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LIBRARY 




MASSACHUSETTS 

AGRICULTURAL 

COLLEGE 



M. A, C, 

CCi-LECTIOK 



»n 



Td[)<i Nineteen Ol)irteen "3n6ex 

V «> 1 II III e X L I I I 

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Address, O . C, . A N D E R S O J*! . M a n a b e i 

A III h p r s t . M ass. 



THE TUTTLE COMPANY 



RUTLAND. 



VERMONT 



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[NfX)EK 



UAL 



PUBLI 
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CLASS OF 
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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/index1913univ 




€6ltor-ln-(Iblcf 

CLYDE MONROE PACKARD 

T^A-sslstant "lE6itor 

HARRIS WILLIAM ANGIER 



-A.ssoclatc £6ltors 

REYER HERMAN VAN ZWALUWENBURG 
JAMES DUDLEY FRENCH 
SIMON MILLER JORDAN 
GEORGE ZABRISKIE, 2nd. 

^rt ~£6ltorH 

CHARLESWORTH HERBERT BREWER 

CHARLES DWIGHT ROBERTS 

FREDERICK, DAVID GRIGGS 

business Mlanagcr 

OSCAR GUSTAF ANDERSON 



-Assistant MZanagcr 

RALPH JAMES BORDEN 





"^^J^he campus lies in quiet of suggested fall, 
^^0/ Surroun6e6 b;? tl)e l)azy hlUs of fading green. 
Once more the welcome busg sounds return. 
Of students, bookwlse. 'gaged In studj or in play. 
Once more tbe valleip, changed by bluff, cold days. 
"Cles white and bleak, tho' lovely still, and fair. 
"2\.nd warm as seen hy those who love the vale. 
Once, more all aspects, changed again by warmer 

suns, 
^rlng back to memory scenes of other springs : 
Once more the call of wood and hill and stream 
5ltakes class-room drear and studies dreaded tasks. 
Oncn more the reckoning days, commencement, and 

a year 
^•fas passed o'er "^Ima ^ater and h^r sons : 
Of growth, success, defeat, and start anew; 
Of sweet, made so by contrast with th* gall. 
"iX^e all have had our problems to o'crcome, 
TIA.nd know that future days bring other tests 
'Wherein, the knowledge, gained thru errors past. 
Shall h<ilp us all to see the way and choose aright. 



(Ll)arles Robert Duncan 

~3n grateful recognition of bis 
quiet loyalty to 511. T!A.. Can^ 
l)ls friendly, efficient guidance. 
founJi always at the service of 
l)er sons, we affectionately 6e6l- 
cate tbls book 



:iD)(§©©(§^iin[[ n[M©M^ 



(Tbctrles Robert iDuncan 

GHARLES ROBERT DUNCAN was born at Newark, N. J., in 1884, 
and received his early education in private schools of that city. He early 
showed an aptitude for mathematics and won a prize for the highest 
standing in the subject. He then entered the high school of that city and 
V 33 graduated in 1902. Entering Rutgers College in the fall of the same year, he took 
up the study of Civil Engineering and received his B. S. degree in 1906. While in 
college he was a member of the Glee Club and its president during his senior year. He 
was also a member of the Chess Club at the college and played on his class baseball 
team. 

In June 1906, immediately after graduation, he entered the employ of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad in the engineering department, and was assigned to duties on construc- 
tion of the New York terminal then being built. This is without doubt the most com- 
plete and costly railroad terminal in the world and while on this work, he gained much 
experience in practical construction. His duties were varied, and he was successively 
engaged at surveying, locating forms, office work, and inspection of construction. Dur- 
ing the last few months of his connection with that work, he was in the employ of the 
contractor as assistant to the night superintendent. 

In June, 1908, he was engaged as Instructor in the Department of Mathematics and 
Civil Engineering at this College and entered upon his work here in September of that 
year. His training and experience made him at once a valuable man in that department. 
Altho he has devoted his time to teaching while at the college, he was engaged in pro- 
fessional work during the summer vacations of 1910 and 1911. 

During the summer of 1910 he assisted Mr. G. M. Tompson in making a valua- 
tion of the Boston & Maine Railroad property in New Hampshire. All of the system's 
lines in that state were gone over in about two months, and an estimate made of the prop- 
erty and cost of about twenty-five different roads in the state, embraced in the B. & M. 
system. As a result of the work the railroad won its suit against the state for a reduc- 
tion of assessment. 

During the past summer he was employed on construction of the extension of the 
Florida East Coast Railway from Knights Key to Key West. 

Coming to this institution a stranger three years ago, by his quiet manner and sym- 
pathetic attitude, he has won the respect and good will of the student body and the 
esteem of his associates on the faculty. j p OSTRANDFR 



m 



i 




Another station on Time's Gliding Railv 
Life's Train Hath Past; 

And now Anticipation's Eager Glances 
Onward are cast 



(Lainnbav 



September 11-13, Monday-Wednesday 
September 11-14, Monday-Thursday 
September 13. Wednesday, 1.30 p. m. 
October 12, Thursday 
November 29-Decemeer 4, Wednesday 1 p. 
December 15, Friday, 6 p. m. 



1911 

Condition Examinations 

Entrance Examinations 

First Semester Begins; Assembly 

Half-HoUday. Columbus Day 

1. to Monday, 1 p. m., Chapel Thanksgiving Recess 

Winter Recess Begins 



1912 



January 1. Monday, I p. m. 
January 29, Monday 
February 5. Monday, 1 p. M. 
February 22. Thursday 
March 29. Friday. 6 p. m. 
April 8. Monday, 1 p. m. 
April 19. Friday 
May 30, Thursday 
June 3. Monday 
June 10, Monday 
June 15-19, Saturday-Wednesday 
June 19-22, Wednesday-Saturday 



Winter Recess Ends; Chapel 

Semester Examinations Begin 

Second Semester Begins; Chapel 

Half-Holiday, Washington's Birthday 

Spring Recess Begins 

Spring Recess Ends ; Chapel 

Half-Holiday. Patriot's Day 

Holiday. Memorial Day 

Senior Examinations Begin 

Non-Senior Examinations Begin 

Entrance Examinations 




!>ttembcrs €x-Offlclo 

His Excellency, Governor Eugene N. Foss President of the Corporation 

Kenyon L. Butterfield .... President of the College 

David Snedden ..... State Commissioner of Education 

J. Lewis Ellsworth . . Secretary of the State Board of Agriculture 

5tl(imbcrs of tbc (Eorporatlott 

Davis R. Dewey of Cambridge 
M. Fayette Dickinson of Brooklire 
William H. Bowker of Concord 
George H. Ellis of West Newton 
Charles E. Ward of Buckland 
Elmer D. Howe of Marlborough . 
Nathaniel I. Bowditch of Fram:ngham 
William Wheeler of Concord 
Arthur G. Pollard of Lowell 
Charles A. Gleason of New Braintree 
Frank GeRRETT of Greenfield 
Harold L. Frost of Arlington 
Charles H. Preston of Danvers . 
Frank A. Hosmer of Amherst 

Officers of tl)<i (Torfioratlott 

His Excellency, Governor Eugene N. Foss of Boston 
Charles A. Gleason of Springfield .... 
J. Lewis Ellsworth of Worcester .... 
Fred C. Kenney of Amherst ..... 

Charles A. Gleason of Springfield .... 



Te 


rm Expires 




1912 




1912 




1913 




1913 




1914 




1914 




1915 




1915 




1916 




1916 




1917 




1917 




1918 




1918 




. President 


V 


ce-President 




. Secretary 




Treasurer 




Auditor 



13 



Ra]D)@(§©(@^[[nn no^ie)]:^^ 



Standing Commlttftes of tlje (Lorporatlon 

(Totnmlttee on IFxnance. 

Charles A. Gleason, Chairman 
George H. Ellis Nathaniel I. Bowditch 

Arthur G. Pollard Charles E. Ward 

Frank A. Hosmer 

(Toinmlttcc on (Tourse of Stui^ i"-^ ^yaculty 

William Wheeler, Chairman 
William H. Bowker Elmer D. Howe 

M. Fayette Dickinson Davis R. Dewey 

David Snedden Frank A. Hosmer 

(Tommlttcc on ~jfarm 

George H. Ellis, Chairman. 
Frank Gerrett Charles A. Gleason 

Nathaniel I. Bowditch 

Committee on IKortlculturc 

J. Lewis Ellsworth, Chairman 
Davis R. Dewey Elmer D. Howe 

Harold L. Frost 

(Tommlttcc on ^Experiment "JDepartment 

Charles H. Preston, Chairman 
J. Lewis Ellsworth Arthur G. Pollard 

Charles E. Ward Harold L. Frost 

Committee on ^ull6lngs an6 "i^rrangement of <5roun6s 

M. Fayette Dickinson, Chairman 
William Wheeler William H. Bowker 

Frank Gerrett Charles H. Preston 

^Examining Committee of Overseers 

John Bursley of West Barnstable N. B. TURNER of Great Barrington 

Isaac Damon of Wayland Frank P. Newkirk of Easthampton 

William E. Patrick of Warren 




WILLIAM P. BROOKS, Ph. D. 

Director. 

JOSEPH B. LINDSEY, Ph. D. 

Vice-Dlreclor. 
FRED C. KENNEY 

Treasurer. 
CHARLES R. GREEN. B. Agr. 

Librarian. 



OfflC(irs 



28 Northampton Road 

47 Lincoln Avenue 

Mount Pleasant 

Mount Pleasant 

Department of "Plaitt aii6 'lA.nlmal (Tbcmlstri? 



JOSEPH B. LINDSEY. Ph. D. 

Chemist. 
EDWARD B. HOLLAND, M. Sc. 

Associate Chemist, in charge of Research Division. 
FRED W. MORSE, Ph. D. 

Research Chemist. 
HENRI D. HASKINS, B. Sc. 

In charge of Fertilizer Division. 

PHILIP H. SMITH. B. Sc. 

In charge of Feed and Dairy Division. 

LEWELL S. WALKER, B. Sc. 

Assistant. 
JAMES C. REED, B. Sc. 

Assistant. 
JOSEPH F. MERRILL, B. Sc. 

Assistant. 
CLEMENT L. PERKINS, B. Sc. 

Assistant. 
R. W. RUPRECHT, B. Sc. 

Assistant. 

JOSEPH P. HOWARD 

Collector. 

HARRY J. ALLEN 

Assistant. 

JAMES R. ALCOCK 

Assistant in Animal Nutrition. 

15 



47 Lincoln Avenue 

28 North Prospect Street 

44 Pleasant Street 

33 Northampton Road 

102 Main Street 

19 Phillips Street 

Nutting Avenue 

North Prospect Street 

32 North Prospect Street 

North Amherst, Mass. 

Amherst, Mass. 

North Amherst, Mass. 



:iD)(§(§©(g^[iQn n[Kiis)©^ 



JPepartntent of -A-grlcultura 

WILLIAM P. BROOKS, Ph. D. 

Agriculturist. 

H. J. FRANKLIN, Ph. D. 

In charge of Cranberry Investigation. 

EDWIN F. GASKILL, B. Sc. 

First Assistant Agriculturist. 

"^Department of "horticulture 

FRANK A, WAUGH, M. Sc. M 

Horticulturist. 

FRED C. SE.ARS, M. Sc. 

Pomologist. 
JACOB K. SHAW, M. Sc. 

Assistant Horticulturist. 
DAVID W. ANDERSON. B. Sc 

Graduate Assistant. 

"Department of t^otanip anb Vegetable "Patl)olo9j 

GEORGE E. STONE, Ph. D. 

Botanist and Vegetable Pathologist. 
GEORGE H. CHAPMAN, M. Sc. 

Assistant Botanist. 
EDWARD A. LARRABEE, B. Sc. 

Assistant Botanist. 

"Department of TEntomologj 

HENRY T. FERNALD, Ph. D. 

Entomologist. 

BURTON N. GATES, Ph. D. 

Apiarist. 
ARTHUR I. BOURNE, B, A. 

Assistant in Entomology. 

"Department of Veterinary Science 

JAMES B. PAIGE, B. Sc, D. V. S. 
Veterinarian, 

"Department of Mlcteorologj 

JOHN E. OSTRANDER, A. M., C. E. 

Meteorologist. 

Otber Officers of tl)e TExpcrlment Station 
HERBERT J. BAKER, B. Sc 
Secretary to the Director. 

16 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Wareham, Mass. 

North Amherst, Mass. 

huselts Agricultural College 

Mount Pleasant 

I Allen Street 

32 North Prospect Street 



Mount Pleasant 
13 Fearing Street 



44 Amity Street 
42 Lincoln /ivenue 
66 Pleasant Street 

42 Lincoln Avenue 
35 North Prospect Street 



3::^sii=ii=ii=ii=ii=ii=ii=ii=ii=:^ 

III - ' : '~~ \\\ 

II 



11 



II 



ffSCMLTl 



^11 

%;:=;ii£ii=iirii=ii=ii=:iisii^fii=AJ: 




Kenyon L. Butterfield, a. M. LL.D., President of the 
College and Head of Division of Rural Social Science. 

Born 1868. B. Sc, Michigan AgricuUural College, 1891. Assistant 
Secretary, Michigan Agricultural College, 1891-92. Editor of the 
"Michioan Cranoe Visitor:' 1892-95. Editor Grange Department 
'•Michigan Farmer," 1895-1903. Superintendent Michigan Farmers' 
Institutes. 1895-99. Field Agent, Michigan Agricultural College, 
1896-99. Graduate Student, University of Michigan, 1900-02. 
A. M., University of Michigan. 1902. Instructor in Rural Sociology, 
University of Michigan, 1902-03. President of R. I. College of 
Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 1903-06. President of Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College since 1906. L.L. D., Amherst College, 
1910. <I'K*. 



George F. Mills, A. M., Dean of the College and Pro- 
fessor of Languages and Literature. 

' Born 1839. A. M., Williams College, 1862. AA*. Associate 
Principal of Greylock Institute, 1882-89. Professor of English and 
Latin at Massachusetts Agricultural College since 1890. Head of 

, the Division of Humanities, 1907-11. Appointed Dean of the 
College in 1907. 'Hv*. 





Charles H. Fernald, Ph. D., Honorary Director of the 
Graduate School. 

Born 1838. Bowdom College, 1865. Ph. D.. Maine State College, 
1886. Studied m the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Cam- 
bridge and under Louis Agassiz on Penekese Island. Also travelled 
extensively in Europe, studying insects in various museums. Principal 
of Litchfield Academy, 1865. Principal of Houllon Academy, 
1865-70. Chair of Natural History, Maine State College, 1871-86. 
Professor of Zoology at Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1886- 
1910. <!'K<I'. 

18 



[iD)(§(g@@^iinn nff^io)!^^ 



William P. Brooks, Ph. D., Direclor of the Experiment 
Slalion and Lecturer on Soil Fertility. 

Born 1851. Massachusetts Agricultural Col 
graduate, Massachusetts Agricultural Coll 



1875. >I'i;K. P, 
1875-76. Profe; 
College of Agri. 
af Botany, 1831-88 



of Agriculture and Director of 
ture, Sapporo. Japan, 1877-78; also Prof 

Acting President, Imperial College, 1880-83, and 1886-87.' Prof 
of Agriculture at Massachusetts Agricultural College, and Agricul- 
turalist for the Hatch Experiment Station since January, 1889. Ph D 
Halle, 1897. Acting President of the College and Acting Direclor 

of the Experiment Station, 1905-05. 

Direclor of the Experiment Station, 1906. 

*K<I.. 




William D. Hurd, B. Sc 

Work. 




M. Agr., Direclor of Extension 



Born 1875. Michigan Agricultural College. 1889. 'MU, .\Z. Nur- 
sery Inspector, University of Illinois, 1899. Teacher in Lansing 
High School, 1900-02. Professor of Horticulture, Prachcal School 
of Agriculture and Horticulture, Briarcliff Manor, New York, 1902- 
03. Professor of Agriculture, University of Maine, 1903-06. Dean 
of College of Agriculture, University of Maine, 1906-09. Direclor 
of Short Courses, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1909. <I>K<I'. 



Frank A. Waugh, M. Sc, Head of the Division of Hor- 
ticulture and Professor of Landscape Cardening. 
Born 1869. Kansas Agricultural College. 1891. KE. Editor Agri- 
cultural Department, Topeka Capital. 1891-92. Editor Montana 
Farm and Stocl; Journal, 1892. Editor Denver FiM and Farm. 
1892-93. M. Sc. Kansas Agricultural College. 1893. Professor of 
Horticulture, Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, and 
nent Station, 1893-95. Graduate Stu- 
i-99. Professor of Horticulture, Um- 
.Agncultui-al College, and Horticultur- 
)n, 1895-1902. Horticultural Editor of 
1898. Professor of Horticulture and 
chusetts Agricultural College, and Hor- 



Horticulturalist of the Experi 
dent, Cornell University, 189 
versily of Vermont and Stale 
ahst of the Experiment Sialic 
the Counfri, Centieman since 
Landscape Gardening, Ma 





Hatch Experiment Slalion since 1902. <I'K*. 

James A. FooRD, B. Sc, M. Sc, Head of the Division of 
Agriculture, and Professor of Farm Administration. 

Born 1872. B. Sc, New Hampshire College of Agriculture and 
Mechamc Arts, 1898. KZ. M. S. A., Cornell University, 1902. 
^3;. Assistant in Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion, 1900-03. Graduate Summer School of Agriculture. Ohio 
State Umversily, 1902. Professor of Agriculture, Delaware College, 
1903-06. Umversily of IHinois, 1906. Associate Professor of 
Agronomy, Ohio Stale University, 1906-07. Associate Professor 
of Agronomy. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1907, Cornell 
University, 1908. Professor of Farm Administration, Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, 1908. 'I'K*. 

19 



G^[e)@' 



i2^m nKi£)i 




Robert J. SpR-AGLE, Ph. D., Head of the Division of 
Humanities and Professor of Economics and Sociology. 

Bom 1868. B. .A.. Boslon University, 1897. BBn. Studied indus- 
trial conditions in England in 1898. M. A.. Harvard University, 
1900. Ph. D., Boslon University, 1901. Head of Department of 
Economics and History, Knox College, 1901-06. Studied Socialism 
and Socialistic Development throughout Northern Europe m 1903. 
Head of the Department of Economics and Sociology, University of 
Maine, 1906-11. Appointed to research work at the Carnegie 
Institution, Washington, D. C in 1906. Head of the Division of 
Humanities and Professor of Economics, Massachusetts Agncultural 
College, 1911. *BK. <I>K*. 



Joseph B. Li.xdsey, B. Sc Ph. D., Head of Department 

of Chemistrv and Coessmann Professor of Agricultural 

Chemistry. 

Born 1862. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1883. C, S. C. 
Chemist, Massachusetts State Agricultural Experiment Station, 1883- 
85. Chemist, L, B. Darling Fertilizer Co., Pavvluckel, R. I., 1885- 
89. Student at University of Goettingen, 1889-92. -A. M.. Ph. D., 
University of Goettingen. 1892. Student Zurich Polytechnic Insli- 
1892. .Associate Chemist, Massachusetts Slate Experiment Sta- 
1892-95. In charge of Department of Foods and Feeding, 
1895-1907. Chemist and Vice-Director 
1907. Head of 



lute 

tion. 

Hatch Experiment Station, 

of Massachusells .Agricultural Experiment Stati 

Department of Chemistry and Goessmann Professor of .Agrici 

Chemistry, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1911. M 



American Ch 





Society. Fellow in American Association 
the -Advancement of Science. 4>K<I>. 



CH.4RLES Wellington, M. A., Ph. D., Professor of 
Chemistry. 

Massachusetts Agricultura 
Chemistry 



orn 1853. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1873. K2. Grad- 
uate Student in Chemistry, Massachusetts .Agricultural College, 1873- 
76. .Assistant Chemist, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 1876. 
Student in University of Virginia, 1876-77. First .Assistant Chemist, 
Department of .Agriculture, 1877-82. Ph. D., University of Goettin- 
gen. 1885. .Associate Professor of Chemistry at Massachusetts .Agri- 
cultural Colleoe, 1885-1907. Professor of Chemistrv, Massachusetts 
.Agricultural College since 1907. *K*. 



James B. Paige, B. Sc, D. V. S., Chairman of the Division 

of Science and Professor of Veterinary Science. 

Born 1861. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1882. Q. T. V. 
On farm at Prescott, 1882-87. D. V. S., Faculty of Comparative 
Medicine and Veterinary Science, McGill Universitv, 1888. Prac- 
ticed at Northampton, 1888-91. Took course in Pathological and 
Bacteriological Department McGill Universitv, summer 1891. Stu- 
died in the Veterinary School in Munich. Germany, 1895-96, Pro- 
fessor of Veterinary Science at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
since 1891. *K*. . 

20 




3^ns)©@©(§^3nn nMie)3 



George E. Stone, Ph. D.. Professor of Botanv. 

Born 1861. Massachusetts .Agricultural College, 1882-84. *^K. 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1884-89. In the summer of 
1890, in charge of the Botanv Classes at Worcester Summer School 
of Natural Hislorj-. Leipsic ' University. 1891-92. Ph. D.. Leipsic 
University, 1892. Studied m the Physiological Laboratory at Clark 
University, 1893. Assistant Professor of Botany at Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, 1893-95. B. Sc.. Massachusetts Agricultural 
Colleoe, 1897. Professor of Botanv at Massachusetts .Agricultural 
Colleae smcc 1895. 'S'K*. 




Philip B. H.ASBROUCK, B. Sc, Professor of Physics and 
Registrar of the College. 

Bom 1870. B. Sc. Rutgers College, 1893. X>^. .Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics. iNlassachusetts .Agricultural College, 1895- 
1902. .Associate Professor of Mathematics, 1902-11. Registrar since 
1905. Professor of Phvsics, Massachusetts .Agricultural College, 
]9]1_. .fK*. 



John E. Ostr.^NDER, A. M., C. E., Professor of Mathe- 
matics and Civil Engineering. 

Born 1865. B. .A. and C. E., Union College, I8e6. Assistant on 
Sewer Construction. West Trov. N. "^'.. 1886. .Assistant on Con- 
struction. Chicago, St. Paul & Kansas City Railway. 1887. Draughts- 
man vsllh Phoenix Bridge Company. 1887. M. .A., Union College. 
1839. .Assistant in Engmeenns Department. New York State Canals. 
1888-91. Instructor in Civil Engmeenng. Lehigh University, 1891- 
92. Engineering Contractor for .Alton Bridge, Summer of 1892. 
Professor of Civil Engineering and Mechanic .Arts. University of 
Idaho, 1892-97. Professor of" Mathematics and Civil Engineering 
Massachusetts Agricultural College since 1897. 4>K<1>. 





Henry T. FeRN.aLD, M. Sc, Ph. D., Professor of Ento- 
mology and Acting Director of the Graduate School. 

Born 1866. University of Maine, 1885. BOn. M. Sc, University 
of Majne, 1888. Graduate Student in Biologv, \^'eslevan University, 
1885-86. Graduate Student. Johns Hopkins University, 1887-90. 
Laboralorv Instructor, Johns Hopkins University. 1889-90. Ph. D., 
Johns Hopkins Umversitv, 1890. Professor of Zoology. Pennsyl- 
vania State College. 1890-99. State Economic Zoologist. Professor 
of Entomology Massachusetts Agricultural College since 1899. •J'K'i'. 

21 



G^[D)(g(§©(g^niin HKiiD)!^^ 




George C. Martin, C. E., Captain 18th U. S. Infantrv, 
Professor of Mllitar\i Science and Tactics. 

Born 1869. C. E., Universily of Vermonl, 1892. ^'^. With 
Engineering News, 1895-97. Entered array, July, 1898, as Second 
L.ieutenant of Twenty-first United Slates Infantry, Promoted to 
First Lieutenant of Second United States Infantry, March, 1899. 
Promoted to Captain of Eighteenth United States Infantry, August, 
1903. Placed en duty at Massachusetts Agricultural College by 
order of the Honorable, the Secretary of War, September, 1905, 
Retired from United Slates Army, 1909. 



Edward A. White, B. Sc, Professor of Floriculture. 

Born 1872. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1895. KS. Assist- 
ant Horticulturalist, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1895-97. 
While & Frost, Florists, Arlmglon, Mass., 1897-1900. Assistant 
Professor of Horticulture, Texas Agricultural and Mechanical Col- 
lege, 1900-02. Professor of Botany, Forestry, and Landscape Archi- 
tecture, Connecticut Agricultural College, 1902-07. Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Floriculture, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1907-09. 
Professor of Floriculture, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1909. 





William R. Hart, B. L., A. M., Professor of Agricultural 
Education. 

B. L., Iowa Slate Law School, 1880. A. B., University of Nebraska, 
1896. A. M., University of Nebraska, 1900. Department of Psy- 
chology and Education in Nebraska Slate Normal at Peru, 1901-07. 
Professor of Agricultural Education, Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lese, 1907. 



Fred C. Sears, M. Sc, Professor of Pomology. 

Born 1866. B. S., Kansas Agricultural College, 1892. Assistant 
Horticulturalist at Kansas Experiment Station, 1892-97. M. Sc, 
Kansas Agricultural College, 1896. Professor of Horticulture, Utah 
Agricultural College, 1897. Director Nova Scotia School of Horti- 
culture, Wolfville, Nova Scotia, 1898-1904. Professor of Horti- 
cullure. Nova Scotia Agricultural College, Truro, Nova Scotia, 1905- 
07. Professor of Pomology, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
1907. 'I'K*. 

22 




^^ RaiD(§(§(§(§^nnii nB^iDi 



Fred C. Kenney, Treasurer. 



1869. 



Ferns Insl.lule, 1890-91. Bookkeeper for Man.slee and 
Norlheaslern Railroad Company. 1895-1907. Assislant Secretary and 
Cashier of Michigan Aoricullural College. Treasurer, Massachusetts 
Agricultural College since 1907. 





Robert W. Neal, A. M., Associate Professor of English. 

Born 1873. A. B., University of Kansas, 1898. A. M.. University 
of Kansas, 1899. Assistant in Department of English, University of 
Kansas, 1898-99. University Scholar, Yale Graduate School, 1899- 
1900. Teacher in Wallmgford, Conn., High School, 1900-01. 
Instructor in English, University of Cincinnati, 1901-02. Harvard 
Graduate School, 1902-03. A. M.. Harvard, 1903. Substitute 
Instructor in English and Acting Head of Department, Rutgers Col- 
lege, 1903-04. Editorial Department of The WorLVs Work. '904- 
06. Assistant Professor of English and Instructor in German, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, 1906-08. A. M., Yale, 1908. Assist- 
ant Professor of English, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1908. 
4'1!K. 



Joseph S. Chamberlain, M. Sc, Ph. D., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Organic and Agricultural Chemistrv. 

Born 1870. B. Sc, Iowa State Agricultural College, 1890. M. S., 
Iowa Stale Agricultural College, 1892. Instructor in Chemistry, 
Iowa State Agricultural College, 1894-97. Ph. D., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1899. Instructor in Chemistry, Oberlin College, 1899- 
1901. Volunlarv Assistant in Chemistry at Wesleyan University, 
summer of 1900-01. Research Assistant to Professor Ira Remsen, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1901. Chemist U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, 1901-09. Chief of Cattle Food and Grain Investigation 
Laboratory, Bureau of Chemistry, 1907-09. Student, University of 
Berlin, 1909. .Associate Professor of Organic and Agricultural 
Chemistry, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 1909. 'I'K*. 





William P. B. Lockwocd, M. Sc, Associate Professor of 
Dairying. 

Born 1875. B. Sc, Pennsylvania State College, 1899. Ki:. With 
Walker-Gordon Laboratory Co.. of Boston and Philadelphia, 1899- 
1901. Instructor in Dairying, Pennsyl ania State College, 1902-03. 
Inspector Hires Condensed Milk Co., Malvern, Pa., 1903-06. Cream- 
ery and Condensing Conslruclion Work, 1906-08. M. Sc, Pennsyl- 
vania Stale College, 1909. Associate Professor of Dairying, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, 1908. 

23 



:[D)(§(§©(g2^[inn niMie)^^ 




Elmer K.. Eyerly, A. M., Associate Professor of Rural 

Sociolog]}. 

Franklin and Marshall College, 1888. Yale Divinity School, 1888- 
89. Professor of Pohllcal Economy, Redfield College, 1889-91. 
Sludenl of Pohlical Economy. Berlm University. 1891-92. Professor 
of Political Economy. Redfield College, 1892-93. A. M.. Franklin 
and Marshall College. 1893. Professor of English Literature, Yonk- 
ton College, 1893-99. Student of Sociology, University of Chicago, 
summers of 1897, 1898, 1899. Professor of English Literature, South 
Dakota Agricultural College, 1899-1907. Fellow in Sociology, Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1908. Fellow in Political Economy, University 
of Chicago, 1909. Instructor m Agricultural Economics and Rural 
Sociology, Correspondence-study Department, University of Chicago, 
1908-09. Assistant Professor of Political Science and Lecturer in 
Rural Sociology. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1909-11. 
Associate Professor of Rural Sociology, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 1911, 



Frederick F. Moon, A. B., M. F., Associate Professor of 
Foreslr]]. 

B. A.. Amherst, 1901. '/.^'. Harvard Medical College two years. 
Yale Forestry. 1909. Forestry Service. National Forest Service. 
Forester New York Forest, Fish and Game Commission. 





John A. McLean, A. B. 
of Animal Husbandry). 



B. Sc. Agr., Associate Professor 



Born 1878. B, A., 
State College, 1905. 
Colorado Stale Coll 
bandry, Iowa State 



McMaster University. 1902. B. Sc. Agr.. Iowa 
Head of the Department of Animal Husbandry, 

;ge, 1905. Associate Professor of Animal Hus- 
College, 1906-03. Experimentalist in Animal 



Husbandry. Mississippi Experiment Station, 1908-09. As: 
tor of the Farmer's Advocate. 1910. Associate Profes; 
Husbandly. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1911. 



John C. Graham, B. Sc. Agr., Associate Professor of 
Poullrv Husbandry. 

Born 1868. Milwaukee State Normal College, 1894, Taught at 
iity, summers of 1 



ciate Edi- 
af Animal 



Chicago Un 

work in Wisconsin, 1894-1907. 



chu 



in, 1911. 
etts Agri' 



Associate Pr 
ultural College. 



4-98. Teaching and institute 
Sc. Agr.. University of Wis- 
f Poultry Husbandry, Massa- 




:[s)(§(§©(§^IIIIQ HKIlD)©^ 



Guy C. Crampton, A. B., A. M., Ph. D., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Entomology. 

Born 1882. A. B., Pnncelon University, 1904. A. M., Cornell 
Universlly. 1905. Sludenl at Freiburg and Munich, 1907. Ph. D., 
Berlin University, 1908. Instructor in Biology, Princeton Univer- 
sity, 1908-10. Professor of Biology and Entomology, South Caro- 
lina, Slate Agricultural College, 1910-11. Associate Professor of 
Entomology, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1911. 





*S. Francis Howard, M. Sc, Assistant Professor of Cbcm- 
istr\). 

Born 1872. B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1894. *i;K. 
Principal of Eliot, Maine, High School, 1895. Student of Philoso- 
phy, Johns Hopkins University, 1896-98. Assistant Professor of 
Chemistry, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1899. M. Sc.. Mass- 
achusetts Agricultural College, 1901. <Mv<I'. 



A. Vincent Osmun, M. Sc, Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Born 1880. Connecticut Agricultural College, 1900. Assistant, 
Storrs Agricultural Experiment Station, 1900-02. Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, 1903. Q. T. V. M. Sc, Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College. 1905. Instructor in Botany, Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College, 1903-07. Assistant Professor of Botany, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, 1907. 'Mv'l'. 





Sidney B. Haskell, B. Sc, Assistant Professor of Agron- 
omy. 

Born 1881. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1904. C. S. C. 
Assistant Agriculturist, Hatch Experiment Station, 1904-06. Instruc- 
tor in Agriculture since 1905. 'Mv*. 



25 



;[D)(§@©(§2«[IIin HKIlD)! 




Clarence Everett Gordon, B. Sc, A. M., Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor of Zoology and Geology. 

Born 1876. Massachusells Agricultural College, 1901. C. S. C. 
Student Clark University, summer session, 1901-03. B. Sc, Boston 
University, 1903. Instructor. Cushing Academy, Ashburnham, Mass., 
1901-1904. Graduate Student m Geology and Zoology, Columbia 
University, 1904-05. A. M., rSH., Columbia University, 1905. 
Instructor in Geology, summer session, Columbia University, 1905. 
University Fellow in Geology, Columbia University, 1905-06. Assist- 
ant Professor of Zoology and Geology, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 1906. Ph. D., Columbia University, 1911. *K'I'. 



Edgar L. Ashley, A. M., Assistant Professor of German. 
■My. 1903 



Born 1880. A. B.. Brown University, 1903. *K^I'. Instructor in 
German at Brown University, 1903-06. A. M., 1904. Student at 
University of Heidelburg, 1906-07. Instructor in German at Bates 
College, 1907-08. Instructor in German at Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College, 1903-1911. Assistant Professor , of German, 1911. 
*BK. 



A. Anderson Mackimmie, A. B. 
French. 





Assistant Professor of 



Born 1873. A. B., Princeton University, 1906. Bondinol Fellow 
in Modern Languages, 1906-07. Instructor m French, Colchester 
Academy, Truro, Nova Scotia, 1906-08. Instructor in French and 
Spanish, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1908. KI'*. Assistant 
Professor of French, 1911. *BK. *K*. 



Alexander E. Cance, B. A. Ph. D., 
Professor of Agricultural Economics. 



A., Assistant 



B. A., Macalester College. Graduate CerliRcale, Stale Norma 
School, Oshkosh. M. A., University of Wisconsin. Professor o 
Greek and Literature, Avalon College, 1897-99. Principal of Ash 
vil'e Industrial School, 1901-04. Supervisor of Practice, First Penn 
sylvama State Normal School, 1904-05. Fellow in Economics, 
University of Wisconsin, 1906-03. Ph. D., University of Wisconsin 
1908. Instructor in Agricultural Economics, Massachusetti 

Agricultural College, 1908-10. Assistant Professor of Agricultura 
Economics, 1910. 

26 




G^[D)(§(§@@^IIQ]] ,nK!Ie)[^^ 



5URTON N. Gates, A. B., A. M., Ph. D., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Beel(eeping. 

Born 1881. Cornell University, College of Agricullure, 1901-03. 
A. B., Clark College, 1903. K<I>. Scholar m Biology, Clark Uni- 
versity, 1905-06. A. M., ;t;</, 1906. Fellow in Biology, ;/>W, 1906- 
07. Assistant in Biology, Clark College, 1906-07. Field Fellow, 
Clark University, 1908-09. Ph. D., iHJ. 1909. Lecturer in Bee- 
keeping, Massachusetts Agricultural College, Spring 1906, '07, 'OS, '10. 
Collaborator, Bureau of Entomology, Unitecl Stales Department of 
Agriculture, February to July, 1907. Expert in Apiculture and 
Apicullural Assistant, ifc/J, 1907-10. Assistant Professor of Bee- 
keeping, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1910. 





Edward M. Lewis, B. A. M. A., Assistant Professor of 
English and Assistant Dean of the College. 

Born 1872. B. A., Williams College, 1896. M. A., Williams College 
1899. Graduate of Boston School of Expression, 1901. Instructor in 
Public Speaking. Columbia University, 1901-03. Instructor and Assist- 
ant Professor of Public Speaking and Oratory, Williams College, 
1903-11. Instructor in Elocution, Yale Divinity School, 1904-11. 
Assistant Professor of English and Assistant Dean Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, 1911. ^ 



Charles A. Peters, Ph. D. 
ganic and Soil Che'nistrv. 



Assistant Professor of Inor- 



Born 1875. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1897. C. S. C. 
B. S., Boston University, 1897. Ph. D., Yale University, 1901. 
i;3:. Instructor in Chemistry, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
1897-98. Assistant in Chemical Laboratory, Yale Umversily, 1899- 
1901. Professor of Chemistry. Head of Departmenl. University of 
Idaho, 1901-09. Student al the University of Berlin, 1903-10. 
Exchange Teacher. Friedrichs Werdersche Oberrealschule, 1909-10. 
Graduate School, Yale University, 1910-11. Assistant Professor of 
Inoraanic and Soil Chemistry, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
1911. *K*. 





Curry S. Hicks, B. Pd., Assistant Professor of Ph\;sical 
Education and Hygiene. 

Born 1885. Michigan Agricultural College, 1902-03. B. Pd., Mich- 
igan State Normal College, 1909. Instructor in Physical Education, 
Michigan State Normal College, 1908-09. Edward Hitchcock Fel- 
low in Physical Education. Amherst College, 1909-10. Director of 
Athletics, Michigan State Normal College, 1910-11. Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Physical Education and Hygiene, Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College, 1911. 



27 



[©(§(§©(§2^011 n[MI6)I^^ 




Frederick L. Yeaw, B. Sc, Assistant Professor of Market 
Gardening. 

Born 1882. Massachusetts Agricultural College. 1905. <I>2K U S 
Bureau of Soils, 1906. Plant Pathologist, California Experiment 
Station, 1906-11. Assistant Professor of Market Gardening, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, 1911. 



George E. Gage, B. A., M. A., Ph. D., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Animal Pathology, Department of Veterinarv t 
Science. 

B. A., Clark College, Clark University, 1906. K<1'. M. A., Yale 
University, 1907. Physiological Chemist, Sodium Benzoate Investi- 
gation, U. S. Department of Agriculture, 1908. Ph. D., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1909. Associate Biologist, Maryland Experiment Station, 
1909-10. University of Michigan, 1910. Special Student m Path- 
ology, University of Michigan, summer of 1910. Biologist, Mary- 
land Experiment Station, in charge of Pathological Investigation. 
Assistant Professor of Animal Pathology, Department of Veterinary 
Science, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1911. 



George N. Holcomb, A. B., S. T. B., Lecturer 
tor^. 





Hi 



Born 1872. Trinity College, 1896. Philadelphia Divinity School, 
1900. Graduate Student in American Institutional and Political His- 
tory at University of Pennsylvania, 1900-01. Graduate Student of 
History and Economics, Harvard University, 1901-03. Williams 
Fellow, Harvard Union, S. T. B., Harvard, 1903. Then engaged 
in agricultural work. Instructor in Economics and Constitutional 
History, Connecticut Agricultural College. Instructor in Economics, 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1905-1907. Lecturer in History, 
Massachusetts Agricultural College. 1909. 



C. Robert Duncan, B. Sc, Instructor in Mathematics. 



Born 1884. B. Sc, Rutgers College, 1906. 
of Pennsylvama Tunnels, 1906-08. Instru 
Physics, Massachusetts Agricultural College 
Mathematics, 1911. 



On East River Divis 

lor in Mathematics ; 

1908-11. Instructor 



28 




G^©(§(g©©2S[IQlI 1]KI©M^ 



a 



Charles R. Green, B. Agr., Librarian. 

Born 1876. Connecticut Agricultural College, 1895. The Hartford 
Couranl. 1895-1901. Assistant Librarian, Connecticut Slate Library, 
1901-08. Librarian at Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1908. 





Alvah J. Norman, M. Sc, B. Sc. Agr., Extension Instruc- 
tor in Pomolog]). 

Bom 1881. B. Sc. Agr., Iowa Stale College, 1906. Manager 
Nehawka Fruit Farm, Nehawka, Nebraska. 1906. Iowa Experiment 
Station, 1907. Alabama Experiment Station, 1907. M. Sc, Mary- 
land Agricultural College and Experiment Station, 1910. Extension 
Instructor in Pomology, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1910. 



George F. E. Story, B. Sc, Extension Instructor in Dairy- 
ing. 

Born 1885. University of Vermont, 1905-08. Ki;. B. Sc, Ohio 
Stale Umversily, 1910. Extension Department, Ohio State Univer- 
sity, 1910-11. Extension Instructor in Dairying, Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College, 1911. 







Arthur K. Harrison, Instructor in Landscape Gardening. 

Born 1872. With Warren H. Manning. Landscape Designer. Bos- 
ton, acting at various times in charge of the Surveying and Engineer- 
ing Department, of the Planting Department, and of the Drafting 
Room, 1898-1911. Instructor in Landscape Gardening, Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College, 1911. 



29 



[lD)(§@(§(§^[[[in HKIIs)! 




Chester A. Butman, A. M., B. Sc, Instructor in Ph\)sics. 



ark Ur 
Te 



A. M., CI 

Inslilule of Technology 
lege, 1907-08. Student 
low in Physics, Clark 
Clark College, 1909-10. 
1 1. Member of the Ame 
slcs, Massachusetts Agncu 



ty, 1909. Student in Physics, Massachusetts 
1901-04. Assistant in Physics, Tufts Col- 
in Physics, Clark University, 1908-09. Fel- 
University, 1909-10. Assistant in Physics, 
Student in Physics, Yale University, 1910- 



Phys 
Coll 



.1 Society. 
;, 1911. 



Inslr 



Phy- 



WiLLARD A. Wattles, A. B., A. M., Instructor in English. 

A. B., University of Kansas, 1909. A. M., University of Kansas, 
1911. In charge of English at Leavenworth, Kansas. High School, 
1909-10. Instructor of Freshman Rhetoric, University of Kansas, 
1910-11. Instructor in English, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
1911. <i>BK. 





Elvin L. QuAlFE, B. Sc. Agr., Instructor in Animal Hus- 
bandr\). 



Born 1887. B. Sc. Agr.. Iowa Sta 
Instructor in Animal Husbandry, Mas 

1911. 



William L. Machmer, A. M., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Born 1883. A. B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1909. A. M., 
Franklin and Marshall College, 1911. Instructor m Mathematics, 
Franklin and Marshall Academy. Instructor in Mathematics, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, 1911. *BK. 



30 



College, 1911. ASP, 
chuselts Agricultural Co 




[©©©©(g^nan jimm)] 



Arthur N. Julian, A. B., Instructor in German. 

A. B., Northwestern University, 1907. Instructor in German at 
Elgin Academy, Elgin, 111., 1907-10. Travelled in Germany and 
student al Berlin University, 1910-11. Instructor in German, Mass- 
achusetts Agricultural College, 1911. 'I'lSK. 





Howard De Forest Widger, A. B., Instructor in Public 
Spealfing and English. 

Born 18S7. A. B., Yale University, 1910. .\i;'I'. Columbia Law 
School, Columbia University, 1910-11. Instructor in Public Speak- 
ing and English, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 1911. 'I'HK. 



Willard a. Turner, Ph. B., Assistant in Chemistrv. 

Born 1887. Williams College, 1906-07. Ph. B., Yale Sheffield. 
1910. Assistant in Chemistry, Massachusetts .Agricultural College, 

1910. 





Helena T. Goesmann, M. Ph., Assistant in English. 

Elmhurst Academy, Providence, R. I., 1887. Studied in B 
and New York. M. Ph., Ohio State University, 1895. 
England and Pans, 1899, and in Munich during the 
1900. Published The Ctirisllan Woman in Philanlliropy. 
entitled Broltier Phillip and a small book of poems, A Scoi 
Member of Pen and Brush Club of New York. Assista 
hsh, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1910. 



Studied 


in 


winter of 
a novelette 
■_. of Songs. 
nt in Eng- 



.1.^^^ 



[E)(§©©©5^IIEn QKIIs)!^^ 




Samuel R. Parsons, B. Sc, Assistant in Mathematics and 
in Military Science. 

Born 1888. Massachuselts Agricultural College, 1911. Q. T. V. 
Instruclor in Malhemalics and in Military Science, 1911. *K't>. 



Frederick A. McLaughlin, B. Sc Assistant in Botany. 

Born 1888. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1911. Ki:. Assist- 
ant in Botany, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1911. 





Herbert J. Baker, B. Sc, Assistant in Agronomy. 

Born 1885. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1911. K2. Assist- 
ant in Agronomy and Secretary to the Director of the Experiment 
Station at Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1911. 



Floyd B. Jenks, A. B., B. Sc. Agr., Assistant Professor 
of Agricultural Education. 

A. B., Purdue University. Practical Farmer and Dairyman. Speaker 
for the Indiana Farmer's Institute. Teacher of Agriculture, Goshen 
High School, 1904-08. Instructor in Agricultural Education, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, 1903-11. Assistant Professor of Agri- 
cultural Education, 1911. 



132: 




!ID(§©©(§2^1I[in niKlIB)!^^ 



Ernest D. Waid, B. Sc, Assistant Director of Extension 
Work. 

Born 1880. B. Sc, Ohio Slale Universlly, 1906. Professor of 
Agriculture and Chemistry, Knoxville College, 1906-07. Assistant 
Professor of Agronomy, University of Maine, 1907-09. Assistant 
Professor of Agronomy, Ohio Stale University, 1909-11. Assistant 
Director of Extension Work, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
1911. 

Frank W. Rane, M. Sc, Lecturer in Forestry. 

Born 1868. B. Sc. Agr., Ohio Slate University, 1891. M. Sc, 
Coraeil University, 1892. *Ae. Lecturer in [forestry Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College, 1906. 

William L. Harmount, A. B., Instructor in French. 

Born 1881. A. B., Yale Umversity, 1903. Tutor In College Pre- 
paratory Subjects, 1903-06. Instructor, Kingsley School, Essex Falls, 
N. J., 1907-08. Instructor m French, Kiskiminetas Springs School, 
Salisbury, Pa., 1908-11. Student at Cours de Vacences of the 
Universities of Caen and Grenoble, France, summer of 1910. <I'BK. 




(Graduate Assistants 

Leonard S. McLaine, B. Sc, Graduate Assistant in Zool- 
ogy. 

Born 1837. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1910. Ki:. Grad- 
uate Assistant in Zoology and Graduate Student in Entomology. 



Marcus T. Smulyan, B. Sc, Graduate Assistant in Botany. 

Born 1885. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1909. Graduate 
Assistant in Botany and Graduate Student in Entomology, 1910. 




[©©©ws^nnMss^i^^il 




Harold S. Adams, A. B., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry. 

Born 1888. A, B., Williams College, 1911. O.AX. Graduate 
Assistant in Chemistry. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1911. 



Raymond G. Smith, B. Sc, Graduate Assistant in Botany. 

Born 1888. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1911. Graduate 

Assistant in Botany, 1911. 




William S. Regan, B. Sc, Graduate Assistant in Entomol- 
ogy. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1908. K2. Graduate Student 
in Entomology, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1909-11. Grad- 
uate .Assistant in Entomology, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 

1911. 



34 



I 


ISJ 



cradvate 
j;tvdemt>s 



Adams, Harold S. 

A. B., Williams College, 1911. 

Allen, R. Harold 

B. Sc, Massachusells Agricultural College, 1910. 

Anderson, David W. 

B. Sc, New Hampshire Stale College, 1910. 

Bartlett, Oscar C. 

B. Sc., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1909, 

Blodgett, Warren K, 

A. B., Harvard University, 1911. 

Bourne, Arthur I. 

A. B., Dartmouth College, 1907, 

Butler, Aubrey B, 

A. B., Dartmouth College, 1911. 

Crocker, Bartow 

A. B„ Harvard Umvers.ly, 1909. 

Grossman, Samuel S. 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1909. 

Holland, Edward B. 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1898. 

Hourdequin, Leon R. 

A, B„ Williams College, 1911. 

35 



Pittsfield 

Fall River 

Manchester, N. H. 

Westhampton 

Cambridge 

Amherst 

Chelsea 

Fitchburg 

Needham 

Amherst 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



;iD)(§@©@2«On HKIlD)!^^ 



McLaine, Leonard S. New York City 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1910. 

Merrill, Joseph H. Danvers 

B. Sc, Dartmouth College, 1905. 

Regan, William S. • Northampton 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1908. 

Smulyan, Marcus T. Amherst 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1909. 

Thomas, Frank L. Athol 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1910. 

Thompson, Edward J. Cambridge 

B. S., Harvard University, 1911.. 

Watkins, John B., Jr. Midlouthian, Va. 

B. Sc, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1911. 



36 



TKe Oasses 





Senate 

l^niergraduate Organization 



H. C. Walker . 
R. R. Parker . 
N. P. Larsen < 



A. C. Brett 
J. A. Harlow 



B. W. Ellis 
F. D. Griggs 



Officers 

5tlember5 
1912 

H. C. Walker 
1913 



. President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



T. J. Moreau 
R. R. Parker 



B. A. Harris 
N. P. Larsen 




■<i -» a. 



;iD)(g©©(§^nnn hlniib)!^^ 



^.S 




Settlor (Tlass 

Officers 



Alden Chase Brett 
Theodore Joseph Moreau 
Eric Nichols Boland 
John Edwards Pierpont 
Edward Russell Lloyd . 
Royal Norton Hallowel! 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 

. Sergeant-at-Arms 

Class Captain 

Class Historian 



(Llass (Tolors 

Silver Gray and Maroon. 



[©©©©(g^Eiin Jim]^] 



Senior Ufistor^ 




LMA MATER will soon hear our farewells. There are only a few yards 
more to cover in the race, a few more months in which to live and rejoice 
and work before the end which marks, after all, the beginning. Knowing 
that we must move on, we mingle pleasure with regret — pleasure in the 
anticipation of dealing a first hand in the game of life, and regret because to say good- 
bye to the scenes and associations we have loved is not easy. 

Today we number less than one hundred. Three years ago there were many more 
of us. But it is a sturdy hundred, a loyal hundred, that remains. It has its tall and its 
short, its stout and its slim, its leaders and its led. It discovers in each the dross and the 
gold. It aspires to honesty rather than to piety and to folly rather than to deceit. Each 
of its number respects another less for measure of attainment than for honesty of heart 
and goodness of intention. Such is the fellowship that unites us, never quite to be for- 
gotten. 

Senior history is largely history unmade, lying more in the future than in the past. 
We do not here content ourselves with the hope that it is to be one of worthy accom- 
plishment but we resolve that it shall be one of the full accomplishment of all under- 
takings growing out of the worthiest ambitions and aspirations of which we are at present 
capable. Lift the veil and look thru thirty years. See the honors well earned, the wealth 
in dollars accumulated, the wealth in happily founded homes — and grieve for the ships 
that will never come back from sea. 

Where the storm rages or the sun shines, we will give to the world the best we have, 
believing in a two-fold return. And in the future as in the past our college will be 
remembered. First, last, and always we pledge ourselves, "All honor to M. A. C." 



42 




01)^ ^loR6e ^ont^omer^-'^ard doiffure 

CHAPTER I. 

GYMBELINE SMYTHE, the ravishing chiropodiste gazed intently at her 
sylph-hke form in the $3.79 mirror. She was dolling up for the ball in 
honor of Daniel Joseph, second Duke of Marlboro. She heaved a sigh, 
nearly laying low the household kitten, and with palpitatmg heart buried 
her strawberry nose m the depths of a powder puff. "Alas," she mur- 
mured, "my locks are raven and my own, my beeyootiful Daniel loves none but blondes. 
Ah, crooil dissimulation — " and she drew forth from under the bed a large handsome box 
labelled, "Best A-1 hair-goods. Patagonian." She raised the cover and peeped within. 
A cry of joy escaped her. With a gurghng "rata-ta-thrat" she drew forth to the light of 
the Amherst gas, an albino pompadour. Nailmg this to her cerebral structure, she tripped 
lightly down three flights of stairs, picked herself up, and climbed into the waiting hack 
to be borne swiftly to the Grand Ball at the Armorie des Aggies. 



CHAPTER II. 

As she entered the brilliant salon, the Duke of Marlboro thrust his Havana cigar 
butt hastily into his watch-pocket and dashed forward to greet her, almost tipping over 
Hans Walker and a tureen of punch, that were arriving simultaneously. 

"Sweet Cymbie, I greet you again," murmured he as he chastely saluted the lunch- 
hook she extended toward him. 

"Oh go on, quit yer kiddin'," she replied, mashing a fly on his brow with her fan. 

Count Fowler, the Duke's hated rival, hidden behind the one and only palm, ground 
the biting edge off his Martinolar teeth. 

43 



:[D)(§(g©(§2^[[[[n 



CHAPTER III. 

Cymbeline and the Duke glided 'midst the gay throng, oblivious to all about them. 
"I could Boston with you forever," she lisped resting her fair head on his spotless vest. 
But the fates willed otherwise. As she raised her head to view Gretta Growler's haughty 
entrance, her blond headgear was whisked to the floor by a travelling-ring which swung 
above her. Cymbeline, cursing softly to herself, glanced down to see if her high school 
pin was on straight. The Duke's eyes welled up with tears of sorrow. "You have deceived 
muh," he murmured sadly. "No," she exclaimed, her ready wit coming to her aid, 
"there is the villain. Hockey Count Fowler hated you in your happiness and plotted 
this foul deed. He done it, and him alone! " And she fell into the arms of the Springfield 
Republican's society reporter. 

' . . CHAPTER IV. 

Time moved on. Bolstered up by three cigarettes the Duke of Marlboro made his 
way to Madame Smythe to beg the hand of her brunette-blonde daughter Cymbeline. 
Quickly snapping up his offer in order to give him no time for repentance she called in 
her daughter and the Vicar of Wakefield. So the ceremony occurred and after a bridal 
trip to Cushman the happy pair returned to a sumptuous wedding breakfast at Thurber's. 

Count Fowler, exiled from the land of his birth, read the details of the wedding 
in the "Police Gazelie," and, turning a double somersault, muttered, "Aha, I have lured 
him on to his doom." He then sang the grand old hymn "No Wedding Bells for Me." 




44 



JUNIOR 




i]^[D)(§(§(§(§^[inn niMiDi 




3unlor (Tlass 

Officers 



Herman Theodore Roehrs 










President 


Charles Dexter Walker 










Vice-President 


Ralph Thomas Neal 










Secretary 


David Story Caldwell . 










Treasurer 


George Ware Barber 










Sergeant-at-Arms 


Stuart Dodds Samson 










Captain 


Robert Sedgwick Fay 










Historian 




(Tlass (Tolors 






Mc 


iroon a 


nd W 


hite. 





RaiD)(g©@(§^[[iin nKi©i^^ 



Tfunlor Hfistor^ 




ERCILESSLY assailed in the classroom, hounded by upper-classmen, tor- 
mented by petty changes and fancied reforms, and fed for the most part in 
a very promiscuous manner, for four semesters we have resisted the wiles 
of our adversaries and still we are here. On our stormy voyage we have 
solved all manner of problems, and have succeeded in making history which 

is printed indelibly on our own minds if not on the minds of those with whom we have 

come in contact. 

Thirty of our original number have gone elsewhere, and we mourn our loss — in most 
cases — but ninety-nine genuine A No. I Agriculturalists remain, bound by such ties as 
only class associations can create. 

You have heard how we wrote 1913 as winners after the majority of athletic con- 
tests on our freshman program, and, on the two occasions during our sophomore year when 
we looked defeat in the face, it was never for lack of spirit or true sportmanship, but 
rather due to the brute strength of our opponents. In speaking of our class labors we 
would emphasize the task of roping, bridling and breaking to harness one of the worst 
freshman classes that M. A. C. has ever seen. During this, our junior year, we are 
bringing up in the way they should go, one hundred eighty of Nature's unfinished pro- 
duct. And we mention with pride that a large percentage of the men allied with the best 
and busiest interests of college life are members of the class of 1913. 

This year is the third lap of our race, and now we are branching out, choosing our 
life work and formulating ideas of our own. As a class we are not interested in the suf- 
fragette movement beyond the personal appearance of its advocates, but we might be 
persuaded to tolerate the army canteen, and we all believe that His Excellency the gov- 
ernor is his own worst enemy. 

But beneath our mask of cynicism you will find true patriotism. We have con- 
fidence in each other because we are all striving for the one goal — Education. We have 
faith in our instructors because they are expending their best energies in our behalf. We 
take pride in our Alma Mater because it is our own; ours to take from, ours to add to, 
ours to cherish. As individuals, as a class, as a college unit, 1913 is striving to work 
together for the best interests of "Old Massachusetts. 



!1D©(§©(§5^[IE1] n^Ie)!:^^ 



3uriior (Tlass 



Win fold Frederic Adams, 

83 Pleasant Sireet; b. 1891; e* ; Agricullure. 

EasI Lev'ielt's braes are bonme 
Where farmin's a' they "dew." 

And 'twas there thai Nubby Adams 
Allowed he'd do ihat too. 

His gait is slightly pigeoned, 
His voice IS like the swan. 

But he s as a good a fellow 
As e'er the sun shone on. 



Mtembers 

East Leverett 





Harry Willis Allen, West Pelham 

Amherst, b. 1892; i;TA; Entomology. 

Harry is a "fan" and his personal endeavors on ihe diamond 
are inspired by a handsome bust of Ty Cobb which beams down 
upon the family from above the kitchen door. It is rumored that 
Chick has again received the contract for collecting the Sophomore 
herbaria. This annual pastime makes the run from Sunderland seem 
to him a mere sprint for a Pelham car. Even geology cannot "rock" 
his determination to be a "bachelor" and we expect to find Harry 
among the leaders when the tape is reached. 



"CHICK- 
Oscar Gustaf Anderson, 

Entomological Laboratory; b. 16 



East Pepperel 
Horticulture; Class Presi- 



deni 


(1); 


Class Ba 


sketball Manage 


(2); 


Business Ma 


nager 


Inde) 


(3) 


Signal Board 


(2, 3); Sophomore-Se 


nior 


Hop Con 


mittee 


(2) 


President Cercle Fr 


mcais (2, 3). 














He can't keep 


till and he can' 


be k 


ept 


till. The 


sophs 


triec 


it two yea 


rs ago, a 


nd we've tried 


t. but 


It s 


of no us 


e. |u 


St le 


him 


follow 


his own 


busy inclinations 


and t 


ust 


to luck he'll kee 


p ou 


of n 


nischle 


. Andy' 


s special line ra 


iges f 


rom 


"touching 


' adve 


-tiser 


for 


pace to being th 


e annua! banque 


-time 


aoat 


That " 


Mona 


Lisa 


smile of hi 


5 bears hi 


Ti safely past all 


difhcu 


lues 


including 


those 


,t Ih 


class 


-room. 


and whil 


e some call it lu 


k. we 


know It's mo 


e than 


that 


The 


e's a 


lot more 


we should like to tell 


abou 


t this Blc 


ndy S 


wede 


but 
look 


he's on 


the Boa 


d and will not 


et us 


notice how c 


angerous h 




"ANDV 



;[D)(§(§@(§^II[[n niMIe)!^^ 




Hanis William Angler, 



Westborough 
Vice- 



88 Pleasant Street; b. 1891; B*; Mathematics and Lands^ 
President (2); Assistant Editor 1913 Index. 

In Bill Angier we have one of the original shark boys. All the 
rest are dead. He is one of the few forlunates who do their study- 
ing by reading the SalurJav Evening Pesi, and his Math, work by 
playing penny ante. And when the averages come in he draws his 
ninety-plus with monotonous regularity. It is rumored in Boston 
literary circles that Fat will soon publish a guide to Europe con- 
taining an interesting chapter on Coney Island. 



"FA T" 

Harry Albert Baird, 
Pleasant Street; b. 1 



somervilie 



Kl'fl>; Pomology. 

Harry has caught the back-to-the-soil fever and is taking Pomol- 
ogy in large doses to sustain it. Love for the simple life led him, 
with Big Jim, to isolate himself during part of Sophomore year 
in the Lover's Lane House, but the long walks to "eats" soon dam- 
pened his ardor for his suburban home. Harry puts in many of his 
spare moments pursuing the elusive pigskin or a baseball about the 
campus. He is also a charter member of the "Hammer Swingers ' 
and has suggested remedies for many of our short-comings. 



Dean Foster Baker, 





Fairha 



116 Pleasant Street; b. 1889; Landscape; Class Track ( 
Class Cross Country (1, 2); Glee Club (I). 

This Yankee pie-biter is a versatile member of 1913, r 
in his activities from literature to athletics. Being a patron 
arts, Dean was turned loose on the Lit. and points with pride 
fact that but for him it would still be making its monthly appe 
on metropolitan news stands. During Freshman year, in the m: 
the hurry and distraction of training Walker Hall in the \ 
should go. Beany found time to sob his soul out in the Glee 
His track work has been a credit to himself and '13. 



h 2); 



anging 
of the 
to the 



Club. 



■■BEANY" 



i©(§©©(§^[[iin HKiE)]^^ 



Horace Mitchell Baker, 

Tower, SoulK College; K2; Econ 
(2); Buinham Eighl (1). 

"Silvery longued" but family 
quality in Lawyer Baker's make-up 
could sell gold bricks lo a Wall Street spf 
self that although he has no desire lo be 
how he can help it. How sad that one sh^ 
Worse yet, Bakes brilliancy has already 
the privilege of being a member o 
is now listed as a Senior. But thi 



Selbyville, Del. 
Public Speaking Council 



We 



is yet willing to honor us by altowing 
printed on the same page with ours. 



•s the most pronounced 
honestly believe that he 
ulator, and he says him- 
rich, he doesn't see just 
lid come to such a fate! 
obliged him to renounce 
the best class in college for he 
old ties are the stronger and he 



stocratic "phiz" to be 





George Ware Barber, 

13 North College; b. 1 



Franklin 



2TA; Forestry. 

Barb is one of the quiet get-there members of the class. He 
often regrets that our location is so near the girls' colleges, because 
he is considerably bothered by feminine attention. His impersonation 
of a sprained ankle last spring was an artistic success, enabling him 
to cleverly elude the tortures of June drill. In spite of a frail frame 
he successfully withstands the rigors of our curriculum. 



-BARB" 

Laurence Algur 
84 Pleasant Str< 
"H 



5evan, 

•t; b. 1890; 2TA; Agriculture. 



Bridaewater 



he loves its gentle gurgle. 
How he loves its fluent flow. 
How he loves to wind his mouth 
And how he loves to let 



go- 



Bev joined us last February fresh from M. 1. T., w 
acquired his taste for books and discovered a latent gymnastic 
Bev features in indoor track meets and he swarms up the n 
a reckless abandon deserving at least a few more points 
actually earns. 



here he 

ability. 

ipe with 

than he 




"BEV 



c^]D)(§(§(§(g2^[inn oKiiD)!^^ 




"BIRDV 



Ralph Cedric Blake, 



Webster Jennings Birdsall, 



Ot, 



ego, 



N. Y. 



K— House: b. 1889; ^'^^^ ; Agronomy; Assistant Manager Varsity 
Baseball (2, resigned) ; Vice President Dramatic Society (2) ; Presi- 
den. (3). 

This preternaturally grave and solemn owl has had his brow 
furrowed, and life embittered by his harrowing experiences with the 
Zabriskie Troupe of Barn Stormers. Our Marquis of Queensberry 
covers all the important bouts of the town for the Signal, Ladies' 
Home Journal and AsiocialeJ Press. Birdy maintains a model stock 
farm in rural New York and comports himself as becomes a landed 



propr 



elor 



Wollaston 



President's House; b. 1889; Q. T. V.; Pomology; Manager Cla 
Cross Country (I); Class Football (1, 2); Cross Country (1. 3). 



Lo the human flower-pot! Ralph has a near-tenor which h 
uses with deadly effect at chapel and Y. M. C. A., and he is fur 
iher known for his ability as a spontaneous cheer-leader. Blaky i 
a favorite with the summer-school boarders and is listed in "Who' 
■Who" as Green's right bower. Stay with it, Ralph, labor omni 





"BORDY" 



Ralph James Borden, 



Fall River 



7 North College; b. 1891; C. S. C; Floriculture; Class Secretary 
and Treasurer (1); Manager Class Hockey (1); Manager Varsity 
Baseball (3); Assistant Manager 1913 Index. 

Ralph's nerve and ready smile will "get him by" anywhere. 
This branch of the milk trust just loves to pore over his books, and 
has made a name for himself as a walking compendium of informa- 
tion. Cheap at half the price! 'While teaching his Sunday School 
class one day, a little lad asked, "Teacher, do you use Pompeian 
Massage Cream?" Seriously speaking, however, Ralph takes strong 
and active interest in all branches of college life — except the Thurs- 
day evening prayer meetings. 



52 



R;iiiD(§@©(g2^fl[in nKiiD)!:^^ 



Charlesworth Herbert Brewer, 



Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 



C. S. C. House, b. 1889; C. S. C, Landscape Gardening; Varsily 
Hockey (1); Varsity Baseball (1, 2); Class Hockey (I, 2); Class 
Baseball (I, 2); Fralernily Conference; Art Editor 1913 IndeX. 

Athletics is the piece tie rcstslarice in the daily diet of this man, 
with music as the favorite side dish. His ivory-tickling skill is remem- 
bered along with thai of "Grover" Cleveland of "Dill Pickle" fame. 
Since the day when he volplaned from the house-porch, with a broken 
arm as the result, he has renounced the pleasures of aviation and 
now devotes himself exclusively to Diabolo. (This sounds devilish 
so we put it down.) Herb is among the strongest of "Thirteen ' 
men and popular with all who know him. 





Herbert Augustine Brown, Sa.xonville 

Brook's Farm; b. 1888; Agriculture. 

Genus— Ursus Major. Habitat— Hash House. Appearance— 
Ferocious beyond description. When enraged lays back its ears 
savagely. Age — Indeterminable. Range — Leverctl to South Amhersl. 
Diet— Mainly food. Despite all this, Herbert is a plucky and 
persistent worker for whom success in after life surely waits. 



■■BRUIN" 

Alvan Henry Bullard, 

5 McClellan Street; b. 1890; 



Econ 



South Framingham 

cs and History. 



After greeting this world with glad surprise. Periwinkle out- 
witted the truant officer by coming to M. A. C. As a freshman his 
life was one unceasing round of worry, planning to beat Jimmie up to 
college and to get home first to "studeh." The first lap he usually won, 
but on the homeward dash the Sophs would get him and put him 
to work. Alvan hopes to vote within ten years. 




"PERlWlNKLE^ 



[©©©©(g^^nnn nmj^i 




BUr.B 



Lawrence Walter Burby, 



Chicopee Falls 



88 Pleasant Street; b. 1890; 0*; Agriculture; Buinham Eight (I); 
Band (1, 2). 



He 



othe 



our unassuming members who might be mis- 
taken for a visitor except for an occasional "Here" at roll-call. But 
when anything starts Burb is there strong and a good stayer. His 
lung power is good, as the above record shows. In the Band he 
annoys an alto horn. 



Harold Barrows Bursley, 



Peabody 

88 Pleasant Street; b. 1891; G*; Landscape Gardening; Class Sec- 
retary (2). 

Bang! "Who threw that biscuit?" "Oh, that was only Bursley 
glad to see you back." A vociferous rough-housing youth — yet 
harmless — Burse has always been a strong "Thirteen" man, espe- 
cially in limes of war. But of course he has his failings, chief of 
which are his love for an old "3 B" and an abnormal appetite for 
work (not). 





David Story Caldwell, 



South Byfield 



9 North College; b. 1891; ilTA; Agriculture; Class Treasurer (3); 
Varsity Track (I, 2); Class Track Captain (1, 2); Class Basket- 
ball (I); Class Baseball (I, 2). 

"He's there a mile!" This familiar expression fits Dave to a 
T. It should be varied, however, to include six miles, two miles or 
even one hundred yards. A glance at his record explains the ability 
of this modern son of Mercury. Bone has one sad affliction, 
chronic giggling, for which we recommend constant companionship 
with Dayton as a cure. 



"BONE- 



IM@©©©2^IIIIII QKIIs)]^^ 



John Stuart Carver, 

C. S. C. House; b. 1892; C. S. C, Pomology. 



Boston 



Jawn may not be a "bally Englishman," bul al times his 
accent says olherwise. He'll let us call him anything, so we're not 
anaicl. For diversion John is a theoretical athlete, but is content 
to leave the active side of sport to the crowd. His daily route never 
changes between bed, the Hash House, and his recitation rooms. 
Stuart has "a plentiful lack of wit," but is ever quick to laugh 
when anything is sprung. 





"JA IV N- 



Woon Young Chun, Shanghai China 

90 Pleasant Street, b. 1891; Forestry and Entomology; Flint Con- 
test; Burnham Eight (2). 



rking and 



ad afte 



This little Oriental gentl. 
wastes a day; and his smile is 
success. He hkes nothing belter than to get a chapelful of listeners 
locked in, and then read dramatically to them. In Class and college 
affairs he never shirks and is ever on hand to do what he can. 



"CHUN" 



Norman Russell Clark, 



Worcester 



16 Norlh College; b. 1892; B<I> ; Landscape Gardenmo and Engin- 
eering; Prom Commillee (^2); Class Track (1, 2). 

Norm's repulalion as a modern Bluebeard is based on his pira- 
tical partnership in the College Store. Little cares he, however, for 
il spells money, and "kale," — lo him, — ^means Edgeworlh and fre- 
quent informals. His Apollo-like form has been one of the star 
attractions of the Wily Physician's gym class in years gone by. 
He ■vvili soon issue his new scientific monograph on "Flapjack 
Tossing as an Economic Factor in Rural Sociability." 




''NORM" 



G^iD)(§(g©©^[[En nK]©^^ 




Joseph Boyd Cobb, 



Chicopee Falls 



■■JOE- 



Arlin Tower Cole, 



5 North College; b. 1890; «* ; Horticulture; Class Vice-President 
(1); Glee Club (1, 2, 3); Secretary Musical Association (3). 

Joe's genial nature and easy way have almost given him the honor 
of class goat, for he sheds cutting remarks as a duck sheds water, 
and so pursues a path of peace. Chemistry would have been his 
major had not the possibilities of Chicopee reclamation work pre- 
viously inspired him to other fields of service. Everybody enjoys 
hearing Joe's melodious basso (Monson maids not excepted). 



Chesterfield 



44 Triangle Street; b. 16 



Agriculture. 

Two years ago Arlin introduced his look of eager surprise and 
began his co-operative knowledge factory with Cris. Outside of 
office hours he keeps his partner's collection of photos dusted and 
in order. He is a popular member of Thurber's Lunch Club, where 
his gastronomic exhibitions startle and delight beholders. He carries 
under his hat a gorgeous pompadour which is the chief joy and 
care of his eventful existence. 





Flora Atwood Cole 
H 



Drape 

This fair 
tion. We ha. 
real one. Fl( 
in spite of thi 
in the narrow 



b. 1892; Fh 

haired damsel 



ultur 



the one bright star in our constella- 
1 near-ladies in our class, but this is the only 
ndulged in a few cuts in her recitations, but 
ceeds in keeping the "mere men" of the class 



^^ M©(§©©(§^[IQn HKIlD)!^^ 



Isaac Coleman, 

12 North Coll. 



Boston 



b. 1890; Pomology; Cercle Francais. 

Isaac Coleman of Boslon and Amherst Weeks of study of the 
Queen's Gambit and of Ruy Lopez, in the seclusion of his den, have 
made him the acknowledged chess-master of the class. When not 
engaged m sleeping, eating, or other similar pleasures, he is almost 
invariably juggling rooks and pawns. Being adept at throwing a 
bluff, he made good in the band two days after his appearance here. 





"COLEMAN" 



Everett Hanson Cooper, 



Wakefield 



14 North College; b. 1889; 2TA; Entomology; Manager Class 
Track and Cross Country (2) ; Assistant Manager Varsity Track 
(3); Fraternity Conference (3). 

You can't lead this horse to water, but, — Oh you Draper! 
Coop has been taking a correspondence course m tennis, and his 
knowledge of the court game should make him valuable in some law 
office. The class will never forget Coop's plucky work in the cross- 
country, when, without training, he ran seven miles in order that 
"Thirteen" should not forfeit by withdrawal. The destruction of the 
weed interests him greatly. 



•COOP" 



Harold Cory, 



Rutherford, N. J. 
Franqais; New Jersey 



15 Beston Street; b. 1892; Pomology; Ce 
Club. 

Here we have the original "White Man's Hope," formerly 
hailing from the Sunflower State of Kansas, but now making the 
home of the Anopheles his base of supplies. At a tender age he was 
carelessly left lying about on his native plains with a mosquito- 
netting over his face. Hence the polka-dotted visage which is at 
once the joy and despair of artists. He may be seen at any hour 
of the day or night, explaining the fine points of tennis to a group 
of rapt listeners "over the mountain." Corinne hopes some day to 
make the world believe him a pomologist. 




57 



:iD)(§@©(§2^niin ,nKi©[^^ 




Joseph Wairen Coville, 



West Roxbury 



■IVILLIE" 
Clyde Edward Cristman, 

44 Triangle Street; b. 1891 



7 South College; b. 1890; Q. T. V., TAP; Entomology and Pomol- 
ogy; 1912 Sergeanl-at-Arms (1); Manager 1912 Rope Pull; Cap- 
tain 1912 Basketball (1); 1912 Baseball (1); Captain Class Bas- 
ketball (2); Varsity Baseball (1, 2, 3); Assistant Manager Foot- 
ball (3). 

This accomplished nickel-grabber divides his time between North- 
ampton and East Orange, N. J. One of Bill's favorite outdoor amuse- 
ments is skating, and at this he is preeminently successful. He has 
never recovered from the shock of the loss of that pair of shoes last 
spring, and Joe may be seen any day in front of South College, 
perusing Elbert Hubbard's "Little Batting Averages of our Noted 
Collegians." Extreme diffidence is his one fault. 



Da 



TAP; Agriculture. 

A continuous smile is Cris's long suit. At times its perseverance 
seems to imply a lack of mentality, but we know that its use is only to 
counteract the sobriety of his satellite Coley. Cris is a good 
student of agriculture, both theoretical and practical, and we think 
he'll "gel by" with it if he doesn't set the hay on fire with his pipe. 



f 


■tLwm^^^M 


1 




ill 


ifl 




Fiank Hamilton Culley, Marshalltown, Iowa 

77 Pleasant Street; b. 1888; Landscape Gardening; Cercle Francais. 

As a dispenser of pink tea at afternoon affairs, this member of 
the Equal Suffrage League is a dazzling success. In a late interview 
one of the leaders of the cause said to a member of the Index staff, 
"I don't know how I shall get along without Hamilton." This year 
Frank will charter a wheelbarrow to carry about his manicure set 
and collar-box. 

"He don't use tobacco because he does think 
That them as do use it are liable to drink," 

In spite of all this, Culley will probably "get there" before the 
rest of us. 



58 



:©(§©(§(§2:sii[[n jiMJ^] 



Harold William Curtis, 



Belchertown 



Iscapt 



Garde 



Cercle 



Enlomoloi>ical Laboratory; b. 1892; Land 
Francais. 

Had Harold slopped to consider the horrors of commutation 
on the Boston 6j Maine between his home and Amherst, it is Hkely 
that "Thirteen" would never have rejoiced in his presence. But 
luckily for the railway officials he decided as he did. He is their 
one reliable dividend-producer. In July and August when William 
woos the sweet seclusion of the country, payment of premiums is 
suspended and the directors strain every nerve to meet expenses. 




James Wilson Dayton, 
15 Beston Street; b. 1893 




South Norwalk, Conn. 



Pomology; Cercle Francais. 
Venus unfolded his petals at a tender age and is 
envy and inspiration of Draper Hall. His beauty parlors 
opened in Amherst "are a boon to those who would atl 
pelual youth" (all this from Dayt's prospectus). "Peachbl 
plexions and curly hair guaranteed for a moderate 
James also conducts the "advice to the lovelorn" 
Amhenl Record. 



the 
nlly 



sideration." 
mn in the 



"VENUS" 



Thomas Patrick Dooley, 



South Boston 



35 East Pleasant Street, b. 1888; Forestry; Class Football. 

Here is another proof that a man's character cannot be deter- 
mined by his outward appearances. You would never suspect Tom 
of being an orator, a deep student (witness the spectacles he now 
wears) and a football man, would you? Yet he is all three, and 
more. We, who have given his case a searching investigation, have 
failed as yet to fathom and fully ferret out all his unusual attributes. 
He and Kell stick together pretty well, and it looks as though 
they would continue housekeeping in partnership even after gradua- 
tion unless sinister Fate gives them an unwelcome jolt. 



59 




"TOM- 



:[D)(g(§©(g^oii nKi©! 




Lewis Floyd Diury, 



Rutland 

Track (1, 2); 



120 Pleasant Street; b. 1892; Pomology; Cla 
Orchestra (I); Band (1, 2, 3). 

Besides making it a point to a]v< 
Fuzzy is a terrible warrior, whose sa 
advantage in many a class scrap. Whe 
Deac may be found sighing through 
indoor track circles he is famous for 

climbing. We have often wondered who collected his prize herbarium 
for him. 



■ays "hit" his books hard, 
vageness has been seen to 
n not asleep in the library, 
a horn in the band. In 
his justly celebrated rope- 



Albeit Franklin Edminster, 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 



5 South College; b. 1891; BK*; Pomology and Entomology; Rifle 
Team (2); Fraternity Conference (3). 

Ed came to Aggie mainly to dazzle the co-eds with his curly 
hair. He owns a tennis racket, shoots bulls-eyes for the rifle team, 
and makes himself generally useful. By way of recreation he studies 
slightly and escapes all his finals. He has also succumbed to informali- 
tis. Ed looks down Indulgently on the struggling world from the 
summit of Green's Kopje. 





Benjamin Ward Ellis, 

Clark Hall; b. 1886; Ki: 
Hockey (1): Captain Class 

This serious-minded Cr 
schedule to advise ' Thirteei 
teen. ' The senator takes 
vheel) except when h< 



seminars are in a large measure responsible fo 
minished strength of "Thirteen.". 



Plymouth 

; Pomology; Rope Pull (1,2); Class 
Hockey (2). 

anberry King finds time in his arduous 
", chastise "Fourteen," and father "Fif- 
his exercise in the saddle (of a tired 
an the rink in winter. "Ben's" physics 



the present undi- 



"B£A'" 



[©©©©©^nnn jimj^: 



Robert Sedgewick Fay, 

84 Pleasant Street; b. 1891 



Mc 



Pomology; Class Historian (3), 

A feeling of sadness is the inevitable effect of Due's presence, 
and the reason is not hard to find. It is simply the quality of his 
constant stream of almost humor that gives the hearer a desire to 
shed bitter tears. Since his arrival at M. A. C. Bob has proven 
useful in helping to engineer several successful escapades including 
a kidnapping, and by often proving his right to his M. D. at the 
expense of his long-suffering class mates. He is ambitious to perform 
on the banjo, but so far his wooing of the Muses has been limited 
to lyric poetry. 





Wallaca Clifford Forbush, 



Rutland 



"BUSH" 



Dudl 



ey 



:h, 



79 Pleasant St.; b. 1891; BI';*; Pomology; Band (1, 2, 3). 

If any inhabitant of Rutland, standing beside the cradle of the 
infant whose name heads this obituary, could have forseen the 
future — well, the future is mercifully veiled. Wallace plugged his 
way through "prep" school and on his arrival here became a heavy 
consumer of midnight oil. Murder will out, so he now successfully 
carries a horn in the band. Forbush practices tennis too, and hopes 
some day to play with the big boys. 



Hvde Park 



Amherst; b. 1891; Q. T. V., Agricullure; Class President (2); 
Public Speakino Council (3); Index BoARD (3); Glee Club (1,2.3); 
Mandolin Club (2, 3); Debating Team (2); Manager Musical Asso- 
ciation (3); Orchestra (I, 3). 

After looking us over to his complete satisfaction. Dud leaned 
his violin in the corner, hung his hat on the gas jet. and announced 
his intention of staying awhile. He then rolled up his sleeves and 
proceeded to show the public speakers of the college how the best 
debaters operate. As a result, he is today a walking jewelry shop 
of fobs and medals. Dud's dreamy appearance proclaims his 
character, and when lost in the "Angel's Serenade" he is simply 




-DUD" 



[©(§(§ ©(g^^son niME)]^^ 




Ralph Hicks Gaski 



Mendon 



15 Ha 



ck Street; b. 1892; Pomology; Class Hocke 
ads 



(1). 



much 
but a 



uppers. 



Ralph leads one of those Jekyll-Hyde lives we read sc 
about in the popular magazines. His vaunted studiousness is 
cloak for his wild revels at South Amherst chicken-pie s 
Barking "Step" from the file-closers is one of his numerous 
plishments, and many are the freshmen he has scared into convul- 
sions by his savage vociferations. Ralph has a fondness for cider, 
and the echoes of his rollicking songs have often disturbed midnight 
slumberers. 



Thomas Joseph Godvin, 

North College; b. 1889; Kl'*; 



La 



ape 



Keep your eye on this boy and stay 
political extinction awaits the man who cro 
over when he gets into the Legislature, as 
will, it may "help some" to be abl 
Honor the Mayor." Vote for Tor 
Democratic parly! 



Garde 
in his 



Jamaica Plam 



for 



ghl side 

ses Tom Godvin. More- 

we confidently predict he 

to reach the official ear of "His 

Godvin, free growlers, and the 




"BATH-HOUSE JOHN Znd." 




Harold Martin Gore, 



Wollaston 

II South College; b. 1891; Q. T. V., Pomology; Class Treasurer 
(1, 2); Class Football (1, 2); Captain Class Football (2); Class 
Track (2); Varsity Football (2). 

Could we bul employ gestures and the spoken word to do this 
man justice! One cannot half appreciate Kid until he has seen 
him in action and heard his raucous voice and silvery laugh. "Molly- 
coddle" is the last term in the dictionary that would apply to Kid, 
but his tough nature is tempered by certain softnesses where one least 
expects to find them. He is a young fiend on the gridiron and all 
he envys in the world is a husky frame like big Sam's. Harold has 
been known to peep between the covers of his roommate's books, and 
always manages to wriggle by the profs. 



"KID" 



[©©©©©^flnn flff^iD)!^^ 



George Freeman Greenleaf, 



21 Feanng Sir 
Hockey (2). 



b. If 



Brockton 

Foieslry; Class Track (2); Class 



George is another of those 
snappy on the gym 
A'hirligig mo 



little, but — oh my" chaps. He is 
ipparatus, perfoiming the difficult kipp and 
^ ^ - ith masterful impunity. In spite of a stren- 

uous program George cannot consume all of his superfluous energy, and 
to that end he follows Pill's example and thrusts an old "dudine" 
into his face for an exhaust. Leave it to George to come strong at 
the finish. 





"FREDDIE" 



Burton Adams Harris, 



Frederick David Gnggs, 

5 North College; b. 1890; >I>21v; Agricultural Journalism and Econo- 
mics; Class President (2); Class Track (1, 2); Class Football 
(2); Captain Rope-Pull (1); Captam Class Basketball (1); Man- 
ager Class Baseball (1); Band (1, 2, 3); Glee Club (2, 3); Index 
Board (3); Senate (3). 

Behold the royal countenance of "Frederick the Great". Czar 
of Chicopee Falls, Prince of Allhesurveys, Glee Club Ringleader, 
and future President— or leader of a band. Seers tell us that in 
previous incarnations he was Cleopatra and Martin Luther. We 
can well believe it. for he is capable of anything and has the most 
diverse interests of anyone in college. At the same lime he "gets 
away with it" in the classroom. 



Wethersfield, Conn. 



84 Pleasant Street; b. 1691; i;T.\; Agncultuie; Class Sergeant- 
al-Arms (I); Vice-President (2); Rope-Pull (2); Senate (3); 
Prom. Committee (2). 

Burt is a practical advocate of the "take no thought for the 
morrow" idea, and the same seems to agree admirably with his 
happy-go-lucky nature. His hearty horse-laugh is a natural by- 
product of the farm, and is guaranteed a sure cure for pessimistic 
philosophers. To the uninitiated, Burt may be easily recognized 
by the straw stuck in his mouth and by the cap perched rakishly on 
his starboard ear. 




[[D)(g(g©(g^[iiin HKiiD)] 




Willard Harrison Hasey, 



Brockton 

Botany; Glee Club 



87 Pleasant Street; b. 1890; C. S. C, T-il' 
(1, 2, 3). 

Bill's champagne tenor blends well with the liquid warbles of 
the Glee Club songsters, and is in great demand. His one great 
difficulty is the securing of enough "makins" and pipe-loads to carry 
him through the day, although he is fast becoming an adept at the 
same. Harrison stars as a strike-breaker and many are the cats along 
the Hamp line that he has reduced to eight lives. It is rumoreci 
that Bill has at last met his fate and may soon become a benedict. 



Herbert Tilden Hatch, 

East Experiment Station; b. 1888; i^TA; Pomology 
urer (2); Rope-Pull (1); Manager Rope-Pull (2), 

Since landing here, Hatcho has accumulated or 
enjoying few things more than gliding over the dril 
floor, in accompaniment to the seductive strains 
Derrick's Superbas. As a class treasurer he was 
success being able to keep himself and Swatzie in 
'ithout showing a deficit. He is rapidly rounding 



except physically, 
piece of the rope. 



■When his lime 



Beverley 



: bad habit- 
hall's superb 
wrung from 
a pronounced 
Prince Albert 
every way 



all be there to buy a 





"HA TCHO" 



Herbert Wallace Headle, Boltorf 

6 North College; b. 1890: Landscape Gardening. 

Crusts of silence thick enough to skate on enshroud in mystery 
the character of this specimen. But a surprise awaits him who 
breaks through the crust, to find the amiable, humorous, and studious 
personality beneath. He's all there, and while the other fellows, are 
talking he saws wood. 



"HEADLE DEE" 



[©©©©(g^iiiin niMis): 



Marshall Headle, 



Plant Ho 



b. 1893; Floncullun 



Like h,s brolher, Marshall has developed m more ways ih, 
one since tobogganing into view. He is often found devouring 
pile of books in the library, but that will not last much longe 
because he has nearly all of them digested, A part of his tim 
however, he devotes to his avocation of wielding a cue in the garr 
room, and when he finishes the library he will take up billiards 
earnest with the idea of trimming Hoppe, e( ai 





■■HEADLE DUM- 



mes Loomis Holden, 












Palmer 


5 McClellar 


Street; b. 


1890; 


Che 


nistry. 










Where 


shall 


we b 


■gin to 


descr 


ibe thi 


s "cha 


mpeen" 


card 


sharp 


and clog da 


ncer^ 


He 


can imitate 


any m 


usical 


nslrument or 


other 


animal with 


his 


nouth 


alone. 


•Loomeh" 


IS the 


most he 


teroge 


neous 


combination 


of VI 


rtues a 


nd othe 


r thi 


igs on 


our p 


esent ho 


rizon 


He 


enjoys life 


here 


selling 


Pen's 


book 


s, and 


match 


ng Ed 


Lake 


with 


the proceeds 


Vt 


s, Jim 


my will 


bear 


watch 


ng. 









■■KID" 



Glover Elbridge Howe, 



Marlborough 

II South College; b. 1891; Q. T. V., Pomology; Class Captain 
(2); Class Football (1, 2); Class Baseball (I, 2); Class Basket- 
ball (1. 2); Class Track (1, 2); Manager Class Baseball (2). 

Poor boy! Seth is one of those unfortunates who never "fit" 
and "get in wrong with everyone, ' Strangely enough, however, there 
seems to be a considerable number of fellows around college who 
appreciate his worthlessness. With his appetite sufficiently provoked 
he can eat his weight in wildcats, and even Freshmen volunteer for 
work when under his eagle glance. Seth, with his wide know- 
ledge of biblical terms, would make a successful minister. 



^^m-* 


1 



"SETH" 



[©(§(§ ©(§2^[iiin nKiiD)[^^ 




Ralph Wesley Howe, 

W.lder Hall; b. 1889; 



East Dover, Vt. 
^TA; Entomology; Class Historian (2). 



Here, savage reader, is a very decorous young rnan who obeys 
the third commandment — most always. He is a fair example of the 
kind they grow in Vermont — husky, vigorous and sound — but not 
warranted to stand without hitching. We judge he is hitched, though, 
for whenever an opportunity offers he goes straight to East Dover 
as though led by an unseen halter. When left alone with his surging 
thoughts Ralph has all the appearances of a scholar and bookworm, 
but don't be fooled. 



Benjamin Franklin Hubert, 



White Plains, Ga. 



East Pleasant Street; b. 1886; A. B., Atlanta Baptist College; Agri- 
culture and Economics; Varsity Football (2); Class Football (2). 

It isn't every class that has an A. B. walking unconcernedly 

about in its midst. Hube is the young person who wears those 

extra letters after his name. A. B. might mean "at bat," but it 

doesn't, for Ben was graduated from Atlanta Baptist College in 

1907. The members of his Botany 1 table, remembering that last 

"shout," are rooting for him to win another Flint contest. Since his 

arrival here he has made good at Varsity football, and is a loyal 
classmate. 





;amuel Percy Huntington, 



Lynn 



K^ House; b. 1891; K2 ; Pomology; Captain Class Baseball (2); 
Class Baseball (I); Varsity Baseball (1, 2); Varsity Football (2); 
Class Track (1, 2); Rope-Pull (1); Band (1, 2, 3); Class Fool- 
ball (2); Class Basketball (1, 2). 

This exponent of the Lynn accent is seriously thinking of challeng- 
ing Martin Sheriden for the all-round athletic championship. Sam 
is the possessor of a luxuriant crop of Ostermoors and at times pre- 
sents a very roguish appearance as he peers from behind the brambles. 
Despite these impediments he has already made Phi Kappa Phi in 
the gym department. 



c^is)(§©©(§^iinn niKiis)]^^ 



Harold Wilson Hyland, 



Weymouth 



Insectory; b. 1890; K2^ ; Chemistry and Entomology; Orchestra (1); 
Band (1, 2, 3); Burnham Eight (1, 2); Dramatic Club (2). 

Hi, Hy! His breezy flights about the campus are among the 
sights that visitors come miles to see. As he sweeps down the walk 
with the smoke from his "3 B" solacer streaming behind, he is truly 
inspiring. Dick managed the acquisition of our class pipes with 
admirable eclai, and now leans back content, waiting till "the great 
day comes." 





Harold Frederic Jones, Campello 

West Experiment Station; b. 1891; 'I'^^K ■ Entomology; Class His- 
torian (1); Assistant Manager Dramatics (3). 

Gentlemen, the original Casey Jones, famed in song and story. 
Social events occupy most of his time and energy, though he does 
plow through a little work between informals, trips to Hamp, 
dramatics and sleep. Whilst the rest of us were far beyond our 
depth in Aggie Industry reading Jonesy was head and shoulders 
out of water, being peculiarly fitted for that kind of reading. Last 
spring with tears in his eyes the poor lad expressed regret that he 
had "only one hundred thirty-five specimens" in Botany. He's too 
good for this world! 



Simon Miller Jordan, 



Rutherford, N. J 



9 South College; b. 1891; Q. T. V., Pomologv ; Class Cross Coun 
try (1); Leader Mandolin Club (2, 3); Signal (1, 2, 3); Sopho 
more-Senior Hop Committee (2); Index (3); Fraternity Conferenc 
(3); Secretary (2) and Vice-President (3) of Dramatic Society 
Secretary and Treasurer New Jersey Club (2); Manager Varsity 
Tennis (3), 

"Joe Miller's Joke Book" is this jumping jack's favorite. Miller, 
or Sime, as he prefers to be called, is prominent here in the 
Queeners Amalgamated. His chicken-charming seances at the 
siege of Forrislall's are rivalled only by the mysteries of the Yogi. 
Now and then a suggestion of sadness flits across his face as he thinks 
of the time he went to sleep in the barber's chair, bat as a rule he 
wears the smile indelible. 



67 




"TIM" 



:©(§(§ ©@2^[inn nKi©!^^ 




Albeit Joseph Kelley, 

E. PleasanI Slreel; b. 1890; Che 



Boston 



siry. 



Little Kel threatened to lead a sailor's life on the bounding 
main, but finally decided that terra ftrma was §ood enough for him 
and so came to Aggie with Tom and the rest of Boston" Here he 
has shown marked ability as Serex's alarm clock and as a manipula- 
tor of the "Krag" at Commencement Drill. We fear that Albert 
has his eagle eye on the colonelcy. 



"LITTLE KEL" 
5einarcl Jenkins Kelley, Harwich 

Pleasant Street; b. 1891; KM'; TAP; Entomology and General 
Agriculture. 

Kolumbo IS the minstrel of the class. The glorious deeds of 
old gain added lustre from his telling; and yet — . No more terrify- 
ing sight could be witnessed than Kel, both "death dealers" revolv- 
ing with terrifying repidity as he wades thru twenty or thirty Sophs 
without turning a hair. The pride and joy of the Long One is 
a high-water mark uniform which was probably washed up at high 
tide and salvaged by him in a fit of despondency. 



Frederick Alfred Kenney, 
b. 1889; 





16 North Co 

(I). 



ThlE 



"LONG TOM" 



Charlestown 

Class Vice-President 



"When mau 
And purple 



cks skip o'er the green, 
t's Fwed! " 



unity two 



"FWED" 



riot of color awoke the echoes of our quiet comi 
years ago. Since getting the informal habil Fred has be 
ambitious, and at present Labby is under contract for a vest of 
lavender broadcloth with an artistic sprinkling of orange cabbages. 
Alfred enjoys playing tag on the campus, High School Day, and 
bids fair to become the only, original Kolgate Kid. 



68 



:iD)(§(§©(§^nni] n^]©! 



James Edward Lake, 

5 McClellan Street; b. 



Fall River 



ancls< 



He says that what inured hii 
ne was his daily passing of 



Ed IS the hard boy of the cla 
to look unwinkingly on scenes of 

brewery on his way to and from school. James Edward admits that 
evil has ihe upper hand in him and is resigned to the uller hopeles 
ness of his case. He now spends his time either sitting in Dicki* 
o^ce or playing Casino. 



^^P^H 


Kv^"^^H 


U ^ «^9 


^^H ^^H 


^^H —^^ J^H 


^K ^^H 



Nils Paul Larsen, 




Bridgeport, Conn. 



Clark Hall; b. 1890; K2 ; Biology; Class Secretary (2. 3)- Class 
Track (1,2); Class Hockey (1,2); Class Baseball (2); Class 
Football (1, 2); Varsity Football (2, 3); Senate (3). 

Paul is the living exponent of the safe and sane Fourth. "When 
he has accomplished something he doesn't celebrate W[th a bunch of 
cheap fireworks; the real celebrators are those who profit by his 
timely labors to get them past dangerous obstacles in the shape of 
math, exams. It was a sad day for Stockholm when she exported 
Paul to America. His only fault is a cap designed after the lines 
of a ferry boat, both ends being in front. 



John Warren Thomas Lesure, 

94 Pleasant; b. 1890; 6*; Agriculture. 



iburg 



Jack is a practical student of the chemistry of coal combustion 
and uses his owl-like look to advantage in the class room. He has 
impersonated Dodo the Human Dray in the capacity of bass-drum 
porter in the band but his love of liberty soon asserted itself and he 
was moved lo lead a different life. He is now a self respecting 
young man with no vices except the Y. M. C. A. 



69 




■■JACK" 



[©(§(§ ©(g^^HIin HKIIe); 




Willard Stone Little, 



Newburyport 



''IVAR" 



Quincy Shaw Lowry, 



66 Pleasant; b. 1891; K2; Landscape Gardening; Class President 
(I); Class Hockey (1, 2); Class Baseball Captain (1); Class 
Baseball (2); Manager Class Hockey (2); Assistant Manager 
Varsity Hockey (3); Fraternity Conference (3). 

Wbat's in a name? So said the immortal bard of Avon. For 
example there's War Little. We all know how Gen. Sherman 
characterized war. In the first place "War " is not little as his 
exploits on many a field will attest. And most emphatically he is 
not— well, what war is. Willard likes nothing better than a cruise 
in his motor boat or a ramble across country with a little Brownie 
on his arm and a good old jimmy pipe m his face. 



Canton 



K2 House; b. 1890; KI:: ; Landscape Gardening; Manager Cross 
Country (I). 

Perhaps you have already recognized this man, since he is often 
pictured in the popular magazines as the exponent of the Hart, Shaff- 
ner & Marx system. We feel obliged to depart for once from our 
iron clad office rule in order to condemn Quin as a first degree 
fusser, who never has been known to appear at a game. Prom, 
Informal or even a tug-of-war. without a specimen of feminine pul- 
chritude on his arm — usually a new one each lime. His activities In 
olher lines are rather limited but he makes up for it in this way. 



Robert Arthur Ludgren, 

88 Pleasant; b. 1889; B*; Animal Husbandr 





Orange 



Chasin 
scan trees 
enn.s, kno. 
he house, 
t close." 



butterflies and chimeras, diggin' cabbag 
I the market gardens, "onward thru life h 
:in' baseballs thru the neighbors windows, loafin' around 
each morning sees some graft' begin, each evening sees 



d prunin' 
goes, " playin' 



"LUNDV 



M[s)(§(§©(§2^niin niM©] 



Harold Lyon, 



Winter 



13 Phillips; b. 1888; KV'l; Agricullure. 

Mike's sorrowful mien would lead one lo believe that he was 
out of sympathy with his environment and longing to be at Johns 
Hopkins, studying philosophy. But this impression is quickly dis- 
pelled when his inner nature is fathomed. Mike has the energy 
of a young colt but succeeds in keeping it within bounds of reason- 
able restraint, with the possible exception of his attempts on the 
public speaking platform. 





Joseph Augustine Macone, 

1 North; b. 1889; K1M>; Agriculture; 



Band. 



The Lilliputian form of this member proves again that good 
things come in small packages. Quality not quantity is the motto 
here. According to latest rumors Augustine has received a flattering 
offer to tour the Keith circuit with Big Kel as a running mate in 
a "Mult and Jeff" sketch. This will probably lead to his entering 
the Produce Exchange. 



■/OF" 



George Alfred Mallet 



Bridgeport, Conn. 



116 Pleasant; b. 18<50; i:T.i; Landscape; Class Cross Country (2). 
As a rule. George is a quiel lad, but when a tennis ball frisks 
past his racket or he sends one to wrap Itself coyly in the net his 
remarkable command of the simple Anglo-Saxon is sublime. He 
punishes his books severely at times and puts up a very fair imitation 
of "a stude". We know him better than that, however, for It has 
been discovered that he has a tendency to forget his responsibilities and 
sorrows In a reckless game of High Low Jack. 




Raig)©©©@^ii[in n[NiiD)g^ 




Frank Eugene Marsh, 

North College; b. 1885; BK*; Agriculture. 



Holde 



Frank drew rein on the Aggie campus and entered into his 
new life with a sprightly grace and a thirst for knowledge which has 
not yet been drowned. Eugene is one of "Coal-oil Johnny's" most 
consistent patrons and is always indulging himself in his taste for 
study. Only a most hardy book can withstand the wear and tear of 
one of his night sessions, ending with a playful toss at the household 
cat. 



Julius Matz, 

112 Pleasant Street, b. 1886; Bioloi 



Boston 



gy- 



In spile of the fact that his name signifies plural, Julius is a 
very singular person. Like every member of the "Four Hundred" 
his life IS a burden lo him. Thinking M. A. C. a suitable remedy 
for those afflicted wilh monetary despondency, he flipped a "double 
eagle," and soon swung into our routine of study, sleep, and three 
meals a day. He has so far but one recreation, and his classically 
chiselled features light up with a scowl of exquisite delight at mention 
of Its name— Math. 



John Lawrence Mayer, 

35 East Pleasant Street; b. 1892; Chemistry. 





■•JULIUS" 



South Boston 



John's name doesn't imply connection with municipal govern- 
ment, nor does it signify any terrestial appearance during the fifth 
month. He acquired his "larnin" through constant attention to 
Grape Nuts, his path being strewn with little yellow boxes, though 
as far as we can see, there's no reason. He has been known to 
occupy space on the drill hall floor on certain festive occasions, 
and his fawn-brown eyes excite much admiration in East Street 



■■JOHN- 



[©©©©(g^nnn hikiib)!^^ 



Allister Francis McDougall, 



Westford 



6 Norlh College; b. 1891; Pomology; Band (1, 2, 3); Rifle Team 
(2). 

Allisler blew into a certain yellow dive on the northern bound- 
ary of the campus one afternoon and ever since his arrival the anti- 
quated landmark has fairly resounded with the "battle of the books." 
Aided by his famous cast-iron cornel he has helped add to the horrors 
of many a parade-ground evolution. His eagle eye has often been 
successfully called into action along the "shootin" iron. Last spring 
the cider bung almost gave the struggling space-fillers on the Signal 
opportunity for an epitaph. But Mac is still with us. 




William Stuart Moii 




Boston 



88 Pleasant Street; b. 1892; H'|.; Forestry; Class Hockey (1, 2); 
Class Track (2); Burnham Eight (2); Dramatic Club (2); Cercle 
Franqais (2). 

This prodigy of intellect gained his rugged constitution on a 
diet of Boston baked beans and brown bread. Since coming here 
Stuart has distinguished himself as a hockey player by the deft 
manner in which he interposes his eye between the scooting puck 
and the goal. Upon the stage he is well known for the grace and 
the elegance with which he flirls a monocle in the role of a benevo- 
lent old gentleman. 



Joseph Wilbur Murray, 

Ki; House; b. 1892; K^ ; TAi', 



Holyoke 



Lands 



Garde 



Though Joe hangs his hat in Holyoke during vacation he came 
to us last year from Colorado College. He wears the sad martyr 
expression of a Shakesperian artist driven to the wall by the success 
of the moving pictures, but as yet has communicated his grief to no 
one. Perhaps the East is loo lame for him after the lynchings and 
homicides of the wooly West. Cheer up, Joe! 




"JOE" 



i[D)(§@©(§2^[[[in nK]iD)[^^ 




Ralph Thomas N 
Insectory; b. 189' 



Matt 



apan 



Pomology; Class Secretary (3). 

Mutt's firm belief in the ultimate success of co-education led 
h]m to M. A. C, and here he has set himself to studying the sub- 
ject from every possible angle. Squirt is deeply interested in 
botany, but even in this work he keeps constantly in mind the noble 
ideal of his college life. Ralph considers alfalfa the queen of crops. 



■■MUTT" 



Norman Joseph Nichols, 



116 
Club 



Oft . 

lestini 
deck 



Pleasant Str 

(1). 
When his 
of operatiol 
;eded to den 
ame hole m 
no his shots 



Everett 
Forestry and Entomology; Mandolin 



home town became tiresome Nick sought a n 
US, in Amherst. He polished up his pop-gun a 
lolish the bulls-eyes on the range. Shooting ihroi 
the target time after time made it seem that he v 
pty air, so Norman gave it up as a bad j 



mid the calm hush of 

the transportation h 
)f a caltle car. 



lidnit 



-It he 
the 



may be 

i. & M. 



the 




"NICK" 




James Leo O'Brien, 



Wayland 



Pleasant Stre. 
(2) ; Class Fc 

There wi 
and Brownie 
tion and a nc 
has made hin 
his share of 



t. b. 1839; Kl'*; Pomology; Class Sergeanl-at-Arms 
olball (1, 2); Rope-Pull (2); Varsity Football (1, 2). 

s a blare of trumpets and a roll of drums when Jimes 
strode upon the campus, each with a firm determina- 
se-guard. Leo's insatiable thirst for warm fresh blood 
I a valuable man on the gridiron. He has also had 
success in his eager pursuit of knowledge. Jim is 



^edingly useful in class excitements; he 
elhing," and to follow it up. 



always ready to "start 



"JIMES" 



;iD)(§(§©©2^[iQn Eff^iD)!^^ 



Clyde Monroe Packard, 



Springfield 

8 Kellogg Avenue; b. 1889; Horlicullure ; Edilor-in-Chief 1913 
Index. 

Behold! the Edilor-in-Chief of ihis hrainstorm symphony. As 
Pallas Athene sprang clothed in full armor from the forehead of 
Jupiter, so, we are led to believe, this intellectual giant must have 
risen from the ciadle m full possession of all his marvellous facul- 
ties. We wish we knew where he "got the habit," for Ferret is one 
of the most persevering and successful workers of the class. 




.ester Newton Pease, 




Meriden, Cc 



84 Pleasant Street; b. 1889; -I'SK; Pomology; Class Track (2); 
Band (2, 3); Glee Club (1, 2, 3). 

Can a man with a harmonious name like unto this, be other 
than one of the leading songbirds in the class? Having decided to 
raise the standard of music of the "sod-busters," he entered with 
"Thirteen." As he stands up in the choir of a morning, his face 
bears that angelic simplicity that even rooming with Doc cannot 
efface. Lester's brawny arms have made him invaluable to the band 
as a bass-drum smasher. 



"SNEEZE' 



Joseph James Pillsbury, 



West Bridgewater 



8 South Prospect Street; b. 1891; Forestry and Entomology; Varsity 
Track (I, 2); Class Track (1, 2). 

The nimble flea has nothing on Joseph. The t.unk market has 
not yet subsided from the flutter occasioned by Pill's baggage 
smashing activities with Sam as assistant smasher. Careful study 
of "The Grasshopper Outhopped" has made him a point winner in 
numerous track events. Joe represents a type of grace and beauty 
far from common at this institution and it is generally conceded that 
he is greatly envied at certain feminine institutions of learning in 
,he vicinity of Amherst. 



75 




"PILL" 



[©©©©(g^Hnn niMiB)! 




George Atwell Post, 



Richmond Hill. N. Y. 



88 Pleasant Street; b. 1889; 9*; Pomology and Agronomy; Band 
(1. 2, 3); Vice-President Y. M. C. A. (3). 

George has been terrorizing the town with his tenor ever since 
he arrived. He is very athletic, belonging to the Slockbridge Club, 
and to a pair of Indian clubs which hold his door open in his den, 
down on Pleasant Street. The band would not have been complete 
without George's piccolo, so he was signed up soon after his arrival. 
Atwell has flooded the rural districts with his volume on cooking and 
domestic science. 



"TOAST POSTIE" 



Charles Dwight Roberts, 



New Haven, Conn. 
Pomology; Debating Club; 1913 



7 Nutting Avenue; b. If 
Index Board (3). 

Just as the sun was setting o'er St. Andrews he put up his golf 
clubs with a sigh of sweet content. He had beaten his bogey. This 
happened last summer. Cap is a fixture on the tennis courts, and 
would desert a drowning relative for a couple o' sets. He has broken 
into the society column of the Signal on more than one occasion, 
being "among those present" at drill hall functions. 





Herman Theodore Roehrs, 



nderful mountain climbe 
But then his interest i 



■■HANS" 



New York City 

K2 House; b. 1886; K2 ; Pomology; Class President (3); Man- 
ager Class Football (I, 2); Varsity Tennis (1, 2); Chairman Soph- 
Senior Hop, 

For a "Deutscher" Hans makes 
His trips "over the mountain ' are 
Pomology, with its sludv of peaches, pippins, etc., may account for 
this. Hans is a true New Yorker, as his speech will show. He 
and his ex-wife, Zab, are socialists — "What is thine is mine, and 
what is mine is mine." During the summer Herman manages a hot 
bull-pup counter at Coney Island. 



76 



[[D)@(§(§(§^niiii n[NiiDi^^ 



Walter Edwin Rosebrooks, 

15 Hallock Slreel; b. 1890; Agricullure. 

Slalislics make Edwin lo be only Iwenly-one years of a 
we should have said ihjriy-one al least. He has a rugged 
lulion, and can sleep through almost any chapel "spiel." 
awful sorrow must have blighted this young life while prepi 
Oxford High for the world's battles, else why thai worn and 
look? 

"I've often said lo myself, I've said. 
Cheer up Rosie! you'll soon be dead. 
A short life and a gay one!" 



Oxford 




Stuart Dodds Samson, 




"ROSIE" 
Grand Isle, Vt. 



"SAM" 



K^ House; b. 1891; K2 ; Agricullure; Class Captain (2.3) 
Varsity Football (2. 3); Varsily Track (I); Class Foolball (1.2) 
Class Baseball (1. 2); Class Basketball (1, 2); Class Track (1. 2) 
Captain Rope-Pull (2). 

Big Sam loomed up a tower of strength when, as a Freshman, 
he played the role of rescuer on the right side of the rope. Skeet's 
frail form began to pick up as soon as he struck the Connecti- 
cut valley, and now he can sometimes "put it onto" the "Pride of 
Palmer." Sam has a name as a serious heavy-weight conversationalist 
at informals. He joined the immortals when he doped the following: 
"I am monarch of all I survey 

My right there is none to dispute. 

In my hair there is no trace of hay 

And I never engage in a 'toot*." 



John Lincoln Sclden, Northampton 

Northampton; b. 1891; Entomology; Band (2); Orchestra (2). 

Seld was a little late in coming but he appears lo have the 
qualifications of a "Thirteen" man. He slid noiselessly through 
Physics, iho Billy did his best. Even so. his life is not a happy 
one; imagine living next door to the minister in the same town with 
"Dickie's." Since he arrived here he has qualified for the "Plugger 
bund," and attends the nightly meelmgs with inhuman regularity. 




"SELD" 



iiD)(§(g©(§2^[inii n[Mig)B^ 




1 Serex, Jr., 

16 Pleasan' Slreel; b. 1890; Chemistry. 

''Yes, dis guy was born in New *Yoik.' 



Pla 



If there were any 
doubt of this fact, his sad sweet songs during Surveying field-work 
would undeceive one at once. One day is embittered m his memory. 
Some enthusiast, seeking to verify the Principle of Archimedes, 
caused Polio's classic form, while wrapped in after-dinner slum- 
ber, to displace an equal volume of water in the bath-tub. That 
was two years ago, however. All present freshmen look up to him 
with respect. 



Dennis Anthony Sheehan, 



Weston 



1 North College; b. 1890; KIM- Chemistry; Class Captain (2); 
Varsity Football (2); Class Hockey (1); Class Baseball (2). 

Mighty appeared one fall at M. A. C. and has always loomed 
large in Nineteen-Tbirleen history since the day be taught Long 
Tom the manly art, and leading him by the hand, sallied forth as a 
Freshman to the destruction of the would-be banquet wreckers. When- 
ever trouble threatens Mighty is right up m the front row with 
his little argument. He is down in Who's Who as an after-dinner 
speaker, ranking with the Honorables, B. J. Kelley and C. M. 
DepeW. 




'^MICHTV 




Carl August Shute, 



Hannpden 

<I»2K; Landscape Gardening; Soph- 



4 South College; b. U 
Senior Hop Committee. 

Since Cal's arrival at Amherst, Lab has been able to afford a 
new pair of shoes, and business is picking up. In Hampden whither 
he retires for rest each week-end. Plupy's life is one nerve-racking 
round of quoils and wailing for the daily stage. He has developed 
into a star al the former game, and holds the diamond belt of North 
and South. Cal was once seen al an informal. 



•'FLU FY'' 



;[D)(§©©(§2^nil!I 



Charles Marsh Streeter, 



Brimfield 



79 Pleasant Street; b. 1892; BK'I>; Forestry and Pomology; Man- 
dolin Club (I). 

Another math, shark! If. as Mark Twain says. "Abihly to do 
mathematics is a low form of cunning," this man is cunning. He 
is now occupied with keeping Forbush on the narrow way. and m 
resting up. Charles also finds lime to loaf during exam week. He 
may wake up some day to find himself famous as a member of 
McGraw's Giants. 




Clark Leonard Thayer, 




Enfield 



West Experiment Station; b. 1890; Floriculture. 

Clark IS a rabid rooler, and likes nothing belter than to stand 
near the home plate, where hot fouls vary the monotony of existence. 
He is usually either studying Life in the reading-room or looking 
for the "lost chord" upstairs in chapel. Sages and soothsayers have 
it that Len will some day defy the W. C. T. U. from behind a 
brass rail, but we who know him are inclined to doubt this. 



Waldo Guy Tucker, Lynn 

Math. Bmldmg; b. 1892; Biology; Class Track (1). 

Vigorous onslaughts against his Freshman books put Tuck in 



solid, and he has been coasting ever sine 
obtained. He slid by the Czar, is a boj 
Geology. He is a well-known figure in the 
and his handsome head reposing in slumbei 
desks is a familiar sight to visitors. 



the momentum thus 
urveyor, and devoured 
ck-room of the library. 
I the soft wood of the 




■TUCK" 



:is)(§©©(§2:s[inn mM©] 




Arthur Sommerville Tupper, Roxbury 

C. S. C. House; b. 1891; C. S. C. ; TAP; Landscape Gardening. 
Tup can fairly claim the lille of ihe Nmeleen-Thirteen nightin- 



When he opens that little mouth, an 
eyes, "I've got your number" — well he c 
reason "Li'l Artha" came to M. A. C. m 
mired mathematicians. He has so far shun 
if he would only become versed in the poetiy 
a verse, we feel sure that he would soon 
proud title of "Belle of the Ball." 



mgs, 



with mischievous 

has. The only 

s to inspire a class of 

d the mazy dance, but 

f motion, at so much 

rest from Andy the 



Reyer Herman Van Zvvaluwenburg, 



Rutherford, N. J. 



East Experiment Station; b. 1891; 'I'i;!^; Entomology; Class His- 
torian (2); College Signal (1,2.3); 1913 Index Board (3); 
Advertising Manager Dramatic Society (3); Dramatics (2). 

Swatzie runs principally to brain and length; hence we musin t 
judge him harshly when he sets the freshmen that pernicious example 
of getting high marks through natural ability rather than by plug- 
ging. He says it's great to be crazy, and when he and Sime tear 
off one of their justly famous reunions we have to believe it. His 
intermittent flow of bargain counter rhetoric is equaled by few and 
excelled by none. Let us be thankful for that. 




"SWATZIE" 




Charles Dexter Walker, 



Greenwich Village 

14 South College; b. 1889; <i'^K: Landscape; Class Vice-President 
(3); Class Baseball (1); Fraternity Conference (3). 

Seedy "trips the light fantastic," is one of the fixtures in front 
of South and with Plupy holds the championship at doubles in 
"quates." Dexter rails loudly against the injustice of donating cuts 
merely for going to sleep in Aggie Industry. He has raised con- 
siderable dust at third base on class teams. Charlie's entire siring of 
blooded bull-pups was entered in the Belchertown Fair last fall but 
at sight of food the hunger-maddened canines disappeared and lost 
the prize, to the owner's great dismay. 



80 



[[5)(§(§@(§^[in[i immi 



Nathan Holrr 

AmhersI; b. 



Wells, 

88; Agncullur 



Kennebunk, 



Education. 



Afler a year's study in the University of Maine, Nat follow- 
ing in the steps of our ex-physical director, came to M. A. C. He 
is remarkable for the fact that he is one of the very few who neither 
belongs to the band nor even tried to qualify for it. During the sum- 
mer months, Nat pulls down the bacon as a camp-meeting lecturer, 
delivering his monologue, "How shall we increase our vocabularies?" 
He claims that several of his voles this fall were cast against the 
"wets". 






n 


■ 









-NAT- 



Francis Wellington Whitney, 



Wellesley 



4 North College; b. 1890; Pomology and Poultry; Class Hockey 
(1, 2); Class Track (1, 2); Class Football (2). 

Whit IS a valued member of Angier's Pinocle Club, and loves 
nothing better than to "start something" during a session. He can 
also hold down his share of sas-parilla and Hires. In spite of his 
success as an ultimate consumer he manages to help earn victory after 
victory for '13 on the track. 



-WHIT- 



Geoige Zabriskie, 2nd, 



New York City 

83 Pleasant Street; b. 1890; Q. T. V.; Economics; Manaaer Dra- 
matic Society (1, 2, 3); Glee Club (1, 2); Assistant Business Man- 
ager 5igna/ (2, 3); Index Board; Sophomore-Senior Hop Com- 
mittee (2); Dramatics (2); Vice-President New Jersey Club (2). 

Our last victim is George II. His accomplishments as social 
lion, actor, and carrier of the big drum in the band soon won him 
distinction here and so far have carried him along without loss of 
life. George will attain wealth with his familiar formula of; '"Aw, 
lend me a nickel, I don't want to break a dime." 'We'll all be sur- 
prised if, some day, he doesn't work St. Peter for a passage through 
the Pearly Gates. 

81 




"ZAB" 



G^[D)(§(§(§(§^[[nn nKiiQ)!^^ 



Harry Dickinson Allen, 

82 Pleasant Street; i;AE; Dartmoulil (1, 2). 



Lynn 



Edward Stephen Coen Daniel, ' ' Peterville 

15 Fearing Street; h. 1889; Q. T. V.; Engineering. 

Gordon Waterman Ells, Haverhill 

116 Pleasant Street; b. 1891; i:TA; Forestry; Glee Club. 



John Lewis Eisenhaure, 

Brook's Farm; b. 1890. 



North Reading 



Herbert Colby Hutchings, South Amherst 

87 Pleasant Street; b. 1890; :2TA; Pomology. 




82 



mMmmimmiiinmmiiiimimmii mMiJiwwmm^ 




F. L. Ames 
H. M. Baker, 1912 
W. S. Baker, 1914 
H. B. Barstow 
J. W. Bradley 

F. J. Clegg, 1914 ■ 
W. A. Cleveland 
W. P. Cowles 

R. H. Currier, 
S. M. Dohanian 
D. j: Dowd 
L. W. Everson 
J. Freifeld 

G. Fuller, 1914 
H. E. Goodnough 
W. G. Griffin, 1914 

L. F. Guild 

R. C. Harrington 

W. V. Hayden, 1914 

C. B. Heath, 1914 

H. W. Helberg 

R. E. Hubbard 



914 



C. A. Hurley 
R. B. Hutchinson 
H. E. Jenks 
H. H. Jenney, 
W. C. Kinney 
W. F. Lane 
F. C. Milbury 
H. H. Miller 
R. Parsons 
R. K. Patch 
J. D. Pellett, 1914 
T. F. Peters 
R. H. Prouty 
E. F. Putnam 
J. H. Quinn 
H. W. Ryder 
J. L. Shea 
H. L. Smart 
H. B. Staab 
L. B. Turner 
M. H. Wheeler 
H. L. Wheeler 



W. C. Whitman 



SoPnoMo 




CH B 



W55^Z^M 




^ 



SSffi 



Sof>l)omore (Tlass 



Officers 



Stanley Barron Freeborn 




President 


David Wyman Gibson 




Vice-President 


Leland Hart Taylor 




Secretary 


John Philip Palmer 




Treasurer 


Sidney Stokes Besser 




Class Captain 


H. C. Wooley . 




. Sergeant-at-Arms 


Chester Eaton Wheeler 

E 


(Tlass dolors 
Mue and White. 


Historian 



G^]D)(§(g©(§^IIIin IIK!Is)l 



Sopl)omora Hflstor^ 




ES, LADS, we are the brave crew of the gallant ship "1914," which has 
been voyaging for more than a year on the high seas of Alma Mater. 
Durmg the year just past we have encountered the sand-bars and storms 
of Algebra and English, and lo! we are left a band of hardened sailors, 
ready to face the icebergs of Physics and the typhoons of Zoo. Some of 
us have been lost into the sea, and given up, but the greater part of us have stuck to the 
ship. Our way has not been unmolested, for another ship, the Odd Class, sailed the 
same waters that we navigated, and disputed our right to cruise where we would. Many 
times we fought for supremacy with our enemy, and although we were frequently 
scathed, we came out at the end little the worse for the wear and tear of conflict, and so 
maintained our right to sail the high seas in liberty. Several of our number were cap- 
tured from time to time and forced to walk the plank, but this only served to increase our 
spirit, until, in the final struggle of the first year, when the Odd Class endeavored to pre- 
vent our departure for a long voyage, we got away successfully amid a fusillade of 
(egg) shells. While we were in the Summer Haven this ship went to other seas. In 
this, our second year, we find ourselves at odds with a new ship, the "1915," but our 
guns will soon send her to the depths of the green, green sea. As for our own good ship, 
she will sail on and on, proud of the maroon and white at her stern, and winning greater 
victories on the unknown seas of Life. 

Altogether now, lads, here's to the grand old college. And here's to our success 
in everything, even to the end of the voyage. 




WMv JoMESEV L£rr H OME 



^ Two HuNDK^ED AjuES Pek Hour, or, 

We W(iN t COMf n»Ct IM "rut flORNi'VG 




3. T3efloriFUL /VoRTriP/etD, or. 
How We Loi/£ V 60 ro QHftP£L 



^' Oh, PiEASf Don't 60 , oR, 

IF K/f HAD Some ))flK,Ll/J yoii'HRM Mb E66S 



'^^ 6et roOirrHBR . BoYi . OR 
fvTtiNO Jfia ,joHN<:o\ (Out ()f i3i;?if<£S5 




S- Eflr, D/?iNk, AND 6e MeRRY, or 

WHr Wfl5 N'T THIS p/lVflOfT 4 Sl^CCfSS' 



i©@(§©©^nnn nff^E)!^^ 



ONE NIGHT ONLY 



The Class of 1914 presents its Side-splitting Farce, 

"THE BANQUET" 

Egged on and assisted by special talent engaged at enormous expense. 

2— COUNT 'EM— 2 L. E. SMITHS -E. PARKERS 2— COUNT 'EM— 2 

THE LAUGH OF THE SEASON 



See the Thrilling Escape of Uncle Tom Powers and his Little Flock ! 

Come and Hiss the Malicious Machinations of Glover Legree and his Minions ! 

Witness the Final Triumph of Virtue ! ! ! 



SAM BO FREEBORN 

in charge of the gentlemanly ushers 

DINAH JONES 

will dispense her justly famed lemonade at the Main Entrance 



ONE PERFORMANCE ONLY!! 



FROSH 




1 Id) (§(§(§©2^11 nil 



JPre$l)man (Tlass 

Officers 



D. J. Lewis 

P. V. Kane 

H. W. Bishop 

R. E. Rendall 

C. D. Mobeig 

R. E. Phillips 

Stuart Kittredge Fairar 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Sergeant-at-Arms 

Class Captain 

Class Historian 



(Tlass Colors 

Brown and White. 



92 



;[5)(§(§©@2«[inn ng^B)!^^ 



JP^re5l)man|lffistorY 



© 



RIEF but interesting has been our history. It commenced the very first night 
that college opened, when, aided by the Juniors we "yipped it over" on 
the Sophomores and held our first tug-of-war practice. This proved to be 
our only one for a time, however, for the following night the Sophomores 
requested the pleasure of our company at a "seeing Amherst" party — vul- 
garly known as a "night-shirt parade." Little need be said of this affair aside from men- 
tioning the childish delight our hosts seemed to take in it. 

Then came the annua! tug-of-war! Sixty of our huskiest men lined up against an 
equal number of stubborn Sophomores across the college pond. At the crack of the pistol 
our opponents "got the jump" on us and appeared to be having everything their own way. 
We were slowly nearing the water's edge when, suddenly encouraged by the Juniors, we 
took a stand and showed our strength and spirit by snatching a splendid victory from the 
jaws of apparently inevitable defeat. We were also successful in obtaining a class picture 
on the chapel steps while the hungry Sophs were enjoying their Sunday dinner. That we 
do not lack athletic spirit is shown by the fact that we have sent several most promising 
men out upon the gridiron, where a good record appears to be waiting them. 

On the threshold of our college life we look forward to years full of creditable ser- 
vice to 1915 and above all to old M. A. C. 



94 



:iD)(§©(§(g2^[inn qim^i^^^s 



Q. o. V. 

1869-1911 

AMHERST CHAPTER 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

1869 

BOSTON ALUMNI CHAPTER 
1889 



THE CORPORATION 
1890 



R;a]D)(g(§@ (§2:^11 [[[[ nff^©i^^ 



Eslablhhcd 1869. 



James B. Paige 



Frederick Tuckerman 
Gerald D. Jones 
David Barry 
J. E. Bement 
Henri D. Haskins 



O. o. V. 

^Sttembers 

"3n "3f^acultate 



Samuel R. Parsons 
In Krbe 



Incorporaled 1890. 



A. Vincent Osmun 



James E. Deuel 
Charles F. Deuel 
E. H. Forristall 
Albert McCloud 
Frank L. Thomas 



lCn6ergra6uatcs 



Arthur John Ackerman 
Leon Emanuel Fagerstrom 
Jay Morrill Heald 
Frank Burrows Hills 
Earle Johnson Robinson 
Edward Roger Williams 
Theodore Joseph Moreau 
Francis Spink Madison 
Ralph Cedric Blake 
Joseph Warren Covill 
Edward Stephen Coen Daniels 
James Dudley French 



Harold Martm Gore 
Chester Blanchard Heath 
Glover Elbridge Howe 
Simon Miller Jordan 
George Zabnskie, 2nd 
Warren Sears Baker 
Newton Howard Dearing 
Stanley Barron Freeborn 
Dettmar Wentworth Jones 
Richard Henry Powers 
Joel Powers Sherman 
Raymond Wmslow Warner 



101 



MIs)@©(§(g^[[lin niMIe)!^^ 



fifyi Sigma IKaipipa 



IS73-19U 



Ol)e !5\oU of Chaftdrs 



ALPHA 


Massachusetts Agricultural College 








1873 


BETA 


Union University 








1888 


GAMMA 


Cornell University 








1889 


DELTA 


West Virginia University 








1891 


EPSILON 


Yale University .... 








1893 


ZETA 


College of City of New York 








1896 


ETA 


University of Maryland 








1897 


THETA 


Columbia University . 








1897 


IOTA 


Stevens Institute of Technology 








1899 


KAPPA 


Pennsylvania State College 








1899 


LAMBDA 


George Washington University 








1899 


MU 


University of Pennsylvania . 








1900 


NU 


Lehigh University 








1901 


XI 


Saint Lawrence University 








1902 


OMICRON 


Massachusetts Institute of Technology 








1902 


PI 


Franklin and Marshall College 








1903 


RHO 


Queen's University 








1903 


SIGMA 


Saint John's College . 








1903 


TAU 


Dartmouth College 








1905 


UPSILON 


Brown University 








1906 


PHI 


Swarthmore College 








1906 


■ttil 


Williams College 








1907 


PSI 


University of Virginia 








1907 


OMEGA 


University of California 








1908 


ALPHA DEUTERCN 


University of Illinois . 








1910 


BETA DEUTERON 


University of Minnesota 








1910 


GAMMA DEUTERON 


Iowa Stale College 








1911 


I5l)e (Llubs 


The New York Club 


I889<^ The Southern Club 1902 


The Boston Club 


1897 The Morgantown Club 1902 


The Albany Club 


1900 The Philadelphia Club 1905 


The Connecticut Club 


1901 The Pittsburgh Clu 


b 






1907 



The Seattle Club 1910 



102 



[©©©©(g^Kiin niKiiB)!^^ 



Organized 1873 



Ipfyi Sigma IKapfa 

^lpl)Q (Tl^apter 



Incorporated 1892 



William P. Brooks 
S. Francis Howard 



^ttembers 

Dn "3Pacultatc 

George E. Stone 
Frederick L. Yeaw 



Ralph J. Watts 
Arthur W. Hall 
F. Civille Pray 
Lawrence S. Dickinson 



In Krbe 

Raymond H. Jackson 
Roy E. Cutting 
Philip H. Smith 
Luther A. Root 
Sumner C. Brooks 



Eric Nichols Boland 
Fred Arlo Castle 
Win f red Griswold Demins 
Thomas Hemenway 
Charles Cornish Pearson 
William Edwin Philbrick 
Daniel Gordon Tower 
Herman Chester Walker 
Howard Holmes Wood 
Frederick David Griggs 
William Vassall Hayden 



I£n6ergra6uatcs 

Harold Frederic Jones 
Lester Newton Pease 
Carl August Shute 
Reyer Herman Van Zwaluwenburg 
Charles Dexter Walker 
Lloyd Garrison Davies 
Robert Norton Demond 
Almon Morley Edgerton 
Edward Clinton Edwards 
John Gouvernour Hutchinson 
John Philip Palmer 
Ernest Franklin Upton 



[^©©©©©^on ii[Niis)i^^ 



(E. S. d. fvaUvnit^ 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 
1879-1911 



THE CORPORATION 
Incorporated in 1 892 

THE GRADUATE ASSOCIATION 
Organized September 4, 1897 







i Z" o:: 



;iD)(§@(§(§2^[ii]n nKiiB)!^^ 



d, S. d, Jraternit^ 

IKonorar^p Members 



Dean George F. Mills 
Professor George B. Churchil 



Professor Herman Babson 
Professor John H. Genung 



Clarence E. Gordon 
Sidney B. Haskell 
Edwin F. Gaskill 
Oscar C. Bartletl 



Charles Albert Lodge, Jr. 
Rowland Trowbridge Beers 
Lewis Warren Gaskill 
Frank Benedict Hickey 
James Francis Martin 
Fred Sawyer Merrill 
Ralph Robinson Parker 
Curtis Peckham 
John Edwards Pierpont 
Stephen Perry Puffer 
George Wilbur Tupper 
Ralph James Borden 



Dr. Charles S. Walker 



^eslient (Graduates 

Joseph B 



Lindsey 
George H. Chapman 
Lewell S. Walker 
Erwm S. Fulton 



Charles A. Peters 



X^ader graduates 



Charlesworth Herbert Brewer 
John Stuart Carver 
Frank Jackson Clegg 
WiUard Harrison Hasey 
Arthur Sommerville Tupper 
Harold William Brewer 
Robert Theodore Frost 
Walter Goss Kilbourn 
Tell William Nicolet 
Theodore Arthur Nicolet 
Harry Nissen 
Leon Edgar Smith 



G^In)(§(g©(§^On HKIlD)!^^ 



^aipipa Sl^ma 



1867-1910 



ZETA 

BETA 

ETA PRIME 

MU 

ALPHA ALPHA 

ALPHA BETA 

KAPPA 

LAMBDA 

ALPHA CHI 

PHI 

OMEGA 

UPSILON 

TAU 

CHI 

PSI 

IOTA 

GAMMA 

BETA THETA 

THETA 

PI 

ETA 

SIGMA 

NU 

ALPHA PI 

ALPHA RHO 

ALPHA SIGMA 

ALPHA TAU 

ALPHA UPSILON 

ALPHA PHI 

ALPHA PSI 

ALPHA OMEGA 

BETA ALPHA 

BETA BETA 



University of Virginia . 
University of Alabama 
Trinity College . 
Washington and Lee Univ 
University of Maryland 
Mercer University 
Vanderbilt University . 
University of Tennessee 
Lake Forest University . 
Southwestern Presbyterian Un 
University of the South 
Hampden-Sidney College 
University of Texas 
Purdue L'niversity 
University of Maine 
Southwestern University 
Louisiana State University 
University of Indiana . 
Cumberland University 
Swarthmore College 
Randolph Macon College 
Tulane University 
William and Mary Colleg 
Wabash College 
Bowdoin College 
Ohio Stale University . 
Georgia School of Techn 
MiUsaps College . 
Bucknell University 
University of Nebraska 
William Jewell College 
Brown University 
Richmond College 



1873 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1877 



1882 
1883 



1887 
1887 



1890 
1895 
1895 
1895 
1895 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1897 



110 



C^J^.,^^^ 




%8 luO^^ 



->-^iA. 







c^iD)(g©(§(g^[[[[n ,eim!d)[^^ 



^Ctlva (El)aptcrs — (Continued 



BETA DELTA 
BETA GAMMA 
BETA EPSILON ■ 
BETA ZETA 
BETA ETA 
BETA IOTA 
BETA KAPPA 
BETA LAMBDA 
BETA MU 
BETA NU 
BETA XI 
BETA OMICRON 
BETA PI 
BETA RHO 
BETA SIGMA 
BETA TAU 
BETA UPSILON 
BETA PHI 
BETA PSI 
BETA CHI 
BETA OMEGA 
GAMMA ALPHA 
GAMMA BETA 
GAMMA GAMMA 
GAMMA DELTA 
GAMMA ZETA 
GAMMA EPSILON 
GAMMA ETA 
GAMMA THETA 
GAMMA IOTA 
GAMMA KAPPA 
GAMMA LAMBDA 
GAMMA MU 
GAMMA NU 
GAMMA XI 



Washington and Jefferson College 










1898 


Missouri State University 








1898 


University of Wisconsin 










1898 


Leiand Stanford University . 










1898 


Alabama Polytechnic Institute 










1900 


Lehigh University . 










1900 


New Hampshire State College 










1901 


University of Georgia . 










1901 


University of Minnesota 










1901 


University of Kentucky 










1901 


University of California 










1901 


University of Denver . 










1902 


Dickinson College 










1902 


University of Iowa 










1902 


Washington University . 










1902 


Baker University 










1903 


North Carolina Agricultural and ^ 


lechar 


ical 


^olleg 


e 


1903 


Case School of Applied Sciences 










1903 


University of Washington 










1903 


Missouri School of Mines . 










1903 


Colorado College 










1904 


University of Oregon . 










1904 


University of Chicago 










1904 


Colorado School of Mines . 










1904 


Massachusetts Agricultural College 










1904 


New York University . 










1905 


Dartmouth College 










1905 


Harvard University 










1905 


University of Idaho . 










1905 


Syracuse University 










1906 


University of Oklahoma 










1906 


Iowa State College 










1909 


Washington State College 










1909 


Washburn College 










1909 


Denlson College . 










1911 



c^id)(§(§@@^[iq: 



niMio)] 



Boston, Mass. 
New York, N. Y. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
Schenectady, N. Y. 
Scranton, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Danville, Va. 
Lynchburg, Va. 
Newport News, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Washington, D. 
Concord, N. C. 
Durham, N. C. 
Kingston, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Savannah, Ga. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Mobile, Ala. 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Covington, Tenn. 
Jackson, Tenn. 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Nashville, Tenn. 



C. 



c. 






Louisville, Ky. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Columbus, Ohio 
Chicago, 111. 
Danville, 111. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Little Rock, Ark. 
Pine Bluff, Ark. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Jackson, Miss. 
Oklahoma, Okla. 
New Orleans, La. 
Ruston, La. 
Vicksburg, Miss. 
Texarkana, Tex.-Ark. 
Waco, Tex. 
Yazoo City, Miss. 
Denver, Col. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
Los Angeles, Cal. 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Portland, Ore. 
Seattle, Wash. 



Fort Smith, Ark. 



114 



^^^^^^^^^^wsw 



^af>pa Sigma 



Charles Wellington 
Frank A. Waugh 
W. P. B. Lockwood 
William S. Regan 
Herbert J. Baker 



Edward B. Holland 
Rev. J. M. Lent 
George E. Cutler 



"3it IFacuUatc 



Alden Chase Brett 
Lawrence Sanborn Caldwell 
Horace Mitchell Baker 
Jesse Carpenter, Jr. 
Lester Earle Gibson 
Joseph Alvin Harlow 
Royal Norton Hallowell 
Marshall Cotting Pratt 
Ezra Ingram Shaw 
Robert Webster Wales 
Earle Irving Wilde 
Oscar Gustaf Anderson 
Webster Jennings Birdsall 
Benjamin Ward Ellis 
Samuel Percy Huntmgton 



iti i/:rbc 



iCrtdergraiuatcs 



Edward A. White 
James A. Foord 
Leonard S. McLaine 
George F. E. Story 
Frederick A. McLaughlin 



Clement L. Perkins 
David W. Anderson 
Edward A. Larrabee 



Harold Wilson Hyland 
Nils Paul Larsen 
Willard Stone Little 
Quincy Shaw Lowry 
Joseph Wilbur Murray 
Herman Theodore Roehrs 
Stuart Dodds Samson 
Harry Dunlap Brown 
Samuel Reed Damon 
Stuart Brooks Foster 
Ralph Reid Melloon 
Lester Ward Needham 
Harold Curtis Wooley 
Fritz John Bittinger 
Fred Wright Shaylor 



115 



[^(g(S(s@^iinn iiff^B)[^^^^gJ 



oMa Ph^ 



[©©©©(g^^iinn HKi©!^^ 



e»l)eta Jpl)i 



Founded 1908. 



Incorporated 1911. 



I^tt6ergra6uate ^Jllembcrs 



Frederick Huntington Burr 
Raymond Kingsley Clapp 
Frank Orus Fitts 
Arthur French Kingsbury 
Robert Edward Reed 
William Crocker Sanctuary 
Roger Andrew Warner 
Silas Williams 
Winford Frederick Adams 
Harris William Angier 
Lawrence Walter Burby 
Harold Barrows Bursley 
Joseph Boyd Cobb 



Norman Russell Clark 

Robert Sedgwick Fay 

Frederick Alfred Kenney 

John Warren Thomas Lesure 

Arthur Robert Lundgren 

William Stuart Moir 

George Atwell Post 

Evans King Dexter 

Harold Lockwood Eldridge 

David Wyman Gibson 

John Doubleday Pellett 

Nathaniel Kennard Walker 

Edward John Gare 
Richard Craig Taft 



[©©©©(g^nnn nKHe)]^^ 



IKappa (bamma Jpl)l 



120 



^ 



^ 



m 



!^ 1909 ^'' 



'^'^U^uo-oax^^ 



:ie)©(§©@^Enii n^©] 



Hn 'yaculiale. 

A. Anderson Mackimmie 



lCn6ergra&uate 

William Richard Bent 
Daniel Joseph Curran 
Louis Edmond Gelinas 
Frank Leonard Gray 
Hairy Albert Baird 
The mas Joseph Godvin 
William Gerald Griffin 
Bernard Jenkins Kelley 
Chester Arthur Bokelund 
Edward Wheeler Christie 
Mark Anthony Grebin 
Harold Frederick Hadfield 



Members 

Henry Lucius Holland 
Thomas Anthony McGarr 
Alfred Frederick Muller 
George Bernard O'Flynn 
Harold Lyon 
Joseph Augustine Macone 
James Leo O'Brien 
Dennis Anthony Sheehan 
Richard Fowler Leete 
Frederick William Read 
Charles Warren Whippen 
George Edmund Williams 



[©(§(§©(§^[[nn n[P^_MM^ 



Sl^ma ^au iDelta 



JFouixicii jDccember. 1909 



;[5)@(§©(§^nnn r^©!^^ 



Sigma Oqu iDelta 



lCn6crgra6uate ^Hembcrs 

Albert Wesley Dodge Gordon Waterman Ells 

Arthur Nathaniel Raymond Herbert Colby Hutchings 

Harry Willis Allen Burton Adams Harris 

George Ware Barber ■ Herbert Tilden Hatch 

David Story Caldwell Ralph Wesley Howe 

Everett Hanson Cooper George Alfred Mallett 

Ernest Samuel Clark, Jr. Leone Ernest Smith 

Ralph Edward Davis Chester Eaton Wheeler 

Rodney Wells Harris John Govan Wing 

Paul Francis Whorf 



127 



i©(§(§©(§2^i[iin niKiie)!^^ 



^eta IKaffa 4^^l 



,3ft-::i-»<«*** 





:m: 




^6?; 



^^l^yiilw 



:©(§(§ ©(g^^Qiin niKiis)!^^ 



Dfonorary 5ttcntber 

Frederick B. McKay 

TJit IFacuUatz 

Albert Roscoe Jenks 

lCn.be.rQrai>ual(i.s 

Carlos Loring Beals Harry Alfred Noyes 

Warren Francis Fisherdick Emory Sherman Wilbur 

Albert Franklin Edmmster Frank Eugene Marsh 

Wallace Clifford Forbush Charles Marsh Streeter 

Arthur Wmslow Brooks Leslie Howard Norton 

Alfred Lynn Coe Bennett Allen Porter 

William Aashman Davis Arthur Eben Stevens 

Vincent Spaulding Harriman Arthur Searle Thurston 



131 



[[D)(§©(§(§2^nnn niKii^M^ 



^oll of (ri)apters 

University of Maine Chapter 

Pennsylvania State College Chapter 
University of Tennessee Chapter 

Massachusetts Agricultural College Chapter 

Delaware College of Agriculture Chapter 



132 



C^ID(§(§(§(§^[[[in OKIIe)©^ 



lp[)i Ifappa T)fy 



C. E. Gordon 
S. B. Haskell 
R. J. Watts 



Offlc 



President 
Secretary 



K. L. Butterfield 
G. F. Mills 
H. T. Fernald 
J. B. Lindsay 
F. A. Waugh 
S. F. Howard 
C. H. Fernald 
C. Wellington 



3n Jracullalc 

J. B. Paige 
P. B. Hasbrouck 
A. V. Osmun 
W. P. Brooks 
G. E. Stone 
J. E. Ostrander 
C. E. Gordon 
J. A. Foord 



S. B. Haskell 
W. D. Hurd 
F. C. Sears 
A. A. Mackimmie 
J. S. Chamberlain 
R. J. Sprague 
C. A. Peters 
S. R. Parsons 



C. F. Deuel 
H. M. Thomson 



In Krht 
E. H. Lehnert 
E. B. Holland 

O. M. Turner, Miss 



D. Barry 
R. J. Watts 



P. W. Pickaid 



TEUchons Tor 1911 

S. R. Parsons 
E. N. Davis 



A. P. Bursley 




JPraterriltY (Tonference 



Q. B. V. 



T. J. Moreau 



S. M. Jordan 



43bl Sigma '^iappa 

E. N. Boland C. D. Walker 



C. 5. €. 



F. S. Merrii: 



C. H. 



3iappa Sigma 

L. S. Caldwell B. W. Ellis 



R. K. Clapp 



I5l)eta l^bl 



H. B. Bursley 



IKappa (Bamma "pi)l 

A. F. Muller T. J. Godvin 

Sigma t5au "SDelta 

A. N. Raymond E. H. Cooper 

!^eta 'Kappa 131)1 

E. S. Wilbur A. F. Edminster 



136 



ATHLETICS 





^t!)letic (Louitcil 



Prof. Clarence E. Gordon 
Dr. James B. Paige 
George H. Chapman. 
Prof. Edward M. Lewis . 
Prof. Curry S. Hicks 



. President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Auditor 

General Manager 



George H. Chapman 



Charles C. Pearson 
Howard H. Wood 



executive (Tommlttee 

^ Prof. Curry S. Hicks 
I^n6ergraduate Members 

S. Miller Jordan 
140 



Leonard S. McLaine 



Ralph J. Borden 
Rowland T. Beers 




'bearers of tl)e ''yU' 



Thomas A. McGair 
Theodore B. Moreau 
Herman C. Walker 
Harold M. Gore 
Benjamin F. Hubert 
Samuel P. Huntington 
Nils P. Larsen 



Arthur J. Ackerman 
J. Warren Covill 
Leon E. Fagerstrom 
Charles A. Lodge, Jr 
Thomas A. McGarr 
Edward R. Williams 



Raymond K. Clapp 

Arthur J. Ackerman 
Curtis Peckham 
William C. Sanctuary 
Charlesworth H. Brew; 

Alden C. Brett 
J. Morrill Heald 



"Jootball 



baseball 



OracK 

Daniel G. Tower 



Octinis 



James L. O'Brien 
Stuart D. Samson 
Harold W. Brewer 
William V. Hayden 
Bernhard P. Johnson 
Richard H. Powers 
George E. Williams 

Charlesworth H. Brewer 
Frank J. Clegg 
Samuel P. Huntington 
Harold W. Brewer 
Lloyd G. Davies 
Joel P. Sherman 

David S. Caldwel 

John G. Hutchinson 
Dettmar W. Jones 
Lester W. Needham 
Harold C. Wooley 

Dau Yang Lin 
Herman T. Roehrs 




Tootball m 19U 



G 



HE FOOTBALL SEASON of 1911 began with only fair prospects of 
a winning team. The entering class was the largest in the history of the 
college, but seemed to fall short of expectations in its quota of football 
material. It contains some very promising material for future use, but none 
that could be sent in immediately to fill up the weak spots in the Varsity 



In John Hubbard the team has had as good a coach as any college could desire. 
His record is too well known to need repetition. Those who have watched the practice 
from day to day cannot help but feel that he is a master of the game and a good leader. 

The showing of the team in the first game was anything but good, yet early games 
are not always the best ones from which to judge a whole season. The success or 
failure of any season depends in a large measure upon the whole-hearted support of 
the college body. Many a player is made a success or a failure simply by the attitude 
shown towards him by his fellow students. To feel that he has the confidence of his 
fellows adds materially to a man's playing power: so, as a student body, we should 
make every player feel that we are with him ; then, and only then, are we loyal to the 
college ; only then will our teams fight to win. The schedule shows that the team has 
nothing but hard games before it; there are no places for rest until the season is closed 
and football for 1911 is history. It is another case of "work together" where united 
effort can be of great good. 

142 




Varsity J^ootball Oeam 



Left End . 






Hun 


ington. 


' 1 3, Edgerton, ' 1 4, Curran, 


'12 


Left Tackle 






Hayden, 


'14 


Left Guard 










Baker, 


'14 


Center 










Johnson, 


'15 


Right Guard 










(Capt.) Walker, 


•|2 


Right Tackle 










Samson, 


'13 


Right End 










Larsen, 


'13 


Quarter-Back 










Smith, ' 1 4, Gore, 


'13 


Left Half-Back 










Brewer, 


'14 


Right Half-Back 








Moreau, "12, Darling, 


'15 


Full-Back 










Merrill, '12, Hubert, 


'12 



:iD)@©©©^g[in nKi©[^^ 



Herman C. Walker 
Charles C. Pearson 
J. Warren Covill . 
John Hubbard 



TFootball Officers. 19U 



Assistant 



Captain 

Manager 

Manager 

Coach 











Dixilvl^ual Statistics 












Age. 




Height 




Weight. 




Prep. School. 




Walker 




23 




6 ft. 






175 


Marlboro H. S. 




Johnson 




23 




5 ft. 


9 


in. 


159 


Mech. 


Arts H. S. 




Hubert 




25 




5 ft. 


8 


in. 


165 


American Institute 




Hayden 




20 




6 ft. 






190 


Beverly H. S. 




Samson 




20 




6 ft. 


4 


in. 


200 


Burling 


ton (Vt.) H. S. 




Larsen 




21 




5 ft. 


7 


in. 


154 


Bridgef 


ort (Conn.) H. 


S. 


O'Brien 




21 




5 ft. 


11 


in. 


157 


Wayland H. S. 




Huntingtor 




21 




5 ft. 


8 


ni. 


152 


Lynn Eng. H. S. 




Brewer 




21 




5 ft. 


9 


m. 


162 


Mt. Vernon (N. Y.) H 


. s. 


Moreau 




20 




5 ft. 


11 


in. 


171 


Turners 


Falls H. S. 




Jones 




21 




5 ft. 


9 


in. 


152 


Melrose 


H. S. 




Gore 




20 




5 ft. 


6 


in. 


132 


Quincy 


H. S. 




Baker 




20 




5 ft. 


11 


in. 


168 


Quincy 


H. S. 




Edgerton 




20 




5 ft. 


8 


in. 


155 


W. Sp 


ingfield H. S. 




Melecan 




22 




5 ft. 


7 


in. 


139 


Worcester Academy 




Smith 




20 




5 ft. 


8 


in. 


147 


Mech. 


Arts H. S. 




Nissen 




21 




5 ft. 


IVi 


in. 


150 


Mech. 


Alts H. S. 




Lloyd 




20 




5 ft. 


10 


in. 


164 


Stow H. S. 




DarHng 




18 




5 ft. 


8 


in. 


156 


Mendon H. S. 












:aesuits 


of 1911 S<iason 






September 


23 


At 


Amherst 




M 


issachusetts 





R. L State 


5 


September 


30 


At 


H 


mover 




M 


issachusetts 





Dartmouth 


22 


October 


7 


At 


Providence 


M 


issachusetts 





Brown 


26 


October 


14 


At 


Amherst 




M 


issachusetts 


12 


W. P. L 





October 


21 


At 


w 


orceste 


■ 


M 


^issachusetts 





Holy Cross 


6 


October 


28 


At 


Med ford 




M 


assachusetts 





Tufts 


6 


November 


4 


At 


M 


inchester 


M 


issachusetts 


8 


N. H. State 





November 


11 


At 


Hartford 




M 


jssachusetts 


6 


Trinity 


35 


November 


18 


At 


Sp 


ingfield 


M 


issachusetts 


3 


S. T. S. 


12 














145 












^^^( 




ILast Seasoa anb ytdxl 




'S WE look back over the last baseball season we cannot help but feel the 
greatest satisfaction with the results. When Captain Williams first issued 
his call for candidates, the team was very much handicapped for want 
of a coach, and the first few games, though characterized by a splendid 
show of gameness on the part of our team, only served to emphasize the 
seriousness of this handicap. Things took on a different aspect, however, when Coach 
William P. Fitzmaurice was secured for the rest of the season. Immediately the base- 
ball outlook became more cheerful. From the moment he took charge of the team 
it seemed inspired with new life, and the men played with a vim and confidence that 
they had lacked earlier in the season. 

The schedule called for 1 6 games, one of which had to be cancelled because of 
rain. Out of the 1 5 games played, eight were won and one was tied. During May 
and June, while Coach Fitzmaurice was piloting the team, we lost but two games. Per- 
haps our greatest victory was the Commencement game, when we outplayed and 
defeated our Classical friends at the other end of the town by a score of 1 -0. Never 
was a season more successfully closed. 

Prospects for an equally successful team next spring could hardly be brighter. 
Piper, lost by graduation, is the only man missing from the old line-up. With Captain 
Williams again leading the team. Coach Fitzmaurice at his old place on the side-lines, 
and 1915 coming along with an abundance of good material, it surely looks as though 
Old Aggie is going to make the other colleges look well to their laurels when spring 
ushers in baseball again. 

147 








►\ t'', ^ J ..# 









1911 

E. R. Williams 
L. E. Fagerstrom 
R. J. Borden 

W. P. FiTZMAURlCE 



Officers 

Captain 

Manager 

Assistant Manager 

Coach 



1912 

E. R. Williams 

R. J. Borden 

D. W. Jones 

W. P. Fitzmaurice 



Varsity. 1911 



Williams, Sherman, Davies, Pitchers 
Huntmgton, Catcher 
Brewer, C. H., Covill, First Base 
Ackerman, Second Base 



Brewer, H., Shortstop 
Piper, Third Base 
Davies, Williams, Left Field 
McGarr, Center Field 



Sherman, Williams, Rieht Field 



;[D)(g(§(§(§^On EKIIs)! 



April 
12. 
14. 
20. 
22. 
29. 
May 

1. 

3. 
II. 
13. 
19. 
20. 
25. 
27. 
30. 
June 

9. 
17. 



(Barnes 

Brown at Providence 
Tufts at Amherst 
Vermont at Amherst 
Williams at Williamstown 
Dartmouth at Hanover 

Norwich at Amherst 

Springfield Training School at Amherst 

Wesleyan at Middletown 

W. P. I. at Amherst 

Holy Cross at Worcester 

Trinity at Hartford 

Tufts at Medford 

Rhode Island at Kingston 

Springfield Training School at Springfield 

Syracuse at Amherst 
Amherst at Amherst 



M. A. 


C. 


Opponents. 


3 




10 


Rain 




2 




4 


2 




4 


2 




9 


4 




1 


10 




2 


11 




1 


4 




5 


4 




1 


2 




3 


8 




3 


6 







5 




5 ( 1 7innings) 


12 

1 




1 




Percentage, .571 



Total 



76 



49 





awg. 



Review of 19U Season 




HE SEASON of 1910-1911, though it did not bring such brilliant 
results as the previous season, was yet one that we may well be proud 
of, when the many difficulties which confronted the team are considered. 
In the first place, Capt. Dudley was the only veteran not lost by gradua- 
tion. Hardly had the season begun before he was forced to resign his 
position and give up training. This left the team in a crippled condition. Barrows 
was chosen as the new captain and the mer went to work, with the help of L. S. 
Dickinson, '10, as coach, determined to win. Results were surprising. At Provi- 
dence the team scored an easy victory over Rhode Island State, and a few days later 
at Boston defeated W. P. I. for the third time in as many years, in a close and exciting 
race. Manager Piper was very unfortunate in not being able to secure a dual meet 
at home, each of his several attempts being unexpectedly cancelled. 

The outlook for the coming year is very bright, since only two men have been 
lost by graduation. With a schedule including a dual meet and a cross country run 
at Amherst, the track team will have a good opportunity to show itself a credit to 
M. A. C. 



151 




lfartfor6, (Tcnn., :?y.rmorY ^*^<^t IFeb. 21. 19U. 

PASTIME ATHLETIC CLUB OF NEW YORK 

vs. 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Mi: 

Ml 

High 
Po 



Events. 
Relay — 

Run- 
Jump— 
Vault— 



4 sec. 



Winners. Records. 

Pastime A. C. 3 min. 47 s 

Caldwell, M. A. C. 1st I 
Tower, M. A. C, 2nd |' 
Pastime A. C, 1st and 2nd; Huntington, M. A. C, 3rd 
Pastime A. C, 1st and 2nd; Huntington, M. A. C, 3id 
152 



i^iD)@(§@(g2^nnn himidi 



i9io-n 

R. C. Barrows, ' 
R. W. Piper, '1 1 
R. T. Beers, '12 



Officers 

Captain 

Manager 

Assistant Manager 



1911-12 

R. K. Clapp, '12 
R. T. Beers, '12 
E. H. Cooper, '1 3 



Season 1910-U 
Varsity Orack (Scam Varsltj ^claj Oeam 

allows, 'II (Capt.) R. C. Barrows, 'II (Capt.) 



R. C 

G. A. Nielson, 'I I 

R. K. Clapp, '12 

D. S. Caldwell, '13 

D. G. Tower, ' I 2 



R. C. Barrows, 

G. A. Nielson, ' I 1 

R. K. Clapp, '12 

D. S. Caldwell. '13 



Results of t^ela^ traces 

-R. I. State vs. M. A. C. 



Rhode Island A. A. Meet 

Won by M. A. C. Time 

B. A. A. Meet— W. P. I. vs. M. A. C. 

Won by M. A. C. Time 

New Haven Meet — Wesleyan, College of City of N. Y., M. A. C. One-Mile Relay 

Won by Wesleyan, M. A. C. 2nd Time, 3 min. 40 sec. 



One-Mile Relay 
3 min. 55 3-5 sec. 

1560-Yard Relay 
3 min. 14 1-5 sec. 





yCi, Ji, <r. Orack Records 



Event. 
100-Yard Dash 
220-Yard Dash 
440- Yard Dash 

880-Yard Run 

One Mile Run 
120 Yard Hurdles 
220-Yard Hurdles 
High Jump 
Broad Jump 
Pole Vault 
Shot Put 
Hammer Throw 
Discus Throw 



Record. 
10 2-5 sec. 
24 1-5 sec. 
55 1-5 sec. 

2 mm. 9 sec. •. 

4 min. 54 sec. 
1 8 2-5 sec. 
29 2-5 sec. 
5 ft. 7'/2 in. 
20 ft. 6^4 in. 
9 ft. 6/2 in. 
38 ft. 3 m. 
105 ft. 4 in. 
103 ft. 6 m. 



Name. 
G. N. Lew, ' 1 I 
F. C. Warner, '09 
L. S. Dickinson, '10 
R. C. Barrows, 11, 
J. F. Dee. '12 
D. S. Caldwell, '13 
L. C. Claflin, '02 
W. F. Sawyer, 08 

K. E. Gillett, '08 
F. B. Shaw, '96 
J. J. Pillsbury, '13 
S. D. Samson, ' 1 3 
H. P. Crosby, '09 
S. D. Samson, ' 1 3 

154 




n 




!^eview of Season \9\X 



HAST winter's successful hockey season is a very gratifying one, and we 
shall long be proud of the record of the team. M. A. C, with a team 
composed of three veterans and four new men, Vv'on seven out of nine 
games played against the fastest New England college teams. Among 
the victories were those over Williams, Yale, and Amherst. 
Prospects for the coming year are decidedly promising, for Capt. Adams, who was 
graduated last June, is the only man lost from the old team, and there is a wealth of 
excellent material in the Freshman class. With the assistance of a coach, whose services 
we hope to secure, for a time at least, a hockey team should be turned out that will 
place M. A. C. in the front rank among culleges which have taken up this increasingly 
popular winter sport. 

3fock(tj (Barnes 



At Williamstown 


Massachusetts 


6 


Williams 


3 


At Amherst 


Massachusetts 


6 


S. T. S. 


2 


At Hartford, Conn. 


Massachusetts 


6 


Trinity 


2 


At Albany, N. ^•. 


Massachusetts 


13 


R. P. I. 


1 


At Albany, N. ^'. 


Massachusetts 


5 


Louden Field C. 


4 


At Amherst 


Massachusetts 


3 


M. I. T. 


4 


At New Haven, Conn. 


Massachusetts 


4 


Yale 


1 


At Hanover, N. H. 


Massachusetts 





Dartmouth 


4 


At Amherst 


Massachusetts 


1 


Amherst 





Total 


Massachusetts 43 


Opponents 


22 




155 










Officers 



1911 




J. F. Adams 


Captain 


G. P. NlCKERSON 


Manager 


H. H. Wood 


Assistant Manager 



1912 

C. Peckham 
H. H. Wood 
W. S. Little 



Ocam. 1910-19U 

A. J. Ackerman, '12, Coal D. W. Jones, '14, Trover 

J. F. Adams, '11, Point J. G. Hutchinson, ' 1 4, Centre 

L. W. Needham, '14, Cover Point C. Peckham, '12, Right Wing 

H. C. Woolley, '14, Left Wing 







e 



Review of Season 19U 



' XTENSIVE repairs on the Varsity courts gave the tennis team httle chance 
for practice before the opening of the season and the outcome was, there- 
fore, not as successful as that of the year before, when the team finished 
the season without the loss of a game. 

Of the nine matches played this year, six were victories. In addi- 
tion to the regular schedule, a practice match with Williston was held before the season 
opened, in which the team took every game. After two defeats at the hands of Union 
and Rensselaer, the team settled down to work. Springfield Training School went down 
before us and we then lost to Trinity. The remaining games were all victories — Con- 
necticut Aggie, Holy Cross, Vermont, Springfield Training and Holyoke Canoe Club 
being defeated in the order named. 

It is to be hoped that some good material will be found in the Freshman class, for 
the proposed schedule for 1912 includes games with teams representing the strongest New 
England colleges. This will be the fourth year of tennis at M. A. C. and efforts will be 
made to turn out a better team than ever before. 

157 




19U 


Officers 




1912 




L. M. Johnson, M 1 


Capiam 




A. C. Brett, ' 


12 


J. M. Heald. "12 


Manager 




S. M. Jordan. 


, '13 


S. M. Jordan, '13 


Assistant Manager 


C. B. Heath, 


'14 


L. M. Johnson 


19U Odam 




A. C. Brett 




D. Y. Lin 






H. T. Roehrs 




yttatc\)(ts 








April 28 — At Schenectady 


Massachusetts 


1 


Union 


5 


April 29— At Troy 


Massachusetts 


1 


Rensselaer 


5 


May 6 — At Amherst 


Massachusetts 


5 


Springfield 





May 1 1— At Hartford 


Massachusetts 


1 


Trinity 


5 


May 12 — At Storrs 


Massachusetts 


5 


Conn. Aggie 


1 


May 1 3 — At Worcester 


Massachusetts 


5 


Holy Cross 


1 


May 19 — At Amherst 


Massachusetts 


6 


Univ. of Vermont 


1 


May 20 — At Springfield 


Massachusetts 


4 


Springfield 


2 


May 11 — At Smith's Ferry 


Massachusetts 


3 


Holyoke Canoe Club 2 


Total 


Massachusetts 
158 


37 


Opponents 


22 



CLASS 
ATHLEVflCS 




(Toatests Won b^ 1913 

T^rc5l)man V<^<ir 

Results. 
Football 8 — Interclass Track Championship 

Basketball 9—5 

5ofil)omore ^car 

Results. 

Rope-Pull 30 ft. 8 in. Interclass Track Championship 

Baseball 5 — 2 Cross Country Run 

Basketball I 7—5 




Score: 1913—8; 1912—0. 




1913—9; 1912—5. 
160 



!iD)(§(g©@2^iimi nff^iD)!^^ 



EXPECTS EASY GAME WILLISTONONE 

TALLY IN REAR 



Williston to meet M. A. C. 
This afternoon. 



Colts 



EASTHAMPTON, April 29— The Am- 
herst Agrfjie freshmen and Williston Seminary 
game will be the baseball altiaction on Sawyer 
field tomorrow afternoon. The local students 
look for an easy victory and Coach Wright will 
use either Karrman or Nichols in the box. 
Winkler will be saved for next week, as the 
Gold and Blue has two stiff contests, namely 
Holy Cross Preps, on Thursday, and Dart- 
mouth 1913, on Saturday. 



Easthampton Prep School 

Strikes Snag in M. A. 

C. Freshmen. 




Sopbomore !^opc pul[ Ocam 
Won by 1913. 30 ft. 8 in. 



161 




Sophomore basketball Oeam 

Scoi-e: 1913—1 7; 1914—5. 




*-w 



Sopljomore t^aseball Ocam 

Score: 1913—5; 1914—2. 




Inlerclass OracK (ri)ampionsl)ip Oropl)^ 

Awarded annually to the class winning the largest total number of points in the 
interclass meets during the year. To become the property of the class winnmg it three 
successive years. 

Won by 1913 m 1909-10, 1910-11. 

Point totals for year of 1910-1 1 : 191 1. 8; 1912, 63; 1913, 102; 1914, 38. 




Sophomore Orack Ocam 

163 




.^±.^*^^^. _ ^^4iMmimMA 



Mm^t >ji_t»U., 




V. m, (T. ^, 



Francis S. Madison, 1912 
George A. Post, 1913 
Lester N. Pease, 1913 . 
John W. T. Lesure, 1913 
William A. Davis, 1914 . 
Pres. Kenyon L. Butterfield 
Robert W. Wales, 1912 
Edwin B. Young, 1912 
Harry A. Noyes, 1912 
Frederick D. Griggs, 1913 
Glover E. Howe, 1913 . 
George A. Post, 1913 . 
Nils P. Larsen, 1913 
Joseph B. Cobb, 1913 
William C. Sanctuary, 1912 
Herbert E. Cole, 1914 . 



Bibl, 



. President 

Vice-President 

. Treasurer 

Recording Secretary 

Corresponding Secretary 

Advisory Committee 

and Mission Study Committee 

New Student Committee 

Devotional Committee 

Membership Committee 

Handbook Committee 

Social Committee 

Northfield Committee 

Music Committee 

Deputation Committee 

. Librarian 



166 



G^[e)(§©(§©^[I[in IIKIlD)!:^^ 



Ol)e ^, ^, d, iDramallc Society? 

ONE evening in January, 1910, a small group of students, having at heart 
the interests of the college, met in the chapel for the purpose of forming 
a college dramatic club. Previous to this time, dramatic productions had 
been class affairs, and did not represent the whole college. Consequently, 
in order to attam the standard of other activities, it became imperative 
that a dramatic club representative of the college be organized. 

During the following spring, a constitution was drawn up and the club given the 
name of the Massachusetts Agricultural College Dramatic Society. No action concern- 
ing the production of a play was taken until the opening of the next college year, when 
it was decided to present the three-act farcical ccmedy. The Privale Secretary. A suit- 
able cast was selected and rehearsals were begun. The society was very fortunate in 
securing the assistance of Mr. and Mrs. James K. Mills as directors, and the subsequent 
success of the play was due largely to their untiring efforts. Three productions were given 
during the year, the Amherst performance being of a character which would do credit 
to any organization of a like nature. At the close of the season it was decided to present 
a gold medal watch fob to each member of The Private Secrelary cast and of all 
future casts. 

The play selected for the coming year is George Broadhurst's comedy. What 
Happened to Jones. The call for candidates was responded to by some thirty-five or 
forty men and, as a result of this number, an exceptionally good cast is expected to be 
lorthcoming. It is intended that the production schedule shall include a trip through 
New Jersey and southern New York State, one through northern New England and 
short trips to various near-by towns, including Northampton. 

Dramatics are now well established at M. A. C, and it remains with the college 
authorities and undergraduates to support the organization. The chief ambition of the 
present management is to make the club a permanent success and a credit to "OLD 
MASSACHUSETTS." 




Offlc 



W. J. BlRDSALL, '13 

S. M. Jordan, '13 . 
G. W. Simmons, '14 
E. B. Young, '12 . 
George Zabriskie, 2nd, '13 
R. H. Van Zwaluwenburg, '13 
H. F. Jones, '13 
J. P. Palmer, '14 . 



1912 
Jesse Carpenter, 
F. B. Hills 
E. I. 'Wilde 
E. B. Young 



Jr. 





Mlcmbcrs 








1913 




o. 


G. 


Anderson 




F. 


D. 


Griggs 




H. 


W 


Hyland 




H 


F. 


Jones 




S. 


M. 


Jordan 




w 


S. 


Mon- 




R. 


H. 


Van Zwal 


uvvenbur 


George 


Zabriskie, 


2nd 






169 





President 
Vice-President 
. Secretary 
. Treasurer 
Business Manager 
Advertising Manager 
Assistant Business Manager 
Assistant Advertising Manager 

1914 
J. P. Palmer 

F. W. Read 

G. W. Simmons 




**Ot)e jprlvaU Secretary 



A Farcical Comedv 



in Three Acts. By CHARLES HaWTRY. 

AS PRESENTED BY THE 



yU. ^. (T. i)ramatlc Society 

AT 

^ttontaguc, ~2>ec. 9. Ambcrst. "Jeb. 16. Warn. ^Aprll U 

Cbaractsrs in Orier of "^fpearancc 



Douglas Calterinole .... 
Mrs. Sfeati (his landlady) . 

Mr. 5pJnej) Gibson (tailor of Bond St.) 

Harry Marsland .... 

/^ev. Robert Spaulding (the Private Secretary) 

Mr. Catfermole (Douglas's uncle) . 

Knox (a writ server) . 

Miss Ashford (the Marsland governess) 

Mr. Marsland (Harry's uncle) 

Edith Marsland (daughter of Marsland) 

Eva Webster (her friend and companion) 

John (a footman) 



A. H. Sharpe, ' I I 

R. C. Robmson, '1 1 

^G. W. Simmons, '"4 

/E. A. Larrabee, '11 

^J. E. Dudley, Jr., 'II 

} R. H. Van Zwaluwenburg, ' 1 3 

S. M. Jordan, '13 

George Zabriskie, 2nd, ' I 3 

F. W. Read, '14 

F. B. Hills, '12 

W. S. Moir, '13 

H. E. Goodnough, 13 

E. I. Wilde, '12 

. G. p. Nickerson, 'I I 



Staged under the direction of Mr. James K. Mills, '77, and Mrs. J. K. Mi 

170 






T.^ 







^ifk I3eam, Season \9\X 

VJ^^^^ HE Rifle Team of the past season upheld the reputation for good rifle shoot- 
^ ^^\ ing which M. A. C. has gained. A. H. Sharpe, '11, was captain, 
K I and several of the men were veterans of the previous year's success- 

^^^^^^^ ful team. Sergeant Wahlstrom, one of the best rifle shots in the army, 
was assigned as coach, and to him was due much of the steadiness and 
excellence of the team's records. 

The season began in the second week of January with the matches of the Inter- 
collegiate Indoor Rifle Shooting League. Sixteen State Colleges and Universities com- 
peted. M. A. C. won second place with a record of fourteen victories and one defeat, 
one Match being lost to Iowa, the winner of the series. During these matches our team 
made a new intercollegiate indoor record of 1,915 out of a possible 2,000; and Cap- 
tain Sharpe made a new individual record, 197 out of a possible 200. On May 2nd, 
the team repeated the achievement of the year before, and won the Intercollegiate Indoor 



173 



;i2)(§©©(§^iiiin niM©!^^ 



Championship Shoot. Our score of 1897 was ample to beat the Iowa team, which took 
second place. The team also won the Intercollegiate Outdoor Championship, shooting 
at the Bay State Range in Wakefield on June 1 5th. In this match, Stevenson, by 
making a perfect score, broke the intercollegiate individual record of 49 for the 500- 
yard range, held by Captain Sharpe. 

Although we have lost Sharpe and four other members of the team by graduation, 
still the prospects for a winning team this season are good. The captain of the team 
this year is E. R. Lloyd, 12, who has made good on both indoor and outdoor teams 
for two years. Five of last year's team — Wilde and Raymond, '12, Edminster and 
McDougall, 13, and Murray, '14, are eligible again this year, and the college may 
be certain of a having a good coach assigned from the regular army. 




174 




Officers 



Allister F. McDougall, 
Albert F. Edminster, '13 
Gordon W. Ells, '13 
John W. T. Lesure, '13 . 
Edward R. Lloyd, '12 
■Arthur N. Raymond, *12 



President 

Vice-President 

. Secretary 

. Treasurer 

. Captain 

Range Captain 



lFn6oor ^ifle Oeam 

Winners ol Indoor Intercollegiate Championship. 



A. H. Sharpe, '1 1 
P. A. Racicot, '1 I 
F. A. McLaughlin, 'I 
H. J. Baker, 'I 1 
L. O. Stevenson, ' 1 I 



E. R. Lloyd, '12 
E. I. Wilde, '12 

A. F. McDougall, '13 
A. F. Edminster, ' I 3 
J. K. Murray, '14 



Outdoor ^ifU ^eam 

Winners of Outdoor Intercollegiate Championship. 
A. H. Sharpe, '11 P. A. Racicot, '11 

F. A. McLaughlm, 'II E. R. Lloyd, '12 

L. O. Stevenson, 'II A. F. Edminster, ' I 3 

175 




RATORY 



iDramatic !^ea6lit3 (Lontest 

collegp: chapel 

'We.bne.sba'^. 3anuary 25. 1911 
"program 

College Orchestra P. A. Racicot, Leader 



Music 

1. Quarrel Scene from "Julius Caesar" 

2. "The Polish Boy," by Slephem, 

3. "The Unknown Rider," by L'lppard 

4. "The Soul of the Violin," by Merrill, 

5. The Galley Scene from "Ben Hur" 

from 



Alternate — "Wolsey's Farevvel 
Music — College Orchestra. 



First — Horace M. Baker 
Second — Frederick D. Griggs 



W. Young Chun 

Louis F. Guild 

Horace M. Baker 

Frederick W. Reed 

Frederick D. Griggs 

'Henry VIH" 

Ralph C. Blake 



'Winners 




HORACE M. BAKER 



[]D)(g©@@2^[inn QiKiiD)!^^ 



Second ^naual iDebaU 

COLLEGE CHAPEL 
^ibniisba'2. ^Sttarcb 8. 1911 

Question 
Resolved — That the Republican Paity is entitled to popular support. 
Speakers 



Affirmative 
Irwin C. Gilgore 
Theodore J. Moreau 
Thomas Hemenway 

Bernard Ostrolenk 

First 
Second 
Third 
Fourth 



-A.lternatcs 
"dinners 



Negative 
J. Dudley French 
Thomas J. Godvin 
J. Morrill Heald 

Lawrence W. Burby 

Irwin C. Gilgore 

Theodore J. Moreau 

Thomas J. Godvin 

J. Dudley French 



^Incteentl) Annual fiinl Oratorical (Tontest 



COLLEC^iE CHAP1;L 
■^eincs^aj. "I^pril 26. 1911 



College Orchestra, 

International Peace, 

The College Man's Ideals, 

The Larger Freedom of the Negro 

New Forces m Old China, 



First — Benjamin F. Hubert. 



"program 

F. A. Racicot, Leadei 

Lewis W. Gaskill 

Horace M. Baker 

Benjam n F. Hubert 

W. Young Chun 

Winners 

Second — Horace M. Baker. 

177 




BENJ. F.HUBERT 



:]D)(§(g(§(g^[[[[n niKirB)] 



Ol)irt^-nintl) Annual 
^ural)am Reclamation (Eontest 



COLLEGE CHAPEL 
^c6ncs6ar. Mtay 24. 1911 



43ro3ram 

Wednesday, May 24, 1911 
Music ; College Orchestra. 
"The Commonwealth of Massachusetts" 

Leland H. Taylor 
"The Southern Negro" . 

N. Paul Larsen. 
"Reply to Mr. Corry" . 

Frederick W. Read. 
"The War with America" 
W. Stuart Moir. 
"The Soldier Boy" 

Newton H. Dearing. 
"Daniel Webster" 

Stanley B. Freeborn 
"A Plea for Cuba" 

Harold W. Hyland. 
"The New South" 

Harold W. Brewer. 
Music; College Orchestra 



Win 



First 

Second 

Honorable Mention 



P. A. Racicot, Leader 
. Wm. E. Russell 

Henry W . Gradp 

Henry Crallan 

Lord Chatham 

. John D. Long 

George Frisbie Hoar 

John M. Thurston 

Hertrv IV. Gradv 



Frederick W. Read 
Harold W. Brewer 
Leland H. Taylor 





m 


^H 


^H 




, .1 


T^^^H^I 


^H 




1 i 


^^^^r^'^mpN^ 


^1 




li 




^^1 




u 


^^'"^"^ 


F' ^^^^^^H 




Mi 


^H 


JHH 



iDebating 



V^^^^^^ HE SEOND annual debate last spring began a season of greater activity 
M C^\ '" '^'^ form of public speaking than has ever before been apparent at M. 
^k J A. C. The contest was well fought and highly creditable to the partici- 

^^^^^ pants. More good work followed when Bernard Ostrolenk, 11, and 
Thomas Hemenway, 12, representing the Debating Club, defeated Rhode 
Island State College in a debate on the restriction of immigration. On May 19, 1911, 
the college Debating Team, composed of Irwin C. Gilgore, 11, Theodore J. Moreau, 
'12, and J. Dudley French, '13, won the unanimous decision over Bates College, at 
Lewrston. They defended the affirmative of the proposition, "Resolved That the 
Federal Government should levy a graduated income tax." 



179 



r~ 




^Jtlettawampe 



Offi 



fleers 

F. C. Kenney ...... ....... President 

C. R. Green Vice-PresidenI 

C. K. Duncan .......... Secretary and Treasurer 

A. V. OsMUN ......... Chairman Executive Committee 

IKdab OreK !Jttastcr 

A. V. Osmun 



Assistant I3rcK 5ttasters 



S. B. He 


skel 




A. 


A. Mackimmie 






I3reKs for 1911-12 


October 


5 


Mt. Lincoln 


October 


12 


Market H)li, Camp Fire .... 


October 


28 


Holland Glen and Merrick Woods 


November 


4 


Bay Road Fruit Farm, Camp Fire 


November 


11 


Hatfield Ferry and Williamsburg . 


November 


18 


Springfield Training School . 


November 


25 


Norwottock 


December 


2 


Faculty, Camp "Pinus Strobus" . 


December 


9 


Ml. Toby, South Trail .... 


December 


16 


Montague over Mt. Toby .... 


1912 






January 


6 


Rattle Snake Gutter 


January 


13 


Skating Party 


January 


20 


Skeeing Party 


January 


27 


Snow Shoeing Party 


February 


10 


Orient Springs and Mt. Orient . 


February 


22 


Lock's Pond, Ladies' Night, Dinner , ' . 


March 


2 


Mt. Warner 


March 


16 


Sugar Party 






April 


12 


Holyoke Range . 






April 


19 


Whately Glen . 






May 


4 


Sugar Loaf Range 






May 


18 


Horse Mountain . 






May 


30 


Mt. Ascutney 







ns. Si 



C. S. Hick) 



Jos. H. Merrill 

H. D. Haskins 

P. H, Smith 

F. A. Waugh 

F. F. Moon 



C. S. Hicks 

A. V. Osmun 

C. R. Green 

C. Peckham, '12 

J. H. Merrill 

F. B. Jenks 

J. A. McLean 

mith and Merrill 

G. F. Story 

W. R. Hart 

S. Chamberlain 

C. R. Duncan 

R. J. Walts 

C. S. Hicks 

K. L. Butlerfield 




Stock ^u^ging Oeam 



Francis S. Madison Roger A. Warner William J. Weaver 

Second place in the N. E. F. A. S. Intercollegiate Contest. 

Brockton Fair. Oct. 5, 1911. 



181 



[©©©©(g^on nKiiD)!^^ 



Stockbri69e (Tlub 



W. J. Wean'er 
R. A. Warner 
E. S. Wilbur 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



"TExccutlve (Tommlttcc 



J. A. Foord 
F. A. Waugh 



F. S. Madison 
E. N. Boland 



R. K. Clapp 



Entomological Journal (Tlub 



Dr. H. T. Fernald 
S. S. Grossman 
F. L. Thomas 
A. I. Bourne 
Dr. E. N. Gates 
L. S. McLaine 



R. H. Allen 
M. T. Smulyan 
E. J. Thompson 
Dr. G. C. Crampton 
W. S. Regan 
!- H. Merrill 



L. R. Hourdequm 



Jay M. Heald 
J. Dudley French 
Herbert A. Brown 
Roger A. Warner 
Herbert A. Brown 
Thomas Hemenway 



"Debating (Tlub 



President 
Vice-President 
. Secretary 
Treasurer 
Credit Secretary 
Representative to Public Speakmg Council 



182 




!^ew Herse^ (Tlub of ^, A. (T. 



G. Zabriskie. 2nd . 

R. H. Van Zwaluwenburg 

S. M. Jordan . 



Prof. P. B. Hasbiouck 
Prof. A. V. Osmun 
Prof. C. R. Duncan 
J. A. Hyslop, '08 
R. P. Armstrong, '10 



Organized 1910 
Officers 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasure! 



(Tbartcr Mlcntbcrs 

N. H. Hill. '11 

L. O. Stevenson, ' I I 
H. G. Cory, *I3 
S. M. Jordan, "13 
R. H. Van Zwaluwenburg, 
G. Zabriskie, 2nd, 13 

(Tommcncemetit !^anquet 

The Draper, June 12, 1911 
183 




< H 3 




Clyde M. Packard 
Harris W. Angier 



3n6ex ^oar6 



Editor-in-Chief 
Assistant Editor 



-Associate Ciltors 

Reyer H. Van Zwaluwenburg J. Dudley French 

S. Miller Jordan George Zabriskie, 2nd 



C. Herbert Brewer 
Frederick D. Griggs 
Clarence D. Roberts 
Oscar G. Anderson 
Ralph J. Borden 



Art Editor 

Artist 

Artist 

Business Manager 

Assistant Business Manager 



li it 1 If 





(TolUge Signal 



!8>oar6 of TEiltors 

Alden C. Brett, 1912 

R. H. Van Zvvaluvvenburg, 1913 

Jesse Carpenter, Jr., 1912 

Marshall C. Pratt, 1912 

Royal N. Hallowell, 1912 

Joseph A. Harlow, 1912 

Silas Williams, 1912 . 

Oscar G. Anderson, 1913 

S. Miller Jordan, 1913 



Editor-in-Chief 

Assistant Editor 

Managing Editor 

Competition Editor 

. Athletics 

. Athletics 

Department Notes 

Alumni Notes 

College Notes 



business i^cpartmcnt 



Albert W. Dodge, 1912 . 
George Zabriskie, 2nd, 1913 
Ernest S. Clark, Jr., 1914 . 
Chester E. Wheeler, 1914 . 
Stuart B. Foster, 1914 



Business Manager 

Assistant Business Manager 

Circulation 

Circulation 

Circulation 



187 



sica: 





First Tenon 
W. Hasey, 13 
R. R. Melloon, 
Campbell, '15 
Kaulbach, ' 1 3 
H. B. Mahan, '15 



Second Tenors 



First Bass 



iJ Bo 



14 



L. E. Gelinas, '12 J. B. Cobb, '13 G. Ells, '13 

F. B. Hills, '12 F. D. Griggs, '13 D. W. Gibson, '14 

J. D. French, '13 G. Zabriskie, '13 G. H. Cale, '15 

L. N. Pease, '13 W.H.'W.Komp, '15R. E. Tower, '15 

H. G. Little, '15 A. J. Towne, '15 P. F. 'Whitmore,' I f 



First Mandolins 
S. M. Jordan, '13 (Leader) 
A. Johnson, ' 1 5 
H. B. Mahan, '15 
H. B. White, '15 



^aadolm (Tlub 

Second Mandolins 
H. D. Brown. ' I 4 
F. E. Allen, ' I 5 
R. B. Grirgs, '15 



J. D. French, "13, Violin 
T. A. Nicolet, '14, 'Cello 
J. G. Hutchinson, '14, Piano 




THE QUARTETTE. 




§TK 




J. D. French, '13 








Violin 


R. S. Bragg, '14 








Violin 


J. I. Bennett, '15 








Violin 


H. M. Rogers, '15 . 








Violin 


R. E. Tower, '15 








Violin 


T. A. Nicolet, '14 . 








Violoncello 


H. H. Jenney, '14 . 








Clarinet 


W. H. W. Komp, '15 








Flute 


J. L. Selden. '13 








Cornet 


M. G. Tarbeli, '14 . 








Cornet 


L. P. Howard, '14 . 






Trombone 


F. D. Griggs, '13 






Drums and Traps 


J. G. Hutchinson, '14, Leade 


r 






Piano 





(Tlark (LaM ^anb 



F. L. Gray, First Lieutenant and Leader 

S. P. Huntington, Sergeant and Chief Mu- 
sician 

F. D. Griggs, Sergeant and Principal Mu- 
sician 

L. F. Drury, Sergeant and Drum Major 

A. F. MacDougall, Sergeant 



H. W. Hyland, Sergeant 
J. L. Selden, Sergeant 
J. G. Hutchinson, Corporal 
W. A. Davis, Corporal 
M. D. Lincoln, Corporal 
L. P. Howard, Corporal 
M. G. Tarbeli, Corporal 



E. E. H. Boyer 
S. L. Friedman 
L. W. Burby 
I. Coleman 
W. C. Forbush 



R. W. Harper 
H. H. Jenney 
J. A. Macone 
T. J. Kennedy 
H. J. Morse 
P. O. Petersen 



G. A. Post 
L. N. Pease 
F. W. Read 
A. J. Tonry 
C. A. Shute 



193 











i^--» *?3 .X. *■ >-^ 















TML 




;©©(§©(§^[[[in niKiiD)©^ 



3unior 4^romena6(i 



February 17, 191 



(Tommlttee 

Alden C. Brett, Chairman 



Prof. C. E. Gordc 
J. Carpenter, Jr. 
J. A. Harlow 
H. C. Walker 



Mr. A. A. Mackimmie 

F. B. Hills J. M. Heald 

R. T. Beers S. Williams 

J. E. Pierpont W. R. Bent 



Mrs. Butterfield 
Mrs. Gordon 
Mrs. Mackimmie 



4!'atroncsscs 



Mrs. Carpenter 



Mrs. Martin 
Mrs. Osmun 
Mrs. Duncan 





G. Zabriskie, 2nd 
O. G. Anderson 

Prof. A. V. Osmun 
E. A. Larrabee 



Sopl)omore Senior Hfof 

June 20, 191 1 
(Tommittce 

Herman T. Roelirs, Chairman 
S. M. Jordan 
B. A. Harris 



N. R. Clark 
C. A. Shute 



Mrs. A. V. Osmun 
Mrs. J. A. McLean 
Mrs. Chas. Wellington 



Prof. J. A. McLean 
R. C. Robinson 
patronesses 

Mrs. K. L. Bulterfield 
Mrs. E. A. White 
Mrs. W. D. Hurd 
Mrs. J. S. Chamberlain 





DAMOUETcS 

^res^man !!^anquet, 1913 

WARREN HOTEL, WORCESTER 

"Happiness for man — the bungr\) sinner — 

Since Eve ate apples, must depend on dinner." — Bwon. 



Bread Sticks 
Olives 

Mashed Potatoes 
Ice Cream 

Cafe 



Puree of New Tomatoes 

Hors D'Oeuvres 

Salted Nuts 

Boiled Fresh Caught Codfish 

Hollandaise Sauce 

Potatoes a la M. A. C. 

Roast Young Vermont Turkey 

Celery and Cucumber Salad 

Roquefort and American Cheese 
Toasted Crackers 



French Rolls 
Radishes 

Asparagus Tips 
Assorted Cake 

Cigars 




Coasts 



Willard S. Little, Toastmaster 

"No man can lame his tongue." — Barclay. 

Old Mass'chusetts ....... Frederick D. Griggs 

"A health to the college We all love best." — S. Neal. 
Some of Our Prolessors ...... Glover E. Howe 

"Full well iheXj laughed with counterfeited glee 
At all his jol(es, for manv a jol(e had he." — Goldsmith. 
Hash House Grub ....... Warren S. Baker 

"The chidden liked me not, I guess. 

It staved with me two hours or less." — W. Shakespeare. 

1913 Herman T. Roehrs 

"/( i.s success that colours all in life." — Thompson. 
The Future ........ Oscar G. Anderson 

"For who can tell what lies in store for this most glorious class." — Longfellow. 
"'lis hitter now to rend the heart 
With the sad words that we must part." — Benjamin. 

(Tommlttce 

Harold E. Jenks Burton A. Harris 

Reyer H. Van Zwaluwenburg 




^V^ilh^-i.^h', f Aa ^*f%« ?t'-^^'^'^^dd^i^>;\S&!)^f^^f^'!'}mw^^ 



Officers of tl)e (Tlark (La6et ^e^iment 

TFiel6 Staff 



Marshall C. Pratt 
Henry L. Holland 
Francis S. Madison 



Colonel 

Captain and Quartermaster 

. Captain and Adjutant 



Officers of JF^irst !&attallon Officers of Sccoit6 tSattallon 

Eric N. Boland, Major Benjamin G. Southwick, Major 

Herman C. Walker, Captain Company A. Thomas L. Hemenway, Capt. Company D 

Earl I. Wilde, Captain Company B. Herbert J. Stack, Captain Company E 

John E. Pierpont, Captain Company C. Louis E, Gclinas, Captain Company F 





(Tommencement 19U 

Sun6ai?, 'Sum 18 

Baccalaureate Address President Kenyon L. Butterfield 

5lloix5ai?, "Suite 19 

Commencement Drills and Parade 
Class Sing 

Ouesda^, "Sune 20 

Alumni Day 

Senior Class Day Exercises 

Sophomore-Senior Hop 



'Wednesday. '3\xn& 21 

Commencement Exercises 

Address by Eugene Davenport. Dejn of College of Agriculture, University of 
Illinois. 




To members of the Senior Class who passed the best, second best, and thirci 
best examinations, oral and wnlten, in theoretical and practical agricultuic. 

First Prize, $25, Herman Alfred Pauly 
Second Prize, $15, Robert Delano Lull 
Third Prize, $10^ Nathaniel Herbert Hill 

"Jlint "prizes 

To members of the Senior and Junior Classes delivering the best and second 
best oration. 

First Prize, $20, Benjamin F. Hubert 
Second Prize, $15, Horace M. Baker 
Honorable Mention, W. \ oung Chun 

!!6urnl)ain "Prizes 

To Freshmen and Sophomores for excellence in declamation. 

First Prize, $15, Frederick W. Read 
Second Prize, $10, Harold W. Brewer 
Honorable Mention, Leiand H. Taylor 



203 



iE)(§(§©(§^[inn nff^iDi^^ 



J'orestr^ prize. 

Given by the Bay State Agricultural Society as the J. W. D. French Prize 
for the best essay on arboriculture. 

(Bcncral Umprovcment Iprize. 

Given to that member of the Sophomore Class who, during his first two years 
in college, has shown the greatest improvement in scholarship, character and 



example, $25. 



rded to Nils Paul Larsen. 



IflU's !^otanlcal prizes 

For the best herbarmm, $15. 

(Not awarded in 1911.) 

For the best collection of Massachusetts trees and shrubs, $10. 
(Not awarded in 1911.) 

For the best collection of Massachusetts woods, $10. 
(Not awarded in 1911.) 

For the best herbarium submitted by a member of the Sophomore Class, $5. 
Lewis Floyd Drury. 



Military Hfonors . 

The following Cadet Officers were reported to the Adjutant General of the 
United States Army, and to the Adjutant General of the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts as being efficient in Military Science and Tactics, the first five graduating as honor 
men in the Military Department, and the ne.xt five as distmguished graduates in the 
Department : 



Kfcnor (5ra6uatcs 
Cadet Colonel Samuel Raynolds Parsons 
Cadet Major AUyn Parker Bursley 
Cadet Major Harold Francis Willard 
Cadet Captain Arthur Harris Sharpe 
Cadet Captain Percy William Pickard 



i!)lstlngulsl)e6 <&ra6uatcs 
Cadet Captain Irwin Craig Gilgore 
Cadet Captam Edward Arthur Lanabee 
Cadet Capt. Frederick Adams McLaughlin 
Cadet Captain Herbert Jonathan Baker 
Cadet 1 st Lieut. Phileas Armand Racicot 




'^Awarde^ In 3unc. 1911 




Marshall Cotting Pratt — Gold medal for highest 
military standing in Junior class from date of 
entrance to end of Junior ^'ear. 

James Dudley French — Gold medal for highest 
military standing in Sophomore class from date 
of entrance to end of Sophomore year. 

Stanley Barron Freeborn — Silver medal for highest 
military standing in Freshman class. 

For Individual Prize Drill 

Color Sergeant Herman C. Walker, first prize, 

Gold Medal. 
Corporal Ralph 1 . Neal, second prize. Silver 

Medal. 
Private Herbert A. Brown, third prize. Bronze 

Medal. 
Company F, prize company, to carry regimental 

flag during ensuing college year. 
Arthur H. Sharpe, Captain of Company F, the 

company winning the prize drill, awarded a 

gold-mounted sabre. 



Won by Class of 1!I1:! in llHO and 1011 



203 




"Junior JOa'^ (EeUbratloa 

1913 Presents the Greatest of all Pageants, 
" Ol)e (Toronatlon" 

Participants — The Entire Junior Class. 




King George, Bernard J. Kelley 

Queen Mary, Ralph C. Blake 

Prince of Whales, Stuart D. Samson 

Archbishop of Canterbury, Geo. Zabriskie, 2nd 
Archbishop of York Robert S. Fay 

Bishop of London, Joseph A. Macone 

Court jesters, crown bearers, messengers, 
heralds, envoys, ladies and gentlemen-in-waiting, 
body guards, coachmen, army and navy, and 
attendants to special envoys. 

Scene. — The Chapel Steps and South Col- 
lege Tower. 

Time. — October eleventh, nineteen hundred 
and eleven. 

Service conducted by the Archbishop of 
Canterbury. 



208 



;is)(§©©©^[[[[n n^iis)!^^ 



Ol)e (Toronatlon (TeremottY 

Services (Toriiucteii bj tlje TA.rcl)blsbop of (Tanterburj 

"George of England, we by the grace of 'Chain Lightning' and John Canavan, 
do hereby crown you supreme ruler and monarch of England, Ireland, Scotland, 
Whales, Australia, Canada, South Hadley and Pelham. We tender unto you all 
powers and responsibilities thereof. We trust that your reign may in the future remain 
uninterrupted by Billy the Czar, and that ye rule in affluence and sobriety. May 
many offspring smile upon the royal household to perpetuate through future centuries in 
dignity and notoriety the untrammeled name of the 'House of Bernard.' " 
(The Archbishop of Canterbury crowns George V.) 

"Mary, most esteemed spouse of George of England, Ireland, Scotland, Whales, 
Australia, India, Canada, South Hadley and Pelham, we bequeath to you as the better 
half of His Most Royal Highness of Ireland, etc., the share becoming a royal spouse. 
May your hand guide that of 'hubby' in the paths of morality, veracity and South 
Boston." 
(Archbishop crowns Mary and presents George with the sceptre.) 

"Arise, most royal and unsophisticated sovereigns. Survey your bountiful realms 
of alfalfa and Bull Durham. Gaze upon your numerous subjects for matrimony, 
monopoly and monogamy." 

(The King presents the Prince of Whales to the people from the Tower of London 
while the address of welcome is read by the Archbishop of Canterbury.) 

''Hear ye. People, hear ye! 

To all inhabitants of the empire — behold 
I Albert Edward Samuel, Prince of Whales and 
Suzerian of South Amherst; also selectmen of 
Grand Isle. Albert Sam, look carefully upon 
your lieges; look and tremble! Throughout the 
whole domain there is no such aggregation of 
side-door pullman artists. Ye foreign powers, 
'^'^^SLutr ^^n^ ^Hflf ''lAS including Dick, we greet you in the name of the 

kmg, queen and other members of the nursery. 
Look ye upon this promising prodigy and recog- 
nize the fact that in him you see a pocket edi- 
tion of potential energy, which eventually will 
dominate Europe. 

Prince, behold your subjects; subjects, wor- 
ship your Prince." 
210 




R;aE)(§(§©(g^n[[n n^©]:^^ 



Society for tl)e ^^romotlon of (TrueltY to ^usic 



^7RY\TH1S^ 




ON 
YOUR PIANO 



Head Butcher — C. Dexter Walker. 

Able Assistant Butcher — Deacon Drury. 

Rank and Vile* — The Wednesday Evening Music Class. 

The Band. 

The Glee Club (sometimes). 
Annual Winter Massacre — January, 1912. 
All horror specialists must be in the ring when the bell sounds. 

All participants must sing different songs at the same time in their loudest voices. 
This last condition will be msisted upon. Try to drown out your neighbor. 
The following confections must be rendered ensemble by the contestants. 

1 . Bubbling Thru a Tonic in the Good Old College Store. 

2. The Tinkling Mandolinists or The Club That Seldom Plays. 

3. Splashing in the Frog-pond, 'neath the Smiling Harvest Moon. 

4. Dickie, I Have Lost my Love — Quick, Another Stein. 

In the resulting riot the Lost Chord will possibly be re-discovered. 

(Janitor, the dustpan.) 
*In answer to objections to this cheap one we would say: "What do you want 
for $1.75?" 



211 



:is)©(§©©^nQn mM©!^^ 



Un tl)e Ufasl) Ufouse 




BAKING THE BEANS 



If you find a cockroach in your nourishment do 
not depress the spirits of those present by mashing 
him with a rock-bound doughnut. Introduce him 
unostentatiously into your neighbor's pocket or 
quietly flip him at the head-waiter. 

If the Sunday ice-cream contains Grape-nuts 
do not complain bitterly but instead try a second 
dish in an endeavor to learn to like it. 

When you strike an obdurate piece of steak do 
not cripple your neighbor's appetite by dropping 
some remark about "door-hinges." Quietly take 
out a sharp pocket knife, cut the subject into 
pieces the size of dice and swallow whole. 

When corn is served on the cob in lengths of 
over a foot it should be broken and eaten in sec- 
tions. This will avoid the unpleasant necessity of 
mussing up your neighbor's ears. 

Potato-skins, lobster shells, etc., should not be 
hurled about promiscuously, but should be tossed 



Thi; 



ill add 



lightly behind the pictures on the wall. 
to your reputation with the waiters. 

When eating grape-fruit or oranges on the half-shell 
use automobile goggles or borrow your neighbor's spec- 
tacles. 

Do not crudely crush the end of an egg with the 
business end of a spoon. Tap it gently on someone's 
head as this will deaden the sound. 

Do not feed corn-flakes to the hash-house cat ; live 
and let live. 

Some people find it impossible to absorb soup, coffee 
and other liquids without imitating the exhaust of a bath- 
tub. This disturbance may be reduced by the use of a 
length of gas-tubing. 

Bones of guinea-fowl, quail, etc., served in the hash- 
house should be carefully collected in a clean napkin. 
Besides their value as curiosities, they make recherche 
wall ornaments and give the owner a tone of savoir faire. 

in 




**'@r,<S', 



FORGING THE DOUGHNUTS 




"^1)0 '$ Who in '13 



The Most Confirmed Bachelor. 

Mary Blake wins out decisively, and we consider this vote of the class a most 
suitable and deserved reward for Ralph Cedric's three long years of single-minded, 
unwavering devotion to Prexy and the college library. 

The Most Successful Maiden Charmer. 

Fudge! Fudge! Fudge! Anderson! The class vote was all but unanimous for 
the "idol of Mt. Holyoke." Our Andy has been loved and lost all the way from the 
Mississippi to the Atlantic. The only other men in the class even considered were 
Fuzzy and Bush — they'll get there some day. 

The Most Notable Eccentrics. 

Hans Roehrs won out by a hair's breadth, with Drury and The Kid making him 
do his craziest at the finish. 

The Smoothest Bluffer. 

Tom Godvin, by continually putting into practice the useful lessons absorbed thru 
close association with Johnny Fitz, has gained this coveted honor. Plupy was only a 
bluff behind and Seth also ran. Perhaps, if they, too, had struggled so oratorically as 
Tom did towards this high ideal, the result would have been different. 

The Creasy Grind. 

The greasiest of them all is, or rather was, Ed Lake. While in college he 
ground to a powder the math, courses of Bloky, Billy and Johnny O. Alas, he 



213 



Ra[D)(§(§@(§2^[[[[n Q[NiE)i^^ 



couldn't stand the strain; he has suffered the common fate of grinds — take heed all ye 
who would not thusly end. 

Class Hellian. 

Dayton, Doc and Rosie is the order of merit. Venus is small but awfully tough. 
However, he conceals his evil ways so that even his folks have no suspicion. Doc's 
"rep" is due of course to his versatility as an historian, but the puzzle is that Rose- 
brooks got no better than third place, for last year he played bid whist intermittently and 
carried matches, and this year he smokes a pipe. 
The Most Unsophisticated Lamb. 

The ballot returns Nat Tupper as winner by a wide margin. It is really pitiful to find 
how little he knows about the ways of this wicked world and to see the abject fear in 
his face when anyone mentions Hamp or the Draper. 

The Cheap Joke-smith. 

Fay first, Jordan second, "Big Kell" third. No wonder Doc's jokes are cheap — 
he turns out so many of them. Kell shouldn't be in this list, for his jokes are really rich. 
Sime gets his from the other two — the grafler — and gets away with them just as if 
they were original. 

Class Smoke-stack. 

Cris is the one and only, and really, when you see the smoke of one of his old 
furnaces above the tall trees it looks as though the power station had combined with the 
city of Pittsburgh to cast a thick black pall over the surrounding landscape. 

Class Knocker. 

Zab and Tom Godvin tied for first place, with Howe, G. E., a few bumps in the 
rear. Zab is always disgusted because 1913 doesn't agree with New Jersey ideas. Tom 
knocks because he was born that way and Seth because "this bunch doesn't know what's 
good for 'em anyway." 
The Strongest Canteen Advocate. 

Tup again! Puzzle — how can he be this and unsophisticated too? Oh — we 
get it — it means the same as being a member of the W. C. T. U. But don't ask any 
more questions. 

Most Chronicallv Fatigued. 

Again George II got the coveted first, but it made him so tired that he is even going 
to have somebody write home for his money the rest of the year. Big Som was second 
and Streeter, who looked so strong before the contest, barely stretched into third, although 
he is rapidly losing his ability to get tired from being fatigued these many weary years. 

214 



Ra©(§©©(§^iinn ,niMie)i^^ 



Fashion Precursor. 

Plupy wins because his fashion-plates and ideas are Ail-American while Fwed's 
are merely All-Boston. Rosebrook's line is direct from Oxford; but it's Oxford, 
Mass., so Rosie loses out again. 

Class Mone])-caicher. 

This time the class picked Norm Clark as Chief Shylock, which title he richly 
deserves on account of his damnedly avaricious schemes for mercilessly extracting cash 
from his fleecy fellows. Gore drew only second place, in spite of having haunted our 
lives for a year or two while serving as class treasurer; and Coleman was given third 
thru the influence of thoughtful friends. 

Deepest Theologian. 

This is B. J. of Harwichport. The texts for his sermons are drawn from real col- 
lege life and explain the psychological relations between faculty and undergraduates. 
Said discourses are delivered to small, select audiences in Long Tom's peculiarly touch- 
ing manner. Bashfulness alone has prevented Kell from training for the ministry at 
some institution like Northfield Seminary. 

Class Globe-iroiter. 

Swatz has been to Mexico, Zib to Wyoming and Angier to New York on his way 
to that near-fabulous country, Europe. Consequently, these men win in the order named. 
For authentic souvenirs Swatz brought back a lot of strong and outlandish smoking . 
George, some new western expressions which he turns loose whenever he gets a chance; 
Angier brought back Pellett. 

Most Musical. 

How many, many men have tooted horns or beaten drums three weary years to win 
this coveted glory! Drury, who is a wonderful wind-bag for his diminutive size, is the 
lucky man. Walker and Griggs squeeze in a poor second and third. Just how they 
had the face to run against such opposition we cannot conceive. We move the secretary 
be instructed to cast one unanimous ballot for Fuzzy. 

IVhxi I Came to College. 

To learn to spell intransubstantiationableness, and to pronounce Van Zwaluwen- 
burg. — Culley. 

To escape the cross-fire of three sisters. — Huntington. 

To drill for the Bloke. — Samson. 

Where I Have Developed the Most. 
In the smoke line. — Hyland. 
In soul. — Walker and Adams. 



[©©©©(gs^niin no^is)! 



Hofi! I Stand Worl(ing so Hard. 
Omega oil. — Nuf ced. 
Crackers and butter. — Packard. 
By exquisite cuisine and superhuman mental derangement. — Kenney (again). 

What I Have Done the Most. 

Help G. E. through math.— R. W. 

Take Sophomore physics. — Lowry. 

Take Freshman chemistry. — Cobb. 

Support the C. V. railroad. — Coleman. 

Talked. — Fay. (He finally admits it.) 

Watch for "that check." — Anonymous. (Sounds like Tup.) 

Fussed. — Thayer. (We didn't believe he'd fib so.) 

IVh^ I Did It. 

I was desperate. — Anderson. ' . 

Well, they all do it.— Hyland. ' ' ' ' .' 

I answered that in Freshman English. — Anon. 

Blasted hopes — a brunette. — Coleman. 

To supply Cobb with "makins. " — Little. 

I Am an Habitual Drunl(ard, Smol(er, Card Sharif and Fusser. 
Oh, yes! — Thayer. 

Refuse to answer, by advice of counsel. — Coleman. 
No, No, No, No.— Birdsall. 
No, father's a Salvation Army Captain. — Mallett. 

What Makes Me so Naughtv. 
Hans Roehrs. — Anderson. 
So young, such eyes. — Ralph Howe. 
Looking at Kenney — Birdsall. 
Working nights on the IndeX Board. — Borden. 

Mp Chief Ambition Is 

To go "over the mountain." — CuUey. 

Home and little ones. — Ralph Howe. 

To fly with Percy. — Kenney. 

To sit in front of South and yell "Hip" at the regiment. — Borden. 

216 



c^iD)(§(§@(§^[[nn nK!i5)[^^ 



Do You Prefer a Blonde or a Brunette, and Why. 

Brunette for mine, because she is the only one who will have me. — Little. 
Blonde, she is not so hard on a fellow's knees. — Jones. 
Blonde, easier seen in the dark. — Pease. (Why, Lester!) 

Decline to commit myself. — Jordan. (Two colleges too near at hand and this 
book has a large circulation.) 

Not at all "fussy." — Shute. 

Your Favorite Professor, and Why. \ 

Billy, he's charitable. — Anderson. 

Doc Gordon, he raised me three. — Huntington. 

Hart, he never spoke to me. — Fay. 

Neal, because he has so few genuine admirers. — Shute. 




•■■WH.'\T'S THE DIFF" 
Tailor to Bill Lane. — What size will you have your hip pockets, pint or quart?' 



217 



i[B>@(§©@2«[inn niNi[B)ig^ 






WE SUSPECTED AS MUCH 






AT THE BARNS OLD JOHN 

Mt. Holyoke maid, on trip of inspec- p^f Gordon (as two co-eds and two 

tion with Hans. — "Why is that cow fellows are excused from lecture and leave 



mewing, has she lost her kitten?' 



the room) — "And thus they went into 
the ark." 



:[D)(§(g@(§2^[[nn nff^©!^^ 



(bvanb ^nnounccmenl 



ON JANUARY tenth the Amherst Town Hall will be the scene of the 
grandest spectacular attraction ever offered to the theatre-going public of 
Hampshire County. The title of the play is, "Lights and Shadows of a 
Great City" and it has been produced with great eclat on the Montague- 
Pelham circuit by the celebrated troupe of Zabriskie Barnstormers. The 
scene is laid in Montague and shows up in vivid style the life of the demi-monde of that 
wicked town. The scenery has been built and painted under the direct supervision of 
Clarence E. Jewett of Amherst and at the production's debut in Montague a thunder of 
tumultuous applause shook the theatre as the curtain rose disclosing the wonderful repro- 
duction of that city's Great White Way. 

Costumes by the co-eds ; chorus girls furnished by the Empire Theater Stock Com- 
pany. The ballet is led by M. Harold de Rosebrooks, Premier Ballerino de I'Opera 
Somerviile. 





"SOREHEAD" 

Borden suggests a cheap grmd during a 
midnight Index Board session. — "Aw, 
shut up ! Do you think this is the Police 
Gazette or the 1912 InDEX.^" 



IN 1919 

Why does Griggs, the great writer, 
wear such a constant look of fear? 

He wrote the class song when he grad- 
uated, and his enemies are constantly 
threatening to make it public. 



220 



:[B)©©©©^iiiin oKiiD)!^^ 



The depth of bassness. — Clegg's voice. 

Wha' da matter?— Billy. 

Prof. Cance. — "Macone, name the principal cotton markets. 
Mac. — "Milwaukee, Denver, Winnepeg, and Sitka." 




OVER THE RIVER 

"Oscar, swear you will always love me. Swear and dry these tears." 
"Dam your eyes, darling, I'll love you forever." 




THE SUMMER SUB-FACULTY 
221 



c-2iD)(§(§©(§^nnn iiiM^t^s^s 



Ol)in95 Wz '6 CiKe to IKnow 

1. How to get "seconds." 

2. How many windows in South will be smashed during the next baseball season. 

3. Why is High School Day? 

4. Was the cash-register in the College store bought on the strength of unpaid 
bills? 

5. Will anyone ever "box" Glover? 

6. How to stay awake in Assembly. 

7. What the quartette tried to sing on College Night. 

The person sending in a correct set of answers to the above will be awarded a 
building lot in the Desert of Saharah. 





HANG ONTO ^'OUR WATCH 




IN THE GOOD OLD SUMMER TIME 



!©(§©©©^[[[in nK[iD)i:^^ 



^no6el I)a3e.49l2 St^le 




A FACSIMILE 



FOR THE LAND'S SAKE 




F. O. B. BOSTON 




Work Bench of One of the Editors 



B^lD)(§(§@©2^0Q niMIs)!^^ 



^e Original 



When some one makes a racket yell, "Under a barrel." 

When you meet anyone coming out from an exam, ask, "How did you hit it?" 

If board goes up blame it on "Shylock." 

To a Freshman who has been rushed and bid: "I hope you're coming the right 



If you are a Soph and a Freshman succeeds in "getting your Angora" say threaten- 
ingly, "Gwan, Freshman." 

Ninth inning; score tied; bases full; pitcher at bat. Yell, "Win your own game, 
old man." 



Ol)e 'Weekly Snooze 



A man once came to Amherst town. 

And he did know a heap. 
He preached unto the Aggie boys 

And put them all to sleep. 

And when he heard how they did snore. 
He straightway took to prayin'. 

And made a Freshie yawn so loud 
It woke them up again. 





MADE IN VERMONT 



;©(§©©©5«iii]ii niMie)! 



"I3be Slxtr "per (Tent '^tlan" 



The shades of night were falling fast. 
As up the chapel steps there passed 
A youth who bore above. his head 
A painted sign which boldly read, 
"Get by." 



A SIX o'clock Blake's lusty shout 
Rang from the reading room: "All out. 
The scribbling youth heard not the yell 
Sighmg the while as in a spell: 
"Get by." 



His furrowed brow proclaimed him worried, At sev'n o'clock when they returned. 



As thru the door he madly hurried. 
It mattered not the readers cussed 
At the noise. Said he, "I must 
Get by." 

From off the shelves he quickly took 
His ref'rences and in his book 
He scribbled drawings, notes galore, 
A hundred pages, then some more. 
"Get by." 

Next day withii 



His sallow face with fever burned; 
Still murmured in delirium 
(And you'll admit 'twas raving some) 
"Get by." 

At nine o'clock they lelt him there, 
With staring eye dishevelled hair. 
All night they left him in that place, 
A foolish smile suffused his face. 
"Get by." 
a padded cell 



They locked him up to rave and yel 
He chewed the pages of his Zoo, 
And shrieked, for lack of else to do, 
"Get by." 






- v^ ..<^ 




;[e)(§(§©@3SEnn 



:i§)g^ 



HET US NOT be too particular. Better to have an unenclosed athletic field 
than none at all. 
October. This is one of the particularly bad months in which to 
crib. Others are November, September, April, February, June, May, 
January, December and March. 
You wouldn't call him a coward. He was not without certain spirit. He was 
just a mucker: he paddled. 

Be thankful for the Freshmen. But for them there would be nobody to throw into 
the pond. 

As to the Batter: when in doubt strike him out. 

At times there is nothing so absolutely flunk Physics even Billy will be sorry. 

Let us so conduct ourselves that if we ignorant as the chapel clock. 




^no6c 



I want to be a Junior 

And with the Juniors stand, 
A bull-dog pipe stuck in my face 

And a cane within my hand. 
O happy, happy Juniors, 

No work they have to do (?) 
They play at poker all night long 

And loaf the whole day thru. 

Neal (m Physics). — "I got two answers to this 
example." 

Billy. — "No double-barrelled shot-guns around 
here, Mr. Neal. If you don't get the bird the first time 
he gets away mto the brush, here." 



IMIlD©©©(§2^[I[in UMIs)!^^ 




HEARD EN ROUTE 



If the distance from South Hadley to Amherst is nine miles, how many Mt. 
Holyoke girls would it take to negotiate the distance? 
Ans. — Nine, for a miss is as good as a mue. 




fr' J- 



SIEGE OF FORRISTALL 

227 



:©(§(§©©^Qnn hip^idi 



Billy (leaving Physics Lab.) — "Packard, when you are thru will you please shut 



upr 



Prof. Norman in Hort. — "It looks suspicious when a paper conies in with a foolish 
mistake which is exactly duplicated on two or three other sheets." 

Voice from the rear of the room — "That's a mere coincidence." 



(T. 1.. 13 



Come all you fellows if you want to hear 

A verse about a young Informaleer. 

"Casey" Jones was the fusser's name. 

By his fussing thru out the state he won his fame. 

Casey is always the first one on the floor, 
And when the music's over he sadly sighs for more. 
One thing's surely certain; it is the "one best bet." 
If the orchestra were playing he'd be dancing yet. 

Casey Jones, going to th' Informal, 

Casey Jones, with your order in your hand, 

Casey Jones, waltzing in the Drill Hall, 

Casey thinks this is the modern Promised Land. 



Herbarium of 



TR.T Ntau 






t'fi 

Common 

Date J'-fi'Xr (1^, 

Locality ^a^ ^ - // 

Ranar ks ^-^ Z^zSy /O-^A^IX-. V 

l£c^k^^U^^a€<neu^ - ^A^A^cz^ttAje^ 

£JleLi^ZiJ:^ ^ 'irt^ l^Ui^^i^ 

ed by ' ^^./.jrL. 



Collected by 



228 



Ra]D)(§@(§(g2^[[iin iiKi©!^^ 



In Agony. 

Forbush (defining organic matter). — Organic matter is decayed animal matter. 
S. B. H. — Do you call yourself organic matter, Mr. Forbush? 




ANOTHER ON THE HASH FACTORY 
Is there such a thing as a white lie? 



Fresh 

Fresher. — How about thi 



ilk? 



Billy (after Zabriskie gets tangled up in the Moment of Inertia). — I'm afraid, 
Mr. Zabriskie, you're making a record for altitude. 



SOPHOMORES BAFFLED. 



Freshmen Ha 



Ilanquet In AVorceater. 



The freshmen class of Massnchusetta a^lcul- 
tnral college had Its class haiiquer a the War- 
ren last night, after avoiding the eopbomorea. 
who eDdeavored to break up the nsemblage by 
kidnaping the ofTicers of the claws So well 
guarded were the pians, the sophomores were 
completely baffled and the banquet was nm off 
Ti Ithout molestation. 

The success of the baocpiet was due to the 
committee lu charge, and Ilaiold E. Jeriks, who 
sraduated from South high echuol in June, was 
rbatioiau of the comiulttee that planned the 
L'finqu°t for WoreesTer and as it was the first 
time any of the freshmen classes from the 
<itate "ollt^ce e^er came to Worcester, the sopho- 
mores did uot learn where they were until late 
tin the afternoon and then It was too late to 
■biaUe an attempt to break it up. 

There wero IC of the sophomores In Worcester 
Inst nlpbt, nnd they pat up at the city hot?l. 
and after making oue attempt to capture a few 
of the freahmcu, gave up the Job lu disgust as 
Sergt. Thomas Mc Murray and Patrolman Fred 
W YV'lUlQms dro\e tbeiu away from the vicinity 
of the Wiirren. after they had a run In with 
a few freshmen who bad ventiu-ed out of the 
hotel before the banquet was servnd at S o'clock. 

In the tussle one of the Creshman'a eyeglesses 
were broken nnu bU right eye discolored by a 
pUDcih from s sophomore. 



cvg[D)(§©@(§2^nnn nff^©!^^ 



jFabU :fov J^re^l^man 



V,4^^^^ HERE WAS once a young Corporal by name of George; and he was in 
M C"^ 'he front Rank. George loved his Drill dearly, and his Heart went out 
^L I in Sympathy to a poor Corporal who had never had a Chance to drill in 

^^^^^^ Front but who spent his Time loafing with some vulgar Sergeants in the 
File-closers. He was a most unhappy young Person who was kept very 
busy watching that no one stole the Gun-racks in the Armory. He also had learned to 
smoke Cigarettes, but George very nobly did not allow this to stand between him and his 
pity for the unfortunate File-closer. He magnanimously resolved to throw away all his 
Chances for the Colonelcy, and to assist his unhappy Fellow-corporal to a front rank Job. 
So George spent a Dime to have some rough young Men in North sprain his Ankle. 
Hence the Crutch. And one Day he watched Commencement Drill from the chapel 
Steps, suppressing his Tears and Sobs as he watched his happy Company doing Butt's 
Manual in the warm June Sun. We do not know what the Moral of this is. 



"PI 



easeanshernames 



Of all sad words of tongue or pen 

The saddest are those, "Board's up again." 




FRESHMAN GOING INTO POND 



230 




The Laws for Freshmen. 

Now these are the laws for the Freshmen ; not many but mighty are they. 
The first one — Be unassuming; the second is merely. Obey! 

One on "Goody." 

Goody stepped out of the library. — "Ah, my little man," exclaimed the elderly 
visitor, " and what is your name?" 

"I was christened Henry, sir, but they call me Hen, 'cause I lay around the house 
so much." 

And the ambulance clanged in the distance. 




PUZZLE— FIND THEIR NURSES 



231 



Ra©©(§©©^QQn niM]o)i^^ 




'"i ou are quite a sailor, aren't you, Mr. Little? Were you ever wrecked in your 
little motor-boat?" 

Well, no, but we were out without a bottle-opener, once." 

Well, ' said the young class lawyer, as he watched a tennis ball soar above the 
telegraph wires and bound into the alfalfa, "That's out of the jurisdiction of the courts." 
Whereupon they fell upon him and slew him. 




;©(§©(§ (g^^niin iiff^ig)!^^ 



^ooK Reviews 



"Life in Lunenberg," by Jack Lesure, (Chet Heath & Co.), is not a tale of stu- 
dent life in Germany, as one would suppose from the title, but is a pretty pastoral tale of 
unrequited love in a little country town in New England. 

"What I Cannot Do," by F. D. Griggs (The Republican Co.). Mr. Griggs was 
importuned by his many admirers to write an autobiography, and, as it would be 
manifestly impossible for him to write a history of all his accomplishments, he decided to 
list only the things he has not done, modestly leaving it to others to record the rest. 

"Conservation of Conversation," by Headle and Headle (Pearson, Blake & Tay- 
lor). An abtruse scientific treatise which none but the authors, and possibly the writer 
of this review, can understand, showing how the supply of conversation is rapidly becom- 
ing exhausted. It points out the danger of the total exhaustion of the commodity within 
ten years if the example of the authors is not generally followed. 




234 



V 



[©©©©(g^min Hff^iB)!^^ ^^ 



(Tlass of 1912 

Mtcmbcrs 

Acker man, Arthur John Worcester 

7 South College; Q. T. V.; Captain Class Baseball (2); Varsity Baseball (1, 2, 3); Vars.ty 
Hockey (1, 2, 3); Class Baseball (1, 2); Class Hockey (1,2). 

Baker, Horace Mitchell Selbyville, Del. 

South College; KZ ■ Public Speaking Council (2); Burnham Eight (1). 

Beals, Carlos Loring Sunderland 

5 South College; HIvI'; Band (1, 2, 3). 

Beers, Roland Trowbridge Billerica 

8 North College; C. S. C. ; Promenade Committee; Manager Varsity Track (4); Class 
Track (I. 2). 

Bent, William Richard Marlborough 

2 North College; K T* ; Promenade Committee (3) ; Class Football (2); Burnham Eight (1). 

Bodfish, Edward Hill West Barnstable 

Plant House; Class Track (1, 2, 3); Index Board (3). 

Boland, Eric Nichols South Boston 

17 South College; '^— K; Secretary and Treasurer (3); Fraternity Conference. 

Brett, Alden Chase North Abington 

83 Pleasant Street; K2 ; Class Historian (1); Captain Varsity Tennis (4); Class Basket- 
ball (1); Rope-pull (I, 2); Class Football (2); Band (1, 2, 3); Glee Club (1); Editor- 
in-Chief 1912 Index (3); Editor-in-Chief Signal (4); Senate (3, 4); Rifle Team (1, 2). 

Brown, Merle Raymond Prescott 

92 Main Street; Class Baseball (I, 2). 

Bu rr, Frederick Huntington Worthington 

Theta Phi House; H<^ ; Class Track (3); Class Cross Country (3). 

Caldwell, Lawrence Sanborn Lynnfield Centre 

Ivi; House; Ki; ; Class Vice-President (I); Manager Class Basketball (1); Fratermty Con- 
ference (3, 4). 

Carpenter, Jesse, Jr. Attleboro 

Ki; House; K2; Class Vice-President (3); Class Basketball Manager (1, 2); Class Base- 
ball (1, 2); Sional Board (3, 4); Junior Promenade Committee. 

Castle, Fred Arlo Seattle, Wash. 

13 South; <l>i:K; Business Manager 1912 Index; Glee Club (3). 

235 



G^[5)(§(g©(g^nnQ niMis)!^^ 



Clapp, Raymond Kingsley Westhampton 

H<I. House; O* ; Class Vice-President (2); Class Secretary and Treasurer (3); Manager 
Class Track (3); Class Track (1, 2. 3); Caplain Varsity Track (4); Burnham Eight (2); 
Fraternity Conference (3, 4). 



Marlborough 

sketball (2). 

Wethersfield, Conn. 



all (4); Class Ba 



Worcester 

(1, 2); Index 



Curran, Daniel Joseph 

2 North; Ki'*; Class Football (1, 2); Class Baseball (1, .') CI 

D e m i n g , W infred Griswold 

16 South; *i:K. 

Dodge, Albert Wesley South Hamilton 

14 North; i;TA; Class Track (1, 2, 3); Class Foolball (2); Business Manager Sifnal 
(4); 1912 Index; Fraternity Conference (3). 

Fagerstrom, Leon Emanuel 

12 South College; Q. T, V.; Manager Varsity 
Board (3). 

Fisherdick, Warren, Francis 

26 South Pleasant Street; BK*; Band (1, 2, 3). 

Fitts, Frank Orus 

Chemical Laboratory; «'i'; Class Football (I. 2). 

Fitzgerald, John Joseph 

75 Pleasant Street. 

Fowler, George Scott 

44 Pleasant Street; Class Hockey (2). 

Gallagher, James Andrew 
Pleasant Street. 

Gaskill, Lewis Warren 

6 South College; C. S. C. 

Gelinas, Louis Edmund 

4 South College; KI'*; Rope-pull (1); Glee Club (1). 

Gibbs, Robert Morey 
Plant House, 

Earl 



Gibson, Leste 

Ki; House; Ki:. 



Amherst 

North Amherst 

Holyoke 

Wayland 

North Wilmington 

Hopedale 

North Adams 

Chester 

Melrose Highlands 

East Boston 



Gray, Frank Leonard 

21 Fearing Street; Kl'<t>; Class Basketball (1, 2); Class Track (I); Band (1, 2, 3); 
Burnham Eight (1). 



Hallowell, Royal Norton 

South College; K2; Signal (1, 2, 3, 4); Mandolin Club (I). 



amaica riams 



Pla 



:iD)(§(§©(§^iiii[i niM©! 



Harlow, Joseph Alvin Tui-ners Falls 

Ki: House; Ki:; Class Track (1): Index Board (3); Signal (4); Cheer Leader (4); 
Senale (4); Promenade Commitlee (3). 

Heald, Jay Morrill Watertown 

10 South College; Q. T. V.; Promenade Commiltee (2, 3); Manager Varsily Tennis (4); 
Band (3, 4); President Debating Club (3); Rhode Island Debate (3). 

Hemenway, Thomas Nashua, N. H. 

17 South College; <l.i;K; Class Secretary and Treasurer (I); Public Speaking Council (3); 
Debating Team (3). 

Hickey, Frank Benedict Brockton 

C. S. C. House; C. S. C; Class Baseball (1); Class Hockey (I). 

Hills, Frank Burrows Bernardston 

8 South College; Q. T. V.; Promenade Committee (3); Band (I, 2, 3); Glee Club (I, 2, 
3, 4); Musical Association (3, 4); Dramatics (3, 4). 

Holland, Henry Lucius Amherst 

28 North Prospect Street; K T'l'. 

Kingsbury, Arthur Fiench Medfield 

88 Pleasant Street; H.|.; Class Secretary and Treasurer (2); Class President (3). 

Lamson, Robert Ward Amherst 

North Pleasant Street. 

Lin, Dau Yang Shanghai, China 

21 Fearmg Street; Varsily Tennis (2, 3). 

Lloyd, Edward Russell Boston 

North College; Rifle Team (2, 3), Captain (-1). 

Lodge, Charles Albert, Jr. Manchester 

87 Pleasant Street; C. S. C; Manager Varsity Baseball (2). 

Madison, Francis Spink East Greenwich, R. I. 

Veterinary Laboratory; Q. T. V.; President 'l'. M. C. A. (4); Slock Judging Team (4). 

McGarr, Thomas Anthony Worcester 

3 North College; KI'.|.; Class Capla.n (3); Class Basketball (1, 2); Class Baseball (I, 2); 
Class Football (I, 2); Varsity Football (I). Varsily Baseball (1, 2, 3). 

Merkle, George Edward Amherst 

East Street. 

Merrill, Fred Sawyer Danvers 

C. S. C. House; C. S. C; Class Sergeanl-at-.Aims (I); Class Captain (I. 2); Class Foot- 
ball (I); Class Track (1); Class Hockey (2); W. C. T. U. 

237 



[[D)(§(g©(§^nnn hg^id^^ 



Moreau, Theodore Joseph Turners Falls 

10 South Colleoe; Q. T. V.; Class Captain (2); Class Vice-President (4); Class Football 

(1, 2); Class Basketball (1, 2); Vaisily Football (2, 3, 4); Buinham Eight (I, 2); Flint 

Contest; Varsity Debating Team; Senate (3, 4); Fraternity Conference (3, 4). 



Mulle: 



Alfred F 



r e d e r 1 c 



4 South College; KI'<I>; Class Basketball (1, 2); Class Baseball 
ference (4). 

Noyes, Harry Alfred 

Chem.cal Laboratory; HK4>; Class Track (3). 

O'Flynn, George Bernard 

Kl'* House; Kl'*; Fraternity Conference (3, 4). 

Parker, Ralph Robinson 

C. S. C. House; C. S. C; Class Secretary and Treasurer (I); CI, 
enade Committee (2); Rope-pull (2); Senate (3, 4). 

Pearson, Charles Cornish 

18 South College; *2K; Class President (3); Manager Varsil 
enade Committee (2). 

Peck ham, Curtis 

7 North College; C. S, C, ; Captain Class Hockey (I, 2); Cla 







Jamaica Plains 


(1. 2) 


; F 


aternity Con- 

Marlborough 

Worcester 

Maiden 


JSS Pr 


■siden 


t (2); Prom- 
Arlington 


y Fo 


Mball 


(4); Prom- 



New Bedford 

baseball (I, 2); Class 



Hockey (I, 2); Varsity Hockey Captain (4); Varsity Hockey (1, 2, 3, 4). 

Pierpont, John Edwards Williamsburg 

C. S. C; Rope-pull (I, 2). 

Taunton 

3oard ; Sophomore- 



1912 



C. S. C. Hou 
Philbrick, William Edwin 

18 South College; ^SK; Manager Class Football (1); 
Senior Promenade Committee. 

Pratt, Marshall Cotting Holderness, N. H. 

K2 House; KS; Class Treasurer (3); Signal Board (2, 3, 4). 

Puffer, Stephen Perry North Amherst 

8 North College; C. S. C; Varsity Hockey (2); Class Hockey (2). 

Raymond, Arthur Nathaniel Leominster 

9 North College; ^T^- R.fle Team (2, 3); Fraternity Conference (3, 4). 

Reed, Robert Edward Abington 

•)<1- House; 01.; Class Track (1, 2); Class Hockey (2). 

Robinson, Earle Johnson Hingham 

8 South College; Q. T. V.; Class Football (I, 2); Rope-pull (1, 2). 

Rock wood, Lawrence Peck Waterbury, Conn. 

Amherst. .-^- 



238 



:]D)(g©©(g^i][[n nff^E)!^^ ^^ 



Sanctuary, Willi a mCrocker ' Amherst 

e<I> House; H.I.; Rope-pull (I, 2); Class Hockey (2); Class Cross-Counlry (3); Varsity 
Hockey (I. 2). 

Sellew, Lewis Raymond Natick 

Plant House; Class Football (2). 

Shaw, Ezra Ingram Amherst 

8 Spauldmg Street; Ki: ; Class President (I); Class Football (1,2); Class Baseball 
(I, 2); Class Track (I). 



S o u t h w 1 c k , Benjamin Gilbert 

11 North College; Cross Country (I); Debating Team (2). 

Stack, Herbert James 

French Hall; Class Track (I, 2, 3); Burnham Eight (1). 

Terry, Leon 

12 North College; Class Track (2). 

Torrey, Ray Ethan 
Clark Hall. 



To 



Daniel Gordon 



Buckland 

Conway 

Springfield 

North Leverett 

Roxbury 



15 South College; 'I'Sls; Captain Cross-Country (2); Class Track (I, 2, 3); Varsity Track 
(3); Mandolin Club (3). 

Tupper, George Wilbur Roxbury 

C. S. C. House; C. S. C; Manager Rope-pull (2); Promenade Committee (2). 

Turner, Howard Archibald Dorchester 

East Pleasant Street. 

Wales, Robert Webster North Abington 

Ki; House; K2 ; President Y. M. C. A. (3): Orchestra (I, 2, 3); Class Football (2); 
Manager Class Track (2). 

Walker, Herman Chester Marlborough 

16 South College; '^'^K : Class Captain (2); Captain Varsitv Football (4); Varsity Foot- 
ball (2, 3. 4); Class Football (I, 2, 3); Class Hockey (I, 2); Senate (3, 4); Manager Glee 
Club (3); Rifle Club. 



Warner, Roger Andrew 

88 Pleasant Street; M' ; Band (I. 2, 3); Stock-judging Team (4). 

Whitney, Charles Everett 

10 North College; Class Seigeanl-at- Arms (3). 

W eaver, William Jack 

15 North College; President Stockbridge Club (3,4). 



Sunderland 

Wakefield 

Allandar 



239 



:©(§(§©(§^Hnn niM©!^^ 



Wilbur, Emory Sherman East Wareham 

Brook's Farm; liK*; Class Baskelball (2); Band (I, 2. 3); Fiaternily Conference (3, 4). 

Wilde, Earle Irving Taunton 

2 South College; KS; Class Fooiball (I); Band (1); Rifle Team (3); Dramalics (3). 

Williams, Edward Roger Concord 

12 South College; Q. T. V.; Class Baseball (1, 2); Class Football (1, 2); Class Track 
(1); Varsity Baseball (1, 2, 3, 4); Captain Varsity Baseball (3, 4). 

Williams, Silas Fall River 

e* House; H*; Promenade Committee (2, 3); Band (1, 2, 3). 

Wood, Howard Holmes Shelburne Falls 

15 South College; 'i'i;K; Class Sergeant-at-Arms (2); Class Captain (3); Manager Class 
Basketball (1); Class Football (1, 2); Class Baskelball (2); Manager Varsity Hockey (4). 

Young, Edwin Burnham Dorchester 

II North College; *KM'; Class Historian (2, 3); Class Track (1, 2, 3); Dramatics (2, 3, 
4). 




:iD)(§@©(g^[[[in n[KiiB)[^^ 



diass of 1914 



Members 

Abbott, Leslie Elmer Sandwich 

E. F. Gaskill's. 

Allen. Carl Mur dough Holyoke 

87 Pleasani Street; Banquet Commillee (I); Class Track (1); Mandolin Club. 

Anderson. Leslie Oscar Concord 

7 Nulling Avenue. 

Anapolsky. Morris Boston 

11 Amily Street 

Baker. Warren Sears Wollaston 

Pleasant Street; Q. T. V.; Vars.ly Football (1, 2). 

Besser, Sidney Stokes Gilbertville 

3 Nutting Avenue; Class Caplain (2); Mana. er Class Track (1); Class Baseball (1); Class 
Track (I). 

Black, Harold C. Falmouth 

3 Pleasant Street, 

Bokelund, Chester Worcester 

66 Pleasant Street; K r<I>. 

Bragg. RalphStanley Milford 

Ml. Pleasant; Orchestra. 

Brewer, Harold William Mt. Vernon. N. Y. 

C. S. C. House; C. S. C; Class Captain (1); Varsity Football (1); Varsity Baseball 
(1); Class Football (1, 2); Captain Class Rope-pull Team (1); Class Basketball (I); Class 
Baseball (1); Class Hockey (1); Burnham Eight. 

B r o o k s , A r t h u r W i n 5 1 o w - Enfield 

31 East Pleasant Street; HK'I'. 

Brown, Harry Dunlap ■ Lowell 

82 Pleasant Street; Ki:; Glee Club (1); Mandolin Club (1). 

Calvert, Melville New London, Conn. 

56 Pleasant Street. 

Campbell, Malcolm David Harvard 

35 East Pleasant Street. 

Christie, Edward Wheeler North Adams 

29 Lincoln Avenue; KF*. - •' ~ 

241 



;[D)©©(§(§^[[[in n[^iD)[^^ 



Clay, Harold Johnson Cambridge 

21 Fearing Street. 

Clark, Ernest Samuel Tolland 

Amherst; STJ,; Cross-Counlry (1); Signal Board ; ( 1 , 2) ; Ce.cle Franca.s. 

Coe, Alfred Lynn Syracuse, N. Y. 

1!K* House; BK*; Class Track (I). 

Cole, Herbert Elmer Manchaug 

Plant House. 

Coleman, David Augustus South Frammgham 

108 Pleasant Street. 

Damon, Samuel Reed Kingston, R. I. 

Ki: House; Ki); Varsity Tennis (1); Class Football (I); Glee Club. 

Davies, Lloyd Garrison Peabody 

75 Pleasant Street; <I>i: K ; Varsity Baseball (I); Class Baseball (I); Class Basketball (1). 

Davis, William Ashman Sunderland 

79 Pleasant Street; BK*; Band. 

Davis, Ralph Edward Oxford 

77 Pleasant Street; 2 Til. 

Dearing, Newton Howard Brookline 

7 Nutting Avenue; Q. T. V. 

Demond, Robert Norton North Adams 

Forristairs; 't-SK. 

Dexter, Evans King Mattapoisett 

31 East Pleasant Street; O*. 

Dunbar, Erving Walker North Weymouth 

7 Nutting Avenue. 

Dunn, Robert Ernest New York City 

17 Kellogg Avenue. 

Edgerton, Almon Morley West Springfield 

6 Nutting Avenue; *i;lC; Banquet Committee (I); Varsity Football (I); Class Foolball 
(1); Class Baseball (I). 

Edwards, Edward Clinton Salem 

10 Nulling Avenue; <I>i:l'; ; Class President (I); Class Football (1). 

Eld ridge, Harold Lock wo od Wareham 

College Store; 0*. 

242 



:ig)@©©©^nnn him©!^^ 



Foster, Stuart Brooks West STnerville 

Ki; House: Ki;; Signal Board. 

Freeborn, Stanley Barron Ware 

116 Pleasant Street; Q. T. V.; Class President (2); Manager Class Football (I); Ban- 
quet Committee (I). 

Freedman, Samuel Leavitt Roxbury 

101 Pleasant Street. 

Frost, Robert Theodore New York City 

C. S. C. House; C. S. C; Class Basketball (I). 

I' rye, Carl Raymond South Hadley Falls 

116 Pleasant Street; Cross-Counlry (1). 

[ uller, George Deerfield 

9 Fearing Street. 

Gibson, David Wyman Groton 

116 Pleasant Street; 6$; Class Treasurer (1); Class Vice-President (2); Manager Rope- 
pull Team (1); Glee Club. 

G re bin, Mark Anthony Hadley 

Amherst; Kf*. 

Hadfield, Harold Frederick North Adams 

29 Lincoln Avenue; Kf<I>; Class Basketball (1). 

Handy, Ralph Ellis Cataumet 

Goldberg's. 

Harris, Rodney Wells Wethersfield, Conn. 

77 Pleasant Street; i;TA; Class Basketball (1). 

Haskell, Willard Anderson Greenfield 

Pleasant Street. 

Hayden, William Vassal Beverley 

13 South College; 4'2IC; Class Captain 1913 (1); Varsity Football (1, 2, 3); Class Base- 
ball 1913 (1); Class Football 1913 (I, 2); Class Basketball 1913 (2). 

Hazen, Edward Leonard Springfield. 

Forrislall's; Class Captain (1); Manager Class Basketball (1). 

Heath, Chester Blanchard Needham 

4 North College; Q. T. V.; Varsity Hockey (1); Class Hockey 1913 (I); Class Base- 
ball 1913 (1); Assistant Manager Tenms. 

Hebard, Emory Blodgett Holland 

3 Fearing Street. 

243 



:[D)(§(§©(§2xsnnn h^im©^ 



Heffron, Frederick Sherborn 

108 Pleasant Sueet. 

Higgins, Edward William Arlington 

6 Nutting Avenue; 'I'2K ; Class Football (1); Class Baseball (1); Class Hockey (1); Class 
Rope Pull (1). 

Hogg, Lawrence Jagger Lawrence 

1 3 Fearing Street. 

Howard, Lewis Phillips North Easton 

19 Hallock Street; Class Secretary (1); Class Treasurer (1); Class Basketball (I); Band 
(1); Orchestra (1). 

Hutchinson, John Gouvernour Arlington 

14 South; 'I'Sl':; Varsity Hockey (I); Class Football (1); Class Hockey (1); Class 
Baseball (1); Orchestra (1); Band (1). 

Hutchinson, Raymond Ernest Harvard 

35 East Pleasant Street. 

Ingham, Earl Morris Granby 

9 Phillips Street. .'. ' ' 

Jacobs, Lor ingHumphrey . Wellesley 

14 Kellogg Avenue. 

Jenney, Herbert Hedge South Boston 

6 Nutting Avenue; Orchestra (1, 2); Band (1, 2). 

Johnson, Rollins Eugene Templeton 

120 Pleasant Street. 

Jones, Dettmar Wentworth Melrose 

66 Pleasant Street; Q. T. V.; Class Sergeant-at-Arms (I); Class Football (1); Class 
Hockey (1); Varsity Hockey (1); Assistant Manager Varsity Baseball (2). 

Kilbourne, Walton Goss South Lancaster 

C. S. C. House; C. S. C; Class Rope Pull (1); Class Football (1). 

Kriebel, Addison Reiff Morristovvn, Pa. 

81 Pleasant Street; Glee Club (1). 

Leach, Benjamin Robert ■ Methuen 

13 Philhps Street. 

Leete, Richard Fowler - '^ ,. Mt. Kisco, N. Y. 

66 Pleasant Street; KIM'. . " 

Levine, Henry W alter Boston 

101 Pleasant Street. 

244 - 



;iD)(g(§©(§2^[iEii niMie)!^^ 



Lincoln, Murray Danforth 

19 Hallock Street-, Class Sergeanl-at-Arms (I); Band (1, 2). 

Lucas, Hoyt Dennis 

I Allen Street; Class Track (1). 

M a c D o n a 1 d , Daniel Alfred 
67 Pleasant Street. 

Major, Joseph 
58 Pleasant Street. 

Melloon, Ralph Reid * 

Mt. Pleasant; Ki); Glee Club (1). 

Merkle, Frederick G rover 
East Street. 

Morrison, Harold Ivory 
77 Pleasant Street. 



North Paynham 

West Springfield 

Walpole 

Rutherford, N. J. 

Lowell 

Amherst 

Melrose 

Townsend 

Winthrop 

Springfield 

Fall River 

Fall River 



Morse, Harold John 

75 Pleasant Street; Captain Class Baseball (1); Band (I). 

Murray, John Kane 
14 Kellogg Avenue. 

Needham, Lester Ward 

K2 House; K2 ; Class Hockey (I); Class Track (1); Varsity Hockey (1). 

Nicolet, Tell William 

C. S. C. House; C. S. C. ; Captain Class Track (1). 

Nicolet, Theodore Arthur 

C. S. C. House; C. S. C; Class Secretary (1); Orchestra (1); Mandolin Club (I). 

Nissen, Harry Roslindale 

C. S. C. House; C. S. C; Class Football (1); Class Hockey (1). 

Norton, Leslie Howard Newport, R. L 

79 Pleasant Street; HIv*; Class Track (1). 

Oertel, John Thomas South Hadley Falls 

116 Pleasant Street. 

Portsmouth, N. H. 
(2); Class Baseball (I); Dramatic Society (2). 

Parker, Ervine Franklin Poquonock 

81 Pleasant Street; Class Vice-President (1). 

245 



Palmer, John Philip 

President's House; *-K ; Class Tr^ 



;iD)(g(§(§©^[i[in n[NirB)i^^ 



Payne, Roland Alfred 

North Amherst. 

Peters, Chester Harry 

116 Pleasant Street. 

Peterson, Peveril Oscar 
7 Nutting Ave.; Band (1), 

Porter, Bennett Allen 

Belchertown Road; BK*. -. 

Powers, Richard Henry 

9 South; Q, T. v.; Class Football (1); Va;s,ly Football (1). 

Read, Frederick William 

7 Nuttmg Avenue; Kl^*; Dramatic Club (1); Burnham Eight (1). 

Rees, Harry Launcelot 

3 Fearing Street. ■: 

Reid, George Alexander 

54 Lincoln Avenue. .. 

Robinson, Herbert Calvin 

75 Pleasant Street. 

Russell, Alden Hesseltine 

7 Nutting Avenue. 

Sanford, Clarence Higgins 

Cottage Hospital; Class Captain (1). 

Sexton, George Patrick 
Brook's Farm. 

Sherman, Joel Powers 

7 Nutting Avenue; Q. T. V.; Varsity Baseball (1); Class Baseball 

Shirley, John Newton 

30 North Prospect Street. 



Simmons, George Walker 

35 East Pleasant Street; Dramatic Society (1, 2); Class Track (I). 

Slein, Owen Francis 

3 Nutting Avenue. 

Small, Francis W i 1 1 a r d 

12 Hallock Street. 



Wakefield 

Brown Station, N. Y. 

Concord 

Amherst 

Maiden 

Boston 

Monson 

Worcester 

Haverhill 

Watertown 

Allston 

Allston 

Hyannis 

South Duxbury 

Boston 

New Braintree 

North Truro 



(1). 



246 



:[D)(g(§(§(§2^[[[in nKiiD))^^ 



Stevens, Arthur Eben 

79 Pleasant Street; HK't.. 

Smith, l^eone Ernest 

116 Pleasant Street ; i;TA; Class President (1). 

Smith Leon Edgar 

C. S. C. House; C. S. C; Class Vice-President (1); Caplatn Class 
Baseball (I); Class Track (1). 

Strange, Sarah Josephine 
Draper Hall. 

Sullivan, Arthur James 
19 Hallock Street. 

T a f t , Carl Mather 

15 Hallock Street. 

Tar bell, Munroe Gifford 
College Store; Orchestra (1); Band (1). 

Taylor, Arthur Wright 

13 Fearing Street. 

Taylor, Leland Hart 

75 Pleasant Street; Class Secretary (2). 

Thurston, Arthur S e a r 1 e 

9 Fearing Street; HK*. 

Tower, Alfred Leigh 

120 Pleasant Street. 

Tsang, Oong Hynen 

26 Lincoln -Avenue. 

Upton, Ernest Franklin 

Nutting Avenue; 'I'iiK. 

Walker, Raymond Philip 

120 Pleasant Street; Glee Club (1). 

W alker, Nathaniel Kcnn:ird 

83 Pleasant Street; <»*. 

W arner, Raymond W i n s 1 o vv 
For istall's; Q. T. V. 

Webster. Louis Armstrong 

82 Pleasant Street. 



Brockton 

Leominster 

Brighton 

Football (1); Class 

Marshfield 

Rochester, N. Y. 

Mendon 

Brimfield 

Feeding Hills 

Peabody 

Everett 

Sheffield 

Shanghai, China 

Salem 

Taunton 

Maiden 

Sunderland 

Blackstone 



247 



iiD)(§(§(§@^on ng^B)!^^ 



Weigel, Arthur George Lawrenc: 

Ml. Pleasanl. 

W heeler, Chester Eaton Lowell 

87 Pleasant Street; i:TA; Class Historian (I. 2); Class Track (I); Signal Board (1,2). 

Whidden, Burton Clark Waltham 

81 Pleasant Street. 

Whippen, Charles Warren Lynn 

13 Phillips Street; Kf*. 

White, Samuel Alexander Boston 

56 Pleasant Street. 

W iliiams, George Edmund Belchertown 

Kr* House; KIM>; Varsity Football (I); Class Football (1); Class Basketball (I). 

Wing, John Goran Somerviile 

116 Pleasant Street; i;TA; Class Baseball (1). 

Wood, Henry Joseph Mendon 

82 Pleasant Street; Glee Club (I). 

Woolley, Harold Curtis Maiden 

KS House; K2 ; Varsity Hockey (1); Class Hockey (1). 




;©(§(§(§(§2^[ii]n niM©!^^ 



Class of 1915 

Mlembcrs 

Alden, Charles Harold Rockdale 

East Pleasant Street. 

Allen, Francis Ell wood Melrose 

10 Allen Street. 

Anderson, Herbert Henry '■ Ware 

13 Hallock Street. 

Archibald, Herbert Hildreth Waltham 

Pleasant Street. 

Baird, Earle Fairbank . Waltham 

120 Pleasant Street. 

Banister, Seth Warrener • Westford 

30 North Prospect Street. 

Barnes, DwightF. ■ Marshfield 

North Amherst. 

Bartlett. Emory Hatnes ' Enfield 

44 Triangle Street. 

Bartlett, Edward Russell Newburyport 

66 Pleasant Street. 

Bartley, Hastings New comb ' Sandwich 

77 Pleasant Street. 

Beebe, William Carleton ' Evans Mills, N. Y. 

Prospect House. 

Beers, Norman Laner '" Somerville 

21 Fearing Street. 

B e m i s , W i I 1 a r d Gilbert ■ North Brookfield 

33 Cottage Street. 

Bennett, Johning ram ' Bostoii 

77 Pleasant Street. 

Bisbee, Eleanor ' Arlington Heights 

Draper Hall. 

249 



;©(§(§ ©(g^nnn nK!©©^ 



Bishop, Chester Allen 
79 Pleasant Street. 

Bishop, Herbert Walker 

79 Pleasant Street. 

Bittinger, Fritz John, K5 
96 Pleasant Street. 

Boyer, Edward Everett Hale 
Brooks Farm. 

Braley, Merton Loring 
Brooks Farm. 

Bredemeier, Car! 
19 Pleasant Street. 

Bronson, Harold Julius 
19 Hallock Street. 

Brooks, Gardner Milton 

Brooks Farm. 

B u t t r i c k , John W i 1 1 a r d 
31 North Prospect Street. 

Cale, Gladstone Hume 
I Allen Street. 

Callard, John Case 

29 McCIellan Street. / 

Cande, Donald Hopkins 

83 Pleasant Street, 

Chase, Alexander Baxter, Jr 
13 Fearing Street. 

Churchill, Chester Albert 
Augur's Cottage. 

Clark, Arthur Lincoln 
35 East Pleasant Street. 

Clark, Ellis Fred 

North Amherst. 

Clark, George Henry 
Nutting Avenue. 



Peterboro, N. H. 

Doylestown, Pa. 

Plymouth 

Lynn 

Rock 

Buffalo, N. Y. 

Buckland 

Newton 

Melrose 

West Springfield 

Winthrop 

Pittsfield 

West Barnstable 

Brockton 

Jamaica Plain 

Granby, Conn. 

Sherborn 



250 



;[D)(§(g(§(§^[[[in n[MIE)[^^ 



Clark, Saxon Dickinson 
120 PleasanI Street. 

Clough, Maurice Joseph 

30 North Prospect Street. 

Cohen, Samuel Aclams 
101 Pleasant Street. 

Dalrymple, Andrew Campbell 
Pleasant Street. 

Damon, Leon Blanchard 

31 North Prospect Street. 

Darling, Homer Chester 

15 Hallock Street. 

Day, George Allen 

East Street. 

Dole, Sumner Alvord 
19 Hallock Street. 

Donnell, George Edwin 

9 Phillips Street. 

Doran, William Leonard 

35 East Pleasant Street. 

Draper, Earle Sumner 

30 North Prospect. 

Eaton, Paul Baker 

83 Pleasant Street. 

Ester, Ralph Cary 

79 Pleasant Street. 

Fairbank, Hawey Nathan 

North College, Box 63. 

Fales, Gerald 

75 Pleasant Street. 

Farrar, Stuart Kittridge 

Fornstall's. 

Fisher, Leonard Cyrus 

35 East Pleasant Street. 



Springfield 

Swampscott 

Chelsea 

Revere 

Melrose 

Mendon 

Warren 

Bardwell's Ferry 

Caribou, Maine 

North Dartmouth 

Milford 

Wakefield 

Lancaster 

Sudbury 

Worcester 

Springfield 

Norwood 



251 



iis)(§©(§(§2^iinn niMiDi:^^ 



Fitzgerald, Daniel James 

75 Pleasant Street. 

Flebut, Alpha John 

11 McClellan Street. 

Fox, Everett Bailey 
Brook's Farm. 

Gare, Edward John, Jr. 0$ 

13 Phillips Street. 

Gibbs, Robert Burley 
3 Nutting Avenue. 

Goodwin, Malcolm Noyes 
66 Pleasant Street. 

Grant, Harold Davidson 

47 Pleasant Street. 

Griggs, Raymond Bradford 
84 Pleasant Street. 

Hager, Clayton Marden 
9 Nutting Avenue. 

Hall, George Morris 
29 Lincoln Avenue. 

Hall, Roderick Chesley 

Brook's Farm. 

Harper, James Edward 

29 Lincoln Avenue. 

Harper, Raymond Wires 
Brook's Farm. 

Harvey, Rusell Wilton 

44 Pleasant Street. 

Haskell. Willis Henry, Jr. 

1 5 Beston Street. 

Haskins, Le Roy Everett 
120 Pleasant Street. 

Hatfield, William Hollis 

30 North Prospect Street. 



Worcester 

Amherst 

Dracut 

Northampton 

Balston Spa, N. Y. 

Newburyport 

Melrose 

Chicopee Falls 

Somerville 

Brookline 

Worcester 

New Haven, Conn. 

Barre 

Lanesville 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Taunton 

Wellesley 



G^[D)@(§©(§^[i[in ,jiKiiB)[^^ 



Hathaway, Isaac 
E. F. Gasklll's. 

Haug, Chester A. 
I 5 Fearing Street. 

Hawes, Clayton Piescott 
35 East Pleasant Street. 

Heartz, Forrest Oscar 
35 Amity Street. 

Hildreth, Paul Hughes 
60 Amity Street. 

Hill, Charles Chase 
Hallock Street. 

Hotis, Ralph P. 
52 Amity Street. 

Houghton, Arthur Reginald 
79 Pleasant Street. 

Hyde, George Frederick 

7 Nulting Avenue. 

Hyde, Harold Gilmore 
29 North Prospect Street. 

Jackson, John Carlton 

47 Pleasant Street. 

Johnson, Arthur 

Brooks' Farm. 

Johnson, Bernhard P. 
North College. 

Jordan, Perley Balch 

31 North Prospect Street. 

Joubert, Sylvester Gordon 

31 Lincoln Avenue. 

Kane, Paul Vincent 

Brooks' Farm. 

Kaman, Parker Robert 
31 Lincoln Avenue. 



K.ingston 

New York City 

North Dartmouth 

Melrose Highlands 

Newtonville 

Melrose Highlands 

Evans Mills, N. Y. 

South Lancaster 

North Dana 

Winchendon 

Sherborn 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

New York City 

Topsfield 

Middletown, Conn. 

Worcester 

Hyde Park 



253 



;[D)@(§(§(g^[[nn HKIID-I^^ 



Kelleher, Jerome Joseph 
75 Pleasant Street. 

Kennedy, Thomas James 

Pleasant Street. 

Kilbon, Ralph Gillette 

2 Allen Street. 

Komp, William H. W. 

82 Pleasant Street. 

Koplovitz, Samuel 

1 12 Pleasant Street. 

Lane, M e r t o n C. 

Pleasant Street. 

Le Due, Ashley Cudworth 
13 Hallock Street. 

Lewis, Daniel James 
120 Pleasant Street. 

Lewis, John Kirby 
52 Lincoln Avenue. 

Lincoln, Irving B. 
55 Pleasant Street. 

Little, Harold Greenleaf 

66 Pleasant Street. 

Lovejoy, John Sumner 

44 Triangle Street. 

MacDonald, Norman Duncan 
47 Pleasant Street. 

MacNeil, Ralph Langdell 
52 Amity Street. 

M a c y , Phillip Arthur 
44 Triangle Street. 

Mahan, Harold Butter worth 

Brooks' Farm. 

Marsh, Franklin Winter 
9 Woodside Avenue. 



Montague City 

South Hadley Falls 

Springfield 

Rutherford, N. J. 

Chelsea 

South Duxbury 

Chesterfield 

Hanson 

New Haven, Conn. 

Glens Falls, N. Y. 

Newburyport 

Newburyport 

Melrose 

Chelsea 

Oak Bluffs 

Hingham Center 

Dorchester 



254 



[©©©(gcg^iinn HKi©M^ 



Marsh, Herbert Verner 

2 Allen Street. 

Masse, Sidney Merton 

3 McClellan Street. 

McKechnie, Ray Farrar 

5 MeClellan Street. 

McLain, Ralph Emerson 
10 Allen Street. 

Melican, George D. 
66 Pleasant Street. 

Moberg, Carl David 
5 McClellan Street. 

Moberg, Eldon Samuel 
5 McClellan Street. 

Montague, Enos Janes 

Nutting Avenue. 

Moore, Elbert Francis 
81 Pleasant Street. 

Moore, Roger Henry 
79 Pleasant Street. 

Murray, John K.ean 
Mt. Pleasant. 

Navas, Miguel 
56 Pleasant Street. 

Norton, Chester Harold 

2 Allen Street. 

Parmenter, Ernest Brigham 

29 North Prospect Street. 

Patten, Merrill Campbell 

52 Lincoln Avenue. 

Patterson, Robert Ear ley 

9 Woodside Avenue. 

Pendleton, Harlow L. 

31 North Prospect Street. 

255 



Greenfield 

Dorchester 

Natick 

Melrose 

Worcester 

Campello 

Campello 

Westhampton 

Waltham 

Beverly 

Winthrop 

Colombia, S. A. 

Chelsea 

Dover 

Brighton 

Dorchester 

Dorchester 



^©©©©(g^nQn nff^B)!^^ 



Perkins, Olney Hilton 
9 Woodside Avenue. 

Perry, Gerald Eugene 
Prospect House. 

Phillips, Ralph Edward 
15 Hallock Street. 

Pike, Joseph Stevens, Jr. 
9 Nutting Avenue. 

Po, Shue Lo 
3] Lincoln Avenue. 

Potter, George Raymond 
1 Allen Street. 

Price, James Gilbert 

1 5 Beston Street. 

Prouty, Langdon 

35 East Pleasant Street. 

Quincy, Knight .' 

35 East Pleasant Street. 

Ray, George Burrill 

Brooks' Farm. 

Rendall, Raymond Eaton 
Lincoln Avenue. 

Rhoades, Paul W h i t n e y 

2 Allen Street. 

Rogers, Harold Merriman 
Mt. Pleasant. 

Saben, Maxwell Boehur 
Main Street. 

Sauter, John Martin 
75 Pleasant Street. 

Scott, Lincoln B. 

3 McClellan Street. 

Sears, William Richardson 

29 North Prospect Street. 



Brockton 

Amherst 

Mendon 

Somerville 

China 

Ludlow 

New York City 

Littleton 

Roslindale 

Hingham 

Melrose 

Maiden 

Southington, Conn. 

Leominster 

Turners Falls 

Melrose 

Arlington 



■^^ 



[iD)(§@@(§^nnn nc^©!^^ 



Sexton, George Patrick 

21 East Pleasant Street. 

Sliaylor, Fred Wright, KS 
l^i^ House. 

Sherman, Milton Francis 
Dickinson Flouse. 

Simon, Isaac Barnby 
Brooks' Farm. 

Smith, Francis Albert 

29 McClellan Sireel. 

Smith, Philip L . 

Wilbur Hall. 

Spofford, Chester Porter 

66 Pleasant Street. 

Strauss, Abraham 

101 Pleasant Street. 

Taft, Richard Craig, 0$ 

88 Pleasant Street. 

Tarr, Lester Winslow 

44 Pleasant Sireel. 

Thayer, Granville M a r t y n 

Amherst, Box 56. 

Tonry, Albert Joseph 

29 McClellan Street. 

Tower, Ralph Ernest 
Brooks' Farm. 

Tower, William Reginald 

120 Pleasant Street. 

Towne, Edwin Chester 
19 Pleasant Street. 

Upton, Raymond Melville 

19 Hallock Street. 

Vinal, Stuart Cunningham 
Brooks' Farm. 



Darien, Conn. 
Lee 

South Lincoln 

Revere 

West Newton 

Lawrence 

Georgetown 

Roxbury 

Oxford 

Lanesvilie 

South Hanson 

Winthrop 

Becket 

Sheffield 

Waltham 

Peabody 

Brockton 



[©©©©(g^QIin UKI©!^^ 



Wainei, Lewis Pomery 

13 Phillips Street. 

W eed, Frank Hammonc! 

83 Pleasant Street. 

Wellington, Benjamin 
E. F. Gaskill's. 

W hite, Homer Beethoven 

35 South Pleasant Street. 

White, Harry Dexter 
56 Pleasant Street. 

White, Henry Harrison 

19 Hallock Street. 

Whitmore, Philip Ferry 
13 Phillips Street. 

W h o r f , Paul Francis, :S1^A 

87 Pleasant Street. 

Wilkins, Alfred Emerson 

83 Pleasant Street. 

WiUey, Harold C. 
1.2 Hallock Street. 

Williams, Donald 

29 McClellan Street. 

Wright, Elvin Stanley 

15 Fearing Street. 



Sunderland 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Waltham 

Melrose 

Boston 

West Peabody 

Sunderland 

Dorchester 

Wakefield 

Orange 

Catasauqua, Pa. 

Worcester 



258 




Chambers, Maude B. 
Chow, Tse-Ki 
Chu, Alfred W. 
Crosby, Stanley 
Dearth, Newman 
Fisher, Earl J. 
Fuller, Richard 
Goodnow, Edna M. 
Hart, Edward H. 
Hart, James 
Hart, Mrs. James 
Kaulbach, Hugh A. 
Kennedy, W o r t h i n g t o n C . 
Liang, Foo 1. 
Mott, Percival 
Nash, Henry C., Jr. 
Noble, Howard E. 
Noyle, John, Jr. 
Palmer, Arthur S. 
Pease, Willard N. M. 
Phelps, Benjamin A. 
Prouty, Le Roy F. 
Rae, George L. 
Ray, Frederick A. 
Richards, Edwin H. 
Selkregg, Edwin R. 
Stamford, Ernest E. 
Faplin, Warren H. 
F rider, George H., Jr. 
Wright, George E. 



Harpers Ferry, W. Va. 

Canton, Chma 

Tientsin, China 

Warren 

Ashland 

Falmouth 

Salem 

Amherst 

Falmouth 

Chippewa Falls, Wis. 

Chippewa Falls, Wis. 

Greenfield 

Hardwick 

Canton, China 

Nashua, N. H. 

Amherst 

Tyngsborough 

Groton 

Worcester 

Altoona, Pa. 

Northampton 

Rockland 

Needham Heights 

Hyde Park 

Springfield 

North East, Pa. 

Rowe 

Winchester 

Waltham 

Brockton 



:iB)©©©©^[[ii!i ii[MiB)i^^ 



Mlassacbusctts -Agricultural (Tollege 

'Alumni 'lA.ssociations 

ALUMNI SECRETARIES' ASSOCIATION, Organized 1909. 
- Ralph J. Watts, 1907, Secretary, Amherst, Mass. 

ASSOCIATE ALUMNI, Founded 1874. 

Ph.hp H. Smith, 1897, Secretary, Amherst, Mass. 

LOCAL ALUMNI ASSOCI.ATION, Founded 1905. 

Sidney B. Haskell. 1904, Secretary, Amherst, Mass. 

BOSTON ALUMNI CLUB. 
CONNECTICUT VALLEY ASSOCIATION, Founded 1902. 

Allen B. Cock, 1896, Secretary, Farmington, Conn. 

M. A. C. CLUB OF NEW YORK, Founded 1886. 

John A. Cutter, 1882, Secretary, 262 West 77th Street, New York, N. Y, 

M. A. C. CLUB OF WASHINGTON. D. C, Founded 1904. 

C. H. Griffin, 1904, Secretary, 1864 Park Road, Washington, D. C. 

WESTERN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 

Charles A. Tirrell, 1906, Secretary, 4012 Perry Street, Chicago, 111. 

PACIFIC COAST ASSOCIATION. Founded 1909. 
Thomas F. Hunt, 1905, Secretary, U. of C, Berkeley, Cal, 



G^[D)(§(§(§(§^ii[[n no^©!^^ 



Ol)e Alumni 



'71 

E. E. THOMPSON, Secrelar}). 

Allen, Gideon H., K2, 179 Court Street, New Bedford, Mass., Accountant and Writer. 
*Bassett, Andrew L., Q. T. V., 36 East River, New York City. Business address, 352 Decatur 

Street, Brooklyn, New York, Transfer Agent Central Vermont Railroad Company. 
*BiRNiE, W. P., K2, 34 Stearns Terrace, Springfield, Mass., Manufacturer. 

BoWKER, William H., Concord, Mass., Business address, 43 Chatham Street, Boston, Mass., Presi- 
dent Bowker Fertilizer Company. Trustee Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Caswell, Lillev B., Athol, Mass., Civil Engineer. 

CowLES, Homer L., Amherst, Mass., Farmer. 

Ellsworth, Emory A., 356 Dwight St., Holyoke, Mass., Architect and Civil Engineer, 

Fisher, Jabez F., Fitchburg, Mass., Accountant. 
*Fuller, George E., Address unknown. 

Hawley, Frank W., died October 28, 1883, at Belchertown, Mass. 

HerricK, Frederick St. C, D. G. K., died January 19, 1894, at Lawrence, Mass. 

Leonard. George, D. G. K., 30 Avon Place, Springfield, Mass., Lawyer, Clerk of Courts, LL. B. 

Lyman, Robert W., *K$, Q. T. V., I 1 Linden Street, Northampton, Mass.. L.L. B., Boston Uni- 
versity, 1878. 

Morse, James H., died June 21, 1883, at Salem, Mass. 

Nichols, L. A., K2, 6231 Cottage Grove Avenue, Chicago, III., Consulting Engineer, President 
Chicago Steel Tape Company. 

Norcross, Arthur D., D. G. K., Monson, Mass., Retired. 

Pace, Joel B., D. G. K., died August 23, 1902, at Conway, Mass. 

Richmond, S. H., P. O. Box 128, Miami, Florida, Real Estate. 

Russell, William D., *K<I>, D. G. K., 353 West 85th Street, New York City, Manufacturer. 

Smead, Edwin B., Q. T. V.. P. O. Box 335, Hartford, Conn., Principal Watkinson Farm School. 

Sparrow, Lewis A., Norlhboro, Mass., Farmer. 

Strickland, George P., D. G. K., 3825 So. L Slreel, Tacoma, Washington, Rancher. 

Thompson, Edgar E., 5 Jaques Avenue, Worcester, Mass., Supervising Principal Worcester Schools. 

Tucker, George H.. died October 1, 1889, at Spring Creek, Pa. 

Ware, Willard C, Hamilton, Mass., Retired. 

Wheeler, William, "tK*, K2, Concord, Mass., Business address, 14 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 
Consulting Engineer. Trustee Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Whitney, Frank L., D. G. K., Harvard, Mass., Farmer. 

WooLSON, George C, Summit Driveway, Riverview Manor, Hastings-on-Hudson, N. Y., Nursery- 



*Not heard from in 1911- 

262 



;[5)(§(§©(§^iinn niM©!^^ 



'72 - 

S. T. MAYNARD, Sccrdar],. 

*Bell, Burleigh C D. G. K., Address unknown. 
*Brett, William F.. D. G. K., Newton, Mass., Retired. 

Clark, John W., Q. T. V., North Hadley, Mass., Fruit Grower. 

COWLES, Frank C., 31 Grant Street, Worcester, Mass., Civ.l Engineer. 

Cutter, John C, D. G. K., M. D., died August, 1909, at Worcester, Mass. 

Dyer, Edward N., d.ed March 17, 1891, at Holllston, Mass. 

Easterbrook, Isaac H., died May 27, 1901, at Webster, Mass. 

Fiske, Edward R., Q. T. V., 234 West Chelton Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa„ Manufacturer. 

Flagg, Charles O., Q. T. V., Hardwick, Mass., Superintendent Page Demonstration Farms. 
♦Grover, Richard B., 160 Prospect Street, Gloucester, Mass.; Clergyman. Andover Theological 
Seminary, 1881. 

Holmes. Lemuel Le B., Q. T. V., died August 4, 1897, at Maitapoiselt, Mass. 

Howe, Edward G., 10233 Wood Streel, Chicago, III., Teacher in Chicago High School. 

Kimball, Francis E., 8 John Street, Worcester, Mass., Accountant. 
*Livermore, R. W., Q. T. v.. Red Springs, North Carolina. 

Mackie, George. Q. T. V., M. D., D. V. S., died August 31, 1906, at Aiileboro, Mass. 

Maynard, Samuel T., Northboro, Mass., Fruit Grower and Farmer. 

MoREY, Herbert E., 34 Hillside Avenue, Maiden, Mass., Business address, 41 Washington Street., 

Boston. Mass., Numismatist and Philatelist. 
Peabody, William R., Q. T. V., died June 28, 1903, at St. Louis. Mo. 
Salisbury, Frank B., D. G. K., died 1895, at Mashonaland, Africa. 
Shaw, Elliot D., 130 Firglade Avenue, Springfield, Mass., Real Estate. 
*Snow, George H., Leominster, Mass., Farmer. 
SoMERS, Frederick M., Q. T. V., died February 2, 1894, at Southampton, England. 
Thompson, Samuel C, ^K*, *::K, 2348 Aqueduct Avenue, New York City, Civil Engineer. 
Wells, Henry, Q. T. V., died September 19, 1907, al Jamestown, R. 1. 
Whitney, William C, Q. T. V., 313 Nicollet Avenue, Minneapolis, Minn., Architect. 

'73 

CHARLES WELLINGTON, Secretary. 

Eldred, Frederick C, Sandwich, Mass., Cranberry Grower. 

Leland, Walter S., D. G. K., Concord Junction, Mass., Officer in Massachusetts Reformatory. 
Lyman, Asahel H., D. G. K., died January 16, 1896, al Manistee, Mich. 
Mills, George W.. 60 Salem Street, Medford, Mass., Physician; M. D., Harvard. 
Minor, John B., <I>K<I>, Q. T. V.. New Britain, Conn., Manufacturer. 
Penhallow, David P., Q. T. V., died at sea, October, 1910. 
Renshaw, James B., Deceased. 
*SlMPSON, Henry B.. Q. T. V.. 902 Pennsylvania Avenue, N. W., Washington, D. C. 
Wakefield, Albert T., Sheffield, Mass., Physician; M. D., Jefferson Medical College, 1878. 

*Nol heard from in 1911. 

263 



iie)(§(§©©^iiiin n^[S)i^^ 



Warner, Seth S., KS, Florence, Mass., Farmer. 

Webb, James H., *K$, K2, Hampden, Conn., Business address, 42 Church Street, New Haven, 
Conn., Lawyer, Instructor in Yale University Law School; LL. B., Yale, 1877. 
Wellington, Charles, 'I'K*, KS, Amherst, Mass., Professor of Chemistry Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College; Ph. D., Gottingen, Germany, 1885. 
*WooD, Frank W., Address unknown. 

4 '74 

DANIEL G. HITCHCOCK, 5ecre/arj!. 
Benedict, John M., D. G. K., 80 Linden Street, Waterbury, Conn., Business address, 81 North Main 
Street, Physician; M. D., University of the City of New York, 1882. 
*Blanchard, William H., Address unknown. 
Chandler, Edward P., D. G. K., Woodville, Oregon, Fruit Grower. 
Curtis, Woolfred F., died November 18, 1878, at Westminster, Mass. 
Dickinson, Asa W., D. G. K., died November 8, 1899, at Easton, Pa. 

Hitchcock, Daniel G., Warren, Mass., Insurance and Real Estate. 
*HoBBs, John A., Address unknown. 
LlBBEY, Edgar H., <I'K<{>, Clarkston, Washington, Real Estate. 
Lyman, Henry, died January 19, 1879, at Middlefield, Conn. 
Montague, Arthur H., South Hadley, Mass., Farmer. 
Phelps, Henry L., died March 3, 1900, at West Springfield, Mass. 
Smith, Frank S., D. G. K., died December 24, 1899, at Cleveland, Ohio. 
Woodman, Edward E., tI>K<J>, Danvers, Mass., Florist. 

Zeller, Harrie McK., 910 Cedar Street, R. F. D. No. 3, Hagerstown, Md., Fruit Grower and 
Gardener. 

MADISON BUNKER, S^crcXary,. 

Barrett, Joseph F., 'Hv*, <I>2K, 60 Trinity Place, New York City, Fertilizer Business. 
Barri, John A., care of Berkshire Mills, Bridgeport, Conn., Grain and Coal Dealer. 
d^' Bragg, Everett B., Q. T. V., Evanstown, 111., Business address, 112 Adams Street, Chicago, 111., 

Vice-President General Chemical Company. 
Brooks, William P., 'I'K*, <I>2K, Amherst, Mass., Director Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment 

Station; Ph, D., Friedrichs University at Halle, Germany. 
Bunker, Madison, Newton, Mass., Veterinary Surgeon; D. V. S., American Veterinary College, New 

York, 1881. 
*Callender, Thomas R., D. G. K., NorthSeld, Mass., Farmer. 
Campbell, Frederick G., 'J'SK, Putney, Vermont, Farmer. 
Carruth, Herbert S., D. G. K., Amherst, Mass., Retired. 
Clark, Zenos Y., *SK, died June 4, 1889, at Amherst, Mass. 
Clay, JaeEZ W., *2K, died October 1. 1880, at New York City. 
Dodge, George R., Q. T. V., South Hamilton, Mass., Farmer. 



»Not heard from m 1911. 



[©©©©(g^on no^E)] 



address, 72 Chauncey Street, Boston, 



Plain. Ma 



Hague, Henry, "I'SK, 695 Soulhbridge Street, Worcester, Mass., Clergyman. 

Harwood, Peter M., ^I'SK, Barre, Mass., Business address. Room 136, Slate House, Bosion, Mass- 
General Agent Massachusetts Dairy Bureau. 

KnaPP, Walter H.. *K<I>, 116 North Street, Newlonvillc, Mass., Florist. 

Lee, Lauren K., 205-206 Dispatch Building, St. Paul, Minn., Advertising Agent. 

Miles, George M., Miles City, Montana, Banker and Merchant. 

Otis, Harry P., Ki;, Florence, Mass., Manufacturer. 

Rice, Frank H., 854 Madison Street, Oakland, Cal., Accountant. 

SoUTHWlCK, Andre A., 'tSlv, 355 Tremont Street, Taunton, Mass., Farmer. 

Winchester, John F., Q. T. V., Lawrence, Mass., Veterinarian; D. V. S., American Veterinary 
College, New York, 1878. 

'76 

C. FRED DEUEL, Sccrchn. 
*Bagley, David A., Address unknown. 
Bellamy, John, D. G. K., West Newton, Mass., Business 

Mass., Bookkeeper. 
Chickering, Darius O., Enfield, Mass., Farmer. 
Deuel, C. Fred, *K<I>, Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Druggist. 
Guild, George W., Q. T. V., died May 8, 1903, ai Jamaic 
*Hawley, Joseph M.. D. G. K., Address unknown. 
*KeNDALL, Hiram, D. G. K., East Greenwich, R. I. 
*Ladd, Thomas H., Watertown, Mass. 
McCoNNELL, Charles W.. K^, 171 Tremont Street, Boston, 

phia Dental College, 1880. 
Macleod, William A., *K*, D. G. K., Business addri 
Lawyer; LL.B., Boston University. 
*MaNN, George H., 68 Stoughton Avenue, Readville, Ma 
*MarT1N, William E., Sioux Falls, S. D.. Bookkeeper. 
Parker, George A., 'tK*, 'l>i:K, 100 Blue Hills Avenue, Hartford, Conn., 

Box 1027, Hartford, Conn., Superintendent of Parks, Advisory Cily For. 
Parker, George L.. 807 Washington Street, Dorchester, Mass.. Florist. 
*Phelps, Charles H.. Address unknown. 
Porter, William H.. <I>-K, Agawam, Mass., Farmer, County Commissioner. 
Potter, William S., D. G. K., 920 State Street, Lafayette, ]nd.. Business address, 4 Wallace Block, 

Lafayette, Ind., Lawyer and Banker. 
Root, Joseph E., 'I'i;K, 67 Pearl Street, Hartford, Conn., Physician and Surgeon; M. D.. College 

of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, 1883. 
Sears, John M., Ashfield, Mass., Farmer, Town Clerk, Treasurer of Creamery. 
Smith, Thomas E„ D. G. K., died September 20, 1901, at West Chesterfield, Mass. 
Taft, Cyrus A., died February 7, 1908, at Whitinsville, Mass. 
UrnER, George P., D. G. K., died .April, 1897, at Wesley, Montana. 
Wetmore, Howard G., D. G. K., M. D., died April 27, 1906, at New York Ciiv. 
Williams, John E.. died January 18, 1890, at Amherst, Mass. 



Ma 



De 



350 Tren 



D. D. S., Philadel- 
ilding, Boston, Mass., 



En, 



gineer 



ness address, P. 
of Hartford. 



O. 



"Not heard from in 1911. 



26S 



[©©©©(g^^OII niMlD)! 



'77 

*Benson, David H., Q. T. V., North Weymouth. Mass. 
*Brewer, Charles, Address unknown. 

Clark, Atherton, "fK*, K2, 231 Waverly Avenue, Newton, Mass., Business address, 140 1 
Street, Boston, Mass., Merchant. 

HiBBARD, Joseph R., died June 17, 1899, at Stoughton, Wisconsin. 

Howe, Waldo V., Q. T. V., Newburyporl, Mass., Farmer. 

Mills, James K., D. G. K., Amherst, Mass., Photographer. 
*Nye, George F., 420 East 42nd Street, Chicago, 111. 

Parker, Henry F., LL. B., died December 21, 1897, at Brooklyn, N. Y. 
*PoRTO, Raymundo M. Da., <!'2K, Address unknown. 

SouTHMAYD, John E., 'I'SK, died December II, 1878, at Minneapolis, Minn. 

Wyman, Joseph, 347 Massachusetts Avenue, Arlington, Mass., Real Estate. 

'7S 

C. O. LOVELL, 5ecre(arj,. 
Baker, David E., *2K, 227 Walnut Street, NewlonviUe, Mass., Physician; M. D. Harvard. 
BoUTWELL, W. L., died September 28, 1906, at Northampton, Mass. 
BrigHAM, Arthur A., Brookings, So. Dakota, Principal So. Dakota School of Agriculture; 1 

Gottingen, Germany, 1 896. 
Choate, Edward C, Q. T. V., died January 18, 1905. at Southboro. Mass. 
CoBURN, Charles F., Q. T. V., died December 26, 1901, at Lowell, Mass. 
Foot, Sanford D., Q. T. V., 231 West 70th Street, New York City, Manufacturer. 
Hall, Josiah N., *K<I', ■i'SK, 1344 Elizabeth Street, Denver, Colorado; M. D., Harvard. 
Heath, Henry G. K., D. G. K., 35 Nassau Street, New York City, Lawyer. 
Howe, Charles S., ^K*, •i'SK, 2060 Cornell Road, Cleveland, Ohio, President Case 



School 



Armour Institute, 1905; LL. D., 



Ave 



rovidence. 



R. 



addn 



26 Cu 



Ma 



of Applied Science; Ph. D., Wooster University, 1887; D. Sc 
Mount Union College, 1908. 
*Hubbard, Henry F., Q. T. V., 37 Elm Gn 
tom House Street, Providence, R. 1.. Tea 
Hunt, John F., 234 Ferry Street, Malder 

Building Superintendent. 
Lovell, Charles O., Q. T. V., 5 Bromfield Str 
Lyman, Charles E., Middlefield, Conn,, Farmer. 
*Myrick, Lockwood, Hommonlon, N. J., Fruit Grower. 
*OsG00D, Frederick H., Q. T. V., 50 Village Street, Boston, Mass. 
Spofford, Amos L., *2K, died in 1911. 

Stockbridge, Horace E., K2, 20 South Forsyihe Street, Atlanta, Ga 

Ph. D. 

TuCKERMAN, Frederick, Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Anatomist; M. D., Harvard, 1882; M. A. and 

Ph. D., University of Heidelberg, Germany, 1894. 
Washburn, John H., K-, Farm School, Pa.. Director National Farm School; Ph. D., Gottingen, 

Germany. 
Woodbury, Rufus P., Q. T. V., Stock Yard Station, Kansas City, Mo., Secretary Kansas City Live 

Slock Exchange. 

*Not heard from in 1911. ■" " 

266 



;., Business address, 27 State Street, Boston, Mass., 
et, Boston, Mass., Manufacturer. 



Editor Southern Ruralist; 



[©©©©(g^^iitin OKiis)] 



'79 

R. W. SWAN, Secrelar\). 

Dickinson. Richard S„ Columbus, Neb., Banker. 
Green, Samuel B., died July II, 1910, at St. Anihony Park, Minn. 
*RuDOLPH, Charles, Q. T. V., Hotel Rexford, Boslon, Mass. 
Sherman, Walter A., D. G. K.. 214 Pawluckel Street, Lowell, Mass.. Veterinary Surgeon; D. 

V. S., American Veterinary College. 1883; M. D.. Long Island Medical College. 
Smith, George P., K2, Sunderland, Mass., Farmer. 
*Swan, Roscoe W., D. G. K., M. D., 41 Pleasant, Street, Worcester, Mass., Physician. 
Waldron, Hiram E. B., Q. T. V., 112 Highland Street, Hyde Park, Mass., Real Estate and 
Insurance. 

'80 

ALVAN L. FOWLER, Secref^rv. 

Fowler, Alvan L., 'i'SK, 413 P. O. BIdg., Philadelphia. Pa., National Bank Examiner. 
*Gladwin, Frederick E., 'i'SK, 2401 North 16ih Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lee, William G., D. G. K., Cornmg, Tehama Co.. California, Horticulturist, 
*McQuEEN, Charles M., *2K, address unknown. 

Parker, William C, 'I'SK, LL.B., 294 Washington Street, Boston, Mass., Lawyer. 
*RlPLEY, George A., Q. T. V.. Greendale, Mass., Market Gardener. 

Stone, Almon H., Wareham, Mass., Farmer. 

•81 

J. L. HILLS, Secretary. 

Bowman, Charles A., C. S. C, 609 Astrom Avenue, Syracuse, N, Y., Business address, 514 Dil- 
laye Building, Syracuse, N. Y., Civil Engineer. 

Boynton. Charles E., M. D., died at Los Banos, Cal. 

Carr, W. Frank, Q. T. V., 116 Thirty-Second Street. Milwaukee, Wis.. Manufacturer and Engineer; 
C. E. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1884. 

Chapin, Henry E.. 49 Lefferts .Avenue, Richmond Hill, New York City, Teacher of Biology and 
Physiology; M. Sc, Michigan Agricultural College, 1893; D. Sc, McKendree College, 1908. 

Fairfield, Frank H.. Q. T. V., 153 Fourth Avenue, East Orange. N. J.. Chemist. 

Flint, Charles L.. Q. T. V., died June, 1904. 

HaSHIGUCHI, Boonzo, D. G. K., died August 12, 1903, at Tokio, Japan. 

Hills. Joseph L., *K*, K2, 59 North Prospect Street, Burlington, Vt., Dean, Department of Agri- 
culture, University of Vermont, Director Vermont Agricultural Experiment Station; D. Sc, Rutgers 
College. 

Howe, Elmer D., <I>2K, Marlboro, Mass., Dairy Farmer, Trustee Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

PETEhs, Austin, Q. T. V., Harvard, Mass., Farmer; D. V. S., American Veterinary College, 
New York, 1883; M. R. C. V. S., London. England. 



*Not heard from in 1911. 



267 



[©(§(§ ©(§2::SIinn niM©!^^ 



Rawson, Edward B., D. G. K., 226 East 16lh Street, New York City, Superintendent Friends' 

School, New York and Brooklyn; Pd. M., New York University. 
Smith, Hiram F. M., 115 South Main Street, Orange, Mass., Physician; M. D., Harvard, 1885. 
Spalding, Abel W., C. S. C, 422 Globe Block, Seattle, Wash., Architect. 
Taylor, Frederick P., D. G. K., Athens, Tenn., Farmer. 
Warner, Clarence D., D. G. K., died October 16, 1905, at Kimmswick, Mo. 
Whittaker, Arthur, D. G. K., died March, 1906, at Needham, Mass. 
Wilcox, Henry H., D. G. K., died January 11, 1899, at Honolulu. 
Young, Charles E., 'i'SK, Columbia, S. C, Physician; M. D., University of the City of New 

York, 1882. 

•82 

G. D. HOWE, Secre(arji. 

Allen, Francis S., C. S. C, 221 Main Street, Nashua, N. H., Veterinary Surgeon; D. V. S. Amer- 
ican Veterinary College, New York, 1884; M. D., New York University, 1886. 

ApLiN, George T., Q. T. V., East Putney, Vt., Farmer. 
*Beach, C. Edward, D. G. K., West Hartford, Conn., Farmer. 

Bingham, Eugene P., C. S. C, died March 31, 1904, at Los Angeles, Cal. 

Bishop, William H., *SK, Farm School, Pa., Professor of Agriculture, National Farm School. 

BrodT, Harry S., Q. T. V., died December, 1906, at Rawlins, Wyo. 

Chandler, Everett S., C. S. C, North Judson, Ind., R. F. D. No. 3, Clergyman; LL. B., Har- 
vard, 1885; B. D., Chicago Theological Seminary, 1890. 
*CooPER, James W.. D. G. K., Plymouth, Mass., Pharmacist. 

Cutter, John A., 262 West 77th Street, New York City, Physician; M. D., Albany Medical Col- 
lege, 1886. 

Damon, Samuel C, Kingston, R. I., Assistant in Agronomy, Rhode Island Agricultural Experiment 
Station. 

Floyd, Charles W., died October 10, 1883, at Dorchester, Mass. 

Goodale, David, Q. T. V., Marlboro, Mass., Farmer. 

HiLLMAN, Charles D., 'I'SK, Walsonville, Cal„ R. F. D. No. 2, Nurseryman. 
■ Howard, Joseph H., died February 13, 1889, at Minnsela, South Dakota. 

Howe, George D., 25 Winter Street, Bangor, Me., Salesman. 

Jones, Frank W., Q. T. V., Assinippi, Mass., Teacher. 

Kingman, Morris B., Amherst, Mass., Florist and Market Gardener. 

Kinney, Burton A., 18 Bleachery Street, Lowell, Mass., Manufacturer. 

May, Frederick G., *2K, 34 Adams Street, Dorchester, Mass., Business address, 68 East Street, 
Printer. 

Morse, William A., Q. T. V.. 15 Auburn Street, Melrose Highlands, Mass., Business address, 
28 Stale Street, Boston, Mass., Secretary. 

Myrick, Herbert. Myrick Building, Springfield, Mass., Editor, Author, Publisher and Manufacturer. 

Paige, James B., 'Hv*, Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Professor of Veterinary Science, Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College, Veterinarian Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station; D. V. S., 
McGill University, 1888. 

*Not heard from in 1911. 

268 



G^[D)(§(§©(§^II[[II HKIEb)] 



Perkins, Dana E., Medford Square, Medford, Mass., Civil Engineer. 
Plumb, Charles S., Q. T. V., 19S0 Indianola Avenue, Columbus, Ohio, 
Husbandry, Ohio Slale University. 
*Shiverick, Asa F., K2, 100 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 111., Merchant. 
Stone, WinTHROP E., C. S. C, 146 North Grant Street, West Lafayette 
due University; Ph. D., Gotlingen, Germany, 1888; LL. D., Michig: 

1907. 
Taft, LeV[ R., *K>1>, C. S. C, Agricultural College, Michigan; State Superintendent of F, 

Institute. 
Taylor, Alfred H., D. G. K., Caldwell. Idaho, Farmer. 
Thurston, Welbur H., died August, 1900, at Cape Nome, Alaska. 
Wilder, John E., 'Mv*, K2, 226-228 Lake Street, Chicago, 111., Tanner a 

Trustee Beloit College. 
Williams, James S., Q. T. V., Glastonbury, Conn., Manufacturer. 
Windsor, Joseph L., 922 State Life Building, Indianapolis, Ind., Insurance. 



Ind., President I 
Agricultural Coll 



nd Leather MerchanI, 



'83 



J. B. LINDSEY, Sccretaii,. 

*BaglEY, Sidney C, 't-K, 230 Tremont Street, Melrose Highlands, Mass., Cigar Packer. 

Bishop, Edgar A., C. S. C, Peterboro, N. H., with American Guernsey Cattle Club. 

Braune, DoMlNCOS H., D. G. K., 'Barry do Pirahy E. do Rio, Brazil. 

Hevia, Alfred A., *SK, 71 Nassau Street, New York City, Real Estate and Insurance, 

Holman, Samuel M., Q. T. V., 39 Pleasant Street, Attleboro, Mass., Real Estate and Insurance. 

LiNDSEY, Joseph B.. <I>K<I>, C. S. C, Amherst, Mass., Vice-Director and Chemist Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station; Goessmann Professor of Chemistry Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege; A. M. and Ph. D., Gottingen, Germany, 1891. 

MiNOTT, Charles W., C. S. C, Hudson, Mass., State .Agent, Gypsy and Brown Tail Moth Sup- 
pression. 

NOURSE, David O., C. S. C, Newburg, N. Y., Farmer. 

Preston, Charles H., '{"Kfl), Ki:, Hathorne, Mass., Farmer, Bank President, Trustee Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

Wheeler, Homer J., C. S. C. Kingston, R. 1., Director Rhode Island Agricultural Experiment 
Station; M. A. and Ph. D., Gottingen, Germany, 1889. 



'84 



*Hermes. Charles, Q. T. V., Address unknown. 

Holland, Harry D., Amherst, Mass., Merchant. 

Jones, Elisha A., <I>-K, New Canaan, Conn., Farm Superintendent. 
*Smith, Llewellyn, Q. T. V., Address unknown. 



*Nol heard from in 1911. 



:©(§(§ ©(g^nnn 



mj^\ 



'85 

E. W. ALLEN, Sccrelar}). 

Allen, Edwin W., ^K't, C. S. C, 1923 Biltmore Street, Washington, L>. C, Assistant Director, 
Office of Experiment Stations, United Slates Department of Agriculture; Ph. D., Gottingen, Ger- 
many, 1890. 

Almeida, Luciano J. De, D, G. K., Cajurie Est Sao Paulo, Brazil, Surveyor. 

Barber, George H., Q. T. V., Naval Hospital, Olougapa, P. I., Physician and Surgeon United 
Slates Navy; M. D., College for Physicians and Surgeons, New York, 1888. 
'Browne, Charles W., <I>K*, Westboro, Mass. 

*GoLDTHWAIT, JoEL E., 'I'K*, C. S. C, 372 Marlborough Street, Boston, Mass., Physician; M. D. 
College for Physicians and Surgeons, New York, 1888. 

Howell, Hezekiah, 'P-K, Monroe, Orange Co., New York, Retired. 

Leary, Lewis C, died April 3, 1888, at Cambridge, Mass. 

Phelps, Charles S., 'I'K<J', K2, Salisbury, Conn., Farmer. 
*TayLOR, Isaac N., Jr., D. G. K., 84-86 Second Street, San Francisco, Cal., Secretary Electric Rail- 
way and Manufacturing Supply Co. 

Tekirian, Benoni O., C. S. C, 201 West 118th Street, New York City, Merchant. 



'86 



WINFIELD AYRES, 5ecre/ari;. 

*Ateshian, Oscar H., C. S. C, Hotel San Remo, New York City, Merchant. 

Atkins, William H., D. G. K., Burnside, Conn., Florist. 

Ayres, Winfield, Ki;, 616 Madison Avenue, New York Cily, Physician; M. D., Bellevue Hos- 
pital Medical College, 1893. 

Carpenter, David F., 'I'K*, Ki;, Littleton, N, H., Superintendent of Schools, 

ClapP, Charles W., C. S. C, Main Street, Northampton, Mass., Assistant Superintendent Con- 
necticut Valley Street Railroad, 
*Duncan, Richard F., 'tSK, M. D., 1236 Westminster Street, Providence, R. I., Physician, 

Eaton, William A., D. G. K., Business address, I Madison Avenue, New York City, Lumber 
Dealer. 

Felt, Charles F. W., *K<I>, C, S, C, 1020 Van Buren Street, Topeka, Kan., Civil Engineer. 

Mackintosh, Richard B., 'I>K<I>, D. G. K., 21 Aborn Street, Peabody, Mass,, with United Shoe 
Machinery Company. 

Sanborn, Kingsbury, 'I'-K, Riverside, Cal., Hydraulic Engineer. 

Stone, George E., <I>K<I>, 'I>i;K, Amherst, Mass., Professor of Botany Massachusetts Agricultural 
College; Plant Pathologist Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station; Ph, D., Leipsic Uni- 
versity, Germany, 1892, 

Stone, George S., D. G. K., Otter River, Mass., Farmer. 



'••Not heard from in 1911. 



Ra le) (§(§©(§ s^niin 



'S7 

F, H. FOWLER, Sccrclar\). 

*Almeida, AucUSTO L., De, D. G. K., Rio Janeiro, Brazil. 

Barrett, Edward W., D. G. K., 4 Ashland Street, Medford, Mass., Physician; M. D., Jefferson 
Medical College. 

Caldwell, William H., Ki^, Pelerboro_, N. H., Farmer, Secretary and Treasurer American Guern- 
sey Cattle Club. 
'Carpenter, Frank B., 'I-K*, C. S. C, 602 Lamb Avenue, Boston Heights, Richmond, Va., Chemist. 

Chase, WtLLIAM E., 1 1 East 60th Street, North Portland, Oregon, Farmer. 

Davis, Frederick A., C. S. C, 223 Majestic Bmldlng, Denver, Colo., Physician; M. D., Harvard, 
1891; A. M., Harvard, 1900. 

FlSHERDlCK, Cyrus W., C. S. C, Laplala, New Mexico, Merchant and Rancher. 

Flint, Edward R., Q. T. V., Gamsvllle, Fla.. Professor of Chemistry, University of Florida; 
Ph. D., Gottingen, Germany; M. D., Harvard. 

Fowler, Frederick H., -i'K-]; C. S. C, Shirley, Mass., Clerk, Industrial School for Boys. 

Howe, Clinton S., C. S. C, West Medway, Mass., Farmer. 

Marsh, James M., C. S. C, Lynn, Mass., Manufacturer. 

Marshall, Charles L., D. G. K., Dedham, Mass., Florist and Gardener. 

Meehan, ThoiviAS F., D. G. K., died April 4, 1905, at Boston, Mass. 

Osterhout, Jeremiah C, Chelmsford, Mass., Farmer. 

Richardson, Evan F., 'I>— K, Millis, Mass., Farmer, Lecturer State Grange. 

RlDEOUT, Henry N. W., Q. T. V., 7 Howe Street, winter Hill, Mass., Assistant Paymaster, B. & 

M. R. R. 

TolmaN, William N., 'I'-K, United Gas Improvement Company, 1921 Indiana Avenue, Kansas 
City, Mo., Civil Engineer. 

*Torrelly, FiRINlNO Da S., Cidado de Rio Grande do Sud, Brazil. 

*WaTSON, Charles H., Q. T. V., 184 Summer Street, Boston, Mass., Representative Wool Depart- 
ment for Swift & Company. 

'SS 

H. C. BLISS, Sccrefary. 
Belden, Edward H., C. S. C, 18 Park View Street, Roxbury, Mass.. with Edison Electric Illum- 
inating Company, of Boston. 
Bliss, Herbert C, K2, 14 Mechanic Street, Altleboro, Mass., Manufacturing Jeweler. 
Brooks, Fred K., C. S. C, 36 Brockton Avenue, Haverhill, Mass., Laundryman. 
CoOLEY, Fred S., 'I'K'I', <{>2K, Bozeman, Mont., Supervisor of Farmers' Institutes. 
*DiCKINS0N, Edwin H., C. S. C, North Amherst, Mass., Farmer. 
Field, Samuel H., C. S. C, North Hatfield, Mass., Farmer. 
Foster, Francis H., Andover, Mass., Civil Eng neer and Farmer. 
Hayward, Albert I., C. S. C, Ashby, Mass., Farmer. 
Holt, Jonathan E., C. S. C, Andover, Mass., Business. 
Kinney, Lorenzo F., Kingston, R. 1., Commercial Horticulluralist. 

*Not heard from in 1911. 

271 



;iD)(§(§(§(§2^[[nn nmm] 



Knapp, Edward E., K2, Glenolden, Pa., in Mechanical Department Atlantic Refining Company. 
*MisHiMA, Viscount Yataro, D. G. K., 5 Shinrudo, Azabuku, Japan. 

Moore, Robert B., *K<I>, C. S. C. 2520 South Cleveland Street, Philadelphia, Pa., Superintendent 
American Agricultural Chemical Company. 
*Newman, George E., Q. T. V., 287 North First Street, San Jose, Cal. 

NoYES, Frank F., D. G. K., 472 North Jackson Street, Atlanta, Ga., Superintendent Electric Power 
Company. 

Parsons, Wilfred A., 'i'-K, Southampton, Mass., Farmer. 

Rice, Thomas, D. G. K., 126 Third Street, Fall River, Mass., Journalist. 

Shepardson, William M., C. S. C, Middlebury, Conn., Landscape Gardener. 

Shimer, Boyer L., Q. T. V., Mt. Airy Park, Bethlehem, Pa., Farmer and Real Estate. 

•89 

C. S. CROCKER, 5ccre/arl,. 

Blair, James R., Q. T. V., 158 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Mass., Superintendent of C. 
Brigham Co., Milk Contractors. 

CoPELAND, Arthur D., KS, died September 3, 1907, at Boston, Mass. 

Crocker, Charles S., Ki), 2453 Carpenter Street, Philadelphia, Pa., Chemist with American Agri- 
cultural Chemical Company. 

Davis, Franklin W., *K<I>, ^XK, 85 Colberg Avenue, Roslindale, Mass., Journalist. 

HartweLL, Burt L., 'I'K'I', C. S. C, Kingston, R. 1., Chemist Rhode Island Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, Professor of Agricultural Chemistry, Rhode Island State College; M. Sc, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, 1900; Ph. D., University of Pennsylvania, 1903. 

Hubbard, Dwight L., C. S. C, 645 Washington Street, Brighton, Mass., Civil Engineer. 

Hutchings, James T., 'tilK, 34 Clinton Avenue, Rochester, New York, Assistant General Man- 
ager of Rochester Railway and Light Company. 

Kellogg, William A., *2K, died March 28, 1910, at Northampton, Mass. 

Miles, Arthur L., C. S. C, 12 Magazine Street, Cambridge, Mass., Dentist; D. D. S., Boston 
Dental College, 1898; D. M. D., Tufts College, 1909. 

North, Mark N., Q. T. V., Windsor, Vt., Veterinarian. 

NouRSE, Arthur M., C. S. C, Westboro, Mass., Farmer. 

Sellew, Robert P., 'tSK, 166 Kent Street, Brookline, Mass., Sales Manager. 
*Whitney, Charles A., C. S. C, Upton, Mass. 

*Wo0DBURY, Herbert E., C. S. C, 1512 North Delaware Street, Indianapolis, Ind.; M. D. Har- 
vard, 1899. 

'90 

DAVID BARRY, Secrdary. 

*BarrY, David, •I'K*, Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Superintendent Electric Light Works. 
Bliss, Clinton E., D. G. K., died August 24, 1894, at Attleboro, Mass. 
Castro, Arthur De M., D. G. K., died May 2, 1894, at Juiz de Fora, Minas, Brazil. 
Dickinson, Dwight W., Q. T. V., Watertown, Mass.; Dentist; D. M. D., Harvard, 1895. 
FeltON, Truman P., C. S. C, West Berlin, Mass., Farmer. 

*Not heard from in 1911. 

272 



[©©©©(g^iiiin 



Gregory, Edgar, C. S. C, Marblehead, Mass., Seedsman. 

Haskins, Henri D., Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Chemist Massachusetts Agricuhural Experiment Sta- 
tion. 
*HeRREO, Jose M., D. G. K., Havana, Cuba, Editor. 

*J0NES, Charles H., 'I'K*, Q. T. V., 83 Brooks Avenue. Burhngton, Vermont, Chemist Vermont 
Agricultural Experiment Station. 
LoRING, John S., died January 17, 1903, at Oilando, Florida. 

McCloud, Albert C, Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass.. Insurance and Real Estate. 
MossMAN, Fred W., C. S. C, Westminster, Mass., Farmer. 

Russell, Henry L., D. G. K., Pawlucket, R. 1., Secretary, Pawtucket Ice Company. 
SiMONDS, George B., C. S. C, died July 19, 1909, at Fitchburg, Mass. 

Smith, Frederick J., *K*, Q. T. V., Pierce Phosphate Company, Pierce, Polk Co., Florida; Chem- 
ist; M. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1896. 
*Stowe, Arthur N., Q. T. V., Hudson, Mass., Farmer. 
*Taft, Walter E., D. G. K., Berlin, N. H., Mechanical Engineer. 
Taylor, Frederick L., Q. T. V., 524 Warren Street, Boston, Mass., Physician; M. D., Harvard,, 

1901. 
West, John S., Q. T. V., died July 13. 1902, at Belchertown, Mass. 
Williams, Frank O., Q. T. V., Sunderland, Mass.. Farmer. 

'91 

H. T. SHORES, Secrclar\^. 
Arnold, Frank L., 'I>K*, Q. T. V., 32 School Street, North Woburn, Mass.. Chemist. 
Brown, Walter A., C. S. C, died January 18, 1910, at Springfield, Mass. 
Carpenter, Malcolm A., C. S. C, 33 Hight Street, Greenfield, Mass., Landscape Gardener. 
'■Fames, Aldice G.. 'I'^K, North Wilmington, Mass., Journalist. 
Felt, E. Porter, C. S. C, Geological Hall, Albany, N. Y.. State Entomologist; Sc. D.. Cornell, 

1894. 

*F|ELD, Henry J., Q. T. V., Greenfield, Mass. 

Gay, Willard W., D. G. K., 156 Fifth Avenue, New York City, Landscape Gardener and Engineer. 

Horner, Louis F., C. S. C, 3905 Wisconsin Piace, Los Angeles, Cal., Landscape Architect. 

Howard, Henry M., C. S. C, 284 Fuller Street, West Newton, Mass., Market Gardener. 

Hull, John B., Jr., D. G. K., Great Barrington, Mass., Coal Dealer. 
*JoHNSON, Charles H., D. G. K.. 8 Harvard Avenue, Dorchester, Mass., Electrical Engineer. 
*Lace, Oscar V. B., D. G. K., Juiz de Fora, Minas, Brazil. 

Legate, Howard N., D. G. K., II Copeland Place, Roxbury, Mass.. Business address. Room 136, 
State House, Boston, Mass., Clerk Stale Board of Agriculture; LL. B., Boston Y. M. C. A. 
Evening Law School, 1908. 

MagILL, Claude A., 902 Chapel Street, New Haven, Conn., General Manager Connecticut Hassem 
Paving Comapny. 

Paige, Walter C, D. G. K., 505 Masonic Temple, Louisville, Ky., Field Secretary, Y. M. C. A. 
*RuGGLES, Murray, C. S. C, Milton, Mass., Superintendent Electric Works. 

Sawyer, Arthur H.. Q. T. V., 131 North 16th Street, East Orange, N. J., Cement Inspector. 

Shores, Harvey T., K2, 177 Elm Street, Northampton, Mass., Physician; M. D.. Harvard, 1894. 

*Not heard from in 1911. 

273 



:ie)(§(§©©^iiiin no^iD! 



•92 

H. M. THOMSON, Secrelar]). 

Beals, Alfred T., Q, T, V., 120 East 23rd Sireet, New York City, Photographer. 

BOYNTON, Walter I., Q. T. V., 73 Darlmoulh Street, Springfield, Mass., Business address, 3!0 
Main Street, Dentist; D. D. S.. Boston Denial College, 1895. 

Clark, Edward T., C. S. C, Shirley, Mass., Farm Manager Industrial School for Boys. 
*Crane, Henry E., C. S. C, Monroe Road, Quincy, Mass. 

Deuel, James E., Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Druggist; Ph. G., College of Pharmacy, Boston, 
Mass. 

Emerson, Henry B., C. S. C, 6 Central Street, Methuen, Mass., Superintendent in Arl.ngton Mills. 

Field, Judson L., Q. T. V., 223 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, 111., Salesman. 
*Fletcher, William, C. S. C, Chelmsford, Mass. 

Graham, Charles S., C. S. C, Holden, Mass., Farmer. 

Holland, Edward B., 'I'K<t, K2, Amherst, Mass., Associate Chemist Massachusetts Agricultural 
Experiment Station; M. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Hubbard, Cyrus M., Q. T. V., Sunderland, Mass., Farmer. 

Knight, Jewell B., Q. T. V., Poona, India, Professor of Agriculture and Director Experiment Sta- 
tion, Poona College; M. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1901. 

Lyman, Richard P., Q. T. V., East Lansing, Mich., Dean of Veterinary Division Michigan Agri- 
cultural College; M. D. V., Harvard, 1894. 

Plumb, Frank H., Q. T. V., Stafford Springs, Conn., Farmer. 

Rogers, Elliott, 'tSK, Kennebunk, Me., Manufacturer. 

Smith, Robert H., died March 25, 1900, at Amherst, Mass. 

Stockbridge, Francis G., <I'K<I>, D. G. K., Englishlown, N. J., Farmer. 

Taylor, George E., <I'K*, Q. T. V., Shelbume, Mass., Farmer. 

Thomson, Henry M., "tK"!', C. S. C, Amherst, Mass., Farmer. 
*West, Homer C, Q, T. V„ Belchertown, Mass., Traveling Agent. 

WillaRD, George B„ <I'2K, Waltham, Mass., City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes. 

Williams, Milton H., Q. T. V., Sunderland, Mass., Veterinarian; M. D. V., Harvard, 1894. 

'93 

F. A. SMITH, SecretaT\). 
Baker, Joseph, Q. T. V., North Grosvenordale, Conn., Farmer. 



*BarTLETT, Frederick G., D, G. K., 298 Cabot Street, Holyoke, Mass., Superintendent Forestdale 
Cemetery. 
Clark, Henry D„ C. S. C, Fitchburg, Mass., Veterinarian; D, V. S., McGill University, 1895, 
*CuRLEY, George F., <I'K*, C. S. C, 10 Congress Street, Milford, Mass. 
Davis, Herbert C, Q. T. V., 45 West Cain Sireet, Atlanta, Ga., Railway Postal Service. 
Goodrich, Charles A., D. G. K., 61 North Beacon Street, Hartford, Conn., Physician; M. D., 

College for Physicians and Surgeons, New York, 1896. 
Harlow, Francis T., 'tSK, Marshfield, Mass., Farmer. 
*Harlow, Harry J., Ki;, Shrewsbury, Mass., Farmer. 

*Nol heard from in 1911. 

274 



[[B)@©©©^[[[in no^iD)]^^ 



*Hawks, Ernest A., C. S. C, Address unknown. 

Henderson, Frank H., D. G. K„ 1 1 East 24ih Street, New York City, Gv.l Engineer. 

Howard, Edwin C, 'I'-K, Lawrence School, Boston, Mass., Teacher. 

HoYT, Franklin S., C. S. C, 44 Winthrop Street, West Newton, Mass., Editor Educational Depart- 
ment, Houghton, Mifflin & Company; A. M., Columbia, 1904. 

LehNERT, Eugene H., '1>K<|., i;K, D. V. S., 7 Franklin Street, Northampton, Mass.. Teacher. 

Melendy, a. Edward. Q. T. V., 1 I Grant Street, Wallaston, Mass., Clerk C. and R. Department, 
U. S. Navy. 

Perry, John R., 101 Tremont Street, Boston. Mass., Decorator and Painter. 
*SmiTH, Cotton A., Q. T. V., 614 Trust & Savings Building, Los Angeles, Cal., Real Estate; Ph. 
D., Sheffield Scientific School, 1894. 

Smith, Fred A., C. S. C, Turner Hill, Ipswich, Mass., Farm Superintendent. 

Smith, Luther W., -KK, Manteno, 111., Stock Farmer. 

Staples, Henry F., C. S. C, 8628 Wade Park Avenue. Cleveland, Ohio, Physician; M. D., 
Cleveland University of Medicine and Surgeiy, 1896. 
*TlNOCO, Luiz A. F.. D. G. K., Campos, Rio Janeiro. Brazil, Planter and Manufacturer. 

Walker. Edward J., C. S. C, Box 315, Clinton, Mass., Farmer. 



'94 

S. F. HOWARD, Secrclan. 

Alderman, Edwin H., C. S. C, R. F. D. No. 2. Chester, Mass., Farmer. 

Averell, Fred G., Q. T. V., 131 Slate Street, Boston, Mass., Clerk. 

Bacon, Linus H., Q. T. V., 36 Cherry Street, Spencer, Mass., with Phoenix Paper Box Company. 

Bacon, Theodore S., 'Hv*. <\^1K, 69 Maple Street, Springfield, Mass., Physician and Surgeon; 

M. D. Harvard, 1898. 
Barker, Louis M., C. S. C, Hanson, Mass., Civil Engineer. 
BoarDMAN, Edwin L., C. S. C, Sheffield, Mass., Farmer. 

Brown, Charles L., C. S. C, 870 State Street. Springfield, Mass., Laundryman. 
Curtis, Arthur C, C. S. C, Spring Valley, N. Y., Farmer. 
Cutter, Arthur H., 'I'SK, 333 Broadway, Lawrence, Mass., Physician and Surgeon; M. D., 

Harvard, 1901. 
Davis, PerleY E., Q. T. V., Granby, Mass., Farmer. 
*DlCKINSON, Eliot T., Q. T. V., D. M. D., 138 Main Street, Northampton, Mass., Dentist. 
Fowler, Halley M., 52 Madison Street, Somerville, Mass.. Railway Postal Clerk. 
Fowler, Henry J., C. S. C, died February 2, 1911. 
GiffORD, John E., K-, Sutton, Mass., Farmer. 
*GreeNE, Frederick L., C. S. C, Anderson, Shasta Co., Cal, Teacher; A. M., Columbia, 1899. 
Greene, Ira C, Q. T. V., 222 Pleasant Street, Leominster, Mass., Ice and Coal Dealer. 
HicCINS, Charles H.. C. S. C, Ottawa, Canada, Pathologist to Department of Agriculture, Do- 

mimon of Canada; D. V. S., McGill University, 1896; Fellow of the Royal Microscopical 

Society of London, England, 1910. 

*Not heard from in 1911. 

275 



[©©©©(g^iinn iiKiis)!^^ 



Howard, S. Francis, <I'K*, <i>i;K, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md., Assistant Professor of 

Chemistry, Massachusetts Agricultural College; M. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1901; 

Graduate Student at Johns Hopkins University, 1911-1912. 
Keith, Thaddeus F., Q. T. V., 8 Wallace Avenue, Fitchburg, Mass., Advertising Contractor. 
KiRKLAND, Archie H., *2K, Huntington, Mass,, Consulting Entomologist; M. Sc, Massachusetts 

Agricultural College, 1896. 
LouNSBURV, Charles P„ 'i'K'I), *SK, Department of Agriculture, Pretoria, South Africa, GoV' 

ernmenl Entomologist, Colony of Cape of Good Hope. 
ManlEY, Lowell, Ki), West Roxbury, Mass.. Farm Superintendent. 
MerwIN, George H., C. S. C, Southport, Conn., Farmer. 

Morse, Alvertus J., Q. T. V., Northampton, Mass., Lawyer; LL. B., Boston University, 1901. 
Pomeroy, Robert F., C. S. C, died 1909. 

Putnam, Joseph H., K2, Litchfield, Conn., Farm Superintendent. 
*SanDERSON, William E., K2, 36 Cortlandl Street, New York City. 

Smead, H. Preston, K2, Dummerston Station, Vt., Farm Superintendent. 
*Smith, George E., C. S. C, Belfast, Me., Manager Stock Farm. 
Smith, Ralph E., *K*, *2K, Berkeley, Cal., Associate Professor of Plant Pathology, University of 

California. 
SpauldinG, Charles H., *2K, 223 Massachusetts Avenue, Lexington, Mass., United States Inspec- 
tor, Engineering Department, 
Walker, Claude F„ C, S, C, 155 West 65th Street, New York City, Teacher; Ph, D., Yale, 

1897, 
White, Elias D., 'I'SK, Athens, Ga., Postal Service. 

•95 

E. A. WHITE, 5ecre(arj;. 

Ballou, Henry A., 'I'K*, Q. T. V., Barbadoes, B, W. I., Entomologist, Imperial Department of 
Agriculture for the West Indies; M. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1906. 
*Bemis, Waldo L., Q, T. V., Spencer, Mass., Manufacturer. 

Billings, George A„ C. S. C, U. S., Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C, Farm Man- 
agement Investigations. 

Brown, William C, D. G. K., 103 Newbury Street, Boston, Mass., Interior Decorator. 

Burgess, Albert F., 'I'-K, Melrose Highlands, Mass., Entomologist in U. S. Bureau of Ento- 
mology; M. Sc. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1897, 

Clark, Harry E„ <1>2K, Middlebury, Conn,, Farm Superintendent. 

Cooley, Robert A., 'tSK, Bozeman, Mont., Professor of Zoology and Entomology, Montana Agri- 
cultural College, State Entomologist. 

Crehore, Charles W., "tSK, Chicopee, Mass., Farmer. 

Dickinson, Charles M., Q. T. V., 76-78 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, III., Seedsman and Florist. 

Fairbanks, Herbert S., K2, 13th and Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia, Pa., Patent Attorney. 

Foley, Thomas P., C. S. C, 466 Valley Road, West Orange, N. J., Draughtsman. 

Frost, Harold L., "fK*, 'PSK, Arlington, Mass., Landscape Forester and Entomologist. Trustee of 
Massachusetts Agricultural College. 



*Not heard from in 1911. 



c^iD)(§(g©(§^[[iin niMis)] 



HemENWAY, Herbert D., C. S, C, Norlhamplon. Mass.. General Secretary Home Culture Clubs. 
*JoNES, Robert S., 'I'i^K, Address unknown. 
*KUR0DA, ShirO, <T>i;K, 127 Second Street, Osaka, Japan. 

Lane, Clarence B.. D. G. K., 1118 Jefferson Street. Philadelphia. Pa.. Dairyman. 

Lewis, Henry W., Paraiso, Canal Zone, Panama, Superintendent of Construction. 

Marsh, Jasper, K-, Danves, Mass., Lamp Manufacture,-. 

Morse, Walter L., K:^, Grand Central Station, New York City, Engineer. 

Potter, DANtEL C, C. S. C, Fairhaven, Mass., Landscape and Sanitary Engineer. 

Read, Henry B., <I'-K. Westford, Mass., Farmer. 

Root, Wright A., 'f'-K, Easlhampton, Mass., Fruit Grower. 

Smith, Arthur B., Q. T. V., 1434 Farragut Avenue, Fort Wayne, Ind., Bookkeeper. 
--Stevens, Clarence L.. died October 8, 1901, at Sheffield, Mass. 

Sullivan, Maurice J., Littleton, N. H., Farm Manager. 

TOBEY, Frederick C, C. S. C, West Slockbridge, Mass., Lime Manufactuier. 
*ToOLE, Stephen P., Amherst, Mass., Evergreen Nurseryman. 

Warren, Franklin L., Q. T. V., 417 West Galu Street, Seattle, Wash.. Physician; M. D., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1899. 

White, Edward A., Ki:, Amherst, Mass., Professor of Floncullure, Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege. 

'96 

ASA S. KINNEY, Secrdan,. 



r, 1907, a 
m-Hudson 
Farm M, 



t Gr. 



N. Y, 



ch. Conn. 
Civil Engineer 



urg. Va„ 
ell. 1900. 
ler and P 



Di 



Vii 



arket Gardene 



BuRRlNGTON, HoRACE C, 'I'i^K, died No er 
Clapp, Frank L., 'I'K<1', C. S. C, Cornw; 
Cook, Allen B., C. S. C. Farmmgion, Coi 
*Edwards, Harry T., C. S. C, Address unknown. 
Fletcher, Stevenson W., 'I>KiI>, C. S. C, Black 

ment Station; M. Sc, Cornell, 1898. Ph. D.. Co 
Hammer, James F., C. S. C, NasSua, N. H., Fa 
-*Harper, Walter B., Q. T. V., Address unknown. 
Jones, Benjamin K.. C. S. C, died August 21, 1903, a* Springfield 
Kinney, Asa S., K2, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass 

in Botany; M. Sc. Massachusetts Agricultural College. 1907. 
KraemeR. AlBIN M., K2, 171 Boston Road, Spr.ngfield, Mass., Civil Enginee 
*LeaMY, Patrick A., Q. T. V., Address unknown. 
Luce. Edmond De, 'I'i:!-:, 27 West 23rd Street. N 

Sons. 
Marshall, James L., C. S. C. 7 Belvidere Avent 

pany. 
Moore, Henry W., Ki:, 28 Amh.»ist Street, Wo c< 
,' Nichols, Robert P., D. G. K., Deceased. 

Nutting, Charles A., <I>i;K, West Berlin, Mass., Farmer. 

Pentecost, William L., D. G. K., ChapinvilL, Corn., Farm Superintendent 



Agricultural Expe 



Floriculluralist and Instructor 



■ "I'ork City, Manager, 
Worcester, Mass., Os: 
er, Mass., Fan 



re G. P. Putnam & 



d Bradlev Car Co 



d Market Gardener. 



*Not heard fr^ 



1911. 



277 



[©©©©(g^^iinn HKiiB)!^^ 



Nautical College. 



Park, 111,, Assistant Professor of 



Poole, ErfORD W., 'tK*, KS, P. O. Box 129, New Bedford, Mass., Estimator and Draughtsman. 
*PooLE, I. Chester, *K*, K2, 204 High Street, Fall River, Mass., Osteopathic Physician; D. 0„ 
American School of Osteopathy, 1904. 
Read, Frederick H.. 'tSK, Oaklawn, R. 1., Teacher. 
Roper, Harry H., C. S. C, Ipswich, Mass., Farm Manager. 
SaiTA, SeiJIRO, C. S. C, 12 Aoyama, Takagicho, Tokio, Japan, Profess 

B. L., Nilson Law School, Tokio, 1907, Master's Deg)ee, 1908. 
SasTRE, Salome, D. G. K., Cardenas, Tabasco, Mexico, Sugar Planter ai 
Sellew, Merle E., *2K, Wallmgford, Conn., Teacher. 
Shaw, Frederick B., D, G. K., Amherst, Mass., Farmer. 
ShePARD, Lucius J., C. S. C, West Sterling, Mass,, Farmer. 
Shultis, Newton, Ki;, 601 Chamber of Commerce, Boston, Mass., Gra 
Tsuda, George, <I'-K, 213 Honnura, Cho., Azabu, Tokio, Japan, Editor. 

•97 

C. A. PETERS, Semlarv. 
Allen, Harry F., C. S. C, Winchester, Mass., Farmer. 
Allen, John W., C. S. C, Northboro, Mass., Market Gardener. 
Armstrong, Herbert J., 'i'-K, 11337 Crescent Avenue, Morgan 

Civil Engineering, Armour Institute of Technology, Chicago. 
Barry, John M., *:2K, 509 Tremont Street, Boslon, Mass., Aul 
*Bartlett, James L., 'I'K*, Q. T. V., Madison, Wisconsin. 
Cheney, Liberty' L., Q. T. V., 322 Ellis Street, Augusta, Ga 

of Pennsylvania, 1899. 
*Clark, Lafayette F., C. S. C, 1337 Eighth Street, Des Moin 

m charge of Testing Department. 
Drew, George A., 'I'SK, Greenwich, Conn., Farm Manager. 
ElMRlCH, John A., Q. T. V.. 292 Park Street, Portland, Oregon, Superintendent First Ch 

School. 
GoessmanN, Charles I., D. G. K., 1015 Diamond Street, Philadelphia, Pa., Chemist. 
Leavens, George D., *K<I>, <I'i;K, 527 Second Street, Brooklyn, N. Y., Business address 

Chambers Street, New York Cily, Second Vice-President Coe-Mortimer Company. 
^Norton, Charles A., 'tSK, 30 Grove Street, West Lynn, Mass., Pianos and Piano Tuner. 
Palmer, Clayton F., C. S. C, Gardena, Cal., Head of Department of Agriculture, Agricultural 

High School; M. A., Leland Stanford, Jr., University. 
Peters, Charles A., *K*, C. S. C, 6 High Street, Amherst, Mass., Assistant Professor of Chem- 
istry, Massachusetts Agricultural College; Ph. D., Yale, 1901. 
Smith, Philip H., 'tSK, Amherst, Mass., Chemist Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station; 

M. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1911. 



obile Deale 



Veter: 



irian; M. D. V., University 
eatrice Creamery Company, 

Bible 

651 



Adjemain, Aredis G., D. G. K., Adana 
Baxter. Charles N., C. S. C, Souihbc 
Harvard University, 1902. 



^Not heard from 



1911. 



•98 

Eastern Turkey, car. 
;o, Mass., Assistant i 



278 



LL N. Barnum. 
oil Athenaeum Libr 



;iD)(§@©(g2^iinn niMiD)!^^ 



Clark, Clifford C, D. G. K., Sunderland, Mass., Farmer. 

Eaton, Julian S., D. G. K., Nyack, N. Y., Business address, 141 Broadway, New York City; Chief 
Attorney Traveler's Insurance Co.; LL. B,, University of Minnesota, 1904. 

Fisher, Willis S., <I>2K, 24 Vine Sheet, Melrose, Mass., Principal Lincoln Grammar School. 
"Montgomery, Alexander W., C. S. C, Hadley, Mass., Florist. 

NiCKERSON, John P., Q. T. V., West Harwich, Mass., Physician; M. D., Tufts Medical School, 
1901. 

Warden, Randall D., <I'i;K, C.ly Hall, Newark, N. J., Director Physical Training, Public Schools. 

Wiley, Samuel W., Ki;, 15 South Gay Street, Baltimore, Md., Firm of Wiley & Company, Analy- 
tical and Consulting Chemists. 

Wright, George H., *:SK, 262 McDonough Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.. Bookkeeper. 

'99 

DAN A. BEAM.^N, Secretary. 

Armstrong, William H., <I'2K, San Juan, Porto Rico, Captain in U. S. Army. 

Beaman, Dan A., Q. T. V., Rio Piedras, Porto Rico, Farm Superintendent. 

Chapin, William E., 'tSK, 76 Lincoln Avenue, New London, Conn., Commercial Instructor Bulke- 
ley High School. 

Dana, Herbert W., C. S. C, 1 1 Bnchwood Avenue, East Orange, N. J., Advertising Manager. 

Hinds, Warren E., <I>K*, C. S. C, Auburn, Ala.. Professor of Entomology and Entomologist. 
Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station; Ph. D., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1902. 

Hooker, William A., *2K, Office of Experiment Stations, U, S. Department of Agriculture, Wash- 
ington, D. C, Assistant Editor Experiment Station Record. 

Hubbard, George C, 'I'SK, Sunderland, Mass., Farmer. 
*MayNARD, Howard E., C. S. C, Boonton, N. J., Manager Westinghouse Storage Battery Company. 
*Merr]LL, Frederick A., Mount Vernon, Ga. 

*Pingree, Melvin H., C. S. C, 2343, South Clinton Street, Baltimore, Md., Chemist .American Agri- 
cultural Chemical Co. 

Smith, Bernard H., <I>K*, C. S. C, 29 Lowden Avenue, West Somerville, Mass., Business address, 
177 State Street, Boston, Chemist, Bureau of Chemistry, U. S. Department of Agriculture; M. Sc. 
George Washington University, 1903; LL. B., National University, 1905. 

Smith, Samuel E., C. S. C, Holliston, Mass., Farmer 

Turner, Frederick H., <I>K<I', C. S. C, Great Barrington, Mass., Merchant. 
*Walker. Charles M., C. S. C, 50 W. 93rd Street, New \'ork City, 

•00 

EDWIN K. ATKINS, Secretary. 

Atkins, Edwin K.. K-. 15 Hubbard Avenue. Northampton, Mass., Civil Engineer. 
Baker, Howard, C. S. C, Wheeling, W. Va., Veterinarian, Inspector U. S. Bureau of Animal Indus- 
try; M. D. v., University of Pennsylvania, 1902. 
Brown, F. Howard, K2, Hosmer Street, Marlboro, Mass., Farmer. 
^Campbell, Martin A., C. S. C, Brooks, Me., Principal Brooks High School. 



*Not heard from in 1911. 

279 



[©©©©(g^HEn nM©M^ 



umbia Un.ver 


)ly, 1904. 


St Pennsyl an 


ia Depa;l 


Mich., Physic 


lan and S 



*Canto, YsiDRO, Address unknown. 
Crane, Henry L., <I>-K, Weslwood, Mass., Fruit Grower. 
-Felch, Percy F., C. S. C. died in North Hadley. July 8, 1900. 

Frost, Arthur F., C. S. C, 1584 East I2lh Street, Brooklyn, N. Y., Gv,l Engineer. 
Gilbert, Ralph D., C. S. C., 43 Chatham Street, Boston, Mass., Chemist, Manager Bowker Inse 

licide Company; Ph. D., Yale, 1904. 
HallIGAN, James E., K-, Box 246, Baton Rouge, La., Chemist, Stale Experiment Station. 
Harmon, Arthur A., *K<I>, C. S. C, died November, 1910. 
Hull, Edward T., *K*, C. S. C, 2420 7th Avenue, New York City, Pathologist St. Mary's Ho 

pital for Children and Sloane Maternity Ho.pilal; M. D., Colu 
Kellogg, Jaivies W., *2K, Box 645, Harrisburg, Pa., Cuef Che 

Agriculture. 
Landers, Morris B., D. G. K.. 79 Washington Bou'evard, Detroit, Mich., Physician and Surge 

M. D., Detroit Medical College. 
*LEWts, James F., <I>2K, East Bridgewater, Mass. 
MoNAHAN, Arthur C, ^K*, C. S. C, Bureau of Educalicn, Washington, D. C. Specialist in 

Agricultural Education. 
Morrill, Austin W., 'I>i;K, Phoenix, Ariz., En'o-nologisI Arizona Horticultural Commission and 

Agricultural Experiment Station; Ph. D., Massachusetls Agricultural College, 1903. 
MuNSON, Mark H., C. S. C, Hunlinglon, Mass , Farmer. 
ParmENTER, George F., *SK, Walcrville, Me., Professor of Che;nislry Colby College; Ph. D., 

Brown Unive-sily. 
Stanley, Francis G., Q. T. V.. 144 Cabot Sheet, Beverley, Mass., Physician; M. D., Harvard 

University. 
West, Albert M., 4>i;K, Washington, D. C, U. S. Depa.lment of Agriculture, Bureau of Ammal 

Industry. 

'01 

JAMES H. CHICKERING, Secretary,. 

*Barry, John E., K-. Address unknown. 
BridGEFORTH, George R., Tuskegee Instilule, Tuskegee, Ala., Teacher. 
Brooks, PerciVAL C, ^SK, 7201 Champlam Avenue. Chicago, III., Chemical Engineer, General 

Chemical Company, Hegewich, III. 
Casey, Thomas, Q. T. V., 59 Highland Avenue, Fitchburg. Mass.. Business address. 145 Main 

Street, Lawyer. 
ChickERING, James H., 'I'2K, Dover, Mass., wilh E. F. Hodgson Company. 

Cooke, Theodore F., C. S. C, 183 Elm Street, Pittsfield, Mass., Teacher of Mathematics, Pitlsfield 
High School. 
*Dawson, William A., C. S. C Williamantic, Conn., Florist. 
*DlcKERMAN, William C, *2K, Attleboro, Mass., Life Insurancs. 
*Gamwell, Edward S., C. S. C, Address unknown. 



*Not heard from in I9ll. 



280 



[©©©©(g^unn oKiis)!^^ 



Cordon, Clarence E., <I>K<T>, C. S. C Amhersi, Mass., Assistant Professor of Zoology and Ceology 
Massachusetts Agricultural College; A. M., Columbia University, 1905; Ph. D.. Colunbia Uni- 
versity, 1911. 

Graves, ThaDDEUS, Jr., <I>-K, Hatfield, Mass., Farmer. 

Henry, James B., D. G. K., 50 State Street, Hartford, Conn,, Lawyer; LL, B., University of Mich- 
igan, 1904. 

Hunting, Nathan J., C. S. C, Shutesbury, Mass., Farmer. 

Leslie, Charles T., C, S, C„ Pittsfield, Mass., Physician; M. D., Columbia University, 1905. 

MaCOIWBER, Ernest L„ *2K, West Barnstable, Mass., Station Agent. 
■ *OvALLE, Julio, D. G. K., Address unknown. 

PlERSON, Wallace R„ *K'1>, Ki;, Cromwell, Conn., Secretary and Assistant Treasurer of A. N. 
Pierson, Inc., Wholesale Florists. 

Rice, Charles L„ C. S. C, 463 West Street, New York City, Assistant Superintendent Western 
Electric Company. 

Root, Luther A., <I>2K, Amherst, Mass., Farmer. 

ScHAFFRATH, Max, Coalinga, Cal.. Superintendent Standard Oil Company. 

Smith, Ralph L, Q. T. V., 119 Hillsboro Street, Raleigh, N. C, .Assistant Professor of Entomol- 
ogy and Zoology, Entomologist North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station. 

TashJIAN, DickRAN B., Q. T. V., Turner Hill, Ipswich, Mass,, Landscape Gardener. 
*ToDD, John H., Q. T. V., Rowley, Mass. 

Whitman, Nelson D., ■l'i;K, 525 Central Building, Los Angeles, Cal., Chief Engineer Reinforced 
Ccncrete Pipe Company. 

Wilson, Alexander C, '1'K'1>, <I>i;K. First National Bank Building. San Francisco, Cal., Consulting 
Civil Engineer. 

'02 

HOWARD L. KNIGHT, Secretary. 

Belden, Joshua H„ 'tSK, Newinglon, Conn,, Special .Agent for Fidelity and Casually Company. 
*B0DF1SH, Henry L., D, G. K., 56 Olivia Street, Derby, Conn.. Civil Engineer. 

Carpenter, ThornE M., <M\*. C. S. C, Nutrition Laboratory, Fenway, Boston, Mass., Chemist 
for Carnegie Institution. 

Church, Frederick R., C. S. C, died at Queens. Long Island, N. Y.. March 17, 1910. 

ClafliN, LeandeR C, 'I'-K, 3202 .Arch Street. Philadelphia, Pa., Merchant, Business address 1107 
Chestnut Street. 

Cook, Lyman A., Q, T. V., Milhs, Mass., Farmer. 

CoOLEY, Orrin F., 480 South Washington Street, Denver, Col., Civil Engineer. 

DacY, Arthur L., *K<I>, C. S. C, 28 Buchanan Avenue, Morganlown. W. Va., Assistant Hor- 
liculturalist. West Virginia Agricultural E\pen."nenl Station. 

DellEA, John M., C, S, C, Great Bamngton, Mass., Farmer. 
*Dwyer, Chester E„ C, S, C„ Nebraska City, Neb., Farm Manager. 
*Gates, Victor A„ *2K, Address unknown. 

Hall, John C„ <I>SK, South Sudbury, Mass., Teacher, 

*Not heard from m 1911. 

281 



c^]D)(§(§©(g2^!inn niKi©! 



HoDGKiss, Harold E., C. S. C, Geneva, N. Y., Assistant Entomologist New York Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station. 
*KiNNEY, Charles M., <I>-K, 453 Cajon Street, Redlands, Cal. 

Knight, Howard L., 'I'K'I', C. S. C, Office of Experiment Stations, U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture. Washington, D. C, Assistant Editor Expcr'imenl Slalion Record. 
*LeW!S, Claude I.. C. S. C, Corvallis, Ore., State Horticulturalist and Professor of Horticulture 
Oregon State University and Agricultural Experiment Station; M. Sc. Agr., Cornell University, 
1906. 

Morse, Ransom W., Q. T. V.. Worcester Telegram, Worcester, Mass.. Journalist; M. Sc, Dart- 
mouth, 1907. 
*PaUL, Herbert A., C. S. C, Tie Plant, Ark., Gvil Engineer Rock Island Railroad. 

Plumb, Frederic H., 7 Elm Grove Street, South Norwalk, Conn., Salesman. 

Saunders, Edward B., D. G. K., Nashua, N. H., Manager for Swift & Company. 

Smith, S. Leroy, C. S. C, 107 Halsey Street, Newark. N. J., Y. M. C. A. Secretary. 

West, D. Nelson, Q. T. V., Roslyn. Long Island. N. Y„ Gvil Engineer. 

•03 

GERALD D. JONES, Secnlarv. 

'Allen, William E.. ■I'i;K, Dunlap P. O., Seattle, Wash., Salesman. 
Bacon, Stephen C D. G. K., 60 Warner Avenue, Jersey City, N. J., Civil Engineer. 
Barrus, George L., Ki;, Lithia, Mass., Farmer. 
*Bowen, Howard C Q. T. V., Address unknown. 
*Brooks, Philip W., Q. T. V., Imperial, Cal., Farmer. 
Cook. Joseph G., 'I'K*, C. S. C, Hadley, Mass. (Amherst R. F. D.), Farmer. 

Franklin, Henry J., *Mv<i>, Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., in charge of Cranberry Investigation, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural Experiment Station; Ph. D., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1908. 
HalligaN, Charles P., K2, East Lansing, Mich., Assistant Professor of Horticulture, Michigan 

Agrcuhural College. 
Harvey, Lester F., C. S. C, Romford, Conn., Farmer. 

Hood, William L., Boley, Okla., Professor of Military Science, Creek-Seminole College. 
Jones, Gerald D., Q. T. V., North Amherst, Mass., Farm Superintendent. 

Lamson, George H., Jr., C. S. C Storrs, Conn., Professor of Zoology, Connecticut Agricultural 
College; M. Sc, Yale, 1905. 
*MoNAHAN, Neil F., C. S. C, South Framingham, Mass. 
*NeRSESSIAN, Paul N., Marash, Turkey. 
Osmun, a. Vincent, 'Hv*, Q. T. V., North Amherst, Mass., Assistant Professor of Botany, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College; M. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1905. 
Parsons, Albert, Q. T. V., Kamehameha Schools, Honolulu, T. H., Agriculturalist. 
■^Peebles, W. W., 424 Fulton Street, Chicago, 111. 

Poole, Elmer M., K-, North Dartmouth, Mass., Farmer. 
*Proulx, Edward G., >I'SK, Lafayette, Ind., Chemist, Indiana Agricultural Experiment Station; M. 
Sc. Agr., Purdue University, 1909. 

*Not heard from in 1911. 

282 



C^{D)(§(§@(§^1I[[[[ niMIe)!^^ 



'Robertson, R. H., D. G. K., d.ed September, 10, 1904, Amherst, Mass. 

Snell, Edward B., Q. T. V., 24 High Street, New Haven, Conn., Civ.l Engineer. 

TlNKHAM, Charles S., D. G. K., 126 Thornton Street. Roxbury, Mass., Civil Engineer for Massachu- 
setts Highway Commission. 

TOTTINCHAM, WlLUAM E., 'I-K'!', Q. T. V., Madison, Wis., Professor and Research Assistant in 
Agricultural Chemistry, College of Agriculture, University of Wisconsin; M. Sc, Umversity of 
Wisconsin, 1908. 

Tower, WinTHROP V., 'I'-K, San Juan, Porto R.co, Entomologist Porto Rico Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. 

West, Myron H., Q. T. V., 27 Linden Court, Chicago, 111., President Am. Park Builders, Inc. 

•04 

PARKMAN E. STAPLES, 5ecrc/arl,. 
*AhearN, Michael F., C. S. C, 507 Laramie Street, Manhattan, Kan., Instructor in Horticulture 
and Floriculture, Athletic Coach, Kansas Agricultural College. 

Back, Ernest A., *K*, C. S. C, Blacksburg. Va., State Entomologist and Entomologist for Vir- 
ginia Agricultural Experiment Station; Ph. D.. Massachusetts Agricultural College. 1907. 

Blake, Morris A., Q. T. V., New Brunswick, N. J., Horticulturalisl New Jersey Agricultural 
Experiment Station. 

CouDEN, Fayette D.. <I>K'I>. <I'i;K, Souin Bend, Wash., Lawyer. 

ElwoOD, Clifford F., K-, Green's Farms, Conn., Farmer. 

Fulton, ErwiN S.. C. S. C, North Amherst, Mass., Farmer. 

Gilbert, Arthur W., <I'K*, C. S. C, Ithaca, N. Y., Professor of Plant Breeding, Cornell Univer- 
sity; M. Sc. Agr., Cornell Umversity, 1905; Ph. D., Cornell University, 1909. 

Gregg, John W., C. S. C, State College, Pa., Department of Horticulture, Pennsylvania State Col- 
lege. 

Griffin, Clarence H., <I'SK, 1864 Park Road, Washington, D. C, Bacteriologist. Chapin-Sacks 
Manufacturing Company; M. D., George Washington University, 1909. 

Haskell, Sidney B., *K<I>, C. S. C, 5 Fearing Street, Amherst, Mass., Assistant Professor of 
Agronomy, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Henshaw, Fred F., *K*, C. S. C, 801 Kelley Street, Portland, Ore., District Engineer U. S. 
Geological Survey. 

Hubert, ZacharY T., President Jackson College. Jackson, Miss. 

Newton, Howard D., C. S. C, Head of Department of Chemistry, Connecticut Agricultural Col- 
lege, Slorrs, Conn. 

*0'Hearn, George E., C. S. C„ Pittsfield, Mass. 
Parker, Sumner R., C. S. C, Hardwick, Mass., Farmer. 

Peck. Arthur L., *K<I', C. S. C, 407 East 40th Street, North Portland, Ore., Landscape Archi- 
tect. 
Quigley, Raymond A., C. S. C. 406 Commerce Bldg.. Everett. Wash., Physician; M. D., Har- 
vard Medical School. 
*Rayiviouth, R. Raymond, Ki^, Takoma, Wash. 

Staples, Parkman F., C. S. C, North Grafton, Mass.. Farmer. ^ 

*White, Howard M., <I'K*, ^SK, Springfield, Mass. 

*Not heard from in 1911. 



!iD)(§(g(§(§^iinn ng^B)!^^ ^^ 



*05 

PERCY F. WILLIAMS, Secretary. 

Adams, Richard L., 'I'K*, Spreckels, Cal., in charge of Spreckels ExpenmenI Slalion; M. Sc, Uni- 
versity of California, 1909, 

Allen, G, Howard, 'I'iK, Lilllelon, Mass., Orchardist. 

Barnes, Hugh L., C. S, C, Interlaken, Stockbridge, Mass., Farmer, 
■'■BartleTT, Frank A., *2K, 315 Atlantic Street, Stamford, Conn. 
*Crosby, Harvey D„ Q, T. V., Rutland, Mass., Farmer. 

ClshmaN, M SS Esther C„ <I'K<1', 21 Brown Street, Providence, R, I., Assistant at .^mmary Brown 
Memoiial, 
*GardneR, John J„ C. S. C, Durham, N, H„ Assistant HorticulturalisI New Hampshire Agricul- 
tural College, 
*Gay, Ralph P., <l'i;K, 965 West Front Street, Plainlield, N. J., Forester. 

Hatch, Walter B., C. S. C, Nayatt Point, R. I„ Landscape Engineer. 

Holcomb, C. Sheldon, Ki;, 38 Westland Avenue, Boston, Mass., Teacher. 

Hunt, Thoiwas F., C, S. C„ Berkeley, Cal„ Assistant Plant PathologisL University of California. 

Ingham, Norman D., C. S. C, Santa Monica, Cal„ Silviculturalist, 

Kelton, J, Richard, Ki:, 34 Pearl Street, Amsterdam, N. Y., Teacher Amsterdam High School, 
*LadD, Edward T„ KS, 609 Falls Road Terraces, Roland Park, Md., Chemist, Baugh Chemical 

Company; M, Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1907. 
*LewIS, Clarence W„ Q. T, V„ 28 Albine Street, Melrose Highlands, Mass. 

Lyman, John F„ *K*, K2, 1345 Highland Street, Columbus, Ohio, Associate Professor of Agri- 
cultural Chemistry, Ohio State University; Ph. D., Yale University, 1909. 
*MuNSON, WiLLARD A., *K<I', 'I'SK, Littleton, Mass., Fruit Grower, 

^"EWHALL, Edwin W„ Jr.. D. G. K., 260 California Street, San Francisco, Cal., Earner, 

Patch, J, Willard, <Wv*, *2K, 260 Broadway, Arlington, Mass,, Purchasing Agent for Brown 
Durrell Co,, Boston. 

Sanborn, Monica L., (Mrs. William O. Taft), <I'K*, R. F. D., No, 4, Northlield, Vt, 

Sears, William M., *2K, Maple Street, Franklin, Mass, Farmer, . 

Swain, Allen N„ <I>SK, 15 Merlin Street, Dorchester, Mass,, Horticulturalist, 

Taylor, Albert D„ *K*, C, S. C„ 1101 Tremont Building, Boston, Mass., Superintendent for 
Warren H. Manning, Landscape Architect; M, Sc, Agr„ Cornell University. 

ToMPSON, Harold F., *K*, KS, R, F, D. No, 4, Attleboro, Mass,, Market Gardener, 

TuPPER, Bertram, 'J'K*, K2, 427 Chestnut Street, Waban, Mass,, Farm Superintendent. 

Walker, Lewell S„ C. S, C, 19 Phillips Street, Amherst, Mass,, Assistant Chemist Massachusetts 
Agricultural Experiment Station. 

WhitaKER, Chester L., ^SK, 46 Second Avenue, Pelham, N, Y., President Munson Whitaker 
Company, Commercial and Landscape Foresters. 

Williams, Percy F„ K2, Auburn, Ala,, Professor of Horticulture and Forestry Alabama Poly- 
technic Institute, State Horticulturalist, 

V/lLLIS, Grenville N., *K*, <I>i:K, 82 Bromfield Road, West Somerville, Mass,, Civil Engineer 
for Massachusetts Highway Commission. 

Yeaw, Frederick L„ *2K, Amherst, Mass., Assistant Piofessor of Market Gardening, Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

*Not heard from in 1911. 284 



l[D)(§(§©(g2^[[Iin HKIlD)! 



'06 

RICHARD WF.LLINGTON, Secrelary. 

Carey, Daniel H., Q. T. V.. Blylhe, Riveisid Co., Ca).. Nurseryman. 
Carpenter, Charles W., 'I'K-I', Ki;, Monson, Mass., Farmer. 
Craighead, William H., 10 Soirih Court Avenu , Hamsburg, Pa., Editor. 
Filer, Harry B., 5 Gty Hall, Buffalo, N. Y., G;y Fo^esier, 

French, Talbot C <I'K.|., .1>1:K, Geneva, N. Y., Assistant Botanist, New York Agricultural Exper- 
iment Station. 

GasKILL, Edwin F., C. S. C, Amheist. Mass., Assistant Agriculturalist, Massachuselts Agricultural 
Experiment Station. 

Hall, Arthur W., Jr., 'I'-K North .Amherst, Mass., Lawyer. 

Hastings, Addison T., Jr., Q. T. V., 220 Clalrmont Avenue. Jersey City, N. J., City Forester, 
Secretary of Shade Tree Commission. 

Hood, Clarence E., Q. T. V., Champaign, 111., Entomologist. 

Kennedy, Frank H., C. S. C, 33 Goddard Road, Brocklon, Mass., Analyst for Brockton Sewage 
Commission. 
*Martin, J. Edward, C. S. C. Leadville, Colo., U. S. Forest Service. 

MoseleY, Louis H., C. S. C, Glastonbury, Conn., Farmer. 

Mudge, Everett P., K-, 69 Cherry Street, Swa-npscott, Mass., Tree Warden. 
*Peaks, Ralph W., Q. T. V., 7 Walnut Street, Ncwtonville, Mass., Chemist. 

Pray, F. CivILLE, *-K, T.imdad, Cuba, Summer address, Amherst, Mass., Chemist and Superinten- 
dent Trinidad Sugar Company. 

Rogers, Stanley S., *K*, K2, Whillier, Gal, Assistant Plant Pathologist University of California. 

Russell, Harry M., •I'K*, C. S. C, Complon, Gal., Bureau of Entomology, U. S. Department of 
Agriculture. 

Scott, Edwin H., ^K*, KS, Millidgeville, Ga., Teacher. 

Sleeper, George W., "J'K^', C. S. C Kendal Green, Mass., Farmer; Business addiess, 63 South 
Street, Boston, Mass., Leather Business. 

Strain, Benjamin, Q. T. V., Maybrook, N. Y., Assistant Civil Engineer Central New England 
Railroad. 

SUHLKE, Herman A., Ki;, 273 Biddle Avenue, Wyandotte, Mich., with Pennsylvania Salt Manu- 
facturing Company. 

Taft, William O., C. S. C, R. F. D. No. 4, Northfield, Vt., Farmer. 

Tannatt, Willard C, Jr., <1>K'1', C. S. C, Easthamplon, Mass., Town Engineer. 

TiRRELL, Charles A., Q. T. V., 1481 Irving Park Boulevard, Chicago, 111., Business addiess, 815 
Sleinway Hall, Landscape Engineer. 

Wellington, Richard, *K*, Q. T. V.. Geneva, N. Y., Horticulturalist New York Agricultural 
Experiment Station; M. Sc, Harvard, 1911. 
i^WHOLLEY, Francis D., Q. T. V., North Scituatc, Mass. . ■ _ 

Wood, Alexander H. M., KS, Easton, Mass., Farmer. 



»Not heard from m 1911. 

285 



[©©©©(gs^Hnn JiMJ^i 



'07 

JOHN N. SUMMERS, 5ccrc-(arj). 



Honolulu, T. H.. In 



ctor in Science and 



Industrial and Asricullur 



Insli- 



Armstrong, Arthur H., K-, died December 22, 19 

BartlETT, Earle G., 'I'K'I>, <I'i;K, Kamehameha School! 
Malhemallcs. 
*CaruTHERS, John T., Bordenlown, N. J., Principal Borde 

tule. 
*Chace, WavlaND F., C. S. C, Address unknown. 

Chapman, George H., C. S. C, Amherst, Mass., Assistant Botanist Massachusetts Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station; M. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1910. 

Chapman, Joseph O., K2, 276 Andover Street, North Andover, Mass., Farmer. 

Clark, Milford H., Jr., C. S. C, City Hall, Buffalo, N. Y., Assistant City Forester. 

Cutter, Frederick A., *SK, 40 Elm Street, Orange, N. J., Forester. 

Dickinson, Walter E., <I'K'I>, <I>2K, GlenwiK'.. La., Chemist. 

Eastman, Jasper F., <I'K<I>, Morrisville, N. Y., Agronomist New York State School of Agriculture; 
M. Sc, University of lUinois, 1910. 

Hartford, Archie A., West Lebanon, N. H., Teacher. 

HiGGiNS, Arthur W., *K*, Ki;, Westlield, Mass., Florist. 

King, Clinton, 'I'K'I', Q. T. V., 28 Sagamore Street, Dorchester, Mass., Business address. Rooms 
611-613, 6 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass., Lawyer; LL. B., Boston University, 1910. 

Livers, Miss Susie D., 43 Peter Parley Road, Jamaica Plain, Mass., with Ginn & Co.. Publishers. 

Parker, Charles M., <M\*, Q. T. V., Brookfield. Mass., Farmer. 

Peters, Frederick C, 'I>SK, Ardmore, Pa., Landscape Foiester and Entomologist. 

Shaw, Edward H., <I'2K, 275 Washington Street, Belmont, Mass., Market Gardener. 

Summers, John N., C. S. C, 48 Copeland Street. Campello, Mass., Bureau of Entomology, U. S. 
Department of Agriculture; Ph. D.. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1911. 

Thompson, Clifford B., *2K, Selama, Perak, Malay, Manager Rubber Plantation. 

Walker, James H., *2K, City Hall, Newark, N. J., City Forester. 

Watkins, Fred A., 'KK, West Millbu-y, Mass., Market Gardener. 

Watts, Ralph J., <T>K<I», <I>2K, Amherst, Mass., S;:retary to the President Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College. 

Wood, Herbert P., C. S. C. Box 208, Dallas, Texas, Bureau of Entomology, U. S. Department of 
Agriculture. 

'OS 

JAMES A. HYSLOP, Secretary. 

*Allen, Charles F., C. S. C, General Delivery, .Sioux City. Iowa, Salesman. 
Alley, Harold E., K2, Spreckels, Cal., Assistant Plant Pathologist, Spreckels Sug 

Station. 
Anderson, John A., <I'2K, Mount Clair, N. J., Forester, Shade Tree Commission, 
Anderson, Kenneth F., died May, 1911, in Philippine Islands. 



Experiment 



*Not heard fr. 



in 1911. 



;[D)(§(g@(g^I][in niM©! 



Bailey, Ernest W., 'I'K'T', K2, University of Illinois, Urbana, 111.; Associale in Horlicullure Uni- 
veisily of Ill.nois; M. Sc, Universily of Illinois, 1909. 

Bancs, Bradley W., C. S. C, Carleret. N. J.. Chemist. American Chemical Company. 
*BarRY, Thomas A.. 'I'K'I', C. S. C, Schenectady. N. Y., General Electric Company. 

Bartholomew, Miss Persis, Westboro, Mass.. Farmer. 

Bates, Carlton, K^, 1628 Columbia Road, Washington, D. C, Bacteriologist, Bureau of Chemistry, 
U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

Chapman, Lloyd W., Q. T. V., 724 4th Avenue North, Great Falls, Mont., Assayer and Chemist. 

Chase, Henry C, C. S. C, 41 Stetson Avenue, Swampscoll. Mass.. with Sleeper Leather Company, 
63 South Street, Boston, Mass. 
*Clark, Orton L., <I'i:K, Rostock, Germany, Talriotische Weg 120. 

Cobb, George R., C. S. C, Kingston, R. I., Instructor in Horticulture, Coach Athletic Teams, Rhode 
Island College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. 

Coleman, William J., C. S. C City Hall, Newark, N, J.. Shade Tree Commission. 

CUMMINGS, WinTHROP A., Q. T. v., 721 Belden Avenue, Chicago, III., Foreman Lincoln Park. 

Cutting, Roy E., 't^K, 33 Phillips Street, Providence, R. I., Salesman. 
*Daniel, John, <I>K*, Q. T. V., West Barnstable, Mass., Farmer. 

Davenport, S. Lothrop, *K*, Ki;, North Grafton. Mas; 

Davis, Paul A., 'Mv*, e*, Woosler, Ohio, Assistant Bola 

DoLAN, Clifford, Windsorville, Maine, Farmer. 

Eastman, PerLEY M., 8 Summit Park, Albany, N. Y., Assistant Inspector, New York State Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. 

Edwards, Frank L., •\'-K, Rockland, Mass., Farmer. 

Farley, Arthur J.. Q. T. V., New 
lural Experiment Station. 

FarRAR, Park W., K-, Rogerson, Idaho, Civil Engineer, Sa 



Fruit Grower. 
St Ohio Agricultural Experiment Statu 



vick, N. J., Assistant Horticulturalisl New Jersey Agricul- 



Flint, Clifton L., K-, Corvalhs 

College. 
Gillett, Chester S., <I>KiI>, Ki:, 
Gillett, Kenneth E., 'I>K'1', 'I'-K 



Ore., Instructor 

5ox 244, Salinas, 
Soulhwich, Mas! 
C, 209 Camde 



L,,andsi 



River Dam. 

; Gardening Oregon Agricultur 



Gowdey. Carlton C, 'I'K'l', C. S 

for British Government. 
Hayes, Herbert K., 'M\<I', Ki;, Connecticut .Ag 
Howe, William L., Marlboro. Mass.. Farmer. 
Hutchincs, Frank F., Q. T. V., South Amhe 



Cal., Experim 

, Nurseryman. 

Road, Londo 



N. W., England, Entomologist 



cultural l-.xperiment Station, Ne 



Ma 



Te 



Hyslop, James A., Q. T. V.. Pullman, Wash.. Bureau of Entomology, U. S. Department of Agri 

culture; M. Sc, Washington Stale College, 1911. 
Jackson, Raymond H., 'tSK, Amherst, Mass., Merchant. 
JenNISON, Harry M., C. S. C, Bozeman, Montana, Teacher. 
Johnston, Fred A.. C. S. C, Washington, D. C, Bureau of Entomology, U. 

Agriculture. 
Jones. Thomas H., <|.K<1', Q. T. V.. 19112 G Street, N. W., Washington, D. C, 

mology. U. S. Department of .Agriculture. 



Department of 
ureau of Ento- 



*Not heard fn 



in 1911 



287 



Rai5)(§©(§©^iinn nmj^i 



LarnED, Adelbert J., Q. T. V.. Lyonsville, Mass., Farmer. 

Larsen, L. David. *K*, KS, Honolulu, T. H., PlanI Patholog 
*LiANG, Lai Kuei, Tienlsin, China. 

Miller, DanFORTH P., K2, 149 Broadway, New 
Nursery Company. 
*Paige, George, Q. T. V., Amhersl, Mass. 

Parker, John R., Ki;, Box 301, Bozeman, Mont., 
perimenl Station. 

PhilbrICK, Edwin D., 't— K, 381 Fourth Avenue, N' 

Reed, Horace B„ Ki^, Greenwich, Conn,, Farm Foreman. 

Regan, William S„ K2, 84 Pleasant Street, Amherst, Mass 
cultural College. 

Sawyer, William F., Q. T. V., Sterlmg Junction, Mass., A 

ShatTUCK, Leroy A., C. S. C, Pepperell, Mass., Farmer. 
*Thlirst0N, Frank E., •I'-K, Soledad, Cuba, Assistant Chcm 



York City, Manager Sales Department American 

Assistant Entomologist Montana Agricultural Ex- 
w Vork City, Landscape Forester. 

Graduate Student Massachusetts Agri- 

hilectural Draughtsman. 

t for E. Atkins & Co., Sugar Manufac- 



Turner, Miss Olive M., 'Mv*, 22 Spaulding Street, Amherst, Mass. 
Turner, William F., <I>K*, Q. T. V., Auburn, Ala., Economic Em 

Institute. 
VerBECK, Roland H., <I>i;K, Kezar Falls, Me., Principal Parsonsfield Semii 
Warner, Theoren L., <I'K*, Q. T. V., U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, 
WauCH. Thomas F., Q. T. V., 7 Grant Court, Worcester, Mass., Teacher. 
Wellington, Joseph W„ Q. T. V., Lafayette, Ind, Assistant Horticultur; 

Experiment Station. 
Wheeler, Herman T., Q. T. V., Lexington 
Whiting, Albert L., Q. T. V., Urbana, II 

Island Stale College of Agriculture and M< 
Whitmarsh, Raymond D., K2, Woosler, Ohi 

Station; M. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultura 
Wright, Samuel J., Q. T. V., Wayland, 



logist Alabama Polytechnic 



Washingion, D. C. 



ist Indii 



Agricultural 



Ma 



R. F. D., No. 1, Farmer. 
1., Graduate Student University of Illinois; M. Sc, Rhode 
;chaRic Arts, 1910. 

io. Assistant Entomologist Ohio Agricultural Experiment 
,1 College, 1911, 
Mass., Farm Manager. 



'09 

CHARLES S. PUTNAM, Secrdarv. 

Alger, Paul E., C. S. C, No.th Amherst, Mass., Tree Expert. 

Barlow, Waldo D., 'I'^K, Boulder, Mont., Forest Service. 

Barnes, Benjamin F., Jr„ O*, Haverhill, Mass., Farm Manager, 

BaRTLETT, Oscar C, C. S. C, Amherst, Mass., Graduate Student Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Brigcs, Orwell B.. Q. T. V., 43 Chatham Street, Boston, Mass., with Bowker Fertilizer Company. 
*Brown, George M., Jr., ^K*, Q. T. V., Address unknown. 

*CafFREY, Donald J., C. S. C, Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Slalion, New Haven, Conn., 
Superintendent Gypsy Moth Control. 

Cardin, Patricio P., Q. T. V.. Agricultural Experiment Station, Santiago de las Vegas, Cuba, Chief 
of Department of Vegetable Pathology and Entomology. 

*Not heard from in 1911. 



c^iD)(§(§@(g2^flnn niKiiD)]:^^ 



*Chase, Edward I., 85 Vine Slreel. Somerville, Mass.. Civil Engineer, 
CoDDINC, George M., 'I'i^K, Fourlh Avenue BIdg.. New York Cily, Forester. 

CoRBETT. Lambert S., Q. T. V., Lexington, Ky., Assistant in Animai Husbandry Kentucky Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station. 

*Crosby, Harold P., C. S. C, Newbury. Vt., Teacher. 
Grossman, Samuel S.. Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Graduate Student Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 



En 



gineer 



Park. 



*Curran, David A., Marlboro, Mass., Civil Engineer. 
*Cutler, Homer, Address unknown. 

Fulton, Gordon R., C. S. C 156 Beacon Hill Avenue, Lynn, Mass., Salesman. 

Geer, Myron F., 6*, Conway, Mass., Teacher of Sciences High School. 

Geer, Wayne E., 6<I>, Wethersfield, Conn., Teacher. 

Hathaway, Elmer F., K2, 97 Huron Avenue, Cambridge, Mass., with C. F. Hathaway & Son, 
Wholesale Bakers. 
*HSE1H, En-Lung, -tK*, 132 Blair Street, Ithaca, N. Y.. Graduate Student Cornell University. 

Hubbard, Arthur W., *K*. Q. T. V., Sunderland, Mass., Farmer, Agent for Bowker Fertilizer Co. 

Ide, Warren L., Sterlington, N. Y., Farm Manager. 

IncalLS, Dorsey F., Q. T. V., Berkshire, Mass., Farmer. 
*Jen, Huang, Q. T. V., Tientsin, China. 
»KnigHT, Harry O., C. S. C, 425 Porter Avenue, Buffalo, N. Y., Foreman Great Bear Spring Co. 

Lindblad. Rockwood D., *K*, Ki;, 43 Harvard Avenue, Depew, N. Y., Cp 

MacGown, Guy E., Walnut Hill, Me., Tester for Dairy Association. 
*Monahan, James V.. C. S. C, South Framingham, Mass. 

Neale, Harold J., C. S. C, 2 Sturgis Street, Worcester, Mass., City Forester. 
*NoBLE, Harold G., KZ, 4012 Perry Street, Chicago, 111., Civil Engineer, Lin 

Noyes, John, Q. T. V., 1101 Tremont Bldg., Boston, Mass., Landscape Gardener. 

O'Grady, James R.. C. S. C, Littleton, N. H., Farmer. 

Oliver, Joseph T., 711 Lyceum Bldg., Pittsburgh. Pa., Teacher. 

Phelps, Harold D.. *K<f', Box 88, West Springfield, Mass.. Landscape Architect. 

Potter, Richard C, Q. T. V., Racine, Wis., Teacher. 

Putnam, Charles S.. 'Hv*, O*, Walpole, N. H., Principal High School. 

Sexton, George F., Second Street, Do Pere, Wis., Teacher. 

Smulyan, Marcus T., Amherst, Mass., Graduate Student and Graduate Assistant Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

Thompson, Myron W., "I'-K, Cody, Wyoming, Forest Service. 

Thomson, Jared B., C. S. C Monterey, Mass., Farmer. 
*Turner, Henry W., C. S. C, Santiago de las Vegas, Cuba, Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Warner, Fred C, Q. T. V., Sunderland, Mass., Farmer. 

Waters, Theodore C, C. S. C, Rocky Hill, Conn., Farmer. 

Webb, Charles R., C. S. C, Shrewsbury, Mass., Farmer and Forester. 
*Whaley, James S., 'J'K'I', 64 North Arlington Avenue, East Orange, N. J. 

White, Charles H., North Uxbridge, Mass., Farmer and District Field Agent Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College. 



*Not heard from in 1911. 



289 



;[D)(§(§©(§2^[[Iin niMMM^ 



White, Herbert L., Q. T. V., Maynard, Mass., Second Clerk State Board of Agriculture 136 State 

House Boston, Mass. 
Willis, Luther G., Q. T. V., State College, Pa., Chem.si. 
Wilson, Frank H., C. S. C, Nahant, Mass., Florist. 

'10 

FRANK L. THOMAS, Sccretar\i. 

*AlleN, RodoLPHUS H., KS, 565 June Street, Fall River, Mass.. Graduate Student Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

Annis, Ross E., 'KK, 18 Oakland Street, Nalick. Mass., Civil Engineer. 
*ArMSTRONG, Robert P.. 'i>-K, Canton, N. Y., Assislant Professor of Horticulture, St. Lawrence Uni- 
versity. 

Bailey, Dexter E., *K<1', O*, Brookings, S. Dak., Assistant in South Dakota Agricultural Experiment 
Station. 

Bailey, Justice C, H<I., Wareham, Mass., Horticulturist. 

BeemaN, Francis S., Kli, Box 122, Ware, Mass., Farmer. 

Blaney, Jonathan P., C. S, C 235 Humphrey Street, Swampscott, Mass., Landscape Gardener. 

Brandt, Louis, KS, Urbana, 111., Instructor in Landscape Gardening, University of Illinois. 

Brooks, Henry A., 'I'^iK, 102 B. Street N. E., Washington, D. C, Draughtsman. 

Brooks, Sumner C, 'I'K'I', *-K, 28 Northampton Road, Amherst, Mass. 

Brown, Louis C, Ki^, Philippine Constabulary, Manila. 

BuRKE, Edward J., C. S. C. Hadley, Mass., Instructor in Agriculture. 

Clarke, Walter R., Ki;, Milton-on-Hudson, N. Y., Fruit Grower, 

Cloues, William A., Q. T. V., Lyndon, Vt., Instructor in Agricultural High School. 

Cowles, Henry T., 'I'K*, e*, Arecilo, Porto Rico, Teacher. 

Damon, Edward F., ^liK, Paonia, Colorado. 

Dickinson, Lawrence S., •I'SK, Amherst, Mass., Civil Engineer. 

Eddy, Roger S., Q. T. V., 37 Parkman Street, Dorchester, Mass. 
*EvERS0N, John N., Chrome, N. J., Analytical Chemist, American Agricultural Chemical Company. 
*FisKE, Raymond J., B'I>, Bureau of Education, Manila, P. I. 

Folsom, Josiah C, 0*, Billerica, Mass., Farmer. 

Francis, Henry R., Q. T. V., Culver, Ind„ Superintendent of Grounds, Culver Military Academy. 

French, Horace W., 'I'2K. East Charemont, Mass., Farmer. 

HaYNES, Frank T., *K*, Q. T. V., Slurbridge, Mass., Farmer. 

HayWARD, Warren W., KI'*, Millbury, Mass., Farmer. 

Hazen, Myron S., Ki^, Box 673, Syracuse, N. Y., Agricultural Chemist. 

Holland, Arthur W., Ki^, Shrewsbury, Mass., Farmer. 
*H0SMER, Charles I„ C. S. C, Turners Falls, Mass., Civil Engineer. 

Johnson, William C. Q. T. V., 57 Chambers Street, New York City, with Coe-Mortimer Co. 

Leonard, William E., Soledad, Cuba, Sugar Chemist. 

McLaiNE, Leonard S., KS, 84 Pleasant Street, Amherst, Mass.. Graduate Student and Graduate 
Assislant, Department of Zoology and Geology, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Mendum, Samuel W., *K*, e*, Berwick, N. S. Orchardist. 

*Not heard from in 1911. 

290 



G^E)(§(§©©^IIEQ nO^©l 



Oi 



Mass.. Farmer. 
SIS, Ariz., Deparin 



of the In 



U. S. Ind.i 



NiCKLESs, Fred P., e*, Bil 
Oertel, Charles A., Indii 

Farmer. 
Partridge, Frank H., 'l'i)K. Kamehameha Scho 
Paulsen, George W., Ki:, Theiford, Vi., Pnn 
Schermerhorn, Lyman G., Q. T. V., Bozeman, 

lural College and Experiment Station. 
Thomas, Frank L., Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., Graduate Student, Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 



als, Honolulu, T. H., Assistant Agriculturalist. 
:ipal Thetford Academy. 
Mont., Assistant Horticulluralist Montana Agricul- 



TuRNER, Edward H.. Q. T. V., Colebrook. N. H., Sub-Master High School. 
*Urban, Otto V. T., Ki), Carteret, N. J., Analytic Chemist at Liebig Works. 
Vinton, George N., Sturbridge, Mass., Farmer, 

Waldron, Ralph A.. Q. T. V., State College, Pa., Instructor m Botany, 
Wallace, William N., Amherst, Mass., Orchardist. 

u 

Adams, James F., Q. T. V., University Club, Stale College, Pa., Teacher. 
Allen, Park W., *SK. Weslfield, Mass., Insurance and Real Estate. 

Baker, Herbert J., K-, Amherst, Mass., Assi tant in Agronomy, Massachusetts Agricullur 
*Barrows, Raymond C, Q. T. V., Stafford Springs, Conn. 



nt Av 



Hyde Park, Mass., Becker 
Humphrey Street, Swampscott, Mass., with Wa 
City Park Department. 



Co 



itree 


, Hartf 


Old, Con 


1 B 


arnstable 


, Mass. 


ass., 


Salesman. 


erst. 


Mass., 


Teacher. 


Ri 


.ers. Ma 


ss.. Farm 


Vi., 


Teach- 


r. Middl 



Ka 



*Bentley, Arno!,d G., Q. T. V., 193 F 
Co. 
Blanev, Herbert W., C. S. C, 23; 

ning. Landscape Designer. 
Brown, Edgar M., h<I>, 333 Vine S 
Bursley, Allyn P„ *K'I', (».!., Wes 
*Conant, Arthur T., Sunderland, Mc 
Damon, Charles M., C. S. C, Amh 
Davis, E. Norton, *K*, P.K<I>, Three 
*Davis, Irving W., KS, Middlebury, 
*Gilgore, Irwin C. Q. T. V. 
Hill, N. Herbert, *i;K, 14 Park Place, Pnnc. 
Jenks, .Albert R., nK<\>. 120 Pleasant Street, Ai 

Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Johnson, Leonard M., Kl'*, Newtown, Conn., Assistant Principal of High School. 
LaboUTELEY, Gaston E., KS, Great Northern Hotel, Wenalchee, Wash., on Fruit Farm. 
Larrabee, Edward A., K^, Amherst, Mass., Assistant m Botany, Massachusetts Agricultura 

ment Station. 
Lull, Robert D„ <f>i;K, Dalton, Mass., Farm Manager. 
*McGraw, Frank D., C, S, C, Fall River, Mass. 
McLaughlin, Frederick A., K2, .Aimherst, Mass., Assistant in Botany, Massachusetts Aj 

College. 
Morse, Henry B., KS, Ando\ 
NaGAI, Isaburo, Bryant Avenu 

*Not heard from in \9\\ . 



,1 College, 
ling Mch. 
H. Man- 



N. J., Demonstrator for German 
st, Mass., Supervisor Corresponds 



Works 
Courses 



1 Experi- 



H., Head of Science Department, Proctor Academy, 
:a, N, Y., Graduate Student at Cornell University. 



291 



:iD)@(g(§(g^[[[in n^iie)! 



NlCKERSON, George P., 'I'-K, 40-46 So. Forsyth Slreel, Allania, Ga., wilh So. Belting Co. 
Nielsen, Gustaf A., C. S. C., Harvard, Mass., Farmer. 

OsTROLENK, BeRNHARD 

Parsons, Samuel R., *K*, Q. T. V„ Amherst, Mass., Assistant in Mathematics and Mihtary 
Science, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Patch, Roland H., e<t>, Wenham, Mass. 

Pauly, Herman A., KT*, The Warelands, Norfolk, Mass., Tester, Norfolk Dairy Imp. Associa- 
tion. 

PiCKARD, Percy W., <I>K*, Q. T. V., 43 Chatham Street, Boston, Mass., with Bowker Fertilizer 
Company. 

Piper, Ralph W,. Q. T. V., South Acton, Mass., Fruit Grower. 

Prouty, Philip H., Q. T. V., Shrewsbury, Mass., Farmer. 

RacICOT, PhilIAS A., <I>2K, 51 Chambers Street, New \'ork City, with Coe-Mortimer Co., Manu- 
facturers of Fertilizers. 

Robinson, Ralph C, Nayack, Rhode Island, Landscape Gardener. 

Sharpe, Arthur H., KS. 

Smith, Clarence A., Q. T. V., State College, Pa., Assistant in Chemistry. 

Smith, Raymond G., Amherst, Mass., Graduate Assistant in Botany, Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 



SteVENSON, Lomas O., C. S. C, Barnett. Miss., Farmer. 

TiTUS, WilLARD M., *:;K, Moosic, Pa., with Coe-Mortimer Co. 

Warren, Edward E., <P^K, Leicester, Mass., Traveling for German Kali Works. 

Whitney, Raymond L., Q. T. V., Winchester, Mass., Superintendent Estate of Edwin Ginn. 

WiLLARD, Harold F., *SK, Mid-Pacific College, Honolulu, T. H., Teacher. 

Winn, Ervin L., Carteret, N. J., Chemist. 

*Not heard from in 1911. 




[©©©©(g^nnn hki©] 



Acknowledgment 



INCE there was work enough to employ but a few of the 

large number of applicants desiring to help us, the 

favored ones should consider themselves especially 

fortunate to have been of service in the publication of 

such an unusual work as the present. Fully realizing 

what an extraordinarily fine book this volume of the Index is, the 

members of the board of publication are all wearing football pads on 

their backs, so slap as hard as you please. 





^ ^ Oable of (Tontents g ^ 



PAGE 

Boaid of Publication 5 

Prologue 7 

Dedication 11 

Calendar 12 

The Corporation 13 

Experiment Station Staff 15 

The Faculty 17 

Graduate Students 33 

College Senate 38 

Senior Class 39-44 

Junior Class 45-83 

Sophomore Class 85-90 

Freshman Class 91 -95 

Fraternities 97- 1 36 

Athletics 139-158 

Football 142 

Baseball 147 

Track 151 

Hockey 155 

Tennis 157 

Class Athletics 1 59 

Organizations and Clubs 165-193 

Y. M. C. A 166 

Dramatic Society 1 67 

Rifle Club 173 

Public Speaking 176 

Mettawampe Club 180 

Stock Judging 181 

Slockbridge Club 182 

New Jersey Club 183 

Publications 1 85 

Musical Clubs 189 

Promenades 195 

1913 Freshman Banquet 198 

Clark Cadet Regiment Rosier 200 

Commencement 201 

Grinds 207-234 

Class Rolls 235-259 

Alumni Associations 261 

Alumni 262-292 

Acknowledgment 293 



iJ'^)'il'^i!'^^^^^i!dil'^^^^i2:^^-e^ii:i22i22^^^^^l^ 






^6verti5lrig iI)irector^ 






Adams Drug Sfore 
American Dairy Supply Co. 
Amherst Book Store 
Amherst Co-op. Laundry 
Amherst House 
Amherst Barber Shop 
American Fountain Pen Co. 

Boynton, W. W. 

Beckman's Candy Store 

Blodgett, F. E. 

Bolles, E. M. 

Bowker Ferlihzer Co. 

Breck & Sons, Joseph - 

Brackett, Shaw & Lunl 

Belcher & Taylor Agricultural Tool Co., The 

Campion 

Carpenter & Moorehouse 

Chicago Steel Tape Co. 

Ch.lson, W. L. . ■, 

Coe-Mortimer Co. 

College Drug Store ' 

College Store 

Commonwealth Hotel 

Copley Square Hotel 

Corwin Co., C. R. 

Cowles, W. D. 

Cumberland Hotel 

Cotrell & Leonard 

Deuel's Drug Store 
Dillon & Douglass 
Dorr & Co., Arthur E. 
Draper Hotel 

Elder, C. R. 

Eureka Ruling & Binding Co. 

Ewells, Charles E. 

Fottler, Fiske, Rawson & Co. 
Folger, Stephen Lane 

Harrison, J. G., & Sons 
Holyoke St. Railway Co. 
Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

International Instrument Co. 

Jackson & Cutler 
Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 



XXV 
XXV 



Keuffel & Esser Co. 
Kingman, M. B. 
Kinsman, H. E. 
Kny-Scheerer Co. 
Labrovilz, I. M. 
Lamprey Co., The 
Lord & Burnham 

M. A. C. 

Madison Cooper Co. 

Marsh, E. D. 

Meriiam Co., G. & C. 

Millett, E. E. 

Mitchell, Woodbury Co. 

Morandi-Froctor Co. 

Mutual Plumbing & Healing Co. 

National Blank Book Co. 

New England Plumbing Supply Co. 

Norton E. Russell 

Olympia Candy Co. 

Oriental Tea Co. 

Page's Shoe Store 

Parks, A. 

Pettingill, Andrews, Co. 

Plumb's Barber Shop 

Prospect House 

Puffer Bros. 

Read, G. P. 

Reed Sons, Jacob 

Remington Typewriter Co. 

Sanderson & Thompson 

Schillaire, A. J. 

Shatluck & Jones 

Springfield Republican 

Trott, J. H. 

Tuttle Co. :, 

United States Hotel 

Utieys 

Waldo Bros. 

White Studio 

Whiting & Sons, D. 

Wilder & Co. 

Winchester Repeating Arms Co. 

Woodward's Lunch 

Ziegler & Co., P. R. 



We lannol blame, indeed—but 



s\eep.— Assembly. 



P h o t o li r o p h c r 



t h i .V boo k 



S III i t li , V a s s a r 



'The lV/i!ft' Sti/(/ios, a '' Broiid-uuiy production," 
has ' ' [jLiycd to full houses ' ' for over twenty- 
five years. This means keeping ahead of the 
most changeable aiui exacting public in the world. 




^JUDIO 



fr5U6-U8 iBroadiuai/, .J\^eiv york 

( belween 4Stli and 46tll Sts.. in Times Si|. 1 



Studios also in 

1.^oiighkeepsie, ^V. y. 
.jSort/iampton, ^Hass. 
Soiit/i Uiadley, ■^fiass. 



The School and College IJepartment makes avail- 
able the best skilled artists and modern methods, 
and also assures promptness and accuracy in com- 
pletion of work. 



C o I II ni b i a , and many other colleges for the season 



fading.— Maf/i. 



Silence that dreadful he]\.— Chapel Bell. 




Sanderson & Thompson 



CLOTHIERS 

Hatters ^ Tailors 

Reliable merchandise at prices that are always as low as the lowest 

Sanderson & Thompson, Amherst 




GOODS FOR MEN 



C. & K. Derbies 

Ni I James R. Reiser's 

eCKWear ( Welch, Margetson, London 

Enghsh and Scotch Woolens 

CAMPION 



Tailor GfHaberdasher 




He is a modest youth, su.— Alien. 



cnl, I want to be lough,— £J Lah 



E. M. BOLLES 



The Store of quality 
where collegre men 
iet what they vvanl 



FOOTWEAR 



Walk Over Shoes, $3.50, $4, $5, $6 

Stetson Shoes, $5— $8 



F. A. CASTLE. '12, 13 South College 

Student Representative 



Headquarters for 

Sheets, 

Pillow Cases 
and Quilts 



A full assortment of DENIMS for 
corner seats 

A large line of 

Dry Goods, Notions and 
Groceries 



Jackson & Cutler 



Page's 



Shoe 

Store 



Amherst 



ALWAYS RELIABLE 

The Elite Shoe 
$3.50 to $5.00 

Pumps 
$2.00 to $4.00 

Swell Shod 
The best $5.00 Shoes made 

Expert Repairing 

You will find a full line of 

Blank Books 
Stationery 
and . . . 
College Supplies 



Also all Magazines and 
Daily Papers at 

Charles E. Ewells 

Amherst, Mass. 



Whither shall 1 Hy for news?— Criggs. 



Hush, he sleeps.-^Sireeter. 





Deuel's Drug Store 




Kodaks^ Films 
Victor Ta/kirig Machines 

Tennis Rackets and Balls 

Fountain Pens 
M. A. C. Banners 




Deuel's Drug Store 








_|i_ 




COLLEGE DRUG STORE 

is the place to buy 

Foss '''' Premier ^^ Chocolates 

Foss ^^Quality^^ Chocolates 

See our line of 

Cigars, Cigarettes, Tobacco, Pipes 

COLLEGE DRUG STORE 

On the Way to the Postojfice McGrath Qe. CuRLEY 











If silence were golden I'd be a millionaire. ^^5eWen. 



Senlimenlally, I 



bul orBanically I 



apable of a lu 



-Drury. 



I ^fC 



Simplex 

Notebook 




National Loose Leaf Note Books 

tj^OR the college student there is nothing more 
•*■ useful than ;i National Siinj)lex Note Book. 
The pages may be inserted or removed instantly 
by opening or closing the rings. This book Cf)mes 
in several sizes, and paper with various rulings is 
supplied. Whene\er you buy blank books be sure 
they bear the Eagle trade mark. 

The National Blank Book Co 

(Largest makers in the world) 

HOLYOKE, .... MASS. 



EUREKA RULING & 
BINDING CO. 

Prtntfrs <xnh 
llmtk loDh 
fHakprB 

School work a specialty 
HOLYOKE, .-. MASS. 



"■The only car that is self slopping" 

PUPMOBILE 

Next year all degenerate automobiles will be 
equipped with self stopping devices; you make a 
mistake if you buy a self stopping car, you get this 
feature in the PUPMOBILE "33 flea powder." 

90% of last years PUPMOBILES are now 
out of commission, and the other 9'/r never were 
in, this shows that 9 out of the 10 cars sold last year 
are not now in use; this is proof of the instability 
that no other car can offer at the same price. 

Call in and see our latest 1905 model; we have 
made no cars since that time, as it has been impos- 
sible to invent any later improvements. 

PUPMOBILE MOTOR CAR CO. 

Maiden Lane, Plum Tree, Mass. 
T. P. DOOLEY, M. A. C Agent 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii-i 

Book Store !|: 



:ll Amherst.... 



4< IJonka, i'tatinopru g 

3 53irturrfi attii ». 

2 PfnnantB £ 

•H Waterm.^n's Ideal and H« 

4H Moore's Non-leakable Fountain Pens H« 



We carry a large assortment of 



50c FICTION 



4^ Leave your 
^ orders for 



ENGRAVED CARDS and H. 
PICTURE FRAMING I? 



idd, too mdd — 1 pray thee swear. — Cullcv. 



The Sunday School, thai blessed placf 

Oh I would rather stray 
Within its walls a child of grace 

Than spend my time in play. — Post. 



1857 



1912 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

(STANDARD FOR OVER FIFTY YEARS) 

ARE "MIXED WITH BRAINS" 

They combine the experience of over fifty years in the fertilizer business with the latest 
teachings of Agricultural Science. 

They are True Plant Foods — Concentrated, Available, Sure in Their Action, and Bene- 
fit alike Crops and Soil. It Pays to Use Them. 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(Basic Slag Phosphate) 

Gives a Large Amount of Available Phosphoric Acid, without acidity or acidulation. Also containj 
a Large Amount of Lime. Has no equal for Clover, Alfalfa, Timothy, Cereals and Fruits, 



(Our lit 



lany years of practical farm 



! prepared by agricultural experts whose experience Cuvcia uuj.y yc^io vi piaLntai ,»>u 
"'ning of Agricultural Colleges and Experiment Stations. Let us know in wba 
■ested and we shall be glad lo co-operate with you in every way possible. ) 



The Coe-Mortimer Company 



51 CHAMBERS STREET 

NEW YORK CITY 



BUSINESS ESTABLISHED 1857 



Constant Temperature 

Electric Drying 

Ovens 




International Instrument Co. 

23 Church St., Cambridge, Mass. 




Cat. No. 624 P 



Paragon Drawing 
Instrument 

Are of the most practical design, the most precise 
workmanship and the best finish. In every respect 
they merit the reputation they have gained as the 
finest iira-Tuing instruments made. 

KEUFFEL & ESSER CO. 

New York Gen. Office and Factories 

127 Fulton St. Hoboken, N. J. 

CHICAGO. ST. LOUIS. SAN FRANCISCO. MONTREAL 



Drawing Materials 

Mathematical and Surveying Instruments 

Measuring Tapes 



He hath an eagle eye. — Doc Cordon. 



"The world knows nolhing of her greatest men." — Blalfe 



J-M Asbestos and Magnesia Products 



Pipe Coverings for High, Medium and Low 
Pressure Steam Surfaces 

J-M Asbestos Sponge Felted 85% Magnesia 

Asbestos Fire Felt Asbestocel 

PACKINGS FOR ALL STEAM PRESSURES 

Asbestos Papers, Pipe and Boiler Cements and Boiler Gaskets 

J-M Dry Batteries ' Linolite" Tungsten Lighting System 

J-M Sectional Conduit Electrical Supplies 

Asbestos Roofing, Shingles and Asbestos Fireproof Wood 
J-M Heat, Cold and Sound Deadening Insulation 



H. W. JOHNS-MANVILLE COMPANY 

55-59 High Street "^Ze'cuill"' BOSTON, MASS. 



Edward T. Davis 

Treas. and Mir. 



LoDii Disl. 'Phune 



NEW ENGLAND 
PLUMBING SUPPLY CO., 

Plumberf *, Steam and Gas Fitters' and 
Tinners' Supplies 

166-172 Bridge Street 

SPRINGFIELD. MASS. 



WANTED 

A freshman to keep College Store 
open betzveen the hours of 8-12 
a. m., and again between the 
hours of 1 and 6 p. m. Do not 
apply before 6 p. m., as the store 
may not be open. 



H. E. KINSMAN 

Nash Block Main Street 



OFFICIAL COLLEGE 

Pbotograpber 



The Studio for high grade Photography in all 
its departments; also 

Picture framing 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 

Visitors Welcome 



•Whence? Where? Why? What?"— Curii; 



Molto of Springfield Ga 




Over 2,000,000 Apple and 1,300,000 Peach Trees for sale this season 
Inquiries from interested parlies »ill receive prompt attention 

J. G. HARRISON & SONS, Berlin, Maryland 



Holyoke, Mass 



Leather Collefie and Fraternity Producti^ 
Opalescent Leather Decorations 
Menus. Proftrams 



Original and Exclusive Craft Noveltie 

Artistic Siins and Show Cards 

Advertising Displays 

Desi^nin^ 



S. M. Jordan, 13 



:: Jardin de fiasbc fiaus :: 

Amusement provided to detract 
attention from the food 

Week be^innin^ A sh Wednesday 

Mr. Oscar Have-a-Stein presents 

Senor Bernardo Jenkinferno Kel-le 

tlie world renowned impresario 
and giand opera virtuoso in Felix 
Frensio Friedman's fiair splitting 
and fide raising tragedy . 

"The Pink Maid" 

or the first amendment to 
" Der Riny des Niebelun^ens " 



CHORUS DIRECT FROM THE OLD HOWARD 



Dances under the direction of Count Johan Lin- 

colnidas Seldonnes, late janitor of Cook's 

notorious emporium 

ADMISSION FREE 

In order to leave, all sufferers must demonstrate their ability to 
masticate one acidulated sample of egg debris commonly known as 
"THE CHEF'S REVENGE." 

^OTE— Undertaker furnished gratis 



P. R. Zie^ler Si Co. 



lerchant 



BOSTON, MASS. 



Mountain Silos 
Stable Fittings 



B-L-K Mllkind Machin 

Separators. Coole 

Bottle Fille 



erylhinii that a 



illk 



pot of 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

THHE Certified Milk pro- 
■■• duced and bottled in the 
model dairy of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College is dis- 
tributed in greater Boston by 

D. WHITING Sl sons 

370 Rutherford Avenue 
BOSTON 

ale. -Al Dickie's! 



N 



FresS every hour.—Cor 



A FULL LINL OF 



WateriJiaff s Ideal 

. . . .Fountain Pens 



EVERY PEN GUARANTEED 



Henry Adams & Company 

THK OLD CORNKR DRUG STORE 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Manufacturing Optician 

Prescription lense grinding a specialty. Violin, 
Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Strings 

COLLEGE SEAL JEWELRY 

Special attention given to all kinds of FINE 
WATCH WORK. 



WANTED 

Some Tobacco, 

The Papers, 

A Match, 

Another Match. 
HASEY, '13 



Go to Mt. Tom 



ffl'HERE the vvoild is at your feet. 
^ There the radiait beauty of the 'and- 
icape reveals itself in infinite variety. You 
see mountains like great billows, with deep, 
far shadowy valleys between; long uplands 
with slender spires rising here and there 
from clustered homes; green meadows, 
fallow fields and stretches of woodland; 
busy cities and towns whose sounds of 
human toil cannot penetrate the repose of 
this grand height; the "Long River," with 
a history overfiowing with legend and 
tradition, sweeping proud. y by through 
mountain pass and love'y banks to the sea, 
winding for many a mile wiihin the bountl- 
arics of this noble outlook. 



He 



bcauly for ihe 



Bacchus has drowned n 


lore men than Neptune. 


BECKM ANN'S 


Woodward's 


Candies 


Lunch,,., 


and... 


27 lUAIIV STREET. Masonic Bld^ 


Ice Creams 


Northampton, Mass. 


Fancy Ices 


Lunches Soda Ice Cream 


LOST! 

Alfalfa 


247 - 249 Main Street 


Queen 


Northampton 


NEAL, '13 


Prospect House 

Telephone 8351 

PERRY'S 

The place to eat at all limcs. Attractive 
dining room and excellent service. : : 


Olympia Candy 
Company 

Wholesale and Retail 


Order a Table Ahead 




17 Amity St. Amherst, Mass. 


FINE CANDIES 

and 

ICE CREAM 


Amherst House 
Barber Shop 


m—^*——'^ 


257 Main Street 


All First . Class Workmen 
Hair Cutting Our Specialty 


Northampton, :: Massachusetts 



The Revival of Learning — -Just before exams. 



"Learned he was In medicinal lore."-- "Doc" Fay. 



E. RUSSELL NORTON 

BOSTON a?n/ N K W YORK 

Crown Moshannon 

COAL 



Low in Ash Low in Sulphur Free from CHnker 

Has no superior tis a steam producing coal 



DILLON ^ DOUGLAS 



DISTRIBUTORS OF 


GOLD MEDAL 


BUTTER 

AND 



BLUE RIBBON 

EGGS 



SPRINGFIELD, 



MASS. 




A Skin Tackle 



"Bid me discourse, 1 will enchant thine ear." — Codvin. 



"Alas, alas, loo full for ullerance. "—Cn'sfman. 



iiassad|itsrtta Agrtatltural (Enlbg^ 

AMHERST. :: :: :: :: MASSACHUSETTS 



THE COLLEGE THAT TRAINS MEN FOR ATTRACTIVE POSITIONS IN AGRICUL- 
TURE, HORTICULTURE, AND ALLIED SCIENCES. 

Ideal location. 

Oldest and Largest College of Agiicultuie in New England. 

Tuition free to residents of Massachusetts. 

Necessary expenses moderate. 

ADMISSION 

Entrance examinations required in English, History, Mathematics, Modern Languages, and Sciences. 
Applicants presenting satisfactory certificates from approved High Schools or Academies, or from 
the Regents of the State of New York, accepted without examination. 

PARTIAL LIST OF EQUIPMENT 

Clark Hall: For the Department of Botany and Plant Pathology. 

Wilder Hall: Occupied by the Departments of Pomology, Landscape Gardening, Forestry, Drawing. 

French Hall and Durfee Plant Houses: Floriculture and Market Gardemng. 

Entomological and Zoological Laboratory: Largest and best equipped laboratory for its purposes in 
the country. 

Dairy and Storage Barns: Models in construction and equipment. 

Veterinary Laboratory and Hospital: For Veterinary Science and Bacteriology. 

Draper Hall: Dimng Hall to accommodate 300 students. 

Slock Judging Pavilion: For Department of Animal Husbandry. 

Fruit Storage: Additional equipment for Department of Pomology. 

Dairy Building: In process of construction. 

"He follows as the mght the day."— Co/e. 



"My heart laments llial 



-B. /. Kcllcv. 







DEPARTMENTS 


The 


Aca 


Jemic DeparlmenI offers a four years' course leading to the degree of B. Sc. A general course 




is required during the first two years, followed by elective work offered by the following named 




div.s 


ons and departments: 




I. 


THF 


DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE: 


III. THE DIVISION OF SCIENCE— Con. 




1. 

2. 
3. 


Agronomy. 

Animal Husbandry. 

Dairying. 


5. Physics. 

6. Veterinary Science. 

7. Zoology and Geology. 




4. 
5. 


Farm Administration. 
Poultry Husbandry. 


IV. THE DIVISION OF THE HUMANITIES: 
1. Economics and Sociology. 


11. 


THE DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE 

1. Floriculture. 


2. History and Government. 

3. Languages and Literature. 




2. 


Forestry. 


V. THE DIVISION OF RURAL SOCIAL 




3. 

4. 


Landscape Gardening. 
Market Gardening. 


SCIENCE: 

1. Agricultural Economics. 




5. 


Pomology. 


2. Agricultural Education. 


111. 


THE DIVISION OF SCIENCE: 


3. Rural Sociology. 




1. 


Botany. 


VI. GENERAL DEPARTMENTS: • 




2. 


Chemistry. 


1. Library. 




3. 
4. 


Entomology. 
Mathematics. 


2. Military Science. 

3. Physical Education. 


The 


Cra 


duale School offers advanced courses to 


graduates of this and other colleges in the major 




departments of study. 




The 


Ext 


nsion Deparlmeni presents a number of 


hort courses and conferences, also correspondence and 




lectu 


re courses, educational exhibits, etc. 




The 


Exp 


crimcnf Slaiion is immediately connected 


with the College. 




Fo 


further information address 








KENYON 


L. BUTTERFIELD, President. 


SENC 


FOR A CATALOGUE, ILLUSTRATED BOOKLET, OR OTHER PRINTED 






MATERIAL ISSUED BY THE COLLEGE. 



'An all round man." — Dursle^. 
XUI 



A refined, inlellectual, handsome and Apollo-like group of penile 



-The 1913 Indfx Board. 



When in Northampton visit the 

Draper Rathskellar 

1- O R 

Broiled Live Lobster 

Chicken a la Maryland 

Planked or Club 
Sirloin Steak 



Li^ht Lunches Served in Our 
Lunch Room 



New England's Leading Newspaper 

(MASSACHUSETTS) 

The favorite with college men. All the 

news, local and general, and a 

strong editorial page 

Progressive Independent 

DAILY, $8.00 SUNDAY, S2.00 

WEEKLY. Sl.OO a Year 



Specimen copies of either edition sent free on ap- 
plication. ®l(r MSerklg iSppubltrart will be sent 
free for one month to anyone who wishes to 
trv it. 




United States Hotel 

BEACH STREET 
Boston 



A most comfortable and convenient 
place to stop at . ' . ' . ' 



American and European Plan 



Only two blocics from 
South Terminal Station. 
North Union Station is 
easily reached by ele- 
vated railroad. 



JAMES G. HICKEY. 
TILLY HAYNES, 



Manager 
Proprietor 



A variable, constantly approaching ihe limit. — Draper Hall Hash. 
XIV 



"Smash if you must this curly head 
Bui Icl me pilch pennies, sir," he said.— C. E. Howe. 




T^HERE is in 
the soil some 
beneficial action to 
crops due not so 
muchtothe 
amount of nitro- 
gen, phosphoric acids and potash supplied as 
to some other characteristic of the fertilizer. 
''For the lands' sake" use BOH^KEWS. 

THEY ENRICH THE EARTH AND THOSE WHO TIEL IT. 




OF EVERY KINDr 

I m plementsi ^c^g^s, 
lEUPnoNE Machines. -^^^^^ 
BicnMOND 2360 Woodetiware. 

SI AND 52 NORTHS ARK^T STHECT. BOSTON. 



JPumlsIi OS- ^tppro i-ed Jintplo} cas. 
Morcantile. ^^rJcillturaJ, IfttrficulhiraL 

TELEPHO^JE RICll. 2360 



Pettingell-AiidreMS Co. 

iElprtnral JHprrl^an&tBe 

iGightitig 3Tixturra 

AutinuDbilp anii iHntnr Snat 

&up;)lip3 

Atlantic Avenue and Pearl Street 

Boston 



Wanted ! 

Someotie to take me to 
the Informals .... 

Treas. Office 



Whal sweel dehghls a quiel life affords.— Dallfon. 



"Cap" Rohcrl!. 



•H!:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiti±iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii±i±±±» 




Hotel Cumberland I 

S. W. Corner Broadway and 54th St. - - NEW YORK [J 

Near 50(h Street Subway Station aad 53d Street Elevated [J 

KEPT BY A COLLEGE MAN £ 

Headouarters yor College Men h. 

Special Rates for College Teams 4. 

Idial Location — Near Theatres, Shops and Central Park h» 

New, Modern and Absolutely Fireproof ^ 

Most Attractive Hotel in New York [t 

Transient Rates $2.50 with bath and up. Ten minutes' walk H« 

to twenty theatres. All outside rooms. h« 

H< 

Send for Booklet 4. 

HARRY P. STIMSON S 

Formerly with Hotel Imperial £ 



Headquarters for Stude 



H« 



•Hff^^m^i^^-ifi=i'f^imifa^a-i-^^f^^ffi^^^fm'-tifi^=i-m=i-^fafi»' 



Copley 
Square 
Hotel 



Huntington Avenue, Exeter and 
Blagden Streets 

BOSTON, MASS. 




3 50 Rooms; 200 Private Baths 

Headquarters for College and School Tean 

When in Boston 

AMOS H. WHIPPLE, Proprietor 




The only thing in him worth noting is his walk. 
And that is like the "Oceana Roll." — Adams. 



1 sal, and sicepina dfeamed.— C/:ar;;c. IValkc 




Pomology and Cold Stor 

Massachusetts Aericultu 

Amherst, Mas^ 



Desiiinecl ;ind Built by 

MADISON COOPER 
COMPANY 

Refriyeralind Eniiiniers. Architects 
and Contractors 

1 I" COURT STREET 
CALCIUM. N. Y. 

Equipped with 

The Cooper Brine System 

and 

The Cooper Chh)ride of 
Calcium Process 



No other system is as simple in operation and perfect in its results and as 
applicable to north temperate zone conditions 



For Sale ! 

' ' Harew-Scare-Em ' ' 
Skirt 

G. E. Howe, '13 

Mitchell Woodbury Company 



IpXHIBlT in their Hotel Department every requirement in 
•«& CHINA, GLASS and SILVER (or the proper egnipmenl 
of hotels, restaurants and public institutions. Seven 
floors. Hotel Department Representatives: Mr. Arthur N. 
Howe, Mr. Maurice G. Cochrane, Mr. Warren A. Merrill, 
Mr. Theron T. Romer. 



Telephone 4600 Main 
Branch Exchange 



Commonwealth Hotel 



Opposite State House, Boston. M 




Offers rooms with hot and cold wa'er for SI. 00 per day and up. 
which includes free use of public shower b.th Nothing to equal 
this in t4ezv England. Rooms with private halhs for SI 50 per 
day and up; suites of two rooms and bath for S4.00 per day and up. 
niiiinir Room and Cafe first class European plan. 

ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 

Stone floors, nothing wood but the doors, Kquipped with its own 
Sanitary Vacuum ClraninK Plant. Lode distance teleplione. Strict 
ly a temperance hotel. Send for Booklet. 



STORER F. CRAFTS, (ien. Mer 



A man of brain and brawn. — Larsen. 
XVll 



A round, round face, two chubby cheeks 

Two eyes of brightest blue, 
A pompadour of yellow sold, 

A heart that's kind and' true.— A'/ .is Cole 



DRINK 

BOYNTON'S 

BIRCH BEER 

and HIRES' 
25 Other Flavors 

W. W. Boynton 

3 1 River St. Northampton 



Cotrell & Leonard 

Albany, New York 




Makers of 

Caps, 

Gowns and 

Hoods 

to the American Colleges and 
Univer.'iilies, frcmi the Atlantic to 
the Pacific. 



ChASS CONTRACTS A SPECIALTY 



Chicago Steel Tape Company 



Manufacturers of 



Common Sense Things 
for Field Work 



The Chicago Steel Tape, Marking Pins, Tape Repairing 

Supplies, Leveling Rods, Stadia Targets, 

Rod Ribbons and Lining Poles 

6229-6233 Cottage Grove Ave. CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, U. S. A. 



He grins with elfish glee. — Tapper. 
XVlIt 



ar solemnly l.y llicr heatds.—BirchaU. 



Jacob Reed's Sons 



MANUFACTITRERS OF 



Gold Medal Uniforms 

Our equipment and facilities for producing uniforms for Col- 
leges and Military Schools are unequalled by any other house in the 
United States. You are sure of intelligent and accurate service in 
ordering of us. 

The uniforms worn at the Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of the character, quality and appearance of 
our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons 



1424-1426 Chestnut St. 



Pliiladelphia 



JOHN FOTTLER. President 

W C BRIGGS, Treas 



H. E. FISKE. Vice President and Manage 
H. W. KAWSON. Secretary 



Fottler, Fiske, Raw^soii Co, 

Seeds, Bulbs & Plants 



Poultry Supplies 
Mandy Lee Incubator 



Representing the Firms o( 

SCHLEGEL & FOTTLER CO. 
H. E. FISKE SEED CO. 
W. W. RAWSON & CO. 



Our Specially 

Highest Grade SEEDS 

For the Market Gardner 

For the Florist 
For the Private Gardner 



Cahic address 
Fottler-Fiske, Boston 



Telephone Main 3201 
Private Exchange Connecting all Ofiic 



ml 13 FANEUIL HALL SQUARE 
19 CHANGE AVENUE 



Boston, Mass. 



We must know when to spare and when lo spend. — ColUgc Slor 
XIX 



The heavens speed ihee in ihy enlerpiise. — Chain Liahlnwg. 



C. I^. Corwin Company 



COMMISSION 
MERCHANTS 



Butter, Eggs, Poultry, Game 



Hotel and Restaurant Supplies 
a Specialty 



BASEMENT, 2 FANEUIL HALL MARKET 
SOUTH SIDE 

Telephone Connection 

Boston, .". .'. Massachusetts 




JJl/ <^ ',5 i,.^,t-':^s^t-^■*'l^ 1- Ct 



Oriental Tea Company 
(Eras att^ OIo^pgB 

87 Court Street Boston, Mass. 

PUFFER BROS. 

A Fi;ll Line of 
HOTEL, CLUB, STEAMER a n d SCHOOL 

SUPPLIES 

^®=Wc attend personally to all orders. Our success 
depends upon our reputation. Our reputation depends 
on our methods of doing business. Shippers Cali- 
fornia and Foreign Fruits. 

20 Mercantile St. , Boston, Mass. 



osrpli L. Ncivion. Prcs. 
.-Ii.irles H. TlwiyiT. Vice-Prci 



\V. Muiiroe Hill, Treas. 
All.M K, Nowton, Secy. 



ShattLick ^ Jones 
FISH 

of ail kinds 




128 Faneuil Hall Market 
BOSTON 



TERRAPIN and 
SOFT CRABS 



GREEN TURTLE 
and OYSTERS 



Shouts of mockery made sport of me. — "Scaoui. 



My crcdil stands 



und.— Pc/;c-/(, 




A GREENHOUSE SUGGESTION 

When you get ready to build, it nil! pay you to get in touch with us and talk things over. 
Don't simply build a greenhou.-e, but have one planned right, arranged right and built right — one 
that is the result of our years of experience. : : :-: This greenhouse shown, is fully 

describeti in our new Catalogue, advance pages of which we will gladly send you at once. They 
show up our Curved Eave houses in an especially interesting way :-'■ :-: :-: 



LORD & BURNHAM COMPANY 



NEW YORK 
St. James Bids;. 



BOSTON 
Tremont BIdg. 



PHIL A DEL PHI A 
Heed BIdg. 



CHICAGO 

The Rookery 



The Kny-Scheerer 
Company 

Department of Laboratory Supplies 

Manufacturers and Importers of 

High Grade Chemical 
Apparatus and Chemicals 

Catalogues sent free on application 

404-410 West 27th St. 
NEW YORK U. S. A. 



Wholesale Distributors of all High Grade 

LEATHERS 

Wilder & Company 

GENERAL OFFICE 

226-228 West Chicago, 111. 

Lake Street 

Waldo Brothers 

C. S. WALDO, Sole Partner 

1U2 MILLS ST. BOSTON 

Akron Salt Glazed Sewer Pipe, Fire Clay, 
Flue Linings, Portland and Rosendale 
Cement, Masons' and Contrac- 
tors' Supplies 



Maddened by the joy of sudden deliverance.— Bo/i .;. Pohcon. 



I'm a good skale so push me along. — Whitney. 




Manufactured by 

American Dairy Supply Co. 

Washington, D. C. 



G. P. READ 

199 DUANE ST. NEW YORK 



Branch Factory, Albion, New York 

We have All the Supplies 
needed by the Fruit Grower 
for the protection of his fruit at 
the time of packing and during 
transit. . '. '. " ' . ' 

Send for Booklet on 
Fruit Packing Supplies 





LAMPREY 

Improved 

•ARCH- 
PLATE 

MUD POCKET 



MANUFACTURED BY 

THE LAMPREY COMPANY 

WESTFIELD, MASS. 



For steam boilers. More than 5000 in use. 
Inquiries promptly attended to 



HI 




HIGH GRADE COLLEGE WORK 

Improved machinery and methods enable 
us to turn out the very best class of work 

LAUNDRY AGENTS 

Ralph R. Parker 
C. S. C. House, S5 Pleasant St. 

Francis S. Madison 
A^'t for 1915 and Short Course, Vet' nary Lab' tory 

PRESSING AGENT 

Fred S. Merrill 
C. S. C. House, 85 Pleasant St. 



He's gentle and not fearful. — Mighty. 
XXII 



Wliy board goes up.^ — San 




' II 



.401 Caliber 

Self-Loading RMe 

This new Winchester five-shot repeater is the 
finest and latest example of progress in gun 
making. It is reloaded by recoil, the repeat- 
ing as well as the firing mechanism being 
under control of the trigger finger. A bullet 
fired from it strikes a blow 2038 pounds — force 
enough to topple over the biggest game — pene- 
tration enough to reach the innermost vital spot. 
Tho wonderful in operation and powerful in 
execution, this rifle is neither complicated in 
construction nor cumbersome to handle. From 
butt to muzzle it's a handsome, handy gun. 

Don't fail to examine one of these riHes 
before taking your next hunting trip. 

IT HITS LIKE T H n 
H A M M n R OF T H O R 

Kn argument against woman's suffrage.— Quin Lowry. 



Step up boys, he woni bite. — Lyon. 



ANGIER '13 



CLARK '13 



■i-J:-t--\ -Viiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



College Store 

Confectionery, Tonics, 
Student Supplies 



STATIONERY, POSTERS, BANNERS 

Student Patronage 
Appreciated 



i:±±i±±±±±±±±±i:i±±i±±±±ii±ii±±±±±±ii±±±±±±±i±,^rjfi±±±±±±ii:ii±ii±i- 




ELDRIDGE 14 



TARBELL 14 




Goin^ to 

Leave 

no stone unturned to please 
those who favor us with a 
sitting. We will put torth 
every effort to give perfect 
satisfaction. 

Our 

Photographs 

are produced h\' the most 
approved method. There 
is no tedious posing and 
changing. Experience en- 
ables us to decide at once 
how a subject will photo- 
graph to the best advantage. 
Our pictures are artistic, 
beautiful and lasting. 

Schillare's 

Studio 

142 Main St.. 
NORTHAMPTON 

•Phone 333-2 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barher Shop 

All Work of a First-Class Order 
ELECTRICAL MASSAGE 



3 Amity St. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



1 In- Miissacliusttts Agricultural Culk-; 



.' prLigressive farmers, are kept s\\eei and clean wiih 

BALED SHAVINGS 

J ill tarluad lots only hy ■ - 



F. E. Blodgett 

Suncook, N. H. 



ihan nex 
xxiv 



If nol pood enough fo' ihc Index, please hand lo ihe Signal. 



New Eriglarul A'lac/e 

Farm Iwplements 

Riding and Walking Plows 

Spring, Spike Tooth and Disc Harrows 

Fertilizer Sowers 

Corn Planters 

Ensilage and Fodder Cutters 

Corn Shellcrs 

Root Cutters 

New Chicopee Corn Husker 

Fan Mills 

Land Rollers Garden Barrows 

Hay Rakes, Hay Tedders, Etc. 

K..r I'ull lufurmiuiii.i A.l.lross 

Belc/ier ^ Taylor 

Ag'l Tool Co. 

Chicopee Falls, Mass. 



M. A. C. Dramatics 

NoKI-HAMPTON ACAUKMY 

OF Music 
'Thursday Evcni/iir, February 15th 

"What Happened to Jones" 



Reliance LJue 
GASOLINE 

ENGINES 



()ujlil\ IImIm) Pneumatic Water S^ stems 

IiliMi I ktiric LiEhting Plants 

(Meld Spraying Machines 

Write for Calaloii 

Brackett, Shaw Sf Lu?it Co. 

('2 No. Washington St. 




Soniers'ivort/t 
Neiv Hampsliit 



Boston^ Mass. 



Arthur E. Dorr & Company 



BEEF, POULTRY, GAME 




North and Union Streets, BOSTON, MJSS. 



Phones. Ridimond 1592 & I59J 



Fools are my theme; let satire be my song. — Pac}^ard. 
XXV 



Angler or Healh? Neither. Twas Va 



The Mutual Plumbing 
^ Heating Company... 



Plumbing, Heating 
Iron Pipe, Sewer Pipe 
Kitchen Furnishini^s 
Wire, Pumps, Nails 
Paints and Oils 

EVERYTHING 
IN HARDWARE 



The Mutual Plumbing 
^ Heating Company... 

Amherst, Mass. 

Carpenter & Morehouse 



BOOK and JOB 



frtnlfrH 



The Amherst Record 



Amherst, Mass. 



W. I). COWLES 

Tel. 173 



J. HERBKRT HOWARD 
Tel. 127-3 



W. D. Cowles & Co, 



LUMBER 

WOOD and TIES 



Railroad Lumber 
and Chestnut Poles 
of all kinds 
a Specialty 



North Amherst, 



Massachusetts 



Excursions de Luxe 

To the vacation land oE the predatory 
landlord and the weekly bean— Massa- 
wlppi. Vt. 

The Beanem R. R. announces the inauguration of 

the B. L. Limited. (Just Suits)* t 
Equipment: Through vestibuled Bullman palace 

stock car. (Whale oil lighted) 
Swift refrigerator cars for patrons who get liot at 

the management. 
One White House /uncA car, Boston to Winter 

Hill. (Physician in charge) 

Sleeping Cars 

1st night. — Waltham to Barre Plains 
2nd night. — Amherst to Hadley 

(stopover privileges for pilgrimaees lo the home of H. B. Barstow.) 

3d night. — Take steamer "Swamp Angel" 

Northampton to Hatfield. 

From this point a choice of routes is offered :- 
A — Up the river by raft 
B — Return home via the Cee Vee 
C — Continuation of trip on foot 

*West bound train stops only for eastbound pass- 
engers and repairs. 

:j:This train due to run daily except Mondays, Tues- 
days, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. 



ep of the hboring i 
XXVI 



veet. — Cobb. 



Tell me 
HydrauH. 



empty dream. HrcjiH 



Hi 



W 



.<>Vi, 






J 



9 ^H Hi ^H ^H 



^E PRINT and bind College 
Annuals. This volume 
is a sample of our work. We 
supply the original drawings, the 
halftone and line engraving plates 
if ordered — also the steel die 
work for the fraternity emblems — the com- 
plete book. ^ =^-« ^ =^ =^ 

We do the work so well that we hold the order year 
after year— in one instance for 10 consecutive years— 
our best friends are managers and editors for whom 
we have furnished annuals. ^ ^ ^ 

We make a specialty of this work, and as specialists, 
can offer you special features— and intelligent service 
— our experience in printing over 170 different Annuals 
is cumulative and at your disposal. ^ ^ 

The T^Httle Company 

Established 1832 J I & 1 3 Ce/lter St. , R/lt/cUld, Vt. 







Haven't scratched yet. — The Headla 
XXVll 



The very pink of perfeclion. — Harris. 



TTALF-7 0NES, Line 

Engravings and Steel 
Die Work in this annual 
furnished by ... . 

The Tuttle Company 

R.utland, Vt. 

Pri/itets for Particular People 



Dead men tell no tales.— BuWarJ. 
XXVllI 



-Crcanlcaf ami Pill. 



M. B. Kingman 



M. A. C. '82 



I'lic place to get the best 

Cuf F/owers 

fur that girl 
TELEPHONE IN TIME 



Store next to "Campion" 

37 SOUTH PLEASANT STREET 
AMHERST, MASS. 




'Smoke Prince Albert.' 



The Holyoke Valve 
and Hydrant Company 



JOBBERS OF 



Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe Valves and 

Fittings for Steam, Water and Gas. 

Asbestos and Magnesia Boiler 

and Pipe Coverings. 



Pipe Cut to Sketch 



Mill Supplies 



ENGINEERS AND (ONrRACTORS FOR 

Steam and Hot Water Heating 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems 

Boiler and Engine Connections 

HOLYOKE, MASS. 



W. L. CHILSON 

Trunks, Bads 
Suit Cases 

Fur Coats 
Gloves 

Sheepskins for table covers and seals 

Harness, Blankets, and Horse goods of 

all kinds. The IVunk and Bag Store 

of Hampshire Co. Both Hand 

and Machine-Made Harness 

Always on Hand 

Pocket Books, Dressini; Cases anJ Ladies* Bags 

Repairing Done Promptly 

141 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



An idle man. — Lesure. 
XXIX 



High privates of ihe rear rank — San 



Pellelt, Kellcv. 



vimsicmutum' 

aiiiiilisiii*! 

tHE ORlGINAi^NONf LEAKABLEj 

iiiiliiiliNiiEi* 



A Iways ready to write at the first 
•^^ stroke without shaking. 

That is a vital point which is lacking in 
ordinary fountain pens. You can readily 
understand how this is made possible in a 
Moore when we explain that the pen when 
not in use lies submerged in ink which keeps 
it moist and prepared for instant writing, 
positively eliminating the necessity of 
shaking. 

But that is not all ofits strong features. The Moore 
can be carried in any position without the least fear of 
leaking. Has a large ink capacity. Always writes 
freely and evenly, and is easily filled. 
Ewrv Moore Non-Uakahle Fountain Pen cmrici 
with it the most unconditional guarantee. 

BE SURE ITS A MOORE. 
For Sa/e /iy J)ea/ers Everj wfiere. 

AMERICAN FOUNTAIN PEN CO. 

(/dams, Cusliiny' £ Foster. Jellind ffg'erits. 
160 DEVONSHIRE ST.. DOSTON."' MASS 
CANADIAN AOENTS, W.J.OAOE&CO.,TflR0NT0,CAN 



f WEBSTER'S 1 
] NEW 

INTERNATIONAL 
DICTIONARY 

THE MERRIAM WEBSTER? 

RpraiKto i' >** ^ NEW CREATION, 
uccduac covering every field of the 
world's thought, action, and culture. 
The (inly new unabridged diction- 
ary in many years. 
Ro<-siico it defines over 400,000 
DCCdUSe ^ynrds. 2700 Pages. 
6000 Illustrations, 
Dp„-,,-p it is the on Ji- dictionary with 
uccausc jjjg j^g^^j, divided page. 
Roz-aiico it is accepted by the Courts, 
oeidUbc Schools, and Press as tha 
one supreme authority. 
Rorniico he who knows Wins Suc- 
Decause p^^^._ j^gj ^g ^gu y^u about 

this new work. Write for specimens 
of the new divided page. 
C.&C.MERRIAMC0..Pukn>Iiert,Sprii>efie1d.Ma,>. 

Mention thl&paper,TeceiveFREE,set of pocket mapB, 



J. H.TROTT 

PLUMBER 

STEAM n n d GAS FITTER 




Aeeni for the Famous 

Glenwood Ranges and Heaters 
13' North Pleasant St. 

New Endland Telephone 



WE'VE BEEN SELLING 

COAL 

For Years 

Also a Complete Line of 
HARDWARE SUPPLIES 

C. R. ELDER 

Amherst 



ins 6ry.~lVclh 
XXX 



Baker. Burhc 



A, Park, Florist 
FRESH FLO IFF RS 

SUPPLIED 

For any occasion on short notice 

Telephone connection 

Mciifi St. - Northampton, Mass. 



Remifi^ton 

Adding and Snhtracting 

lypewriter 

Wabl Addina Mechani.smi 



1|||R1TING anil adding are joined by 
•**> natural laws. Much writing in- 
volves adding; most adding involves writ- 
ing — both on the same page. Why then 
a separate writing machine and a separate 
adding machine ? 

Our Adding and Subtracting Typewriter 
is the answer to this question. These 
two functions are indivisibly joined in 
practice, and practice demands that they 
be joined in one machine. 

Remington Typnvntcr Coni/niny 

NE/I' YORK AND El'ERriVHERE 




Amherst House 

D. H. Kendrick, Prop. 




1 jusi can't make my longue slop wagging. — Muxrav. 
XXXI 



I j4mherst r tirnitiire and darpet Jxooms * 



mAKES A SPECIALTY of Student's Furniture, 
Carpets, Rugs, Draperies, Bedding, Book-Cases, 
Blacking-Cases, Desks, Window Shades, Picture Frames, 
Cord, Etc., at lowest prices. Save freight and Cartage 
money by purchasing here 



E. D. MARSH, 



1S-2J-22 MAIN STREET 
AMHERST MASS. 



|t'; 



Students, Attention I 

Have your clothes made to order at the 
Tailoring Parlor of 

LABROVITZ 

Style, Fit and workmanship the best, 
guaranteed. 

Full Dress Suits to rent. Gents' furnishings, 
E. & W. Collars, Dress Shirts, Clean- 
ing, Repairing and Pressing neatly 
done 

/. M. LABROVITZ 

11 Amity St. Tel. 302-M 



Stephen Lane Folger 



Established 1892 



Manufacturing Jeweler 

Club and College Pins 
and Rings 
Gold, Silver and 
Bronze Medals 



180 Broadway 



NEW YORK 



Morandi- Proctor 
Company 

Designers and Manufacturers of 

Cooking Apparatus 

Hotels, Restaurant, Clubs, Institutions 
and Steamships 

48-50 Union St. BOSTON 



Mercury's 1 st Assistant — Long distance routes a specialty. — Caldmcll. 
XXXIl