refer you to the last three volumes of the Index. 

/^merieai) pr\T)t\r)(^ ai}d ^9(5raui9(5 Qo., 

Telephone No. 860. 50 Arch STREET, BOSTON. 



BOOK AND PAMPHLET BINDING IN ALL ITS VARIETIES. 



ROBERT BURLEN, 

BOOK AND PAMRHLKT BINDINO, 

50 ARCH STREET, and 197 DEVONSHIRE STREET, BOSTON. 



Special Attention Paid to Binding of Large Illustrated Works, Engravings, etc. 
Old Books Rebound and Polios of Every Description Made to Order. 



PASSENGER ELEVATOR AT 197 DEVONSHIRE ST. FREIGHT ELEVATOR AT 56 ARCH ST. 

THIS BOOK WTtS BOUND BY UB. 




4 





fy/'/£'/VO- Co.^oS-^oa/. 



®l^je inb^x. 






J^olwmx^ XXV. 






ci^. 



2- 




WHOSE SHELTERING HILLS SMILE 
UPON OUR 

THIS LITTLE BOOK IS AFFECTIONATELY 
DEDICATED. 



5 




w 



ITH many misgivings, 
Builders unskillful, 
Pilots unpracticed. 
Launch we our Argos}^ 
On Time's current changeless ; 
Bearing no malice. 
Freighted with friendliness. 
Freighted with fun. 



Intr05rui:tii:iit. 



TX accordance with the law of contraries, the introduction of a book 
is usually written after the book is nearly completed. This is 
necessar}-, in order that the introduction may contain some reference, 
to the contents of the work. So it naturally follows that the length 
of the introduction is, to some extent, a guide to the size of the book. 
But, recognizing the fact that the book will be judged b}^ what it 
contains and not by what we say of it, we will be as brief as is 
consistent with courtesy, and allow but one point of reference a place 
in this introduction — to wit — the originality of both the artistic and 
literary features of the work. 

With but a passing mention, then, of our attempts to outdo our 
predecessors in getting out an Index which should be at once a 
valuable literary feature of the College and a mirror of the events 
of the year, we respectfull}' present this 

TWENTY-FIFTH VOLUME OF THE 
INDEX. 




Fall Term Closes 

Winter Term Opens 
Winter Term Closes 
Spring Term Opens 
Commencement . 
Spring Term Closes 
Examinations for Admission 
Examinations for Admission 
Fall Term Opens 
Fall Term Closes 



1893. 



1894. 



Wednesday, December 20. 

Wednesda}', January 3 

Thursday, March 22 

Tuesday, April 3 

June 17 to 20 

. Wednesday, June 20 

Thursday, June 21 

Tuesday, September 4 

Wednesday, September 5. 

Wednesday, December 19, 



craicStr o£ ^ru^teje^. 



Members Ex Officio. 

His Excellenxy Gov. WILLIAM E. RUSSELL, 

President of the Corporation. 

HENRY H. GOODELL, M. A., LL. D., 

President of the College. 



Hox. JOHN W. DICKINSON, 

Secretary of the Board of Education. 



WILLIAM R. SESSIONS, 

Secretary of the Board of Agriculture 



Members by Appointment. 



Franxis H. Appletox of Lynntield. 
William Wheeler of Concord. 
Elijah W. Wood of West Newton. 



Merritt I. Wheeler of Great Barrington. 
James S. Grixxell of Greenfield. 
Joseph A. Harwood of Littleton. 



Charles A. Gleasox of New Braintree. William H. Bowker of Boston. 



Daniel Needham of Groton. 
James Draper of Worcester. 
Hexry S. Hyde of Springfield. 



J. D. W. French of Boston. 

J. Howe Demoxd of Northampton. 

Elmer D. Howe of Marlborough. 



Officers Elected by the Board of Trustees. 



James S. Gkixxei^l of Greenfield, 
Vice-J'resident of the Corporation. 

George F. .Mills of Amherst, 
7're<i surer, pro tein. 



William R. Sessions of Hampden, 
Secretary. 

Charles A. Gleason of New 15raintree, 

.■luditor. 



Committejes. 



Committee on Finance and Buildings.^ 

Daniel Needham, Chah'inan, 
James S. Grixnell, Henry S. Hyde, 

J. Howe Demoxd, Charles A. Gleason. 

Committee on Course of Study and Faculty.* 

William Wheeler, Chahynan, 
William H. Bo\vker, Joseph A. Harwood, 

Elmer D. Howe, J. D. W. French. 

Committee on Farm and Horticultural Departments.* 

William R. Sessions, Chairfnan, 
Elijah W. Wood, James Draper, 

Francis H. Appleton, Merritt I. Wheeler. 

Committee on Experiment Department.* 

William R. Sessions, Chair//ian, 
Daniel Needham, Elijah W. Wood, 

.William Wheeler, James Draper. 

Board of Overseers. 

The State Board of Agriculture. 

Examining Committee of Overseers. 

Charles A. Mills of Southboro, Chairman. G. L. Clemexce of Southbridge. 
Atkinson C. Varnum of Lowell. George Cruikshanks of Fitchburg. 

Dr. William Holbrook of Palmer. E. A. Harwood of North Brookfield. 

*The President of the college is ex officio a member of each of the above committees. 




HENRY H. GOODELL, M. A., LL. D., 

President of the ColL^e and Professor of Modern Laiti^iiages and Kni^^/ts/i Literature, also Direetor 
of tlie Ilatth Jixperiiiient Station, and Lil'rarian. 

Amherst College, 1862. •* T. LL. D., Amherst College, 1S91. Instructor in Williston 
Seminary, 1864-67. Professor of Modern Languages and English Literature at Massachusetts 
Agricultural College from 1S67. President of the College since 1886. 

LEVI STOCKBRIDGE, 

Professor of Ai^ricultiire {Honorary'). 

As a member of the lioard of Agriculture, he did his best to induce the Legislature to 
accept the original grant of Congress for the establishing of an Agricultural College in each 
state. In 1S66, was invited to take charge of the college property, and in November commenced 
operations. Instructor in Agriculture at Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1867-68. Pro- 
fessor of Agriculture, 1868-82, and also, 1888-89. Acting President, 1876-77, and again in 1879. 
President, 18S0-82. 

CHARLES A. GOESSMANN, I'li. I)., LL. I)., 

Professor of Clieinistry and J)i rector of State P.xferiuient Station. 

University of Grittingen, 1S53, with degree Ph. I)., LL. U., Amherst College, 18S9. 
Assistant Chemist, University of Gcittingen, 1852-57. Cliemist to Onondaga Salt Company, 
1861-68. Also I'rofessor of Chemistry, Renssellaer Polytechnic Institute, 1862-64. Professor 
of Chemistry at Massachusetts Agricultural College from 1868. Since 1SS4, has been Analyst 
for .State Board of Health. 



SAMUEL T. MAYNARD, B. S., 

Professor of Botany and Horticitltiirc, and Horticulturist for the Hatch Experivicnt Station. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1S72. Associate Professor of Horticulture, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, 1874-79. Professor of Botany and Horticulture, and Instructor 
in Microscopy and Drawing at Massachusetts Agricultural College from 1S79. 



CLARENCE D. WARNER, B. S., 

Professor of Mathematics and Physics, and Meteorologist for Hatch Experinioit Station. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1881. D. G. K., Principal teacher, Reform School, 
Providence, R. I., 1882. Student at Johns Hopkins University, 1883-84. Professor of Mathe- 
matics and Physics at Massachusetts Agricultural College from 1884. 



CHARLES WELLINGTON, E. S., Ph. D., 

Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1873. ^- G. K. Graduate student in Chemistry, 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1873-76. Student in University of Virginia, 1876-77. 
Ph. D., University of Gottingen, 1885. Assistant Chemist, United States Department of 
Agriculture, Washington, D. C, 1876. First Assistant Chemist, Department of Agriculture, 
1877-82. Associate Professor of Chemistry at Massachusetts Agricultural College from 1885. 



CHARLES H. FERNALD, M. A., Ph. D., 

Professor of Zoology, and Entomologist for Hatch Experiment Station. 

Bowdoin College, 1865. Ph. D., Maine State College, 1885. Studied in the Museum of 
Comparative Zoology at Cambridge, and under Louis Agassiz on Penekese Island. Also 
traveled extensively in Europe, studying insects in various museums. Principal of Litchfield 
Academy, 1865. Principal of Houlton Academy, 1865-70. Chair of Natural History, Maine 
State College, 1S71-86. Professor of Zoology at Massachusetts Agricultural College from 1886. 



Rev. CHARLES S. WALKER, Ph. D., 

Professor of Mental and Political Science, and Secretary of the Faculty, also College Chaplain. 

Yale University, 1S67. <l>. B. K. M. A. and B. D., Yale University, 1870. Ph. D., Amherst 
College, 1885. Professor of Mental and Political Science, and Chaplain at Massachusetts 
Agricultural College since 1886. 



WILLIAM r. BROOKS, B. S., 

Profc'ssor of Ai:^riciiltiirc, and Agriculturist for Hatch E.xpcriiiiciit Station. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1S75. $ S K. Professor of Agriculture, and Director 
of Farm at Imperial College of Agriculture, Sapporo, Japan, 1877-88. Acting President, 
Imperial College, 1S80-S3. and 1S86-87. Professor of Agriculture at Massachusetts Agricultural 
College from 1S88. 



GEORGE F. MILLS, M. A., 

Professor of Latin and Pnglish. 

Williams College, 1S62. A A <i>. Associate Principal of Greylock Institute, 1S62-S2. 
Principal of Greylock Institute, 18S2-S9. Professor of Latin and English at Massachusetts 
Agricultural College from iSgo. 



JAMES B. PAIGE, B. S., D. V. S., 
Professor of Veterinary Science. 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1S82. Q. T. V. D. V. S., McGill University, 1888. 
Practiced at Northampton two and a half years. Professor of Veterinary Science at Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College from 1S90. 



WALTER M. DICKINSON, 

First Lieutenant Seventeentli Lnfantry, U. S. A., Professor of Military Science. 

United .States Military Academy, iSSo. Q. T. V. Received commission as Second Lieu- 
tenant, Fourth Cavalry, June 12, 1880. Promoted to First Lieutenant, Fourth Cavalry, 
September i, 1886. Transferred to .Seventeenth Infantry, November 4, 1891. Graduated from 
Infantry and Cavalry, School for Officers in June, 1885. Has been stationed in Indian Territory, 
New Mexico, Arizona, Kansas, Missouri, Washington, California, and Wyoming. Professor of 
Military Science at Massachusetts Agricultural College from September, 1S92. 



EDWARD R. FLINT, B. S., Pii. D., 

Assistant J''rofessor of Chemistry. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1S87. Q. T. V., 1!. S. Assistant Chemist, State 
Experiment Station, 1887-90. University of Gottingen, Germany, 1890-92, IMi. D. Analytical 
Chemist, Boston, 1892-93. Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Massachusetts Agricultural 
College from June, 1893. 

»3 



GEORGE E. STONE, Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, 18S2-84. Massachusetts Institute of Technologv, 
1884-89. In the summer of 1S90, had charge of the Botany Classes at the Worcester vSummer 
School. Leipsic University, 1891-92. Ph. D. Studied in the Physiological Laboratory of 
Clark University, 1S93. Assistant Professor of Botany at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
from June, 1S93. 

A. COURTENAY WASHBURNE, 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Purdue University, 1884-88. United States Military Academy, 1888-90. Assistant City Civil 
Engineer of La Fayette, Indiana, 1882-84. Professor of Mathematics and Military Science, New 
York Military Academy, 1890-91. Professor of Mathematics and Military Tactics, and Instructor 
in the Ogontz School for Young Ladies, 1891-92. Professor of Mathematics and Military Science, 
St. John's Military School, and Instructor in the Ossining Ladies' Seminary, 1892-93. Assistant 
Professor of Agriculture at the Massachusetts Agricultural College since June, 1893. 



HERMAN BABSON, A. B., 

Assistant Professor of English. 

Amherst College, 1893. X ^., A. B Assistant Professor of English at Massachusetts 
Agricultural College from June, 1893. 



FRED. S. COOLEY, B. S., 

Assistant Professor of Agricu/tiire. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1888. Teacher in public school at North Amherst, 
1888-89. Assistant Agriculturist at Hatch Experiment Station, 1889-90. Farm Superin- 
tendent at Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1890-93. Assistant Professor of Agriculture at 
Massachusetts Agricultural College since June, 1893. 

ROBERT W. LYMAN, LL. B., 

Lecturer on Farm Law. 



14 



I^nit^jersiito QL^xxncii 



WILLIAM F. WARREN, S. T. D., LL. D., 

Presidtiit of the University. 

EDMUND H. BENNETT, LL. D., 
Dean of t/ie Sc/ioo/ of Laiv. 

BORDEN P. BOWNE, LL. D., 

Dean of the School of All Sciences. 

MARCUS D. BUELL, S. T. D., 
Dean of the School of Theology. 

HENRY H. GOODELL, M. A., LL. D., 
President of the Massachusetts Agricultural Colhgt. 

WILLIAM E. HUNTINGTON, Ph. D., 
Dean of the College of Liberal Arts. 

I. TISDALE TALBOT, M. D., 

/)e,ni of the School of .Medicine. 



'S 



31Xeeting[ of Inirjeae H^oarir^ 



OCTOBER 12, 1893. 



T , President of the Board, has notified the members to meet at his room, 

6 South College, at three minutes of seven o'clock, sharp. 

7 o'clock. All darkness and silence at room 6. 

7.30. C ■, the representative from Deerfield, arrives and lights up. 

7.35. C , watching, waiting, and beginning to get nervous, thinks " there 's 

been some mistake." 

7.40. A musical step heard on the stairs, and F , the fiddler, appears, 

chucks his violin under the table, and picks out the easiest chair. 

7.45. K , the artist, heard under the window yelling for the President. 

7.50. C decides to "hunt 'em up." 

7.55. Appears M , the delegate from the onion town (commonly called 

Danvers) ; also F , the naturalist, bearing under his arm a suspicious-looking 

perforated tin box, tied with a wrapping twine, which he tenderly sets down in a 
corner by the fire-place. Following these come the artist and the President. 

Pres. T : "Why, how long have you fellows been here?" A heavy 

tramp in the passage, and at precisely 8 o'clock and 3 minutes C appears 

with the delinquents, P and L , whom, he explains, he found dis(r«j'jr///)g 

chemistry; and the President promptly calls the meeting to order. 

Pres. T : " Now, here 's something we 've got to decide upon right away, 

that's " toot-t-t-t from a baritone just outside the door, and several members 

start to lay violent hands on the musician. 

Pres. T (in a voice of thunder) : " Sit down ! We 've got to get this 

dedication out to-night." 

All sit except the good representative who turns door-keeper, bracing his 
back against it to keep out an intruder. 

M : " I think we 'd better dedicate the book to The Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts, that sounds kind of good." 

16 



P : ■' United States of America." 

F — ■ — - : " I go in for Grover Cleveland." 

L (^from land of wooden nutmegs) : " I won't vote for a Democrat." 

Pres. T : "Now, — now, — " 

M : " Say, have you fellows heard about X's stealing ice-cream at the 

President's reception ? Well, the boys were hanging around trying to get some, 
but the old darky kept his eye peeled and told them that they could n't have 
any. ' I 's too smart for you's.' 

'' X was standing by so quiet and innocent looking that no one suspected 
him, and. when the darky's back was turned, he grabbed a brick of ice-cream as 
big as a Bible, walked leisurely off, and invited the crowd up to his room to the 
spread.'" 

M : '• He did n't walk off leisurely, he ran like thunder." 

Pres. T (rapping violently on table) : " Come, come, fellows ! We 've 

got only a week and a half to get this book out. Now, how about this dedi- 
cation ? '' 

L : " Here 's an annual from a college in Texas, it 's dedicated to 

athletics." 

M : "Oh, say ! There is no foot-ball game with Amherst to-morrow." 

F (the naturalist) : " What 's the matter now ? " 

M : " O, their " 

Pres. T : " Now, how is this for a dedication ? — 

" The qualities rare in a bee that we meet. 
In the Index never should fail ; 
Its body should always be little and sweet. 
And a sting should be left in its tail.'' 

Chorus : "What kind of a dedication do you call that? Put him out! " 

T : " Well, somebody else do something, then ; I can't do all the work." 

F (the fiddler) : " Now, here 's my idea : — 

" We dedicate devoid of hate 
To '94 so weary. 

In the belfry high so near the sky, 
Tiiey lonesome sat and dreary." 

L (elbowing M ): "Great Scott ! Is the man crazy.'" 

M : "Darnifino." 

17 



P (who has been writing) : '' How is this for a dedication?" The 

naturalist, who has been kneeling lovingly over the aforesaid perforated tin box, 
jumps suddenly up with the exclamation, " By Gracious ! " and looks around with 
a bewildered expression. 

All : " What 's the matter ? What 's the matter, F ? " 

F (wildly) : " He 's gone ! " 

All : " What 's gone ? " 

F : "My rat ! I was going to take him over to the Zoo. Lab. and dissect 

him to-morrow, — there he goes now! — Whoop ! " 

The fiddler jumps up, his feet in his chair, and pulls off his coat. 

P elevates his feet on the table, laughing uproariously ; others charge on 

the rat. 

From the melee in the corner : — 

" There he is ! There he is ! '" 

" There under the radiator ! " 

" Where 's the bayonet ? " 

" I '11 jab him ! " 

(Naturalist's voice recognized) " Don't kill him, don't kill him ; catch him 
alive ! " 

The rat makes a rush across the room, followed by the crowd, yelling vigor- 
ously, upsetting two chairs and a table, literature and kerosene oil. 

" Ara-ra-ra, koko-so-ko. Ah, hitsu-kama ya ! " (Supposed to be a Japanese 
oath.) 

" Here ! " " There ! " " In the waste-basket ! " 

"I've got him! I've got him! — No-o-o, darn him, he's got me. Let go! 
Wow ! ! " 

"The box, where 's the box .'' " 

" Here it is." 

The rat succumbed to the inevitable, the box was clapped over him, the cover 
tied down, the naturalist took it carefully under his arm, and the meeting stood 
adjourned. 




.-c 



'G^be Cl 



asees. 



— ^-V--^..^^^^^V^^-»-J-8-^ 





Officers. 

President Charles Ignatius Goessmann. 

Vice-President Alexander Cullen Birnie. 

Secretary . Herbert Coleman Hunter. 

Treasurer P^rederick William Colby. 

Class Captain Charles Austin King. 

Foot-Ball Captain . Edward Dwight Palmer. 

Sergea7tt-at-Arvis Austin Hervey Fittz. 

Class Colors. 

Brown and Gold. 



Class Yell. 

Boom-a-laka ! Boom-a-laka 1 

Sis-boom-ah ! 
Ric-a-raka ! Ninety-seven! 

Rah-Rah-Rah ! 



^i^tor^ txi '9t. 



s 



ARDLY had we entered upon our active duties at M. A. C, when we were 



the College but a few short weeks, but they have been weeks fraught with 
many incidents. When, on the morning of September sixth, we took our places in 
chapel, song and scripture were all forgotten, and we were the objects of many 
interested looks and wondering comments. Believing that the class rush ought 
to have no place in our college course, we agreed to co-operate with the Sopho- 
more class in abolishing this barbarous custom, although we were numerically 
stronger than they. Realizing at the start that true success can be obtained 
only by hard study and continued effort, we began our college course with strong 
hearts and determined minds. After electing our class officers, the first ques- 
tion of any importance was, — Will the Two-years' men be allowed to take part 
with us in the Freshman-Sophomore athletic contests ? We decided that they 
were Freshmen, and in justice to them should be allowed to take part with us. 
The class of '96 objected to this, and on the day of the rope-pull they at first 
refused to pull, but finally agreed to contest for the rope. We were defeated 
owing to the stony nature of our side of the field, the inability of some of our 
men to obtain a hold, and the fact that the '96 team was heavier than ours. 
Among the other events of interest were the midnight calls of the " Owl Club." 
Their calls, though short, were remembered long, and preparations were always 
made for the next visit. We were defeated in the foot-ball contest with the 
Sophomores owing to inexperience and lack of a thorough knowledge of the 
game. We believe, however, that with the experience which time will bring, our 
class will show up well in the athletic field. We have already furnished some 



men for the college eleven, and can safel}' predict that we shall be represented 
on the base-ball field. We are well represented in the other organizations, 
having furnished men for the Glee Club, Orchestra, and Band. Finally, class- 
mates, let us press on toward that end for which we entered this college, and 
accomplish our work in a manner worthy of its true value. The ladder of 
fame is before us, and it depends upon our individual work and effort whether 
or not we shall mount to the top and receive the well-earned diploma. 

B. 




2.? 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 



Harry Francis Allen Northboro. 

Mr. Shepardson's. Y. M. C. A. 

John William Allen Northboro. 

Mr. Shepardson's. Y. M. C. A. W. I. L. S. 

Herbert Julius Armstrong Sunderland 

D. K. Bangs'. $ 2 K. Y. M. C. A. 

Frederick White Barclay Kent, Conn. 

4 N. C. C. S. C. Y. M. C. A. W. I. L. S. Class Foot-Ball Team. 

John Marshall Barry Boston. 

Mrs. Clark's. N. H. S. 

James Lowell Bartlett Salisbury. 

Stockbridge House. Q. T. V. Y. M. C. A. W. I. L. S. 

Alexander Cullen Birnie Ludlow. 

2 S. C. * S K. Y. M. C. A. Class Vice-President. Class Historian. Class Foot- 
Ball Team. 

Thomas Herbert Charmbury Amherst. 

Home. Q. T. V. Orchestra. 

Liberty Lyon Cheney Southbridge. 

28 N. C. Q. T. V. W. L L. S. 

Lafayette Franklin Clark West Brattleboro, Vt 

Mrs. Gilbert's. C. S. C. Y. M. C. A. 

Frederick William Colby Roxbury. 

18 S. C. D. G. K. Class Treasurer. Class Foot-Ball Team. 

Robert Parker Coleman Richmond. 

I N. C. C. S. C. 

Maurice Elmer Cook Shrewsbury. 

6 N. C. C. S. C. Y. M. C. A. W. I. L. S. 

24 



George Albert Drew Westford. 

1 1 N. C. * Z K. Y. M. C. A. W. I. L. S. 

John Richmond Eddy Boston. 

7 N. C. * 2 K. Y. M. C. A. W. I. L. S. Class Foot-Ball Team. 

John Alkert Emrich Amherst. 

15N. C. Q. T. V. Class Foot-Ball Team. 

Francis Rand Falby Northboro. 

Mr. Shepardson's. 

Robert Leroy Farnsworth Turner's Falls. 

22 N. C. D. G. K. Band. 

Percy Fletcher Felch Ayer. 

8 N. C. C. S. C. Y. M. C. A. 

Austin Hervey Fittz Natick. 

21 N. C. C. S. C. Y. M. C. A. W. I. L. S. Class Sergeant-at-Arms. 

Meltiah Tobey Gibbs New Bedford. 

II S. C. 

Charles Ignatius Goessmann Amherst. 

Home. D. G. K. N. H. S. Class President. Class Foot-Ball Team. 

Herbert Frank Howe North Cambridge. 

iiN. C. Q. T. V. Y. M. C. A. Class Foot-Ball Team. 

George Caleb Hubbard Sunderland. 

Home. 

Herbert Coleman H inter South Natick. 

3 S. C. C. S. C. Y. M. C. A. N. H. S. W. I. L. S. Class Secretary. 

Charles Austin King East Taunton. 

31 N. C. Q. T. V. Y. M. C. A. \V. I. L. S. Class Foot-Ball Captain. 

Charles Jerome King South Amherst. 

Home. Class Foot-]]all Team. 

George Davison Leavens Pawtucket, R. I. 

Mrs. Clark's. * :S K. Y. M. C. A. Glee Club. 

George Rogers Mansfield Gloucester. 

Mrs. Clark's. * IS K. Y. M. C. A. Glee Club. 

Frank Covvperthwait Millard North Kgremont. 

Club House. Y. M. C. A. 

25 



Charles Ayer Norton Lynn. 

2 S. C. <!> S K. Y. M. C. A. 

Allen Marsh Nowell Winchester. 

D. K. Bangs'. C. S. C. Director Tennis Association. 

Clayton Franklin Palmer Stockbridge. 

I N. C. C. S. C. 

Edward Uwight Palmer Amlierst. 

Home. D. G. K. Class Foot-Ball Team. College Eleven (i). 

Charles Adams Peters Greendale. 

Club House. C. S. C. 

Percy Colton Roberts North Amherst. 

Home. Band. 

Carleton Farrar Sherman Boston. 

D. K. Bangs'. Y. M. C. A. 

Harry Robinson Sherman Dartmouth. 

3 S. C. Y. M. C.A. 

Philip Henry Smith, Jr South Hadley. 

13 N. C. <I>SK. Y. M. C. A. 

Harold Everett Stearns , . . . Conway. 

26 N. C. D. G. K. Y. M. C. A. W. I. L. S. 

Robert Henry Vaughan Worcester. 

Miss Cowles'. D. G. K. Director N. H. S. Class Foot-Ball Team. 

Tom Francis Walsh North Amherst. 

Home. 

Samuel William Wiley Amherst. 

Home. 






26 




l^i^torxcaL 



JjVOR the first time in the history of the M. A. C, we have five distinct 
Jj classes in college. This class has proved itself an enigma to the 
student body — a class without a head or organization, a Freshman addi- 
tion, a thorn to the Sophomores. By what name shall this class be known ? 
was the first question to concern the college. Webster says that a Freshman is 
a man taking his first year in college, and so we called them Freshmen. The 
Faculty interfered, however, saying that they should be known as Two-years' 
men ; that they are not Freshmen, not members of the class of '97. As a pio- 
neer class, this class has started off very well, having twenty-two men in its 
non-organization ; men of worth, men that are of value to the college and its 
athletic organizations. The question whether or not this new class should be 
allowed to enter into athletic contests as a part of the Freshman class was 
brought before the college early in the term, and practically settled when the 
first class contest between the Freshmen and Sophomores took place. At the 
annual "rope-pull" of the lower classes. Two-years' men appeared upon the field 
as members of the Freshman team ; the Sophomores at first hung back, but 
finally pulled with a good many "ifs." That settled it. Since that time the 
Freshmen and these new men have played together as the Freshman class of 
the M. A. C. 



27 



FIRST YEAR MEN. 



Elisha Aaron Bagg West Springfield. 

Tower. Q. T. V. Glee Club. Class Foot-Ball Team. College Eleven (i). 

George Henry Bailey Middleboro. 

D. K. Bangs'. C. S. C. Y. M. C. A. 

Dan Ashley Beaman Leverett. 

Home. 

George Louis Burnham Andover. 

7 N. C. D. G. K. Class Foot-Ball Team. 

Charles Wesley Delano North Duxbury. 

4N. C. Y. M. C. A. 

Arthur Edwin Dutton Chelmsford. 

12 S. C. Y. M. C. A. W. I. L. S. 

Williams Eaton North Middleboro. 

Mrs. White's. Y. M. C. A. Class Foot-Ball Team. 

Albert Dunell Hall West Newton. 

15N. C. Q. T. V. Class Foot-Ball Team. 

William Anson Hooker Amherst. 

Home. 

Louis Maynard Huntress . Amherst. 

Home. Q. T. V. Y. M. C. A. Class Foot-Ball Team. 

Asa Howard Kimball Melrose Highlands. 

27 N. C. Y. M.C. A. W. I. L. S. 

Frank Pitkin Lane Oak Park, 111. 

Mrs. White's. C. S. C. Y. M. C. A. 

Frank Linn^us Nims Amherst. 

Home. 

Benjamin Willard Rice Northboro. 

Mr, Shepardson's. Y. M. C. A. 



Albert Shepard Rising Westfield. 

31 N. C. Y. M. C. A. W. I. L. S. N. H. S. 

Frank Eaton Sweetser Danvers. 

2 N. C. D. G. K. 

Charles Ernest Tisdale North Amherst. 

Home. 

Fred Alvin Tisdale North Amherst. 

Home. 

Fred Gage Todd Boxford. 

20 N. C. Y. M. C. A. W. I. L. S. 

William Benjamin Wentzell Amherst. 

Home. 

Herbert Raymond Wolcott Amherst. 

Home. 




29 




Officers. 

President Herbert Warren Rawson. 

Vice-President Harry Howard Roper. 

Secretary Charles Allen Nutting. 

Treasurer Gilbert Day. 

Historian Frank Lemuel Clapp. 

Class Captain Patrick Arthur Leamy. 

Foot-Ball Captain Horace Clifton Burrington. 

Base-Ball Captain Patrick Arthur Leamy. 

Class Colors. 

Purple and Buttercup Yellow. 



Class Yell. 

Hiyi-Hiyi ! Rah-rah-rix! 
Boom-a-ra-kah ! Boom-a-ra-kah ! '96 ! 



30 



l^i^tot:^ 0£ '96. 



(JjVOR a second time the pleasant duty of contributing to tlae Index devolves 
J- upon the class of Ninety-six. Once again the historian reviews the 
records and relics of the past to glean from the vast accumulation a few 
reminiscences of life at M. A. C. which may be appreciated by readers of the 
College annual. 

Unallured by the fascinations of society at the seashore, undaunted by the 
trials and hardships which confront the book peddler while on his rounds, 
uncaptivated by the " Black Beauties " of the Midway, we have returned once 
more to college life, but with our hopes and aims more clearly defined by the 
three terms of study that have already passed. It must not be thought for a 
moment, however, that all our time has been spent in writing notes, or in seek- 
ing knowledge in the labyrinths of the text-book. Athletics and class contests 
have always demanded a share of our attention. A year ago we were competing 
with Ninety-five for the honors of the rope-pull and the foot-ball game. This 
year we have met not one but two classes, and, in spite of their combined forces, 
defeated them in both rope-pull and foot-ball. The Freshmen and the First- 
year men made a plucky resistance, but the hand of Fate was against them. 

It would be a sad mistake if, in hurrying on, no mention were made of the 
climax of our Freshman career. By this we refer to that eventful night when, 
doubtless, the moon was eclipsed and the night was as bright as day, when we 
laid. aside the Freshman derby to take the tile and cane. Then there was mirth 
in the banquet hall, and whatever of gloom there might have been was dispelled 
by cheers and songs from a class resplendent with glory. We were Sophomores. 

If the owl had not been heard before that night in June, one cannot say that 
he has been silent since. 

32 



Our Mountain Day excursion took place in the early part of October. One 
bright morning we found ourselves headed for the " Notch " and the " Devil's 
Garden." Far up on precipitous heights we paused to enjoy the beautiful 
panorama. After feasting upon the beauties of the valley of the Connecticut 
spread out before us, we continued our search for long-named botanical speci- 
mens. Dinner came at last, and while one and all were busily engaged inves- 
tigating the mysteries of certain well-filled boxes, the photographer of the class 
improved the opportunity to secure a unique souvenir. An hour later we began 
the drive homeward. Although somewhat late for floral specimens, pumpkins 
and signs were in their prime. The country schools were in session, and all these 
contributed to the pleasure of the ride. 

For the second year we are enjoying the vicissitudes of dormitory life. 
When we consider how much real head work the Sophomore can get between 
" bucking centre," in foot-ball, and study, we should , not be surprised at our 
reports at the close of the term. We can still predict for the class of Ninety-six 
continued success and prosperity. 

C. 




33 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



Horace Clifton Burrington Charlemont. 

25 N. C. <!> S K. Y. M. C. A. W. I. L. S. Business Manager Boarding Club. 

College Eleven ( I and 2). Class Foot-Ball Captain. Class Base-Ball Team. 
Fowler Four (i). Corporal Co. D. '96 Index Board. 

Frank Lemuel Clapp Dorchester. 

D. K. Bangs'. C. S. C. Y. M. C. A. Class Historian. (First) Prize Fowler 
Four (i). Corporal Co. C. Editor-in-Chief '96 Index Board. 

Allen Bradford Cook Petersham. 

2 N. C. C. S. C. Y. M. C. A. 

Gilbert Day Haverhill. 

D. G. K. House. D. G. K. W. I. L. S. Class Treasurer. Director Athletic 
Association. College Nine (i). Class Base-Ball Team. Class Foot-Ball 
Team. 

Frank Edmund De Luce Warren. 

Mrs. Gilbert's. $ S K. Manager Glee Club. Corporal Co. D. 

Harry Taylor Edwards Chesterfield. 

6 N. C. C. S. C. Y. M. C. A. W. L L. S. Corporal Co. D. 

Peter Stevenson Whitcomb Fletcher Middleboro. 

8 N. C. C. S. C. Y. M. C. A. W. I. L. S. 

Josiah Elton Green Spencer. 

4 S. C. Q. T. V. Y. M. C. A. N. H. S. Director Tennis Association. 

James Fabens Hammar Swampscott. 

D. K. Bangs'. C. S. C. 

Walter Benjamin Harper Wakefield. 

26 N. C. Q. T. V. Class Base-Ball Team. Class Foot-Ball Team. Band. 

Orchestra. 

Ralph Lyon Hayward Uxbridge. 

D. G. K. W. L L. S. N. H. S. Editor Aggie life. '96 Index Board. 

Benjamin Kent Jones Middlefield. 

Old Creamery. C. S. C. W. L L. S. Recording Secretary Y. M. C. A. Class 
Foot-Ball Team. 

34 



Asa Stephen Kinney Worcester, 

Stockbridge House. D. G. K, W. I. L. S. Class Foot-Ball Team. 

Albin Maximillian Kramer Clinton. 

Mr. H.J. Clark's. Y. M. C. A. 

Patrick Arthur Leamy Petersham. 

2S N. C. Q. T. V. W. I. L. S. Class Captain. Class Base-Ball Captain. 
Class Foot-Ball Team. Second Prize Fowler Four (t). Corporal Co. B. 
Business Manager '96 Index. 

James Laird Marshall Lancaster. 

Stockbridge House. C. S. C. Y. M. C. A. Director Polo Association. Class 
Polo Captain. Class Foot-Ball Team. Class Base-Ball Team. College 
Eleven (2). 

Henry Ward Moore Worcester. 

D. G. K. House. D. G. K. W. L L. S. Class Foot-Ball Team. 

Robert Parker Nichols Norwell. 

Prof. W. P. Brooks'. D. G. K. Y. M. C. A. Class Foot-Ball Team. Cla.ss 
Base-Ball Team. 

Charles Allen Nutting Leominster. 

22 N. C. * 2 K. Y. M. C. A. Class Secretary. Class Foot-Ball Team. 

William Lewis Pentecost Worcester. 

15 S. C. D. G. K. Secretary W. L L. S. Class Base-Ball Team. '96 ///(^'tu- Board. 

Erford Wilson Poole North Dartmouth. 

12 S. C. W. I. L. S. Artist '96 Index Board. 

Isaac Chester Poole North Dartmouth. 

12 S. C. 

Herbert Warren Rawson Arlington. 

16 S. C. <i> 2 K. N. H. S. W. I. L. S. Class President. 

Frederick Henry Read ; Wilbraham. 

23 N. C. * S K. Y. M. C. A. Director Base-Ball Association. Class Base-Ball 

Team. College Nine (i). 

Frank Dean Robinson ]*etersham. 

27 X. C. C. S. C. 

Harry Howard Roper I'-ast Hubbardston. 

Old Creamery. C. S. C. V. M. C. A. W. L L. S. Director Reading Room 
Association. Class Vice-President. Band. '96 Index P)oard. 

35 



Seijiro Saito Nemuro, Japan. 

12 N. C. C. S. C. Y. M. C.A. W.I.L. S. Corporal Co. C. Class Photographer. 

Salome Sastre De Verand Had, Esquipulas, Cunduacan, Tabasco, Mexico. 

D. G. K. House. D. G. K. 

Michael Edgar Scannel Amherst. 

Home. Class Foot-Ball Team. 

Merle Edgar Sellew East Longmeadow. 

13N. C. *2K. 

Frederick Uridgman Shaw South Amherst. 

9 S. C. D. G. K. Class Foot-Ball Team. College Eleven (2). 

Newton Shultis Medford. 

18 S. C. I). G. K. W. I. L. S. N. H. S. Corporal Co. A. 

George Tsuda Tokio, Japan. 

12 N. C. * S K. Y. M. C. A. 

Frank Porter Washburn ' North Perry, Me. 

9 N. C. i" 2 K. Y. M. C. A. N. H. S. Director Foot-Ball Association. Class 
Foot-Ball Team. 




O^^^y-^' 



36 



Cattgl^t on tiffin Jfltr. 



YOU Freshie, I say, 
Get out of the way 
When my glory you behold ; 
I'm a regular tough, 
All the Profs. I bluff, 

For I 'm a Sophomore bold. 

I '11 not stand a jeer 
For I 'm here a year. 

And we have an owl club, too 
The whole Freshman class 
We are ready to sass. 

For we 're a roaring crew. 

I can twirl a cane. 
But study 's my bane ; 

The theatre's my best hold, 
There I cut a dash, 
I 'm great on a mash. 

For I 'm a Sophomore bold. 



* The above was taken by the I'.OAUIVS official stenographer as the song floated from 
the Cami)us into the Samliiiit. 

37 




Officers. 

President Jasper Marsh. 

Vice-President Herbert Daniel Hemenway. 

Secretary and Treasitrer Charles Winfred Crehore. 

Historian Clarence Bronson Lane. 

Class Captain Henry Blood Read. 

Foot-Ball Captain William Clay Brown. 

Base-Ball Captain Edile Hale Clark. 



Class Colors. 

Lavender and Crimson. 



Class Yell. 

Rah-Rix-Rive ! Rah-Rix-Rive ! 
Boom-a-rang ! Boom-a-rang ! '95 ! 



38 



^i^itor^f o£ '95* 



I GAIN the time has come for us to send our greeting to the readers of the 
Index. In glancing back over the past two years, we all have the feeling 
that our journey thus far has been quickly and pleasantly accomplished. 
As we approach the third mile-stone that marks our progress in the college curri- 
culum, hardly can we realize that two years have passed by. 

With the Junior year come new experiences and responsibilities which are 
realized only when we reach this welcome period. One of our new duties was to 
instruct and advise the Freshmen for their athletic contests. The class of '97 
and Two-years' men together comprise the largest freshet that we have had at 
M. A. C. for a number of years, and they appear to have those elements of pluck 
and perseverance which are necessary to success. We congratulate ourselves on 
entering this new era of our college life with the loss of but two men, and we 
hope to hold our present number until that time when we shall all part and face 
the world, supported by a sheep-skin and what we have stored up in the pigeon- 
holes of knowledge. In our Sophomore year we penetrated the depths of trig- 
onometry and puzzled our brains over the use of log., sine, and tangent. Sur- 
veying, with its charms, was also indulged in, and we will leave it for future classes 
to follow our trail and prove the accuracy of our work. 

When the Governor's proclamation was read, fixing the date for Arbor Day, 
we made preparations to set out a little grove in the ravine as a memento of our 
college days. A number of trees were selected from the nursery and borne by 
us to the college grounds, where they were carefully planted. We also set 
out a class tree which is young but promising. 

There seemed to be the impression among some of us that when we became 
Juniors the thorny paths of knowledge would lead into grassy vales of Junior 
dignity and ease. Alas, for such dreams ! The dry rhetoric and long zoological 
names are not as e asy to digest as the Sophomoric schedule. 

However, there are many pleasant incidents associated with the Junior year. 
One of the most enjoyable occasions we have ever had as a class was the trip we 

40 



took under the direction of Professor Maynard to the vineyards of Fitchburg and 
the market gardens about Boston. 

This trip was of great pleasure and profit to all, not only in a scientific way, 
but in the acquirement of general knowledge. The historic towns about Boston 
were deserving of our most careful study. 

In athletics, which are so important in every college, we have more than held 
our own, winning four out of the six contests in which we have been engaged. 
Aside from this, we have always done our part in supporting the college teams. 

Now, classmates, let us remember that our college days are numbered. Two 
years of toil and strife have passed and a third is fast going. The remainder of 
our course will fly by only too quickly. Ere long college duties will be a thing of 
the past, and our dreams of life's battles will become realities. Therefore, let us 
settle down to the work before us and do our best while the time is still our own, 
determined to gain all we can that will prepare us for our future life work. 

So here 's a health to all 
Who at this college strive, 
Through all our days 
We '11 sing the praise 
Of jolly '95. 




41 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



Henry Arthur Bai.lou West Fitchburg. 

5N. C. Q. T. V. Y. M. C. A. First Sergeant Co. C. 

Waldo Lewis Bemis Spencer. 

5 N. C. Q. T. V. Y. M. C. A. Color Corporal. 

George Austin Billings South Deerfield. 

6 S. C. C. S. C. Y. M. C. A. N. H. S. Leader Glee Club. Color Corporal. 

William Clay Brown Peabodv. 

D. G. K. House. D. G. K. Y. M. C. A. Secretary and Treasurer Polo Asso- 
ciation. Orchestra. First Sergeant of Band. 

Albert Franklin Burgess Rockland. 

14 N. C. Y. M. C. A. Band. 

Edile Hale Clark Spencer. 

10 S. C. Q. T. V. Secretary and Treasurer Base-Ball Association. Captain Col- 
lege Nine. Class Base-]jall Captain. Second Prize Fowler Four (2). Sergeant- 
Major. 

Harry Edward Clark Wilbraham. 

23 N. C. <!> 2 K. Y. M. C. A. Corporal Co. D. 

Robert Allkn Cooley South Deerfield. 

5 S. C. <!> 2 K. Corresponding Secretary Y. M. C. A. 'gq Index Board. Editor 
Aggie Life (3). First Sergeant Co. A. 

Charles Winfred Crehore . Chicopee. 

14 S. C. <i> 2 K. Class Secretary and Treasurer. Manager Polo Team. Duty 
Sergeant Co. B. College Eleven (3). 

Charles Morrison Dickinson Park Ridge, 111. 

I S. C. Q. T. V. N. H. S. Corporal Co. B. 

Herbert Stockwell Fairbanks Amherst. 

Home. D. G. K. Director Foot-Ball Association. College Eleven (3). First 
Sergeant Co. B. 

42 



Thomas Patrick Foley Natick. 

ID N. C. C. S. C. W. I. L. S. Director Tennis Association. '95 Index Hoard. 
Editor Aggie Life (2 and 3). First Prize Fowler Four (2). Leader Orchestra. 
Quartermaster-Sergeant. 

Harold Locke Frost Arlington. 

14 S. C. 4> S K. Treasurer Y. M. C. A. W. I. L. S. Secretary and Treasurer 
N. H. S. Business Manager '95 Index Board. Duty Sergeant Co. C. Class 
Polo Captain. 

Herbert Daniel Hemenway Barre. 

21 N. C. C. S. C. Y. M. C. A. W. L L. S. Class Vice-President. Cor- 
poral Co. A. 

Edward Harris Henderson Maiden. 

10 X. C. D. G. K. Y. M. C. A. N. H. S. Corporal Co. B. 

John Horace Jones Pelham. 

Home. Band. 

Robert Sharp Jones \. ' ' ''^'* 

8 S. C. "J" S K. Secretary and Treasurer Athletic Association. College Nine (2). 
Duty Sergeant Co. A. 

Shiro Kuroda Japan. 

iiS. C. * 2 K. Y. M. C. A. Artist '95 /;/(/6U- Board. Fowler Four (2). Cor- 
poral Co. B. 

Clarence Bronson Lane Killingworth, Conn. 

32 N. C. D. G. K. Y. M. C. A. Director W. I. L. S. Class Historian. '95 Index 
Board. Editor Aggie Life (3). Duty Sergeant Co. D. 

Jasi'ER Marsh Danvers Centre. 

D. G. K. House. D. G. K. N. IL S. Secretary and Treasurer Boarding Club. 
Class President. '95 Index Board. College Eleven (3). Duty Sergeant Co. A. 

Walter Levi Morse Middleboro. 

D. G. K. House. D. G. K. Y. M. C. A. N. IL S. Director Boarding Club. 
Duty Sergeant Co. D. 

Daniel Charles Potter Fairhaven. 

20 N. C. President W. L L. S. N. IL S. Director Keading-Room Association. 
'95 Index Board. 

IlENKV liLooD Read Westfo.d. 

10 S. C. * i) K. Class Captain. College Nine (2). Color Sergeant. 

43 



Wright Asahel Root Deerfield. 

5 S. C. $ S K. Y. M. C. A. W. I. L. S. Secretary and Treasurer Reading- 

Room Association. Duty Sergeant Co. C. 

Arthur Bell Smith North Hadley. 

I S. C. Q. T. V. Y. M. C. A. Secretary and Treasurer Tennis Association. 
Glee Club. Corporal Co. C. 

Clarence Linden Stevens Sheffield. 

14 N. C. 

Morris John Sullivan Amherst. 

Home. Director Base-Ball Association. College Nine (2). Duty Sergeant Co. B. 

Frederick Clinton Tobey West Stockbridge. 

6 S. C. C. S. C. Y. M. C. A. W. I. L. S. N. H. S. Editor-in-Chief '95 Index 

Board. Corporal Co. C. 

Stephen Peter Toole Amherst. 

Home. Director Foot-Ball Association. Director Athletic Association. Fowler 
Four (2). College Eleven (3). Corporal Co. A. 

Frank Lafayette Warren Shirley. 

Tower. Q. T. V. Y. M. C. A. Secretary and Treasurer Foot-Ball Association. 
College Eleven (3). First Sergeant Co. D. 

Edward Albert White Fitchburg. 

32 N. C. D. G. K. Y. M. C. A. Corporal Co. D. 




44 



Cia$^ ^0]em. 



WINGING still his changeful flight. 
Old Time speeds on. Nor stops, but now and then 
Some earthly star, some radiant flower of manhood's worth 
To pluck. Yet finds he still 
A valiant band of brothers tried and true. 
His scythe affrights us not, his warning hour-glass 
Serves but to remind us of the swiftly flowing tide 
Of years through which, like comrades 
In the sanguinary strife, we've struggled on 
And up to victory. 

The double bands of Loyalty 

And Love for classmates true have ever stronger grown 

Through weeks of toil and care. And stronger yet. 

And binding closer still their sacred ties. 

Our twin loves. Love and Loyalty, shall ever hold 

Within our hearts the highest place. 

Nor years nor Time's unswerving faithfulness 

To all his masters, Death, Forgetfulness, Oblivion, 

Shall loose the bands of Friendship and of Love. 

But as the years roll on and Winter's hoary whiteness 

Comes and goes, gives place to song-bird 

And to flower, then Memory's brightening glances oft 

Will turn to college days and Ninety-Five. 

We'll see once more the tried and true ; we'll fight 
The old fights o'er and o'er again. We'll hear, 
Across the softening lapse of Season's changing glory, 
The songs we used to sing. And sharply drawn 
In Memory's hazy picturings will stand our College 
And our ('lass. 



45 




Officers. 

President Alvertus Jason Morse. 

Vice-President George Henry Merwin. 

Secretary Lowell Manley. 

Treasurer Chakles Harrington Spaulding. 

Historian Arthur Clement Curtis. 

Class Captai7i Edwin Loring Boardman. 

Foot-Ball Captain Henry Justin Fowler. 

Sero-eant-at-Arjns Theodore Spaulding Bacon. 



Class Colors. 

Peacock Blue and Cream. 



Class Yell. 

Rah-Rex-Rah ! Zip-Boom-Bah ! 
'94! '94! Rah-Rah-Rah! 



46 



^is^torg ix£ '94. 



IT is a mild October afternoon ; the sun looks calmly down from a cloudless 
sky ; scarcely a breath of air stirs the brilliantly hued autumn leaves, and 
everything in nature seems conducive to rest and reflection. The historian, 
sitting by his study window, is soothed by the calmness and serenity of all 
about him, and falling into a deep reverie, allows his mind to wander dreamily 
over the events of his college course, now fast drawing to a close. 

Again he is a verdant Freshman, treading for the first time the soil of Old 
Aggie, gazing in surprise and admiration at her noble buildings, or listening, 
with awe, to the words of wisdom let fall from the lips of her worthy professors. 
Again he joins heartily in that stirring class yell, heard so often in those days, 
cheering on to victory the pride of '94, the class foot-ball team. 

The scene changes. The weeks and months have flown swiftly by ; spring 
has come and gone ; the final examinations of the Freshman year are over. 
Once more he takes part in the celebration of that gala time of all the year, 
Freshman Night. With a feeling of exultation he hears the melodious notes of 
the Old Chapel bell pealing forth its defiance to Sophomoric enterprise, joins 
with his classmates in scufifle and rush, and triumphantly bears to the fountain 
his share of Sophomoric avoirdupois. 

Now his mind dwells upon the varied experiences of his second year at 
college ; but strange to relate, his attention is fixed, not so much upon the rush, 
the class and college foot-ball games, nor even that most exciting event of the 
year, the rope-pull, as upon that momentous occasion when, with all his class- 
mates, he first realized the advantage of combining instruction in agriculture 
with military drill. Again he hears those stern words of command : " Attention 
there ; silence in the ranks ! Right, Dress ; Front ! " as standing in line with 
fifty classmates, he feels his own insignificance and the mighty power of that 
august personage, the martial Professor of Agriculture. 



Now he is a jolly Junior, participating in the pleasures of that most delightful 
class trip to Boston and its suburbs, cheering on his classmates in the contests 
at the spring athletic meet, and exulting over their triumph at its close, or 
joining in the singing of the class song, after partaking of the banquet so 
liberally provided by '96. 

Once more, returning to begin the last year of his college course, he feels for 
the first time the dignity of a full-fledged Senior. Reviewing the events of the 
weeks past, his thoughts turn to those who have once been members of his 
beloved class, but are such no longer. Particularly does he think of the two 
who have passed into the realm of eternal peace. One, beloved by all, had gone 
before, and now another has followed him through the dark valley. 

Then his thoughts reach forward into the future. He wonders what the 
next few months will have in store. He pictures to himself the scenes of 
the bright Commencement season, and then, looking beyond Commencement, 
is just beginning the erection of various castles in the air, when "One! two! 
three ! four ! " strikes the chapel clock, arousing him to a sense of the fact that 
"Time and tide wait for no man," and bringing him face to face with the 
practical affairs of the present. 

Thus, with feelings in the main bright and joyful, though now and then 
tinged with sadness, the historian reviews the events of the past three years. 
Yes, classmates, to all of us they have been years of happiness. Doubtless we 
shall look back upon them as the happiest years of our lives ; and let us hope 
they have been full of profit, as well as of pleasure. And now, during the 
remainder of our time here, let us strive to improve our opportunities to the 
utmost, that we may go forth at Commencement worthy representatives of '94 
and of the M. A. C. C. 




49 



CLASS OF '94. 



Edwin Hammond Alderman Middlefield. 

29 N. C. C. S. C. Y. M. C. A. W. I. L. S. 

Fred Gilbert Averell Amherst. 

Home. Band. Flint Six (3). 

Linus Hersey Bacon Spencer. 

4 S. C. Q. T. V. Y. M. C. A. Director N. H. S. First Lieutenant and Quar- 
termaster. 

Theodore Spaulding Bacon Naticl^. 

Mrs. Gilbert's. <l> 2 K. Y. M. C. A. Director N. H. S. Class Sergeant-at-Arms. 
Manager College Nine. Director Tennis Association. President Press Club. 
Glee Club. Editor Agoje Life (3 and 4). Captain Co. D. 

Louis Morton Barker Hanson. 

13 S. C. C. S. C. Y. M. C. A. Director N. H. S. 

Edwin Loring Boardman Siieffield. 

Tower. C. S. C. N. H. S. Class Captain. Director toot-Ball Association. 
College Eleven (2, 3 and 4). 

Charles Leverett Brown Feeding Hills. 

7 S. C. C. S. C. Y. M. C. A. First Lieutenant and Fire Marshal. 

Arthur Clement Curtis Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Plant House. C. S. C. W. I. L. S. Class Historian. President Reading-Room 
Association. First Prize Flint Six (3). Captain Co. C. 

Arthur Hardy Cutter Pelham, N. H. 

Tower. * S K. N. H. S. College Eleven (4). 

Perley Elijah Davis Jay, Me. 

24 N. C. Q. T. V. Y. M. C. A. Drum Major Band. 

Elliot Taylor Dickinson Amherst. 

Home. Q. T. V. Second Lieutenant Co. C. 

Halley Melville Fowler South Gardner- 

D. G. K. House. D. G. K. President Tennis Association. Director Boarding 
Club. Manager Orchestra. Second Lieutenant Co. B. 

5° 



Henry Justin Fowler North Hadley 

13 S. C. C. S. C. Y. M. C. A. W. I. L. S. N. H. S. Class Foot-Ball Captain. 
Director Polo Association. 

John Edwin Gifford Brockton. 

D. G. K. House. D. G. K. W. I. L. S. N. H. S. Director Athletic Association. 
Captain College Eleven. Captain Co. B. 

Frederick Lowell Greene Shrewsbury. 

Upper Plant House. C. S. C. Editor Aggie Life (4). 

Ira Charles Greene Fitchburg. 

Kellogg Block. Q. T. V. Pi-esident N. H. S. College Eleven (3) (4). 

Charles Herbert Higgins Dover. 

8 S. C. C. S. C. N. H. S. College Eleven (3 and 4). Band. Orchestra. 

Samuel Francis Howard Wilbraham. 

9 N. C. <!> S K. Y. M. C. A. W. I. L. S. N. H. S. President Base-Ball Asso- 

ciation. President Polo Association. College Nine (2 and 3). Glee Club. 
First Lieutenant Co. B. 

Thaddeus Fayette Keith Fitchburg. 

9 S. C. Q. T. V. N. H. S. Editor Aggie Life (3 and 4). 

Archie Howard Kirkland Norwich. 

Insectory. $ S K. Y. M. C. A. N. H. S. Flint Six (3). First Lieutenant Co. A. 

Charles Pugsley Lounsbury Allston. 

17 S. C. $ S K. N. H. S. Director Keading-Room Association. 

Lowell Manley Brockton. 

D. G. K. House. D. G. K. N. H. S. Class Secretary. Manager College Eleven. 
President Athletic Association. First Lieutenant Co. D. 

George Henry Merwin Westport, Conn. 

29 N. C. C. S. C. President Y. M. C. A. Class Vice-President, Business Man- 
ager Aggie Life. Flint Six (3). Captain Co. A. 

Alvkrtus Jason Morse Belchertown. 

24N. C. Q. T. V. Vice-President Y. M. C. A. Class President. Director Base- 
Ball Association. Director Boarding Club. Second Lieutenant Co. I). 

Robert Ferdinand Pomeroy South Worthington. 

Upper Plant House. C. S. C. 

Joseph PLvrry Putnam West Sutton. 

D. G. K. House. \). G. K. College Eleven (2, 3 and 4). First Lieutenant and 
I'.anfl Leader. Orchestra. 

SI 



William Edwin Sanderson Hingham. 

D. G. K. House. D. G. K. Y. M. C. A. W. I. L. S. 

Horace Preston Smead Greenfield. 

15 S. C. D. G. K. Y. M. C. A. W. I. L. S. First Lieutenant and Adjutant. 

George Eli Smith Slieffield. 

7 S. C. C. S. C. Y. M. C. A. 

Ralph Elliot Smith Newton Centre. 

17 S. C. $ S K. Y. M. C. A. President Foot-Ball Association. College Eleven 
(3 and 4). First Lieutenant Co. C. 

Charles Harrington Spaulding East Lexington. 

16 S. C. <l> 2 K. W. L L. S. Class Treasurer. Director Boarding Club. Second 

Lieutenant Co. A. 

Claude Frederic Walker Amherst. 

Home. C. S. C. Y. M. C. A. Secretary and Treasurer Press Club. Editor-in- 
Chief Aggie Life. Flint Six (3). 

Elias Dewey White Highlands, N. C. 

25 N. C. <t> S K. Y. M. C. A. Director N. H. S. Second Prize Flint Six (3). 




52 



r0tn WiL ^lea^ant 



\^_TlGHLANDS o'er which comes morning, 
-l—L Broad stretch of valley below, 
Low sweep of green elm arches, 
With the maple's scarlet glow. 

'Mid surge of tossing foliage 

Dark spires and turrets frown ; 

O'er all a floating ensign, 

'Gainst mountains, purple-brown. 

Blue flashing glimmer of steel. 

From moving lines 'neath the trees. 

As thrilling martial music 

Floats up on the swelling breeze. 

No feudal tyrant's stronghold 

Is blighting this valley bright. 
No hoary wrong 's uplifted 

By the bayonet's flashing light. 

Here superstition riveth 

No shackles for the mind. 
All faiths, all creeds find welcome, 

And truth alone 's enshrined. 



No clime this for oppression, 

Forging the fetters of serfs ; 

The soil below 's New England's, 

Free thought's fruition and nurse. 

Outpost of Labor's army strong, 
Whose onset famine flies ; 

Enemies to darkness sworn. 

Peace and Plenty's firm allies. 

Trained in her temples of science, 
The Bay State's sons sustain 

True nobility of toil, 

Cunning hand and cultured brain. 

Taught, from her rugged hillsides 
The horn of plenty to fill ; 

To wrest from niggard Nature, 
Her bountiful yield to skill ; 

To challenge wrongs and errors. 
As his mission each fulfills. 

With view as broad as our valley, 
And purpose firm as her hills. 



54 



Secret Yraternities. 




3lfrat]ernit:g. 



ALEPH CHAPTER. 



ESTABLISHED 1869. 



INCORPORATED 1886. 



RESIDENT GRADUATES. 



Charles Stoughton Crocker. 



Charles Henry Johnson. 



UNDERGRADUATES. 



Halley Melville Fowler. 
L(j\vell Max ley. 
William Edwin Sanderson. 
William Clay Brown. 
Eiavaki; Harris Henderson. 
Jasper Marsh. 
Edward Alhert White. 
Asa .Stei'Hen Kinney. 
RoiiERT Parker Xhhols. 
Sal(j.mk de Verand Sastre. 
Geor(;e Louis Burnha.m. 
Robert Leroy Farnswuriii. 
Edward Dwniiir I'almkk. 
Frank Eaton Sweets er. 



John Edwin Gifford. 
Joseph Harry Putnam. 
Horace Preston Smead. 
Herbert Stockwell Fairbanks. 
Clarence Bronson Lane. 
Walter Levi Morse. 
Ralph Lyon Hayward. 
Henry Ward Moore. 
William Lewis I'e.ni'ecost. 
Newton Siii'LTIS. 
Frederick William Colby. 
Charles Ignatius Goessmann. 
IIakoi.d Everett Stearns. 

RoiiERT UlNKV V.M'GllAN. 



57 



^. XL. t). 

1869. 1893, 



AMHERST. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1869. 



ORONO. 

Maine State College, 1874. 



GRANITE. 

New Hampshire College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. 



BOSTON ALUMNI CHAPTER, 1889. 



58 




m 



i«^*»l 



Jilii-^ % 



flP 



. ^. IS. ^x^ti^xniijgf. 



AMHERST CHAPTER. 



ESTABLISHED 1869. 



INCORPORATED 1890. 



RESIDENT GRADUATES. 



Henry Darwin Haskins. 
Charles Howland Jones. 



Frank Luman Arnold. 
Frederick Jason Smith. 



Joseph Baker. 



UNDERGRADUATES. 



Linus Hersey Bacon. 
Elliot Taylor Dickinson. 
Thaddeus Fayette Keith. 
Henry Arthur Ballou. 
Edile Hale Clark. 
Arthur Bell Smith. 
JosiAH Ei.TuN Greene. 
Patrick Arthur Leamy. 
James Lcjwell Bartlett. 
LiiJERTY Lyon Cheney. 
Ai.iiKR'i' Dun ELL Hall. 
Louis Maynard Huntress. 



Perley Elijah Dayis. 
Ira Charles Greene. 
Alvertus Jason Morse. 
Waldo Lewis Bemis. 
Charles Morris Dickinson. 
Frank Lafayette Warren. 
Walter Benjamin ILvrper. 
Elisha Aaron Bagg. 
Thomas Herhert Charmbury. 
John Albert Emrich. 
Herbert Frank Howe. 
Charles Ausiin Kinc;. 



59 



phi Sigma IRappa. 

1873. 1893. 



^Vf'^^tl$:V^-, 



ALPHA. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1873. 



BETA. 

Union University, Albany, iJ 



GAMMA. 

Cornell University, Cornell, i< 



DELTA. 

West Virginia University, Morgantown, 1891. 



EPSILON. 

Yale University, New Haven, 1893. 



THE NEW YORK CLUB, 1889. 



60 




M 



Ptyi ^igma l^app^. 



ORGANIZED 1873. 



ALPHA CHAPTER. 



INCORPORATED 1892. 



RESIDENT GRADUATE. 

William A. Kellogg. 



UNDERGRADUATES. 



Theodore Spaulding Bacon. 
Samuel Francis Howard. 
Charles Pugsley Lounsbury. 
Charles Harrington Spaulding. 
Harry Edward Clark. 
Charles Winfred Crehore. 
Robert Sharp Jones. 
Henry Blood Read. 
Horace Clifton Burrington. 
Charles Allen Nutting. 
Frederick Henry Read. 
George Tsuda. 
Herbert Julius Armstrong. 
George Ai.iiK.RT Drew. 
George Davison Leavens. 
Charles Ayer Norton. 



Arthur Hardy Cutter. 
Archie Howard Kirkland. 
Ralph Elliot Smith. 
Elias Dewey White. 
Robert Allen Cooley. 
Harold Locke Frost. 
Shiro Kuroda. 
Wright Asahel Root. 
Frank Edmund De Luce. 
Herbert Warren Rawson. 
Merle Edgar Sellew. 
Frank Porter Washburn. 
Alexander Cullen Birnie. 
John Richmond Eddy. 
George Rogers Mansfield. 
Philip Henry Smith. 



6i 



^^oLiT^^^ 




EA.WHIGMT.PHILA. 



College ^iyake^pjearean OTlttlr, 



ORGANIZED 1879. 



INCORPORATED 1892. 



OFFICERS. 

President, Arthur Clement Curtis. 

Vice-President, George Henry Merwin. 

Recording Secretary, Thomas Patrick Foley. 

Corresponding Secretary, Harry Howard Roper. 
Treasurer, Louis Morton Barker. 

Historian, Seijiro Saito. 
George Eli Smith, \ 

Frederick Clinton Tobey, > Directors. 
James Laird Marshall, > 

RESIDENT GRADUATES. 



Joseph Birdgeo Lindsey. 
Malcolm Austin Carpenter. 



William Martin Shepardson. 
- Henry Martin Thomson. 



UNDERGRADUATES. 



-Edwin Hammond Alderman. 
-Edward Loring Boardman. 

Arthur Clement Curtis. 

Frederick Lowell Greene. 

George Henry Merwin. 

George Eli Smith. 
-George Austin Billings. 

Herbert Daniel Hemenway. 

Frank Lemuel Clapp. 

Harry Taylor Edwards. 

James Faben Hammar. 

James Laird Marshall. 

Harry Howard Roper. 

George Hknry Bailey. 

Lafayette Franklin Clark. 

Maurice Elmer Cook. 

Austin Hervey Fittz. 

Frank Pitkin Lank. 

Clayton Franklin Palmer. 



- Louis Morton Barker. 

Charles Leverett Brown. 
— Henry Justin Fowler. 
"Charles Herbert Higgins. 
-Robert Ferdinand Pomeroy. 
-Claude Frederick Walker. 

Thomas Patrick Foley. 

Frederick Clinton Tobey. 

Allen Bradford Cook. 

Stephen Whitcomb Fletcher. 

Benjamin Kent Jones. 

Frank Dean Robinson. 

Seijiro Saito. 

Frederick White Barclay. 

Rohert Parker Coleman. 

Percy Fletcher Felch. 

Herbert Coleman Hunter. 

Allen March Novvell. 

Charles Adams Peters. 



63 



^l^ie ^ifle"^ iCament. 



I 



HAVE spoken in the battle, 
When the enemy were nigh ; 

I have watched around the camp-fire, 
'Neath the dark and wintry sky. 



I have lain, all soiled and battered, 
On the torn and bloody ground ; 

I have been a guard and comrade 

When the foes were thick'ning round. 

I have seen the black men's faces, 

When Abe Lincoln's men drew nigh ; 

I have heard them sing for freedom, 
Boldly shout their battle cry. 

I have sent my leaden message 
Speeding on its way of death ; 

I have heard the cannons' roaring. 
Caught the dying soldier's breath. 

I have seen the Southern country, 
In its beauty and its pride ; 

I have seen it crushed and bleeding, 
In the trail of Sherman's ride. 

I have felt the burning hand-grasp, 
I have felt it then grow cold ; 

I have watched beside the bodies 
Of the brave heart and the bold. 



64 



I have listened oft to women's 
Voices wailing o'er the dead ; 

I have been a staff to weakness, 
Pillowed many a wearied head. 

I have watched the smoke of battle, 
Heard the trumpet's thrilling call ; 

I have seen the power of slavery, 
Felt it totter then and fall. 

I have been the sombre Angel's 
Tried and trusted comrade true ; 

I have followed ever loyally 
The red, white and the blue. 

And now my story is ended. 

Sad and memory haunted, still I wait. 

With comrades few, for the end. 

Which is oblivion. 

My once emblazoned plate 

And shining steel are dimmed and scarred 

By Time's unsparing hand. 

No more shall I obey 

The trumpet's blast, proclaiming 

Liberty's oncoming host. No more 

Speak I to tyrants 

Or to knaves ; but all forgotten 

Still I wait, with comrades few, 

For the end, which is oblivion. 

My song is done. 



6S 



_^A^ ^^-^ 



^^> 



.^ 



A SELECTION. 



cV 



^^.^lAvaWfin^j^ 



yt 



§'^IRITUALA3NGS 



yx>' 



T^r^*^ 



^ 





,,^wV[. jc;pf^ 



'^^^-^^K^^ 



^^5-^-^-^^ 



FOR USE IN SOCI 



"TW;^^^,^ ^ ^^,.^ 



ETINGS. ^ 










^ 



^^ 



o^-- 





^^ CHARLES S. ROBINSON. > 



\ 



^T^ 



^ 
^ 



THE DJ^^URY<^^0. NEW-VORK 






^S°J3??<g.SS' 



;^ 



-<yMr 



-vyvv>^ wv'-^- 



College 



Associations 



6| 




OFFICERS. 



President. 

GEORGE H. MERWIN. 



Vice=President. 

ALVERTUS J. MORSE. 



Corresponding Secretary. 

ROBERT A. COOLEY. 



Recording Secretary. 

BENJAMIN K. JONES. 



Treasurer, 

HAROLD L. FROST. 



68 



College Preacher. 

Rev. Charles S. Walker, Ph. D. 

Teacher of Bible Class. 

Prof. George F. Mills, M. A. 



COMHITTEES. 



ELLA.S D. White. 
Edward H. Henderson. 



Devotional. 



George Tsuda. 
Alexander C. Birnie. 



Edwin H. Alderman. 
Frederick C. Tobey. 



Membership. 



Edward A. White. 
George D. Leavens. 



Horace P. Smead. 
Shiro Kuroda. 



nissionary. 



Seijiro Saito. 
Frederick W. Barclay. 



George E. Smith. 
Clarence B. Lane. 



Nominating. 



Wright A. Root. 
Herbert F. Howe. 



69 



la^je-l^all ^000jciatx0n. 



OFFICERS. 

President^ Samuel F. Howard. Secretary, Edile H. Clark. 

Directors. 

Alvertus J. Morse. Morris J. Sullivan. Frederick H. Read. 



COLLEGE TEAM. 

Theodore S. Bacon, Mariager. Edile H. Clark, Captain. 

Walter J. Curley, c. Patrick A. Leamy, 3b. 

George F. Curley, p. Frederick H. Read, s. s. 

Henry B. Read, ib. Robert S. Jones, 1. f. 

Edile H. Clark, 2b. Samuel F. Howard, c. f. 

Morris J. Sullivan, r. f. 



Substitutes. 

Alt^ert F. Burgess. Edward O. Bagg. Gilbert H. Day. 



70 




6 Ll < 



^ lij 

z 
o 



M^^it^M^li ^js^ojcifc^tion. 



GAMES PLAYED. 

April 15, Worcester Tech. vs. Aggie, Amherst, y-^i- 

April 22, Mt. Hermon vs. Aggie, Amherst, 2-9. 

April 26, Amherst '96 vs. Aggie, Amherst, 3-10. 

April 29, Worcester Tech. vs. Aggie, Worcester, 14-8. 
May 13, Trinity vs. Aggie, Hartford, 7-25. 

May 27, Trinity vs. Aggie, Amherst, 6-1 1. 

May 31, Williston vs. Aggie, Easthampton, 4-9. 

June 10, Williston vs. Aggie, Amherst, 4-1. 



73 




OFFICERS. 



President, D. C. Potter. 



Vice-President, C. H. Spaulding. 



Secretary, W. L. Pentecost. 



Treasurer, H. P. Smead. 



Directors. 

S. F. Howard. C. B. Lane. A. S. Kinney. 



74 




OFFICERS. 

President, Ira C. Greene. 
Vice-President, John E. Gifford. Secretary-Treasurer, Harold L. Frost. 

Directors. 

Lixus H. Bacon. Elias D. White. Theodore S. Bacon. 

Louis M. Barker. Robert H. Vauohan. 



75 



3if00t-|^aU IV^S0c£atiatt. 



OFFICERS. 

President. Ralph E. Smith. Seci-etary-T^'eas^irer, Frank L. Warren. 

Directors. 

Ralph E. Smith. Herbert S. Fairbanks. 

Edwin L. Boardman. Stephen P. Toole. 

Frank P. Washburn. 



COLLEGE TEAM. 

Manager, Lowell Manley. Captain, John E. Gifford. 

Guards, Edward L. Boardman, Horace C. Burrington. 

Tackles, Charles H. Higgins, Herbert S. Fairbanks. 

Ends, Lowell Manley, Jasper Marsh. Qiiarter-Back, Joseph H. Putnam. 

Half-Backs, John E. Gifford, James L. Marshall. Full-Back, Elisha A. Bagg. 

Substitutes. 

Arthur H. Cutter. Frederick B. Shaw. 

Ira C. Greene. Stephen P. Toole. 

Alvertus J. Morse. Frank L. Warren. 

Charles W. Crehore. Edward D. Palmer. 

76 




Q: S 



2 X 



^rOiXXt'^W^ii ^^^KiJCX'atxiXtl^ 



GAMES PLAYED. 

Sept. 25, Aggie vs. Mt. Hermon, 0-26. 

Oct. I, Aggie vs. W. P. I., 0-16. 

Oct. 4, Aggie vs. Amherst, 0-26. 

Oct. 13, Aggie vs. Wesleyan University, 12-18. 
Oct. 18, Aggie vs. Williston, 38-0. 

Oct. 21, Aggie vs. Yale Freshmen, 0-16. 

Oct. 28, Aggie vs. Mt. Hermon, 0-54. 



79 




OFFICERS. 

Presidetit, Lowell Manley. 
Secretary and Treasurer, Robert S. Jones. 



Directors. 

Lowell Manley. Robert S. Jones. John E. Gifford. 

Stephen P. Toole. Gilbert H. Day. 




DAVIS 
A. J. MORSE 



L. MANLEY 



H. D. HEMENWAY 
S. P. TOOLE 



yiAtf Ba^. 



■livOR many years the students of the M. A. C. have anticipated a field day; 
Jj but from year to year their fond ambitions have been shattered simply 
because the officers of the Athletic Association could not see enough 
athletic material in college to warrant the undertaking. The past few years 
have manifested to the college that there is an abundance of latent athletic force 
in the students, and all that is needed to turn it into active force is a general 
awakening and interest in sports. The officers of the Athletic Association of 
last year realized this fact, and went to work with a will. They spent much 
time and money in fitting up the gymnasium, they prepared an attractive pro- 
gramme of sport for both an indoor meet and a field day, and they succeeded, 
by hard work^n carrying out the programme very successfully, and in creating 
the desired r' boom " in Aggie's athleticsT? The Association also offered a 
beautiful banner to the class that should wki the largest number of points in 
the two meets. This banner is to be turned over from year to year to the 
winning class, the class having the privilege of placing its figures upon it and 
of possessing it until it is won by another class. The banner finally becomes 
the property of the class possessing it for three consecutive years. The trustees 
of the college having set apart May 17 for a field day, the students accordingly 
prepared for the events. No recitations were held, and the whole college gave 
itself up to sport. 

The real contest for the banner lay between the classes of '94 and '95. '94, 
having secured a lead of 31 points in the winter meets, had good reason to feel 
confident of success. '95 fought bravely for supremacy, but went into the 
contests with hearts saddened by the fact that their most popular man, their 
college athlete, lay upon his bed dangerously ill. '93 aspired not for honors, 
and '96 was content with only a few points. 

'94 came out victorious, securing 81 points. The average of the two meets 
gave '94 the first place, with 188 points and a percentage of 44.1; '95 secured 
139 points, or 33.1 per cent; '93, 72 points, or 14.1 per cent; '96, 42 points, or 
8.7 per cent. 

At the close of the day's contests the banner was formally presented to the 
class of '94, who bore it in triumph to the college, and, after placing their figures 
upon it, hung it in the college reading room. 

83 



COLLEGE RECORDS. 



Relay Race. — Class of '94, 4 minutes, 9 4-5 seconds. 

Mile Run.— Henry J. Fowler, '94, 5 minutes 23 1-5 seconds. 

Half Mile Run.— Herbert D. Hemenway, '95, 2 minutes, 27 4-5 seconds. 

220-YARDS Dash.— Stephen P. Toole, '95, 24 1-2 seconds. 

igo-Yards Dash.— Stephen P. Toole, '95, 10 4-5 seconds. 

2S-YARDS Dash. — Tie, 3 2-3 seconds. 

Hurdle Race (120 yards, 3 1-2 feet hurdles).— Alvertus J. Morse, '94, 21 seconds. 

Half Mile Walk.— Frank L. Warren, '95, 3 minutes, 56 4-5 seconds. 

Running Broad Jump. — Stephen P. Toole, '95, 18 feet. 

Standing Broad Jump.— Stephen P. Toole, '95, 9 feet, 7 mches. 

Three Standing Jumps. — Stephen P. Toole, '95, 28 feet, 7 inches. 

Running Hop, Step and Jump.— Stephen P. Toole, '95, 39 feet, 6 1-2 inches. 

Standing Hop, Step and Jump. — Joseph Baker, '93, 26 feet, 8 inches. 

Running High Jump.— Lowell Manley, '94, 5 feet, 2 inches. 

Standing High Jump.— Lowell Manley, '94, 4 feet, 4 inches. 

Backward Jump. — Frank L. Warren, '95, 6 feet, 6 inches. 

Running High Kick. — Edward L. Boardman, '94, 8 feet, 3 inches. 

Standing High Kick.— Henry B. Read, '95, 7 feet, 4 inches. 

Bicycle Race.— Lowell Manley, '94, 3 minutes, 59 3-5 seconds. 

Pole Vault. — Lowell Manley, '94, 8 feet, 6 inches. 

Putting Shot (16 lb.).— Perley E. Davis, '94, 32 feet, 6 inches. 

Throwing Hammer (16 lb.) Perley E. Davis, '94, 65 feet 10 inches. 

Throwing Base Ball. — Walter J. Curley, '96, 312 feet. 

Batule Board High Jump.— Walter J. Curley, '96, 6 feet, 8 inches. 

84 



Practical ^.ti^Uticss. 



Vtv HE Class of '95, visiting the market gardens and other places of interest in 
[ the suburbs of Boston, were royally entertained at the house of one of 
the Trustees of the College. At the end of the banquet the notice, 
" Three mi7mtes to catch the train,'' was received, and the class adjourned some- 
what hastily as follows ; — 

" Three minutes to catch the train in," 
Cried the trustee, cried the women, 
Cried we all with terror stricken ; 
Cried and sprang up from the table. 
Like unto the arrow pointed. 
That from bow is swift directed ; 
Like unto the nimble full-back 
When the ball is passed unto him. 
Swift we sprang out through the doorway, 
With our grips and coat tails flying, 
With umbrellas left behind us, 
With a ten-course dinner in us. 
Stopped outside upon the gravel. 
Stopped and gave a sturdy class-yell. 
Then away to where the railroad 
Stretches out his serpent fingers. 
And the hors^ of iron standing 
Ready to be off and going, 
Down the long hillside we thundered. 
Thundered on and stopped for nothing. 
As the storm comes down the valley. 
As the herds of deer and bison 
Rush across the mountain passes. 
So we rushed and thundered onward. 
Swifter than the blazing comet, 
Swifter than the eagle's winging, 

85 



When the prey is down beneath him, 
Was our course, held straightway onward. 
Shrank the women, frightened, backwards, 
Shrank the children, shrank the maidens, 
As, our headlong course pursuing, 
Down we sped with nought retarding. 
Frightened citizens on the corners 
Stopped, aghast, and looked upon us ; 
Stopped, then turned away, affrighted. 
Thinking we had lost our senses. 
Thinking we had come from Danvers, 
Just escaped from some asylum, 
Stopped and called for the policeman. 
But we got there just in time to 
Catch the train for Woodlawn Station. 

Thus the quiet town of Newton 
Was invaded by the Juniors, 
Was invaded, then she trembled, 
But 'twas naught to make her tremble. 
But not all the gallant Juniors 
Came unto the railroad station. 
Some there were who stopped to tarry, 
Some the ice-cream stopped to finish ; 
These were left of course behind us. 
Left within old, quiet Newton. 
Then we came on back to " Aggie," 
Back upon the iron roadway, 
Back to work and daily routine. 
But while sands of time are flowing 
Ne'er shall that run be forgotten. 
And we ne'er shall see man running. 
Running to the railroad station, 
Rushing on to make connection, 
But that we will think of Newton ; 
Think of trustee, think of women. 
Think of running to the station. 
In the glancing sun of Autumn, 
In the suburbs of old Boston, 
In the quiet town of Newton. 



86 




'^i^nni'^ IV^s^^ociati^tt. 



OFFICERS. 

President, IIallev M. Fowler. 
Secretary and Treasurer. Arthur B. Smith. 

Directors. 

Tmkod(jrk S. Bacon. J. Elton Grk.knk. Thomas r. Folkv. 



College Champion. 

Allkn M. Nowkll. 
87 



^> 




P^W A$00]cmti0n* 



OFFICERS. 

President, Samuel F. Howard. Secretary-Treasurer, William C. Brown. 

Manager, Charles W. Crehore. 



Directors. 

Henry J. Fowler. James L. Marshall. Elisha A. Bagg. 




OFFICERS. 



President. 

A. C. CURTIS. 



Secretary and Treasurer. 

W. A. ROOT. 



C. P. LOUXSBURY 



DIRECTORS. 



H. H. ROPER. 



D. C. POTTER. 



Cilj^^niiti^^ Cront ^ ^xiit^i}nxnn^^ ^ot^e l^^ook. 



AGRICULTURE. Lectures by 

aENTLEMEN you will please take careful notes of these lectures. Lecturing 
students is somewhat new to me, though I have spoken much on the stage. 
Agriculture is founded on the sciences of Geology and Chemistry, The 
composition of air is Oxygen 20.96 per cent Nitrogen 79.00 per cent and Carbolic 
Acid 0.04 per cent. The Carbolic Acid is most used up by vegetation, but the 
rain brings it down. 

There are three theories about the earth, Tvr^/ that the earth is a solid crust, 
with a molten interior. Secomi thsit it is solid clear through, and 77«'r^that it is 
all solid, with a belt of molten strata all around it. The earth must be solid or 
it would fly all to pieces, and the rising tides would carry the earth with it. 

The earth is more than 20,000,000 years old and is divided into five periods. 
The Arcadean, The Pleozoid, The Mezoid, The Cauzoid, The Quadionary and 
The Silorian. Rocks are horn blend granite and carbonacious and Divonian — 
about 400 species 100 feet thick in the middle of the country. The Arcadean 
rocks are clays and appetites, equal to phosphate of lime, and used for fertilizers 
by mixing lime with it; and it is the chief source of plant life. 

The Pleozoid time was the Silvaran age full of animal life. The Divorian age 
is called the age of fishes. The Carboniferous age rocks, are quarts grit and 
they grind it up to make mill stones. The mountain grass of Kentuckey belongs 
to this period. The Permian time, the air began to loose its acid and lizzards to 
to crawl. The Missosaric time is divided into the Triac and the Juric. The 
Cauezoic period is devided into Tersary and Quadionary. The * Guartinean 
Age had ice 6,000 feet thick and it moved south because it was melting. Fol- 
lowing came the Sham plain and the Terrce and man lived with animals in the 
mountains. Then came the iron stone and bronze age of minerals and agriculture. 

There are thirteen elements that plants must have in order to reproduce. The 
earth is being exhausted of nutriment ; one hectare of land receives annually 37.5 
kilogram Chloids of Sodium, 1.8 kilo Chloids of Cardimon, 7.2 kilo Chloids of 
Potassium, 2.5 kilo Chloids of Magenta 8.4 Sulfate of Solomon and 6.2 Lime. 

I did'nt get all, nor undustand any of it. 

* He said these rocks were amorphus, but he couldnt explain what that was, and said we need 'nt write it. 

90 



31lean 3liUn! 



Professor M. "There are ten thousand acres of celery in Michigan." 
Sully (with a tired expression ). " Do they use machines to bank it ? " 

Professor W. " If you are ready now, Mr. Hemenway, we will listen to you." 
Hemenway. " I'm not ready yet. My answer is six ten-millionths out of the 

waj^" 
FRESH^L\x (to Prof. M.). " I can't mount this specimen ; the petals are very 

deliquescent." 
Morse, '95 (defining function). " Function is the duty of an organ." 
Professor. " A pipe organ or a reed organ ? " 
Morse. " I guess it's a melodeon." 

Professor. " Does the salt come from the ocean, Mr. Read, or the ocean come 

from the salt ? " 
Read, '95. " The ocean comes from the salt." 

TsuDA. " What is this cribbing ? " 

Stevens, '95. " It is biting the desk." 

TsuDA. " Ah, ha ! I don't think anybody in my class does it." 

Morse, '95 (outside recitation room door). " Prexy hasn't called on me for 

three days." 
Prexy (suddenly appearing). " I'll try and get you to-morrow." 

Professor W. (in physics). " If you were on one end of the rope what would 

the tension be, Mr. Boardman ? " 
BoARDMAN. " About one hundred and eighty-six pounds." 

Morse, '95. " I wouldn't be seen cribbing." 

Burrinoton. " Hemenway spends the least time between the College and the 

Boarding Club, and Brown, '94, the most." ' 
Professor, "Are the nitrates generally applied soluble or insoluble, Mr, 

Burgess ? " 
Buk(;kss (waking up, emphatically). "Yes, sir." 

9' 



Professor. " Man can never fly till he becomes an angel." 

Professor Brooks (to Leavens). " Excuse me, I've been laboring under the 
impression that you were a Freshman ; but you are Professor of English 
Babson, are you not ? " 

Professor Mills. " That was a good square bolt your class got on me to-day. 
I was off my trolley." 

Hammer rooms at Mrs. Baker's. During an evening pillow fight Hammar 
throws his room-mate out of bed upon the floor. Mrs. Baker, hearing the 
noise, comes to the stairway. 
Mrs. Baker. " Aren't you making a good deal of noise, Mr. Hammar ? " 
Hammar. " Yes'm. I just dropped my Webster's Dictionary on the floor." 

Lewis, just starting for the World's Fair, is approached by Keith, who grasps 
him by the hand and says earnestly : " Good-bye, Lewis. God bless you. 
Look out for those d d Anarchists." 

Professor Stone. " What is grafting ? " 

Barry. " It is cutting the tree open to let the air out." 

Professor Stone. " What is morphology ? " 
Goessmann. " The study of moths and butterflies." 

Professor M. " What do market gardeners build fences for ? " 
Rawson. " To lean shutters up against." 

Lieutenant (to Bagg, '97). " You walk like an old cow." 

Barry. " Say, can you bolt if you want to ? " 

Lieutenant (to J. Jones). " You have three unexcused absences. What are 

your excuses ? " 
Jones. " I haven't had time to make up any." 

Lieutenant (in drawing room, temperature 43° above). " Are your hands cold? " 

J. Jones. " Yes, sir." 

Lieutenant. " Mine aint." 

J. Jones. " I know it. You've got yours in your pocket." 

Prexy. "Well, if I'm here, I'll be here." 

92 



lee QLinb. 



Leader. 

George A. Billings. 

Business Manager. 

Frank E. De Luce. 



Samuel F. Howard. 



First Tenor. 



George D. Leavens. 



Theodore S. I^acon. 



Second Tenor. 



George A. Billings. 



Arthur B. Smith. 



First Bass. 



Elisha a. Bagg. 



Frank E. De Luce. 



Second Bass. 



George R. Mansfield. 



94 




Leader. 

George A. Billings. 

First Tenor. 

George D. Leavens. Allen M. Nowell. 

Second Tenor. 

George A. Billings. Theodore S. Bacon. 



Elisha a. Bagg. 



First Bass. 



Arthur B. Smith. 



Harry E. Clark. 



Second Bass. 



George R. Mansfield. 



97 




OFFICERS. 

President, Theodore S. Bacon. 
Secretary-Treasurer, Claude F. Walker. 

Theodore S. Bacon. Frederick L. Greene. Ira C. Greene. 

Thaddeus F. Keith. Archie H. Kirkland. 

Claude F. Walker. Daniel C. Potter. Merle E. Sellew. 

Louis M. Huntress. 



NEWSPAPERS REPRESENTED. 



New York Tribune. 

Boston Journal. 

Springfield Union. 

Boston Post. 

New Bedford Evening Journal 



Boston Globe. 
Boston Herald. 
Springfield Republican. 
Northampton Gazette. 
New England Homestead. 



Massachusetts Ploughman. 




ESTABLISHED IN 1884. 

OFFICERS. 

Horace C. Burrington, President and Business Manager. 

Halley M. Fowler, Vice-President and 2nd Director. 

Jasper Marsh, Secretary-Treasurer and jd Director. 
Alvertus J. Morse, 4t/t Director. 

Charles IT. Spaulding, jt/i Director. 

Walter L. Morsi:, 6t/i Director. 

One Hundred and Ten Members. 



99 



%nx^^riQ Ki^:gtnje^. 



Revised Version. 



ARK ! Hark ! Oh, what a lark ! 

The Sophomores going their rounds ; 
Some in rags, 
And some in tags, 

And some in ghostly gowns. 

II. 

There was a man in '97, 

His name was Robert Vaughan, 
He wanted to be in it. 

So he jumped into the pond ; 
And when he saw that he was in, 

With all his might and main. 
He grasped his hair with both his hands. 

And pulled himself out again. 

III. 

Sing a song of board bills, a pocket full of rye, 
Four and twenty hungry men tackling one big pie ; 
When the pie was opened they all began to sing (?), 
For underneath the flaky crust was not a single thin^ 

IV. 

Young Ollie Cole was a merry old soul. 
And a merry old soul was he ; 
He sent for the boys 
And he sent for the girls 
To come to his husking bee. 



V. 

Rock-a-bye, Warren dear, high in the air, 
Hang out the white flag, weather is fair. 

When the wind blows 

The whirligig goes, 
But that doesn't worry him, up in his lair. 

VI. 

The wind will blow and we shall have snow. 
And what will South College do then. 

Poor thing ? 
They'll all sally forth and go to " Old North," 
And huddle all round the coal stoves. 

Poor things. 

VII. 

Bye, baby bunting. Senior's gone a-hunting. 
For to get a sheep-skin. 
To have his full name written in. 

VIII. 

I had a little bicycle. 

With a pneumatic tire , 
I lent it to a Senior, 

Who thought he was a flyer. 
He bent it, he scratched it. 

He rode it through the mire ; 
I'll never lend my wheel again 

For any Senior's hire. 

IX. 

Hey diddle, diddle, John Hammer and fiddle ! 
I know he can play it quite well ; 

But as I go by 

I oftentimes sigh 
For the tune I never can tell. 



t^jci^je^^tra. 



Leader. 

THOMAS P. FOLEY. 

Thomas P. Foley ist Violin. 

Thomas H. Charmbury 2nd Violin, 

Halley M. Fowler Bass Viol. 

Walter B. Harper . . . Cornet. 

J, Harry Putnam Flute. 

Charles H. Higgins . Baritone. 

William C. Brown . . . Drum. 

Manager. 

HALLEY M. FOWLER. 




X O 




Leader. 

J. HARRY PUTNAM. 

Drum Major. 

PERLEY E. DAVIS. 



J. Harry Putnam . 
Walter B. Harper . 
Alexander C. Birnie . 
Charles H. Higgins 
Albert F. Burgess 
Harry H. Roper 
Percy C. Roberts 
Robert L. Farnsworth 
William C. Brown 
Fred G. Averell 
John H. Jones 



Piccolo. 

Solo B Flat Cornet. 

. B Flat Cornet 

Solo Alto. 

Tenor. 

Tuba. 

Baritone. 

Alto. 

Snare Drum. 

Bass Drum. 

Cymbals. 



'o.S 







OFFICERS. 

Presidetit, J. Harry Putnam. 

1st Vice-President, Frederick L. Greene. 2d Vice-President, Waldo L. Bemis. 

Secretary, Edward H. Henderson. 

Treasurer, Herbert D. Hjemenway. 



Cir^ss CiuU. 



OFFICERS. 

President, Ira C. Greene. 
Vice-President, Samuel F. Howard. Secretary, J. Elton Green. 

/■rt^/jwrr, Charles M. Dickinson. 

Directors. 



Thaddeus F". Keith. 

Henry B. Read. 



F'rederick B. Shaw. 
John A. Emrich. 



106 



^l^e #ttr (Bxxn. 



/ I \ HERE had been a late session of the Index Board. We left the close, hot, 

\ room, wearily groped our way, hand over hand, along the crooked balus- 
trade, down the dark stairway into the night. How refreshing was the 
cool air. The stars shone brightly, and facing the south wind, inhaling the life- 
giving oxygen, I strode aimlessly across the campus, found myself in front of 
the drill hall, iri vicinity of the artillery park, and, standing beside the southern- 
most gun, leaned languidly back against it, resting my elbows on the piece, as 
the night wind fanned my hot and aching brow. 

Few lights burned in the silent colleges, their vigorous 3'oung life was hushed in 
repose. Sounds of the night alone came to my ears ; the distant barking of a 
dog, the querulous notes of a screech-owl, and the cricket's faint, frost-burdened 
lament. From a distant bell sounded twelve slow, quivering strokes — they died 
away. Another bell, differently toned and nearer, solemnly sounded its refrain — 
and was silent. Then, from the spire above me, slowly, but with oppressive weight 
and distinctness, twelve measured, musical strokes, as if in corroboration, told 
the mystic hour of midnight. The great waves of sound, turned back by Mt. 
Pleasant, rolled like a deluge over the westward valley, and as the last faint 
reverberations ceased, I was startled by a low, deep, hollow voice, close beside 
me, saying, " Republics are ungrateful." 

I turned with a start, but, with eyes now grown accustomed to the darkness, 
could discern no living thing. Meanwhile, the strange voice, such as never came 
from human larynx, continued, " Old, infirm, superannuated, am I ? Not abreast 
of the times ! Well, to ingratitude and neglect I've not grown calloused, at least." 
The sound, as I have said, was low and deep ; it was not spoken, it issued, like 
the murmur from a sea-shell, a continuous stream without accent, pause, or inflex- 
ion ; a deep, hollow roar, in which, however, words shaped themselves distinctly, 
unmistakably, sententiously, sometimes sharply, like pictures in a flame. I looked, 
listened intently, bent low over the old gun, and, in defiance of reason, was soon 
convinced that from its brazen, blackened, throat came the mysterious sounds. 

Superstitious fears I have always treated with ridicule and contempt, but down 
deep in all our natures there are inconsistencies of which we ourselves are 
scarcely aware till some extraordinary mental upheaval brings them to light, and, 
in spite of ourselves, the flesh will creep and the breath come quicker. 

107 



I recovered myself, at least in part, and listened, not without awe, as the mono- 
logue went on : " I've been distinguished for beauty and efficiency, petted, loved, 
feared. A single service I once performed deserves from the country everlasting 
regard, yet here I've been stationed for years, a nameless, old Napoleon gun ; toy 
for an awkward squad of college Sophomores. Even for this ignoble duty I'm now 
deemed unfit, and am ruthlessly doomed to banishment and oblivion. Did my 
retirement indicate the cessation of warfare, the end of bloodshed, the advent of 
universal peace, I'd joyfully withdraw, and merge my identity in some monument 
to heroism or humanity; but, no, they just change me off for some prim, new-fangled 
breech-loader, untried and unreliable, probably more dangerous to friends than foes. 

" I've been tried and not found wanting. Though scarred with service, smooth- 
ness and polish gone, tougher fibre than mine does not exist ; and I'm not old, 
January 5, 1863, at the Watervliet Arsenal I first saw the light. I joined the 
Army of the Potomac, and for two long years duty's call ever found me in the 
wild forefront of a giant time, my voice always heard for the true and the right. 
Now I'm forgotten and friendless ; the boys who knew and loved me sleep in 
nameless graves on Southern battlefields. I recall them now, brave fellows and 
true, they fell in the swamps of the Chickahominy, at Malvern's Hill, Manassas, 
Centreville, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville. On 
this disastrous field an act of mine changed the course of history. 

" In a narrow road of the dense woods, with horses hitched up, we patiently 
waited, six of us, comrades tried, a battery unattached, commanded by Lieut. 
Frank B. Crosby, Co. F., 3d U. S. Artillery. The sun declined, the rumble of 
battle away on our right grew more distinct, nearer. Crosby, just from West 
Point, a true soldier, but a mere boy, could endure it no longer ; the bugle called 
' to horse,' and we moved rapidly toward the sound of conflict. 

"Across a small clearing drifted in wildest confusion the broken masses of an 
army, men, horses, wagons, mules, hopelessly disorganized and fear stricken — 
a stampede. General Pleasonton, with a regiment of cavalry, was trying to clear 
ground for his battery. Our horses at full run, we dashed through the fugitives ; 
and Crosby, saluting, reported in a voice heard above the tumult, ' General, I have 
a battery of six guns ! Where shall I go ? What shall I do ? ' 

" 'Take position at once on Captain Martin's right.' 

" In three minutes we were ready for action, while General Pleasonton, with his 
cavalry, cleared space and succeeded in placing in line ten more guns — an Ohio 
battery. Staff officers passed the word, ' Be cool, self-possessed, aim low, make 
every shot tell' I was double shotted with canister, and so pointed, my projectiles 

loS 



would strike the ground a hundred yards to the front, midway to edge of the thick 
wood, from which we expected the enemy ; then, in the gathering darkness, we 
silently waited the attack. 

" In the gloom of the forest, at foot of the hill, a strong force deployed and 
appeared forming for assault ; but, as they carried several U. S. flags, — captured 
from the 12th Corps, — General Pleasonton, turning to a staff officer, said, ' Major 
Thompson, ride out there and see who those people are.' It was Stonewall Jack- 
son's entire corps, Pender's Brigade in advance. They had routed the right wing 
of our army, and were sweeping victoriously down our entire line. As the 
mounted officer approached, their front delivered its fire with telling effect. My 
sergeant went down, and number one threw up the rammer and fell against my 
wheel, the bullet that shattered his arm making the deep dent in my muzzle. 
Then, with their well-known yell, the enemy's dense columns charged toward us. 

" Fire ! from General Pleasonton's bugle, and twenty-two of us, held in leash, 
belched forth an avalanche of iron. Continued it, as the boys plied us shrapnell 
and canister. The earth trembled ; the clearing filled with our dense sulphurous 
breath ; while the darkness, settling over the forest, was illumined by our incessant 
fire ; and over all rose our chorus, one unbroken, deafening roar. Again and again 
the enemy, in heavy masses, vainly strove to carry the hill. Flesh and blood 
could not withstand that storm of iron ; their battalions sank beneath it. Then 
our fire slackened, ceased. 

" The forest below was mown and splintered ; the hillside plowed, torn, and 
heaped with mutilated forms of men. The enemy's victorious march was stayed, 
and the Army of the Potomac saved. 

" While the fire was hottest, one of my shrapnells burst in a group of the 
enemy's officers ; four went down ; one, pierced with three bullets, was Stonewall 
Jackson, the Right Arm of the Confederacy. Friends said he was struck by 
bullets from his own men, and, doubtless, they thought so ; but in that chaos of 
thunder, darkness, and death, human eyes availed not. My knowledge is not of 
the senses, and no untruth passeth my lips." 

High above me from the chapel tower rang out a single stroke, heavy, sudden, 
startling almost as a signal gun, and all was silence. The soliloquy, if such it 
was, had ceased ; and, thoroughly roused from my intense absorption in this old 
picture of the time when the Nation's fate trembled in the balance, yet pondering 
deeply the strange revelation, I turned my steps toward the now dark and silent 
dormitories, realizing the necessity of a few minutes' sleep, and a few hours' 
study before the morrow's exam. 

109 



^lOigie Wii^^ 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Claude F. Walker, Editor-i)i-Chief. 
George H. Merwin, Business Manager. 

Theodore S. Bacon. Thaddeus F. Keith. 

Frederick L. Greene. Thomas P. Foley. 

Robert A. Cooley. Clarence B. Lane. 

Ralph L. Hayward. 



®i^t^^ axxl^ Sojcijei^ Ij^nhlxicnix^xx^. 



THE INDEX. 

Published annually by the Junior Class. 
Volume XXVI. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

C/ass of Ninety-Six. 

Frank L. Clapp, Editor-in-CJiief. Patrick A. Leamy, Business Manager. 

Erford W. Poole, Artist. 

Horace C. Burrington. William L. Pentecost. 

Ralph L. Hay ward. Harry H. Roper. 



THE CYCLE. 

Published annually by the D. G. K. Fraternity. 

Q. T. V. QUARTERLY. 

I'uhlished quarterly by the Q. T. V. Fraternity. 

"3 



l^attaU^n ©rj^atti^^ation. 



CLARK CADETS. 

Commandant. 

Lieutenant Walter M. Dickinson, 17th Infantry, U. S. A. 

Commissioned Staff. 

First Lieutenant and Adjutant Horace P, Smead. 

First Lieutenant and Quartermaster Linus H. Bacon. 

First Lieutenant and Fire Marshal Charles L. Brown. 

Non=Commissioned Staff. 

Sergeant Major '. • Edile H. Clark. 

Quartermaster Sergeant Thomas P. Foley. 

Color Sergeant Henry B. Read. 

Color Corporal George A. Billings. 

Color Corporal • Waldo L. Bemis. 

BAND. 

First Lieutenant and Band Leader Joseph H. Putnam. 

Drum Major Perley E. Davis. 

First Sergeant . William C. Brown. 

COnPANlES. 

Captain, Company A George H. Merwin. 

Captain, Company D Theodore S. Bacon. 

Captain, Company B • John E. Gifford. 

Captain, Company C Arthur C. Curtis. 

First Lieuttnant, Company A Archie H. Kirkland. 

First Lieutenant, <Zovcv^zxvjV) LowELL Manley. 

First Lieutenant, Company B Samuel F. Howard. 

First Lieutenant, Company C Ralph E. Smith. 



114 



Second Lidiitciia lit, Comi't'a.wy A Charles H. Spaulding. 

Second Lieutena /it, Compa.ny D Alvertus J. Morse. 

Second Lieutenant, Company B Halley M. Fowler. 

Second Lieutenant, Com-p3iXvy C Elliot T. Dickinson. 

First Sergeant, CompSiny A Robert A. Cooley. 

First Sergeant, Company D Frank L. Warren. 

First Sergeant, Company B ........ Herbert S. Fairbanks. 

First Se?-geant, ComY)2Lny C Henry A. Ballou. 

Sergeant, Company B Charles W. Crehore. 

Sergeant, Company B Morris J. Sullivan. 

Sergeant, Company A Robert S. Jones. 

Sergeant, Company A Jasper Marsh. 

Sergeajit, Company D Walter L. Morse. 

Sergeant, Company D Clarence B. Lane_ 

Sergeant, Company C Wright A. Root. 

Sergeant, Company C . . Harold L. Frost. 



Corporal, 
Corporal, 
Corporal, 
Corporal, 
Corporal, 
Corporal, 
Corporal, 
Corporal, 
Corporal, 
Corporal, 
Corporal, 
Corporal, 
Corporal, 
Corporal, 
Corporal, 
Corporal, 



Company A , 
Company C 
Company C . 
Company B 
Company D . 
Company li . 
Company A - 
Company B , 
Company D 
Company A 
Company D 
Company C . 
Company B , 
Company A . 
Company C , 
Company D , 



Stephen P. Toole. 

Frederick C. Tobey. 

Arthur B. Smith. 

. Shiro Kuroda. 

Harry E. Clark. 

Edward H. Henderson. 

Herbert D. Hemenway. 

Charles M. Dickinson. 

. Edward A. White. 

Newton Shultis. 

Horace C. Burrington. 

Frank L. Claim-. 

. Patrick A. Leamey. 

Frank E. DeLuce. 

Skijiro Saito. 

. Harry T. 1'',I)WArds. 



"S 



Inotriita. 



Written for Index by E. C. Howard, '93. 



/TV HROUGH memory's haze, 'mid cares and toils of life, 
\ When trials thicken, and a grim despair 
Flanks all our ways, darkens all our skies. 
Our thoughts turn back to scenes we used to share 
In A/ma Mater's walls, where loyal hearts 
Their words of kindly cheer so freely gave, 
And, like a ray of sunshine through the clouds, 
Dispel the gloom, — our paths with radiance pave. 

Though years have ilitted since those happy days 
We spent, surrounded by our college mates, 
Our hearts are still as loyal, true, and warm 
As in the olden time, when kindlier fates 
Decree that we should battle hard for fame 
And honor, though within a narrower sphere. 
Forgetting self in pride for Aggie's name, 
Which greater sacrifice made still more dear. 

And when the 'Rah, 'Rah, 'Rah comes floating down 

In triumph, from the fields where sturdy men 

Are struggling fresher laurels to attain. 

It makes our care-worn hearts grow young again. 

And long once more to enter on the strife. 

And lift the old Maroon and White on high ; 

To lead another rousing, thundering cheer, 

And crov/n the day with glorious victory. 

ii6 



Or, milder scenes come tiocking fast to mind. 
When gathered round the chapel steps we'd sing ; 
Or, on the corner 'neath old South College tower, 
Our jests would make the air with laughter ring. 
The field, where stirring words of sharp command 
Roused in our bosoms all the patriot's love 
Of country, while the glittering stars and stripes, 
Like clouds in summer, floated far above. 



Though swiftly fleeting time still hastens on, 
And bears us farther still from boyhood's days, 
Yet memory brightens with the rolling years. 
And puts within our hearts new songs of praise. 
We'll raise our voices high as in past days. 
And this our watchword evermore shall be. 
Oh, Aggie ! as our thoughts far backward fly 
Through life, For God, for Country, and for Thee. 




117 



ui:itatx0tTS^. 



Professor (to G. E. Smith). "What would suit you best, brown or red ? " 
Smith. " Red, in my case." 

Professor. "Wliat is the size of the male of the Trichina Spiralis ? " 
Fowler (H. J.). " I don't know." 
Professor. " Of the female ? " 
Fowler. " About the same." 

Leamey (in '96 class meeting). " If the pictures don't come sooner, they will 
come earlier." 

Professor Mills. " Is Mr. Stevens here ? " 

Henderson. " He's coming." 

Professor. " That reminds me of the old saying, ' So's Christmas.' " 

Barclay (to Prof. Babson). " Where are you going to room ? " 
Babson. " I'm one of the instructors in this institution." 

Lieutenant. " What is meant by the charge of a cannon ? " 
Hammar. " The following up in pursuit of the enemy by the men in charge of 
the cannon." 

Professor (in surveying). "Which is the highest side of the instrument, Mr. 

Brown ? " 
Brown, '95. "That lowest side, over there." 

Lieutenant (on drill, to guide of company). " Take a short step, Mr. Manley ; 
there are lots of short legs here." 

Lieutenant. " Tell Mr. Sellew to carry that base drum himself. We'll have 
to be getting somebody to carry him pretty soon." 

Professor Mills tells the class how he used personal motive to get into the 
House of Commons. 

118 



Professor. " If the process of cooling goes on the water and atmosphere will 
become solidified and solid rock.'' 

Professor. " His address was changed quite recently, but this is his recent 
address." 

Professor. " How many spaces of cream make a pound of butter ? " 
Hammar. " Six and one-quarter." 
Professor. " No ; six and one-fourth." 

Dickinson, '95. "When I go to Milwaukee I don't have any colds." 
Professor. " The best thing for you to do is to go to Milwaukee." 

Professor. " Don't go to sleep in the class room, you might take cold without 
extra clothing." 

Stevens (to Burgess, who has been sick). " Are you going to recitations, 

to-morrow ? " 
Burgess, " Yes.'' 
Stevens. '' I had hoped that you were not, so that 1 might stay out and take 

care of you." 

Dickinson, '95. " If you blindfold a person, he can't tell the difference between 
an onion and an apple." 

Professor Stone's watchword. — " Steady-there-Gibbs." 

Lieutenant. " What are successive formations." 

Hemenway. " It is where companies come into line successfully." 

Professor. " I don't think the nose was made to take snuff in, if it was it would 
have been put on the other side up." 

Professor Stonk (to boys who are snapping matches). " That's enough of 
that, boys ; better save your brimstone for the other world." 

LiEU'iENANT (to White, E. D., just entering class room stamping), " Is this 

Mr. Howard or Mr. Higgins ? " 
Wnrn:. '-Neither; it's Mr. White." 
Lieutenant. " I should think it was all three." 

Professor Brooks. "One water is as wet as another." 

119 



0oU 0£ JHctmtniUxatt. 



MAXIMILLIAN I. 



CHAPTER I. 

I. Maximilliaii gathers with the scribes and elders. 

3. Cliaracter of Maximillian. 

5. The character of tlie Sophomorites. 

6. The Sopliomorites plan to deceive Maximillian. 
ID. Sopliomorites sing praises. 

15. They speak of the ten silver talents. 

16. Maximillian is deceived. 

17. His conceit. 

1. Behold it came to pass 011 a certain 
day in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred 
and ninety-two, a young man, who was called 
Maximillian, gathered daily with the scribes 
and people. 

2. Now Ma.ximillian was of the tribe of 
the Freshites who were sojourners in the 
land of Emasee. 

3. And he was a just man and righteous 
in his own conceit, but he had this little 
shortcoming. 

4. And this fault, which is called conceit, 
worketh destruction to him which possesseth 
it. 

5. Now, when the morning was come, a 
great band of Sophomorites, who were pub- 
licans and sinners, gathered upon the high- 
way and byway of the land. 

6. And there came also upon the high- 
ways men of the tribe of Seniorites and of 
the tribes of Juniorites. 

7. And behold the men of the tribe of 
Sophomorites gathered themselves together 
and whispered among themselves. 

8. And they rejoiced thereat with exceed- 
ing great joy, but their joy was hidden. 

9. And it came to pass, as Maximillian 
approached the gates of the Temple they 
raised their voices and saluted him, saying: 

10. Hear, O ye Seniorites! Give ear, O 



ye Juniorites ! We will sing unto Maximil- 
lian ; we sing praises unto Maximillian the 
Fresh ite. 

11. And Maximillian understood them 
not, and marveled greatly within himself. 

12. And again they opened their mouths, 
and spake unto him, saying : 

13. Behold wisdom is justified in her peo- 
ple, but the fool worketh his own destruction. 
Hail, Maximillian ! 

14. But Maximillian understanding them 
not, spake unto them, saying: I know not 
whereof ye speak. 

15. And they said unto him: Behold to- 
day thou art honored in the land. To-day 
thou art awarded ten silver talents for thy 
wisdom and thy knowledge of the flowers of 
the field. Hail, Maximillian ! 

16. And again they said unto him : Go 
thou straightway unto the house of Samuel 
the professor, and receive the ten talents 
awarded thee. For they were deceitful men 
and sought his humiliation. 

17. Then was Maximillian's heart swollen 
with pride, and conceit sat with his soul. 

18. And he was much puffed up; and he 
went his way and spake not to the men of 
any tribe. 

CHAPTER II. 



Maximillian goeth to the house of Samuel. 

He is followed by the Sophomorites. 

He is entertained by the wife of Samuel. 

Samuel enters. 

Maximillian demands the talents. 

Samuel's surprise. 

Light comes to Samuel. 

His advice. 

Maximillian goeth away. 

The glee of the Sophomorites. 



1. And behold when evening was come 
about the seventh hour he went to the Mount 
of the Vineyard. 

2. For the house of Samuel, the professor, 
who was a wise man and a ruler in the land, 
was upon the jSIount of the Vineyard. 

3. And certain of the tribe of the Sopho- 
morites, seeing him, followed him afar off. 

4. And he went straightway unto the 
house of Samuel and knocked upon the door 
thereof. For Samuel was a judge in the land 
and knew all things concerning the flowers 
of the field. 

5. And the door was opened unto him 
and he entered therein. 

6. And behold the men of the tribes of 
the Sophomorites who had followed him 
came nigh unto the house of Samuel and 
sought after him and saw him enter therein. 

7. And they went their way and reported 
all things unto the men of their tribe, and 
unto the tribe of Seniorites, and to the tribe 
of Juniorites, and unto the tribe of Freshites. 

8. Now, Samuel the wise man was not in 
the house, for he was farther up in the 
Mount of the Vineyard, among the fruit trees 
and the grape vines. For he would watch 
the fruit. 

9. But the wife of Samuel received the 
young man kindly, and bade him sit. 

10. And she spake to him concerning 
many things, and entertained him. 

11. Now Samuel's daughter was also in 
the room. 

12. But Maximillian answered only yea 
and nay, for his thoughts were upon the ten 
silver talents. 

13. And it came to pass that Samuel en- 
tered the house and sat, and spake to his guest 
concerning the weather and many things. 

14. But Ma.ximillian was silent, and mar- 
veled much within himself. 

15. For he expected that Samuel would 
soon produce the ten silver talents. 

16. But .Samuel spake only of the crops 
and other things. 

17. Now Samuel was sometimes called 
.Samuel, and sometimes he was called I'ro- 
fessor, but in general he was called Pro- 
fessor. 



18. And after a little time Maximillian 
raised his voice and spake unto Samuel, say- 
ing: 

19. Professor, I have come for the ten 
silver talents. 

20. But Samuel was much bewildered and 
marveled greatly. 

21. And he answered him, saying : I know 
not whereof you speak. 

22. And again Maximillian spake unto 
him, saying : 

23. I have come for the ten silver talents 
that have been awarded me for my wisdom 
and my knowledge of the lilies of thy field 
and the flowers thereof. 

24. And again Samuel said unto him : Ver- 
ily, verily, I know nothing about this matter. 

25. And he questioned Maximillian and 
learned from whom he had received the word. 

26. And when he had heard that the men 
of the tribe of Sophomorites had given the 
word to Maximillian, he was filled with un- 
derstanding. 

27. And light came into his soul and 
again he answered Maximillian, saying: 

28. Go thy way with care, brother Ma.xi- 
millian. Happy is thy lot if the men of the 
tribe of Sophomorites have not seen ye enter 
here. 

29. But if they have seen thee come nigh 
unto my house, thy ways will be hard and thy 
paths thorny in the land. 

30. Straightway go thju out this back 
way, brother Maximillian ; be thou careful 
of thy speech. 

31. And Maximillian's heart was hum- 
bled, and he went his way sadly. 

32. But the men of the tribe of Sopho- 
morites published the matter unto all the land 
and unto the corners of the earth, and unto 
the four winds thereof. 

33. And this was the manner of tlieir 
speech : 

34. liehold wisdom is justified in her peo- 
ple, but the fool worketh his own destruction. 

Moral : The seeds of Sophomoric 
delusion germinate only in the fertile 
"•rounds of egotism and conceit. 




■ijlA, nJLi.Qa.jiJf. 











^ er ciK'^Liie-, 



1 1 Li 



/^?^ii,^v^y 



3^V^,,:f^i;'''^^ 






n\_^vtM.d-(Ul 'VIA 9,^1" ' 




(^ - 

/./S.VJ^ 




uKencement 



Pr0jp[rcttnnxje. 



SHTUI^DjRY, JUriE 17. 



GRINNELL PRIZE EXAMINATION, 

At 8. 10 p. M. 



SUNDAY, JUJSLE 18. 



BACCALAUREATE SERMON, 

By Rev. Chas. S. Walker, Ph. D., 

Professor of Mental Science, 

At 10.45 ^- '^• 



ADDRESS BEFORE THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

By Rev. A. E. Dunning, of Boston, 

At 8 p. M. 



JWIOr^DAY, JUJNLE 19. 

FLINT PRIZE SPEAKING, 
At 3.30 P. M. 

George H. Merwin The Decadence of Our Nation. 

Archie H. Kirkland Crises and Character. 

Elias D. White Our Duty to the Freedman. 

Claude F. Walker John Ericsson. 

Fred G. Averell Fanaticism in History. 

Arthur C. Curtis . . . . . . • Responsibility of the American Citizen. 

124 



WESTERN ALUMNI PRIZE SPEAKING, 

At 8 p. M. 

FresJiDicu. 

Salome Sastre Crime its Own Detector. 

Horace C. Burrington Charles Sumner. 

Frank L. Clapp The Heroism of Horatio Nelson. 

Patrick A. Leamev The Tomb of Washington. 

Sophomores. 

Stephen P. Toole Assault on Wagner. 

Shiro Kuroda The Gladiator. 

Thomas P. Foley The Amnesty of Jefferson Davis. 

E. Hale Clark The Chariot Race. 



TUESDAY, JUJME 20. 



TRUSTEE MEETING. 
P. S. K. ANNIVERSARY EXERCISES, 

At ID A. ^L 



MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON EXPERIMENT DEPARTMENT, 

At Office of Hatch Experiment Station, 

At 11.30 A. M. 



ALUMNI DINNER, 

At I I'. M. 



CLASS DAY I':XEKCISES, 
At 2 V. M. 



125 



READING OF MILITARY ESSAYS. PRESENTING OF MILITARY DIPLOMAS, 

In Stone Chapel, at 4.30 p. m. 
By Governor Russell. 



DRESS PARADE, BATTALION DRILL, SABRE DRILL, 

At 5.30 p. M. 



PRESIDENT'S RECEPTION, 

At 8 p. M. 



SENIOR PROMENADE, 

At 9 A. M. 



WEDIMESDAY, tJUfJE 21, 
GRADUATING EXERCISES, 

At 10 A. M. 

Franklin Sherman Hoyt The Hope of Our Country. 

Francis Turner Harlow The Successful Farmer of the Future. 

Alphonso Edward Melendy A Duty Neglected. 

Fred Andrew Smith A Plea for Forestry Legislation. 

Harry James Harlow Changed Condition in New England Life. 

Francis Howard Henderson ..... Immigration into the United States. 

Luther Williams Smith The Economic Value of Highways. 

*Edwin Carleton Howard The Mission of the Agitator. 

* Representative at Boston University. 

126 



Qii^^^ IBa^. 



ORDER OF EXERCISES. 

IVY POEM C. A. Smith. 

CLASS ORATION F. H. Henderson. 

CAMPUS EXERCISES. 

CAMPUS ORATION C. A. Goodrich. 

CAMPUS POEM E. C. Howard. 

CLASS SONG. 

PIPE ORATION F. S. Hoyt. 

GROVE ORATION . . . H. F. Staples. 

PRESENTATION OF GIFTS A. E. Mei.endy. 

CLASS YELL. 

COLLEGE YELL. 

ALUMNI YELL. 
MUSIC M. A. C. IJAND. 



Ixi^ ^oem^ 



THE OAK AND IVY. 

I. 

IN Nature's quiet sylvan bowers, 
Rich carpeted with shy wild flowers, 
Near the placid basin of the brook. 
Where Psyche is so wont to look 
Over the basin's rocky brink 
At her sweet face reflected. 
Here, from all care and sorrow free, 
There grew a gnarled, old oak tree. 

II. 

Age and strength unite in glory, 

The patriarch from moss seems hoary, 

While here and there some rustic swain 

The names of some amorous twain 

Has deeply carved in the old, rough trunk, 

A youth's pledge of fidelity. 

From the dim windows, leaf-latticed. 

The silver sphere's rays are noticed. 

III. 

On high it grows in mountain air, 
With rustic beauty everywhere ; 
The tempting sward declivitous, 
The brook below harmonious ; 
While, in the valley far adown. 
The picturesque old village lies ; 
Enhancing both to scenery 
And to the old oak's finery. 

IV. 

'Neath the scabrous stock upspringing. 
To its rough coat tightly clinging, 
Far in the branches there entwine 
The slender stems of the ivy vine. 



128 



Little by little, year by year, 
It has grown in its silent way, 
Clinging to the old tree, so grand, 

As a child to its father's hand. 

******** 

IX. 
And here the maidens in their teens 
Assemble 'round like fairy queens, 
To kindle their erotic fire 
By reading to their hearts' desire 
Enchanting " Idylls of the King." 
They've changed the names of half the kine 
From "Crumpled Horn" and "Beauty Spot' 
To " Guineveve " and " Sir Lancelot." 

X. 

The city boarders from the village 
Roam the fields, and flowers pillage ; 
They find a quiet, calm delight 
To read, and meditate, and write 
Beneath the ivy and the oak. 
By none offended, offending none, 
They sit, they walk, at their own ease, 
Just pleasing self, none to displease. 

XL 

So man doth love the old oak tree, 
His symbol of hospitality ; 
And the ivy has been by men 
Chosen for his friendship's emblem. 
He's taken them from native homes 
Away from their own cooling wilds, 
To spread, 'mid city affluence. 
Their rustic beauties' influence. 

XII. 
A custom old have college men. 
To take the ivy of the glen 
And plant it as they graduate, 
Their friendship thus to propagate, 
And love for Alma Mater, too. 
So we do follow in the van ; 
To-day we plant our ivy vine, 
It Ninety-three more closely binds. 



129 



^^>\^ 




•0n0i: 31Etjen. 



-^^ e-* y^ 



QRINNELL AGRICULTURAL PRIZES. 

Fred Goff Bartlett, ist. Frank S. Hoyt 2d. 



HILL'S BOTANICAL PRIZE. 

Francis T. Harlow, ist. Henry F. Staples, 2d. 



MILITARY PRIZE ESSAYS. 

Frank S. Hoyt, ist. Eugene H. Lehnert, 2d. 



FLINT ORATORICAL PRIZES. 

Arthur C. Curtis, ist. Elias D. White, 2d. 



Thomas P. Foley, ist. 
Frank L. Clapp, ist. 



FOWLER ORATORICAL PRIZES. 

Sophomores. 



Freshmen. 



Edile H. Clark, 2d. 
Patrick A. Leamy, 2d. 



130 



•jenior IVp^p^inttn^ents^. 



Secretary, C. F. WALKER. 

CLASS DAY. 

MARSHAL Lowell Manley. 

IVY ORATION G. H. Merwin. 

IVY POEM C. F. Walker. 

CLASS ORATION J. E. Gifford. 

CAMPUS ORATION A. H. Kirkland. 

CAMPUS POEM E. D. White. 

PIPE ORATION F. G. Averell. 

CLASS SUPPER. 

TOAST MASTER A. J. Morse. 

POET H. M. Fowler. 

PROPHET R. E. Smith. 

I'ROPHET'S PROPHET C. II. Si-aulding. 

HISTORIAN A. C. Curtis. 

I. C. Greene. 



( H. J. 



END MEN 

Fowler. 



ttotation^. 



White, '95. "Ah me ! that no herb can cure the love-sick." 

Class of '94. " All the learned and authentic fellows." 

Stevens. " There 's mischief in this man." 

Pentecost. "A snapper-up of unconsidered trifles." 

GiFFORD. "A rival to sunshine." 

Poole Brothers. " Two stars keep not their motion in one sphere. 

E. H. Clark. " One omnipotent, d d, eternal noise." 

Harper. " I have a little axe of my own to grind." 

De Luce. '"T is looking down that makes me dizzy." 

Cheney. " Framed in the prodigality of nature." 

TsuDA. "With an air of perpetual apology." 

Dickinson. " He comes at the last with stealthy step, and steps within 
unseen." 

Vaughan. " Eye of newt and toe of frog. 

Wool of bat and tongue of dog ; 

In things like these does he delight, 

Hunts by day, cuts up by night." 

Hunter. "This the porcelain clay of human kind." 

Barry. " That unfeathered, two-legged thing." 

Canavan. " I 'm but a gatherer and disposer of men's stuffs." 

GiBBS. " They spare the rod, and spoil the child." 

'95 Index Board. "Though this may be play to you, it is death to us." 

132 



LEA^[V. " His words of learned length and thundering sound. 
Amaze the wondering students seated round." 

Mansfield. - For his gentleness we love him, and the magic of his singing." 

"Maud." " Cursed be he that moves my bones." 

Peters. " He wears the rose of youth upon him." 

I. H. Jones. ''Fit for the mountains and the barb'rous caves, 
Where manners ne'er were preached." 

CooLEY. "A wonderful son that can so astonish a mother? " 

Hemenwav. " So extraordinarily earnest and pretty." 

Read, '95. " A mighty runner of Philadelphia speed." 

LouNSBURY AND Spaulding. " Art not ashamed to look upon these beards ? " 

Millard. '• Our Garrick 's a salad, for in him we see 

Oil, vinegar, sugar, and saltness agree." 

Bemis and Ballou. '• Let the world wagge and take myne ease in myne 

inne." 

H. B. Read. •' He ruleth all the roost." 




xtr Bfrje^^lfman Hlxoii^t. 



IT is an ancient custom for the Freshman class to hold a jubilee at the completion 
of their first college year. At Aggie, up to 1S92, such celebration had been held 
about the college grounds, and was frequently marked by collisions between the 
classes, occasional involuntary cold baths in the fountain, and at times almost degener- 
ated into a free fight, resulting not only in much hard feeling between the classes, but 
often in serious injury to the contestants. The disturbances were not confined to the 
college grounds, but were often carried on in other parts of the town, and as there are 
large numbers of visitors in Amherst just before commencement, such riotous proceed- 
ings gave the college a bad reputation. 

When the time came for '95's Freshman night, we decided to institute a reform, and 
going to Brattleboro, Vt., we were served with an elaborate supper and had a general 
good time. Instead of the whole town waking to blood-curdling howls and war whoops, 
the night, both in Amherst and Brattleboro, was as peaceful and quiet as any other night 
in the year. 

The innovation was commended by the upper classmen, and we believe the general 
sentiment of the college is in its favor. The class of '96 wisely followed our example, 
and it is to be hoped for the well-being of the men themselves, the dignity of the college, 
and in the interest of civilization, that subsequent Freshmen may take their first degree 
as sensibly. But to '95 and '96 belongs the honor of having demonstrated that loyalty 
to college and to class may find expression in actions more creditable than those associ- 
ated with the old Freshman night. 



134 



^^^i 



^ 



]£\>ent6 of tbe ]^ear. 





HTint^r* 



Nov. 2, The '95 Index Board begins work. 

Kramer swims the brook. Blank, — blankety-blank, — blank. Dutch. 

'95~'9^ rope-pull ; '95 wins. 

Foot-ball: Springfield Training School, 18; M. A. C, 16. 

'95 takes a journey to infinity. Gets back all right. 

Election bets discharged : Spaulding takes a wheelbarrow ride around 
the campus ; Cutter starts an election beard. 
II. Republicans appear in chapel with coats turned inside out. 
17. Republicans dismount Democratic cannon. 
19, College buttons appear. 



3- 

4. 

5- 

9- 
10. 



1^,6 



Dec. 



Jan. 



29. 
I. 



20. 
20. 
26. 



Students go home to eat turkey. 
College reopens. 

It was at night, 

And 'twas not right 

These children should do so. 

They cut the tree 

And let it be, 

Now " Prexy " is their foe. 
Dam finished. 

First water flows over the dam. 
" Billy " Brown explores the bottom of the pond. 
Pyrotechnics : '94 fires wall-nuts ; Prof. W. fires '94. 
Christmas vacation. 

Opening Glee Club concert at North Hadley. 
Professor and Mrs. Maynard give a reception to '94. 
Day of prayer for colleges ; Professor Tyler addresses the students. 




137 




>|jr«T0. 



March 


4- 




lO. 




lO. 




II. 




1 1. 




i6. 




t6. 


April 


5- 




5- 




6. 



Q. T. V. reception to local Alumni. 

Professor and Mrs. Maynard's reception to '95. 

Crehore proves himself the champion guesser of '95. * 

First indoor meet of the term. 

Aggie Life Board photographed at Northampton. 14 plates broken. 

Retiring Life Board hold a banquet at Amherst House. 

Prof. Mills tells '95 how he used personal motive to get into the 

House of Commons. 
Signal Service established. 
" Maud" suspended in Chapel. 
Fast Day. It went fast enough. No college exercises. 



138 



7- Book agents invade Aggie. 20 victims. 

10. Over $300 raised for base-ball. 

12. '95 Index Board photographed at Northampton. 

14. Freshmen entertained by Professor and Mrs. Maynard. 

16. Sunday evening. White, '95, makes an amazing record on Amherst's 

Triangle. 

22. Book agents plead their case at Amherst House. 

29. Aggie's first World's Fair delegation start for Chicago. 

May 3. Juniors begin to chase insects. 

6. Hayward discovered at North Amherst walking between a girl and 
a cane. 

10. Freshman-Sophomore base-ball ; '95 wins. 

17. Field Day. '94 wins the banner, 

18. Grand Lodge Q. T. V. hold convention at Boston. 
25. At World's Fair : Ballou and Miss get lost. 

June 5, Rev. Edward Everett Hale entertained by Professor and Mrs, 
Maynard, 

6, Rev. Edward Everett Hale addresses the students in Old Chapel. 

9. Freshman class hold a class supper at Hotel Hamilton, Holyoke. 

18, Baccalaureate sermon, 

20. ci> :2 K anniversary. 

21, Graduatins: Exercises, 



'J9 




Sept. 



13 



3S^niL 



Entrance examinations. 
College opens. 

'97 " Gibbs " us many Freshmen. 

Rising applies for work of running the elevator in North College. 
Y. M. C. A. reception to Freshmen. 
Capt. Barry : " I'll ask the President if we may rush." 
Horticultural department secures a prize of $50 for excellence of vine- 
yard. 



13. Owl Club organizes. 

ig. Over $400 raised for foot-ball. 



140 



Sept. 25. Foot-ball season opens : Mt. Hermon, 26 ; Aggie, o. 

29. Freshman-Sophomore rope-pull : '96 wins. 

Oct. 6. A Freshman goes to the undertaker's to get measured for a military 
suit. 
Foot-ball : Wesleyan University, 18 ; M. A. C, 12. 
Sophomore mountain day. 

" Mille River Deestrick Skule at North Amherst." 
Prof, and Mrs. Cooley serenaded. A "howling" success. 
Foot-ball : M. A. C, 38 ; Williston, o. 
'95 te^ts a bolt on Prof. Mills. 

Owl Club find Sherman under his bed, pull him out, and pathetically 
tuck him in. 
21. Foot-ball: Yale Freshmen, 16; M. A. C, o. 
25. Glee Club and Orchestra entertained by Prof, and Mrs. Warner. 
27. Orchestra photographed. 

30. '96 Jjidex Board organize. 



IS- 
17- 

iS. 
18. 

19- 

20. 




'■I' 



3Jla'^5iitcl|ttsi^its ^^ticxxlinrbxl ^ollit^it. 



College Colors — Maroon and White. 

College Yell — Rah ! Rah ! Rah-Rah-Rah ! 

A-G-G-I-E! Rah! Rah! Rah-Rah-Rah ! 

REVIEW OF THE YEAR. 

(JjXOR many years decided improvements have been gradually going on in all 
P departments of the college, but it is doubtful if in its history there has 
been a period of such marked progressiveness as has characterized the 
past year. 

Within a few months a series of events have occurred, which are to be 
important factors in the future prosperity of the college. Among the most 
important of these was the adoption of the long desired electives, and the intro- 
duction of a new course of study, known as " the two years' course." 

These changes necessitated the appointment of assistant professors in the 
departments of Chemistry, Botany, Mathematics, English, and Agriculture. 

In introducing electives into the institution, it has been necessary to consid- 
erably change the course of study. In the four years' course the principal 
changes are : first, in the increased requirements for admission, and, second, in 
making the Senior studies elective. 

In addition to the regular course, opportunities are offered to those having 
received the degree of Bachelor of Science, for the taking up of advanced work, 
as a post-graduate course leading to the degree of Master of Science. 

The two years' course is intended for those who propose to follow agricul- 
tural pursuits, but who lack either the time or the means required for the longer 
course. 

There have been some alterations in the college buildings and grounds. The 

142 



old chapel room, so long used for prayers and college gatherings, has been fitted 
up as a chemical laboratory for the use of advanced students. 

The much needed floor has been placed ni the drill hall, and is greatly appre- 
ciated bv the students. Although the hall is noisier during drill hour than 
formerly, it is free from dust and makes a much better gymnasium. 

The sum of seventeen hundred and fifty dollars was appropriated to finish 
the dam, so that the pond is now of ample size for winter sports, and a pleasant 
feature of the college grounds. 

There has been a great change made in the Botanical buildmgs. The old 
plant house, which was becoming somewhat dilapidated, has been entirely 
remodeled, and several new buildings have been erected. Among the additions 
are the vegetable house, forcing house, workshop, and the enlargement of the 
Durfee plant house. This latter building is now considered a model glass struct- 
ure. The house is certainly well laid out, and it is an ornament to the college 
grounds. 

The blooming of the century plant was the occasion of considerable interest 
last spring. It is an unusually large plant, and is estimated to be something over 
sixty-five years old. The plant covers an area of over three hundred square feet, 
and the flower-stalk reached the height of twenty-five feet. 

A new barn is in process of erection west of the dormitories, and when com- 
pleted will be one of the finest and best equipped in the State. Near the barn 
a large dairy house will be fitted up with all the modern appliances for dairying. 
It will also contain a classroom, fully equipped with material for illustration. 

Since the funds at the disposal of the college have been increased, the dif- 
ferent departments have been greatly improved, especially by the addition of new- 
equipments. 'J'he Chemical department has received a large amount of costly 
apparatus for practical laboratory work. This addition places the department on 
a good foundation for advanced study. 

'['here have been fifteen hundred books added to the library during the past 
year, and it is rapidly becoming headciuartcrs in the State for all matters pertain- 
ing to agriculture and its various branches. New liooks are constantly being- 
received both from ]Durchase and gift. We would especially mention the gift of 
William 13. Court. This consists of over sixty volumes of the standard writers 
of fiction. It was especially appreciated, as this part of the library has not kept 
pace with the increase whicli has steadily been going on in other departments, 

111 athletics we are steadily improxing year b\' year. Some of the new feat- 

'43 



ures which have been introduced are worthy of note. Last winter, for the first 
time in the history of the association, regular athletic meets were held in the 
gymnasium every Saturday afternoon. Sharp competition was tlie rule between 
the classes to secure points : '94 and '95 were especially active. A banner was 
offered by the athletic association to the class winning the most points, both dur- 
ing the winter meets and on Field Day. The meets were well attended, and a 
good deal of interest was shown by the student body. 

The Field Day was celebrated at Hampshire Park last spring. It was a grand 
success, and we hope it is now an established custom. One thing is vet lacking 
for the best welfare of our athletic interest : that is an enclosed athletic field. A 
movement towards securing such a field has been started by Professor Brooks, 
who laid a petition before the trustees to the eft'ect that thev appropriate to the 
use of tlie college students sufficient land for an enclosed athletic field ; further, 
that permission be granted to erect a grand stand and other appropriate struct- 
ures. This petition was granted. Professor Brooks has the matter in charge, 
and we do not doubt but that he will soon have the funds necessary to go forward 
with the plan. 

The college has long been celebrated for the excellence of its Military Depart- 
ment : visitors at the college always show great interest in the military drill. 
The improvement in this department has been very noticeable the past year. Its 
success is due not merely to the work of the Commandant, but in a great degree 
to the individual efforts of the students. Military instruction is not to be found 
in every college, and it is but natural that the student body should take a certain 
pride in the excellence of this peculiar feature of our institution. 

I'he changes here noted are those which have affected most strikingly the 
welfare of our institution. Besides those mentioned there have been many minor 
changes which ha^'e aided much in the growth of the college. An}' one who 
observes the condition of our institution at the present time, cannot conclude 
otherwise than that it is making rapid progress, and that in the near future there 
will be changes which will eft'ect the college far more vitallv than those in 
the past. The number of students this year is in keeping with its general 
prosperity. 



144 



^£ifxiorx<xl^. 



/ I \ HE editorial columns of this edition of the hidex would be incomplete without 
I some mention of the assistance which we have received from our predecessors, 
the '94 Index- Board. The loyalty to class, which prevented the members of 
former Index- Boards from extending any help to their immediate successors, is a false 
one and unworthy of the name. Recognizing this fact, the '94 Index Board came for- 
ward and generously offered us their assistance. We extend to the members of the 
Board our most sincere thanks for the help which they so unhesitatingly afforded us. 
The work of getting out a publication of this kind, while to a great extent original, is 
peculiarly alike, year after year, and is work which experience simplifies remarkably. 
The mechanical parts — copying, collecting statistics, writing and answering letters, 
reading proof, etc., — all, are susceptible of arrangement and systematization, so as to 
promote more concentrated and effective action by each member of the Board. 

To our successors, then, the '96 Index Board, we extend a greeting, with an offer of 
assistance which we will fulfill by every means in our power. It is as much our wish 
that the '96 htdex may be superior to ours as it was our hope that the '95 Index should 
excel any that had preceded it. 



It is with*pride that we call the attention of the Alumni, and others interested in the 
prosperity of the college, to the increased interest which has been taken in athletics. 

We have started a system of indoor meets to be held during the winter term, and the 
Field Day of the spring has become one of the events in our college life. 

Thus far this year progress in athletic matters has been generally satisfactory, though 
in one direction fault may justlv be found; that is, with the manner in which support 
has been given to the foot-ball team ; not financially, for in this direction it has been of 
the best, but in regard to practice, to the numbers who habitually came out, or, rather, 
failed to come out, to play against the college eleven. 

To be sure, it is not very inspiring to stand up before the team when there is no chance 
of scoring; but the students should take pride enough in the College to assist the team 

MS 



in obtaining the practice, without which contests w'ith other institutions scarcely mean 
laurels for Aggie. 

Let us try this year to keep the athletic standing of the college as high as possible, 
then we shall be able to form a league with other institutions, which will be a benefit, 
not only in athletic matters, but will also materially aid in the general advancement of 
the colleofe. 



We can but deplore the necessity which compels us here to speak of the ungentle- 
manly conduct of a few of our numbers on occasions when visitors have been present 
at the College. It is always the case that a mischievous few will lead an unthinking 
majority as long as they are allowed to do so. We feel that it must be because the 
majority z> an unthinking one, that the occasions — happily but few — when ungentle- 
manly conduct was observed, have been allowed to pass without action by the student 
body. Nevertheless, the student body is to blame for any results of indifference to 
these occasions. Even if the individuals participating were the only ones injured by 
such conduct, it would still be the duty of their classmates to put a stop to it if possible; 
but when the standing of all the students and of the whole college is affected, it be- 
comes a common cause. Moreover, the students are more to blame than are any other 
parties concerned. They have the power of influence, which already controls the 
actions of the individual to a large extent, and which is irresistible when rightly used. 
Again, they are in a position to know more about these matters than the Faculty, who 
are not always present when events of this kind take place. 

Such a condition of things should be remedied. Just so long as we allow the stand- 
ing of the College, and therefore our own interests, to suffer by the actions of a heedless 
few, just so long will these impositions continue. But when we shall awake to the fact 
that by our indifference we are injuring our own reputation, then will strong and united 
action result. 



It is the general opinion of the students that such arrangements should be made in 
the Military Department as will relieve the Senior privates from all routine military 
exercises. They are now obliged to tramp around the campus, shoulder to shoulder 
with the raw recruits, participating in the dispiriting monotony engendered by three 
years' constant drill ; and is it any wonder that their bearing is characterized by a spirit- 
lessness and indifference which is but a poor example to the lower classman, and is a 
positive injury to the appearance of the battalion 1 The Senior year, always a full one, 
is now made additionally so by the advantages furnished by the new electives. Is there 
any good reason why the Senior private should not be relieved of the daily grind of drill, 
to improve these opportunities, and thus apply his energies in some more profitable 
direction ? 

146 



Doubtless our readers have discovered, perhaps with regret, that some features, 
usuallv considered essential in publications of this kind, and to which our predecessors 
have alwavs given more or less prominence, are in this volume conspicuous by absence. 
We refer to grinds on the professors. This omission was not due to inadvertence, or 
lack of ability on the part of the editors to furnish literature of this character, both tart 
and entertaining. The faculty always presents a shining mark for such target exercise. 
Their peculiarities, eccentricities, and slips of the tongue, treasured up, raised to the 
fourth power, and woven into a connected whole, make interesting reading for the 
student; and, we are free to confess, the temptation to thus add to the attractiveness of 
our book was a strong one, and that we, in a measure, yielded. But better counsels 
prevailed, and the editorial waste-basket now contains a production of this kind which, 
we honestly believe, would do credit to Charles Dudley Warner or Mark Twain. 

Each person connected with the institution, faculty or student, has individual inter- 
ests for which it is his duty to care ; but each also has, if he is worthy a place here, a 
common interest in the upbuilding of our college and the advancement of education. 
And, as in an ideal industrial system, there should be no antagonism between capital 
and labor, so in an ideal college there should be between faculty and student, not antag- 
onism, but cooperation and friendliness. Furthermore, as was suggested in last year's 
Itidex, we hope to see this feeling crystallized in a Senate of the student body, to which, 
under proper limitations, would be intrusted the details of college government; and 
while some survivals, as compulsory chapel, vi^ould doubtless be called in question, the 
necessary discipline of the institution would, in our opinion, no wise suffer thereby. 

Again, in our personal, individual intercourse with members of the faculty we expect 
to treat them as gentlemen, and be treated as gentlemen in return ; and w^e fail to see 
how, in our editorial capacity, we are warranted in saying what we should regard as dis- 
courteous or hesitate to say as individuals. And these sentiments, while precluding any 
attempt to use editorial position for unworthy ends, in no wise enjoins silence when, 
in our opinion, the college interests require us to speak. If, in the exercise of this right, 
any one suffers, we can only regret that he was in the track of progress. The college is 
for the State and the people, and the community is more than the individual. 

Now, resigning to the new color guard, '96 Index Board, the high standard we have 
tried to follow, we conjure them for the honor of Old Aggie to keep it "well advanced 
the ranks before." 

We also desire here to express our sense of obligation to the gentlemen of the Fac- 
ulty for their uniform courtesy and assistance extended to us in our labors, and we sin- 
cerely hope those labors will meet their approbation. 



147 



3E^353SitJcl;wsi:eitsi ^^txi^xxiixxvixl ©oili^jcj^e. 



ALUMNI CLUB OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

FOUNDED DECEMBER 9, 1886. INCORPORATED NOVEMBER II. 1890. 

OFFICERS FOR 1893=94. 
President. 

William C. Parker, LL. V>., 'So. 

Treasurer. 

Charles L. Flint, '8i. 

Clerk. 

Frederick H. Fowler, '87, Office, 11 Mt. Vernon Street, Boston. 

Board of Directors. 

Dr. Austin Peters, '81. Frederick G. May, '82. 

William H. Bowker, '71. 

HONORARY MEMBERS. 

His Excellency, Governor Wm. E. Russell. 
Ex-GovEKNOR John Q. A. Brackett. 
Hon. John W. Dickinson, Secretary of the State Board of Education. 
Hon. Wm. R. Sessions, Secretary of the State Board of Agricidttire. 

Henry H. Goodei.L, M. A. LL. D., President of the Massachusetts Agrictdtural College. 



OF NEW YORK. 

FOUNDED NOVEMBER 10, 1886. INCORPORATED MAY 21, 1890. 



OFFICERS. 



President. 

Mr. E. H. Libby, '74. 



Vice=President. 

Dr. Charles E. Young, 'Si. 



Secretary "Treasurer. 

Dr. John A. Cutter, '82. 



Board of Trustees. 

JosEi'H F. Barrktt, '75. John A. Cutter, '82. 

Asa W. DicKiNS(m, '72. Sankdrd D. Fooi', '78. 

Alfred W. Lublin, '84. Jcsei'H E. Root, '76. 

Samuel C. Thompson, '72. Frank G. Urner, '77- 



OFFICE OF THE CLUB. 

Address, l>r. John A. Cutter, Treasurer, l<2(|uitablc liiiilding, No. 120 IJroadway, 

New York Cilv. 



149 



3l3^e^tern B.Uttnni ^^sociation 



— OF THE- 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

ORGANIZED AT CHICAGO, NOVEMBER 14, 1890. 



OFFICERS. 



President. 

|. E. Wilder, '82. 



Vice=President. 

C. S. Plumb, '82. 



Secretary 'Treasurer. 

A. F. Shiverick, '82. 



MEMBERS. 

A. H. Lyman, '73. A. W. Spaulding, '81. 

F. W. Wood, 'jTi- ^- ^- I'lumb, '82. 

W. S. Potter, '76. A. F. Shiverick, '82. 

H. E. Stockbridge, '7^- I" ^^- Taft, '82. 

J. E. Wilder, '82. 

150 



^luntni JV^^^octation 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



OFFICERS FOR 1893=94. 

President. 

R. W. Lyman, '71. 



Vice=Presidents. 

F. C. Eldred, '73. J. Barrett, '75. 



Secretary. 

S. T. Maynard, '7-- 



Treasurer. 

CiiAS. Wellington, '73. 



Auditor. 

J. B. Pack, '82 



Executive Committee. 

J. I!. LlNDSK.Y, '83. F. S. COOLEV, '88. 



IS' 



m 



xxnxxxL 



'71. 

Allen, Gideon H., D. G. K., Journalist, 87 Union St., New Bedford. 

Bassett, Andrew L., Q. T. V., Pier 36, East River, New York City, Transfer Agent, Central 

Vermont R. R. Co. 
Birnie, William P., D. G. K., Springfield, Mass., Paper and Envelope Manufacturer. 
Bowker, William H., D. G. K., 43 Chatham St., Boston, Mass., President Bowker Fertilizer 

Company. 
Caswell, Lilley B., Athol, Mass., Civil Engineer. 
Cowles, Homer L., Amherst, Mass., Farmer. 

Ellsworth, Emory A., 7 Main St., Holyoke, Mass., Architect and Civil Engineer. 
Fisher, Jabez F., D. G. K., Fitchburg, Mass., Paymaster in Cleghorn Mills. 
Fuller, George E., address unknown. 

* Hawley, Frank W. 

* Herrick, Frederick St. C, D. G. K. 

Leonard, George, LL. B., D. G. K., Springfield, Mass., Clerk of Court. 

Lyman, Robert W., LL. B., Q. T. V., Linden St., Northampton, Mass., Registrar of Deeds. 

* Morse, James H. 

Nichols, Lewis A., D. G. K., St. Paul, Minn., 56 Hotel Barteau. 

NoRCROSS, Arthur D., D. G. K., Monson, Mass., Merchant. 

Page, Joel B., D. G. K., 366 Garden St., Hartford, Conn., Farm Superintendent. 

Richmond, Samuel H., address unknown. 

Russell, William D., D. G. K., Turner's Falls, Mass., Treasurer Montague Paper Co. 

Smead, Edwin B., 394 Park St., Hartford, Conn., Principal Watkinson's Farm School. 

Sparrow, Lewis A., 238 Market St., Brighton, Mass., Superintendent Bowker Fertilizer Works. 

Strickland, George P., D. G. K., Livingston, Mont., Machinist on N. P. R. R. 

Thompson, Edgar E., 27 Wellington St., Worcester. 

Tucker, George H., West Spring Creek, Pa., Civil Engineer. 

Ware, Willard C, 225 Middle St., Portland, Me., Manager of the Boston & Portland Cloth- 
ing Co. 

Wheeler, William, D. G. K., 89 State St., Boston, Mass., Wheeler & Parker, Contracting 
Engineers. 

Whitney, Frank LeP,, D. G. K., 2179 Washington St., Boston, Mass., Boot and Shoe Busi- 
ness. 

WooLSON, George C, Lock Drawer E., Passaic, N. J., Grower and Dealer in Hardy Herbs. 
Cions, and Plants. 

* Deceased. 



•72. 

Bell, Burleigh C, D. G. K., Sixteenth and Howard Sts., San Francisco, Cal., Druggist. 

Brett, William F., D. G. K., Danbury, Conn., Merchant. 

Clark, John W., Q. T. V., North Hadley, Mass., Farmer. 

Cowles, Frank C, Court St., Boston, Mass., Engineer and Draughtsman, with Norcross 

Bros. 
Cutter, John C, M. O. D. G. K., 406 Main St., Worcester, Mass., Dermatologist. 
* Dyer, Edward N. 

Easterbrook, Isaac H., Box 491, Webster, Mass., Farmer in Dudley, Mass. 
Fiske, Edward R., Q. T. V., 217 West Chelton Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. In the firm of Folwell 

Bros. & Co., Manufacturers. 
Fl.\gg, Chas. O., Kingston, R. I., Director R. I. State Agricultural Experiment Station. 
Grover, Rich.\rd B., Roslindale, Boston, Mass., Minister, 

Holmes, Lemuel Le B., Q. T. V., 38 North Water St., New Bedford, Mass., Lawyer. 
Kimball, Francis E., Worcester, Mass., with E. T. Smith & Co., Wholesale Grocers. 
Livermore, Russell W., LL. B., Q. T. V., Pates Roberson Co., N. C, Farmer, Merchant, 

and Manufacturer of Naval Stores. 
Mackie, George, M. D., Q. T. V., Attleboro, Mass., Physician. 
Mayn.\rd, Samuel T., Amherst, Mass., Professor of Botany and Horticulture, Mass. Agri. 

College. 
MOREY, Herbert E., 31 Exchange St., Boston, Mass., Dealer in Foreign and American Coins 

and Stamps. 
Peabody, William R., Q. T. V., 165 Walnut St., Cincinnati, O., Gen. Ticket Agent, A. T. & S. 

F. R. R. 
Salisbury, Frank B., D. G. K., Beaconsfield Diamond Fields, South Africa, Care of J. F. 

Fishmash, Graham St., Kimberly, South Africa. 
.Shaw, Elliot D., 46 Dwight St., Holyoke, Mass., Florist. 
Snow, George H., Leominster, Mass., Farmer. 

.SoMERS, Frederick M., Q. T. V., 47 Exchange Place, New York City, Journalist. 
Thompson, Samuel C, 2622 Third Ave., New York City, Civil Engineer. 
Wells, Henry, Q. T. V., 1416 F St., Washington, D. C, Manager of the Washington Hydraulic 

Press Brick Co. 
Whitney, William C, Q. T. V., Minneapolis, Minn., Architect. 

•73. 

Eldred, Frederick C, Sandwich, Mass., Farmer, and Poultry Raiser. 

Leland, Walter S., D. G. K., Concord Junction, Mass., Teacher in Massachusetts Reforma- 
tory. 
Lyman, Asahel IL, D. G. K., 427 W. River St., Mainstree, Mich., Druggist. 
Mills, George W., M. D., 24 Salem St., Medford, Mass., Physician. 

• Deceased. 



Minor, John B., Q. T. V., 127 Arch St., New Britain, Conn., Minor & Corbin, Manufacturers 

of Paper Boxes. 
Penhallow, David P., Q. T. V., Montreal, Canada, Professor of Botany and Vegetable 

Physiology, McGill University. 
Renshaw, James B., D. D., Trent, Washington, Missionary Pastor. 

Simpson, Henry B., Q. T. V., 1207 Q St., Washington, D. C, Clerk in Treasury Department. 
Wakefield, Albert T., B. A., M. D., Sheffield, Mass., Physician. 
Warner, Seth S., D. G. K., Northampton, Mass., Agent for Bowker Fertilizer Co., and Dealer 

in Agricultural Tools, etc. 
Webb, James H., LL. B., D. G. K., 69 Church St., New Haven, Conn., Ailing & Webb, 

Attorney and Councillor at Law. 
Wellington, Charles, Ph. D., D. G. K., Amherst, Mass., Associate Prof, of Chemistry at 

Mass. Agricultural College. 
Wood, Frank W., 58 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111., Civil Engineer with Illinois Central R. R. 

•74. 

Benedict, John M., M. D., D. G. K., 18 Main St., Waterbury, Conn., Physician and Surgeon. 

Blanchard, William H., Westminster, Vt., Farmer in Putney, Vt. 

Chandler, Edward P., D. G. K., Maiden, Fergus Co., Mont., Extensive Wool Grower. 

* Curtis, WoLFRED F. 

Hitchcock, Daniel G., High St., Warren, Mass., Editor and Proprietor, Warren Herald. 

HoBBS, John A., 2661.3 S. Main St., Salt Lake City, John A. Hobbs & Co., Rocky Mountain 
Dairy. 

LiBBY, Edgar H., Times Building, New York City, Treasurer and Manager of Rural Publish- 
ing Co. 

* Lyman, Henry. 

Montague, Arthur H., Granby, Mass., P. O. South Hadley, Mass., Farmer. 
Phelps, Henry L., Southampton, Mass., Farmer. 

Smith, Frank S., D, G. K., Albany, Wis., Manufacturing, Albany Woolen Wills. 
Woodman, Edward E., Danvers, Mass., E. and C. Woodman, Florists' and Garden Supplies. 
Zeller, Harry McK., 145 W. Washington St., Hagerstown, Md., Agent for Fidelity Investment 
Association. 

'75. 

Barrett, Joseph F., $ S K., 29 Beaver St., New York City, Traveling Salesman. 

Barri, John A., 13 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport, Conn., Fertilizer Manufacturing Firm of 
Chittenden, Barri & Sanderson. 

Bragg, Everett B., Q. T. V., 61 Wall St., New York City, Chemist for the Grasselli Chemical 
Co. 

Brooks, William P., $ 2 K., Amherst, Mass., Professor of Agriculture at Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College. 



154 



Bunker, Madison, D. V. S., Newton, Mass., Veterinary Surgeon. 

Callender, Thomas R., D. G. K., Northfield, Mass. 

Campbell, Frederick G., <i> S K., West Westminster, Yt., Farmer and Sheep Raiser. 

Carrith, Herhert S., D. G. K., id Beaumont St., Dorchester, Mass., Builder. 

*Clay, Jabez W., <I> S K. 

Dodge, George R., Q. T. V., Hamilton, Mass., P. O. Asbury Grove, Farmer. 

Hague, Henry, <I> - K., 527 South Bridge St., South Worcester, Mass., Clergyman. 

Harwood, Peter M., * 2 K., Walkerville, Ont,, Manager of Hiram Walker Farm. 

Knapp, Walter H., Newtonville, Mass., Florist. 

Lee, Lauren K., 1122 Raymond Ave., St. Anthony Park, St. Paul, Minn., Grain and Seed 

Commission Dealer. 
Miles, George M., Miles City, Custer Co., Mont., Hardware Merchant and Stock Raiser. 
Otis, Harry P., D. G. K., Florence, Mass., Superintendent Northampton Emery Wheel Co., 

Leeds, Mass. 
Rice, Fra.nk H., Reno, Washoe Co., Nev., Clerk with Folsom & Wells. 
SOUTHWICK, Andre A., <i> 2 K., Taunton, Mass., Superintendent Taunton State Lunatic 

Hospital. 
Winchester, John F., D. V. S., Q. T. V., 392 Haverhill St., Lawrence, Mass., Veterinarian. 

■76. 

B.A.GLEY, David A., address unknown. 

Bellamy, John, D. G. K., West Newton, Mass.. Dealer in Hardware, 27 Eliot St., Boston 

Mass. 
Chickerixg, Darius O., Enfield, Mass., Farmer. 
Duel, Charles F., Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Druggist. 
Guild, George W. M., Q. T. V., 5 St. John St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Hawley, Joseph M., D. G. K., Berlin, Wis., Banker, C. A. Mather & Co. 
Kendall, Hiram, D. G. K., Providence, R. I., Kendall Mfg. Co. 
Ladd, Thomas H., Care of Wm. Dadmun, Watertown, Mass. 
Mann, George H., Sharon, Mass., Superintendent Cotton Duck Mills. 
Martin, William E., Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Secretary Sioux Falls Candy Co., Mfg. 

Confectioners. 
McConnkl, Charles W., D. D. S., D. G. K., 170 Tremont St., Boston, Mass., Dentist. 
MacLeod, William A., B. A., LL. B., D. G. K., Exchange Building, 53 State St., Boston, Mass., 

with MacLeod, Calver & Randall. 
Parker, George A., # 2 K., Mansfield, Mass., Foreman Garden Dept., Old Colony R. R. 
Parker, Geo. L., S07 Washington St., Dorchester, Mass., Florist. 

Phelps, Charles H., 115 liroadway, New York, N. Y., Electrical Construction and Supplies. 
Porter, William H., * S K., Silver Hill, Agawam, Mass., Farmer. 
Potter, William S., D. G. K., La Fayette, Ind., Lawyer, Rice & Potter. 

R(jOT, Joseph K., M. D., F. S. Sc.,* S K., 49 Pearl St., Hartford, Conn., Physician and Surgeon. 
Sears, John M., Ashfield, Mass.. Farmer. 
• Deceased. 

'55 



Smith, Thomas E., D. G. K., West Chesterfield, Mass., Hoop Manufacturer, H. B. Smith & 

Son. 
Taft, Cyrus A., Whithisville, Mass., Agent for Whitinsville Machine Works. 
Urner, George P., D. G. K., Big Timber, Park Co., Mont., Druggist. 
Wetmore, Howard G., M. D., io East nth St., New York, N. Y., Physician. 

* Williams, John E. 

'77. 

Benson, David H., Q. T. V., North Weymouth, Mass., Analytical and Consulting Chemist, 

with Bradley Fertilizer Co. 
Brewer, Charles, Address Unknown. 
Clark, Atherton, D. G. K., 140 Tremont St., Boston, Mass., in the firm of R. H. Stearns & 

Co. 
Hibbard, Joseph R., Stoughton, Wis., Farmer. 
Howe, Waldo V., Q. T. V., 20 Broad St., Newburyport, Mass., Superintendent Anna Jacques 

Hospital. 
Nye, George E., D. G. K., 70 Exchange Building, Union Stock Yards, Chicago, 111., with Y. F. 

Swift & Co. 
Parker, Henry F., LL. B., Mills Building, 35 Wall St., New York, N. Y., Solicitor of Patents. 
Porto, Raymundo M. da S., "I" 2 K., Para, Brazil, Teacher and Planter. 

* Southmayd, John E., * S K. 

Wyman, Joseph P., 52 to 70 Blackstone St., Boston, Mass. 

'78. 

Baker, David E., f> S K., 227 Walnut St., Newtonville, Mass., Physician. 

BouTWELL, Willie L., Leverett, Mass., Farmer and Market Gardener. 

Brigham, Arthur A., ^ S K., Sapporo, Japan, Professor of Agriculture, Sapporo Agricultural 

College. 
Choate, Edward C, Q. T. V., Readville, Mass., Manager Sprague Farm, owned by H. H. 

Forbes. 

* Clark, Xenos Y., <I> S K. 

Coburn, Charles F., Q. T. V., Lowell, Mass., Associate Editor Loivcll Daily Citizen. 

Foot, Sanford D., Q. T. V., Patterson, N. J., File Manufacturer, Karney Foot Co. 

Hall, Josiah N., M. D., $ S K., 730 i6th St., Denver, Col. 

Heath, Henry G. K., LL. B., M. A., D. G. K., 54 Wall St., New York, N. Y., Attorney and 
Counselor at Law. 

Howe, Charles S., Ph. D., $ 2 K., 103 Cornell St., Cleveland, Ohio, Professor of Mathemat- 
ics, Care School of Applied Science. 

Hubbard, Henry F., Q. T. V., 94 Front St., New York, N. Y., with J. H. Catherwood & Co.» 
Tea Importers. 

Hunt, John F., Clifton, Pa., Civil Engineer. 

Lovell, Charles O., Q. T. V., Lewiston, Me., with Standard Dry Plate Co. 

* Deceased. 

156 



Lyman, Charles E., Middlefield, Conn., Farmer. 

Myrick, Lockwood, Springfield, Mass., with Compound Ido-oxygen Co. 

Osgood, Frederick H., M. R. C. V. S., Q. T. V., Professor and Surgeon, Harvard Veterinary 

School, 50 Village St., Boston, Mass. 
Spofford, Amos L., <f> S K., Georgetown, Mass., Mechanic. 
Stockbridge, Horace E., D. G. K., Fargo, N. Da., President North Dakota Agricultural 

College, and Director of Agricultural Experiment Station. 
Tuckerm.an, Frederick,. M. D., Q. T. V., Amherst Mass., Traveling in Europe. 
Washburn, John H., Ph. D., D. G. K., Kingston, R. I., President Rhode Island State 

Agricultural College. 
Woodbury, Rufus P., Q. T. V., 2118 Minnie Ave., Kansas City, Mo., Secretary of Kansas City 

Live Stock Exchange. 

•79. 

Dickinson, Richard S., D. G. K., Columbus, Platte Co., Neb., Farmer. 

Green, Samuel B., D. G. K., St. Anthony Park, Minn., Professor of Horticulture at University 

of Minnesota. 
Rudolph, Charles, LL. B., Q. T. V., 41 Sears Building, Boston, Mass., Lawyer and Real Estate 

Agent. 
Sherman, Walter A., M. D., D. V. S., D. G. K., 1S2 Central St., Lowell, Mass., Veterinary 

Surgeon. 
Smith, George P., D. G. K., Sunderland, Mass., Farmer. 

Swan, Roscoe W., M. D., D. G. K., 19 Oakdale St., Worcester, Mass., Physician. 
Waldron, Hiram E. B., Q. T. V., Jamaica Plain, with N. E. Telephone and Telegraph Co. 

•80. 

Fowler, Alvan, <I> 2 K., 137 Centre St., N. Y., Cashier, with H. B. Smith Co. 

Gladwin, Frederick E.,* 2 K., 31 State St., Portland, Ore., F. E. Gladwin Co., Typewriters. 

Lee, William G., D. G. K., 13 Elizabeth St., Birmingham, Conn., Architect. 

McQueen, Charles M., * S K., Room 4, 260 Clark St., Chicago, 111. 

Parker, William C, LL. B., * S K., 53 Tremont St., Boston, Mass., Attorney and Counselor 

at Law. 
Ripley, Ge:orge A., Q. T. V., Worcester, Mass., Traveling Salesman. 
Stone, Almon IL, Tougaloo, Miss. 

•81. 

Bowmen, Charles A., C. S. C, 3 Hamilton Place, IJoston, Mass., Civil Engineer. 
Boynton, Charles E., M. D., Buena Vista, Mexico. 

Carr, Walter F., Q. T. V., Roanoke, N. C, General Manager of Roanoke Street Railroad. 
CliAi'iN, Henky E., C. S. (J., Athens, (Jhio, Professor of Biology, at Ohio University. 
Fairfield, Frank IL, Q. T, V., 90 Warren St., New York, N. Y., Poultry Dealer. 

157 



Flint, Charles L., Q. T. V., 25 Congress St.,*Boston, Mass., Stockbroker. 

HASHlOLTCHr, BooNZO, D. G. K., Sapporo, Japan, President of Sapporo Agricultural College, 
Commissioner of Kok-kaiclo Colonial Bureau. 

Hills, Joseph L., D. G. K., King St., Burlington, Vt., Chemist of Vermont Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station. 

Howe, Elmer D., <f> S K., Marlboro, Mass., Fairview Farm. 

Peters, Austin, D. V. S., M. R. C. V. S., Q. T. V., Room 23, 35 Congress St., Boston, Mass. 

Rawson, Edward B., D. G. K., Teacher at Friends Seminary, East Sixteenth St. and Ruthef 
ford PL, New York, N. Y. 

Smith, Hiram F. M., M. D., <I> S K., Orange, Mass., Physician. 

Spalding, Abel W., C. S. C, 661 Bank of Minneapolis, Minn., Architect and Civil Engineer. 

Taylor, Frederick P., D. G. K., Athens, McMinn County, Tenn., Farmer. 

Warner, Clarence D., D. G. K., Amherst, Mass., Professor of Mathematics, Physics and 
Electricity at Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Whitaker, Arthur, D. G. K., Needham, Mass., Farmer. 

Wilcox, Henry H., D. G. K., Lihue, Kauai, H. I., Sugar Planter. 

•82. 

Allen, Francis S., M. D., D. V. S., C. S. C, 804 North Seventeenth St., Philadelphia, Pa., 

Veterinary Surgeon. 
Aplin, George T., East Putney, Vt., Farmer. 
Beach, Charles E., D. G. K., West Hartford, Conn., C. E. Beach & Co., Vine Hill and Ridge 

Farms. 
Bingham, Eugene P., C. S. C, Fairview, Orange County, Cal., Fruit Grower. 
Bishop, William H., <!> S K., Newark, Del., Professor of Agriculture at Delaware Agricultural 

College. 
Brodt, Henry S., Q. T. V., Rawlins, Wyo., with J. W. Hugus & Co. 
Chandler, Everett S., C. S. C, Harvey, Cook County, 111., Minister. 
Cooper, James W., Jr., D. G. K., Plymouth, Mass., Druggist. 
Cutter, John A., M. D., ^ 2 K., Room 47, Equitable Building, 120 Broadway, New York, 

N. Y., Physician. 
Damon, Samuel C, C. S. C, Lancaster, Mass., Brick Manufacturer. 

* Floyd, Charles W. 

Goodale, David, Q. T. V., Butte, Mont., with Colorado Smelting and Mining Co. 
Hillman, Charles D., <I> S K., Fresno City, Cal., Nurseryman and Stock Raiser. 

* Howard, Joseph H., ^ S K. 

Howe, George D., North Hadley, Mass., Seed Potato Grower. 

Kingman, Morris B., Amherst, Mass., Florist. 

Kinney, Burton A., <l> S K., Lowell, Mass., Traveling Salesman for Lowell Novelty Wire 

Works. 
May, Frederick G., <i> S K., Cedar Knoll Farm, Kendal Green, Mass. 

* Deceased. 



Morse, William A., Q. T. V., Room 12, 28 State St., Boston, Mass. 

Myrick, Herbert, 151 Bowdoin St., Springfield, Mass., Editor-in-chief of The American Agri- 
culturalist, New York and Xew England Homesteads, and Farm and Nome. 

Page, James B., D. V. S., Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Veterinary Surgeon and Professor of 
Veterinary Science at Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Perkins, Dana E., 34 Wareham St., Medford, Mass., Civil Engineer. 

Plumb, Ch.arles S., La Fayette, Ind., Director of Purdue University Agricultural Experiment 
Station and Professor of Agriculture in Purdue University. 

Shiverick, As.a F., D. G. K., Chicago, 111., with Tobey Furniture Co. 

Stone, Winthrop E., C. S. C, 501 State St., La Fayette, Ind., Professor of Chemistry at Pur- 
due University. 

Taft, Levi R., C. S. C, Lansing, Mich., Professor of Horticulture and Landscape Gardening 
at Michigan Agricultural College. 

T.AYLOR, Alfred H., D. G. K., Plainview, Neb., Manager of Plainview Butter and Cheese 
Factory. 

Thurston, Wilbur H., Selig, Adams Co., Ohio, Farmer, Surveyor, and Notary Public. 

Wilder, John E., D. G. K., 212-214 Lake St., Chicago., 111., Wholesale Leather, Wilder & Co. 

WiLLL-VMS, James S., Q. T. V., Glastonbury, Conn., Farmer. 

Windsor, Joseph L., with Geo. M. Harvey & Co., Insurance Agents, 187-1S9 LaSalle St., 
Chicago, 111. 

'83. 

Bagley, Sydney C, <I> 2 K., 35 Lynde St., Boston, Mass., Cigar Packer. 

Bishop, Edgar A., C. S. C, Talladega, Ala., Agricultural Superintendent Talladega College. 
Braune, Domingos H., D. G. K., Nova Friburgo, Province of Rio Janerio, Brazil, Planter. 
Hevia, Alfred A., <i> 2 K., 346 Broadway, New Vork, N. Y., General Agent of New York 

Insurance Co. 
Holman, Samuel M., Jr., ii Pleasant St., Attleboro, Mass. 
Lindsey, Joseph B., Ph. D., C. S. C, Amherst, Mass., Chemist at Agricultural Experiment 

Station. 
MiNorr, Charles W^, C. S. C, Westminster, Mass. 
Nourse, David O., C. S. C, Blacksburg, Va., Professor of Agriculture at Virginia Agricultural 

College. 
Preston, Charles H., D. G. K., Asylum Station, Danvers, Mass., Farmer. 
Wheeler, Homer J., Ph. D., C. S. C, Kingston, R. I., Chemist to Rhode Island Experiment 

.Station. 

•84. 

Herms, Charles, Q. T. V., 1223 Third Ave., Louisville, Ky. 

Holland, Harry D., Amherst, Mass., Hardware and Groceries, Holland & Gallond. 
Jo.NES, Elisha A., <i> S K., Experiment Station, New Brunswick, N. J. 

Smith, Llewellyn, Q. T. V., 24 Wellington St., Worcester, Mass., Traveling Salesman, 
QuinniiJJac C<j. 

159 



•85. 

Allen, Edwin W., C. S. C, Washington, D. C, Office of Experiment Stations, 1526 East St. 
Almeida, Luciano J. de, D. G. K., Agenda des Tres Barras, Bananal de Sao Paulo, Brazil, 

Planter. 
Barker, George H., M. D., Q. T. V., Surgeon on "Pensacola" of the South American 

Squadron. 
Brown, Charles W., <I> 2 K., Temple, N. H., Farmer. 

GoLDTHWAiT, Joel E., M. D., C. S. C., 719 Boylston St., Boston, Mass., Physician. 
Howell, Hezekiah, $ S K., Monroe, Orange County, N. Y., Farmer. 
*Leary, Lewis C. 
Phelps, Charles S., D. G. K., Mansfield, Conn., Professor of Agriculture and Vice-Director 

of Storrs School E.xperiment Station. 
Taylor, Isaac N., Jr., D. G. K., 277 Stevenson St., San Francisco, Cal., with Thomson 

Houston Electric Co. 
Tekirian, Benoni O., C. S. C, 272 Forty-second St. and Evans Ave., Chemist, with Y. T. 

Metzoon Co. 

'86. 

Ateshian, Osgan II., C. S. C, 172 Tremont St., Boston, Mass., Importer of Oriental Goods. 

Atkins, William H., D. G. K., Burnside, Conn., Market Gardener. 

Avers, Winfield, D. G. K., 173 Fifth Ave., New York, N. Y., Student at Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College. 

Carpenter, David F., D. G. K., Millington, Mass. 

Clapp, Charles W., C. S. C, Montague, Mass., Farmer. 

Duncan, Richard F., M. D., $ S K., Williamstown, Mass., Physician. 

Eaton, William A., D. G. K., Nyack, N. Y., Book-keeper and Salesman in I^miber Yard, foot 
of Jane St., North River, New York. 

Felt, Charles F. W., C. S. C, Box 232, Galveston, Texas, Civil Engineer of Gulf, Santa Fe 
and Colorado R. R. 

Mackintosh, Richard B., D. G. K., 30 Chestnut St., Peabody, Mass., Foreman in J. B. Thomas's 
Wool Shop. 

Sanborn, Kingsbury, i> 2 K., Lock Box 1095, Riverside, Cal., Assistant Engineer for River- 
side Water Co. 

Stone, George S., D. G. K., Otter River, Mass., Farmer. 

•87. 

Almeida, Augusto L. de, D. G. K., Agenda des Tres Barras, Bananal de Sao Paulo, Brazil, 

Planter. 
Barrett, Edward W., D. G. K., 331 Main St., Milford, Mass., Teacher. 
Cadwell, William H., D. G. K., Professor of Agriculture and Director of Experiment Station 

of Pennsylvania State College. 



160 



Carpenter, Frank B., C. S. C, Raleigh, N. C, Assistant Chemist at North Carolina Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station. 

Chase, William E., ijo^o Second St., Portland, Ore., Contractor and Builder. 

D.wis, Fred A., M. D., C. S. C, 120 Charles St., Boston, Mass., Eye and Ear Specialist. 

FiSHERDiCK, Cyrus W., C. S. C, 231 So. Eleventh St., Lincoln, Neb., Attorney at Law, Web- 
ster and Fisherdick. 

Flint, Edward R., Ph. D., Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Assistant Professor of Chemistry at 
Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Fowler, Fred H., C. S. C, Conimonwealth Building, Boston, Mass., Chief Clerk, Office of 
State Board of Agriculture. 

Howe, Clinton S., C. S. C, Marlboro, Mass., Farmer. 

Marsh, James M., C. S. C, 393 Chestnut St., Lynn, Mass., with G. E. Marsh & Co., Soap Man- 
ufacturers. 

Marshall, Charles L., D. G. K., 48 Stevens St., Lowell, Mass., Market Gardener and 
Florist. 

Meehan, Thomas F., D. G. K., 159 Green St., Jamaica Plain, Mass., Lawyer. 

Osterhout, J. Clark, Carlisle, Mass., Farmer. 

Richardson, Evan F., <i> 2 K., Millis, Mass., Farmer. 

RiDEOUT, Henry N. W., Q. T. V., 8 Howe St., Somerville, Mass., Clerk at Paymaster's Office, 
Fitchburg Railroad. 

TOLMAN, WiLLi.\M N., <l> S K., Civil Engineer, with H. M. Whitney, 39 Court St., Boston, Mass. 

Torelly, Firmino de S., D. G. K., Cidale do Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, Stock 
Raiser. 

Watson, Charles IL, Q. T. V., La Monte, Mo., Superintendent La Monte Milling Co. 

'88. 

Belden, Edward H., C. S. C, 48 New Parke St., Lynn, Mass., Electrical E.xpert, with 

Thomson-Houston Electric Co. 
Bliss, Herbert C, D. G. K., Attleboro, Mass., Traveling Salesman, with Bliss Bros. 
Brooks, Frederick K., C. S. C, 69 Washington St., Haverhill, Mass., Bookkeeper, with 

Chesley & Rugg. 
CooLEY, Fred S., 4> S K., Amherst, Mass., Assistant Professor of Agriculture at Massachusetts 

Agricultural College. 
Dickinson, Edwin H., C. S. C, North Amherst, Mass., Farmer. 
Field, Samuel H., C. S. C, Valley Farm, North Hatfield, Mass., Farmer. 
Foster, Francis H., Andover, Mass., with City Board of Survey, Boston, Mass. 
Havward, Alhkrt L, C. S. C, Ashby, Mass. 
Holt, Jonathan E.; C. S. C, Suffield, Conn., Superintendent of Farm, Grounds and Buildings 

of Connecticut Literary Institute. 
Kinney, Lorenzo F., Kingston, R. I., Horticulturist at Rhode Island E.xperiment Station, 

Professor of Botany and Horticulture. 
KnaI'P, Edward E., D. G. K., ior8 Routt Ave., Pueblo, Col. 

161 



MiSHiMA, Viscount Yataro, D. G. K., Mita Shikokumachi, Shiba, Tokio, Japan. 

Moore, Robert B., C. S. C, ii Erie St., Elizabeth, N. J., Chemist, with Bowker Fertilizer Co., 

Elizabethport. 
Newman, George E., Q. T. V., Lehi City, Utah. 
NoYES, Frank F., D. G. K., Gould Building, Atlanta, Ga., Electrical Engineer, with General 

Electrical Co. 
Parsons, Wilfred A., <l> S K., Southampton, Mass., Farmer. 
Rice, Thomas 2d., D. G. K., 1923 Broadway, Newport, R. I., Hardware Business. 
Shepardson, William M., C. S. C, Amherst, Mass., Superintendent Horticultural Department, 

Agricultural College, and Assistant Horticulturist at Hatch Experiment Station. 
Shimer, B. Luther, Q. T. V., Gilt Edge Dairy Farm, Bethlehem, Pa., Fruit Culture and 

Dairying. 

'89. 

Blair, James R., Q. T. V., 386 Tremont St., Boston, Mass., Chemist, with C. Brigham & Co. 

Copeland, Arthur D., D. G. K., Campello, Mass,, Market Gardener. 

Crocker, Charles S., D. G. K., Sunderland, Mass., Assistant Chemist at Massachusetts State 
Experiment Station. 

Davis, Franklin W., $ S K., Editorial Rooms, Boston Journal, Boston Mass. 

Hartwell, Burt L., C. S. C, Kingston, R. I., Assistant Chemist, Rhode Island Experiment 
Station. 

Hubbard, Dwight L., C. S. C, Boston," Mass., City Engineer's Office. 

Hutchings, James T., ^ S K., Thirty-first St., above Girard Ave., Philadelphia, Pa., Superin- 
tendent West End Electric Co. 

Kellogg, William A., <l> S K., Amherst, Mass. 

Miles, Arthur L., C. S. C, Westboro, Mass., Professor at Lyman School. 

North, Mark N., Q. T.V., SomerviUe, Mass , Student at Harvard Veterinary School, 50 Village 
St., Boston, Mass. 

Nourse, Arthur M., C. S. C, Mountain View, Cal., Manager of Stock Farm. 

Sellew, Robert P., $ S K., Boston, Mass., Manager of Advertising Department, New Eng- 
land Farmer. 

Whitney, Charles A., C. S. C, Upton, Mass., Farmer. 

Woodbury, Herbert E., C. S. C, Mansfield, Conn., Horticulturist at Storrs Agricultural 
School. 

•90. 

Barry, David, Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Superintendent Electric Light Works. 
Bliss, Clinton E., D. G. K., 120 W. Monroe St., Phoenix, Arizona. 
Castro, Arthur M., D. G. K., Juiz de Fora, Minas, Brazil, Planter. 
Dickinson, Dwight W., Q. T. V., Harvard Dental College, Boston, Mass. 
Felton, Truman P., C. S. C, West Berlin, Mass., Farm Superintendent. 
Gregory, Edgar, C. S. C, Danvers, Mass., at Asylum Station. 

Haskins, Henry D., Q. T. V., North Amherst, Mass., Assistant Chemist at Massachusetts 
State Experiment Station. .... 

162 



Herrero, Jose M., D. G. K., Jovellanos, Cuba. 

Jones, Charles H., Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Assistant Chemist at Massachusetts State 
Experiment Station. 

LoRi.N'G, John S., D. G. K., Shrewsbury, Mass., Farmer. 

McCloud, Albert C, Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Life and Fire Insurance Agent. 

MossMAN, Fred W., C. S. C, Westminster, Mass., with F. Lombard, Chair Manufacturer. 

Russell, He.nry L., D. G. K., Pawtucket, R. L, Ice Dealer, Disprass, Russell & Eddy. 

SiMONDS, George B., C. S. C, Ashby, Mass., Farmer. 

Smith, Frederick J., Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Assistant to Professor of Chemistry, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College. 

Howe, .Irthur N., Q. T. V., Hudson, Mass., Graystone Farm. 

Taft, Walter E., D. G. K., 14 Park St., Rutland, Vt., with Howe Scale Co. 

Taylor, Fred L., Q. T. V., Room 4, Town Hall, Brookline, Mass., Civil Engineer on Brookline 
Covered Reservoir. 

West, John S., Q. T. V., Moody's Bible School, Chicago, 111. 

Williams, Frank O., Q. T. V., Sunderland, Mass., Farmer. 

'91. 

Arnold, Frank L., Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Assistant Chemist, Massachusetts State 

Experiment Station. 
Brown, Walter A., C. S. C, Springfield, Mass., at City Engineer's Office. 
Carpenter, Malcolm A.,C. S. C, Amherst, Mass., Assistant Horticulturist, Hatch Experiment 

Station. 
Fames, Aldice G., <I> S K., Phi Sigma Kappa Lodge, Ithaca, N. V., Graduate Student in 

Letters at Cornell University. 
Felt, E. Porter, C. S. C, Fort Plain, N. Y., Clinton Liberal Institute, Teacher of Science. 
Field, Henry J., Q. T. V., 223 North Aurora St., Ithaca, N. Y., Post-graduate Student in 

Chemistry, Cornell University. 
Gay, Willard W., U. G. K., 33 Elm St., Brookline, Mass. 
Horner, Louis F., C. S. C, Cohasset, Mass. 

Howard, Henry M., C. S. C, Mt. Auburn, Mass., Market Gardener. 
Hull, Joh.n B., Jr., D. G. K., Waverly, Mass., Superintendent of Farm at School for Feeble 

Minded. 
Johnson, Charles H., I). G. K., Amherst, Mass., Assistant Chemist, Massachusetts State 

lixperiment Station. 
Lage, Oscar V. B., D. G. K., Juiz de Fora, Minas, Brazil. 
Legate, Howard N., D. G. K., Commonwealth Building, Boston, Mass., Assistant to Secretary 

of Agriculture. 
Magill, Claude A., Amherst, Mass. 

Page, Walter C, I). G. K., 14S Madison St., Chicago, 111., in Y. M. C. A. Work. 
Ruggles, Murray, C. S. C, Milton, Mass., Farmer and Superintendent of Electric Light Co. 
Sawyer, Arthur II., Q. T. V., Cromwell, Conn., Oak Grove Fruit Farm. 
Shores, Harvey T., I). G. K., Student at Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. 

.63 



•92. 

Beals, Alfred T., Q. T. V., Sanderson St., Greenfield, Mass., Florist. 

BoYNTON, Walter I., Q. T. V., Boston Dental College, Boston, Mass. 

Clark, Edward T., C. S. C, Rhine Cliff, N. Y., Farm Superintendent for Levi P. Morton. 

Crane, Henry E., C. S. C, 24 Washington St., Quincy, Mass., with Crane & Son, Grain 

Dealers. 
Deuel, James E., Q. T. V., 48 Dudley St., Boston, Mass., Clerk in Pharmacy. 
Emerson, Henry B., C. S. C, Schenectady, N. Y., with Edison General Electric Co. 
Field, Judson L., Q. T. V., 4S26 Kimbark Ave., Chicago, 111., with Marshall, Field & Co. 
Fletcher, William, C. S. C, Chelmsford, Mass. 

Graham, Charles S., C. S. C, Westboro, Mass., Instructor at Lyman School. 
Holland, Edward B., Amherst, Mass., at Massachusetts State Experiment Station. 
Hubbard, Cyrus M., Q. T. V., Sunderland, Mass., Farmer. 
Knight, Jewell B., Q. T. V., Belchertown, Mass. 
Lyman, Richard P., Q. T. V., Student at Harvard Veterinary School, 45 Mt. Vernon St., 

Boston, Mass. 
Plumb, Frank H., Q. T. V., Springfield, Mass., Assistant Agricultural and Commercial Editor, 

jVe7a England Homestead and Farm and Home. 
Rogers, Elliot, $ S K., loS Lincoln St., Boston, Mass., with Towne Manufacturing Company. 
Smith, Robert H., Amherst, Mass., at Massachusetts State Experiment Station. 
Stockbridge, Francis G., D. G. K., Northfield, Mass. 

Taylor, George E., Q. T. V., Shelburne, Mass., Farmer, P. O. Address, Greenfield. 
Thomson, Henry M., C. S. C, Amherst, Mass., Assistant Agriculturist, Hatch Experiment 

Station. 
West, Homer C, Q. T. V., Belchertown, Mass., Farmer. 
Williams, Milton H., Q. T. V., Student at Harvard Veterinary School, 50 Village St., Boston, 

Mass. 
WiLLARD, George B., <I> S K., Waltham, Mass., Druggist in Charlestown. 

•93. 

Baker, Joseph, Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Assistant on M. A. C. Farm. 

Bartlett, Fred G., D. G. K., Hadley, Mass., Farmer. 

Clark, Henry D., C. S. C, 55 Beaver Hall Hill, Montreal, Canada, Veterinary Student at 

Magill University. 
Curley, George F., C. S. C, 417 Spruce St., Philadelphia, Pa., Studying Medicine. 
Davis, Herbert C, Q. T. V., Savannah, Ga., in Wholesale Grocery Business. 
Goodrich, Charles A., D. G. K., New York City, Student at Columbia College. 
Harlow, Francis T., * 2 K., Marshfield, Mass., Farmer. 
Harlow, Harry J., D. G. K., West Boylston, Mass., Farmer. 
Hawkes, Ernest A., C. S. C, Hudson, Mass., Farmer. 
Henderson, Frank H., D. G. K., 344 Cross St., Maiden, Mass., Civil Engineer, Boston, Mass. 

164 



Howard, Edwin C, <I> 2 K., Wilbraham, Mass. 

HoYT, Franklin S., C. S. C, Bridgeton, N. J., Instructor in Mathematics and the Sciences, 

also Commandant of Cadets at West Jersey Academy. 
Lehxert, Eugene H., D. G. K., Montreal, Canada, Veterinary Student at Magill University. 
Melendy, Alphonso E., Q. T. V., Sterling, Mass., Farmer. 
Perry, John R., D. G. K., 8 Bosworth St., with Perry & Whitney. 
Smith, Cotton A., Q. T. V., 347 Crown St., New Haven, Conn., Student at Sheffield Scientific 

School. 
S.MITH, Fred A., C. S. C, Euclid Ave., Lynn, Mass., Gardener. 
Smith, Luther W., * S K., Manteno, 111., Superintendent of Highland Farm. 
Staples, Henry F., C. S. C, West Stockbridge, Mass., Principal of West Stockbridge High 

School. 
TiNOCO, Luiz A. T., D. G. K., Traveling in Europe. 
Walker, Edward J., C. S. C, Clinton, Mass., Farmer. 




i6s 



Itt JEemoriant. 



IN MEMORY OF OUR COLLEGEMATE, 

HARRY CRICCS STOCKWELL, 

JVho Died in Sutton, Oct. i8, i8gj. 



The members of the Class of Ninety-Four of the Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
feeling deeply the affliction which they have sustained in the loss of their beloved classmate, 
Harry Griggs Stockwell, desire to express to all their appreciation of his many sterling 
qualities. His genial and sunny nature, together with a pure Christian character, made him one 
who was ever devoted to the best interests of all, and endeared him to every one with whom he 
came in contact. Our association with him in the class room, on the campus, and in the various 
literary circles will ever be treasured in memory; and although he is gone from our midst, his 
life will bear fruit in an ennobling influence upon all who knew him. 

Dear as he was to us, there were others, members of the home circle, who felt his loving 

devotion far more deeply than we ever could, and to them in this time of affliction, we desire to 

express our tender and heartfelt sympathy. 

The Class of Ninety-Four, 

T. S. Bacon, ] 

A. C. Curtis, \ Co^nmittee. 
I 

J. E. GiFFORD. J 



IN MEMORY OF OUR BROTHER, 

HARRY GRIGGS STO C4-: WELL. 

Whereas, It has been the will of the Heavenly Father to take to his sheltering care our dear 
friend and brother, Harry Griggs Stockwell, and 

Whereas, We recognize in him qualities that won the respect and esteem of all. There- 
fore, be it 

Resolved, That we, the members of Aleph Chapter of the D. G. K. Fraternity, do sincerely 
mourn his loss, and be it further 

Resolved, That we extend our heartfelt sympathy to his parents in their hour of bereave- 
ment, and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the parents of our departed brother, 
and that copies also be placed on file in the Fraternity records, and be published in the Cycle 2,i\A 
in the college publication. 

H. M. Fowler, 1 Conmiittee 

Jasper Marsh, \ for 

Chas. I. Goessmann. j the Society. 

i66 



l^ijecea^eJtr. 



•71. 

Hawley, Frank W., died Oct. 27, 1883, at Belchertown, Mass. 
Herrick, Frederick St. C, died Jan. 19, 1S84, at Methuen, Mass. 
Morse, James H., died June 21, 1SS3, at Salem, Mass. 

•72. 

Dyer, Edward N., died March 17, 1891, at Holliston, Mass. 

•74. 

Curtis, Wolfred, died Nov. 8, 1878, at Westminster, Mass. 
Lyman, Henry, died Jan. 8, 1S79, ^t Middlefield, Conn. 

•75. 

Clay, Jabez W., died Oct. i, 18S0, at New York City. 

•76. 

Williams, John E., died Jan. 18, 1890, at Amherst, Mass. 

•77. 

SouTHMAYD, JoiiN E., died Dec. 11, 1878, at Minneapolis, Minn. 

'78. 

Clark, Xexos Y., died June 4, 1889, at Amherst, Mass. 

•82. 

Floyd, Charles W., died Oct. 10, 1S83, at Dorchester, Mass. 
II(jward, Joseph H., died Feb. 13, 1889, at Minnesota, Dakota. 

■ 

Leaky, Lewis C, died Ajirii 21, 1S8S, at Caml)ridge, Mass. \ 



167 



3ltarrictgje^. 



'"I chose my wife as she did her wedding gown, for qualities that would wear well.'" 
Goldsmith. 



Llewellyn Smith, '84, to Miss Isabelle B. Reeves. 



Frank S. Clark, '87, to Miss Jessie M. Rich, Dec. 2, 1892, at Lowell. 



Frank O. Williams, '90, to Miss Kathleen Roberts, Feb. 22, 1893, ^^ North Amherst 



H. P. Rogers, Ex.-'88, to Miss R. S. Davis, May 4, 1893, ^^ Allston. 



F. S. Cooley, ''?&, to Miss Grace C. Smith, Oct. 4, at Ashfield. 



G. E. Taylor, '92, to Miss Lila Harrington, Sept. 27, 1893, ^^ North Amherst. 



A. W. Lublin, Ex. '84, to Mrs. Patterson, New York City. 



U. S. Miles, '89, to Miss Marie A. Putnam, Aug. 15, 1893, ^^ Westboro. 



Contjs^nt-s* 



PAGE. 



Dedication 3 

Prologue 4 

Introdlction 7 

Calendar 

Organization ok College 9-' 5 

Meeting of Index Board 16-18 

The Classes '9-52 

From Mt. Pleasant . . • 53-54 

Secret Fraternities . . - 55-^3 

The Rifle's Lament 64-65 

An Autumn Leaf 

College Associations , . . . . 67-89 

Gleanings from a Freshman's Note-Book 9° 

Mean Fun 91-92 

Cluhs 93-106 

The Old Gun 107-109 

Aggie Life "°-"- 

Class and Society Puhlications "3 

The B.-vitalion 114-11S 

Lnoijlita 116-117 

Cinders "^-"9 

Book of Ma.ximili.ian 

Bulletin Board " . 

co.mmencement exercises i23-i3o 

Senior Aim-ointments '3' 

QuoTATi.ms '32-133 

Freshman Nighi '34 

Events <.f Year '35-Mi 

Review 01 Tin. Veak 142-144 

Editorials i45->47 

Alumni Statistics '48-168 

169 



120-121 



i: 



" Here may we rest, our labors done, 
Others now speed the signal on." 



/ I \ HE contributions which follow are an important, a necessary, feature of 
-L our little volume. They are made by gentlemen who are not only 
friends of the college, and so desirous of giving highest character to its annual, 
but they are men who would be pleased to make the personal acquaintance 
of all our readers, and, if possible, effect with them some mutually advan- 
tageous business relations. We would, therefore, suggest to our students 
especially, that not only does one good turn deserve another, but that careful 
perusal of these communications will be likely to result in their pecuniary 
well-being. The business standing of our advertisers renders superHuous any 
indorsement of ours, but we will say we believe them to be of that class of 
men who as truly praise the Lord in measuring corn as in singing " Glory, 
hallelujah ! " 

Now, casting off the editorial mantle, which we have worn with varying 
degrees of self-satisfaction, grace, and dignity, we will merely add : A fact 
never apologizes to anybody. 



CHAS. NEUHAUS & CO. Trusses, Jibdoniiiial Supporters, 

Baqdages, Elastic StocKinSS- 

Manufacturers of 



SuvGical, 2)ental, anb 

— ®rtbopa^blcaI IFnstruments. 

shoulder Braces, Crutches, S^o North Ezitaiv Street, near Franklin, 

Hrid All fippliar\ces for Deforrqities. BacuxiivioRE, md. 

The Eagle Publishing Company. 



PETERSBURGH, N. Y. UTICA, N. Y. OBERLIN, 0. URBANA, 0. 



Ma7iy students pay their way through college by 
traveling during vacation for our House 



ADDRESS THE OFFICE NEAREST YOU. 



-A 



p'^OR PHOTOGRAPHS 



GO TO 



C. R. KENFIELD. 

Views of College and Vicinity for Sale. All Work Warranted First=Class. 

DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS. 

STUDIO ON SPRING ST., AMHERST, MASS. 



Si 






GLYNN THE TAILOR 



V^tt^Ci 



CM 



IVill Continue to Display a 



UOT OF Sfly^ 



-.^^ 



leaning and Repairing a Q.pecialty 
^^ V ^ — y 



DRESS SUITS TO t^EflT. 



5peeial ^tteQtioi) Oiuei) to /T\ilitary 5'Ji'^s. 



Hiehmond Straight Gat fo. 1 

Are made from the brightest, most delicately 

flavored, and highest cost GOLD LEAF 

grown in Virginia. 

T/i/s /s the OLD AXD ORIGINAL BRAND OF STRAIGHT CUT CIGARETTES, 
iiid TC'trs broitglit cut by us in t/ie year /Sy_^. 

BEJl^ARE of imitations, and observe that the firm name as below is on every package. 

ALLEN & GINTER— THE AMERICAN TOBACCO COMPANY, Successor, 




RICHMOND, VA. 



MANUFACTURER. 



Webster's International 
Didlionary 

The Ne-w "Unabridged." 



Ten years were spent in revising, a numerous staff 
of editors being employed, and more tlian $300,000 
expended in tlie preparation of tlie work before the 
first copy was printed. 

Abreast of the Times 

A Orand Family Educator 

A tribrary in Itself 

The "International" is invaluable in the household, 
in the schoolroom, and to the teacher, scholar, profes- 
sional man, and self-educator. 



Ask your Bookseller to sliow it to you. 

Gc & C. Merriam Co., Puljlisliers, 
Spriiigrfield, 9Iass. 

i^~Sencl for free prospectus containing specimen pages, illustra- 
tions, testimonials, and full pavticulais. 

i®~ Do not buy cheap photographic reprints of the "Webster of 1847. 
They are tar behind the times. 



WEBSTER'S 

, INTERNATIONAL J 

DICTIONARY 



H. o. pea: 



/III 



^^ /Ifccrcbant tCailor 



AMHERST HOUSE ANNEX, 
A]VIHHHST, JVIASS. 



. . . E. D. IVIARSH . . 



Makes a Spccia//y of 
I ^v^ • Stiiih-iifs'' Fiiniiture, 

uraimFP ano i :r;r ^ 

^-^ Desks, \]'i)idinv Shades, 

M^ Pielure Frames, Cord, etc., 

.1/ Loioest Prices. 






SAVE FREIGHT AND CARTAGE. SAVE MONEY BY PURCHASING HERE. 



Scbillare 

Photographer and Crayon Artist. 

Also Headquarters for Group and Large Work. 

©am©® "MBMrn & mWM(BtM%'WWo 
Satisfaction Guaranteed to All. We carry a Fine Line of Frames and Mouldings. Also Amateur Supplies. 



(2J\matear ©yv'offt c^o^e ooitfi (©are af^t) promptaeil)/i>. 



3NropiTia:-A.is/Ei=»TOisr, 3VE-A-SS. 



HENRY ADAMS, P^af. D. 

Apothecary, 

1 COOK'S BLOCK, ANIHERST, IVlASS. 

OaUGS, mEDlClHES, PERFOinERY, TOILET HHTICLES. 

Park & Tilford's Cigars, Imported Cigarettes and Smoking Tobaccos. 
KISHINO TACKLK. 



|-| EADQUARTERS for Sporting Goods, Powder, Shot, Primers, and 

Qun Wads, Metallic and Paper Shells, Metallic Cartridges. 



Siinday and itiglit calls responded to at residejice, first door west of Amherst House Annex. 




M. ABBOTT FRAZAR, 
nfaxidern^ist, 



And Dealer in 



NATURALISTS' SUPPLIES AND SPECIMENS, 



Sheet Cork, Insect Pins, Nets, Botanists' Materials, and everything 
IN general required by Collecting Naturalists. 



Send 5-cent stamp for 78-page illustrated catalogue to 

93 SUDBURY STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 




S. K. MERRITT, 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 




... [fV ai'c the auf/ion'2cd ma)n(facfi(rcrs of flic . . . 

Q. T. V. FRATERNITY PINS 

Any letter addressed as above will receive prompt attention. 



m 



iiiU 



T\ 






pi 



ui 






m 



T) 






riakes a business of keeping what the " Aggie Boys" 
want in the way of footwear . 

Fmi Pitimt Liithii-i 

and RELIABLE 

iall lai Baii-Ball 



ALWAYS ON HAND. 



Keep in the gang, and come to 
the right place. 



JAMES E. STINS0N. 



G. H. SANDE)RSON & GO. 



Mn% 



if 



'^tjTj 



%. 



WE ALWAYS HAVE A COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF 

Ready-made: Gi^othinc, Magkintoshi^s, Sweaters. 



THE LATEST STYLES IN HATS AND CAPS, GLOVES AND MITTENS. 



WE ALSO MAKE CLOTHING TO ORDER. 

Suiis, $ij to $40. Overcoats, $10 to $jo. Trousers, $j to $10. 



C. H. SANDERSON & CO., AMHERST, MASS. 



Q HARLES DEU E L , 



SYi") 



raarsrlst Bind Clhiemlst< 



(^t^ 



HUYLER'S CANDIES, 



Fresh anl Fine. 



Imported and Domestic Cigars, 
Fancy and Toilet Articles, 
Sponges, Brushes, etc. 



Amherst HoMse Drimg' Stor 



AMHERST, MASS 



mmwsT k ei*i3 



DEALERS IN 



HATS, CAPS, BAGS, and VALISES. 

HUNT'S block: and AMHERST HOUSE. 



IVc a/iL'aj's have the latest styles in the Nczv )'ork and />oston nnirkets. 



YOUMAN AND DUNLAP HATS ALWAYS IN STOCK. AGENTS FOR COLLEGE LAUNDRY. 




rug 




CHies 




TOILET GOODS, FANCY ARTICLES, and PERFUMERY, ( cJ 1 • 
CHOICE CONFECTIONERY AT LOWEST PRICES, 
BEST ICE-CREAM AND SODA WATER, 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS, 

TOBACCO AND SMOKERS' SUPPLIES. 



- - Srex^cripfionx^ a ^peciaPfu - - 

AT 

MORGAN'S PHARMACY, 
Order Coal Here. 6 phcenix row. 



LE & 



ONLY FIRST-CLflSS WORK DONE, RT MODERHTE PRICES. 



iJinixii'^ino' ^or (aKinateury. 



143 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



/Bb 



assacbusetts Hgricultural Colleoe, 

AMHERST, MASS. 



Botanical Department, 

We -would ir[forrr\ tt\e frierids of tt|e College aqd tl\e public gerierally tl\at -We 
l\aVe a licqited supply of 

FRUIT AND ORNAHENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS. 
52 SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, all true to name. 
CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS at lowest prices. 

For Trees, Plar\t3, Slirubs, Flo-Wers, arid Srriall Fruits, address 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD, Amherst, Mass. 



ynVassacbusetts Hgticultural CoUeoe. 

AT THE COLLEGE FARIvl WE HAVE 

Percheron Horses and Southdown Sheep 

And we beg to announce that we usually have 
a surplus stock of these breeds for sale at reason° 
able prices. For information address 

^VM. r. BROOKS, . . ATrLlLe.vst, Mass. 



HERBERT D. HEMENWAY, 



DKALER IN 



students' Supp//^^ 

FOUNTAIN PENS, NOTE-BOOKS, STATIONERY, WHITE GLOYES, ETC., ETC., 

ALSO AGENT FOR WASHING. 

21 North College, = = = = = M:. A. C. 

i BICYCLES i 



OLD WHEELS MADE OVER 

WITH PNEUMATIC TIRE 



Neiv and Second- Hand s^Vj J-^IW 1 Wl^L^W i^yj 



Bicycle Sundries, Pumps, Spokes, Balls, Cork Handles, 

Tire Cement, etc., too numerous to mention. 

No. 13 Phoknix Row, 

' AMHERST, MASS. 



A. X. PETIT, 



TEACHER OF 



ID /^ N C I N <3 



Residence^ Corner East Pleasant and Triangle Streets, 
Hall, Cook'' s Block. 

CLASSES FOR M. A. C. MEN. ALSO PRIVATE LESSONS WHEN DESIRED. 



XXll 



>TUDENTS' 
SUPPU 



H. J. FOWLER, 



College Agent for 

YALE FOUNTAIN PEN. 



Note Books, Fountain Pens, Gum Paper, White Gloves, College Buttons, 
College Paper, A No. 1 Confectionery, Lunch Cookies, etc. 

13 SOUTH COI^LEGE. 



DW^IGHT IVLOORE, 






61) 



i 



a-z^'ioz^^. 



3 PHCENIX ROW (upstairs), AMHERST, MASS. 

FINE LINE OF CIGARS. 



Bffspepsia 



Dr. Ephrai.m Batemax, CedarviUe, N. J., says of 

HOKSFORD'S ACID PHOSPHATE, 

" I have u.sed it for several years, not only in my practice, but in my own individual 
case, and consider it under all circumstances one of the best nerve tonics that we 
possess. For mental exiiaustion or overwork it gives renewed strength and vigor to 
the entire system. 

A most excellent and agreeable tonic and appetizer. It nourisiies and invigorates 
the tired brain and body, imparts renewed energy and vitality, and enlivens the functions. 
Descriptive pamphlet free on application to Rumford Chemical Works, Providence, R. I. 
|{«"\v;ii-<' of Substitutes and liiiitatioiis. 
FOR SALE BY ALL DRUGGISTS. 



M. N. SPEAR, 
.useUef, Stationer, ^^^sc^e., 

*^ AMHERST, MASS. ^^. 



Paper Hangings and Borders, Toys, Fancy Goods, Cutlery. 



AGENT FOR RUBBER STAIifPS. 



SECOND-HAND TEXT-BOOKS BOUGHT AND SOLD. 



K. B. DICKINSON, D. D. S, 



OFFICE HOURS : 
9 TO 12 A. M. 

1.30 TO 5 P. M. 




GAS AND ETHER 
ADMINISTERED WHEN 
DESIRED. 



WILLIAMS BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



, COUCH ^ 

Have tl:\e best assortrqer\t of 



FRUITS, NUTS, BISCUIT, LUNCH and SANDWICH MEATS, SARDINES, 
JELLIES, JAMS, and KEROSENE OIL 



In AMHERST. 



Our Prices are at Rock=bottom. 



GIVE US A TRIAL. 



THE FISK TEACHERS AGENCIES. 

EVERETT 0. FISK & CO., Proprietors. 

President, EVERETT O. FISK, No. 4 Ashburton Place, Boston, Mass. 



Managers. 

W. B. HERRICK, 4 Ashburton Place, Boston, Mass. 

H. E. CROCKER, 70 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

B. F. CLARK, 106 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

W. O. McTAGGART, 32 Church Street, Toronto, Can. 

I. C. HICKS, I32y„ First Street, Portland, Ore. 

C. C. BOYNTON, 1201/2 South Spring Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

HARRINGTON & rREEMAN 

Watehes, Diamonds, SilveruiaFe, Optieal Goods, 

59 Court Street, near Cornhill, 

l. t. harrington. boston. geo. t. freeman. 



" P 



Ti^AILORS 




34t8 Washington Street, Boston. 

GEORGE A. HARDY. GEO. E. RODMAN. 

P^IIVEER & am: END, .... Established .851. 

Miinii/actiircrs and I>n/>orters of 

i'oj, 2()Y , 2()g cr^ 2// Third .Ivonic, cor))cr of iSlIi .SV., NEW YORK. 

Finest Bohemian and German Glassware, Royal Berlin and Meissen Porcelain. 
Purest Hammered Platinum, Balances and Weights, Zeiss Microscopes, and Bacteriological Appa- 
ratus, Chemically Pure Acids, and Assay Goods. 




GEORGE TYLER & G0. 

Agricultural Implements, 

WINDMILLS, PUMPS, TANKS, PIPE, 
VEHICLES, HARNESS. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE OF GOODS THAT INTEREST YOU. 

43 & 45 South Market Street, Boston, Mass. 



T. W- SLOAN,/ ^->- 



in 



LRDIES' HND m^ 

GENTLEMEN'S _2] 

See our Reliable Goods, which are 
warranted to give satisfaction. 



%§9ii 



7i\ 



%l%i 



Special attention paid to 
REPAIRING. 



2 PHCENIX ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



FOR FINE GOODS AND PROMPT REPAIRING 

GO TO 

RENNETT thee JEWELL! 



First Door from Post Office AMHERST, MASS. 

O. JD. nmsiT, 

RETAIL DEALER IN 

Coal and Wood of All Kinds 

AL80 

FIRE INSURANCE AGENT 

Office in Himfs Block AMHERST, MASS. 



H 



OLLAND & GALLOND, 



DEALERS I.N 



Paints and Oils, 



V 



J 



AMHERST, MASS. 



AMLHERST COLLEQE . . 



/ 



H. A. UTLEY, 
Manager. 



■Si 
Si 



AGGIE AGENCY with 

C. L. BROWN, '94. 



§o-Operatiue Steam l^aupdry apd 



<$arpel: F{e90uati9(5 ^Stabli5f7mc9l:. 



V 



Office at Amherst House Annex. 



Work taken Monday, delivered Thursday ; taken Thursday, delivered Saturday. {Satisfaction Guaranteed.) 



NEW 

AND 

SECOND-HAND 



^tudents' 

^"^ Furniture t:>esHs, Ql^alrs, Carpets, 

I^ij^s, Drap(^rie5, Jables, ete. 

. . DEALER IN . . 

I^ounges, Cot Beds, and Window Sents. 

ALL KINDS OF UPHOLSTERING AND REPAIRING NEATLY AND PROMPTLY DONE BY 
KELLOCC'S BLOCK, ... - AMHERST, MASS. 



BOUGHT 

AND 
SOLD 



THE NORTH BRITISH AND IHERCflHTlLE INSDRflUCE CO., Of LORdOR and EdiljDurgH, 
THE PPENIX IHSORflNCE COmPHNY, Of London, and 

THE GOPimERClHL UNIOH HSSURHIiGE GOmPflNY, Of LoijdOIl, 

Give Sound and Reliable hisurance^ and Pay Every Honest Claim %vhen due. 
E. A. THOMAS, Agent, 5 Cook's Block, Amherst. 



Ibair dressing IRoomsr 



SUPPLIES ALWAYS ON HAND, RAZORS HONED. 

JOSEPH PARISEAU, Proprietor, Amherst, Mass. 



CARPENTER & MOREHOUSE, 

^ and Job Prlr^i 



rst, flasso 

C. S. GATES, E. N. BROWN, D. D.S., 

• deHtists • 

ETHER AND NITROUS OXIDE ADMINISTERED WHEN DESIRED. 

°""=%"rm.= to 5 p. m. Cutler's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



THE BANISTSR GARL,©Y GO. 

q)c)^^K Statioriery^ and ^Xews ^^oom. 

SPORTING GOODS. ARTISTS' MATERIALS. 

WRITING PAPER BY THE POUND. ENGRAVING NEATLY DONE. 

FOUNTAIN PENS A SPECIALTY. 

170 jnHlfl STt^EHT, TiORTHJUVIPTOri, JVIflSS. 

KRANK C. PIvXJlVIB, IbaiV 

^^ Dressing 

RAZORS CONCAVED AND HONED o«-\i^ IlxUv'lllO* 

IN SHORT ORDER. 



0X^0. ^ Thcenix T{ow (tipsfairs), zAmherst, {Mass. 



/lib 



ercbant John Doherty 

^^ailOC* ^^^ always on hand a 

(^S) First=Class Line of 

Gcwd Work at Moderate Prices. Fashionable Qoods. 



SPECIAL A-TTENTION GIVEN TO CLEANING, PRESSING, AND REPAIRING. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

KELLOGG & STEBBINS, 

tademits' Smppllles, 



DEALERS IN 




1^. 



Fancy Groceries, Bv^^^^)/J 

Crockery, WJiiS^^^ 

Cigars, Cigarettes, Tobacco, 
Fruits, 



GOODS DELIVERED AD COLLEGE. 



Confectionery, 

Lamp Goods, and ■: j 3 Doors South of Post Office, 

Kerosene Oil. Amherst, Mass. 



Hacks to and from All Trains. 

T. L. PAIGE, Proprietor. 



Livery, Feed, 
and Sale Stable. 



Tally-ho, Hacks, Barge, D ouble and Single Teams, furnished at short notice . 
Careful Drivers. APvl HERST, NlASS. Fair Prices. 

'Pvcrvtliing hi the Music Line, such as 

% Pianos £i2d Organs ^J 

Rented or Sold 

Violins, Banjos and Guitars, Sheet Music, Strings, etc., can be obtained of 

F. M. CUSHMAN, Amherst and Northampton. 



llVERY ANB FEED STABLE. 



GEORGE M. CHAMBERLAIN, Proprietor. 



TO LET AT 

FAIR PRICES. 



Hacks, Carryalls, 

Double and Single Teams, 



Accommodations for Transient Feeding. Barge for use of Small Faj-ties. 

Rear of Phoenix: Row, Amherst, IVIass. 



Moments Bxcbange. 

HOME=MADE FOOD OF ALL KINDS. ICE=CREAM AND CAKE. 

PRICES FOR FANCY CRACKERS VERY REASONABLE. 



Orders taken for Seiving and Af ending. 
AMHERST HOUSE ANNEX 



THIRD DOOR. 



(^HARLES G. AYRES, 

Ljvery .^stable. 



PLEASANT STREET, 



Sing/c Teams To Let at Fair Prices. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



G. S. KENDRICK 



DEALER IN 



PROVISIONS, MEAT, 
FISH, OYSTERS, 
'^Z^ FRUIT, GAME, ETC. L^S^SSJ 



Amhei^sf, Afass 



D. A. HOWE 






WHOLESALE DEALER IN FINE . 



g) npesis and Coff 




ALSO JOBBER IN ALL 



Fancy Groceries, Canned Goods, Extracts, Baking Powder, Preserves, &c. 



Hotels, Restaurants and Boarding Houses 

Will find it to their advantage to consult us when ptirchasing. 



NEW ENGLAND TEA GO,, 273 Main St,, WorGESTER, Mass. 







Residence, Cor. Pleasant and McClellan Streets, 



J. L. LOVELL % 



1850 



1893 



AMHERST, MASS. 



f 






■m^M^M