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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/index1942univ 



BUSINESS MANAGER— GOULD KETCHEN Photographer— SARGENT STUDIO 

STEPS OFF THE SEAL OF 



Priutoi— SPRINGFIELD PRINTING & BINDING CO. 




104:^ 




Dedicated to 






'V 'Z'- 






When the INDEX Board decided to dedicate their book 
to Dr. Maxwell Henry Goldberg, they honored a leading 
advocate of the philosophy that "man doth not live by 
bread alone"; that if he tries to do so, so much the less 
is he a man. Now in an institution which has been con- 
cerned chiefly with the problem of "the loaves and the 
fishes," there is bound to be always a rivalry between 
those who regard the business of man's life as the acquisi- 
tion of "bread" and those who do not. It is with the 
latter, the dissenters from the utilitarian interpretation 
of man, that Dr. Goldberg long has been identified. 

To Dr. Goldberg abiding values, proceeding from "the 
good life," alone can give significance to man and "his 
little day." By no accident, then, integrity, industry, 
assiduous application to the task in hand, tireless energy 
— all have their unique exemplification in Dr. Goldberg. 
Through these he has achieved a scholarship which has 
won the approbation even of a Karl Young. Hence, to 
all cant, politics playing, dabbling; to flippant and 
shallow sparkle as a substitute for hard thinking. Dr. 
Goldberg is a living rebuke. 

Those of us, moreover, who have come to know this 
man are well aware that mere theory without practice can 
never satisfy him. Our "rights to life, liberty, and the 
pursuit of happiness," he has said in a recent commence- 
ment address, must be won again and again, if they are 
to be something more than formulae to which lip service 
only is rendered. So it is through education, right 
education, that we are, in Dr. Goldberg's phrase, to "re- 
possess ourselves, afresh, .... of our basic rights and 
privileges." "Democracy [must] become again democ- 
racy in action," as Archibald MacLeish says, "not 
democracy accomplished and piled up in goods and gold." 

"Democracy in action," that is it; a thinking hard 
and lean; an integrity found in one's personal life and 
found, hence, in society ;— these, I know, are the principles 
which motivate our friend. These are the standards by 
which he judges his students, and for these they respect 
and admire him. 

Walter E. Prince. 



[6] 




Maxwell H. Cpoldberg 



r- • '^^f^^f.- 





"On the blue rignal. . 




"Magnified in importance. 



While the rest of the world held its ring- 
side seat and waited breathlessly for the next 
bout in the international wrestling match, 
Massachusetts State College turned its back on 
the ring. Minds which had concentrated on 
foreign aflfairs during the summer again focussed 
on sophomore "Pats" and the first vie party of 
the season. M. S. C. students shut themselves 
away from the world and settled down to the 
goode olde grinde in ye towne of Amherste. 

Bewildered frosh, who found themselves 
wearing maroon caps and "stylish" tams, soon 
carried a whole lot of pricked bubbles in their 
wake — what with hopping over numerals and 
serenading at 6:30 A. M. Monitored by the 
Maroon Key, the men of '45 had to answer for 
any misdemeanors to the unyielding Senate; 
capital punishment meant a swim in the College 
Pond. Freshman Reception, exclusive to the 
'45ers and their profs, and the Freshman- 
Sophomore Rope Pull (where for the first time 
in four years the frosh were dragged in ignominy 
and disgrace through the College Pond) were 
among major freshman functions. At the 
Razoo push ball game the frosh again bowed to 
the sophs. W. A. A. Play Day introduced 
coeds to sports participated in by women of 



[8] 



M. S. C. Gradually the class of '45 became 
sufficiently acquainted with campus affairs to 
settle down to a calm and serious life of wearing 
caps and tams and of remaining seated in 
Bowker Auditorium until their elders left. 

Now on to the Big Fall News — football. 
This year with Walter Hargesheimer as coach 
and Jack Brady as captain, the club came out 
with balanced ledgers — one tie, three wins, 
four losses — and with the general feeling that 
football at State would remain out of the "red." 
Campus rallies (including Dean Lanphear's 
traditional advice to the "Squaws and Braves") 
preceded the games. Attired in snappy new 
outfits, the cheer leaders provoked spirit at 
fall games with their revamped fanfares, their 
acrobatic tumbling, and their indomitable 
"Clarky"; and the band, marching jauntily 
on to the field, led by strutting majorettes, 
added color and music to the fall turf battles. 
Among the battles this fall two stand out 
because of the beloved college tradition they 
represented. At the first, on Dads' Day, a 
holiday spirit prevailed as dads brushed against 
dads, attending classes, military review, and 
the football game against Norwich. On the 
second — Amherst Weekend — torrents of rain 
engulfed campus; the rain that Amherst spe- 
cially reserves for that occasion. Beginning 
on Friday evening with Campus Varieties, 
which financed Student Leader Day in March, 
and continuing through the Amherst-State foot- 
ball game and Round-Robin vie parties in the 
evening, the weekend proved a bit wet. 

Vying with the gridiron team in popularity 
this year was the soccer team, which played its 
best season in ten years with four wins, two 
losses, and one tie. Not so successful in terms 
of victories but nevertheless right in there 
fighting was the cross country team for which 
senior Brad Greene did outstanding work. 

Extracnrricnlar Extravaganza 

What the morning paper is to the business 
man at breakfast is the "Collegian" to the 
M. S. C. student after convo; so, firmly 
shaking summer sands from tousled heads, the 
members of the Collegian staff hustled back to 
campus and published a Collegian for the con- 




"A W.A.A. Play 





" Among battles of this fall. . 



[9] 




"CoUegtan makes efort. 




"More than ready to take up. 



Give »*2. 
of }four bdirk.^ 
C, birvA tr<s 




"Tribe of creative artiett. 



vocation that officially opened college. This 
year they made an all out effort to cover all 
the college news Meanwhile Editor-in-chief 
Lois Doubleday, having spent most of the 
summer struggling over the 1942 INDEX 
dummy, brought her "brain-child" back to a 
staff that, although depleted in numbers, was 
still more than ready to continue where they 
had left off the previous May. Priorities 
claimed some of the materials and shortened 
semesters worked havoc on the printing and 
engraving deadlines. Nevertheless, the first 
of May the 1942 INDEX appeared on campus. 
Members of the long-haired tribe of creative 
artists unsatisfied even with the high level of 
journalism as maintained in the Collegian and 
INDEX found in the Collegian Quarterly the 
vehicle for their creative work whether poetry, 
drama, fiction, or essay. 

Meanwhile other campus activities were 
getting started. Doric Alviani began pumping 
pep and spirit into his summer-jaded musical 
outfits, and rehearsals started in full swing. 
This year their enlarged off-campus program 
brought the musical clubs to near-by towns, to 
Springfield and Boston, and to the air waves. 
Highlights of their campus programs were the 
Social Union concert and the operetta. Their 
good work culminated in that long-awaited, 
richly-deserved New York trip in the spring. 
The M. S. C. Outing Club, combining with 
other O. C.'s started fall off with a mountain 
climbing jaunt and spent an active year of 
tripping, trailing, and twirling. Matching point 
for point with their opponents and digging up 
even more convincing arguments in rebuttal 
the M. S. C. debating team "batted the breeze" 
with Amherst, Mount Holyoke, A. I. C, and B. U. 
New this year for the club was a freshman 
debating team and the attendance of the team at 
the Model Congress of Colleges in New England. 

Director Reverend Easton, new on campus, 
carried on regular Sunday Vespers, coordinated 
the various religious organizations, and insti- 
gated the United Religious Conference in March. 
Evidence of M. S. C.'s interest in religion was 
the large attendance afforded Dr. Gilkey, the 
intense interest shown in Rabbi Cahn's course, 
and the hearty welcome extended to Father 
Walsh. Father Walsh's lectures at convocation 



;io] 



and before the Languages and Literature Club 
brought forth a large and appreciative audience. 
Throughout the year, Social Union and 
Fine Arts brought excellent entertainment to 
campus. Most enjoyable of all — the Chekhov 
players' Twelfth Night — started Social Union in 
full swing. Other popular Social Union per- 
formances were those of violinist Dushkin, the 
American Ballad Singers, and the three Roister 
Doister one-act plays. This year the Fine Arts 
series consisted of informal talks about poetry, 
painting, and music led by campus men who 
encouraged student discussion. 

The Most Social of Animals 

With fall came the hunting season and 
M. S. C. went after Big Game: they set their 
traps, lured their quarries, and, when they had 
them cornered, sicked their hounds upon them. 
Thegame, unsuspecting freshmen; the hunters, 
smooth sorority sisters and friendly fraternity 
men. Beginning on Student Leader Day in 
the spring with, "Say, Jack, old boy ! Why don't 
you come down to the house!" and continuing 
in the summer through the media of those 
"lovely letters" from upperclassmen, rushing 
extended its exact "season." Fall is the time for 
all good houses to jam closets full of trash, to 
hide bottles under beds, and to serve steak and 
chicken to freshmen with "caf "-starved stomachs. 
The two-week period of concentrated rushing 
for the men this fall netted only 47% of the 
class. For the coeds, however, rushing did not 
officially begin until a Round-Robin tea on 
October fifteenth; rushing was kept open with 
"open house" on the following Thursday and 
continued until November fifteenth. 

Even during rushing season campus activi- 
ties managed to survive; and the weekend of 
November seventh found hordes of people, a 
transformed cage, men holding meters (that 
ticked off over seventeen thousand people), 
girls with gardenias, yum-yum apples, pottery 
piggy banks, and flowers everywhere. This all 
meant "Hort" Show, big fall event. As usual 
the Hort Show reflected the interest of the 
students even while it carried out a Victorian 
theme, and placed its emphasis on patriotism 
with a giant shield of red, white, and blue 
flowers, and fruits. Supposed to represent the 

[11] 





"Batting the breete. . ." 




'Cams the huiUing leaeon. . ." 




"Chicken for 'caj'-slarvcd frosk. 




"Hordes of people found. . 




"Politics never guite forgotten. 



zealous patriotism of the Victorian era, the 
shield truly expressed the spirit of November, 
1941. Fall brought scholarship convocation. 
Newly elected seniors to Phi Kappa Phi, seniors 
doing honors work, and profs all took over the 
stage — these and the Dean's List are a quiet 
reminder to the unambitious students. But 
scholarship was soon in the background in the 
excitement over fall elections, Campus politics, 
never completely forgotten, emerged in full 
view, as elections for class officers roiled up the 
muddy water of politics. Election day, Decem- 
ber fourth, saw every house on campus turned 
out en masse to vote. 

Then War and "What Now?" 

December 7, 1941! Attack on Pearl 
Harbor! With the entry of the United States 
into the war, a period of doubt and uncertainty 
ended; but actual fear cropped up in its stead. 
What now? For a few short days a wave of 
war hysteria almost submerged campus. Books 
were thrown aside for serious bull sessions. 
News broadcasts were fairly eaten up. The 
situation necessitated a special "war" convoca- 
tion for men alone. As they sang the Alma 
Mater and When Twilight Shadows Deepen, 
the men of Massachusetts State exhibited a 
vein of seriousness rarely before witnessed by 
convo walls. They were asked to remain in 
college until they were called to service, and 
suitable credit was promised those having to 
leave. Familiar khaki uniforms with crossed sa- 
bers were magnified in importance on campus to 
others as well as uniform-susceptible feminine 
hearts. R. O. T. C. was now a direct step to 
more real action. The military unit this year 
saw excellence in markmanship, the formation 
of the Sabers and Spurs Society, and promotion 
in rank for the commanding officers. Though 
this may be a war of tanks and jeeps, cavalry 
troops still have an important place and the 
usual training was continued. Ranking with 
R. O. T. C. was the C. A. A. group of student 
pilots, who, after a strict training, became 
available to the army. Four short days after 
declaration of war found campus uniforms 
tripping the "light fantastic toe" in Drill Hall. 
New war economy? No, the big fall formal — 
Military Ball. 



[12] 



In December, a Community Chest Drive 
consolidated the former annual Red Cross, 
March of Dimes, and World Student Service 
Fund into one extensive victory drive. This 
drive instigated and guided by Mr. Easton with 
Dean Machmer's help and cooperation set a 
goal at $1,500 and made it. A giant ther- 
mometer stationed in front of South College 
registered the progress of this worth-while drive. 

Snow, wind, and ice brought winter sports. 
The boys on the hockey team, although officially 
an informal club, put as much spirit into their 
play and as much hard work into their practice 
as any recognized team. Fairly successful this 
year among official winter clubs was the basket- 
ball team with eight wins and three losses to its 
credit when Christmas vacation came along. 
After the exam period, the team seemed to 
have lost its stride though it played some 
mighty fine basketball against its traditional 
rival, the Amherst quintet, and against Wil- 
liams and A. I. C. Bellowed into victory by 
Joe Rogers, this year's swimming team chalked 
up a record of seven wins out of nine meets. 
However, the boys were not the only ones with 
a victorious swimming team, for the W. A. A. 
swimming club not only won the New England 
Telegraphic Meet but also won renown through 
its intricate water ballet. While on women's 
athletics, we shouldn't neglect Kate Callahan's 
Modern Dance Club, and for corroboration of 
its benefits, ask certain football players. 

The last school week in 1941! Through 
the clear, cold air on Sunday evening sounded 
the notes of Chapel chimes in the carol "Silent 
Night! Holy Night!" Student voices, aug- 
mented by the band and Glee Clubs, softly 
picked up the melody and slowly increased in 
volume. This traditional carol singing, directed 
by Doric Alviani, was broadcast over the radio. 
All in all this week before Christmas vacation 
was a musical one. At their annual Christmas 
Concert the band combined with Conductor 
Farnham, Student Director Al Eldridge, and 
the Drimi Majorettes to give an excellent per- 
formance. Two nights later the Glee Clubs 
and the Sinfonietta gave a joint concert — this 
program has always been one of the most 
popular Social Unions. 




"A direct step to real action 







"All in all a musical week. 




TAP rfiO 
"Snow, tcind, and ice brought. 



[13] 




"Atk certain football players. 




"Show of the air. 




"TvHMceeki reign of terror. 



Defense, Varieties, Calamity 

Immediately after Christmas vacation the 
college organized Civilian Defense. Upon the 
blue signal, A. R. P. groups directed students 
to the nearest air raid shelter, whether Goodell 
Libe, Goessman Lab, or Butterfield. Particu- 
larly noticeable were the number of males who 
happened to be in the vicinity of Butterfield. 
In January, too, a new radio show was 
born, "Campus Varieties," an M. S. C. show 
of the air entirely student planned and pro- 
duced. The only faculty man concerned, Fran 
Pray, took charge of the technical end of 
production. Also student planned and pro- 
duced were the one-act plays sponsored by the 
Roister Doisters. Roister Bolsters omitted 
their usual winter play while Professor Rand 
took care of a Dramatic Workshop added to 
the curriculum because of student demand. 
Sudden calamity descended upon campus 
as the shortened first semester brought no 
official exam period but a two-weeks reign of 
terror with profs able and willing to give in- 
numerable hour exams. Suffering on campus 
from January 12-21 was unbelievable, but few 
fatalities were reported in the Dean's Office and 
second semester started calmly. New war econ- 
omy and the accelerated program created a 
shortened second semester to end in May and 
anticipated a two-semester summer course. 

Friday the thirteenth and Carnival 
Ball. Despite Chairman Potter's public prayer 
for snow, there was very little of the stuff. 
Nevertheless most of the scheduled events — 
ice skating, wrestling and boxing, snow sculpture, 
swimming and dancing — took place. Dark- 
haired Anita Marshall reigned as ball queen. 
Campus politics again came into prominence 
with the March election for Senate, Maroon 
Key, W. S. G. A., Honor Commission, and 
fraternity and sorority presidents. The week 
of March third saw the annual High School 
Basketball Tournament, and on the following 
weekend the campus was again given over to 
crowds of people — the Recreation Conference. 
Another big weekend in March was that of the 
presentation of the Pirates of Penzance. 



114] 



Spring and Campus Customs 

Spring came early to State and with it the 
good old American custom of baseball, but 
spring sports were overshadowed by the short- 
ened semester and the compulsory physical 
education program set up for all men students. 
Spring track and tennis were the other usual out- 
standing spring varsity sports. Perhaps in- 
cluded in spring sports should be the weekly 
Tuesday morning R. O. T. C. reviews when a 
young army paraded up and down campus. 
Then came the Inter-Greek Ball, cramming the 
two spring balls of tradition into one evening, 
Greek maidens wailed when both they and their 
men had to buy tickets. Mothers' Day came 
the first of May, one week earlier than the 
national day, and had enthusiastic approval as 
students chose a typical mother. While the 
rest of the campus was so happily concerned 
with the present, some students were thinking 
of the future and taking care of a Freshman 
Handbook to guide next year's freshmen. 
Reward for merit was taken care of at the 
end of the year: at the Academic Activities 
Convocation, late in April, medal awards were 
made; at the Senior Convocation new Adel- 
phians were tapped; and at the Junior-Senior 
Processional, Isogonians tapped new members. 

The sound of the chimes at 5:15, cokes at 
the college store. Collegians after convo, bull 
sessions in the Libe — but days were too full for 
remembering as Commencement was telescoped 
into two short days. Senior Convocation and 
the Senior Banquet as usual prepared the way 
for Commencement: The Horse Show, the 
Flint Oratorical Contest, Alumni Homecoming 
and parade to the baseball game, the Roister 
Bolster play. Torch Bearers, Roister Doister, 
Academic Activities, and Varsity Breakfasts, 
Baccalaureate, President's Reception, and 
Graduation — beloved Campus traditions were 
kept for the class of 1942. And on the evening 
of May 18, came their last ball — Soph-Senior 
Hop complete with the Chapel chimes concert. 

So with shoulders square and eyes straight 
ahead, M. S. C. marched through '41-'42 not to 
the tune of "Heil Hitler" but of "There is a cer- 
tain valley by a river's golden stream. . . ." 




"Qreek maidtni wailed. . ." 







"Reward for merit. . ." 




"Beloved traditioni kept. 



[15] 




THE PRESIDENT 

"We were ready — we are serving" is Massa- 
chusetts State College's proud message to the 
world. Our college has been among the leaders 
in planning and mobilizing for national defense 
and for allied victory. 

War, declared in September, 1939, dragged 
along as a "token" war. In June, 1940, France 
fell. At that time, while America still spoke 
of keeping out of a fighting war, this college 
prepared and sent to Governor Saltonstall a 
complete summary of how this college could 
aid in defending America. A College Defense 
CouncU was then appointed to study and report 
on the matter. 

Since "Pearl Harbor" and our subsequent 
entry into the war, we have adopted an accel- 
erated program. This includes shortened 
semesters with Commencement coming on May 
17th, and a twelve weeks' summer session 
which will continue each year through the 
duration of the war. This will give students 
their fullest college experience before they are 
called to industrial or military service. 




[16] 



rHE COLLECiE . . . ANn THE WAR . . 




President and Mrs. Baker still devote evenings to social affairs such as the 1941 Soph-Senior Hop receiving 
line pictured above; but this year finds the President much concerned in the College's part in national defense 



171 




R. O. T. €. AS A MAJOR 



With polyandrous Bellona constantly 
demanding new bridegrooms, the 
R. O. T. C. has sprung into a sudden and 
eventful prominence on State campus. 
Commandant Donald A. Young was 
promoted first to the position of Lt. 
Colonel, then to that of Colonel; new 
member of the khaki department James 
R. Chambliss was advanced from a 
captaincy to a majority; and Staff 
Sergeant Patrick Creary retired from 
active duty after fourteen years of 
teaching. 

The student section of our military 
department kept hitting the headlines, 
too. A military society, Sabers and 
Spurs, modeled on the Scabbard and 
Blade, national honor fraternity of the 
R. O. T. C, was formed by junior and 
senior cavalry majors, and automatically 



Horsemanship at Horse Show, Gauniond on JuUus 




officers 



hA a 



,ber-t»-«*'' 



,,^., for Victory 



Vin and Jack try out a hit of mechanization 




.18] 



PAKT OF THE STUDEXTS' LIFE 



included all rm'nihor.s of the advanced 
corps. The members, fearing' that their 
choice of officers might conflict with the 
cadet commanders chosen in the spring, 
did not elect leaders in the customary 
manner. Instead, they chose George 
Kimball, James Gilman, Vincent Erikson, 
Vincent LaFleur, Ralph Hatch, Frederick 
Burr, Russell McDonald, Roger Mad- 
docks, and Frederick McLaughlin to 
make arrangements for meetings. Sabers 
and Spurs has as its underlying motive 
"the imiting in clo.ser relationship of 
the Military Department and the corps 
of cadets ... of promoting military dis- 
cipline, courtesy, and patriotism ... of 
giving military majors, as educated men, 
the chance to take a more active part in 
the military affairs of the state and 
nation. . . ." 



A great military advance gained 
through skillful strategy was the whole- 
-saie invasion of the uniform-su.sce|)tible 
feminine hearts at the Military Bali held 
December twelfth appropriately in Drill 
Hall. The work of Chairman Winthrop 
Avery's committee gladdened not only 
the warriors and their wenches, but the 
civilians and their swinging sweet- 
hearts. " 'Cush' for Colonel!" cried the 
cadets as they chose Eleanor Cushman 
Honorary Colonel; and, as saber blades 
glittered, Eleanor, with Bill Kimball 
escorting her, marched down the columns 
of "at attention," uniformed "Majors" 
to receive from the Colonel her military 
mantle and regimental pin, insignia of 
her office as chief reviewer of all "Mass. 
State Cavalry." 

M. S. C.'s unit headed the list of nine 



Arv's spring 



oi M»**- 



Colonel 



„ Colooe 



.^ YouoP 





JUXIOR & 







New England colleges in the percentage 
qualified in rifle marksmanship (91.3% 
of the seniors) for the 1941 training 
camp season for the First Corps Area. 
Since every junior taking advanced 
military qualified in either of the two 
upper classes, expert or sharpshooter. 



good riflemen must be rife on campus. 
The Rifle Team was reorganized only 
last year, after five years of inactivity, 
and has been outstandingly successful 
in its competition with the rifle teams of 
such colleges as the University of Con- 
necticut and M. I. T. It also competed 



F. McLaughlin, Gizienski. Fiorio. Gorman. Burr, Freeman. Drozdal 
Tosi, Marsden, Melnick, Atwood, Hatch, Andrew, J. Shepardson, Rochelea 




"iO 



SENIOR COMS & NON-COMS 



- M M \ 



^^ 



#^i 



-^T 






W 



W 



■4«5^jl 



■■■1^^^^ -Wall, ^'■'^'^' stooB' l-»^' ^ Bisb»P' *^ 

J Andrew. J- „ Lalibe" 



d. Erikson, Sullivan, McDonald 
Carter, Avery, Bennett 




honorably in the First Corps Area 
matches, and in the Hearst Trophy 
Matches in which rifle teams throughout 
the United States compete. 

Spring reviews and horsemanship shows 
came early in accordance with the rest 
of the college's accelerated program. 
Nevertheless, M. S. C."s military majors 
continued to ujjhold their excellence in 
riding and jumping and in commanding 
underclassmen in formation marching. 

The War Department issued the state- 
ment that Massachusetts State College's 
cavalry unit will maintain its present 
status, but that modern equipment, in- 
cluding some for mechanized training, 
will probably be sent here. But still 
Lochinvars ride out of the West (of 
Massachusetts). 



n 




Octal 



North to Undorliill 

Eight o'clock, and the morning after! 
With snatches of music and faces of 
sweet little blondes still floating through 
misty thoughts. State's dance-weary but 
bellicose brethren on June tenth betook 
themselves to the military department to 
collect equipment and horses. Thirty- 
seven military majors started north on a 
six-weeks training trip which included a 
ten-day stop for firing in Northfield. 
Vermont, home of Norwich Cavalry. 
Later M. S. C.'s Modern Knights Mili- 
tary arrived at Underhill, Fort Ethan 
Allen's artillery range, and, finding the 
Norwich Giants there ahead of them, 
proceeded to engage them in sham battles. 
Casualties were few but included one 
horse tangled and mangled by barbed 
wire. Highlights of the trip were two 
night marches: one from Randolph to 
Barnard entailing a reveille at one A.M., 
the second into Amherst. Intended to 
give a well-rounded impression of the 
private's life, this trip provided K. P., 
Picket Duty, and Fatigue Duty for each 
aspiring officer. 

From a slightly-censored diary, we 
reconstruct a typical day : 



LET'S KEEP 'EM 

At the screech of the whistle, Punk 
crawled sleepily from his bedroll, joined 
a moment later by Jim to go on an 
expedition pertaining to starved steeds. 
Returning, they ripped down pup tents, 
and rushed to breakfast. Starting at 
six and walking ten minutes out of sixty 
to rest their — horses, they reached camp 
at ten. Lunch! Sick call (no reported 
connection), followed by struggles with 
strategy problems. Class adjourning, 
Jim, Punk, and several other warriors 
relaxed. After retreat formation, they 
advanced towards supper. A double 
feature and a double soda in town, 
"Darling, Today we — ," then Z-Z-Z-Z. 

It was on July twenty-first that the 
Maroon militarists rode out of the morn- 
ing fog, turned in their equipment, and 
joyfully headed for home. 




llors«* 



roomed, "-■• 



relax*' 



A at 



yA of a 



day 



RIDIXO & FLYIXG AT M.S.C. 



rivil Aoronaulies 

Wlien you walk on our campus at night 
and see the classrooms ahght, or when 
you hear the drone of a motor and 
notice bright wings dipped in the sun, you 
iinow that Massachusetts State College's 
faculty and students are doing their share 
to "Keep "em flying." 

For three years the students of Massa- 
chusetts State College have had the 
opportunity of becoming pilots under the 
Civil Aeronautics Act. This year Lewis 
Atwood, Daniel Carter, Paul Cole, John 
Dudds, Thomas Gordon (Alternate), 




Robert Hobson, Walter Niles, Richard 
Pierce, Lester Rich, Harry Sloper, Chester 
Stone, Richard Symonds (Alternate) were 
enrolled for this training. 

The course was open to both upper- 
class and graduate students. The ground 
school instructors were volunteers from 
the faculty. Members of this year's 
committee for C. A. A. included Registrar 
Lanphear, Dr. Anderson, and Dr. Ross. 
The practical work was supervised by 
Mr. O'Connor, manager of the Westfield 
Airport, where students took ground 
school and flight training from instruc- 
tors at the airport. 

Twenty-four hours of navigation, eight- 
een hours of civil air regulations, six 
hours of general service of aircraft con- 
stituted the work of the ground school. 
After flying a minimum of eight hours, 
the student was required to make thirty- 
five hours of solo flight and to complete a 
government examination. He then be- 
came the holder of a private pilot's 
license, ready to be called on by the 
United States whenever necessary. 

Others than C. A. A.'ers Carter and Sloper interested 





FORWARD FROSH 








pads' 



Day 



sbbaU coov 



yiesb'rt"*' 



ilaxoo 



BECOME 



Hilarious Hazing 

This year's "Welcome Frosli" greeted 
just three more bewildered freshmen than 
did last year's. Beginning September 
15, the class of '45 entered a period of 
hilarious hazing that lasted through half 
its first year at State. 

That this hazing was ridiculous could 
be confirmed by the sight of muscular 
freshmen daintily skipping over the 
numerals thoughtfully provided by numer- 
ous graduating classes. No less laugha- 
ble was the appearance of the freshman 
women when they wore their smart 
white (orphanage mode) berets pulled 
down chicly over their ears, and dressed 
their hair in the tightly-drawn style 
another generation has labelled that of 
"Kate Snatch of the needle factory." 



less attractive after a mud bath 




124] 



The rule forbidding the use of make-up 
during hazing week proved tlie fear of 
competition felt by the safely-painted 
sophomore women. However an en- 
chanting piquancy was leant to the 
freshmen by the eyebrow-pencilled freck- 
les and lovable lisp of "Baby Day." 



^Iiid and Mutiny 

Less attractive after a mud bath were 
the men of '45 at the end of the freshman- 
sophomore rope pull wherein the fresh- 
men lost for the first time in four years. 
Adding 1-1 was their defeat at Razoo, 
determined by the outcome of a pushball 
game before paternal eyes on Dads' Day. 
Penalized for their defeat by a Senate 
rule requiring that they exhibit their 
sophisticated headgear from Thanks- 
giving to Christmas, a few defiant souls 



rebelled, to be gently requested to appear 
before the Senate. To show its appre- 
ciation, this august body held two 
aquatic socials for them. The Senate 
honored one recalcitrant freshman by 
allowing him to render invaluable aid in 
the province of flood control by bailing 
out College Pond with a pail for fifteen 
minutes after Convo. 

Meanwhile fair freshmen vacillated 
between saluting and snubbing dashing 
military men. And at times the Dairy 
Damsels, unduly prudent, carried um- 
brellas beneath a beaming sun. 

To many a freshman the one consoling 
feature of hazing was an oppor- 
tunity to take part in group singing in 
the salubrious morning mist. Often a 
suitable accompaniment for the male 
serenaders was provided by that novel 
percussion instrument, a wooden paddle, 
plus a slightly padded resonator. 



MEEK MEN & MAIDENS 



Sophisticated headgear mark Frosh 



Fair freshmen no less laughable in "smart" white tarns 







25 




culpt"*^'"' 



Carai^"^ 



HotnaS 



King 



CARNIVAL 



Friday, February Thirteenth 

Registration at Memorial Hall 
Ski Races and Skating Races 
Judging of Snow Sculptures 
Winter Carnival Ball at Drill Hall 
Coronation of the Carnival Queen 
Announcement of Sculpture Winners 

Saturday, February Fourteenth 

Boxing and Wrestling 
Hockey Game on College Pond 
Figure Skating Exhibition 
Swimming and Diving at Whitcomb 

Pool 
Ski Boot Informal at Drill Hall 
Medal Awards by Carnival Queen 
Fraternity Round-Robin Dances 



QUEST FOR A 



The devil wakes the north wind and third prize for T.E.P. 




In spite of Chairman Spencer Potter's 
public prayers for a heavy snowfall 
there wasn't enough of the stuff on the 
ground to permit ski races to be held 
during Winter Carnival, but Success 
smiled elsewhere — from the sleekness of 
the prize-winning snow sculpture, 
"Tribute to King Winter," to the satis- 
fying grunts in boxing and wrestling at 
the cage. 

Friday the thirteenth didn't faze Dottie 
Dunklee and Betty Washburn who placed 
first and second respectively in the 
hundred and two-hundred yard women's 
events, while "Ace" Thayer smiled 
scornfully at superstition after skating 
off with three firsts ! Al Salomon won the 
four-forty yard dash, while Art White 
concentrated on seconds. In a surprising- 
upset. Alpha Gam's amateur cross 
countrv runner, Dick Smith, took first in 



H, 



"^Jage fo 



QUEEX 



the snow-bank and ice-patch course 
while Bill Darrow of Kappa Sig copped 
second. 

That night after giving first place to 
Alpha Gamma Rho's snow sculpture, the 
judges picked Alpha Tau Gamma's 
dramatically-lighted Defense group 
second, and Tau Epsilon Phi's The Devil 
JVho Wakes the NoHh Wind third. 

With Sam Donahue and his orchestra 
playing, the Winter Carnival Ball was 
voted — almost any filmland superlative 
adjective — and Anita Marshall the most 
beauteous coed. As Carnival Queen she 
was attended by a sextet of ladies-in- 
waiting, including M. S. C.'s own Estelle 
Bowen, Peggy Deane, Daphne Miller, 
and Marge Stanton. 

Faced with the Parisian task of judg- 
ing the most beautiful among so much 
beauty were Professors Frederick S. 
Troy and John H. Vondell of M. S. C. 
and David Morton, famed Amherst poet. 



"'^aiy^l 




All the other lovely ladies attending 
received favors of ski-crossed wooden 
MSC pins. 

In Saturday's wrestling matches Emil 
Adams beat Salvatore Italia, Herb Gross 
pinned Jim Fulton, and Bob Doolittle 
fought Al Salomon to a draw. Sam 
Glass was granted a technical knockout 
over Fred Filios, and Huck Koobatian a 
three-round decision over George Flessas 
in the boxing events, Bernie Stead gain- 
ing the decision in the heavyweight class 
over Bob Kline. Nor was grace neg- 
lected in the worship of strength — in- 
spired by the spectacle of a skillful 
hockey game, the Holyoke Figure Skating 
Club pirouetted on the pond that same 
P. M. State's naiads performed a delicate 
and rhythmic Water Ballet during the 
swimming exhibition featuring Maria 
Lenk, Brazilian Breaststroker, and New 
England diving champions, Peggy 
Matchet and Ed Smyke. 

At the Ski-Boot Informal later in the 
afternoon. Queen Anita, after receiving 
her own silver loving cup, graciously be- 
stowed medals on winners of the carnival 




Queen 



AoVta 



,Uects 



contests and presented the Interfraternity 
Carnival Cup to Alpha Gamma Rho. 
That evening festive feet grew faintly 
more fatigued as fraternity dances and 
Round-Robins completed carnival capers. 



Fedeli, Darrow 
ss Brown, Potte 



Moreau, G. Smith, Gi; 
Miss MarshaU. P. Dwye 






[jha. 


U 


mi 


1 


^^ 




ri 


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28] 




"Beautiful daughters, ferocious pirates," leading the caste in Alviani-produced musical opera 



"PIRATES OF PEXZAXCE 



55 



The curtain came up on "The Pirates of 
Penzance" on March iO; and laughs 
began when the dutiful Frederic said to 
his pirate chief, "As soon as my appren- 
ticeship is over, I'll turn around and 
annihilate you." And laughs continued 
through the play. The cast included the 
well-known Kenneth Collard as Richard, 
Leon Barron as Samuel, and Raymond 
Lynch, Jr., as Frederic. Betty Moulton, 
Rita Mosely, and Margaret Stanton had 
the leading roles of Mabel, Edith, and 
Ruth, while Jane Holmes and Caroline 
Rimbach appeared as Kate and Isabel. 
Major-General Stanley (Gordon Smith) 
and Edward (John Foley) were partners 
in "cut-ups." The men's and women's 
glee clubs, as beautiful daughters and 
ferocious pirates and the Sinfonietta did 
excellent work in accompanying. 

Energetic, bespectacled Director Al- 
viani plans to continue Gilbert and Sulli- 
van next year. 



M. 



"^ S»-«ton, j,i„ 



"P for 





MAY 17 



ir- paint and I'eat Jiers give local color to the Hatchet Oration at Coniniencement exercises 



Friday, May 15 

Annual Spring Horse Show, Riding Park 
Flint Oratorical Contest, Memorial Hall 

Saturday, May 16 

Roister Doister Breakfast, Draper Hall 
Class Day Exercises, Bowker Auditorium 
Alumni Parade and Baseball Game 
Roister Doister Play, The Torch Bearers 

Sunday, May 17 

Academic Activities Breakfast, Draper 
Hall 

Varsity Club Breakfast, Draper Hall 

Baccalaureate Exercises, Bowker Audi- 
torium 

President's Reception, Rhododendron 
Garden 

Graduation Exercises, Physical Educa- 
tion Building 

Alumni Reception for Seniors, Memorial 
Hall 

Concert on College Chimes 

Monday, May 18 

Sophomore-Senior Ho]), Drill Hall 



, , parade to 



^V,Ut oC 1941 

Class i^*" ^ 

GoodeU on O^^^^ 




THE DAY & THIS THE WAY . . . 



With mixed feelings of elation and de- 
pression, members of the class of 194'2 
grasped their diplomas and Prexy's hand 
Sunday afternoon. May 17th. Doldrums, 
not caused entirely by the sudden real- 
ization that they must now leave their 
benevolent foster-mother, undoubtedly 
sprang from the strenuous program in 
which they had participated the previous 
week. Elation could be traced to their 
newly-acquired status of graduates and 
the prospect of the Soph-Senior Hop 
scheduled for the following evening. 

With the final military review on 
Tuesday, Commencement activities be- 
gan. The banquet had been its usual 
somewhat sentimental, almost maudlin, 
success. At the Senior Convocation new 
Adelphians had been tapped, the senior 



oration given, and the gift to the college 
presented, beautifully wrapped in ver- 
bosity. 

Under the direction of Chairman 
Martha Hall the Class Day exercises 
were held Saturday morning in Bowker 
Auditorium. Here the president of the 
graduating class, William Dwyer, had 
gravely delivered the mantle oration, 
symbolic transfer of the mantle of under- 
graduate tradition from his shoulders to 
those of Robert Fitzpatriek, leader of the 
class of 1943. Other orations followed: 
the Ivy by Martha Hall, the Campus by 
Herbert Weiner, and the most colorful, 
the Hatchet and Pipe oration, given by 



^ceiO«'* 



p^^^tt^n^ 



How**'' 



Coioi"'* 



cotoes 



during 



, of Goo' 



^eUUbra^y 



Ivy pl'*"*^"^ 




WE COMMENCE 



Robert Triggs and William Mahan in 
picturesque Indian regalia. After George 
Langton recited the Class Ode, Albert 
Eldridge led the seniors (definitely in an 
Auld Lang Syne mood by now) in the 
Class Song. Class Day exercises ended 
when Waldo Lincoln planted the ivy 
along the side of Goodell Library. 

On Sunday morning at eight o'clock, 
Baccaulaureate exercises were held in the 
Rhododendron Gardens and a mortar- 
topped audience were told how it could 
help the world in the present condition of 
crisis. For the first time in the history 
of the college these exercises were held 
on the same day as Graduation — part 
of the defense speed-up program. (The 
class of 1917 had received its sheep- 
skins sans sermon.) Despite this accel- 
eration most of the traditions were main- 
tained: the Horse Show, the Flint Ora- 
torical Contest, the Alumni Breakfasts, 
both Academic and Varsity, the joyous 
Alumni Parade to the baseball game, and 
the Roister Doister production. 




X» 



iN 



l)E% 



delega 



.tVo» 



Distinguishd faculty and guest speakers (1911) tell mortar-capped audience about world conditions 




[32] 




ttop 



ItapP* 



Cross, Podolak, Marsden, 
Miss Carpenter, Bush 




i„bt) «» 



Sophomore-Senior Hop 

While the orchestra in the canopied 
Drill Hall alternately called for the 
romantic mood with dreamy fox-trots and 
dulcet waltzes, then the primitive with 
blaring brass and burning boogie-woogie 
beat, outside a diplomatic moon high- 
lighted encircling mountain ranges and 
the discreet luminosity of oriental lan- 
terns cast friendly shadows along South 
College and the Chapel. The breeze 
bowed the star-fastened atmospheric 
strings tenderly in the night; inside, man 
tried vainly to compete with nature's 
notes — the Soph-Senior Hop, in late 
spring, was almost an outdoor specta- 
cle, not only "ye olde gray barne" 
but the whole campus providing a stage. 
A commencement dance given by the 
sophomores for the senior class, the Soph- 
Senior tradition has been faithfully 
fostered by a committee from the younger 
class. Mary K. Haughey, Chester Mann, 
Muriel Barbour, William Ryan, Robert 
Wroe, and Milton Bass set the. 



33] 




DAD AND MOM 



"Bi, »'*'*■ 



but 





Dads find the Norwich-State foothall game exciting 




Con ley, IV 



ss Bodwell. Miss H. B. Sn 
Judge, Miss MiUer, Mis 



ith, T. Kelley 
Davis, Shackley 



October 11 found dads dashing about 
campus attending lectures, peering into 
labs, watching their sons and daughters 
at work. The Dads' Day committee, 
including Jean Davis as chairman, Marion 
Bodwell, John Conley, Robert Dietel, 
William Drinkwater, Robert Fitzpatrick, 
Mary K. Haughey, Mary Judge, Thomas 
Kelley, Daphne Miller, Frederick Shack- 
ley, and H. Barbara Smith, had a varied 
program planned. Campus tours were 
interrupted at ten o'clock by a rush to 
the Cavalry Field where smartly clad 
military majors performed for their dads. 
After this exhibition, everyone trooped 
to Alumni Field to watch the lowly Frosh 
drill in a grand review. 

That afternoon dads attended the 
Norwich-State football game, afterward 
watching the freshman-sophomore push- 
ball contest. This favorite Army game, 
a mad-cap reversal of tug-o'-war, offered 
dads something new in entertainment. 
Informal gatherings ended the day. 



1341 



AT COLLEGE 




<.rali;im. Miller 
Casper. Miss Beauregard. Miss Li 

Miss Marshall. Miss Bute 



Smiling mothers sporting spring bouquets 
strolled arm in arm with their offspring 
around campus on a bright May morning. 
At their Third Annual Mother's Day, 
Massachusetts State College, along with 
the nation, paid honor to its mothers. 

The day of fun planned by Co-(^hair- 
men Gabriel Auerbach and Edward 
Anderson and their committee proved 
entertaining but a little wearying to 
mothers unused to the "Mass. State 
stride." Campus tours, a regimental 
review in the morning, an afternoon in- 
cluding a W. A. A. dance exhibition and 
swim drill, and a State-Tufts baseball 
game filled the daytime. Mothers dis- 
covered Amherst in the spring and perhaps 
sensed that spring fever so prevalent. 

High-light of the day was a Mother- 
Daughter Banquet at Butterfield with 
the table password "no men allowed." 
A combined musical club concert ended 
the day while a Sunday afternoon band 
concert topped off the week-end. 



The mother-daugrhter approach to K.O.T.C. review or baseba 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^HV #> 







35] 




VICTORIANISM MOTIF 



„t *« *»« 



patr»' 



Shield 



centra 



A mammoth horticultural shield of red, 
white, and blue flowers and fruit proved 
in keeping both with the spirit of Novem- 
ber, nineteen-forty-one, and with the 
zealous patriotism of the Victorian era — 
main theme of this year's "Hort" show. 
Flanked by great horns of plenty, this 
shield stood at the head of a Victorian 
garden where a fountain dripped water 
from Victorian urns. Student displays 
carried through the \'ictorian motif. 

Over seventeen thousand people at- 
tended this thirty-third annual Horticul- 
tural Show held in the cage during the 
weekend of Nov^ember 7. State and 
Sto(ikbridge students worked out the 
Victorian theme under the supervision 
of the committee — Vin Erikson, execu- 
tive chairman; Spencer Potter, publicity 
chairman; Brad Greene, construction 
chairman. As in the past Professor 
Thayer, assisted by Professor Blundell in 
construction and Professor Robertson in 
designing, guided the entire production. 



Corner of a Victorian Parlor ... a first prize winner 



The popular Hort. .Man. Country Store exhibit 




■ ^ ' _LJ J,^,o2 ,_ 




36] 



AT -'HORT- SHOW 



Prizo Winners 



Corner of a Victorian Parlor 

Frances Albrecht, Mary Bowler, Ce- 
leste Dubord, Dodson L. AVebster 



Dream Terrace 

Donald Parker, Arvid Anderson, Henry 
Thompson 

Queen Anne's Garden 

William Needham, Charles Dolby, 
Edward Fedeli, Charles Dunham 

Tropical Nature 

H. Holihan, V. Musehenski 

Golden Harvest 

M. Molitoris, D. Yarnell 



Blundell, Greene, Smder. Erikeon. Potter. Tha 




In a Victorian garden a Victorian fountain dripped watf 




[37 



AS THE DEEP 

Unmercifully ribbing a few well-chosen 
and, on the whole, deserving-of-raillery 
professors, George Langton's Campus 
Varieties skit, "When the Deep Purple 
Falls," was presented on October 31 as a 
means of financing Student Leader Day 
given in March for high school students. 
Audience gasped as radio announcer Ted 
Busing (Bob Triggs) dragged out skele- 
tons from classroom closets with a play- 
by-play description of faculty and stu- 
dents entering the bleachers while station 
announcer Graham Krackers (Tom Kel- 
ley) interrupted with ribald advertise- 
ments. Frederick Eversneeze Glips 
(Clarky) droned out campus secrets. 
Gridiron Girt (Lurane Wells) and Pru- 
dence Abigal Burns (Beverly Bigwood), 
Dean Burns' (Carl Nastri's) daughter, 
completed the "eternal triangle." 




, Shaw, Bulluck, W. Uwye 



PURPLE FALLS 



s. c- *^"' 



i,„t body 



..entauvc po- 



The 



V>eaO 



icctxires to 





Umbrellas, rubber boots and raincoats reign at a rainy Amherst game 



•Fight. Team! Fight!" 



OX A WET AMHERST WEEKEND 



Rain and Rotmd-Robins 
Punch and Funis 
Tackles and Theatricals 
Thai's What's Amherst Weekend 

The long awaited weekend began Friday 
night, October 31, 1941, with a rally and 
bonfire followed by Campus Varieties. 

In the usual downpour, on Saturday, 
State's team put up a spirited resistance 
against the reserve-rich Amherst phalanx. 
The game, broadcast over AVHYX by an 
announcer with an encyclopedic knowl- 
edge of football, ended with a score of 
20-0 in favor of the Bloody "cross-town 
team. The State soccer team had been 
more successful when it tied the Amherst 
kickers 2-2 on Friday, even after a twi- 
light overtime period. 

Rubber boots and corsages, utility and 
hyacinths, made a surrealistic combina- 
tion that night as the Hellenic hou.ses 
were flooded with guests and wet foot- 
prints. From eight to ten round-robin 
dances caused a deal of trafiic along 
Fraternity Row, followed by a lull when 
each house held a private dance. 



Bonfires blazed the way for the Amherst-State battle 




SWIXG & SWAY AT GRAY BARN 




[issee Beauregard, Lappen 
Carpenter, Handforth, Helya 



Intersorority Ball 

Jack and Jill, Little Bo-Peep— all Mother 
Gooseland Characters were represented 
at the Intersorority Ball held April 18, 
1941, at the Drill Hall. 

By a unique scheme of decoration 
which featured silhouettes of favorite 
nursery rime characters the Drill Hall 
was transformed into a childhood wonder- 
land. Under a shower of gaily colored 
balloons two hundred couples danced to 
the music of Kent Bartlett's orchestra. 
In accordance with the children's theme 
of the evening was the "Milk Bar" where 
guests could buy ice cream or milk 
drinks. Responsible for the success of 
the ball and the unusual decorations was 
Vi Henschel's committee — Marion Freed- 
man, Kate Belk, Muriel Sherman, and 
Betty Desmond. 

A Tea Dance on the next afternoon was 
held at Munson Memorial Library where 
Norman Temple furnished the music. 
Decorations, planned by Frances Lappen 



and Ruth Helyar, followed the same pat- 
tern as those at the ball. 

Interfraternity Ball 

With a storm of colors and the rhythmic 
tempos of Claude Hopkins' band, the 
Greek Ball shone forth as an outstanding 
social event of May, 1941. The Drill 
Hall became a glittering ball-room as 
three thousand revolving mirrors re- 
flected an ever-new flux of sparkling 
rainbows from colored spot-lights, and 
traditional fraternity banners blended 
with tropical plants. During the evening 
over six hundred patrons enjoyed the 
scintillating display of many colored 
lights, and at 2:30 the Greek brothers 
escorted their fair ladies homeward and 
returned down dark fraternity row to a 
routine and everyday life. 

The sparkling light and music were 
conceived as the brilliant idea of the 
committee, made up of "Pop" Simons, 
Al Silverman, Bob Peters, Bill Kimball, 
and John Horgan, representatives of the 
1941 Interfraternity Council. 



40] 





G. KimbaU 


Magnin, 


Eaton, W. Kimball 






9 


^^^Iplf^^^^^^^^H 




i^jiii 


^^Bbw 




ij 


^ * M^^'''lt^B 






mam 


H&' % '1 1 






^^^M 


Hh' '^'1 m 




Pf ^ «>fl 


W^M 


^^K^iJa, ' >«<j«^^^ ■» nHS^I 






H 


Bh^^I^^^^^^m?^ , V|^^| 


1 4 


^1/ 


ifl 


jJHHifli 











& OKKEK HOUSE 



The Inter-Greek Ball of 1})4'2 was a war- 
created innovation. The aecelerated col- 
lege program had to eliminate one spring 
formal and so for the first time Inter- 
sorority and Interfraternity Balls be- 
came one. On April 17. Les Kite's 
orchestra came to M. S. C. to provide 
dance music for brother and sister 
Greeks. In the Old Gray Barn (Drill 
Hall to strangers) a "Milk Bar" was 
established and across the way at 
Memorial Hall a public address system 
was furnished for couples who wished to 
sit and smoke. Checking money went to 

u. s. o. 

Vic Parties and Informal^ 

Vic parties are to M. S. C. as haemo- 
globin is to blood, as bread pudding is to 
"Caf," as the failings of the present 
generation are to DocTorrey. Almost the 
exclusive monoply of fraternities, vie 
parties are limited to two a month for 
each fraternity though they sometimes 
occur oftener. Found in the pantry 
stronghold of a State fraternity house 
was this recipe for the successful vie 





"""^Ptes,, 



party: 9 dreamy records, 3 boogie- 
woogie ones, 2-3 dimly-lighted rooms, 
several couples, seasoning to taste. Wel- 
come relief from grind of studies and 
news of war were vie parties in 1942. 

Informals are the answer to a be- 
wildered swain's plight when research 
reveals a dearth of crashable vie parties or 
other entertainment on a weekend that 
was never meant for strolling or poison 
ivy picking, either. 

Study on Sat "day night? You could 
as well imagine Miss Skinner as con- 
fidante of Gipsy Rose Lee! Or Presi- 
dent Baker never mentioning trips to 
Boston! Besides, the Girlfriend's toes 
have been tickling all week in anticipa- 
tion of a bit of terpsichorean tonic, pro- 
vided this year by a committee of four — 
Paul Dwyer, Benny Freitas, Jim Bullock, 
and Mif Atwood. As a result of their 
work, Larry Francis, Bob Chaplin, Vic 
Curley, and Johnny Newton — among 
others — furnished rhythm and melody 
for M. S. C. and the Girlfriend. 




Go, Malvolio! If it be suit from the Count, I am sick." 

5i»oeial Union 

The appreciation and applause accorded 
the Chekhov Players' production of Shake- 
speare's comedy. Twelfth Night, at the 
first Social Union in October proved the 
fallacy of the campus axiom that Massa- 
chusetts State College students plus 
Shakespeare or fine arts equal confusion 
and misunderstanding. The crowded 
chapel seminar room at Tuesday Fine 
A rts programs and the welcome extended 
Father Walsh were added proof. 

The Carolina Players' presentation of 
Paul Green's modern drama, House of 
Connelly, on December fifth had less 
success with Social Union goers, perhaps 
due to the spirit of restlessness apparent 
on campus as war with Japan became 
imminent. The final program before 
. Chri.stmas was the popular review of 

Doric Alviani's music clubs. 

Samuel Dushkin, among the most 
famous of the country's violinists, opened 



SHAKESPEARE 

the Social Union season in February. 
Dushkin's recital bore out his reputation 
of a truly fine master of the violin. On 
February twentieth the American Ballad 
Singers, emphasizing the patriotic theme, 
traced the course of American music from 
the Psalms of the Pilgrims up to modern 
music. The final program of the year in 
March again featured campus talent with 
plays produced by students in Professor 
Rand's new Dramatic Workshop. 

Fine Arts 

During the illness of Professor Waugh, 
head of the Fine Arts Council, an in- 
novation was made in the customary Fine 
Arts programs. Campus artists were en- 
couraged through informal discussions 
and illustrations of poetry, music, and 
painting. These programs included music 
hours under Doric Alviani's direction, 
picture hours sponsored by Professor 



Samuel Dushkin 



'a trulv fine master of the violi 




:42i 



A SUCCESS AT SOCIAL UNION 



Robertson, and poetry readings by Pro- 
fessor Walter E. Prince. 

The most fascinating oi tiie Memorial 
Hall exhibitions to M. S. C. students was 
the Family Art Show. This included 
work by faculty members their wives, 
alumni, and graduate students, ranging 
through most of the genres between 
pencil sketching and oil painting. 

Not to be forgotten as an important 
cultural event was the three-day visit of 
Father Walsh. Appearing first at con- 
vocation on Thursday, November '27, 
Father Walsh in his lectures on Dante to 
philosophy and history students and to 
the Newman Club enjoyed the double 
success of putting across both his subject 
and himself. 

In such programs as these Massachu- 
setts State College finds its deeply felt 
need of culture fulfilled. 




«Sic 



'"^"gfanis 



Student directed sophmore olas-^ p'ay presented l>y Professor Rand at llie March Social Union 




431 



Government 






Government not only by the president, 
the dean, and the administration but also 
government by the students themselves — 
the Senate, the W, S. G. A., Class 
Officers, Interfraternity and Intersoror- 
ity Councils; government by combined 
student-faculty boards, the Honor Com- 
mission, the Academic Activities Board, 
the Interclass and Intercollegiate Athletic 
Boards. Government at M. S. C. means 
student governing boards as v,'e\\ as 
faculty governing boards; a democratic 
system in a democratic college. Massa- 
chusetts State College has a government 
of, by and for the students, and it has 
tried to keep this despite difficulties that 
expansion has brought. 



Traditions — faculty processional (left), and handing down of senior mantle 




of, by, and for M. S. C. 



• • • 




Trees frame old South College, which now houses atliiiimslialioii . . . stutieiils coitic nad go from dean's offic< 




TRUSTEES MAKE POLICIES 



F resident 
His Excellency Leverett Saltonstall 

Vice-President 
Nathaniel I. Bowditch of Framingham 

iiecretar\j 
James W. Bnrke of Amherst 

Treasurer 
Robert D. Hawley of Amherst 

Term Expires 19^3 
John Chandler of Sterling Junction 
Frederick D. Griggs of Springfield 

Terin Expires 1943 
Nathaniel I. Bowditch of Framingham 
William C. Monahan of Framingham 

Term Expires 1944 
Mrs. Elizabeth McNamara of Cambridge 
James R. Cassidy of Dorchester 

Term, Expires 1945 
Mrs. Katherine G. Canavan of Amherst 
Joseph B. Ely of Westfield 



Term Expires 194G 
Clifford C. Hubbard of Norton 
David J. Malcolm of Charlemont 

Term Expires 1947 
Harry Dunlap Brown of Billerlca 
John W. Haigis of Greenfield 

Term, Expires 1948 
Joseph W. Bartlett of Boston 
Philip F. Whitmore of Sunderland 

Term Expires 1949 
Richard Salton.stall of Sheridan 
Frederick D. Griggs of Springfield 

Members Ex-Officio 

His Excellency Leverett Saltonstall, Gov- 
ernor of the Commonwealth 

Hugh P. Baker, President of the College 

Walter F. Downey, Commissioner of 
Education 

William Casey, Commissioner of Agri- 
culture 



PREXY & DEAN ADMINISTER 




Chief administrator, Hugh P. Baker, D.Occ , LL.D. 



A glance at the increased enrollment of 
the college will be enough to assure any- 
one that the task of the administrative 
staff is not a small one. Dr. Baker in 
a report to the trustees pointed out that 
between the years 1930 and 1940 the 
student body had increased by 53% 
while the net cost of the college to the 
state was less in the year 1940 than in 
the year 1930. Since 1933 it has been 
necessary to limit classes because of 
lack of staff members, equipment and 
facilities for taking care of extra students. 
Although the legislature increased appro- 
priations for personnel of the college by a 
substantial sum, at the same time it 
decreased appropriations for maintenance 
and operation by practically an equiva- 
lent percentage. This has created a very 
difficult and educationally unsound situa- 
tion since an increasing staff has been 
deprived of tools necessary to carry on 
work. 



The trustees in their meetings both 
here and at Boston discuss and deter- 
mine with President Baker general 
policies of the college. The task of 
administering these policies lies with 
President Baker, Dean Machmer, Regis- 
trar Lanphear, and the other officers of 
administration. Dean Machmer and 
Hciiistrar Lanphear control and govern 
students of the regular undergraduate 
school, and the dean acts as the go-be- 
tween in student relationships with the 
faculty and the administration. The 
dean, admini.strative officers, and faculty 
members are all in the last analysis 
responsible to the President. 



Administrative Officers 

There arc many men and women who 
work hard and efficiently to keep the 
college program running smoothly. These 
are the so-called administrative officers. 
Mr. Burke as secretary of the college 
and Mr. Erickson as business officer 
take care of much of the hiring, firing, 
and buying of the college. Mr.^Sievers 
directs the graduate school and takes 



Dean Machmer, Lanphear discuss the enrollment 




47" 



CrRRICULA CONTROLLERS 



care of the experiment station, while Mr. 
Verbeck takes charge of the short 
courses, such as the Stockbridge School. 
Mr. Grayson assisted by Mr. Glatfelter 
and Miss Hamlin has charge of the 
Placement Service. It is interesting to 
note that students through the recom- 
mendation and help of the college earned 
over $80,000 in the years 1939-1940, and 
there has always been a high percentage 
of placement for students after gradua- 
tion. At the present time the war has 
brought about a shortage of specialized 
help in many fields, and lately it was 
announced that there were not enough 
students available to fill these vacant 
jobs. This year, of course, army jobs 
are leading the long list of positions filled 
by '41 graduates and the class of '42 will 
add another long list of names to the 
role of men of M. S. C. serving with the 
United States armed forces. Mr. Pray 
as assistant college editor takes care of 
publicity for the college not only through 
leading newspapers but also via radio. 
Mr. Hawley who is treasurer of the col- 
lege has an able assistant in Mr. Broad- 
foot. Mr. Basil Wood who might well 
be classed in a separate category has one 
special domain, Goodell Library, and 
there his word is supreme. Also a 
separate administrative function is that 
of the Alumni Office and it is through 



the Alumni Association that many col- 
lege improvements — notably the two new 
dorms, Lewis and Butterfield — have been 
made possible. The Alumni Office in 
Memorial Hall is taken charge of by 
Alumni Secretary Emery who keeps 
wandering alumni carefully catalogued 
and recorded, and publishes the Aluvini 
Bulletin regularly. 



Faculty Set-Up 

The six divisions — Physical and Bio- 
logical Sciences, Liberal Arts, Agri- 
culture, Horticulture, Home Economics 
and Physical Education — are divided 
usually into two or more departments. 
The head of a division is appointed on 
the basis of seniority and merit by Presi- 
dent Baker with the approval of the 
trustees of the college. Heads of the 
departments also appointed on a seniority 
and merit basis have the responsibility 
of scheduling and planning all classes in 
their specific field and of dividing work 
and courses among the members of his 
department. Department heads are re- 
sponsible to Division heads and both are 
responsible to the President and the 
Trustees. 



GUISNAR ERICKSON 
Business Officer of College 






FRED SIEVERS 
Director of Graduate School 






481 




BASIL WOOD 
Librarian of the Colle 








ROUKKT llAWLEY 
Treasurer of the College 



Standing committees made up of 
faculty members (sometimes combined 
with students) are active on campus. 
Committees of from three to six men and 
women who have a particular interest in 
a specific field are appointed and approved 
by President Baker. Some of the more 
important and active committees on 
campus are the Committee on Academic 
Activities which with student manager 
members forms the Academic Activities 
Board; the Athletic Board and the 
Honor Commission which are also stu- 
dent-faculty combinations; the Admis- 
sion and Scholarship Committee; Stu- 
dent Life Committee: Discipline Com- 
mittee. There are approximately thirty- 
five of the committees all together. 
When the national emergency arose and 
war was declared, President Baker had a 
defense board already formed so that the 
college program could be streamlined to 
aid state and national defense with a 
minimum of lost time and effort. 







Director ot ^^^g^ 



MARGARET HAMLI^ 
Placement Officer for Women 





'•"•en,e„( o 





od, Seo"**^^ 



College po 

What the wings are to the pilot, what 
the Phi Kappa Phi key is to the genius, 
that is what the Senator's hat is to the 
college student. Having assumed the 
office along with the hat. Senators find 
themselves not only big men on campus 
but mentors of student life. 

Although the black hat with the rim of 
maroon and white around the crown is 



CAMPUS F.B.I. 

for most students the emblem of the 
Senate, to the freshman, the college 
pond seems the more appropriate symbol : 
even more frequently than usual this 
fall, the Senate held pond parties for 
frolicsome frosh who found it difficult 
to suppress the urge to wreak havoc 
on the long established traditions of 
Massachusetts State. 

Quietly, yet efficiently, throughout the 
year the Senate did its best to improve 
and further our college life: by the in- 
troduction of a new election system call- 
ing for all balloting to be done in one 
day; by the supervision of committees 
for all social events; the support of the 
campaign to make Massachusetts State 
College a university; the recommenda- 
tion of disciplinary measures in extreme 
cases of individual misbehavior; the 
successful backing of the Community 
Chest Drive; and by the reorganization 
of the Maroon Key, the Handbook, and 
the cheer-leaders, along with the creation 
of song leaders. 



Potter. Wood, Eldrid^e. I 
Podolak, Bullock, Zeitler, We 



er. McDonough 

e, Freitas, Fitzpatrick 




1501 



CONSISTS OF SENATE W.S.G. A. 




The 



Song 



W — for wide-awake, S — for suspicious, 
G — not for Doc Torrey's adjective, but 
for Gestapo, A — for Anything — thinks 
the victimized coed as she faces a dreary 
"campused" week, but the Women's 
Student Government Association does 
more than punish tardy tabbies, belated 
butterflies, and fractious frosh. This 
year it originated a Point System intended 
to prevent a few students from being 
snowed under, and to give the slightly 
less ambitious an opportunity to garner a 
few honors. The W. S. G. A. established 
a commuters" room at North College and 
House Councils at dorms to help offenders 
before taking them to the main council. 
Working for defense, it sponsored a Red 
Cross First Aid Course and knitting 
program. 

This year's true governing board was 
president, Martha Hall; vice-president, 
Helen Berger; secretary, Frances Al- 
brecht; treasurer, Phyllis Mclnerny; 
sophomore members, Mary K. Haughey, 
Cynthia Leete; house chairmen, Norma 
Handforth, Mary Cobb, Marion Avery. 



Cobb, Ijeele, Avery, Handforth, Haughey 
isses Mclnerny, HaU, Berger, Albrecht 




51] 



COPPERS OF FRATERNITIES 




C. Warner, McCarthy, Caraganis, Mag 
Rubenstein, W. Kimball, Barton, J. Shepardao 



. „ life Ix'S'"* ^ 




nin, Eatoix, Goddu^ Edminster 

n, G. Kimhall. Casper, Zeitler, Kirvin 

Like a policeman during rush hour it is 
the duty of the Interfraternity Council 
to guide the traffic of fraternity com- 
petition. "Full speed ahead" was as 
usual the motto of each fraternity, when, 
early in the fall. Council members 
introduced uninformed freshmen to 
formal rushing. Since this year's rush- 
ing rules proved inadequate, the Council 
has drawn up a new set for next year. 

There are three classifications on which 
Interfraternity competition is based- 
sports, extracurricular activities, and 
scholarship. Under the direction of the 
twenty-two Council members were the 
fraternity intra-mural sports; while in the 
extracurricular activities line, the Coun- 
cil took charge of Interfraternity Skits, 
Declamation and Sing, House Inspec- 
tion, and Winter Carnival Competition. 

Under the leadership of George Kim- 
ball, president; John Shepardson, vice- 
president; and Murray Casper, secretary, 
the Interfraternity Council effectively 
upheld the ideal of sportsmanship in 
competition within the fraternity system. 



& SORORITIES 

Intersorority Council is not a cat con- 
clave, but a group of cooperating coed.s 
attempting to keep pan-hellenic relations 
smooth. Composed of a junior and a 
senior member from each of the five 
socially-minded sisterhoods, it meets the 
first Wednesday of each month to act as 
the sorority legislative body. 

Besides its diplomatic duties, it gave 
a tea in the fall for the patronesses of all 
the houses, managed the Intersorority 
Sing and Declamation, presented plaques 
to the winner of this and the scholastic 
competition after patiently figuring out 
the sorority averages, and also took time 
to revise the rushing rules in order to 
give the rushees time to breathe and the 
rushers time to study. Instead of cram- 
ming the total tea-and-tantalizing time 
into one week, a w hole month was allotted. 
(Extensive rather than intensive farm- 
ing.) After a Round-Robin Tea on 
October 19, open house tid-bitting was 
held from 2:30 to 5:30 every Thursday 
until pledging on Saturday, November 
15. 







Following the tradition of senior presi- 
dent and vice-president, and junior 
secretary-treasurer, Ruth Helyar wielded 
the gavel, Frances Lappen seconded her, 
and Mary Jean Carpenter took notes and 
guarded the guineas. 



I Cohen, Mrs. Wetherbee, Miesee Milner, Holton, Bowler 
tses Beauregard, Carpenter, Helyar. Lappen, Handforth 



1 1 1 


^'*1fc" 


f 






mm ^^^^HHHPI 





531 



INCREASINC IMPORTANCE 



"Nineteen-forty-two has seen an unprece- 
dented increase not only in the size but 
in the quality of Academic xActivities" — 
so says Professor Dickinson, hard work- 
ing advisor of these activities. This 
growth has naturally increased the im- 
portance of the Academic Activities 
Board. The board made up of managers 
of activities, two faculty members, two 
alumni members, and the dean has the 
special duty of keeping the Glee Clubs, 
the Sinfonietta, the Roister Doisters, the 
Debating Club, the Collegian, and the 
INDEX functioning smoothly. 

In the spring this board recognizes the 
work of individuals in activities by medal 
awards and a Conspicuous Service 
Trophy. A major change in ruling this 
year was that proposed by Professor 
Rand that ten credits be given to the 
"chief creative contributor" to an 
activity; these credits not to be counted 
into the total of two per person allowed 
for each activity. 




Acadei^i*" 



A.ctVv» 



ties 



Boar 



d.sdVan»on« 



Prof. GHck, J. Shepardson, Ketche 
Nottenburg, Miss Van Meter, Dean f 



Shea, Prof. Dickinson 
Miss Berry, Prof. Rand 




54 




Litchfield, Klubock, Shea, Kipnes 
lark, Mr. Lanphear, Mr. M-cLaushlin. Prof. Hi. 



MEX BEHIXD THE M-MEX 




"azooed 



s'veater 



P«se for 



tJSDEX 



came 



Four to ten was the score of scheduled 
baseball vs. cancelled baseball games in 
the records of the Joint Committee on 
Intercollegiate Athletics when the college 
war program suddenly shortened second 
semester. Rearrangement of schedules 
resulted in the Amherst and Wesleyan 
games being rescheduled and three new 
games being scheduled with army teams. 
Since all but one of the tennis matches 
had been cancelled, it was decided in 
March to discontinue tennis for this year. 
Though rescheduling was one of its 
major jobs, the Committee didn't neglect 
its customary duties of providing big 
white "M's" for the chests of outstand- 
ing athletes and regulating athletic poli- 
cies including those of finances, playing 
fields and buildings, managerships, and 
special athletic presentations. A special 
decision of the Committee made separate 
positions of indoor and outdoor track 
managerships, thus making nine mana- 
gers, two faculty, three alumni, the dean, 
and Chairman Curry Hicks, the personnel 
of the Committee. 



[55] 




,x^.J•0«''•' 




Vice-President M. Hall 



PERSOBf ALITY & 

"Chieftains of the tribe," officers of the 
senior class, are the distinguished leaders 
of a distinguished group. . . . Senators, 
honor students, Adelphians. The offi- 
cers — Bill Dwyer, president; Martha 
Hall, vice-president; Marion Avery, 
secretary; Paul Dwyer, treasurer; 
Edmund Freitas, sergeant-at-arms; and 
Carl Werme, captain — held meetings 
throughout the year and voted on mat- 
ters important to the class. Besides 
selecting chairmen for the numerous 
committees, they also decided to contrib- 
ute money to the Community Chest 
and Winter Carnival and on senior 
entrance into the Alumni Association. 
The class president and vice-president, 
as chairmen of the Commencement and 
Class Day committees respectively, made 
arrangements for the graduation exer- 
cises. Despite problems caused by a 
war-shortened semester Commencement 
remained a traditional ceremony. 



Sergeant-at-Arms Freitas, Secretary Avery, Captain 




y j.D«je' 




56 



POLITICS MAKE PREMIERES 



The officers of the class of 1943 received 
a vote of confidence similar to that given 
to the leaders of foreign nations when 
their classmates voted to return them to 
office en masse. The undefeated group 
were Robert Fitzpatrick, president; Mary 
Jean Carpenter, vice-president; Blanche 
Gutfinski, secretary; John Hicks, treas- 
urer; William E. Clark, sergeant-at- 
arms; and John McDonough, captain. 

With last year's razzing and Hell 
Week, bestowed by sophomores now 
passed into the decadence of their junior 
year, still smartingly fresh in their 
memory, the 44 's found their chance to 
vindicate themselves by taking it out on 
the befuddled freshmen at the rope pull. 
The first sophomores in four years to 
win the rope pull they also defeated the 
frosh at Razoo. The class was under the 
expert guidance of Robert Denis, presi- 
dent; Cynthia Leete, vice-president; 



Margaret Deane, secretary; Arthur Mar- 
coullier, treasurer; Edwin Fedeli, sergeant- 
at-arms; and James Parsons, captain. 

After freshmen had lost their first im- 
pressions of grim and ghastly hazing by 
the sophs and had grown accustomed to 
seeing their classmates as students, they 
were given the chance to designate their 
choice of officers: Jack Coughlan, presi- 
dent; Anne Stafford, vice-president; Bar- 
bara Walker, secretary; Warren Ander- 
son, treasurer; Bernard Stead, sergeant- 
at-arms; and Gilbert Merrill, captain. 

Class officers vote on class expendi- 
tures such as the Community Chest con- 
tributions; organize, finance, and appoint 
committees for class parties; and help 
plan and run Razoo. The enterprising 
freshman class wanted to start an in- 
novation — a Freshman Prom — but, be- 
cause of the present war conditions, 
authorities considered it unwise. 



iillier. Hicks, Parsons. Denis, Fedeli. Fitzpatrick. Clark 
9 Deane. Leete. Carpenter, Gutfinski, Stafford. Walker 




[571 




McCo.e^eon 






Interelasis Athletics 

As traditionally as it wears maroon caps 
and white tams, each freshman class 
elects two of its members as four-year 
representatives of its spirit of sportsman- 
ship. These members accept election 
for a four-year term extending from their 
freshman to their senior year, and help 
control all Interclass Athletics. 

Under the leadership of Senior Sid 
Zeitler, this year's eight-man board 
enlisted the aid of sports coaches and 
physical education department in a 
general reorganization of non-specific and 
antiquated rules. Freshman numerals 
formerly awarded only to men of winning 
freshman teams may now be awarded to 
individual freshmen who have completed 
their required playing time. Intercol- 
legiate freshman games which had previ- 
ously gone without rules of any kind 
were defined and limited specifically. 
The rules drawn up by the board in- 
cluded most of the major sports such as 
football, soccer, basketball, and swim- 
ming and promoted other sports as well. 



Honor Commission 

The Honor Commission, created in nine- 
teen-forty, this year continued its task of 
organizing a system of examinations that 
would prove suitable to replace the out- 
moded Honor System. 

The Commission — a joint committee 
to which student representatives are 
elected by students and faculty repre- 
sentatives are appointed by President 
Baker — has a function largely "preventa- 
tive and advisory, rather than executive 
and punitive." Its methods are "in- 
formal, personal, and appropriate to 
each problem." It seeks to place respon- 
sibility for proper examinations right 
where it belongs — upon each instructor, 
individually. Some of its many recom- 
mendations were: that all quizzes and 
examinations should be proctored so as 
to protect the honorable majority from 
the morally weak or dishonorable "rotten 
apples that spoil the barrel"; that in- 
structors should report to the Commission 
each case of alleged cheating that they 
have; that students may report cheating 
without having to name the individual 
concerned ; and that penalty for a cheat- 
ing offense should be failure in the course. 



Foley, Zeitle 
Anderson, Nebe 




[58] 




'Goessmaii at a safe distance" . . . fearfully reflects the freshman from across the college pond 



FACULTY 





„.aUVonanana.«-^^ 



of tb« ' 



Tl»e 



\\xae 



coaled fe^ 



house at 



foot "» 



ProfetisorN Emeriti 

JOSEPH S. CHAMBERLAIN, Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus 
Born 1870. B.H., Iowa State College, 1890. M.S., 
Iowa State College, 1892. Ph.D., .Johns Hopkins 
University, 1899. Goessman Professor, 1934. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1909. Professor Emeritus, 
1940. 

WALTER WINFRED CHENOWETH, B.S.Agr. 

Professor of Horticultural Manufacturers, Emeritus 
Born 1871. B.A., Valparaiso University, 1903. 
B.S.Agr., Missouri LTniversity, 1912. Sigma Xi; 
Phi Kappa Phi; Alpha Zeta. Accepted to Faculty, 
1912. Professor Emeritus, 1941. 

HENRY T. FERNALD, Ph.D. 

Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 
Born 1866. B.S., University of Maine, 1885. 
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1890. Beta 
Theta Pi; Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Beta Kappa. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1890. Professor Emeritus, 
1930. 

.lOHN C. GRAHAM, B.S. 

Professor of Poultry Husbandry, Emeritus 

B.S., Wisconsin University, 1911. Fellow, Poultry 

Science Association. Accepted to Faculty, 1911. 

Professor Emeritus, 1938. 



FRED C. KENNEY 

Treasurer, Emeritus 

Born 1869. Kappa Epsilon. Treasurer Emeritus, 
1940. 

FRED W. MORSE, M.S. 

Research Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus 

Born 1863. B.S., Worcester Polytechnical Insti- 
tute, 1887. M.S., Worcester Polytechnical In- 
stitute, 1900. Phi Beta Kappa. Accepted to 
Faculty, 1910. Professor Emeritus, 1935. 

FRED C. SEARS, M.S. 

Professor of Pomology, Emeritus 

Born 1866. B.S., Kansas Agricultural College, 
1892. M.S., Kansas Agricultural College, 1896. 
Honorary Doctor's Degree, Kansas State College, 
1937. Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to Faculty, 1907. 
Professor Emeritus, 1936. 

FRANK A. WAUGH, M.S. 

Professor of Landscape Architecture, Emeritus 

Born 1869. B.S., Kansas State College, 1891. 
M.S., Kansas State College, 1903. D.S., Kansas 
State College, 1934. L.H.D., University of Ver- 
mont, 1934. Kappa Sigma; Phi Kappa Phi. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1902. Professor Emeritus, 
1939. 



601 



TearhintS Faculty 

GEORGE W. ALDERMAN, B.A. 

Associate Professor of Physics 
Born 1898. B.A., Williams College, 1921. Sigma 
Xi; American Physics Society, .\ccepted to 
Faculty, 19'Jl. Avocations: Hiking, Photography. 

CHARLES PAUL ALEXANDER, Ph.D. 

Head of Department of Entomology and Zoology 
Born 1889. B.S., Cornell University, 1913. 
Ph.D., Cornell University, 1918. Phi Kappa Phi; 
Sigma Xi; Alpha Gamma Rho; Gamma Alpha. 
Accepted to Faculty, 19'23. Avocation: Taxonomy 
of Crane-Flies of the World. 

DORIC JOSEPH ALVIANI, Ed.M. 

Instructor of Music 
Born 1913. Mus.B., Boston University, 1937. 
Ed.M., Boston LTniversity, 1941. Accepted to 
Faculty, 1938. Avocations: Travel, Reading, 
Riding, Boating, Collecting. 




JOHN H. BLAIR, MA. 

Instructor of Physiology and Hygiene 
Born 1915. B.A., Wesleyan University, 1937. 
M.A., Wesleyan University, 1939. Delta Kappa 
Epsilon; Sigma Xi. Accepted to Faculty, 
1939. 

' LYLE LINCOLN BLUNDELL, B.S. 

Professor of HorticulUire 

Born 1897. B.S., Iowa State College, 1924. 

Gamma Sigma Delta; Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted 

to Faculty, 1931. Avocation: Gardening. 

HAROLD DANFORTH BOUTELLE, Ch.E. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Born 1898. B. S., Worcester Polytechnical Insti- 
tute, 1920; Ch.E., Worcester Polytechnical In- 
stitute, 1922. Accepted to Faculty, 1926. 

LEON ALSON BRADLEY, Ph.D. 

Professor of Bacteriology and Head of the Department 
Born 1896. B.S., Wesleyan University, 1922. 
PhD., Yale University, 1925. American Public 
Health Association; Society of American Bacteri- 
ologists; Sigma Xi; Beta Theta Pi. Accepted to 
Faculty, 1925. 

LAWRENCE ELLIOT BRIGGS, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
and Coach of Soccer 
Born 1903. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1927. M.S., Massachusetts State College, 1938. 
Theta Chi; Western Massachusetts Winter Sports 
Council; United States Eastern Amateur Ski 
Association; National Ski Association. Accepted 
to Faculty, 1927. 

MILDRED BRIGGS, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics 
B.A., De Pauw University, 1920. M.S., Iowa 
State College, 1925. Accepted to Faculty, 1931. 
Avocations: Weaving, Horseback Riding. 



Col. Young, Sgt. Cronk during summer trip pjof-"'''"'^'' 



ALLEN EMIL ANDERSEN, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Born 1899. B.A., University of Nebraska. 1923. 
M.A., University of Nebraska, 1924. Ph.D., 
Harvard L'niversity, 1932. Sigma Xi. Accepted 
to Faculty, 1937. Avocations: Gardening, Read- 
ing, Listening to Music. 

LORIN EARL BALL, B.S. 

Instructor of Physical Education 
Born 1898. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1921. Accepted to Faculty, 1923. Avocation: 
Boy Scout Work. 

LUTHER BANTA, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Poultry Husbandry 
Born 1893. B.S., Cornell University, 1915. Sigma 
Pi; Lambda Gamma Delta; Poultry Science Asso- 
ciation; Science Club of Amherst College Ac- 
cepted to Faculty, 1918. Avocations: Bowling, 
Horseshoes, Ping-Pong. 

ROLLIN HAYES BARRETT, M.S. 

Professor of Farm Management 
Born 1891. B.S., University of Connecticut, 1918. 
M.S., Cornell University, 1926. Accepted to 
Faculty, 1926. Avocation: Motion Pictures. 



„^looreBet8S«' 



ndialn^* 



,Uem»«'"'"^ 




THEODORE CUYLER CALDWELL, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of History 
Born 1904. B.A., College of Wooster, 1925. 
M.A., Harvard University, 1927. Ph.D., Yale 
University, 193-t. Accepted to Faculty, 1935. 
Avocation: Mountain Climbing. 

KATHLEEN CALLAHAN, B.A. 

Instructor of Physical Education for Women 
B.A., West Virginia University. Certificate of 
Hygiene and Physical Education, Wellesley Col- 
lege. Chi Omega. Accepted to Faculty, 1937. 

ALEXANDER E. CANCE, Ph.D. 

Head of the Department of Economics 
B.A., Macalester College, 1896. M.A., University 
of Wisconsin, 1906. Ph.D., L^niversity of Wiscon- 
sin, 1908. Phi Kappa Phi; Alpha" Sigma Phi; 
American Economic Association. Accepted to 
Faculty, 1908. 

HAROLD WHITING CARY, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of History 
Born 1903. B.A., Williams College, 1925. M.A., 
Harvard University, 1926. Ph.D., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1938. Accepted to Faculty, 1933. Avoca- 
tions: Gardening, Hiking. 

JAMES ROLLIN CHAMBLISS, M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 
Born 1902. B.A., University of Georgia, 1927. 
M.A., Harvard University, 1939. Phi Beta Kappa; 
Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to Faculty, 1941. 

ORTON LORING CLARK, B.S. 

Associate Professor of Botany 
Born 1887. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1908. A. A. A. S.; Phi Sigma Kappa. Accepted 
to Faculty, 1916. Avocations: Handicrafts, Gar- 
dening. 



RICHARD MOWRY COLWELL, M.S. 

Instructor in Economics 

Born 1913. B.S., Rhode Island State College, 1935. 
M.S., Rhode Island State College, 1937. Alpha 
Tau Gamma; Phi Kappa Phi; American Economic 
Association; American Accounting Association. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1937. 

GLADYS MAE COOK, M.S. 
Instructor of Home Economics 
B.S., Battle Creek College, 1934. M.S., Massa- 
chusetts State College, 1936. American Dietetics 
Association; American Home Economics Asso- 
ciation; A. A. U. W'. .\ccepted to Faculty, 1937. 

SARA COOLIDGE, M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Home Economics 
B.S., Michigan State College, 1924. M.S., Michi- 
gan State College, 1927. Sigma Xi. Accepted to 
Faculty, 1935. 

GUY CHESTER CRAMPTON, Ph.D. 

Professor of Entomology 
Born 1881. B.A., Princeton University, 1904. 
M.S., Cornell University, 1906. Ph.D., University 
of Berlin, 1908. M.A., Harvard University, 1920. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Beta Kappa; Phi 
Kappa Phi; Sigma Xi. Accepted to Faculty, 
1911. Avocations: Photography, Travel, Col- 
lecting Specimens. 

FRANK CRONK 

Instructor of Military Science aiul Tactics 
Born 1894. Enlisted, 1914; Corporal, 1915; 
Sergeant, 1916; Staff Sergeant, 1937; Technical 
Sergeant, 1941. Accepted to Faculty, 1921. 
Avocation: Touring Country Roads. 



Maj. Rice, Lt. Nogelo, Col. Young, and Capt. Chambliss planning tactics of teaching cavalrymen 




6^2 



FREDERICK MORSE CUTLER, Ph.D. 

Assistunt Professor of History and Sociology 
Born 1875. B.A., Columbia University, 1895. 
B.D., Columbia University, 1898. Ph.D., Clark 
University, 19'22. Pi Gamma Mu; "Historian," 
Amherst Historical Society: Fellow of the Institute 
of American Genealogy; Sigma Phi Epsilon. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1920. Avocation: Ex- 
ploration. 

WILLIAM HAROLD DAVIS, Ph.D. 

Asslslaiit Professor of Bolany 
Pd.B., New York State Teachers' College, 1903. 
B.A., Cornell t'niversity, 1912. M.A., Wisconsin 
llniversity, 1916. Ph.D., Wisconsin University, 
1922. Forum; Acacia; Sigma Xi. Accepted to 
Faculty, 1922. Avocations: Research in Plant 
Pathology, Photography, Clarinet Playing. 





^ J Skin"*'' " 



,{ Div. of " 



Professor "Bull" Prince elaborates on Elizabethan Drama 



BERNARD J. DOYLE, M.D. 

Professor of Hygiene and Director of Student Health 

Born 1913. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1935. M.D., Tufts Medical School, 1939. Ameri- 
can Medical .Association; Massachusetts Medical 
Society: Hampshire County Medical Society; 
Theta Kappa Psi; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Accepted 
to Faculty, 1941. Avocations: Contract, Tennis. 

CHARLES NELSON DUBOIS, M.A. 

Instructor of English 

Born 1910. B.A., Middlebury College, 1934. 
Diploma in Humanities, University of London, 
1935. M..\., Middlebury College, "l935. Kappa 
Delta Rho: Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Delta Epsilon; 
Kappa Phi Kappa. .Accepted to Faculty, 1937. 
Avocation: Gardening. 



LLEWELLYN LIGHT DERBY, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
and Coach of Track 
Born 1893. B.S., Springfield College, 1940. Col- 
lege Track Coaches Association of .America; 
National Collegiate Track Coaches .Association. 
.Accepted to Faculty, 1916. 

L.AWRENCE S. DICKINSON, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Agrostology 
Born 1888. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1910. M.S., Massachusetts State College, 1936. 
Phi Sigma Kappa; Faculty Manager of Academic 
Activities. Accepted to Faculty, 1913. 

PARRY DODDS, M.S. 

Instructor of Agricultural Economics 
Born 1917. B.S., Iowa State College, 1939. 
M.S., Iowa State College, 1940. .Alpha Zeta; 
Sigma Delta Chi; Gamma Sigma Delta: Farm 
House; .American Farm Economics .Association. 
.Accepted to Faculty, 1940. .Avocation: Flying. 

CLYDE WALTON DOW, M.S. 

Instructor in Oral English 
Born 1907. B.L.I., Emerson College, 1931. M.S., 
Massachusetts State College, 1937. Phi .Alpha 
Tau. .Accepted to Faculty, 1937. Avocations: 
16 mm. Movies, Travel, Research. 



WILLIAM BURNET E.ASTON, JR., S.T.M. 

Director of Religious Activities; 
Assistant Professor of Religion 

Born 1905. Ph.B., Yale University, 1929. B.D., 
Union Theological Seminary, 1933. S.T.M., Union 
Theological Seminary, 1940. National Associa- 
tion of Biblical Instructors; American Federation 
of Teachers. .Accepted to Faculty, 1941. Avoca- 
tion: Reading. 

WALTER S. EISENMENGER, Ph.D. 

Research Professor of Agronomy and Head of the 
Department 

Born 1886. B.S., Bucknell University, 1912. 
M.S., Bucknell University, 1913. M.A., Columbia 
University, 1925. Ph.D., Columbia University, 
1926. Sigma Xi; .American Society of Agronomy; 
.American Society of Plant Physiologists; American 
Chemical Society: A. A. .A. S.; New York Academy 
of Science. .Accepted to Faculty, 1931. -Avoca- 
tions: Gardening, Hiking. 

FREDERICK C. ELLERT, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of German 

Born 1905. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1930. .Adelphia; Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to 
Faculty, 1930. 



[63] 




'rof. Markuson expostulates to seniors in Ag. Engineering class 

EVELYN BLANCHE ELLMS, M.D. 

Ass^istant Professor of Hygiene 
B.S., Tufts College, 1929. M.D., Tufts Medical 
School, 1932. Massachusetts Medical Society; 
American Medical Association: Newton Medical 
Club: Zeta Phi. Accepted to Faculty, 1940. 
Avocations: Cactus Collection, Mountain Climbing. 

JOHN NELSON EVERSON, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Agronomy 
Born 1887. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1910. M.S., Massachusetts State College, 1926. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1938. Avocation: Boy Scouts. 

CARL RAYMOND FELLERS, Ph.D. 

Professor of Horticultural Manufactures and 

Head of the Department 
Born 1893. B.A., Cornell University, 1915. M.S., 
Rutgers, 1916. Ph.D., Rutgers, 1918. Theta 
Kappa Phi: Phi Kappa Phi: Sigma Xi; Phi 
Lambda Upsilon. .\ccepted to Faculty, 1925. 
Avocations: Gardening, Angling, Tennis. 

RICHARD WILLL\M FESSENDEN, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Inorganic Chemistry 
Born 1902. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 

1926. M.S., Massachusetts State College, 1928. 
Ph.D., Columbia University, 1931. Phi Kappa 
Phi; Phi Lambda Upsilon: Sigma Xi; 
Alpha Gamma Rho: American Chemical Society; 
New England Chemistry Teachers' Association. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1931. Avocation: Hiking. 

WILLIAM H. FITZPATRICK, Ph.D. 

Instructor of Horticultural Manufacturing 
Born 1916. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1939. M.S., Massarluisetts State College, 1940. 
Ph.D., Massachusi-tts Stale College, 1942. Sigma 
Xi. Accepted to Faculty, 1941. 

RICHARD CAROL FOLEY, M.S. 

AssiMant Professor of Animal Husbandry 
Born 1906. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 

1927. M.S., Massachusetts State College, 1931. 
Phi Kappa Phi: Sigma Phi Epsilon: American 
Dairy Science Association; American Society of 
Animal Production. Accepted to Faculty, 1932. 
Avocations: Photography, Sports. 



CHARLES F. FRAKER, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Modern Languages 

Born 1888. B.A., Colorado College, 1919. M.A., 
Harvard University, 1920. Ph.D., Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1931. Accepted to Faculty, 1933. 

JULIUS HERMAN FRANDSEN, M.S. 

Head of the Department of Dairy Industry 

Born 1887. B.S., Iowa State College, 1902. M.S., 
Iowa State College, 1904. Phi Kappa Phi; Gamma 
Sigma Delta. Accepted to Faculty, 1926. Avoca- 
tions: Travel, Photography. 

ARTHUR PERKINS FRENCH, M.S. 

Professor of Pomology and Plant Breeding 

Born 1895. B.S., Ohio State University, 1921. 
M.S., Massachusetts State College, 1923. Phi 
Kappa Phi; Alpha Zeta; Sigma Xi; Alpha Tau 
Omega; American Society of Horticultural Science. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1921. Avocations: Photog- 
raphy, Mountaineering. 



I^i^i 




"'' of Oi, 



GEORGE EDW.\RD GAGE, Ph.D. 

Professor of Physiology and Bacteriology and Head 
of the Department 

Born 1884. B.A., Clark University, 1906. M.A., 
Yale University, 1907. Ph.D., Y'ale University, 
1909. Phi Kappa Phi; Honorary Member of 
Massachusetts Veterinary Medical Society; 
A. A. A. S. Accepted to Faculty, 1911. Avoca- 
tions: Art, Languages, Travel (16 Trips Abroad), 
Construction Work and Equipment-Making. 

PHILIP LYLE GAMBLE, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.S., Wesleyan University, 1928. M.A., Wesleyan 
University, 1929. Ph.D., Cornell University, 1933. 
American Economic Association; American Asso- 
ciation of University Professors; Sigma Chi; Phi 
Kappa Phi. Accepted to Faculty, 1935. Avoca- 
tions: Traveling, Sports. 



641 



HAROLD MARTIN GORE, B.S. 

Professor of Physical Education and Head of the 
Department 

Born 1891. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1913. Q. T. v.: .\delphia. Accepted to Faculty, 
1913. 

CLARE A. GUNN, B.S. 

Instructor of Landscape Architecture 

Born 1910. B.S., Michigan State College, 1940. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1941. Avocations: Sketch- 
ing and Hiking. 



MARY ELLEN GARVEY, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 
B.S., Massachusetts State College, 1919. Sigma 
Delta Epsiloni Society of American Bacteriologists; 
American Public Health Association. Accepted to 
Faculty, 1921. 

HARRY NEWTON CLICK, Ph.D. 

Professor of Psychology and Philosophy 
Born 1885. B.A., Bridgewater College, 1913. 
M.A., Northwestern University, 1914. Ph.D., 
University of Illinois, 1923. Phi Kappa Phi; 
Kappa Delta Kappa; Kappa Delta Pi; American 
Philosophical Association. Accepted to Faculty, 
1923. Avocation: Gardening. 

MAXW'ELL HENRY GOLDBERG, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 
Born 1907. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1928. M.A., Y'ale University, 1932. Ph.D., Yale 
University, 1933. Alpha Epsilon PI; Adelphia; 
Phi Kappa Phi; Modern Language Association of 
America; Modern Humanities Research Asso- 
ciation; National Association of Teachers of 
Speech; American Association of University 
Professors. Accepted to Faculty, 1928. Avoca- 
tions: Dramatics, Gardening. 

CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, Ph.D. 

Professor of Geology and Mineralogy, Head of the 
Department and Head of the Dicision of 
Phyi-ical and Biological Sciences 
Born 1876. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1901. B.S., Boston University, 1903. M.A., 
Columbia University, 1906. Ph.D., Columbia 
University, 1911. Phi Kappa Phi; Sigma Xi; 
A. A. A. S.; Geological Society of America; Pale- 
ontological Society; American Geophysical Union. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1906. 

Philosophy and advanced entomology are mingled in Dr. Crampton's class at Fernald Hall 



CHRISTIAN I. GUNNESS, B.S. 
Professor of Engineering and Head of the Department 

Born 1882. B.S., North Dakota Agricultural 
College, 1907. American Society Agricultural 
Engineering; Phi Kappa Phi. .\ccepted to Faculty, 
1914. Avocation: Fishing. 

WALTER G. HARGESHEIMER, M.Ed. 

Professor of Physical Education and Coach of Football 

Born 1912. B.S., University of Minnesota, 1934. 
M.Ed., University of Minnesota, 1939. Phi Alpha 
Theta; Phi Epsilon Kappa; Alpha Sigma Pi. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1941. 

ARTHUR KENYON HARRISON 

Professor of Landscape Architecture 

Born 1872. New England Botanical Club; Life 
Member Appalachian Mountain Club. Accepted 
to Faculty, 1911. Avocation: Systematic Botany. 




65 



MARSHALL CONRAD HECK, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry 

Born 1915. B.S., University of Missouri, 1938. 
M.S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical Col- 
lege, 1939. Alpha Gamma Sigma. Accepted to 
Faculty, 1941. Avocations: Aviation, Tennis, 
Quick-Freezing. 

VERNON PARKER HELMING, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 

Born 1904. B.A., Carleton College, 1925. Ph.D., 
Yale University, 1932. Phi Beta Kappa; Phi 
Kappa Phi; Modern Language Association. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1933. Avocations: Piano, 
Classical Language and Literature, Philosophy, 
Tennis. 

CURRY STARR HICKS, M.Ed. 

Professor of Physical Education and Head of the 
Dimsion 

Born 1885. B.P.Ed., Michigan State Normal 

College, 1909. M.Ed., Michigan State Normal 

College, 1924. Accepted to Faculty, 1911. Avoca- 
tions; Touring, Hiking, Fishing, Golf. 

WALTER HENDRICKS HODGE, Ph.D. 

Instructor of Botany 

Born 1912. B.A., Clark University, 1934. M.S., 
Massachusetts State College, 1936. M.A., Harvard 
University, 1940. Ph.D., Harvard University, 
1941. Sigma Xi; Kappa Phi. Accepted to Fac- 
ulty, 1936. Avocations: Photography, Writing. 



ROBERT POWELL HOLDSWORTH, M.F. 

Professor of Forestry and Head of the Department 

Born 1890. B.S., Michigan State College, 1911. 
M.F., Yale School of Forestry, 1928. Senior 
Member, Society of American Foresters; Phi 
Kappa Phi; Alpha Gamma Rho. Accepted to 
Faculty, 1930. Avocation; History of Forestry. 

LEONTA G. HORRIGAN, B.S. 

Instructor of English 

Born 1914. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1936. Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to Faculty, 1936. 

SAMUEL CHURCH HUBBARD 

Assistant Professor of Floriculture 

Born 1890. American Association of Nurserymen; 
New England Nurserymen's Association; American 
Rose Society; New England Rose Society. Ac- 
cepted to Faculty, 1921. Avocations: Hunting, 
Fishing, Dogs. 

ARTHUR NELSON JULIAN, B.A. 

Professor of German 

Born 1885. B.A., Northwestern University, 1907. 
Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Gamma 
Delta. Accepted to Faculty, 1911. Avocations: 
Gardening, Photography. 

SIDNEY W. KAUFFMAN, M.S. 
Instructor of Physical Education 

Born 1904. B.S., Springfield College, 1931. M.S., 
Springfield College, 1934. Accepted to Faculty, 
1935. Avocations: Hunting, Fishing. 



Prof. Caldwell and Gary discuss the march of dictatorship in today's history-in-the-niaking 




AVILLIAM HENRY LACHMAN, M.S. 
Instructor of Olericulture 

Born 1912. B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1934. 
M.S., Pennsylvania State College, 193G. Pi Alpha 
Xi; Gamma Sigma Delta. Aecepted to Faculty, 
193G. Avocation: Photography. 

JOHN BECKLEY LENTZ, Y.M.D. 

Professor of Veterinary Science 

Born 18S7. B.A., Franklin and Marshall College, 
1908. V.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1914. 
Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Sigma Kappa. Accepted to 
Faculty, 1916. 




f Lib. ^'^^ 



prof. ^- ' 



5vtacki««""'"' 



HARRY GOTFRED LINDQUIST, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Dairying 

Born 1895. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1922. M.S., University of Maryland, 1924. 
American Dairy Science Association; A. A. A. S.; 
American Public Health Association; Institution 
of Food Technologists; International Association 
of Milk Sanitarians. Accepted to Faculty, 1927. 
Avocations: Gardening, Travel. 

ADRIAN HERVEY LINDSEY, Ph.D. 

Professor of Agricultural Economics and Farm 
Management and Head of the Department 

Born 1897. B.S., University of Illinois, 1922. 
M.S., Iowa State College, 1922. Ph.D., Iowa 
State College, 1929. Pi Gamma Mu; Alpha 
Gamma Rho. Accepted to Faculty, 1929. Avoca- 
tion: Travel. 



C. COLLIS LYLE, JR., M.A. 

Instructor of German and Latin 

Born 1912. B.A., Cornell University, 1933. M.A., 
Cornell University, 1934. Accepted to Faculty, 
1935. 




Roister Doister Director, Prof. F. P. Rand, applies make-up 



CLINTON VILES MacCOY, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Zoology 

Born 1905. B.A., Harvard University, 1928. 
M.A., Harvard University, 1929. Ph.D., Harvard 
University, 1934. Kappa Sigma; Gamma Alpha. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1939. Avocations: Photog- 
raphy, Horticulture. 

MERRILL J. MACK, M.S. 

Professor of Dairy Industry 

Born 1902. B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 
1923. M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1925. 
Alpha Zeta; Phi Kappa Phi; Sigma Xi. Accepted 
to Faculty, 1925. 

ALEXANDER A. MACKIMMIE, M.A. 

Professor of History, Head of the Department and 
Head of the Divimon of Liberal Arts 

Born 1878. B.A., Princeton University, 1906. 
M.A., Columbia University, 1914. Phi Beta 
Kappa; Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to Facultv, 
1908. 

WALTER ARNOLD MACLINN, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Horticultural Manufaclures 

Born 1911. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1933. M.S., Massachusetts State College, 1935. 
Ph.D., Massachusetts State College, 1938. Theta 
Chi; Sigma Xi. Accepted to Facultj', 1936. 
Avocations: Fishing, Camping. 

MINER JOHN MARKUSON, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Engineering 

Born 1896. B.S., Univer.sity of Minnesota, 1923. 
Architectural Society of Western Massachusetts; 
Massachusetts State Association of Architects; 
Lions International. Accepted to Faculty, 1925. 
Avocation: Golf. 

GEORGE ANDREWS MARSTON, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Engineering 

Born 1908. B.S., Worcester Polytechnical In- 
.stitute, 1930. M.S., State University of Iowa, 
1933. Lambda Chi Alpha; Sigma Xi; American 
Society of Civil Engineers; American Geophysical 
Union. Accepted to Faculty, 1933. Avocation: 
Tennis. 



"671 




rof. A. P. Tuttle adds the domestic note to campus life 



OREANA A. MERRIAM, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., University of Vermont. M.S., Massachusetts 
State College. Sigma Xi. Accepted to Faculty. 
1941. 

WALTER McKINLEY MILLER, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Born 1896. Ph.B., Lafayette, 1918. M.A., Penn- 
sylvania State College, 1923. Ph.D., University of 
Illinois, 1927. Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Kappa Phi; 
Mathematics Association of America; American 
Association of University Professors. Accepted 
to Faculty, 1935. Avocations: Chess, Philately, 
Clock Repairing. 

FRANK CODUANE MOORE, B.A. 

Professor of Mathematics and Head of the Department 

Born 1879. B.A., Dartmouth College, 1902. Phi 
Beta Kappa; Phi Kappa Phi; A. A. A. S.; Associa- 
tion of Mathematics Teachers in New England; 
Mathematical Association of America; Chi Phi. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1918. Avocation: Philately. 



A. VINCENT OSMUN, M.S. 
Professor of Botany and Head of the Department 

Born 1880. B.Agr., Connecticut State College, 
1900. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 1903. 
B.S., Boston University, 1903. M.S., Massa- 
chusetts State College, 1905. Phi Kappa Phi; 
Sigma Xi; .4. A. A. S.; Life Member .American 
Phytopathological Society; American Fern Society; 
New England Botany Club; Q. T. V. Accepted to 
Faculty, 1905. 



RAYMOND HERMAN OTTO, M.L.A. 

Professor of Land Architecture and Head of the 
Department 

Born 1905. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1926. M.L.A., Harvard Graduate School of Land 
Architecture, 1929. Member A. S. L. A. Accepted 
to Faculty, 1938. Avocations: Photography, 
Sports, Graphic Arts. 




fPh,„ 



"nd Bio, 



CLAUDE CASSELL NEET, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Born 1905. B.A., University of California, 1930. 
M.A., Clark University, 1932. Ph.D., Clark Uni- 
versity, 1935. American Psychological Association; 
American Association of University Professors. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1935. Avocation: Reading. 

JOHN BUXTER NEWLON 

Instructor in Forge and Machine Shop 

Born 1884. Accepted to Faculty, 1919. Avoca- 
tions: Auctions, Collecting Old Iron. 

ANTHONY JOSEPH NOGELO, M.B.A. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

Born 1915. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1937. M.B.A. , Harvard Graduate Business School, 
1940. Accepted to Faculty, 1940. 



RANSOM CLAYTON PACKARD, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 

Born 1886. B.S.A., University of Toronto, 1911. 
M.S., Massachusetts State College, 1933. Accepted 
to Faculty, 1927. Avocation: Gardening. 

RAYMOND THURSTON PARKHURST, Ph.D. 

Professor of Poultry Husbandry and Head of the 
Department 

Born 1898. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1919. M.S., University of Idaho, 1925. Ph.D., 
University of Edinburgh, 1930. Sigma Xi; Phi 
Kappa Phi; Kappa Sigma; American Poultry 
Science Association; Science Club. Accepted to 
Faculty, 1938. Avocations: Dancing, Bridge, 
Ping-Pong, Boy Scout Work. 



'681 



ERNEST M. PARKOTT, Ph.D. 

Instructor of Chetnistri/ 

Born 1903. B.S., Union University, 1927. M.S., 
Massachusetts State College, 193'2. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Missouri, 193S. Phi Kappa Phi; Sigma 
Xi; Gamma Sigma Epsilon. Accepted to Faculty, 
1929. Avocation: Gardening. 

CLARENCE H. PARSONS, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Animal Husbnnihij and 
Superintendent of Farm 

Born 1904. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1927. M.S., Massachusetts State College, 1933. 
Q. T. v.; Adelphia; American Society of Animal 
Production. Accepted to Faculty, 1931. 

CHARLES ADAMS PETERS, Ph.D. 

Professor of Inorganic and Soil Chemistry 

Born 1875. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1897. Ph.D., Yale University, 1901. Sigma Xi; 
Phi Kappa Phi; Alpha Sigma Phi. Accepted to 
Faculty, 1911. Avocation: Gardening, Hiking. 

WALLACE FRANK POWERS, Ph.D. 

Professor of Physics and Head of the Department 

Born 1889. B.A., Clark University, 1910. M.A., 
Clark University, 1911. Ph.D., Clark University, 
1914. American Physical Society; .\merican Asso- 
ciation of L^niversity Professors; Phi Kappa Phi; 
Sigma Xi; Alpha Sigma Alpha. Accepted to 
Faculty, 1925. Avocations: Photography, Radio. 



WALTER EVERETT PRINCE, M.A. 

Professor of Enylish 

Born 1881. Ph.B., Brown University, 1904. 
M..\., Brown University, 1905. Sphinx; Phi 
Kappa Phi: Shakespeare Association of America; 
National Association of Teachers of Speech. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1912. .\vocations: Dra- 
matics, Reading, Chess. 

ALBERT WILLL\M PURVIS, Ed.D. 

Assistant Professor of Education 

Born 1903. B.A., LIniversity of New Brunswick, 
1931. Ed.M., Harvard University, 1935. Ed.D., 
Harvard University, 1937. Accepted to Faculty, 
1936. Avocations: Hiking, Cabinet-Making. 

GEORGE FREDERICK PUSHEE 

Instructor of Agricultural Engineering 

Born 1887. Accepted to Faculty, 1916. Avoca- 
tion: Scouting. 

FRANK PRENTICE RAND, M.A. 

Head of the Department of Languages and 
Literature 

Born 1889. B.A., Williams, 1912. M.A., Amherst, 
1915. Phi Kappa Phi; Delta Sigma Pi; Adelphia; 
Phi Sigma Kappa; C. E. A.; Modern Language 
Association; Shakespeare Association of America. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1914. Avocation: Mask 
Making. 



Departmental meetings of poultry department take place in Greek-columned Stockbridge Hall 




[69: 



ARNOLD DENSMORE RHODES, M.F 

Instructor of Forestry 

Born 1912. B.S., University of New Hampshire, 
1934. M.F., Yale University School of Forestry, 
1937. Society of American Foresters; A. A. A. S, 
Botanical Society of America; Ecological Society 
of America; British Ecological Society; Sigma Xi 
Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Sigma; Alpha Tau Omega. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1939. Avocations: Fish 
ing. Hiking. 

ALLEN FOSTER RICE, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

Born 1904. B.S., Norwich University, 1926. 
Theta Chi. Accepted to Faculty, 1940. 

VICTOR ARTHUR RICE, M.Agr. 

Professor of Animal Husbandry, Head of the 
Department and Head of the Division 
of Agriculture 

Born 1890. B.S., North Carolina State College, 
1916. M.Agr., Massachusetts State College, 1923. 
Kappa Alpha; Alpha Zeta; Phi Kappa Phi; 
A. A. A. S. Accepted to Faculty, 1916. Avoca- 
tions: Reading, Golf. 

J. HARRY RICH, M.F. 

Assistant Professor of Forestry 

Born 1888. B.S., New Y'ork State College of 
Forestry, 1913. M.F., New Y'ork State College of 
Forestry, 1936. Sigma Xi; Society of American 
Foresters; Phi Kappa Alpha. Accepted to Faculty, 
1933. 



FRANCIS JAMES RIEL, M.S. 

Instructor of Physical Education and Coach of Baseball 

Born 1914. B..4., Massachusetts State College, 
1939. M.S., Massachusetts State College, 1940. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1941. Avocations: Baseball, 
Fishing, Reading. 

WALTER STUNTZ RITCHIE, Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry and Head of the Department 

Born 1892. B.S., Ohio State University, 1916. 
M.A., University of Missouri, 1918. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Missouri, 1922. Sigma Xi; Phi Kappa 
Phi; Alpha Chi Sigma; Delta Tau Delta; American 
Chemistry Society. Accepted to Faculty, 1934. 

OLIVER COUSENS ROBERTS, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Pomology 

Born 1895. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1919. M.S., University of Illinois, 1941. Theta 
Chi. Accepted to Faculty, 1926. Avocation: 
Community Service. 

JAMES ROBERTSON, B.Arch. 

Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture 

Born 1906. B.Arch., Carnegie Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1930. Accepted to Faculty, 1930. Avoca- 
tions: Painting, Drawing, Photography, Acting, 
Stage Production. 

JOSEPH R. ROGERS 

Instructor of Physical Education and Coach of 
Swimming 

Born 1906. Worcester Polvtechnical Institute, 
1930. Accepted to Faculty, 1930. 



Prof. Harrington, Engineering Extension, works out a problem in the machine shop 




^701 



CHARLES JAMES ROHR, Ph.D. 

Assktani Professor of Political Economy and Execii- 
tiiie Secretary, Bureau of Public Adminisiraiion 

Born 1905. Johns Hopkins I'niversity, 1928. 
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins I'nivorsity, 1!);U. American 
Society for Public Aclminislralion; National 
Municipal League; Civil Sci\irc Assembly of the 
United States and Canada; Kajipa .\l])ha. Ac- 
cepted to Faculty, 1937. 

DONALD E. ROSS, B.S. 

Greenhouse Foreman and Instructor of Floriculture 

Born 1896. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1925. Alpha Gamma Rho. Accepted to Faculty, 
1928. Avocations: Indian Lore, Stamps. 








Vtof. ^" 

WILLL\M HAROLD ROSS, Ph.D. 

Instructor of Physics 

Born 1909. B.A., Amherst College, 1929. M.A., 
Amherst College, 1930. Ph.D., Yale University, 
1934. Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma Xi; American 
Physical Society; A. A. A. S.; Phi Delta Theta. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1933. Avocation: No 
Leisure Time. 

WILLIAM CROCKER SANCTUARY, M.S. 
Professor of Poultry Husbandry 

Born 1888. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1912. M.S., Massachusetts State College, 1932. 
Theta Chi; Phi Delta Kappa; Poultry Science 
Association; American Poultry Association. Ac- 
cepted to Faculty, 1922. Avocations: Golf, 
Bowling, Photography, Music. 

ALBERT HORTON SAYER, B.S. 

Instructor of Horticulture 

Born 1914. B.S., Cornell University, 1937. Pi 
Alpha Xi; Sigma Phi Epsilon. Accepted to 
Faculty, 1940. Avocations: Aviation, Hiking. 



Evenings find Land Arch. "Profs." knocking down the pins 

NORMAN JAMES SCHOONMAKER, B.S. 

Instructor of Mathematics 

Born 1918. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1940. Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Beta Kappa; Kappa 
Sigma. Accepted to Faculty, 1941. Avocations: 
Sports, Chess. 

PAUL SEREX, B.S. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Born 1890. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1913. Phi Kappa Phi; Sigma Xi; American 
Chemical Society. Accepted to Faculty, 1913. 
Avocation: Gardening in Summer. 

FRANK ROBERT SHAW, Ph.D. 

Instructor of Entomology 

Born 1908. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1931. Ph.D., Cornell University, 1936. Sigma 
Xi; Phi Kappa Phi; American Association of 
Economical Entomologists; Entomological Society 
of America. Accepted to Faculty, 1935. Avoca- 
tions: Travel, Research, Reading. 

EDNA L. SKINNER, MA. 

Professor of Home Economics, Head of the Division, 
and Advisor of Women 

B.S., Teachers College, Columbia LTniversity, 1908. 
M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1928. M.Ed., Honorary, Michigan State Normal 
College, 1922. Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to 
Faculty, 1919. Avocations: Birds, Gardens. 

HAROLD WILLIAM SMART, B.A. 

Assistant Professor of Economics 
Born 1895. LL.B., Boston University, 1918. 
B.A., Amherst College, 1924. Phi Delta Phi; 
Delta Sigma Rho; Kappa Epsilon; Adelphia. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1920. Avocations: Garden- 
ing and Bridge. 

GRANT BINGEMAN SNYDER, M.S. 
Professor of Olericulture and Head of the Department 

Born 1899. B.S.A., Ontario Agricultural College, 
1922. M.S., Michigan State College. American 
Society for Horticultural Science; American Vege- 
table Growers Association. Accepted to Faculty, 
1922. Avocation: Photography. 



71] 




Business and Literary Advisors of M. S. C. publications 

RUTH STEVENSON, M.S. 

Director of Physical Education for Women 

B.A., Wellesley College, 1934. M. S. Wellesley 
College, 1936. Accepted to Faculty, 1940. 

HARVEY L. SWEETMAN, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Entomology 

Born 1896. B.S., Cole Agricultural College, 1923 
M.S., Iowa State College, 1925. Ph.D., Massa 
chusetts State College, 1930. Sigma Xi; Ph 
Kappa Phi; Alpha Zeta; Gamma Sigma Delta 
Alpha Gamma Rho; A. A. A. S.; American Asso 
ciation of Economic Entomology; American Asso- 
ciation of University Professors; American Society 
of Zoology; Ecological Society of America; Ento- 
mology Society of America; Royal Entomology 
Society, London; Limnological Society of America. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1930. Avocation: Nature. 

WILLIAM HENRY TAGUE, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering 

Born 1892. B.S., Iowa State College, 1924. 

Accepted to Faculty, 

Machines. 



1929. .\vocation: Sewing 



CHARLES HIRAM THAYER 

Assistant Professor of Agronomy 

Born 1884. Accepted to Faculty, 1918. Avoca- 
tions: Hiking, History. 

CLARK LEONARD THAYER, B.S. 

Professor of Floriculture and Head of the Department 

Born 1890. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1913. Alpha Gamma Rho; Phi Kappa Phi; Pi 
Alpha Xi; Adelphia; Society of American Florists. 
Avocations: Hiking, Genealogy. 

RAY ETHAN TORRE Y, Ph.D. 

Professor of Botany 

Born 1887. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1912. M.A., Harvard University; 1915. Ph.D., 
Harvard University, 1918. Accepted to Faculty, 
1919. 



JAY R. TRAVER, Ph.D. 

Instructor of Zoology 
Born 1894. B.A., Cornell University, 1918. M.A., 
Cornell University, 1919. Ph.D., Cornell Uni- 
versity, 1931. Sigma Xi; Sigma Delta Epsilon; 
A. A. A. S.; Entomological Society of America; 
-American Limnological Society; American Asso- 
ciation of University Professors; New York 
Academy of Science. Accepted to Faculty, 1938. 
Avocation: Mayflies. 

REUBEN EDWIN TRIPPENSEE, Ph.D. 

Professor of Wildlife Management 
Born 1894. B.S., Michigan State College, 1920. 
M.S., University of Michigan, 1933. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1934. Alpha Zeta; Seminar 
Botanicus; Phi Kappa Phi; Sigma Xi; Phi Sigma. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1936. Avocations: Fishing, 
Hunting. 




«. A 






FREDERICK SHERMAN TROY, M.A. 

Assistant Professor of English 
Born 1909. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1931. M.A., Amherst College, 1936. Phi Kappa 
Phi. Accepted to Faculty, 1931. 

ALDEN PARKER TUTTLE, M.S. 

Assistatit Professor of Vegetable Garderiing 
Born 1906. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1928. M.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1930. 
Gamma Sigma Delta. Accepted to Faculty, 1930. 
Avocations: Sports, Cooking. 

RALPH ALBERT VAN METER, Ph.D. 

Professor of Pomology, Head of the Department and 

Head of the Division of Horticultiire 
Born 1893. B.S., Ohio State University, 1917. 
M.S., Massachusetts State College, 1930. Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1935. Delta Theta Sigma; 
Phi Kappa Phi; Sigma Xi. ."Accepted to Faculty, 
1917. Avocations: Gardening, Camping, Moun- 
tain Climbing. 

H. LELAND VARLEY, M.A. 

Instructor of English 
Born 1910. B.A., Wesleyan University, 1934. 
M.A., Wesleyan University, 1935. Accepted to 
Faculty, 1938. 



'721 



WILLIAM G. VINAL, Ph.D. 

Professor of Nature Education 
Born 1881. B.S., Harvard University, 1906. 
M.A., Harvard University, 1907. Ph.D., Brown 
University, 1924. Sigma Xi; Kappa Delta Phi. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1937. Avocations: Camping, 
Hiking. 

JOHN HENRY VONDELL 
Instructor of Poultry Husbaudry (ind Plant 
Superintendent 
Born 1898. Ponltry Science Association. Ac- 
cepted to Faculty, 1929. .\vocations: Moun- 
taineering, Photography. 

WINTHROP SELDEN WELLES, M.Ed. 
Professor of Education and Head of the Department 

of Education and Psychology 
Born 1875. B.S., University of Illinois, 1901. 
M.Ed., Harvard University, 1929. Phi Delta 
Kappa. Accepted to Faculty, 1919. Avocations: 
Reading, House Lot. 

GILBERT LLEAVELLYN WOODSIDE, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
Born 1909. B.A., DePauw University, 1932. 
M.A., Harvard University, 1933. Ph.D., Harvard 
University, 1936. Phi Beta Kappa: Sigma Xi; 
Phi Kappa Phi: American Society of Zoologists; 
A. A. A. S. Accepted to Faculty, 1936. Avoca- 
tions: Badminton, Tennis. 

COL. DONALD ANDERSON YOUNG, M.S. 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics and 
Commandant of Cadets 
Born 1888. B.S., University of Maine, 1914. 
M.S., Norwich University, 1929. Sigma Nu. 
Accepted to Faculty, 1939. Avocations: Horse- 
manship, Hunting, Fishing. 



JOHN MICHAEL ZAK, M.S. 

Instructor of Agronomy 

Born 1914. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 
1936. M.S., Massachusetts State College, 1938. 
Sigma Xi. Accepted to Faculty, 1938. Avoca- 
tion: Outdoor Sports. 

Professiiors on L«>ave 

STOWELL COOLIDGE CODING, M.A. 

Associate Professor of French and Music 
Special Study at the University of Wisconsin. 

CALVIN SIDDELL HANNUM, M.S. 

Instructor of Mathematics 
Active Duty, 2nd Armored Division in South. 

HELEN MITCHELL, Ph.D. 

Research Professor of Home Economies 

Government Committee on Food Problems, Wash- 
ington. 

ERNEST JAMES RADCLIFFE, M.D. 

Professor of Hygiene 
Active Duty, Army Medical Corps, Windsor Locks 

JOHN DAVID SWENSON, M.A. 

Instructor of Mathematics 

Industrial Defense Work, Babcock & Wilson Co., 
New York. 



At Commencement . . . rank upon rank of the faculty attended final results of eight semester.s 




[73; 





EDWARD B. HOLLAND 



atry of butterfat 



ALEXANDER E. CANCE 
agricultural marketing and cooperation 



RECOGNITION 




Helped pl-» 






Although M. S. C. has a horticultural department, 
the INDEX cannot award laurel wreaths as did 
the ancients, nor orchids as does Winchell, but it 
can call attention to faithful service. 

Dr. Edward B. Holland, State graduate, has 
retired after a half-century of research in the 
chemistry department. Pioneer in work on the 
composition of butterfat in milk, he is also well- 
known for his work on insecticides, soy beans, 
butter spoilage, and connection of rare elements 
with composition of vegetables. 

The clear thinking and interest in his students 
of Dr. Alexander E. Cance has earned their 
respect and affection; his researches and innova- 
tions including first American college courses in 
agricultural marketing and cooperation have been 
recognized by our government. He taught in the 
A. E. F. University, and France made him 
Chevalier of Agriculture. 

A practicing engineer before he came to M. S. C, 
Arthur K. Harrison has brought an exactness 
to his teaching that often awes his students. 
Preferring landscape construction to theory, he 
planned Alumni Field with Curry Hicks. Pro- 
fessor Emeritus Waugh considers him helpful to 
akimni who face professional problems. 



[74: 





Home f 



GEORGE F. FARLEY 
*enty-five years leader of the 4-H Club 



IX MEMORIAM 

Four familiar faces are gone — four whom Massa- 
chusetts State College loved, and there is nothing 
we can say, nothing but quote a few facts, weep 
for Adonais, and retell their deeds. 

"Uncle" George Farley, for twenty-five years 
director of 4-H Club activities at M. S. C, died 
suddenly after a short illness. The Farley Club- 
house was his greatest achievement. President 
Baker, in selecting a word to use in reference to 
this Phi Beta Dartmouth man, chose '"service." 

Miss Helen Knowlton, associate professor of 
Home Economics, died at home last spring. 
A graduate of Mount Holyoke, and head of the 
Department of Home Economics and Dean of 
Women at the University of New Hampshire, 
she served here since 19''24. 

Professor Merrill J. Mack succumbed in North- 
ampton after undergoing a presumably successful 
operation. A son of Pennsylvania State College, 
he taught ice cream and butter making, and dairy 
chemistry here for eighteen years. He was widely 
known in Massachusetts for his Boy Scout work. 

"Bud" Evans, formerly of the class of 1942, 
died December 9, 1941, in Pittsfield, following an 
operation. While here, he played freshman 
football and was a popular member of the varsity 
squad in 1939 and 1940. 




MERRILL .1. M\CK 




Extracurricular 




I ; -I ^ . / 





Extracurricular activities have grown 
out of their short pants on Massachusetts 
State College's campus, and the growth, 
both in the size and in the number of 
student outside interests, is an excellent 
index of the growth of the college as it 
has progressed toward a university status 
during the last ten years. 

Academic activities and other activities 
that have a similar educational basis, 
athletics, both for men and women, 
religious organizations, and fraternity 
and sorority life give to the student 
valuable experience in the art of living 
and getting along with people, and have 
for each as integral a part in college life 
as does the more formal system of 
education — classes, lectures, labs. ■ 



Academic Activities (INDEX, below), athletics are major extracurricular activities 




Activities at M. S. C. • • • 




A pine tree limb, a corner of Stockbridge Hall make a striking silhouette against white and fluffy spring clouds 



t fflflSSft**' 



.rt\s<Xo\\«»«ft 



{^ FroBtJ 



coiw*?'-"";!'!: 











Stepping up news coverage through the 
cooperation of students and faculty and 
an expert news staff under managing 
editor Stan Polchlopek, the Collegian, 
with efficient Bill Dwyer as editor, 
matured into a well-organized college' 
newspaper. Better student-faculty rela- 
tionships, cooperation with defense 
efforts, the expression of student opinion 
have been some of the more important 
Collegian policies. 

Bob McCutcheon, associate editor, did 
a good job of Tuesday night workshop 
sessions, and George Litchfield, keeping 
the sports news up to date, added pep 
to the sports page with his G. Willie L. 
column. Other columnists did good work, 
especially the founders of the Peanut 
Gallery, Fitzpatrick and Hicks, with 
their inane but pointed remarks. 

Meanwhile coeds proved their versa- 
tility on the Collegian. Dot Dunklee 



THE COLLEGIAX 

wrote general news stories and features 
including an interesting comment on 
Chief Justice Stone and his trials while at 
State; Alice Maguire, in her Coediting 
column, kept women up to date on the 
latest fashion developments and campus 
gossip; Marge Stanton worked under 
G. Willie L. on the sports page keeping 
women athletically informed and pinch 
hit at times for regular sports writers. 
Bob Nottenburg and his staff of effi- 
ciency experts kept the business affairs 
of the Collegian in good running order. 
During November, Bob, who is also an 
officer in the New England Intercol- 
legiate Newspaper Association, accom- 
panied Stan Polchlopek to the annual 
Associate Press Conference in St. Louis, 
Missouri. 

Li December the Collegian staff voted 
on and endorsed a change in the Col- 
legian Constitution. This change called 
for two managing editors instead of one 



>\anag* 



,NoU«"»^"^^ 




781 



HAS PBOGBESSIVE POLICY 



and f«r two news editors. When Stan 
Polehlopek took over the editorship on 
January fifteenth, he appointed Dave 
Bush and Fred Rothery as managing 
editors and Hank Martin and George 
Chornesky as news editors. Dot Dunk- 
lee became associate editor and Ted 
Shepardson, sports editor. At the busi- 
ness board elections in February Wendell 
Brown was chosen to take the place of 
Bob Nottenburg. 

Since the war, the Collegian has added 
its efforts to the general all-out victory 
policy of the college and throughout the 
year the Collegian, besides serving stu- 
dents as a reliable source of information 
and an active expression of their opinion, 
has added to the prestige of Massachusetts 
State College and supported its aim of 
becoming a State University. 




"odfiob 



"'"'''Usifle, 



■ssl>, 



oard 



'^'■aps 



T. Shepardson, Rotlicry, II. Martin 
Miss Cobb, Miss E. McNamara. Miss Mag 
Prof. Dickinson, Cox, Litchfield, W. Dwy< 



lush, Zahn. 


5r, Kaplinsky, 


Burke, Saulnier 




•e, Morton, 


Miss Dunldcc 


, Miss Martin, Miss Stanto 


n, Bornstein 


Nottenburg 


;, McCutcheon 


1, Golan, Dr. GoIdl)erg 






79 




THE 1942 INDEX 



Steak — delicious, juicy steaks at the 
INDEX picnic — that is the vision that 
spurs on the members of each INDEX 
staff. With priorities, shortage of ma- 
terials and time holding back production, 
members of the 1943 INDEX Board 
struggled valiantly to keep copy rolling 
through even despite their own heavy 
schedules. 

Editor-in-Chief Lois Doubleday got 
her four hours of sleep regularly every 
night and went through the year with her 
fingers crossed and with the prayer that 
fate and professors would be kind. 
Meg Marsh found time between poultry 
exams to take some 26.5 senior informals. 
Her board, Henri Kreczko, Joe Bornstein, 
and Arnold Kaplinsky who often found 
other work too pressing, developed and 
printed most of these and helped with the 
taking and printing of most of the other 
informal shots. Brad Greene, Babe Ne- 



I Thomson, Miss Kreczko, Small, Kaplinsky, Mathias, Nesin, Ceer. Miss Daub, Miss Koonz 
Litchfield, Miss McManiara. Ketchen, Miss Doubleday, Witt, Miss Marsh, Miss Lappen 




801 



STAFF HAS INDIAN TROUBLE 



sin, Betty Coffin, and Marcia Greene 
had a wrestling match witii the Indian 
motif but eventually came out the win- 
ners. Although Jean McNamara took 
up the work of literary editor late in the 
year, she did a fine job of keeping her 
board on their toes — Rudy Mathias, Lee 
Filios, and Annette Bousquct who practi- 
cally moved into the INDEX office 
caught up on late copy and kept it going 
to the presses even after the rest of the 
board had finished their work. The 
statistics board after loosing two editors 
finally settled down to routine work with 
Charlie Geer as nominal editor and Helen 
Donnelly as his chief aide. Their efficient 
board, Sally Boyden, Marion Thomson, 
Florence Daub, and Bob Keefe, did the 



huge mass of typing and checking in 
record time. George Litchfield forming 
a one man sports board did all the sports 
division work. 

Throughout the year Gould Ketchen 
took charge of finances and business of 
the book and with the energetic encour- 
agement of Professor Dickinson and the 
work of his board, Fran Lappen, Charlie 
Geer, Mel Small, Doc Freeman, and Bob 
O'Shea, did an efficient job on advertise- 
ments, sales, budgeting, scheduling, and 
making out orders. 

The board's expression of gratitude to 
Doctor Goldberg may be found in the 
dedication of their book. 



..HHtbeEdHo^ 



discus*''* ' 



photog 



Sophon-"''^' 



,ff members 




LONG-HAIRED LITERATI 



"O come, Gentle Muse," entreats the 
weary underclassman racking his brain 
for a neat phrase, a catchy title. On the 
basis of M'hat he can produce in the 
literary line this future Longfellow will 
be rated along with others in competition 
for the Collegian Quarterly Staff. Once 
a week competitors are recjuired to pass in 
an article which must be one of the fol- 
lowing three types: creative, critical, or 
technical. At the beginning of second 
semester, those who have striven dili- 
gently are rewarded by becoming mem- 
bers of the staff. In addition one Sopho- 
more is advanced from ordinary crew to 
the associate editorship recently held by a 
Junior who automatically becomes com- 
mander-in-chief. 

Editor Mary Donahue, with Associate 
Editor Robert Fitzpatrick, had as her 
staff Seymour Koritz, Theodore Noke, 
Phyllis Peterson, Annette Bousquet, and 
Brad Morton. The entire staff discussed 
material contributed by faculty, students 
and alumni but the final decision of 



whether it should be printed or not was 
left to the editor-in-chief. 

The three Quarterly editions of this 
year, one in the fall, one in mid-winter, 
and one in spring, contained poetry, 
prose, and fiction selections. 



Quar 



...Editor Vi»Pa 



itUaSoph 




Morton. Nottenburis, Noke 
\ Bousquet,, Miss Donahue, Miss Pete 




[821 




Editor Shaw finishes Freshman Handbook 



our campus and to serve as a later refer- 
ence. Receiving the Handbook is usually 
a part of registration ceremonies, but due 
to printing complications this year's 
books were not ready on time. This left 
bewildered freshmen seeking the Old 
Chapel in the vicinity of Wilder Hall, and 
wondering what the songs and cheers 
mumbled at football games were. 

Annual winter competition brings the 
compilers of the multi-varied articles in 
line for the Handbook board which is un- 
limited. Each member of the board is 
assigned to one section of the book and is 
responsible for gathering and writing 
all the data in that section — student 
government, customs, social, religious, 



INFORMATION PLEASE!! 



Two by four inches and one hundred and 
fifty pages of compact, accurate data 
about what goes on and who's who on the 
Massachusetts State College campus is 
presented to each information-seeking 
freshman in the form of the Freshman 
Handbook. The purpose of the Hand- 
book is to orient incoming freshmen to 



academic, and athletic activities. The 
book is written during the spring and 
printed during the summer. Anderson, 
Greenspan, Mary Martin, Hemond, and 
Allen with Wes Shaw as editor did the work 
of compiling and distributing the book 
which, even though late, was welcomed by 
still wondering and wandering Freshmen. 



Allen, Anderson, Cr 



i Martin, Hemond 




83' 




A SEMESTER'S 

'Twas thirty years ago that the name 
"Roister Doisters," borrowed from the 
roguish Ralph of an early university 
play, was adopted by the M. A. C. 
Dramatic Society. This year, after a 
semester's rest, the Roister Doisters, 
scorning the theater's traditional super- 
stition, presented an interclass contest 
of student-directed, one-act plays for the 
Social Union on Friday, March 13th. 
The sophomores, under the direction of 
Gordon Smith, offered Sham by Frank G. 
Tompkins; the seniors. Love and How to 
Cure It by Thornton Wilder under the 
tutelage of co-directors David Burbank 
and George Langton; and the conquer- 
ing juniors, coached by Fran Ward, The 
Dear ^ Departed by Stanley Houghton. 
Professor Frank Prentice Rand pre- 
sented to the winning cast, Agnes Gold- 
berg, Lurane W'ells, Don Wood, Beverly 
Bigwood, Murray Caspar, Larry New- 
comb, copies of American Folk Plays. 



inieiicenieiit play R. D."s rested while Prof. Kaiid taught workshop 




[84] 



REST FOB ROISTER ROISTERS 



In 1940 the Roister Doister production 
for High School Day and Coninience- 
ment was George Bernard Shaw's Hecirl- 
hreak House, in 1941 Kaufman and 
Hart's George Washington Slept Here, 
and, in 194'2, George Kelly's "roll-'em- 
in-the-aisle" satire on the little theatre 
movement. The Torch Bearers, lent added 
joy to Commencement and the com- 
bined High School and Mothers' Day. 
The first of three hilarious scenes con- 
cerns itself with a line rehearsal at the 
home of a substitute leading lady. 
Actors boomps-a-daisy, mix their lines, 
fail to heed directions, and in general 
reproduce any amateur theatricals. The 
second scene presents every backstage 
catastrophe possible to aspiring hams; 
the third attempts to clear up all the 
problems. The fun of the play consists 
not so much in wisecracks as in eccen- 
tricities and in recognition of the types 
of people who go in for such pork leg. 



Giving the backstage view of an amateur 
production are Jack Sherman as Mr. 
Frederick Ritter, Don Wood as Mr. 
Huxley Hossefrosse, Arthur Monk as 
Mr. Spindler, Dave Burbank as Mr. 
Ralph Twiller, Fran Ward as Teddy 
Spearing, Larry Newcomb as Mr. Stage 
Manager, Marjorie Cushman as Mrs. 
Paula Ritter, Marion Nagelschmidt Jones 
as Mrs. J. Duro Pampinelli, Marjorie 
Spear as Mrs. Nelly Fell, Lurane Wells 
as Miss Florence McCrickett, Beverly 
Bigwood as Mrs. Clara Sheppard, and 
Kate Wetherbee as Jenny. 

Advised by Professor Frank Prentice 
Rand are "Rusty-Dusty" officers : Presi- 
dent David Burbank, Vice-President 
Marion Nagelschmidt Jones, Manager 
John U. Shepardson, Assistant Manager 
Robert I. Goldman, Electrician Ralph K. 
Dakin, Technical Assistant Charles H. 
Schauwecker, and Scenic Adviser James 
Robertson, Jr. 



Ward, Wroe, Gentry, Manix, Langton, G. Smith, Greenfield 
Bornstein, Misses Wells, Grayson, Barbour, Smith, Groesbeck 
I Bigwood. Dakin, J. Shepardson, Prof. Rand, Burbank, Miss Nagelschmidt, Mil 




[85] 



SYLLOGISM & REBUTTAL 




\feets 



Herb 



Wci"'^'' 



Choosing for its questions this year the 
timely ones proposed by the National 
Debating Societies, including questions 
on war and labor problems, the Debate 
Club realistically faced issues. 

As an aid to teaching its members the 
art of presenting logical arguments elo- 
quently, the twenty-odd debaters were 
divided into a freshman team concentrat- 
ing on the fundamentals of debate and 
an upperclass one endeavoring to im- 
prove its already acquired facility in 
syllogism and rebuttal. The beginners 
debated within the club and with the fresh- 
man teams of other colleges, including the 
undergraduates of Norfolk Prison Colony, 
while the varsity batted the breeze in 
college and local discussion groups. 

For the first time M.S. C. was repre- 
sented at the Model Congress of the Col- 
leges in New England and the national 
contest sponsored by the American Eco- 
nomic Foundation; while a trip through 
the South served to ascertain opinions of 
other colleges, and spread M. S. C.'s fame. 




[86] 



SIXFONIETTA GROWS UP 




^"'•'y^ tb 



** Sit,/-, 



^'■^t Shi. 



"lanafi 



Dynamic Doric directing a bigger and 
better Sinfonietta found skeptical States- 



men applauding enthusiastically for en- 
cores. Under an efficient manager, Mary 
Berry, it expanded in one year from 
twenty-five to thirty-six members, the 
freshmen enlarging the brass and string 
sections. A string quartet, which made 
its debut at the orchestral convocation, 
was well received at local programs. 

At Convocation on November 6 the 
Sinfonietta presented a variety of selec- 
tions — some Tschaikowsky, Franz Lehar's 
Merry Widow Waltz, Rose Marie by 
PViml, and a bit of Wagner. It was 
featured at the combined Glee Club con- 
cert at Social Union on December 16, 
and on March f20 and 21 it success- 
fully accompanied Pirates of Penzance. 

As just reward for the players' good 
work they took outside trips : on Novem- 
ber 12 accompanying the Men's Glee 
Club to South Hadley Falls, and on 
February 9 performing in Turners Falls 
at the request of Senator James Gunn. 



Butler, Zahner, Brady. Donahue. Van den Noort, Tarbell, Miss Str< 
Hilchey, Misses Hoff, Collins, White, Avella, Holton, Stanton, Hallor 
Goldman, Gcwirtz. Weinhold, Miss Berry, Miss H. Smith, Miss I 
Miss Mclntyre, Goldin. Doten 



Moreau, Radway 
It, King, Kelleher 
ss Swanbeck, 




871 



BETTER MUSICIANS STRIKE 



With drab raincoats covering their 
maroon uniforms, members of the band, 
spirits undampened, presented a true 
picture of "loyal sons of Old Bay State" 
at the Amherst-State battle royal. Al- 
though the band with its pretty major- 
ettes and its expert formation marching 
always calls forth a bit of neck-stretching 
at football games, spectators at the 
Tuft's game watched with amazement as 
the members went on a lay-down strike 
to spell out Y-E-A T-E-A-M. Always 
the instigator of spirited student support 
at football games, the band proved the 
backbone of the cheering section. 

The Over There Overture, most difficult 
of the band's repertoire and most appro- 
pos, was excellently performed at the 
Christmas Concert, under the direction 
of regular conductor. Charles Farnum. 
That same evening the band added 



something new to this annual concert by 
accompanying the traditional student 
carol sing. As usual the band played 
at the Veterans' Hospital in Leeds the 
week before its Christmas appearance, 
and in February it made a second out- 
side trip in order to appear at Westover 
Field. At Convocation the last week in 
February, the band brought its new 
Glockenspiel to the foreground in the 
march Chimes of Liberty. The well- 
planned program included a favorite 
arrangement of southern melodies and 
the difficult .1 Day at West Point. 
Leo Moreau was trumpet soloist at the 
Ch^ristmas Concert, and Robert Radway 
played the cornet solo selection at the 
Convocation Concert. Going on the 
assumption that students appreciate the 
more beautiful things in life, the band 
also featured Drum Majorettes Jean 



Band played for Alumni Parade last Commencement Gloria Maynard leads Band in formation marching 




IIP THE BAB^D AT MASS. STATE 



Carlisle, Mary Holton. and Gloria 
Maynard, who twirled batons at the 
important indoor concerts as well as at 
football games. 

Conspicnous service award winner, Al 
Eldridge, continued his band career, 
becoming one of the most active student 
leaders in the band's history. His "brain 
child," the New England Intercollegiate 
Band Association, was well cared for at 
bi-monthly meetings, where representa- 
tives made plans for the association paper. 
Cadence, for an All New England Band 
Concert, and for national expansion. 

Although the accelerated study pro- 
gram and shortened semester kept Man- 
ager Willis Janes on his toes getting 
members to rehearsal and keeping sched- 
ules straight, the band gave all its sched- 
uled performances even including the 
spring concert given on Mothers' Day. 




^«nd.^ 



•"n relav t- 



■ Oiarehj- 



"^'""«''»'D«, 



Radway, Campbell, Hilchey, Ilemond, Libby, Quinn, Promisel, Chase, Ballov, Martin 
ss Holton, Moreau, King, Hall. T^ldin, Gaylord, Bosworth, Gould, Colling, Miss Maynard 
, Edminster, Benemelis, Mr. Farnum, Janes, Miss Carlisle, Eldridge, Pushee, Binder, Brode 




[89] 




Glee 



Club* 



Acclaimed "the best ever," the M. S. C. 
Glee Clubs lived up to that mild Holly- 
woodism. From the first soprano of the 
Women's Glee Club to the bass of the 



GLEE CLUBS GO 

Men's Glee Club general improvement 
was marked. 

"Something new was added," in extra 
performances for the M. S. C. Glee Clubs 
which frequently in combination and at 
other times separately not only sang at 
Alumni gatherings — in Springfield, 
Boston, and New York (the famous and 
long awaited New York trip) — but also 
at campus concerts and many other off- 
campus affairs — at South Hadley, at 
Turners Falls, and at Ayer. The high 
spot of their traveling career was the 
part taken in the dedication exercises for 
the new United Service Organization 
Building at Fort Devens. Nor was 
sweet charity neglected for benefits were 
given for the Red Cross and similar 
organizations. 

In March the Glee Clubs contributed 
to the success of the annual operetta. 
The Women's Glee Club gaily undertook 



Misses Glagovsky, Baird. Moggio, Lawrence, J. Milner, Van Meter, Bird, Davis, Keedy, Lane, Miehike 
blisses Wasserman, Gilchrest, Peck, Kelso, Thomas, Lee, M. Milner, Day, T. Moulton, Bentley, Merritt 
Misses Mothes, Holmes, Filios, Moseley, B. Moulton, Berthiaume, Stanton, Cobb, Tilton, Williams 




"901 



SIGHT-SEEING IN NE\¥ YORK 



the coy roles of beautiful daughters wooed 
by the ferocious pirates portrayed by the 
Men's Gke Chib. 

Bav Staters and Bay Statettes 

Closely connected with the (ilee Clubs 
are the eight Bay Staters and the six 
Bay Statettes. These two groups may, 
according to Maestro Doric Alviani, 
vdtimately merge to form a miniature 
glee club. Really the stars of the Glee 
Clubs, members of these two groups 
appeared frequently along with the Glee 
Clubs — at Turners Falls, at Westfield, 
Boston, and, of course, New York. 
Both groups were well-received, especially, 
no doubt, the Bay Statettes, at Fort 
Devens where they gave a variety con- 
cert for the U. S. O. The popularity of 
both these hard-working groups has 
grown immensely since their debut at 
the musical clubs Social Union. 




">o, c, 






'^'^"M^. ' 'rube 



Smith, Shu8ter, Rothery, Anderson, Nichols. Block, Franklin, Trubey 
Leonard, Crosby, Cole, Lynch. Biron. Giannotti, Kaplowitz, Sidd. Martii 
Cadorette, Graham. Parker. Walker, Whitney, Hathaway 
Count, Bralit, Alviani, Barron, Mendall. Foley 




91 



STATESMEN & STATETTES 



Statesmen 

Four boys in white ties and tails "pro- 
claiming far and near the peerless fame" 
of our alma mater, need anyone know- 
more to guess that these are the States- 
men? The Statesmen . . . that quar- 
tet that sang for students and alumni, in 
city and town, bringing good music 
wherever they went. The members, 
Bralit, Mendall, Foley, and Whitney, 
have worked hard to continue the States- 
men tradition of the best music for 
audiences whether large or small, old or 
young. Music Week, Social Union, High 
School Day, the quartet was always 
there singing, joking and entertaining. 

During the winter the Statesmen 
sang over the radio from W. B. Z. in 
Springfield, from W. H. Y. N. in Green- 
field and at home from States tower 
studio. They sang at concerts with the 
other musical clubs, at the musical clubs' 
Social Union, and at the Hotel Kimball 
in Springfield. Spring found them, after 
that important New York trip, busier 
than ever, with appearances in Spring- 
field with the combined musical clubs, in 
Boston, and in Westfield. 



Bralit, Mendall, Foley, Whil 





i Moulton, Berthiaur 



Statettos 

Always the more alluring counterpart of 
the Statesmen have been the Statettes. 
This year, however, saw their number 
reduced to that of a trio when Gladys 
Archibald graduated. The trio — Betty 
Moulton, Peg Berthiaume, and Marge 
Stanton — sang at the musical clubs' 
Social Union, at concerts in Turners 
Falls, Shelburne Falls, and Ayer: made 
trips to sing before Alumni groups in 
Springfield, Boston, and New York; be- 
sides making several radio broadcasts. 
Their light, rhythmical pieces proved as 
popular at off-campus functions as for 
campus functions. Big event of the year 
for the Statettes as well as the other 
musical groups was, of course, the New 
York trip that came in the middle of 
second semester. 

This June two of the charter members 
of the group — Peg Berthiaume and Betty 
Moulton — will leave the campus trio to 
form a Statette Alumni Trio with Gladys 
Archibald. But, along with the States- 
men, Statettes have formed a vital part 
of M. S. C.'s musical life. 



[92] 



"The students of Massachusetts State 
College bring you Campus Varieties." 
Many a Thursday afternoon in 19-l'-2 this 
familiar phrase issued from the Tower 
Room high in South College. Radio- 
minded students created a new precedent 
in ethereal activity on campus when 
previous years' unsuccessful attempts to 
produce drama were supplanted by a 
variety show. With the exception of 
college editor, Fran Pray, who super- 
vised the technical end of the production 
and handled the controls during actual 
broadcasts, this was a "hands off" affair as 
far as faculty were concerned. Interested 
students designed and executed the 
entire program. 

A good portion of praise goes to John 
Vondell "43, who was most directly 
responsible for the coordination of these 
programs. This was only a stepping 




Marge Stanton in charge of musical no tables 



VARIETY VIA AIR-WAVES 




Quix 



'Bast, 



''^ G. Li 



tchfie/d 



stone for John, who handled the an- 
nouncing, since he plans to make radio 
his life's work. Among other students 
who participated actively were Marge 
Stanton '43, who was chief cook and 
bottle washer in the music department. 
She presented many campus musical 
notables such as the college band and 
various singing groups. Our own "Dr. 
I. Q." was unearthed in the form of 
Quizmaster George Litchfield '42 whose 
specific duty was to run a "quiz show to 
end all quiz shows." Contestants ranged 
from R. O. T. C. cadet officers to a trio of 
home economics majors. Also presented 
regularly was a radio edition of the 
Collegian that featured frequent inter- 
views with students outstanding in 
campus activities . . . Basketball Star 
Bokina, Carnival Queen Anita Marshall. 
Although more than twenty-five students 
participated in these weekly broadcasts, 
especially active were Winifred Day, 
Robert Doolittle, John Foley, Dick 
Smith, and Robert Holmes. 




O. C. Margie Reed as birdie in the cage 



'Birdie in the center and three hands 'round'' 



TWIRLS, TRAILS & TRIPS 



Cacoowah! echoes the barbaric cry from 
the slopes of encircling mountains as the 
plaid-shirted and dungaree-trousered Out- 
ing Clubber hails his scattered com- 
panions. Based upon the premise that 
"the primitive has always appealed to 

king members of Hunter's harem take a mid-day siesta 




the cultured mind (Pat's)," State's O. C 
began its program before the opening of 
the college year by participating in the 
Intercollegiate Outing Club Association's 
Adirondacks "College Week" with Yale, 
Vassar, Cornell, and several other Outing 
Clubs, and running a get-acquainted 
picnic for the freshmen. 

Busy taking part in 5-college trips, 
running barn dances, and short hikes 
almost weekly — it saved Mountain Day 
by substituting guided hikes for the 
administration-cancelled tradition. 

Though few long trips were under- 
taken (in order to aid the National De- 
fense Program by conserving tires and 
gasoline) the State Outing Club did not 
stint its members in other joys — the 
muffled slap of skis on a powder snow, 
crooning ripples from a rhythmic paddle, 
breathless companionship on a steep 
slope, sweetness of rest after strenuously 
battling Nature, harmony by a fire, and 
"Swing your i)artncrs!" in the dance. 



94 




ga*wSg.--><vpT '. ■ 



Baseball .... symbolic of the American way of life and of action vital in the time of war 




ATHLETICS 




inwamu^''' 



Thor 



ntoo? 



Non-varsity sports leaped into sudden 
prominence as America entered upon an 
active war program. Two plans for 
voluntary physical recreation — one in the 
late spring and one in the early fall of 
1941 — had been abandoned because of 
absolute lack of student support, and, as 
the need for more complete conditioning 



WAR EMERGENCY 



of men who must eventually take up a 
military life grew apparent, a compulsory 
physical education program was resorted 
to in March of 1942. Sports in this 
program consisted of swimming, soccer, 
football, cross country, and six-man 
football. Men who were members of 
varsity squads were, of course, exempt. 

Although spring sports were dropped 
because of the compulsory program of 
activity, a normal fall and winter intra- 
mural program went along well and 
brought its usual amount of fun and 
excitement to spectators and participants. 
Interfraternity athletics received the most 
attention with greater activity and wider 
participation than any other informal 
sport. 

Honors for the school year of 1940-1 
went to Alpha Epsilon Pi. Closing event 
last spring was the softball tournament in 
which Tau Epsilon Phi just edged Alpha 
Gamma Rho. 



Greek runners battle around a curve 



Intramural speedsters crouching ready for the gun 




96] 



SPEEDS INTRAMURAL SPORTS 



Swinging into tiu- current year's com- 
petition, the record's show A. E. P. out 
ahead once again. Touch football in the 
fall was widely supj)orted and it was 
Lambda Chi Alpha that ended up wearing 
the crown in this division. In soccer. 
Kappa Sigma unleashed a booting attack 
which buried all comers. 

Winter sports saw Phi Sigma Kappa 
and Sigma Alpha Epsilon splitting honors. 
The former took the finals of the basket- 
ball tourney, while S. A. E. was victorious 
in volleyball. Directorship of these sports 
was under Sid Kaufman of the Physical 
Education Department, with Henry 
Thornton assisting in the administration. 

In the other angle of intramurals, 
interclass sports (which fall under the 
jurisdiction of a student elected Inter- 
class Athletic Board), activity was lim- 
ited this year to the two lower classes. 
In the fall, the teams split: the yearlings 
winning in football; the freshmen proving 
victorious in soccer. 



Phi Sig %v'on in the interfraternity basketball 




'"■nival 



<?Uee„ 



'^'^s'lai/ 



S. A. E. conquered A. E. P. in volleyball 



A 


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97; 



I 



XEW SPIRIT IS 




,.oav 



Sal^***^ 



trappe'^ a 



fter a long P 



uot return 



Riel. Hareesheimer. 

Santin, Hitchcock. Katoti, Dunhan 

Field, Nebeelty, Wright, Engelhard, 

Ryan, Larkin, Colella, Salwak, Norton, 

McDoaough, Oilman, Werme, Seery, Brady 



An "in and out" football team with a 
record of three wins, four losses and one 
tie was the result of the new coaching 
regime at State. But, general feeling 
gives the 1941 club credit for more "in 
than out," and the opinion prevails that 
State football fortunes are on the up- 
swing. 

Credit for this rejuvenation goes to 
head coach Walter Hargesheimer who 
came here in the late spring of 1941 to 
take over a strange group and introduce a 
new system of play. Captaining this 
year's club was John Brady, '4'-2, recipient 
of last year's Pond .\ward. Johnny 
showed the enthusiasm and inspiration of 
a real leader, putting in as many playing 
minutes as any man on the squad. 



Glick. Miller 
. Fedcli, Morton. <^arrity 
Pushee. Handrich. Tolman 
Forest, Anderson, C. Warner 
Bullock, Kimball, Freitas, Stor 




!»S| 



SEEN ON STATE CRIDIRON 



The opener at Springfield College ended 
in a 6'-6 tie but showed a team that had 
ability to go places. The following week 
it had picked up enough to edge Con- 
necticut by an 8-(i count. Norwich 
earned only one touchdown and the "20-0 
score shows only the superiority of the 
Horsemen, not the great battle put up by 
the Statesmen. The Rhode Island game 
was really an "out" day; nearly half of 
the regulars left the game on injuries. 
But the Hargesheimer club turned around 
and made it a State field day the following 
week against the Worcester Engineers 
with score of 3'2-0. 



Hopes were high for the town game 
with Amherst. But the weather was bad 
and the battle hard fought with a result- 
ing State so worn down that the Sabrina's 
stream of fresh reserves gave them a 20-0 
victory. The team next experienced a 
really "in" day when they traveled to 
Brooklyn and came out of a thriller ahead 
by 33-19. In the season's closer, the 
Statesmen lacked the necessary spark to 
hold an average Tufts aggregation. Each 
club got one six-pointer on an intercepted 
pass, and the Jumbos earned one more to 
win 14-7. 






tM 



SaWa^ ' 



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Broo' 



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Tired, but happy, the Maroon Club leaves the field after their defeat of the University of Connecticut 




I 100 1 



Looking Ahoad 

In addition to Captain Brady, a valuable 
group of seniors will be lost by gradua- 
tion. In the backfield Freitas, Seery, 
and Bullock have all been standout 
players for four years. The last men- 
tioned has played all positions in the 
backfield, Seery has been a running half, 
while big Benny Freitas was a plunging 
fullback. Both of these boys have done 
a lot of passing. Senior ends were Paul 
Dwyer, retired from service by a jaw 
injury in the Worcester game, and 
George Kimball. In the line, Carl Werme 
and Jim Oilman were a dependable pair 
of tackles. Carl has been a stalwart for 
four years, while "Hank" was a third 
string back who had never seen much 
play until this year's shift to the line slot. 
The emergency situation of the country 
leaves the athletic setup rather in doubt. 
However, disregarding the draft, there 
are a nmnber of veterans available for 
next year. Outstanding was junior Gil 
Santin who was presented the Allan Leon 
Pond Memorial Award at the close of the 




1941 season, in addition to being elected 
co-captain of the 194'-2 club. The other 
half of the combination is John McDon- 
ough, a rugged guard who plays a hard 
game. Linesmen who remain include 
Storozuk, Pushee, Clarke, Dunham, 
Morton, Warner and Englehard. In the 
backfield, available lettermen include 
Ryan and Masi, both creditable signal 
callers, plus Santin, Salwak, Larkin, 
Fedeli and Forrest. 



Registrar Lanphear in a rousing plea at an Adelphia pep rally before the Norwich game 




101 



GREENE IS OUTSTANDING IN 




Bill Kimball, track captain for two years 

Only one man of the 1941 cross country 
team lived up to pre-season expecta- 
tions and finished out in front con- 
sistently. This man was Bradford 
Greene, a senior, who, although running 
as a regular member of the team the 
year before, was never a really stand-out 
hill and dale man until this year. The 



other members of the team joined be- 
hind him for one victory, although they 
were edged only by small margins in 
their other two dual meets. Wiry Russ 
McDonald ran a close second to Brad 
most of the season. Captain Kimball 
and sophomores Newton and Caldwell 
were the other men who ran regularly in 
the first five. Bill Kimball, serving his 
second year as leader of the club, failed 
to reach the form which he displayed in 
his two previous years, but did continue 
to add pep to the club. George Caldwell 
and Earle Newton were two sophomores 
who easily won their letters. Others 
who ran last fall included seniors Hal 
Mosher and Eric Greenfield, sopho- 
mores Lloyd Fitzpatrick and Joe Born- 
stein. 

The season's opener was run at Boston 
on the Franklin Park course. Greene 
took first in the race, Newton fifth and 
the other team members were just far 
enough back to give the locals a 31-24 



Derby, Fitzpatri 
Caldwell, H. Mosher, Or 



Burnstein, Litchfield 
e. Morrill. McDonald. Ne 




102 1 



HILL & DALE 

loss. At W. P. I. things were turned 
around as a triple tie between Captain 
Kimball, Greene and Xewton edged the 
Techmen 'il-'ii). Ties seemed to be the 
thing as in the final dual meet with 
Springfield, McDonald and Greene tied 
in third place, while Kimball, Mosher, 
Newton, and Caldwell were together in 
seventh place. The place of State in the 
Connecticut ^'alley Meet at New London 
was third as a result of Greene's eighth 
position out of thirty-five. 

Russ McDonald placed thirty-ninth 
in the New England Intercollegiates 
again at Franklin Park. He was closely 
followed by Greene who captured the 
forty-third slot. Newton, Kimball, and 
Mosher followed to give the team a 
tenth place. 

Russ McDonald, elected captain of 
the 194''2 club, and two other lettermen 
will be returning, besides re-enforce- 
ments from the class of '4.5 in the form 
of Ray Campbell and Dave Hunter, to 




give Coach Derby a fairly bright out- 
look in the long grind of next year's 
cross country season. 



Runners bunched at the N. E. Intercollegiates 



Maroon harriers finish in quadruple tie 




103 



A SUCCESSFUL SEASON FOR 




Fitchburg suffered a 3-1 loss in this game 

Having one of its best years since the 
undefeated team of 1931, State soccer 
forces closed last fall's campaign with 
four wins, one tie and two losses. Prov- 
ing that the 1940 season was a building up 
year, a number of juniors and seniors 
came into their own, with several 
sophomores helping out. 



The club started out with a 2-0 de- 
feat of the Rensselaer team. The Engi- 
neers were good, but State revenged 
last year's whitewashing. Two defeats 
followed in succession: the University 
of Connecticut defeated the Maroon for 
the first time in over a decade; and mud 
and rain, several injuries and a superior 
Indian squad gave Dartmouth a 5-0 win. 

Experimenting with his forward line, 
Coach Briggs seemed to find a winning 
combine, for the club rolled over all but 
one of the remaining opponents. Coast 
Guard was decisively whipped, and 
Trinity neatly downed before the Amherst 
game arrived. In this contest, both 
teams fought hard, with State scoring 
first arid holding a one point lead until 
the Sabrinas tied things up in the final 
period. Fitchburg was the last victim 
as the seniors polished oft' their career 
with a 3-1 win. 



McLeod, BrigRg. Tallen, Golick 
Blanchard, Bauer. Casper, Logothetis. Filios, Allen, Swartz 
McLean. Walker. Andrew, Trufant. Hibbard. TewhiU, Surgen. Giziei 
Ddolak. IV.IIer, MuIIanv. Arnold, Erickson, Hebert, Koskoski. Callaha 




I 104 I 



SOCCER TEAM 

Besides Captain Erickson, Miillany, 
Arnold and Hibbard have been with the 
club for three years, while Potter was a 
standout player for the last two seasons. 
Other seniors were McLean, Andrew and 
Tewhill. In the junior class, rangy Ed 
Podolak was perhaps the most essential 
cog of the Briggs' machine. From his 
fullback position, he served as field 
general. His playing and leadership 
qualities gave him the captaincy of the 
194'2 team. Howie Bangs back in the 
goal was a good defense man, while 
Gizienski and Callahan up forward were 
valuable as scoring threats. Other junior 
letterman was Clint Allen. A large 
group of yearlings saw service with 
several regulars. Giannotti, Surgeon, 
Trufant, Hebert and Kokoski all started 
many games; Walker was the other 
letterman. 

Post-season commendation came to the 
team in the choice of Potter and Podolak 
to the New England coaches ALL team. 




c'ub 



Potter in addition made the ALL-New 
England team picked by Charlie Collins 
in the Boston GLOBE. 



Red and Spense try a few warm-up passes 



Red Mullany, three-year veteran forward 




105 




Stra> 



iiietl 



faces 



BASKETBALL 

Good material and good coaching gave 
the 1941-2 basketball club a fairly suc- 
cessful season with eight wins and six 
losses. But the entire year didn't pro- 
duce a working combine which could 
score consistently. DofEng the mole- 
skins for sweatpants and rubber soles, 
Coach Hargesheimer took over imme- 
diately after the gridiron sport finished 
up its schedule. Assisting him were 
freshman coach Fran Riel and manager 
Ed Rosemark. 

The first quintet and most of the second 
numbered veterans from last year's squad. 
Giant Thaddeus Bokina once more domi- 
nated the play and led in points scored. 
j^et Although it took him several games to 
regain his shooting eye, he was valuable 
as a set-up man. Senior Mike Frodyma 



losemark. Santin, Bubriski, Bokin 
Denis, Maloy, Podolak, Frodyma 



1, Keough. Moore. C 
Triggs, Wall, Kelly, 



ving, Hargi 
rzyk, Fitzg 




I loiH 



TEAM SPASMODIC IN PLAY 



started off the season with a burst and 
through the season showed the best 
floorwork of the group. Tom Kelly 
covered the other forward position. 
Guarding the back court was the com- 
bination of Maloy and Podolak, both 
hard-playing veterans. Substitutes who 
saw much service were center Wall, 
guard Triggs and forwards Santin and 
Bubriski. 

Play started off rather raggedly at 
the beginning of the season. Three 
games were scheduled before the Christ- 
mas recess, and the Statesmen were 
victorious in all. Starting slowly, they 
had achieved quite a degree of smooth- 



ness by the last of this series. The 
second game, played down in Worcester 
with Clark University, was really a sur- 
prise, as the locals won by 48—41 and 
held high scoring Ziggy Strzelecki to 
eleven points. 

Coming back after vacation, the club 
had lost much of its polish and dropped 
the first encounter of 1942 to the Spring- 
field Maroons. However, they gradually 
came back and took Amherst, Williams, 
and A. I. C. successively. Following 
this came the two-week lay-off period 




teO*«^ 



ioOto«'' 



Riel 



Harge*' 



beio*'^'^ 



stered 



tbese 



expre.sioO- 



Coacbes 
Tad Bokina's special one-handed hook shot 



Here's a scramble in the Springfield game 




IIOHI 



uornially occui)iod hy final exams. Al- 
though the boys started ott' the next 
series with some spirited play against 
high scoring Rhode Island, the lay off 
seemed to have broken their stride as 
play was erratic for the remainder of the 
year. The score in the Ram affair was 
83-68 and the local rooters couldn't help 
but enjoy the smooth shooting of Coach 
Keaney's Rutledge, Shannon and Mod- 
zelewski. With several spots of sloppy 
playing, the Maroon Club dropped the 
next two to Tufts and Coast Guard. 
Then, against Wesleyan, Tad Bokina 
came through to win the game almost 
single-handed with twenty-eight of State's 
fortj'-nine markers. 

The schedule finished up with two 
games over the last week end in February. 
The first, played at home, saw the quintet 
lose to the Boston University Terriers by 
the close count of 36-34. B. U. was 
obviously oft' in the first half as they 
chalked up nine points to State's twenty- 
five. But, in the second half, it was the 
locals who seemed to be off as they 
racked exactly nine points while the 




^'■•"tc;, 



Scarlet and White were scoring twenty- 
seven. The season finished oft' with a 
real victory over the W. P. I. Engineers 
at Worcester. 64-55 was the count as 
Tom Kelly reached his high mark for 
the year with twenty points and Bokina 
added another fifteen to his record. 
Maloy also scored fourteen and the 
defense of the team seemed to be really 
working. 



Modzelowski (no. 8), Rhode Island State star 



Players wait tensely for the tap in a jump 




1091 







ROCERSMEN- 

The record of Coach Rogers' 1941-'-2 
swimming outfit resulted in that team's 
once again holding down top position in 
the win record book. And the ]94'-2 
Index refrains from beginning with a 
tribute to Coach Rogers himself only 
because the last two books have begun 
their enthusiastic laudations with the 
phrase, "Miracle coach of New England." 

The spirit of the boys should be the 
first thing mentioned in a write-up of 
the year, for the successful season did not 
lie in massed team strength. As in the 
last few years, the story is of a handful of 
outstanding swimmers, switched about, 
aided and abetted by the rest of the club 
and bellowed to victory by sagacious Joe. 

Top name, of course, has been that of 
Captain Joe Jodka, who twice this year 



Shea, Dolby, Ransow, Hall, Gorman, Hayes, Rogers 
Schiller, Tilley, Jodka, Avery, Gare 




I i 10 



CONTIXIJE IN WINNING WAY 



cracked his own New England breast- 
stroke record and as many more times 
restrained himself because of the necessity 
of swimming in at least one other event 
and usually two. His free style, almost 
as strong as his chosen event, more than 
once resulted in a win in the four hundred 
yard relay. 

Close behind Joe in both versatility 
and records broken was Sophomore Bud 
Hall. His special events were the one 
hundred yard and two-twenty yard 
free style in both of which he lowered 
records; even broke his own marks. 



In addition. Bud filled in for other free 
style swims on both relay teams. 

The other of the big three in Whitcomb 
Pool was George Tilley "4.3, co-holder of 
the New England backstroke record. 
George swam his own distance very 
successfully and was ever ready to help 
out in the relays and occasionally in the 
440 free style event. 

Several others did some good swimming 
to make this squad a winning one. Win 
Avery was a senior who placed con- 



Coach Joe 



Bogc"^" 



opens 



to bri"« 



, Vio»"e 



Vbe ^^i""'^'" 



c\ose 



,in»«n'»^ 



eveot 





The coach gives Hin! ailvicc «liil«- the rapliiin <lial~ 



iiniiii" enthusiasts 



sistently in the fifty yard dash and 
helped out the relay cause frequently. 
The dive department was entirely handled 
by Bob Schiller who also swam an occa- 
sional race. Lou Gare and Ken Gorman 
were other dependables while Chuck 




P^IkLI '"^ fift> y'** 

at tbe e«d "* 



Dolby, Carl Ransow, and Kirby Hayes 
filled in to good advantage. 

So interesting to the student body has 
swimming become that a summary of the 
season is almost unnecessary. Before 
the Christmas recess, the locals took over 
W. P. I., although many members of the 
squad were far from good condition. 
The 1942 section of the schedule found 
the lads really rolling as they took over 
every opponent except Yale University's 
national swimming champsionship team. 
And in that defeat, the mermen covered 
themselves with glory as they came far 
nearer a win than anyone foresaw. 

Several other battles were dangerously 
close, but Joe Rogers' dexterous juggling 
of his men brought wins in dual meets 
over Williams, Conn. U, Wesleyan, Coast 
Guard and Bowdoin. A triangular vic- 
tory came at Cambridge against M. I. T. 
and W. P. I. Going into the New 
England Intercollegiates, held this year 
at Amherst College, the team was again 
handicapped by its lack of quantity, but 
made up for it in ((uality to take a third 
place just behind Amherst and Springfield. 



112] 



ACTIVE YEAR FOR STICKMEX 



Officially, the State hockey club may be 
informal, but the boys certainly put 
just as much spirit into their play and 
just as much hard work into their prac- 
tice as any recognized team. The coach 
this year was Tommy Filmore, former 
Springfield Indian player, who was hired 
at the suggestion of Eddie Shore, man- 
ager of that club. He worked hard 
producing clubs for both State and 
Stockbridge. 

Personnel for 1941-''2 edition read 
much the same as last year's, with 
Atwood and Young guarding the nets. 
In front of them for defense were Colella 
and Grogan, and a forward line made up 
most often of Fitzpatrick, Gaumond and 
Thayer. Others who saw action were 
Baker, Forest, White, Yetman, Leland, 
Anderson and Rhodes. 

Games throughout the season were 
pretty well controlled by the supply of 
ice. Coach Filmore pitted his own two 
teams together three times. Blue-clad 
Stockbridge club showing the better 




action 



hockey came out with a 2-1 advantage. 
For outside opponents. State split a pair 
of games with Springfield College and 
lost two hard-fought contests to the 
Americans. 



Fitzpatrick takes the rubber after a Springfield College .shot is blocked by Goalie Younf" 




:ii3i 



TWO TRACK TEAMS FEATURE 




Spring track distance runner, Chet Putney 

The 1941 Spring Track picture shows a 
few outstanding performers but, on the 
whole, a combined team lacking the neces- 
sary strength for consistent point gather- 
ing. Outstanding among last year's 
group of stand-outs was Ed O'Connor. 

Angular Chester Putney was a sure 
thing in the mile run and frequently filled 



in for the 880 yard run. These two men, 
plus pole-vaulter Bill Warren, were the 
only scorers lost by graduation; and, in 
the fall, jumper Alan Bell left school. 

The weather was very cold and Boston 
University just too strong in the opener 
at Nickerson Field. But there was a 
bright spot in the meet when Chet Putney 
established a record in the mile run with a 
time of 4:32.7. The State win came the 
next week in a home meet with Trinity. 
Putney again starred by taking his own 
event and the half mile. Tufts and Con- 
necticut University proved far too strong 
in the last two meets of the season. How- 
eyer. State stand-outs such as O'Con- 
nor, Putney, Warren, Gare, Wall, Bell, 
and Greene continued to capture their 
share of the points. Although Coach 
Derby sent only a small squad to the 
Eastern Intercollegiates, several of the 
better Maroon men did land in the 
scoring. 



Klubock, Derl>y, McDoDOugli, Santin, Stlaw 

Crimmins, Gare, Hauck. Potter, Filios 

H. Mosher. Adams. Leianii. Vi' . Kimball, Bell, Greene 

Joyce, Warren, Putney, O'Connor, Tilson, Wall, RalTinoli 









1141 



MAXY STARS • • 

First in two dual meets, a close second in 
the triangular and a handy first in their 
only relay run was the record which 
established a successful season for the 
194'2 winter tracksters. 

Donald Parker, long-legged sophomore, 
was the season's "find," as he broke the 
college record for both the six hundred 
and one thousand yard runs. Several 
other outstanding individuals were notice- 
able on the club, and the team seemed to 
possess the largest amount of team 
strength which State has ever put forward . 

Among the individual stars was Bill 
Wall, who broke the college record by 
tieiag with Underwood of W. P. I. 
with the bar at six feet. General utility 
man Brad Greene ran the six hundred, 
hurdled and high jumped, scoring more 
than his share of points in all of them. 
Stan Hood, Don Walker and Charlie 
Warner starred in the sprint and hurdle 
department. Other runners included 
Joyce, Graham, Filios, Caldwell, Freeman 




'i-eene 



ieadir 



'■"''«or 3.5-,.«, 



^'■gh 



curdle 



and Potter. In the field events Benny 
Freitas was the standout performer, 
while McDonough, Santin, Joyce, Frost, 
Wall, Barnes, Adams, Walker and Tol- 
man were the other scorers. 



Tolman. Hood, Nichols, Freeman, Bornstein 

Derby. Caldwell. Frost, Parker, Walker, Warner. Greenfield 

Adams. Filios. Joyce. Graham, Greene, Potter 




1151 




field 



Bei»»*y 



preitas 



aUy S***'^ 



a Votig 



WEAK SPOT OF 

Former State athlete, Fran Riel, '39, 
took over the coaching vacancy of the 
1941 varsity baseball club with an aver- 
age amount of good material available. 
However, he failed to find an air-tight 
infield combination. Pitcher trouble was 
perhaps the one outstanding factor which 
resulted in only three wins in fourteen 
starts for the 1941 varsity baseball club. 
Of the Maroon team's three wins, Herb 
Gross received credit for a 6-4 score in 
the opener with the Connecticut Uni- 
versity team ; Bullock got credit for a 7-4 
defeat of Union; and five games later 
southpaw Bangs took the U-Conns a 
secpnd time with a 5-4 win. Early in 
the season the loss of Co-captain Jackim- 
czyk, a regular at second base for two 



Kiel, Bower, Bangs, W 

Sloper, Larkin, O'Brien, 

Shackley, Bolcina." Gross, IVIaloy, 

Bullock, Spencer. Kelley, Parzyeh. 



Casper 
IVfagnin 
, MuUan 



Mahan 




IK! 



STATESMEN WAS PITCHING 



seasons, left the other co-captain. Hank 
Parzycli, as the only senior starter. 

The outfield department of the club 
included lettermen Triggs, Freitas, 
Sparks, and Miles. The first two, with 
sophomore Bower, made the most fre- 
quent starting combination. In the in- 
field, Parzych at first and Maloy at short 
were regular starters; second base was 
shared by Mullaney and O'Brien; and 
third, also a dual affair, found Mahan and 
Kelley fighting it out all season for the 
keystone corner. Surest player on the 
team was little Matty Ryan, who handled 
the back stop work during the season. 



His dependable playing and high batting 
average of .420 led to his being picked as 
the recipient of the E. Joseph Thompson 
award. His stand-in was husky Frank 
Spencer. From the roster of pitchers, 
sophomore Gross stands out as the main- 
stay. Bangs, another sophomore, saw 
service as much as any of the staff. The 
list of relief pitchers included Bullock, 
Thayer, Kimball and Shackley. Of this 
list of playing members. Captain Parzych, 
Miles, Green, and Spencer were the 
only ones to graduate. 

A review of the games reveals two im- 



,berst 



., Sabrioa* 



Coacb 



Kiel 






aosei"'^'''" 



.„ A\um»» 



field 





Captain Hank I'arzych laid inio this one for a long clout and a t«o base hit against Bowdoin 



portant factors which accounted for the 
season being as good as it was: the 
timely hitting of Ryan and Freitas and 
the able pitching of Herb Gross. Matty 
Ryan led the batting average column, 
while big Benny secured several long dis- 
tance blows at most opportune times. 




BallocU, »»"^^ 



and Gro.s 



led P»«^*"^ 



As for Herb — well, enough to say he 
appeared in eleven of the fourteen games 
and made a good showing every time. 

In the opener with the Connecticut 
University team it was Herb who re- 
ceived credit for the 6-4 victory. Soon 
afterwards Jim Bullock got a recorded 
win for a 7-4 defeat of Union. To com- 
plete the trio of wins southpaw Howie 
Bangs, five games later, took the U- 
Conns a second time with a 5-4 win. 
The rest of the season cannot be called a 
total loss for, although many of the 
games were characterized by sloppy 
fielding and low reserve pitching strength, 
State's team seldom got beaten by more 
than three runs. The early season tilt 
with Bowdoin was a good example of 
this; the Polar Bears just edged Riel's 
team by 6-5, despite two singles and a 
double by Freitas. Another heart- 
breaker was pitched by Sumner Green 
near the close of the season when he held 
Wesleyan to six scattered hits but lost 
by one run. 

The 194'-2 season sees Fran Riel, '39, 
continuing as mentor, and outfielder Ed 
Sparks, '42, as captain. 



1181 



XETMEN LACK PRACTICE 



State's rejuvenated tennis team had only 
one letterman in attendance wlien Coach 
Sid Kaufman started practice on a rainy 
April afternoon in 1941. Two factors — 
lack of experienced material and short- 
ness of the pre-game practice — were 
undoubtedly those which resulted in the 
poor win-loss showing. The University 
of ^'e^mont caught the Statesmen rather 
unprepared in the first match and made a 
clean sweep with a 9-0 score. Following 
the Catamount invasion, the Maroon 
Club lost to Connecticut University 7-'2. 
The third and fourth matches resulted in 
two more whitewashings at the hands of 
Springfield and Trinity respectively. 

Best individual playing of the club was 
shown by Captain Ed Anderson whose 
spirited play and leadership earned for 
him the honor of being the second to have 
his name inscribed on the Paul Stearns 
Putnam Memorial Cup. Of the 1941 
lettermen, Lacey and Graham showed the 
best playing and were elected co-captains 




'°°*« like „„ . I 

for the 1942 club. Other lettermen who 
showed constant improvement included 
Nebesky, Kirshen, Zeitler, and Szmyd. 



J. Shepardson, NebeHky. S^niyd, Anderson, Kirshen, Shaw, L; 



Craha 




[119] 



W.A.A. AIMS AT VARIETY 




teaW» 



re«o 



„j an" 



.hytV.'"^*'" 



cannot take defeat with a smile. Most 
men when defeated shake the hand of 
their victor. Not the women; they are 
very apt to give vent to true 
feehngs and refuse to congratulate the 
victor. In this respect they are not in 
my mind any less true sportsmen. 
They are just less hypocritical. After 
all, the incentive in competition is to win, 
not to lose." And so, too, the spirit of 
the Women's Athletic Association is to 
win not to lose. 

Freshman Play Day on September 27 
introduced the W. A. A.'s varied program. 
From then on, tournaments of all shapes 
and sizes raged between classes, dormi- 



,„- baWet toi-ies and sororities. Two new groups 



Tbe 



Via Esquire came this assertion by 
Joe Rogers: 

"The only difference I have noticed 
between men and women is that women 



were formed: the Dance Club for stu- 
dents ■ of modern dance and the Swim 
Club for those aquatically inclined. The 
Women's swimming team increased the 
renown of its intricate water ballet and 
was entitled by last year's victory to be 
the sponsor of this year's National Tele- 
graphic Meet. 



sees Baker, Miller, Dunklee. 
Misses Hall, Judge. <::irprrt 



ison, Kelleher 
M.Inori.y. I.; 



Helyar, Keedy, Fitzgerald 
r>r>en , Berry, Chapman 




1120] 




After Christmas Vespers . . . traditional student carol sing survived despite news of war 




RELIGION 



IJ.R.C. HOLDS €OXFEREX€E 



How Congress serves the varied interests 
of the country — those of the industrial 
East and the agricultural Midwest — 
that's how the Religious Council serves 
the sometimes antipodal attitudes of 
the various faiths on campus. Comprised 
of representatives from the Newman 
Club, Menorah-Hillel, and the Christian 
Federation, it plans and executes inter- 
faith activities of the college. 

The Council has two major functions, 
sponsoring the weekly Sunday afternoon 
Vesper services and the annual religious 
conference. Among the Vesper speakers 
highlighting subjects of contemporary 
interest to .students was Reverend James 
T. Cleland of Amherst College who 
delineated Christmas in Germany at the 
pre-Yuletide service. At March IGth's 
Conference, Father John T. McPherson 
of Holyoke. Dr. James G. Gilkey of 
Springfield, and Dr. Henry Sloninsky of 
New York considered the theme, College 
Youth Faces the Future, in the Old Chapel, 
and led discussion afterwards. Reverend 
Easton, new Religious director, expertly 



handled Council activities with the aid 
of officers — President Kay Duffy, Vice- 
President Brad Richards, Secretary Dan 
Balaban — and members Herb Weiner, 
Paul Dwyer, Spence Potter, Fran Lappen, 
Bob Fitzpatrick, Lilian Politella. 




reUgio"* 



airecior 



Re 



rereo 



a Easto!" 



Weiner. P. Dwyer, Potter, Mr. Easton 
aban. Miss Duffy, B. Richards, Miss Lappe 




122 




Spense Potter's cabinet, an Inner Circle 



grams. Its purpose is first to relate 
students moro closely to their own 
denominations and then to combine these 
in active unity. As member of the New 
England Intercollegiate Religious Move- 
ment it is part of the National Student 
Religious Movement. 

Feeling the "more intense religious 
fervor" reported in Reader's Digest and 
Mademoiselle, it expended its energies in 
conducting young people's groups in 
surrounding towns, in Sunday night 
services at the Hope Negro Church, in 
organizing deputations to local churches 
and in a committee to call on the com- 
munity's shut-ins and old folks. Other 



CHRISTIAIV FEDERATION 



Not a group of halo-wearing holier-than- 
thous, but an organization of college men 
and women attempting to help others, 
the Christian Federation is theoretically 
composed of all students following neither 
the Catholic nor Jewish faiths. In 
practice, it consists of only those Prot- 
estants who are sufficiently interested to 
attend its varied and stimulating pro- 



activities included a monthly Friday night 
supper and speaker, and Freshman dis- 
cussion of such subjects as Science and 
Religion and Christianity in Our World. 
The Cabinet, President Spencer Potter, 
Vice-President Lillian Politella, and Secre- 
tary May Thayer, plus various com- 
mittee heads, comprised an Inner Circle 
directing activities. 



I Dunklee. Richards 
Dakin, f 



1 Davis, Newcomb, Miss Spencer, Mr. Easton, Miss LeMay 
entley. Potter, Miss Angell, Ketclien 




1231 



^EWMA]%^ CLUB 

Named after the great English Cardinal, 
the Newman Club attempts to instill in 
its members the same devotion to tlu 
Church he loved. Among the most 
effective of these measures was the 
illustrated lecture on the Mass given by 
Reverend Edward Featherstone, pastor 
of the Leeds parish, and the monthly 
Communion breakfasts held in Father 
Madden Hall. 

Event of the year most popular with 
the non-Catholic friends of the members 
was the speech of Father Gerald Walsh of 
Fordham on Religion in a Modern World, 
given during his visit here. 

Officers for 1941-42 were Paul Dwyer, 
president; Kay Duffy, vice-president; 
Marie Kelleher, secretary-treasurer; 
Henry Martin, publicity manager; Robert 
Fitzpatrick, representative to the United 
Religious Council. These, with the ex- 
ception of Henry Martin, retired in March 
to be replaced by the new officers inducted 
at the annual Communion breakfast at 
the Lord Jeff. Popular speaker at the 
installation was Reverend Paul Francis, 
C.P., of West Springfield Passionist 
Monastery. 

H. Martin, P. Dwyer, Miss Duffy, Miss Kelleher 





ChoroesW. Reiner, »' 



iME^ORAH-HILLEL 

This year the Menorah Club added 
Hillel to its name by affiliating itself 
with the national Hillel. This affiliation 
has lent greater impetus and efficacy to 
the desire "to foster sympathy and 
understanding for Judaism in its past and 
present forms, and to promote greater 
fellowship among Jewish students." 

Rabbi Cahn delivered courses on 
"Jewish Customs and Rituals" and 
"Contemporary Jewish Philosophies." 
Guest speakers attended special monthly 
Friday evening services, and fraternity 
and sorority discussion groups were also 
sponsored. Entertainment had its place 
with monthly Sunday meetings and several 
social gatherings. The SJwfar, the club's 
paper, came out regularly, and the 
Menorah-Hillel continued to make availa- 
ble to students a large number of publica- 
tions of Jewish interest. 

This year's officers of the Menorah- 
Hillel Club were Herbert Weiner, presi- 
dent; Frances Lappen, vice-president; 
Shirley Gordon, secretary; and an able 
cabinet of undergraduates. 



I 1241 



WESLEY FOUXDATIO^ 



PHILLIPS BROOKS 



Followers of the Revivalists, the members 
of Wesley Foundation devote their Sun- 
day evenings to a rekindling of the reli- 
gious flame at Mt. Pleasant Inn. A 
speaker, general discussion, refreshments, 
and sometimes a short recreational pro- 
gram, follow a student-led devotion in 
the fire-lit Recreation Room. The Con- 
tribution of Science to Religion, China 

> Cook, Miss Angell. Hathaway, H. Mosher, Miss Butemrnt 
Dakiii. Miss Davis, Newcomb, Miss Reed, Bush 




The name Phillips Brooks brings thoughts 
both of the gentle composer of Little 
Town of Bethlehem and of a religious club 
here on campus. Founded to centralize 
activity of Episcopalian students so that 
the student committee of the Church 
might more effectively reach them, the 
M. S. C. group is under the direction of 
Reverend Peter Sturtevant and the 
leadership of officers William Clark, 
president; Daphne Miller, vice-president; 
Olive Tracy, secretary; Stanley Hood, 
treasurer. 

With the exception of the Communion 
services held one Friday a month at the 
ascetic hour of 7:25 in the Old Chapel 
Seminar Room, its whole program con- 
sists of supper meetings on the second and 
fourth Mondays of each month. At 
these gatherings a short talk on some 
religious, social, political, or economic 
issue is presented, usually by an Amherst, 
M. S. C, or Smith professor. For 
example, Quaker William Wilson, alumni 
secretary of Amherst College, spoke on 
Pacifism and Dr. George E. Gage on 
Russia. 



Today, and Developing a Christian Person- 
ality have been among the subjects con- 
sidered under the kindly hospitality 
of Dr. and Mrs. Lindsay. Advisers are 
Professor and Mrs. Rust of Amherst 
College, but Dr. Cramer, pastor of the 
Wesley Methodist Church, also attends 
meetings. 

President Minnie Davis, Mce-president 
Larry Newcomb, Secretary-Treasurer 
Ralph Dakin, Devotion Chairman Mar- 
jory Reed and Action Co-chairmen 
Marion Cook and Barbara Butement 
form a Cabinet which chose the speakers 
and brought them to Amherst. Besides 
the Sabbath sessions, it sent deputations 
to other churches, sometimes presenting 
a play during the visit. 



125 



^"'' Hood, M- . 




GIRLS TAKE OVER CHOIR 



"Prepare ye the way of the Lord," might 
well enter the thoughts of those who go 
to Sunday afternoon Vesper services as 
they watch the maroon-robed choir file, 
singing, into its place behind Reverend 
Easton. An innovation this year was an 
all-girl choir formed at the beginning 
of second semester. Because of lack of 
interest shown by the male members, 
they were eliminated en masse — which 
left the coeds to carry on without trilling 
tenors and bottom-noteing basses. 

For active participation in the choir, 
two academic credits are given the first 
year, but attendance after that is purely 
voluntary. 

With the competent leadership of Doric 
Alviani and the accompaniment of Wil- 
fred Hathaway at the organ, the Choir 
has fulfilled its function of providing 
spiritual music at the traditional five 
o'clock service. An invitation to sing at 
the Grace Church in Holyoke early in 
December may be cited as proof of 
its consistently excellent performances. 




^^^^^^^^^^ r robes 
^^^^^ off «=^*" 

Students 



ry, Scheuneman, Symonds, Milner, Kelleher. Tarbell. Hayward, Miehlke, Politella 
i Wiesing, Thomas, Bentley, Van Meter, Baird, Cooper, Milner, Beach. Holmes 



^M^^^M^ 


"^Mm 1 B i, . ^ . 


f 1 % % is 

^ ^' dK lit 49^ *mm. ' 







126 1 




Down the walk from fraternity row as the tower bell calls students to 8 o'clock class 



FRATERNITIES 





Prexy 



Jack 



Rabeo' 



9teio a" 



d Inter 



fraternity 



Alpha Epsilon Pi 

Phi Chapter 

389 North Pleasant St. 
Local Founded in 1916 
Colors: Blue and Gold 
Publications: Alpha Epsilon Pi Quar- 
terly and Moqen David 



BOOGY WOOGY 

Phi chapter of Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity 
has earned recognition in practically all 
fraternity activities. In the annual fall 
and winter athletic competition A. E. Pi 
captured second places in football, soccer 
and volleyball. Scholarship also found 
A. E. Pi at second place and the annual 
skit competition was won by Alpha 
Epsilon Pi for the second year in suc- 
cession. This year's skit Boogy Woogy 
Whacks was expertly directed by Murray 
Caspar '43, and its success was largely 
the result of the splendid work of the 
actors plus especially fine lighting. 

At the end of first semester when 
winners of the interfraternity competi- 
tion were announced, the highly coveted 
cup was presented to Alpha Epsilon Pi 
and is now proudly displayed with other 
fraternity trophies. 

Pledging this year saw Alpha Epsilon 
Pi leading other fraternities on campus 
with twenty-five freshman pledges in- 



Horlick, Kaplinaky, KJubock, Salk, Silverman, Walba, Feldman, Math 
Kipnes, ScliiUer, Gordon, Lavien, Alkon, Applebauni, M. Goldman, \ 
Hlrshman. R. Goldman, Edelstein, M. Goldman. Rich, Tallen. Stern, Bass. 
Blake, Wolf, Rabinow, Roseniark, Golin, Pearlman, Rubenstein, J. Cohen, 
Barenboim, Broivn, Gilbord, Epstein, Glass, Sid< 



Wliite. Greenberg, Gross, Yavner 
tbrop, Schwartz, Sacks, Sherman 
Mendelson, Gould, Harris, Noahson 
hen, Brunell, Golick, Casper 







128 1 



BOIS BUY A DEFENSE BOND 



dicating that the future will be not oaly 
in good, but many hands. 

The war and tlie defense program of 
the college found Alpha Epsilon Pi up 
ahead as usual with many alumni in the 
armed services and with a thousand 
dollar Defense Bond, purchased in 
December, to their credit. 

Officers 

President : Jack Rubenstein 
Vice-President: Stanley Pearlman 
Secretary: Harold Golan 
Treasurer: Jason Cohen 

Members 

Faculty: Maxwell H. Goldberg, Arthur 
Levine. 

1942: Harvey Brunell, Jason Cohen, 
Harold Golan, Howard Kirshen, Stanley 
Pearlman, Morton Rabinow, Edward 
Rosemark, Jack Rubenstein, Myron 
Solin, Henry Wolf. 

1943: Arnold Blake, Murray Casper, 



Allen Feldman, Robert Goldman, Melvin 
Goldman, Nathan Golick, Irving Gordon, 
Samuel Harris, Lloyd Horlick, Arnold 
Kaplinsky, Herbert Kipnes, Albert Klu- 
bock, Maxim Lebeaux, Rudolf Mathias, 
Irving Mendelson, Lester Rich, Robert 
Schiller, Ellis Tallen, Justin Winthrop. 

1944: Herman Barenboim, Milton Bass, 
Philip Cohen, David Kaplan, George 
Kaplan, Robert Karp, Irwin Promisel, 
Gilbert Salk, Jack Schwartz, Melvin 
Stern, Harold Walba. 

1945: Selig Alkon, Cyril Applebaum, 
Albert Brown, Milton Edelstein, Robert 
Epstein, Melvin Fefer, Mischa Friedman, 
Harold Gilboard, Samuel Glass, Melvin 
Goldman, Harris Gould, Harold Green- 
berg, Herbert Gross, Hyman Hershman, 
Edward Kaplowitz, Harold Lavien, 
Jack Margolis, Coleman Noahson, Jason 
Sacks, Stanley Sherman, Edward Sidd, 
Sidney Topol, Philip White, Melvin 
Yavner. 



A bit of clowning taken out of Alpha Epsilon Pi's winning Interfraternity Skit, Boogy Woogy Whacks 



A. E. Pi men seem to have a knack for clowning 





Edio 



ttecte 



d Caro'^' 



V t up 



Prexy 

Alpha (•amma Rho 

Mu Chapter 

406 North Pleasant St. 
Local Founded in 1917 
Colors: Green and Gold 
Publications: Sickle and Sheaf and Mu 
Crescent 



ANNIVERSARY 

The twenty-fifth anniversary of Alpha 
(■amma Rho fraternity on this campus 
served as the nucleus around which its 
entire year's program was built. The 
opening event was participation in the 
Interfraternity Skit finals with an ultra- 
modern television number. The house 
was then awarded, in December, the 
second place cup for Interfraternity 
Competition in 1940-41. The start of 
the new semester in February, 1942, was 
marked by the winning of the Winter 
Carnival Cup. This was done on a com- 
bination of points earned in the Skiing, 
Skating and Snow Sculpture Com- 
petition. The latter, with the theme. 
Homage to King Winter, took first in 
the competition. Less than a week 
later tlie house took another first in the 
Interfraternity Declamation. The end 
of the year drew to a close in a final cele- 
bration of the house's Anniversary with a 
special banquet, at which it was 
awarded first place in the National 
Fraternity Journal Competition. 



Thompson, Iluehes. Bush, Zahner, Poziani, Ludcnian, Ryan, CaldweU, Bralit 

O'Shea, Chatel, Weeks, Giannotti. Rabaioli, McCarthy, Lincoln, Keefe, Bosworth 

Truby, Hardy. Clark, W. Lucey, HaUen, Trufant, Mollis, Rogers, Teot, Lecinar 

R. Smith, G. Arnold, Yale, Putnam, TewhQl, Edminster, Drinkwater, Andrew, Lanson, Moffitt, Libby 




1301 



SPURS ALPHA GAM ONWARD 



Offi«*ors 

President: Talcott Edniinster 
Vice-President : Richard Libby 
Secretary: Richard Andrew 
Treasurer: John Tewhill 

Members 

Faculty: Charles P. Alexander, Ells- 
worth W. Bell, Arnold M. Davis, James 
W. Dayton, William L. Doran, Richard 
W. Fessenden, Robert P. Holdsworth, T. 
Richard Leonard, Adrian H. Lindsey, 
Campbell Miller, Boyd Pack, Donald E. 
Ross, Harvey L. Sweetman, Clark L. 
Thayer, Frederick S. Troy. 

1942: Richard C. Andrew, Gilbert S. 
Arnold, John H. Brotz, W. Allen Cowan, 
Talcott W. Edminster, Haig Koobatian, 
Raino K. Lanson, Stephen B. Leavitt, 
Donald W. MofEtt, James N. Putnam, 
Richard R. Smith, John J. Tewhill, Jr., 
Carl P. Werme, George R. Yale. 



1943: H. Lymon Bralit. William C. 
Clark, William O. Drinkwater, Mason M. 
Gentry, Norman L. Hallen, William B. 
Lecznar, Richard L. Libby, Harry C. 
Lincoln, Jr., David H. Marsden, James L. 
McCarthy, Urbano C. Pozzani. 

1944: F. William Aldrich, Russell H. 
Bosworth, David G. Bush, George B. 
Caldwell, Elmer E. Clapp, Jr., John D. 
Giannotti, Frank Hardy, Raymond H. 
HoUis, John F. Hughes, Robert W. Jones, 
Frank E. Jost, James H. Keefe, John A. 
Ludeman, Robert J. O'Shea, Edward 
Rabaioli, Charles J. Rogers, Arthur S. 
Teot, Henry L. Thompson, Howard B. 
Trufant, W. Leon Weeks. 

1945: Thomas J. Army, Robert K. 
Chatel, Paul O. Dickinson, Jr., Henry H. 
Jackson, Jr., William E. Lucey, David W. 
Mathey, Robert I. Ryan, Dwight V. 
Trubey, Richard A. Williams, Henry R. 
Zahner. 



On Alpha Gam's twenty-fifth anniversary Duchess adds that family touch with a litter of pups 



Gib Arnold and brothers watch at initiation 





bone 



Xlpl^a^ 



Alpha Lambda Mn 

Local Organization 

245 Lincoln Ave. 
Local Founded in 1931 
Colors: Blue and Silver 
Publication : Silver Barque 



ALPHA LAM'S 

Playing hostess to freshman women on 
imaginary trips to China, Canada, 
Mexico, and Holland, Alpha Lambda Mu 
girls opened their fall rushing season 
which culminated in the annual mid- 
winter formal held in honor of the pledges 
on January 9 at the Munson Memorial 
Library. On October 26, Alpha Lam's 
annual Parents' Day, parents were given 
a lunch and an entertainment which was 
followed by a parents' business meeting. 
In December sorority patronesses gave 
the Alpha Lam's a Christmas party in 
cooperation with President and Mrs. 
Baker. Both in November and March 
alumni weekends were held and old grads 
returned to discuss present sorority 
problems and to offer their advice and 
help. Throughout the year Alpha 
Lambda Mu "mimicked" fraternities and 
other sororities by holding at least one 
vie party each month. 

Alpha Lam's, who became outstanding 
on campus, were: Kate Belk Wetherbee, 
an active member of Isogon; Barbara 



Misses Filios, Jaquitli, Rayner, Holmberg, Monk, Monro©, Gasson, Howarth, Bigwood, McCarthy, Carney, Perkins, Reed, Kane 

Misses Appel. Murray, Moore, M. Milner, Cromwell. White. A. Brown, Donnelly, Beary, Durlee, Wheelock, Culbertson 
Misses McMahon, Georges, Mclntyre, Greene, Moulton, Beniis, Whitney. Kinsley, Puilan, Groesbeck, Boles, Hayward, H. Smith, 



Merritt, Miehike, Towe 



Bolto 
Gallagher, J. Milner, Dunklee, Buteii 



nt. Cook, Clark, Wetherbee, Bradley, Kozak 



l^I;Ji^^S^i't"'i 1 



I i ft if 1 g ^ I I". 



VVA^isc* 



«^«s^V^ 



[132 



HOLD PARENTS' DAY IN FALL 



Butcnient, who participated in the Wesley 
Foundation and various W. A. A. sports, 
the Dance Chib and Swim Chib; Dorothy 
Dunklee, associate editor of the Col- 
legian and newly elected president of 
the W. S. G. A. These are only a few of 
the Alpha Lam's accomplishments. 

An April edition of the Silver Barque 
summarized and emphasized the versa- 
tility of the Alpha Lambda Mu sister- 
hood. 

Officers 

President : Barbara Butement 
Vice-President : Dorothy Dunklee 
Secretary: ^Marion Cook 
Treasurer: Frances Clark 

^■embers 

Faculty: Marion E. Smith. 

1942 : Barbara Butement, Frances Clark, 
Marion Cook, Marion Gallagher, Mary 
Kozak, Phyllis Tower, Helen Watt, Kate 
Wetherbee. 



1943 : Beverly Bigwood, Dorothy Dunk- 
lee, Frances Gasson, Norma Holmberg, 
Henrietta Kreczko, Helen McMahon, 
Janet Milner, Alice Monk, Phyllis Mor- 
gan, Harriet Rayner, Helen Smith, Laurel 
Wheel ock. 

1944: Edith Appel, Josephine Beary, 
Barbara Bemis, Marjorie Bolton, Ruth 
Crosby, Helen Donnelly, Lee Filios, 
Artemis Georges, Dorothy Greene, Shirley 
Groesbeck, Ruth Howarth, Katherine 
Jaquith, Dorothy Kinsley, Ruth Markert, 
Elizabeth McCarthy, Elizabeth Mclntyre, 
Roberta Miehlke, Thyrza Moulton, Aileen 
Perkins, Marjory Reed. 

1946 : Phyllis Boles, Anne Brow-n, Mary 
Carney, Helen Cromwell, Jean Culbert- 
son, Carolyn Durfee, Natalie Hayward, 
Ellen Kane, Thelma Medine, Peggy 
Merritt, Mary Milner, Eleanor Monroe, 
Allison Moore, Ruth Murray, Barbara 
Pullan, Carol White, Ethel Whitney. 



President Barbara Butement gathers girls on Alpha Lambda Mu's steps while parents have meeting 



Barbara Bemis, Dottie Greene enjoy lunch at A. L. M. 





roen-^^'^ 



CoTuegat^*"^ 



rouiv 



dnovf 



Alpha Sigma Phi 

Gamma Chapter 

409 North Pleasant St. 

Local Founded in 1913 

Colors : Cardinal and Stone 

Publications: The Tomahawlc &nd Gamma 
Chaiier 



ALPHA SIGMA 

Alpha Sigma Phi entered interfraternity 
competition with a zeal which carried it 
to a tie in its league in touch football. 
The Interfraternity Skit showed the 
transition of a group of typical college 
students in their four years at State. In 
the winter competition Alpha Sig floored 
a basketball team which caused a great 
deal of trouble for the rest of the league. 
The volleyball team also showed up well 
although it was defeated in a few games. 
A successful fall and winter social season 
carried on into the spring, culminating 
in the Spring Formal. During the year 
the house received a great rejuvenating, 
whep the alumni refurnished it from top 
to bottom. In addition to the refurnish- 
ing already done, the alumni plan to 
build a new dining hall as soon as the 
members of the house move out for the 
summer vacation. 

Individual members who stood out on 
various athletic teams contributed to the 
importance of Alpha Sigma Phi on 



y, MorriU, Girard, Nichols, Bubriski. Weinhold, Nor, 

McLeod, Zucarro, Mullany, Papp, Podmayer, Horgai 

Bokina, Johnston, Goddu, Lucey, Pushee, Dellea, 



-ood, Adams, Broderick 
I, Sullivan, Hendry 
Garrity, Holmes 




i;{4 



PHI ALUMS REVAMP HOUSE 



campus. Outstanding man for the second 
year was Tad Bokina who led the basket- 
ball team in scoring. Along the military 
line Alpha Sigma Phi was well repre- 
sented with the highest cadet honor 
going to a member of the house, Jim 
Gilman. This is the second year in a 
row that the house has received this 
honor. 

In Scholastic ranking Alpha Sigma 
stood fourth among fraternities with a 
77% average. 

Officers 

President: John Lucey 
^'ice-President : Warren Pushee 
Secretary: Francis Garrity 
Treasurer: Robert Johnston 

Members 

Faculty: Alexander Cance, Earle S. 
Carpenter, Edwin F. Gaskill, Stowell C. 



Goding, Emory E. Grayson, William L. 
Machmer, Sumner Parker, Charles A. 
Peters, James Burke, George W. Wescott. 
1942 : Paul J. Adams, William L. Franz, 
James Gilman, Theodore A. Girard, 
John D. Horgan, John P. Lucey, David 
R. Morrill, Robert J. Mullany, Joseph 
W. McLeod, Howard L. Norwood, Ste- 
phen Papp, Warren M. Pushee, John J. 
Sullivan. 

1943: Thaddeus V. Bokina, Stanley W. 
Bubriski, James E. Dellea, George Goddu, 
Robert S. Johnston, John Podmayer. 
1944: Donald C. Broderick, Francis J. 
Garrity, Robert C. Holmes, Paul Leone, 
Charles Limanni, Earle Newton, Irving 
Nichols, Raymond A. Weinhold. 
1945: Joseph Alfieri, William Hendry. 
Richard Hoey, Ralph Tinker, Rudolph 
Zucarro. 



Alpha Sigma Phi seniors, Morrill and Norwood, wise-crack while waiting their turn at the telephone 

Alpha Sig's Boh Johnston, at piano, gives for the boy> 





i Ovae^^ 



life 



CoO»*^ 



Beaur*" 



Chi Omega 

Iota Beta Chapter 

315 Lincoln Ave. 
Local Founded in 1941 
Colors: Cardinal and Straw 
Publications: The Eleusis of Chi 
and The Scroll 



Omega 



LAMBDA DELT 

Something new and different came into 
being on the M. S. C. campus on June 5, 
1941 — new because it wasn't here before, 
different because it was a women's 
fraternity. Lambda Delta Mu passed 
into reverend retirement and Iota Beta 
chapter of Chi Omega came in, a brand 
new baby in whose growth lay the 
promise of a great future of purpose and 
achievement. 

Chi Omega made its debut into college 
life by a luncheon held at the Lord Jeff 
in honor of the installation of members 
and pledges. Since then, beginning with 
the new college year, Chi Omega entered 
into> the full swing of campus socialities 
with vie parties, faculty and rushing 
teas, a pledge formal in January, a pledge 
banquet in March, climaxed in April by 
members gaily dancing at the first-time 
combined Interfraternity and Inter- 
sorority Ball; the Inter-Greek Ball — 
high spot of Greek social life. 



> Albrecht, H. Grant, E. McNamara, M. Mann. Lcc. Haugliey, Keedy, Maguire, Ewing. Deane. Woodworth. Petersen, 

Deering. Hayward 
! R. Grant, Sullivan, Walsh, M. Daylor, P. Daylor. Langan, Kcavy. Hodgess. O'Brien. Kelso, Stanton, Collins, Andersen 
i Coye, Harcourt, Van den Noort, Dubord, Callahan, Olson, Sperry. Webber, Grayson. Beauregard, Wisly, Wheeler, Ogden, 

Noone, DeLap, Spear, Bowler 
s Drinkwater, Russell, J. McNamara, Berthiaume, Day, Gagnon, Mclnerny, Ward, Chapman, Fiske, Moseley, Barney 



f i I f f f f 



If 



^.. ^ -. . f f ti||.| 
I I t f/| f ill 



HKn&iKMrKlI 



1361 



XOW NATIONAL CHI OMEGA 



But the stx^ial life of Chi Omejia is not 
the only aspeet of its well-rounded 
organization. The house has maintained 
high scholarship; enjoyed participation 
in college activities, the W. S. G. A., the 
W. A. A.. Academic Activities; and 
entered into friendly rivalry with other 
sororities in sports and into the more 
formal expression of this rivalry, the 
Intersorority Declamation and Sing. 

Officers 

President: Phyllis Mclnerny 
Vice-President: Evelyn Gagnon 
Secretary: Evra Ward 
Treasurer: Winifred Day 

Members 

Faculty: Kathleen Callahan. 

1942 : Elizabeth Barney, Constance Beau- 
regard, Marguerite Berthiaume, Marie 
Chapman, Phyllis Drinkwater, Wilma 
Fiske, Dorothy Grayson, Phyllis Mc- 
lnerny, Jean XcXamara, Rita Moseley, 



Eleanor Russell, Evra Ward, Nancy 
Webber. 

1943: Frances Albrecht, Mary Bowler, 
Mary Callahan, Winifred Day, Mary 
Daylor, Agatha Deering, Lorann DeLap, 
Celeste Dubord, Evelyn Gagnon, Helen 
Grant, Barbara Hayward, Mary Keavy, 
Harriet Kelso, Frances Langan, Mary 
Mann, Margaret Stanton, Janice Wisly, 
Rut^ Woodworth. 

1944 : Margaret Daylor, Margaret Deane, 
Theresa Fallon, Mary K. Haughey, Ruth 
Hodgess, Anna Keedy, MarjolaineKeough, 
Alice Maguire, Edna McNamara, Bar- 
bara O'Brien, Louise O'Connor, Ruth 
Sperry, Janet Wheeler. 

1945 : Miriam Andersen, Lucille Chaput, 
Barbara Collins, Wilda Coye, Margaret 
Deinlein, Ruth Ewing, Rose Grant, Ann 
Harcourt, Marjorie Huff, Dorothy Lee, 
Barbara Noone, Margaret Ogden, Helen 
Petersen, Marjorie Spear, Nancy Sul- 
livan, Virginia Van den Noort, Rosemary 
Walsh. 



Before studies or bed Chi Omega girls often take time out for a sing or a chat in front of fireplace 



Evra Ward. Harriet Kelso, and Chi O'ers on steps 








Kappa Sigma 

Gamma Delta Chapter 

70 Butterfield Ter. 
Local Founded in 1904 
Colors : Scarlet, Green and White 
Publications: The Caduceus and The 
Gamma Delta Bulletin 



KAPPA SIGMA 

On the hill overlooking the campus 
stands Kappa Sigma House. Now in 
its second year it houses some of the most 
important men on campus, besides some 
forty odd others who have helped to keep 
Kappa Sig up among the best of houses. 

In athletics the interfraternity soccer 
team was head and shoulders above the 
field. The interfraternity skit, a take- 
off on the College Store, written by Lou 
Bishop, brought plenty of laughs but not 
much else. Though the declamation 
was no more profitable. Jack Sherman 
came through with first prize in the 
Burnham contest. 

Eerhaps the best-known Kappa Sig is 
Bob Fitzpatrick who is president of his 
class, president of the Senate, editor of 
the Quarterly, and co-author of the 
famous Peanut Gallery. Then there are 
also the footballers, Ed Hitchcock, John 
Seery, Stan Salwak, Ed Fedeli, Charlie 
Dimham, and Brad Morton, and not 



Denis, Warner, Place, Rothery, Dunham, Desrosier, Pratt, Serex, Courchene, Morton, Mendall, Fedeli 
Hitchcock, Glaaer, Tucker, Dobson, Pushee, Brown, DriscoU, Janes, F. McLaughlin, MacConnell, Richards, Stahlberg 
Sherman, O'Shea, Scaling!, Kunces, Sanlnier, Needham, Howe, Holmes, Tolman, Geer 
Greenfield, Bishop, Mason, Pierce, MacCormack, Carter, Seery, Gardner, G. McLaughlin, Graham. Clarke 




1381 



MEBf IMPORTANT OX CAMPUS 



soon to be forgotten are the water 
wizards, Joe Jodka, captain of the team, 
and Bud Hall, promising Rogersman 
who startled the country by coming 
within a tenth of a second of a world's 
one hundred yard free-style record. 

Officers 

President: Charles MacCormack 
Vice-President : Daniel Carter 
Secretary: James Graham 
Treasurer: Richard Mason 

Members 

Faculty: Oran C. Boyd, Kenneth L. 
Bullis, Guy V. Glatfelter, Calvin S. 
Hannum, Edward B. Holland, Marshall 
O. Lamphear, Frederick A. McLaughlin, 
Raymond T. Parkhurst, Dale H. Sieling, 
Frank A. Waugh. 

1942: John L. Bishop, Daniel Carter, 
William Darrow, John Gardner, Eric 
Greenfield, James C. Graham, Joseph 
Jodka, Charles MacCormack, George 



McLaughlin, Richard Mason, Richard 
Pierce, John Seery. 

1943: Wendell E. Brown, Russell E. 
Clarke, Charles Courchene, Robert Fitz- 
patrick, Charles D. Geer, David Holmes, 
Willis Janes, William MacConnell, Ralph 
B. Mendall, Fred McLaughlin, Charles 
B. Richards, Theodore Saulnier, William 
Serex, Joseph Tosi, Charles L. Warner. 

1944: Arvid W. Anderson, Hollis Baker, 
Robert Cowing, Norman Desrosier, Robert 
Denis, Warren Dobson, Charles Dunham, 
Edwin Fedeli, Rowland Freeman, Ed- 
ward Hall, Joseph Hebert, Edward Hitch- 
cock, Milton Howe, John Keough, Ray- 
mond Kneeland, Joseph Masi, Lewis 
Morton, William Needham, Robert Place, 
George Pushee, Robert Rhodes, Frederic 
Rothery, John Sherman, Harry Sloper, 
Paul Stahlberg, Robert Stevens, Thomas 
Tolman, William Tucker, Arthur White. 

1945: Joseph Driscoll, Robert Glaser, 
Philip lampietro, Richard Kimball, Joseph 
Kunces, John Powers, Robert Pratt. 



Seniors MacCormack, Seery, and Mason drop studies to catch up on contemporary literature 



Kappa Sig boys settle down for a hand of poker 





obJa 



Chi 



snow 'i'^ 



ai.vv.re l""^ 



ri»'«l 



family lite 



Lnmbda i'hi Alpfaa 

Gamma Zeta Chapter 

374 North Pleasant St. 
Local Founded in 1912 
Colors : Purple, Green and Gold 
Publications: Cross and Crescent and 
Gamma Gram 



L.C.A. VARIETY 

Athletics, dramatics, politics, publica- 
tions. . . . variety of talent was Lambda 
Chi's distinguishing virtue and with such 
variety of talent such leaders as Greene, 
Langton, Lacey, Shaw and Kimball 
stood out in campus activities both cur- 
ricular and extracurricular. 

Moderate success was Lambda Chi's 
in Interfraternity Competition with the 
house taking second in last spring's 
house inspection. . . . and a noble first 
in the football tournament this fall. 
Another median mark was secured in 
scholarship and a close win was almost 
scored in the Sock and Buskin contest 
with the presentation of Lord Jeffery 
Amherst. The annual sing and declama- 
tion found the boys from the house out 
of the win column. 

Tangible evidence, however, of the 
strength of the local group came to the 
eyes of the Alumni at commencement 
time when they saw their younger 
brothers participating in two of the major 



.loliansson, Allen, Moulton. Barton. Hoenipr, Cole, Webster. Fitzgerald. Manchester, Campbell, R. Kelley 

Forest, Roberson, Dcvaney, FitzPatrick, Wroe, St. Palley, E. Yetman, Cou^hlan, Monroe, Mullaly, Bauer 

Greene, Maloy, G. Kimball, Grain, Lacey, Langton. Shaw. Arnold. Sparks. Mahan, Kelley 




140 



OF TALENT IS STKOXCi POIXT 



features of homecoming — the annual 
commencement Roister Doister play and 
the usual Saturday afternoon last base- 
ball game of the year. 

Congratulations should go to the 
Gamma Zeta chapter for its two decades of 
continued progress in fraternity affairs and 
the leadership that the Green and Gold 
has shown in campus affairs. The local 
chapter is among the older members of 
the national organization, having been 
founded in 191'-2, ten years after the 
national at Boston University in 1902. 

Officers 

President: George Langt on 
Vice-President: John Grain, Jr. 
Secretary: William Arnold 
Treasurer: H. Westcott Shaw 

^lembers 

Faculty: Walter Eisenmenger, George 
A. Marston. 

1942 : John E. Fitzgerald, Bradford M. 
Greene, George E. Kimball, Howard R. 



Lacey, George P. Langton, William E- 
Mahan, H. Westcott Shaw, Edward F- 
Sparks. 

1943: William E. Arnold, Richard R. 
Barton, George F. Benoit, John H. 
Grain, Thomas J. Kelley, Richard E. 
Maloy, Robert F. O'Brien, John F. 
Powers, Jr., Francis E. Ward. 

1944: Stewart E. Allen, Richard W. 
Bauer, Paul Cole, Glenn B. Dearden, 
Thomas E. Devaney, Frank A. Duston, 
John M. Fitzgerald, Lloyd S. Fitz- 
Patrick, G. Paul Foley, John F. Foley, 
Bernard A. Forest, Douglas W. Hosmer. 
Warren I. Johansson, C. Robert Kelley, 
Robert A. Monroe, J. Malcolm Moulton, 
Richard C. Roberson, Robert Stevens, 
Dobson L. Webster, Robert L. Wroe. 

1945: Robert Campbell, Robert Chand- 
ler, John Coughlan, James Fulton. Joseph 
Griffin, John A. Mullaly, Theodore St. 
Palley, G. Elliott Yetman. 



Lacey and Lambda Chi practical jokers prepare to apply the hot foot to an unsuspecting brother 



Piano playing, amusement of versatile Lambda-men 





ideot 



John 



M»r! 



1 *» 
cohorts^ I >« 



Mai""*^- 



Ring 



Phi Sigma Kappa 

Alpha Chapter 

510 North Pleasant St. 
National Founded in 1873 
Colors : Silver and Magenta Red 
Publications: The Signet and Alpha Bits 



PHI SIGMA K 

"In fact, Phi Sig may well be termed the 
house of athletes" — quoted from Phi 
Sig's Alpha Bits. 

The football team was studded with 
men from Alpha: Ben Freitas and Gil 
Santin in the backfield, Rollie Collela in 
guard position, and Dick Norton and 
Paul Dwyer in flank positions; Gil 
Santin became the 1942 captain. In 
( >ther sports as well Alpha men stood out : 
Ed Podolak and Gil Santin in basket- 
ball: Miff Atwood, Deke Young, Rollie 
Collela, Mo Leland, Babe Gaumond, and 
Ace Thaper in winter sports; Carl Erick- 
son, this year's captain, and Ed Podolak, 
next year's, and Howie Bangs, in soccer; 
Bill Kimball, this year's captain, and Russ 
McDonald, next year's, in cross country; 
Gil Santin, Ben Freitas, and Stan Hood 
in winter track; Herbie Gross, Ace 
Thayer, Fred Shackley, Howie Bangs, 
Ben Freitas, in baseball. 

But Phi Sig didn't fall behind either in 



C. Biohop, Fox. K. Stewart, Santin. McEwan. Brutcher. Grogan. Bueli. Robbins, Garnett. Quinn, Dietel 

Gaumond, Hood, Campbell, Iriyk. Merrill, Stone, Natti, Stewart. Bor^atti, Willemain. Norton, Symonds 

Price, Cleary, JVahil. Colella, J. Arnold. Gilman, W. Ryan, Burrington, Shackley, Ring, Lynch, Moreau 

IMcSwain. Cressy, W. Kimball. Freitas. M. Atwood. Marsh. P. Dwyer, C. Erickson. Dunbar. W. Dwyer, Hatch 

Hadley, Leland, Young, Flessas. Parsons, McDonald, LeMaire, Podolak, Wood, Nelson 




14(2] 



CALLED HOUSE OF ATHLETES 



social activities or Intorfraternity Com- 
petition in which their skit Ben Killer just 
missed first place and their basketball 
and soccer teams came through ahead. 

Officers 

President: John Marsh 
Vice-President: Paul Dwyer 
Secretary: Carl Erickson 
Treasurer: Milford Atwood 

Members 

Faculty: Orton L. Clark, Lawrence S. 
Dickinson, Robert D. Hawley, John D. 
Lentz, Willard Monson, Francis C. Pray, 
Jr., Frank P. Rand, Roland H. Verbeck. 

1942: Milford Atwood. Charles Bishop, 
Richard Cressy, Ernest Dunbar, Jr., Paul 
Dwyer, William Dwyer, Carl Erickson, 
Edmund Freitas, George Gaumond, Ben- 
jamin Hadley, Ralph Hatch, Jr., William 
Kimball, Maurice Leland, George Mc- 
Swain, Freeman Morse, Frederic Shack- 
ley, Chester Stone, Donald Thayer, 
Casimir Zielinski. 



1943 : Howard Bangs, Robert Bourdeau, 
Stewart Bush, Robert Cleary, Robert 
Dietel, Herbert Gross, Theodore Le- 
Maire, John Marsh, Russell McDonald, 
Edward Podolak, Harold Quinn, Gildo 
Santin, Kenneth Stewart. 

1944: Joseph Arnold, Raoul Borgatti, 
Frederick Brutcher, Horace Burrington, 
Roland Colella, Richard Damon, Law- 
rence Garnett, Ralph Gilman, Stanley 
Hood, Jack Hull, Arthur Irzyk, Robert 
McEwan, Leo Moreau, Fred Nahil, 
Walter Niles, Richard Norton, Stanley 
Parnish, James Parsons, Sam Price, 
James Ring, Leo Ryan, William Ryan, 
John Spencer, Robert Stewart, Richard 
Symonds, Bernard Willemain, Donald 
Wood, Philip Young. 

1945: Patrick Bresnahan, Samuel Kim- 
ball Gove, James Laliberte, Ray Lynch, 
Joseph Magri, Arthur Moroni, Gilbert 
Merrill, John Natti, Andrew Nelson, 
Carol Robbins, Wesley Sprout. 



Bill Ryan and Jim Parsons have a sharp game of pool down in Phi Sigma Kappa's recreation room 
^^B*^^ ^_ Not Bonny Baker — ^just Phi Sig's Jack Hill skitting 





HbPbil«»» 



l.eoy 



Berg*' 



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Phi Zeta 

Local Organization 

778 North Pleasant St. 
Local Founded in igS'S 
Colors: Black and White 



PHI ZETA NOW^ 

Phi Zeta's fall term began this year in 
a house just sparkling with new paint 
and led by a new house mother, Mrs. 
Ross. Living up to this beginning, the 
girls really made a success of the school 
year. Mary Berry was manager of the 
Sinfonietta, and, incidently, the first girl 
ever to hold this position. Another first 
was Helen Van Meter, manager of the 
Women's Glee Club and first girl manager 
of the operetta. Ruth Helyar was presi- 
dent of the Intersorority Council, and 
Jean Davis, president of the house, was 
co-chairman of the new Community 
Chest Drive. The ever-watchful W. S. 
G. A. was led by Martha Hall. 

Phi Zeta's year was filled with academic 
a,nd social activities. Following the work 
and excitement of a successful rushing 
season, the girls entertained their pledges 
at a Sunday night supper and, later in 
the year, at a pledge formal held in the 
Lord Jeff. The annual Christmas party 
took place December fourteenth when 
everyone received a gift and sang carols 



> Cunther, Bird, Barbour, Tracy. Berger, Perkins, Goodhue, Ti 

Anderxe 
9 Bentley, Hadley, E. Fitzgerald, M. Aldricli, E. Cobb, Crow 

Gately, Atk 

> Rice, Miller, Symonds, V. Aldrich, Webster. Baker. Salsman. Bates. Bo 

Carpenter 
! I. Fitzgerald, Alger, Berry, Prest, Cramer. M. Cobb, Gasaett, Davis, \ 



Iton, Flynn. Stoekwell. Beaumont. Van Meter. Leete. Arnold, 

ther. H. Smitli, Johnson, Clapp, Bigelow, Julian, O^Keefe, 

, Thayer. Burgess. Koonz. Greene. J. Smith, 

a. Pederzani, Culver, Kelleher, Hall, Helyar 



if. I I 14*1 If s f 



& S ft 'It M t 1 



i^^fijJfJ^^M^ 



144] 



HAS A NEW HOUSE MOTHER 



around the Christmas tree. In October 
girls from Phi Zeta were challenged by 
boys from Amherst College and Marg 
Mann, Elinor Koonz, Peggy Perkins, 
Daphne Miller upheld Phi Zeta's honor. 
Throughout the year, members of Phi 
Zeta have been active as leading women 
on campus, and to all its members Phi 
Zeta has stood for deep and lasting 
friendships. 

Officers 

President : Jean Davis 
A'ice-President : Ethel Gassett 
Secretary : Margery Mann 
Treasurer: Ruth Baker 

Members 

1942: Nancy Alger, Thyrza Barton, 
Mary Berry, Barbara Cramer, Mary 
Cobb, Mildred Culver, Jean Davis, Ida 
Fitzgerald, Ethel Gassett, Martha Hall, 
Ruth Helyar, Marie Kelleher, Margery 
Mann, Alice Pederzani, Dorothy Prest. 



1943: Marjorie Aldrich, Ruth Baker, 
Priscilla Bentley, Helen Berger, Mary 
Jean Carpenter, Elizabeth Cobb, Chris- 
tine Gately, Rosalind Goodhue, Doris 
Johnson, Elinor Koonz, Daphne Miller, 
H. Barbara Smith, Jane Smith, Catherine 
Stockwell, Olive Tracy, Helen Van Meter, 
Betty Webster. 

1944: Mabel Arnold, Betty Jane At- 
kinson, Muriel Barbour, Estelle Bowen, 
Jean Burgess, Betty Clapp, Barbara 
Crowther, Marcia Greene, Marjorie Gun- 
ther, Cynthia Leete, Dorothy Nestle, 
Peggy Perkins, Shirley Salsman, Anna 
Sullivan, Barbara Thayer, Betsy Tilton. 

1945: Virginia Aldrich, Patricia Ander- 
sen, Elizabeth Bates, Helen Beaumont, 
Barbara Bigelow, Barbara Bird, Eliza- 
beth FitzGerald, Kathleen Flynn, Mari- 
lyn Hadley, Virginia Julian, Connie 
O'Keefe, Mary Virginia Rice, Norma 
Sanford, Mary Symonds. 



The camera catches Estelle Bowen, Helen Smith, Betty Clapp instead of the posed hath-tub party 



Nancj \lf;er. Pinky Smith in Phi Zeta's living-room 





,.T.V 



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fleeV"" 



fioi" 



Vrost 



Q. T. V. 

Local Organization 

358 North Pleasant St. 

Founded in 1869 

Colors: Carmen, Jet and Gold 

Publication: Q. T. V . Alumni Bulleti 



Q.T.V. DABBLES 

Q. T. V. was active in all extracurricular 
activities and athletics. In scholarship, 
the house finished fifth. In winter sports, 
Q. T. V. teams brought the house into 
second place. The touch football team 
lost in the semifinals, while the basket- 
ball team went into the finals. 

Members of the house who were active 
in campus affairs were Stanley Polchlopek 
and Henry Martin, Collegian; Ted Noke, 
Collegian Quarterly; football, John Mc- 
Donough, Edward Warner, and John 
Storozuk; Senate, John McDonough; 
Ken Gorman, swimming; Charlie Warner 
and Dick Frost, track; Tom Moore, 
basketball; soccer, Stan Gizienski and 
Jim Callahan; military, Vin Lafleur, 
Neil Bennett, and Stan Gizienski. 

Within the last two years nearly the 
whole house has been done over. All of 
the rooms have been repapered. New 
furniture has been bought for the living 
rooms downstairs and many of the study 
rooms have been refurnished. Before 



Polchlopek, Gizienski, Moke, Ilandrich, Frost, Gorman, Muldoon. C. Warner 
Allen, Miller, Bennett, Lafleur, Barton, Martin, E. Warner, Leonowicz, Hock 




14(i 



IN LITERATURE & ATHLETICS 



school opened this fall. Brothers Edward 
Warner, Charlie Warner, and Stanley 
Polchlopek returned early and insulated 
the sleeping quarters with celotex. 

Despite the poor start the house had 
in pledging this year, the boys put their 
shoulders to the wheel and acquired a 
total of nine new pledges before spring 
rolled around. 

Nearly all of last year's graduating 
class is now in the services of Uncle Sam. 
In fact, Q. T. ^^ boasts of nearly one 
hundred alumni in the armed forces, 
most of them officers. 

Q. T. V.'s social season, under the 
direction of Social Chairman John Cado- 
rette, included, besides regular vie parties, 
a dance on Amherst Weekend and another 
on the weekend of the Military Ball. 
On the evening of April 18 Bob Miller 
played for the annual spring formal. 



Officers 

President: Everett Barton 
Vice-President : Vincent Lafleur 
Secretary: Henry Martin 
Treasurer: Edward Warner 

Members 

Faculty: Lorin E. Ball, Leo V. Crow- 
ley, William B. Esselen, Harold M. Gore, 
A. Vincent Osmun, Clarence H. Parsons. 
1942: Everett Barton, Neil Bennett, 
^'incent Lafleur. 

1943: Stanley Gizienski, Philip Hand- 
rich, Raymond Hock, Victor Leonowicz, 
Henry Martin, John McDonough, Henry 
Miller, Stanley Polchlopek, John Storo- 
zuk, Edward Warner. 
1944: Richard Frost, William Hart, 
John Hilchey, Thomas Moore, Alfred 
Muldoon, Theodore Noke, Charles War- 
ner. 

1945: John Cadorette, Nello Fiorio, 
Leon Gizienski, Peter Tassinari. 



Music offers rela.\ation to physically fit Q. T. V. men worn out by the compulsory Phys. Ed. course 

Home Ec course at Q. T. V., prerequisite of marriage 





batiq' 



ue*- 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Massachusetts Kappa Chapter 

387 North Pleasant St. 
Local Founded in 1937 
Colors: Purple and Gold 
Publications: The Record and StAtE 



S.A.E.B.M.O.C.'s 

House improvements have been the 
most noticeable achievement of the 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity during 
the last year. In addition, the Mass. 
Kajjpa chapter, as it celebrates its fifth 
year of union with the national organiza- 
tion, continued to hold up its place in 
interfraternity competition and to pro- 
duce its share of "B. M. O. C.'s." 

In the spring of 1941 it became evident 
that both dining hall and kitchen facilities 
must be enlarged. Since cost of labor and 
materials was rising, the boys decided 
to do all the work themselves. Things 
were started off right by one of the 
brpthers constructing a complete set of 
plans. Weekend work parties through 
the summer made the enlargement rain- 
proof by the opening of the school year. 
Such niceties as matched flooring, wall 
panelling and window trimming were 
added in the fall. And, most recently, a 
completely remodelled kitchen brought 
the project to completion. 



MiUer, Kcefe, Browne, Block. Hollis, Parker, Sullivan, Peck, Mann, Anderson 
Wood, Ransow, Karvonen, Paraons, Bodurtlia. Young. Vanasse, Bodendorf. Radway, McCormack 

T. Shepardson, Bernard, Boy, Dolby. Gervin. Wilder, Savino, Moser, AmeU, Watts 
1>, W. Mosher, Litchfield, Dakin, J. Shepardaon, Potter, McLean, Benemelis, Buckley, Blanchard, Ste 




[148] 



RAIN -PROOF GRUR CENTER 



In Intcrfratcrnity Competition, S. A. 
E."s claim to fame lies in their firsts 
in last spring's track meet and this 
winter's volleyball tournament. Repre- 
sentatives on nearly every college activity 
are evident in the fraternity membership. 
Last fall, the sport world saw Spencer 
Potter tops as he starred on the soccer 
team and made the Boston Globe's 
.\11-Xew England team. In the winter, 
Don Parker took honors, as he broke the 
college records for both the six hundred 
and one thousand yard run. 

Officers 

President: Spencer Potter 
Vice-President: John Shepardson 
Secretary: Hubert McLean 
Treasurer: Ralph Dakin 

Members 
Faculty: Guy Chester Crampton. 
1942: Leslie Benemelis, Ralph Dakin, 
John Laliberte, George Litchfield, Hubert 



McLean, Harold Mosher, William Mo- 
sher, Spencer Potter, John Shepardson. 

1943 : Charles Blanchard, Francis Buck- 
ley, Peter Gervin, George Gyrisko, Alex- 
ander Hewat, Lawrence Ncwcomb, Stan- 
ley Salwak, Theodore Shepardson, 
Raymond Steeves, Edward Watts, Loren 
WUder. 

1944: Alexander Amell, David Ander- 
son, Milton Barnes, James Block, Warren 
Bodendorf, John Browne, Charles Dolby, 
Steven Hollis, Aarne Karvonen, Robert 
Keefe, Chester Mann, Ralph McCor- 
mack, Everett Miller, Roy Moser, Donald 
Parker, Robert Parsons, Robert Radway, 
Arnold Salinger, Leslie Savino, Norman 
Vanasse, Robert Young. 

1945 : George Bernard, James Bodurtha, 
Wallace Boy, Arthur Peck, Walter Sul- 
livan, Wallace Wannlund, Charles Wood. 



Bob Young and Chet Mann try S.A.E.'s weight lifting (a still unanswered question: "Is it a fake?") 



Prexy John Shepardson polishes his own boots 





iVeg 



\> »»«' 



$i)l<ma Bola Chi 

Local Organization 

314 Lincoln Ave. 
Local P'ounded in 1931 
Colors: Blue. Black and White 
Publication: Signa 



SIG BETE BAN 

Primary question in the minds of Sig 
Betes this year \\as that of going 
national. Early in the fall negotiations 
were started with Kappa Kappa Gamma. 
Throughout the year representatives 
visited the house for teas, dinners and 
weekends, and early in February Martha 
Shirley announced that Sigma Beta Chi 
was to be affiliated with Kappa Kappa 
Gamma. Because of the shortened col- 
lege year, initiation ceremonies will 
probably be postponed until fall. This 
major step was one inevitably connected 
with Sigma Beta Chi's growth. 

With the idea of going national in the 
background Sigma Beta came out of the 
fall rushing period ahead of the rest of 
the, sororities with eighteen freshmen 
pledges. Sig Bete's social calendar this 
year included teas for faculty, patronesses, 
pledges," and Kappa Kappa Gamma 
representatives; an annual Christmas 
party: and the pledge formal which was 
given January tenth. 

Liitiation for freshmen was a hilarious 



Carnall, Daub, Everberg 
, Nelson, Huban, Putnam, 



ies Gore, Bigelow, Cutfinski, Holmes, Hyatt, Sheldon. Sampson. Gibson, Kenny, J. B: 
. Starr, J. Murray, Winberg, Thayer, H. Murray, Treml. Washburn, Cole, Telander, Cu> 

Bowler 
i Deacon, Doolittle, Wbitcomb, Walker, Holton, Sargent, Gale, Avery, Eyre, Judge, Martin, Handforth, Willet, Maso 

Bartlett, FitasGerald 
ses Carlisle. Waldron. White, Nagelschmidt, King, Hedlund, Shirley. E. Brown. Merrill. Moulton, Avella, Durland 
Misses Ryan. Stafford. Allnian. Carlson, Skiffington. Scott. Quinn. LeMay. Ilalloran 






It 1 1 It t 



^^^T-# -■t^'i 



•*««- 



1.501 



ON ICE BOX KEEPS 'EM SLIM 



period of three days during Fehniary 
wlien freshmen pledges were thorougiiiy 
and effectively initiated. 

Partly in connection with rushing but 
carried on throughout the year were 
house improvements which included re- 
vamping the downstairs den and adding 
new furnishings throughout the house, 
and during the year Mrs. Ann Runeon 
took up the position of house mother. 
In January with cost of food rising. 
House Manager Norma Hedlund an- 
nounced that the kitchen would be closed 
to all girls between meals. 

Officers 

President : Martha Shirley 
Vice-President : Norma Hedlund 
Secretary : Esther Brown 
Treasurer: Marjorie Merrill 

Members 

1942: Marion Av'ery, Frances Avella, 
Esther Brown, Jean Carlisle, Priscilla 
Durland, Mildred Eyre, Margaret Gale, 
Norma Handforth, Norma Hedlund, 
Mary Judge, Elenor King. Lillian Martin, 



Marjorie Merrill, Betty Moulton, Marion 
NageLschmidt, Harriett Sargent, Martha 
Shirley, Ann Waldron, Anne White. 

1943: Jean Brown, Beatrice Carnall, 
Florence Daub, Mary FitzGerald, Blanche 
Gutfinski, Norma Gibson, Mary Holton, 
Claire Horton, June Kenny, Priscilla 
Scott, Rita Skiffington, May Thayer. 

1944: Betty Bartlett, Eleanor Cush- 
man. Norma Deacon, Bettye Huban, 
Lucille Lawrence, Miriam LeMay, Shir- 
ley Mason, Helen Murray, Shirley Nel- 
son, Joy Putman, Mary Quinn, Avis 
Ryan, Doris Sheldon, Carolyn Starr, 
Martha Treml, Jean Washburn, Marian 
Whitcomb, Pauline Willett. 

1945 : Cynthia Allman, Eleanor Bigelow, 
Ellen Bowler, Shirley Carlson, Marjorie 
Cole, Nancy Doolittle, Barbara Everberg, 
Jacqueline Halloran, Jane Holmes, Phyllis 
Hyatt, Doris Roberts, Martha Sampson, 
Anne Stafford, Dorothy Telander, Bar- 
•bara Walker, Wilma Winberg. 



Pauline Willett claims lime-light as she watches the photographer take a shot of Sig Bete dinner 



We suspect that they're not knitting for Britain 





,mWan«« 



Sigma lot4» 

Local Organization 

Local Founded in 1934 
Colors: Blue and White 



SIGMA IOTAS 

The aims of the members of Sigma Iota 
sorority are to uphold the ideals of 
honesty, sincerity, and good fellowship, 
to strive for attainment of true learning, 
retirement, and culture, to conduct them- 
selves in all ways as gentlewomen, and to 
foster the ideals of the Massachusetts 
State College. During the past year 
Sigma Iota has felt pleased with its 
greatly increased membership. With the 
rise in number of new sisters to help, 
Sigma Iota has achieved many outstand- 
ing honors. Because of the outstanding 
ability of Agnes Goldberg and Gertrude 
Goldman, Sigma Iota won first place 
in Intersorority Declamation. Winter 
Carnival brought more honors to Sigma 
Iota with the election of Anita Marshall 
as Winter Carnival Queen. Every mem- 
ber also did her share in helping to give 
Sigma Iota the highest scholastic rating 
for sororities on campus. Social life has 
not been at a standstill either, for with 
many informals and the pledge formal, 
Sigma Iota has entertained its members 
and their guests well. At the gala and 



hisses Glagovskj, Merlin, Shuldiner, Sacks, Edinburg. Robinson, Rossman, Stein, WiUiams. Slotnick 

off. Rosoff, Saver, S. Cohen, Magidson, Wolkovsky, C. Eigner, Bernian. Alpert, Wasserman. T. Cohen, Dwork 

e Kerlin, Wainshel, Fox, A. Cohen, Goldman, Lappen, Marshall, Adelson, M. Cohen, Gordon, Goldberg 



■ 1*1 * 



■$% I I 

tail 



152 J 



TOPS IN DRAMA & STUDIES 



colorful Monorah-Hillol purim party in 
February the Sigma lota girls under the 
direction of President Fran Lappen took 
over the program and presented a short 
pantomime play with Charlotte Eigner 
doing a take-off on Mr. Hitler. 

Sigma Iota girls find time for Academic 
activities as well as social and scholastic 
excellence: Fran Lappen has been a 
member of the INDEX staff for the last 
three years and Helen Glagovsky is a 
regular reporter on the Collegian news 
staff, and the list goes on to include 
almost all Sigma Iotas. And Sigma Iota 
is looking forward toward years of even 
more satisfying achievement and attain- 
ment. 

Officers 

President: Frances Lappen 
Vice-President : Gertrude Goldman 
Secretary : Anita Marshall 
Treasurer: Anne Cohen 



Members 

1942: Dorothy Adelson, Edith Fox, 
Gertrude Goldman, Frances Lappen. 

1943 : Ann August, Anne Cohen, Marion 
Cohen, Agnes Goldberg, Anita Marshall, 
Miriam Sacks, Barbara Wainshel, Trudy 

Wolkovsky. 

1944: Shirley Azoff, Marcia Berman, 
Charlotte Eigner, Helen Glagovsky, Shir- 
ley Gordon, Charlotte Kaizer, Libby 
Kerlin, Irene Merlin, Ruth Rosoff, Sylvia 
Rossman, Charlotte Shuldiner, Bertha 
Slotnick, Beatrice Wasserman, Laura 
Williams. 

1945: Beatrice Alpert, Shirley Cohen, 
Thelma Cohen, Harriette Dwork, Golda 
Edinburg, Norma Magidson, Natalie 
Robinson, Sylvia Sandler, Barbara Saver, 
Lucille Stein. 



Sigma Iotas toast marshmallows and sip tea during a party given for their freshmen pledges 



d the girls have a quiet little chat 





val ^ctiU>»»'^'^ 



Dxiov 



bo repre 



Ued ^i- 



EP 



Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Massachusetts Alpha Chapter 

394 North Pleasant St. 
Local Founded in 1912 
Colors : Purple and Red 
Publications: The Journal and Spema 



SIG EPS ARE 

This year, Sigma Phi Epsilon celebrated 
its thirtieth year. The fraternity founded 
as a local, Sigma Tau Delta, in 1912 soon 
afterwards became national as the Massa- 
chusetts .\lpha chapter of Sigma Phi 
Epsilon. 

Sig Ep started this year with a rushing 
program that added fourteen new pledges 
to the chapter role, and these men have 
already made themselves well-known on 
campus. The upperclass members of the 
house were active in college activities, 
notably in athletics. Three athletic 
captaincies were held by Sig Eps this 
year: Bob Triggs, basketball; Bill Joyce, 
winter track; Bill Wall, spring track. 
Bill Wall also held the college record for 
high jump. Other Sig Eps familiar in 
athletic circles were: Jim Hurley, Fred 
Filios, Bud Allen, Art Koulias, Dave 
Wright, Otto Nau, and Fran Shea who 
was also captain of the college debating 
team. 

While the old conception that athletes 
and brains do not go together may have 
some basis, it does not apply in the case 



Dow. Britl. Starvish, Caraganis, Gilmore, Murray, Cianarakos, Gillis. Murphy 

Allen, Weretelnyk, LaFountain, Triggs, Hurley, Shea, Hebert, Wright, Farinha. Burgess, Lynch 

Joyce, Stonoga, Kirvin, Conley, Wall, Woodcock, Cochran, Filios, Nau, Szmyd 




1.54 1 



A-1 IN THEIR SCHOLARSHIP 



of Sig' Ep since the house took first place 
among fraternities in schohirship hist 
semester witii an 80. 4*^(1 average. 

Sig Ep entered the Interfraternity Skit 
Competition this year with an "epic" 
based on the famous Casey at the Bat. 
^Yhiie it was not chosen ultimately as the 
winner, it was chosen for the final even- 
ing's performance and gave both the 
audience and the actors plenty of laughs. 

In view of the present national crisis, 
Sig Ep is proud to have five military 
majors among its members — three of 
these plan to enter active service imme- 
diately upon graduation; and many 
recent graduates have already entered 



Officers 

President: William Wall 
Vice-President: Charles Woodcock 
Secretary: Philip Cochran 
Treasurer: Fred Filios 



M4>nibers 

Faculty: Frederick M. Butler, Richard 
Foley, Albert H. Sayer, Winthrop S. 
Welles. 

1942 : Philip Cochran, John Conley, Fred 
Filios, Rene Hebert, James Hurley, Bill 
Joyce, Robert Kirvin, Otto Nau, Fran 
Shea, Ben Stonoga, Lucien Szmyd, Rob- 
ert Triggs, William Wall, Charles Wood- 
cock. 

1943: Clinton Allen, Nicholas Cara- 
ganis, Chris Gianarakos, Arthur Koulias, 
Stanley Pacocha. 

1944 : David Secor, Chester Starvish, 
David Wright. 

1945: Harold Britt, Dan Burgess, Ed- 
mund Farinha, Fred Gillis, John Gilmore, 
Robert LaFountain, Robert Lynch, James 
Murphy, Arnold Murray, Joseph Were- 
telnyk. 



Making a fourth at bridge, Duchess waits for Sig Eps, C. Gianorakos and N. Caraganis, to play 



Sig Ep's masculine adoration of the eternally feminine 





tier 



t.ep 



boy* 



V,old session 



Tan Epsilon Phi 

Tau Pi Chapter 

418 North Pleasant St. 
Local Founded in 1938 
Colors : Lavender and White 
Publications: The Plume and Pilot 



T.E.P. TO NAME 

The pledging of seventeen freshmen 
started T. E. P.'s school year off with a 
bang. The first social event, Amherst 
Weekend, brought the return of many 
alumni and their wives. Informal dances 
kept the social ball whirling until the 
Winter Carnival Weekend. At the fra- 
ternity dances on Saturday night Harriet 
Dwork "4.5 received the honor of being 
"The Queen of Tau Epsilon Phi," an 
award to be made every year at Carnival 
time. T. E. P.'s snow sculpture. The 
Deril Who Wakes the Xorth Wind, won 
the third award from the Carnival judges. 
During the lull in social activities that 
followed the Carnival Weekend. T. E. P. 
continued to hold frequent vie parties 
through the spring until the big event of 
interfraternity society came up — the 
Inter-Greek Ball. 

Tau Epsilon Phi was active in the 
sports world as well as the social whirl 
and captured third place in the fraternity 
soccer and basketball competition. In 
the other Greek competitions, Tau Ep- 



Cooley, Greenspan, Altshuler, Gold, Saltzman. Allen, Shuster, Lippa, Madorsky, Fox, Libon 
Grossman, Levine, Alper, Reines, Black, Geller, Barsky. Goldin, S. Wein, Dobrusin 
Licht, Helfand, Freedman, Chornesky, Murachver, J. Goldman. Schwartz. Schuman, Lipnick, Fein, h 
Lind, Hershberg, Rodman, E. Wein. Zeitler, Glick, Horvitz, Balaban, Pruss, Nottenburg 




[156] 



ITS GUEST QUEEN ANNUALLY 



silon Phi's Jack Jackler tied for third 
place in the declamation and its 
scholastic average took another third. 

The fraternity banquet was held on 
February '•28 at the Drake Hotel where 
food was plentiful and a good time was 
enjoyed. 

Looking back upon a college year full 
of routine and work and extracurricular 
activities, Tau Epsilon Phi can well be 
satisfied with the results in all its 
varied fields of interests. 

Officers 

President: Sydney Zeitler 
Vice-President: Saul Glick 
Secretary: Daniel Horvitz 
Treasurer: Eugene Wein 

]^leinber.s 

1942: Melvin Abrahamson, Dan Bala- 
ban, Alan Buxbaum, George Garbowit, 
Saul Glick, Joseph Goldman, Bernard 
Hershberg, Sylvan Lind, Robert Not- 



tenburg, Norman Ogan, Harris Pruss, 
William Rabinovitz, Mitchell Rodman, 
Herbert Weiner, Sydney Zeitler. 

1943: H. Manuel Dobrusin, Daniel G. 
Horvitz, Abraham Klaiman, Morton 
Levine, Raymond Licht, Bourcard Nesin, 
Eugene Wein. 

1944: Irving Alper, Joseph Bornstein, 
George Chornesky, David Freedman, 
Seymour Gold, Irwin Green, Edward 
Greenspan, George Grossman, Israel Hel- 
fand, Jacob Jackler, Irving Jacobs, Sey- 
mour Koritz. Bert Libon, Solomon Mark- 
owitz, Sidney Murachver, Irving Saltz- 
man. 

1945: Elliot Allen. Justin Altshuler, 
Louis Barsky, Sidney Black, David 
Cooley, Robert Fein, Lester Fox, Jerome 
Geller, George Goldin, Saul Lipnick, 
Herman Lippa, Sheldon Madorsky. Eli 
Reines, Arthur Schwartz, Paul Shuman, 
Herbert Shuster, Stanley Wein. 



A quiet afternoon at T. E. P. house with Harris Pruss at the piano providing music for a jam session 



Music has power to soothe . . ," is proved at T. E. P. 





fi-oi" 



THeia 



Tb« 



ioii»^a 



-'Uark'i 



Thela Chi 

Theta Chapter 

496 North Pleasant St. 

Local Founded in 1911 

Colors : Red and White 

Publications : The Rattle and Theta Neivs 



THETA CHAPTER 



From among Theta Chi's fifty-six active 
nicinhtTs came these individuals distin- 
guished in 194'-2 : Al Eldridge, retiring presi- 
dent, student band leader. Conspicuous 
Service Trophy holder, a senator, anAdel- 
phian; Rob McCutcheon, Honor Com- 
mission member, Adelphian; Arthur Mar- 
coullier, sophomore class treasurer; Fuller 
and George Anderson, Maroon Key 
members; Win Avery, Luther Gare, and 
Kirby Hayes, mainstays of the swimming 
team; Ken Collard and Gordon Smith, 
operetta principals. Four men are en- 
listed in the Naval Reserve, one in the 
.Army Air Corp, and eight in advanced 
R. O.T. C. 

Besides promoting cooperation among 
its present members, Theta chapter 
created a special office for alumni con- 
tact, working, thus, toward a closer 
fellowship. 

Officers 

President: Albert Eldridge 
Vice-President: Howard Sunden 
Secretary : Robert McCutcheon 
Treasurer: Winthrop Avery 



CbV 



VondeU, Katun. Mascho, CoUard. Ward, Manix. Gare. Case. Magnin, Ritter, Carlson, Batey 

Warner. Hamilton, Burr, Shannon. Lynch, Ristuccia. FuUer, Chase. H. Lewis, V. Cole, Jackson, D. Walker 

Merrow, Washburn. Kellogg. Terry. West. Rano, Landon. D. Lewis. Phippen. Foster, Tibbett, G. Smith, Powell 

Pearson, R. Walker. Long, Avery, Sunden. Eldridge. McCutcheon. Burbank, Fosgate, Cox, Erikson. White, Gordon 

Warden. Ruggles, Malloy, Simpson. Hayes, Fyfe. Anderson, jVfarcoullier, Clark. Dawkins. Hughes 



^ «S^ w. 




158 



HAS SPIRIT OF FELLOWSHIP 



Membors 

Faculty : Lawrence Briggs, Walter Mac- 
linn, Oliver Roberts, William Sanctuary. 

1942: Winthrop Boynton Avery, John 
Edward Brady, Jr., David Farwell Bur- 
bank, William Waldo Case, Richard 
Philip Co.v, Albert Coolidge Eldridge, 
Axel Vincent Erikson, Fred Courtney 
Fosgate, Thomas Parke Gordon, Jr., 
Lewis Rice Long, Robert Clinton Mc- 
Cutcheon, Howard Henry Sunden, Rob- 
ert Norman Walker, Paul Arthur White. 

1943: Haig Aroian, Frederick Hunting- 
ton Burr, William Eric Clark, Kenneth 
Lounsbury Collard, Melville Bates Eaton, 
Gordon Field, Charles Glennie Fyfe, 
Luther Gare, Harold Sunter Lewis, 
Merwin Paul Magnin, Stuart Victor 
Nims, John Rowland Powell, Carl Rano, 
Bernard Ristuccia, John Vondell, Jr., 
Lewis James Ward, Jr. 



1944 : Thomas Edward Batey, Jr., Leon- 
ard Hubert Carlson, C. Vernon Cole, 
Robert O. Dewey, Kirby Hayes, Freder- 
ick Hopkins, Raymond Edward Malloy, 
Arthur Stuart MarcouUier, Fayette Clapp 
Mascho, Edward Crowell Manix, Henry 
Fiske Ritter, Gordon Paul Smith, Fred- 
erick Rogers Tibbetts, Donald Burgin 
Walker, Elmer R. Warner. 

1945: George Eric Anderson, George 
R. Chase, John P. Dawkins, Robert H. 
Doolittle, Jr., James R. Foster, Jr., Ray 
Russell Fuller, John Cameron Hamilton, 
John Thomas Hughes, Richard Field 
Jackson, Ransford Kellogg, Marcus O. 
Landon, Donald Alexander Lewis, Robert 
Edmund Lynch, Robert Eugene Merrow, 
Robert D. Pease, William Greeley Phip- 
pen, Almon Orcutt Ruggles, John Ward 
Shannon, Albert Stuart Simpson, Wil- 
liam E. Stadler, Nathaniel Spaulding 
Terry, Alan S. Warden, George Arthur 
Washburn, Frederick James West. 



Sleep conies to Theta Chi as boys seek their double-decker bunks after a day of dashing about 

Pierson and brothers bull session in McCutcheon's room 




M. S. a students 








Classes may come and classes may go but 
it is still the studies, the activities, the 
interests, the life of students that make 
Massachusetts State College a college. 
Freshmen, 45'ers as well, pass through 
their period of being hazed and helped; 
sophomores, 44'ers, too, have always been 
sophomoric; juniors (43'ers), always 
sophisticated; seniors (42'ers), always 
cynical. But each class leaves Massa- 
chusetts State College with the feeling 
that it has added a little to M. S. C.'s 
prestige and has helped slightly in its 
growth, and each class leaves, too, with 
the hope that classes that come after it 
will carry on where it has left off. 

Bicycles for quick transportation around the wide open spaces of campus 




from 1942 to 1945 




FromFrosh days to Commencement, students rrowd into ihe Old Chapel for classes and lectur 




^^^/t^tW^ Sis'"" ^ 

^^^^^ .,, active >" 



!^ij£nia Xi !!« ^»r*iciitfi(> 

Officers: President Jacob Shaw, Vice- 
President Leon Bradley, Treasurer 
Ernest Parrott, Secretary Kenneth Bullis. 
Members: George Alderman, Charles 
Alexander, Allen Andersen, John Archi- 
bald, John Bailey, Hugh Baker, William 
Becker, Emmett Bennett, Herbert Berg- 
man, Arthur Bourne, Oran Boj'd, Leon 
Bradley, Robert Buck, Kenneth Bullis, 
William Colby, Sara Coolidge, G. Cramp- 
ton, William Davis, William Doran, 
Walter Eisenmenger, William Esselen, Jr., 
Carl Fellers, Richard Fessenden, Ralph 
France, Henry Franklin, Monroe Free- 
man, Arthvir French, James Fuller, Con- 
stantine Gilgut, Clarence Gordon, Emil 
Guba, Christian Gunness, Marie Gutow- 
ska, Frank Hays, Edward Holland, Linus 
Jones, Clifford Kightlinger, Arthur 
Levine, Robert Lubitz, Malcolm 
McKenzie, Merrill Mack, Walter 
Maclinn, George Marston, Oreana Mer- 
riam, Walter Miller, Helen Mitchell, 
William Mueller, Carl Olson, A. Vincent 
Osmun, Raymond Parkhurst, Ernest Par- 



HOXORARIES 

rott, Charles Peters, Wallace Powers, 
J. Harry Rich, Walter Ritchie, Arnold 
Rhodes, William Ross, Paul Serex, Dale 
Sieling, Philip Simon, Frank Shaw, Jacob 
Shaw, Fred Sievers, Marion Smith, 
Harvey Sweetman, Frederic Theriault, 
Jay Traver, Reuben Trippensee, Ralph 
Van Meter, Henry Van Roekel, William 
Mnal. Willett Wandell, Frederick Wenzel, 
Warren Whitcomb, Harold White, Gilbert 
Woodside, Robert Young, John Zak. 




Phi Beta Kappa key, liberal arts reward 

Phi Iteia Kappa, Arts Reward 

Officers: President William Machmer, 
Vice-President Charles DuBois, Secre- 
tary-Treasurer G. I. Woodside. 
Members: Mrs. Kenneth Bullis, G. C. 
Crampton, Charles DuBois, Mrs. William 
Easton, Mrs. G. E. Erickson, Stowell 
Coding, Vernon Helming, Arthur Julian, 
William Machmer, A. Anderson Mackim- 
mie, Walter Miller, Helen Mitchell, 
Frank Moore, William Ross, Mrs. Frank 
Shaw, Marion Smith, Basil Wood, Gil- 
bert Woodside. 



162] 



REWARD FOR THE STilllEXT 



Phi Kappa Phi for Sliidonts 

Officers: President Charles Friikei-, 
\'ice-President Clark Thayer, Treasurer 
Richard Foley, Secretary .Arthur Julian, 
Corresponding Secretary Marion Smith. 
Members: Charles .Alexander, John 
.-\rchibald, Hugh Baker, .Arthur Beau- 
mont, Lyle Rlundell, Carl Bokina, Oran 
Boyd, Alfred Brown, Alexander Canoe, 
Joseph Chamberlain, AValter Chenoweth, 
Richard Colwell, G. Chester Crampton, 
William Doran, Fred Ellert, Carl Fel- 
lers, Richard Fessenden, Richard Foley, 
Charles PVaker, Julius Frandsen, .Arthur 
French, George Gage, Philip Gamble, 
Harry Glick, Stowell Coding, Maxwell 
Goldberg, Clarence Gordon, Christian 
Gunness, Frank Hays, Vernon Helming, 
Robert Holdsworth, Edward Holland, 
Leonta Horrigan, Arthur Julian, Marian 
Kuhn, Marshall Lanphear, John Lentz, 
Arthur Levine, William Machmer, Mer- 
rill Mack, A. .-Anderson Mackimmie, 
Walter Miller, Helen Mitchell, Frank 
Moore, Fred Morse, Willard Munson, 



.4. Vincent Osmun, Raymond Parkhurst, 
Ernest Parrott, Clarence Parsons, 
Charles Peters, Wallace Powers, Walter 
Prince, Frank Rand, Arnold Rhodes, 
Victor Rice, Walter Ritchie, David 
Rozman, Fred Sears, Paul Serex, Frank 
Shaw, Jacob Shaw, Frederick Sievers, 
Edna Skinner, Marion Smith, Harvey 
Sweetman, Clark Thayer, Ray Torrey, 
Reuben Trippensee, Frederick Troy, Alice 
Turner, Ralph Van Meter, Frank Waugh, 
Gilbert Woodside. 

1941 Spring Election: Marguerite Briel- 
man, AVinifred L. Giles, Marian Kuhn, 
Merton P. Lamden, Irving Meyer, John 
C. Morytko, Hyman J. Steinhurst. 

1941 Fall Election: Marion Avery, 
Barbara Butement, Mary Donahue, 
Bradford Greene, Abraham Kagan, 
Kenneth Nagler, Herbert Weiner, Henry 
Wolf. 

WIfl Scholar: Mary J. Donahue. 



e. Miss Donahue, Miss Avery, Mii 




163] 



ISOGON 

Isogon simultaneously startled the males 
of the college and lent a helping hand to 
Freshman coeds with its new and different 
Coediquette. Mary Donahue, president 
of this year's Isogon, and Kay Tully of 
last year's Isogon edited this bit of valua- 
ble blue and buff advice on anything, in- 
cluding apple polishing, guts, girdles and 
kisses. Rumor has it that both under- 
class men and munsingwear, taking the 
matter to heart, were in pursuit of the 
editors. 

Isogon in achieving its first purpose, 
recognition of outstanding women on 
campus, insvires success of its second 
purpose, that of service to the College. 
Members were active as leaders in soror- 
ity and campus activities. Isogon car- 
ried out its self-assigned traditions of 
ushering at Commencement and taking 
charge of Junior-Senior processional. Be- 
sides aiding the College defense program, 
it lent support to the Community Chest 
Drive. Mary Donahue, Jean Davis, 
Ruth Helyar, Marion Avery, Betty 
Moulton, Nancy Webber, and Kate 
Wetherbee made up the Isogon seven. 



Poller, Eldridse, Werme 
Zeitler, W. Dwycr, McCutoheon, Shaw 





ADELPHIA 



An air of expectancy was sensed in Senior 
Convo as be-gowned seniors of Adelphia 
singled out for distinction eight of their 
classmates and their seven junior succes- 
sors. Receiving gentle taps signifying 
their election to Adelphia the new men 
were then led by old members to the 
platform where the retiring president 
officially enrolled them in the society. 

Svelte maroon jackets with gold-em- 
broidered Adelphia on the breast pockets 
distinguish the envied members (per- 
haps not so envied if the public knew 
that the brothers bear half the expense of 
those smoothly-tailored garments) . Their 
activities included ushering at Sunday 
Vespers and conducting pre-game rallies. 

Red Cross Drive, World Student 
Service Fund, March of Dimes — usually 
handled separately by Adelphia — were 
combined this year in the Community 
Chest, directed by a committee repre- 
senting various campus organizations. 
Adelphia's representative was Wes 
Shaw. 



164 




««J«-Ga 






CHEER LEADER!^ 

"A little improvement," modest quote of 
Babe Gaumond, leader of State's 1941- 
1942 cheer leaders, included renovated 
uniforms, revamped fanfares, revised 
cheers, and acrobatic tumbling. 

Augmenting the glories of the group 
were two personalities, that of a man, 
that of a dog — Bill Clark with his 
self-exhausting, crowd-tickling antics, 
"Rippy," center of attraction in his 
Maroon, "M" blazoned sweater. Al- 
though "jest plain dorg," Rippy showed 
typical M. S. C. spirit at the W. P. I. 
battle when he encountered and con- 
quered W. P. I.'s goat. 

The team included Babe Gaumond, 
Bill Clark, Betty Webster, Ruthie Baker, 
Pinkey Smith, and Gordon Smith; and 
proud the members are that they were 
present at every game whether traveling 
with the band or soaking up atmosphere 
at the Amherst-State conflict. 

A new system proposed by the Senate 
for next year will call for two members 
from each class, freshman trials, and a 
senior leader. 



MAROOX KEY 

Not on the possession of a smooth line 
alone but on the basis of ability and 
achievement members of the Maroon 
Key are elected by their male classmates. 
As official hosts to campus visitors on 
High School Day, and Dads' Day, and 
at all athletic events, members of the 
Key found their duties included safe- 
guarding valuables, seeing about com- 
fortable accommodations, and ciceron- 
ing guests about the campus. 

Easily recognizable by the white hat 
with a Maroon Key, members supported 
the Senate at pre-sunrise serenades and 
other disciplinary action pertaining to 
the freshmen, including the highly effec- 
tive "pond parties." The Senate, be- 
sides paternalistically presenting pins to 
Maroon Key members, undertook re- 
drafting the Maroon Key constitution. 
This led to the increase from ten to 
fifteen members chosen last spring and 
may lead to further changes in the 
organization and duties of the group. 
Officers were President Edwin Fedeli, 
Vice-President Gordon Smith, and 
Hawaii-Absent Bob Engelhard, secre- 
tary-treasurer. 



Engelhard. Dunham. Colella, G. Smith. Moreau. Fedeli 
Parker. \» arner, Marcoullier. De>ane». Giannotti. Webster, Dolb> 




165 



ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES 




Academic Activities breakfast held annually at Dr 



Hall on Commencement weekend 







Not a Nobel or a Pulitzer prize but a 
recognition of the work and achievement 
of students in Academic Activities are 
the medal awards made at Academic 
Activities Convocation. Students accu- 
mulate credits through their four years 
with an average of two per year from 
each activity in which they participate. 
Besides the silver medal given for eight 
credits, the gold medal given for fifteen 
credits and the diamond chip for twenty- 
five credits, there are given a managers 
prize of fifty dollars for the most efficient 
performance of routine duty and a Con- 
spicuous Service Trophy awarded for the 
most outstanding innovation in the field 
of Academic Activities. 

At last spring's convocation three seniors 
received diamond chips, forty-four other 
students received either gold or silver 
medals. Ed King and George Hamel 
split the fifty dollar managers prize, and 
Al Eldridge received the Conspicuous 
Service Trophy for his organization of 
the intercollegiate band festival. 



16G' 




The "Libe" in a fog . . . Goodell as it appeared during the heavy mist of late December 




SENIORS 




^^kk^^taHdiyf 



M. I. ABRAHAMSON L. G. \BR\MS 




P. J. ADAMS 



D. E. ADELSON 



N. S. ALGER 



R. C. ANDREW 



MELVIN I. ABRAHAMSON 
Chemistry 



137 Wells St., Greenfield. 
Greenfield High School. 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; TE*. 



Born 1920 at New Britain, Conn. 
Men's Glee Club, 3, 4; Menorah 



LOUIS G. ABRAMS 
Chemistry 



113 Thornton St., Revere. Born 1921 at Revere. Revere 
High School. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 
2, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 3, 4. 



PAUL JOSEPH ADAMS 
Chemistry 



23 Harding St., Feeding Hills. Born 1920 at Springfield. 
Agawam High School. Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; Bay State 
Review, 2; Spring Track, 1, 2, 3, 4; Winter Track, 1, 2(M), 
3, 4; "M" Club, 2, 3; AS*. 



DOROTHY ELEANOR ADELSON 
History 



309 Sargeant St., Holyoke. Born 1921 at Springfield. Hol- 
yoke High School. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Current 
Affairs Club, 4; Nature Guide Association, 3; Dance Club, 
4; 21. 



NANCY STROWBRIDGE ALGER 
Home Economics 



5 Court End Ave., Middleboro. Born 1920 at Middleboro. 
Middleboro Memorial High School. Roister Doisters, 1, 2, 
3, 4; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; AVomen's Athletic 
Association, 1, 2, 3, 4; <I>Z. 



RICHARD COLWILL ANDREW 
Industrial Engineering 



18 Plymouth Ave., Florence. Born 1920 at Northampton. 
Northampton High School. Band, 1, 2; Choir, 1, 2, 3; Men's 
Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Advanced Military, 3, 4; Campus 
Varieties, 3; Engineering Club, 1, 2, 3; Rifle Team, 3, 4; 
Soccer, 4(M); ATP (Secretary, 4). 





tik dMf^M 



D. E. A^G^:LL <;. s. \h\old d. e. atwood m. w. atwoou f. p. avklla 



M. R. AVERY 



Ridgeview Terrace, Westfield. Born 1921 at Westfield. 
^Yestfield High School. Deaii"s List, 2, 3; Christian Federa- 
tion Cabinet, 3, -i; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2, 3, 4 (President, 3); 
Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



DOKIS ELVA ANGELL 
Home Economics 



Southwick. Born 1921 at Southwick. Westfield High School. 
Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; Soccer, 1, 2(M), 3(M), 4(M); "M" 
Club, 2, 3, 4; AFP 



GILBERT S. ARNOLD 
Economics 



110 Southwick St., Feeding Hills. Born 1921 at Springfield. 
.\gawam High School. Dean's List, 2, 3; Languages and 
Literature Club, 3, 4. 



DOROTHEA EVE ATWOOD 
English 



44 Florence Ave., Holjoke. Born 1916 at Springfield. 
Mount Hermon School. Class Nominating Committee, 3; 
Dean's List, 3; Maroon Key, 2; Collegian, 1, 2; Advanced 
Military, 3, 4; Carnival Committee, 2: Informal Com- 
mittee," 4; Baseball, 1: Hockey, 1, 2, 3, 4: Tennis, 2, 3; 
Soccer, 1; <J>2K (Treasurer, 4). 



MILFORD W. ATWOOD 
.Agricultural Economics 



26 Flynt Ave., Monson. Born 1920 at Monson. Monson 

High School. Transfer from Springfield Junior College 

Choir, 3; Orchestra, 2, 3, 4: Newman Club, 2, 3, 4; Lan- 
guages and Literature Club, 3, 4; i:BX. 



FRANCES PAULINE AVELLA 
English 



Pocasset. Born 1920 at Pocasset. Bourne High School. 
Class Secretarv, 3; Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; Isogon, 4; W. S. G. 
A., 4; Band, 3; Choir, 3; Phillips Brooks Club, 2; Home 
Economics Club, 3, 4 (Vice-President, 3, President, 4); 
Women's .\thletic Association, 1, 2; SBX. 



MARION RACHEL AVERY 
Home Economics 





^pM 




W. B. AVERY 



D. BALABAN 



E. A. BARNEY M. L. BARROWS E. W. BARTON T. S. BARTON 



WINTHROP B. AVERY 
Economics 



11 Loring St., Shrewsbury. Born 1919 at Worcester. 
Worcester Academy. Class Nominating Committee, 3; 
Advanced Militarj', 3, 4; Military Ball Committee, 3, 4 
(Chairman); Social Union Committee, 4; Swimming, 2(M), 
3(M), 4(M); "M" Club, 2, 3, 4; OX (Treasurer, 4). 



DAN BALABAN 

Horticultural Manufactures 



87 Abbotsford Rd., Brookline. Born 1921 at Jerusalem, 
Palestine. Boston Latin School. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Student Religious Council, 4 (Secretary); Horticultural 
Manufactures Club, 3, 4; Basketball, 2, 3, 4; TE*. 



ELIZ.^BETH ANN BARNEY 
Psvcholoev 



14 Spring Vale Ave., West Roxburj'. Born 1921 at Boston. 
Jamaica Plain High School. Dean's List, 3; Psychology 
Club, 2, 3, 4; Xfi. 



MARJORIE LUCILLE BARROWS 
Economics 



178 Auburn St., Auburn. Born 1919 at Milton, N. H. 
Auburn High School. Outing Club, 1; Wesley Foundation, 
1. 



EVERETT WILBUR BARTON 
Engineering 



1077 Massachusetts Ave., North Adams. Born 1920 at 
North Adams. Drury High School. Interfraternity Coun- 
cil, 3, 4; C. A. A., 2; Outing Club, 1; 4-H Club, 1; Q.T.V. 
(President, 4, Secretary, 3). 



THYRZA STEVENS BARTON 
Recreational Planning 



Middle St., South Amherst. Born 1921 at South Amherst. 
Amherst High School. Transfer from Smith College. Choir, 
3; Women's Glee Club, 3; Outing Club, 3; Nature Guide 
Association, 3, 4; Recreational Planning Club, 3, 4; ^Z. 








C. .1. HtVlKKGAKU 



M. L. Bh;CK 



K. UENEMELIS 




G. N. BENNETT 



B. T. BENTLEY 



3 Sonoma Place, Holyoke. Born 1!)'-21 at Holyoke. Holyoke 
High School. Class Nominating Committee, 1, i; Dean's 
List, 3; Intersororitv Council, 3, i: Choir, 2; Bay State 
Revue, 2; Outing Club, 1; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, i (Vice- 
President, 3); Student Religious Council, 3 (Secretary); 
Mothers" Day Committee, 3, i: Pre-Med. Club, i: 
AVomen's Athletic Association, -2, 3, 4; Xn. 



CONSTANCE JEAN BEAUREGARD 
French 



-tS Ellington St., Dorchester. Born 1920 at Boston. Rox- 
burv Memorial High School. Dean's List, 3; Menorah 
Club, 1, 2, 3, i: Mathematics Club, 1, 2; Psychology Club, 
3,4. 



MORRIS LEO BECK 
Psvcholoarv 



236 Sargeant St., Holyoke. Born 1920 at Pittsfield. Willis- 
ton .\cademy. Holyoke High School. Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Choir, 3; Mathematics Club, 4; Soccer, 1; 2AE. 



LESLIE ROSS BENEMELIS 
Engineeriii" 



39 Bridge St., South Hadley Falls. Born 1921 at Holyoke. 
South Hadley High School. Dean's List, 1, 3; Advanced 
Military, 3, 4: Military Ball Committee, 4; Languages and 
Literature Club, 4; Football, 1; Q.T.V. 



GEORGE NEIL BENNETT 
English 



180 North Elm St., Northampton. Born 1918 at Hartford, 
Conn. Northampton School for Girls. Christian Federa- 
tion Cabinet, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



BARBARA TUCKER BENTLEY 
Geologv 



253 Front St., Weymouth. Born 1921 at Weymouth. 
Weymouth High School. Academic Activities Board, 4; 
Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; Honor Council, 3, 4; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4 
(Manager, 4); Women's Glee Club, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club, 

1, 2, 3, 4: Nature Guide Association, 3: Pre-Med. Club, 3, 4; 
Zoology Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; W^omen's .\thletic Association, 1, 

2, 3, 4 (Archery Manager, 3, 4) ; *Z. 



MARY ELIZABETH BERRY 
Zoology 



M. D. BKRTHIAUME 



N. V. BIANCO 



F. A. BINDER 



C. F. BISHOP 



L. J. BISHOP 



J. B. BLACKBURN 



MARGUERITE DORIS BERTHIAUME 
English 



274 North Pleasant St., Amherst. Born 1920 at Holyoke. 
Springfield Classical High School. Dean's List, 2, 3; 
Choir, 1, 2, 3; Statettes, 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Glee Club, 1, 
2, 3, 4; Bay Stete Revue, 1, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Languages and Literature Club, 3, 4; Women's Athletic 
Association, 3,1 4; XQ. 



NORMAN VINCENT BIANCO 
Pre-Dental 



46 Quincy St., North Adams. Born 1919 at North Adams. 
Drury High School. Transfer from Villanova College. 
Newman Club, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 3, 4. 



FREDERICK ALBERT BINDER 

Chemistry 



17 Water St., Shelburne Falls. Born 1919 at Shelburne. 
Arms Academy. Transfer from Bates College. Band, 3, 4; 
Chemistry Club, 3. 



CHARLES FREDERICK BISHOP 
Chemistrv 



172 Pleasant St., East Walpole. Born 1919 at Kentville, 
Nova Scotia, Canada. Walpole High School. Class Nomi- 
nating Committee, 1, 2; Dean's List, 1; Collegian, 1, 2, 3; 
Advanced Military, 3, 4; <f>SK. 



LESTER JOHN BISHOP 
Economics 



1 Margaret Lane, Huntington, N. Y. Born 1919 at Hunting- 
ton, N. Y. Huntington High School. Burnham Declama- 
tion, 2; Baseball, 3: Basketball, 1; Football, 1, 2; K2. 



JUSTINE BETTE BLACKBURN 
Home Economics 



Meadow St., Lanesboro. Born 1920 at Pittsfield. Pitts- 
field High School. 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3: Home Economics Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4: Women's Athletic Association, 2. 




U. J. BLOOM 



59 Addington Rd., Brookline. Born 1920 at Boston. Dor- 
chester High School. Menorah Ckib, 1, 2, 3, 4; Nature 
Guide Association, -i; Geolog.v Club, 3, i: New England 
Intercollegiate Geological Society, 3, 4: Football, 1. 



HAROLD JAKOB BLOOM 

Geolofiv 



Southfield. Born 1920 at Great Barrington. New Marl- 
borough High School. Deans List, 3; Home Economics 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's .\thletic Association, 2; AAM. 



ROBERTA HELEN BRADLEY 
Home Economics 



237 Federal St., Greenfield. Born 1918 at Somerville. 
Deerfield Academy. Maroon Key, 2; Football, 1, 2(M}, 
3(M), 4(M); "M" Club, 2, 3, 4; eX. 



JOHN EDWARD BRADY 
Physical Education 



12 First St., Chelmsford. Born 1919 at Lowell. Chelmsford 
High School. Dean's List, 3; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Animal 
Husbandry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; ArP. 



JOHN HARPER BROTZ 
Animal Husbandry 



5 North Westfield St., Feeding Hills. Born 1920 at Spring- 
field. Agawam High School. Transfer from Bridgewater 
Teachers College. Carnival Ball Committee, 3; French 
Club, 1, 2; Psychology Club, 2, 3, 4; SBX (Secretary, 4). 



ESTHER M.\THER BROWN 
Psychology 



7 Jones St., Worcester. Born 1921 at Worcester. Worcester 
Classical High School. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Horticul- 
tural Manufactures Club, 3, 4; AEH. 



HARVEY J. BRUNELL 
Horticultural iNIanufactures 









J. G. BUIXOCK 



D. F. BURBANK B. M. BUTEMENT 



A. BlIXBAUM 



.1. B. CARUSI.K D. R. CARTER, JR. 



JAMES GERARD BULLOCK 
Chemistry 



43 Everett St., Arlington. Born 1918 at Cambridge. Arling- 
ton High School. Dean's List, 3; Maroon Key, 2 (Presi- 
dent); Stndent Senate, 3, 4 (Treasurer, 4); Newman Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Informal Committee, 4 (Treasurer); Student 
Leader Day Committee, 4; Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Baseball, l', 2(M), 3(M), 4(M); Football, 1, 2(M), 3(M), 
4(M); Hockey, 1, 2, 3, 4; "M" Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



DAVID FARWELL BURBANK 
English 



119 Webster St., Worcester. Born 1919 at Worcester. 
Worcester South High School. Choir, 4; Men's Glee Club, 1; 
Roister Doisters, 3, 4 (President, 4); Philhps Brooks Club, 4; 
Languages and Literature Club, 4; 9X. 



BARBARA MYRLE BUTEMENT 
Recreational Leadership 



39 Madison Circle, Greenfield. Born 1921 at Springfield. 
Greenfield High School. Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; Choir, 2; 
Women's Glee Club, 1, 3; Outing Club, 1, 3, 4; Wesley 
Foundation, 1, 2, 3, 4; Mothers' Day Committee, 3; 4-H 
Club, 4; Mathematics Club, 1, 2, 3; Nature Guide Asso- 
ciation, 3, 4; Modern Dance Club, 4; Swimming Club, 4; 
AAM (Vice-President, 3, President, 4). 



ALAN BUXBAUM 
Pre-Medical 



8741 150th St., Jamaica, N. Y. Born 1920 at Jamaica, N. Y'. 
Woodmere Academy. Men's Glee Club, 3; Menorah Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Animal' Husliandry Club, 1, 2; Pre-Med. Club, 
3, 4; TE*. 



JEAN BURLEIGH CARLISLE 

Chemistry 



164 Essex St., Saugus. Born 1921 at Salem. Saugus High 
School. Dean's List, 1; Band, 3, 4 (Drum Majorette); 
Phillips Brooks Club, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Psychology Club, 2; Mathematics Club, 2; Women's Athletic 
Association, 2, 3, 4; 2BX. 



DANIEL ROBERT CARTER, JR. 
Economics 



244 Glen Road. Wilmington. Born 1920 at Wilmington. 
Wilmington High Sclidcil. Advanced Mihtary, 3, 4; C. A. A., 
4; Military H.ill ( '..iniiiiltee, 4; Football, 2, 3(M); "M" 
Club, 3, 4; Ki; (Vice-President, 4). 




W. W. CASE 



M. L. CHAPMAN 



F. E. CLARK 



M. L. COBB 



P. A. COCHRAN 



E. M. COFFIN 



26 Manitoba St., Springfield. Born 1921 at Springfield. 
Springfield Technical High School. Transfer from Uni- 
versity of Maine. Dean's List, 1, '2; GX. 



WILLIAM WALDO CASE 
Geology 



28 ^Yestern \ve., Westfield. Born 1920 at Springfield. 
Westfield High School. Transfer from Westfield State 
Teachers College. Newman Club, 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic 
.Association, 2, 3, 4 (Tennis Manager, 4); Xfi. 



MARIE LOUISE CHAPMAN 
Home Economics 



235 Ashley St., West Springfield. Born 1920 at Springfield. 
West Springfield High School. Dean's List, 2, 3; Outing 
Club, 3, 4: 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Treasurer, 4); Home Eco- 
nomics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; AAM (Treasurer, 4). 



FRANCES EMMA CLARK 
Home Economics 



332 Grove St., Chicopee Falls. Born 1920 at Springfield. 
Chicopee High School. Transfer from Springfield .Junior 
College. Dean's List, 3; W. S. G. A., 4; 4-H Club, 4; Home 
Economics Club, 4; <J>Z. 



MARY LOUISE COBB 
Home Economics 



269 Summer St., Somerville. Born 1920 at Maiden. Mount 
Hermon School. Dean's List, 1; Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Bay 
State Revue, 2; Dairy Products Judging Team, 4; Dairv 
Club, 3, 4; 2*E (Secretary, 4). 



PHILIP ARTHUR COCHRAN 
Dairy Industry 



4 Jefferson St., Newburyport. Born 1920 at Haverhill. 
Newburyport High School Dean's List, 1, 2; Collegian, 1; 
Outing Club, 1; Chemistry Club, 1. 



ELIZABETH MARIE COFFIN 
Physics 



Chappy 



^ 








J. S. COHEN 



A. COLLIEK .1. F. CO.NLEY, JR. 



M. H. COOK 



F. T. COUGHLIN V. A. COUTURE 



JASON SUMNER COHEN 
History 



59 Auburn St., Brookline. Born lOS'S at Boston. Boston 
Publir l,atiu School. Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; Roister Doisters, 
.S; Mcn.irali Cluh, 1, 2, 3, 4; Current Affairs Club, 3, 4; 
Town Hall Club, 3, 4; AEH (Treasurer, 3, 4). 



ALAN COLLIER 
Horticultural Manufactures 



6 Glenville Ave., Allston. Born 1918 at Boston. Lincoln 
Preparatory School. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry 
Club, 2, 3, 4; Horticultural Manufactures Club, 3, 4. 



.JOHN FRANCIS CONLEY, .JR. 
Economics 



126 Belmont St., Brockton. Born 1921 at Brockton. Brock- 
ton High School. Advanced Military, 3, 4; Bay State Review, 
2; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (President, 3); Student Religious 
Council, 3; Dads' Day Committee, 4; 2<J>E. 



MARION HELEN COOK 
Bacterioloev 



1 Underwood St., Worcester. Born 1920 at Worcester. 
Worcester Classical High School. Dean's List, 3; Outing 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: Weslev Foundation, 1, 2, 3, 4: Chemistry 
Club, 4; Mathematics Club, 1, 2: Pre-Med. Club, 2, 3, 4; 
AAM (Secretary, 4). 



FRANCIS TIMOTHY COUGHLIN 
Cheniistrv 



26 Adams St., Taunton. Born 1918 at Taunton. Coyle 
Memorial High School. Debating, 3, 4 (Co-Chairman, 3); 
Student Leader Day Committee, 3, 4 (Co-Chairman, 4); 
Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Vice-President, 3); Mathematics 
Club, 1, 2; Radio Club, 3. 



VIRGINIA AGNES COUTURE 
Zoology 



Becket. Born 1922 at Schenectady, N. Y. Pittsfield High 
School. Freshman Handbook Board, 1; Newman Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Zoology Club, 2, 3, 4. 




W. A. COWVN 



B. A. <:itA'VIh;R 



R. W. CRESSY 



M. CULVER 



R. K. DAKIN 



29 McKinley Terrace, Pittsfield. Born 19-20 at Pittsfield. 
Pittsfield High School. Deans List, 3; Judging Teams, 3, 4; 
Outing Club, 1, i, 3; Animal Husbandry Club, 1, 2, 3. i 
(President, 4); 4-H Club, 1, 2; Spring Track. 1, 2(M). 



WILLIAM ALLEN COWAN 
Animal Husbandry 



192 Summer St., Bridgewater. Born 1920 at Brockton. 
Bridgewater High School. Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; Collegian, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Current .\ffairs Club, i: Psychology Club, 2, 4; 
Town Hall Club, 4: OX. 



RICHARD PHILIP COX 
History 



155 Northampton Road, Amherst. Born 1920 at Amherst. 
Amherst High School. Transfer from Mount Holyoke Col- 
lege. Dean's List, 2, 3; Outing Club, 1; Newman Club, 1, 

2, 3, 4; Current Affairs Club, 1; Psychology Club, 3, 4 
(Secretary-Treasurer, 4); Women's Athletic Association, 1, 2, 

3, 4 (Swimming Team, 3, 4); *Z. 



BARBARA ANN CRAMER 
Psychology 



40 Stone St., Beyerly. Born 1919 at Beyerly. Beverly High 
School. Advanced Military, 3, 4; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Current Affairs Club, 3, 4;' Town Hall Club, 3, 4; Soccer, 1; 
*2K. 



RICHARD WILLIAM CRESSY 
History 



18 Park St., Easthampton. Born 1920 at Easthampton. 
Northfield Seminary. Dean's List, 3; <I>Z. 



MILDRED CULVER 
Psychology 



169 Park Aye., Dalton. Born 1920 at Pittsfield. Dalton 
High School. Dean's List, 3; Choir, 4; Roister Doisters, 
3, 4 (Electrician, 3, 4); Outing Club, 4; Christian Federa- 
tion Cabinet, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary- 
Treasurer, 3, 4); Mathematics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Radio Club, 
3; Camera Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 2AE (Treasurer, 4). 



RALPH KEN YON DAKIN 
Physics 



*t 



W 



f . al/l 





ijJiA 




W. H. DAKRO"W', JR. J. A. DAVIS K. B. DiCIHARA M. J. DOiNAHUE E. J. DOUBLEDAY L. E. DOUBLEDAY 



WILLIAM HINDS DARROW , JR. 
Pomology 



Putney, Vt. Born 1920 at .Jamaica Plains. Putney School. 
Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival Committee, 4; KS. 



JEAN ANWVL DAVIS 

Liberal Arts 



62 Lark Lane, Waltham. Born 1919 at Waltliam. Waltham 
High School. Academic Activities Board, 3; Class Nominat- 
ing Committee, 1; Dean's List, 1, 2; Intersorority Council, 
3; Isogon, 4; Women's Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Manager, 3); 
Dads' Day Committee, 2, 3, 4 (Co-Chairman, 2, Chairman, 3, 
4); Social Union Committee, 4; Sophomore-Senior Hop 
Committee, 2; AVomen's .'Vthletic Association, 1, 2, 3; 
■1>Z (President, 4). 



ROSALIE BLAISE DiCHIARA 
Bacteriology 



88 Columbus Ave., Holyoke. Born 1921 at Thompsonville, 
Conn. Holyoke High School. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Modern Dance Club, 4; French Club, 1, 2. 



MARY JOAN DONAHUE 
English 



7 Coffin's Court, Newport. Born 1921 at Newport. New- 
port High School. Class Nominating Committee, 3; Dean's 
List, 1, 2, 3; Isogon, 4 (President, 4); Phi Kappa Phi, 4; 
Collegian, 1, 3; Collegian Quarterly, 2, 3, 4 (Editor-in-Chief, 
4); Freshman Handbook Board, 1, 2 (Co-Editor, 2); Index, 
2, 3, 4; Languages and Literature Club, 3, 4; Outing Club, 1. 



ELWYN JOHN DOUBLEDAY 
Cheniistrv 



■West Pelham. Born 1920 at Prescott. Belc-hertown High 
School. -Advanced Military, 3, 4; Soccer, 1. 



LOIS E. DOUBLEDAY 
English 



West Pelham. Born 1920 at Prescott. .\ndierst High 
School. Inde.v, 2, 3, 4 (Editor-in-Chief, 4); Dean's List, 3; 
Languages and Literature Club, 3, 4. 




p. L. DRINKWATER K. If. DIKF^ E. V. DUNBVK, JH 



I'. F. 1)1 III.WI) 



.1. DWYER W. J. DWXER, JR. 



443 West Britannia St., Taunton. Born lOiO at Dighton. 
Taunton Higli School. Choir, 1, i: Pre-Med. Chib, 3, 4; 
Swimming Club, 4; Women's Athletic Association, -Z, 3, 4: 
XQ. 



PHYLLIS LOUISE DKINKWATEK 
Bacteriology 



619 Broadway St., Chicopee Falls. Born 1921 at Spring- 
field. Cathedral High School. Class Nominating Com- 
mittee, 4; Bay-Statettes, 3; AVomen's Glee Club, 2; New- 
man Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Vice-President, 4); Student Religious 
Council, 3, 4 (President, 4) ; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Women's Athletic Association, 3. 



KATIIRYN KITA DUFFY 
Home Economics 



Kendall St., Barre. Born 1919 at Barre. Sanborn Seminary, 
Kingston, N. H. Collegian, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2, 3, 
4; Zoology Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; *ZK. 



EKNEST ALBERT DUNBAK, .|K. 
Zoology 



IS Thomas Rd., Swampscott. Born 1920 at Lynn. Swamp- 
scott High School. Christian Federation Cabinet, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 2BX. 



PRISCILLA FLORENCE DURLANO 
Home Economics 



96 Loring Rd., Winthrop. Born 1919 at Winthrop. Win- 
throp High School. Senate, 4; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 
(President, 4): Student Religious Council, 4; Carnival Ball 
Committee, 3, 4 (Chairman, 4); Carnival Committee, 4; 
Informal Committee, 3, 4; Ring Committee, 2, 3, 4; Sopho- 
more-Senior Hop Committee, 2 (Co-Chairman); Horticul- 
tural Manufactures Club, 3, 4: Football, 1, 2(M), 3(M) 
4(M); "M" Club, 2, 3, 4; *2K (Vice-President, 4). 



PAIL .JOSEPH DWYER 

Horticultiiial Manufaclures 



66 Nonotuck St., Holyoke. Born 1920 at Holyoke. Holyoke 
High School, .\delphia, 4 (President); Class President, 2, 
3,4; Dean's List, 3; Honor Council, 2, 3; Collegian, 1, 2, 3, 4 
(Managing Editor, 3, Editor-in-Chief, 4); Newman Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival Committee, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2; 
Psychology Club, 3, 4 (President, 4) ; *2K. 



WILLIAM .JOHN DWYER, Mi. 
Psychology, Physiology 



T. W. EDMINSTER A. C. ELDRIDGE C. L. ERICKSON A. V. ERIKSON 



M. M. EYRE 



F. A. FILIO.S 



TALCOTT WHITE EDMINSTER 
Agricultural Engineering 



Howland Rd., East Freetown. Born 1920 at East Freetown. 
New Bedford High School. Interfraternity Council, 4; 
Band, 1, 3, 3, 4 (Assistant Manager, 3); Outing Club, 2, 3, 4 
(Treasurer, 3); Mothers' Day Committee, 3, 4; Animal 
Husbandry Club, 1, 2; Engineering Club, 2, 3, 4; AFP 
(President, 4) . ' 



ALBERT COOLIDGE ELDRIDGE 
Polilical Science 



47 Highland Rd., Somerville. Born 1920 at Somerville. 
Somerville High School. Academic Activities Board, 3; 
Adelphia, 4: Class Treasurer, 3; Class Nominating Committee, 
2, 3: Senate, 4: Band, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Manager, 3, Student Leader, 
4); Carnival Ball Committee, 3; Sophomore-Senior Hop Com- 
mittee, 2; Football, 2; Spring Track, 1; 9X (President, 4). 



CARL LAMBERT ERICKSON 
Animal Husbandry 



68 Steere St., Attleboro. Born 1918 at Attleboro. Bristol 
County Agricultural School. Judging Team, 4; Animal 
Husbandry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Dairy Club, 3, 4; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 

3, 4; Soccer, 1, 2(M), 3(M), 4(M) (Captain, 4): "M" Club, 
2, 3, 4; <J>2K (Secretary, 4). 



AXEL VINCENT ERIKSON 
Floriculture 



94 Mas.sasoit St., Northampton. Born 1918 at Northampton. 
Williston Academy. Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; Advanced Mili- 
tary, 3, 4; Horticultural Show Committee, 3, 4 (E.xecutive 
Chairman, 4); Military Ball Committee, 4; Floriculture Club, 
3, 4; ex. 



MILDRED MAUY EYRE 
Home Economics 



111 Riverside Drive, Northampton. Born 1921 at Northamp- 
ton. Northampton High School. Dean's List, 2, 3; New- 
man Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; SBX. 



FRED ARTHUR FILIOS 
Agronomy 



Bates Rd., Woronoco. Born 1918 at Westfield. Westfield 
High School. Bay State Revue, 2; C. A. A., 2; Newman 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Spring Track, 1, 3; 
Soccer, 2, 3, 4; Winter Track, 1, 3; 2*E (Treasurer, 3, 4). 




M. FITZGERALD J. K. FITZGKKAl.D F. C. FOSGATE 



W. E. FRANZ 



School St., Upton. Born 1920 at Upton. Upton High 
School. Choir, 2, 3; C. A. A., 3; Outing Club, 1; Wesley 
Foundation, 1, 2 (Secretary, 2); Xfi. 



WILMA FISKE 
Bacteriology 



Surtelle St., Pepperell. Born 1919 at Pepperell. Pepperell 
High School. Women's Glee Club, 2, 3, 4; Zoology Club, 
2, 3, 4 (Secretary-Treasurer, 4); Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Bowling Manager, 4) ; <I>Z. 



IDA MARY FITZGERALD 

Zoology 



44 Lexington Ave., Springfield. Born 1918 at Springfield. 
Springfield Technical High School. Transfer from Bowling 
Green State University. 



JOHN ED'WARD FITZGERALD 
Cheniistrv 



152 Central St., Hudson. Born 1920 at Hudson. Hudson 
High School, .\dvanced Military, 3, 4; Current Affairs 
Club, 3, 4; Swimming, 1, 2: OX. " 



FRED COURTNEY FOSGATE 
Economics 



556 Cottage St., Xew Bedford. Born 1920 at Xew Bedford. 
New Bedford High School. Choir, 1; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Zl. 



EDITH FOX 
Bacteriology 



R. F. D. No. 3, Waterbury, Conn. Born 1920 at Bulach, 
Germany. Crosby High School. Horticultural Show Com- 
mittee, 4: Landscape Architecture Club, 2, 3, 4: AS*. 



WILLIAM EMIL FRANZ 
Landscape Architecture 



E. K. FREITAS 



M. M. FRODYMA 



M. R. GALE 



M. L. GALLAGHER 



G. A. GARBOWIT 



J. J. GARDNER 



EDMUND FREEMAN FREITAS 
Animal Husbandrv' 



121 Laurel St., Fairhaven. Born 1918 at Fairhaven. Hart- 
ford High School, Vt. Senate, 3, 4; Class Sergeant-at-Arms, 
2, 3, 4; Campus Varieties, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 
Informal Committee, 3, 4; Animal Husbandrv Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 
Baseball, 1, 3(M), 4(M); Football, 1, 2(M), 3(M), 4(M) 
Spring Track, 1, 2(M), 3(M), 4(M); Winter Track, 1, 2(M) 
3(M), 4(M); "M" Club, 2, 3, 4; <J>2K. 



MICHAEL MITCHELL FRODYMA 
Cheniistrv 



88 High St., Holvoke. Born 1920 at Holyoke. Holyoke 
High School. Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 2(M), 
3(M), 4(M); "M" Club, 2, 3, 4; S*E. 



MARGARET ROBERTS GALE 
Psychology 



3 Summer St., Northboro. Born 1921 at Northboro. North- 
boro High School. Class Nominating Committee, 3; Dean's 
List, 3; Bay State Revue, 2; Psychology Club, 3; Women's 
Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3; 2BX. 



MARION LUELLA GALLAGHER 
Home Economics 



1G5 Walnut Ave., Norwood. Born 1920 at Boston. Nor- 
wood High School. Dean's List, 2, 3; Bay State Revue, 2; 
4-H Club, 1; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Danforth 
Fellowship, 3; AAM. 



GEORGE ALBERT GARBOWIT 
Agricultural Economics 



39 Prospect St., Pittsfield. Born 1919 at PittsSeld. Pitts- 
field High School. Dean's List, 3; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
TE*. 



JOHN .JOSEPH GARDNER 
Agricultural Economics 



460 Hallock St., Pittsburgh, Pa. Born 1920 at Delta, Col. 
St. Mary of the Mount High School. Outing Club, 2; New- 
man Cliib, 1, 2, 3, 4; Football, 3; KS. 




E. K. GASSETT G. W. GAUMOND A. I. GEWIRTZ C. GILCHKEST J. W. GILMAN T. A. GIRARD 



56 Ellis ave.. Whitman. Born 1920 at Whitman. Whitman 
High School. Class Nominating Committee, 2; Outing Club, 
1, 2, 3; Phillips Brooks Club, 1, 2; Ring Committee, 3, 4; 
Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion, 1, 2, 3, 4; *Z (Vice-President, 4). 



ETHKL KENFIELD GASSETT 
Home Economics 



70 West Boylston St., Worcester. Born 1919 at Worcester. 
Worcester North High School. Class Nominating Committee, 
4; Dean's List, 3: Advanced Military, 3, 4; Newman Club, 
2, 3, 4; Military Ball Committee, 4; Social Union Com- 
mittee, 4; Hockev, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Captain, 3); Cheer Leader, 
2, 3, 4; *2K. 



GEORGE WOODROW GAUMOND 
Agricultural Economics 



136 Woodward St., Newton Highlands. Born 1921 at Boston. 
DeWitt Clinton High School. Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing 
Club, 1, 2; Pre-Med. Club, 2, 3; Psychology Club, 1, 2. 



ALAN 1. GEWrRTZ 
Zoology 



Arbor St., Lunenburg. Born 1920 at Lunenburg. Lunen- 
burg High School. Dean's List, 3; Women's Glee Club, 1, 
3, 4; Weslev Foundation, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club, 1, 
2, 3, 4. 



CHARLOTTE GILCHREST 
Home Economics 



HoUis St., East Pepperell. Born 1920 at Pepperell. Pep- 
perell High School. Dean's List, 2, 3; Advanced Military, 
3,4; 4-H Club, 2, 3, 4; Football, 2, 4(M); AS*. 



.JAMES WILBUR GILIVIAN 
Chemislrv 



14 Main St., Housatonic. Born 1921 at Fall River. Searles 
High School. Dean's List, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; AS*. 



THEODORE ALSDORF GIRARD 
Chemislrv 



Hank Crowbar 






.^Uw' A II ' ^^c^J. 




S. M. CLICK 



P. GOLAN G. H. GOLDMAN 



J. GOLDMAN 



r. 1'. GOKDO-N, JR. J. C. GRAHAM 



SAUL MONROE CLICK 
Dairy Industry 



77 Walnut Park, Roxbury. Born 1921 at Roxbury. Boston 
Public Latin School. Judging Teams, 4; Menorah Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Dairy Club, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary, 3, 4); Baseball, 1, 2, 
3, 4(M) ; Football, 1, 2, 3, 4(M) (Manager, 4) ; Joint Committee 
on Inter-Collegiate .\thletics, 4; "M" Club, 4: TE* (V'ice- 
President, 3, 4).^ 



HAROLD PHILIP COLAN 
Zoology 



45 Templeton St., Dorchester. Born 1920 at Boston. Boston 
Latin School. Deans List, 1, 2, 3: Collegian, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Mathematics Club, 1; Zoology 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball, 1, 2, 3(M) (Manager, 3); Hockey, 
1; Joint Committee on Inter-Collegiate Athletics, 3; "M" 
Club, 4; AEn (Secretary, 4). 



CERTRUDE HELEN COLDMAN 
French 



129 Franklin Ave., Chelsea. Born 1921 at Chelsea. Chelsea 
High School. Dean's List, 2, 3; Choir, 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's 
Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; French Club, 
2, 3, 4 (Secretary, 2, 3); Languages and Literature Club, 3, 4; 
Women's Athletic Association, 2, 3, 4; Si. 



JOSEPH GOLDMAN 
Pre-Medical 



40 Boylston St., Maiden. Born 1918 at Maiden. Maiden 
High School. Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4 (String Ensemble, 3, 4); 
Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; TE*. 



THOMAS PARKE CORDON, JR. 

Horticultural Manufactures 



55 New South St., Northampton. Born 1918 at Northamp- 
ton. Wilbraham Academy. Horticultural Show Committee, 
4; Horticultural Manufactures Club, 3, 4: Baseball, 1; 
Basketball, 1, 3; Football, 1; eX. 



JAMES CLIFFORD GRAHAM 
History 



Wareham St., Middleboro. Born 1920 at Hardwoodland, 
Nova Scotia. Middleboro Memorial High School. Dean's 
List, 3; Collegian Quarterly, 3; Debating, 4: Mothers' 
Day Committee, 2, 3, 4; Current Affairs Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 4-H 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Town Hall Club, 3, 4 (President, 4); Baseball, 
2; Basketball, 2: Hockev, 1; Tennis, 3(M), 4(M) (Captain, 4); 
Winter Track, 3, 4; "M"" Club, 3, 4; KZ (Secretary, 3, 4). 





U. \. t;R\Y!iON 



B. M. GREENE 



91 Cottage St., Amherst. Born 1921 at Belchertown. 
Amherst High School. Dean's List, 3; Roister Doisters, 
3, 4: Psychology Club, 3, 4: Spanish Club, 3; Women's 
Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3, 4: XO. 



DOKOTHY ANN GRAYSON 
Psychology 



108 Dartmouth St., Springfield. Born 1920 at Springfield. 
Transfer from Springfield Junior College. Deans List, 2, 3; 
Phi Kappa Phi, 4: Inde.\,2,3, 4 (Art Editor, 4) ; Horticultural 
Show Committee, 4 (Chairman of Construction) ; Landscape 
Arrhitccture Club, 3, 4 (President, 4) ; Cross Country, 3(M), 
4(Mii Spring Track, 2, 3, 4(M); Winter Track, 2(M), 3(M), 
4uMJ; "M " Club, 2, 3, 4; AXA. 



BRADFORD MARSON GREENE 
Landscape Architecture 



117 Church St., W^are. Born 1920 at Fitchburg. Ware High 
School. Roister Doisters, 1, 2, 3, 4; Advanced Military, 
3, 4: Cross Country, 1, 2, 3, 4(M) ; Winter Track, 2 (Manager, 
4); "M" Club, 4; KS. 



ERIC LEROY GREENFIELD 
Agricultural Engineering 



62 Ledgelawn Ave., Bar Harbor, Me. Born 1920 at Bar 
Harbor, Me. Bar Harbor High School. Class Captain, 1; 
Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4 (Vice-President, 4) ; Football, 
1, 2, 3; *i;K. 



BEN.IAMIN L. HADLEY, JR. 
Entomology 



South Ashfield. Born 1919 at South Ashfield. Sanderson 
Academy. Dean's List, 3; Choir, 3; Outing Club, 1; 
Mothers" Day Committee, 3: Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 
3, 4: 4-H Club, 4. 



PAULINE JANE HALE 
Home Economics 



223 June St., Worcester. Born 1920 at Worcester. Worces- 
ter Classical High School. Class Vice-President, 3; W. S. 
G. A., 2, 4 (President, 4); Outing Club, 3; Phillips Brooks 
Club, 2; Nature Guide Association, 3, 4 (Secretary, 3); 
Women's Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Vice-President, 2, 
President, 3, Dance Manager, 4); 'I'Z. 



MARTHA BAIRD HALL 
Recreational Planning 





2t^: 




N. L. HANDFORTH 



H. M. HARLEY 



R. A. HATCH, JR. 



R. V. HEBERT 



N. L. HEDLUND 



L. IIEERMANCE 



NORMA LOUISE HANDFOKTH 
Home Economics 



406 Main St., West Medway. Born 1919 at Somerville. 
Medway High School. Class Nominating Committee, 2; 
Intersorority Council, 3, 4; W. S. G. A., 4; Choir, 1, 2; 
Women's Glee Club, 1; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival 
Ball Committee, 2, 3 (Secretary, 3); Home Economics Club, 
3, 4 ; Women's Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Tennis Manager, 
3); SBX. 



HELEN MARIE HARLEY 
Dietetics 



Massachusetts Ave., Lunenburg. Born 1920 at Lunenburg. 
Lunenbiu-g High School. Dean's List, 3; Home Economics 
Club, 1, 3, 4. 



RALPH AUGUSTUS HATCH, JR. 
Animal Husbandry 



51 Centre St., Brookline. Born 1921 at Brookline. Gould 
Academy. Advanced Military, 3, 4; Judging Teams, 3; 
Animal Husbandry Club, 3, 4r'l>2K. 



RENE VICTOR HEBEKT 
Pre-Meclical 



57 Franklin St., Holyoke. Born 1918 at Holyoke. W^il- 
braham Academy. Dean's List, 1, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 
4; Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Swimming, 2; Z*E. 



NORMA LINNEA HEDLUND 
Home Economics 



2 Hedlund Ave., Braintree. Born 1919 at Braintree. Trans- 
fer from Simmons College. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
W'omen's Athletic Association, 2, 3, 4; SBX (Vice-President, 

3,4). 



LOUISE HEERMANCE 
Landscape Architecture 



241 Lawrence St., New Haven, Conn. Born 1921 at New 
Haven, Conn. New Haven High School. Women's Glee 
Club, 2, 3; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Horticultural Show Com- 
mittee, 4; 4-H Club, 2, 3; Landscape x\rchitecture Club, 
2, 3,4. 





^^J. 




R. M. IIELYAK B. J. HERSIIBERG R. E. IllllltARD R. N. HOBSON J. D. MORGAN G. N. HOKST 



201 Western Ave., Brattleboro, Vt. Born 1919 at New 
Brunswick, N. J. Brattleboro High School. Class Nominat- 
ing Committee, 2; Dean's List, 3: Intersorority Council, 3, 4 
(President, 4); Isogon, 4 (Vice-President); Nature Guide 
Association, 3, 4; Recreational Planning Club, 3, 4; Women's 
Athletic Association, 2, 3, 4 (Riding Captain, 4) ; ^Z. 



RUTH MILLEK HELYAK 
Kecrealional Planning 



42 Bradshaw St., Medford. Born 191.S at Lynn. Gardner 
High School. Dean's List, 3; Freshman lIaii(ll«)ok Board, 2 
Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Fernald Entomologv Club, 2, 3, 4 
Pre-Med. Club, 2, 3: Psychology Club, 2; Zoology Club, 2, 3 
Tennis, 3; Soccer, 2; Winter Track, 2; TE*. 



BERNARD JOSEPH HERSHBERG 
Entomology 



North Hadley. Born 1920 at Northampton. Hopkins 
Academy. Dean's List, 3; Judging Teams, 3, 4; Animal 
Husbandry Club, 2, 3, 4; Soccer, 1, 3, 4. 



RUSSELL ELMER HIBBARD 
Animal Husbandry 



9 Main St., Florence. Born 1921 at Northampton. North- 
ampton High School. Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; C. A. A., 4; 
Engineering Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



ROBERT NOBLE HOBSON 
Engineering 



28 Havnit Ave., Belmont. Born 1918 at Belmont. Transfer 
from Cambridge School of Liberal Arts. Interfraternity 
Council, 2, 3, 4 (Treasurer, 3); Campus Varieties, 2; Newman 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary, 4) ; Zoology 
Club, 4; Soccer, 1; AS*. 



JOHN DANIEL HORGAN 
Pre-Medical 



97 Meadow St., North Amherst. Born 1902 at Gnarp, 
Sweden. Transfer from Fitchburg State Teachers College. 
Dean's List, 2, 3; Home Economics Club, 3, 4. 



GERDA NORELL HORST 
Home Economics 




1 ^ 




J. M. HURLEY 



B. R. HYMA.N 



J. F. T. JODK V E. B. JOHNSON 



W. V. JOYCE 



JAMES MICH.4EL HURLEY 

Cheniistrv 



19 Aldrich St., Northampton. Born 1921 at Northampton. 
St. Michael's High School. Dean's List, 1, 3: C. A. A., 3; 
Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: Mathe- 
matics Club, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 3, 4; Basketball, 1, 2(M), 
3(M), 4: "M" Club, 2, 3; S*E. 



BERTRAM ROY HYMAN 
English 



112 Talbot Ave., Dorchester. Born 1920 at Roxbury. 
Dorchester High -School for Boys. Dean's List, 3; Col- 
legian, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Sports Editor, 2, 3, Associate Editor, 3); 
Collegian Quarterly, 2, 3; Freshman Handbook Board, 2; 
Radio Studio Staff, 4: Menorah Club, 1, 2; Sophomore- 
Senior Hop Committee, 3; Fernald Entomology Club, 2; 
Languages and Literature Club, 3, 4; Psychology'CIub, 2, 3; 
Zoology Club, 1, 2; Basketball, 2; Cross Country, 2; Tennis, 
2; Winter Track, 2; "M" Club Founder, 2. 



JOSEPH FRANCIS THOMAS JODKA 
Entomology 



104 Park St., La^vrence. Born 1918 at Lawrence. Marian- 
apolis School. Dean's List, 2, 3; Newman Club, 3; 
Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4: Swimming, 2(M), 3(M), 
4(M) (Captain, 4); "M" Club, 2, 3, 4: KS. 



ELEANOR BUSS JOHNSON 
Home Economics 



Hockanum Rd., South Hadley. Born 1920 at Northampton. 
Hopkins Academy. Dean's List, 3; Home Economics Club, 
2, 3, 4. 



WILLIAM ALAN JOYCE 
Geology and Minerology 



291 Locust St., Florence. Born 1920 at Northampton. 
Northampton High School. Dean's List, 3; C. A. A., 3; 
Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: Flying Club, 3, 4 (President, 3, 4); 
Spring Track, 1,2, 3(M): Winter Track, 1, 2, 3(M); i;*E. 



MARY ELIZABETH JUDGE 
Psychology 



47 Paine St., Worcester. Born 1920 at Worcester. Worcester 
North High School. Choir, 3; Women's Glee Club, 3; Bay 
State Revue, 3, 4; Campus Varieties, 1: Newman Club, 1, 2, 
3, 4; Dads' Day Committee, 2, 3, 4; Psychology Club, 3, 4; 
Women's Athletic .Association, 3, 4; SBX. 




L J 




M. KAGAIV 



M. B. KEIXEHER 



A. E. KENNEDY 



G. KETCHEN 



G. E. KIMBALL 



133 Grove St., Chelsea. Born 1922 at Maiden. Chelsea 
High School. Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; Debating, 1; Outing Club, 
1: Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 1, 2; Pre-Med. 
Club, 1, 2, 3, i: Zoology Club, 3, 4. 



ABRAHAiM KAGAN 

Zoolo"v 



91 Fuller St., Brookline. Born 1919 at Maiden. Boston 
Latin School. 



IMILTOiN KAGAN 
Economics 



Sandwich. Born 1921 at Hyannis. Henrj' T. Wing High 
School. Dean's List, 1, 2; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Flute En- 
semble, 2); Women's Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Roister Doisters, 
3, 4; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary-Treasurer, 4); Mathe- 
matics Club, 3: Women's Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3, 4 
(Basketball Manager, 4) ; Women's Rifle Team, 1 ; iZ. 



MAKIE BARBARA KELLEHER 
Chemistry 



30 St. Jerome Ave. 
voke High School. 
3(M); Q.T.V. 



Holyoke. Born 1917 at Holyoke. Hoi- 
Advanced Military, 3, 4; Football, 1, 2, 



ANDREW EMMETT KENNEDY 

General Engineering 



Jabish St., Belchertown. Born 1919 at Belchertown. Bel- 
chertown High School. Academic Activities Board, 4; 
Index, 2, 3, 4 (Business Manager, 4); Christian Federation 
Cabinet, 3, 4; Current Affairs Club, 2, 3, 4. 



GOULD KETCHEN 
Economics 



99 East Pleasant St., Amherst. Born 1919 at Marblehead. 
Wakefield High School. Interfraternity Council, 3, 4 (Presi- 
dent, 4); Advanced Military, 3, 4; Campus Varieties, 2, 3; 
Interfraternity Ball Committee, 4; Baseball, 2, 3; Football, 
1, 2, 3(M), 4'(M): Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Spring Track, 1; "M" 
Club, 3, 4; AXA. 



GEORGE EDWARD KIMBALL 
Economics 




('. W. KIMBALL, JR. 



n. K. KIRSHEN 



R. J. KIRVIN 



H. KOOBATIAN M. A. KOZAK 



WILLIAAI WAKREN KIMBALL, JR. 

Forestry 



99 East Pleasant St., Amherst. Born 1918 at Lynn. Wake- 
field High School. Interfraternity Council, 3, 4; Advanced 
Military, 3, 4; Interfraternity Ball Committee, 3, 4; Cross 
Country, 1, 2(M), 3(M), 4(M); Spring Track, 1, 2(jVI), 3(M), 
4(M); "Winter Track, 2(M), 3(M), 4(M); "M" Club, 2, 3, 4; 
*2K. 



ELENOR KING 
Home Economics 



19 Great Rd., Maynard. Born 1921 at Winchester. May- 
nard High School. Orchestra, 2, 3, 4; Phillips Brooks Club, 
2, 3, 4; Mothers' Day Committee, 3; Home Economics Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; 2BX. 



HOWARD ROBERT KIRSHEN 
Chemistry 



49 Almont St., Mattapan. Born 1921 at Boston. Dor- 
chester High School. Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; Debating, 1; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4; Tennis, 
3(M); Winter Track, 2; "M" Club, 3; AEH. 



ROBERT .JOSEPH KIRVIN 

Economics 



145 Bradford St., Pittsfield. Born 1921 at Pittsfield. Pitts- 
field High School. Interfraternity Council, 2, 3, 4: Bay 
State Revue, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 1; 
Current Affairs Clul), 2: Pre-Med. Club, 1; 2*E. 



HAIG KOOB.4TIAN 

Pomology 



28 Hermitage Lane, Worcester. Born 1920 at Worcester- 
Worcester North High School. Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; Men's 
Glee Club, 1; Judging Teams, 3, 4; Horticultural Show Com- 
mittee, 3; ArP. 



MARY ANNE KOZAK 
Home Economics 



1 Oakdale Place, Easthampton. Born 1920 at Easthampton. 
Easthampton High School. Dean's List, 3; Women's Glee 
Club, 3; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; AAM. 




r yjg||£. 



M. KKASN'OSELSKV 



n. R. LACEY 



V. A. LAFLEUR .1. P. LALIBERTE G. P. LANGTON, JR. R. K. LANSON 



Ashfield. Born VJiO at Ashfiekl. Sanderson Academy. 
Outing Club, 1; Languages and Literature Club, 3, 4; Spanish 
Club, 3; Women's Athletic Association, 3, i. 



EVA MAE KRASNOSELSKY 
Languages and Literature 



83 Milk St., Fitchburg. Born 1919 at Fitchburg. Transfer 
from Gettysburg College. Campus Varieties, 3; Wesley 
Foundation, i; Chemistry Club, 4: Horticultural Manu- 
factures Club, 4: Tennis, 3(M), 4(M) (Co-Captain, 4); 
"M" Club, 3, 4; AXA. 



HOWARD RAYMOND LACEY 
Cheniistrv 



'26 Williams St., Marlboro. Born 1919 at Marlboro. Marl- 
boro High School. Class Nominating Committee, 3, 4; 
Dean's List, 2, 3; Advanced Military, 3, 4; Newman Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4; Hockey, 1; Q.T.V. 
(Vice-President, 4). 



VINCENT ARTHUR LAFLEUR 
Entomology 



27 Lexington Ave., Holyoke. Born 1920 at Holyoke. Wil- 
liston Academy. Advanced Military, 3, 4; Newman Club, 1; 
Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: French Club, 4; Mathematics 
Club, 3; 2AE. 



JOHN PAUL LALIBERTE 
Chemistry 



25 Fuller Rd., Lexington. Born 1919 at Milton. Arlington 
High School. Dean's List, 3; Roister Doisters, 3, 4; 
Advanced Military, 3, 4; Campus Varieties, 3, 4; Languages 
and Literature Club, 3, 4; Soccer, 1; AXA (President, 3, 4). 



GEORfiE PAUL LANGTON, JR. 
English 



681 Burncoat St., Worcester. Born 1917 at Worcester. 
Worcester North High School. Dean's List, 2, 3; Judging 
Teams, 2, 3; Outing Club, 1; Danforth Fellowship, 3; Animal 
Husbandry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: 4-H Club, 1, 2; Poultry Club, 
2, 3, 4; .\'rP. 



RAINO KULLERVO LANSON 
Poultry Husbandry 



F. H. LAPPEN S. B. LEAVITT 



M. W. LELAND 



W. C. LINCOLN. JR. 



S. M. LIND 



J. H. UNDSEY 



FRANCES HELEN LAPPEN 
Bacteriology 



137 Geneva Ave., Dorchester. Born 1921 at Boston. J. E. 
Burke High School. Intersorority Council, 3, 4 (Vice- 
President, 4); Index, 2, 3, 4 (Assistant Business Manager, 4); 
Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Vice-President, 4) ; Student Religious 
Council, 4; Women's Athletic .Association, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Dance 
Manager, 3, gecretar.v, 4); 21 (President, 4). 



STEPHEN BARTLETT LE.WITT 

Chemistry 



28 Shawmut .\ve., New Bedford. Born 1919 at New Bedford. 
New Bedford High School. ATP. 



MAURICE W. LELAND 
Entomology 



12 Fiske St., Natick. Born 1920 at Framingham. Natick 
Senior High School. Deans List, 3; Advanced Military, 3, 
4; Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4; Hockey, 1, 2; Spring 
Track, 1, 2, 3(M); Winter Track, 2, 3(M); *2K. 



WALDO CHANDLER LINCOLN, JR. 
Floriculture 



121 Church St., Ware. Born 1919 at Ware. W'ilbraham 
Academy. Dean's List, 3; Horticultural Show Committee, 
3, 4; Floriculture Club, 3. 



SYLVAN MORTON LIND 
Chemi.stry 



21 East 21st St., Brooklyn, N. Y. Born 1920 at Brooklyn, 
N. Y. James Madison High School. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 
3, 4: Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Ps.ychology Club, 4; Soccer, 1; TE4>. 



JOYCE HAMILTON LINDSEY 
Home Economics 



114 Church St., Ware. Born 1921 at Ware. AVare High 
School. 4-H Club, 4; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 




ff^\ fA 





G. W. LITCHFIELD L. R. LONG 



J. P. LUCEY C. D. MacCORMACK, JR. M. E. MacNEILL 



Whately. Born 1919 at Waylaiul. Wayland High School. 
Band, 1, 2, 3 (Student Leader, 3); Collegian, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Sports 
Editor, 4) ; Index, 2, 3, 4 (Sports Editor, 4) : Outing Club, 1, 2; 
Christian Federation Cabinet, 1; Cross Country, 1, 2, 3, 4(M) 
(Manager); Spring Track, 1; Joint Committee on Inter- 
Collegiate Athletics, 3, 4; 2AE (Secretary, 4). 



GEOKGK WILLIAM LITCHFIELD 
English 



26 Beachmont St., Worcester. Born 1920 at Baltimore, Md. 
Worcester Academy. Men's Glee Club, 1; Phillips Brooks 
Club, 4; Current" Affairs Club, 3, 4 (Vice-President, 3); 
Pre-Med. Club, 3, 4; Zoology Club, 4; Spring Track, 1; 
Winter Track, 1, 2; Cheer Leader, 1(M), 2(M), 3(M); eX. 



LEWIS RICE LONG 
Zoology 



374 Hyde Park Ave., Boston. Born 1918 at Manchester 
N. H. Jamaica Plain High School. 



HENKY JOSEPH LOTT 
Botany 



19 Underbill Place, Pittsfield. Born 1920 at Pittsfield. 
Pittsfield High School. Deans List, 1, 2, 3: Pre-Med. Club, 
3, 4 (President, 4); Zoology Club, 3, 4; AS<(> (President, 4). 



.lOHN PAUL LIGEY 
Zooloev 



16 Gorham Rd., West Medford. Born 1919 at West Med- 
ford. Medford High School. Men's Glee Club, 3; Phillips 
Brooks Club, 2, 3, 4; Soccer, 1, 2; KZ (President, 4). 



CHAItLES l)0\ALI) iMacCOKMAGK, .|K. 
Bacteriology 



148 South St., Plainville. Born 1919 at Plainville. Plain- 
ville High School. Choir, 1; Women's Glee Club, 4; Home 
Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



IMIKIAlM EUNICE MacNEILL 
Home Economics 



SS/,-: 






W. E. MAHAN 



M. C. MANN 



J. P. MARSH 



L. G. MARTIN 



WILLIAM EDWARD MAHAN 
Economics 



Elm Court, Stockbridge. Born 1920 at Stockbridge. Lenox 
High School. Newman Club, 1, '2, 3, 4; Baseball, 3(M); 
"M" Club, 3; AXA. 



MARGERY CONSTANCE MANN 
Home Economics 



19 Abbott St., Pittsfield. Born 1920 at Pittsfield. Transfer 
from Framingham State Teachers College. Dean"s List, 
1, 2, 3; Choir, 3; Horticultural Show Committee, 4; Home 
Economics Club, 2, 3, 4; Cheer Leader, 2, 3; *Z (Secretary, 4). 



JOHN PEABODY MARSH 
History 



155 Center St., Danvers. Born 1920 at Peabody. Phillips 
Andover Academy. Class Nominating Committee, 1 (Chair- 
man) ; French Club, 1 ; Soccer, 1 ; *SK (Secretary, 3, Presi- 
dent, 4). 



MARGARET WHEELER MARSH 
Poultry Husbandry 



North Hatfield. Born 1918 at Concord, N. H. Doylestown 
High School. Index, 2, 3, 4 (Photography Editor, 4): 
Judging Teams, 2; Poultry Club, 2, 3, 4; Camera Club, 3, 4. 



LILLIAN GERTRUDE MARTIN 
Home Economics 



100 Lakewood St., Worcester. Born 1919 at Lynn. Worces- 
ter South High School. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Home 
Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; SBX. 



RICHARD RANDALL MASON 
Chemistry 



29 Lowell St., Maiden. Born 1920 at Maiden. Maiden 
High School. Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4; 
Mathematics Club, 2, 3; Hockey, 1; Soccer, 1, 2; KZ 
(Treasurer, 4). ^ 





^M 




R. C. McCllTCllKON P. A. McIiNERNY W. F. McINTOSH G. E. McL-^UGHLIN II. II. McLEAN M. J. McNAMARA 



9 Park .\ve.. South Deerfield. Born 1919 at Greenfield. 
Deerfield Academy, .\delphia, 4 (Vice-President): Class 
Nominating Committee, '2 (Chairman); Honor Council, 1, 2, 
3, i (Secretary, 3); Collegian, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Campus Editor, 2, 3, 
.\ssociate Editor, 4); Ring Committee, 2, 3, 4 (Chairman, 3); 
ex (Secretary, 4). 



ROBKKT CLINTON McCLlTCHEON 
Economics 



103 Lakewood St., Worcester. Horn 1920 at Worcester. 
Worcester South High School. Class Secretary, 3; Class 
Nominating Committee, 1; W. S. G. A., 2, 3, 4 (Vice-Presi- 
dent, 3, Treasurer, 4); Campus Varieties, 3; Newman Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club, 1, 2 (Treasurer, 2); Recrea- 
tional Planning Club, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association, 
1, 2, 3, 4 (Vice-President, 3, President, 4); Xn (Vice-Presi- 
dent, 3, President, 4). 



PHYLLIS ANNA McINERNY 
Recreational Planning 



19 Summer St., North Amherst. Born 1918 at Northampton. 
Dean .\cademy. Newman Club, 3, 4; Landscape .\rchi- 
tecture Club, 3, 4 (Treasurer, 4). 



WILLIAM FRANCIS McINTOSH 
Landscape Architecture 



14 Nutting .\ve., Amherst. Born 1920 at Palmer. Amherst 
High School. C. A. X., 3; Outing Club, 2; Swimming, 1; 
K2. 



GEORGE EDWARD McLAUGHLIN 
Wildlife Management 



155 Cowper St., East Boston. Born 1920 at Winthrop. 
East Boston High School. Class Nominating Committee, 

2, 4; Choir, 3; Outing Club, 1; Fernald Entomology Club, 

3, 4 (Secretary, 3); Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Spring Track, 
1, 2; Soccer, "l, 2, 3, 4(M); Winter Track, 1, 2; SAE (Secre- 
tary, 3, 4). 



HAROLD HUBERT McLEAN 
Entomology 



10 Central St., Brookfield. Born 1920 at Beverly. Brook- 
field High School. Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; Town Hall Club, 4; 
Freshman Handbook Board, 1; Index, 4 (Literary Editor) ; 
Outing Club, 1; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Languages and 
Literature Club, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association, 2, 4; XJJ. 



MARY .JEAN McNAMARA 
English 



W. MELNICK M. E. MERRILL A. R. MEZOFF 



S. MICKA D. W. MOFFITT A. J. MONK 



WALTER MELNICK 
Aariculliira] Economics 



Pine Nook, South Deerfield. Born lO'SO at South Deerfield. 
Deer6eld High School. Dean's List, 3; Advanced Military, 
3,4. 



MARJORIE EDNA MERRILL 
Home Economics 



Hi President St., Lynn. Born 1920 at Lynn. Lynn Eng- 
lish High School. -Dean's List, 2, 3; Danforth Fellowship, 1; 
Choir, 3; Christian Federation Cabinet, 1, 2, 3, 4; Home 
Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 2BX (Treasurer, 4). 



ALBERT RICHARD MEZOFF 
Bacteiiolosv 



167B North Common St., Lynn. Born 1920 at Maiden. 
Lynn English High School. Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; Menorah 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Psychology Clula, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



SUSAN MICKA 
Home Economics 



Park Hill Rd., Eastharapton. Born 1918 at Hatfield. 
Transfer from American International College. Dean's List, 
1, 3; 4-H Club, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club, 2, 3, 4. 



DONALD WILLIAM MOFFITT 
Engineering 



1 Franklin Court, Northampton. Born 1920 at Hayden- 
ville. Northampton High School. Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; 
Advanced Military, 3, 4; Mathematics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Engi- 
neering Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; ArP. 



ARTHCK JOSEPH MONK 
English 



11 Rhinecliff St., Arlington. Born 1921 at Boston. Transfer 
from Northeastern University. Dean's List, 3; Menorah 
Club, 3, 4; Languages and Literature Club, 3, 4. 



D. K. MORRILL F. E. MORSE R. M. MOSELEY 



IT. E. MOSHER W. J. MOSHER A. M. MOTIIES 



2 Prospect St., Rowley. Born 1919 at Ipswich. Newbury- 
port High School. Current .\ffairs Club, 4; Cross Country, 
1, 2(M), 3(M), 4(M); Spring Track, 1, 2; Winter Track, 1; 
"M" Club, 2, 3, i: .^Z*. 



DAVin RLIPEKT MOUHILL 
Economics 



9 Rhodes .\ve., Lynn. Born 1917 at Lynn. Lynn Classical 
High School. Fernald Entomology Club, 3, i; Psychology 
Club, 1, 2; Zoology Club, 1; *i;K. 



FREEjMAN EDWARD MORSE 
Eiilomolo"v 



571 Main St., .4gawam. Born 1920 at Hartford. Transfer 
fromrSpringfield Junior College. Bay-Statettes, 3, 4; Choir, 
2, 3, 4; Women's Glee Club, 2, 3, 4; Psychology Club, 3, 4; 
XJ2. 



RITA MAE MOSELEY 
Psychology 



Worcester St., Sterling. Born 1920 at Sterling. Leominster 
High School. Dean's List, 3: Outing Club, 2, 3, 4 (President, 
4); Wesley Foundation, 1, 2, 3, 4: Horticultural Show Com- 
mittee, 4; Horticultural Manufactures Club, 2, 3, 4 (Vice- 
President, 4): Cross Country, 2, 3, 4; Spring Track, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Swimming, 2, 3, 4; SAE. 



HAROLD ELWOOD MOSHER 
Landscape A rclii lecture 



Pleasant Ridge Rd., Harrison, N. Y. Born 1921 at Harrison, 
N. Y. Harrison High School. Class Nominating Com- 
mittee, 1: Dean's List, 2, 3; Current Affairs Club, 3, 4; 
Town Hall Club, 3, 4; 2AE. 



WILLIAM JOHN MOSHER 
Political Science 



65 Cottage St., Hudson. Born 1920 at Hudson. Hudson 
High School. Deans List, 1, 2, 3; Women's Glee Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Mathematics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Zoology Club, 3, 4 (President, 4). 



ARLINE MARIE MOTHES 
Zoology 







£^#ii 



B. J. MOULTON R. A. MULLANY E. R. MUSHOVIC M. L. .NAGELSCHMIDT K. M. NAGLER O. S. NAU, JR. 



BETTY JANE MOULTON 
Languages 



63 Highland St., Worcester. Born 1920 at Worcester. 
Worcester North High School. Class Nominating Com- 
mittee, 1; Dean's List, 1, 2, 3: Isogon, 3, 4; Choir, 1, 2, 3, 
4; Statettes, 1, 2, 3, 4: Women's Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Bay 
State Revue, 2; Christian Federation Cabinet, 1; Languages 
and Literature Club, 3, 4: Spanish Club, 3, 4; Women's 
Athletic Association, 2, 3; 2BX. 



ROBERT ALLAIRE MULLANY 
Agronomy 



24 Elm St., Hatfield. Born 1919 at Hatfield. Cushing 
Academy. Dean's List, 1, 3; Newman Club, 1, 4; Baseball, 

2(IV1),3(M); Soccer, 1, 2(M), 3(M), 4(M); AS* (Treasurer, 
3). 



ELSIE ROSE MUSHOVIC 
Bacteriology 



3.56 Deerfield St., Greenfield. Born 1920 at Greenfield. 
Greenfield High School. Christian Federation Cabinet, 1, 2; 
Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4. 



MARION LOUISE NAGELSCHMIDT 
Bacteriology 



26 Garden St., Pittsfield. Born 1921 at Pittsfield. Pitts- 
field High School. Dean's List, 2, 3; Roister Doisters, 2, 3, 4 
(Vice-President, 4); Christian Federation Cabinet, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Radio Studio Staff, 3, 4; Radio Committee, 4: Home Eco- 
nomics Club, 1, 2; 2BX. 



KENNETH MALCOLM NAGLER 
Mathematics 



577 Longmeadow St., Longmeado\v. Born 1920 at Spring- 
field. Transfer from Springfield Junior College. Dean's 
List, 2, 3; Outing Club, 2, 3; Mathematics Club, 2, 3, 4. 



OnO SCHAEFER NAU, JR. 
Zoology 



Country Club Hd., Greenfield. Born 1920 at Greenfield. 
Greenfi'eld High School. Dean's List, 2, 3; Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Advanced Military, 3, 4; Campus Varieties, 2; Pre-Med. 
Club, 1, 3, 4; Zoology Club, 1, 4; Fencing, 1, 3, 4; 2;4>E. 



S. L. MEI.SEN' 



R. E. >'00> H. L. iNORWOOD. JR. R. A. ■NOTiENBURO E. J. O'BRIEN 



60 Oak Crest Rd., Needham. Born WiO at Waverley. 
Needham llifjli School. Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary, 
3); Hortiiidlural Sliow Committee, 4; Floriculture Club, 4; 
Women's KiHe Team, 1. 



SARAH LOUISE NIELSEN 
Floriculture 



105 Lincoln St., Hudson. Born 1921 at Hudson. Hudson 
High School. Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 4; Mathematics Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4. 



RICHARD EDWARD NOON 
Chemistry 



148 Pearl St., Holyoke. Born 1921 at Fitchburg. Holyoke 
High School. Mathematics Club, 1, 4; Engineering Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4: A2*. 



HOWARD L. NORWOOD, JR. 

General Engineering 



132 Sumner St., Waltham. Born 1921 at Boston. Waltham 
High School. Academic Activities Board, 3, 4; Collegian, 
1, 2, 3, 4 (Business Manager 3, 4,); Collegian Quarterly, 3, 4 
(Business Manager): Freshman Handbook Board, 1, 2 
(Business Manager, 2); New England Intercollegiate News- 
paper Association, 3, 4 (Vice-President, 3, President, 4); 
Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival Committee, 4 (Treasurer); 
Mathematics Club, 3, 4; TE* (Treasurer, 3). 



ROBERT ARTIItlR NOTTENBURG 
Mathematics 



36 Nutting .\ve., Amherst. Born 1919 at Arhherst. Amherst 
High School. Class Nominating Committee, 2; Inter- 
fraternity Council, 3: Collegian, 1, 2, 3; Freshman Hand- 
book Board, 2; Outing Club, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club, 1, 2; 
Carnival Committee, 2: Mathematics Club, 1, 2, 3; Engineer- 
ing Club, 2, 3; K2. 



EDWARD JOSEPH O'BRIEN 
Engineering 



461 Appleton St., Holyoke. Born 1922 at Boston. Holyoke 
High School. Dean's List, 2; Collegian Quarterly, 3. 



NORMAN OGAN 
English 



SaUy 




p. PACOCHA 



S. PEARLMAN A. PEUERZANI 



R. H. PIERCE 



D. F. PLUMB 



PETEK PACOCHA 
Economics 



56 Glendale St., Easthampton. Born 1919 at Holyoke. 
Easthampton High School. 



STEPHEN KICHAKU PAl'P 
Mathematics 



North Fahnouth. Born 1921 at Essex Fells, N. J. Falmouth 
High School. Class Nominating Committee, 3; Dean's List, 
3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; French Club, 1, 2; Mathe- 
matics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Hockey, 1; Soccer, 2, 3(M), 4(M); 
"M" Club, 3, 4. 



STANLEY PEAKLiMAN 
Chemistrv 



258 Kent St., Brookline. Born 1919 at Boston. Roxbury 
Memorial High School. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Dairy 
Club, 3; Hockey, 1; AEn (Vice-President, 4). 



ALICE PEDEKZANI 
English 



3 Piney Place, Springfield. Born 1920 at Springfield. Ware- 
ham High School. Women's Glee Club, 1, 2; Languages and 
Literature Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association, 
2, 3; *Z. 



KICHAKD HLKST PIEKCE 
Chemistry 



37 Birchwood Ave., Longmeadow. Born 1919 at Worcester. 
Williston Academy. Interfraternity Council, 4; Men's 
Glee Club, 1, 2; Advanced MiHtary, 3, 4; Campus Varieties, 
4; Outing Club, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 3, 4; Soccer, 1; KS. 



DOKOTHY FLOKENCE PLUjMB 
Home Economics 



Box 16, Springfield, Vt. Born 1920 at Whitingham, Vt. 
Springfield High School. Dean's List, 1, 2, 3: Choir, 1; 
Women's Glee Club, 1, 4; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: Home Eco- 
nomics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Swimming Club, 4: Burnham Dec- 
lamation, 2. 




\ . L. I'OLITELLV 



L. F. POI TKH 



S. K. POTTER 



D. B. PREST 



W. M. PUSHEE 



■400 Hampshire St., Lawrence. Born 1920 at Lawrence. 
Lawrence High School. Dean's List, 2, 3: Choir, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Christian Federation Cabinet, 1, 2, 3, 4 (President, 3, Vice- 
President, 4); Phillips Brooks Club, 2, 3, 4; Student Religious 
Council, 3, 4; French Club, 2, 3, 4; Languages and Literature 
Club, 3, 4. 



VIOLKT LILLIAN POLlTELL.\ 
French 



4 Mechanic St., Ware. Born 1920 at Ware. Ware High 
School. Dean's List, 3; Collegian, 1, 2, 3; Outing Club, 1; 
Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 2, 3, 4; Zoology 
Club, 3, 4. 



LOLISF FKANCKS POTTKK 
Cliemistrv 



Norfolk, Conn. Born 1920 at Kodai Kanal, India. Gilbert 
High School. Adelphia, 4: Maroon Key, 2; Senate, 4; 
Band, 1, 2; Christian Federation Cabinet, 3, 4 (President, 4, 
Vice-President, 3): Student Religious Council, 3, 4; Carnival 
Ball Committee, 2; Carnival Committee, 3, 4 (Chairman, 4); 
Horticultural Show Committee, 3, 4; Sophomore-Senior Hop 
Committee, 2; Soccer, 2, 3(M), 4(M); 2AE (President, 4). 



SPENCEK ROMEYN POTTKK 
Floiiciiiliiir 



19 Brook St., Manchester. Born 1920 at Manchester. 
Story High School. Class Nominating Committee, 3; 
Orchestra, 1; Outing Club, 3; Pre-Med. Club, 4; Women's 
.\thletic Association, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary, 3) ; <I>Z. 



DOROTIIV BOYD PREST 
Baclei ■iolof'y 



36 Sagamore St., Lynn. Born 1920 at Lynn. Lynn English 
High School. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; TE* (Secretary, 3). 



HARRIS PRUSS 
Sociology 



27 Orchard St., Adams. Born 1920 at Housatonic. Searles 
High School. Dean's List, 1, 3; Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer, 1, 2; 
AS* (Secretary, 2, Vice-President, 4). 



WARREN MERRILL PUSHEE 
Bacteriology 



J. N. PUTNAM 



W. R4BINOVITZ 



M. B. R^BINOW S. H. RICH\RDS 



E. RICHARDSON 



JAMES NATHANIEL PUTNAM 
Poultry Husbandry 



4 Larchmont St., Danvers. Born 1920 at Danvers. Dan- 
vers High School. Dean's List, 3; Roister Doisters, 2; 
Judging Teams, 2, 3; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Poultry Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; ArP. 



WILLIAM KABINOVITZ 
Dairy Iiidiistrv 



116 Brunswick St., Roxbury. Born 1919 at Boston. Boston 
Latin School. Choir, 1; Men's Glee Club, 1; Judging Teams, 
4; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Dairy Club, 3, 4; TE*. 



MORTON BERNARD RABINOW 

Eiialish 



31 Hazleton St., Mattapan. Born 1921 at Boston. Dor- 
chester High School. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Hockey, 1; 

AEn. 



STEPHEN HENRY RICHARDS 
Wildlife Management 



246 Bronxville Rd., Bronxville, N. Y. Born 1918 at Trenton, 
N. J. Transfer from Bard College, Columbia. Outing Club, 
2, 3, 4. 



ELLEN RICHARDSON 
Home Economics 



Otter River Rd., Winchendon. Born 1919 at South Sud- 
bury. Templeton High School. Women's Glee Club, 1, 2, 4; 
Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



REMIGIO SANTOS RODA 
Mathematics 



16 Alden St., Provincetown. Born 1919 at Provincetown. 
Transfer from Boston University. Mathematics Club, 4; 
Radio Club, 3. 



^i^3 



'%/^ 



m 





..■>-/;«• A* •■/^^^ 



M. S. RODMAN I. J. ROGOSA E. M. ROSEMARK J. RUBENSTEIN E. M. RUSSELL H. N. SARGENT 



21 Stratton St., Dorchester. Born 1919 at Chelsea. Boston 
Public Latin School. Menorah Club, 1, '2, 3, i. Pre-Med. 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Soccer, 1, -i, 3: TE*. 



MITCHELL SIDNEY RODMAN 
Bacteriology 



55 Cherry St., Lynn. Born 1919 at Lynn. Lynn English 
High School. Dean's List, 1, i, 3;' Outing Club, 4; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, i; Chemistry Club, 1; Current 
Affairs Club, 1, % 3: Mathematics Club, 1. 



ISRAEL JAY ROGOSA 
Economics 



57 Supple Rd., Dorchester. Born 19''20 at Chelsea. Boston 
Latin School. Freshman Handbook Board, 1; Menorah 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball, 4(M) (Manager); Soccer, 1, 2; 
"M" Club, 4; .Joint Committee on Inter-Collegiate Athletics. 
3, 4: AEn. 



iDWARD MORTON ROSEMARK 
Economics 



104 Ormond St., Mattapan. Born 1921 at Boston. Boston 
Public Latin School. Dean's List, 1, 3; Interfraternity 
Council, 3, 4; Bay State Revue, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
AEn (Secretary-Treasurer, 3, President, 4) . 



.JACOB RUBENSTEIN 
Bacteriology 



280 Main St., Easthampton. Born 1919 at Lonsdale, R. I. 
Easthampton High School. Transfer from Winthrop Col- 
lege. Dean's List, 3; Languages and Literature Club, 3, 4; 

xn. 



ELEANOR MARY RUSSELL 
English 



37 Echo St., Brockton. Born 1919 at Swampscott. Thayer 
Academy. Dean's List, 2, 3; Women's Glee Club, 2, 3, 4; 
Mothers' Day Committee, 3, 4; Home Economics Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic .^Association. 1, 2; SBX. 



HARRIETT NEWHALL SARGENT 
Home Economics 





rfr^fcat# 




F. SHACKLEY, II H. W. SHAW 



A. F. SHEA J. U. SHEPARDSON M. I. SHIRLEY 



JOHN JOSEIMI SEEKY 
Horticultural Mauufac lures 



FKEDEKIC SHACKLEY, M 
Horticultural iVIauufaclures 



HOWAKH WESTCOTT SHAW 
Chemistry 



A. FRANCIS SHEA 
Economics 



JOHN UPHAM SHEl'AKHSON 
Chemistry 



MARTHA IRVINE SHIRLEY 
Econouiics 



West Main St., Brookfield. Born 1918 at Detroit, Mich. 
Brookfield High School. Advanced Military, 3, 4; Newman 
Club, 1, 2, 3, i; Horticultural Show Committee, 3, -t; 
Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: Horticultural Manufactures 
Club, 3, 4; Baseball, 1: Basketball, 2(M) : Football, 1, 2(M), 
3(M), 4(M); "M" Club, 2, 3, 4; KX. 

241 Washington Ave., Winthrop. Born 1920 at Cambridge. 
Winthrop High School. Dean's List, 1; Phillips Brooks 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Dads' Day Committee, 3, 4: Horticultural 
Manufactures Club, 3, 4; Baseball, 3, 4: Hockey, 1; Soccer, 
1; *2;K. 

41 Independence St., Canton. Born 1921 at Canton. Canton 
High School. Class Nominating Committee, 4; Dean's List, 
1, 3: Freshman Handbook Board, 1, 2, 3 (Co-Editor, 2, 
Editor-in-Chief, 3); Orchestra, 2; Campus Varieties, 3, 4; 
Student Leader Day Committee, 3, 4 (Co-Chairman, 4); 
Community Chest Drive Committee, 4 (Treasurer); Chem- 
istry Club,'^ 3, 4: Pre-Med. Club, 3, 4; Spring Track, 1, 2, 3 
(Manager, 3); Winter Track, 1, 2, 3 (Manager, 3); Joint 
Committee on Inter-Collegiate Athletics, 3; AXA (Secretary, 
3, Treasurer, 4). 

102 Oak St., Florence. Born 1920 at Northampton. North- 
ampton High School. Academic Activities Board, 3, 4; 
Dean's List, 3; Debating, 2, 3, 4 (Manager, 3, 4); Outing 
Club, 4; Current Affairs Club, 4: Swimming, 2, 3, 4 (Assist- 
ant Manager, 3, Manager, 4) ; Joint Committee on Inter- 
Collegiate Athletics, 4; Flint Oratorical Contest, 3; 2*E. 

166 Allen St., Athol. Born 1920 at Winchendon. AtholHigh 
School. Academic Activities Board, 3, 4; Interfraternity 
Council, 3, 4 (Vice-President, 4); Roister Doisters, 3, 4 
(Business Manager); Advanced Military, 3, 4; Bay State 
Revue, 4 (Manager); Outing Club, 1, 2; Radio Staff, 3; 
Chemistry Club, 2, 3; Hockey, 1; Tennis, 3(M); Joint Com- 
mittee on Inter-Collegiate Athletics, 2, 3; "M" Club, 3, 4; 
SAE (President, 4, Vice-President, 4). 

128 Hampden St., Indian Orchard. Born 1921 at Cohoes, 
N. Y. Springfield Chissical High School. Dean's List, 
1, 2, 3; WesUy I'nundation, 1; W'omen's Athletic Associa- 
tion, 2, 3; 2HX (President, 4). 







4^ 






G. S. SINNICKS I. J. SI.OTMC.K 




K. F. ^Mllll 



R. R. SMITH 



E. F. SPARKS 



24 Bennett St., Manchester. Born 191G at Beverly. Trans- 
fer from Tufts College. Outing Club, -2; Nature Guide Asso- 
ciation, 3, ■!■ (President, 3) ; Z*. 



GEOKGE STEl'UEN SINNICKS 
Foreslrv 



269 Center St., Indian Orchard. Born 1921 at Indian 
Orchard. Transfer from Ohio State University. Dean's 
List, 3: Menorah Club, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 3, i; SAM. 



IKVING JAMES SEOTNICK 
Cheniislry 



Daggete Ave., Vineyard Haven. Born 1919 at Vineyard 
Haven. Tisbury High School. Dean's List, 3; Current 
Affairs Club, 3, i: Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



EILEEN FRANCES SMITH 
History 



Vining Hill, Southwick. Born 1921 at Fall River. West- 
field High School. Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; Choir, 2, 3, 4; 
Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Treasurer, 4); Chemistry Club, 2, 3; 
Mathematics Club, 3; Cross Country, 1, 2, 3; Spring Track, 
3; ArP. 



KK.IIAKD KLSHTON SMITH 

Cheniislrv 



2039 Northampton St., Holyoke. Born 1920 at Holyoke. 
Holvoke High School. Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; Menorah Club, 
1, 2", 3, 4; Tennis, 2, 3, 4; AEn. 



MYKON SOLIN 
Economics 



20 First St., Pittsfield. Born 1919 at Springfield. St. 
Joseph's High School. Campus Varieties, 3; Newman 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball, 2(M), 3(M), 4(M) (Captain, 4): 
Basketball, 3, 4; Football, 1; "M" Club, 2, 3, 4; AXA 
(Vice-President, 3). 



EOVtARU FRANCIS SPARKS 
Economics 





■ri»r ■'^ 



F. E. STAPLES 



C. C. STONE 



B. STONOGA 






,(. J. SULLIVAN H. H. SUNDEN 




P. J. SWALUK 



FRANCES ELIZABETH STAPLES 
Home Economics 



353 Lincoln St., Stoughton. Born 1920 at Stoughton. 
Stoughton High School. Dean's List, 2, 3: Phillips Brooks 
Club, 1, 2, 3; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3, i (Secretary, 2, President, 4): 
Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Horticultural Manufactures 
Club, 3; Psychology Club, 3. 



CHESTER GUSHING STONE 
General Engineering 



340 Pakachoag St., Auburn. Born 1920 at .\uliurn. .\ubur 
High School. Advanced Military, 3, 4; C. A. A., 4; <!>SK. 



BENJAMIN STONOGA 
Horticultural Manufactures 



15 Hardy Ave., Watertown. Born 1920 at Cambridge. 
Watertown High School. Dean's List, 3; Horticultural 
Show Committee, 3; Horticultural Manufactures Club, 3, 4; 
Tennis, 2(M), 4(M); Soccer, 1; "M" Club, 2, 3, 4; S*E 
(Secretary, 3). 



JOHN JOSEPH SULLIVAN 
English 



58 Bellingham St., Chelsea. Born 1919 at Chelsea. Chelsea 
High School. Class Treasurer, 1, 2; Maroon Key, 2; 
Advanced Military, 3, 4; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Military 
Ball Committee, 4; French Club, 4; Languages and Litera- 
ture Club, 3, 4; A2*. 



HO'WARD HENRY SUNDEN 
Economics 



35 Upsala St., Worcester. Born 1919 at Philadelphia, Pa. 
Worcester South High School. Men's Glee Club, 1, 2; 
Phillips Brooks Club, 4; Carnival Committee, 2: Current 
Affairs Club, 3, 4; Soccer,!; Swimming, 1; Cheer Leader, 2; 
ex (Vice-President, 4). 



PETER JOSEPH SWALUK 
Horticultural Manufactures 



Pine Nook, South Deerfield. Born 1919 at Sunderland. 
Deerficld High S.liool. Dean's List, 3; Choir, 4; Horti- 
cultural .Manufactures Club, 3, 4; Soccer, 1. 



H. E. TARBELL 



,1. .1. TEW HILL, JR. 



M. F. THOMSON 



1-29 Walnut St., Holyoke. Born 1919 at Holyoke. Holyoke 
Higli School. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, i; Horticultural Show 
Committee, 4; Chemistry Club, 4; Horticultural Manu- 
factures Club, 3, 4; Tennis, 3(M); "M" Club, 4; S*E. 



LUCIEN SZMYD 
Horticultural Manufactures 



Brookfield Rd., Brimfield. Born 1920 at Brimfield. Hitch- 
cock Free Academy. Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Glee 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; French Club, 2, 3, 4 (President, 4) ; Languages 
and Literature Club, 3, 4. 



HARKIET ELIZABETH TARBELL 
Modern Languages 



16 Center St., Northampton. Born 1922 at Northampton. 
Northampton High School. Deans List, 1, 2, 3; Choir, 3; 
Advanced Military, 3, 4; Outing Club, 2, 3, 4: Newman 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: Animal Husbandry Club, 4; Soccer, 3, 4; 
ArP (Treasurer, 3, 4). 



JOHN JOSEPH TEWHILL, JR. 
Chemistry 



618 Mill St., W'orcester. Born 1919 at Newton. Worcester 
North High School. Class Nominating Committee, 1, 2; 
Campus Varieties, 3; Baseball, 1, 2(M), 3(M), 4(M); Basket- 
ball, 1; Hockey, 1, 2, 3, 4; "M" Club, 2, 3, 4; *2K. 



DONALD TURNER THAYER 
Forestry 



Monterey. Born 1919 at Monterey. Transfer from Ameri- 
can International College. Deari's List, 3; Index, 4; 
Judging Teams, 2; Outing Club, 4; Anirhal Husbandry Club, 
3, 4; Poultry Club, 2, 3, 4 (Hostess). 



MARION FRANCES THOMSON 
Poultry Husbandry 



239 Centre Ave., Abington. Born 1920 at Portland, Me. 
Abington High School. Judging Teams, 2, 3; Outing Club, 
1, 2, 3: Animal Husbandry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3, 
4; .\AM. 



PHYLLIS LOUISE TOWER 
Animal Husbandry 









R. X. TRIGGS 



E. D. TRIPP M. VanBUREN 



J. A. WAITE A. G. WALDRON R. N. WALKER 



ROBERT XAVIER TKIGGS 
Entoniolosv 



22 Atwood Plat-e, Springfield. Born 1918 at Springfield. 
Transfer frnin Si-ldii lliill College. Campus Varieties, 2, 3, 4; 
Newman Cliili, 1, '-', :>. 1; Fernald Entomology Club, 2, 3, 4; 
Baseball, 'ilM', .'i'Mi; Basketball, 2(M), 3(M), 4(M), 
(Captain, 4); Football, 1, 2(M); '-M" Club, 2, 3, 4; 2*E. 



EinVAlU) DONALD TRIP 
I'svcholrtjiv 



490 Chicopee St., Willimansett. Born 1920 at Holyoke. 
Holyoke High School. Dean's List, 3; Advanced Military, 
3, 4; Basketball, 1, 3; Football, 1. 



MERIEL VanBUREN 
Home Economics 



83 Whittier Ave., Pittsfield. Born 1920 at Pittsfield. Pitts- 
field High School. Dean's List, 2, 3; Bay-Statettes, 3, 4; 
Choir, 3; Women's Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Bay State Revue, 2; 
Radio Studio Staff, 3; Phillips Brooks Club, 3; Home Eco- 
nomics Club, 1, 2, 3. 



.JOANN WAITE 

Enelish 



98 Newton St., Athol. Born 1921 at Athol. Athol High 
School. Women's Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club, 1, 2, 
3, 4; Home Economics Club, 1; Languages and Literature 
Club, 3, 4. 



ANN GERTRUDE WALDRON 
Enelish 



15 Fifth Ave., Northampton. Born 1919 at Northampton. 
St. Michael's High School. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Lan- 
gauges and Literature Club, 3, 4; SBX. 



ROBERT NORMAN WALKER 

Animal MiisUandrv 



20 Center St., Winthrop. Born 1920 at Winthrop. Winthrop 
High School. Bay Staters, 4; Choir, 3; Men's Glee Club, 3, 4: 
Judging Teams, 2, 3, 4; Animal Husbandry Club, 2, 3, 4; 
Soccer, 1; OX. 




M|;S|| 






i^.-- ^ 








C. p. WERME 



IS Adare Place, Northampton. Born 1921 at Northampton. 
Northampton High School. Dean"s List, 3; Advanced 
Military, 3, 4; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Fernald Entomology 
Club, 3, i: Basketball, 1, 2, 3: Spring Track, 1, 2(M), 3(M), 
4(M) (Captain, i); Winter Track, 1, 2(M), 3(M), 4(M) 
(Captain, 4); "M" Club, 2, 3; 2<I>E (Vice-President, 3, Presi- 
dent, 4). 



WILLIAM JAMES WALL, JK. 
Entomologv 



162 Bowdoin St., Springfield. Born 1921 at Springfield. 
Springfield Classical High School. Dean's List, 2, 3; Home 
Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: XS2 (Secretary, 4). 



EVKA ALTUEA WAKD 
Home Economics 



720 West Hampden St., Holyoke. Born 1919 at Holyoke. 
Holvoke High School. Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; Newman Club, 
1, 2', 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3; AAM. 



HELEN AGNES WATT 
Chemistry 



8 Maple St., Bedford. Born 1920 at Concord. Lexington 
High School. Class Nominating Committee, 3; Dean's 
List, 1, 2, 3; Isogon, 3, 4: W. S. G. A., 3 (Secretary); Sopho- 
more-Senior Hop Committee, 2; XQ (Treasurer, 3). 



KUTH NANCY WEBBER 
Histoiv 



69 River St., Mattapan. Born 1919 at Boston. Boston 
Latin School. Dean's List, 1, 2, 3: Phi Kappa Phi, 4; Index, 
1, 2, 3; Debating, 1, 2, 3, 4 (President, 3, 4): Menorah Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4 (President, 3, 4): Student Religious Council, 1, 2, 3, 
4; Cross Country, 2; TE*. 



HERBERT WEINER 
History 



36 Steele St., Worcester. Born 1918 at Millbury. Worces- 
ter South High School. Adelphia, 4; Class Captain, 2, 3, 4; 
Interfraternity Council, 3, 4 (President, 4); Maroon Key, 2 
(Vice-President); Senate, 3, 4 (Vice-President, 4); Dairy 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (President, 3, 4); Football, 1, 2(M), 3(M), 
4(M); "M" Club, 2, 3, 4; AFP (Vice-President, 3). 



CARL PERSHING WERME 
Dairy Industry 




K. B. WETHERBEE A. C. WHITE 



P. A. WHITE P. WHITTEMORE .(. WILLIAMS 



M. WINER K. D. Wir I 



KATE BELK WETHERBEE 
History 



Burnam Rd., Bolton. Born 1920 at Kenilworth, N. J. 
Dedham High School. Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; Intersorority 
Council, 3, 4 (Secretary-Treasurer, 3) ; Isogon, 3,4; Women's 
Glee Club, 2; Bay State Revue, 2; Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation, 2, 3; AAM. 



ANNE CAROLYN WHITE 
Bacteriology 



279 Lexington St., Springfield. Born 1921 at Springfield. 
Transfer from Springfield Junior College. Dean's List, 1; 
Phillips Brooks Club, 2, 3; SBX. 



PAUL ARTHUR WHITE 
Forestry 



23 Pearson Rd., Somerville. Born 1920 at Westfield. Somer- 
ville High School. Dean's List, 1, 3; Advanced Military, 3, 4; 
Football,!; eX. 



PHOEBE WHITTEMORE 

Home Economics 



Sturbridge. Born 1919 at St. Albans, \ t. Dean Academy. 
4-H Club, 3, 4; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



JEANNETTE WILLIAMS 
Bacteriology 



123 Oklahoma St., Springfield. Born 1919 at Newport, R. I. 
Springfield Technical High School. Dean's List, 3; Outing 
Club, 2; Women's Athletic Association, 2. 



MILTON WINER 
Political Science 



63 Wildwood St., Mattapan. Born 1920 at Boston. Boston 
Public Latin School. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Current 
Affairs Club, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 1; Psychology Club, 1; 
Zoology Club, 1. 



KENNETH D. WITT 
Political Science 



Belchertown. Born 1921 at Belchcrtown. Belchertown 
High School. Dean's List, 3; Index, 2, 3 (Associate 
Editor, 4); Wesley Foundation, 3, 4; Current Affairs Club, 
3; 4; Swimming, 1. 




H. R. \lOLF 



C. M. V( OOOCOCK 



II. S. WYZAN 



G. R. YALK S. ZEITLER C. A. ZIELINSKI 



G4 Armond St., Mattapau. Born 19J0 at Brighton. Boston 
Public Latin School. Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; Men's Glee Club, 
3: Menorah Club, 1, -2, 3, -i; Psychology Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
AEn (Secretary, 3) . 



45 Hosmer St., Mattapan. Born 1920 at Boston, Dor- 
chester High School. Menorah Club, 3; Football, 3(M). 



Silver St., South Hadley. Born 1920 at East Orange, N. J. 
South Hadley High School. Dean's List, 3: Bay State 
Revue, 2, 3; Horticultural Show Committee, 4; Chemistry 
Club, 2, 4; Horticultural Manufactures Club, 3, 4; 2*E (Sec- 
retary, 3, Vice-President, 4). 



19 Glines Ave., Milford. Born 1919 at Milford. Transfer 
from Brigham Young University. Dean's List, 2, 3; Menorah 
Club, 2, 3, 4; Animal Husbandry, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 
2, 3, 4. 

44 Baker Rd., Everett. Born 1919 at Fall River. Transfer 
from Stockbridge School. Judging Teams, 2, 4; Christian 
Federation Cabinet, 3, 4; Animal Husbandry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
4-H Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Poultry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary- 
Treasurer, 1, 2, 3, President, 4); Soccer, 1; ATP. 



29 Magnolia St., Maiden. Born 1918 at Maiden. Maiden 
High School, .\delphia, 4; Class Nominating Committee, 2, 
3; Dean's List, 1, 2, 3; Interfraternity Council, 3, 4 (Secre- 
tary, 3); Maroon Key, 2; Senate, 3, 4 (Secretary, 3, Presi- 
dent, 4); Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Psychology Club, 3, 4: 
Football, 1, 2, 3; Tennis, 3(M); Spring Track, 1; Winter 
Track, 1; Inter-Class Athletic Board, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary, 3, 
President, 4); "M" Club, 4; TE* (President, 4). 



473 Hillside Ave., Holyoke. Born 1919 at Holyoke. Hol- 
voke High School. Sophomore-Senior Hop Committee, 2; 
isK. 



HENRY ROBERT WOLF 
Psychology 



LOUIS "WOLK 
Chemistry 

CHARLES MARTIN WOODCOCK 
Horticultural Manufactures 



HENRY SAMUEL WYZAN 
Chemistry 



GEORGE RICHARD YALE 
Poultry Husbandry 



SYDNEY ZEITLER 

Psychology 



CASIMIR ANTHONY ZIELINSKI 
Botanv 



ALUMNI II\ UNIFORM. TOO 




Kt'turniii^ Alumni register for the Alumni Office in Memorial Hall during Commencement 



During this year of war the Alumni 
oiEce has been keeping closely in touch 
with the some three hundred Alumni 
serving with U. S. armed forces. From 
recent letters came these excerpts : 

Lt. Col. W. W. Jcnna "16 

"The list (of Alumni in the armed 
forces) is an imposing one; but, as I 




. ,.«, aide to 



recall it, the College has done every- 
thing it has gone into in an imposing 
and outstanding way." 

2nd Lt. Fletcher Prouty, Jr. '41 

"After four years on horseback at 
State we are now bouncing around in the 
cockpit of a tank — you should try it." 

Maj. William I. Goodwin '18 

"Have just finished the course in 
Command & General Staff School where 
I enjoyed being a classmate again of 
Colonel George L. Goodridge, Chief of 
Staff of the 26th Division." 

Capt. Daniel J. Leary '33 

■ "The Military Department at the 
College has been doing a good job for 
a long time. ... I have heard nothing 
but good reports of State graduates who 
are in the Service." 

Lt. George Benjamin '39 

Attached to a unit designated by a 
"■5," he writes it . . . "Vth." 



■2121 




At Butterfield House last June . . . "twas a Soph and a Senior sat sunning on the steps 



UNDERCLASS 




•Juniors 



Frances Josephine Albrecht, 14 

Pembroke St.. SomerviUe. Somer- 
ville High School. Landscape Archi- 
tecture. Dean's List, 2; W. S. G. A.. 
2. 3 (Secretary, 3); Horticultural Show 
Committee. 3; Landscape Architecture 
Club, 2, 3 (Secretary. 3); Chi Omega. 

Marjorie Frances Aldrich, 706 Allen 
St.. Springfield. Springfield Classical 
High School. Home Economics. 
Women's Glee Club, 2; Outing Club, 
2; Newman Club, 1, 2. 3; Home Eco- 
nomics Club, 1, 2, 3; Mathematics 
Club, 1; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion, 1, 2, 3; Phi Zeta. 

Barton Bruce Allen, Butter Hill Rd., 
Pelham. Phillips Academy. Animal 
Husbandry. Animal Husbandry Club, 
3; Q. T. V. 

Clinton Wright Allen, 41 Russell St., 
Greenfield. Greenfield High School. 
Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 3; Cur- 
rent Affairs Club, 3; Mathematics 
Club, 2; Radio Club, 3; Soccer, 1, 
2(M), 3; "M" Club, 2, 3; Sigma Phi 
Epsilon. 

Gerald Clifton Anderson, S.S Frank- 
lin St.. Barre, Vt. Spaulding High 
School, Barre, Vt. Animal Husbandry. 
Class Nominating Committee, 2. 3; 
Freshman Handbook Bo.ard, 1, 2, 3 
(Business Manager, 3); Outing Club, 
2, 3; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2, 3; 
Animal Husbandry Club, 1, 2. 3; 4-H 
Club, 3; Cross Country, 1. 

■WlUlam Edmund Arnold, Main St., 
Lunenburg. Lunenburg High School. 
Dairy Industry. Class Nominating 
Committee. 3; Campus Varieties, 3; 
Soccer. 1; Lambda Chi Alpha (Secre- 
tary, Treasurer, 3). 



Halg Bruce Arolan, Charlton St., 
Oxford. Alabama Preparatory School. 
Agricultural Economics. Class Nomi- 
nating Committee, 1; Choir, 1: Men's 
Glee Club, 2; Outing Club, 3; Chem- 
istry Club. 1. 2; 4-H Club, 1, 2. 3; 
Pre-Med. Club. 1. 2, 3; Football, 1; 
Theta Chi. 

Lewis Roswell Atwood, Jr., 105 

Burncoat St., Worcester. Worcester 
North High School. English. Colle- 
gian, 1, 2, 3; Index, 2; French Club, 

1, 2, 3. 

Anne Ruth August, 156 Crescent St., 
Northampton. Northampton High 
School. English. Menorah Club. 1, 

2, 3: Languages and Literature Club, 
3; Sigma Iota. 



Club, 1, 2, 3; Cheer Leader, 2, 3; 
Women's Athletic Association. 1. 2. 3 
(Badminton Manager, 3); Phi Zeta 
(Treasurer, 3). 

John Walton Ball, IS}^ Pond St., 
Greenfield. Greenfield High School. 
English. 

Howard Tracy Bangs, Bradstreet 
Depot Rd., Hatfield. Deerfield Acad- 
emy. Chemistry. Baseball, 2(M), 
3(M); Soccer, 1, 2(M), 3(M); "M" 
Club, 2, 3; Phi Sigma Kappi^. 

Mildred Sheridan Barber, 1 1 Waverly 
Place, Brighton. Brighton High 
School. Economics. Dean's List. 2; 
Current Affairs Club, 3: Women's 
Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3. 

Richard Russell Barton, 242 Fort 
Pleasant Aye.. Springfield. Transfer 
from Springfield Junior College. Chem- 
istry. Newman Club, 2, 3; Student 
Affiliate of A. C. S., 3 (Chairman); 
Lambda Chi Alpha. 

William Augustus Beers, 66 Calumet 
Rd., Holyoke. Chemistry. Physics. 




velve 



.It's mi"*^- 



George Francis Benolt, ISl Daria- 

ton St.. Springfield. Springfield Tech- 
nical High School. Physics. Colle- 
gian, 3; Interfr.iternity Council, 2, 3; 
Advanced Military, 3; Newman Club, 
1, 2, 3; Lambda Chi Alpha. 

PrlsclUa Bentley, Bartlett Rd., 
Manomet. Transfer from Hyanni. 
State Teachers College. Home Eco- 



Helen Eleanor Bergcr, 93 Bradford 
Rd., Watertown. Watertown High 
School. Psychology. W. S. G. A., 3 
(Vice-President); Psychology Club, 3; 
Class Nominating Committee, 2; Phi 
Zeta. 

Beverly Ann Bigwood, 59 Highland 
Ave., Athol. Athol High School. 
History, English. Dean's List, 2; 
Roister Doisters, 2; Campus Varieties, 
3; French Club, 1, 2; Alpha Lambda 
Mu. 

Arnold Irving Blake, 97 Rockland 
St.. Springfield. Springfield Classical 
High School. Entomology. Dean's 
List. I. 2; Men's Glee Club, 2, 3; 
Menorah Club, 1. 2. 3; Fernald Ento- 
mology Club. 3; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 

Charles Edward Blanchard, Granite 
St.. North Uxbridge. Uxbridge High 
School. Animal Husbandry. Class 
Nominating Committee, 1; Band, 1; 
Judging Teams, 3; Animal Husbandry 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Spring Track, 1; Soccer, 
3; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

Marion Elvira Bodwell, 30 Hunting- 
ton Ave., Sharon. Sharon High School. 
English. Women's Glee Club, 2, 3; 
Dads' Day Committee. 3. 

Thaddeus Victor Bokina, 7 Prospect 
St.. Hatfield. Smith Academy. Agri- 
cultural Economics. Maroon Key, 2 
(President); Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Carnival Ball Committee, 2; Baseball, 
2; Basketball, 1, 2(M), 3(M); "M" 
Club, 3; Alpha Sigma Phi. 

Robert Eugene Bourdeau, 116 Third 
St.. Turners Falls. Turners Falls High 
School. Physics. Newman Club. 1; 
Mathematics Club. 3; Basketball, 2: 
Soccer, 1, 2, 3; Phi Sigma Kappa. 

Mary Louise Bowler, 18 Sterling St., 
Westfield. Westfield High School. 
Floriculture. Class Nominating Com- 
mittee, 1; Intersorority Council, 3; 
Newman Club, 1. 2, 3; Floriculture 
Club, 3; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion, 1, 2, 3; Chi Omega. 

Henry Lymon Brallt, Carlisle. Con- 
cord High School. Floriculture. Bay 
Staters. 1. 2; Choir. I; Men's Glee 
Club. 1. 2. 3; Statesman, 3; Campus 
Varieties, 1; Outing Club. 1; Animal 
Husbandry Club. I; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Alpha Gamma Rho. 

Jean EUen Brown, West St., Feeding 
Hills. Agawam High School. Home 
Economics. Class Nominating Com- 
mittee, 1, 2; Choir, 1; Carnival Com- 
mittee. 2. 3 (Secretary, 3); 4-H Club. 
1, 2, 3 (Secretary, 2); Home Eco- 
nomics Club, I, 2. 3; Sigma Beta Chi. 

Pearl Nash Brown, 36 Clement St., 
Springfield. Northampton School for 
Girls. Home Economics. Radio 
Studio Staff, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 2, 
3; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3. 

Wendell Everett Brown, 162 West 
St.. Amherst. The Peddle School. 
Pre-Med. Collegian, 2, 3 (Business 
Manager, 3); Outing Club, 2, 3; Pre- 
Med. Club, 2, 3; Zoology Club, 2, 3 
(Vice-President, 3); Soccer, 1; Kappa 
Sigma. 



[214] 



Biibriskl. HI 

Soarlcs Hiljl. 
>r.in's List. 1, 
. !, Newman 
ll.JI. 1. 2(M). 



Stanley William 

Grove St., H<iiis;it..ii 

School. CluMIHvlM 

2; Adv»nco.l \Mii 
Club. 1. 2, :;, 11,1-1 
3(M); Soceor, I; Al| 

Francis Thomas Bucklfv, LM Carvtr 
St., Springfield. Tniiisl.-r ri..i.i S|,riiiK- 
field Junior College. Cheinisliv. New- 
mun Club, 2. :i; Sij.'mi. .VIplia ICpsiion. 
Jean Clarke Buddington. tit) Scott 
St.. Springfield. Springfield Cliiiisical 
High School. Cheuii.stry. Dean's 
List, 1; Mathcuialics Club, 2. 
Frederick Huntinftton Burr, 2.S9 
Main St., Kastharnpton. Williston 
Academ.v. Animal Husbandry. Class 
President. 1; Advanced Militarv, 3; 
Carnival Committee, 2, 3 (Vice-Chair- 
man); Hockey. 1, 2 (Informal Team); 
Theta Chi. 

Stewart William Bush, 43 West 
Glen St.. Holyoke.^ Holyoke High 
School. Pre-Med. Sophomore-Senior 
Hop Committee. 2 (Chairman); Pre- 
Med. Club. 3; Phi Sigma Kappa. 
Elizabeth Jean Bushnell, tiSo Sunder- 
land Rd.. Worcester. Shrewsbury High 
School. Home Economics. Dean's 
List. 1. 2; French Club. 3; Home 
Economics Club, 1, 2. 3; Women's 
Athletic Association, 3. 
James William Callahan, Sunder- 
land. Hopkins Academy. Agricul- 
tural Economics. Newman Club, 1. 
2, 3; Soccer. 1, 2(M). 3(M); "M" 
Club. 2, 3. 

Mary Frances Callahan, 273 .\quid- 
neck St.. New Bedford. New Bedford 
High School. Mathematics. Dean's 
List. 1, 2; Newman Club. 1, 2, 3; 
Chemistry Club. 1; Mathematics 
Club, 1, 2, 3: Chi Omega. 
Nicholas Lewis Caraganis, 111 
Phineas St.. Dracut. Dracut High 
School .\nimal Husbandry. Inter- 
fraternity Council. 2, 3; Advanced 
Military. 3; Judging Teams, 1. 2. 3; 
Outing Club. 1. 2, 3; Animal Hus- 
bandry Club. 1. 2. 3; Sigma Phi 
Epsilon. 

Beatrice Emma Carnall, 1 Irwin 
Place. Northampton. Northampton 
High School. Home Economics. New- 
man Club. 1. 2. 3: Home Economics 
Club. 1. 2, 3; Sigma Beta Chi. 
Mary Jean Carpenter, 127 High St.. 
Greenfield. Greenfield High School. 
Psychology. Class Vice-President, 1. 
2. 3; Dean's List. 2; Intersororitv 
Council, 3 (Secretary-Treasurer); 
Sophomore-Senior Hop Committee. 2; 
Psychology Club, 3; Women's Athletic 
.Association, 2. 3 (Vice-President, 3); 
Phi Zeta. 

Catherine Jane Carroll, 3S Haw- 
thorne Ave., Pittsfield. Pittsfield High 
School. English. French Club, 2, 3; 
Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Language and 
Literature Club, 3. 

Murray Harold Casper, 11 Morse 
St., Dorchester. Dorchester High 
School. Pre- Dental. Dean's List. 1; 
Interfraternity Council. 3 (Secretary); 
Band, 1; Menorah Club. 1. 2, 3; 
Mothers' Day Committee. 2, 3; Ba.se- 
ball, 2; Soccer, 1, 2, 3; Alpha Epsilon 
Pi. 

Clinton Turner Cheever, 12 High 
St.. Oakdale. Major Edward's High 
School. Chemistry. 
Betty Price Chellman, 104 Florence 
St.. Roslindale. Roslindale High 
School. Home Economics. Dean's 
List, I, 2; Outing Club. 1; Wesley 
Foundation. 3; Home Economics 
Club, 1. 2. 3. 

Walter Chroniak, 37 Moynan St.. 
New Bedford. New Bedford High 
School. Zoology. Dean's List, 2; 
Chemistry Club. 1. 




Indian-like, girls at cold fall game gasp, "Ugh! He's over. 



William Curtis Clark, .500 King' 
Highway. West Springfield. Ti 






North Carolina St.ate College of 
Agriculture and Engineering. Ento- 
mology. Outing Club, 1; Fernald 
Entomology Club, 1; Alpha Gamma 
Rho. 



William Eric Clark, 2S Ja 

Lawrence. Lawrence High School. 
History. Class Sergeant-at-Arms, 1, 

2, 3; Campus Varieties, 3; Christian 
Federation Cabinet, 3; Phillips Brooks 
Club, 3; Cheer Leader, 2, 3; Theta 
Chi. 

Russell Tyman Clarke, 12 Tirrell St.. 
Worcester. Worcester Academy. 

Agricultural Economics. Class Nomi- 
nating Committee. 1; Baseball. 1, 
2(M); Basketball. 1; Football, 1, 
2(M); Kappa Sigma. 

Robert E. Cleary, 186 Pinehurst Rd., 
Holyoke. Williston Academy. Chem- 
istry. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Chem- 
istry Club, 1, 2, 3; Pre-Med. Club, 3; 
Phi Sigma Kappa. 

Elizabeth Boyd Cobb, 332 Grove St., 
Chicopee Falls. Transfer from Spring- 
field Junior College. English. Bay- 
Statettes. 4; Choir. 3; Collegian. 3, 4 
(Secretary, 3); Women's Glee Club, 

3, 4; Operetta. 2. 3, 4; Phi Zeta. 

Anne Eleanor Cohen, 30 Ridgewood 
Ave., Holyoke. Holyoke High School. 
History. Dean's List. 1, 2; Collegian, 
2; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Sigma Iota 
CTreasurer, 3). 

James David Cohen, 7 Nicholas St., 
Chelsea. Transfer from Pennsylvania 
State College. Dairy. Phi Epsilon 
Pi. 

Marion Cohen, 49 Fremont Ave., 
Chelsea. Cushing Academy. Psy- 
chology. Class Nominating Commit- 
tee, 3; Intersorority Council, 3; 
Menorah Club, 1. 2, 3; Psychology 
Club, 3; Sigma Iota. 



Kenneth Lounsbury Collard, Maple 
St.. Belchertown. Williston Academy. 
Zoology. Biiy Staters. I; Men's 
Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Statesmen, 1; Bay 
State Revue, 1, 2; Theta Chi. 

Elizabeth Harvey Cooper, 221 

Francis Ave.. Pittsfield. Transfer from 
North Adams State Teachers College. 
English. Choir. 3; Women's Glee 
Club, 3; Newman Club, 3. 

Charles Henry Courchene, .50 Dexter 
St., Springfield. Transfer from Ameri- 
can International College. Chemistry. 
Men's Glee Club. 1. 3; Newman Club, 

1, 2, 3; Kappa Sigma. 

John Harold Grain, Jr., lljO Union 
St.. Leominster. Leominster High 
School. Chemistry. Newman Club, 

2, 3; Outing Club. 2; Maroon Key. 2; 
Lambda Clu Alpha (Treasurer, 1, Vice- 
President, 3). 

Marjorie Cushman, 34 Beacon Ave., 
Holyoke. Transfer from Springfield 
Junior College. History. Dean's List, 
1, 2. 

Stanley Cykowski, 35 Maple St.. 
Easthampton. Transfer from Ameri- 
can International College. Political 
Science. Collegian, 2, 3; Soccer, 2. 

Joseph Andrew Daley, SO Tower 
Hill St., Lawrence. Transfer from 
University of Alabama. History. 
Dean's List. 1, 2; Newman Club. 1, 2. 
3; Psychology Club, 3; Sigma Chi. 
Florence Mary Daub, Gardner Rd., 
Baldwinsville. Templeton High School. 
Economics. IndcK, 3; Christian Fed- 
eration Cabinet, 1, 2; Women's 
Athletic Association, 2. 3; Sigma Beta 
Chi. 

Minnie Arlene Davis, Fairview St., 
Lee. Lee High School. Home Eco- 
nomics. Choir, 1, 2; Women's Glee 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Wesley Foundation, 1. 2. 
3 (President. 3); 4-H Club, 1; Home 
Economics Club, 2, 3; Women's Ath- 
letic Association, 1, 2, 3. 



215 




Juniors find time and place for anything at Soph-Senior 



Winifred Elaine Day, Boston-Worces- 
ter Turnpike, Northboro. Northboro 
High Sciiool. M,atheinatics. Dean's 
List, 1; Choir, 1, 3: Women's Glee 
Club, 1, 2, 3: Wesley Foundation, 1, 2; 
Mathematics Club, 2, .3; Women's Ath- 
letic Association, 1, 2, 3; Chi Omega 
(Treasurer, 3). 

Mary-Kathcrine G. Daylor, 914 

Rock St., Fall River. Transfer from 
College of New Rochelle. Chemistry. 
Newman Club, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 
2, 3; W'omen's Athletic Association, 
2, 3; Chi Omega. 

Wallace Charles Dec, .S West St., 
Hadlev. Hopkins Academy. Agri- 
cultural Economics. C. A. A., 1. 

Evelyn Agatha Deerlng, 14 Water 
St.. Shrewsbury Shrewsbury High 
School. Home Economics. Home 
Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; Chi Omega. 

Lorann DeLap, Granite St., Foxboro. 
Foxboro High School. Economics. 
Women's Athletic Association, 2; Chi 
Omega. 

James Edward Dellea, Great Har- 
rington. Searles High School. General 
Engineering. Dean's List, 1, 2; Col- 
legian. 2, 3; Advanced Military, 3; 
Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Alpha Sigma 
Phi. 

Robert Charles Dletel, 4S Bardwell 
St., South Hadley Falls. South Had- 
ley Falls High School. Chemistry. 
Christian Federation Cabinet, 1, 2; 
Student Religious Council, 2; Dads' 
Day Committee, 3; Pre-Med. Club, 1, 
2, 3; Phi Sigma Kappa. 

H. Manuel Dobrusin, 10 Sachem 
Ter., Lynn. Lynn English High 
School. History and Government. 
Dean's List, 2; Interfraternity Coun- 
cil, 3; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; French 
Club, 1; Winter Track, 3 (Assistant 
Manager, 3); Tau Epsilon Phi. 



Celeste Margaret Dubord, 1.5.5 
Washington St., New Bedford. New 
Bedford High School. Horticultural 
Manufactures. Newman Club, 1, 2, 
3; Horticultural Manufactures Club, 
3; Mathemiitics Club, 1; Women's 
Athletic Associ.ntion, 1, 2, 3; Chi 
Omega. 

Dorothy Grace Dunklee, 3 Chase St., 
Brattleboro, Vt. Brattleboro High 
School. Home Economics. Dean's 
List, 1, 2; Collegian, 1, 2, 3; Outing 
Club, 1, 2 3: Christian Federation 
Cabinet. 3; 4-H Club, 1, 2. 3; Home 
Economics Club, 1, 2, 3 (Treasurer, 2, 
Vice-President, 3); Women's Athletic 
Association, 1, 2, 3; Alpha Lambda Mu 
(l-'ice-President, 3). 

Melville Bates Eaton. 144 Winsor 
Ave., Watertown. Mount Hermon. 
Economics. Interfraternity Council, 
3. 4; Maroon Key, 2 (Secretary-Treas- 
urer); Carnival Ball Committee, 2; 
Interfraternity Ball Committee, 4; 
Football, 1, 4; Hockey, 1, 2; Theta 
Chi. 

Ruth Adelaide Esson, 127 Fairmount 
St., Dorchester. Dorchester High 
School. Bacteriology. Wesley Foun- 
dation, 2, 3; Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation, 1, 2, 3. 

Robert Carrol Everson, 29 Phillips 
St.. Amherst. Transfer from Roanoke 
College. Pomology. Band, I, 2i Out- 
ing Club, 1, 2; Horticultural Show 
Committee, 1, 2, 3; Kappa Sigma. 

Allen Irwin Feldman, 107 Winthrop 
Rd., Brookline. Roxbury Memorial 
High School. History. Menorah 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 

Gordon Field, 221 Winter St., Hyan- 
nis. Barnstable High School. Ento- 
mology. Advanced Military, 3: 
Ferniild Entomology Club, 3; Theta 



Mary Frances FitzGerald, 41 Liberty 
St., Northampton. St. Michael's High 
School. English. Dean's List, 2; De- 
bating, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Lan- 
guages and Literature Club, 3; Sigma 
Beta Chi. 



Robert Alan Fitzpatrick, 30 Su 

St., Medford. Medtord High School. 
Agricultural Economics. Class Presi- 
dent, 2, 3; Class Nominating Commit- 
tee, 1; Dean's List, 2; Maroon Key, 2; 
Student Senate, 3 (Secretary); Col- 
legian, 3; Collegian Quarterly, 2, 3 
(Associate Editor); Newman Club, 1, 
2, 3; Dads' Day Committee, 2, 3; 
Carnival Ball Committee, 2; Kappa 
Sigma (Treasurer, 3). 

Charles G. Fyfe, 22 Audubon Rd., 
Worcester. New 'Vork Military Acad- 
emy. Dairy Industry. Phillips 
Brooks Club, 3; Dairy Club, 2, 3; 
Theta Chi. 

Evelyn Gagnon, 21S Park St., North 
Attleborough. North Attleborough 
High School. Chemistry. Choir, 1, 
2: Women's Glee Club, 3: Christian 
Federation Cabinet, 3; Phillips Brooks 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 2, 3; 
Women's Athletic As.90ciation, 1, 2, 3: 
Chi Omega (Vice-President, 3). 

Luther Stearns Gare, 27 Belmont 
Ave., Northampton. Northampton 
High School. Chemistry. Advanced 
Military, 3; Spring Track, 1, 2(M); 
Swimming, 1, 2; Theta Chi. 

Frances Mary Gasson, 60 J St., 
Athol. Athol High School. Home 
Economics. Newman Club, I, 2, 3; 
Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Women's Athletic .Association, 3 (Swim- 
ming Manager); Alpha Lambda Mu. 

Christine Petrea Gately, 22 Howard 
St., Holyoke. Transfer from Spring- 
field Junior College. Bacteriology. 
Dean's List, 2; Newman Club, 2, 3; 
Women's Athletic Association, 3; Phi 
Zeta. 

Charles Denlson Geer, Liberty 
St., Belchertown. Belchertown High 
School. Chemistry. Index, 2, 3 
(Statistics Editor, 3; Secretary, 3); 
Men's Glee Club, 2; Advanced Mili- 
tary, 3; Christian Federation, 1, 2; 
Baseball, 2; Kappa Sigma (Secretary, 
3). 

Mason MacCabe Gentry, 33 Third 

St., Albany. N. Y. Wordsworth School, 
London, England. English. Political 
Science. Roister Doisters, 1, 2, 3; 
Debating, 2, 3; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Radio Studio Staff. 2, 3; Current 
Affairs Club, 2, 3; Alpha Gamma Rho. 

Peter Alphonse Gervin, 110 Cottage 
St., Athol. Athol High School. Chem- 
istry. Dean's List, 2; French Club, 1; 
Mathematics Club, 1, 2, 3; Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon. 

Chrlstos Ellas Glanarakos. 1334 
Middlesex St., Lowell. Lowell High 
School. Animal Husbandry. Dean's 
List, 2; Advanced Military, 3; Outing 
Club, 1, 2; Animill Husbandry Club, 
1,2,3; Football, 1; Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

Norma Florence Gibson, IS Riddell 

St.. Greenfield. Greenfield High 
School. English. Christian Federa- 
tion Cabinet, 1, 2, 3; Current Affairs 
Club, 3; French Club, 1, 2, 3; Lan- 
guages and Literature Club, 2, 3; 
Sigma Beta Chi. 

Stanley Frank Gizienski, 150 North 
Maple St., Hadley. Hopkins Academy. 
General Engineering. Dean's List, 1; . 
Advanced Military, 3; Newman Club, 
1,2,3; Basketball, 1, 2; Soccer, 2(M), 
3(M); "M" Club. 2, 3; Q. T. V. 



2161 



Georfte Arthur Goddu, ill:! l.iiulin 
St., Holyoke. Hoiyoke Hish School. 
Education, Interl'raternity Council, 3, 
4; Newman Club, 1. 2, 3; Alpha 
Sigma Phi. 

Agnes Goldberg, 46 Highland Ave, 
Cambridge. Transfer from Cambridge 
School of Liberal Arts. Home Eco- 
nomics. Roister Doisters, 2, 3; 
Women's Glee Club, 2, 3; Menorah 
Club, 2, 3; Home Economics Club, 2, 
3; Sigma Iota. 

Melvin Irving Goldman, 020 Nor- 
folk St., Mattapan. Boston Latin 
School. Forestry. Horticultural 

Show Committee. 1; Alpha Epsilou Pi. 

Robert Irving Goldman, 102 Wallis 



Rd., 



Brooklii 



Brooklii 



High 



Historv. Roister Doisters 
3 (Business Manager, 3); Debating, 1, 
2; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Alplui 
Epsilon Pi. 

Nathan Goliclc, 11 Flmliurst St., 



Dorcheste 

Horti 

List, 

Chen 

Manufacture 

Alpha Epsilo 



1, 2; 



B..slo 

M;,ll 



Pi. 



e, Ri: 



Rosalind Dickinson Goodhu 

bunk Lane, Ipswich. Ipswich High 
School. Home Economics. Outing 
Club. 2: Animal Husbandry Club, 2; 
Home Economics Club. 1, 2, 3; 
Women's Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3 
(Swimming Club, 3); Phi Zeta. 

Irving Sidney Gordon, 63 South 
St., Ware. Ware High School. Eng- 
lish. Collegian, 1, 2, 3; Freshmen 
Handbook Board, 1; Menorah Club, 

1, 2, 3; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 

Helen Elizabeth Grant, 925 Main 
St., Athol. Athol High School. Home 
Economics. Dean's List, 1; Outing 
Club, 1, 2; Home Economics Club, 1, 

2, 3; Psychology Club, 3: Women's 
Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3; Chi 
Omega. 



Herbert Dow 

Park. Maiden. 
School. Histor 
President, 2); 
littee, 2; 



ball. 



Gross, 30 Main St. 
Morgan Preparatory 
% Maroon Key. 2 (Vice- 
Sophomore-Senior Hop 
" ball, 2 (M): Foot- 



Hockey, 2; Phi Sigma Kappa 



Blanche Anne Gutfinski, Elm St., 
HatBeld. Smith Academy. English. 
Class Secretar.y. 1. 2; Honor Council, 
2; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; French Club, 
2; Sophomore-Senior Hop Committee. 
2; Languages and Literature Club, 3; 
Sigma Beta Chi. 

George Gordon Gyrisko, Ferry St., 
South Hadley. South Hadlev High 
School. Entomology. Dean's List. 1. 
2; Cross Country, 1; Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. 

Norman Leonard Hallen, 14 River- 
view Place. Willi mansett. Chicopee 
High School. Forestry, Economics. 
Dean's List. 2; C. A. A., 2; Mathe- 
matics Club, 1. 2; Psychology Club. 
1. 2; Alpha Gamma Rho. 

Philip Handrich, Hadley. Hadley 
High School. Engineering. Football. 
3; Q. T. V. 

Samuel Nahum Harris, 1726 Com- 
monwealth Ave.. Brighton. Boston 
Latin School. Horticultural Manu- 
factures. Dean's List. 1. 2; Menorah 
Club. 1. 2; Chemistry Club. 2; Horti- 
cultural Manufactures Club. 3; Mathe- 
matics Club. 1; Pre-Med. Club, 1. 2; 
Soccer. 1; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 
Barbara Hayward, 31 Clinton St., 
Taunton. Taunton High School. 
Home Economics. 1. 2. 3; Dean's List, 
1, 2; Chi Omega. 



iionil, 400 Pleasant 
.h..kc High School. 



idl.ook Board. 1, 2. 



Richard Alexander Hewat, ISO 

Pleasant St.. North Adams. Gushing 
Academy. Chemistry. Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. 

John Hicks. 200 Overlook Rd.. New 
li...li,llc, N. -1". New Rochelle High 
S.li.H.I. At-rirultural Economics. 

Cla..s rrca.suicr, 1. 2, 3; Class Nomi- 
nating Committee. 1. 2; Dean's List. 
1.2; Collegian. 3; Campus Varieties. 3; 
Baseball, 2. 

Raymond James Hock, 11 Piper Rd.. 
West Springfield. Transfer from 
Springfield College. Zoology. Outing 
Club. 2. 3; Fernald Entomology Club. 
3; Zoology Club. 2. 3; Spring Track. 3; 
Q. T. V. 

Norma Lillian Holmberg, 1 1.5 Broad- 
view Ter., Pittsfield. Bacteriology. 
Outing Club. 2; Alpha Lambda Mu. 

David Nelson Holmes, Central St., 
West BrookHeld. Brookfield High 
School. Landscape Architecture. 

Landscape Architecture Club. 2. 3; 
Kappa Sigma. 

Mary Evelyn Holton, 17 .\cademv 
St.. South Braintree. Braintree High 
School. Home Economics. Dean's 
List. 1. 2; Intersorority Council, 3; 
Band. 3; Orchestra. 3; Home Eco- 
nomics Club, 1, 2, 3; Sigma Beta Chi. 

Lloyd Malcolm Horlick, 227 Han- 
cock St.. Everett. Everett High 
School. Zoology. Menorah Club, 1. 
2. 3; Zoology Club. 3; Swimming. 2; 
Alpha Epsilon Pi. 



Juniors 



Claire Dorothy Ilorton, Maple Ave., 
Hadley. Hopkins Academy. Psy- 
chology. Dean's List, 2; Newman 
Club, 1. 2; Sigma Beta Chi. 



Daniel Goodman llorvitz, 34 Jona- 
than St.. New Bedford. New Bedford 
High School. Mathematics. Dean's 
List. 1. 2; Menorah Club. 1. 2. 3; 
Mathematics Club, 1. 2. 3; Tau 
Epsilon Phi (Secretary. 3). 



Willis Eben Janes, 29 M.arsh Ave., 
Worcester. Worcester North High 
School. Clicniislrv. Academic Activi- 
ties li.Kiid. :;: ll^rri,!, 1. 2. 3 (Manager. 
3); Adv,iii...l M,lLl;,ry. 3; Christian 

Fedcr; 1 (';, 1,111,1. I: Spring Track, 

1; Swiiinuij.i;. .; iA.ssistant Manager); 
Kappa Sigma. 

Dorothy Marion Johnson, 46 Fames 
Ave., Amherst. Amherst High School. 
English. 

Robert Stanton Johnston, 05 North 
St.. Ware. Belchertown High School. 
Chemistry. Band. 1; Alpha Sigma 
Phi (Secretary. 2. Treasurer. 3). 



Arnold Kaplinsky, 306 Chestnut St., 
Holyoke. Holyoke High School. 
Historv. Dean's List, 1; Collegian, 
2.3; Index. 2, 3; Menorah Club. I, 2. 3; 
Current Affairs Club, 2, 3; Alpha 
Epsilon Pi. 

Mary Lisabel Keavy, 33 North St., 
Hvannis. Barnstable High School. 
English. Dean's List, 1. 2; W. S. G. A., 
2; Newman Club. 1. 2, 3; Women's 
Athletic Association. 1. 2; Chi Omega. 




•^'■an Davi^ 



"P^^s Con,^ 



""'■ty Chest Ori 



eject; 



'°« eoovo 



■217] 



«l II II i o r s 



Thomas Joseph Kelley, 6 Rosalind 
Ter.. Lynn. Lynn Classical High 
School. Pre-Dental. Class Nominat- 
ing Committee, 2; Campus Varieties, 
2; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3: Dads' Day 
Committee, 1, 2, 3; Pre-Med. Club, 
2, 3; Zoology Club, 2, 3; Lambda Chi 
Alpha (President, 3). 

Thomas Joseph Kelly, 26 Dearborn 
St.. Springfield. Monson Academy. 
History. Campus V.irieties, 3; New- 
man Club, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2(M): 
Basketball, 1, 2. 

Harriet Phyllis Kelso, Chester. 
Chester High School. Home Eco- 
nomics. Dean's List, 1, 2; 4-H Club, 
1, 2, 3; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3 
(Secretary, 2, 3); Women's Athletic 
Association, 1, 2, 3; Chi Omega. 

June Mary Kenny, 535 Main St., 
Palmer. Palmer High School. Psy- 
chology. Class Nominating Commit- 
tee, 3; Women's Glee Club, I; Outing 
Club, 1, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Ring Committee, 2, 3; French Club, I; 
Mathematics Club, 1: Psychology 
Club, 2, 3; Spanish Club, 2; Sigma 
Beta Chi. 

Herbert Kipnes, 51 Franklin Ave., 
Revere. Revere High School. Engi- 
neering. Men's Glee Club, 1; Menorah 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 
Abraham Klalman, 314 Washington 
St., Maiden. Maiden High School. 
Psychology. Band, 1, 2; Menorah 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Student Leader Day 
Committee, 3; Tau Epsilon Phi. 



Albert Joseph Klubock, 46 Bare- 
meadow St.. Methuen. Methuen High 
School. Horticultural Manufactures. 
Men's Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Menorah 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Horticultural Manu- 
factures Club, 3; Spring Track, 1, 2, 
3(M) (Manager, 3); Joint Committee 
on Inter-Collegiate Athletics, 3; Alpha 
Epsilon Pi. 

Elinor Myrtle Koonz, S6 Montague 
City Rd., Greenfield. Greenfield High 
School. Mathematics. Dean's List, 
1, 2; Index, 2, 3; Mathematics Club, 
3; Women's Athletic Association, 3; 
Phi Zeta. 

Arthur Nicholas Koulias, 3S Butter- 
field St., Lowell. Lowell High School. 
Dairy Industry. Men's Glee Club. 1; 
Campus Varieties, 3; Judging Teams, 2: 
Student Leader Day Committee, 3; 
Animal Husbandry Club, 2. 3; Chem- 
istry Club, 2, 3; Dairy Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Swimming, 1, 2(M); "M" Club, 2, 3; 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

Henrietta Mary Kreczko, South 
W'est St., Feeding Hills. Agawam 
High School. Chemistry. Index, 2, 3; 
Newman Club, 2, 3; Animal Hus- 
bandry Club, 3; Women's Athletic 
Association, 1, 2, 3; Alpha Lambda Mu. 

Florence May Lane, 11 Knowlton 
Sq., Gloucester. Gloucester High 
School. Bacteriology. Dean's List, 1, 
2; Women's Glee Club, 1, 2i, 3; Wesley 
Foundation, 3. 

Frances Anne Langan, 121 W'ayne 
St., Springfield Springfield Technical 
High School. Home Economics. 'New- 
man Club, 1, 2, 3; Mothers' Day Com- 
mittee, 2, 3; Home Economics Club, 
1, 2, 3; Women's Athletic Association, 
1; Chi Omega. 




Mars' 



3eaO 



Carpe 



oter 



^.ith ^^"""^ 



of rare 



Ccotury 



Anita Luclne Lapointe, IS Cherry 
St., Easthampton. Home Economics. 
Dean's List, 1, 2. 

Marguerite Georgette Laprade, 69 

Pleasant St., Easthampton. East- 
hampton High School. French. Dean's 
List. 1, 2; Newman Club, 2; French 
Club, 1, 2, 3 (Secretary, 3); Languages 
and Literature Club, 3; Modern Dance 
Club, 3. 

Edward Peter Larkin, 215 Arsenal 
St., Watertown. Watertown High 
School. Dairy Industry. Newman 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Student Leader Day 
Committee, 3; Dairy Club, 3; Base- 
ball, 1, 2; Basketball, 1; Football, 1, 2, 
3. 

Maxim Ian Lebeaux, 30 Fruit St„ 
Shrewsbury. Shrewsbury High School. 
Pre-Med. Debating, 1, 2; Menorah 
Club, 1, 2; Pre-Med. Club, 3; Alpha 
Epsilon Pi. 

William Billings Lecznar, 18 Boyal 

Ave., Holvoke. Holvoke High School. 
Economics. Dean's List. 1, 2; New- 
man Club, I, 2; Alpha Gamma Rho. 

Theodore R. LeMaire, 1470 Eastern 
Ave., Maiden. Fryeburg Academy. 
English. Football, 3; Phi Sigma 
Kappa. 

Victor Anthony Leonowlcz, 161 

Bedford St., Whitman. Bridgewater 
High School. Floriculture. Class 
Nominating Committee, 1; Dean's 
List, 1. 2; Judging Teams, 3; New- 
man Club, 1, 2, 3; Horticulture Show 
Committee, 3; Football, 1, 2; Q. T. V. 

Morton Ashur Levlne, 11 Appleton 
Ter., Watertown. Watertown High 
School. Mathematics. Band, 1; 

Menorah Club, I, 2. 3; Tau Epsilon 
Phi. 

Harold Sunter Lewis, 1S4 Edge Hill 
Rd., Milton. Thayer Academy. Zo- 
ology. Current Affairs Club, 2; Zool- 
ogy Club, 3; Theta Chi. 

Richard Lawrence Libby, 34 Dean 
St., Bridgewater. Bridgewater High 
School. Chemistry. Class Nominat- 
ing Committee, 3; Dean's List, 1, 2; 
Band, 3; Chemistry Club, 2, 3; Alpha 
Gamma Rho (Vice-President. 3). 

Raymond Sidney Licht, 3 Coltax 
St., Springfield. Springfield Classical 
High School. Horticultural Manu- 
factures. Dean's List, 1. 2; Menorah 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Horticultural Manu- 
factures Club, 3; Mathematics Club; 
Tau Epsilon Phi. 

Harry Carlton Lincoln, 1764 Bay 
St., Taunton. Taunton High School. 
Economics. Advanced Military, 3: 
Alpha Gamma Rho. 

William Preston MacConnell, 14 

Seove St., W'estboro. Mount Hermon. 
Forestry. Kappa Sigma. 

Roger Sawyer Maddocks, Brimfield. 
Briinfield High School. History. Ad- 
vanced Military. 3. 

Merwin Paul Magnin, 547 South St., 
Dillon. Diiltoii High School. Eco- 
,,,,1111. s. Intcrfratcnutv Council, 3; 
VdvaiKcd Military, 3; Baseball, 1, 2; 
Basketball, 1; Theta Chi. 

Thaddeus Francis Maliszewski, 275 

High St., Lowell. Lowell High School. 
Bacteriology. Newman Club, 3. 

Richard Edward Maloy, 666 West 

Honsatonic St., Pittsfield. St. John's 
Academy. Liberal Arts. Advanced 
Military, 3; Campus Varieties. 2; 
Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1. 
2(M): Basketball. 1, 2(M); Swim- 
ming, 1; "M" Club. 2; Lambda Chi 
Alpha. 



218 



Mary Josephine Mann, 237 High 
St., Diilton. Diilton High School. 



Hon 



Hon 



Club, 1, 2, 3: Women's Athletic .\sso- 
cintion, 1, 2. 3 (Basketball Manager, 2); 
Chi Omega. 

David Henry Marsden, 419 Winthrop 
St., Taunton. Taunton High School. 
Botany. Dean's List. 1; Maroon Key, 
2 (Secretarv-Treasurer): Advanced 
Military, 3; Carnival Ball Committee, 
2; Sopiiomore-Senior Hop Committee. 
2: Alpha Gamma Rho. 
Anita Jean Marshall, IS Brookline 
Ave.. Holvoke. Holyoke High School. 
English. 'Class Nominating Commit- 
tee, 2; Dean's List. -; Menorah Club, 

1, 2, 3: ^L.tho^s' Dav Committee. 2; 
Sigma Iota iScrclaiy. 3K 

Helen Clara Marten, Pendleton 
Ave.. Willimansett. Transfer from 
American International College. Eng- 
lish. 

Henry Francis Martin, 30 Cottage 
St.. Amherst. Transfer from St. 
Ansehn's College. Economics. Col- 
legian. 1. 2, 3 (Sports Editor, 2, Campus 
Editor, 3); Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Current Affairs Club, 2: Q. T. V. 
(Secretary, 2, 3). 

Rudolf E. Mathias, 310 Elm St., 
Northampton. Northampton High 
School. English. Dean's List, 1. 2; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2. 3; French Club, 

2, 3 (Treasurer, 2, S); Alpha Epsilon 
Pi. 

James Leo McCarthy, 37 Fauender 
St., Millis. Millis High School. Eco- 
nomics. Dean's List, 1; Interfra- 
ternitv Council, 3; Advanced Military, 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Alpha 



Rho 



; Church 
I High 



Russell Joseph McDonald, < 

St., Wheelwright. Hardwic 
School. Liberal .\rts. Class 
nating Committee, 3; Advanced Mili- 
tary, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Military 
Ball Committee, 3; Current Affairs 
Club, 1, 2. 3; Baseball, 1, 2; Cross 
Country. I. 2(M), 3(M); Spring Track, 
1, 3; Winter Track. 1, 3(M); "M" 
Club, 2. 3; Phi Sigma Kappa. 
John P. McDonough, 54 Leonard 
St., Dorchester. Jamaica Plain High 
School. Dairy Industry. Class Cap- 
tain, 2, 3; Maroon Key, 2; Student 
Senate, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Ring Committee, 2, 3; Dairy Club, 
1, 2, 3; Football, 1, 2(M), 3(M); 
Spring Track, 1. 2(M): Winter Track. 
1.2(M): "M" Club. 2, 3; Q. T. V. 
Richard S. McKcnzie, Woods Hole. 
Falmouth High School. Dairy In- 
dustry. Class Nominating Commit- 
tee. 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Dairy 
Club, 2, 3. 

Frederick Adams McLaughlin, Jr., 
14 Nutting Ave., Amherst, .\mherst 
High School. Landscape Architecture. 
Advanced Military, 3; Landscape 
Architecture Club, 3; Basketball, 1, 2; 
Kappa Sigma. 

Joseph Wright McLeod, 4 Maple 
St., Pepperell. Pepperell High School. 
Bacteriology. Class Nominating Com- 
mittee, 1, 2, 3; Collegian, 4; Bay 
State Revue, 2, 3; Campus Varieties, 
3. 4; Judging Teams, 3, 4; Outing 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club, 1. 2, 3, 
4; Chemistry Club, 1. 2: Dairy Club, 
3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 2, 3; Cross 
Country. 1, 2; Soccer, 2, 3, 4 (Manager, 
4); Winter Track, 1. 2; Joint Com- 
mittee on Inter-Collegiate Athletics, 
3, 4. "M" Club, 3, 4; Alpha Sigma 
Phi (Secretary, 2). 

Helen Elizabeth McMahon, 16 
Holyoke St., Easthampton. East- 
hampton High School. Bacteriology. 
Dean's List, 1: Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Alpha Lambda Mu. 




Professor Troy discusses Spenser and the Faerie Queene 



George Alexander McSwain, Syble 
St., Walpole. Transfer from Uni- 
versity of Alabama. History. 

Ralph Bertrand Mendall, Jr., 18 

Forest St., Middleboro. Middleboro 
Memorial High School. Economics. 
Band, 1, 2; Choir, 3; Men's Glee Club, 

1, 2, 3; Statesmen, 3; Bay State 
Revue, 1, 2; Kappa Sigma. 

Irving S. Mendelson, 463 Crescent 
St.. Brockton. Brockton High School. 
Horticultural Manufactures. Orches- 
tra, 1. 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Horticultural Manufactures Club, 3; 
Alpha Epsilon Pi. 

Daphne Parker Miller, Bayside 
Gables, Bavside. N. Y. Bayside High 
School, N. Y. Home Economics. 
Dean's List, 2; Band, 1; Choir, 1, 2: 
Christian Federation Cabinet, 1, 2; 
Phillips Brooks Club, 1, 2, 3 (Vice- 
President, 3); Dads' Day Committee, 

2, 3; Carnival Ball Committee, 3; 
Home Economics Club, I, 2, 3; 
Women's Athletic Association, 2, 3; 
Phi Zeta. 

Henry Omer Miller, 875 Washington 
St., Haverhill. St. James High School. 
Economics. Class Nominating Com- 
mittee, 1, 2; Band, 1; Newman Club, 

1, 2, 3; Mothers' Day Committee, 2; 
Spring Track, 1; Q. T. V. 

Janet Milner, 12 Dale St., Rochdale. 
Leicester High School. Home Eco- 
nomics. Dean's List, 1, 2: Inter- 
sorority Council, 3; Bay-Statettes, 2, 
3; Choir, 1, 2, 3; Women's Glee Club, 

2, 3; Outing Club, 1; PhiHips Brooks 
Club, 3: Chemistry Club. 3; 4-H Club, 
1, 2, 3 (Secretary, 3); Home Economics 
Club, 1, 2, 3 (Treasurer, 3); Women's 
Athletic .\ssociation, 1, 2, 3; Swim- 
ming Club, 3; Alpha Lambda Mu. 

Ida Claudia Moggio, 31 East St., 
Chicopee Falls. Chicopee High School. 
Modern Languages. Women's Glee 
Club, 1, 2, 3: Newman Club, 1, 2, 3. 



Alice Foster Monk, 111 Champney 
St., Groton. Groton High School. 
Home Economics. 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; Alpha 
Lambda Mu. 

Anne Rita Moriarty, Russell St., 
Hadley. Hopkins Academy. Zoology. 
Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Zoology Club, 3. 

Thomas F. Moriarty, 11 School St., 
Holyoke. Holyoke High School. 



Che 



stry. 



Helen Navoy, 415 Hampshire St., 
Lawrence. Lawrence High School. 
Mathematics. Dean's List, 1, 2. 3; 
Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; French Club, 

1, 2, 3; Mathematics Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Psychology Club, 3; Women's Ath- 
letic Association, 1, 2, 3; Dance Club. 

2, 3; Swimming Club, 3. 

Edvrard Vaughn Nebesky, 12 Car- 
penter St., Amesbury. Amesbury High 
School. Horticultural Manufactures. 
Advanced Military. 3; Football. 1, 2. 3; 
Hockey, 2; Tennis, 2(M); Interclass 
Athletic Board, 1, 2, 3; Phi Sigma 
Kappa. 

Bourcard Nesin, 750 Southampton 
Rd., Wostffeld. Westfield High School. 
Chemistry. Dean's List. 1, 2; Index, 
2, 3; Mathematics Club, 2, 3. 

Lawrence Edward Newcomb, Jr., 

Norwell Ave., Norwell. Norwell High 
School. Civil Engineering. Collegian, 
I; Roister Doisters. 2. 3; Outing Club. 
3; Christian Federation Cabinet, 2, 3; 
Student Religious Council, 1, 2, 3 
(Vice-President, 3); 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

Stuart Victor Nims, 81 Park Ave., 
Keene. N. H. Keene High School. 
Agricultural Economics. Theta Chi. 

David Lloyd George Nowell, 25 

B St., Adams. Transfer from North 
Adams State Teachers College. His- 
tory. Newman Club, 1. 



219] 




^Military majors take the center walk from convo crowd 



Robert Francis O'Brien, 17 Beech- 
wood Ave., Watertown. Watertown 
High School. Engineering. Advanced 
Militarv, 3: Newman Club, 1, 2, 3 
Ring Committee, 2, 3; Baseball, 2(M) 
Basketball, 2, 3; Football, 2; "M' 
Club, 2: Lambda Chi Alpha. 
Samuel Robert Orcutt, 213 Main St., 
West Newbury. Transfer from Nor- 
wich University. Veterinary Science. 
Judging Teams, 2. 

Stanley Pacocha, 56 Glendale St., 
Easthampton. Williston .\cademy. 
Economics. Class Nominating Com- 
mittee, 2; Spanish Club, 2, 3; Basket- 
ball, 1; Sigma Phi Epsilon. 
Robert Douglas Pearson, Pleasant- 
ville Rd., BriarclifTe Manor, N. Y. 
Mount Hermon. Zoolocv. Cla.ss 
Nominating Committee, 1; Band, 

1, 2; Phillips Brooks Club, 3; Pre- 
Med. Club, 1, 2, 3 (Vice-President, 3); 
Zoology Club, 1, 2, 3; Soccer, 1, 2; 
Theta Chi. 

Barbara Frances Peck, R. F. D. No. 

2, Shelburne. Arms Academy. Eng- 
lish. Dean's List, 2; Orchestra, 1; 
Women's Glee Club, 3. 

Samuel B. Peskin, 49 Coolidge St., 
Brookline. Transfer from Michigan 
State College. Poultry. Judging 
Teams, 3; Menorah Club, 2, 3; Poultry 
Club, 2, 3. 

John Podmayer, Chestnut St., West 
Hatfield. Smith Academy. Agricul- 
tur.al Economics. Soccer, 1, 2, 3; 
Alpha Sigma Phi. 

Edward Michael Podolak, 79 Maple 
St., Easthampton. Easthampton High 
School. Physics. Student Senate, 3; 
Advanced Military, 3: C. A. A., 2; 
Sophomore-Senior Hop Committee, 2: 
Basketball, 1, 2(M): Soccer, I, 2(M), 
3(M); Phi Sigma Kappa. 
Stanley Edwin Polchlopek, 140 
Cabot St., Chicopee. Chicopee High 
School. Chemistry. Collegian. 1, 2, 
3 (Managing Editor, 2, 3, Editor, 3); 
Carnival Committee, 3; Q. T. V. 



Anthony Joseph Polito, 43 Fair St., 
Northampton. Northampton High 
School. Chemistry. Dean's List, 2. 

John Howland Powell, Brookfield. 
Brookfield High School. Landscape 
Architecture. Class Nominating Com- 
mittee, 1; Dean's List, I, 2; Honor 
Council, 2, 3; Informal Committee, 3; 
Landscape Architecture Club, 2, 3; 
Soccer, 1; Theta Chi. 
John Francis Powers, IS Salem St., 
Bradford. Haverhill High School. 
Economics. Dean's List, 2; Newman 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 1, 2; 
Mathematics Club, 1, 2; Football, 1; 
Spring Track, 1; Swimming, 1; Winter 
Track, 1; Lambda Chi Alpha. 
Urbano Carlo Pozzani, 1S3 New 
Bridge St., West SpringBeld. West 
Springfield High School. Chemistry. 
Chemistrv Club, 1, 2, 3; Alpha Gamma 
Rho. 

Harold Joseph Quinn, 70 Proctor 
St., Salem. Salem High School. Zo- 
ology. Band, 2, 3; Newman Club, 1, 
2, 3; Phi Sigma Kapp.a. 

Ephraim Morton Radner, 6.i Fir- 
glade Ave., Springfield. Springfield 
Classical High School. English. 
Dean's List, I, 2; Collegian, 1, 2; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Mathematics 
Club, 1. 

Carl Robert Rano, 9^ Lake Ave., 
Worcester. Transfer from University 
of Alabama. Chemistry. C. A. A., 
2; Newman Club, 2; Chemistry Club, 
2, 3; Pre-Med. Club, 3; Theta Chi. 
Carl Ransow, 47 Mvlod St., Norwood. 
Norwood High School. Economics. 
Class Nominating Committee, 3; 
French Club, 1, 2, 3 (Vice-President, 
3); Swimming, 1, 2, 3; Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. 

Harriet Agnes Rayner, 2 Lorenzo St., 
Neponset. Dorchester High School. 
Bacteriology. Dean's Li.st, 1; 4-H 
Club, 2, 3; Prc-Med. Club, 3; Alpha 
Lambda Mu. 



Lester Reynold Rich, 11 Ellison 
Road, Newton. Boston Latin School. 
Pre-Med. Dean's List, 1, 2; Men's 
Glee Club, 2; C. A. A., 3; Menorah 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 
Charles Bradford Richards, 18 
Churchill Ave., Arlington. Holder- 
ness Preparatorv School. Animal Hus- 
bandry. Christian Federation Cabi- 
net. 1, 2, 3; Phillips Brooks Club. 1, 2; 
Student Religious Council, 2, 3 (Vice- 
President. 3); Animal Husbandry 
Club. 1; Swimming, 2, 3; Kappa 
Sigma. 

Bernard Joseph Ristuccia, 549 
Crafts St., West Newton. Waltham 
High School. Pomology. Newman 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Horticultural Show Com- 
mittee, 3: Mathematics Club, 1; Foot- 
ball, 1; Theta Chi. 
Robert Albert Rocheleau, 37 Mun- 
roe St., Northampton. Northampton 
High School. Chemistry. Advanced 
Military, 3; C. A. A., 2. 
Louis Frederic Ruder, Jr., 64 



Northampto 



Zoology. 
Kappa Sigma. 

Matthew John Ryan, 677 Carew St., 
Springfield. Monson Academy. Engi- 
neering. .\dvanced Mihtary, 3; New- 
man Club, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2(M); 
Football, 1, 2(M), 3(M). 
Miriam H. Sacks, 267 Fuller St., 
Dorchester. Dorchester High School. 
Bacteriology. Dean's List, 1, 2; 
Sigma Iota. 

Alvin Joseph Salomon, 112 Spring 
St., Springfield. Transfer from Spring- 
field College. Chemistr.v. 
Stanley Francis Salwak, 222 East 
River St., Orange. Orange High 
School. Pre-Med. Deans List, 1; 
Football, I, 2(M), 3(M). 
P. Gildo Santin, 382 Elliott St., 
Beverly. Essex Agricultural School. 
Floriculture. Maroon Key. 2; New- 
man Club, 1, 2, 3; Floriculture Club, 
1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; 
Football, 1, 2(M), 3(M); Spring Track, 
1, 2(M), 3; Winter Track, 1, 2(M). 3; 
"M" Club, 2, 3; Phi Sigma Kappa. 
Theodore R. Saulnier, 476 Waverly 
St., Framingham. Framingham High 
School. Chemistrv. Collegian, 1, 2, 
3: Freshman Handbook Board, 1, 2, 3; 
Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Kappa Sigma. 
Robert James Schiller, 130 Long- 
wood Ave., Brookline. Brookline High 
School. Chemistrv. Dean's List, 1: 
Menorah Club. 1, 2, 3; Chemistrv Club, 
1. 2; Pre-Med. Club, 1; Swimming, 1, 
2(M); "M" Club, 2; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 
Priscilla Scott, 94 Spruce St., Water- 
town. Watertown High School. Psy- 
chology. Phillips Brooks Club, 2, 3; 
Psychology Club, 3: Women's Ath- 
letic Association, 1, 2, 3; Sigma Beta 
Chi. 

William Gordon Serex, 327 Lincoln 
Ave.. Amherst. Amherst High School. 
Chemistry. Kappa Sigma. 
Theodore Shepardson, 63 Simonds 
St., Athol. Athol High School. Dairy 
Industry. Class Nominating Commit- 
tee, 1; Dean's List, 1: Collegian, 3; 
Outing Club, 1, 2, 3; Dairy Club, 3; 
Cross Country, 1; Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. 

Marguerite Jane Sherwood, Hunt- 
ington. Chester High School. Home 
Economics. Student Religious Coun- 
cil. 1. 2, 3; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3; Home 
Economics Club, 1, 2, 3. 
Rita Elizabeth Skiffington, 7 High 
St.. West Brookfield. Warren High 
School. Bacteriology. Class Nomi- 
nating Committee, 1; Freshman Hand- 
book Board, 1, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2, 
3: Sigma Beta Chi. 



220 



Cornelius William Slack, 177 M.intii- 
Rvio Ud., Nortli Amherst. Amlierst 
Hisli Sfliool. MiUhcnmtifs and 
Physics. 

Melvin Small, S4 Trull St.. Somcrville. 
Somerville High School. Histor.v. 
Dean's List, 1, 2; Index, 2, 3; Debat- 
ing, 1, 2; Radio Studio Stuff, 1; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; French Club, 1; 
Cross Countr.v, 2, 3 (Assistant Man- 
ager, 3) . 

E. Jane Smith, 262 Mount .\uburn 
St., Watertown. Watertown High 
School. Psvchologv. Roister Bols- 
ters, 2, 3; Psvchologv Club, 3; Cheer 
Leader, 3: Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation, 1, 2, 3; Phi Zeta. 
Helen Barbara SmitFl, 32 Hillside 
Ave., Woll.iston. Woodward School 
for Girls. Languages and Literature. 
Dean's List, 2; Choir. 1, 2; Women's 
Glee Club. 1. 2. 3; Outing Club. 1: 
Phillips Brooks Club, 1, 2, 3; Dads' 
Da.v Committee, 2, 3: Languages and 
Literature Club. 3; Swimming Club, 3; 
Phi Zeta. 

Helen Frances Smitli, 133 Farns- 
worth St., Springfield. Transfer from 
American International College. Chem- 
istry. Alpha Lambda Mu. 
'William Fred Smith, 5 Exchange 
St., Holliston. Holliston High School. 
Agronomy. 

Ralph Earle Southwick, Marshall 
St., Leicester. Leicester High School. 
Horticultural Manufactures. Rifle 
Team, 2, 3. 

Joan Ann Stanne, 163 Triangle St.. 
.\mhcrst. .\mherst High School. 
Sociologv. Xewman Club, 1, 2, 3; 
4-H Cluij, 1, 2, 3. 

Margaret Isobel Stanton, 475 Park 
Ave., W'orcester. \Yorcester South 
High School. English. Choir, 1, 3; 
Collegian, 3; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; 
Statettes, 2, 3; Women's Glee Club, 
1, 2, 3; Campus Varieties, 2; W^esley 
Foundation, 1; Radio Committee, 3; 
Languages and Literature Club, 3; 
Chi Omega. 

Earle Raymond Steeves, 233 Mer- 
riam .\ve.. Leominster. Leicester High 
School. Animal Husbandry. Outing 
Club. 1; Animal Husbandry Club, 2, 3; 
Football, 2{Mh Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 
Kenneth A. Stewart, IIS Quincy 
Ave., Winthrop. Winthrop Senior 
High School. Chemistry. Xewman 
Club, 1,2, 3; Chemistry Club. 3; Phi 
Sigma Kappa. 

Catherine Louise Stockwell, Hill 
Rd., Sutton. Sutton High School. 
History. Dean's List, 1, 2; Women's 
Glee Club, 2: Mathematics Club, 1; 
W'omen's Athletic Association, 2, 3; 
Phi Zeta. 

Kathryn Marilyn Stone, 14 Clark 
St., Holyoke. Holyoke High School. 
Home Economics. Class Nominating 
Committee, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; Horti- 
cultural Manufactures Club, 1, 2. 
John Martin Storozuk, 75 Wilson 
Ave., Pomona, California. Deerfield 
Academy. Agricultural Economics. 
C. A. A., 2; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Agricultural Economics Club, 3; Bas- 
ketball, 1; Football, 1, 2(M), 3(M); 
Winter Track, 1; "M" Club, 2, 3; 
Q. T. V, 

Ellis Charles TaUen, 670 River St., 
M.attapan. Brighton High School. 
Horticultural Manufactures. Dean's 
List, 1, 2; Menorah Club. 1, 2, 3; 
Horticultural Manufactures Club, 3; 
Soccer, 1, 2, 3; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 
May Merle Thayer, 395 West Housa- 
tonic St., Pittsfield. Pittsfield High 
" ' ' ' "■ Beta 



Gcorfte Preston Tilley, 135(1 North- 
ampton St., Holvoke. Deerlield Acad- 
emy. Chemistry. Swimming, 1, 

2(M). 3(M). 

Joseph Andrew Tosi, Jr., Justice 
Hill, Sterling. Worcester North High 
School. Wildlife Management. Ad- 
vanced Military, 3; Bav State Revue, 
1, 2, 3; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3l Newman 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Horticultural Show 
Committee, 2. 3; Horticulture Club, 
1. 2, 3; Zoologv Club. 3; Ski Team 
(1. S. U.), 2, 3; Kappa Sigma. 

Olive Elizabeth Tracy, 57 Monterey 
Rd., W'orcester. W^orcester North 
High School. Zoology. Class Nomi- 
nating Committee, 3; Phillips Brooks 
Club, 3 (Secretary); Women's Ath- 
letic Association, 3; Phi Zeta. 

Wallace 'Wilder Turner, 13.S Ashue- 
lot St., Dalton. Dalton High School. 
Zoologv. Choir. 3; Men's Glee Club, 
1. 

Helen Luciie Van Meter, 167 

Montague Rd., North Amherst. 
Amherst High School. English. Aca- 
demic Activities Board, 3; Bay 
Statettes, 2, 3; Choir, 2, 3; Collegian 
(Juarterly, 1: Orchestra, 3; Women's 
Glee Club, 1, 2, 3 (Manager, 3); 
Operetta, 1, 2, 3 (Manager, 3); Phi 
Zeta. 

Philip William Vetterling, U Belvi- 
dere Ave., Holvoke. Holvoke High 
School. History. Dean's List. 1, 2; 
M.aroon Key, 2; Advanced Military, 
3; Soccer, 1. 

Bernard William Vitkauskas, 99 

Williams St., Northampton. North- 
ampton High SchooL Chemistry. 
Advanced Military, 3; Chemistry 
Club. 3; Kappa Sigma. 



J 11 11 i o 1* s 



John Henry Vondell, Jr., SO Fearing 
St., Amherst. Amherst High School. 
Liberal Arts. Tennis, 2: Radio Studio 
Staff, 3; Thcta Chi. 

Barbara Cecile Wainshel, 92 South 
Common St., Lynn. Lynn Classical 
High School. Ps.ychology. Menorah 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Psvchologv Club, 3, 4; 
Current Affairs Club, 3; Sigma Iota. 

Francis Everett Ward, 77 Birch St., 
Wdrrrstn-. \N"nrcester South High 

S. I I I'liL-lisli. Bay State Revue, 3; 

U'lislri l)Lii~lrr.s, 1, 2, 3; Languages 
^iii^l 1,1 In;, lure Club, 3; Soccer, 1; 
Lauibiia Clu Alpha. 

Lewis James Ward, Jr., 30 Laurel 
Drive, Needham. Norfolk County 
Agricultural School. Animal Hus- 
bandry. Advanced Military, 3; Judg- 
ing Teams, 3; Animal Husbandry 
Club, 1, 2, 3 (Secret.ary, 3); Theta 
Chi. 

Charles Lloyd Warner, 3 Prospect 
St., West Bridgewater. Holderness 
School. Entomology. Interfrater- 
nity Council, 3, 4 (Treasurer, 3); 
Men's Glee Club, 2: Advanced Mili- 
tary, 3; Interfraternity Ball Com- 
mittee, 3; Fcrnald Entomology Club, 
3, 4 (Secretary, 3); Kappa Sigma. 

Edward Clark Warner, Main St., 
Sunderland. Amherst High School. 
Engineering. Interfraternity Council, 
3; C. A. A., 2; Football, 1, 2(M), 3(M); 
Q. T. V. (Treasurer, 2, President, 3). 

Frank Thayer Waters, Jr., 185 

South Main St., Orange. Transfer 
from Wesleyan. Physical Education, 




^Pfiog 



221 



WilHam Wadsworth Waters, 185 

South Main St., Or,-inge. Transfer 
from Wesleyan. Chemistry. 

Edward Arthur Watts, S Somerset 
St., E.ist Weymouth. Weymouth 
High School. English. Dean's List, 
2; Wesley Foundation, 2, 3; French 
Club, 3; Languages and Literature 
Club, 3; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

Betty Ellis Webster, 44 Magnolia 
Rd., Swampscott. Swampscott High 
School. Home Economics. Women's 
Glee Club, 2; Dads' Day Committee, 
2; Outing Club, 2; Hoiie Economics 
Club, 1, 2: Cheer Leader, 2, 3; 
Women's Athletic Association, 1, 2; 
Phi Zeta. 

Eugene Weln, 60 Chase Ave., North 
Adams. Drury High School. Eco- 
nomics. Class Nominating Commit- 
tee, I; Dean's List, I, 2; Interfrater- 
nity Council, 3; Menorah Club, I, 2, 3: 
Zoology Club, 1; Football, 1; Tau 
Epsilon Phi (Treasurer, 3). 

Lurane Wells, East Main St., Orleans. 
Hyannis State Teachers College. 
Home Economics. Home Economics 
Club, 2, 3; Roister Doisters, 2, 3; 
Campus Varieties, 3; Christian Fed- 
eration Cabinet, 3. 

Laurel Emily Wheelock, 29 Gram- 
pean Way, Dorchester. Boston Girls' 
High School. Home Economics. 4-H 
Club, 2, 3; Home Economics Club, 
1, 2, 3; Women's Athletic .Association, 
1, 2, 3; Alpha Lambda Mu. 

Jonah S. White, 12S Union St., 
Everett. Everett High School. 
Horticultural Manufactures. Horti- 
cultural Manufactures Club, 3; Meno- 
rah Club, 1, 2, 3. 



Loren Cecil Wilder, 298 Orange St., 
Springfield. Springfield High School 
of Commerce. Economics. Basket- 
ball, 1; Interfraternity Council, 3: 
Sigma .\lpha Epsilon. 

Justin Irving Winthrop, 510 Eastern 
Ave., Lynn. Lynn English High 
School. English. Menorah Club, 1, 
2, 3; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 

Janice Louise Wisly, 78 Hitchcock 
St., Holvoke. Holvoke High School. 
Home Economics. Home Economics 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Chi Omega. 

Gertrude Wolkovsky, 34 Longwood 
Ave., Holyoke. Holyoke High School. 
Mathematics. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Mathematics Club, 2; Sigma Iota. 

Ruble Alfreda Woodward, 60 

Blanchard Place, Gardner. Gardner 
High School. Home Economics. 



Ruth Elaine Woodworth. 35 Rand 
St., East Lynn. Lynn English High 
School. Home Economics. Home 



Sam Zeltserman, 90 Capen St., 
Dorchester. Dorchester High School. 
Physical and Biological Sciences. 

William John Zukel, 55 Fort St., 
Northampton. Northampton High 
School. Zoology. Dean's List, 1; 
Pre-Med. Club, 3; Zoology Club, 3. 




Junio 



'F tr 



Sophomores 



Clarice Frances Abrahms, 64 Forest 
Park Ave., Springfield. Transfer from 
Springfield Junior College. Public 
Health. Menorah Club. 2. 
Francis William Aldrich, 23 Lind- 
bergh Blvd., Westfield. Westfield High 
School. Chemistry. Engineering 

Club, 1; Alpha Gamma Rho. 
Stewart EUwood Allen, 42 Orchard 
St., Manhasset, Long Island, N. Y. 
Manhasset High School. Recreational 
Planning. Freshman Handbook Board, 
1, 2; Recreational Planning Club, 2: 
Lambda Chi Alpha. 

Irving Jacob Alper, 45 Main St., 
Millburn, N. J. MiUburn High School. 
Bacteriology. Dean's List, 1; Meno- 
rah Club, 1: Tau Epsilon Phi. 
Alexander Renton Amell, 416 Hough- 
ton St., North Adams. Drurv High 
School. Chemistry. Dean's List, 1: 
Outing Club, 1; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 
Arvid W. Anderson, 19 Greenleaf 
Ave., West Springfield. Transfer from 
Bay Path Institute. Landscape Archi- 
tecture. Class Nominating Commit- 
tee, 2; Men's Glee Club, 1,2; Operetta, 
1; Wesley Foundation, 2; Landscape 
Architecture Club, 2. 

David Werner Anderson, Jr., 13 

Rena St., Worcester. Worcester North 
High School. Chemistry. Maroon 
Key, 2; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2; 
Baseball, 1; Basketball, 1; Football, 2; 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 
Edith Elizabeth Appel, ISS High St., 
Dalton. Dalton High School. Eng- 
lish. Phillips Brooks Club, 1: French 
Club, 2; Alpha Lambda Mu. 
Joseph Moulton Arnold, 10 Marble 
St., Gloucester. Essex County Agri- 
cultural School. Floriculture. Class 
Nominating Committee, 2; Honor 
Council, 1, 2; Horticultural Show Com- 
mittee, 1, 2, 3; Floriculture Club, 1, 2, 
3: Horticulture Club, 1, 2, 3; Phi 
Sigma Kappa. 

Mabel Arnold, 102 Crescent St., 
.Northampton. Northampton High 

School. Home Economics. Choir, 1; 
Women's Glee Club, 2: Home Eco- 
nomics Club, 1, 2; Women's .\thletic 
Association, I, 2; Phi Zeta. 
Elizabeth Jane Atkinson, 468 Alden 
St.. Springfield. Transfer from Spring- 
field Junior College. Home Economics. 
Phi Zeta. 

Priscilla Ethel August, 39 Fairview 
Ave., Northampton. Transfer from 
Springfield Junior College. Physical 
and Biological Sciences. 
Shirley Anne AzofI, 253 Beverly Rd., 
Hrookline. Brighton High School. 
Home Economics. Women's Glee 

Club, I ' 

Club. 1, 2; Ho 
Sigma Iota. 
Mollis E. Baker, 14 Bonad Rd., 
Arlington. Mount Hermon. Animal 
Husbandry. Baseball, 1; Hockey, 1; 
Kappa Sigma. 

Eleanor Louise Barber, 22 South 
Ave., Melrose. Melrose High School. 
English. Dean's List. 1. 
Muriel Edith Barbour, 117 Florence 
St., Uo.slindalc. Roslindale High 

School. Home Ki-uTuimics. Roister 
1), lister.^, 1: Phillips Brooks Club, 1; 
Home Economics Club, 1; Phi Zeta. 
Herman Saul Barenboim, 527 
Haverhill St., Lawrence. Lawrence 
High School. Political Science. Meno- 
rah Club, 1. 2; Baseball, 1; Winter 
Track, 1; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 



Milton Rutherford Barnes, ti7 

Spring St., SpringlicKl. Trnnsfer troui 
Springadd College. Economics. 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 
Leon Oser Barron, 16 Intervale St., 
Roxburv. Transfer from Cambridge 
Junior College. English. Bay Staters, 
2: Men's Glee Club, 2: Mcnorah 
Club. 2: Current Affairs Club, 2. 
Mary Elizabeth Bartlett, N:i Cluinb 
St., Mansfield. Man.^HcKl HJKli School. 



Ho 



Cla 



littee. 2; Phillips Brooks Club. 
1, 2; Home Economics Club. 1, 2; 
Women's Athletic Association, 1; 
Sigma Beta Chi. 

Milton Ralph Bass, 136 Briullcn.l Si . 
Pittsfield. Pittsfield High S, li,.,,!. 
Physical and Biolocical S. i, ii. . ~. 
Menorah Club, 1, 2; Soccer. 1; Alpha 
Epsilon Pi. 

Richard Wingate Bauer, 236 Pleas- 
ant St., South Weymouth. Mechanic 
\rts High School. History. Soccer, 
2; Lambda Chi Alpha. 
Josephine Anne Beary, 225 Com- 
mercial St.. Whitman. Whitman High 
School. Home Economics. Newman 
Club. 1. 2; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion, 1, 2: Alpha Lambda Mu. 
Cedrlc Harding Beebe, 111 L.ake- 
view Ave., Cambridge. Cambridge 
High School. Chemistry. 
Barbara Jean Bemis, Sunset Farm, 
Spencer. David Prouty High School. 
Home Economics. Outing Club, 1; 
4-H Club, 1, 2; Home Economics Club, 
1, 2; Women's .\thletic Association, 
1, 2; .\lpha Lambda Mu. 
Armand Louis Bengle, Jr., 164 
Mvrtle St.. Indian Orchard. Spring- 
field Classical High School. Chemis- 
try. Dean's List, 1; Debating, 2; 
Current Affiiirs Club, 1, 2; Newman 
Club. 1. 2; Pre-Med. Club, 2. 
Marcia Judith Berman, 33 Wenoniah 
St., Roxburv. Girls' Latin School. 
Liberal Arts". Menorah Club, 1, 2; 
Sigma Iota. 

Roger Conrad Biron, 114.5 Massa- 
chusetts .\ve.. North .\dams. Drury 
High School. English. Dean's List, 
1; Men's Glee Club, 1. 2. 
Maurice Blauer, 67 Hillside Ave., 
Arlington. Brookline High School, 
Physical and Biological Sciences. 
Dean's List, 1. 

James Anderson Block, 61 W'arren 
St., Norwich, Conn. Norwich Free 
Academy. Landscape Architecture. 
Men's Glee Club, 1, 2; Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. 

Warren Julius Bodendorf, Cabot 
Rd.. Westfield. Westfield High School. 
Chemistrv. Chemistry Club, 1, 2; 
4-H Club, 1, 2; Psychology Club, 1; 
Spring Track. 1, 2; Soccer, 1; Sigma 
.\lpha Epiilon. 

Marjorie Lois Bolton, 354 Davis St., 
Greenfield. Greenfield High School. 
Home Economics. Dean's List. 1; 
Weslev Foundation, 1, 2; Home Eco- 
nomics Club, 2; Women's Athletic 
.Association, 1, 2; Alpha Lambda Mu. 
Raoul Francis Borgatti, 75 High St., 
Bridgewater. Bridgewater Academy. 
Pre-Med. Chemistrv Club, 1, 2; 
Mathematics Club, 1, 2; Pre-Med. 
Club. 1, 2; Phi Sigma Kappa. 
Joseph Bomstein, 24 Audubon Rd., 
Milton. Milton High School. Engi- 
neering. Collegian, 1, 2; Inde.x, 2; 
Roister Doisters, 1; Menorah Club, 1, 
2; Cross Country, 2; Spring Track, 1; 
Winter Track, 1; Tau Epsilon Phi. 
Norman Maynard Bornstein, 317 
Saint Paul St., Brookline. Transfer 
from University of Vermont. Agri- 
cultural Economics. 




Women alloued occasionally at Thatcher, dorm for men 



Russell Henry Bosworth, 10 Pearl 
St.. East Bridgewater. East Bridge- 
water High School. Liberal Arts. 
Band. 2: Weslev Foundation, 1, 2; 
Baseball, 1; Alpha Gamma Rho. 
Annette Irene Bousquet, 17 Mary- 
land St., Springfield. Springfield High 
School of Commerce. English., Dean's 
List, 1; Collegian Quarterly. 2; Newman 
Club, 1, 2; Outing Club, 1, 2; French 
Club, 2; Dance Club, 1, 2; Index, 2. 
Estelle N. Bowen. 75 Merrick Ave., 
Holyoke. Holyoke High School. 
Bacteriology. Newman Club, 1, 2; 
Women's .\thletic Association, 1, 2; 
Phi Zeta. 

Sally Gary Boyden, 34 Locust St., 
Marblehead. Marblehead High School. 
English. Index, 2. 

Joseph Brauner, 151 Savoy St.. 
Bridgeport. Conn. Transfer from 
Junior College of Connecticut. Nature 
Recreation. Men's Glee Club, 1; 
Outing Club, 1; Menorah Club, 1; 
Nature Guide Association, I. 
Donald Clinton Broderick, 93 Sheri- 
dan St., East Lynn. Lynn English 
High School. Zoology. Band, 1, 2; 
Zoology Club, 2; Alpha Sigma Phi. 
John McCall Browne, 94 Kemper 
St., W'ollaston. Thayer Academy. 
Landscape Architecture. Phillips 
Brooks Club. 1. 2; Horticulture Club, 
2; Horticultural Manufactures Club, 
2; Pre-Med. Club, 2; Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. 

Frederick Vincent Brutcher, 69 
Warren Ave., Mansfield. Mansfield 
High School. Chemistry. Collegian, 
2; Newman Club, 1, 2; Mathematics 
Club, 1, 2; Phi Sigma Kappa. 
Jean Audrey Burgess, 123 Prospect 
St.. Brockton. Brockton High School. 
Home Economics. Dean's List, 1; 
Women's Glee CluD, 1; Home Eco- 
nomics Club, 1; Phi Zeta. 
Robert William Burke, 27 Blandford 
Rd., Woronoco. Westfield High 
School. Chemistry. Dean's List, 1; 
Collegian, 1, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2. 



Horace Crawford Burrington, 

Charlemont. Charlemont High School. 
Chemistry. Phi Sigma Kappa. 
David Graves Bush, 137 Union St., 
Westfield. Westfield High School. 
Chemistry. Dean's List, 1; Collegian, 
1, 2 (M.inaging Editor, 2); Wesley 
Foundation, 1, 2; Soccer, I; Alpha 
Gamma Rho. 

George Brown Galdwell, King St., 
Littleton. Littleton High School. 
Poultry Husbandry. Poultry Club. 2; 
Cross Country, 1, 2(M); Alpha 
Gamma Rho. 

Donald Allen Campbell, 123 Thomp- 
son St., Springfield. Transfer from 
Dartmouth College. Agriculture. Band, 
2; Football, 2; Swimming, 2: Phi 
Sigma Kappa. 

Leonard Hubert Carlson, 31 Carlson 
St., Bristol, Conn. Bristol High 
School. Class Nominating Commit- 
tee, 1; Outing Club, 1; Theta Chi. 
George Chornesky, 16 .Arlington St., 
Lvnn. Lvnn Classical High School. 
Chemistrv. Collegian, 2; Menorah 
Club, 1, 2; Tau Epsilon Phi. 
Elizabeth Shirley Clapp, 20 Graves 
St.. South Deerfield. Deerfield High 
School. Home Economics. Home 
Economics Club, 2; Phi Zeta. 
Elmer Everett Clapp, Jr., West St.. 
Leeds. Northampton High School. 
Animal Husbandry. Men's Glee Club, 
1; Animal Husbandry Club, 1, 2; 
4-H Club, 1, 2: Poultry Club, 2; Base- 
ball, 1, 2; Alpha Gamma Rho. 
Philip Jay Cohen, 40 Westernview 
St.. Springfield. Springfield Classical 
High School. Pre-Dental. Men's Glee 
Club. 1; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Alpha 
Epsilon Pi, 

Carroll Vernon Cole, 9S5 North 
Pleasant St.. North Amherst. Mount 
Hermon. Chemistrv. Men's Glee 

Club. 1, 2; Theta Chi. 
Paul Cole, 2 Lyman St., Northboro. 
Worcester Commerce High School. 
Engineering. Band, 1; C. A. A., 2; 
Lambda Chi Alpha, 



■2231 




Smug Sophs greet bedraggled Frosh, beaten but unbowed "J-^' 



Roland Francis Colella, 2 Little St.. 
Rumlord, R. I. Transfer from Brown 
University. Dairy Industry. Maroon 
Key, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2: Animal 
Husbandry Club, 1; Dairy Club, 1, 2; 
Football, 1, 2; Spring Track, 1; 
Hockey, 1; Phi Sigma Kappa. 
Robert Harlan Cowing, 4.3 Garden 
St., West Springfield. Monson Acad- 
emy. Chemistry. Basketball, 1; 
Kappa Sigma. 

Marjorie Esther Cowles, South East 
St., Amherst. Amherst High School. 
Home Economics. Outing Club, 1, 2; 
Home Economics Club, 1. 
Ruth Cordelia Crosby, 86 Gray St., 
Amherst. Amherst High School. 
Languages. Dean's List, 1; Alpha 
Lambda Mu. 

Barbara Louise Crowther, IS Berk- 
shire Rd., Welleslev Hills. Welleslev 
High School. Home Economics". 
Home Economics Club, 1, 2; Phi Zeta. 
Eleanor Winifred Cushman, 15 
Darby St., Worcester. W^orcester 
North High School. Liberal Arts. 
Class Nominating Committee, 2; 
Phillips Brooks Club, 1, 2; Sigma 
Beta Chi. 

Stanley Marshall Daggett, 2 Orchard 
St., Auburn. Transfer from Worcester 
Polvtechnical Institute. Mathematics. 
Band, 1; Mathematics Club, 1. 
Richard Alan Damon, 7 Dover St., 
Lowell. Lowell High School. Agri- 
culture. Interfraternity Council, 2; 
Animal Husbandry Club, 2; Phi Sigma 
Kappa. 

Margaret Maria Daylor, 914 Rock 
St.. Fall River. B. M. C. Durfee High 
School. Newman Club, 1, 2; Chi 
Omega. 

James Wilson Dayton, Jr., Lode- 
stone, Amherst. Amlierst High School. 
Botany. Outing Club, 1. 
Norma Mae Deacon, 19 Butler Place, 
Northampton. Northampton High 
School. Home Economics. Home 
Economics Club, I, 2; Sigma Beta Chi. 



Margaret Cecilia Deane, 70 North 
Main St., Whitinsville. Northbridge 
High School. Liberal Arts. Women's 
Athletic Association, 1. 2: Newman 
Club, 1, 2; Chi Omega. 
Glenn Blrtwell Dearden, 33 Lawler 
St., Holyoke. Holyoke High School. 
Engineering. Dean's List, 1; Lambda 
Chi Alpha. 

Robert Bassett Denis, 46 Alvin St., 
Springfield. Springfield High School 
of Commerce. Economics. Class 
Treasurer, I; Basketball, 1, 2; Kappa 
Sigma. 

Norman Wilfred Desrosier, 210 

Orange St., Athol. Athol High School. 
Chemistry. K.nppa Sigma. 

Thomas Eugene Devaney, 14 Auburn 
St., Medford. Medford High School. 
Pre-Med. Class Nominating Com- 
mittee, 1; Maroon Key, 2; Student 
Leader Day Committee, 2; Newman 
Club, 1, 2; Lambda Chi Alpha (Secre- 
tary, 2). 

Robert Orth Dewey, 21 King St., 
Westfield. Westfield High School. 
Ph.vsical and Biological Sciences. 
Basketball, 1; Soccer,!; Theta Clii. 
John Melville Dickerman, 252 Main 
St., Spencer. David Prouty High 
School. Bacteriology. Winter Track, 
1. 

Warren Spencer Dobson, 42 Belle- 
vue Ave., Norwood. Gushing Acad- 
emy. Chemistry. Kappa Sigma. 
Charles Weston Dolby, 37 Humphrey 
St., Great Barrington. Searles High 
School. Floriculture. Maroon Kev, 
2; Phillips Brooks Club, 2; Baseball, 
1; Basketball,!; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 
Helen Elizabeth Donnelly, Proutv 
St., Brookfield. Brookfield High 
School. Liberal Arts. Newman 
Club, 1, 2; Index, 2; Alpha Lambda 
Mu. 

Henry E. Drozdal, South Hadley. 
Williston Academy. General Engi- 
neering. Rifle Team, 2; Newman 
Club, 1, 2. 



Eleanor Marguerite Dudley, 218 

Bridge St., Northampton. Northamp- 
ton High School. Pre-Med. Outing 
Club, 2; Newman Club, 1,2. 
Charles Warren Dunham, 164 Cot- 
tage Park Rd., Winthrop Gushing 
.\cademy. Floriculture. .Dean's List, 
1; Maroon Key, 2; Floriculture Club, 
1; Kappa Sigma. 

Frank Algar Duston, 26 Hazelwood 
Ave., Longmeadow. St. Stephen High 
School, New Brunswick, Canada. 
Chemistry. 

Charlotte Sylvia Eigner, 1S2 Norfolk 
Ave., Swampscott. Swampscott High 
School. French. Dean's List, 1; 
Women's Glee Club, 2; Menorah Club, 
1, 2; French Club, 2; Sigma Iota. 

Robert Hind Engelhard, 2551 Monoa 
Rd., Honolulu, Hawaii. PunashoTi 
.\cademy. Chemistry. Maroon Kev, 
2; Men's Glee Club, 1; Outing Club, 1; 
Football, 1, 2(M); Swimming, 1; 
Inter-Class Athletic Board, I, 2; 
•M" Club, 2. 

Theresa Fallon, 18 Winthrop Ave., 
Bridgewater. Bridgewater High School. 
Home Economics. Chi Omega. 
Robert Louise Fay, 127 College St., 
South Hadley. South Hadley High 
School. Engineering. 
Edwin John Fedell. 25 Alvarado 
.\ve., Worcester. Worcester North 
?hool. Floriculture. Sergeant- 
, 2; Maroon Key, 2 (President); 
a Club, 1, 2; Carnival Com- 
mittee, 2 (Vice-Chairman, 2); Football, 
1, 2(M); Winter Track, 1; "M" Club, 
2; Kappa Sigma. 

Lee Elda Fllios, Bates Rd., Westfield. 
Westfield High School. Chemistry. 
Class Nominating Committee, 2; 
Index, 2; Women's Glee Club, 2; New- 
man Club, 1, 2; Mathematics Club, 2; 
Women's Athletic Association, 1, 2; 
Alpha Lambda Mu. 

John Morgan Fitzgerald, 294 Orange 
St., Springfield. Springfield Classical 
High School. English. Freshman 
Board Officer, 1; Newman Club, 1, 2; 
Basketball, 1, 2; Lambda Chi .\lpha. 
Lloyd Samuel FitzPatrick, 7 Haw- 
thorn St., Wakefield. Wakefield High 
School. English. Cross Country, 1; 
Hockey, 1, 2; Lambda Chi Alpha. 

George H. Flessas, 166 Chestnut St., 
Brookline. Brookline High School. 
Bacteriology. Dean's List, 1. 
John Francis Foley, 47 Greenlawn 
St., Fall River. B. M. C. Durfee High 
School, Economics. Dean's List, 1; 
Men's Glee Club, 1, 2; Statesmen, 2; 
Newman Club, 1, 2; Inter-Class 
Athletic Bo.ard, 1, 2; Lambda Chi 
Alpha. 

George Paul Foley, 20 Fairfax Rd., 
Worcester. Worcester Classical High 
School. Chemistry. Newman Club, 
1, 2; Lambda Chi Alpha. 
Bernard Arthur Forest, 12 Lewis 
Ave., Arlington. Arlington High 
School. Mathematics. Mathematics 
Club, 1, 2; Lambda Chi Alpha. 
Allan James Fox, 1590 Bridge St., 



Drat 



Tri 



sfer 



Uu 



iity of 



npshire. Dairy Industry 
Dairy Club, 2; Phi Sigma Kappa. 
David Michael Freedman, 91 

Gmriiii St., lioxhurv. Roxbury Memo- 
n;J iliL-l. -, li.Mil, Chemistry. Dean's 
l.i.i I W. tHii.h Club, 1, 2; Chem- 
i.,lM I lull, I. .Mathematics Club, 2; 



Tiiu i: 



Rowland Godfrey Freeman, Wilson- 
dale Rd., Dover. Phillips Academy. 
Pre-Med. Index. 2: Cross Country, 
2; Spring Track. 1, 2: Winter Track, 
1, 2; Kappa Sigma. 



224 



Richard John Frost, 2"> Huiulnds 
Cirde, Wellesley. Wellcsley High 
School. Forestry. Dean's List. 1; 
Spring Track, I; Winter Track, 1; 
Q. T. V. 

Lawrence Taylor Garnett, OtJ4 Burn- 
coat St., Worcester. Worcester South 
High School. General Engineering. 
Phillips Brooks Club, 1. 2: Phi Sigma 

Francis James Garrlty, IS Lakeway 
Drive, PittsHeld. Pittsfield High 
School, .\griculture. Outing Club, 1; 
Newman Club. 1, 2: Football, 2; 
Alpha Sigma Phi (Secretary, 2). 
Artemis Georges, 421 Court St.. New 
Bedford. New Bedford High School. 
Chemistry. Dean's List, 1; Women's 
Athletic .-issociation, 1; .Mpha Lambda 
Mu. 

William Edgar Gere, S Belmont Ave., 
Northampton. Transfer from Worces- 
ter Polvtechnical Institute. Chemis- 
try. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 
John Dino Giannotti. 424 Dwelly St., 
Fall River. B. M. C. Durfee High 
School. Chemistry. Maroon Key, 2; 
Mens Glee Club. J. 2: Newman Club, 
1, 2: Soccer. 2lMt; "M" Club, 2; 
Alpha Gamma Rho. 
Ralph Glover Gilman, Jr., 6.5 
Beacon St., Greenfield. Greenfield 
High School. Bacteriology. Phi 
Sigma Kappa. 

Helen Glagovsky, 27 Wellington Ave., 
Haverhill. Haverhill High School. 
English. Collegian, 1. 2; Women's 
Glee Club. 2; Menorah Club, 1. 2; 
Sigma Iota. 

Theodore Henry Godek, 4.37 Spring- 
field St.. Chicopee. Chicopee High 
School. Chemistry. Dean's List, 1. 
Seymour Gold, 14 Maryland St., 
Springfield. Springfield Classical High 
School. Chemistry. Dean's List, 1; 
Debating, 1, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2; 
Chemistry Club. 2; Tau Epsilon Phi. 
Theodore Joseph Golonka, 35 
Eleventh St., Turners Falls. Turners 
Falls High School. Liberal Arts. 
Dean's List. 1; Alpha Gamma Rho. 
Sarah Shirley Gordon, SO Hamilton 
St.. Holvoke. Holyoke High School. 
Psvcholog.v. Menorah Club, 1. 2; 
French Club, 1: Women's Athletic 
Association, 2; Sigma Iota (Treasurer, 
2). 

Kenneth Gorman, 11 Channing Rd., 
Watertown. Huntington Preparatory 
School. Chemistrv. Class Nominat- 
ing Committee, 2i Band.l; Swimming, 
2(M); Rifle Team. 1, 2. 
Irwin Sampson Green, 166 Coolidge 
St., Brookline. Brookline High School. 
Pre-Med. Menorah Club, 1. 2; Tau 
Epsilon Phi. 

Margaret Frances Green, 6 Devereux 
St., Marblehead. Marblehead High 
School. History. Newman Club, 1, 
2; French Club, 1; Women's Athletic 
Association, 2. 

Dorothy Julia Greene, 17 Holly Ave., 
" nfield. Greenfield High School. 



Ho 



Hon 



Club. 2; Alpha Lambda Mu. 
Marcia Greene, lOS Dartmouth St., 
Springfield. Transfer from Sprins- 
field Junior College. Liberal Arts, 
Horticulture Club. 2. 
Edna Greenfield. 117 Church St., 
Ware. Ware High School. Liberal 
.Arts. French Club, 2. 
Edward Jules Greenspan, 33 Fair" 
field Ave., Holyoke. Holyoke High 
School. Economics. Dean's List, 1; 
Freshman Handbook Board, 1, 2 (Busi- 
ness Manager, 2); Menorah Club, 1, 2; 
Tau Epsilon Phi. 



Shirley Sunderland Groesbeck, 14 

Bodwell St., Lawrence. Lawrence 

High School. Entomology. Roister 
Doisters. 1, 2; French Club, 2; .Vlpha 
Lambda Mu, 

George Grossman, 53 Euclid .\ve., 
Pittsfield. Pittsfield High School. 
Pre-Dental. Menorah Club, 1. 2; 
Tau Epsilon Phi. 

Marjorie Jean Gunther, 40 Spring 
Park Ave., Dracut. Dracut High 
School. Zoology. Mathematics Club, 
2; Zoology Club, 2; Women's .\thlctic 
.Association. 2; Phi Zeta. 

Peter Hahn, 17 Battery Place, New 
York, N. Y. Woodmere High School. 
Agronomy. 

Edward Duncan Hall, 223 June St., 
Worcester. Worcester Classical High 
School. Chemistry. Swimming, 1, 
2(M); Kappa Sigma. 

Frank Owing Hardy, Island St., 
Essex. Essex High School. Poultry. 
Poultry Judging Team, 3; Poultry 
Club, 1. 2, 3 (Secretary-Treasurer, 3); 
Alpha Gamma Rho. 

'William James Hart, 474 Maple St., 
Holvoke. Sacred Heart High School. 
Chemistry. Q. T. V, 

Mary Katherine Haughey, 19S 

Union St.. Pittsfield. St. Joseph's High 
School. Bacteriology. W. S. G. .\.. 2; 
Newman Club, 1. 2; Dads' Day Com- 
mittee, 2; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion, I. 2; Chi Omega. 
Kirby Maxwell Hayes, County Rd.. 
Bourne. Bourne High School. Bac- 
teriology. C. A. A., 2; Outing Club, 
1; Swimming. 1, 2; Theta Chi. 
Joseph Omer Hebert, 57 Franklin 
St., Holvoke. Mount Hermon. 

Economics. Basketball. 1; Soccer, 1; 
Kappa Sigma. 



Sophomores 



Israel llclfand, s Westbrook St., Mil- 
ford, Mill, 11. 1 lliL-l. School. Psy- 
eholoiiv, ( .,11, •1,11 J; Menorah Club. 
1, 2; 1'., M..I I 1,11.. 2; Psychology 
Club. J. 111! i;|.~il..ii Phi, 

Wallace G, Hibbard, 1S40 Riverdrive 
St., North Hadley. Transfer from 
Vermont Academy. Agriculture. 
John Duncan HUchey, .55 Woburn 
St., Reading, Reading High School. 
Entomology. Band, 2; Q. T, V. 
Edward Wilson Hitchcock, 1476 
W'estfield St., West Springfield. West 
Springfield High School. Chemistry. 
Football. 2; Kappa Sigma. 
Ruth Alice Hodgess, 13B Maple St., 
Maynard. Maynard High School. 



Hon 



Hon 



Club, 1, 2; Chi Omega. 
Raymond Howard HoUis, 179 Lin- 
coln .\ve., .\mherst. Mechanic Arts 
High SchooL Physics, Mathematics. 
Men's Glee Club, 1. 2 (Manager, 2); 
Cross Country, 1; Alpha Gamma Rho. 
Steven Lloyd Hollis, North Main 
St.. South Hadlev Falls. South Hadley 
Falls Higli School. Engineering. 
Phillips Brooks Club, 2; Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. 

Robert Charles Holmes, Highland 
St., Housatonic. Searles High School. 
Chemistrv. Basketball, 1; Alpha 

Sigma Phi. 

Charles Stanley Hood, 286 Davis 
St., Greenfield. Greenfield High 
School. Entomology. Interfrater- 

nitv Council, 3; Phillips Brooks Club, 
3; " Fernald Entomology Club, 3; 
Spring Track, 1; Winter Track, 1; 
Inter-Class _ Athletic Board, 2, 3; 
Phi Sigma Kappa. 




: 225 1 



Sophomores 



Frederick Sherman Hopkins, Jr., 

110 Mill St.. Springfield. Springfield 
Classical High School. Forestry. 
Christian Federation Cabinet, 1, 2: 
Horticultural Show Committee, 2; 
Theta Chi. 

Douglas Williams Hosmer, 235 
Fountain St., Springfield. Springfield 
Classical High School. Chemistry. 
Outing Club, 1; Lambda Chi Alpha. 
Ruth Emma Howarth, Ii4 Butcher 
St., Hopedale. General Draper High 
School. Liberal Arts. Outing Club, 
2; Women's Athletic Association, 1, 2; 
Alpha Lambda Mu. 

Milton Albert Howe, Jr., 19 Dexter 
St., Pittsfield. Pittsfield High School. 
Chemistry. RiBe Team, 1, 2; Kappa 
Sigma. 

Bettye Marie Huban, 5 Bartlett Ave., 
Pittsfield. Pittsfield High School. 
Liberal Arts. Newman Club, 1, 2; 
French Club, 2; Sigma Beta Chi. 
John F. Hughes, 22 Springfield St., 
Cambridge. Cambridge Latin School. 
Animal Husbandry. .Animal Hus- 
bandry Club, 2; Winter Track, 1, 2; 
Alpha Gamma Rho. 
John Jay Hull, 10 Washington St., 
Gloucester. W'ilbraham .Academy. 
English. Class Nominating Commit- 
tee. 2; Dean's List, 1; Phi Sigma 
Kappa. 

Arthur Stanley Irzyk, 37 Mason St., 
Salem. Salem High School. Eng- 
lish. Baseball, 1; Basketball, 1; Phi 
Sigma Kappa. 

Jacob Marlowe Jackler, 2.57 Park 
St., Holyoke. Holyoke High School. 
Chemistry. Dean's List, 1 ; Orcliestra, 
1; Menorah Club, 1; Tau Epsilon Phi. 



Irving Aaron Jacobs, Revere. Revere 
High School. Economics. Menorah 
Club, 1; Tau Epsilon Phi. 

Katharine N. Jaquith, 5S Summer 
St., North Brookfield. W'arren High 
School. Home Economics. Wesley 
Foundation, 1, 2; 4-H Club, 1, 2; 
Home Economics Club, 1, 2; Alpha 
Lambda Mu. 

Albert Joseph Jasukonls, 16 Sterling 
St., Worcester. Transfer from Uni- 
versit,v of Idaho. Bacteriologv. Base- 
ball, 1. 

Warren Irving Johansson, 96 Bou- 
telle St., Leominster. Leominster 
High School. Wildlife. Outing Club, 
1; Phillips Brooks Club, 1, 2; Lambda 
Chi .\lpha. 

Doris Christina Johnson, 221 W'est 
Center St., West Bridgewater. Har- 
vard High School. Psychology. Class 
Nominating Committee, 1; Phi Zeta. 

Robert William Jones, Colony Rd., 
Longmeadow. Medwav High School. 
Chemistry. Outing Club, 1, 2; Chem- 
istry Club, 1, 2; Mathematics Club, 
1, 2; Alpha Gamma Rho. 
Elizabeth Miriam Jordan, 127 
Depot St., Dalton. Dalton High 
School. Home Economics. Outing 
Club, 1, 2; Home Economics Club, 1, 
2; Women's Athletic Association, 1, 2. 
Frank E. Jost, 9 Hillside Ave., Port 
Washington, N. Y. Port Washington 
Senior High School. Public Health. 
Alpha Gamma Rho. 
William Joseph Kablick, 4S Hocka- 
num Rd., Northampton. Transfer 
from Marianapolis College. Physics. 
Charlotte Susan Kalzer, 64 Hutch- 
ings St., Roxburv. Girls' Latin School. 
History. Dean's List, 1; Menorah 
Club, 1. 2; Current Affairs Club, 1, 2; 
Sigma Iota. 




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David Herbert Kaplan, 421 Warren 
St., Roxburv. Boston Latin School. 
Animal Husbandry. Menorah Club, 
1, 2: Animal Husbandry Club, 1, 2; 
Dairy Club, 1; Baseball, 1; Alpha 
Epsilon Pi. 

George Robert Kaplan, 142 Suther- 
land Rd., Brighton. Boston Latin 
School. Agricultural Economics. 

Class Nominating Committee, 1; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2; Animal Hus- 
bandry Club, 2; Baseball, 1; Soccer, 1; 
Alpha Epsilon Pi. 

Robert Joseph Karp, 297 Trafton 
Rd., Springfield. Springfield Classical 
High School. Physical and Biological 
Sciences. Alpha Epsilon Pi. 

Aarne Olva Karvonen, Box 421, 
Townsend Rd., Shirley. Aver High 
School. Chemistry. Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. 

Anna Mary Keedy, 37 Salem St., 
Amherst. Miss Hock.adav's School. 
Bacteriology. Dean's List, 1; Women's 
Athletic Association, 1, 2; Chi Omega. 
James Hammerle Keefe, 43 Con- 
verse St., Palmer. Palmer High School. 
Botany. Band, 1; Christian Federa- 
tion Cabinet, 1, 2; Mathematics Club, 
I, 2; Alpha Gamma Rho. 
Robert LeRoy Keefe, Jr., Stony Hill 
Rd., Springfield. Cathedral High 
School. Chemistry. Outing Club, 2; 
Newman Club, 1, 2; Chemistry Club, 

1. 2: 4-H Club, 1, 2; Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. 

Charles Robert Kelley, 260 Spring- 
side Ave., Pittsfield. Pittsfield High 
School. Pre-Med. Campus Varieties, 
2; Outing Club, 2; Newman Club, 1, 
2; Pre-Med. Club, 2; Lambda Chi 
Alpha. 

John Edwin Keough, 95 Pearl St., 
Holyoke. Holvoke High School. 
Chemistry. Newman Club, 1, 2; 
Chemistry Club, 2; Basketball, 1; 
Kappa Sigma. 

Marjolaine Anne Keough, 95 Pearl 
St., Holyoke. Holyoke High School. 
Liberal Arts. Dean's List, 1; New- 
man Club, 1, 2: French Club, 1, 2; 
Chemistry Club, 1; Mathematics 
Club, 1; Chi Omega. 
Llbby J. Kerlln, Parkham Rd., 
Spencer. David Prouty High School. 
Liberal Arts. Debating, 1; Outing 
Club, I; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Sigma 
Iota. 

Robert Howard King, Westchester, 
Pa. Transfer from Worcester Poly- 
technical Institute. Dairy Industry. 
Band, 1, 2. 

Dorothy Bean Kinsley, I W^inthrop 
St., Stoneham. Stoneham High School. 
Economics. Mothers' Day Commit- 
tee, 2; Women's .\thletic .Association, 

2, 3; Alpha Lambda Mu. 

Stanley Timothy Kislel, 44 Lathrop 
St., South Hadlev Falls. South Had- 
lev High School. Entomology. Dean's 
List, 1; Outing Club, 2. 
Joseph Edward Kivlin, 2S McDonald 
St., Dedham. Dedham High School. 
.\nimal Husbandry. Dean's List, 1, 2; 
Choir, 2; Animal Husbandry Club, 1; 
Dairy Club, 1; 4-H Club, 1; Zoology 
Club, 1. 

Robert Ernest Klein, Mt. Olivet 
Cemetery, Frederick, Md. Transfer 
from University of Maryland. _ Land- 
scape Architecture. Theta Chi. 
Raymond Harold Kneeland, 17 
Monroe St., Northampton. Transfer 
from Syracuse University. Physical 
P^ducation. 

Joseph Thomas Kokoski, Amherst. 
Hopkins Academy. Agricultural Eco- 
nomics. Soccer, 1, 2CM); "M" Club, 



Beulamae Kolb, 122 Howe St., 
Methuen. Edward Searles High School. 
History. 

Seymour Benjamin Korltz, 23 

Dumiis St., Dorchester. Roxbury 
Memorial High School. Chemistry. 
Dean's List. 1; Collegian Quarterly, 2; 
Menorah Club, 1. 2: Prc-Med. Club, 
1, 2; Zoology Club, 1, 2. 

Mitchell Fred Kosciusko, 231 Mill- 
bury St., Auburn. Auburn High 
School. Veterinary Science. Football, 
2: Alpha Gamma Rho. 

Lawrence Walter Lamery, Mohawk 
Trail, Greenfield. Greenfield High 
School. Chemistry. Mathematics 
Club, 2. 

Edwin Harold LaMontagne, 7<) 

Columbus Ave., Northampton. North- 
ampton High School. Floriculture. 
Newman Club, 1. 2. 

Albert Aurel LaPlante. 10 Higgins 
St., Auburndale. Newton High School. 
Zoology. Men's Glee Club. 1; Outing 
Club, 1; Newman Club, 1. 

Lucille Lawrence, .S9 Rittenhouse 
Ter., Springfield. Springfield Classical 
High School. Home Economics. 

Choir, 1, 2; Women's Glee Club, 1, 2; 
Home Economics Club, 1. 2; Mathe- 
matics Club, 1; Women's Athletic 
Association, 1, 2; Sigma Beta Chi. 

Virginia May LeClair, 29 AVest 
Broadway St., Gardner. Gardner 
High School. Home Economics. Home 
Economics Club, 1. 



Cynthia Norton Leete, Maple Rd., 
Briarcliff Manor, N. Y. Briarcliff 
Manor High School. English. Class 
Vice-President, 1, 2; W. S. G. A., 2; 
Phi Zeta. 

Miriam Le May, 19 Highland Ave., 
Ayer. Ayer High School. Home 
Economics. Christian Federation Cabi- 
net, I, 2; Home Economics Club, 
1, 2; Sigma Beta Chi. 

Paul Vincent Leone, 17 Berkeley St., 
Lawrence. Lawrence High School. 
Zoology. Pre-Med. Club. 2: Psy- 
chology Club. 2; Spanish Club, 2; 
Zoology Club, 2; Alpha Sigma Phi. 

Bert Libon, 60 Brunswick St., Boston. 
Roxbury Memorial High School. So- 
ciology. Economics. Menorah Club, 
1, 2; French Club, 1; Swimming, 1; 
Tau Epsilon Phi. 

Charles Limanni, 11.5 Garden St., 
Lawrence. Lawrence High School. 
Zoology. Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2; Psy- 
chology Club, 2; Zoology Club, 2; 
Alpha Sigma Phi. 

Anne Louise Lincoln, Thompson St., 
Halifax. Whitman High School. Home 
Economics. Home Economics Club, 
1, 2. 



Clearhos Logothetis. Velos, Greece. 
Transfer from Thessalonica Agricul- 
tural and Industrial Institute. Ento- 
mology. Fernald Entomology Club, 1. 

John Stanley Lord, 83 Vernon St., 
Northampton. Northampton High 
School. History. 

John A. Ludeman, Marysville, Texas. 
Newsome Dourghty Memorial High 
School. Zoology. 

Alice Kathleen Maguire, 10 Noble 
St., Westfield. Westfield High School. 
Bacteriology. Class Nominating Com- 
mittee, 2; Collegian, 2; Newman 
Club, 1, 2; Chi Omega. 




Basic field work in engineering is for both boys and girls 



Raymond Edward Malloy, 46 Silver 
Hill Rd., Weston. Transfer from 
Harvard College. Forestry. Theta 
Chi. 

William Raymond Manchester, 26 

Fifth St., Attleboro. Springfield Classi- 
cal High School. English. Dean's 
List, 1; Collegian Quarterly, 2: Phil- 
lips Brooks Club, 1, 2; Current 
Afi'airs Club, 2; Swimming, 1; Lambda 
Chi Alpha. 

Edward Crowell Manix, 62 Graves 
St., South Deerfield. Deerfield Acad- 
emy. Economics. Class Nominating 
Committee, 2; Roister Doisters, 2, 3; 
Theta Chi. 

Franlc Chester Mann, 309 Sa fiord 
St., Wollaston. Thayer Academy. 
Chemistry. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

Dorothy Lothrop Maraspin, Mill- 
way, Barnstable. Winchester High 
School. Liber,al Arts. Phillips Brooks 
Club, 1, 2; French Club, 1. 

Richard Pell March, 30 Otis St., 
Medford. Medtord High School. 
Dairy Industry. Horticultural Show 
Committee, 1; Dairy Club, 2. 

Arthur Stuart Marcoullier, 22 

Tekoa Ter., Westfield. Westfield High 
School. Forestry. Maroon Key, 2; 
C. A. A., 2; Theta Chi. 

Ruth Anna Markert, 156 West St., 
Amherst. Amherst High School. Lan- 
guages. Alpha Lambda Mu. 

Solomon Harvey Marckowitz, 261 

Denez Ave., Pittsfield. Pittsfield High 
School. Chemistry. Menorah Club, 
2; Tau Epsilon Phi. 

Mary Elizabeth Martin, 30 Cottage 
St., Amherst. Amherst High School. 
English. Dean's List, 1; Collegian, 
1, 2; Freshman Handbook Board, I, 2; 
Newman Club, 1, 2. 



Fayette Clapp Mascho, Westhamp- 
ton. Northampton High School. 
Chemistry. 4-H Club, 2; Soccer, 2; 
Theta Chi. 

Joseph A. Masi, 71 North Park St., 
Franklin. Dean Academy. History. 
Newman Club, 1, 2; Baseball, 1; 
Football, 1, 2; "M" Club, 2; Kappa 
Sigma. 

Shirley Gertrude Mason, 23 Merriam 
St.. Auburn. Auburn High School. 
Home Economics. Class Nominating 
Committee, 1; Women's Glee Club, 1; 
Newman Club, 1, 2; Home Economics 
Club, 1, 2; Sigma Beta Chi. 

Elizabeth Marie McCarthy, 68 

Margin St., West Newton. Newton 
High School. Zoology. Newman 
Club, 1, 2; Alpha Lambda Mu. 

Ralph Emerson McCormack, 33 

Falcon St., East Boston. East Boston 
High School. Liberal Arts. Col- 
legian, 1, 2; Men's Glee Club, 2; Out- 
ing Club, 2; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

Robert Fuller McEwan, 89 Johnson 
Ave., Winthrop. Winthrop High 
School. Engineering. Men's Glee 
Club, 1, 2; Phillips Brooks Club, 1, 2; 
Mathematics Club, 1, 2; Engineering 
Club, 1, 2; Phi Sigma Kappa. 

Elizabeth Barbara Mclntyre, 734 

Longmeadow St., Longmeadow. 

Springfield Classical High School. 
Pnysical and Biological Sciences. 
Dean's List, 1; Orchestra, 1, 2; Alpha 
Lambda Mu. 

Edna Ann McNamara, 10 Central 
St., Brookfield. Brookfield High 
School. English. Dean's List, 1; Col- 
legian, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2; Women's 
Athletic Association, 1, 2; Chi Omega. 

Irene Merlin, 390 Geneva Ave., Dor- 
chester. Dorchester High School. 
English, Languages. Dean's List, 1; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2; Sigma Iota. 



227] 




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Roberta M. Miehlke, 111 Cedar St., 
Clinton. Clinton Hish School. 
Recreational Planning. Choir. 1, 2; 
Outing Club, 1, 2 (Secretary, 2); 
Women's Athletic Association, 1, 2; 
Alpha Lambda Mu. 

Everett Russell Miller, 104 River- 
side Drive, Northampton. North- 
ampton High School. Chemistry. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

Robert Adams Monroe, 9S Broad 
St., Wevmouth. Weymouth High 
School. Animal Husbandry. Hockey, 



Thomas Patrick Moore, S Magnolia 
Ave., Holyokc. Vermont Academy. 
History. Baseball, 1; Basketball, 1; 
Soccer, 1. 

Theodore Joseph Morawski, South 
Deerfield. DeerBeld High School. 
General Engineering. Newman Club, 
1; Mathematics Club. 2; Cross Coun- 
try, 1. 

Leo Albert Moreau, 27 Chester St., 
Taunton. Taunton High School. 
Chemistry. Class Nominating Com- 
mittee, 1; Dean's List, 1; Maroon 
Key, 2; Band, I, 2; Newman Club, 
1, 2: Carnival Ball Committee, 2; 
Phi Sigma Kappa. 

Lewis Bradford Morton, 2.)0 Sand- 
wich St., PIvmouth. Plymouth High 
School. Political Science. Collegian, 
2; Collegian Quarterly, 2; Football, 2; 
Kappa Sigma. 

Roy Edgar Moser, Jr., 75 Sunset 
Ave.. Amherst. Amherst High School. 
Chemistry. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

James Malcolm Moulton, l.'!9 Belle- 
claire Ave., Longmeadow. Springfield 
Classical High School. Zoology. Class 
Nominating Committee, 2; C. A. A., 2; 
Lambda Clii Alpha. 



Thirza Moulton, 2 Silloway St., Dor- 
cliester. Dorchester High School. 

Home Economics. Outing Club, 1; 
Home Economics Club, 2; Women's 
.\thletic Association, 1, 2; Alpha 
Lambda Mu. 

Alfred Paul Muldoon, 152 Winthrop 
St., Quincv. Norfolk County Agri- 
cultural School. Horticulture. New- 
man Club, 1, 2; Floriculture Club, 1. 2; 
Swimming, 1; Q. T. V. 

Sidney Albert Murachver, S.5 Francis 
St., Everett. Chelsea High School. 
Chemical Engineering. Collegian, 1, 
2; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Baseball, 1; 
Basketball, 1; Tau Epsilon Phi. 

Helen Dorothy Murray, 137 South 
Main St., Florence. Northampton 
High School. Home Economics. Home 
Economics Club, 1, 2: Sigma Beta Chi. 

Fred Joseph Nahil, 96 Kremont St., 
Lawrence. Lawrence High School. 
Zoology. Dean's List, 1; Newman 
Club, 1, 2; Pre-Med. Club, 2; Phi 
Sigma Kappa. 

William Henry Needham, 33 Pratt 
St., Springfield. Wilbraham Academy. 
Landscape Arclntecture. Men's Glee 
Club, 1, 2; Landscape Architecture 
Club, 1, 2; Soccer, 1; Kappa Sigma. 
Shirley Nelson, 64 Billings St., Sharon. 
Sharon High School. Liberal Arts. 
Sigma Beta Chi. 

Dorothy Nestle, 277 Triangle St , 
Amherst. Amherst High School. 
Home Economics. Newman Club, 1, 
2; Home Economics Club, 1; Phi 
Zeta. 

Robert Pike Newton, 249 Spring St., 
Athol. Transfer from Bates College. 
Mathematics. 

W. Earle Newton, 59 Harold St., 
Melrose. Melrose High School. 
Animal Husbandry. Christian Federa- 
tion Cabinet, 1, 2; Animal Husbandry 
Club, 2; Cross Country, 1, 2(M). 



Irving Eaton Nichols, 32 BuUard St., 
Dedham. Dedham High School. 
Animal Husbandry. Men's Glee Club. 
2; Outing Club, 2'; Alpha Sigma Phi. 

Walter Mansfield Niles, 12 Orient 
Place, Melrose. Melrose High School. 
Entomology. C. A. A., 2; Outing 
Club, 1, 2; French Club, 2; Chemistry 
Club, 1, 2; Fernald Entomology Club, 
2; Mathematics Club, 1, 2; Cross 
Country, 1; Phi Sigma Kappa. 

Dorothea Mae Nijcon, Westford. 
Westford Academy. Home Economics. 
Newman Club, 1; 4-H Club, 1. 

Theodore Antony Noke, S5 Litch- 
field St., Brighton. Brighton High 
School. English. Class Nominating 
Coinmittee, 1; Collegian, 1; Winter 
Track, 1; Q. T. V. 

Richard A. Norton, 87 Vernon St., 
Norwood. Norwood High School. 
Animal Husbandry. Animal Hus- 

bandrv Club, 1. 2; Football, 1, 2(M); 
Plii Sigma Kappa. 

Barbara Ruth O'Brien, ISS Wood- 
land Ave., Gardner. Gardner High 
School. Home Economics. Newman 
Club, 1, 2; Home Economics Club, 1, 
2; Women's Athletic Association, 1; 
Chi Omega. 

Shirley O'Connell, 4 Grand Ave.. 
Millers Falls. Turners Falls High 
School. Home Economics. Outing 
Club, 1; Newman Club, 1, 2; Home 
Economics Club, 1. 2; Women's 
Athletic Association, 1. 

Louise Alice O'Connor, 24 Almont 
St.. Mattapan. Hyde Park High 
School. Pre-Med. Dean's List, 1; 
Newman Club, 1, 2; Chi Omega. 

Daniel Francis O'Shea, 44 Loring 
St., Hvde Park. Jamaica High School. 
Landscape Architecture. Newman 
Club, 1, 2, 

Robert John O'Shea, 218 Crescent 
St., Northampton. St. Michael's High 
School. Economics. Men's Glee 
Club, 1; Debating, 1, 2; Newman 
Club, 1, 2; Current Affairs Club. 2; 
Alpha Gamma Rho. 

John Costas Papageorge, 16 Myrtle 
St., Northampton. Northampton 
High School. Cfuting Club, 2: Engi- 
neering Club, 1, 2. 

Donald Howard Parker, 185 Wren 
St.. West Rox-bury. Roxbury Latin 
Sclinoi Lrindscape Architecture. 

Cl.i,, I'lrM.l.iil, 1; Maroon Key, 2; 
H,,v -I, hi-, - Men's Glee Club, 1. 2; 

l.aii.Uc , Ai. Iiilccture Club, 2; Spring 

Tr;i,k. 1. Winter Track, 1; Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon. 

Stanley Edward Parnish, 14 Leid- 
hold Place, PittsBeld. Pitts6eld High 
School. Physics. Dean's List, 1; 
Newman Club, 1, 2; Radio Club, 1: 
Phi Sigma Kappa. 

James Walter Parsons, 136 East 
Main St., Gloucester. Gloucester High 
School. Physical Sciences. Class 
Captain, 1, 2; Dean's List, 1, 2; Dads' 
Day Committee, 3; Baseball, 1; 
Basketball, 1; Phi Sigma Kappa. 

Robert Thomas Parsons, 97 Federal 
St., Mclrlii-rfown. Belchertown High 
S,h..,,l 111, 1. TV. Band, I; Student 

H.lii I, I ..nrHil. 1, 2; Current 

.\lV:ni, ( liil., J; Psychology Club, 2; 
Sigma .Uplia Epsilon, 

Dorothy Ellen Peck, Shelbu 



Acaden 



Hon 



Ec 



2281 



Aileen Boyer Perkins, l.onn IMain 
Rd., Acushnet. Now Ucdiord HIrIi 
School, Biicteriology. Outing Club, 
1.2; Cheer Lender, 2; Alpha Xambdn 
Mu. 

Margaret Rowan Perkins. Goshen. 
SebrinR High School, Florida. P.sy- 
ohologv. Class Nominating Commit- 
tee, 1;' Dean's List, 1; Orchestra, I, 2; 
Phi Zeta. 

Helen Phyllis Peterson. Saint George 
St., Duxburv. Duxbury High School. 
Home Eeonomics. Dean's List, 1; 
Home Economics Club, 1, 2. 

Kenneth Elliot Peterson, 19 Howe 

St., Auburndale. Newton High School. 

Chemistry. 

Robert Edward Place, 15 .\ppleton 

Rd.. West Auburn. Auburn High 

School. Chemistry. Class Captain, 

1; Kappa Sigma. 

Samuel Edwin Price, Wantagh Game 

Farm, Wantagh, N. Y. W. C. 

Mepharn High School. Engineering. 

Baseball, 1; Phi Sigma Kappa. 

Irwin Promisel, 322 Spruce St., 
Chelsea. Chelsea High School. Dairy 
Industry. Band, 1, 2; Outing Club, 
2; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon 
Pi. 

Georfte Frederick Pushee, Jr., 1147 
North Pleasant St., Amherst. Amherst 
High School. ■\Vildlite. Football, 
2(M); Kappa Sigma. 
Edward John Putala, 25 L St., 
Turners Falls. Turners Falls High 
School. Physical and Biological Sci- 
ences. Collegian, 1. 
Joy Lina Putnam, Sutton. Sutton 
High School. English. Mathematics 
Club, 1 ; Sigma Beta Chi. 
Mary Winifred Quinn, 71 Lexington 
Parkway, Pittsfield. Pittsfield High 
School. Liberal Arts. Newman Club, 
1; Sigma Beta Chi. 

Edward Joseph Rabaioli, 531 Village 
St., Medway. Medway High School. 
Chemistry. Dean's List. 1: Newman 
Club, 1,2; Baseball, 1; Alpha Gamma 
Rho. 

Robert Franklin Radway, 29 Jeffer- 
son Aye., New London, Conn. Bucke- 
lev School. Agricultural Economics. 
Class Nominating Committee, 1; 
Band, 1, 2; Orchestra, 2; Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. 

Bradley Hickox Raymond, Wren- 
tham State School, Wrentham. Wren- 
tham High School. Pre-Med. Out- 
ing Club, 1; Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2; 
Radio Club, 2. 

Marjory Bernice Reed, 400 Jame.s 
St., Fairyiew. Chicopee High School. 
Recreational Planning. Outing Club, 
2; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2; 4-H Club, 
1, 2; Women's Athletic Association, 
1, 2; Alpha Lambda Mu. 
Robert 'W. Rhodes, Alden St., Whit- 
man. Tha.yer Academy. Wildlife. 
Band, 2; Mathematics Club. I, 2; 
Kappa Sigma. 

James Manix Ring, 27.5 Middlesex 
Aye., North Wilmington. Wilming- 
ton High School. Forestry. New- 
man Club, 1, 2; Phi Sigma Kappa. 
Henry Fiske Ritter, Greenwich Rd., 
Hardwick. Mount Hermon. Dairy 
Industry. Theta Chi. 
Richard Charles Roberson, 17 
South St., Leominster. Leominster 
High School. Physics. Campus Varie- 
ties. 2; Newman Club, 1, 2; Lambda 
Chi Alpha. 

Charles John Rogers, .\lder St., 
Medway. Medway High School. 
Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 2; Cross 
Country, 1; Spring Track, 1; Winter 
Track, 1; Alpha Gamma Rho. 



Ruth RosoR, 9 Icmplc St., Spring- 
field. Springheld Classical High 
School. Bacteriology. Dean's List, 1 ; 
Menorah Club, 1, 2; Sigma Iota. 

Sylvia Rossman, 87 Broad St., Lynn. 
Lynn Classical High School. Liberal 
Arts. Dean's List, 1; Menorah Club, 
I, 2; Sigma Iota. 

Frederic Albert Rothery, 121 Belle- 

yue Ave. SpriiiKticld. Spring6eld 
Technical High S. Imh.I. Liberal Arts. 
Class NouiiiK.ling Committee, 1; Col- 
legian, 1, 2 (Managing Editor, 2); 
Men's Glee Club, 1, 2; Kappa Sigma. 

Avis Mary Ryan, 43 West St., North- 
ampton. Northampton High School. 
Home Economics. Newman Club, 1, 
2; Home Economics Club, 1, 2; Sigma 
Beta Chi. 

Leo Thomas Ryan, 31 Michigan Aye., 
Pittsfield. PittsBeld High School. 
Pre-Dental. Collegian, 1; Newman 
Club, 1, 2; Phi Sigma Kappa. 

William Partridge Ryan, 15 Lennon 
St.. Gardner. Gardner High School. 
Horticultural Manufactures. New- 
man Club, 2; Sophomore-Senior Hop 
Committee, 2; Mathematics Club, 1; 
Phi Sigma Kappa. 

Arnold Clarke Salinger, 4 Bridge 
St., Monson. Monson Academ.v. 
Chemistry. Dean's List, 1; Phillips 
Brooks Club, 2; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 
Gilbert Salk, 12 Wiltshire Rd., 
Brighton. Boston Latin School. Pre- 
Med. Menorah Club, 1, 2; Alpha 
Epsilon Pi. 

Shirley Salsman, 30 Central St.. 
Ashland. Ashland High School. 
Liberal Arts. Phillips Brooks Club. 
1. 2; Zoology Club, 2; Women's Ath- 
letic Association. I, 2; Phi Zeta. 



!i»ophoinores 



Irving Jackson Saltzman, 21 Theo- 

(lore St.. Dorchester. Dorchester High 
Scho..l, IVvclinlogy. Dean's List, 1; 
Men. .rah Club, 1, 2; Chemistry Club, 
1; Mathcmalics Club, 1; Pre-Med. 
Club. 1; Psychology Club, 1, 2; 
Basketball, 1; Tan Epsilon Phi. 

Leslie Vincent Savino, 4S Walnut 
St., Northampton. St. Michael's High 
School. Economics. Newman Club, 
1,2; French Club, 1, 2; Basketball, 1 ; 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

Albert Vincent Scalingi, 104 Jose- 
phine Aye., Someryillc. Somerville 
High School. Chemistry, Bacteriology. 
Newman Club, 1; Cross Countr.v. 1; 
Spring Track, 1; Winter Track. 1; 
Kappa Sigma. 

Jack Edwin Schwartz, 11 Quint 

Ave., Boston. Brighton High School. 
Public Health. Menorah Club. 1. 2; 
Soccer. 1; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 

David S. Secor, Wilbraham. Ridg- 
wav Higli School. Veterinar.y 

Science. 

Doris Jeanette Sheldon, 86 Wood- 
mont St., West Springfield. West 
Springfield High School. Liberal Arts. 
Phillips Brooks Club, 1. 2; Mathe- 
matics Club. 1; Women's Athletic 
Association. 1, 2; Sigma Beta Chi. 

ham. Chat- 



John Rosier Sherman, Main St., 
Sheffield. Berkshire School. Liberal 
.'irts. Dean's List, 1; Kappa Sigma. 




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2291 



Sitpliitiuores 



Charlotte S. Shuldlner, 2S Ransom 
Rd., Brighton. Transfer from Cam- 
bridge Scliool of Liberal Arts. Chem- 
istry. Mathematics Club. 2; Menorah 
Club. 2. 

Harry Wellington Sloper, 51 Union 
St., Pittsfield. Wilbraham Academy. 
Economics. Men's Glee Club. 1. 2; 
C. A. A., 3; Baseball, 1, 2: Basketball, 
1, 2; Football, 1: Kappa Sigma. 
Bertha Slotnlck, 21 Parker St., Hol- 
yoke. Holyoke High School. Home 
Economics. Dean's List, 1; Menorah 
Club, 1; Home Economics Club, 1; 
Sigma Iota. 

Emil John Slowinski, S3 West St., 
Greenfield. Greenfield High School. 
Chemistry. Dean's List, 1; Mathe- 
matics Club, 2. 

Cordon Paul Smith, 3 Federal Court. 
Salem. Mount Hermon. Economics. 
Maroon Key, 2 (Vice-President); 
Roister Doisters, 1, 2; Campus 
Varieties, 2; Carnival Committee, 2; 
Baseball, 1; Basketball, 1; Cheer 
Leader, 2; Theta Chi. 
John LeBanon Spencer, 85 Adena 
Rd., We.st Newton. Coburn Classical 
Institute. Horticultural Manufac- 
tures. Phi Sigma Kappa. 
Joyce Mary Spencer, Jackson St., 
Belchertown. Belchertown High 

School. History. Choir, 1; Christian 
Federation Cabinet, 2; Women's 
Athletic Association, 1, 2. 
Ruth Catherine Sperry, 4S Scott St., 
Springfield. Cathedral High School. 
Chemistry. Newman Club, 1, 2; 
Women's Athletic Association, 1, 2; 
Chi Omega. 



Paul Stahlberfl, 44 State St., North- 
ampton. Northampton High School. 
Chemistry. Kappa Sigma. 

Chester Starvish, 7 Woodlawn St., 
Taunton. Transfer from St. Michael's 
College. Pre-Mcd. Newman Club, 
1: Pre-Med. Club, 1. 
Melvin William Stern, 34 Chiswick 
Rd.. Brigliton. Hoxbury Memorial 
High School. Pre-Dental. Menorah 
Club, 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 
Robert Armour Stevens, 94 Mt. 
Vernon St.. Arlington. Transfer from 
Tufts College. Political Science. 
Hockey, 2; Kappa Sigma. 
Robert Morrison Stewart, US 
Quincv Ave., Winthrop. Winthrop 
High School. Chemistry. Newman 
Club. 1, 2; Phi Sigma Kappa. 
Charlotte Lee Sturtevant, 5S North 
Prospect St., Amherst. Amherst High 
School. Home Economics. Home 
Economics Club, 1, 2. 
Anna E. Sullivan, 124 North Whitney 
St.. Amherst. Amherst High School. 
Home Economics. Newman Club, 2; 
Home Economics Club, 1; Phi Zeta. 
Henry Ronald Surgen, 145 Goffe St., 
Hadley. Hopkins Academy. Pre- 
Med. Newman Club, 1, 2; Soccer, 
2(M). 

Richard Jackson Symonds, Fort 
Wright, N. Y. Melrose High School. 
Chemistry. Band. 1: C. A. A., 2; 
Outing Club, 1; Newman (Club, 1, 2; 
Cross Country, 1; Hockey, 1, 2; Phi 
Sigma Kappa. 

Ruth Carolyn Symonds, 16 Dodge 
Ave., Worcester. Transfer .from 
Worcester State Teachers College. 
Languages. Choir, 2; Women's Glee 
Club, 2. 

Hazel Cora Tenney, Northfield. 
Northfield High School. Liberal Arts. 




_;e lectures 



„.En.U.UUVsto.y 



Arthur Stafford Teot, 88 Lincoln St.. 
Pittsfield. Pittsfield High School. 
Chemistry. Collegian, 1; Alpha 

Gamma Rho. 

Barbara Cushlng Thayer, Westfield 
Farm, Groton. Groton High School. 
Zoology. Phi Zeta. 

Kasha Vallentlne Thayer, Hickory 

Farm, Amherst. Physical and Biologi- 
cal Sciences. Outing Club, 1, 2 (Secre- 
tary, 2). 

Henry L. Thompson, Pleasant St., 
Framingham. Framingham High 
School. Landscape Architecture. 

Men's Glee Club. 1; Outing Club, 1; 
Alpha Gamma Rho. 

Frederick Rogers Tibbetts, 27 

School St., Winchendon. Transfer 
from University of Texas. Liberal 
Arts. Football, 2; Theta Chi. 
Elizabeth Dike Tilton, 12 Newbury 
St., Woburn. Woburn High School. 
Home Economics. Women's Glee 
Club, 1. 2; Home Economics Club, 

1, 2; Phi Zeta. 

Thomas Jones Tolman, River St., 
Norwell. Wilbraham Academy. Poul- 
try Husbandry. Poultry Club, 2; Base- 
ball, 1; Basketball, 1; Football, 1; 
Kappa Sigma. 

Martha Abbott Treml, 8 Burnett St.. 
Turners Falls. Turners Falls High 
School. Home Economics. Home 
Economics Club, 1, 2; Sigma Beta Chi. 
Gordon Prescott Trowbridge, 129 
King St., Northampton. Northamp- 
ton High School. Chemistry. 
HalanM.Twyble, 111 South Main St., 
Gilbertville. Hardwick High School. 
Physical and Biological Sciences. 
Howard Blcknell Trufant, 78 Wash- 
ington St., .\bington. Abington High 
School. Mathematics. Orchestra, 1; 
Baseball, 1; Soccer, 1; Alpha Gamma 
Rho. 

William Joseph Tucker, 287 First 
St., Pittsfield. Pittsfield High School. 
Chemistry. Newman Club, 1; Kappa 
Sigma. 

Mildred Nancy Turner, 4 Earl Ave.. 
Greenfield. Greenfield High School. 
Languages and Literature. Phillips 
Brooks Club, 2. 

Norman Alfred Vanasse, 36 Phillips 
Place, Northampton. St. Michael's 
High School. Horticultural Manu- 
factures. Debating, 2; Newman Club. 
1; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 
Harold Walba, 15 Dyer St., Dor- 
chester. Boston Public Latin School. 
Cheniistrv. Dean's List, 1, 2; Meno- 
rah Club, 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon Pi. 
Donald Burgln Walker, Pelham Hill. 
Amherst. Wilbraham Academy. 

Chemistry. C. A. A., 2; Phillips 
Brooks Club, 1, 2; Spring Track, 1; 
Soccer. 1, 2; Winter Track, 1, 2; 
Theta Chi. 

Charles Newton Warner, 451 Main 
St., Sunderland. Amherst High 
School. Entomology. Maroon Key. 

2, Spring Track, 2; Winter Track, 1, 2; 
Q T V 

Elmer Roger Warner, 207 Main St.. 
Sunduland. Chemistry. Theta Chi. 
Jean Washburn, 190 George St., 
Pliinvdle Plainville High School. 
Liber.il \rts. Women's Glee Club, 1, 
2. S[gma Beta Chi. 
Beatrice Wasserman, 52 Westmore 
Rd., Mattapan. Girls' Latin School. 
Bacteriology. Dean's List, 1; Women's 
Glee Club, 1, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2; 
Sigma Iota. 

Marjorie Arline Watson, IS Charles 
St., Westboro. Westboro High School, 
Home Economics. Women's Athletic 
Association. 1. 



2301 



Dobson Lindley Webster, i")0 Lake- 
wood Ud.. South Weymouth. Wey- 
mouth High School, /oology. Ser- 
geant-at-.\rnis. 1. 2; Maroon Key. 2; 
Zoology Cluh. 2; Lnnibdu Chi Alpha. 

W. Leon Weeks, 12 Long Ave., Green- 
6eld. Greenfield High School. Eco- 
nomics. Dean's List, 1; Band, 1, 2; 
Debating, 1, 2 (Assistant Manager, 2); 
Outing Club, I: Soccer. 1; Alpha 
Gamma Rho. 

Raymond Arnold Weinhold, N2 
Birch St., Worcester. Worcester South 
High School. Forestry. Orchestra, I, 
2, 3 (Assistant Manager, 3); Alpha 
Sigma Phi. 

Janet Elizabeth Wheeler, 1381 
Plunitree Rd., Springfield. Transfer 
from Springfield Junior College. 
Liberal Arts. 

Marian Eloise Whltcomb, -4 Lorion 
Ave., Worcester. Worcester North 
High School. Home Economics. 
Choir, 1; Glee Club, 1; Sigma Beta 
Chi. 

Arthur White, 17 Chadwick St., 
Worcester. W'orcester North High 
School. Wildlife, Forestry. New- 
man Club, 1, 2; Hockey, 1, 2; Kappa 
Sigma. 

Bernard Maurice Willemaln, 29 

Francis Ave., Holyoke. Holyoke High 
School. Landscape Architecture. 

Band, 1: Newman Club, 1, 2; Sopho- 
more-Senior Hop Committee, 2; Phi 
Sigma Kappa. 

Pauline Viola Wlllett, Cheshire. 
Adams High School. Liberal Arts. 
Newman Club. 1, 2; French Club, 1; 
Sigma Beta Chi. 

Laura Williams, 120 Main St., Pea- 
bodv. Peabody High School. Ph.vsi- 
cal and Biological Sciences. Women's 
Glee Club, 2; French Club, 2; Sigma 
Iota. 

Mark Curtis Wilson, 121 South St.. 
Ware. Ware High School. Animal 
Husbandry. Outing Club, 1; i-H 
Club, 1. 2. 

Donald Guilford Wood, Jr., 143 

Main St., Shelburne Falls. Deerfield 
Academy. Entomology. Student 

Senate, 3; Band. 2, 3; Roister Doisters. 
2; Newman Club. 1, 2, 3; Fernald 
Entomology Club, 3; Phi Sigma Kappa. 

David Joy Wright, 67 West St., 
Northampton. Northampton High 
School. Engineering. Sigma Phi 
Epsilon. 

Robert Leonard Wroe, 47 Baker St.- 
Foxboro. Lincoln Technical Institute. 
Liberal Arts. Roister Doisters, 2; 
Campus Varieties, 2; Lambda Chi 
Alpha. 

Philip Mason Young, 17.5 Salem St.' 
North Andover. Johnson High School. 
Chemistry. Hockey, 1; Phi Sigma 
Kappa. 

Robert Levels Young, .54 Maiden St., 
Worcester. Worcester North High 
School. Liberal Arts. Christian Fed- 
eration Cabinet, 2; W'esiey Foundation, 
1, 2; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 
Stanley Harris Young, Peterborough, 
N. H. Transfer from New Hampshire 
University. Landscape Architecture. 
Alglrdas Peter Yurkstas, 48 Cottage 
St., Bridgewater. Transfer from 
Bridgewater Teachers College. Horti- 
cultural Manufactures. 
George John Zewskl, 357 Bridge St., 
Northampton. Northampton High 
School. General Engineering. 
Margarete Ziegengeist, 248 Hatfield 
St., Northampton. Northampton 
High School. Botany. 




Quantitative analysis for chemically concerned sophomores 



Freshmen 



Jean Esther Abeleln 

36 Queen St., Holyoke 



Sellg J. Alkon 

25 Nazing St., Roxbury 

Elliot R. Allen 

103 Knolhvood St., Springfield 

Phyllis Allen 

175 Lincoln St.. Holyoke 

Cynthia S. Allman 

37 HuntiTigton Ave.. Sharon 

Beatrice S. Alpert 

41 Bartlett St.. Springfield 

Justin L. Altshuler 

Hotel Buckminster, Boston 

Miriam L. Andersen 

162 W'oodlawn St., Lynn 

Patricia R. Andersen 

53 California Ave., Springfield 

Edward J. Anderson 

7 Old Oaken Bucket Rd., Scituate 

George E. Anderson 

133 High Haith Rd., Arlington 

Warren E. Anderson 

13 Rena St., Worcester 



Elizabeth A. Bates 

29 Ruby Ave., Marblehead 

Dorothea Beach 

76 Sagamore Rd., Worcester 

Marian E. Bean 

Harper Rd., Williamstown 

Helen E. Beaumont 

285 .\niity St., .\mherst 

George J. Bernard 

652 Newton St., South Hadley 

Martha C. Bicktord 

Zenita St.. Lake Pleasant 

Barbara A. Bigelow 

West Main St.. Northboro 

R. Eleanor Bigelow 

18 Checver St., Milton 

Barbara H. Bird 

97 Franklin St., Reading 

Sidney N. Black 

62 Maywood St., Roxbury 

Thomas K. Bliss, Jr. 

697 Park St., Attleboro 

James N. Bodurtha 

Russelville Rd., Southampton 

Phyllis G. Boles 

Sea St., Marshfield 

Edward J. Bourdeau 

116 3rd St., Turners Falls 

Ellen C. Bowler 

57 Craiwcll Ave., West Springfield 

Wallace H. Boy 

403 Maple St.. Holyoke 

PrlscUla Bradford 

255 South Main St., Orange 

William G. Brady 

Wilbraham 

Dwight A. Bramble 

131 State .\vc.. Palmer 

Lawrence C. Brautigam 

87 College St., South Hadley 



231 




Defiant Frosh as they face the Senate Supreme Court 



Patrick 1. Bresnahan 

4(1 M.irpin St.. Holyoke 

Donald H. Bricrc 

2y Forest St.. Williniansett 

Harold J. Brltt 

21 Libert.v St.. Northampton 

Albert Brown 

610 Park St., Dorchester 

Anne H. Brown 

36 Notch Rd., Adams 

Marjorie H. Brownell 

1 Park St., Mattapnisett 

Eleanor S. Bryant 

Sterling Rd., South Lancaster 

Mary P. Burdett 

Main St.. Charlemont 

Daniel F. Burgess 

247 Market St., Brockton 

Bernard P. Bussel 

24 Longvvood Ave., Holyoke 

Georfte D. Butler, Jr. 

1.53 Highwood Ave., Leonia, N. J. 

Mary G. Butler 

26 Arlington St.. Leominster 

Robert K.. Butler 

12 Barnard Rd., Worcester 



Robert J . Campbell 

63 Westford Ave, Springfield 

Catherine Capen 

40 Park St., Stoughton 

Annella Card 

39 Linfield St., Holbrook 

Shirley M. Carlson 

75 Quinaposet Lane, Worcester 

Mary Carney 

1672 Pleasant St., Athol 

Salvatore Cataudella 

132 Bailey St., Lawrence 

Robert G. Chandler 

Hildreth St., We.itford 



Robert K. Chatel 

23 Green Ave., Northampton 

Virginia A. Clark 

Windsor Rd.. Dalton 

James P. Coffey 

9 Sanderson Ave., Northampton 

Shirley Cohen 

30 Ridgewood Ave., Holyoke 

Thelma F. Cohen 

67 Richmond Ave., Worcester 

Dorothy R. Colburn 

12.5 Rogers Ave., West Spring6eld 

Ruth M. Cole 

Lyman St., Northboro 

Barbara H. Collins 

Natick 

Alan A. Cooley 

ISO Appleton Ave., Pittsfield 

Max David Cooley 

33 Medford St., Springfield 

Joseph V. Corriveau 

124 Westmoreland Ave., Longmeadon 

John S. Coughlan, Jr. 

127 Woodside Ter., Springfield 

Wllda M. Coye 

58 Liberty Ave., West Somerville 

Helen E. Cromwell 

45 Glendale St., Weymouth 

Benjamin C. Crooker 

Grove St.. Upton 

John F. Crosby 

58 Water St.. Greenfield 
A. Jean Culbertson 
Glen St., South Natick 
Eldon C. Daniel 

11.59 West St., Walpole 
Edward Daunais 

59 Bellevue Ave., Adams 



John P. Dawkins 

619 Clifton Ave., Newark. N. J. 

Margaret M. Deinlein 

Chestnut St., West Hatfield 

Catherine T. Dellea 

R. F. D. 3, Great Harrington 

Robert J. Deltour 

IS Reynolds Ave., Monson 

Mayo A. Derby 

Harvard St.. Leominster 

Robert E. Diamond 

12 McKinley Ave., Easthampto 
Paul O. Dickinson, Jr. 

147 Ferry St., Easton, Pa. 

Robert E. Dillon 

23 Walnut St., Ware 

James L. Dinsmore 

266 Chapman St., Greenfield 

Frances E. Donahue 

92 Crescent St., Franklin 

Michael J. Donohue 

936 Dwight St., Holyoke 

Nancy Doolittle 

9 Rexhame Rd., Worcester 

Robert H. Doolittle, Jr. 

Main St., Wilbraham 

George W. Doten 

246 Court St., Plymouth 

Joseph C. Driscoll 

4 Beaver Dam Rd., Scituate 

Carolyn W. Durfee 

13 Flynt Ave.. Monson 
Harriette A. Dwork 

281 Mason Ter.. Brookline 

Milton Edelsteln 

641 Haverliill St.. Lawrence 

Golda M. Edinburg 

925 Pleasant St., Worcester 

Robert Epstein 

100 Willard Rd., Brookline 



Ruth J. Ewing 

Easthampton 

Edmund Farinha 

426 Bay St.. Fall River 

Melvin H. Fefer 

47 Draper St.. Springfield 

Robert E. Fein 

103 Shawmut St.. Springfield 

Richard W. Flnck 

263 Bridge Rd.. Florence 

Nello F. Fiorio 

,S0 Washington St., Hyde Park 

Gordon Fisher, Jr. 

5S Wyman St., Woburn 

Elizabeth M. FitzGcrald 

724 Union St.. Rockland 

Kathleen M. Flynn 

15 Perkins Manor. Jamaica Plain 

John J. Foley 

23 Belmont St., Amesbury 

James R. Foster 

11 Wildwood Ave.. Greenfield 
Lester H. Fox 

121 Livingston .\ve.. Lowell 
Mischa E. Freedman 

12 Nevada St.. Worcester 
Ray R. Fuller 

3 Providence St., Springfield 

James W. Fulton 

60S South Pleasant St., Amherst 

Benedict F. Galas 

14 Hampden Ave., Monson 

Richard C. Garvey 

193 Prospect St., Northampton 

William H. Gaylord, Jr. 

85 College St., South Hadley 

Jerome H. Geller 

111 Church St.. Pittsfield 

Margaret J. Glbbs 

HuntinetoD 



Harold Gilboard 

33 Ames St., Liiwrence 

Frederick J. GIIUs 

324 Bellevue St., West Roibury 

John E. Gilmore 

271 Plain St., Brockton 

Warren P. Ginf^ras 

21 Marshall St., Turners Falls 

Leon G. GIzienskI 

North Hadley 

Edward M. Gladding 

21 Millbury .\ve., iMillbury 

Kennetli D. Glancy 

50 .\uburn St., Chicopee 

Donald \V. Glaser 

512 New Rochell Rd., Bronxville, N. Y. 

Samuel Glass 

2 Crawford St., Rosbury 

Robert E. Glendon 

4 W.nre Rd., Winchester 

Walter R. Goelirlng 

6 Laurel St., Holyoke 

George Goldin 

76 Grove St., Lynn 

Melvin N. Goldman 

20 J.isper St., Lawrence 
Carol Goodchild 

209 Dunmoreland St.. Springfield 

Margaret M. Gore 

165 West St., Florence 

Louise P. Gosling 

Perkins Institute, Watertown 

H. Harold Gould 

76 Merrick St., Worcester 

Samuel K. Gove 

239 School St., Walpole 

Robert B. Gower 

155 Oakleigh Rd., Newton 

Rose E. Grant 

3S6 Davis St., Greenfield 

Harold L. Greenbcrg 

21 Wolcott St., Dorchester 
Joseph P. Griffin 

757 Dwight St., Holyoke 
Mildred C. Griffiths 

11 Vine St., Braintree 
George F. Grogan 

12 West Wyoming Ave., Melrose 
Herbert H. Gross 

29S North Main St., Sharon 

Marilyn Roberts Hadley 

540 Weetanoe St., Fall River 

Robert W. Haeberle 

Shelburne Falls 

James G. Halkiotis 

36 Wheeler Ave.. Haverhill 

Jacqueline A. Halloran 

26 Adare Place, Northampton 

John C. Hamilton 

150 Quincy..\ve., Winthrop 

Ann P. Harcourt 

2SS East Main St., North Adams 

Marie C. Hauck 

87 Wilder Ter., West Springfield 

Natalie Hayward 

69 Oak St., Lexington 

William R. Hendry 

68 Marlboro St., Chelsea 

Muriel C. Herrlck 

257 Elm St., Pittsfield 



Geraldlne H. Hervleux 

Belchertown 

Leona M. Hibbard 

2 Massasoit .\ve., Northampto 

Joseph W. Hlgglns 

135 West St., Northampton 

Agnes M. HiU 

New Salem 

Richard M. Hoey 

15 Catalpa St., Worcester 



Jane C. Holmes 

146 Federal St., Greenfield 

Marjorie P. Huff 

Clover Hill Farm, Fitchburg 

John T. Hughes 

167 Circuit Ave., Oak BlulTs 

Mary A. Hughes 

Hampden 

David H. Hunter 

16 Rutledge St., West Roxbury 
Virginia A. Hurd 

95 Fearing St., Amherst 
Phyllis L. Hyatt 

Carleton Ave, Briarcliff Manor, N. Y. 

Philip V. lampletro 

.50 Vine St., Middleboro 

Salvatore J. Italia 

182 East Elm St., Torrington, Conn. 

Henry H. Jackson, Jr. 

10 Angcll St., .\ttleboro 

Richard F. Jackson 

Hartsliorn Rd., Walpole 

Brooks R. Jakeman 

81 Hickory Grove Dr., Larchmont, N. Y. 

Rosemary G. Jeff way 

17 Park St., Easthampton 
Marguerite Jenks 

96 West Alvord St., Springfield 
Ruth Johnston 

4312' East Main St., Spencer 

Frederick L. Jones 

Averdale Parkway, Hopedale 

Nelson V. Jones 

34 Preston St.. Springfield 

Virginia L. Julian 

40 Farview Way, Amherst 

Ellen J. Kane 

12 Pratt St., Worcester 

Thomas J. Kane 

576 Lincoln St., Worcester 

Edward Kaplovltz 

4 Loxwood St., W'orcester 

Robert F. Kearney 

10 Havelock Rd., Worcester 



Freshmen 



David E. Kelleher 

14 Stanley St., Greenfield 

Ransford W. Kellogg 

Southwick 

John W. Kelly 

16 Dana St„ Northampton 

George L. Kennedy 

S B St., Adams 

Richard H. Kimball 

99 East Pleasant St., Amherst 

Donald M. Kinsman 

963 Worcester Rd., Framingham 

Joseph C. Kunces 

12 Washburn St., Middleboro 

Robert F. LaFountain 

685 Bridge Rd., Northampton 

Sally M . Laltlnen 

333 A Union St., Gardner 

James J. Lallberte 

60 King St., Holyoke 

John E. Lambert 

82 North Prospect St., Amherst 

Marcus O. Landon 

lis Hollcnbeck Ave., Great Barrington 

Virginia E. LaPlante 

14 John St., Williamstown 

Harold Lavlen 

41 Gleason St., Dorchester 

Dorothy F. Lee 

53 Cleveland St., Greenfield 

Elisabeth V. Lee 

124 Hillside Ave., Shelton, Conn. 

Kenneth A. Legg 

51 Orange St., Nantucket 

Dorothy L. Lent 

5 Harrison St., Maynard 

Donald A. Lewis 

184 Edge Hill Rd., Milton 




Freshmen 



Herman F. Llppa 

644 Harvard St., Mattapan 

Lois E. Litz 

38 State St.. Monson 

William E. Litz, Jr. 

38 State St., Monson 

William E. Lucey 

116 Revere St., Spring6eld 

Lillian A. Luksis 

4 Carlstad St., Worcester 

Richard Lundy 

So Knolhvood St., Springfield 

Donald R. Lyman 

29 Allen St., Greenfield 

Elizabeth C. Lyman 

R. F. D., White River Junctioi 

Rachel G. Lyman 

108 Hastings St., Greenfield 

Raymond J. Lynch 

465 Pleasant St., Holyoke 

Robert E. Lynch 

168 Bartletter Rd., Winthrop 

Robert J. Lynch 

29 Pleasant St., Milford 

Sheldon A. Madorsity 

124 Draper St., Springfield 

Norma J. Magidson 

IS Boyer St., Springfield 

Olivia L. Magnuson 

41 Lincoln St., Manchester 

Joseph L. Magri 

111 Pearl St., Holyoke 

Elizabeth E. Mahoney 

SB Scituate St., Arlington 



Jacob Marftolis 

2.5 North Woodford St., W 

Cyrus F. Maroneey 

20 Green Ave., NorthampI 

John J, Martin 

Crandall St., Adams 

Marion V. Martin 

4,51 South Pleasant St., Ai 

Mary H. Martin 

41 Lamb St., South Hadle, 

Richard S. Martin 

R. F. D., Box 68, Stow 

Anthony G. MarullI 

6S Newton St., Holyoke 



Gloria T. Maynard 

Deer Island, Boston Harbor 

Daniel J. McCarthy 

22 Holland Ave, Westfield 

Louise H. McKemmie 

Middle St., Amherst 

Virginia A. Meats 

3 Buckingham Rd., Milton 

Thelma R. Medine 

6S Brattle St., Holden 

Grace E. Mentzer 

R. F. D., Box 213. Bolton 

Gilbert E. Merrill 

21 Berry St., Danvers 

Frances M. Merritt i 

14SS Westfield St., West Springfield 

Robert E. Merrow 

12 Eastern Ave., South Essex 

Marilyn Miller 

34 Coombs St., Southbridge 

Horace N. Milliken 

S7 West St., Hyde Park 




class 



Wlas* 



of '»' 



Aitary 



fresUt^e" 



Eleanor F. Monroe 

Pine St., Dover 

Allison H. Moore 

19 Isabelle St., Melrose 

Dennison H. Moray 

West Cummington 

Jane V. Moriarty 

34 Maple St., Chicopee Falls 

Arthur Moroni 

298 Race St., Holyoke 

Robert F. Mount 

10 Chiitham Rd., Longmeadow 

John A. Muilaly 

10 Stoddard Ave., Pittsfield 

Francis J. Murphy 

115 Peabody St., Gardner 

James H. Murphy 

88 Bridge St., Northampton 

Arnold H. Murray, Jr. 

343 Ash St.. Brockton 

Joan I. Murray 

33 Maple St., Florence 

Ruth J. Murray 

Main St., Rowley 

John J. Natti 

1142 Washington St., Gloucester 

Andrew W. Nelson 

44 SavUle Ave., Quincy 

Donald G. Newton 

Northfield Farms, Northfield 

Maxwell J. Niedjela 

Spruce Hill, Hadley 

Val Nisbeth 

Douglas Rd., Chappaqua, N. Y. 

Coleman Noahson 

1874 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton 
Barbara J . Noone 

114 Franklin St., North Adams 
Margaret G. Ogden 
Acoaxet 
Constance O'Keefe 

56 Youle St., Melrose 
Elizabeth Patton 

18 Charles St.. Westboro 

Robert D. Pease 

47 East Pleasant St., Amherst 

Arthur H. Peck 

Winter St., Barre 

Helen C. Petersen 

Ml Brow .\v,.. South Braintree 

VViiliam G. Phlppen 

221 Mystic Valley Parkwiiy. Winchest 

Robert B. Pierce 

Box 42, Paxton 

Robert E. Pierce 

24 Carew St., South Hadley 

Myrtle H. Policy 

15 Coolidge Ave.. Southbridge 

John C. Powers 

31 Lisle St., Braintree 

Robert W. Pratt 

245 North St., Dalton 

John J. Prendergast 

174 Arlington St., Lar - 

Barbara L. Pullan 

58 Highland Ave., Andover 

Janet Race 

11 Washington Ave., Northampto 

Anthony J . Randazzo 

133 Garden St., Lawrence 

Richard A. Rawling 

Richmond 

Norman C. Regnler 

7S7 Mill St., Feeding Hills 

Eli Reines 

s Dwight St., Boston 

Thomas G. Reynolds 

27 Ferry Rd.. Turners Falls 

Mary Virginia Rice 

KM Noitliai.iplon ltd., Amherst 

Dorothy L. Richards 

95 Downing St.. Worcester 

Carolvn F. Rimbach 

Sterling 

Carroll F. Robbins 

24 Linden St., Norwood 



[234] 



Doris H. Roberts 

201 Osborne Ter., Springfield 

Natalie Robinson 

350 Ames St.. Liiwrence 

John P. Rose 

Truro 

Edward L. Ross 

Pleasant St.. Berlin 

Alma E. Rowe 

Fosgate liil., Hud.son 

Almon O. Rugftles 

West Main St.. Brookticld 



Frederick S. Rutan, Jr. 

12 Stearns Rd., Brookline 
Robert 1. Ryan 
02 Park St., Hudson 
Jason Sacks 

143 Gardner Rd., Brooklin, 



Martha M. Sampson 

607 Beeeh St.. Holyoke 

SylTla I. Sandler 

35 Hallenan Ave.. Lawrence 

Norma E. Sanford 

045 Laurel St., Longmeadow 

Richard E. Saulnler 

1 North St.. Saxonville 

Barbara G. Saver 

51 Hallenan Ave., Lawrence 

Irmarle Scheuneman 

186 West St., Leominster 

Arthur Schwartz 

327 King St.. Springfield 

Gladys R. Scott 

Ashfield 

Mary F. Sellew 

131 Broad St., Middletown, Co 

John W. Shannon 

31 Bates Rd.. Milton 

Stanley R. Sherman 

713 Nnntasket Ave., Allerton 

Paul R. Shuman 

7 Jefl^erson Ave., Chelsea 

Herbert V. Shuster 

82 Devon St., Boston 

Shirley M. Sibley 

33 Juniper St., W'inchendon 

Edward G. Sidd 

165 Chiswick Rd.. Brighton 

Roy E. Slevwright 

70 Vernon St., Northampton 

Julius Silverman 

79 Shirley Ave., Revere 

Albert S. Simpson 

10 Minthorne St., Worcester 

Helen E. Smith 

P. 0. Bos 35, Royalston 

Marjorle E. Spear 

360 B Pond St.. Wcstwood 

Samuel Springer 

246 Magnolia St.. Roxbury 

Wesley B. Sprout 

24 Canterbury St., Hingham 
WUliam E. Stadler 

305 Franklin St., Holyoke 

Anne D. Stafford 

26 Banks Rd., Swampscott 

Bernard L. Stead 

604 Essex St., Lynn 

Robert S. Stedman 

25 Harvard St., Holyoke 
Lucille C. Stein 

10 Forest Park Ave., Adams 

Donald H. Stewart 

43 Scarlett St., West Boylston 

Madge I. Strong 

Chathamport 

M. Nancy Sullivan 

82 Union St., North Adams 




Two freshmen gingerly examine a pickled frog in Zoo lab 



Walter C. Sullivan 

20 California Ave.. Springfield 
Paul H. Sussenguth 
364 Linden St.. Holyoke 
Lois M. Swanbeck 

102 Peck St., Franklin 



Edward R. Szetela 

4 Magnolia Ave.. Holyoke 

Peter J. Tassinari 

49 Broad St., Salem 

Dorothy E. Telander 

610 North Main St.. Randolph 

Nathaniel S. Terry 

36 High St.. Hingham 

Helen M. Thomas 

1560 Longmeadow St., Longmeadow 

Jean B. Thomas 

3S Peirce St., Middleboro 

Ralph H. Tinker, Jr. 

Great Barrington 

Sidney Topol 

10 Richfiebl St., Dorchester 

True Tower 

239 Centre Ave., Abington 

Virginia R. Tripp 

Main Rd., Westport 

Dwight V. Trubey 

220 Dunstable Rd., North Chelmsford 

Virginia H. Van den Noort 

21 Clifton St.. Lynn 

Rocco A. Verrilll 

24 Maple Ave., Harrison, N. Y 

Barbara R. Walker 

3 Fourth St.. Onset 
Ouinn Walker 

62 East 54th St.. New York, N. Y. 
Rosemary B. Walsh 

4 Sackett .St.. Westfield 
Wallace R. Wannlund 

144 Mt. Vernon St.. Arlington 

Alan S. Warden 

471 Ridge St.. Newark, N. J. 

Betty F. Washburn 

Main Rd., Montgomery 



George A. Washburn 

Main Rd., Montgomery 
Marjorle R. Waterhouse 

Leverett 



Stanley L. Wein 

60 Chase Ave., North Adams 
Barbara L. Weissbrod 
1 Brightwood Ave.. Holyoke 
Joseph Weretelnyk 

20 Keenan St., Watertown 
Frederick J . West 

74 Houston Ave., Milton 

Carol H. White 

356 Albion St.. Wakefield 

Philip R. White 

264 SouthHuntington Ave.. Boston 

Ethel B. Whitney 

Worcester Rd.. Westminster 

Porter E. Whitney 

Main St., Charlton 

Shirley Wiesing 

15 Thomas Ave., Holyoke 

Warren K. Wilhelm 

79 Maple Rd.. Longmeadow 

Earle M. Williams 

30 Morris St.. Feeding Hills 

Richard A. Williams 

36-31 214 St.. Ba.yside, N. Y. 

Wilma C. Winberg 

1339 Main St.. Waltham 

Nathan B. Wlnstanley, Jr. 

14 Empire St.. AUston 

Charles W. Wood 

7 Oak St., Monson 

Melvin S. Yavner 

21 Supple Rd.. Dorchester 
George E. Yetman 

47 Highland Place, South Weymouth 

Carlton B. Young 

Sloan Rd.. South Williamstown 

HeiU"y Richards Zahner 

Groton 

Rudolph Zuccaro 

32 Sunset Rd., Somerville 



235 



Acknowledgments 






I /r-- 



';.' \ 






In the long twelve-month production 
of the 1942 INDEX, many individuals 
performed services beyond their duties. 
The human attitude of Prof. Dickinson — 
technically the business advisor but 
actually the INDEX godfather — inspired 
the editor and made possible the publica- 
tion in spite of priorities and lack of time. 
Milton Fitch, Miss Cooper, Irv Green, 
Charlie lannello, Mr. Canty, Mr. Osborn 
— each contributed to the INDEX. 
Editorial thanks go to Red Emery, 
Baxter Allen, Prof. Vondell, Ralph Dakin. 
Paul Dwyer, Jack Laliberte, Peg and 
Elwyn Doubleday, Mike and Dave 
Canney, and others. 



EditorandCharlif lannello sohefliilinis; . . . "Ketch" and Prof. Dickinson budgeting 




and Advertisements . . . 




Wes>l of Ihe INDEX office is- the Librar> wFhtt window*!- frame soeiics of the campus and tbc HerUshire Hills 




DOVGLA<$S-MARI$H 



... the store -where you -M'ill aWays 
ohtain dependable merchandise, 
courteous service, and good values 
. . . the house that offers you all 
of the nationally known brands 
and types of furniture ... Doug- 
lass-Marsh ... "In Amherst ... 
At the Head of the Village Green." 




Douglass wins frionds with 
good furniture 




GULF SERVICE STATIOX 



. • • When you want gas, when 
your car needs lubricating, or 
when it needs any type of service, 
drive in at the sign of Gulf Gas. . . . 
Here courteous attendants are al- 
ways ready to give you the best 
in the shortest time. . . . For 
those famous Gulf products plus 
service "with a smile" remember 
the Gulf Service Station. 




Good Gulf Gas scores again 



COLLEGE 
STORE 




... on everyone's must list, the 
student's store ... stop In for 
a light snack and a few minutes 
of relaxation . . . get your books, 
stationery, magazines and odds 
and ends at inviting prices ... 
meet your friends at . . . the 
College Store. 




'Store for students' 
for lower prices 




LOUIS' 
FOODS 



. . • Louis' Foods is the best 
equipped store in New England 
to fill your every food require- 
ment ... Semi-self-service, the 
best of modern refrigeration, 
prompt delivery on request, com- 
bined M'ith a complete line of 
produce, meats and groceries at a 
reasonable price, ans>*'er your de- 
sire for an exclusive place to trade 
... Telephone Amherst 477-8-9. 




State faculty finds 
Louis* superior 




AMHEHST OIL COMPAXY^ 



... on Main Street near Triangle ... 
this company serves Amherst and 
vicinity with fuel oil ... numbering 
annong Its many customers nearly 
all of State's fraternities and soror- 
ities ... M'here you can also obtain 
General Electric and Crosley refrig- 
erators ... remember to call the 
Amherst Oil Company to satisfy 
your fuel oil need ... your call will 
bring instant service by one of its 
fleet of five trucks. 




You jjct your money's worth 
at the Amherst Oil Company 




THE LORD JEFFERY 



... a "Treadway Inn" . . . words that 
to the traveler mean all that Is fine 
and enjoyable in one's stay "a>vay 
from home". . . just the place for an 
excellent meal or a successful ban- 
quet . . . where you will find that 
"quaint New- England atmosphere" 




During graduation your folks will appreci- 
ate your choice if you recommend the "Jeff" 



MUTUAL 
PLUMBIXlii 



^m f'mJTVAL^Si^_ 


COMPANY. -^^ 


»^ H.ARDWy5 


^^^Hp - i iimm^ 


HVh^rovaS^E^^^^^^bI 




;..Jii.Jiil, 





... the store M^here you can obtain 
the latest and most popular Victor 
and Bluebird recordings plus radio 
and record-player equipntent of all 
kinds ... if you want any type of 
hardware, expert plumbing service, 
or plumbing supplies . . . come in, 
no matter hoM- lar^e or small your 
purchase ... to the Mutual Plumb- 
ing and Heating Concipany. . . • 




Get Victor and Bluebird 
records at Mutual today 



■pi 


T^ ""'"' ,yL^^ i^l^l 




^jip^'v "■ -.."^ m 


■L'. .^ifli^^^t^ife i£^ I* 11 


|b ' /t^' -^ 




it,......,iiilfl 



FURXITURE 



FROM GOOD AMERICAN STOCK 



At Griggs there is furniture that 
comes deep from the roots of 
America — furniture that retains 
the true, unspoiled beauty of 
original designs, handed down by 
our pioneers, the French, the 
Spanish, Dutch and old New Eng- 
land stock. There is nothing 
more appropriate for the Ameri- 
can home today than these treas- 
ures of Conant-Ball solid rock 
maple, finished in a warm natural 
tone, found in Amherst exclu- 
sively at Griggs. 




End your Furniture 
fstruigglcs at Griggs 



AMtJLMiH-HOCHKSTBn TAMM^OHKO 




Sure we'll have nasty iveather this spring 

... A covert top coat by Adler-Rochester is stylish, long wearing, 
and should last for "The Duration." Covert cloth is a tightly woven, 
smoothly finished fabric that is practically wind and rain proof. 
... For over twenty years Adler-Kochester coats and suits have 
been sold in Amherst bv 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



COLLEGE OUTFITTERS 




CHRISTENSON 

Specialists in ^ine^ oMilitary Bquipment 

286 FIFTH AV;ENUE * NEW YORK CITY 




ST. REGIS DIXER 






20 Points of Silent Speed Superiority 



The Marchant Man will gladly explain to you the 
advantages of the 20 points 



Sales Agencies and Manufacturer's Service Stations 

in all Principal Cities Give 

Service Everywhere 



92 STATE STREET - SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



^*THE COLLEGE CA]\DY KITCHEX 



99 



During twenty-six years of con- 
tinual service to Amherst, Sarris 
Restaurant has become a tradition 
with the students, faculty, and 
alumni of Massachusetts State 
College. Many returning alumni 
remember Sarris's during their 
student days and all have en- 
joyed the inviting and refreshing 
atmosphere that is always present 
there. Although renovations 
have altered and modernized the 
interior, Sarris still has that 
pleasant atmosphere that faculty 
and alumni remember whenever 
suggestions for a place to eat are 
made. When you are tired and 
M-ant refreshments or hungry and 
want the best in foods, M'e recom- 
mend Sarris's as the restaurant to 
patronize when in the vicinity of 
Amherst. 



SARRIS RESTAURANT 

33 MAIN STREET 




The 
Pressroom 



1U 



279 DWIGHT STREET 
SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 



Vyinten and ^mAcrs to a d,\scyi-m.\natmg clientele 
since 1S54 



The 
Bindery 




Another Publication . . . 



SHOWING 

SARGENT 

SUPERIORITY 



Complete Photographic Service 
to the 

1940, 1941 and 1942 
INDEX 



Sargent Studio Inc. - Boston, Massachusetts 



Sinootk SoIIa^ 




When pur Yearbook Course 
HOWARD -WESSON COMPANY 

44 Portland Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 



Ne4ju. Chx^IghjcI^ J!.afu^e>it QolU(^ Z*Uf/ui4Aefi4> 



Table of Contents 



Academic Activities 78 

Academic Activities Awards 166 

Academic Activities Board 54 

Acknowledgments 236 

Adelphia 164 

Administration 46 

Advertisements 238-253 

Alpha Epsilon Pi 128 

Alpha Gamma Rho 130 

Alpha Lambda Mu 132 

Alpha Sigma Phi 134 

Alumni 212 

Amherst Weekend 39 

Athletic Activities 95-120 

B 

Band 88 

Baseball 116 

Basketball 106 

Bay Staters 91 

Bay Statettes 91 



C. A. A 23 

Campus Varieties 38 

Cheer Leaders 165 

Chi Omega 136 

Choir 126 

Christian Federation 123 

Class Lists 167-235 

Class Officers 56 

Collegian 78 

Commencement 30 

Cross Country 102 

D 

Dads' Day 34 

Deans 47 

Debating Club 86 



D 

Dedication 6 

Directors 48 

F 

Faculty 59-75 

Fine Arts 43 

Football 98 

Fraternities 127-159 

Freshman Officers 57 

Freshman Events 24 

Freshman Lists 231 

G 

Glee Clubs 90 

H 

Handbook 83 

Hockey 113 

Honor Committee 58 

Horticulture Show 36 

I 

Index 80 

In Memoriam 75 

In Recognition 74 

Interclass Athletic Committee 58 

Intercollegiate Athletic Committee. . . 55 

Interfraternity Ball 40 

Interfraternity Council 52 

Inter-Greek Ball 41 

Intersorority Ball 40 

Intersorority Council 52 

Intramurals 96 

Isbgon 164 

J 

Junior Officers 57 

Junior Lists 214 

K 

Kappa Sigma 138 



[254] 



Table of Contents 



L 

Lambda Chi Alpha U() 

M 

Maroon Key 165 

Menorah-Hillel 124 

Men's GleeCkib 91 

Mothers' Day .'5.5 

Musical Clubs 90-93 

N 

Newman Club 124 

o 

Operetta "29 

Outing Club 94 

P 

Phi Beta Kappa 162 

Phi Kappa Phi 163 

Phillips Brooks Club 125 

Phi Sigma Kappa 142 

PhiZeta 144 

Pirates of Penzance 29 

President Baker 16, 17, 47 

Q 

Quarterly 82 

Q. T. V 146 

R 

Radio 91 

Religious Activities 121-126 

Review of the Year 8-15 

Roister Doisters 84 

R. O. T. C 18 

s 

Senate 50 

Senior Officers 56 



s 

Senior Lists 168 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 148 

Sigma Beta Chi 150 

Sigma Iota 152 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 154 

Sigma Xi 162 

Sinf onietta 87 

Social Union 42 

Soccer 104 

Sophomore Officers 57 

Sophomore Lists 222 

Soph-Senior Hop 33 

Sororities 127-159 

Statesmen 92 

Statettes 92 

Swimming 110 

T 

Tau Epsilon Phi 156 

Tennis 19 

ThetaChi 158 

Track 114 

Trustees 46 

u 

United Religious Council 122 

V 

Vic Parties 41 

w 

W. A. A 120 

AVesley Foundation 125 

Winter Carnival 26 

Women's Glee Club 90 

W. S. G. A 51 



255'