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^ 



i ti DE X 



LIBRARY 




MASSACHUSETTS 

AGRICULTURAL 

COLLEGE 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/index1911univ 



The Andover Press 
andover, mass, 











'Ihe Index 




AN ANNUAL PUBLISHED BY THE JUNIOR 

CLASS OF THE MASSACHUSETTS 

AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

AMHERST, MASS. 


DECEMBER, NINETEEN 
HUNDRED AND NINE 


191 I 


Volume X L I 









*■ A, t, 




^\)^ B> IndeK 




Sitrrnry t,&itiirH 

ALLYN PARKER BUKSLEY 

EDGAR MORTON BROWN 

S'tatiatiral .tDitnra 

IRVING WILDER DAVIS 

PERCY WILLIAM PICKARD 

ArtiBto 
LOMAS OSWALD STEVENSON 
PHILEAS ARMAND RACICOT 



Pufcfls^ecf by t^e Junior flass of 
tpe /i^Dssachusetfe /jgnculTmol (oi/pgc 



m.xu 



r^far^,. 



'HTl^e butij of compiling tl|e college an- 
nual t^as tl^is year fallen upon us. 
Wz IjavQ strioen to reach tl^e Ijigl] stanb-- 
atb establisbeb by tl]e precious classes 
in its publication. IPI^etlier u)e I]ar>e 
reacljeb tljat stan^ar^ or not sl^all be 
jubgeb by tl^e readers Wz now present 
^hz 3n(?ex of tl^e (Elass of nineteen 
fjunbreb (Elenen to tl^e CJlumni, Students 
anb ^rienbs of JTlassactjusetts CJgricuI= 
tural (BoIIege. 

Clje €bitors 



Co tiie president of m. Q. €. 

in appreciation of l]is unceasing efforts 

toroarbs tlje aboancement of tijis m- 

stitution tl^e Class of nineteen 

fjunbreb (Elenen corbially 

bebicates tljis columc 




THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 




ENYON Leech Butterfield was born at Lapeer in the South- 
eastern part of Michigan some sixty miles north of Detroit 
in 1868 . His father was a Michigan farmer of exceptional 
ability, intelligence and accjuirements, who after four 3'ears' 
service on the Board of Agriculture, which in Michigan, 
practically controls the Agricultural College of that state, became and for 
six years remained Secretary of that body. At present, the elder Mr. Butter- 
field resides in Detroit, where he fills the important position of Secretary of 
the State Fair. 

It was natural that the son should seek his education in the institution 
with which his father was for ten years thus closely connected. It is the 
oldest of the important group of state land-grant colleges, now sixty-three 
in number, having been established by the State of Michigan a few years 
before the passage by Congress of the Morrill Act of 1862. He was gradu- 
ated B. S. in 1 89 1 with high honors as a scholar, evincing, even at that 
early period in life, a strong inclination toward the special studies in which 
he has since distinguished himself. He was known as a diligent, painstaking, 
thorough and conscientious student. 

After six months' work upon the farm immediatel}^ following his 
graduation, he served a like period as Assistant Secretary of his College. 
Then came three full years of valuable training as Editor of the "Grange 
Visitor," the organ of the Michigan State Grange. It was undoubtedly this 
experience which fixed and confirmed his literary style which is one of 
unusual charm and effectiveness. In 1895 he was promoted to the important 
post of Superintendent of Farmers' Institutes, a work carried on with great 
success by his college, and which he advanced to a position of unprecedented 
importance and wide recognition. Retiring from this post in 1899 he spent 
a year in further study and writing along the lines of his favorite topics. In 
1900 he entered the University of Michigan for graduate work. There he 
received his Master's degree in 1902 and at once became Instructor in Rural 
Sociology in that great intsitution. In this position he remained until called 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



to the Presidency of the Rhode Island State CoUege at Kingston in 1904. 
In 1906 he was unanimously elected, by the Trustees of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, President of this institution, as successor of Henry 
Hill Goodell, L. L. D., whose recent lamented death had left us without a 
head. Three years of service has confirmed the wisdom of our Trustees' 
choice. 

Among the sixty-three land-grant colleges of the United States — the 
Southern States having duplicates along the color line — ours is the only 
purely Agricultural College. All the others combine in one institution both 
agricultural and industrial education. Both of these were provided for under 
the terms of the Morrill Act of 1862. In Massachusetts alone, the bene- 
factions of the general government were divided between this' institution, 
which was chartered by our General Court in 1863 for the single purpose of 
affording collegiate instruction in agriculture and kindred subjects, and the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, then already in existence, which 
offered unrivalled facilities for higher industrial training. Of the income 
arising from the Massachusetts Land Grant two-thirds is appropriated to 
the Agricultural College, one-third to the Institute. Subsequent grants of 
money from Congress have been received, all specifically to maintenance, no 
part being available for buildings. Under the existing scheme of division 
this college receives annually about $25,000, while the Experiment Station 
gets about $30,000 more. The State is making annual liberal gifts of money 
for the erection of buildings — and maintenance — and support of an adec[uate 
teaching outfit. The administrative and teaching outfit of the College and 
Station now numbers about fifty, of whom at least 25 per cent have been 
added since President Butterfield assumed charge. 

Our President seems to possess administrative c]ualities of the highest 
order. He has before him a scheme of education of very broad scope, to the 
development of which he brings a mind alert and vigorous, disciplined and 
trained to the highest efficiency. A mass of details crowd upon his attention 
and demand constant effort and watchfulness. His annual budget for the 
Legislature rec[uires the most careful preparation and presentation, and here 
he has occupied a field in which he has thus far won the confidence and 
support of successive legislative bodies. His remarkable earnestness and 
sincerity and entire frankness in dealing with them, have won for him the 
entire confidence of the men at the State House. 



12 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 

In addition to the oversight of this important trust, he was called by- 
President Roosevelt to assume the responsible position of membership in the 
Commission of Country Life, to the wfork of which he contributed much, 
and an important part of whose report came from his pen. In the Depart- 
ment of Rural Sociology he is reckoned as one of the leaders, so that what- 
ever he says or writes on this fruitful topic commands universal attention 
and is received as authoritative. 

Under his guidance the Massachusetts Agricultural College is rapidly 
advancing in influence and importance. This year opens with 350 students, 
the Freshman class numbering 130, with a notable increase in the graduate 
courses and special students. The winter and summer courses are increas- 
ingly popular and are numerously attended. A strong effort is being made 
to carry the benefits of the college to the farmers and dwellers in rural 
communities. The standards of scholarship are being much elevated. Thus 
far the administration of President Butterfield has been a notable success 
and the future prospects of M. A. C. brighten under his gracious guidance. 



v^^^t-^H^^^^ a^ o^:-^7C^^^^<-vi,.«a----«,..,^ 




"M^^ 







dabnbar 



September 13-14, Monday-Tuesday, 

Entrance Examinations 

September 15, Wednesday, 9.30 A. M., 

Assembly ; First Semester Begins 

November 24-29, Wednesday, i P. M.- 
Monday, I P. M. Thanksgiving Recess 

December 17, Friday, 6 P. M., 

Winter Recess Begins 



January 3, Monday, i P. M., 

Assembly ; Winter Recess Ends 



February 6, Sunday, 



Fall Semester Ends 



February 7, Monday, i P. M., 

Assembly ; Second Semester Begins 

February 22, Tuesday, Wasliington's Birthday 

March 25, Friday, 6 P. M., Spring Recess Begins 

April 4, Monday, i P. M., 

Assembly ; Spring Recess Ends 



April 19, Tuesday, 
May 30, Monday, 



Patriots' Day 
Memorial Day 



June 18-22, Saturday-Wednesday, 

Commencement Exercises 







• •..'■■-~..-Vi 



p^ScTW^ 



14 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



loarh of ©ruBt^^a 



Mtmbets sx (©ffirtn 

His Excellency Governor Eben S. Draper^ President of the Corporation 
Kenyon L. Butterfield . . . . President of the College 

George H. Martin . . . Secretary of the Board of Education 

J. Lewis Ellsworth . . . Secretary of Board of Agriculture 



Msmbtts bg Appotntmrnt 

Frank Gerrett of Greenfield 
Samuel C. Damon of Lancaster 
Thomas L. Creeley of Belmont. . 
Charles H. Preston of Danvers . 
Davis R. Dewey of Cambridge 
M. Fayette Dickinson of Boston 
William H. Bowker of Boston 
George H. Ellis of Boston . 
Charles E. Ward of Buckland 
Elmer D. Howe of Marlboro 
Nathaniel L Bowditch of Framingham 
William Wheeler of Concord 
Arthur G. Pollard of Lowell 
Charles A. Gleason of New Braintree 



Term Expire: 

1910 
1910 
1911 
1911 
1912 
1912 
1913 
1913 
1914 
1914 
1915 
191S 
1916 
1916 



©fitrpra Slwlpii bg tljf CUnrpnralinn 

Charles A. Gleason of New Braintree Vice-President of the Corporation 

J. Lewis Ellsworth of Worcester Secretary 

Fred C. Kenney of Amherst ...... Treasurer 

Charles A. Gleason of New Braintree Auditor 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 15 



(Enmmtttpp on 3Finanrp 

Charles A. Gleason^ Chairman 
George H. Ellis Charles E. Ward 

Arthur G. Pollard Charles H. Preston 



CttommtltPf on (Hourap of f>tu&g anb iFantltij 

William Wheeler^ Chairman 

William H. Bowker George H. Martin 

M. Fayette Dickinson Elmer D. Howe 

Davis R. Dewey 



(Hummittpp on iFarm anb i^nrttrttlturp 

Jfarm Slutatan 

George H. Ellis^ Chairman 

Frank Gerrett Charles A. Gleason 

Nathaniel I. Bowditch 

il^nrtirultural Blutaian 

J. Lewis Ellsworth, Chairman 
Thomas L. Greeley Elmer D. Howe 



CUnmmtttpf nn Expmmpnt IrpartntPttt 

Charles H. Preston, Chairman 
]. Lewis Ellsworth William H. Bowker 

Arthur G. Pollard Samuel C. Damon 



16 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



(Hammittee an SStttlbtttga anb ArrangpJttPttt of dirnuniiH 

M. Fayette Dickinson, Chairman 
William Wheeler Frank Gerrett 

William H. Bowker Nathaniel I. Bowditch 



iExamtntttg Qlommittfp of ©uprsrprB 

John Bursley of West Barnstable, Chairman 

Warren C. Jewett, of Worcester 

Isaac Damon of Wayland Frank Gerrett of Greenfield 

Noble B. Turner, of Great Barrington 




THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



iFarult^ 




George F. Mills, M. A. Dean of the College, Head 
of the Division of the Humanities, and Professor 
of Languages and Literature. 

Born 1839. Williams College 1862. A A $. Associate 
Principal of Greylock Institute 1S82-89. Professor of Eng- 
lish and Latin at Massachusetts Agricultural College since 
1890. Apointed Dean of the College and Head of the 
Division of Humanities in 1907, 




Charles H. Fernald, Ph. D., Direetor of Graduate 
School and Professor of Zoology. 

Born 1838. Bowdoin College 1865. Ph. D., Maine State 
College 1886. Studied in the Museum of Comparative Zoology 
at Cambridge and under Louis Agassiz on Penekese Island. 
Also traveled extensively in Europe, studying insects in va- 
rious museums. Principal of Litchfield Academy, 1865. Prin- 
cipal ofHoulton Academy, 1865-1870. Chair of Natural 
History, Maine State College, 1871-1886. Professor of Zo- 
ology at Massahcusetts Agricultural College since 1886. 




William P. Brooks, Ph. D., Director of the Experi- 
ment Station and Lecturer on Soil Fertility. 

Born 1 85 1. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1875. 
•i* S K. Post-graduate, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
1875-76. Professor of Agriculture and Director of Farm, 
Imperial College of Agriculture, Safforo, Japan, 1877-78; 
also Professor of Botany, 1881-88. Acting President Im- 
perial College, 1880-83, and 1S86-87. Professor of Agricul- 
ture at Massachusetts Agricultural College, and Agriculeural- 
ist for the Hatch Experiment Station since January, 1889. 
Ph. D., Halle, 1S97. Acting President of the College and 
Acting Director of the Experiment Station, 1905-06. Director 
of the Experiment Station, 1906. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



William D. Hurd, B. S., M. Agr., Director of Short 
Courses 

Born 1875. Michigan Agricultural College, 1SS9. * r A; 

$ K $; A Z. Nursery Inspector, University of Illinois, 

1S99. Teacher in Lansing High School, 1900-02. Professor 
of Horticulture, Practical School of Agriculture and Horti- 
culture, Briarcliff Manor, New York, 1902-03. Professor of 
Agriculture, University of Maine, 1903-06. Dean of College 
of Agriculture, University of Maine, 1906-09. Director of 
Short Courses, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1909. 



Frank A. Waugh, M. Sc, Head of the Division of 
Horticulture and Professor of Landscape Gardening. 

Born 1869. Kansas Agricultural College, 1891. K S. M. S., 
1893. Graduate Student Cornell University, 1S98-99. 
Editor Agricultural Department Topeka Capital, 1891-92. 
Editor Montana Farm and Stock Journal, 1892. Editor 
Denver Field and Farm, 1892-93. Professor of Horticulture, 
Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, and Horti- 
culturalist of the Experiment Station, 1893-95. Professor of 
Horticulture, University of Vermont and State Agricultural 
College, and Horticulturalist of the Experiment Station, 1895- 
1902. Professor of Horticulture and Landscape Gardening, 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, and Horticulturalist of 
the Hatch Experiment Station since 1902. Horticultural 
Editor of the Country Gentleman since 1898. 

James A. Foord, B. S., M. S. A., Acting Head of the 
Division of Agriculture, and Professor of Farm 
Administration. 

Born 1872. B. S., New Hampshire College of Agriculture 
and Mechanic Arts, 1898. M. S. A., Cornell University, 
1902. S E; # K *; K S. Graduate Summer Schools of 
Agriculture, Ohio State University, 1902 ; University of 
Illinois, 1906; Cornell University, 1908. Assistant in Cornell 
University Agricultural Experiment Station, 1900-03. Pro- 
fessor of Agriculture, Delaware College, 1903-06. Associate 
Professor of Agronomy, Ohio State University, 1906-07. Asso- 
ciate Professor of Agronomy, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 1907. Professor of Farm Administration, 1908. 

Charles Wellington, M. A., Ph. D., Professor of 
General and Agricultural Chemistry. 

Born 1853. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1873. K S. 
Graduate Student in Chemistry, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 1873-76. Student in University of Virginia, 1876- 
77- Ph. D., University of Gottingen, 1885. Assistant Chem- 
ist, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, 
D. C, 1876. First Assistant Chemist, Department of Agri- 
culture, 1877-82. Associate Professor of Chemistry at Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, 1885-1907. Professor of 
Chemistry, Massachusetts Agricultural College since 1907. 






, ^iW*^ 




20 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 




James B. Paige, D. V. S., Professor of Veterinary 
Science, and Veterinarian for the Massachusetts 
Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Born 1 86 1. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1882. Q. T. 
v., On farm at Prescott, 1882-87. D. V. S., Faculty of 
Comparative Medicine and Veterinary Science, McGill Uni- 
versity, 188S. Practiced at Northampton, 1888-91. Pro- 
fessor of Veterinary Science at Massachusetts Agricultural 
College since 1891. Took course in Pathological and Bac- 
teriological Department, McGill University, summer 1891. 
Took course in Veterinary School in Munich, Germany, 
1895-96. 




^ <m^ 




George E. Stone, Ph. D., Professor of Botany and 
Botanist for the Massachusetts Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. 

Born 1 86 1. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1882-S4. 
$ S K. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1S84-89. In 
the summer of 1890, in charge of the Botany classes at 
Worcester Summer School of Natural History. Leipsic 
University, 1891-92; Ph. D., 1S92. Studied in the Physio- 
logical Laboratory at Clark University, 1893. Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Botany at Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
1893-95. Professor of Botany at Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 1895. B. S., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 





John E. Ostrander, M. A., C. E., Professor of 
Mathematics and Civil Engineering. 

Born 1865. B. A., C. E., Union College, 1886; M. A.^ 1889. 
Assistant in Sewer Construction, West Troy, N. Y., 1SS6. 
Assistant on Construction, Chicago, Saint Paul & Kansas City 
Railway, 1887. Draughtsman with Phoenix Bridge Company, 
18S7. Assistant in Engineering Department, New York State 
Canals, 1888-91. Instructor in Civil Engineering, Lehigh 
University, 1891-92. Engineering for Contractor Alton Bridge, 
summer or 1892. Professor of Civil Engineering and Me- 
chanical Arts, University of Idaho, 1892-97. Professor of 
Mathematics and Civil Engineering at the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, 1897. 

Henry T. Fernald, M. S., Ph. D., Professor of En- 
tomology and Associate Entomologist for the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Born 1866. University of Maine, 1885. Ben, * K 4>. 
M. S., 1888. Graduate Student in Biology, Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, 1885-86. Gradudate Student in Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1887-90. Laboratory instructor, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1889-1890. Ph. D., Johns Hopkins University, 
1890. Professor of Zoology, Pennsylvania State College, 
1890-99. State Economic Zoologist of Pennsylvania, 1898-99. 
Professor of Entomology, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
and Associate Entomologist, Hatch E.xperiment Station, iSgg. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



George C. Martin, C. E., Captain United States 
Army, retired. Professor of Military Science. 

Born 1869. C. E., University of Vermont, 1S92. S *. With 
Engineering News, 1895-97. Entered army, July 9, 189S, as 
Second Lieutenant of Twenty-first United States Infantry. 
Promoted to First Lieutenant of Second United States In- 
fantry, March 2d, 1899. Promoted to Captain of Eighteenth 
United States Infantry, August 26th, 1903. Placed on duty 
at Massachusetts Agricultural College by order of the Honor- 
able, the Secretary of War, September, 1905. Retired from 
United States Army, 1909. 




Edward A. White, B. Sc, Professor of Floriculture. 

Born 1S72. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1895. K S. 
Assistant Horticulturalist, Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege, 1895-97. White & Frost, Florists, Arlington, Mass., 
1897-1900. Assistant Professor of Horticulture, Texas Agri- 
cultural and Mechanical College, 1900-1902. Professor of 
Botany, Forestry, and Landscape Architecture, Connecticut 
Agricultural College, 1902-07. Assistant Professor of Flori- 
culture, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1907. Professor 
of Floriculture, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1909. 



William R. Hart, B. L., A. B., A. M., Professor of 
Agricultural Education. 

B. L., Iowa State Law School, 1880. A. B., University of 
Nebraska, 1896. A. M., University of Nebraska, 1900. De- 
partment of Psychology and Education in Nebraska State 
Normal at Peru, 1901-07. Professor of Agricultural Educa- 
tion, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1907. 



Fred C. Sears, M. Sc, Professor of Pomology. 

Born 1 866. B. S. Kansas Agricultural College, 1S92. Assist- 
ant Horticulturalist at Kansas Experiment Station, 1892-97. 
M. Sc, Kansas Agricultural College, 1896. Professor of 
Horticulture, Utah Agricultural College, 1S97. Director Nova 
Scotia School of Horticulture, Wolfich, Nova Scotia, 1S98- 
1904. Professor of Horticulture, Nova Scotia Agricultural 
College, Truro, Nova Scotia, 1905-07. Professor of Po- 
mology, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1907. 






22 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 







Philip B. Hasbeouck, B. S., Associate Professor of 
Mathematics, Adjunct Professor of Phvsics. 

Born 1S70. B. S. Rutgers College, 1893. x 'i. Assistant 
Professor of Mathematics at Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege from April, 1895 to 1902. Associate Professor of Math- 
eipatics since 1902. Registrar since June, 1905. On leave 
of absence, 1909-1910, at Sloane Physical Laboratory, Yale 
University. 



Joseph S. Chamberlain, M. S., Ph. D. 

Born Hudson, Ohio, 1870. B. S., Iowa State Agricultural Col- 
lege, 1890; M. S., Iowa State Agricultural College, 1892. 
Instructor in Chemistry, Iowa State Agricultural College, 
1834-1897. Ph. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1899. In- 
structor in Chemistry, Oberlin College, 1899-1901. Voluntary 
Assistant in Chemistry at Wesleyan University, summer of 
1900-1901. Research Assistant to Professor Ira Remsen, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1901. Chemist, U. S. Department 
of Agriculture, 1901-1909. Student, University of Berlin, 
1909. Chief of Cattle Food and Grain Investigation Labora- 
tory, Bureau of Chemistry, 1907-1909. Associate Professor 
of Organic and Physiological Chemistry, Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College, 1909. 



Fred C. Kenney, Treasurer. 

Born 1869. Ferris Institute, 1890-91. Bookkeeper for Man- 
istee and Northeastern Railroad Company, 1891-1895. Assist- 
ant Secretary and Cashier of Michigan Agricultural College, 
1895-1907. Treasurer of Massachusetts Agricultural College 
since July i, 1907. 



S. Francis Howard, B .S., M. S., Assistant! Professor 
of Chemistry. 

Born 1872. B. S., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1894. 
* S K. Principal of Eliot, Maine, High School, 1S95. Stu- 
dent of Philosophy, Johns Hopkins University, 1S96-98. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College since July, 1S99. M. S., Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College, 1901. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



23 



A. Vincent Osmun, B. Agr., M. S., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Botany. 

Born iS8o. Connecticut Agricultural College, 1900. Assistant 
Storrs Agricultural Experiment Station, igoo-02. Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College, 1903. Q. T. V.. * K *, M.S., 
Maissac'hu-setts Agricultural College, 1905. Instructor in 
Botany at Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1903-1907. 
Assistant Professor since June, 1907. 



Clarence Everett Gordon, B. S., A. M., Assistant 
Professor of Zoology and Geology. 

Born 1876. B. S. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1901. 
Student Clark University, summer session, 1901-03. Science 
* K $; C. S. C, B. S., Boston University, 1903. 

Instructor, Cushing Academy, Ashburnham, Mass., 1901-04. 
Graduate student in Geology and Zoology, Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1904-05. A. M., S H., Columbia University, 1905. 
Instructor iifGeology, summer session Columbia University, 
1905. University Fellow in Geology, Columbia University, 
1905-06. Assistant Professor in Zoology and Geology, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, 1906. 





Robert Wilson Neal, A. B., A. M., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of English. 

Born 1S73. A.B. University of Kansas, 1898; A. M., 1S99. 
$ B K. Assistant in Department of English, University of 
Kansas, 1898-99. University scholar, Yale Graduate School, 
1899-00. Teacher in Wallingford, Conn., High School, 1900- 
01. Instructor in English, University of Cincinnati, 1901-02. 
Harvard Graduate School, 1902-03. A. M. Harvard, 1903. 
Substitute Instructor in English and Acting Head of De- 
partment, Rutgers College, 1903-04. Editorial department 
of The World's Work, 1904-06. Assistant Professor of Eng- 
lish and Instructor in German, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 1906-08. A. M. Yale, 1908. Assistant Professor of 
English, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1908. 

Percy Loring Reynolds, M. D., Assistant Professor 
of Physical Education and Hygiene. 

Born 1876. International Y. M. C. A. Training School, 1902. 
M. D., University of Georgia, 1906. Assistant Instructor 
Training School, 1901-02. X Z X. Medical Fraternity. 
Physical Director at University of Maine, 1906-oS. Assistant 
Professor of Physical Education and Hygiene, Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, 190S 





24 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 




William P. B. Lockwood, B. S., M. Sc, Assistant 
Professor of Dairying. 

Born 1875. B. S. Pennsylvania State College, iSgg. K S. 
With Walker-Gordon Laboratory Co. of Boston and Phila- 
delphia, 1899-01. Instructor in Dairj'ing, Pennsylvania State 
College, 1902-03. Inspector Hires Condensed Milk Co., Mal- 
vern, Pa., 1903-06. Creamery and Condensing Construction 
Work, 1906-08. Ms. C. Pennsylvania State College, 1909. 
Assistant Professor of Dairying, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 1908. 



Elmer K. Eyerly, A. B., A. M., Assistant^ Professor 
of Political Science and Lecturer in Rural Sociology. 

Franklin and Marshall College, 1S8S; A. M., 1893. Student 
in Yale Divinity School,, 1S88-89. Professor of Political 
Economy, Redfield College, i88g-gi, 1892-93. Student of 
Political Economy, Berlin University, iSgi-gz. Professor of 
English Literature, Yonkton College, i8g3-9g. Student of 
Sociology, University of Chicago, summers of 1897, '98, '99. 
Professor of English Literature, South Dakota Agricultural 
College, 1 899-1907. Fellow in Sociology, University of Chi- 
cago, 1908. Fellow in Political Economy, ibid., 1909. In- 
structor of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, 
Correspondence-study Department, ibid., igoS-09. Assistant 
Professor of Political Science and Lecturer in Rural Soci- 
ology, Massachvisetts Agricultural College, igog. 

Robert H. Lyman, LL. B., Lecturer on Farm Lazv. 

Born 1850. B. S. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1S71. 
* K *. Q. T. V. Followed Civil Engineering, 1 871 -78. 
Admitted to the Bar as Attorney at Law, 1878. LL. B., 
Boston University Law School, 1S79. Appointed Judge Dis- 
trict Court of Hampshire Countj', 1882. Registrar of Deeds 
for Hampshire County since i8gi. Lecturer Rural Law and 
Citizenship Law, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1882. 






George N. Holcomb, B. A., S. T. B., Lecturer in 
Political Science. 

Born 1872. Trinity College, 1896. Philadelphia Divinity 
School, I goo. Graduate Student in American Institutional 
and Political History at University of Pennsylvania, igoo-oi. 
Graduate Student in History and Economics. Harvard Uni- 
versity, igoi-03. Williams Fellow, Harvard Union, S. T. B., 
Harvard, igo3. Then engaged in agricultural work. In- 
structor in Economics in Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
igo7. Lecturer in Political Science in Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College, igog. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



25 



Sidney B. Haskell, B. S., Instructor in Agriculture 

Born 1881. C. S. C, $ K #. Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege, 1904. Assistant Agriculturalist, Hatch Experiment 
Station, June, 1904, to July, 1906. Instructor in Agriculture 
since September, 1905. 




Harold F. Thomson, B. Sc, Instrucor in Market 
Gardening. 

Born 1885. K S. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1905. 
Instructor at Mount Hermon School, January, 1906, to Jan- 
uary, 1907. Instructor in Market Gardening at Massachusetts 
Agricultural College since February, 1907. 



Ray L. Geibben, B. S. 
Husbandry. 



A., Instructor in Animal 



B. S. A. Iowa State College, 1906. Assistant in Animal 
Husbandry in charge of livestock judging, Iowa State College, 
1906-07. Instructor in Animal Husbandry since 1907. 



Edgar Louis Ashley, A. B., A. M., Instructor in 
German 

Born 1S80. Brown University, A. B., 1903; A. M., 1904. 
$ B K, $ K #. Instructor in German at Brown Univer- 
sity, 1903-06. Student at University of Heidelberg, Germany, 
1906-07. Instructor in German at Bates College, 1907-0S. 
Instructor in German at Massachusetts Agricultural College, 






26 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLl 






A. Anderson McKimmie, A. B., Instructor in French 
and Spanish. 

Born 1878. A. B. Princeton University, 1906. * B K. 
Bondinot Fellow in Modern Languages, 1906-07. Instructor 
in French, Colchester Academy, Truro, Nova Scotia, 1906-08. 
Instructor in French and Spanish at Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College, 1908. 



C. Robert Duncan, B. S., Instructor in Mathematics 
and Physics. 

Born 1884. B. S. Rutgers College, 1906. On East River 

Division of Pennsylvania Tunnels, 1906-08. Instructor in 

Mathematics and Physics, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
1908. 




Charles Robert Green, B. Apt., Libre 



nan 



Born 1876. Connecticut Agricultural College, 1S95. T!te 
Hartford Courant, 1895-1901. Assistant Librarian, Connecti- 
cut State Library, igoi-o8. Librarian at Massachusetts 
Agricultural College since September, 1908. 



Frederick B. McKay, B. A., Instructor 
and Public Speaking. 



in En$:lish 



Michigan Normal College, 1902. Instructor Reading and 
Oratory Department of the Michigan Normal College, 1909. 
Instructor in English and Public Speaking at Massachusetts 
Agricultural College since September, 1909. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



27 



Harry Milliken Jennison, B. Sc, Instructor in 
Botany at the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Born 1885. B. Sc. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1908. 
C. S. C. 



John Noyes, B. Sc, Assistant in Landscape Gar- 
dening. 

Born 18S6. B. Sc. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1909. 
Q. T. V. 





John N. Summers, B. Sc, Assistant in Entomology. 



Born 188 

c. s. c. 



B. Sc. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1907. 




Frank William Rane, M. S., Lecturer in Forestry. 

Born 1 868. Ohio State University, B. Agr. 1891. Cornell 

University, M. Sc, 1892. * A 9. Lecturer in Forestry at 

the Massachusetts Agricultural College since September 15, 
1906. 



28 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



Floyd B. Jenks, A. B., Instructor in Agricultural Ed- 
ucation. 

A. B. from Purdue University. Practical farmer and dairy- 
man. Speaker for the Indiana Farmers' Institute. Teacher of 
Elementary Agriculture, Goshen High School, 1904-08. In- 
structor in Agricultural Education at Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College since 1908. 



Alexander E. Cance, B. S., M. S., Ph. D., Instructor 
in Agricultural Economics. 

B. S. from Yale University; M. S. and Ph. D. from Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin. Instructor in Agricultural Economics at 
Massachusetts Agricultural College since 1908. 





(ifi^rprs of tl|f iEKp^rtmrtit B'tattntia 



Charles A. Goessmann, Ph. D., LL. D., 

Honorary Director and Expert Consulting Chemist 

William P. Brooks, Ph. D., 

Director 

Fred C. Kenney, 

Treasurer 

Charles R. Green, B. Agr., 

Librarian 

SppartmPitt nf (Hljpmtalrg 

Joseph B. Lindsey, Ph. D., 

Chemist 

Edward B. Holland, M. Sc, 

Associate Chemist in Charge of Research Division 

Henri D. Haskins, B. Sc, 

In Charge of Fertilizer Division 

Philip H. Smith, B. Sc, 

In Charge of Feed and Dairy Division 

Roy E. Gaskill 

Assistant in Animal Nutrition 

Lewell S. Walker, B. Sc, 

Assistant 

Philip V. Goldsmith, B. Sc, 

Assistant 



Amity St 

M. A. C. 

Mount Pleasant 

Mount Pleasant 

47 Lincoln Ave. 

28 North Prospect St. 

87 Pleasant St. 

102 Main St. 

M. A. C. 

19 Phillips St. 

32 North Prospect St. 



30 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



James C. Reed, B. Sc, 

Assistant 

Charles D. Kennedy, 

Assistant 

Ifpartmfttt of Agritttlturp 

William P. Brooks, Ph. D., 

Agriculturalist 

Erwin S. Fulton, B. Sc, 

First Assistant Agriculturalist 

Edwin F. Gaskill, B. Sc, 

Second Assistant Agriculturalist 



Sppartitipnt nf ffarttrulturp 



Frank A. Waugh, M. Sc, 

Horticulturalist 

Fred C. Sears, M. Sc, 

Pomologist 

Jacok K. Shaw, M. Sc, 

Assistant Horticulturalist 



19 Phillips St. 
120 Pleasant St. 

M. A. C. 

North Amherst. 

Mr. Goldberg's. 

I 

M. A. C. 

Mount Pleasant. 

I Allen St. 



Ippartmpnt of iBatang anb Ipgttablr PattfolDgg 

George E. Stone, Ph. D., 

Botanist and Vegetable Pathologist 

George H. Chapman, B. Sc, 

Assistant Botanist 

Sppartmfnt nf iEntmnologa 

Charles H. Fernald, Ph. D., 

Entomologist 

Henry T. Fernald, 

Associate Entomologist 

John N. Summers, B. Sc, 

Assistant Entomologist 



Bppartmntt of Urtprinarg ^rirnrf 

James B. Paige, B. Sc, D. V. S., 

Veterinarian 

ippartmput of iMrtfurolnga 

John E. Ostrander, A. M., C. E., 

Meteorologist 

Charles M. Damon, 

Observer 



Mt. Pleasant 
13 Fearing St. 

3 Hallock St. 

44 Amity St 

66 Pleasant St. 

42 Lincoln Ave. 

33 N. Prospect St. 
M. A. C. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



®tl|er ©ffirpra nf lift ^xpstimeat ^tatintt 



Miss Rose J. Brown, 

Secretary to the Director 

Miss Jesse V. Crocker, 

Stenographer, Department of Botany and Vegetable Pathology 

Miss Harriet Cobb, 

Stenographer, Department of Plant and Animal Chemistry 

Miss Bridie O'Donnell^ 

Stenographer, Department of Entomology 



mi}n (ttollpgt WStceta 



Elwin H. Porristall, M. Sc, 

Farm Superintendent 

Ralph J. Watts, B. Sc, 

Secretary to the President 

Charles H. White, B. Sc, 

Field Agent 

Newton Wallace, 

Electr 



Clarence A. Jewett, 

Superintendent of Buildings 

James Whiting, 

Foreman, Department of Floriculture 

Burke Huff, 

Purchasing Agent 

Miss Mary E. Caldwell, 

Bookkeeper, Treasurer's Office 

Miss Clara L. Stuart, 

Correspondence Clerk 

Miss Henrietta Webster, 

Clerk, Treasurer's Office 

Miss Gertrude Warner, 

Stenographer, Division of Agriculture 

Miss Ruth G. Smith, 

Clerk to the Dean and Registrar 

Miss Ola H. Perrin, 

Clerk to the Director of Short Courses 

Miss Helen Granger, 

Clerk to the Division of Horticulture 



Draper Hall 

Sunderland, Mass. 

33 Cottage St. 

Amherst, Mass 

M. A. C. 

9 Fearing St. 

9 Fearing St. 

6 Phillips St. 

112 Pleasant St. 

Draper Hall 
Draper Hall 
Draper Hall 

79 Pleasant St. 
Draper Hall 

North Amherst 
Draper Hall 
Draper Hall 



32 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



dra&uat? ^tubftttsi 



Bartlett. Oscar C. 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1909 

Bourne, Arthur I. 

A. B., Dartmouth, 1907 

Caffrey, Donald J. 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1909 

ChapmaNj George H. 

B. Sg., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1907 

Davis, Edward M. 

A. B., Harvard, 1909 

Davis,, Irving G. 

A. B., Bates, 1906 

GiBLiN, Edward M. 

A. B., Boston College, 1905 

Holland, Edward B. 

M. S., Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Jennison, Harry M. 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1908 

Johnston, Frederick A. 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1908 

Merrill, Joseph H. 

B, S., Dartmouth, 1905 

Parker, Jolin R. 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1908 

Regan, William S. 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 190S 

Shaw, J. Kingsley 

University of Vermont, 1899 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1908 

Smith, Phillip H. 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1897 

Summers, John N. 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1907 

ToppAN, Gushing 

A. B., Harvard, 1908 

Waters, Theodore C. 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1909 

Whitmarsh, Raymond D. 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 190S 



Westhampton 

Kensington, N. H. 

Gardner 

Amherst 

Cambridge 

Auliurn, Me. 

Holliston 

Amherst 

Millloury 

West ford 

Danvers 

Paquonoclv, Conn. 

Nortliampton 

Amherst 

Amherst 

Campello 

Cambridge 

Rocky Hill, Conn. 

Amherst 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 35 



^futor iltatorg 




HIS, the last history of our college years, is before you, yet it 
is only a very small part of our real history. This part, no 
matter how small it may be in the matter of words, means 
much to us, for it binds the past, present, and future with 
glory of color and its slow change to the more sombre side 
of life, is typically significant of the senior year. 

It has been during the last year that we have really found our friends. 
Like a veteran regiment, defeated perhaps in numbers, we are yet so close 
together that only death can really break our friendships. The year has 
transformed us from "Jolly Juniors" to "Grave old Seniors." 

We are not here now to blazen forth glorious victories or to tell about 
class victories. The days of boasting are over. There are many memories 
of achievements and good times laid up in our hearts, memories that, way 
on in our future, will come stealing back to us, to lighten our load and cheer 
us on to victory. 

It is not the past we are thinking of now; it is the future. As the wheel 
starts on its fourth round, we look with feelings of joy and sadness. Joy, as 
we look to the nearing completion of our college course, and to that which, 
so full of promise, lies beyond. Feelings of sadness, at the thought of leaving 
the Alma Mater, who so kindly sheltered us for four years. So now, as we 
pass out of the circle of the classes, feeling that we have tried to stand by 
the best ideals of the college, it is our hope that the other classes too, will 
keep and endeavor to raise yet still higher, those ideals. 



36 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



QUaaa (iffirprfi 



Walter R. Clarke 
Ralph A. Waldron 
Henry T. Cowles 
Charles A. Oertel 
George N. Vinton 
William E. Leonard 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Class Captain 

Sergeant-at-Arms 

Historian 



OIIaHH frfl 

i—g—T—E—N! 
Massachusetts 
Nineteen Ten 



OlkBH dalara 

Blue and White 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLI-EGE 37 



mnsB of 13in 



Allen, Rudolphus Harold Fall River 

KS; 12 South College; Manager Varsity Football; President Fraternity 
Conference ; Class Baseball ; Class Basketball ; Manager Class Football ; 
Mandolin Club ; Class Sergeant-at-arms. 

AnniSj Ross Evered Natick 

*2K; K; 14 South College 

Armstrong, Robert Pierson Rutherford, N. J. 

$ S K; 13 South College; Fraternity Conference; Stock Judging Team; 
Class Vice-President, 1909; Class Track 

Bailey, Dexter Edward Tewksbury 

e * ; e * House ; Class Track 

Bailey, Justus Conant Wareham 

e *; e * House 

Beeman, Francis Stone West Brookfield 

KS; K 2 House; Class Secretary and Treasurer, 1906; Freshman Rope Pull 

Blaney, Jonathan Phillips Swampscott 

C. S. C. ; 10 South College; Captain Varsity Football; Class Baseball; Captain 
Class Football; Class Basketball; 1910 Index 

Brandt, Louis Everett 

KS;K 2 House; Captain Varsity Hockey; Class Captain, 1908; Class Foot- 
ball; Class Basketball; Rope Pull; Glee Club; Choir; Burnham Eight; 1910 
Index 

Brooks, Henry Alvan . Cleveland 

*2K; 16 South College; College Senate; Vice-President Y. M. C. A.; Signal 
Board; Class Baseball; Class Vice-President; 1910 Index 

Brooks, Sumner Gushing Amherst 

*2K; M. A. C. Grounds; Class President '06; Class Track 

Brown, Louis Carmel Bridgewater 

KS; 12 South College; Captain Class Baseball; Class Football; Signal Board 

Burke, Edward Joseph Holyoke 

C. S. C. ; 9 South College ; Captain Varsity Basketball ; Manager Varsity 
Baseball ; Captain Class Basketball 



38 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



Clarke, Walter Roe Milton-on-Hudson, New York 

KS: 4 South College; College Senate; Editor-in-chief College Signal; Editor- 
in-chief 1910 Index; Class President 

Cloues_, William Arthur Warner, N. H. 

Q. T. V. ; 7 South College ; Varsity Track ; Captain Class Track 

CowLES, Henry Trask Worcester 

'3>; 9 $ House; College Senate; Class Baseball; Rope Pull; Track; Class 
Secretary and Treasurer; Second Prize Burnham Essay. 

Damon, Edward Farnham Concord Junction 

# SK; 18 South College; Business Manager Signal; Cheer Leader; Class 
Baseball; Class Track; Assistant Manager 1910 Index 

Dickinson, Lawrence Sumner Amherst 

* SK; M. A. C. Grounds; Manager of the Musical Club; Manager Junior 
Play ; Captain Varsity Relay Team ; Mandolin Club 

Eddy, Roger Sherman Dorchester 

Q. T. v.; 116 Pleasant Street; Manager Track Association; Class President 
Class Football and Rope Pull; Second Prize Flint Speaking; "H. H." 

Everson, John Nelson Hanover 

2 South College ; Manager Class Basketball ; Captain Class Track Team 

FisKE, John Raymond Danvers 

e *; * House 

Folsom, Josiah Chase Billerica 

10 North College; Signal Board; Y. M. C. A. Handbook Committee; Treasurer 
Debating Club 

Francis, Henry Russell Dennisport 

Q. T. V. ; 5 South College 

French, Horace Wells Pawtucket, R. I. 

4> S K ; North Amherst ; Varsity Football ; Baseball ; Captain Varsity Baseball 
Assistant Manager Varsity Football ; President New England Federation of 
Agricultural Students ; President Stockbridge Club ; Class Football and Baseball 

Haynes, Frank Tuttle Sturbridge 

Q. T. V. ; 8 South College ; Vice-President College Senate ; Vice-President 
Stockbridge Club; President Y. M. C. A.; Class President; Vice-President 
Social Union; Business Manager 1910 Index 

Hazen, Myron Smith Springfield 

K S ; Veterinary Laboratory ; Varsity Football ; Burnham Prize Speaking Eight ; 
Flint Prize Speaking Eight ; Class Football ; Rope Pull 

Hayward, Warren Willis Millbury 

Care John Walsh 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 39 

Holland, Arthur Witt Shrewsbury 

K S: 12 North College; Flint Prize Speaking; Treasurer Y. M. C. A.; Class 
Track 

HosMER, Charles Irving Turner's Falls 

C. S. C. ; 9 South College ; Varsity Football ; Basketball ; Baseball 

Johnson, William Clarence South Framingham 

Q. T. V. : 5 South College; First Prize Flint Prize Speaking; Secretary and 
Treasurer Chemical Club; Class Baseball; Class Track; 1910 Index 

Leonard, William Edward Belmont 

C. S. C. ; 10 South College; President Senate; Fraternity Conference; Varsity 
Football ; Burnham Eight ; Assistant Manager Varsity Basketball ; Class 
President ; Class Historian ; Class Track ; Football, Basketball, Rope Pull 

McLaine, Leonard Septimus New York, N. Y. 

KS; 4 South College; Class President; Class Vice-President; Cheer Leader; 
1910 Index 

Mendum, Samuel Weis Roxbury 

e *• 0$ House; Third Prize Burnham Essay; Fraternity Conference 

Nickless, Fred Parker Carlisle 

e* ; 10 North College; Class Track 

Oertel, Charles Andrew South Hadley Falls 

14 North College; Class Captain 

Partridge, Frank Herbert Cambridge 

# S K ; Clark Hall ; Class Football and Baseball 

Paulsen, George New York N. Y. 

K S ; 2 South College ; President Rifle Club ; Captain Rifle Teams 

Rockwood, Albert Fletcher Concord. 

*SK; 17 South College; Captain Tennis Team; Tennis Championship; 
Class Baseball 

Schermerhorn, Lyman Gibbs Kingston, R. I. 

Q. T. V. ; II South College ; Varsity Football and Basketball ; Manager 
Hockey Team ; Class Football, Basketball, Baseball, Track, and Rope Pull ; 
Class Captain 

Thomas, Frank Lincoln Athol 

Q. T. v.; 1 1 North College; Manager Tennis; Treasurer Musical Association; 
Class Football, Baseball and Track; 1910 Index; Class Secretary and Treasurer 

Titus, Willard McCready Snow New Braintree 

# SK; 16 South College; Class Sergeant-at-arms 



40 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



Turner, Edward Harrison Reading 

Q. T. v.; 6 South College; Fraternity Conference; Burnham Eight; Class 
Football 

Urban, Otto Velorous Taft Upton 

K S ; K S Hotise ; President Chemical Club ; Class Football ; Track 



Vinton, George Newton 

Care Mrs. Tripp, East Pleasant Street ; Class Sergeant-at-arms 



Sturbrids'e 



Waldron, Ralph Augustus Hyde Park 

Q. T. V. ; 6 South College ; President IMusical Association ; President Debating 
Club; Mandolin Club; Band; Class Vice-President; Class Captain; Class 
Basketball and Track 



Wallace, William Newton 

6 Phillips Street 



Amherst 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 43 



Sitntnr l|tBtiirg 




XCE more the hurrying hand of Time has brought a new class 
— nineteen hundred 'leven — to the pubhcation of its pride — 
the Index — and with it comes that necessary evil, the class 
history. 

From the staid and grave dignity of upper classmen, we 
ma}^ look back upon our Freshman and Sophomore years with a feeling of 
C]uiet satisfaction with work well done. Though small in numbers, it can 
never be said that we have been found wanting in spirit. To all phases of 
the full, bi'oad college" life, our class has given freely of its best. 

The year with us has scarcely been one of excitement. Rather we have 
pursued the even tenor of our way, undisturbed by the petty ripples which 
would fain have engulfed us. 

As disciplinarians our influence has been most strongly felt. Indeed, so 
ardently did we pursue our attentions along this line that the class which 
succeeds us has decided that our treatment should be enough for two years, 
and has, in consequence, relinquished all the pleasures incident to a "paddling 
match" or a "ducking bee." 

In the field of athletics we have had our share of the sweets of victory 
as well as the bitterness of defeat. To the green but promising Freshman 
class we have handed down the doggedness and the "never-give-up" spirit 
which is one of the attributes of our Alma Mater. This is evidenced by this 
year's tug-of-war. 

In the class-room our record has fully ecjualled and even surpassed that 
on the field. Our victories over the tough places in the Sophomore year were 
manifold. As soon, however, as we had conquered the bugbears of our 
course, the cm-riculum was greatly altered and mitigated. Evidently our 
friends, the faculty, recognized the necessity of quitting the old schedule when 
classes which could not possibly measure up to "Eleven" appeared on the 
scene. 

But enough of boasting and vaunting. That partakes too much of the 
class spirit. During the first two years of our college life we have come to 
consider our College first in all things, not class nor clicpe, but M. A. C, first, 
last, and always. It is, then, with this spirit, that we are passing through 
our Junior year, and with which, if it may be, we wish to enter the golden 
days which mark the final, the Senior year, in our beloved Alma Mater. 



44 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



Juntnr Qllaaa ©ffiarB 



Herbert W. Blaney 
Percy W. Pickard 
Clarence A. Smith 
Herman A. Pauly 
Raymond G. Smith 
Allyn p. Bursley 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Class Captain 

Sergeant-at-Arms 

Historian 



Cdlaaa fFll 

Ki Ro, Ki Ro, Ki Ro, Ke! 

Nineteen 'Leven 

M. A. C. 



(Ckaa fflolora 

Brown and White. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 45 



mUBB of IHH 



Adaais, James Fowler Melrose 

Q. T. V. ; II South College; Class Football; Class President, 1908-1909; Band; 
Glee Club; Fraternity Conference; Varsity Hockey; Assistant Manager Varsity 
Football 

Allen, Parker West Westfield 

*2K; 18 South College; Class Secretary and Treasurer, 1908; Senate; 
Signal Board ; Leader Glee Club ; Band 

Armstrong, Ralph Henry Holyoke 

75 Pleasant Street ; Class Basketball and Baseball 

Baker, Herbert Jonathan Selbyville, Del. 

K 2 ; 4 North College ; Sophomore Rope Pull Team ; President Debating 
Club, 1909; Assistant Business Manager Index 

Barrows, Raymond Corbin Union, Conn. 

Q. T. v.; 16 North College; Class Basketball and Baseball; Captain Class Track 

Bean, Thomas Webster South Hadley Falls 

C. S. C. ; 75 Pleasant Street ; Class Baseball ; Varsity Baseball 

Bentley, Arnold Gordon Hyde Park 

Q. T. V. ; 3 North College; Manager Class* Rope Pull; Class Baseball; Varsity 
Hockey 

Blaney, Herbert Wardwell Swampscott 

C. S. C. ; Tower, South College; Manager Class Baseball, 1907-1908; 
Burnham Eight ; Class President ; Senate ; Vice-President Fraternity Con- 
ference ; Signal Board ; Business Manager Index 

Brown, Edgar Morton Merrick 

6*; 8* House; Signal Board; Index Board; Manager Class Football; 
Class Baseball 

Burnham, Arthur James Holyoke 

C. S. C. ; 75 Pleasant Street ; Class Baseball 

Bursley, Allyn Parker West Barnstable 

e *; e * House; Class Football; Class Basketball; Class Historian; Index 
Board ; Senate ; First Prize Burnham Eight 



46 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 

CoNANT, Arthur Theodore Sunderland 

Brooks Farm 

Damon, Charles Murray Williamsburg 

C. S. C. ; Tower, South College ; Class Football ; Captain Rope Pull Teams 
1907-1908; Class Captain, 1908 

Davis, Egbert Norton Sherborn 

7 North College 

Davls, Irving Wilder Lowell 

K S; Insectary ; Class Vice-President, 1908; Band; Burnham Eight; Index 
Board 

Drury, Harold Blake Athol 

6 North College 

Dudley, John Edward, Jr. Newton Center 

Q. T. V. ; II North College; Manager Class Track; Class Baseball; Class 
Track and Rope Pull ; Varsity Track 

GiLGORE, Irving Craig Schenectady, N. Y. 

Q. T. V. ; 3 North College 

Henry Willard Francis Hopedale 

6 #; e $ House; Fraternity Conference 

Hill, Nathaniel Herbert Hopewell, N. J. 

#S K; 19 South College; Class Baseball and Rope Pull Teams; Fraternity 
Conference 

Howe, Harold Hosmer Springfield 

K S; Wilder Hall; Choir; Class Secretary, 1907; Burnham Eight 

Jenks, Albert Roscoe Three Rivers 

Plant House 

Johnson, Leonard Matthews Easthampton 

2 North College; Class Secretary and Treasurer, 1908-1909; Class Basketball; 
Varsity Tennis 

Labouteley, Gaston Edward Lynn 

K S; 1 01 Pleasant Street 

Larrabee, Edward Arthur Winthrop 

K S; Clark Hall; Class Historian, 1907-1908; Class Basketball 



MASS ACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 47 

Lodge, Charles Albert, Jr. Manchester 

C. S. C, ; 14 North College; Class Vice-President, 1907; Manager Varsity 
Baseball 

McGraw, Frank Dobson Fall River 

C. S. C; IS North College 

McLaughlin, Frederick Adams Lee 

K S; 4 North College; Rifle Team; Class Football, 1908 

Morse, Henry Bowditch Salem 

K S; 75 Pleasant Street; Captain Class Football and Basketball; Class Base- 
ball and Track ; Varsity Football 

Magai, Isaburo - Tokyo, Japan 

9 North College 

NiCKERSON, George Payne Amherst 

* 2 K ; East Experiment Station ; Class Baseball, Football, Basketball and 
Track ; Assistant jVIanager Varsity Hockey 

Neilsen, Gustaf Arnold West Newton 

C. S. C. ; 15 North College 

OsTROLENK, Bernhard Gloversville, N. Y. 

9 North College ; Class Football ; Vice-President Debating Club 

Parsons, Samuel Reynolds N. Amherst 

Q T V. ; North Amherst ; Organist ; Assistant Editor Index 

Patch, Roland Harrison Wenham 

6 * ; 35 North Prospect Street 

Pauly, Herman Alfred . Somerville 

Nash Hall; Class Football; Class Captain 

PiCKARD, Percy William Hopedale 

Q. T. v.; 16 North College; Class Football, Baseball and Track Teams; Class 
Vice-President; Senate; Western Alumni Prize; Index Board 

Piper, Ralph Waldo South Acton 

Q. T. V. ; 8 North College; Captain Class Baseball, 1908; Manager Class Rope 
Pull 

Prouty, Frank Alvin Worcester 

Q. T. v.; Snell Street; Band; Choir; Class Track 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



Prouty, Philip Herman Shrewsbury 

Q. T. V. ; West Experiment Station 

Racicot, Phileas Armand Lowell 

■fSK; 15 South College; Leader Orchestra; Rifle Teams; Artist Index 

Robinson, Ralph Gushing South Boston 

7 North College ; Class Football 

Smith, Clarence Albert Northampton 

Q. T. v.; S North College; Class Basketball; Class Vice-President, 190S, 
and Class Secretary and Treasurer 

Smith, Raymond Goodale Lynn 

3 Fearing Street ; Class Football ; Class Sergeant-at-arms 

Stevenson, Lomas Oswald Radcliffe-on-Trent, England 

C. S. C. ; 87 Pleasant Street; Rifle Teams; Class Basketball; Index 

Sharpe, Arthur Harris Saxonville 

K S • K S House ; Fraternity Conference ; Signal Board ; Secretary Rifle Club ; 
Rifle Teams; Class Captain, 1909; Class Football and Basketball; Editor-in- 
chief Index 

Warren, Edward Erving Leicester 

PEK;is South College 

Whitney, Raymond Lee Amherst 

Q. T. V. ; 6 Maple Avenue ; Leader of Band ; Class Football ; Orchestra 

Willard, Harold Francis Leominster 

PEK; 14 South College; Class Track; Class Rope Pull 

Winn, Erwin Lawrence • Holden 

87 Pleasant Street ; Class Baseball ; Choir ; Band 



TKe 




I Q \t-\ 



ei 



^)) 



•r 



e 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 51 



^opJinmor? HftBtorg 




I N entering the second year of otn- college career we are at the 
beginning of a more auspicious period than the first. The 
ensuing year is more propitious, because of the changed 
atmosphere, the different relations, and the greater oppor- 
tunities. 

As Freshmen, we were the largest class that ever entered M.^ A. C. 
From the time of our entrance we began to find our places, to be enthused 
with college spirit and to take our part in college activities. 

Some of us didn't find our places without much diligent searching and 
even then, not until the closing months of the year. Of course the upper 
classmen had to aid us, but we choose to use "moral persuasion" in directing 
wayward freshmen. 

Our college spirit is, perhaps, best shown in our attitude towards inter- 
class and college athletics. The tug-of-war made a successful beginning 
for us. This victory over the sophomores was but the vanguard of a year 
almost full of class victories for us. The college too, we are proud to say, 
was willing to have some of our members on many of its teams. 

During last year our class was and even this year expects to be, 
prominent in the varied college activities. We hope that by so doing we 
may make our college a "bigger, better, and busier M. A. C." 



52 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



Ralph R. Parker -------- President. 

Charles C. Pearson ------ Vice-President. 

Arthur F. Kingsbury ----- Secretar}' and Treasurer. 

Fred S. Merrill ------- Class Captain. 

Howard H. Wood ------- Sergeant-at-Arms. 

Edwin B. Young -------- Historian. 



(ClaoB frll 

J thrat, ta thrat, ta thrat! 
TerOj da li.v, da lix, da li.v! 
Kicka, zvah ha! 
Kicka, ivah ha! 

ipi2 
Rah! Rah! Rah! 
Massachusetts 



QIIaBB (Unlora 

Silver Gray and Maroon 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 53 



mnsB of 19U 



AcKERMAN, Arthur John Worcester 

Q. T. V. ; 5 McClellan Street; Varsity Baseball and Hockey; Class Baseball 

Beals, Carlos Loring Sunderland 

Brooks Farm 

Beers, Roland Trowbridge Billerica 

C. S. C. : West Experiment Station ; Class Track Team 

Bent, William Richard Marlboro 

Lovers' Lane; Burnham Eight 

Birdsall, Webster Jennings Otego, N. Y. 

KS; 28 Lincoln Avenue; Assistant Manager Varsity Baseball; Class Track 
Team 

Bodfish, Edward Hill West Barnstable 

6 Phillips Street 

Boland, Eric Nichols South Boston 

*SK; 13 Fearing Street 

Brett, Alden Charles North Abington 

K2; KS House; Class Historian, 1909; Class Rope Pull Teams; Class 
Basketball ; Band ; Signal Board ; Rifle Team ; Debating Club ; Editor-in-chief 
1912 Index 

Brown, Merle Raymond Greenwich Village 

60 College Street 

Burr, Frederick Huntington Worthington 

9$; 21 Fearing Street 

Cabot, George Dwight Winchester 

*SK; 79 Pleasant Street; Band; Mandolin Club; Manager Class Track Team 

Caldwell, Lawrence Sanborn Lynn 

KS;KS House; Class Vice-President, 1909; Manager Class Basketball 

Carpenter, Jesse, Jr. Attleboro 

K2;KS House; Class Baseball and Basketball; Manager Class Basketball 

Castle, Fred Arlo Seattle, Wash. 

$SK; East Experiment Station; Business Manager 1912 Index 

Clapp, Raymond Kingsley Westhampton 

e*;20 North College; Class Track Team 

CuRRAN, Daniel Joseph Marlboro 

Lovers' Lane; Class Football and Baseball Teams 

Daniel, Edward Stephen Coen Osterville 

Q. T. V. ; 9 Fearing Street 

Dee, John Francis Worcester 

6 Nutting Avenue; Burnham Eight; Class Track; Winner Cross Country, 1908 

Deming, Winifred Griswold Wethersfield, Conn. 

*SK; 6 Nutting Avenue 

Dodge, Albert Wesley Wenham 

Brooks Farm; Signal Board 



54 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



ElSENHAURE, JOHN LOUIS 

6 Nutting Avenue ; Captain Class Rope Pull Teams ; Class Football 

EllSj Gordon Waterman 

44 Triangle Street 

Fagerstrom, Leon Emanuel 

Q. T. V. ; 3 East Pleasant Street ; Manager Class Baseball 

Fisherdick, Warren Francis 

26 South Pleasant Street; Band 

FiTTS, Frank Orus 

6 * ; North Amherst 

Fitzgerald, John Joseph 

75 Pleasant Street 

Fowler, Gejrge Scott 

85 Pleasant Street 

Frost, Newton John 

75 Pleasant Street ; Band 

Gallagher, James Andrew 

85 Pleasant Street 

Gaskill, Lewis Warren 

C. S. C. ; Goldberg's ; Band 

Gelinas, Louis Edmund 

Nash Hall ; Class Rope Pull Team 

GiBBS, Robert Morey 

Brooks Farm 

Gibson, Lester Earle 

K S ; 85 Pleasant Street 

Gray, Frank Leonard 

21 Fearing Street; Band; Burnham Eight; Class Basketball Team 

Hallowell, Royal Norton 

K 2 ; K E House ; Mandolin Club ; Burnham Eight 

Harlow, Joseph Alvin 

K S ; K S House ; Class Track Team 

Heald, Jay Morrill, 

Q. T. V. ; 2 North College; Band; Banjo Club 

Hemenway, Thomas 

$ S K West Experiment Station; Class Secretary and Treasurer, 1909; Varsity 
Hockey 

Hills, Frank Burrows 

Q. T. V. ; 8 South College; First Prize, Burnham Eight 

Hickey, Francis Benedict 

C. S. C. : 5 McClellan Street 

Holland, Henry Lucius 

28 North Prospect Street 

HuTCHiNGS, Herbert Colby 

E. H. Forristall's ; Class Track 

Kingsbury, Arthur French 

9 $ ; 20 North College ; Class Secretary and Treasurer 



North Reading 

Cambridge 

Worcester 

Amherst 

North Amherst 

Holyoke 

Wayland 

Natick 

North Wihnington 

Hopedale 

North Adams 

Chester 

Melrose Highlands 

East Boston 

Jamaica Plain 

Turner's Falls 

Watertown 

Winchester 

irsity 

Bernardston 

Brockton 

Amherst 

South Amherst 

Medfield 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



55 



Amherst 

Boston 

Canton 

Orange 

East Greenwich, R. I. 

Amherst 

Elkhart, Ind. 

Worcester 

Amherst 

Danvers 



Lamson, Robert Ward 

51 Pleasant Street 

Lloyd, Edward Russell 

3 Nutting Avenue 

LowRY, QuiNCY Shaw 

K S ; 85 Pleasant Street ; Manager Class Track Team 

LuNDGREN, Arthur Robert 

e *; e * House 

Madison, Francis S. 

12 Cottage Strreet 

Martin, James Francis 

C. S. C. ; 19 South East Street 

Maxon, Donald Charles 

25 Sunset Avenut : Burnham Eight 

McGarr, Thomas Anthony 

31 East Pleasant Street; Class Baseball and Basketball Team: 

Merkle, George Edward 

East Street 

Merrill, Fred Sawyer 

C. S. C. ; 5 Fearing Street; Class Captain; Class Sergeant-at-arms, 1909; 
Class Football 

Moreau, Theodore Joseph Turner's Falls 

2 North College; Varsity Basketball; Class Football and Basketball Teams 

Muller, Alfred Frederick Jamaica Plain 

31 East Pleasant Street; Class Basketball and Baseball Teams 

NoYES, Harry Alfred Marlboro 

Plant House 

O'Flynn, George Bernard Worcester 

75 Pleasant Street 

Parker, Ralph Robinson Penekese Island 

C. S. C. ; 13 North College; Class Secretary and Treasurer, 1909; Class 
Rope Pull Team, 1909; Class President 

Pearson, Charles Cornish Arlington 

* 2 K ; 5 North College ; Varsity Basketball ; Class Basketball ; Class Vice- 
President 

Peckham, Curtis Clififord 

C. S. C. : I North College ; Varsity Hockey ; Class Baseball 

Philbrick, William Edwin Taunton 

$ S K; 5 North College; Manager Class Football Team 

Pierpont, John Edward Williamsburg 

C. S. C. ; 6 Nutting Avenue ; Class Rope Pull Teams 

Pratt, Marshall Cotting Lowell 

K S ; 85 Pleasant Street 

Puffer, Stephen Perry North Amherst 

C. S. C. ; North Amherst ; Band ; Varsity Hockey 

Raymond, Arthur Nathaniel Leominster 

31 East Pleasant Street 



56 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLl 

Reed, Robert Edward Abington 

e #; e * House 

Roberts, Clarence Dwight New Haven, Conn. 

10 Allen Street 

Robinson, Earle Johnson Hingham 

Q. T. v.; 116 Pleasant Street; Class Rope Pull Teams 

RocKWOOD, Lawrence Peck Waterbury, Conn. 

116 Pleasant Street 

Sanctuary, William Crocker Amherst 

9*; Amherst: Varsity Hockey; Class Rope Pull Teams 

Sellew, Lewis Raymond Natick 

Brooks Farm 

Shaw, Ezra Ingram Amherst 

KS; 8 Spaulding Street; Class President, 1908 and 1909 

Southwick, Benjamin Gilbert Buckland 

82 Pleasant Street 

Stack, Herbert James Conway 

Pleasant Street 

ToRREY, Ray Ethan North Leverett 

East Pleasant Street 

Tower, Daniel Gordon Roxbury 

$SK; 13 South College; Class Vice-President, 1909; Class Football and Class 
Track Teams 

Tupper, George Wilbur Jamaica Plain 

C. S. C. ; 13 North College; Manager Rope Pull Team 

Turner, Howard Archibald Dorchester 

East Pleasant Street 

Wales, Robert Webster North Abington 

KS; KS House; Orchestra; Class Track Team; Botany Prize 

Walker, Herman Chester Marlboro 

$ S K; Brooks Farm; Varsity Football; Class Football; Class Captain, 190S 

Warner, Roger Andrew Sunderland 

6 #; E. H. Forristall's; Band 

Weaver, William Jack Alandar 

10 Allen Street 

Whitney, Charles Everett Wakefield 

Brooks Farm 

Wilbur, Emory Sherman East Wareham 

Brooks Farm ; Band 

Wilde, Earle Irving Taunton 

KS;KS House; Band; Class Football 

Williams, Edward Roger Concord 

Q. T. V. ; 3 North College ; Varsity Baseball ; Captain Class Baseball ; Class 
Football 

Williams, Silas Fall River 

e *; 6 # House; Band 
Wood, Howard Holmes Shelburne Falls 

$SK; 79 Pleasant Street; Class Football; Class Sergeant-at-arms 

Young, Edwin Burnham Dorchester 

5 Fearing Street ; Burnham Eight ; Class Historian 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 59 



iFr?Hl)man l^iatorg 




HORT but eventful has been our class history. The first Satur- 
day night, the Sophomores, fearing that we lacked entertain- 
ment, treated us to a parade which gave us a good view of 
Amherst by lamplight. It was a howling success. 

Soon after this, under the kind coaching of the Juniors, 
we began to prepare for the six-man rope pull. But before we had time to 
be coached into good form the Sophomores challenged us and we were 
obliged to enter into the contest. Our men fought hard but were defeatetl. 
Then came the great rope-pull across the pond. The afternoon on w!i;cii 
the pull was scheduled, both teams assembled and the contest began in earnest. 
The rope, however, could not stand the strain and parted twice. This neces- 
sitaicd getting a new rope, therefore the contest had to be postponed until the 
following afternoon. The time soon arrived and again the opposing classes 
lined up to do or die. It was a record pull. For the first few minutes dele. it 
stared us in the face. But the tide soon turned and '13 began to gain ground. 
Tliis gave us new hope and courage, and spurred on by the cheers of tlie 
Juniors and visitors, we succeeded in giving the class of 1912 a ducking in 
the college pond. 

We have already shown our college spirit in football — a large numbei' 
reporting for practice — and in this and other forms of athletics we hope to 
;lo well for Massachusetts. 

A bright future looms before us; a future full of energy, and spirit, and 
loyalty; first, to our beloved M. A. C, and then to our class, the class of 191, •!. 



60 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



iFrpalfman ffllaaH (©fitr^ra 

Oscar G. Anderson ... . . . . . . President 

Frederick A. Kenney ...... Vice-President 

Ralph J. Borden . . . . ' . . Secretary and Treasurer 

William S. Hayden Class Captain 

Frank J. Clegg Sergeant-at-arms 

Harold E. Jenks Historian 



QJlaaa f?U 

One-nine-one-three 

Nineteen thirteen 

M. A. C. 



(Ulaaa Ololora 

Maroon and White 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE- 



61 



m^BB of 1913 



Adams, Winfokd F. 

2 Allen Street 

Allen, Harry W. 

West Pelham 

AmeSj Francis L. 

loi Pleasant Street 

Anderson, Oscar G. 

85 Pleasant Street 

Angier, Harris W. 

77 Pleasant Street 

Baird, Harry A. 

6 Phillips Street 

Baker, Dean F. 

Brooks Farm 

Baker, Howard M. 

Chemical Laboratory 

Baker, Warren S. 

75 Pleasant Street 

Barber, George W. 

Ill Pleasant Street 

Blake, Ralph C. 

75 Pleasant Street 

Borden, Ralph J. 

I Allen Street 

Bradley, John W. 

Taylor's Place 

Brewer, Charlesworth H. 

Henry Nash's 

Brown, Herbert A. 

Brooks Farm 

Bullard, Alvan H. 

75 Pleasant Street 

Burby, Laurence W. 

19 Halleck Street 

Bursley, Harold B. 

44 Triangle Street 

Caldwell, David S. 

East Experiment Station 

Carver, John S. 

15 Fearing Street 



East Everett 

West Pelham 

Cochituate 

East Pepperell 

Westboro 

Somerville 

New Bedford 

Selbyville, Del. 

Wollaston 

Franklin 

Wollaston 

Fall River 

Groton 

Mount Vernon, N. H. 

Saxonville 

South Framingham 

Chicopee Falls 

Peabody 

South" Byfield 

Roslindale 



62 



THE 19] 1 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



Chun, Woon Y. 

90 Pleasant Street 

Clark, Norman R. 

66 Pleasant Street 

Clegg, Frank J. 

6 Kellogg Avenue 

Cleveland, Waldo A. 

14 Kellogg Avenue 

Cobb, Joseph B. 

84 Pleasant Street 

Cole, Arlin T. 

3 Fearing Street 

Coleman, Isaac 

8 Walnut Street 

Cooper, Everett H. 

Brooks Farm 

Cory, Harold 

82 Pleasant Street 

CowLES, Winfred p. 

North Hadley 

Cristman, Clyde E. 

44 Triangle Street 

Currier, Richard H. 
Curtis, Harold W. 

19 High Street 

Dayton, James W. 

25 College Street 
DOHANIAN, SeNEKEKIM M. 
Syi Pleasant Street 

DooLEY, Thomas P. 

12 Halleck Street 

DowD, Daniel J. 

12 East Pleasant Street 

Drury, Lewis F. 

North Amherst 

Edminster, Albert F. 

Mount Pleasant 

Ellis, Benjamin W. 

120 Pleasant Street 

EvERSON, Leon W. 

44Triangle Street 

Fay, Robert S. 

120 Pleasant Street 

FoRBUSH, Wallace C. 

12 East Pleasant Street 

Freifeld, Joseph 

8 Walnut Street 



Shanghai, China 

Worcester 

Fall River 

Baldwinville 

Chicopee Falls 

West Chesterfield 

Boston 

Greenwood 

Rutherford, N. J. 

N. Hadley 

Dalton 

Pelham, N. H. 
Belchertown 

South Norwalk, Conn. 

Somerville 

South Boston 

North Amherst 

Rutland 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Plymouth 

Bryantville 

Monson 

Rutland 

New Bedford 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



63 



French, James D. 

1 16 Pleasant Street 

Fuller, George 

Corner Amity Street and Lincoln A\'ei 

Gaskill, Ralph H. 

Brooks Farm 

GoDviN, Thomas J. 

4 East Pleasant Street 

GooDNOUGH, Henry E. 

85 Pleasant Street 

Gore, Walter M. 

75 Pleasant Street 

Greenleaf, WillL'Vm F. 

21 Fearing Street 

Griffin, William G. 
Griggs, Frederick D. 

84 Pleasant Street 

Guild, Louis F. 

Forristall's 

Harrington, Russell C. 

58 Pleasant Street 

Harris, Burton A. 

66 Pleasant Street 

Hadsey. Willard H. 

5 McClellan Street 

Hatch, Herbert T. 

Brooks Farm 

Hayden, Williaai Y. 

3 McClellan Street 

Headle, Herbert W. 

North Amherst 

Headle, Marshall 

North Amherst 

Heath, Chester B. 

Forristall's 

Helberg, Henry W. 

29 McClellan Street 

Holden, James L. 

85 Pleasant Street 

Howe, Glover E. 

75 Pleasant Street 

Howe, R. W. 

85 Pleasant Street 

Howlet, Loring C. 

FIUBBARD, RoSWELL E. 
Lincoln Avenue 



Hyde Park 

Deerfield 

Worcester 

Jamaica Plain 

Wilbraham 

Wollaston 

Brockton 

So. Hadley Falls 
Chicopee Falls 

Swanton, Vt. 

Swanton, Vt. 

Wethersfield, Conn. 

Brockton 

Norwell 

Beverly 

Bolton 

Bolton 

Needham 

Lawrence 

Palmer 

Marlboro 

East Dover, Vt. 

Brimfield 
Hatfield 



64 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



Huntington, Samuel C. 

19 Pleasant Street 

Hutchinson, Robert B. 
HylanD) Harold W. 

44 Pleasant Street 

Jenks, Harold E. 

15 Fearing Street 

Jenney, Herbert H. 

I Allen Street 

Jones, Harold F. 

5 McClellan Street 

Jordan, S. M. 

82 Pleasant Street 

Kelley, Albert J. 

35 East Pleasant Street 

KelleYj Bernard J. 

116 Pleasant Street 

Kenney, Frederick A. 

77 Pleasant Street 

Kinney, Warren C. 

120 Pleasant Street 

Lane, William F. 
Lake, James E. 

Corner Amity Street and Lincoln Avenue 

Larsen, Nilo p. 

3 McClellan Street 

Lesure, John W. 

44 Pleasant Street 

Little, Willard S. 

120 Pleasant Street 

Lyon, Harold 

79 Pleasant Street 

Macone, Joseph A. 

116 Pleasant Street 

Mallett, George A. 

3 McClellan Street 

Marsh, Frank E. 

Brooks Farm 

Matz, Julius 

16 Pleasant Street 

Mayor, John L. 

12 Halleck Street 

McDougall, Allister F. 

Brooks Farm 

Milbury, Freeman C. 

3 McClellan Street 



Lynn 

Somerville 
Weymouth 

Worcester 

South Boston 

Campello 

Rutherford, N. J. 

Roxbury 

Harwich 

Charlestown 

West Bridgeport, Conn. 

Leominster 
Fall River 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

Lunenburg 

Newburyport 

Somerville 

Concord 

Bridgeport 

Jefferson 

Boston 

South Boston 

Westford 

Lynn 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



65 



Miller, Harold H. 

Forristall's 

MoiR, William S. 

3 McClellan Street 

Neal, Ralph T. 

120 Pleasant Street 

Nichols, Norman J. 

Taylor's 

O'Brien, James L. 

loi Pleasant Street 

Parsons, Robert 

29 McClellan Street 

Patch, Roy K. 

3 McClellan Street 

Pease, Lester N. 

120 Pleasant Street 

Pellett, John D. 

66 Pleasant Street 

Pierce, H.W. 
PiLLSBURY, Joseph J. 

21 Fearing Street 

Post, George A. 

Theta Phi House 

Prouty, Roy H. 

Snell Street 

Putnam, Earl F. 

58 Pleasant Street 

OuiNN, Joseph H. 

6 Kellogg Avenue 

Roehrs, Herman T. 

85 Pleasant Street 

RosEBROOKS, Walter E. 

35 East Pleasant Street 

Ryder, Harold W. 

21 Fearing Street 

Sampson, Stuart D. 
Seres, Paul, Jr. 

35 East Pleasant Street 

Shea, John L. 

22 McClellan Street 

Sheehan, Dennis A. 
Shute, Carl A. 

9 High Street 

Smart, Herbert L. 
Brooks Farrn 



Needham 

Boston 

Mattapan 

Everett 

Wayland 

Lynn 

Beverly 

Meriden, Conn. 

Worcester 

Somerville 
West Bridgewater 

Richmond Plill, N. Y. 

Worcester 

Easthampton 

Boston 

New York, N. Y. 

Oxford 

East Boston 

Grand Isle, Vt. 
Jamaica Plain 

Amherst 

South Lincoln 
Clayton. 111. 

Framinoham 



66 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



Staab, Harold B. 

85 Pleasant Street 

Streeter, Charles M. 
Thayer, Clark L. 

77 Pleasant Street 

Tucker, Walter G. 

19 Pleasant Street 

Tupper, Arthur S. 
Turner,, Leon B. 

2 Allen Street 

Van Zwaluenburg, Ryder H. 

66 Pleasant Street 

Walker, Charles D. 

120 Pleasant Street 

Wheeler, Henry L. 

19 Pleasant Street 

Wheeler, Merrill H. 

56 South Pleasant Street 

Whitman, Warren C. 

2 Allen Street 

Whitney, Francis W. 

Forristall's 

Zabriskie, George, 2nd 

82 Pleasant Street 



InrlaBBttifJi g'tuJifnta 



Barstow, Harold B. 

North Amherst 

Critchett, Edward R. 

120 Pleasant Street 

DeMott, Henry V. 

Allen Street 

Greene, William A. 

79 Pleasant Street 

Granger, Miss Helen 

7 Draper 

Hammond, Arthur A. 

12 Kellogg Avenut 

Hawkins, Guy C. 

56 Pleasant Street 

Powers, Richard H. 

u South College 

Robinson, Sturgis M. 

17 East Pleasant Street 



Northampton 

Brimfield 
Enfield 

Lynn 

Jamaica Plain 
North Abington 

Rutherford, N. J. 

Greenwich Village 

Salem 

Rutland 

Abington 

Needham 

Rutherford, N. J. 



Hadley 

Watertown 

Metuchen, N. J. 

Elm wood 

Amherst 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

Lancaster 

Maiden 

East Weymouth 



68 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



a. c. fr. 

1889::1909 

AMHERST 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 
1869 

BOSTON ALUMNI CHAPTER 
1889 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



69 



a. c '^^ 



Established 1869 



James B. Paige 
A. Vincent Osmun 



Frederick Tuckerman 
Gerald D. Jones 
David Barry 
J. E. Bement 
Henri D. Haskins 



3fn 3fatttUatt 

Robert VV. Lyman 
John Noyes 

James E. Deuel 
Charles F. Deuel 
E. H. Forristall 
Albert McCloud 
Clarence W. Lewis 

eHnUeraraliuatcfi 



William Arthur Clones 
Roger Sherman Eddy 
Henry Russell Francis 
Frank Tuttle Haynes 
William Clarence Johnson 
Lyman Gibbs Schermerhorn 
Frank Lincoln Thomas 
Edward Harrison Turner 
Ralph Augustus Waldron 
James Fowler Adams 
Raymond Corbin Barrows 
Arnold Gordon Bentley 
John Edwai-d Dudley, Jr. 
Irvin Craig Gilgore 

Theodore 



Samuel Reynolds Parsons 
Percy William Pickard 
Ralph Waldo Piper 
Frank Alvin Prouty 
Philip Herman Prouty 
Clarence Albert Smith 
Raymond Lee Whitney 
Arthur John Ackerman 
Edward Stephen Coen Daniel 
Leon Emanuel Fagerstrom 
Jay Morrill Heald 
Frank Burrows Hills 
Earle Johnson Robinson 
Edward Roger Williams 
Joseph Moreau 



70 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



53f)t S)igma liappa 



1873^1909 



ALPHA 

BETA 

GAMMA 

DELTA 

EPSILON 

ZETA 

ETA 

THETA 

IOTA 

KAPPA 

LAMBDA 

MU 

NU 

XI 

OMICRON 

PI 

RHO 

SIGMA 

TAU 

UPSILON 

PHI 

CHI 

PSI 

OMEGA 



€I)c JSoII of CIjapteriEf 

Massachusetts Agricultural College .... 1873 

Union University ........ 18S8 

Cornell University ....... 1889 

West Virginia University ...... 1891 

Yale 1893 

College of the City of New York ..... 1896 

University of Manyland ....... 1897 

Columbia University ........ 1897 

Stevens Institute of Technology ..... 1899 

Pennsylvania State College ...... 1899 

George Washington University ..... 1S99 

university of Pennsylvania ..... 1900 

Lehigh University .... . . . . . . 1901 

Saint Lawrence University ...... 1902 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology .... 1902 

Franklin and Marshall College 1903 

Queen's University ........ 1903 

Saint John's College 1903 

Dartmouth College 1905 

Brown University ........ 1906 

Swathmore College 1906 

Williams College i907 

University of Virginia '907 

University of California 1908 



€l)c €Iut>jef 



The New York Club 
The Boston Club 
The Albany Club 
The Connecticut Club 



1900 
1901 



The Philadelphia Club 
The Southern Club 
The Morgantown Club 
The Pittsburg Club 



1905 
1902 
1902 
1907 



72 The 1911 iisfDEX volume xlI 



College ^l)ake2ipearean Clul) 

of tbe 

;^a0^at\iumt^ Agricultural College 

THE CORPORATION 
Incorporated in 1892 

THE GRADUATE ASSOCIATION 
Organized September 4, 1897 

THE COLLEGE CLUB 
Organized September 20, 1879 



.^^oLri^e^^, 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



73 



College §'|)akespearean ClulJ 



Dean Georg-e F. Mills 
Professor George B. Churchill 
Professor John H. Genung 



Professor Herman Babson 
Doctor Charles S. Walker 
Doctor William Rolfe 



Eesilrent ©raUnates 



Clarence E. Gordon 
Sidney B. Haskell 
Edwin F. Gaskill 
John N. Summers 
Donald J. Cafifrey 
Oscar C. Bartlett 



Joseph B. Lindsey 
George H. Chapman 
Lewell S. Walker 
Erwin S. Fulton 
Hari"y M. Jennison 
Theodore C. W^aters 



Frederick A. Johnston 



JHnJerpaiuatcs 



Jonathan Phillips Blaney 
Edward Joseph Burke 
Charles Irvin Hosmer 
William Edward Leonard 
Thomas Webster Bean 
Herbert Wardwell Blaney 
Arthur James Burnham 
Charles Murray Damon 
Charles Albert Lodge, Jr. 
Frank Dobson McGraw 
George Wilbur Tupper 



Gustaf Arnold Neilsen 
Lomas Oswald Stevenson 
Roland Trowbridge Beers 
Lewis Warren Gaskill 
Francis Benedict Hickey 
James Francis Martin 
Fred Sawyer Merrill 
Ralph Robinson Parker 
John Edwards Pierpont 
Stephen Perry Puffer 
Curtis Peckham 



74 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



liappa g^tgma 

1867^1909 



ZETA 

BETA 

ETA PRIME 

MU 

ALPHA ALPHA 

ALPHA BETA 

KAPPA 

LAMBDA 

ALPHA CHI 

PHI 

OMEGA 

UPSILON 

TAU 

CHI 

PSI 

IOTA 

GAMMA 

BETA THETA 

THETA 

PI 

ETA 

SIGMA 

MU 

XI 

DELTA 

ALPHA GAMMA 

ALPHA DELTA 

ALPHA ZETA 

ALPHA ETA 

ALPHA THETA 

ALPHA EPSILON 

ALPHA KAPPA 

ALPHA LAMBDA 

ALPHA MU 

ALPHA NU 



3lctibe €tjaj)tcc$f 

University of Virginia ....... 1869 

University of Alabama ....... 1869 

Trinity College, North Carolina ..... 1873 

Washington and Lee University ..... 1873 

University of Maryland ....... 1874 

Mercer University ........ 1S75 

Vanderbilt University ....... 1S77 

University of Tennessee ....... 18S0 

Lake Forest University . . .... 1880 

Southwestern Pennsylvanian University .... 1882 

University of the South 1882 

Hampden Sidney College ...... 1883 

University of Texas ....... 1884 

Purdue University ........ ..1885 

University of Maine 1886 

Southwestern University ....... 1886 

Louisiana State University 1887 

University of Indiana ....... 1S87 

Cumberland University . . .... 1887 

Swarthmore College ....... 188S 

Randolph Macon College ...... 1888 

Tulane University ........ 1889 

William and Mary College 1890 

University of Arkansas 1S90 

Davidson College ........ 1890 

University of Illinois ....... 1891 

Pennsylvania State College ...... 1S92 

University of Michigan ....... 1S92 

George Washington University ..... 1892 

Union University ........ 1892 

University of Pennsylvania ...... 1S92 

Cornell University ........ 1892 

University of Vermont ....... 1S93 

University of North Carolina ...... 1893 

Wofford College ....... 1893 



%'^'A, 




Oi-e 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



75 



ALPHA PI 
ALPHA RHO 
ALPHA SIGMA 
ALPHA TAU 
ALPHA UPSILON, 
ALPHA PHI 
ALPHA PSI 
ALPHA OMEGA 
BETA ALPHA 
BETA BETA 
BETA DELTA 
BETA GAMMA 
BETA EPSILON 
BETA ZETA 
BETA ETA 
BETA IOTA 
BETA KAPPA 
BETA LAMBDA 
BETA MU 
BETA NU 
BETA XI 
BETA OMICRON 
BETA PI 
BETA RHO 
BETA SIGMA 
BETA TAU 
BETA UPSILON 
BETA PHI 
BETA PSI 
BETA CHI 
BETA OMEGA 
GAMMA ALPHA 
GAMMA BETA 
GAMMA GAMMA 
GAMMA DELTA 
GAMMA ZETA 
GAMMA EPSILON 
GAMMA ETA 
GAMMA THETA 
GAMMA IOTA 
GAMMA KAPPA 
GAMMA LAMBDA 
GAMMA MU 
GAMMA NU 



Wabash College ........ 1895 

Bowdoin College ........ 1895 

Ohio State University ....... 1895 

Georgia School of Technology ..... 1895 

Millsaps College ........ 1895 

Bucknell University ....... 1896 

University of Nebraska ....... 1897 

William Jewell College . . . . . . . 1897 

Brown University ........ 1898 

Richmond College ........ 1898 

Washington and Jefferson College ..... 1898 

Missouri State University ...... 1898 

University of Wisconsin ....... 1898 

Stanford University ....... 1898 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute ..... 1900 

Lehigh University . . . . . . . • . 1900 

New Hampshire State College ..... 1901 

University of Georgia . . . . . . . 1901 

Kentucky State College 1901 

University of Minnesota . . . . . . 1901 

University of California ...... 1901 

University of Denver ....... 1902 

Dickinson College 1902 

University of Iowa 1902 

Washington University ....... 1902 

Baker University ........ 1903 

North Carolina Agricultural and Mechanical College . 1903 

Case School of Applied Sciences ..... 1903 

University of Washington ...... 1903 

Missouri School of Mines ...... 1903 

Colorado College ........ 1904 

University of Oregon 1904 

University of Chicago 1904 

Colorado School of Mines 1904 

Massachusetts Agricultural College . . . . 1904 

New York University 1905 

Dartmouth College 1905 

Harvard University ....... 1905 

University of Idaho 1905 

Syracuse University igo6 

University of Oklahoma igo6 

Iowa State ••......, 1909 

Washington State College 1909 

Washburn College 1909 



76 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



^appa g'lsma 



aiumni Cljapterief 



Boston, Mass. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Schenectady, N. Y. 
Scranton, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Danville, Va. 
Lynchburg, Va. 
Newport News, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
"Washington, D. C. 
Concord, N. C. 
Durham, N. H. 
Kingston, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Savannah, Ga. 
Birmingham, Ga. 
Montgomery, Ala. 
Mobile, Ala. 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Covington, Tenn. 
Jackson, Tenn. 

Fort Smith, 



Memphis, Tenn. 
Nashville, Tenn. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Columbus, O. 
Chicago, 111. 
Danville, 111. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Little Rock, Ark. 
Pine Bluff, Ark. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Jackson, Miss. 
New Orleans, La. 
Ruston, La. 
Vicksburg, Miss. 
Waco, Tex. 
Yazoo City, Miss. 
Denver, Col. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
Los Angeles, Cal. 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Portland, Ore. 
Seattle, Wash. 
Ark. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



77 



^appa g^isma 



Charles Wellington 
Frank A. Wangh 
W. P. B. Lockwood 



Edward B. Holland 
William S. Regan 
Rev. J. M. Lent 



3rn jFattiltate 

Edward A. White 
James A. Foord 
Harold F. Temps on 

3'n Witit 

George E. Cutler 
Raymond D. Whitmarsh 
John R. Parker 
Carl D. Kennedy 



SSnJccffralinateii 



Rodolphus Harold Allen 
Francis Stone Beeman 
Louis Brandt 
Louis Carmel Brown 
Walter Roe Clarke 
Myron Smith Hazen 
Arthur Witt Holland 
Leonard Septimus McLaine 
George William Paulsen 
Otto Velorous Taft Urban 
Herbert Jonathan Baker 
Living Wilder Davis 
Harold Hosmer Howe 
Gaston Edward Labouteley 
Edward Arthur Larrabee 



Frederick Adams Lee McLaughlin 
Henry Bowditch Morse 
Arthur Harris Sharpe 
Webster Jennings Birdsall 
Alden Charles Brett 
Lawrence Sanborn Caldwell 
Jesse Carpenter, Jr. 
Lester Earle Gibson 
Joseph Alvin Harlow 
Royal Morton Hallowell 
Ouincy Shaw Lowry 
Marshall Cotting Pratt 
Ezra Ligram Shaw 
Robert Webster Wales 
Earle Irving Wilde 



78 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



d)eta 5^1)1 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



79 



'Cf)eta W 



i3nJerji;ralr«att ^erabers 



Dexter Edward Bailey 
Justus Conant Bailey 
Henry Trask Cowles 
Raymond John Fisk 
Samuel Weis Mendum 
Fred Parker Nickless 
Edgar Morton Brown 
Allyn Parker Bursley 
Willard Francis Henry 
Roland Harrison Patch 



Frederick Huntington Burr 
Raymond Kingsley Clapp 
Frank Orus Fitts 
Arthur French Kingsbury 
Arthur Robert Lundgren 
Robert Edward Reed 
William Crocker Sanctuary 
Roger Andrew Warner 
Silas Williams 
George Atwell Post 




Henry 
Blaney 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



jfraternit^ Conference 

R. H. Allen President 

H. W. Blaney ...... Vice-President 

E. H. Turner ..... Secretary and Treasurer 

(S. c ©. 

E. H. Turner J. F. Adams 

|J&i S>ig:ma Rappa 

R. P. Armstrong N. H. Hill 



W. E. Leonard H. W. Blaney 

Slappa §>isma 

R. H. Allen A. H. Sharpe 

eCIjcta piji 

S. W. Mendum W. F. Henry 

3fnforniaI Committee 

R. H. Allen, Chairman E. H. Turner, Treasurer 

W. E. Leonard L. S. McLaine 

R. P. Armstrong R. A. Waldron 

S. W. Mendum 



82 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



Jloll of CfjapterjBf 

University of Maine Chapter 

Pennsylvania State College Chapter 
University of Tennessee Chapter 

Massachusetts Agricultural College Chapter 

Delaware College of Agriculture Chapter 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



83 



W Happa W 



]. B. Lindsey 
S. B. Haskell 
R. J. Watts 



President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



E. A. Back, '04 

F. D. Couden, '04 



C&arter JHemberB 

A. W. Gilbert, '04 
S. B. Haskell, '04 
H. M. White, '04 



P. F. Henshaw, '04 
A. L. Peck, "04 



K. L. Butterfield 
G. F. Mills 
H. T. Fernald 
F. A. Waug-h 
S. F. Howard 
J. A. Foord 



jFatttltp iftembers 

C. H. Fernald 
C. Wellington 
J. B. Paige 
P. B. Hasbrouck 
A. V. Osmun 
C. E. Gordon 
S. B. Haskell 



W. D. Hurd 
W. P. Brooks 
G. E. Stone 
J. E. Ostrander 
R. W. Lyman 
H. F. Tompson 



fHtmUx& h^ afSliation 

H. T. Fernald J. A. Foord 



^n atbfiientta 
C. S. Walker H. Babson 



84 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



C. F. Deuel 
J. B. Lindsey 



f n mxu 

H. M. Thomson 
E. H. Lehnert 



D. Barry 

E. B. Holland 



R. J. Watts 



O. M. Turner, Miss 



eiettiong for 1909 

G. M. Brown, Jr. A. W. Hubbard H. L. Phelps 

R. C. Lindblad E. L. Hsieh - J. S. Whaley 

C. S. Putnam 




<=:{5'0<^^M>°H>°^°^°-==T>° °^°<h'°'^]==^'#=^ 




<=^0<=^0-=:^0<=:^0<=^0<=^^<><=^0,^r^0<^ 



iErmbfra for 1909-10 
iFarultH 



Dr. James B. Paige 
Prof. Clarence E. Gordon 
Dr. Percy L. Reynolds 



Alumni 



Prof. S. Francis Howard 
John N. Summers 



President 

Vice-President 

Executive Committee 

Seci'etary and Treasurer 
Auditor 



R. H. Allen 
F. L. Thomas 



George H. Chapman 
luifrgratiuatffi 

R. S. Eddy 



C. A. Lodge 
L. G. Schermerhorn 








wm^ 







%#• M 



Allen, Mgr. Gage 
Blaney, Capt. 
Goodnough 



Harstttf 

J. p. Blaney Captain 

R. H. Allen Manager 

J. F. Adams Assistant Manager 

J. W. Gage Coach 

Dr. p. L. Reynolds . . . . . . • Physical Director 

®pam for 1909 

Hayden, Putnam, Center 

Walker, Powers, Hazen, Guards 

Schermerhorn, Leonard, Tackles 

Hubbard, O'Brien, Lew, Ends 

Blaney, Hosmer, Goodnough, Halfbacks 

Roberts, Moreau, Ftdlhack 

Morse, Quarterback 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLI,EGE 



89 



iFnntball 




HEN the men reported for practice on September 13th, the 
outlook for a good team at M. A. C. this fall was rather dis- 
couraging. Of last year's team, only a few men were left 
and very few new men were out. To cap the climax, the 
coach who was expected to be here went back on us at the last 
mmuce ana we were forced to look around for another man. Good fortune 
favored us here, and Mr. Jesse W. Gage of Dartmouth, whom I believe to be 
one of the best coaches M. A.C. has ever had, offered his services. Our first 
games coming, as they did, inside of a week, and all being away from home, 
gave him but little time in which to whip the team into shape. 

But with that spirit which is always predominant at Massachusetts, the 
team met University of Maine, Dartmouth and Union, with only the loss of 
one game, that with Dartmouth, and making the other two teams work for 
a tie score. 

With practicall}' the hardest part of our schedule over and the men in 
good condition, we should make a good showing in the rest of the games. 
The men on the team are doing their very best to accomplish this, and if the 
student body stand back of us, whether it be in victor}^ or defeat, there is no 
reason why Massachusetts should not be raised another notch in the athletic 
world. 





HI 


PPVI 




^B r i 


Br ^^^BHI 




IH^^Hh^'v:::^'^'^ "^^wB 


m 




Howells, Coach 



Hubbard Warner Burke, Mgr. 

Thayer OGrady, Capt. French 

Smith Bean 



1909 

J. R. O'Grady 
E. J. Burke 
C. A. Lodge 



lasfball 



Captain 
Manager 

Assistant Manager 
W. D. Howells, Coach 
Dr. Percy L. Reynolds, Physical Director 



1910 

H. W. French 

C. A. Lodge 

W. J. Birdsall 



®fam for 1909 

French, Catcher 

Hubbard, Williams, Curran, Pitcher 
Hubbard, Hosmer, Coville, First Base 
Smith, Piper, Second Base 

Tha3'er, Right Field 



Ackerman, Shortstop 
Warner, Left Field 
O'Grady, Center Field 
Tilton, Bean, Third Base 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



91 



April lo 

14 
16 

17 
19 

24 
28, 
8. 
II 
19 
21 
22 

24 

26 

28 

June 



May 



^faaon'a i>rarps 1909 

Rhode Island College at Kingston 

Brown at Providence 

Tufts at Amherst 

Worcester Tech. at Amherst 

Holyoke Conn. League at Holyoke 

Williams at Williamstown 

Tufts at Med ford 

Amherst at Amherst 

Vermont at Amherst 

Trinity at Hartford 

Vermont at Burlington 

Vermont at Burlington 

Middlebury at Middlebury 

Springfield Training School at Amherst 

Andover at Andover 

Dartmouth at Hanover 

Holy Cross at Worcester 



M. A. C. 


Oppune 


7 


3 


6 





3 


2 


3 


2 





5 


5 


3 


4 


5 


I 


2 


I 


. 4 


3 


4 


•3 


n 



Totals 



65 



55 



92 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



laapball 




ONSIDERING that the team was composed of ahnost entirely 
new men, last year's season was fairly successful. We de- 
feated Williams, the first game of the season; played a good 
game with Vermont, and lost a hotly-contested game with 
Andover. A number of the games were cancelled on account 
of rain. 

This year the prospects are good, though we have lost five of last year's 
men. So far we have for a battery Williams and French, both members of 
last season's team. Other men for these positions will probably appear when 
practice begins. 

Both infield and outfield are sadly in need of new material. The only 
last year's men remaining are Bean and Ackerman. However, there is good 
promise of a large squad and with a good coach, we ought to make a good 
showing this year. 

Manager Lodge is now at work on a good schedule. With conscientious 
work on the part of the squad, and the whole college "lending a hand," there 
is no reason why the season of 1910 should not be successful. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 93 



M. A. (H. iJB. M. p. 31. 

L. S. Dickinson, Captain S. S. Grossman 

F. C. Warner J. E. Dudley, Jr. 

L. S. Corbett, Manager 

Won by M. A. C. Time 3 min. 30 sec. 



2Irark lEofnts 

100 yd. Dash: G. N. Lew, '11. Time, 102-5 sec. 

220 yd. Low Hurdles : W. F. Sawyer, '08. Time, 29 2-5 sec. 

220 yd. Dash: F. G. Warner, '09. Time, 24 1-5 sec. 

440 yd. Dash: L. S. Dickinson, '10. Time, 55 1-5 sec. 

880 yd. Run: E. L. Macomber, '01. Time, 2 min. 10 sec. 

Mile Run : H. E. Maynard, '99. Time, 4 min. 57 sec. 

120 yd. Hurdles : L. G. Glaflin, '02. Time, 18 2-5 sec. 

I Mile Bicycle: E. E. Saunders, '01. Time, 2 min. 282-5 sec. 

Running High Jump : K. E. Gillett, '08. 5 ft. 7 1-2 in. 
Running Broad Jump : F. B. Shaw, '96. 20 ft. 6 3-4 in. 
Putting 16 lb. Shot : H. P. Grosby, 09. 2>7 ft. 9 in. 
Throwing Discur, 4 lbs. 4 oz. : W. E. Leonard, '10. 102.2 ft. 
Throwing 16 lb. Hammer : H. P. Grosby, '09. 105 ft. 4 in. 
Pole ault: F. G. Warner, '09. 9 ft. 2 in. 




Ifnrk^g Q^tnm 



Louis Brandt, 'lo, Captain L. G. Schermerhorn, 'lo, Manager 

G. P. Nickerson, ii, Assistant Manager 

(Ffam fnr I909 

A. J. Ackennan, '12, Goal 'L. Brandt, '10, Center 

E. F. Hathaway, '09, Point W. C. Sanctuary, '12, Left JJ'ing 

J. F. Adams, '11, Cover Point E. J. Norris, 12, Riglit Wing 

C. Peckham, '12, Rover 



BcoxsB for 1909 

M. A. C. 2— S. T. S. o 

M. A. C. 4— S. T. S 5 

M. A. C. o — Amherst 3 

M. A. C. o— M. I. T. I 

M. A. C. o— Trinity i 




Rockwood, Capt. 



©^tttttB 



A. F. Rockwood, Captain F. L. Thomas, Manager 





S 


ingles — A. F. Rockwood 
L. M. Johnson 
C. R. Webb 
H. Jen 






Doubles — Rockwood and Webb 








Johnson and Thomas 








BtatiB for 1909 




April 


24. 


Amherst 6, M. A. C. 





May 


i.S- 


Williams 6, M. A. C. 





May 


28. 


S. T. S. 0, M. A. C. 


2 


June 


I. 


Bowdoin 7 M. A. C. 





June 


3- 


Bates 3, M. A. C. 


3 



96 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 





Ufarrrs nf tl|f 




M 


J. p. Blaney 
R. H. Allen 


Ifaatbnll 

H. W. French 
M. S. Hazen 


L. G. Schermerhoi 


rn H. B. Morse 


W. E. Leonard 


C. E. Roberts 


C. I. Hosmer 


H. C. Walker 




Wmms nf tt|p 




m 


H. W. French 


Sasrball 

T. W. Bean 


E. J. Burke 


A. J. Ackerman 


C. I. Hosmer 


E. R. Williams 




Wmma nf tljp 




BJVlB 


E. J. Burke 


laskftball 

C. I. Hosmer 


L. G. Schermerhor 


n C. C. Pearson 




Ufarrrs nf ll^p 




M 


L. S. Dickinson 


Ulratk 

J. E. Dudley 




Upartra nf tljp 




H|\/|T 


L. Brandt 

W 


il^nrkfg 

C. Peckham 
. C. Sanctuary 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 97 



iFr?Bl|man IFootball (Ltnm 



Robinson, Center 

Howard, Loker, Schmitz, Guards 

Becker, Pauly, R. G. Smith, Tackles 

Sharpe, Lew, Davey, Ends 

Morse, Quarterback 

Daniels, Tilton, Whittaker, Halfbacks 

Coash, Fidlback 

S'tate 

1911, o; 1910, o 




iFr^sIiman Eojj^-Pitll Qlmm 



Damon, Captain and Anchor 
Howard 
Daniels 
Becker 
Schmitz 
Tilton 
Bentley, Manager 




iFr00l|mau lasphall ®^am 



Robb, Catcher 

Hill, Pitcher 

Nickerson, First Base 
Morse, Second Base 
Piper, Third Base 

Tilton, Shortstop 

Coash, Left Field 

Burnham, Center Field 
Blaney, Manager Bentle}^ Right Field 

1911, 9; 1910, 4 



b ' 


1 . ^ .= 


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Brown, Mgr McLaushlin 
Smith Pickard Sharpe Pauly 

i Morse, Capt. Damon Bursley 



B>opl|0m0r0 iFootball (E?am 



Bursley, Center 

R. G. Smith, Whitney, Robinson, Guards 

Damon, Ostrolenk, McLaughlin, Tackles 

Sharpe, Nickerson, Ends 

Morse, Quarterback 

Pauly, Fullback 

Adams, Pickard, Halfbacks 

Btart 
1911, o; 1912, o 



COUUECE 








R 



G 



fK 

n 



I 

L 

A 
T 







I 



r\ 




Ololbg^ ^^tiat? 



Wm. E. Leonard 
Frank T. Haynes 
Allyn p. Bursley 



Frank T. Haynes 
Henry A. Brooks 
Walter R. Clarke 
Flenry T. Cowles 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Wm. E. Leonard 

Herbert W. Blaney 
Allyn P. Bursley 
Percy W. Pickard 
Park W. Allen 




(Uii? mtt (Club 

(iffir^ra 

George VV. Paulsen, 'io President 

Henry A. Brooks, 'id Vice-President 

Arthur H. Sharpe, 'i I Secretary 

Justus C. Bailey, 'io Treasurer 

LoMAs O. Stevenson , ' 1 1 , Captain 

intfrrollfgtDtP Strnrha 
Arthur H. Sharpe 500 yards 49 

Lomas O. Stevenson 300 yards 47 



3lnbonr Stfl? ultam 

F. A. 
P. A. 
A. H. 



TOTAL SCORE 



9^ 
89 

91 



G. E. MacGowan, '09 

F. S. Beeman, '10, 
J. N. Everson, "10 

G. VV. Paulsen, Capt., '10 93 
H. J. Baker, '11 92 

(iul&oor iStflp Stam 

G. W. Paulsen, Capt., '10 121 A. H. 

F. A. McLaughlin, '11 113 L. O. 

P. A. Racicot, '11 no A. C. 



L. O. 

A. C. 



McLaughlin, '11 
Racicot, '11 
Sharpe, '11 
Stevenson, '11 
Brett, '12 



90 
90 
94 
91 
92 



TOTAL SCORE 

Sharpe, '11 123 

Stevenson, '11 128 

Brett, '12, 124 




"®1|? SnaBtmastfr' 



Montague, May 28, 1909 
Petersham, June 4, 1909 



Presented by 

otljp Sluninr Qllaaa 



Hanagftttrnt 



Amherst, June 18, 1909 



L. S. Dickinson, Stage Manager R. A. Waldron, Business Manager 

J. K. Mills, Coach 

ull;p daat 

Bill Morgan^ zvho loves and owes, W. E. Leonard 

"Towel" Fairfax^ the Toastmaster, R. A. Waldron 

Bob KenmarKj a friend of Bill's, E. F. Damon 

Henry Reed, son of Prof. Reed, R. S. Eddy 

Tom RipleYj a friend of Henry's, H. W. Cowles 

George MacIntosh, zvho loves and hopes, J. P. Blaney 

Prof. Reed, who has something to say, E. H. Turner 

Mrs. Reed, zvho has nothing to say, H. A. Brooks 

Buzzer, tlicir son, zvho has too much to say, S. C. Brooks 

Cynthia, their daughter, Miss Calista Roy 




f m. 01. A. 



Frank T. Haynes, 1910, 
Henry A. Brooks, 1910, 
Arthur VV. Holland, 1910, '. 
Charles H. White . 
Frank B. Hills, 1912, . 
Alden C. Brett, 1912, . 
Pres. Kenyon L. Butterfield 
Ralph A. Waldron, 19 10, . 
Henry A. Brooks, 1910, . 
Arthur W. Holland, 19 10 
Samuel W. Mendum, 1910, 
E. Farnham Damon, 1910, . 
Horace W. French, 1910, 
Henry A. Brooks, 1910, . 
Roland H. Patch, 191 i, . 



President 

Vice-President 

Treasurer 

Graduate Secretary 

Recording Secretary 

Corresponding Secretary 

. Advisory Committee 

. Musical Committee 

Membership Committee 

Bible Study Committee 

Devotional Committee 

. Hand Book Committee 

Social Committee 

Northfield Committee 

. Librarian 



106 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



iEntomologtral Journal Cluh 

Prof. C. H. Fernald W. S. Regan 

Dr. R. T. Fernald J. H. Merrill 

J. N. Summers R. D. Whitmarsh 

A. J. Bourne H. M. Jennison 

F. A. Johnston O. C. Bartlett 
D. J. Caffrey 



i>t0rkbnb9^ Clitb 



H. W. French ....... President 

F. T. Haynes ...... Vice-President 

J. C. Bailey .... Secretary and Treasurer 

iExwutw Qlnmnttttpp 

H. W. French, Chairman 
Prof. J. A. Foord 

Prof. F. A. Waug-h 
A. W. Holland 
N. H. Hill 

^tork-dl«Jigtng ulpam 

F. S. Beeman 

F. T. Haynes 

W. M. S. Titus 



CJi^mtral Club 



Wm. C. Johnson President 

Dexter E. Bailey ..... Vice-President 

Dr. Charles Wellington . .Honorary Vice-President 
Dr. Joseph E. Chamberlain . Honorary Vice-President 
Otto V. T. Urban . . . Secretary and Treasurer 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



107 



i^ bating Club 



PIerbert J. Baker . 
Bernard Ostrolenk 
Alden C. Brett 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 



iM^ttabamp^ Club 



Dr. p. L. Reynolds ...... President 

F. C. Kenney ...... Vice-President 

C. R. Duncan .... Secretary and Treasurer 

A. V. Osmun . . . Cliairman Executive Committee 



Henri D. Haskins 
P. H. Smith 



®rrk iHaatrra 



S. B. Haskell 

A. A. MacKimmie 





i>^mor iHtuBtrrl i>I|nhi 



(ElaBB af 1909 
Januarg 15. 1909 



. ■ «S: IK' 


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... Hit_ 


:-;i-: _: I;. 




■'"" 'fe S' *■ -^ 


ii^ : * -i^^^^u^^ 



OInlbp Signal 

Month flf Sbttnra 



Walter R. Clarke, 19 10 
Arthur H. Sharpe, 191 i 
Henry A. Brooks, 1910 
LoL'is C. Brown, 1910 
JosiAH C. FoLsoM, 1910 
Edgar M. Brown, 191 i 
Herbert W. Blaney, 191 i 



Editor-in-Chief 

Assistant Editor 

College Notes 

Athletic Notes 

Alumni Notes 

Department Notes 

College Notes 



luBxtiPsa Bepavtmmt 



E. Farnham Damon, 1910 
Park W. Allen, 191 i 
Alden C. Brett, 19 12 
Albert W. Dodge, 19 12 



Business Manager 

Assist. Business Manager 

Circulation 

Circulation 



l_ 




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3ln&?3c Month 



Arthur H. Sharpe 
Herbert W. Blaney 
Samuel R. Parsons 
Herbert J. Baker 
Phileas a. Racicot 
L. Oswald Stevenson 



Editor-in-Chief 

Business Manager 

Assist. Editor 

Assist. Business Manager 

Artist 

Artist 



AaaortatP Ebttnra 



Edgar M. Brown 
Allyn p. Bursley 



Irving W. Davis 
Percy W. Pickard 



12 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



PubltBljpb Annually bg Jljf f . M. (H. A. 

(fInmmiJtp? 

E. Farnham Damon, '10, Chairman Josiah C. Folsom, '10 

Marshall C. Pratt, '12 George D. Cabot, '12 




114 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



luBtral O^rgamxattons 




N 3'ears past "Old Mass'chusetts" was represented b}^ excellent 
glee clubs. For several years previous to 1906 there had been 
no attempt to organize special music — aside from the Cadet 
Band. Four years ago the need of such an association was 
again realized. A few of the more ambitious called together 
the different clubs and formed them anew. That year, and the year following, 
the work was carried on cjuite successfully. Since then the interest has lagged 
again. This was due, not to lack of talent, but to lack of enthusiasm. 

The prospects, this year, for a good Glee Club, Orchestra, and Mandolin 
Club are brighter than ever before. With the largest entering class on record, 
there has come much talent from which to choose, and to form clubs of which 
we will be proud. 

Music expresses the feelings and personality of the student body, and 
anyone with musical ability should try for one of the clubs. What we want 
is the old M. A. C. spirit to urge us to attend rehearsals and keep up this spirit 
and the interest in the clubs. Don't be discouraged because you think you 
cannot do much. Every man should put forth an effort if there is any music 
in him at all. He can at least make others work harder through the feeling 
of competition. We need the best support of all, to succeed as we should. 
We must keep up with our neighbors. We must not lag behind in one thing 
because we are ahead in everything else. One other thing we need is musical 
instruction. Let us hope for another department added to the college in the 
near future along this line. 

R. A. Waldron, '10, . . . . . . President 

L. S. Dickinson^ '10, . . . . . . Manager 

F. L. ThomaSj '10 . . . Secretary and Treasurer 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 115 



mn mnb 



Park W, Allen Leader 

L. N. Pease .......... First Tenor 

G. W. Barber First Tenor 

F. A. Prouty First Tenor 

Geo. Zabriskie First Tenor 

J. D. Frencli ......... Second Tenor 

P. A. Racicot ......... Second Tenor 

H. H. Jenney Second Tenor 

J. H. Ouinn .......... Second Tenor 

P. W. Allen First Bass 

J. B. Cobb First Bass 

F. D. Griggs First Bass 

A. C. Brett First Bass 

E. D. Winn Second Bass 

H. B. Barstow Second Bass 

G. W. Ells Second Bass 

H. C. Walker Second Bass 



(irrli^Btra 



A. Racicot, 'ii Leader 

P. A. Racicot, 'ii ' . . First Violin 

L. B. Turner, '13 . , . . . . . . First Violin 

J. D. French, '13 First Violin 

R. D. Wales, '12 Second Violin 

H. B. Staab, '13 Second Violin 

R. L. Whitney, '11 First Cornet 

R. A. Waldron, '10 Second Cornet 

H. H. Jenney, '13 First Clarinet 

M. H. Wheeler, '13 Flute 

P. W. Allen, '11 Trombone 

L. F. Drury, '13 Trombone 

H. W. Hyland, '13 Piano 



116 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



iEmtbnUti nnh lattjo Ollitb 



L. S. Dickinson, '10, Leader 






. Guitar 


S. M. Jordan, '13 






. Mandolin 


R. C Blake, '13 










. Mandolin 


G. D. Cabot, '12 










. Mandolin 


R. A. Waldron, '10 










. Banjo 


J. M. Heald, '12 










. Banjo 


C. M. Streeter, '13 










. Banjo 


N. J. Nichols, '13 










. Banjo 


R. H. Allen, '10 










. Baujeaurine 



OInlbgf OIl|0tr 



S. Francis Howard, Leader First Tenor 

Louis Brandt, '10 . . . Second Tenor 

Frank' A. Prouty, '11 Second Tenor 

Harold H. Howe, '11 First Bass 

Herman C. Walker, '12 First Bass 

Park W. Allen, '11 Second Bass 

Ervin L. Winn, '11 . . Second Bass 

Samuel R. Parsons, 11 . . . . . . Ors'anist 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



17 



m. A. (d. OIkrk (UnM lanb 



R. L. Whitney, Leader .... Captain and Solo Cornet 
F. A. Prouty . . . Sergeant and Chief Musician, Bass Drum 
I. W Davis . . Sergeant and Principal iMusician, Snare Drum 
P. W. Allen ..... Sergeant and First Trombone 
P. H Prouty . Sergeant, Cymbals 

E. L. Winn . Sergeant, First Cornet 

W. C. Sanctuary ..... Sergeant, Second Cornet 

F. B. Hills .... Corporal, Second B Flat Clarinet 

J. M. Heald Corporal, E Flat Clarinet 

A. C. Brett . . . . . . . Corporal, First Trombone 

R. A. Warner . Corporal, Baritone 

C. L. Beals Corporal, First Cornet 

D. C. Maxon Tuba 

M. H. Wheeler E Flat Alto 

W. C. Forbush E Flat Alto 

G. A. Post Second B Flat Clarinet 

N. J. Frost Second B Flat Clarinet 

H. H. Jenney B Flat Clarinet 

H. W. Hyland B Flat Clarinet 

S. P. Huntington Flute 

F. D. Griggs . Piccolo 

D. Cabot ... . ■ Flute 

H. L. Wheeler Flute 

Lewis Drury . . .... Second B Flat Trombone 

S. Williams E Flat Bass 

F. L. Gray Solo Alto 

W. F. Fisherdick Tenor 

S. P. Puffer First Aho 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



(Elaaa i'ong 



^^^^^^^i^ 



wm 



^ i i >, ii J i ,^ I > ,^ i ,ii i-!^ 1 ^ 



J i j J ' ^ 5 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 119 



1911 €la00 Bon^ 

Now our song of love and praise; 
Nineteen hundred "leven, to thee we raise 
For thy noble sons will e'er be found 
Coming forth with vict'ries for the white and brown- 
When upon the field thy foes we meet, 
For the dear old class now gather 'round, 
Make the hills and valleys ring with joyful sound. 



Qlljnrua 

Ahogether, boys, now RAH-RAH-RAH, 
For the dear old College, too, 
Always by our Alma Mater stand 
Nineteen hundred 'leven so true. 
And all noble Aggie men shall know 
Of thy deeds of loyalty ; 
And our spirit then shall ever show 
To the grand old class we'll ever faithful be. 




9- 
II. 

14- 
15- 
i6. 



(irtob^r, 1908 

Stock-judging Contest at Brockton. 

College Night. 

M. A. C. o, Dartmouth 23. 

Senior Landscape Class Visits Hartford. 

Rifle Range opened. 

Vespers. Prexy speaks. 

Rope-pull. 191 2 wins. 

Assembly, Horatio Knox of Providence. 

Republican Club organized. 

Water Wagon Parade. 

Democratic Club organized. 

Waugh speaks at Y. M. C. A. 

Prof. Grosvenor addresses Republican Club. 

Vespers, Rev. J. C. Breader of Northampton. 

M. A. C. 6, University of Vermont 6. 

Y. M. C. A. Speaker, E. C. Worman. 

Mass meeting. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE \2\^ 

Spflprtiona of tip f far— ni«tin«ta 

17. M. A. C. II, Worcester Polytech 5. 
First informal. 

18. Vespers. F. L. Willis of Worcester. 

21. Phi Kappa Phi oration, President G. E. Fellows of University of Maine. 
Governor Draper speaks at Town Hall. 

23. Republican Club Supper at Draper Hall. 

24. M. A. C. o, Williams 40. Reserves 16, Holyoke High School 2. 

25. Vespers. Rev. E. F. Sanderson of Providence. 

28. Debate, Republicans vs. Democrats. Republicans win. 
31. M. A. C. o, Yale 49. 

Noufmbrr, 19O8 

I. Vespers. Dr. Lyman Abbott. 

3. Election Day. 

4. Assembly, R. W. Stimpson of Smith's Agricultural School. 
7. M. A. C. 13, New Hampshire State 9. 

1912 wins Rope-pull. 

Prexy leaves on Country Life Commission. 

Edward Avis entertains for Union. 

Vespers. Dr. W. W. Fenn of Harvard. 

Uniforms are donned for first time. 

Mass meeting. Varsity Relay Team organized. 

13. Mass meeting. 

14. M. A. C. 5, S. T. S. 5. 

15. Vespers. Dr. William E. Barton of Chicago — all dark. 
Assembly. Dr. Tucker of Boston. 

19. Index Board of 191 1 elected. 
Mass meeting. 

20. Mass meeting. 



122 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



21. M. A. C. 6, Tufts 6. 

22. Vespers. Rev. C. L. White of New Yorl 

23. Interclass Cross-Country. 

25. Vacation begins. 

26. Lots of Turkey. 

30. College Exercises resumed. 



Bttsmbn, 19O8 



5- 
7- 

10. 

II. 



16. 
18. 



1911 o, 1912 o. 

Reception by Ladies of College. 

W. L. Cowles, on Sicily. 

Literclass Basketball. 

1 9 10 Index appears. 

Freshman pledged. 

Hockey. M. A. C. 2, S. T. S. o. 

Hendrickson and Rosani in Chapel. 

Assembly," Pres. Butterfield. 

Christmas Vacation. 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 123 

Jmtuarg, 1909 

4. Back again. 
Shorthorns arrive. 
Gym work starts. 

5. "Bobby" arranges Enghsh. 

6. Bolt on Assembly. 

8. Hockey. M. A. C. 6, Northampton Y. M. C. A. o. 

9. Basketball. M. A. C. 21, Rhode Island State 27. 
Fred E. Kendall in Chapel, Union Night. 

10. Vespers. Rev. A. P. Reccord. 

12. Debating Club elects officers. 

13. No Assembly. 

14. English exam. MacKimmie gives a startling explanation of rain. 

15. Senior Minstrel Show. 

16. Informal. 

17. No vespers. No milk for breakfast. Water main frozen. 

18. Chem. Ouizz. 

20. Assembly. Prof. Churchill of Amherst. 
Physics Ouizz. 

Meeting of New England Federation of Agricultural Students at 
Orono, Me. 

21. New Salem Academy visits us. 

22. Exams, posted. 

M. A. C. 19, S. T. S. 29. 

23. Interclass Track Meet. 

Frederick W. Bancroft entertains in Chapel. 

24. Vespers. L. P. Powell. 

27. Assembly. Rev. Thomas Van Ness. 
Zoo Test. 

M. A. C. 4, S. T. S. 5. 

28. Stenographers' Sleigh-ride. 

29. Senior Minstrels in New Braintree. 
Agriculture Ouizz. 

30. Hockey. M.A . C. o, Amherst 3. 
Basketball. Dartmouth 40, M. A. C. 11. 



3fffhruary:. I909 

Daddy wears a 1910 hat. 

Hockey. M. A. C. o, M. I. T. i. 

M. A. C. wins Relay from W. P. I. at B. A. A. meet. 

Second semester begins. 

New Hymn Books in Chapel. 



[24 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



II. 



apflfrtiana of tljp f par— tantmuE& 



10. Mass meeting. 



Rifle Club formed. 

12. Junior Prom — Lots of girls. 

13. Prom theatre parties. 

14. Vespers. Pres. Harris of Amherst. 

15. Capt. Martin lights on the Band. 

16. Morse appears in German with a dog. Ashley: "Will you kindly take 

your friend out, Mr. Morse?" 

17. Assembly. Rev. E. C. Swift of Fall River. 

18. Class elections. Legislative Committee on Agriculture visits College. 

19. "Tabby" forgets his necktie. 

20. Basketball. M. A. C. 7, S. T. S. 31. 

21. Vespers. Rev. E. M. Antrim of Springfield. 

22. Measles. 

23. No surveying. 

24. Mendelssohn and Chopin concert. 

25. Pauly sits in water. 

26. College Night. 

27. Hockey. M. A. C. o, Trinity i. 
Basketball. M. A. C. 23, W. P. L 21. 
Pitt Parker in Chapel. 

28. Vespers. Carl Hamilton of Andover. 

Mnvt\), 1909 

"Blokie" fools 191 1. 

Pigs' Feet for supper. 

Assembly. Hon. F. H. Jackson of Providence, R. L 

191 1 puts the "Kid" on the bum. 

Physics Test. 

Informal. 

Vespers. Rev. W. E. Tinker of New York. 

Horticulture Quizz. 

Assembly. Prof. Sedgwick of M. I. T. 

Farmers' Institute. 

12. Dedication of French Hall. 

13. Union entertainment — David Todd of Amherst. 

14. Vespers. Rev. J. Rolfe Stevenson. 

15. Another of Billy's moving picture shows. 

17. Billy says, "Get busy!" Mass meeting. 

18. Sharpe makes a brilliant recitation in German. 
20. Informal. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 125 



SwnUwtinna of tlje f far — ronitnupb 

21. Vespers. Pres. C. W. Huntington of Boston University. 

22. Tax of $3.00 in Chemistry. 

23. First lesson in grafting. 

24. Intercollegiate Rifle Match ; M. A. C. 5th. Band concert 

25. Chem. Final. 

26. Vacation besiins. 



April, 1909 

Back again. 

The pond roiled a little. 
Basketball. 191 1 9, 1912 18. 
Windy as the dickens. 
Freshmen do some stunts. 
Baseball. M. A. C. 7, R. I. 3. 
No vespers. 

Freshmen have an all-day class meeting. 
Freshmen decide to stay. 
Baseball. Brown 6, M. A. C. o. 
A few Freshmen disappear. 
Baseball. Tufts 3, M. A. C. 2. 
Ways and Means Committee visits College. 
Baseball. M. A. C. 3, W. P. I. 2. 
Informal. 
19. Baseball. Holyoke (Conn. League) 5, M. A. C. O. 
Senior Class Tree transplanted. 
"E. M. Brown also ran." 
Class meeting. 
5 Bones. 

Freshman Banquet. 
Baseball. M. A. C. 5, Williams 3. 
Freshmen back. 
Horticulture Test. 
Only four take English Ouizz. 
Baseball. M. A. C. 4, 'fufts 5. 
Assembly. A. E. Winship of Boston. 

29. Skip burns his mouth with hot air. 

30. Surveying. Pace the distance to North College. 



126 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 

iMag. 1909 

I. Informal. 

4. Seniors water Class Tree 
Mouse in the pudding. 

5. Assembly. J. H. McFarland. 
Williams 191 2 4, M. A. C. 1912 o. 

8. Baseball. M. A. C. i, Amherst 2. 

11. M. A. C. I, University of Vermont 4. 

12. No Assembly. 

13. Government Inspection. 

14. Junior Banquet. 

15. High School Day. 

17. Juniors plant Class Tree 

19. Baseball. M. A. C. 3, Trinity 4. 
Assembly. Mr. Critchett of M. I. T. 

20. German Quizz. 

21. Baseball. M. A. C. 3, Vermont 9. 
Intercollegiate Press Association meets at Boston. 

22. M. A. C. 4, Vermont 2. 
Informal. 

24. M. A. C. 10, Middlebury i. 

26. Flint Prize Speaking. 

27. Exams, posted. 

28. Catalogs out at last. 

Baseball. M. A. C. 9, S. T. S. i. 
"Toastmaster" given in Montague. 

29. Baseball. Andover 2, M. A. C. i. 

30. Memorial Day. 

31. Band goes to North Hadley. 
Battalion parades in Amherst. 

Hlunt. 1909 

1. Tennis team defeated by Bowdoin. 

2. Burnham Prize Speaking. 

Baseball. Dartmouth 7, M. A. C. 5. 
Tennis at Bates. 

4. Baseball. Holy Cross 3, M. A. C. o. 
Tennis at Bates, broke even. 

5. Bobby's bulletin board filled. 
7. Senior exams, begin. 

9. Prexy says, "We give good board at cost." 

10. Mass meeting. 

11. Last recitation with Billy. 

12. Tactics final. 
14. Finals 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



127 



i8. 
19. 

20. 

21. 
22. 
23- 



Junior play. 

Intercollegiate Ritie Match at Seagirt, N. J.; M. A. C. .2nd. 

1911 2, 1912 5. 
Baccalaureate sei'mon. 
Commencement Drill.. 
Alumni Day. 

Commencement Exercises. 
Sophomore-Senior Prom. 

^^ptembpr, 1909 

Beginning to return. 

More arrivals 

Registration. Football practice begins. 

More of the same. 

College opens with largest Freshman Class in the history of the College. 

Everybody broke. 

Y. M. C. A. Reception to 19 13. 

Freshmen attempt Class Picture. 

Prexy speaks. in chapel. 

Hampshire Fair. Rope-pull challenge posted. 

191 2 wins Rope-pull. Junior Day. Mass meeting. 
Junior Class officers elected. 

M. A. C. o, University of Maine o. 

George E. Burgess in chapel. 

Seniors elect officers. "Nick" recites "in absentia." 

Dartmouth 22, M. A. C. o. 

Rope breaks. Billy leaves for Yale. 

(l^rtnbpr, 1909 



I. Tug-of-war. 1913 wins. 







'0- 



Commencement 



iFltnt O^ratortral Olontet 

MpiinPBtiag, iHag 26. 1 909 

William Edward Leonard ....... Belmont 

"Theodore Roosevelt." 

Willard McCready Titus ...... New Braintree 

"The Young Citizen." 

Myron Smith Hazen ........ Springfield 

"The No-License Question." 

William Clarence Johnson ..... South Framingham 

"General Custer." 

Arthur Witt Holland ....... Shrewsbury 

"The Duty of a College Man." 

Roger Sherman Eddy ........ Boston 

"Capital Punishment," 



130 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



W^JinpaJiaa, 3lunf 2, 19119 

William Richard Bent . .Marlboro 

"Massachusetts and South Carolina" — Daniel JVebster. 

John Francis Dee ........ Worcester 

"Toussaint L'Ouverture" — Wend ell Phillips 

Frank Leonard Gray ....... East Boston 

"The Victor of Marengo" — Joel T. Headley. 

Frank Burrows Hills ....... Bernardston 

"The Last Combat" — Lord Lytton. 

Donald Charles Maxon ...... .Elkhart, Lidiana 

"Irish Aliens and English Victories" — Richard Shell. 

Theodore Joseph Moreau ...... Turners Falls 

"The Honor of the Woods" — Anonymous. 

Herbert James Stack ........ Amherst 

"A Call to Action" — Patrick Henry. 

Edward Burnham Young ....... Dorchester 

"Napoleon the Little" — Victor Hugo. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



131 



i'unDag. 3mt 20, 19D9 

By President Kenyon L. Butterfield. 
Subject: "Limitations." 



Class iag ^£xtnm^s 

Supabau. 3lunp 22. 19119 

Planting of Class Ivy By Class President 

Ivy Poem M. F. Geer 

Class Oration C. H. White 

Class Song W. D. Barlow 

Class Ode G. M. Brown 

Campus Oration L. S. Corbett 

Pipe Oration P. E. Alger 

Hatchet Oration O. C. Bartlett 

Class Tree Planted May 4, 1908. 



Hpbn?abae. 3um 23, 1999 

Commencement Address : 

Hon. Gifford Pinchot, M. A., D. Sc, LL.D., United States Forester. 
Subject: "The Next Step." 



132 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



AmnxhB nnh Srtz^s 



(grinttpll PrizfB: 

To members of the Senior Class who passed the best, second best, and 
third best examinations, oral and written, in theoretical and practical 
agriculture. 

First Prize, $25, Benjamin Franklin Barnes, Jr., Haverhill, 
Mass. 

Second Prize, $15, Paul Edgar Alger, Reading, Mass. 

Third Prize, $10, Jared Brewer Thomson, Monterey, Mass. 

Engltsli PrizPB : 

The Flint Prizes to members of the Junior Class delivering the best 
and second best oration. 

First Prize, $30, William Clarence Johnson, South Framing- 
ham, Mass. 

Second Prize, $20, Roger Sherman Eddy, Dorchester, Mass. 

lurnljam ?^rt2PH: 

To Freshmen, for excellence in declamation. 

First prize, $25, Frank Burrows Hills, Bernardston, Mass. 
Second prize, $20, Theodore Joseph Moreau, Turner's Falls, 

Mass. 
Honorable mention to Edward Burnham Young, Dorchester, 
Mass. 

Entamologital PrizpH: 

To Seniors who have done the best work in Entomology during their 
course, in accordance with the scale of points prepared by the givers 
of the prizes. 

First prize, $20, Donald John Caffrey, Gardner, Mass. 

Second prize, $10, George Melvin Codding, Taunton, Mass. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 133 

Jfnrrstrn T^vizt: 

Given by the Bay State Agricultural Society as the J. W. D. French 
Prize for the best essay on arboriculture. 

$25, Charles Andrew Oertel, South Hadley Falls, Mass. 

Qlftipral SlmprofapntPttl Prt2P: 

Given to that member of the Sophomore Class, who, during his first 
two years in College, has shown the greatest improvement in scholar- 
ship, character, and example. 

$25, Percy WilHam Pickard, Hopedale, Mass. 

^i^Vs Sntantral Prtzra: 

For the best herbarium. 

$15, to Waldo Darius Barlow, Amherst, Mass. 

For the best collection of Massachusetts trees and shrubs. 

$10, to Waldo Darius Barlow, Amherst, Mass. 
For the best collection of Massachusetts woods. 

$10, to Waldo Darius Barlow, Amherst, Mass. 
The prize of $5, offered to that member of the Freshman Class pre- 
senting the best herbarium in regular course, is awarded to Robert 
Webster Wales. Honorable mention is made of Edward Hill Bodfish. 

illtUtarH ^anats anii J^rtzps: 

The following officers were reported to the Adjutant-General of the 
United States, and to the Adjutant-General of Massachusetts, for high merit 
in their military work : 

Major Rockwood Chester Lindblad 

Capt. Lamert Seymour Corbett. 

Capt. Henry William Turner 

Capt. Richard Chute Potter. 

Capt. Myron Wood Thompson. 

Lieut. George Melvin Codding. 

Lieut. Frederick Chester Warner. 



134 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



JPrtzfB 



To the winner of the Company competitive drill, a flag, to Company A. 
To the Captain of the best drilled company, a sabre with scabbard, to 
L. S. Corbett, '09. 

For individual drill in the manual of arms and firings : 
Gold medal, H. A. Brooks, '10. 
Silver medal, E. M. Folger, '12. 
Bronze medal, W. E. Philbrick, '12. 

For outdoor shoot : 

Gold medal, P. A. Racirot, '11. 
Silver medal, L. O. Stevenson, '11. 
Bronze medal, George Paulsen, '10. 

For indoor shoot : 

Gold medal, A. H. Sharpe, '11. 
Silver medal, George Paulsen, '10. 
Bronze medal, H. J. Baker, '11. 

To the Junior having the highest military standing, a gold medal, 
R. S. Eddy, '10. 

To the Sophomore having the highest military standing, a gold medal, 
S. R. Parsons, '11. 

To the Freshman having the highest military standing, a silver medal, 
H. L. Holland, '12. 



136 fHE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLl 



Juntor Prom^nab? 

Jfftbruarg 12, 1909 
Suntor Prnm ^atrflnfaaw 

Mrs. VVm. P. Brooks 

Mrs. P. B. Hasbrouck 

Mrs. F. A. Waugh 

Mrs. E. A. White 

Mrs. A. V. Osmun 

3«m0r Pram QlnmmittrF 

R. A. Waldron, Chairman 

Prof. P. B. Hasbrouck L. Brandt 

Prof. F. A. Wangli L. S. Dickinson 

Prof. E. A. White G. W. Paulsen 

Wm. E. Leonard F. T. Haynes 

E. H. Turner H. T. Cowles 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 137 



3)unF 23. 1909 

Mrs. K. L. Butterfield 

Mrs. P. B. Hasbrouck 

Mrs. J. A. Foord 

Mrs. R. D. McLaurin 

Mrs. A. V. Osmuii 

Mrs. J. B. Lindsey 

^apI}omo«-i»rmor Prom (HommitUt 

E. A. Larrabee, Chairinan 

Prof. P. B. Hasbrouck L. O. Stevenson 

Dr. R. D. McLaurin E. L. Winn 

R. C. Lindblad F. A. McLaughlin 

C. R. Webb F. A. Prouty 

J. E. Dudley, Jr. R. W. Piper 

H. W. Blaney G. P. Nickerson 




iHaaaarliuB^tts Agnmltural Colbg^ 



Maroon and White 



A^ass! Mass Massachusetts! 
Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! 
Mass'chusetts 



FT 






■ 




H 




1 


*" 


^SUl 




l^^jnH 




1 


- 


- 


'iiSiplfl 


wBSmSmx^ 












' 



Clark (^nM Battalion %mUY 

mdh i'taff 

R. S. Eddy . . . . . . . . . . Major 

E. H. Turner ....... Captain and Adjutant 

G. W. Paulsen .... First Lieutenant and Ordnance Officer 

D. E. Bailey ..... First Lieutenant and Quartermaster 

A. P. BuRSLEY ........ Sergeant Major 

H. H. Howe ....... Quartermaster Sergeant 

P. W. PiCKARD ........ Color Sergeant 

H. J. Baker ......... Color Sergeant 



(Unmpanij ©ffirtra 



Company A 

H. A. Brooks 
L. S. Dickinson 
W. C. Johnson 
A. H. Sharpe 
H. F. Willard 
E. L Warren 
E. N. Davis 
R. H. Armstrong 

L. S. Caldwell 

Q. S. Lowry 

H. L. Holland 

R. R. Parker 

D. G. Tower 

H. J. Stack 

W. J. Birdsall 



Company B 

F. T. Haynes 

L. G. Schermerh'n 

L. S. McLaine 

L C. Gilgore 

F. A. McLaughlin 

G. P. Nickerson 
C. A. Smith 

H. W. Blaney 

W. E. Philbrick 
H. C. Walker 
T. J. Moreau 
A. F. Kingsbury 
J. E. Pierpont 
E. N. Boland 
L. E. Fagerstrom 



Company C 

H. W. French 

F. L. Thomas 
O. V. T. Urban 
S. R. Parsons 
W. F. Henry 

L. O. Stevenson 

H. B. Morse 

H. A. Pauly 

R. C. Barrows 

G. W. Ells 

J. J. Fitzgerald 
E. B. Young 
R. G. Southwick 
C. Peckham 
E. S. C. Daniel 
J. A. Harlow 



Company D 

L. C. Brown 
W. R. Clarke 
J. C. Folsom 
E. A. Larrabee 
G. A. Labouteley 
J. E. Dudley 
P. A. Racicot 
N. H. Hill 

M. C. Pratt 

E. I. Shaw 

A. W. Lamson 

F. A. Castle 
R. M. Gibbs 
E. I. Wilde 

R. N. Hallowell 



Captain 

First Lieutenant 

Second Lieutenar, 

First Sergeant 

Sergeant 

Sergeant 

Sergeant 

Sergeant 

Sergeant 

Corporal 

Corporal 

Corporal 

Corporal 

Corporal 

Corporal 

Corporal 



140 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



AgnruUural Hnrattous 




UR last catalogue states in its introductory paragraphs, that 
"The chief purpose of the college is to prepare men and 
women for the agricultural vocations." This is a very im- 
portant statement. Periodically, colleges are obliged to 
justify themselves to their students and to the public, not 
merely for their existence, but for their real task. In any college that is to 
be permanently successful,there must be some central idea, some dominant 
purpose, that shall work itself out in the administrative organization, in the 
curriculum, in the studies and researches of the professors, and that must 
pervade the atmosphere of the institution. 

In stating that the central idea of this college is to prepare men and 
women for the agricultural vocations, some explanations must be made, lest 
we be misunderstood. The catalog goes on to say that "In this statement, 
the term 'agricultural' is used in the broadest sense." It also says that the 
course is admirably fitted for training men for any pursuit in which the 
sciences are an essential preparation, and that, "Still other students find the 
course a splendid general education, without regard to future occupation." 
!t also must be understood that no college, and particularly no state-supported 
college, can fulfil its obligation to society, unless it definitely trains its students 
to realize their duties as citizens, and inspires them for some form of leader- 
ship in helping solve the problems of democracy. Nor can any educational 
institution long justify its existence, unless it takes definite measures to main- 
tain enterprises that minister directly to the personal development of students 
as men and women, unless it encourages and leads the students to lay such 
foundations for successful living as will result in physical health, intellectual 
strength, personal culture, and moral power. 

Thus a college like ours has a peculiar task. Its avowed purpose it to 
prepare men and women for the agricultural vocations, the callings by which 
they are to make a living. But it must also prepare for citizenship and for 
life. 

Doubtless there are some who think that this announced purpose is too 
narrow, but I am convinced that if we can fulfil this mission properly, we 
will have before us a task that will strain our powers to the utmost. Many 
forces are contributing to a vast movement for the development of both 
scientific agriculture and the reconstruction of life under rural conditions; 
and the colleges of agriculture will indeed be fortunate if they shall be able 
to keep up with these purposes, to say nothing about taking leadership in them. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE Hj^ 

It is to be noted also that the term "agricultural vocations" means some- 
thing far different tlian the term "farming." With the rise of the agricultural 
colleges, and the development of this movement for scientific agriculture and 
renewed country life, entirely new vocations have come into existence which 
have to do with some phase or another of this great movement. So that the 
agricultural colleges have the work of not only preparing students for prac- 
tical agriculture, and for teaching and research, but for entirely new vocations, 
or at least for vocations followed in an entirely new spirit. 

I think of at least five classes of agricultural vocations, for which an 
agricultural college may attempt to train men and women. 

1. Independent farming. This would include all of those branches of 
agriculture and horticulture that have to do with the growing of plants and 
animals for human use. There is no doubt but the opportunities for college 
men in this field are developing very rapidly. 

2. Vocations connected with agriculture, where expert service is needed 
b}^ some large enterprise, governmental or private, such as the Forestry Ser- 
vice or the superintendency of a large estate. 

3. Research and teaching along- agricultural lines. The demand for 
men here is much beyond the supph', and the development of agricultural 
high schools is creating a still further demand. 

4. Positions in general enterprises more or less dependent upon agri- 
culture, where men with agricultural training are needed for technical and 
managerial work, such as the canning industries, the fertilizer business etc. 

5. A series of vocations which are really agricultural in their nature, 
requiring agricultural training, and in which too, there are developed leaders 
in social service, such as teachers in rural communities, rural librarians, rural 
Y. M. C. A. secretaries, and country clergymen. 

I should like, if there were space in this article, to describe the oppor- 
tunities in these different classes of vocations, but perhaps I have said enough 
to indicate that in definitely holding up as the purpose of this college prepara- 
tion for the agricultural vocations, we have given the institution a broad 
scope. 

I have no hesitation whatever in saying to young men and women who 
have the ability, and who like the subjects of study that underlie preparation 
for the various agricultural vocations, that in no field of human endeavor 
are there greater possibilities, and in no field is the demand for strong, alert 
people more sure of substantial reward. 



^ 



(CI , 




142 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 143 




N^hi lining^ ImlJitttg 

f^^? HE building now being erected for the Departments of Zoology 
^^ and Entomology is located just north and a little east of the 
"^ Insectary. Its front is one hundred and twenty-six feet in 
length, and its north and south wings are one hundred and 
five feet. It will have two stories, a basement and an attic. 
Mineralogy, Geology, Insecticide analysis, a pump-room and the lower part 
of the large lecture room, will occupy the basement. On the first floor will 
be the Zoological laboratory, the upper part of the large lecture room, the 
lower floor of the Zoological Museum, the Insectary of the Experiment Sta- 
tion, and several oflrces and supply rooms. On the second floor will be the 
Entomological laboratories for seniors and graduate students, the insect col- 
lection, the library of the departments, the gallery of the Museum, a small 
lecture room and a room for advanced Zoology. In the attic will be rooms 
for photography, and for the janitor. The present Insectary greenhouse 
will be moved so as to connect with the Insectary portion of the building. 

The building, which is to be fireproof, will cost about $80,000, and is 
being erected by the Allen Brothers of Amherst. C. P. Hoyt of Boston is 
the architect. It is hoped that it may be ready for use by the beginning of the 
next college year. 



144 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



GROWTH ol the COLLEGE 
from l6(JJto /f^^ 



'9 7 ^ 'f<s:^f 

s/jo,ooo 
I Z 0,0 00 
n 0,000 
100,000 

q 0.000 

60,00 

J 0.000. 

bO.OOQ 



Total Income 

'00 '0/ OZ '0-5 '04 'OS 06 '0 7 '06 'Of 




Total Va/uation of Buiidinqs and Colleae Proper tu 

'(jj 'f& 'qCj 00 '01 '01 'Oi 04 'OS Od 'OJ '06 'Of 



qo 0,000. 

600,000. 
JOO.OOO. 

600,000 

600,000 
400,000 
J 00,000 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



145 



Instructors 



,-^0 


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'q(? 


'00 


■01 


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'03 


'04 


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Total Students 



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160 


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100 


^--' 




















H^H 






FRENCH HALL 

WITH NEW OURFEE PLANT HOUSES 

ERECTED 1909 



148 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



©rtbulattottfi attb a^numpljs 



In the spring of the year nineteen hundred and eight, 

The Sophomores thought they would settle our fate, 
So they schemed to compel us our banquet to hold, 

While they kept in bondage, our president bold. 
Then on April eighteenth, as the sun sank from sight, 

They carried our Jimmie far into the night, 
Then they posted the challenge, in which they declared 

That to pull rope next day we must all be prepared. 

As it chanced, the next day on a holiday fell. 

So eleven rushed off to the Senate pell-mell. 
There, but small was the comfort the poor Freshmen got. 

For the grave Seniors said, "You have vexed us enough. 
And the only thing possible which we can do 

Is to say that neither one of the two, 
That is, rope-pull or banquet, shall be carried through. 

Before midnight of the fourth day to ensue." 

At this, secretly pleased, the sly Sophomores, next day, 

Nailed up a new challenge for a rope-pulling fray. 
And now in sad quandary, the poor Freshmen lay. 

For if this new challenge was not soon accepted 
The rope-pull to ten would be given, 'twas expected. 

And if, at the same time, we wished to accept it. 
We must in three days pull off our class banquet ; 

Which without our Jimmie, 'tis sad to relate 
Would have been a sad failure, were it not for kind fate. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE [49 

But as chance would ordain it, soon it was found out 

That Jimmie, bound captive, was held without doubt. 
At the house of a clergyman, father of he 

Who throughout the college was known as Tubbie. 
So, gathering up all the Freshmen at large. 

We prepared, on the stairs, to advance at full charge ; 
But alas and alack, how men's plans go astray, 

For the dominie stood in his own doorway. 
And demanded of those who were standing about 

What this smashing of windows and doors was about. 
Then sad, disappointed, we went on our way, 

Vowing vengeance we'd take on the very next day. 

In the contest next day, it was merely child's play 
To take feet of rope from those Sophomores away ; 

And then ere the smoke from our pipes had died down. 
We started in haste for the river-side town. 

Where our scouts had assured us the captive was hid, 
Since from Amherst away he had been spirited. 

Through the long, weary night our search was in vain. 

Until as the sun o'er the hills rose again 
Our outposts declared that our quest had been seen ; 

For, as Ostro against the boat-house door leaned 
The door was opened, then slammed with a sound. 

Disclosing the fear that the captive was found. 
The news of his whereabouts instantly spread 

By Marathon runners, of which you have read, 
To La France, Massasoit, and then Marble Hall, 

Summoning classmates. Juniors and all. 



150 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 

Back over from Holyoke, we went with a speed 
That only mates give when a friend is in need 

If the banquet's success is the price at stake. 
On arriving a summons we then did make, 

And assured by force the captive we'd take 
If instantly he was not surrendered up. 

And yet, they desired to hold him, but stay, 
A log up the bank of the stream found its way. 

At the point of the ram, soon the Sophomores found 
That they had little chance with the Freshmen 'round 

So, deeming discretion the .best part of valor, 
They loosened the captive, on whose face a pallor 

Bore witness to days in anxiety spent 
While he in the Sophomores' camp had been pent. 

What a shout rent the air as he stepped forth again ! 

Free in the midst of eleven's bold men. 
With feelings relieved, hearts joyous and gay. 

We turned then to face what the new dawning day 
Might for us have in store. To Holyoke first. 

We went with intent to quench hunger and thirst. 
This having accomplished, we took the first train 

To the city of Hartford, far down on the plain. 

The morning was spent in the city's broad lanes 

And watching for all of the southern bound trains. 
Rose gardens, capitol, theatre and all 

Claimed attention, until the night shades 'gan to fall. 
To a right royal banquet we sat down together, 

And after the banquet was cleared from the board. 
At the toasts and the wit we all of us roared. 

But the happiest thought of this glad, joyous meal 
Was — How do you think those d Sophomores feel ? 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLI,EGE 



151 



Olampus iErl|0?0 



Billy: "Adams, have you got that example?" 

Adams: "No, sir, I don't know how to do it." 
Billy : "Armstrong, have you ?" 

Armstrong : "No sir, I don't understand it." 
Billy : "Damon ?" 

Damon : "I lost my book." 
Billy: "Yes, I forgot you did. Well, Davis, how about you?" 

Davis : "I forgot all about the problem." 
Billy: "AND THEY ALL WITH ONE ACCORD BEGAN TO MAKE 

EXCUSE." 



Advice to physically disabled students : Put your foot through the window 
and the pane will be gone. 



The Kid: When the bell rings the time is up "ex officio.' 



GiLGORE : "Only fools are certain, wise men hesitate." 
Bentley: "Are you sure?" 
Gilgore: "Yes, positive." 



5.B.H. 



%^ J., . ^a 



U/eU, w\iyj so' 



152 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 

Short Horn to Kid Howard: "Are you one of the fellows taking the short 
winter course ?" 

Bl^ney 
Wi^n 
R^cicot 
AIL en 

ProutY 
Smi^h 

BurSley 
|i^ owe 

D^mon 
ShaRpe 
OstrolenJ^ 

Pardons 

Pea green Freshman to Vint: "You better take those corduroys off or the 
Sophs will get wise." 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



153 




M 



M 



R 



154 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



A couple of fellows for fun 
Went out for the cross-country run ; 
A respectable horse 
Was scared from his course, 
And that's what the cross-country done 



^nAa-r>'te 



G.N.H. 



r j j i J 



-^ 



« # 



Tkjit ur'xW ao, rni^ter Barrov\/5 



Sergeant Warren : "When I say 'halt,' place the foot on the ground beside 
the one in the air, and remain motionless." 



QII|? iams OIlub 

I. W. Davis President 

I. G. Davis Vice-President 

E.N.Davis Treasurer 

E.M.Davis Secretary 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



155 



Willard: "How long will these bushes live?" 
Prof. White : "Oh, till the next generation." 
Willard: Oh, that won't be long." 
Prof. White : "I guess not, at the rate you're going." 

A. P. Burs Ley 
H. W. BlAney 
G. A. NielsoN 

C. M. Damon 

A. H. Sharpe 

R. ^ Robinson 

G. C. H/\wkins 

F. A. prouty 

E M. Brown 

Johnson: "Did you hear about the explosion this morning?" 
Adams: "No; why, what was it?" 

Johnson : "Gordon talked so fast and used such big words that the windows 
blew out." 




156 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



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MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 157 



Hampshire Agricultural Society 



OF THE y^^:^^***^ 

Massachusetts Agricultural College 
SEPTEMBER 21. 1909 



H. A. PARSONS, Pres. U. G. GROFF, Secy. 

Squirt Neal has a system, they say, 
He revises it three times a day. 

For all crazy notions 

And useless commotions. 
There's none can meet him half-way. 

Johnson : "Skip, got a match ?" 
Smith : "No, I'm matchless." 

We were studying once how to cut up a cow, 

To get the best slices of meat, 
And Gribben, of course, was telling us how, 

And the parts that are finest to eat. 

He was telling about a fine Porterhouse steak 
He had eaten in days gone before. 

But he saw by our faces our hearts might break. 
And he stopped, ere he said any more. 

"I am sorry I spoke of it, boys," he said, 

"I know that I ought to beware. 
And not even mention a Porterhouse steak 

When you live on real Hash-house fare." 



158 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



During Sophomore Chem. final : : 

Kid (To Sharpe) : "Those tables are all in your book." 

Sharpe {zvhose book is on the radiator) : "Yes, but I can't reach it." 

Kid (calling the roll) : "Jenks, Jenks." 

Labouteley : "He's got the chicken-pox." 

Kid (confidentially) : "Do you know, I remember having them when a boy. 
One morning my mother told me that I had chicken-pox, and I, being inquisitive 
to see what they were like, pulled up my night shirt, looking for the feathers." 

Billy: "If this keeps up, gentlemen, I'll have enough goose-eggs to set a 
hen every night." 





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How much can Has-brouck? 

Not so much as Lock-wood. 

Where has Grib-ben ? 

Across the Foord as far as Daddy Mills. 



R. G. SwiTii: "Well, that's what it says in Alexander Smith's chemistry. 
Billy: "That's Smith's chemistry, all right." 



Blokie's interest in football is evidenced by his becoming so enthusiastic 
in a mass meeting that he walks around with his crutch in the wrong hand. 





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160 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



HaSkell 

W. p B. Lockwood 
NEal 
MacKimmi £ 
Howar Q 

pernald 
Gr I bben 
Reynolds 
Du 1^ can 
FoorQ 
OSmun 



Billy : "You can't get it by putting it under your pillow ; it don't soak up 
that way, nor you can't get it by sitting on it; it don't soak up THAT way either." 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



161 



AMHERST. 



LION HUNT IN PROGHESS. 



Kins of Beasts Reported to Have Es-. 
tablished a Lair in the Hickey AVoods. 

There was great excitement and consid- 
erable fear in North Hadley and the ad- 
joining part of Amherst yesterday over the 
report that a huge lion was stalking about. 
Men armed with rifles, shotguns, pitch- 
forks, crowbars, axes and other imple- 
ments of warfare hunted in vain all day 
for the creature. The animal was first 
seen by Michael Gekonski. a bright Pole, 
who has been in this country some 20 
years a^d been to many circuses, and he 
swears that it is nothing less than a huge 
bull lion. He was coming through the 
Hickey woods just west of the Massachu- 
setts agricultural college, when he saw 
the creature lying across its lair. He de- 
scribes it as being five feet long, with a 
shaggy head as big as a bushel basket 
and with a long tail with a big tuft of 
hair on the end. 

He backed away as rapidly as possible 
until out of sight and then ran for dear 
life. He was so thoroughly frightened that 
he was unable to leave the house yester- 
day. The hunters found the den. which is 
said to be about six feet deep, five feet in 
diameter and 20 feet long. Many are skep- 
tical of the whole story, but those who 
have seen the hole, including such men as 
Thomas Hickey, the well-known tobacco 
grower, are at least satisfied that; there 
has been some big wild animal there, and 
others who know Mr Gekonski say that 
he is not a man likely to be so badly 
frightened at nothing. 



162 



THE 19U INDEX VOLUME XLI 



Kid (to R. G. Smith): "You have mercurous ; now mercurous and mercuric 
are just as different as C. A. and R. G." 

"Quick, quick, bring some water, the hen-house is on fire and the hens are 
so excited they are running about laying fried eggs." 

pickard 
BUrsley 
Qrown 
BL^ney 
Dav|is 
Stevengon 
S H arpe 
BakEr 

Racicot 
ParQons 

At inspection Armstrong stands with feet apart. 
Inspector: "What is your position as a soldier?" 
Armstrong: "Oh! I'm a corporal." 

A microscope they took to Chem, 
And when, perplexed, we questioned them, 
They said, "Why you poor stupid folks 
To see the point in Howard's jokes." 



\i r r 



SF.H, 



c 



limes y^P' 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



163 



LOGIC ACCORDING TO R. G. SMITH 
Smith : "All donkeys have ears. 
This man has ears, 
Therefore this man is a donkey." 

MacKimmie: "Why, Smith, any fool can see that is not true.' 
Billy: "Do you know anything about this, Armstrong?" 
Armstrong: "Not much." 
Billy : "Well, I suppose so, go ahead." 

I sipped the honey from her Hps 
As under the pale moon's ray we sat 
And wondered if ever man before 
Had drunk from a mug like that. 

McGraw (In Light) : "They go but they don't arrive." 



1 


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164 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



Attraction varies directly or inversely as the square of the distance. 

Interesting special case of equilibrium — the couple. 

Lever — at 10 P. M. 

Torque — hot air. 

Negative acceleration — due to chaperone. 

Dyne — only at Boyden's. 

= phase (d) 

I prom 

The tide (tied) — unfortunate. 

Lift pumps — naughty! naughty! 

Block — the chaperone, and tackle — the girl. 

Unit charge — six cents. 

Foot-pound — applied at 10 P. M. 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 165 




©I|0 Olalkg? %x\hn 1912 iHauag^m^ut 



AS there ever, in the history of our Alma Mater, a class equal 
to that of 1912? Never! The unstained record of our Fresh- 
man year will go down into the future as a glowing example 
of success. In all our contests with the Sophomores, we 
suffered never a defeat. Football they played well and hard — 
but they did not beat us. They contested the tug-of-war heroically — but they 
were pulled through the pond. The six-man rope-pull led them to do their 
best — ^yet they lost three and one-half feet of rope, and with it the six-man 
pull. Basketball they lost, eighteen to nine. They succeeded, to be sure, in 
kidnapping one or two of our class officers. But poor old 191 1! Their 
prisoners were taken from them at the moment of victory. At the hour when 
they had expected to be gloating over a despairing and bancjuetless class, the 
impertinent Freshmen were hilariously about the board. 

In athletics 19 12 was among the foremost. The college football eleven, 
the basketball team, the hockey squad, the baseball nine — we were well rep- 
resented in all. Not more than three college games were played in which at 
least one '12 man did not take part. Moreover, we had some good track men 
and it was one of our men who received the highest honors in the cross- 
country run. 

Our scholastic work, too, won us renown. Literary men, debaters, 
orators, mathematicians, scientists, philosophers, flourished among us. We 
were so industrious, and we learned so much — of some things — that one of 
our most learned professors has gone to Yale in order to find something more 
to teach us. We should have enjoyed taking you into one of our classes — 
Economic History, for example, that you might get a glimpse of our diligence 
and love of study. 



166 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 

• Nor was the social side of our life neglected. Better fussers never 
entered the social whirl of M. A. C. Some members of the class, indeed, 
went to excess, at least in their attendance upon Sophomore functions. And 
in justice we must say that, although their hosts met them more than half- 
way and gave them a very, very warm reception, yet our men for days there- 
after showed a painful sense of soreness. Our reception to 1913 is quite 
different ; we are treating them in the very best way we know how. We trust 
that they appreciate our efforts and will help us to maintain the good feeling 
which exists between us. 

Now we are Sophomores — 91 of us. The second quarter of our brilliant 
career was begun by pulling thirty-one feet of rope away from the Freshman 
class in the six-man rope-pull. It is true they won the tug-of-war across the 
pond, but they can never reach the heights that we have climbed. Hov^^ever, 
we wish them well. 

In a few words: the class of '12 has helped to make a "bigger, better, 
busier" M. A. C. — bigger, because of our numbers ; better, because of our 
presence; and busier, because to compare favorably with us, other classes 
have to hustle. 

A LAST YEAR'S FRESHMAN 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



167 





168 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



IForm^r iEemh^rB of 19X1 



"When musing on companions gone 
We doubly feel ourselves alone." 



John Becker 
Wihiam H. Bliss 
Irving C. Brown 
James G. Chadbourne 
William H. Coash 
Chester E. Coles 
Ernest L. Daniels 
James A. Davey 
Raymond A. Denslow 
Edward Fitzgerald 
George H. Grey 
Clarence A. Gunn 
Charles P. Hammond 
Henry Harrington 
William F. Hennessey 
Chen Hua Huang 
Herbert F. Hyatt 



Ying Chi Liang 
Walter M. Loker 
Philip S. McGann 
Rupert S. McNayr 
Charles E. Merrill 
George B. Merrill 
Chester Moody 
Clyde M. Packard 
William R. Phipps 
Gordon H. Robb 
Joseph Rosenbaum 
Frank J. Schmitz 
Howard Spencer 
George A. Tilton 
Ralph E. Wheeler 
E. Carl Whittaker 
Donnell B. Young 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



169 



X9XI ilntot^uaUit 



JAMES FOWLER ADAMS 

It was for "Our Jim" that the whole class paraded 
the streets of South Hadley Falls and a large number 
of those of Holyoke, on the memorable night and morn- 
ing of April 21 and 22, 1908, and great was the rejoicing 
when Jim, cold, hungry, and sleepy, was taken from 
the guardian Sophomores at 4.20 Wednesday A. M. 
Jim soon recovered from the effects of his night in 
the boat-house and led us in triumph to Hartford. 
Beside this adventure, to secure his name a place in 
our halls of fame, Jim played Class Football, Varsity 
Hockey, is Assistant Manager Football, a member of 
the Fraternity Conference, Band and Glee Club. Jim, 
with all his varied duties, is a very busy man and 
withal a studious one, as should be a man who was 
born in the cultured city of Boston. Jim or "Jimsie," 
as he is known by some, has been very much alive 
since March 5, 1888, and after showing the boys of 
Melrose High a few pointers in various respects, came 
to old M. A. C as a member of 1911. Jim is a member 
of Q. T. v., and is taking Forestry. 



PARK WEST ALLEN 

This sturdy young New England's melodious voici 
first reached G Flat on March 12, 1889, near West 
field. After a few quiet years on the farm he enterec 
Westfield High School, where he developed into a 
great fusser as well as a scholar. It was here that hu 
adopted the motto, "Use thy neighbor as thyself," lo 
which he has been faithful ever since. Stimulated by 
his success at High School, Park ventured higher and 
entered M. A. C. with 191 1. Here he has answered 
many callings and is "Jack of all trades." Early in his 
career he was seen in the college choir, later on leading 
the Glee Club. He has also had the responsibilities of 
Class Secretary and Treasurer and is Assistant Business 
Manager of the Signal, also an active member of the 
Married Men's Club. Allen is a member of the Senate 
and blows himself in the band when not "physically 
disabled." His early desire was to be a pomologist, 
but after a summer of practical horticulture, spent in 
Connecticut, he decided there was "no place like home" 
and has therefore elected Math, fitting himself for a 
partner in Allen and Son. Park is a member of ■* S K. 




170 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 




RALPH HENRY ARMSTRONG 

Our "Monk" first attracted attention in Nashua, 
N. H., May 31, 1S89. But not being satisfied with 
the atmospheric conditions of the Granite State, he 
journeyed to Holyoke via Lowell and Taunton, stop- 
ping just "long enough at the last-named place to take 
a peep at the "fair ones" as they went by. Now while 
we all realize that Monk is somewhat of a fusser and 
rough-houses his landlady once in a while, we could 
not possibly get along without seeing his smiling coun- 
tenance. Among his many achievements we find that 
he has played on the Class Baseball and Basketball 
teams. Annie has elected Forestry. 




HERBERT JONATHAN BAKER 

This is "Bill Bryan" of the mighty mind and 
mightier gab, but New England cannot claim this in- 
tellectual wonder, for he was born in 1SS5, in Selby- 
ville, Del. After assimilating all the knowledge of 
that vicinity and spending some time imparting it to 
others, he decided to come north and learn something. 
To be morally fortified against college temptations, he 
attended Mount Hermon before entering with 191 1. 
And until his second summer he did not fall, but the 
fair summer school dames were even too much for his 
"amour" plate. Bill's even disposition is seldom stirred 
from its lethargy, but when his "righteous anger" is 
aroused he makes the occasion so momentous that "Al" 
tabulates his profane phrases on the wall. "Bake's" 
ability to argue, besides getting him "by," has made 
him President of the Debating Club. He was on the 
Burhham Eight and is also Assistant Manager of the 
Index. He says he will elect Botany and Pomology, 
but he should be classed with those "wheats" that live 
up in East Entry of North. "Bake" is a K E and if 
hard work will cause him to "get there" he will be 
waiting when you arrive. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



171 



. RAYMOND CORBIN BARROWS 

The meek, demure voice of "Barry" was first 
heard in Providence, on March 8, 1889. We are told 
that Raj'niond spent his school days as all well-behaved 
boys should and finally graduated from the Stamford 
High School. Raymond debated the question of his 
future education long and hard, but at last decided 
that M. A. C. was the proper place for him. So today 
we find him a classmate of gocd old '11. Raymond has 
achieved some success in athletics, being our Class 
Track Captain, and playing on the Sophomore Baseball 
and Basketball teams. But "Barry's" principal achieve- 
ment is the gentle art of "fussing." On pleasant 
Sundays one may see him making tracks toward the 
regions "over the river" with his "wife" Pickard. Ray- 
mond has elected wheat and is a member of Q. T. V. 




THOMAS WEBSTER BEAN 

Here lies the body of Thomas Bean, 

Beneath the daisies and the green. 

Bean is not here, only the pod, 

Bean has shelled out and gone home to God. 

On the day of November 25, 18S8, to the post- 
master of South Hadley Falls there came a small 
package, and they named it Thomas Webster Bean. 
Owing to good fortune and political influence Tom 
emerged from South Hadley Falls High School after 
occupying every office possible, except janitor. By this 
time he had expanded every way but longitudinallj'. 
Tom entered old M. A. C. with '09, but went back 
home to grow, and as a method of accomplishing this, 
he took to reaching for the cord to pull in fares on the 
electric cars. Having saved up enough money to bu3' 
a street car line, he decided to enter with 191 1. On 
arriving at M. A. C. Tom immediately showed the train- 
ing he had received at High School by making third 
base on the Varsity nine. His fielding average is 
better on some "balls" than on others. "Joe" spends 
most of his time with the books ( ?) but he devotes a 
few spare moments to fussing and caressing his old 
clay pipe. Besides playing Varsity Baseball, "Beany" 
assisted 191 1 by playing Class Baseball. He is a 
member of C. S. C, and "Ski Hi." Tom will elect 
Forestry. 




172 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 




ARNOLD GORDON BENTLEY 

Over the river they're beckoning to me. 
Loved ones who've gone afar. 

Born May i6, 1889, at Truro, Nova Scotia, we 
next hear of this clammy bacteriaceae in the town of 
Hyde Park, Massachusetts, where he graduated from 
High School in the good old year of 1907. Next, he 
found his way to M. A. C. and at once made his pres- 
ence felt. He has always been popular, as is well shown 
by the honors which he has received. He has been 
Manager of the Rope-pull team and has played on our 
Class Baseball and Varsity Hockey teams. "Bent" is 
a jolly, good fellow and is always ready to give advice. 
Whenever any discussion is going on, he is always on 
hand with a characteristic opinion. Moreover, he is 
a charter member of the BuUers Club and has an 
earnest desire to become major of the Battalion about 
1925 A. D. He is a member of Q. T. V and has 
elected Chemistry. 




HERBERT WARDWELL BLANEY 

On a still and calm day, December 14, 1889, a 
stately boat sailed into Swampscott Harbor, dropped 
anchor off Blaney's rocks and landed Herbert. He 
was immediately tied to his mother's apron-strings, 
and was not released until he entered Swampscott High 
School. Here "Herb" started the independence which 
he has carried with him to M. A. C. Although unable 
to take part in any form of athletics, he has become 
prominent in other affairs of college life and has 
fulfilled his ardent desire to do something for the 
college. During his Freshman and Sophomore years 
he managed his class Baseball team, and since, has 
grown into Uass President, a member of the Senate, 
Fraternity Conference, Signal Board, was one of the 
Burnham Eight, and is Business Manager of the 191 ' 
Inde.v. Although his Index duties have taken most of 
his time, his religious duties are not entirely neglected, 
for he occasionally attends vespers "over the moun- 
tain." Herbert being good at pulling strings, succeeded 
in landing the "Tower" room, and on account of this 
faculty, he roped in "Johnny O." and Prof. Waugh, 
and will major in Math and Landscape. In spite of 
this last fact he is a good student, a worthy classmate 
and friend, and has the best wishes of the class for 
his future success. He is a member of C. S. C. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



173 



EDGAR MORTON BROWN 

This small ciliate was first formed in Granville, 
Mass., October 4, 1889. As the flagella began to de- 
velope we find Brownie first in Stamford, Conn., 
then in Sound Beach, later in Springfield, and finally 
in West Springfield. Here he assumed a resting stage 
long enough to graduate from the West Springfield 
High School in the class of 1907. His next move was 
to enter M. A. C. with 191 1. Here he has had an 
easy time with the faculty as is shown by the fact that 
he found time to manage the Sophomore class football 
team and to play class baseball. Besides, he is on the 
Signal and Index boards. Some claim that Browni'- 
has a tendency towards fussing but no marked symp- 
toms have been noticed as yet. "Little" Brown is a 
member of Theta Phi and has elected Landscape. 




ARTHUR JAMES BURNHAM 

This youth first tripped the light fantastic on the 
eleventh day of November in the year of Our Lord 
1889. Racking their brains to find some name suitable 
to this squalling youngster, they finally called it Arthur 
James Burnham. The boys call him ''Art' or "Marie" 
for short. After graduating from IlDlyoke High School 
he finally made his debut at M. A. C. Before he 
entered college he was a quiet and likeable youngster, 
but since he entered here he has Ijecome a finished 
wind-jammer. Owing to his many trips to "Hanip" he 
is mistaken by many people as a lireclor of llie Conn. 
Valley St. R. R. Co. He has a very striking fondness 
for blondes and is a great fusser, and between that 
and his studies we see very little of aim. During the 
summer months you will see "Art" juggling grain bags 
in his father's grain store in Holyoke. Usually you 
will see him holding down the only cushioned chair in 
the store, talking to some fair young maiden. "Art" 
is an all round good fellow and is studying the pros 
and cons of Horticulture. He succeeded in making 
a good showing on the class baseball team. He is a 
member of the C. S. C. and one of the "Ski Hi" bunch. 




174 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 




ALLYN PARKER BURSLEY 

In all the history of the progress of the world we 
find only one steamboat more famous than our own 
"Steamer" Bursley. Except for Robert Fulton's Cler- 
mont, the fame and renown of our own "Steamer" ex- 
ceeds by far that of any steam-propelled craft known 
to mankind, including the great Lusitania and her 
sister ship, the Mauretania. Our "Steamer" was 
launched January 7, 1S91, in that little "down-on-the- 
Cape" town of West Barnstable. It is needless to 
add that when launched he was christened with "Old 
Cape Cranberry Juice." For his maiden trip, "Steam- 
er" sailed through Tabor Academy. This trip showed 
him to be seaworthy and his next trip was to M. A. C. 
Since arriving at that harbor "Steamer" has taken 
part in many student activities, being College Senator, 
Class Historian, Member of Index Board, playing class 
football and basketball and taking first prize in the 
Burnham Eight. "Steamer" is a member of 6* and is 
taking Math and Landscape. 




ARTHUR THEODORE CONANT 

Did any good thing ever come from North Lev- 
erett? Yes; July 11, 1887, Arthur Theodore Conant 
originated there, but at the early age of two, becoming 
weary of his monotonous surroundings, he migrated 
to North Hadley. He soon became possessed of a 
desire for more knowledge, and as a result, graduated 
from Hopkins Academy and proceeded to enter Am- 
herst College. Fearing, however, that he might not 
find the "Willies" very congenial, he chose M. A. C. 
as his Alma Mater. Pomology is his specialty along 
with Dairying and Agriculture, for some day he_ hopes 
to show us a thing or two about farming. He is that 
quiet, industrious sort of a chap whom everyone likes, 
even the girls, although he seldom fusses. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



175 



CHARLES MURRAY DAMON 

The 25th day of April, 1889, was a fortunate day 
for M. A. C, for on that day was born C. M. Damon, 
who makes the weather for us. He is fortunate to have 
this work, for he thereby gets out of chapel attendance. 
Damon has always lived on a farm in Haydenville, 
Mass. But after graduating from Northampton High 
School he came to M. A. C. to study to be, not a 
farmer, but a civil engineer. His life here has been 
rather fast for a quiet man. During his Freshman 
year he was Captain of our winning Rope-pull team. 
The next year he was also Captain of the Rope-pull 
team and Class Captain. From the way in which he 
has served us in these lines we can but predict for him 
good success if he only can keep well. Just at present 
he is in bad condition, not being able to drill. "Dame" 
is a member of C. S. C. 




EGBERT NORTON DAVIS 

It was on the 26th day of the little month of 
February, in 1890, that a great event happened at 
Natick, Mass. This event was the birth of fair-haired 
Egbert Norton, otherwise known to us as "Goldie," 
"Beetle," etc. Goldie spent his school days in Natick, 
graduating from Natick High in 1907. He came 
to M. A. C. to fit himself to show the world how 
to grow fruits and garden truck. Beetle worked 
along practical lines last summer. He is an aspirant 
to the Married Men's Club, and is a sergeant in the 
Clark Cadet Battalion. 




176 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 




IRVING WILDER DAVIS 

This interesting and unique member of the Davis 
Club first put in his appearance at Lowell, Mass., 
November 19, 1889. He is a genealogist and recently 
was taken for George Washington, an ancestor whom 
he closely resembles. Irving, after fooling the Lowell 
High School into giving him a resignation, followed 
his brother to old Mass'chusetts. He knew that the 
odd classes are the better, so '11 was his choice. "Dave" 
is a loyal classmate and a staunch friend. As a Fresh- 
man he was Vice-President. He is a remarkable mu- 
sician, too, for he can play the drum to "beat the 
band." L W. stands in with the faculty, especially 
"Billy" and "Jocko." Dr. Fernald has given "Shine" 
the responsible position of head bug nurse. You can 
always find him anywhere on Pleasant Street making 
all the new-comers feel at home. "Dave" is a good 
beefer, having been on the Burnham Eight. "Tude" 
nas the misfortune of being an editor of this book, is a 
K S, and believing in courses that afford free feeds, he 
has elected Pomology. 




HAROLD BLAKE DRURY 

This wonder hails from the wondrous town of 
Athol. It hailed there for the first time on April 28, 
1888, and has been hailing all over the world ever 
since. Though nobody may know it, the fact is that 
Harold is the most extensive fusser in the class. His 
seductive charms are as alluring in Seattle, Washing- 
ton, as in Sinclair, N. J., or in New Haven, Conn., to 
say nothing of Boston, Orange, Athol, or over the 
river. Beat that ! tie it if you can ! H. B. learned 
the principles of fussing at the Athol High School, 
where he also obtained a sufficient knowledge of algebra 
to get a pull with "Billy." His favorite apparel con- 
sisting of a green necktie, yellow shirt, brown socks, 
red sweater and checkered trousers, would make 
"Joseph's coat of many colors" look like a funeral 
garb. He farms when he is not fussing, and has elected 
Horticulture and Market Gardening. He was a mem- 
ber of the Burnham Eight. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



177 



JOHN EDWARD DUDLEY, JR. 

John was first seen running through Wellesle\ 
Mass., on the 28th of August, 1886, and he has been 
running ever since, until now he thinks he is runnin, 
the college. Finding things rather slow here in the 
East, he went to the "wild and wooly West," but he 
didn't leave all his wildness out there. After spending 
thirteen years in Colorado, the longing for the East 
became too great, and "Dud" returned in time to 
graduate from Newton High School with the class of 
'07. After spending a year at Brown, but thinking 
that he was too good and that he knew too much, he 
came here and cast in his lot with 191 1. "Dud" has 
helped us considerably in athletics, showing his pace 
last winter at the B. A. A. He has worked well as 
a classmate, having been manager of Class Track, 
captain of Class Track, a member of the Sophomore 
Rope-pull team, and the Sophomore-Senior Prom com- 
mittee. "Dud" has elected Chemistry, and he is a 
member of Q. T. V. 




IRVING CRAIG GILGORE 

Twenty years ago on the 28th of January, this 
roving character was found in Schenectady. From there 
he wandered to Geneva, then to Utica, and finally 
back to Schenectady. Here the High School furnished 
hnn an education sufficient to enter Columbia. Before 
he had been long at this college he came to the con- 
clusion that his supposed talents as a lawyer were 
lacking. Next he started in with the I. C. S. Com- 
mercial course, but his tastes were not congenial with 
the gay white way and again he changed and came to 
M. A. C. Here he found a satisfactory environment, 
both as to studies and fellow-students. From the time 
he entered he has been a loyal classmate, sharing alike 
the pleasures and misfortunes of 191 1. Gilgore is 
specializing in Pomology. He is a member of Q. T. V. 




178 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 




WILLARD FRANCIS HENRY 

Hopedale ! Did yon ever hear of such a place? 
No ? Well, neither had any of us, until a little chicken 
came to us tied to Percy as a companion. Small, fair, 
light-haired ; yes, that is Willard Francis Henry. He 
was born at Milford, Mass. September 28, 1888. He 
didn't remain long in an unknown state, for as peeps 
to chickens grow, so "Chick" has come out into the 
world of college life. He is a mighty wielder of 
paddles and a destroyer of hearts. Under classmen 
can testify to the first, and upper classmen acknowledge 
that the second is his worst fault. Willard expects 
to engage in the jeweler's business and if not successful 
in that line of work he will follow up his election, 
greenhouse management. With such a partner as can 
be found on McClellan Street, we are sure he will be 
successful in his undertakings. "Chick" is a member 
of the Fraternity Conference and the Theta Phi 
fraternity. 




NATHANIEL HERBERT HILL 

According to the generally preconceived notion of 
the state of New Jersey, it is able to produce nothing 
but mosquitos, but here is the exception which proves 
the rule, we have a genuine New Jersey "Nat," not the 
common or garden variety of gnat, but Nat nevertheless. 
"By Jehoo" was discovered "over on the Jersey side" 
on March 23, 1S87, in the town of Glenmore, but at 
present his home is in Hopewell, N. J. Nat preped 
at Peddle Institute. His farm training gave him good 
muscle, which fitted him to be a member of our class 
Rope-pull team. He also twirled for the class Baseball 
team. He is specializing in Horticulture and after 
graduation he expects to go back to the Garden State 
and show them how to grow fruit. Nat belongs to 
* S K, and is a member of the Fraternity Conference. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



179 



HAROLD HOSMER HOWE 

This thick-set combination of three H's was first 
discovered March 29, 18S8, at Hartford, Conn. 
"Decker" soon moved his family to Springfield and in 
course of time was allowed to graduate from the Tech- 
nical High School with the class of '07. Believing in 
the luck of odd classes we next find him at "Aggie" 
with 191 1. "Fat's" melodious voice won hiiTi imme- 
diate favor with the Kid and consequently he sings in 
the choir. So skillfully has Fat manipulated the 
crutches that Bloke has given him a job in the office. 
Deck showed some tendency to fussing when he en- 
tered with us, but now he has advanced to President 
of the Fussers. Fat was Freshman Secretary and 
Treasurer; he was on the Burnham Eight. KS claims 
him as a member. He is using his gray matter on 
Mathematics. 




ALBERT ROSCOE JENKS 

Jenks floated into Three Rivers on November 13, 
1889, but no one seems to know which river brought 
him ; perhaps all three contributed a little. He went 
to Palmer High School, where he learned the art of 
fussing, and has never forgotten it. As the train went 
by his house to the Northwest every day, he became 
curious to see the world. So one day he hopped a 
freight and the brakeman kicked him off at Amherst. 
Ever since, he has stayed with 191 1 and continued to 
plug. "Yenks" has quite a head for Math and French, 
although he has never found it out himself ; his only 
serious fault is joking. He thought he had a pull with 
the Hort. Department, but his hopes were all shattered 
when his abnormal taste for grapes was discovered. 
The Trustees decided to save the Old Plant House to 
give him a home for another year. Jenks is our prac- 
tical and scientific market gardener, and is majoring 
in Pomology. 




180 



THE 1911 INDEX VOfcUME XLI 




LEONARD MATHEWS JOHNSON 

Hail ! King of Rough-housers. When Skip comes 
down the stairs singing "Then we'll rough-house Old 
Johnny," to the tune of "Boola-boola," John at once 
remarks somewhat after the following ; "You will, is 
it?" "Why so?" "There'll be no rough-house." And 
immediately the mixup starts. "John" with his husky 
left wing always holds his own with any number of 
men and even if he does get pounded never gets sore. 
Constantly good-natured, never letting anyone in his 
own room, or going into another room without trying 
to "start something," John still finds time to get to 
the books, to play tennis, and to make weekly visits to 
"The Girl He Left Behind" in his home town, East- 
hampton, and in as many other towns as possible 
without conflicts in the schedule. Johnny started his 
first rough-house in Easthanipton, Mass., December 
15, 1889, continued the same at Williston Seminary 
and is still doing business for the same firm. John 
has been Class Secretary and Treasurer, has played 
Class BasketbaUl and Varsity Tennis. Along with his 
course in "College Life" John takes Horticulture. 




GASTON EDWARD LABOUTELEY 

Gaston E. Labouteley was born in the little town 
of Lynn, June 10, 1SS8. After graduating from that 
institution of learning known as the Lynn English High 
School, Lab came to ivi. A. C, where he was allowed 
to registed with 191 1. Gaston is one of those quiet 
chaps who devotes altogether too much time to study. 
On the other hand he has gained considerable reputa- 
tion as a fireman, has been known to smoke cubebs, 
chews gum once in a while, and fusses on the sly. Lab 
is majoring in Pomology ; belongs to K S, and withal 
is a loyal 191 1 man. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



181 



EDWARD ARTHUR LARRABEE 

From the Witch City, July ii, 1SS9, blew a salt 
breeze which was refreshing to all ; it bore the spiril 
of Ed Larrabee. He was meant for a celebration, but 
became only the tail-end of the Horribles. Then the 
public and high schools he passed without serious 
troubles. He struck M. A. C. with the class of 191 1. 
and soon made a record in his studies, in rough-housing 
and in fussing. He has divided his InformalS between 
the "mountain," "over the river" and Springfield. His 
latest accomplishment is that of dramatics, being the 
hero of North Amherst church plays. His first year 
here he was the freshest of Freshmen ; his Sophomore 
year he became a student and an important item in 
the expense account of the Chemical Laboratory. Ed 
claims Winthrop as his burg now: he madeXa bluff in 
class and captured the following honors : Class His- 
torian, Class Basketball, chairman Sophomore-Senior 
Prom, and Junior Banquet committees. He is a K S, 
Ed has elected Biology and you may often see him 
sporting with the lower animals. 




CHARLES ALBERT LODGE 

This young mountain of adiposity first saw the 
light of day in the little fishing village of Manchester, 
Mass. Why he selected that "rube" town for his na- 
tivity is a mystery to everyone. However, there he 
appeared, drifting in on a high tide one bleak and 
stonily day, the 17th of April, 1S88. It was said that 
above the screams of the howling gale could be heard 
his- lusty squalling of "Ma! Ma!" This was only a 
small beginning, but he persevered until he could say 
it all, "Massachusetts." Charles Albert was always a 
precocious kid, and he soon mastered his A B C's at 
the Manchester Grammar School. He then enterred 
the Story High School, where he was the only male 
member among a bunch of fifty females. Here his 
fetching smile and black, curly locks earned him the 
nickname of "Liz" or "Lizzie," which has stuck by him 
ever since. On the memorable day, September 16, 
1907, "Liz" attained his highest ambition when he 
entered the gates of old M. A. C. While a pea-green 
Freshman "Liz" was chosen Class Vice-President : 
other offices hav^e been his since coming, the most 
important being Class Hot-air Merchant, Class Co-ed, 
and Varsity Baseball Manager. In spite of all his 
failings, "Liz" is a good fellow and well liked in his 
class. He is a member of C. S. C. 




162 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLl 




FRANK DOBSON McGRAW 

This ever-happy, "don't cher care" first absorbed 
the oxygen out of mother nature's vast atmosphere on 
February 8, 1887, in the little hamlet of Fall River. 
He began on this very day to "paint the town red," 
and it was then that he acquired the name "Dobby." 
No one seems to know how "Dobsy" ever got into 
the Bradford Mathew Challoner Durfee High School, 
but nevertheless he did and made a name for himself 
in the athletic world. "McGraw again the star." These 
were the glaring headlines of the "Fall River Hot-air 
Spreader. "Mugsy" entered old Mass'chusetts with 
191 0, but secured a year's leave of absence because of 
sickness. Thus it happened that Mac dropped into 
our midst in the spring of 1909. He always had a 
very kindly feeling toward "Kiddo" and even now you 
may hear their friendly squabbles when nearing the 
lab. It was understood that Mugsy would take up 
Horticulture, but after specializing on the Lemon (d) 
for a year, he decided that other branches afforded 
better openings. After spending a season in the wheat 
fields of Kansas, he has decided that he will follow 
the wheat course. Mugsy belongs to C. S. C. 




FREDERICK ADAMS McLAUGIILIN 

It all happened in Lee, Mass., on June 8, 188S. 
This homo sapiens Caucasian species of mankind, (Mac 
takes Zoo and likes to classify every mammal even 
himself) early acquired the habit of hunting and fish- 
ing. The former habit gave him the practice which 
enabled him to make both the Indoor and Outdoor 
Rifle teams. After graduating from the Lee High 
School, Fred prepared for Harvard at Mount Hermon. 
But learning that the opportunities for fussing were 
good at M. A. C. he entered with us in the fall of '07. 
He soon proved his ability as a fusser and his beefing 
qualities have enabled him to make good with the De- 
bating Society. Mac served on the Sophomore Prom 
committee. Nevertheless with all his faults Fred is a 
good fellow and shows the proper class spirit. Al- 
though he tackled the wrong man, yet he helped out in 
the Class Football team. He is K S, and has elected 
Forestry. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



183 



HENRY BOWDITCH MORSE 

In which city was "Keg" Morse born? Why, in 
the Witch City, Salem, Mass., September 24, 1890, and 
on the beautiful North Shore, at that. He graduated 
from both the Pickering Grammar School and the 
Salem High School. In these places "Keg" was one 
of the big g"uns, and an official authority on all social 
matters. Since coming to M. A. C. he has become a 
second Napoleon, having led 191 1 in Class Football 
and Basketball, besides being a member of our Class 
Baseball and Track teams. He has also played Varsity 
Football for two years. Now this modest young man 
is quite a fusser, having caused more than one of the 
fair damsels in this vicinity to succumb to his good 
looks. Oh ! If we could all fit like that. "Hen" is a 
member of K S, and is majoring in Chemistry. 




ISABURO NAGAI 

It was in Tokyo, Japan, on November 18, 1887, 
that Isaburo for the first time realized that there arc 
social problems in this world. However, that didn'l 
worry him then, not until he had graduated from the 
Imperial University and entered M. A. C. did his 
thoughts turn to Sociology. Isoburo is a deep student 
and has no time for fussing, in fact, he doesn't belie\e 
in it. He wields the tennis racket with considerable- 
facility and knows what he is talking about when he 
endeavors to demonstrate to you that agriculture in 
Japan has a brilliant future to look forward to. He 
has elected Rural Economy. 




184 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 




GEORGE PAINE NICKERSON 

This bunch of wind put in its appearance on March 
31, 1S90, in Norwood, Mass., but he seemed to be of 
a restless disposition and has made his habitation at 
different times in Garamer, Maine ; Barre, Vermont ; 
Somerville, Mass. ; Abington, Mass. ; and at Amherst. 
He prepared for college at the High School at Am- 
herst. Since coming to M. A. C. he has occupied 
himself in wearing sporty clothes, knowing everybody 
and being into everything. He has represented the 
class in Baseball, Football and Basketball, and was a 
member of the Senior-Sophomore Prom committee. 
Last year he was elected Assistant Manager of the 
Hockey team. Windy is specializing in Forestry and 
is a member of ^ S K. 




GUSTAF ARNOLD NIELSEN 

Eighteen hundred and eighty-eight years after the 
birth of Christ, on the self-same day, the breezes wafted 
into West Newton an embryo which attached itself 
permanently before it was discovered, and the suf- 
ferers called it "Kiddo" or "Goostaff." After a course 
of studious application at Allen School, West Newton, 
"Kiddo" followed in the footsteps of "Cap." Turner 
and entered M. A. C. After many trials and tribula- 
tions with the arduous courses at the ancient institu- 
tion, he finally struck his pace and decided to see 
"eleven" through. "Goostaff" is specializing in For- 
estry and Botany, and put in his time this summer in 
the Maine woods. He says he was working there, but 
knowing "Kiddo" as we do, we have our doubts ; how- 
ever, we know he wielded an axe effectively, for he 
came back with a scar on his knee. His experience in 
Forestry also enabled him to acquire lumber for his 
corner-seat this fall. We are proud to have "Goostaff" 
in our midst and although much of his time is spent 
in upholding his reputation as a confirmed fusser 
"over the mountain," and in "Hamp," we still see 
enough of him to know that he is a loyal classmate. 
Gus is a member of C. S, C. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



185 



BERNHARD OSTROLENK 

"Ostro" was first seen in Warsaw, Russia, on ih' 
cold morning of May 14, 1887, but as Russia had no 
charms for this active protoplasmic body, we find hnii 
migrating through Germany, stopping at Halberstadi. 
Friedrichshagen, and Berlin. But the advantages nt 
America soon appealed to him, so at the age of thirteen 
we find him at Gloversville, N. Y. Here he did nut 
stay very long, for we next find him at Doylstown, Pa.. 
where he prepared for college at the National Farm 
School. After completing his work there he went to 
Vineland, N. J., where he was a superintendent of 
farm work. But soon the desire for a broader educa- 
tion overcame him, and after his characteristic pon- 
derous thought he came to M. A. C, where he has 
been a loyal member of the class of 191 1, playing on 
our Football team. "Blmks's" early inclination to be 
a farmer has been overcome and we now find that he 
has elected Chemistry as a major. His ability as a 
debater is well known, and his special delight, arguing 
against something which everyone else believes, may 
gain for him a work of distinction in future years. 




SAMUEL REYNOLDS PARSONS 

"Still, and still, and still, 
The wonder grew ; 

That one small head could carry 
AH that he knew. 
Sam, quiet and studious, came to us conflicted with 
two great desires or ambitions, one to be a great musi- 
cian, that is, to finger the ivories in such manner and 
with such technique as to bring forth more celestial 
strains than any ever produced on the pianoforte or 
pipe organ ; the other ambition to master the difficulties 
of Engineering. As a result of these two forces Sam 
will probably design a musical cantilever which will 
peal forth sweetest music. Sam was born June 23, 
1 888, at North Amherst, and graduated from Amherst 
High School at a tender age, enjoyed life for a year 
or two, and came to M. A.C. as a worthy member of 
191 1. With all his studying Sam finds time to play 
the chapel organ and has done good work on the Index 
Board. He is a member of Q. T. V., and is taking 
Math, along with Engineering. 




186 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 




ROLAND HARRISON PATCH 

On a calm summer day, July 28, 18S8, Roland was 
born in Wenham, Mass. Immediately "Dan" started 
his race. Through the Grammar and High Schools of 
Salem he went, a lap at a time, not with lightning 
rapidity, but with his characteristic steady gait. Then 
he came to M. A. C. to run another heat, preparatory 
to the final heat in life. He busies himself with Y. 
M. C. A. work and other college clubs. Because of his 
firm determination and ability Captain Martin has 
given his the dignified position of body-guard and 
night watch. Dan is a member of Theta Phi. The 
old "race horse" has our best wishes of success in his 
ambition to make Pomology his life work. 




HERMAN ALFRED PAULY 

This wily ape of impudence first made his appear- 
ance in the little town of Plainfield, Vt., July 5, 1888. 
He soon left the Green Mountain State for dear old 
Massachusetts, graduating from the Sonierville English 
High School in 1907. Then he packed his trunk full 
of old shoes and came to M. A. C. as an "Elevener." 
Here he has proved himself to be a staunch and loyal 
classmate even though he does have a few bad habits, 
such as fussing and rough-housing. He was a valuable 
member of our class football team and is at present 
serving as our class captain. Through the far-reaching 
reputation of the course in Agricultural Chemistry at 
M. A. C, Pauly was attracted in this direction, but 
after two years of association with the worthy head 
of that Department, he has decided to drop the Chem- 
istry and simply take up the Agriculture. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



187 



PERCY WILLIAM PICKARD 

Mostly "Percy" and generally known as Pick. 
This good looking youth was born in Fall River. Mass.. 
September 22, 1S89, and being of a roving disposition 
went on sojourns of different duration to Utica, N. Y.. 
and Manville, R. I., finally assuming a state of rest 
in his present home, Hopedale, Mass., incidentally be- 
coming a staunch supporter of Gov. Draper. Since 
coming to M. A. C., "Pick" has enjoyed many of the 
blessings here to be obtained. He is a College Senator, 
a member of the 191 1 Index Board and Class Vice- 
President, has won his numerals in football, baseball, 
and track, and was awarded the Western Alumni Prize. 
"Pick" improved his golden opportunities the past 
summer by attending the summer-school dances, and 
is now able to trip the light fantastic toe with the best 
of the profession. He is endeavoring to impart some 
of his knowledge to "Barry" and is planning to make 
a great conquest among the fair ones "over the river." 
"Pick" is a member of Q. T. V., and is majoring in 
Pomology. 




RALPH WALDO PIPER 

See who's here ! "Pipe," who gained for himself 
the cognomen of "The Spider" by his base running in 
one of the baseball games, spun the first strand of his 
web April 30, 18S9, in South Acton, Mass. He soon 
came to the center of the web, not to catch flies, as all 
good spiders do, but to handle grounders at third. 
This position he held down well as captain of the class 
baseball team. "Pipe" also served as manager of our 
Sophomore Rope Pull Team. As Johnson's companion 
in conquests of the fair damsels, Piper shows up in 
best advantage. Here is "Pipe'' in his element for he 
is a past grand master in the art of winning the good 
graces of the ladies. Because of his strong pull with 
the ladies, "Pipe" was well fitted to serve on our 
Soph-Senior Prom. Committee. "Pipe" is assistant 
track manager and a member of Q. T. 'V., and is taking 
Pomology in hopes to one day feed the King of Ireland 
some fine apples. 




THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 




PHILIP HERMAN PROUTY 

Whenever in the midst of a speech you stop short 
trying to think of somebody whom to put up as a 
model of gigantic achievements just mention Philip 
H. Prouty. Phil came to college to get what Prof. 
Eyerly would call future economic independence. 
Baffled hopes and suppressed desires have no place in 
Phil's vocabulary. He cow-milked his way through 
the freshman year, farmed through the sophomore, and 
has now joined the hash-slinger's league. Phil's abili- 
ties to get along were first recognized in Worcester, 
December 20, 18S9, and were developed at the Shrews- 
bury High School. Complete metamorphosis took place 
on entering M. A. C, for he is not only getting along, 
he is actuallly running along, and at quite a clip at 
that. If you are interested in fruit, watch Phil, for 
he is taking Pomology and there will be something 
doing when he gets out. He is a member of Q. T. V. 




PHILEAS ARMAND RACICOT 

Phil popped into the world in Lowell, Mass., in 
18S5, with that "If you want to know who's boss, start 
something" air which he has retained ever since. 
"Rossy" prepared for M. A. C. at the University of 
Ottawa Preparatory School and at Williston Seminar}'. 
Since he cast his lot with 191 1, he has won much fame 
in class and college activities, and has received the 
name of "General," because of his commanding and 
military bearing. Soon after our class games began, 
"General's" superior bray was heard, and he was 
elected class cheer-leader, while he now sings in the 
college Glee Club. His adeptness with the crayon gave 
him a position as artist on the Iitdex Board, while his 
wonderful stunts with the violin procured him the 
leadership of the college Orchestra. Phil belongs to 
the Old Men's Club, and the K. C. Club, but he never 
goes fussing, because he cannot pull away from the 
Chem. Lab., where he has decided to spend the rest 
of his college days. General has taken the "third 
degree" in the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



189 



RALPH GUSHING ROBINSON 

Fat first hung out his shingle in South Boston, 
May 29, iSgo. After consuming a few barrels of 
Mellins Food with his enlarged cardiac stomach, he 
succeeded in squeezing through the massive gates of 
the Mechanic Arts High School. Finding the streets 
of Boston too narrow to allow him to meet a team, 
Fat chartered a box car and started for the West. But 
when he reached Amherst, there was a slight mishap 
to his car, and Fat rolled out. There is, to this day, 
a depression in the earth's crust showing where he 
struck. Just then a crowd of would-be Aggie Fresh- 
men came along. They helped him up, and brought 
him as far as the college, from whence no one has yet 
tried to remove him, except Billie, and he didn't 
succeed. Here, among his other asquisitions. Fat got 
the habit of frightening painters' horses until they ran 
away. Ralph played on the Varsity Football team and 
was one of the mainstays of our class team. He hopes 
to become a forester some day. 




ARTHUR HARRIS SHARPE 

On July 6, 1884, the stork got lost, but finally 
wound up at Saxonville with Al in his beak and as 
a result he has been lost more or less ever since. He 
finished the Grammar and High Schools at Framing- 
ham, but not considering that preparation enough, 
entered Gushing Academy. Here Al was second 
D'Artagnan, with the "Annex" as his retreat, and any 
old freight car for his charger. By this time Al had 
learned to use his head, so entered old M. A. G. with 
igii. He is a member of the Fraternity Gonference, 
Assistant Editor of the Signal, Editor-in-chief of 1911 
Index, made the Indoor and Outdoor Rifle teams. Glass 
Basketball and Football and has been Glass Gaptain. 
He is a K S, and is electing Landscape Gardening. 




190 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 




CLARENCE ALBERT SMITH 

"Skip" first saw the light of this progressive world 
in the city of Northampton, October 14, 1888. From 
here this little animalcule was transported to Denver, 
Colorado. Then, the balmy air of the mining town not 
agreeing with the fundamental makeup of his constitu- 
tion, he was shipped back to the Meadow City. There 
he was given a try-out in the High School, and after 
successfully competing with all of the requirements of 
that illustrious institution, he entered M. A. C. with 
the class of igii. Since coming to this port of learn- 
ing, "Skip" has proved himself to be an industrious 
"plugger," a loyal classmate, and a systematic "rough- 
houser." Though small in stature, he developed into 
a valuable man for our class Basketball team, besides 
holding several class offices. Having more or less love 
for "Tabby" and the "Kid," Skibo has elected Chem- 
istry. He is claimed by the Q. T. V. fraternity. 




RAYMOND GOODALE SMITH 

On April 12, 1888, the inhabitants of Ipswich were 
startled by a loud bray which came to herald the advent 
into this world of this highly intellectual protozoan 
fonn. The good people of Ipswich, however, soon 
tired of his musical laugh, and passed him on to Lynn, 
where he had drilled into his head the foundations of 
knowledge. Here by the ocean side he became inter- 
ested in zoological forms and forthwith he came to 
old Mass'chusetts to perfect his learning along those 
lines. Among his accomplishments are football and 
fussing, of which the opponents of 191 1 well know the 
former. The popular fellow who has many nicknames, 
some of them drawn from the Scriptures, has been 
entrusted with the post of Sergeant-at-arms. He has 
elected Biology and we wish him the best of success. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



191 



LOMAS OSWALD STEVENSON 

This "beastly chap, don't-cher-know," first caught 
a glimpse of Merrie England at Beeston, May 28, 18S7. 
He did not remain there long enough to call it his 
home, for his inclinations called him to America soon 
after he was able to talk. He attended school at 
Chicago, and Wauhegan, 111., then decided to complete 
his education in his mother country, so he returned. 
There he attended Exeter School, in Exeter, Devon. 
Finding that his ambitions for learning would not be 
fulfilled at this place, he again crossed the briny deep, 
and landed at M. A. C. with 191 1. We are proud to 
have Steve in our midst and also proud to say that 
after years of training he is fast learning to see 
through a joke. We believe that Steve will also admit 
that America can produce some things as well as Eng- 
land. He has already learned this through his many 
visits to "Hamp" and "over the mountain." Besides 
making a hit at these places, he has shown his optical 
abilities in other directions, being a member of the 
Outdoor and Indoor shooting teams. Steve also shot 
some baskets for his class Basketball team and is also 
responsible for many of the drawings in this book. 
He is a member of C. S. C, and is majoring in Agri- 
culture. 




EDWARD ERVING WARREN 

Coming into this world nearly twenty-two years 
ago in Leicester, Mass., "Warry" is said to be a direct 
descendant of "Old Man Noah," he is that wise. With 
that sedate walk of his he trailed into M. A. C. last 
year with his suitcase in tow, from Clark College, to 
help 191 1 finish the innocent Freshmen. Having pre- 
viously been to Leicester Academy, where he learned 
his A, B, C's and other rudiments of wisdom, he came 
to M. A. C. just to brush up. He tried hard to make 
our Basketball team and is always yelling for "Old 
Mass'chusetts" and "'Leven." When he is not plugging 
Pomology, which he insists on calling "my course," he 
dopes over that dear old clay pipe of his or bums 
the makings from his classmates. He is a noted pillow- 
whacker from overstudy (?). It is said that Erving's 
favorite poem is 

That heaven on earth to the weary head ! 

Bed ! Oh, bed ! Delicious bed ! 
"Tad" is a good kid, and we all like him. He is a 
member of $ S K. 




192 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 




RAYMOND LEE WHITNEY 

"Poor, poor fellow !" 
"But why so? Why so?" 
"Listen ! He is a benedict." 
"Whit" started at Mendon, Mass., April iS, 1SS6. 
Next stop, Quincy. Here he gets an idea into his 
infant brain that quinces and fruit in general are good 
things to know about. Next stop, Cambridge ; second 
idea, must go to college for proper knowledge of 
Horticulture. Third stop, Brockton ; tanned with a 
piece of good old Brockton leather for having so many 
ideas. Since then it has been an express train, going 
through Brockton High School and the class of 1910 
to the class of igii. Whit has played Class Football, 
is Captain and Leader of the Band, and plays in the 
Orchestra. He takes Horticulture, is a member Q. T. 
v., and is a good fellow, even if he is married. 




HAROLD FRANCIS WILLARD 

What have we here? A "boodle politician?" No; 
this is Harold Francis Willard, who first put in his 
appearance at Neilsville, 111., February 21, 1S84. How- 
ever, this little town was not exciting enough for Harry 
so he soon migrated to Chicago. But this metropolis 
didn't exactly suit him, so he went to Ludington, Mich., 
where he attended the Grammar School. From this 
place he came East, and after living awhile in Green- 
ville, N. H., he finally landed in Leominster, Mass. 
After working awhile, for the mere sake of experience, 
he awoke to the fact that he wanted a higher education 
so he prepared for college at Mount Hernion, and 
entered M. A. C. with the class of 1911. He soon 
proved himself worthy of the honor, by being on the 
Rope-pull team, and later running in the Cross-country, 
iiarry has elected Horticulture and hopes soon to 
have someone help him manage his little plantation. 
He is a member of 4> S K. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



193 



ERWIN LAWRENCE WINN 

This man came to us from the class of igii of 
Worcester Polytech. Just as soon as he had been 
pulled through, and thus bathed by the pure, whole- 
some and sparkling waters of the Pond, enough of his 
outer covering was removed to show his identification 
card. From this record of the immigration officers we 
learned that "Windy" (there being more truth than 
poetry in the name) was born February 8, i8S8, in the 
town of Holden, Mass., where he grew and waxed fat, 
going to Holden High as a prep for Tech. Very soon 
after arriving at M. A. C. "Windy" found his affinity 
"Steve" and has stuck to him with bull dog tenacity 
ever since, the campus continually resounding with calls 
of "Oh, Windy!" and answering ones of "Oh, Steve!" 
"Steve took "VVmdy" to "Old England" this summer, 
thereby shocking the subjects of His Majesty. Edward 
VII, because Windy persisted in calling rabbits and 
other small animals "little buggers." Aside from that 
"Windy" made a hit with the English. As a class 
man "Windy" played Class Baseball and was on the 
Sophomore-Senior Prom committee. He is also a 
member of A T U at W. P. I., and majors in Chemistry. 





m, A. 01. 

(Ulaaa nf 1911 
lanqurt 



Celery 



Green Peas 

Strawberry Short Cake 
Cigars 



Blue Point Oysters 

Clear Mock Turtle Soup 
Planked Shad — Shove Style 

Potatoes Dutchesse Cucu 

Boiled Spring Chicken 

Potatoes Delmonico 
191 1 College Punch 
Fresh Asparagus Salad 

Whipped Cream 
Coffee 

Cigarettes 



SJfw inm il^ntrl il^artfnrli, (Jnitit. 

April 22, lana 

®oaatitiaBtpr, A. 1^. g-ljarfir 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 195 



©oasts 

Sloaattttaatfr 

A. L. Sharpe 

191 1 J- F. Adams 

The Rope Pull CM. Damon 

Track G. N. Lew 

Wine, Women and Songs P. A. Racicot 

Our Struggles E. L. Daniels 

The Pond G. H. Robb 

Baseball W. H. Coash 

(Hommtttpp 

A. L. Sharpe 

I. C. GiLGOEE 

E. L. Daniels 



196 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



, I Perry IT. Don' ui ..laacliester and Artllu 
; U. V^'hitlemoie of Dover. The delegate 
I 1 are impledccd and uniDslruct^d. 



FRESHMEN HOLD BANQUET. 

isNQChnKPttn \Krit-ull(irRl CollcRi; 
riant l::iudc Ihp SophomorefT and 
Have 'Their PrcHliU-nt With '1 hem. 

■tini Dispiucli . lu I-uo Kcpublicaa. 

ilARTlor.D. Ct.. Wcdncsdaj-. April 22. 
Jespile liie fai.t lliat llicii- president was 
itnrcd on Salurdri.v ^Ind.beld in custodj- 

ny lioui-s, the Irc-tluneii of the Jlassa- 
.i>ell» jgrifnltural college held their 
■is hanijiiet in the New Doni hotel in 
5 city this eieuiDi-, and their president 
s there, very nineli lu cvidance In the 
■ ilie.s. This was the last iiisht upon 
LOijId have been held 



"hif'li file bniionet 
as the time limit vi 
Without tlie preset! 
the uresident. the an 
held, and 



.xpire' the -'3d. 



ok fo 



irlv ho 






let lo-hichl 
arrived in Ihis 
left Sprincfield 



i\ed. and there 
t I he opening i 
The toaytmiisie 



the banquet. 

at the baitfiuet wa 



)AILY REPUBLICAN: THURSI 



The 



u appetiz 

an.l there "as also an abimdanee of entlui- 
.-.MSin. I'he nails rans with college songs, 
ihe favorites being "Kons of Old .Massa- 
ihiisettb' and •'Hail, Hail. Massachu- 
setts." The e.xnberanco' of the freshmen 
vas vented at regular intervals in class 
and college cheers. Among those eallcj 
upon to respond to toasts by Toastoraster 
Sharpc wore -lames -idams, William 
Consh, George Tilton, Gordon Robb and 
Charles Damon. ' 

.\daois, after being removed by his soph- 
omore captors from the house of George) 
H. Eversnn on C'ailal street at'-South Had- 
ley" Falls, as told in The Jtepnblic 



.-inb's 



ved 



the Rei^-liffe 
Ounecticut 



^ _ guarded by -- 

l>ut .inally the number was reduced to 
throe. Soon some freshn 
peared outside and gave the 



f lagging. He had spent Monda 
agged. aiid desired to avoid fiirlh 
dimcnt of lluit kind. About 4 n. 
r the sophomores opened the ( 



m^U iRE 



Into town to 




nd 


he fre 


shinan ban- 




will 


be 


held 


al the Neiv 




this 






but coUeg'i 


history has 


been 


made sin 


ce last Sat- 


urday when 


the 


sophomot 


es captured 


Presldetit J 


antes 


F 


Adan 


15 and at- 



to hold him from his cla^ 
mates. In true college manner, the 
eophomores kidnapped the Ereshmai 
president and took him to South Had 
iley Falls, 



The 



Ireshm 



invaded that town last ever 

found the house whore the' 

ing chief 



they were trying to gain 
admittance bv way of the front door, 
the sophomores took President Adams 
through the back door of the house 



Canoe clubhouse 



50 



thU 



he KedcUffe 
le freshmen 
1I5 Vnornlng, 
Adams was 
ibers of the 
:ity, wher: 



they Vlll hold their banquet tonight, 
after having gained a notable battle 
over the second -year class. A. H. 
Sharps, who I3 to be toastmaater of the 
banquet, waa alao taken a prisoner 
wltb President Adams, 'but he also Is 

The officers of the freshmen class 
arec President, James F,, Adams; vice- 
preistdcnt, Davis; secretary and treas- 
urer, Flpps; sergeant-at-arms, Loker; 
class captain, Daniels. People who 
live In the vi<:Inlty of the New Dom 
will hear more tljan one college yi 
for "Amherst. 1911. ■* tonight and ihi 
may h'^ar some loud refereijce to 1910, 



t,at 



be ( 



nplin 



the (rail. Immediately 



ItpJttlliitC 






, [01 Hartford 



:uHl the: 
sm-reiidcr o 
iked 
00 W 

ft Spriug 



IS 



WATERBURV after BARBOUR. 
MInan a Third 8nse- 




iQ\TO({\/\Lh 



N the weeks spent in compiling this vohime we have been 
surrounded by Nature in aU her glory, and the trees which 
beautify our campus have been clothed in many gorgeous 
colors. At other times, too, we have been deeply impressed 
by the beautiful shades of green which spread themselves 
before the eye. How many times since we became students at M. A. C. 
have we been reminded that the environment is a factor to be considered 
in the development of this institution. However, there is another beauty 
beside the .beautj of the landscape which makes up our environment, 
that is, moral beauty. This morality should never be lost sight of. Hardly 
a year passes in which there is not some thoughtlessness on the part of 
the student which tends to lower the standard of the college. This spirit 
of rowdyism does not pervade the entire student body, and in every instance 
the students of the college have rallied to the settlement of the regretted 
action. We find that this spirit is being felt less each year and soon will pass 
entirely from our environment. 

(Enlbgf Jftgljt 

The series of college nights held throughout the year are very successful 
means of bringing the trustees, faculty, alumni, undergraduates and friends 
of the college together. These gatherings which occur in Draper Hall, permit 
the discussion of plans for the advancement of the college. The one held 
this year was devoted to the celebration of the anniversary of the college. 
Last year, the athletic field was the main topic under discussion, and the 
opportunity was given everybody interested in the welfare of the college to 
listen to the remarks of representatives from every department of executive 
and undergraduate work. 

These gatherings can hardly be called elaborate, but simply a joining 
together of men with a single purpose, the advancement of M. A. C. Let us 
show a real M. A. C. spirit, and unite our efforts for this advancement. 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



The demand for organization in the financial control of the college 
activities is becoming imperative. Upon investigation we find that in this 
matter M. A. C. has much chance for improvement. In the spring of last 
year the managers of the various student activities received an announcement 
from the President recjuesting them to consider plans for such reorganiza- 
tion; This fall the matter was taken up afresh, and now has become the main 
topic of conversation among those interested. President Butterfield has 
outlined a plan which he thinks will meet all requirements; yet we hesitate 
to endorse such a plan. The board of this publication has investigated what 
is known among colleges as the "Dartmouth System." To this system every 
Dartmouth man is loyal, and to it we may attribute the rapid development 
of that institution. 

Far from advocating a system which we expect to rectify all mismanage- 
ment in the student organizations, we seek to simply bring to the attention 
of the student body, a system which has been highly successful and in which 
we place our confidence. 

Stijt MatrlimorJi 

In the early part of the year, a watchword was adopted which signified 
the spirit of the college throughout the year. That watchword was a "Bigger, 
Better, Busier M. A. C." 

The work here at college was reorganized. Every branch of activities 
received a shaking and finally was given an impetus which made possible 
a successful year. Especially was this true in regard to athletics. Football 
and baseball carried heavy schedules, yet their results show that M. A. C. was 
up to the standard in these major sports. Track, hockey and tennis teams 
were organized and their success has assured these sports a permanent place 
at this college. Basketball, which is becoming generally unpopular as an 
intercollegiate sport, has been dropped here. 

We should indeed feel that our development had been one-sided, if the 
development of the other activities had not kept pace with that of athletics. 
The Signal has made a great advance this year, by a reorganization which 
now places it among the leading college weeklies. After a lapse of several 
years, debating and dramatics have revived. The Debating Club has had a 
successful year and the Junior Play has become established as an annual 
event. A Rifle Club was organized, which received splendid support from 
faculty and students, and the team shot well in the intercollegiate matches. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE [99 

The Y. M. C. A. has been especiaUy active and has been successful in securing 
prominent and interesting speakers. Under the auspices of the Y. M. C. A. 
Bible study courses are conducted, in which a large number of students show 
special interest. 

With the adoption of this watchword the demand for the athletic field 
became imperative. It was wonderful to see the organization and system 
which developed in the promotion of the fight to secure this necessary addi- 
tion to the college. Trustees, alumni, undergraduates, and friends of the 
college united their best efforts to secure the appropriation for the field. This 
unity of purpose, this concentration of action, succeeded in arousing a spirit 
which means the advancement of the college and will result in a "Bigger, 
Better and Busier" M. A. C. 

Mmic tu m. A. 01. 

During the last few years, the college has made a surprising growth in 
many directions. New departments and instructorships have been added, 
three new buildings besides the barns have been added, and a fourth is now 
in process of construction. Last year a successful Debating Club was 
organized, and this year the Signal has been made a weekly paper. In ath- 
letics, while we have dropped basketball, we have added ice hockey and tennis. 
But with all this growth along other lines, the musical organizations have 
not grown as they should. It has been a constant lament that music has been 
very much neglected. 

But this year, there has been a change. The entering class is large, and 
contains much good material, and the musical clubs have taken on new life. 
At the time this is written we cannot say much of what has already been 
done, but it seems safe to predict that this will be a good year for the musical 
clubs. The Glee Club will be more than a C[uartet this year; the Orchestra 
shows a promising number of pieces; and the Mandolin Club seems to have 
good prospects before it. There seems to be no reason why, with constant 
and systematic practice, we cannot develop some musical organizations that 
will be a credit to the college. The singing of the student body, while not 
materially different from what it has been, is fairly good, but this shows 
room for improvement. We need to do more singing, and we need some 
good, new songs. 

It is a good thing for the college that music should receive more atten- 
tion. This college is so intensely practical that we are in danger of becoming 
interested only in the one line in which we are specializing ; and of forgetting 
that a broad education demands something of a knowledge of things that 
interest other persons; and that music may add very much to our culture. 
But we are getting away a little from this exclusively practical feeling, and 
coming to realize the place that music should take in our college life. This 



200 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 

year a course in history and appreciation of music is being given by Mr. 
Ashley. This is a very good beginning for a department of music. Let us 
hope that the interest shown in this course may lead to the presentation of 
others in the future. 

Now let us all set to work this year for more and better music. Let 
those in the various clubs do their part, and let us who are not in the clubs 
stand behind them and give them our support. These clubs can be made a 
credit to old Massachusetts as much as any of the other college organizations. 
Let us make the singing of the student body on the field, in our mass meetings, 
and in the Union room, a feature of our college life. It will tend toward that 
unity of classes and students which makes the right kind of college spirit. 
There have been times in the history of the college when the musical clubs 
have been quite active. They have had their ups and downs. Now they are 
up, and we want to keep them up. The outlook is good, and prophesies a 
good year for music in old M. A. C. Let us see that the prophecy is fulfilled. 

S .R. P. 

During the past summer numerous changes in several buildings have 
been made. The Drill-hall, South College, North College, and Horse Barn 
are those upon which most work has been done. 

A new ceiling, a casing for the steam pipes, a shower and toilet room 
are the chief improvements made on the Drill-hall. Later a partition in the 
Gun Shed will separate the shooting gallery from a locker room. 

In South College another suite of student rooms has been appropriated 
for administrative purposes. Dean Mills occupies these new rooms, and 
Mr. Kenney has the Dean's old office for his private use. The English office 
has been remodelled, making a new office for the English professor and one 
for the new instructor in public speaking. 

The completion of last year's renovation in North College was reached 
this summer. The Social Union room and the student rooms were all tinted; 
the basement was plastered, and a room was made which eventually will be 
a billiard room. 

By raising the horse barn and making stalls and box-stalls, quarters 
more spacious have been made for the horses. 

The question arises — Does it pay to make extensive and expensive re- 
pairs upon old buildings? One of the first buildings that the Legislature 
will be asked for, is an x\dministrative Building. Why, then, this outlay of 
money on South College offices? We also hope for a g>minasiurn. If this 
comes with our new athletic field, why should such an old building as the 
drill-hall nave such repairs made upon it? 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 20[ 

The heating and lighting plant may not need a larger plant, but it needs 
something in it that will light the campus and buildings and will heat the 
class and students' rooms. The plant has the directorship of laying steam 
pipes and caring for repairs. Why is it necessary for the campus to be dug 
up all the fall and North College and the drill-hall in a state of incompletion ? 
Could not some of the repair fund go into equipment and management of 
the power station, that would furnish lights and heat when wanted, and have 
repairs done on time? 

E. M. B. 

(Tiff Sormtt0rg ^ijatFin 

The steady growth of the college brings before us another vital ques- 
tion : Shall our dormitory system be extended ? 

At present our dormitories accommodate less than one-third of the 
student body. This means that the other two-thirds are broken up into 
small groups, which are scattered here and there throughout the town. The 
result is two-fold. 

First, we must consider the result of the present system upon the student 
himself. The fellow who rooms in a private house is, perhaps, compelled to 
room a long distance from college. This means a loss of a great many houi'S, 
all of which are valuable to M. A. C. And the time is lost in this way: on 
our schedule are a few vacant hours each day ; a fellow cannot go to his room 
to study, for by the time he reaches his room and allows time enough to get 
back to his next recitation, the hour is consumed ; he can go to the -library, but 
in order to do his best work — get down and dig it out — he must be in his 
own room, at his own desk; he can go to a student's room, who lives in the 
dormitory, but when he gets there he probably finds a dozen other fellows, 
and the hour is idled away. If, on the other hand, he has a room in the 
dormitory, he can go to his room and there spend an hour profitably. The 
most vital thing to be considered, however, is not time, but the effect upon 
the student's college life, that is, his life among the students. In the private 
house he associates only with a very few fellows; in the dormitory he comes 
in close contact with a large number of fellows. In the private house there 
is the feeling that this is not my home; in the dormitory there is the feeling 
of a whole-hearted, wholesome freedom. And no student who has lived in 
a dormitory would consider for a moment living in a private house. To sum 
up, the effect of living in a private house is narrowing and confining, while 
dormitory life is broadening and unfolding. 



202 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



Second, the effect of the present system upon coUege Hfe must be con- 
sidered. As conditions now exist, the student body is — in a sense — divided. 
Those who room in private houses are taken away from the campus and 
they become residents of the town. There exists the feeHng that they are 
not reaUy a part of the coUege any longer; they have left college behind. On 
the other hand, the student living in the dormitory feels that he is a part of 
the institution and he unconsciously imbibes that wholesome and ennobHng 
spirit which can be given only by an institution of learning. The dormitory 
life, therefore, is necessary for the developmnt of the best college spirit — 
that spirit which is to make a Bigger, Better, Busier M. A. C. 

Shall we then extend our dormitory system? We voice the sentiment 
of the student body when we say : Give us "more" dormitories. 

H. J. B. 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



203 



E\^t Assortat^ Alumni of tl|^ M. A. 01. 

(fffirprs for 1909-10 

H. J. WheeleRj '83 President 

J. B. Paige, '82 First Vice-President 

C. O. Flagg, '72 . . . . . . Second Vice-President 

S. B. HaskelLj '04 ........ Secretary 

David Barry, '90 Treasurer 

E. A. White, '95 Auditor 

H. F. ToMPSON, '05 E. B. Holland, '92 



204 



THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



ICcral Alumni Assnrtattnn of M. A. C. 



Jnunlipli 1905 



WftuUB 

David Barry^ '90 ......... President 

Charles W. Clapp, '86 First Vice-President 

Frank O. Williams^ '90 Second Vice-President 

A. C. MoNAHAN, '00 Third Vice-President 

Sidney B. Haskell, '04 Secretary 

A. Vincent Osmun, '03 Treasurer 

J. E. Deuel, '92 Auditor 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 205 



IflBtnn Alumnt dlitb 

(iffima for 1909-1310 

F. W. Davis, '89 . President 

H. W. Dana, '99 Secretary 

W. A. Morse, '82 ........ . Treasurer 

itrertora 

F. G. May, '82 

R. B. Mackintosh, '86 

Bertram Tupper, '05 



206 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



Olflnn^rttrut lall^g ABBoriatintt of M, A. C 

^omhth iFfbruarg 21, 1902 
(§mtns far 1909-10 

G. A. Parker, '76 .President 

J. S. Eaton, '98 First Vice-President 

C. M. Hubbard, '92 Second Vice-President 

W. B. Hatch, '05 Secretary 

A. S. Kinney, '96 Treasurer 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



207 



m. A. 01. ailuh 0f ^m 

WfCittva fat iflna-in 

A. W. Lublin, '84 President 

Prof. H. E. Chapin, '81 First Vice-President 

W. L. Morse, '95 Second Vice-President 

F. A. Cutter, '07 Third Vice-President 

S. D. Foot, '78 Choragus 

A. L. Fowler, '80 Treasurer 

Dr. J. A. Cutter, '82 Secretary 



208 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



maaaarl^ufi^tta Agnrultural College 
Club 0f llaBl|ttt9ton, i. 01. 

Jfoun^rb 19D4 

(§tCicH& for lana-iain 

A. F. BuRGESSj '95 President 

G. A. Billings, '95 First Vice-President 

J. W. Kellogg, '00 ...... Second Vice-President 

F. D. CouDEN, '04 ...... Secretary and Treasurer 

C. H. Griffin, '04 Choragus 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 209 



WfBt^rn Alumni Assnrtatton at t\}t M, A. 01. 

A. B. Smith President 

P. C. Brooks, ......... Vice-President 

M. H. West ...... Secretary and Treasurer 

W. E. Stone, '82 L. A. Nichols, '71 

J. E. Wilder, '82 G. M. Miles, '75 

H. J. Armstrong, "97 A. B. Smith, '95 

All Alumni West of Buffalo 



210 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



Iff^rttalb lEntnmnlogiral Ollufa 

Dr. W. E. Hinds, '99 President 

Prof. R. I. Smith, '01 Vice-President 

VV. A. Hooker, '99 ...... Secretary and Treasurer 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 2 1 1 



®I|0 AUtmnt 



71 

E. E. THOMPSON, Secretary, Worcester, Mass. 

Allen, Gideon H , KS, B. S., 179 Court Street, New Bedford, Mass , former chairman Board 
of Assessors of Taxes. Considerable Newspaper Work, Reportorial and Editorial, Accountant. 

Bassett, Andrew L., Q. T. V., 36 East River, New York City, Transfer Agent Central Vermont 
Railroad Company. 

BiRNlE, W. P., KS, 34 Sterns Terrace, Springfield, Mass., Paper and Envelope Manufacturer. 

Bowker, William H., B. S., 43 Chatham Street, Boston, Mass., Reside^'ce Concord, Mass., Presi- 
dent Bowker Fertilizer Company. 

Caswell, Lilley B., Athol, Mass., Civil Engineer. 

Cowles, Homer I.., B. S., Amherst, Mass., Farmer. 

Ellsworth, Emory A., 35b Dwight Street, Holyoke, Mass., Architect, Civil and Mechanical Engi" 
near, (Ellsworth and Homes), Member American Society Civil Engineers; Boston Society Civil 
Engineers ; American Waterworks Association ; New England Waterworks Association ; Resi- 
dence 40 Essex Street, Holyoke, Mass. 

Fisher, Jabez F., K2, 94^^ Myrtle Avenue, Fitchburg, Mass , Bookkeeper Parkhill Manufacturing 
Company. 

Fuller, George E., Address unknown. 

Hawley, Frank W., died October 28, 1883, at Belchertown, Mass. 

Herrick, Frederick St. C, D. G. K., died January 19, 1894, at Lawrence, Mass. 

Leonard, George B., LL. B., D. G. K., Springfield, Mass., Clerk of Courts. 

Lyman, Robert W., B. S., LL. B., ^K*, Q. T. V., Courthouse, Northampton, Mass. ; Residence 
II Linden Street, Northampton, Mass.; Registrar of Deeds for Hampshire County, Instructor 
■in Farm Law at Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Morse, James H., died June 21st, 1883, at Salem, Mass. 

Nichols, L. A., B.S., KS, 6233 Cottage Grove Avenue, Chicago, 111., President of the Chicago 
Steel Tape Company, Residence 6054 Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

NORCROSS, Arthur D., D. G. K., Monson, Mass., Merchant and Farmer, retired. State Senator 
Hampshire and Hampden District. 

Page, Joel B., D. G. K., died August 23, 1902, at Conway, Mass. 

Richmond, S. H., B. S., 300^^ 12th Street, Miami, Florida, Residence, Cutler Dade County, Florida, 
Agent Land Department, F. E. E. R. R. ; also Truck Farmer. 

Russell, William D., *K<i>, D. G. K., 353 West 85th Street, New York City, Manufacturer, Paper 
Merchant. 

Smead, Edwin B., Q. T. V., Principal Watkinson Farm School, Hartford, Conn., P. O. Box 335 
Hartford, Conn. 



212 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 

Sparrow, Lewis A., Northboro, Mass., Farmer. 

Strickland, George P., D. G. K., 3825 So. Z Street, Tasema, Washington, Machine Shop 
Foreman. 

Thompson, Edgar E., B. S., Residence, 5 Jaques Avenue, Worcester, Mass., Supervising Princi- 
pal Worcester Schools. 

Tucker, George H., died October i, 1S89, at Spring Creek, Pa. 

Ware, Willard C., Hamilton, Mass., Manager Portland and Boston Clothing Company, Retired. 

Wheeler, William, *K*, K2, 14 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass., Consulting Engineer, Residence 
Concord, Mass. 

Whitney, Frank Le P., D. G. K., Harvard, Mass., Farmer and Miller. 

WooLSON, George Clark, i Madison Avenue, New York City, Representative, Morris Nursery Co. 

72 

S. T. MAYNARD, Secretary, Northboro, Mass. 

Bell, Burleigh C, D. G. K., address unknown. 

Breti', William F., D. G. K., address unknown. 

Clark, John W., Q. T. V., North Hadley, Mass., Fruit Grower. 

Cowles, Frank C, 22354 Pleasant Street, Worcester, Mass., Civil Engineer and Draughtsman. 

Cutler, John C, M. D., D. G. K., 7 Gates Street, Worcester, Mass., Physician, Author Cutler's 

Comprehensive Physiology, Professor in Agricultural College, Sapporo, Japan. Order of Rising 

Sun, conferred by the Emperor. 
Dyer, Edward N., died March 17, iSgr, at HoUiston, Mass. 
Easterbrook, Isaac H., died May 27, igor, at Webster, Mass. 
FiSKE, Edward R., Q. T. V., 234 West Chelten Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa., Manufacturer at 

Germantown, Pa. 
Flagg, Charles O., Q. T. V., Hardvvick, Mass., Superintendent of Mi.\ter's Guernsey Stock Farm. 
Grover, Richard B., 160 Prospect Street, Gloucester, Mass., Clergyman. 
Holmes, Lemuel Le B., Q. T. V., died August 4, 1897, at Mattapoisett, Mass. 
Howe, Edward G., 10233 South Wood Street, Chicago, 111., Author of Systematic Science Teaching, 

also Advanced Elementary Science, Appleton Co. 
Kimball, Francis E., 8 John Street, Worcester, Mass., Accountant. 
LiVERMORE, R. W., Q. T. v., Pates, North Carolina, Residence, Red Springs, North Carolina, 

Merchant and Farmer. 
Mackie, George M., M. D., D. V, S., Q, T. V., died August 31, igo6, at Attleboro, Mass. 
Mayn.^rd, Samuel T., Northboro, Mass., Landscape Gardner aud Fruit Specialist, Author of " Prac- 
tical Fruit Culturist," "Landscape Gardening as applied to Home Decorations," " The Small 

Country Place," etc. 
Morey, Herbert E., 19 Washington Street, Boston, Mass., Residence 34 Hillside Avenue, Maiden, 

Mass., Numismatic Association, American Society of Curio Collections, American Geographical 

Association, British Numismatic Association. 
Peabody, William R., Q. T. V., Genera! Agent A. T. and S. F. R. R., Atchison, Kan. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 2|3 

Salisbury, Frank B., D. G. K., died 1S95, '" Mashonaland, Africa. 

Shaw, E. D., Springfield, Mass., Salesman. 

Snow, George H., Leominster, Mass., Farmer. 

SoMERS, Frederick M., Q. T. V., died February 2, 1894, at Southampton, England. 

Thompson, Samuel C, ^SK, $K<J>, Third Avenue and 177th Street, New York City, Residence 810 

East 173rd Street, New York, Civil Engineer, Engineer of Highways, Bron.x Borough. 
Wells, Henry, Q. T. V., died September 19, 1907, at Jamestown, R. I. 
Whitney, William C, Q. T. V., 313 Nicollet Avenue, Minneapolis, Minn., Architect. 



73 

C. WELLINGTON, Secretary, Amherest, Mass. 

Eldred, Frederick C, Sandwich, Mass., Cranberry Grower. 

Leland, Walter S., D. G. K., Concord Junction, Mass., Reformatory Officer in Massachusetts 
Reformatory. 

Ly'man, Asahel H., D. G. K., died of peneumonia at Mainstee, Mich., January 16, 1896. 

Mills, George W., M.D, 60 Salem Street, Medford Mass., Physician, M.D. (Harvard), Brigade Surgeon, 
Major, Medical Department M. V. M., Member of the Association of Military Surgeons of the 
United States, Chairman of Board of Health, Medford, Mass. 

Minor, John B., Q. T. V., il>K$, New Britain, Conn., Residence Plainville, Conn., Paper Box Man- 
ufacturer. 

Penhallow, David P., M. Sc, D. Sc, Q. T. V., McGill University, Montreal, Canada. Professor 
of Botany in McGill University ; Author of " North American Gymnosperms," Residence 210 
Milton Street, Montreal, Canada. 

Renshaw, James B., B. D. 

Simpson, Henry B., Q. T. V., 902 Pennsylvania Avenue, N. W. Washington, D. C. Care of Mutual 
Fire Insurance Company. 

Wakefield, Albert T., Sheffeld, Mass., Physician. 

Warner, Seth S., KS, Northampton, Mass., Dealer in Agricultural Instruments and FertiHzers. 

Webb, James H., LL. B., itK*, K2, 42 Church Street, New Haven, Conn., Residence Hampden, 
Conn. Lawyer, Instructor in Law School, Yale University, Ameiican Editor of " Kenney's 
Outlines of Criminal Law." 

Wellington, Charles, Ph. D., iK*, K2, Amherst, Mass., Professor and Head of Chemistry De- 
partment at Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Wood, Frank W., address unknown. 



74 

Benedict, John M., M.D., D. G. K., 81 North Main Street, Residence 80 Linden Street, Waterbury 

Conn., Physician. 
Blanchard, William H., Westminster, Vt., Teacher. 



214 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



Chandler, Edward P., D. G. K., Woodville, Oregon, Fruit Grower. 

Curtis, Wolfred F., died November 18, 1S78, at Westminister, Mass. 

Dickinson, Asa W., D. G. K., died November 8, iSgg, at Easton Pa., from apoplectic stioclc. 

Hitchcock, Daniel G., Warren, Mass., Agent Monaton Realty Investing Corporation, New York. 

Manager Ideal Trips to the Catskills and Bahamas. 
HoBBS, John A., Salt Lake City, Utah, Proprietor Rocky Mountain Dairy and Hobb's Creamery. 14 

East Third South Street. 
LiBBY, Edgar H., *Ki1>, Clarkston, Washington, Real Estate and other Investments, especially 

Irrigated Lands, Advisory Counsel in Organization of Irrigation Enterprises. 
Lym.^n, Henry, died January 19, 1S79, ^' Middlefield, Conn. 
Montague, Arthur H., South Hadley, Mass., Farmer. 
Phelps, Henry L., died at West Springfield, Mass., March 3, 1900. 
Smith, Frank S., D. G. K., died December 24, 1899, in Cleveland, Ohio. 

Woodman, Edward E., *K<ti, Danvers, Mass., E. & C. Woodman, Florists' and Garden Supplies. 
Zeli.er, Harrie McK., 908 Summit Avenue, Hagerstown, Md., Fruit Grower and Canvassar. 



75 

MADISON BUNKER, Secretaiy, Newton, Mass. 

Bartlett, Joseph ¥., •SK*, $2K, Barre, Mass., Business Address 5o Trinity Place, New York City, 

Secretary Bowker Fertilizer Company. 
Barri, John A., Bridgeport, Conn., Residence 346 Maple Street, Springfield, Mass., Dealer in Grain, 

Berkshire Mill. 
Bragg, Everett B., Q. T. V., 135 Adams Street, Chicago, 111., Residence 1838 Chicago Avenue, 

Evanstown, III. ; Third Vice-President General Chemical Company. 
Brooks, William P., Ph. D., itK*, <i>SK, Amherst, Mass., Director Massachusetts E.xperiment 

Station. 
Bunker, Madison, D. V. S., 28 Park Street, Newton, Mass., Veterinary Surgeon. 
Callender, Thomas R., D. G. K , Northfield, Mass., Farmer. 

Campbell, Frederick G., *2K, Westminster West, Vt., Farmei and Merino Sheep Raiser. 
Carruth, Herbert S., D. G. K., 32 Tremont Street, Assistant Penal Commissioner, Suffolk County, 

Mass. 
Clark, Zenos Y., 'I'SK, died June 4, 1889, at Amherst, Mass. 
Clay, Jabez, W., *XK, died October i, 1880, at New York City. 

Dodge, George R., Q. T. V., South Hamilton, Mass., General Truck and Small Fruit. 
Hague, Henry, 'i'SK, 695 Southbridge Street, Worcester, Mass., Clergyman. 
Harwood, Peter M., <i>2K, Barre, Mass., Business Address Room 136 State House, Boston, Mass., 

General Agent Massachusetts Dairy Bureau. 
Knapp, Walter H., *K<i>, North Street, Newtonville, Mass., Florist. 
Lee, Lauren K., 611 Ryan Building, St, Paul, Minn., Residence 631 St. Anthony Avenue, St. Louis, 

Minn., Advertising Agency of L. K. Lee & Son. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 215 



Miles, George M., Miles City, Montana, Banker, Merchant and Stock Raiser. 

Otis, Harry P., KS, Florence, Mass., Manufacturer. 

Rice, Frank H., 854 Madison Street, Oakland, Cal., Accountant. 

SOUTHWICK, Andre A., 'i'SK, Taunton, Mass., Farm Superintendent Taunton Insane Hospital, Re- 
sidence 355 Tremont Street, Taunton, Mass. 

Winchester, John F., Q. T. V., D. V. S., Lawrence, Mass., Veterinarian, Member Cattle Com- 
mision of Massachusetts, President American Veterinary Medical Society, President Massachusetts 
Veterinary Association ; Lecturer Massachusetts Agricultural College and New Hampshire State 
College; Inspector Animals for City of Lawrence. 



76 

C. FRED DEUEL, Secretary, Amherst, Mass. 

Bagley, David A., address unknown. 

Bellamy, John, D. G. K., 197 Webster Street, West Newton, Mass , Bookkeeper. 

Chickering, Darius O., Enfield, Mass., Farmer. 

Deuel, C. Fred, $K*, Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Druggist. 

Guild, George W., Q. T. V., died May 8, 1903., of heart disease, at Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Hawley, Joseph M , D. G. K., address unknown. 

Kendall, Hiram, D. G. K., East Greenwich, R. I., Assistant Superintendent for the Shepard 
Company. 

Ladd, Thomas L., Watertown, Mass. 

McConnell, Charles W., D. D. S., K2, 171 Tremont Street, Boston, Mass., Dentist. 

MACLEOD, William A., A. B., LL. B., D. G. K., *K*, 350 Tremont Building, Boston, Mass., Re- 
sidence 22 Tremlett Street, Boston, Mass., Lawyer. 

Mann, George H.,'.6S Stoughton Avenue, Readvills, Mass., Erecting Engineer with B. F. Sturtevant 
Company, Hyde Park, Mass. 

Martin, William E., Sioux Falls, S. D., Bookkeeper. 

Parker, George A., <i'K4i, iI>SK, P. O. Bo.x 1027, Hartford, Conn., Residence 100 Blue Hills Avenue, 
Hartford, Conn., Superintendent of Parks. 

Parker, George L., 807 Washington Street, Dorchester, Mass., Florist. 

Phelps, Charles H., 155 Leonard Street, New York City, Dresden Lithographic Company. 

Porter, William H., *SK, Silver Hill Farm, Agawam, Mass., Farmer. 

Potter, William S., D. G. K., 4 Wallace Block, Lafayette, Ind.; Residence 920 State Street, 
Lafayette, Ind. ; Attorney-at-Law Banker. 

Root, Joseph E., M. D., *SK, 67 Pearl Street, Hartford, Conn., Physician and Surgeon. 

Sears, John M., Ashfield, Mass , Farmer and Town Clerk. 

Smith, Thomas E., D. G. K., died September 20, 1901, at West Chesterfield, Mass., of apoplexy. 

Taft, Cyrus A., died February 7, 1908, at Whitinsville, Mass., of pneumonia. 

Urner, George P., D. G. K., died April, 1897, at Wesley, Mont., from effusion of blood from the 
brain. 



216 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 

Wetmore, Howard G., M. D., D. G. K., died at 63 West 91st Street, New York City, April 27th, 

1906. 
Williams, John E., died January iStli, 1890, at Amherst, Mass. 



77 

Benson, David H., Q. T. V., North Weymouth, Mass. 

Brewer, Charles, Haydenville, Mass. 

Clark, Atherton, SK*, K2, 140 Tremont Street, Boston, Mass., Residence, 231 Waverly Avenue, 

Newton, Mass., with R. H. Stearns & Co. 
HiBBARD, Joseph R., killed by kick of horse, June 17th, iSgg, at Stoughton, Mass. 
Howe, Waldo V., Q. T. V., Newburyport, Mass., Poultry Raiser. 
Mills, James K., D. G. K., Amherst, Mass., Photographer. 
Nye, George F., 420 East 42nd Street, Chicago, 111., with Swift & Co. 
Parker, Henry F., LL. B., died December 21, 1897, at Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Porto, Raymundo M. Da. S., *2K, Para, Brazil, Sub-Director Museum Pareuse. 
Southmayd, John E., $2K, died December nth, 1878, at Minneapolis, Minn. 
WvMAN, Joseph, 347 Massachusetts Avenue, Arlington, Mass., Market Gardener. 



78 

C. O. LOVELL, Secretary. 47 Summer Street, Boston, Mass. 

Baker, David E., *2K, 227 Walnut Street, Newtonville, Mass., Physician. 

Boutwell, W. L., died September 28th, 1906, at Northampton, Mass., of meningitis. 

Brigham, Arthur A., Ph. D., Brookings, So. Dakota, Principal So. Dakota School of Agriculture. 

Choate, Edward C, Q. T. V., died at Southboro, Mass., January 18th, 1905, of appendicitis. 

Coburn, Charles F., Q. T. V., died December 26th, 1901, at Lowell, Mass. 

Foot, Sanford D., Q. T. V., with Nicholson File Co., Patterson, N. J., Residence 231 West 70th 

Street, New York City. 
Hall, Josiah N., M. D., <i>K<i>, *SK, 30S Jackson Building, Denver, Colo. 
Heath, Henry F , D. G. K., 35 Nassau Street, New York City, Lawyer. 
Howe, Charles S , Ph. D., D. Sc, *K*, *SK, 2060 Cornell Road, Cleveland, Ohio, President of the 

Case School of Applied Science. 
Hubbard, Henry F., Q. T. V., 26 Custom House Street, Providence, R. I., Residence 37 Elm Grove 

Avenue, Providence, R. L, Representing A. P. Irvin & Co., of New York City, Tea Importers. 
Hunt, John F., 27 State Street, Boston, Mass., Residence 232 Ferry Street, Maiden, Mass., Building 

Superintendent. 
LovELL, Charles O., Q. T. V., 48 Summer Street, Boston, Mass., i Madison Avenue, New York 

City ; Residence Paul Street, Watertown, Mass., President United Photo Materials Co. 
Lyman, Charles E., Middlefield, Conn., Farmer. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 217 



Myrick, Lockwood, Hammonton, N. J., Fruit Grower. 

Osgood, Frederick H., D. V. S., M. R. C. V. S., Q. T. V., 50 Village Street, Boston, Mass., 

Veterinarian. 
Spofford, Amos L., <tSK, Georgetown, Mass., Farmer. 
Stockbridge, Horace E., Ph. D., K2, Atlanta, Ga., Editor " Southern Ruralist," Author of "Rocks 

and Soils." 
Tuckerman, Frederick, M. A., Ph. D., Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Anatomist, Author of various 

papers on Anatomy in American and European Journals. 
Washburn, John H., M. A., Ph. D., K2, Farm School, Penn., Director National Farm School, 

Professor of Chemistry, Formerly President Rhode Island College for thirteen years. 
Woodbury, Rufus P., Q. T. V., 3612 Campbell Street, Kansas City, Mo., Secretary Kansas City 

Live Stock Exchange. 



79 

R. S. SWAN, Secretary, Worcester, Mass. 

Dickinson, Richard S., Columbus, Neb., Farmer. 

Green, Samuel B., *K*, K2, 2095 Commonwealth Avenue, Saint Anthony Park, Minn., Author of 

"Amateur Fruit Growing," "Vegetable Gardening," "Forestry in Minnesota," "Principles of 

American Forestry," "Hedges and Windbreaks"; Professor of Horticulture and Forestry, 

University of Minnesota. 
Rudolph, Charles, LL. B., Q. T. V., Hotel Rexford, Boston, Mass., Lawyer and Real Estate Agent. 
Sherman, Walter A., D. V. S., M. D., D. G. K., 340 Central Street, Residence 214 Pawtucket Street, 

Lowell, Mass., Veterinary Surgeon. 
Smith, George P., KS, Sunderland, Mass., Farmer. 

Swan, Roscoe W., M. D., D. G. K., 41 Pleasant Street, Worcester, Mass., Physician. 
Waldron, Hiram E. B., Q. T. V., 12 West River Street, Residence 112 Highland Street, Hyde 

Park, Mass., Real Estate and Insurance. 



'80 

Fowler, Alvan L., *SK, 60 Sound View Avenue, New Rochelle, N. Y., Receiver Manisquan 

National Bank, Manisquan, N. J. 
Gladwin, Frederick E., 'I'SK, 2401 North i6th Street, Philadelphia, Pa., Mining Engineer. 
Lee, William G., D. G. K., Holyoke, Mass., Architect and Civil Engineer. 
McQueen, Charles M., *2K, 802 Pine Street, St. Louis, Mo. 
Parker, William C, 'i'SK, LL. B., 294 Washington Street, 636 Old South Building, Boston, Mass. 

Residence 162 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Mass., Lawyer, State Representative from Boston. 
Ripley, George A., Q. T. V., Jefferson, Mass., Farmer. 
Stone, Almon H., Wareham, Mass., Cranberry Grower. 



218 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



'81 

J. L. HILLS, Secretary, Burlington, Vt. 

Bowman, Charles A., C. S. C, Dillaye Building, Syracuse, N. J., Residence 609 Astrom Avenue; 

Secretary and Treasurer of Morrison & Farrington, Inc., Civil Engineers. 
BovNTON, Charles E., M. D., died at Los Banos, Cal., date unknown. 
Carr, W. Frank, C. E., Q. T. V., 116 Thirty-Second Street, Milwaukee, Wis., Chief Engineer 

for the Falk Company; Member American Society of Civil Engineers. 
Chapin, Henry E., M. Sc , D. S. C , 49 Lefferts Avenue, Richmond Hill, New York City, Teacher 

of Biology and Physiology ; Joint Author Chapin and Rettger's " Elementary Zoology and 

Laboratory Guide"; Honorary Fellow Society Biological Chemistry, London ; President Depart- 
' ment of Botany, Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences. 
Fairfield, Frank H., Q. T. V., 42 Broadway, New York, President Black Sand Smelting Company, 

Residence, 153 Fourth Avenue, East Orange, N. J. 
Flint, Charles L., Q. T. V., died June, 1904. 

Hashiguchi, Boonzo, D. G. IC, died August 12th, 1903, at Tokio, Japan. 
Hills, Joseph L., Sc. D., *K*, KS, 55 No. Prospect Street, Burlington, Vt., Dean, Department 

of Agriculture, University of Vermont; Director Vermont Agricultural E.'^periment Station. 
Howe, Elmer D., itSK, Fair View Farm, Marlboro, Mass., Farmer, Secretary of Salisbury and 

Amesbury Mutual P'ire Insurance Co.; Trustee of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Peter.s, Austin D., D. V. S., M. R. C. V. S., Q. T. V., State House, Boston, Mass., Residence 

Walnut Avenue, Jamaica Plains, Mass., Veterinarian and Chief of Cattle Bureau, Massachusetts 

State Board of Agriculture. 
Rawson, Edward B., D. G. K., 226 East Sixteenth Street, New York City; Residence, 322 Sher- 

merhort Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Superintendent Friends' School, New York and Brooklyn ; 

Lecturer on Education, Swarthmore College. 
Smith, Hiram F. M., M. D., 9 East Main Street, Orange, Mass , Physician. 

Spalding, Abel W., C. S. C, 422 Globe Block, Seattle, Wash,, Spalding and Umbrecht, Archi- 
tects; President Washington State Chapter, American Institute of Architects, 1906. 
Taylor, Frederick P., D. G. K., Athens, Tenn., Farmer. 
Warner, Clarence D., D. G. K., died October 16, 1905, at Kimmswick, Mo. 
Whittaker, Arthur, D. G. K., died March, 1906, at Needham, Mass. 
Wilcox, Henry H., D. G. K., died at Honolulu, January nth, 1899. 
Young, Charles E., M. D., "tSK, Aberdeen, S. D., Physician. 



'82 

G. D. HOWE, Secretary, Bangor, Me. 

Allen, Francis S., M. D., D. V. S., C. S. C, 221 Main Street, Nashua, New Hampshire. 
Alpin, George T., Q. T. V., East Putney, Vt., Farmer. 
Beach, C. Edward, D. G. K., West Hartford, Conn., Farmer. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 219 



Bingham, Eugene P., C. S. C, died March 31st, 1904, at Los Angeles, Cal. 

Bishop, William H., i'SK, Farm School, Pa., Professor of Agriculture at the National Farm 
School. 

Brodt, Harry S., Q. T. V., died at Rawlins, Wyo., December, igo6. 

Chandler, Everett S., B. D., C. .S. C, North Judson, Indiana, R. F. D.'No. 3, Clergyman. 

Cooper, James W., D. G. K., i Court Street, Plymouth, Mass., Pharmacist; Residence, 142 Court 
Street. 

Cutter, John A., M. D., 325 West 83rd Street, New York, Physician; Author of "Fatty Ills and 
their Masquerades," and "Food: It's Relation to Health and Disease." 

Damon, Samuel C, Assistant, Agronomy, Rhode Island Experiment Station, Kingston, R. I. 

Floyd, Charles W., died October toth, 18S3, at Dorchester, Mass. 

GooDALE, David, Q. T. V., Marlboro, Mass., Farmer. 

HiLLMAN, Charles D., *SK, Watsonville, Cal., R. F. D. No. 3, Fruit Grower. 

Howard, Joseph H., died of typhoid fever, February 13th, iSSg, at Minnsela, S. D. 

Howe, George D., 25 Winter Street, Bangor, Me., Commercial Traveller for H. J. Heinz Co. 

Jones, Frank W., Q. T. V., Asseneppi, Mass., Teacher. 

Kingman, Morris B., ii Amity Street, Amherst, Mass., Florist; Residence, 91 South Pleasant Street. 

Kinney, B. A., Littleton, N. H., or 18 Bleachery Street, Lowell, Mass.; Travelling Salesman. 

May, Frederick G., $2K, 68 East Street, Dorchsster, Mass., Printer ; Residence, 34 Adams Street. 

Morse, William A., Q. T. V., 15 Auburn Street, Melrose Highlands, Mass.; Accountant at 28 
State Street, Boston, Mass. 

Myrick, Herbert, i to 57 Worthington Street, Springfield, Mass.; Editor, Author, Publisher^ 
Manufacturer ; has completed largest office building of reinforced concrete in United States ; 
Residence, 151 Bowdoin Street. 

Paige, James B., D. V. S., iK<t, Q. T. V., 42 Lincoln Avenue, Amherst, Mass., Professor of 
Veterinary Science at Massachusetts Agricultural College, Veterinarian Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. 

Perkins, Dana E., Medford Square, Civil Engineer; Residence, 12 Riverside Avenue. 

Plumb, Charles S., Q. T. V., Columbus, Ohio, Professor of Animal Husbandry, Ohio State 
University; Author of "Types and Breeds of Farm Animals," "Little Sketches of Famous 
Beef Cattle," "Indian Corn Culture," "Biographical Sketches of American Agricultural 
Scientists." 

Shiverick, Asa F., KS, 100 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 111., Vice-President of Tobey Furniture 
Company. 

Stone. Winthrope E., Ph. D., LL. D , C. S. C, 146 North Grant Street, West La Fayette, Ind.; 
President of Purdue University. 

Taft, Levi R., *K*, C. S. C, Agricultural College, Michigan, Horticulturist, Michigan Experi- 
ment Station; Superintendent Farmers' Institutes; Author of "Greenhouse Construction," 
"Greenhouse Management," and collaborator " Garden Making," and " Practical Gardening and 
Farming." 

Taylor, Alfred H., D. G. K., Brunswick, Neb., Farmer. 

Thurston, Wilbur H., died August, 1900, at Cape Nome, Alaska. 

Wilder, John E., *K*, K2, 212-214 Lake Street, Chicago, 111., Wholesale Leather Dealer and 
Tanner, Trustee of Beloit College, Beloit, Wis. 



220 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



Williams, James S., Q. T. V., President and General Manager of The Williams Brothers Manu- 
facturing Company, Glastonbury, Conn. 

Windsor, Joseph L., 922 State Life Building, Indianapolis, Ind. ; Residence, La Grange, Ind. ; 
Special Agent Glen Falls Insurance Company, Specializing in Insurance Engineering. 



'83 

S. M. HOLMAN, Secretary, Attleboro, Mass. 
Bagley, Sidney C, "SSK, Tremont Street, Melrose Highlands, Mass., Cigar Packer. 
Bishop, Edgar A., C. S. C, Hampton, Va., Director of Agriculture in Hampton Normal and 

■ Agricultural Institute. 
Brahne, Domincos H., D. G. K., Address unknown. 
Hevia, Alfred A., *2K, 61 Nassau Street, New York City, Mortgage Investments and 

Insurance 
Holman, Samuel M., Q. T. V., 39 Pleasant Street, Attleboro, Mass., Real Estate; Photographer; 

Member of Massachusetts Legislature, House of Representatives. 
LiNDSEY, Joseph B., A. M., Ph. D., *K*, C. S. C, 47 Lincoln Avenue, Amherst, Mass., Chemist. 

Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station. 
MiNOTT, Charles W., C. S. C, 6 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass., Room loog; Residence, R. F. D., 

No. 2, Westminster, Mass; State Agent, Gypsy and Brown Tail Moth Suppression. 
NoHRSE, David O., C. S. C, Clemson, S. C, Professor of Animal Husbandry and Dairying, 

Clerason College. 
Preston, Charles H., *K#, KD, Danvers, Mass., Farmer; Trustee Massachusetts Agricultural 

College; Residence, Hathorne, Mass. 
Wheeler, Homer J., M. A., Ph. D., C. S. C, Kingston, R. I., Director Rhode Island Agricultural 

Experiment Station. 

'84 

L. SMITH, Secretary, 25 Mercantile Street, Worcester, Mass. 
Hermes, Charles, Q. T. V., address unknown. 

Holland, Harry D., Amherst, Mass., Merchant, Firm of Holland & Gallond. 
Jones, Elisha A. *2K, New Canaan, Conn., Superintendent of Waveny Farms. 
Smith, Llewellyn, Q. T. V., 25 Mercantile Street, Worcester, Mass.; Residence, 679 Main Street; 
Representative Norfolk Clothes Reel Co. 



'85 

E. W. ALLEN, Secretary, Washington, D. C. 

Allen, Edwin W., Ph. D., *K*, C. S. C, Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C, As- 
sistant Director, Office of Experiment Stations; Editor of "Experiment Station Record"; 
Residence, 1933 Biltmore Street, Washington, D. C; Secretary for Country Life Commission. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 221 

Almeida, Luciano J. De., D. G. K., Director and Professor of Agriculture of Piracicola Agri- 
cultural College, Estate de Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

Barber, George H., M. D., Q. T. V., United States Naval Training Station, Newport, R. I., 
Physician and Surgeon in U. S. Navy. 

Browne, Charles W., *K*, Temple, New Hampshire, Farmer. 

GOLDTHWAIT, JOEL E., M. D., $K$, C. S. C, Milton, Mass., Physician. 

Howell, Hezekiah, *SK, Washington Ville, Orange Co., New York, Farmer. 

Leary, Lewis C, died April 3rd, 1S88, at Cambridge, Mass. 

Phelps, Charles S., ^K*, K2, ChapinviUe, Conn., Superintendent Farm Scoville Brothers. 

Taylor, Isaac N., Jr., D. G. K., 84-86 2nd Street, San Francisco, Cal., Secretary Electric Rail 
way and Manufacturing Supply Co. 

Tekirian, Benoni O., C. S. C, 201 West irSth Street, New York City, Dealer in Oriental Rugs. 

•86 

DR. WINFIELD AYRES, Secretary, 616 Madison Ave., New York. 

Ateshian, Osgan H., C. S. C, Hotel San Remo, New York City, Dealer in Oriental Rugs and 
Carpets. 

Atkins, William H., D. G. K., Burnside, Conn., Florist. 

Ayres, Winfield, M. D., D. G. K., 616 Madison Avenue, New York City; Residence, Shippan 
Point, Stamford, Conn., Physician; Adjunct Professor of Surgery at New York Post Graduate 
Medical School. 

Carpenter, David F., ^K*. K2, Mountain View, New Hampshire; Superintendent Schools of 
Ossipee and Tamworth. 

Clapp, Charles W., C. S. C, 102 Main Street, Northampton, Mass., Assistant Superintendent 
Connecticut Valley Electric R. R. 

Duncan, Richard F., M. D, *2K, 1236 Westminster Street, Providence, R. I., Physician. 

Eaton, William A., D. G. K., No. i Madison Avenue, New York City, Wholesale Lumber. 

Felt, Charles F. W., *K*, C. S. C , Chief Engineer, Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe R. R. Co., 
Galveston, Texas. 

Mackintosh, Richard B., *K#, D. G. K., 21 Aborn Street, Peabody, Mass., Acting Superin- 
tendent Salem P'raternity. 

Sanborn, Kingsbury, #SK, Riverside, Cal., Chief Engineer to Riverside Water Co.; Civil and 
Hydraulic Engineer. 

Stone, George E., Ph. D., *K#, *2K, Amherst, Mass., Professor of Botany, Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College. 

Stone, George S., D. G. K., Otter River, Mass., Farmer. 

'87 

F. H. FOWLER, Secretary, Boston, Mass. 
Almeida, Augusto L. De., D. G. K., Rio Janeiro, Brazil, Coffee Commission Merchant. 
Barrett, Edward W., M. D., D. G. K., 67 Main Street, Medford, Mass., Physician. 



222 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 

Caldwell, William H., KS, Peterboro, N. H., Secretary and Treasurer American Guernsey Cattle 
Club; Proprietor Clover Ridge Farm; Editor of Guernsey Publications; Correspondent to 
Agricultural Press and Contributions to Agricultural Experiment Station. Publication 

CarpEiNTER, Frank B., $K$, C. S. C, ii South Twelfth Street, Richmond, Va., Residence 602 
Lamb Avenue, Barton Heights, Richmond, Va., Chief Chemist Virginia and Carolina Chemical 
Company. 

Chase, William E., East Burnside and West Avenues, Portland, Ore., Fruit and Garden. 

Davis, Frederick A., M. D., C. S. C, 327 Jackson Block, Denver, Col., Eye and Ear Specialist. 

FISHERDICK, Cyrus W., C. S. C, Laplanta, New Mexico, Keeper of Varch Store. 

Flint, Edward R., Ph. D., M. D., Q. T. V., Professor of Chemistry, University of Florida, 
Gainsville, Fla. 

Fowler, Frederick H., *K*, C. S. C, Clerk to Superintendent of State Industrial School for 
Boys, Shirley, Mass.; Author of a " Synoptical and Analytical Index," "Agriculture of Massa- 
chusetts, 1837-1892." 

Howe, Clinton S., C. S. C, West Medway, Mass., Farmer. 

Marsh, James M., C. S. C, 391 Chestnut Street, Lynn, Mass., Treasurer of G. E. Marsh & Com- 
pany, Manufacturers of Good Will Soap. 

Marshall, Charles L., D. G. K., 107 Stevens Street, Lowell, Mass., Florist and Market Gardener. 

Meehan, Thomas F., D. G. K., died April 4th, 1905, at Boston, Mass., of pneumonia. 

Osterhout, J. C, Chelmsford, Mass., Farmer. 

Richardson, Evan F., *SK, Millis, Mass., Farmer, County Commissioner. 

Rideout, Henry N. W., Q. T. V., 7 Howe Street, Somerville, Mass., Assistant Paymaster, Office 
Fitchburg Division Boston & Maine Railroad, Boston, Mass. 

TOLMAN, W. N., *2*, 24 North Twenty Second Street, Philadelphia, Pa., Civil Engineer, Erect- 
ing Engineer with United Gas Improvement Company. 

ToRRELLY, FIRININO Da S., Cidado de Rio Grande do Sud, Brazil, Stock Raising. 

Watson, Charles H., Q. T. V., Wool Exchange, West Broadway and Beach Streets, New York 
City, Representative Wool Department for Swift & Co. 



'88 

H. C. BLISS, Secretarv, Attleboro, Mass. 

Belden, Edward H , C. S. C, 39 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass., Residence 18 Park View Street, 
Roxbury, Mass., with Edison Electric Illuminating Company, of Boston. 

Bliss, Herbert C, *2, 14 Mechanic Street, Attleboro, Mass., Manufacturing Jeweler; Treasurer 
of Bliss Brothers Co.; Director of Providence Jewelers' Board of Trade, Providence, K. I. 

Brooks, Fred K., C. S. C, 14 Washington Street, Haverhill, Mass., Residence 36 Brockton Ave- 
nue, Proprietor Merrimac Laundry. 

CooLEY Fred S., *K*, *S#, Bozeman, Mont., Supervisor of Farmers' Institutes for State of 
Montana; Residence 603 South Central Street; Head of Extension Department, Mcntana 
College of Agriculture. 

Dickinson, P^dwin H., C. S. C, Nonh Amherst, Mass., Farmer. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 223 

Field, Samuel H., C. S. C, North Hatfield, Mass., Farmer. 

Foster, Francis H., Andover, Mass., Civil Engineer. 

Hayward, Albert I., B. A., C. S. C, Ashby, Mass., Farmer. 

Holt, Jonathan E., C. S. C, 67 Bartlet Street, Andover, Mass., Students' Boarding House. 

Kinney, Lorenzo F., Kingston, R. I., Commercial Horticulture. 

Knapp, Edward E., K2, 3144 Passyunk Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa.; Residence Wells Avenue, 
Llanwellyn, Pa., in Mechanical Department Atlantic Refining Company, Philadelphia- 

MrsHlMA, Viscount Y.ataro, D. G. K., 5 Shinrudo, Azabuku, Japan, Farmer. 

Moore, Robert B., *K#, C. S. C, P. O. Bo.x 2530, Passyunk Station, Philadelphia, Pa., Resi- 
dence 5617 Girard Avenue, Superintendent Tygert-Allen Works, American Agricultural Chemical 
Company 

Newman, Geo. E., Q. T. V., 287 North First Street, San Jose, Cal., Residence 164 South Critten- 
den Street, Model Creamery, Wholesale and Retail Dairy Products. 

NoYES, Frank F., D. G. K., 472 North Jackson Street, Atlanta, Ga., Superintendent of Lines and 
Sub-stations for the Atlantic Water and Electric Power Co. 

Parsons, Wilfred A., #2#, Southampton, Mass., Farmer. 

Rice, Thomas, D. G. K., Business address, "Daily News," Fall River, Mass. ; Residence Savoy 
Hotel, Fall River. Mass., Reporter for "Daily News." 

Shepardson, William M., C. S. C, Middlebury, Conn., Landscape Gardener. 

Shimer, Boyer L., Q. T. v., Bethlehem, Pa., Mount Airy Park Farm, Breeder of Pure Bred 
Stock and Poultry; Real Estate Business. 



'89 

C. S. CROCKER, Secretary, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Blair, James R., Q. T. V., 158 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Mass.; Residence 35 Maple 

Avenue, Boston, Superintendent C. Brigham Co., Milk Contractois. 
Copeland, Arthur D., K2, died September 3rd, 1907, at Emerson Hospital, Boston, after an 

operation for appendicitis. 
Crocker, Charles S., K2., 2453 Carpenter Street, Philadelphia, Pa., Chemist with American 

Agricultural Chemical Co. 
Davis, Franklin W., *K(f, #SK, 85 Colberg Avenue, Roslindale, Mass., Telegraph Editor 

"Boston Record"; Secretary Massachusetts Agricultural College Alumni Club 1899-1903; 

President, 190S. 
Hartwell, Burt L., Ph. D., M. Sc, *K*, C. S. C, Kingston, R. I., Chemist, Rhode Island 

Agricultural E,xperiment Station ; Professor Agricultural Chemistry, Rhode Island State College. 
Hubbard, Dwight L., C. S. C, 645 Washington Street, Brighton, Mass., Civil Engineer, City 

Engineer's Office, Boston, Mass. 
HuTCHiNGS, James T., iSK, Assistant General Manager of Rochester Railway and Light Co. 

Residential address 656 Averell Avenue. 
Kellogg, William A., *SK, Amherst, Mass. 
Miles, Arthur L., D. D. S., C. S. C, 12 Magazine Street, Cambridge, Mass., Dentist. 



224 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



North, Mark N., M. D. V., Q. T. V., Corner Bay and Green Streets, Cambridge, Mass. 
Veterinarian. 

NouRSE, Arthur M., C. S. C, Westboro, Mass., Farmer. 

Sellew, Robert P., *2K, 31 Whitney Building, Boston, Mass.; Residence 166 Kent Street, Brook- 
line, Mass., Eastern Representative of the J. W. Biles Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Whitney, Charles A., C. S. C, Upton, Mass., Farmer. 

Woodbury, Herbert E., C. S. C, 1512 Delaware Street, Indianapolis, Indiana. 



'90 



F. W. MOSSMAN, Secretary, Westminster, Mass. 
Barry, David, *K*, Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Superintendent Electric Light Works. 
Bliss, Clinton E., D. G. K., died August 24th, 1894, at Attleboro, Mass. 
Castro, Arthur De M., D. G. K., died May 2nd, 1894, at Juiz de Fora, Minas, Brazil. 
Dickinson, Dwight, W., D. M. D., Q. T. v., 25 Melendy Avenue, Watertown, Mass., Dentist. 
Felton, Truman P., C. S. C, West Berlin, Mass., Farmer. 
Gregory, Edgar, C. S. C, Marblehead, Mass., Proprietor J. J. H. Gregory & Son, Seedsmen, 

Marblehead, Mass. 
Haskins, Henri M., Q. T. V., 87 N. Pleasant Street, Amherst, Mass., Chemist, in charge of 

Official Inspection of Commercial Fertilizers, Massachusetts Experiment Station, Amherst, Mass. 
Herreo, Jose M., D. G. K., Havana, Cuba, Associate Editor, " Diario de la Marina." 
Jones, Charles H., iK*, Q. T. V., Burlington, Vt., Chemist, Vermont Agricultural E.xperinient 

Station. 
LoRiNG, John S., died at Orlando, Florida, January 17th, 1903. 

McCloud, Albert C, Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Life and Fire Insurance Agent, Real Estate. 
MossMAN, Fred W., C. S. C, Westminster, Mass., Farmer. 
Russell, Henry L., D. G. K., 126 No. Main Street, Pawtucket, R. I.; Residence 34 Greene Street, 

Secretary Pawtucket Ice Co. 
SiMONDS, George B., C. S. C, 63 Forest Street. Fitchburg, Mass., Postal Service. 
Smith, Frederick J., M. Sc, *K*, Q. T. V., Corner of Smith and Huntington Streets, Brooklyn, 

N. Y.; Residence 46 Reid Street, Elizabeth, N. J., Manufacturing Chemist, Insecticides ; Author 

of papers. Board of Agriculture, 1897. 
Stowe, Arthur N., Q. T. V., Hudson, Mass., Fruit Grower. 

Taft, Walter E., D. G. K,, Berlin, N. H., Draughtsman and Secretary Sheeley Automatic Rail- 
road Signal Co. 
Taylor, Frederick L. M. D., Q. T. V., 524 Warren Street, Boston, Mass., Physician ; Medical 

Director of Walter Baker Sanatorium. 
West, John S , Q. T. V., died at Belchertown, July 13th, 1902. 
Williams, Frank O., Q. T. V., Sunderland, Mass., Farmer. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 225 



'91 

W. A. BROWN, Secretary, Greenfield, Mass. 

Arnold, Frank L., #K*, Q. T. V., 32 School Street, No. Woburn, Mass., Superintendent Oil of 

Vitriol Department of the Merrimac Chemical Company. 
Brown, Walter A., C. S. C, 93 Main Street, Greenfield, Mass., Civil and Landscape Engineer; 

Treasurer of the firm of Clapp & Abercrombie Company, Greenfield, Mass. 
Carpe.\ter, Malcolm A., C. S. C , 448 Huron Avenue, Cambridge, Mass., Landscape Gardener. 
Eames, Aldice G., *2K, North Wilmington, Mass., Literary Work. 
Felt, E. Porter, D. Sc, Cornell, C. S. C, Geological Hall, Albany, N. Y. ; Residence Nassau, 

Rensselaer County, N. Y. ; State Entomologist; Author of "Insects Affecting Park and Wood. 

land Trees"; also Bulletins and Reports. 
Field, Henry J., LL. B., Q. T. V., Greenfield, Mass., Lawyer; Judge Franklin District Court. 
Gay, Willard W., D. G. K., Melrose, Mass., Landscape Designer and Planter. 
Horner, Louis F., C. S. C, 3905 Wisconsin Place, Los Angeles, Cal., Landscape Architect 

Landscape Gardener; Superintendent Cinque Foil Water Company; President Santa Barbara 

Horticultural Society ; Secretary Montecito Hall and Library Association. 
Howard, Henry M., C. S. C, Fuller Street, West Newton, Mass., Market Gardener. 
Hull, John B., Jr., D. G. K., Great Barrington, Mass., Coal Dealer. 
Johnson, Charles H., D. G. K., Lynn, Mass., General Electric Works. 
Lage, Oscar V. B., D. G. K., Juiz de Fora, Minas, Brazil, Stock Raiser. 
Legate, Howard N., LL. B, D. G. K., Room 136, State House, Boston, Mass.; Residence 11 

Copeland Place, Roxbury, Mass., Clerk State Board of Agriculture ; Boston Y. M. C. A. 

Evening Law School, Class of igoS. 

Magill, Claude A., 902 Chapel Street, New Haven, Conn.; Residence 59 Division Street, New 
Haven; General Manager of The Connecticut Hassem Paving Company. 

Paige, Walter C, D. G. K., 725 Fourth Avenue, Louisville, Ky. ; Field Secretary of Y. M. C. A. 

Ruggles, Murray, C. S. C, Milton, Mass., Superintendent of Electric Works. 

Sawyer, Arthur H., Q. T. V., 98 Hudson Street, Jersey City, N. J. ; Residence 131 N. i6th St., 
Cement Inspector with Hudson Companies, New York City. 

Shores, Harvey T., M. D., K2, 78 Main Street, Northampton, Mass., R esidence, 177 Elm Street 
Physician, State Health Inspector for Hampshire and Franklin Counties. 



'92 

H. M. THOMSON, Secretary, Amherst, Mass. 

Beals, Alfred T., Q. T. V., 120 East 23rd Street, New York City, Magazine Photographer. 

Boynton, Walter I., D. D. S., Q. T. V., 310 Main Street, Springfield, Mass., Residence, 73 
Dartniouth Street, Dentist, 



226 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



Clark, Edward E., C. S. C, Hudson, Mass., Farmer. 

Crane, Henry E., C. S. C, Quincy, Mass., F. H. Crane & Sons, Grain Dealers. 

Deuel, James E., Ph. G. Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Druggist. 

Emerson, Henry E., C. S. C, Master Mechanic, Arlington Mills, Lawrence, Mass. 

Field, Judson L., Q. T. V., 294 Fifth Avenue, Chicago, III., Residence, Oak Park, 111., Salesman 
with Jenkins, Kreer & Co., Dry Goods Commission Merchants, Chicago. 

Fletcher, William, C. S. C, Chelmsford, Mass., Drummer. 

Graham, Charles S., C. S. C, Holden, Mass., Farmer. 

Holland, Edward B., M. S., $K$, KS, 2S North Prospect Street, Amherst, Mass., Associate 
Chemist, Massachusetts Agricultural E.xperiment Station, Department of Plant and Animal 
Chemistry. 

Hubbard, Cyrus M., Q. T. V., Sunderland, Mass., Tobacco Farming. 

Knight, Jewell B., M. S., Q. T. V., Poona, India, Residence, Kirkel, India, Professor of Agri- 
culture and Director Experiment Station, Poona College. 

Lyman, Richard P., M. D. V., Q. T. V., Residence, 1336 East 15th Street, Kansas City, Mo., 
Veterinary Surgeon ; Secretary American Veterinary Medical Association ; Editor Americair 
Veterinary Medical Association Annual ; Member State Board of Veterinary Examiners ; Or 
ganizer and First President of State Examining Board of Veterinary Surgeons; and Author 
of Laws Pertaining to Glanders and Rabies in the State of Connecticut. 

Plumb, Frank H., Q. T. V., Stafford Springs, Conn., Farmer. 

Rogers, Elliott, $2K, Vice-President and General Manager N. F. Bd. Co., Kennebunk, Me. 

Smith, Robert H., died March 25th, igoo, at Amherst, Mass. 

Stockbridge, Francis G., *K*. D. G. K., Narcissa, Pa., Superintendent of Triple Springs Farm. 

Taylor George E., Jr., *K*, Q. T. V., Shelburne, Mass., Farmer, Breeder of Pure-Bred Short- 
horn Cattle ; President Connecticut Valley Breeders' Association. 

Thomson, Henry M., *K*, C. S. C, Amherst, Mass., Farmer. 

West, Homer C, Q. T. V., Belchertown, Mass., Traveling Agent. 

Willard, George B., $2K, Waltham, Mass., City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes. 

Williams, Milton H., M. D. V., Q. T. V., Sutiderland, Mass., Veterinarian. 



'93 



F. A. SMITH, Secretary, Ipswich, Mass. 

Baker, Joseph, Q. T. V., Riverside Farm, North Grosvenor Dale, Conn., Farmer. 

Bartlett, Frederick G., D. G. K., 298 Cabot Street, Holyoke, Mass., Sexton Forestdale Ceme. 

tery. 
Clark, Henry D., D. V. S., C. S. C, 15 Central Street, Fitchburg, Mass., Residence, 69 High 

Street, Veterinary Surgeon. 

Curley, George F., M. D., ^K*, C. S. C, io Congress Street, Milford, Mass., Physician and 
Surgeon. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 227 



Davis, Herbert C, Q. T. v., 45 West Cain Street, Calant, Ga., Railway Postal Clerk, U. S. 
Government. 

Goodrich, Chas. A., M. D., D. G. K., 61 North Beacon Street, Hartford, Conn., Residence, 61 
North Beacon Street, Physician. 

Harlow, Harry J., KS, Shrewsbury, Mass., Dairyman. 

Harlow, Francis T., *2K, P. O. Bo.k 106. Marshfteld, Mass., Farmer and Cranberry Grower. 

Hawks, Ernest A., C. S. C, P'ourth and Broad Streets, Richmomd, Va., Evangelist. 

Henderson, Frank H., D. G. K., New York City, Rural Engineer. 

Howard, Edwin C, #SK, Corner B and Third Streets, South Boston, Mass., Residence, 156 
Hillside Avenue, Arlington Heights, Mass., Sub-Master Lawrence School, Boston, Mass. 

HOYT, Franklin S., A. M., C. S. C, 4 Park Street, Boston, Mass., Residence, 44 Winthrop 
Street, West Newton, Mass. Editor Educational Department, Houghton, Mifflin & Company. 

Lehnert, Eugene H., D. V. S. 4>K*, KS, Storrs, Conn., Professor of Veterinary Science and 
Physiology, Connecticut Agricultural College. 

Melendy, a. Edward, Q. T. V., Quincy, Mass., Government Drafting Rooms, Fore River Ship- 
building Company; Residence, 11 Grant Street, Wollaston, Mass.; Weight Clerk, C. and R. 
Department, U. S. Navy. 

Perry, John R., ioi Tremont Street, Boston, Mass., Interior Decorator. 

Smith, Cotton A., Ph. B., Yale, '94, Q. T. V., 327 Douglas Building, Los Angeles, Cal., Resi- 
dence, 323 South Hill Street; Real Estate Broker. 

Smith, Fred A., C. S. C, Turner Hill, Ipswich, Mass., Manager of a Country Estate. 

Smith, Luther W., ^SK, Manteno, 111., Stock and General Farmer. 

Staples, Henry F., M. D., C. S. C , 802 Rose Building, Cleveland, Ohio, Residence, 8628 Wade 
Park Avenue, Physician and Surgeon; Professor of Hygiene, Cleveland Homeopathic Medical 
College; Secretary Homeopathic Medical Society of Ohio; President of Cleveland Homeo- 
pathic Society; Vice-President and Member of Medical Staff of Cleveland City Hospital. 

Tinoco, Luiz a. F., D. G. K., Campos, Rio Janeiro, Brazil, Planter and Manufacturer. 

Walker, Edward J., C. S. C, Bo.\ 315, Clinton, Mass., Farmer. 



'94 



S. FRANCIS HOWARD, Secretary, Amherst, Mass. 

Alderman, Edwin H., C. S. C, R. F. D. No. 2, Chester, Mass., Residence, Middlefield, Farmer. 

AvERELL, Fred G., Q. T. V., 131 State Street, Boston, Mass., Clerk. 

Bacon, Linus H., Q. T. V., Main Street, Spencer, Mass., with Phceni.x Paper Box Company ; 

Residence, 36 Cherry Street. 
Bacon, Theodore Spaulding, M. D., 4>K<i>, 4>2K, 6 Chestnut Street, Springfield, Mass., Physician 

and Surgeon; Secretary Hampden District Medical Society; Director Springfield Academy of 

Medicine; Associate Medical Examiner, Hampden County, District 2. 
Barker, Louis M., C. S. C, Hanson, Mass., Civil Engineer; Inspector of Waterbury Country 

Club, 



228 THE 19U INDEX VOLUME XLI 

BoARDMAN Edwin L., C. S. C, Sheffield, Mass., Farmer. 

Brown Charles L. C. S. C, 870-878 State Street, Springfield, Mass., Residence, West Spring- 
field, Laundryman. 

Curtis, Arthur C, C. S. C, Salisbury School, Salisbury, Conn., Master in English. 

Cutter Arthur H. M. D., 2K, 333 Broadway, Lawrence, Mass., Physician ; Surgeon on Staff, 
of Lawrence General Hospital. 

Davis Perley E., Q. T. V., Granby Mass., Farmer. 

Dickinson, Eliot T., D. M. D., Q. T. V., 138 Main Street, Northampton, Residence, Florence 
Mass., Dentist. 

Fowler, Halley M., Mansfield, Mass., Railway Postal Clerk. 

Fowler, Henry J., C. S. C, North Hadley, Mass., Agent for Alfred Peats cS: Company, Wall 
■ Papers, Boston, Mass.; U. S. Mail Carrier. 

Gifford, John E K2, Sutton, Mass., Farmer. 

Greene, Frederick L., A.M., C. S. C, Red Bluff Union High School, Red Bluff, Cal. ; Princi- 
pal of Anderson High School, Shasta Co., Cal. 

Greene, Ira C, Q. T. V., 222 Pleasant Street, Leominster, Mass., Greene Bros., Coa! Dealers 
and Wholesale Shippers of Ice. 

HiGGiNS, Charles H., D. V. S., C. S. C, Pathologist to Dominion of Canada; in charge of Bi- 
ological Laboratory, Ottawa, Canada; Residence, 74 Fairmount Avenue, Ottawa. 

Howard, S. Francis, M. S., $K$, K2, Amherst, Mass., Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Mass- 
achusetts Agricultural College. 

Keith, Thaddeus F., Q. T. V., 8 Wallace Avenue, Fitchburg, Mass., Residence gS Blossom Street, 
Advertising Contractor. 

Kirkland, Archie H., M. S., 4>SK, 6 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass., Entomologist; Superintend 
ent of Gypsy Moth Work ; Residence Reading Mass. 

LoUNSBURY, Charles P., iliKiI>, #SK, Department of Agriculture Cape Town, South Africa, Gov- 
ernment Entomologist, Colony of Cape of Good Hope; Residence Karlskrona, Kenihvorth, 
Cape Colony. 

Manley, Lowell, KS, Weld Farm, West Roxbury, Mass., Farm Superintendent. 

Merwin, Gf.orge H., C. S. C, Southport, Conn., Stock-farming. 

Morse, Alvertus J , Q. T. V., 59 Main Street, Northampton Mass., Attorney. 

POMEROY, Robert F., C. S. C, South Worthington, Mass., Farmer. 

Putnam, Joseph H, KS, Litchfield, Conn., Farm Superintendent; Lecturer Connecticut State 
Grange. 

Sanderson, William E., KS, 36 Cortlandt Street, New York City, Salesman for J. M. Thorburn 
& Company; Residence 161 State Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Smead, H. Preston, KS, East Dummerston, Vt, p'arm Manager. 

Smith, George E. C. S. C, Belfast, Me., Manager Stock Farm. 

Smith, Ralph E., ^K*, <i'2K, Berkeley, Cal., Associate Professor of Plant Pathology, University 
of California. 

Spaulding, Charles H , *SK, Le.\ington, Mass., United States Inspector of Dredging, Engineer- 
ing Department. 

Walker, Claude F., Ph.D., C. S. C, 155 West 6sth Street, New York City, Residence, 2 Saint 
Nicholas Place, Co-Editor of " Outlines of Inorganic Chemistry and Laboratory Experiments, ' 

White, Elias D , 'I'SK, Athens, Ga., Post Master at Athens, Ga. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 229 



•95 

H. A. BALLOU, Secretary, Barbadoes, West Indies. 

Ballou, Henry A., M S., #K*, Q. T. V., Barbadoes, B, W. I., Entomologist, Imperial Depart" 
ment of Agriculture for the West Indies ; Author of Papers on Economic Entomology. 

Bemis, Waldo L., Q. T. V., Spencer, Mass. 

Billings, George A., C. S. C, Office Farm Management United States Department of Agricul- 
ture, Washington, D. C. ; Residence 3649 nth Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. ; Assistant 
Agriculturist in Dairy Farm Management; Author of Bulletins and Reports of Dairy Hus- 
bandry, New Jersey Experiment Station. 

Brown, Wm. C, D. G. K., 33S Boylston Street, Boston, Mass., with J. J. Wingott, Interior Decorator. 

Burgess, Albert F., M. S., *2k, 1358 Newton Street, Washington, D. C, Entomologist in Bureau 
of Entomology; Secretary of Association of Economic Entomologists. 

Clark, Harry E., *SK, Middlebury, Conn., Superintendent of Biscoe Farm. 

Cooley, Robert A., $SK, Bozeman, Mont., Professor of Zoology and Entomology, Montana Agri- 
cultural College, State Entomologist ; Fellow A. A. A. S. 

Crehore, Charles W., *SK, Chicopee, Mass., Farmer. 

Dickinson, Charles M., M. S. Q. T. V., 76-78 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, III; Residence Park 
Ridge, 111., Seedsman and Florist. 

Fairbanks, Herbert S., KS, 13th and Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia, Pa.; Residence Germantown 
Pa., Patent Attorney, Patents and Patent Causes; with Wiedersheim and Fairbanks. 

Foley, Thomas P , C. S. C, 17 Battery Place, New York City ; Residence 466 Valley Road, West 
Orange, N. J., Draughtsman with Construction Department of Otis Elevator Company. 

Frost, Harold L., *K*, $SK, Arlington, Mass., Forester and Entomologist. 

Hemenway Herbert D , C. S. C, Home Culture Clubs, Northampton; Residence 57 High Street 
Northampton, Mass., General Secretary Home Culture Clubs ; Author of " How to Make School 
Gardens," "Hints and Helps for Young Gardeners," Illustrated Lectures on How to Plan the 
Home Grounds, Gospel of Gardens, Our Common Trees, Children's Gardens in United States- 

Jones, Robert S., iSK, Columbus, Ohio, Civil Engineer, Water Filtration Plant. 

KuRODA, Shiro, 'i'SK, 127 Second Street, Osaka, Japan, Chief Foreign Department, Osaka Revenue 
Administration Bureau, Utsobo, Kitadore. 

Lane, Clarence B., *K*, D. G. K., Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. ; Residence 
4026 5th Street, N. W. Washington, D. C; Assistant Chief Dairy Division United States De. 
partment of Agriculture; Author of "The Business of Dairying"; in charge of Market Milk 
Investigation. 

Lewis, Henry W., McCall Ferry, Pa.; Residence Rockland, Mass., Civil Engineer and Superin 
tendent of Construction. 

Marsh, Jasper, KS, Danvers, Mass., with Consolidated Electric Light Company. 

Morse, Walter L., KS, Grand Central Station, New York City ; Residence 1432 Pacific Street 
Brooklyn, Terminal Engineer for N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R. Co. 

Potter, Daniel C, C. C. S., Fairhaven, Mass., Landscape and Sanitary Engineer. 

Read, Henry B., *SK, Westford, Mass., Farmer. 

Root, Wright A., "tSKj Easthampton, Mass., Market and Fruit Farm. 



230 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLt 

Smith, Arthur B., Q. T. V., 332 Fifth Avenue, Chicago, 111.; Residence iSio Winnemac Avenue, 

Bookkeeper for Wilson Bros. 
Stevens, Clarence L., died October 8th, igoi, at Sheffield, Mass., of hemorrhage. 
Sullivan, Maurice J, Littleton, N. H., Superintendent of "The Rocks." 
ToEEY, Frederick C, C. S. C, West Stockbridge, Mass., Lime Manufacturer. 
Toole, Stephen P., Amherst, Mass., Evergreen Nurseryman. 
Warren, Franklin L., M. D., Q. T. V., Bridgewater, Mass., Physician. 
White, Edward A., KS, 55 Pleasant Street, Amherst, Mass., Assistant Professor of Floriculture, 

Massachusetts Agricultural College; Director Summer School; Author of "The Hymenialis of 

Connecticut." 



'96 

BURRINGTON, HORACE C, $2K, died at Greenwich, Conn., November, 1907. 

Clapp, Frank L., $S*, C. S. C, Cornwall-on-Hudson, N. Y., Civil Engineer, Board of Water 

Supply of the City of New York. 
Cook, Allen B., C. S. C, Farmington, Conn., Superintendent of Hill Stead Farm. 
De Luce, Edmond, *SK, 27 W. 23rd Street, New York City, Salesman, % P. Putnam Sons. 
Edwards, Harry T., C. S. C, United States Department of Agriculture, 227 Calle Rege Malate, 

Manila, P. I. 
Fletcher, Stevenson W., M. S., Ph. D., il>K$. C. S. C, Blacksburg, Va., Director of Virginia 

Agricultural Experiment Station ; Author of " Soils " and " How to Make a Fruit Garden." 
Hammar, James F., C. S. C, Nashua, N. H., Farmer and Florist. 
Harper, Walter B., M. S., Q. T. V., Bogalusa, La., Manager Turpentine Department, Great 

Southern Lumber Company. 
Jones, Benjamin K., C. S. C, died August 21, 1903, at Springfield, Mass. 
Kinney, Asa S., K2, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass., Floriculturist and Instructor 

in Botany. 
Kramer, Ai.bin M., KS, 351 Main Street, Springfield, Mass., Architect and Civil Engineer; Resi- 
dence 452 Wilbraham Road, Springfield, Mass. 
Leamy, Patrick A., Q. T. V., Midas Via Golconda, Nevada. 
Marshall, James L. C. S. C, 18 Grafton Street, Worcester, Mass., Ofiice of Bradley Car Works; 

Residence 29 Gardner Street, Worcester. 
Moore, Henry W., K2, 19 Amherst Street, Worcester, Mass., Farmer and Market Gardener. 
Nichols, Robert P., D. G. K., Care of B. Parker Nichols, Norwell, Mass. 
Nutting. Charles A., ^SK, Ashby, Mass., Farmer. 

Pentecost, William L,, D. G. K., Chapinville, Conn., Superintendent of Grassland Farms. 
Poole, Erford W., #K*, KS, P. O. Box 129, New Bedford, Mass., Estimator and Draughtsman. 
Poole, I. Chester, D. O., #K$, KS, P. O. Box 129, New Bedford, Mass., Osteopathic Physician. 
Read, Frederick H., *SK, Oaklawn, R. I., Teacher in English, High School, Providence, R. I.; 

President Rhode Island Interscholastic Athletic League; Vice-President Eastern Commercial 

Teachers' Association. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 231 



Roper, Harry H., C. S. C , Ipswich, Mass., Manager Turner Hill Farm. 

Saito, Seijiro, C. S. C, Nautical College, Tokio, Japan, Teacher; Interpreter at Marine Courts ; 
Residence 12 Aoyama Takagi Cho, Tokio. 

Sastre, De Veraud Salome, D. G. K., Cardenas, Tabasco., Mexico, Sugar Planter and Manu- 
facturer. 

Sellew, Merle E., *SK, Wallingford, Conn., Teacher, Central District, Wallingford. 

Shaw, Frederick B., D. G. K.. iS City Square, Taunton, Mass., Manager Western Union Tele- 
graph Company, Taunton; Residence 41 Winthrop Street. 

Shepard, Lucius J., C. S. C, West Sterling, Mass., Farmer. 

Shultis, Newton S., KS, 601 Chamber Commerce, Boston, Mass., Wholesale Grain Dealer; Resi- 
dence, 14 Winthrop Street, Winchester. 

TsuDA, George, *SK, Editor of Agriculturist, Seed and Nurseryman, Ayabu, Tokio, Japan ; Pres- 
ident Tsuda& Company, Importers and E-vporters of Plants, Seeds, and Agricultural Implements. 



'97 

C. A. PETERS, Secretary, Moscow, Idaho. 
Allen, Harry F., C. S. C, Northboro, Mass., Farmer. 
Allen, John W., C. S. C, Northboro, Mass., Market Gardener. 
Armstrong, Herbert J., *SK, 11337 Crescent Avenue, Morgan Park, 111., Assistant Professor of 

Civil Engineering, Armour Institute of Technology, Chicago. 
Barry, John M., *SK, 509 Tremont Street, Boston ; Residence 552 Tremont Street, Automobiles. 
Bartlett, James L., #K*, Q. T. V., 615 State Street, Madison, Wis., Observer United States 

Weather Bureau, Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin. 
Cheney, Liberty L., V. M. D., Q. T. V., 329 Telfair Street, Augusta, Ga., Veteiinarian to the 

Board of Health in Augusta. 
Clark, Lafayette F., C. S. C, 1337 Seventh Street, Des Moines, la., Beatrice Creamery Co., in 

charge of Testing Department. 
Drew, George A., *2K, Greenwich, Conn., General Manager of Conyers Manor, Estate of E. C. 

Converse. 
Emrich, John A., Q. T. V., Park Street, Portland, Oregon, Superintendent First Christian Bible 

School. 
GoESSMANN, Charles I., D. G. K., Scranton, Pa., Industrial Chemist. 
Leavens, George D., $K<i>, $2K, 24-26 Stone Street, New York City; Residence 527 Second 

Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Second Vice-President and Treasurer The Coe-Mortimer Company, 

Fertilizers, Soil Expert Agricultural Experts' Association. 
Norton, Charles A., #2K, 30 Grove Street, West Lynn, Mass., Pianos and Piano Tuner. 
Palmer, Clayton F., A. M., C. S. C, Los Angeles, Cal., Residence 1622 Bushnell Avenue, So. 

Pasadena, Cal., Instructor in Agricultural Nature Study, Los Angeles (State) Normal School. 
Peters, Charles A., Ph. D., *K$, C. S. C, Berlin, Germany, 103 Essmacher Street, Teacher in 

Frederick Werdersche Abberrealschule. 
Smith, Philip H., *SK, 102 Main Street, Amherst, Mass., Chemist in charge of Feed and Dairy 

Division, Massachusetts Agricultual Experiment Station. 



232 THE 191 i INDEX VOLllMiE XLt 



'98 

S. W. WILEY, Secretary, Baltimore, Md. 

Adejmian, Aredis G., D. G. K., Harpoot, Turkey, Care Rev. H. N. Barnum, Farmer. 

Baxter, Charles N., A. B., C. S. C, \o]A, Beacon Street, Boston ; Residence 209 Quincy Avenue, 
Quincy, Mass., Assistant Boston Athenaeum Library. 

Clark, Clifford G., D. G. K., Sunderland, Mass., Farmer. 

Eaton, Julian S., B. S., D. G. K., 711 Prospect Avenue, Hartford, Conn., Chief Adjuster and 
Attorney for Travelers' Insurance Co. 

Fisher, Willis S., *2K, 24 Vine Street, Melrose, Mass., Principal of Lincoln and D. W. Gooch 
Grammar Schools. 

Montgomery, Alexander J., C. S. C, Natick, Mass., Wholesale Rose Grower. 

NiCKERSON, John P., M. D., Q. T. V., West Harwich, Mass., Physician. 

Warden, Randall D., *SK, Board of Education, City Hall, Newark, N. J., Director of Physical 
Training in Public Schools. 

Wiley, Samuel W., KS, 15 South Gay Street, Baltimore, M. D.; Residence " Kenilworth " 339 
Bloom Street, Analytical and Consulting Chemist, Wiley & Hoffman. 

Wright, George H., *2K, Ennis & Stoppani, Brokers, 34-36 New Street, New York City, Book- 
keeper. 



'99 

D. A. BEAM AN, Secretaty, Ponce, Porto Rico. 

Armstrong, William H., <i>SK, San Juan, Porto Rico; Residence Cambridge, Mass., First Lieu- 
tenant, Porto Rico Regiment of Infantry, United States Army. 

Beaman, Daniel, Q. T. V., Teacher of Horticulture and Entomology, Ponce Agricultural School, 
Ponce, Porto Rico. 

Chapin, William E., ^"LVi, 76 Lincoln Avenue, New London, Conn., Commercial Teacher. 

Dana, Herbert W., C. S. C, 5 Roslyn Street, Salem, Mass., Advertising Manager R. H. White 
Company, Boston, Mass. 

Hinds, Warren E., Ph. D., "tK*, C. S. C, Auburn, Alabama, Professor of Entomology and En- 
tomologist to the Experiment Station, Alabama Polytechnic Institute; Author of Publications 
on Economic Entomology, Thysanoptera of North America and Mexican Cotton Boll Weevil. 

Hooker, William A., $SK, United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology 
Washington, D. C. 

Hubbard, George C, *2K, Sunderland, Mass., Farmer. 

Maynard, Howard E., C. S. C, Boonton, N. J., Electrician, Manager Westinghouse Stor. Bat. 
Works. 

Merrill, Frederick A., Mount Vernon, Ga., Professor of Agriculture and Member of Industrial 
Department of the Baptist Collegiate Industrial Institute. 

Pingree, Melvin H., C. S. C, 2343 S. Clinton Street, Baltimore, Md. ; Chemist with American 
Agricultural Chemical Company, Baltimore, Md. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 233 

Smith, Bernard H., M. S., LL. B., *K*, C. S. C, Residence, 29 Lowden Avenue, West Somer- 

ville, Mass., Chief Boston Laboratory, Bureau of Chemistry, Department of Agriculture. 
Smith, Samuel E., C. S. C, Amherst, Mass. 

Turner, Frederick H , *K*, C. S. C, Great Barrington, Mass., Hardware Business. 
Walker, Charles M., C. S. C, Student Yale Forestry School, New Haven, Conn. 



'00 

E. K. ATKINS Secretary, Northampton, Mass. 

Atkins, Edwin K., KS, 15 Hubbard Avenue, Northampton, Mass., Civil Engineer, with E. C. & 
E. E. Davis. 

Baker, Howard, V. M. D., C. S. C, Care of ElUott & Company, 37th Avenue West, Duluth, 
Minn., Veterinary Inspector, Bureau of Animal Industry, in charge of Station. 

Brown, Frank H., K2, Hosmer Street, Marlboro, Mass., Farmer. 

Campbell, Morton A., C. S. C. Sangerville, Maine, Principal High School. 

Canto, Ysidro H., Causaheub, Yucatan, Mexico. 

Crane, Henry L , *2K, Westwood, Mass., Farmer. Strawberries a Specialty. 

Felch, Percy F., C. S. C, drowned in Connecticut River, North Hadley, July 8th, 1900. 

Frost, Arthur F., C. S. C , 526-S West 147th Street, New York, N. Y., Bridge Designer with 
Public Service Commission of First District, 154 Nassau Street, New York. 

Gilbert, Ralph D., Ph. D., C. S. C, 43 Chatham Street, Boston, Mass., Residence, 254 Arling- 
ton Street, West Medford, Mass., Chemist, in charge of the Bowker Insecticide Co., Boston> 
Mass. 

Halligan, James E., K2, Box 246 Baton Rouge, La., Chemist, State Experiment Station ; Asso- 
ciate Referee on Sugar; Referee on Molasses Methods for the A. O. A. C, 1906-1907 ; Referee 
on National Cattle Food Standards. 

Harmon, Arthur Atwell, V. M. D., *K#, C. S. C, Flagstaff, Arizona, Veterinary Inspector, Bu- 
reau of Animal Industry, Care of Dr. Marion Imes, Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

Hull, Edward T., M. D., ^K*, C. S. C, 2420 Seventh Avenue, New York City, Physician and 
Surgeon; Pathologist at St. Mary's and Sloane Maternity Hospital. 

Kellogg, James W., *2K, Box 645, Room 635, Capitol, Harrisburg, Pa., First Assistant Chemist 
and Microscopist, State Department of Agriculture. 

Landers, Morris B., M. D., D. G. K., 13 East Street, Ludlow, Mass., Physician; New York Hos- 
pital and Sloane Maternity Hospital; Attending Physician to O. P. D. Harlem Hospital. 

Lewis, James F., *SK, Carver-Cutter Cotton Gin Company, East Bridgewater, Mass. 

MoNAHAN, Arthur C, ^K*, C. S. C, Principal Turner's Falls High School, Turner's Falls, Mass. 

Morrill, Austin W., Ph. D., (Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1903), *SK, Entomologist Ari 
zona Experiment Station ; Author of " Fumigation for the White Fly as Adapted to Florida 
Conditions." 

Munson, Mark H., C. S. C, Littleville, Mass., Sheep Raiser and Slaughterer. 



234 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



Parmenter, George F., M. A., Ph. D., <i>SK, 3 Center Place, Waterville, Maine, Professor of 
Chemistry in Colby College; Author of "Laboratory Experiments in General Chemistry," and 
Papers on Entomological Subjects. 

Stanley, Francis G., M. D., Q. T. V., 144 Cabot Street, Beverly, Mass., Physician. 

West, Albert M., ^SK, Whittier, Cal., Assistant, Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 



'01 



J. H. CHICKERING, Secretary, Dover, Mass. 

B.-VRRY, John E., KS, Schenectady, N. Y., General Electric Company, Testing Department. 

Bridgeforth, George R., C. S. C, Head of Department of Agriculture, Tuskegee, Ala. 

Brooks, Percival C, $SK, 418 Englewood Avenue, Englewood Station, Chicago, 111., Foreman 
of Silicate Soda Department at Calumet Works of the General Chemistry Company. 

Casey, Thomas, Q. T. V., 145 Main Street, Fitchburg, Mass., Attorney at Law. 

Chickering, James H., $SK, Dover, Mass., Farmer. 

Cooke, Theodore F., C. S. C, 1S3 Elm Street, Pittsfield, Mass., Teacher in Pittsfield High School 

Dawson, William A., C. S. C, Willimantic, Conn., Florist. 

Dickerman, William E. $SK, Life Insurance Agent, Attleboro, Mass. 

Gamwell, Edward S.. C. S. C, 237 South Fourth West Street, Salt Lake City, Utah, Inspector 
for Faust Creamery and Supply House. 

GoRDAN, Clarence E., A. M., *K*, C. S. C, North Amherst, Mass., Assistant Professor of Zo- 
ology at Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Graves, Thaddeus, Jr., *SK, Hatfield, Mass., Tobacco Grower. 

Henry, James B., LL. B., D. G. K., 50 State Street, Lawyer; Firm Name, Chapin & Henry; 
Residence, 288 Sargeant Street, Hartford, Conn. 

Hunting, Nathan J., C. S. C, Shutesbury, Mass., Farmer; Instructor in Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College during school. 

Leslie, Charles T., M. D., C. S. C, Pittsfield, Mass., Physician. 

Macomber, Ernest L., *2K, West Barnstable, Mass., N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Company. 

Ovalle, Julio, M. B., D. G. K., Chili. 

PlERSON, Wallace R., $K#, KS, Cromwell, Conn., Florist ; Secretary A. Pierson, Inc. 

Rice, Charles L. C. S. C, Western Electric Company, 463 West Street, New York City, Resi- 
dence, 223 North Ninth Street., Roseville, N. J., Electrical Engineer. 

Root, Luther A., *2K, Amherst, Mass., Farmer. 

ScHAFFRATH, MAX, Box 95, Coalinga, Cal., Oil Business. 

Smith, Ralph I., Q. T. V., Agricultural Building, West Raleigh, N. C, Entomologist to North Caro- 
lina Experiment Station and A. M. College; Residence, 106 New Burn Ave., Raleigh, N. C. 

Tashjian, Dickran B., Q. T. V., Turner Hill, Ipswich, Mass., Landscape Gaidener to C. G. Rice, 
Esq.; Special Editor of " Ardrive," a semi-monthly Armenian Magazine. 

Todd, John H., Q. T. V., Rowley, Mass., Dairyman. 



Massachusetts agricijltural colle,gE 235 



Whitman, N. D., *SK, 2307 West 30th Street, Los Angeles, Cal., Engineer for Reinforced Con- 
crete Pipe Company, 715-16 Central Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Wilson, Alexander, C, *K*, #SK, Heller & Wilson, ist National Bank Budding, San Francisco, 
Cal., Consulting Engineer. 



'02 

H. L. KNIGHT, Secretary, Washington, D. C. 

Belden, Joshua H., *SK, Hammond Building, Detroit, Mich., Home address, Newington, Conn., 
Special Agent of The Fidehty and Casuality Company, New York City. 

BoDFiSH, Henry L., D. G. K., 56 Olivia Street, Derby, Conn., Civil Engineer. 

Carpenter, Thorne M., *K$, C. S. C. Chemist Nutrition Laboratory, Vila Street, Boston. 

Church, Frederick R., C. S. C, Shelburne Falls, Mass., Lecturer for German Kale Works. 

Claflin, Leander C, *SK, 1107 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa.; Residence Media, Pa., Man- 
ager of Men's Department Shoe Shop of Waldo M. Claflin. 

Cook, Lyman A., Q. T. V., Millis, Mass., Farm Superintendent. 

CooLEY, Orrin F., 1636 Court Place, Denver, Col.; Residence 690 .So. Washington Avenue, Chief 
Engineer of The Bennett Tunnel and Machine Company. 

Dacy, Arthur L., •I'K*, C. S. C, Morgantown, W. Va., Assistant Horticulturist W. Va. Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station. 

Dellea, John M., C. S. C, Great Barrington, Mass., Farmer. 

DwYER, Chester E., C. S. C, Arbor Lodge, Nebraska City, Neb., Manager of Estate of Morton 
Bros. 

Gates, Victor A., ■i'SK, Little Rock, Ark., Care of Scott-Mayer Commission Company, Whole- 
sale Fruit and Produce; Residence 11 16 North Third Street. 

Hall, John C, #2k, So. Sudbury, Mass., Board of Health and Tax Collector of Town. 

HoDGEKiss, Harold E., C. S. C, New York Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, N. Y. ; 
Residence 172 Genesee Street, Geneva, First Assistant Entomologist. 

Kinney, Charles M., *2K, 453 Cajon Street, Redlands, Cal., Organist. 

Knight, Howard L., *K$, C. S. C, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C, 
1829 G. St. Washington, D. C, Editorial Assistant, Office of Experiment Stations, United States 
Department of Agriculture; Author of "Dietary Studies of a Week's Walking Trip" in Storr's 
Connecticut Report of 1905. 

Lewis, Claude L, M. S. A., C. S. C, Professor of Horticulture, Oregon State University and 
Oregon Experiment Station, Corvalis, Ore. 

Morse, Ransom W., M. S. C, Q. T. V., 231 Pocasset Street, Fall River, Mass.; Residence 140 
Winter Street, Business Manager Fall River Herald Pubhshing Company. 

Paul, Herbert A., C. S. C, Escanaba, Mich. 

Plumb, Frederick H., Westport, Conn., Treasurer Purington Oil Engine Co., Stamford, Conn. 

Saunders, Edward B., D. G. K., Nashua, N. H., Manager Swift & Company. 



236 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 

Smith, Samuel L., C. S. C, Y. M. C. A. Work, Residence, 1314 West Street, Wilmington, Del. 
West, D. Nelson, Q. T. V., Care of G. G. White & Company, Hatfield, Wis. 



'03 

G. D. JONES, Secretary, North Amherst, Mass. 

Allen, William E., #SK, 27 Boylston Building, Boston, Mass., representing Reiter Fruhauf & 

Company, Style Creators, New York City. 
Bacon, Stephen C, D. G. K., Residence, 60 Warner Avenue, Jersey City, N. J., Engineer of 

Tunnel Construction. 
Bowen, Howard C, Q. T. V., Chemawa, Oregon, Teacher in Indian School. 
Barrhs, George L., K2, Lithia, Mass., Farmer. 

Brooks, Philip W., Q. T. V., Imperial, Cal., Irrigation Farming, Imperial Valley. 
Cook, Joseph G., *K*, C. S. C, Head Farmer at Northampton State Hospital, Northampton, 

Mass.; Residence, 219 East Street. 
Franklin, Henry J., *K*, Q. T. V. 

Halligan, Charles P., K2, Agricultural College, Mich., Assistant Professor in Horticulture. 
Harvey, Lester F., C. S. C, Rumford, Conn., Farmer. 
Hood, W. L., Normal. Ala. 

Jones, Gerald D., Q. T. V., Superintendent Cowles Farm, North Amherst. 

Lamson, G. H., C. S. C, Storrs Agricultural College, Storrs, Conn.; Assistant Zoology Professor. 
Monahan, Niel F., C. S. C, Ridgeford, Conn. 
Nersessian, Paul N., 32 West Street, Attleboro, Mass. 
OSMUN, A. Vincent, M. S., *K*, Q. T. V., Assistant Professor of Botany, Massachusetts Agri. 

cultural College. 
Parsons, Albert, Q. T. V., Instructor in Kamehameha School, Honolulu, T. H.; in charge of 

Agricultural Department. 
Peebles, W. W., C. S. C, 424 Fulton Street, Chicago, 111. 
Poole, E. M., K2, North Dartmouth, Mass.. Dairyman. 

Proulx, Edward G., *2K, Lafayette, Ind., Chemist, Indiana Experiment Station 
Robertson, R. H., D. G. K., died September loth, 1904, at Amherst, Mass., of peritonitis. 
Snell, Edward B., Q. T. V., 91 George street. New Haven, Conn., U. S. Inspector. 
TiNKHAM, Charles S., D. G. K., 15 Ashburton Place, Boston, Mass., Residence 126 Thornton 

Street, Roxbury, Mass., Civil Engineer, Massachnsetts Highway Commission. 
ToTTlNGHAM, WiLLlAM E., M. Sc, $K$, Q. T. V., Experiment Station, Madison, Wis., Residence 

915 W. Johnson Street, Instructor in Agricultural Chemistry, College of Agriculture, and As- 
sistant Chemist, Agricultural E.xperiment Station. 
Tower, Winthrop V. $2K, Porto Rico Agricultural Experiment Station, Mayagues, Porto Rico. 
West, Myron H., Q. T. V., 28 Linden .Court, ^Chicago, 111., Superintendent of Lincoln Park, 

Clark and Center Streets. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 237 

'04 

p. F. STAPLES, Secretary, North Grafton, Mass. 

Ahearn, Michael F., C. S. C, Manhattan, Kan., Foreman of Greenhouses, Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College; Coach of Kansas State Agricultural College Athletic Teams. 
Bach, Ernest A., Ph. D., <I>K$, C. S. C, Washington, D. C, Field address Orlando, Fla.; Special 

Field Agent, United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology ; Author of 

" Dasypogonenae of North America, North of Mexico." 
Blake, Maurice A., Q. T. V., 197 Somerset Street, New Brunswick, N. J., Horticulturist at the 

New Jersey State Experiment Station. 
Couden, Fayette D., ^K*, <i>2K, 1310 Columbia Road, Washington, D. C, Entomologist, United 

States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology ; Law Student at George Washington 

University, 190S. 
Elwood, Clifford F., K2, Green's Farms, Conn., General Farming and Fruit Growing. 
Fulton, Erwin S., C. S. C, Assistant Agriculturist, Massachusetts Experiment Station, Amherst, 

Mass. 
Gilbert, Arthur W., M. S. A., iK*. C. S. C, 32 Thurston Avenue, Ithaca, N. Y„ Fellow in 

College of Agriculture, Cornell University, Assistant Professor of Plant Breeding, Cornell 

University. 
Gregg, John W., C. S. C, Baron de Hirsch Agricultural School, Woodbine, N. J., Professor of 

Landscape Gardening and Ornamental Horticulture. 
Griffin, Clarence H., *SK, 2002 G. Street N. W., Washington, D. C, Medical Student at 

George Washington University; Assistant in Laboratory of Bacteriological Chemistry, Bureau 

of Chemistry, United States Department of Agriculture. 
Haskell, Sidney B., *K*, C. S. C, Amherst, Mass., Instructor in Agriculture at Massachusetts 

Agricultural College. • 

Henshaw, Fred F. *K*, C. S. C, United States Geological Survey, Washington, D. C, Hydraulic 

Engineer, in charge of Stream Measurements in Seward Peninsula, Alaska ; Author of "Water 

Supply Investigetion in Alaska in 1907." 
Hubert, Zachary T., A. B , 35 Humphries Street, Atlanta, ;Ga , Superintendent Grounds and 

Buildings at Spelman Seminary ; Lecturer on Agriculture for the Summer School at Clark UnL 

versity, Atlanta, Ga ; Professor of Chemistry at Atlanta Baptist College. 
Newton, Howard D., C. S. C, 117 Wall Street, New Haven, Conn., Graduate Student at Yale 

University, Head of Chemistery Department at Storr's Agricultural College. 
O'Hearn, George E., C. S. C„ Pittsfield, Mass. 
Parker, Sumner R., C. S. C, Kahuku, Oahn, I. H., Team Overseer Kahuku Plantation; Herds 

man for Geo. Mixter of Hardwick. 
Peck, Arthur L., *K*, C. S. C, Manhattan, Kan., Assistant Horticulturist Kansas State Agri. 

cultural College and Experiment Station ; Assistant Professor of Landscape Gardening in 

Oregon Agricultural College, Corralis, Oregon. 
Quigley, Raymond A., M. D., C. S. C, 4 Hamilton Street, Brockton, Mass. 
Raymoth, R. Raymond, KS, Rockford, 111., Landscape Architect. 
Staples, Parkman F., C. S. C, North Grafton, Mass., Farmer. 

White, Howard M. *K*, *2K, 1106 K. Street N. W., Washington, D. C, United States De- 
partment of Agriculture, Division of Pomology. 



238 THE 191 1 INDEX VOLUME XLI 

'05 

P. F. WILLIAMS, Secretary, Milton, Mass. 

Adams, Richard L., ^K*, Spreckles, Cal., Residence, Salinas, Cal., Director of the Spreckels 
Sugar Company Experiment Station. 

Allen, G. Howard, #2K, 1102 Flatiron Building, New York City, Residence, 522 West 158th 
Street, Care of J. G. Curtis, Vice-President Munson-Whittaker Company, Foresters; Vice- 
President Boston Nature Bureau; Author of "The Care of Trees." 

Barnes, Hugh L., C. S. C, Box 35, Greenwich, Conn., Residence, Stockbridge, Mass. Recently 
resigned position as Horticulturalist, Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, Hampton, 
Va. Farmer. 

Bartlett, Frank A., #2K, Depot Square, White Plains, N. Y., Residence, 147 South Lexington 
Avenue, New York, Business Manager H. L. Frost & Co., Foresters and Entomologists. 

Crosby Harvey D , Q. T. V., New Canaan, Conn., Head Gardener, Waverly Farms. 

Cushman, Esther C, *K*, Teacher of Biology, Beverly High School; Residence, 683 Hope 
Street, Providence, R. I. 

Gardner, John J., C. S. C, Littleton, N. H., Assistant Superintendent of "The Rocks." 

Gay, Ralph P., *SK, Plainfield, N. J., Forestry Business. 

Hatch, Walter B., C. S. C, Torrington, Conn., Superintendent of Construction of Hillside Ceme- 
tery. 

HoLCOMB, C. Sheldon, K2, 67 Walnut Street, Somerville, Mass., with M. S. Ayer, Wholesale 
Grocer, State Street, Boston, Mass., 

Hunt, Thom.as F., C. S. C, Riverside, Cal., Pathologist, connected with Citrus Experiment Station. 

Ingham, Norma.n D., C. S. C, Superintendent University of California Forestry Experiment Station, 
Santa Monica, Cal. 

Kelton, James R., KS, Amsterdam, N. Y., Amsterdam High School. 

L.ADD, Edward T., M. S., KS, Baltimore, Md., Chemist for Baugh Chemical Company, Fertilizer 
Manufacturers. 

Lewis, Clarence W., Q. T. V., 28 Albion Street, Melrose Highlands, Mass., State Gypsy Moth 
and Brown-Tail Moth Commission. 

Lyman, John F., $K$, K2, 1292 Hunter Ave., Culumbus, Ohio, Residence, Amherst, Mass. 
Associate Professor of Agricultural Chemistry in Ohio State University. 

Munson, Willard a., *K*, ■tSK, Superintendent; Bay State Fruit Farm, Waugh & Sears, Am- 
herst, Mass. 

Newhall, Edwin W. Jr., D. G. K., 114 Battery Street, San Francisco, Cal., Farming. 

Patch, George W., it>K$, *2K, Purchasing Agent, Brown-Durrell Company, Boston, Mass., Resi- 
dence, Arlington, Mass. 

Sanborn, Monica L. (Mrs. W. O. Taft), "tK*, Brook Farm, Northfield, Vt., R. F. D. No. 4. 

Sears, William M., $SK, Norwood, Mass., Superintendent of Arbordene Farm. 

Swain, Allen N., 15 Merlin Street, Dorchester, Mass, Forester and Horticulturist. 

Taylor, Albert D., M. S. A., #K#, C. S. C, Landscape Gardener with W. H. Manning, Boston 
Mass. 

ToMPSON, Harold F., <tK*, K2, Instructor in Market Gardening, Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege, Amherst, Mass. 

TUPPER, Bertram, *SK, KS, West Newton, Mass., Foreman at Ellis Farm. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 239 



Walker, Lewell S., C. S. C, Assistant Chemist, Massachusetts Agriciiltuial Experiment Station, 
Amherst, Mass. 

Whittaker, Chester L., itSK, 103 Union Avenue, Mt. Vernon, N. Y., Forester and Entomolo- 
gist with Munson, Whittaker Co., Residence, Somerville, Mass. 

Williams, Percy F., KS, Acting State Horticulturist, Auburn, Ala. 

Willis, Grenville N., iK*, itSK, Massachusetts Highway Commi.ssion, 124 Oxford Street, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

Yeaw, Frederick L., iSK, Assistant Plant Pathologist California Experiment Station, Davis, 
Yolo County, Cal. 

'06 

RICHARD WELLINGTON, Secretary, Geneva, N. Y. 
Carey, Daniel H., Q. T. V., Rockland, Mass., Horticultural Pursuits. 
Carpenter, Charles W., *K*, KS, Monson, Mass., Farmer. ' 
Craighead, William H., 427 State Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Filer, Harry B., 5 City Hall, Buffalo, N. Y.; City Forester. 
French, G. Talbot, *K$, *SK, Assistant Botanist, New York Agricultural Experiment Station 

Geneva, N. Y. 
Gaskill, Edwin F.,C. S. C, Assistant Agriculturist, Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station 

Amherst, Mass. 
Hall, Arthur W. Jr., *2K, North Amherst, Mass., Law Student with Hammond and Ham- 
mond, Northampton, Mass. 
Hastings, Addison T. Jr., Q. T. V., City Forester and Secretary for the Shade Tree Commission 

of Jersey City; 151 Lexington, Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. 
Hood, Clarence E., Q. T. V., Agent and Expert, LTnited States Department of Agriculture, 

Bureau of Entomology ; Residence 1S8 Rieger Avenue, Dallas, Texas. 
Kennedy, Frank H., C. S. C, 8 Paisley Park, Dorchester, Mass.; Assistant City Bacteriologist 

and Milk Inspector at Brockton ; Director of Sewerage Filtration Plant, Brockton, Mass. 
Martin, James E., C. S. C, Yale Forestry School, New Haven, Conn. 

MOSELEY, Louis H., C. S. C, Glastonbury, Conn., Student at Ohio School of Veterinary Medicine. 
MuDGE, Everett P., K2, 67 Cherry Street, Swampscott, Mass. 

Peakes, Ralph W., Q. T. v.. Chemist, Boston, Mass.; Residence Newtonville, Mass. 
Pray, F. Civille, *2K, Sugar Chemist and Superintendent, Trinidad Sugar Company, Trinidad, 

Cuba; Residence Natick, Mass. 
Rogers, Stanley S., *K'!>, K2, Spreckels, Cal.; Residence Salinas, Cal., First Assistant Plant 

Pathologist. 
Russell, Harry M., #K*, C. S. C, Orlando, Fla., Special Field Agent, United State Department 

of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology; Home address Bridgeport, Conn. 
Scott, Edwin H., *K*, K2, Instructor in Agriculture, Storr's Agricultural College. 
Sleeper, George W., *K*, C. S. C, Swampscott, Mass., New Castle Leather Co., Boston, Mass., 

63 South Street. 

Strain, Benjamin, Q. T. V., Assistant Engineer, Central New England Railway Company, 
Maybrook, N. Y. 



240 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



SuHLKE. Herman A., KS, Assistant Superintendent of Penna Salt Manufacturing Company, Wy. 

andotte, Mich. 
Taft, William O., C. S. C, Northfield, Vt., Poultry Farmer. 

Tannatt, W1LL.A.RD C, Jr., #K*, C. S. C, Easthampton, Mass., Town Engineer. 
TiRRELL, Charles A., Q.T. V., 747 Webster Avenue, Chicago, 111., Landscape Architect. 
Wellington, Richard, ^K<^, Q. T' V., Assistant Horticulturist, New York Agricultural Expei- 

ment Station, Geneva, N- Y. 
Wholley, Francis D., Q. T. V., 17(5 Railway E.vichange Building, Chicago, 111. 
Wood, Alexander H. M., KS, Easton, Mass., Farm Superintendent. 

'07 

G. H. CHAPMAN, T, Secn/aiy, Amherst, Mass. 

Armstrnno, Arthur H., KS, Amherst, Mass., Graduate Student in Entomology, Massachusetts 

Agricultural College. 
Bartlett, Earle G., *K*, *SK, Instructor Kamehameha Schools, Honolulu, I. H. 
Caruthers, John T., Bordentown, N. J., Professor of Agriculture in Bordentown Industrial and 

Agricultural Institute. 
Chace, Wayland F., C. S. C, Lake City, Minn., Landscape Gardening. 

Chapman, George H., C. S. C, Amhersi, Mass., First Assistant Botanist, Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station. 
Chapman, Joseph O., KS, Brewster, Mass. 
Clark, Milford H., Jr., C. S. C, Superintendent of Forestry Department, Buffalo Park Commis 

sion, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Cutter, Frederick A., 4>SK. Orange, N. J., Forestry and Landscape Gardening. 
Dickinson, Walter E., *K*, *SK, Nighi Superintendent, Sacremento Valley Sugar Company. 
Eastman, Jasper F., 4>K$, Assistant Agriculturist, New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station 

and Instructor in Agriculture, New Hampshire State College, Durham, N. H. 
Hartford, Archie A , Westford, Mass., Principal Washington High School, Washington Depot, 

Conn. 
Higgins, Arthur W., iKi, KS, Westfield, Mass., Florist. 
King, Clinton, *K*, Q. T. V., 28 Sagamore Street, Dorchester, Mass., Law Student, Boston, 

University. 
Livers, Susie Dearing, 60 McLellan Street, Dorchester, Mass., with Ginn & Company, Boston, 

Mass. 
Parker, Charles M., ^K*, Q. T. V., Riverside Farm, Stratham, N. H. 
Peters; Frederick C, *SK, F. C. Peters & Co., Foresters and Entomologists, Orange, N. J., 

Ardmore, Pa.; Residence, Lenox, Mass. 
Shaw, Edward H., *SK, Belmont, Mass , Market Gardening. 
Summers, John N., C. S. C, Amherst, Mass., Assistant Entomologist, Massachusetts Agricultural 

Experiment Station, and Instructor in Entomology, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Thompson, Clifford B., #SK, Instructor in Agriculture and Horticulture, Kamehameha Schools, 

I. H. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 241 

Walker, James H., ^1K, 39 Orchard Street, Newark, N. J., Foreman Newark Park Commission. 

Watkins, Fred A., *SK, West Milbury, Mass., Farmer. 

Watts, Ralph J., "i'K*, #2K, Private Secretary to President Kenyon L. Biitterfield, Massachusetts 

Agricultural College, Amherst, Mass. 
Wood, Herbert P., C. S. C, United States Department of Entomology, Bo,x 20S, Dallas, Texas. 



'08 

JAMES A. HYSLOP, Secretaiy, Washington, D. C. 

Alley, Harold, KS, B. S., with Sprekels Sugar Company, King City, Cal. 

Allen, C. F., C. S. C, B. S. Agent United States Bureau of Immigration, New York City. 

Anderson, A. J., <ii2K, B. S., Tree Commissioner, 39 Orchard Street, Newark, N. J. 

Anderson, K. F. B. S., Teaching, Flint Medical College, New Orleans, La. 

Bailey, E. W., K2, B. S., Assistant in Plant Breeding, University of Illinois, Champaign, 111. 

Bangs, B. W , Q. T. V., B. S., American Agricultural Chemical Co., Carteret, N. J. 

Barry, T. A., C. S. C, B. S., Amherst Electric Light Co., Amherst, Mass. 

Bartholomew, Miss Persis, Westboro, Mass. 

Bates, Carlton, KS, B. S. 205 D Street N. W., Washington, D. C, United States Department 

of Agriculture, Bureau of Chemistry, Scientific Assistant in Bacteiiology. 
Chapman, L. W.,' Q. T. V., B. S., Coe-Mortimer Co., Moosic, Pa. 
Chase, H. C, C. S. C , B. S., Gypsy Moth Commission, Harvard, Mass. 
Clark, O. L., *SK, B. S., Ethical Culture School, New York City. 
Cobb, G. R., C. S. C, B. S., Pierson, Cromwell, Conn. 

Coleman, W. J., C. S. C, B. S., 39 Orchard Street, Newark, N. J., Forester. 

Cummings, W. A., Q. T. V., B. S., 413 Center Street, Chicago, 111., Park Forester, Lincoln Park. 
Cutting, R. E., *SK, B S., Salesman, Quaker Oats Co., Amherst, Mass. 
Daniel, John, Q. T. V., B. S., Field Agent, Experiment Station, Durham, N. H. 
D.wenport, S. L., KS, B. S., Fruit Farmer, North Grafton, Mass. 
Davis, P A., 9#, B. S., Instructor in Sciences, Dover High School, Dover, N. J. 
Dolan, Clifford, B. S., Dairyman, Massachusetts Industrial School, Shirley, Mass. 
Eastman, P. M., B. S., with T. T. Withers, Landscape Gardener, i Montgomery Street, Jersey 

City, N. J. Residence, 120 Philip Street, Albany, N. Y. 
Edwards, F. L., *2K, B. S., West Hanover, Mass., Farming, P. O. Address, Rockland, Mass. 
Farley, A. J., Q. T. V., B. S., Assistant Horticulturist, State Agricultural E-xperiment Station, 

New Brunswick, N. J. 
Farrar, P. W., K2, B. S., with Salmon Land and Water Co., Twin Falls, Idaho. 
Flint, C. L., K2, B. S., with H. L. Frost & Co., Box 145S, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Gillett, C. S., K2, B. S., vrith Sprekels Sugar Company, Ranch No. 8, Soledad, Cal. 
GiLLETT, K. E., *2K, B. S., Gillett's Nurseries, Southwick, Mass. 
GowDEY, B. C., C. S. C, B. S., 28 Albion Street, Melrose Highlands, Gypsy Moth Commission. 



242 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 

Hayes, H. K., K2, B. S., Tariffville, Conn. Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, North 
Bloomfield, Conn. 

Howe, W. L., B. S., Mariboro, Mass. 

HUTCHINGS, F. F., Q. T. v., B. S., Instructor in Physics and Chemistry in South Manchester 

High School, Conn. 
Hyslop, J. A., Q. T. v., B. S., Pullman, Wash., United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau 

of Entomology, Agent and Expert. 

Jackson, R. H., iSK, B. S., with Jackson & Cutler, Amherst, Mass. 

Jennison,' H. M., C. S. C, B. S., Instructor in Botany at the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Johnson, F. A., C. S. C, B. S., Post-Graduate Student at Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Jones, T. H., Q. T. V., B. S. 

Earned A. J., Q. T. V., B. S., Lyonsville, Mass. 

Larsen, David, K2, B. S., Honolulu, Hawaii, Plant Pathologist, Sugar Experiment Station. 

Liang, Lai Kwei, B. S., Tiensin, China. 

Miller, D. P., KS, B. S., with American Nursery Company, 150 Broadway, New York. 

Paige, George, Q. T. V., B. S., 610 Elm Street, New Haven, Conn. 

Parker, J. R., K2, B. S., Post Graduate in Entomology at Massachusetts Argicuttural College. 

Philbrick, E. D., *2K, B. S. 

Reed, H. B., KS, B. S., Foreman Conyer's Manor, Greenwich, Conn. 

Regan, W. S., K2, B. S., Post Graduate Student, Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst, 

Mass. 
Sawyer, W. F., Q. T. V., B. S., Sterling Junction, Mass., with R. H. Hosmer, Leominster, Mass., 

Surveyor. 
Shattuck, L. a., C. S. C, B. S., Ipswich, Mass. 

Thurston, F. G., *SK, B. S., Chemist, E. Atkins Co., Soledad, Cuba. 
Turner, Miss O. M., B. S., Amherst, Mass. 

Turner, W. ¥., Q. T. V. B. S., Auburn, Ala., Assistant Entomologist, State Experiment Station. 
Verbeck, R. H., *SK, B. S., Petersham, Mass., Principal of Petersham Agricultural High School. 
Warner, T. L., Q. T. V., B. S, Coast and Geodetic Survey, Vinalhaven, Maine. 
Waugh, T. F., Q. T. v., B. S., 31 Bigelow Street, Quincy, Mass., with Bowker Fertihzer Company. 

Wellington, J. W., Q. T. V., B. S., Assistant Horticulturist at Vermont Experiment Station, 

Burlington, Vt. 
Wheeler, H. T., Q. T. V., B. S., Farmer, Lexington, Mass. 

Whiting, A. L., Q. T. V., B. S., Kingston, R. I., Assistant Agriculturist, State Experiment Station. 
Whitmarsh, R D., KS, B. S., Post Graduate Student at the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Wright, S. J., Q. T. V., B. S., Manager Stannot Farm, Sherburn, Mass. 

•09 

C. S. PUTNAM, Sec)-6'/a)y, Turner Center, Maine. 

Alger, Paul E., C. S. C, North Amherst, Mass., with Amherst and Sunderland Street Railway 

Company. 
Barlow, Waldo D., <i>SK, Post Graduate Work at Yale Forestry School, Residence, 5S Lake 

Place, New Haven, Conn. 
Barnes, Benjamin F., 6$, Plaverhill, Mass., Farming. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 243 



Bartlett, Oscar C, C. S. C, Post Graduate in Entomology at Massachusetts Agricultural 

College. 
Briggs, Orwell B., Q. T. V., Great Barrington, Mass., Farmer. 
Brown, George M. Jr., Q. T. V., Greenwood, Mass., Salesman. 
Caffrey, Donald J., C. S. C, Post Graduate in Entomology at Massachusetts Agricultural 

College. 
Cardi.m, Patricio P., Q. T. V., Estacion Agronomica Santiago de la Vegas, Cuba, Chief of Depart- 
ment of Vegetable Pathology and Entomology. 
Chase, Edward I., 26 Chapman Street, Greenfield, Mass., Civil Engineer with Boston and Maine 

Railroad. 
Codding, George M., *2k, 10 Philips Place, Montreal, Quebec, Landscape Architect, with Fred 

erick G. Todd, Landscape Architects. 
CoRBETT, Lamert S., Q. T. V., Foreman with the United Fruit Company, Sixaola River, Bocos 

del Toro, Panama. 
Crosby, Harold P., C. S. C. 
Grossman, Samuel S., Q. T. V., Box 589, Orlando, Fla., Working on White Fly Investigation, 

Bureau of Entomology. 
Curran, D.avid A., Room 8, Bodanaceo Building, Marlboro, Mass., Engineer wifh North Attle- 

boro Sewerage Committee. 
Cutler, Homer, Orangeburg, S. C, Instructor in Science and Agriculture in Claflin University. 

Fulton, Gordon R., C. S. C. 

Geer, Myron F., 9#, Conway, Mass., Instructor in Sciences, Conway High School. 

Geer, Wayne E., 9*. 

Hathaway, Elmer F., KS, 97 Huron Avenue, Cambridge, Mass., with C. F. Hathaway & Son, 

Wholesale Bakers. 
HSEIH, En-Lung, 132 Blair Street, Ithaca, N. Y., Post Graduate Cornell University. 
Hubbard. Arthur W., Q. T. V., with Kowker Fertilizer Company, 43 Chatham Street, Boston, 

Mass. 
Ide, Warren L., Wallingford, Conn., Fruit Growing. 
Ingalls, Dorsey F., Q. T. V., Cheshire, Mass., Farmer. 
Jeu, Huang, Q. T. V. 
Knight, Harry O., C. S. C, 419 Porter Ave., Buffalo, N. Y., Foreman Great Bear Spring 

Company. 
Lindblad, Rockwood C, K2, Signal Department, N. Y. C. R. R., New York City. 
MacGown, Guy E., Walnut Hill, Me., Farming. 
Monahan, James V., C. S. C, South Framingham, Mass., Farmer. 
Neale, Harold J., C. S. C, 193 Lincoln Street, Worcester, Mass., Civil Engineer with Park 

Commission, 
Noble, Harold G., KS, 747 Webster Avenue, Chicago, 111,, Engineer, Lincoln Park. 
Noyes, John, Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Instructor in Landscape Gardening, at Massachusetts 

Agricultural College. 
O'Grady, James R., C. S. C, 23 Myrtle Street, Springfield, Mass., Landscape Architect. 
Oliver, Joseph T., 473 Adams Street, Dorchester, Mass. 
Phelps, Harold D., 122 Willow Street, Minneapolis, Minn., with Minneapolis Park Commission, 

Forestry Department. 
Potter, Richard C, Q. V. T., Derry Village, N. H., Instructor in Pinkerton Academy. 
PuTN-\M, Charles S., 9*, Turner Center, Maine; Teacher of Science and Agiiculture, Leavitt, 

Institute. 



244 THE 1911 INDEX VOLUME XLI 



Sexton, George F., Orange, N. J., with F. A. Cutler, Forestry and Landscape Gardening ; Resi- 
dence, 14 Blanche Street, Worcester, Mass. 

SUMLYAN, Marcus T., Amherst, Mass., Plant Breeding for the Division of Horticulture, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College. 

Thompson, Myron W., *SK, New Haven, Conn., Post Graduate in Yale Forestry School. 

Thomson, J. B., C. S. C, Ipswich, Mass. 

Turner, Henry W., C. S. C, Estacion Agronomica Santiago, de la Vegas, Cuba. 

Warner, Fred C, Q. T. V., Gatun, Canal Zone, Panama; Engineer with Municipal Engineering 
Division of Isthmian Canal Commission. 

Waters, T. C, C. S. C, Amherst, Mass., Post Graduate in Floriculture at Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College. 

Webb, Charles R., C. S. C, Bo.x 999, Orange, N. J., with F. A. Cutler & Co., Forestry and 
Landscape Gardening. 

Whaley, James S. 

White, Charles H., Amherst, Mass., Field Agent and Graduate Secretary of Y. M. C. A. for 
Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

White, Herbert L., Q. T. V., Maynard, Mass., Clerk, Massachusetts State Board of Agriculture, 
State House, Boston, Mass. 

Willis, Luther G., Q. T. V., Springfield, Mass. 

Wilson, Frank H. Jr., C. S. C, Nahant, Mass., Floriculture. 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRlCULTURAt, COLLEGE 245 



Mnvtxn^tB 



95 William C. Brown to Miss Jacobs, at Peabody. 

'oo Howard Baker to Miss Bertha Smith, Sept. ii, 1909, at South Hadley. 

'03 Lester F. Flarvey to Miss Laura Buckingham, May 25, 1909, at New 

Preston, Conn. 
'03 Albert Parsons to Miss Marion Sawyer, June 30, 1909, at Maiden. 
'04 Dr. Clarence H. Griffin to Miss Elizabeth Babette, Sept. 26, 1909, at 

Washington, D. C. 
'04 Sidney B. Haskell to Miss Florence Dacy, Dec. 25, 1908. 
Ex-'o4 H. T. Witt to Miss Amy Crombie, March 31, 1909, at Manchester, 

N. H. 
05 Harvey D. Crosby to Miss Helen Erickson, Oct. 14, 1908. 
05 E. T. Ladd to Miss Rachel Bessom, Sept. 22, 1909, at Lynn. 

05 Grenville N. Willis to Miss Florence Ripley, Aug. 8, 1909. 

06 Addison T. Hastings, Jr. to Miss Marie Millett, Oct. 5, 1909. 

06 W. C. Tannatt to Miss Alice Burt, Oct. 6, 1909. 

07 John T. Caruthers to Miss Annie Greene, Dec. 22, 1908. 
07 George H. Chapman to Miss A. J. Dick, March 27, 1909. 

07 W. F. Chase to Miss Florence McDermit, Dec. 31, 1908. 

08 W. A. Cummings to Miss Lillian Ives, June 16, 1908, at Bondsville. 
08 Leroy E. Cutting to Miss Bertha Harlow, Dec. 24, 1908. 

08 W. L. Howe to Miss Mildred Walker, Aug. 31, 1909. 

Raymond D. Whitmarsh to Miss Emma Nichols, June 30, 1909. 
Raymond L. Whitney to Miss Grace Hinckley, Sept. 2, 1909, at Amherst. 



01 /i*?^^ ^ 




Kenyon Leech Butterfield 

Calendar 

Trustees 

Faculty 

Experiment Station Staff 

Graduate Students 

Classes 

Senior 

Junior 

Sophomore 

Freshman 
Fraternities 
Athletics 

Football 

Baseball 

Track 

Hockey 

Tennis 
College Organizations 
Publications 
Musical Organizations 



13 
14 
17 
29 

32. 
35-66 
35 
41 
49 
57 
67 
85-100 

87 
90 

93 
94 
95 

lOI 

109 
113 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



247 



Reflections of the Year 120 

Commencement . . . . • • ■ • • .129 

Awards and Prizes 132 

Proms 135 

Battalion Roster I39 

Agricultural Vocations • • 14° 

New Entomology Building I43 

Statistics of Growth of College I44 

Grinds I47 

191 1 Individually 169 

Freshman Banquet I94 

Editorials I97 

Alumni Associations 204 

Alumni 241 







A^tu^rttstng itr^rtnrg 



'o<}=>o^o<^<i=>o^o<i=>o<|=> 



<=^o^o<rpo<=po<=^o<=^<=^o^^o<^o^o<^o<^o<^o^o^ 



Adams, Druggist 

Allen Bros., Contractors 

American Fountain Pen Co. 

'Amherst Book Store 

Amherst Co-Op Laundry 

Amherst House 

Amherst House Barber Shop 

Andover Press 

Beckmann's Candy Shop 
BoUes, the Shoeman 
Bowker Fertilizer Co. 
Boynton, Soft Drinks 
Breck, Joseph & Sons, Seeds 
Briggs, Pool Tables 

Campion, Haberdasher and Tailor 
Carpenter & Morehouse, Printers 
Chilson, Trunks and Bags 
Coe-Mortimer Co., Fertilizers 
Copley Square Hotel 
College Store, Student's Supplies 
Cotrell and Leonard 

Daniels, Cornell Co., Provisions 
Devel, Druggist 

EUwanger & Barry, Trees and Shrubs 
Ewell, Chas. E., Student's Supplies 
Folger, S. L., Jeweler 
Gilbert & Barker Mfg. Co. 
Gregory & Son, Seeds 

Hearn, C. W., Photograph 
Holyoke Street Railway Co. 
Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 



XVII 
XVII 



XXII 
XXI 



XVI 
XVI 



Horticultural Department viii 

Howe, D. A., Wholesale Grocer xviii 

Jackson & Cutler, Dry Goods iv 

Jacob Reed's Sons, Sporting Goods xii 

Keuffel & Esser Co., Engineering Sup. ix 

Krugman, M. B., Florist v 

Labrowitz, Clothier xix 

Levin, Shoemaker V 

Lord & Burnhara vii 

M. A. C. x-xi 

Marsh, Furniture IV 

Massachusetts Engraving Co., xx 

Millett, E. E., Jeweller vii 

Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. v 

Page, J. F., Shoestore v 

Paige, T. L., Livery VI 

Plumb, F. C, Barber iv 

Sanderson & Thompson, Clothiers ii 

Schlegel & Fottler Co., Seeds xxi 

Sheldon, W. A., Photographer xiii 

Spaulding, A. G., Sporting Goods xiv 

Stephen Lane Folger, Jeweler vii 

The H. L. Frost & Bartlett Co., 
Landscape Foresters 

Trott, J. H., Plumbing 



Waldo Bros., Drain Tile 

Wards 

West Stockbridge Lime Co. 

Willard, Charles L. Co., Engravers 

Woodward's Lunch 

Wright & Ditson, Sporting Goods 



xxvii 

XVII 
XVI 

xxm 

XV 
XIV 
XIII 
XIV 



"The bell invites me, for it is a knell 

That summons thee to heaven or to chapell." 



5:?o«>=={soo€3=={9oc<}==0«o£>=.^5™«}=={>ogj=H3<<i=={s«j 



^ 



f 



=A FULL LINE OF- 



WATERMAN'S IDEAL 
FOUNTAIN PENS 

EVERY PEN GUARANTEED 

HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE 



I 



I 




¥^PMmmfi.¥.m]fMmm¥MmmPMmmp.m^^^ 



GOODS FOR MEN 

C. & K. Derbys (Quality De Luxe) ; Keiser 
Cravats, Sporting Goods 

ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

Confined Styles, imported direct from London 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES 

CAMPION 

AMHERST DARTMOUTH 



d^S^^^ 




MtJMtJMiiSlfrMisMtsatJMtsJiltiJiltsatsMtJjiltJJiltJSllJ^KJiMati^M 



Can it be 
That this is all remains of thee — Check from home 



Fools are my theme ; let satire be my song — Index Editors 




Making Good 

^ There's only one reason why 
our store is such a popular resort 
with college men who desire 
snappy footwear, viz: 

Walk Over Shoes, $3.50. $4, $5, $6 
Stetson Shoes, $5-$8 



E. M. BOLLES 



ALLEN BROS 

BUILDERS AND BUILDING 
SUPERINTENDENTS 



Wood, Brick, Stone and 
Concrete Buildings 

Fire Losses Adjusted ; Plans and Esti- 
mates Furnished 



OFFICE, 28 SO. PLEASANT ST. 

Residences 28 and 125 So. Pleasant Street 
Tel. i2,-4andi2.-3 



AMHERST 



MASS. 






SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



Clothiers, Hatters and Tailors 



RELIABLE MERCHANDISE AT PRICES THAT ARE ALWAYS AS 
LOW AS THE LOWEST 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON, Amherst m 



Sji>j? 



'A hat not much the worse for wear" — Daddy's 



O, what a tangled web we weave 

When first we practice to deceive — The Crihbers. 











DEUEL'S DRUG SI ORE 




Kodaks, 

Eastman's Films, 

Photographic Plates, 


FOUNTAIN PENS 


M. A. C. BANNERS 


DEUEL'S DRUG SI ORE 









' It was a boisterous captain of the sea — Bursley." 



"If thou would'st view fair Melrose aiight 
Go visit it by the pale moonlight." — Adams. 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All Work of a First-Class 
Order 

ELECTRICAL MASSAGE 



3 Amity Street 
AMHERST, ... MASS. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Sheets 
Pillow Cases 

and Quilts 

A full assortment of Denims for 
corner seats. A large line of 

Dry Goods, Notions 
and Qroceries 

Jackson & Cutler 



Amherst Furniture and Carpet Rooms 



MAKES A SPECIALTY of Students' Furniture, 
Carpets, Rugs, Draperies, Bedding, Book-Cases, 
Blacking-Cases, Desks, Window Shades, Picture 
Frames, Cord, Etc., at Lowest Prices. Save freight 
and cartage money by purchasing here .... 



E. D. MARSH 



18-20-22 MAIN STREET 



AMHERST, MASS. 



" Blow, bugle blow ! set the wild echoes ringing." — Racicot. 



" With just enough of learning to misquote." — Driiry. 


The Mutual Plumbing 


The 


& Heating Company 


LATEST STYLES 


Plumbing, Heating, 
Iron Pipe, Sewer Pipe, 
Kitchen Furnishings, 
Wire, Pumps, Nails, 
Paints and Oils. 


IN 


College SKoes 


Everything in Hardware 




A-r 


The Mutual Plumbing & 
Heating Co. 


Page s SKoe Store 


AMHERST, . . . MASS. 


AMHERST, ' - MASS. 


M. B. KINGMAN 


R. LEVIN 


M. A. C. '82 


FIRST-CLASS 

Boot and Shoe Repairing 


Store Next to '"CAMriox" 
J7 SOUTH PLEASANT STREET 


Shoe Shihihg 


AMHERST, MASS. 

The place to get the best 


Second-Hand Shoes bought 
and sold. Good workman- 
ship, Lowest Prices. Work 
Promptly Attended To. 


CUT FLOWERS 

For that girl 


II 1-2 AMITY STREET 


TELEPHONE IN TIME 


AMHERST, MASS. 



" His beard was white as snow, all flaxen was his poll." — C. A. Smith. 



" Tis pleasant, sure, to see one's name in print." 



Amherst Book Store 


T. L. PAGE 

Livery and 
Hack Stable 


Books, Stationery, 
Pictures and Pennants 

We have a large 
assortment of 

Waterman's Ideal and 
MoorE's Non-Leakable 

Fountain Pens 

Leave your orders here for 
Engraved Cards 

AND 

Picture Framing 


Rear of Amherst House 
Garage Connected 


You will find a full 
line of 

Blank Books^ 
Stationery^ 

Etc., Etc. 

Also all 

Magazines and 
Daily Papers at 

Charles E. Ewells, 

AMHERST, MASS. 


Carpenter & Moreliouse 

BOOK AND JOB 


The Amherst Record 
amherst, mass. 



" It will discourse most eloquent music." — Parsons 



" The enduring elegance of female friendship " — Howe 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician 

Prescription Work a Specialty 
College S eal Jewelry 
Special Attention given to 
all kinds of 

FINE WATCH WORK 



Stephen L 



Foh 



en J^ane r oiger 

Established 1892 

Manufacturing Jeweler 

Club and College Pins 
and Rings, Gold, Silver 
and Bronze Medals 

I8O Broadway, New York 



Amherst House 




BARBER SHOP 

All First - Class Workmen 
Hair Cutting Our Specialty 




THIS IS OUR 

Handy Hand 
Book 



II is really a book covering every sort of ma- 
terial for building or repairing a greenhouse. 
It is the kind of reference book that every 
student should have hanging on a hook. It 
will help you now, help you greatly later on. 



Below is a list of ju 


St a few of the college 


and institutions for 


which we have erectec 


greenhouses, and we 


are building new ones 


for you this year. 


Send for the book 



Harvard, Bussey Institute, Yale, j 

Smith, Comeil, Mississippi Dept. j 

of Agriculture, Iowa Agricultural ! 

College, New Jersey Agricultural i 

College, Connecticut Agricultural ' 

College, Geneva, N. Y. Experi- f 

ment Station, Baton Rouge, La. | 

Experiment Station. ♦ 



Lord and Burnham i 

COMPANY } 

1 1 33 Broadway, NEW YORK j 

5 i 

53 •» — * — «♦ — ♦« — •« — »< — «-H 



" Stern Winn-ter loves a dirge-like sound.' 



" I counted two and seventy stenches 

All well defined, and several stinks " — Chem. Lab. 



COPLEY SQUARE HOTEL 

HUNTINGTON AVENUE, EXETER AND BLAGDEN STREETS 
BOSTON, MASS. 

350 Rooms; 200 Private Baths. Headquarters for College and School Teams 
when in Boston. 

AMOS H. WHIPPLE, Piopiietor 



FOLSOM '10 NICKLESS '10 

FELLOWS : Thanks for the favors you have given us 

in the past. 
We trust we may continue to receive and merit them 

more than ever before. 

Run for Students AGGIE STORE Run By Students 

CLAPP '12 BEERS '12 



OUR SPECIALTIES 



Fruit Trees - We sell a few choice trees of select varieties. Furthermore, we are pre- 
pared to plan and furnish the stock for complete orchards. 

Ornamentals — Trees, Shrubs, and Climbers are grown and sold in all the best species. 

We also have a limited supply of hardy herbaceous plants. 
Cut Flowers — Chrysanthemums, Carnations, and Violets in season. Suitable for proms, 

informals, and general Sunday nights. 
Landscape Gardening — We have a complete Landscape Gardening department in 

which we are able to prepare surveys, designs, planting plans, etc., and to carry out 

such designs on the ground. 

GOOD MEN— We have a few good men to put on the market 
each year. Men who can do things. This is our Specialty of 
Specialties. Next spring's crop promises to be a good one. 
Better order early. 

DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE 

Telephone MassacKvisetts Agricultural Colleg'e 



Or whispering with white lips, " The foe I 
They come! They come! " — Freshman Picture. 



" Fat, fair and forty " — Treasurer's 



AmKerst Co-op Laundry 

....and Sanitary Cloblies Cleahing — 


KEUFFEL d, ESSER CO. 

127 Fulton Street Central Office and Factories 

NEW YORK HOBOKEN, N. J. 

CHICAGO ST. LOUIS SAN FRANCISCO MONTREAL 


Our Laundry Work just a little 
better than ever. Our new 
process of steam cleaning and 
pressing is up to the minute. 

Try us and be satisfied 
JSk A 

J. F. BLANtY, '10, Laundry Agent 

L. BRANDT, '10, 
Clothes Cleaning and Pressing Agent 


Drawing Materials Measuring Tapes 
Mathematical and Surveying Instruments 


Our PARAGON DRAFTING INSTRUMFNTS 
are of the most precise workmanship, the finest finish, 
the most practical design, and are made in tlie greatest 
variety. We also have tlie Key, and other brands. 

Oar MANNHEIM and DUPLEX SLIDE 
RULES excel in construction and accuracy. 


Complete (^^o- Page) Catalogue on request 


Special attention given to large and small spreads Ample room for transients 

AMHERST HOUSE 


D. H. KENDRICK, Prop. 

Terms reasonable House recently equipped with modern improvements 



" A man who could make so vile a pun 

Would not scruple to pick a pocket " — Ji'ld Ho^aard 



' It was an ancient mariner " — Blaney 



AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS 



Ideal location. 

Oldest agricultural college in New England. 

Attendance of four year students has increased over ioo% in six years. 
Special attention given to short courses and correspondence courses. 
Attractive opportunities for efficient training in branches of practical and scien- 
tific agriculture. 
Tuition free to citizens of the United States. 
Necessary expenses moderate. 
Opportunity for needy students to earn part of their expenses. 

ADMISSION. 

Entrance examinations required in English, history, mathematics, modern languages, 
and sciences. Applicants presenting satisfactory certificates from approved 
high schools or academies, or from the regents of the state of New York, 
accepted without examination. 

DEPARTMENTS. 

The Academic Department offers a four years' course leading to the degree 
of B. Sc. Required work of the first two years includes courses in 

Agriculture, French, Horticulture, 

Botany, Geology, Mathematics, 

Chemistry, German, Zoology. 
English, 

Additional required or elective courses, amounting to over 120 in number, are of- 
fered to juniors and seniors by the following divisions and departments: 

Agricultural education. Horticultural: Humanities: 

Agriculture: Floriculture, English, 

Dairying, Forestry, French and Spanish, 

Animal husbandry. Landscape gardening, German and music. 

Agronomy, Market gardening, Political science. 

Farm administration, Pomology, Physical education. 

Botany, Rural sociology. 

Chemistry, Veterinary science. 

Entomology, Zoology and geology. 

Military drill is required the first three years, elective the fourth. 



" O call it by some better name 

For friendship sonnds too cold." — Biintham 



' I am monarch of all I survey " — Dudley 



The Graduate School offers advanced courses leading to the degrees of M. Sc. 
and Ph. D. to graduates ot this and other institutions of recognized standing, 
in the following subjects : 

Agriculture, Entomology, Veterinary Science, 

Botany, Horticulture, Zoology. 

Chemistry, Mathematics and Physics, 

Short Courses, both winter and summer, are offered in agriculture, horticulture, 
and allied subjects. 
This department also conducts correspondence and lecture courses. 

experiment St&tion. This is immediately connected with the college, and 
gives students an opportunity to become familiar with Experiment Station 
methods and results of research and investigation. 

PARTIAL LIST OF EQUIPMENT. 

Clark Hall, for the department of botany, contains large laboratories and lecture rooms ; also 
private laboratories for individual research; the Knowlton Herbarium of 15,000 species of 
flowering plants and ferns ; also a large collection of mosses, lichens, and fungi. The thor- 
oughly equipped laboratories and the large collection of technical bulletins afford exceptional 
opportunity for elementary and advanced study in all branches of botany. 

Wilder Hall, the administrative center of the division of horticulture, contains offices for the 
departments of pomology and landscape gardening; lecture rooms, draughting rooms, and 
reading room for literature pertaining especially to horticulture. 

French Hall and its attached range of glass houses, adds to the equipment of the division of 
horticulture. It is used for instruction and practical demonstration of courses in floriculture 
and market gardening. 

Entomological Laboratory contains lecture rooms and laboratories, also one of the most 
valuable and complete collection of insects in the world. A magnificent new building is 
now being constructed for use by this department and that of zoology. 

Dairy and Storage Barns are models in construction and equipment. Sanitary production of 
milk and up-to-date handling of tne product is made a specialty. The farm of over 400 
acres makes possible the demonstration of proper farm operations and management. 

Veterinary Labor.atory and Hospital offer unique facilities for study of animal diseases and 
their treatment. 

Chemistry Laboratory contains lecture rooms and well equipped laboratories for work in 
different branches of chemistry. 

Library contains 33,000 volumes. 

Drill Hall and Target Range make efficient and attractive the work of the military department 

Modern Dining Hall furnishes board at cost. 

Students room in college dormitories or in private houses of the town. 

For further information write to 

President KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD. 

Matters relating to entrance should be taken up with 

The Registrar. PHILIP B. HASBROUCK. 

Forty-third year begins Septeinber 14, I9IO. 

" And when you stick in conversations burrs 

Don't strew your pathway with those dreadful urs" — Nicktrson 



' Pursuit of knowledge under difficulties " — Larraiee 



JACOB REED'S SONS 

1424-1429 CHESTNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA 



Uniform Martufactxirers for Officers 
of tKe Army, Navy and Marine 
Corps, and Students of many Mili- 
tary ScHooIs and Colleges &«&«&« 



We are the oldest uniform makers in the United States, the house being founded 
in 1824 by Jacob Reed. Our uniforms are all made in sanitary warerooms on our own 
premises, and are ideal in design, tailoring, and fitting quality. 



Students Attention 



RED^MAN BRAND 
riRWOOD 
EARL&WILSON^ 



Have your clothes made to order at the 
TAILORING SHOP of 

I. M. LABROVITZ 

STYLE, FIT AND WORKMANSHIP 
THE BEST. GUARANTEED 

Gents' Furnishings 
Full Dress Suits to Rent 



Silk Socks, Boston Garters, Gloves, etc. 
CLEANING, REPAIRING AND PRESSING NEATLY DONE 



L M. LABROVI TZ 



II AMITY ST. 



Tel. 302-4 



" Reputation, reputation, reputation ! 
Oh, I have lost my reputation I " — Jenks 



'I live in a crowd of jollity" — Johnsoti 



We Make a Specialty of 

College, Class and 
Group Work 

TKe SKelden Studio 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 


W. L. CHILSON 

XrunKs, Bags, 
Suit Cases, Fxir Coats 

Harness, Blankets, and Horse Goods 

of all kinds. The Trunk and Bag 

Store of Hampshire Co. Both 

Hand and Machlne-Made 

Harness Always on 

Hand 

Repairing Done Promptly 
141 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 


BECKMANN'S 

The Candy Shop 
of Northampton 

247-349 MAIN STREET 

Telephone 356 


WOODWARD'S 

T T T M r^ U 


L, vj iN v^rl 

27 Main St., Masonic Building 
NORTHAMPTON, - MASS. 

Lunches, Soda, 
Ice Cream 

Closed only from 1 a. m. to 4 a. m. 
F. W. WOODWARD, Proprietor 



England, with all thy faults, I love thee still — Stevenson 
XIII 



' A delusion, a mockery, and a snare " — New Schedule 




WRIGHT 
'- &DITSON 

CATALOGUE OF 

Athletic Goods 

is out, and should be in the hands of 
everyone interested in sports 

The Foot Ball, Basket Ball and Hockey 

Goods are made up in the best models, 

the best stock, and are official 

Everyone admits that the Wright & Ditson 
Sweaters, Jerseys, Shirts, Tights and 
Shoes are superior in every way. Our 
goods are gotten up by experts who know 
how to use them. 

CATALOGUE FREE 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

344 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 



Chas. L. Willard Co. 
...nnh l^rlnUvB... 



Class Day Programs Invitations 

Dance Programs Embossed Stationery 



Makers of Half-Tones and Printers of 

West Point Annual "Howitzer" 

and all the Leading College 

Souvenir Calendars 



I 56 Fifth Avenue, New York City 



A. G. Sf>al-diimg & Bros. 



SPALDING 

TRADE-MARK 




is known throughout the 
world as a 

GUARANTEE OF 
QUALITY 



Are the Largest Manufacturers in the World of 

OFFICIAL EQUIPIVIENT 

FOR ALL ATHLETIC SPORTS 
AND PASTIMES 



I r V n 1 1 are interested in Athletic Sport you 

II I U U should have a copy of the Spalding 
Catalogue. It's a complete encyclopedia of 

What's New in Sport 

and is sent free on request. 



A. C. Spalding & Bros., 



141 Federal St., Boston 



"And what is writ is writ " 

Would it were worthier " — Finals 



"Both were young, and one was beautiful." — Iiifo7-maUtes. 



West Stockbridge Lime 
Company 

HIGHEST GRADE 
FINISHING LIME 

and 

Agricultural Limes 
* * * 

pREDERirK C. ToBEY, Gen. Mngr. 
WEST STOCKBRIDGE, MASS. 




OF EVERY KIND. 

Implements. 



TEiEPno-Es Machines. ^^^ 



Woodenware. 



SI AND 52 NORTH MARKET STREET. BOSTON; 



fcLrnistie.s ^jiproved -EmpJoyeefS. 
Mercantile, A^riculturaJ, Horflcaltural. 

TELEPHONE RICH. aTfl. 



1857 



INSURE YOUR PROFITS BY USING 



1910 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

THE STANDARD FOR OVER FIFTY YEARS 

There's a Reason and Your Crops mil Make it Plain to You 
PERUVINA BRANDS 



(GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO BASE) 
LEADERS FOPv MARKET GARDENING AND GRASS TOP DRESSING 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE) 

17% to 20% Phosphoric Acid 35% to 50% Lime 

THE COE-MORTIMER COMPANY 



24 STONE STREET, 



NEW YORK CITY 



"Soprano, basso, even the contra-alto 

Wished him five fathoms under the Rialto." — Rid Hozaard. 



"There's a gude time coming" — Bean 




iMlJslMliiilffliF'SLC 




GO TO MT. TOM ! ! ! 
There the world is at your feet ! 



Ivoke 



JOBBERS OF 

WROUGHT IRON AND BRASS PIPE 

VALVES AND FITTINGS FOR STEAM, 
WATER AND GAS 

ASBESTOS AND MAGNESIA BOILER 
AND PIPE COVERINGS 

PIPE CUT TO SKETCH 

MILL SUPPLIES 



ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS FOR 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING 
AUTOMATIC SPRINKLER SYSTEMS 
BOILER AND ENGINE CONNECTIONS 



HOLYOKi 



....DRAIN OR LAND TILE.... 

ESTABLISHED .S69 

WALDO BROTHERS 

C. D. WALDO, Sole Partner 

102 MILK STREET - BOSTON 

Akron i>alt O^laggb ^ghi^r ppg 

FIRE CLAY FLUE LININGS 

PORTLAND and ROSENDALE CEMENTS. MASONS' and CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES. 



" Oh that this, too, solid flesh would melt. 

Thaw and resolve itself into dew " — " Fat " Robinson 



' He sighed for many, though he loved but one " — McGratv 



DRINK 

Boynton's Birch Beer 
and Hires 



27 FLAVORS 

W. W. BOYNTON 

31 River St., Northampton 



J. H. TROTT 

Plumbing, Heating, Steam, 
Gas and Water Piping, Paints, 
Stoves and Ranges, Tinv^fare 

ALL JOBBING PROMPTLY DONE 



TELEPHONE 36 12 



"For the Land's Sake" 



USE 



Bowker^s 
Fertilizers 



They Enrich the 
Earth and those 
who till it. 




" So we'll go no more a roving 
So late into the night " — Henry 



' Marriage is a desperate thing'' 



MOORE'S Non-Leakable ^i^^^^^^ $950 

FOUNTAIN PEN ^,,^,^ -^-^ 

CLEAN TO CARRY — Safe to carry in vest ..a 0'''Omr ALWAYS READY— 

pocket or shopping bag in any position. ^^00/^^^^^^ ^''" P°"" ''^^^^ '" ' 

Impossible to lealc. ^.rfS^^lSP^^ '''''^" ""' '" "^^ ~ "° 

CLEAN TO HANDLE- Barrel .^^ ^StK^ ^ shaking is required, 

in one piece— no joints. ^^gj^^Mt^ ^ UNIQUE CONSTRUCTION— No other pen 
Can be filled with- ,ig0 '! ^^ S S^^^^ like it. Can' i leak — no pen section to nn- 
out soiling the ^aa^P ^^MBP ^^^ screw and get covered with ink. Uses any kind 
fingers. -^^0^^^K^^^ °^ '"'^ including Higgins' India Ink. 

^^^jljP'^^^illJI^^^^ _ Each pen fully gTjarnnteed. Money refunded after 10 days' trial if not 
y^^^K/t^^^^ Send for illustrated circular and testimonials from highly pleased customers. 

EURAMERICAN FOUNTAIN PEN CO., 168 Devonshire St., Boston, Mass. 



D . A . MO \A/ E: 

..,5ilbole$ale Grocer,,. 

TEAS AND COFFEES S« GALLON CANNED GOODS A SPECIALTY 
WE SELL DIRECT TO LARGE CONSUMERS 

273 MAIN STREET - WORCESTER, MASS. 



Stores at Worcester, Mass. ; Providence, R.L ; New London, Conn.; Manchester, N.H. 

THE DANIELS-CORNELL CO. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ORDERS 
FROM SCHOOLS AND INSTITUTIONS 

MULBERRY AND FULTON STS., - WORCESTER, MASS. 

WM. F. WHIPPLE, Treas. and Mgr. 



"Minds that have nothing to confer 
Find little to perceive" — Ariiislrang 



"Too fair to worship, too divine to love" — Stenographers 



THI AIDOWIR PR! 



ESTABLISHED 1809 




POSSESSING one of the best equipped Printeries 

in New England, we solicit all kinds of Printing 

with confidence in our ability to satisfy the most 

exacting demands M ^ M M M M 



THI ANDOWIR PRISS 

JOHN N. COLE 

Printers f ublfelf^rs i^tattnn^rs 



"I had a hat. It was not all a hat, 
Part of the crown was gone " — Daddy 



' The silver snarling trumpets 'gan to chide '' — Band 



CHARLES WESLEY HEARN 

561 Boylston Street _ - _ Boston, Mass. 



Mr. Hearn returns thanks to those students past and present of 
" Aggie " College, for much appreciated patronage during the 
years that he was selected to do their work, and for their most 
courteous and honorable dealings at all times. 

With best wishes for your future, believe me 

Cordially yours, 

Oct. 18, 1909 CHARLES WESLEY HEARN 



j0^ RANK FOOLISHNESS -^ 

Do not buy your cuts and illustrations because 



they 


are 


cheap 


buy 


them 


because 


they 


are 


good 




You 


can't 


get 


fool 


ish 


with 


us. 



Massachusetts Engraving Company 

Half-tone and Line Cuts 104 HANOVER ST. 

Illustrators and Engravers BOSTON ■ MASS. 



" Let us liave wine and women, mirtli and laughter. 
Sermons and soda water the day after " — Satitrdav A'ight at "Hainp" 



' Counts his sure gains and hurries back for more " — Kenney 



Oliver L. Briggs & Son 



BRIGGfS 
TABLESJ 


Manufactu 


lers of 


J 


i 


Pool 


and 


/ 


ft 


Billiard Tables 



Pool and Billiard Supplies 



61 ESSEX ST., BOSTON 

Estimates Furnished 



GREGORY'S 

..HONEST SEED.. 



Send for our Free Catalogue 



J. J. H. Gregory & Son 

MARBLEHEAD, MASS. 
Seed Growers and Seed Dealers 



Flower, Vegetable and Grass Seed 

Superior Quality 



Our Flower Seeds take the lead with many private 
gardeners and florists. Our Vegetable Seeds are in de- 
mand by the largest market gardeners, and our Franklin 
Park Lawn Seed, grass seeds for shady locations, tennis courts 
and golf links, cannot be excelled for purity and quality 

Catalogue Mailed on Request 



SCHLEGEL ^ FOTTLEK GOMPANY 

26^27 SOUTH MARKET STREET. BOSTON 



"How fast has brother followed brother 
From sunshine to the sunless land" — Ex-ii 



■ He mouths a sentence as curs mouth a bone " — '■'■ Sqiiirt^'' 



..The Springfield Gas Machine.. 

Gas for Lighting and Fuel Purposes 
PRODUCED AT A MINIMUM COST 



Gas Appliances, Gas Furnaces, Gas Heating 
Burners, Gas Water Heaters, Incandescent 
Gas Burners, Pipe, Fittings, Valves, and all 
Supplies for Gas and Oil ^ -^ .^ =^ 

Gilbert & Barker Manufacturing Co. 

193 LYMAN STREET SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



ELLWANGER & BARRY'S 

Shrubs, P\Oses and Hardy Plants 

ARE FAMOUS THE WORLD OVER 



Illustrated Descriptive Catalogue Free on Request 

MOUNT HOPE NURSERIES 

Established 1840 ROCHESTER, N.Y. 



■ I had a dream wliich was not all a dream " — Assembly 
XXII 



' His bark is worse tlian liis bite " — Billv 



57-63 FRANKLIN ST., BOSTON 

The place where original designs 
in fine 

Class Day Programs, etc., 
are executed 



Cottrell & Leonard 




Caps, Gowns and Hoods 



To Massachusetts Agricultural College 
for many years, Amherst, Williams, 
Dartmouth, Wesleyan, Harvard, Yale, 
Princeton, Minnesota, Stanford, Tulane 
University of North Carolina, and the 
others. Class Contracts a specialty. 
Rich Gowns for Pulpit and Bench. 

Superior Workmanship, Reliable Material 



The H. L. Frost & Bartlett Co. 



STAMFORD 



CONNECTICUT 



" The loud laugh that speaks the vacant mind " — J^. G. Sinitit