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AUG 13 197S 

UNiV. Or wi.',o^. 
ARCHIVES 




^/Pt I 




f </ r 



The INDEX 



^An Annual published by the 
junior Class of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College ^ 




AMHERST : MASSACHUSETTS 

DECEMBER : NINETEEN 

HUNDRED l3 FIVE 



igoj 



VOLUME XXXVII 



Press of The F. a. Bassette Company 
Springfield, Massachusetts 



GREETING 



CFRIEN DS, ONCE 
MORE WE PLACE 
BEFORE YOU THIS 
NARRATIVE OF AN- 
OTHER YEAR OF 
LIFE AND ACTIVITY 
AT MASS'CHUSETTS, 
WITH THE SUGGES- 
TION THAT 'TT IS 
BY OUR WORKS AND 
NOT BY OUR WORDS 
WE WOULD BE 
JUDGED. "( ?) 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/index1907univ 



Dedication 



To him whom we honored as a soldier, respected as an instructor, 

and esteemed as a sincere friend : Major John Anderson, 

U. S. A., this book is respectfully dedicated 

by the Class of 1907 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Major John Anderson 

UNITED STATES ARMY 



l^'^EW years ago I was asked by one of our great newspapers 
to give it my definition of true patriotism. I wrote to the 
paper as follows: 

" I put the question to a Grand Army comrade of 
mine, and his answer was: ' To be willing to give all you 
have, all that you are, and all that you expect to be, for 
the sake of your country.' This man served with distinguished gallantry 
as a volunteer officer in the War of the Rebellion, devoted the next thirty 
years of his life to active dut}' in the regular army, and upon his retirement 
settled down in a Massachusetts town, not to rust, like an old fieldpiece, 
but to become the useful and influential citizen which his service, experi- 
ence and intelligence fit him to be, I regard him as a true patriot, and am 
glad to adopt his definition of true patriotism." 

The man to whom I referred was Major (then Captain) John Anderson, 
and it is with genuine pleasure that I respond to the request of the editor 
of the Index for a brief sketch of his life. 

He was bom in Monson, Massachusetts, sixty-five years ago. If, how- 
ever, it be true that we live in deeds, not years, he is as old as Methuselah. 
His boyhood and youth were like that of any other hearty, healthy country 
boy, full of pranks which need not be recounted here. I think he has 
always, even as a member of a college faculty, sympathized openly or 
secretly with good-natured mischief makers. His military record shows 
that at the age of twenty-two he enlisted as a p)rivate in the First Michigan 
Sharpshooters, January 5, 1863, and served until February 9, 1864. On 
February i, 1864, he was commissioned a second lieutenant in the 5 7th 
Massachusetts Infantry, one of the most famous of the fighting regiments 
of the Civil War. In the battle of Petersburg crater, July 30, 1865, he 
received a severe shell wound, and was discharged for disability, January 



U) THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 

I, 1865. (Jn the 2 5tli of March of the same year he became second Heuten- 
ant, 20th Veteran Reserve Corps ; was breveted first Heutenant and captain, 
U. S. v., for gallant and meritorious services in the battles before Peters- 
burg, Virginia, and was mustered out of the volunteer service June 30, 
1866. On the loth of August, 1867, he entered the regular army as a 
second lieutenant in the 25th Infantry; was transferred to the i8th Infan- 
try, April 26, 1869; promoted first lieutenant, October 17, 1878; regimental 
quartermaster, November 16, 1889; captain, June 21, 1890, and retired 
with that rank, June 6, 1894. Two years ago he was promoted to the 
grade of major, under an act of Congress. 

Some ten years ago, with an officer of the 57th Massachusetts, I was 
looking through a collection of photographs of his brother officers of that 
regiment. On the back of each photograph he had written a word or two 
epitomizing the character of the original ; and on the back of Anderson's 
picture was the single word "sandy." As patriotism and public spirit 
characterized him as a citizen, so did what we call sand characterize him 
as a soldier. During the battle of the Wilderness, when his own regiment^ 
bravely but unwisely standing up before the fire of the enemy, was almost 
swept away, he seized a gun and joined the regiment nearest at hand, 
which happened to be my own, the 36th Massachusetts, where he gallantly 
fought in the ranks. For a short period during the campaign he served 
as an aide on the staff of the brigade commander, of whose soldierly qual- 
ities the major never seemed to be wholly enamoured. In the terrible 
struggle at the crater at Petersburg on the 30th of July, 1864, he was 
severely wounded in the arm by a shell, which created the disability for 
which he was discharged from active service five months later. 

In the regular army he saw much service on the plains among the 
Indians, and was specially honored with the command of a company of 
mounted Indian scouts. This service was not only dangerous but full of 
hardship — conditions under which his "sandy" quality was always con- 
spicuous. A brother officer of his in the i8th Infantry once told me how, 
starting off suddenly in the midst of a blizzard to check an Indian foray, 
the first sergeant of the company was half sick and very blue, and the men 
themselves seemed to share his feelings. Anderson, who was really ill and 
unfit for duty, insisted on starting, and during the march chaffed the first 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 11 

sergeant with such joUy persistency that not only were the blues driven 
out of him, but the spirit and morale of the entire command restored. 

His last service was at Fort Clark, Texas, where he was so seriously 
affected by the climate that his retirement was imperative; indeed, his 
condition was so serious that an army surgeon, after a careful examination, 
informed him that he was incurable. Here, however, the sand showed 
itself again. The surgeon told him that the record showed no instance of 
recovery in a case like his. Anderson's reply was: "Every record can be 
broken and I propose to beat this one;" and he did, as his physical and 
mental condition fully proves. 

His service as a member of the faculty of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College is well known. He put into it, as he did into everything he 
undertook, the best that was in him. 

At present he is on recruiting duty with headquarters at New Haven, 
Connecticut, and sub-stations at Hartford, Bridgeport and Stamford. 
He is hale, hearty, cheery ; always serious of purpose, but with an unfailing 
sense of humor, and abounding in a dry and sometimes caustic wit. Long 
may he continue a living type of the patriotic American citizen and the 
true-hearted ' ' sandy ' ' American soldier. 



^/^.6fe. 




imdf^Srtt^t^*:^^ 




Members Ex-Officio 

His Excellency, The Governor, William L. Dougl,\s 

President of the Corporation 
William P. Brooks .... Acting President of the College 

George H. Martin .... Secretary of the Board of Education 
J. Lewis Ellsworth . . Secretary of the Board of Agriculture 



Members by Appointment 

William H. Bowker of Boston 
George H. Ellis of Boston 
J. Howe Demond of Northampton 
Elmer D. Howe of Marlborough 
Nathaniel I. Bowditch of Framinghani 
William Wheeler of Concord 
Arthur G. Pollard of Lowell 
Charles A. Gleason of New Braintree 
James Draper of Worcester 
Samuel C. Damon of Lancaster 
Merritt L Wheeler of Great Barrington 
Charles H. Preston of Danvers 
William R. Sessions of Springfield 
M. Fayette Dickinson 



Term E.^pires 
1906 

igo6 

1907 
1907 

1908 
1908 

1909 
1909 

I9I0 
I9I0 
191 1 
191 1 
I9I2 
I9I2 



Officers Elected by the Corporation 

His Excellency, Governor William L. Douglas of Brockton 



William R. Sessions of Springfield 
J. Lewis Ellsworth of Worcester 
George F. Mills of Amherst 
Charles A. Gleason of New Braintree 



President 

Vice-President of the Corporation 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Auditor 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Committee on Finance and Buildings 

Charles A. Gleason, Chairman 
William R. Sessions J. Howe Demond 

Arthur G. Pollard Charles H. Preston 

Committee on Course of Study and Faculty 

William Wheeler, Chairman 
William H. Bowker Elmer D. Howe 

M. Fayette Dickinson • George H. Ellis 

Committee on Farm and Horticulture 

Farm Division 

William R. Sessions, Chairman. 
George H. Ellis NT. Bowditch 

Merritt L Wheeler 

Horticulture Division 

J. L. Ellsworth, Chairman 
James Draper Elmer D. Howe 

Committee on Experiment Department 

James Draper, Chairman 
J. L. Ellsworth Charles H. Preston 

William H. Bowker Samuel C. Damon 

Committee on New Buildings and Arrangement of Grounds 

James Draper, Chairman 
William Wheeler Samuel C. Damon 

M. Fayette Dickinson N. I. Bowditch 

Board of Overseers 

State Board of Agriculture 

Examining Committee of Overseers 

John Bursley, Chairman, of West Barnstable 

C. K. Brewster of Worthington 

W. C. Jewett of Worcester 

Arthur A. Smith of Colrain 

Chas. H. Shaylor of Lee 




p 



December 20, 1905 Wednesday, to January 3, 1906, 
Wednesday Winter Recess 

January 3, 1906, Wednesday, 

Fall Semester resumed at 8 A. M. 



February 7, Wednesday, 



Fall Semester Ends 



February 8, Thursday, 

Spring Semester begins"at 8A.M. 

March 28, Wednesday, to April 3, Tuesday, 

Spring Recess 

April 3, Tuesday, Spring Semester resumed at 8 A.M. 

June 20, Wednesday, Commencement Exercises 

Vacation Thirteen Weeks 

September 20, Thursday, 

Fall Semester begins at 8 A. M. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Boston University Council 



Wm. E. Huntington, Ph.D., LL.D. 
President of the University 

Melville M. Bigelow, Ph.D., LL.D. 
Dean of the School of Law 

Borden P. Bowne, LL.D. 
Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences 

Wm. F. Warren, S.T.D,. LL.D. 
Dean of the School of Theology 

Wm. p. Brooks, Ph.D. 
Acting President of the Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Wm. Marshall Warren, Ph.D. 
Dean of the College of Liberal Arts 

John P. Sutherland, M.D. 
Dean of the School of Medicine 





William P. Brooks, Ph.D., Acting President of the College and Acting 
Director of the Hatch Experiment Station. Professor of Agriculture 
and Agriculturist for Hatch Experiment Station. Director of Short 
Winter Courses. 

Born 1851, Massachusetts Apricultural College, 1S75. <I> I K. Postgraduate, 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1875-76. Professor of Agriculture and Director 
of Farm, Imperial College of Agriculture, Safforo, Japan, 1877-78; also Professor 
of Botany, 1881-SS. Acting President, Imperial College, 1880-83, ^^^ 18S6-87. 
Professor of Agriculture at Massachusetts Agricultural College, and Agriculturist 
for the Hatch Expermient Station since January, 18S9. Ph.D., Halle, 1897. .Acting 
President of tl.e College and .Acting Director of the Hatch Experiment Station 
since January, 1905. 



Charles A. Goessmann, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Chemistry and 
Chemist for the Hatch Experiment Station. 

Born 1827. Ph.D., University of Goettingen, 1S53; LL.D., Amherst College 1889. 
Assistant Chemist, University of Goettingen, 1852-57. Chemist and Manager of 
a Philadelphia Sugar Refinery, traveling extensively in Cuba and the South in the 
interests of the Sugar Industry, 1857-61. Chemist to Onondaga Salt Company, 
1861-68, during that time investigating the salt resources of the United States and 
Canada. Professor of Chemistry, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1862-64. Di- 
rector of Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station 1882-94. Professor of 
Chemistry, Massachusetts Agricultural College since 1868. Analyst of the State 
Board of Health since 1884. 



IS 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 




Charles Wellington, M.A. 
IS try. 



Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chern- 



Born 1853. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1873. K 1. Graduate student 
in Chemistry, Massachusetts Agricultural College 1873-76. Student in University 
of Virginia, 1876-77. Ph.D., University of Gbettingen, 1885. Assistant Chemist, 
United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C, 1876. First Assistant 
Chemist, Department of Agriculture, 1877-82. Associate Professor of Chemistry 
at Massachusetts Agricultural College smce 1885. 




Charles H. Fernald, M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Zoology, and Ento- 
mologist for Hatch Expernnent Station. 

Born 1838. Bowdoin College, 1865. Ph.D., Maine State College, 1886. Studied in 
the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Cambridge, and under Louis Agassiz on 
Penekese Island. Also traveled extensively in Europe, studying insects in various 
museums. Principal of Litchfield Academy, 1865. Principal of Houlton Academy, 
1865-70. Chair of Natural History, Maine State College, 1871-S6. Professor of 
Zoology at Massachusetts Agricultural College since 1886. 



George F. Mills, M.A., Professor of English and Latin. 

Born 1839. Williams College, 1862. A J (P. Associate Principal of Greylock 
Institute, 1882-89. Professor of English and Latin at Massachusetts Agricultural 
College since 1890. 



James B. Paige, D.V.S., Professor of Fete 
inarian for Hatch Expernnent Station. 



inary Science, and Feter- 



Born 1861. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1882. Q. T. V 
Prescott, 1882-87. D. V. S., Faculty of Comparative Medicine 
Science, McGill University, 1888. Practiced at Northampton, l88f 
of Veterinary Science at Massachusetts Agricultural College sinC' 
course in Pathological and Bacteriological Department, McGill Uni 
1891. Took course in Veterinary School in Munich, Germany, 1895 



nd Vcte 
91, Pre 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 




Georgh E. Stone, Ph.D., Professor of Baftniy <ind Bntnnist for Hatch 
hs pmtncnt Station. 

Born 1861. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1882-84. * - l<- Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology, 1884-89. In the summer of 1890, in charge of the 
Botany Classes at Worcester Summer School of Natural History. Leipsic Univer- 
sity, 1891-92; Ph.D., 1892. Studied in the Physiological Laboratory at Clark 
University, 1893. Assistant Professor of Botany at Massachusetts Agricul>jral 
College, 1893-95. Professor of Botany at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
since July, 1895. B.S., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1897. 




John E. OstRANDER, M.A., C.E., Professor of Mathemntirs and Ci'i 
Engineering. 

Born 1865. B.A. and C.E., Union College, 1886; M.A., 1889. Assistant on Sev 
Construction, West Troy, N. Y., 1886. Assistant on Construction, Chicago, 
Paul and Kansas City Railway, 1887. Draughtsman with Phoenix Bridge Co 
pany, 1887. Assistant in Engineering Department, New York State Canals, 188 
91. Instructor in Civil Engineering, Lehigh University, 1891-92. Engineering I 
Contractor Alton Bridge, summer of 1892. Professor of Civil Engineering a 
Mechanic Arts, University of Idaho, 1892-97. Professor of Mathematics a 
Civil Engineering at the Massachusetts Agricultural College since July, 1897. 



-♦%. 




Henry T. Fernald, M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Entomology, and Asso- 
ciate Entomologist for the Hatch Experiment Station. 

University of Maine, 1885; B 11, IPK0, M.S., 1888. Graduate student in 
Biology, Wesleyan University, 1885-86. Graduate student Johns Hopkins University, 
1887-90. Laboratory Instructor Johns Hopkins University, 1889-90. Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1 890. Professor of Zoology, Pennsylvania State College, 
1890-99. State Economic Zoologist of Pennsylvania, 1898-99. Professor of 
Entomology, Massachusetts Agricultural College, and .Associate Entomologist, 
Hatch Experiment Station, since 1899. 




Frank A. Waugh, M.S., Professor of Horticulture and Landscape 
Gardening. 

Born 1869. Kansas Agricultural College, 1891. K I. M.S., 1S93. Graduate 
student Cornell University, 1898-99. Editor Agricultural Department, Topeka 
Capitol, 1891-92. Editor Montana Farm and Stock Journal, 1892. Editor Denver 
Field and Farm, 1892-93. Professor of Horticulture, Oklahoma .Agricultural and 
Mechanical College, and Horticulturist of the Experiment Station, 1893-95. Pro- 
fessor of Horticulture, University of Vermont and State Agricultural College, and 
Horticulturist of the Experiment Station, 1895-1902. Professor of Horticulture 
and Landscape Gardening, Massachusetts Agricultural College, and Horticulturist 
of the Hatch Experiment Station since 1902. Horticultural editor of Country 
Gentleman since 1898. 



20 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 




George C. Martin, C.E., Captain iSth Infantry, United States Army. 
Professor of Military Science. 

Born 1869. C. E., University of Vermont, 1 89Z. ^ 0. V/ith Engineering News, 
1895-97. Entered Army July 9, 1898, as 2d Lieutenant of 21st U. S. Infantry. 
Promoted to ist Lieutenant of 2d U. S. Infantry, March 2, 1899. Promoted to 
Captain of 1 8th U. S. Infantry, August 26, 1903. Placed on duty at Massachusetts 
.Agricultural College hy order of the Honorable, the Secretary of War, September 
I, 1905. 




Richard S. Lull, M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Born 1867. Rutgers College, 1893. X ¥. M.S., Rutgers College, 1896. Ph.D., 
Columbia University, 1903. Special Agent, Scientific Field Corps, United States 
Department of Agriculture, Division of Entomology, 1893. Assistant Professor of 
Zoology and Entomology at Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1894-1902. Asso- 
ciate Professor of Zoology since June, 1902. Member of expeditions to Wyoming 
and Montana sent out by American Museum of Natural History. 




Philip B. Hasbrouck, B.S., Associate Professor of Mathematics, 
Adjunct Professor of Physics. 

Born 1870. B.S., Rutgers College, 1893. ,Y W. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
at Massachusetts Agricultural College from April, 1895-1902. Associate Professor 
of Mathematics since 1902. Registrar since June, 1905. 




Fred S. CooleY, B.S. Assistant Professor of Agriculture. 

Born 1869. B.S., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1888. I K. Teacher in 
Public School at North Amherst, 1888-89. Assistant Agriculturist at Hatch 
Experiment Station, 1889-90. Farm Superintendent at Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 1890-93. Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry and Dairying. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



21 




Herman Babson, M.A., Assistant Professor of English, and Instructor 
in German. 

Born 1S71. B.A., Amherst College, 1S93. X W. M.A., Amherst College, 1896. 
Assistant Professor of English at Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1893-1904. 
Instructor of Rhetoric in Amherst College, January to July, 1900. Student at 
University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany, 1903-04. Assistant Professor of English, 
and Instructor of German since 1904. 





S. Francis Howard, M.S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Born 1S72. B.S., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1894. Ill I K. Principal of 
Ehot, Maine, High School, 1895. Student of Philosophy, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1896-98. Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Massachusetts Agricultural 
College since July, 1899. M.S., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1901. 



Louis RoWELL Herrick, B.S., Instructor in Modern Languages. 

Born 1880. B.S., Amherst College, 1902. <I) A 0. Instructor in Modern Languages 
at Massachusetts Agricultural College since September, 1902. 




George N. Holcomb, B.A., S.T.B. Instructor in Economics. 

Born 1872. Trinity College 1896. Philadelphia Divinity School 1900. Gradu- 
ate student in American Institutional and Political History at University of Penn- 
sylvania 1900-01. Graduate student in History and Economics, Harvard Uni- 
versity 1901-03. Williams Fellow, Harvard Union, S. T. B. Harvard 1903. Then 
engaged in agricultural work. Instructor in Economics and Constitutional His- 
tory, Connecticut Agricultural College. Instructor in Economics in Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College since September, 1905. 



THE H)()7 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Maurice A. Blake, B.S., Instructor in Horticulture and Assistant 
Horticulturist at Hatch Experiment Station. 

Born 1882. B.S., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1904. Q. T. V. First 
Assistant Horticulturist, Rhode Island State College and Experiment Station, 
July I, 1904, to September i, 1905. Instructor in Horticulture since September i, 
1905. 





A. Vincent Osmun, Instructor in Botany. 

Born 1880. Connecticut Agricultural College, 1900. Assistant Storrs Agricultura 
Experiment Station, 1900-02. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1903, Q. T. V. 
(I> K 0. M.S., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1905. Instructor in Botany 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1905. 




Francis O. Canning, Instructor 
Management. 



Floriculture and Greenbous 




Born 1868. Belvoir Castle Gardens, England, 1883-89. Superintendent of Propa- 
gating and Plant Department, Horticultural Hall, Fairmont Park, Philadelphia, 
Pa., 1889-95. Superintendent of the estate of Mrs. Charles F. Berwind, Wynne- 
wood, Pa., 1896-1900. Superintendent of the estate of Samuel T. Bodine, Villa 
Nova, Pa., 1900-03. Massachusetts Agricultural College since 1903. 



Walter Bowerman Hatch, Instructor m Drawing and Assistant 
Experimental Horticulturist Hatch Experiment Station. 
Born 1884. B.S., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1905. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



2:i 




Ierbert Phrcival Gallinger, A.B. Ph.D., /mtnutor in History. 

Amherst College, 1893. </' B K, J K E. Principal of Oxford Academy, Oxford, 
N. Y., 1893-95. Studied in Germany at Jena, 1895-96, and at Leipsic, 1896-98. 
Ph.D., Leipsic University, 1898. Instructor in History, Amherst College, 1898- 
1904. Associate Professor of History since 1904. 



TIenry J. Franklin, B.S., Instructor tn Botany. 

Born 1S83. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1903. Q. T. V.. '!' K (IK Post- 
graduate student at Massachusetts Agricultural College since September, 1904. 
Instructor in Botany at Massachusetts Agricultural College since September, 1904. 



Robert W. Lyman, U.S. LL.B., Lcctura on Farm Lmv. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1871. Q. T. V. Boston University, 1879. 
Registrar of Deeds, Hampshire County. District Judge. 



Philip B. Hasbrouck, 13. S., Registrar 
E. Frances Hall, Librarian. 




£-^ 




24 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Graduate Students 



Back, Ernest Adna Florence, g6 Pleasant Street 

B.S., Massachusetts Agricultviral College, 1904. 

Franklin, Henry James Bernardston, g6 Pleasant Street 

B.S., Massachtisetts Agricultural College, 1903. 

Lancaster, Walter B. Boston 

Tower, Winthrop Vose Roxbury, 3 Mt. Pleasant 

B.S., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1903. 



Special Student 



Foster, Elsie Addie Worcester, 9 Fearing Street 



■i^H 




s 



E 



N 




I 




O 



H 



26 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Class History, 1906 




,NE short spurt and the race is ours. Yes, dear readers, for three 
long years we have run a hard race aud now the goal line is already 
in sight. We, the class of 1906, have passed through all the trials, 
temptations, defeats, sorrows, victories, and exultations of joy. 
Many of you know our history for the first three years of college 
life, and you cannot but admit that we have conducted ourselves in a praise- 
worthy manner. 

And now while our history is being written for the last time, we must 
pause in passing and consider briefly what we really did. 

The early days of our Freshman year were made memorable by the work 
of our invincible football team. In our Sophomore year we entertained the 
Freshmen, and once again established a record of which we are proud. And 
then came our Junior year and perhaps of all the years of those which have 
passed and which are to come, this one was the happiest. Yet it was not all 
pleasure, for there was a large Freshman class to train in the way they should 
go, The Index, and the facts, ideas and principles which were fired at us in 
volleys by " Doc." 

The banquet which was tendered to us by the class of 190S must not be 
forgotten and to them must be given a share of our good will. What about 
that trip to the Springfield brewery and the pulp and paper mills at Holyoke 
and Mount Tom? Surely it is worthy of mentioning as a remarkable incident 
in our career. 

And so we passed our Junior year. Summer and vacation drifted us far apart. 
With Kennedy in the wilds of Maine throwing the spit-ball to please the natives 
and Tannatt exploring the Connecticut River by moonlight in a canoe, and 
others of us in the west, south and east, it looked as though these might be a 
scattering of such a magnitude that would scarce come together again. 

Now the fall has come upon us and we are nearly all back in our places. 
As we look upon the beautiful hills shrouded in their blue veil and as we see 
the glorious autumn foliage which decorates the landscape on all sides, a 
feeling of sadness must come over us to think that perhaps it is the last time 
that such a sight will be before us. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 27 

But alas! the joyous days are gone when we made merry with our German 
professor and treated physics as a joke. The bell in the chapel has tolled 
them into the past and each new stroke of the hammer is hurrying us on to the 
future. The victories which we have helped to win are already a thing of the 
past and others are closely following in our places, ready to do or try to do 
as well as we have done. 

What of the future? Here is where no man can penetrate for it lies shrouded 
in the darkness, only to be revealed to us as we journey onward. 

Although our class has lost nearly two-thirds of its original members, we, 
who remain, are courageous, strong, and ready to meet whatever may come. 

We cannot treat the last year of our life at Massachusetts as we have done 
the first three. We as a class need not be ashamed of ourselves. Intellectu- 
ally and socially we rank well. We have nothing to fear, and let us keep up 
our good work and fight to the finish. 

Then will we become loyal sons of old Massachusetts and that spirit of 
loyalty will raise ever higher the name of our dear old Alma Mater. 




28 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Senior Class, 1906 



Clarence E. Hood 
Harry M. Russell 
Richard Wellington 
Daniel H. Carey 
William 0. Taft 
Francis D. Wholley 



Officers 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Class Captain 

Sergeant-at-Arms 

Historian 



Class Yell 

Sis! Boom! Bah! 
Rah! Rah! Rix! 
Massachusetts t 
Naiighty-Six! 



Class Colors 

Maroon and BlacJz 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Class of 1906 



Carey, Daniel Henry Rockland 

Q. T. V. Plant House. Varsity Football. Class Rope Pull. 

Carpenter, Charles Walter Monson 

K I. K J House. Band. Signal Board. 

Craighead, William Hunlie Boston 

25 North College. Captain Football Team. Flint Prize. 

Filer, Harry Burton Belchertown 

1 1 South College. Class Basketball and Baseball Teams. 

French, George Talbot Tewksbury 

I K. 18 South College. Class Football Team. 

Gaskell, Edwin Francis Hopedale 

C. S. C. Goldberg's. Class Football Team. 

Hall, Arthur William, Jr. ■ North Amherst 

(P J K. Home. 

Hastings, Addison Tyler, Jr. Natick 

Q. T. V. 5 Fearing Street. Assistant Manager of 1906 Index. Manager Basket- 
ball Team. . Class Baseball, Basketball, and Football Teams. Editor-in-Chief 
College Signal. 



Hood, Clarence Ellsworth 
Q. T. V. 4 South College. 



MilHs 



Kennedy, Frank Henry 



Ashmont 



C. S. C. 12 South College. Business Manager 1906 Index. Fraternity Confer- 
ence. Band. Captain Class Football and Baseball Teams. Class Basketball 
Team. Senate. Rope Pull Team. Varsity Baseball Team. Reading Room 
Director. 

Martin, James Edward Brockton 

C. S. C. 6 South College. Varsity Baseball and Football Teams. Reading 
Room Director. Class Baseball. Football, Basketball and Rope Pull Teams. 



30 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 

MosELEY, Louis Hale Glastonbury, Connecticut 

C. S. C. 4 South College. Band. Class Baseball Team. 

MuDGE, Everett Pike Swampscott 

A' ^. 8 South College. 

Peakes, Ralph Ware Newtonville 

Q. T. V. lo South College. Editor-in-Chief igo6 Index. Flint Prize. Business 
Manager College Signal. Class Baseball Team. President of the Senate. Choir. 
Manager Football Team. 

Pray, Fry Civille Natick 

I K. 1 6 Sovith College. Class Football and Baseball Teains. 

Rogers, Stanley Sawyer Brookline 

K I. West Experiment Station. Class Football and Baseball Teams. Leader 
of Band. Signal Board. 

Russell, Harry Merwin Bridgeport, Connecticut 

C. S. C. Insectary. Index Board. Dining Hall Director. 

Scott, Edwin Hobart Cambridge 

A' 2. K I House. Signal Board. Second Burnham Prize, Sophomore Year. 

Sleeper, George Warren Swampscott 

C. S. C. Redding's. Artist 1906 Index. 

Strain, Benjamin Mt. Carmel, Connecticut 

Q. T. V. E. M. Dickinson's. Class Football and Baseball Teams. 

SuHLKE, Herman Augustus Leominster 

A' I. West Experiment Station. Class Football and Rope Pull Teains. 

Taft, William Otis Pepperell 

C. S. C. I 2 South College. Varsity Football Team. Class Football and Baseball 
Teams. 

TiRRELL, Charles Almon Plainfield 

Q. T. V. 5 Fearing Street. Varsity Baseball Team. Class Football and Base- 
ball Teams. 

Tannatt, Willia m Colbu rn Dorchester 

C. S. C. E. M. Dickinson's. Band. Signal Board (College Notes). 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



HI 



Wellington, Richard ' Waltham 

Q. T. V. I o Sovxth College. vSenate. Class Rope Pull and Football Teams. 

Wholley, Francis Dallas Cohasset 

Q. T. V. II South College. 1906 Index Board. Class Rope Pull Team. 



Wood, Alexander Henry Moore 

A' I. K I House. Senate. Class Rope Pull and Football Teams. 



Easton 




34 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



1907 Class History 




NCE again are we called upon to glance at our past record. Again 
we muster at the roll-call and lo, what find we here? 

A jolly crowd from old '07, 

And loyal to the core; 
'Tis Naughty Seven then and now, 

Naught Seven forevermore. 
For many a merry time we've had, 

And will have by the score; 
Till for life's work our "prep" is done. 

And our college course is o'er. 

As the somber voice of the clerk peals forth, a revelation gradually dawns 
upon us. Many are the familiar "heahs" for which we wait m vam. Though 
few of our former numbers remain to uphold the honor of the best class in col- 
lege, we note with a thrill of joy the hearty response of the remnant. With 
the confidence that those who have stayed thus far will be with us to the finish, 
we feel that the "survival of the fittest" has left to us the refined metal which 
is sure to stand the test of time. 

The first two stages of our progress are past. In the former, "little Willie " 
sat for his first cute picture and learned his lessons of loyalty. The second 
reveals our broad grinning amusement at the greenness of '08. At last as 
staid upper classmen we eagerly assume the duties devolving upon us. Whether 
it be in the encouragement of our new protegees, or the suppression of the 
exuberant foolishness of '08, we have the best interests of the college at heart. 

We now abandon the art of war for the quiet pursuits of peace. Neverthe- 
less we still delight to recall some of our early evening escapades. Among 
the most recent of these as well as the most prominent is a certain red-letter 
night, the sport of which did not terminate as completely successful as we 
might have wished. The outcome of this little lark was an eventful trip to 
Hamp. without even the avowed purpose of "fussing." To our infinite relief 
"clever Dick" came to the rescue and settled the matter quite amicably for 
all concerned. Next come those midnight calls both received and paid, on 
which occasions "Herb" was wont to wear a smile, or " iShimmy " capered 
'round with the paddle. Then we see those grand class feasts, those times of 
jollity when even physics and chemistry were sciences of another world and 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 35 

all our troubles vanished. Who can forget those glorious times when, secure 
in the confidence of well-laid plans, we gave ourselves up to hearty good cheer. 

Our first brush with the Freshmen resulted in a draw. In the rope-pull 
and football games we trimmed them handily, thus lowering their conceit just 
three pegs. To leave them a little self confidence, however, we concluded that 
it was advisable to give them the honors in basketball and baseball, — the first by 
one point and the second by a margin. We wished to teach politeness without 
being quite severe. 

One or two more instances conclude our list of frolics. Our mourning 
for the departed Seniors and Babby's prompt dismissal might be mentioned 
incidentally. But the rub that hurt our sense of duty was, that circumstances 
compelled us to disappoint the watchman in the chapel on the eve of St. Pat- 
rick's day. It seems that one of the faculty was "wise" — there was something 
doing, so a guard was posted the night before and promptly loaded for bear, 
or goat, we don't know which. 

As this record is merely a statement of the exceptional occurrences, our 
intellectual abilities and scientific accomplishments which are a matter of course, 
need not be mentioned. Suffice it to say that we have the material in all branches 
and will put upon the field of life a finished product of mankind, the like of 
which has never vet been known. 




36 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Junior Class 1907 



F. C. Peters 
M. H. Clark, Jr. 

A. W. HiGGINS 

J. N. Summers 
H. T. Pierce 
C. King 
E. G. Bartlett 



Officers 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Class Captain 

Sergeant-at-A rms 

Historian 



Class Yell 

One, Nine, Naught, Seven 
Massachusetts Naughty Seven 



Class Colors 

Green and White 



Sweater Colors 

Brown and White 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 37 



Members of Junior Class 



Alley, Harold Edward Newburyport 

A" -T. K I House. 

Armstrong, Arthur Huguenin West Gardner 

K I. K I House. 

Bartlett, Earle Goodman Chicago, Illinois 

(p ^ K. ii6 Pleasant Street. 1907 Index Board. Class Historian. Signal 
Board. Secretary-Treasurer Senate. 

Caruthers, John Thomas Columbia, Tennessee 

32 North College. Captain Rope Pull Team, Freshman and Sophomore years. 

Chace, Wayland Fairbanks Middleboro 

C. S. C. 96 Pleasant Street. Fraternity Conference. 

Chadwick, Clifton Harland Cochituate 

(t 1 K. 20 South College. Editor-in-Chief 1907 Index. 

Chapman, Joseph Otis East Brewster 

A' J. 3 Fearing Street. Sophomore Class Basketball. 

Clark, Milford H., Jr. Sunderland 

C. S. C. 5 South College. Business Manager 1907 Index. Class Vice-President. 
Assistant Manager Football Team. Varsity Baseball. Class Football and Base- 
ball. Varsity Football. 

Cutter, Frederick Augustus Lowell 

'/' i' A". 16 Sotith College. Varsity Football. Class Basketball Team. 

Dickinson, Walter Ebenezer North Amherst 

I K. Hoine. Artist 1907 Index. Rope Pull Team Freshman and Sopho- 
more years. 

Eastman, Jasper Fay Townsend 

loi Pleasant Street. 

HiGGiNS, Arthur William Westfield 

A" I. Goldberg's. 1907 Index Board. Signal Board. Reading Room Director. 
Dining Hall Director. Manager Sophomore Class Baseball Team. Class Secretary. 



38 THE 1907 INDEX, Volume XXXVII 



King, Clinton Dorchester 

Q. T. V. 77 Pleasant Street. 1907 Index Board. Signal Board. Reading 
Room Director. Class Sergeant-at-Arms. 

Earned, Adelbert Joseph Amherst 

Q. T. V. Home. Class Baseball Team Sophomore year. 

Lincoln, Ernest Avery Fall River 

C. S. C. 96 Pleasant Street. Class Basketball Team Freshman year. 

Livers, Susie Dearing Boston 

Draper Hall. 

Peters, Frederick Charles Lenox 

(p I K. 14 South College. 1907 Index Board. Senate. Captain Basketball 
Team. Captain Class Football, Class Baseball and Basketball Teams. Class 
President. 

Pierce, Henry Tyler West Millbury 

C. S. C. Veterinary Laboratory. 1907 Index Board. Senate. Assistant 
Manager Basketball Team. Class Captain. Rope Pull. Class Football and 
Basketball Teams. 

Shaw, Edward Houghton Belmont 

(P I K. 13 South College. Class Football. Captain Freshman Baseball Team. 
Basketball. 

Summers, John Nicholas Campello 

C. S. C. 6 South College. Class Football and Rope Pull Teams. Class Treasurer. 

Thompson, Clifford Briggs Halifax 

S K. 14 South College. Class Football Team. 

Walker, James Henry Greenwich Village 

S K. 5 South College. Class Football Team. 

Watts, Ralph Jerome Littleton 

(l> I K. East Experiment Station. Manager Class Basketball Team Sophomore 
year. Assistant Manager Signal Board. 

Watkins, Fred Alexander Peru 

<P I K. I South College. Class Football Team. 

Wood, Herbert Poland Hopedale 

C. S. C. Hatch Barn. Class Football Team. Captain Class Basketball Team 
Sophomore Year. 




\&p]t^^M^f^ 



_^*ji 



40 THE U)07 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Sophomore Class History 




:T is now a year since the class of 1908 first became enrolled on the 
pages of the Index, but what changes have taken place during 
that interval. Then we were a large number of individuals, 
today after a year of college life, we are united into a single body, 
the largest in numbers of any Sophomore class ever in this insti- 
tution. To attempt a recital of the events of our freshman year is a difficult 
task but I will try and enumerate some of them. 

The very first night of college we met the Sophomores in the campus rush. 
Although the night was dark and we scarcely knew our own men, we fought 
bravely and at the end of the rush 1907 gladly withdrew, content at the Senate 
decision that it was a draw. ' Soon we began to hear of rope-pull and when one 
day we were practising up on the hill, the Sophomores tried to steal our rope. 
There was a great battle and again 1907 retreated, leaving us in possession of 
the hill and rope. In athletics we lost, after a hard fight, the rope-pull and 
football, but then our luck changed and the basketball game came our way 
with a score of g-8. In baseball we won easily 10-6. The most enjoyable 
occasion of the year was our class banquet at North Adams and it proved one 
of the most successful Freshman banquets ever held. We left Amherst so 
quietly that the Sophomores were unable to learn our destination and the 
banquet was not disturbed. Pleasant memories of that evening will long remain 
with us. There was a little disturbance the night after the class baseball game 
and some of our members received natatorial instruction in the College Pond 
but we couldn't blame the Sophs for being a little sore after that victory. 

Now we have returned to Mass'chusetts for another year. Turning from 
French and Trig, we must make new conquests in the "physical" world and 
beat out Billy at his own game. We find a verdantly green class before us to 
be initiated into the college customs. We have already found an excellent 
rowing crew among them and learned of their vocal powers. But we assure 
them that they yet have much to learn before we shall cease our instruction. 
Our most practical lesson was at the time 1909 wished to learn what the old- 
fashioned campus rush was hke. The second night of college they began to 
make a disturbance down by the "widow's." Soon 1908 appeared to quell 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



41 



the riot. After a few rushes the obstrejjerous freshmen aU faded into the 
background and nothing but their discarded headgear was left on the battle- 
field. 

We have so far met the Class of 1909 in but one organized contest — the 
new pole rush. Here one of our fleet runners captured the pole at the begin- 
ning and held it until the end. We won by the overwhelming score of 34-20. 
We expect this is but a foretaste of coming events and it is these very demands 
upon our class loyalty which have converted us into a concrete and symmetrical 
class organization. As we watch the warm suramer sunshine on the hills 
"beyond the river" give place to the snowy bleakness of winter and the rotation 
of the seasons brings us ever nearer to the goal of our ambitions — Commencement, 
we shall find our love for old Mass'chusetts and our loyalty for igo8 increasing, 
without end. 




42 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Sophomore Class, 1908 



Officers 



John R. Parker 
Lloyd W. Chapman 
Marcus M. Browne 
Leroy a. Shattuck 
Henry C. Chase 
Allan D. Farrar 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Class Captain 

Sergeant-at-Arms 

Historian 



Class Yell 

Ki Yi! Ki Yil Ki Yi! Kate! 
Massachusetts! 
Naughty-Eight! 



Class Colors 

Steel Gray and Maroon 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



43 



Class of 1908 



Allen, Charles Francis 

C. S. C, 96 Pleasant Street. 

Anderson, Albert John 

I K. I 7 South College. Class Football Team. 

Anderson, Kenneth French 
26 North College. 

Bailey, Ernest Winfield ' 

K -. K - House. 

Bangs, Bradley Wheelock 
C. S. C. 29 Lincoln Avenue. 

Barry, Thomas Addis 

C. S. C. 86 Pleasant Street. Captain Class Football Team. 

Bates, Carlton 

K I. 96 Pleasant Street. Class Basketball and Baseball Teams 



Worcester 

North Brookfield 

Roslindale 

Worcester 

Amherst 

Amherst 

Salem 



Browne, Marcus Metcalf Maiden 

K J. 6 Nutting Avenue. Class Secretary and Treastirer Signal Board. 

Chapman, Lloyd Warren Pepperell 

Q. T. V. Forristall's. Class Football Team. Class Vice-President. 

Chase, Henry Clinton Swampscott 

C. S. C. 66 Pleasant Street Class Baseball and Football Team. Sergeant-at- 
Arms. 



Clark, Orton Loring 
* I K. Mt. Pleasant. 



Maiden 



Cobb, George Robert Amherst 

C. S. C. T,2i Cottage Street. Varsity Football, Basketball and Baseball Teams. 
Class Basketball. Captain Class Baseball. 



Coleman, William John 
C. S. C. Plant House. 



Natick 



44 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



CUMMINGS, WiNTHROPE AtHERTON 
Q. T. V. L. H. Taylor's. 

Curtis, Jesse Gerry 

'/' J K. 136 So. Pleasant Street. 

Cutting, Roy Edward 
<t IK. II High Street. 

Daniel, John 

Q. T. V. 6 North College. 

Davenport, Stearnes Lothrop 
K I . S South College. 

Davis, Paul Augustin 
82 Pleasant Street. 

Dolan, Clifford 
9 Fearing Street. 

Eastman, Perley Monroe 
E. M. Dickinson's. 

Edwards, Frank Lawrence 
I K. 2 1 North College. 



Belchertown 

South Framingham 

Amherst 

Osterville 

North Grafton 

Lowell 

Hudson 



Townsend 



Somei-ville 



Waltham 
Class Football Team and Rope Pull. Varsity Football. 

Amherst 
Class Historian. 



Class Football and Basketball Teams. 



Farley, Arthur James 

Q. T. V. 9 North College. 

Farrar, Allan Dana 

Q. T. V. I Dana Street. 

Farrar, Parke Warren 
K S. K I House. 

Flint, Clifton Leroy 
A' I. K I House. 

GiLLETT, Chester Socrates 
A' -I. E. M. Dickinson's. 

Gillett, Kenneth Edward 

I K. 17 South College. Class Football and Basketball Teams. 

Gold, Frank Lyman 
14 Gray Street. 

Gowdy, Carlton Cragg 
116 Pleasant Street. 



Springfield 
Amesbury 
Southwick 
Southwick 
Amherst 
St. Michael, Barbadoes 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



45 



Hayef, Herbert Kendell 
K I. E M. Dickinson's. 

Howe, William Llewellyn 
9 South College. 

Hyslop, James Augustus 
Q. T. V. 5 North College. 

Ingalls, Dorsey Fisher 
Q. T. V. 2 2 North College. 

Jackson. Raymond Hobart 

J K. 26 Lincoln Avenue. Class Football. 

Jennison, Harry Milliken 
C. S. C. 5 North College. 

Johnston, Frederick Andrew 

C. S. C. 7 South College. Class Football. 

Jones, Thomas Henry 

Q. T. V. Forristall's. Class Football. 

Larson, David 

K -T. East Experiment Station. 

Liang, Lai-Kwei 
80 Pleasant Street. 

Miller, Danforth Parker 
K I . K I House. 

Parker, John Robert 

A' I. 96 Pleasant Street. Class President. 

Philbrick, Edwin Daniels 

(P I K. 20 Sovith College. Varsity Football. Signal Board 

Reed, Horace Bigelow 
K I. Professor Cooley's. 

Regan, William Swift 

K I. 84 Pleasant Street. Class Basketball. 

Sawyer, William Francis 
Q. T. V. 77 Pleasant Street. 

Shattuck, Leroy Altus 



North Granby, Connectticut 

Marlboro 

Rutherford, New Jersey 

Cheshire 

Amherst 

Millbury 

■"\ . Westford 

Easton 

Bridgeport, Connecticut 

Tientsin, China 

Worcester 

Poquonock, Connecticut 

Somerville 

Worcester 

Northampton 

Sterhng 



C. S. C. 66 Pleasant Street. Class Football and Baseball. Class Captain. 



Pepperell 



46 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 

Thurston, Frank Eugene Worcester 

- A'. 15 South College. 

Turner, Olive May ' Amherst 

22 Spaulding Street. 

Turner, William Franklin • Reading 

9 South College. 

Verbeck, Roland Hale Maiden 

'/' J J\ . 13 South College. 

Warner, Theoren Levi Sunderland 

Q. T. V. 24 North College. 

Waugh, Thomas Francis Worcester 

Q. T. V. 96 Pleasant Street. 

Wellington, Joseph Worcester Waltham 

Q. T. V. 9 North College. 

Wheeldon, Albert James Worcester 

C. S. C. I Dana Street. 

Wheeler, Herman Temple Lincoln 

Q. T. V. 24 North College. Captain Ropepull Teams Freshman and Sopho- 
more Years. Class Captain Freshman year. Class Football. 

White, Herbert Linvv'ood - Maynard 

Q. T. V. C. H. Kellogg. Signal Board. 

Whiting, Albert Samuel Stoughton 

Q. T. V. Forristall's 

Whitmarsh, Raymond Dean Taunton 

K I. 96 Pleasant Street. Captain Class Basketball Team. 

Wright, Samuel Judd South Sudbury 

Q. T. V. 22 North College. 



48 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



1909 Class History 




jROM all parts of New England on the twenty-first day of Sep- 
tember, 1905, there assembled in chapel the coming class of 
1909, under the scrutinizing eyes of the critical upper classmen. 
Those entering on certificate were feeling happy enough, 
while those who had taken exams, weren't saying a word. They 
held their breath while the roll of admitted men was read, and as the turn for 
each one's name drew near his heart stopped beating until it was passed, then 
onl}' did it resume its action with a more rapid beat, in some cases with joy, 
in others with sorrow. Better luck to the latter next time. After having 
the college customs and rules drummed into us we were given a little kind 
advice on the quiet by the Juniors, and our college days began. 

A husky class we are to be sure, and a large one, a very promising class 
that much may be expected of in the next four years. Our college spirit was 
exhibited by at least a dozen men reporting for football practice with the varsity 
squad the very first day, a number of them making good. We were told that 
to pay our taxes at once was good college spirit, so we cashed in regardless of 
other demands. 

On this first night of our college days many of us went down town to see 
Amherst by lamplight. The willing Sophs proved ready guides, teaching us 
how to treat the Freshmen of next year. We are quite sure we know now. 

The Sophs were the victors of the "flag-rush," but not until after five full 
minutes of the hardest kind of tussle with our spirited class. We hope to 
redeem ourselves, however, in both the rope-pull and on the gridiron, our pros- 
pects for victory in the latter being especially brilliant. 

We are a class that may be relied upon to furnish plenty of good material 
for future athletic teams, and other branches as well. 

Our history now is not long but it will be some day. May it be a credit 
to the class, the class of '09. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Freshman Class, 1909 



Eben Herman Brown 
Charles Russell Webb 
Arthur D. Lyman 
George Francis Sexton 
Harold Parsons Crosby 
Homer Cutler 
Alfred Elmer Cox, Jr. 



Officers 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Class Captain 

Scrgcant-at-A mis 

Historian 



Class Yell 

In Preparation 

Class Colors 

Under Consideration 




50 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Class of 1909 



Adams, William Everett 
Alger, Paul Edgar 
Bardwell, Frank R. 
Barnes, Benj. F., Jr. 
Bartholomew, Persis 
Bartlett, Oscar C. 
Bean, Thomas Webster 
Beebe, John Cleveland 
Briggs, Orwell Burlton 
Brooks, Henry Alvan 
Brown, Eben Herman 
Burke, Edward Joseph 
Caffrey, Donald John 
Cardin, Patricio G. 
Chase, Edward Irving 
Codding, George M. 
Coleman, Leon Nelson 
Cook, William Arthur 
Corbett, Lahnert Seymour 
Cox, Leon Clark 
Cox, Alfred Elmer, Jr. 
Cronyn, Theodore 
Crosby, Harold Parsons 
Crossman, Samuel Sutton 
Curran, David Alysius 
Cutler, Homer 
Davison, Raymond Robbins 
Eddy, Roger Sherman 
French, Horace Wells 

Fulton, Gordon Russel 
Geer, Myron Francis 



Chelmsford Center 
Somerville 
North Brookfield 
Haverhill 
Melrose Highlands 
Westhampton 
Holyoke 
Hampden 
Great Barrington 
HoUiston 
Reillev's, Pleasant Street Bridgewater 



82 N. Pleasant Street 
John Walsh's 
John Walsh's 
Draper Hall 
Thompson House 
82 Pleasant Street 
E. M, Dickinson 
112 Pleasant Street 



2 South College 

3 Fearing Street 
66 Pleasant Street 
82 Pleasant Street 
77 Pleasant Street 
23 North College 
116 Pleasant Street 
27 North College 

1 5 South College 
6 Nutting Ave. 
96 Pleasant Street 

9 Fearing Street 

10 North College 
Goldberg's 

1 1 North College 



116 Pleasant Street 

2 McClellan Street 

Pawtucket 

3 Fearing Street 
Thompson House 



Holyoke 

Gardner 

Artemisa, Cuba 

Somerville 

Taunton 

Gardner 

Milton 

Jamaica Plain 

Boston 

Maiden 

Bernardston 

Lenox 

Needham 

Marlboro 

Westboro 

Leeds 

Boston 



Rhode Island 

Lynn 

Springfield 



MASSACHUvSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Geer, Wayne Emory 
Handy, Leory Marshall 
Hastings, David B. 
Hathaway, Elmer Francis 
Hayward, Warren Willis 
Hibbard, Myron James 
Hillman, Arthur Joseph 
Hubbard, Arthur Ward 
Ide, Warren Leory 
Jen, Huan 

Kenney, Walter James 
KiLBURNE, Ralph Turner 
Knight, Harry Orison 
Lambert, Marjorie Willard 
lindblad, rockwood chester 
Learned, Wilfred Hill 
Lull, Robert B. 
Lyman, Arthur D. 
MacGown, Guy E. 
Maps, Charles H. 

Martin, Nelson Lansing 
MoNAHAN, James V. 
MuNSiNG, Robert Henry 
Neal, Harold Johnson 
Noble, Harold Gordon 
NoYES, John F. 
O'Donnell, John F. 
Oliver, Joseph Thomas 
Paddock. Charles H. 

Parker, Ralph Robinson 
Parsons, Ernest Reynolds 
Parsons, Samuel Reynolds 
Pearce, Ernest Edwin 
Phelps, Harold Dwight 
Potter, Richard 
Putnam, Charles Summer 
Randolph, Lucy Amelia 



Thompson House 
96 Pleasant Street 

87 Pleasant Street 

Goldberg's 

Amherst 

82 Fearing Street 

8 North College 

112 Pleasant Street 

Mr. Fearing's 

5 East Pleasant Street 



Springfield 
Worcester 
New York 
Cambridge 
MiUbury 
North Hadiey 
Hardwick 
Sunderland 
Dudley 
Tientsin, China 
Lowell 
Winchendon 
Hatch Barn Gardner 

Draper Hall West Brighton, New York 
North College North Grafton 

5 McClellan Street Florence 

g Fearing Street Windsor, Vermont 

82 Pleasant Street Springfield 

Mr. Forristall's, Amherst, New Hampshire 
77 Pleasant Street 

Long Branch, New Jersey 
116 Pleasant Street Boston 

Goldberg's South Framingham 

Ludlow 
16 Pleasant Street 
5 East Pleasant Street 
27 North College 



Worcester 
Springfield 
Roslindale 
Worcester 
Boston 



Professor Mills 
9 Fearing Street 

West Claremont, New Hampshire 
Maiden 



9 Fearing Street 

1 2 North College 
97 Pleasant Street 
26 North College 
E. M. Dickinson's 
Belchertown 



Lenox 

North Amherst 

Worcester 

West Springfield 

Concord 

Brooks Stations 

Belchertown 



THE 1()07 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Richardson, George T. 
Robinson, D. O. 
Sexton, George Francis 
Shamiae, George M. 
Smith, Alexander H. 
Smulyan, Marcus Thomas 
Stanton, Willard Faraday 
Stewart, Eri S. 
Stowell, Leo Merrill 
Strong, Anson Loomis 
Sweet, Charles 
Thacher, Henry Bangs 
Thompson, James F. 
Thompson, Myron W. 
Thompson, Jared B. 
Trainer, Owen Francis 
Treat, Carlton Eddy 
Tucker, Horace N. 

Turner, Henry M. 
Turner, Leroy H. 
Wadsworth, Ralph E. 
Warner, Frederick Chester 
Warner, Raymond Anthony 
Webb, Charles Russell 
Whelpley, Walter Merton 
White, Charles Howard 

Willis, Luther George 
Wilson, Frank Hurbert 



82 Pleasant Street Middleboro 

Hornellsville, New York 

Worcester 



Amherst House 
7 North College 
1 1 North College 

14 North College 



Damascus, Sierra 

Nyack, New York 

New York City 

. Athol 



31 North College, Colchester, Connecticut 
96 Pleasant Street Worcester 



)7 Pleasant Street 
25 North College 



Halifax 
Monterey 
Worcester 

Chelsea 



5 East Pleasant Street 
9 Fearing Street 

Waterbury, Connecticut 
56 Pleasant Street Teuridad, Cuba 

77 Pleasant Street 

9 Fearing Street Northboro 
8 North College Sunderland 

66 Pleasant Street Worcester 

1 1 6 Pleasant Street Winthrop 

82 North Pleasant Street 

Providence, Rhode Island 

10 North College Melrose Highlands 
3 1 North College Nahant 



54 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Q. T. V. Fraternity 

1869-1905 



Chapters 

Amherst 

Massachusetts Agricultural College 

1869 



Boston Alumni Chapter 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Q. T. V. Fraternity 



55 



AMHERST CHAPTER 

Established i86g Incorporated it 



James B. Paige 



Members 

In Facultate 

Albert V. Osmun 
Maurice A. Blake 



Gerald D. Jones 
David Barry 
Henry J. Franklin 



In Urbe 

Henri D. Haskins 
James E. Duell 
Charles F. Duell 
E. H. Forristall 



Undergrad 

Richard Wellington 
Daniel Henry Carey 
Addison Tyler Hastings, Jr. 
Ralph Ware Peakes 
Benjamin Strain 
Clarence Ellsworth Hood 
Charles Almon Tirrell 
Charles Morton Parker 
Joseph Worcester Wellington 
Theoren Levi Warner 
William Francis Sawyer 
DoRSEY Fisher Ingalls 

Lloyd Warren 



uates 

John Daniel 
Adelbert Joseph Earned 
Allan Dana F^arrar 
Clinton King 
Samuel Judd Wright 
Herbert Linwood White 
Albert Lemuel Whiting 
Herman Temple Wheeler 
Thomas Francis Waugh 
Thomas Henry Jones 
Arthur James Farley 
WiNTiiROP Atherton Cummings 
Chapman 



56 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Phi Sigma Kappa 



1873-1905 



The Roll of Chapters 

Alpha Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Beta Union University 

Gamma Cornell University 

Delta West Virginia University 

Epsilon Yale University 

Zeta College of the City of New Yorl 

Eta University of Maryland 

Theta Columbia University 

Iota Stevens Institute of Technology 

Kappa Pennsylvania State College 

Lambda George Washington University 

Mu University of Pennsylvania 

Ntr Lehigh University 

Xi St. Lawrence University 

Omicron Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Pi Franklin and Marshall College 

Rho Queen's University 

Sigma St. John's College 

Tau Dartmouth College 



1873 
188S 
1889 
1891 

1893 
1896 
1S97 
1S97 
1899 
1899 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1902 
1903 
1903 
i9°3 
i9°S 



The New York Chxb 
The Boston Club 
The Albany Club 



The Clubs 



The Philadelphia Club 



The Connecticut Club 
The Southern Club 
The Morgantown Club 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Phi Sigrna Kappa 



Organised i8jj 



ALPHA CHAPTER 



Incorporated i8q2 



William P. Brooks 
Fred S. Cooley 



Members 

In Facultate 

George E. Stone 
S. Francis Howard 



Philip H. Smith 



In Urbe 

Edward G. Proulx 
WiNTHROP V. Tower 



Unde 

George Talbot French 
Fred Alexander Watkins 
Clifford Briggs Thompson 
Edward Houghton Shaw 
Jesse Gerry Curtis 
James Henry Walker 
Ralph Jerome Watts 
John Albert Anderson 
Orton Loring Clark 
Leon Clark Cox 
Frank Eugene Thurston 
Arthur William Hall, Jr. 



rgraduates 

Fry Civille Pray 
Frederick Charles Peters 
Frederick Augustus Cutter 
Edwin Daniels Philbrick 
Clifton Harland Chadwick 
Walter Ebenezer Dickinson 
Earle Goodman Bartlett 
Roy Edward Cutting 
Frank Lawrence Edwards 
Kenneth Edward Gillett 
Raymond Hobart Jackson 
Roland Hale Verbeck 



5S THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



College Shakespearean Club 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

A Non-Secret Fraternity 



The Corporation 

Incorporated in 1892 

The Graduate Association 

Organized September 4, 1897 

The College Club 

Organized September 20, 1879 

The Associate Club 

Organized at Connecticut Agricultural College, May 18, iJ 



^t^oLiTe,,^,, 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



College Shakespearean Club 



Honorary Members 

Prof. George F. Mills Prof. Herman Babson 

Prof. George B. Churchill Dr. Charles S. Walker 

Prof. John F. Genung Dr. William J. Rolfe 

Resident Graduates 

Dr. John B. Lindsey Walter B. Hatch 

Neil F. Monahan Frederick R. Church 

Sidney B. Haskell Earnest A. Back 

Sumner R. Parker 



Undergraduates 

Harry Merwin Russell Herbert Poland Wood 

George Warren Sleeper Ernest Avery Lincoln 

Louis Hale Moseley Henry Tyler Pierce 

James Edward Martin John Nicholas Summers 

Edwin Francis Gaskell Milford Henry Clark, Jr. 

William Otis Taft Wayland Fairbanks Chace 

Frank Henry Kennedy Charles Francis Allen 

George Robert Cobb Bradley Wheelock Bangs 

William John Coleman Thomas Addis Barry 

Frederick Andrew Johnson Rodman Ruggles Blake 

Leroy Altus Shattuck Henry Clinton Chase 

Albert James Wheeldon - Harry Milliken Jennison 

James Raphael O'Grady 



60 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVIl 



Kappa Sigma 

1867-1905 



Zeta 




Beta 




Eta Prime 


Mu 




Alpha 


Alpha 


Alpha Beta 


Kappa 




Lambda 


Alpha 


Chi 


Phi 




Omega 




Upsilon 


Tau 




Chi 




Psi 




Iota 




Gamma 




Beta Theta 


Theta 




Pi 




Eta 




Sigma 




Nu 




Xi 




Delta 




Alpha 


Gamma 


Alpha 


Delta 


Alpha 


Zeta 


Alpha 


Eta 


Alpha 


Theta 


Alpha 


Kappa 


Alpha 


Epsilon 


Alpha 


Lambda 


Alpha 


Mu 


Alpha 


Nu 


Alpha 


Pi 


Alpha 


Rho 


Alpha 


Sigma 


Alpha 


Tau 


Alpha 


Upsilon 


Alpha 


Phi 


Alpha 


Psi 


Alpha 


Omega 


Beta Alpha 



Roll of Chapters 

University of Virginia 
University of Alabama 
Trinity College, Durham, N. C. 
Washington and Lee University 
Universit)^ of Maryland 
Mercer University 
Vanderbilt University 
University of Tennessee 
Lake Forest University 
S. W. Presbyterian University 
University of the South 
Hampden-Sidney College 
University of Texas 
Purdue University 
University of Maine 
Southwestern University 
Louisiana State University 
Peekskill 

University of Indiana 
Cumberland University 
Swarthmore College 
Randolph Macon College 
Tulane University 
William and Mary College 
ITniversit)^ of Arkansas 
Davidson College 
University of Illinois 
Pennsylvania State College 
University of Michigan 
George Washington University 
S. W. Baptist University 
Cornell University 
University of Pennsylvania 
University of Vennont 
University of North Carolina 
Wofford College 
Wabash College 
Bowdoin College 
Ohio State University 
Georgia School of Technology 
Millsaps College 
Bucknell University 
University of Nebraska 
William Jewell College 
Brown University 



1867 
1867 
1873 
1873 
1874 
187s 
1877 



1883 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1886 
1887 
1887 
1887 
1887 
1888 
iSSS 
i88q 
1890 
i8go 
i8go 
1 89 1 
1892 
1892 



1893 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1895 
189 s 
189s 
1 89 5 
1896 
1897 
1897 



. cs.^ 




iy^^^ 



«'^J^.. 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



()1 



Beta Beta 
Beta Delta 
Beta Gamma 
Beta Epsilon 
Beta Zeta 
Beta Eta 
Beta Iota 
Beta Kappa 
Beta Lambda 
Beta Nu 
Beta Mu 
Beta Xi 
Beta Omicron 
Beta Pi 
Beta Rho 
Beta Sigma 
Beta Tau 
Beta Upsilon 
Beta Phi 
Beta Psi 
Beta Chi 
Beta Omega 
Gamma Alpha 
Gamma Beta 
Gamma Gamma 
Gamma Delta 
Gamma Epsilon 
Gamma Zeta 
Gamma Eta 



Richmond College 
Washington and Jefferson 
Missouri State Universit)' 
University of Wisconsin 
Stanford University 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute 
Lehigh University 
New Hampshire State College 
University of Georgia 
Kentucky State College 
University of Minnesota 
University of California 
University of Denver 
Dickinson College 
University of Iowa 
Washington University 
Baker University 
North Carolina A. and M. College 
Case School . . . 

University of Washington 
Missouri School of Mines , V' 

Colorado College . •. , 

University of Oregon . . ' 

University of Chicago 
Colorado School of Mines 
Massachusetts Agricultural College 
Dartmouth College 
N. Y. University 
Harvard University 



1S98 



iSg« 
i8gg 
igoo 
igoo 
1901 

K^OI 

lyoi 
I go I 
I go I 
[go2 
I go 2 
igo2 
I go 2 
I9°3 

igoj 
1903 
1903 

i9°3 

1904 

igo4 
igo4 
1904 
1904 
1905 
I9°5 
1905 



Alumni Chapters 



Boston 

Norfolk 

Pittsburg 

Indianapolis 

Memphis 

Louisville 

Los Angeles 



Danville 
Atlanta 
New York 
St. Louis 
BufTalo 
Concord 
Little Rock 



Waco 

Yazzo. City 
New Orleans 
Pine Bluff 
San Francisco 
Ithaca 
Lynchburg 



Washington 

Philadelphia 

Chicago 

Ruston 

Denver 

Fort Smith 

Richmond 



62 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Kappa Sigma 



GAMMA DELTA CHAPTER 



Charles Wellington 



Members 

In Facultate 



Frank A. Waugh 



In Urbe 

Edward B. Holland E. Thorndyke Ladd 



Undergraduates 



Charles Walter Carpenter 
Edwin Hobart Scott 
Herman Augustus Suhlke 
Alexander Henry Moore Wood 
Stanley Sawyer Rogers 
Raymond Dean Whitmarsh 
William Swift Regan 
Horace Bigelow Reed 
John Robert Parker 
Danforth Parker Miller 
David Larsen 
Herbert Kendall Hayes 



Everett Pike Mudge 
Harold Edward Alley 
Arthur Huguenin Armstrong 
Joseph Otis Chapman 
Arthur William Higgins 
Chester Socrates Gillett 
Clifton Leroy Flint 
Parke Warren Farrar 
Stearnes Lothrop Davenport 
Marcus Metcalf Browne 
Carlton Bates 
Ernest Winfield Bailey 



MASSACHUvSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 03 



Fraternity Conference 



Addison T. Hastings, Jr. ...... President 

Geo. Talbot French ....... Vice-President 

Wayland F. Chace . ... . . Secretary and Treasurer 

Members 

PHI SIGMA KAPPA 

G. Talbot French Frederick C. Peters 

c. s. c. 

Frank H. Kennedy Wayland F. Chace 

kappa sigma 

Edwin H. Scott Herman Suhlke 

Q. T. V. 

Addison T. Hastings, Jr. Richard Wellington 



G4 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Phi Kappa Phi 



Roll of Chapters 

University of Maine Chapter 
Pennsylvania State College Chapter 
University of Tennessee Chapter 
Massachusetts Agricultural College Chapter 
Delaware College of Agriculture Chapter 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Phi Kappa Phi 



MASS. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE CHAPTER 



E. A. Back, '04 

F, D. COUDEN, '04 

A. W. Gilbert, '04 



Charter Members 



H. M. White, '04 



S. B. Haskell, ' 
F. F. Henshaw, 
A. L. Peck, 



04 



^\ 



C. H. Fernald 

F. A. Waugh 

G. F. Mills 

J. E. OSTRANDER 



Faculty Members 

C. Wellington 
P. B. Hasbrouck 
H. T. Fernald 
S. F. Howard 
W. P. Brooks 



G. E. Stone 
J. B. Paige 

A. V. OSMUN 

H. J. Franklin 



Member by Affiliation 

H. T. Fernald 



Graduate Members 



W. D. Russell, '71 
W. Wheeler, '71 
S. C. Thompson, '72 
J. B. Minor, '73 
J. H. Webb, '73 
E. H. LiBBY, '74 
E. E. Woodman 
J. F. Bartlett, '7; 
W. P. Brooks, '75 
W. H. Knapp, '75 
C. F. Deuel, '76 
W. A. Macleod, '7 
G. A. Parker, '76 



74 



R. 


B. Mackintosh, '86 


W 


. E 


. Hinds, '99 


F. 


B. Carpenter, '87 


F. 


H. 


Turner, '99 


F. 


H. Fowler, '87 


B. 


H. 


Smith, '99 


R. 


B. Moore, '88 


A. 


C. 


Monahan, '00 


B. 


L. Hartwell, '8q 


E. 


T. 


Hull, '00 


F. 


W. Davis, '89 


A. 


A. 


Harmon. '00 


D. 


Barry, '90 


C. 


E. 


Gordon, '01 


C. 


H. Jones, '90 


A. 


C. 


Wilson, '01 


F. 


J. Smith, '90 


H. 


L. 


Knight,. '02 


F. 


L. Arnold, '91 


T. 


M. 


Carpenter, '02 


E. 


B. Holland, '92 


A. 


L. 


Dacy, '02 


G. 


E, Taylor/'92 


H. 


J. 


Franklin, '03 


F. 


S. Hoyt, '93 


W 


. E 


, Tottingham, '03 



66 THE 


1907 


INDEX Volume 


XXXVII 


A. Clark, '77 


E. 


H. Lehnert, '93 


J. G. Cook, '03 


J. N. Hall. '78 


G. 


F. CURLEY. '93 


A. V. OSMUN, '03 


C. S. Howe, '78 


R 


E. Smith, '94 


E. A. Back, '04 


S. B. Green, '79 


F. 


S. Bacon, '94 


F. D. COUDEN, '04 


J. L. Hills, '81 


S. 


F. Howard, '94 


A. W. Gilbert, '04 


J. E. Wilder, '82 


C. 


P. LOUNSBURY, '94 


S. B. Haskell, '04 


L. R. Taft, '82 


C. 


B. Lane, '95 


F. F. Henshaw, '04 


J. B. LiNDSEY, '83 


H 


A. Ballou, '95 


A. L. Peck, '04 


C. H. Preston, '83 


H 


L. Frost, '95 


H. M. White, '04 


C. S. Phelps, '85 


F. 


L. Clapp. '96 


R. L. Adams, '05 


J. E. GOLDTHWAITE, '85 


I. 


C. Poole, '96 


E. C. CusHMAN (Miss), '05 


E. W Allen, '85 


G 


D. Leavens, '97 


W. A. MUNSON, '05 


D. F. Carpenter, '86 


C. 


A. Peters, '97 


G. W. Patch, '05 


C. F. W. Felt, '86 


J. 


L. Bartlett. '97 


M. L. Sanborn (Miss), '05 


B. TUPPER, '05 


G 


N. Willis, '05 


H. F. Tompson, '05 



Deceased Member 

H. H. Goodell 




c'lRE^'ft 




(iS 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Athletic Board 

MEMBERS FOR 1905-1906 



Dr. James B. Paige 

Dr. R. S. Lull 

Capt. George C. Martin 



Faculty 



President 

Vice-President 

Exeeittive Committee 



S. F. Howard 
M. A. Blake 



Alumni 



J. G. Cook 



Secretary and Treasurer 
Auditor 



R. W. Peakes 



Undergraduates 

F. A. Cutter 



A. T. Hastings, Jr. 




William Hunlie Craighead 
Ralph Ware Peakes 
MiLFORD H. Clark, Jr. 



Captain 

Manager 

Assisiaui Manager 



J. Thomas Keady, Walter Abbott Conley, Walter Huston 
Lillard. Willis Parker Craig ..... 



Coaclies 



Team for 1905 ,,; 

Cutter, Center 
Willis, Carey, Johnson, Guards 
Craighead, Summers, Thompson, Farley, Tackles 
Crossman, Barry, Clark, Wood, Ends 
Cobb, Quarter Back 
Warner, Brown, French, Taft, Hal} Backs 
Crosby, Philbrick, Full Backs 



Sept. 
Oct. 



Results of Games for Season 



Massachusetts 





Holy Cross 


17 


Massachusetts 





Dartmouth 


t8 


Massachusetts 





Brown 


-1 


Massachusetts 


1 1 


Rhode Island State 


n 


Massachusetts 





Williams 


T ? 


Massachusetts 


IS 


New Hampshire State 





Massachusetts 




Bates 


t6 


Massachusetts 





Andover 


1" 


Massachusetts 


IS 


Springfield 


n 


Massachusetts 


6 


Tufts 


8 



69 



f 



MASSvVCHUSETTS AGRICULTURy\L COLLEGE 



Football 




DLf RING the last few years we have invariably stuck to 
the Dartmouth men to coach our football teams, 
and to these men and our indomitable spirit is due 
the success that we have had. I cannot praise too 
hi^hh the spirit of old Mass'cliiisclls, for it is the 
pint that has brought us to the front; it is the spirit 
that has caused our athletic teams to rank with col- 
kLjts far bevond us in numbers. Without this spirit 
\\c Lould do but little, inasmuch as we have so 
few men from which to choose. 

Last season, 1904, we prided ourselves in having 
one of the best teams that we have ever had. There 
were just eleven men and practically no substitutes, to play every game. But 
under the careful coaching of Mr. Bullock, we won all our games but two. Since 
most of the members of that team were graduated last June, it left a very hard 
problem to be solved. 

Last spring, we began work at once looking for material. We had spring 
practice for ten days to find the best material we had. Several men showed 
up fairly well, but none excellently. Consequently it became evident that our 
task to develop a team out of so much raw material was no small undertaking. 
However we have started out with Mr. Thomas Keady as coach. He comes to 
us well recommended from Dartmouth. We know that he is working hard to 
turn out a good team, and too much praise cannot be given him for his untiring 
energy along this line. 

Our first game of the season opened with Holy Cross as usual. It was a 
decisive victorv for the latter, winning by a score of 17-0. This score does not 
tell anything of the hard fight and plucky stand that we made against the strong 
veteran line of Holy Cross. We were especially weak on our ends, and there 
is where Holy Cross made most of their gains. Our next game came with 
Dartmouth. By this time our line had been whipped into shape and the game 
we put up against Dartmouth won the admiration of their coaches. Although 
the final score was 18-0, we ]:iractically held them down to 12 points which 



72 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



were scored in the first half. During tlie second half, Dartmouth could not 
gain through our line and the final score was made on a fluke. Our third game 
with Brown, coming so close after the Dartmouth trip, found us altogether un- 
prepared for Brown's style of play, they using mostly trick .plays and end runs. 
We were unable to hold them down to a smaller score than 24-0. 

Although we have been beaten in our first three games, we are not at all 
discouraged, because we know that we have not been idle. If there is any 
criticism to be made, I would criticise arranging such a hard schedule at the 
beginning of the season, before we are prepared for it. We must prepare for 
each game if we wish to make a showing.' 

Wm. H. Craighead, Captain 




Brown \s. M.^ 



jltural College, Oct. 4, 1905 




Baseball 



1905 

F. H. Kennedy 
W. 0. Taft 
F. A. Cutter 
P. A. Bowler 



Captain 

Manager 

Assistant Manager 

Coach 



igo6 , 
F. H. Kennedy 
F. A. Cutter 
T. A. Barry 



Ingham, Catcher 
Kennedy, Cobb, Pitchers 
TiRRELL, First Base 
Martin, Second Base 
Draper, Hunt, SJiort Stop 



College Team, 1905 

Cobb, Shattuck, Third Base 

O'Grady, Shattuck, Left Field 

O'Grady, Clark, Centre Plcld 

Clark, Kennedy, Right Field 



Results of Games for Season of 1905 

April iS Wcsleyan at Middletown 

24 Holyoke at Holyoke 

29 Holy Cross at Worcester 
May I Colby on the Campus 

3 Trinity at Hartford 

13 University of Rochester on campus 

17 Springfield T. S. on campus 

19 Dartmouth at Hanover 

20 Williams at Williamstown 

22 Andover at Andover 

23 Boston College at Boston 

24 Colby at Waterville, Me. 

30 Springfield T. S. at Greenfield 
30 Springfield T. S. at Greenfield 

June I Boston College at Northampton 

7 Brown at Providence 

Totals 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 75 



Baseball 




EARLY last spring quite a number of men responded 
to the call for baseball candidates, and began prac- 
tice in the drill hall. Of the number who began prac- 
tice there were however only five experienced men — 
the greater part being Freshmen. As soon as the 
weather permitted, the squad took up practice on 
the campus and the real work of the season was 
begvm under the supervision of Coach Bowler. The 
limbering-up and practice work gave indications of 
a very successful season, but as the season wore on, it 
became apparent that there was a lack of experience, 
which was of course due to the green material. In 
spite of this fact, however, the team made a very creditable showing by win- 
ning half of the games scheduled, a feat which has not been performed for many 
years in our baseball history. All the more credit is due the team when it is 
taken into consideration that nearly all the eastern colleges, with the exception 
of Harvard and Yale, were included in the schedule. Having just finished so 
brilliant a season, and having lost only two men of last year's team and with 
the vast amount of good baseball material in the present Freshman class, there 
is no reason why we should not put just as good a team on the field next year. 
All that is needed is the co-operation of each and every man in college. En- 
courage the men on the teams, rather than dishearten them, for good results 
cannot be obtained unless we all work together for the same end. Practically 
the same schedule will be adopted for the coming season so that we have a chance 
to retrieve some of our lost laurels. 

Frank H. Kennedy, Captain 



76 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Baseball 



Individual Batting Averages of 1905 Team 



Players and Positions 

Walker, 2b, jb 
Ingham, c 
Martin, 55, 2b 
Hunt, 55, 2b 
O'Grady, rf, If 
Cobb, p, jb 

TiRRELL, lb 

Shattuck, //, jh 
Kennedy, p, rf {ca 
Clark, cf 
Draper, 55 



pt.) 



mes 


a.b. 


K. 


H. 


T.B. 


,S.H 


S.B. 


% 


3 


10 





4 


6 





2 


400 


16 


63 


18 


23 


28 


I 


9 


36s 


15 


55 


12 


13 


14 


I 


4 


236 


16 


68 


I I 


15 


19 





5 


221 


16 


60 


8 


13 


IS 


I 


7 


217 


16 


60 


6 


I 2 


15 


I 


6 


200 


16 


62 


9 


I 2 


i6 


3 


4 


193 


I 2 


39 


5 


6 


7 





I 


154 


IS 


49 


6 


7 


7 


2 





143 


I I 


39 


6 


5 


6 


2 


4 


128 


7 


20 


2 


2 


3 





I 


100 



Individual Fielding Averages of 1905 Team 



Players and PusitiDns 








(lames 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


% 


Tirrell, lb ....... 16 


I 21 


7 


4 


970 


Ingham, c 








16 


128 


23 


9 


944 


Clark, cf . 








I I 


14 


3 


I 


944 


Hunt, ss, 2b 








16 


28 


36 


8 


889 


Cobb, p, jb 








16 


19 


47 


12 


846 


Martin, ss, 2b 








15 


42 


28 


14 


833 


Shattuck, If, jb 








I 2 


19 


5 


5 


828 


Kennedy, p, rf (capt.) 








IS 


16 


17 


8 


80s 


Walker, 2b, jb 








3 


s 


5 


3 


769 


Draper, 55 








7 


8 


13 


7 


750 


O'Grady, rf, If 








16 


13 


2 


10 


600 




Basketball 



1905 

T. F. Hunt 

J. J. Gardner 

A. T. Hastings, Jr. 



Captain 

Manager 

Ass'istaut Mauaticr 



1906 
F. C. Peters 
A. T. Hastings, Jr. 
H. T. Pierce 



College Team for 1905 

Taylor, Cobb, Ingham, Whitmarsii, Foncards 
GiLLETT, Taylor, Centers 
Hunt, Peters, Ciiards 



Results of Games for Season 



Jan. 


7 


Massachusetts 21 


Worcester Tech 


,U 


Jan. 


17 


Massachusetts 67 


Holyoke Consohdated 


I 2 


Jan. 


20 


Massachusetts 1 5 


Newport Naval Reserves 


20 


Jan. 


21 


Massachusetts 14 


Brown 


SI 


Feb. 


I 


Massachusetts 37 


Northampton Y. M. C. A. 


s 


Feb. 


4 


Massachusetts 66 


Connecticut A. C. 




Feb. 


17 


Massachusetts 15 


Tufts 


.^s 


Feb. 


18 


Massachusetts 18 


Andover 


51 



77 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Basketball 



IN looking back over the past season, one can hardly 
say that it was a very successful one, and I do not 
think it was due wholly to the work of the team. 
When the call for candidates was made last year a 
large number reported, but they soon dwindled down 
t'l about seven men. Now what we want is a good 
s(|uad out for the whole season, or at least enough 
. lor a scrub game every night. This is a line chance 
for the Sophomores and Freshmen to get in practice 
for their annual contest and they should take advan- 
tage of it. It would help the captain and manager 
greatly in picking out good men, if we could have 
regular scheduled class games before Christmas. There are generally some 
good men to be found in the class teams, that don't try for the varsity. The 
outlook for the coming season is encouraging. By the graduation of 1905 we 
lose two good men, but with the material now in college we should turn out a 
fast team. This year we want a team that will make a record which approaches 
those made by the football teams of 1901 and 1904. The manager is arranging 
a fine schedule and there are some hard games to be played. If we are to have 
a successful season we must also have the hearty co-operation of the whole 
student body. 

F. C. Peters, Captain 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Football 

Former Managers and Captains 

Manager Captain 

Ralph Ware Peakes 190S William Hunlie Craighead 

Edwin White Newhall, Jr. 1904 Willard Anson Munson 

Clarence H. Griffin 1903 George E. O'Hearn 

Philip W. Brooks 1902 Charles P. Halligan 

Victor A. Gates 1901 ' Herbert A. Paul 

C. L. Rice 1900 T. F. Cook 

C. L. Rice 1899 J. E. Halligan 

G. F. Parmenter 1898 A. D. Gile 

R. D. Worden 1897 D. A. Beaman 

C. I. Goessman 1896 J. W. Allen 




so 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Baseball 



Former Managers and Captains 



Manager 
Frederick A. Cutter 
William O. Taft 
Raymond A. Quigley 
Joseph G. Cook 
Victor A. Gates 
Y. H. Canto 
N. D. Whitman 
G. H. Wright 
J. S. Eaton 
Newton Shultis 



igo6 

1905 
1904 

1903 
1902 
1 90 1 
1900 



Captain 

Frank H. Kennedy 

Frank H. Kennedy 

George E. O'Hearn 

M. F. Ahearn 

Herbert A. Paul 

T. Graves 

J. E. Halligan 

J. S. Eaton 

J. A. Emrich 

J. I. Marshall 



Basketball 



Former Managers and Captains 



Manager 

Addison T. Hastings, Jr. 1906 

John J. Gardner 1905 

Raymond A. Quigley 1904 

Edward B. Snell 1903 

J. H. Belden 1902 



Captain 

Frederick C. Peters 

Thomas F. Hunt 

Edwin S. Fulton 

M. F. Ahearn 

John M. Dellea 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Wearers of the M. 



Football 

D. H. Carey W. 0. Taft G. R. Cobb 

J. E. Martin F. A. Cutter E. D. Philbrick 

L. G. Willis F, C. Peters M. H. Clark, Jr. 

S. S. Grossman E. H. Brown J. N. Summers 

H. P. Crosby H. W. French 



Baseball 

F. H. Kennedy E. G. Bartlett J. R. O'Grady 

J. E. Martin M. H. Clark, Jr. L. A. Shattuck 

C. A. TiRRELL G. R. Cobb 



Wearers of the " M. B. B." 

F. C. Peters G. R. Cobb R. D. Whitmarsh 

K. E. Gillett 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1907 Sophomore Football Team 



H. H. Green, Centre 
Thompson, Whitney, Guards Peters, (Capt.) Qiiarterback 

Watkins, Summers, Tackles Wood, Shaw, Halfbacks 

Clark, Walker, Ends Pierce, Fullback 



Score 

igoy — II 1908 — o 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1907 Freshman Ropepull Team 



, Raitt, A'O. I Clementson, No. _/ 

Dickinson, No. 2 Caruthers (Capt.). No. 5 

Whitney, N'o. j Pierce, Anchor 



1907 plus 3 ft. 9 in. 1906 minus 3 ft. 9 in. 



MAvSvSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1907 Sophomore Basketball Team 



Wood {Capt.), Centre 
Cutter, Shaw, Forifanis 
Peters, Green, Chapman, Guards 



Score 

1907 — 7 1908 — 8 



90 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Young Men's Christian Association 



Officers 



L. H. MOSELY 

F. C. Peters 
H. M. Russell 
H. M. Russell 
D. Larsen 



President. 

Vice-Preside n t 

Recording Secretary 

Treasurer 

Corresponding Secretary 



Advisory 

Dr. J. B. Lindsey, Ch. 
M. B. Kingman 
Prof. F. A. Waugh 



Committees 

Reception 

H. M. Russell, Ch. 
C. E. Hood 
E. F. Gaskell 



Membership 

W. F. Chace, Ch. 
J. N. Summers 
C. F. Allen 



Devotional 

F. C. Peters, Ch. 
R. J. Watts 
L. H. Mosely 



Missionary 

J. T. Caruthers, Ch. 
E. W. Bailey 
A. D. Farrar 



Bible Study 

E. F. Gaskell, Ch. 
L. H. Mosely 
W. L. Howe 



Music 

D. P. Miller, Ch. 

E. W. Bailey 
W. L. Howe 



Handbook 

R. J. W.ATTS, Ch. 

E. W. Bailey 

F. C. Peters 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



91 



Faculty Members 

Professor Mills Professor Howard Dr. H. T, Ferxald 

Professor C. H. Fernald Doctor Lull 



1900 
C. W. Carpenter 
H. M. Russell 

E. F. Gaskell 

A. T. Hastings, Jr. 
C, E. Hood 
R. Wellington 
L. H. Mosely 

1907 

F. C. Peters 
W. F. Chace 

J. T. Caruthers 

A. W. HiGCINS 



Active Members 

John N. Summers 
R. J. Watts 
A. J. Earned 

igo8 
D. Larson 
D. P. Miller 
W. F. Turner 
W. L. Howe 
F. L. Edwards 
A. J. Farley 
J. W. Wellington 
S. J. Wright 



1909 
R. Potter 

E. J. Burke 
H. G. Noble 
A. L. Strong 

F. H. Wilson 

M. W. Thompson 
C. E. Treat 

G. T. Richardson 
P. E. Alger 

L. G. Willis 
L. N, Coleman 
R. D. Lull 
C. H, White 



igoo 
W. H. Craighead 
G. T. French 
F. D. Wholley 



Associate Members 

1907 
J. H. Walker 
M. H. Clark, Jr. 
C. King 
J. O. Chapman 
C. B. Thompson 
H. P. Wood 



1908 
C. F. Allen 
J. R. Parker 
K. F. Anderson 
R. H. Verbeck 
A. J. Wheeldon 
S. L. Davenport 



92 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Senate 



Ralph Ware Peakes 
Richard Wellington 
Earle G. Bartlett 



President 

Vice-Presiden t 

Secretary 



F. H. Kennedy 
R. W. Peakes 
R. Wellington 
A. H. M. Wood 



Members 



F. C. Peters 
E. G. Bartlett 
H, T. Pierce 
W. E. Dickinson 



College Choir 



Instructor and Leader 

Professor S. Francis Howard 



First Tenors 

S. F. Howard 
R. Potter 

First Bassos 

R. W. Peakes 
G. R. Cobb 



Second Tenor 

A. D. Farrar 



Second Bassos 

L. W. Chapman 
J. A. Hyslop 



Organist 

Earle G. Bartlett 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



9:3 



Reading- Room Association 



Edwin H. Scott 
James E. Martin 
Harry M. Russell 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



Edwin H. Scott 
James E. Martin 
Harry M. Russell 



Directors 



James R. O'Grady 



Clinton King 
John N. Summers 
J. Robert Parker 



Dining Hall Committee 

Prof. G. F. Mills H. M. Russell 

Prof. P. B. Hasbrouck A. W. Higgins 

C. E. Rowe 



Entomological Journal Club 



Prof. C. H. Fernali 
Dr. H. T. Fernald 
A. H. Armstrong 
E. A. Back 



Members 



H. J. Franklin 



W. A. Hooker 
H. M. Russell 

J. N. Summers 
W. V. Tower 



94 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 




TH^ 



%i^m%s 



A Society of 

The Junior Class igo; 
The Freshman Class 1909 

Members 



96 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Frederick A. Cutter 
Frank H. Kennedy 
Arthur W. Hall, Jr. 
S. Francis Howard 



Komikal Klub 



Motto : Look Cheerful 



Fussers' Club 



. ■ Joker 

Joke Cracker 

Joke Biid 

Cheap Joker 



Jesse G. Curtis 
Clifford B. Thompson 
Kenneth E. Gillett 
Clifton H. Chadwick 



Active Members 



Chief Fiisser 

Carrier of the Bouquets 

A Chaser of Skirts 

A Gallant Knislit 



Retired Members 

Edwin D. Philbrick — Honorably dischar^ 
wounds received in action. 

Frederick C. Peters — Died on the Firing Line, 
lege. May 20, 1905, 

Motto: A faint heart never won a fair lady 



on account of 

arnard Col- 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



97 



Boots and Saddles 



A club composed of numerous Seniors for the promotion of any good 
cause, chiefly that of grub. 

Motto: "Be Whollcy" 



Officers 



Ben Strain 
A. Hastings, Jr. 
M. F. Wholley 
Charles Tirrell 
H Filer 



Chief High Rocking Horse 

Chief Stable Boy 

Chief Musician 

Chief Hay and Oats S linger 

Cigarette Roller 



Strain 



Members 

Wholley 
Tirrell Filer 



Hastings 



Meetings are held regularly at the same place and at same time. Mem- 
bers are requested to bring chairs. 



The Index 



PUBLISHED ANNUALLY BY THE JUNIOR CLASS 
Volume XXXVII 



Board of Editors — Class of 1907 

Clifton H. Chadwick, Edilor-iii-i liicf 
Edwin D. Philbrick, Assistant Editor 

MiLFORD H. Clark, Jr. . .... Business Mmiai^ei- 

Frederick C. Peters . . . - Assistant Business Manager 

Walter E. Dickinson . . . Artist 

Associate Editors 

Henry T. Pierce Arthur W. Higgins 

Clinton King Earle G. Bartlett 



Editors-in-Chief and Business 

Editor-in-Chief 



Clifton H. Chadwick 
Ralph W. Peakes 
George H. Allen 
Fayette D. Couden 
Neil F. Monahan 
Leander C. Claflin 
Alexander C. Wilson 
Arthur C. Monahan 
Edwin H. Wright 
Alexander Montgomery 



1907 
1906 

1905 
1904 
1903 
ig02 
1 90 1 
1900 



Managers 

Bus in ess Ma n ager 

Milford H. Clark, Jr. 

Frank H. Kennedy 

Bertram Tupper 

Arthur L. Peck 

George L. Barrus 

Ransom W. Morse 

Percival C. Brooks 

F. A. Herrill 

John R. Butcher 

Randall D. Warden 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 101 



The College Signal 

PUBLISHED FORTNIGHTLY BY THE STUDENTS OF "MASSACHUSETTS' 



Editors 

Addison T. Hastings, Jr. ..... Editor-in-Chief 

Ralph W. Peakes ....... Business Manager 

Ralph J. Watts ..... Assistant Business Manager 

Associate Editors 
Charles Walter Carpenter, 'o6, Department Notes 
Edwin Hobart Scott, 'o6, Intercollegiate Notes 
Stanley Sawyer Rogers, 'o5, College Notes 
Arthur William Higgins, '07, Alumni Notes 
Earle Goodman Bartlett, '07, Athletics 
Clinton King, '07 
Herbert Linwood White, '08 
Marcus Metcalf Browne, '08 
Edwin D. Philbrick, '08 

Editors-in-Chief and Business Managers 

Editor Manager 

Addison T. Hastings, Jr. 1905 Ralph W. Peakes 

John F. Lyman 1904 G. Howard Allen 

R. Raymond Raymoth 1903 Howard M. White 

Myron H. West 1902 William E. Allen 

Howard L. Knight 1901 Leander C. Claflin 

Clarence E. Gordon 1900 Nathan D. Whitman 

Morris B. Landers 1899 George F. Parmenter 

Warren E. Hinds 189S Frederick H. Turner 

Randall D. Warden 1897 Alexander Montgomery, Jr. 

George D. Leavens 1896 John M. Barry 



102 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Handbook of the College 

PUBLISHED ANNUALLY BY THE Y. M C A. 



Editors 

Ralph J. Watts Frederick C. Peters 

Ernest W. Bailey 



The Cycle 

PUBLISHED ANNUALLY BY THE KAPPA SIGMA FRATERNITY 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



103 



M. A. C. Cadet Battalion Roster 



Clarence E. Hood 
Addison T. Hastings, Jr. 
George W. Sleeper 
Charles A. Tirrell 
Harry M. Russell 
John N. Summers 



Field Staff 

First Lieutenant and Adjutant 

First Lieutenant and Quartermaster 

Sergeant Major 

Color Sergeant 

Color Sergeant 

Ordnance Sergeant 



Company A 

H. A. Suhlke 
F. C. Pra-y 

B. Strain 
W. O. Taft 

W. E. Dickinson 
F. D. Wholley 
E. D. Philbrick 

C. H. Chadwick 
H. T. Pierce 
H. E. Alley 

H. B. Filer 

W. H. Craighead 

H. P. Wood 

R. D. Whitmarsh 

M. M. Brown 

C. S. Gillett 



Captain 
First Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 

First Sergeant 
Second Sergeant 

Third Sergeant 
Fourth Sergeant 

Fifth Sergeant 

First Corporal 
Second Corporal 

Third Corporal 
Fourth Corporal 

Fifth Corporal 

Sixth Corporal 
Seventh Corporal 
Figlith Corporal 



Company B 

G. T. French 

D. H. Carey 

A. H, M. Wood 

A. W. Hall, Jr. 

F. C. Peters 

W. F. Chace 

E. F. Gaskell 

R. Wellington 

E. H. Scott 

J. T. Caruthers 

J. H. Walker 

C. B. Thompson 

J. O. Chapman 

C. King 

R. J. Watts 

. T. A. Barry 



104 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Clark Cadet Band 



Chief Musician, with 
Ralph W. Peakes 

L. H. MOSELY 

E. P. MUDGE 

F. H. Kennedy 

E. G. Bartlett 
J. A. Hyslop 
A. W. Hubbard 

F. L. Gold 

J. F. Eastman 
R. E. Wordsworth 
H. P. Crosby 
E. H. Shaw 
L. W. Chapman 
R. E. Cutting 
C. W. Carpenter 
A. L. Strong 
K. E. Gillett 
W. C. Tannatt 
M. H. Clark, Jr. 
A. D. Farrar 



Stanley S. Rogers 
rank of First Lieiitenant, solo B flat cornet 

First Sergeant, solo B flat cornet 

Second Sergeant, first B flat cornet 

First Corporal, solo E flat alto 

Second Corporal, bass drum 

Solo B flat clarinet 

First B flat clarinet 

Second B flat clarinet 

Second B fiat cornet 

Third B flat cornet 

Solo E fiat cornet 

Second E flat alto 

First B fiat tenor 

First trombone 

Second trombone 

E flat tuba 

E flat tuba 

Baritone 

Snare drum. 

Snare drum 

Cymbals 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 105 

COMMENCEMENT 

SUNDAY, JUNE i8, 1905, 10:45 A. M. ; 

Baccalaureate Sermon by Rev. Calvin Stebbins, Framingham 



Flint Oratorical Contest 



Afton S. Hayward . . . . . . . . ■ Amherst 

"College and After" 

Charles W. Carpenter ....... Monson 

"The Execution of Nathan Hale" 

Louis H. Mosely ..... Glastonbury, Connecticut 

"Theodore Roosevelt — The Liberty of the Individual" 

Ralph W. Peakes ........ Newtonville 

"Thomas De Quincy — The Weakness of Man" 

William H. Craighead . . . . . . . . Boston 

" Booker T. Washington " 

Edwin F. Gaskell ........ Hopedale 

"The Cost of the United States" 



106 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



The Burnham Prize Speaking 

MONDAY, JUNE 19 

Herbert L. White ........ Maynard 

"Hannibal to his Soldiers" — Livy 

Henry M. Jennison ....... Millbury 

"Centralization in America" — Grady 

David L.-vrson ...... Bridgeport, Connecticut 

"A Message to Garcia" — Hubbard 

Allan D. Farrar ........ Amherst 

"Mob Rule in Chicago" — Adapted 

Raymond D. Whitmarsh ....... Taunton 

"Corruption in Municipal Government" — Parkhiirst 

Stearnes L. Davenport ...... North Grafton 

"The Voyage of the Fram " 

Thomas F. Waugh ........ Worcester 

"Freedom of Slavery" — P. Henry 

John A. Anderson ....... North Brookfield 

"Cuba and Spain" — Thurston 



Class Day Programme 



Planting Class Ivy 
Ivy Poem 
Class Oration 
Class Song 
Class Ode 
Campus Oration 
Pipe Oration 
Hatchet Oration 



JUNE 20, 1.30 p. M. 

Class President 

Grenville Norcott Willis 

Frederick Loring Yeaw 

Words by Richard Laban Adams 

George Howard Allen 

Hugh Lester Barnes 

Thomas Francis Hunt 

Bertram Tupper 



Class Tree Planted 



Exhibition Drill 
President's Reception 
Senior Promenade 



4 : 00 p. M. 

: 00-10 : 00 p. M. 

10 : 00 p. M. 



lOS THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Graduation Exercises 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21 



Programme 

Music 

Prayer 



Address: "Educational Responsibilities" 

W. E. Stone, Massachusetts Agricultural College, '82 



Commencement Appointments 

A. D. Taylor Miss E. C. Cushman 

J. F. Lyman H. F. Tompson 

R. L. Adams A. N. Swain 



Presentation of Diplomas Announcement of Prizes 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 109 



Honor Men 



Grinnell Agricultural Prize 

Bertram Tupper, First H. F. Tompson, Second 

Hills Botanical Prize 

Miss E. C. Cushman 

Flint Oratorical Prizes 

William H. Craighead Ralph W. Peakes 

Burnham Prizes 

Sophomore 

Waldo D. Barlow, First Clinton King, Second 

J. O. Chapman, Third 

Freshman 

Thomas F. Waugh, First Allan D. Farrar, Second 



112 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Junior Promenade 

FEBRUARY 17, 1905 



Patronesses 

Mrs. H. H. Goodell Mrs. P. B. Hasbrouck Mrs. F. S. Cooley 

Mrs. J. E. Ostrander Mrs. R. S. Lull Mrs. H. A. Babson 

Committee 

H. M. Russell, Chairman 
Prof. P. B. Hasbrouck Dr. R. S. Lull Prof. F. A. Waugh 

G. T. French S. S. Rogers H. A. Suhlke 

R. W Peakes ■ G. W. Sleeper W. O. Taft 

W. C. Tannatt R. Wellington 



Senior Promenade 

JUNE 20, 1905 



Patronesses 

Mrs. W. p. Brooks Mrs. G. E. Stone Mrs. W. N. Swain 

Mrs. Charles Wellington Mrs. F. S. Cooley Mrs. J. E. Whitaker 

Committee 

A. D. Taylor, Chairman 
G. H. Allen . T. F. Hunt A. N. Swain 

H. D. Crosby C. W. Lewis C. L. Whitaker 

Miss E. C. Cushman Miss M. L. Sanborn P. F. Williams 

J. J. Gardner W. M. Sears 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 




Massachusetts Agricultural College 



College Colors 

h[arooii and White 



College Yell 

Mass! Mass! Mass'chiisctts! 

Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! 

Mass'chiisctts! 



114 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Review of the Year 




When one sits down to 
review the happenings of the 
past college year, he is over- 
whelmed with a flood of recol- 
lections. He recalls one by 
one each little event which has 
gone to make up the total, and 
shape the destinies of our 
grand old college for another 
year. To attempt to sift from 
all these incidents those which 
will exert a real influence on 
the succeeding history of the 
college is indeed a hard task. 
The past year has been quite eventful as far as the college has been concerned. 
The year Opened auspiciously with the largest freshman class on record. Pro- 
fessor Babson returned fresh from the Continent to take up new duties as Ger- 
man instructor in addition to his connection with the English department. Our 
football team established an enviable record on the gridiron. 

Thus the clear skies and bracing air of autumn gave place to the snow and 
ice of winter and soon the Christmas recess was at hand. Returning after 
Christmas, we were shocked to learn of the death of our classmate William S. 
Chapman. In the gloom and depression of the winter that followed there occured 
two unhappy events : the trouble between the Senior Class and the Faculty, 
and the death of President Goodell. 

With the advent of spring, however, our prospects brightened. As the dis- 
tant hills became fresh and green with the spring sunshine, the dissensions in 
college disappeared. The bill appropriating the money for the Horticultural 
building and various other improvements passed the Legislature and was ap- 
proved by the Governor. The baseball team, although handicapped by un- 
fortunate circumstances met with remarkable success and when '05 appeared 
on the Commencement stage, all was joy and peace. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE Ho 



Of course there was another aspect of Hfe during the past year. The campus 
rush resulted in the usual unsatisfactory manner owing to the lack of a trophy 
to decide it positively. The class contests developed much class spirit, especially 
the last one which indirectly led several people to bathe at an unseemly h'r^ur in 
the college pond and disturbed the mental equilibrium of several residents of 
Pleasant street. The customary St. Patrick's Day celebration was omitted this 
year, to the bitter disappointment, 'tis said, of a lonely watchman in the chapel. 
That was indeed "Hard Luck." There were the usual tilts in the class room, 
ludicrous, pathetic and tragic, but these belong elsewhere. Nor must we forget 
the celebrations after the Williams game and the passage of the college appro- 
priation bill through the Legislature. 

This, in brief, outlines the events of the year. In every case the college 
has pushed onward and upward. The most trying and vexatious incidents have 
been satisfactorily settled. When the college opened, there were nearly two 
hundred enrolled. At Commencement there were but a scant one hundred fifty 
left. The rest had fallen by the wayside. Many men come to college insufficiently 
prepared or lacking the necessary application and these are sure to fail at this 
institution where no mercy is shown to delinquents. But such is the expected 
order of things: it is the survival of the fittest. For verily I say unto you that 
"Many are called, but few are chosen." 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 117 



Henry Hill Goodell 



hlB' 




still fresh in the memory of so many, when the 
j{\ death of President Goodell was announced, the feel- 
'S\"^f^iM ings of the undergraduates of the college found 
pf/ expression in fitting words. Among them were these : 
"Surely he, who has made himself dear to us by his 
conscientiousness and earnest desires for our welfare 
* * *" "Earnest desires for our welfare," — here we find the students' 
estimate of President Goodell's attitude toward them; "conscientiousness," 
— this reveals their appreciation of a characteristic that belonged to him. 
Taken together, these expressions are an eloquent tribute from young 
hearts to the memory of their teacher, counsellor and friend. 

The Massachusetts Agricultural College is properly classed among 
the sinall colleges, and illustrates the advantages that the small college 
oft'ers. Prominent among these is of course the better opportunity here 
given the teacher to know his students and to adapt instruction to individ- 
ual needs, and to secure these results some of our large colleges are increas- 
ing the number of their institictors. The opportunity for personal con- 
tact and influence President Goodell heartily enjoyed. While he rarely 
failed to bring inspiration to the class as a whole, his interest sought out 
the individual mind upon which he played with a touch so sure and master- 
ful that harmonies were evoked which were a surprise even to the student 
himself. President Goodell appreciated possibilities, and had a word of 
encouragement for the most unpromising. With what delight, too, he 
announced to the students any fresh evidence of the fostering care of the 



lis THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 

Legislature, and how earnestly he worked for the success of any "appro- 
priation" that Avoulcl make the college more helpful to the student body! 
From this desire to help the student in his work arose the President's 
intense interest in the growth and efficiency of the library. His own words 
show his appreciation of it: "Books are the tools of both teacher and 
pupil. A librar}^ is perhaps the most important adjunct of instruction. 
It is open to all and is used by all * * * In every department of science 
throughout the world the keenest intellects are at work, seeking for solu- 
tions to the unending series of problems that present themselves in the 
physical and natural world. ' Light, more light, ' said the dying philosopher, 
and the longing of the world is but the echo of his last faint cry. To do 
our duty and to give reply to the many demands made upon us requires all 
the light and all the experience of other minds, wheresoever they may be 
found." 

But President Goodell's interest -sj/as not confined to the intellectual 
life of his students. In the earlier years especially, and before his duties 
as President claimed so much of his time and thought, he was the com- 
panion of the students. He shared their sports, he helped them in their 
difficulties, — to all he was a friend, to many he was like a brother. His 
cheerful good humor, his affable manners, his warm sympathies, helped 
him and them, and we are not surprised that one of his students should 
write, "Living amongst the students in one of the college dormitories he 
came closer to the college lives of the boys than any other professor, and 
his influence during his long years of service was wholly for the truth and 
the uplifting of character." More than one alumnus of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College recalls today the kind word, the gentle reminder, the 
wise counsel, that were potent influences in determining the current of his 
life, and joins the undergraduates in blessing the memiory of him "who 
has made himself dear to us by his earnest wishes for our welfare." 

Conscientious devotion to his work was a characteristic of President 
Goodell as a man; it was especially marked after he became President. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLLGE 119 

He was naturally self-distrustful. He knew well the prejudices that beset 
the path of the college, tlic limitations with which it was obliged to con- 
tend. Whatever motto liis ain1)iti()n liad chosen, it certainly was not 
"Aut Ctpsar, aut nullus." Ikit lie liad l)cen with the college from its 
beginning, and had become deeply interested in its success. He had en- 
joyed acquaintance with the author of the Land Grant Act, had caught 
his spirit and sympathized with liis lilieral view of the field which the col- 
leges of his creation were designed to cover, and when the call to this 
responsible and difficult task was distinctly heard the President answered. 
That the acceptance of this call involved a possible sacrifice cannot be 
doubted. He had a fine appreciation of literature; he was a ready writer, 
an interesting and forceful speaker ; tlie fair field of scientific investigation 
offered him its choice flowers and rich fruits; surely the path to distinction, 
to eminent success, was open to Inm. But from these he turned aside and 
laying himself upon the altar of devotion to the college he gave himself to 
her exhausting work. During these toilsome years more than one " 15th 
of June, 1863 " has come to him with its forlorn hope in his struggle against 
his own physical weariness and pain and against the inexperience and 
moral obliquity of others ; but he quailed not and he died with his armor on, 
a true witness to his faith in the education of the laboring classes, in tlie 
dignity of labor and in the worth of the individual soul. 

Many friends of the Agricultural College will recall with interest the 
addresses delivered at the college on the twenty-fifth anniversary of the 
passage of the Morrill Land Grant Act. (Jne of the speakers on that 
occasion constructed an imaginary picture gallery, the walls of which 
"will be decked with the painted images of those who have been the creat- 
ors or benefactors of this institution." The speaker named several of these, 
and closed his address with these words: "And when in after time the 
long list of the faithful and devoted servants of the college shall be scanned, 
one will be found who from 1867 was professor of modem languages and 
English Litei-ature ; from 1 867 to 1 869, instructor in gymnastics and military 



120 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 

science; in 1869, lecturer in entomology; in 1869 and 1870, instructor in 
zoology; from 1869 to 1871, instructor in anatomy and physiology; in 1872 
and 1873, instructor in history; in 1885 and 1886, librarian; and finally 
in 1886, president of the college; and Goodell's name 'will lead all the rest'." 
Whether this prediction is to be fulfilled is not for us to say. Of this, 
however, we may be sure that the increase in the number of students 
during these last nineteen years ; the additions to buildings and equipment ; 
the repeated appropriations for the maintenance of the college made by 
the State of Massachusetts and the United States; the growth, among the 
people of Massachusetts, of confidence in the college already ripening 
into aft'ectionate loyalty; these will bear, to future generations, abiding 
testimony to the conscientious work and untiring devotion of President 
Henrv H. Goodell. 



^^^^.M^Zl^ 



122 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Fifty-Seventh Book of Chronicles 



And it came to pass that during the interregnum after the death 
of Henry the Father, that Wilham the Round Tile held the sceptre. 

Now when the year was nearly spent and the pea-green Fresh- 
men being in need of chastisement for various deeds unbecoming 
their station an ancient custom was revived, namely ducking in the 
college pond. 

And one night a great multitude formed and marched to an abode 
kept by a certain widow and her daughter. 

And they held counsel together, and after much argument and 
deliberation it was agreed that for the betterment of mankind it 
was advisable to cleanse these foul bodies of their iniquity by im- 
mersing them in said college pond. 

Whereupon with one accord they made their way to the door of 
the abode, and in a voice like thunder demanded the persons of the 
culprits from the publicans and sinners who resided there. 

But the hostess fearing for the safety of her guests more than 
the wrath of the multitude, came forth and delivered a tirade of 
many and violent words, saying : 

"Ye men, ye worse than men, ye brutes, take yourselves hence. 
Back to your hoes and kine ; depart, leave these poor defenceless 
women to the quiet that is want to prevail in this metropolis." 

And many were they that were ready to do as she had bidden 
them, being sore afraid. 

But Jack of the heavy paw stood afar off, and when the woman 
had gone within, said : " Men of Honor, take no heed of this woman ; 
gird yourselves, for the bark is worse than the bite — the appointed 
time is at hand." 

Whereupon the multitude fell upon the doors and windows, and 
in a trice the publicans and sinners were brought out. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 12H 

Then the multitude marched slowly, for it was very dark, to the 
celebrated baths of Mass'chusetts. 

And while they were gone there was wailing and gnashing of 
teeth at the abode of the widow. 

Between the sobs and lamentations came a lull, in which the 
daughter, a great and mighty thinker, sprang up, saying, "Herein 
I see a chance to rival ' Lawson' as to ' Frightful Frankness." 

Whereupon she disclosed a plan, shrewd and clever as woman 
alone can devise. "On the morrow will I appear before the king 
and demand an indemnity of this riotous band for disturbing the 
nerves of four defenceless women." 

And it was agreed that there was one long head in the family, 
and visions of automobiles and European travels came before them. 

Thereupon, when the sun was well up and William had ascended 
the throne, there appeared before him a worthy follower of Madame 
Yale, who with a voice quivering with wrath borne of her long vigil, 
told how the multitude had in\'aded the home of a widow and her 
daughter. 

And William, when he had heai'd her sad story, said, " Fear not, 
woman, the offenders shall be dealt with according to their sin." 

Whereupon he retired to his Holy of Holies and held a council 
with his round tiles, his sheep and his fertilizers. 

Finally, after much reasoning, it was decided that of all the 
tribes of Israel, the second should bear the penalty of the crime. 

Then he decreed that the tribe should appear before the High 
Court of the land to listen to the council of older and wiser heads. 

Wherefore a multitude of Israelites appeared the following day 
in the chamber of the High Justice. 

And wdien finally they were admitted to the presence of the all- 
high judge, they were chided at length for their iniquity. 

And it was decreed that they should pay into the royal coffers 
one hundred and fifty shekels of silver. 

Now when this became known there was much sorrow amongst 
them, for the second tribe parted not with its shekels cheerfully. 

And they reasoned with the king sa\dng, "We can not do this 
thing. ' ' 



124 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Whereupon the Judge answered, saying, " Either pay these silver 
shekels or suffer exile in distant parts." 

i\nd the tribe departed with extreme sorrow in their hearts. 

Now it came to pass on the morrow that a young man of the 
tribe, a young lawyer of great talent, arose and departed and came 
again unto the Judge. 

And when he was come to the'Judge, he reasoned with him'say- 
ing, " Why dost thou purpose to tax us in this manner? " 

And the Judge answered not. 

But the young lawyer spake once more, reasoning with him, and 
finally persuaded him that such was extortion, and to rid himself 
of his youthful opponent, the Judge closed the deal for twenty-five. 




BE IT HEREBY KMOJK 

That the aubsorlbers have recolvad from the voting men who vers con- 
nected with the disturfcanco at our house on the nl^ht and ffiomlng of 
June ninth and tenth, 1905, tSo oua of twenty-flva dollars In full release 
and aatlBfaotlon for any oialm arising out of the *fent. 

vfitnasa our names hereto subscribed and our aaala- Each adopting 
the common seal affixed. 




(7 ^^. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 125 



Song of Pennies 



Sing a song of pennies 

A pocketfuL ah me * 

Have you any coppers? 

Said our manager Milford C. 

So with a few more ringers 

To the steps of North they went, 

And all during English 

They pitched away their cents. 

Oh how those coins did rattle 
And ring against the brick, 

Ah me but this is easy 

I'll show them a little trick. 

But when the game was over 
Poor Milford he looked sad 

For he was minus twenty, 
Twenty pennies to the bad. 



126 THE 1007 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Faculty Philosophy 



There is pleasure in looking into the eyes of those to whom we 
have given conditions. 



Look wise, but never volunteer information. 



To try to bluff through mathematics is like carrying a lantern 
before a blind man. 



Learn to say, " I do not know," not " I think." 

There is no greater fool than he who thinks himself through a 
course ; no one wiser than he who would not bet a cent either way. 



We do as we please, but the student body must obey the col- 
lege rules. 



A bluff is like a lame horse — it will break down if ridden too long. 

Believe what we tell you. It is policy if you expect to receive 
a degree from this institution. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 127 



Jolts 



(Scene — A mid-week prayer meeting at the First Church.) 

The Minister: " Wih you lead us in prayer, Brother Waugh?" 

Professor Waugh (who often indulges in poker at the 

club): "It's not my bid — I dealt." (Great commotion.) 



Professor Wellington — (talking to Tottingham in Amherst 
Square.) 

Tottingham: "Are you coming my way, Professor?" 

Professor W. : "A — a — a next week." 



{Scene — Senior English.) 

Professor Mills: "You should never begin a sentence with 
the adverb 'well.' " 

Student: "If I am not mistaken, you do it frequently." 

Professor M. : " Well, what if I do?" 



Professor Babson (reciting from Whittier) : "Who touches a 
hair of you gray dog, etc." (Checkei's on the brain.) 



128 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Appropriate and Otherwise 



Alley: "Shall I like a hermit dwell 

On a rock, or in a cell?" 

Armstrong: "I hate nobody; I am in charity with the world." 

Bartlett: "This man's as true as steel." 

Caruthers: "A rope! a rope! My kingdom for a rope!" 

Chace: "But still his tongue ran on, the less 

Of weight it bore, with greater ease." 

Chadwick: "Look beneath the surface; let not the several qualities of a 

man, nor his worth, escape thee." 

Chapman: "Tell thee, I gladly would 

If I but knew my mind." 

Clark: "Company, villianous company, hath been the spoil of me." 

Cutter : "A college joke to cure the dumps." 

Dickinson: "He could distinguish and divide 

A hair 'twixt south and southwest side." 

Eastman: "Lord! I wonder what fool it was that first invented kissing." 

Hartford: "Though I am young, I scorn to flit 

On the wings of borrowed wit." 

Higgins: " Hold the fort! I am coming!" 

King : "I never knew so young a body with so old a head." 

Earned: "Pernicious Weed! Why didst thou cross the path 

Of our great Sarhpson in the art of math ? 

Eincoln: "My life is one demd horrid grind." 

Miss Eivers: "A poor lone woman." 

"She is pretty to walk with. 
And witty to talk with. 
And pleasant, too, to think on." 

Parker: "His cogitative faculties were immersed 

In a cogitabundity of cogitation." 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



129 



Peters: "To one of more intrinsic worth, 

This fair land will ne'er give berth." 

Philbrick: "As good be out of the world as out of fashion." 

Pierce: "He is a man, take him all in all 

I shall not look upon his like again." » 

Shaw: "Happy am I; from care I'm free! 

Why ar'n't they all contented like me?" 

Summers: "The man behind the gun." 

Thompson: "Throw Physics to the dogs, 

I '11 none of it! " 

Walker: "He meets thee like a pleasant thought, 

When such are wanted." 

Watkins: "Hang sorrow — care will kill a cat — 

And therefore let's be merry." 

Watts: "I awoke one morning and found myself famous." 

Wood: "It requires a surgical operation to get a joke into his under- 

standing." 

Index Board: "We have met the enemy and they are ours." 




13f) THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Jokettes 



One of the Kids. 

Kid (as someone lights a match): "You must remember that sometimes 
miatches go out." (No one laughs.) 

' ' Major John (seeing very few in his class): "This class doesn't seem very 
full today, but I suppose they will be full after the banquet tonight." 

Professor Lull (in Anatomy class, to Gowdy, '08): "Now, Mr. Gowdy, 
I move this chair with my hand. What organ do I bring into use?" 
Gowdy: "Hand organ." 

King (to the Kid): "I have hunted through my dry set and find Calcium 
Hydroxide but I need Calcium Oxide." 

The Kid: "Hum — can you tell me the difference between a live rat and a 
drowned one? " 

King: "No, sir, I can not." 

The Kid: "One contains water and the other does not." 

Archie Hartford : "When I am sick, my food always goes to my stomach." 

Kid's Advice to Cutter: "Come back with your sleeves rolled up." 

Carey (drilling B Company): "Parade rest, attention, order arms!" 

Billy H.: "Gentlemen, some of you will try and cut when the angel 
Gabriel calls his roll." 

Major Anderson (in tactics): "What are some of the methods of getting 
out of the army?" 

Bright Senior: "By getting shot, half shot, and fired." 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



131 



Student (to Professor Howard, whom he sees on the way to the Chem. 
Lab. carrying a baseball bat): "Good morning, Professor; you look as if you 
were out to make a hit." 

Professor Howard: "Yes, the Sophs (1907) are coming into the labora- 
tory today for the first time, and I may have to use it." 

Professor Hasbrouck (to '07): "I suppose you all know where the 
reservoir is? " 
(All laugh.) 
Prof. H.: "I don't see the ])oint — oh, yes I do!" 

Pray (sees a form on the opposite side of his laboratory stand): "Say, 
boy, hand me that acid." 

Doctor Wellington: "What can I do for you now, Mr. Prav?" 



"Kid" Howard — "Full well they laughed with counterfeited glee 
At all his jokes, for many a joke had he." 




132 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



The Freshman's Dream 



The applause of staring grandstands to command, 
The risks of pain and danger to despise, 

To rush the pigskin up the sodden field 

And hear the cries of triumph and surprise ; 

To be a hero with the bleacher fans, 

To bat and field the ball with dextrous wing, 

To be the man to knock the winning run 

And homeward slide while crowded grandstands ring 

To be a shark in all his lessons dear, 

To be the sportiest man within his class. 

And often to the town of " Hamp " to go 

And rush and fuss with heedless, reckless dash. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLLGE 133 



Class Song 



The class of naughty-seven behold, 

The class of noble spirit bold. 

With dash and might we always fight, 

Our games we always win. 

The class stands solid, always true. 

Her teams are fast, her losses few. 

Cheer, cheer, old naughty-seven. 

Her worth is here revealed ; 

Onward to victory with mighteous zeal! 

In after years when we are far 

From our old Alma Mater, 

Our thoughts will to the campus steal 

And those familiar scenes reveal. 

Our college days will ring with cheers 

For naughty-seven, whom we hold dear. 

Cheer, cheer, old naughty-seven, 

Her worth is here revealed ; 

Onward to victory with mighteous zeal! 

J. G. Curtis, ex-igo- 
Tunc: "Wacht am Rhein " 



i;54 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Tips from the Index Board 



I . Any and all persons having complaints to register against 
the 1907 Index may call on the editor the day the Index comes 
out. We have just received a new supply of baseball bats, and 
complainants must present themselves singly. 



2. Kindly remember that we have roasted different people 
in proportion to the thickness of their skin, and we hope no 
blisters arise. 



3. There are people who have troubles worse than yours — 
there may be some comfort in that. 



4. The Editor leaves for a three-months' vacation the day 
before the Index appears. There is safety in flight. 



5. Go to T. Canavan for sympathy. He can tell you all you 
wish to know. 



6. Assist the Manager by paying cash. 



MAS.SACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE VAr, 



Canavan's Theatre 

AMHERST, MASS. ^ 

WALLACE & FRARY, Proprietors THOMAS CANAVAN, Manager 

SEASON 1905 Continuous Show, 12-01 a. m. to 11.59 P- iri- 



HIGH-CLASS VAUDEVILLE 

ALL STAR CAST 



1 PHILBRICK AND CURTIS 

In their exciting coinedv, "Stranded," or "Down with the Tigers." 

2 WILLIAM TAFT 

and his prize pup, Pandora. 

3 FREDERICK CUTTER 

The great joker and entertainer in liis specialty, Pittsburg, Indianapohs 
and the West. 

4 CY WHITNEY 

Heavy tragedian presenting "Twice in a Week, and Onlv Eighteen." 

5 ANDERSON, CHADWICK, CLARK AND CO-EDS 

In their one-act comedv, "A Fussing Part^•." 

6 JICK WHOLLEY 

Singing comedian, introducing the latest songs. 

7 MOVING PICTURES 

1 Homer Cutler entertaining '08. 

2 Perley Eastman skating at Mt. Holvoke. 




]3(i THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Observations by the College Clock 



|ERHAPS you do not all of you know — you thoughtless 
young fellows who pass beneath me day by day as I mark 
the hour for recitation, for dinner and for Chapel, up here 
abo\"e the belfry — that I have a real live heart beneath 
my gray exterior. Perhaps you do not realize that a clock 
has its joys and its griefs, its pleasures and its troubles 
like you. You may not have thought how cold it is up here in the winter, 
in the time of the blizzard and the zero weather. So cold has it become 
at times that my hands have been frozen stiff, and for days I have been 
unable to move them. You did not think of this doubtless, when a bunch 
of you were out plugging snowballs at my face, though you rarely succeeded 
in reaching me. It only goes to show the prevalent lack of respect and 
veneration among the present generation for age and eminence. But on 
the whole I have very little to complain of in the life I lead, and verj? often 
I have an opportunity to see sights which are very interesting and amusing. 
Of all the classes that have ever passed beneath me and out into the 
world, one to which we should all be thankful, is the class of '92 — the class 
which was sufficiently thoughtful and generous to place me in the tower 
that all far and near might know the time of day. Many were the happy 
spectacles which I was privileged to look upon in those good old days. 
Good to see was the class and college spirit displayed in many ways, but 
I can say from experience that this college spirit has not deteriorated, but 
is growing fuller and deeper every year. 

After the long, quiet and rather lonesome summer months, there is 
nothing which rejoices my heart more than to see you lads returning, 
many all tanned and browned from hard work, vigorous from fresh air and 
exercise, back at college for another year to renew those friendships which 
make the life at this college what it is ; back to study, to work, and to play. 
Cheering to my heart are the shouts on the campus in the autumn — 
twenty-five — fortv-nine — thirty-seven — three — and the sound of running 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 137 

and pushing and struggling as the scrub gives way before the heavier 
varsity football squad. What a joyful sound peals out upon the startled 
air when the young, green Freshmen pull at the bellrope with all their 
might, urged on by the shouts of the vSophomores, stirring up every soul 
within several miles to let them know that Mass'chusetts has won an 
important football game — a game, perhaps, with a college several times 
as large and wealthy as herself, but not possessing that sturdy patriotism 
and college spirit — the feeling that they must win for the glory of the 
college — that characterizes Mass'chusetts players. May they ever continue 
with the same or increased zeal and love for their Alma Mater in the glori- 
ous years to come, when they will no longer have to fight so hard to get 
the necessary funds to bring out the winning team ! 

In the early morning up here in the tower I see young men coming in 
all directions toward the chapel — some early and others straggling along 
at the last moment. But what come they here to do? This was a hard 
question to answer in days gone by, when a venerable aged man led the 
morning exercises, for no one seemed to take any interest in the proceedings, 
but all to come under compulsion. But these things are all passed away 
now, and we see the aged gentleman no more. He seems to have severed 
all connection with the college now, taking so little interest in us as to 
stop his subscription to the college paper. But he is aged, and age calls 
for respect. 

One morning not many months ago the chapel bell began to ])eal forth 
note after note in a very startling manner. As it was a very unusual liour 
for it to be heard from, everyone was surprised. This it kept up for five 
minutes steadily, when it became cjuiet. If the partictilars are required, 
it might be well to refer to a certain man by the name of Bill — the man 
who told Joker to put that tooth back into his head and "get into it'' at the 
Dartmouth football game — and inquire why it was that he arrived breath- 
less and hastily dressed, with wild eyes, at a few minutes past the hour of 
seven ! 

On any bright Sunday morning at about 10.20, a tramp-tramping is 
heard on the walks and I see quite a number of groups of fellows, dressed in 
their Sunday best, all wending their way to the churches of the center. Whv 
it is that these men do not organize with the faculty and institute services in 
the chapel is a question, but anyway, it is no great hardship to walk a mile 



138 THE ]907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 

to church on a bright Sunday morning. In the evening more young men 
are seen on their way to town, and then it is that they sometimes have 
fair companions from Draper HaU by their sides. I see them strolling 
down the walks very slowly, as if every moment of their walk were precious. 
All in all, Sunday at Mass'chusetts is a noteworthy day. 

The one thought at which my heart becomes sad and tears come to 
my eyes is the death of our beloved president. We old-timers realize much 
better what Henry Hill Goodell did for the college than you younger men 
who knew him only when his powers were failing and he was hardly able to 
carry on his duties day by day. That Mass'chusetts had a great man to 
mourn is seen by the large number of distinguished gentlemen who came 
from all parts to pay tribute to his memory on the clay of his funeral. 

Among those things which tend to inspire the men to a greater love 
of college, I can not forbear speaking of the mass meetings held in the 
chapel on evenings before great football games. How overflowing with 
feeling are the addresses and the songs and cheers which are heard, and 
how eloquent they are of Mass'chusetts's spirit! May they continue to be 
a source of inspiration to players and men in the years to come. 

At the first of every month there are generally some very interesting 
scenes below me of which I hear much and can imagine more. It is at 
this time that the faculty meetings occur, and the weighty matters about 
college are decided. The deliberate, careful, deep-voiced Professor Brooks 
who presides is vacillating about some important matter which demands 
immediate attention. The twins, Billy and Johnny, are discussing tans and 
cotans. Hot-headed Babby, who is bothered "like thunder," has a great 
deal to say about discipline and like matters, while Ach Louis is trying to 
decide why it is that he is unpopular with his classes. The Kid has a care- 
worn expression of countenance. 

As to the future of this college, everything from this height — above 
all petty weaknesses and failings — seems encouraging. Classes are increas- 
ing in size and quality, a better education than ever before is being offered, 
and what is more important, people are beginning to realize as they have 
not in the past, the real worth of the college. She is becoming a power in 
the state. Certainly a bright future is now about to dawn upon the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College. 



I,^^l4™,,g, 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1907 



We hail thee, class of brain and might 
That decks its festal board tonight, 
For wily Soph has not been able 
To bar the way to banquet table. 

Our right to rule was early shown. 
Our deeds of prowess well are known. 
The host of Sophs was pulled by rope 
Until it lost its little hope. 

Then once again these boys were tried 
Without a rope, in football pride. 
Our picture, too, was finely caught, 
Unless all signs now count for naught. 

The next year's Freshmen soon shall get 
A suit that will not spoil from wet. 
Then learn to be polite, not bold — 
Pond's extract never cured a cold. 

Now hail our colors, green and white, 
An emblem of our honor bright ; 
As fair a flag as ere was seen 
Is nineteen-seven in white and green. 

In future years to come and go 

May we know all there is to know; 

Ma}^ our fame rise up from earth to heaven. 

Three rousing cheers for old Naught-Seven! 

(From our Co-Eds.) 



142 THE 1907 INDP:X Volume XXXVII 



Massachusetts 1907 Freshman Banquet 

NEW DOM HOTEL, HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT, MAY 13, 1904 

MENU 

LITTLE NECK CLAMS, on Half Shell 

CELERY OLIVES CUCUMBERS 

MOCK TURTLE, a la Anglaise 
PLANKED CONNECTICUT RIVER SHAD 

POMMES VICTORIA 

SWEETBREADS, pique l'Oriental 

FILET OF BEEF, a la Godard 

1907 Punch 

ROAST PHILADELPHIA CAPON 

french peas parisienne potatoes 

Currant Jelly 

Cherry Bisque 

Assorted Cakes 

camembert cheese toasted crackers 

Cafe Noir 

Toasts 

ToasUnaster, J. G. Curtis 
"Spirit of NaughtA'-Seven " . . . . . E. D. Philbrick 

"Cross Roads" ........ E. A. Lincoln 

"Athletics" . . . . . . . . F. C. Peters 

"Birdies from the Bird Cage" ...... G. W. Searle 

"A little nonsense now and then 
Is relished by the best of men." 

"It's Up to You" ....... J.N.Summers 

"Side Lights of Amherst" ..... W.E.Dickinson 

"Protoplasm" ........ John A. Raitt 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1 4:; 



1907 Individual Records 



Harold Edward Alley wandered into Lynn one bright morning about the 
second of November, 1880, from no one knows where. Like many other Metho- 
dist ministers' sons, Harold never hked to be in one place long, and consequently 
he has lived in fourteen different places. Naturally 
from the manner of his life his education was some- 
what desultory, but after spending a few weeks or 
iiiMiitlis at various high schools and academies, and 
(laMihng in a vast number of subjects, from Greek to 
fussing, he considered himself ready for college. He 
entered Syracuse University in 1902, but soon 
left, deciding that Mass'chusetts was the place for 
him. Although the roving spirit has at times been 
strong upon him (especially while he was taking 
Physics), he always has turned his back upon temp- 
tation and trudged manfully along, trusting some day 
to be the proud possessor of his hard-earned B.Sc. 
Alley has for some time served as a private secretary 
for Tabby, and is a member of Kappa Sigma frater- 
nity. 




Arthur Huguenin Armstrong. This "moa' less 'longated " specimen was dis- 
covered on the 24th of September, 1883, in the town of Wolfville, Nova Scotia. 
To what genus he belongs is not known, but he resembles some of those scleren- 
chyinatous prosenchyma which "old Protoplasm" 
used to show us up on the hill. If we were to compare 
him with one of Mr. Blake's nursery trees, we would 
say that he is headed rather high. That he is long as 
to his legs is evident to everyone. Arthur soon had 
enough of the wildness of Wolfville, and chose a more 
propitious location in Massachusetts. He received 
his education largely at Hyde Park, where he gradu- 
ated from the high school in 1903. Since coming to 
Mass'chusetts he has led rather of a strenuous life, 
being a great plugger. His hobby is bugs, in the 
researches of which he has become famous, though 
very few besides himself are acquainted with the fact. 
He is a member of the Kappa Sigma fraternit)*. 




144 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Earle Goodman Bartlett. It has been said that Chicago is way out in the 
"wild and woolly West," but the fact that this gentleman comes from that dis- 
tant city amply disproves the statement. Earle first appeared there January i8, 
1884, on one of those winter morns when a freezing 
wind was blowing off Lake Michigan. Like many 
others, his youth was uneventful until after he gradu- 
ated from the Englewood High School. On a visit 
East he learned of Mass'chusetts, and returned to 
Illinois determined to seek our college for a higher 
education. Since joining 1907 Earle has pushed rapid- 
ly to the front. Without him. Kid and his renowned 
choir would meet with an ignominious downfall in 
their attempt to render a ' ' concord of sweet harmony , ' ' 
for he is the organist. He also scribbles for the College 
Signal, and has roasted many of his classmates by 
means of his position on the Index Board, so that he 
is now being roasted himself. Bartlett is secretary of 
the College Senate, is class historian, and has won his 
numerals and "M" playing baseball. He has at- 
tracted some admiration since he courageously elected Math. We judge that he 
left his heart behind him on the prairies of Illinois, for we recently heard him 
directing the shipment of a floral order to Chicago, which shows that he is but 
mortal. The Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity claims him as a member. 




John Thomas Caruthers hails from Columbia, — that's way down south in 

Tennessee. He was born March 22, 1879. His home was in the hilly country 

where the phosphate grows and the little goats skip about over the bones of their 

ancient predecessors. He tells us that when he was 

not occupied in driving these refractory beasts, he 

was attending the public schools of Columbia. Later 

he graduated from the normal acadennc course at 

Nashville Universit}'. As Massachusetts best suited 

his ideas of what a college should be, he joined the 

class of 1907 and has never since regretted his choice. 

He has been a strong man for his class, having filled 

with dignity the position of sergeant -at-arm,s, and 

having been ropepull captain for two years. As a 

result Naitghty-seven holds two trophies, well won. 

Major John honored him with a corporalsy, and he is 

a man always to be counted on in times of need. 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



145 



Wayland Fairbanks Chace. The next victim of the chronicler's pen is one by 
the name of Chace. He was born on the 13th of August, 1884, at Middleboro, 
Mass. A profound reverence for domestic fehcity caused him to recjuest, on the 
first day of his sojourn here, that he be allowed to 
remain at home. And many are the enchanting 
visions which still occasionally haunt him of "Home, 
Sweet Home." Being desirous of seeing a little of 
the great big world, however, he has manage"d to 
break the home ties long enough to visit Boston, New 
^'ll^k, Toronto, Montreal and Portland, and become 
somewhat acquainted with life on the sea in a yacht. 
He is charged with being quite a fusser; in answer to 
which he cites his extreme bashfulness in the presence 
of ladies. His personal attractiveness and jovial 
manner would appear somewhat puzzling under the 
circumstances. The course here is evidently better 
than medicine for him, as he has improved greatly so 
far and we have high hopes for him in the future. 
A member of C. S. C. 




Clifton Harland Ciiadwick. Many famous personages have been born in 
South Acton, according to Chad, and without a doubt there is some truth in the 
fact, as our chief, Clifton Harland Chadwick, was born in that historic hamlet 
October 26, 1883. That town was not progressive 
enough for Chad, and after testing its qualities for 
ten years he moved to a place which we think must 
have been named in his honor — Cliftondale. While 
here he attended the Saugus High School and grad- 
uated with the class of 1902, Being precocious he 
rested a year before attempting college, and without 
a doubt he benefited by the change, for since entering 
with 1907 he has developed some habits which our 
younger members seem to lack. There is no need to 
mention these habits here as we all agree that they 
are all honorable and we can not help but feel a little 
envious. Chad has a strong pull with the Math, de- 
partment, and foretells the weaiher. He is a member 
of the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. 




146 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Joseph Otis Chapman, commonly known as "Chappie," dedicated for his birth- 
place the town of Brewster, 'way down on the cape; population, eight hundred 
souls; chief industry, fishing. Perhaps the idea which actuated him to choose a 
birthplace of this description was the same as that of 
Julius Caesar — it is better to be first in a village town 
than second at Rome. Like many other famous men 
the exact date of his birth is still doubtful, but it is 
believed by the best authorities to have been Febru- 
ary 3, t884. Chappie soon made known his determi- 
nation to seek a college education, and so we find him 
here, a member of . the illustrious class of 1907. Not 
exactly the same man as we see today, however. 
Chappie has changed a great deal since that time, and 
we hope it has not been entirely for the worse. An 
example of his changing disposition mav be seen in 
the sale of a certain commodity in which a number of 
other college men have engaged. It is doubtful if he 
himself can tell the whole account of his changes — 
certainly no one else can. Joe has not been lacking 
in his athletic interest, having won his numerials in basketball and tried his 
hand at various other sports. He is now interested in landscape gardening, 
and is a member of the Kappa Sigma fraternity. 




MiLFORD H. Clark, Jr., was evolved in the neighboring town of Sunderland. 
October 4, 1883. There among the onions and tobacco Milford grew up. He 
had a distrust for the educational facilities of the place of his nativitv and so he 
went up to Mount Hermon where he prepared for 
Amherst College. He entered there in September, 
iqo3, but soon left to enter our own institution. Mil 
is rather a little fellow, but like Shimmie and the rest 
of 'em he is "right there with the goods." He has 
always been a desultory fusser and has had acquain- 
tance with certain maidens down at the "Conserva- ^jB^^ *i^V^ -1 
tory " in Boston and across the river at Smith, but 
not until recently could we designate him as a real 
"co-ed chaser." His appearance at the first informal 
with a stately young woman from Draper Hall has 
placed him in that category. Mil is a prominent man 
in class and college. He was manager of our Fresh- 
man and captain of our Sophomore baseball teams, 
has won his " M " on the varsity football and baseball, 
is assistant manager of the football team and is busi- 
ness manager of the Index. He won the college tennis championship last June 
and makes believe play a snare drum in the band. He is a member of the 
College Shakespearean club. 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



147 



Frederick Augustus Cutter. Come one, come all ; here under the big tent you 
will find Frederick Augustus Cutter, the original funny man. He can tell you 
more about Pittsburg, Indianapolis and the West than any hot-air merchant in 
this vicinity. Frederick, or "Joke," as he is known 
around college, is without doubt the only product of 
Pelham, N. H., at M. A. C. We are all thankful of 
this because with another similar specimen the college 
would turn into a circus with Joke standing in the 
main ring snapping the whip. Fred was born in Pelham, 
N. H., sometime in 1882. After a course of prepara- 
tion at Lowell High School, Joke entered M. A. C, but 
after bucking the semester exams for no gain regretted 
the step and dropped into our class. Since entering 
college, athletics have been materially benefited by 
Joke's presence. He has played guard or center on 
the varsity three years, and helped the 1907 basketball 
and baseball teams also. This spring Joke is to man- 
age the varsity baseball team, and we can safely pre- 
dict a successful season. He is a member of Phi 
Sigma Kappa. 




Walter Ebenezer Dickinson. There are very few towns that are able to pro- 
duce more than one famous man. North Amherst, however, is an exception. The 
latest in her line of prodigies is Walter Ebenezer Dickinson. This boy orator was 
born on September 25, 1885. His early existence was 
spent knocking around the streets of the "big city." 
In due time he entered and graduated from the Am- 
herst High School. As "Dick" was chemically in- 
clined he came to Mass'chusetts. We see little of 
this youth around the campus, but his influence is 
strongly felt throughout the class. He pulled on the 
Freshman and Sophomore rope pull teams and is the 
artist of this book. Where he received his inspira- 
tions for his artistic abilities we know not, but it is 
intimated that one fair damsel and a few old cronies 
from the post office step posed for him. Dick is a 
member of Phi Sigma Kappa. 




148 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Jasper Fay Eastman was originated in Townsend, March 17, 1887, at eight 

o'clock sharp. From all accounts Jasper seems to have led a very uneventful 

youth, passing in regular order through the years of the grammar and high schools. 

It was said that he was salutatorian of his class at 

graduation — he might have been valedictorian but for 

the fact that there was another member in the class. 

At any rate, he passed Billy's examinations, and after 

^^^^^ long preparation, on the morning of the fifteenth of 

'^"^^^^B September, 1903, set out from Townsend for Mass'- 

chusetts with the best wishes of his friends and a 

large supply of canned goods. Since that eventful 

morning Jasper has not been idle, and has lost no 

^, '^^^^ opportunity that has come to him. He often makes 

i|H|gH^tt ^^ M^^^ trips over to Mount Holyoke — so often as to cause 

^^^^^^ "^v^^^^^V alarm to some of his friends, — but he is nevertheless 

^^^^^LjM^^^^r a good student. His hobby is agriculture, and he bids 

^^^^/^^^^^^r fair to turn out a veritable "wheat." 




Archie Augustus Hartford. When this fair youth first cast the trajectory of 
his mortal life at Westford, Massachusetts, the calendar indicated January 10, 
1889. At that remote period Westford was a beautiful town of one thousand 
inhabitants, therefore Archie became the thousand 
and oneth. History is silent concerning his childhood, 
but it is known that he graduated from the Westford 
High School. It was at that time that he decided to 
join the class of 1906 at Mass'chusetts, but soon seeing 
his mistake united his fortunes with those of Naughty- 
seven. Since that time he has proved his worth to the 
class, doing valiant service in right field at baseball. 
Among the honors which he has received we will 
mention only that of being former reading-room 
director and the title of the best punster in the class. 
Some of Archibald's witty sa^dngs have become col- 
lege-famous, and he is the especial friend of Kid 
Howard. 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



149 



Arthur William Higgins — truly a marvelously imposing name for such a 
modest, meek little fellow as "Chatmcey " used to be. He is still quite sedate and 
proper, but Freshman "Chauncey" and Mr. Higgins of the present day are but 
^^^ distant cousins. In other words, Chauncey has blos- 

^^^^^^^^ somed out. Though they say that no good thing 

^^^K^^^^^^ comes from Westfield, this excellent young man does 

'^^^^^^^^^^ ' not disdain to credit it with his nativity. The begin- 

W^ ^k nings of his polished education were impressed upon 

js ,1 ,_» __, P him in a dainty little shanty with three windows and 

I '^ 5 a fish-pole flag staff. As soon as he could tear himself 

away from this primitive institution he entered West- 
field High School and graduated with flying colors. 
After a year of deliberation, Arthur decided to descend 
to the humble pursuit of agriculture, or more specifl- 
cally horticulture. He has planted at his home "down 
on the farm" an embryonic floral establishment. As 
a Freshman he was elected to the Signal Board, and 
later to the board of reading-room directors. He is 
also a member of the editorial staff of this volume and 
a member of the Kappa Sigma fraternity. 




Clinton King. This little prodigy is surely an enigma. A glance at him would 
reveal nothing of especial importance. An ordinary man with — but stay! you 
wrong him. Rather short and slight is he, and though he is not bold, no ordi- 
nary mortal could have such stately stride; no ordi- 
nary man that eagle eye and noble air, that subtle 
power which made him sergeant of his class. A 
glance beneath the surface, and lo! we start with 
wonder. 

" Such giant intellect no man has yet beheld; 

A mind like those of yore, which fear and awe impelled. 

We scarcely can believe a gift like this so rare, 

In this great age of strife bestowed unto our care." 
He was born September 7, 1884, at Easton, Mass. 
This place he called his home until 1905, when the 
family moved to Dorchester. A P. G. course at the 
Oliver Ames High School gave him sufficient "prep" 
to join us. He entered a full-fledged Freshman and 
is just beginning to be appreciated. He is on the 
Signal and Index boards and a reading-room director. 
A member of 0. T. V. 




150 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Joseph Adelbert Earned. To form any sort of conception of this marvelous 
nature a great variety of circumstances must be considered. His brilliant career 
opened with his advent to the town of Colrain, Mass., on June 28, 1885. The 
fame of this precocious youth has attracted crowds 
of ambitious people to Colrain -in the hope that they 
too may become bright. When two years of age he 
took his family to a more quiet and secluded home in 
Springfield. Soon after this his eager desire after 
worldly things caused him to lean so far out of an 
open window that he lost his balance, and after 
turning three somersaults in mid-air sat down on the 
sidewalk to rest. It is said that in the process of these 
gyrations his hair received an impetus to lengthen, 
which it has never fully overcome. We next find him 
in Pelham whence he completed a course in Amherst 
High School and then found his way to M. A. C. He 
is something of an athlete, and a "shark in math." 
He belongs to Q. T. V. 




Ernest Avery Lincoln. This is the boy — the veritable "Missing Link," al- 
though you would not imagine it to look at his placid countenance. Ernest 
hustled into the city of Fall River on October 24, 1883, just in time to avoid 
getting a half cut. Probably he was then in much 
the same state of mind as on that morning when he 
reported at Babby's recitation minus his necktie and 
his wits. Abe hung around Fall River until he got 
into the high school, and then he went up to Worcester 
Academy. Having an indefinite longing for the mys- 
ticism of the Chemical Lab. he came over the moun- 
tains to Mass'chusetts. Of late Link has departed 
from the chemical path and is now taking Math. 
However, he is quite liberal and is ready to discuss 
with you anything from the higher criticism to ana- 
lytical geometry. He spent last summer studying 
the occult sciences with a fair but perverse cousin on 
the wooded shores of a distant New Hampshire lake. 
Lincoln played on the Freshman basketball team and 
belongs to the C. S. C. With this brief dissertation, 
we present him to you, a Link that binds together the class of 1907. 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



151 



C. Morton Parker. It was on the 25th of February, 1884, at Newtonville, that 
our friend Parker, with fine determination and inextinguishable eourage set out 
on the journey of life. He readily overcame the obstacles which might have 
prevented his success, and graduated in the scientific 
-^^^^^^-^ course from the Newton High School. Realizing the 

^^9^^ ;. advantages possessed by one who has attained to 

f^ ^B *''.. erudition in the science of Horticulture, he perambu- 

lated in the direction of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
t^^^f^ - '^'' Xk' tural College. Events have justified the choice he 

^H^B "* J^ made. His prevailing modesty and fine discrimina- 

^^^^■■^ ~~"~..^ ! tion in regard to values of knowledge obtained prompt- 

^^^HB "'Hl^k ' '■'^ ^^^™ ^° remark on one occasion: "Owing to lack 

^^^^1 ' ^^^ ,. j "f sufficient preparation, I do not feel competent to 
^^^^B |» ^^^^^^ recite upon the subject intelligently." He was a 
^^^HJ|^^^^^^V Burnham speaker in his Freshman year. In his 
^^^KK^^^^^^ Sophomore year he entered his cognomen on the 
^^^^^^^^^r roster of the Q. T. V. fraternity. His steady perse- 

^^^^^^^ verance has lead to a good degree of scholarship, and 

gives us confidence that he will bring his course to a 
successful termination. In the opinion of his humble classmates, the truth is 
that he has a pull with Daddy Mills. 



Frederick C. Peters tells us that he was born September 20, 1884, at Lenox, 
in the heart of the good old Berkshires. He attended the Lenox schools and then 
went to Cushing Academy to study co-education and other minor .subjects. 
That he accomplished his purpose is attested b)' the 
fact that the mail service works overtime and such 
dainty letters arrive almost daily. Pete is all right 
for all his faults. He has made a specialty of basket- 
ball, playing guard on the varsity each year, and this 
winter he is to captain the five. He has also played 
substitute quarter on the football team each year and 
covered the initial bag on the class baseball team. As 
he has served the class as president for two years it is 
evident that he has given complete satisfaction. Other 
honors have been thrust upon Pete, namely, election 
to the Senate and Fraternity Conference. He is a 
member of Phi Sigma Kappa, and expects to travel in 
France in 190S. 




THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 




Henry Tyler Pierce landed with a crash in the center of West Millbury on 
May II, 1883. Ever since this first frantic effort to secure a grip on life, "Shorty" 
has had a perfect mania for grasping things. Not content with the course of 
study at M. A. C, it is his intention to go to Tech., 
and this is but a stepping-stone to a career as a mighty 
civil engineer in which high estate he may claim the 
admiration of the entire country. We can't help 
admiring his ambition. Shorty graduated with honors 
from the Millbury High School and then retired to the 
seclusion of his father's farm for four years. He did 
manage to break away just long enough to visit Sara- 
toga and cast a cursory glance at the Pan-American 
Exposition. About a week before college opened in 
1903 he chose to honor '07 with his presence. Since 
his arrival he has won the hearts of his classmates 
with his usual cupidity. He was a member of our 
famous ropepuU and football teams, and is the class 
captain. Credit is also due him in connection with 
his services in the preparation of this mighty volume. 
He is a member of the C. S. C. 



Edward Houghten Shaw. Somewhere on the map of Massachusetts is situ- 
ated the town of Belmont. Where, we know not, but at any rate the subject of 
this sketch says he was born there on October 7, 1885. Eddie found this town 
so attractive that he has always remained there. He 
graduated from Belmont High School in 1903 and 
footed it out to Mass'chusetts. The long walk tired 
him so that he still appears rather sleepy. However, 
he played on the class football team both Freshman 
and Sophomore years, and also on the basketball 
team both years. He captained the baseball team 
his Freshman year. This youth, strange to relate, is 
a great "fusser," and also patronizes Uncle Sam's 
postal system to quite an extent. Eddie elected 
Horticulture and expects to make his future as a 
market gardener. He is a member of Phi Sigma 
Kappa. 





MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 15^ 

John Nicholas Summers. When this bold warrior was consulted in regard to 
the extent of his achievements, he modestly replied: "I have done nothing of 
which to boast." Such seems to be the attitude of all great men toward their 
various accomplishments, and this in fact is one of the 
beauties of their natures. The first event of any im- 
portance in his life was his appearance as a real live 
"it," in Brockton, Mass., on January 25, 1884. He 
developed rapidly, and almost before he knew it had 
graduated from Brockton High School and come to M. 
A. C. for Horticulture. Early in his course he turned 
his back on " Hort." and took up the study of insects. 
We are told that he is especially interested in the 
Tomicus plastographus variety of the tribe Scolytidae. 
of the Coleopterous race. Whatever this may mean, 
he alone can tell, but we rejoice that he has at last 
found his calling and heartily wish him the greatest 
possible success. As a member of our Sophomore rope- 
pull team, John gained great renown. He is a valu- 
able football man and controls the purse strings of 
the class. A member of C. S. C. 



Clifford Briggs Thompson was born about October 2, 1884, in Halifax, down 
in the lake region of the Old Colon3^ After securing all the education available 
in that paradise of woodland, Halifax, Tommy entered the high school at Brock- 
ton. The location of the well-known Grover shoe 
factory in that city made a great impression in Clif- 
ford's mind and possibly accounts for the peculiar 
interest which he has developed in that name, but we 
fail to see why he should always connect Hamp. with 

that name. At length Tommy secured sufficient ^^' -' -T" <^*< 
Math, to enter our college, and became one of this class. 
He has since secured the college championship as a 
' ' roughhouser " and was one of those who took the water 
cure in his Freshman j^ear ; but no pond is deep enough 
to drown his enthusiastic class spirit. He has elected 
Landscape Gardening, and undertook last summer, 
with the assistance of Pete and Mudge, to give people 
down to Boston points on the improvement of the 
Blue Hill Reservation. Thompson played on both 
of our class football teams, and has been a reading- 
room director. He is a member of the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. 




154 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



James Henry Walker. On November i, 1885, this individual strolled into 

Greenwich Village, a peaceful hamlet over beyond the Pelham hills. After a 

rather tumultuous youth, during which he managed to get through the Hard- 

wich High School, James sought knowledge of the 

world beyond his valley home, and so one day he 

suddenly appeared in Amherst and became a member 

of the class of Naughty-seven. Here he has grown 

rapidly in body and mind, especially since he came 

under the influence of his roommate, "Mil" Clark. 

Billy had no terrors for him, and when that gentleman 

needed one to tackle a difficult proposition in Physics 

, -ajjjjj it was "Jim" every time. Now as a Junior he has 

^^ ^^^ Jk L-lected Landscape and expects someday to practice 

^tfHBHH^V^^Hjbjj^' his profession in the metropolis of Greenwich. Walker 

^^^^^^^A^^^^V won his numerals on the class football team, and is 

^^^^^KM^^^^F affiliated with Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. He is 

^^K^K^^^^r noted for his love of music and his abilities as an 

^^^^^^^^ essayist. As the best of good fellows we gladly claim 

him as one of "our" class. 




Fred Alexander Watkins tells us that he arrived in the city of Peru, Mass., 
one fine autumn morning about October 17, 1885. The elevated position of this 
metropolis led him to decide to make it his permanent abode. "Cy" attended 
the district school perched on the country hillside, 
and having heard of a great and mighty philosopher 
who once said "Round Tile is the best," he decided 
to join the class of 1906 at M. A. C. where this learned 
man discourses to his faithful followers. There is, 
however, a certain august body called the faculty, 
and these gentlemen decreed that our hero should 
join Naughty-seven, and so we found him among us 
at the beginning of Sophomore year. Watkins has 
now resolutely begun his elective course in "Wheat," 
and expects to go back to the Berkshires aiter gradua- 
tion, armed with the magic tile which is round, to 
disseminate Brook's agriculture to the unenlightened 
citizens of Peru. " Cy " is no indifferent football 
player, having won his numerals by playing on the 
teams of the two classes to which he has belonged. 
He belongs to Phi Sigma Kappa and has the remarkable ability of always 
being "on the spot" when he is wanted. This tale would not be complete did 
we not recall that amusing episode when Watkins asked Professor Babson a 
question about Hawthorne's "Elsie Venner" and how in the outburst which 
followed the disgusted professor dismissed the class for insubordination. 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1 55 



Ralph Jerome Watts. And what shall we say of our mascot, the one who has 
brought '07 her luck? When we first adopted "Shimmie" he was as frisky as an 
untrained colt fresh from the verdure of his native heath. Our unskilled judg- 
ment almost led us to reject him as unlikely, "but 
then," you see, "it 's just like this " : — he showed some 
signs of a brilliant future and we could not afford to 
lose him. Ere long we found to our great delight that 
he "would have been cheap at half the price." He 
has far surpassed our highest hopes and stands today 
one of the honored "wise boys" of the class. While 
we do not feel justified in calling him a professional 
fiisser, it is c[uite evident to all that 

" He truly hath a pleasing way 
Which cannot be resisted." 
The arrival of this distinguished personage was cele- 
brated by a public holiday on the 2d of January, 
1885, in Littleton, Mass. He graduated from the 
Littleton High School and came to us for his degree. 
Besides the honor of sporting his numerals he is 
assistant manager of the College Signal and a member of Phi Sigma Kappa. 




Herbert Poland Wood first began his noisy career in a secluded corner of South 
Attleboro, Mass., in August, 1883. In two years he had done that town andmoved 
to Millbury, Mass. There he remained for fourteen years during which time he 
journeyed through the grammar and partly through 
the high school. He did many other things in Mill- 
bury but none of them will come up to his achieve- 
ments in athletics. In '99 he drifted to Hopedale and 
there prepared for M. A. C. He entered bold and 
fresh with igo6, but owing to his desire for study and 
his honesty, he soon tired of them and joined the 
1907 bunch at the beginning of our Sophomore year. 
He did wonderful things for us in football and basket- 
ball. He captained the latter team and succeeded in 
producing an excellent team under great disadvan- 
tages. He is a member of the C. S. C, and he had the 
courage to elect Chemistry for his Junior ^^ear. 




15(5 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Susie Bearing Livers first saw the light of the world in Mendota, Illinois, on 
January 20, not so many years ago. When but a wee bit of a lassie she left her 
"native hamlet for the "Sunny South." Disgusted with the frivolity of the 

Spanish elements of the population she decided to 

return to the North. To Miss Livers no more cultured 
neighborhood appeared than that about the Hub, so 
she has since then resided within a three-mile radius 
of the gilded dome. After attending the Girls' High 
School the interests of agriculture led her to M. A. C. 
It is said that she intends to go to California after 
graduation, where a successful career as a poultry- 
raiser awaits her. The best wishes of the class of 
1907 will accompany her. 






EDI TOR-ZN-CHIEr 



/ISSIS T/?NT EDI TOR 



BUS/NE3& AlAfi//)GER 

'§ T/iNTjfl/IN/iRER 

AtfLV 

^RT/ST 

^8S OCI/? TE EJJI TONS 



1(30 THE H107 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Editorials 




[ODAY the Index goes to press. For several weeks 
has the board been -working conscientiously in the 
endeavor of producing a representative classbook. 
Day after day has the editor read and reread the copy, 
sometimes cheerfully, and again the wrinkles in his 
forehead would deepen, and with a smothered exclam- 
ation a piece of copy would be thrown in the waste 
paper basket. And all because he was trying to give everyone a square 
deal. It has been the policy of the board to be just to everyone — faculty 
and students alike. No ill-humored or malicious grinds were to be coun- 
tenanced, and honors were to be distributed impartially. In short, the 
1907 Index was to be a book to be read with pleasure. 

And right here the Editor wishes to extend his personal thanks to all 
who have contributed in any way, either by suggestion, data or drawings. 
The Editor certainly appreciates the saying, "Every little bit helps," as 
no one else in college does. 

In regard to the art department, the board has been especially fortu- 
nate in its artist, W. E. Dickinson, who has worked untiringly with his 
pencil and brush, often into the wee small hours of the morning, in order 
to produce a drawing on time. "Dick," the class extends its congratula- 
tions to yoti for the aid given us. 

To E. T. Ladd, '05, the Index is also grateful for suggestions and 
drawings. 

Our alumni list has been carefully revised this year with the assistance 
of Doctor Paige and Professor Howard, and to these gentlemen do we 
also extend our thanks. 

As the hour approaches when all copy must be set up, a feeling of 
uneasiness creeps into the mind of the Editor. Is the book to be a success? 
Time will tell ; but whether success or failure awaits our efforts, we feel as 
though we have done our best, considering the trying circtmistances under 
which the board labored. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE Kil 

With a single suggestion to the readers, the Editor hands his pen to 
his valet to wipe — Be Charitable. 



I STOOD upon the hill by the Botanic Museum one day in early spring and 
looked down upon the college which we call so fondly, " Old Mass'chusetus." 
All seemed so peaceful ! In the sky above floated a few fleecy clouds as on 
one of those "rare days" in June. On the campus and the fields beyond 
lay the fast-melting snow, the last remnants of the retreating and van- 
quished forces of the Ice King. Beyond the college was the depression 
marking the course of the "Long River" on its way to the sea, and far 
beyond on all sides a barrier of lofty hills acted as a setting to the scene. 
Indeed this was a view approaching sublimity, and how ennobling and 
exhilarating to feel that you, yourself, were one of the student body at 
this educational institution enthroned among the eternal hills! 

But as I descended the hill toward the college buildings I felt a new 
influence stealing over me. The very walks seemed to sound a warning. 
They were covered with water, and occasionally gave place to mires of 
slush and mud. Soon even a careless observer could see that something 
was wrong. A group of students appeared eagerly reading a newspaper 
and commenting upon what they read. Other groups in earnest and 
indignant tones were discussing some recent incident in college life. In- 
stinctively all eyes were turned toward the college chapel where the faculty 
was in a star-chamber session. On all sides were heard scathing rebuke of 
the actions of that body. Not a word of arbitration or diplomacy. Not a 
single voice to cry, " Peace." 

At length as the sun sank in rosy splendor behind the hills of Peru and 
Cummington and darkness began to descend upon the college, a body of 
men came out of the chapel. Gradually they broke up into groups and 
slowly wended their way home. The faces of some of these gentlemen 
were calm and stoical, others were flushed and angry, more were pained 
and sorrowful. But again there was no hope of settlement, no suggestion 
of a happier day when the Prince of Peace shall rule on earth. Self-interest, 
bigotry and hatred dominated on both sides of the controversy. 

It is not pertinent to enter into the merits of this particular incident. 
It is closed and has been recorded in history. An attempt to reopen it 
would be both unwise and unfortunate. But the lesson Avhich we should 



162 THE U)07 INDEX Volume XXXVII 

learn from it, the moral which it teaches, is painfully self-evident. There 
is no cooperation between the faculty of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College and the undergraduates. Although both parties should work for 
the welfare of the college, it is a fact that when the slightest chance for a 
disagreement occurs, neither side will yield one iota until compelled by 
some arbitrary power to relinguish their claims. There is apparently little 
respect held on either side for the other, for we often find students treated 
like children and, on the other hand, it is indeed seldom that we do not 
hear the faculty arraigned for some real or fancied insult. These petty 
difficulties are abundant proof of Dryden's assertion that "Men are but 
children of a larger growth." It is wrong to suppose that any considerable 
number of the faculty are narrow-minded, and it is likewise the height of 
folly and misapprehension to suppose that we of the student body are 
looking for what is vulgarly' called a "cinch," or are attempting to usurp 
the administration of college affairs. 

Let us all in the future strive to work together for the advancement of 
the college with the least possible friction and a charity which shall cover 
the delinquencies of our co-laborers in the field of knowledge. Forgetting 
the trials of Today, let us face resolutely toward Tomorrow where the future 
of our college lies. Turning our eyes to Sugar Loaf and Tobey or Tom and 
Holyoke, let us raise oiu" ideals to keep themi company, thus giving to the 
college the full benefit of the moral influence of those things of beauty 
which Nature has so bountifully bestowed upon us. Then the faculty, 
"the powers that be," and the students, "the powers that are to be," will 
no longer clash in performing their labors, "neither shall they learn war 
anv more." 



The New Horticultural Building 

With the completion of our new Horticultural building the attention of 
the public is called more forcibh^ than ever to this exceedingly important 
branch of agriculture. It is a department in which this college has long 
held a prominent position and in which it rightly should excel. Our 
natural facilities for experiment and demonstration together with the de- 
mand made by a large majority of the students for courses in Horticulture, 
Landscape Gardening, and Floriculture, indicate plainly that this insti- 
tution may well be one of the best in the country. We have a strong de- 
partment with the natural environment, and we rejoice to know that we 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 163 

are progressing materially on the way to a gootl equi]:)ment. The one great 
need still unsupplied is a commodious and tip-to-date greenhouse. One 
who is in the least interested could not fail to note this fact on even the 
most castial inspection of our present quarters. However, we are thankful 
for little favors. 

Wilder Hall is a building upon which we may rightfully look with 
pride. Of an artistic and practical design, it is so arranged that it presents 
no rear aspect. While the main entrance faces the east, the west door will 
be reached b}^ a side approach from tlie botanic walk. A fine turf lawn 
will cover the slope down to tlie county road, thus setting off the building 
to its best advantage. The red brick exterior with terra cotta trimmings 
and a tile roof forms a very pleasing departure from the hitherto accepted 
standard. It is fireproof throughout. 

The interior will contain but little wood^^•ork. This will give an 
extremely neat appearance as well as aid in the matter of cleanliness. The 
arrangement is as follows: Basement floor — two classrooms, two labora- 
tories, a large storage room, hat room, toilet room, and room for surveving 
instiiaments ; main floor — two offices, record room, museum, laboratory, 
library, and loggia; upper floor — large drafting room and one classroom, 
also a photographing room with dark room and private laboratory. Thus 
we see that the necessities of the department are verv well met. 

Of coiirse a college building is intended for practical use, but in this 
age of skilled specialties nothing but an agreeable structure should be 
tolerated. Mr. Willcox, the designer, has attained a happy combination of 
the practical with the sesthetic elements which is worthy of the true artist. 
Our present growth and prosperity necessitate the addition of accommoda- 
tions. Let us use all our influence to further the tendency to make the 
buildings a credit to the institution and an added attraction to this most 
fortunate of college locations. 



At the present time, as the annual meeting of tlic Trustees of the college 
draws near and with it the possibility ni' the election of a new president, 
every friend of the institution finds himself placed on the tiptoe of expec- 
tancy. There is a golden opportunity otfered to benefit the college, for as 
it is the brain that directs and controls the human body so the executive 



164 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 

powers in the college rest with the president. It is now a year since Presi- 
dent Goodell was forced to forever cease his labors. For a year the college 
and everything connected with it has drifted on — a ship without a pilot, 
on a trackless sea. We can not expect an acting-president to do more than 
transact routine business, leaving the establishment of definite policies to 
the permanent executive. To illustrate: recently a member of the faculty 
was approached in regard to effecting a change in the course of study. 
His reply was: " Until a new president is elected, the faculty does not feel 
justified in making a change in the course of study or the policy of the 
institution." Although the selection of a new president is delegated to 
the Board of Trustees, it is pertinent for us to discuss the type of man 
needed for the office. 

It would seem that a comparatively young man with experience in the 
executive control of an institution similar to our own, should be selected. 
Owing to the fact that educational ideals are changing so rapidly such an 
officer must be possessed of a progressive spirit that will advance with the 
times, although in so doing he may well follow the general lines which 
made the administration of Doctor Goodell so notable. We also suggest 
that this gentleman should be one who does not limit his connection with 
the college to his office hours or to those times when he is absent on official 
business. The students will have more respect and esteem for the president 
who appears at athletic contests and other student gatherings, not as an 
officious, "butting-in" member of the faculty, but as a friend and adviser. 
Every day we note that altogether too many of the faculty of our American 
colleges possess little tact or ability to get along with the students harmon- 
iously. From that small number of men who can look at matters both from 
a faculty and student point of view our president should come. 

When these conditions are fulfilled the Index believes we shall have 
the right man in the right place. It would be an extravagant statement 
to say that the college will then enter upon an entirely unprecedented 
period of prosperity and advancement. With a word of congratulation to 
Professor Brooks for his conscientious and arduous work, often under 
perplexing difficulties, as acting-president, the alumni, undergraduates and 
friends of the Massachusetts Agricultural College eagerly await the new 
executive. All hail the new president. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 105 



The Alumni 



WHEN we consider the present location of these men who in the past 
have gone out from this college, we find them scattered from South 
Africa to the Hawaii, from Canada to Brazil. All are engaged in 
active, useful occupations, for the reason that very few Massachusetts 
men have had sufficient means to live a life of idleness and pleasure-seeking. 
Many of our alumni are engaged in farming or are superintendents of large 
estates; others are landscape gardeners, florists and market gardeners; some 
have become famous in the line of entomology, while a few have taken up a 
profession. It wotild be very interesting to follow out the occupations and 
positions of all, noting the variety of opportunities and lucrative positions open 
to graduates of this college, but this would require much time. That they 
have secured positions which compare favorably with those obtained by other 
trained men is incontestable. 

Sometimes it is said, "But do these men ever remember their Alma Mater, 
to whom they owe so much? What are they doing to advance her interests?" 
When we come to look into the matter we see that our alumni have done a great 
deal — more than most of us realize. If we examine the accounts of the athletic 
association we find that a very material part of the money received by them 
has come from alumni subscriptions. If we look into college affairs we see that 
the alumni have taken part in many things. When troubles have arisen, they 
have come to the front and done all in their power to improve matters. The 
Western Alumni Association has recently offered a prize of twenty-five dollars 
each year to the member of the Sophomore class who has made the most marked 
improvement during his first two years. Although many of the men live in dis- 
tant parts, yet we see a large number around college at Commencement and 
before important football games. 

Thus we see that a great many of our alumni continue to take an active 
interest in the college, and are doing much for its advancement. That there are 
some, however, who seem lax in regard to this institution can not be denied. 
Neither is it those men who are in distant parts of the world. Men there are in 
the state of Massachusetts and in neighboring states who are not heard from 
year in and year out. Now Mass'chusetts needs the loyal support of every 



166 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



alumnus. We need your help in bringing good men to the college; we need your 
aid financially; but most of all we need your encouragement, your criticism and 
your approbation. We need to know that you are still interested in us; that 
you are working as we are working for the advancement of the college. Would 
that more alumni might keep in touch with us, subscribe to the college paper, 
and let us know their addresses and occupations, and thus all work together 
for the good of "Old Mass'chusetts." 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



The Associate Alumni 

OF THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Founded 1874 



Officers for 1905-1906 

C. E. Beach, '82 

Frederick Tuckerman, '78 

H.P. Otis, '75 

C. M. Hubbard, '92 

J. B. Paige, '82 

H.J. Franklin, '03 . 

David Barry, 'go 



President 

First Vice-President 

Second Vice-President 

Third Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Auditor 



Executive Committee 

Wm. p. Birnie, '71 Wm. H. Caldwell, '87 



Annual Meeting, Tuesday of Commencement Week 



168 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Alumni Club of Massachusetts 

OF THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Founded 1885 



Officers for 1905-1906 

L. Le B. Holmes, '72, New Bedford . . . President 

F. W. Davis, '89, Roslindale .... Clerk 

W. A. Morse, '82, Boston ..... Treasurer 



Directors 

M. Bunker, '75, Newton 

A. H. KiRKLAND, '94, Reading 

E. F. Richardson, '87 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 169 



Massachusetts Agricultural College Club 
of New York 



Founded 1886 



Officers 1904-1905 

J. H. Webb, '73, New Haven, Conn. . . . President 

J. F. Barrett, '75, New York . . First Vice-President 

C. E. Lyman, '78, Middlefield, Conn. Second Vice-President 

F. L. Greene, '94, New York . . Third Vice-President 

A. L. Fowler, '80, New York . Secretary and Treasurer 

21 West 24th St., New York City 
S. D. Foot, '78, Paterson, N. J. . . . . Choragiis 

J. A. Cutter, '82, New York .■ . . . Historian 



Annual Dinner, First Friday of December at St. Denis Hotel, 
lYeic York City 



170 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Western Alumni Association 

OF THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Officers for 1905-1906 

A. F. Shiverick, '82 . . . . . . President 

J. L. Field, '92 .... Vice-President 

A. B. Smith, '95 . . . Secretary and Treasvirer 



Trustees 

W. E. Stone, '82 L. A. Nichols, '71 

H. J. Armstrong, '97 
P. C. Brooks, '01 Geo. M. Miles, '75 

Members 

All Alumni west of Buffalo 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



171 



Connecticut Valley Association 

OF MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE ALUMNI 

Founded February 2i, igo2 



Officers for 1905-1906 

William P. Birnie, '71, Springtield, Mass. 
Dr. Charles Goodrich, '93, Hartford, Conn. 
Prop. A. S. Kenney, '96, South Hadley, Mass. 

H. D. Hemenway, '95, Hartford, Conn. . 
John B. Minor, '73, New Britain, Conn. 



President 
First Vice-President 

Second Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Executive Committee 

William P. Birnie, '71 Prof. A. S. Kenney, 'i 

Dr. Charles Goodrich, '93 H. D. Hemenway, '95 
John B. Minor, '73 



172 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Massachusetts Agricultural College Club 
of Washington, D. C. 



Founded 1904 



Officers 

C. B. Lane, '95, Washington, D. C. 
W. E. Hinds, 'gg, Dallas, Texas . 
S. W. Wiley, '98, Baltimore, Md. 

B. H. Smith, 'gg, Boston, Mass. 

C. M. Walker, 'gg, Amherst 



President 

First Vice-President 

Second Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Choragus 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



\T.i 



Home Association of M, A. C. Alumni. 



Founded 1905 



Officers 

C. F. Deuel, '76, Amherst 
H. T. Shores, '91, Northampton 
C. M. Hubbard, '92, Sunderland 
A. C. MoNAHAN, '00, Amherst 
E. B. Holland, '92, Amherst 
G. P. Smith, '79, Sunderlani' 



. 1 . J 'resident 

First Vicc-PrcsiJcnt 

Second Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Aii'lit'jr 



174 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



THE ALUMNI 



-4^c 



'71 

E. E. THOMPSON, Secretary, Worcester, Mass. 

Allen, Gideon H., D.G.K., 397 Union Street, New Bedford, Mass., Bookkeeper and 

Journalist. 
Bassett, Andrew L., Q.T.V., Pier 36 East River, New York City, Transfer Agent Central 

Vermont Railway Company. 
Birnie, W. p., K I, 34 Sterns Terrace, Springfield, Mass., Paper and Envelope Manu- 
facturer. 
3owKER, W. H., D.G.K., 43 Chatham Street, Boston, Mass., President Bowker Fertilizer 

Company. 

Caswell, Lilley B., Athol, Mass., Civil Engineer. 
CowLES, Homer L., Amherst, Mass., Farmer. 
Ellsworth, Emory A., Q.T.V., 40 Essex Street, Hoi yoke, Mass., Ellsworth & Kirk- 

patrick, Architects and Engineers. 
Fisher, Jabez P., K I, Fitchburg, Mass., Bookkeeper Parkhill Manvifacturing Com- 
pany. 
Fuller, George E., address unknown. 
*Hawley, Frank W., died October 28, 18S3, at Bplchertown, Mass. 
*Herrick, Frederick St. C, D.G.K.. died January 19, 1894, at Lawrence, Mass. 
Leonard, George B., LL.B., D.G.K., Springfield, Mass., Clerk of Courts. 
""W.YMAN, Robert W., LL.B., Q.T.V., Linden Street, Northampton, Mass., Registrar of 
Deeds, Lecturer Rural Law at M. A. C. 
*MoRSE, James H., died June 21, 1883, at Salem, Mass. 
Nichols, Lewis A., D.G.K., 630 East 63d Street, Chicago, 111., Chicago Steel Tape Com- 
pany. 
NoRCROss, Arthur D., D.G.K., Monson, Mass., Merchant and Farmer. 
*Page, Joel B., D.G.K., died August 23, 1902, at Conway, Mass. 
Richmond, Samuel H., Cutler, Dade County, Fla., Editor of Biscayne Bay; Dealer in 

General Merchandise; Surveyor and Draughtsman on the Perrine Grant. 
Russell, William D., K 0. D.G.K. , 329 West 83d Street, New York City, Business. 
Smead, Edwin B., Q.T.V., P. O. Box 965, Hartford, Conn., Principal Watkinson's Farm 

School of Handicraft Schools. 
Sparrow, Lewis A., 74 Elmira Street, Brighton, Mass., Supt. Bowker Fertilizer Works. 
Strickland, George P., D.G.K., Livingston, Mont., Machine Shop Foreman. 
Thompson, Edgar E., 5 Jaques Ave., Worcester, Mass., Teacher. 
*Tucker, George H., died October i, 1889, at Spring Creek, Pa. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 175 

Ware, Willard C, 225 Middle Street, Portland, Me., Manager Boston and Portland 

Clothing Company. 
'+W11EELER, William, (D K (H . D.G.K., 14 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass., Civil Engineer. 
Whitney, Frank Le P., D.G.K,, 104 Robinwood Ave., Jamaica Plain, Mass., Dealer in 

Teas and Coffees. 
WooLSON, George C Irvington-on-Hudson, N. Y., Florist. 

'72 

S. T. MAYNARD, Secretary, Northboro, Mass. 

Bell, Burleigh C. D.G.K. , no Grant Ave., San Francisco, Cal., Druggist in MacDonald 
Pharmacy. 

Brett, William F., D.G.K., address vmknown. 

Clark. John W., Q.T.V., North Hadley, Mass., Fruit Grower. 

CowLES. Frank C, 223^ Pleasant Street, Worcester, Mass., Civil Engineer and Draughts- 
man. 

Cutter, John C, M.D., D.G.K , 7 Gates Street, Worcester, Mass., Physician. 
*Dyer, Edward N., died March 17, 1891, at Holliston, Mass. 
*Easterbrook, Isaac H., died May 27. iqoi, at Webster, Mass. 

Fiske, Edward R., Q.T.V., 625 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa., in the hrm of Fohvelt 
Brothers & Company, 217 West Chelton Avenue, Philadelphia, Penn. 

Flagg, Charles O.. Box 77 Hardwick, Mass., Manager of George Mi.Kter's Guernsey 
Stock Farms. 

Grover, Richard B., 67 Ashland Street, Boston, Mass.. Clergyman. 

Holmes. Lemuel Le B.. Q.T.V., 38 North Water Street, New Bedford, Mass.. Judge 
Superior Court. 

Howe, Edward G., Principal Preparatory School, University of Illinois, Urbana, 111. 

Kimball, Francis E., 8 John Street, Worcester, Mass., Accountant. 

LivERMORE, Russell W., LL.B., O.T.V., Pates, Robinson County, N. C, Merchant and 
Manufacturer of Naval Stores. ^ 

■Mackie, George, M.D., D.V.S., Q.T.V., Attleboro, Mass., Physician. 
JV'^aynard, Samuel T., Northboro, Mass., Landscape Architect, Fruit Specialist. 

MoREY, Herbert E., 31 Exchange Street, Boston, Mass., also 134 Hillside Avenue., 
Maiden, Mass., Stamp and Coin Dealer 

Peabody. William R., Q.T.V., St. Louis, Mo., Assistant General Freight Agent for Mis- 
souri Pacific Railroad. 
*Salisbury, Frank B.. D.G.K., died 1895, in Mashonaland, Africa. 

Shaw, Elliot D., Holyoke, Mass., Florist. 

Snow, George H. Leominster, Mass., Farmer. 
*Somers. Frederick M., Q.T.V., died February 2, 1894, at Southampton, England. 

Thompson, Samuel C K 'P, <P JT A'. Member American Society C. E., 950 East i66th 
Street. New York City, Civil Engineer. Paving and Grading Departinent. 

Wells, Henry. O.T.V., 1410 G Street, N. W . Washington, D. C, Real Estate, Loans, 
Insurance. 

Whitney, William C, Q.T.V., 313 Nicollet Avenue., Minneapolis, Minn., Architect. 



176 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



'73 

C. WELLINGTON, Secretary, Amherst, Mass. 

Eldred, Frederick C, Sandwich, Mass., Cranberry and Poultry Raiser. 

Leland, Walter S., D.G.K., Concord Junction, Mass., Teacher in Massachusetts Refor- 
matory . 
♦Lyman, Asahel H., D.G.K., died of pneumonia at Mainstee, Mich., January i6, 1896. 

Mills, George W., M.D., 60 Salem Street, Medford, Mass., Physician. 

Minor, John B., (I> K <I> , Q.T.V., New Britain, Conn., Manufacturer, Minor &• Corbin Box 
Company. 

Penhallow, David P., D.S.C., Q.T.V., Montreal, Canada, Professor of Botany and Veg- 
etable Physiology, McGill University; Vice-President American Society of Naturalists. 

Renshaw, James B., B.D., Box 1935, Spokane, Wash., Farmer. 

Simpson, Henry B., Q.T.V., 2890 N Street, N. W., Washington, D C, Coal Merchant. 

Wakefield, Albert T., M.D., Sheffield, Mass., Physician. 

vVarner, Seth S., D.G.K., Northampton, Mass., Dealer in Agricultural Implements and 
Fertilizers. 

Webb, James H., LL.B., (D K . D.G.K., 42 Church Street, New Haven, Conn., Lawyer, 
Instructor in Criminal Law and Procedure, Yale University, Department of Law, 
— LWellington, Charles, Ph.D., (D K (I>, K I, Amherst, Mass., Associate Professor of 
Chemistry at Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Wood, Frank W., address unknown. 



'74 

Benedict, [ohn M., M.D., D.G.K., 18 Main Street, Waterbury, Conn., Physician and 

Surgeon. 
Blanchard, William H., Westminster, Vt., Teacher. 

Chandler, Edward P., D.G.K., Maiden, Fergus County, Mont., Wool Grower. 
*CuRTis, Wolfred F., died November 18, 1878, at Westminster, Mass. 

*Dickinson, Asa W., D.G.K., died November 8, 1899, at Easton, Pa., from apoplectic shock. 
Hitchcock, Daniel G., Warren, Mass., Editor and Proprietor Warren Herald. 
HoBBS, John A., Salt Lake City, Utah, Proprietor Rocky Mountain Dairy and Hobbs' 

Creamery, 13 East Third South Street. 
LiBBY, Edgar H., '/> A' <P , Clarkston, Wash., President Lewiston Water and Power Company. 
♦Lyman, Henry, died January 19, 1879, at Middlefield, Conn. 

Montague, Arthur H., Granby, Mass,, P. O. South Hadley, Mass., Farmer. 
♦Phelps, Henry L., died at West Springfield, Mass., March 23, 1900. 
♦Smith, Frank S,, D.G.K., died December 24, 1899, in Cleveland, Ohio. 
Woodman, Edward E., (/> K (P, Danvers, Mass., E. &. C. Woodman, Florists and Garden 

Supplies. 
Zeller, Harrie McK., 145 West Washington Street, Hagerstown, Md., Canvasser for 
Publishing House. 



J"Br 



MASSACHUSETTvS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 177 

'75 
M. BUNKER, Secretary, Newton, Mass. 

Barrett, Joseph F., <I> K 0, * 1' A. ,S [ New Street, New York City, Salesman Bowker 
Fertilizer Company. 

Barri, John A., residence Maple Street, Springfield, Mass., lousiness, Bridgeport, Conn., 
Dealer in Grain and Coal. 

Bragg, Everett B., Q.T.V., 135 Adams Street, Cliicago, 111., West Manager National 
Chemical Company. 

ooKs, William P., Pli.D., tf' K d'. (I> y K. Amlierst, Mass., Acting President Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College, Professor of Agriculture at M. A. C. 

Bunker, Madison, D.V.S., 4 Baldwin Street, Newton, Mass., Veterinary Surgeon. 

Callender, Thomas R., D.G.K., Northfield, Mass., Farmer. 

Campbell, Frederick G., ffi - K, Westminster West, Vt,. Farmer and Merino Sheep Raiser. 

Carruth, Herbert S., D.G.K.. Beaumont Street, Dorchester, Mass., Assistant Penal 
Commissioner, Suffolk County, Mass. 
*Clark, Zenos Y., I K, died June 4, 1889, at Amherst, Mass. 
*Clay, Jabez W., 2' K, died October i, 1880, at New York City. 

Dodge, George R., Q.T.V.. Hamilton, Mass., Garden Truck and Small Fruits. 

Hague, Henry, J A', 6gs Southbridge Street, Worcester, Mass., Clergyman, Arch- 
deacon of Worcester. 
. Harwood, Peter M., '/' S K. Barre, Mass., General Agent Dairy Bureau of Massachusetts 
State Board of Agriculture. 

Knapp, W. H., K 0, 1x6 North Street, Newtonville, Mass., Florist. 

Lee, Lauren K., 311 South Franklin Street, St. Paul. Minn., employ of Nicliols & Dean. 

Miles, George W., Miles City, Mont., Mercliant and Stockraiser. 

Otis, Harry P., D.G.K., 104 North Main Street, Florence, Mass., Supt. Northampton 
Emery Wheel Company. 

Rice, Frank H., 14 Sansome Street, San Francisco, Cal., Bool<keeper. 

Southwick, Andre A.. J K, Taunton, Mass., General Manager Outside Affairs Taunton 
Insane Hospital. 

Winchester, John F., D.V.S., Q.T.V., 39 East Haverhill Street. Lawrence, Mass., Veteri- 
narian. 

'76 

C. FRED DEUEL, Secretary, Amherst, Mass. 
Bagley, David A., address unknown. 
Bellamy, John, D.G.K., 133 Webster Street, West Newton, Mass., Bookkeeper for H. H. 

Hunt, Builder and Contractor. 
Chickering, Darius 0., Enfield, Mass., Farmer. 
Deuel, Charles F., K 0, Q T.V., Amherst, Mass., Druggist. 
*GuiLD, George W., Q.T.A^., died May 8. 1903, of heart disease, at Jamaica Plain. 
Hawley, Joseph M., D.G.K.. address unknown. 
Kendall, Hiram, D.G.K.. East Greenwich, R. I., Assistant Superintendent for The Shep- 

ard Company. 

♦Deceased 



178 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



Ladd, Thomas L., care of William Dadmum, Watertown, Mass., Insane. 

McCoNNELL, Charles W., D.D.S., D.G.K., 171A Tremont Street, Boston, Mass., Dentist. 

MACLEOD, William A., B.A., LL.B., <I> K d', D.G.K., 350 Tremont Building, Boston, Mass., 
Lawyer, Macleod, Calver & Randall, Law3fers. 

Mann, George H., Sharon, Mass., Supt. Cotton Duck Mills. 

Martin, William E., Sioux Falls, S. D., Secretary of the Sioux Falls Candy Company. 

Parker, Georoe A., K #, ip Jf K. P. O. Box 397, Hartford, Conn., Supt. of the Hartford 
Parks. 

Parker, George L., 807 Washington Street, Dorchester, Mass., Florist. 

Phelps, Charles H., 155 Leonard Street, New York City, Dresden Lithographic Company. 

^ORTER, William H., H' I K, Silver Hill, Agawam.'Mass., Farmer. 

Potter, William S., D.G.K., Lafayette, Ind., Rice & Potter, Lawyers. 

Root, Joseph E., M.D., B.S., <D I K, 49 Pearl Street, Hartford, Conn., Physician and 
Surgeon. 

Sears, John M., Ashfield, Mass. Farmer. 
*Smith, Thomas E., D.G.K., died September 20, 1901, at West Chesterfield, Mass., of apo- 
plexy. 

Taft, Cyrus A., Whitinsville, Mass., Supt. Whitinsville Machine Works. 
*Urner, George P., D.G.K. , died April, 1897, at Wisley, Mont., from effussion rf blood on 
brain. 

Wetmore, Howard G., M.D., D.G.K., 63 West gist Street, New York City, Physician. 
*Williams, John E., died January 18 i8qo, at Amherst, Mass. 

'77 

Benson, David H., Q.T.V., North Weymouth, Mass. 

Brewer, Charles, Haydenville, Mass., Farmer. 

Clark, Atherton, K <t , D.G.K., 19 Baldwin Street, Newton, Mass., in firm of R. H. 
Stearns c& Company, Boston, Mass. 
*Hibbard, Joseph R., killed by kick of a horse, June 17, 1899, at Stoughton, Wis. 

Howe, Waldo V., Q T.V., Newburyport, Mass., Poultrjr Farmer. 

Mills, James K., D.G.K., Amherst, Mass., Photographer. 

N-SE, George E., 420 East 42d Street, Chicago, 111., with Swift & Company. 
*Parker, Henry F., LL.B., died December 21, 1897, at Brooklyn, N. Y. 

PoRTO, Raymundo M., Da.S., 2 K, Para, Brazil, Sub-Director Museum Pareuse. 
*Southmayd, John E., I K, died December ii, 1878, at Minneapolis, Minn. 

Wyman, Joseph, 347 Massachusetts Avenue, Arlington, Mass., Salesman. 

•78 

C. O. LOVELL, Secretary, New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Baker, David E., I K, 227 Walnut Street, Newtonville, Mass., Phj^sician. 
' 'OUTWELL, W. L., Leverett, Mass., Farmer. 

' -Brigham, Arthur A., Ph.D., I K, Lakeside Ave., Marlboro, Mass., Professor at Colum- 
bia School of Poultry Culture, Waterville, N. Y. 
*Choate, Edward C, Q.T.V., died at Shelburne, Mass., January 18, 1905, of appendicitis. 
*CoBURN, Charles F., Q.T.V., died December 26, 1901, at Lowell, Mass 



MASSACHUvSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 179 

Foot, Sanford D., Q.T.V., Vice-President of Nicholson File Company, Paterson, N. J. 

Hall, Josiai-i N., M.D., * K (l>, (l> 1 K, 1325 Franklin Street, Denver, Col., Physician. 

Heath, Henry F., D.G.K.. 35 Nassau Street, New York City, Lawyer. 

Howe, Charles S., Ph.D., '/' l< '/'. '/' ^ A'. Cleveland, Ohio, President Case School of Ap- 
plied Science. 

Hubbard. H. F., O.T.V., 26 Custom Hovise Street, Providence, R. I. 

Hunt, John P., 27 State Street, Boston, Mass., Supt. of Brazer Building. 

LovELL, Charles O., Q.T.V., 24 East 2i.st Street, New York City, Traveling Salesman 
for the Scientific Law Company; Home address. New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Lyman, Charles F., Middlefield, Conn. 

Myrick, Lockwood, Hammanton, N, J., Fruit Grower. 

Osgood, Frederick H., M.R.C.V.S.. Q.T.V., 50 Village Street, Boston, Mass., Veterinarian. 

Spofford, Auros L., # I K. Georgetown, Mass., 1898; Private 8th Massachtisetts Infantry, 
Coir^pany A. 

Stockbridge, Horace E., Ph.D., A'^', Lake City, Fla. Editor agricvdtural paper. 

Tuckerman, Frederick, Ph.D., Q.T.V., Amherst, Mass. 

Washburn, John H., Ph.D., A' 1., Director of National Farm School at Doylestown, Pa. 

Woodbury, Rufus P., Q.T.V., 3612 Campbell Street, Kansas City, Mo., Sec. Kansas City 
Live Stock Exchange. 

'79 

R. W. SWAN, Secretary, Worcester, Mass. 

Dickinson, Richard S., Columbvis, Neb., Farmer. 

Green, Samuel B., K </>, D.G.K., St. Anthony Park, Minn., Professor of Horticulture 
and Forestry, University of Minnesota. 

Rudolph, Charles, LL.B., Q.T.V., Hotel Rexford, Boston, Mass., Lawyer and Real 
Estate Agent. 

Sherman, Walter A., M.D., D.V.S., D.G.K., 340 Central Street, Lowell, Mass., Veteri- 
narian. 

Smith, George P., A" J, Sunderland, Mass., Farmer. 

Swan, Roscoe W., M.D., D.G.K., 41 Pleasant Street, Worcester, Mass., Physician. 

Waldron, Hiram E. B., Q.T.V., Hyde Park, Mass., Manager New England Telephone 
and Telegraph Company. 

'80 

Fowler, Alvan L., '/' .^' K. 21 West 24th Street, New York City. Engineer and Contractor. 
Gladwin, Frederick E., il> 2' K. 2401 North i6th Street, Philadelphia, Pa., Mining Engi- 
neer. 
Lee, William G., D.G.K., Holyoke, Mass.. Architect and Civil Engineer. 
McQueen, Charles M,, f S K. 802 Pine Street, St. Louis Mo. 

Parker, William C, LL.B., <I> I K. 249 Washington Street, Boston, Mass., Lawyer. 
Ripley, George A., Q.T.V.. 36 Grafton Street, Worcester Mass., Farmer. 
Stone, Almon H., Wareham, Mass., Jobber. 

^Deceased 



180 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 

'8i 

_r L. HILLS, Secretary. Burlington, Vt. 
Bowman, Charles A., C.S.C., 124 Walnut Street, Clinton, Mass., Division Engineer 

Metropolitan Water Works. 
BoYNTON, Charles E., M.D., Los Banos, Cal., Phj'sician. 
Carr, Walter F., Q.T.V.. 2819 Dunbar Place, Milwaukee, Minn., Chief Engineer for 

Folk Co. 
Chapin, Henry E., M.S., C.S.C, 58 Johnson Avenue, Richmond Hill, New York City, 

Teacher in Biology in Brooklyn High School. 
Fairfield, Frank H., Q.T.V., 153 Fourth Avenue, East Orange, N. J., with General 
Electric Inspection Company. 
*Flint, Charles L., died June, 1904. 

*Hashiguchi, Boonzo, D.G.K., died August 12, 1903, at Tokio, Japan. 
Hills, Joseph L., K 0, K I, Burlington, Vt., Director of Vermont Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, Dean of Agricultural Department University of Vermont and State 
V Agricultural College. 
WE, Elmer D., (P I K, Union Street, Marlboro, Mass., Farmer. Secretary of Salisbury 
and Amesbviry Fire Insurance Company. 
X Peters, Austin, D.V.S., M.R.C.V.S., Q.TV., President Board Massachusetts Cattle Com- 
mission, State House, Boston, Mass. 
Rawson, Edward B., D.G.K., 226 East i6th Street, New York City, Principal Friends' 

Seminary. 
Smith, Hiram F. M., M.D., Orange, Mass. Physician. 

Spalding, Abel W., C.S.C, 620 Colman Building, Seattle, Wash., Professor of Agriculture. 
Taylor, Frederick P., D.G.K., Athens, Tenn., Farmer. 
-^y«?WARNER, Clarence D., D.G.K., address vmknown. 
Whitaker, Arthur, D.G.K., Needham, Mass., Farmer. 
*WiLcox, Henry H,, D.G.K., died at Hauamaulu, H. I. 
Young, Charles E., M.D., I K, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Physician. 

'82 

G. D. HOWE, Secretary, Portland, Me. 

Allen, Francis S., M.D., D.V.S., C.S.C, Soo North 17th Street, Philadelphia, Pa., Veter- 
inary Surgeon. 

Alpin, George T., East Putney, Vt., Farmer. 

Beach, Charles E., D.G.K., West Hartford, Conn., C E. Beach & Company, Vine Hill 
and Ridge Farms. 
*BiNGHAM, Eugene P., C.S.C, died March 31, 1904, at Los Angeles, Cal. 

Bishop, William H., '/' I K, Doylestown, Pa., Professor of Agriculture at National 
Farm School. 

Brodt, Henry S., Q.T.V., Rawlins, Wyo., Manager of J. W. Hughes & Company, General 
Merchandise. 

Chandler, Everett S., C.S.C, NorthGodson, Ind., Clergyman. 

Cooper, James W., D.G.K., Plymouth, Mass., Druggist. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 1S1_ 

Cutter, John A., M.D , i' A', 175 Fifth Ave., New York City, Physician. 
■r"DAMON, Samuel C, C.S.C, Lancaster, Mass., Farmer. 
*Floyd, Charles W., died October 10, 1S83, at Dorchester, Mass. 

GooDALE, David, Q.T.V., Marlboro. Mass., Farmer. 

HiLLMAN, Charles D., '/' J A', Watsonville, Cal., Nurseryman. 
*HowARD, Joseph H., '/' I K, died February 13, i88g, at Minnsela, vSouth Dakota. 

Howe, George D., 25 Winter Street, Bangor, Me., State Agent for Deering Harvest 
Machine Company. 

jONES, Frank W., Assinippi, Mass., Teacher. 

Kingman, Morris B., Amherst, Mass., Florist. 

Kinney, B. A., Rochester, N. Y., Traveling Salesman. 

May, Frederick G., O I K, 34 Adams Street, Dorchester, Mass., Farmer. 

MoRSE, William A., Q.T.V., 15 Auburn Street, Melrose Highlands, Mass., Clerk at 28 
State Street, Boston, Mass. 

Myrick, Herbert, 151 Bowdoin Street, Springfield, Mass., Editor-in-Chief of the .4 merVcaw 
Agriculturists, New York and New England Homesteads and Farm and Home. 
•n^UiGE, James B., D.V.S., Q.T.V., Amherst, Mass., Veterinary Surgeon and Professor of 
Veterinary Science at M. A. C; elected to General Court 1903 and 1904. 

Perkins, Dana E., 43 Maple Avenue, Medford, Mass.. Civil Engineer and Surveyor. 

Plumb, Charles S., 107 West nth Avenue., Columbus, Ohio, Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry. Ohio State University. 

Shiverick, Asa F.. A' J, 100 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 111.. Vice-President of Tobey Fur- 
niture Company. 
X Stone, Winthrop E., Ph.D.. CSC. 146 North Grant Street. Lafayette, Ind., President 
of Purdue LTniversity. 

Taft, Levi R., (P K 0, CSC, Agricultural College, Michigan, Superintendent of Farm- 
er's Institute of Michigan. 

Taylor, Alfred H., D.G.K,, Plainview, Neb., Farmer and Stock Breeder. 
*Thurston, Wilbur H., died August 1900, at Cape Nome. 

Wilder, John E., '/' A' *, A' I, 212-214 Lake Street, Chicago, 111., Wholesale Leather 
Dealer and Tanner. 

Williams, James S., Q.T.V., Vice-President and Treastirer Williams Brothers Manufac- 
turing Company, Glastonbury, Conn. 

Windsor, Joseph L., 922 State Life Building, Indianapolis. Ind., Insurance Agent. 

'83 

S. M. HOLMAN, Secretary, Attleboro, Mass. 
Bagley, Sidney' C, iP I K, Tremont Street, Melrose Highlands, Mass.. Cigar Packer. 
Bishop, Edgar A., C.S.C, Head of Agricultural Department of Hampton Normal and 

Agricultural Institute at Hampton. Va. 
Braune, Domingos-H.. D.G.K.. Cysneiro. E.F., Leopoldina. via Rio Brazil, S. A., Planter. 
Hevia, Alfred A., ii I K, 165-167 Broadway, New York City. Mortgage Investments, 

Fire, Life and Accident Instirance Company. 
Holman, Samuel M., Q.T.V., 11 Pleasant Street. Attleboro. Mass., Real Estate Agent. 

^Deceased 



1N2 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 

^r^iNDSEY, Joseph B., Ph.D., <l> K 0, C.S.C., Amherst, Mass., Chief of Department of Foods 
and Feedings, Hatch Experiment Station at M. A. C. 
MiNOTT, Charles W , C.S.C., 6 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass., Gypsy Moth Commission. 
NouRSE, David O., C.S.C, Blacksburg, Va., Professor of Agriculture at Virginia Poly- 
technic Institute. 
'"^'reston, Charles H., * A" (I>, K -T, Hawthorne, Mass., Farmer; Board of Trustees of M.A.C. 
Wheeler, Homer J., Ph.D., C.S.C, Kingston, R. I., Director of Rhode Island Experiment 
Station. 



L. SMITH, Secretary. Spriilgheld, Mass. 
Hermes, Charles, Q.T.V., address vmknown. 

Holland. Harry D., Amherst, Mass., Hardware and Groceries, Holland & Gallond. 
Jones, Elisha A., '/' S K, New Canaan, Conn. 
Smith, Llewellyn, Q.T.V., Box 1282, Springfield, Mass., Traveling Salesman. 

'85 

E. W. ALLEN, Secretary, Washington, D. C. 

Allen, Edwin W., Ph.D., * K (!>, C.S.C, 1725 Riggs Place, Washington, D. C, Vice- 
Director of the office of Experiment Stations, XJ. S. Department of Agrciulture 

Almeida, Luciano J. De., D.G.K., Director and Professor of Agriculture of Piracicoba 
Agricultural College, Estado de S. Paulo, Brazil, S. A. 

Barber, George H., M.D., Q.T.V., U. S. Naval Training Station, Newport, R. I., Physi- 
cian and Surgeon in U. S. Navy. 

Browne, Charles W., K 0, Temple, N. H., Farmer. 

Goldthwaite, Joel E., M.D., K 0, C.S.C, 372 Marlboro Street, Boston, Mass., Physician. 

Howell. Hezekiah, I K, Washington Ville, Orange County, N. Y., Farmer. 
*Leary, Lewis C, died April 3, 1888, at Cambridge, Mass. 

Phelps, Charles S., K 0, K I, Chapinville, Conn., Supt. Farm of Scovelle Brothers. 

Taylor, Isaac M., Jr., D.G.K., San Francisco, Cal., Electric Railway and Manufacturers 
Supply Company, 68-72 First Street. 

Tekirian, Benoni, C.S.C, 103 West 114th Street, New York City, Dealer in Oriental Rugs. 

'86 

Ateshian, Osgan H., C.S.C, Broad Street, New York, Dealer in Oriental Rugs and 

Carpets. 
Atkins, William H., D.G.K., Burnside, Conn., Market Gardener. 
Ayres, Winfield, M.D., D.G.K., 112 West g4th Street, New York City, Physician. 
Carpenter, David F., (D K 0, K I, Reeds Ferry, N. H , Principal McGraw Normal 

Institute. 
Clapp, Charles W., C.S.C, Northampton, Mass., Assistant Supt. Connecticut Valley 

Electric Railroad. 

^Deceased 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE Uv3 

Duncan, Richard F., M.D., '/' S K, 5 Norwich Avenue, Providence, R. L, Physician. 

Eaton, William A., D.G.K., Nyack, N. Y., Wholesale Lumber Dealer, Stevens, Eaton & 
Company, iS Broadway, New York City. 

Felt, Charles F. W., Hi K <I>, C.S.C. Chief Engineer Gulf , Colorado and Santa Fc Railroad 
Company, Galveston, Texas. 

Mackintosh, Richard B., * K >!', D.G.K.. 30 Chestnut Street, Pealiody, Mass., Forem^^^ 
in J. B. Thomas' Wool Shop. 
/ Sanborn, Kingsbury, iI> J A . Ri\crside, Cal., Civil Engineer. 
'T^Stone, George E., Ph.D., '/' K il>. '/' ^ K, Amherst, Mass., Profes.sor of Botany, Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 

Stone, George S., D.G K., Otter River, Mass., Farmer. 



F. H. FOWLER, Secretary, Boston, Mass. 
Almeida, Augusto L. De., D.G.K , Rio Janeiro, Brazil, Coffee Commission Merchant. 
Barrett, Edward W., D.G.K. , Medford, Mass., Physician. 

Caldwell, William H., K I, Peterboro, N, H., Secretary and Treasurer American Guern- 
sey Cattle Club, Proprietor of Clover Ridge Farm. 
Carpenter, Frank B., iP K (!>, C.S.C, Richmond, Va., Chief Chemist Virginia and Carolina 

Chemical Company, 
Chase, William E., Portland, Ore., with Portland Coffee and Spice Company. 
Davis, F. A., M.D., C.S.C, Denver, Col., Eye and Ear Specialist. 
FiSHERDiCK, Cyrus W., C.S.C, Laplanta, New Mexico, Keeper of Varch Store. 
Flint, Edward R., Ph.D., M.D., Q.TV., Professor of Chemistry, Florida Agricultural 

and Technical College, Lake City, Fla. 
"^owLER, Fred H., '/' A' (P, C.S.C, State House Boston, Mass., First Clerk and Librarian 

State Board of Agriculture. 
Howe, Clinton S., C.S.C, West Medway, Mass., Farmer. 
Marsh, James M., C.S.C, Lynn, Mass., Treasurer of G. E. Marsh & Co., manufacturers of 

Good Will Soap. 
Marshall, Charles L., D.G.K., 48 Stevens Street, Lowell Mass., Market Gardener and 

Florist. 
*Meehan, Thomas F., D.G.K., died April 4, 1905, at Boston, Mass., Pneumonia. 
OsTERHOUT, J. Clark, Chelmsford, Mass., Farmer. 
Richardson, Evan F., (I> I K, Millis, Mass., Farmer; Town Treasurer; Massachusetts 

General Court, 1904. 
Rideout, Henry N. W., 7 Howe Street, Somerville, Mass., Assistant Paymaster Otfice 

Fitchburg Railroad, Boston, Mass. 
ToLMAN, William N., (P I K, 25th Ward Gas Works, Germantown, Philadelphia; address 

2 2d and Filbert Streets. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Torelly, Firming Da S., Cidade do Rio Grande do Sud, Brazil, Stockraiser. 
Watson, Charles H., Q.T.V., Wool Exchange, West Broadway and Beach Street, New 

York City, representing Wool Dept. for Swift & Company. 

*Deceased 



184 THE ](H)7 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



-¥ 



Belden, Edward H., C.S.C, i8 Park View Street, Roxbury, Mass., Electrician. 

Bliss, Herbert C, D.G.K., 64 North Main Street, Attleboro, Mass., Traveling Salesman 
with Bliss Brothers. 

Brooks, Frederick K., C.S.C, 14 Washington Street, Haverhill, Mass., Laundryman. 
OOLEY, Fred S., '/' ^ A', Amherst, Mass., Professor of Animal Hvisbandry and Dairying 
at M. A. C. 

Dickinson, Edwin H., C.S.C, Ashby, Mass., Farmer. 

Field, Samuel H.. C.S.C, North Hatfield, Mass., Farmer. 

Foster, Francis H., Andover, Mass., Civil Engineer. 

Hayward, Albert I., C.S.C, Ashley, Mass., Farmer. 

Holt, Jonathan E., C.S.C, 67 Bartlett Street, Andover, Mass. 

Kinney, Lorenzo F., Kingston, R. I.. Horticulturist. 

Knapp, Edward E., D.G.K., 215 East Evans Avenue, Pueblo, Col., Foreman of B. F. 
Dept. Pueblo Smelting and Refining Company. 

MiSHiMA, Viscount Yataro, D.G.K., 5 Shinrudo, Azabiiku, Japan, Farmer. 

Moore, Robert B., K *, C.S.C, 5617 Girard Avenue, Supt. Lygert-AUen Works, Ameri- 
can Agricultural Chemical Company, Philadelphia, Pa. ~f- 

Newman, George E., Q.T.V., San Jose, Cal. 

NoYES, Frank F., D.G.K., address unknown. 

Parsons, Wilfred A., (/' - K, Southampton, Mass., Farmer. 

Rice, Thomas, D.G.K., Fall River, Mass., Reporter for Fall River Daily News. 

Shepardson, William M., C.S.C, Middlebury, Conn., Landscape Gardener. 

Shimer, Boyer L., Q.T.V., Bethlehem, Pa., Mt. Airy Park Farm, Breeder of Pure Breed 
Stock and Poultry; Real Estate Business. 



'89 

C S. CROCKER, Secretary, Boston, Mass. 
Blair, James R., Q.T.V., 15S Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Mass., Superintendent 

with C Brigham & Company, Milk Contractors. 
Copeland, Arthur D., A' J, 494 Copeland Street, Campello, Mass., Market Gardener and 

Florist. 
Crocker, Charles S., D.G.K., Chemist for Bradley Fertilizer Company, Boston, Mass. 
Davis, Franklin W., <l> K '/'. '/' J A', 85 Colberg Avenue, Roslindale, Mass., Managing 

Editor Boston Courier; Journalist. 
Hartwell, Burt L., Ph.D., d' K <l>, C.S.C, Associate Chemist Rhode Island Experiment 

Station, Kingston, R. I. 
Hubbard, Dwight L., C.S.C, 74 Elmira Street, Brighton, Mass., Civil Engineer City 

Engineer's Oiifice, Boston, Mass. 
Hutchings, James T., (J -T K. Superintendent Rochester Street Railway Electric Generating 

Plant, Rochester, N. Y. 
Kellogg, William A., <D I K, Amherst, Mass. 
Miles, Arthur L., D.D.S., C.S.C^ 12 Brooklyn Street, Cambridge, Mass., Dentist. 

*Deceased 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE LS5 

North, Mark N., M.D.V., Q.T.V., Corner of Bay and Green Streets, Camliridge, Mass., 

Veterinarian. 
NouRSE, Arthur M., C.S.C, Westboro, Mass. 

Sellew, Robert P., * I K, Cox & Co., Chamber of Commerce Boston, Mass. 
Whitney, Charles A.. C.S.C, Upton, Mass., Farmer. 
Woodbury, Herbert E., C.S.C, Natick, Mass. 

•90 

F. W. MOBSMAN, Secretary, Westminster, Mass. 
Barry, David, (1> K <I> ., Q.T.V., Amherst, Mass., Supt. Electric Light Works. 
*Bliss, Clinton, E., D.G.K., died August 24, 1894, at Attleboro, Mass. 
*Castro, Arthur De M., D.G.K., died May 2, 1894, at Juiz de Fora, Minas, Brazil. 
Dickinson, Dwight W.,D.M.D., Q.T.V., 25 Melendy Avenue, Watertown, Mass., Dentist. 
Felton, Truman P., C.S.C, West Berlin, Mass., Farmer. 

Gregory, Edgar, C.S.C, Middleton, Mass., with firm of J. J. H. Gregory & Son, Seedsmen, 
Asylum Station, Mass. 
— V^askins, Henri D., Q.T.V., Amherst, Mass., Assistant Chemist Hatch E.xperiment Sta- 
tion. 
Herrero, Jose M., D.G.K., Havana, Cuba, Associate Editor of Diarco dc la Marina. 
*LoRiNG, John S., D.G.K., died at Orlando, Fla., January 17, 1903. 
McCloud, Albert C, Q.T.V., Amherst, Mass., Life and Fire Insurance Agent; Real Estate. 
Mobsman, Fred W., C.S.C, Westminster, Mass., Farmer. 
Russell, Henry L., D.G.K., 126 North Main Street, Pawtucket, R. I., with Pawtucket 

Ice Company. 
Simonds, George B., C.S.C, 63 Forest Street. Fitchburg, Mass., Postal Service. 
Smith, Frederick J,, M.S., '/' A' (D, Q.T.V., 46 Reid Street, Elizabeth, N. J., Bowker 

Insecticide Company. 
Stowe, Arthur N., Q.T.V., Hudson, Mass., Fruit Grower. 
Taft, Walter E., D.G.K., Berlin, N. H., Draughtsinan and Secretary Sheehy Automatic 

Railroad Signal Company. 
Taylor, Fred L., M.D., Q.T.V., 336 Washington Street, Brookline, Mass., Physician. 
*West, John S., Q.T.V., died at Belchertown, July 13, 1902. 
Williams, Frank O., Q.T.V., Sunderland, Mass., Farmer. 



'91 

Arnold, Frank L., iI> K ili. Q.T.V., North Woburn, Mass., Supt. Sulphuric Acid Depart- 
ment of the Merrimac Chemical Company. 

Brown, Walter A., C.S.C, 43 Bridge Street, Springfield, Mass., First Assistant Engineer 
City Engineer's Office. 

Carpenter, Malcolm A., C.S.C 103 Belmont Street, Cambridge, Mass., Landscape 
Gardener. 

Eames, Aldice G., I K. Address unknown. 

Felt, E. P., C.S.C, Geological Hall, Albany, N. Y., State Entomologist. 



1S() THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 

Field, Henry J., LL.B., Q.T.V., Greenfield, Mass., Lawyer; Judge Franklin District 

Court. 
Guy, Willard W., D.G.K., Melrose, Mass., Landscape Designer and Planter. 
Horner, Louis F., CSC, Montecito, Cal., Supt. Estate of Mrs. C H. McCormick. 
Howard, Henry M., C.S.C, 484 Fuller Street, West Newton, Mass., Market Gardener. 
Hull, John B., Jr., D.G.K., Main Street, Great Harrington, Mass., Coal Dealer. 
Johnson, Charles H., D.G.K., Lynn, Mass., General Electric Works. 
Lage, Oscar V.B., D G.K., Juiz de Fora, Minas, Brazil, Stockraiser. 
Legate, Howard N., D.G.Iv., Room 136 State House, Boston, Mass., Clerk of State Board 

of Agriculture. 
Magill, Claude A., City Hall, Woonsocket, R. I., Supt. of Streets. 
Paige, Walter C, D.G.K., New Albany, Ind., Secretary of Y. M. C A. 
Ruggles, Murry, C.S.C, Milton, Mass., Electrician with Edison Electric Illuminating 

Company of Boston. 
Sawyer, Arthur H., Q.T.V., 29 Pierce Place, Clinton, Mass., Inspector in Dam and 

Reservoir Department for Metropolitan Sewage and Water Board. 
Shores, Harvey T., M.D., K I, 78 Main Street, Northampton, Mass., Ph5'sician. 



'92 

H. M. THOMSON, Secretary, Thompson, Conn. 

Beals, Alfred T., Q.T.V., 3483 Morgan Street, St. Louis, Mo., 

Boynton, Walter I., D.D.S., Q.T.V., 411 Whitney Building, Springfield, Mass., Dentist. 

Clark, Edward T., C.S.C, Southboro, Mass., Supt. Wolf Pen Farm, Southboro, Mass. 

Crane, Henry E., C.S.C, Quincy, Mass., F. H. Crane & Sons, Grain Dealers. 

DuEUL, James E., Q.T.V., Amherst, Mass., Apothecary. 

Emerson, Henry B., C S.C, 616 Liberty Street, Schenectady, N. Y. 

Field, Judson L., Q.T.V., 207 Jackson Bend, Chicago, 111., Salesman, Dry Goods Com- 
mission. 

Fletcher, William, C.S.C, Chelmsford, Mass., Drummer. 

Graham, Charles S., C.S.C, Holden, Mass., Poultry Raiser and' Milk Farmer. 
OLLAND, Edward B., M.S., <tK§,K I, Amherst, Mass., First Assistant Division Foods 
and Feedings at Hatch Experiment Station. 

Hubbard, Cyrus M., Q.T.V., Sunderland, Mass., Farmer. 

Knight, Jewell B., Q.T.V., Professor of Agriculture, Poonca College, India. 

Lyman, Richard P., D.V.S., Q.T.V., 1260 Main Street, Hartford, Conn., Veterinarian. 

Plumb, Frank H., Q T.V., Ellithorp Farm, Stafford, Conn., Farmer. 

Rogers, Elliott, - K, Kennebunk, Me., Supt. Leatherward Mill. 

Smith, Robert H., died March 25, 1900, at Amherst, Mass. 

Stockbridge, Francis G., D.G.K., Supt. Overbrook Farm, Narcissa, Pa. 

Taylor, George E., K (I>, Q.T.V , R.F.D., Shelburne, Mass., Farmer. 

Thomson, Henry M., * K (l>, C.S.C , Supt. estate of N. B. Ream, Thompson, Conn. 

West, Homer C, Q.T.V. , Belchertown, Mass., Traveling Agent. 

Willard, George B., it I K, Waltham, Mass., Clerk in City Treasurer's Office 

Williams, Milton H., M.D.V., Q.T.V., Sunderland, Mass., Veterinarian. 



*^ 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE LS7 

'93 

FRED A. SMITH, Secretary. Hopedale, Mass. 
Baker, Joseph, Q.T.V., Riverside Farm, New Boston, Conn., Farmer, 
Bartlett, Fred G., D.G.K., corner Cabot and Sycamore Streets, Holyoke, Mass., Supt. 

Forestdale Cemetery. 
Clark, Henry D., D.V.S., C.S.C, 15 Central Street, Fitchburg, Mass., Veterinary Surgeon. 
CuRLEY, George F., M.D., '/' K <I', C.S.C, 10 Congress Street, Milford, Mass., Physician and 

Surgeon. 
Davis, Herbert C, Q.T.V., 376 North Boulevard, Atlanta, Ga., Railway Postal Clerk 

Georgia Railroad. 
Goodrich, Charles A., M.D., D.G.K., 5 Haynes Street, Hartford, Conn., Physician and 

Surgeon. 
Harlow, Harry J., D.G.K., Shrewsbury, Mass., Dairyman. 
Harlow, Francis T., I K, Box ro6, Marshfield, Mass. 

Hawks, Ernest A., C.S.C, 4th and Broad Streets, Richmond, Va., Evangelist. 
Henderson, Frank H., D.G.K., 36 East loth Street, New York City, Civil Engineer. 
Howard, Edwin C, <I> 2' K, Dedham, Mass., Principal Aines Grammar School. 
Hoyt, Franklin S., i1> K <I', C.S.C. 191 7 North Penn Street, Indianapolis, Ind., Assistant 

Supt. of Schools. 
Lehnert, Eugene H., D.V.S., <li K <I> . K I, Storrs, Conn., Professor of Veterinary 

Science and Physiology, Connecticut Agricultural College. 
Melendy. Alphonse E., O.T.V., 52 Gay Street, Quincy, Mass 
Perry, John R., A' I, 8 Bosworth Street, Boston, Mass., Interior Decorator. 
Smith. Cotton A., Q.T.V., 210 Braly Building, Los Angeles, Cal., Real Estate. 
Smith, Fred A., C.S.C, Turner Hill, Ipswich, Mass., Farm Superintendent. 
Smith, Luther W., <I> - K. Nome, Texas, Secretary Southwestern Rice Company. 
Staples, Henry F., M.,D.. C.S.C. 530 Wade Park Ave., Cleveland, Ohio, Physician and 

Surgeon. 
TiNOCO, Luiz A.F., D.G.K., Campos, Rio Janeiro, Brazil, Planter and Manufacturer. 
Walker, Edward J., C.S.C, Box 315, Clinton, Mass., Farmer. 

'94 

S. FRANCIS HOWARD, Secretary, Amherst, Mass. 
Alderman, Edwin H., C.S.C, Chester, Mass., Fanner. 
Averell, Fred G., Q.T.V . 131 State Street, Boston, Mass. 
Bacon, Louis H., * A" '/', Q.T.V. . 36 Cherry Street, Spencer, Mass., with Phcenix Paper 

Box Coinpany. 
Bacon, Theodore S.,M.D.. di 1 K. 6 Chestnut Street, Springfield, Mass., Physician. 
Barker, Louis M., C.S.C, 120 Washington Street, Brookline, Mass., Civil Engineer with 

T. J. Kelley, Contractor. 
Boardman, Edwin L., C.S.C, Sheffield, Mass., Farmer. 

Brown, Charles L., C.S.C, 870 State Street, Boston, Mass., Laundryman. 
Curtis, Arthur C, C.S.C, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Cutter, Arthur H., M.D.. '/> i' K. 333 Broadway, Lawrence, Mass., Physician. 
Davis, Perley E., Q.T.V., Granby, Mass , 



-b^ 



188 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 

Dickinson, Eliott T., Q.T.V., 138 Main Street, Northampton, Mass., Dentist. 

Fowler, Hali.ey M., Hiram, Me., care C. E. Wadsworth. 

Fowler, Henry J., C.S.C, Nortli Hadley, Mass., Agent for Alfred Peats & Co., Wall 

Papers. Boston, Mass. 
>iFFORD, John E., Sutton, Mass., Farmer and Stock Breeder. 
Greene, Frederick L., C.S.C, San Marcos, Cal. 
Greene, Ira C, Q.T.V., A.M , Columbia University, 22 Pleasant Street, Leominster, 

Mass., Coal Business. 
HiGGiNS, Charles H., D.V.S., C.S.C, Pathologist to Dominion Dept. of Agricvtlture, 32 

Senentte Street, Hintonberg, Ontario, Canada. 
owARD, S. Francis, M.S., K 0, <l' 1 K, 19 Phillips Street, Amherst, Mass., Assistant 

Professor of Chemistry Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Keith, Thaddeus F., Q.T.V., 304 Main Street, Fitchburg, Mass., Advertising Agent. 
Kirkland, Archie H., <I) I K, Superintendent of the Gypsy Moth Commission, 6 Beacon 

Street, Boston, Mass. 
LouNSBURY, Charles P., d' K <!> . ifi S K, Cape Town, Cape of Good Hope, Africa, Govern- 
ment Entomologist. 
Manley, Lowell. K I, West Roxbury, Mass., Superintendent Weld Farm. 
Merwin, George H., C.S.C, Southport, Conn., Farmer. 

Morse, Albertus J., Q.T.V., 59 Main Street, Northampton, Mass., Attorney. 
PoMEROY, Robert F., C.S.C, South Worthington, Mass., Farmer. 
PuTMAN, Joseph H., K I, Litchfield, Conn., Manager Fernwood Farm. 
Sanderson, William E., A' J, 36 Cortlandt Street, New York, New England Salesman for 

J. M. Thorburn & Co., Home address 161 State Street, Brooklyn N. Y. 
Smead, H. Preston. D.G.K., 725 West Main Street, North Adams, Mass. 
Smith, George H., CSC Sheffield, Mass., Farmer. 
Smith, Ralph E., K 0, I K, Berkeley, Cal., Professor of Plant Diseases, University of 

California, Plant Pathologist University of Cahfornia. 
Spaulding, Charles H., I K, 185 Massachusetts Avenue, East Lexington, Mass., U. S. 

Inspector Engineering Department. 
Walker, Claude F., Ph.D., C.S.C, 2 Nichols Place, New York City, Teacher in High 

School of Commerce. 
White, Elias D., I K, College Park, Ga., Railway Postal Clerk. 

'95 

H. A. BALLOU, Secretary, Barbadoes, W. I. 
Ballou, Henry A., K 0, Q.T.V., Entomologist for British West Indies. 
Bemis, Waldo L., Q.T.V., Spencer, Mass. 
Billings, George A., C S.C, New Brunswick, N. J., New Jersey Experiment Station, 

Dairy Htisbandry. 
Brown, William C. D.G.K., 338 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass., with J. J. Wingatt, 

Interior Decorator. 
Burgess, Albert F., M.S., I K, Columbus, Ohio, Chief Inspector of Nurseries and 

Orchards, State House, 
Clark, Harry E., (J I K, Middlebury, Conn., Superintendent Biscoe Farm. 
CooLEY, Robert A., I K, Bozeman, Mont., Professor of Zoology and Entomology at 

Montana Agricultural College; State Entomologist. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE IS*) 

Crehore, Charles W., '/' J A', 357 Chicopee Street, Chicopee, Mass., Farmer. 

Dickinson, Charles M., Q.T.V., 76 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 111., Florist and Seedsman. 

Fairbanks, Herbert S., K I, "The Gladstone," with Pneumatic Tool Company, Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. 

Foley, Thomas P., C.S.C., Easthampton, Mass., Proprietor of Four Bridge p'arm. 

Frost, Harold 1,., '/' K 0. <l> 1' K , 6 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass., Forester and Entomolo- 
gist. 

Hemenway, Herbert D., C.S.C, i 100 Albany Ave., Hartford, Conn., Director of School 
of Horticulture. I 

Jones, Robert S., '/' I K, Columlnis, Ohio, Civil Engineer Water Filtration Plant. "/ 

Kuroda, Shiro, ([) I K, 127 Second Street, Osaka, Japan, Chief Foreign Department of 
Osaka Revenue Administration Bureau, Utsubo, Kitadore. 

Lane, Clarence B., K <l', D.G.K., Assistant Chief Dairy Division, U. S. Department 
Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

Lewis, Henry W., 320 Union Street, Hudson, N. Y., Assistant Engineer. 

Marsh, Jasper, A' I, Danvers, Mass., with Consolidated Electric Light Company.' 

Morse, Walter L., A' I, 335 Madison Ave., New York City. Assistant Engineer, N. Y. C. 
and H. R. R. R.; Office of Terminal Engineer. 

Potter, Daniel C, C.S.C, Fairhaven, Mass., Landscape Gardener and Sanitary Engineer 

Read, Henry B., - K. Westford, Mass., Farmer and Manufacturer of Read Farm 
Cider. 

Root, Wright A., <D I K, Easthampton, Mass., Dairy Farmer. 

Smith, Arthur B., Q.T.V., 544 Winnemac Ave., Chicago, 111., Bookkeeper. 
*Stevens, Clarence L., died October 8, 1901, at Sheffield, Mass., of hemorrhage. 

Sullivan. Maurice J., Littleton. N. H., Superintendent "The Rocks." 

ToBEY, Frederick C, C.S.C, West Stockbridge, Mass., Tobey Brothers, Lime Manufac- 
turers. 

Toole, Stephen P., Amherst, Mass., Evergreen Nvirseryman. 

Warren, Frank L., M.D., Q.T.V., Bridgewater, Mass., Physician. 

White, Edward A., A' J, Storrs, Conn., Professor of Botany and Landscape Gardening, 
Storrs College. 

'96 

Burrington, Horace C. '/' i' K . Greenwich. Conn., Superintendent Edgewood Farms 

and Gardens. 
Clapp, Frank L., (l> K (l> . C.S.C, Assistant Engineer, City Engineer's Office, Waterbury, 

Conn., house 294 North Willow Street. 
Cook, Allen B., C.S.C, Superintendent Hillstead Farms, Farmington, Conn. 
De Luce, Edmond, I A', Clerk in Putman's, New York City. 
Edwards, Harry T., C.S.C, Philadelphia, Pa., Expert in Fibre Investigation, Bureau of 

Agriculture; now in Manila, P. I. 
Fletcher, Stephen W., M.S., Ph.D., (l> K 0. C.S.C, Professor Horticulture Michigan 

Agricultural College. 
Hammar, James F., C.S.C, Nashua, N. H., Farmer. 
Harper, Walter B., Q.T.V., Box 475, Lake Charles, La. 

* Deceased 



190 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 

*JoNES, Benjamin K., C.S.C, died August 21, 1903, at Springfield, Mass. 
Kinney, Asa S., A' J, Mt. Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass., Floricultvirist and 

Instructor in Botany. 
Kramer, Albin M., D.G.K.. 2 Ashton Street, Station A, Worcester, Mass., Draughtsman 

Eastern Bridge and Structural Company. 
Leamy, Patrick A., Q.T.V., Butte, Mont., Principal in High School, 
Marshall, James L., C.S.C, 29 Gardner Street, Worcester, Mass., Bradley Car Works 

Office. 
Moore, Henry W., K I, 19 Amherst Street, Worcester, Mass., Market Gardening. 
Nichols, Robert P., D.G.K., care of B. Parker Nichols, Norwell, Mass. 
Nutting, Charles A., I K, Ashby, Mass., Farmer. 
Pentecost, William L., D.G.K., South Newbury, N. H., Farm Superintendent for Shultis 

Dairy and Poultry Farm. 
PooLE, Esford W., '/' A' d', K J, Box 129, New Bedford, Mass., Draughtsman and 

Order Clerk. 
Poole, Isaac C, A' I, 292 Pine Street, Fall River, Mass., Physician. 

Read, Frederick H., * 2 A', Providence, R. I., Teacher English High School, Providence. 
Roper, Harry H.. C.S.C, East Hubbardston, Mass., Farmer. 
Saito, Seijiro, C.S.C, 7 Chome Asyana, Minamicha, Tokio, Japan, Teacher. 
Sastre, De Veraud Salome, D.G.K., Hacienda Station, Rosalia Cardenas, Tobasco. 

Mexico, Planter. 
Sellew, Merle E.. (P I A, Sub-Master Pepperell High School, Pepperell, Mass. 
Shaw, Frederick B., D.G.K., 28 Orchard Street, Taunton, Mass.. Manager Postal Tele- 
graph Company, Taunton, Mass. 
Shepard, Lucius J., C.S.C, Assistant Agricvilturist and Farm Superintendent, National 

Farm School, Doylestown, Pa. 
Shultis, Newton, D.G.K., 601 Chamber of Commerce, Boston, Mass., Wholesale Grain 

Dealer 
Tsuda, George, * -T A', Editor of Agriculturist, Seed and Nurseryman, Azabu, Tokio, Japan. 

'97 

C A. PETERS, Secretary, Moscow, Idaho. 
Allen, Harry F., C.S.C, care J. W. Allen, Northboro, Mass. 
Allen, John W., C.S.C, Northboro, Mass., Farmer. 

Armstrong, Herbert J., </' J A', 1033 Railway Exchange, Chicago, 111., Draughtsman. 
Barry, John M., '/' J A", 552 Tremont Street, Boston, Mass., Real Estate, Insurance and 

Mortgages. 
Bartlett, James L., <I> K <I>, Q.T.V.. 18 East Dayton Street, Madison, Wis., Observer U. S. 

Weather Bureavi, 
Cheney, Liberty L., D.V.S.. Q.T.V.. 2205 First Avenue, Birmingham. Ala. 
Clark, Lafayette F., C.S.C, Mt Vernon, South Dakota, with Hanford Produce Company. 
Drew, George A., I A', Greenwich, Conn., Resident Manager Estate of E. C Converse. 
Emrich, John A., Q.T.V., HoUj'wood, Cal. 
Goessmann, Charles I., D.G.K., Paper Company, Nepera Park, Yonkers, N. Y. 

*Decea.sed 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE l_m 

Leavens, George D., (I> K <!>. '!> 2' A', Grafton, Mass , Massachusetts and Rhode Island 
Representative of Edmund Mortimer FertiUzer Company, 13 William Street, New York- 
City. 

Norton, Charles A.. '* I K. 30 Grove Street, Lynn, Mass. 

Palmer, Clayton F., C.S.C, Palo Alto, Cal., Graduate Student Leland Stanford, Jr., 
University. 

Peters, Charles A.. Ph.D., * A *, C.S.C, Moscow, Idaho, Professor of Chemistry. Univer- 
sity of Idaho. 
T4*oMiTn, Philip H., ifi I A', 102 Main Street, Amherst, Mass., Assistant Chemist, Division 
Foods and Feedings, Hatch Experiment Station. 



S. W. WILEY, Secretary, Baltimore, Md. 
Adejmian, Aredis G., D.G.K , Harpoot, Turkey, care Rev. H. N. Barnum, Farmer. 
Baxter, Charles N., C.S.C, Quincy, Mass., Library Work; Assistant at Boston Athenfeum^ 

Beacon Street, Boston. Mass. 
Clark, Clifford G., D.G.K., Sunderland, Mass., Farmer. 
Eaton, Julian S., D.G.K. , 311 Nicolette Avenue, Minneapolis, Minn., Adjuster of Claims 

in Law Department of Travelers Insurance Company. 
Fisher, Willis S.. '/' I K, Principal Grammar School, Danvers, Mass., 
Montgomery. Alexander, Jr., C.S.C, Natick, Mass., Waban Rose Conservatories, Rose 

Grower. 
NiCKERSON, John P.. Q.T.V., West Harwich, Mass , Physician. 
^Warden, Randall D.. (I> S K, Teacher in New York City Public Schools. 

Wiley, Samuel W., A' J, 339 Bloom Street, Baltimore, Md., "The Kenilworth," First 

Chemist with American Agricultviral Chemical Company, of Baltimore. 
Wright, George H., (P I K, with Ennis and Stoppani, Brokers, 34 and 36 New Street, 

New York City. 

'99 

D. A. BEAMAN, Secretary, Hartford, Conn. 

Armstrong, William H., '/' -T K, San Juan, Porto Rico, ist Lieutenant U. S. Army, care 
Adjutant General, U. S. A., Washington, D. C 

Beaman, Daniel A , Q.T.V., Teacher of Horticulture and Entomology, Ponce Agricul- 
tural School. Ponce, Porto Rico. 

Chapin, William E,, <!> I K, 165 Chicopee Street, Chicopee, Mass., Postal Clerk. Spring- 
field, Mass. 

Dana, Herbert W., CS-C, Salem, Mass., Advertising Manager for Almy Bigelow & Co. 

Hinds, Warren E , Ph.D.. il> K iD, C.S.C. Field Agent Bureau of Entomology. U. S. 
Department of Agricviltvire. Washington. D. C, temporary headquarters, Dallas, Texas. 

Hooker, William A'.. I K, Special Field Agent, Bureau of Entomology, U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, Washington, D. C; now at Dallas, Texas. 

Hubbard, George C, I K, Sunderland, Mass., Farmer. 

Maynard, Howard E., C.S.C, East Orange, N. J., Electrician. 

Merrill, Frederic A., address unknown. 

Pingree, Melvin H., C.S.C, Pennsylvania State College, Assistant Chemist Agricultural 
Experiinent Station. 



192 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 

Smith, Bernard H., * A' '/', C.S.C, Custom House, Boston, Mass. 

Smith, Samuel E., C.S.C, Superintendent of Dairy Department of Becket Boys' Farms, 

Backet, Mass. 
Turner, Frederick H., '/' K (I> . C.S.C., Great Barrington, Mass., Hardware Business. 
Walker. Charles M., C.S.C, Student Yale Forestry School, New Haven, Conn. 



00 

E. K. ATKINS, Secretary, Northampton, Mass. 

Atkins, Edwin K., D.G.K., 15 Hubbard Avenue, Northampton, Mass., Civil Engineer 
with C. E. Davis. 

Bakfr, Howard, M.D.V., C.S.C, 1016 North 22d Street, Omaha, Neb., inspector U. S. 
Department of Agriculture. 

Brown, Frank H., D.G.K. , Marlboro, Mass., Farmer. 

Campbell, Morton A., C.S.C, Townsend, Mass., Farmer. 

Canto, Ysidro H., 452 West 23d Street, New York City. 

Crane, Henry L., <? I K. Westwood, Mass., Farmer. 
*Felch, Percy F., C.S.C, drowned in Connecticut River, North Hadley, July 8, 1900. 

Frost, Arthur F., C.S.C, Albany, N. Y., State Engineering Department, State House. 

Gilbert, Ralph D., Ph.D., C.S.C, 23 Edgehill Road, New Haven, Conn., Research 
Chemist. 

Halligan, James E., A' ~. Chemist in Sugar Experiment Station, Audubon Park, New 
Orleans, La. 

Harmon, Arthur A., M.D.V., H' K (D , C.S.C, 1716 V Street N.W., Washington, D. C, 
Pathological Department Bureau of Animal Industry. 

Hull, Edward T., K (D, C.S.C, Southport, Conn. 

Kellogg, James W., I K, Assistant Chemist Rhode Island Experiment Station, Kings- 
ton, R. I. 

Landers, Morris B., D.G.K., Ludlow, Mass. 

Lewis, James F., (t I K, Carver Cutter Colton Gin Company, East Bridgewater, Mass. 

Monahan, Arthur C, iD K (P, C.S.C, Principal Montague High School, Montague, Mass. 

Morrill, Austin W., Ph.D., 'P I K, Bureau of Entomology, U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture, Washington, D. C Field address, Dallas, Texas. 

•MuNSON, Mark H., C.S.C, Hinsdale, 111., with G. B. Robbins. 

Parmenter, George F.. di S K, Head Department of Chemistry, Colby College, Water- 
ville. Me. 

Stanley, Francis G., M.D., Q.T.V., 144 Cabot Street, Beverly, Mass., Physician. 

West, Albert M., (t ^ K, Assistant Biochemic Division Department of Agriculture, 
Washington, D. C, Bacteriologist. 

'01 

J. H. CHICKERING, Secretary, Dover, Mass. 
Barry, John C, A' I, Schenectady, N. Y., General Electric Company, Testing Department. 
Bridgeforth, George R., C.S.C, Head of Department of Agriculture, Tuskegee, Ala. -,l„ 

^Deceased 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE MKi 

Brooks, Percival C, <t' i' A', 6343 Yale Avenue, Chicago, 111., with General Chemical Co. 

C.^SEY, Thomas, Q.T.V.. Law Student with John J. McGrath, 15 Railroad Street, Fitch- 
burg, Mass. • .. 

Chickering, James H., '/' 1' K . Dover,. Mass., Farmer. 

Cooke, Theodore F., C.S.C, 183 Elm Street, Pittsfield, Mass., with Stanley G. I. Elec- 
tric Manufacturing Company. 

Dawson, William A., C.S.C, Willimantic, Conn., Florist. 

DiCKERMAN, William C, I K, 97 Arnold Street, Providence, R. I. 

Gamwell, Edward S., C.S.C, 257 South 4th West Street, Salt Lake City, Utah, Inspector 
for Faust Creamery and Supply House. 
■^Gordon, Clarence E., K 0, C.S.C, Graduate Student at Columbia University, New 
York City. Home address, 4913 High Street, Clinton, Mass. 

Graves, Thaddeus, Jr., '/' S K, Hatfield, Mass., Tobacco Grower. 

Henry, James B., D.G.K., 50 State Street, Hartford, Conn., with J. B. Day. 
-}«HuNTiNG, Nathan J., C.S.C, Shutesbury, Mass., Farmer. 

Leslie, Charles T., C.S.C. Pittsfield, Mass.. Physician. 

Macomber, Ernest L., Jf A', 17 Gen. Cobb Street, Taunton, Mass., Freight Cashier 
N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Co. 

Ovalle, Julio M.B., D.G.K., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Pierson, Wallace R., K 0, K I, Florist, Cromwell, Conn. 

Rice, Charles L., C.S.C, New York City, with Western Electric Company, Experiment 
Department, 2209 Seventh Avenue. 

Root, Luther A., J A", 57 King Street, Northampton, Mass., Milk Dealer. 

Schaffrath, Max, Box 95, Coalinga, Cal., Oil Business. 

Smith, Ralph I., Q.T.V., Assistant State Entomologist, Atlanta, Ga. 

Tashjian. Dickran B., Q.T.V., care John W. Flint, Bellows Falls, Vt , Landscape Gard- 
ener. 

Todd, John H., Q.T.V., Rowley, Mass., Dairyman. 

Whitman, Nathan D., IK. 1301 Grand Avenue, Kalamazoo, Mich., Civil Engineer 
with G. S. Pierson. 

Wilson, Alexander C, '/' A 0, I A, Hotel Britannia, Howe Sound, British Columbia, 
Britannia Copper Syndicate, Ltd. 

'02 

H. L. KNIGHT, Secretary, Middletown, Conn. 

Belden, Joshua H., '/' I A', care of J. J. Benson, Detroit, Mich. 

Bodfish, Henry L , D.G.K., 56 Olivia Street, Derby, Conn., Civil Engineer. 

Carpenter, Thorne M., K 0, C.S.C, Assistant Chemist, Wesleyan University, Middle- 
town, Conn. 

Church, Frederick R,, C.S.C, Amherst, Mass., Assistant Agriculturist Hatch Experi- 
ment Station. 

Claflin, Leander C, '/' I A, Media, Delaware County, Pa. With Clafiin Athletic Goods, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Cook, Lyman A., Q.T.V., Millis, Mass., Poultry Farmer. 

Cooley, Orrin F,, Springfield, Mass., City Engineer's Office, Civil Engineer. 
, Dacey, Arthur L., K 0, C.S.C, Turner Hill, Ipswich, Mass., Foreman for C S. Rice. 



194 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 

Dellea, John M., C.S.C, with H. L. Frost & Co., Boston, Mass., home address, Great 
Barrington, Mass. 

DwYER, Chester E., C.S.C, Nebraska City, Neb., Foreman J. Sterling Morton Estate. 

Gates, Victor A., <Ii I K, Little Rock, Ark., care of Scott, Mayer Commission Company. 
Wholesale Fruits and Produce; residence at 1116 N. Third Street. 

Hall, John C, «? I K, Sudbury, Mass., Poultry Farmer. 

HoDGKiss, Harold E., C.S.C, Assistant Entomologist Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Geneva, N. Y. 

Kinney, Charles M., <I> 1 K, 453 Cajou Street, Redlands, Cal., Organist. 

Knight, Howard L., (t K 0, CSC, 64 Church Street, Middletown, Conn., Nutrition Inves- 
tigation U. S. Department of Agricvilture, Graduate Student Wesleyan University. 

Lewis, Claud I., C.S.C, Graduate Student Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 
- Morse, Ransom W., Q.T.V., Gardner, Mass., Vice-Principal Gardner High School. 

Paul, Herbert A., C.S.C, 61 Maple Street, Lynn, Mass. 

Plumb, Frederick H., Norwalk, Conn., Instructor in Mathematics and Science, Connecti- 
cut Military Academy. 

Saunders, Edward B., D.G.K., Traveling Salesman Bangor Beef Company, Machias, Me. 

Smith, Samuel L., C.S.C, Trenton, N. J., Y. M. C A. Work. 

West, D. Nelson, Q. T. V., Roslyn, Long Island, N. Y., Draughtsman. 

'03 

G. L. JONES, Secretary, North Amherst, Mass. 
Allen, William E., - K, 27 Boylston Building, Boston, Mass., representing Reiter, 

Fruhauf & Co., Style Creators, New York City. 
Bacon, Stephen C, D.G.K., 417 West 22d Street, New York City, 
BowEN, H. C, Q.T.V., La Center, Washington, Lumbering. 
' _ *3arrus, George L., K I, Lithia, Mass., Farmer. 

Brooks, Philip W., Q.T.V., Imp^ial, Cal., Cattle Business. 

Cook, Joseph G., * A' (D , C.S.C, Box 38, Norfolk, Mass., Superintendent T. D. Cook's 
Farm. 
A Franklin, Henry J., '/' K '/', Q.T.V., Gradvtate Student Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
I lege. 
^Y^Jalligan, C.P., D.G.K., National Farm School, Pa., Instructor Horticulture and Botany. 
Harvey, Lester F., C S.C, Romford, Conn., Farmer. 
Hood, W. L., Professor of Agriculture and Military Science, Sango Baptist College and 

Industrial Institute, Muskogee, Indian Territory, P.O. Box, 1166. 
Jones, Gerald D., Q.T.V.. Superintendent Cowles Farm, North Amherst, Mass. 
Lamson, G. H., C.S.C, Storrs Agricultural College, Storrs, Conn. 
J^MoNAHAN, Neil F., C.S.C, Botanist Ha.tch Experiment Station, Amherst, Mass. 

Nersessian, Paul N., 32 West Street, Attleboro, Mass., Farming. 
*fOsMUN, A. v., (P K 0, Q.T.V., Instructor in Botany, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Parsonj Albert, Q.T.V., Assistant Superintendent Hood Farm, Lowell, Mass. 
Peebles, W. W., C.S.C, 424 Fulton Street, Chicago, 111. 
Poole, E. M., A' I, North Dartmouth, Mass., Dairyman. 
m A ■J j' jiouLX, E. G., I K, Amherst, Mass., Chemist in Departinent Foods and Feedings at 
\ Hatch Experiment Station. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 1 95 

♦Robertson, R. H., D.G.K., died Seirtember lo, 1904, at Amherst, Mass., of peritonitis. 

Snell, Edward B., Q.T.V., New Haven, Conn., Civil Entjincer for N. Y., N. H., & H. 
R. R. 

TiNKHAM, C. S., D.G.K., Jioxbury. Mass., Civil Engineer with State Highway Commission. 

ToTTiNGHAM, WiLLiAM E., '/' A' (l> . Q.T.V., Geneva, N. Y., Chemist New York Experiment 
Station. 

Tower, Winthrop V., '/' X K, Amherst, Mass., Graduate Stvtdent Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College. 

West, M. H., Landscape Gardener for Lincoln Park System, Chicago, 111. 

'04 

P. F. STA.PLES, Secretary, Woodbine, N. J. 
Ahearn, M. F., C.S.C, Manhattan, Kan., Foreman of Greenhouse, Kansas State Agricul- 
tural College; Coach of K. S. A. C. Athletic Teams. 
_^Back, Ernest A., * A' di, C.S.C, 96 Pleasant Street, Amherst, Mass., Graduate Student 

at Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
'-4-Blake, Maurice A., Q.T.V., Instructor in Horticulture at Massachusetts Agricvxltural 
College, Ainherst, Mass. 
CouDEN, Fayette D., <li K (/>. (I> 1' K. 1310 Columbia Road, N. H., Washington, D. C, U. S. 

Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology. 
Elwood, Clifford E., A' I. Greens Farms, Conn., General Farming and Fruit Growing. 
^_l£uLT0N, Erwin S., C.S.C, Middletown, Conn., Assistant Chemist Wesleyan University. 
Gilbert, Arthur W.,(i!) K 0, C.S.C, Orono, Me., Assistant Agriculturist, University of Maine. 
Gregg, John W., C.S.C, Arbor Lodge, Nebraska City, Neb., Landscape Gardener. 
Griffin, Clarence H., I K, St. Louis, Mo., Medical Student, Barnes University. 
\( Haskell, Sidney B., K 0, C.S.C, Amherst, Mass., Assistant Agriculturist and Instructor 
in Agriculture Massachusetts Agricultural College and Hatch Experiment Station. 
Henshaw, Fred F., K 0, C.S.C, Washington, D. C, U. S. Geological Survey, Steam 

Gaging Work. 
Hubert, Z. Taylor, Tallahassee, Fla., Professor of Agriculture and Natural Science, 

Florida State Normal School. 
Newton, Howard D., C.S.C, 115 Wall Street, New Haven, Conn., Graduate Student. 

Yale University. --^ 

O'Hearn, George E., C.S.C, Pittsfield, Mass., with Eagle Publishing Compam-. ' 

Parker, Summer R., C.S.C, Amherst, Mass., Hatch Experiment Station. 
Peck, Arthur L., K 0, C.S.C, Room 56, Renouf Building, Montreal, P. O., Manager 

Canadian Nursery Company, Ltd. 
QuiGLEY, Raymond A., C.S.C, 20 Bartlett Street, Brockton, Mass., Student Harvard 

Medical School. y 

Raymoth, R. Raymond, A' I, S. W. Corner 7th and Locvist Streets, Evansville. Ind., 

Landscape Gardener. 
Staples, Parkman F., C.S.C, Woodbine, N. J., Horticulturist Baron de Hirsch Agricul- 
tural and Industrial School. 
White, Howard M., K 0, (H I A', 1206 K Street, N. W., W'ashington. D. C, Division of 
Pomology, U. S. Department Agriculture. 

*Deceased 



~Vw 



196 THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 

'05 

P. F. WILLIAMS, Secretary, Milton, Mass. 

Adams, Richard L., 'i> A' it, 23 Burr StreetT Jamaica Plains, Mass. 

Allen, Seorge H., (I> S K, Worcester Lane, Waltham, Mass., AUen-Yeaw Company, 
Florists. 

Barnes, Hugh L., C.S.C, Assistant Horticulturist Rhode Island State College, Kings- 
ton, R. I. 

Bartlett, Frank A., <I> I' K, Horticulturist, Hampton Institute, Hampton, Va., Box 205. 

Crosby, Harvey D., Q.T.V., Thompson, Conn., Florist. 

Cushman, Esther C, (D K 0, 256 Grove Street, Woonsocket, R. I. 

Gardner, John J., C.S.C, Littleton, N. H., Foreriian. 

Gay, Ralph P., (J i' K, Stoughton, Mass. 

Hatch, Walter B., C.S.C, Instructor of Drawing at Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
Amherst, Mass., Assistant Experimental Horticulturist Hatch Experiment Station. 

HoLCOMB, C. Sheldon, K I, Charles River, Mass., Walker-Gordon Farm. 

Hunt, Thomas F., C.S.C, Experiment Station University of California, Berkeley, Cal., 
M.S. Student. 

Ingham, Norman D,, C.S.C, Experiment Station University of California, Berkele)?, Cal., 
M.S. Student. 

Kelton, James R., A' I, Alfred, N. Y., Instructor of Botany, Zoology and Entomology 
Alfred University. 

,Ladd, Edward T., K I, Amherst. Mass., Chemical Experiment Station. 

Lewis, Clarence W., Q.T.V., Melrose Highlands, Mass., Gypsy Moth Commission. 

Lyman, John, F. (P K 0, K I, Instructor and Graduate Student at Ohio State University, 
1406 Neil Avenue, Columbus, Ohio. 

MuNSON, Willard a., '/' A.' (P, I K, Firm of Munson-Whittaker Compan5^ Foresters and 
Landscape Gardeners, Office 48 Winter Street, Room 52, Boston, Mass. 

Newhall, Edwin W., D.G.K., 309 Sansome Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Patch, George W., K 0, 2 K, with Brown-Durell Company, Boston, Mass. 

Sanborn, Monica L., K 0, Vaughn's Seed Store, 'New York City. 

Sears, William M., J A', Seekonk, Mass., Dairy Superintendent Berry Farm. 

Swain, Allen N., S K, 47 Elmwood Avenue, Geneva, N. Y., Willards Nurseries. 

Taylor, Albert D., '/' ,'i 0, CvS.C, gi Wait Avenue., Ithaca, N. Y., Instructor in Cor- 
nell University. 

ToMPSON, Harold ¥., A *, A' y. 2S4 Fuller Street, West Newton, Mass. 

Tupper, Bertram, K 0, K I, Commonwealth Avenue and Valentine Street, West 
Newton, Mass., Foreman at Ellis Farm. 
alker, Lewell S., C.S.C, Pittsfield, Me., Teacher. 

Whittaker, Chester L., '/' I K, Firm Munson-Whittaker Co., Foresters and Landscape 
Gardeners, Office 48 Winter Street, Room 52, Boston, Mass. 

Williams, Percy F., A' -T, Metropolitan Park Commission, Blue Hills Reservation, Hill- 
side Street, Milton, Mass. 

Willis, Grenville N., K 0, 01 K, New Haven, Conn., N Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 

Yeaw, Frederick L., I K, Firm AUen-Yeaw Company, Florists, Worcester Lane, 
Waltham, Mass. 



^ 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 197 



Marriages 



'94 S. Francis Howard to Miss Marie L. Trott, June 21, 1905 

'95 R. S. JoxES to Miss Elinor M. Etcher, March 21, 1905 

'97 C. A. Peters, to Miss Mary D. Kittredge, June 29, 1905 

'99 G. C. Hubbard to Miss Florence E. Graves, May, 1905 

'01 J. H. Chickering to Miss Miriam B. De Merit, January 7, 1905 

'01 J. C. Barry to Miss Anna B. Foley, June 6, 1905. 

'02 A. L. Dacy to Miss Amelia M. Bachman, August t6, 1905 

'02 J. C. Hall to Miss Elba Ellens, at Soutli Sudbury, Mass., March 

22, 1905 
'02 C. L Lewis to Miss Marie Antoinette Berry, at New Paltz, N. 

Y., March 31, 1905 
'03 M. H. West to Miss Rachael S. Curtis. October 21, 1905 



THE 1907 INDEX Volume XXXVII 



In iWemoriam 



EDWARD COOK PERKINS 

DIED JUNE 19, (904 



WILLIAM SPAULDINC CHAPMAN 

DIED DECEMBER 31, I 904 



Advertising- Directory 


Afiams, lienry A: Co., Druggists, Amherst 




Amherst House Barber Sho|), Amherst .... 


XIX 


Amherst Steam Laundry, Amherst . ' . 


VII 


Anker Printing Co., Holyoke ...... 




Armstrong, R. F., Clothing, Northampton . . . 


XIV 


Ba.ssette, The F. A. Co., S]5ringfield .... 


XV 


Bolles, E.M., Boots and Shoes, Amherst 


xin 


Boston & Maine Railroad, Boston ..... 


VI 


Bowker Fertilizer Co., Fertilizers, Boston 


VI 


Burnham Hitchings Pierson Co., New York City 


XVII 


Campion, Tailor, Haberdasher, Amherst .... 


IV 


Campion & Fish, Clothing, Amherst .... 


III 


Carpenter & Morehouse, Printers, Amherst 


XVIII 


Cotrell & Leonard, Caps and' Gowns, Albany, N. Y. . 


XVII 


Connecticut Valley Street Railway Co., Northampton 


XVII 


Deuel, Charle.s, Druggist, Amherst ..... 


vni 


Doray, Charles, Boots and Shoes, Amher.->t 


VIII 


Draper Hotel, Northampton ...... 


XII 


Elder, C. R., Heating and Plumbing, Amherst 


xni 


Elliott, Charles H. Co., Philadelphia 


XVII 


Frost & Adams, Engineers' Instruments. Boston 


XIV 


Griffin, Thomas Paine, Butter, Eggs and Poultry, Boston 


y 


Labrovitz, I. M., Tailor, Amherst . . . . , 


XX 


Lathrop House, South Deerfield . . . .. '. 


VII 


Marsh, E. D., Furniture and Carpets, Amherst 




Massachu.setts Agricultural College, Amherst . 


IX X 


Farm Department .... 


'xi 


Horticultural Department ... 


XII 


Millett, E. E., Jeweler and Optician, Amherst 


VII 


Mills, James K., Photogi-apher, Amherst .... 


XIX 


Maplewood Hotel, Whately . . . . 


xvin 


Mount Tobey House, Sunderland . . , . 


XII 


Newman Hotel, Providence, R..I. . 


IV 


Paige's, Amherst . . . . . . 


xin 


Page, James F., Boots and Shoes, Amherst 


XIX 


Rahar's Inn, Northampton ...... 


VII 


Roberts, Jeweler, Northampton 


IV 


Sanderson & Thompson, Clothiers, Amherst 


VIII 


Science Agency, Durham, N. H. . 


IV 


Sheldon, Photographer, Northampton .... 


XVI 


Smith Brothers, Butter, Cheese and Eggs, Boston 


V 


Trott, J. H., Stoves and Ranges, Amherst 


XIII 


Veimont Farm Machine Co.. Bellows Falls, Vt. / . 


II 


Waldo House, Worcester 


XIX 


Warren House, South Deerfield ..... 


xvin 


Woodward Lunch, Northampton ..... 


XX 


Wright & Ditson, Athletic Goods. Boston 


V 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



OcrriBER 14. — '07 wins the Ropepull. 4 ft., S ir 



The U. S. Cream Separator 




Don't be influenced by general claims. FACTS are what you want. 
We have mentioned a few. Let us send you a free catalogue, which 
tells them all. It will surely interest you. Better write for it now 
you think of it. Address: 



TiSKIMS THE MOST CREAM FROM 
THE MILK— Because its bowl (where the 

skimming is done) is really three bowls in 
one. A feature found in no other separator. 



^HOLDS THE WORLD'S RECORD 
FOR CLOSE SKIMMING. 



^RUNS SMOOTHEST AND EASIEST 
— Because the driving gears are enclosed, 
self-oiling and automatically supplied with 
fresh oil. No other separator has all these 
advantages. 



^IS EASIEST AND QUICKEST 
WASHED — Because there are only two 
simple parts inside the bowl, and because 
the bowl is wide enough to be easily cleaned. 
Other separators have from 5 to 45 inside 
parts, or are long and narrow like a gun 
barrel. 

^LS MOST CONVENIENT—Because the 
top of the milk supply-tank is about as 
lugh as the operator's waist, making it easy 
to fill. This means labor saved. 

BLASTS LONGEST— Because there are 
ball hearings at all high speed points. 
Because it is built only of carefully-selected, 

I'igh-grade materials. Becau.ie the parts 
are few, simple and easy to get at. 



VERMONT FARM MACHINE CO. 



October 20, — Kid Howard mixes drinks for the benefit of '07 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



November 2. — Doc. Walker forgets to wear a necktie to chapel 



E. D. MARSH 
jfuvnituvE antJ Carpet i\oomsi 



/7T Makes a Specialty of Students' Furniture, Carpets, Rugs, Draperies, Bedding, 

^^Bookcases, Blacking-Cases, Desks, Window Shades, Picture Frames, Cord. 

Etc., at Lowest Prices. Save freight and cart,ige money by purchasing here. 

10 PHCENIX ROW : AMHERST, MASS. 



G 


A M P I 


N 


& 


Fi 


s H 






AGENTS FOR 










Stein- B 


och Clothing 


and 






All Kind 


s of Sporting G 


oods 





November 5. — Massachusetts smothers W. P. I. 39-0 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



November 14. — The "Sports" wear the "Glad Look" as a result of the Dartmouth-Ainherst game 

%\)t SCIENCE 9[genCl> 3^ Durham, New Hampshire 

Universities, Colleges and Schools : General, Technical, and 
Practical Educators 



EUROPEAN PLAN 
Rate $1 .00 and upwards 



HOTEL NEWMAN 

jFveli. ;fHnnBfifUi, proptiEtor 

i8-i8 ABORN STREET : PROVIDENCE : R. I. 



RESTAURANT 
A la Carte and Table d'Hote 




CJ. p. CAMPION 

Confined Scotch ^ English 
Tweeds tor Men 



«rSOLE AGENTS FOR CHASE & CO. HATS 
REISER'S CRAVATS AND DENT'S GLOVES 



TIWE make a specialty of engraved stationery 

F. W. ROBERTS 

yeweler, Optician^ Stationer a?id Dealer in 
Musical Merchandise 

hall work done at 197 main street J^ NORTHAMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



November 15. — Fine Scrvib Game — Whitney eats up Cutter 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



November i6. — Class Game, iqoy-ii, igo8 



Griffin-Thomas-Paine Company 



ESTABLISHED 1875 



Receivers and Distributors of 



Butter, Eggs and Dressed Poultry 

103 to 109 South Market Street 
BOSTON : MASS. 



H. B. Griffin. Pres. 
George A. Paine, Vice-Pres. 
J. M. Thomas, Treas. 
J. F. Brock, Sec. 



REFERENCES: 
Fourth National Bank 
Faneuil Hall National Bank 
Mercantile Agencies 



Albert P. Smi- 



SMITH BROTHERS 

BUTTER, CHEESE AND EGGS 

HTWO AN,D FOUR FANEUIL HALL MARKET, BOSTON 
Sole Receivers of Randolph Creamery 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

TENNIS RACKETS 

Ct)amptons!jip Cennis 33aU 

BASKET BALL AND ICE SKATES 

Baseball Goods, Football Goods, Field Hockey, Golf, Archery, Croc|uet, 

Bathing Suits, jerseys. Sweaters, Everything pertaining 

to .Athletic Sports, Rules for all games. 

Send for Catalogue 

WRIGHT & DITSON, 344 Washington Street, BOSTON, MASS., and 
Harvard Square, CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 




ADVERTISEMENTS 



December 15. — King startles English division by arguing with Prof. Babson 

([THE PRINCIPAL VACATION RESORTS 

THE FISHING AND HUNTING REGIONS OF NEW ENGLAND ARE ALL REACHF.D BY THE 

Boston & Maine Railroad 



PULLMAN PARLOR OR SLEEPING CARS ON ALL THROUGH TRAINS 

LOJVESr RATES 

^Fast Train Service between Boston and Chicago, St. Louis, St. Paul, Minne- 
apolis and all Points West, Northwest, Southwest. 1|For tickets and 
intormation apply to any principal ticket office of the company 
D. J. FLANDERS, General Passenger and 
Ticket Agent, BOSTON, MASS. 



'FOR THE LAND'S SAKE' 



Use BOWKER'S Fertilizers 

Thev Em-ich the Earth and Those who till it 




ADVERTISEMENTS 



January 5. — Prof. Brooks mistakes Cy. Watkins for a sliort cour 



E. E. MILLETT 

Succcyyor tu E. Iv. lioimeLl. 



Jeweler and 
Optician 



Prescription W^ork 

A 8 ]• K (' I A 1, ]■ V 



Special attention given to all kinds of 
Fine Watch Work 




THE LATHROP 

Formerly Bloody Brool Himsr Tele I bore 0-^ 

' SOUTH DEER FIELD, MASS. 
^a\)ag;c c*? l)oB(rfein6, JJrnpnrtorfi 

Under new management This house has been 
thoroughly renovated Private dining ro jms for 
parties at short notice Livery attached 



Amherst Steam LaNrnlry 



The Best o.f Work 

Guaranteed 

Mending done on all 

Students' Work 



M. A. C. Agent, W. O. Taft, '06 



Modern improvements ^ Fine Outlool<; 
Beautiful Grounds ^ Excellent Cuisine 
Up-to-date in all its Appointments 



R, J RAHAR - Proprietor 

Old South Street (off Main) 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



The best place to dine in the city 
Pschon Brau, Pilsner and Wurzburger on 
Draught * When in Hamp. stop with us 



January ii. — Doc. Walker sheds tears in conference with 'oo 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



January i 2. — Doc. Walker sheds tears in conference with '06 



Don't walk on 
your heels to save 
your SOLE! 



Come to me for your custof?i 
made hoots and shoes 

Repairing a Specialty 

Chas. Doray 

Opp. To'svn Hall 



Sanderson 5f Thompson 

The L.eadijig Clothiers 
a?id Furnishers 



We always have a complete assortment of 
Ready-made Clothing, Mackintoshes, Sweat- 
ers, Latest Styles in Hats and Caps, Gloves 
and Mittens. We also make Clothing to 
Order. Suits $13 to $40. Overcoats $10 
to $30. Trousers $3 to $10. 



Amherst 



Massachusetts 



Henry Adams ^ Co. 

Jiriiggists anti 
9[poti)eraric6 

Our stock of Drugs and Medicines 
. is of best quality and always fresh. 
A full line of Domestic and Im- 
ported Cigars and Cigarettes, also 
of High G; ade Smoking Tobaccos. 
Come in and try a glass of our 
Ice Cream Soda ; we use the best 
materials and know how to mix 
them. 



THE NEW STORE 
COOKS BLOCK 



Amherst, Mass. 



Charles Deuel 

Druggist and 
Chemist 

Waterman's Ideal 
Parker's 
Wirt's and 
Crocker's 
Fountain Pens 

College Seal Stationery 

Deuel's Drug Store 
Amherst - Massachusetts 



January 23. — Jones gets back to college 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



January 24 — Tests 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



A rare chance to obtain a thoroughly practical education. The cost has 
been reduced to a minimum. Tuition is free to citizens of the United States. 
An opportunity is offered to pay a portion of expenses by work. 

Six courses of study are offered: eleven weeks' coitrses in dairy farming and 
horticulture; a two weeks' course in bee culture; a jour years' course leading to 
the degree of Bachelor of Science; a tivo years' course in horticulture for women; 
a graduate course leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy. 

In the Freshman and Sophomore years of the four years' course the follow- 
ing subjects are tatight: agriculture, botany, horticulture, chemi.stry, anatomy 
and physiology, zoology, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, surveying, physics, 
English, French, German, history and military tactics. For the Junior year a 
student may elect one of the following six courses : 



First Semester 



Hortioulti: 
Botany 

1' ("hemistrv 
Geology ' 
English 



culture 

iKjlogy 



ultu 



Hort 
Bota . 
(.'hemistry 
Lan<iscape 

(iardeniiig 
Entomology 
Ecf 



Chenii:stry 



Agricuftu^-e 
J Mathematics 
Ge..l<.ffy 

EiiKlish 
[Special vSuh.iect 

Analytical 

Geometry 
Entrineering 



Gardening 
Geology 
English 



vSeconi) Se.mioj 

(Chemistry 
Agriculture 
Mathematii 



Engineering 
Mnthematicrt 
Mechanieal 

Drawing 
Landscape 

Gardening 



( Zoology 

Botany 
J Chemistry 
) Geologv 

Horticultui 
I English 



Landscape 



In the Senior year bacteriology, Constitution of the United States and 
military science are required during the first semester, and Constitution of the 
United States and military science during the second semester. In addition to 



January 25. — More tests 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



January 26. — Still more tests 



these tlie student must take three courses elected from the following and closely 
correlated with his Junior year course. Only one course in language can be 
elected. 



Agriculture Entomi 

Horticulture Ohemistrt French 

VETEniNABY PHYSICS GerM.\N 

bot.\nt e.vgineering t..\tin 

Landscape G-\rdening 

Facilities for illustrating subjects of study include a working library of 
20,000 volumes, properly classified and catalogued; the State collection of birds, 
insects, reptiles and rocks of Massachusetts, with many additions; the Knowlton 
herbarium of 10,000 species of named botanical specimens: the 1500 
species and varieties of plants and types of the vegetable kingdom, 
cultivated in the Durfee plant house; the large collections of Amherst 
College within easy access; a farm of about 400 acres, divided between the 
agricultural, horticulttiral, and experimental departments, embracing every 
varietv of soil, and offering splendid opportunities for observing the application 
of science to the problems of agriculture. 

Worthy of especial mention are the laboratories for practical work in agri- 
culture, in chemistry, in zoology, in entomolog}', and in botany, well equipped 
with essential apparatus. The Durfee plant house has been recently rebuilt and 
greatly enlarged, and a new tool-house and workshop provided for the horticul- 
tural department. For the agricultural department a model barn furnishes the 
best facilities for storage of crops, care of horses, cattle, sheep and swine, and 
management of the dairy; it includes also a lecture-room for instruction. For 
the veterinary department a new and fully-equipped laboratory and stable have 
been provided, where bacteriology and the diseases of animals are studied. 

EXPENSES. Board in the dining hall is $3.25 per week, and in families 
from $3.00 to $5.00; room rent, $9.00 to $21.00 per semester; heat and light, 
$12.00 per semester; washing, 40 to 50 cents per dozen; military suit, $15.75; 
books at wholesale prices; furniture, second-hand or new, for sale in town. 

Certificates from approved high schools admit students without examination. 

Requisites for admission to the several courses and other information may 
be learned from the catalogue, to be obtained by application to the Acting 
President. 

Amherst, Massachusetts. 



February 3. — Anxious taces in class of 15 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



FiiBRi^ARY S. — Second Semester begins 'o, rough-houses Doc. Walker 




I Kl \( II ( ()\( h M \LIJ():\ I OKAINI 
Dark Bay, \veit;hi 1170. heiyhl Id hands 



WE SET THE PACE 

Will) ©ur specialties 

FRENCH COACH HORSES 

Improved Canadian YorkshireHogs, Berkshire Pigs,Southdown 

Sheep; also Choice Potatoes and Crisp Celery 

FARM DEPARTMENT 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

AMHERST MASS 
TELEPHONE 51-5 ' E. H. FORRISTALL, Superintendent 

We breed only the best ot High-Grade Stoclv. Our Vegetables are the 

product of SCIENCE ANO NATURE CO^I BIN ED 

PRICES REASONABLE VISITORS WELCOME 



February 13 — Senate meets to consider what to do with tlic facult\- 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



February 14. — Kid fires Archie and Joke out 



The only Hotel in the 
town Open all the^year 
round 

JUNDERLAND, MASS. 
IRA A. HOXIE - Proprietor 




OUR SPECIALTIE.S 

FRUIT TREES We sell a few choice trees of select varieties. Furthermore we are prepared to 
plan and furnish the stock for corhplete orchards. 

OR.NAMENTALS Trees, Shrubs and Climbers are grown and sold in all the best species. We also 
have a limited svipply of hardy herbaceous plants. 

LANDSCAPE, GARDENING We have a complete Landscape Gardening department in which 
we are able to prepare surveys, designs, planting plans, etc. and to carry out such designs on the ground. 

FR.ESH FR.UIT In season we have a supply of the best fruits such as Strawberries, Peaches (when 
the buds don't freeze), Plums, Apples, Quinces, etc. We sell those to people who want the best. 

VEGETABLES Our fresh vegetables in season are also worth while for people who like good things 
to eat — Celery, Beets, Carrots, Lettuce, Spinach, Dandelion, Corn, Tomatoes, etc., etc., are on this list. 

GOOD MEN We have a few good men to put on the market each year. Men who can do things. This 
is our Specialty of Specialties. Next spring's crop promises to be a good one. Better order early. 

DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE 

Telephone MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

W})t ©rajper HOtrl jam-tljampton. Jlass. 

Two Minutes Walk from Smith College and Theatre 

One Hundred and Fifry Rooms Forty with Private Bath 

American and European Plan Special Rates to College Men 

Entirely complete in all appointments 

Pilsner, Hofbrau and Pabst on Draught Visit our Rathskeller and Tap Room 

C. H. BOWKER y CO., Proprietors 

February 17. — Junior Prom 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



February 22. — Seniors vote to allow faculty one week for a reconsideration 



E. M. BOLLES 



DEALER IN 



J|tgl) (Sralie 
JFootVucar 



LOCAL AGENT FOR 



Walk -Over Shoe 

$3.50 and $4-00 

Stetson $5.00 Shoe 



Repairing a 
Specialty 



AMHERST, MASS. 



J. H. TROTT 



Stoves, Ranges 
and Oil Heaters 

We do Roof Painting, Tinning 
and Repairing of all kinds 

Plumbing, Steam and Hot 
Water and Gas Fitting a 
Specialty 

Amherst, Mass. 



Get Our Prices 



Before having anything done in the 
way of Heating and Plumbing. . A 
full line of up-to-date goods always 
on hand. Oil Stoves. Wood Stoves, 
Coal Stoves and Steam Heaters are 
right in our line. 



ANDIR ONS, SC R EENS and 
FIRE SETS 

COAL, WOOD AXD KINDLINGS 

C. R. ELDER, Amherst, Mass. 



Paige s 

L The Place To Get 

®oo5j tIDcains 



ALSO ALL DEPOT WORK FROM 
ALL TRAINS 

DON'T FORGET THE PLACE 

Rear of Amherst House 



February 28, — Baseball squad out 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



March 2 — Senior farewell banquet at Whately 



FROST & ADAMS COMPANY 

Architects, Engineers' ©^Surveyors' Supplies 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS is- STUDENTS' SUPPLIES 
MATHEMATICAL INSTRUMENTS 



37 CORNHILL 



BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



DORR & ROGERS 


R. F. Armstrong 

80 MAIN ST., NORTHAMPTON 
MASSACHUSETTS 


WHOLESALE DEALERS & JOBBERS IN 

5Boultn> antj (§amc 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb & Veal 


fine 
€lotl)in5 


Telephones 
lyp-I^QS Rirhmond 


anD iHcn'0 
furni0l)ing0 


Basement 32 North St., Eastern Cold 
Storage Building, Boston, Mass. 


Fine Gloves, Umbrellas and Raincoats 

Dress Suits, Tuxedos & Prince 

Alberts to Rent 



March ii — Bill Larned invests 75 cents in a haircut 



ADVERTLSEMENTS 



^Iarci! 17 — Nothing doing — special police on hand last niglit 




Cljf JF. a;. 3Sa00rttr Conipanj) 

of Springfield : iHa0!3acl)U)Sctt)S 

WOULD RESPECTFULLY CALL YOUR ATTENTION 

TO THEIR SUPERIOR FACILITIES FOR PRO 

DUCING THE HIGHKST GRADE OF 

CATALOGS AND BOOKS 

EMBRACING 

Designing : Wash Drawings 
Halftones : Printing : Binding 




iChr cub 15 ta tniilD lurll" 



^Each step carried to completion in the highest sense 
in our own establishment. IVc court 'niqub-'ies and a test 



April u — Dadd)' discusses ' hell " with the Sophomores 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



April 15. — Chauncey appears with a black eye 



^HJGH GRADE Jt^ORK ONLY 




)3))otoa;tat|)l)er 



102 Main Street 

Northampton 

M ass. 



Special prices to College Graduating Classes 



April 23. — Easter Sunday — President Goodell dies 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



May 8. — Tommy drinks some "tin solution" and is first scared and then mad 



COT R ELL & LEONARD 

ALBANY, TV. Y. 

Makers of 

Caps, ©owns an6 Iboobs 

To Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst, Williams, Brown, Dartmouth, Wes- 
leyan, Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Minnesota, Stanford, Tulanc, University of North 
Carolina and the others. Class contracts a specialty. Rich Gowns for Pulpit and Bench. 

SUPERIOR IVORKMANSHIP RELIABLE MATERIALS 




Some Day 



You will want a snug little greenhouse, all your own. 
Flowers all the year around; strawberries, tomatoes, 
lettuce, when the snow blows. Then you will remem- 
ber that in '05 we advertised in the index. We have a 
collection of illustrations of small houses and some text 
of interest. If vou write, ask for The Index Collection. 



BURNHAM - HITCHING S - PIERSON COMPANY 

GREENHOUSE DESIGNERS and MANUFACTURERS 
Boston Branch, 819 Tremont Building 1 133 Broadway, corner 26th Street, New York. 




THE LARGEST 

COLLEGE ENGRAVING HOU/E 

IN THE WORLD 



The Chas. H. Elliott Co. 

Works : 1 ?th Street and Lehigh Avenue, PHILADELPHIA, PA 

Commencement Invitations and 
Class Day Programs 

Dance Programs and Invitations, Menus. Class and Fraternity Inserts for Annuals, Class and 
Fraternity Stationery, Class Pins and IVIedals (write for catalogue). Makers of Superior Half- 
Tones, Calling Cards vSpecial Offer to Students) 



The Connecticut Valley Street Railway 

Runs from Amherst to Northampton, Northampton to Greenfield, and east to 
Turners Falls, Lalce Pleasant and Millers Falls. Special cars at reasonable 
rates to any points on the line. 

John A. Taggart, Supt., Greenfield, Mass. 
Charles W. Clapp, Ass't. Supt., Northampton, Mass. 

May ig. — 1907 Banquet at Greenfield 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



June 2. — Military insppction by Major Rowan 






East (Vhately, Massachusetts 



Class Banquets a Specialty 



COLLEGE ^^ ^"y r'^,^'- 

printing looks 

much more ar- 
PRINTING tistic and at- 

tractive when 

left with us CO be done than it would if 
left with other printers, especially where 
taste and neatness is desired. We make 
a specialty of the finer grades of work- 
manship and have among our many 
customers people of decided taste whom 
we satisfy which assures us that we can 
pleasevou. A trial order will convince you. 



Anker Printing Company 

^f;6 Hi^h Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 



Carpenter & 
Morehouse 

^Book and Job 
Printers 

Amherst, Mass. 

The Amherst Record 



1F3otel Maneii 

SoutbIDccufieI^ 

T J AHERN, Manager 



Livery Stable Connected 



June 9. — Class Baseball — lyoS goes swimming in College Pond 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



June io, — Mrs Ke.l'ling calls on Billy Brooks 




OF EVERY KINB. 

Implements. c^^^^ 

TELEPHONE Machines. ^ 
RicwMOND I660 Woofleiivvare. 

51 AND 52 NORTH rlARKET STREET. BOSTON. 



furnish (fA- .- Ifijtfo r v.v/ J: in pin} cos. 
Morcantilo. .liiricilltur/il. Jlnrticultural. 



The Amherst House 
BARBER SHOP 



Centrally Situated 
Refurnished and 
equipped with all 
the modern Im- 
provements. We 
solicit your pat- 
ronage. 



Footwear 

Case, Elite 

W.L.Douglas 

Shoes 



Our Aim "Satisfaction to AH 



JAMES F. PAGE 

Next to Post Office .hii/u-rst, Mass. \ 



J as. K. Mills 
Photographer 

And Dealer hi 

PHOTOGRAPHIC 
S U P P L I E S 



Agent t^astman Kodak Co. 
College Work a Specialty 



JuNi; 1 4 — '07 all goes over to Hamp to see the Jvtdge 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



September 26. — Babby returns from over the sea 



WOODWARD'S LUNCH 

27 Main Street : Northampton, Massachusetts 

LUNCHES : CONFECriONERT : CIGARS 



TTNoted for its excellent Oyster Stew and Clam Chowder 

TlClosed only from i a.m. to 4 a.m. Open every day 

Masonic Block (near Depot) 



/. M. LJBROFITZ, Custom Tailor 

7 PLEASANT STREET : AMHERST, MASS. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER, ALSO DYEING, CLEAN 
ING, PRESSING AND REPAIRING 



All orders promptly attended to. Drop me a postal and I 
will call on you 



Special attention given to large and small spreads 
Ample room for transients 



D. H. KENDRICK s^Prop. 



House recently equipped with modern improvements 
Terms reasonable 



September 2S. — "Liz" Hayward goes to "Amherst' 



MM 



vPrvil-^aa 



■wm