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^^^. ARCHIVES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF 

lltl MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST 



RG-45/00/I5 
INDEX--1941 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/index1941univ 




Eiilire Conlcnts CopyriijIU, lUJiJ, by the 19-'fl Index, 
Massachusetts State College, Amherst, Massachusetts 




4|tf«^tt»«3M^ 




*1U 19^1 Onde^ 

"For our College, the INDEX is a directing 
signor pointing finger; and it will continue to 
point in future years ... to indicate a com- 
plete record of one more year taken from the 
life of our Alma Mater ... to awaken 
our memories of college friendships 
. . . and to point another year past, 
another noteworthy step 
onward." President 
Hugh P. Baker 







MASSACH 



A M H E R S 1 




ETTS STATE COLLEGE 



MASSACHUSETTS 




(left) "Dad and Warrior" — photo by Donald 
(right) Lehrer Julian checks exams in office 



RTHUR N. Julia 



N 



DEDICATION 




A DIGNIFIED, professorial figure dismounts from an old 
wheel, stands it in a rack, and enters the Chapel. Then, 
his classroom filled with expectant undergraduate faces, he 
leans or sits on a table and mixes German verbs with stories 
of his days in Illinois or in the Dentschland of a generation ago. 

Arthur Nelson Julian's immediate forebears were Eng- 
lish — his mother a Midwestern teacher, his father a Cornish- 
man who migrated to Canada and then to Plato Center, 
Illinois, where Arthur was born November 22, 1885. Because 
most Plato Center citizens were German immigrants, he per- 
force spoke German. At nearby Elgin, a Scottish community, 
Arthur found his intellectual father, the Principal of Elgin 
Academy and a teacher of the classics. 

"Should I major in Greek or German?" he asked himself at 
Northwestern University. Deciding on German, he was 
elected to Phi Beta Kappa, and was graduated in 1907. After 
teaching German at Elgin Academy for two years, he trav- 
elled and studied in Germany for a year and a half. Returning 
to America in 1911, he became German instructor at State. 

In 1913 Arthur Julian married Helen Gaskill. At his home 
on the northern edge of campus he has lived a close family life 
with his four daughters and two sons, spending his spare time 
on his hobbies — photography and gardening. 

Then came World War I. Since the chemistry department 
lost men and German courses were cut short. Professor Julian 
was transferred to chemistry. From 1920, however, he has 
devoted full time to German. On campus he has also worked 
in both college honorary societies. 

As a teacher, Professor Julian is an enthusiast; as a human 
being, a friend to students; as a part of college life, "a swell 
prof." Unhurried by the turmoil of modern living, he repre- 
sents one of the old guard; and his wheel— as he rides it home 
in the afternoon — symbolizes a cultured gentleman's peaceful 
way of life in a world gone mad. 




Taken from over the Grounds Service Buildins, this panorama shows Memorial Hall and the Old Chapel with the Holyoke Range In the distance 




(Photograph by Sargent ) 



QG4ii/p4^ Ge4^ie^ 



Here is the hub of the campus — the 
chime tower and the war memorial next 
to it. 

The Old Chapel officially houses the 
Liberal Arts Department — class-rooms, 
cubby-hole offices, seminar room, and 
auditorium. The chimes in the Old Chapel 
tower punctuate the day's activities and 
will always be associated with Shake- 
speare, American government, and with 
the horrors of Public Speaking 29. 

Adjoining the Chapel is the more pro- 
saic Memorial Hall — the home of aim- 
less people, busy people, different and 
diffident people. . .It accommodates ves- 
pers, religion, the music department, the 
CoUe(/ian, the 1941 Index, the Alumni 
Office, and even bowling alleys. 




Summer scene of students going to classes— taken from a "Libe" window 



irtw^ 














Lewis Hall shot from a Thatcher window 



R. 



,ENDEZVOUS of the maroon-topped neophytes, the 
newest addition to the campus, the center of frosh midnight grind 
and bull sessions, the school home of the men of '44 .... 

Most frosh living at Lewis hail from metropolitan Boston and 
Western Massachusetts, while at the other extreme are those who 
have traveled from six outside states and Hawaii. Hawaii bade 
Aloha to Bob Engelhard, one of the College's promising football 
heroes who now lives at the new dorm. Social life at Lewis Hall 
ranges from ping pong to the vie parties held there frequently. 

On October 20, 1940 the new frosh dorm held a reception for 
the faculty, the staff, and their families to visit the building which 
was opened September 15 and which was constructed by funds 
raised by the Alumni Building Corporation. (Large picture of 
Lewis Hall on opposite page was taken from Thatcher Hall by 
Senior Donald Simpson especially for the 1941 Index.) 



Jle^uMA. <JlcdL 




Freshmen 




^e^inoM 



Cool shadows on the stone 



A pickled frog bares its heart to very inquiring zoolosy major In lab 



Feature attraction of Fernald Hall (af- 
fectionately called "Infernal Hall") is 
the study of Rocks, Frogs, and Insects. 
From September to June students who 
major in Geology, Zoology, and Entomo- 
logy spend mornings, afternoons, and 
frequently evenings over laboratory 
benches or over notebooks in the amphi- 
theatre lecture room. On November 11, 
almost thirty-one years ago, Fernald 
Hall was dedicated and called one of 
"the finestly equipped buildings for ento- 
mology in the country." Today, it stands 
up well after three decades of service to 
State science students. 





JtcdL 



walk and lawn add to Fernald Hall an unscientific romance unnoticeabic to students in their haste to and from classes (Photo — Sargent Studio) 












.^^V'^bbe.' 



Iii\-J 



frfn.:: 



I'Miiraiir''! 

nil 



A mid-winter view of the Abigail Adams House, upperclass coed dormitory, contrasting with the June scene on opposite page (Sargent photo) 



'7/te "AUeif."— QiM' %o^imiia^ 



This year marks the revolution of the 
Abigail Adams House; for at the begin- 
ning of the second semester it became an 
upperclass coed dormitory. 

The government of the Abbey is un- 
usual — a more or less happy medium 
between totalitarianism and democracy. 
At the head stands Mrs. Broughton, the 
house-mother, who is assisted by a house 
chairman (a .senior elected by the W.S. 
G.A.) and four proctors (juniors chosen 
by Miss Skinner and the W.S. G.A. 
Council). Despite changes, the Abbey 
will have the same play, work, and even 
the same problems. 








REVIEW OF 



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THE YEAR : 1940-1941 



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17] 





The Reserve Officers' Tramm^ Corps at 
Massachusetts State College is a unit 
designed to provide a source of reserve 
officers in the United States Cavalry. Two 
years of training are required of every 
physically fit male who enters State. Re- 
maining two years of optional instruction 
give a limited number of students an op- 
portunity to earn commissions as Second 
Lieutenants. 

Basic course of instruction consists of 
dismounted drill, manual of arms, chemi- 
cal warfare, marksmanship, military hy- 
giene and sanitation, military history 
and customs of the service. The regi- 
mental review presented yearly during 
Commencement (see picture below) cli- 
maxes this rudimentary training. 

Sophomores learn the art of equitation 
and many participate in horse shows 
during the course of the year. The three 



upperclasses also participate in week-end 
road marches in the surrounding country- 
side. These trips are made under actual 
field conditions and provide necessary 
experience for the future officers. 

Perhaps the period most anxiously pre- 
pared for is the Federal Inspection — when 
officers designated by the War Depart- 
ment make their annual inspection of the 
various units throughout the country 
and judge the accomplishments of these 
organizations. The Massachusetts State 
College corps has received an "excellent" 
rating, a classification which is proudly 
upheld by members of the cadet corps 
and of the Regular Army personnel. 

The R.O.T.C. also possesses its social 
angle. The Military Ball, first big social 
event of the year, was held December 6, 
1940. Harry Scollin, 1941 chairman of the 
ball, presented State's most popular 
military formal for years — together with 
his committee made up of Wes Aykroyd, 
Jack Haskell, Ernie Bolt, George Brag- 
don, Bob Hall, and Win Avery. One of 
the Index's on-the-spot writers, "Duke" 
Politella, gives his account of the colorful 
dance : 

"Horses' heads were profiled against 
a golden halo. Crossed cavalry sabres 



Last Platoon of Troop F passes reviewing stand on Alumni Field, Cadet Sergeant Hamel commanding 




[18] 



gleamed from all sides. Spread eagles 
perched majestically on their sturdy 
claws. 

"There was a distinctly blue sky above 
and a very slippery floor below, while 
all about gleamed the white of shirt 
fronts and the brass of embryo officers. 
The Military Ball pulled the lanyard on 
the formal dance series at State . . . and 
they say that the shell which was re- 
leased has not been accounted for defi- 
nitely as yet .... 

"Hal Mclntyre's band did the honors 
at the inception of a new Honorary 
Colonel — Jeanne Phillips, reputed to be 
the most beautiful bit of femininity on 
campus . . . we were convinced by the 
sight of the fair damsel drifting happily 
under the arch of swords created by the 
cadets of her command .... Ball Com- 
mittee Chairman Harry Scollin was the 
donor of a steady right arm for the escort 
detail. Lieutenant Colonel Donald A. 
Young, P.M.S.&T., presented Miss Phil- 
lips with a colorful bouquet of red roses 
and a gold insignia of crossed sabres . . . 
getting back to horses, sabres and stuff, 
we hope the motif next year will not go 
ultra-modern on us and display combat 
cars stuck in the mud and the sabres re- 




Chosen as honorary colonel. Miss .leanne Phillips — Phi Zeta 
senior — is shown with K.O.T.C. Cadet Officer Clem Burr 



'Cadets in camp" — at left is a row of tents at Fort Ethan Allen and at right, inilitary majors with gas masks at camp in '40 




19 



placed by crossed tommy guns, or some- 
thing. ..." 

In June the awarding of commissions 
to members of the graduating class is the 
proudest moment of the Army's spirit 
here. Of the twenty seniors who became 
"shave-tails" with the class of '40, for 
example, thirteen were selected for a 
year's active duty under the Thomason 
Act; and this year the prospects are 
greater. "Massachusetts State College is 
able to produce some of the best officer 
material in the Army." 

Two hundred twenty miles on horse- 
back to Fort Ethan Allen! After seniors 
receive commissions, juniors begin their 
annual ride to the fort. More than twenty 
junior military majors ride through 
Vermont's Green Mountains to the fort 
where they spend three weeks in rifle, 
machine-gun, and pistol practice. There 
the boys get a taste of honest-to-goodness 
Army life, living in tents and "learning 
the ropes." Kitchen Police duty, a camp 
horseshow, and a daily routine of horse- 
grooming and range practice occupy the 
men from five-thirty in the morning imtil 
five in the afternoon. And finally comes 
the ten-day ride back to State where they 
arrive tanned and dusty and tired. 

The Cavalry, instead of being on its 



H. King, R. HaU. Prouty. Schen 

Aykroyd, Hamel, Scolliii, C. Bui 

Broderick, Crerie, Bragdon. Hendr 



t;vW^ ■* *»*;> 




*v 



Color guard inarches at the head of College 
K.O. T. C. unit in the annual June review 



way out, is definitely on its way to being 
more important than ever before — this 
is the keynote of a statement made this 
year by Lt. Col. Donald A. Young, com- 
mandant of the Massachusetts State 
College R.O.T.C. unit. 

"Gone are the days," Colonel Young 
said, "when the Cavalry unit consisted 
of a cavalryman, a horse, a McLellan 
pack, a sabre, a rifle and a pistol. The 
modern Cavalry unit, augmented by 
small tanks, light guns and other pieces 



.er, C. Jones, Haskell, Skogsberg 
r, Foley. Bassett. Coffey, Knight 
ckson. Bolt, C. F. Goodwin. Tills. 







20 




A salute to First Corps Area Commander, 
jMaj. Gen. Woodruff, before his inspection 



of mechanized warfare, is more effective, 
more dangerous than ever before. In re- 
cent wars, horses have been moved in 
vans hundreds of miles to woodlands, 
mountains, swamps, deserts — places 
where tanks would be of no avail." 

The fact that Germany has a cavalry 
of between 700,000 and 800,000 horses; 
that England is building up her own 
cavalry; that Italy, without the aid of 
cavalry in her African campaign, is hav- 
ing a great deal of trouble moving her 



tanks about in the desert — all this, Colon- 
el Young emphasized, pointed to the 
importance of cavalry, augmented by 
mechanized units. 

Interest in war is taking more and 
more of a hold on the College: the number 
of students in competition for the R.O. 
T.C. rifle team (begun in November, 
1940 on campus) far exceeds the number 
of candidates for any other student ac- 
tivity, sports, or academic. Despite in- 
sufficient facilities for training and de- 
spite the fact that no remuneration is to 
be given, 135 men representing all classes 
turned out for the rifle team which is 
coached by Lieut. Anthony Nogello '37. 
Participation is voluntary. No letters or 
other recognition are awarded. Several 
postal meets have already been arranged 
with Louisiana State University, Virginia 
Polytechnical Institute, Rutgers LTniver- 
sity. University of Tennessee, University 
of Pennsylvania, Connecticut State Univ- 
ersity, and Niagara LTniversity. A fifteen 
man team has been chosen and is repre- 
senting the college at all rifle meets. 

Durhig the June regimental review 
military awards are made: the Society of 
the American Revolution medals, the 
315th Cavalry trophy sabre, marksman- 
ship medals, and the Stowell trophy cup. 



Mclnick, Tripp, Stone, Laliberte. Pierce, White. Gilman, Wall, Conley, Trufanl, Tewhill 

Doubleday. Andrew. J. Gordon, Gaumond, Cressy, Lafleur, Fosjsate, J. Shepardson, Williams, Kennedy, Alwood, Na 

MoHil, Langlon, \ I'rd.son. W. Kimhall. \very. G. Kimhnll. Leland. Seery. <:arter. ISi^linp, G. Bennett 



^ . ^ «► ^ ^ 






21 




"Flying Statesmen is the name we're 
known by," say the twenty State College 
students who are given training under 
the Civil Aeronautics Act. The ground 
school on campus is supervised by Dr. 
Andersen, with instructors Lanphear, Ross, 
and Marston assisting; it includes 48 hours 
of instruction in aviation theory, radio, 
and related courses. 

Any candidate for a degree, who is 
nineteen years of age, who ranks well in 
his studies, and who passes a rigid physi- 
cal examination, is eligible. After com- 
pleting the courses in January, candi- 
dates are quizzed by a federal examiner. 
If successful, the student takes thirty- 
five hours of flying instruction at the 
Westfield Airport. 



e. A. A. <^lUfkt 



"The Flying Statesinen"- 
these are second semester 
students; in front are Ed 
Warner, C. P. Jones, Bob 
Rocheleau, and Jim Ryan; 
in back are L. Shaw and 
Michigan's David DePree 



Lanphear, Ross, Marston, Andersen (See article left) 




IZ' 



Hlu4nHl Ganlt/i44xdi04^ oi 2>a^4fUian^ie4. 



The State campus skyline has undergone 
a memorable change this year. As a re- 
sult, 147 coeds and 157 men are able 
to enjoy the benefits of dormitories in- 
stead of rooming-houses off campus. 

"To me, these dormitories are the sym- 
bol of a growing spirit of cooperation be- 
tween private groups and the govern- 
ment." With these words, Governor 
Leverett Saltonstall paid tribute to the 
work of the Alumni Association. 

The two new dormitories — Lewis Hall 
and the women's building on Clark Estate 
Hill — are essentially of same construc- 
tion, brick throughout and completely 
fireproof. The luxury of a private dining 
room in the coeds' "dorm" permits an 
uninterrupted daily schedule. Overlook- 
ing the Valley panorama, both dormitor- 
ies will form an important part of the 
freshman's life on campus. In this work 
the alumni have responded nobly to the 
needs of their Alma Mater. 

"Moving day!" occurred in February 
when coeds occupied the Butterfield 
House. 




"Ghosts on campus" — coeds and workmen 
during construction on Butterfield House 




Two scenes above show progress of work on 
Lewis Hall, completed in September, 1940 



23 



^^(lelUf4C4t SiaJuli/^ei ^^ o^ GoMAiddA. 



FF 




Religious Director Sharp advises Handbook 

"It is difficult for the State College stu- 
dent to think of religious activities on 
campus without a profound feeling of 
gratitude — a feeling which daily grows 
deeper as the gap widens between the 
broken spirit of the world and the har- 
mony of faith on his own campus." 

A sound reason for the existence of this 
spirit is the United Religious Council and 
interfaith functions on campus. 

The 1941 Annual Religious Conference 
was the best witness to the unified spirit 
which motivates the activities of the 
United Religious Council. "Religion in a 
World of Crisis" was the theme of the 
eighth annual parley held at this college 
on February 12 and 13. In the opening 
session over which President Baker pre- 



sided, Dr. Seth Rogers Brooks spoke on 
"Responsibility of the Church and Syna- 
gogue Today." At the evening panel 
discussion, the theme dealt with religion 
in a world of war; the panel members 
were distinguished: Dr. Philip L. Gam- 
ble; Miss Dorothy Day, Editor of Catho- 
lic Worker, New York; Rabbi Barnet 
Brickner, Euclid Avenue Temple, Cleve- 
land; and John M. Swomley, Fellowship 
of Reconciliation, New York. 

In the closing session on February 13, 
Dean Machmer presided. Topic of the 
day was "The Individual and His Life." 
Speaker was Dr. A. W. Loos of Spelman 
College in Georgia. 

The Rev. David A. Sharp, the College's 
Director of Religious Education, was 
general supervisor of the conference 
itself. 

Another of the regular religious activi- 
ties is the Vesper services which are held 
every Sunday afternoon in the Memorial 
Building. Protestant, Jewish, and Catho- 
lic speakers are secured from all parts of 
the country to speak at these services. 



Miss PoUtella, Keller, H. Wein^ 
Prof. Sharp, Miss Duffy, Ander! 



, S. Potter, Miss Freedman 
n. Miss Beauregard, Conley 




24 



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WilUams, Washburn, Wyman, Burnham, R. Walker, Gould, Hathaway, Schubert, R. Smith, Irvine 
Cole, Andrew, Miss Stohlmann, Miss Spencer, Miss Avery, Miss Lawrence, Miss Moseley, Miss Van Meter, Miss Gold- 
Misses D. Miller, Duffy, King, H. Smith, Arnold, Van Buren, MerriU, Flagg, Gagnon. S. Burgess 
Misses M. Davis, Politella, Moulton. M. Grise, Desmond, D. Johnson. De Palma. Judge, Avella. Fislte 



Effectiveness of Vespers is chiefly due 
to the music of the choir which is con- 
ducted under the inspiring direction of 
music instructor Alviani, State's "musi- 
cal bombshell." Famous off campus as 
well as on campus, the 55-member choir 
has popularized Vespers, presented sever- 
al special concerts, and made a number of 
appearances alone and several more in 
conjunction with the other musical clubs. 

Vesper speakers included Dr. Rufus 
M. Jones, philosophy professor and au- 
thor; Dr. James Gordon Gilkey; Dr. Ed- 
win B. Robinson; Dr. Henry D. Gray; 
and Bishop William Appleton Lawrence. 
And each year at the last Vesper services, 
faculty, and students gather to hear a 
Jewish, Catholic, and Protestant student 
speak on each religion. 

The United Religious Council is com- 
posed of an Advisory Council made up 
of faculty members appointed by Presi- 
dent Baker, an Advisory Board composed 
of clergy and laymen interested in the 
college, and finally the Student Religious 



Council composed of representatives from 
the three major faiths. 

Most active religious force on campus 
is the Rev. Mr. Sharp who is also advisor 
of the Freshman Handbook. His goal has 
always been to bring religion into the 
student's life. 



Dr. Seth Brooks, most prominent speaker 
in February's Annual Religious Conference 




25 



^itija A^iii • Qo4iJcenti • Boded ^nix^^^ 




Doric and the Sinfonietta practice for musical revue 



Music . . . literature . . . artists and per- 
formers in several mediums . . . painting — 
culture has a place on campus. Three 



focal points are the Fine Arts Council, 
Community Concert, and Social Union. 

The fifth annual series of programs 
presented by the Fine Arts Council be- 
gan October 29, 1940, when Miss Kidder 
and Dr. Waugh presented their tradition- 
al opening concert. The next event on the 
Tuesday afternoon programs was Miss 
Carolyn Ball, pianist, on November 4. 
Next Tuesday Prof. S. S. Smith of the 
A.S.C.A.P. lectured on ''The Fine Arts 
in a Democracy." On November 26 Prof. 
M. Markuson discussed stone houses. On 
December 17, Doric Alviani, baritone, 
sang a program of favorite songs, accom- 
panied by Mrs. V. Shumway. Other pro- 
grams included a number of local and off- 
campus speakers and artists. 




Professor F. A. Waugh, head of the Fine Arts Council 



26 



As part of the Fine Arts program were 
presented displays of etchings, paintings, 
woodcuts, lithographs, prints, and re- 
productions in the Memorial Building. 

The Amherst Community Concert As- 
sociation claims most subscribers among 
State College students. The first concert 
of the tenth annual series was presented 
in the fall with the Metropolitan Opera 
Company baritone, Leonard Warren. 
The Kraeuter Trio appeared January 10. 
And February 17 found the pianist, Ran- 
dolph Hokanson, on campus. The dancing 
of Carola Goya on April 27 concluded 
this year's schedule of musical artists. 

Dr. Frank A. Waugh is chairman of 
the Fine Arts Committee. Active on the 
Community Concert committee were 
Doric Alviani and Prof. Stowell Coding. 

Social Union, paid for by the student 
body through their student tax, pre- 
sented a year's program characterized by 
variety. Kurt and Grace Graff with their 
Ballet troupe drew a full house on Octo- 
ber 9. For more serious lovers of music, 
the Boston Philharmonic Ensemble ap- 
peared on December 5. Cornelia Otis 



Skinner, noted stage personality and one 
of America's leading actresses, returned 
to campus this year on January 16; pre- 
senting comedy, satire and pathos in 
rapid succession, she proved herself to be 
still the greatest single attraction of the 
stage. 

Mystifying students with tricks and 
capturing them with his inimitable per- 
sonality, John Mulholland made his 
visit on February 18 a memorable one. 

In the spring a student-written musical 
comedy was to be produced on campus as 
a Social Union program. Written and be- 
gun by co-authors Bob McCartney, Bob 
Breglio, and Pete Barreca, the show was 
indefinitely cancelled because time was 
lacking on the part of the participants and 
the overworked authors. The Index 
sympathizes with the ambitious creators. 

Final programs were the Musical 
Revue by the well-known State musical 
clubs on March 12 and the concert by 
Rudolph Gaaz, pianist, on March 24. 



Cornelia Otis Skinner, the 
famed monologist, and 
John Mulholland, popular 
magician : Social Union 
performers in 1941 season 





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Five hundred fathers converged on camp- 
us October 26 to take part in the annual 
celebration in their honor. Jean Davis, 
chairman of the committee, accomplished 
a feat in making the proud dads at home. 
They inspected the campus, visited class 

Dads and students line up before Tech game 



rooms, and enjoyed the horse show pre- 
sented by the R.O.T.C.jmiiors and sen- 
iors. Guests at the football game, the 
dads watched the fighting statesmen 
trounce Worcester for a 12-6 victory, the 
first of the season. In the evening at 
Bowker, the dads topped off a perfect 
day at a show consisting of interfraternity 
skits. 

State band, Tech majorettes line up at half 










28 



Se4njcde'l £ec04id ^^Camfuid VaAleiied. 



rr 



"She is more to be pitied than censored, 
she is more to be helped than despised." 

A mellerdramer complete with mous- 
tached villain and winsome, but ill-ad- 
vised lassie — "Tainted Blood" — was this 
year's (,'ampus Varieties show. And while 
Schlyvester Schlemeil (Bobby Triggs) 
and Beauteous Belinda (Peggy Stanton) 
made their asides to the audience, the 
1941 Sub-Freshman Day was made possi- 
ble: for the funds of the Varieties are 
turned over to the Senate for that pur- 
pose. The idea of Sub-Freshman Day for 
promising high school scholars and ath- 
letes originated first in 1939 through the 
efforts of students and faculty. 

This year's "Tainted Blood" had a 
winning informality and variety that 
made it a success. Laurels go to Bob 
Breglio's musical effects, the Alpha Gam- 
ma Rho Glee Club, "Harry Trueblue" 
Hoxie, Mary Judge, Bartender Jack Has- 
kell, Master of Ceremonies Ace Tajdor, 
and to the rest of the supporting cast. 

The play, written by Francis Ward 
and George Langton, supposedly was a 



true revival of the Gay Nineties with 
occasional State College touches. Stu- 
dents and band packed Bowker to capaci- 
ty after the football rally; and after an 
evening of belly-laughs, sang the chorus 
to Stu Hubbard's "She's more to be 
pitied. . ." and also the 1940 State song 
called the "Massachusetts Challenge 
Song," a Barreca-Breglio hit. 



Se. 



nate P, 



'•Psicie 



Mi(,-F, 



•""^h Da 



founder 




'Campus Varieties" stars: S. Triggs Schlemeil, Harry Ho.r(e Trueblue, Beauteous Miss Stanton Belinda 




[29] 




Flessas '44 (left) outboxes Caraganis '43 at Razoo 



"The more the merrier" is meaningful 
when apphed to the incoming freshmen 
on State campus. The class of 1944 is the 
largest in the history of Massachusetts 
State College. 

Among the new students were those 
who came for the "fun-and-frolic" repute 
bestowed on the school by the New York 



Welcome, ^^vo^A! 



Times . . others came to fit themselves 
for a dubious career. . the remainder 
tagged along because it is the thing to 
do once a high school diploma is safely 
tucked away. 

The first two weeks provided a varied 
program for the neophytes. Registration 
. . . physical exams . . . psychological tests. 
The faculty took a big hand in welcoming 
the new class with orientation lectures 
and talks on the college customs. 

When Doric Alviani led the freshmen 
in the student sing, the maroon-and- 
white-topped new-comers felt that they 
finally belonged to State College and that 
the songs were their own. The socially 
inclined freshmen were inducted into 
the lighter side of campus life at the 
Freshman Reception given on the night 
of September 20. They ran the gauntlet 
of the receiving line, danced, partook of 
refreshments, and sang together, again 
under Doric's leadership. 

The traditional, and final, event of the 
first week was the freshman-sophomore 
battle — the annual rope pull across the 



"Abbey" serenade at the chilly hour of 6:30 a.m. 






Somewhat later coeds go on a "fishing trip'' 







[30] 




A frosh fitting himself for a dubious career 



Freshman coeds hold an odd fishing party 



college pond. With determined frosh on 
one side and hopeful sophs on the other — 
a grim fight began. But the frosh damp- 
ened the spirit of the sophomores; for, in 
eight minutes, the frosh had won. 

Meanwhile, the freshman program was 
still crowded. At the chilly hour of 6:30 
in the morning, the freshmen seren- 
aded the Abigail Adams House "under 
the auspices of the Maroon Key." Then, 
too, fraternity rushing began September 
26. Tours of the houses, "vie parties," 
and smokers further confused the "rush- 
ees." 

The following Saturday came the sec- 
ond round in the Frosh-Soph struggle 
for supremacy. . .Razoo Day. After a 
program of wrestling and boxing among 
the manlier of the two classes, the Senate 
abandoned the skirmish on the athletic 
field for individual battles on a platform 
in the middle of the college pond. The 
sophomores recovered some of their lo.st 
pride by besting the freshmen, even 
though it was by the margin of one point. 

During the week coeds wore coats 
backward, displayed unmatched shoes, 
carried glasses of flowers to class, played 
with dolls, and recited nonsensical prose — 
this was coed hazing. 



One bright Saturday afternoon in 
October freshman coeds, in the fiendish 
hands of the upperclass women, went 
through the excitement of the Freshman 
Coed "Fishing Party" on the shores of 
College Pond. 




"Sophomores besting frosh by one point' 



[3i: 



"7^0 31 6i AiUi44<ll <M04tiC44U44/uU £Uo44A 




Japanese Tea Garden, an outstanding work 
exhibited by Land. Arch, graduate students 



An unusual oriental motif plus days and 
weeks of research, planning, and labor 
insured success to the 1940 Horticultural 
Show. About 15,595 persons were at- 
tracted during the three days of the 
thirty-first annual flower show held on 
the week-end of November 3. As in each 



of the past twenty-two years, Professor 
Clark L. Thayer guided the entire enter- 
prise. The larger share of the actual work, 
however, was done by State and Stock- 
bridge students. Winners in the under- 
graduate displays were Betty Desmond, 
George Feiker, Henry Thompson, Rich- 
ard Smith, Marion Freedman, and Vivian 
Henschel. 

The Japanese garden was the show's 
central theme. Pagodas, lattice- work 
fence, rock cascade with moss-covered 
stones and real waterfall, and small 
trees brought out the Oriental motif. 
Other features were a Japanese tea 
garden, an oriental winter garden, and 
several miniature Japanese scenes. 

From 1908 until 1932, the annual show 
took place in Wilder Hall, French Hall, 
and outdoor tents. When the physical 
education cage was built, an ideal place 
was created for this show which combines 
outside and student ability in flower and 
fruit arrangement and landscape planning. 



^allhem'^ 



at thirty ■ 



first air-^"'^ 



\ Viortt' 



.euUura^^^"-' 



TSove' 



tobei 



'\lw«*"^ 




Presented at Stockbridge Hall April 11, 
1940, "The Gondoliers" — supplemented 
by the college orchestra, electric organ, 
elaborate sets, and special lighting — re- 
ceived a salvo of applause from a large 
audience. Principals were Margaret 
Stanton (Tessa), Myron Hager (Guis- 
seppe), Betty Moulton (Gianetta), and 
John Osmun. Other main roles were: 
Rita Mosely (Casilda), Bob Dunn 
(Luiz), Isadore Cohen (Lord luquisator). 
Bob Carpenter (Duke of Plaza-Toros). 

The 1941 Gilbert and Sullivan oper- 
etta, "H.M.S. Pinafore," was a timely 
one since the theme involves the life and 
ego of the British sailor. Principals of the 
cast included the following: William 
Clark (Sir Joseph Porter), Kenneth Col- 
lard (Captain Cocoran), John Gould 
(Ralph Rackstraw), Tracy Slack (Bill 
Bobstay), Wendell Washburn (Bob 
Becket), Betty Moulton (Josephine), 
Rita Mosely (Hebe), and Gladys Archi- 
bald (Mrs. Cripps). Chorus was com- 
posed of men's and women's glee clubs 
and the Sinfonietta also appeared. Robert 
McCartney was business manager . . . and 




Bob Dunn and Rita Mosely — Gondoliers principals 

sang the part of Dick Deadeye. Assistant 
Manager was Ralph Levine. The "Tor- 
nado-in-D-sharp" Doric x\lviani was di- 
rector of both successful musical shows. 



Cast of singers in "H.M.S. Pinafore," 1941 Gilbert & Sullivan operetta directed by Doric Alviani 




33 




7^e '41 Wude/i GGA4Uo<d % 



1941 Winter Carnival Qu 




CARNIVAL BALL COMMITTEE 

Marsden, P. Dwyer, Fitzpatri" \- 

Barreca, Eldridge 



President Hugh P. Baker and Queen Norma, 
central figures of Coronation Ceremony held 
at Bowker Auditorium on February 15, 1941 




Alpha Gamma Rho's song-hit 
sculpture, First Prize winner, 
created by C. Miller, Leonard, 
Pozzani, and all the Brothers 



34 



QdAyuAMil Ball ^ S^uuu Bcuu/piidAe^. 



Scientific selection of beauty! Used to 
determine the week-end comeliness, the 
a-pplause meter (by Minzner '37) "oscil- 
lated in grand style," choosing for this 
year's carnival the dark Norma Hand- 
forth, a Sigma Beta Chi belle. 

The biggest event of the week-end, even 
for the cup-winning Alpha Gamma Rho 
brethren, was the Carnival Ball. The 
"barn" shone forth in all its glory. 
Despite the un-wintry weather, the 
Drill Hall was icicled with the Spirit of 
Winter. . .even Johnny McGee's- hot 
tunes failed to melt the silvery atmos- 
phere. Gowns and orchids and tiaras; 
tails, tuxes, black, white, and maroon 
ties . . . everything to announce the festiv- 
ity of the occasion transformed the for- 



merly prosaic students. Figure skaters 
and skiers adorned the walls, and Kur- 
alowicz's "M" Girl almost tapped ski- 
booted toes to the tunes interpreted by 
McGee and band. High spot of the eve- 
ning was the selection of Norma Hand- 
forth as Carnival Queen. 

"High on a Windy Hill" — Alpha 
Gamma Rho's prize-winning snow sculp- 
ture showed most talent and originality. 
Racing against time and thawing weather, 
fraternities put in days of work. Judges 
Thayer, Fraker, and Helming admitted 
that the '41 sculptures excelled past 
years'. Sigma Alpha Epsilon's Valentine's 
Day theme took second; Lambda Chi 
Alpha took a well-earned third with its 
University of Massachusetts skier. 



Court of Beauty at Carnival week-end (left to right) — Kathleen Griffin, Carolyn Starr, 
Jeanne Phillips, Queen Norma Handforth, Tinimie Gow, Anita Marshall, Marion Avery 




Dean Burns — '^director of State. Blount llolyoke, 
and Amherst College" — gives a speeeh at the Ball 

[35 1 



Indians step off the seal 
of Massachusetts to give 
Hatchet and Pipe oration 
during the June class day 
affair before graduation. 





• Horse show and R.O.T.C. Review 



• Alumni and fraternity class reunions 



• Annual C. Flint Oratorical Contest 



Final varsitv baseball game of season 



Final Roister Doister play of year 




• Baccalaureate among rhododendrons 

• Chime Concert and Prexy's reception 

• Senior Class Dav Ode and orations 



id attention 



to fa^*"" 



fastening 



iviiuta'-y 



major „' 



„b-Senior 







"Farewell to Bay State!"', traditional song of the College, arouses 
unexpected emotion from seniors, remembering their hard work, 
new friends, new responsibilities, and their life at State. 

In these four years the men and women of '41 have outgrown 
their intellectual swaddling clothes; and during Commencement 
put on their academic caps and gowns, receive their hard-earned 
" sheepskins, " and puzzle over their careers. 



• Graduation— "FarewelltoBay State" 

• Final dance — Sophomore-Senior Hop 



Mater 



T^V,e'4lg'^^*^ 



„U-SenVortt«^ 



,UBaUn^-^"" 




With finals over, the Saturday introducing Commencement is 
the day for alumni and fraternity reunions, for the final baseball 
game, and for the Roister Doisters' production of William Saroy- 
an's "Washington Slept Here." 

On Sunday, after club breakfasts, seniors and faculty parade 
to the Rhododendron Garden for the Baccalaureate Service. 
Afterward President Baker receives the seniors at his home. In the 
evening come Senior Class Day exercises with student speakers: 
Ivy Orator, Pipe Orator, Hatchet Orator, Class Day Orator, and 
Class Ode composer. A torchlight parade ends the evening. 

Final graduation exercises occur on Monday. And the Soph- 
Senior Hop on Monday night is the last social get-together of the 
seniors who reminisce at the sound of the Chapel chime . . . 




j3 

g ^ DMINISTRATION— these 
men and women guide more than 1,211 
students through four years of college. 
Policy-forming, finances, and discipline 
are the functions of President Baker, 
Dean Machmer, Registrar Lanphear, 
the Treasurer's Department, and the 
Extension Service. The Placement Service 
provides student employment; the News 
Service, college publicity; and Alumni 
Secretary Emery, contact between alumni 
and their Alma Mater. 

The one-hundred twenty-odd members 
of the teaching faculty, for the most part, 
go beyond their duties as instructors and 
give students much-needed inspiration. 
Massachusetts State College is gaining a 
reputation, not only for its courses in agri- 
culture and the sciences, but also for its 
cultural courses leading to the Bachelor 
of Arts degree. 





ms"-'' ■ ■ 



noonday meal in the historic Stockbridge House, faculty center used also for recreation, teas. Red Cross work, and meetings 



DMINISTRATION" FACULTY 




HUGH P. BAKER, D.Oec, LL.D. 

Born 1878. B. S. Michigan State College, 1901. M.F. Yale Univer- 
sity, 1904. D.Oec. University of Munich, 1910. LL.D. Syracuse 
University, 1933. Fellow A.A.A.S.; F.R.G.S., London. Accepted 
to Faculty 1933. 

[42 1 



MoAlcudMAeUl State GoUe<fe> ^n^dAiee^. 



President 
His Excellency Leverett Saltonstall 

Vice-President 
Nathaniel I. Bowditch of Framingham 

Secretary 
James W. Burke of Amherst 

Treasurer 
Robert D. Hawley of Amherst 

Term Expires 194-1 
Joseph W. Bartlett of Boston 
Philip F. Whitmore of Sunderland 

Term Expires 19^2 
John Chandler of Sterling Junction 
Frederick D. Griggs of Springfield 

Term Expires 19Jf3 
Nathaniel I. Bowditch of Framingham 
William C. Monahan of Framingham 

Term Expires 19 H 
Mrs. Elizabeth McNamara of Cambridge 
James R. Cassidy of Dorchester 



Term Expires 19J^5 
Mrs. Katherine G. Canavan of Amherst 
Joseph B. Ely of Westfield 

Term Expires 19Jt.6 
Clifford C. Hubbard of Norton 
David J. Malcolm of Charlemont 

Term Expires 19Jf7 
Harry Dunlap Brown of Billerica 
John W. Haigis of Greenfield 

Term Expires 19i8 
Joseph W. Bartlett of Boston 
Philip r. Whitmore of Sunderland 

Members Ex-Officio 
His Excellency Leverett Saltonstall, 

Governor of the Commonwealth 
Hugh P. Baker, President of the College 
Walter F. Downey, Commissioner of 

Education 
William Casey, Commissioner of Agri- 
culture 



Treasurer R. D. Hawley. W. C. Monahan. F. D. Griggs. H. D. Brown. P. F. Whitmore. Comn 
C. C. Hubbard, D. J. Malcolm. Governor L. Saltonstall. Vice-President N. 1. Bowditch. 

H. P. Baker 



W. Casey. Secretary J. W. Burke 
isioner W. F. Downey. President 




43 



Dean W. IMachmer 




(Upper) Director Sievers, 
Director W. Munson, and 
Director R. H. Verbeck; 
(Lower) Gunnar Erickson, 
Assist. Treas. Broadfoot, 
and Secretary W. Burke 



Oj^f^ce^ ajf tUe 



JOHN K. BROADFOOT 

Assistant Treasurer. Born 1884. Accepted 
to Faculty 1915. 

WILLIAM J. BURKE, B.S. 
Secretary. Born 1910. B.S. Massachusetts 
State College, 1938. Alpha Sigma Phi; 
Sphinx Head; Ho-nun-de-kah. Accepted 
to Faculty 1935. 

GEORGE E. EMERY, B.S. 
Field Secretary and Executive Alumni Sec- 
retary. Born 1904. B.S. Massachusetts 
State College, 1924. Sigma Phi Epsilon; 
Adelphia. Accepted to Faculty 1929. 

GUNNAR S. ERICKSON, B.S. 
Btisi7iess Officer. Born 1897. B.S. Massa- 
chusetts State College, 1919. Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. Accepted to Faculty 1935. 

GUY V. GLATFELTER, M.S. 
Placement Officer. Born 1893. B.S. Penn- 
sylvania State College, 1919. M.S. Iowa 
State College, 1920. Kappa Sigma. Ac- 
cepted to Faculty 1921. 

EM Kin' E. GRAYSON, B.S. 
Director of Placcnunt Service. Born 1894. 
B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1917. 
Alpha Sigma Phi; Adelphia. Accepted to 
Faculty 1927. 

MARGARET HAMLIN, B.A. 
Placement Officer for Women. B.A. Smith 
College, 1904. Accepted to Faculty 1913. 

ROBERT D. HAWLEY, B.S. 
Treasurer. Born 1895. B.S. Massachusetts 
State College, 1920. Phi Sigma Kappa; 
Adelphia. Accepted to Faculty 1920. 

MARSHALL O. LANPHEAR, M.S. 
Registrar and Professor of Freshman Orien- 
tation. Born 1894. B.S. Massachusetts 
State College, 1918. M.S. Massachusetts 
.State College, 1926. Phi Kappa Phi; Phi 
Sigma Kappa. Accepted to Faculty 1921. 

WILLIAM L. MACHMER, Ed.D. 
Dean and Professor of Matliematics. Born 
1883. B.A. Franklin and Marshall Col- 
lege, 1907. M.A. Franklin and Marshall 



(Group at riglit)PIacenient 
Officers: Miss M. Hamlin, 
G. Glatfelter, E. Grayson 




44] 



Ad411/UiMt^lGii04^ 



College, 1911. Ed.D. American Interna- 
tional College, 1936. Phi Beta Kappa; 
Phi Kappa Phi; Pi Gamma Mu; Alpha 
Sigma Phi; Adelphia. Accepted to Fac- 
ulty 1911. 

WILLARD A. MUNSON, B.S. 
Director of Extension Service. Born 1881. 
B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1903. 
Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Sigma Kappa. x\c- 
cepted to Faculty 1926. 

FRANCIS C. PRAY, M.S. 
Assistant College Editor. Born 1909. B.S. 
Massachusetts State College, 1931. M.S. 
Massachusetts State College, 1932. Phi 
Sigma Kappa. Accepted to Faculty 1934. 

FRED J. SIEVERS, M.S. 
Director of E.vperiment Station and Gradu- 
ate School. Born 1880. B.S. University of 
Wisconsin, 1910. M.S. University of 
Wisconsin, 1924. Fellow A.A.A.S.; Theta 
Chi; Sigma Xi; Alpha Zeta; Phi Kappa 
Phi. Accepted to Faculty 1928. 

ROLAND H. VERBECK, B.S. 
Director of Short Courses. Born 1886. 
B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1908. 
Phi Sigma Kappa. Accepted to Faculty 
1924. 

BASIL B. WOOD, B.A. 
Librarian. Born 1881 B A. Brown Uni- 
versity, 1905. Delta Upsdon, Phi Beta 
Kappa. Accepted to Faculty 1924. 




Registrar M. O. Laiiphear 



(Lower left) Goodell Librarian Basil Wood 
(Lower right) College Treasurer R. Hawley 




(Alright) Assistant College 
Editor Pray, and Exec. 
Alumni Sec. George Emery 



45 




The Associate Alumni was organized in 
1874, with its purpose the promotion of 
the welfare of Massachusetts State Col- 
lege. Through active cooperation, the 
Association has greatly aided the progress 
of the College since that time. 

Within the past twenty years the 
Alumni made possible the building of 
Memorial Hall, the athletic field, the 
Physical Education Building — through 
their initiative as well as through actual 
financial contribution. 

The work of the Akunni Organization 
was in large part responsible for the award 
of the A.B. degree and for the change of 
name of the College. 

During the past two years the Associ- 
ation has carried on a statewide program 
designed to give high school officials a 
better understanding of the College en- 
trance requirements and courses. The 
head of this Alumni Committee is him- 
self a superintendent of city schools. 

Oldest M.S.C. Alumnus, D. P. Cole '72, leads parade 




M. S. Q. A^Ajodate AUufvni 



An alumni committee on athletics func- 
tions with the athletic department at the 
College, working toward the end that 
Massachusetts State teams may be as 
good as those of other colleges in our class. 

Portraits of former teachers and presi- 
dents of the College have been placed in 
campus buildings by the Alumni. 

The Alumni work with the committee 
of the Student Senate to acquaint well- 
qualified students with educational op- 
portunities at the College. Alumni report 
on good prospective students; the under- 
graduate committee then invites these 
students for a campus weekend. 

The Associate Alumni interests itself 
in the maintenance of good college pub- 
licity, and in the continuance of a capable 
College Trustee Board. 

The work of the Associate Alumni best 
known to students on campus is that 
which provided $7,400 in scholarships, 
and the two new dormitories. 

Through the fine cooperation of the 
Lotta Crabtree Fund Trustees, an Alum- 
ni Committee announced last fall that 
members of each class would receive 
$1,600 in scholarship awards this year, 
that two Alumni in the graduate school 
would each receive $500. 

However, the building of two dormi- 
tories has been the most celebrated ac- 
complishment of the Associate Alumni 
this year. With the cooperation of the 
parents of students and the college ad- 
ministrative board, the Alumni secured 
legislative approval for the erection of 
self-liquidating dormitories. Nearly a 
half million dollars was then secured for 
the construction of the buildings. These 
dormitories will be presented to the Col- 
lege as soon as returns from rentals have 
retired the bond issues which were ar- 
ranged to cover the cost of construction. 



46 




Sec. Lanphear '18, Vice-Pres. Smith '22, Pres. Brett '12, Treas. Thayer "13. and Exec. Sec. Emery 



Lewis Hall, named in tribute to a 
former president of the College, is now 
housing one hundred and fifty men of the 
freshman (1944) class. Lewis Hall was 
completed last June and stands as a 
handsome monument to alumni initia- 
tive. The second dormitory, located on 
the Clark Estate hill, was ready for 
occupancy by the undergraduate women 
in February. The building has been named 
the Kenyon Butterfield House. 

In addition to these outstanding ac- 
complishments, the Alumni Office in 
Memorial Hall carries on a continuous 
program of work in behalf of individual 
alumni and alumni clubs. This central 
ofiice maintains address, occupational, 
and biographic lists of all graduates 
and former students; and gladly supplies 
much useful information to many indi- 
vidual alumni as well as to organized 
alumni clubs. It also helps local alumni 
clubs in arranging meetings, parties, and 
other affairs; and helps class secretaries 
conduct reunions. 

The Alumni Bulletin, sent out ten 
times a year to Associate Alumni mem- 
bers, contains news of interest about the 
College and the work of the graduates. 

Massachusetts State College is a grow- 
ing college, and the loyal interest of the 



47 



alumni has played a large part in this 
growth and progress. Every State alum- 
nus should, by active membership, help 
support his alumni organization and, 
through so doing, help to increase the 
prestige of his College. The accomplish- 
ments of the Associate Alumni depend 
not only on its able and energetic officers 
but also on the active support of each 
individual alumnus. 

During January a bill to re-name the 
(College the Unirersiiy of Massachusetts 
was introduced before the current session 
of the legislature by the Associate Alum- 
ni. After hearing the report of an Alumni 
Committee in 1937, the Alumni Directors 
gave further thought to the university 
matter and in December, 1940 recom- 
mended it to the College Trustees. 

Coeds, Alumni, and architect at new women's dorm 




Bicf4ii4i ^i Socletif Plu lieia fCofLfia 





Dr. Charles A. Peters, Sigma Xi President 



Phi Beta Kappa officers: Woodside, Coding 



OFFICERS 

PresidenU Charles A. Peters; Vice-President, J. K. 
Shaw; Treasurer, William H. Ross; Secretary, Helen 
S. Mitchell. 



OFFICERS 

President, Stowell C. Coding; Vice-President, Mrs. 
G. E. Erickson; Secretary-Treasnrer, Dr. Gilbert L. 
Woodside. 



MEMBERS 

George W. Alderman, Charles P. Alexander, Allen 
E. Andersen, John G. Archibald, John S. Bailey, 
Hugh P. Baker, William B. Becker, Herbert F. 
Bergman, John H. Blair, William Booth, Arthur I. 
Bourne, Oran C. Boyd, Leon A. Bradley, K. L. 
Bullis, Walter W. Chenoweth, William G. Colbv, 



Sara M. Coolidge. 
Davis, William L 
Carl E. Fellers, Rich 
Fitzpatrick, Ralp^ 
Monroe E. Freem; 
Fuller, Constant 
Emil F. Cuba, 
Gutowska, Frank Ar/ II 




mpton, William H. 
Iter S. Eisenmenger, 
Fessenden, William H. 
Henry J. Franklin, 
. French, James E. 
'larence E. Gordon, 
:.iiiiuess. Mane S. 
E.hvanI li. Ilnllaua, 



John W. Hurdis, Lji fe n''.Joj i(-s. Clifford V. Kight- 
linger, Arthur Lcvijyr- jjjjfe' q^i/ A. McKenzie, Mer- 
rill J. Mack, Walter A. 5|aPlinn, George A. Marston, 
Walter M. Miller, HeMS. Mitchell, Charles H. 
Moran, William S. Mueljf r, Carl Olson, Raymond 
T. Parkhurst, Ernest M. Parrott, Charles A. Peters, 
Wallace F. Powers, Harry J. Rich, Walter S. Ritchie, 
Arnold D. Rhodes, William H. Ross, Paul Serex, 
Frank R. Shaw, Jacob K. Shaw, Dale H. Sieling, 
Fred J. Sievers, Marion E. Smith, Harvey L. Sweet- 
man, Frederic Theriault, Jay R. Traver, Reuben 
E. Trippensee, Henry Van Roekel, William G. 
Vinal, Willett Wandell, Warren D. Whitcomb, Har- 
old E. White, Frederick J. Wishart, Gilbert L. 
Woodside, Robert E. Young, John M. Zak. 



MEIklBERS 

Mrs. Kenneth L. BMhs,) Joseph S. Chamberlain, 
G. C. Crampton, £1^^^_N. Dubois, Mrs. G. E. 
Erickson, George |l«**F;i rlejf , Stowell C. Goding, 
Vernon P. Helming, Arlhiir X. Julian, William L. 
Machmer, A. AiuU'r^nii M.iikimmie, Mrs. Eugene 
Martini, Walter \1 -A Hllrr, Helen S. Mitchell, 
Frank C. Moore, WiU^i H. Ross, Mrs. Frank R. 
Shaw, Marion Smith, U?asil B. Wood, Gilbert L. 
Woodside. 



^<4e K^OM^ Sooietif o^ Pltl Kap/pxi PUi 




Bolt. Broderick, Nye. Killer. \ii 
;. Archibald. Hartley, Long, Tyle 



. Giehler, Field 



OFFICERS 

President, Marshall O. Lanphear; Vice-President, Charles F. Fraker; Secretary, Arthur N. Julian; Treasurer, 
Richard C. Foley; Corresponding Secretary, Marion A. Smith; I9J4I Scholar, Elmer W. Smith. 



MEMBERS 

Charles P. Alexander, John G. Archibald, Hugh P. 
Baker, .Arthur B. Beaumont, Lyle L. Blundell, Carl 
J. Bokina, Mabelle Booth, Oran C. Boyd, Alfred A. 
Brown, Alexander E. Cance, Joseph S. Chamberlain, 
Walter W. Chenoweth, Richard Colwell, G. Chester 
Crampton, William L. Doran, Fred C. Ellert, 
George L. Farley, Carl R. Fellers, Richard W 
Fessenden, Richard C. Foley, Charles F. Fral 
Julius H. Frandsen, Arthur P. French, Wilho F 
gard, George E. Gage, Philip L. Gamble, Harry N 
Glick, Stovvell C. Coding, Maxwell H. Goldberg, 
Clarence E. Gordon, Christian I. Gunness, Frank 
A. Hays, Robert P. Holdsworth, Edward B. Hol- 
land, Leonta G. Horrigan, Arthur X. Julian, Mar- 
shall O. Lanphear, Joseph B. Lentz, .\rthur S. 
Levine, William L. Machmer, Merrill J. Mack, A. 
Anderson Mackimmie, Walter M. Miller, Frank C. 
Moore, Willard A. Munson, X. Vincent Osmun, 
Ernest M. Parrott, Clarence H. Parsons, Charles 
A. Peters, Wallace F. Powers, Walter E. Prince, 
Frank P. Rand, Arnold D. Rhodes, Victor A. Rice, 
Walter S. Ritchie, David Rozman, Fred C. Sears, 
Paul Serex, Frank R. Shaw, Jacob K. Shaw, Fred- 




erick J. Sievers, Edna L. Skinner, Marion A. Smith, 
Lawrence Southwick, Harvey L. Sweetman, Clark 
L. Thayer, Ra.v E. Torrey, Reuben E. Trippensee, 
Frederick S. Troy, Ralph A. Van Meter, Frank A. 
Waugh, Gilbert L. Woodside. 



1940 SPRING ELECTION 

erly H. Barton, Robert L. Benemelis, Earl K. 
Bowen, Vernon L. Ferwerda, Robert C. Kennedy, 
Robert A. Martin, Virginia H. Pease, William H. 
Richards, Jr., Beatrice Wood. 



1941 FALL ELECTION 

Gladys G. Archibald, Gabriel I. .-Vuerbach, Alan R. 
Bardwell, Ernest A. Bolt, Edward Broderick, George 
E. Erikson, Frances R. Field, Doris M. Giehler, 
Louise M. Hartley, W. R. Jacobson, Thomas W. 
Johnson, Paul Z. Keller, Dorothy J. Long, John W. 
Nye, Arthur A. Pava, Jean Puffer, Elmer W. Smith, 
Frederick E. Smith, Jean G. Tyler, William F. 
Warren. 



49 



^cuiddJiif. 




PROFESSORS EMERITI 

JOSEPH S. CHAMBERLAIN, Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry, Emeriiiis 
Born 1870. B.S. Iowa State College, 1890. M.S. 
Iowa State College, 1892. Ph.D. Johns Hopkins 
University, 1899. Goessman Professor 1934. Ac- 
cepted to Faculty 1909. Professor Emeritus 1940. 

HENRY T. FERNALD, Ph.D. 

Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 
Born 1866. B.S. University of Maine, 1885. Ph.D. 
Johns Hopkins University, 1890. Beta Theta Pi; 
Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Beta Kappa. Accepted to Fac- 
ulty 1890. Professor Emeritus 1930. 

JOHN C. GRAHAM, B.S. 

Professor of Poultry Husbandry, Emeritus 
B.S. Wisconsin University, 1911. Fellow, Poultry 
Science Assoc. Accepted to Faculty 1911. Professor 
Emeritus 1938. 



Born IS 
1940. 



FRED C. KENNEY 

Treasurer, Emeritus 
Kappa Epsilon. Treasurer Emeritus 



President and Dean discuss proposed plans for a university 




50 




Professor Mackimniie, head of the Liberal 
Arts Division and the History Department 



FRED W. MORSE, M.S. 
Research Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus 
Born 1865. B.S. Worcester Polytechnical Institute, 
1887. M.S. Worcester Polytechnical Institute, 1900. 
Phi Beta Kappa. Accepted to Faculty 1910. Pro- 
fessor Emeritus 1935. 

FRED C. SEARS, M.S. 
Professor of Pomology, Emeritus 
Born 1866. B.S. Kansas Agricultural College, 1892. 
M.S. Kansas Agricultural College, 1896. Honorary 
Doctor's Degree Kansas State College, 1937. Phi 
Kappa Phi. Accepted to Faculty 1907. Professor 
Emeritus 1936. 

FRANK A. WAUGH, M.S. 
Professor of Landscape Architecture, Emeritus 
Born 1869. B.S. Kansas State College, 1891. 
M.S. Kansas State College, 1903. D.S. Kansas 
State College, 1934. L.H.D. L'niversity of Vermont, 
1934. Kappa Sigma; Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to 
Faculty 1902. Professor Emeritus 1939. 



TEACHING FACULTY 

GEORGE W. ALDERMAN, B.A. 

Assistant Professor of Physics 
Born 1898. B.A. Williams College, 1921. Accepted 
to Faculty 1926. Sigma Xi. Avocations: Hiking, 
Photography. 

CHARLES PAUL ALEXANDER, Ph.D. 

Professor of Entomology and Head of Department of 

Entomology and Zoology 
Born 1889. B.S. Cornell University, 1913. Ph.D. 
Cornell University, 1918. Alpha Gamma Rho; 
Gamma Alpha; Adelphia: Sigma Xi; Phi Kappa 
Phi; Fellow Ent. Soc. America; Fellow A. A. A. 
Science; Fellow Ent. Soc. London; Member Ent. 
Soc. France, Accepted to Faculty 1922. Avocation: 
Taxonomy of Crane-Flies of World. 



DORIC JOSEPH ALVIANI, Mus.B. 

Instructor of Music 
Born 1913. Mus. B. Boston University, 1937. N'ew 
England Festival Assoc.: Lions Club. Accepted to 
Faculty 1938. Avocations: Travel, Saddle Horses, 
Tennis, and Book Collections (First Editions). 

ALLEN EMIL ANDERSEN, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Born 1899. B.A. University of Nebraska, 1923. 
M.A. University of Nebraska, 1924. Ph.D. Harvard 
L'niversity, 1934. Sigma Xi. Accepted to Faculty 
1937. Avocations: Gardening and Reading. 

LORIN EARL BALL, B.S. 

Instructor of Physical Education 
Born 1898. B.S. Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege, 1921. Q.T.V. Accepted to Faculty 1923. Avo- 
cation: Boy Scout Work. 

LUTHER BANTA, B.S. 

Assistafit Professor of Poultry Husbandry 
Born 1893. B.S. Cornell L^niversity, 1915. Sigma 
Pi; Lambda Gamma Delta; Poultry Science Assoc; 
Amer. Poultry Assoc. Accepted to Faculty 1918. 
Avocations: Bowling, Ping-Pong, Fishing, and 
Genealogy. 

ROLLIN HAYES BARRETT, M.S. 

Professor of Farm Management 
Born 1891. B.S. Connecticut State College, 1918. 
M.S. Cornell University, 1926. Accepted to Faculty 
1926. Avocation: Motion Pictures. 

JOHN H. BLAIR, M.A. 

Instructor of Physiology and Hygiene 
Born 1915. B.A. Wesleyan University, 1937. M.A. 
Wesleyan University, 1939. Sigma Xi; Delta Kappa 
Epsilon. Accepted to Faculty 1939. 

LYLE LINCOLN BLUNDELL, B.S. 

Professor of Horticulture 
Born 1897. B.S. Iowa State College, 1924. Gamma 
Sigma Delta; Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to Faculty 
1931. Avocation: Gardening. 

HAROLD DANFORTH BOUTELLE, Ch.E. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Born 1898. B.S. Worcester Polytechnical Institute, 
1920. Ch.E. W'orcester Polytechnical Institute, 1922. 
Mathematical Assoc, of Amer. Accepted to Faculty 
1926. Avocation: Bridge. 

LEON ALSON BRADLEY, Ph.D. 

Professor of Bacteriology and Head of the Department 
Born 1896. B.S. Wesleyan University, 1922. Ph.D. 
Yale University, 1925. Beta Theta Pi; Sigma Xi; 
Soc. of Amer. Bacteriologists; President of Conn. 
Valley Section, 1935-36; Amer. Public Health 
Assoc; World War Veteran, Ensign U.S. Navy. 
Accepted to Faculty 1925. Avocation: Motor Boat- 
ing. 

LAWRENCE ELLIOT BRIGGS, M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education and Coach 

of Soccer 
Born 1903. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1927. 
M.S. Massachusetts State College, 1938. Theta Chi; 
Western Mass. Winter Sports Council; U.S. East. 
Amateur Ski Assoc; National Ski Assoc. Accepted 
to Faculty 1927. 




51 



MILDRED BRIGGS, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B.A. DePauw University, 1920. M.S. Iowa State 

College, 1925. Kappa Alpha Theta. Accepted to 

Faculty 1931. 

THEODORE CUYLER CALDWELL, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of History and Sociology 
Born 1904. B.A. College of Wooster, 1925. M.A. 
Harvard University, 1926. Ph.D. Yale University, 
1934. Accepted to Faculty 1935. Avocation: Hiking. 

KATHLEEN CALLAHAN, BjV. 

Instructor of Physical Education for Women 
Born 1910. B.A. LTniversity of West Virginia. Cer- 
tificate of Hygiene and Phys. Ed. Wellesley College. 
Chi Omega. Accepted to Faculty, 1937. 

ALEXANDER EDMUND CANCE, Ph.D. 
Professor of Economics and Head of the Department 
Born 1874. B.A. Macalester, 1896. M.A. University 
of Wisconsin, 1906. Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, 
1908. Phi Kappa Phi; Amer. Economic Assoc; 
Chevalier d' .\griculture, France; Alpha Sigma Phi; 
Who's Who in Amer.; R.U.S.; Accepted to Faculty 
1908. Avocation: Travel. 



Professor Kohr, Annual Government Conference ehairnian 





ELBERT FRANCIS CARAWAY, B.S.A. 

Professor of Physical Education and Head Coach of 

Football and Baseball 
Born 1905. B.S.A. Purdue University, 1930. Gimlet 
Club; Lambda Chi Alpha; Lions Club; Amer. Foot- 
ball Coaches Assoc.; State Football Coaches Assoc. 
Accepted to Faculty 1936. Avocations: Golf, Base- 
ball, and Coin Collecting. 



HAROLD WHITING GARY, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of History 
Born 1903. B.A. Williams College, 1925. M.A. Har- 
vard University, 1926. Ph.D. Y'ale University, 1938. 
Accepted to Faculty 1933. Avocations: Gardening 
and Hiking. 



WALTER WIXFRED CHENOWETH, B.S. Agr. 
Professor of Horticultural Manufactures and 
' Head nf Departincui 
Born 1871. B.A. Valparaiso University, 1903. 
B.S.Agr. Missouri University, 1912. Sigma Xi; 
Phi Kappa Phi; Alpha Zeta. Accepted to Faculty 
1912. Avocations: Amateur Photography, Garden- 



Prof. Walter Prince, Flint Oratorical Contest chairman 




52' 



JOHN ALBERT CLAGUE 

Assistant Professor of Horticultural Manufactures 
Born 1905. B.S. University of Washington, 1925. 
M.S. Massachusetts State College, 1931. Ph.D. 
Massachusetts State College, 1935. Pi Kappa Phi. 
Accepted to Faculty 1936. 

ORTON GORING CLARK, B.S. 

Associate Professor of Botany 
Born 1887. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 
1908. Phi Sigma Kappa; Fellow A.A.A.S. Accepted 
to Faculty 1913. 

RICHARD MOWRY COLWELL, M.S. 

Instructor of Economics 
Born 1913. B.S. Rhode Island State College, 1935. 
M.S. Rhode Island State College, 1937. Alpha Tau 
Gamma; Phi Kappa Phi; Amer. Economic Assoc. 
Accepted to Faculty 1937. Avocation: Philately. 

GLADYS M. COOK, M.S. 

Instructor of Home Economics 
B.S. Battle Creek College, 1934. M.S. Massachu- 
setts State College, 1936. Accepted to Faculty 1936. 

SARA M. COOLIDGE, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics 
B.S. Michigan State College, 1924. M.S. Michigan 
State College, 1927. Sigma Xi. Accepted to Facultv 
1935. 

G. CHESTER CRAMPTON, Ph.D. 

Professor of Insect Morphology 
Born 1881. B.A. Princeton University, 1904. M.S. 
Harvard Universitv, 1901. M.A. Cornell University, 
1905. Ph.D. Berlin University, 1908. Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon; Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Kappa Phi; Sigma 
Xi. Accepted to Faculty 1911. Avocations: Photo- 
graphing Different Types of Americans, Travel. 

BUCKNER M. CREEL 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 
Born 1896. Accepted to Faculty 1940. 

FRANK CRONK 

Instructor of Military Science and Tactics 
Born 1894. Enlisted, 1914; Corporal, 1915; Ser- 
geant, 1916; Staff Sergeant, 1937. Accepted to 
Faculty 1921. Avocation: Touring Country Roads. 

FREDERICK MORSE CUTLER, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of History and Sociology 
Born 1875. B.A. Columbia University, 1895. B.D. 
Columbia University, 1898. Ph.D. Clark Univer- 
sity, 1922. Sigma Phi Epsilon; Pi Gamma Mu; 
Lieut. Colonel, U.S. Army (Reser.). Accepted to 
Faculty 1926. 

WILLIAM H. DAVIS, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Botany 
Born 1876. Pd. B. New York State Teachers' Col- 
lege, 1903. B.A. Cornell University, 1912. M.A. 
Wisconsin University, 1916. Ph.D. Wisconsin Uni- 
versity, 1922. Sigma Xi; Forum; Acacia. Accepted 
to Faculty 1922. Avocations: Music, Photographing 
of Plant Diseases and Making Lantern Slides. 



LLEWELLYN LIGHT DERBY, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education and Coach 

of Track 
Born 1893. B.S. Springfield College, 1940. College 
Track Coaches Assoc, of America; National Col- 
legiate Track Coaches Assoc. Accepted to Faculty 
1916. 





Professor Clarence E. Gordon is head of 
Division of Physical and Biological Sciences 



LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Agronomy 
Born 1888. B.S. Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege, 1910. M.S. Massachusetts State College, 1936. 
Phi Sigma Kappa; Amer. Soc. of Agronomy. Ac- 
cepted to Faculty 1913. Avocation: The Luxury of 
Relaxation, Statistics. 



WALTER S. EISENMENGER, Ph.D. 

Research Professor of Agronomy and Head of the 

Department 
Born 1887. B.S. Bucknell University, 1912. M.S. 
Bucknell University, 1916. M.A., Ph.D. Columbia 
L'niversity, 1926. Lambda Chi Alpha; Amer. Soc. 
of Agronomy; Amer. Assoc, of Plant Physiologists; 
Amer. Assoc, for Advancement of Science; Sigma 
Xi. Accepted to Faculty 1931. Avocation: Garden- 
ing. 

FREDERICK CHARLES ELLERT, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of German 
Born 1905. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1930. 
Adelphia; Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to Faculty 
1930. 

EVELYN BLANCHE ELLMS, M.D. 

Assistant Professor of Hygiene 
B.S. Tufts College, 1929. M.D. Tufts Medical 
School, 1932. Accepted to Faculty 1940. 



MARION EUGENE ENSMINGER, M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry 
Born 1908. B.S. University of Missouri, 1931. M.A. 
University of Missouri, 1932. Alpha Zeta; Lambda 
Gamma Delta; Block and Bridle Club. Accepted 
to Faculty 1937. 



PARRY DODDS, M.S. 

Instructor of Agricultural Economics 
Born 1917. B.S. Iowa State College, 1939. M.S. 
Iowa State College, 1940. Alpha Zeta; Gamma Sig- 
ma Delta; Sigma Delta Chi; Farm House; Cardinal 
Key. Accepted to Faculty 1940. 



CLYDE WALTON DOW, M.S. 

Instructor of Language and Literature 
Born 1907. B.L.I. Emerson College, 1931. M.S. 
Massachusetts State College, 1937. Phi Alpha Tau; 
Nat. Assoc, of Teachers of Speech; Amer. Speech 
Correction Assoc. Accepted to Faculty 1937. Avo- 
cations: Taking Motion Pictures and Mountain 
Climbing. 



CHARLES NELSON DUBOIS, M.A. 

Instructor of English 
Born 1910. B.A. Middlebury College, 1934. M.A. 
Middlebury College, 1935. Kappa Delta Rho; Phi 
Beta Kappa; Kappa Phi Kappa; Pi Delta Epsilon. 
.\ccepted to Faculty 1937. Avocation: Gardening. 



Prof. K. Barrett, recording State College events on film 



53 




^GJCMUif. 




JOHN NELSON EVERSON, M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Agronomy 
Born 1887. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1910. 
M.S. Massachusetts State College, 1935. Accepted 
to Faculty 1936. Avocations: Bowling and Flower 
Study. 

SETH JUDSON EWER, Ph.D. 
Instructor of Botany 
Born 1905. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1928. 
M.S. University of Illinois, 1930. Ph.D. Rutgers 
University, 1934. Amer. Assoc, for Advancement of 
Science; Amer. Nature Assoc. Accepted to Faculty 
1938. 

RICHARD WILLIAM FESSENDEN, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Inorganic Chemistry 
Born 1902. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1926. 
M.S. Massachusetts State College, 1928. Ph.D. 
Columbia University, 1931.. Phi Kappa Phi; Phi 
Lambda Upsilon: Sigma Xi; Amer. Chemical Soc; 
New England Chemistry Teachers Assoc. Ac- 
cepted to Faculty 1931. Avocations: Photography, 
Gardening, and Hiking. 

RICHARD CAROL FOLEY, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry 
Born 1906. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1927. 
M.S. Massachusetts State College, 1931. Phi Kappa 
Phi; Sigma Phi Epsilon; Amer. Dairy Science Assoc; 
Amer. Soc. of Animal Production. Accepted to 
Faculty 1932. Avocation: Photography. 

Dr. Alexander, Fernald, Felt at first Entomology home 




54 




Professor Edna L. Skinner, head of Home 
Economics Division and the Dean of Women 



CHARLES FREDERIC FRAKER, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Modern Languages 
Born 1888. B.A. Colorado College, 1919. M.A. Har- 
vard University, 1920. Ph.D. Harvard University, 
1930. Accepted to Faculty 1931. Avocation: Nature. 

JULIUS HERMAN FRANDSEN, M.S. 
Professor of Dairy Industry and Head of the 
Department 
Born 1887. B.S. Iowa State College, 1902. M.S. 
Iowa State College, 1904. Phi Kappa Phi; Gamma 
Sigma Delta. Accepted to Faculty 1926. Avoca- 
tions: Photography and Travel. 

ARTHUR PERKINS FRENCH, M.S. 

Professor of Pomology and Plant Breeding 
Born 1895. B.S. Ohio State University, 1921. M.S. 
Massachusetts State College, 1923. Alpha Tan 
Omega; Alpha Zeta; Phi Kappa Phi; Sigma Xi; 
Amer. Soc. of Hort. Science. Accepted to Faculty 
1921. Avocations: Photography and Mountain 
Climbing. 

WILHO FRIGARD, M.S. 
Instructor of Physical Education and Coach of 
Basketball 
Born 1912. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1934. 
M.S. Massachusetts State College, 1938. Phi Kappa 
Phi; Lambda Chi Alpha; Adelphia. Accepted to 
Faculty 1936. 

GEORGE E. GAGE, Ph.D. 

Professor of Bacteriology and Physiology and Head of 

the Department 
Born 1884. B.A. Clark University, 1906. M.A. Yale 
University, 1907. Ph.D. Yale University, 1909. 
Kappa Phi; Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to Faculty 
1912. Avocations: Travel, Painting, Designing, 
Gardening. 

PHILIP LYLE GAMBLE, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Economics 
B.S. Wesleyan University, 1928. M.A. Wesleyan 
University, 1929. Ph.D. Cornell University, 1933. 
Amer. Economic Assoc; Amer. Assoc, of LTniv. 
Prof.; Sigma Chi; Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to 
Faculty 1935. Avocations: Traveling and Sports. 



MARY E. GARVEY, B.S. 

Ass-istant Profeasor of Bacteriology 
B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1919. Sigma 
Delta Epsilon; Soc. of Amer. Bacteriologists; Amer. 
Public Health Assoc. Accepted to Faculty 1935. 
Avocation: Amateur Photography. 

HARRY NEAVTOX CLICK, Ph.D. 

Professor of Psychology 
Born 1885. B.A. Bridgewater College, 1913. M.A. 
Northwestern University, 1914. Ph.D. University 
of Illinois, 1923. Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Delta Kappa; 
Kappa Delta Pi; International Congress of Psych.; 
Amer. Philosophical Soc; Amer. Assoc, of Univ. 
Prof. Accepted to Faculty 1923. Avocation: Garden- 
ing. 

STOWELL COOLIDGE CODING, M.A. 

Associate Professor of French and Music 
Born 1904. B.A. Dartmouth College, 1925. M.A. 
Harvard University, 1927. Phi Beta Kappa; Phi 
Kappa Phi; Gamma Delta Epsilon; Kappa Phi 
Kappa; Alpha Sigma Phi; Pres. of New Eng. Mod- 
ern Language Assoc, 1937. Accepted to Faculty 
1927. Avocations: Color Photography and Travel. 

MAXWELL HENRY GOLDBERG, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 
Born 1907. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1928. 
M.A. Yale L^niversity, 1932. Ph.D. Yale University, 
1933. Adelphia; Phi Kappa Phi; Alpha Epsilon Pi; 
Mod. Languages Assoc, of Amer.; Mod. Humani- 
ties Research Assoc; College Eng. As.soc. ; Amer. 
Assoc, of LTniv. Prof. .4ccepted to Faculty 1928. 
Avocations; Dramatics and Gardening. 

CLARENCE EVERETT CORDON, Ph.D. 

Professor of Geology and Mineralogy, Head of the 
Department and Head of the Division of Physical and 

Biological Sciences 
Born 1876. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1901. 
B.S. Boston University, 1903. M.A. Columbia Univ- 
ersity, 1906. Ph.D. Columbia University, 1911. 
Phi Kappa Phi; Sigma Xi; Fellow A.A.A.S.; Fellow 
Geol. Soc. Amer.; Fellow Paleontological Soc; 
Member Amer. Geophysical LTnion. .Accepted to 
Faculty 1906. 

HAROLD MARTIN GORE, B.S. 

Professor of Physical Education and Head of the 

Department 
Born 1891. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1913. 
Q.T.V.; Adelphia. Accepted to Faculty 1913. 

CHRISTIAN I. GUXNESS, B.S. 

Professor of Engineering and Head of the Department 
Born 1882'. B.S'. North Dakota Agricultural College, 
1907; Amer. Soc. Agricultural Engineering; Phi 
Kappa Phi. Accepted to Faculty 1914. Avocation: 
Fishing. 

CALVIN SIDDELL HANNUM, M.S. 

Instructor of Mathematics 
Born 1914. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1936. 
M.S. Massachusetts State College, 1938. Adelphia; 
Kappa Sigma. Accepted to Faculty 1938. Avocation: 
Camping. 

ARTHUR KENYON HARRISON 

Professor of Landscape Architecture 
Born 1872. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Accepted to 
Faculty 1911. Avocations: Botanical Study 'and 
Gardening. 




55 



VERNON PARKER HELMING, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 
Born 1904. B.A. Carleton College, 1925. Ph.D. Yale 
University, 1937. Phi Beta Kappa; A.A.U.P.; Mod- 
ern Language Assoc. Accepted to Faculty 1933. 
Avocations: Music, Classical Languages. 

CURRY S. HICKS, M.Ed. 

Professor of Physical Education and Head of the 

Division 
Born 1885. B.P.Ed. Michigan State Normal Col- 
lege, 1909; M.Ed. Michigan State Normal College, 
1924. World War Veteran, 2nd Lieut. Accepted to 
Faculty 1911. Avocations: Touring, Hiking, Fish- 
ing, and Golf. 

ROBERT POWELL HOLDSWORT H, M.F. 

Professor of Forestry and Head of the Department 
Born 1890.'B.S. Michigan State College, 1911. M.F. 
Yale University, 1928. Senior Member, Soc. of 
Amer. Foresters; Phi Kappa Phi; World War Veter- 
an, Capt.; Alpha Gamma Rho. Accepted to Faculty 
1930. 

LEONTA GERTRUDE HORRIGAN, B.S. 

Instrnctor in English 
Born 1914. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1936. 
Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to Faculty 1936. 

SAMUEL CHURCH HUBBARD 

Assistant Professor of Floriculture 
Born 1890. Accepted to Facuity 1921. 



Professor S. Godiii; 




^GCdMif, 




ARTHUR NELSON JULIAN, B.A. 

Professor of German 
Born 1885. B.A. Northwestern University, 1907. 
Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Gamma Delta. 
Accepted to Faculty 1911. Avocations: Photography 
and Gardening. 

SIDNEY W. KAUFFMAN, M.Ed. 

Instructor of Physical Edncation and Coach of Tennis 
Born 1904. B.S. Springfield College, 1931. M.Ed. 
Springfield College, 1934. Nat. Physical Education 
Soc. Accepted to Faculty 1935. Avocations: Hunt- 
ing and Fishing. 

HELEN KNOWLTON, M.A. 

Associate Professor of Home Economics 
B.A. Mount Holyoke College, 1903. M.A. Teacher's 
College, 1924. A'ccepted to Faculty 1934. 

WILLIAM HENRY LACHMAN, M.S. 

Instructor of Olericulture 
Born 1912. B.S. Pennsylvania State College, 1934. 
M.S. Pennsylvania State College, 1936. Gamma 
Sigma Delta; Pi Alpha Xi. Accepted to Faculty 
1936. Avocation: Photography. 



Hicks (right) welcomes Hargesheinier (left), new coach 




56 



JOHN BECKLEY LENTZ, V.M.D. 

Professor of Veterinary Science and Head of the 

Department 
Born 1887. B.A. Franklin and Marshall College, 
1908. V.M.D. University of Pennsylvania, 1914. 
Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Sigma Kappa. Accepted to 
Faculty 1916. 

HARRY G. LINDQUIST, M.S. 

Assistajit Professor of Dairy Industry 
Born 1895. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1922. 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1924. Accepted to 
Faculty 1927. 

ADRIAN HERVE LINDSEY, Ph.D. 

Professor of Agricultural Economics and Farm 

Management and Head of the Department 
Born 1897. B.S. University of Illinois, 1922. M.S. 
Iowa State College, 1923. Ph.D. Iowa State College, 

1929. Pi Gamma Mu; Alpha Gamma Rho. Accepted 
to Faculty 1929. Avocation: Travel. 

C. COLLIS LYLE, JR., M.A. 

Instructor of Oerman and Latin 
Born 1912. B.A. Cornell University, 1933. M.A. 
Cornell L'niversity, 1934. Accepted to Faculty 1935 

CLINTON V. M.icCOY, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Zoology and Entomology 
Born 1905. B.A. Harvard University, 1928. M.A. 
Harvard University, 1934. Ph.D. Harvard L^niver- 
sity, 1934. Gamma Alpha. Accepted to Faculty 1939. 
Avocations: Photography, Gardening, Restoration 
of Colonial Houses, Antiques, Wood- Working. 

MERRILL J. MACK, M.S. 
Professor of Dairy Industry 
Born 1902. B.S. Pennsylvania State College, 1923. 
M.S. University of Wisconsin, 1925. Alpha Zeta; 
Phi Kappa Phi; Sigma Xi; Amer. Dairy Science 
Assoc; Amer. Health Assoc; Amer. Assoc, for the 
Advancement of Science. Accepted to Faculty 1925. 

ALEXANDER ANDERSON M ACKIMMIE, M. A. 

Professor of History, Head of the Department and 

Head of the Dirision of Liberal Arts 
Born 1878. B.A. Princeton University, 1906. M.A. 
Columbia LTniversitj', 1914. Phi Beta Kappa; Phi 
Kappa Phi. Accepted to Faculty 1908. Avocations: 
Raising Daffodil and Tulip Bulbs. 

WALTER ARNOLD MACLINN, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Horticultural Manufactures 
Born 1911. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1933. 
M.S. Massachusetts State College, 1935. Ph.D. 
Massachusetts State College, 1938. Theta Chi; 
Sigma Xi. Accepted to Faculty 1936. Avocations: 
Fishing and Camping. 

MINER JOHN MARKUSON, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Engineering 
Born 1896. B.S. University of Minnesota, 1923. 
I,ions Club. Accepted to Faculty 1925. Avocation: 
Golfing. 

GEORGE ANDREWS MABSTON, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Born 1908. B.S. Worcester Polytechnical Institute, 

1930. M.S. State University of Iowa, 1933. Sigma 
Xi; Lambda Chi Alpha; .4,mer. Soc. of Civil En- 
gineers; Amer. Geophysical I'nion. Accepted to 
Faculty 1933. 



EUGENE RICHARD MARTINI, B.F.A. 

Instructor of Landscape Architecture 
Born 1915. B.F.A. University of Illinois, 1939.'Uni- 
versit}' Landscape Architects Soc; Phi Eta Sigma; 
Union Associate, Amer. Soc. of Landscape Archi- 
tects. Accepted to Faculty 1939. Avocation: Bird 
Studj'. 





Professor Curry Starr Hicks, head of the 
Division of Physical Education and Hygiene 



WALTER McKINLEY MILLER, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Born 1896. Ph.B. Lafayette College, 1918. M.A. 
Pennsylvania State College, 1923. Ph.D. University 
of Illinois, 1927. Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Kappa Phi; 
Sigma Xi; Amer. Assoc, of Univ. Prof.; Mathe- 
matical Assoc, of America. Accepted to Faculty 
1935. Avocations: Chemistry, Philately, Skating. 

FRANK CODUANE MOORE, B.A. 

Professor of Mathematics and Head of Department 
Born 1879. B.A. Dartmouth College, 1902. Phi Beta 
Kappa; Phi Kappa Phi; Amer. Assoc, for the Ad- 
vancement of Science; Assoc, of Math. Teachers in 
New England; Mathematical Assoc, of America; 
Chi Phi. Accepted to Faculty 1918. Avocation: 
Philately. 

CLAUDE CASSELL NEET, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Born 1905. B.A. University of California at Los 
Angeles, 1930; M.A. Clark University, 1932; Ph.D. 
Clark University, 1935; Associate Member, Amer. 
Psychological Assoc; Amer. Assoc, for the Advance- 
ment of Science. Accepted to Faculty 1935. Avoca- 
tion: Reading Psychology and History. 

JOHN BAXTER NEWLON 

Instructor of Agricultural Engineering 
Born 1884. Accepted to Faculty 1919. Avocation: 
Hand Wrought Iron. 

ANTHONY JOSEPH NOGELO, M.B.A. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 
Born 1915. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1937; 
M.B.A. Harvard Graduate School of Business .Ad- 
ministration, 1940; Accepted to Faculty 1940. 



A. VINCENT OSMUN, M.S. 
Professor of Botany atid Head of the Department 
Born 1880. B.Agr. Connecticut State College, 1900; 
B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1903; B.S. Boston 
L'niversity, 1903; M.S. Massachusetts State College, 
1905; Q.f .v.; Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to Faculty 
1905. 

RAYMOND HERMAN OTTO, M.L.A. 

Professor of Landscape Architecture and Head of the 

Department 
Born 1905. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1926. 
M.L.A. Harvard University, 1929. Amer. Soc. of 
Landscape Architects. Accepted to Faculty 1938. 
Avocations: Photography, Graphic Arts.,. 

RANSOM CLAYTON PACKARD, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 
Born 1886. B.S. A. University of Toronto, 1911. 
M.S. Massachusetts State College, 1933. Accepted 
to Faculty 1927. Avocations: Gardening, Pinochle. 

RAYMOND THURSTON PARKHURST, Ph.D. 

Professor of Poultry Husbandry and Head of the 

Department 
Born 1898. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1919. 
M.S. University of Idaho, 1926. Ph.D. University 
of Edinburgh, 1932. Sigma Xi; Kappa Sigma. 
Accepted to Faculty 1938. Avocations: Badminton, 
Bridge, Dancing, Swimming. 



Major Gen. Woodruff, Pres. Baker, and Lieut. CoL Youn 




^aOI4U4f. 




ERNEST M. PARROTT, Ph.D. 

Inxtnictor of Chemistry 
Born 1903. B.S. Union University, 1927. M.S. 
Massachusetts State College, 1932. Ph.D. Univer- 
sity of Missouri, 1938. Phi Kappa Phi; Gamma 
Sigma Epsilon; Sigma Xi. Accepted to Faculty 
1931. 

CLARENCE HOWARD PARSONS, M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry and 

Superintendent of Farms 
Born 1904. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1927. 
M.S. Massachusetts State College, 1933. Phi Kappa 
Phi; Adelphia; Q.T.V. Accepted to Faculty 1931. 

CHARLES ADAilS PETKRS, Ph.D. 

Professor of Inori/anic and Soil Chemistry 
Born 1875. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1897. 
B.S. Boston University, 1897. Ph.D. Yale Univer- 
sity, 1901. Sigma Xi; Phi Kappa Phi; Alpha Sigma 
Phi. Accepted to Faculty 1911. Avocations: Garden- 
ing, Hiking. 

WALLACE FRANK POWERS, Ph.D. 
Professor of Physics and Head of the Department 
Born 1889. B.A. Clark University, 1910. M.A. 
Clark LTniversity, 1911. Ph.D. Clark University, 
1914. Amer. Physical Soc; Amer. Assoc, of Univ. 
Prof.; Phi Kappa Phi; Sigma Xi; Alpha Sigma 
Alpha. Avocation: Photography. 



Cap'n Bill" Vinal, Recreation Conference head and author 





Dr. R. A. Van Meter of the Department 
of Pomology, Horticulture Division head 



WALTER EVERETT PRINCE, M.A. 
Professor of English 
Born 1881. Ph.B. Brown University, 1904. M.A. 
Brown University, 1905. Sphinx; Phi Kappa Phi; 
Shakespeare Assoc, of Amer.; National Assoc, of 
Teachers of Speech. Accepted to Faculty 1912. 
Avocations: Dramatics, Reading, Chess. 

ALBERT WILLIAM PURVIS, Ed.M. 

Assistant Professor of Education 
Born 1903. A.B. LTniversity of New Brunswick, 
1931. Ed.M. Harvard University, 1935. Ed.D. 
Harvard University, 1938. Accepted to Faculty 

1936. Avocations: Hiking, Camping. 

GEORGE FREDRICK PUSHEE 

Instructor of Agricultural Engineering 
Born 1887. Boy Scouts. Accepted to Faculty 1916. 
Avocation: Scouting. 

ERNEST JAMES RADCLIFFE, M.D. 

Professor of Hygiene and Student Health Director 
Born 1898. M.D. University of Toronto, 1923. 
Amer. Medical Assoc; Mass. Medical Assoc; 
Hampshire County Medical Soc; Phi Rho Sigma. 
Accepted to Faculty 1930. Avocations: Bridge, 
Tennis, Handicrafts. 

FRANK PRENTICE RAND, M.A. 

Professor of English and Head of Department of 

Languages and Literature 
Born 1889. B.A. W'illiams College, 1912. M.A. Am- 
herst College, 1915. Phi Sigma Kappa; Delta Sigma 
Rho; Phi Kappa Phi; Adelphia; Who's Who in 
Amer. Accepted to Faculty 1914. Avocation: 
Mask-Making. 

ARNOLD DENSMORE RHODES, M.F. 

Instructor of Forestry 
Born 1912. B.S. LTniversity of New Hampshire, 
1934. M.F. Yale LTniversity School of Forestry, 

1937. Phi Kappa Phi; Sigma Xi; Phi Sigma; Alpha 
Tau Omega; Soc. of Amer. Foresters; Ecological 
Soc. of Amer. Accepted to Faculty 1939. Avoca- 
tions: Photography, Philately. 



ALLEN FOSTER RICE, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 
Born 1904. B.S. Norwich University, 1926. Accepted 
to Faculty 1940. 

VICTOR ARTHUR RICE, M.Ag. 

Professor of Animal Husbandry, Head of Department 

and Head of Division of Agriculture 
Born 1890. B.S. North Carolina State College, 1916. 
M.Ag. Massachusetts State College, 1923. Kappa 
Alpha; Alpha Zeta; Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to 
Faculty 1916. Avocations: Reading and Golf. 

J. HARRY RICH, M.F. 

Assistant Professor of Forestry 
Born 1888. B.S. New York State College of Forestry, 
1913. M.F. New York State College of Forestry, 
1936. Sigma Xi; Soc. of Amer. Foresters; Pi Kappa 
Alpha. Accepted to Faculty 1933. 

WALTER STIENZ RITCHIE, Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry and Head of the Department 
Born 1892. B.S. Ohio State University, 1916. M.A. 
University of Missouri, 1918. Ph.D. University of 
Missouri, 1922. Sigma Xi; Phi Kappa Phi; Gamma 
Sigma Delta; Gamma Alpha; Alpha Chi Sigma; 
Delta Tau Delta; Amer. Chem. Soc; .\mer. Inst, of 
Chemists. Accepted to Faculty 1934. 

OLIVER COUSENS ROBERTS, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Pomology 
Born 1895. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1919. 
Theta Chi. Accepted to Faculty 1926. 

JAMES ROBERTSON, Jr., B.A. 
Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture 
Born 1906. B.A. Carnegie Institute of Technology, 
1930. .\ccepted to Faculty 1930. Avocations: Paint- 
ing, Stage Productions, and Photography. 

JOSEPH R. ROGERS 

Instructor of Physical Education and Head Coach of 

Swimming 
Born 1906. Worcester Polytechnical Institute, 1930. 
Accepted to Faculty 1931. 

CHARLES JAMES ROHR, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Political Economy 
Executive Secretary, Bureau of Public Adminis- 
tration. Born 1905. Ph.D. Johns Hopkins ITniver- 
sity, 1931. Kappa Alpha; Amer. Political Science 
Assoc; Govt. Research Assoc; Consultant, Mass. 
Selectmen's Assoc; Amer. Soc. for Public Adm.; 
Civil Service Assembly of the United States and 
Canada. Accepted to Faculty 1937. Avocations: 
Model Airplanes, Hunting, and Fishing. 

DONALD ERNEST ROSS, B.S. 

Greenhouse Foreman and Instructor of Floriciilttire 
Born 1896. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1925. 
Alpha Gamma Rho. Accepted to Faculty 1928. 
Avocations: Philately, and Indian Relics. 

WILLIAM HAROLD ROSS, Ph.D. 

Instructor of Physics 
Born 1909. B.A. Amherst College, 1929. M.A. Am- 
herst College, 1930. Ph.D. Yale University, 1934. 
Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma Xi; Amer. Physical Soc; 
,\mer. Assoc, for the Advancement of Science; Phi 
Delta Theta. Accepted to Faculty 1933. Avocation: 
Tumbling. 



59 




WILLIAM CROCKER SANCTUARY, M.S. 

Professor of Poultry Husbandry 
Born 1888. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1912. 
M.S. Massachusetts State College, 1932. Theta 
Chi; Phi Delta Kappa; Poultry Science Assoc; 
Amer. Poultry Assoc. Accepted to Faculty 1922. 
Avocations; Golf, Bowling, Photography, Music. 

ALBERT HORTON SAYER, B.S. Agr. 
Instructor of Horticulture 
Born 1914. B.S. .Agr. Cornell University, 1937. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon; Pi Alpha Xi; C.A.A. Accepted 
to Faculty 1940. Avocations: Hiking, Wood-Work, 
Surveying, Aviation. 

PAUL SEREX, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
Born 1880. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1913. 
M.S. Massachusetts State College, 1916. Ph.D. 
Massachusetts State College, 1923. Amer. Chem. 
Soc; Phi Kappa Phi; Sigma Xi. Accepted to 
Faculty 1913. Avocation: Philately. 

DAVID ADDISON SHARP, Jr., B.D. 

Director of Religion 
Born 1913. B.A. William .lenell College, 1933. B.D. 
Andover Newton Theological School, 1938. Ac- 
cepted to Faculty 1939. 



French Hall houses horticulture, floriculture and forestry 




^€iJC44M4f 




FRANK ROBERT SHAW, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Entomology and Beekeeping 
Born 1908. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1931. 
Ph.D. Cornell University, 1936. Sigma Xi; Ent. 
Soc. of Amer.; Amer. Assoc, of Econ. Ent.; Phi 
Kappa Phi; Apis Club. Accepted to Faculty 1935. 
Avocations: Travel, Research on Mycetophilidae. 

DALE HAROLD SIELING, Ph.D. 

Research Professor of Chemistry 
Born 1909. B.S. Kansas State College, 1931. M.S. 
Kansas State College, 1932. Ph.D. Iowa State Col- 
lege, 1936. Sigma Xi; Phi Lambda L^psilon; Gamma 
Sigma Delta; Kappa Sigma; Amer. Soc. Agron.; 
Soil Science Soc. of Amer. Accepted to Faculty 1940. 

EDNA L. SKINNER, MA. 

Professor of Home Economics, Head of the Dirision, 

and Advisor of Womeii 
B.S. Teacher's College, Columbia LTniversity, 1908. 
M.A. Teacher's College, Columbia University, 
1928. M.Ed., Honorary, Michigan State Normal 
College, 1922. Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to Faculty 
1919. .\vocations: Birds, Gardens. 

HAROLD WILLIAM SMART, B.A. 

Assistant Professor of Law and Economics 
Born 1895. LL.B. Boston University, 1918. B.A. 
Amherst College, 1924. Phi Delta Phi; Delta Sigma 
Rho; Kappa Epsilon; Adelphia. Accepted to Fac- 
ulty 1920. Avocations: Gardening and Bridge. 

Prof. Clark L. Thayer, active on Student Life Committee 




60 



GRANT BINGEMAN SNYDER, M.S. 

Professor of Olericulture and Head of the Department 
Born 1899. B.S.A. Toronto University, 1922. M.S. 
Michigan State College, 1928. Amer. Soc. of Horti- 
cultural Science; Amer. Soc. of Plant Physiologists; 
Vegetable Growers Assoc, of Amer. Accepted to 
Faculty 1922. Avocation: Photography. 

RUTH STEVENSON, M.S. 

Physical Director of Women 
B.A. Wellesley College, 1934. M.S. Wellesley Col- 
lege, 1936. Accepted to Faculty, 1940. Avocations: 
Sports, Music, and Travel. 

HARVEY LEROY SW'EETMAN, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Entomology 
Born 1896. B.S. Colorado State College, 1923. M.S. 
Iowa State College, 1925. Ph.D. Massachusetts 
State College, 1930. Amer. Assoc, for the Advance- 
ment of Science; Amer. Assoc, of Econ. Entomology; 
Entomology Soc. of Amer.; Ecological Soc. of Amer. 
Amer. Assoc, of Univ. Prof.; Alpha Zeta; Alpha 
Gamma Rho; Gamma Sigma Delta; Phi Kappa 
Phi; Sigma Xi. Accepted to Faculty 1930. Avoca- 
tion : Nature Study. 

JOHN DAVID SWENSON, M.A. 

Instructor of Mathematics 
Born 1909. B.S. New Y'ork University, 1932. M.A. 
Columbia University, 1936. Accepted to Faculty 
1936. Avocation: Philately. 

WILLIAM HENRY TAGUE, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
Born 1892. B.S. Iowa State College, 1924. Accepted 
to Faculty 1929. Avocation: Sewing Machines. 

CHARLES HIRAM THAYER 

Assistant Professor of Agronomy 
Born 1884. Accepted to Faculty 1919. Avocations: 
Hiking and Local History. 

CLARK LEONARD THAYER, B.S. 

Professor of Floriculture and Head of the Department 
Born 1890. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1913. 
Alpha Gamma Rho; Phi Kappa Phi; Pi Alpha Xi; 
Adelphia; World War Veteran. Accepted to Faculty 
1919. Avocation: Hiking. 

LORING VINSON TIRRELL, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry 
Born 1896. B.S. Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege, 1920. Theta Chi; Alpha Zeta. Accepted to 
Faculty 1940. Avocations: Hunting and All Sports. 

RAY ETHAN TORREY, Ph.D. 

Professor of Botany 
Born 1887. B.S. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
1912. M.A. Harvard University, 1918. Ph.D. Har- 
vard University, 1918. Avocation: "No Leisure 
Time." 

JAY R. TRAVER, Ph.D. 

Instructor of Zoology 
Born 1894. B.A. Cornell University, 1918. M.A. 
Cornell University, 1919. Ph.D. Cornell L'niversity, 
1931. Sigma Xi; Sigma Delta Epsilon; Fellow A.\. 
A.S.; Fellow Ent. Soc. America. Accepted to Faculty 
1938. Avocation: Mayflies. 



REUBEN EDWIN TRIPPENSEE, Ph.D. 

Professor of Wihllifi' Miniiviiment 
Born 1894. B.S. Michigan State ( 'olk-ge, 1920. M.S. 
University of Michigan, 1933. Ph.D. University of 
Michigan, 1934. Alpha Zeta; Seminar Botanicus; 
Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Sigma; Sigma Xi. Avocation: 
Fishing. 




Prof. V. A. Rice of the Animal Husbandry 
Department, Division of Agriculture head 



FREDERICK SHERMAN TROY, M.A. 

Assistant Professor of English 
Born 1909. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1931. 
M.A. Amherst College, 1935. Phi Kappa Phi. Ac- 
cepted to Faculty 1931. 

LOWELL RAY TUCKER, Ph.D. 

Instructor of Hortindtvral Manufactures 
Born 1900. B.S. University of Illinois, 1926. M.S. 
University of New Hampshire, 1928. Ph.D. Massa- 
chusetts State College, 1939. Accepted to Faculty 
1940. 

ALDEN PARKER TUTTLE 

Assistant Professor of Vegetable Gardening 
Born 1906. B.S. Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
1928. M.S. Pennsylvania State College, 1930. Gam- 
ma Sigma Delta. Accepted to Faculty 1930. 

RALPH ALBERT VAN METER, Ph.D. 

Professor of Pomology, Head of the Department and 

Head of Division of Horticulture 
Born 1893. B.S. Ohio State University, 1917. M.S. 
Massachusetts State College, 1930. Ph.D. Cornell 
Lniversity, 1930. Delta Theta Sigma; Phi Kappa 
Phi. Accepted to Faculty 1917. Avocation: Camp- 
ing- . 

H. LELAND VARLEY 

Instructor of Languages and Literature 

Born 1910. B.A. Wesleyan University, 1934. M.A. 

W^esleyan University, 1936. Accepted to Faculty 

1938. 

WILLIAM GOULD VINAL, Ph.D. 

Professor of Nature Education 
Born 1881. B.S. Harvard University, 1906. M.A. 
Harvard LTniversity, 1907. Ph.D. Brown LTniversity, 
1924. Sigma Xi; Fellow Amer. Assoc, for Advance- 
ment of Science. Accepted to Faculty 1937. Avoca- 
tion: Camping. 



61 




JOHN HENRY VONDELL 

Instructor of Poultry Husbandry and Plant 
Superintendent 
Born 1898. Poultry Science Assoc; National Park 
Service, Department of the Interior. Accepted to 
Faculty 1929. Avocations: Photography, Mountain 
Climbing. 

WINTHROP SELDEN WELLES 

Professor of Education and Head of the Department 

of Education and Psychology 
Born 1875. B.S. University of Illinois, 1901. M.Ed. 
Harvard LTniversity, 1929. Phi Delta Kappa; Sigma 
Phi Epsilon. Accepted to Faculty 1919. 

GILBERT LLEWELLYN WOODSIDE, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
Born 1909. B.A. DePauw University, 1932. M.A. 
Harvard University, 1933. Ph.D. Harvard LTni- 
versity, 1936. Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma Xi; Phi Kap- 
pa Phi; Amer. Soc. of Zoologists; Amer. Assoc, for 
the Advancement of Science. Accepted to Faculty 
1936. Avocations: Photography, Tennis, Badmin- 
ton. 

DONALD ANDERSON YOUNG 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics and Head of 

the Department 
Born 1888. B.S. University of Maine, 1914. M.S. 
Norwich LTniversity, 1929. Sigma Nu. Accepted to 
Faculty 1939. Avocations: Hunting, Fishing, Horse- 
manship. 

JOHN MICHAEL ZAK 

Instructor of Agronomy 

Born 1914. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1936. 

M.S. Massachusetts State College, 1937. Associate 

Sigma Xi. Accepted to Faculty 1938. 

Professor Charles Hiram Thayer, "The Old Naturalist' 




94^ lleco<fH4ii04^ 




Professor Walter W. Chenoweth . "organ- 
ized the Horticultural Alanufactures Dept." 



Professor Chenoweth this year completes 
his twenty-ninth year as one of the most 
popular members of the State College 
faculty. It would be impossible to com- 
press in these words a fitting tribute to 
the three decades of service which he has 
rendered the college. His retirement will 
leave us with a memory not to be effaced 
by time. 

To honor Professor Chenoweth is to 
add but a postscript to a career marked 
by a creditable record. Nearly two gener- 
ations of students have revered him. He 
has gained fame for the college and him- 
self during his long career at State Col- 
lege. This year the Index is proud to 
make this tribute to Professor Chenoweth 
in recognition. . .of a pioneer in his field, 
teacher supreme in his classroom, and 
gentleman throughout his life .... 



In 1903 Professor Chenoweth gradu- 
ated from Valparaiso College with a B.A. 
degree and later received his B.S. Agr. 
degree at Missouri University in 1912. 
He headed the science department at 
Missouri Normal School for seven years 
and then acted as secretary of the State 
Horticultural Board of Missouri. 

In 1912 he became instructor of pomol- 
ogy at State College and later was pro- 
moted to the post of associate professor. 

"Food will win the war!" was a fav- 
orite slogan of World War I. Like a true 
patriot, Walter Chenoweth during those 
trying years organized food administra- 
tion in Massachusetts and led the Col- 
lege's efi^ort in food conservation and pre- 
servation. In 1918 he organized the Hor- 
ticultural Manufactures Department at 
State and since then has been one of the 
world's pioneers in the field of horticul- 
tural manufactures. Under his enthusi- 
astic leadership this department has ex- 
panded rapidly in facilities and personnel 
until in 1929 a building was erected to 
meet rapidly growing needs. 

Professor Chenoweth has been respon- 
sible for much research in food perserva- 
tion carried on at State and for many 
developments in that industry. He is a 
member of Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi, and 
Alpha Zeta. 



"Teacher supreme and gentleman through 
his life" — W. Chenoweth (below) at desk 




62 



IN MEMORIAM 



JOHN W. BRAIXERD '71 
1850-1040 

LEVI TAFT '82 
1859-1941 

B. LUTHER SHIMER '88 
1867-1941 

HAROLD L. FROST '95 
1876-1940 

FRATVKLIN L. WARREN '95 
1870-1941 

HERRERT F. HOWE '97 
1876-1941 

WILLIAM H. CRAIGHEAD '05 
1876-1940 

FREDERICK A. JOHNSON '08 
1887-1940 

THOMAS H. JONES '08 
1885-1941 

FRANK EUGENE THURSTON '08 
1887-1940 

RALPH H. ARMSTRONG '11 
1889-1941 

L EDWARD FORSTER INGRAHAM '25 
1902-1940 




42 

jf IGHTING to the finish, two 
hundred seventy seniors will graduate 
this June. In 1937 the class of 1941 num- 
bered 360. Only 78% saw college through. 
Mentally confused, the class of '41 at 
that time regarded college as a paradise — 
until it found that study was a necessity. 
Then followed four packed years during 
which an A.B. degree was introduced at 
State and during which World War II 
began outside the college's "cloistered 
walls." At the end of their college careers, 
seniors exclaim, "Time certainly flies, 
doesn't it? Egad, it seems a little while 
ago that I was writing themes on why I 
came to college!" But the senior has 
undergone four years of so-called higher 
education crammed in with study, ac- 
tivities, sports, and dances. And now . . . 
comes the struggle for existence in a war- 
torn world .... 



Registrar Lanphear signs Senior Rouffa for national draft 





Cap and gown time for t 



c 




fl^*' 



\ 



10lf^ 




Class of 1941 — climactic ceremonies end four years of toil and tribulation for the l«« luin<lred seventy seniors leaving in June 



:n I o R 




LASS 




K. E. AGAMBAR 



H. D. AlIEARN 



D. P. ALLAN 



H. r. ALPERIN 



E. E. ANDERS 




ROSE ELAINE AGAMBAR 

29 Hitchcock St., Holyoke 
<I)Z. Born 1920 at Holyoke. Holyoke High School. Major in 
Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's 
Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3, i. 

HELENE DOROTHY AHEARN 

145 Cliff Ave., Winthrop 
Born 1921 at Winthrop. Winthrop High School. Major in 
Pre-Med. Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Zo- 
ology Club, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Current .\ffairs 
Club, 4. 



DONALD PEARSON ALLAN 

20 Winch St., Fitchburg 
AX.\. Born 1913 at Fitchburg. Fitchburg High School. Major 
in Economics. Adelphia, 4; Student Senate, 3, 4 (Secretary, 3, 
President, 4); Class Nominating Committee, 1, 2; Dads' Day 
Committee, 2, 3, 4; Football, 1, 2(M), 3 (M); Basketball, 1, 
2, 3 (M); Baseball, 1, 2 (M); Campus Varieties, 3, 4 (Chair- 
man); Sub-Freshman Day, 3 (Chairman). 



HELEN FAITH ALPERIN 

159 Allyn St., Holyoke 
SI. Born 1919 at Rockland, Me. Holyoke High School. Trans- 
fer from American International College. Major in Bacteri- 
ology. Orchestra, 2, 3, 4; Women's Glee Club, 3; Bay State 
Revue, 3: Menorah Club, 2, 3, 4; Psychology Club, 4; Sorority 
Vice-President, 4, Secretary, 3. 

EDWARD EVERETT ANDERSON 

3 William St., Andover 
S.-VE. Born 1919 at Peabody. Punchard High School. Major in 
Bacteriology. Student Religious Council, 2, 3, 4 (President, 
4); Christian Federation Cabinet, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation, 
3, 4: Mothers' Day Committee, 3, 4; Outing Club, 2, 3; Chem- 
istry Club, 2, 3, 4;" Radio Club, 2, 3; Cross Countrv, 1,2: Ten- 
nis,'3 (M), 4 (M) (Captain); Hockey, 2; "M" Club, 4. 



1941 




ANDREWS G. G. ARCHIBALD P. B. ARCHIBALD L. A. ABSLANL\N E. W. ASHLEY 



THOINUS JOSEPH A>DREWS 

24 Beach St., Revere 
KD. Born 1917 at Boston. Transfer from Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology. Major in Zoology. Outing Club, 3, 4; Pre- 
Med. Club, 3, 4. ' 



GLADYS GLENCROSS ARCHIB.4LD 

164 Montague Rd., North .\mherst 

<I>Z. Born 1919 at Truro, Xova Scotia, Canada. Amherst High 

School. Major in English. Phi Kappa Phi, 4; Women's Glee 

Club, 2, 3, 4: Bay State Revue, 3; Statettes, 2, 3, 4; Operetta, 

. 2, 3, 4; Languages and Literature Club, 3, 4. 




PRISCILLA BALES ARCHIBALD 

84 Beechwood Ave., Watertown 
<t>Z. Born 1918 at Beverly. Norwood High School. Major in 
Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 4: Women's 
.\thletie Association, 1, 2, 4 (Rifle Team, 1, 2, Manager Bowl- 
ing, 4, Manager Rifle Team, 4). 



INDEX 



LILLIAN ARCINE ARSLANIAN 

541 State St., Springfield 
Born 1919 at Southbridge. Springfield Classical High School. 
Transfer from Springfield Junior College. Major in Economics. 
Women's Glee Club, 2, 4; French Club, 4. 



EDWARD WILMARTH ASHLEY 

Dr. Braley Rd., East Freetown 
lAE. Born 1919 at Berkley. New Bedford High School. Major 
in Chemistry. Outing Club, 1; Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 4-H 
Club, 1; Cross Country, 1. 




G. I. AUERBACH 



G. S. AUGUST 



A. W. AYKROYD 



R. T. BABBITT 



E. P. BADGl 




GABRIEL IRVING ALERBACH 

26 Commonwealth Ave., Springfield 
AEn. Born 1919 at Springfield. Springfield Classical High 
School. Major in Horticultural ilaniifactures. Honor Council, 
3, 4; Class Nominating Committee, 3, 4; Phi Kappa Phi, 4; 
Men's Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Roister Doisters, 2, 3, 4; Menorah 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Mothers' Day Committee, 3, 4: Horticultural 
Manufactures Club, 3, 4; Radio Studio, 3, 4; Winter Track, 2; 
Baseball, 1; Tennis, 2, 3. 



GEORGE STERLING AUGUST 

34 Columbus Ave., Northampton 
Born 1919 at Northampton. Northampton High School. Major 
in Pre-Dental. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Zoology Club, 3, 4; 
Pre-Med. Club, 3, 4; Psychology Club, 3; Tennis, 3, 4. 



A. WESLEY AYKROYD 

2 Warden St., Worcester 
0X. Born 1918 at Worcester. Fitchburg Academy. Major in 
Entomology. Bay State Revue, 3, 4: Roister Doisters, 2, 3, 4 
(Vice-President, 4); Military Ball Committee, 4; Advanced 
Military, 3, 4; Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4; Fraternity 
Secretary, 4; Soccer, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M). 



ROBERT TODD BABBITT 

92 Woodlawn Ave., Wellesley Hills 
KS. Born 1919 at Peabody. Wellesley High School. Major in 
Forestry. Orchestra, 3; Band, 1, 2; Student Religious Council, 
4; Christian Federation Cabinet, 3, 4; Outing Club, 3, 4; 
Fraternitv Steward, 4. 



194 1 



ELLEN PRISCILLA BADGER 

36 Clapboardtree St., Norwood 
f&Z. Born 1919 at Westwood. Norwood High School. Major in 
Economics. Women's Athletic Association, 4. 





C. H. BAILEY 



A. R. BARDWELL 



V. J. BARNARD 



FRANCIS GERALD BAGGE 

1487 River St., Boston 
Q.T.V. Born 1919 at Boston. Hyde Park High School. Major in 
Landscape Architecture. Horticultural Show Committee, 4; 
Landscape Architecture Club, 2, 3, 4; Hockey, 1, 2. 



CYINTHIA HAVEN BAILEY 

Kingston 
<i>Z. Born 1919 at Boston. Kingston High School. Major in 
Dietetics. W.S.G.A., 3 (Vice-President); Outing Club, 4; 
Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Social Chairman, 4) ; Sorori- 
ty President, 4; Women's Athletic Association, 3 (Hockey 
Chairman). 




ANNETTA BALL 

440 North St., Dalton 
<I>Z. Born 1920 at Springfield. Dalton High School. Major in 
Dietetics. Home Economics Club, 2, 3, 4; Mathematics Club, 
1; Women's Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



INDEX 



ALLAN RALPH BARDWELL 

122 Pine St., Florence 
K!S. Born 1919 at Northampton. Northampton High School; 
Major in Chemistry. Phi Kappa Phi, 4; Swimming, 3, 4 
(Assistant Manager, 3, Manager, 4). 



VINCENT JASON BARNARD 

199 East Main St., North Adams 
AXA. Born 1917 at North Adams. Drury High School. Major 
in English. Men's Glee Club, 2, 3, 4; Swimming, 1. 




C. H. BARNEY 



P. J. BAKRECA 



E. R. BARRETT 



R. E. BARRUS 




CHARLES HENRY BARNEY 

7 Hadley St., South Hadley 
I;AE. Born 1917 at Holyoke. South Hadley High School. 
Major in History. Football, 3; Swimming, 1; Spring Track, 1. 



PETER JOSEPH BARRECA 

89 Dalton Ave., Pitt.sfield 
KS. Born 1918 at Pittsfield. Pittsfield High School. Major in 
English. Collegian, 2, 3, 4; Collegian Quarterly, 3, 4 (Editor- 
in-Chief, 4); Band, 1, 2; Bay State Revue, 4; Roister Bolsters, 
3, 4 (Stage Manager, 4) ; Radio Advisory Board, 3, 4; Carnival 
Committee, 4; Carnival Ball Committee, 3, 4 (Chairman, 4); 
Sophomore-Senior Hop Committee, 2; Social Union Commit- 
tee, 4; Languages and Literature Club, 3, 4 (Chairman, 4). 



EDWARD RICHARD BARRETT 

268 Denver St., Springfield 
A^. Born 1919 at Springfield. Cathedral High School. Trans 
fer from St. Michael's College. Major in Chemistry. 



RUTH EMELINE BARRLS 

Goshen 
2BX. Born 1919 at Goshen. Williamsburg High School. 
Major in Home Economics. Women's Glee Club, 2, 3, 4; Stu- 
dent Religious Council, 1, 2; Christian Federation Cabinet, 2; 
Dads" Day Committee, 3; Outing Club, 1, 4; Home Economics 
Club, 1, 2I 3, 4; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion, 1, 2, 3. 



JOSEPH BART 

51 Maple St., Northampton 
KS. Born 1915 at Northampton. Northampton High School. 
Major in Agronomy. Collegian, 1, 2, 3, 4; Bay State Revue, 
3; Dairy Products Judging, 3. 



1941 






B. BASCOM 



C. A. BASSETT 



R. A. BEAUBIEiN 



N. J. BECKETT 



E. S. BERGSTROM 



ELIZABETH BLANCHE BASCOM 

Main St., Ashfield 
AAM. Born 1919 at Springfield. Amherst High School. Major 
in English. 1-H Club, 1, 2. 



CORTLAND AJNHDON BASSETT 

1365 Main St., Athol 
SAE. Born 1918 at Athol. Athol High School. Transfer from 
Harvard College. Major in Chemistry. Interfraternity Ball 
Committee, 3; Advanced Military, 3, 4; Outing Club, 2, 3, i: 
Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4; Mathematics Club, 2, 3; Interfraterni- 
ty Council, 3, 4 (Vice-President, 4) ; Fraternity Vice-President, 
3, Secretarv, 2. 




ROSALIE AGNES BEALBIEN 

85 West Main St., Millers Falls 
<I>Z. Born 1919 at Turners Falls. Turners Falls High School. 
Major in Home Economics. Freshman Handbook Board, 1; 
Women's Glee Club, 3, 4; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Home 
Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



INDEX 



NORIVIAN J.AlMES BECKETT 

100 Jaques St., Somerville 
AS*. Born 1916 at Medford. Somerville High School. Major 
in Agronomy. Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Animal Husbandry 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Zoology Club, 1, 2, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2, 3, 
4 (Secretary, 4); Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



EVELYN SOFIA BERGSTROM 

188 Melbourne Rd., Pittsfield 
AAM. Born 1918 at Pittsfield. Pittfield High School. Major 
in Recreational Planning. Honor Council, 4; W.S.G.A., 4 
(President); Collegian, 4 (Secretary); Women's Glee Club, 3; 
Christian Federation Cabinet, 1, 2, 3; Carnival Ball Commit- 
tee, 3; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary, 3); Recreational 
Planning Club, 4. 





K. J. BERNSON 



J. BIEDERMAN 



E. BIRCHARD 



R. A. BLODG 




RICHARD JOLLES BERNSON 

\ 111 York Terrace, Brookline 

AEH. Born 1920 at Boston. Brookline High School. Major in 
History. Collegian, 1; Debating, 2, 3; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 
4; Current Affairs Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Football, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 
3, 4; Tennis, 2. 



ISAAC BIALER 

42 Union St., Holyoke 
Born 1919 at Vilna, Russia. Holyoke High School. Major in 
Chemistry. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Zoology Club, 4; Pre- 
Med. Club, 4; Chemistry Club, 4; Mathematics Club, 4; 
Soccer, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



JEROME BIEDERMAN 

952 Morton St., Mattapan 
TE4). Born 1920 at Boston. Boston English High School. 
Major in Physics. Men's Glee Club, 1, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 
3, 4; Mathematics Club, 1, 2, 3; Swimming, 2. 



ELEANOR BIRCHARD 

368 Belmont Ave., Springfield 
AAM. Born 1919 at Springfield. Springfield Classical High 
School. Transfer from American International College. Major 
in Zoology. 



R. ALDEN BLODGETT 

88 Lakeside St., Springfield 
AXA. Born 1919 at Springfield. Springfield Technical High 
School. Major in Economics. Honor Council, 2, 3, 4 (Secre- 
tary, 3, President, 4) ; Index, 2, 3, 4 (Associate Business Man- 
ager, 4); Soccer, 1. 



19 4 1 



^'''^ \ 






kilML. 




A. BOLT, JR. 



M. P. BORNSTEIN 



J. B. BOURNE 



J. J. BRACK 



G. W. BRAGDON 



ERNEST ALBERT BOLT. JR. 

Windsor 
AZ*. Born 1919 at Boston. Dalton High School. Major in 
Zoology. Phi Kappa Phi, -t; Roister Doisters, 2, 3; Military 
Ball Committee, 4; Advanced Military, 3, 4; Pre- Med. Club, 
3, 4 (President, 4); Radio Club, 2: Phillips Brooks Club, 3, 4 
(President, 4). 



IVEERTON P. (LAMDEN) BORNSTEIN 

39 Pearl Ave., Winthrop 
TE<I>. Born 1919 at Boston. Winthrop High School. Major in 
Horticultural Manufactures. Mens Glee Club, 3, 4; Menorah 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 4; Mathematics Club, 3; 
Horticultural Manufactures Club, 3, 4; Winter Track, 1; 
Spring Track, 1. 




JOHN BODFISH BOIJBNE 

Red Brook Rd., Buzzards Bay 
Born 1919 at Boston. Bourne High School. Major in .Agron- 
omy. Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Spring Track, 2. 



INDEX 



JOHN JOSEPH BRACK 

26 Westcott St., Dorchester 
Q.T.V. Born 1918 at Boston. Dorchester High School for 
Boys. Major in English Literature. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 
(President, 3): Fernald Entomology Club, 2; Pre-Med. Club, 
1, 2; Interfraternity Council 3, 4 (Treasurer, 3); Fraternity 
Vice-President, 4. 



GEORGE WILLIAM BRAGDON 

641 Lowell St., Methuen 
Q.T.V. Born 1919 at Methuen. Methuen High School. Major 
in .Animal Husbandry. Military Ball Committee, 4; .Advanced 
Military, 3, 4; .Animal Husbandry Club, 3, 4. 




R. A. BREGLIO 



M. BREILMAN 



E. broderi<;k 



E. W . BROWN S. M. BURGE* 




ROBERT ANTHOINY BKEGLIO 

136 Rimmon Ave., Chicopee 
KS. Born 1918 at Springfield. SufBeld Academy. Major in 
Pre-Med. Bay State Revue, 3, 4; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, i; 
Informal Committee, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 3, 4; Basketball, 2, 
3(M), 4(M); "M" Club, 3, 4 (Treasurer); Radio Staff, 4; 
Social Union Committee, 4. 



MARGUERITE BREILMAN 

21 Britton St., Pittsfield 
Born 1921 at Pittsfield. Pittsfield High School. Major in Bac- 
teriology. Christian Federation Cabinet, 1, 2; Spanish Club, 
4; Outing Club, 1; Pre-Med. Club, 4; Current Affairs Club, 4. 



EDWARD BRODERICK 

169 Irene St., Willimansett 
AFP. Born 1919 at Holyoke. Chicopee High School. Major in 
Chemistry. Phi Kappa Phi, 4; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; .Ad- 
vanced Military, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4; Interfraternity 
Council, 3, 4; Fraternity Vice-President, 3. 



ELIZABETH WILL.ARD BROWTN 

40 Norwood Terrace, Holyoke 
SBX. Born 1920 at Monroe Bridge. Holyoke High School. 
Major in English. Languages and Literature Club, 3, 4. 



SHIRLEY MARIE BURGESS 

123 Prospect St., Brockton 
<I>Z. Born 1919 at Brockton. Brockton High School. Major in 
Home Economics. Women's Glee Club, 1, 3, 4; Outing Club, 
1; Home Economics Club, 1, 4. 



1941 




C. F. BURR 



K. T. CALLANAN 



S. CAMPBELL 



R. N. CASHMAN 



M. E. CHAFFIN 



CLEIVIENT FRANKLIN BURR 

289 Main St., Easthampton 
0X. Born 1919 at Springfield. \Villi.ston .\cademy. Major in 
Physics. Adelphia, 4 (President); Student Senate, 3, i; Maroon 
Key, 2; Class President, 2, 3, 4; Carnival Ball Committee, 2; 
Informal Committee, 4; Advanced Military, 3, 4; C.A.A., 3; 
Soccer, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M); "M" Club, 3, 4; Inter-Class Ath- 
letic Board, 2, 3, 4 (President, 4). 



KATHERINE T.4PPAN CALLANAN 

64 Elmlawn Rd., Braintree 
AAM. Born 1919 at Northampton. Braintree High School. 
Major in Floriculture. Christian Federation Cabinet, 2, 3, 4: 
Outing Club, 1, 4; Floriculture Club, 3, 4. 




SYLVIA CAMPBELL 

39 Knox St., Palmer 
AAM. Born 1919 at Thorndike. Palmer High School. Major 
in English. Christian Federation Cabinet, 3, 4; Languages and 
Literature Club, 3, 4. 



INDEX 



ROBERT NORMAN CASHMAN 

22 Searle Ave., Easthampton 
2*E. Born 1918 at Easthampton. Williston Academy. Major 
in History. Interfraternity Council, 3, 4; Fraternity President, 
4, Secretary, 3; Soccer, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1; Sub-Freshmen 
Day Committee. 



IMARY ELIZABETH CHAFFIN 

293 Sea St., Hyannis 
Born 1920 at Falmouth. Barnstable High School. Transfer 
from New Jer,sey College for Women. Major in History. 




K. J. CLARE 



V. M. COAXES 



W. S. COFFEY 



A. I. COHEN 



A. B. COLE 




KATHLEEN JEAN CLARE 

185 Main St., Easthampton 
Born 1921 at Hartford, Conn. Plymouth High School, N. H. 
Major in Pre-Med. Outing Club, 1; Zoology Club, 4; Pre-Med. 
Club 3, 4; Psychology Club, 4; Chemistry Club, 3, 4; Women's 
Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3, i; Phillips Brooks Club, 1, 2, 4. 



VIRGINIA MAE COAXES 

184 Cottage St., Xew Bedford 
AAM. Born 1919 at Philadelphia, Penn. New Bedford High 
School. Major in Home Economics. Outing Club, 1; Home 
Economics Club, 4; Sorority Treasurer, 4. 



WILLIAlM SEBASTIAN COFFEY 

9 Sanderson Ave., Northampton 
Q.T.V. Born 1920 at Northampton. Saint Michael's High 
School. Major in Economics. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Ad- 
vanced Military, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2; Chemistry Club, 1; 
Swimming, 1, 2, 3 (M), 4 (M); "M" Club, 3, 4. 



ARTHUR IRVING COHEN 

251 Marvin St., Springfield 
AEH. Born 1920 at Springfield. Springfield Classical High 
School. Major in Zoology. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Dads' 
Day Committee, 3, 4; Zoology Club, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 
2, 3, 4; Psychology Club, 3, 4; Football, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M); 
Basketball, l;"M"Club, 3. 



ALTON BRIGHAiVI COLE 

455 Main St., West Med way 
AFP. Born 1917 at North Wilmington. Medway High School. 
Major in Forestry. Band, 1, 2; Men's Glee Club, 2, 3, 4 
(Assistant Manager, 3) (Manager, 4); Fraternity House Man- 
ager, 4; Football, 1, 2; Baseball, 1. 



194 1 




1. W . COONEY 



E. M. CR VFTS 



R. G. CRERIE 



R. L. CRIMMIN 



J. P. CRIMMINS 



ANN WILHELiNIINA COONEY 

212 Bridge St., Northampton 
^Z. Born 1919 at Northampton. Northampton High School. 
Major in Home Economics. Newman Club, 4; Women's Glee 
Club, 4; Horticultural Show Committee, 4; Outing Club, 4; 
Home Economics Club, 3, 4; Horticultural Manufactures 
Club, 4. 

ELIZABETH MARY CRAFTS 

176 South St., Northampton 
Born 1919 at Northampton. Northampton High School. 
Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 2, 3, 4. 




RICHARD GR\HAJM CRERIE 

58 Hadwen Rd., Worcester 
0X. Born 1919 at Worcester. Worcester Classical High School. 
Major in Economics. Adavnced Military, 3, 4; Pre-Med. 
Club, 1. 



RUTH LILLIAN CREVEVIIN 

55 Westover St., West Roxbury 
<I>Z. Born 1919 at Lowell. Girl's Latin School. Major in Nutri- 
tion. Wesley Foundation, 1, 2, 3 (Secretary, Treasurer, 1); 
Women's Glee Club, 4; Outing Club, 4; Home Economics 
Club, 4. 



INDEX 



JOHN PAUL CRIMIMENS 

18 Gifford Drive, Worcester 
KH. Born 1919 at Worcester. Worcester North High School. 
Major in Horticultural Manufactures. Student Senate, 3, 4 
(Vice-President, 4); Maroon Key, 2 (President); Freshman 
Handbook Board, 2; Student Religious Council, 2; Newman 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival Ball Committee, 2; Sophomore-Senior 
Hop Committee, 2; Horticultural Manufactures Club, 3, 4; 
Football, 4; Winter Track, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M): Spring 
Track, 1, 2, 3 (M), 4 (M); "M" Club, 2, 3, 4. 




K. B. CURTIS 



S. G. DAVIS 




BARBARA JANE CRITCHETT 

46 Hillcrest PI., Amherst 
<I>Z. Born 1920 at Amherst. Amherst High School. Major in 
Psychology. Academic Activities Board, 3, 4; Class Secretary, 
1, 2, 3, 4;' Women's Glee Club, 2, 3, 4 (Manager, 3, 4); Or- 
chestra, 1, 2, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club, 1; 
Home Economics Club, 1; Psychology Club, 3, 4 (President, 
4) ; Sorority Secretary, 4. 



ELEANOR SAVEL CURTIS 

96 Stafford St., Worcester 
Born 1917 at Worcester. Worcester South High School. Major 
in Home Economics. Women's Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Home 
Economics Club, 1, 2. 



RICHARD BROWTVE CURTIS 

233 Church St., Marlboro 
9X. Born 1918 at Marlboro. Governor Dummer Academy. 
Major in Pomology. Horticultural Show Committee, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Carnival Committee, 2, 3; Ring Committee, 2, 3, .4; Spring 
Track, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



SHERMAN GILBERT DAVIS 

62 Commodore Rd., Worcester 
Born 1920 at Detroit, Mich. Transfer from Worcester Poly- 
technical Institute. Major in Horticultural Manufactures. 
Band, 3, 4; Bay State Revue, 3; Horticultural Manufactures 
Club, 3, 4; Dairy Club, 4; Chemistry Club, 4. 



MARION ELAINE DELOREY 

13 Crosier Ave., Pittsfield 
SBX. Born 1919 at Pittsfield. St. Jo.sephs High School. Major 
in Psychology. Student Religious Council, 3 (Secretary, 3); 
Xewman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club, 1, 2; Psy- 
chology Club, 3, 4. 



1941 









B. DESMOND 



C. L. DONAHUE 



N. C. DONDERO 



C. H. DOWNS 



ESTHER DE PALMA 

12 Garden St., Feeding Hills 
I:BX. Born 1919 at Feeding Hills. Agawam High School. 
Major in P.svchologv. Women's Glee Club, 3, 4; Bay State 
Revue, 3; Psychology Club, 3; 4-H Club, 1, 3. 



BETTY DESMOND 

Simsbury, Conn. 
AAIM. Born 1917 at Simsbury. Simsbury High School. Major 
in Landscape Architecture. Women's Glee Club, 2; Landscape 
Architecture Club, 2, 3, 4 (Vice-President, 4); Intersorority 
Council, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association, 2, 3, 4. 




CHARLOTTE LEE DONAHUE 

2352 Washington St., Newton 
Born 1917 at Xewton. Newton High School. Major in Lan- 
guages and Literature. Outing Club, 1 ; Landscape Architecture 
Club, 1. 



INDEX 



NORIMAN CARL DONDERO 

81 Playstead Rd., Medford 
Born 1918 at Somerville. Medford High School. Major in Bac- 
teriology. 



CURRIE HAYES DOWNS 

38 Tucker St., East Lynn 
.\i;<I>. Born 1918 at Lynn. Lynn English High School. Major 
in Dairy Bacteriology. Men's Glee Club, 1 ; Bay State Revue, 3. 





F. H. DREW 



R. E. DUKESHIRE G. E. ERIKSON M. L. EVEKSO.N R. S. EWIN 




FRANKLIN HARISION DREW 

167 Walker Road, Swampscott 
Born 1920 at Waltham. Waltham High School. Major in 
Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball, 1. 



ROBERT ELSWORTH DUKESHIRE 

242 Monument St., Concord 
<I>SK. Born 1919 at Grafton, Nova Scotia. Hopkinton High 
School. Major in Chemistry. Men's Glee Club, 4; Chemistry 
Club, 4. 



GEORGE EMIL ERIKSON 

125 Shearer St., Palmer 
Born 1920 at Palmer. Palmer High School. Major in Ento- 
nology. Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4 (Vice-President, 3). 



MARGARET LUCILLE EVERSON 

1063 North Pleasant St., North Amherst 
AAM. Born 1918 at Savannah, Ga. Hanover High School. 
Major in Floriculture. Phillips Brooks Club, 2, 3; Horticultural 
Show Committee, 4; Floriculture Club, 3, 4. 



ROBERT STANLEY EWING 

121 Main St., Easthampton 
0X. Born 1918 at Northampton. Monson Academy. Major in 
History. Roister Doisters, 3, 4; Psychology Club, 4; Current 
Affairs Club, 3, 4; Soccer, 1, 2, 3, 4 (M); Tennis, 4. 



1941 




F. FAVORITE 



G. C. FEIKER 



F. R. FIELD 



E. J. FINNEGAN 



WILLLAJNI FOSTER FAVORITE 

183 Clinton Rd., Brookline 
Born 1916 at Philadelphia, Penn. Transfer from Yale and 
Columbia. Major in Botanv. Geologv Club, 4; Mathematics 
Club, 2; 4-H Club, 4; Winter Track,"3. 



GEORGE CAMPBELL FEIKER 

2137 Bancroft PL, N.W., Washington, D. C. 
SAE. Born 1918 at Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Western High School, 
D. C. Transfer from Michigan State College. Major in Land- 
scape Architecture. Horticultural Show Committee, 3; Outing 
Club, 2, 3; Landscape Architecture Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Treas- 
urer, 2, Vice-President, 3); Fraternity President, 4. 




FRANCES ROSALIE FIELD 

51 Lawler St., Holyoke 
Born 1920 at Springfield. Holyoke High School. Major in 
English. Phi Kappa Phi, 4; Languages and Literature Club, 4; 
Spanish Club, 4. 



INDEX 



EUGENE JOSEPH FINNEGAN 

72 Westland Ave., Boston 
Born 1919 at Dorchester. Jamaica Plain High School. Major in 
Dairy Industry. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Dairy Club, 2, 3, 4. 



GLADYS ELIZABETH FISH 

53 Edward Ave., Pittsfield 
4>Z. Born 1919 at Pittsfield. Pittsfield High School. Major in 
Psychology. 



Gladys 




■^ -m 




A. J. G. FOLEY 



H. E. FORREST 




HELEN JULU FITCH 

12 Courtland PI., Pittsfield 
AAM. Born 1919 at Springfield. Pittsfield High School. Major 
in Psychology. Class Nominating Committee, 3; Roisters 
Doisters, 2, 3, 4; Psychology Club, 3, 4. 



MARGARET FLYNN 

124 Ingham St., Willimansett 
AAM. Born 1921 at Holyoke. Chicopee High School. Major in 
Bacteriology. Freslunaii Handbook Board, 1; Newman Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Sorority Treasurer, 3, Secretary, 4. 



ARTHUR JAiVIES GLEASON FOLEY, III 

9 Fairfax St., Boston 
KS. Born 1918 at Boston. Dorchester High School. Major 
in Political Science. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Advanced Mili- 
tary, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 1; Current Affairs Club, 4; Swim- 
ming, 1. 



HAJiOLD EVERETT FORREST 

186 Brattle St., Athol 
2AE. Born 1919 at Athol. Athol High School. Major in Eng- 
lish. Index, 2, 3; Collegian, 1, 2, 3, 4; Languages and Literature 
Club, 3, 4. 



1941 



GEORGE FOTOS 

351 Main St., Amherst 
Born 1920 at Springfield. Amherst High School. Major in 
Psychology. 





FREEDMAN 



W. H. FULLER 



U. M. GIEHLER 



W. L. GILES 



H. S. OILMAN 



MARION GERTRUDE FREEDMAN 

91 A'erndale St., Brookline 
SI. Born 1919 at Chelsea. Chelsea High School. Major in 
Floriculture. W.S.G.A., 4 (House Chairman); Bay State Re- 
vue, 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Religious Council, 4; Menorah Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary, Treasurer, 2, 3, Vice-President, 4); Horti- 
cultural Show Committee, 4; Intersorority Ball Committee, 3; 
Intersorority Council, 3, 4 (Secretary, Treasurer, 3, President, 
4); Sorority President, 4; Social Union Committee, 4; Flori- 
culture Club, 3. 



WILLIAM HALL FULLER 

Lancaster 
Born 1918 at Clinton. Clinton High School. Major in Agrono- 
my. Class Nominating Committee, 3; Orchestra, 1; Carnival 
Committee, 3; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Skiing, 3 (M); "M" 
Club, 3. 




DORIS MADELINE GIEHLER 

61 Elmwood Ave., Holyoke 
Born 1920 at Boston. Holyoke High School. Major in Mathe- 
matics. Phi Kappa Phi, 4; Mathematics Club, 3, 4. 



INDEX 



WINIFRED LESLIE GILES 

Cummington 
Born 1920 at Cummington. Northampton High School. Major 
in Botany. Women's Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Assistant Manager, 
3); Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary, 2). 



HARRY STANTON GILMAN 

18 Brainerd Rd., Allston 
TE<I>. Born 1918 at Chelsea. Brookline High School. Major 
in Horticultural Manufactures. Freshman Handbook Board, 1; 
Men's Glee Club, 1, 2; Roister Doisters, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 
3, 4; Zoology Club, 2, 3; Horticultural Manufactures Club, 3, 4. 



^ S 



.X 





^^ m 






S. N. GINSBERG 



S. F. GOOCH 




C. F. GOODWIN, JK. 



W. T. GOODWIN 




SUMNER NATHAN GINSBERG 

36 Willowwood St., Dorchester 
AEn. Born 1918 at Boston. Transfer from Northeastern Uni- 
versity. Major in Zoologj'. Collegia?!, 3, 4; Menorah Club, 3, 4; 
Pre-Med. Club, 3, 4. 



STEPHEN FR4NCIS GOOCH 

72 Egmont St., Brookline 
SAE. Born 1914 at Newton Upper Falls. \Yilliamstown High 
School. Major in History. Class Nominating Committee, 3; 
Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Current Affairs Club, 3, 4; Baseball 
2, 3. 



CLINTON FOSTER GOODWIN, .]R. 

20 Commonwealth Ave., Haverhill 
AXA. Born 1919 at Haverhill. Haverhill High School. Major 
in Landscape .Architecture. Index, 3, 4 (.\rt Editor, 4); Band, 
1, 2; Men's Glee Club, 3, 4; Advanced Military, 3, 4; Land- 
scape Architecture Club, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary, 3); Fraternity 
Treasurer, 4; Soccer, 1, 2. 



WILLIAJM THOMAS GOODWIN 

24 Silver St., South Hadley 
2AE. Born 1920 at Holyoke. South Hadley High School. 
Major in Engli.sh. Collegian, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Radio Editor, 4) ; Carni- 
val Committee, 3. 



JOHN DAVIDSON GOULD 

340 Woodlawn Terr., Collingswood, N. J. 
0X. Born 1918 at Amherst. Williston Academy. Major in 
Entomology. Class Captain, 2; Men's Glee Club, 1, 3, 4; 
Statesmen, 4; Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4 (Secretary, 3); 
Soccer, 1, 2(M), 3 (M), 4 (M) ; "M" Club, 3, 4. 



194 1 





I*. V. GR[SE 



R. E. HALL 



R. F. HALLORAN G. HAMEL 



iMARCELLE JOAN GRISE . 

North Brookfield 
ZBX. Born 1920 at Ware. North Brookfield High School. 
Major in Economics. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Sorority Trea- 
surer, -t; Cheer Leader, 3, 4. 



PAULINE VIOLA GRISE 

Church St., Ware 
Born 1917 at "Ware. Ware High School. Major in History. 
Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 




ROBERT EDWARD HALL 

Mendon Rd., Upton 
K5;. Born 1919 at Upton. Upton High School. Major in Ento- 
mology. Adelphia, 4 (Secretary, Treasurer); Student Senate, 4; 
Collegian, 1, 2, 3; Orchestra, 2; Men's Glee Club, 2: Military 
Ball Committee, 4; Advanced Military, 3, 4; Fernald Entomol- 
ogy Club, 3, 4; Fraternity Vice-President, 4; Swimming, 1, 2 
(M), 3 (M), 4 (M) (Co-Captain); Tennis, 4; "M" Club, 3, 4. 



INDEX 



ROBERT FR.4NCIS HALLORAN 

146 Federal St., Northampton 
AXA. Born 1919 at Northampton. Northampton High School. 
Major in Mathematics. Freshman Handbook Board, 1; New- 
man Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2, 3; Mathematics 
Club,3,4;C.A.A.,4. 



GEORGE F. HAMEL 

3 Assumption Ave., Worcester 
AXA. Born 1919 at W^orcester. Worcester High School of 
Commerce. Major in Agricultural Economics. Academics 
Activities Board, 4; Honor Council, 3, 4; Class Nominating 
Committee, 3; Index, 2, 3, 4 (Business Manager, 4); Advanced 
Military, 3, 4; Horticultural Manufactures Club, 3. 




A. E. HARRINGTON 



L. M. HARTLEY 



J. W. HASKELL 



W. B. HATHAWAY 



J. M. HAYES, 




ANNA ELIZABETH HARRINGTON 

148 High St., Amherst 
<I>Z. Born 1918 at Palmer. Amherst High School. Major in 
Home Economics. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Psychology Club, 4. 



LOUISE MAY HARTLEY 

Wyben Orchards, Westfield 
Born 1920 at Westfield. Westfield High School. Major in Home 
Economics. Phi Kappa Phi, 4; Outing Club, 1, 3, 4; Home 
Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's 
Athletic Association, 2, 3. 



.JOHN WILLIA]M HASKELL 

160 Waverly St., Arlington 
AXA. Born 1914 at Boston. Worcester Academy. Transfer 
from Cornell University. Major in History. Collegian Quarter- 
ly, 1; Military Ball Committee, 4: .Advanced Military, 3, 4; 
C.A.A. 3, 4: Winter Track, 1, 2, 3, 4; Spring Track, 2; Campus 
Varieties, 3, 4. 



WILFRED BOSTOCK HATHAWAY 

121 Davenport St., Taunton 
©X. Born 1919 at Salem. Taunton High School. Major in 
Entomology. Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Men's Glee Club, 2, 3, 4; Outing 
Club, 2; Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4. 



JOHN MICHAEL HASTES, JR. 

217 Cambridge St., Worcester 
AXA. Born 1919 at Worcester. Worcester High School of 
Commerce. Major in Economics. Collegian, 1, 2; Freshman 
Handbook Board, 2, 3 (Editor, 3); Men's Glee Club, 3, 4; 
Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Radio Dramatics, 3, 4. 



1941 




. HAYWAKD W. A. HENDRICKSON, JR. V. V. HENSCHEL J. T. HEVMAN 



C. H. HOt)l>, .)K. 



RICHARD BASCOM HAYWARD 

31 Clinton St., Taunton 
AS4>. Born 1919 at Taunton. Taunton High School. Major in 
Landscape Architecture. Band, 1, 2; Christian Federation 
Cabinet, 4; Horticultural Show Committee, 4; Landscape 
Architecture Club, 3, 4; C.A.A., 3; Interfraternity Council, 
2, 3, 4; Fraternity Secretary, 3; Cross Country, 2 (M), 3 (M), 
4 (M). 



WILLIAM ARLINGTON HENDRICKSON, JR. 

First Parish Rd., Scituate 
.\S<I>. Born 1919 at Boston. Scituate High School. Major in 
Chemistry. Adyanced Military, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 
4; Radio Club, 2, 3. 




VIVIAN VICTORIA HENSCHEL 

107 Mountfort St., Boston 
SBX. Born 1917 at Boston. Brighton High School. Major in 
Floriculture. Intersorority Ball Committee, 4; Intersorority 
Council, 3, 4 (Vice-President, 4); Sorority Secretary, 4; Flori- 
culture Club, 3, 4. 



INDEX 



JOHN TAYLOR HEYMAN 

129 Sumner Ave., Springfield 
AXA. Born 1919 at Wheeling, West Va. Cathedral High 
School. Major in Economics. Class Nominating Committee, 2; 
Men"s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Student Religious Council, 3 (Vice- 
President); Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (President, 3); Dads" 
Day Committee, 2, 3, 4; C.A.A., 3; Fraternity Vice-President, 
3, President, 4. 



CALVIN HENRY HOOD, JR. 

Rockland Heights, Northampton 
Born 1918 at Northampton. Northampton High School. 
Major in Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4. 




^^^^Wl 




Jlts^ 




K. A. HOWLAND G. P. HOXIE, JR. M. B. IIOYE 



E. S. HUBBARD P. D. HUTCHINSON 




KENNETH ARTHUR HOWLAND 

Chestnut St., Duxbury 
Born 1919 at Brockton. Duxbury High School. Major in Rec- 
reational Planning. Adelphia, 4; Collegian, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Manag- 
ing Editor, 3, Editor-in-Chief, 4); Carnival Committee, 4; 
Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



GEORGE PERKINS HOXIE, JR. 

31 Bridge St., Northampton 
Born 1918 at Northampton. Northampton High School. 
Major in History. Bay State Revue, 4; Roister Doisters, 2, 3, 
4 (President, 4); Radio Committee, 4. 



MARION BARBARA HOYE 

39 Granite St., Taunton 
AAM. Born 1919 at Taunton. Taunton High School. Major 
in Psychology. Class Nominating Committee, 1; Newman 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club, 1, 2; Psychology 
Club, 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3. 



ERWIN STLART HUBBARD 

R.F.D. 2, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
GX. Born 1919 at New York City, N. Y. Oakwood School. 
Major in Pomology. Class Nominating Committee, 1; Men's 
Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Bay State Revue, 3, 4; Horticultural 
Show Committee, 4; 4-H Club, 1; Football, 1, 2; Winter Track, 
1; Statesmen, 2, 3, 4. 



1941 



PHYLLIS DEAN HUTCHINSON 

Stafford St., Rochdale 
Born 1917 at Rochdale. Leicester High School. Major in 
English. Languages and Literature Club, 3, 4; Current Affairs 
Club, 1, 2; Women's Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3, 4. 





W. G. IRVINE. JR. S. A. JACKIMCZYK \* . R. JACOBSON 



U. M. JOHNSON T. W. JOHNSON 



WALTER GR.\\1ES IRVINE, .JR. 

25 Rollinson Rd., Worcester 
0X. Born 1919 at Worcester. Worcester North High School. 
Major in Dairy Industry. Men's Glee Club, 4; Outing Club, 1; 
Dairy Club, 2, 3, 4; Animal Husbandry Club, 2. 

STANLEY ARTHUR JACKIMCZYK 

13 Oak St., Florence 
Q.T.V. Born 1918 at Florence. Northampton High School. 
Major in Education, .\delphia, 4 (Vice-President); Student 
Senate, 3, 4; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Informal Committee, 4 
(Chairman); Fraternity President, 4; Football, 1, 2 (M); Base- 
ball, 1, 2 (M), 4 (M) (Co-Captain); "M" Club, 3, 4 (Vice- 
President). 

WOODROW RICHARD J.4COBSON 

Winthrop Ave., Ivoryton, Conn, 
ex. Born 1918 at Hartford, Conn. Pratt High School. Major 
in Phjsics. Phi Kappa Phi, 4; Mathematics Club, 2; Soccer, 1, 
3 (M); Basketball, 1; Spring Track, 1. 




INDEX 



DORIS J\L\RIE JOHNSON 

64 Grand St., Springfield 
Born 1917 at Springfield. Springfield Classical High School 
and Bay Path Institute. Major in Home Economics. Index, 4; 
Christian Federation Cabinet, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2, 3, 
4 (Secretary, Treasurer, 3) ; Outing Club, 1 ; Landscape Archi- 
tecture Club, 4; Home Economics Club, 4; Psychology Club, 
4; Horticultural Manufacturers Club, 4; Current .Affairs Club, 
4; Cheer Leader, 2, 3 (M); Women's Athletic Association, 3, 
4; Phillips Brooks Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 

THOMAS WELLS JOHNSON 

Main St., Deerfield 
<I>I;K. Born 1918 at Fitchburg. Deerfield .\cademy. Major in 
Entomology. Phi Kappa Phi, 4; Index, 2, 3, 4 (Sports Editor, 
3, 4) ; Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4; Fraternity Treasurer, 4; 
Soccer, 2, 3, 4; Baseball, 2, 3 (Manager, 3); Joint Committee 
on Inter-Collegiate Athletics, 3. 




I. JOHNSTON 



E. H. JOSEPHSON 




IRENE JOHNSTON 

' 18 Main St., Easthampton 

<J)Z. Born 1918 at Easthampton. Easthampton High School. 
Transfer from Ohio State University. Major in History. Sor- 
ority Treasurer, 4. 



CARLETON PARKER JONES, JR. 

22 Nutting Ave., Amherst 
KS. Born 1918 at Amherst. Kimball Union Academy. Major 
in English. Advanced Military, 3, 4; Outing Club, 1; Mathe- 
matics Club, 3; Swimming, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M); "M" Club, 
3,4. 



MARY JANE JONES 

28 Tahanto Rd., Worcester 
Born 1919 at Worcester. Worcester Classical High School. 
Major in Chemistry. Pre-Med. Club, 4; Chemistry Club, 3, 4; 
Women's Athletic Association, 2, 3, 4. 



ROBERT LINCOLN JONES 

Princeton, Mass. 
KS. Born 1917 at Worcester. Worcester Classical High School. 
Major in Wildlife Management. Student Senate, 4; Class Trea- 
surer, 1, 2; Band, 1, 2; Outing Club, 1, 4; Fraternity President, 
4. 



ELLIOT HAROLD JOSEPHSON 

58 Tovvnsend St., Roxbury 
TE*. Born 1920 at Boston. Roxbury Memorial High School. 
Major in Bacteriology and Physiology. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 
4; Zoology Club, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 3, 4; Football, 2, 4: Base- 
ball, 1. 



1941 






D. M. KAGAN 



S. Z. KAPLAN 



D. A. KEIL 



K. M. KELL 



P. Z. KELLER 



DAVID MICHAEL KAGAJN 

134 East 51st St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
TE*. Born 1921 at Brooklyn, X. Y. Erasmus Hall High School. 
Major in Zoology. Index, 2, 3, 4 (Associate Editor, i); Meno- 
rah Club, 1, 2, 3^, 4; Zoology Club, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2, 
3, 4; Hockey, 1,2. 



SUMNER ZALINIAN KAPLAN 

47 Winchester St., Brookline 
AEn. Born 1920 at Boston. Boston Latin School. Major in 
History. Academic Activities Board, 3, 4; Index, 2, 3, 4; Bay 
State Revue, 3, 4 (Business Manager, 4) ; Roister Doisters, 2, 
3, 4 (Business Manager, 4); Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Current 
Affairs Club, 3, 4: Fraternity Vice-President, 4; Soccer, 1, 2, 
3, 4 (M); Winter Track, 3. 




DANA ALTON KEIL 

70 Lindsey St., Attleboro 
<J>I;K. Born 1919 at Attleboro. Attleboro High School. Major 
in Economics. Maroon Key, 2; Index, 3, 4 (Photography 
Editor, 4); Interfraternity Council, 3, 4; Fraternity President, 



INDEX 



KATHLEEN MARGARET KELL 

31 Clapp St., Stoughton 
AAM. Born 1919 at Wollaston. Stoughton High School. Major 
in Home Economics. Bay State Revue, 3; Sorority President, 
4; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Associ- 
ation, 3. 



PAUL ZELMAN KELLER 

257 Dickin.son St., Springfield 
AEH. Born 1919 at Springfield. Springfield Classical High 
School. Major in Political Science. Phi Kappa Phi, 4; Men's 
Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Roister Doisters, 2; Student Religious 
Council, 3, 4; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Fraternity Treasurer, 
3, 4; Basketball, 1. 





E. W. KING. JK. 



11. F. KING 



M. D. KING 



M. J. KLEVENS 




EDWIN WALLACE KING, JR. 

9 Franklin Terrace, Melrose 
Born 1918 at Melrose. Melrose High School. Major in Ento- 
mology. Academic Activities Board, 4; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4 
(Manager, 4); Christian Federation Cabinet, 1, 2, 3; Land- 
scape Architecture Club, 1; Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4. 



HOWARD FRANCIS KING 

Summit St., Millville 
.A.S*. Boru 1920 at Millville. Dean .\cademy. Major in Ani- 
mal Husbandry. Freshman Handbook Board, 1; .Advanced 
Military, 3, 4; Outing Club, 1; Animal Husbandry Club, 3, 4; 
Fraternity Vice-President, 4. 



M. DORIS KING 

44 Elm St., Gardner 
AAM. Born 1918 at Gardner. Gardner High School. Major in 
Economics. Xenman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Sorority Treasurer, 2, 
Vice-President, 3, President, 4; Women's Athletic Association, 
3, 4. 



SOLOMON KLAMAN 

33 Bicknell St., Boston 
AEn. Born 1920 at Boston. Boston English High School. 
Major in iVgricultural Economics. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Soccer, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M): Winter Track, 1, 2 (M), 3, 4 (M); 
Spring Track, 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball, 2; "M"' Club, 3, 4. 



1941 



MILTON JON KLEVENS 

22 Oklfields Rd., Roxbury 
Born 1919 at Jamaica Plain. Roxbury Memorial High School. 
Major in Forestry. Men's Glee Club, 2, 3, 4; Menorah Club, 
1,2,3,4. 








R. H. KNIGHT 



R. G. KRAWIEC 



M. E. KUHN 



C. L. KURALOWICZ 



JAMES JOEL KLENE 

2 Harlem St., Dorchester 
AEIT. Born 1920 at Boston. Roxbury Memorial High School. 
Major in Horticultm'al Manufactures. Bay State Revue, 3; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Horticultural Manufactures Club, 3, 
4; Winter Track, 1, 2, 3, 4; Spring Track, 1, 2, 3. 



RICHARD HOOPER KNIGHT 

52 Elm St., Melrose 
<I)I;K. Born 1918 at Maiden. Melrose High School. Major in 
Forestry. Advanced Military, 3, 4; Hockey, 1, 2 (M); Swim- 
ming, 1; Baseball, 1, 2. 




REGINA GENEVIEVE KRAWIEC 

Liberty St., Belchertown 
AAM. Born 1920 at Goodyear, Conn. Belchertown High 
School. Transfer from American International College. Major 
in Zoology. Women's Glee Club, 1, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 2, 3, 
4 (Vice-President, 4); Mathematics Club, 3; Languages and 
Literature Club, 1. 



INDEX 



IVLVRIAN ERNA KUHN 

Southampton 
Born 1920 at Southampton. Easthampton High School. Trans- 
fer from Springfield Junior College. Major in Chemistry. Out- 
ing Club, 4; Chemistry Club, 3, 4 (Treasurer, 4). 



CHESTER LEON KURALOWICZ 

19 Catherine St., Willimansett 
AFP. Born 1919 at Holyoke. Chicopee High School. Major in 
English. Index, 2, 3, 4 (Editor-in-Chief, 4); Collegian, 1, 2, 
3, 4: Collegian Quarterly, 2, 3 (Associate Editor); Newman 
Club, 4; Languages and Literature Club, 3, 4; 1940 Danforth 
Summer Fellowship. 




W. R. LALOR 



.1. 1'. LAKKIN 



E. M. LAVITT 




WALTER RUSSELL LALOR 

432 Hollis St., Framingham 
Q.T.V. Born 1916 at Dorchester. Framingham High School. 
Major in Dairy Industry. Collegian, 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman Hand- 
book Board, 1; Band, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Dairy Club, 

2, 3, 4 (Secretary, Treasurer, 3). 



PRISCILLA ELIZABETH LANE 

590 Pleasant St., Brockton 
AAM. Born 1919 at Brockton. Brockton High School. Major 
in Home Economics. Class Nominating Committee, 1; Chris- 
tian Federation Cabinet, 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club, 1, 
2, 3, 4. 



JOSEPH PHELPS LAEKIN 

215 Arsenal St., Watertown 
AXA. Born 1918 at Watertown. Watertown High School. 
Transfer from United States Naval Academy. Major in Chem- 
istry and Dairy. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Dairy Club, 4: 
Football, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M); Basketball, 1; Winter Track, 
2, 3; Spring Track, 3; Baseball, 1; "M" Club, 3, i. 



HAINHLTON LAUDANI 

123 High St., Lawrence 
Ai;<i>. Born 1915 at Sicily, Italy. Lincoln Preparatory' School. 
Major in Entomology. Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4 (Presi- 
dent, 4) . 

EDWIN jNIITCHELL LAVITT 

41 North Park, Rockville, Conn. 
TE*. Born 1920 at Rockville, Conn. Rockville High School. 
Major in Animal Husbandry. Band, 1, 2; Debating, 1; Meno- 
rah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Animal Husbandry Club, 2, 3, 4; Cross 
Country, 4; Winter Track, 1, 3; Spring Track, 1; Joint Com- 
mittee on Inter-Collegiate Athletics, 3; Livestock Judging 
Team, 4. 



1941 





r. R. LEONARD. JR. 



R. H. LESTER 



D. LEVINE 



B. E. LOBACZ 



D. J. LONG 



T. RICHL4JRD LEOiNARD, JR. 

Church St., Raynham 
.\rP. Born 1919 at Brockton. Taunton High School. Major in 
Landscape -\rchitecture. Men's Glee Club, 4; Horticultural 
Show Committee, 4; Outing Club, 2, 3, 4; Landscape .Archi- 
tecture Club, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary, 4) ; Fraternity Secretary, 3, 4. 



RICHARD HENRY LESTER 

9 Highland St., Ware 
AXA. Born 1920 at Ware. Ware High School. Major in Eco- 
nomics. Football, 2, 3, 4 IM) (Manager, 4); Joint Committee 
on Inter-Collegiate Athletics, 4. 




DANIEL LEVINE 

103 Westbourne Terrace, Brookline 
TE*. Born 1920 at Boston. Boston Latin School. Major in 
.Agricultural Economics. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival 
Committee, 3, 4 (Trea.surer, 4); Interfraternity Council, 2, 3, 
4; Fraternity Treasurer, 3, President, 4; Swimming, 1; Base- 
ball, 1. 



INDEX 



BERTHA ELIZABETH LOBACZ 

36 Thompson St., Amesbury 
<I>Z. Born 1920 at .Amesbury. Amesbury High School. Major 
in Zoology. Women's Glee Club, 4; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Outing Club, 4; Zoology Club, 2, 3, 4; Sorority Treasurer, 4; 
Women's .Athletic .As.sociation, 1, 2, 3, 4; Nature Guide .Associ- 
ation, 4 (Vice-President). 



DOROTHY .JEAN LONG 

211 Clifton St., Maiden 
Born 1919 at .Arlington. .Arlington High School. Major in 
Chemistry. Phi Kappa Phi, 4; Women's Glee Club, 3, 4; 
Christian Federation Cabinet, 1, 2, 3 (Secretary, 3); Outing 
Club, 1, 2; Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary, 4). 






J. R. Lorow 



K. W. LOVELL 



F. LUCCHESI 



D. H. MALINS 




JASON RONALD LOTOW 

1820 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton 
AEn. Born 1918 at Boston. Williston Academy. Major in 
Economics. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Psj'chologv Club, 3; 
Tennis, 2, 3, 4. 



REBECCA WEST LOVELL 

643 Lincoln St., AVorcester 
Born 1929 at Worcester. Worcester North High School. 
Major in Horticultural Manufactures. Women's Glee Club, 
4; Chemistry Club, 1; Horticultural Manufactures Club, 3, 4 

(Secretary, 4). 



FLORA LUCCHESI 

108 Nonotuck St., Holyoke 
AAM. Born 1919 at Holyoke. Holyoke High School. Major i 
Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



STELLA RUTH MAISNER 

Amherst Rd., Leverett 
AAM. Born 1920 at Shutesbury. Amherst High School. Major 
in Home Economics. Home Economies Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 4-H 
Club, 1. 



DANA HAROLD MALINS 

8 Nottinghill Rd., Brighton 
AEn. Born 1919 at Boston. Boston Latin School. Major in 
English. Bay State Revue, 3; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: Pre- 
Med. Club, 1, 2: Psychology Club, 3; Languages and Litera- 
ture Club, 3, 4; Fraternity Secretary, 3; Soccer, 2, 3. 



1941 





J. C. MANIX 



H. ,1. McCALLUM 



McCarthy 



R. J. McCartney 



F. W. McGURL 



JOHN CHARLES MAiMX 

62 Graves St., South Deerfield 
AFP. Born 1918 at South Deerfield. Deerfield Academy. 
Major in General Engineering. Cla.ss Nominating Committee, 
3; Collegian, 2, 3; Carnival Committee, 3; Pre-Med. Club, 1; 
Fraternity President, 4. 



HOWARD JAlMES McCALLUM 

96 North St., Northampton 
Ki;. Born 1918 at Rahway, N. J. Northampton High School. 
Major in Landscape Architecture. Landscape Architecture 
Club, 3, 4; Interfraternity Council, 4: Swimming, 1, 2 (M), 3 
(M), 4 (M) (Co-Captain); "M" Club, 2, 3, 4. 




HAROLD TIMOTHY McCARTHY 

59 Broad St., Salem 
KS. Born 1920 at Salem. Salem High School. Major in Eng- 
lish. Collegian, 2, 3; Roister Doisters, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Mathematics Club, 1; Swimming, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



INDEX 



ROBERT JOSEPH McCARTNEY 

233 Lafayette St., Salem 
Born 1917 at Salem. Salem High School. Major in Enghsh. 
Collegian, 2, 3: Collegian Quarterly, 2, 3 (Editor-in-Chief, 3); 
Men's Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Bay State Revue, 2, 3, 4 (Co- 
Author, 4); Lanugages and Literature Club, 3, 4; Operetta 
2, 3, 4 (Manager). 



FREDERICK WILSON McGURL 

211 Hamilton St., Worcester 
Born 1918 at Worcester. Worcester Classical High School. 
Major in Pre-Med. Men's Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Assistant 
Manager, 3); Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Treasurer, 4). 




J. F. MEUEK 



W. T. MILES 



J. T. MILLER 



M. MILLER 




JOSEPH FRANCIS MEDER 

244 North St., Northampton 
Born 1919 at Northampton. Northampton High School. 
Major in Chemistrj'. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry 
Club, 3, 4; Mathematics Club, 2, 3; Horticultural Manu- 
factures Club, 4. 



IRVING MEYER 

58 Linden St., Springfield 
TE<3E>. Born 1920 at Springfield. Springfield Classical High 
School. Major in Zoology. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Zoology 
Club, 2, 3, 4; Pre- Med. Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Fraternity President, 
4, House Manager, 3; Soccer, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M); Bas- 
ketball, 1; Winter Track, 2, 3, 4; Baseball, 1; "M" Club, 2, 3, 
4 (Secretary, 4). 



WALTER THEODORE MILES 

19 Pleasant St., Dalton 
0X. Born 1918 at Holyoke. Williston Academy. Major in 
Economics. Class Nominating Committee, 1, 2; Fraternity 
Vice-President, 4; Football, 1; Basketball, 1, 3 (M), 4 (M); 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3 (M), 4 (M); "M" Club, 4. 



JOSEPH THOMAS INHLLER 

Oakham Rd., Barre Plains 
Q.T.V. Born 1919 at Barre Plains. Barre High School. Major 
in Horticultural Manufactures. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Horticultural Manufactures Club, 3, 4; C.A.A., 3; Fraternity 
Treasurer, 4; Baseball, 1, 2. 



MIRIAM MILLER 

29 Maple St., Brookfield 
SI. Born 1920 at Worcester. Brookfield High School. Major in 
History. Bay State Revue, 3; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Sorori- 
ty Treasurer, 3, 4. 



1941 





M. B. MILLETT 



B. L. MITCHELL 



L. D. MOODY 



S. M. MORRISON 



J. €. MORYTKO 



MvSJtlON BURNHAlM MILLETT 

23 Melrose St., Adams 
AAM. Born 1919 at West Newbury. Adams High School. 
Major in Chemistry. Orchestra, 1, 2: Women's Glee Club, 1, 
2, 3 (Accompanist, 2, 3); Chemistry Club, 3, 4. 



BETTY LOUISE INIITCHELL 

84 Bartlett Ave., Pittsfield 
Born 1920 at Pittsfield. Pittsfield High School. Transfer from 
University of Rochester. Major in Recreational Planning. 
Outing Club, 4. 




LINCOLN DAVID MOODY 

57 Blue Hills Rd., Amherst 
I;AE. Born 1918 at Springfield. Amherst High School. Major 
in Physics. Men's Glee Club, 3; Roister Doisters, 1, 2, 3, 4 
(Electrician, 4); Outing Club, 1, 2, 3 (Treasurer, 3); Mathe- 
matics Club, 2; Radio Club, 3 (Vice-President); Fraternity 
Treasurer, 4; Soccer, 1, 2, 3. 



INDEX 



SUMNER MARTIN MORRISON 

280 Humbolt Ave., Roxbury 
Born 1919 at Bo,ston. Boston Public Latin School. Major in 
Bacteriology. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 3,^4; 
Chemistry Club, 2, 3; Football, 2. 



JOHN CHARLES IMORYTKO 

9 Sibley Ave., Westfield 
Born 1920 at Westfield. Westfield High School. Major in 
Economics. Advanced Military, 3, 4; Horticultural Manu- 
factures Club, 4; Current Aff'airs Club, 2, 4. 




U. p. MOTRONI 



C. v. NASI RI 



K. E. 0"<;ONr\OK 



K. M. O-NEIL 




UMBERTO PASQLALE IMOTRONI 

62 Emerald St., Boston 
ASI<I>. Born 1918 at Lucca, Italy. Boston College High School. 
Major in Landscape Architecture. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Horticultural Show Committee, 4; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Landscape Architecture Club, 3, 4; Soccer, 2, 3, 4 (M) (Man- 
ager); "M" Club, 4; Joint Committee on Inter-Collegiate 
Athletics, 4. 



CARL ALBERT NASTRI 

55 Maltby PI., New Haven, Conn. 
Born 1917 at New Haven, Conn. Milford School. Major in 
History and Physical Education. Maroon Key, 2; Class Nom- 
inating Committee, 3; Newman Club, 2, 3, 4; Football, 1, 2, 
3, 4 (M); Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4 (M); Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4 (M); 
"M" Club, 4. 



JOHN WILLIAM NYE 

14 Otis St., Needham 
KS. Born 1919 at Watertown. Needham High School. Major 
in Chemistry. Phi Kappa Phi, 4; Men's Glee Club, 2, 3, 4; 
Bay State Revue, 2, 4; Chemistry Club, 3, 4; Fraternity Sec- 
retary, 4; Winter Track, 1, 2, 4; Spring Track, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



J. EDWARD EIMjMETT O'CONNOR 

87 Pine St., Holyoke 
AXA. Born 1920 at Holyoke. Holyoke High School. Major in 
Engineering. Class Captain, 1; Winter Track, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M), 
4 (M) (Captain, 4); Spring Track, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M) 
(Captain, 4). 

FLORENCE JMARI O'NEIL 

14 Howard St., Ludlow 
AAM. Born 1920 at Ludlow. Ludlow High School. Major in 
Home Economics. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics 
Club, 2, 3, 4 (Senior Representative, 4). 



19 41 








M. H. OUDERKIRK 



R. E. PARDEE 



H. M. PAKZYCH 



MERTON HOWARD OLDERKIRK 

34 Marion Ave., Brockton 
Born 1918 at Brockton. Transfer from Northeastern Univer- 
sity. Major in Floriculture. Horticultiu-al Show Committee, 3, 
4 (Executive Chairman, 4); Floriculture Club, 3, 4 (Vice- 
President, 3). 



ROBERT EVERETT PARDEE 

509 ■\\Tiite St., Springfield 
DAE. Born 1919 at Springfield. Springfield Technical High 
School. Major in Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Vice- 
President, 3, President, 4); Fraternity Secretary, 4. 




HENRY MYRON PARZYCH 

80 Devens St., Greenfield 
Born 1918 at Greenfield. Wilbraham Academy. Major in 
Economics. Newman Club, 1, 4; Basketball, 1, 2, 4; Baseball, 
1, 3 (M), 4 (M) (Co-Captain, 4); "M" Club, 4. 



INDEX 



CHRISTOPHER PAUL 

332 Talbot Ave., Dorchester 
*SK. Born 1916 at Reading, Penn. Jamaica Plain High 
School. Major in Horticultural Manufactures. Band, 1, 2, 3, 
4; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Dairy Club, 3, 4; Football, 1, 2; 
Basketball, 1; Baseball, 1. 



ARTHUR AVRUM PAVA 

28 Somerset St., Springfield 
Born 1919 at Springfield. Springfield Classical High School. 
Major in Entomology. Phi Kappa Phi, 4; Wesley Foundation, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Fernald Entomology Club, 2, 3, 4; Zoology Club, 3. 






R. R. PETERS 



P. .1. PHILLIPS 



W. PHILLIPS, JU. 



R. H. PLICHTA 



W. F. POWERS, JR. ; 




ROBERT RICE PETERS 

2250 Dixnell Ave., Hamden, Conn. 
0X. Born 1919 at Hamden, Conn. Taft Preparatory School. 
Major in Economics. Class Nominating Committee, 3, 4; 
Interfraternity Council, 3, 4; Soccer, 1; Hockey, 2 (M); "M" 
Club, 3, 4. 



PHYLLIS JEAJNNE PHILLIPS 

44 Holmes Rd., Pittsfield 
<i)Z. Born 1919 at Sterling, II!. Edgenood Park High School. 
Major in Psychology. Class Vice-President, 1, 2, 3; Pre- Med. 
Club, 3, 4 (Secretary, 4) ; Phillips Brooks Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



WILLIAM PHILLIPS, JR. 

Beverly 
ex. Born 1916 at Washington, D.C. Avon Old Farms School, 
Conn. Transfer from University of Virginia andStockbridge 
School. Major in Pomology. 



ROSE HELENA PLICHTA 

Strong St., Amherst 
AAM. Born 1920 at Adams. Amherst High School. Major in 
English. 



1941 



WALLACE FRANK POWERS, JR. 

30 Fearing St., Amherst 
Born 1918 at Camden, N. J. Darrow School. Major in Mathe- 
matics. Mathematics Club, 3, 4. 



/ - V 





p. N. PROCOPIO L. F. PROUTY. JR. A. A. PKUSICK 



J. J. PRYMAK 



PAUL NICHOLAS PROCOPIO 

264 Boylston St., Brockton 
Ai;*. Born 1919 at Brockton. Brockton High School. Major 
in Landscape Architecture. Horticultural Show Committee, 4; 
Landscape Architecture Club, 2, 3, 4 (Treasurer, 4). 



L. FLETCHER PROLTY, JR. 

Barney Estate, Springfield 
Born 1917 at Springfield. Springfield Classical High School. 
Major in English. Academic Activities Board, 3; Men's Glee 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Manager, 3); Debating, 2, 3; Newman Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival Committee, 1, 2, 3 (Vice-Chairman, 2, 
Chairman, 3); Ring Committee, 1, 2, 3, 4; Advanced Military, 
3, 4: Current Afi^airs Club, 1, 2, 3 (Chairman, 3); C.A.A., 4; 
Football, 3; Operetta, 1, 2, 3. 




ALFRED ADAMS PRUSICK 

10 Devens Ave., Greenfield 
Born 1919 at Greenfield. Greenfield High School. Major in 
Economics- Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Football, 1, 2(M), 3(M); 
"M" Club, 3, 4. 



INDEX 



JOHN JOSEPH PRYMAK 

61 Kingston St., Lawrence 
fJ>SK. Born 1917 at Lawrence. Lawrence High School and 
Huntington Preparatory School. Major in Entomology. 
Campus Varieties, 4; Fernald Entomology Club, 2, 3, 4; Swim- 
ming, 2 (M),3 (M),4(M). 



JEAN PUFFER 

11 Rockhill St., Fo.xboro 
AAM. Born 1919 at Newton. Foxboro High School. Major in 
Bacteriology. Phi Kappa Phi, 4; Orchestra, 2; Christian Feder- 
ation Cabinet, 3, 4; Outing Club, 3, 4; Fernald Entoraologj' 
Club, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association, 3, 4. 




B. F. PULNIK 



C. C. PUTNEY 



B. M. READE 



L. G. REDER 



A. J. REED, in 




BRUNO FRANCIS PULNIK 

76 Main St., Hopkinton 
Born 1917 at Methuen. Hopkinton High School. Major in 
Floriculture. Floriculture Club,3;4-H Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; C.A.A., 
4. 



CHESTER CARLOS PUTNEY 

R.F.D. No. 1, Orleans, Vt. 
Born 1917 at Derby, Vt. Orleans High School. Major in 
Animal Hu.^bandry. Animal Husbandry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 4-H 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (President); Cross Country, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M), 
4 (M); Winter Track, 1, 2, 3 (M), 4; Spring Track, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
"M" Club, 3, 4. 



BERTHA IMERRITT READE 

61 Main St., Amherst 
SBX. Born 1919 at Cataumet. Bourne High School. Major in 
Home Economics. \Y.S.G.-\., 3; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 
3, 4; House Chairman of Abbey, 4. 



LIONEL GEORGE REDER 

142 Strong Ave., Pittsfield 
TE<J). Born 1920 at Perth Amboy, N. J. Pittsfield High School. 
Major in Animal Husbandry. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Dairy 
Club, 1, 2; Animal Husbandry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Current Af- 
fairs Club, 1. 



ANDREW JOHN REED, III 

7538 Paxton Ave., Chicago, 111. 
KS. Born 1919 at Newburyport. Transfer from George Wil- 
liams College. Major in Zoology. Collegian, 2; Men's Glee 
Club, 3, 4; Outing Club, 4; Zoology Club, 2, 3, 4. 



19 4 1 





J. D. RETALLICK 



H. E. REYNOLDS 



1. M. REYNOLDS 



E. A. RICHARDSON 



STANLEY COPELAND REED 

78 Winthrop St., Brockton 
Ai;<J). Born 1919 at Brockton. Brockton High School. Major 
in Animal Husbandry. Outing Club, 1; Animal Husbandry 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Fraternity Treasurer, 3; Football, 2. 



JOHN DAVID RETALLICK 

6 Wallace PI., Pittsfield 
ex. Born 1918 at Pittsfield. Pittsfield High School. Major 
in Economics. Maroon Key, 2 (Vice-President) ; Class Nomin- 
ating Committee, 1, 2 (Chairman, 2) ; Carnival Committee, 1, 2, 
3, 4 (Chairman, 3, 4) ; Fraternity Treasurer, 4. 




HELENA ELISABETH REYNOLDS 

134 Woodland St., Worcester 
SBX. Born 1919 at Worcester. Worcester South High School. 
Major in French. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Le Cercle Franjais, 
3, 4 (President, 4); Class Nominating Committee, 1. 



INDEX 



lONA MAE REYNOLDS 

41 Church St., Thorndike 
AAM. Born 1919 at West Springfield. Palmer High School. 
Major in Bacteriology. W.S.G.A., 2, 3, 4 (Secretary, 3, Trea- 
surer, 4); Roister Doisters, 2, 3; Christian Federation Cabinet, 
3, 4; Women's Athletic Association, 2, 3. 



EDWARD ADAMS RICHARDSON 

47 Highland Ave., .\yer 
Born 1919 at Groton. Ayer High School. Major in Botany. 
Men's Glee Club, 2, 3, 4. 






V. A. RICHARDSON 



R. 15. UISliUKRG 



A. M. ROBINSON 



R. A. RODRIGUEZ 



R. J. ROFFINOLI 




VIRGINIA ALICE RICHARDSON 

38 Maple Ave., Medford 
SBX. Born 1919 at Medford. Medford High School. Transfer 
from Lasell Junior College. Major in Home Economics. 
Women's Glee Club, 4; Outing Club, 4; Home Economics 
Club, 2, 3, 4; Cheer Leader, 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion, 2, 3, 4; Phillips Brooks Club, 3, 4. 



ROBERT BERTRAM RISEBERG 

90 Howard St., Walthara 
AEIT. Born 1919 at Providence, R. I. Waltham High School. 
Major in Economics. Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Winter Track, 1, 2, 3, 4; Spring Track, 3, 4; Tennis, 3, 4; 
Brass Quartet, 4; Economics Club, 4. 



ADA MARGARET ROBINSON 

24 Hubbard St., Concord 
SBX. Born 1918 at Concord. Concord High School. Majo 
Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



ROBERT AMES RODRIGUEZ 

fi99 Main St., Amherst 
Born 1920 at Springfield. Northampton High School. Major in 
Economics. Christian Federation Cabinet, 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing 
Club, 1,2, 3; Soccer, 1. 



RINO JOSEPH ROFFINOLI 

97 South St., Williamstown 
AS<I>. Born 1916 in Italy. Williamstown High School. Major 
in Agronomy. Bay State Revue, 3; Newman Club, 2, 3, 4; 
Fraternity President, 4; Soccer, 2, 3 (Manager, 3); Cross 
Country, 4; Winter Track, 4; Spring Track, 3, 4; Joint Com- 
mittee on Inter-Collegiate Athletics, 3. 



1941 





A. S. ROJKO 



A. S. ROUFFA I'. M. SANDERSON H. SCHENKER 



H. V. SCOLLIN, JR. 



ANTHONY STANLEY ROJKO 

East St., Hadley 
Born 1918 at Hadley. Hopkins Academy. Major in Agricul- 
tural Economics. 



ALBERT STANLEY ROUFFA 

5 Park Vale, Brookline 
TE*. Born 1919 at Boston. Brookline High School. Major in 
Agronomy. Men's Glee Club, 4; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Cross Country, 1. 




PATIENCE MONTIETH SANDERSON 

84 Hastings St., West Roxbury 
SBX. Born 1919 at Boston. Girls' Latin School. Major in 
English. Class Nominating Committee, 1, 2; Women's Glee 
Club, 1, 4; Bay State Revue, 3; Home Economics Club, 1, 2; 
Languages and Literature Club, 2, 3, 4. 



HANSSEN SCHENKER 

44 Brookline Ave., Holyoke 
Born 1919 at Holyoke. Holyoke High School. Major in Ento- 
mology. Band, 1, 2, 3, 4 (.4ssistant Manager); .Advanced Mili- 
tary, 3, 4; Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4. 



INDEX 



HAROLD VINCENT SCOLLIN, JR. 

51 Barham Ave., North Quincy 
KS. Born 1919 at Jamaica Plain. North Quincy High School 
Major in Economics, .\delphia, 4: Maroon Key, 2 (Secretary 
Treasurer); Freshman Handbook Board, 2 (Business Man- 
ager); Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Roister Doisters, 2, 3, 4; Debating, 2 
Ring Committee, 2, 3, 4: Sophomore-Senior Hop Committee, 2 
(Co-Chairman); Military Ball Committee, 3, 4 (Chairman) 
.\dvanced Military, 3, 4; Burnham Declamation, 2. 




M. E. SCULLY 



I. W. SEAVER 




MARION ELIZABETH SCULLY 

24 Adams St., Pittsfield 
SBX. Born 1919 at Pittsfield. St. Joseph's High School. 
Major in Psychology. Bay State Revue, 1, 2; Newman Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club, 4; Psychology Club, 2, 3, 4; Sorority 
Alumnae Secretary, 4. 



IRVING WILLARD SEAVER 

160 Gulf St., Shrewsbury 
0X. Born 1920 at Worcester. Shrewsbury High School. Major 
in Dairy Industry. Dairy Club, 2, 3, 4; Dairy Judging Team, 4. 



BENJAMIN H.AROLD SHANKER 

14 Dedham St., Wrentham 
TE*. Born 1919 at Wrentham. Wrentham High School. 
Major in Agricultural Economics. Orchestra, 1; Menorah 
Club, 1; Soccer, 1; Basketball, 1, 2. 



BERNICE IVIAE SHAW 

Belchertown 
Born 1918 at Holyoke. Belchertown High School. Major in 
Zoology. Christian Federation Cabinet, 2, 3; Fernald Ento- 
mology Club, 2, 3; Zoology Club, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 2, 3. 



SAMUEL PETTEE SHAW 

88 Pearl St., Middleboro 
KS. Born 1918 at Middleboro. Middleboro Memorial High 
School. Major in Wildlife Management. Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Christian Federation Cabinet, 3, 4; Outing 
Club, 4; Zoology Club, 4; Fraternity Treasurer, 4; Basketball, 
2, 3; Baseball, 2; Tennis, 3, 4. 



1941 





M. E. SHERMAN 



R. SIEfJEL 



A. SILVERMAN F. M. SIMONS, JR. D. A. SIMPSON 



IVIl KIEL EDITH SHERMAN 

26 Pine St., Palmer 
<i>Z. Born 1919 at Buffalo, X. Y. Palmer High School. Major 
in Home Economics. Honor Council, 3, 4; Home Economics 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (President); Intersorority Council, 3, 4; Sorori- 
ty Vice-President, 4. 

ROBERT SIEGEL 

15 Roxton St., Dorchester 
AEn. Born 1921 at Boston. Roxbury Memorial High School. 
Major in Pomology. Winter Track, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2; Horti- 
cultural Show Committee, 3. 




ALAN SILVERMAN 

54 Elm Hill Ave., Roxbury 
AEn. Born 1920 at Boston. Boston Latin School. Major in 
History. Maroon Key, 2; Class Nominating Committee, 1; 
Freshman Handbook Board, 1, 2 (Business Manager); Roister 
Doisters, 2, 3, 4; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Interfraternity 
Council, 3, 4; Fraternity President, 4; Soccer, 2, 3 (M); Bas- 
ketball, 1, 2, 3; "M" Club, 3, 4; Burnham Declamation Con- 
test, 1; Flint Oratorical Contest, 3. 



INDEX 



FRANK MELVILLE SIMONS, JR. 

19 Everett St., Stoneham 
AXA. Born 1917 at Somerville. Worcester Academy. Major in 
Agricultural Economics. Adelphia, 4; Student Senate, 4 
Class Nominating Committee, 2; Carnival Ball Committee, 3 
Interfraternity Ball Committee, 3; Advanced Military, 3, 4, 
Interfraternity Council, 3 (Secretary), 4 (President); Frater- 
nity Secretary, 2, 3; Soccer, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M) (Captain 



DONALD ANGUS SIMPSON 

296 Franklin St., Holyoke 
Born 1920 at Holyoke. Holyoke High School. Major in Psy- 
chology. Christian Federation Cabinet, 1, 2. 




V. L. SKOGSBERG 



D. SKOLNICK 



T. B. SLACK, JR. 




PAUL LESTER SKOGSBERG 

9 Beekman St., Worcester 
0X. Born 1919 at Worcester. Worcester South High School. 
Major in Entomology. Class Sergeant-at-Arms, 1, Captain, 3; 
Advanced Military, 3, 4; Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4; 
Fraternity President, 4; Football, 2, 3 (M). 



DAVID SKOLNICK 

108 Brunswick St., Roxbury 
TE<I>. Born 1919 at Roxbury. Winthrop High School. Major in 
Pomology. Men's Glee Club, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
C.A.A., 4; Cross Country, 1, 2, 3, 4 (M) (Manager); Winter 
Track, 1, 2, 3, 4 (M); Spring Track, 1, 2, 3, 4 (M); "M" Club, 
4; Joint Committee on Inter-Collegiate Athletics, 3, 4. 



TRACY BERNARD SLACK, JR. 

North Amherst 
Born 1917 at Boston. Charlemont High School. Major in 
Landscape Architecture. Men's Glee Club, 3, 4; Landscape 
Architecture Club, 3, 4. 



FRANCIS LEO SLATTERY 

11 King St., Dorchester 
KS. Born 1918 at Bcston. Boston Public Latin School. Major 
in Forestry. Class Nominating Committee, 2, 3; Band, 1; 
Men's Glee Club, 2, 4; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club, 
2, 3, 4; Baseball, 1, 2, 3. 



CARLTON VERNON SMITH 

HillsviUe Rd., North Brookfield 
AFP. Born 1917 at We.st Brookfield. North Brookfield High 
School. Major in Agricultural Economics. Class Sergeant-at- 
Arms, 3: Soccer, 3 (M), 4 (M); Basketball, 1, 2, 3 (M); Spring 
Track, 1; Baseball, 1. 



1941 





E. W. SMITH 



F. E. SMITH 



H. M. SMITH 



R. N. SMITH 



B. SNYDER 



ELJMER WILLL\M SMITH 

18 West Center St., Florence 
Born 1920 at Florence. Northampton High School. Major in 
Entomology. Phi Kappa Phi, 4; Fernald Entomology Club, 
3, 4.. 



FREDERICK EDWARD SiMITH 

35 Stanford PI., Glen Ridge, X. J. 
Born 1920 at Springfield. Bloomfield High School, N. J. Major 
in Entomology. Fernald Entomology Club, 2, 3, 4. 




HELEN MARG.4RET SMITH 

53 Beacon St., Athol 
.\AM. Born 1917 at Athol. Athol High School. Major in 
History. Orchestra, 1; Outing Club, 1; Current Affairs Club, 
4; 4-H Club, 2, 3. 



INDEX 



RICHARD NEILSON SINIITH 

384 East St., Chicopee Falls 
SAE. Born 1918 at Springfield. Chicopee High School. Major 
in Chemistry. 



BEVERLEY SNYDER 

109 Rochelle St., Springfield 
AAM. Born 1919 at Cambridge. Springfield Classical High 
School. Major in Home Economics. Christian Federation 
Cabinet, 1; Wesley Foundaton, 4; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 
3, 4; Current Affairs Club, 4. 




R 



I 







M. M. SOBOiN 



G. H. SOULE 



F. II. SI'ENCKK 



II. J. STEINHURST 



J. A. STEWART, JR. 




MATILDA iMARTHA SOBON 

29 Kendrick St., Lawrence 
Born 1920 at Lawrence. Lawrence High School. Major in 
Bacteriology. Women's Glee Club, 4; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



GEORGE HODGES SOLLE 

32 Ashmont St., Springfield 
Born 1918 at Rochester, N. H. Springfield Classical High 
School. Major in Agricultural Economics. Animal Husbandry 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 4-H Club, 2, 3, 4 (Treasurer, 3, 4). 



FRANK HENRY SPENCER 

439 Elm St., Northampton 
Born 1919 at Northampton. Northampton High School. Major 
in History. Football, 1, 2, 4; Basketball, 1; Baseball, 1, 2, 3 

(M). 



HYIMAN JULILS STEINHLRST 

90 Greenwood St., Boston 
TE<J>. Born 1920 at Boston. Boston Public Latin School. 
Major in Bacteriology. Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Mathe- 
matics Club, 2. 



JA!\IES ALEXANDER STEWART, JR. 

14 Fruit PL, Amesbury 
AXA. Born 1918 at Newburyport. Amesbury High School. 
Major in History. Wesley Foundation, 1; Soccer, 2, 3, 4; 
Cross Country, 1. 



1941 





B. STEWART 



P. I. STONE 



H. F. STOREY R. M. STREETER C. W. STYLER 



JOHN BUSHNELL STEWART 

14 Highland Terrace, Worcester 
KS. Born 1918 at Battle Creek, Mich. Worcester Academy. 
Major in Horticultural Manufactures. Bay State Revue, 1, 2; 
Horticultural Show Committee, 3, 4; Outing Club, 2, 4; Land- 
scape Architecture Club, 2; Horticultural Manufactures 
Club, 2, 3, 4 (President, 4); Football, 4; Baseball, 3, 4. 



PHOEBE ISABELLE STONE 

17 Boulevard Terrace, Brighton 
DI. Born 1919 at Boston. Girls' Latin School. Major in Eng- 
lish. Bay State Revue, 3; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Languages 
and Literature Club, 3, 4; Sorority Secretary, 4. 




HAROLD FREDERICK STOREY 

199 Union St., Millis 
0X. Born 1917 at Millis. Millis High School. Major in .Agrono- 
my. Class Nominating Committee, 1; Horticultural Show 
Committee, 4; 4-H Club, 4; Football, 1. 



INDEX 



RONALD IVIATHER STREETER 

126 Pearl St., Holyoke 
©X. Born 1919 at Holyoke. Holyoke High School. Major in 
Business Economics. Class Treasurer, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 4 

(M) (Manager). 



CHARLES WU.LU1AI STYLER 

44 Quinaposet St., Jeffer.son 
AFP. Born 1917 at Gilbertville. Hardwick High School. Major 
in Poultry Husbandry. Roister Doisters, 3, 4; Newman Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry "Club, 2; Poultry Club, 3, 4 (Vice-Presi- 
dent, 4); Baseball, 1,2. 





M. M. SULLIVAN 



J. F. TAYLOR 



R. W. THAYER 



M. A. THOMAS 



H. S. THORNTON 




MARY MARGARET SULLIVAN 

Brimfield Inn, Brimfield 
AAM. Born 1919 at Springfield. Hitchcock Academy. Major 
in Bacteriology. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



JEAN FRANCES TAYLOR 

92 Mt. Auburn St., Watertown 
SBX. Born 1919 at Medford. Watertown High School. Major 
in English. Class Nominating Committee, 1, 2, 3, 4; Ring 
Committee, 2, 3, 4 (Chairman, 3); Languages and Literature 
Club, 3, 4; Sorority President, 4. 



RAYMOND WINCHELL THAYER 

5817 London Rd., Duluth, Minn. 
0X. B jrn 1919 at Duluth, Minn. Duluth Central High School. 
Major in Landscape Architecture. Class Nominating Com- 
mittee, 1; Outing Club, 1, 2; Landscape Architecture Club, 
3, 4. 



MILDRED ARLENE THOMAS 

157 Maple St., Amherst 
Born 1920 at Hadley. Hopkins Academy. Major in Home 
Economics. Women's Glee Club, 2; Home Economics Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Horticultural Manufactures Club, 4; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 
3, 4. 



1941 



HENRY SMITH THORNTON 

77 East Pleasant St., Amherst 
A^4>. Born 1918 at Irving. Amherst High School. Major in 
History. Current Affairs Club, 4. 






R. C. TILLSON 



B. TOLMAN 



M. E. TOLMAN 



P. TOLMAN 



M. M. TORMEY 



ROBERT COiNNOR TILLSON 

Commonwealth Rd., Cochituate 
AFP. Born 1919 at Plattsburg, N. Y. Wayland High School. 
Major in Poultry Husbandry. Advanced Military, 3, 4; Out- 
ing Club, 4; C.A.A., 3; Cross Country, 1, 2; Winter Track, 2; 
Spring Track, 2; Poultry Science Club, 3, 4. 



BARBARA TOLMAN 

530 Burncoat St., Worcester 
Born 1918 at Worcester. Worcester Classical High School. 
Transfer from Smith College. Major in English. Orchestra, 2, 
3; Roister Doisters, 4; Languages and Literature Club, 2, 3, 4; 
Women's Athletic Association, 3, 4. 




INDEX 



M.ARION ESTHER TOLMAN 

22 Main St., Gilbertville 
AAM. Born 1919 at Ware. Holyoke High School. Major in 
Home Economics. Women's Glee Club, .'!, 4; Outing Club, 4: 
Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Intersorority Council, 3, 4. 



PHYLLIS TOLMAN 

530 Burncoat St., Worcester 
.\AM. Born 1919 at Worcester. Worcester Classical High 
School. Major in Home Economics. Women's Glee Club, 2, 3; 
Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 4-H Club, 3, i. 



MARY MARGARET TORMEY 

18 George St., Pittsfield 
Born 1920 at Pittsfield. Lenox High School. Major in English. 
Women's Glee Club, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Languages 
and Literature Club, 3, 4. 





K. M. TULLY 



E. A. TWYBLE 



E. M. VASSOS 



R. W. VINCENT 




KATHLEEN MILDRED TLLLY 

\ 35 South St., Southbridge 

SBX. Born 1920 at Worcester. Mary E, Wells High School. 
Major in English. W.S.G..\., 4 (House Chairman); Collegian, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman Handbook Board, 1, 2 (Editor); Bay 
State Revue, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary, 3); Lan- 
guages and Literature, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association, 
3, 4 (Riding Chairman, 4); French Club, 3, 4 (Vice-President, 



ELLSWORTH ARNOLD TWYBLE 

111 Main St., Gilbert ville 
Born 1918 at Gilbertville. Hardwick High School. Major in 
Bacteriology. Zoology Club, 4. 



JEAN GATES TYLER 

Stockbridge House, Amherst 
<I>Z. Born 1918 at West Xewbury, Vt. Mclndoes Academy. 
Major in Home Economics. Phi Kappa Phi, .4; Home Eco- 
nomics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



ELEANORE MILDRED VASSOS 

2055 Allen St., Springfield 
AAM. Born 1920 at Springfield. Springfield Classical High 
School. Major in Zoology. Outing Club, 2, 3, 4; Fernald Ento- 
mologj- Clulj, 3, 4; Zoology Club, 2, 3, 4. 



RICHARD W. VINCENT 

Little River St., Westfield 
*I;K. Born 1918 at New York, N. Y. Westfield High School. 
Major in Entomology. Fernald Entomology Club, 2, 3, 4; 
Fraternity Vice-President, 3; Spring Track, 1. 



1 9 4 1 





D. WALKER W. T. WALSH A. L. WANNLUND E. L. WARNER W. F. WARREN 



JAMES DEXTER WALKER 

Pelham 
0X. Born 1918 at Greenwich. Transfer from Rensselaer Poly- 
technical Institute. Major in Physics. Engineering Club, i. 



WILLL-VM THOMAS WALSH 

249 Springfield St., North Agawam 
KS. Born 1919 at Agawam. Agawam High School. Major in 
Economics. Maroon Kev, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; In- 
formal Committee, 4; Basketball, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4(M) 
(Captain); Baseball, 1, 2, 3 (M), 4 (M); "M" Club, 3, 4. 




ARTHUR LEON.4RD WANNLLTND 

144 Mount Vernon St., Arlington 
DAE. Born 1919 at ArHngton. Arlington High School. Major 
in Chemistry and Physics. Christian Federation Cabinet, 1, 2, 
3, 4; Outing'Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Mathe- 
matics Club, 1, 2; Radio Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis, 3 (M) (Man- 
ager); Joint Committee on Inter-Collegiate Athletics, 3. 



INDEX 



EVERETT LEE WARNER 

163 Northampton Rd., Amherst 
Born 1917 at Springfield. Springfield Technical High School. 
Major in Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4. 



WILLIAM FITTS WARREN 

26 Park St., West Roxbury 
Born 1919 at West Roxbury. Putney School. Major in Animal 
Husbandry. Phi Kappa Phi, 4; Animal Husbandry Club, 3, 4; 
Dairy Judging Team, 3; Livestock Judging Team, 4; Meats 
Judging Team, 4; Spanish Club, 4. 




A. W. WASHBURN, JR. 



E. E. WENTWORTH 



H. E. WHEATLEY 



E. C. WHEELER 



N. M. WOZNIAK 




ARTHUR WENDELL WASHBURN, JR. 

George St., Plainville 
AFP. Born 1919 at Boston. Kimball Union Academy. Major in 
Geology and Mineralogy. Maroon Key, 2; Band, 1, 2; Men's 
Glee Ciub, 1, 2, 3, 4; Christian Federation Cabinet, 1; Wesley 
Foundation, 1, 2; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Fraternity Vice- 
President, 2, President, 3; Ssvimming, 1; Statesmen, 3, i; 
Double Quartet, 2, 3, 4. 



ELEANOR ELIZABETH WENTWORTH 

Stanley St., Amherst 
Born 1918 at .\mher.st. .\mherst High School. Major in Ec 
nomics. 



HARRIET ELIZABETH WHEATLEY 

Chester Depot, Vt. 
AAM. Born 1919 at Rutland, Vt. Chester High School. Major 
in Home Economics. Outing Club, 1, 4; Home Economics 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Horticultural Manufactures Club, 4; 4-H 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



E. CHRISTINE WHEELER 

194 Clark St., Worcester 
AAM. Born 1920 at Worcester. Transfer from Guilford Col- 
lege, X.C. Major in Economics. Sorority House Chairman, 4. 



NELLIE MARIE WOZNIAK 

30 "X" St., Turners Falls 
1]BX. Born 1919 at Turners Falls. Turner Falls High Schools. 
Major in Languages and Literature. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Dads' Day Committee, 2, 3, 4; Junior-Senior Processional 
Committee, 3; Languages and Literature Club, 3, 4; Radio 
Club, 3; French Club, 3, 4 (Treasurer, 4). 



1941 




D. E. WRIGHT 



W. W. WYMAN 



D. M. YOULAND 



DOROTHY ELEANOR WRIGHT 

Stockbridge Rd., Lee 
AAM. Born 1919 at Pittsfield. Lee High School. Major in 
Bacteriology. Outing Club, 4; Current Affairs Club, 4; i-H 
Club, 4: Freshman Hazing Committee, 2; Nature Guide Asso- 
ciation, i. 



WALLACE WARREN WYMAN 

74 Highland Ave., Westfield 
AFP. Born 1919 at Blandford. Westfield High School. Major 
in General Engineering. Men's Glee Club, 4; Student Religious 
Council, 3; Christian Federation Cabinet, 3; Wesley Founda- 
tion, 1, 2, 3, 4 (President, 3); Outing Club, 4; Mathematics 
Club, 1 ; Engineering Club, 4. 




ALBERT YANOW 

43 Millet St., Dorchester 
TE<i>. Born 1920 at Everett. Boston Latin School. Major in 
English. Collegian, 1, 2; Student Religious Council, 3 (Presi- 
dent); Menorah Club, 2, 3, 4 (President, 3); Psvchologv 
Club, 3; Current Affairs Club, 3. 



INDEX 



DOROTHY iNIARION YOULAND 

35 Winslow .\ve.. West Somerville 
AAM. Born 1919 at Cambridge. Somerville High School. 
Major in Home Economics. Women's Glee Club, 1; Home 
Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Sorority Secretary, 4. 




42 

M UTURE leaders of the coming 
generation find a training -ground at Mas- 
sachusetts State College in the varied 
student government activities. From the 
active Senate to smaller groups, like the 
Dads' Day committee, a spirit of leader- 
ship that is ALIVE predominates. These 
honorary societies, class officers, student 
self-government groups, and less elabor- 
ate committees show the same coopera- 
tion found on the football gridiron. Hand- 
ling of student funds and finances in these 
activities develops the character of those 
who have been elected by fellow students. 
Mature advice and experience in many 
of the groups reach the students through 
faculty advisors. From September until 
June, these student organizations plan 
the year's program for most student 
dances and minor activities. These are the 
men ahead of the average. 



Campus "brain children" discuss quadratics in the lAIath Club 





Typical committee group: 





\^ alterniirc '41, Ouderkirk '41, and Erikson '42 make their plans for attracting 15,000 to the 31st Annual Horticultural. Shov 



TUDENT 



do- 



OVERNMENT 




Bullock. R. Jones, R. Hall, Freitas, Simons 
.Tackimczyk. Zeitlcr, Crimmins, C. Burr. Werme 

The Senate, junior-senior organization which is the main executive 
body on campus, this year proved its brain-chiklren — the Campus 
Varieties and Student Leader Day — to be worthy additions to 
the State campus. 

The Senate purchased a baseball scoreboard and gave $250 
toward the electric organ. In addition, the body sponsored Sub- 
Freshman Day and improved class election rules. It integrates all 
underclass organizations, including the Handbook. 







SENATE 



The W.S.G.A. — scourge of freshman coeds without berets and 
frugal issuer of one o'clock permissions — continued their tradition 
of meetings on rainy nights and customary discipline. Most im- 
portant of all the W.S.G.A. initiated the Lsogon. 

This more progressive W.S.G.A. does not expect merely to chas- 
tise frisky coeds but wi.shes to be the vehicle of better coed self- 
government and to advance women's place on the campus. The 
active head of the organization is Evelyn Bergstrom. 



W. S. G. A. 





ACADEMIC 
ACTIVITIES 




Critcliett, Emery 



The Index — the Collegian — the Band — the Roister Doisters — all 
are supervised by the Academic Activities Board. It is seldom con- 
sidered an ogre but rather an essential student-faculty organization, 
and is made up of two faculty members, two alumni members, 
student activities managers. Dean Machmer, and a board man- 
ager. 

Part of the Board's work is the annual awarding of activities 
medals, a Conspicuous Service Cup and a Manager's Prize. 



White "M's" against a maroon background are both attractive 
and significant of honor. The Intercollegiate Athletic Committee 
decides on the athlete's qualifications for these. 

The committee — Chairman Curry Hicks, Director of Athletics, 
alumni F. A. McLaughlin and Theoren Warner, M. O. Lanphear, 
Secretary Earle Carpenter, and all student sports managers — con- 
siders candidates for varsity letters, decides on the selection of 
managers, and buys equipment. 



J. Shepardson, Motroni, W. Shaw, Skolnick. H. Golan 
Lester, Prof. Hicks, F. McLaughlin, Registrar Lanphear, Streeter 




INTERCOLLEGIATE 
ATHLETICS 




[V'ol 




, Jackiinczyk, Howla 
C. Burr, Hall 



Maroon coats mark the men who have made campus Ufe richer 
without winning the usual campus fame. In May seniors and 
juniors are " tapped " every year by retiring members of the society. 
With its aim the "promotion of good fellowship and the fostering 
of the highest ideals on campus," the Adelphia in the past year 
directed football rallies, conducted its annual Red Cross campaign, 
collected funds for the March of Dimes, and directed activities for 
which no other organization exists. 



/ft 




"K- \ - 



ADELPHIA 



This year, coeds will also be "tapped" to membership in a senior 
honorary society — the new Isogon. The first seven seniors were 
appointed by the W.S.G.A. Council and, hereafter, the Isogon will 
be self-perpetuating. Four seniors are chosen in the spring and 
seven juniors at the Junior-Senior Processional. Appointment, 
based on character, scholarship, versatility, and participation in 
activities, is by unanimous vote. Isogon provides a worthwhile 
goal for all women students. 



i TuUy, Freedman, Kell, G. Archibald 
Lsses Sherman. Bailey, I. Reynolds 



ISOGON 




124 





McDonough, Santin, Fitzpatrick 
Marsden, Cross^ Bokina. Vetteriins 



MAROON KEY 



The freshman's opinion of the Maroon Key naturally depends on 
the time of year. At early morning "serenades" the freshman may 
be a bit biased, but the true worth of the Key is not long hidden. 
Besides supplying hats for college atmosphere, it acts as host to 
visiting varsity teams. 

From 32 freshmen, later cut to 18 by the Senate, 10 are chosen 
for the Maroon Key. It has come to be respected both by visitors 
and classmates. 



Each class elects two members to serve four years on the Interclass 
Athletic Board. This .schedules interclass games, determines eligi- 
bility, and awards numerals. 

The board plans to hold interclass competition in football and 
soccer in the fall; swimming, track, basketball, and hockey in the 
winter; and baseball, track and tennis in the Spring. These sports 
present a successful form of athletic activity supplementary to the 
regular varsity program. 



Hood. Zeitler. C. Burr. Evans. Nebeskv 




INTERCLASS 
ATHLETICS 




125 




ns, W alsl. 
i Phillips, Mi, 




With Commencement and the Soph-Senior Ball as the closing 
events in its scholastic and social life, the Class of 1941 leaves 
campus but carries on the tradition of Massachusetts State. The 
freshmen who arrived in 1937 have matured and this year have 
held important positions — sports or extracurricular activities 
managers, lettermen. Senate or Adelphia members, publications 
editors, Isogon members, fraternity or sorority officers, advanced 
cadet officers, and their quota of Phi Kappa Phi scholars. 



SENIOR CLASS 
OFFICERS 



The Class of 1942 first saw Amherst through a mist, and they 
were not through the rigors of ghosts-on-campus talk when the 
Hurricane arrived. Since then, a few have returned to the Great 
Unheard-of beyond Amherst ; but most have gone on walking over 
the same numerals, cutting the same classes .... At this point they 
are beginning to study what they like; but the privileges, the lord- 
ship, and the rousing nostalgia of the Senior are still only theirs in 
anticipation. 



Eldridge, Mi! 



iVerme, Freitas 

, Hall, W. Dwyer, Mi. 



JUNIOR CLASS 
OFFICERS 





126 





SOPHOMORE 
OFFICERS 



The Class of 1943, like the junior class, cuts the carpet (in the social 
respect) regularly and thoroughly. However, after holding a soph- 
omore social and a sophomore Christmas party, the class then 
proved its high mental ability by capturing several Lotta Crabtree 
scholarships. For the class in general, high spot of the year is the 
Soph-Senior Ball. The three-hundred members of the class this 
year chose an exceptional Maroon Key membership, lost the an- 
nual rope-pull to freshmen, and won on Razoo Day. 



FROSH CONFUSION . . . psychology exams . . . rope pull . . . Razoo 
sports. . .two coed Olympic swimming champions. . .football ral- 
lies. . .dorm "vie" dances. . chemical plumbing majors. . .fresh- 
men mob storms the Amherst common to punish frisky Amherst 
College men in the fall . . . rapid, relentless rushing by the Greek- 
letter houses. . .Lewis Hall "quiet hours". . ."Ontogeny recapit- 
ulates phylogeny " . . . Burnham declamation ... spring military 
training under a hot New England sun in May. 



J. Fitzgerald. Parker. Miss Leete. Miss Lawrence. .Anderson 




FRESHMAN 
BOARD 




h: 




'ttJfe 



i p. Archibald, Badg 



Berry. Pede 
Hall. Mcln 



zani. Tully, Carpenter 
rny. Preat, Handforth 



When coeds begin to knock out their teeth with hockey sticks and 
to limp about in jodhpurs, everyone reahzes that the Women's 
Athletic Association is at work. For its function is to manage all 
sports for coeds not already leaden-eyed from the efforts of social 
life and study. In W.A.A. organization, there are student officers, 
Physical Director, and a captain for each sport. Coed participation 
is voluntary. The W.A.A. makes rules, carries on tournaments, 
and makes awards in May. 




W. A. A. 



"What about honor?" Pressing question of the year, it came to 
another solution after the old Honor Council resigned. In Nov- 
ember, 1940, Dr. Goldberg and Dr. Woodside were appointed to 
serve with Dean Machmer as faculty members of the Honor Com- 
mission. McCutcheon '42 and Blodgett '41 were appointed by the 
Senate; Miss Bergstrom '41 and Miss Berry '42 by the W.S.G.A. 
Cases of dishonesty are reported to the Commission by all in- 
structors who conduct exams to their own preference. 



Dr. Goldberg, Miss Berry, Dean Machmer, Miss Bergstrom, Dr. Woodside, McCulcheon 



HONOR 
COMMISSION 







H. Shaw. Saulnier. Mi,s M. Donahue. G. Anderson, Noltenbnrg. Prof. Sharp 



HANDBOOK 
BOARD 



"A group of dusty compilers of State rules and activities and tra- 
ditions"— this is the Freshman Handbook Board. Under the eco- 
nomical but expectant eye of the Senate, the organization of the 
board has been entirely changed in the past year. It is now to en- 
snare three juniors, three sophomores, and three freshman com- 
petitors. In the work of these nine, however, there is always the 
bait of innovation and the sense of the Handbook's being a "Bible" 
of guidance to perennially new frosh. 

Due recognition for the success of the 31st Horticultural Show 
goes to Student Managers Kenneth Waltermire and Merton 
Ouderkirk for the direction and portrayal of a difficult Oriental 
theme. The central theme, taken from a religious woodcut found in 
an old Japanese book, was the first educational theme that the 
Department of Landscape Architecture has had in the annual 
show. Laurels also go to the other committee members and to the 
Stockbridge School of Agriculture for their hard work. 



Hayward. Potter, V. Erikson, Procopio, Leonard 
gge, Miiis Frecdman. Wallermire. Ouderkirk. Rhi 



HORT. SHOW 
COMMITTEE 




129 




KiilH-nstein, A, Silverman, ltrn<lrri< k. <i. Kimball, Brack, D. Levine, Frandsen, 

J. Shrpardson. McCallum 
Zeitler, Keil, Peters, Morgan, Simons. Bassett, Rhines, M. Eaton, Hayward, W. Kim- 
ball (not pictured) 




"Healthy competition" among fraternities through the Greek 
sing, declamation, skits, snow sculpture, house inspection, and 
athletics competitions — this is the aim of the Interfraternity 
Council. It also supervises the complicated task of freshman rush- 
ing in the fall, for which rules were revised this year. Since sixty 
per cent of men students belong to fraternities, the council func- 
tions as a meaningful organization at Massachusetts State. 



The Intersorority Council, composed of two members from each 
sorority, influences most State coeds. Our sororities have been in 
existence since 1931 and owe much of their success to the Council. 
This body prevents haphazard competition, makes rules for 
rushing, and plans intersorority events, such as the annual Ball. 
Each year, two plaques are awarded — one for the Declamation 
and Sing and one for the best scholarship average. 



INTERFRATERNITY 
COUNCIL 



Misses Lappen,, Hclyar. M. Tolman, Handforth. Beauregard 
Misses Desmond, Belk. Freedman. Henschel, Sherman 



INTERSORORITY r 
COUNCIL 





130 





MILITARY 
BALL 



Avery, R. Hall. Haskell 
Bragdon, ScoUin, Aykroyd, Bolt 

Early in November the Military Ball band — Hal Mclntyre's 
seventeen-piece outfit- — was announced by Chairman Harry Scol- 
lin. Posters decorated the campus. Junior and senior R.O.T.C. 
majors rode on their Army "hosses" in formation to Stockbridge 
Hall before "convo" with placards. On December 6, decorations 
arranged by a professional company with local help, special favors, 
and crowning of the honorary colonel added to the attractions of 
the Ball. Pasteboards, retailing at $3.50, sold by the hundreds. 



"Will it snow, or. . ." Weather-worrying as usual, the three-class 
committee — headed by John Retallick — arranged a gala Winter 
Carnival which even rain could not spoil completely. Vice-Chair- 
men Frederick Burr and Spencer Potter, Treasurer Dan Levine, 
Secretary Norma Handforth, Social Chairman Peter Barreca, 
Walter Miles (Winter Sports), and Kenneth Howland (Publicity) 
were the others in charge of the Carnival, which is the largest all- 
school event of the year. 



Poller, F. Burr, Lcvinc, Howland 
a. Miss ,1. Brown, Miss Handforlh, Relallic 



WINTER 
CARNIVAL 




131 




Graham, Miss Beauregard, Miss Barrus, E. Anderson 

From sunrise until long after sundown, mothers were rushed from 
one event to another at the 1941 Mothers' Day on campus. Regis- 
tration, a full-dress review of the R.O.T.C., a sports program, a 
modern dancing exhibition by coeds, a swimming meet, an Alviani- 
created musical program at Stockbridge, sorority declamations, 
and a Sunday band concert were the planned activities of the day. 
In spite of difficulties, the Mothers' Day committee presented the 
most entertaining Mothers' Day yet held. 




MOTHERS' DAY 



Welcomed by Chairman Jean Davis '42, five hundred fathers of 
State students went to classes and later enjoyed the military drill. 
After lunch at fraternities and sororities, they attended the State- 
Worcester Tech game, an evening banquet, and the annual Dads' 
Day show at which the college orchestra, President Baker, and the 
intersorority glee club also took part. Chairman of the show was 
Jack Heyman, Lambda Chi Alpha prexy. Akin to Mothers' Day, 
Dads' Day is an annual event. 



DADS' DAY 




[ 13^1 , 




INTER -"GREEK' 
DANCES 




Horgan. Miss Belk, Miss Desmond. Silverman, W. Kimball (not pictured) 
Miss Sherman. Peters, Miss Hcnschel, Simons. Miss Freedman 



Most important spring formals are the Interfraternity Ball and the 
Intersorority Ball. In April the "Greekettes" plan their "ronaantic, 
ravishing" Ball, to which they lure unsuspecting males-about- 
campus. In May the fraternity men retaliate with the interfraterni- 
ty dance-fest. Orchestras to suit jitterbug or sway-time fans enter- 
tain the hundreds of couples. Both committees have proved that 
the Old Drill Hall can be transformed with crepe paper, decora- 
tions, and solid work. 



The crowning event of Commencement and the gala occasion of 
the year occurs during the second week of June: the Soph-Senior 
Hop. Since it is the major and final dance of the year, the commit- 
tee in charge of preparations this year plans a "smooth" band and 
painstaking transformation of the "Old Grey Barn." Occurring 
long after publication of the Index, the only prediction possible is 
one based on the reputation of the wellknown committee members 
— the Sophomore-Senior Hop will be "tops." 



Zielinski, P. Dwyer, Miss Webber, Eldridge. Potter 




SOPH-SENIOR 
HOP 




133 



THE MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE OUTING CLUB 




Senior Bill Fuller gathers Outing Club members with his "gee-tar" and songs at a barn dance 



With its square dances, bike trips, and 
hikes througliout New England, the State 
College Outing Club is literally the most 
active club on campus. Just looking at 
their hiking plans for the year can make 
your legs ache in sympathy. And to the 
lazy wonder of the campus, the Outing 
Club carries out those plans. 

Howard Hunter, the busy president, is 
always about, putting up notices, calling 
meetings, and mounting people on bikes. 
And when the energetics have finished 
riding their bikes, they usually have 
square dances and quadrilles with a 
fiddle in the Drill Hall. 

The Outing Club is not just exercising. 
During the past year, more than any 
other club, it has made friends at other 



colleges in New England. And in the 
most informal of ways — square dances at 
Mount Holyoke, canoe trips with Am- 
herst and Dartmouth, week-end larks 
with Renssalaer Polytechnical Institute. 

Now a member of an intercollegiate 
association of such groups, the club was 
host (with R.P.I.) to all at a week-end 
trip last fall. And, of course, it was a week 
end of hiking and dancing and singing — 
the classic formula of the Club. 

OflBcers: '40 President — Howard Hun- 
ter, Vice-President — Milton Fortune, 
Treasurer — Talcott Edminster, Secre- 
tary — Sally Neilson, Secretary — Louise 
Heermance. Executive committee : Fuller, 
Douse, Miss Hartley, Miss Dunklee, and 
Mosher. Membership: 100. 




Veteran Massachusetts State and Rensselaer hikers on their Stratton Pond climb in Vermont 

[134 1 



ZOOLOGY CLUB 



VARSITY CLUB 




Officers: Secretary — Bertha Lobacz, 
President — John Reed, Advisor — Dr. 
Woodside, Vice-President — Robert Breg- 
lio. Membership: 25. Purpose: "to foster a 
spirit of research, provide a medium for 
discussion, estabhsh a means of bringing 
lectures on zoological subjects to the 
campus, and facilitate exchange of ideas 
and enthusiasm among members." 



Officers: Secretary — Irving Meyer, Vice- 
President — Stanley Jackimczyk, Presi- 
dent — Frank Simons, Treasurer — Robert 
Breglio. Membership: 90. Purpose: "to 
bring together all the lettermen on cam- 
pus in a single body to work for the wel- 
fare of the college in general and to bring 
forth a better athletic program together 
with alumni." 



LANG.-LIT. CLUB 



FRENCH CLUB 




Officers: '42 Chairman — Mary Donahue, 
'41 Chairman — Peter Barreca, Commit- 
tee — Prof. Coding, Mr. Lyle (not pic- 
tured), and Miss Horrigan (not pic- 
tured). Membership: 30. (Faculty ad- 
visors are members of the languages and 
literature department.) Purpose: "to 
present speakers and programs to keep 
members culturally up-to-date." 



Officers: Secretary — Gertrude Goldman, 
President — Betty Reynolds, Advisor — 
Prof. Coding, Vice-President — Kay Tul- 
ly, Treasurer — Nellie Wozniak. Member- 
ship: 15. Purpose: "to enjoy speaking 
French and to acquire a broader knowl- 
edge of French culture, providing an hour 
of conversational French and fun every 
Friday night in the Old Chapel." 



[ 135 



PRE-MED CLUB 



FERNALD ENT. CLUB 




Officers: Secretary — Norman J. Beckett, 
Vice-President — Regina Krawiec, Treas- 
urer — Fred McGurl, President — Ernest 
Bolt, Advisor — Dr. Woodside. Member- 
ship: 25. Purpose: "to keep the prospec- 
tive medical students posted on the not 
too technical modern developments." 
(The club offers talks by competent 
authorities and movies.) 



Officers: Club yearbook editor — Elmer 
Smith, Vice-President — Ben Hadley, Pro- 
gram committee chairman — Tom John- 
son, President — Hamilton Laudani, Sec- 
retary — Harold McLean. Membership : 
40. Purpose: "to carry on the interest of 
modern entomological work on campus." 
(Club founded in 1925 and named in 
honor of Dr. Henry T. Fernald.) 



LAND. ARCH. CLUB 



HOME EC CLUB 




Officers: Secretary — Richard Leonard, 
Vice-President — Betty Desmond, Presi- 
dent — Kenneth Waltermire, Treasurer — 
Paul Procopio, Advisor — Ray Otto (not 
pictured). Membership: 20. Purpose: 
"to keep interest in the study of Land- 
scape Architecture and to have outside 
speakers on the phases of the subject 
which aid the members in their major." 



Front row: Dorothy Dunklee, Louise 
Hartley, President Muriel Sherman, Har- 
riet Kelso, Florence O'Neil; second row: 
Sally Kell, Cynthia Bailey, Agatha Deer- 
ing, Harriet Sargent. Advisor: Mrs. 
Coolidge (not pictured). Purpose: "to 
provide a discussion group in which the 
latest ideas on Home Economics may be 
aired among the members." 



136] 



POULTRY CLUB 



DAIRY CLUB 




Officers: Vice-President — Charles Styler, 
President — Howard Fassett, Secretary- 
Treasurer — George Yale. Membership : 
50. Purpose: "to promote fellowship 
among students and faculty, to stimulate 
leadership and cooperation among poul- 
try majors." (One of the largest clubs on 
campus, the Poultry Club climaxes its 
program with an annual banquet.) 



Officers : Mce-President — William Mer- 
rill, Secretary-Treasurer — Saul Glick, Co- 
President — C. H. Dorchester, Co-Presi- 
dent — Carl Werme, Advisor — Prof. Lind- 
quist (not pictured). Membership: 60. 
Purpose: "to hold a series of meetings 
throughout the year with prominent 
speakers on modern dairy industry and 
to stimulate student discussion." 



HORT. MAN. CLUB 



NATURE GUIDE CLUB 




Officers: Vice-President — Gabriel Auer- 
bach, Secretary-Treasurer — Rebecca Lov- 
ell. President — John Stewart, Advisor — 
Prof. Chenoweth (not pictured). Mem- 
bership: 20. Purpose: "to keep the mem- 
bers of the horticultural manufactures 
club advised as to developments in the 
line of food technology and to prepare 
students for practical work." 



Officers : Secretary-Treasurer — Martha 
Hall, President — George SLnnicks, Vice- 
President — Bertha Lobacz, Advisor — 
Dr. Vinal (not pictured). Membership: 
20. Purpose: "to discuss mutual prob- 
lems and newer developments in the field 
of recreation with the students interested 
in it either as a profession or as a hobby 
in later life." 



137 



ENGINEERING CLUB 



CHEMISTRY CLUB 




Active members: John Manix, Talcott 
Edmiiister, Wallace Wyman, Richard 
Andrew; Faculty Advisor — Prof. G. Mar- 
ston (not pictured). Membership: 25. 
Purpose: "to study current problems of 
engineering." (Typical meetings included 
talks by seniors concerning summer work 
on engineering projects and movies on 
the Tacoma bridge failure.) 



Officers: Secretary — Jean Long, Presi- 
dent — Robert Pardee, Vice-President — 
Francis Coughlin, Treasurer — Marian 
Kuhn, Advisor — Dr. Ritchie (not pic- 
tured). Membership: 25. Purpose: "to 
provide instruction, entertainment, and 
help for students who expect to choose 
work in chemistry for their careers after 
graduation from college." 



CHRISTIAN FEDERATION CABINET 




Front row: Doris Johnson, Priseilla Lane, 
Advisor David Sharp, President Lillian 
Politella, Edward Anderson; back row: 
Daphne Miller, Bradford Richards, Doris 
Angell, Vice-President Spencer Potter, 
and Secretary Barbara Bentley. Member- 
ship : 260. Purpose : " to influence the stu- 
dents at State College in the ways of 
Christ and to further the fellowship of 



Christians at the College." (Affairs of the 
Christian Federation are managed by an 
executive group of fifteen students. Rep- 
resentative to the Student Religious 
Council is Edward Anderson. Typical 
lectures during the year, sponsored by the 
Federation have been "Marriage and 
Youth," "Courtship," and "Propagan- 
da.") 



138 



NEWMAN CLUB 

■ 



MENORAH CLUB 




Front row: Publicity manager Robert 
Clorite, Advisor David Sharp, President 
John Conley; back row: Secretary-Treas- 
urer Matilda Banus, Vice-President Con- 
stance Beauregard, and Student Re- 
ligious Council representative Katherine 
Duffy. Membership: 70. Purpose: "to 
further the fellowship of Catholic stu- 
dents with communion breakfasts." 



Front row: Secretary Rivka Stein, Ad- 
visor David Sharp, Mce-President Mari- 
on Freedman, President Herbert Weiner, 
Frances Lappen; back row: Agnes Gold- 
berg, Irving Meyer, Ann August, Student 
Religious Council representative Paul 
Keller, Helen Alperin. Purpose: "to lead 
to a greater fellowship among Jewish 
students at the College." 



WESLEY FOUNDATION 



PHILLIPS BROOKS CLUB 




Front row: Secretary-Treasurer Ralph 
Dakin, Vice-President R. Hutchinson, 
President Doris Angell, Ed Sprague, 
Wallace Wyman; back row: M. A. Davis, 
Barbara Butement, Ed Anderson, Marion 
Cook, Marjory Reed. Membership: 20. 
Purpose: "to gather the Methodist stu- 
dents for discussing religion and modern 
problems of society." 



Officers: Christian Federation representa- 
tive — Daphne Miller, President — Ernest 
Bolt, Secretary-Treasurer — Jeanne Phil- 
lips. Membership: 30. Purpose: "to pro- 
vide social gatherings and discussions of 
current questions for Episcopalian stu- 
dents on campus." (Founded in 1937, 
present advisors are Rev. Jesse Trotter 
and Prof. Sharp.) 



139] 



«7 

m HE lure of printer's ink. . the 
glamour of grease-paint. . the power of 
the speaker's platform . . . the mania for 
musical performances.. ..these factors 
attract hundreds of students into extra- 
curricular activities. The Collegian, the 
Index, the Quarterly, the debating team, 
and the large number of musical groups 
have grown through the years to near- 
professional standards. Differing from 
most American colleges, Massachusetts 
State College gives no academic credits 
for yearbook work, journali.sm, or musical 
clubs — yet all these activities have equaled 
those subsidized in other colleges. The 
1940 Index, for example, under the 
editorship of Edith Clark '40, received the 
First Class Honor Rating awarded by 
the National Scholastic Press Associa- 
tion for outstanding yearbooks through- 
out the country. 



Embryonic Jascha Heifetzes swing a mournful "Boogie-Beat' 




Yearbook staff at work 



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V 



Lois Doiibleday puts compelilors "Duke," "Ed," "Mel," "Henri," "Kappy," "Babe," and "Bunny" through their paces 



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The newly-elected Sports 
Editor, "Hank" Martin '43 
at his desk together with 
the new Associate Editor, 
Bert Hyman, the two of 
whom check copy for the 
"Collegian" printers on 
a busv Tuesday afternoon. 



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HEARTBREAK HOUSE, by Bernard 
Shaw presented at Bowker, June 8, 1940. 

OUTWARD BOUND, by Sutton Vane 
presented at Bowker, December 14, 1940 
and on High School Day, May 3, 1941. 

BEYOND THE HORIZON, by Eugene 
O'Neill presented at Bowker, February 
11, 1941 and at Ware, March 5, 1941. 



Director Rand and Pres. Hoxie check script 



Miss B. Tolman. Wroe, Styler, Wcissberg, P. Trufant, J. Shepardson, Scollin 
Miss Goldberg. Barreca. S. Kaplan, Hoxie. Aykroyd. Silverman, Miss VanBuren 



ifi 




148 




"Heartbreak House," George B. Shaw 's play 
depicting the futility of the old war-ridden 
order. In picture (left to right) are — Ewing, 
Auerbach, Miss Jacobs, JMiss Alvord, Sulli- 
van, Gentry, IXIiss Nagelschmidt, Miss Janis, 
Hoxie, and Aykroyd. Play given in June, 1940 



ROISTER DOISTER actors m 
Shaw's, Vane's, and O'Neill s 
plays (number of stars before 
name indicates number of plays 
in which the student has pei 
formed) : *Miss Alvord, *G. Auei 
bach, ***Aykroyd, *Miss Bai 
bour, *Burbank, **Ewing, *Miss 
Fitch, **Gentry, *Miss Goldberg 
*Greenfield, **Hoxie, *Miss Jan 
is, *Miss Jacobs, *Langton, *E 
Manix, **Miss Nagelschmidt 
*Miss Newell, *Miss E. J. Smith 
*Sullivan, *Miss VanBuren 
*Weissberg, *Wood, *Wroe. 

DOISTERS off stage: Bus 
iness Manager — Kaplan '41, As 
sistant — Shepardson '42, Stage 
Manager — Barreca '41, Electric 
ian — Moody '41, Scenic Artist — 
Prof. Robertson, Technical As 
sistant — Schauwecker, and Di 
rector — Prof. Frank Prentice 
Rand. 



Hoxie, Gentry, and Manix: "Outward Bound"— Langton, Aliss Barbour, D. Wood play O'Neill 




149 




Drum Majorette 
Marion Avery '42 



The State College Band made its first ap- 
pearance of the year at the U. of Conn, 
game. The snappy players formed their 
letters with a tricky elision method which 
melted one letter into another as though by 
magic. At the W.P.I, tangle, the band form- 
ed T-E-C-H, M-S-C, and H-I D-A-D. At 
Amherst game, however, the weatherman 
took a hand and deluged the countryside. 
"Backus was willin'," though, and the 
band appeared in full undress, attemp- 
ting valiantly to cheer the team on with 
the torrential downpour "wettin' their 
whistles." 

Student Manager Eldridge carried on as 
the mainstay of the group, and accom- 
plished a grand piece of organization, 
assisted by Janes, Benemelis, and Ed- 
minster. The credit for the results of con- 
stant disciplining and planning is due 
these Juniors, for their work was rend- 
ered the more difficult by the absence 
of faculty assistance given to other musi- 
cal groups on campus. 

Nor must we forget the enthusiastic 



S. Shaw. R. King, Weeks. Oulnn. V 

rk. Nau, Keefe. Janes, Edminster, Moreau, Broderick, 

Riseber;:. Scollin. Miss Averv. Litrliliehl. Eldr 



Cole, Terry, Hemond, Hilchey 
'ushee, Benemelis, Burnham, Radway, Hathaway, Mott 

dse. Slearns. Miss Carlisle. Davis, Paul 




1.50 



^aAiiXA^tn cuHxi ^UUldcf^e HcUie Mo^uUe 




Mothers' Dav concert on "Mem" Hall lawn 



performances of Drum Majorettes Marion 
Avery and Jean Carlisle, who were cer- 
tainly instrumental in drawing forth 
from the stands the spirit necessary to 
bolster morale in the scrimmage line. 
And certainly the Band could not func- 
tion without the work of Bandmaster 
Farnam who achieves each year the 
organization of the group from a small 
nucleus of veteran players. 

Every Thursday night the Mem Build- 
ing rings during instrumental rehearsal 
of the band in preparation for games or 
concerts. Marching rehearsals during the 
fall were held in the cage. 

Presenting its annual Christmas con- 
cert on December 16, 1940, the band 
gave a variety of classical, semi-classical, 
and novelty numbers and arrangements. 
A successful dress rehearsal was held on 
December 11 when the band played for 



the inmates and staff of the Veteran's 
Hospital in Leeds. The swing favorite, 
"MacNamara's Band," had widest audi- 
ence appeal. Trumpeter "Bucky" Davis 
and Clarinetist Bob King played instru- 
mental solos. Majorettes twirled a special 
arrangement of Sabres and Spurs. Student 
Leader George Litchfield "took over" 
for part of the concert. 

The convocation appearance and the 
spring Mothers' Day concert were the 
principal concluding appearances of the 
band. Manager Al Eldridge's enthusiasm, 
tempered by his insistence on hard work 
by every member, produced a band that 
Massachusetts State College is proud to 
acknowledge. In October, Bandmaster 
Charles Farnam prophesied a top-notch 
band for 1941, and his prophecy has be- 
come a reality. This extensive program 
has furthered State's fame. 

This year's Band was the bright spot 
of State activities and was pleasing both 
to the eye and to the ear. 



Leo Moreau '44 solos in "Columbia Polka' 




151 



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Small. O'Shca, S. Gold, Weissbe 
i M. FitzGerald. Lebeaux, H. Weir 



R. Goldm 
, Shea. Mi! 



iOOO-Mde ^eJf^di^ ^^ ^Uu l/feaA 



"Argument in its purest and most stim- 
ulating form" — this, in short, is debating. 
All in a stride, the debating society takes 
problems of national defense, of foreign 
relations, and of domestic policies. Adding 
to these issues the opportunity to gain 
valuable experience in public speaking, 
forensic activities constitute one of the 
vital aspects of State's extra-curricular 
program. 

Spread over a 2,000-mile radius, the 
varsity team's schedule this year has 
been full and diversified. 

Before opening its ofBcial season, the 
varsity spent most of its time in "girding 
its loins" with the coaching of Professor 
Walter E. Prince. Practice debates with 
Amherst College and A.I.C. of Spring- 
field formed part of the pre-season pro- 
gram. In the middle of February the team 
fired its official opening volley in a duel 
with Boston University. Afterward came 
duels with Holy Cross, a return engage- 
ment with B. U. and a meeting with 



Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 

The usual 2,000-mile trip which the 
varsity has made for years was shortened 
to 1,000 miles in 1941. One reason offered 
by President Herb Weiner and Manager 
Fran Shea was that one thousand miles 
in a car filled with glib-tongued, argu- 
mentative souls was just enough for any- 
body's nerves. A more important reason, 
however, was the increased opportunity 
which it offered the debaters to display 
their talents in week-end trips to Boston, 
Troy, and New York. 

On their journey through the South 
this April, the team spent most of its 
time on the proposition, "Resolved, that 
the nations of the western hemisphere 
should form a permanent union or al- 
liance in defense against foreign aggres- 
sion." 

The same resolution was the topic of 
the annual convocation debate held this 
year with a woman's team from the 
American International College. 



152 









Therrien. J. Goldman. S. Shaw. Jacklcr, P. Trul'anl. E. King. Belcher. Weinhold, Hilchey, Beyer. Gewirtz. Nazarian, 

H. Trufant 
Misses Stanton, Berry, Mclntyre, Kelleher, Perkins, Avella, Tarbell, Fox 



"Face-lifting" is what the old State Col- 
lege orchestra needed, and this year the 
Sinfonietta has made its successful debut. 
In its first year of existence, this musical 
group, under the inspirational direction 
of Doric Alviani and Fred Meyers, has 
made itself indispensable to the numerous 
student activities. 

Created in answer to a call for a smaller 
instrumental group, the Sinfonietta re- 
placed the old orchestra and relieved 
pressure on other campus musical organ- 
izations. It also fills a need for a musical 
unit which can be more flexible and more 
adaptable to the varied campus needs 
than a symphony orchestra. 

How well it has succeeded is answered 
in its year's activities. It has accompanied 
musical shows, provided incidental music 
for dramatic productions, performed at 
concerts, churches, and convocations. It 
has even broadcasted. 

Making its debut at convocation in 
November, the Sinfonietta plunged into a 



schedule which many times called for 
appearances away from campus. It lent 
aid to productions of "H.M.S. Pinafore" 
and "Outward Bound." At Dads' Day, 
twice at convocation, and at the Music 
Festival in May, it provided excellent 
full-program concerts. 

The Sinfonietta has performed the 
difficult task of adding new lustre to 
State's already sparkling musical activ- 
ities. 




153 




Bralit. Klubock, Rothery, Barnard, Slack, McCormick, Nye, A. Anderson, McEwan. Englehard 

Foley, Biron, O'Shea, Garrow, C. Warner, Blake, V. Cole, E. Richardson, Wyman, Washburn, Geer 

R. Johnson, Clapp, H. Thompson, Lamden, Gianotti, C. F. Goodwin, McDermitt, Rouffa, Wethers, Leonard, Wolf 

Irvine, Parker, Gould, Hathaway, Williams, A. Cole, Andrew, HoUis, R. Walker, Prouty, McGurl 



Singing their fame throughout New Eng- 
land, the Men's Glee Club has fast be- 
come one of the most popular organiza- 
tions on campus and now ranks as one of 
the most polished musical groups in 
Massachusetts. 

During the past year the Glee Club has 
appeared in College concerts, in sur- 
rounding towns, and even on the radio. 
In October it made a series of eight re- 
cordings to be sent to alumni in all parts 
of the United States. During the same 
month, the club also appeared on two im- 
portant broadcasts over the air. A set of 
recordings of college songs, made in the 
last week of February, has been grouped 
in an album now on sale. 

All these appearances have been made 
possible by the weeks of rehearsals, the 
efficient direction of Music Director Al- 
viani, and the spirit of all the members 
and the student body as a whole. 

This year the Club has been enlarged to 
fifty voices, selected from ninety-two 
competitors. Thirty-two of the singers 



comprise the Varsity Men's Glee Club, 
which travels for out-of-town engage- 
ments. Another advance this year was 
the donation of one dollar by each mem- 
ber for the purchase of music. 

The Club appeared on campus in the 
'40 Dads' Day Show and at a second- 
semester Social Union program. At Christ- 
mas it combined with the Women's 
Glee Club in the First Church of Amherst, 
at College Vespers, and at the Christmas 
convocation; the featured song was 
Handel's "Messiah." 

This spring it took part in the Gilbert 
and Sullivan operetta, "H.M.S. Pina- 
fore," one of the most elaborate musical 
Alviani-produced hits of the year. 

Besides these appearances, the club 
sang in Amherst on "Amherst Week- 
End," at a February concert in Ware, at 
a Westfield combined concert on March 
7, 1941, and also on festival programs. 
It went on tour the last week in February, 
attended a Religious Conference, and 
made a successful spring trip. 



154 



^ 






Si^i"^ 



Misses Bodwell. M. Davis. Lawrence, Heermance. Barrus. A. Baker. Kellher. M. Tolman. VanMetcr. Butcmcnt. Milner 
Misses Lane. Smith. Moggio, Van Buren. Moseley. E. Cobb, TarbelKWhitcomb. Mason.Washburn, Berry, Day, Stanton 
Misses Wasserman, I. Fitzgerald, Goldman, H. Sargent, LaPradc, Gilchrist, Bentley, Mothes, Goldberg, Moulton, 

Berthiaume, Waite. Cakes, J. Burgess, Azotf 
Misses S. Burgess, Giles, Long, Beaubien, Lobacz, Crimmin, Critchett, G. Archibald, DePalma, Richardson. Lovell, 

Arslanian, Sobon 



Though not a brashly new group on 
campus, the Women's Glee Club has 
made a leaping jump in size. In the past 
year the coeds have not only come forth 
in new uniforms, but have increased 
from a mere thirty-six to a resounding 
fifty. It seems a broad metamorphosis; 
still, with the increased instruction in the 
music department, it is well justified. 

Maintaining State's musical fame in 
soprano, the Women's Glee Club sang at 
the March program of the Social Union, 
at the Religious Conference, in the later 
operetta, and — as a new notion — in re- 
cording for part of the new State album 
of songs. 

They have also had their share of 
broadcasting and (perhaps unknown to 
campus circles) they have sung in Ware 
and given their annual performance at 
the Grace Church in Holyoke. 

The coordination which single man- 
agement gives the Women's Glee Club 



and other musical groups make such pro- 
grams as the Social Union possible; but 
it cannot impair the individuality of this 
group. As a prelude to the Religious Con- 
ference or as part of a variety program, 
they are unmistakable in their harmony. 

The growth of the Club in a few years 
from a handful of coeds who had an urge 
for singing to the widely-competed-for 
group of fifty at the present has proved 
their musical ability. As one of the coed 
singers expressed herself: 

"Glee club work takes a good bite out 
of my schedule, crowded as it is. But I 
wouldn't give it up for the world." 

Postponed because of a crowded sched- 
ule, the combined men's and women's 
glee club concert for Social Union was 
presented on March 12. After the oper- 
etta performance, the Club participated 
in the AU-American Concert during 
Music Week, May 11-17 and later made 
its spring trip. 



155 



Coed equivalent of the Bay Staters — 
though different in number — are the 
Bay Statettes. Overflowing from the 
estabhshed clubs, the Bay Statettes 
prove students' musical ability. 

Composed of six girls of different 
classes, the group made its first full- 
fledged appearance in Ware in early Feb- 
ruary. To Rita Moseley '42, Winifred 
Giles '41, Meriel VanBuren '42, Helen 
Van Meter '43, S. M. Burgess '41, and 
Janet Milner '43 the Index gives encour- 
agement for continued hit performances. 

On campus they first passed the stu- 
dent censor in the oft-mentioned Social 
Union program in which all musical 
groups took part. Like the Bay Staters 
and the Statesmen, they dote on negro 
spirituals, but keep their spark of indi- 
viduality in singing such modern bits as 
Templeton's "Humming Blues." The 
ultimate place in the musical scheme 
proposed by Doric Alviani is probably 
their merging with the male double 
quartet to form an impressive group. 



licuf. BtateMe^. 





, G. Archibald, Stanton 



Staietied. 



Women were tahoo on Shakespeare's stage 
in 1599; but the Coed Quartet of State 
is vital to the Bowker stage in 1941. 
Their quality performances have helped 
to make Massachusetts State College 
a "musical college." 

The "Statette trio," which Director 
Alviani organized a few semesters ago, 
evolved into a quartet this year. This solo 
group now consists of Betty Moulton, 
Peggy Berthiaume, and Gladys Archi- 
bald — who are members of two years' 
standing — and Marge Stanton, the new 
addition. 

Locally, the coeds sang at the Poultry 
and the Amherst Extension Conferences. 
Then, besides making a broadcast, they 
appeared in the Amherst Methodist 
Church. 

The Statettes sang twice in Athol — 
once before the Athol Professional Wom- 
en's Club — and appeared at the well- 
known Tufts' Week-End. Concerts were 
also given in South Deerfield and Wor- 
cester. 



156 




Washburn. Hubbard. McGurl. Gould 



Bt<ite4^Me4i. 



When the Statesmen give four concerts in 
three days, when their studies pile up, 
when they get about four or five hours 
of sleep a night — they grin and like it! 

The quartet, composed of Stuart Hub- 
bard, Wendell Washburn, Fred McGurl, 
and John Gould, has given one radio 
broadcast, as well as appearing in numer- 
ous local and out-of-town concerts. 

On campus the group sang in the 
"Campus Varieties" program. During the 
year they have journeyed as far as Boston 
and Hartford. In Boston the quartet 
sang in the Hotel Bradford, and, while in 
the latter city, they performed at an 
Agricultural Association program. The 
Statesmen also appeared in a Tufts' 
weekend program in the eastern part of 
the state. Following this, they took part 
in concerts in Grafton, Williamsburg, 
and in a spring concert at Athol. They 
also sang at the Y.M.C.A. Conference in 
Pittsfield, where they remained for two 
days. Their crowded schedule shows their 
ability to put songs over with a hancjl 



"We're the boys with a TRA-LA-LA- 
LA ..." Not a line from a Gilbert and 
Sullivan operetta the above — rather it 
might be the theme song of the neicest of 
the new: the Bay Staters. 

Another of the increasing parts of the 
State musical whole, the Bay Staters 
this year form their nucleus about eight 
men — Wallace Wynian '41, Henry Bralit 
'43, Richard Andrew '43, John Nye '41, 
Foster Goodwin '41, Merton Lamden '41, 
Albert Rouffa '41, and Alton Cole ex-'41. 

Having had their virgin rehearsals only 
last January, they sang in the annual 
Social Union program and in the operetta. 
Possessing great versatility, they have 
dashed, in campus performances, from 
negro spirituals to college songs and then 
jumped into "I With I Were a Thugar 
Bun" — and this simply with lighthearted- 
ness rather than incongruity. Their 
"Williams Fight Song," "Navy Blue and 
Gold," and "Come Where My Love Lies 
Dreaming" have caught their listeners' 
fancy. 



[ 157 



^a^ Staie^ 




CJ^t^ 



ELL WEEK and Sorority 
Rushing reveal the lighter side of State 
College fraternities and sororities. Round- 
ing out the average student's life at col- 
lege, the fifteen Greek-letter houses on 
campus build life-long friendships. The 
houses are "Home, Sweet Home" for a 
large number of students during the 
school year. Other functions enrich the 
comradeship of Greek life. Interfraternity 
and intersorority sports provide keen 
competition for prize cups awarded in 
May. Greek "sings" and declamations 
encourage talent. Intersorority and inter- 
fraternity skits create fun for actors and 
audience alike. Awards for house ap- 
pearance lead to hard work and pride in 
these "secret" student societies. And 
finally . . . Hell Week . . . adding a picture- 
esque overtone to fraternity and sorority 
Hfe. 



Alpha Sipina Phi siiper-snioolhies turniiif; on all their charm 





The honor given to leaders 





in Greek houses at State is fraternity or sorority presidency — pictured are all prexies but those of Theta Chi and T.E.P. 



REEKS 





(Top) The boys heckle a '40 graduate, Har- 
vey Frani; (Center) Jase Cohen, Saul Kla- 
man, Murray Casper, Paul Keller, Ellis Tal- 
len, Samuel Harris, and Lloyd Ilorlick watch 
Pleasant Street pedestrians before supper: 
(Bottom) Arnold, Harvey, Gabe, Kaplinsky, 
j4I, Howard, Jim, and Paul on "frat" porch 



PHI CHAPTER 

Address: 389 North Pleasant St. 
Local Founded in 1916 
National Founded at New York 

University in 1913 
Colors: Blue and Gold 
National Chapters: 30 
Publications: Alpha Epsilon Pi Quarterly 

and Mogen David 



OFFICERS 

Master: Alan Silverman 

Lt. Master: Sumner Kaplan 

Scribe: Jack Rubenstein 

House Manager: Stanley Pearlman 

Steward: James Kline 




FACULTATE 



Maxwell H. Goldberg- 
Arthur Levine 



[160: 



ALpJ^^ ofiAiw^ Pi 

CLASS OF 1941 

Gabriel Auerbach, Richard Bernson, Ar- 
thur Cohen, Sumner Green, Sumner Kap- 
lan, Paul Keller, Saul Klaman, James 
Kline, Jason Lotow, Dana Malins, Rob- 
ert Riseberg, Robert Siegel, Alan Silver- 



CLASS OF 1942 

Harvey Brunell, Jason Cohen, Harold 
Golan, Melvin Hutner, Howard Kirshen, 
Stanley Pearhnan, Morton Rabinow, Ed- 
ward Rosemark, Jack Rubenstein, Myron 
Solin, Justin Winthrop, Henry Wolf. 




beau, Norman Mamber, Rudolph Mat- 
thias, Irving Mendelson, Lester Rich, 
Byron Schiller, Ellis Tallen. 



CLASS OF 1943 

Arnold Blake, Murray Casper, Allen 
Feldman, Robert Goldman, Nathan Go- 
lick, Irving Gordon, Samuel Harris, 
Lloyd Horlick, Arnold Kaplinsky, Herb- 
ert Kipnes, Albert Klubock, Maxim Le- 



CLASS OF 1944 

Herman Barenbaum, Milton Bass, Philip 
Cohen, David Kaplan, George Kaplan, 
Robert Karp, Irwin Promisel, Gilbert 
Salk, Jack Schwartz, Chester Stern, Mel- 
vin Stern, Harold Walba. 



Promisel, Kaplinsky. Kirshen. C. Stern. Feldman, Walba. Pearlman, Mathias. Blake. Salk. Rosemark 
Golan. Tallen. I. Mendelsohn. Schwarts. G. Kaplan. Rich. Klubock. Rabinow, Brunell. Horlick. Harris. Golick 
Camber, Kipnes. Hutner. J. Cohen. I. Gordon. R. Goldman. Casper, P. Cohen, Karp. Barenbaum. Wolf, IM. Stern 
Auerbach, Riseberg, Klaman, Kline, Keller. Silverman, S. Kaplan, Rubenstein, Malins, Lotow, Siegal, Bernson 




161 





(Top) V. Smith's "Terrible Tigers": Sarge, 
Gibby and Phil; (Center) Presidents lAIanix 
and Baker at Carnival interfraternity pres- 
entation; (Bottom) Chess in the blue room 




MU CHAPTER 

Address: 406 North Pleasant St. 

Local Founded in 1917 

National Founded at University of Ohio 

in 1908 
Colors : Green and Gold 
National Chapters : 31 
Publications: Sickle and Sheaf and Mil 

Crescent 

OFFICERS 

Noble Ruler: John C. Manix 
Vice Noble Ruler: Carl P. Werme 
Secretary: T. Richard Leonard 
Treasurer: Alton B. Cole 



FACULTATE 

Charles P. Alexander 
Ellsworth W. Bell 
Arnold M. Davis 
James W. Dayton 
William L. Doran 
Richard W. Fessenden 
Robert P. Holdsworth 
Adrian H. Lindsey 
Campbell Miller 
Donald E. Ross 
Harvey L. Sweetman 
Clark L. Thayer 
Frederick S. Troy 



162 



Alpiia Qcufiufui 



CLASS OF 1941 

Edward Broderick, Alton B. Cole, Ches- 
ter L. Kuralowicz, T. Richard Leonard, 
Jr., John C. Manix, C. Vernon Smith, 
Charles W. Styler, Robert C. Tillson, 
Arthur W. Washburn, Jr., Wallace W. 
Wyman. 

CLASS OF 1942 

Richard C. Andrew, Gilbert S. Arnold, 
John H. Brotz, W. Allen Cowan, Talcott 
W. Edminster, Donald W. Moffitt, James 
N. Putnam, Larry P. Rhines, Richard R. 
Smith, John J. Tewhill, Philip A. Tru- 
fant, Carl P. Werme, H. Edwin Williams. 

CLASS OF 1943 

Henry L. Bralit, William C. Clark, Robert 
H. Clorite, Joseph A. Daley, William A. 
Drinkwater, Mason M. Gentry, Walter A. 
Glista, Norman L. Hallen, Frank I. 
Hardy, William B. Lecznar, Richard L. 
Libby, Harry C. Lincoln, Jr., David H. 
Marsden, James L. McCarthy, Dario 




Politella, Urbano C. Pozzani, George R. 
Yale. 

CLASS OF 1944 

F. William Aldrich, Laurence G. Brown, 
Russell H. Bosworth, Charles W. Dolby, 
John D. Giannotti, John F. Hughes, 
Robert W. Jones, Frank Jost, James H. 
Keefe, Mitchell F. Kosciusko, Donald S. 
Livermore, James B. MacGregor, Jr., 
Robert J. O'Shea, William Perednia, 
Henry G. Porteck, Jr., Edward Rabaioli, 
Charles J. Rogers, Robert I. Ryan, Henry 
L. Thompson, Howard B. Trufant, Wilder 
L. Weeks, Jr. 



Kosciusko. Bralit. L. Brown. H. Trufant. K. Moffitt. Hughes. Pozzani, Libby. Rhines, Glista. Gentry. Putnam. MacGregor 

Rabaioli. Lecznar. Weeks. Portek, Yace, Daley, Marsden, Lincoln, Hardy, Williams, Keefe. Jost, McCarthy. R. W. Jones 

Clorite, Rogers, G. Arnold, Brotz, Perednia, O'Shea, P. Trufant. Clark, Tewhill, R. Smith, Giannotti. Thompson. Bosworth. 

Politella 
Andrew, Broderick, Tillson. Styler. Edminster. Leonard. J. Manix, Werme. A. Cole, Washburn, Wyman, C. V. Smith. Kuralowicz 




163 





(Top) A unique shot of the sorority crest 
over fireplace; (Center) Stella, Alice, Dot, 
and Henrietta, "sisters all in the honds of 
Alpha Lambda Mu"; (Bottom) Fireplace 



ALPHA CHAPTER 

Address: 245 Lincoln Ave. 

Local Organization 

Founded at Massachusetts State College 

in 1931 
Colors: Blue and Silver 
Publication: Silver Barque 



OFFICERS 

President: Kathleen Kell 
Vice-President: Barbara Butement 
Secretary: Dorothy Youland 
Treasurer: Virginia Coates 




FACULTATE 

Marion E. Smith 



164 



CLASS OF 1941 

Elizabeth Bascom, Eleanor Birchard, 
Roberta Bradley, Katherine Callanan, 
Virginia Coates, Margaret Everson, Kath- 
leen Kell, Regina Krawiec, Stella Mais- 
ner. Rose Plichta, Helen Smith, Beverley 
Snyder, Marion Tolman, Phyllis Tolnian, 
Harriet Wheatley, Christine Wheeler, 
Dorothy Wright, Dorothy Youland. 



CLASS OF 1942 

Kate Belk, Barbara Butement, Marion 
Cook, Marion Gallagher, Mary Kozak, 
Phyllis Tower, Helen Watt. 



CLASS OF 1943 

Beverly Bigwood, Dorothy Dunklee, Dor- 
othy Flagg, Frances Gasson, Norma 
Holmberg, Dorothy Kinsley, Henrietta 
Kreczko, Helen McMahon, Janet Milner, 
Alice Monk, Phyllis Morgan, Anne Mori- 




arty, Harriet Rayner, Dorothy Roun- 
holm, Laurel Wheelock,Rubie Woodward. 



CLASS OF 1944 

Edith Appel, Josephine Beary, Barbara 
Bemis, Ruth Crosby, Rosamond Ellord, 
Lena Filios, Dorothy Greene, Ruth How- 
arth, Katherine Jaquith, Sophie Korzun, 
Ruth Market, Elizabeth Mclntyre, Thir- 
za Moulton, Marjory Reed. 



Misses Monk. Cook. Dunklee, Beary. Milner. Gasson. Hawarth. Bigw< 

Misses M. Reed, Moulton. Bemis. Jaquith. Kreczko. Tower. Holmberg. Rayr 

i Appel, McMahon, Mclntyre. W. Greene. Everson. Callanan. H. Smith, Maisner. I 

Korzun 
i M. Tolman, D. Wright, Wheeler, Snyder, Coates, Kell, Butement, Youland, Wheatley 



Woodward. Flagg 

F. Clark. Filios. Markert 

, Belk. Gallagher. Ellord. Kozak. 



Plichta, P. Toln 



fi'li M'i 1 1 I 



165 





(Top) Alpha Sig's timely snow sculpture at 
the 1941 Winter Carnival; (Center) a typical 
bull session in the fraternity library; (Bot- 
tom) Warren Pushee, Howie F. King, Paul 
Procopio, Stan Reed, Dick Hayward, and 
Norm Beckett continue the "bull session" 



GAMMA CHAPTER 

Address : 409 North Pleasant St. 

Local Founded in 1913 

National Founded at Yale University in 

1845 
Chapters : 38 

Colors: Cardinal and Stone 
Publications: The Tomahmvk and Gamma 

Chatter 

OFFICERS 

President: Rino J. RofEnoli 
Vice-President: Howard F. King 
Secretary: Robert S. Johnston 
Marshal: Paul J. Adams 
Custodian: James Dellea 



FACULTATE 




Alexander Cance 
Earle S. Carpenter 
Edwin F. GaskiU 
Stowell C. Coding 
Emory E. Grayson 
William L. Machmer 
Sumner Parker 
Charles A. Peters 
James Burke 
George W. Wescott 



166] 



CLASS OF 1941 

Norman J. Beckett, Ernest Bolt, Currie 
H. Downs, Richard B. Hayward, William 
A. Hendrickson, Howard F. King, Ham- 
ilton Laudani, Lmberto Motroni, Paul 
N. Procopio, Stanley C. Reed, Rino J. 
RofBnoli, Henry Thornton. 



CLASS OF 1942 

Paul J. Adams, James Oilman, Theodore 
A. Girard, Robert Holbrook, John D. 
Horgan, John P. Lucey, Joseph W. Mc- 
Leod, David R. Morrill, Robert A. Mul- 
lany, Howard L. Norwood, Warren M. 
Pushee, John Sullivan. 




CLASS OF 1943 

Thaddeus Bokina, Stanley Bubriski, James 
Dellea, George Goddu, Robert Johnston, 
John Podmayer, William Robinson, Ray- 
mond Weinhold. 

CLASS OF 1944 
Robert Holmes, Irving Nichols. 



V. Horgan, Lucey, Girard, Nichols. Weinhold, Holbrook, Pushee, Norwood, Morrill 
Podmayer, Holmes, Thornton, Motroni, Downes, Procopio. Bolt. Beckett, Hayward, Goddu 
Bokina, S. Reed, Dellea, R. Johnston, Roffinoli, H. King, Mullaney, Adams, McLeod, Laudai 




-s*--^ ^ 



167 




^-. 



T- ! 




k 




(Top) The boys congratulate Harry ScoUin, 
newly appointed Cadet Major; (Center) the 
Esquire-inspired figure in an artistic U. of 
JM. snow sculpture; (Bottom) "Bob" Breglio 
and Pete Barreca, Kappa Sig's musical team 



GAMMA DELTA CHAPTER 

Address: 70 Butterfield Ter. 

Local Founded in 1904 

National Founded at University of Vir- 
ginia in 1869 

Colors: Scarlet, Green and White 

National Chapters : 109 

Publications: The Caduceus and The 
Gamma Delta Bulletin 



OFFICERS 

President: Robert L. Jones 
Vice-President: Robert E. Hall 
Secretary: John W. Nye 
Treasurer: Samuel P. Shaw 




FACULTATE 

Oran C. Boyd 
Kenneth L. BuUis 
Guy V. Glatfelter 
Calvin S. Hannum 
Edward B. Holland 
Marshall 0. Lanphear 
Frederick A. McLaughlin 
Raymond T. Parkhurst 
Dale H. Sieling 
Frank A. Waugh 



168 



CLASS OF 1941 

Robert T. Babbitt, Alan R. Bardwell, 
Peter Barreca, Joseph Bart, Robert Breg- 
lio, John Crimmms, Arthur J. Foley, 
Robert E. Hall, Carleton P. Jones, Robert 
L. Jones, Howard J. McCallum, Harold 
McCarthy, John W. Nye, Andrew J. 
Reed, III, Harold V. Scollin, Samuel P. 
Shaw, Francis L. Slattery, John B. Stew- 
art, William Walsh. 

CLASS OF 1942 

Lester J. Bishop, Daniel Carter, William 
Darrow, John Gardner, James C. Gra- 
ham, Eric Greenfield, Louis Lescault, 
Charles MacCormack, Richard Mason, 
George McLaughlin, Richard Pierce, 
John Seery. 

CLASS OF 1943 

Douglas Allen, Wendell Brown, Charles 
Courchene, Richard Coffin, Robert Fitz- 
patrick, Charles Geer, David Holmes, 
Everett Horgan, Willis Janes, Arthur 




Kouilas, William MacConnell, William 
Mann, Fred McLaughlin, Edward Neb- 
esky, Robert Place, Robert Rhodes, 
Bradford Richards, Theodore Saulnier, 
William Serex, Harry Sloper, Joseph 
Tosi, Charles Warner. 

CLASS OF 1944 

Hollis Baker, Robert Cowing, Warren 
Dobson, Joseph Driscoll, Richard Fay, 
Edwin Fedeli, Rowland Freeman, Frank 
Fuller, Edward Hall, Edward Hitchcock, 
Milton Howe, John Keough, Joseph 
Masi, William Needham, Donald Page, 
George Pushee, Jr., Frederic Rothery, 
John Sherman, Paul Stahlberg, Rodney 
Stone, Thomas Tolman, William Tucker, 
George Warner, Jr., Arthur White. 



Fay, Mason. Place. A. White, MacCormack. W. Mann, Pierce. Carter. Courchene. Fuller. C. Warner. Serex 
in. E. Horgan. Fransen. Fedeli. Driscoll. Hitchcock. Janes. Dobson. Bishop. F. McLaughlin. Graham. Freeman, Tucker 
nit. Sherman. Greenfield. Geer. Stahlberg. Breglio. Scollin, McCarthy. McCallum. McConnell. Richards, Masi. G. Mc- 
Laughlin, Everson 
Babbitt, Barreca, A. Reed, S. Shaw, Nye, R. Hall, R. Jones, C. Jones, Foley, Bardwell, J. B. Stewart, Walsh, Bart 




169 





(Top) The Lambda Chi Alpha tracksters — 
Bauer, Hoermann, H. Shaw, Bell, O'Connor 
and Greene; (Center) the "University" win- 
ter carnival snow sculpture; and (Bottom) 
the "brothers" discuss interfraternity pros- 
pects in sports on the chapter house stairs 



GAMMA ZETA CHAPTER 

Address: 374 North Pleasant St. 

Local Founded in 1912 

National Founded at Boston University 

in 1902 
Colors: Purple, Green and Gold 
National Chapters: 106 
Publications: Cross and Crescent, and 

Gamma Gram 



OFFICERS 

President:. John Heyman 
Vice-President: Edward Sparks 
Secretary: H. Westcott Shaw 
Treasurer: C. Foster Goodwin 




FACULTATE 

Elbert F. Caraway 
Walter S. Eisenmenger 
Wilho Frigard 
Georae A. Marston 



170 



CLASS OF 1941 

Donald P. Allan, R. Alden Blodgett, C. 
Foster Goodwin, Jr., Robert E. Halloran, 
George F. Hamel, John W. Haskell, John 
M. Hayes, Jr., John T. Heyman, Joseph 
Larkin, Richard H. Lester, J. Edward E. 
O'Connor, Frank M. Simons, Jr., James 
A. Stewart, Jr. 



CLASS OF 1942 

James Bullock, Francis Coughlin, John 
Fitzgerald, Bradford Greene, Henry Kelly, 
George E. Kimball, Howard Lacey, 
George P. Langton, William E. Mahan, 
H. Westcott Shaw, Edward F. Sparks, 
Francis E. Ward. 



CLASS OF 1943 

William E. Arnold, Allan Bell, George 
Benoit, John H. Crain, Jr., Richard 
Haughton, Francis J. Hoermann, Daniel 




J. Horton, Thomas J. Kelly, Richard E. 
Maloy, Robert F. O'Brien, John F. Pow- 
ers, Alfred Rumminger. 



CLASS OF 1944 

Stewart E. Allen, John A. Barry, Richard 
W. Bauer, Paul Cole, Glenn B. Dearden, 
Thomas E. Devaney, Frank A. Duston, 
John M. Fitzgerald, Douglas W. Hosmer, 
Warren I. Johansson, William R. Man- 
chester, Jr., J. Malcolm Moulton, Robert 
A. Monroe, Richard C. Roberson, Dob- 
son L. Webster, Robert L. Wroe. 



Allen. Hoermann. Haughton. Webster. Cole. Hosmer. Barry. Langton. W. Shaw. Rumminger 

Bullock. Arnold. Johansson. Wroe, H. Kelly. Benoit. Grain. Manchester. T. Kelley. Devaney 

Bauer, Duston. Dearden. Ward. J. Fitzgerald. Moulton, G. Kimball. Roberson. Mahan. Monroe 

O'Connor, J. Larkin, Lester, Hamel, Simons, Heyman, C. F. Goodwin. Hayes, Blodgett, J. Stewart. Haskell 

II II! ! '"^If ■!' 



f^ 



f^ f^ 






^^immtfi^K JB^ 



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ff f f*^ "i 



I 



;^^ ^ m.^ ^ m ♦A^ 



171] 








(Top) "Fran" Albrecht is studiously inclined 
regardless of jitterbugs; (Center) At right 
Ellie Vassosand Jean Puffer in Lambda Delta 
Mu room: (Bottom) "A Study in Blankets" 
or "Three Women on a Double-decker Bed" 



ALPHA CHAPTER 



Address: 315 Lincoln Ave. 

Local Organization 

Founded at Massachusetts State College 

in 1931 
Colors : Green and Gold 
Publication: The Scroll 



OFFICERS 

President: Doris King 
Vice-President: Phyllis Mclnerny 
Secretary: Margaret Flynn 
Treasurer: Nancy Webber 




172 



Jdcu^tMa ^eUa Mu 



CLASS OF 1941 

Evelyn Bergstrom, Sylvia Campbell, 
Betty Desmond, Helen Fitch, Margaret 
Flynn, Marion Hoye, Doris King, Pris- 
cilla Lane, Flora Lucehesi, Florence 
O'Neil, Jean Puffer, lona Reynolds, 
Mary Sullivan, Eleanore ^'assos. 

CLASS OF 1942 

Elizabeth Barney, Constance Beauregard, 
Marguerite Berthiaume, Marie Chap- 
man, Phyllis Drinkwater, Wilma Fiske, 
Dorothy Grayson, Phyllis Mclnerny, 
Jean McNamara, Rita Mosely, Eleanor 
Russell, Evra Ward, Nancy Webber. 

CLASS OF 1943 

Frances Albrecht, Anne Baker, Mary 
Bowler, Mary Callahan, Winfred Day, 
Mary Daylor, Agatha Deering, Lorann 
DeLap, Celeste Dubord, Evelyn Gagnon, 
Helen Grant, Barbara Hayward, Mary 




Keavy, Harriet Kelso, Frances Langan, 
Mary Mann, Margaret Stanton, Janice 
Wisly, Ruth Woodworth. 

CLASS OF 1944 

Evelyn Bamberg, Kathleen Cronin, Mar- 
garet Daylor, Margaret Deane, Barbara 
Dempsey, Marie Hamel, Mary K. Haug- 
hey, Ruth Hodgess, Anna Keedy, Marjo- 
laine Keough, Alice Maguire, Mary 
Maling, Anne McLierny, Edna McNam- 
ara, Barbara O'Brien, Ethel Savalin, 
Ruth Sperry. 



»rth. E. McNamara, Mosley, Ma 
, Kelso, Albrecht. Dempsey, Gr 



es O'Brien. Deane. M. J. Mann, Maguire. Drinkwater. A. Baker, Ward, Grayson. Woodv 
es Cronin. Bowler. Haughey. Hodgess. Savalin, A. Mclnerny, Sperry, Bamberg, Barne; 

Dubord. Fiske 
es Beauregard. Chapman. Russell. Keough. Keedy. M. M. Daylor, M. K. Daylor. Hamel. Keavy. Lucehesi. Langan. Wisly, 

Gagnon, Day, Stanton, Hayward, Deering. Callahan. Delap. J. McNamara 
es Fitch, Bergstrom. Puffer, I. Reynolds. Campbell. Vassos, Webber, King, P. Mclnerny, Flynn. Hoyc, O'Neil. Lane. Desmond 

Sullivan 



Oil^ 



ffl ^% I f f.l I f -tilt.! t!»'| f _ 

14^ I it 1^ I ft I i ,aJ t f 



173] 




(Top) Lindsey '40 and Dukeshire '41 at the 
"vie" party on Carnival week-end; (Center) 
Bishop and Lemaire also attend; (Bottom) 
Marsh, Hatch, Jarvis, Terry, and Keil exit 




ALPHA CHAPTER 

Address: 510 North Pleasant St. 
National Founded at Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College in 1873 
Colors : Silver and Magenta Red 
National Chapters: 45 
Publications: The Signet and Alpha Bits 

OFFICERS 

President: Dana A. Keil 
Vice-President: Richard Vincent 
Secretary: John P. Marsh 
Treasurer: Thomas W. .Johnson 

FACULTATE 

William H. Armstrong 
Alfred H. Brown 
Orton L. Clark 
Charles R. Creek 
Lawrence S. Dickinson 
Robert D. Hawley 
John D. Lentz 
James F. Moorehead 
Willard A. Munson 
Francis C. Pray, Jr. 
Frank P. Rand 
Roland H. Verbeck 



[174] 



CLASS OF 1941 

Robert Dukeshire, Thomas Johnson, 
Dana Keil, Richard Knight, Christopher 
Paul, John Prymak, Richard Mncent. 

CLASS or 1942 

Milford Atwood, Charles Bishop, Richard 
Booth, Richard Cressy, Ernest Dunbar, 
Jr., Paul Dwyer, William Dwyer, Carl 
L. Erickson, Edmund Freitas, George 
Gaumond, Benjamin Hadley, Jr., Ralph 
Hatch, Jr., William Kimball, Marrigan 
Krasnecki, Maurice Leland, Allister Mac- 
Dougal, John Marsh, Freeman Morse, 
Donald Thayer, Frederic Shackley, II, 
Chester Stone, Casimir Zielinski. 

CLASS OF 1943 

Joseph Arnold, Robert Bourdeau, Stew- 
art Bush, Robert Cleary, Robert Dietel, 
George Entwisle, Herbert Gross, Ray 
Jarvis, Theodore LeMaire, Russell Mc- 




Donald, Brian McKiernan, James Ring, 
Gildo San tin, Kenneth Stewart, John 
Terry. 

CLASS OF 1944 

Frederick Brutcher, Horace Burrington, 
Richard Damon, Lawrence Garnett, 
Ralph Gihnan, Jr., Edward Hall, Stanley 
Hood, Ernest Knowlton, Jr., Alden Lea- 
royd, Leo Moreau, Richard Norton, 
Robert O'Leary, Stanley Parnish, James 
Parsons, Jr., Francis Petroccione, Samuel 
Price, Leo Ryan, John Spencer, Robert 
Stewart, Philip Young. 



K. Stewart, Erickson, Entwistle, W. Dw 



Krasnecki. Brutcher, Bush, Thayer, Terry, Spencer, Santin, Petroccione, Garnett, 

Hood, Arnold, Jarvis, Damon, R. Stewart, Parsons, Lemaire, Dunbar, Cressy, Gilman, Knowlton. Freitas, Gaumond 
irnish. Moreau, M. Atwood, Hull, W. Ryan, Hadley, Hatch, O'Leary, Burrington, Price, Cleary, L. Ryan, Ring, Shackley 
acDonald, Leland, W. Kimball, Dukeshire, P. Dwyer, Marsh, Keil, T. Johnson, Vincent, C. Bishop, Knight, Paul, Young 




175 





(Top) Marie Kclleher prepares meal in the 
Phi Zeta kitchen; (Center) Afterward she 
plays cards with friends while "Pris" Bad- 
ger studies; (Bottom) . and continues play- 
ing while Ruth and "Barb" apply nail polish 



ALPHA CHAPTER 



Address: 778 North Pleasant St. 

Local Organization 

Founded at Massachusetts State College 

in 1932 
Colors: Black and White 



OFFICERS 

President: Cynthia Bailey 
Vice-President: Muriel Sherman 
Secretary-: Barbara Critchett 
Treasurer: Irene Johnston 
House Chairman: Priscilla Badger 




PUi ^eta 



CLASS OF 1941 
Rose Elaine Agambar, Gladys Archibald, 
Priscilla Archibald, E. Priscilla Badger, 
Cynthia Bailey, Annetta Ball, Rosalie 
Bcaubien, Shirley Burgess, Ann Cooney, 
Ruth Crimmin, Barbara Critchett, Elea- 
nor Curtis, Gladys Fish, Anna Harring- 
ton, Irene Johnston, Bertha Lobacz, 
P. Jeanne Phillips, Muriel Sherman, Jean 
Tyler. 

CLASS OF 1942 

Nancy Alger, Thyrza Barton, Mary 
Berry, Betty Cobb, Mary Cobb, Mildred 
Culver, Jean Davis, Ida Fitzgerald, Ethel 
Gassett, Martha Hall, Ruth Helyar, 
Marie Kelleher, Margery Mann, Alice 
Pederzani, Dorothy Prest, Hope Smith. 

CLASS OF 1943 

Marjorie Aldrich, Ruth Baker, Priscilla 
Bentley, Helen Berger, Mary Jean Car- 
penter, Ruth V. Ellis, Elena Ferrante, 




Christine Gately, Rosalind Goodhue, 
Doris Johnson, Marion Johnson, Elinor 
Koonz, Daphne Miller, H. Barbara 
Smith, Jane Smith, Olive Tracy, Helen 
Van Meter, Betty Webster. 

CLASS OF 1944 

Mabel Arnold, Estelle Bowen, Jean 
Burgess, Betty Clapp, Barbara Crowther, 
Marjorie Gunther, Cynthia Leete, Doro- 
thy Leonard, Dorothy Nestle, Margaret 
Perkins, Anna Sullivan, Barbara Thayer, 
Betsy Tilton. 



Tilton. Van Meier, R. Elli 
Culver, 



Helyar, Prest, 



i H. B. Smith, Kelleher. H. Berger, Tracy, M. Johnson, Goodhue, Perk 

B. Cobb, M. Cobb, Bentley 
i J. Burgess, Gunther. Pederiani. Crowther, Clapp. Leete. Arnold. Alger, H. Smith. D. C. Johnson, Culver, Da 

Bowen 
i Webster, R. Baker. Berry, MiUer, M. Mann. J. Smith. Ball, Curtis. Hall, B. Thayer, I. Fitzgerald, Carpenter, Nestle, 

Sullivan. Koonz 
lisses Phillips, Agambar. Beaubien, Fish. Lobacz, Sherman. Bailey. I. Johnston, Badger, Crimmin. Tyler. G. Archibald, 

P. Archibald 




^ ^'t 11 ti f.i 






[177] 





(Top) Vic Leonowicz bids Joe IMiller good- 
bye; (Center) Henry Miller, "Bill" Coffey, 
and "Ray" Hock enjoy Stanley Polchlopek's 
cynicism; (Bottom) Scene at a "vie" party 



Q.T.V. 

Address: 358 North Pleasant St. 

Local Organization 

Founded at Massachusetts Agricultural 

College in 1869 
Colors : Carmen, Jet and Gold 
Publication: Q.T.V. Alumni Bulletin 



OFFICERS 

President: Stanley Jackimczyk 
Vice-President: John Brack 
Secretary: Everett Barton 
Treasurer: Joseph Miller 




FACULTATE 

Lorin E. Ball 
William R. Cole 
Harold M. Gore 
A. Vincent Osmun 
Clarence H. Parsons 



178 



2. 1. V. 



CLASS OF 1941 

Frank Bagge, John Brack, George Brag- 
don, William Coffey, Stanley Jackimcyzk, 
Russell Lalor, Joseph Miller. 



CLASS OF 1942 

Everett Barton, G. Neil Bennett, Ray- 
mond Hock, Vincent Lafleur. 



CLASS OF 1943 

John Bennett, Richard Best, Philip Hand- 
rich, Victor Leonowicz, Henry Martin, 
John McDonough, Henry Miller, Stanley 
Polchlopek, John Storozuk, Edward War- 




CLASS OF 1944 

Richard Frost, William Hart, John Hil- 
chey, Thomas Hughes, Thomas Moore, 
Alfred Muldoon, Theodore Noke, Charles 
Warner. 



Lafleur. Hilchey, Martin, Hock, J. Bennett. Frost. Best. MacDonough 
Leonowici. E. Warner, Storozuk. Miller. Noke. Polchlopek, Bennett. C. War 
Barton, Bagge, Miller, Brack, Jackimczyk. Coffey. Lalor. Bragdon 




179 





(Top) Wilder, AX. Goodwin, Barney, Barnes. 
Salwak, Gooch, Bassett, Nazarian — bask- 
etball team in fraternity athletics; (Cen- 
ter) Valentine's Day theme snow sculpture 
in the '41 Winter Carnival; (Bottom) Sun- 
day afternoon scene at the S.A.E. veranda 



MASSACHUSETTS KAPPA 
CHAPTER 

Address: 387 North Pleasant St. 
Local Founded in 1937 
National Founded at University of Ala- 
bama in 1856 
Colors : Purple and Gold 
National Chapters: 113 
Publications : The Record and StAtE 



OFFICERS 

President: George Feiker 
Vice-President: Cortland Bassett 
Secretary: Robert Pardee 
Treasurer: Lincoln Moody 




FACULTATE 

Guy Chester Crampton 
Gunnar E. Erickson 



180] 



SlcfHixi Alp/Ua ZftAilo4i. 



CLASS OF 1941 

Edward Anderson, Edward Ashley, Hen- 
ry Barney, Cortland Bassett, George 
Feiker, Harold Forrest, Stephen Gooch, 
William Goodwin, Lincoln Moody, Robert 
Pardee, Richard Smith, Arthur Wann- 
lund. 

CLASS OF 1942 

Leslie Benemelis, Ralph Dakin, Howard 
Hunter, John Laliberte, George Litch- 
field, Hubert McLean, Harold Mosher, 
Spencer Potter, Elliot Schubert, John 
Shepardson. 

CLASS OF 1943 

Milton Barnes, Charles Blanchard, Win- 
throp Brielman, Francis Buckley, Wayne 
Burnet, Peter Gervin, Alexander Hewat, 
Gregory Nazarian, Lawrence Newcomb, 
Stanley Salwak, Earle Steeves, Loren 
Wilder. 




CLASS OF 1944 

John Browne, Robert Denis, Norman 
Desrosier, Lloyd Fitzpatrick, Richard 
Hansen, Steven HoUis, Aarne Karvonen, 
Robert Keefe, F. Chester Mann, Ralph 
McCormack, Everett Miller, Roy Moser, 
Donald Parker, Robert Radway, Arnold 
Salinger, Leslie Savino, Norman Van- 
asse, Walter White, Robert Young. 



C. Mann. Blanchard. Newcomb. Desrosier. Dakin. Parker. Mollis. Laliberte, Keefe. Steeves. Miller 
, Young, Dennis, W. White. Shepardson. Wilder. Browne. Potter. Barnes. L. Fitzpatrick. Benemelis, Van 
ivino, Karvonen, McLean. Brielman. Litchfield. Burnet, Kadway, Hanson, Nazarian, Buckley. Sallinger 
'orrest. Gooch, W. Goodwin. Barney. Pardee. Feiker. Bassett, Moody, E. Anderson. Wannlund. Ashley 



IT 



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181 





(Top) Juniors in their "Dr. Denton" sleep- 
ing togs — Mary Judge chuckles and Esther 
Bro^vn knits; (Center) An evening scene at 
"Sig Beta" including a "grind" session and 
a card game; (Bottom) Jean Brown and one 
of her "sisters" caught at an odd angle shot 



ALPHA CHAPTER 

Address: 196 North Lincoln Ave. 

Local Organization 

Founded at Massachusetts State College 

in 1931 
Colors : Blue, Black and White 
Publication: Siyna 



OFFICERS 

President: Jean Taylor 
Vice-President: Norma Hedlund 
Secretary: Vivian Henschel 
Treasurer: Marcelle Grise 




isa 



CLASS OF 1941 

Ruth Barrus, Betty Brown, Elaine De- 
lorey, Esther DePalma, Marcelle Grise, 
Vivian Henschel, Bertha Read, Virginia 
Richardson, Margaret Robinson, Patience 
Sanderson, Marion Scully, Jean Taylor, 
Kay TuUy. 

CLASS OF 1942 

Frances Avella, Marion Avery, Esther 
Brown, Jean Carlisle, Priscilla Durland, 
Mildred Eyre, Margaret Gale, Norma 
Handforth, Norma Hedlund, Mary Judge, 
Eleanor King, Lillian Martin, Marjorie 
Merrill, Betty Moulton, Marion Nagel- 
schmidt, Patricia Newell, Martha Shir- 
ley, Ann Waldron, Anne White. 



CLASS OF 1943 

Jean Brown, Bea Carnall, Florence 
Daub, Eileen Farrell, Theresa Finn, Mary 




Fitzgerald, Norma Gibson, Blanche Gut- 
finski, Mary Holton, Priscilla Scott. 

CLASS OF 1944 

Betty Bartlett, Jean Capper, Eleanor 
Cushman, Norma Deacon, Bettye Huban, 
Lucille Lawrence, Shirley Mason, Helen 
Murray, Mary Quinn, Avis Ryan, Doris 
Sheldon, Carolyn Starr, Virginia Tib- 
betts, Martha Treml, Jean Washburn, 
Marion Whitcomb, Betty Whitney, Paul- 
ine Willett. 



Misses Lawrence, Cutfinski, Daub, Sheldon, Durland. Carlisle, Gibson, Avery, J. Brown, Kenny, Ayre, Shirley, Gale, Avella 
Misses Deacon, Martin, Handforth. Merrill, Tibbetts, Washburn, Treml, Finn, Capper, Willett, Huban, E. King, Waldron 

Whitney 
Misses Starr. M. Bartlett, Quinn, Mason, Cushman, Whitcomb, E. M. Brown, Judge, Moulton. Holton, M. FitiGerald. Murray 

Scott. Ryan 
Misses A. White, E. W. Brown. Scully. Sanderson. Hedlund. Taylor. Henschel, M. Grisc, Wozniak, Richardson, TuUy, De Palma 

Carnall 



XT 



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4 %^% % 



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183 





(Top) Trudy directs I lie "sisters" for the in- 
tersorority sing in the Memorial Hall audi- 
torium; (Center) Miss Anne Cohen in the 
forbidden sanctum of a coed's room; (Bot- 
tom) "Trudy" Goldman and Agnes Gold- 
berg strike a unique pose "At Home" for 
INDEX photographer, Miss Margaret Marsh 



ALPHA CHAPTER 

Local Organization 

Founded at Massachusetts State College 

in 1934 
Colors : Blue and White 



OFFICERS 

President: Marion Freedman 
Vice-President: Helen Alperin 
Treasurer: Miriam Miller 
Secretary: Phoebe Stone 




184 



BUj/fna 9oici 



CLASS OF 1941 

Helen Alperin, Marion Freedman, Miri- 
am Miller, Phoebe Stone. 



CLASS OF 1942 

Dorothy Adelson, Edith Fox, Trudy 
Goldman, Frances Lappen. 



CLASS OF 1943 

Ann August, Anne Cohen, Marion Co- 
hen, Ruth Ellis, Agnes Goldberg, Anita 
Marshall, Barbara Wainshel, Trudy Wol- 
kovsky. 




CLASS OF 1944 

Arline Altshuler, Shirley Azoff, Marcia 
Berman, Charlotte Eigner, Helen Glag- 
ovsky, Charlotte Kaizer, Libby Kerlin, 
Irene Merlin, Anne Ossen, Sylvia Ross- 
man, Ruth Rosoff, Bertha Slotniek, 
Beatrice Wasserman, Beatrice Weisman, 
Laura Williams. 



Misses Kaizer, Rossman, Marshall, August, Sachs, Ellis, Merlin, Williams, Eigner, Weisman 
ses Osson, Goldberg, Slotniek, Berman, Glagovsky, Wolhov, M. Cohen, Wasserman, RosofT, Kerlin, Az 
Misses Goldman, Wainshel, M. Miller, Alperin, Freedman, Stone, Lappen, Adelson, Stein, A. Cohen 




185 




MASSACHUSETTS ALPHA 
CHAPTER 

Address : 394 North Pleasant St. 

Local Founded in 1912 

National Founded at Richmond College 

in 1901 
Colors : Purple and Red 
National Chapters: 72 
Publications : The Journal and Spema 



(Top) Bill Wall, John Conley, and Otto Nau 
shot en route to afternoon classes; (Center) 
Mary Judge, of Sigma Beta Chi, at Sigma 
Phi Epsilon vie dance — Juniors Wall, Hur- 
ley attend; (Bottom) Sigma Phi's contribu- 
tion to the large number of original snow- 
sculptures at the Winter Carnival week-end 



OFFICERS 

President: Robert Cashman 
Vice-President: William Wall, Jr. 
Secretary: Benjamin Stonoga 
Historian: Charles M. Woodcock 




FACULTATE 



Malcolm S. Butler 
Frederick M. Cutler 
George M. Emery 
Richard Foley 
Ralph L. France 
Albert H. Sayer 
Winthrop S. Welles 



186 



CLASS OF 1941 
Robert Cashman. 

CLASS OF 1942 

Phillip H. Cochran, John Conley, Fred 
Filios, Rene Hebert, James Hurley, Rob- 
ert Mott, Otto Nau, Benjamin Stonoga, 
Lucien Szmyd, William Wall, Charles 
M. Woodcock. 

CLASS OF 1943 

Clinton Allen, William Beers, John L. 
Brown, Nicholas Caraganis, John Dav- 
enport, Christos Gianarackos, Robert 




Kirvin, Richard McKenzie, Stan Pa- 
cocha, Renzo Peccioli, Don Wood. 



CLASS OF 1944 
Roland Colella, Charles Parker. 



DivoU, Trlggs, Joyce, Gianarakos. Conley, Woodcock, Cochran, Kirvin. Hebert 
Parker, Nau, Mott, Wall, Cashman, Stonoga, Filios, Allen, Caraganis 




187 




(Top) Harry, Jerry, and Bob enjoy Dave's 
ivory-tickling; (Center) "Vic" party visitors; 
(Bottom) Mitch Rodman, Dave Kagan, and 
Harry Pruss check TEP's record collection 




TAU PI CHAPTER 

Address: 418 North Pleasant St. 
Local Founded in 1938 
National Founded at Columbia Univer- 
sity in 1910 
Colors : Lavender and White 
National Chapters: 40 
Publications: The Plume and Pilot 



OFFICERS 



Chancellor {1st sem.) : Dan Levine 
Chancellor {2nd sem.): Irving Meyer 
Bursar: Robert Nottenburg 
Scribe: Harris Pruss 
Steivard: Harry Gilman 
Historian {1st sem.): Al Rouffa 
Historian {2nd sem.): Maynard Steinberg 



188 



^au ZftA4Jjo^ PUi 



CLASS OF 1941 

Jerome Biederman, Mertoii Lamden, 
Harry Gilman, Elliot Josephson, David 
Kagan, Edwin Lavitt, Daniel Levine, 
Irving Meyer, George L. Reder, Albert 
Rouffa, Benjamin Shanker, David Skol- 
nick, Hyman Steinhnrst, Albert Yanow. 



CLASS OF 1942 

Melvin Abrahamson, Dan Balaban, Alan 
Buxbaum, George Garbowit, Saul Gliek, 
Joseph Goldman, Bernard Hershberg, 
Abraham Kagan, Sylvan Lind, Robert 
Nottenburg, Norman Ogan, Harris Pruss, 
William Rabinowitz, Mitchell Rodman, 
Maynard Steinberg, Herbert Weiner, 
Sydney Zeitler. 

CLASS OF 1943 

Hyman Bloom, Norman Cohen, H. Man- 
uel Dobrusin, Daniel Horvitz, Abraham 
Klaiman, Morton Levine, Raymond 




Licht, Boureard Nesin, Ephraim Radner, 
Eugene Wein, Jonah White. 

CLASS OF 1944 

Irving Alper, Earl Alpert, Stanley Belch- 
er, Joseph Bornstein, Milton Cooper, 
Hyman Epstein, Manuel Farber, Herbert 
Fishgal, David Freedman. Seymour Gold, 
Irwin Green, Edward Greenspan, George 
Grossman, Israel Helfand, Jacob Jackler. 
Irving Jacobs, Seymour Koritz, Bertram 
Libon, Solomon Markowitz, Sidney Mura- 
chver, Irving Saltzman, Irving Shind. 



Weiner, Balaban. Horvitz, Gold, Lind, Belcher, N. Cohen. Saltzman. Markowitz. Abr 
Helfand. Steinberg, Hershberg, Murachver. J. Goldman, Farber, Cooper, Jackler. Koritz 

Bornstein, Wein, Freedman, Rodman, Dobrusin, Kagan, Shanker, Shind, Zeitler. Licht, Radn 
RoulTa, Biederman, Gilman, Pruss, Nottenburg, Levine, Meyer, Josephson, Lamden. Lavitt, Yano^ 



r. Click 
, Steinhur 



<^ <-!» ^ 


1 

\ ^ ^ ^^ ^i 


IP 


^. J^^.^gi v^^; ^^J^H 




. t f wt 


SJnftftAS 


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m^ii 


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B\V-liii^iK-^iJ^^ 


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^^^^/^^ '^^if*^^^ 



189 





(Top) Lew Long and Win Avery, prominent 
juniors-about-canipus; (Center) Ron clears 
snow, Tom warms up for Softball, and the 
boys heckle; (Bottom) Poker in the library 




THETA CHAPTER 

Address: 496 North Pleasant St. 

Local Founded in 1911 

National Founded at Norwich University 

in 1856 
Colors: Red and White 
National Chapters: 53 
Publications : The Rattle and Theta News 



OFFICERS 

President: Paul Skogsberg 
Vice-President: Walter Miles 
Secretary: Wesley Aykroyd 
Treasurer: John Retallick 



FACULTATE 

Lawrence Briggs 
Walter Maclinn 
Allen Rice 
Oliver Roberts 
William Sanctuary 
Fred Seivers 
Loring Tirrell 



[190 



'Ikeia GUi 



CLASS OF 1941 

A. Wesley Aykroyd, Clement Burr, Rich- 
ard Crerie, Richard Curtis, Robert Ew- 
ing, John Gould, Wilfred Hathaway, 
Stuart Hubbard, Walter Irvine, Wood- 
row Jacobson, Walter Miles, Robert Pet- 
ers, William Phillips, John Retallick, 
Irvin Seaver, Ralph Simmons, Paul 
Skogsberg, Harold Storey, Ronald Street- 
er, Raymond Thayer, James Walker. 

CLASS OF 1942 

Winthrop Avery, Thomas Batey, David 
Burbank, Preston Burnham, William 
Case, Richard Cox, Melville Eaton, Al- 
bert Eldridge, Clarence Emery, Vincent 
Erikson, Courtney Fosgate, Charles 
Fyfe, Thomas Gordon, Lewis Long, Rob- 
ert McCutcheon, Robert Pearson, How- 
ard Sunden, Robert Walker, Paul White. 

CLASS OF 1943 
Frederick Burr, William Clark, Kenneth 




Collard, George Ferguson, Richard 
French, Gordon Field, Harold Lewis, 
Edward Manix, Merwin Magnin, Stuart 
Nims, John Powell, Edward Sprague, 
James Ward. 

CLASS OF 1944 

Dave Anderson, Leonard Carlson, Vern- 
on Cole, Thomas Cooley, Robert Dewey, 
Arthur Marcoullier, Fayette Mascho, 
Robert McKay, Frederick Preston, Hen- 
ry Ritter, Gordon Smith, Harlan Twy- 
ble, Donald AValker, Elmer Warner. 



Eaton, McCutcheon, CoUard, Ward. Case. Burnham, R. Walker. P. White, Eldridge. Ferguson. Magnin. V. Erikson 

Powell, Cox, Avery, Sunden. Field. Sprague, E. Manix. Carlson. E. Warner. Aroian. Batey. F. Burr. Burbank 

Macoulicr. Pearson. Emery. Lewis. Streetcr. Crerie. Hathaway. Storey. Fosgate, Fyfe. Smith. Preston 

lr%in. . r Iviv.r. <.iirli«. Peters. Gould. R.Uillii k. SkiiL-shir:;. \>kro>d. Phillips. Jarobson, C. Burr, J. Walker, Seaver 




191 



^^^ HANGE is the keyword for 
State sports in 1940-41. At the end of the 
football season, a new coach for the next 
season was announced. The basketball 
team started its schedule with a new 
mentor, Lou Bush, and ended with Fred 
Ellert. In hockey, John Janusas led the 
State team. And completing the picture 
of changing coaches, the 1941 baseball 
team is under the tutelage of Fran Riel. 

Policies also changed in this eventful 
if not successful year. A training table 
was set up for the football team, thus 
aiding the morale of players. A football 
program was also initiated. Basketball 
spectators learned of substitutions 
through a loudspeaker, and the band 
added color to the games. These changes 
have already helped to make a difference 
in basketball fortunes and, we hope, will 
do the same in other sports. 



'Fight yell for the teain!" — scene at bonfire in football rally 




JNlaroon coaches talk over 




I 




1940-tl sports season with hopes for coming year (Caraway, Ball, Hunter, Kofiers. Kauffinan, Briggs, Frigard, and Derby) 



T H L E T I C S 



Capt. Simmons 




Ebb Caraway (right), 1941 football coach, 
and Dick Lester (left), the 1941 manager 



Ryan 




AMHERST COLLEGE, 14— STATE, 
November 2, at Amherst College 

COAST GUARD ACADEMY, 1 9— STATE, 6 
November 12, at New London 

RENSSELAER "TECH," 25— STATE, 
November 16, at Troy 

TUFTS COLLEGE, 19— STATE, 6 

Ncvv-r-b-r '>7 at Medford 




Massachusetts loses in home game 9-3 
to famed Keaney club from Rhode Island 







«r- 




When a "breakless" game is invented, the State College football 
team should really go to town, for they certainly lost their share en 
breaks this year. One out of nine are the brutal statistics of the 
win record, but, although it sounds suspiciously like recent Index 
write-ups, these figures do not tell the entire story. Undoubtedly 
the greatest blow of the season was the loss of Captain Ralph Sim- 
mons. The 230-pound guard, who was named to the All-New Eng- 
land team in 1939, was forced from the line-up just at mid-season, 
suffering from a neck injury, probably sustained in the Norwich 
game. The worth of this Clemson transfer, who always had trouble 
holding up his pants, is best summed up by a quotation from a pre- 
season article by Francis Wallace in the Saturday Evening Post: 

"Ralph Simmons, of Massachusetts State, could play on any- 
body's team." 

Several other injuries robbed the team either of first team ma- 
terial or valuable reserves. 

The opener with Springfield College found State almost helpless 
except for a very few plays, on one of which speedy Bud Evans 
scored the only Maroon touchdown. Springfield, meanwhile, 
picked up two tallies rather easily, the latter on a blocked kick. 
The following week, the Statesmen really outclassed the UConn 
Nutmeggers, but ended on the wrong side of the 13-0 decision. Two 
penalties and a fumble broke up State's several goal-line attacks. 
Captain Simmons on defense and signal-caller Matty Ryan on 
offense were the bright spots of the team. Donnelly of Connecticut 



_J 



State ties Rensselaer in 1939 season but loses disastrously to the "Engineers" 
this year. Action shot below shows a fast play at the crowd-packed home tilt 
in 1939 season. At left: Seery (top), Carter (center), and Kennedy (bottom). 




BecuiOH. Record — Jlofte Vlcia^4f 

accounted for both of the rival scores with his great running and 
passing. 

Really stiff opposition was the cause for the third defeat. The 
Norwich Horsemen started fast and quickly acquired two touch- 
downs. Later in the game, a field goal and another touchdown 
brought the score to 24-0. Bullock's carrying and Freitas' passing 
threatened somewhat, but the nearest approach to the Norwich 
pay-stripe was the 12-yard line. Good defensive work was turned 
in by Simmons and Brady, backing up the line. 

The following week's home game against the far-famed Keaney 
club from Rhode Island State saw Massachusetts State playing 
one of its best games in recent years to hold the father-son com- 
bine to a 9-3 score. The team took its only victory from Worcester 
the next Saturday and overpowered the Engineers all the way. 
Captain Simmons was forced to remain on the sidelines due to an 
obscure neck-and-back injury. Freitas and Santin carried to ad- 
vantage and Ryan turned in a good game with a forty-three-yard 
run back for a touchdown. 

A heavy downpour made a swimming pool out of Amherst's 
Pratt Field and slowed down the three Sabrina speedsters : Mulroy, 
Blood, and Sweeney. Despite the weather these three alternated 
to push over a touchdown at the beginning of the second quarter. 
Near the end of the same period, triple-threat Bob Blood broke 
loose and galloped through the mud seventy-two yards to a touch- 
down to make the score 14-0. 



Caraway's sophs gain 6-0 win over Frigard's frosh gridsters on November 7, 1940. 
E. Larkin, Borowski, Fideli, Race, Grain, Sleeves, and Dunham provided thrills 
in the clash. At right: G. Kimball (top), Salwak (center), and Warner (bottom). 





IT SO |# »X 3M ^^ KSt 



Line-up at the Springfield College game on Alumni Field. State ended on the 
wrong side of the 13 to 6 decision; speedy Bud Evans made the only Maroon 
touchdown then. At right: Bullock (top), Steeves (center), and Grain (bottom). 



In each of the last three games the Maroon team was rather 
badly trounced. Under lights at New London, the Middies of the 
Coast Guard Academy pushed the ball across three times. Thomp- 
son scored all three for the Academy with Shepard setting them 
up. A recovered fumble on the 38 by Gil Santin, led to Ben Freitas' 
lone State score. The following week the Rensselaer Engineers 
from Troy, New York, pushed across four touchdowns, one of them 
within the first few minutes of play. The State line gave consider- 
able ground and was particularly susceptible to the slicing of 
quarterback Freddie Schwartz. Tufts finished off the schedule in a 
hard fought game at Medford. Although the team really turned 
ha a good showing, the final score was 19-6. 

Besides the injured Captain Simmons, the only senior regular 
was 200-pound Joe Larkin. After his conversion from an end, Joe 
turned in a consistently good job at the tackle berth. Joe was also 
chosen to serve as field captain in the absence of Simmons and 
carried on the latter's enthusiastic leadership. 

Junior John Brady's worth can be best shown by the fact that 
he was, first of all, chosen to receive the Allan Leon Pond Me- 
morial Medal, and secondly, chosen by his teammates to lead 
the next year's football team. Johnny probably played more actual 
game minutes than any other member of the team. His job as 
snapper-back was well-nigh perfect. 

Other juniors did their share and can be counted upon to be out 
there working hard next year. Benny Freitas, well-known as a 
plunger and passer since his freshman year, gained more than his 

[198 1 






/^* m 






Fullback Ben Freitas speaks at the "mike" during a Senate-sponsored football 
rally and bon6re. With him are Senate President Allan, Skogsberg, and Field 
Captain J. Larkin. At left: E. Larkin (top), Nastri (center). Gross (bottom). 



share of the yardage. Bullock, Seery and Evans also were valuable 
backfield men. In the line, besides Captain-elect Brady, Carl 
Werme and Paul Dwyer played good ball. 

The class of 1943 contributed much toward this year's team and 
gained a lot of experience which should stand the squad to good 
stead next year. Outstanding for the sophs was 157-pound Matty 
Ryan, who called signals. In addition, he snagged numerous passes 
both offensively and defensively and at the safety position stopped 
many prospective touchdown runs. Stan Salwak did some classy 
running from the halfback position, as did husky Gil Santin. The 
latter looked good on the defense also. Ed Larkin, Gross, and 
Field also saw service. In the line, Billy Mann was the stand-out 
and played clear through several games at his tackle position. 
Steeves and Coffin saw plenty of duty at the ends, while Warner, 
McDonough and Grain were at the guard holes quite regularly. 

An able addition to the coaching staff this year has been rugged 
John Janusas who has had charge of the line material. The resigna- 
tion of Ebb Caraway has left a vacancy which will be filled by 
Walter Hargesheimer who played with Minnesota in 1933 and 
comes from an Illinois high school. 

An innovation this year has been a training table for the squad 
for supper after the heavier practice sessions. Close connection of 
this kind increases the friendships among the players and aids 
morale. 

As shown in the outline of players above, there will be plenty 
of veteran material around next year for Hargesheimer. 



199 



Triggs 




Hurley 



BASKETBALL 

TRINITY COLLEGE, 54— STATE, 53 
December 10, at HartFord 

HAMILTON COLLEGE, 34— STATE, 41 
December 1 4, at Clinton 

CLARK UNIVERSITY, 61— STATE, 42 
December 19, at Amherst 

SPRINGFIELD COLLEGE, 44— STATE, 37 
January 8, at SpringField 

AMHERST COLLEGE, 36— STATE, 37 
January 1 1 , at State 

WILLIAMS COLLEGE, 34— STATE, 48 
January 15, at Williamstown 

WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, 45— STATE, 41 
January 1 8, at Amherst 





Lou Bush (right), 1941 basketball coach, 
Ronnie Streeter (left), the 1941 manager 



Frod\ 




Bokina (24) in action at the Clark game 
in which State received a 61-42 trouncing 




1941 SEASON 

RHODE ISLAND STATE, 84— STATE, 39 
February 5, at Kinsston 

MIDDLEBURy COLLEGE, 30— STATE, 40 
February 8, at Middlebury 

TUFTS COLLEGE, 35— STATE, 32 
February 1 4, at MedFord 

CONNECTICUT UNIVERSITY, 57— STATE, 37 
February 19, at Amherst 

BOSTON UNIVERSITY, 54— STATE, 34 
February 21 , at Boston 

COAST GUARD ACADEMY, 34— STATE, 40 
February 28, at Amherst 

WORCESTER "TECH", 51— STATE, 42 
March 1 , at Worcester 



SofJt <^aafidien>d. Add Sco^uHtj, Pid^oU 



"New life!" was given to varsity basketball this year with Lou 
Bush as coach. It was through his efforts that the band played at 
games and a loudspeaker system was installed. When he left for 
the army in the middle of the season, a distinct loss was felt. A 
wise choice, however, was the selection of German professor Fred 
Ellert '30 to finish the season. Basketball next year is to be under 
Hargesheimer. 

Though seniors on the squad were few, they decided many a 
game. Captain Bill Walsh proved to be a capable leader and upheld 
his reputation as a fine guard and scorer. Two other seniors who 
saw service — Hank Parzych and Vern Smith — became co-captains 
after the Connecticut game when Walsh was declared ineligible for 
further games. 

The junior class promises to add power next year. This year 
Triggs was a steady performer; Frodyma more than once flipped 
in important baskets ; Sparks and Hurley also starred. 

It was the sophomore class, however, that gave the team most 
of its material and a good share of scoring punch. Center Ted 
Bokina consistently scored more than ten points a game. Podolak 
deserves high praise especially for his defensive work. Malloy, T. 
Kelly, and Bubriski also played a bang-up game. 

Five wins and nine defeats is not an outstanding record, but 
there were four more victories than last year, and most of the 
losses were close and exciting. The season got under way with a 
slam-bang game against Trinity which ended with a 54-53 count 



"A study in Hands" as Statesmen and Terriers fight for control of the ball. 
B. U. swamped State by 54-34 during this game at the Hub City. At left is 
Sophomore Ed Podolak who has been doing brilliant defensive work all season. 





7^e 19^1 SeaAj04^ (Second — ^lae WUU 



for the Hartford team. Not to be disheartened, the Statesmen 
came back in the next game to beat Hamilton 41-34 with Bokina 
and Maloy scoring 25 points between them. 

The next two games were defeats by Clark and Springfield by 
the scores of 61-42 and 44-37 respectively. The Amherst game was 
undoubtedly the thriller of the year. When the Jeffmen came to 
the cage with a veteran team as decided favorites, amazed specta- 
tors saw State fight its way to a one-point victory over a flashy 
Amherst club after a last-minute basket by Parzych. Another win 
in the Little Three was garnered the next night by taking Williams 
to the tune of 48-34. 

In an attempt to make a clean sweep of the Little Three, State 
pushed Wesleyan to the limit; but the visitors ended on top with a 
45-41 score. Rhode Island State routed the State team by a score 
of 84-39 though not without trouble. The Statesmen gave Lou 
Bush a send-off with a victory over Middlebury, 40-30. Fred EUert 
was coaching as Tufts beat the local boys 35-32 in a closely fought 
contest — the second time in eight years that Jumbos have beaten 
the Maroon. 

The University of Connecticut tripped Massachusetts State in 
the next game with a 57-37 shellacking. With a score of 54-34, 
B. U. took over State. Then, Coast Guard was the fifth and final 
victim of the year when State beat the officers 40-34 on the cage 
floor. In the finale of the season, Worcester Tech rode over State 
with a 51-42 victory. 



Ted Bokina and Mike Frodynia cover a B. U. man with his eye on the basket. 
Bokina was the star scorer during the "jinxed" Boston University game and 
all season. At right is Sophomore Stan Bubriski who played a bang-up game. 





licuieloU StcUfKfe^ In tke '40 Se4jAx^ 





Coach E. Caraway and Manager Johnson '41 

The 1940 baseball season is the story of 
one man Pitcher Carl Twyble figured in 
every game but one, and that one proved 
to be the most severe shellacking of the 
year. The team's poor showing of three 
wins and nine defeats would have been 
even worse without Carl's arm, and it 
might have been much better if he had 
been supported by a team that could 
field. Time after time he held his oppon- 
ents in the palm of his hand when a weak 
infield hit or pop fly would be mishandled. 



and the game would be thrown away. 
Many a "hit" by opponents was a 
simple misjudgment by fielders, and yet 
the earned run average per game by 
Twyble was only 1.8. When Carl faltered 
in a game, it was unfortunate, for Coach 
Caraway could not afford to risk one of 
the sophomore hurlers in a relief role. The 
proof of Carl's ability is amply shown by 
the fact that the Springiield Nationals 
signed him after graduation and that he 
baffled the best the Eastern League had 
to offer with his twirling. 

The rest of the pitching staff consisted 
of three sophomores all of whom showed 
some promise in pre-season practice but 
who never lived up to expectations. Jim 
Bullock proved the steadiest of the three, 
but even he never pitched a whole game. 
His control was his main asset. Ace 
Thayer might have been more successful 
if he had more control; but when he 
started to throw balls, "strike" was a 
word for a mythical event. George Kim- 
ball, too, had more than a prayer on his 
pitch, yet it was often lucky if his fast 
ball would come near enough to the plate 
for the catcher to stop. There are hopes 
that these men have been able to iron 



Sophomore pitchers Thayer, G. Kimhall and Bullock 



"Howie" Rudge 



"Al" Irzyk 




out some of these difficulties during the 
past summer. The success of the 1941 
team will probably depend on them. 

The most outstanding player in line 
after Carl Twyble was Captain Warren 
Tappin. Always the most dependable 
fielder on the team, his batting in the 
last part of the season was almost phe- 
nomenal. He ended the season with an 
average over 400. Warren was the only 
man on the team to whom a ball could be 
hit with certainty that it would be 
stopped. Reputed for his good arm, he 
also had a good eye for flies. 

The infield was weak although it did 
not fall down completely. Al Irzyk, 
Howie Rudge, Hank Parzych, Bill Walsh, 
and Red Mullany made frequent brilliant 
plays. On several occasions, these boys 
came through with timely hits, especially 
Bill Walsh, who seemed to have the 
knack of putting infield clouts "where 
they ain't." Yet, when a game was tight 
and a stout defense was needed, balls 
galore would dribble through legs, and 
wild throws were plentiful. Most of the 
time this infield looked like good material, 
but as Ebb Caraway remarked, "A team 
is good only when it wins the close ones." 

The outfield, with the exception of Tap- 
pin, was not remarkable either for its merits 



•Reason Of 



\Q4o 



^^ 



r 



or its faults. John Blasko showed good 
hitting against slow ball pitching, but his 
inexperience in the field was often pain- 
fully apparent. Walt Miles and Russ 
Clarke proved fairly dependable in the 
field although neither was strong at bat. 
The catching staff' consisted of "Big 
Frank" Spencer and fiery Bob Triggs. 
The two alternated throughout the sea- 
son and gave a steady, if not a brilliant, 
performance. 

Of these men, Tappin, Twyble, Blasko, 
Irzyk and Rudge graduated, leaving a 
large number of men with which to build 



'Action at third 



"Bobby" Triggs 



'Walt" Miles 




a winning combination. Hank Parzych 
and Stan Jackimczyk (who last year 
coached third base because of an injury) 
are the co-captains for the 1941 season. 
If some of the sophomore pitchers can 
produce, the new baseball coach will 
have a somewhat easier task than that 
which faced Caraway in 1940. Experience 
should remove the tightness of last year's 
infielders and should improve the hitting. 
Of course, a successful team depends on 
a number of "if's" — time alone will tell 
the baseball future for State. We know 
this, and it is not "blarney": the team on 
the field this spring is fighting for wins. 
The boys fought last year and would 
have been on top more often if lack of 
skill and polish had not hampered them. 

The 1940 season began in encouraging 
style with a convincing victory over the 
University of Connecticut. Twyble 
pitched a creditable game, never meeting 
with any real trouble. The team put on a 
shining performance after it slapped out 
fourteen hits. The six Connecticut rvuis, 
made chiefly through errors, were ob- 
scured by State's piling up of the eleven 
runs. 

Bowdoin and Williams, respectively 
characterized by the Collegian as "weak" 
and "medium," followed Connecticut in 



order but not in quality. Bowdoin used 
two pitchers who had difficulty getting 
the ball to the plate, and State made a 
grand total of four hits and two runs. In 
the meantime, Twyble was allowing ten 
singles and three runs. The only State 
man who looked good was John Blasko. 
He banged out two solid hits. Since Wil- 
liams had been the scapegoat for the 
State power house in previous seasons, 
Ebb gambled on Ace Thayer as starting 
pitcher. The Ephmen proceeded to romp 
through all three sophomore hurlers for 
eleven runs and throttled the State at- 
tack with sophomore pitcher Spaulding, 
who was one of the best twirlers seen all 
the season. 

Carl Twyble took four innings in 
which to warm up in the next game 
which was with Amherst. His smooth 
pitching from the fifth inning on did not 
overcome the lead made by Amherst in 
the third. A spectacular rally by the 
Statesmen in the sixth, which produced 
four runs, merely served to show the 
possibilities of the stumbling State team. 
More than one observer was astounded at 
the spirit and potential power of the club 
in this rally of the game. 

The next game, a return bout with 
Connecticut State, resulted in the second 



'Stash" Jackimczyk 



"Hank" Parzych 



'Tank" Spencer 



"Tap" Tappin 




victory of the season for the Maroon. 
The puzzling thing about the two wins 
over Connecticut was that the Nutmeg 
team outshone considerably some of the 
teams that drubbed State. 

The next three games, all defeats, put 
State in the doghouse. Tufts eked out a 
4-3 victory after Twyble relieved Jim 
Bullock in the sixth. "Dumb" base run- 
ning principally caused the defeat. The 
Wesleyan game was the thriller of the 
season, lasting thirteen innings and end- 
ing with a home run! Bullock pitched 
eight good innings, but errors threw 
away a good lead. Twyble held the op- 
ponents until the thirteenth. When try- 
ing to protect a one-run lead gained in 
the first half of that game, he allowed a 
homer with one man on base. New 
Hampshire then invaded State and 
emerged with a 5-2 victory. The Wildcat 
club was one of the classiest outfits seen 
on the local diamond. 

The following contest produced the 
third victory of the year, a 9-'i massacre 
of Lowell Textile at Lowell. Ace Thayer 
started and was effective until the fifth 
when he walked five straight batters, and 
King Carl had to be called in. State had a 
field day with thirteen hits. Frank 
Spencer clouted the longest hit of the 




Hank slams a two bagger in the Amherst tilt 

game and managed to stagger to second. 

Springfield eked out a decision in the 
next game to the humiliation of the State 
team. The team had wanted to end up 
the season with three victories, but its 
hitting fell off appreciably after the 
Lowell game. 

Amherst capped the desolate season 
with another defeat which even the re- 
turning alumni could not enjoy. Fireball 
Stott throttled the Statesmen while Carl 
Twyble faltered in the ninth and had to 
be relieved. 



'Russ" Clarke 



'Bill" Walsh 



'Red" Mullaney 



"Ed" Sparks 














'/fO Gnjo4A. Qo444€t^ ^eatn Oi^JAio/wlUf^ 




'Harry" E. jMosher 



'Dave" Morrill 



'Bill" Kimball 



An outstanding team of the year was the 
Varsity Cross Country with five consec- 
utive dual wins against one defeat. Five 
men bore the brunt of tlie burden, with 
Uttle replacement available, and the in- 
jury jinx could at any time have upset 
the whole team. 




Unquestionably, the stand-out runner 
of the 1940 team was Senior Chester Put- 
ney. As captain of the 1939 club Chet 
was almost constantly handicapped be- 
cause of weak ankles. This year, however, 
skillful care kept him from this worry. 
Chet took a good deal of "joshing" con- 
cerning his native state, but was always 
ready to give as good as he received. As 
a runner and as a personality, he will 
never be forgotten at State. 

A close second was Junior William Kim- 
ball, the team's fighting captain. In spirit, 
training, and running Captain Kimball 
set an example for the whole squad. 

The only sophomore on the squad was 
diminutive Russell MacDonald, who sur- 
prised his teammates by never finishing 
less than third. The other two members 
of the regular team were Juniors Brad- 
ford Greene and David Morrill. Both 
turned in spots of good running and 
should be "right in there" next season. 
Only other point scorers were Richard 
Hayward '41 and Harold Mosher '42. 



208 



Btate llu4n^KjeAA. Win ^(4^ 2>ucU Meeti 




'Chet" Putiiev 



'Dick'- Ha%uanl 



'Russ" MacDonald 



Bright spot in the first meet as the 
Northeastern Huskies defeated State 
was Putney's drive in the stretch. From 
there on, the club was not topped in a 
dual meet. M.I.T. was the first victim 
with a score of 23-33. The following week, 
Worcester Tech tasted defeat. The score 
was 18-43, and Kimball and Putney just 
nosed out Worcester's Ken Hunt. Al- 
though two Indians crossed the line first, 
a triple tie of the two State leaders plus 
MacDonald, followed closely in eighth 
place by Morrill, gave the local team a 
three-point margin. 

The following week at Wesleyan, the 
same Springfield team edged State by 
ten points to give the Maroon and White 
a third behind Connecticut U.'s perfect 
score. The Amherst-State dual run in 
conjunction with this ended in an 18-38 
loss for the Jefl^s. 

At the New England Intercollegiates, 
the Derby Dalers edged Springfield by 
one place to finish eighth. Putney's 35th 
was State's best. A fitting climax for the 



season was the Trinity meet with five 
Statemen ahead of Trinity's first. 

Prospects for next year seem very 
bright for Coach Derby's plodders, with 
Putney the only graduate. Several Fresh- 
men should add needed reserve strength 
to give a perfect season. 

Coach L. Derby and Manager D. Skolnick 




209 



WlH^te^ ^^ack "^eani. f^^ieakl (leca^dl 




Coach Derby. Bell. Freitas. McDonough, Santin. Bower, Klubock, Manager Shaw 
Graham. Adams, Joyce. Warren, Captain O'Connor. Putney, Greene, Frandsen. Mosher (Photo by Ki 



The 1941 Winter Track team came out 
at just .500 in the books, but managed in 
the process to shatter several records. 
The relay team split even, winning its 
first K. of C. race in a decade, only to be 

Star track runner. Senior "Okie" O'Connor 




called out on a fluke disqualification. At 
the B.A.A. events, Worcester Tech nosed 
out the Derby quartet by one second. 

In the regular winter meets, State also 
broke even. The Connecticut team was 
the victim of a 53-28 score, and North- 
eastern' took the Derbymen in the other 
dual. In the former, two records fell — 
diet Putney bettering the mile time by 
.2 seconds and Alan Bell adding a half- 
inch to the broad jump record. At the 
Northeastern match. Junior Bill Wall set 
a new college record and tied for a new 
cage record with the bar at 5 ft. 10}^ 
inches. 

At the home triangular meet. State 
rolled up 65 points to take Worcester 
Tech and Springfield. Bill Wall scored 
a dual victory taking the 35-yard hurdles 
and the high jump, while Ed O'Connor 
and Brad Greene showed up well. At the 
next threesome meet. Tufts forced State 
to second with Worcester third. 



I 



210] 



SfjiAuUf ^^lacJz jeam^ JlacJzd. Bt^ve4^xitn 




Coach Derby. Captain O'Connor. Manager La 
W. Kimball. Lcland, Adams. Cowan 
ick. Wall, Copson, Crimmlns, Bowcn (Photo by 



Lacking team strength, the State spring 
track club of 1940 turned in one win out 
of three for a less than average season. 
A few stand-out men were about all that 
State could put in the field last year. 
Ed O'Connor '41 was undoubtedly the 
season's outstanding performer and won 
more than his share of the short distance 
runs. In recognition of these feats, he was 
elected to captain the 1941 team. Follow- 
ing close behind in wins amassed was 
Captain Bob Joyce '40. Jack Crimmins '41 
was the other scoring speedster. 

After an 83-to-43 win over Trinity in 
the first meet of the season, hopes were 
high for the remainder of the meets. But 
Tufts picked off eleven firsts to make a 
rather one-sided contest. 

Although the Connecticut meet was 
rather close, the UConns came out ahead, 
chiefly by virtue of sweeping all places 
in the long distance runs. At the Eastern 
IntercoUegiates, Dick Curtis '41 was the 



only Statesman to gain a place. As de- 
fending javelin champion, he pulled down 
only third. Jack Crimmins '41 in the 
hurdles and Bill Wall '42 in the 220 both 
narrowly missed qualification. 

Pole-vaulter crosses the bar on .\lnmni Field 




211 



(^OCfB^^ WcUeA. GlnC444. 9l ^OfL SpjoAi 




W. Avery K. Hall C. P. Jones H. McCalUim 



J. Pryniak L. Gare A. Koulias 



"Miracle coach of New England" is the 
phrase which the last two yearbooks have 
used for Joe Rogers, and the 1941 Index 
will stick to that precedent, for once 
again, the swimming team has excelled 
in the win column. By taking one trian- 
gular contest and five dual meets, while 
dropping two, the 1941 tank-men have, 

JManager Bardwell '41 and Coach Joe Rogers 




for the third consecutive year, turned in 
the best showing of any State athletic 
team. 

Once again, Joe Jodka of Lawrence was 
the outstanding individual performer for 
the 1941 water squad. This smiling jun- 
ior, who last year cracked the New Eng- 
land Intercollegiate breast stroke record, 
succeeded in beating his own mark at 
this season's first meet. Joe's record is 
2:25.2 which is 0:4.4 seconds better than 
his 1940 time. In addition the husky 
swimmer later appeared independently 
at Providence and pulled down the Ameri- 
can A.A.U. junior 220-yard breaststroke 
record. 

"Win" Avery has been turning in 
consistently good showing for two years, 
specializing in the 50-yard free style. In 
the sophomore class there are also a couple 
of performers who will be right there next 
year. George Tilley has been a regular 
member of the medley relay team and 
has swum the backstroke event, while 
Byron Schiller is a diver who has shown 
improvement this season. Of the fresh- 



212 ] 



QltCuHifUoH. ^odkcL Beati Ou^n l^eco^d 




W . CofVey J. Jodka G. Tilley 



Richards . Gavin K. Schiller Kansow . . H. -McCarlh\ 



men, "Bud" Hall turned in the best 
record, having placed well in several New 
England A.A.U. meets this year. 

Credit in the senior class must be more 
widely distributed, for there are five 
members of the '41 class who added ma- 
terially to team strength. Bob Hall has 
probably turned in the most actual wins; 
but Coffey, Jones, McCallum, and Pry- 
mak have been around for three years, 
giving substantial accounts of themselves. 
These men will be sorely missed when 
the 1942 squad begins its drilling. 

The team started the season in rather 
poor physical shape. And with a winning 
streak of two seasons to maintain they 
were apprehensive. Worcester Tech suc- 
cumbed easily enough in the opener, but 
the Rogersmen came back from vacation 
to cut short their win record with a 50-25 
defeat by Williams. 

Then the Statesmen opened up, dunk- 
ing UConn. in their own pool 47-28. 
Next, Wesleyan was handed a first defeat 
of the year; Joe Jodka won the breast 
stroke, taking second in the 440 free style 



and swimming a leg of the 300 medley 
relay. 

The following week, "Win" Avery set 
a new college 50-yard free style record of 
24.6, as Coast Guard sank 47-28. Union 
got a real drubbing as the Maroon team 
took all first and four seconds, ending the 
home season with a 60-13 score. 

B. U. was sadly deficient at the sea- 
son's only triangular meet held in M.I.T.'s 
new half-million dollar pool. So, the 
contest was between the Engineers and 
Statesmen — with the locals nosing out a 
69-62 win. The following night Joe's 
chlorine crew competed at the Bowdoin 
pool and — despite wins by Avery, Hall, 
and Jodka — came home "on their shield" 
with a defeat of 51-24. 

Competition at the New Englands in 
Cambridge was "pretty stiff." The med- 
ley relay team of Tilley, Hall, and Jodka 
scored a third in their event, while Joe 
Jodka in addition placed third in the 220- 
yard free style and finished off a glorious 
undefeated season with a first in his 
favored event, the 200-yard breast stroke. 



213] 



fi^Uaal BiuMd Si/vQHXf. Soccer Sc^uad 




1940 Soccer Captain Frank Simons Kight halfback Clem Burr ami Darlmoiitli "Indian" fight in tie game October 5, 1940 



"Two wins, two tie games, and three 
defeats," reads the record book for thr 
1940 soccer season. A fair season — but 
undoubtedly the big achievement of the 
year was the building-up process. Several 
outstanding men have been developed, 
all of whom have at least one more year of 
soccer at State. 

IXIanager Alotroni and Coach "Larry"" Briggs 





Through the entire season. Coach 
Briggs carried on his well-liked coaching 
methods which have won for him a far 
better than .500 average for the eleven 
years of coaching the Maroon booters. 
A glance over the list of lettermen shows 
that Larry has built a sizable nucleus 
toward next year's team. 

Benefiting by last year's experience, 
the '42 element of the team has exhibited 
Trojan spunk in all games. Gib Arnold 
and Bob Mullany, both small but ex- 
tremely fast forwards, booted the ball all 
around opposing teams. Lambie Erickson 
(Captain-elect) and Spence Potter who 
are both huskier men, proved valuable 
either in the forward or center lines. 

In the Class of '43, Callahan, Gizien- 
ski, and Podolak were all stand-outs. Jim 
Callahan, another small forward, showed 
skill in whipping the ball around. Stan 
Gizienski held up the center halfback 
position after Erickson was forced from 
the line-up while Ed Podolak was prac- 
tically invincible in the fullback slot. 
Both of these men should have a better 



i 



214 



fClaman 96. ^UcUd AU-J\le^ S^4^xjJja4Jt 




Molrorii, Ma 



obek. Assistant Coach; Filios, Colick. McLean, Callahan, Tewhill, J. L. Brown, McLeod, Assistant Ma 

C. Alien, Ewing, Gizienski. Hibbard, C. Erickson, Podolak, Potter, Papp. MuUany, Arnold 

Bangs, S. Kaplan, J. A. Stewart, Meyer, Simons, Captain; Klaman, Jacobson, Gould, C. V. Smith 



than even chance as New England or 
Eastern choices. Howard Bangs, also a 
sophomore, had experience in the goal 
and should be ready to take over for 
Vern Smith — outstanding goalie of the 
past two years. 

Biggest loss to the coming '41 season 
is Sol Klaman, gifted right halfback. He 
was the only Statesman elected by 
sports writers to the All-New England 
team and was reported as "strong and 
steady, always ready to help the other 
fellow." Captain Simons played the 
other outside halfback position; his work, 
both offensively and defensively, will be 
hard to equal next season. The defensive 
department will find a diffcult gap to fill 
with the graduation of fullback Woody 
Jacobson. 

Coach Briggs began the season with 
unseasoned regulars and first-string subs. 
Despite this, the Rensselaer Engineers 
found it hard work to down the Statesmen 
3-2. The following week with the Big 
Green of Dartmouth, a double overtime 
was not enough to settle the issue. 



Though the match was hard fought on 
both sides and though the home team 
seemed to have the edge, State was un- 
able to get to the pay window to break a 
2-2 tie. 

Like the Dartmouth match, the Con- 
necticut game ended in a tie. Potter took 
a tricky crossover to score the first goal, 
while fullback Ed Pololak made the other 
on a penalty kick. Harvard won the next 
contest, but the Brigadiers deserve real 
commendation for holding the Crimson 
scoreless for the entire game. The Har- 
vard break came on a lucky penalty kick 
which left the count at 1-0. 

The visiting Trinity team on Dads' 
Day proved weak and quickly yielded 
three goals. However, as Coach Briggs 
threw in subs, the Hartford club regained 
two goals. In the town feud with Amherst, 
the Statesmen lost by a 2-1 score for the 
second consecutive year. Fitchburg 
Teachers, in the final game of the season, 
showed a very weak attack, going down 
with a 3-0 decision — even with State's 
many substitutions. 



215 



Va/iAdiif, 




Manager Waniilu 



THE 1940 VARSITY TENNIS TEAM 
, Solin. R. Moshrr. Silfeii, Stahlberg, R. Foley, Si 



ga, KaulTnian (Coach) 



Replacing a discontinued hockey team, 
State last year entered a tennis team in 
varsity competition for the first time in 
25 years. Despite inexperience and lack 
of pre-season practice because of the 

A typical spring day on Slate tennis eonrt 




weather, the new club did well with three 
wins and two losses. 

Robert Foley '40 proved to be the out- 
standing player and was consequently 
elected, after the first match, to captain 
the club for the remainder of the season. 
Bob also became first to have his name 
inscribed on the Paul Putnam Memorial 
Trophy, being picked as outstanding in 
athletic ability, general scholarship, and 
good sportsmanship. Edward Anderson 
'41 was picked to succeed as the captain 
of the club. 

In their first match the team took over 
Clark University 5-1. The UConn meet 
was called because of rain, but the next 
week the Statesmen scored over Worcester 
Tech, 7-2. The two defeats of the season 
followed, Springfield nosing out the locals 
6-3 and Trinity winning 8-1. In a return 
match, Connecticut succumbed 6-3, while 
the final meet of the year with Tufts was 
rained out. 



216 



Qo^m^xaA. PefLl ^fi 9*vlfi^uyuU Jtockeif, 




f^i 



^^g\...±^^ 






State's Hockey Team shellacks the Amherst pucksters 10 to 1 in a practiee game on January 7 



By rolling up three wins, two ties, and 
two losses, State's unofficial hockey team 
under John Janusas made a strong bid to 
return to varsity status. With the 
Alumni Association behind the move and 
with continuance of ice such as enjoyed 
this winter, hockey players may soon 
again receive M's for their endeavors. 

The season summed up is two wins 
over Amherst and one over Stockbridge, 
ties with Springfield and Amherst, and 
losses to Stockbridge and Springfield. 
The scores are unimportant when it is 
realized that all the games produced in- 
teresting hockey and showed skill and 
.spirit. 

The first line of Captain Babe Gau- 
mond. Ace Thayer, and Rollie CoUela 
furnished the scoring punch for the team. 
A very capable defense was found in 
Herb Gross, and Lloyd Fitzpatrick. The 
goal was tightly defended by Mif At- 
wood with Phil Young as an able reserve. 
Baker, White, Leland, Burr, and Norton 



well filled the skates of the first squad 
when they got a chance. It is a notable 
fact that not one of the above mentioned 
men is a senior and that many are fresh- 
men. Hockey must certainly be on the 
upgrade at State ! 

Hockey and football line coach John .lanusas 




217 



14J,A,A, Bfuo^il Keep. Coedl o^ %ei 



From modern dancing to basketball and 
swimming, the feminine campus popu- 
lation "goes to town" in sports, proving 
that the average coed type is The Out- 
door Girl. 

Besides required physical education 
courses, coeds have had a full program of 
sports. 

The interhouse competition has elim- 
inated to a great extent the "cut-throat 
rivalry" of the five State sororities. Only 
girls who live in a house may represent it 
— with the exception of off-campus stu- 
dents who may permanently affiliate 
themselves with any house. The houses, 
sororities and women's dormitories, com- 
pete in basketball, hockey, swimming, 
skiing, and bowling. 

The managers of each sport — Mary 
Mann in basketball, Betty Webster in 
hockey, Mary Jean Carpenter in swim- 
ming, Dorothy Dunklee in skiing, and 
Priscilla Archibald in bowling — arrange 
the time for games and help conduct 
tournaments. Sigma Beta Chi won in 
basketball; Draper Hall, in hockey; 
Draper Hall, also in swimming. Inter- 



class as well as interhouse competition 
was held in both swimming and basket- 
ball. This year coeds are also entering the 
National Telegraphic Swimming Meet. 

Interest in skiing has been fostered by 
ski movies and lessons to any coed who 
wanted to learn that fine art. A women's 
ski meet, arranged for Carnival week-end, 
was cancelled because of the unfortunate- 
ly poor weather. 

In addition to interhouse competition, 
individual tournaments and activities 
were conducted in tennis, badminton, 
archery, and riding. The managers are, 
respectively: Norma Handforth, Priscilla 
Badger, Mary Berry, and Kay Tully. 
Besides tournament participation, the 
"coeds on horseback" ride weekly and 
take part in a spring horse show. 

As this year's innovation in the physi- 
cal education program, modern dancing 
classes under the direction of Frances 
Lappen put on a program in March. 
Coeds also had an exhibit at the Recrea- 
tion Conference in March and presented 
an afternoon entertainment on Mothers' 
Day. 



Coed sAvimmers, unde 



anay:<'r Mary Jean (larpenler Ml. execiilr an elaborate exhibition <)n Mother.s" Day held in May 




^le^jien ^nxite/u^itLeA. In Sfuo^iti (lUjuaJ/uf 



It is a sure sign of spring on campus 
when the hoys roll out of battered frat 
doors of an eveing to compete with rival 
houses in softball. There are more shouts 
and cheers than have ever been given at a 
varsity game, and the victory march 
back to the house re-echoes in the hills 
surrounding Amherst. 

The most signal reward for the best- 
rated fraternity on campus besides its 
own satisfaction of achievement is the 
first place Interfraternity Cup, won by 
Kappa Sigma for the 1939-40 competi- 
tion. The purpose of the interfraternity 
sports is to promote healthy competition 
between men who otherwise would have 
no opportunity to engage in athletics. 
Lettermen are ineligible to participate in 
these sports. 

Competition for the cups involve rat- 
ings in interfraternity academics and 
scholarship as well as sports. True fra- 
ternal sportsmanship is shown in such 
sports as soccer, touch football, track, 
volleyball, basketball, and softball. Kappa 
Sigma's touch football sextet romped to a 
championship of the league when it 



downed Alpha Epsilon Pi to a 38-20 vic- 
tory. Sigma Phi Epsilon booted its way 
to a flying victory over stiff competition 
when it took the soccer pennant. First 
place in athletics was a dead heat be- 
tween Theta Chi and Alpha Epsilon Pi 
during competition so far this year. Sid 
Kauffman of the Physical Education De- 
partment handles these Greek sports. 

Carnival week-end dawned cloudy 
and warm, but the interfraternity skating 
events were run off regardless of the 
weatherman's carelessness. The skating 
races (see picture below) resulted in a 
first for Phi Sig, with A.G.R. and Theta 
Chi panting to a tied second. A.G.R.'s 
placing in the sporting events and a first 
in snow sculpture earned the proud house 
the Carnival Cup and points toward the 
Interfraternity Cup. The first-place cup 
is presented to the best all-around fra- 
ternity on campus for the competition 
period. A.E.P., Theta Chi, and Lambda 
Chi Alpha hold second, third and fourth 
places for the period just past. Three cups 
and an honorable mention are awarded 
at a spring convocation. 



Phi Sifinia Kappa wins first in the Winter Carnival fraternity competition, with A.G.R. and T.C second, and S.A.E. third 





«7 

M HE green-as-grass freshman, the 
cocky sopliomore, and the metamorphos- 
ed junior — these three lower classes are 
grouped together in the following Direct- 
ory. Listed under their names are their 
bare statistics, but unknown (except to 
themselves) are their struggles in gearing 
their personalities to the college world. 
Freshmen drop their mothers' apron 
strings, groan under the stiff require- 
ments of the college professor, and study 
their Zoology and Chemistry night after 
night. Sophomores learn new cuss-words 
for the "Pat's" literature course and 
frolic on horseback in the R.O.T.C. 
cavalry class. Blase juniors awaken only 
for quizzes, hour exams, "Dean's Satur- 
day," or semester finals — while approxi- 
mately thirty of the best are chosen as 
military majors. These are the men and 
women of tomorrow. 



Coeds play rowbi 



Alice I'cderzani, "12 <<><'<1. a I li 






Frosh and sophomore men 





take military training; upperclass cadet offieers are in command; picture above shows the annual June regimental review 



NDERCLASSES 



UNDERCLASSES 



JUNIORS 



I. Melvin Abrahamson, 137 Wells 
St., Greenfield; Greenfield High School; 
Chemistry; Men's Glee Club, 3; Men- 
orah Club, 1, 2, 3; Tau Epsilon Phi. 

Louis G. Abrams, 113 Thornton St., 
Revere; Revere High School; Bacteri- 
ology; Menorah Club, 2; Pre-Med. 
Club, 1, 2. 

Paul Joseph Adams, 23 Harding St., 
Feeding Hills; Agawam High School; 
Chemistry; Bay State Revue, 2; Winter 
Track, 1, 2(M); Spring Track, 1, 2; 
"M" Club, 2; Alpha Sigma Phi. 

Dorothy Eleanor Adelson, 309 Sar- 
gent St., Holyoke; Holyoke High 
School; History; Menorah Club. 1, 2, 
3; Current Affairs Club, 3; Sorority 
Secretary, 3; Sigma Iota. 

Nancy Strowbridge Alger, .5 Court 
End Ave., Middleboro; Middleboro 
Memorial High School; Home Econ- 
omics; Roister Doisters, 1; Home 
Economics Club, 3; Phi Zeta. 



Robert E. Ames, .54 Dartmouth St., 
Somerville; Somerville High School; 
Clark University and Boston Univer- 
sity; Wild Life; Senate, 2; Class Sec- 
retary, 1; Class Nominating Committee, 
1, 2 (Chairman); Outing Club, 3; Soc- 
cer, 1; Basketball, 1. 2. 

Richard Colwill Andrew, IS Plym- 
outh Ave.. Florence; Northampton 
High School; General Engineering; 
Band, 1, 2; Men's Glee Club. 1, 2, 3 
(Assistant Manager, 3); Advanced Mil- 
itar.v, 3; Engineering Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Alpha Gamma Rho. 

Doris Elva Angell, Ridgeview Terr., 
Westfield; Westfield High School; 
Home Economics; Christian Federation 
Cabinet, 3; Wesley Foundation. 1, 2, 3 
(President, 3); Home Economics Club, 
1, 2, 3. 

Gilbert Stetson Arnold, Southwick; 
Westfield High School; Economics; 
Soccer, 1, 2(M), 3(M); Alpha Gamma 



Dorothea Eve .4twood, 110 Southwick 
St., Feeding Hills; Agawam High 
School; English. 



Litchfield decorates and later dances at the Soph-Senior Ball 




Milford 'Walter Atwood, 44 Florence 
Ave., Holyoke; Mount Hermon; Agri- 
cultural Economics; Maroon Key, 2; 
Class Nominating Committee, 3; Col- 
legian, 1, 2; Carnival Committee, 2; 
Advanced Military, 3; Soccer, 1; Base- 
ball, 1; Tennis, 2; Phi Sigma Kappa. 



Frances Pauli 


ne 


Avella, 1 


6 Flynt 


Ave., Monson; 


Mo 


nson High 


Scho 


ol; 


Springfield Jun 


ior 


College; 


Engli 


sh; 


Orchestra, 2, 3 


Nc 


wman CI 


Jb, 2, 


3; 


Sigma Beta Ch 











Marion Rachel Avery, Pocasset; 
Bourne High School; Home Economics; 
Christian Federation Cabinet, 1, 2, 3; 
Home Economics Club, 2, 3; Women's 
Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3; Sigma 
Beta Chi. 



Winthrop B. Avery, 1 Loring St., 
Shrewsbury; Worcester Academy; 
Economics; Military Ball Committee, 
3; Advanced Military, 3; Current 
Affairs Club, 3; Swimming, 2(M); 
Theta Chi. 



Dan Balaban, S7 Abbottsford Rd., 
Brookline; Boston Latin School; Horti- 
cultural Manufactures; Menorah Club, 
1, 2, 3; Horticultural Manufactures 
Club, 3; Tau Epsilon Phi. 



Matilda Ida Banus, 45 Longfellow 
Ave., Pittsfield; Pittsfield High School; 
Home Economics; Newman Club, 1, 2, 
3 (Secretary, Treasurer, 2, 3); Home 
Economics Club, 1, 2, 3. 



Elizabeth Ann Barney, 14 Spenny 
Vale Ave., West Roxbury; Jamaica 
Plain High School; Psychology; Psy- 
chology Club, 2, 3; Lambda Delta Mu. 



Marjorle Lucille Barrows, 35 Whit- 
man Rd., Worcester; Auburn High 
School; Economics; Wesley Founda- 
tion, 1, 2; Outing Club, 1. 



Everett 'Wilbur Barton, 1077 Massa- 
chusetts Ave., North Adams; Drury 
High School; Engineering; Outing 
Club, 1; C.A.A., 2; Intertraternity 
Council, 3; Fraternity Secretary, 3; 
Q.T.V. 



Thyrza Stevens Barton, R.F.D. 1, 
Amherst; Smith College; Recreational 
Planning; Outing Club, 3; Nature 
Guide Association, 3; Phi Zeta. 



■222' 



Constance Jean Beauregard. 3 Son- 
oma Pl„ Holyoke; Holyoke High 
School; French; Class Nominating 
Committee, 1, 2; Bay State Revue, 2; 
Student Religious Council, 3 (Secre- 
tary); Newman Club, 1, 2, 3 (Vice- 
President, 3); Outing Club, 1; Psychol- 
ogy Club, 2; Intersorority Council, 3; 
Women's Athletic Association, 2, 3; 
Mothers' Day Committee, 2, 3; Lambda 
Delta Mu. 



Morris Leo Beck, 48 Ellington St., 
Dorchester; Roxbury Memorial High 
School; Psychology and Physiology; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Psychology 
Club, 2, 3; Mathematics Club, 1. 



Kate A. Belk. 210 Fifth St., Leomin- 
ster; Dedham High School; History; 
Women's Glee Club, 2; Bay State Re- 
vue, 2; Current Affairs Club, 3; Inter- 
sorority Council, 3 (Secretary-Treas- 
urer); Alpha Lambda Mu. 



Leslie Ross Benemelis, 236 Sargeant 
St., Holyoke; Williston Academy; 
Engineering; Band, 3; Soccer, 1; Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon. 



George Neil Bennett, 39 Bridge St., 
South Hadley Falls; South Hadley 
High School; English; Advanced Mil- 
itary, 3; Football, 1; Q.T.V. 



Barbara Tucker Bentley, ISO North 
Elm St., Northampton; Northampton 
School for Girls; Geology; Christian 
Federation Cabinet, 1, 2, 3 (Secretary, 
3). 



Mary Elizabeth Berry, 2.53 Front 
St., Weymouth; Weymouth High 
School; Zoology; Honor Council, 3; 
Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Women's Glee Club, 
2, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Outing 
Club, 3; Zoology Club, 2, 3; Women's 
Athletic Association, 2, 3 (Archery 
Captain); Phi Zeta. 



Marguerite Doris Berthiaumc, 2/4 

North Pleasant St., Amherst; Spring- 
field Classical High School; Languages 
and Literature; Women's Glee Club, 1, 
2, 3; Bay State Revue, 1, 2, 3; Newman 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Languages and Literature 
Club, 3; Women's Trio, 1, 2, 3; Lambda 
Delta Mu, 



Frederick Albert Binder, 17 Wate 
St., Shelburne Falls; Arms Academy 
Bates College; Chemistry; Band, 3. 



Charles Frederick Bishop, 172 Pleas- 
ant St., East Walpole; Walpole High 
School; Chemistry; Class Nominating, 
1, 2; Collegian. 1, 2, 3; Advanced Mil- 
itary, 3; Phi Sigma Kappa. 



Lester John Bishop, 1 Margaret 
Lane, Huntington, N. Y.; Huntington 
High School; Economics; Football, 1, 2; 
Basketball, I; Baseball, 1; Campus 
Varieties, 2; Burnham Declamation, 2; 
Interfraternity Declamation, 2; Kappa 
Sigma. 



Justine Bette Blackburn, Meadow 
St., Lanesboro; Pittsfield High School; 
Home Economics; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Women's Athletic Association, 2; 
Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3. 



Harold Jakob Bloom, 111 Ma.xwell 
St., Dorchester; Dorchester High 
School; Historical Geology; Geology 
Club, 3; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Football, 
1. 



Richard Alfred Booth, 50 Raymond 
Ave., Holyoke; Georgia Institute of 
Technology; Mathematics; Mathemat- 
ics Club, 1, 2, 3; Phi Sigma Kappa. 



John Edward Brady, 237 Federal St., 
Greenfield; Deerfield Academy; Geol- 
ogy; Maroon Key, 2; Football, 1, 2(M). 
3(M); "M" Club, 2, 3; Theta Cbi. 



John Harper Brotz, 12 First St., 
Chelmsford; Chelmsford High School; 
Animal Husbandry; Outing Club, I, 2, 
3; Dairy Club, 1, 2, 3; Current Affairs 
Club, 1; Alpha Gamma Rho. 



Esther M. Brown, 5 North Westfield 
St., Feeding Hills; Agawam High 
School; Bridgewater Teachers' College; 
Psychology; Bay State Revue, 2; 
Psychology Club, 3; Sigma Beta Chi. 



Harvey J. Brunell, 7 Jones St., 
Worcester; Worcester Classical High 
School; Horticultural Manufactures; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Horitcultural 
Manufactures Club. 3; Alpha Epsilon 
Pi. 



James Gerard Bullock, 43 Everett 
St., Arlington; Arlington High School; 
Chemistry; Senate, 3; Maroon Key, 
2 (President); Newman Club, 1. 2, 3; 
Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3; Football, 1, 
2(M), 3(M); Baseball, 1, 2(M), 3(M); 
"M" Club, 2, 3; Lambda Chi Alpha. 



JUNIORS 



David Farwell Burbank, 119 Webster 
St., Worcester; Worcester South High 
School; English; Men's Glee Club, 1; 
Theta Chi. 

Preston ..lames Burnham, 10 Jack- 
son St., Lynn; Lynn Classical High 
School; Pre- Med.; Collegian, 2; Band, 1, 
2, 3; Dads' Day Committee, 2; Zoology 
Club, 1, 2, 3 (Secretar,y, Treasurer, 2); 
Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2, 3; Psychology 
Club, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 1, 2. 3; 
Theta Chi. 



Barbara Myrle Butement, 39 Mad- 
ison Circle, Greenfield; Greenfield High 
School; Recreational Planning; Wom- 
en's Glee Club, 1, 3; Wesley Founda- 
tion, 1, 2, 3; Outing Club, 1, 3; Mathe- 
matics Club, 1, 2, 3; Sorority Vice- 
President, 3; Alpha Lambda Mu. 

Alan Buxbaum, 170-40 Highland 
Ave., Jamaica; Woodmere Academy; 
Zoology; Men's Glee Club, 3; Men- 
orah Club, 3; Tau Epsilon Phi. 

Jean Burleigh Carlisle, 104 Essex 
St., Saugus: Saugus High School; 
Chemistry; Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Mathematics Club, 2, 3; Women's 
-A-thletic Association, 2, 3; Phillips 
Brooks Club, 3; Drum Majorette, 3; 
Sigma Beta Chi. 

Daniel Robert Carter. Jr., 244 Glen 
Rd., Wilmington; Wilmington High 
School; Economics; Advanced Mil- 
itary, 3; Football, 2, 3(M); Kappa 
Sigma. 



■William -Waldo Case, 26 Manitoba 
St., Springfield; Springfield Technical 
High School; University of Maine; 
Geology; Theta Chi. 

Marie Louise Chapman, 28 Western 
Ave., 'VVestfield; Westfield State Teach- 
ers' College; Home Economics; Newman 
Club, 2, 3; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion, 2, 3; Lambda Delta Mu. 



Frances Emma Clark, 23.5 Ashley 
St., West Springfield; West Springfield 
High School; Home Economics; Outing 
Club. 3; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 
3; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3. 



Elizabeth Boyd Cobb, 332 Grove St., 
Chicopee Falls; Chicopee High School; 
Springfield Junior College; English; 
CoUcfiim. 3; Women's Glee Club, 3; 
Phi Zeta. 



223' 



JUNIORS 

Mary Louise Cobb. 332 Grove St., 
Chicopee P'ails; Springfield Junior Col- 
lege; Home Economics; Home Econ- 
omics Club, 3; Phi Zeta. 



Philip Arthur Cochran. 209 Sum- 
mer St.. Somerville; Mount Hermon; 
Dairy Industry; Band, 3; Sigma Phi 
Epsilon. 

Elizabeth Marie Coffin, 4 Jefferson 
St., Newbnryport; Newburyport High 
School; Physics; Collegian, 1; Chemistry 
Club. 1. 



Jason Sumner Cohen, 59 Auburn 
St., Brookline; Boston Latin School; 
History; llenorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Current 
.\Hairs Club, 3; .\lpha Epsilon Pi. 



Alan Collier. 6 Glenville Ave., All- 
j;ton; Lincoln Preparatory School; 
Horticultural iS'Ianufactures; Menorah 
Club, 1. 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 1, 2; 
Horticultural Manufactures Club, 2. 



John Francis Conley. Jr., 12 



ont St., 



ckton; Brockton. Hi( 



School; Economics; Bay State Revue. 
2: Student Religious Council. 3; New- 
man Club, 3 (President); Fraternity 
Steward, 3; Advanced Military, 3; 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



Marion Helen Cook, 1 Underwood 
St., \Yorcester; Worcester Classical 
High School; Bacteriology; Wesley 
Foundation, 1, 2, 3; Outing Club, 1, 3; 
Pre-Med. Club, 3; Mathematics Club, 
1; .Alpha Lambda Mu. 

Francis Timothy Coughlin, 20 

Adams St., Taunton; Coyle High 
School; Chemistry; Newman Club, 1, 
2, 3; Chemistry Club. 1, 2, 3 (Treasurer, 
3); Mathematics Club, 2, 3; Lambda 
Chi Alpha. 

Virginia Agnes Couture, Beckett; 
Pittsfield High School; Zoology; Fresh- 
man Handbook Board. 1; Newman 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Zoology Club, 2, 3; Prc- 
Med. Club, 2, 3. 

W. Allen Cowan. 2« McKinley Ter.. 
Pittsfield; Pittsfield High School; 
Animal Husbandry; Outing Club, 1, 2, 
3; Animal Husbandry Club, 2, 3; 1,-H 
Club, 1, 2; Dairy Cattle Judging Team, 
2; Spring Track, 1, 2(M); Alpha Gam- 
ma Rho. 



Richard Philip Cox, 192 Summer St., 
Bridgewater; Bridgewater High School; 
History; Collegian. 1, 2, 3; Theta Chi. 

Barbara Ann Cramer, 1.5.5 Northamp- 
ton Rd., Amherst: Mount Holyoke 
College; Psychology; Newman Club, 
1, 2, 3; Psychology Club, 3; Current 
Affairs Club, 2; Women's Athletic 
Association, 2, 3. 



Benny Freitas, 1942 gridiron star, engaged in campus social whirl 




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Ralph Kenyon Dakin, 109 Park Ave., 
Dalton; Dalton High School; Ph.vsics; 
Wesley Foundation, 1, 2, 3 (Secretary, 
Treasurer, 3); Mathematics Club, 1, 2 
3; Sigma .41pha Epsilon. 



William Hinds Darrow, Jr., Putney, 
Vt.; Putney High School; Pomology; 
Carnival Committee, 2; Outing Club, 
1, 2, 3; Kappa Sigma. 

Jean Anwyl Davis, 53 Nathan Rd., 
Waltham; Waltham High School; Lib- 
eral Arts; Academic Activities Board, 
3; Class Nominating Committee, 1; 
Women's Glee Club, 1, 2, 3 (Manager); 
Dads' Day Committee, 2, 3 (Chair- 
man); Sophomore-Senior Hop Com- 
mittee, 2; Intersorority Council, 3; 
Phi Zeta. 

Mary Joan Donahue, 7 Coffin's 
Court, Newburyport; Newburyport 
High School; English; Index, 2, 3; 
Collegian, 1; Collegian QuaHerly, 2, 
3 (Junior Editor); Freshman Hand- 
book Board, 1, 2 (Co-Editor); Outing 
Club, 1; Languages and Literature 
Club, 3. 

Elwyn John Doubleday, West Pel- 
ham; Belchertown High School; Chem- 
istry; .Advanced Military. 3; Soccer, 1. 

Lois E. Doubleday. Route 2, West 
Pelham; Amherst High School; English; 
Index, 2, 3 (Co-Statistics Editor, 3); 
Languages and Literature Club, 3. 



Phyllis Louise Drinkwater. 443 West 
Britannia St., Taunton; Taunton High 
School; Bacteriology; Outing Club, 
3; Pre-Med, Club, 3; Lambda Delta 
Mu. 

Ernest Albert Dunbar. Jr.. Barre; 
Sanborn Seminary; Zoology; Collegian, 
2, 3; Phi Sigma Kappa. 



Durland. IS 
Thomas Rd., Swampscotl; Swampscott 
High School; Home Economics; Home 
Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; Christian 
Federation Cabinet, 1, 2, 3; Sigma 
Beta Chi. 



224 



Paul Joseph Dw.v<^r, 96 Loring Rd.. 
Winthrop; Winthrop High School; 
Food Technology; Newman Club. 1, 2, 
3; Informal Committee, 3; Ring Com- 
mittee, 2, 3; Sophomore-Senior Hop 
Committee, 2 (Co-ChairmanV. Football, 
1, 2(M), 3; "M" Club, 2, 3; Phi Sigma 
Kappa. 



William John Dwyer, Jr., 60 Nono- 
tuck St., Holyoke; Hol.voke High 
School; Psychology and Phy.siology; 
Honor Council, 2; Class President, 2, 
3; CoUegian, 1, 2, 3 (Managing Editor, 
3, Editor-in-Chief. 3); Newman Club. 
1, 2, 3; Carnival Committee, 2, 3; 
Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2; Psychology Club, 
3; Phi Sigma Kappa. 



Melville Bates Eaton, 144 Winsc 
.\VB.. Watertown; Mount Hermoi 
Economics; Maroon Key, 2; Carniv, 
Ball Committee, 2; Football, 1; Inle 
fraternity Council, 3; Theta Chi. 



Talcott White Edminster, Howland 
Rd., East Freetown; New Bedford 
High School; Agricultural Engineering; 
Band, 1, 2, 3 (Assistant Manager, 3); 
Outing Club, 1, 2. 3 (Treasurer, 3); 
Animal Husbandry Club, 1, 2; Engin- 
eering Club, 2, 3; .\ipha Gamma Rho. 

Albert Coolidge Eldridge, 47 High- 
land St.. Somerville; Somerville High 
School; Political Science; Academic 
.Activities Board, 3; Men's Glee Club, 
1, 2, 3; Band, 1, 2, 3 (Manager. 3); 
Sophomore-Senior Hop Committee, 2 
(Co-Chairman); Spring Track, 1; 
Freshman Frolic Committee, 1; Sopho- 
more Social Committee. 2; Theta Chi. 



Nye Emery. Chestnut St., 
Westboro; Mount Hermon; Agricul- 
tural Economics; Cheer Leader, 1, 2, 3; 
Theta Chi. 



Mildred Mary Eyre. Ill Riverside 
Drive, Northampton; Northampton 
High School; Home Economics; New- 
man Club, 1, 2, 3; Home Economics 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Sigma Beta Chi. 

Frederick Arthur Filios, Bates Rd., 
Westfield; Westfield High School; 
Agronomy; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; 4-H 
Club, 1, 2, 3; C.A.A., 2; Fraternity 
Treasurer, 3; Soccer, 2, 3; Spring Track, 
2; Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

Wilma Fiske, School St., Upton; Up- 
ton High School; Bacteriology; Wesle.v 
Foundation, 1, 2 (Secretar.v, 2); Outing 
Club, 1; Lambda Delta Mu. 

Ida Mary Fitzgerald, Sartelle St., 
Pepperell; Pepperell High School; 
Zoology; Women's Glee Club, 2, 3; 
Zoology Club, 2, 3; 'Women's .\thletic 
Association, 2; Phi Zeta. 

John Edward Fitzgerald, 44 Lexing- 
ton .\ve., Springfield; Bowling Green 
State Universit.v, Ohio; Chemistry. 

Fred Courtney Fosgate, 152 Central 
St., Hudson; Hudson High School; 
Economics; Advanced Military, 3; 
Current Affairs Club, 2, 3; Swimming, 
1, 2: Theta Chi, 



Edith Fox, noii Cottage St.. New Bed- 
ford; New Bedford High School; Bac- 
teriology; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Menorah 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Sigma Iota. 



Dana Christian Frandsen, 179 Lin- 
coln Ave., .\mherst; Williston Acad- 
emy; Economics; Senate, 3; Maroon 
Key, 2; Cl.lss Sergeant-at--Arms, 2; 
Carnival Ball Committee, 2; Dads" Day 
Committee, 3; Interfraternity Council, 
3; Football, 2(M); Spring Track, 2(M); 
Kappa Sigma. 



JUNIORS 



Marion Luella Gallagher, 16.5 Wal- 
nut Ave.. Norwood; Norwood High 
School; Home Economics; Bay State 
Revue, 2; Home Economics Club, 1; 
Alpha Lambda Mu. 



George Albert Garbowit, 39 Prospect 
St.. Pittsfield; Pittsfield High School; 
Agricultural Economics; Tau Epsilon 



John Joseph Gardner, 460 Hollock 
St.. Pittsburgh. Penn.; Newman Club. 
1. 2, 3; Football, 3; Kappa Sigma. 



Ethel Kenfield Gassett. .56 Ellis 
Ave.. Whitman; Whitman High School; 
Home Economics; Class Nominating 
Committee, 1; Ring Committee, 3; 
Outing Club, 1, 3; Home Economics 
Club, 1,2,3; Phi Zeta. 



George Woodrow Gaumond, 70 West 
Boyleston St., Worcester; Worcester 
North High School; Agricultural Econ- 
omics; Orchestra, 2; Advanced Mil- 
itary, 3; Cheer Leader, 2, 3; Hockey, 1. 



Alan Irwin Gewirtz. 16 Cross St., 
Winthrop; DeWitt Clinton; Zoology; 
Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 
3; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3; Zoology Club, 
3; Pre-Med. Club, 3; Psychology Club, 
I, 2. 



Charlotte Gilchrest, Arbor St., 
Lunenburg; Lunenburg High School; 
Home Economics; Women's Glee Club, 
1, 3; Wesley Foundation, 2, 3; Home 
Economics Club, 1, 2, 3. 



Carl Lambert Erickson, 6S Sture St. 
Attleboro; Bristol County Agricultural 
School; Animal Husbandry; Dairy 
Club, 2, 3; Animal Husbandry Club, 
1, 2, 3; 4-H Club, 2, 3; Soccer, I, 2(M), 
3(M); "M" Club, 2, 3: Phi Sigma 
Kappa. 

Axel Vincent Erikson, 94 Massasoit 
St.. Northampton; Williston .\cademy; 
Floriculture; Horticultural Show Com- 
mittee. 3; Advanced Militar.v, 3; 
Theta Chi. 



William Theodore Evans, 24 War- 
riner St., Pittsfield; Pittsfield High 
School; History; Maroon Ke.v, 2; Foot- 
hall, I, 2(M), 3(M); Winter Track, 1. 



Edmund Freeman Freilas, 121 

Laurel St., Fairhaven; Hartford High 
School; Animal Husbandry; Senate, 3; 
Class Sergeant-at-Arms, 2; Newman 
Club, I, 2, 3; Dairy Club, 1, 2; Animal 
Husbandry Club, 1, 2, 3; Football, 1, 
2(M), 3(M); Winter Track, 1, 2(M), 3; 
Spring Track, 1, 2(M), 3; Baseball, 1; 
"M' Club, 1, 2, 3; Phi Sigma Kappa. 

Michael Mitchell Frodyma, SS High 
St., Hol.voke; Hol.voke High School; 
Chemistry; Basketball. 2(M); "M" 
Club, 2. 



Margaret lloberts Gale, 3 Summer 
St., Northboro; Northboro High School; 
Psychology; Bay State Revue, 2; Sigma 
Beta Chi. 



James Wilbur Gilman, Hollis St., 
East Pepperell; Pepperell High School; 
Chemistry; Newman Club, 1; Chemis- 
try Club, 3; 4-H Club, 2, 3; Alpha 
Sigma Phi. 



Theodore Alsdorf Girard, 14 Main 
St., Housatonic; Searles High School; 
Chemistry; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2, 3: Alpha Sigma 
Phi. 



Saul Monroe Glick. 77 Walnut Park. 
Roxbury; Boston Latin School; Dairy 
Industry; Menorah Club. 1, 2, 3; 
Dairy Club, 3; Football, 1, 2, 3; Base- 
ball, 2; Tau Epsilon Phi. 



JUNIORS 



Harold Philip Golan. 45 Templcton 
St., Dorchester; Boston Latin School; 
Zoology; Collegian, 1. 2, 3; Mcnorah 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Zoology Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Chemistry Club, 1; Mathematics Club, 
2; Baseball, 1, 2, 3(M); Joint Com- 
mittee on Inter-Collegiate Athletics, 3; 
Hockey, 1; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 



Gertrude Helen Goldman, ISO 

Franklin Ave., Chelsea; Chelsea High 
School; French; Band, 3; Women's 
Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Menorah Club, I, 2, 
3; Le Circle Frangais, 2, 3 (Secretary, 
3); Languages and Literature Club, 3; 
Sigma Iota. 



Joseph Goldman, 40 Bo.vlston St., 
Maiden; Maiden High School; Bac- 
teriology; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Menorah 
Club, ], 2, 3; Tau Epsilon Phi. 



Fred Morris Gordon. Stony Hill 1 
Wilbraham; American Internatii 
College; Botany. 



Joseph Robert Gordon, Jr., 8 Con- 
gress St., Greenfield; Greenfield High 
School; Bacteriology; Index, 2, 3; 

Collegian, 1, 2, 3; Collegian Quarterly, 3; 
Advanced Military, 3; Phi Sigma Kap- 
pa. 



Thomas Parke Gordon, Jr., 55 New 

South St., Northampton; Wilbraham 
.\cademy; Horticultural Manufactures; 
Horticultural Manufactures Club, 3; 
Football, 1; Basketball, 1, 2; Baseball, 
l;Theta Chi. 



James Clifford Graham. Warehan 
St., Middleboro; Middleboro Memoria 
High School; History; Wesley Founda 
tion, 1, 2, 3; Current Affairs Club, 3 
4-H Club, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 2; Base 
ball, 2; Tennis, 3; Mothers' Day Com 
mittee, 2; Kappa Sigma, 



Dorothy Ann Grayson, 91 Cottage 
St., Amherst; .\mherst High School; 
Ps.ychology; Spanish Club, 3; Psychol- 
ogy Club, 3; Lambda Delta Mu. 



Bradford Ma 



lOS Dart- 



outh St., Springfield; Spri 



eld 



Classical High School; Springfield 
Junior College; Landscape Architecture; 
Index, 2, 3; Landscape Architecture 
Club, 3; Cross Country, 3; Winter 
Track, 2(M), 3; Spring Track, 2, 3; 
"M" Club, 2; Lambda Chi Alpha. 



Eric Leroy Greenfield, 117 Church 
St., Ware; Ware High School; Agri- 
cultural Engineering; Roister Doisters, 
1, 2, 3; Advanced Military, 3; Cross 
Country, 1, 2, 3; Kappa Sigma. 



Dick surprised at Thatcher . . .do crossed fingers mean anything? 



Benjamin Levi Iladley, 62 Ledge- 
lawn Ave., Bar Harbor, Me.; Bar 
Harbor High School; Entomology; 
Class Captain, 1; Outing Club, 3; 
Fernald Entomology Club, 3 (Vice- 
President); Football, 1, 2, 3; Phi Sigma 
Kappa. 



Pauline Jane Hale, South Ashfield; 
Sanderson Academy: Home Economics; 
Outing Club, 1; Home Economics 
Club, 1, 2, 3. 



Martha Baird Hall, 223 June St., 
Worcester; Worcester Classical High 
School; Recreational Planning; W.S. 
G.A., 2; Outing Club, 3; Women's 
Athletic .Association, 1, 2, 3 (Vice- 
President, 2, President, 3); Nature 
Guide Association, 3 (Secretary); 
Phillips Brooks Club, 2, 3; Women's 
Rifle Team, 1; Phi Zeta. 



Norma Louise Handforth. 406 Main 
St., West Medway; Medway High 
School; Home Economics; Class Nom- 
inating Committee, 2; Women's Glee 
Club, 2, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Carnival Committee, 2, 3 (Secretary, 3); 
Home Economics Club, 3; Intersorority 
Council, 3; Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation, 1, 2, 3 (Tennis Manager, 3); 
Sigma Beta Chi. 



Helen Marie Harlcy. Massachusetts 
Ave., Lunenburg; Lunenburg High 
School; Home Economics; Home Econ- 
omics Club, 1, 3; 4-H Club, 1. 




Ralph Augustus Hatch. Jr., 51 

Centre St., Brookline; Gould .A-cademy; 
Zoology; Advanced Militar.v, 3; Phi 
Sigma Kappa. 



Rene Victor Hebert. 57 Franklin St., 
Hol.vokc; Wilbraham Academy; Zoo- 
oiogy; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Pre- Med. 
Club, 1, 3; Swimming, 2; Sigma Phi 
Epsilon. 



Louise Heermance. 241 Lawrence St., 
New Haven, Conn.; New Haven High 
School; Landscape Architecture; Wom- 
en's Glee Club, 2, 3; Outing Club, 1, 2, 
3; Landscape Architecture Club, 2, 3; 
4-H Club. 2, 3. 



Rulh Miller Helyar, 201 Western 
Ave., Brattlcboro, Vt.; Brattleboro 
High School; Recreational Planning; 
Class Nominating Committee, 2; Out- 
ing Club, 3; Inter-Sorority Council, 3; 
Phi Zeta. 



[226] 



Bernard J. Hcrshberg, 101 Elm St., 

Gardner; Gardner High School; Ento- 
mology; Freshman Handbook Board, 2; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Fernald Ento- 
mology Club. 2. 3: Zoology Club, 2, 3; 
Winter Track, 2: Spring Track, 2; Tau 
Ep.silon Phi. 



Russell Elmer Hibbard. North Had- 
ley; Hopkins Academy; Animal Hus- 
bandry; Animal Husbandry Club, 2, 3; 
Soccer, I, 2, 3. 



Robert Noble Hobson. 9 Main St., 
Florence; Northampton High School; 
Engineering; Engineering Club, 1, 2, 3. 



Raymond James Hock, Springfield; 
Ludlow High School; Springfield Col- 
lege; Zoolog.v; Outing Club, 2, 3; 
Fernald Entomology Club, 3; Zoology 
Club, 3; Winter Track, 3; Spring 
Track, 3; Q.T.V. 



Robert Holhrook. 78 Congress St., 
Milford; Kents Hill School; Histor.v; 
Alpha Sigma Phi. 



John Morgan, 2.S Harriet Ave, Bel- 
mont; Belmont High School; Cam- 
bridge School of Liberal Arts; Zoology; 
Bay State Revue, 2; Newman Club, 1, 
2, 3; Zoology Club, 3; Pre-Med. Club, 
3; Interfraternity Council, 3; Soccer, 1; 
Alpha Sigma Phi. 



Gerda Norcll Horst, 97 Meadow St., 
North Amher.st; Fitchburg State Teach- 
ers' College; Home Economics; Home 
Economies Club, 3. 



Howard Hunter, 41 Noblehurst .\ve.. 
Pittsfield; Pittsfield High School; 
Stockbridge School of Agriculture; 
M.ithematics; Class Nominating Com- 
mittee, 1; Index, 2; Christian Federa- 
tion Cabinet, 1, 2; Wesley Foundation, 
2, 3; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3 (Treasurer, 1, 
President, 3); I.O.C.A. (Executive 
Secretary, 3); 4-H Club, 2, 3; Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon. 



James Hurley, 19 Aldrich St., North- 
ampton;. St. Michael's High School; 
Chemistry; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 
2(M); "M" Club, 2, 3; Sigma Phi Ep- 



Melvin Hutner. 230 Chapin Terr., 
Springfield; Springfield Classical High 
School; Pre-Dental; Menorah Club, 
1, 2, 3; Psychology Club, 2; Alpha 
Epsilon Pi. 



Bertram Hyman, 112 Talbot Ave., 
Dorchester; Dorchester High School 
for Boys; English; Collegian, 1, 2, 3 
(Sports Editor, 2, 3, Associate Editor, 
3); Collegian Quarterly, 2, 3; Freshman 
Handbook Board, 2; Fernald Entomol- 
ogy Club, 2; Zoology Club, 1, 2; Psy- 
chology Club, 2, 3; Languages and Lit- 
erature Club, 3; Football Program Ed- 
itor, 3; Cross Country, 2; Basketball, 2; 
Winter Track, 2; Tennis, 2, 3; "M" 
Club, 2 (Founder). 



Joseph Jodka, 104 Park St., Lawrence; 
St. Mary's Preparatory School; En- 
tomology; Newman Club, 3; Fernald 
Entomology Club, 3 (Business Manager, 
3); Swimming, 2(M), 3(M); "M" Club, 
2,3. 

Eleanor Johnson. Hockanum Rd., 
South Hadley; Hopkins Academy; 
Home Econ 



JUNIORS 



William Joyce, 291 Locust St., Flor- 
ence; Northampton High School; 
Geology; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; C.A.A., 
3; Winter Track, 1, 2, 3; Spring Track, 
1, 2, 3; Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



Mary Judge, 47 Paine St., Worcester; 
Worcester North High School; Psychol- 
ogy; Women's Glee Club, 3; Bay State 
Revue, 2, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Dads' Day Committee, 2, 3; Women's 
.\thletic .\ssociation, 2, 3; Sigma Beta 
Chi. 



Abraham Kagan, 133 Grove St. 
Chelsea; Chelsea High School; Zoology 
Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Outing Club, 1 
Pre-Med. Club, 1; Chemistry Club, 1 
Tau Epsilon Phi. 



m Kagan. 91 Fuller St., Brook- 
Boston Public L,atin School; 



Marie Kellehcr, Sandwich; Henry 
T. Wing High School; Chemistr.y; 
Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Women's Glee Club, 
1, 2, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Outing 
Club, 3; Mathematics Club, 3; Women's 
Rifle Team, 1; Flute Ensemble, 2; Phi 
Zeta. 



Andrew Kennedy, 30 St. Jerome Ave., 
Hol.yoke; Hol,yoke High School; En- 
gineering; Advanced Military, 3; Foot- 
ball, 1, 2, 3; Swimming, 1 ; Q.T.V. 



Gould Kelchcn, .labist St.. Belcher 
town; Belchcrtown High School; Econ 
omics; Index, 2, 3; Current Affair; 
Club, 2, 3. 



George Kimball. 99 East Pleasant 
St., Amherst; Wakefield High School; 
Political Science; Advanced Military, 
3; Interfraternity Council, 3; Football, 
1, 2, 3(M); Spring Track, 1; Baseball, 
2; "M" Club, 3; Lambda Chi Alpha. 



William Kimball, 99 East Pleasant 
St., Amherst; Wakefield High School; 
Forestry; Interfraternity Council, 3; 
.\dvanced Militarj', 3; Interfraternity 
Ball Committee, 3; Cross Countr.v, 1, 
2(M), 3(M); Winter Track, 1, 2(M), 
3(M); Spring Track, 1, 2(M), 3; "M" 
Club, 2, 3; Phi Sigma Kappa. 

Elenor King. 19 Great Rd., Maynard; 
Maynard High School; Home Econ- 
omics; Orchestra, 2, 3; Home Econom- 
ics Club, 1, 2, 3; Phillips Brooks Club, 
2, 3; Sigma Beta Chi. 

Howard Kirshen. 49 Almont St., 
JNIattapan; Dorchester High School; 
Chemistry; Debating, 1; Wesley Foun- 
dation, 1, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 2; 
Winter Track, 2; Tennis, 2; Alpha Ep- 



Mary Kozak. 1 Oakdale PI., East- 
hampton; Easthampton High School; 
Home Economics; Women's Glee Club, 
3; Home Economics Club, 3; Alpha 
Lambda Mu. 



Marrigan Samuel Krasnecki, Adams 
St., North Chelmsford; Chelmsford 
High School; English; Newman Club, 
1, 2, 3; Languages and Literature Club, 
3; Football, 1, 2. 3; Phi Sigma Kappa. 

Eva Mae Krasnoselsky. Ashfield; 
Sanderson Academy; English; Outing 
Club, 1; Spanish Club, 3. 

Howard Raymond Lacey, .S3 Milk 
St., Fitchburg; Fitchburg High School; 
Gettysburg College; Chemistry; Lamb- 
da Chi Alpha. 



Vincent Arthur Lafleur, 26 Williams 
St., Marlboro; Marlboro High School; 
Forest Entomology; Class Nominating 
Committee, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Advanced Military, 3; Fernald. En- 
tomology Club, 3; Hockey, 1; Q.T.V. 



John Paul Laliberte, 27 Lexington 
Ave., Holyoke; Williston Academy; 
Chemistry; .\dvanccd Militar.v, 3; 
Chemistry Club, 2; Mathematics Club, 
3; Soccer, 1; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 



22 



JUNIORS 



George Paul Langlon. 77 Highland 
Ave., Arlington; Arlington High School; 
English; Roister Doisters, 3; Advanced 
Military, 3; Languages and Literature 
Club, 3; Fraternity President, 3; Soc- 
cer, 1; Lambda Chi Alpha. 



n, 137 Geneva 
. Burke High 



Frances Helen Lappe 

Ave., Dorchester; J. H 
School; Bacteriology; Index, 2, 3; 
Bay State Revue, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 
2, 3; Intersorority Council, 3; Women's 
Athletic Association, 2, 3; Sigma Iota. 



Stephen Bartlett Leavitt, 770 Kemp- 
ton St., New Bedford; Neo- Bedford 
High School; Chemistry. 



right Leiand. 12 Fiske 
St., Natick; Natick High School; En- 
tomology; Advanced Military, 3; Fern- 
aid Entomology Club, 3; Spring Track, 
1,2; Phi Sigma Kappa. 



William Henry Lennon, 197 Middle- 
sex Ave., Medford; Medford High 
School; Forestry. 



Waldo Chandler Lincoln. 121 Church 
St., Ware; Wilbraham .Vademy; Flori- 
culture; Horticultural Show Commit- 
tee. 3. 



Sylvan Morton Lind, 21 East Twenty- 
first St., Brookl.vn, N. Y.; James 
Madison High School; Chemistry; 
Menorah Club, 1. 2, 3; Pre- Med. Club, 
1, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3; Tau 
Epsilon Phi. 



Joyce Hamilton Lindsey, 11-1 Church 
St., Ware; Ware High School; Home 
Economics; Home Economics Club, 1, 



George William Litchfield, Whately 
Glen, Whately; Wa.vland High School; 
English; Index, 2, 3; Collegian, 1, 2, 3; 
Band, 1, 2, 3; Debating, 3; Outing 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Cross Country, 1, 2, 3; 
Sigmii Alpha Epsilon. 



Agnes Elizabeth Lockhart, 151 

Montague City Rd.. Greenfield; Green- 
field High School; Newman Club, 1, 2, 
3; Home Economics Club. 1, 2; Lan- 
guages and Literature Club, 3. 



Lewis Rice Long, 26 Beechmont St., 
Worcester; Worcester Academy; Zool- 
ogy; Zoology Club, 3; Current Affairs 
Club, 3 (Vice-President); Winter Track, 
1, 2; Cheer Leader, 1, 2, 3; Theta Chi. 



Henry Joseph Loll. 374 Hyde Park 
Ave.. Boston; Jamaica Plain High 
School; Botany. 



French Club portrays restaurant scene in fiay Paree — Garcon! 




John Paul Lucey, 19 Underbill PL, 
Pittsfield; Pittsfield High School; 
Zoology; Zoology Club, 3; Pre-Med. 
Club, 3; Alpha Sigma Phi. 



Charles Donald MacCormack, Gor- 

ham Rd., West Medford; Medford 
High School; Bacteriology; Men's Glee 
Club, 3; Soccer, 1, 2; Kappa Sigma. 



Sandy IVfacDougall. 27 


m'A Rivei 


■side 


Blvd., 


Wes 


tford; 


Mo 


unt Hern 


oon; 


Psycho 


logy; 


Adva. 


iced 


Military, 


3; 


Phi Sig 


maKi 


ippa. 
MacN. 


■ill. 


US South 




Miriar 


n E. 


St.. 


Plainvi 


lie; 


Plainvi 


lie 


High School; 


Home 


Econ 


omics; 


Hoi 


ne Econo 


mics 


Club, 1 


, 2, 3, 










Willia, 


m Eli 


Iward 


Mahan, Elm 


Ct.. 


Stockb 


ridge; 


Lenox 


High School; 


Ec- 


onomic 


s; Cla 


ss Nominati 


ng Committee, 


1, 2, 3; 


Newi 


man CI 


ub, 1 


, 2, 3; Fer 


nald 


Entomology 


Club, 


2; 


Lambda 


Chi 


Alpha. 













Margery Constance Mann. 19 Ab- 
bott St., Pittsfield; Framingham State 
Teachers' College; Outing Club, 3; 
Home Economics Club, 2, 3; Cheer 
Leader, 2, 3; Phi Zeta. 



John Peabody Marsh, 1.5;") Center 
St., Danvers; Phillips Academy; His- 
tor.v; Class Nominating Committee, 1 
(Chairman); Fraternity Secretary, 3; 
Soccer, 1; Phi Sigma Kappa. 



Margaret Wheeler Marsh, North 
Hatfield; Do.vlestown High School, 
Penn.; Poultry; Index, 2, 3; Poultry 
Club, 2, 3. 



Lillian Gertrude Martin, 100 Lake- 
wood St., Worcester; Worcester South 
High School; Home Economics; New- 
man Club, 1, 2, 3; Home Economics 
Club, 1,2, 3; Sigma Beta Chi. 



chard Randall Mason. 29 Lowell 
, Maiden; Maiden High School; 
lernistry; Soccer, 1; Kappa Sigma. 



Robert Clinton MoCulcheon, 9 Park 
Ave., South Deerfield; Deerfield Acad- 
emy; Honor Council, 1, 2, 3; Class 
Nominating Committee, 2; ColU'ginn, 
1. 2, 3; Ring Committee, 2, 3 (Chair- 
man, 3); Theta Chi. 



228 



Phyllis Anna Mclnerny, 103 Lake- 
wood St., Worcester; Worcester South 
High School; Recreational Planning; 
W. S. G. A., 1, 2, 3 (Vice-President, 3); 
Class Secretary, 2; Class Nominating 
Committee, 1; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Outing Club, 3; Home Economics 
Club, 1, 2 (Treasurer, 2); Recreational 
Planning Club, 3; Sorority Vice-Presi- 
dent, 3; Lambda Delta Mu. 

William Francis Mcintosh, 19 Sum- 
mer St., North Amherst; Dean Acad- 
emy; Landscape Architecture; New- 
man Club, 3; Landscape Architecture 
Club, 3. 

George Edward McLaughlin. 1 1 
Nutting Ave., Amherst; Amherst High 
School; Wild Life Management; C. A. 
.\., 3; Swimming, 1; Kappa Sigma. 



Harold Hubert McLean. 155 Cowper 
St., East Boston; E.ast Boston High 
School; Entomology; Newman Club, 

1, 2, 3; Outing Club, 1; Fernald En- 
tomolog.v Club, 3 (Secretary); Soccer, 

2, 3; Winter Track, 1; Spring Track, 1; 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 



Mary Jean McNamara. 10 Central 
St.. Brookfield; Brookfield High School 
English; Freshman Handbook Board, 1 
Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Outing Club, 1 
Languages and Literature Club, 3 
Lambda Delta Mu. 



Waller Meluiek. Pine Nook, South 
Deerfield; Deerfield Academy; Agricul- 
tural Economics; Advanced Military, 3. 



Marjorie Edna Merrill, 114 President 
St., Lynn; Lynn English High School; 
Home Economics; Home Economics 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Danforth Fellowship, 
193!); Sigma Beta Chi. 



Albert Richard Mezoff. l(i7B North 
Common St., Lynn; Lynn English High 
School; Bacteriology; Menorah Club, 

1, 2, 3: Pre-Med. Club, 1. 2, 3; Psy- 
chology Club, 1, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 

2, 3. 

Susan lyiicka. Park Hill Rd., East- 
hampton; Easthampton High School; 
,\merican International College; Home 
Economics; Home Economics Club. 2, 
3; 4-H Club, 2,3. 



Donald William Moffitt. 1 Franklin 
Court, Northampton; Northampton 
High School; Engineering; Advanced 
Military, 3; Mathematics Club, 2; 
Engineering Club, 1, 2, 3; Alpha Gam- 
ma Rho. 



.\rthur Joseph Monli. 11 Rhinecliff 
St., Arlington; Arlington High School; 
Northeastern University; English; Men- 
orah Club, 3. 



David Rupert Morrill, 2 Prospect St.. 
Rowle.v; Newburyport High School; 
Economics; Cross Country, 1, 2(M); 
Winter Track, 1; Spring Track, 1; 
" M " Club, 2; Alpha Sigma Phi. 



Freeman Edward Morse, 9 Rhodes 
Ave., Lynn; Lynn Classical High 
School; Entomology; Outing Club, 1; 
Fernald Entomology Club, 3; Phi Sig- 
ma Kappa. 



Rita Mae Moseley, Main St., Aga- 
wam; Springfield Junior College; Psy- 
chology; Women's Glee Club, 2, 3; Psy- 
chology Club, 3; Lambda Delta Mu. 



Harold Elwood Mosher, Worcester 
St., Sterling; Leominster High School; 
Landscape Architectuie; Wesley Foun- 
dation, 1, 2, 3; Outing Club, 2,3; Land- 
scape Architecture Club, 2, 3; Cross 
Country, 2, 3; Winter Track, 1, 2, 3; 
.Spring Track, 1, 2; Sigma Alpha Ep- 



William John Mosher, Pleasant 
Ridge Rd., Harrison, N. Y.; Political 
Science; Class Nominating Committee, 
1; Current Affairs Club, 3. 



Arlene Marie Mothes, 65 Cottage St., 
Hudson; Hudson High School; Zool- 
ogy; Women's Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Zoology Club, 3; Mathematics Club, 
1,2, 3; 4-H Club, 1,2. 



John Robert Molt, 15 Oak St., North 
Attleboro; North Attleboro High 
School; Worcester Polytechnical Insti- 
tute; Agronomy; Band, 1, 2, 3; Sigma 
Phi Epsilon. 



Belly Jane Moullon, 63 Highland 
St., Worcester; Worcester North High 
School; Languages; Women's Glee 
Club, 1, 2. 3; Bay State Revue, 1, 2, 3; 
Home Economics Club, 1; Languages 
and Literature Club, 3; Women's 
.\thletic Association, 2; Statettes, 1, 2, 
3; Sigma Beta Chi. 



Robert Mullany. 24 Elm St., Hat- 
field; Cashing .\cademy; Agronomy; 
Newman Club, 1. 2; Fraternity Treas- 
urer, 3; Soccer, 1, 2(M), 3(M); Basket- 
ball, 1; Basebiill, 2(M); Alpha Sigma 
Phi. 



JUNIORS 



Elsie Rose Mushovie. 356 Deerfield 
St., Greenfield; Greenfield High 
School; Bacteriology. 



M 



Lou 



Nagelschmidt, 54 

Garden St., Pittsfield; Pittsfield High 
■School; Bacteriology; Roister Doisters. 
2, 3; Home Economics Club, 1; Sigma 
Beta Chi. 

Kenneth Malcolm Nagler, 577 Long 
meadow St., Longmeadow; Springfield 
Junior College; Mathematics; Outing 
Club, 2. 3; Mathematics Club, 2, 3. 



Otto S. Nan. Jr., Country Club Rd., 
Greenfield; Greenfield High School; 
Zoology; Band, 1, 2, 3; Bay State 
Revue, 2; .\dvanced Military, 3; Pre- 
Med. Club, 1; Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



Patricia Ann Newell, 101 Maple St., 
West Roxbury; Girls' Latin School; 
Home Economics; Roister Doisters, 1, 
2; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; Sig- 
ma Beta Chi. 

Sarah Nielsen, 60 Oak Crest Rd., 
Needham; Needham High School; 
Floriculture; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3. 



Richard E. Noon, 40 High St., Hud- 
son; Hudson High School; Chemistr.v; 
Chemistry Club, 1. 2, 3; Mathematics 
Club, 1, 2; Swimming, 2. 



Howard L. Norwood, 14S Pearl St., 
Hol.voke; Holyoke High School; En- 
gineering; Engineering Club, 1. 2. 3; 
Mathematics Club, 1; Alpha Sigma Phi. 



Robert Arthur Notlenburg. 132 

Summer St., Waltham; Waltham High 
School; Mathematics; Academics Activ- 
ities Board, 3; Collegian, 1, 2, 3 (Bus- 
iness Manager, 3); Collegian Quarterly^ 
3 (Business Manager); Freshman Hand- 
book Board, 1, 2 (Business Manager, 2); 
Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Mathematics 
Club, 3; Fraternity Treasurer, 3; Tau 
Epsilon Phi. 

Norman Ogan. 461 Appleton St., 
Holyoke; Holyoke High School; Horti- 
cultural Manufactures; Menorah Club, 
3; Horticultural Manufactures Club. 3; 
Tau Epsilon Phi. 



Peter Pacocha. 36 Glendale St., East- 
hampton; Easthampton High School; 
Economics. 



229 



JUNIORS 



Stephen Papp, Box 21, North Fal- 
mouth; Falmouth High School; Math- 
ematics; Mathematics Club, 1, 2, 3; 
French Club, 1, 2; Soccer, 2, 3(M); 
Hockey, 1;"M" Club, 3. 



Stanley Pearlman, 6 Ruthven St., 
Roxbury; Roxbury Memorial High 
School; Dairy Industry; Menorah 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Dairy Club, 2, 3; Alpha 
Epsilon Pi, 



Alice Pederzani, 3 Piiicy PI., Sprir 
field; Wareham High School; Englis 
Women's Glee Club, 1; Cheer Leader, 
3; Phi Zeta. 



Richard Hurst Pierce. 37 Birchwood 
Ave., Longmeadow; Williston Acad- 
emy; Chemistry; Men's Glee Club, ), 
2; Advanced Military, 3; Chemistry 
Club, 3; Mathematics Club, 3; Soccer, 
1; Kappa Sigma. 



Dorothy Florence Plumb, Box IGA, 
Springfield, Vt.; Springfield High 
School; Home Economics; Women's 
Glee Club, I; Home Economics Club, I, 
2, 3; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3; Burnham Decla- 



V. Lillian Politella, 400 Hampshire 
St., Lawrence; Lawrence High School; 
Modern Languages; Student Religious 
Council, 2, 3; Christian Federation 
Cabinet, 2, 3 (Vice-President, 2, Presi- 
dent, 3); Cercle Frangais, 2, 3; Languages 
and Literature Club, 3. 



Louise Frances Potter. 4 Mechanic 
St., "Ware; Ware High School; Chem- 
istry; Collegian, 1, 2; Pre-Mcd. Club, 
2, 3; Psychology Club, 3. 



Spencer Romcyn Potler, Norfolk. 
Conn.; Gilbert High School; Floricul- 
ture; Maroon Key, 2; Band, 1, 2; 
Christian Federation Cabinet, 3; Hor- 
ticultural Show Committee, 3; Carnival 
Committee, 3; Carnival Ball Commit- 
tee, 2; Sophomore-Senior Hop Com- 
mittee, 2; Horticulture Club, 3; Soccer, 
2, 3(M); Winter Track, 1; Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. 



Dorothy Boyd Prcst. 19 Brook St., 
Manchester; Story High School; Bac- 
teriology; Orchestra, 1; Outing Club, 3; 
Women's Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3 
(Secretary, 3); Phi Zeta. 



St., Ly 



Harris Pruss, 36 Sagai 
Lynn English High School; Sociolog.y; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Fraternity 
Secretary, 3; Tau Epsilon Phi. 



Warren Merrill Pushee, Prospect St., 
Housatonic; Searles High School; Bac- 
teriology; Band, 1, 2, 3; Bay State 
Revue, 2; Fraternity Secretary, 2; 
Soccer, 1; .\lpha Sigma Phi. 



James Nathaniel Putnam, 4 Larch- 
mont St., Danvers; Danvers High 
School; Poultry Husbandry; Roister 
Doisters, 2; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Poultry Science Club, 1, 2, 3; Alpha 
Gamma Rho. 



Irving Rabinovitz, Babson St., Mat- 
tapan; Roxbury Memorial High 
School; History; Collegian, 1, 2, 3; 
Collegian Quarterhj, 1; Menorah Club, 1. 



William Rabinovitz, 116 Brunswick 
St., Roxbury; Boston Public Latin 
School; Dairy; Men's Glee Club, 1. 



Morton Bernard Rabinow, 31 Hazle- 
ton St., Mattapan; Dorchester High 
School; English; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Languages and Literature Club, 3; 
Tennis, 2, 3; Hocke.v, 1; .\lpha Epsilon 



Lorimer Pease Rhines, Malone 
Ave., Westfield; Westfield High School; 
Floriculture; Horticultural Show Com- 
mittee, 3; Interfraternit.v Council, 3 
(Secrctar.v); Alpha Gamma Rho. 



State's cheer-leaders added LIFE to athletics all this year 




Stephen Henry Richards, 246 Bronx- 
ville Rd., Bronxvillc. N. Y.; Cornell 
University; Wild Life Management; 
Outing Club, 2, 3. 



Ellen Richardson, Hospital Cottages, 
Winchendon; Templeton High School; 
Home Economics; Women's Glee Club, 
1, 2; Home Economics Club, 1. 



Remigio Santos Roda, 16 Alden St., 
Provincetown; Provincetown High 
School; Boston University; Mathe- 



Mitchell Sidney Rodman, 21 Strat- 
lan St., Dorchester; Boston Public 
Latin School; Bacteriology; Menorah 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Pre-Med. Club, 1; Soccer, 
2. 3; Tau Epsilon Phi. 



Israel .Jay Kogosa, .55 Cherry St., 
Lynn; Lynn English High School; 
Economics; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Chemistry Club, 1; Mathematics Club, 
1; Current Affairs Club, 1, 2, 3. 



230 



Edward Morton Rosemark, 57 Sup- 
ple Rd., Dorchester; Boston Latin 
School; Economics; Freshman Hand' 
book Board, 1; Menorah Club, 1, 2, .3; 
Current Affairs Club, 3; Soccer, 1, 2; 
Basketball, 1; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 



Jack Rubenstein, 104 Ormond St., 
Mattapan; Boston Public Latin School; 
Bacteriology; Bay State Revue, 2; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Interfraternity 
Council, 2, 3; Fraternity Secretary, 
3; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 



Eleanor Mary Russell, 2S0 Main St., 
Easthampton; Winthrop College; Eng- 
lish; Lambda Delta Mu. 



Harriett Newhall Sargent. 121 Hill- 
berg Ave., Brockton; Thayer Academy; 
Home Economics; Bay State Revue, 2, 
3; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Women's .\thletic Association, 1, 2. 



Elliot Vernon Schubert, ISS Pleasant 
Valley St., Methuen; Searles High 
School; Poultry Husbandry; Wesley 
Foundation, 3; Outing Club, 1; Poultry 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 



John Joseph Seery, West Main St., 
Brookfield; Brookfield High School; 
Horticultural Manufactures; Newman 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Advanced Military, 3; 
Horticultural Manufactures Club, 3; 
C.A.A., 3; Football, 1, 2(M), 3(M); 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1; "M" 
Club. 1. 2, 3; Kappa Sigma. 



Frederic Shackley, II. 121 Cottage 
Park Rd., Winthrop; Winthrop High 
School; Horticultural Manufactures; 
Dads' Day Committee, 3; Horticul- 
tural Manufactures Club, 3; Soccer, 1; 
Hockey. 1; Phi Sigma Kappa. 



Howard Wcstcott Shaw. 41 Inde- 
pendence St., Canton; Canton High 
School; Pre-Med.; Freshman Handbook 
Board, 1, 2 (Co-Editor, 2); Orchestra, 
2; Student Leader Day Committee, 1, 2, 
3; Pre-Med. Club, 3; Chemistry Club, 
3; Fraternity Secretary, 3; Winter 
Track, 1, 2. 3(M) (Manager); Spring 
Track, 1, 2, 3(M) (Manager); Joint 
Committee on Inter-Collegiate Athlet- 
ics, 3; Lambda Chi Alpha. 



Alfred Francis Shea. 102 Oak St., 

Florence; Northampton High School; 
Economics; Debating. 2. 3(Man,ager); 



John Shepardson, 7 McGregor .\ve., 
Athol; Athol High School; Chemistry; 
Roister Doisters, 2, 3; Advanced Mil- 
itary, 3; Outing Club, 2, 3; Chemistry 
Club, 2, 3; Interfraternity Council, 3; 
Tennis, 3 (Man.ager); Hockey, 1; Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon. 



Martha Irvine Shirley, 128 Hampden 
St., Indian Orchard; Springfield Classi- 
cal High School; Economics; Women's 
.\thletic Association, 3; Sigma Beta 



JUNIORS 



Chi. 



George Stephen Sinnicks. 24 Ben- 
nett St., Manchester; Story High School; 
Tufts College; Forestry; Outing Club, 
2; Zeta Psi. 



Irving James Slotnick. 269 Ccnte 
St., Indian Orchard; Ohio State Uni 
versity; Chemistry; Sigma .\lpha Mu. 



Eileen Frances Smith, Vineyard 
Haven; Tisbury High School; History; 
Newman Club, I, 2, 3; Current Affairs 
Club, 3. 



Hope G. Smith. IS Rankin St., 
Worcester; Middlebury College; Eng- 
lish. 



Richard R. Smith. Vining Hill Rd., 
Southwick; Westfield High School; 
Chemistry; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3; Chem- 
istry Club, 3; Cross Country, 1, 3; 
Alpha Gamma Rho. 



Myron Solin, 2039 Northampton St.. 
Holyoke; Holyoke High School; Eco- 
nomics; Menorah Club, I, 2. 3; Tennis, 
3(M); Alpha Epsilon Pi. 



Edward Francis Sparks, 20 First St., 
Pittsficld; St. Joseph's High School; 
Economics; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Chemistry Club, 1; Mathematics Club, 
1; Radio Club, 1; Fraternity Vice- 
President, 3; Football, 1; Spring Track. 
3; Baseball, 1, 2(M); "M" Club, 3; 
Lambda Chi Alpha. 



Frances Elizabeth Staples, 3,53 Lin- 
coln St., Stoughton; Stoughton High 
School; Home Economics; Christian 
Federation Cabinet, 1, 2, 3; Home 
Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; Psychology 
Club, 2; Horticultural Manufactures 
Club, 3; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3 (Sccrctar.v, 2). 



Maynard Albert Steinberg, 70 Bou- 
telle St., Fitchburg; Fitchburg High 
School; Horticultural Manufactures; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Carnival Com- 
mittee, 3; Horticultural Manufactures 
Club, 3; Tau Epsilon Phi. 



Abigail Marie Stone, 14 Clark St., 
Holyoke; Holyoke High School; Math- 
ematics; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Mathe- 
matics Club, 3; Horticultural Manu- 
factures Club, 3. 



Chester Gushing Stone, 340 Pak- 

achoag St., .\uburn; .\uburn High 
School; General Engineering; .\d- 
vanced Military, 3; Phi Sigma Kappa. 



Benjamin Stonoga, 15 Hardy Ave., 
Watertown; Watertown High School; 
Horticultural Manufactures; Horticul- 
cultural Show Committee, 2, 3; Horti- 
cultural Manufactures Club, 3; Fra- 
ternity Secretary, 3; Tennis, 2(M), 
3(M); "M" Club, 2, 3; Sigma Phi 
Epsilon. 



John Joseph Sullivan. .58 Belling- 
ham St., Chelsea; Chelsea High School; 
English; Maroon Key, 2; Class Treas- 
urer, 1, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2; Advanced 
Military, 3; Pre-Med. Club, 2; Foot- 
ball, 1, 2; Basketball. 1; Alph.i Sigma 
Phi. 



Howard Henry Sunden, 35 Upsala 
St., Worcester; Worcester South High 
School; Economics; Men's Glee Club, 1; 
Swimming, l;Theta Chi. 



Peter Joseph Swaluk, Pine Nook, 
South Deerfield; Deerfield High 
School; Horticultural Manufactures; 
Horticultural Manufactures Club, 3; 
Soccer, 1(M). 



Lucien Szmyd, 129 W^alnut St., Hol- 
yoke; Hol.voke High School; Horticul- 
tural Manufactures; Horticultural Man- 
ufactures Club, 3; Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



Harriet Elizabeth Tarbcll. Brook- 
field Rd.. Brimfield; Brimfield High 
School; French; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; 
Women's Glee Club, 2, 3; Cercle Fran- 
Cais, 1, 2, 3; Languages and Literature 
Club, 3. 



231 



JUNIORS 



John Joseph Tewhill. llj Center St., 
Northampton; Northampton High 
School; Chemistry; Advanced Military, 
3; Outing Club, 2, 3; Soccer. 2, 3; .\lphu 
Gamma Rho. 



Fran 



Mo 



Thon 

merican International College; 
Poultry Science Club, 2, 3; 
lusbandry Club, 3. 



Phyllis Louise Tower. 239 Centre 
Ave., Abington; Abington High 
School; Animal Husbandry; Outing 
Club, I, 2, 3; Animal Husbandry Club, 
1, 2, 3; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3; Alpha Lambda 
Mu. 



Robert Xavler Triggs. 22 Atwoot 
PI., Springfield; Seton Hall College 
Entomology and Physical Education 
Bay State Revue, I, 2; Newman Club. 
1, 2; Fem.ald Entomology Club, 2 
Ps.vchology Club, 2; Radio Club, 1, 2 
Football, 1, 2(M); Basketball, 2(M) 
Baseball, 2(M); "M" Club, 1, 2; Sigm! 
Phi Epsilon. 



Edward Donald Tripp. 490 Chicopee 
St., Willimansett; Holyoke High School; 
Economics; Advanced Military, 3; 
Football, 1; Swimming, 1. 



Philip Arthur Trufant, 78 Washing- 
ton St., Abington; Abington High 
School; Pomology; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; 
Roister Doisters, 2, 3; .Advanced Mil- 
itary, 3; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3; .Alpha 
Gamma Rho. 



Mericl VanBuren. S3 Whittier Ave., 
Pittsficid; Pittsfield High School; 
Home Economics; Women's Glee Club, 
1, 2, 3; Bay State Revue, 2; Roister 
Doisters, 3; Home Economics Club, 1, 



JoAnn Waite. 9S Newton St., Athol; 
Athol High School; Languages and 
Literature; Women's Glee Club, 2, 3; 
Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Home Econom- 
ics Club, 1; Languages and Literature 
Club, 3. 



Ann Gertrude Waldron, 1.5 Fifth 
Ave., Northampton; St. Michael's 
High School; English; Newman Club, 
1, 2, 3; Languages and Literature Club, 
3; Sigma Beta Chi. 



Robert Norman Walker. 20 Center 
St., Winthrop; Winthrop High School; 
Animal Husbandry; Men's Glee Club, 
3; Outing Club, 1; Animal Husbandry 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Soccer, 1; Theta Chi. 



Coeds of 1943 limber up in Phys . Ed. cotirse at Drill Hall gym 




William James Wall. IS Adare PI., 
Northampton; Northampton High 
School; Entomology; Newman Club, 
1, 2, 3; Fernald Entomology Club, 3; 
Fraternity Vice-President, 3; Football, 
1; Basketball, 1, 2; Winter Track, 1, 2; 
Spring Track, 1, 2(M); "M" Club, 2; 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



Evra Althea Ward, 162 Bodoin St., 
Springfield; Springfield Classical High 
School; Home Economics; Home Econ- 
omics Club, 1, 2, 3; Lambda Delta Mu. 



Franeis Everett Ward, 77 Birch St., 
Worcester: Worcester South High 
School; English; Bay State Revue, 3; 
Roister Doisters, 1, 2, 3; Languages and 
Literature Club, 3; Soccer, 1; Lambda 
Chi .\lpha. 



Helen Agnes Watt, 720 Hampden 
St., Holyoke; Holyoke High School; 
Chemistry; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Chemistry Club, 1, 2; Alpha Lambda 
Mu. 



R. Nancy Webber, 8 Maple St., Bed- 
ford; Le-xington High School; Liberal 
.Arts; W.S.G.A., 3 (Secretary, 3); 
Sophomore-Senior Hop Committee, 2; 
Sorority Treasurer, 3; Lambda Delta 
Mu. 



Herbert Weiner, 09 River St., ilat- 
tapan; Boston Latin School; History; 
Index, 2, 3; Debating, 1, 2, 3 (President, 
3); Student Religious Council, 2, 3; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3 (President, 3); 
Cross Country, 2; Tan Epsilon Phi. 



Carl Pershing Werme, 36 Steele St., 
Worcester; Worcester South High 
School; Dairy Industry; Senate, 3 
(Historian); Maroon Key, 2 (Vice- 
President); Class Captain, 2; Dairy 
Club, 2, 3; Fraternity Vice-President, 
3; Football, 1, 2; "M" Club, 2, 3; 
Alpha Gamma Rho. 



Anne Carolyn White. 279 Lexington 
St., Springfield; Springfield Junior Col- 
lege; Bacteriology; Sigma Beta Chi. 



Paul Arthur White, 23 Pearson Rd., 
Somerville; Somerville High School; 
Forestry; Advanced Military, 3; Theta 



Phoebe Whittemore, Stu 
Dean Academy; Home Ecc 
Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3. 



232 



H. Edwin Williams. Yale Hill, Slo 
bridge; Williams High School; Agn 
omy; Men's Glee Club, 2, 3; AdvaiK 
Military, 3; Alpha Gamma Rho. 



Jeannette Williams, 123 Oklahoma 
St., Springfield; Springfield Technical 
High School; Bacteriology; Outing 
Club, 2, 3. 



Milton Winer, 63 Wildwood St., Bos- 
ton; Boston Latin School; Political 
Science; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Pre- 
Med. Club, 1; Current Affairs Club, 1. 



Kenneth Douglas Witt. 1 Rural St., 
Belchertown; Belchertown High 

School; Political Science; Index, 2, 3 
(Co-Statistics Editor, 3); Wesley Foun- 
dation, 3; Current Affairs Club, 3; 



Henry Robert Wolf, 64 Ormond St., 
Mattapan; Boston Latin School; Psy- 
chology; Men's Glee Club, 3; Menorah 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Zoology Club, I; Psychol- 
ogy Club, 2, 3; .Alpha Epsilon Pi. 



Louis Wolk. 91 Nightingale St., 
Dorchester; Dorchester High School; 
Bacteriolog.v; Menorah Club, 3; Foot- 
ball, 3(M). 



Charles Martin Woodcock, Jr., 

Silver St., South Hadley; South Hadley 
High School; Horticultural Manufac- 
tures; Bay State Revue, 1, 2; Chemistry 
Club, 1; Horticultural Manufactures 
Club, 3; Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



JUNIORS 



Henry Samuel Wyzan, 19 Glines 
Ave., Milford; Milford High School; 
Brigham Young Universit.v; Chemistry; 
Newman Club, 3; Pre-Med. Club, 3; 
Chemistry Club, 3. 



Sydney Zeitler. 29 Magnolia St., 
Maiden; Maiden High School; Psy- 
chology; Senate, 3 (Secretar.v); Maroon 
Key, 2; Class Nominating Committee, 
2, 3; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Interfra- 
ternity Council, 2, 3; Football, 1; Inter- 
Class .\thletic Board, 1, 2. 3; Tau 
Epsilon Phi. 



inthony Zielinski, 473 

;.. Holyoke; Holyoke High 
m.v; Phi Sigma Kappa. 



THE "SHOOTING" of next year's sen- 
iors, the class of '42, will be the most im- 
portant work of the new Index staff. 
Since characteristic informals will be 
taken of every senior, Margaret Marsh 
and her photographers must have the co- 
operation which the class of '41 did not 
give. 

Members of the class of '42 should see 
Miss Marsh before November 1st. Any 
who do not see her this spring or before 
the November deadline " will be 'shot' in 
any position, flattering or otherwi.se." For 
those, censorship will be only by the 
Index Board so that Index photogra- 
phers will be spared the cutting comments 
of uncooperative students. 

"The earlier you look me up the better 
chance you have of getting a good likeness 
yourself — yourself, not Myrna Loy or 
Clark Gable. " — Margaret Marsh 




/I MeMofe ta AIL 19^2 Qnx^ixLudeA.! 



233 



SOPHOMORES 



Frances Josephine Albrecht, 1- 

Pembroke St., Somerville; Somervilh 
High School; Landscape Architecture 
W.S.G.A., 2; Landscape Architect un 
Club, 2: Lambda Delta Mu. 



Marjorie Frances Aldrich, 706 Allen 
St., Springfield; Springfield Classical 
High School; Home Economics; W.S. 
G.A., 1, 2; Women's Glee Club, 2; 
Newman Club, 1, 2; Outing Club. 2; 
Home Economics Club, 1, 2; Mathe- 
matics Club, 1; Phi Zeta. 



Gerald C. Anderson, SS Franklin St., 
Barre, Vt.; Spaulding High School; 
Animal Husbandry; Freshman Hand- 
hook Board, 1, 2; Outing Club, 1, 2; 
Animal Husbandr.v Club, 1; Cross 
Countr.v, 1; Winter Track, 1, 2. 



Joseph Moulton Arnold, 10 Marble 
St., Gloucester; Essex County Agri- 
cultural School; Floriculture; Honor 
Council, 1, 2; Horticultural Show Com- 
mittee, 2; Horticulture Club, 1, 2; Phi 
Sigma Kappa. 



William Edmund Arnold, Main St., 
Lunenburg; Lunenburg High School; 
Horticulture; Horticultural Show Com- 
mittee, 2; Lambda Chi Alpha, 



C. Winthrope Bailey, 2,35 Washing- 
ton St., Maiden; Dartmouth High 
School; Chemistry. 



Ann Virginia Baker, lOSl Hampden 
St.. Holyoke; Holyoke High School; 
Liberal Arts; Women's Glee Club, 2; 
Newman Club, 2; Lambda Delta Mu. 



Mary Ely Baker, Northampton Rd., 
Amherst; Amherst High School; Home 
Economics; Outing Club, 2; Home 
Economics Club, 1, 2; Languages and 
Literature Club, 1, 2; Phillips Brooks 
Club, 1, 2. 



Barton Bruce Allen, Pelham; Phil- 
lips Academy; Animal Husbandry. 



Clinton Wright Allen, 41 Russell St., 
Greenfield; Greenfield High School; 
Chemistry; Mathematics Club, 2; 
Soccer, 1, 2(M); Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



Douglas Ives Allen, 16 Fairfield Ave., 
Holyoke; Deerficld Academy; Mathe- 
matics; Orchestra, 1; Men's Glee Club, 
1; Bay State Revue, 1; Soccer, 1; Kappa 
Sigma. 



Haig Aroian, Charlton St., Oxford; 
Oxford High School; Extension; Zool- 
ogy Club, 1; Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2; 4-H 
Club, 1, 2; Football, 1; Swimming, 1. 



Lewis Roswell Atwood, 10.5 Burn- 
coat St., Worcester; Worcester North 
High School; Languages; Collegian, 1, 
2; French Club. 2. 



Ann Ruth August, 1.36 Crescent St., 
Northampton; Northampton High 
School; English; W.S.G.A., 1, 2; Men 
orah Club, 1,2; Sigma Iota. 



Ruth Kather 



Baker, Spring St., 

Academy; Home 

: Economics Club, 



rfield; 



Dot Dunklee is served by Tim, coffee-disher-outer at Draper 



Howard Tracy Bangs, 

Deerficld Academy; Physical and 
Biological Sciences; Soccer, 1, 2(M); 
Kappa Sigma. 



Mildred Sheridan Barber, U Way- 
erly PI., Brighton; Brighton High 
School; Sociology and Psychology; 
Newman Club, 1, 2; Women's Athletic 
Association, 1, 2. 




Milton Rutherford Barnes, 97 

Spring St., Springfield; Springfield 
College; Forestry. 



Richard Russell Barton, l.")l Dick- 
inson St., Springfield; Springfield .Junior 
College; Chemistry. 



William Augustus Beers, 06 Catu- 
met Rd., Holyoke; Holyoke High 
School; Chemistry; Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



Alan Wallace Bell, 9 Da.vs Lane, Web- 
ster; Newton High School, Elmhurst, 
Long Island, N. Y.; Economics; 
Collegian, 1, 2 (Sports Editor, 2); 
Winter Track, 1; Spring Track, 1; 
Radio, 1; Lambda Chi Alpha. 



"234 



John Edgar Bennett, 4$ Bicknell 
St.. Quincy; Mechanics Arts School; 
Ph.vsical and Biological Sciences; 
Q.T.V. 



George Francis Benoit, 181 Daviston 
St., Springfield; Springfield Technical 
High School; Physical and Biological 
Sciences; Newman Club, 1. 2; Lambda 
Chi .\lpha. 



Warren Julius Bodendorf, Cabot 
Rd.. Westfield; Westfield High School; 
Chemistry; Chemistry Club, 1; 4-H 
Club, 1; Soccer, 1; Spring Track, 1. 



Marion Elvira BodweU, aO Hunting- 
ton Ave., Sharon; Sharon High School; 
Liberal Arts; W.S.G.A., 1, 2; Women's 
Glee Club, 2. 



SOPHOMORES 



Pearl Nash Brown, 22 Lemuel Ave.. 
Chicopee; Northampton School for 
Girls; Home Economics; W.S.G.A., I, 
2; Outing Club, 2; Home Economics 
Club, 1. 2; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion, 1. 



Priscilla Agnes Bentley. Bartlett 
Rd., Manomet; Hyannis State Teachers 
College; Home Economics; W.S.G. A., 
2; Women's Glee Club, 2; 4-H Club, 2. 



Helen Eleanor Berger, !I3 Bradford 
Rd., Watertown; Watertown Higl 
School; Liberal Arts; Christian Feder 
ation Cabinet, 1, 2; Outing Club, 2 
Phi Zeta. 



Richard Higham Best, 01 Locust 
St., New Bedford; Middlesex School; 
Agricultural Economics; Q.T.V. 



__ 1 Vineent Bianco. 46 Quincy 

St., North .\dams; Drury High School; 
illanova College; Pre-Dental; New- 
an Club, 2. 



Beverly Ann Bigwood. ■'i9 Highland 
Ave., Athol; Athol High School; Lan- 
guages and History; French Club, 1, 2; 
Alpha Lambda Mu. 



Arnold Irving Blake. 97 Rockland 
St., Springfield; Springfield Classical 
High School; Physical and Biological 
Sciences; Men's Glee Club, 2; Menorah 
Club, 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 



Charles Edward Blanchard, Granite 
St., North Uxbridge; Uxbridgc High 
School; Animal Husbandry; Class Nom- 
inating Committee, 1; Band, 1; Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon. 



Thaddeus Victor Bokina, 7 Prospect 
St.. Hatfield; Smith Academy; Agri- 
cultural Economics; Maroon Key. 2 
(President); Newman Club, 1, 2; Bas- 
ketball, 1; Alpha Sigma Phi. 



Robert Eugene Bourdeau, 116 Third 
St., Turners Falls; Turners Falls High 
School; Physical and Biological Sci- 
ences; Soccer, 1. 2; Phi Sigma Kappa. 



George Hartt Bower, 11 Wilson Rd., 
Stoneham; Stoneham High School; 
Mathematics; Winter Track, 1; Spring 
Track, 1; Lambda Chi Alpha. 



Mary Louise Bowler. 113 Franklin 
St., Westfield; Westfield High School; 
English; Class Nominating Committee, 
1; Newman Club, 1. 2; Women's Ath- 
letic Association. 2; Lambda Delta Mu. 



Henry Lymon Brallt, Carlisle; Con- 
cord High School; Agricultural Econ- 
omics; Men's Glee Club. 2; 4-H Club, 
2; Football, 1; Alpha Gamma Rho. 



Winthrop Eugene Brielman, 21 

Britton St., Pittsfield; Pittsfield High 
School; Veterinary Medicine; 4-H Club, 
1, 2; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 



Jean Ellen Brown, West St., Feeding 
Hills; Agawam High School; Class 
Nominating Committee, 1; 4-H Club, 
1 (Secretary); Sigma Beta Chi. 



"Wendell E. Brown. 162 West St.. 
Amherst; The Peddle School; Kappa 
Sigma. 



Stanley 'Winiam Bubriski, 19 Grove 
St.. Housatonic: Searles High School; 
Chemistry; Basketball. 1; Alpha Sigma 



Francis Thomas Buckley, 21 Ca 

St.. Springfield; Springfield .Junior 
lege; Chemistry or Wildlife Conse 
tion; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 



Jean Clarke Buddington. 00 Scott 
St., Springfield; Springfield Classical 
High .School; Ph.vsical and Biological 
Sciences; W.S.G.A., I, 2; Women's 
-Athletic -Association, 1. 2. 



Barbara Phyllis Burke, Foresldale; 
Sandwich High School; Floriculture; 
4-H Club, 1, 2. 



Wayne Arthur Burnet, 30 Cheney 
St.. Orange; Orange High School; 
Chemistry; Chemistry Club, 1. 2; 
Cross Country. 1; Sigma -Alpha Epsilon. 



Frederick Huntington Burr, 289 

Main St., Easthampton; Williston 
Academy; Animal Husbandry; Class 
President, 1; Carnival Committee, 2 
(Sophomore Vice-Chairman); Theta 
Chi. 



Hyman Leon Bloom, 81 Kingsdale 
St.. Dorchester; Boston English High 
School; Pre-Med.; Tau Epsilon Phi. 



.John Leland Brown, 50 High St., 
Monson; Monson Academy; Zoology; 
Men's Glee Club, 1, 2; Soccer, 1, 2. 

[235 1 



Stewart William Bush, 43 West 
Glen St., Hol.voke; Holyoke High 
School; Chemistry; Student Religious 
Council. 1, 2; Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2; Phi 
Sigma Kappa. 



SOPHOMORES 



Elizabeth J. Bushnell, 63.5 Sunder- 
land Rd., Worcester; Shrewsbury High 
School; Home Economics; W.S.G.A., 1, 
2; Home Economics Club, 1, 2. 



James William Callahan, R.F.D.. 
Sunderland; Hopkins Academy; Agri- 
cultural Economics; Soccer, 1, 2. 



Mary Frances Callahan, 273 Aquid- 
ncck St., -New Bedford; New Bedford 
High School; Physical and Biological 
Sciences; Newman Club, 1, 2; Mathe- 
matics Club, 1, 2. 



Nicholas Lewis Caraganis. 1 1 1 

Phineas St., Dracut; Dracut High 
School; Animal Husbandry; Outing 
Club. 1, 2; Animal Husbandry Club, 
1, 2; Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



Beatrice Emma Carnall. 1 Irwin 
PI., Northampton; Northampton High 
School: Home Economcis; Newman 
Club, 1, 2; Sigma Beta Chi. 



Mary Jean Carpenter, 127 High St., 
Greenfield; Greenfield High School 
Liberal Arts; Class Vice-President, 1 
Christian Federation Cabinet, 1, 2 
Outing Club, 2; Women's Athletic 
Association. 2; Phi Zeta. 



Catherine Jane Carroll, 3S Haw- 
thorne Ave., Pittsfield; Pittsfield High 
School; Liberal Arts; Newman Club, 1, 



Murray Harold Casper. 1 1 Morse 
St., Dorchester; Dorchester High 
School; Pre-Med.; Band, 1; Menorah 
Club, 1; Soccer, 2; Baseball, 1; Alpha 
Epsilon Pi. 



Clinton Turner Cheever, High St., 
Oakdale; High Edwards High School; 
Chemistry; Alpha Gamma Rho. 



Betty Price Chellman, 104 Florence 
St.. Roslindale; Roslindale High 
School; Home Economics; Outing Club, 
2; Home Economics Club, 2. 



Walter Chroniak. 39 Moynan St., 
New Bedford; New Bedford High 
School; Chemistry; -Mpha Gamma Rho. 



Coeds and Prof. Barrett perch on press box for military review 



WiHiam C. Clark, 500 Kings High- 
way, West Springfield; North Carolina 
State College; Horticulture; Alpha 
Gamma Rho. 



William Eric Clark, 2S Jamaica St., 
Lawrence; Lawrence High School; 
Bacteriology; Class Sergeant-at-Arms, 
1; Christian Federation Cabinet, 1, 2; 
Theta Chi. 



Robert Emmet Cleary, IS6 Pine- 
hurst Rd., Hol,yoke; Williston .Acad- 
emy; Chemistry; Newman Club, 1, 2 
Phi Sigma Kappa. 



Robert Henry Clorite. 133 Elsbrec 
St., Fall River; Durfee High School: 
Vocational Agricultural Education 
Newman Club, 1, 2; Outing Club, 1, 2 
Dairy Club, 2; Current Affairs Club, 1 
Cross Country, 1; Alpha Gamma Rho, 



Richard Freeman Coffin, 11 Regent 
Circle, Brookline; Bridgton Academy, 
Me.; Physical Education; Maroon Key, 
2; Class Sergeant-at-Arms, 1; Christian 
Federation Cabinet, 1; Outing Club, 2; 
Football, 1, 2(M); Basketball, 1; W'in- 
ter Track, 1; Spring Track, 1; Baseball, 
1; --M" Club, 2; Kappa Sigma. 




Anne Eleanor Cohen, 30 Ridgewood 
Ave., Holyoke; Holyoke High School; 
Liberal Arts; W.S.G.A., 1, 2; Menorah 
Club, 1, 2; Sigma Iota. 



James David Coher 

Chelsea; Pennsylvani 
Dairy; Phi Epsilon Pi. 



7 Nicholas St., 
State College; 



Marion Cohen, 49 Fremont Av 
Chelsea; Gushing Academy; Libei 
Arts; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Sigma Iota. 



Cohen, 

e; Somerv 



High School; Psychology; 
Tau Epsilon Phi. 



236 



Kenneth Lounsbury CoUard. Maple 
St.. Belchertown; Willislon Academy; 
Physical and Biological Sciences; Men's 
Glee Club, 1, 2; Bay State Revue, 1; 
Bay Staters, 1; Tbeta Chi. 



Charles Henry Courchene. 50 Dex- 
ter St., Springfield; Springfield Tech- 
nical High School; American Inter- 
national College; Chemistry; Men's 
Glee Club, 1, 2; Statesmen. 2; Bay 
State Revue, 1; Newman Club, 1; 
Kappa Sigma. 



John Harold Grain. Jr.. UiO Union 
St., Leominster; Leominster High 
School; Chemistry; Newman Club, 2; 
Outing Club, 2; Fraternity Treasurer, 
1; Lambda Chi .Alpha. 



Marjorie Cushman, 34 Beacon Ave., 
Holyoke; Holyoke High School; Spring- 
field -Junior College; Sociolog.v. 



Stanley Cykowski, So Maple St., 
E.istbampton; Easthampton High 
School: American International Col- 
lege; Political Science: Collegian. 1, 2; 
Soccer, 1. 



George Peter Uanaczko. 11 North 
Ea.st St., Holyoke; Hol.voke High 
School; Engineering. 



Florence M. Daub. Gardner Rd.. 
Baldwinsville; Templeton High School; 
Liberal Arts; Christian Federation 
Cabinet, 2; Sigma Beta Chi. 



Winifred Elaine Day. Boston- 
Worcester Turnpike, Northboro; 
Northboro High School; Physical and 
Biological Sciences: Women's Glee 
Club, 1, 2; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2; 
Mathematics Club, 2; Lambda Delta 
Mu. 



Mary Kalhryn Daylor. 914 Rock St.. 
Fall River; .Academy of Sacred Heart: 
College of New Rochelle; Chemistry; 
Newman Club, 2. 



Wallace Charles Dec. S West St., 
Hadley; Hopkins .\cademy; Agronomy: 
C.A.A.,1. 



Evelyn Agatha Deering. 14 Water 
St., Shrewsbury: Shrewsbury High 
School; Home Economics: W.S.G.-\., 
1, 2: Home Economics Club, 1, 2; 
Lambda Delta Mu. 



Lorann DeLap. Granite St., Foxboro; 
Foxboro High School; Liberal Arts; 
Lambda Delta Mu. 



James Edward Dellea. R.F.D. .3, 

Great Barrington; Searles High School; 
General Engineering; Newman Club, 
1, 2; Alpha Sigma Phi. 



Marguerite Hartwell DeRautz. 37 

Willow St., Adams: Adams High 
School; Collegian, 1, 2. 



Rosalie Blaise DiChiara, 105 Walnut 
St., Holyoke; Holyoke High School; 
Bacteriology; Pre-Med. Club, 3; Hor- 
ticultural Manufactures Club, 3; Lan- 
guages and Literature Club, 1, 2. 



SOPHOMORES 



John William Divoll. SOO Main St.. 
Worcester; Bellows Falls High School; 
Animal Husbandry; Bay State Revue, 
2; Outing Club, 1, 2; Animal Husbandry 
Club, 2; Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



H. Manuel Dobrusin. 10 Sachem 
Terr., Lynn: Lynn English High 
School; History and Government; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2; Tau Epsilon Phi. 



William Drinkwater, 14 Holland 
Terr., Needham: Norfolk County 
Agricultural School; Horticulture; Hor- 
ticultural Show Committee. 1, 2; 
C..\..\., 2; Soccer, 1; Alpha Gamma 
Rho. 



Celeste Margaret Dubord. 155 Wash- 
ington St., New Bedford; New Bedford 
High School; Horticultural Manufac- 
tures: Newman Club, 1, 2: Lambda 
Delta Mu. 



Kathryn Rita Duffy. (il9 Broadwaj 
St., Chicopee Falls; Cathedral Higl 
School; Home Economics; Women': 
Glee Club, 2; Student Religious Coun 
cil, 2, 3: Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Hom< 
Economics Club, 1, 2, 3. 



Dorothy Grace Dunklee. 3 Chase 
St., Brattleboro, Vt.; Brattleboro High 
School;Home Economics; Collegian, 1, 
2; Christian Federation Cabinet, 1, 2; 
Outing Club, 1, 2; Home Economics 
Club, 1, 2 (Treasurer, 2); 4-H Club, 1, 
2; Women's Athletic A.ssociation, 2; 
Alpha Lambda Mu. 



.John Robinson Davenport, 31 Maple 
St., Shtlbourne Falls; Arms .-Vcademy; 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



Robert Charles Dietel, 48 Bardwell 
St., South Hadley Falls: South Hadley 
High School; Chemistry; Christian 
Federation Cabinet, 1; Pre-Med. Club, 
1. 2: Phi Sigma Kappa. 



Ruth Ellis. Ue Beverly Rd., Brook- 
line; Cambridge Preparatory School 
for Girls: Home Economics; Menorah 
Club, 1, 2; Home Economics, 1, 2; 
Sigma Iota. 



Minnie Arlene Davis. Fairview St., 
Lee: Lee High School; Ph.vsical and 
Biological Sciences; Women's Glee 
Club, 1, 2: Wesley Foundation, 1, 2; 
Pre-Med. Club, 2; Chemistry Club, 2; 
4-H Club. 1. 



Walter Edward Dinn, l.io Hillside 
Ave., Hol.voke; Holyoke High School; 
Engineering; Newman Club, 1, 2; 
Chemistry Club, 1; Mathematics Club, 
1,2. 



Ruth Virginia Ellis, 309 Revere St., 
Winthrop: Winlhrop High School; 
Home Economics: Home Economics, 1, 
2; Phi Zeta. 



237 



SOPHOMORES 



George P. Entwisle, 16 Westla 
Ave., Boston; Brighton High Scho 
Mathematics; Phi Sigma Kappa. 



Rulh Adelaide Esson 

mount St., Dorchester 
High School tor Girls; 
Biological Sciences. 



Chester 
al and 



North 



Robert CarroU Eve 

Pleasant St., Amherst; Amherst High 
School; Roanoke College; Horticulture; 
Band, 1; Outing Club, 1, 2; Kappa 
Sigma. 



Eileen Marie Farrell. H4 Orchard St., 
Adams; Adams High School; English; 
Newman Club, 1; Outing Club, 2; 
Sigma Beta Chi. 



Allen Irwin Feldman, 107 Winthrop 
Kd., Brookline; Roxbur.v Memorial 
High School tor Boys; Liberal Arts; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2. 



George Wesley Ferguson. 1 7 Beaeons- 
6eld Rd., Worcester; Abington High 
School; Economics; Football, 1, 2; 
Theta Chi. 



Elena Ester Ferrante, S Ferrante 
Ave., Greenfield; Greenfield High 
School; Outing Club, 2; Mathematics 
Club, 1; Phi Zeta. 



Harry Eugene Fertlg, Sheridan, 
Penn.; Schaefferstown High School; 
Poultry Husbandry; Soccer, 1. 



Gordon Field, Plum St., West Ban 
stable; Barnstable High School; Pn 
Dental; Theta Chi. 



Hannah Theresa Finn, 174 College 
St., Amherst; Amherst High School; 
Mathematics; Newman Club, 1, 2; 
Mathematics Club, 1, 2; Sigma Beta 
Chi. 



Mary Frances FitzGerald, 41 Lib- 
erty St., Northampton; St. Michael's 
High School; English; Newman Club, 
1.2; Sigma Beta Chi. 



Robert Alan Fitzpatrick. 30 Summer 
St., Medford; Medford High School; 
Dairy Industry; Maroon Key, 2; Class 
Nominating Committee, 1; Dads' Day 
Committee, 2; Kappa Sigma. 



Dorothy Marie Flagg, Boston Rd., 
Chelmsford; Chelmsford High School; 
Home Economics; Orchestra, 1; Out- 
ing Club, 1; Home Economics Club, 1; 
Alpha Lambda Mu. 



Richard H. French, 1.5 Oak Rd., 

Milton; Milton High School; Engineer- 
ing; Class Nominating Committee, 1; 
Outing Club, 1; Languages and Litera- 
ture Club, 2; Theta Chi. 



Charles Glennie Fyfe, 22 Audubon 
Rd., Worcester; New York Military 
Academy; Dairy Industry; Dairy 
Club, 1; Theta Chi. 



Evelyn Gagnon, 21S Park St., North 
Attleboro; North Attleboro High 
School; Chemistry; W.S.G.A., 1, 2; 
Chemistry Club, 2; Women's Athletic 
Association, 1, 2; Lambda Delta Mu. 



Luther Stearns Gare, 27 Belmont 
.\ve., Northampton; Northampton 
High School; Latin; Swimming, 1; 



'One of the best class parties held" is general Soph consensus 




Frances Mary Gasson, 60 ".]" St., 
Athol; Athol High School; Home 
Economics; Newman Club, 1, 2; Home 
Economics Club, 1, 2; Alpha Lambda 
Mu. 



Christine Petrea Gately, 22 Howard 
St., Hol.voke; Hol.voke High School; 
Springfield Junior College; Physical 
and Biological Sciences. 



William John Gavin. 23 Adams St., 
Dorchester; Boston College High 
School; Liberal Arts; Newman Club, 
1, 2; Lambda Chi Alpha. 



Charles Denison Geer, BeUhertown; 
Belchertown High School; Mathe- 
matics; Index, 2; Christian Federation 
Cabinet, 1; Kappa Sigma. 



■238 



Mason MacCabe Gentry, 33 Third 
St., Turners Falls; Wordsnorth School, 
London, England; Economics; Roister 
Doisters, 1, 2; Outing Club, 1, 2; 
Alpha Gamma Rho. 



Peter Alphonse Gervin, 110 Cottage 
St., Athol; Athol High School; Mathe- 
matics Club, 2; Languages and Litera- 
ture Club, 1; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 



Christos Elias Gianarakos. 1334 
Middlesex St., Lowell; Lowell High 
School: Agriculture; Outing Club, 2: 
Animal Husbandry Club, 1, 2; Foot- 
ball, 1; Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



Norma Florence Gibson. IS Riddell 
St., Greenfield: Greenfield High 
School; Liberal Arts; Languages and 
Literature Club, 1, 2; Christian Federa- 
tion Cabinet, 1, 2; French Club, 2; 
Sigma Beta Chi. 



Stanley Frank Gizienski. North 
Maple St., Hadley; Hopkins Academy; 
General Engineering; Newman Club, 1; 
Soccer, 2(M); Basketball, 1. 



Walter Glista, 475 North St., Bridge- 
water; Bridgewater High School; Poul- 
try Nutrition; Poultry Science Club, 
I, 2; Chemistry Club, 2; Alpha Gamma 
Rho. 



George Arthur Goddu. 3S3 Linden 
St., Holyoke; Holyoke High School; 
Chemistry; Newman Club, 1, 2; Chem- 
istry Club, 1; .\lpha Sigma Phi. 



Agnes Goldberg. S Austin Park, 
Cambridge; Cambridge School of Lib- 
eral Arts; Home Economics; Women's 
Glee Club, 2; Bay State Revue, 2; 
Alenorah Club, I, 2; Home Economics 
Club, 2. 



Robert Irving Goldman, 102 Wallis 
Rd., Brookhne; Brookline High School; 
Liberal Arts; Roister Doisters, 2; De- 
bating. 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Alpha 
Epsilon Pi. 



Nathan Golick, 11 Elmhurst St., 
Dorchester; Boston Latin School; Math- 
ematics; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Chemistry 
Club, 1, 2; Mathematics Club, 1, 2; 
Alpha Epsilon Pi. 



Rosalind Dickinson Goodhue, 2 

Labor-in-Vain Road, Ipswich; Ipswich 
High School; Home Economics; Outing 
Club, 2; Home Economics Club, 1, 2; 
Phi Zeta. 



Irving Sidney Gordon, 63 South St., 
Ware; Ware High School; Pr3-Dental; 
Collegian, 1, 2; Freshman Handbook 
Board, 1; Menorah Club, 1, 2; .\lpha 
Epsilon Pi. 



Helen Elizabeth Grant, 383 Chestnut 
Hill Ave., Athol; Athol High School; 
Home Economics; Outing Club, 1, 2; 
Home Economics Club, 1, 2; Lambda 
Delta Mu. 



Herbert Dow Gross, 173 Jit. Vernon 
St., Maiden; Morgan School, Conn.; 
Liberal Arts; Maroon Key, 2 (Vice- 
President); Football. 2; Phi Sigma 
Kappa. 



Blanche Anne Gutlinski, Elm St., 
Hatfield; Smith .\cademy; English; 
Class Secretary, 1; Languages and Lit- 
erature Club, 2; French Club, 2; Sigma 
Beta Chi. 



George Gordon Gyrisko, Ferr.v St.. 
South Hadley Center; South Hadley 
High School; Entomology. 



Norman Leonard Hallen. 14 River- 
view PI.. Willimansett; Chicopee High 
School; Forestry; C..\..A., 2; Mathe- 
matics Club, 1, 2; Alpha Gamma Rho. 



SOPHOMORES 



Samuel Nahum Harris. 1726 Com- 
monwealth .\ve., Brighton; Boston 
Latin School; Bacteriology; Menorah 
Club, 1; Pre- Med. Club, 1; Soccer, 1; 
Alpha Epsilon Pi. 



Richard Haughton, 21 Cocassett St., 
Fcxboro; Fo.xboro High School: En- 
gineering; Lambda Chi .-Vlpha. 



Barbara Hajward. 31 Clinton St., 
Taunton; Taunton High School; Home 
Economics; Christian Federation Cab- 
inet, 1, 2; Home Economics Club, 1, 2; 
Lambda Delta Mu. 



Norma Linnea Hedlund, 2 Hedlund 
Ave., Braintree; Braintree High 
School; Simmons College; Home Econ- 
omics; Home Economics Club, 1, 2. 3; 
Sorority Vice-President. 3; Sigma Beta 
Chi. 



Robert Lee Hemond, 400 Pleasant 
St.. Hol.voke; Holyoke High School; 
Pre-Med. and Ph.vsics; Freshman 
Handbook Board. 1. 2; Band, 1, 2; 
Soccer, 1, 2. 



Richard Alexander Hcwat, ISO 

Pleasant St., North Adams; Gushing 
Academy; Chemistry; Sigma .\lpha 
Epsilon. 



John Hicks, 206 Overlook Rd., New 
Rochelle, N. Y.; New Rochelle High 
School; Agriculture; Class Treasurer, 1. 



Francis James Hoermann, Rich- 
mond; Pittsficld High School: Engin- 
eering; Winter Track, 1: Spring Track, 
1: Lambda Chi Alpha. 



Melvin Irving Goldman, 620 No 

folk St., Mattapan; Boston Lat 
School; Forestr.v. 



Philip Handrich, P. O. 433, Hadley; 
Hadley High School: Engineering; 
Q.T.V. 



Norma Lillian Htdmbcrg, 115 Broad- 
view St.. Pittsficld: Pittsfield High 
School; Bacteriology; Alpha Lambda 
Mu. 



SOPHOMORES 



David Nelson Holmes. 59 Central 
St., West Brookfield; Brookfield High 
School; Landscape Architecture; Land- 
scape Architecture Club. 2; Kappa 



Mary Evelyn Holton, 17 .\cadem.v 
St., South Braintree; Braintree High 
School; Home Economics; Sigma Beta 



Everett Francis Horgan, 2S Harriet 
Ave., Belmont; Belmont High School; 
Pre-Med.; Class Nominating Com- 
mittee, 1; Newman Club, 1; Pre-Med. 
Club, 2; Chemistry Club, I; Mathe- 
matics Club, 2; C.A.A., 2; Football, 1; 
Baseball, 1; Kappa Sigma. 



Lloyd Malcolm Horlick. 227 Han- 
cock St., Everett; Everett High School; 
Sciences; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 



Claire Dorothy Horlon. Maple Ave., 
Hadley; Hopkins Academy; Liberal 
Arts; Nenman Club, 1, 2. 



Daniel James Horton, 74 iMerriam 
St., Pittsfield; Vermont Academy; 
Mathematics; Maroon Key, 2; New- 
man Club, 1, 2; Football, 1; Basketball, 
1; Baseball, 1; Lambda Chi Alpha. 



Daniel G. Horvitz, 34 Jonathan St.. 
New Bedford; New Bedford High 
School; Ph.vsical Sciences; Menorah 
Club, 1. 2; Mathematics Club, 1, 2; 
Tan Epsilon Phi. 



.John Hutchings. South East St., 
.\mherst; Amherst High School; Physi- 
cal and Biological Sciences; Radio 
Club, 3; Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



Willis Eben Janes, 29 Marsh Ave., 
Worcester; Worcester North High 
School; Chemistry; Band, 1, 2; Chris- 
tian Federation Cabinet, 1; Swimming, 
1; Spring Track, 1; Kappa Sigma. 



Raymond Stanley Jarvis, 41S Palmer 
St., Plymouth, Penn.; Plymouth High 
School; Zoology and Physiology; Cd- 
h-gian, 1, 2; Zoolog.v Club, 1; Soccer, 1, 
2; Phi Sigma Kappa. 



Alma Marion Johnson, 34 Providence 
St., Millbury; Boston University; 
Home Economics Club. 2. 



Doris Christine Johnson, 221 West 
Center St., West Bridgewater; Howard 
High School; English; Class Nomin- 
ating Committee, 1; Phi Zeta. 



1 Johnson, 46 Fan 
Lmherst High Scho 



Paul Alvion Johnson. S.5 Fearing 
St., Amherst; Amherst High School; 
Chemistry; C.A.A., 2, 



Robert Stanton Johnston, .5 Pleas- 
ant St., Ware; Belchertown High 
School; Chemistry; Chemistry Club, 2; 
Fraternity Secretary, 2; Alpha Sigma 
Phi. 



Arnold Kaplinsky. 306 Chestnut St., 
Holyoke: Holyoke High School; Liberal 
Arts; Index, 2; Collegian, 2; Menorah 
Club, 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 



Mary Lisabel Keavy, 33 North St., 
Hyannis; Barnstable High School; 
English; W.S.G.A., 1, 2; Newman 
Club, 1, 2; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion, 1, 2; Lambda Delta Mu. 



.Don Wood and John Bennett typify study methods 




Thomas Joseph Kelley, 6 Rosalind 
Terr., Lynn; Lynn Classical High 
School; Physical and Biological Sciences; 
Newman Club, 1. 2; Pre-Med. Club, 2; 
Dads' Day Committee, 2; Lambda Chi 
Alpha, 



Henry Anthony Kelly, 30 Otis St., 
Fitchburg; Fitchburg State Teachers' 
College; English: Lambda Chi Alpha. 



Thomas Joseph Kelly. 26 Dearborn 
St., Springfield; Monson Academy; 
History and Economics; Newman 
Club, 1, 2; Basketball, 1; Baseball, 1. 



Harriet Phyllis Kelso, Chester; 
Chester High School; Home Economics; 
Christian Federation Cabinet, 2; Home 
Economics Club, 1, 2 (Secretary, 2); 
4-H Club, 1, 2; Lambda Delta Mu. 



2-10 



June Mary Kenny, 17 Rockview St.. 
Palmer; Palmer High School; Band. 
1; Women's Glee Club, 2; Newman 
Club. 1. 2; Ring Committee, 2. 



Florence May Lane, 11 Knowlton 
Sq., Gloucester; Gloucester High 
School; Physical and Biological Sci- 
ences; Women's Glee Club, 1. 2. 



SOPHOMORES 



Dorothy Bean Kinsley, 1 Winthrop 
St., Stoneham; Stoneham High School; 
Liberal Arts; Alpha Lambda Mu. 



Herbert Kipnes, .51 Franklin Ave. 
Revere; Revere High School; Engin- 
eering; Men's Glee Club, 1; Menorah 
Club, 1; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 



Frances Anne Langan. 121 Wayne 
St., Springfield; Springfield Technical 
High School; Home Economics; New- 
man Club, 1, 2; Home Economics Club, 
1, 2; Lambda Delta Mu. 



Anita Lucine Lapointe, IS Cherr.v 
St., Easthampton; Easthampton High 
School; Home Economics. 



Morton .4shur Levine, 40 Brimmer 
St., Watertown; Watertown High 
School; Mathematics; Band, 1; Men- 
orah Club, 1, 2; Tan Epsilon Phi. 



Harold Sunter Lewis, 1.S4 Edge Hill 
Rd., Milton; Thayer Academy; Pre- 
Med.; Class Nominating Committee, 1; 
Current Affairs Club, 2; Theta Chi. 



Kobert Joseph Kirvin, 14.5 Bradford 
St., Pittsfield; Pittsfield High School; 
Economics; Bay State Revue, 1, 2; 
Newman Club, 1, 2, .3; Dads' Day 
■Committee, 2, 3; Pre-Med. Club, 1; 
Chemistry Club, 1; Mathematics Club, 
1; Current Affairs Club, 1; Interfra- 
ternity Council, 3; Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



Abraham Klaiman, 31 Washington 
St., Maiden; Maiden High School; 
Liberal Arts; Band. 1, 2; Tau Epsilon 



Albert Joseph Klubock, 46 Bare- 
meadow St., Methuen; Edward F. 
Searles High School; Agriculture; 
Men's Glee Club, 1, 2; Menorah Club, 
1, 2; Soccer, 1; Winter Track, 1, 2; 
Spring Track, 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 



Elinor Myrtle Koonz, 86 Montague 
City Rd., Greenfield; Greenfield High 
School; Index, 2; Mathematics; Phi 
Zeta. 



Arthur Nicholas Koulias, 38 Butter- 
field St., Lowell; Lowell High School; 
Dairy Bacteriology; Dairy Club, 1, 2; 
Swimming, 1, 2{M); Kappa Sigma. 



Henrietta Mary Kreczko, West St., 
Feeding Hills; Agawam High School; 
Chemistry; Index, 2; Newman Club, 1; 
Chemistry Club, 1; Women's Athletic 
Association, 1. 



Alfred O'Neal LaBelle, School St., 
Northfield; Mt. Hermon; North Car- 
olina State College; Forestry. 



Marguerite Georgette Laprade. 69 

Pleasant St., Easthampton; Easthamp- 
ton High School; French. 



Edward Peter Larkin. 215 Arsen 
St., Watertown; Watertown Hi) 
School; Dairy Industry; Newmi 
Club, 1; Lambda Chi Alpha. 



Maxim I. Lebeaux, 30 Fruit St., 
Shrewsbury; Shrewsbury High School; 
Physical and Biological Sciences; De- 
bating, 1, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2; .Mpha 
Epsilon Pi. 



William Billings Lccznar, l.S Royal 
Ave., Holyoke; Holyoke High School; 
Economics; Alpha Gamma Rho. 



Theodore Rogers LcMaire, 1070 
Eastern Ave.. Maiden; Maiden High 
School. 



Victor Anthony Leonowicz, 161 

Bedford St., Whitman; Bridgewater 
High School; Floriculture; Class Nom- 
inating Committee, 1; Newman Club, 
I, 2; Mathematics Club, 1; Football, 1, 
2; Q.T.V. 



Louis Ovila Lescault, 6 Morse .\ve.. 
Ware; Dean Academy; Chemistry; 
Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Zoology Club, 
2, 3; Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2, 3; Chemistry 
Club, 3; Languages and Literature 
Club, 3, Kappa Sigma. 



Richard Lawrence Libby, 34 Dean 
St., Bridgewater; Bridgewater High 
School; Chemistry; Alpha Gamma Rho. 



Raymond Sidney Licht. 3 Colfax St., 
Springfield; Springfield Classical High 
School; Horticultural Manufactures; 
Menorah Club, I, 2; Mathematics 
Club, I; Tau Epsilon Phi. 



Harry Carlton Lincoln. t7li4 Bay St. 

Taunton; Taunton High School; Dairy 
Industry; Alpha Gamma Rho. 



'William Preston MacConncU, 14 

Grove St., Westboro; Mount Hermon; 
Forestry; Kappa Sigma. 



Roger Sawyer Maddocks, Brimfield; 
Hitchcock Academy; Liberal Arts; 
Lambda Chi Alpha. 



Mcrwin Paul Magnin, 547 South St., 
Dalton; Dalton High School; Econom- 
ics: Basketball, 1; Baseball, 1; Theta 
Chi. 



Richard Edward Maloy, 666 West 
Housalonic St., Pittsfield; St. John's 
Preparatory School; Liberal Arts; New- 
man Club, 1, 2; Basketball, 1; Baseball, 
1; Lambda Chi Alpha. 



Parker Mamber, 43 Rice 

Ave., Revere; Revere High School; 
Liberal Arts; Men's Glee Club, 1; 
Swimming, 1; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 



241 



SOPHOMORES 



Edward Crowell Manix, 62 Graves 
St., South Deerfield; Deerfield Acad- 
emy; Economics; Roister Doisters, 2; 
Theta Chi. 



Henry Francis Martin. 30 Cottage 
St., Amherst; Saint Anselm's College; 
Economics; Collegian, 1, 2; Newman 
Club, 1, 2; Current Affairs Cluh, 2; 
Radio Club, 2; Q.T.V. 



Rudolf E. S. Mathias, 310 Elm St.. 

Northampton; Northampton High 
School; Liberal Arts. 



Joseph Brian McKiernan, 119 Ridge- 
wood Ave., Holyoke; Johnson High 
School; History; Maroon Key, 2; New- 
man Club, 1, 2; Soccer, 1; Phi Sigma 
Kappa. 



Frederick .4danis McLaughlin. Jr.. 

14 Nutting .\ve., Amherst; Amherst 
High School; Physical and Biological 
Sciences; Basketball, 1: Kappa Sigma, 



Mary ,)osephinc Mann. 237 High 
St., Dalton; Dalton High School; 
Home Economics; Home Economics 
Club, 1, 2; Women's .\thletic Associa- 
tion, 2; Lambda Delta Mu. 



William Mann, 19 Abbott St., Pitts- 
field; Ricker Classical Institute; Ph.vsi- 
cal and Biological Sciences; Footb.all, 1, 
2; Swimming, 1; Kappa Sigma. 



James Leo McCarthy, 37 Laver 
St., Millis; Minis High School; Phys 
and Biological Sciences; Alpha Gaa 



Russell Joseph McDonald, S Church 
St., Wheelwright; Hardwick High 
School; Political Sciences; Cross Coun- 
tr,y, 1, 2(M); Winter Track, 1; Spring 
Track, 1; Phi Sigma Kappa. 



Joseph Wright McLcod, 4 Maple St., 
Pepperell; Pepperell High School; 
Dairy Bacteriology; Bay State Revue, 
2; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Outing Club, 
1, 2; Dairy Club, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 
1; Soccer, 1, 2, 3 (Assistant Manager); 
Spring Track, 1, 2; Joint Committee on 
Intercollegiate Athletics, 3; Alpha 



Sign 



Phi. 



David Henry Marsden, 419 Win- 
throp St., Taunton; Taunton High 
School; Plant Pathology; Maroon Key, 
2 (Secretary- Treasurer); Alpha Gam- 
ma Rho. 



ita Jean Marshall, IS Brookline 
e., Holyoke; Hol.voke High School; 
■norah Club, 1, 2; Sigma Iota. 



John Paul McDonough. 54 Leonard 
St., Dorchester; Jamaica Plain High 
School; Dairy Industry; Maroon Key, 
2; Newman Club, 2; Ring Committee, 
2; Dairy Club, 2; 4-H Club, 2; Winter 
Track, 1; Spring Track, 1; Q.T.V. 



Richard Stephen MeKenzie, W^oods 
Hole; Lawrence High School; Dairy; 
Newman Club, 1, 2; Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



Sophomores and Juniors at Winter Carnival Ball, February 14 




Helen Elizabeth McMahon, 

Holyoke St., Eiisthampton; Eastham 
ton High School; Liberal Arts; Ne 
man Club, 1, 2; Alpha Lambda Mu. 



George Alexander McSwain, S.vble 
St., Walpole; Walpole High School; 
University ol Alabama; History. 



Irving Seymoure Mendelson, 463 

Crescent St., Brockton; Brockton High 
School; Bacteriology; Orchestra, 1, 2; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2; .\lpha Epsilon Phi. 



Daphn 



Bayside 



Parker Mille 

Gables, Ba.vside, Long Island, N. Y.; 
Bayside High School; Home Economics; 
Band, 1; Christian Federation Cabinet, 
1, 2; Dads' Day Committee, 2; Outing 
Club, 1, 2; Home Economics Club, 1, 2; 
Phi Zeta. 



Ilcnrj Omer Miller. S75 Washington 
St., Haverhill; Saint James High 
School; Economics; Band, 1; Newman 
Club, 1, 2; Spring Track, 1; Q.T.V. 



Janet Milner. .S Dale St.. Rochdale; 
Leicester High School; Home Econom- 
ics; Women's Glee Club; 2, Outing Club, 
1; Home Economics Club, 2; 4-H Club, 
1,2; Alpha Lambda Mu. 



[ 242 : 



Ida Claudia Moggio, 31 East St., 
Chicopee Falls; Chicopee High School; 
Languages and Literatures: Women's 
Glee Club, 1, 2; Newman Club, 1,2. 



Alice Foster Monk, 171 Champne.v 
St., Groton; Groton High School; 
Home Economics; Women's Glee Club, 
2; Home Economics Club, 1, 2; 1-H 
Club, 1, 2; Alpha Lambda Mu. 



Phyllis E. Morgan, West Pelham; 
Amherst High School; Chemistry; 
Alpha Lambda Mu. 



Anne Rita Moriarty, Russell St., 
Hadle.y; Hopkins Academy; Physical and 
Biological Sciences. 



Bobort Francis O'Brien, 17 Beech- 
wood Ave., Watertown; Watertown 
High School; Engineering; Newman 
Club, 1, 2; Ring Committee, 2; Lambda 
Chi Alpha. 



Samuel Robert Oreutt, 213 Main St., 
West Newbury; Norwich University; 
Pre-Veterinary. 



Stanley Pacocha, 56 Glendale St., 
Easthampton; Williston Academy; His- 
tory; Basketball, 1; Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



John Costas Papageorge, 44 Walnut 
St., Northampton; Northampton High 
School; Engineering. 



SOPHOMORES 



.Anthony Joseph Polito, 43 Fair St., 
Northampton; Northampton High 
School; Ph.vsical and Biological Sci- 



Leo Porrctli. 0!1 Pine St., Waltham; 
Waltham High School; Forestry; Math- 
ematics Club, 1. 



John Howland Powell. Brookfield; 
Brookfield High School; Landscape 
Architecture; Class Nominating Com- 
mittee, 1; Soccer, 1; Theta Chi. 



Thomas Francis Moriarty, 11 School 
St., Holyoke; Holyoke High School; 
Chemistry ;Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



Robert Douglas Pearson, Pleasant- 
ville Rd., Briarcliff Manor, N. Y.; 
Jlount Hermon; Zoology; Class Nom- 
inating Committee, 1; Band, 1, 2; Pre- 
Med. Club, 2; Soccer, 1, 2; Theta Chi. 



John Francis Powers, IS Salem St., 
Bradford; Haverhill High School; 
Economics; Newman Club, 1, 2; Foot- 
ball, 1; Winter Track, 1; Spring Track, 
1; Lambda Chi Alpha. 



Helen Navoy, 41.3 Hampshire St., 
Lawrence; Lawrence High School; 
W.S.G.A., 1, 2; Newman Club, 1; 
Mathematics Club, 1, 2. 



Barbara Frances Peck, Shelburn 
Arms .\cademy; Liberal Arts; Orche 
tra, 1. 



Urbano Carlo Pozzani, 1S3 New 

Bridge St., West Springfield; West 
Springfield High School: Chemistry; 
Alpha Gamma Rho. 



Gregory Haig Nazarian. 30 Mish- 
awurn Rd., Woburn; Northeastern 
University; Engineering; Orchestra, 1; 
Band, 1; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 



Samuel Benson Peskin. 1S72 Com- 
monwealth .Ave., Boston: Michigan 
State College; Agriculture; CoUegiun, 2. 



Harold Joseph Quinn. 70 Proctor 
St.. Salem; Band, 2; Newman Club, 2; 
Zoology Club, 2; Prc-Mod. Club, 2. 



Edward Anthony Nebesky, 12 Car- 
penter St., Amesbury; Amesbury High 
School; Pre-Med.; Football, 2; Kappa 



John Podmaycr, Chestnut St., West 
Hatfield; Smith Academy; Agricul- 
tural Economics; Soccer, 1, 2; Alpha 
Sigma Phi. 



Virginia Race, 11 Washington Ave., 
Northampton: Northampton High 
School; Liberal Arts. 



Bourcard Ncsin, 7S0 Southampton 
Rd., Westfield: Westfield High School; 
Chemistry; IsDEX, 2; Tau Epsilon Phi. 



Edward Michael Podolak, 79 Maple 
St., Easthampton; Easthampton High 
School; Liberal Arts; Soccer, 1, 2(M); 
Basketball, 1. 



Ephraim Morton Radnor, 6.5 Fir- 
glade Ave., Springfield; Springfield 
Classical High School: Collegian, 1; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2; Tau Epsilon Phi. 



Lawrence E. Ncwcomb. Norwe'l 
Ave., Norwell; Norwell High School: 
Engineering; Collegian, 1; Christian 
Federation Cabinet, 1; Wesley Founda- 
tion, 1: 4-H Club, 1: Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. 



Stanley Edwin Polchlopek, 140 

Cabot St., Chicopee; Chicopee High 
School; Collegian, 1, 2 (Managing 
Editor, 2); Q.T.V. 



Carl Ransow. 47 Mylod St., No) 
wood; Norwood High School; Lar 
guages and Literature: Languages an 
Literature Club, 1: Swimming, 1. 



Sluarl Victor Nims, SI Park Ave., 
Keenc, N. H.: Keene High School; 
Economics; Theta Chi. 



Dario Politella, 400 Hampshire St., 
Lawrence; Virginia Military Institute; 
English; Index, 2; Collegian, 2: Alpha 
Gamma Rho. 

[243] 



Harriet Agnes Rayncr, 2 Lorenzo 
St., Neponset; Dorchester High School; 
Bacteriology; Alpha Lambda Mu. 



SOPHOMORES 



Robert W. Rhodes. Ill Aldcn St., 
Whitman; Thayer Academy; Wildlife; 
Band, 1; Outing Ciub. 2; Mathematics 
Club, 1, 2; Kappa Sigma. 



Bernard Joseph Ristuccia, West 
Newton; W^altham High School; Horti- 
culture; Newman Club 1, 2; Sigma Phi 
Epsilon. 



William James Robinson, 78 New- 
ton St.. Hol.yoke; Holyoke High School; 
Engineering; Alpha Sigma Phi. 



Matthew John Ryan. 077 Carew St., 
Springfield; Monson Academy; Dairy 
Industry. 



riam Hilda Sa< 


;ks. 


207 Fi 


dier St., 


rchester; 


Dorchi 


?ster 


High 


School; 


;teriology 


; Men 


orah 


Club, 


1, 2; 



Lester Reynold Rich, 11 Ellison Rd., 
Newton; Boston Latin School; Chem- 
istry: Men's Glee Club, 2; Menorah 
Club, 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 



Robert Albert Rocheleau, 37 Munroe 

St., Northampton; Northampton High 
School; Physical and Biological Sci- 
ences; Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



Stanley Francis Salwak, 222 East 
River St., Orange; Orange High School; 
History. 



Charles Bradford Richards, ) 

ChurchhiU Ave., Arlington; Uolderne 
Preparatory; Animal Husbandr; 
Christian Federation Cabinet, 1, : 
Kappa Sigma. 



Dorothy Marie Rounholm, .32 Sand 
St., Gardner; Gardner High School; 
Zoology; W.S.G.A., 1, 2; Alpha Lambda 
Mu. 



Patrick Gildo Santin, 3S2 Elliott 
St., Beverly; Esse.t Agricultural School; 
Horticulture; Maroon Ke.y, 2; Newman 
Club, 1, 2; Basketball, 1; Winter 
Track, 1; Phi Sigma Kappa. 



James Manix Ring, 275 Middlesex 
Ave, North Wilmington; Wilmington 
High School; Wildlife; Newman Club, 
1,2; Phi Sigma Kappa. 



Louis Frederic Ruder, Jr.. IH Bel- 
mont Ave., Northampton; Williston 
Academy; C..\.A.. 2; Kappa Sigma. 



Theodore A. Saulnier. Jr.. 47C 

Waverly St., Framingham; Framing- 
ham High School; Chemistry; Col- 
legian, 1, 2; Collegian Quarterlj/, 1, 2; 
Freshman Handbook Board, 1, 2; 
Newman Club, 1,2. 



Donald Hammond Rist, 190.\ Mer- Alfred Paul Rumminger, 23 Center 

riam Ave., Leominster; Leominster St., Leeds; Northampton High School; 

High School; Physics. Chemistry; Lambda Chi Alpha. 



Alex Sawicki, 3 Belchertown 
.'hree Rivers; Palmer High 
Pre-Med.; Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2. 



Poultry majors travel to Brattleboro, Vt., with Dr. Parkhurst 




Byron B. Schiller. l(i(i Thorndike 
St., Brooklinc; Boston Latin School; 
Engineering; Band, 1; Menorah Club, 
1. 2; Mathematics Club, 2; Soccer, 1; 
Alpha Epsilon Pi. 



Robert James Schiller, 130 Long- 
wood Ave., Brookline; Brookline High 
School; Chemistry; Menorah Club, 1. 
2; Pre-Med. Club, 1; Chemistry Club, 
1, Swimming, 1. 



PrisciUa Scott, 94 Spruce St., Water- 
town; Watertown High School; Eng- 
lish; Sigma Beta Chi. 



Amherst; Amherst High School; 



244 



Marguerite Jane Sherwood, Box 2S, 

Huntington; Chester High School; 
Home Economics; Christian Federa- 
tion Cabinet, 1, 2; Home Economics 
Club, 1, 2; 4-H Club, 1, 2. 



Rila Eli:eabeth Skiffinglon, 7 High 
St., West Brookfield; Warren High 
School; Chemistry; W.S.G.A., 1, 2; 
Class Nominating Committee, 1; 
Freshman Handbook Board, 1; New- 
man Club, 1, 2. 



Harry Wellington Sloper. 51 Union 
St., PittsBeld; Wilbraham Academy; 
Liberal Arts; Men's Glee Club, 2; Foot- 
ball, 1; Basketball, 1; Baseball, 1; Kap- 
pa Sigma. 



Melvin Small, S4 Trull St., Somerville; 
Somerville High School; History and 
Economics; Index, 2; Debating, 1; 
Menorah Club, 1. 



E. Jane Smith, 2(32 Mount Auburn 
St., Watertown; Watertown High 
School; Psychology; Phi Zeta. 



Helen Barbara Smith, 32 Hillside 
Ave., Wollaston; North Quincy High 
School; Woodward School tor Girls; 
Spanish and Economics; Women's 
Glee Club, 1, 2; Dads' Day Committee, 
2; Phillips Brooks Club, 1, 2; Phi Zeta. 



Helen Frances Smith, 3S4 East St., 
Chicopee Falls; Chicopce High School; 
American International College; Chem- 



Joan Ann Stanne. 163 Triangle St.. 
-Amherst; Amherst High School; Lib- 
eral Arts; 4-H Club, 1. 



Margaret Isobel Stanton, 47.5 Park 
Ave., Worcester; Worcester South High 
School; English; Orchestra, 1, 2; Wom- 
en's Glee Club, 1, 2; Bay State Revue. 
2; W'esley Foundation, 1; Operetta, 1; 
Statettes, 2; Lambda Delta Mu. 



Earle Raymond Steeves, 233 Mer- 
riam Ave., Leominster; Leicester High 
School; Animal Husbandry; Outing 
Club, 1; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 



Rivka Marie Stein, 45 Bay State 
Rd., Holyoke; Holyoke High School; 
Home Economics; W.S.G.A., 1; Men- 
orah Club, 1; Home Economics Club, 1; 
Sigma Iota. 



Kenneth A. Stewart, 11.S Quincy 
Ave. Winthrop; Winthrop High 
School; Prc-Med.; Phi Sigma Kappa. 



Catherine Louise Stockwcll, Hill 
Rd., Sutton; Sutton High School; 
Liberal Arts; Women's Glee Club, 2; 
Mathematics Club, 1. 



Mildred Barbara Stohlmann. East 
Rd., Adams; Adams High School; 
Chemistry; Mathematics Club. 1. 



Kathryn Marilyn Stone, 14 Clark 
St., Holyoke; Holyoke High School; 
Home Economics; Newman Club, 1, 
2; Home Economics Club, 2; Horti- 
cultural Manufactures Club, 2. 



SOPHOMORES 



Donald Turner Thayer, 61S Mill 
St., Worcester; Worcester High School; 
Wild Life Management; Class Nomin- 
ating Committee, 1, 2; Hockey, 1; 
Baseball, 2(M), 3(M); "M" Club, 2, 3; 
Phi Sigma Kappa. 



May Merle Thayer, 395 West Housa- 
tonic St., Pittstield; Pittsfield High 
School; Liberal Arts. 



George Preston Tilley, 1356 North- 
ampton St., Hol.voke; Deerfield .\cad- 
emy; Chemistry; Swimming, 1. 



Joseph Andrew Tosi, Jr., Justice 
Hill, Sterling; Worcester North High 
School; Wild Life Management; Bay 
State Revue, 1, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2: 
Horticultural Show Committee, 2 
Outing Club, 1, 2; Horticulture Club 
1, 2; Kappa Sigma. 



Olive Elizabeth Tracy, 57 Monterey- 
Rd., Worcester; Worcester North High 
School; Physical and Biological Sci- 
ences; W.S.G.A., 1, 2; Women's Glee 
Club, 2; Outing Club, 2; Phi Zeta. 



Paul Rupert Turner, 526 Plymout 
St., East Bridgcwater; Tilton Junio 
College; Horticulture; 4-H Club, 1. 



Wallace Turner, 138 Ashuelot St., 
Dalton; Dalton High School; Zoology; 
Men's Glee Club, 1. 



William Fred Smith, 5 E.vchange St.. 
Holliston; Holliston High School; 
Agronomy; Mathematics Club, 1. 



John Martin Storozuk, Russell St., 
Sunderland; Deerfield .\cademy; .\gri- 
cultural Economics; C.A.A., 2; Foot- 
ball. 1, 2; Cross Country. 1; Basketball, 
1; Spring Track, 1; Q.T.V. 



Helen Lucile 'VanMeter, 167 Mon- 
tague Rd., North Amherst; Amherst 
High School; English; Women's Glee 
Club, 1, 2 (Assistant Manager, 2); 
Phi Zeta. 



Ralph Earle Southwick, JIarshall 
St., Leicester; Leicester High School; 
Horticultural Manufactures. 



Ellis Charles Tallcn, 670 River St., 
Mattapan; Brighton High School; 
Horticultural Manufactures; Soccer, 1; 
.\lpha Epsilon Pi. 



Philip William Vctterling. 11 Bel- 
videre Ave., Holyoke; Holyoke High 
School; Liberal Arts; Maroon Key, 2; 



Edward Dubois Sprague, 27 Wcnt- 
worlh PI., East Lynn; Lynn English 
High School; Horticulture; Index, 2; 
Wesley Foundation. 1. 2; 4-H Club, 2; 
Cross Country, 1; Thcla Chi, 



John Leary Terry, Jr., 74 Camp St., 
Hyannis; Barnstable High School; 
Prc-Veterinary; Band, 1, 2; Newman 
Club, 1,2; Phi Sigma Kappa. 



Bernard William Vitkauskas, 99 Wil- 
liams St., Northampton; Northampton 
High School; Ph.vsical and Biological 
Sciences, 



245 



SOPHOMORES 



John Henry VondcU, Jr., SO Fearing 
St., Amherst; Amherst High School; 
Liberal Arts. 



Barbara Cecile Wainshel, 92 South 
Common St., Lynn; Lynn Classical 
High School; Psychology; Menorah 
Club.l, 2, 3; Psychology Club, 3; Cur- 
vent Affairs Club, 3; Sigma Iota. 



Betty Ellis Webster, 44 Magnolia 
Rd., Swampscott; Swampscott High 
School; Home Economics; Women's 
Glee Club, 2; Dads' Day Committee, 2; 
Outing Club, 2; Home Economics Club, 
1, 2; Cheer Leader, 2; Women's Ath- 
letic Association, 1, 2; Phi Zeta. 



Eugene 'Wein, 60 Chase Ave., North 
Adams; Drury High School; Pre-Den- 
tal; Class Nominating Committee, 1; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2; Zoology Club, 1, 2; 
Football, 1, 2; Tau Epsilon Phi. 



Jonah S. "White, 128 Union St., Ev- 
erett; Everett High School; Horticul- 
tural Manufactures; Menorah Club, 1, 
2; Tau Epsilon Phi. 



Priseilla Edith Whitney, 20 Bush 
St., WestBeld; Westfield High School; 
Home Economics; W.S.G.A., 1, 2; 
Home Economics Club, 1. 



Loren Cecil Wilder, 29S Orange St., 
Springfield; Springfield High School ot 
Commerce; Basketball, 1; Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. 



Lewis James Ward, 30 Laurel Driv 
Needham; Needham High School; An 
mal Husbandry; Theta Chi. 



Raymond Arnold Weinhold, S2 

Birch St., Worcester; Worcester South 
High School; Forestry; Orchestra, 1, 2. 



Justin Irving Winthrop, .510 Eastern 
Ave., Lynn; Lynn English High 
School; English; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Alpha Epsilon Pi. 



Charles Lloyd Warner, 3 Prospect 
St., West Bridgewater; Holderness 
School; Entomology; Christian Fed- 
eration Cabinet, 1; Kappa Sigma, 



Milton Weissberg, 24 UHord St., 
Dorchester; Chelsea High School; 
Languages; Collegian, 1, 2; Debating, 
1, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2. 



Janice Louise Wisly, 7S Hitchcock 
St., Hol.voke; Holyoke High School; 
Home Economics; Women's Glee Club, 
2; Home Economics Club, 1, 2; Lambda 
Delta Mu. 



Edward Clark Warner, Main St., 
Sunderland; Amherst High School; 
Engineering; Q.T.V. 



Edward Arthur Watts, S Somerset 
St., East Weymouth; Weymouth High 
School; Enghsh; Wesley Foundation, 2; 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 



Lurane Wells, East Main St., Orleans: 
Yarmouth High School; Hyannis State 
Teachers' College; Home Economics; 
Home Economics Club, 2. 



Laurel Emily Wheelock, 29 Gram- 
pean Way, Dorchester; Boston Girls' 
High School; Home Economics; Home 
Economics Club, 2; Alpha Lambda Mu. 



Gertrude Wolkovsky, 34 Longwood 
Ave., Hol.voke; Holyoke High School; 
Miithematics; W.S.G.A., 1, 2; Menorah 
Club, 1, 2; Mathematics Club, 2; 
Sigma Iota. 



Donald Guilford Wood, 143 Main St., 
Shdburne Falls; Deerfield Academy; 
Band, 2; Newman Club, 1. 2. 



Henri '43, Hope '42, and Blanche '4.3 "lunch in" at the Abbey 




Kubie Alfreda Woodward, 60 Blanch- 
ard PI., Gardner; Gardner High 
School; Home Economics; Home Econ- 
"uiics Club, 2; Alpha Lambda Mu. 



Kuth Elaine Woodworth, 35 Rand 

SI., East Lynn; Lynn English High 
School; Home Economics; W.S.G.A., 
1. 2; Home Economics Club, 1, 2; 
Lambda Delta Mu. 



George Richard "ifale, 49 Baker Rd., 

Everett; Chelsea High School; Poultry 
Husbandry; Animal Husbandry Club, 
2. 3; 4-H Club, 2, 3; Poultry Science 
Club, I, 2, 3; Soccer, 1; Alpha Gamma 
Rho. 



ti Zeltserman, 90 Capen St., 
Chester; Dorchester High School 
Bo.vs; Physical and Biological 



William John Zukel, 55 Fort St., 
Northampton; Northampton High 
School; Ph.ysical and Biological Scien- 



246 



Francis W. Aldrich 

11 Princeton St., Wcstfield 
Stewart E. Allen 

42 Orchard St., Manhasset, N. Y. 

N. J. 
Earl Alpert 

23 Parkside St.. Springfield 
.Arline L. Altshuler 

192 Washington St., Brighton 
.\Iexander R. Amell 

41 G Houghton St., North .\dams 
.\rvid W. Anderson 

130 Earle St., Hartford, Conn. 
David W. Anderson, Jr. 

13 Rena St., Worcester 
Edith E. Appel 

ISSHighSt., Dalton 
Mabel .Arnold 

102 Crescent St., Northampton 
Shirley A. Azoff 

2.53 Beverly Rd., Brookline 
Hollis E. Baker 

14 Bonad Rd., .\rlington 
Evelyn E. Bamberg 

Cambridge St., Burlington 
Eleanor L. Barber 

22 South Ave., Melrose 
Muriel E. Barbour 

117 Florence St., Roslindale 
Herman S. Barenboim 

527 Haverhill St., Lawrence 
Erma P. Barrett 

6 Orchard St., Adams 



Mary E. Bartlett 

S3 Church St., Mansfield 
Milton R. Bass 

136 Bradford St., Pittsfield 
Thomas E. Batey, Jr. 

40 Silver Hill Rd., R. D., W'altham 
Richard W. Bauer 

236 Pleasant St., So. Weymouth 
Josephine A. Beary 

25.5 Commercial St., Whitman 
Cedric H. Beebe 

111 Lakeview Ave., Cambridge 
Stanley M. Belcher 

11 Brookledge St., Roxbury 
Barbara .1. Bemis 

Sunset Farm, Spencer 
-Armand L. Bengle. |r. 

164 Myrtle St., Indian Orchard 
Marcia J. Berman 

33 Wenonah St., Ro.xbury 
Roger C. Biron 

1145 Massachusetts Ave., North 
Adams 



Donald C. Broderick 

93 Sheridan St., East Lynn 
Laurence G. Brown 

13 Hawthorne St., East Lynn 



FRESHMEN 



Ma 



!rnice A. Blake 

49 Madison St., Amesbury 
: Blauer 



67 Hillside Ave., Arlington 
James A. Block 

61 Warren St., Norwich, Conn. 
Marjorie L. Bolton 

3.54 Davis St., Greenfield 
Raoul F. Borgatti 

75 High St., Bridgcwater 
.Joseph Bornstein 

24 Audubon Rd., Milton 
Ernest G. Borowski 

57 Aberdeen Rd., Milton 
Russell H. Bosworth 

10 Pearl St.. East Bridgcwater 
.Annelle I. Bousquct 

17 Maryland St., Springfield 
Estelle N. Bowen 

75 Merrick Ave., Hol.voke 



Frederick V. Brutcher 

69 Warren Ave., Mansfield 
Jean A. Burgess 

123 Prospect St., Brockton 
Robert W. Burke 

27 Blandford Rd., Woronoco 
Horace C. Burrington 

Charlemont 
David G. Bush 

137 Union St., Westfield 
George B. Cald^vell 

King St.. Littleton 
.lean M. Capper 

24 Youle St., Melrose 
Leonard H. Carlson 

31 Carlson St., Bristol, Conn. 
Lois Chase 

Main St., W. Yarmouth 
George Chorneskv 

16.\rlingtonSt.,Lynn 
Elizabeth S. Clapp 

20 Graves St., S. Deerfield 
Elmer E. Clapp, Jr. 

West St., Leeds 
Philip .J. Cohen 

109 Carver St., Springfield 
C. Vernon Cole 

9S5 N. Pleasant St., Amherst 
Paul Cole 

12 Kinnicutt Rd., Worcester 
Roland F. CoUela 

2 Little St., Rumford, R. I. 
Bernard V. Como 

7 Highland St.. Ware 
Thomas S. Coolev 

2 Western Ave., Westfield 



Cynthia E. Cowing 

135 Webb St., Weymouth 
Robert H. Cowing 

43 Garden St., W'est Springfield 
Marjorie E. Cowles 

S. East St., Amherst 
M. Kathleen Cronin 

Fort Banks, Winthrop 



Norma M. Deacon 

19 Butler Place, Northampto 
Margaret C. Deane 

70 N. Main St., Whitinsville 
Glenn B. Dearden 

33 Lawler St., Holyoke 



Robert B. Denis 

46 Alvin St., Springfield 
Norman W. Desrosier 

210 Orange St., Athol 
Thomas E. Devanev 

14 Auburn St., W.'Mcdford 



Robert O. Dewey 

21 King St., Westfield 
John M. Dickerman 

252 Main St., Spencer 
Robert E. Dillon 

23 Walnut St., W.are 
Warren S. Dobson 

42 Bellevue Ave., Norwood 
Charles W. Dolby 

37 Humphrey St., Great Barringto 
Helen E. Donnelly 

Prouty St., Brookfield 
Joseph C. DriscoU 

4 Beaver Dam Rd., Scituate 
Henry E. Drozdal 

Hockanum St., So. Hadley 
Robert D. Drummey 

11 Miller Ave., E. Braintree 
Eleanor M. Dudley 

21S Bridge St., Northampton 
Charles W. Dunham 

164 Cottage Park Rd., Winthrop 
Frank A. Duston 

26 Hazelwood Ave., Longmeadow 
Charlotte S. Eigner 

1S2 Norfolk Ave., Swampscott 
Rosamond P. EUord 

SI Manitoba St., Springfield 
Robert H. Engelhard 

Coral Ave., Pearl City, Hawaii 
Hyr 

21 
Manuel M. Farber 

41S Hillside Ave., Holyoke 
Richard C. Fay 

Butler Ave., Conyngham, Pa. 



Ed« 

Lena E. Filios 

Bates Rd.. Woronoco 
Herbert D. Fishgal 

537 Norfolk St., Mattapan 
John M. Fitzgerald 

294 Orange St., Springfield 
Llovd S. Fitzpatrick 

7"Hawthornc St., Greenwood 

George H. Flessas 

166 Chestnut St., Brookline 



.John F. Foley _ „ „ 

47 Greenlawn St., Fall Ri^ 

Marion Foole 

East St.. Lee 
Bernard A. Forest 

12 Lewis Ave, Arlington 
David M. Frcedman 

91 Georgia St., Roxbury 



Frank M. Fuller 

199 Sumner Ave, Spnnghcld 
Lawrence T. Garnett 

664 Burncoat St., Worcester 

Francis J. Garrity 

IS Lakeway Drive, Pittsfield 

James G. Garvin 

Whitney St., Framingham 

\r 



247 



FRESHMEN 



John D. Giannotti 

424 Dwelly St., Fall River 
Ralph G. Gilman. Jr. 

Go Beacon St., Greenfield 
Helen Glagovskv 

27 Wellington Ave., Haverhill 
Theodore H. Godek 

437 Springfield St., Chicopee 
Seymour Gold 

14 Maryland St., Springfield 
Tluclor.- .1. Golonka 

;;:, KLirnlli Sl., Turners Falls 



. <; 



in F,.lge,_liiyi- Kd.. VVatertown 

""Tee Coolidge St., Brookline 
Margaret F. Green 

IS Smith St., Marblehead 
Dorothy J. Greene 

17 Holly Ave., Greenfield 
Edna Greenfield 

117 Church St., Ware 
Fred A. Greenleaf 

14 Brentwood Rd.. Woburn 
Edward J. Greenspan 

33 Fairfield Ave., Holyoke 
Shirley S. Groesbeck 

14 Bodwell St., Lawrence 
George Grossman 

53 Euclid Ave, Pittsfield 
Marjorie J. Gunther 

40 Spring Park Ave., Dracut 
Peter J. Hahn 

17 Battery Place, N. Y. City, N. Y. 

Edward D. Hall 

223 June St., Worcester 

Marie B. Hamel 

3 Assumption Ave., Worcester 

Richard C. Hansen 

73 Horace St., E. Boston 



William J. Hart 

480 Maple St.. Holyoke 
Mary K. Haughey 

198 Union St., Pittsfield 
Kirby M. Hayes 

Buzzards Bay 
Frances N. Hazen 

North St., Chester Depot, Vt. 
Joseph O. Hebert 

.57 Franklin St., Holyoke 
Israel J. Helfand 

S Westbrook St.. Milford 
Wallace O. Hlbbard 

North Hadley 
John D. Hilchey ^ ^^ ^^ 

233 E. 17th St., N. Y. City, N. Y. 
Jack H. Hlrsch 

822 Lullwater Rd. N. E.. Atlanta, G 
Edward W. Hitchcock 

147U Wcstfield St., W. Spnngticld 
Ruth A. Hodgess 

133 Maple St., Maynard 
Raymond H. Hollis 

Central St., W. Boylston 
Steven L. Hollis 

N. Main St., So. Hadley Falls 
Robert C. Holmes 

Highland St., Housatonic 
Charles S. Hood 

286 Davis St., Greenfield 
Frederick S. Hopkins 

110 Mill St., Springfield 
Douglas W. Hosmer 

235 Fountain St., Springfield 
Ruth E. Howarth 

04 Dutcher St., Hopedale 
Milton A. Howe, Jr. 

19 Dexter St., Pittsfield 
Bettye M. Huban 

5 Bartlett Ave., Pittsfield 
John F. Hughes 

22 Springfield St., Cambridge 
Thomas F. Hughes 
.585 High St., Holyoke 



Turbaned Cynthia Leete renders homage to a pleased freshman 



John J. Hull 

10 Washington St., Gloucester 

William A. Hyder 

713 Lowell Ave., Haverhill 
-\rthur S. Irzyk 

37 Mason St., Salem 
Jacob Jackler 

261 Park St., Holyoke 
Irving .4. Jacobs 

29 Florence .\ve.. Revere 
Katharine N. Jaquith 

126 School St., N. Brookfield 
Warren I. Johansson 

96 Boutelle St., Leominster 
Robert W. Jones 

Box 205, CaryviUe 
Elizabeth M. Jordan 

127 Depot St., Dalton 
Frank E. Jost 

9 Hillside Ave., Port Washingto 
N. Y. 
Frank C. Joyner 

Cummington, Mass. 
Charlotte Kaizer 

192 Walden St., Cambridge 
David H. Kaplan 

421 Warren St., Roxbury 
George R. Kaplan 

142 Sutherland Rd., Brighton 
Robert J. Karp 

297 Trafton Rd., Springfield 
Aarne O. Karvonen 

Box 421, Townsend Rd., Shirley 
Anna M. Keedy 

37 Salem St., Amherst 
James H. Keefe 

43 Converse St., Palmer 
Robert L. Keefe. Jr. 

Stony Mill Rd., Springfield 
Charles R. Kelley 

260 Springside Ave., Pittsfield 
John E. Keough 

95 Pearl St., Holyoke 
Marjolaine A. Keough 

95 Pearl St., Holyoke 
Libby J. Kerlin 

Oakham Rd.. Spencer 
.\line J. Kernahan 

86 Orchard St., Adams 




Stanley T. Kisiel 

Box 44 Lathrop St., So. Hadley Fa 
.loseph T. Kokoski 

R.F.D. No. 3, Amherst 
Ernest A. Knowlton. Jr. 

18 Forest \\-e., Greenfield 
Bculah M. Kolb 

122 Howe St., Methuen 
Seymour Koritz 

23 Dumas St., Dorchester 
Sophie M. Korzun 

,83 Penn. Ave., Worcester 
Mitchell F. Kosciusko 

231 Millbury St., Auburn 

Lawrence W. Lamery 

French King Highway, Gill 
Edwin H. LaMontagne, Jr. 

76 Columbus Ave., Northampton 
Albert A. LaPlante 

10 Higgins St., Newton 
Lucille B. Lawrence 

84 Rittenhouse Ter., Springfield 
\lden W. Learovd 

371 Maple St., Danvers 



Cynthia N. Leetc 

Maple Rd., Briarcliff Manor, N. \. 



248 



Miriam LeMav 

Ifl Highland Ave., Ayer 
Oorothy T. Leonard 

10 Ferdinand St., Worcester 
Paul V. Leone 

17 Berkeley St.. Lawrence 
Bertram Libon 

fiO Brun.snick St., Roxbury 
Charles Limanni 

11.5 Garden St., Lawrence 
Anne L. Lincoln 

Thompson St., Halifax 
Donald S. Livermore 

2S Grant St., Spencer 
Clearhos Logothetis 

10 Cypress St., Brookline 
.John S. Lord 

83 Vernon St., Northampton 
.lohn A. Ludeman 



lla 



Te 



William R. Manchester 

77 Gillette Ave., Springfield 
Frank C. Mann 

309 Safford St., Wollaston 
Dorothy L. Maraspin 

Millway. Barnstable 
Richard P. March 

30 Otis St., Medford 
Arthur S. MarcouUier 

22 Tekoa Ter., Westfield 
Ruth A. Marfcert 

1.56 West St., Amherst 
Solomon H. Markowitz 

261 Dewey Ave., Pittsfield 
Marv E. Martin 

30 Cottage St.. Amherst 
Fayette C. Mascho 

R.F.D., Northampton 
Joseph A. Masi 

71 N. Park St., Franklin 
Shirley G. Mason 

23 Merriam St., Auburn 
Elizabeth M. McCarthy 

(>S Margin St., W. Newton 
Ralph E. McCormack 

33 Falcon St., E. Boston 
James H. McDermott 

W. Stockbridge 
Robert F. McEwan 

S9 Johnson Ave., Winthrop 
Anne E. Mclnerny 

103 Lakewood St., Worcester 
Eli»;al>ith B. Mclntvre 

7:; I l.niin, II, billow St., Longnieadow 
RoliiTl V*. M. Kav 

l.s WolcoU Rd.,'Watertown 
Edna A. McNamara 

10 Central St., Brookfield 
Forrest D. Meader 

1.5 Prospect St., Ware 
Irene Merlin 

390 Geneva Ave., Dorchester 
Roberta M. Miehike 

111 Cedar St., Clinton 
Everett R. Miller 

11)4 Riverside Dri%-e, Northampton 
Robert A. Monroe 

98 Broad St., Weymouth 
Thomas P. Moore 

S Magnolia Ave., Holyoke 
Leo A. Moreau 

27 Chester St., Taunton 
Lewis B. Morton. Jr. 

250 Sandwich St., Plymouth 
Roy E. Moser 

7.5 Sunset Ave., Amherst 



James M. Moulton 

139 Belleclaire Ave.. Longmeadow 
Thirza Moulton 

2 Silloway St., Dorchester 
Alfred P. Muldoon 

152 Winthrop St.. Quincy 
Sidney A. Murachver 

So Francis St., Everett 
He 



William H. Needham 

33 Pratt St., Springfield 
Shirley Nelson 

45 Cottage St., Sharon 
Dorothy Nestle 

277 Triangle St., Amherst 
Waldo E. Newton. Jr. 

59 Harold St., Melrose 
Irving E. Nichols 

32 Bullard St., Dedham 
Walter M. Niles 

12 Orient Place, Melrose 
Dorothea M. Nixon 

Westford 
Theodore A. Noke 

• 85 Litchfield St., Boston 
Richard .4. Norton 

87 Vernon St., Norwood 
Gloria E. Oakes 

34 Farnham St., Lawrence 
Barbara R. O'Brien 

188 Woodland Ave., Gardner 
Shirley A. O'Connell 

4 Grand Ave., Millers Falls 
Louise A. O'Connor 

24 Almont St., Mattapan 
Robert E. O'Leary 

40 Swain Rd., Wilmington 
Daniel F. O'Shea 

44LoringSt., HydePark 
Robert J. O'Shea 

218 Crescent St., Northampton 
Anne H. Ossen 

2lj7 Normandy St., Roxbury 
Donald E. Page 

107 Stratford A.ve., Pittsfield 
Charles F. Parker 

R.F.D. No. 1 Chester, Vt. 
Donald H. Parker 

285 Wren St., West Roxbury 
Stanley E. Parnish 

14 Lcidhold Place, Pittsfield 

31 Chestnut St., Gloucester 
Robert T. Parsons 

Federal St., Belchertown 
Renzo PeccioU 

125 Oak St., Holyoke 
Dorothy E. Peck 

Shelburne Falls 
William P. Percdnia 

94 Concord Ave., Norwood 
Aileen Perkins 

Box 181, Long Plain Rd., Acushnet 
Margaret R. Perkins 

Goshen 
Arnold B. Ferry 

Segregansett 
Helen P. Peterson 

St. George St., Millbrook 
Kenneth E. Peterson 

19RowcSt., Auburndale 
Francis M. Petroccione 

103 Bowler St., Lynn 
Robert E. Place 

15 Applelon Rd., West Auburn 
Henry G. Porleck, Jr. 

4 Allen St., North Andover 
Sue Poulos 

117 Washington St., Worcester 



FRESHMEN 



, Wantagh, N.Y. 



Frederick L. Preston. Jr 

Otis 
Samuel E. Pri, 

Wantagh Gar 
Irwin Promisel 

322 Spruce St., Chelsea 
George F. Pushee, Jr. 

1147 Pleasant St., North Amherst 
Edward J. Putala 

25 L St., Turners Falls 
Joy L. Putnam 

Sutton 
Mary W. Quinn 

71 Lexington Parkway, Pittsfield 
Edward J. Rabaioli 

531 Village St., Medway 
Elson B. Race 

Ro.valston Rd., Winchendon 
Robert F. Radway 

29 Jefferson .\ve., Waterford, Conn 
Bradlev H. Raymond 

Wrentham State School, Wrentham 
Marjory B. Reed 

400 James St., Chicopee 
Elizabeth J. Richards 

24 Terrace St., Orange 



Richard C. Roberson 

17 South St., Leominster 
Charles J. Rogers 

R.F.D. , Medway 
Ruth Rosoff 

9 Temple St., Springfield 
Sylvia Rossman 

87 Broad St., Lynn 
Frederic .4. Rothery 

121 Bellevue Ave., Spjingfield 



Avis M. Rvan 

S3 Massasoit St., Northampto 
Leo T. Ryan 

31 Michigan Ave., Pittsfield 
Robert I. Rvan 

U2 Park St., Hudson 
William P. Rvan 

15 Lennon St., Gardner 
Arnold C. Salinger 

4 Bridge St., Monson 
Gilbert Salk 

12 Wiltshire Rd., Brighton 



Irving J. Saltzman 

21 Theodore St., Dorchester 
Ethel M. Savalin 

1410 Blue Hill Ave., Mattapan 
Leslie V. Savino 

48 Walnut St., Northampton 
Jack E. Schwartz 

11 Quint Ave., .\llston 
David S. Secor 

Wilbraham 
Dor 

0.= 
Edith Sherman 

Main St., Chatham 
John R. Sherman 

Box 195, Sheffield 
Irving Shind 

8S Fairmont St., Malde 
Bertha Slotnick 

21 Parker St., Holyoke 



249 



FRESHMEN 



Beatrici 

52 Westmore Rd., Mattapan 



William D. Tittcrton 

257 Valentine Lane, Apt. 2A. Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 



Wilder L. Weeks 

12 Long Ave., Greenfield 



Ruth C. Sperry 

4S Scott St., Springfield 

Paul Stahlberg 

44 State St., Northampton 



1 Falls 

Gordon P. Trowbridge. ,Jr. 

129 King St., Northampton 

Howard B. Trufant 

78 Washington St., Abington 



Walter B. White 

60 Hollingsworth Ave., Braintree 



Mclvin W. Stern 

59 Brookledge St., Roxbur.v 

Robert M. Stewart 

lis Quinc.v Ave., Winlhrop 



Mildred N. Turner 

1(15 Montague City Rd., Greenfield 



Charlotte L. Sturtevant 

5S N. Prospect St., Amherst 



Peggy !Marsh snapped this study in lower limbs at Kazoo Day 




[250: 



Academic Activities Board . . 123 

Acknowledgments 252 

Adelphia 124 

Administration Officers ... 44 

Advertisements 253 

Alpha Epsilon Pi 160 

Alpha Gamma Rho 162 

Alpha Lambda Mu 164 

Alpha Sigma Phi 166 

Associate Alumni 46 

Band 150 

Baseball 204 

Basketball .200 

C.A.A 22 

" Campus Varieties " .... 29 

Chenoweth, Prof. W 62 

Class Officers 126 

Clubs 134 

Coed Sports 218 

Collegian 142 

Commencement 36 

Community Concert .... 26 

Construction 23 

Cross Country 208 

Dads' Day 28, 132 

Debating 152 

Dedication 6 

Faculty 50 

Fine Arts 26 

Football 194 

Fraternity Sports 219 

Freshman Activities 30 

Glee Clubs 154, 155 

Greeks 158 

Handbook Board 129 

Hockey 217 

Honor Commission .... 128 
Horticultural Show .... 32, 129 

Index 2, 4, 140, 146 

Interfraternity and Intersorority 

Ball Committees 133 

Interfraternity Council .... 130 

In Memoriam 63 

Interclass Athletic Board . 125 

Intersorority Council .... 130 

f 251 



Intermural Sports 219 

Isogon 124 

Joint Committee on Intercollegiate 

Athletics 123 

Kappa Sigma 168 

Lambda Chi Alpha 170 

Lambda Delta Mu 172 

Maroon Key 125 

Military Ball 19, 131 

Mothers' Day 132 

Operettas (1940-1941) .... 33 

Phi Beta Kappa 48 

Phi Kappa Phi 49 

Phi Sigma Kappa 174 

PhiZeta 176 

President Baker 3, 42 

Q. T. V 178 

Quarterly 145 

Religious Activities 24 

Roister Doisters 148 

R.O.T.C 18 

Scenic Section 8 

Senate 122 

Senior Class 64 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon .... 180 

Sigma Beta Chi 182 

Sigma Iota 184 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 186 

Sigma Xi 48 

Sinfonietta 153 

Soccer 214 

Social Union 26 

Soph-Senior Hop .... 38, 133 

Statesmen and Bay Staters . 157 

Statettes and Bay Statettes 156 

Swimming 212 

Tau Epsilon Phi 188 

Tennis 216 

ThetaChi .190 

Track (Spring and Winter) . 210, 211 

Trustees 43 

Underclasses 222 

Winter Carnival 34,131 

Women's Athletic Association . 128 

W.S.G.A 122 




( lia». laiiiiello, liv. Green 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



The covers for the 1941 Index were made by the David 
J. MoUoy Plant, 2857 North Western Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Orchids of gratitude from the Index staff to . . . Prof. 
Lawrence S. Dickinson, Dino G. Valz, Milton L. Fitch, 
Irving P. Green, Charles lannello, Dorothy Cooper, Dr. 
Maxwell Goldberg, A. A. Lubersky, George E. Emery, 
Robert Coffin, Joseph Bornstein, and State students. 







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(Above) Dr. >I. Goldberg and Prof. L. Dickinson, 1941 INDEX; (below) Dino Valz, Miss Dorothy Cooper and Milton Fitel 



DVERTISEMENTS 




DOUGLASS - MARSH 



. . . the store where you will always ob- 
tain dependable merchandise, cour- 
teous service, and good values . . the 
house that offers you all of the na- 
tionally known brands and types of 
furniture . . . Douglass-^Iarsh ... "In 
Amherst ... At the Head of the Village 
Green." 




In good furniture, lei Douglass 
be your life-saver. 




GULF SERVICE STATION 



. . . where courteous attendants are 
ready at all times to give you the fin- 
est service possible with those famous 
Gulf products. . when you want gas, 
when your car needs lubricating, or 
when it needs any other type of ser- 
vice . . . you will get quick service 
"with a smile" at the Gulf Service 
Station. 




"One long cheer" for 
Gulf Service Station. 




AMHERST OIL COMPANY 



. . . on Main Street near Triangle . . . 
this company serves Amherst and vi- 
cinity with fuel oil . . numbering 
among its many customers nearly all 
of State's fraternities and sororities 
. . . where you can also obtain General 
Electric and Crosley refrigerators . . . 
remember to call the Amherst Oil 
Company to satisfy your fuel oil need 
. . . your call will bring instant service 
by one of its fleet of five trucks. 




Amherst Oil Company leads the 
parade in economy and quality. 




THE LORD .JEFFEKY 



. . .a '' Treadivay Inn'' . . words that 
to the traveler mean all that is fine 
and enjoyable in one's stay "away 
from home". . just the place for an 
excellent meal or a successful ban- 
quet . . . where you will find that 
"quaint New England atmosphere" . . 




During graduation your folks will appreci- 
ate your choice if you reeoniniend the "Jeff." 



PAIGE'S 
GARAGE 




...Paige's Garage . on Pleasant 
Street next to the Post Office has 
served the people of Amherst well 
from the "horse and buggy days" 
for service with those fine Socony 
products . . . for repairs on your car 
for the new Chevrolet and Oldsniobile 
. . . America's most popular cars ... go 
to Paige's. 




'Ride high!" — trade 
at Paige's Garage. 




COLLEGE 
STORE 



. . . the student's store on campus . . . 
where State students stop for a light 
lunch and a few minutes of relaxation 
. . . where you can get your books, sta- 
tionery, wall decorations, and reading 
material at lower prices . . . meet your 
friends at . . . the College Store. 




"The Student's Store on 
campus" — for lower prices. 



CARPENTER 

AND 

MOREHOUISE 




. . . printers of distinction and merit 
yesterday, today, and tomorrow . . 
with a proud record of 99 years of ser- 
vice to Amherst, Carpenter and More- 
house is today perfectly equipped to 
meet your printing needs . . . no mat- 
ter how large or small. 
Printers of. . . 

The Massachusetts Collegian 

The Amherst Record 




"A Happy Landing" 

in Printing Satisfaction. 




LOUIS' 
FOODS 



. . . for a full line of quality produce, 
meats, and groceries — visit the new- 
est, finest food shop in Amherst . . . for 
your every food requirement, call 
Louis' Foods and receive prompt de- 
livery . get the best for the most rea- 
sonable price . . when you buy at 
Louis*. 




Even State faculty 
find Louis' superior. 



HASTINGS 




. . . for your choice in literature . . . 
novel, magazine, or newspaper . for 
all types of gifts, games, stationery, 
school supplies, and sporting goods 
. . . where the atmosphere is cordial 
and service prompt . . . drop in to buy 
or merely to browse . at Hastings. 




"Your choice in literature" 
and miscellany at Hastings. 



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HARRIS 

CANDY 

KITCHEN 



. . .New England's finest restaurant 
. ..where State students have gath- 
ered on all occasions for more than 
twenty-five years . . . where you can 
always be assured of getting the best 
of food and fountain service in the 
most pleasant surroundings . . . and at 
a reasonable price . . the Sarris Col- 
lege Candy Kitchen. 




The Candy Kitchen, rendezvous 
of all fraternity men. 




CHRISTENSOX 

Cypecialisis m cTine ^1 iLiiiiary (Ocfutpuieiit 
286 FIFTH AVENUE * NEW YORK CITY 




THE HOUSE OF WALSH 

. . . the clever man chooses his clothes with care . . . the House of Walsh, favorite cloth- 
ier for Mass. State men for many years, always gives its patrons the satisfaction they 
desire . . for the best and latest styles in men's furnishings, let the House of Walsh 
be your guide. 




BUTTERFIELD HOUSE LOUIS WARREN ROSS. ARCHITECT 
GEORGE H. REED & CO.. INC.. BUILDERS 



George H. Reed & Co., Inc 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTORS 



Our experience and equipment are your insurance. 



24 FRANKLIN STREET 



GREENFIELD, MASS. 




LEWIS HALL — LOUIS WARREN ROSS. ARCHITECT 
GEORGE H. REED a CO.. INC.. BUILDERS 



SmooiU BcUiid^! 



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-n 



When qour Yearbook Course 
HOWARD-WESSON COMPANY 

44 Portland Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 



Ne>uA ZHjflcuHxh. JUa/Ufeii QolUtfe. duyijCuue/iA. 



L//ie S^nc/ot^f'- r/i^eA^', ^tc/. 



Htuotlte^ PuMicaiio^t . . . 



SHOWING 

SARGENT 

SUPERIORITY 



Complete Photographic Service 

to the 

1940 and 1941 

INDEX 



Sargent Studio Inc. - Boston, Massachusetts