(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Index"

r t 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/index1914univ 




Mailinsv Price, $^2.25 



Address E. S. CLARK, Jr. 
iVmherst, Mass. 





JUNIOR 

ANNUAL 

DF THE 

M/\SSflCHUSETTS 
AGRICULTURAL 

COLLEGE 

PUBLISHED 

BY 

THE CLASS 

OF 




i NINETEEN HUNDRED PDIIRTEEN | 



^\^A^/.^^yK^JsS2^^it^J!it!J^^^ 





Business Manager 

Ernest Samuel Clark, Jr. 

Assistant 
Business Managers 

Theodore Artlnir Xicolet 
Leone Ernest Smith 



mmrrffrri] 













PROLOGUE 



(§' 



\nte mare lamp (SuHturn Ijaa tame oat in gala liress. 
At1^ tit Btrnt tanes hemmxieli tl|at a Junior rlaaa 
IntB t\)e BtitbrntB nf "ali Aggir" gtut? tljrtr tttnt 
(Sa gatl|pr in tljr alh, ttye ttnn, a tanglfb mass. 
AnJi glaring it in arber, as in nrara bfforr. 
PrPBrnl a wolumt ll^at aljaU be Ijrr iprilir; anb Ijrl^i 
®n "lonat ®lii Aggie" tn tljf Ijiglirst plarr of all. 
g>o tliat as arara paaa by, bcr fa»«f mau aprrati abrnali, 
Ani fill mitl? vriiie tiiase sans mbom al^r Jintlt rail lirr nmn. 
Aa tljrg afar from lirr tl|rir mantt tasks vrrfnrm. 



1^ 




Albert Btnr^ttt ®Bmun 

3(n rrrngnitiou nf l]ts quirt sprutrpa to tijf atuiiMtts of 

"Wlh Aggtp." anil in tfHtimnnu to Iiia mortlj 

aa a man anJi to tl^p ualup of l)ia 

friPttbaliip, tat bthxmtt 

thia hook 




^^^i^i'^^O::LJL.*.'C^^^£J<Z'VyU0t/t/' 



e>^^^^s^ 




Albert Vincent Osmun 




HE ALUMNUS, looking back upon his college life from the van- 
tage point of his maturer years, sees many things to which 
as a student he was blind. He appreciates more clearly the 
difference between that popular acclaim which is but the im- 
pulse of a moment, to be destroyed by later impulse, and that 
enduring esteem and respect which registers true popularity. 
He understands more and more clearly with every passing 
year that the impression made by a strong teacher upon a student leaves a mark 
which can never be effaced, but which grows deeper as time passes. The col- 
lege graduate will hold in memory longest those of his instructors who have 
thus given him something enduring, something which he has been able to carry 
away with him. Few have been more successful in this way than Professor Al- 
bert Vincent Osmun. There are many alumni, graduates of the past eight or 
nine years, and many students now in college who hold in grateful remembrance 
the time when in the field, in the laboratory, and in the classroom they first re- 
ceived from him that stimulus which has led them on to that understanding 
and enjoyment of Nature which knowledge gives to her close observers. 

Professor Osmun was born in Danbury, Connecticut, in 1880, his father 
being at the time a business man of that place. After the usual preliminary 
training he entered the Connecticut Agricultural College, graduating from there 
in 1900. He then served two years as secretary to the president of that insti- 
tution, at the same time continuing his botanical studies. In the fall of 1902 he 
came to Massachusetts, entering as a senior in the regular course, and graduating 
the following June with the class of 1903. Shortly after graduation he entered 
upon his duties as instructor in botany, and has remained on the teaching force 
of the Department of Botany ever since. Continuing his graduate work here, he 
received in 1905 the degree of Master of Science. 

Professor Osmun has held several offices with the American Fern Society, 
and has been a frequent contributor to the Fern Bulletin and other botanical 
publications. He is at present treasurer of the Associate Alumni of the Mass- 



e>^^55^^ 




achusetts Agricultural College, and has occupied a like position with the local 
chapter of the Phi Kappa Phi. He assisted in organizing and has always been 
an active member of the Mettawampe club. But after everything is said, it is 
as a teacher that he is best known. His dignified and courteous treatment of 
his students, and the energy and enthusiasm which he gives to his work is an in- 
spiration to all. To quote a student, "he makes the boys want to work," and 
than this nothing finer can be said of a teacher. 

Professor Osmun's associates on the faculty of the College, his many friends 
in the town of Amherst, and all of the alumni of M. A. C. with whom he has 
come in contact, join with the class of Nineteen Fourteen in hoping that for 
many years to come Massachusetts may be able to keep in her service one so 
singularly well fitted for the post which he occupies. 

SIDNEY B. HASKELL. 





mmn 




1912 

September 4-7, Wednesday-Saturday 
September 11, Wednesday, 1-30 P. M. 
November 27 — December 2, Wednesday 1 P. 

December 20, Friday, 6 P. M. 



January 6, Monday, 1.10 P. M. 

January 27, Monday 

February 3, Monday, 1.10 P. M. 

March 28, Friday, 6 P. M. 

April 7, Monday, 1.10 P. M. 

May 30, Friday 

June 2, Monday 

June 9, Monday 

June 14-16, Saturday- Wednesday 

June 18-21, Wednesday-Saturday 



1913 



Entrance Examinations 

First Semester Begins; Chapel 

M.— Monday, 1.10 P. M., 

Chapel; Thanksgiving Recess 

Winter Recess Begins 



Winter Recess Ends; Chapel 

Semester Examinations Begin 

Second Semester Begins; Chapel 

Spring Recess Begins 

Spring Recess Ends; Chapel 

Memorial Day, Holiday 

Senior Examinations Begin 

Non-Senior Examinations Begin 

Commencement 

Entrance Examinations 







Members ex-OfFicio 

HIS EXCELLENCY, GOVERNOR EUGENE N. FOSS 

President of the Corporation 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, . . . President of the College 

DAVID SNEDDEN, . . . State Commissioner of Education 

J. LEWIS ELLSWORTH . . Secretary of the State Board of Agriculture 



Members of the Corporation 



WILLIAM H. BOWKER of Concord 
GEORGE H. ELLIS of West Newton 
CHARLES E. WARD of Buckland . 
ELMER D. HOWE of Marlborough . 
NATHANIEL I. BOWDITCH of Framingham 
WILLIAM WHEELER of Concord . 
ARTHUR G. POLLARD of Lowell . 
CHARLES A. GLEASON of New Braintree 
FRANK GERRETT of Greenfield 
HAROLD L. FROST of Arlington . 
CHARLES H. PRESTON of Danvers 
FRANK A. HOSMER of Amherst . 
DAVIS R. DEWEY of Cambridge . 
M. FAYETTE DICKINSON of Brookline . 



Term Expires 
1913 
1913 
1914 
1914 
1915 
1915 
1916 
1916 
1917 
1917 
1918 
1918 
1919 
1919 



Officers of the Corporation 

HIS EXCELLENCY, GOVERNOR EUGENE N. FOSS of Boston, President 
CHARLES A. GLEASON of New Braintree . . . Vice-President 

J. LEWIS ELLSWORTH of Worcester Secretary 

FRED C. KENNEY of Amherst Treasurer 

CHARLES A. GLEASON of New Braintree .... Auditor 



JS^^^ 




Standing Committees of the Corporation 

Committee on Finance 

CHARLES A. GI.EASON, Chairman 

GEORGE H. ELLIS ARTHUR G. POLLARD FRANK A. HOSMER 

NATHANIEL I. BOWDITCH CHARLES E. WARD 

Committee on Course of Study and Faculty 

WILLIAM WHEELER, Chairman 
WILLIAM H. BOWKER DAVID SNEDDEN DAVIS R. DEWEY 

M. FAYETTE DICKINSON ELMER D. HOWE FRANK A. HOSMER 

Committee on Farm 

NATHANIEL I. BOWDITCH. Chairman 
FRANK GERRETT CHARLES A. GLEASON GEORGE H. ELLIS 



DAVIS R. DEWEY 



Committee on Horticulture 

J. LEWIS ELLSWORTH, Chairman 
ELMER D. HOWE 



HAROLD L. FROST 



Committee on Experiment Department 

CHARLES H. PRESTON, Chairman 
J. LEWIS ELLSWORTH CHARLES E. WARD HAROLD L. FROST 
ARTHUR G. POLLARD 

Committee on Buildings and Arrangement of Grounds 

WILLIAM H. BOWKER, Chairman 
WILLIAM WHEELER FRANK GERRETT CHARLES H. PRESTON 
M. FAYETTE DICKINSON 

Examining Committee of Overseers 

JOHN BURSLEY of West Barnstal.le 

FRANK P. NEWKIRK of Easthampton 

WILLIAM E. PATRICK of Warren 

JOHN J. ERWIN of Wayland 

R. HENRY RACE of North Egremont 



\i 




EMRI/VMSMIN 
51AFF 



Officers of the Experiment Station 



**WILLIAM P. BROOKS, Ph. D. 

Director. 
FRED W. MORSE, Ph. D. 

Acting Director. 
JOSEPH B. LINDSEY, Ph. D. 

Vice-Director. 
FRED C. KENNEY 

Treasurer. 
CHARLES R. GREEN, B. Agr. 

Librarian. 



■10 Pleasant Street 

47 Lincoln Avenue 

Mount Pleasant 

Mount Pleasant 



Department of Plant and Animal Chemistry 



JOSEPH B. LINDSEY, Ph. D. 

Chemist. 
EDWARD B. HOLLAND, M. Sc. 

Associate Chemist, in charge of Research Division. 
FRED W. MORSE, Ph. D. 

Research Chemist. 
HENRI D. HASKINS, B. Sc. 

In charge of Fertilizer Division. 
PHILIP H. SMITH 

In charge of Feed and Dairy Division. 
LEWELL S. WALKER, B. Sc. 

Assistant. 
JAMES C. REED, B. Sc. 

Assistant. 
RUDOLF W. RUPRfeCHT, B. Sc. 

Assistant. 
GEORGE R. PIERCE, B. Sc. 

Assistant. 
CARLETON P. JONES, B. Sc. 

Assistant. 
JOSEPH P. HOWARD 

Collector. 
HARRY J. ALLEN, 

Assistant. 
JAMES R. ALCOCK, B. Sc. 

Assistant in Animal Nutrition. 
CARLOS L. BEALS 

Assistant. 

**0n leave of Absence. 



47 Lincoln Avenue 

28 North Prospect Street 

44 Pleasant Street 

Amherst House 

102 Main Street 

19 Phillips Street 

Nutting .\ venue 

31 Amity Street 

Lincoln Avenue 

30 North Prospect Street 

North Amherst 

Amherst 

North Amherst 

North Amherst 



Si,^^^ 




Department of Agriculture 



WILLIAM P. BROOKS, Ph. D. 

Agriculturist. 
H. J. FRANKLIN, Ph. D. 

In charge of Cranberry Investigation. 
EDWIN F. GASKILL, B. Sc. 

Assistant Agriculturist. 



East Warehain 
North Amherst 



Department of Horticulture 



FRANK A. WAUGH, M. Sc 

Horticulturist. 
FRED C. SEARS, M. Sc. 

Pomologist. 
JACOB K. SHAW, Ph. D. 

Assistant Horticulturist. 



Massachusetts .Agricultural College 

Mount Pleasant 

1 Allen Street 



Department of Botany and Vegetable Pathology 



GEORGE E. STONE, Ph. U. 

Botanist and Vegetable Pathologist. 
GEORGE H. CHAPMAN, M. Sc. 

Assistant Botanist. 
EDWARD A. LARRABEE, B. Sc. 

Assistant Botanist. 



Mount Pleasant 

13 Fearing Street 

Clark Hall 



Department of Entomology 



HENRY T. FERNALD, Ph. D. 

Entomologist. 
BURTON N. GATES, Ph. D. 

Apiarist. 
ARTHUR I. BOURNE, B. A. 

Assistant in Entomologv. 



a Amity Street 

42 Lincoln Avenue 

12 East Pleasant Street 



Department of Veterinary Science 



JAMES B. PAIGE, B. Sc, D. V. S. 

Veterinarian. 



42 Lincoln Avenue 



JOHN E. OSTRANDER, A. M., C. E 

Meteorologist. 
HARRIS W. ANGIER 

Observer. 



Department of Meteorology 

35 North Prospect Street 
Massachusetts Agricultural College 



]0 




BElBDlBDa 





KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, A. M., LL.D., Presi- 
dent of the College and Head of Division of Rural 
Social Science. 

Born 1868. B. Sc, Michigan Agricultural College, 1891. Assist- 
ant Secretary, Michigan Agricultural College, 1891-92. Editor of 
the Michigan Grange Visitor, 1892-95. Editor Grange Department 
Michigan Farmer, 1895-1903. Superintendent Michigan Farmers' 
Institutes, 1895-99. Field Agent Michigan Agricultural College, 
1896-99. Graduate student. University of Michigan, 1900-02. 
A. M., University of Michigan, 1902. Instructor in Rural So- 
ciology, University of Michigan, 1902-03. President of R. I. Col- 
lege of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 1903-06. President of 
Massachusetts Agricultural College since 1906. LL. D., Amherst 
College, 1910. <S>K*. 



GEORGE F. MILLS, A.M., Dean of the College and 
Professor of Languages and Literature. 

Born 1839. A. M., Williams College, 1862. A A*. Associate 
Principal of Greylock Institute, 1882-89. Professor of English 
and Latin at Massachusetts Agricultural College since 1890. 
Head of the Division of Humanities, 1907-11. Dean of the Col- 
lege since 1907. ^K*. 





CHARLES H. FERNALD, Ph. D., Honoranj Director 
of the Graduate School. 

Born 1838. Bowdoin College, 1865. Ph. D., Maine State Col- 
lege, 1886. Studied in the Museum of Comparative Zoology at 
Cambridge and under Louis Agassiz on Penekese Island. Also 
traveled extensively in Europe, studying insects in various muse- 
ums. Principal of Litchfield Academy, 1865. Principal of Houl- 
ton Academy, 1865-70. Chair of Natural History, Maine State 
College, 1871-86. Professor of Zoology at Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College, 1886-1910. Director of the Graduate School 
1909-10. Honorary Director of the Graduate School since 1910. 



18 



^^^^B^^^^2^^^^L 






CHARLES E. MARSHALL, Ph. D., Director of the 

Graduate School and Professor of Microbiology. 

Born 1866. Ph. B., University of Michigan, 1895. Assistant 
Bacteriologist, University of Michigan, 1893-96. Bacteriologist, 
Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station, 1896-1902. Jorgen- 
sen's Laboratory, Copenhagen, 1898. Ph. D., University of 
Michigan, 1902. Professor of Bacteriology and Hygiene, Michi- 
gan Agricultural College, 1902-08. Pasteur's Institute, Paris and 
Ostertag's Laboratory, Berlin, 1902. Scientific and Vice Director, 
Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station, 1908-12. Director 
of the Graduate School and Professor of Microbiology, Massa- 
chusetts .Agricultural College, 1912. A Z. 

*WILLIAM P. BROOKS, Ph. D., Director of the Ex- 
periment Station and Lecturer on Soil Fertility. 

Born 1851. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1875. *2K. Post- 
graduate, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1875-76. Professor 
of Agriculture and Director of Farm, Imperial College of Agricul- 
ture, Sapporo, Japan, 1877-78; also Professor of Botanv, 1881-88. 
Acting President, Imperial College, 1880-83, and 1886-87. Pro- 
fessor of Agriculture at Massachusetts Agricultural College, and 
.Agriculturalist for the Hatch Ex- 
periment Station since January. 
1889. Ph. D., Halle, 1897. Acting 
President of the College and Acting 
Director of the Experiment Station. 
1905-06. Director of the Experi- 
ment Station since 1906. ^K*. 

WILLIAM D. HURD, M. Agr., Director of the E.vtension 

Service. 

Born 1875. Michigan Agricultural College. 1889. <i>rA. 
Nursery Inspector, University of Illinois, 1899. Teacher in Lan- 
sing High School, 1900-02. Professor of Horticulture, Practical 
School of Agriculture and Horticulture, Briarcliff Manor. New- 
York, 1902-03. Professor of Agriculture, University of Maine, 
1903-00. Dean of College of Agriculture, University of Maine. 
1906-09. Director of Short Courses, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 1909-10. Director of the Extension Service since 1910. 
AZ; tflv*. 

FRANK A. WAUGH, M. Sc, Head of Division of Hor- 
ticulture and Profes-wr of Landscape Gardening. 

Born 1869. Kansas Agricultural College, 1891. K2. Editor 
Agricultural Department, TopeI:a Capital. 1891-92. Editor 
ifonlaiia Farm and SfocI: Joiirnal, 1892. Editor Denver Field 
and Farm, 1892-93. M. Sc, Kansas Agricultural College, 1893. 
Professor of Horticulture, Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical 
Collcgo, and Horticulturist of the Experiment Station, 1893-95. 
Cradiiate Student, Cornell University, 1898-99. Professor of 
llorliculture. University of Vermont and State Agricultural 
CoIUkc and Horticulturist of the Experiment Station, 1895-1902. 
Horticultural Editor of the Conntnj Cciitlrman. 1S9S-1911. Hos- 
pitant in the Kooiiigliche Gaertncr-LehranstaU. Dahlem, Berlin, 
(icrmany, 1910. Professor of Horticulture and of Landscape 
(iardcning, Massachusetts Agricultural College, and Horticul- 
lurist of the Hatch Experiment Station since 1902. <I>K<I>. 

*Absent on leave. 

19 





e>^cS5^^ 




JAMES A. FOORD, M. S. A., Head of the Division of 
Agriculture and Professor of Farm Administration. 

Born 1872. B. Sc, New Hampshire College of Agriculture and 
Mechanic Arts, 1898. K2. M. S. A. Cornell University, 1902. 
Assistant in Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station, 
1900-03. Professor of Agriculture, Delaware College, 1903-06. 
Associate Professor of Agronomy, Ohio State University, 1906-07. 
Associate Professor of Agronomy, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 1907-08. Professor of Farm Administration, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College since 1908. 2E. <i>K*. 



ROBERT J. SPRAGUE, Ph. D., Head of Division of 
the Humanities and Professor of Economics and So- 
ciology. 

Born 1868. B, A., Boston University, 1897. Ben. Studied 
industrial conditions in England, 1898. M. A., Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1900. Ph. D., Boston University, 1901. Head of Depart- 
ment of Economics and History, Knox College, 1901-06. Studied 
Socialism and Socialistic development throughout Northern 
Europe, 1903. Head of Department of Economics and Sociol- 
ogy, University of Maine, 1906-11. Appointed to research work 
at the Carnegie Institution, Washington, D. C, 1906. Head of 
the Division of Humanities and Professor of Economics and So- 
ciology, Massachusetts Agricultural College since 1911. *BK. 





JOSEPH B. LINDSEY, Ph. D., Goessmann Professor of 
Chemistry. 

Born 1862. B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1883. 
C. S. C. Chemist, Massachusetts State Agricultural Experiment 
Station, 1883-85. Chemist, L. B. Darling Fertilizer Co., Paw- 
tucket, R. I., 1885-89. Student at University of Gottingen, 1889- 
92. A. M., Ph. D., University of Gottingen, 1892. Student at 
Zurich Polytechnic Institute, 1892. Associate Chemist, Mass- 
achusetts State Experiment Station, 1892-95. In charge of 
Department of Foods and Feeding, Hatch Experiment Station, 
1895-1907. Head of Department of Chemistry and Goessmann 
Professor of Agricultural Chemistry, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College since 1911. Member American Chemical Society. 
Fellow in American Association for the Advancement of Science. 
*K*. 



CHARLES WELLINGTON, Ph. D., Profe.<tsor of 
Chemistry. 

Born 1853. B. Sc., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1873. 
KS. Graduate Student in Chemistry, Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College, 1873-76. Assistant Chemist, United States De- 
partment of Agriculture, 1876. Student, University of Virginia, 
1876-77. First Assistant Chemist, United States Department of 
Agriculture, 1877-82. Ph. D. University of Gottingen, 1885. 
Associate Professor of Chemistry, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 1885-1907. Professor of Chemistry, Massachusetts 
Agricultural College since 1907. *K$. 



20 




e>^^^^ 




JAMES B. PAIGE, B. Sc, D. V. S., Chairman of the 

Division of Science and Professor of Veterinary Science. 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1882. Q. T. V. 
Farmer, 1882-1887; V. S. Montreal Veterinary College, 1888. 
D. V. S., Faculty of Comparative Medicine and Veterinary 
Science, McGill University, 1891. Veterinary practitioner, 
1888-1891. Student in Pathology and Bacteriology, McGill 
University, Medical School, summer 1891. Post Graduate stu- 
dent in the Konigliche Tierarztliclien Hochschule and the Patho- 
logical Institute of Ludwig-Maximilians Universitat in Munich, 
1895-1896. Professor of Veterinary Science at Massachusetts 
Agricultural College since 1890. *K*. 




GEORGE E. STONE, Ph. D., Professor of Botany. 

Born 1861. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1882-8-i. *SK. Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 1884!-89. In the summer of 1890, in charge of the Botany Classes at Worcester 
Summer School of Natural History. Leipsic University, 1891-92; Ph. D., (Liepsic University) 
1892. Studied in the Physiological Laboratory at Clark University, 1893. Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Botany at Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1893-95. B. Sc, Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, 1897. Professor of Botany, Massachusetts Agricultural College since 
1895. *K*. 



PHILIP B. HASBROUCK, B. Sc, Professor of Physics 
and Registrar of the College. 



Born 1870. B. Sc, Rutgers College, 1893. X*. Assistant 
Professor of Mathematics, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
1895-1902. Associate Professor of Mathematics, 1902-11. Reg- 
istrar of the College since 1905. Professor of Physics, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College since 1911. *K<1>. 





JOHN E. OSTRANDER, A. M., C. E., Professor of 

Mathematics and Civil Engineering. 

Born 1865. B. A. and C. E., Union College, 1886. Assistant 
on Sewer Construction, West Troy, N. Y., 1886. Assistant on 
Construction, Chicago, St. Paul and Kansas City Railway, 1897. 
Draughtsman witli Phoenix Bridge Company, 1887. M. A., 
Union College, 1889. Assistant in Engineering Department, 
New York State Canals, 1888-1891. Instructor in Civil En- 
gineering, Lehigh University, 1891-92. Engineering Contractor 
for .\llon Bridge, Sinnmor of 1892. Professor of Civil Engineering 
mihI Mechanic Arts, University of Idaho, 1892-97. Professor of 
Matlu-malics ami Civil Engineering, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College since 1897. Member of Committee No. 6, International 
Commission on the Teaching of Mathematics, 1909-11. <I>K<I>. 



21 



ey^^%k^ 





HENRY T. FERNALD, Ph. D., Professor of Entomolo- 
f/ij- 

Born 1866. University of Maine, 1885. Ben. M. Sc, Uni- 
versity of Maine, 1888. Graduate student in Biology, Wesleyan 
University, 1885-86. Graduate student, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1887-90. Laboratory Instructor, Johns Hopkins University, 
1889-90. Ph. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1890. Professor 
of Zoology, Pennsylvania State Col- 
lege, 1890-99. State Economic Zool- 
ogist, Pennsylvania, 1898-99. Pro- 
fessor of Entomology, Massachusetts 
Agricultural College since 1899. <I>K <i> 



GEORGE C. MARTIN, C. E., Captain United States 
Army, retired, Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

Born 1869. C. E. University of Vermont, 1892. 2*. With 
Engineering News, 1895-97. Entered army, July 1898, as Second 
Lieutenant of Twenty-first United States Infantry. Promoted to 
First Lieutenant of Second United States Infantry, March 1899. 
Promoted to Captain of Eighteenth United States Infantry, Au- 
gustl903. Placed on duty at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
by order of the Honorable, the Secretary of War, September, 1905. 
Retired from United States Army, 1909. 





EDWARD A. WHITE, B. Sc, Professor of Floriculture. 

Born 1872. B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1895. 
K2. Assistant Horticulturalist, Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege, 1895-97. White & Frost, Florists, Arlington, Mass., 1897- 
1900. Assistant Professor of Horticulture, Texas Agricultural 
and Mechanical College, 1900-02. Professor of Botany, Fores- 
try, and Landscape Architecture, Connecticut Agricultural Col- 
lege, 1902-07. Assistant Professor of Floriculture, Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, 1907-09. Pro- 
fessor of Floriculture, Massachusetts 
Agricultural College since 1909. 



WILLIAM R. HART, B. L. 

cultural Education. 



A. M., Professor of Agri- 



B. L., Iowa State Law School, 1880. A. B., University of Ne- 
braska, 1896. A. M., University of Nebraska, 1900. Depart- 
ment of Psj'chology and Education in Nebraska State Normal 
at Peru, 1901-07. Professor of Agricultural Education, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College since 1907. 




ey^c55^v^ 




FRED C. SEARS, M. Sc, Professor of Pomology. 

Born 1866. B. S., Kansas Agricultural College, 1892. Assistant 
Horticulturalist at Kansas E.xperiment Station, 1892-97. M. Sc, 
Kansas Agricultural College, 1896. Professor of Horticulture, 
Utah Agricultural College, 1897. Director Nova Scotia School 
of Horticulture, Wolfville, Nova Scotia, 1898-190-1. Professor 
of Horticulture, Nova Scotia Agri- 
cultural College, Truro, Nova Scotia, 
1905-07. Professor of Pomology, 
Massachusetts Agricultural College 
since 1907. <i>K*. 



FRED C. KENNEY, Treasurer of the College. 





Born 1869. Ferris Institute, 1890-91. 
& Northeastern Railroad Company, 
retary and Cashier of Michigan Agri- 
cultural College. Treasurer Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College since 
1907. 



EDWARD M. LEWIS, M. A., Associate Dean of the 

College and Professor of Literature. 

Born 1872. B. A., Williams College, 1896. M. A., Williams 
College, 1899. Graduate of Boston School of Expression, 1901. 
Instructor in Public Speaking, Columbia University, 1901-03. 
Instructor and Assistant Professor of Public Speaking and Ora- 
tory, Williams College, 1903-11. Instructor, Harvard Summer 
School, 1903 and 1906. Instructor in Elocution, Yale Divinity 
School, 1904-11. Assistant Professor 
of English and Assistant Dean, Mass- 
achusetts Agricultural College, 1911. 
Professor of Literature and Associate 
Dean, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 1912. 



Bookkeeper for Manistee 
1895-1907. Assistant Sec- 





AVILLIAM D. CLARK, B. A., M. F., Professor of Forestry. 

Born 1879. B. A., 190i; M. F., 1906, Yale University. United 
States Forestry Service, 1906-08. Professor of Forestry, Penn- 
sylvania State College, 1909-12. Professor of Forestry, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, 1912. A Z. 



ey^g5^^ 





SIDNEY B. HASKELL, B. Sc, Associate Professor of 

Agronomy. 

Born 1881. B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1904. 
C. S. C. Assistant Agriculturalist, Hatch Experiment Station, 
1904-06. Instructor in Agriculture, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 1905-10. Assistant Professor of Agronomy, Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College, 1910-12. 
Associate Professor of Agronomy, 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
1912. <i>K<J>. 



ROBERT AV. NEAL, A. M., Associate Professor of Eng- 
lish. 

Born 1873. A. B., University of Kansas, 1898; A. M., 1899. 
Assistant in Department of English, University of Kansas, 1898- 
99. University scholar, Yale Graduate School, 1899-1900. 
Teacher in Wallingford, Conn., High School, 1900-01, Instructor 
in English, University of Cincinnati, 1901-02. Harvard Graduate 
School, 1902-03. A. M., Harvard, 1903. Substitute Instructor 
in English and Acting Head of Department, Rutgers College, 
1903-04. Editorial department of The World's Work, 1904-06. 
Assistant Professor of English and Instructor in German, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, 1906-08. A. M., Yale, 1908. As- 
sistant Professor of English, Massachusetts Agricultural College 1908 





CLARENCE E. GORDON, A. M., Ph. D., Associate 
Professor of Zoology and Geology. 

Born 1876. B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1901, 
C. S. C. Student Clark University, summer session, 1901-03. 
B. Sc, Boston University, 1903. Instructor, Gushing Academy. 
Ashburnham, Mass., 1901-04. Graduate student in Geology and 
Zoology, Columbia University, 1904-05. A. M., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1905. Instructor in Geology, summer session, Columbia 
University, 1905. University Fellow in Geology, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1905-06. Assistant Professor of Zoology and Geology, 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1906-12. Ph. D., Columbia 
University, 1911. Associate Profes- 
sor of Zoology and Geology, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, 1912. 
SH. "I-K*. 



ALEXANDER E. CANCE, M. A., Ph. D., Associate 

Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

B. A., Macalester College, Graduate Certificate, State Normal 
School, Oshkosh. M. A., University of Wisconsin. Professor 
of Greek and Literature, Avalon College, 1897-99. Principal, 
Ashville Industrial School, 1901-04. Supervisor of Practice, 
First Pennsylvania State IS'ormal School, 1904-05. Fellow in 
Economics, University of Wisconsin, 1906-08. Ph. D., Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin, 1908. Instructor in Agricultural Economics, 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1908-10. Assistant Professor 
of Agricultural Economics, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
1910-12. Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, 1912. 

24 




e^^S^^^ 




JOSEPH S. CHAMBERLAIN, Ph. D., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Organic and Agricultural Chemistry. 

Born 1870. B. Sc, Iowa State Agricultural College, 1890. 
M. S., Iowa State Agricultural College, 1892. Instructor in 
Chemistry, Iowa Sate Agricultural College, 1894-97. Ph. D., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1899. Instructor in Chemistry, 
Oberlin College, 1899-1901. Voluntary Assistant in Chemistry 
at Wesleyan University, summer of 1900-01. Research .Assistant 
to Professor Ira Remsen, Johns Hopkins University, 1901. 
Chemist, U. S. Department of Agriculture, 1901-09. Chief of 
Cattle Food and Grain Investigation Laboratory, Bureau of 
Chemistry, 1907-09. Student University of Berlin, 1909. As- 
sociate Professor of Organic and Agricultural Chemistry, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College since 1909. ^K*. 





WILLIAM P. B. LOCKWOOD, M. Sc, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Dairying. 

Born 1875. B. Sc, Pennsylvania State College, 1899. KS. 
With Walker-Gordon Laboratory Co., of Boston and Philadel- 
phia, 1899-1901. Instructor in Dairying, Pennsylvania State 
College, 1902-03. Inspector, Hires Condensed Milk Co., Mal- 
vern. Pa., 1903-06. Creamery and Condensing Construction 
Work, 1906-08. M. Sc, Pennsyl- 
vania State College, 1909. Assistant 
Professor of Dairying, Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College, 1908-10. 
Associate Professor of Dairying, 
since 1910. AZ. 



ELMER K. EYERLY, A. M., Associate Professor of 
Rural Sociology. 

Franklin and Marshall College, 1888. Yale Divinity School, 

1888-89. Professor of Political Economy, Redfield" College, 

1889-91. Student of Political Economy, Berlin University, 1891- 

92. Professor of Political Economy, Redfield College, 1892-93. 

A. M., Franklin and Marshall College, 1893. Professor of Eng- 
lish Literature, Yonkton College, 1893-99. Student of Sociology, 

University of Chicago, summei's of 1897, 1898, 1899. Professor 

of English Literature, South Dakota Agricultural College, 1899- 
1907. Fellow in Sociology, University of Chicago, 1908. Fellow 
in Political Economy, University of Chicago, 1909. Instructor 
in Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, Correspondence- 
study Department, University of Chicago, 1908-09. Assistant 
Professor of Political Science and Lecturer in Rural Sociology, 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1909-11. Associate Profes- 
sor of Rural Sociology, Massachusetts Agricultural College since 
1911. 





JOHN A. McLEAN, A. B., B. Sc. Agr., A.'isociate Pro- 
fessor of Animal Husbandry. 

Born 1878. A. B., McMaster University, 1902. B. Sc, Agr., 
Iowa State College, 1905. Head of the Department of Animal 
Ilusliandry, Colorado State College, 1905. Associate Professor 
of Animal Husbandry, Iowa State College, 1906-08. Experi- 
mentalist in Animal Husbandry, Mississippi Experiment Station, 

1908-0'» Vssodilc Editor of the Farmer's Advocate, 1910. .Associate Professor of Animal 

Husbandry, Massachusetts Agricultural College since 1911. A Z. 

25 



^^^2fi^j2^^^b 




JOHN C. GRx\HAM, B. Sc. Agr., Associate Professor of 
Poultry Husbandry. 

Born 1868. Milwaukee State Normal College, 1894. Taught at 
Chicago University, summers of 1894-98. Teaching and Insti- 
tute AVork in Wisconsin, 1894-1907. B. Sc. Agr., Ui 
of Wisconsin, 1911. Associate Pro- 
fessor of Poultry Husbandry, Mass- 
achusetts Agricultural College since 
1911. 



GUY C. CRAMPTON, A. M., Ph. D., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Entomology. 

Born 1882. A. B., Princeton University, 1904. A. M. Cornell 
University, 1905. Student at Freiburg and Munich, 1907. Ph. D., 
Berlin University, 1908. Instructor in Biology, Princeton Uni- 
versity, 1908-10. Professor of Biology and Entomology, South Car- 
olina State Agricultural College, 1910-11. Associate Professor of 
Entomology, Massachusetts Agricultural College since 1911. "SBK. 





CHARLES A. PETERS, Ph. D., Associate Professor of 

Inorganic and Soil Chemistry. 

Born 1875. B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1897. 
C. S. C. B. Sc, Boston University, 1897. Assistant in Chemis- 
trv, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1897-98. Assistant in 
Chemical Laboratory, Yale University, 1899-1901. Ph. D., Yale 
University, 1901. Professor of Chemistry, Head of Department, 
University of Idaho, 1901-09. Student at the University of 
Berlin, 1908-10. Exchange Teacher, Friedrichs Werdersche 
Oberrealschule, 1909-10. Graduate School, Y'ale University, 
1910-11. Assistant Professor of Inorganic and Soil Chemistry, 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1911-12. Associate Profes- 
sor of Inorganic and Soil Chemistry, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 1912. 2H. <i>K*. 



A. VINCENT OSMUN, M. Sc, Assistant Professor of 
Botany. 

Born 1880. Connecticut Agricultural College, 1900. Assistant, 
Storrs Agricultural Experiment Station, 1900-02. B. Sc, Mas- 
sachusetts Agricultural College, 1903. Q. T. V. M. Sc, Mas- 
sachusetts Agricultural College, 1905. Instructor in Botany, 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1903-07. Assistant Profes- 
sor of Botanv, Massachusetts Agricultural College since 1907. 




e>^c56^3 




EDGAR L. ASHLEY, A. M., Assistant Professor of 

German. 

Born 1880. A. B., Brown University, 1903. *K*. Instructor 
in German, Brown University, 1903-06. A. M., Brown Univer- 
sity. 1904. Student, University of Heidelburg, 1906-07. 
Instructor in German, Bates Col- 
lege, 1907-08. Instructor in Ger- 
man, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 1908-11. Assistant Profes- 
sor of German, Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College since 1911. <1>BK. 





A. ANDERSON MACKIMMIE, A. B., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of French. 

Born 1878. A. B., Princeton University, 1906. Bondiuot Fel- 
low in Modern Languages, 1906-07. Instructor in French, Col- 
chester Academy, Truro, Nova Scotia, 1906-08. Instructor in 
French and Spanish, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1908. 
Kr*. Assistant Professor of French, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College since 1911. *BK. ^K*. 



BURTON N. GATES, A. M., Ph. D., Assistant Profes- 
sor of Beekeeping. 

Born 1881. Cornell University, College of Agriculture, 1901-03. 
A. B., Clark College, 1905. K*. Scholar in Biology, Clark 
University, 1905-06. A. M., ibid, 1906. Fellow in Biology, ibid.. 
1906-07. Assistant in Biology, Clark College, 1906-07. Field 
Fellow, Clark University, 1908-09. Ph. D., ibid., 1909. Le(- 
turer in Beekeeping, Massachusetts Agricultural College, Sprin;,' 
1906, 1907, 1908, 1910. Collaborator, Bureau of Entomology, 
United States Department of Agriculture, February to July, 1907. 
Expert in Apiculture and Apicultural Assistant, ibid., 1907-10. 
Assistant Professor of Beekeeping, Massachusetts Agricultural 
_ College, Apiarist, Massachusetts Ex- 

periment Station and Inspector of 
Apiaries, State Board of Agriculture 
since 1910. 





CURRY S. HICKS, B. Pd., Assistant Profes.wr of Phy- 
sical Education and Hygiene. 

Born 1885. Michigan Agricultural College, 1902-03. B. Pd.. 
Michigan State Normal College, 1909. Instructor in Physical 
Education, Michigan State Normal College, 1908-09. Edward 
Hitchcock Fellow in Physical Education, Amherst College, 1909- 

10. Director of Athletics, Michigan State Normal College, 1910- 

11. Assistant Professor of Physical Education and Hygiene, 
Massachusetts Agricultural College since 1911. 

27 



e>g^%^^ 





FREDERICK L. YEAW, B. Sc, Assistant Professor of 
Market Gardening. 

Born 1882. B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1905. 
*2K. United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of 
Soils, 1906. Plant Pathologist, California Experiment Station, 
1906-11. Assistant Professor of Market Gardening, Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College, 1911. 



GEORGE S. GAGE, M. A., Ph. D., Assistant Professor 

of Animal Pathology. 

B. A., Clark College, Clark University, 1906. K*. M. A., Yale 
University, 1907. Physiological Chemist, Sodium Benzoate In- 
vestigation, U. S. Department of Agriculture, 1908. Ph. D., 
Yale University, 1909. Associate Biologist, Maryland Experi- 
ment Station, 1909-10. University of Michigan, 1910. Special 
Student in Pathology, University of Michigan, summer of 1910. 
Biologist, Maryland Experiment Station, in charge of Pathological 
Investigation. Assistant Professor of Animal Pathology, De- 
partment of Veterinary Science, Massachusetts Agricultural 
C ollege, since 1911. 





ERNEST ANDERSON, B. A., Ph. D., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of General and Physical Chemistry. 

Born 1881. B. A., Trinity College, Texas, 1903. B. S., Univer- 
sity of Texas, 1903. Fellow in Botany, University of Texas, 
1903-04.. M. S., University of Texas, 1904. Fellow in Chemis- 
try, University of Texas, 1904-05. Instructor in Corsicana High 
School, Texas, 1905-06. Fellow in Chemistry, University of 
Chicago, 1906-07. Associate in Chemistry, University of Chica- 
go, 1907-09. Ph. D., University of Chicago, 1909. Research 
Instructor, University of Chicago, 1909-12. Assistant Professor 
of General and Physical Chemistry, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 1912. *BK. SH. 



HENRY E. SMITH, M. A., Assistant Professor of English. 

A. B., University of Chicago, 1902. Instructor, High School, Whitewater, Wisconsin, 1903, 
Instructor, State Normal School, Cheney, Washington, 1904-06. Acting Assistant Professor, 
State Agricultural College, North Dakota, 1907. Graduate Student, University of Chicago, 
1907-08. Professor, Tabor College, Iowa, 1907-10. Graduate Student, University of Chicago. 
1910-11. M. A., Yale University, 1911. Professor, Westminster College, 1911-12. Assistant 
Professor of English, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1912. 



e>^fl5>>^ 



soei 




GEORGE N. HOLCOMB, B. A., S. T. B., Lecturer on 
History. 

Born 1872. Trinity College, 1896. Philadelphia Divinity 
School, 1900. Graduate student in American Institutional and 
Political History at University of Pennsylvania, 1900-01. Grad- 
uate student in History and Economics, Harvard University, 
1901-03. Williams Fellow, Harvard Union. S. T. B., Harvard, 
1903. Then engaged in agricultural work. Instructor in Eco- 
nomics and Constitutional History, Connecticut Agricultural 
College. Instructor in Economics in Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 1905-07. Lecturer in History, Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College since 1909. 





C. ROBERT DUNCAN, B. Sc, Instructor in Mathe- 
matics. 

Born 1884. B. Sc, Rutgers College, 1906. On East River Di- 
vision of Pennsylvania Tunnels, 1906-08. Instructor in Mathe- 
matics and Physics, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1908-11. 
.'Vssistant Engineer on Valuation of Boston and Maine Railroad s 
Property in New Hampshire, summer of 1910. Inspector of 
Bridge and Pier Construction, Florida East Coast Railroad's 
Extension over the Florida Keys, summer of 1911. Instructor 
in Mathematics, Massachusetts Agricultural College, since 1911. 
On Valuation Survey for Canadian Pacific Railway m Ontario, 
Canada, summer of 1912. 



CHARLES R. GREEN, B. Agr., Librarian. 



Born 1876. Connecticut Agricultural College, 1895. The Hart- 
ford Covrant, 1895-1901. Assistant Librarian, Connecicut State 
Library, 1901-08. Librarian at Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege since September 1908. 





ARTHUR K. HARRISON, Instructor in Landscape 
Gardening. 

Born 1872. With Warren H. Manning, Landscape Designer, 
Boston, acting at various times in charge of the Surveying and 
En"ineering Department, of the Planting Department, and of the 
Drafting Room, 1908-11. Instructor in Landscape Gardening, 
Massachusetts Agricultural College since 1911. 

29 



e>^fl5^^ 





CHESTER A. BUTMAX, A. M., B. Sc, Instructor in 
Physics. 

Student in Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1901- 
04. Assistant in Physics, Tufts College. 1907-08. Student in 
Physics. Clark University, 1908-09. A. M., Clark Universitv. 
1909. Fellow in Physics, Clark University, 1909-10. Assistant 
in Physics, Clark College, 1909-10. Student in Physics, Yale Uni- 
versity, 1910-11. Member of the American Physical Society. 
Instructor in Phvsics. Massachusetts Agricultural College since 
1911. 



WILLARD A. WATTLES, A. M., Instructor in English. 

A. B., University of Kansas, 1909. In charge of English at Leav- 
enworth, Kansas, High School, 1909-10. Instructor of Freshman 
Rhetoric, University of Kansas, 1910-11. A. M., University of 
Kansas, 1911. Instructor in English, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College since 1911. <J>BK. 





ELVIX L. QUAIFE, B. Sc. Agr., Itisiructor in A>iimal 

Husbandry. 

Born 1887. B. Sc, Agr., Iowa State College, 1911. ASP. A Z. 
Instructor in Animal Husbandrv, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 1911. 



WILLIAM L. MACH:MER, A. M., Instructor in Math- 
ematics. 

Born 1883. Graduate of Keystone State Normal School, 1901. 
Teacher in Public Schools, 1901-04. A. B., Franklin and Mar- 
shall College, 1907. Head of Department of Mathematics, 
Franklin and Marshall Academy, 1907-11. A. M., Franklin and 
Marshall College, 1911. Instructor in Mathematics, Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College, 1911. <iiBK. 




e>g^S5k^ 




ARTHUR N. JULIAN, A. B., Instructor in German. 

A. B., Northwestern University, 1907. Instructor in German at 
Elgin Academy, Elgin, 111., 1907-10. Travelled in Germany and 
student at Berlin University, 1910-11. Instructor in German, 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1911. <i>BK. 



WALTER W. CHENOWETH, A. B., B. 

Instructor in Pomolonii. 





Sc, Agr., 



Born in Missouri, 1872. A. B., Valparaiso University, 1902. 
Assistant in Botany, ibid, 1902-3. Head of Department of 
Science, Chillicothe Normal School, Mo., 1903-10. Secretary 
of the Missouri State Board of Horticulture, 1912. B. Sc, .\gr.. 
University of Missouri, 191'2. Instructor in Pomology, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, 1912. AZ. 2S. 



A. ABBOTT BROAVN, B. Sc. Agr., Instructor in Poultry 
Husbandry. 

Born 1890. B. Sc, Agr., University of Wisconsin, 1912. In- 
structor in Poultry Husbandry, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 1912. 




ELMER M. McDonald, B. Sc, Instructor in Agronomy. 

Born 1882. B. Sc, University of Illinois, 1910. Illinois College of Agriculture and .\gricul- 
tural Exi)oriment Station, 1910-12. Instructor in Agronomv, Ma.ssachusetts Agricultural 
College, 1912. AZ. i;H. 



,S^^^t£. 





HELENA T. GOESSMANN, Ph. M., Assistant in Eng- 
lish. 

Elmhurst Academy, Providence, R. I., 1887. Studied in Boston 
and New York. Ph. M., Ohio State University, 1895. Studied 
in England and Paris, 1899, and in Munich during the winter of 
1900. Published The Christian Woman in Philanthropy, a 
novelette entitled Brother Phillip and a small book of poems, a 
Score of Songs. Member of Pen and Brush Club of New York. 
Assistant in English, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1910. 



SAMUEL R. PARSONS, B. Sc, Assistant in Mathe- 
matics and in Military Scierice. 

Born 1888. B.Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College,1911. Q.T.V. 
Instructor in Mathematics and in Military Science, 1911. *K*. 





FREDERICK A. McLAUGHLIN, B. Sc, Assistant in 
Botany. 

Born 1888. B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1911. K2. 
Assistant in Botany, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1911. 



ROBERT H. BOGUE, B. Sc, Assistant in Chemistry. 

Born 1889. B. Sc, Tufts College, 1912. Instructor in Chemistry at 
Franklin Union, Boston, 1910-11. Assistant in Chemistry, 
Tufts College, 1911-12. Assistant in Chemistry, Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, 1912. 




e>g^%k^ 




WALTER E. PRINCE, A. M., Ph. B., Instructor in English and Public 

SpeaJcing. 

Born 1881. Ph. B., Brown University, 1904. A. M., Brown University, 1905. Instructor 
in English, University of Maine, 1905-12. Instructor in English and Public Speaking, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, 1912. 



WILLIAM L. HARMOUNT, A. B., Instructor in French. 

Born 1881. A. B., Yale University, 1903. Tutor in College Preparatory Subjects, 1903-06. 
Instructor, Kingsley School, Essex Falls, N. .7., 1907-08. Instructor in French, Keskiminetas 
Springs School, Saltsbury, Pa., 1908-11. Student at Cours de Vacences of the Universities 
of Caen and Grenoble. France, summer of 1910. Instructor in French, Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, 1911. <I>BK. 



FRANK W. RANE, M. Sc, Lecturer in Forestry. 

Born 1868. B. Sc, Agr., Ohio State University, 1891. M. Sc, Cornell University, 1892. 
<I>Ae. Lecturer in Forestry, Massachusetts .Agricultural College, 1906. 



SAMUEL COONS, Instructor in Dairying. 

With W. R. Boynton, 1898-1908. Delhi Dairying Co., 1908-11. Short Course Instructor 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1909. Instructor in Dairying, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 1912, 



WILLIAM J. FITZMAURICE, Assistant in Physical Education. 



Baseball coach, Massachusetts Agricultural College since 1911. 
tion, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1913. 



.\ssistant in Physical Educa- 



^/iff^ 




Graduate Assistants 

HARRY A. NOYES, B. Sc. 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

IRVING W. DAVIS, B. Sc. 

Assistant in Beekeeping. 

RALPH R. PARKER, B. Sc. 

Assistant in Zoology and Geology. 

JAMES F. MARTIN, B. Sc. 

Assistant in Entomology. 

G. SCOTT FOWLER, B. Sc. 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

R. G. SMITH, B. Sc. 

Assistant in Botany. 

R. G. GATES, B. Sc. 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

Officers of Short Courses and Extension Service 

WILLIAM D. HURD, M. Agr. 

Director. 

EARNEST D. WAID, B. Agr. 

Assistant Director. 

O. A. MORTON 

Extension Professor of Agricultural Education. 

E. L. MORGAN 

Community Field Agent. 

GEORGE F. E. STORY, B. Sc. Agr. 

Instructor in Dairying. 

R. W. REES, B. Sc. 

Instructor in Pomology. 

CHARLES H. WHITE, B. Sc, 

Field Agent. 

HERBERT J. BAKER, B. Sc. 

Field Agent in Farm Management. 

ARTHUR T. DAILEY, B. Sc. 

Supervisor of Correspondence Courses. 

MISS MABEL R. CASE 

Clerk to the Director. 

MISS HANNAH GRIFFIN 

Clerk. 

34. 



Beta Kappa Phi House 

Kappa Sigma House 

C. S. C. House 

19 East Street 

44 Pleasant Street 

Clark Hall 



82 Pleasant Street 

Amity Street 

Mount Pleasant 



10 Allen Street 

17 Fearing Street 

North Uxbridge 

Kappa Sigma House 

9 Fearing Street 

Draper Hall 



e>^c5S^^ 



tae§ 




Graduate Students 



ACKERMAN, ARTHUR JOHN 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1912 



Worcester 



ANDERSON, DAVID AVADSWORTH 

B. Sc, New Hampshire State College, 1910 



Manchester, N. H. 



BOURNE, ARTHUR ISRAEL 

A. B., Dartmouth College, 1907 



Amherst 



DAVIS, IRVING WILDER 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1911 



Lowell 



EATON, MARION GOODAVIN 

A. B., Radclift'e College, 1910 



Sudbury 



FOWLER, GEORGE SCOTT 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1912 



Waylaiid 



GATES, RUPERT GRANVILLE 

Yale University, 1912 



Amherst 



GILBERT, GEORGE HENRY 

Ph. B., Boston University 



Boylstou 



HALL, RUSSELL BERTRAM 

Amherst College, 1912 



Worcester 



Qj^S^^^ 




HUTSON, JOHN COGHLAN 

A. B., Oxford College (England) 19 

MARTIN, JAMES FRANCIS 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1912 

MORSE, HENRY BOWDITCH 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1911 

NOYES, HARRY ALFRED 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1912 

PARKER, RALPH ROBINSON 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1912 

RAND, FRANK PRENTICE 

A. B., Williams College, 1912 

RICHARDSON, FRANCIS ALLEN 

A. B., S. B., Harvard University, 1896 

RUPRECHT, RUDOLPH W. 

B. Sc, Rhode Island State College 

SMULYAN, MARCUS THOMAS 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1909 

TOWER, DANIEL GORDON 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1912 

TURNER, HOWARD ARCHIBALD 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1912 

WATKINS, JOHN BEDFORD 

B. Sc, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1911 

WEHLE, HARRY BRANDEIS 

A. B., Harvard University, 1911 



Barbados, W. I. 

Amherst 

Salem 

Marlboro 

Maiden 

Worcester 

Boston 

Flatbush, N. Y. 

Amherst 

Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Midlothian, Va. 

Louisville, Ky. 



THE CLASSES 





Senate 



Undergraduate Organization 
Officers 



F. D. Griggs 
B. W. Ellis 
S. B. Freeborn 



B. W. Ellis 
J. D. French 



S. B. Freeborn 
D. W. Jones 



Members 

1913 

F. D. Griggs 
1914 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



B. A. Harris 

S. P. Huntington 



M. D. Lincoln 
L. W. Needhani 




cnxor^ 




£U^aS~- 




BURTON ADAMS HARRIS 



Senior Class 



Officers 



Burton Adams Harris . 
Harris William Angier . 
Ralph Wesley Howe 
Robert Sedgewick Fay . 
Joseph Augustine Macone 
Joseph Wilbur Murray . 



President 
Vice-President 
Treasurer 
Secretary 
Sergeant-at-Arms 
Historian 



Class Colors: 

Maroon and White 



e^^c^it^ 




1913 History 




Swiggles and Smart, the Parlor Athletes 

HAT? You don't know any girls? You've been here 

four years, too! . . . You're sure in hard luck! How would 

you like to come over the river to-night and see a 'queen'?" 

"B'Jove I'd be mighty happy to go, y'know. I'm 

deucedly obliged to you! My word!" 

"All right 'old chappie', you're on! Meet you on the 
"seven thirty" or in front of the drug store." 
"So long!" 
"So long!" 

"I'll have some real fun with Swiggles, — you can bet. I guess I'll call up 
the girls and explain the move." 

"Well, it's seven thirty and no Swiggles in sight. I wonder if the 'hackney' 
took exception to what I said! I wonder if he understood me! Ah, there he 
comes all 'dollied out' for the affray." 

"Oh deah! I'm all tired out y'know! I finished dinner late and 

"A-L-L R-I-G-H-T! Get on the car and get a seat, we can listen to this 
'line' later." 

"Y'know I had dinner late " 

"A-L-L R-I-G-H-T ! ! Here's part of my paper! Read about the sports. 
This girl is a real 'sport' and likes all kinds of games. She is an enthusiast in 
foot-ball, base-ball, track, and hockey." 

"Does she play socker, or tennis, or does she enjoy polo?" 
"R-E-A-D T-H-E P-A-P-E-R! ! (Oh what a bore!)" 

"Say, don't those 'scallies' rush a man. They neahly threw me off of the 
car!" 

"M-Y W-O-R-D! (I'm afraid this fellow will queer me.)" 

"Say! Does this miss like to sit in a nook with a fellaw?" 

"I'm sure I can't say. (Wait 'till she sees it!) Get out one of your cards 
so we needn't wait." 

"Heah it is, old man!" 

"Mr. Claud Montmorency Swiggles! (Oi!)" 

"Will you please give these two cards to Miss Julia Sheppard? Thank you!" 

"This is a weal charming place, y'know! 

"Yes! (I guess I had better do it now.)" 

"Good evening Mr. Smart." 
"Oh, how do you do Mr. Smart?" 



e>^c55k^ 




"Good evening Miss Sheppard! And Miss Keegin too! You're looking 
charming. I should like to have you meet Mr. Claud Swiggles! Miss Sheppard. 
Miss Keegin." 

"It gives me great pleasure indeed, y'know!" 

"Really? How devilish you're getting, Claudie! You surely must have 
been a cute baby. Mr. Swiggles is from Wooton, England. Wouldn't you 
like to sit down Miss Sheppard?" 

"I say Miss Keegin, let us also take seats. It's wather tiresome standing, 
y'know." 

"Do you really want to have some fun. Miss Sheppard? We'll listen to 
Swiggles tell about himself. It will be worth half of your life." 

"Y'know, Miss Keegin I came to "Aggie" with the class of 1913 and as for 
the Fweshman year I only made a few acquaintances. 

"He's off like a gun, now the fun is only beginning." 

"You say that you made few acquaintances, Mr. Swiggles?" 



"Well it was this way, y'know. All of the fellaws had to study pretty hard. 
My word! Some of the boys that woomed at Kellogg's and at Whitmarshes' 
had loads of fun and all seem to be glad that they woomed there. It was so dif- 
ferent that I expected heah. Oh dear, yes! I thot it might be something like 
Oxford, but it is so different. Do you know that they weally threw some of the 
fellaws in the pond shortly after we awived. I thot then that this was mean to 
say the least. I'm weally glad that they didn't discover that I was such a 
'gaudy' until I was a Sophomore. Well all of the things that we did are now 
classed as history, and they are so many. Weally!" 

"You played on the foot-ball team I suppose, Mr. Swiggles." 

"Oh deah no! I should feali that I would get killed. Deali, no, I was 
nevah made for rough work. But I managed to get past the Freshman Year. 
When I came back as a Sophomore I struck the worst studies that were imagi- 
nable. Neahly a half of the class thot that they'd be on theih way, y'know. 
But all survived but a few of the poor unlucky 'pups' that were crushed in the 
crowd. I met some moah of the boys that year, and began to like the place a 
great deal moah. This year too was filled with tributes to our class, and we were 
sheltered by the wing of ouah friends, the faculty, that we passed." 

"Say, Miss Sheppard the 'cockney' has a 'pretty fair line.' " 

"Yes, Mr. Smart. He's not such a "dead-head." 

"Ouah Junior yeah was the crowning yeah of oiuih lives even aftah the time 
that we planted ouah tree. We showed them all that we were horticulturists. 
I weally do believe that we killed the bloomin" thing with ceah! Weally, Miss 



e>^flB^^ 




Keegin, I got 'bloomin' full' that night and I acted like a 'silly ass.' This yeah 
passed fastah than any preceeding yeah, and we had the best time that a bunch 
could have in any college. I would rather be a "sod-bustah' than any othah 
thing that I know of at present." 

"Tell us about what you think of the Senior Year, Mr. Swiggles." 

"Well, Miss Sheppard, I weally can't say. It's awfully satisfactory to be 
speciaKzing. Few bally snags that a fellaw runs up against but nothing to the 
ones that he meets in aftah life. Y'know, we ah' almost weady to be cast out 
to eithah sink oah swim. We ah' told that we ah the only ones that can do the 
swimming, and altho we've had the lessons we must swim for ourselvahs. Yes, 
we are surely touched with deep pathos as we think of leaving ouah 
Alma Mater. We, recruits to the army of life, full of hope, are about to be 
swung off on a tangent from the circle of classes. We have attained all but the 
last grade on the slope of ouah college careah, and all buoyant, expectant, we 
hope to view the pleasant sunset that we have attained by ouah hard work. 
As I look on the freshman buttons this year they appeah greenah, the buildings 
look moah inviting but it's all' in the game.' We must get out and make the 
city listen and stop its 'wattle and woah' because we believe that we ah about 
to cause a little agitation. You bet! Whether we do or not, we shall always 
say that 'Aggie' did the right thing for us, and I'm suah that the majohity will 
succeed if we judge by the class wecord in ouah Alma Mater. All of the fellaws 
twied to live theih lives in 'Aggie' so that the old weapah, Fathah Time, is sorry 
to see them leaving." 

"Say, Miss Sheppard, that fellow is more of a man than I thot he was. 
I thot that we'd have some fun with him, but he has had as much fun with us, 
I do believe. That's the one trouble with college life. A fellow just begins to 
realize that there are a great many fellows in his class that he doesn't know as 
he should. Here for instance, is this man Swiggles that I always thot was a 
sort of 'cad' but he turns out to be a real good fellow in his way." 

"Oh yes. Miss Keegin, now that I know some people oveh heah, I'll want 
to be heah all of the time. Do you know I always thot that Smart was a 'fresh 
scally,' but I am learning a whole pile my Senior year." 

"Well boys, we hate to mention it but the ten o'clock bell rang some time 
ago. I guess we'll have to be saying "Good night" to you." 

"Come on Swiggles, I guess we'd better be trying to get the 'ten thirty car.' 
Good night everybody! May we call again?" 

"Surely you may call again! Bring Mr. Swiggles! Good night!" 

U"rS/D£— "Say Swiggles, you made a hit to-night. I really never thot 
that it was in you." 

INSIDE "Hasn't M. A. C. progressed since our Freshman Year. As 
Mr. Swiggles would say "1913 did a bit, y'know! !" 



il^^Zk2 




Class of 1913 

Members 



East Leverett 



^Yest Pelliam 
East Pepperell 



ADAMS, WINFORD FREDERICK 

ex House; OX. 

ALLEN, HARRY WILLIS 

West Pelham; S*E; Class Baseball (2) ; Siffraai Board (3,4). 

ANDERSON, OSCAR GUSTAF 

Entomological Building: KS; Horticulture; Class President (1); Class Basketball 
Manager (2); Business Manager 1913 hidex; Signal Board (2, 3); Sophomore-bemor 
Hop Committee (2); President Cercle Francais (2, 3); Roister Bolsters (4). 

ANGIER, HARRIS WILLIAM Westborough 

South College; GX; Vice-President (2); Assistant Editor 1913 hidex. 

BAIRD, HARRY ALBERT SomerviUe 

4 South College; KT*. 
BAKER, DEAN FOSTER Fairliaven 

15 North College; Class Track (1, 2, 3,); Class Cross Country (1, 2, 3, 4); Manager 

Class Track (3, 4); Varsity Cross Country (4); Glee Club (1, 2). 

BARBER, GEORGE WARE Hyde Park 

13 North College; 2<I>E; Glee Club (1-4); Class Track (1, 2, 3); Class Cross Country 
(4); Class Sergeant-at-Arms (4). 

BEVAN, LAURENCE ALGUR Bridgewater 

15 North College; S<i>E. 

BIRDSALL, WEBSTER JENNINGS Otego, N. Y. 

KS House; KS; Roister Doisters; Class Track (3); Cheer Leader (4); President 
Dramatics (3). 

BORDEN, RALPH JAMES Fall River 

7 North College; C.S.C; ONE; Mandolin Club(3, 4); Manager Class Hockey (1) : Mana- 
ger Varsity Baseball (3) ; Class Secretary (1); Class Treasurer (2); Assistant Manager 
1913 Index; Junior Prom Committee (3). 

BULLARD, ALVAN HENRY South Framingham 

3 North College; Cercle Francais, Rifle Club. 

BREWER, CHARLESWORTH HERBERT Mt. Vernon. N. Y. 

C.S.C. House; C.S.C; GN E; Varsity Hockey (1); Varsity BasebaU (1,2,3); Class 
Hockey (1, 2); Class Baseball (1, 2); Art Editor 1913 Index. 



g>^g^s^^ 




BROAVN, HERBERT AUGUSTINE 

Brook's Farm. 



Saxonville 



BURBY, LAURENCE WALTER Chicopee Falls 

ex House; GX; Burnham Eight (1); Band (1, 2, 3); Class Debating Team (3). 



BURSLEY, HAROLD BARROWS 



Peabody 



5 North College; GX; Landscape Art Club; Fraternity Conference; Informal Com- 
mittee; Junior Prom Committee. 

CARVER, JOHN STUART Boston 

C. S. C. House; C. S. C. 

CLARK, NORMAN RUSSELL Millbury 

ex House; eX; Sophomore-Senior Hop Committee; Class Track (1, 2, 3); Varsity 
Track (3). 

COBB, JOSEPH BOYD Chicopee Falls 

5 North College; eX; Glee Club; Stockbridge Club; Class Vice-President (1); Secre- 
tary Musical Association (3); President Musical Association (4). 

COLE, ARLIN TOWER 

2 North College; TAP. 

COLE, FLORA ATWOOD 

Care of Professor MacKimmie. 



West Chesterfield 



Newton 



COLEMAN, ISAAC 

12 North College. 

COOPER, EVERETT HANSON 



Boston 



Wakefield 

11 North College; 2<J>E; GNE; Class Cross Country (2); Class Track Manager (2) ; Man- 
ager Varsity Track (4); Junior Prom Committee (3); Informal Committee (3). 

CORY, HAROLD Rutherford, N. J. 

15 Beston Street; Cercle Francais. 

COVILLE, JOSEPH WARREN West Roxbury 

7 South College; Q. T. V.; TAP; 1912 Sergeant-at-Arms (1); Manager 1912 Rope 
Pull; Captain 1912 Basketball; 1912 Baseball (1); Captain Class Basketball (2); Var- 
sity Baseball (1, 2, 3); Assistant Manager Football (3); Manager Football (4). 



CHRISTMAN, CLYDE EDWARD 

2 North College; TAP. 

CULLEY, FRANK HAMILTON 

77 Pleasant Street; Cercle Francais. 



Dalton 



Marshalltown, Iowa 



gy^gS^^ 




Belchertown 

Osterville 

Redding, Conn. 

South Boston 



CURTIS, HAROLD WILLIAM 

Entomological Laboratory; Cercle Francais. 

DANIEL, EDWARD STEPHEN 

7 South College; Q. T. V.; Manager 1912 Class Football. 

DAYTON, JAMES WILSON 

5 South College; BK<t>; Cercle Francais. 

DOOLEY, THOMAS PATRICK 

6 North College; Class Football (2). 

DRURY, LEWIS FLOYD Rutland 

120 Pleasant Street; AXA; Stockbridge Club; Class Track (1, 2, 3); Band (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Fraternity Conference (4); Orchestra (1). 

EDMINSTER, ALBERT FRANKLIN Brooklyn, N. Y. 

5 South College; BK*; Rifle Team (2, 3) ; Captain Rifle Team (4) ; Fraternity Con- 
ference (3). 

EISENHAURE, JOHN LOUIS North Reading 

3 North College; 1912 Class Rope Pull (1, 2); 1912 Class Football (1, 2); 1912 Class 
Captain (3); Varsity Football (4). 

ELLS, GORDON WATERMAN Haverhill 

5 North College; S<I>E; Glee Club; Rifle Club; Roister Doisters; Manager 1912 Class 
Hockey. 

ELLIS, BENJAMIN AVARD Bournedale 

KS House; K2; Rope Pull (1, 2); Class Hockey (1, 2); Class President (3); Senate 
(3, 4); Chairman Junior Prom Committee. 

FAY, ROBERT SEDGEWICK Monson 

84 Pleasant Street; eX; Stockbridge Club; Class Historian (3) ; Class Secretary (4). 

FORBUSH, WALLACE CLIFFORD Rutland 

BK* House; BK*; Cercle Francais; Stockbridge Club; Band (1. 2, 3); Rifle Team (3); 
Vice President Rifle Club (4). 

FRENCH, JAMES DUDLEY Hyde Park 

8 South College; Q. T. V., Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4); Orchestra (1. 3, 4); Mandolin Club 
(1, 2, 3, 4); Manager Musical Clubs (3, 4); Class President (2); Stock Judging Team 
(4); Public Speaking Council (3, 4) ; Junior Prom Committee; 1913 /urfci' Board; Sen- 
ate (4). 



GASKILL, RALPH HICKS 

15 Hallock Street; AXA; Stockbridge Club; Rifle Club; Class Hockey (1). 



Amherst 



^^^^^^^^ 




GORE, HAROLD MARTIN Quincy 

11 South College; Q. T. V.; Class Treasurer (1, 2); Class Football (1, 2); Class Track 
(2); Varsity Football (2, 3). 



GREENLEAF, GEORGE FREEMAN 

21 Fearing Street; Class Track (2) ; Class Hockey (2). 



Brockton 



GRIGGS, FREDERICK DAVID Chicopee Falls 

18 South College; *SK; ONE; Class Football; Baseball; Track; Basketball and Rope Pull; 
Captain Rope Pull (1); Captain Class Basketball (1); Manager Class Baseball (1); 
Burnham Eight (1); Class President (2); Band (1, 2, 3, 4); Leader of Glee Club (2, 3, 4); 
Orchestra (2, 3, 4); 1913 Index Board; Signal Board (3, 4); Rifle Team (3); Senate 
(3, 4). 



HARRIS, BURTON ADAMS 



Wethersfield, Conn. 



11 North College; S^E; Stockbridge Club; Sophomore-Senior Hop Committee; Class 
Vice President (2); Senate (3, 4); Class President (4); Rope Pull (2). 



HASEY, WILLARD HARRISON 

C. S. C. House; C. S. C; TAP. 



Brockton 



HATCH, HERBERT TILDEN Beverly 

East Experiment Station; 2i>E; Rope Pull (1); Manager Rope Pull (2); Class Treas- 
urer (2). 



HEADLE, HERBERT WALLACE 

8 North College; Cercle Francais; Landscape Art Club. 

HEADLE, MARSHALL 

French Hall. 

HOLDEN, JAMES LOOMIS 

3 North College; Cercle Francais; Rifle Club. 



Bolton 
Bolton 
Palmer 



HOWE, GLOVER ELBRIDGE 



Marlborough 



11 South College; Q. T. V.; Class Captain (2); Class Football (1, 2); Class Baseball 
(1, 2); Class Basketball (1, 2); Manager Class Track (2); Varsity Football (4). 



HOWE, RALPH WESLEY 

Wilder Hall; S*E; Class Treasurer (4); Class Historian (2). 



East Dover, Vt. 



ey^g^s-g 




HUNTINGTON, SAMUEL PERCY Lynn 

12 South College: KS: Captain Class Baseball (2); Class Baseball (1); Varsity Base- 
ball (1. 2, 3); Varsity Football (2); Class Track (1, 2, 3); Rope Pull (1); Band (1, 2, 3); 
Class Football (2); Class Basketball (1. 2): Captain Varsity Baseball (i): Senate (i). 



HUTCHINGS, HERBERT COLBY 

9 North College: S*E: Cross Country (4). 



South Amherst 



HYLAND, HAROLD WILSON Weymouth 

Insectary: KS: Orchestra (1): Band (1. 2, 3); Burnham Eight (1, 2): Roister Doisters. 

JONES, HAROLD FREDERIC Brockton 

West Experiment Station; <i>SK; Manager Roister Doisters; Junior Prom Committee; 
Class Historian (1): Class Captain (3). 

JORDAN, SIMON MILLER Rutherford, N. J. 

9 South College; Q. T. V.; Mandolin Club (1, 2, 3, i); Secretary (2) and Vice 
President (3) Roister Doisters; Class Cross Country (1); Class Track (2); 
Signal Board (1, 2, 3, 4); Sophomore-Senior Hop Committee (2): 1913 Index Board; 
Fraternity Conference (3, 4); Dramatics (2. 3, 4); Manager Varsity Tennis (3); In- 
formal Committee (4). 



KELLEY. ALBERT JOSEPH 

1 North College; Catholic Club. 



Boston 



KELLEY, BERNARD JENKINS 

Brooks Farm; KT*: TAP. 



Harwich 



KENNEY, FREDERICK ALFRED 

20 South College: eX. 



Charlestown 



LESURE, JOHN WARREN THOMAS 

Flint Laboratory; 9X; Stockbridge Club; RiHe Club 



Lunenburg 



LITTLE, WILLARD STONE Newburyport 

() South College; KS: Class President (, I); Class Hockey (.1, 2): Class Baseball Captain 
(1); Class B.aseball (2): Manager Class Hockey (2): Assistant Manager Varsity Hockey 
(3); Manager Varsity Hockey (4): Varsity Hockey (3): Junior Prom Committee; 
President Fraternity Conference. 



40 



gy^^SSk^ 




LOWRY, QUINCY SHAW Canton 

6 South College; KS; Manager Class Cross Country (1); Chairman Informal Commit- 
tee (4). 



LUNDGREN, ROBERT ARTHUR 

9X House; 9X; Stockbridge Club; Stock Judging Team. 

LYON HAROLD 

13 Phillips Street; KT*. 

MACONE, JOSEPH AUGUSTINE 

4 South College; KT*; Band (1, 2, 3); Stockbridge Club. 

MALLET, GEORGE ALFRED 



Orange 

Somerville 

Concord 



Bridgeport, Conn. 

9 North College; S^E; Class Cross Country (3); Secretary-Treasurer Fraternity 
Conference and Informal Committee. 



MATZ, JULIUS 

112 Pleasant Street. 

MAYER, JOHN LAWRENCE 

1 North College; President Catholic Club. 



Boston 
South Boston 



McDOUGALL, ALLISTER FRANCIS Westford 

18 South College; *SK; President Stockbridge Club; President Rifle Club; Rifle 
Team (2, 3); Band (1, 2, 3); Stock Judging Team (4). 

MOIR, WILLIAM STUART Boston 

GX House; 8X; Dramatics (2, 3); Roister Doisters (4); President Cercle Francais (4) ; 
Class Hockey (1, 2); Class Track (1, 2, 3); Burnham Eight (2). 

MURRAY, JOSEPH WILBUR Holyoke 

K 2 House; KS; TAP; Landscape Art Club; Catholic Club; Class Historian (4). 



NEAL, RALPH THOMAS 

Insectary; Class Secretary (3). 

NICHOLS, NORMAN JOSEPH 

Mathematics Building; Mandolin Club (1). 



Mattapan 
Everett 



e>^fl6k^ 




O'BRIEN, JAMES LEO Wayland 

10 South College; KT*; Class Sergeant-at-Arms ('2); Class Football (1, 2); Rope Pull 
(2); Varsity Football (1, 2). 

PACKARD, CLYDE MONROE Springfield 

84 Pleasant Street; Editor-in-Chief 1913 Index; Vice President Christian Association. 

PEASE, LESTER NEWTON Meriden, Conn. 

17 South College; <I>SK; Stockbridge Club; Class Track (2, 3) ; Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Band (2, 3). 

PILLSBURY, JOSEPH JAMES West Bridgewater 

8 South Prospect Street; Varsity Track Squad (1, 2, 3); Class Track (1, 2, 3). 



POST, GEORGE ATWELL 

ex House; OX. 



Richmond Hill, N. Y. 



ROEHRS. HERMAN THEODORE New York City 

KS House; KS; Class President (3) ; Manager Class Football (1, 2); Varsity Tennis (1, 
2, 3); Chairman Sophomore-Senior Hop Committee; Captain Varsity Tennis (4). 



ROSEBROOKS, WALTER EDWIN 

14 North College. 



Oxford 



SAMSON, STUART DODDS Grand Lsle, Vt. 

12 South College; KS; Class Captain (2. 3); Varsity Football (2. 3); Class Football 

(1, 2); Class Baseball (1, 2); Class Basketball (1, 2); Class Track (1, 2, 3); Varsity 
Track (3); Captain Varsity Football (4). 



SELDEN, JOHN LINCOLN 

21 Fearing Street; AXA; Band (2, 3); Orchestra (2, 3 4). 



Northampton 



SEREX, PAUL, JR. 

14 North College. 



Jamaica Plain 



ey^c55^^ 




SHEEHAN, DENNIS ANTHONY Weston 

1 North College; K T *; Class Captain (2) ; Varsity Football Squad (2) ; Class Hockey (1) ; 
Class Baseball (2). 



SHUTE, CARL AUGUST 

l-t Soiith College; ^SK; Sophomore-Senior Hop Committee. 



Hampden 



STREETER, CHARLES MARSH 

BK* House; BK<J>; Mandolin Club (1); Rifle Club. 



Brimfield 



THAYER, CLARK LEONARD 

8 North College; BK*; Class Secretary (3). 



Enfield 



TUCKER, WALDO GUY 

Math. Building; Class Track (1). 



Lynn 



VAN ZWALUWENBURG, REYER H. San Luis Potosi, Mexico 

17 South College; ^SK; Class Historian (2); Signal Board (1, 2, 3, 4); Editor-in- 
Chief Si'^nai (4); 1913 /«de.c Board; Dramatics (2); Class Vice President (3); Roister 
Doisters (4). 



WALKER, CHARLES DEXTER Greenwich Village 

14 South College; <PXK; GNE; Class Baseball (1); Class Vice President (3); Fraternity 
Conference (3). 



WHITNEY, FRANCIS WELLINGTON Wellesley 

4 North College; Class Hockey (1, 2); Class Track (1, 2, 3); Class Football (2); Varsi- 
ty Track (3); Captain Varsity Track (4). 

ZABRISKIE, GEORGE 2nd New York City 

9 South College; Q. T. V.; Manager Roister Doisters; (1,2,3) President Ibid (4); Dra- 
matics (2); Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4); Signal Board (2, 3, 4); Index (3); Sophomore-Senior 
Hop Committee (2); Business Manager Signal (4). 



52 



3 



unx v& 





ALMON MORLEY EDGERTON 



Junior Class 



Officers 



Almon Morley Edgerton 
Lester Ward Needham 
Joel Powers Sherman 
Leon Edgar Smith 
Harry Nissen 
Harold John Morse 
Chester Eaton Wheeler 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Captain 

Sergeant-at-Arms 

Historian 



Colors: 

Blue and White 



54 



e>^^^^ 




1914 History 

MASSAGGIE'S VODEVIL THEATRE 

Executive Staff 

General Manager — A. M. Edgerton. 
Ass't. Gen. Man. — L. W. Needham. 
Secretary — J. P. Sherman. 
Treasurer — L. E. Smith. 
Stage Manager — C. E. Wheeler. 
Stage Director — ^H. Nissen. 
Head Usher—R. J. Morse. 

Note: — -Ladies will, and gentlemen must, take off their hats. 

PROGRAM: 

OVERTURE BY 
HUTCHINSON'S FAMOUS M. A. C. ORCHESTRA 

introducing: "The March of the One Hundred Sixty." 



B 



BREWER AND COMPANY 

in the splashing comedy "How We Pulled '13 Through." 
60^SIXTY PEOPLE— 60 



LOCSTEPPE AND P. GREEN 

in their laugh-provoking costume and talking act. 
(Have appeared before all the (hald) crowned heads of Europe.) 



Qj^S5^^ 




D 



H 
I 



THE SOLID ELEVEN 

in their successful ball-carrying and kicking act. 
(This act is especially interesting to even-classmen.) 

L. E. SMITH, PARKER CO. 

in the whirlwind success: "How '13 Let 150 go for 1, or, "The Siege of 

Forristall. " 

(In this sketch are introduced scenes from the famous Shoot-the-shoots 

down the chem. lab. steps.) 

POWER'S POWERFUL SIX 

in their feats of strength and rope-work. 
(Souvenirs will be handed out to the audience at the close of the act.) 

"FOUR PERIODS OF LAUGHTER" 

The sketch that caused the freshmen to break their clay pipes. 

HENKING, THE SMOKER 

In his song-hit "Boost Old Aggie." 

SOPH O. MORE COMPANY 

presents the sketch "Survival of the Fittest, A Tale of Feliruary, 191'-2." 



K 



FROSH AND SOFS 

in their unique lunibliiig and wrestling act. 

THE ELECT— OGRAPH 

"Oh! That Schedule!" "What Major Shall I Choose?" "Shylock." 



FINALE 

ORCHESTRA. "We're Gathered Here." 



Qj^S6^^ 





Junior Class 



Members 



Leslie Elmer Abbott 



Sandwich 



10 North College; Pomology; Stockbridge Club; Class Track 

The palm of being able to talk continuously from one to 
three hours and yet say nothing is universally accorded to 
Abbott. Exams are his pet line, and his "Gol darn it, if I'd 
only done this," or "Td just misplaced one letter" is familiar 
to all. As a grouch, he ran a close second to our colleague, 
Clark, but Shaw doesn't think so! 



Carl Murdough Allen, "Cal" Holyoke 

87 Pleasant Street; S*E; Chemistry; Mandolin Club; 
Class Track (1, 2). 

Who is that over there? Oh, that's "Cal", the Math, 
shark, all-around assistant to the Algebra-struck Fresh and 
the Physics-laden Sophomore. Carl's favorite occupation 
is plinking the mandolin in Cushman or Greenfield at sundry 
times during the musical club season. We all expect to see him 
some day demonstrate how to 
grow beets or turnips in air, by 
a special action of the ele- 
ments, or some equally amaz- 
ing thing. 




*&!? 





Leslie Oscar Anderson, "Andy" Concord 

Mt. Pleasant; Agricultural Education; Class Football (2). 
Who have we here? Why, none other than "Bull" Ander- 
son from Concord. "Bull" is a very prominent member of 
the International Mexican Athletic Union. As an imitator 
of Shakespeare's Shylock, he has no equal, and does every- 
thing from smashing baggage to selling tickets for Terpsy. 



Qj>^S&t^ 




Warren Sears Baker, "Bake" 



WoUaston 





8 South College; Q. T. V.; GNE, Agriculture; Class Football 
(1, 2); Varsity Football (1, 2, 3); Class President (2). 

"Bake" is what we call him. One of his worst draw- 
backs is that he comes from Quincy, but even at that he is one 
of our pretty boys. He has a good conformation and is well 
proportioned around the val- 
uable cuts. He "stuck around" 
during the summer vacation 
and became Forristall's Pet. 
But we have a lot of respect 
for him just because he showed 
good judgment in preferring 
191-1 to 1913. Second, he is a 
worker, not only as student, 
but as a football man, having 
played varsity for two years. 



Harold Cotting Black, "Blackie" Falmouth 

Kappa Sigma House; KS; Landscape Gardening; Signal 
Board (2, 3); Advertising manager Dramatics (3); Land- 
scape Art Club. 

Blackie came to us last year from Worcester Tech to 
swell the red-headed tribe, and also the Amalgamated Society 
of Fussers, and under Brown's tutelage he is speedily reaching 
.1 high degree of efficiency in the noble art. He is pretty good 
wilh the books, and "Twees and 
Shwubs ' already has a benevo- 
lent regard for him. We fear 
that Harold is going to prove a 
strong competitor for that class 
cup as he appeared on the cam- 
pus this Fall displaying the badge of the Slaves of the Golden 
Circle. Such energy is to be commended, but we really think 
that he ought to give the rest of us half a chance at least. 

Chester Story Bokelund, "Chesty" Worcester 

10 South College; Kr<I>; Roister Doisters; Manager Tennis 
(3); Artist, 1914 Index Board. 

He stuck in this thumb 

And pulled out a plum. 

And cried, "What a great man am I." 
So Sang "Chesty", his classic head thrown back, display- 
ing the wonderful chest and mighty vocal chords. Matches 
are tabooed in his presence, and his landlady never has to 
heat his room. Football seemed to be his proper sphere, but 
alack! — even that could not quiet him, so he gave up and 
spends his time chasing "the makin's." 

59 




g>^^^^-^ 





John Watling Bradley, "Brad" Groton 

20 South College; GX; Entomology; 1913 Class Hockey (2). 
This pink-faced boy hails from Groton and rumor has it 
that the town is now in a state of coma owing to his absence. 
Take our word for it, John was 
once some wild boy, but since 
he decided to quit 1913 and 
join with the fortunes of 191 i. 
he has followed the general 
example of his new classmates 
and quieted down consider- 
ably. 




Ralph Stanley Bragg, "Braggo" Milfcrd 

Mt. Pleasant; K2; Landscape; Orchestra (1, 2, 3); 191-t 

Prom Committee; 1911 Index Board. 

Since coming to Amherst, we are not surprised that 

"Braggo's" native town is called Braggville. He is a hustling 

dollar-chaser if there ever was one, and when he and his part- 
ner, Hazen, get their heads together, you may be sure that 

someone is going to get stuck. There isn't the slightest doubt but 

what his ability to sepaj'ate us from our coin will serve him 

well later. Although business, or shall we callit running a bucket- 
shop, is Ralph's forte, he is not averse to a little fussing on the 
side, and is one of those who make the Informals a success. 

Harold Wiriam Brewer, "Mike" Scarsdale, N. Y. 

7 \orth College; C. S. C; Agriculture; Mandolin Club 
(3); Varsity Football (1, 2); Varsity Baseball (1, 2); Class 
Football (1, 2); Captain Class Football (2); Class Basket- 
ball (1,2); Class Hockey (1); Class Baseball (1, 2); Captain 
Rope Pull (1); Class Captain (1); Burnham Eight (1); Junior 
Prom Committee. 

Haw! Haw! Haw! Recognize him? It's rollicking, 
romping "Mike." Mt. Vernon certainly is proud of Wash- 
ington, but fifty years hence, he will be forgotten and the 
children will point to an old gray haired man, and say. That's 

the man who drove the cook at Hotel insane. Why 

he ate everything on the menu and then called for more. 
"Mike" wears the laurel wreath for athletics, but apparently 
manages to steer clear of the "bow and arrow." Well, we 
always did believe that it pays to stick to the "girl back home." 

60 




Qj^S&^^ 



Ji-iL^ 




Arthur Winslow Brooks, "Art" 



Enfield 



Beta Kappa Phi House; BK*; Chemistry. 

"Arty" escaped Billy's clutches and promptly lost him- 
self along' with Prof. Noyes and all the rest of the boys in the 
lab. He essayed Informals 
once, but his success was so 
wonderful that it frightened 
him, and since then he re- 
ligiously absents himself and 
pulls in his hooks at the 
slightest sign of danger. 





Harry Dunlap Brown, "Harry" Lowell 

Kappa Sigma House; KS; Pomology; Mandolin Club (1, 
2,3); Glee Club (1, 2, 3); Roister Doisters; Assistant Mana- 
ger Musical Association (2, 3); Chairman Junior Prom Com- 
mittee. 

Here is the only thirty-third degree fusser in existence. His 
conquests are known in many colleges for the fair sex, and as 
for "over the river" — well, we will be charitable and draw 
the curtain. Of course, we can say some good things about 
this man; he is a hustler in class affairs and labors manfully 

with our vocal chords each June. Next to fussing Harry 

shines most brilliantly behind the footlights, and his talents 

in that direction have already been recognized by the Amherst 

Women's Club. "Baldy" hopes to make a pomologist out of 

him, and judging from Brownie's ability at catching peaches, he 

ought to succeed. We are already anticipating a trip to that 

Kentucky fruit farm. 

Melville Bradford Calvert, "Jeff" New London, Conn. 
58 Pleasant St.; Pomology. 

Behold! Melville Bradford Calvcrl, the King of the 
Lilliputians, affectionately dubbed "Jeff." Jeff is right there 
with the comeback and will not stand any joshing. New 
London first endured him, until he developed roving tenden- 
cies. The C. V. R. R. turned him off at Amherst and here he 
has stuck ever since. Religious scruples are strong, leading 
him once to remark that riding in cars on Sunday tended to 
produce "pernicious influences on the moterman and con- 
ductor." We admire him for his devotion to the fair sex — 
and his grinding tendencies explain the mysterious sounds 
emanating from Pleasant Street early and late. 

01 




e>^g35^^ 





Malcolm David Campbell, "Camp" Harvard 

Poultry Building; Poultry; Glee Club (2); Choir (2). 

Malcolm's good looks werent appreciated at Worcester 
Tech, so he came to M. A. C. where he was at once enrolled as 
a member of the 1914 Art Gallery. This is a tremendous 
handicap, but "Camp" is doing his best to overcome it by hi- 
bernating with the chickens, in hopes that some of the flying 
feathers will take root and hide that peaches and cream com- 
plexion. 



Edward Wheeler Christie, "Ned" 



North Adams 
Class Basket- 



Kappa Gamma Phi House; K F*; Landscape 
ball (2). 

"Ned" blew in from North Adams two years ago closely 
followed by his other half, — namely, "Spike" Hadfield. For 
the first month, "Ned" was scarcely ever seen unless perhaps 
it was in the act of dodging around the corner of some build- 
ing for he truly was a bashful boy. But what a difference a 
few years have made in him! ! 





(ieorge Clarence Churchill, "Clarence" 

Pomology. 



Worcester 



58 Pleasant St. 

Greasiest of greasy grinds, that's about all we can say of 
this man. He has never been known to have his head out 
of a book except to sleep, and even then he probably slips one 
under the pillow in an effort to soak up the knowledge in that 
way. Knowledge may be power, but deliver us! 



e>^c55^s^ 




Ernest Samuel Clark, Jr., "Sam" 



Tolland 



82 Pleasant Street; S*E; Pomology; Rifle Club (1, 2); Class 
Cross Country (1); Signal Board (1, 2, 3); Business Manager 
1914 Index. 

One day. Mount Hermon's doors slowly opened, and a 
robust youth strode forth, who made his way to "Massaggie". 
"Sam" has made A-1 progress in all the courses including 
fussology. We understand that he is passing a very successful 
course in this at another institution not far away. Chasing 
"ads" seems to be his favorite occupation most of the time. 
"Sam" will be the happiest man on earth if the Index comes 
out above board. 





Harold Johnson Clay "Henry" Cambridge 

21 Fearing St.; Pomology. 

Mild old Cambridge woke one morn to find Henry on 
deck. A piece of Clay you say! Yea, but moulders clay, to 
be fitted and shaped, and his square corners are fast wearing 
away to fit the round hole of his existence among us. Peda- 
gogical discussions delight him, and as for metaphysics — 
nothing to it — he cats 'em alive! His pious mien conceals 
considerable horse sense, and serves as a cloak to his well- 
known fussing ability. 



Frank Jackson Cle" 



'Frank" 



Fall Rivei 



C. S. C. House; C. S. C; Varsity Baseball (1); Class Base- 
ball (1, 2); 1913 Class Rope Pull (1); Glee Club (1, 3); 1913 
Class Sergeant-at-Arms (1). 

Frank's the strong man of the class. You don't believe 
it? Ask him and see! The entomological bug died a sudden 
death this summer, and ani-m-i-1-e-s is occupying his atten- 
tion just at present. Although an ex '13 man, Frank has al- 
ways been strong for 1914 since joining our ranks. 





Alfred Lvnii Coe 



Fayettville, N. Y. 



Beta Kappa Phi House; BK*; Landscape Gardening; Rifle 
Club; Class Track (1, 2); Class Cross Country (2, 3); 1914 
Index Board. 

"Never do to-day what you can do to-morrow" hits this 
youth in the mid-rib. Once you get him started, though, he 
makes a noise like vinegar pickles on a tear. Those "Bella- 
dona orbs" pulled him through the round of Informals un- 
scathed, but watch out, Alfred, and don't get caught out late 
alone on East Street. 



Maiichaufi 



Herbert Elmer Cole, "Herby" 

Plant House; Floriculture; Stockbridge Club. 

Hel — lo! is the musical greeting of this rough fellow 
as he whizzes by on his new 1913 model bicycle. Although 
older than most of us, "Herby" has to don corduroys and a 
class hat to prove to the freshmen that he is not one of them, 
but a real hard junior. While not running the Plant House, 
Herby is found at the Methodist church where he claims the 
fussing is as good as "over the river," and besides there is no 
carfare to pay. "Herby" is one of the boys who alwaj-s ap- 
pears in the catalogue with a 
small numeral after his name. 
He blames "Squirt" for this, 
but 



David Augustus Coleinaii, "Gus" 

108 Pleasant St.; Chemistry. 





South Framiiiaham 



This fellow is a sort of dark horse; we don't hear much 
about him, but like most such animals, we haven't a doubt 
but that he will be there at the finish. A would-be chemist, 
he showed his ironclad nerve by electing physics, a proceeding 
which calls for admiration on the part of us poor suckers who 
considered ourselves lucky to escape from the Chamber of 
Torture with our lives. 



e>^^55^s^ 




Lloyd Garrison Davies, "Chick" 



Peabody 



13 South College; *SK; ONE; Chemistry; Varsity Base- 
ball (1, 2); Class Baseball (1, 2); Class Football (2); Class 
Basketball (1); Manager Class Basketball (2); Class Track 
(2); Sophomore-Senior Hop Committee; President Christian 
Association (3). 

Tell the people of Peabody that "Chick" Davies is presi- 
dent of the M. A. C. Christian Association, and you will be 
voted into the local Ananias Club without hesitation. How 
he got this job is certainly the eighth wonder of the world. 
Lloyd didn't profit much by making the first splash in the 
pond for he is fresher now than the freshest freshman. While 
on the campus he is generally accompanied by "Mike" Brew- 
er's "Haw! Haw! Haw!" In addition to all this, "Chick" is 
a necessary man on the base- 
ball team, and is also a spe- 
cial student at Mt. Holyoke. 





Ralph Edward Davis, "Dave" Oxford, Couii. 

77 Pleasant Street; S*E; Pomology. 

Behold the King of Fussers! Why, Ralph has been 
known to make a trip clear across the State so as not to miss 
his Sunday night call. Those soulful brown eyes of his seem 
to have an especial charm for the eternal feminine. "Dave" 
can be seen almost any time moving swiftly through space on 
his "chug-chug"; and he will pass you out a line on that subject 
or any other, for that matter. 
"Talk, lordv, how he can 
talk!" 



William Ashinuii Davi.s, "Bill" 



Northfield 



Beta Kappa Phi House; BIC*; Animal Husbandry; Stock- 
bridge Club; Rifle Club; Class Track (2); Band (1, 2, 3). 

"Bill" happened along one day and "Frosty" roped and 
threw him. Once branded. Bill reckoned he'd stay and 
grow up with the calves. The growing pains still trouble 
a bit, but they'll wear off in time. Bill has considerable po- 
tential energy, but transformers can't make it over into 
kinetic, so it's all wasted. 




g>^c55^^ 





Newton Howard Dearinff, "Newt" 



Brookline 



Robert Norton Dcmond, "Bob" 
16 South College; eSK; Agriculture. 

A line reaching from here to North Adams, where he 
comes fi-om, would not be quite as long as Bob's. We do not 
know where he got his license to talk, but his capacity is in- 
finite. In spite of this fact, "Joe" finds time enough to get 
out of a few finals now and then. We might also add that 
without his support the college store could not long live in 



7 South College; Q. T. V.; Animal Husbandry; Manager 
Class Hockey (2); Burnham Eight (1). 

"Newt" is his name, and he is sort of a "I don't know 
what you call it." He's a great man with the ladies, especially 
the Stenogs. They are his joy and his pleasure and he never 
lets the studies interfere with his pleasure. We do not know 
what his winning points are in the eyes of the fair ones, but 
anyway he fits. It may be his "line" which we must admit 
is all his own. He is the model of optimism and smiles best 
while others are cussing. 



North Adams 





Evans King Dexter, "Deck" Mattapoisett 

Theta Chi House; GX; Pomology. 

Blokie sure was taken into camp by this enterprising 
Cape Codder. To be sure, he can't drill, but he does love a 
game of tennis! It isn't everyone who can do it. Congratu- 
lations! However, he keeps the records straight and that's 
something. 



,s^^^^ 




p]rving Walker Dunbar, "Dunnie" North Weymouth 

116 Pleasant St.; Pomology. 

Here we have the pluckiest chap on the campus; one 
whom we all admire for his nerve and perseverance. Al- 
though laboring under a handicap which would discourage an 
ordinary man, "Dunnie, " always cheerful and smiling, has 
made good from the start. We haven't a doubt but that this 
same pluck which has characterized his efforts in college 
will hew a straight pathway 
for him in the outside world. 



Ahnon Morlev Eduerton, "Al" 





West Springfield 



13 South College; <1>SK; Pomology; Varsity Football (1,2,3); 
Class Basketball (2); Class Baseball (1); Banquet Committee 
(1); Class Basketball, Captain (1, 2); Class President (3). 

.\nother of the West Springfield gangi And he's the 
only real cutie who can propel a canoe and throw overhand. 
Once away from home, "Al" commenced to pick up amaz- 
ingly till now he's loaded to the scuppers with sundry brands 
of information. On the "Macaroon Circuit" Al is stamped 
as a woman-hater, trailing rather than girling like a true cap- 
tive. He probably imagines 
that at his age dining out and 
dancing wouldn't be entirely 
"hep." 



Edward Clinton Edwards, "Ned" 



Salem 



IG South College: 'tSK; BNE; Landscape Gardening: 
Class Football (1, 2): Class President (I): Landscape Art 
Club; Assistant Manager Track (3); Sophomore-Senior 
Hop Committee. 

Because he comes from the Witch City "Xed" claims to 
be able to bewitch most any girl that comes along. He 
tried hard to get the position of class tusscr. and gave Brown 
a pretty good rub for the place. As a "prof" bluffer "Ned" 
is almost a complete success, "Doc" Gordon being the only one 
wild dared to "call". "Ned" is a strong believer in sartorial 
perfection, and he cuts quite a figure by appearing in public 
in Ills chocolate ice-cream trousers which arc the envy of the 
campus sports, as well as the pride of his admirers. 




ej^S6^^ 





Harold Lockwood Eldridge, "Harold" Wareham 

College Store; 6X; Animal Husbandry. 

Since the Boston "Post's" "Mechanical Man" could not 
be procured to relieve Tit's arduous duties, Eldridge was 
substituted, and happily has made good with everybody, 
due, no doubt, to his sailing ability, for the waters of North 
boil and seethe periodically. He has been known to say 
"Damn" under extenuating circumstances, for which we are 
thankful. Without this opportunity we would never know 
that he varied the even tenor 
of his ways. 



Stuart Brooks Foster, "Red" 



West Sonierville 

Signal (1, 2, 3); Ed- 



Kappa Sigma House; K2; Chemistry 
itor-in-Chief, Iflli Index. 

Lo, 'tis the big man himselfl We would say more, but 
'tis futile — his word is law! That blue pencil will inevitably 
pare our true conception — so we must exaggerate. "Stink 
Lab forever" is his slogan, and if he can manage to work 
Billy for a pass he bids fair to become a good experimenter. 
He has been tried many times and never found wanting, usual- 
ly about Informal time. 





Stanley Barron Freeborn, "Sambo" Ware 

116 Pleasant Street; Q. T. V.; GNE; Horticulture; Mana- 
ger Class Football (1); Burnham Eight (1); 1914 Index 
Board; Senate (3); Assistant Manager Football (3); Class 
President (2); Junior Prom. Committee. 

Ware, Ware, for Stan Freeborn! He's a bashful young 
man — that is, all but his knees. They will persist in "cud- 
dlin' up a little closer" and may be see at their best in his new 
uniform. Husky, did you say? But how about his line.' 
Can you beat it.' Good enough to pull him out as our Prexy, 
and to hypnotize the football team into a manageable state. 



Q^^S^I^ 




Samuel Leavitt Freedman, "Sam" Roxbury 

101 Pleasant Street; Floriculture; Class Cross Country (3). 
"Sam" is the only original, bred-in-the-bone "gold dust 
twin" and like them is always ready to do you. Sam's head 
hangs pretty close to the books and his studious look comes 
perfectly natural. This captain of finance is owned body and 
soul by his wife, Levine. For further particulars apply there. 





Carl Raymond Frye, "Tommie" South Hadley Falls 

110 Pleasant Street; Class Track (1); Landscape Art Club. 
A pair of indestructible dancing legs, surmounted by a 
pipe shoved back under a head guard. He's a "tough guy" 
and all the local chickadees are daffy over him, and you may 
be sure that when the first crash of music comes, "Carl" will 
be on the floor "with his hair in a braid." 



George Fuller, "Full" Deerfield 

86 Pleasant Street; Agriculture. 

1913 once more proved too tame, so Fuller waited until 
1914 hove in sight and then hung on behind. So far, he sticks, 
and chances look good of his hanging to us until the Skins 
are passed around. Then he'll be Johnny-on-the-Spot, by 
which we do not mean he isn't always just at present! 




e>^^55^^ 





William Gerald GrifEn 



South Hadley Falls 



33 E. Pleasant St.; KT*; Catholic Club; Class Football 
(2) — 1913; Varsity squad. 

Thirteen couldn't hold him, so now we have him, and he 
is a welcome addition to our energetic bunch of "Boosters." 
Although far from being a Samson, his energy and pluck 
make up for his lack of "beef," and have earned for him a place 
in the football limelight. 



Harold Frederick Hadfield, "Spike" North Adams 

Kappa Gamma Phi House; KT*; Landscape Gardening; 
Class Basketball (1, 2); Class Baseball (2). 

When "Ned" decided to leave North Adams, "Spike" 
guessed he'd go along, too, and see a bit of the world. "Ned" 
succeeded in stopping him at M. A. C, and just now it looks 
as though they'd clean up Phi Kappa Phi as a result. "Spike" 
is the only Kid when it comes to basketball and baseball, 
for he can slap 'em over the pan with the best. 





Ralph Ellis Handy, "Fat" Cataumet 

10 North College; Animal Husbandry. 

"A mighty Handy man to have round. " So say all the 
Grangers, especially the fairer sex, with whom his prestige 
is already won. His chubby form makes a fitting appendage 
to the military corps, only sometimes he can't walk fast 
enough to keep up. Cheer up! Only one more year, "Tub- 
by ". Sid can't get you after this. 



e>^c55k^ 




U,. 'c) 



Rodney Wells Harris, "Rod" Wethersfield, Conn. 

77 Pleasant Street; 2*E; Agriculture; Class Basketball (1). 
Rod followed cousin "Burt" up to Aggie, but soon after 
his landing he got "stuck" on Dave, and they have been in- 
separable ever since. Rod dislikes nothing more than work, 
and he is always willing to let somebody else do for him. Some- 
how, he has managed to slip by the exams, and he is still 
with us (sitting down). 



Edward Leonard Hazen, "Ed" 





Springfield 



Forristall's; K2; Pomology; Class Captain (1); Manager 

Class Basketball (1); Class Football (2). 

Here lies the body of Edward L. Hazen 
Mouth almighty and teeth amazin'! 
Stranger, tread lightly this grave o'er 
If he opens his mouth, you're a goner 
By thunder! 
"Push up forward, please, 

plenty of room up front!" It 

is the voice of our windiest, Ed. 

Ever since he first appeared in 

Springfield, he has been pushing 

up front, and we fear the front 

won't be big enough to hold him 

when he arrives, as he must 

inevitably. 



Emory Blodgett Hebard Holland 

3 Fearing Street; Animal Husbandry; Stockbridge Club. 

This specimen was found in the wilds of Holland. No, 
he isn't a Dutchman, although he is about that speed. He 
can be seen every morning moving to Draper with the regu- 
larity of a clock. We hear it whispered that his mirror and 
hairbrush could tell tales of the many hours of nightly labor 
spent upon his chestnut tresses, smoothing them this way 
and that. Does this indicate that a "She" somewhere ad- 
mires those same locks.^ We hesitate to say. 




e>^c55^^ 





Fredei-ick Heffron, "Freddy" 



Sherborn, Mass. 



108 Pleasant Street; Agriculture; Stockbridge Club; Catho- 
lic Club; Class Hockey (1). 

The class was treated to an immense surprise that mem- 
orable May morning when Heffron, hitherto a model of placid- 
ity, created havoc in the Sophomore ranks with his weighty 
pile-drivers, thereby earning our lasting respect and admira- 
tion. Perhaps living in Sherborn has made "Freddy" sus- 
picious of the fair sex, at any rate, fussing seems to have no 
charms for him. 



Lawrence Jagger Hogg, "Larry" Lawrence 

Pease Avenue; Entomology; Orchestra; Class Track (1). 

Lawrence is a native of Lawrence, the city of strikes. 
In fact, it is believed that he was one of the first to become 
dissatisfied with conditions there, for a few years ago, he 
"struck" and came to Amherst. Larry immediately fell in 
with "Fat" Taylor who trained him in the gentle art of 
rough-housing. After develop- 
ing in this line as much as pos- 
sible, Larry struck off into the 
dramatic world, where we un- 
derstand that he is a success, 
because of his good "line." 





North Easton 



Lewis Phillips Howard, "Kid" 

19 Hallock Street; AXA; Chemistry; Orchestra (1, 2, 3); 
Class Secretary and Treasurer (1); Class Basketball (1). 

When it comes to "lip" the "Kid" is certainly there. 
We defy anybody to compete with him both for long distance 
and noise. W'ithout that slippery trombone, our poor old 
band would sure keel over forever. To be sure, it does oc- 
casionally slip now, but between "Jack" and "Kid" up she 
comes "bobbin' and scrappin' " every Wednesday. Kid's 
second suit is physics and it is rumored that our esteemed 
man of Butt bids fair to be displaced. 



e>^fi5^s^ 




John Gouverneur Hutchinson, "Jack" 



Arlington 



15 South College; <I>2K; ONE; Landscape Gardening; 
Orchestra (1, 2, 3); Varsity Hockey (1, 2); Sophomore-Senior 
Hop Committee; Manager Class Football (2) ; Class Football 
(1); Class Hockey (1, 2); Class Baseball (1, 2). 
With apologies to George Ada: 

Truly a Bachelor flown with Insolence and Pride is the 
favorite Mark for the Bow and Arrow kid. His familiar line 
of Chatter together with his emotional nature feeds itself on 
the latest song hits. Why should we blame this little "Broth- 
er of the Rich" for putting his undying Nerve into the market 
and getting what he can with it? Even the "Buckingham 
Palace" manner and the Swell Front cannot buffalo the idle 
Spectator into overlooking the fact that he belongs to the 
genus. Lemon. 



Earl Morris Ingham, "Earl" 








Granby 



86 Pleasant Street; Pomology. 

After that famous Chem Lab scrap, Ingham's name was 
changed to "Whangem" and several Seniors have good cause 
to remember the lusty bingles dealt by that able wMng. Ordi- 
narily, he is a quiet, peaceable chap, but when aroused, look 
out! A consistent worker, and a loyal classmate; he has 
earned the respect of all who know him. 



Loring Humphrey Jacobs, "Jake" Wellesley 

25 Pleasant Street, Agriculture. 

"Funny how quick a chap forgets, isn't it?" "Why, 
when I was in High School, Gee! I was some speedy!" Do 
you know him? It doesn't seem funny to forget when 
there's nothing to remember. Never mind, Jake, your 
"system" will pull you through toj) of the heap and Dana 
Hall shall have no cause to be ashamed of yon. Caw! Caw! 




jSii^^g 





Herbert Hedge Jenney, "Herb" 



South Boston 



G Nutting Avenue; Poultry; Orchestra (1, 2, 3); Band (1, 2, 
3). 

There was born in old South Boston some thirty years 
before, a child, afflicted with the name of Herbert Jenney. 
And it came to pass that he grew and grew, until Boston cast 
him out, his wit (?) having become greater than that of his 
betters. In like manner did 1913 do away with him, and it 
befell 1914 to bear with him. Besides being a regular over 
the river, Jenney has been known to assist at certain church 
functions within Amherst, being conspicuous for his gallan- 
try. 



E-ollin Eugene Johnson, "Spike" Templeton 

120 Pleasant Street; AXA; Poultry. 

Here's a clean cut ten penny "Spike," but Billy's ham- 
mer drove him hard and fast against a snag, and there he 
sticks. However, molecular readjustment will bring about 
a change of state soon — at least we hope so. The present 
state of his inertia needs some stimulant. 





Dettmar Wentworth Jones, "Det" 



Melrose 



9 South College; Q. T. V.; ONE; Entomology; Class 
Football (1); Class Hockey (1, 2); Varsity Hockey (1, 2); 
Class Sergeant-at-Arms (1); Class Secretary (2); Senate 
(3). 

Hail to our hero! Some guy this Det. His many hobbies 
include fussing, hunting, hockey, and rough-housing, but 
must never try to catch a pig in an alley. Tree work is stuff 
he likes because the natural bow of his legs makes it easy to 
hold on and have both hands free to work. 



e>^^56^^ 




Richard Fowler Leete, "Dick" Mount Kisco, N. Y. 

81 Pleasant Street; Kr4>; Landscape. 

Long, thin, and as inscrutable as the Sphinx, was this 
variety of the genus homo when it first appeared in Amherst, 
and to our knowledge, has not yet reformed. We imagine, 
however, that Dick greases the hinges of that necessary ad- 
junct, his tongue, when calling on his favored one "over the 
river." 





Boston 



Henry Walter Levine 

101 Pleasant Street; Floriculture. 

Being Sammie"s twin, all we can say about one is equally 
true of the other. We had nervous prostration after finish- 
ing "Sam" and don't care to repeat. We wish them all 
possible success and if there is anything in a name, tlie 
"Golddust twins" will surely get what they deserve. 



Murray Dani'orth Lincoln, "Line" Raynham 

19 Hallock Street; AXA; Animal Husbandry; Stockbridge 
Club; Rope Pull (2); Senate (3); 1914 Index Board; Fra- 
ternity Conference (3); Junior Prom Committee; Band (1, 
2, 3); Class Sergeant-at-Arms (1). 

Behold, perhaps not the great emancipator of the black 
man, but the emancipator of the poor mortals called Sopho- 
mores from the toils of Norman's Horticulture Sleeping po- 
tions. "Line" besides his gentle art of tickling the keys, has 
done more strenuous work on the rifle team, and perhaps the 
most strenuous of all — the Index. 




L L7 



^^^^CX^s^ 





Hoyt Dennis Lucas, "Luc" 



West Springfield 



Joseph Major, "Joe" 

58 Pleasant Street; Agriculture. 

Major is the only representative of New Jersey who 
knows enough to be modest about it. We never hear Joe 
cracking up this mud heap, although he claims it as his native 
place. Major's "major" is evidently work. 



1 Allen Street; Chemistry; Class Track (1, 2); Class Cross 
Country (1, 2). 

Look! Gaze upon the sole existing descendant of the 
mighty Hermes. This speedy boy lives out his life upon the 
boards and cinders. Hoyt's oratorical organs are strongly 
inclined to assume that disagreeable and wholly undesirable 
habit of not knowing when to cease their eternal jabberings. 
He was put together a few feet at a time and then he grew. 
This gives him the appearance of a house built under like 
conditions. 



Rutherford, N. J. 





Amherst 



Frederick Grover Merkle, "Fred" 

North East Street; Agronomy. 

Every morning long before sunrise, Fred is to be seen 
trudging from his home in North East Street over the fields to 
college. He has one advantage over the rest of us, even if he 
does live so far off; namely, that he is excused from morning 
chapel. 



e>^c56^.^ 




Harold Ivory Morrison, "Soap" Melrose 

77 Pleasant Street; Entomology. 

This one made himself famous in our class meetings by de- 
claring everything to be unparliamentary. Probably he 
couldn't fool the Bloke so well if he knew of his strenuous 
mountain climbing expeditions in the pursuit of geological 
knowledge. Harold is a great music lover and wastes his 
time rattling off classical stuff. 





Harold John Morse 



Townsend 



75 Pleasant Street; Agronomy; Captain Class Baseball (1): 
Band (1, <H, 3). 

Morse is lucky enough to have a face that is a life pre- 
server. The knowing and at the same time innocent noises 
that article can make have more than once pulled him through 
courses when the rest of us just barely got by with the hardest 
kind of work. When "Morsie" isn't busy fooling the Profs, 
he usually may be found practicing in the Ski Hi House. 



Lester AVard Needham, "Les" 



Springfield 



KS House; KS; Landscape Gardening; Varsity Hockey 
(1,2); Class Hockey (1. 2); Class Track (1, 2); Sophomore- 
Senior Hop Committee; Senate (3); Class Vice-President 
(3); Fraternity Conference (3); Landscape Art Club. 

Behold, Lester Ward Needham, hero of the Siege of 
Forristall. The Sophs used poor "Les" for a football that 
day, but he, being the original "Come Back Kid" came back 
so strong that Thirteen finally threw up the sponge. He is 
one of the lucky ones who managed to slide by Sophomore 
mid-years with a clean slate in spite of "Billy ". In addition 
to "Need's " success with the books, he is one of that noble 
quartet which put Fourteen on the map by their skating 
ability. While we hesitate to condemn him as a fusser, 
evidence being slight, wc feel quite certain that several fae- 
similics of his face might be discovered in a neighboring city. 




.2^^^^ 





Theodore Arthur Nicolet, "Ted" 



Fall River 



C. S. C. House; C. S. C; Dairying; Class Hockey (2); 
Class Secretary (1); Orchestra (1, 2, 3); Mandolin Club (1, 
2, 3); Fraternity Conference (3); 1914 Index Board. 

Those soul-stirring melodies which Ted's beloved 'cello 
evolves are still the main attraction when Jack's orchestra 
performs at Red Man's Hall. You can blame Brother Tell 
for inflicting this musicbox on us, as he was the method of 
transportation, but it will be useless. "Billy'' is doing his 
best, but we feel sure that Fall River will prove too strong for 
him. 



Tell William Nicolet, "Nic' 



Fall Ri\er 



C. S. C. House; C. S. C; Landscape Gardening; Cercle 
Francais; Captain Class Track (1, 2); Varsity Track (2); Ar- 
tist, 1914 Index Board. 

De Soto, Indiana, wasn't big enough to hold him so they 
shipped him to Fall River where B. M. C. Durfee High en- 
dured him till '09. M. A. C. was selected as the next victim 
to fill his rapacious maw. This time he bit off quite as much 
as he could chew, which is go- 
ing some! Prexy hopes to be 
able to keep college open after 
Tell leaves, but we are fearful. 





Harry Nissen, "Niss" 



Portland, Oregon 

Agriculture; Varsity Footbat 



i); Class Hockey (1, 2); Class 



C. S. C. House; C. S. C 
(2, 3); Class Football (1, 
Sergeant-at-Arms (2). 

"Gros" was shipped from Norway when only three 
weeks old and landed at the port of Boston. He grew up 
there and prepared for M. A. C. at Mechanic Arts High. 
"Gros " takes great pride in showing visitors around college, 
but usually is most active in this respect on High School Day. 
Harry has played varsity football for two years, and can cer- 
tainly "tear up their line." In class affairs "Gros" is always 
a loyal supporter and is interested in growing "big" apples out 
in Oregon when he graduates. 



gy^gSk^ 




Leslie Howard Norton, "Red" Newport, R. I. 

Beta Kappa Phi House; BK$; Chemistry; Class Track 
(1, 2); Class Hockey (2). 

"Red" decided to take a taxi to the gay life via South 
Amherst, and so far has attained the enviable reputation of 
being able to stir tea without spilling it, even in the dark. 
"Red" is a firm believer in the Moonlight Schedule as ar- 
ranged by the Committee on regulations. His aspirations 
are track, and hockey, but neither season is long enough to 
permit full development of latent possibilities. 



J^ 


«^ 




■ r 




\ 
is 


V 


d 


i 




Raymond Edson Nute, "Nute" Fall River 

9 Fearing Street; AX A; Pomology. 

"Xute's" one of those chaps who has a habit of knocking 
over the parlor furniture every time he moves. Somewhere 
in that dome, the wires are crossed, for so far he hasn"t been 
able to make his brain and legs cooperate. He likes to keep 
his head cool, so never wears a hat. Good scheme, too. we 
tliink. 



John Thomas Oertel South Hadley Fa 

110 Pleasant Street; Agriculture. 

Here is a very quiet, shy boy who hides his light under a 
bushel most of the time. John is some English. His expla- 
nations of the wonders of the "Selected Reading" with Watty 
at the helm will long be remembered. He has also the proud 
distinction of being an "also ran" in Physics. 




<^/i^^ 





Ervine Franklin Parker, "Park" 



Poquonock, Conn. 

Hermon Club; Signal 



KS House; KS; Pomology; Mt 
Board (2, 3); Class Vice-President (1) 

"Park" was born with a sure 'nuff gold spoon in his mug, 
if we can judge from sundry contributions to the "Signal". 
He's one of those quiet guys, but Mt. Holyoke could tell 
some tales, if she dared speak. However, we won't give you 
away, so dream on, gentle youth, all things come to an end. 
We all join with the hope that the awakening will not be too 
harsh. 



Roland A. Payne 

North Amherst; Pomology. 



Wakefield 



Are we down-hearted.' Impossible when Payne is on 
deck. Bubbling over with wit and humor (extra dry), he 
chases our frowns to the tall timbers, and smooths our fur- 
rowed brows, in fact the title of Class Jester is undisputably 
his. But beneath the frivolous surface, lie those good, sen- 
sible qualities which account for his popularity with the class 
and the Western Alumni As- 
sociation. , 



John Doubleday Pellett, "Jawn" 





Worcester 



16 North College; eX; Landscape Gardening; Assistant 
Manager Hockey (3); Sophomore-Senior Hop Committee; 
Fraternity Conference. 

"Jawn" found Thirteen too fast for him, so he cast his 
lot with a good class, which undoubtedly was an excellent 
move, because since that day he has weathered all the storms 
which have beset our course without a care as to what Fate 
might have in store for him. Next to taking life easy, John's 
greatest delight is fussing, and his good looks have already 
earned for him a membership certificate to the Married 
Men's Club. 



e>^^55^>j9 




Chester Henry Peters, "Pete" Brown's Station, N. ' 

116 Pleasant Street; Class Basketball (1); Class Track (2); 
Class Hockey (2). 

The squirrels will probably get this youth before long. 
It's a shame, but the higher they are the harder they fall. 
"Pete" will lead you to such dizzy heights that you'll need an 
aeroplane to come back to earth. He's lost his, so he's hope- 
less. Once he was a runner, but that was down in New 
York, and afraid to "show the boys up", he turned to hockey 
and fussing on the q. t. 








Peverill Oscar Petersen, "Pete' 



Concord 



9 Fearing Street; AXA; Pomology; Band (1, 2, 3). 

When "Andy" was given leave of absence from Concord 
Reformatory "Pete" was sent along as a guard. But Andy 
was too much for him, and the connection was soon severed. 
.\t drill. "Pev" holds a cornet to his mouth, thus adding to 
the general noise and leading the "Bloke" to believe that it 
is the equivalent of drill. "Pop" sticks pretty 
liooks since he was "stuck" 
in physics by accident, and 
I Ills year he intends to show 
"Billy" something. 



to hi 



Bennett Allen Porter, "Port" Amherst 

Animal Nutrition Barn; BK<S>; Entomology. 

If you want to know anything, ask the "Chief". This 
])rodiict of the fertile soil of Amherst is the shining light of the 
strugglers through the reefs of the first two years. "Ben " 
will probably some day be found sitting at the bottom of the 
"pit" causing about two hundred other human beings to wear 
out their hands and pen-points, as he reels off the knowledge 
stored within him at a mile-a-minutc rate. 






Qj^S&^^ 





Richard Henry Powers, "Dick" Maiden 

Veterinary Lab.; Q. T. V.; Agriculture; Varsity Football 
(1, 2); Rope Pull (2). 

Hail to the father of 1914! Like the Delphian oracle of 
old, so he stands, always ready and willing to advise. His 
pet hobby is 1916, and bloated malefactors of wealth have 
come to fear his mighty wallops. His Terpischorean ability 
as displayed at the Social Union "stags", puts to shame the 
Informal devotees. 



Frederick William Read, "Fred" 



Bostc 



Kappa Gamma Phi House; KT*; Agricultural Education; 
Band; Dramatics (1, 2); Roister Doisters (3); Catholic 
Club; Fraternity Conference. 

This "'Bean-eater" is the joy and pride of the town tailor- 
ing establishments. No need to advertise in the Signal, 
Fred is an able substitute. This fact coupled with his knowl- 
edge of the art that made Demosthenes famous has favorably 
impressed the judges at our 
various oratorical contests. 
Small wonder that he slips by 
the Faculty when such learned 
gentlemen are fooled. 




m 



N^ m jraj 



M 



George Alexander Reid, "Bull' 

Mt. Pleasant; Horticulture. 

Act I. — Scene 1. (Stage setti 



Worcester 



Train pulls into 
Worcester station. Distraught young lady paces up and 
down platform. Train stops. Dashing youth descends. 
They meet. (Curtain). The Worcester "Telegram" didn't 
hear about it, but the "Index" did, so the jig s up, "Bull." 



e>g^56^s^ 




Alden Hesseltine Russell, "Russ" Watertown 

16 Pleasant Street; Pomology. 

"Russ" is one of those lucky ones who get high marks 
without grinding; no doubt, the Profs are fooled by that 
studious air acquired in prep, school, and lost; that is, in- 
wardly, during Freshman year. Nevertheless, in spite of the 
evil influences to which he was subjected that year, Alden 
is still a model youth, and has managed to keep on the narrow- 
path, although we fear that he is developing a fondness for the 
weed. 





(Jiibiiel Artliur Sahr 



Boston 



Joel Powers Sherman, "Joe" 



1.5 Phillips Street; Pomology. 

Here is the original salamander. Yes, gentlemen, this 
exhibit from the w'ilds of Scollay Square holds the Internation- 
al Pipe Smoker's Medal for quantity consumed, endurance, 
and general excellence. He owns more pipes than any other 
three members of the class. It is even rumored that he has 
them named and celebrates their birtlidays. Wheu Georgi- 
a|)pears without one, the as- 
sembled multitudes will prob- 
ably rise and uncover, some 
tlioughtrul individual will ring 
the chapel bell, au.l should 
the startling news gel to Prexy, 
a general holiday will be de- 
clared. 



Hv:i 



8 South College; Q. T. V.: ON K; I'umologv; Varsitv liase- 
ball (1, 2): Class Haseball (t, -i): Class' Hockey; Class 
Treasurer (2). 

Smokey Joe! Rattle him)' Impossible, my friend, 
nothing rattles him. His easy-going habits were acquired 
among the .sand dunes of old C'ape Cod where all he had to 
do was to cast his line out the window each morning for 
breakfast. To this exercise is attributed his development of 
that good old wing that Amherst will never cease to fear. 



f* 


»i 


1 


i 


4/ 





83 



&>^S&^>j> 





John Newton Shirley 



South Duxbury 
Class Track (2); 



30 North Prospect Street; Chemistry; 
Cross Country (2, 3). 

The great "I am." First, last, and always. Take our 
advice and avoid a discussion with this boy for you will have 
to give in or get out. John is a hard plugger, and he also 
manages to show his heels to the would be cross— country 



runners. 



Francis WiUard Small 



North Triiro 



120 Pleasant Street; Animal Husbandry. 

The older inhabitants of a certain little town down on 
the Cape still talk about the great day in 1910 when Francis 
Small left for college. Why, the North Truro Military 
Band even turned out to see him off! Once entered into the 
promised land, he sought Blokie's protection, but Blokie 
thinks it's quite impossible to make a soldier of him. Still 

he houses him, for you never 

can tell! 





Leone Ernest Smith, "Smithy" 



Leominster 




116 Pleasant Street; 2<I>E; Botany; Class Cross Country 
(2); Manager Class Track (2); Class President (1); 1914 
Index Board; Fraternity Conference (.S). 

The convenient form of the initials of Smithy's handle 
were of untold annoyance to the beloved sophomores when, 
in the freshman year, they ran off with his namesake. Al- 
though usually of a quiet temperament, Leone can suddenly 
transform himself into a full-fledged roughhouser of the 
worst type; at any rate he came from Leominster so he's 
excusable. His worst fault is trying to be a "would-be" 
lieutenant. Well, he holds down the ground behind the 
ranks anyway. 



.2^^^^ 




Leon Edgar Smith, "Smithy" 



Boston 



2 South College; C. S. C; ONE; Landscape Gardening; 
Landscape Art Club; Captain Class Football (1); Class 
Football (2); Class Track (1, 2); Class Baseball (1, 2); 
Varsity Football (2, 3); Class Basketball (2); Assistant 
Manager Baseball (2); Manager Baseball (3); Class 
Vice-President (1); Chairman Sophomore-Senior Hop Com- 
mittee (2); Banquet Committee (1); Class Treasurer (3). 

Due to a case of mistaken identity, "Smithy" was among 
the missing when the chapel roll was taken the morning of 
the opening of the banquet season. He's back on the job 
with both feet now, however, "scrapin' land, prom'in" up an' 
down, bootin' the ball, and tackin' down bases for practise 
next Spring." 



Arthur Eben Stevens, "Steve" 





Brockton 



Beta Kappa Phi House; BK*; Pomology; Class Cross- 
Country (2). 

"Steve's" arid smile reminds you of a Harvard man out 
of his depth. When the moulting period terminates, the 
scales will drop off, maybe. Queerly enough, books appeal 
to him, and that degree looms up like a Standard Oil dividend. 
His collection of cigarette pictures has led to a wide acqxiain- 
tance among the celebrities of 
the day. Where he got them 
and what became of the 
"nails" is a mystery. 



Sarah Josephine Strange, "Joe" Marshfield 

Draper Hall; Landscape Gardening. 

You have only to take a glance at the class picture to 
find out just how much we think of our bright and shining 
light. "Joe," as we call her when she isn't looking, is a loyal 
member of 1914 although we have detected evidence of a 
decided leaning in another direction. Someone said the other 
day, "Does he go to the Informals?" "Why, sure," was the 
reply. "Nothing Strange about that, is there?" 




e>g^55^^ 





Munroe Gifford Tarbell, "Tit' 



Brimfield 



10 North College; Landscape; Orchestra (1, 2); Rope Pull 
(2); Band (1, 2). 

Fatty Spilliker in long trousers! Honestly, little girl, 
didn't you recognize him? This cartoon was evidently made 
of him during one of his calm and lucid moments but could the 
gentle readers see him in the midst of one of his tantrums in 
his Beauty Parlor, the College Store, or when he is dressed 
for his weekly trips to Smith, they would not marvel that his 
father offers a silent prayer to Allah every time he sees him, 
out of thankfulness to the fact that the game laws are still in 
effect. 



Arthur Wright Taylor, "Fat" Feeding Hills 

3 Nutting Avenue; Animal Husbandry; Rope Pull (2). 

This large bunch of beef left Feeding Hills two years 
ago. Since then he has been feeding himself. It was a hard 
thing for '"Fat" to leave home, as is evidenced by his bi- 
weekly visits to his native haunts. "Fat" made a good man 
on the rope pull team and would shine in football if he would 
only be willing to leave his books long enough. Last year 
"Fat" made the "three-deck- 
er"famous with his vociferous 
rough-housing. He owes his 
good health and strength to 
the fact that he wears neither 
hat nor coat during the winter 
months. 



Leland Hart Taylor, "Leland" 






Peabody 



13 South College; *SK; Entomology; Burnham Eight (1); 
Class Secretary (2); Junior Prom Committee; 19\i Index 
Board. 

"Leland's" general atmosphere makes you believe he has 
been embittered by the faithlessness of some creature. But 
when the Bon Tons get together for a real orgy, Leland al- 
ways happens "round, doubtless to deliver his famous address 
on "Whiskey and Its Effects." Interest on student deposits 
piled up so fast that "Shylock" couldn't handle the job alone, 
so called in Leland. Between the two, the dividends are 
small enough to keep the public quiet. 



8C 



Qj^S^^^ 




Arthur Searle Thurston Everett 

9 Fearing Street; BK*; Horticulture. 

Arthur got the idea of "mixing" last summer, and since 
he returned he has mixed more than ever. He was one of the 
lucky ones, who sat on the right side of "Doc" Cance, and 
did not have to go through the tortures of his final. He also 
exhibited the same faculty in his dealings with the mighty 
Czar. Arthur doesn't say much, but he gets there just the 
same. 






Alfred Leigh Tower, "Al" Sheffield 

94 Pleasant Street; Agricultural Education. 

We have never been able to figure out how this man 
can be such a terrible fusser as he would have us believe. 
He must be trying emulate Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde because 
with us his name is synonymous with "grouch". It may 
lie interesting to have two faces but we who remember the 
fate of the aforesaid gentlemen prefer one. 



Ernest Franklin Upton, "Uppie" Salem 

Nutting Avenue; *SK; Landscape Gardening; Signal 
Board (2, 3). 

"Uppie's" ambition was shattered when he found he was 
not elected as laziest man in the class. His laziness consists 
mainly in never getting up in time for breakfast. "Uppie" 
has always been a good man to sit side of in Math, courses 
and came near leaving college when he found he could not 
major in that subject. We could enumerate other faults 
than this, but it would only bring out his good points, so we 
refrain. 




e>^c5S^>^ 





Nathaniel Kennard Walker, "Nat" 



Maiden 



16 North College; GX; Pomology. 

This, gentle reader, is N. K. or just plain "Nat." Upon 
closer acquaintance you come to find he isn't so grouchy as 
he seems, his dazed expression being due, no doubt, to the 
incubus — "R. P."' Once arrived, Nat wasted no time getting 
over the mountain and to-day is a doughty member of the 
faithful old guard. The rest of his routine consists of getting 
to classes on time. 



Raymond Philip Walker, "Ray" 

87 Pleasant Street; OX; Pomology; 



Cercle 



Taunton 

Francais; 



Glee Club (1, 2, 3); Mandolin Club (2, 3). 

This elongated specimen first drew smoke in Taunton 
and wise citizens, foreseeing a diminution of the supply, 
shipped him off to M. A. C. Without him the "baccy" depart- 
ment of the College Store would indeed be bankrupt. Among 
his other activities we must not forget the marvelous de- 
terity with which he handles a 
cue, and "16 ball back here" 
is to be heard almost any 
night from the precincts of 
the game room. 





Raymond Winslow Warner, "Stubby" Sunderland 

77 Pleasant Street; Q. T. V.; Animal Husbandry; Class 
Cross Country (1,3). 

This little man rolled ofi^ Mt. Sugarloaf one day and 
couldn't stop till he struck this campus and he has been here 
ever since. He is noted for his smile which usually covers 
his map, but get him "riled" and he immediately develops 
four rows of teeth and then eats 'em alive as the facts of our 
class scraps show. 



JS^^^ 




Louis Armstrong Webster, "Web" 
AX A; Pomology 



Blackstone 

Stockbridge Club; 



82 Pleasant Street; 
Cercle Francais. 

Being an ambitious cuss, "Web" quit high school early, 
and made tracks for M. A. C. He is our youngest and 
requires careful attention to overcome the lures of Hamp 
and Fuzzy's cigarettes. Nourished on a diet of Zoo and 
Physics, his condition is improving and there isnt a doubt 
of his getting a first mortgage on that bacon. 





Arthur George Weigel 



Lawrence 



35 North Prospect Street ; Chemistry. 

Although this "Deutscher" hails from the "City of 
Strikes" we can hardly call him a member of the "I ^^on't 
Work" society. He says little, but manages to keep up with 
the procession. Weigel's fondness tor Drill led him to take 
up his abode with the Bloke this year; no doubt he has a 
hankering for one of those tin swords. 



Chester Eaton Wheeler, "Chef 



Lowell 



87 Pleasant Street; S*E; Landscape Gardening; Cercle 
Francais; Roister Doisters; Class Track (1, 2): Signal 
Board (1, 2, 3); 1914 Index Board; Class Historian (1, 2, 3). 
"Chet" was cut out for a missionary and selected M. A. 
C. as a likely 6eld. Here, he has labored with Blokie's un- 
derstudies for two years, and is still at it, trying to show us 
how they did it in Lowell. His "Signal" efforts are worthy 
of commendation and we are sure that he'll be a help to his 
mother when he grows up. 




g>^^^^^ 





Burton Clark Whidden, "Liz' 



Waltham 



81 Pleasant Street; Pomology; Roister Doisters. 

Hear that distressed sigh? Sure, who heaved it? 
Oh, that's Lizzie thinking. "Liz" doesn't get cold feet often, 
but ask him about the time he woke up in the morning with 
six inches of snow to hold them down. Although of very 
quiet demeanor a great deal of the time, he can develop 
rapidly into a whirlwind rough-houser, and when in this 
mood, look out for he has been known to pull a bathtub up by 
the roots in his excitement. "Off with the old, and on with 
the new" is his motto. 



Charles Warren Wliippen, "Whip" Lynn 

Kappa Gamma Phi House; KT*; Chemistry. 

A change being always beneficial, "Whip" pulled stakes 
and camped anew at Aggie. The present outlook indicates 
that some day he may swing his pedal extremities from a 
hallowed fence along with the rest of the lucky ones. 





John Govan Wing, "Jack" 



Somerville 



116 Pleasant Street; S*E; GNE; Rope Pull (2); Class 
Baseball (1, 2). 

Jack comes from Somerville with all its other baseball 
men. This game-room ornament is some there with the twirl- 
ing stuff, and he works off his energy in the winter indoors 
at giving instructions in the gentle art of being a pool shark. 
This variety can be distinguished from the rest of his species 
by its lazy walk, which although apparently slow, gets him 
there just the same. Maybe he can't tickle the ivories some. 
Just give him half a chance. 



90 



e>^c56^^ 




Henry Joseph Wood, "Hen" 



Mendon 



82 Pleasant Street: Animal Husbandry; Glee Club; Stock- 
bridge Club; Class Football (2). 

"Hen's" homing characteristic is so well developed 
that "Hen" is a misnomer. All during his Freshman year 
he fully believed he was misunderstood, and the impression 
is just beginning to wear away. "Bucket" trains steadily 
during the season and works hard to boost the teams. So far 
as we know, he has not been inoculated with love bacillus, 
but vou cant alwavs sometimes tell. 









HERBERT CALVIN ROBINSON 

CLASS OF 1914 

3lu ilemortam 




a 



vh 



omore^ 





HERBERT HILDRETH ARCHIBALD 



Sophomore Class 



Officers 



Herbert Hildreth Archibald 
Donald Hopkins Cande 
Henry Harrison White . 
Harold Davidson Grant 
Perley Balch Jordan 
Irving B. Lincoln 
Daniel James Lewis 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Captain 

Sergeant-at-Arms 

Historian 



Colors: 

Bi'own and White 



94 



,s,^^t£. 




1915 History 




Wanted! 

NE hundred eighty men for the chorus of 'The Follies Of 1915'. 
Tryouts will be held in June and September. 

(Signed) 'Prexy' and Faculty, Managers. 
In response to the above advertisement, one hundred 
seventy eight 'stage struck' youths appeared before "Prexy 
and Faculty" to have their voices tried out. Of these, one 
hundred seventy four were chosen. Rehearsals began at 
once in the M. A. C. Opera House, under the direction of 1914, and for six long, 
weary months were continued. To break up the monotony, there were numerous 
disagreements with 1914 — -in the majority of which we won out. We showed 
our keen insight into the ways of life at the very outset of our career by obtaining 
a 'drag' with the director and by using it for all it was worth. 

When dress rehearsals began, we were a bit disappointed in our costumes. 
In place of the 'flossy', be-spangled affairs which we had expected, a 'night shirt' 
and a very modest black 'sky piece' with a resplendent green button was our 
only ward-robe. This costume we were forced to wear during the first part of 
Act I. — much to our personal disgust. 

By the first of January, we began to look forward to our 'first night'. The 
managers had made arrangements to 'try us out on the dog', as it were, before 
opening up on Broadway. The first week in February, we were to travel, play- 
ing six 'one night stands'. For the entire month of January, we were nearly 
worked to death and much 'mid-night oil' was burned. Those who had let their 
'parts' 'slide' now 'plugged' early and late. Everyone was seized with a fit of 
nervousness — -more of expectancy than fear however. 

All to soon the day of our initial performance arrived and we were obliged 
'to go on' with the ever-present thought that more time might have been well 
spent in further preparation. The orchestra banged away, and the curtain rose. 
'Out front', we saw the managers and critics in the nearest boxes, while the pop- 
ulace was scattered over the rest of the house. Each individual felt that 'it 
was up to him' to 'do or die' — -only a few died. By the end of the week, we 



ey^^55^s^ 




were a thoroughly tired and nerve-racked bunch of 'hams' and mighty glad 
of the few days of rest which followed. 

Time moved on a pace until May. By this time, the ideal spring weather 
had set in, and 1914 invited us to give an 'open air' performance — the proceeds 
to go towards a new 'cheni' Lab. We agreed willingly enough but it turned out 
much the same as did Mrs. Vanderbilt's affair with 'The Merry Princess' at 
Newport last summer. Instead of meeting us half way, 191-t made us walk the 
entire distance — down town; and instead of commodious dressing-rooms, we 
had to make use of a dark alley. Nevertheless, the performance was entirely 
satisfactory, and we bear 1914 no malice. 

In June, we were given a 'try-out' on a second-class circuit, before opening 
in New York. For another week, we were under the double scrutiny of the 
public and of our managers. Owing to various things, over which they had no 
control of course, several members 'lost their voice' and had to abandon their 
stage careers. 

Then, the show broke up for the summer and most of us spent our time pac- 
ing up and down Broadway, trying to sign a contract with some summer show. 
A few were successful, the others spending the summer at swell watering places 
or in the mountains — in the capacity of 'bell-hops'. 

By the first of September, we were back in the 'big city' for a week's re- 
hearsal. On September eleventh, the great day of our lives dawned — the dream 
of our lives came true — we opened at the 'Aggieodrome' on 'the great white 
way' for a three year's run. We had pas.sed through all the trials and tribula- 
tions of 'prep' and were now a firmly established musical comedy that had come 
to stay. 

Imagine our surprise on the morning we were to 'open', to find the town 
literally 'painted green' with bill-posters announcing the existence of a cheap 
moving picture show, which had been set up as our ri\'al. The impudence 
seemed incredible, but was nevertheless unexcusable and we set out at once 
to convince the concern with the one thousand nine hundred sixteen feet of blank 
film that their proper location was several blocks nearer the 'East Side' of the city. 
It took little or no argument to convince them. 

Such is our history up to date. Upon the threshold of a successful career, 
we face the future with joyful expectancy. May 'The Follies of 1915' never 
become a thing of the i>ast as have other 'Follies', but always j^lav the 'leading 
role' in the great drama entitled 'College Life At M. A. C 



e^^S&t^ 




Class of 1915 



Members 



ALDEN, CHARLES HAROLD 

East Pleasant Street. 



ALLEN, FRANCIS ELLWOOD 

10 Allen Street. 

ANDERSON, HERBERT HENRY 

19 Pleasant Street. 

ARCHIBALD, HERBERT HILDRETH 

Nutting Avenue; <I>SK; Captain Class Hockey (1); Class Baseball (1); 
(1); Class President (2). 

BAIRD, EARLE FAIRBANK 

15 Beston Street; <I>SK; Banquet Committee (1). 

BANISTER, SETH WARRENER 

14 Nutting Avenue; AX A; Class Football (1). 

BARTLETT, EMORY HATNES 

12 Cottage Street. 

BARTLETT, EDWARD RUSSELL 

60 Pleasant Street; Class Baseball (1). 

BARTLEY, HASTINGS NEWCOMB 

66 Pleasant Street; Q. T. V.; Class Hockey (1). 

BEMIS, WILLARD GILBERT 

12 Cottage Street. 

BENNETT, JOHN INGRAM 

66 Pleasant Street. 

BISHOP, CHESTER ALLEN 

C. S. C. House; C. S. C; Class Track (1). 

BOYER, EDWARD EVERETT HALE 

67 East Pleasant Street. 



Amherst 

Melrose 

Ware 

Waltham 

Varsity Tennis 

Waltham 

Westford 

Enfield 

Newbiiryport 

Sandwich 

North Brookfield 

Boston 

Peterboro, N. H 

Lynn 



ej^S&^^ 




BRAYLEY, MERTON LORING Rock 

52 Amity Street. 

BRONSON, HAROLD JULIUS Buckland 

Brooks Farm. 

BROOKS, GARDNER MILTON Newtou 

8 Allen Street; *SK; Class Baseball (1). 

BUELL, FRANK W. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

83 Pleasant Street; Q. T. V.; Banquet Committee (1). 

BUTTRICK, JOHN WILLARD Melrose 

6 Nutting Avenue. 

CALE, GLADSTONE HUME West Springfield 

BK* House; BK*; Glee Club. 
CALLARD, JOHN CASE Winthrop 

President's House; ^ZK; Manager Rope Pull (1); Captain Class Track (1). 

CANDE, DONALD HOPKINS Pittsfield 

87 Pleasant Street; 2<I>E; Class Vice President ('2); Banquet Committee (1). 

CHASE, ALEXANDER BAXTER, JR. West Barnstable 

Clark Hall. 
CHURCHILL, GEORGE CLARENCE Worcester 

58 Pleasant Street. 

CLARK, ELLIS FRED Granby, Conn, 

ex House; eX. 

CLARK, SAXON DICKINSON Springfield 

19 Phillips Street. 
CLEVELAND, WALDO Baldwinsville 

14 Nutting Avenue. 
CLOUGH, MAURICE JOSEPH Needham 

84 Pleasant Street; Q. T. V.; Glee Club; Class Cross Country (2); Manager Class 



Track (1, 2); Signal Board (2). 

DALRYMPLE, ANDREW CAMPBELL 

3 McClellan Street. 

DAMON, LEON BLANCHARD 

Nutting Avenue. 



Revere 
^Melrose 



99 



e>^c56^^^ 




DAY, GEORGE ALLEN Warren 

12 Cottage Street. 

DOLE, SUMNER ALVORD Shelbuine 

BK* House; BK*; Class Football (1); Kope Pull (1); Varsity Football (2). 
DONNELL, GEORGE EDWIN Burlington 

East Experiment Station; Signal Board (2). 

DORAN, WILLIAM LEONARD North Dartmouth 

Plant House. 

DRAPER, EARLE SUMNER Milford 

C. S. C. House; C. S. C; Burnham Eight (1); Class Hockey (1); Cercle Francais. 
FARRAR, STUART KITTRIDGE Springfield 

KS House; K2; Class Historian (1). 

FITZGERALD, DANIEL JAMES Worcester 

75 Pleasant Street. 

FLEBUT, ALPHA JOHN Amherst 

27 McClellan Street; KT*. 

FOX, EVERETT BAILEY Dracut 

FROST, ROBERT THEODORE New York City 

C. S. C. House; C. S. C; Class Basketball (1); Manager Class Track (2). 

FULLER, RICHARD Salem 

West Experiment Station; *2K; Rope Pull Team (2). 

GARE, EDWARD JOHN, JR. Northampton 

13 Phillips Street; GX. 

GOODWIN, MALCOLM NOYES Newburyport 

KS House; KS; Manager Class Baseball (1); Class Secretary (1). 

GRAHAM, LUCIUS HENRY Boston 

83 Pleasant Street. 

GRANT, HAROLD DAVIDSON Melrose 

3 McClellan Street. 

GREBIN, MARK ANTHONY North Hadley 

North Hadley; KT*. 

GRIGGS, RAYMOND BRADFORD Chicopee Falls 

84 Pleasant Street; *SK, SNE; Manager Class Basketball (1, 2); Mandolin Club (1, 2); 
Glee Club (1, 2); Banquet Committee (1). 



100 



e>^gi5^s^ 




HALL, GEORGE MORRIS 

31 East Pleasant Street; C. S. C. 

HALL, RODERICK CHESLEY 

BK* House; BK*. 

HARPER, JAMES EDWARD 

Kr* House; KT*. 

HARPER, RAYMOND WIRES 

94 Pleasant Street; Band. 

HARVEY, RUSSELL WILTON 

44 Pleasant Street. 

HASKELL, WILLIS HENRY, JR. 

116 Pleasant Street; S<I>E; Rifle Club; Mandolin Club. 

HATFIELD, WILLIAM HOLLIS 

87 Pleasant Street; Glee Club; Choir. 

HATHAWAY, ISAAC 

KS House; K2; Class Hockey (1). 

HILDRETH, PAUL HUGHES 

8 Allen Street; *2K; Glee Club; Roister Bolsters. Choir. 

HILL, CHARLES CHASE 

Pease Avenue. 

HOTIS, RALPH P. 

20 Amity Street. 

HYDE, GEORGE FREDERICK 

BK* House; BK*; Class Football (1); Rope Pull (2); Rifle 
(1). 

HYDE, HAROLD GILMORE 

36 North Prospect Street. 

JOHNSON, ARTHUR 

12 South College; Q. T. V.; Class Baseball; Class Hockey. 

JORDAN, PERLEY BALCH 

15 Beston Street; *2K; Rope Pull (1); Captain Rope Pull (i 
Class Baseball (1); Class Captain (2). 

KELLEHER, JEROME JOSEPH 

75 Pleasant Street. 



Brookline 

Worcester 

New Haven, Conn. 

Barre 

Lanesville 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Wellesley 

Kingston 

Newtonville 

Melrose Highlands 

Evans Mills, N. Y. 

Petersham 
Team (1); Glee Club 

Winchendon 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

Topsfield 

); Class Football (1); 

Montague City 



e^^S&^^ 




KENNEDY, THOMAS JAMES 

35 East Pleasant Street. 

KENNEDY, WORTHINGTON 

101 Pleasant Street; Stockbridge Club; 

KOPLOVITZ, SAMUEL 

29 Lincoln Avenue. 

LANE, MERTON C. 

Pleasant Street. 

LEDUC, ASHLEY CUDWORTH 

19 Pleasant Street; Cercle Francais. 

LEWIS, DANIEL JAMES 



South Hadley Falls 

Hardwick 

Chelsea 

South Duxbury 

Chesterfield 

Hanson 



K 2 House; KS; Assistant Manager Roister Bolsters; Class Historian (2); Class Presi- 
dent (1); Dramatics (1). 

LEWIS, JOHN KIRBY New Haven, Conn. 

Mt. Pleasant. 

LINCOLN, IRVING B. Glens Falls, N. Y. 

President's House; Glee Club; Burnham Eight; Flint Prize Speaking; Class Cross 
Country (1); Rope Pull (1, 2). Public Speaking Council 

LITTLE, HAROLD GREENLEAF Newburyport 

KS House; K2; Class Football (1); Class Basketball (1); Class Hockey (1); Class 
Baseball (1); Rope Pull (2); Assistant Manager Baseball (2). 



LOVEJOY, JOHN SUMNER 

53 Lincoln Avenue. 

MacNEIL, RALPH LANGDELL 

21 Amity Street. 

MACY, PHILLIP ARTHUR 

53 Lincoln Avenue. 

MARSH, FRANKLIN WINTER 

16 Nutting Avenue. 

MARSH, HERBERT VERNER 

BK* House; BK*. 

MASSE, SIDNEY MERTON 

3 McClellan Street. 



Newburyport 

Chelsea 

Oak Bluffs 

Dorchester 

Deerfield 

Dorchester 



e>^^^^ 




McKECHNIE, EAY FARRAR 

5 McClellan Street; KT*. 

McLAIN, RALPH EMERSON 

66 Pleasant Street, Q. T. V.; Assistant Manager Track (2). 

MELICAN, GEORGE D. 

66 Pleasant Street Q. T. V; GNE; Class Football (1). 

MELLOON, RALPH REID 

KS House; K2. 

MOBERG, ELDON SAMUEL 

18 Nutting Avenue; C. S. C. 

MONTAGUE, ENOS JONES 

13 Phillips Street; eX; Rope Pull (2). 

MOORE, ROGER HENRY 

66 Pleasant Street. 

NAVAS, MIGUEL 

120 Pleasant Street. 

O'BRIEN, DANIEL WILLIAM 

Apiary; KF*. 

PARMENTER, ERNEST BRIGIIAM 

BK* House; BK*. 

PATTEN, MERRILL CAMPBELL 

31 East Pleasant Street; Cercle Francais; Class Cross Country 

PATTERSON, ROBERT EARLEY 

74 Pleasant Street. 

PENDLETON, HARLOW L. 

16 Nutting Avenue. 

PERRY, GERALD EUGENE 

Prospect House; 9X. 

PIKE, JOSEPH STEVENS, JR. 

3 Nutting Avenue; S<I>E; Captain Class Basketball (1); Capta 
Class Captain (1). 

POTTER, GEORGE RAYMOND 

41 Pleasant Street. 



Natick 

Melrose 

Worcester 

Lowell 

Campello 

Westhampton 

Beverly 

Columbia, S. A 

Waylaiid 

Dover 

Boston 

Dorchester 

Dorchester 

Amherst 



Somcrville 
in Class Baseball (1); 



(2). 



Ludlow 



103 



e>gfl5^s^ 




PRICE, JAMES ALBERT 

15 Beston Street; *2K; BNE; Signal Bourd (1, 

RHOADES, PAUL WHITNEY 

2 Allen Street; Class Treasurer; Manager Class 

ROGERS, HAROLD MERRIMAN 

87 Pleasant Street; S*E; Class Cross Country 

SAUCHELLI, VINCENT 

11 High Street. 

SCOTT, LINCOLN B. 

3 McClellan Street; GX. 

SEARS, WILLIAM RICHARDSON 

84 Pleasant Street. 

SEVERANCE, VERNE L. 

Pleasant Street. 

SHERMAN, MILTON FRANCIS 

10 Allen Street. 

SLEIN, OWEN FRANCIS 

127 South Pleasant Street. 

SIMON, ISAAC B. 

38 Cottage Street; Burnham Eight (1). 

SPOFFORD, CHESTER PORTER 

5 McClellan Street. 

STRAUSS, ABRAHAM 

101 Pleasant Street; Class Baseball (1). 

TAFT, RICHARD CRAIG 

84 Pleasant Street; OX. 

TARR, LESTER WINSLOW 

4.4. Pleasant Street; BK*. 

TONRY, ALBERT JOSEPH 

Plant House; *SK; Class Football (1); Band. 

TOWER, RALPH ERNEST 

120 Pleasant Street; Class Cross Country (2); 
Club; Glee Club. 



New York City 
2); Banquet Committee (1). 

Maiden 

Track (2). 

Southington, Conn. 

(1); Orchestra (1, 2). 

Waterbury, Conn. 

Melrose 

Arlington 

South Hanson 

South Lincoln 

New Braintree 

Revere 

Georgetown 

Roxbury 

Oxford 

Rockport 

Winthrop 

Becket 
Band; Orchestra (1, 2); Mandolin 



Qj^S^^^ 




TOWER, WILLIAM REGINALD 

94 Pleasant Street; Glee Club. 

TOWNE, EDWIN CHESTER 

C. S. C. House; C. S. C; Banquet Committee (1). 

UPTON, RAYMOND MELVILLE 

87 Pleasant Street; Rifle Club. 

VENER, BENJAMIN 

38 Cottage Street. 

VINAL, STUART CUNNINGHAM 

9 Allen Street. 

WELLINGTON, BENJAMIN 

10 Allen Street. 

WHITE, HOMER BEETHOVEN 

10 Allen Street; Class Hockey (1); Band (1). 

WHITE, HENRY HARRISON 

BK* House; BK*; Mandolin Club. 

WHITMORE, PHILIP FERRY 

13 Phillips Street; eX; Rifle Team (1); Glee Club. 

WHORF, PAUL FRANCIS 

87 Pleasant Street; S^E. 

WILKINS, ALFRED EMERSON 

116 Pleasant Street; 2*E. 

WILLEY, HAROLD C. 

Gnskill's. 

WILLIAMS, DONALD 

C. S. C. House; C. S. C. 

WRIGHT, ELVIN STANLEY 

15 Fearing Street; eX. 

WOODMAN, EDAVARD, JR. 

83 Pleasant Street. 



Sheffield 

Waltham 

Peabody 

Brockton 

Brockton 

Waltham 

Melrose 

West Peabody 

Sunderland 

Hyde Park 

Wakefield 

Orange 

Catasaqua, Pa. 

Worcester 

Portland, Me. 



5lrf^l|tnf n 





CHARLES HENRY FERNALD, 2nd. 



Freshman Class 



Officers 



Charles Henry Fernald, 2nd . 


President 


Frank Albert Anderson ... 


Vice-President 


Robert Kellogg Wheeler 


Secretary 


Charles Davis Francis . . 


Treasurer 


Clayton Marden Hager 


Captain 


Donald Sanderson Dinsmore . 


Historian 


Class Colors: 




Silver Gray and Maroon 





e>^S5^^ 




1916 History 



Letters From a Self-Made Freshman to His Parents 



Dearest Mama: — 



Amherst, Sept. 15. 



I arrived safely in Amherst after a long, lonesome journey on the train. 
Oh, my, but I wish you were here to spend the first few weeks with me, for I 
am sure I will be very homesick. I have had several terrible experiences since 
I last saw you. Wednesday night several Sophomores made me stand in front 
of the Amherst House and talk and sing for a long time. I was so embarrassed 
I hardly could open my mouth, but I managed to satisfy my tormentors. 

I don't beheve I shall enjoy my life here at all. The first day, when I regis- 
tered, "Billy" Hasbrouck, that's our registrar, actually told me to keep quiet 
when I started to tell him about my family history. The worst of it is I shall 
probably have him for "trig" next semester, and I am sure he will "stick" me. 
Thursday night a little roughhouse occurred which nearly carried away your 
beloved son. Nearly all of our class were down in the lot back of the college 
barns, practising for the six man rope-pull, when suddenly a howling mob of 
Sophs descended upon us from all points of the compass; why they actually 
jumped on us and pounded us with their fists. Before it was over I really thought 
I should die. 

Friday afternoon the greatest event of the year came off — the annual Fresh- 
man-Sophomore rope-pull across the pond. I suppose you have read in the pa- 
pers how our team pulled for twenty seven minutes and were preparing to 
pull twenty seven more when it was called off by tlie referee. Of course I didn't 
enter this, for you know how frail and delicate my constitution is. Last night 
the night-shirt parade made a fitting climax for the week. We marched all 
over town yelling "Green" and when we could not yell any more we sang, "How 
Green I ani". To-day my throat feels like a piece of wood. Last night I thought 
I should go straight home to-day and get away from this horrid place but I guess 
I will stick it out. Perhaps there will be good times coming. Well, I must stop 
and do my lessons for to-morrow. 

Ever your dutiful son, WILLIE. 



Dear Father:— Amherst, Sept. 22. 

If I gave you the impression in my last letter that I was having a hard time 
up here, please forget it, for I have changed my mind completely. This is the 
best college in New England. The spirit shown in yesterday's football game 



e>^g5k^ 




clinched my opinion, so that I am now an "Aggie" man, through and through. 

Yesterday afternoon, just before the game, the six-man rope pull between 
picked teams of Freshmen and Sophomores, took place. Although our six men 
outweighed the Soph's, they had not had the experience, and the other team took 
all the rope they wanted and then some. However, we will get them when the 
football game comes off. Perhaps the air wont be full of smoke that day. 

Many thanks for that check you sent. It has surely come in handy in more 
ways than one. Most of it has already gone to pay up my debts and perhaps 
you had better send another next week. I never saw a place where money went 
so fast. As I have a "date" to-night I must stop writing. 

Hastily, WILLIAM. 



Dear Ma:— 



Amherst, Oct. 6. 



I hope you will forgive me for not writing last week but I really couldn't 
find the time. There is nothing very interesting to write about except a little 
affair that came off the first of last week. Three fresh Freshmen were baptized 
in the pond. Now perhaps that doesn't sound nice to you, but it certainly seemed 
nice to us one hundred seventy four other "Fresh" who were standing afar off, 
gazing on the scene and thanking our lucky stars that we were not one of the 
three unlucky ones. 

A week ago Tuesday morning, at seven a. m. we had our class picture taken 
on the chapel steps. Notwithstanding the fact that a few Sophs tried to start 
something, we had sixty five per cent of the class in the picture. 

Next Saturday comes the first Informal and the last home footliall game. 
I expect to attend both. To-night I go "fussing" to 'Hamp. Perhaps you 
don't know what this means, but if you ask Pa I think he can guess. 

Lovingly, WILL. 



Dear Pop: — ■ Amherst, Oct. 13. 

If you have any extra money down there, please ship it along for 1 am on 
ray last dollar. This letter is just a word to let you know that I had a corking 
time yesterday. Gosh, but I had a peach of a girl. She surely is one queen; 
but all this "kiteing" around doesn't pay and I have decided to buckle down and 
work; not only for my own good but for the welfare of the class of 1916 and 

^- ^- ^- Hastily, BILL. 



e>^^55k^ 




Freshman Class 



Members 

AIKEN, HAROLD 

29 McClellan Street. 

ALLEN, CHESTER KING 

Brooks Farm. 

ANDERSON, FRANK ALBERT 

13 Phillips Street. 

ANDREWS, FRANCIS MARSHALL 

53 Lincoln Avenue. 

BARNES, FRED LESLIE 

7 Xutting Avenue. 

BEAN, HAROLD JOHN 

Gaskill's. 

BEELER, LEON CHARLES 

75 Pleasant Street. 

BISHOP, HERBERT WALKER, C. S. C. 

C. S. C. House. 

BISBEE, PHILIP EMERSON 

East Pleasant Street. 

BLANPIED, NELSON UHLER 

Forrestall's. 

BRADLEY, WILLIAM GEORGE 

31 East Pleasant Street. 

BRAZIL, WILLIAM HENRY 

116 Pleasant Street. 

BRUSH, DAVID CAREY 

19 Phillips Street. 

BURNHAM, CHESTER ARTHUR 

Brooks Farm. 



Millis 

Quincy 

Soraerville 

Manchester 

Plymouth 

Haverhill 

Adams 

Doylestown, Pa. 

Waitsfield, Vt. 

Framingham 

Groton 

Leominster 

Vineyard Haven 

Westford 



Qj^S^^^ 




BURT, AVARNER HOWARD 

6 Nutting Avenue. 

CALDWELL, HAROLD NUTE 

3 Nutting Avenue. 

CARDARELLI, EMILIO JOSEPH 

31 North Prospect Street. 

CARRUTH, GLENN HOWARD 

34 North Prospect Street. 

CARVER, FRANK WHITNEY 

7 Nutting Avenue. 

CATE, REX MARCH 

3 Nutting Avenue. 

CHAMBERLIN, RAYMOND 

82 Pleasant Street. 

CHISHOLM, RAYMOND LINCOLN 

60 Pleasant Street. 

CHOATE, CARLYLE E. 

15 Phillips Street. 

CLAPP, RAYMOND LUCKEY 

Brooks Farm. 

CLOUGH, CHARLES HENRY 

35 East Pleasant Street. 

COBBAN, DONALD STICKNEY 

Mount Pleasant. 

COLEMAN, ALBERT SUMNER 

15 Ilallock Street. 

COLEY, WILLIAM STANTON 

36 North Prospect Street. 

COURCHENE, ALCIDE TELESPHOR 

20 Lessey Street. 

CURRAN, HENRY AMBROSE 

Taylor Farm. 



Loiigmeadow 

Lowell 

Boston 

Orange 

Plymouth 

Canton 

Rutherford, N. J. 

Melrose Highlands 

Boston 

Northfield 

Dedluun 

Grovehmd 

Mendon 

Wilton, Conn. 

North Adams 

Marlboro 



ey^^55^s^ 




CURTIN, CHARLES WARREN 

15 Hallock Street. 

GUSHING, RAYMOND ALONZO 

13 Phillips Street. 

DANFORTH, GEORGE NEWLAN 

82 Pleasant Street. 

DAVIS, FRANK LESLIE 

Gaskill's. 

DICKINSON, WILLIAM COULS 

North Amherst. 

DINE, HYMAN BERTRAM 

35 South Pleasant Street. 

DINSMORE, DONALD SANDERSON 

6 Nutting Avenue. 

DOGGETT, WILLIAM HENRY 

35 East Pleasant Street. 

DOHERTY, PAUL EDWARD 

East Pleasant Street. 

DUFFILL, EDWARD STANLEY 

Care of L. A. Root. 

DUMAS, WALTER BRANCA 

35 East Pleasant Street. 

DUNBAR, HENRY HART 

83 Pleasant Street. 

EDWARDS, MAURICE MILLETT 

25 Pleasant Street. 

ELDREDGE, RAA'MOND CHASE 

30 North Prospect Street. 

ELDRIDGE, CLARENCE CROCKER 

52 Lincoln Avenue. 

EPSTEIN, HARRY BROWDY 

38 Cottage Street. 



Aubunidale 

Somerville 

Foxcroft, Maine 

South Hopedale 

North Amherst 

Bo.ston 

Springfield 

Dedham 

Fall River 

Greenwood 

Boston 

Taunton 

Lawrence 

North Abington 

Natiek 

Amherst 



114 



ej^S&^^ 




FERNALD, CHARLES HENRY 

44 Amity Street. 

FIELDING, LESTER EDWARD 

2 Allen Street. 

FISHER, GEORGE BASIL 

Gaskill's. 

FOX, EDWARD LAWRENCE 

29 McClellan Street. 

FRANCIS, CHARLES DAVIS 

25 Pleasant Street. 

GAVENTA, HARRY REYMER 

35 East Pleasant Street. 

GILMORE, BENJAMIN ANTHONY 

40 Amity Street. 

GIOIOSA, ALFRED ANTHONY 

Brooks Farm. 

GLOVER, THEODORE WHITFORD 

Care of L. A. Root. 

GOODWIN, CLINTON FOSTER 

7 Nutting Avenue. 

GOOGINS, BURTON 

52 Lincoln Avenue. 

GORDON, LOUIS SANFORD, JR. 

Nutting Avenue. 

GOULD, CHARLES HOLT 

0() Pleasant Street. 

GRAVES, RALPH WHEELER 

40 Amity Street. 

GRAY, FRANK LYMAN 

North Amherst. 

GUNN, CARLTON MERRICK 

3 Nutting .'V venue. 



Amherst 

INIalden 

Milll)ury 

Wiiithrop 

Crawford, N. J 

Rt'paui)o, N. J 

Acushnet 

Dorehe.ster 

South Duxbiiry 

Haverhill 

Brooklyn, N. Y 

Cliiilon 

Worcester 

Shelhuriie Falls 

Shelhurne Falls 

Sunderland 



ej^S&i^ 




HAGER, CLAYTON HARDEN S$E 

3 Nutting Avenue. 

HALL, STANLEY WILLIAM 

Brooks Farm. 

HARLOW, NATHANIEL ZERNE 

7 Parsons Street. 

HARRIMAN, CHESTER KARL 

36 North Prospect Street. 

HARRIS, WILLIAM LOMBARD, JR. 

53 Lincoln Avenue. 

HARROCKS, THOMAS LINCOLN 

30 North Prospect Street. 

HART, REGINALD 

53 Lincoln Avenue. 

HASKELL, FRANK EUGENE 

Mount Pleasant. 

HATHAWAY, CHARLES EDWARD 

19 Phillips Street. 

HEMENWAY, JUSTIN STANLEY 

Brooks Farm. 

HENDRY, ARTHUR EKMAN 

16 Nutting Avenue. 

HOBART, RALPH EDMUND 

North Amherst. 

HOLDEN, MAE FAUSTINA 

47 Pleasant Street. 

HULSIZER, ALLAN LYNNE 

29 North Prospect Street. 

HUNT, REGINALD STUART 

53 Lincoln Avenue. 

HUNTINGTON, CHARLES ALBERT 

82'Pleasant'Street. 



Somerville 

Saxonville 

Amherst 

Exeter, N. H. 

Deerfield 

Westminster 

Montague City 

Northborough 

Somerset 

Williamsburg 

Mattapan 

North Amherst 

Royalston 

Fleraington, N. J. 

Bridgewater 

Poquonock, Conn. 



e>^^^^ 




JENNA, WILLIAM WALLACE 

116 Pleasant Street. 

JEROME, FREDERICK WILLIAM 

40 Amity Street. 

JONES, LINUS HALE 

Mount Pleasant. 

KAPLAN, BARNEY 

38 Cottage Street. 

KEEGAN, FRANK CHAMPION 

75 Pleasant Street. 

KEEGAN, THOMAS MICHAEL 

75 Pleasant Street. 

KELLEY, HAROLD RUSSELL 

Care of Mrs. Cusliman. 

KENNEDY, GEORGE WILLIAM 

7 Nutting Avenue. 

KILBON, RALPH GILLETTE 

Brooks Farm. 

KING, EDWARD LEE 

Brooks Farm. 

KITSIS, HENRY HYMEN 

41 Pleasant Street. 

KNAPTON, GREY LORD 

Pease Avenue. 

LAIRD, KENNETH BRADFORD 

36 North Prospect Street. 

LAMOUREUX, DOMINA JOSEPH 

75 Pleasant Street. 

LEHMAN, WALTER ERNEST 

East Pleasant Street. 

LIEBER, CONRAD HUGO 

31 North Prospect Street. 



Leominster 

Stockbridge 

Milford 

Maiden 

Turners Falls 

Worcester 

Haverhill 

Sayville, L. I. 

Springfield 

Dorchester 

Boston 

Lawrence 

Brockton 

Adams 

Worcester 

Jamaica Plain 



e^i^^^ 




LINDQUIST, ALBERT EVERT 

5 McClellan Street. 

LOCKE, WILBUR TROW 

25 Pleasant Street. 

LYFORD, WALDO PRESTON 

52 Lincoln Avenue. 

MacDONALD, NORMAN DUNCAN Q. T. V 

College Store. 

MAHONEY, WILLL\M JOHN 

29 McClellan Street. 

MANN, VICTOR LESLIE 

13 Phillips Street. 

MARSHALL, EARLE LeFORREST 

Hadley. 

MATTOON, HAROLD GLEASON 

87 Pleasant Street. 

MAYNARD, HARLAND SLADE 

Goldberg's. 

McCULLOCH, NORMAN ESTES 

Care of Professor Morton. 

MEADE, JOSEPH WILLIAM 

Nutting Avenue. 

MIMITZ, JOSEPH RAYMOND 

Hadley. 

MONTGOMERY-PETER, THOMAS M. 

15 Phillips Street. 

MOONEY, RAYMOND A. 

12 Hallock Street. 

MORTON, WALTER JOSEPH 

Care of Mrs. Gibbs. 

MOSES, CHARLES WICKER 

7 Nutting Avenue. 



Jamaica Plain 

Lawrence 

Natick 

Melro.se 

Winthrop 

Millers Falls 

Neponset 

Pittsfield 

Jefferson 

Pawtucket, R. I. 

West Springfield 

Hadley 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Plattsbiu-gh, N. Y. 

Jamaica Plain 

Ticonderoga, N. Y. 



ej^S&^^ 




MOSS, EARL CHESTER 

Care of Mrs. Gibbs. 

MOSTROM, HAROLD AUGUSTUS 

36 North Prospect Street. 

MURPHY, JOHN WILLIAM 

15 Beston Street. 

NASH, CLAYTON WELLS 

7 Nutting Avenue. 

NESTLE, WILLIAM JOHN 

Amherst. 

NICHOLSON, JAMES THOMAS 

116 Pleasant Street. 

NOYES, VERNE 

36 North Prospect Street. 

OBRION, EDWIN FULTON 

83 Pleasant Street. 

OERTEL, AUGUST LEONARD 

South Hadley Falls. 

PALMER, GEORGE BRADFORD 

Gaskill's. 

PHELPS, SANFORD WALLACE 

35 East Pleasant Street. 

PIERCE, JAMES DWIGHT 

Forristall's. 

PLAISTED, PHILIP 

77 Pleasant Street. 
PORTER, PHILIP CLAYFIELD 

79 Pleasant Street. 

POTASH, PHILIP 

35 South Pleasanl Street. 

POTTER, DAVID 

40 Amity Street. 



Worcester 

Somerset 

Beverly 

South Weymoutli 

Amherst 

Leominster 

Georgetown 

Somerville 

South Hadley Falls 

Brookline 

Turners Falls 

S]iringfield 

Arlington 

West Springfield 

Boston 

Concord 



Qy^i^MsS> 




PRATT, WALTER HOWARD 

Hallock Street. 

PROUTY, STANLEY MARSHALL 

12 Cottage Street. 

QUINCY, KNIGHT 

35 East Pleasant Street. 

RAY, GEORGE BURRILL K r$ 

Brooks Farm. 

REED, ANDREW JOHN, JR. 

Pease Avenue. 

REND ALL, RAYMOND EATON ex 

College Store. 

RICH, GILBERT WARREN 

8 Allen Street. 

RICHARDS, EVERETT STACKPOLE 

Northampton. 

RICHARDSON, LEWIS ELMER 

29 McClellan Street. 

RICKER, DEAN ALBERT 

Brooks Farm. 

ROGERS, ROLAND AVINSOR 

31 North Prospect Street. 

ROGERS, TYLER STEWART 

Forristall's. 

ROWE, LOUIS VICTOR 

18 Nutting Avenue. 

RUSSELL, ERNEST SAMUEL 

Hadley. 

RYAN, WILLIAM EDWARD JR. 

7 Nutting Avenue. 

SANDERSON, EVERETT SHOVELTON 

19 Phillips Street. 

SAUNDERS, WILLIAM PUTNAM 

1 Allen Street. 

SAUTER, WILLIAM HUGO 

75 Pleasant Street. 



Dalton 

North Brookfield 

Roslindale 

Hingham 

Dalton 

Melrose 

Hingham 

Northampton 

Millis 

Worcester 

Roxbury 

Saxonville 

Melrose 

South Hadley 

Stoughton 

Centreville, R. I. 

Lawrence 

Turners Falls 



gy^gS^s^ 




SCHEUFELE, FRANK JOSEPH 

52 Lincoln Avenue. 

SCHLOTTERBECK, LEWIS 

12 Halleck Street. 

SCHWARTZ, LOUIS 

38 Cottage Street. 

SHAPIRO, FRANK SIMON 

41 Pleasant Street. 

SHERINYAN, SURAN DONALD 

North Amherst. 

SIMMONS, PEREZ 

36 North Prospect Street. 

SMITH, HORACE ARTHUR 

Care of Mrs. Gibbs. 

SMITH, PHILIP LAWRENCE 

Care of Mrs. Gibbs. 

STANFORD, ERNEST ELWOOD 

71 South Pleasant Street. 

STEARNS, FREDERICK CAMPBELL 

40 Amity Street. 

STONE, ALBERT EDWIN 

Brooks Farm. 

STOUGHTON, RICHARD 

21 Fearing Street. 

SWAN, DURELLE 

Care of Professor Morton. 

SWIFT, RAYMOND WALTER 

North Amherst. 

TABER, RALPH FRED 

77 Pleasant Street. 

TARBELL, HERBERT HITCHCOCK 

12 Cottage Street. 

TAYLOR, HOWELL 

7 Nutting Avenue. 

TOPHAM, ALFRED 

31 East Pleasant Street. 



South Natick 

Roxbury Station, Conn. 

Melrose 

Lynn 

Worcester 

Pittsfield 

Newtown, Conn. 

Kingston 

Rowe 

Waltham 

Worcester 

Montague 

Dorchester 

North Amherst 

Phoenix Mills, N. Y. 

Warren 

Florida, N. Y. 

Lawrence 



e>^c55^^ 




TREAT, RUTHERFORD SPERRY 

7 Nutting Avenue. 

UPHAM, THOMAS CARLTON 

15 Halleck Street. 

VERBECK, HOWARD GRAVES 

Mount Pleasant. 

WALKDEN, HERBERT HALDEN 

Brooks Farm. 

WALKER, HENRY MARSHALL 

Brooks Farm. 

WARNER, LOUIS POMEROY 

3 Nutting Avenue. 

WEBSTER, FRANK CEDRIC 

35 East Pleasant Street. 

WEISBEEN, ISAAC 

Care of L. A. Root. 

WELLS, HARRY ANDREW 

5 McClellan Street. 

WENTWORTH, EVERETT LAWRENCE 

30 North Prospeet Street. 

WETHERBEE, RAYMOND SCOTT 

35 East Pleasant Street. 

WHEELER, CHESTER WARREN 

28 Northampton Road. 

WHEELER, ROBERT KELLOGG 

40 Amity Street. 

WHITNEY, HAROLD TICHNOR 

C. S. C. House. 

WHITNEY, LEON F. 

52 Lincoln Avenue. 

WIES, CALMY 

38 Cottage Street. 

WILCOX, TIMOTHY PALMER 

83 Pleasant Street. 

WILDON, CARRICK EARLE 

GO Pleasant Street. 



Seymour, Conn. 

Fitohburg 

Maiden 

Westford 

South Harwich 

Sunderland 

Harvard 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Dalton, Pa. 

East Dover, Vt. 

Walthani 

Southboro 

Great Barrington 

Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Brooklyn, N. Y^ 

Maiden 

Andover 

Melrose 



Qj^e^it^ 




Unclassified Students 



BATES, L. EMELINE 
BLACKBALL, ALLEN .1. 
CANN, FRED H. 
CANNON, THOMAS V. 
CHAMBERS, MAUDE B. 
COMEAU, MARK W. 
CROSBY, STANLEY 
DEARTH, NEWMAN 
DILLON, THOMAS S. 
DODD, DEXTER T. 
DODGE, WALTER E. 
FISKE, HOWARD B. 
FITZGERALD, WILLIAM P 
FOX, EVERETT B. 
HICKS, ALBERT J. 
HOOPER, EDWARD A. 
KENDALL, EDWARD D. 
LOCKWOOD, DIMON 
MacCORMAC, WILLIAM F. 
MOTT, PERCIVAL 
NIXON, WILLIAM J. 
PEASE, WILLARD M. N. 
PERRY, EDGAR A. 
PROUTY, LEROY F. 
RAE, GEORGE L. 
RICHARDS, EDWIN H. 
RIDLON, ERNEST T. 
TAYLOR, FRANK R. 
WILLARD, HAROLD N. 
WINKLER, ALFRED 



Billerica 

Brookline 

Beverly 

Newton 

Harpers Ferry, W. Va. 

Maynard 

Warren 

Ashland 

West Warren 

Chestnut Hill 

Geneva, Ohio 

Passaic, N. J. 

Worcester 

Dracut 

Northfield 

Chestnut Hill 

Holden 

Boston 

Maiden 

Cambridge 

Boston 

Altoona, Pa. 

Attleboro 

Rockland 

Necdham Heights 

Hartford, Conn. 

Chelsea 

Fry, Maine 

Baltimore, Md. 

Hackensack, N. J. 




ONE END 




THE OTHER 




iiiiwim^Mm 



e>^^55^^ 




Q. T. V. 

1869-1912 



AMHERST CHAPTER 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

1869 

BOSTON ALUMNI CHAPTER 

1869 

THE CORPORATION 

1890 



e>^fl5k^ 




Established 1869 



Q. T. V. 

Amherst Chapter 



Incorporated 1890 



James B. Paise 



Members 

In Facultate 

A. Mncent Osiuuii 
Samuel R. Parsons 



Frederick Tuckerman 
Gerald D. Jones 
J. E. Bement 
Henri D. Haskins 



In Urbe 



James E. Deuel 
Charles F. Deuel 
E. H. Forristall 
Albert McCloud 



Frank L. Thomas 



Joseph Warren Covill 
Edward Stephen Coen Daniel 
James Dudley French 
Harold Martin Gore 
Glover Elbridge Howe 
Simon Miller Jordan 
George Zabriskie, 2nd 
Warren Sears Baker 
Ralph Cedric Blake 
Newton Howard Dearing 
Stanley Barron Freeborn 



Undergraduates 

Dettmar Wentworth Jones 
Richard Henry Powers 
Joel Powers Sherman 
Raymond Winslow Warner 
Hastings Newcomb Bartley 
Frank Weed Buell 
Maurice Joseph Glougli 
Arthur Johnson 
Norman Duncan MacDonald 
Ralph Emerson McLain 
George Deady Melican 



Lewis Pomerov Warner 



e>^^A^^ 




Phi Sigma Kappa 

1873-1912 
Roll of Chapters 



ALPHA 


Massachusetts Agricultural College 




BETA 


Union University 




GAMMA 


Cornell University . 




DELTA 


University of West Virginia 




EPSILON 


Yale University 




ZETA 


College of City of New York 




ETA 


University of Maryland 




THETA 


Columbia LTniversity 




IOTA 


Stevens Institute of Technology . 




KAPPA 


Pennsylvania State College 




LAMBDA 


George Washington University 




MU 


University of Pennsylvania 




NU 


Lehigh University 




XI 


Saint Lawrence University . 




OMICRON 


Massachusetts Institute of Technology 




PI 


Franklin and Marshall College 




RHO 


Queen's University . 




SIGMA 


Saint John's College 






TAU 


Dartmouth College . 






UPSILON 


Brown University 






PHI 


Swarthmore College 






CHI 


Williams College 






PSI 


University of Virginia 






OMEGA 


University of California 






ALPHA DEUTERON 


University of Illinois 






BETA DEUTERON 


University of Minnesota 






GAMMA DEUTERON 


Iowa State College . 








The Clubs 


The New York Club 


1889 The Morgantown Club 


The Boston Club 


1897 The Philadelphia Club 


The Albany Club 


1900 The Pittsburgh Club 


The Connecticut Club 


1901 The Seattle Club 


The Southern Club 


1902 The 


Chicago Club 





1873 
1888 
1889 
1891 
1893 
1896 
1897 
1897 
1899 
1899 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1902 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1905 
1906 
1906 
1907 
1907 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1911 



1902 
1905 
1907 
1910 
1911 



The Baltimore Club 



Fi 



® 



&.^c^^^ 




Organized 1873 



Phi Sigma Kappa 

Alpha Chapter 

Members 

In Facultate 

William P. Brooks George E. Stone 

Frederick L. Yeaw 



Incorporated 1892 



S. Francis Howard 
Philip H. Smith 
Luther A. Root 
Arthur W. Hall, Jr. 
F. Civille Pray 



In Urbe 

Walter E. Dickinson 
Ralph J. Watts 
Raymond H. Jackson 
Frank E. Thurston 
Lawrence S. Dickinson 
Daniel Gordon Tower 



Frederick David Griggs 
Harold Frederic Jones 
AUister Francis McDougall 
Lester Newton Pease 
Carl August Shute 
Reyer Herman VanZwaluwenburg 
Charles Dexter Walker 
Lloyd Garrison Davies 
Robert Norton Demond 
Almon Morley Edgerton 
Edwaid Clinton Edwards 
John Gouverneur Hutchinson 



Undergraduates 

Leland Hart Taylor 
Ernest Franklin LTpton 
Herbert Hildreth Archibald 
Earle Fail bank Baird 
Gardner Milton Brooks 
John Case Callard 
Richard Fuller 
Raymond Bradford Griggs 
Paul Hughes Hildreth 
Perley Balcli Jordan 
Edwin Kenney Parker 
James Albert Price 



Albert Joseph Tonry 



Qj^S&^^ 




C. S. C. Fraternity 

OF THE 

Massachusetts Agricultural College 
1879-1912 

THE CORPORATION 

1892 



THE GRADUATE ASSOCIATION 

Organized September 4, 1897 



eyg^^k^ 




C. S. C. Fraternity 

Honorary Members 



Dean George F. Mills 
Professor George B. Churchill 

Dr. Charles S. 



Professor Herman Babson 
Professor John H. Genung 
Walker 



Resident Graduates 



Clarence E. Gordon 
Sidney B. Haskell 
Edwin F. Gaskill 
Joseph B. Lindsey 
George H. Chapman 



Stephen P, Puffer 



Lewell S. Walker 
Erwin S. Fulton 
Charles A. Peters 
James F. Martin 
Ralph R. Parker 



Undergraduates 



Ralph James Borden 
Charlesworth Herbert Brewer 
John Stuart Carver 
Willard Harrison Hasey 
Harold William Brewer 
Frank Jackson Clegg 
Tell William Nicolet 
Theodore Arthur Nicolet 
Harry Nissen 



Leon Edgar Smith 
Chester Allen Bishop 
Herbert Walker Bishoj) 
Earle Sumner Drajjcr 
Robert Theodore Frost 
George Morris Hall 
Elden Samuel IMoberg 
Edwin Chester Towne 
Donald Williams 



e>^e55k^ 




Kappa Sigma 

1869-1912 





Active Chapters 










ZETA 


University of Virginia ...... 1869 


BETA 


University of Alabama 








1869 


ETA PRIME 


Trinity, North Carolina 








1873 


MU 


Washington and Lee 








1873 


ALPHA ALPHA 


University of Maryland 








1874 


ALPHA BETA 


Mercer University . 








1875 


KAPPA 


Vanderbilt University 








1877 


LAMBDA 


University of Tennessee 








1880 


ALPHA CHI 


Lake Forest University 








1880 


PHI 


Southwestern Presbyterian University 








1882 


OMEGA 


University of the South 








1882 


UPSILON 


Hampden Sidney College . 








1883 


TAU 


University of Texas . 








1884 


CHI 


Purdue University . 








1885 


PSI 


University of Maine 








1886 


IOTA 


Southwestern University 








1886 


GAMMA 


Louisiana State University 








1887 


BETA THETA 


University of Indiana 








1887 


THETA 


Cumberland University 








1887 


PI 


Swarthmore College 








1888 


ETA 


Randolph-Macon College . 








1888 


SIGMA 


Tulane University . 








1889 


NU 


College of William and Mary 








1890 


XI 


University of Arkansas 








1890 


DELTA 


Davidson College 








1890 


ALPHA GAMMA 


University of Illinois 








1891 


ALPHA DELTA 


Pennsylvania State College 








1892 


ALPHA UPSILON 


Universit}' of Pennsylvania 








1892 


ALPHA ZETA 


University of Michigan 








1892 


ALPHA ETA 


George Washington University 








1892 


ALPHA KAPPA 


Cornell University . 








1892 


ALPHA LAMBDA 


University of Vermont 








1893 


ALPHA MU 


University of North Carolina 








1893 


ALPHA PI 


Wabash College 








. 1895 


ALPHA RHO 


Bowdoin College 








1895 


ALPHA SIGMA 


Ohio State University 








1895 


ALPHA TAU 


Georgia School of Technology 








1895 




^H^B E 







^^^^ 




ALPHA UPSILON 
ALPHA PHI 
ALPHA PSI 
ALPHA OMEGA 
BETA ALPHA 
BETA BETA 
BETA GAMMA 
BETA DELTA 
BETA UPSILON 
BETA ZETA 
BETA ETA 
BETA IOTA 
BETA KAPPA 
BETA LAMBDA 
BETA MU 
BETA NU 
BETA XI 
BETA OMICRON 
BETA PI 
BETA RHO 
BETA SIGMA 
BETA TAU 
BETA UPSILON 
BETA PHI 
BETA CHI 
BETA PSI 
BETA OMEGA 
GAMMA ALPHA 
GAMMA BETA 
GAMMA DELTA 
GAMMA GAMMA 
GAMMA EPSILON 
GAMMA ZETA 
GAMMA ETA 
GAMMA THETA 
GAMMA IOTA 
GAMMA KAPPA 
GAMMA LAMBDA 
GAMMA MU 
GAMMA NU 
GAMMA XI 
GAMMA OMICRON 



Millsap's College 

Bucknell University 

University of Nebraska 

William Jewell College 

Brown University 

Richmond College 

University of Missouri 

Washington and Jefferson College 

University of Wisconsin 

Stanford University . 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

Lehigh University 

New Hampshire State College 

University of Georgia 

University of Minnesota 

University of Kentucky 

University of California 

Denver University , 

Dickinson College 

University of Iowa . 

Washington University 

Baker University 

North Carolina Agri'l and Mech. College 

Case School of Applied Science 

Missouri School of Mines 

University of Washington 

Colorado College 

University of Oregon 

University of Chicago 

Massachusetts Agricultural Collei 

Colorado School of Mines 

Dartmouth College . 

New York University 

Harvard University . 

University of Idaho . 

Syracuse University 

University of Oklahoma 

Iowa State College . 

Washington State College 

Washburn College . 

Dennison University 

University of Kansas 



1895 
1896 
1897 
1897 
1898 
1898 
1898 
1898 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1900 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1906 
1906 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1911 
1912 



133 



e>^fl5^s^ 




Kappa Sigma 



Alumni Chapters 

Boston, Mass. Louisville, Ky. 

New York, N. Y. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Cleveland, Ohio. 

Ithaca, N. Y. Columbus, Ohio. 

Schenectady, N. Y. Chicago, 111. 

Scranton, Pa. Danville, 111. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Indianapolis, Ind. 

Danville, Va. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Lynchburg, Va. Kansas City, Mo. 

Newport News, Va. Little Rock, Ark. 

Norfolk, Va. Pine Bluff, Ark. 

Richmond, Va. St. Louis, Mo. 

Washington, D. C. Jackson, Miss. 

Concord, N. C. Oklahoma, Okla. 

Durham, N. C. New Orleans, La. 

Kingston, N. C. Ruston, La. 

W'ilmington, N. C. Vicksburg, Miss. 

Atlanta, Ga. Texarkana, Tex. -Ark. 

Savannah, Ga. Waco, Texas. 

Birmingham, Ala. Yazoo City, Miss. 

Mobile, Ala. Denver, Col. 

Chattanooga, Tenn. Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Covington, Tenn. Los Angeles, Cal. 

Jackson, Tenn. San Francisco, Cal. 

Memphis, Tenn. Portland, Ore. 

Nashville, Tenn. Seattle, Wash. 
Fort Smith, Ark. 



e>^^55k^ 




Kappa Sigma 

Members 
In Facultate 



Charles AVellington T A 
Frank A. Waugh T A 
W. P. B. Lockwood A A 
William S. Regan T A 



Edward A. White T A 
James A. Foord BK 
George F. E. Story A A 
Frederick A. McLaughlin T A 



Irving W. Davis T A 



Edward B. Holland T A 
George E. Cutler T A 
James K. Mills FA 
Edward A. Larrabee V A 



Oscar Gustaf Anderson 
Webster Jennings Birdsall 
Benjamin Ward Ellis 
Samuel Percy Huntington 
Harold Wilson Hyland 
Willard Stone Little 
Quincy Shaw Lowry 
Joseph Wilbur Murray 
Herman Theodore Roehrs 
Stuart Dodds Samson 
Harold Cotting Black 



In Urbe 

Herbert J. Baker T A 
David W. Anderson BK 
Henry B. Morse T A 
Rudolphus H. Allen T A 

Undergraduates 

Ralph Stanley Bragg 
Harry Dunlap Brown 
Stuart Brooks Foster 
Edward Leonard Hazen 
Lester Ward Needham 
Ervine Franklin Parker 
Stuart Kittredge Farrar 
Malcolm Noyes Goodwin 
Isnac Hathaway 
Daniel James Lewis 
Harold Greenleaf Little 
Ralpli Reid Melloon 



Kappa Gamma Phi 



^ 




.^^z^ 




Kappa Gamma Phi 

Founded 1909 
In Facultate 

A. Anderson MacKimmIe 



Undergraduates 



Harry Albert Baird 
William Gerald Gi'iiBn 
Bernard Jenkins Kelley 
Joseph Augustine Macone 
James Leo O'Brien 
Dennis Anthony Sheehan 
Chester Arthur Bokelund 
Edward Wheeler Christie 
Harold Frederick Hadfield 
Richard Fowler Leete 



Frederick William Read 
Charles Warren AYhippen 
Daniel James Fitzgerald 
Alpha John Flebut 
Mark Anthony Grebin 
James Edward Harper 
Ray Farrar INIcKechnie 
Daniel William O'Brien 
George Burrill Ray 
Chester Porter Spofford 



gg uu u ^ ^ t^?^f^^__^ 




u u. ^% 




Beta Kappa Phi 



e>^^^^^ 




Beta Kappa Phi 

In Facultate 

Harry Alfred Noyes 



In Urbe 



Carlos liOring Beals 



Warren Francis Fisherdick 



Undergraduates 



James Wilson Dayton 
Albert Franklin Edminster 
Wallace Clifford Forbush 
Clark Leonard Thayer 
Charles Marsh Streeter 
Arthur Winslow Brooks 
Alfred Lynn Coe 
William Ashman Davis 
Leslie Howard Norton 
Bennet Allen Porter 
Arthur Eben Stevens 



Arthur Searle Thurston 
Frank Eugene Marsh 
Gladstone Hume Cale 
Sumner Alvord Dole 
William Leonard Doran 
Roderick Cheslcy Hall 
George Frederic Hyde 
Herbert 'N'erncr Marsh 
Ernest Brigham Parmenter 
Lester Winslow Tarr 
Henry Harrison White 



^>^^^^^ 




Theta Chi 

1856-1912 
Roll of Chapters 



ALPHA 




Norwich University .... 




1856 


BETA 




Massachusetts Institute Technology 




1902 


GAMMA 




University of Maine 




1907 


DELTA 




Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute . 




1908 


EPSILON 




Worcester Polytechnic Institute . 




1909 


ZETA 




New Hampshire State College 




1909 


ETA 

THETA 

IOTA 




Rhode Island State College 
Massachusetts Agricultural College 
Colgate University .... 




1910 
1911 
1911 


KAPPA 




University of Pennsylvania 




1912 


LAMBDA 




Cornell University .... 

The Alumni Chapters 




1912 


Boston Chapt 


er 


1909 






New 


York Chapter 

Pittsburg Chapter 

Vermont Chapter 


1910 
1911 
1911 





1856 




eyg^55^^ 




Theta Chi 

Theta Chapter 
Undergraduates 



Winford Frederic Adams 
Harris William Angier 
Lawrence Walter Burby 
Harold Barrows Bursley 
Norman Russell Clark 
Joseph Boyd Cobb 
Robert Sedgwick Fay 
Frederick Alfred Kenney 
John Warren Thomas Lesure 
Arthur Robert Lundgren 
William Stuart Moir 
George Atwell Post 
John Watling Bradley 

Gerald Eugene 



Evans King Dexter 
Harold Lockwood Eldredge 
John Doubleday Pellett 
Nathaniel Kcnnard Walker 
Raymond Philip Walker 
Edward John Gare, Jr, 
Richard Craig Taft 
Lincoln Bain Scott 
Philip Ferry Whitmore 
Elvin Stanley Wright 
Ellis Fred Clark 
Enos James INIontague 
Raymond Eaton Rendall 
Perry 



.2.2^^^ 




Sigma Phi Epsilon 

1901-1912 



VIRGINIA ALPHA 
WEST VIRGINIA BETA 
ILLINOIS ALPHA 
COLORADO ALPHA 
PENNSYLVANIA DELTA 
VIRGINIA DELTA 
NORTH CAROLINA BETA 
OHIO ALPHA 
INDIANA ALPHA 
NEW YORK ALPHA 
VIRGINIA EPSILON 
VIRGINIA ZETA 
GEORGIA ALPHA 
DELAWARE ALPHA 
VIRGINIA ETA 
ARKANSAS ALPHA 
PENNSYLVANIA EPSILON 
OHIO GAMMA 
VERMONT ALPHA 
ALABAMA ALPHA 
NORTH CAROLINA GAMMA 
NEW HAMPSHIRE ALPHA 
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

KANSAS ALPHA 
CALIFORNIA ALPHA 
NEBRASKA ALPHA 
WASHINGTON ALPHA 
MASSACHUSETTS ALPHA 
OHIO DELTA 
NEW YORK BETA 
RHODE ISLAND ALPHA 



Active Chapters 



Richmond College 


1901 


West Virginia University 


1903 


College of Physicians and Surgeons, Universitj 


of Illinois 1903 


University of Colorado . 


1904 


University of Pennsylvania 


1904 


College of William and Mary . 


1904 


North Carolina A. & M. A. College . 


1905 


Ohio Northern University 


1905 


Purdue University 


1905 


Syracuse University 


1905 


Washington and Lee University 


1906 


Randolph-Macon College 


1906 


Georgia School of Technology . 


1907 


Delaware State College . 


1907 


University of Virginia 


1907 


LTniversity of Arkansas . 


1907 


Lehigh University 


1907 


Ohio State University . 


1908 


Norwich University 


1908 


Alabama Polytechnic Institute . 


1908 


Trinity College .... 


1909 


Dartmouth College 


1909 


ALPHA 




George Washington University . 


1909 


Baker University .... 


1910 


University of California . 


1910 


University of Nebraska . 


1911 


W^ashington State College 


1912 


Massachusetts Agricultural College 


1912 


University of Wooster 


1912 


Cornell University 


1912 


Brown University 


1912 



e>^^^^ 




Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Massachusetts Alpha Chapter 



Undergraduates 



Harry Willis Allen 
George Ware Barber 
Laurence Algur Bevan 
Everett Hanson Cooper 
Gorden Waterman Ells 
Herbert Colby Hutchings 
Burton Adams Harris 
Herbert Tilden Hatch 
Ralph Wesley Howe 
George Alfred Mallet t 
Carl Murdough Allen 
Ernest Samuel Clark, Jr. 



Ralph Edward Davis 
Rodney Wells Harris 
Leone Ernest Smith 
Chester Eaton Wheeler 
John Govan Wing 
Donald Hopkins Cande 
AVillis Henry Haskell, Jr. 
Josejjh Stevens Pike, Jr. 
Harold Merriman Rogers 
Paul Francis Whorf 
Alfred Emerson Wilkins 
Clayton Mardeu Hagar 



Q^^cS^St^ 




Lambda Chi Alpha 

1911-12 
Roll of Chapters 

ALPHA ZETA Boston University 

BETA ZETA Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

DELTA ZETA University of Pennsylvania 

GAMMA ZETA Massachusetts Agricultural College 



e>^^55k^ 




Lambda Chi Alpha 

Gamma Zeta Chapter 

John Lincoln St-Iden 
Lewis Floyd Driiry 
Ralph Hicks Gaskill 
Louis Armstrong Wclislcr 
Lewis Philip Howard 
Murray Danforth Lincoln 
Raymond Edwin Nule 
Povcril Oscar Petersen 
Rollin Eugene Johnson 
Seth Warren Banister 



e>^^56k^ 




Phi Kappa Phi 

Roll of Chapters 

University of Maine 

Pennsylvania State College 

University of Tennessee 

Massachusetts Agricultural College 
Delaware College 

Iowa State College 

University of Florida 

University of Nevada 



ey^^55^^ 




Phi Kappa Phi 

Officers 



J. A. Foord . 






President 


A. A. MacKimmie 






Secretary 


R. J. Watts 


Resident Members 




Treasurer 


K. L. IJuUorfield 


E. B. Holland 


R 


J. Sprague 


W. P. Brooks 


W. D. Hurd 


G. 


E. Stone 


J. A. Foord 


J. B. Lindsey 


F. 


C. Sears 


C. H. Fernald 


G. F. Mills 


F. 


A. Waugh 


H. T. Fernald 


A. A. MacKimmie 


R 


J. Watts 


H. J. Franklin 


A. V. Osmun 


C. 


Wellington 


C. E. Gordon 


J. E. Ostrander 


J. 


S. Chamherhiin 


S. F. Howard 


S. R. Parsons 


E. 


A. While 


P. B. Hasbrouck 


C. A. Peters 


B. 


G. Soulhwick 


S. B. Haskell 


J. B. Paige 


R 


R. Parker 



Faculty Elections for 1912 

A. E. Cance E. L. Ashley 

Fall Elections for 1913 

H. W. Allen A. J. Kelley 

R. H. Van Zwaluwenhurg 



Tau Delta Rho 



143 



gy^cSSk^ 




Tau Delta Rho 

An Odd Class Fraternity 

Edablished 1911 
Members 



1!)];; 



Joseph Wilbur Murray 
Joseph Warren Covill 
Arlin Tower Cole 
Bernard Jenkins Kelley 
Willard Harrison Hasey 



Worthington G. Kennedy 
Joseph Stevens Pike, Jr. 
Harold Greenleaf Little 
Stuart Kittredffe Farrar 



191.' 



John Doubleday Pellett 
Clyde Edward Cristman 
Harris William Angier 
Willard Stone Little 
Gordon Waterman Ells 



Daniel James Fitzgerald 
Paul Francis Whort' 
Edward Everett Boyer 
George Morris Hall 



Donald AVilliams 



e>g^%^s-9 




Theta Nu Epsilon 



BETA 

GAMMA 

ZETA 

ETA 

THETA 

IOTA 

LAMBDA 

MU 

NU 

SIGMA 

TAU 

UPSILON 

PHI 

PSI 

ALPHA-ZETA 

ALPHA-IOTA 

ALPHA-OMEGA 

BETA-BETA 

BETA-UPSILON 

BETA-OMICRON 

GAMMA-BETA 

DELTA-DELTA 

DELTA-KAPPA 

DELTA-RHO 

DELTA-SIGMA 

EPSILON-EPSILON 

ZETA-PHI 

KAPPA-RHO 

LAMBDA-SIGMA 

OMICROX-OMEGA 

SI(aL\-TAU 

omk(;a-kappa 
omk'rox-omicron 
alpha-alpha 
zeta-zeta 

ETA-ETA 

ALPHA-THETA 

THETA-THETA 

KAPPA-KAPPA 

MU-MU 

NU-NU 

XI-XI 

RHO-RHO 

SIGMA-SIGMA 

TAU-TAU 

rPSILON-UPSILON 

EPSILON-DEUTERON 

Graduate Chapter University 



Ealahlished at Wesleyan Universitij in 1S70 
Chapter Roll 

Syracuse University 

Union College 

L'niversity of California 

Colgate University 

Kenyon College 

Western Reserve Medical College 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. 

Stevens Institute of Technology 

Lafayette College 

New York University 

Wooster University 

University of Michigan 

Rutgers College 

Ohio State College 

University of Vermont 

Harvard University 

Columbia University 

Ohio Wesleyan University 

Brown University 

Colby University 

Jefferson Med. College 

University of Maine 

Bowdoin College 

North Western University 

Kansas L'niversity 

Case School of Ap. Sci. 

Mass. Institute of Technology 

Baltimore Col. of Den. Surg. 

Yale University 

St. Lawrence University 

University of Maryland 

Baltimore Med. College 

Ohio Northern University 

Purdue University 

University ot Wyoming 

Mass. Agricultural College 

University of Missouri 

University of W. Virginia 

LTniversity of Texas 

Leland Stanford, Jr., University 

Marquette University 

University of Louisville 

Norwich University 

Medical Col. of Virginia 

Baker LTniversity 

New York University, Washington Square Branch 

of Rochester Alumni Association of ALPHA-IOTA 

Boston, Mass. 



^^^2£^^2^^^b 




Eta Eta of 
Theta Nu Epsilon 

Enfahlished at Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1910 
Members 



In Facultate 



Philip B. Hasbrouck 
John A. McLean 



Frederick L. Yeaw 
Elvin L. Quaife 



Undergraduates 

Ralph James Borden Stanley Barron Freeborn 

Charlesworth Herbert Brewer Robert Theodore Frost 

Everett Hanson Cooper Jolui Gonverneur Hutchinson 

Frederick David Griggs Dettmar Wentworth Jones 

Charles Dexter Walker Joel Powers Sherman 

AVarren Sears Baker Leon Edgar Smith 

Harold William Brewer John Govan Wing 

Lloyd Garrison Davies Raymond Bradford Griggs 

Edward Clinton Edwards George Deady Melican 
James Albert Price 




Fraternity Conference 

Q. T. V 



S. M. Jordan 






W. S. Baker 


CD. Walker 




$ S K 


J. G. Hutchinson 


C. H. Brewer 




C. S. C. 


T. A. Nicolet 


W. S. Little, Pres 


'dent 


'k S 


L. W. Needham 


H. A. Baird 




K r * 


F. W. Read 


A. F. Edminster 




B K $ 


A. W. Brooks 


H. B. Biirsley 




e X 


J. D. Pellet 


G. A. Mallet, ^ec. 


and Treas. 


2 * E 


L. E. Smith 


L. F. Drury 




A X A 


M. D. Lincoln 




Athletic Council 

Faculty and Graduate Members 

PROF. EDWARD M. LEWIS . 



DR. JAMES B. PAIGE 
GEORGE H. CHAPMAN 
PROF. FREDERICK L. YEAW 
PROF. CURRY S. HICKS 



. President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Auditor 

General Manager 



Executive Committee 

GEORGE H. CHAPMAN RALPH R. PARKER 

PROF. CURRY S. HICKS 



J. Warren Covill 
L. Edsar Smith 



Undergraduate Members 



Chester S. Bokelund 



Everett H. Cooper 
Willard S. Little 




Football 




HUS far, only two of this season's scheduled games have been 
played, and in both we have distinctly had an advan- 
tage over our opponents, yet we have lost and tied respectively 
with Rhode Island state and Union. We have a light team 
with lots of speed and energy. From a casual observer's 
standpoint the teams of the last few years have lacked the one 
essential of a successful team — the right mental attitude. 
A physically fit and properly coached team will invariably fall down if it goes into 
a contest with merely the hope of "holding" the opponents. This year's team 
has the mental attitude that recognizes no superior in the field, with the result 
that it possesses the fight and 
"come-back" that has been 
lacking for the past few years. 
The coaching system has 
been changed so that instead 
of having each season mark the 
advent of a distinct method, 
a coach, under contract for 
three years, has under way a 
constructive policy of coach- 
ing which is sure to develop 
and hold the material as it 
enters. 





CAPTAIN SAMSON 



MANAGER COVILL 




Varsity Football Team 



Left End . 
Left Tackle 
Left Guard 
Centre 
Right Guard 
Right Tackle 
Right End 
Quarter-Back 
Right Half-Back 
Left Half-Back 
Full-Back 





Edgerton, 


'H 


Captain Samson, 


'1:5 


Eisenhaure, 


'i;3 




Dole, 


"15 




Griffin, 


"14 




leaker. 


"14 




Melican, 


'15 




Gore, 


'13 




Smith, 


'14 




Brewer, 


'14 


isse 


1, '14, Graves, 


'IG 



e>^g5^^ 




Football Association, 1912 



STUART D. SAMSON 
J. WARREN COVILL . 
STANLEY B. FREEBORN 
DR. ARTHUR E. BRIDES 



S. D. Samson 
A. M. Edgerton 
W. G. Griffin 
S..A. Dole 
J. L. Eisenhaure 
W. S. Baker 
G. D. Melican 
H. M. Gore 
L. E. Smith 
H. W. Brewer 
H. Nissen 
G. E. Howe 
F. J. Clegg 
R. AV. Graves 
H. A. Curran 
H. J. Wood 
H. M. Walker 
J. L. O'Brien 



Individual Statistics 



Age, 
21 
23 
21 
19 
22 
21 
22 
21 
24 



21 
23 
18 
18 
1!) 
IS 
21 



Weight. 

217 
■ 15914 
160 
181 
174 
165 
147 
137 
146 
175 
156 
160 
156 
155 
161 
170 
174 
155 



Height. 

6-5 

5-10 

5-6 

6-2 

5-9H 

5-11 

5-8 

5-6 

5-10 

5-10 

5-10 

5-113^ 

5-11 

5-101^ 

5-11 

6-014 

6-114 
5-10 



Position. 
L. T. 
L. E. 
R. G. 
C. 
L. G. 
R. T. 
R. E. 
Q. B. 
R. H. B. 
L. H. B. 
F. B. 
L. H. B. 
Subs. 
F. B. 
Subs. 
Subs. 
L. G. 
R. E. 



Captain 

Manager 

Assistant Manager 

Coach 



Prep. School. 

Burlington, Vt., H. S. 

W. Springfield, H. S. 

So. Hadley Falls, H. S. 

Arms Academy 

Reading High School 

Quincy High School 

Worcester Academy 

Quincy High School 

IMechanics Arts High 

Mt. Vernon High School 

^Mechanics Arts High 

Quincy High School 

AVorcester Academy 

Sanderson Academy 

Marlboro High School 

Mendon High School 

Harwich High School 

AVavland High School 



1911 Scores 



September 23 

September 26 

October 

October 

October 

October 

November 

November 

November 



R. 1. 



Al Anihersl 

At Hanover 

At Providence, 

At Andrerst 

At Worcester 

At Medi'ord 

At Manchester, N.H. 

At Hartford, Conn. 

At Springfield 



Massaehusells 

Massaclmsetts 

IVIassachusetts 

Massachusetts 12 

Massachusetts 

Massachusetts 

Massachusetts 8 

Massachusetts 

Massachusetts ,3 



Rjiode Island 

Dartmouth 

Brown 

AV. P. I. 

Holy Cross 

Tufts 

N. H. State 

Trinitv 

S. T. S. 




6 
6 

35 
12 



Qj^S^^^ 




Dr. Arthur E. Brides 





OR the last, few years "Aggie" has 
not seemed to be able to send out 
a winning football team, even 
though the material at the be- 
ginning of the season has been 
such as to lead us to hope for 
a strong team. Many reasons 
have been advanced to account 
for this fact, but the most plausible of these seems 
to be that we have continually been changing 
coaches and thus there has been no system what- 
ever in the development of strong men from the 
Freshman class. 

Last spring, however, it was decided to engage 
a coach for a period of years in order that we might 
develop a system such as is in vogue in all the large 
colleges. Thanks to the efforts of Manager Co- 
vill, Dr. Brides was secured, and that he is pre- 
eminently fitted to build up such a system and de- 
velop a good team can be seen in his results here 
this Fall and in his record before coming to "Aggie." 
Dr. Brides was born October 31, 1885, in 
Brockton, Mass. He attended the Brockton High 
school wliere lie played full-back and guard on the 
football team for three years and was Captain of 
the team for his last two years there. From 
Brockton, he went to Williston where he played 
full-back for two years. After being graduated 
from Williston he entered Yale University. Here 
his football ability was immediately recognized as 
he easily made the fast Freshman team, playing both the positions of guard and 
full-back. The next fall, he made the Varsity and played on the team for three 
years. That he knows football from beginning to end is shown by the fact that 
he played every position on the team except quarter-back and made good in all 
of them. Besides playing football. Dr. Brides was on the wrestling team his 
second year and also made the basketball and baseball teams. 

Dr. Brides has not, however, had playing experience only, but has had 
coaching experience as well. He coached North Carolina successfully for two 
years and was a coach at his Alma Mater last year. There he made such a good 
record that he is to-day rated among the best of college football coaches. That 
he will make good at M. A. C. is very certain, and we all wish him the best of 
success during his stay here. 




Baseball 




ILLY" Fitzmaurife's regular.s were an aggregation of ball 
tossers that struck fear in the hearts of more than one cam]) of 
baseball collegians last year. The team was practically a 
veteran one, the only loss being that of Piper at third base, 
whose position was filled by Covill who, although not a regu- 
lar in 1911, was already an "M" man. New material was 
slow in showing up, especially from the upper classes, owing 
no doubt, to the apparent lack of open positions to be contested. This was by 
no means a commendable s])irit. The season was eminently successful, not only 
in victories, but in the spirit of the team which was one of co-operation and loyalty. 
Next year's prospects are bright. We lose three players, but the freshman 
class promises some choice material. 
With Captain "Sam" Huntington 
to catch "Smoky Joe" Sherman, 
we Iiave a promising battery, and 
wilh nil iutield and outfield capable 
of handling the finest in the land, 
we are looking for a notable sea- 
son. Practise is to start soon after 
January first, and with Coach 
"Billy" Fitzmaurice regularly in- 
stalled as an assistant in the phy- 
sical department, we have a coach 
whose experience is almost with out 
a par in the coaching profession to- 
day, and whose reputation for 
"fitting" with the student body 
has never been surpassed at Aggie. 





C APT AI \ H U N TI N GTON 



MA\V(;i:i! SAUl'll 



101 




Baseball Association 







Officers 






1912 




1913 


E. 


R. WII'LIAMS 


Captain 


S. P. HUNTINGTON 


R. 


J. BORDEN 


Manager 


L. EDGAR SMITH 


L. 


EDGAR SMITH 


. 1 tfiti.siant Ma naqcr 


H. G. LITTLE 


W 


P. FITZMAURICE 


Coach 
Varsity 1912 


W. P. FITZMAURICE 



Williams, Slu'riiiaii, Daxics, Pitchcn- 
Huntington, Catcher 
Brewer, C. H., First Base 
Ackernian, Second Base 



Brewer, H., !>hortstop 
Covin, Third Base 
Davies, Left Field 
^IcGarr, Center Field 



Sliernian, Williams, Kighl Field 



gy^flB^s^ 




Results of the 1912 Season 







M.A.C. 


Opponents 


April 


17 


Brown at Providence 


1 


10 


April 


20 


Springfield (Conn. League) 


3 


5 


April 


24 


Colby at Amherst 


12 


6 


April 


26 


Williams at Williamstown 





3 


May 


1 


International Y. M. C. A. College at Am- 










herst 


12 


1 


May 


4 


Rensselaer P. I. at Amherst 


16 





May 


11 


Tufts at Medford 


1 


5 


May 


17 


Syracuse at Amherst 


3 


2 


May 


18 


Wesleyan at Middletown 


7 


1 


May 


24 


Holy Cross at Worcester 





8 


May 


25 


Worcester P. I. at Worcester 


12 


4 


May 


30 


International Y. M. C. A. College at 










Springfield 


5 


4 


June 


1 


Vermont at Burlington 


1 


2 


June 


8 


Trinity at Hartford 


8 





June 


15 


Amherst at Pratt Field 

Season Average .(!44 


6 


5 




164 




Hockey 




HE season of I'Jll fairly set the hockey team of M. A. C. among 
the best in the country. The season of 1912 was full of the 
brightest prospects, but gloom overtook the team. This was 
due to a surprising increase in the outside study which kept 
from one to four sophomores out of every game except that with 
Amherst. In spite of this fact, the team did exceedingly good 

work. On a later page is shown 

the schedule which should easily 

have been a clear slate for the Aggie 

team if reasonable treatment had 

been received in the application of 

the eligibility rule. 

The prospects are excellent for 

Uiis season. Captain Hutchinson 

has Jones to help him in the for- 
ward line, with Needham and Mgr. 

Little as veteran defence men. 

This is a nucleus for a wonderful 

loam. 




CAPT. IIUTCIIINSOX 



165 



M.VNAGER LITTLE 




1912 

.C. PECKHAM 
H. H. WOOD 
W. S. LITTLE 



Officers 



Captain 

Manager 

Assistant Manager 



1913 

J. G. HUTCHINSON 

W. S. LITTLE 

J. D. PELLETT 



Varsity 1911-1912 

C. Peckham '12, Right Wing H. C. Walker '12, Cover Point 

D. W. Jones '14, Rover L. W. Needhani "l-i. Point 
H. C. WooUey '14, Left Wing W. S. Little '13, Point 

J. G. Hutchinson '14, Centre A. J. Ackerman "l^. Goal 

W. C. Sanctuary 'U, Utility 





The Season 








At Albany, N. Y. 


Massachusetts 


4 


R. P. I. 





At Williamstown 


Massachusetts 


■-2 


Williams 


"2 


At Amherst 


Massachusetts 


8 


Int. Y. M. C. 


A. College 2 


At Hartford, Conn. 


Massachusetts 


9 


Trinity 


1 


At West Point, N. Y. 


Massachusetts 


7 


West Point 


1 


At New Haven, Conn. 


Massachusetts 





Yale 


3 


At Amherst 


Massachusetts 


3 


Amherst 





At Amherst 


Massachusetts 


4 


Technology 


1 



gy^flS^s^ 





Track— Review of the Year 

HE season of 1911-1912 with its numerous difficulties, can be con- 
sidered a shade more successful than that of the previous year. 
Two new intercollegiate events have been introduced, those 
of cross-country runs and outdoor track. With L. S. Dick- 
inson '10 as coach, and a speedy leader in the person of Capt. 
Clapp, a fast indoor team was soon realized. At the Coast 
Artillery meet, the relay team beat out Tufts and at the B. 
A. A. they won, for the fourth consecutive time, from Worcester "Tech". At 
the Columbia Indoor Rehay Carnival, the relay team was beaten only by Fordham. 
The only indoor meet of the season held in Amherst was with AVesleyan, and 
the meet was lost by M. A. C, by the toss of the coin, because of a tie score 
34-34. The last race of the season was lost to Brown at the Hartford Armory 
in very fast time. 

Manager Beers introduced for the first time outdoor track, but without a 
track and facilities for the work, the best teams could not be had. A triangular 
meet with W. P. I. and Rensselaer at Worcester took place, where M. A. C. 
came out with second place. One other meet was held with Vermont, and un- 
fortunate accidents turned the tide against us. There was however one 
very encouraging feature of the outdoor season, which was the annual inter- 
class outdoor meet, where seven of 
the college records were smashed. 
The other optimistic feature of 
the year was the promising outlook 
for cross-country running. One 
meet was held here at Amherst 
where Tufts was defeated. This 
coming year shows a bright aspect 
in this dei>artment with three cross- 
country runs in view. Very prom- 
ising candidates for track have ap- 
lieared in the incoming class and 
this season bids fair to surpass all 
others. 





CAPTAIN WHITNEY 



MANAGER COOPER 




1911-12 

R. K. CLAPP 'U 
R. T. BEERS '12 
E. H. COOPER '13 



Officers 



Captain 

Manager 

Assistant Manager 



1912-13 
F. W. WHITNEY '13 
E. H. COOPER '13 
E. C. EDWARDS '14 



Season 1911-12 



Varsity Track Team 

R. K. t.^Iapp '12 {Capt.) 
D. G. Tower '12 
H. J. Stack '12 
D. S. Caldwell '13 
F. W. Whitney '13 
S. D. Samson '13 
T. W. Nicolet '14 
N. R. Clark '13 



Varsity Relay Team 

R. K. Clapp "12 (Capt.) 
D. G. Tower '12 
D. S. Caldwell '13 
F. W. Whitney '13 




Results of Indoor Season 



Relay Team 

Coast Artillery Meet— Tufts vs. M. A. C. 
Won by M. A. C. 

B. A. A. Meet— W. P. I. vs. M. A. C. 
Won by M. A. C. 



Time, 2 niin., 40 sec. 



Time, 3 min., 15 3-5 sec. 



Columbia Carnival — Fordham, M. A. C, Amherst, Swarthniore, Wes- 
leyan, Hamilton and C. C. N. Y. 
Won by Fordham, M. A. C, 2nd Time, ;$ min., 33 3-5 sec. 



Hartford Armory Meet — Brown vs. M. A. C. 
Won by Brown 



Time, 3 min., 4-i 2-5 sec. 




M. A. C. Records 



EVENT 

100- Yard Dash 
220- Yard Dash 
440-Yard Dash 
880-Yard Run 
One-Mile Run 
120- Yard Hurdles 
220- Yard Hurdles 
High Jump 
Broad Jump 
Pole Vault 
Shot Put 
Hammer Throw 
Discus Throw 



RECORD 

10 2-5 sec. 
23-3-5 sec. 
53 3-5 sec. 
2 min. 4 2-5 sec. 

4 min. 54 sec. 
18 2-5 sec. 

28 3-5 sec. 

5 ft. 7 1-2 in. 
20 ft. 6 3-4 in. 
9 ft. 6 1-2 in. 
39.15 ft. 

105 ft. 4 in. 
108.85 ft. 



NAME 

G. N. Lew '11 
D. S. Caldwell '13 
F. W. Whitney '13 
D. S. Caldwell '13 
D. S. Caldwell '13 
L. C. Claflin '02 
N. R. Clark '13 
K. E. Gillett '08 
F. B. Shaw '96 
J. J. Pillsbury '13 
S. D. Samson '13 
H. P. Crosby '09 
F. D. Griggs '13 




Te 



nnis 




S a whole, the 1912 tennis season was a disappointment. There 
was Httle material of varsity calibre in college, and unfavorable 
weather conditions interfered with practice and matches 
throughout the season. 

The first tournament, with Springfield, was an easy victory 

for M. A. C. The Williams match, after postponement due 

to rain, was taken by the fast Purple team. Dartmouth 

took the measure of our racket men the following day, and the Vermont 

game came to an untimely end in a driving rain. Two practise matches 

with the Holyoke Canoe club were 

easily won by Massachusetts, and 

Hie Connecticut Aggie game was 

forfeited to us. The Trinity match 

was left unfinished by the rain, with 

Trinity on the long end. Rains 

again interfered with the schedule 

wlien, with the Springfield courts 

flooded, eft'orts to bring Springfield 

to Amherst again proved unavailing 

and the match was cancelled, ending 

the season with but two players and 

the manager eligible for the tMt. 




CAPTAIN ROEIIRS 




MANAGER BOKELUXD 




Officers 



1912 






1913 


A. C. BRETT 


Captain 




H. T. ROEHRS 


S. M. JORDAN 


Manager 




C. BOKELUND 


C. BOKELUND 


Assistant Manager 




R. E. McLAIN 






Varsity 1912 






A. C. 


Brett '12 






H. AV. Hall '12 


D. J. 


Lin '12 


Scores for 1912 




H. H. Archibald '15 


April 27 


At Amherst 


Springfield 


1 


Massachusetts 5 


May 10 


At Williamstown 


Williams 


6 


Massachusetts 


May 11 


At Hanover 


Dartmouth 


6 


Massachusetts 


May 13 


At Burlington 


Vermont 


2 


Massachusetts 1 Rain 


May 15 


At Smith's Ferry 


Holyoke Canoe Club 


2 


Massachusetts 4 


May 18 


At Amherst 


Holyoke Canoe Club 


1 


Massachusetts 5 


May 22 


At Amherst 


Connecticut Aggie 





Massachusetts 6 Forfeit 


May 24 


At Amherst 


Trinity 


3 


Massachusetts 2 Rain 


May 25 


At Springfield 






Cancelled 




Wearers of the 

Football 



'M" 



Warren S. Baker 
Stuart D. Samson 
L. Edgar Smith 
Almon M. Edgerton 
Harry Nissen 

Charleswortli II. Bnnver 
Harold W. Brewer 
J. Warren Covill 



Tell W. Nicolet 



Dettmar W. Jones 
John G. Hutchinson 



S. Miller Jordan 



Baseball 

Frank J. Clegg 
Ralph J. Borden 

Track 

Francis W. Whitney 

Hockey 



Tennis 



Harold W. Brewer 
Richard H. Powers 
Samuel P. Huntington 
James L. O'Brien 
Harold M. Gore 

Saauiel P. Huntington 
Lloyd G. Davies 
Joel P. Sherman 



Stuart D. Samson 

Willard S. Little 
Lester W. Needham 

Herman T. Rochrs 




CALDWELL QUALIFYING FOR THE OLYMPICS 

(Harvard Stadium) 




Contests Won by 1914 

Freshman Year 
Results 

Football 17-0 Hockey 1-0 

Sophomore Year 

Results 

Rope-Pull 45 inches Football 8-0 

Hockey 11-2 




FHKSIIMFA' FOOTHALL TEAM l!)ll-17; li»l:; () 




SOPHOMORE ROPE PULL TEAM ^Yon by 19 U; io Indies 

178 




1914 "M" Men 



Warren S. Baker 
L. Edgar Smith 
Almon M. Edserton 



Harold W. Brewer 
Frank J. Clegg 



Dettmar W. Jones 



Football 



Baseball 



Track 

Tell W. Nicolet 

Hockey 

Lester W. Needham 



Han-y Nissen 
Harold W. Brewer 
Richard H. Powers 



Lloyd G. Davies 
Joel P. Sherniiin 



Jolm G. Hutcliinson 




SOPHOMORE FOOTBAI.I. TEAM 1914-8; 1915-0 




jS.^^^^ 




Freshmen Win Rope Pull. 

The Agricultural colfege freshmen j 
won the annual rope-puU this ait- ■ 
ernoon, dragging the sophomores 
through the college pond. A crowd of 
several hundred^ of people coming to 
the grounds in special trolly cars, au- 
tomobiles and other vehicles and on" 
foot lined the banks of the pond. There 
were 60 sophomores under Capt. Den- 
nis A. Sheehan of South Lincoln on 
the east side of the pond and an equal 
number of freshmen, led by Capt. Har- 
old Brewer of Mt. Vernon, N. T., on 
' the west side. The rope was 800 feet 
long and 1 1-4 inches in diameter. The 
I rules allowed the use of rosin on the 
I hatid and making holes with the foot 
in the ground, but prohibited falling 
on the rope. 
Prof. Clarence E. Gordon, i-eferee, 
I fired the signal shot at 4.31. when the 
[ freshmen immediately began to pull 
ton the rope and never lost an inch. 
In four minutes the. first sophomore 



EIGHT REGULAKS ON TEAM. 

'Varsity Timber Doesn't Help "Ag. 
gie" Sophomores Much. 

The annual sophomore-freshmaD football 
same at the Massachusetts agricuUurnl 
college was pulled off yesterday afteruoou 
and the freshmen canae forth the coaquei- 
oi-s. 17 to 0, Althoush in the sophomor.? 
hne-up there were eisht rarsity .men, ih-» 
lower class wvnt into the garje «i;li u 
spirit which meant, notiwns but victory. 
Never has a team worked tlie forward pass 
more successfully than did the freshmen 
.\e3terda.y. Each time it was this play 
that led to a touchdown, and it was onlv 
durins the last period that the opposing 
backfield could break it up. On the de- 
fensive the freshmen were also strong and 
held the "sophs" fur downs on four dif- 
ferent occasions, once on their own lO-.yard 
line when a touchdown seemed inevitable. 
Capt Smith of the freshmen played a cool, 




FRESHMEN HOCKEY TEAM 

181 



19U-1; 19i;5-0 




SOPHOMORE HOCKEY TEAM 1914-11; 1915-2 




3TUDENT 




ACTIVITIC3 




M. A. C. Christian Association 



LLOYD G. DAVIES, 1914 . 
CLYDE M. PACKARD, 1913 
RICHARD H. POWERS, 19U 
JOHN W. T. LESURE, 1913 
WILLIAM A. DAVIS, 1914 
EDWARD C. EDWARDS, 1914 . 
FREDERICK D. GRIGGS, 1913 . 
HAROLD M. GORE, 1913 . 
CLYDE M. PACKARD, 1913 
ALLISTER M. McDOUGALL, 1913 
GEORGE A. POST, 1913 . 
LELAND H. TAYLOR, 1914 



President 
. Vice-President 
Treasurer 
. Recording Secretary 
Corresponding Secretary 
Bible and Mission Study Committee 
Deputation Committee 
Boys' Clubs 
Handbook Committee 
Membership Committee 
English Classes 
Social Work 




The Roister Doisters 



GEORGE ZABRISXIE, 2nd 
REYER H. VANZWALUW 
OSCAR G. ANDERSON 
HAROLD F. JONES 
HAROLD C. BLACK 
DANIEL J. LEWIS . 
PAUL H. HILDRETH 



Officers 



ENBURG 



President 
. Vice-President 
Secretary 
Business Manager 
Advertising Manager 
Assistant Business Manager 
Assistant Advertising Manager 



1913 
O. G. Anderson 
H. W. Hyland 
H. F. Jones 
S. M. Jordan 
W. S. Moir 

R. H. VanZwaluwenburg 
George Zabriskie, 2nd 



Members 

1914 
M. D. Campbell 
H. D. Brown 
H. C. Black 
L. J. Hogg 
C. E. AVheeler 

B. C. Whidden 

C. S. Bokelund 
F. W. Read 



1915 
W. H. Hatfield 
P. H. Hildreth 
D. J. Lewis 
S. D. Clark 



1916 
A. L. Hulsizer 
W. A. Pratt 
S. P. Serinyan 




"What Happened to Jones" 

An Original Farce in Three Acts. By George Broadhurst 
As Presented by 

The Roister Doisters 
at 

Montague, Nov. 24. Richmond Hill, N. Y., Dec. 16. Hackensack, N. J., Dec. 
18. Rutherford, N. J., Dec. 19. Millers Falls, Jan. 6. Ware, Jan. 11. 
Greenfield, Feb. 7. Northampton, Feb. 15. 



The Cast 

Ebenezer Goodly — a Professor of Anatomy 

Mrs. Goodly — Ebenezer's wife. 

Marjorie — Daughter to Ebenezer 

Minerva — Daughter to Ebenezer 

Richard Heatherly — Engaged to Marjorie 

Alvina Starlight — Mrs. Goodly's sister 

Antony Goodly, D.D., — ^Bishop of Ballarat 

Cissy — ^Ebenezer's ward 

Helma — Swedish domestic 

Thomas Holder — ^a policeman . 

William Bigbee — ^an inmate of the Sanatorium 

Henry Fuller — Superintendent of the Sanatorium 

Jones — -Who Travels for a Hymn Book House 



E. F. Moore '15 
. F. B. Hills '12 
. F. L. Gray ^12 

D. J. Lewis "15 
.F. AV. Read'14 

H. W. Hvland "13 

. W. S. Moir '13 

S. M. Jordan "13 

R. B. Gibbs '15 

B. C. Whidden '14 
H. D. Allen '14 

B. C. Whidden '14 

E. I. Wilde '12 




WHAT HAPPENED TO JONES 

188 



Htfii^tw 




e>g^55^^ 





Review of the Season 

O hold one cup for three successive years, with an everchanging 
team, is a record to be proud of. This is true of the rifle team 
which again, the last season won the intercollegiate indoor 
championship of the United States. The team, of practically 
all new men, led by Captain Lloyd, and coached by Corporal 
Major of the Marine Corps, made a splendid record. To the 
coach is due the very high efficiency and steadiness of the 
members of the team. 

The league of college rifle teams was divided for the season of indoor shoot- 
ing, and all teams of the East were in one league, and those of the West in an- 
other. This simplified the work at Washington and incidentally allowed more 
teams to enter. Iowa won the Western championship with no defeats, as did 
Massachusetts, the Eastern championship, with an equally clean slate. In the 
shoot-off match, the "Aggie" boys made the remarkable score of 973 out of a 
possible 1000, the scores of the five highest men counting. On the basis of the 
previous j^ear's score, this represented a score of 1946 out of 2000. In this match, 
Forbush, who had shot well up to the time was not represented. Edminster 
made the highest individual score, and the team made the highest team score 
for either league. In the outdoor shoot our boys were defeated by Harvard, 
after holding the trophy for two years. 

Under Captain Edminster, the team is sure to have a successful season, and 
the apparent good showing from the entering class, prophecies the retension of 
the indoor trophy, and also the returning of the outdoor trophy to M. A. C. 
Besides Captain Edminster, the veterans in college are: McDougall, Forbush, 
Griggs, Clarke, Hyde, and Whitmore. 

The members of the team have finally after much discussion been awarded 
the R. M. T. which may be worn on the hat, but not on the sweater or jersey. 



Qj^S5^^ 




INDOOR TEAM 

Rifle Club 

Officers 



ALLISTER F. McDOUGALL 
WALLACE C. FORBUSH 
JOHN W. T. LESURE . 
RALPH H. GASKILL . 
ALBERT F. EDMINSTER 



. President 

Vice-President 

. Secretary 

. Treasurer 

Range Captain 



Indoor Rifle Team 

Winners of Indoor Intercollegiate Chanipionshii) 
E. R. Lloyd (Capt.) '12 A. F. McDougall '13 

E. I. Wilde '12 F. D. Griggs '13 

A. C. Brett '12 E. S. Clarke, Jr. '14 

A. N. Raymond '12 G. F. Hyde '15 

A. F. Edminster '13 P. H. Whitmore '15 

W. C. Forbush '13 




OUTDOOR TEAM 
Outdoor Rifle Team 

Second Place Outdoor Intercollegiate Championship 
E. R. Lloyd '12 A. F. Edminster '13 

A. C. Brett '12 A. F. McDougall '13 

W. C. Sanctuary '12 E. S. Clark, Jr., '14 



Outdoor Team 




Indoor Team 




Championship 


Match Scores 


Championship 


Match Scores 
Standing Prone Total 




200 
Yd. 


300 500 

Yd. Yd. 


Total 


Lloyd 


96 


99 


195 










Wilde 


96 


100 


196 


Lloyd 


37 


40 50 


127 


Brett 


95 


100 


195 


Brett 


46 


42 45 


133 


Raymond 


83 


98 


181 


Sanctuary 


43 


43 46 


132 


Edminster 


96 


100 


185 


Edminster 


46 


43 49 


138 


Griggs 


87 


93 


180 


McDougall 
Clark 


41 
39 


42 46 
41 41 


129 
121 


Clark 
Hyde 
McDougall 


87 
93 
85 


96 

98 

100 


183 
191 
185 




• 


_ — . _ — , 




Whitmore 


89 


97 


186 




252 


251 277 


780 




— - 







Totals for first five 476 497 973 




ORATORY 



Twentieth Flint Oratorical Contest 

At The College Chapel 
Wednesday, April 24, 1912 



Prosperity . 

A Life Worth Living 

Emilio Castelar 

The Chinese Revolution 

China and America 



Speakers 



Thomas He men way 'I'i 

Irving Boin Lincohi '15 

Leroy Everett Haskins '15 

Woon Young Chun '13 

. Dau Yang Liu '12 



First, Dau Yang Lin 



Winners 



Second, Woon Young Chun 



e>^c55^^ 




Third Annual Debate 

College Chapel 
Friday, April 12, 1912 

Question : 

Resolved — That the people of the United States should have the power of recall 
over all elective ofScers 



Speakers 

Ajfirmative 
Horace W. Hall 
Herbert A. Brown 
Theodore J. Moreau 

Judges 

Reverend W. L. xA.nderson of Amherst 

Professor W. D. Hurd 



Negative 
Thomas Hemenway 
Benjamin F. Hubert 
Jay M. Heald 



Judge William G. Bassett of Northampton 
Winners 



First 

Second 

Third 

Honorable Mention 



Thomas Hemenway 
Theodore J. Moreau 
Benjamin F. Hubert 
Jay M. Heald 



Qj^e^^s^ 




Fortieth Annual 
Burnham Declamation Contest 

College Chapel 
Wednesday, May 22 

Program 

1. Toussaint L'Ouverture ..... Wendell PliiUips 

RALPH P. HOTIS 

2. The Subjugation of the Filipino . . . George Frisbie Hoar 

ISAAC IJ. SIMON 

3. The New South ...... Henri) W. Grady 

IRVING B. LINCOLN 

4. England and America ..... Edwin 0. Wolcott 

HENRY H. WHITE 

5. The Southern Negro ...... Henri/ W. Grady 

WILLIAM R. TOWER 

6. Llnjust Acquisition of Territory .... Thomas Curwin 

LEROY E. HASKINS 

7. At the Tomb of Napoleon ..... Robert hn/enioll 

SAMUEL A. WHITE 

8. The Greek Revolution ..... Henri/ Clai/ 

EARLE S. DRAPER 



Winners 



First, Leroy E. Ilaskins 



Second, Isaac 15. Simon 




A. K. HARRISON 
C. R. GREEN 

C. R. DUNCAN 



C. S. Hicks 



Officers 



Trek Masters 



President 

. Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



A. K. Harrison 



9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 



Treks for 1912-13 (Partial List) 

Along Amethyst Brook, upstream from Orient Springs. 

Locke's Pond. 

Deerfield Battlegrounds. 

Petticoat Hill, Williamsburg. 

Monadnock. 

Over the Range east from The Notch. 

Granby Center. 

Westfield Little River. 

Skinner Hill, Pelham. 

Sleigh ride trip. 

Toby, east side and Crow's Nest. 

Toby, sugar camps. 

Pratts Corner, Shutesbury, Orient. 

Car to Pelham, walk to Dwights, Belchertown Ponds and return by 



train from Belchertown. 



190 




Stock Judging Team 



J. Dudley French 



Allister F. McDougall 
R. H. Gaskill— Alternate 



Robert A. Lundgren 



Fifth place in the N. E. F. A. S. Intercollegiate Contest 
Brockton Fair, October 5, 1912 



Fourth place in the Stock Judging Contest 

and 

First place in the Guernsey Section, National Dairy Show 

Chicago, 111., October 26, 1912 




Stockbridge Club 



The Stockbridge Club was organized for those whose special interests are 
agriculture or horticulture. It is planned to have local alumni and others suc- 
cessful in agriculture address the Club every three weeks, and at other times 
discussions will be conducted by the members. 



Officers 



ALLISTER F. McDOUGALL 
LAWRENCE A. BEVAN 
BURTON A. HARRIS . 



. President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



Executive Committee 

Joseph B. Cobb John W. T. Lesure 




Landscape Art Club 



The Landscape Art Club was formed with the idea of promoting interest 
along the lines of Landscape Gardening. During the year the club gives a series 
of talks by men who are of note in civic improvement, park designing and in 
the various branches of the work. 



Officers 



HAROLD B. BURSLEY 
FRANK H. CULLEY 
DEAN F. BAKER 



. President 

Vice-President 

. Secretary and Treasurer 



Program Committee 



Willard S. Little, Chairman 
Edward C. Edwards Chester H. Peters 




Cercle Francais 

The Cercle Francais was organized last year for the benefit of those who 
desired to become better acquainted with the romance languages, and particu- 
larly French. At the meetings current events are discussed in French, following 
which brief talks are given by some member or an outside speaker. 



WILLIAM S. MOIR 
WILLIAM L. DORAN 
ALVAN H. BULLARD 
MERRILL C. PATTEN 



Officers 



Honorary Members 



Prof. A. A. Mackimmie 
Mr. W. L. Harmount 



. President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Corresponding Secretary 



Prof. H. T. Fernald 
Mr. W. S. Regan 





fllUSICHIl 

ClitlBS 




T.W.N. 



Qj^S6^^ 




Glee Club 



First Tenors 

L. N. Pease '13 
M. D. Campbell '14 
G. AV. Barber '13 
A. L. Hulsizer '16 
J. T. Nicholson '16 
J. D. French '13 

First Basses 

F. D. Griggs '13, Leader 
J. B. Cobb '13 

G. E. Howe '13 
R. E. Tower '15 
G. Zabriskie '13 
G. H. Cale '15 



Second Tenors 

H. G. Little "15 
R. P. Walker '15 
R. B. Griggs "15 
W. H. Hatfield '15 
H. D. Lucas '14 
M. G. Tarbell '14 

Second Basses 

H. D. Brown "14 

F. J. Clegg '14 

G. W. Ells '13 

P. H. Hildreth '15 
P. F. Whitmore '15 
H. H. Tarbell '15 
H. Smith '16 



Mandolin Club 



First Mandolins 



S. M. Jordan '13, Leader 
H. W. Brewer '14 
A. Johnson '15 
H. B. White '15 

Second Mandolins 

H. B. Brown '14 
R. J. Borden '13 
C. M, Allen '14 
R. B. Griggs '15 



A. B. Epstein '16 
C. A. Bishop '16 
V. L. Mann '16 
R. Chamberlain '16 



J. D. French '13, ]'ioliu 
R. E. Tower '15, Violin 
T. A. Nicolet '14, Cello 
N. J. Nichols '13, Banjo 




Orchestra 



J. D. French '13 

R. S. Bragg '14 

R. E. Tower '15 

L. J. Hogg '14 

J. I. Bennett '15 

H. M. Rogers '15 

R. A. Payne '14 

T. A. Nicolet '14 

H. H. Jenney '14 

R. L. Hunt '16 

J. L. Selden '13 

M. G. Tarbell '14 

L. P. Howard '14 

F. D. Griggs '13 

J. G. Hutchinson '14, Leader 



VioHn 
Violin 
Viohn 
VioKn 
Violin 
Violin 
Violin 
Violoncello 
Clarinet 
Flute 
Cornet 
Cornet 
Trombone 
Drums and Traps 
Piano 



e>^^55^^ 




Clark Cadet Band 

F. D. Griggs, Captain and Leader 



J. L. Selden, Lieutenant 

F. W. Read, Principal Musician 

L. P. Howard, Sergeant 

M. D. Lincoln, Sergeant 

H. J. Morse, Corporal 

A. J. Tonry, Corporal 



R. W. Harper 
T. J. Kennedy 
C. A. Shute 
H. B. White 



Privates 



M. G. Tarbell, Chief Musician 
J. G. Hutchinson, Drum Major 
W. A. Davies, Sergeant 
H. H. Jenney, Sergeant 
P. O. Petersen, Corporal 
R. G. Tower, Corporal 



R. W. Swift 
W. P. Lyford 
R. S. Hunt 
Isaac Hathaway 
R. A. Gushing 



S. W. Phelps 
J. F. Mooney 
R. A. Payne 
W. M. Pease 




tratton^ 





Index Board 



Stuart B. Foster 
Ralph S. Bragg 



Richard H. Powers 
Murray D. Lincohi 

Tell W. Nicolet . 
Chester S. Bokelund 
Alfred L. Coe 
Tell W. Nicolet . 
Ernest S. Clarke, Jr. 
Theodore A. Nicolet 
L. Ernest Smith 



Editor-in-Chief 
Assistant Editor 



Associate Editors 



Leland H. Taylor 



Chester E. Wheeler 
Stanley B. Freeborn 

Artist 
Artist 
Artist 
Photograph Editor 
Business Manager 
Assistant Business Manager 
Assistant Business Manager 



^ es P' 


9 




m£ 







College Signal 

Editors 



R. H. Van Zwaluwenburg, 1913 
Chester E. Wheeler, 1914 
Oscar G. Anderson, 1913 . 
Frederick D. Griggs, 1913 
S. Miller Jordan, 1913 
Harry W. Allen, 1913 
Ervine F. Parker, 1914 
Stuart B. Foster, 1914 
Harold C. Black, 1914 
J. Albert Price, 1915 
George B. Donnell, 1915 



Editor-in-Chief 

Managing Editor 

Assistant Editor 

Athletic Editor 

Athletic Editor 

Alumni Editor 

Alumni Editor 

Department Editor 

Campus Editor 

Associate Editor 

Associate Editor 



Business Department 

George Zabriskie, !-2nd, 1913 ..... Business Manager 
Ernest S. Clarke, Jr., 1914 . . . Assistant Business Manager 

Ernest F. Upton, 1914 .... Assistant Advertising ]\Ian;iger 
Maurice'J. Clough, 1915 ....... Circulation 



£^^^ 




Junior Promenade 

February 16, 1912 
Committee 

Benjamin W. Ellis, Chairman 
Prof. Edward A. White Prof. John A. McLean 



Willard S. Little 
J. Dudley French 



Mrs. Butterfield 
Mrs. Osmun 
Mrs. Story 



Glover E. Howe 
Harold F. Jones 
Harold P. Bursley 

Patronesses 



Ralph J. Borden 
Everett H. Cooper 



Mrs. Hasbrouck 
Mrs. McLean 
Mrs. Zabriskie 





Sophomore-Senior Hop 

June 18, 1912 

Committee 

Leon E. Smith, Chairman 

Dettmar W. Jones Lester W. Needham Edward C. Edwards 

John D. Pellett Lloyd G. Davies John G. Hutchinson 

Prof. Arthur K. Harrison Prof. Edward xA.. AVhite 

Jesse C. Carpenter Arthur N. Raymond 



Patrons 



Pres. Kenyon S. Butterfield 



Patronesses 

Mrs. Kenyon S. Butterfield Mrs. Phili]) B. Hasbrouck 
Mrs. George F. E. Story Mrs. Frederick K. Yeaw 
Mrs. Charles AV. Garfield 



Hon. Charles W. Garfield 



Mrs. Arthur K. Harrison 
Mrs. Edward A. White 




1914 Junior Prom 



Committee 

Harry D. Brown, Chairman 
Joel P. Sherman Murray D. Lincoln 

Harry Nissen Leland H. Taylor 

Stanley B. Freeborn Ralph S. Bragg 

Harold W. Brewer 




JETS 



Qj^S^^^ 




Olives 



Freshman Banquet, 1914 

New American House, Boston 

Menu 

Bluepoints 
Cream d'ltalie 

Sweet Gherkins 
Broiled Shad with Roe, Maitre d' Hotel 

Bebe Potatoes 

Roast Sirloin of Beef, Sauce Bordelaise 

French Peas Delmonico Potatoes 

Fresh Vegetable Salad 

Mocca Ices 



Frozen Pudding 
Roquefort Cheese 

Cigars 



Demi Tasse 



Assorted Cakes 

Crackers 

Cigarettes 



Class Spirit . 
Class Athletics 
Topical Speecli 
The Fussers 
Our College 



Toasts 

Toastmaster, Edwaril C. Edwards 



By the President 
. D ettmar W. Jones 
. Frederick W. Read 
. Ralph R. Melloon 
Stanley B. Freeborn 



Impromptus 

"Sons of Old Massachusetts" 



jS^^^t^ 




Sophomore Smoker 

The Henking 
Springfield, November 18, 1911 



Menu 






Cream of Celery au Croutons 




Mixed Pickles 






Roast Native Chicken 






Potatoes au Gratin 




Green Peas 


Vanilla Ice Cream 






Cake 




Nuts 


Cigarettes 






Toasts 






Toastmaster, Stanley B. Freeborn 




Is Our College Progressing? 


Pres 


Kenyon S. Butterfield 


Class Spirit ...... 




Richard Powers 


Athletics (Mexican) .... 




John G. Hutchinson 


Girls, Girls, Girls . 




Harold "Mike" Brewer 


1914 




. Roland A. Payne 



"Boost Old Aggie" 



([I^tnm^nretnent 





Commencement, 1912 

Sunday, June 16 

Baccalaureate Address 

President Kenyon L. Butterfield 



Class Baseball Game 
Class Sing 



Monday, June 17 

Commencement Drills and Parade 
Fraternity Spreads 

Tuesday, June 18 

Senior Class Day Exercises 

Alumni Reunions 

Sophomore-Senior Hop 

Wednesday, June 19 

Commencement Exercises 
Address by the Honorable Charles W. Garfield of Grand Rapids, Michigan 



S^ji-ii 



. ^i^i^mS^^^^^^ ^m^^ 



toH^ 




Prizes and Awards, 1912 

Grinnell Prizes: 

The Grinnell prizes, given by the Hon. William Claflin of Boston in 
honor of George B. Grinnell, Esq., of New York, to those members of 
the senior class who pass the best, second best, and third best examina- 
tions, oral and written in theoretical and practical agriculture. 

First prize, $25, awarded to Benjamin Gilbert Southwick. 

Second prize, $15, awarded to Francis Spink Madison. 
. Third prize, $10, awarded to Eric Nichols Boland. 

Botanical Prizes: 

The Hills prizes, given by Henry F. Hills of Amherst, awarded to mem- 
bers of the senior class as follows: 

A. For the best herbarium, $15, awarded to Ray Ethan 
Torrey. 

B. For the best collection of Massachusetts trees and 
shrubs, $10, awarded to Ray Ethan Torrey. 

C. For the best collection of Massachusetts woods, $10, 
awarded to Ray Ethan Torrey. 

Special sophomore prize for the best herliarium, $5, 

awarded to Ernest Elwood Stanford. 
Honorary mention made of Raymond Edward Nutc. 

General Improvement: 

The Western Alumni Association prize, given to that member of the 
sophomore class who during his first two years in college has shown 
the greatest improvement in scholarsjiip, character and example, $25. 
Awarded to Roland Alfred Payne. 



Public Speaking: 

The Biu-nham prizes awarded: 
and second best declarations: 



To the students delivering the best 



JL^c^^^ 




First prize, $15, awarded to LeRoy Everett Haskins. 
Second prize, $10, awarded to Isaac Barney Simon. 
The Flint Prizes awarded to the students deUvering the best and second 
best orations: 

First prize, a gold medal and $20, awarded to Dau Yang 

Lin. 
Second prize, a gold medal and $15, awarded to Woon 
Young Chun. 

Debating: 

The prizes in the annual debate are awarded as follows: 

$15 and a gold medal, awarded to Theodore Joseph Mo- 

reau. 
$15 and a gold medal, awarded to Benjamin Franklin 

Hubert. 
$15 and a gold medal awarded to Thomas Hemenway. 

The prizes in the interclass debate are awarded as follows: Won by 
the team representing the Class of 1912, consisting of 

Theodore Joseph Moreau 

Benjamin Franklin Hubert 

Thomas Hemenway 
Each member of the above team was awarded a silver cup. 

Military Honors: 

The following named Cadet Officers have been reported to the Adju- 
tant General of the United States Army and to the Adjutant General 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as being efficient in Military 
Science and Tactics and graduating therein with highest honors: 
Cadet Colonel Marshall Cotting Pratt 
Cadet Major Eric Nichols Boland 
Cadet Major Benjamin Gilbert Southwick 
Cadet Captain Francis Spink Madison 
Cadet Captain Thomas Hemenway 



IBrill 





SENIOR OFFICERS 




JUNIOR OFFICERS 




Military Prizes 



highest iniHtary stiuidiiii 
liiiihcst iniHtarv slaiulini;. 



To the winner of Company competitive drill, a flag', to Comp 
Hemenway, Captain. 

To the Junior lor high military standing, a gold medal, Alber 
'13. 

To the Soi)homore having the 
Harry Dunlap Brown, '14. 

To the Freshman having the 
Philip Ferry Whitmore, '15. 

For individual drill iu manual of arms and firing. 
Gold medal, Corj). Harry Dunlap IJrown, "1-1. 
Silver medal, Corp. Raymond Philip Walker, "14. 
Bronze medal, l.st Serg. Ralph Thomas Neul, '1.'!. 
Students recommended lo llic I'nited States War Depart 
lence in military drill. 

Cadet Col. Marshall Cotting Pratt. 
Cadet Major Eric Nichols Poland. 
Cadet Major Benjamin Gilbert Soutliwick. 
(^adet Cai^t. Francis S])iuck Madison. 
Cadet Capt. Thomas Hemenway. 



any D. 
t Jose])h 
a gold 
a siher 



Thomas 
Kelley, 
medal, 
medal. 




THOMAS CANAVAN 

3ln iMrmnrtam 



.2^^^ 




Thomas Canavan 



In the death of Mr. Thomas Canavan which occurred July 14, 191'-2, the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College and those connected with it sustained the 
loss of a faithful servant and loyal friend. He was here in 1867 when the college 
first opened its doors to students, and remained active in its service until a few 
months before his decease. Thus he was personally and intimately acquainted 
with the development of the institution from the very date of its founding; 
he witnessed all the varying fortunes of its early existence; he saw finally that 
its history had essentially been one of progress; and he lived to enjoy what was 
denied to many of the pioneers in the work of building up the institution: namely, 
the realization that at last the college had become securely established as an 
educational institution of foremost rank. 

Mr. Canavan was born at Roscommon, Ireland; although the exact date of 
liis birth is not known, it is thought by his relatives that he lived to be about 
eighty years of age. While he was a young man he left Ireland, came directly 
to Amherst, and here spent fifty-seven years of his life. Soon after he came to 
Amherst, he was engaged as gardener by Col. William S. Clark who at that time 
owned the beautiful estate on Mount Pleasant which still bears his name. After 
Col. Clark became president of the college, Mr. Canavan was placed in charge 
of tlie Durfee plant houses, and subsequently he was made janitor of the college 
buildings. 

He proved himself to be an efficient, trustworthy and devoted workman; 
with students he was tactful, fair, sympathetic, and always enjoyed their good 
will and high respect. Until very recent years he gained a personal acquaintance 
with every student; his kindly interest in them individually, and his genuine 
interest in their activities, endeared him to them all. At the time of the last 
baseball contest with Amherst, Mr. Canavan was not strong enough to walk to 
Pratt Field, but he procured a carriage and was seen in a conspicuous place 
among the spectators. 

Mr. Canavan's familiar figure and genial personality is missed this autumn 
by his many friends among the students and college officers, and it will long he 
missed by those of former days, as they return to their Alma Mater, with wliom 
the influence and memory of his well directed life still remain. 



Orrinde 




ej^S5^^ 




Faculty Directory 



p. B. Hasbrouck 

F. A. Waugh 

W. P. B. Lockwood 

G. N. Holcomb 
J. E. Ostrander 
H. T. Fernald 
C. R. Duncan 
G. F. Mills 

C. Wellington 

G. E. Gage 

S. B. Haskell 

R. N. Neal 

A. A. MacKimmie 

F. C. Kenney 

F. C. Sears 

G. C. Martin 
C. A. Butman 



Occupation 

Mathematics 

Landscape 

Dairying 

Sociology 

Mathematics 

Entomology 

Mathematics 

The College "Cop" 

Chemistry 

Bacteriology 

Agronomy 

English 

Languages 

Collector of Coins 

Pomology 

Military Science 

Physics 



Alias 

Billy, the Czar 

Pinky 

Roaring Bill 

Peter Hickey 

Johnny O 

Jocko 

Dune 

Daddy 

Tabby 

Tootsie 

Sid 

Squirt 

Mac 

Shylock 

Baldy 

Blokie 

Chesty 



e>gfl5^^ 




907. 

SOX 
707. 

607. 

10% 



>*• 


■»,„^^ 










/^ 


^^s 


^w 








/ 




^s. 








/ 




> 


V 






/ 






x 






/ 






N 






/ 








^^>^ 




/ 












/ 

























I 2 3-1-56 

Hours sperrl on. eacli lesson. 

Law of Diminishing Returns 

Study: an industry of diminishing returns. 

If time and energy, in increasing amounts, be expended on any course, 
a point will be reached beyond which each additional expenditure of energy 
and time will yield a smaller return in marks and finally the additional return 
in knowledge or marks will not be worth the time or energy expended. 

No Doubt, Billy 

Billy to class: Constant dropping of water will wear away a stone; but I 
don't see that constant banging of ideas ever penetrates your skulls. 




e^^cSSb^ 




HERE AT LAST! 



ALLEN &, BIRDSALL'S 

OWL WAGON 



Realizing the demand for a lunch emporium neai ihe campus, wi 

have undertaken to establish a pure food parlor, where one can diver 

one's dreary doldrums when doleful or downcast by drinking a dram o 

a delightful, discriminative decoction called Coffee— a nutritious nectar 

We also serve a delectable dewy dog. All to the mustard 

Our milk is not secured from the Trust, and contains no waterei 

Oar ham is cured, and is not subject to a relapse 

Oar eggs are fresh. We have just laid ihem in stock 

And our b*ans. Shades of beloved Boston ^ Tliey speak for them 

selves. 

We have no sympathy for the lazy man, but we do pity the man wht 

is "bom tired." Frank Hickey and Joe Harlow have been begging u; 
"hurry that bean wagon along." Henct 



forth after 


a strenuous soiree, one can sec 


re swee 


, salubrious sleep 


"the morn 


ng after " without fear of fasting 


until noo 






Said a chap at Mass. Aggie, 


I'm thin 






You can see all my bones thr 


my skin 






What I need is a feed 








At Allen & Birdsall-s New In 






Weathe 


Forecaster Hallowell, who is hir 


d by me 


college, and has 


no repulat 


on as a divinator to sustain, state 


s that Thursday will be fair 


iF It IS not 


stormy, that it may be cold prov 


ded the 


temperature does 


not rise above zero. But fair or stormy 


warm o 


I cold, the Aggie 


L7«hm 


be open to receive members of 
who need light lefreshments. 


the Sta 


valion Army and. 


Remember this is a '■ pay as you enter ca 


and n 


Dl n money-to-loan 


office." 








Drop in 


Sunday night. 







EAT A LA DOG CARTE. 



One on Billy 

Billy: Is that right, Gare? 

Gare: No, sir. 

Billy: Well, what's the matter with it? 

Gare: (meekly) It's wrong. 



e>^fl5^s3 




Famous Sayings of Famous Men 

"Billy"— "That'll do, thank ye." 

"Sid" Haskell — -"No, that's wrong, but thank you just the same.'' 

"Doc" Gordon — "Hurry up! Hurry up! 

"Blokie" — "Take that hand down!" 

"Squirt" — "And what not." 

White — "Arnold Arbowetum." 

"Baldy" — ^"What does the book say?" 

Sprague — "Let's suppose." 

Harrison — •' 'Now-er-er-Now-er . ' ' 

Lockwood — "What can you say concerning — " 

Stone — -"I did it." 

Butman — "AVith tlie compliments of the author." 




KENNEL CLUB 

233 



e>^^55^^ 




Class Statistics 



Who is the handsomest man in the class? 

Stan Freeborn wins in a walk out over a large list of entries. Mike 
Brewer conies in second place. 

The most versatile man in the class? 

Jack "Hutch" gets the honors hands down. 

The most respected? 

Dick Powers clears the field and comes in out of sight of the others. 

The biggest grind? 

Henry Clay fills the title role and is ably supported by Jeff Calvert and 
Churchill. Last year was the banner season for this entertaining trio. 

The brightest man? 

Bennett Porter gets first honors with Christie close behind. 

The most popular? 

This vote goes to Det Jones by a large majority. Dick Powers is next in 
line. 

The nerviest man in the class? 

It certainly takes nerve to tell a earful of returning Informalites that 
the car is "off the irons" and they'll have to get out; but Ed Hazen 
was the man for the job, and he gets this vote. Fred Read claims 
second place in this event. 

The laziest man in the class? 

Tit Tarbell, our bloated bondholder, still follows along the line of least 
resistance and drops down at the first available place in this event. 
His confreres for whom he is waiting seem, by the vote, to be Rod Harris 
and "Jawn" Pellett. 

The grouchiest man? 

Tower gets the biggest vote with Clark taking his dust close behind. 

The wittiest man? 

Brother Payne stands alone in his glory. 



e>^^55^^ 




The best-dressed man'i 

Fred Read is generally conceded to be the best specimen of sartorial 
perfection seen on the campus. 

The best athlete? 

Mike Brewer easily carries off this honor. His opponents are left so 
far in the background as to be nearly out of sight. 

The tvindiest? 

We have another celebrated trio with us this evening, consisting of 
Bull Reid, Ed. Hazen and Blondy Bokelund. They are all officers of 
the "line" with "Bull" holding the greatest honors. 

The freshest ? 

Here we have Chick with us again. He stands out in full view in tills 
capacity. 

The least appreciated? 

Jeff Calvert nearly lost this honor, which was generally accorded him 
the morning he appeared with the black and yellow sweater on. Henry 
Clay is confrere of Jeff as usual. 

The greatest fusser? 

Harry Brown is the past master in fussing. He has taken lectures, 
lab. and practical courses in the science and is some authority. 

The most likely to succeed? 

According to the vote Dick Powers leads in this witli Dot Jones fol- 
lowing a close second. 

Who is the best teacher? 

Billy is the man. In spite of promises that he'll stick ye, Billy is there 
with the teaching stuff. 

The most difficult to recite to? 

Billy is again in the limelight. 

The hardest to bluff? 

Evidently the class has had some experience in bluffing, for it is quite 
certain that "Sid" Haskell is the hardest to bluff. 



e>^^%^^ 




The most broad minded? 

"Mack" takes first in this one. 

The most popidar? 

We all swear by Prof. Osmun in this detail. 

The grouchiest? 

Butnian gets the biggest vote by long odds. 

The handsomest teacher? 

"Dune" is considered by the majority of the class to be the Apollo of 
our Faculty. 

The best lecturer? 

"Jocko" is warmly advocated by all the entomologists as being the 
Prof, with the most pleasing oratorical effects. 

The loindiest? 

"Squirt" receives the vote for being the most apt representative of 
the windy city on the Faculty. 



^^ 


* m 




WBM 


I^KH 


1^ 


^z * * 


. 1 




^B^EB^ 


■SsPPP^yFi 




L 


« 1 




JIT ^fHu^JH 


HBuS^^M^Ifi ^ 




1^ 


31 


i<W 


wl 


f^ 


ih 








' H^P^^ 3 




ni 




"TF IT WERE ONLY TRUE' 
And So Young, Too. 

"Squirt" (in Journalism) Here's a re- 
port of a man who bet he could drink 
a quart of whiskey at a gulp. He died. 
Now let's have that written up — I might 
as well give it to someone familiar with 
the subject — absentmindedly passes 'flimsy' 
to Needham. 



Asleep Again! 

Billy: Rcid, what is the sine of theta? 
Bull: (thinking of mother and tlie 



arm) Five cows. 



Prof. Lockwood: We will take 4-t pages 
in advance for to-morrow. 

Voice: (in the rear) Louder. 




CROSS COUNTRY WINNER 




THE ROVAJ. HUUTEKS 




We Would Suggest That: 

"Doc" Gordon go on the stage as a 
lightning artist. We defy anyone else to 
draw a picture on the board, explain and 
erase it as quickly as he. 

Someone buy "Doc" Peters a new ice- 
cart. 

Bill Hart cease trying to put one over 
on Atlas. Smile, d — n it. Smile! 

Coeds and stenogs hold a 'Votes for Wo- 
men' rally. 



RH^LE TROPHY 




A WINTER'S SCENE 



THEY "BOOSTED OLD AGGIE." 



A Journalistic Sample 

Report (from United Press). 
A woman in New York while in tlu- 
act of picking up a horse-shoe was hi I 
by an automobile. It broke her arms, 
two ribs and steering gear. 



Sid: Lincoln, about what time did 
the glacier cover this country? 

Lincoln: Er-that was before my 
time. 



BANQUET OF THE SOPHOMORES. 



WI T H THE PRESIDENT AS GUEST. 



Massaclmselts Asrlcnltural College 
Students Not Cast Down by Foot- 
ball Defeat, 



"Boost old 'Aggie' " was the slogan at ^ 
the banquet of the class of 1914 of the ) 
JIassachusetts agricultural college held at , 
the Henking cafe last evening, printed on.; 
the menu and echoed in every oue of the 
speeches. The banquet was attended by 
about 100 members of the sophomore class, 
with whom President Kenyon L. Butter- 
fiekJ of the colleg e wa s pr esent, as the I 
Sliest, o f honor. J 



Qj^S^^.3 





The Faculty Baseball Match 

OT long ago the Faculty got to feeling giddy and decided to choose 
up and have a little baseball game. As usual it took them six 
weeks to get into action and take the field. The game started 
at 0.30 A. M. and at 4.30 P. M. had progressed to the eighth 
inning. 

Things were commencing to get exciting. Only ten runs 
were needed to tie the score and the head of the batting 
list was up. It was our old friend Dean Mills "by gosh," strutting up to the 
plate (you know how he can strut) his whiskers playing to the breezes and that 
never to-be-forgotten smile decorating his map. But he fooled them all, for he 
whaled the first one over, and, say, did he run? I should say he did. He stretch- 
ed it into a homer and then modestly withdrew to see to his cuts. 

Next up comes Bill Hart. There was no smile on his face. He forgot how 
to many years ago. He stood there at the plate like a dead one, waiting for a 
good ball. Three of them came over and still he stood there. On investigation 
it was found that he was not dead but only sleeping. "Your out!" roared Blokie, 
giving the high sign with his stick. Still Bill stood by. Again, "Your out!" 
boomed in his ear. "Thanks," murmured Bill. "So I see, but how did I get 
dressed and who let me out?" 

Now came Roaring Bill Lockwood, whirling his bat like a churn. Then he 
commenced to peddle his line to the pitcher, "Skim her over the dish, old man, 
and I'll curdle one over the fence so quick that you can't tell whether it's a junk 
of cheese or 6% butter fat." 

Graham slides down the coaching line and cackles: "Now the pitcher's 
got a broken wing — he's pigeon-toed, chicken-breasted, goose-necked — ■" but 
right here the police removed him and jugged him for using fowl language. 
Lockwood connected for a double and up comes Billy. Wise Bill notices the 
acceleration of the ball and dopes it out how to swing with just enough velocity 
to produce impact sufficient to prove Newt's third law. Lockwood scores, but 
Billy hesitated between 2nd and 3rd to roll a cigarette and gets tagged out. 

Hurd, the hope of the Faculty to start things moving, toddles up. He makes 
good with a swat half way to Amherst. It's ticketed for a homer and away he 



e>^^55k^ 




ambles, but as he sped by 3rd he stubbed his toe and fell. He commenced roll- 
ing but his peculiar conformation prevented his stopping and so far as we know 
he's going yet. 

Nobody knew there were 3 out, the scorer "Shimmy" having gone for a 
drink, so the game proceeded. Wattles is next at bat and as the pitcher was 
about all in, he landed the sphere on the noddle and sti-etched his long legs to- 
ward third, but here the train proved too much and he fell, only to be removed 
by Dickie. 

"Doc" Paige stood on the rubber waiting. Gage, the little dear, thought 
to encourage him, and clapped his hands gleefully and twittered: "Hit it. Dr., 
hard. Oh, so hard!" Somebody sawed the end of Doc's bat and as a result he 
struck out. 

But it was getting dark, so it was decided to let onlj' one more man bat. 
Lewis, the pitcher was all in but the buttons, although he tried to explain all the 
hits as owing to the fact that he didn't want to discourage the men. 

Gates was last man up. Things looked ripe for a victory. Doc swung 
fiercely disturbing one of his pet swarms which he always carries. They spread 
and the game broke up in a riot. 





THE BONE OF CONTENTION 



Some Progressive Movements 

A good looking co-ed. 

A married man in the freshman class. 

Some paint slabbed on to our time honored buildings. 

Major dressed up. 

Stock judging team goes to Chicago. 

Rosebrooks appears with a linen collar. 

Grebin in a benzine buggy. 

John Pellett with a nickel. 

Petersen making calls over the mountain. 

Quaife interested in kindergarten work. 

Spanish class started. 

Another feminine attendant in the library. 

Foss spvmks up courage to appear in chapel. 

Jeff with a new velocipede. 

Kid Gore with a hair cut. 

A few decent sidewalks. 

An addition to the grub house. 

Dog cart on the outskirts. 

A place founded to put your spare cash, — treas. office. 

Gasoline coffee grinder. 

Several new pop bikes. 

New doors on the Dorms. 

^^ Promised" — All night lights in the entry ways. 

A new hen department. 



e^^^ 




Signs of improvement in the band. 

At last: — a real athletic instructor. 

New uniforms for our tin soldiers. 

Other progressive movements ai-e on the way and jjossihly others are here 
but rather than incur the hatred of the other parties we will stoj) blowing our 
horn until after election. 




.v.\ i.x.vAirLi: Of trogress 

243 




AMATEUR NIGHT 

What's in a Name? 

Hogg: Don't you want me to carry your hammer, Doctor? 
"Doc": I'd rather carry it myself than have you Hogfg) it. 




^44 




His Ij^irtK'^ Voice 



The Year 

September 1911 to October 1912 

SEPTEMBER 1911 

Sept. 13. College opens. Football practice really begins in earnest. 

Sept. 14. Freshman night-shirt parade. 

Sept. 15. Freshmen pull Sophomores through the pond. 

Sept. 16. Condition exams to-day. 

Sept. 17. Sunday chapel. Prexie gives watchword for year. 

Sept. 18. First zoo lecture with "Doc" Gordon. 

Sept. 20. First drill to-day. Sophomores make freshmen buy posters. 

Sept. 21. Drill on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 11. -lO. 

Sept. 22. Work begun on foundation of Flint Laboratory. 

Sept. 23. Football. Rhode Island State— 5, M. A. C— 0. Proxy entertains 
the Freshmen. 

Sept. 27. Assembly — ^Richardson '87. Amherst Fair. 

Sept. 28. Y. M. C. A. in chapel. Mr. MacKimmie. 

Sept. 29. Class voted unanimously to throw certain obstreperous freshmen in 
the pond! Anniversary Night celebrated at dining hall. 

Sept. 30. Football. Dartmouth— 22, M. A. C— 0. Social Union entertain- 
ment in Drill Hall — H. H. Clayton. Mettawampe Trek to 
Mt. Lincoln. 



e>^cS5^s^ 




OCTOBER 1911 

Oct. 1. Sophs commence to groan. 

Oct. 4. Assembly — Prexie. 7 freshmen investigate the bottom of tlie pon( 

Oct. 5. Y. M. C. A. 

Oct. 6. Agronomy exams. 

PROGRAM 

OVERTURE 

THE UNSOPHISTICATED UNDERSTUDY 



EAST STREET MINSTRELS 



HEIIMIE ALLEN 



FRED GRIGGS 



QUICK LUNCH COMEDY CO. 



"THE WIIMIMER of the DARBY" 



EXIT-MARCH 

Oct. 7. Football. Brown — 26, M. A. C. — ^0. Social Union entertainment 
in Drill Hall — ^Prof. Lewis on "The Recollections of a Hasbeen." 

Oct. 9. Missionary from Yale spoke on "Foreign Missions." Water! 

Oct. 10. Six-man rope-pull. Won by 1914, 45 inches won over. Junior 
Day, "The Coronation." 

Oct. 11. Roberts of Y. M. C. A. at assembly. 

Oct. 12. Cross country run. Won by seniors. Caldwell '13 first. Met- 
tawampe Trek. 

246 



Qj^Sl^^.^ 




Oct. 


13. 


Oct. 


14. 


Oct. 


17. 


Oct. 


18. 


Oct. 


19. 


Oct. 


20. 


Oct. 


21. 


Oct. 


24. 


Oct. 


25. 


Oct. 


26. 



Oct. 28 



Oct. 


30. 


Oct. 


31. 


Nov. 


1. 


Nov. 


2. 


Nov. 


4. 


Nov. 


5. 


Nov. 


7. 


Nov. 


8. 


Nov. 


9. 


Nov. 


10. 


Nov. 


11. 



Several fellows matched pennies in front of South Dorm. Meeting 
broken up with bags of water! 

Football. M. A. C— 12, W. P. I.— 0. Informal. Archibald '15 
wins tennis tournament. Concrete walks about college being 
laid. 

Billie "gets to" sophs to-day in physics. 

Phi Kappa Phi oration at assembly. Dean Olds of Amherst College. 

Exciting scrimmage on field. 

Democratic rally in Town Hall. Gov. Foss spoke. Also visited 
college during day. 

Football. Holy Cross — 6, M. A. C. — 0. Social Union entertain- 
ment in Drill Hall. 

Lights out in dorms two hours to-night. "Holyoke's hills prolonged 
the strain" ad interim. 
25. Assembly. Prof. Harper of Princeton. 

Y. M. C. A. House-afire near C. V. station. Cheering section ac- 
companies the Amherst "fire department." 

Football. Tufts— 6, M. A. C— 0. Cross country run. M. A. C. 
35, Tufts 20. 

Hockey men report to Capt. Peckham '12. 

Drill in Drill Hall. Draper '15 comes to grief. 

NOVEMBER 1911 

Assembly. Talk on "College Spirit" by "Blokie." 

Many men report for first rifle team practice. 

Football. M. A. C— 8, N. H. State— 0. Whist-smoker 

Hall. 
Chapel. Ex-president Seelye of Smith. 
Lecture before Landscape Art Club by Prof. MacKimmie. 
Assembly. Prof. Lewis on college activities. 1913 Class Smoker 

in Union Room. 
Y. M. C. A. Several prominent Springfield business men si^oke. 
Mass meeting in Chapel — football rally. 
Football. Trinity— 35, M. A. C— 6. 



Drill 



<t^^^ 




m. AGRICOMAL COLLEGE, 1914 

Sophomore Smoker 

THE HENKING 
Saturday, November 18th, 



Nov. 


12. 


Chapel. Pre.s. Burton 
of Smith. 


Nov. 


13. 


Prof. Hart conducts 
chapel. 


Nov. 


14. 


First hockey practice 
in Drill Hall. 


Nov. 


15. 


Assembly. 


Nov. 


17. 


Dr. Chamberlain en- 
tertained the men 



Nov. 


19 


Nov. 


20 


Nov. 


22 



1911 

in his chemistry classes at home. 
Nov. 18. Football. S. T. S.— 12, M. A. C— 3. Sophomore Class smoker 

at Henking's. Prexie guest of honor. 
Chapel. Ex-Gov. Utter of R. I. Rushing season closes. 
Freshmen pledged at Chapel. First snow fiuiTies. 
Assembly. Prof. Crooke, Amherst College. Sophomore-freshman 

football game. 1914-8, 1915—0. Tonry '15 broke his leg. 
Nov. 23. Samson '13, elected football captain for 1912. Y. M. C. A. Dr- 

Sprague. 
Ladies of faculty give reception to students in Drill Hall. 
Mettawampe Trek to Norwottuck. 
Chapel. Mr. Speare of Boston. 
Exodus commences. No double cuts. 
Thanksgiving recess begins. 

DECEMBER 1911 
Thanksgiving recess ends. Outdoor board running track put up. 
Hockey. B. A. A. —0, M. A. C— 1, at Boston. 
Mettawampe Trek to Mt. Toby. 
Chapel. Dr. Eliot of Boston. 
The 1913 Index out to-day. 
13. Assembly. Mr. Nolin of Cambridge en City Planning. 
Christmas recess begins. 



Nov. 


24. 


Nov. 


25. 


Nov. 


26. 


Nov. 


27. 


Nov. 


29. 


Dec. 


4. 


Dec. 


0. 


Dec. 


9. 


Dec. 


10. 


Dec. 


11. 


Dec. 


13. 


Dec. 


15. 



Jan. 



JANUARY 

1. Christmas vacation ends. 



1912 



^^^t£. 




Jan. 


2. 


Jan. 


3. 


Jan. 


5. 


Jan. 


6. 


Jan. 


7. 


Jan. 


8. 


Jan. 


9. 


Jan. 


10. 


Jan. 


11. 


Jan. 


12. 


Jan. 


13. 


Jan. 


14. 


Jan. 


15. 


Jan. 


16. 


Jan. 


17. 


Jan. 


18. 


Jan. 


19. 


Jan. 


20. 


Jan. 


23. 


Jan. 


26. 


Jan. 


21. 


Jan. 


27. 


Jan. 


28. 


Jan. 


29. 


Feb. 


2. 


Feb. 


3. 


Feb. 


4. 


Feb. 


5. 


Feb. 


6. 



Faculty reception in Union Room to Shorthorns. 

Assembly. 

131 Shorthorns registered. 

Hockey at Troy. R. P. I. beaten 4-0. Dramatic Club at Millers 

Falls. Mettawampe Trek. Smoker in the Drill Hall. 
Chapel. Mr. Speare of N. Y. City. 
Rifle team defeats U. of P. 

Landscape Art Club. Lecture by Prof. Waugh. 
Assembly. Prof. Hurd. 
Dramatics Club in Ware. 

Prof. Sprague at chapel. Inflicts two hymns on us. 
Hockey. Williams vs. M. A. C— tie. Trek to Mt. Norwottuck. 

Whist-smoker in Drill Hall. 
Chapel. Rev. J. S. Lyon of Holyoke. Full of "pep". 
Snow. Freshmen sweep off rink. 
Stockb ridge Club. 

Assembly. McCurdy of S. T. S. Hockey. S. T. S. beaten 8-2. 
Y. M. C. A. 

Prof. Eyerly conducts Chapel. 
Hockey. Amherst beaten 3-0. Freshmen win basketball game. 

Big smoke. 
Baseball schedule out. 
Last day of semester. 
Chapel. Mr. Bond of Brattleboro, Vt. 
English exam for sophs. 
Chapel. Only consolation before exams. 
Neurosis very general in Drill Hall. 

FEBRUARY 1912 

Exams over. Everyone slee])ing soundly. 

One grand loaf. 

Checks coming from home. 

Line at Treasurer's OfBce. 

Dean's OflSce active. Many visitors. 



249 



ej^e^^^ 




Feb. 


7. 


Feb. 


8. 


Feb. 


9. 



Feb. 10. 



Feb. 11. 



Feb. 


n. 


Feb. 


14. 


Feb. 


15. 


Feb. 


16. 


Feb. 


17. 


Feb. 


18. 


Feb. 


20. 


Feb. 


21. 


Feb. 


22. 


Feb. 


24. 


Feb. 


25. 


Feb. 


27. 


Feb. 


28. 


Feb. 


29. 


March 


1. 


March 


2. 


March 


3. 


March 


4. 


March 


5. 


March 


6. 


March 


9. 


March 10. 



House Committee on Agriculture 

College. Hockey. West Point 
Worcester. Social Union 



business — 12° below 



Bumper crops? 



Dramatics at Greenfield. 

Y. M. C. A. 

College Night at Hash House. 

visits college. 
Rifle team defeats N. H. State 

beaten 7-1. Relay team wins 

entertainment in Chapel. 
Chapel. Dr. Fitch. ''Owl Wagon does bi 

zero. 
Hort. Classes plant seeds in green house. 
Assembly. Ida M. Tarbell. Hockey. 
Dramatics at Hamp. 

Hockey. M. I. T. beaten 4-1. Junior Prom. 

"The Day After." Sleighing parties. Relay team at Columbia. 
Chapel. Mr. White of Hartford. 
Fire in Kappa Sigma House. 
Assembly. Mr. Sterling of Boston. 
Informal — largest ever — 110 couples. 

Relay team ties Wesleyan. Sophs beat freshmen in hockey 11-2. 
Chapel. Mr. Moody of Springfield. 
Rifle team defeats Norwich. 
Assembly. Mr. Danner of Boston. 
Y. M. C. A. Signal Competition closes. 

MARCH 1912 

Student committee has interview with Governor. 
Mettawampe Trek. Track meet at Hartford. 
Dr. Wiley in town. 
Poultry people arriving. 
Poultry course begins. 
Assembly. Musical Clubs finale. 

Rifle team defeats Princeton. Indoor interclass meet in Drill Hall. 
Prof. Sprague on "Socialism," in Union Room. Russians were not 
admitted. Someone hissed and caused a panic. 



Qj^S^^^ 




March 11. 
March 13. 



March 15. 
March 16. 
March 17. 
March 20. 
March 21. 
March 22. 
March 23. 
March 24. 
IMarch 25. 
March 27. 

March 28. 
March 29. 



Farmers' Week opens. Soph-senior hop committee chosen. 
Grinnell Arena dedicated. Pres. Garfield ofWiUiams at Assembly. 

Rebate announced on dining hall accounts. Rush for the 

Treasurer's Office. 
Signal Board Banquet at Prospect House. 
Emerald Hop in Drill Hall. 

Chapel. Ray Stannard Baker reveals secrets of the "hook worm." 
Assembly. Mr. Pincus of N. Y. 

Y. M. C. A. Mr. Watts. New hockey sweaters out. 
Musical Clubs at Chicopee. Alarm clock discovered in chapel. 
Amateur Night at Drill Hall. Last "credit" Trek. 
Chapel. Carruth '75. 

Sophomore individual photographs taken. 
Assembly. Mr. Sholar of Boston. Something new in the way of 

"practical psychology." Straw vote — -T. R. by one vote. 
Y. M. C. A. 
Easter vacation begins. 



APRIL 1912 

Apiil 8. Easter vacation ends. Chapel. 

April 9. Drill commences again, everybody groans. 

April 10. Assembly. Michael J. Murray of Boston. 

April 11. Y. M. C. A. changes to M. \. C. C. A. 

April 12. Board track taken down. 

April 13. "Make up" Trek over Range. German measles around college. 

April 15. Work begun on tennis courts. 

April 16. Botany exam. 

April 17. Assembly. Prof. Ashley, illustrated lecture on Switzerland. Base- 
ball. Brown 10, M. A. C. 1. 

April 18. Y. M. C. A. 

April 19. Half holiday. Musical clubs at Palmer. 

April 20. Informal in Drill Hall. 

April 24. Assembly. Pres. Hamilton of Tufts. Baseball. Colby beaten 
16-6. Flint oratorical contest. 



.2^^^ 




April 
April 

April 
April 



May 



26. 

27. 



29. 



May 


3. 


May 


4. 


May 


5. 


May 


7. 


May 


8. 


May 


9. 


May 


10. 


May 


11. 


May 


15. 


May 


16. 


May 


17. 


May 


18. 


May 


19. 


May 


21. 


May 


22. 


May 


23. 


May 


24. 


May 


25. 


May 


27. 


May 


29. 


May 


30. 



Baseball. Williams 3, M. A. C. 0. 

Wilsonites journey to Holyoke to hear Wilson. Sigma Tau Delta 

becomes Sigma Phi Epsilon. 
No Chapel. Loud cheers. 
Golf enthusiasts club together. Nothing serious happened. 

MAY 1912 

Baseball. S. T. S. beaten 12-1. Freshmen go in swimming. "Lights 
out, freshmen!" 

Freshman banquet season begins. "Slugging bee" down town. 

Baseball. R. P. I. beaten 16-0. Informal — biggest ever. Dean's 
Saturday. Battle of Cushman. 

Chapel. Jacob A. Riis. 

Stockb ridge Club. 

Mass meeting at Assembly. Prexie. 

Tennis team off on trip. Y. M. C. A. 

Musical Clubs at Enfield. 

High School Day. 

Assembly. Dr. A. Z. Conrad of Boston. Sham battle at Cushman. 

Y. M. C. A. "Northfield Rally." 

Baseball. Syracuse beaten 3-2. 

Baseball. Wesleyan beaten 7-1. 

First meeting of Philosophical Club. 
21. Annual inspection. Sham battle in Cushman. 

Assembly. Mr. Waters of Brooklyn, N. Y. The Burnham Dec- 
lamation Contest. 

Geologists wander through Cushman. 

Baseball. Holy Cross— 8, M. A. C— 0. Senior Night at dining 
hall. 

Baseball. W. P. I. beaten 12-4. Informal. 

Seniors make first appearance in caps and gowns. 

Assembly. Dr. McPherson of Springfield. 

Memorial day. Five companies escort G. A. R. Veterans to ceme- 
tery. S. T. S. beaten 5-4. 



JS^^:^ 




June 



June 


3 


June 


5 


June 


8 


June 


10 


June 


11 


June 


15 


June 


16 


June 


17 


June 


18 


Sept. 


11 


Sept. 


12 


Sept. 


13 


Sept. 


14 


Sept. 


16 


Sept. 


17 


Sept. 


18 



Sept. 21. 



Sept. 


23 


Sept. 


25 


Sept. 


26 


Sept. 


27 


Sept. 


28 


Sept. 


29 


Sept. 


30 



JUNE 1912 

Baseball. Vermont — 2, M. A. C. — 1. Faithful geologists said to 
have tramped the Range. 

Lambda Chi Alpha installed. 

Last Assembly of year, The M. A. C. Song Book out. 

Baseball. Trinity beaten 8-0. 

Non-senior exams begin. 

Much gray matter expended. 

Baseball. Amherst beaten 6-5. Commencement begins. 

Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Inter-class sing. 1913 gets the cup. Commencement drills. Lov- 
ing cup to "Cap" Williams. 

Sophomore-senior hop. 

SEPTEMBER 1912 
College opens. Assembly. Bonfire on campus. 
Gov. Foss visits college. 
Tug-of-war across pond — a draw. Christian Association reception 

to freshmen in the Drill Hall. 
Night shirt parade — rather tame. 
Dining hall opens on lunch counter system. 
Signal competition opens. 
Assembly. Prexy gives "watchword" for the year. Cike club 

candidates out. 
Six-man rope-pull won by sophs — 14 ft. President's rece| tion to 

freshmen. 
Freshman class picture taken. 

Assembly. Hon. James Logan, AVorcester. Siynul medals awarded. 
Exciting football scrimmage. 
Some freshmen ducked. 
Football. Union— 0, M. A. C— 0. Mettawamjie Trek. Social 

Union entertainment. 
Stock-judging team off to Brockton Fair. 
Mass meeting. 



253 



gy^SB^v^ 




Oct. 


2. 


Oct. 


5. 


Oct. 


7. 


Oct. 


9. 


Oct. 


10. 


Oct. 


11. 


Oct. 


U. 


Oct. 


15. 



OCTOBER 1912 

Assembly. Anniversary Day celebrated in Chapel. 

Freshmen win cross country run. Mettawampe Trek. Wilson 
Club formed. Football. Dartmouth— 47, M. A. C— 0. So- 
cial Union entertainment in Drill Hall. Dr. Sprague. 

"Flying Coffee Grinder" and "Flying Emblem" race on football field. 

Assembly. Dean Lewis starts political ball rolling. Rallies in 
Chapel! 

M. A. C. C. A. 

New M. A. C. Bulletin out. 

Football. Boston College beaten 42-0. Informal. 

Olive-drab uniforms for freshmen and officers arrive. 



FINIS 




Acknowledgement 




HE Board of Ed- 
itors of the 1914 
index extend 
their heartiest 



thanks to all who by word or 
deed have in any way, no 
matter how slight, assisted 
them. .'. .•. .•. .•. .•. .•. .•. .•. .•. 




cygiygysftjgiygugt 



5nibnl^^3n]ani:= 



siygygygygmgiL 



Tl^;sfDaT)^^= 



^ygiygmgiysiygiisi 



l^^^aH^SnlSnl 



Advertising Directory 



Adams Drug Store XIX 
American Dairy Su])|)ly Co. XIV-XXVIII 

Amherst Book Store III 

Amherst Co-op. Laundry XXVII 

Amherst House XXVII 

Beckmann's Candy Store XXIII 

Blodgett. F. E. X 

Bolles, E. M. II 

Bowker Fertilizer Co. XI 

Breck & Sons, Joseph VIII 

Campion XVIII 

Carpenter and Moorehouse VI 

Coe-Mortimer Co. XX 

College Drug Store IV 

College Store XIV 

Commonwealth Hotel XIX 

Copley Square Hotel XXIV 

Corwin & Co., C. R. XX 

Cowles, W. D. XXVIII 

Crumb, W. B. Yil 

Deuel's Drug Store III 

Dillon & Douglass XXVIII 

Eagle Printing & Binding Co. XII 

Elder, C. R. XXVIII 

Electric City Engraving Co. XV 

Epstein X 

Ewell III 

Fottler, Fiske, Rawson & Co. X 

Franklyn Davis Nursery Co. XXVI 

Gregory & Sons. J. J. H. VI 

Grey & Co., Thomas XXIV 

Grimm & Co., G. H. XXI 

Hammond's Slug Shot Works VIII 

Holyoke St. Railway Co. XX'VI 

Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. XXII 

International Instrument Co. XIV 

Jackson & Cutler IV 

Johnson, M. M. XXV 

Keuffel & Esser XXV 

Kingman, M. B. IV 

Kny-Scheerer Co. XXVII 



Labrovitz, I. M. 
Lager & Hurrell 
Lord & Burnham 

M. A. C. 
Marsh, E. D. 
Merriam Co., G. & C. 
MiUett, E. E. 
Mitchell, Woodbury Co. 
Morandi-Proctor Co. 



VII 

VI 

XIII 

XVI-XVII 

VI 

XX 

V 

XVIII 

XXVI 



National Blank Book Co. XXIII 

New England Bailed Shavings XXIV 

New England Nurseries VIII 

New England Plumbing Supply Co. XIV 

Norton, E. Russell XXIII 



Oriental Tea Co. 



XIX 



Page's Shoe Store 


II 


Pettingill, Andrews Co. 


XXV 


Pratt & Co., B. G. 


V 


Prospect House 


XI 


Puffer Bros. 


XXVI 


Read, G. P. 


XI 


Reed, Jacob 


XXIV 


Reliable Incubator Co. 


VIII 


Rockland-Rockport Lime Co. 


V 


Root Dairy Supply Co. 


XXII 


Ross Bros. 


V 


Sanderson & Thompson 


II 


Shattuek & Jones 


XXV 


Smith, E. 0. 


XXVI 


Sprainotor Co. 


IX 


Sjiriugficld Republican 


XVIII 


Standard Chanoal Co. 


XVIII 


Stevens Arms & 'i'ool Co. 


VII 


Terpsy Parlors 


V 


Vaughan's Seed Store 


XI 


Vermont Farm Machine Co. 


XXI 


Vermont M'f'g Co. 


XXI 


Welch Bros. 


X 


West Stockhridge Lime Co. 


XXI 


While Studio 


I 


Wright & Sons, H. E. 


XXII 


Ziegler & Co., P. R. 


XIX 



Shylock & Co. — Hazen and Bragg. 



PHOTOGRAPHERS TO THIS BOOK, TO SMITH, TO VASSAR, 






DnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnDnnnnnnnnnnnD 


n 




D 






□ 




n 






D 




□ 






D 




D 






D 


-,«i« /^f^z^"^^ 


D 






D 


■mTi^Ti^^^^ "" 


D 






□ 

□ 


^J^^^^DIO 


□ 

n 






□ 


1546-48 Broadway, New York 


D 






n 


(Between 45th and 46th Sts.. in Times Sq.) 


n 






□ 




n 






n 




n 






D 




□ 






n 




D 






D 




D 






D 




D 






□ 




D 






Q 


Studios also in 


D 






D 
D 
□ 


Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 


n 

D 

I] 






Northampton, Mass. 






South Hadley, Mass. 


D 






D 




□ 






D 




n 






n 




D 






n 




n 






n 




n 






n 




n 






n 




D 






D 




□ 






D 




D 






D 




D 






D 




□ 






□ 




□ 






n 




D 






a 


The School and College Department makes 


□ 






D 


available the best skilled artists and modern 


D 






□ 


methods, and also assures promptness and 


D 








accuracy in completion of work .'. . ". . '. . '. 


n 






n 




D 






n 








□ 


nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnc 




COLUMBIA, AND MANY OTHER COLLEGES FOR THE SEAS 


QN 





Still waters run deep. — Hcffron 
I 



And he shall be as a prop unto the band. — Howard. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



CLOTHIERS 

Hatters & Tailors 



Reliable merchandise at prices that are always as low as the lowest 

Sanderson & Thompson .'. .*. .'. .'. Amherst 



The Bo^s All Like to Trade at 

Page's 
Shoe Store 

The Home of Good Shoes 



EXPERT REPAIRING 



E. M. BOLLES 



The Store of Quality 
Tvhere college men get 
what they want in 



FOOTWEAR 



Walk Over Shoes $3.50, $4, $5, $6 

Stetson Shoes $5 — $8 



Sho-o-o-t! — Huichinson. 
II 



'Ox" twins — Jones and Freeborn. 



Kodaks 






Victor Talking 


Eastman's 






Machines 


Films 






Victor Records 


D 


euel's 


Drug 




Store 




Fountain Pens 






Huyler's 


Safety Razors 






Page & Shaw 


Leather Goods 






Apollo 


Pocket Books 






Candies 



You will find a full line of 

Blank Books 
Stationery 

and 
College Supplies 




Also all Magazines and 
DarTp Papers at 

Charles E. Ewells 

Amherst, Mass. 



AMHERST 
BOOK STORE 

Books, Stationery 
Pictures and 
Pennants 

Waterman's Ideal and 
Moore's Non-Leakable Fountain Pens 

We carry a large assortment of 
50c FICTION 

Leave your ENGRAVED CARDS and 
orders for PICTURE FRAMING 



Long — Oh, Lord — liow long — Lincoln, Lucas and Lcetc. 



The man who made New Jersey famous. — Major. 



COLLEGE DRUG STORE 

is the place to buy 

Foss '"Premier'" Chocolates 

Foss "'Quality'" Chocolates 

See our line of Cigurs, Cigarettes, Tobacco, Pipes 



COLLEGE DRUG STORE 

^ On the Way to the Post Office McGRATH £? CURLEY 



Headquarters for 

Sheets 
Pillow Cases 
and Quilts 

A full assortment of DENIMS for 
corner seats 

A large Line of 

Dry Goods, Notions and 
Groceries 

Jackson & Cutler 



M. B. Kingman 
Florist 

M. A. C. '82 

i<;>j t<;5 ti;^ t<;5 1<:;5 1$) !<;>] i<;>] ii;>j g;>3 t<:;3 

Roses, Carnations 
Violets 

\<^^^^^^^^^^^ 

PRICES RIGHT 

STORE: 37 South Pleasant Street, 
Amherst, Mass. 



Grand Worker of Tlie BhiS.— Morse. 



We got him because we 'Needham.' 



FRILANDLmf 



A mixture of 

A High Calcium 

HY DRAT ED LIME 

and 

A High Calcium 
POWDERED LIMESTONE 

Ready to apply to the land 



Made by the 

Rockland & Rockport Lime Co. 

45 Milk Street, Boston 



Illustrated booklet free 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Ross Bros. Co. 

90 and 92 Front Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



Dealers in Everything that is good 
for the Farm, Garden and Dairy 




Don't grow cider apples. Rid your trees of scale and funtrous pests and grow 
niiinber one apples by using "Scalecide"— the one absolutely sure scale spray. 
"Scalecide" is easy to handle, it will not clog or corrode the nozzle or injure the 
skin. It will build up a poorly paying, run down orchard and make it return 
large profits. It will maintain a good orchard in prime condition. "Scalecide" 
is the best spray for San Jo e. It kills ever>' scale it reaches. "Scalecide" goes 
further, is cheaper and more effective than lime sulphur. Endorsed by Experi- 
ment Stations and used by the best orchardis s everywhere. "Scalecide" will 
solve your scale problem. Our SERVICE DEPA KTMENT furnishes even- 
thing for the orchard. Write to-day for our new booklet "Pratt's Handbook for 
Fruit (Jrowers" and " 'Scalecide'— the Tree Saver." They contain valu'ble 
information for qrcliardists._ Every fruit grower should have them. Hoth 



are free. B. G. Pratt Co., Dept. 



50 Church Street, New York City. 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

Cleansing, Pressing, 
Repairing 

Quickest Service. Best Work, Lowest Price 

All work carefully done. Work called 

for and delivered. 

Teams will call every day at M. A. C. 

WM. FRANKLYN, Prop. 

Rear Nasli Bl'k, Amherst. Tel. No. 342-4 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Manufacturing Optician 

Prescription lense grinding a specialty. Violin, 
Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Strings. 

COLLEGE SEAL JEWELRY 

Special attention given to all kinds of 
Fine Watch Work 



a liis face opened.— .V"/.. 



A perfect lady. — Parker. 



nnDnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnna 
n n 

n Amherst Furniture and Carpet Rooms H 



n 
n 
n 
n 

D 
D 
D 

n 

D 

n 



MAKES A SPECIALTY of Students' Furniture, 
Carpets, Rugs, Draperies, Bedding, Book- 
Cases, Blacking-Cases, Desks, Window Shades, 
Picture Fi-ames, Cord, Etc., at lowest prices. Save 
freight and cartage money by purchasing here 



D 
D 
D 

n 

D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 



n n r\ A/[ A n>Qj-j 1 8-20-22 main street n 

U t. U. NiAKon - AMHERST, MASS. ^ 

D n 

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnannnnnnnnnnn 



Carpenter & Morehouse 



BOOK and JOB 



Printers 



The Amherst Record 



Amherst, 



GREGOR Y 'S HONEST SEEDS 

CATALOG FREE TO ALL 

J. J. H. Gregory & Sons 

Seed Growers and 

Seed Dealers 



Marblehead, 



Mass. 



ORCHIDS 

We are headquarters for 
ORCHIDS 
on this continent. We have 
them from all parts of the world 
wtiere orchids grow and we 
respectfully solicit orders from 
private parties. Botanical Gar- 
dens or Florists. 

Catalogue on application 
LAGER & HURRELL 
Orcliid-Growers and Importers 
SUMMIT. - - N.J. 



Mass. 



A h — 11 of a nuisance. — The bread line. 



The Terrible Triumvirate. — "Sid," "Billy," "Doc." 



S T E V E IN S 

INDOO R TARGET RIFLES 

Designed expressly 

for 

College Teams 

Holders of World's Championships Winners of 50 Meter Match at Olympic Games 

SPECIAL PRICE TO RIFLE CLUBS 




|J. STEVENS ARMS & TOOL COMPANY 

I p. O. Box 5005. CHICOPEE FALLS, MASS. 

I Largest Makers of Sporting Firearms in the World 

fflii!iiiiiiiiiingii(iiii^[iiiiM ii!(i!(iiiimig[in ininimii^iiiii! laMimniiiM imniiiiiiniiiiiiKiiiiigi! imni 



Wallace B. Crumb 

Manufacturers of 

Warriner Patent 
Chain - Han^in^ Stanchion 




Forestville - - Conn. 



Students, Attention! 

Have your clothes made to order 
at the Tailoring Parlor of 

LABROVITZ 

Style, Fit and Workmanship the Best, 
Guaranteed 



Full Dress Suits to Rent. Gents ' Furnish- 
ings, E. & W. Collars, Dress Sliirts. 
Cleaning, Repairing and Press- 
ing Neatly Done 



I. M. LABROVITZ 

1 1 Amity Street Tel. 302-M 



The Bull Pen.— ex House. 
VII 



All is not gold that glitters. — Read. 



itrjoCatdy/i 



yju6/UA^.< 



yuftie^. 



'c^cMatliiA/^^U^Xk^ (JjUa. efAato 



"HAMMOND'S SLUG SHOT" 

USED FROM OCEAN TO OCEAN 

A light, composite, fine powder, easily distributed either by duster, 
bellows, or in water by sprayiny;. Thoroughly reliable in killing 
Currant Worms, Potato Bugs, Cabbage Worms, Lice, Slugs, Sow Bugs, 
etc., and it is also strongly impregnated with fungicides. tC^Put up 
in Popular Packages at Popular Prices. Sold by Seed Dealers and 
Merchants. 

HAMMOND'S SLUG SHOT WORKS. FISHKILL-ON-HUDSON, N. Y. 




OF EVERY KIND 
Implements, Machines, Woodenware 

Nursery and Seed Trial Grounds Conducted by 
The Breck=Robinson Nursery Co., 

Munroe Station, Lexington, Mass. 

Especial attention pairt to Landscape Designing, 

Planting, Forestry, Horticulture, etc, 

BrecR's Real Estate Agency 

Farms, Suburban Properties, etc. 

BrecK's Bureau 

Furnishes Appi ovrd Eniiil(>y<-(<s, Mercantile, 



JOSEPH BRECK 6 SONS, Corp. 

Sl-52 North Market St.. Boston, Mass. 

TelcplKine liichnioiKl 2:i(;o 



High Grade 



Deciduous and 
Evergreen Trees, 

Northern Grown |^,tfrd 

Herbaceous Perennials, Trees for Or- 
chard, Park and Forest Planting. 

We solicit correspondence relative to any planting 
problem. Send for oar Illustrated Catalog 



New England Nurseries Co. 

BEDFORD, MASS. 



Reliable Incubators and 

Bv/-w/-»/-lo ve Have been operated suc- 
rOOUerS cessfully in all the prin- 
cipal Agricultural Experimental Sta- 
tions ill the Tnited States. 
They have been operated successfully in every 
civilized country in the world. 

Reliable Incubator & Brooder Co. 

Quincy, 111. 

Is the oldest concern today manufacturing Incubators and 

Brooders. All goods are positively GUARANTEED. 

Send for prices 



The city where nobody cares. — " Hamp.' 
VIII 



Dyspeptics" Home. — Kennel Club. 



Over 100 Kinds and Sizes of Spra- 
motors of which we here show Three 
Styles: 
r^ HAND POWER HORSE POWER ENGINE POWER ^i 

SpramotorS 





For Painting Buildings, 
Whitewashing and Disin- 
fecting. 

For Orchards, Vineyards, 
Row Crops and Weed 
Destruction. 

All of the very highest 
grade and guaranteed for, 
life. 

Over 100 Gold Medals 
and First Awards. 

90 Page treatise on the 
disea.ses affecting fruit trees 
and their remedies- FREE 
AGENTS WANTED 

SPRAMOTOR 
COMPANY 

1500 Erie Street 
BUFFALO, N. Y. 

1550 King Street 
LONDON, CAN. 



The Port of Missing Men.— Dickie's. 



Much ado about nothing. — " lierbij." 



SEEDS 

For the Planter of large quanti- For the small home 
ties. For the dairymen. garden. For the farmer. 




Grass Seed Grain Millett 

Corn for Ensilage 

We keep one grade of seeds — the best to be obtained 

OUR SPECIALTY 

Highest Grade Seeds for the 

Market Gardener, Florist 

and Private Gardener 



Fottler, Fiske, Rawson Co. 

SEEDS. BULBS. AND PLANTS 
Faneuil Hall Square, Boston, Mass. 



EstabHshed 1877 



Inocrporated 1912 



Welch Bros. Co. 

226 Devonshire Street, 
Boston, Mass. 



Wholesale shippers of cut 
flowers and florist supplies. 
A trial order is solicited. 



It' yoti want to be solid with the girls 

you must have your clothes 

pressed and cleaned at 

EPSTEIN'S 

11 Amity St. Maroon Store 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Most liberal ticket system in town 

TEL. 303-11 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College Stables, 

as well as those of many progressive farmers, 

are kept sweet and clean with 



Baled Shavings 

Supplied in carload lots only by 

F. E. Blodgett 

Suncook, N. H. 



I might have Be(e)n. — Miss Struiigf 



Give me my pound of. flesh, I must have moneys. — Tarbcll. 



^r^ 




Mr. Julius Gardner, Barnstead. "N. H., seeded this piece -with Bowker's. the preceding tall 



""^or the Land's Salce^ 

{Ret. U. S. Pat. OilM 

BOWKER^S FERTILIZERS 

They Enrich the Earth and those who till it 

BO \X/ TfF"R FERTILIZER COMPANY 
Vy W IV i-i IN. Boston New York Buffalo Philadelphia Baltimore 



Prospect House 

Telephone 8351 

PERRY'S 

The place to eat at all times. Attractive 

dining room and excellent service 

Order a Table Ahead 

17 Amity Street, Amherst, Mass. 

When you want 

SEEDS, BULBS 

or 

Anything for the Garden 



Vaughan'*s Seed Store 

25 Barclay St., New York 



G. P. Read, Inc. 

199 Duane Street 
Ne^v York 

Branch Office 

Albion, N. Y. 



\\/^E furnish all the supplies nec- 
essary to be used by the fruit 
grower to prevent his fruit from 
getting- bruised at the time of pack- 
ing and during transit. .'. .'. .'. 




If I ho cat wim't eat it, give it to "BucUot." — Wood. 



Fiddle up. — Bragg. 



EAGLE PRINTING & 
BINDING COMPANY 



& 




School and College Printing 

For years we have made a specialty of this 
sort of printing and have every facility for 
executing it promptly and rvell. Our ex- 
perience and suggestions are alwa\)s at your ^ 
disposal, and with the care which we devote 
to each piece of printing, the results are sure 
to be pleasing. :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: 

We printed and hound this hook 



Flatiron Building, Eagle Square 

PiTTSFiELD, Massachusetts 

Telephone 730 — College Department 



The wind, she blow, she blow like — 
Bime-by she blow some more. — Bokelund. 
XII 



First cousin to Maude: Haw, Haw. — "Mike 




We Built Your College Greenhouses 



You can't forget us while you are in col- 
lege, because every day you are reminded of 
us by the houses we erected on the 
Campus. 

See to it that you remember us after you 
leave your Alma Mater, and want a green- 
house of your own. 

Patronize Lord & Burnham as "loyal 
rooters for Massachusetts Agricultural 
College." 



Lord & Burnham Company 

SALES OFFICES 

New York, St. James Building Boston, Tremont Building 

Philadelphia, Franklin Bank, Building Chicago, Rookery Building 

Rochester, Qranite Building 

FACTORIES 

Iwinglon, N. Y. Des Plaines, III. 



il.V Mollo; Tlicre's saiVly in luuuboi-s.— «ro«-/i. 

xm 



A bicycle, — my kingdom for a bicycle. — Diinhar 



AXGIER -1:5 



TAR HELL '14 



M. A. C. STORE 

CONFECTIONERY, TONICS 
ALL STUDENT SUPPLIES 
STATIONERY, POST- 
ERS, BANNERS 



ELDRIDGE 14 



KENDALL 10 



A 2-BOTTLE 



ELECTRIC 
BABCOCK TESTER 

is better than a 
12-Bottle Hand Tester 




International Instrument Co. 

32 Church St., Cambridge, Mass. 



The American 
Dairy Supply Company 

Manufacturers of the 

CERTIFIED 
MILK BOTTLE CAP 



WASHINGTON 



- - D. C. 



Edward T. Davis 
Treas. and Mgr. 



Long Distance 'Phone 



New England 
Plumbing Supply Co. 

Plumbers', Steam and Gas Fitters' 
and Tinners' Supplies 

166-172 Bridge St., SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



Laugh and tlie world laughs with you. — Edgcrton. 
XIV 



Fireworks from Salem. — Edwards. 



=c 




TH^ Electric City Engraving Co. 

B UFFALO. N.Y. 



WE MADE THE ENGRAVINGS FOR THIS BOOK. 



r»lr 



O 



The king of the Kaiuly K\diS.—Eldridgc. 
XV 



The Golddust Twins. — Freedman and Levinc. 



MASSACHUSETTS 
COLLEGE 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College is a public service institution, the function of which 
is to benefit the agriculture and rural life of the state and incidentally that of the nation. 

In the fulfilment of its mission the College undertakes the work of Investigation, Resident 
Instruction, and Extension Service. 

Investigation follows three distinct lines: (1) scientific research, through which are discov- 
ered new laws governing the growth of plants and animals; (2) experimentation, which seeks to 
ascertain the best methods of applying science to practice; and (3) the agricultural survey or 
inventory of agricultural conditions and possibilities. 

The purpose of Instruction given to resident students is to prepare them for the agricultural 
vocations and also to train them in the principles of good citizenship. Students pursuing the reg- 
ular four years' course may specialize in any of the following named departments: 

Agriculture General Horticulture 

Agronomy Floriculture 

Animal Husbandry Forestry 

Dairying Landscape Gardening 

Poultry Husbandry Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 

Economic Entomology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Undergraduate courses are also offered in a large number of departments the work of which 
is not arranged as a "major". 

The Graduate School admits college graduates for advanced study in agriculture, botany, 
chemistry, entomology, horticulture, mathematics, veterinary science, and zoology. 

The task of the Extension Service is to disseminate agricultural knowledge to all people of 
the state having rural interests, and to assume an attitude of leadership or of cooperation in various 
activities, educational, social, or economic, which tend to benefit agriculture and country life. 



Sounding brass and tinkling cymbal. — Frye. 
XVI 



The little white hope. — Griffin. 



AGRICULTURAL 

Amherst, Mass. 



Thousands of persons are directly reached each year by the Extension Service. Some of the 
types of work organized by this branch of the College are: 

Winter School of Agriculture 

Summer School of Agriculture 

Farmers' Week 

Conference of Rural Social W'orkers 

Correspondence Courses in Agriculture 

Itinerant Schools of Agriculture 

Educational Exhibits 

Demonstration Orchards 

Boys' and Girls' Clubs 

Traveling Libraries 

District Field Agencies 

Lecture Courses 

Five Facts of Interest About the Massachusetts Agricultural College 

1. It train.s men for vocations not yet overorowdt'd. 

2. It offers courses of study in 26 departments of academic instruction covering 

the fields of Agriculture, Horticulture, Sciences, Humanities, and Rural 
Social Science. 

3. Its enrollment of students in four years" courses exceeds 500 in number. 

4. Its field of service is the entire state. 

5. Its educational advantages are practically free. 

ADDRESS: at Amherst, Mass.: 

Dr. Wifliam P. Brooks for Experiment Station Bulletins (free). 

Prof. William D. Third for announcements of Short Courses, information relative to Exten- 
sion Service, Agricultural Leaflets (free), and with questions (for reference to authori- 
ties) on farm practices and agricultural science. 

Dr. Charles E. Marshall for information concerning the Graduate School. 

Prc.t. Keiiyon L. Ihiltcr field for complete catalog, illustrated booklet, and general information. 



Sweet and low, sweet and low. 
Wind of the western sea. — .liidersou. 



Six days shalt tliou labor and no more. — Jeff. 



GOODS FOR MEN 







C. and K. DERBIES 






NECKWEAR 


James 


R. 


Keiser's Welch, Margetson, London 




English and Scotch Woolens 



CA MP ION, Tailor and Haberdasher 



The Collegeman's Newspaper 
The Springfield Republican 

has special correspondents at all of the 

leading colleges. 

It prints daily the best reports of college sports 

and activities of all kinds. Read it and keep 

abreast of the times in your own college and 

others. 

EVERYBODY EVERYWHERE 

Recognizes the Republican as the best newspaper 
in this region and one of the leaders in America. 

Show your discrimination — read a real news- 
paper. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

THE DAILY REPUBLICAN— Three cents a copy, 16 
cents a week, 70 cents a month, S2 a quarter, SS a year; 
including the Sunday edition, 20 cents a week, S5 cents a 
month, S2.50 a quarter, .SIO a year. 

THE SUNDAY REPUBLICAN— Five cents a copy, 50 
cents a quarter, S2 a year. 

THE WEEKLY REPUBLICAN— Three cents a copy, 
25 cents for three months, SI a year. 

All subscriptions are payable strictly in advance. 

Sample copies sent free. 



Mitchell Woodbury Company 

556 to 560 RD'^TDM Corner 

Atlantic Avenue ±JK^>~j i KJ1\ Congress Street 

EXHIBIT in their Hotel Department every re- 
quirement in CHINA, GLASS and SILVER for 
the proper equipment of hotels, restaurants and 
public institutions. Seven floors. Hotel Depart- 
ment Representatives: Mr. Arthur N. Howe, Mr. 
Maurice G. Cochrane, Mr. Warren A. Merrill, 
Mr. Theron T. Romer. 

Telepfione 4600 Main 
Branch Exchange 



CHARCOAL 

STANDARD CHARCOAL CO. 
supplies Colleges, Clubs, Hotels, Foundries, 
and Factories throughout the New England 
States with their best quality Hard-Wood 
Charcoal. 

20 Water St., Somerville, Mass. 

Long Di-stance Te!., Som. 80 



Why should it live.' — Cluirchitl. 
XVIII 



The Lord and I. — Clegg. 



nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnDDnnnnnnnnnn 

I I T T 1 1 ^^^ I Come in and see our big line of Q 



D 

D 

D 

D 

D 

D 

D 

D 

D 

D _ 

D 

D 

D 

'Dan 



Our line of Cameras, Films and Cyko Papers is complete. 
The most distinctive Stationery in town displayed at all 
times. 

DRUG STORE GOODS 

of the best quality at reasonable prices always obtainable. 

Avail yourself of our many store privileges such as free 
local telephone service, town directory, postage stamps, guides 
and our information bureau. 

Whether you buy or not we will be just as pleased to see you. 

HENRY ADAMS & CO., The Rexall Store 

ON THE CORNER 

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn 



Oriental Tea 
Company 

Scollay Square 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Sign of the Big Tea Kettle 




P.R.ZIE6LERCO. 



7 MERCHANTS ROW 

BOSTON.- MASS. 



DAIRY BARN EQUIPMENT 




COMMONWEALTH 
HOTEL 

BOSTON, MASS. 



And slill tlicv gazed and still tlio wonder grew, 
That one small head could carry all he knew. — Clai/. 
XIX 



Everybody loves a chicken.- 



1857 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 



1913 



(THE BUSINESS FARMERS' FAVORITE for OVER FIFTY YEARS) 

Have the Quality That Means Economy 

They coiuhiue the exiicrience of over fifty yeuis in the ferlifizcr business with 
the latest teachings of Agricultural science. They are True Plant Foods — Con- 
centrated, Available, Sure in Their Action, and benefit alike Crops and Soil. 

h Pajis to Use Them 

GENUINE THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(Key-Tree Brand) 

Gives a Large Amount of .\vailable Pliosplioric Acid, without acidity oracidulation. Also con- 
tains a Large Amount of Lime. Has no equal for Clover, Alfalfa, Timothy, Cereals and Fruits 

(Our literature is prepared by agricultural experts whose experience covers many years of practical farm 
work, as well as the training of Agricultural Collegesiand Experiment Stations. Let us l<now in what 
subjects you are most interested and we shall be glad to co-operate with you in every way possible) 

The Coe-Mortimer Company '' '^'^•"'New' S oty 

BUSIXES,-^ E8TABLI,SIIED 1S57 



C. R. Corwin Co. 

Receivers of and 
Dealers in 

BUTTER, EGGS 
POULTRY, GAME 

nnnnnnnnnD 

nnnnnnnn 

nnnnnn 

nnnn 

DD 
D 



Basement, 2 Faneuil Hall Market 
South Side 



Telephone 
Connection 



BOSTON, MASS. 



WEBSTER'S 

NEW INTERNATIONAL 

DICTIONARY 

THE MERRIAM WEBSTER 
The Only New unabridged dictionary in 

many years. 
An Encyclopedia. Contains the pith and 

essence ot an authoritative library. 
The Only dictionary with the A'eH' 

Divided Page. 
400,000 Words Defined. 2700 Ptiges. 

6000 Illustrations. Cost $400,000. 

Write for Bample pagea. 

G. & C. MERRIAM CO. , Springfield. Mau., U.S.A. 




Honk! Honk! — Ralph Davis. 
XX 



What care I if the sun don't shine? — Dearing. 



NITED 
JSTATEc 

CREAM SEPARATORS 




Read Their Points 

of Leadership 

Close Skimming — Holds World's Record. 

Light Running — Bowl about half the di- 
ameter of older models. 

Easy Cleaning — Only separator adapted for 
m echanical washing. 

Durability — Many in use 18 or more years. 

Most Sanitary— Nickel Silver Sections cannot rust, and hold the 
viscous matter less tenaciously. 

Best Quality Cream— No specks of butter found in U. S. Separa- 
tor Cream. 

Convenience — Not only is the Separator itself superior to all others; 
but its manufacturers are near and can always give quick, 
inexpensive assistance, if needed. 

Price — Its quahty and service make it the cheapest to use. 
CORRESPONDENCE AND INVESTIGATION INVITED 



Vermont Farm Machine Co. 



Bellows Falls 
Vermont 



Headquarters for 

Pure Vermont Maple Syrup 

and Sugar of the 

Finest Quality 

G. H. Grimm 

RUTLAND, ------ VERMONT 

Vermont M'Fg Co. 



Manufacturers of 

HIGH GRADE BUTTERINE 



Providence, R. I. and Boston, Mass. 

Fa<^tory Branch 



CLIFFORD L. MILLER 



- - President 



West Stockbridge 
Lime Co. 



Manuf.icturcrs of 



High Grade Finishing, Common 
and Agricultural 



LIMES 



Office 
no East 23rd Street, New York 
Kiln.s 
West Stockbridge, Mass. 



Jack .Johnson has nothing on me. — Baker. 
XXI 



Don't call me "Lizzie." — Tl'hiddcn. 



Fills Bottles Uniformly 




PERFECTION BOTTLE FILLERS 

are absolutely sanitary. The valve seal on the cap seal of bottles and pre- 
vent anv leakage even if the top is chipped off — entirely 
ELIMINATE WASTE OF MILK AND SLOP 
around the bottling room — can be cleaned in a few minutes. 

Steam travels 3-4 around — uses less steam. 



Milk Stays Sweet 
in Clean Bottles 

Our free bulletin on 

bottle washing shows how 

bottles can be washed and 

sterilized the best and most 

No Waste economical way. 

THE PERFECTION TURBINE BOTTLE WASHER 

has more power and uses less steam than any similar de- 
vice — the steam passes ''4 the distance around the tur- 
bine v\heel. 

Ask for free circulars on Pasteurizing, Filling and 
Capping, Cooling, etc. We are complete outfitters for 
creameries and dairies — our expert advice free. 




Root Dairy Supply Co., Main Office, West Grove, Pa. 



BRANCH STORE— PROVIDENCE. R. I. 



HENRY E. 'WRIGHT 
£? SONS 

Incorporated 
Manufacturers and Dealers in 

Everything for the 

Milk Dealer and 

Dairy 



50 Spice Street, Charlestown 
BOSTON. MASS. 



THE HOLYOKE VALVE & 
HYDRANT CO. 

Jobbers of 

W^rougfht Iron and Brass 
Pipe Asbestos and Mag- 
nesia Boiler Coverings 

PIPES CUT TO SKETCH 
Mill Supplies 



ENGINEERS 6? CONTRACTORS 



HOLYOKE. MASS. 



Nature never repeats, Thank Heaven. — "R. P." 
XXII 



S-s-s-s-s-stubbie. 



E. RUSSELL NORTON 



85 Water St. 
BOSTON 

A nthr aci t e 
and Bituminous 



1 Broad-way 
NE^W YORK 



COAL 



Our Coal Produces the Best Results 



BECKMANN'S 

Candies and Ice 

Creams, Fancy 

Ices 




247-249 Main Street 
hi orthampton 




National Loose Leaf Note Books 

For tlie college student there is nothing more 
useful than a National Simplex Note Book. The 
pages may be inserted or removed instantly by 
opening or closing the rings. This book comes in 
several sizes, and paper with various rulings is 
supplied. Whenever you buy blank books be sure 
they bear the Eagle trade mark. 

The National Blank Book Co. 

HOLYOKE. MASS. 



JACOB REED'S SONS 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Gold Medal Uniforms 



fUR EQUIPMENT AND FACILITIES for iJioducing uniforms 
for Colleges and Military Schools are unequalled by any other 
house in the United States. You are sure of intelligent and ac- 
curate service in ordering of us. 
The uniforms worn at the Massachusetts Agricultural College are finished 
examples of the character, cjuality and appearance of our product. 



JACOB REED'S SONS 

1424-1426 Chestnut Street ------ Philadelphia 








Baled (Pianer) ShavJiigs 

For Bedding Stock 



Used by the Agricultural Colleges, State 
Institutions, Progressive Dairy- 
men and Breeders 



Cheaper and Better Than Straw 



Copley Square Hotel 

Cor. Huntington Ave., Exeter 
and Blagden Streets 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Headquarters for Amherst Students 
When in Boston 



AMOS H. WHIPPLE 



Proprietor 



For delivered price in carload 
lots write 

New England Baled Shavings Co. 

ALBANY, N. Y. 



Seeds— Plants— Bulbs 

SUPERIOR QUALITY 

Syracuse Plows — Deering Mowers 
and other good things 

No Second Grade Sold 

Seed and Bulb Catalogs forwarded on application 

THOS. J. GREY CO. 



32 So. Market Street 



Boston, Mass. 



K & E 

Surveying Instruments, Transits, 
Levels, Plane Tables, Etc. 




Are the recognized Stan- 
dard in all branches of the 
Engineering Profession. 
The excellence of their 
design and construction 
insures accuracy and re- 
liability under all condi- 
tions of use. 



We build a complete line of Instruments for 

Farm and Drainage Surveys. See 

Our Catalogue 

Keuffel & Esser Co. 

NEW YORK HOBOKEN, N. Y. 

CHICAGO ST. LOUIS SAN FR.\NCISCO MONTREAL 

Drawing Materials hiathematical and Surveying 
Measuring Tapes 



Students' 
Portable Lamps 

Electrical Merchandise 



Automobile and Motor Boat 
Fittings 

Pettingell-Andrews Co. 

Tearl St., Coriiei- Allantic .Vvc. 

BOSTON 

"Three Minutes from South Statiou" 



Old Trusty 
Incubators 



It--' 

OLD TRUSTY is an Incubator that 
can be counted on. Send for big 
free 1913 book. So many thousands of 
users have found a place that Old Trusty 
fits in. I am sure you can, too. Its suc- 
cess is the beacon light of poultry success 
in the last ten years. I freely admit that 
some make a failure of Poultry. Our book 
tells why and tells how, and of those who 
have turned failure to success. Don't 
delay, but get my book now. A postal 
will bring it. Address 

M. M. Johnson Co. 

Clay Center - - - - Nebraska 



Joseph L. Newton, Pres. \V. Munroe Hill, Treas. 

Charles H. Thayer, Vice-Pres. Allen E. Newton, Secy. 



Shattuck & Jones 
FISH 




bis Fanouil Hall Market 

BOSTON 



TERRAPIN and GREEN TURTLE 
SOFT CRABS and OYSTERS 



ESTABLISHED 1850 



1,200 ACRES 



TREES 

We are wholesale growers of First Class 
Nursery Stock of all kinds — Fruit, Shade, 
Ornamental Trees, Shrubbery, Hedges, 
Small Fruits, etc.. Asparagus, Straw- 
berries and California Privet in large 
quantities. The BEST is the CHEAP- 
EST. Ours is the CHEAPEST because 
it is the BEST. Handling dealers' or- 
ders a specialty. Catalogue Free. .". .'. 

Franklin-Davis Nur- 
sery Company 



BALTIMORE 

M A R Y L A N D 




Try Agawam Brand 

COFFEE AND 
CANNED GOODS 

E. O. SMITH, 

Springfield, Mass. 



Morandi-Proctor 
Company 

Designers and Manufacturers of 

COOKING APPARATUS 

Hotels, Restaurants, Clubs, Institutions and 
Steamships 



Go to Mt. Tom 



48-50 Union Street 



BOSTON 



'~p*HERE the world is at your feet. 
■*■ There the radiant beauty of the 
Uindscape reveals itself in infinite vari- 
etj'. You see mountains like great bil- 
lows, with deep, far shadowy valleys 
between; long uplands with slender 
spires rising here and there from clust- 
ered homes; green meadows, fallow 
fields and stretches of woodland; busy 
cities and towns whose sounds of human 
toil cannot penetrate the repose of this 
grand height; the "Long Biver," with 
a history overflowing with legend and 
tradition, sweeping proudly by through 
mountain pass and lovely banks to the 
sea, winding for many a mile within 
tlic boundaries of this noble outlook. 



PUFFER BROS, 

A FULL LINE OF HOTEL, 
CLUB, STEAMER & SCHOOL 

SUPPLIES 



'"We attend personally to all or- 
ders. Our success depends up- 
on our reputation. Our reputa- 
tion depends on oui' methods of 
doing business. Shippers Cali- 
fornia and Foreign Fruits .". .'. 



20 Mercantile St. Boston, Mass. 



Special attention given to 
large and small spreads 



Ample room for transients 



Amherst House 

D. H. Kendrick, Prop. 



Terms reasonable 



House recently equipped with 
modern improvements 



The Kny-Scheerer 
Company 

Department of Laboratory Supplies 



Manufacturers and Importers of 

High Grade Chemical 

Apparatus and 

Chemicals 



Catalogues sent free on application 

404-410 West 27th St. 
New York - - - - U. S. A. 



Amherst 
Co-Op. 
Laundry 

High Grade College Work 

LAUNDRY 

Ralph Borden, Agent E. C. Kdwards, Agent 
DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Fred S. Merrill, Agent, C S. C House 
85 Pleasant Street 



Put Full Name and Address 
on Laundry 



W. D. COWLES 
Tel. 173 



J. HERBERT HOWARD 
Tel. 127-3 



W. D. Cowles & Co. 
LUMBER 

WOOD and TIES 



Railroad Lumber and 
(niestimt Poles of All 
Kinds a Specialty::::: 



North Amherst Massachusetts 




The American Dairy Suppiy Company 



CTUREKS OF ■: 



Certified Milk Bottle Cap 
WASHINGTON D. C. 



Dillon & Douglas 



DISTRIBUTORS OF 

GOLD MEDAL 

BUTTER 



BLUE RIBBON 

EGGS 



Springfield 



WE'VE BEEN SELLING 

COAL 

FOR YEARS 

Also a Complete Line of 
HARDWARE SUPPLIES 



C. R. ELDER 

AMHERST