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Massachusetts Agricultural College — 1867 



The Staff Of The 

1962 INDEX PRESENTS: 





"BE IT ENACTED BY THE SENATE AND HOUSE OF REP- 
RESENTATIVES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 
THAT THERE BE GRANTED TO THE SEVERAL STATES 
... AN AMOUNT OF PUBLIC LAND . . ." 

With these words, taken from the 1862 Morrill Land Grant Act, 
Massachusetts Agricultural CoUege became a reality. 

Many years have passed and the original Mass. "Aggie" has 
evolved into a great University which, on the eve of its 100th anni- 
versary, can look in retrospect at nearly a century of progress. 

Although the doors for the new college were opened in 1863, 
the first class did not arrive until 1867, mainly due to the fact that 
many administrative and organizational problems had to be solved. 

Beginning in 1867 with a class of thirty three, four borrowed in- 
structors, and four wooden buildings, the College underwent a proc- 
ess of development and expansion sufficient to warrant the official 
changing of its name in 1947 to the University of Massachusetts. This 
act alone seems to have provided further impetus to progress. 

To all of you who share the common heritage of the University 
of Massachusetts, may 1963 be a year in which you will try to re- 
call what the past may have been Uke. Try also to bring to mind all 
the things the University means to you today, small or great, and you 
will then realize why the motto for the 1963 Centennial year is 
Toward Higher Learning More Widely Disseminated. 



^Twas A Long While Ago 




THE PIONEER CLASS OF 1871 had twenty-eight members. Shown above 
are twenty-four of that first group to leave Massachusetts Agricultural College. 



Some Were In Broadcloth . . , 
Some In Homespun . . , 



THE INFANT COLLEGE opened its doors in the fall of 
1867 for the thirty odd entering freshmen. They were a "motley 
lot." Some were in broadcloth, and some in homespun. Their be- 
longings were ill-assorted: trunks, bags, boxes; here a bedstick; yon- 
der a basket of apples. 

The first examination was elementary: the three R's, a little geog- 
raphy and the like. One of the questions in arithmetic was this: "Seven 
men laid a piece of wall sixty-five feet long in twelve days. Again 
eleven men laid a wall of the same kind in ten days. How long was 
it?" 



HENRY F. FRENCH, THE FIRST PRESI- 
DENT of the new college, served from 1 863 to 
1867. No students were in attendance during 
his period in office, principally because of the 
many problems which had to be solved. A 
location had to be decided on and buildings had 
to be constructed. 





AN EARLY ENGRAVING depicting Massachusetts Agricultural College in 
1867. The original copy of this engraving was sent by President Clark to 
Justin Morill, the senator responsible for the introduction of the Land Grant 
Act, in a letter inviting him to the 1871 commencement exercises. 



A Certain Closeness 
Could Be Felt . . . 




A GUITAR ... a few friends ... a song. Have times 
really changed? 




IT WAS IN 1887 that Cadet Amadeo de 
Almeida, a Brazilian student at the college, 
gave this picture to his friend and classmate, 
Edgar Barrett. 



50 



Perfumed Snow/lake and Chromo Cards. no 1 alike 
name in gold or Jet AQc. Star Caul Co. fflint'n'lle.Ct 



TO YOUNG MEN. 




THE TSTJSTB£S OF THE MASSA- 
chusetta Agricultural College have placed 150 
Free Scholarships at the disposal of the Alumni. 
amoonUog to |300 each, equal to the cost of tuition 
for the course. These w.holarshlpa will be' given to 
worthy young men who can paaa the entrance examina- 
tion. The College is located In thu delightful town of 
Amherst, In the valley of the Connecticut, on & beau- 
tiful farm of 400 acres. It affords a Uiorongh English 
education, and a good knowledge of Agriculture, En- 
gineering, Chemlfitry, Botany, and many other sci- 
ences; in short, flts a young man to be a practical 
farmer, or to enter business, or study the professions. 
The locality is 80 healthful, and the physical training 
such, that many young men who have entered wUh 
poor liealth, have returned hoine, not only with a well- 
stored and dlsnlpllned mind, but strong In body. The 
additional expense for thoHe receiving the scholarships 
need not be over fl50 a year, and an industrious stu- 
dent can earn, if he desires, a portion of that amount 
at work on the farm, after performing his dally Col- 
lege duties. A farmer's son, or any young man who 
wanb! tfi get a good education, should apply at once for 
one of these scholarships. 

For Information concerninc entrance examination. 
Ac, apply to Prof. S. T. M AYNARD, Amherst, Ma.<is., 
Secretary of Lbe Alumni. 2^—32 j 




OLD MATHEMATICS CLASSROOM located in Old Chapel. 



FROM THE "CONGREGATION- 
ALIST," July 31, 1878. It consists 
of a bit of Victorian recruiting in- 
viting to the college "any farmer's 
son or any young man who wants a 
good education." 



THE CREW OF 1870 in front of the famous shell that de- 
feated Brown and Harvard in a well-publicized regatta. Left 
to right — Eldred, 73; Duncan, '74; Allen '71; Leonard, '71; 
Simpson, '73; Hardy, '74. 





CADETS HAVING A DRILL PERIOD in front of 
Old Chapel during the Spanish American War era. 



Pride In An Infant College; 

From It Dreams Became Realities 



THE SECOND PRESIDENT, William S. 
Clark, served from 1867 to 1879. His dedica- 
tion and determination brought the small col- 
lege through the many difficulties it faced in its 
early years. 



LEVI STOCKBRIDGE was president from 
1880 to 1882. Once, hearing that the newly 
formed Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity needed 
money for furniture, he offered to lend the 
money personally. 




HENRY HILL GOODELL 
SERVED a long term as pres- 
ident, holding office from 1886 
until 1905. He took over the 
presidency from his office in 
the library. Previous to being 
librarian, he had taught French, 
German, English, and gymnas- 
tics and also served a term 
in the State Senate. 




Old SoulUCoUttrs 



"OLD SOUTH COLLEGE," the first college dormitory, 
shown in 1867 before the rebuilding and extension. It 
housed 46 students and one professor. The lower floor 
was left for recitation and library rooms. It was sub- 
sequently destroyed by fire in 1885. 



"OLD CHAPEL" erected in 1867 at a cost of $10,360. It 
was first used as a chemical laboratory and chapel and later 
as a drill hall. In 1885 it was renovated and became known 
as College Hall. 



THE FIRST PUBLISHED VOICE of the "Aggie" boys was 
given them as a small section of the Amherst Record. 




.=5S., AVED^J]ST)AY, OCTOBER 26, 1870 



Ko. 



Massacliusetts Agricultural College Departmeii t . 



CONDUCTESD BY TH£ SEOTOR CIiASS. 



W. H. BoWKKn, Wu. WlIEEL£B, 

jKf* AU'Covmunlcirtioni lor ihl>i licgio/iuient inint be xlilrev 



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a BdttOft tf U» f Hut. 



L. B. Caswxll, 



O. C. Wooiaos, 



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■li Jroiinrtiiuily tin- Collcgi' i* verr 

^imi TItP •^n-rti I'UC-K-A^ Uiat the insti- 

■11 tui» iiirt with jii t)ic three yeanf it 

l.i'on in ..jM (.itiuQ, hah wvii for it it J)i:i';i; 

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Although there ore now quite a oomber 
of the plants which are iwed for food in dif- 
ferent parts or the couDtry, included in the 
collrctioD, .''till it iu not complete, and it is 
to la- hoped that in time to couie exchanges 
lan be mudc with the differt-nt botanical and 
lioi'ticultunii Bodctie* abroad, w that this 
conflcrvatory will luko ita place io the first 
rank. 

Maatutchosctts \xtt6 i-auM to feel prood of 
iier Agricultural College, and she ought not 

10 withhold the inonoy ncct-asary to carry on 

11 hortieultuffil departiacnt, e«|>cciaHy wheu 
Khe hiut made bO good n start that private 
parties h.ire manileatcd interest cnoupli to 
iin-low Mich n dcpurlroent out of their own 
luniU. 



which it ia hoped will bkMeom in the course 
(if a few yeitrft. 

It b quite laughable at timea to hear the 
rvmarlu of riiitors io relation to the different 
plants, e8p(»cially whm ;na hear the Victo- 
ria called the Centur; Plant or the Ts'ight- 
Blouuiing C'ereua, or the Banana btylcd a 
Cactutt} and it )» to behop^ tjinlthe people 
of Aitihtfirt ud Ticintty wt)l tiUlt the place 
oftrii enough to bocome fivmiliur with the 
Boro important plants. 



The arte of draiaage and irrigation are ua- 
doabtcdiy Doarly as uciont a« the iwrt< of ag- 
riculture, for then an tinv localiUo* when 



apd tiiree feetilecp. and |.!>mli-i 
same year. The next ywir it % 
and seeded down to yr.M-, i- 
rtanent mowing l^ind, ) ir ; 
He of yielding four lmu'' ■ 
Iftwo-third*<if II,.- -.irv 
IW-alandsshrtuld Iic r. -h . 
produw froi>s v jn.l !.■ Vu 
tu in 9ome iu-ilanit--' tb 
thousands of dollar* wo i . 
value of the and'le liui 1 
there arc any faroifr* in '! 
tiie coinni'tnwi.'flHii ■v^\s- 
liowl tiraioii';!. '' ' ' ■■ 
the Inithfulnf-- ■ 
«7,.To tlir imp.-.r 



The 1900' S-- A New Era 




THE EARLY I900's brought with them the hope 
of a new century ... in 1902 varsity basketball 
was introduced . . . Dr. Femald relinquished $1500 of 
his salary to permit a new position in his department . . . 
1906 — Butterfield, grandson of a Michigan pioneer, 
became president . . . 1908 — a graduate school and 
some fifty new courses were introduced . . . 1909 — the 
College Signal became a weekly campus publication 
and in 1914 became the Massachusetts Collegian. 



LOOK OUT FOR THOSE WINDOWS! An early base- 
ball game takes place on the green in front of Old 
Chapel. Alumni field now provides a much safer place 
to play. 




SHOWN ABOVE is a laboratory in the old chemistry build- 
ing located south of the ravine. It was later destroyed by 
fire in 1922. 




AGRONOMY MAJORS of the Class of 1909 get some 
practical work in landscape gardening. 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE in 1906. The old mathematics building is on the right. 
French Hall can be seen in the background. 

Something Looks Familiar 




THE THEME IS ECONOMICAL TRANSPORTATION in this scene in the early 1900's. 
In the background is Draper Hall, built in 1902 as a dining hall to replace the little wooden 
building which had become inadequate. In 1912 its facilities were increased to provide ac- 
commodations for nearly all students. 

9 




1918 ARRIVED AND WAR CLOUDS LOOMED— Readiness 
was the byword as these cadets took part. in bayonet practice. 



THESE CADETS GOT A CHANCE to try out their pitching 
arms, the only difference being that they are throwing grenades 
instead of baseballs. 





IT WAS THE WINTER of 1918 and some of these men 
would never meet again. 

We Will Keep Faith 
With You Who Sleep . . . 



THE WAR PERIOD AT M.A.C. was a grim 
one. The freshman banquet was not held. There 
were no varsity football or baseball games. Even the 
1918 commencement exercises were not held. Mihtary 
service reduced the student enrollment to what one 
member of the class of '21 called "a half dozen co-eds 
and a handful of army rejects." 




MEMORIAL HALL, A LASTING MEMORY 
to those who lost their lives, is shown nearing 
its completion in 1921. 





FOOTBALL WAS IN THE AIR as the men from 
M.A.C. defeated the men from neighboring Amherst 
College, 10-6, on that fall day in 1922. 




SHOWN BELOW IS THE PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
BUILDING in 1930 just before its completion. 



PROFESSOR CURRY HICKS, who 
came to M.A.C. in 1911, did much 
to further the athletic program. Under 
his leadership, plans for Alumni Field 
became a reality. 













12 



Kenyon Butterfield^ 
Alexandrian Hopes 



THE WAR WAS OVER but its memory 
still lingered. Memorial Hall was completed 
in 1921 and that same year 194 disabled vet- 
erans were enrolled . . . 1922 — the old chemistry 
buUding burned, and in 1924 the new $300,000 
Goessmann laboratory was built to replace it . . . 
Boston legislators began to sit up and take notice 
of the small agricultural college, mainly due to 
the efforts of President Kenyon Butterfield . . . 
1926 — the interfraternity sing and Homecoming 
Day were inaugurated . . . 1927 — President That- 
cher took office. 



■V*^ 




/■% 



THE HORSE SHOW, a feature attraction in 
the '20's. NOTE the streamlined vehicles in 
the background. 



PRESIDENT KENYON BUTTERFIELD held office from 
1905 to 1924. As long as he was in office he was the zealous 
advocate of a greater and more versatile institution. 





STUDENTS ARE SHOWN in a corner of the engineering shop where they 
are getting practical training in the construction and operation of farm 
machinery. 




EVERYONE SEEMS TO BE seriously at 
work in this early physiology laboratory. 




mt^^^i^^^i^^S^^^^M^^ 



A GROUP OF AGRICULTURAL STUDENTS are getting 
the "hows" and "whys" of tractor operation. 

14 




AN EDUCATION STUDENT LEADS the rest of the class 
in a practical teacher training problem. 



An Ever Widening Scope 





.1 J 







VETERINARY SCIENCE STUDENTS are shown testing 
blood samples at Paige Laboratory in 1927. 



A PLAQUE ON THE WALL of South Col- 
lege commemorates the founding of the first 
fraternity on campus. 



15 




1932 HORTICULTURAL SHOW — Sponsored by the College of Agriculture. These shows 
have always attracted visitors from afar to view some of nature's products. 

1931— ''Aggie'' Becomes Mass State 






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M>. 



MEMBERS OF THE ROISTER DOISTERS "ham it up" in the '30's with a 
scene from Sidney, a play written by Professor Rand of the English depart- 
ment. 



16 




COMMENCEMENT PROCESSION about 1930. The gentleman at the head 
of the procession was a member of the original class of 1 87 1 . 



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A PICTURE OF COLLEGIATE LIFE as students are shown leaving Stock- 
bridge Hall in 1931. It was in that year that Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege became Massachusetts State College. 



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A PRACTICAL CLASS IN CARPENTRY is in session. 
The class is designed to acquaint agricultural students with 
some of the more difficult farm building problems. 




Lou Bush— 276 Points 
In Three Years 




A SCENE FROM the Roister Doister Produc- 
tion in 1935 of "Death Takes A Holiday." 



LOU BUSH, CAPTAIN of the Massachusetts 
State College football team in 1932, the year 
he led the nation in scoring with 114 points. 
Twice during his collegiate career, the 148 lb. 
Little All-American scored five touchdowns 
in a single game. 



18 




A STUDENT TAKES PART IN A FILMED 
psychology experiment to determine brake re- 
action time. 



THIS OFFICER DOES NOT SEEM to realize that there was 
"theoretically" no parking problem in the '30's. 




19 




ALPHA GAMMA RHO's FIRST PRIZE winning snow sculpture in the early thirties. 
It looks as though it might easily have been named "March Winds, Blow." Snow sculptures 
such as this have always been a highlight of the annual Winter Carnival. 

Fraternities— A Parallel Growth 



IN 1869 THE FIRST FRATERNITY, 
Q. T. v., a Latin fraternity, was 
founded on the Massachusetts campus. A 
plaque on the wall of South College 
commemorates that event. Since that 
time fraternity life has grown in a man- 
ner parallel to that of the University. 
There are now eight sororities and fifteen 
fraternities, the latest addition being Zeta 
Nu Fraternity this past year. Besides 
highUghting the year with Greek Week in 
the spring and the snow sculptures during 
Winter Carnival, the Greeks have recent- 
ly initiated Christmas parties for needy 
children in the area. 




THETA CHI FRATERNITY in the early thirties. The boys 
are shown at their favorite vantage point for watching the 
sorority girls return from class at lunch time. 



20 




SHOWN ABOVE are President Baker and Dean William 
Machmer, former Professor of Mathematics. Dean Machmer 
was held in the highest regard by students both as Dean and 
as a professor. 




MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE at commencement 
time in 1941 — The peaceful atmosphere which prevailed in 
the Spring of '41 was not felt again until 1946. The advent 
of World War II had a strong effect on campus life as military 
service made its inevitable claim. The male enrollment was 
reduced to a minimum with co-eds taking over the fraternities 
as living quarters. 




PRESIDENT HUGH POTTER BAKER who 
served from 1933 to 1947. Behind him can be 
seen Chadbourne dormitory nearing comple- 
tion. 



21 



1947 

A University 

Is Born 



1 9 4 7 _ THE COLLEGE BECOMES THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS! At last 
the hopes of men Uke President Van Meter be- 
came realities. Doors were opened which would 
start a new era of expansion. More dormitories 
were soon built to cope with the projected increase 
in enrollment and the School of Engineering was 
established to meet the obligations of a university. 




PRESIDENT RALPH VAN METER, who 
served from 1948 to 1954. With the help of 
his many efforts, the changing of the College's 
name to the University of Massachusetts be- 
came a reality. 




BEFORE THE STUDENT UNION CAME INTO BEING, students had to have somewhere to 
go for their coffee breaks. The old "C" store, or College Store as it was officially known, pro- 
vided the answer. 



22 




W-- .^.^isei. 



THE TIME IS 1946. The construction of these dormi- 
tories was part of the great expansion program which 
was about to begin. 




THE TRADITIONAL ROPE PULL was always the scene of excitement as the freshman 
and sophomore teams battled for supremacy. It looks like a draw here but within a few 
moments there were probably a few drenched individuals. 

23 




PRESIDENT JEAN PAUL MATHER at his inauguration ceremony. On his right is the 
Governor of Massachusetts at that time, Christian A. Herter. President Mather held office 
from 1954 to 1960. He will be well remembered for his strong efforts for faculty pay raises. 

Hokkaido— A Symbol Of Good Will 



IN 1876 PRESIDENT WILLIAM CLARK of 
Massachusetts Agricultural College went to Japan 
and was mainly responsible for founding Hokkaido 
University. A close association between the schools 
followed, though tapering off somewhat after 1900. In 
1956 Pres. Mather, Dean of Agriculture Sieling, and 
Prof. Zahradnik of Agricultural Engineering attended 
the celebration of Hokkaido's 80th year. From this trip 
resulted a renewal of the initial ties and a pledge for 
future cooperation. 





HOKKAIDO STUDENTS relax in the warm Japanese 
sun. Nearby are the Botanical Gardens. 



SHOWN ABOVE is the main entrance to Hokkaido University. 



24 



As THE UNIVERSITY EXPANDED 
-tA. the need arose for more class- 
rooms, more dormitories, and finally a 
more complete round of facilities for stu- 
dent recreation. The old "C" store was 
just a thing of the past. The students 
needed more than just a place for their 
coffee breaks. The need was filled in 
1957 by the modern Student Union 
Building which provides not only stu- 
dent offices, meeting rooms, and loimges, 
but also faciHties for movies, television, 
bowUng and dancing as well as a large 
cafeteria. 




AN EVENING VIEW of the Student Union Building across Campus Pond. 




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FEMININE PULCHRITUDE IS IN SIGHT as Jennet Roberts, 
'60, Military Ball Queen, is given the Honorary Colonel's 
cape by her predecessor at the 1958 Military Ball. The observ- 
ing cadet seems to be maintaining his military composure 
quite well. 




THESE ATTRACTIVE MEMBERS of the Class of '62 were 
only sophomores at the time of this picture but like most sopho- 
mores probably felt that they were "oldtimers." 




WHETHER IT BE studying, sketching, strumming a guitar or just relaxing. Campus 
Pond has always seemed to provide just the atmosphere, particularly on a lazy Spring day 
such as this. 




THE 50-PIECE UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS CONCERT BAND shown appear- 
ing in Rockefeller Center's Lower Plaza on December 10, 1959. Their appearance took 
place just before the lighting of the Christmas tree, a gift to the Center from the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts. Directed by Joseph Contino, the band also presented holiday music 
on a special live television show on NBC-TV. 



The Goal— 15,000 Students In 1973 




WITH ITS PROJECTED 
goal of 15,000 students in 
1975, the University of Mass- 
achusetts will further establish 
itself as a leader in public educa- 
tion. Public institutions as a 
whole are taking on more and 
more of the responsibility of 
meeting the diverse educational 
needs of our country and the 
University is no exception. 



THIS AERIAL VIEW OF THE CAMPUS is only two years old but already sub- 
stantial changes have been made. Besides the opening of the new infirmary, additions 
to the Morrill Science Center, Hasbrouck Laboratory, and Dining Commons are in 
progress. Out of view but also in the construction stages are a new engineering 
laboratory, a new Conservation building and a modern Newman Center. 



27 




SHANNON McCUNE, former Provost, who 
recently left to take a position with UNESCO. 
His willingness to listen to both students and 
faculty, his thoughtful solutions, his steadiness 
and humor in trying situations — all endeared 
him to those who had the privilege of knowing 
him. 




The Age Of Science 

WITH THE RECENT STRESS on 
science and technology, colleges 
and universities are being called upon to 
provide men of science both for instruc- 
tion and research. Realizing these needs, 
the University is continually expanding 
its facilities for research and undergradu- 
ate study. As a result, numerous grants 
are being awarded for critical research. 
The greatly increased number of corpo- 
rations interviewing seniors in the Spring 
is also sharply indicative of the quality 
of University science and engineering 
graduates. 



A UNIVERSITY ZOOLOGIST has 
been awarded a grant of $82,000 by 
the U.S. Public Heahh Service for a 
three year study of the world of liv- 
ing cells utilizing the ELECTRON 
MICROSCOPE on the left. Dr. Ever- 
ett Anderson will use its highly com- 
plex "eye" for a closer look at the 
inner composition of parts of cells 
from different kinds of animals. 



DR. RICHARD STEIN IS INTER- 
NATIONALLY KNOWN for his 
work in polymer research. Recently 
named to a Commonwealth Profes- 
sorship, Dr. Stein has presented, by 
invitation, papers at two international 
conferences — the 1957 International 
Symposium on Macro-Molecular 
Chemistry and the 1958 International 
Polymer Conference. 





THE MAIN ENGINEERING 
BUILDING houses facilities for Elec- 
trical, Mechanical, Industrial, and 
Civil Engineering. Facilities for 
Chemical Engineering are principally 
in Goessmann Chemistry Laboratory. 
Behind the main building are Gun- 
ness Laboratory and the new 
$800,000 Engineering Shops Labora- 
tory. 



Lliu.isc^'l:, 



28 




BUILT BY 31-YEAR-OLD DR. PHILLIPS JONES, 

assistant professor of Physics, this HOME-MADE 
ATOMIC GUN is an important research weapon at the 
University. Financed by a $60,000 National Science 
Foundation grant, the "gun" is being used by Dr. Jones to 
study the behavior of atoms in close collision. 



HASBROUCK LABORATORY, the home of the Physics 
department. The Physics department has recently initiated a 
comprehensive sophomore course in nuclear physics which 
has become a pre-requisite for engineering students. 



DR. LINDSEY OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING discusses 
some aspects of the recently acquired nuclear reactor in 
Goessman Laboratory. One of its uses is by nuclear physics 
students who use it to measure the half-lives of radio-active 
material. 







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TURMOIL REIGNS as Coach "Chuck" Studley is carried off the field by his players 
after the 1960 New Hampshire game. The victory gave the Redmen co-ownership of the 
Yankee Conference title. The year, one of the best in UMass. history, was highlighted by 
an upset win over Harvard. The following year, the University was elevated to major 
college football status. 




1961 COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES— Every year the class is larger. 

30 



The Past Is Not Forgotten 

As YEAR AFTER YEAR GOES BY the past can 
L easily be forgotten, stirred only by class reunions 
such as that by the members of the Class of '01 shown 
on the right. As we approach 1963, the year of the 
University's Centennial, however, we begin to look 
back at the tradition, the sentiment, and the memories 
which have been a part of every graduating class. Sud- 
denly, it all seems as though it could have been yester- 
day. Indeed, the past is with us on this, the eve of 
the Centennial. 




PRESIDENT LEDERLE AND HIS WIFE with mem- 
bers of the Class of '01 at their 60th reunion. 



^^ 




PROPOSED PHYSICAL EDUCATION BUILDING 



PROPOSED SCHOOL OF 
BUSINESS ADMINIS- 
TRATION. Work is scheduled 
to begin soon on the $2,000,000 
building, which will have as 
one of its assets a 500 seat 
teaching auditorium. 



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THE MILLION DOLLAR INFIRMARY AT THE UNIVERSITY was officially opened 
in January. Besides an 88-bed capacity, it has a well equipped physiotherapy room and a 
new laboratory for chemical and bacteriological procedures. It also has an emergency oper- 
ating room and a modern X-ray room. 




THE OLD AND THE NEW — The remnants of an old tree seem to be stanoing in direct 
opposition to the new liberal arts building, Bartlett Hall, opened for use in 1960. 

32 




Toward Higher Learning 
More Widely Disseminated 



33 












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UNIVERSITY 
OF MASSACHUSETTS 







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Massachusetts Life 



Athletics 



Greeks 



'mi^^i' 



Organizations 



206 




Academic Life 



Seniors 



99 Years of Progress 




SUE LYDON — gentlemen prefer . . 



Index Princess 
For 1962 



TIME OUT is the appropriate title of the 
album Sue Lydon is holding in the picture 
above. Likewise the staff of the Index decided to 
take time out to show the male high school seniors 
who may look over the Index why there is nothing 
like a co-ed university. 

Our favorite this year is freshman Sue Lydon, 
a Botany major from Waltham, Mass. Sue, a 
member of Chi Omega sorority, is also the reign- 
ing Military Ball Queen, otherwise known as 
Honorary Cadet Colonel for 1962. Easy to see 
why gentlemen prefer blondes! 



WHAT COULD BE A COZIER picture than 
an attractive co-ed and a warm fireplace? 





Be It Summer Or Fall, Students Find 
Old King Sol A Good Study Companion 





38 




DEAN OF STUDENTS WILLIAM FIELD 



1962 INDEX- 



A Dedication To Dr. Field 



''We're Glad To Have You Aboard'' 



Now A DEAN, ALWAYS A FRIEND. Dean 
Field, busier than ever, never hesitates to take 
a minute out to talk with students. As the principal 
link for student-administration relationships he has be- 
come a valuable asset to students who want to be 
heard. 

Dr. Field received his B.S. degree from Westchester 
(Pa.) State Teachers College, Ed.M. from Temple 
Univ. and his Ph.D. from the University of Maryland. 

A former research analyst for the U.S. Public 
Health Service, he was appointed to the University of 



Massachusetts staff as a guidance officer in 1951, and 
in 1958 became Director of Guidance. In that post 
he was largely responsible for the introduction of the 
summer counsehng program. 

On July 1961, he became President Lederle's choice 
as the new Dean of Students, a position designed to 
meet the student-faculty communication needs of the 
rapidly expanding University. 

To you Dr. Field, the staff of the 1962 Index would 
like to express the sentiments of the rest of the student 
body: "We're mighty glad to have you aboard." 



39 




MASSACHUSETTS 

LIFE 




^sfeliK 






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Give Me An M . . , ! 



1961 BROUGHT A NEW COACH and new 
spirit to the University of Massachusetts football 
team. Under the direction of head coach Vic Fu- 
sia the team represented the school spirit in its 
best tradition, getting a boost from the student ral- 
lies held before each home game. Adelphia, as- 
sisted by the Maroon Key and with the able sup- 
port of the Marching Band, the Precisionettes, 
and the Cheerleaders, led the students to enthu- 
siastic demonstrations of support for the team. The 
rallies were climaxed by a soaring bonfire and a 
rock and roll dance which provided the height 
of pre-game spirit. 




THE TERRIFIC ENTHUSIASM SHOWN by the cheerleaders 
helped to get the student body fired up in support of the team. 




■mm 






END DAVE HARRINGTON, who showed 
great hands on the football field, seems to be 
fumbling on the speaker's platform. 




METAWAMPE LEADS the traditional parade down 
the hill from the dorms collecting all the students for 
the start of the rallies. 



42 



COACH FUSIA IS PRESENTED with his freshman beanie which he 
wore until the Redmen scored their first touchdown of the year against 
A.I.C. 





"^^^^E^^^HHHHHHn fllHIHI^ ». ■■■IB ■■■ Je 





EXCITEMENT BREAKS as the fi- 
nalists gather around to congratulate 
Jan Wehmann who was just crowned 
Homecoming Queen 1961. 




CLIMAXING THE RALLIES was a huge soaring bonfire heightening the enthusiasm and 
spirit of the students. 



43 




Alumni Take Over For A Weekend 




HOMECOMING 1961 was one of 
the most successful in many years, 
with more alumni than ever before re- 
turning to view the expanding Univer- 
sity. The festive weekend began with a 
very colorful float parade Friday night 
followed by an enthusiastic rally where 
one of the most beautiful queens and 
court in recent years were presented to 
the students and alumni. Saturday began 
with a tailgate picnic enjoyed by the 
alumni and their families. This was fol- 
lowed by a thrilling game at which a ca- 
pacity crowd saw the Redmen defeat 
their traditional rivals, Rhode Island 
25-0. The weekend was climaxed by fra- 
ternity parties which brought many old 
friends together. 



THESE FOLKS SEEM ^o be enjoying the 
tailgate picnic which saw many alumni enjoy a 
snack and some talk with old friends before the 
game. 



44 




ED FORBUSH, end for the Redmen, seems to be danc- 
ing his way to a pass completion during the game. 




EVERYONE ENJOYED the game including this little 
UMass rooter who helped cheer the Redmen on to vic- 
tory. 




JAN WEHMANN the Homecoming Queen and her court proved to be very lovely represent- 
atives of the University as they led the Homecoming parade. 



45 




Everyone Loves 

A Parade 



USING MUCH IMAGINATION 
and hard work the Greeks and the 
dorms produced some of the most elab- 
orate and colorful floats ever seen on 
campus. The parade route was packed 
with spectators viewing the floats whose 
themes concentrated on encouraging the 
team to win. The fraternity first prize 
went to Theta Chi while Kappa Alpha 
Theta won first place sorority honors. 
Victorious for the men's dorms was Van 
Meter and Dwight captured the honors 
for the girl's dorms. 



THETA CHI CAPTURED first place in the fraternity 
competition with their float "Over the Rhode to Victory." 




^uJ^^ 



A.E.PI'S GALLEY was a real crowd pleaser as it floated 
along the parade route with wet crew members. 



46 



THIS HUGE REDMAN of Sig Ep caused gasps from the 
crowd all along the parade route. 





THE CHI O'S DANCED themselves to a sec- 
ond place victory with their "Showboat." 



ONE OF THE MOST colorful 
floats was the "Mardi Gras for 
Umies". 




KAPPA ALPHA THETA MARCHES along "Painting a Fusia Victory" to first place for the 
sororities. 

47 




ALL THE GIRLS SING, "Many a New Day." 



Oklahoma — Here I Come 

THE OPERETTA GUILD this year turned out a performance 
which has been compared favorably with the 1959 Guild pro- 
duction of "Bells Are Ringing", previously considered as one of the 
best efforts in the Guild's history. Michael Hench and Sue Spearen 
did an excellent job in presenting the warmth of their respective lead 
roles as Curley and Laurie. Jean Alden delighted the audience as she 
sang and danced, playing to perfection her role as the rollicking, ir- 
responsible Ado Annie. Choreography, settings, choral arrange- 
ments, and orchestrations all were well presented. All of which went 
towards making "Oklahoma" the tremendous success that it was. 





JEAN ALDEN as "Ado Annie" and Jane Abbiatti as 
"Aunt Eller" receive a lecture from Frank Mancuso as 
"AH". 



48 




THE WHOLE CAST comes on stage for a well deserved curtain call. 



ANDREW CARNES SAYS he thinks Ali made enough of a 
proposal. 




THE FAMOUS SURREY comes out to fetch Lauri and Curl- 
ey to take them to the wedding. 




THE FELLOW on the right won the title of 
"Campus Lovely" with measurements of 45- 
43-47. 



WELL, I'LL BE DOGGONED. Kennedy and 
Kruschev doing the twist. 





These Greeks Are 



Really ''Hams'' At Heart 



ON FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8, the 
fraternities presented their annual 
skits. The Greeks put in much time and 
hard work into their various and sundry 
productions which dehghted an overflow 
crowd at Bowker Auditorium. Theta Chi 
took third place with its clever parody on 
the history of the dance, while Zeta Nu 
placed second by presenting their rendi- 
tion of "Old Mass Aggie." Capturing first 
place was Sig Ep and their first rate fias- 
co entitled "The Good Ship Fraternity." 



THIS IS COMMONLY CALLED 
utilization of resources. 




50 





THE PHI SIGS seem to be enjoying themselves as the boys take out the girls. — Girls? 





OH SWEETIE, you don't really mean that! 



VAT IS DAT, Komrad, a letter from Garcia? 



OK BABE. Take a letter — oh, I forgot, dicta- 
tion isn't one of your skills. 



51 





"PICASSO'S HOUSE" is the title of this study in 
design by Andrea Kruger of Smith College. 



Art exhibit one more facet of growing 
four-college cooperation. 



THIS DRAWING BY JOAN HUSSEY of the University of 
Massachusetts leaves the title to the imagination of the 
spectator. Why don't you try? 




AS THE FOUR LOCAL INSTITUTIONS continue 
Jl\. to expand their programs they realize the need 
for cooperation and mutual use of facilities. Many stu- 
dents enrolled at Smith, Mt. Holyoke, Amherst, and 
the University are now taking courses at one of the 
other schools. 

The Four College Art Exhibition which took place 
January 5-20 in Memorial Hall is one example of the 
expanded program. 



LINDA MAHOOD of the University entered this number in 
the Graphics class under the title of "Grass." 





I 







AN UNTITLED WATERCOLOR by Joyce 
Gorman of the University. 



THE FIRST PRIZE WINNER IN THE SCULPTURE 

CLASS was by Patricia Tobacco of Smith College entitled 

"Head." 

THIS GRAPHIC SEEMS TO BE INQUIRING into 
the subconscious. Entitled "Girl On A Bench" by Bar- 
bara Bernstein of Smith College. 







IS A ROSE A ROSE by any 
other name . . . ? It really 
made no difference at the 49th 
annual Horticultural Show held 
Oct. 27 at the Cage. Visitors tak- 
ing in the "Carnival of Flowers" 
were treated to colorful displays 
ranging from a hand carved "fly- 
ing horse" to a caged "Tiger Lily," 
a head of a tiger surrounded with 
orange petals striped with black. 

AT THE RIGHT is a view looking 
down the midway with displays on 
either side — a pool in the center. 




''Carnival In Flowers^'— A Study In Nature 




IW: 

'<i) 



•iiUS 




SHOWN HERE is a miniature "Ca- 
rousel," depicting the central theme 
of the show. Note the turfed area in 
front of the display adding to the 
realism. It seems hard to believe that 
a basketball court is underneath. 



"In ARCADY," a display by John Crowe and Terry Robinson which took 
first place honors in its class as well as Sweepstakes for the entire show. 








V .X'^'-f 



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THIS YOUNG LADY is ad- 
miring a display entitled "Po- 
seidon's Garden" which took 
first place in the nature cate- 
gory. 




M%^^a^ 



A LOOK ALONG the "boardwalk.' 



A LOOK TOWARD the College of 
Agriculture's information booth show- 
ing different phases of agriculture and 
extension services. 


















SLIGHTLY HIDDEN in the background are professional land- 
scape architecture drawings on display for the first time. 





Miles To Go 



Before I Sleep 



IN ONE OF HIS too infrequent ap- 
pearances in this area, Robert Frost 
captivated a capacity crowd in the Stu- 
dent Union Ballroom. Delighting the au- 
dience with his poetry reading plus per- 
sonality, he showed his true greatness as 
the evening proved to be memorable for 
aU. 



READING FROM ONE of his books Robert 
Frost charms a delighted audience. 



AFTER THE PERFORMANCE, Mr. Frost autographs cop- 
ies of his book for students. 



MR. FROST WENDS his way 

through the enthusiastic crowd who 
are trying to meet him. 




56 





KAPPA GOES Chi O. 



Freshmen Meet The 



rf 



Round Robin" 



EVERY YEAR DURING FIRST SEMESTER, 
the sororities hold "Round Robin." This is a day 
set aside when groups of freshmen girls are taken 
around to each of the sorority houses. This gives the 
girls a chance to meet some of the sisters and get a too- 
short introduction to sorority life. Everyone was 
pleased this year as there was a large turnout of fresh- 
men and an enjoyable day was had by all. 



A FRESHMAN GIRL GETS 

the full treatment as the sisters 
close in on her. 





SOME FRESHMEN GET an introduction to 
sorority life and its rituals. 

57 




MOSCA TRIES to refuse as the captain of the guard decides 
that they all must come to court. 





LEONE DRAWS his sword when Mosca admits that he is the reason that Leone's father is ijisinheriting him. 

V 

58 



m 




THE COURTROOM SCENE where Volpone is being accused of promiscuity and Canina 
pleads for his innocence. 



It Happened In Venice 



THE ROISTER DOISTERS, under 
the able direction of Miss Doris 
Abramson, presented one of their most 
laudable performances this year, there- 
by enhancing a long standing tradition of 
excellent entertainment. Stephen Flagg's 
adaptation of Ben Jonson's "Volpone" 
left the full house audience with the feel- 
ing that they had witnessed a profession- 
ally produced and acted stage show, a 
fact confirmed by the five curtain calls on 
closing night. The members of the cast 
including Mick Broadhurst as Volpone, 
the magnificent scoundrel; Hal Hind as 
Mosca, double-dealing servant of Vol- 
pone; and Bev DeMarco as Canina, an 
honored member of the world's oldest 
profession; portrayed their parts ex- 
tremely well in the witty but satirical 
mood of the comedy. Hats off to a fine 
production. 



MOSCA LAUGHS as the servants practice being "marry" so 
they can cheer up Volpone when he comes in. 





BUCKLE UP, ERNIE, your date 
will be off that guy's lap any minute 
now. 



IT LOOKS like she's going to fade in a minute 
or two — or has she already? 



Various Remedies Found 



For ^'Senioritis'^ 



ALL WORK AND NO PLAY makes Jack 
a dull boy and that's just the way the sen- 
iors felt about the whole situation Dec. 1 at the 
annual senior mix held at the Quonset Club. Rol- 
licking and twisting to the tune of the Electras 
for four hours, the class of 62 showed that they 
hadn't forgotten how to have a good time. Featur- 
ing the afternoon were the Musigals, the new fe- 
male vocal group on campus. 



THAT THING REPRESENTS quite an investment, boy. 
Handle it with care. 



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OKAY, VINNIE, see if you 
can pour a little on his other 
leg now that you've got that 
one good and wet. 




60 








YETH THIR, I've got my date for tonight. 




LV\.. /l' 



THIS ENTIRE DISPLAY of conformistic rowdyism utterly nauseates me. 
Father warned me against this type of thing. 





THAT'S AL HERMAN of the Collegian and I think he's got 
himself a story. Or is that his date? 

61 



OH JOE, you stinker you. 





WHEN THIS GUY SAYS something, he doesn't mess 
around. I dunno, maybe he just smells like onions. 



O K SCHULTZ, you can carry this buddy- 
friend-pal-chum business just so far. 



Seniors Do A Little Bit Of ^'Outside Reading^' 




IT'S OKAY LOU. Let the guy take 
the picture. I know that Marianne 
thinks you're at church but she'll never 
know a thing about it. 



THIS PICTURE wasn't posed for — much! 





IS THAT THE WAY they did it down in 
Brazil, Gabby? 



THE ELECTRAS, with that movin' and groovin' Taj 
Mahal, swing out with some "twist" jive. 



THE MUSICALS LOOK like they're about to get 
canned — literally that is. 





THERE WERE A FEW TALL GIRLS at the 
mix. We should let Matt Zunic know about 
them. 

63 




SHOWN HERE is part of the large contingent of military 
men who made an appearance at the ball. ARE YOU IN 
THERE SOMEWHERE? 



The cadets have a ball. 



FORGETTING ABOUT TACTICS for an eve- 
ning, the R.O.T.C. contingent of the Univer- 
sity took time out long enough to hold their an- 
nual military ball in the Student Union Ballroom 
on Dec. 9. Sue Lydon, a freshman from Waltham, 
was crovmed as Honorary Colonel by Janet Weh- 
man, the outgoing colonel. 

IT'S WAR STORY TIME AS THESE CADETS tell 
their dates about some of their exploits at summer 
camp ... If their dates only knew. 



OH YOU BIG HANDSOME CADET YOU— Are you really 
going to protect me from those nasty Russians. 





IF 

3_^R- R.OTC I 

Treasure 

.HOlCE 




Anti ROTC pickets voice 
their views. 





PICKETS TURN UP in the oddest places. So 
it was that a group of students calUng them- 
selves the Committee for the Abolition of Com- 
pulsory R.O.T.C. took to the Student Union on 
the night of the Ball. The demonstration, lasting 
about an hour, was generally a peaceful one. 

PAUL THEROUX, THE BRAINS behind the whole 
affair seems to be getting his credentials checked. 



65 





Standing: Jan Wehmann, out- 
going colonel. Sitting: Lynne 
Anderson, Joan Werner, Sheila 
Ryan, Sue Lydon, Jeanne Mul- 
laney. 



PRESIDENT LEDERLE AND HIS WIFE enjoyed 
themselves at the ball . . . even without doing the "twist." 



,.l,ji... 




MEMBERS OF THE MILITARY BRASS laugh it up a 
bit during intermission. War stories, no doubt. 




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MY DEAR, there's something I want 
to ask you . . . ah . . . it's rather 
personal. 




ROUND AN' ROUND AN' ROUND we go. Let's twist, man! 
These mihtary balls are not like they used to be. 



Sue Lydon chosen honorary colonel. 





SUE LYDON is tapped as Military Ball Queen 
by outgoing Honorary Colonel Jan Wehman. 



THE SABRES ARE RAISED in honor of the new queen. 




ELAINE CHOMYN LEADS THE KAPPAS to a first place with their fine effort of "Velvet 
Shoes" and "I Enjoy Being A Girl." 




Our Sorority Belles Have Their Day 



SORORITY VOICES ARE USED aU year long to call up boy- 
friends, gossip over the phone, buzz about freshman girls and 
giggle in classrooms when they shouldn't. A big switch occurred 
on Dec. 3 when the annual sorority sing and declamation took place 
in Bowker Auditorium. These same voices grouped together to pre- 
sent one of the finest sings in years with Kappa Kappa Gamma 
taking first place with "Velvet Shoes" and "I Enjoy Being A Girl." 
Second place was won by Kappa Alpha Theta with their rendition 
of "Preludium" and "HI HO Nobody Home". Chi Omega was third 
with "Oh Mary Don't You Weep" and "This Is My Beloved." 
Sigma Delta Tau's Sandra Segal took first place in the declama- 
tion with her presentation of "Medea." Carol Esonis of Kappa Kappa 
Gamma was second with "Saint Joan." Sue Lemanis from Pi Beta 
Phi was third. She gave a humorous version of "Pink and Patches." 



SANDRA SEGAL OF SDT 
with "Medea." 



68 




OUR NEWEST SORORITY, LAMB- 
DA DELTA PHI, was represented by 
Madeline Marsella with her presenta- 
tion of Edgar Allen Poe's "The Tell- 
tale Heart." 




THETA'S BEV BETELHO catches 
the mood of "Look Back In Anger." 




CHI OMEGA CAPTURED THIRD PLACE with their version of "This Is My Beloved' 
"Oh Mary Don't You Weep." 

69 



and 





THIS YOUNG LADY made a hit with the 
audience with her strumming and vocalizing. 




SWINGIN' Taj Mahal, who has entertained at many 
parties on campus, was a popular favorite at the show. 



THIS IS JUST LIKE going to the movies with 
your eyes bandaged. 



Who needs an echo chamber? 



THE ANNUAL ARTS AND MUSIC Talent 
Show was held Friday night, November 10 in the 
Student Union Ballroom. A large audience watched a 
very talented variety of acts from singing to dancing. 
Third place went to Margaret Loomis, a vocalist from 
Amherst, with Gail Brunnelle, a folk singer from the 
Abbey, taking second place honors. First place win- 
ners were Barry Briss and Mike Buckman with their 
fine guitar playing and singing. The Freshman class 
made its debut with a fine representation of talent in- 
cluding the famous Taj Mahal. Audience and per- 
formers alike had a good time. 



BARRY BRISS AND MIKE BUCKMAN entertain with 
their fine folk singing. 



70 





People are funny 
(especially at U Mass). 



HAVE YOU EVER seen something 
really unique on campus and said 
"Oh, if I only had a camera?" Well, some 
of the INDEX photographers have felt 
that way and have been lucky enough to 
have their cameras with them. Shown 
here are a few examples of what happens 
when the camera clicks. 



WHHHEEE-EEE-EEE— This fellow is going 
for a ride. He took that ride when some of 
his companions threw him in the campus pond 
last year right after the Greek Week chariot 
races. 




««•»' 



T 








RED BLASKO SEEMS TO BE a purse snatcher in the 
picture at the left but is only trying to find the owner of this 
purse lost at a football game — above — a couple of freshmen 
scrub the paint off Metawampe which is continually being 
put right back on . . . that'll teach 'em. 



Pennsyh 



vantans 



Come To Town 



FRED WARING and his Pennsylva- 
nians presented a well received pro- 
gram to a large crowd in the cage. The 
program was very diversified including 
vocal and instrumental solos, full orches- 
tra and choral numbers, and separate 
choral groups. The high point of the eve- 
ning was the special tribute to America 
in music, which was presented by the en- 
tire group. 




CAPTIVATING THE AUDIENCE was this appealing 
young lady and her accordion solos. 



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THIS FINE CHORAL GROUP presented many enjoyable numbers. 





THE MUSICAL CUTUPS of the two saxo- 
phone players provided many laughs. 



FRED WARING LOOKS ON as the 
Pennsylvanians present one of their 
many selections. 



72 




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«^?^«^ 



A COUPLE of physies show their stuff. 



. '♦. '1 





SOME PEOPLE will do anything for attention. 




IT LOOKS LIKE they're plan- 
ning to attack the male wall- 
flowers. 



Sophs, Frosh, hold their own mix 



THE ANNUAL SOPH-FROSH NIGHT 
was a fine success with both classes having 
a good time. The activities included swimming, 
volleyball, cheering, and a basketball game be- 
tween the soph and frosh men. Spontaneous dem- 
onstrations also sprang up during the evening to 
provide many extra laughs. The night was cli- 
maxed by a very enjoyable dance with refresh- 
ments being served amid a little hand holding. 



^ 


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THERE'S ALWAYS one dud in the crowd. 



73 




When Twilight Shadows Deepen 



74 




THE COOL SOUNDS OF JAZZ are the products of the following as they specialize in many types of jazz, all written 
University Dance Band under the direction of senior John or arranged by Maggs. 
Maggs from Fitchburg. These musicmen have won a large 



yf liT W" ■ 



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The Sounds of Jazz; 

Kenton vs. Dixieland 



THE JAZZ DOCTORS, playing to a near capacity audience in the SU 
Ballroom gave the crowd their usual fine interpretation of jazz — Dixieland 
style. They have been a favorite for several years at fraternity parties and 
weekend concerts. 



OH, IF LOUIE could only see him 





IT'S KP TIME AGAIN as cadets Tom Crawford of Auburn University and Howie Frisch of 
UMass get set to do a little house cleaning. 

Summer Camp? Oh There Were Parties, 
Golfing, Swimming, Tennis . . . 





n 



■«!W«'%%%«Hlr%' 



STEVE SHUSTERMAN and Howie Frisch perch themselves 
atop an M48-A2 tank along with cadets from VMI and Nor- 
wich, while vacationing at Fort Knox. 






These juniors on a weekend trip to Fort Devens don't 
seem to be overly interested. C'mon guys. Who's gonna 
volunteer? 




76 




AFTER THE MAINE BASKETBALL GAME the twisters in the crowd 
gathered in the SU Ballroom to show off their pivotal gyrations. Luckily no- 
body became a casualty as so often happened during the year during twisting 



The Russians Claim That 
Chubbikov Checkersky Really 
Invented The Twist 




YEH YEH YEH! This fellow must 
be a real connoisseur. Dig the hand- 
kerchief action! 




UP AND DOWN AND ROUND AND ROUND we go, This guy got his ups and downs 
mixed up with his rounds and rounds. 



Old Man Winter Comes Just In 
Time For Winter Carnival 1962 



WE THOUGHT THERE WOULD NOT BE a 
flake of snow on the ground for the Winter 
Carnival festivities but finally, just a few days before 
things were to start happening, Old Man Winter came 
through with about a foot of beautiful white snow. 
This late snowfall naturally provided a problem as 
the fraternities, et al, had to go like the "dickens" to get 
their sculptures built on time. Everyone came through, 
however, and all of the winter masterpieces turned out 
to be not the biggest but possibly the most clever 
efforts to be seen around the campus in many a year. 



1 



WINTER CARNI 

OLD FARMER'S 
fc ALMAMAC 

PREDICTS: 

■ PEBRUARY 12,1962 

THICR,WlT SNOWS 
STICK. 

^^^^^' SNOKi r 

T STORMS THKilE 





THE MYSTERY SNOWMAN made his 
appearance at the Providence game. 
WHOEVER HEARD of a snowman 
wearing galoshes? 



SKIP OAKES, JUNIOR CLASS PRESIDENT, keeps his 
fingers crossed for snow. 




OUR SCULPTURE TURNED OUT TO BE a mess but we 
sure had a lot oif fun in the process. Their sculpture really 



was a good one because these Pi Phi's were just hamming it 
up a bit for the camera. 



78 



CAROL MADISON, PAM O'DONNELL, GLENDA STOCK- 
WELL, LEE PORTER, DOLLY GRIN UK. What in the 
world are you doing, girls? 




A New Queen 

Is Crowned 



EMOTION, EXCITEMENT, and a 
month of suspense . . . and then 
... a new queen is crowned! The lucky 
princess to be selected for that honor this 
year was Carol Madison, a junior from 
Pittsfield, majoring in speech. To en- 
hance her majesty was a court of four 
other very attractive co-eds. The picture 
of these other girls will speak for their 
pulchritude. 




WATCH OUT, CAROL! Carol Madison doesn't seem 
to know what to expect as President Lederle is about 
to put the crown on her head. 




A FEW MOMENTS LATER bring a great big smile 
from the new WINTER CARNIVAL QUEEN. 




CONGRATULATIONS and a kiss or two are in order. 
79 




With A 

Continental 

Flair 



DICK MALTBY, AND HIS 
ORCHESTRA swing out with 
everything from cha chas to 
Charlestons. This was Dick's 
second appearance at the Uni- 
versity. 



WITH A CONTINENTAL FLAIR was the theme 
not only for this year's Winter Carnival Ball 
but for the entire weekend. The ballroom was deco- 
rated to add an international flavor and music for 
dancing was provided for by Dick Maltby's orchestra. 
Dick also played at last year's Carnival Ball. 

Inevitably, some of the customers did the "twist" 
to some of Maltby's numbers which were not intended 
as such but who cares as long as everyone has a good 
time? 

Highlights of the ball were the crowning of Carol 
Madison as Winter Carnival Queen and the disclosure 
of assistant Dean of Men Wm. Burkhardt as the 
Mystery Snowman. 





THE IDENTITY OF THE MYSTERY SNOWMAN was 

disclosed at the ball. Here BARRY WEINER, Publicity 

Chairman, is about to let everyone know that it is really 
BILLY BURKHARDT! 



TWIST, TWIST, TWIST. YOU CAN'T get away from it- 
even at the ball. Everyone is doing it these days — even the 
Duchess of Windsor. 

80 




WHEN ARE WE going to see the girls wearing 
these things around campus. The model here 
is AMY CLAYMAN. 




AS PART OF THE WINTER CARNIVAL fashion show 
this lovely co-ed JEAN ZIMMERMAN models bermudas 
and blouse from the House of Walsh. 



A Pretty Girl Is Like A Melody— Plink! 



A HAPPY PICTURE of all the fashion show models along with their escorts. 






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THE HIGHWAYMEN, dressed in colorful outfits, sing out with one of their hits "Cotton Fields." 



Michael Row Your Boat Ashore , . . 
There's A Leak In It! 



THE CLIMAX TO A 
GREAT WINTER CAR- 
NIVAL was the Jazz Concert on 
Sunday afternoon. The popular 
recording group, The Highway- 
men, sang and played before a 
capacity audience in the Curry 
Hicks Cage. These five honor 
students from Wesleyan Univer- 
sity specialize in folk music, and 
they also play a variety of un- 
usual instruments. Highlighting 
the show were some of their hit 
recordings such as "Michael," 
"Cotton Fields" and "Gypsy 
Rover." 




TUNING UP IN THE DRESSING ROOM, just before show time, the 

Highwaymen display their variety of instruments. In the foreground is a little 

known "zither." - 

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SKIP OAKES PRESIDENT OF THE CLASS 
OF '63, presented awards to the winners of 
the snow sculptures at intermission during the 
Fashion Show. 



FIRST PLACE FOR FRATERNITIES, went to Alpha Sig, 
with their Chinese Pagoda. 

Continental Sculptures Prove Huge Success 




FOLLOWING THE CONTINENTAL THEME of the weekend, was this tine snow sculpture 
by Lambda Chi representing the two sister universities, Umass. and Hokkaido. 

83 



Arts Festival Presents 
''Africa Unbound'' 



AFRICA UNBOUND" was the theme of 
this year's Fine Arts Festival presented 
by Mortarboard, senior women's honor society. 
The weekend began with a panel discussion on 
African thought and culture. Besides a superb 
performance put on by the Modern Dance Club, 
there was also on display a collection of African 
masks and handicrafts. Closing out the weekend 
was the performance by the famed African Dini- 
zulu dancers on Sunday afternoon. 




A COUPLE LOOKS OVER some African jewelry. In the 
background is an African funeral mask. 



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) 




MASK IN THE CENTER is from the Balshako tribe of the 
Congo and Angoha — called Mwana Pwo which means "young 
girl." It is used by young males when initiated into secret 
male societies. 




84 



ANOTHER VIEW OF THE MASK shown 
above. In front of it is a magical statue of 
the Bateke tribe of the Congo. It symbolizes 
the ancestor's spirit. 




BOBBY HANNA APPEARS a bit nervous as 
she goes through dressing room preparations 
for the ensuing performance. "Let's see, is my 
exam tomorrow at seven or at eight?" 



Modern Dance Performance— Nothing Short of Perfection 



THE DANCERS give one of their 
abstract interpretations. The perform- 
ance held on Friday evening in Bow- 
ker Auditorium was an exciting con- 
tribution to the theme of the week- 
end, "Africa Unbound." These per- 
formances by the Modern Dance Club 
have approached professional caliber 
and responsive audience soon became 
aware of it. 





"LEGS IN THE AIR" — Another form of interpretation to show that the Hawaiians do not 
have a monopoly on speaking with the hands. 




THE RHYTHM FOR THE DANCERS was provided by 
this male band playing a variety of drums. 

DINIZULU 

DANCERS 

THE CLIMAX TO THIS YEAR'S Fine Arts 
Festival featuring "Africa Unbound" was 
the dance performance on Sunday afternoon. 
The famed Dinizulu Dancers of South Africa 
gave a very interesting and memorable perform- 
ance. The beating of native drums and ritual- 
istic dances always find a way of capturing the 
audience. 




THE DANCERS PERFORMED a series of tribal dances for 
different occasions. 




IT LOOKS LIKE the "Twist" has even reached Africa. 



86 





MR. SCHWARTZ HITS A CHORD as part of the demonstration on chance music. In the 
background is Charles Wittenberg, noted composer from New York. On the right is John 
Maggs, director of the University Dance Band. 

Ever Heard Of Antiphonal Music? 



EXPERIMENTAL MUSIC WAS 
THE THEME of a presentation 
held in the Commonwealth Room last 
February. Featuring the demonstration 
were composer Charles Wittenberg of 
New York City and Elliott Schwartz of 
our music department. Three types of 
music were demonstrated: antiphonal, 
chance and electronic. The antiphonal 
music consisted of instruments placed at 
various parts of the room and played in 
unison, with special music written for this 
arrangement. Chance music, the essence 
of true jazz, was made of improvisations 
where the artist plays what comes into 
his head and which if played a second 
time would not sound exactly the same. 
The last type, electronic music, consisted 
of experiments with music electronically 
reproduced such as with radio amplifiers. 



THE EXPRESSIONS ON THESE FACES 
were indicative of the audience's interest. The 
evening's experiments with music brought forth 
many novel and fascinating ideas about music. 





WORKMEN PLUG AWAY as the new Student Union nears completion in the winter of 
1957. Shortly after it was opened for use everyone thought that there seemed to be a lot of 
extra room. Oh, did times change in five short years! 

The Student Union Celebrates Its Fifth Anniversary 

THE STUDENT UNION— WHAT would we 
do without it? It's been quite a while now 
since students took their coffee breaks in the old 
"C" store, located where Machmer now stands. 
As the enrollment went over the 3,000 mark, it 
just became impossible to fit everyone into that 
little place. Now that we have the Union our 
worries are over — for a while, anyway. 








TWO STUDENTS take a glance at a painting 
in one of the many typical art shows held in 
the Commonwealth Room of the Union. 



THE QUIET FACADE of the Union is deceiving as the 
change of classes will turn the scene into Grand Central 
Station in a fev/ short minutes. 




A GROUP OF PARACHUTE JUMPERS last spring presented plenty of excitement as 
crowds gathered on the green beside the Union to watch them do their stuff. 

THE ANNUAL PIE-EATING CONTEST held in the Hatch each spring is always good for 
a few laughs. Although the contest is primarily for students, these youngsters somehow got 
into the act — JUST LOVE those blueberries! 




89 



■11l#> 







THE ADMINISTRATION LOOKS OUT ON A SEA OF BEANIES, as they address the new 
class for the first time at the freshmen convocation. Dressed in shirt-sleeves, bermudas, and 
awe-struck expressions, the yearlings get their first dose of UMass lectures. Everyone seems to 
be listening intently, but no one seems to be taking notes. 



Buckle Down Winsocki—And You Too Freshman 




UNDER THE CRITICAL EYES of the members of the senate, the candidates for freshmen 
class officers state their platforms. Each candidate was given a chance to introduce himself 
and his ideas before his new classmates. 



90 




THESE FRESHMEN SEEM TO HAVE THE RIGHT IDEA. Going to college is a business 
nowadays, so why not open a little shop on the side? The work is fun, but the customer 
appears to be a little nervous about the result. 91 




LESTER NEALE, A UMASS 
JUNIOR, this past year re- 
ceived a $3200 grant for study 
at the Sorbonne as a result of 
his short story "Sometimes at 
Night" which previously ob- 
tained an award from Atlantic 
Monthly. The grant was award- 
ed by the Homer Gage Foun- 
dation in conjunction with the 
Guggenheim Foundation. As 
part of his program of study 
in France this summer Neale 
will teach two courses in Eng- 
lish. 



A $3200 Grant And One Man Show 

Highlight Student Accomplishments 




ARTHUR WINER, SENIOR ART MAJOR, poses with two of his works which were on 
display at the Jones Library in Amherst during March as part of his one-man show. The 
sculpture, titled "A Dancer" is made of welded steel, and was done in April 1961. The 
painting, "untitled," is oil on wood. Altogether he had on display fifteen paintings, two water 
colors, two drawings, and four sculptures. 




MEMBERS OF THE NEWS OFFICE STAFF— Sitting: William Deminoff, Standing: 
Daniel Meliey, Pearl Klimczyk, Rosalie Cobbs, Everett Kosarick. 

Meet Bill Deminoff And Co., 



MOST OF THE STUDENTS ON 
CAMPUS TAKE IT somewhat 
for granted when their picture appears 
in their hometown paper along with any 
write-up of their activities here at school. 
Taking care of these items is only a small 
segment of a day's work in the News 
Office. The News Office might just as 
easily be called our public relations de- 
partment. Student and faculty accom- 
plishments, major events, and inquiries 
by radio and newspapermen must all be 
covered or met in a FACTUAL manner. 
On behalf of the rest of the student 
body, the staff of the 1962 Index would 
like to make an appreciative nod to the 
News Office personnel for their efforts — 
and headaches. 



TYPICAL OF MR. DEMINOFF'S CON- 
CERNS was the March appearance of ex- 
Brazilian President Kubitschek, shown standing 
on his immediate left. 



The University's Nerve Center 





THE POLITICAL STABILITY of lapan and Korea was the subject of a panel discussion 
moderated by Professor James Crowley of Amherst College. Also on the panel were Prof. 
Ardath Burks of Rutgers and Prof. James Morley of Columbia. 

^^Communism And The Far Easf^ 

Theme Of International Weekend 

LECTURING ON THE POLITICAL PROBLEMS of the two Chinas is HOWARD BOOR- 
MAN, Director of the Research Problem on Men and Politics in Modern China. Mr. Boorman 
was co-author of Moscow-Peking Axis (1957). Beside him is Assoc. Prof. Cecil Cody of the 
History department, moderator for the discussion. 




94 




FOREIGN STUDENTS SHOWN at the International Weekend Dance. Many 
colorful and clever native dances highlighted the evening. 

PERTINENT DISCUSSIONS, art exhibits, foreign dancers, a 
jazz concert — all lielped to make the 1962 International Week- 
end, starting March 16, a huge success. 

The keynote address on Friday was given by Dr. Benjamin 
Schwartz of Harvard on the Foreign and Domestic Policy of Com- 
munist China while the rest of the weekend was principally devoted 
to Communism in the Far East. 

TONY RAVOSA and his group gave a relaxing concert Sunday afternoon in 
the Ballroom. The group, which plays to many pledge formals and other local 
engagements, is probably the most popular musical choice around. Strangely 
enough, Tony is actually a lawyer from Springfield who started his group as 
a diversion. Quite a successful diversion! 




ANNA ORTIZ de MONTELLANO gives a 
performance of Mexican dancing at intermis- 
sion of the International Weekend dance. Miss 
de Montellano is a student at Smith College. 





SWING YOUR PARTNER . . . hey, buddy, 
... no twists allowed. 



THE EXHIBITIONS ranged from Israeli dances by the Brook- 
lyn College Folk Dance Club to the folk dances of The 
Durham Reelers of the University of New Hampshire and the 
square dances of the Umass "HEYMAKERS." 



University Square Dance Club Hosts 

9th Intercollegiate Folk Festival 




ONE OF THE DANCES of the evening which turned out to be a huge success. 




MR. KUBITSCHEK LECTURES to the audience on the present problems of Brazil and 
their significance in the spotlight of world affairs. 

Ex-Brazilian Pres. Kubitschek Warns 



THE PRESENT IS THE TIME to revive the faith 
needed to sustain democracy." These were the 
words of former Brazilian President Juscilino Kubitshek 
in an address to a capacity audience on March 8th. 

Calling for consolidation of the "freedom and unity 
of the American family," he warned of the dangers 
which might arise in Latin American countries in the 
event of revolutions similar to that of Cuba, and the 
subsequent Communist control. 



Of Latin Communist Threat 





ANY VISITING DIGNITARY must always face the barrage 
of questions from the many newspeople who are looking for 
a story. 



LINDA ACHENBACH, president of Mortarboard, accom- 
panies Mr. Kubitschek to the Student Union, scene of his 
address. 



HOMECOMING 1958, DOT- 
TIE ELLERT is crowned 
Homecoming Queen. 
P.S. We did not win the game. 




1958- Remember those beanies? 




w; 



'HEN WE CAME AS FRESH- 
MEN they said to look at every 
other classmate because they probably 
would not be around when we gradu- 
ated. We found this to be ever so true. 
The men were soon separated from the 
boys. 



FRESHMEN JANE LEWIS AND HARRIET 
CUTLER seem to be getting instructions from 
Archie Babian and Bob Means, also members 
of the Class of '62. 



COMMENCEMENT 1958— In three months 
the Class of 1962 will hit town. 




98 



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HARRIET CUTLER, '62 was crowned Honorary Colo- 
nel at the 1959 Military Ball. There isn't much doubt 
as to how she feels about the situation. 




BOB BOULAIS looks like the happy bartender at one of 
Phi Sig's well known parties. Note the bottle of "7-up." 




Being A Sophomore 
WasnH So Bad. 



THE SECOND YEAR at college is 
always the big year. Students are ad- 
justed and have seriously set up a plan 
for flunking out or getting on the Dean's 
list. The class of '62 started the year with 
a cloud of prohibition over their heads. 
All of the backyard stills were locked up 
and all fraternity bartenders had to start 
collecting unemployment compensation. 



THAT SAME MILITARY BALL provided a few chuckles as a student from another school 
posed as a duke and had a ball being introduced to all the dignitaries. The following days 
produced a few red faces. 




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f'^'IZsuJUMSi^fl 




REMEMBER WHEN THE KING of The World came to the campus . . . 
well anyway, he thought he was king. Sol Gliserman, '63 is shown being 
honored as special King's representative on campus. 



I 



Junior Year — One More To Go. 




THE HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS 
PROVIDED one of the feature at- 
tractions of the year with their raz- 
zle-dazzle display of what can be 
done with a certain game invented 
by Naismith. 



CONTROVERSY, CONTROVERSY" was the 
highlight of our junior year. With the 2.0. issue 
leading the way, the editorial pages of the Collegian 
were kept burning. The defeat of Harvard's highly 
touted football team and the subsequent success and 
departure of Chuck Studley added more fuel. 




MIKE SALEM '62 DOESN'T SEEM to be bothered in the least by that 
Playmate of the Month on his knee. The scene is one of the many skits put 
on by the fraternities in the fall of '60 to show off their dramatic talent . . . 
and OH DID THEY! 




What? Seniors Already. 



IT'S 1962 AT LAST and everyone is 
looking forward to marriage, jobs, 
Uncle Sam and the departure from hour 
exams, finals, curfews, PROHIBITION, 
etc., etc. It's been a long hard grind but 
it aU looks like a flash now that it is all 
over. We have seen and experienced 
more than enough to find a permanent 
place in our memories. Among the high- 
lights were: two new football coaches, a 
new basketball coach, a new president, 
provost, and dean of students, not to 
mention the many new buildings — Bart- 
lett, Morrill et al. We've laughed — we've 
cried. We've been at the heights of jubi- 
lation and at other times the world has 
been against us. 

IN SUMMARY, WE'VE HAD ONE 
HECK OF A TIME. 



MEMORIAL HALL— Home of the Alumni Office. 




IT'S PIZZA TIME AGAIN as we look at a group of happy 
smiling faces. This page IS FOR THE SENIORS. How did 
those JUNIORS sneak in there? 




A THLETICS 



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ONCE AGAIN, as in the last two previous sea- 
sons, the Redmen began their 1961 season un- 
der a new head coach, Vic Fusia. With such a shifting 
of systems, it is remarkable that the Redmen have once 
again had a winning season and have been hot com- 
petitors for the Yankee Conference "beanpot." 

Delayed a week because of a flu epidemic, the sea- 
son began on September 30. Sparked by Freddy Lew- 
is and Sam Lussier in a second-half 21-12 with Bam- 
berry completing all three conversions. 

On the following week, the Redmen faced their 
toughest opponent of the season and played their finest 
game while losing to Villanova 33-13. 

Next, our team was invited to the University of Con- 
necticut to help them celebrate homecoming. This cel- 
ebration turned into the first U. Mass. victory in five 
years. John McCormick and Sam Lussier were the 
principals in the 31-13 slam, along with John Barn- 
berry and his 30 yard field goal and conversions. 

Then, it was our turn to play homecoming host to 
the University of Rhode Island. Kezer and Lewis were 
offensive standouts while Bob Foote earned E.C.A.C. 
honors for his defensive play. As the Redmen blanked 
Rhode Island 25-0 before the "Old Grads," North- 
eastern University became the next Redmen victim by 
a score of 26-7, with Freddy Lewis playing his best 



game of the season. 

On November 4, the Redmen played host to Boston 
University and were overpowered 21-7. Ken Palm and 
Ed Forbush were the two bright aspects of the day. 

The Crusaders handed the Fusiamen a very humil- 
iating defeat to the tune of 44-7. Aided by several U. 
Mass. injuries. Holy Cross completely overran the field 
with the only U. Mass. destruction going to the Precis- 
sionettes. 

With the struggle for the "beanpot" drawing to a 
close, the team succeeded in overcoming the Wildcats 
of New Hampshire with a single score by Ed Forbush 
and a Bamberry field-goal. 

Orono, Maine became the final resting place for 
Umie hopes as the Redmen bowed 10-7 in a hard 
fought battle for the conference title. The tables were 
reversed as our team was in turn defeated by a field- 
goal with the lone score embodied in a McCormick to 
Kezar pass and a Bamberry conversion. 

The fine spirit which carried the University team to 
its 5-4 season is a tribute to the squad and to Vic Fu- 
sia. With many experienced athletes returning we are 
looking forward to another winning season next year, 
and the acquisition of the Yankee Conference Cham- 
pionship. 



104 



TAKING OVER from "Chuck" Studly who 
coached the Yankee Conference Bean Pot 
Champs, facing the roughest schedule that the Redmen 
teams or fans had ever seen, Vic Fusia had his work 
cut out for him. 

What Coach Fusia has done with the Redmen is ob- 
vious. A winning season, despite serious injuries to the 
team and the lack of depth which plagued the squad 
throughout the season, was the final outcome. After 
performing better than anyone thought the team would 
do against Villanova, the Redmen went on to drub 
Connecticut, which hadn't been done by a U. Mass. 
squad since 1954. 

Even more important. Coach Fusia is vitally con- 
cerned with the character and scholarship of his ath- 
letes and places football in a subordinate position to 
them. With this kind of combination in a coach it be- 
comes evident that Coach Fusia is the strength behind 
the team. 




Coach Vic Fusia 



Redmen face roughest slate; WIN 



COACHING STAFF— Gladchuk, Glatz, Delaney, Head Coach Fusia, Schmitt, Johnson, Dr. 

Gage. 




105 



Mass Tips Wildcats 9-7. 
Vie For Yan-Con Bid, 






OVERPOWERING A CHARGING WILDCAT RUNNER, 

linebacker McCormack throws him to the ground. 








ED FORBUSH, STALWART 
END makes "dream-catch" for 
lone U.Mass. score. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE PLAYER WATCHES obligingly, as Fred Lewis picks up yardage at 
Durham, N. H. 




McCormick Leads Team To Winning Season, 




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DESPERATION PASS clicks as "Mac" eludes 
tackles during U. Conn. game. 



JOHN Mccormick, the redmen's triple 
THREAT quarterbacked and co-captained this 
year's fine team. His great passing arm hurls both long 
and short passes with amazing accuracy. Mac, this 
year, attempted 107 passes; in two years he completed 
134 for 1860 yards and 17 touchdowns. Coach Fusia 
before the U. Conn, game said, "John has the finest 
arm of any quarterback I have ever coached." 

This year John tried his toe at punting. His success 
can be measured by a 38.9 average for 27 tries total- 
ling 1078 yards. Playing every game, and with an in- 
jured foot in the last three, John has led the team to a 
winning season through its toughest schedule. 



PLAYING BOTH WAYS, John makes his share of 
tackles on defense. 




POISED FOR ACTION just before the snap, the team 
awaits quarterback McCormack's signal. 



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HALFBACK SAM LUSSIER TWISTS past defense aided by Bob Tedoldi's great double 
block. Sam made many spectacular runs in this game, in all, totaling 104 yards. 



Mass forces nine jumbles on U Conn 



Huskies before Homecoming Crowd 



CLUTCHING A McCORMICK PASS in the 
end zone is Paul Majeski, making the score 
9-0. Majeski was named ECAC lineman of the 
week for this game. 



I i 





KEEPING TRUE TO FORM, McCormick threw two touch- 
down passes against UConn. 

Redmen — 33 
Huskies — 13 



108 




B.U.S CAPTAIN PERREAULT makes a futile attempt to 
block Bamberry's neatly placed point after touchdown. Extra 
point and field goal attempts would not be possible if the de- 
fenders were not held back by a strong line. Working together, 
Bamberry and the line have made many crucial extra points 
and field goals. 




Bamberry gets real ''kick'' out of football 



JOHN'S WIFE EILEEN helping her placekicking specialist hus- 
band. For her efforts she was awarded a varsity letter and was feted 
at a banquet. 




JOHN BAMBERRY may be the most 
distinguished football player at 
Umass. Not only did his wife receive a 
varsity letter for her efforts in furthering 
her husband's career, but he also 
bounced back after an injury to give the 
team a reliable field goal and extra point 

kicker. 

A famihar (53), John ran onto the 

field many times to kick that crucial field 
goal. He successfully kicked field goals of 
30, 28, and 27 yards in the UConn and 
New Hampshire games respectively. This 
year, "Bumps" made 13 out of 16 points 
through the uprights. At Umass he has a 
total of 36 completions out of 40 at- 
tempts. 

The talent John developed will be 
missed for it took many long months of 
patience and determination to acquire 
this skill which is a necessity for any win- 
ning football team. 



109 




^i^;^"! 



SHOWING HIS SPEED AND AGILITY, Foote is able to pull out from the line and lead 
the way for sophomore speedster Freddy Lewis against Northeastern. 

Foote wins berth on YAN CON 

All Stars for bruising lineplay 




BOB FOOTE, a 6'2" 214 lb. senior from North- 
ampton, was twice named ECAC player-of-the- 
weelc and at the end of the season was chosen for the 
first team of the Yankee Conference All Stars. Bob has 
had a great year playing tackle for Umass. and he will 
be sorely missed next year. Perhaps the one game that 
will stick in Bob's memory is the Homecoming game 
against Rhode Island. During the last quarter he re- 
covered a URI fumble in the air and dashed the six 
yards into the end zone for a score to cap the 25-0 vic- 
tory. 



JUST AS EFFECTIVE ON DEFENSE, Foote (70) moves up to 
assist Matt Collins in bringing down a B.U. ball carrier. Also pic- 
tured is "Harry" Harrington moving in for the kill. 





LONE SCORE in game came as Lussier vaults over the line behind fine blocking by Slick 
and Forbush. 

Last period scores give BU 

win over strong Mass bid 21 



- 7 



BULLING HIS WAY through 
the line. Ken Palm meets stout 
B. U. secondary with Dell'Olio 
jumping on. Lacking depth, the 
Redmen squad held on dogged- 
ly until the final minutes of the 
game when the Terriers scored 
two quick T.D's. 





REDMEN LINEMEN War- 
ren (33), Graham (71), close 
in on BU's Jack Farland, who 
later scored on a 49-yard run. 



JIM HICKMAN 

*kick-off returns 
*quick kicks 
*punts 



Senior 
Specialists 





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^ 



LEN LaBELLA 
*Reserve quarter-back 



WAYNE MORGAN 
*guard, tackle 






PETE SULLIVAN 

*defensive linebacker 



CARMEN SCARPA 

*defensive tackle 



112 




There Is Always A Busy Time Upstairs 
When The Game Is On. 



113 




DICK EGER'S quickness and 
agility has made him a main- 
stay in the U. Mass. line. This 
fiery 190 pounder played both 
on offense and defense. He was 
sorely missed when he was in- 
jured in the Holy Cross game 
as the Crusader's backfield 
used this opportunity to blitz 
his hole. Many good teams 
such as Villanova and B.y. 
praised the hitting ability and 
toughness of the Redmen line 
keyed up by Dick Eger. 



Eger sparks scrappy defense 




ALMOST COMPLETELY OBSCURED from view, Eger dumps 
Rhode Island linebacker, opening the way for Sam Lussier. Crisp 
blocking and hard running like this provided U. Mass with a 25-0 
homecoming victory. 



ALLOWING HIS FORWARD WALL a brief rest during ^he Northeastern 
game, Coach Schmitt talks over the strategy with his men. Included with Dick 
Eger (65), are Slick (67), Scarpa (75), Harrington (81), Sikes (50), and 
Palm (32). 





SAM LUSSIER SLOWS down ball carrier enabling John Kozaka to make the tackle. Kozaka 
was voted E.C.A.C. lineman of the week for his efforts in this game. 

Redmen play best game against mighty Villanova 




AT THE HANDS of the mighty Wildcats from 
Villanova, the fighting Redmen suffered their 
first loss by a score of 33-13. Villanova was the most 
powerful team the Redmen faced all year, outweighing 
U. Mass by fifteen pounds per man. The University 
Eleven was in the game right up until the last five min- 
utes, when, were it not for a holding penalty which nul- 
lified a touchdown pass from McCormick to Lussier, 
the score would have been 26-20. However, on the 
next play, Villanova plucked one of McCormick's 
aerial bombs to set up their final tally. This crushed all 
hopes of a U. Mass victory. Against their heavier op- 
ponents, the rugged Redmen line played a very aggres- 
sive game. John Kozaka, a junior, was chosen on the 
weekly E.C.A.C. for his plays against the mighty Penn- 
sylvanians. 



CO-CAPTAIN Mccormick and vin caputo 

meet with officials for toss of coin. Billy Joe, 230 lb. 
Villanova fullback looks on. 



PAUL MAJESKI, strong-armed end, 
brings down Wildcat pro-candidate 
Billy Joe. Sam Slick (67) and Paul 
Graham (71) move up to assist. 







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Nucleus for ^^2^^ squad 




CO-CAPTAIN ELECT for '62 
season has been an offensive 
and defensive standout for 2 
years. At end he was the prime 
target for McCormick's passes, 
as he was 2nd high scorer for 
the '61 team. 



TOP GROUND GAINER for 
the Redmen, fleet Sam Lussier 
was named Yan-Con All Star 
this year. At right half-back 
Lussier has averaged 53 yards a 
carry. 







ALONG WITH MAJESKI, 
KIRBY will Co-captain next 
year's team. A versatile line- 
man, he played both at guard 
and center for the '61 team. 



A 100 YARD and 220 dash 
man in track makes Loren the 
fastest man on the team. Al- 
though relatively light he plays 
a good defensive game. 



STARTING GUARD in his Sophomore year, 
John was also rugged as a linebacker on de- 
fense. Against Villanova, Kozaka was voted 
best lineman of the game. A rugged ball player 
he would make a welcomed addition to any 
team. 



STARRING IN HIS Sophomore year, 
Kezar scored 6 touchdowns in the 
last two games. This year his speed 
and elusiveness will make him a top 
Bickfield candidate. 





SWITCHED FROM FULLBACK to 

center in his Sophomor year. Matt 
Collins has played excellent ball. His 
aggressiveness has made him a stal- 
wart in the touch T. Mass line. 



FILLING IN FOR FULLBACK for the in- 
jured Ken Palm, Art Perdigao earned a starting 
berth on the U. Mass. eleven. 



116 






^■...^...:.:^^ 




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»70 f4i4 14 ,45347 54 ib !^5 fOP'^ 12 ^"44/^61;' 







1961 VARSITY FOOTBALL— F/r^r Row: Head Coach Fu- 
sia, Foote, Salem, Sullivan, Bamberry, Scarpa, Co-Captains 
McCormick and Caputo, Forbush, LaBella, Hickman, Har- 
rington, Coach Schmitt. Second Row: Coach Glatz, Collins, 
Palm, Slick, Hedlund, Pleau, Lewis, Majeski, Kirby, Brophy, 
Eger, Morgan, Coach Delaney. Third Row: Coach Gladchuk, 



Jordan, Hallinan, Sikes, Tedoldi, Hagberg, Tombarelli, Cava- 
naugh, Graham, Longo, Lussier, Kozaka, Trainer Demers. 
Fourth Row: Trainer Keedy, Borges, Coach Johnson, Dineen, 
Flagg, Brown, DeMinico, Perdigao, Romeo, Infusino, Warren, 
Mgr. Soraghan, Mgr. Fitzgerald, Physician — Dr. Gage. 



Fusia 's future firepower 




^g-a. 






FRED LEWIS, powerful running halfback, delighted many Mass. fans with his speed and bal- EXPLOSIVE RUNNING fullback 

ance. Ken Palm charges toward N.H. line. 




JIM HICKMAN (44) led by 
Ken Palm (32), made a good 
gain of this play, but the U. 
Mass. backs couldn't match the 
Crusader's backs, McCarthy, 
Hennessy, and Wheeler. This 
trio totalled over 500 yards as 
McCarthy scored 3 touch- 
downs behind crisp blocking of 
Hennessy and Wheeler. 




Crusaders gallop over U MASS 44-7 



PERFECT TACKLE of Fred Lewis shows why Holy Cross is 

one of the best teams in New England. 




CRUSADER'S PUTTING the pressure on QB McCormick as he cocks his 
arm for a long pass. 





BEFORE THE GAME and during 
half-time, this impressive horse and 
rider entertained the large U. Mass. 
following. 



118 



\- k:^-^i-^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^M '^ 




FORBUSH SNARES A PASS against New Hampshire and 
scoots over for the only score. Lewis, (42), is in the back- 
ground. 




ED FORBUSH is a large (6' 1" 212 
lb.) end who has done an excellent 
job for U. Mass. this year. He has 
anchored the Redmen line with heads 
up and determined play. Perhaps his 
b'est game this year was the U. Conn, 
game where he made several impor- 
tant catches. His excellent play 
against Holy Cross should not go un- 
noticed where he threw passing star 
McCarthy for losses on several occa- 
sions. 



Forbush noted for rugged play 



HOLY CROSS . . . 

Not the Whole Story 
The University's bid for recognition among the ma- 
jor colleges received a rude setback against the aU- 
powerful Crusaders of Holy Cross when U. Mass suf- 
fered a defeat of 44-7. A thirty-three point spread 
doesn't make much for excitement, but in this case, 
neither does it command over-criticism of the Redmen. 
The U. Mass Eleven played without the services of 
end, Paul Majeski, and lost the bulk of their defensive 
stars in Matt Collins, Loren Flagg, and Dick Eger in 
the early minutes of the game. The Crusaders couldn't 
be contained as Holy Cross made gaping holes in the 
weak defensive spots left by the injured ball players, 
and manned by the young, inexperienced Redmen. 
Were it not for their porous defense, the Redmen 
would have made it an exciting game, for they moved 
the ball against the Crusaders whenever they had it. 
The Redmen gained over 150 yards and 13 first downs 
— only five less than Holy Cross. 



119 



PROVING HE'S NO LIGHT TOUCH, big Ed has it out 

with equally large Boston University end, as play starts around 

opposite end. Carrying the ball is Dick Warren. Foote (70), 
looks on. 




Dave Harrington Yan-Con All Star Selection 





DAVE HARRINGTON (helmet off) cheers his teammates 
as he takes a rest during the action of the Northeastern game. 



A3 YEAR VETERAN, rug- 
ged 6 ft., 190 lbs., Dave 
Harrington has been a defensive 
standout for this year's Redmen 
squad. Holding down the defen- 
sive end slot, Dave made ECAC 
Honorable Mention for his ef- 
forts in the fast moving Holy 
Cross game. Harrington has con- 
sistently played good ball. Ris- 
ing to the occasion many times, 
Dave came through with the 
important play. At the end of 
this season Dave Harrington was 
named to the YAN-CON ALL 
STARS. 



U.MASS. 21— A.I.C. (Aces) 7 
U.MASS. 13— Villanova (Wildcats) 33 
U.MASS. 31— U. of Connecticut (Huskies) 13 
U.MASS. 25— Rhode Island (Rams) 
U.MASS. 26 — Northeastern (Huskies) 7 
U.MASS 7— Boston University (Terriers) 21 
U.MASS. 7— Holy Cross (Crusaders) 44 
U.MASS. 9— New Hampshire (Wildcats) 7 
U.MASS. 7— Maine (Black Bears) 10 



120 




^ JK>^^.^ -L- . ^ ^ 



TUMBLER DAVE YATES accompanied by the cheerleaders 
welcomes the team on the field before the game. 



ART PERDIGAO (34) leads swift Jim Hickman (44) in a 
power play around right end to add to the yardage. 




Redmen Humble 
Northeastern Huskies; 
Gain Over 300 Yards 
Final 26-7 



FREDDY LEWIS, PLAYING HIS GREATEST GAME, hurtles over the Hne for a 
spectacular touchdown play against Northeastern. 





First Row: Avery, O'Brien, Buschmann, LaMarre, Kirk, Balch. Second Row: Harrington, 
LaPier, Garsys, Coach Footrick, Giddings, Blomstrom, Reilly. Third Row: Popple, Kelsey, 
Young, Flagg, Wilson. 

Runners Have 3-1 Season; End Year By Burying 

New Hampshire— Win All Events 





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HIGHLIGHTING THIS MEET was 
Sophomore BOB BROUILLET 
who won the two mile run in 9:28., 
breaking a school record of 9:30 set in 
1956. DAVE BALCH finished well 
ahead of the field with a 4:23.9 effort 
in the mile. A previous school mark of 
12'6" in the pole vault was broken by 
JIM LUMLEY at 12'7". JIM BRAD- 
LEY tied the UMASS record in the low 
hurdles at 5.3. KEN O'BRIEN in the 
100, LOREN FLAGG in the dash, and 
JOHN HARRINGTON in the high hur- 
dles went on to win their events indoors. 
Outdoors DICK WARD threw the 35-lb. 
weight 50'9" and strongman GEORGE 
GIDDINGS won the shotput with a 
43'9" heave. The final score was the 
REDMEN 981/2, NEW HAMPSHIRE 
141/2. 



122 




Tom Clark, Pete Hellewell, Red Kenerson, Coach MacConnell, Dick Hurlbut, Don Burgess, 
Clark Bowlen, Dave Urrisco. 

Ski Team Upsets Brown And Princeton 



A GIANT SLALOM set by 
Pierre Ducis, former mem- 
ber of the French National Ski 
Team, at Thunder Mt. was the 
scene of the upset. The Redmen 
Ski Team captured two second 
place trophies in the double ski 
meet sponsored by Amherst 
College. Hurlbut and Kenerson 
scored 84.5, 89.5 respectively 
on the fast and icy three quarter 
mile downhill run. 




•vii* 




First Row: David Williams, Dexter Brown, Captain Charles Paydos, Ralph Nichols, Robert 
Coffin. Standing: Gary Hagopian, James Adam, Eric Coate, Bruce McCracken, Coach Robert 
James. 

Gymnasts End Season With 4-3 Record 





GARY HAGOPIAN DEMONSTRATES a 

single leg cut on the side horse. 



CAPT. CHARLIE PAYDOS PERFORMS an inlocate of the 
front swing on the flying rings. 



124 




BRUCE McCRAKEN, VERSATILE AND VETERAN gym- 
nast, has developed excellent routines on the high bar, paral- 
lel bars, and side horse competition. 




DAVE WILLIAMS EXECUTES a difficult back lever 
on the still rings. 



DAVE YATES SCORES CONSISTENTLY 

in every meet. Dave is by far the best tumbler, 
and scores near perfect in his tumbling rou- 
tines. 



125 





STAM PALEOCRASSUS BOOTS bail away from encircling opposition toward teammate 
Pawluk. 



Booters meet rugged schedule 



THE U. MASS BOOTERS having a better-than-average season this year, 
finished their slate with a 3-1-6 record. Under the leadership of Captain 
David Amundsen, the team edged its first challenger, Coast Guard, with the score 
2-1. Improving their striking power, the Redmen gained their second win by top- 
phng the University of Rhode Island 4-6. A home match against Amherst College 
was the hardest fought game of the season. Although the Lord Jeffs handed U. 
Mass a 2-0 loss, the Briggs men carried out a superb offensive attack which threat- 
ened the Amherst net throughout the game. 

The marked improvement of this year's competition over last year's winless sea- 
son, can be attributed to the added experience of the ballclub. Veteran players 
Captain Amundsen, Pawluk, and Heanue, handled the ball skillfully, and were a 
firm threat against opponent teams. Lettermen Repeta, Packard, Graves,, and Hoa- 
visto were the backbone of the defense, while Argentinis, Astaldi, Leete, Chen- 
ery, and Aksionczyk provided the scoring punch. The highest scorer was Dick 
Leete who didn't miss a single penalty kick. Peter Baker filled the management 
position above par, and helped to boost the morale of the Redmen. All those play- 
ers who did not receive a letter also deserve earned applause, for their efforts 
helped to make the varsity a more efficient ball club. 

Coach Briggs looks forward to still a better and more experienced soccer team 
next season, for only three senior players, Amundsen, Pawluk, and Heanue, will 
be lost through graduation. Fourteen lettermen and a few promising freshmen are 
expected to return. 




^JS. 



>«r**^' 






A DIFFICULT SOCCER maneuver 
is "heading" the ball. Here Bob Chen- 
ery tries to deflect ball with his head 
against high-jumping opponent. 



126 




1961 VARSITY SOCCER— Third Row: Coach Briggs, Berestka, luk, Aksionczyk, Samma, Schmidt, Argentinis, Clinton. First 
Prescott, Lombard, Fitzpatrick, Garsys, Packard, Repeta, Dau- Row: Haavisto, Heanue, Paleocrassus, Chenery, Capt. Amund- 
bitz. Col. W. Akroyd. Second Row: Mgr. Graves, Bowman, Paw- sen, Leete, Astaldi, Golub. 



PROTECTING GOAL, Dick Haovisto (1) with help from 
Capt. Amundsen and Ron Packard. 








SOCCER SCORES 




MASS. 


2 


Coast Guard 


1 


MASS. 





Williams 


6 


MASS. 





Trinity 


3 


MASS. 


1 


Connecticut 


6 


MASS. 


1 


WPI 


1 


MASS. 


4 


Rhode Island 


1 


MASS. 


1 


Tufts 


2 


MASS. 


4 


Clark 





MASS. 





Amherst 


4 


MASS. 


3 


Farliegh Dickenson 


10 













,f 



f 



127 



Bernard Sparks Triumph Over BU; 

Scores 17 Points In 9 Minutes 




HERO'S RECOGNITION is given Pete Bernard as he is 
carried from the floor by the exuberant crowd. 

SOPHOMORE STAR ROGER TWITCHELL 
leaps over outstretched arm of B.U.'S McNulty 
to score with a neat jump shot. 




EXCITING LAST MINUTE WIN opens 
Redmen hoop season. Curry Hicks rocked 
as the Zunicmen, led by Sophomore Pete Ber- 
nard, turned in a remarkable clutch performance. 
Starting slowly the Redmen led 25-17 in the first 
period, but the Terriers closed the gap and went 
ahead 40-36 at half time. At the beginning of the 
second half, the Redmen faulted, and the Terriers 
opened a 14-pt. breach, 64-50. Coach Zunic, try- 
ing different combinations, sent Bernard into the 
game. He quickly scored on Leslie's pass. Play- 
ing ramble-scramble ball, Bernard stole passes, 
dove for out of bounds balls, and fought with op- 
ponents to bring U. Mass. within two points of 
B.U. A hook by Black, and successive scores by 
LaPier and Bernard put the game on ice for U. 
Mass. Final score — 75-71. 



DRIVING HOOK SHOT by Capt. KIRK 
LESIE stuns opposition. 




UConn Freeze Kills Mass.; Bow 76-65 




INCHES AWAY FROM BASKET Roger Twitchell ballet 
dances to the tune of two points. 



FROM 'WAY DOWNTOWN Pete Bernard 
tries a last period jump shot. 




ALL EYES ON BALL— NOT ON ELBOW, as LaPier attempts layup. UConn's Len Carlson 
looks on. 





FROM THE TOP OF THE KEY Dick Conlin hits with a 
jumper. 



U mass— Conference Favorite, 
Upset By Brandeis 80-79 



"WHAT ARE YOU DOING AFTER THE GAME?" Conlin, 
Larkin, Ricciardi, Gventer, Fohlin and Von Bradsky cheer 
play. 





SOPHOMORE STAR ROGER TWITCHELL SCORES 

with neatly arched shot against Brandies. 



130 




REFEREE SIGNALS FOR JUMP BALL as Mole and Black wrestle for ball during Rhode 
Island tilt. 



Redmen Ruin Rhody Rogues 77-69; 

Rams Return, Redmen Ramble 73-67 



MIKE MOLE OUTJUMPS 
RAM OPPONENT. Rhode Is- 
land knocked off strong Provi- 
dence College and the Redmen 
turned around and beat the 
Rams twice. 77-69; 73-62. 





REDMEN CONTROL TAP. Roger Twitchell who teamed up with Pete Bernard (40) to score 
13, 12 pts. respectively controls tap from Ernst of Providence College. 



Providence Five Outclasses Redmen For 79-43 Victory 



SUPERIOR HEIGHT TELLS THE 
STORY. Thompson of P.C. uses size 
to outjump Fohlin. 



HADNOT (55) AND THOMPSON DOMINATE REDMEN. Hadnot 
6' 10" kept ball safely away from basket by blocking shots. 





Mass Takes Two 

From Maine, 

65-54, 72-66; 

Now Have 6-1 Record, 

Have Conference Goal 

In Sight 



right— MIKE MOLE BACK COURT ACE sparked 
team in the second half of this season; scored 17 pts. 
in the series, below — ^Tallest man in team 6'8" DON 
BLACK gets accusing finger from referee. 





JJMass Topples 
Vermont 69-53; 
Fohlin and Twitchell 
Star 



MOVING INTO POSITION FOR A 
REBOUND Rodger Twitchell nudges 
Vermont player. 





ROGER TWITCHELL DRIVES FOR LAYUP over outstretched arms of 
Vermont star Benny Becton. Twitchell was high scorer with 20 pts. 



FRANZ Von BRADSKY SCORES IN CONFERENCE GAME that saw the 
Redmen come closer to a championship by beating Vermont 69-52. 





Redmen Win Last 5; Crush UNH 109-62, 

Cop Yan-Con Title And Get NCAA Bid 



BRANDIES PLAYER CRINGES as Dick Con- 
lin reaches for layup. 



KIRK LESLIE IS RESTRAINED after a momentary loss of 
temper fighting for a rebound. 





135 




DON BLACK SEEMS OBLIVIOUS to Matt 
Zunic's concern with action on the floor. 



The Three Faces 

Of $j^ Matt 






CLARENCE HILL FROM WASHINGTON, D. C; STEVE BONDS pace freshmen team 
to almost perfect season. 

Freshmen Cagers Excel; Finish 12-1 

Crush Providence 79-61 To Spark Year 

HILL HOOPS 26 as freshmen sweep past Worcester Jr. 67-54. 




CHARLIE O'ROURKE SCORES dur- 
ing pre-lim game with Grutchfield's 
ALL STARS. 




137 




REDMEN SCORE 5 GOALS. Second line of Donovan, Taylor, Johnson net 5 goals against 
A.I.C. 



Upset Win Over Bowdoin Highlights Hockey Season 



MOST REWARDING WIN of the season occurred wheir the Redmen 
downed mighty Bowdoin 2-1 in a great upset victory. Bowdoin, always 
a strong team, is a perennial eastern Hockey power slated this year to play in the 
EC AC finals. The win was a team effort, but much of the credit should go to 
goahe Frank Cesario who made 46 saves, 6 more than his per/game average. 
Losses to West Point and Williams were not without consolation. At West Point 
the Redmen fought the Cadets to a 2-1 standstill at the end of the second period. 
In the third frame 2 quick goals killed UMass hopes, and the strong Army team 
won 4-1. The third period of the Williams tilt found 2 Warriors in the penalty 
box. Capitalizing on this, the Williams club sent the puck flying for 3 easy goals. 
Playing without the benefit of home ice, the hockey team must provide their 
own transportation to Orr Rink at Amherst. From this group of determined men, 
a hard working Hockey Team has developed that deserves much credit. Jim El- 
lingwood and Bob Glew co-captain this spirited club. Of EUingwood Coach Ko- 
sikowski remarked that EUingwood was "one of the finest skaters in the East." 
Others who played outstanding Hockey are: Bob Glew, Gerry Clinton, Dick Phil- 
lips, Charlie Glew and, of course, goalie Frank Cesario. 



138 




HARD BODY CHECK by Ed Forbush sends 
opponent crashing to the ice. 




GLIDING TOWARD THE ENEMY, 
Bob Chisholm, defenseman, brings 
game to the opponents. 



PUCK IN MID-AIR Co. Capt.'s Jim EUingwood and Bob Glew wait tensely for puck to hit the ice before the 
start of the game. 




139 




Kneeling: Larry Thibcn, Mark Nataupsky. Standing: Hal Butterworth. Richard Levine, Capt. 
Ed Moses, Frank Fluet, Doug Wells, Jim Vermeiren. 



Whoever Heard Of Annie Oakley? 



THIS WAS PERHAPS the most successful and 
colorful season which the U. Mass. Varsity Rifle 
Team has recently experienced. The final record of 
7-9 showed great improvement over previous team 
performances. Highlighting- the season were the Coast 
Guard Academy and West Point invitational matches. 
Never before has the U. Mass. squad participated in 
these top ranking and highly competitive matches. 
Under the adept guidance of coach Capt. Jack 



Lesley, team Capt. Ed Moses directed the shooters 
in all their undertakings. The team will definitely feel 
the loss of Ed Moses due to his graduation. Top gun 
for the season was Soph. Hal Butterworth, followed by 
Frank Fluet, Capt. Ed Moses, Jim Vermeiren, Mark 
R. Natanpsky, and Doug Wells. Also firing on the 
team but not receiving sweaters were Larry M. Thibert, 
Richard Lavine, and Richard Granger. 





COACH WILLIAM FOOTRICK 



COACH BILL FOOTRICK'S har- 
riers won the YanCon Cross Coun- 
try title for the second straight year at 
Orono, Maine. Edging their host Maine 
by 4, the Redmen scored 42 as Rhode 
Island scored 79, U Conn 90, Vermont 
108 and New Hampshire 110. Coach 
Footrick's winning ways began in his 
first year as Head Coach of Track when 
his varsity was Connecticut Valley 
Champs while his freshmen won the 
New England crown. Today Coach Foot- 
rick can be found on the tiack field with 
a whistle strung around his neck and a 
stop watch in his hand exhorting and 
encouraging his teams on to more 
victorys. 




Ken O'Brien, Dick Blomstrom, David Balch, Jim Wrynn, Bob Avery, Charles 
Proctor, Robert Brouillet, Eugene Colburn, Tom Leavitt, Joe LaMarre, Coach, 
William Footrick, Bob Pendleton. 



141 



%'^ %' 




ENTHUSIASTIC CROWD WATCHES Referee Victor Codis, Commissoner of Wrestling 
Officials in New England, call out of bounds matmen back to the struggle. 



UMass Grapplers Play For Keeps; Not Like On TV 



FINALLY EXHAUSTED, the opponent offers no re- 
sistance as Tom Best, 147 lb., flips him. 



ADVANCED WRESTLING PROGRAMS from 
JL\. competing schools have hurt the UMass. wres- 
tlers this year. Suffering a defeat at the hands of W.P.I. 
20-16 the Redmen showed promise as Tom Best, Al 
Brouillet, Gerry Burnham, and Al Isreal defeated 
their opponents. They might have won, but the Red- 
men don't have a heavy-weight wrestler and had to 
forfeit the match. Co-Capt. Bob Ellis injured his shoul- 
der, and is a doubtful starter for the rest of the season. 
Coach John Douglas feels that a definite improvement 
has been made over last year's Redmen wrestling qual- 
ity and spectator participation. 




142 




STRAINING FOR THE PIN, Al Brouillet rolls A.I.C. 
grappler in the 167 lb. class. 



"HE WONT GO DOWN" as UMass matman struggles 
with opponent. 

FORCING OPPONENT FROM MAT, Craig DeWallace 157 lb., uses headlock for 
final push. 





143 




Standing: Martin Duby, Michael Bjornholm, Arthur King, Michael Rothschild, Donald 
Grant, John Grybko, Coach Joe Rogers. Seated: Bruce Morton, Brendon O'Neil, Captain 
Matt Rutkowski, David Desjardins, Ronald Chiras, James Coffey. 

Swim Team Beats Tufts; Three Records Broken 



BRUCE MORTON TAKES 2 SECONDS in the butterfly 
and diving events. 


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ENDING A 3-6 SEASON the Red- 
men Swim Team posted a 59-36 
victory over Tufts. Three records were 
broken at the meet as Bjournholm, Gry- 
bko, Morton, and Rothschild for Mass. 
broke the school record for the 400 yard 
Medlay Relay in 4:17.0, Mike Roth- 
schild won the 440 freestyle record with 
a record time of 5:07.4, and Joe Brada 
set a new Tufts record in the 200 yard 
breaststroke in 2:46.7. 



144 




CAPT. MATT RUTKOWSKI (second from left) WINS 220 FREESTYLE in 2:33.6 Jim 
Coffey places second. 




145 




THE STEPHEN DAVIS Memorial Award is presented each 
year to the fraternity, dormitory or independent organization 
that gains the most points by participating successfully in "the 
Intramural program throughout the year. This is determined 
by the point accumulation formula. 



PURPOSE . . . INTRAMURAL com- 
petition is designed especially to ful- 
fill the desire for athletic participation 
among the large group of students who 
because of skill level, or inclination do 
not wish to compete on a varsity level. 
The intramural program is a supplement 
to, and a continuation of the general phys- 
ical education program. Provision is made 
for the inclusion of all members of the 
University community in the programming 
of events. This broad pattern of organized 
recreational activities is provided to at- 
tract the leisure time pursuits of the stu- 
dent body. 




146 





ANNUAL "NOSE" BOWL between TEP and 
AEPi draws large crowds for this exciting 
and bruising contest. 



BAKER "A" STOPS frat champs Theta Chi 18-13. 



Diversified Intramural Program 

Receives Enthusiastic Participation 

FAVORITE WINTER COMPETITION is volleyball that was won by the 
Beavers. 




147 




NO PROS HERE, but it looks good. 
Often play gets rough — "no hard 
feelings?" 




DAILY BASKETBALL GAMES at the Cage are popular. 
This year SAE won the Intramural Championships. 



ALL WEIGHT DIVISIONS are represented as many boys try their skill at 
wrestling according to the rules. 




148 




BAKER "A" DESERVES CREDIT for organizing a team that beat the better organized 
and more experienced fraternities. 

Baker Dorm Trips Theta Chi 

To Cop Intramural Grid Title 




EXPERIENCE AND AGILITY ARE NEEDED on the 
trampoline which explains the four assistants around the 
"tramp." 




149 




First Row: Kermit Pruyne, Robert Avery, Loren Flagg, Ralph Buschmann, Ronald Young, 
Abe Scheinker. Second Row: Allan Wilson, Jim Reilly, Charles Proctor, Richard Blonstrom, 
Kenneth O'Brien, Charles LaPier, Al Garsys. Third Row: George Giddings, David Balch, 
Carl Stone, Joseph Cassidy, Joseph LaMarre, James Ballou, Lee Munson. Fourth Row: 
Al Obue, Charles Romeo, Charles Fohlin, Ernest Karshick, Richard Ward, Henry Kelsey, 
Coach William Footrick. 



HIGH JUMPER DICK WARD finishes first 
in conference meet held at Rhode Island. 



SPRING TRACK 




CONFERENCE 100- YD. DASH champion Loren Flagg wins 
again against A.I.C. 






TEAM CAPT. ERNIE KARSHICK practices 
his specialty the SHOT PUT. 






«f ':iii^ .1 










First Row: R. Roland, P. Wennick, Capt. P. Foley, E. Connolly, E. Forbush. Second Row: 
C. Bullock, L. Bush, T. Osetek, L. Pia, C. Elmstrom, F. Pisiewski. Third Row: A. Williams, 
R. Corey, J. Schmoyer, P. Larkin, W. DelVeccio. Fourth Row: R. Chasen, P. Bracci, R. 
Hughes, D. Krukonis, Coach E. Lorden. 



ED CONNOLLY, STRIKE OUT ARTIST, was signed to a 
major league contract. 



BASEBALL 





TONY WILLIAMS SIGNALED to stop by Ted Osetek, 
third base coach. 




Lacrosse Team Climaxes Best Year Yet; Finish 8-2-1 




CLIMAXING ITS BEST SEASON, 
the varsity lacrosse was named win- 
ner of the Marsters Cup for showing the 
most improvement in its league standing. 
The team also won the Northeast Section 
B Title of the U.S. Intercollegiate La- 
crosse Association. The Redmen's All 
American candidate, Co-Captain Dick 
Hoss, missed a few games during the 
latter part of the season because of in- 
juries but still managed to tally 24 goals 
during the year. Jim Ellingwood, Mike 
Chretian, and Bob Glew were other scor- 
ing standouts for Coach Dick Gather's 
squad, while John Bamberry, Jerry Cul- 
len, and Walt Glinski were defensive 
standouts throughout the campaign. 



COACH GARBER looks rather pleased 
Have a good year, coach? 



152 




YANKEE CONFERENCE CHAMPIONS— A'/iee/mg; R. Chisolm, W. Marshall, W. Duns- 
more. Standing: B. Schmoyer, D. Pierre, P. Hatfield, Coach Gladchuk, M. Megliola, J. Don- 
asky, R. Dion. 

Kneeling: S. Poritz, Eddlestein, Rubin, Thompson, Thomas. Standing: Coach Kosakowski, 

Schule, Sherman, Simons, Howarth. 




153 




GREEKS 




??krA''^:r<t';r-s!;-»-.-;!t4ii.'if3a:H 



'.Ji^^^^^ 



"14^; 



y 






ii. » 



f 



-^--^ 




EXECUTIVE BOARD — Stephen Shusterman, Administrative Vice-President, Joel Lerner, 
Secretary, Richard Greene, President, Kevin Judge, Executive Vice-President. Missing: 
George McKenna, Treasurer. 



INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 



THE INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL is the 
central governing body of all campus social fra- 
ternities. Through its three branches: the Fraternity 
Presidents Assembly, Council of Committees, and Ju- 
diciary, it seeks to promote better cooperation and 
communication between member fraternities and to 
insure the continued improvement and success of the 
fraternity system. 

The Fraternity Presidents Assembly is composed of 
all house presidents, the five officers (executive com- 
mittee) and a faculty advisor, and is presided over 
by the president of IFC. This is the central governing 
body of the fraternity system and bears the responsi- 
bility for the proper functioning of the system as a 



whole. 

The Council of Committees is composed of two 
representatives from each of the campus social fra- 
ternities (a junior and a sophomore) and is presided 
over by the administrative vice president with the 
assistance of the secretary and the faculty advisor. 
This body is the IFC workhorse and from it come the 
ideas and manpower which make possible the various 
IFC programs. 

The Judiciary is composed of six fraternity pres- 
idents and is presided over by the executive vice pres- 
ident. The main function of Judiciary is to assist the 
IFC in the enforcement of its constitution and by-laws. 



156 




FRATERNITY PRESIDENTS— S. Shusterman, R. Greene, Sibley, F. Daher, C. Scarpa, K. Judge, T. Antonucci, J. 
J. Lerner, A. Tobias, R. Lees, P. DuPont, R. Legrand, P. Faucette, A. Leblanc, A. Morris, J. Callio, H. Lane. 



COUNCIL OF COMMITTEES— F;/-i7 Row: S. Shusterman, D. Truesdale, S. Israel, T. Tyre, W. Dumfie, A. Jones, S. 
J. Lerner. Second Row: R. Dimoclc, R. Newmarlc, M. Rubin, Gray, H.. McDermott, H. Wainstein. Fourth Row: T. Bish, 
R. Bolton, W. Boyle, D. Cournoyer, M. Belanger. Third Row: R. Clark, P. Legro, L. Murphy, B. Weiner. 

157 




SIG EP's winning entry in I.F.C. skits. 




FRATERNITY relaxation! 




I.F.C. 



INTERFRATERNITY COOPERATION reached 
a high point during the fall of 1961 when the 
IPC sponsored the formation of Zeta Nu fraternity. 
In this experiment, the first of its kind in the country, 
an IFC Rush Committee, composed of two members 
from each house, used the facilities of the Student 
Union to carry on an intensive rushing program. In 
the few short months since its inception Zeta Nu has 
become an integral part of campus life and a thriving 
example of the productivity of interfraternity endeavor. 

The IFC also sponsors and regulates competition 
among the several fraternities for the annual IFC 
trophy. In this chain of events ranging from floats and 
snow sculptures through scholarship and sports, points 
are given for excellence in each area and the house 
with the greatest total number of points is awarded 
the trophy; 

Fraternities are also active in campus and com- 
munity charitable events. They play an important role 
in such organizations as the Campus Chest and Blood 
Drive and their traditional Christmas parties for under- 
privileged children have long helped to brighten the 
holiday season for many local youngsters. 

Through all these activities the IFC seeks to realize 
its dedication to serving the needs of both its mem- 
ber fraternities and the campus community. 



HOMECOMING Weekend Float Parade. 



158 




First Row: C. Rudick, G. Carvalho, D. Bonds, D. Burnett, 
A. Clark, M. Phoenix, R. Landry, G. Bejian, R. Bolton, W. 
DeForest. Second Row: R. Schlitz, B. Pederson, R. Small, 
T. Kelleher, M. Fillmore, J. Ryan, S. Wexler, Pledge #1, 
S. Baniukiewicz, A. Olenoff. Third Row: T. Antonucci, M. 



Belanger, D. Callahan, B. Toussaint, A. Brann, R. Wilson, 
D. Greene, L. Renehan, R. Wilson, P. Anderson. Fourth 
Row: A. Piecewicz, F. Spates, C. Anderson, T. Raftery, P. 
Macumber, S. Lanzo, W. Radulski, W. Walsh, E. Kasprzak, 
J. Macedo. 



ZETA NU 




Newest Fraternity 



BOB SMALL, Zeta Nu's Red- 
man Chief. 




First Row: Beverly DeMarco, Patricia Chase, Elizabeth Nurmey, Linda Griffin, President, 
Judith Hancock, Donna Pope, Jean Mullaney. Second Row: Linda Lederman, Mary Heath, 
Janice Joseph, Barbara Walker, Anne Podoborski, Patricia Oliviera, Sue Hyland. 



PANHELLENIC COUNCIL 



PANHELLENIC COUNCIL'S PURPOSE IS TO 
PROMOTE understanding and cooperation and to 
provide an opportunity for an exchange of ideas among 
the sororities in all aspects of campus life. Its mem- 
bership consists of two representatives from each of 
the eight sororities on campus. 

Throughout the year many social, philanthropic, 
and educational events are sponsored by Panhellenic. 
Among some of our established traditions are: the 
Mum Sale at the Homecoming football game, Inter- 
sorority Sing and Dramatization Competition, Fresh- 
man Tea at which time the Panhellenic Handbooks are 



distributed to all freshmen, and, of course. Formal 
Freshmen Rush. This year Panhel introduced a Fresh- 
man Women's Sorority Convocation in order to acquaint 
the freshmen informally with the sororities. The con- 
vocation, consisting of talks and group singing, was a 
great success and will be continued in the future. 

Always striving for improvement and new ideas, 
Panhel annually holds a workshop in the spring of 
the year at which time many worthwhile ideas and 
suggestions are discussed and recommended for the 
following year. 



160 



THE JOYS of sorority living!! 





INTERSORORITY SING 





AND DECLAMATION. 



FRESHMEN RUSH. 



161 





Barry Ravech 
President 



ALPHA EPSILON PI 

Phi Chapter 1933 

1 I 




BUT, GEE WHIZ 

tastes good! 



. It 





Robert Wallace 
Vice-President 



Michael H. Caroline 
Secretary 





Mike H. Rosenthal 
Treasurer 



Edward S. Davidson 
Member at Large 



A LPHA EPSILON PI WAS FOUNDED as a social 
Jl\. club, called UEO; it was renamed Delta Phi 
Alpha in 1920, officially recognized by the admin- 
istration in 1921 and admitted into the Inter-Fraternity 
Council in the same year. AEPi this year welcomed 
the brothers back to a newly renovated house. During 
the summer, extensive remodeling was undertaken, 
now providing the brotherhood with more modern 
facilities. 

AEPi started the year well by placing third in the 
float parade during Homecoming Weekend. Social suc- 
cesses included traditional theme parties such as the 
annual Military Brawl, a Christmas Party for under- 
privileged children, and the University weekends. 

Living up to its high ideals, AEPi once again placed 
well in IFC Scholarship Competition. As usual, AEPi 
was well represented on campus with brothers on the 
staffs of the Collegian and Index and with others on 
Adelphia, Maroon Key, and Student Union Commit- 
tees. All this, in addition to an excellent freshman 
class, made 1961-1962 a memorable year for Alpha 
Epsilon Pi. 



162 





% 0IIP 



First Row: B. Ravech, Mrs. Tully. Second Row: S. Shuster- 
man, E. Radding, R. Shamroth, L. Winokur, M. Rosenthal, L. 
Pyenson, H. Tempkin, T. Weinberg, M. Caroline. Third Row: 
R. Ravich, H. Frisch, M. Kaplan, B. Sleisenger, H. Shapiro, 
J. Goldberg, B. Rubin, R. Zaiger, M. Smith, M. Rubin. 
Fourth Row: D. Seigal, M. Rose, J. Bloom, J. Rosenberg, J. 



Benjamin, R. Ginsberg, E. Davidson, B. Vravsnof, F. Nesvet, 
S. Orlen, S. Sheldon. Fifth Row: R. Golub, T. Jacobs, R. 
Blitzer, J. Rosendorf, S. Star, A. Schulman, B. Rashotsky, 
R. Servetnick, B. Brass, S. Wassersug, M. Paris. Sixth Row: 
S. Israel, A. Savat, F. Posner, L. Castle, J. Orlen. Missing: 
S. Forman, T. Summers, M. Feingold. 




ONWARD MEN— 



MAYBE IF I TIPTOE and look the other way they'll stop. 



163 





Richard J. Greene 
President 





UAMiaL r raMMQ J4.P'^J -^ 



John B. Faucette 
Secretary 



William B. Field 
Treasurer 




Jonathan S. Field 
Vice-President 



ALPHA GAMMA RHO 

Mu Chapter 1917 



First Row: E. Frado, R. Farrar, C. Bosco, A. Carr, J. Dowst, 
J. Gallagher, J. Adams, N. D'Amado, J. Burham. Second 
Row: D. Annable, K. Barrett, K. Makinen, D. Brown, F. 
Thurberg, C. Bailey, W. Hale, J. DiSano, E. Schmidt. Third 
Row: S. Concemi, B. Albro, R. Kodzis, K. Robbins, T. Astal- 
di, M. Noferi, J. Blanchard, M. Pressler, M. Mott, J. Yablon- 
ski. Fourth Row: R. Packard, C. Pike, D. Haynes, J. Rogers, 
N. MacLeod, P. Sherman, R. Hooper, K. Woolf, D. Adams, 



B. Christman, P. Grigas, A. Kilbourn, B. Najam. Fifth Row: 
L. Koch, P. Fitzpatrick, S. Swenson, P. Read, C. Lemmon, 
A. B. Rockwood, K. Brink, J. Nevers, R. Blair, M. Lamour- 
eux, R. Ostrowski, J. Faucette, R. Greene. Sixth Row: N. 
Richards, F. Smith, W. Dugan, W. McNamara, D. O'Mara, D. 
Osterhaut, R. Bacchieri, R. Greenfield, J. Turbidy, D. Cheney, 
R. Lepp, J. Hyland. Seventh Row: T. Bish, S. Priest, P. 
Stanley, J. Lucas. 




164 




THE BROTHERS of Alpha Gam are proud of their new addition/ 



IN 1917 THE LOCAL CHAPTER Of Beta Kappa 
Phi, located at 406 North Pleasant Street on the 
University of Massachusetts campus, entered into Al- 
pha Gamma Rho as its Mu Chapter. In 1961-62, 
406 North Pleasant doubled its size with the comple- 
tion of a new wing. 

In the past year, the Alpha Gamms have taken 
part in a variety of campus activities and varsity sports. 
Some of the offices and activities include president of 
the Interfraternity Council, vice president of the soph- 
omore class, student senators. Revelers, Maroon Keys, 



members of Men's Judiciary, Class Executive Councils 
and many others. The list of varsity sports ranges 
from baseball, skiing and lacrosse to soccer, golf and 
wrestling. 

Alpha Gamma Rho is also active socially: it hasn't 
missed a Saturday night party during either of the past 
two semesters and has augmented the social calendar 
with frequent exchanges and other events. With a 
growing brotherhood and a strong bond of fraternalism, 
AGR is looking back on a memorable year and is 
looking forward to a most promising one. 




"AND THE NON-AGGIE award of the 
year goes to J. Rogers, presented by John 
Faucette, Secretary of AFP." 



I 




DISHES, dishes, dishes . 



165 



ALPHA 

SIGMA 
PHI 




Gamma 



Chapter 



1913 




FAREWELL, my magnificent masterpiece! 




"SHE WAS a phantom of delight , 



^ w 








% 



m- 

!»1» 




*►* 



■l^|a|l *^ *'**^'^"' *'*^^ '*^' M >T ■ ll*^^*''" 



r 

I 




ALPHA SIG'S 1st prize win- 
ning sculpture. 



life? I' 



"'JIT^'J 




166 



GAMMA CHAPTER, ONE OF the numerous 
Alpha Sigma chapters in colleges throughout the 
country, is the oldest national fraternity on campus. 
The original charter was transferred from Amherst 
College to the University in 1913. Since being reac- 
tivated in 1955, the "Old Gal" has grown significantly 
in both membership and prestige. Plans are being 
made for a new house, with all the brothers looking 
forward to that groundbreaking day. 

The Alpha Sigs have been in numerous campus 
activities this past semester. These activities include 



being members on the Sophomore and Junior Execu- 
tive Councils and the Student Senate. The brothers, 
while finding time for socializing with exchange suppers 
and Saturday night twist parties, also recognize the 
importance of high scholarship. A social highpoint of 
the brothers' year came when their Winter Carnival 
Weekend was successfully ended with the Alpha Sigma 
snow sculpture of a Siamese pagoda winning first place. 
The social program of the house reached its climax 
in the spring with the traditional Black and White 
Formal. 



First Row: J. Levine, J. Black, N. DiDominco, B. Peffer, Mrs. 
Pierce. W. Oldach, D. Fiendel, R. Wilson, S. PaqueUe, N. 
Carpenter. Second Row: A. Case, S. Maskell, R. Binall, J. 
Coman, J. DeVaux, D. Parisi, R. Willcox, W. Smith, A. Kin- 
caid, W. Boyle, R. Henry, J. Southard. Third Row: T. Lach- 
owitz, R. Ireland. G. Berault. J. Whitfield, R. Jarvis, R. 



Mastermateo, D. Fasser, J. Dunlop, W. Carruth, W. Carey, P. 
Winchester, L. Ford. Fourth Row: F. Johnson, H. Wilbur, 
S. Brown, R. Addison, R. Tracy, A. Morris, C. Gittins, J. 
O'Brien, T. Dodge, R. Erickson, R. Golden. Fifth Row: D. 
Klein, W. Morse, W. Ewell. 




167 




(!) 





Don McKaeg 
President 




Robert McGlone 
Vice-President 



KAPPA SIGMA 

Gamma Delta 1904 




"THAT'S MY little honeybun . . 





Peter Ryan 
Secretary 




Joseph Barry 
Treasurer 




LOOK MA, I'm handsome! 



HOME, Sweet Home. 




First Row: J. Harrington, J. Apicello, C. Bearce, J. Barry, 
P. Pumpkin, T. Williams, P. Murray, T. Kilroy, R. Conley, 
J. Street. Second Rom-: J. Canvasback, J. Zajack, J. Awdicki, 
K. Onion, K. Livingston, M. Dineen, D. Monkey, S. Myskow- 
ski, J. Clinton, J. Harrington, R. Cerretani. Third Row: D. 
Krukonis, J. Schmoyer, L. Bartley, M. Brita, H. Dowdy, T. 
Kiley, F. Dawgi, L. McCormack, T. Crowley, B. Deiterle. 



Fourth Row: B. Knuckles, P. Larkin, C. Ruma, J. Long, 
A. Sykeseed, A. Kinsman, W. Wood, P. Breath, H. Corey, 

A. Graham, W. Delvechio. Fifth Row: W. Collins, F. Shmood- 
headlund, A. Moon, W. Cratty, B. Whale, M. Crane, J. Kelly, 

B. Jordan. Sixth Row: H. Lane, L. Goochs, Tombarelli, B. 
Hutch, K. O'Brien, S. Harrington, D. Hagberg, J. Morgan, J. 
Huey. 



THE GAMMA DELTA CHAPTER, one of the 
one hundred thirty-five Kappa Sigma chapters, was 
established on this campus in 1904. At present, this 
University of Massachusetts chapter has sixty-one mem- 
bers, forty of whom live in the house. The first 
chapter house was on North Pleasant Street near 
Dalton's Diner; in 1939, the present building was 
financed, designed and built by Kappa Sigs, actives 
and alumni. 

Although the brothers are primarily athletes, their 
records show that they have not participated in ath- 
letics exclusively. Last year they were first scholastically 



on campus. It was the first time that a fraternity had 
surpassed the University average. Kappa Sigmas fin- 
ished third out of fourteen fraternities in Interfraternity 
Council competition last year. They finished first in 
intramurals. 

Last year Kappa Sigma was represented on eleven 
varsity squads; also captains of three sports were 
Kappa Sigmas. But besides these, the fraternity also 
has many participants in various other campus activ- 
ities. The social highlights of the year come with the 
Christmas party and annual Embassy Ball. 



169 




HERE'S to our new pledge 



. now 1 ... 2 ... 3. 



First Row: J. Quimper, W. Vasil, D. McGlone, A. Hennessey, 
Mrs. E. Mason, J. Varelas, B. Lord, J. Prime, J. Farrell, J. 
MacNeil. Second Row: P. Dupont, R. Burns, G. Peloquin, A. 
Coe, W. Carnivale, E. Buscema, R. Leete, D. Wells, M. 
Roberts. Third Row: E. Sternowski, A. Pierce, C. Sozcek, K. 
Goff, E. Sherman, R. Riciardi, R. Ek, F. Mankuso, R. Bentley, 
R. Lucas, W. Horan, R. Quentin. Fourth Row: J. Philpott, 



C. Monior, R. Ripetta, D. Fitzgerald, R. Skibinski, F. Cizario, 
A. Grace, B. Wallace, P. Mahoney, T. Coyne, R. Feranti. Fifth 
Row: D. Tibaldi, T. Tyrer, C. DeLair, D. Kelsie, R. Dorgan, 

D. Moore, A. Garsys, M. Ratkowski, B. Morton, D. Kennedy. 
Sixth Row: D. Morton, D. Neijedlik, Z. Spita, G. Chouri, 
T. Callahan. 




170 




Paul Dupont 
President 





Charlie LaPier 
Vice-President 




LAMBDA CHI ALPHA 

Gamma Chapter 1912 



John MacNeil 
Secretary 




Joe Quimper 
Treasurer 




PAGE 24 . . . Marilyn Monroe. 



ONCE AGAIN THE BROTHERS of Lambda 
Chi Alpha engaged in a busy year of campus 
life. Many Saturday night parties highlighted the fall 
social calendar, which was climaxed by the fall formal 
on November 1 8th. The Winter Carnival Weekend 
brought another successful attempt in the form of a 
snow sculpture which represented the international 
theme and paid homage to our sister, Hokkaido Uni- 
versity. This took second prize in the competition with 
fourteen other fraternities. 

Physically, the interior of the house has donned a 
new appearance, for it was repainted between semes- 
ters and partially remodeled. 

This spring the Gamma Zeta chapter of Lambda 
Chi Alpha of the University was host to the New 
England Area Conclave in conjunction with its fiftieth 
anniversary. The brothers looked forward to enter- 
taining many national officers and representatives from 
the twelve other Lambda Chi chapters in New England. 
The past year was a most successful one for the 
brothers of Lambda Chi Alpha. 



171 





PHI MU DELTA 

Nu Zeta Chapter 1953 




I'LL TAKE your six oil wells and raise you 
four steel plants. 






Fred Daher 
President 



Michael Driscoll 
Secretary 




Wilham Hailer 
Vice-President 




REACHING for the moon 



YOU THINK that was good — wait'll you hear this one! 



172 



THE NU ZETA CHAPTER OF PHI MU DELTA 
fraternity, founded locally as Zeta Zeta Zeta, 
became a chapter of the national Phi Mu Delta fra- 
ternity in 1953. The house on Sunset Avenue is proud 
of its active brotherhood. Within the past year, it has 
been able to claim as its members the Chief Justice 
of Men's Judiciary, two members of Tau Beta Pi, a 
member of Eta Kappa Nu and workers on the Campus 
Chest committee. 

Sportswise, the fraternity has not lagged behind, 
for it has brothers on six varsity teams, including 



the coming year's wrestling captain. The sports rep- 
resented are football, baseball, wrestling, track, la- 
crosse, and swimming. Besides varsity sports, the house 
has emerged successful from intramural competition. 
The social calendar for the year included their 
weekly Saturday night parties, but also highlighted by 
the annual Pledge Formal and their annual Christmas 
Party. Of course, no year could be successfully com- 
pleted without the fun of the spring Pago-Pago party. 
All was accomplished and another year drew to a suc- 
cessful close. 



First Row: W. Martin, G. Hagopian, D. Robb, W. Millis, J. 
Anderson, R. Simmons, A. Bleau, W. Hailer, F. Daher. 
Second Row: R. Windyka, K. Byrne, J. Collins. D. Gould, R. 
Rose, F. Valerio, P. Gibbon, R. Stone, G. Morrison, J. Sul- 
livan, R. Lane, T. Dubey. Third Row: P. Briggs, J. Murphy, 
M. Howayeck, E. Benoit, R. Cady, M. Driscoll, A. King, J. 



Manfra, P. Legro, G. Drury. R. Chutoransky, S. Wolosky. H. 
Gardner. Foiirlh Row: E. Durfer, R. Elder, R. Seiden, C. 
Bemis, P. Grazio, R. Fletcher, A. Graves, H. McDermott, 
J. Rantilla, J. Hughes, L. Cesario, A. Maskell. Fifth Row: 
R. Covalucci, D. Corners, B. McLain, W. Griffin. 




173 




ALPHA MU CHAPTER of Phi Sigma Delta is a 
-tA. young, growing, non-sectarian fraternity — -the 
newest nationally affiliated fraternity on campus. It 
traces its lineage back to what was once known as the 
"Triangle Club" in 1951. It was a colony of Phi 
Sigma Delta in 1955 and became a national fraternity 
in 1957. After a few years the brotherhood obtained 
a house, and one year later, in 1960, installed a new 
kitchen. 

Phi Sigma Delta is active in all major fields of IPC 
competition — from skits, snow sculptures, to foot- 
ball. The brothers claim among their greatest assets 
their housemother. Miss Dorothy Pyle, an accomplished 
writer, and their marvelous cook, Mrs. Mary Szawlow- 
ski. The fraternity has continued to grow and has 
gained many valuable friends in the faculty, the ad- 
ministration, and throughout the campus. 



AH! ... IS velly disturbing. 




PHI SIGMA DELTA 

Alpha Mu Chapter 1947 




Ronald D. Lees 
President 



Richard E. Gloth 
Vice-President 




Wm 

Jeffrey D. Cohen 
Secretary 





Mark L. Brenner 
Treasurer 



174 




First Row: L. Brown, D. Dimock, R. Cannistraro, R. Schloss- 
berg, C. Nelson, Miss Pyle, J. Cohen, M. Leventhal, M. 
Brenner, R. Keene. Second Row: R. Lees, R. Schuster, L. 
Klemenn, R. Lerner, G. Chaskelson, M. Borin, J. Stein, 



W. Parry, E. Lyons, S. Kessler, S. Goldstein. Third Row: 
S. Ezer, G. Donovan, P. Vecchiarelli, R. Julius, M. Miller, 
J. Karas, A. Tarover, G. Salk, J. Baskin, E. Gaffer, R. Skiba, 
M. Palter, T. Robinson, O. Pollick, P. Snyderman. 



BUT, DEAR ... I told you that northern 
winters are cold! 




^^?«l"iSe'^.S..i*V--D^M M ^' 







PHI SIGMA KAPPA 

Alpha Chapter 1873 



First Row: R. Miniutalo, H. Hyde, V. Puleo, A. Zepeda, J. 
Downer, Mrs. Loretta Rushworth, T. Lindahl, J. Batts, G. 
Critchfield, R. Antil. Second Row: T. Bernard, J. Hubbard, 
B. Tedoldi, A. Benoit, F. Falbo, J. Kates, F. Keppy, J. 
Checile, R. Henry, W. Cassidy, R. Boulais. Third Row: C. 



Stitson, J. Campanelli, C. Mitchell, N. Cullinan, H. Wain- 
stein, B. Allen, R. Collier, R. Rost, S. Blanchard, S. Gray, 
R. Francis. Fourth Row: T. Nevils, K. Ekberg, B. Hogan, J. 
Callio, B. Linton, G. Gauhn. 




176 




OH!!! DO YOU suppose that I'll get mumps too? 




ALPHA CHAPTER OF PHI SIGMA KAPPA 
-l\. fraternity was founded in 1873 in the old North 
College building with all the traditions of campus 
leaders prevalent then, as now, among the brother- 
hood. Forty years later the Phi Sigs built their present 
house at the edge of the campus; the ivy-covered 
structure now occupies its key position near the center 
of campus activities. 

Some of the interests of Phi Sig brothers are shown 
in their record of campus activities. This year the 
fraternity boasted members of Men's Judiciary, Senate, 
Campus Chest and Winter Carnival committees, as 
well as two members, one the president, of the Maroon 
Keys. The house has brothers representing its athletic 
prowess on the football, golf and lacrosse teams. 

The social program of the house reaches its climax 
in the spring with the annual Spring Formal and — of 
course — Mass Grass. 



TOO tall Indian! 



177 




Paul J. Cassidy 
Treasurer 




John R. Wylde Jr. 
Recording Secretary 






Bernard J. Murphy 
Master of Ceremonies 



Kenneth P. Brophy 
Corresponding Secretary 



Frank P. Pisiewski 
President 



Ronald F. Baker 
Vice-President 



Q T V Founded 1869 





I SAY THERE old chap 
you're okay. 



. . carry a green book bag and 



"THE FRATERNITY MAN" 



178 



Q.T.V., THE OLDEST FRATERNITY on this 
campus, is the only local Latin Letter Fraternity 
in the country, being founded on this campus on 
May 12, 1869. Despite several offers to join the ranks 
of national Greek letter fraternities, QTV has chosen 
to remain local to retain its unique and total control 
over its own policies and affairs. The brethren moved 
into their present residence at 358 North Pleasant 
Street in 1917. Constant improvement and renovation 
of the building has resulted in the present structure. 
However, due to the growing needs of the fraternity 
a plan has been initiated under the direction of both 
the alumni and active members that will raise funds 



for a new, all-brick structure on the present site. 
The building is expected to be completed for the QTV 
Centennial in 1969. 

This year the brothers have filled positions in many 
campus activities, ranging from the ranks of class 
officers and the various honorary societies to the cap- 
tain of the varsity baseball team. They have placed 
first in IPC scholarship, as well as being strong com- 
petitors in other areas of IPC competition. The broth- 
ers of QTV feel justified in their pride for the tradition 
of their long-established brotherhood. The fraternity 
has become a heritage on the very campus where it 
was founded so many years ago. 



First Row: G. Hackett, K. Brophy, T. Cosentino, A. Dadley, 
Miss Constance Garvey, P. Baker, B. Wik, K. Beck, D. Le- 
Grand, R. Lyonnais. Second Row: F. Frodyma, D. Adrien, 
R. Doran, T. Budney, T. Clark, J. White, B. Meunier, S. 
Salhus. C. Dyer, D. Cournoye.r, A. Labelle. Third Row: J. 
Medeiros, F. Pisiewski, K. MacDonald, Q. Wolfe, D. DeVries, 
P. Graselli, B. Guardiani, J. Wilson, P. Digit, W. Holmes, 



R. Hopker, W. Young. Fourth Row: R. Nylon, B. Murphy, 
C. Fortin, D. Stewart, J. Wylde, F. Cira, G. Oakes, J. Nise, 
C. Borawski, M. Jaryna, J. Donate, D. Barnes, D. Truesdale. 
Fifth Row: H. Wesoly, R. Cournoyer, L. Doane, E. Piezinski, 
W. McHugh, R. Kelly, J. Lavoie, M. Cook, D. French, J. 
Marsden, R. Hillberg, J. Norton. Sixth Row: W. Gobel, J. 
Curtis, R. Bugley, R. Baker, K. McKenna. 




179 






Carmen J. Scarpa 
President 





Eugene T. Curtin 



dim 



Kenneth J. Ryan 



Peter K. MacDonald 
Vice-President 



Treasurer 



SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON 

Massachusetts Kappa 1935 





OH! I DON'T know if I should. 



THAT'S MY MOTHER you're laughing at! 



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PLEASE MAKE me a good boy. 



180 



I 



• e •% 



First Row: Z. Shade, C. Johnson, D. Hare, B. Jones, P, 
Rossi, T. Furey, T. Kazikonis, J. Brescia, D. Loude, C. 
Scarpa. Second Row: P. Dorme, L. Donnelly, F. Beck, A. 
Inche, K. Keezer, T. Kirby, F. Munge, A. Perdigao, R. Pul- 



sivich. Third Row: H. Stampolaski, B. Red, B. Boomer, T. 
Jaberinnoski, R. McDonel, A. Shunc, P. Sullivan, A. Tacelli, 
N. Glenn. Fifth Row: D. Bank, B. Lyon, B. Jones, K. Fallon, 
P. MacDonald, K. Judge, P. Majewski, C. Pierce. 



SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON has just completed an- 
other year of achievement and activity here at 
the University. Leading the field in athletic participa- 
tion, the House is proud to see four brothers in posi- 
tions as co-captains of the football team for the season 
past and that to come. Some seventeen brothers con- 
tributed to the fine showing the football team made 
this past fall. The house is also proud of its brothers 
who hold important positions in various campus or- 
ganizations including IFC, the Senate, and the FMA 
Board of Directors. Who's Who found several mem- 



bers from SAE this year, and men participating on 
all major athletic teams. The house extends its wishes 
for future success to the two brothers who have signed 
with the Boston Red Sox and the Minnesota Vikings. 
After a season of parties and exchange suppers, the 
year was climaxed with the annual pledge formal and 
initiation banquet. All the SAE's are very happy with 
their new housemother, Mrs. Eva Chatel. She has 
become a friend of everyone and a true part of the 
fraternity. 



181 





Ade LeBIanc 

President 




Charlie Weeber 
Vice-President 




Peter Hodges 
Recording Secretary 



SIGMA PHI EPSILON 

Massachusetts Alpha 1912 




Robert Masow 
Comptroller 




Sam Blythe 
Historian 



First Row: P. Donavan, B. O'Leary, L. Kurtzman, B. Reed, 
T. Argentinas, P. Hadenchuck, G. Frankio, J. Cassano, R. 
Travaris, H. Jilson. Second Row: E. Goflf, J. Murphy, B. 
Hajjar, D. Francin, J. Nichols, T. Lang, B. Thoreaux, J. 
Walton, D. Page, B. Masow, R. Hawkes, B. MacLeod. Third 
Row: P. Hodges, E. Cass, R. Cruflf, J. Burke, D. Field, 
H. Stone, J. Allen, B. Adams, R. Valentinetti, B. Schmoyer, 



R. Mastrodomenico, W. Hathaway, D. Brown. Fourth Row: 
P. Clark, A. Leblanc, N. Laprade, S. Paleocrassas, J. Sheas- 
green, L. Pelligrini, B. Gianoulis, R. Guzowski, T. Parker, 
W. Donovan, B. Phillips, D. Elliot. Fifth Row: W. Mc- 
Partlin, W. Hulk, S. Leclerc, C. Gibson, D. MacLeod, C. 
Weeber, W. Tarbuck, G. Quirk, A. Rand, R. Feener, G. 
Tenzcer, J. Blythe, P. Graham. 




THIS YEAR MARKED the sixtieth anniversary 
of Sigma Phi Epsilon national fraternity, and 
its fiftieth anniversary on this campus. The seventh 
oldest of the present fraternities at the University, 
Massachusetts Alpha was founded on April 27, 1912. 
In these past fifty years Sig Ep has contributed out- 
standing leaders to the campus and to the nation as 
well. Following the dormant years of the Second 
World War and reorganization in 1948, Sig Ep quickly 
regained its position on campus, winning the IPC 
trophy several times during the past decade. Two years 
ago, with the help of loyal alumni, the fraternity was 
able to build a new addition of traditional brick and 
modern glass. 

In the past year, Sig Ep remained a leader in the 
IPC Competition, as it has for many years. Sig Eps 
held membership in numerous campus organizations 
this year . . . from Maroon Key and Men's Judiciary to 
Christian Association and the Senate. For fifty years 
the bonds of brotherhood have been maintained in 
Sigma Phi Epsilon, and this same spirit will prevail 
behind the Red Door in the many years to come. 



OH, WOODY, you're so SMART! 




DIANN, GIRL, you do things to me! 





"... KINDA BROAD at the shoulder and 
narrow at the hip ..." 



183 




Paul B. Sibley 
President 





Roger J. Gleckman 
Treasurer 



TAU EPSILON PHI 

Tau Pi Chapter 




Barry Y. Weiner 
Vice-President 




Eliot Lappen 
Secretary 




FREDDY Shotz . . . or?? 



THIS PAST YEAR HAS SEEN the realization of 
a TEP dream. Working in close cooperation with 
their alumni and national officers, the Teppers have 
formulated definite plans for the construction of a new 
house. One wing Will be started in April, and the old 
chapter house will be torn down after graduation, with 
a second wing being erected on its site. The house 
will be ready to accomodate the brotherhood by the 
beginning of the fall term in September. 

This year the brothers hope to improve on their 
second place IPC finish of last year. With much of the 
competition still to be held, the brothers feel that they 
will be successful if they can defend their previous 
victories in the Sing, in softball and bowling. TEP 
is well represented in most all campus activities. They 
are actively affiliated in such organizations as the 
Maroon Key, Revelers, Adelphia and the Collegian, 
and head important committees for Winter Carnival 
Weekend and Greek Week. With goals firmly estab- 
lished, TEP proceeds confidently toward a future that 
promises to be both productive and exciting. 



184 





FRENCH KISS? Man, I'm just checking out 
your molars. 



WHAT KIDS? We're having too much fun!!! 



First Row: P. Katz, B. Brooks, N. Glassman, J. Berkowitz, 
Mrs. B. Reverly, S. Levine, M. Buchman, R. Greenberg, W. 
Martin, B. Klein. Second Row: H. Levine, R. Reiger, S. 
Cohen, S. Needle, M. Kovick, C. Gordon, K. Wax, M. Kap- 
lan, R. Gleckman, C. Reid, D. Kasoff. Third Row: W. Mat- 
talina, J. Kramer, A. Forman, P. Sibley, M. Herman, N. 
Blatt, E. Sterling, J. Tillman, F. Slater, E. Rosenfield. Foitrtli 



Row: D. Lipton, B. Araick, S. Vengrow, B. Briss, H. Schultz, 
S. Yas, H. Alperin, A. Levick, L. Bernstein, S. Kramer, W. 
Miller, D. Daisy. Fifth Row: R. Charney, J. Jones, E. Salla- 
moff, S. Kingsley, S. Lack, D. Goldstein, B. Schwartz, B. 
Bornstein, S. Morris, M. Feldman, E. Lapin, E. Schevitz, B. 
Weiner. 




185 






Art Crago 
President 



Ralph Simmons 
Vice-President 




TAU KAPPA 
EPSILON 

Delta Chapter 1956 




Ed Mintiens 
Secretary 



Ted Osetek 
Treasurer 



TAU KAPPA EPSILON, THE THIRD YOUNG- 
EST fraternity at the University, has risen in ten 
short years to a place of prominence among campus 
fraternities. TKE is not limited by any restrictions as 
to the race, creed, or color of its members, and the 
interests, activities, and talents of the brothers are both 
varied and diverse. 

The past year has been a demanding and a reward- 
ing one for the Tekes. Their football team was once 
again a strong contender for the league champion- 
ship, but was regrettably edged into second place after 
losing a final game near the end of the season. The 
brothers captured fourth place in both the Home- 
coming Float Parade and in the IPC Skits. Their 
social season has included weekly exchange suppers 
with the sororities, and Saturday night parties, both at 
the house and off campus. At the beginning of the 
second semester TKE sponsored a most successful 
dance, Registration Rock, in the Student Union Ball- 
room. 

The TKE brothers are especially happy with their 
new officers who have organized the members in reno- 
vating the interior of the house this year. They are also 
pleased with our fine pledge class, obtained through 
a newly formulated rushing system. 




YETH, YOU SEE in Rome we do thus and so . 



186 




First Row: T. DePalma, J. Crowe, L. O'Brien, T. Lover, C. 
Lennon, Spike, T. Connely, W. Silvia, M. Hoosh, L. Aksion- 
czyk. Second Row: J. Lerner, K. Wallace, L. Whipple, A. 
Mallette, B. Bonnivier, R. Simmons, G. Smith, J. Nero. 
Third Row: D. Tabb, R. Sloan, F. Lovejoy, R. Hansen, T. 
Meeker, P. Toomey, A. Couper, P. Stevens, P. Bernard, D. 
Leith. Fourth Row: R. Jones, T. Gagliarducci, L. Lefebre, J. 
Sheehy, R. Marsella, D. Bates, C. Noble, G. Webb, H. 



Makie, C. Thoren, P. Kennet. Fifth Row: R. Jones, A. Crago, 
B. Smith, C. Green, B. Kelley, M. Hogan, G. I. Page, B. 
Karampatsos, R. Torla, S. Burke, A. Bevilacova. Sixth Row: 
R. Clarke, W. Dunfee, D. Saari, D. Healy, R. Burns, J. Cran- 
dell, T. Edison, D. Poultney, E. Coate, L. Burgess, B. Pawluk. 
Seventh Row: G. Fleming, C. Rock, P. LaRoche, J. Siira, 
J. Madden. D. Garber, C. Romeo, F. Pluta, D. Faeber, D. 
Garber. R. Lively, C. Olsen. 



I 
I 




YESH— HENRY has two 
strong arms. 




WHAT WE pledges have to go through! 
187 





Lewis C. Hoff 
President 




THETA CHI 

Theta Chapter 1911 



Charles B. Curtis 
Vice-President 



First Row: M. Moynihan, L. Bush, R. Stedt, R. Ferrara, J. 
Zdanowicz, L. HofF, T. Richards, P. Chalmers, M. Kelly, D. 
Dyer. Second Row: A. Collins, R. Morassy, L. Charest, 
C. Dewallace, A. Johnson, T. Mahoney, R. Steward, C. Curtis, 
T. Dicola, E. Rodriques. Third Row: W. Glinsky, R. Philips, 
J. Gounaris, R. Farrell, N. Harris, B. Grimaldi, K. Clark, 
R. Woodbury, J. Bloom, J. Clayton, B. Graves, B. Russo. 



Fourth Row: B. MacCracken, A. Demauro, J. Bradley, R. 
Delafonto, T. Mendell, M. Mole, J. Wheeler, R. Ellis, W. 
Jones, R. Cavanaugh, M. Smith, R. Broggi. Fifth Row: J. 
Cassisy, D. Moschos, R. Wyberg, P. McAdam, M. Moschos, 
F. Morgan, P. Pisenski, R. Murphy, E. Forbush, B. Tucker, 
V. Rist, K. Tevekelian. 




188 







Ronald W. Stewart 
Treasurer 



Richard B. Stedt 
Secretary 



THETA CHI FRATERNITY WAS FOUNDED 
at Norwich University in 1856, with Theta Chap- 
ter, formerly Theta Phi, being initiated in 1911. The 
Chapter's present structure on North Pleasant Street, 
was built in 1935 with a new addition completed in 
1955. 

Theta Chi, celebrating its 50th Anniversary on 
campus, started off the year by winning the Home- 
coming Float Award and IFC touch-football compe- 
tition. This is just one of the areas of campus life where 
Theta Chi is represented; they have brothers in almost 
every varsity sport with captains of football, wrestling 
and basketball. Many members of extra-curricular ac- 
tivities, including Adelphia, Maroon Keys, Student 
Senate and Men's Judiciary, show Theta Chi's interest 
in their school as well as their fraternity. 




IT COULD BE A STICKUP . . . They might be praying for 
rain ... we give up, you figure it out! 

WELL I'LL BE DARNED! ... if it isn't Michael rowing his boat ashore. 






Janet L. Souza 
1st Vice-President 





Elizabeth L. Baldi 
2nd Vice-President 



Nancy P. Hanlon 
President 



ALPHA CHI OMEGA 

Delta Mu Chapter I96I 




Shirley P. Fishman 
Treasurer 



ALPHA CHI OMEGA, FOUNDED NATIONAL- 
i. LY in 1885, has been a member of the Massa- 
chusetts family of Greeks for only one short year. 
This first year as a national has, however, been a 
busy and exciting one. 

Occupying a house of our own for the first time, 
the sisters have enjoyed all the fun of sorority living, 
including midnight snacks, bridge playing, and just 
plain sitting around the living-room and enjoying them- 
selves. 




The more formal social events have also included 
exchange suppers, a Christmas party with the brothers 
of Alpha Gamma Rho, pledge formal at Wiggins and, 
of course, snow sculpture and float parade. 

Second semester was highlighted, as always, by the 
beginning of rush season and the addition of a fine 
group of freshmen to the ranks of Alpha Chi. Thus, 
one successful year draws to a close, as the sisters look 
forward to many more happy moments as members 
of the Massachusetts family of Greeks. 




THE MAKINGS of a winner 



THE SLEEPY heads of Alpha Chi and reet!! 



190 




jL;«ajii¥ . 






First Row: D. Ferrigno, L. Shepardson, M. Hargraves, S. Fish- 
man, J. Pineault, N. Hanlon, S. Colognesi, E. Baldi. M. Jordan, 
K. Hebert. Second Row: C. Howorth, S. Piantoni, E. Peck, M. 
Cyran, N. Harris, A. Williams, M. Cicchetti, J. Dickson, D. 
Bonner, D. Bednarz, R. Henderson. Third Row: J. Hirshberg, 
J. Mendrek, M. Fulton. B. McDonough, J. Taylor. M. Smith, 



M. Dix, J. Burke, E. Vyce, M. McDonald, C. Eggers, L. Rees. 
Fourth Row: J. Hyland, M. Sawyer, S. Gates, D. Tyrrell, S. 
Oakes, S. Ingalls, G. Walukevich, R. Romano, B. Gregory, M. 
Lyons, A. Ozolins, M. Keenan, L. Willis, C. Torto. Fifth Row: 
P. Salvati, G. Shultis, C. Jandris, L. Vander Werf, C. Evans, J. 
Hancock, M. Maloney. 



ifji a^f>^^ 0, A 





191 



mi^ 





Barbara Winslow 
President 




CHI OMEGA 

Iota Beta Chapter 1941 




Nancy Ridill 
Secretary 







Alice Lee Edgerton 
Vice-President 



Sandra D. Glass 
Treasurer 




ME POCAHONTAS— You Tonto? 




First Row: P. Purco, S. Glass, J. Askew, Mrs. Kathryn Young, S. 
O'Reilly, E. Leahy, M. Mallette. Second Row: L. Ritter, D. 
Washiewicz, R. Butterfield, K. Manning, C. Neal, B. DeMarco, 
L. Payzant, M. Brazao, P. Bourbonnais. Third Row: J. Weh- 
mann, C. McGrath, G. Nunes, M. Nickerson, B. Borges, M. 
Billings, N. Cassin, S. Brodsky, E. Verrier, J. Parker. Fourth 
Row: S. Lydon, J. Fitts, M. Lockhart, E. Diggle, P. Sweeney, 
J. Scott, S. Palmer, M. Policow. Fifth Row: L. Allen, K. Rea- 



gan, L. Peirce, A. Long, D. Downey, K. Eichhom, B. Policow. 
Sixth Row: N. Leach, B. Engel, L. Small, N. Fish, S. Ryan, 
D. Driscoll, J. Ryan, M. Jackson, R. Murphy. Seventh Row: 
K. Reid, A. Kelly, A. Burns, N. Carlyn, J. Reimer, P. Crane, 
K. Connolly, N. Speight, N. Pizzano, B. Kelley, P. Conway. 
Missing: A. Edgerton, B. Wood, P. Oliveira, C. Sherriff, J. 
Rubenstein, D. Sylvester, B. Robidoux. 



CHI OMEGA, THE SECOND LARGEST Na- 
tional Sorority here, was founded at the Uni- 
versity of Arkansas in 1895. The local chapter was 
established in 1941 and is located at 315 Lincoln 
Avenue. With an enthusiastic spirit, some hard work, 
and active participation the Chi O's were among the 
top three to place in the Homecoming Float Parade, 
Inter-Sorority Sing, and W,A.A. Swimming Meets. 
Other house activities included teas, exchange suppers, 
a Christmas party for underprivileged children, a co- 
operative civics project with the Amherst Women's 



Club, and several dinners with faculty and administra- 
tive guests. Pledge Formal, held at the Wycoff Coun- 
try Club, was, as usual, a big success. 

The House had the pleasure of sending its officers 
to Firesides, a convention for local chapters, held at 
the Statler Hotel in Boston. Various Chi O's have re- 
ceived mention in Who's Who, won top scholarship 
awards, and three girls have returned after a semester 
or two of study and travel in New Mexico, South 
America, and Europe. In all, the Chi O's have enjoyed 
an active, profitable, and fun-filled year. 



193 





Mary Jane Stak Anne Hall Gertrude Meyer Judy Iverson Janice Ingham 

President Vice-President Rec. Secretary Corr. Secretary Treasurer 



vAAct)A 



KAPPA ALPHA THETA 

Gamma Eta Chapter 1943 



First Row: S. Gruber, J. Wilkinson, M. DriscoU, N. Shurman, 
G. Myers, Mrs. Hamilton, A. Hall, A. Dearborn, J. Atwood, 
A. Griffin, K. Ryan. Second Row: N. Ciaschini, N. Mahlman, 
N. Stack, B. Lavalette, B. Hunter, E. LeMasurier, D. Comeau, 
J. Pariseau, E. Glynn, S. Bello, N. Downing, B. Guertin. Third 
Row: B. Murphy, R. Seward, S. Klein, D. Scandiffio, D. Dunn, 
M. Collins, N. King, E. Hastings, J. Hatcher, C. Creamer, A. 
Sutherland, R. LaBatte. Fourth Row: L. Carlo, T. Johnson, G. 



Sandgren, P. Cox, J. McKniff, B. Botelho, A. Huska, E. Proca- 
chini, L. Johnson, P. Burns, J. Buckley, G. Sird, M. Jewell. 
Fifth Row: K. Walsh, K. Peterson, J. Solitario, J. Hall, J. La- 
Flamme, J. Lyons, M. Olson, G. Spence, E. Compobasso, J. 
Kerr, A. Ruthel. Sixth Row: C. Kimball, M. Walters, J. Jones, 
S. DelaVega, A. Smith, B. Farrell, J. Saunders, B. St. Laurent, 
S. Blood, A. Sherman. 




^ -•^'^ "" ^ 'Kjv^, S n 



%MJXi 




194 





GEE whiz, kids . 



ON BEHALF of "Say No Evil" 
I demand restitution . . . 



I AST FALL THE THETAS returned to campus with 
J the usual mixed sentiments concerning summer's 
end and school's beginning. Those who were "in the 
know" established twisting lessons for their less for- 
tunate sisters — and some even attempted the intricate 
dance floor patterns of the "hully-gully," the "slop," 
and others. By Homecoming Weekend, with dance 
steps learned, the sisters combined to produce the 
float, "Paintin' a Fusia Victory," under Connie Cream- 
er's fine direction. They were all pleased that the 
efforts were not futile and the float became a first 
prizewinner! Later in the fall they gathered on the 
front lawn for the annual slave auction — this year 
with Julie Atwood and Nancy King as auctioneers, a 



new twist version was given — you guessed it, some of 
the slaves were sold as twisters. 

By December a few sisters tuned up to take part 
in the annual Sorority Sing. Thanks to the hard work 
of Pat Valiton and a /evv rehearsals, they placed second. 
The Christmas season began early with the annual 
Christmas party with AEPi. After the holidays, a more 
serious air settled over Theta as everyone began "book- 
ing it" for finals. However, with the beginning of the 
new semester, activity again increased with the ap- 
proach of rushing. By Winter Carnival Weekend, all 
welcomed the new pledges and began plans for Pledge 
Formal, held this year at the Sheraton Kimball. Need- 
less to say, all had a good time! 



195 





Carol Veno 
President 




Jean Havey 
Vice-President 



KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 

Delta Nu Chapter 1942 




Rochelle Bates 
Treasurer 



THE KAPPAS RETURNED THIS FALL antici- 
pating another happy and successful year. The 
sisters welcomed their new housemother, Mrs. Martin- 
dale from Syracuse, and prepared to take advantage of 
the many scholastic, extra-curricular and social oppor- 
tunities on campus. 

Carol Veno and Jean Havey recounted their ex- 
periences at National Convention held in Canada. The 
Kappas enjoyed several interesting dinner guests, in- 
cluding President and Mrs. Lederle and Miss Curtis. 



Under the able direction of their song chairman, they 
claimed the first prize plaque from the Intersorority 
Sing. 

The wearers of the key participated in an active 
social season with teas, exchange suppers and the 
annual Christmas party with the brothers of Tau Ep- 
silon Pi. After a busy rush period, they pledged fresh- 
men who were presented at the Pledge Formal at the 
Wycoff Country Club in Holyoke. Altogether, the Kap- 
pas have had a most enjoyable year. 




I'LL HAVE TO BUY a new dress to wear it with! 

196 







1 . . «. tf 





PETTICOAT is showing, Jean 



WE EAT the strangest meals! 



First Row: A. Ledwith, E. Stang, M. Adams, M. Wenzell, Mrs. 
Martindale, N. Clakson, E. Chomyn, B. Robicheau, C. Smith. 
Second Row: E. Wilson, M. Creanza, C. Stengle, H. Ladd, 
J. Mullin, M. Disano, B. Nurmey, D. Donovan, N. Kornetsky, 
B. Snyder, B. Lukow. Third Row: D. Gurness, C. Viens, B. 
Mercer, R. Harrison, C. Friar, J. Hanlon, C. McKenna, J. 
O'Leary, K. Meehan, L. Brilliant, A. Richards, L. Fisher. 
Fourth Row: E. Blumsack, R. Catalano, S. Fowler, J. Arnold, 
P. O'Connell, M. Ward, D. Pope, J. Rajecki, J. Havey, J. 



Simonds, E. Bernardo, C. Castellanos, N. Thompson. Fifth 
Row: P. Gillgut, B. Christo, S. Kangas, C. Goldrick, M. 
Carlson, D. Dunn, N. Niziak, J. Morgan, L. Doerr, P. Smith, 
P. Malliaros, B. Mens, M. Murray, G. Stockwell. Sixth Row: 
C. Veno, S. Sidney, C. Castellanos, J. Zalesky, J. Napolitano, 
J. Bruen, S. Russell, M. Graf, S. Davis, C. O'Connell, J. Alden, 
L. Pratt. Seventh Row: C. Esonis, D. Anderson, S. Jones, 
N. Palise, C. Hydes, L. Wall, D. Tarant. 




197 





Merrilee Atkins 
President 




Marquita Secino 
Vice-President 




LAMBDA DELTA 
PHI 

Alpha Chapter 1961 




Mary Heath 
Recording Secretary 



Carol Keirstead 
Corresponding Secretary 





Sarah Jean Carpenter 
Senior Treasurer 




Ruth Parley 
Junior Treasurer 



YEP— BEING IN that sub for 45 days with 
those guys didn't bother me a bit! 




JUST ONE big happy family— HA-HA-HA-HO-HEE- 
HEE-URF 



WE DID IT with our own little bagpipes! 



198 




First Row: M. Heath, C. Keirstead, M. Atkins, M. Secino, S. 
Carpenter, R. Perley. Second Row: P. Hynes, D. Loeser, L. 
Wilcox, S. Cooper. Third Row: P. Trabach, J. Shusta, S. Stock- 
haus, M. Zuretti, J. Bourgon, J. Miller, N. Andrade, B. Walker, 
J. Wood, K. Levin, M. Pelton. Fourth Row: B. Conlon, G. 



Cobb, L. Williams, D. Smith, E. Packard, J. Robinson, D. 
Achilla, S. Giordano, M. Marsella, B. Goldman, C. Zoia, S. 
May. Fifth Row: D. Matthews, B. Gerry, R. Potish, M. Whitney, 
V. Kochanowski, N. Flood, I. Budrewicz, J. Marble, J. Hull. 



A LPHA CHAPTER BEGAN THE YEAR coming 
-l\. back as pledges of the first national non-dis- 
criminatory sorority, Lambda Delta Phi. The national 
was formed in June, 1961, at a convention called by 
the UMass chapter. The constitution was presented to 
the respective administrations, and soon cries of "rati- 
fication" by the other chapters at the University of 
Minnesota, Boston University, and the University of 
Rhode Island were heard throughout the house. 

The new national was official. In December, the 
sisters were invited to the University of Rhode Island 
chapter for the national initiation and installation. The 
ideals of friendship, democracy, and non-discrimin- 
ation upon which the sorority had been founded in 
1950 were now firmly established. 



Everything was new, and the sisters were delighted 
to receive their sweatshirts, hats, and finally, in Jan- 
uary, their pins. In November, the scholarship tray for 
the highest sorority average was presented to the 
Lambda Phi's at the annual Pan-Hellenic Tea. Then, 
in January, another tea was held to introduce the new 
national to the campus. 

Of course, the girls were kept busy practising 
for the sorority sing, building a float for the Home- 
coming Parade, and enjoying the festivities of Winter 
Carnival. Their first place snow sculpture of "Donkey 
Serenade" added to the enjoyment of Winter Carnival 
Weekend. Everyone relaxed at the Lord Jeffrey for the 
annual formal honoring the new pledges. 



199 




Patricia Kraft 
President 






Sheila Woodworth 
Vice-President 




Elaine Cantrel 
Recording Secretary 



PI BETA PHI 

Massachusetts Beta 1944 



Deborah Read 



First Row: S. Herron, M. Trimble, E. Cantrell, D. Read, Mrs. 
Mahoney, S. Woodworth, C. Wojcik, D. Titus, E. Holland, A. 
Barton. Second Row: C. Ciepel, K. Creeden, R. Scally, J. 
Chiminello, S. Lemanis, J. Congdon, L. Wilcox, G. Nelson, B. 
Alcarese, T. Wright, P. Hall. Third Row: K. Fiddis, M. Hal- 
stead, M. Kirby, K. Osterberg, M. McQuinney, J. Smith, P. 
Chase, K. Kober, S. lossa, M. Gushing, S. Hanrahan, J. Rose. 
Fourth Row: L. Myers, G. Majewski, D. Goyle, L. Genari, M. 



Makinen, P. Stankiewitz, J. Carey, S. Matthews, M. Frost, D. 
Beerman, J. Webb, J. Crowell, D. Giarlone. Fifth Row: J. 
Dimock, J. Inghram, K. Lenkoski, E. Bamford, R. Hanna, G. 
Ziemak, B. Brent, G. Benvie, D. Mick, P. O'Donnell, R. 
O'Brien, P. Hutchinson, C. McDonough, L. Francescone. Sixth 
Row: P. Gully, A. Tibbetts, L. Schecterly, J. Kline, M. St. 
Aubin, L. Tanner, J. Kelly, J. Kearns, H. Van Kueran, B. 
Stone, R. Beck, P. Simmons, S. Edmonds, C. Townsley. 




200 



FALL, 1961, BROUGHT THE PI PHI'S many 
new and exciting changes to their house. The 
porch was torn down and a new study room added in 
its place. The "back room" became the new entrance 
and reception hall, and a fresh coat of paint topped 
off the renovations giving the Pi Phi's a new gray 
house. 

Socially, the sisters have had a busy season sprinkled 
with such events as exchange suppers, teas, Christmas 
parties, culminating in the pledge formal on March 10th 
held at the Coachlight Room of the Northampton Inn. 

The girls worked hard all fall preparing for the 
Inter-Sorority Sing and Declamation held in early 
December. Sue Lemanis was rewarded for her hard 
work and received third place in the Declamation. 
Also rewarding was the conferment of third place 
given to their snow sculpture on Winter Carnival 
Weekend. 

After a very successful rush season, the excitement 
of attending spring events at the University, and the 
long-awaited graduation of the seniors, the Pi Phi's 
are able to look back on a very happy and fruitful 
school year. 




OO LA LA , 




. . A LITTLE bit reckless! 



201 




SIGMA DELTA TAU 

Psi Chapter 1945 



THE EIGHTEEN YEARS of Psi Chapter of Sigma 
Delta Tau has been filled with activities of varied 
natures which have been beneficial to the scholastic, 
social, and fraternal aspects of the sisterhood. Psi 
chapter served as hostess for this year's Scholarship 
Tea for all sorority women. The SDT's were proud 
and happy to receive second place in the sorority 
competition in scholastic averages. SDT was also proud 
of its president, Sandra Segel, who received the annual 
scholarship award given to the most outstanding and 
deserving sorority woman. Miss Segel brought honors 
to her house also in her first prize winning presentation 
in the Sorority Declamation competition. 

A full schedule of exchange suppers with several 
fraternities and a Christmas party with Theta Chi 
kept the sisters busy and the year filled with fun and 
laughter. Several distinguished guests invited to the 
house during the past year have helped to bring a 
clearer understanding and sensivity to the role of a 
sorority woman in an educational and social com- 
munity. The Torch of Sigma Delta Tau has brought 
light to several phases of college living, not always 
evident to those in an unorganized atmosphere. 




SANTA CLAUS, huh— Who do you think 
you're kidding! 



15 INCHES around and solid muscle! 





Sandra Segel 
President 




Janice Joseph 
1st Vice-President 




Eileen Berenson 
2nd Vice-President 






Judith Izenberg 
Treasurer 



Gerda Brooks 
Corresponding Secretary 



Charlotte Rosenkrans 
Recording Secretary 



First Row: L. Crosby, C. Chessler, M. Levenson, E. Dawe, 
Mrs. Ryan, G. Presser, H. Feingold, J. Addelson, P. Hurst. 
Second Row: J. Louis, E. Kaplinsky, J. Searleman, P. Hughes, 

D. Lindberg, S. Esterquest, R. Fireman, R. Weinberg, B. 
Yaroslow, A. Posner. Third Row: M. Katseflf, W. Greene, N. 
Baker, B. Center, M. Langbort, L. Lederman, L. Bromfield, 

E. Berenson, M. Arnold, R. Ryer, F. Estner, J. Keane. 
Fourth Row: L. Rich, H. Katz, L. Schair, S. Glickman, D. 



Shapiro, I. Schwartz, P. Witovski, B. Schneider, R. Simons, 
J. Rosenberg, H. Gold, S. Lepowe, J. Zenis, V. Boorstein. 
Fifth Row: S. Morse, G. Freedlander, C. Levine, D. Crocker, 
S. Macycove, C. Langbort, M. Bash, S. Segel, G. Brooks, 
G. McCrensky, J. Joseph, C. Rosencrantz, J. Zimmerman. 
Sixth Row: I. Barron, J. Izenberg, J. Wilcox, B. Enstrom, E. 
Lief, J. Rosenthal. 




203 





SIGMA KAPPA 

Beta Eta Chapter 1943 




ROUND Robins. 



/ TOLD YOU she'd trump her partner's Ace 








^^■;<ftS''«^ 



ISN'T IT bee-yoo-ti-ful? 



204 




»#5a:.^-« ' - - »fe^v.:M^v.m/fe-m«MBtiiBiaMSit:^^^/B 



•i^^ it:-M-,A^imi.:ii 




0^ ^^ f^ ^f>\^ f> 



F/w/ i?oH'; A. Pierce, E. Prusky, L. Page, J. Ross (Sec), L. 
Murphy (Pres.), P- Howorth (2nd Vice Pres.), A. Podgorski 
(1st Vice Pres.), N. Stevens, M. Fuller, S. Knight. Second Row: 
N. Baron, P. Appicelli, M. Carroll, C. Geletka, P. Bradway, C. 
Price, M. Sylvia, F. Maziarz, C. Gardini, K. Rafferty. Third 
Row: J. Werner, W. Hall, A. Mawaka, C. Cangrilli, J. Mullaney, 
R. Lewis, C. Balutis, J. Saulnier, N. Sheldon, J. Knox, M. 
Kapinos. Fourth Row: R. Kirchner, S. Howe, S. Slayton, E. 



SIGMA KAPPA, ONE OF THE LARGEST na- 
tional sororities in the United States, and second 
largest at UMass, started the year off in the usual 
tradition of sororities on this campus — with a fire. It 
was hard to adapt to the new living quarters — the 
dorms — but first semester flew by and 19 Allen Street 
was soon ready for occupancy and the Sigmas made 
it their beautiful new home. 

The sisters enjoyed a year of fun and excitement. 
Exchange suppers and parties, building a float for 
Homecoming, and a prizewinning snow sculpture for 
Winter Carni, and participation in the annual Pan-Hel 
Sing and Declamation caused busy hours for many. 
Fun was mixed with study, though, and Sigma Kappa 
placed third among the sororities academically. 

After a successful rush season, both pledges and 
sisters enjoyed the annual Pledge Formal at Wiggins, 
and later in the spring. Initiation Banquet, both of 
which culminated an exciting year. 



Carlson, N. Bollman, M. Jarvela, 
Gwozdz, S. Clapper. Fifth Row: 
Bohlin, E. French, J. Boskiewicz, 
Arcardi, J. Labuzoski, E. Wilson, 
Quirk, J. Ditmars, G. Jensen, J. 
Gurka, E. Ricker, H. Campbell, C. 
J. Harron. 



M. Sullivan, E. Kfoury, T. 
J. Jaruela, P. Wickens, C. 
M. Mortimer, E. Osley, L. 

C. Hajjar. Sixth Row: D. 

Kowalski, M. Clapper, I. 
Kibitz, C. Johnson, C. Tarr, 




Elizabeth Murphy 
President 




Ann Podgorski 
1st Vice-President 




Patricia Howorth 
2nd Vice-President 




Jane Ross 
Recording Secretary 



205 




ORGANIZATIONS 




.'^' 




v^r>^»' 



A 



VXj, 



% 







9 




MANAGING EDITOR ANN HUSKA and EDITOR-IN- 
CHIEF ED RODRIGUEZ. 




The 1962 Index 

Marks The Culmination 

Of A Year Long Effort 



THERE WAS A TIME when a yearbook 
was simply a scrapbook: a collection of 
snapshots and a few humorous anecdotes such 
as "Silliest Sophomore" etc. Times have changed. 
It is now the staff's obligation to provide COM- 
PLETE and ACCURATE coverage of all facets 
of University life — quite a chore. The staff of 
the 1962 Index has attempted to do this. You 
will note that we have deviated somewhat from 
the past in some areas: some things you will 
hke; others will make you shake your head. 




ADMINISTRATION 

EDITOR 

BRINA SHNIDER 



Advertising Manager Al Savat, Marty Adam, Dave Casey, Business Man- 
ager. 




SENIOR EDITOR ROCHELLE BATES, ORGANIZA- 
TIONS EDITOR CHARLOTTE SIMONDISKI. 



208 




Bob Ireland, MARGE ST. AUBIN, GREEK EDITOR; Ann Mullin, Joyce 
Blum. 




Top Photo: Don Crasco, newly-appointed pho- 
tography editor, Al Dumas, Thea Brown, Mary 
^Donovan and friends. Below: Bob Chiesa, Buz 
^mith, Dianne Query, Jim Tauras, Don Starr, 
Deane Howard. 



These Photo Bugs Take Over 
3,000 Pictures A Year 



WHAT WOULD A YEARBOOK be without pic- 
tures? Clicking the shutter, developing the film, 
and making the prints: it all amounts to a monumental 
project especially where quality as well as quantity is 
desired. With over 3,000 pictures being taken and 
nearly a third of these being used in the book, the 
darkroom proves to be a very busy place. 




Photography Editor Don Witkoski. Paul Dowbitz, Exchange Editor. 
209 



\ 




AL BERMAN, Editor-in-Chief 




THE MASSACHUSETTS 
COLLEGIAN 




MARGE BOUVE, BETH PETER^N, MARY ROCHE, KAREN BUR- 
GESS, ANONYMOUS. M 



STEVE ARBIT (standing), BEN GORDON, BEV 
LANG 

THE MASSACHUSETTS COL- 
LEGIAN IS the official under- 
graduate newspaper of the University. It 
is completely uncensored, in that no 
member of the faculty or administration 
reads or passes judgement on any of the 
contents prior to publication. In addition 
to the student and faculty circulation, the 
Collegian has an outside subscription list 
numbering over 500. Also the paper is 
sent to all Massachusetts legislators, to 
the Deans of the other New England 
Land-Grant Colleges, and is exchanged 
with over 50 other Universities through- 
out the country and in three foreign 
countries. 

The Collegian publishes every Mon- 
day, Wednesday, and Friday with a staff 
of 100, and operates with a working bud- 
get of over $30,000 obtained through sub- 
scriptions, advertising and students senate 
appropriations. The newspaper is strictly 
an extra-curricular activity, and no staff 
member receives either financial reward 
or course credit for work done. This year, 
as in the past, the Collegian was awarded 
an honor rating by the Associated Col- 
legiate Press. 



210 





' , VV-Wf 



M. FEINGOLD, HOWIE FRISCH, STEVE POLINS. 



ANN MILLER, KAREN BURGESS, JOE BRADLEY. 




ROD CHARNEY, PAUL THEROUX, JIM TRELEASE. 




Sitting: MARY ROCHE. Standing: MARGE BOUVE, DAVE DAVIS, 
LARRY POPPLE, PETE HEELER. 




MEMBERS OF SEhi ATE— First Row: Delly Matthews, Doris 
Berry, Mary Donovan, Trudy Mahoney, Karen Reilly, Joan 
Labuzoski, Donna-Lee Bonner. Second Rgw: Pete Haebler, Bob 
Brauer, Abdul Samma, Betsy Robicheau, Linda Achenbach, 
Arthur Tacelli, President, Marilyn LeGoflf, Anne Griffin, 



Andrew D'Avanzo, Donald Cournoyer, Robert Broggi. Third 
Row: William Boyle, Fred Thurberg, Dave Leith, Dennis 
Patnaude, Steve Gray, Karol Kucinski, Albert Ford II, John 
Daly, Dana Clarke, Barry Jaye, Paul Donahue, Arnold George, 
James Blanchard, Ed Cass, Stephen Maskell. 



THE SENATE- Fo/V*- Of The Student Body 




THE MEETING APPEARS TO BE going well, as the senate members discuss the pros and 
cons of serving meals cafeteria-style at the University of Massachusetts Dining Commons. 
At last — a break for the students. 



212 




THE SENATE MEMBERS ATTENTIVELY listen as Linda Achenbach introduces a new bill for debate. 



THE AREAS OF INTEREST AND 
the responsible concern for Univer- 
sity activities shown by the members of 
the Student Senate this year have placed 
student government in a vital position on 
campus. 

The Senate this year matched funds 
given by the University to subsidize the 
first honor students program in the state. 
It also endorsed the Senate President to 
appear before the Joint House and Sen- 
ate Committee on Education on behalf 
of the Autonomy Bill. 

Among the more controversial issues 
raised, the Student Senate endorsed vol- 
untary ROTC, and sent the resolution 
to the Faculty Senate. 




ARTHUR "TEX" TACELLI EMPHASIZES the qualifications 
he feels are necessary for the position of President of the 
Student Senate. 



ADELPHl A— Senior Men's Honor Society 




ADELPHIA IS THE SENIOR MEN'S HONOR 
L. SOCIETY. It was founded in 1915 and each 
spring recognizes those 20 juniors and seniors who 
have distinguished themselves by their devoted service 
to the University through outstanding leadership abil- 
ity, and scholastic achievement. This year, Adelphia 
performed a major service to the University by initi- 
ating, organizing and carrying out the High School 
Honor Students Day, which will become a regular 
yearly project for future members. In addition, mem- 
bers have travelled throughout the state speaking at 
high schools and showing slides of the University. 

Also, Adelphia helps organize Legislator's Day, 
football rallies, dances. Campus Varieties, and fresh- 
men talks. Representatives are on the SUG Board, 
the University Assembly, Fine Arts Council and the 
Special Committee on Promising Entrants (SCOPE). 



AL BERMAN SEEMS RAl HER HAPPY as he is tapped 
by Jack Sweeney '61 at Honors Convocation. 
Stan Patz and Ben Gordon, co-workers on the Collegian 
with Al, look on. 

MEMBERS OF ADELPHIA — left to right— Joel Lerner, Stephan Shusterman, Bernard 
Murphy, Frederic Shotz, Paul Cassidy, Francis Lovejoy, Charles Curtis, Allan 
Berman, Arthur Tacelli, Wesley Honey 




214 





?^^^^^^^<^W^^:^^(^ 



MEMBERS OF MORTARBOARD— /e// to ;/g/i/— Merrilee Atkins, Patricia Conway, Alice 
Edgerton, Nancy Hanlon, Linda Achenbach, Diann Coyle, Sandra Segel, Deborah Read, 
Mary Jane Stack, Carol Veno. Missing: Donna Pope 



MORTAR BOARD— Women's Honor Society 



GAIL OSBALDESTON '61, taps the soon-to-be president 
of Mortar Board, Linda Achenbach, '62 




ISOGON IS THE LOCAL CHAPTER OF MOR- 
TAR BOARD, the national senior women's honor 
society, whose purpose is "to promote college loyalty, 
to advance the spirit of service and fellowship among 
university women, to promote and maintain a high 
standard of scholarship, to recognize and encourage 
leadership, and to stimulate and develop a finer type 
of college woman." 

Mortar Board was founded at Swarthmore College, 
Cornell University. The local chapter was installed at 
the University of Massachusetts on March 20, 1955. 
Each chapter is composed of a total of not less than 
five nor more than twenty-five girls from the senior 
class selected on the basis of service, scholarship, and 
leadership. The girls selected from the junior class are 
recognized at the Student Leader's Convocation in the 
spring. 



215 




MEMBERS OF MAROON KEY— First Row: Joe Cos- 
sano, Bill Theroux, Art Collins, Mike Moynihan, Corky 
Brickman. Second Row: John Yablonski, Tom Tyrer, 
Jr., Secretary, Charles Reid, Vice-President, Robert 
Tedoldi, President, Jim Bradley, Treasurer, Ray Kodzis, 



James Medeiros. Third Row: Dave Truesdell, Bob Aus- 
tin, Russ Feener, Al Rand, Paul Pisinski, Bill Kitchen, 
Barry Meunier, Michael Rubin. Missing: Paul Graham, 
Dick Philips, Chris Sideris, Terrence Murphy, Jim 
Bloom, Dr. Harlow, Advisor. 




MAROON KEYS 

THE MAROON KEY IS a sophomore honorary 
society composed of twenty-five men, who have 
displayed outstanding quahties of leadership, scholar- 
ship, and good character. They are nominated by the 
entire freshman class and "tapped" at the Student 
Leaders Convocation. 

The Maroon Key traditionally orients incoming 
freshmen into University life and assists at rallies, 
dances, and programs which are designed to strengthen 
all phases of student life. It also acts as an official host 
to all visiting athletic teams. 

This year, for the first time, the Maroon Key is 
playing major roles in both the Distinguished Visitors 
Program and High School Days at UMass. The Key, 
in co-operation with the Senate Elections Committee, 
is officiating at all dorm elections. 



BOB SLESINGER grins broadly as he turns 
his hat over to a future member of the Keys. 



SCROLLS 



SCROLLS IS THE HONORARY service or- 
ganization which gives recognition to women 
of leadership and scholarship in the sophomore 
class. The Scrolls strive to uphold and maintain 
the standards of high scholarship, cooperation 
and friendliness on this campus. The group co- 
operates with the Maroon Key in coordinating 
activities during freshmen orientation, ushering 
at various events and sponsoring scholarship- 
raising projects. 

Sophomore girls are selected by the incum- 
bents from a group elected by all freshmen 
women and are tapped at Student Leaders Con- 
vocation. The selection is based on scholarship, 
leadership, fellowship and an underlying enthusi- 
asm to work to fulfill these standards upholding 
the prestige of the group. 




MARIE MAKINEN turns in astonishment 
her to join the ranks of the new Scrolls. 



as Bobbie Hanna happily taps 




MEMBERS OF SCROLLS— fi>j/ Row: Margie Jordan, Ellie 
Stang, Ann Ledwith, Betty Mercer. Second Row: Judy Addel- 
son, Nancy Kornetsky, Margaret Walter, Linda Swenson, Sec- 
retary, Janice Reimer, President, Lee Wilcox, Vice-President, 



Barbara Murphy, Treasurer, Bev Christo. Tliird Row: Bonnie 
Hunter, Marie Makinen, Pat Stankiewicz, Lynda Bonney, Judy 
Fitts, Barbara Farrell, Barbara Kelley, Patricia Sweeney, Claire 
Goldrick, Edie Leahy. 



217 







MEMBERS OF REVELERS— Alice Pierce, Barbara 
Viera. Second Row: Barbara Snider, Rosemary Hussey, 
Pat Bourbonnais, Ed Hazlett, Neal Scott, President, 



Nancy King, Treasurer, Anne Hall, Vice-President. Tliird 
Row: Hog Wlyde, Jean Alden, Mike Feldman, Paul Ken- 
nett, William C. Hale, Paul Sibley. 




Those Happy Revelers 



REVELERS IS AN UPPERCLASS 
• honorary society whose main pur- 
pose is to stimulate and encourage fresh- 
man interest, spirit, participation, and 
leadership in campus activities. The 
Revelers work in conjunction with the 
Freshman Class Officers to provide fresh- 
men with more recreation and entertain- 
ment through Talent Nights and Fresh- 
men Picnics. They assist Adelphia with 
rallies and float parades; and most sig- 
nificantly Revelers help in presenting 
Campus Varieties, an original musical 
written, acted, and produced by Univer- 
sity students. 



AS PAUL SIBLEY taps a new Reveler Mike Feldman, the faces of those 
around him express pleasure, surprise, and even astonishment. 

218 




MEMBERS OF JUDICIARY— Barbara Biera, Janice Reimer, Jean Bruen, Diann Coyle, 
Secretary, Carol Veno, Chief Justice. 

Umass Has Its Own Supreme Court Too 



THE GENERAL COURT 
IS made up of members of 
the student body selected to act 
in conjunction with the Student 
Senate. Its primary purpose is 
to render decisions on any con- 
stitutional questions which may 
arise. 

The Court normally functions 
as two separate bodies, the 
Men's and Women's Judicial 
Boards. Each board tries viola- 
tions of the laws of the Univer- 
sity, discusses and weighs all evi- 
dence, and gives decisions which 
will best benefit the offender, the 
students, and the University. 




MEMBERS OF JUDICIARY— Edward Hammond. Bob Guerin, Gerry Anderson, Sec- 
retary, John Vento (standing), Fred Karshick, Chief Justice, William Donovan 



219 



'fl«Hj»- 




OUR WMUA RADIOMEN Jim Trelease and Barry Brooks, seem to be expressing mixed 
emotions about the action on the ball-court. Will he, or won't he, make the shot? 

WMUA— The Voice Of The Redmen 




YOU'VE ALMOST GOT IT right! Now, try just a little more inflection at 
the beginning of the sentence. Skull session with Judy Noren and Charlene 
Prentiss. 



220 




WMUA'S SHOES OFF SESSION certainly has 
a way of putting this young lady in a mellow 
mood. Why don't you try it? (Wrist watch by 
Omega). 



WMUA IS THE UNIVERSITY'S STU- 
DENT supported and student operated, 
non-commercial radio station located in the Engi- 
neering Building. It broadcasts daily during the 
school year and its membership is open to all 
students on a competitive basis. The station 
broadcasts at 91.1 P.M. and may be picked up 
in all dormitories and the surrounding area. 
WMUA serves the campus and the community 
through its programs, and supplies a training and 
learning center for those students interested in 
the many aspects of radio broadcasting. 




THROUGHOUT THE FINALS period, WMUA is proud to announce that 
it is presenting 24 hours of interrupted classical music. We honor all 
requests. 




MEMBERS OF WMVA—Firsi Row: Barbara Paradise, Jac- 
queline Lapointe. Second Row: Martha Nason, Eric Sandel, 
James O'Hearn, Niel Nevins, Dave Mainwaring, Ken Brophy, 



Anne Pinciss. Third Row: John Watullock, Jr., Howie Wain- 
stein, Joseph Ross, Paul Schneideiman, Tim Nevils, David 
Mitchell. 



221 




. J. jaBaP*3BKBB5S»i«E'?!?aS«SK9!^ 



First Row: Donna Knowlton, 64; Jane Purseglove, 62; William 
Monigle, 65; Richard Carroll, 65; Bruce Philbrick, 64; Byron 
McCarthy, 64; Peter Pelton, 62; John Moran, 64; Ralph 
Nichols, 62; Mary Lou Willard, 64; Raymond Stec, 65. Second 
Row: Nancy Harris, 63; Snellen Kone, 65; Robert Skiba, 
64; Sheila MuUane, 64; Patricia Anketell, 64; William Rohan, 
65; Esther Eisenberg, 65; Michael Rosen, 64; William Mohan, 
65; Joanna Gregory, 65; Richard Knopf, 65. Third Row: Lynda 
Taylor, 63; Virginia Sturtevant, 63; Nancy Dame, 63; Norma 
Wolfson, 64; Carole Merhar, 65; Elaine Prusky, 64; Linda 
Schechterle, 64; Virginia Corea, 65; Roy Milligan, 65; Fred- 
erick Fiskaali, 65; L. James Levine, 63. Fourth Row: Sallie 
Maki, 65; Louise Brainerd, 64; David Feindel, 65; Edward 



Broderick, 64; Gerald Myers, 65; Barry Coppinger, 65; Douglas 
Brothers, 65; Frederick Temple, 65; Sandra May, 64; David 
Siek, 64; Bernard Pitkin, 64. Fifth Row: Rainer Bertrams, 
65; Harrison Smiley, 64; Steven Sherman, 65; William Oldach, 
65; Norman Trump, 6'5; Stephen Klyce, 64; Paul Kennett, 
64; Ernest Patrikis, 65; Linda Cole, 65; Edward Schmidt, 65; 
Richard Sauvageau, 65. Sixth Row: Director Joseph Contino; 
Norman Seigel, 62; Sue Fitzgerald, 64; Sandra Glass, 62; 
Robert Small, 63; Susan O'Neill, 63; Diane Woodward, 64; 
Alice Pierce, 64; Howard Meltzer, 64; Ted Ufland, 65. 
Missing from picture: Margaret Carey, 65; Gerald Goldhaber, 
65; David Johnson, 65; Stuart Kessler, 65; Elizabeth Mercer, 
64; Charles Newhook, 63. 



The Redmen Marching Band— 
A Familiar Halftime Sight 

IT'S HALFTIME AGAIN and the Redmen Marching Band is on the field 
headed by the familiar Redmen Chief. The band, besides playing at home 
games, also travels to many games with the team to keep the spirits high in the 
Massachusetts camp. We must not forget their spiritous OOM-PAH-PAHs at 
the rallies either. 

The organization is open to all undergraduates proficient in a musical instru- 
ment. The attractive majorettes are chosen competitively each year. 



222 



Precisionettes 

These Girls Never ^^Get Out Of Line'' 



THESE GIRLS NEVER get out of line— lit- 
erally that is, because PRECISIONettes 
they are and PRECISION movements are their 
specialty. 

The group is open to all women students on a 
competitive basis. They display their precision 
marching and drilling usually at the halftime of 
football games. 





First Row: Marily Foley, (Captain); Patricia Conway, (Squad 
Leader); Jane Grant, (Squad Leader); Anne Leyden, (Squad 
Leader); Sarah-Jane Dion Peavy, (Squad Leader); Arlaine 
Anderson, (Squad Leader); Diana Carlson, Marilyn Billings, 
Gail Richey, Joan Boskiewicz, Charlotte Rosenkrans, June 
Crasco, Katherine Lenkoski, Sheela, Fowler, Marcia Frost. 
Second Row: Penelope Hatch, Carol Kline, Jo-Anne Veale, 
Karen Ploeger, Dolores Bednarz, Marcia Grueter, Mary Trav- 
ers, Marcia Policow, Joanne Solitario, Janet Crowell, Eunice 
Parisi, Merilee Carlson, Jeanne MuUaney, Deborah Read, Jan- 



ice Dimock. Third Row: Catherine Mycue, Joan Lovett, 
Patricia Gilgut, Beverly Botelho, Gail Sird, Nancy Leach, 
Paul Turco, Priscilla Burns, Gunta Austrins, Constance Curtis, 
Carol Roche, Lucille Allen, Joyce Traquair, Wendy Greene, 
Lucille Johnson. Fourth Row: Donald Witkoski, (Drill Mas- 
ter); Patricia Fielding, Mary McLaughlin, Geraldine Dow, 
Joan Campatelli, Barbara Gregory, Carolyn Mozden, Marjorie 
Olson, Judith Soule, Nancy Carlyn, Janet Wehtnann, Adrienne 
Allen, Marilyn Jackson, Ivan Stokes. Missing from Picture: 
Deborah Downey, Bob EUis. 



223 




Kneeling Alice Edgerton, John Nero Second Row: Dotty Donovan, Dave Yates, Diann 
Coyle, D. Bates, Barb Wood, Jean Zimmerman, Bob Lepp, Sheila Ryan, John Vento, Pat 
Bourbonnais. 




CHEERLEADERS 



OUR ENTHUSIASTIC CHEERLEADERS appear 
at nearly all sports events, parades, and rallies 
to promote campus spirit. 

In addition to their cheering both home and away, 
these agile undergraduate men and women are be- 
coming well-known for their tumbling. Routines off 
the baby trampoline, handsprings, shoulder rolls and 
pyramids can be seen at intervals during games and 
rallies. 

Tryouts are open to all freshmen men and women 
who are interested in leading and encouraging our 
teams on to victory. 



"I KNOW YOU'RE EXCITED, but next time, please 
be a little more careful. That's the only left ear that I 
have!" 




THIS IS THE BEST PART of your day — a time to relax in your own 
pool, and forget all pressing problems. Why don't you try this refreshing 
treat tonight in your pool? 



THE NAIADS IS A GIRL'S 
swimming precision group 
open to all University women 
through annual try-outs. The 
Naiads present two performances 
each year in which these talented 
swimmers execute colorful, syn- 
chronized routines to music. The 
girls are led by President Ruth 
Henderson and Miss Esther Wal- 
lace, advisor. 



NAIADS 



\ 




First Row: Judith Wolcott, Terry Price, Chris Merrill, Marcia 
Trimble, Mary Pelton, Ruth Perley, Joan Holleman, Bobbi 
Farinella, Ann Fryer, Susan Kaiser, Leah Shepardson. Sec- 
ond Row: Linda Bodwell, Betty Erker, Cynthia Ward, Barbara 
Quay, Carole Marsden, Ruth Henderson, President, Judy 
Williams, Gretchen Shultis, Janice Dimock, Marcia Frost, 



Gayle Gordon, Sally Billington. Third Row: Barbara Lundgren, 
Joy Gustafson, Sonja Anderson, Trudy Grinde, Geri Dow, 
Laura Ricketson, Judy Quirck, Judy Kelley, Pat Adams, Alice 
Delaney, Carol Dyer, Mary Jane Briggs, Raija Nuppola, 
Donna Wilbur, Barbara Koza, Linda Perley, Linda Morris, 
Pamela Salvati, Ruth Shepard, Bettina Botti. 



225 




MEMBERS OF YA-HOO STAFF- 
Ena; W. Honey, Third Triumvir. 



-T. Wilson, First Triumvir; J. Patten, Second Triimivir; 



The Yahoo— ^ Magazine For Happy Thinkers 



THE YA-HOO, a creation of Jonathan Swift, was originally a creature of nasty 
habits and little regard for the members of the human race. In fact, the Ya- 
Hoos that Gulliver encountered rather sullied his clothing, if not his soul, from 
their arboreal perches. The Ya-Hoo of today, however, has somewhat better man- 
ners, and a much improved aim. No longer does the Ya-Hoo vUify all and sundry, 
nor does the Ya-Hoo practice life in the trees. The Ya-Hoo now attacks only those 
deserving of it, and from a much greater height. 



226 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS CHORALE is an organization 
dedicated to the ideal of excellence in the performance and in the appreci- 
ation of fine choral music. It is open to all members of the University community 
who have an interest and more than average ability in choral singing. It provides an 
intensified study of choral music as well as opportunities for student conductors, 
accompanists, and soloists. Every spring the Chorale tours Massachusetts for sev- 
eral days, in addition to presenting several concerts on campus and in surrounding 
areas. 



The University Chorale 




MEMBERS OF CHORALE— Director: Dr. John King. First 
Row: Joan Janik, Linda Willis, Linda Russell, Judy Moore, 
Patricia Brown, Lynn Musgrave, Lucille Johnson, Virginia 
Carison, Carol Rose, Dianne Paskowsky, Lynn Christiansen. 
Second Row: Virginia Williams, Julie Young, Anne Lautzen- 
heiser, Paula Gould, Grace Fahey, Joan Holleman, Wayne 
Richards, Andrew Kim, Curtis Paine, David Amsden, Mar- 
guerite Kownslar, Lois Grady, Gail Brunelle, Charlotte Kim- 



ball, Evelyn Gregory. Third Row: Ellen Messenger, Anne 
Clinch, Ann Shutty, Donna Achille, Virginia Sturtevant, Rich- 
ard Shields, Lee Burgess, John Avery, Donald Paine, Robert 
Chnton, Elaine Carlson, Dorothy Barnes, Barbara Wood, 
Rosemary Brown. Fourth Row: Reverend Jere Berger, Joseph 
Hsu, Dr. Morriss Holmes, Norman Kennan, Grant Hirst, 
Russell Austin, Jeffery RanfiUa, Josiah Camp, Eugene Burgin, 
Marcia Keith, Lee Paine. 



227 




Ken Chase, Dave Finn, Ed Hazlett, Fran Lovejoy. Missing: Warren Ball. 



THE STATESMEN 



THE STATESMEN, THE ONLY ALL-MALE singing group on campus, have 
been feature performers for almost every type of occasion — from teas to 
Wiggin's "Coach Light" Room to Rockefeller Plaza and NBC-TV, with a rep- 
ertoire ranging from folk to modern. The group, under the direction of Fran 
Lovejoy, can tickle anyone's fancy. 

Membership is on a competitive basis and is open to all male undergraduates. 



228 



THE "MUSICALS" WERE 
organized in the spring of 
1961 by Jayne Hayden, Alsie 
Edgerton, and Francis Lovejoy 
under the guidance of the group's 
advisor, Mrs. Winifred Field. 
Tryouts were held and twelve 
girls were chosen. 

Rehearsals began immediately 
in September and the group made 
its first public appearance at the 
Interdorm Sing. Subsequently 
they appeared at the Senior Mix, 
the Eastern States Editors' Con- 
vention at Hotel Northampton, 
the banquet held for Amherst's 
new residents, President Led- 
erle's Faculty Dance and the 
I.F.C. Skits and many other 
places. 









THESE "GALS" HAVE A special way with a song, and they have dehghted 
the entire campus with their singing. No barber shop quartet ever looked 
like this! 



THE MUSIGALS-5/'w^, Sing, Sing 




Carol White, Doris Sylvester, Carol Scobie, Linda Gardner, Sue Spearen, Alsie Edgerton, 
Jayne Hayden, Merryl Donley, Barb Wood, Carolyn Sherriff, Jan Harron, Pat Oliveira. 



229 




OFFICERS — Christian Hosford, Paul Cwiklik, Jean Roanowicz. 



Operetta Guild features 1962 Production of "Oklahoma"' 




THE OPERETTA GUILD THIS YEAR pro- 
duced the musical play, "Oklahoma." The Guild 
under the direction of Doric Alviani began producing 
Broadway musicals in 1947. During this time the 
Guild has produced seyeral college premieres includ- 
ing Rodgers and Hammerstein's "South Pacific" and 
"Carousel." 



"WOULD YOU BELIEVE IT?" I've never seen a mouse 
that size before! It must be the air in this part of the country." 
Really the curtain call for "Oklahoma." 




230 



BEHIND THE SCENES, ail is not calm, as one as- 
piring actress nervously clasps and unclasps her hands. 



THE ROISTER DOISTERS is the 
campus drama society. It offers a 
creative outlet for students interested in 
the dramatic arts and fosters knowledge 
of all phases of the theatre. Membership 
is open to any interested student. 

During the 1961-62 season the Roister 
Bolsters presented "Volpone," directed 
by Miss Doris Abramson of the Speech 
department, with students in charge of 
lighting, make-up, costumes, publicity, 
and all other aspects of production. 




"O LORD, I IMPLORE THEE, lift this campus up from 
the depths of mud, slush, and snow, and give us dry, dry 
land once again." MICK BROADHURST in his starring role 
of Volpone. 



Roister Doisters Produce Outstanding 

Performance of "Volpone'' 




OFFICERS— Judith Noren. Jeffrey Hai: 
Elizabeth Smith. 



President. Missing: Robert Smith, John Kane, 



231 




First Row: D. Clifford, K. Racette, C. Hill, R. Hirtle, Com- 
mander, M. Rubin. Second Row: J. PeVaux, A. Carr, R. 
Stone, R. Maloy, J. Shea, W. Wilkinson, R. Kesselman, D. 
Shulman, L. Renaghan, E. Dowdy. Third Row: F. Mosakewicz, 



O. Pawluk, W. Southard, S. Glazer, W. Martin, J. Kooyoom- 
jian. Fourth Row: D. Ramos, R. Lupien, D. More, S. Wasser- 
sug, L. Porrazo, R. Wilson, G.Carvalho, R. Holt, D. French, 
J. Charm, D. Bachmann, S. Wolotsky. 



BAY STATE RIFLES 



THE BAY STATE RIFLES, the elite of the University's Ar- 
mored R.O.T.C. corps, is composed of undergraduate male 
students. 

The purpose of the team is to promote the interests of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts by participation in various public functions 
and drill competitions throughout the New England area. 

This year the team was commanded very ably by Cadet Major 
Robert W. Savoy, V.I. The team advisors were Captain A. T. 
Wilson and M/Sgt. E. J. Barringer. 



232 




Kneeling: G. Murano, F. Wilder, R. Moore, G. Salk, J. Earle, 
D. Moore, P. Goldberg. First Row: P. Cabana, Assistant Team 
Captain, W. Vander Burgh, R. Hatfield, T. Jekanowski, J. 
Marcuson, W. Wooley, P. Greenberg, D. Kasoflf, W. Whittam, 
K. Harmer, R. Doherty, A. Babain, Team Captain. Second 
Row: C. Spinney, R. Crocker, N. Condit, W. Phillips, R. 



Newburg, R. Lloyd, P. Casperson, C. Stidsen, D. Finn, P. 
Gorman, G. Davis. Third Row: P. Crotty, M. Lawlor, P. 
Ferenz, R. Bennett, J. Wantman, E. Grand, E. Hanson, M. 
Paris, A. Dec. Missing: H. Baker, D. Cannistro, D. Hunter, 
D. Munn, R. Norris, J. O'Brien. 



FLYING REDMEN 



THE FLYING REDMEN IS A voluntary organization open to 
men in the AFROTC curriculum. Members are chosen on the 
basis of their proficiency in drill. 

The Redmen have won the AFROTC New England and upstate 
New York armed drill team competition for 7 of the past 8 years. 
In addition, they have consistently placed in the upper third of 
teams throughout the coiyitry in the National Drill Team Com- 
petition held in conjunction with the annual Cherry Blossom Festival. 
They also perform locally, in parades, and at Westover Air Force 
Base. 

The team is led by Cadet Major Archie Babaian, the coach is 
Sgt. Edward Bates, and the team advisor is Captain Thomas KilHon. 



233 




Manas Kasemsap, Soesmono Kartono, Vir Agarwal. Standing: 
Abdul Samma, President, Asghar Mahdavian, Hooshmand 



Mottahedeh. Sealed: Hwen-Chen Liang, Beti Evans, Cavit Akin, 
Lim Chheang Chliuy, Amr Ismaih 



INTERNATIONAL CLUB 




THE INTERNATIONAL CLUB is 
composed of both foreign and Amer- 
ican students who promote international 
understanding through speakers, films, 
and slides. They also participate actively 
in the International Weekend held every 
year on campus. The club helps to create 
feelings of friendship among the many 
students who are far from home and are 
adapting themselves to a new and strange 
way of life. 



"I'M NOT SURE that it's worth it. When I think of those warm days at 
home, all this snow is more than I can take." 



234 



IN THE SPRING OF 1960, the initial 
plan and principles constituting the 
club were drawn up by Parker Shanahan. 
On August 18, 1960, the organization 
became incorporated. 

The club tries to promote an interest 
and awareness in the use and mainte- 
nance of aircraft for the pleasure, recre- 
ation and use of the members. 




"FIRST IT WAS MY car, and now it's my plane. Who says 
that there's been progress over the years?" 



The Flying Club Hopes 

To Put A Man In Orbit Before Year's End 




OFFICERS— Joseph Daly, Vice-President, Dorothy Lurie, Treasurer, Thomas Dodge, Pres- 
ident. Missing: Judy Mandel, Secretary, Jack Kelley. 



235 




THE OBJECTIVE of the 
honorary agricultural fra- 
ternity, Alpha Zeta, is the pro- 
motion of the profession of agri- 
culture. A.Z. sponsors a "Fresh- 
man Smoker" and awards a cer- 
tificate of merit to the outstand- 
ing freshman in agriculture. It 
operates an information booth at 
the Horticulture Show and the 
Open House; and it presents a 
program on professional job op- 
portunities in agricultural fields 
for students unable to decide 
their major field. 



ALPHA ZETA — First Row: David Fletcher, Arthur Costonis, Douglas Hawes, John Biello, 
Larry Arnold. Second Row: James Howarth, Philip Verrier, William McNamara, Douglas 
Arnold, Jeffrey Hall, Charles Brown, David Bungay, Sherril Ailtz. Third Row: Walter Mc- 
Partlin, John Swart, Peter Stanley, Francis Howarth, Henry Perkins, Robert Peoples, Jr., 
Robert Lucas. 



O MICRON NU is a national 
home economics honor so- 
ciety seeking scholarship, re- 
search, and leadership in this 
field. It was founded at Michigan 
State College in 1912 and its 
thirty-ninth chapter, Alpha Pi, 
was installed here at the Univer- 
sity in 1952. 




OMICRON NU — First Row: Patricia Conway, Linda Griffin, Ruby Harrison, President; Ruth 
Boicourt, Advisor. Second Row: Eleanor Bartlett, Alice Edgerton. Missing: Bonny Waye. 



PHI ETA SIGMA recognizes 
outstanding scholastic 
achievement in the freshman 
year. Founded at the University 
of Illinois on March 22, 1923, it 
was installed at the University of 
Massachusetts in March of 1955. 
Freshmen men are elected in the 
spring of each year on the basis 
of their first year's academic 
achievement. The advisors are 
Richard Kennedy and Dean Hop- 
kins. 




PHI ETA SIGMA— Walter Crotty, Paul Tesar, John Grybko, Robert Gusciora, Jim 
Bulger, Bill Munroe. 236 



ALPHA PHI OMEGA is an active service organization whose purpose is to 
^ assemble college men in the fellowship of the Scout Oath and Law, to develop 
friendship, and to promote service to humanity." 

This year Alpha Phi Omega held a booksale, allowing students to buy and sell 
used books at more favorable rates. The organization also is in charge of the annual 
float parade held during Homecoming Weekend and through their hard work the 
parade is run smoothly and successfully each year. 




ALPHA PHI OMEGA—First Row: Arthur Clark, 
David Mitchell, Lawrence Popple, William Wilkinson, 
Daniel Dwyer. Second Row: Edmund Rosenbaum, Al 
Obue, Richard Haynes, James Farrow, President; Alden 



Tuttle, Advisor; Dennis Lilly, Advisor; Jack Kooyoom- 
jian, Joseph Tryba. Third Row: Charles Foley, John 
Donovan, Norman Ryan, Paul Nowill, Jonathan Tuttle, 
Lorin Johnson, Ira Somerset, Charles Kelley. 



237 




First Row: Lois Fleishman, Vice-President, Rabbi Ruchames, Brina Shnider, Corresponding 
Secretary. Second Row: Joel Berkowitz, Treasurer, Alan Savat, President. Missing: Irma 
Barron, Recording Secretary. 

HILLEL FOUNDATION 

B'NAI BRITH HILLEL FOUNDATION provides the Jewish student with 
an opportunity for continued "away-from-home" observance of his faith 
as well as an opportunity for continued learning in areas of specific Jewish concern. 
The program encompasses religious, cultural, and social activities and includes 
lectures on a variety of topics. It also provides Holiday and Sabbath services, 
classes in Hebrew, Yiddish, and Jewish beliefs and customs, and suppers and 
breakfasts which bring a little bit of home to the campus. 

238 




OFFICERS — Rita Lisciotti, Executive Board, Mary Jane Papp, First Vice-President, Fred 
Dumas, Executive Board, Penny Matthews, Recording Secretary, Connie Creamer (standing). 
Corresponding Secretary. Missing: George Fisette, Treasurer, Bob Savoy, President. 



NEWMAN 
CLUB 



THE NEWMAN CLUB is 
organized to provide reli- 
gious, social, and educational 
well-being for all Roman Cath- 
olic students at the University. 
The varied program includes bi- 
monthly meetings with prominent 
speakers, a weelcly seminar, 
closed retreats, a Living Rosary 
at Christmas, and dormitory 
rosaries throughout the year. A 
Communion breakfast is held 
during Open House Weekend 
and selected students are spon- 
sored to a Newman School of 
Catholic Thought in June. A new 
Newman Center, currently under 
construction, will provide facili- 
ties for Masses, meetings, semi- 
nars, and social events. It is hoped 
that this will be opened in the 
early part of the fall of 1962. 



CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 



t; 



^HE PURPOSE of the 
Christian Association is 
to encourage the individual to 
challenge and search into the 
Christian faith; to develop a 
faith in Christ that has personal 
meaning; and to express his faith 
responsibly in every area of life, 
individually and in a fellowship 
committed to the fulfillment of 
these concerns." 

To fulfill this purpose, the 
Christian Association offers var- 
ied programs, activities, and pro- 
grams. Weekly vespers, non- 
credit religion courses, coffee 
hours, and Christmas and Lenten 
Vespers are just a few of the 
programs offered to the campus. 




OFFICERS — John Slattery, Treasurer, Susan Onksen, Secretary, Anne Hall (standing). Pub- 
licity, Dick Elliott, Sam Blythe, President, Nancy Gregory. Missing: Jan Taylor, Dorothy 
Lowe. 




Pirst Row: Barbara Gushing, Carolyn Oliver, John Wylde, Chairman, Deborah Read, Susan 
Sidney, Vice Chairman. Second Row: Alfred A. Brown, Clarence B. Shelnutt, Karl N. 
Hendrickson, Harold W. Watts, George W. Westcott, William D. Scott. 



S.U.G. 
BOARD 

THE STUDENT UNION 
Governing Board has a 
membership representing stu- 
dents and faculty. The Board es- 
tablishes all policies for the use 
of Union facilities and has the 
responsibility under the President 
and Board of Trustees of im- 
plementing these policies. The 
Board approves the operating 
budget of the Student Union and 
makes provisions for an Execu- 
tive Student Union Program 
Committee. The purpose of the 
Board is to see that a social, 
cultural, and educational pro- 
gram of activities and services 
are provided for the University 
students and the campus com- 
munity. 



PROGRAM COMMITTEE 



THE EXECUTIVE STU- 
DENT Union Program 
Committee coordinates all pro- 
grams that are run by the Pro- 
gram Committees and is actively 
involved in the selection, plan- 
ning, execution and evaluation of 
all new and existing programs. 
The committees together aim at 
presenting recreational, educa- 
tional, and cultural programs in 
the interest of the students and 
the campus community. With the 
assistance of a Program Coordin- 
ator the Committee strives to 
present a well-balanced program 
of activities in the Student Union. 




EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE— F/r.?/ Row: Susan Sidney, Karen Reilly, Susan O'Neill, Mar- 
ilyn Clapper, Judy Izenberg. Second Row: Barry Ravech, Sidney Feldman, Norm Sharp, 
Clarence Shelnutt, Program Coordinator. 

240 




OFFICERS — Raija Nuppola, Treasurer, June Crasco, Publicity Programs. Missing: Harriet Hawkins, Secretary, Robert Smith, 
Director, Nancy King, Concert Manager, Kathleen Kelley, Technical Director. 



CONCERT ASSOCIATION 



THE CONCERT ASSOCIATION SERVES the musical needs of the Uni- 
versity and members of area communities by bringing to campus professional 
artists in the field of serious music. Among the groups appearing on campus this 
year were Fred Waring, Carlos Montoya, and the Miimeapolis Symphony Orches- 
tra. 

The entire student body is considered to be a part of the Concert Association 
through the payment of a student tax. Any student may join the pohcy-forming 
Executive Board. 



241 



ENGINEERING COUNCIL 




THE ENGINEERING 
COUNCIL acts as a 
coordinating body between 
the faculty and the students. 
It is composed of one stu- 
dent from each of the engi- 
neering schools, chosen 
from the sophomore, junior, 
and senior classes. The 
CouncU also arranges all 
the Engineering Open 
House activities, and plans 
the Engineering dinner- 
dance which is held in the 
fall. 



MEMBERS OF ENGINEERING COUNCIL— Paul Tracy, Mary Ann McKay, Peter Swartz, 
Al Libardoni, Lee Miller, John Meyer, President, Owen Jones, Leonard Zimmer, Richard 
Babineau, William Rice, Gregory Erhard. 



ENGINEERING JOURNAL 



THE ENGINEERING 
JOURNAL is a quar- 
terly publication originating 
in the School of Engineer- 
ing. The publication informs 
students of recent technical 
developments, departmental 
information, and profes- 
sional society news. It is 
distributed to the engineer- 
ing and science buildings 
and dormitories. Member- 
ship is open to undergradu- 
ates majoring in science and 
engineering. 




MEMBERS OF ENGINEERING JOURNAL— f//i/ Row: Dale Kuhn, Walter Silvia, Robert 
Marcinkiewicz, Robert Piatoni, Thomas Doyle, William Ziemba. Second Row: Leo Harootyan, 
James Donahue, John Carrigan, Mary Ann McKay, John Campanale, Russell Couture, Richard 
MacDonald. Third Row: Frank Condez, Jr., Robert Caldwell, James Quance, Joseph Moynihan, 
T. Twarog, Jr., Peter Swartz, John Doyle, Clayton Senecal, Robert Simmons. 

242 




MEMBERS OF OUTING CLUB— Francis Howarth, Nancy West, Kenneth Stibolt, Barbara Baranowski, Eleanor Harring- 
ton, Leslie Bowker, President. Missing: Bruce Myers. 



OUTING CLUB 



THE OUTING CLUB has activities planned for nearly every weekend of the 
school year. One-day trips include hikes, cook-outs, bike-hikes, and spelunk- 
ing in the fall. A trip to Lake George for canoeing and camping is also enjoyed 
by many. Skiing and skating are enjoyed in the winter, and in the spring a sugar- 
eat, mountain-climbing, and cook-outs provide fun for everyone. Square dances 
with other colleges are held occasionally during the year. Non-members are welcome 
to participate in Outing Club activities. 



243 





^'lllrf^, 




First Row: Deena Ferrigno, Alice Pierce, Virginia Jenkins. Second Row: Marcia Bertozzi, 
Miclele King, Linda Streeter, Vice-President, Elaine Needham, President, Carol Kline, Sec- 
retary, Barbara Welsh, Historian. Third Row: Miss Eva Schiffer, Faculty Advisor, Julie 
Young, Dorothy Barnes, Barbara Murphy, Nancy Mello, Susan Black, Sandra Zarvis. Missing: 
Joan Doktor, Pamela Leger, Donna Morrison, Linda Schecterle, Treasurer, Eunice Le 
Masurier. 



ALPHA 
LAMBDA 
DELTA 



ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA, 
-Za. freshman women's honor 
society, started the school year 
with a new advisor. Miss Eva 
Schiffer of the German Depart- 
ment, and a fall initiation of 
four more girls from the class 
of 1964. In order to inaugurate 
a new program to alert freshmen 
to our existence and activities, 
two sophomore members as- 
sisted Dean Huntzberger of Arts 
and Science and Dean Purvis of 
Education, in their Pre-registra- 
tion convocations. We are hoping 
to welcome many new girls from 
the class of 1965 this spring. 



SIGMA 

GAMMA 
EPSILON 



« '-pHE SOCIETY of Sigma 
-L Gamma Epsilon has for its 
objectives the scholastic and sci- 
entific advancement of its mem- 
bers and the extension of the 
relations of friendship and as- 
sistance among colleges. Univer- 
sities, and scientific schools with 
recognized standing which are 
devoted to the advancement of 
the Earth Sciences." 




First Row: Jordan Makower, Kendall Lund, Arthur Needham, Joseph Gonthier, Albert 
Nelson, Herman Zimmerman, Jack Shroder. Second Row: Dave Sommers, John Peper, J. C. 
Moores, Jr., Carlos Carranga. 

244 



ETA 

KAPPA 

NU 



OUTSTANDING UNDER- 
GRADUATE Electrical 
Engineering students are elected 
to Eta Kappa Nu. This national 
honor society assists members in 
becoming better men in their 
profession and in their com- 
munity, and provides a construc- 
tive force for improving standards 
of both the Electral Engineering 
profession and its institutions of 
higher learning. 




First Row: Francis Konsevich, Leonard Zimmer, President, Chester Ozimina, Warren Fitz- 
gerald, Camillo Jacobs, Paul Tracy. Second Row: Robert Moreau, Douglas Holbrook, Charles 
Heath, Alfred Mochau, Jr. 



Hi ^ 


HJI^VJiHB 'IHH^MHI 


/-S ' '*" 




t f ■? f f f At f 


1' f 1 


^^^ 




w^^ 





First Row: P. Bellini, J. Adam, W. Abbott, P. Badavos, H. Waters, E. Daniel, C. Ozimina, 
V. Giupponi, L. Harootyan. Second Row: R. Babineau, L. Zimmer, M. Petronino, C. 
Guilfoyle, W. Rice, P. Tracy, J. Parker, O. Jones, A. Mochau, Jr., A. Sheinker, W. Fitz- 
gerald, C. Jacobs. Third Rovv: J. Rizos, R. Orenstein, G. Scott, P. Swartz, R. Kalita, F. 
Konsevich, F. Martson, C. Camp, F. Karshick, A. Rogers, G. LePine, C. Heath, D. Hol- 
brook, R. Racette, Jr., R. Moreau, P. Cooper, F. Stetson, Jr. 

245 



TAU 

BETA PI 



TAU BETA PI rec- 
ognizes those who 
have conferred honor upon 
their Alma Mater by dis- 
tinguished scholarship and 
exemplary character as stu- 
dents, or by their profes- 
sional attainments as alum- 
ni. The society also aims 
to foster a spirit of liberal 
culture in engineering col- 
leges. 

The Massachusetts Zeta 
Chapter was established at 
the University in 1956. 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS— Tony Lincoln, Vice-President; Bobbie Hanna, Secretary; Sandy 
Russell, Treasurer; Skip' Oakes, President. 



The Centennial Class Has A Big Job Ahead 



STUDENTS AT the University of Massachusetts have taken a keen interest 
in the forthcoming Centennial observances. An undergraduate group of about 
35 students, headed by John Gounaris of the Centennial Class of '63, has been 
functioning for over a year. 

The Committee has been working toward the orientation of future annual stu- 
dent activities and special events into the Centennial program for the 1962-63. 

Among the specific projects undertaken by the students in tribute to the Cen- 
tennial are: l.F.C. — Panhel History, in which the UM Interfraternity Council and 
the Panhellenic Society are jointly planning a booklet tracing the history of the 
fraternities and sororities on the campus, and the Centennial Scholarships, donated 
by the Student Committee in conjunction with the University Store and the P. J. 
Lorillard Tobacco Company. 



246 




FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS— Steve Reimer, Vice-President; Ritchie Weinberg, Sec- 
retary; Sue Glickman, Treasurer; Al Brann, President. 




SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS— Carol Esonis, Treasurer; Kim Wallace, 
President. Missing: Betty Mercer, Secretary; John Yablonski, Vice-President. 




ACADEMIC LIFE 




Governor John A. Volpe 



GOVERNOR VOLPE shown last year ad- 
dressing students and faculty at the inauguration 
of President Lederle. 




President 
Dr. John Lederle 
'^My Door Is 

Always Open^' 



IN HIS TWO YEARS at the 
University, President Lederle 
has been a busy individual cop- 
ing with the many problems as- 
sociated with progress. Busy as 
he is, he has always had time to 
listen to student views. 

To meet the higher education- 
al needs of the University, Pres- 
ident Lederle has advocated a 
policy of fiscal autonomy, a pol- 
icy designed to make autonomy 
commensurate with responsibil- 
ity. 




A WINTER SCENE with the President's residence in the background. 





Provost 



Gilbert L. Woodside, Provost 



PROVOST WOODSIDE RECEIVED HIS A.B. 
degree from De Pauw University, in Indiana; 
his M.A. degree and his PhD. from Harvard Univer- 
sity. He came here in 1936 as Assistant professor of 
Biology. After being Pre-Med. advisor for ten years, 
he became the head of the Department of Zoology in 
1948. He maintained this position until he was ap- 
pointed as Provost this year. 

His job lies in his responsibility for the entire aca- 
demic program for the University. He works with the 
deans of all the schools and colleges of the University 
with regard to curriculum and to the hiring and promot- 
ing of faculty. 

His interests include squash, tennis, hiking, and pho- 
tography. He goes on camping trips with his family, 
and has visited several National Parks. 




PROVOST WOODSIDE DOES RESEARCH on the 
curriculum for next year. 



252 



Secretary 



Mr. Gillespie is the Assistant to President 
Lederle as well as Secretary of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts. He previously 
worked as teacher and administrator with 
the University of Texas and East Central 
State College. He has written three books 
concerning his significant activity in the 
field of city and state government. 




Richard Doolan, Acting Secretary 



Kenneth Johnson, Treasurer 




Treasurer 



Mr. Johnson has been treasurer of the 
University since January, 1952. Before 
assuming that post, he was assistant to 
the provost at Champlain College of the 
State University of New York. In addi- 
tion to administrative posts, Mr. Johnson 
has taught college courses in business and 
industrial management. 



253 



,ti MAHiiH bTRLETER 

> WELLINGTON WHITNEY 

I WATLING BRADLEY '14 

ERT HEh 

,MUELi 

MONDI 

:th BP 



FORREST DEAN JONES 18 
ARTHUR VICTOR PETIT 18 
BROOKS WOODWOPTHJ? 

EDWIN PRINCE COQ 
f.LS'f ON ALMOND 
rnOMAS VVHITTY D' 
LAl'RENCE WASHBU 



juniM cuvici^ mf^r-i li 




A COFFEE HOUR provides the setting as Hugh Calkin, '61, assistant Alumni Director, 
Director Evan Johnston, and Senate President Arthur "Tex" Tacelli talk, over the problems of 
keeping up the interest of students after graduation. 

Through Their Mem Hall Office 

15^000 Alumni Keep In Touch 





T 



ALUMNI DIRECTOR EVAN JOHNSTON was a graduate of Massachusetts 
State College in 1950 with a major in mathematics. The former Navy Pilot, 
who saw action in Korea, now resides in Easthampton with his wife and two 
children. Evan, an ex-Massachusetts football player, is also Chairman of the 
Athletic Council at the University and Adviser to Adelphia. 



^HE ALUMNI OFFICE PRO- 
VIDES a connecting link between 
the past and present for approximately 
fifteen thousand graduates. Besides keep- 
ing an up to date file on each graduate — 
a monumental project — the office sends 
out to each of them the Alumnus maga- 
zine four times a year to keep them 
abreast of the latest developments. 
Among their other projects is the holding 
of three Memorial Lectures each year 
such as the Robert Frost appearance this 
year. The Alumni Association has also 
given financial assistance to the Massa- 
chusetts Review, the quarterly literary 
magazine. 

Their most recent effort has been a 
coffee hour to acquaint students with the 
many facets of this organization which is 
proving invaluable to students while they 
are in school and again after they gradu- 
ate. 




SOMETHING OLD— CAMPUS POND has 
been around in one form or another for 
many years. Back in 1867 it was merely a 
little stream which trickled across the barren 
campus. Besides being a picturesque sight in 
the summer it also provides students with a 
king-sized skating rink in winter time. 



Something Old—Something New 



SOMETHING NEW— Now that the enroll- 
ment at the University is reaching toward 
the seven-thousand mark it has become quite 
a problem caring for and curing all of the 
ills that students inevitably seem to get. To 
solve the problem, a spacious new infirmary 
with the most modern facilities has been 
built near Brooks dormitory to replace the 
cramped quarters at the old infirmary near 
Marshall Hall. 




' -^I^SE^*^^- ,^^*»aw^.it« 



255 



Miss Helen Curtis, Dean of Women, 
came to the University of Massachusetts 
in 1945. Before coming here, she was on 
the Dean's Staff in the women's college 
of Rutgers University. She attended Iowa 
State Teachers College and majored in 
Sociology. At Columbia University, she 
received her Master's Degree in Student 
Personnel Administration. Helping with 
the planning of the women's dormitories, 
and helping with the work of designing a 
new dining commons, are some of the 
many contributions of Dean Curtis. 

Music, sports, and international rela- 
tions take up some of Miss Curtis' spare 
time. She is also a great advocate of stu- 
dent-administration cooperation. 




Miss Helen Curtis, Dean of Women 



University 



Mrs. Isabelle Gonon, Assistant Dean of Women 




Mrs. Isabelle Gonon, Assistant Dean of 
Women, received her Bachelor's Degree 
at Mt. Holyoke College and her Master's 
Degree from Smith College. She also did 
other graduate work at Middlebury Col- 
lege, and at Bryn Mawr she was director 
of the French House. Later, she travelled 
abroad. 

Before coming to the University four 
years ago, Mrs. Gonon experienced per- 
sonnel work in industry as well as at oth- 
er universities. When time permits, she 
enjoys refinishing furniture and attend- 
ing auctions. 



256 




Robert S. Hopkins, Dean of Men 



Dean Hopkins, Dean of Men, 
graduated from Rutgers Univer- 
sity and received his Bachelor of 
Arts degree in Languages and 
Literature. He also received his 
Master's Degree in Education at 
Rutger's. Before coming here in 
1948, he was the Dean of New 
London Junior College. When he 
came here, he was appointed 
Dean of Men. 

Among his many Member- 
ships are: the F and A Masons, 
Society for the Advancement of 
Education, Phi Eta Sigma, and 
Retired Officers Association. 
Dean Hopkins enjoys anything 
associated with the North 
Woods, such as canoeing, hunt- 
ing, and moimtain climbing. 



Deans 



William H. Burkhardt, Jr., Assistant Dean of Men 




Assistant Dean of Men, William Burk- 
hardt, is a graduate of Emerson College, 
where he received his Bachelor of Arts 
degree in Enghsh and History. In 1959, 
he obtained his Master's Degree in Busi- 
ness Administration at the University of 
Massachusetts. In 1957 he was appoint- 
ed faculty resident at Van Meter, and in 
January, 1958, he received his position 
as Assistant Dean of Men. 

Mr. Burkhardt is an avid sailing en- 
thusiast and races his boat frequently. 
Among his other interests are traveling 
and reading. 





George E. Emery, Placement Officer 



David P. Lawrence, Assistant director of Placement 




Placement Officers 



Robert J. Morrissey, Director of Placement and Finan- 
cial Aid Services. 



Miss Carole A. Leland, Placement Officer for 
Women, is an indispensable person on our cam- 
pus. She went to Syracuse University and received 
her Bachelor of Arts degree in English. At Har- 
vard Graduate School, she received her Master's 
Degree in History and Philosophy of Education. 
Before coming here this year, she was guidance 
counselor and director of Student Activities at 
Sparta High School in New Jersey. Here, she is 
advisor to Mortar Board. Music, skiing, and 
camping are among her many hobbies. 



(P| JL ^■ 




258 



Registrars 




William C. Starkweatlier, Assistant Registrar; Donald W. Cadigan, Associate Registrar; Mar- 
shall O. Lanphear, Registrar. 



The job of the Registrars is quite a responsibility. 
Among their various jobs, is the task of keeping order 
in the near chaos of registration. They are in charge of 
arranging Counsehng Day, Pre-Registration Day, and 
Registration Day. If a student wishes to change his 
major, the Registrars have to handle it. If a student 
wishes to audit a course, the Registrars have to approve 
it. 

These men perform a tireless and much appreciated 
job. 



259 




MR. WILLIAM D. SCOTT has degrees from Marshall 
College (A.B. 1941) and the University of Michigan 
(M.A. 1948). He has previously been Director of the 
student unions at both the University of West Virginia 
and Texas Technical College. Besides having profes- 
sional affiliations, Rotary Club and Association of Col- 
lege Unions, he also is the superintendent of Sunday 
School in Amherst, a member of their Bi-Centennial 
Committee, and a Lieutenant Commander in the Naval 
Reserve. 



Mr. William Scott, Coordinator of Student Activities. 



Mr. Edward Buck, R.S.O. Financial Advisor. 





TO OUR 

STUDENT UNION 



MR. EDWARD BUCK, the financial adviser to the 
many RSO organizations, is a graduate of Amherst Col- 
lege where he received a B.A. degree. He later did gradu- 
ate work at Columbia and NYU. In the past he has been 
active in camping, scouting, community center activities 
and related fields. Mr. Buck's principal hobbies are 
gardening and landscape work. He is also a member of 
the faculty swimming group which meets three times a 
week. 



260 



ilMOSS 
7 30 PM 



ftBlO 7 30 




FATHER POWER, CATHOLIC CHAPLAIN of the 

University is a native of Worcester and was educated 
in Worcester schools. He received his A.B. degree at 
Georgetown University and attended the University of 
Montreal for five years — one year in the School of Phi- 
losophy and four years in the Seminary of Theology. 
In 1948, he was appointed full-time chaplain at the 
University and was made Diocesan Director of New- 
man Clubs for the Springfield Diocese. 



Reverend Seely, Protestant Chaplain. 



Father Power, Catholic Chaplain. 



Our Chaplains 



Rabbi Ruchames, Jewish Chaplain. 





REVEREND SEELY IS A GRADUATE OF Oberlin 
College in Ohio. From Oberlin, he was sent to Western 
China, where he worked in the English Department of a 
refugee school. In 1947, he returned to Oberlin for 
graduate work, and later spent three years at Yale doing 
work on the New Testament. Reverend Seely came to 
the University in 1954, where he took the position of 
Protestant Chaplain. 



RABBI RUCHAMES HAS BEEN A member of the Univer- 
sity for the past seventeen years. He is the chaplain for Am- 
herst and Smith Colleges as well. He attended New York City 
College, Columbia University, and the Jewish Institute of 
Religion, and has received his B.S.S.; M.A.; and Ph.D. de- 
grees. Rabbi Ruchames has written various books and articles 
including: Race, Jobs and a John Brown Reader. 



261 




Himy B. Kirshen, Dean of School of Business Administration. 



DEAN KIRSHEN WAS GRADU- 
ATED from Whitman College in 
1926, where he received a Bachelor of 
Science degree. He received his M.A. 
from Columbia and his Phd. from the 
University of Wisconsin. Before coming 
to the University in 1957, Dean Kirshen 
was a member of the faculty at the Uni- 
versity of Maine for twenty-eight years 
during which time he served as head of 
the departments of business, economics, 
and sociology. 

While doing graduate work in New 
York, he worked for a law firm. He 
has been a member of the Maine State 
Panel of Labor Mediators and a visiting 
professor of economics at the University 
of Wisconsin. In addition, during the 
summer of 1958, he was on the teaching 
staff of the Dartmouth program for Amer- 
ican Telephone Executives. 



SCHOOL OF 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



MASSACHUSETTS BUSINESS CONCERNS can 
look to the University as a prime source of 
personnel for the boom years ahead. Fully accredited, 
the School of Business Administration at present has 
600 undergraduate and graduate majors in its resident 
program and an additional 60 off campus. 

Established in 1948, the school was first headed by 
Dr. Philip L. Gamble, presently head of the Univer- 
sity's Department of Economics. 

In 1952, Dr. Gamble, as Acting Dean, was suc- 
ceeded by Dean Milo Kimball. During Dean Kim- 
ball's administration the Board of Trustees approved 
a graduate program which led to awarding of the first 
master of Business Administration degrees. 



In 1957, Dean Kimball resigned and was suc- 
ceeded by Dr. H. B. Kirshen. A former head of the 
department of business, economics, and sociology at 
the University of Maine, Dr. Kirshen had also served 
as an economic consultant with the Wage Stabilization 
Board, and had been a member of the Maine State 
Board of Labor Mediation. 

A growing list of activities has been provided by 
reorganization of the school. Among these activities 
are the annual retailing conference conducted by the 
school for Massachusetts businessmen, and internation- 
al programs in which 16 European business managers 
take a six-weeks course in junior executive training. 



262 




SOME BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION students uti- 
lize adding machines to work out finance problems. 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, John Anderson, shown holding a 
class in accounting. 



263 




Dean Hunsberger 



Dean 

Hunsberger 



DR. HUNSBERGER, A 
RELATIVE NEWCOM- 
ER to the University, came here 
in September, 1960 as head of the 
Chemistry Department. He be- 
came the Dean of Arts and Sci- 
ences in March of 1961. 

Originally from Peimsylvania, 
he received his B.S., M.S., and 
Ph.D. at Lehigh University. Be- 
fore his work at the University, 
he taught at Antioch College and 
Fordham University. 

At present, besides his posi- 
tion as Dean, Dr. Hunsberger 
is continuing research in Chem- 
istry and teaching occasional 
courses. 



THE COLLEGE OF 
ARTS AND SCIENCES 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES offers instruction in the fine arts, 
the humanities, the social sciences, the natural sciences, and mathematics both 
for students enrolled in the College and for those in other undergraduate divisions of 
the University. The program provides for the breadth of intellectual development 
essential to a liberal education and for concentration which is the necessary foun- 
dation for competence in a selected discipline. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree may be earned by students majoring in any divi- 
sion of the College. The Bachelor of Science degree may be earned by students 
in the natural sciences or mathematics. 



264 





MODERN BARTLETT HALL provides the setting for 
these language labs. These labs give students the op- 
portunity to listen to a language being spoken on tape 
and also to their own efforts. 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH Stanley Koehler 
shown above with one of his students, Carol Veno, '62. 

GOESSMAN LABORATORY, where chemistry students may 
utilize the latest facilities in chemistry. Chemical engineering 
students, although not part of the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences, also use its facilities. 









J^ii- 




GEORGE A. MARSTON, DEAN 
OF THE SCHOOL OF ENGI- 
NEERING, came to the University in 
1933. Before becoming the Dean of En- 
gineering in 1947, he instructed Math, 
Engineering, and Civil Engineering at 
the University. He obtained his Bachelor 
of Science degree at Worcester Polytech- 
nic Institute, his Master's Degree in hy- 
draulics at the University of Iowa and 
has received an Honorary Doctorate de- 
gree in Engineering from Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute. 

Outside the realm of engineering, 
Dean Marston is a Colonel in the United 
States Naval Reserve and has an inter- 
est in hiking, tennis, and gardening. 




Dean Marston, School of Engineering. 



Employment Seeking Engineering Seniors 

Play Host To Over 200 Companies 



PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS are being 
completed for a major addition to the Main 
Engineering Building. A new Engineering Shop 
and Laboratory is under construction northwest 
of Gunness. 

A major research contract with the Bureau of 
Ships of the Navy on "Effects of Nuclear Blasts 
on Ship Structures" has been undertaken in the 
Civil Engineering Department with Dr. M. P. 
White and Professor F. J. DZialo as project di- 



rectors. In October of 1959, all five of ourEngi- 
neering Curricula, namely. Chemical, Civil, Elec- 
trical, Mechanical, and the Industrial option, 
were reaccredited. 

Also, in 1960, the average starting salary of 
our Engineering graduates was $550 per month. 
This year it looks as though it will be about four 
percent higher. About two hundred companies 
and organizations are recruiting on campus for 
engineers this year. 



266 




THE NEW $800,000 ENGINEERING SHOPS LABORATORY, now nearing completion, 
will contain over 20,000 square feet of floor space available for teaching and laboratory work. 
The addition of this new laboratory will help to centralize many of the facilities of the 
rapidly increasing scope of the Engineering school. 




GUNNESS LABORATORY, BUILT IN 1948, is used primarily for laboratory work, an 
example being a large and complete electrical machinery lab where students may supplement 
their motor and generator theory with actual use of these devices. 







PLAN FOR THE NEW MEN'S PHYSICAL EDUCATION BUILDING, which will be 
constructed in the near future. 



MEN'S PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



THE SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCA- 
TION offers major areas of professional 
preparation in Physical Education and Recrea- 
tion Leadership and provides a broad program 
of Physical Education for all freshmen and sopho- 
more students. The administration of an exten- 
sive program of Intercollegiate and Intramural 



Athletics is under the direction of the School. 

The major programs in Physical Education are 
designed to prepare men and women for careers 
in teaching physical education and in elected 
minor academic fields in elementary and second- 
ary schools. 



Warren P. McGuirk, Dean of the School of Physical Education. 



DEAN McGUIRK GRADUATED 
FROM Boston College in 1929, 
and attended Boston University Gradu- 
ate School where he received his Ed.M. 
in Physical Education. He taught Gen- 
eral Science at Maiden High School and 
was Director of Physical Education and 
athletics, as well. At the Naval Academy 
in Annapolis, Maryland, he received in- 
doctrination in Naval Aviation Physical 
Training. Among the many clubs and or- 
ganizations Dean McGuirk belongs to 
are: the Massachusetts State Coaches' 
Association; the Gridiron Club of Bos- 
ton; and the Boston College Variety 
Club, of which he was the first president. 





""^^s.— I- — — • 



Ruth J. Totman, Head of Department of Women's 
Physical Education. 



MISS RUTH TOTMAN, HEAD 
OF the Department of Physical 
Education for Women is a graduate of 
the Sargent School for Physical Educa- 
tion. She received her B.S. degree from 
Douglass College and her Masters in 
Education from the University of Pitts- 
burgh. Miss Totman came to the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts in 1943, having 
taught previously in New York, Penn- 
sylvania, and New Jersey. Among her 
favorite pastimes is gardening. 



WOMEN'S PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



OUR U. MASS. GIRLS FIGHT over the ball in this LaCrosse game. 



THE COURSES IN PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION are planned to pre- 
pare women students for professional 
careers. Special attention is given to pre- 
paring teachers for elementary and sec- 
ondary schools in both physical and 
health education. The graduate wiU also 
qualify for teaching sports and dance in 
social agencies, industrial plants, civic 
centers, and camps. The curriculum gives 
a broad general background as well as 
the professional preparation. There is 
opportunity for individual selection in 
order to provide a minor. 





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Dean Purvis, School of Education. 



DEAN PURVIS at- 
tended the Univer- 
sity of New Brunswick 
where he received his A.B. 
degree. At Harvard Uni- 
versity he received his 
Ph.D. and his ED.D. de- 
grees. He was a teacher 
and a principal of schools 
in New Brunswick before 
coming to the University 
of Massachusetts in 1936. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION moved into its 
new quarters in September, 1961. In addition 
to the offices and classrooms of the School of Educa- 
tion the new building also houses a Reading Clinic, 
an Audio-Visual Center and the elementary educa- 
tion Laboratory School which is used for demonstra- 
tion, observation and research by the elementary edu- 
cation majors. 

A unique feature of the Laboratory School is the 



upstair corridor from which students can observe the 
elementary school classes through one-way glass, and 
the use of closed-circuit television for observation of 
classes and for the teaching of special lessons. 

Student programs are available in both elementary 
and secondary school teaching on the undergraduate 
level and in training in guidance, administration, super- 
vision, audio-visual education and reading consultant 
on the graduate level. 



270 




EXCHANGE STUDENTS FROM FLORIDA State University talk with Arltin D. Barfield, 
Jr., Assistant Professor of Education. They are: Professor Barfield; Nancy Frazier, Sophomore 
from Atlanta; Judy Finney, Junior from St. Petersburg; Jerilynn Commer, Sophomore from 
St. Petersburg. 



THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION'S modern building, completed in 1961. 





Dr. Arless Spielman 



THE HOME OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

can be seen in the background. Stockbridge Hall, erected in 
1914, also houses Bowker Auditorium, scene of all major 
campus dramatic productions such as Oklahoma, put on this 
year by the Operetta Guild. 



Dean Spielman 



ON JULY 1, 1961, A NOTED RE- 
SEARCHER, Dr. Arless Spiel- 
man, was named as Dean of the College 
of Agriculture to succeed Dr. Dale Siel- 
ing. Dr. Spielman, who is a specialist 
in animal physiology and nutrition, will 
also serve as Director of the Massachu- 
setts Experimental Station and Director 
of the Cooperative Extension Service. 




272 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 




THE COLLEGE OF AGRICUL- 
TURE at the University of Massa- 
chusetts has been an integral part of the 
University for many years but it was not 
until May, 1955 that it was officially as- 
signed college status. Its organization 
and programs are now divided into four 
major divisions: Instruction, Reasearch, 
Extension, and Control. The college of- 
fers both a four year and a two year 
course of study designed to train people 
needed for the great agricultural and 
food industries. 

The Experimental Station was estab- 
lished in 1887 to provide the research 
needed to improve the agricultural indus- 
try. The Cooperative Extension Service, 
estabhshed in 1909, extends the scien- 
tific, technical and cultural resources of 
the University for the solving of the many 
agricultural problems which exist today. 



ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY STUDENT 
Jim Downey transfers mosquitoes from rearing cages to test 
containers in determining the effectiveness of insecticides. 




DAIRY AND ANIMAL SCIENCE RESEARCH with Jack Beam, a graduate 
student, preparing a solution for the testing of pesticide residues in milk. 




Lt. Colonel Albert W. Aykroyd, Military Science. 



IT. COLONEL ALBERT W. AYK- 
-/ ROYD IS the new professor of 
Military Science at the University. After 
graduating from the University of Massa- 
chusetts in 1941, he was commissioned 
a second Lieutenant in the reserve 
Cavalry Armor School. During World 
War II the Colonel served in Europe, 
from 1948 until 1952 he was in Japan, 
and in the Korean conflict he served in 
the second Infantry Division in that 
country. His last tour of duty was from 
1957 to 1961 in Europe. 



MEN OF THE MILITARY 



Colonel John C. Marchant, Air Science. 



COLONEL JOHN C. MAR- 
CHANT, HEAD OF AIR 
SCIENCE, came to the Univer- 
sity in 1928. He received his 
earlier training at the National 
University Law School in Wash- 
ington, D. C; and at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. In 1951, 
he became a Colonel. He served 
in the southwest Pacific and in 
Panama, and has been awarded 
the Presidential Citation. The 
colonel is a member of the 
George Washington Law Asso- 
ciation and Supreme Court of 
the United States. 




274 




ARMY MEN discuss military maneuvers. 



COLONEL MARCHANT INFORMS the students on the position of the 
military in the current scene as it relates to future. 



RO.T.C. PROVIDES BASIC 
TRAINING in leadership and citi- 
zenship. It is the means by which young 
men may assure themselves that their 
military service is performed in commis- 
sioned status. The second two years of 
R.O.T.C. are not only elective, but selec- 
tive as well. The best qualified volunteers 
are permitted to continue on to a reserve 
commission. Participation in the Reserve 
Officers Training Corps has notable ef- 
fect on character development. It dis- 
closes to the Army and Air Force exist- 
ing officer material and potential leaders. 




275 




Dean M. A. Maher, Dean of School of Nursing. 



AFTER GRADUATION 
^ FROM ROBINSON SEM- 
INARY IN EXETER, New 
Hampshire, Miss Mahar entered 
the Rhode Island Hospital School 
of Nursing. She completed the 
requirements for her M.A. degree 
through study at Simmons Col- 
lege and at Teachers College, Co- 
lumbia University. 

Her early professional experi- 
ences as a teacher and super- 
visor at the Strong Memorial 
School of Nursing, as well as her 
own school of nursing in Rhode 
Island have provided her with a 
background which has been used 
in the various roles in which she 
has served nursing. 

In October, 1953, she as- 
sumed the responsibility of de- 
veloping a basic nursing pro- 
gram at the University of Massa- 
chusetts. 



School of Nursing Begun In 1954l Now Over 200 
Students Enrolled 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING, initiated in 
1954, has shown a progressive growth so 
that at present there are over one hundred stu- 
dents enrolled. 

Since the estabhshment of the School, its stu- 
dents have been very active in student nursing 
organizations. The School has annually partici- 
pated in the National Association of Student 



Nurses. 

Graduates from the nursing program are eligi- 
ble for the licensing examinations for registration 
in any state. The graduates of this program are 
presently employed in public health, psychiatric, 
medical, and surgical nursing throughout the 
country. 



276 



I Jr. NIEDERPRUEM came 
to Massachusetts from Michigan 
State University where she was 
Professor of Home Economics. 
She received her B.S. Degree at 
Buffalo, New York; and her M.A. 
from New York University. At 
the University of Michigan, she 
received her Ph.D. She served 
as Head of the Department of 
Home Economics at the College 
of St. Elizabeth in New Jersey 
and later as principal of Girls' 
Vocational and Home Econom- 
ics Department at the New Jer- 
sey School for the Deaf. In a 
project jointly sponsored by 
Michigan State University and 
the National Retail Merchants 
Association, she recently 
directed research in determining 
the most effective type of college 
education for executive careers 
in retailing and discovering how 
stores can improve their training 
programs for executives. 




Dr. Marion A. Niederpruem, Dean of School of Home Economics. 



School of Home Economics Provides Professionalism 
in Nutrition^ Fashion 



THE SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 
offers an area of study which applies the 
basic principles of arts and sciences to enrich the 
curricula that provide professional competence 
in the areas of Foods and Nutrition, Clothing- 
Textiles and Related Arts and Home Economics 
Education. Career opportunities abound in all 
fields. Specifically, the Foods and Nutrition op- 
tions provide career opportunities for dietitians in 



various types of food services, for nutritionists in 
community and social welfare agencies and for 
Home Economists in the food industry and allied 
enterprises. Stimulating and creative opportuni- 
ties available to the Clothing, Textiles and Re- 
lated Arts major are found in the field of Fash- 
ion — through the avenues of retailing, promotion, 
and related business. 



277 




SENIORS 



H p. 




^:^--m^ 




DR. JOHN R. VAN STEEMBERG 



WE MIGHT SAY that there are 
two types of advisers, the one who 
seems to be omnipresent in class activi- 
ties, and again the one who gives the 
class a disinterested free rein. 

Luckily the Class of '62 has had 
neither, but instead has had a man will- 
ing to go along with most ideas but at the 
same time who insured that mature ideas 
would prevail. 

Dr. Van Steemberg received his M.A. 
from the University of Chicago and later 
his Ph.D. from Harvard University. Pres- 
ently he is an instructor of History. 
Knowing Dr. Van's opinions on a basket- 
ful of platitudes, the Class of '62 would 
like to gather up all its thoughts into a 
simple "thank you." 



Dr. Van— Adviser To The Class of '62 



GEORGE, DR. VAN STEEMBERG'S canine friend, decided that he would also like to 
have his picture in this year's Index. 




Senior 

Class Officers 






1. Sandra Segel 2. Merrilee Atkins 3. Deb- 
orah Read 4. Benjamin Gordon 5. Nancy 
Pizzano 6. Charles Curtis 7. Jean Alden 
8. Bernard Murphy 9. Rosemary Hussey 
10. Carol Veno 11. Edward Rodriguez 
12. Marilyn Clapper 
14. Elizabeth Schneck 
Frederick Karschick 
18. Linda Achenbach 
Kevin Judge 21. Carmen Scarpa 22. Nan- 
cy King. 23. Francis Lovejoy 24. Wesley 
Honey 25. Suzan Sidney 26. John Mc- 
Cormick 27. Arthur Tacelli 28. Diann 
Coyle 29. Richard Greene 30. Steve Shus- 
terman 31. Alice Edgerton 32. Joel Ler- 
ner 33. Mary Jane Stack 34. Linda Grif- 
fin. 
Missing: Frederic Shotz, Paul Cassidy 



13. Patricia Conway 

15. Ed Hazlett 16. 

17. Allan Berman 

19. John Wylde 20. 



Who's Who In American Universities And Colleges 



282 






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Graduation — The Culmination of An Experience 



283 




WILLIAM H. ABBOTT LINDA L. ACHENBACH 




JAMES A. ADAM 



DHARAM V. AGARWAL 




WILLIAM H. ABBOTT 

683 Park Street, Attleboro, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

Chemical Engineering Club 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Student Chris- 
tian Association 1; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 3, 4; Hon- 
ors Work 4. 

LINDA L. ACHENBACH 

128 South Hanover Street, Hummelstown, Pennsylvania 

Marketing 

Marketing Club 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Senate 1, 2, 3, 4, Senator-at-Large 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, Treas- 
urer 3, Vice President 4; Mortar Board 4, President 4; Dean's 
List 2, 3; Carnival Committee 2, 3; S.W.A.P. 2, 3, Committee 
Chairman 3; R.S.O. Committee 3, 4; Distinguished Visitors' 
Program 4, Chairman 4; Collegian Publishing Board 3, 4. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 



JAMES A. ADAM 

34 Garrison Road, Wellesley, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

Chemical Engineering Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Asso- 
ciation 1, 4; Gymnastics 1, 2, 3, 4; Tau Beta Phi 3, 4; Dean's 
List 1, 2; Honors Work 4. 

DHARAM V. AGARWAL 

3671 Timber Market, Ambala Cantt, Punjab, India 

Electrical Engineering 

Electrical Engineering Club 4; International Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Square Dance Club 1, 2, 3; Gymnastics Team 2. 



JEAN ALDEN 



BARBARA R. ALCARESE 



LEON AKSIONCZYK 

1 19 Patton Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Civil Engineering Club 1, 2, 3, 4; International Club 4; Inter- 
national Club 4; Judson Fellowship 1; Student Christian Asso- 
ciation 1, 2, 3, 4; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Wrestling 1; 
Soccer 3, 4; Flying Redmen 1, 2; American Society of Civil En- 
gineers 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 3, 4. 

DONALD J. ALACONIS 
Schoolhouse Rd., Tolland, Mass. 
Management 

Civil Engineering Club 1, 2; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3; Pledge 
Chairman 2, Interfraternity Council 2, 3; Cross Country 1; 
Bay State Rifles 1, 2; Carnival Ball Committee 3. 



JEAN ALDEN 

Aucoot Cove, Mattapoisett, Massachusetts 

English 

Index 3; Chorale 1, 2, 3, 4; University Singers 1; Operetta 
Guild 1, 2, 3, 4; Campus Varieties 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic 
Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Student Union Special Events Committee 1, 2; Dorm Social 
Chairman 2; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Music Chairman 
3, Marshall 4; Revelers 4; Carnival Committee 3; Panhellenic 
Chorus 4, Business Manager 4; Opera Workshop 4. 



BARBARA ALCARESE 

Farmington Circle, Marlborough, Massachusetts 

Government 

284 



EUDOXEA ALIFERIS 

6 Sargents Court, Lynn, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

German Club 2, 3; International Club 4; Phi Kappa Phi 3, 4; 
Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Eastern Orthodox Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Fenc- 
ing Club 4, Secretary-Treasurer 4; Zoology Club 2, 3; Alpha 
Lambda Delta 1, 2, 3, 4. 

DONALD R. ALLEN 

48 Fairmont Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 
History 



French Club 3; Dean's List 3, 
quium 2; History Club 3, 4. 



4; Sophomore Honors CoUo- 



RACHEL E. ALLEN 

167 Curtis Avenue, Dalton, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Chorale 1, 2; University Singers 1; Operetta Guild 1, 2; Wom- 
en's Athletic Association 1, 2; Student Christian Association 
1, 2; Student Council, School of Nursing 3, Chairman 3; Sig- 
ma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, Standards Committee 2; Summer Dormi- 
tory Councilor 3; Dean's List 3, 4; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
District #1 S.N.A.M. 1, 2, 3, 4; N.S.N.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

MARY L. ALLESSIO 

Model Farm, Dalton, Massachusetts 
Botany 

4-H Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2; Women's Athletic Association 
1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Honors Work 4; 
Judging Teams 3. 



HOWARD J. ALPERIN 

634 Main Street, Haverhill, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Collegian 2; Sociology Club 3; Hillel Foundation 1; Tau Ep- 
silon Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, Pledge Warden 4; Intramu- 
rals 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 3. 

CAROLE E. AMARANTES 

255 Cary Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 

English 

Index 2; Campus Varieties 3; French Club 1; Kappa Alpha 
Theta I, 2, 3, 4, Secretary; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 
3; Cheerleader 3; Ski Club 1; S. U. Publicity Committee 1. 



DANIEL L. AMUNDSEN 

19 Billings Avenue, Medford, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Campus Varieties 2; Phi-Ed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 
2, 3, 4; Edwards Fellowship 3, 4; Student Christian Association 
1, 2; Soccer 2, 3, 4, Captain 4; Gymnastics 1, 2, 3, 4; Lacrosse 
1 ; Dean's List 2, 3 ; Campus Varieties 2. 

ARLAINE M. ANDERSON 

43 Haskin Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Botany 

Chorale 2; Operetta Guild 3; Education Club 4; Women's Ath- 
letic Association 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Wesley Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Membership Chairman 3, 4; Pre- 
cisionettes 2, 3, 4, Squad Leader 4; Dean's List 3, 4. 



285 




RACHEL E. ALLEN 



MARY L. ALLESSIO 




DANIEL L. AMUNDSEN 



ARLAINE M. ANDERSON 




WAYNE A. ANDERSON 



RICHARD C. ANNINO 



DOUGLAS L. ARNOLD 

199 School Street, North Dighton, Massachusetts 
Poultry Science 



Poultry Science Club 2, 3, 4; 
President 4. 



Dean's List 2; Alpha Zeta 2, 3, 4, 



LUCILLE C. ASHLEY 

7 Pearl Street, Westfield, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Operetta Guild 2, 3, 4; Math Club 3, 4, Vice-President 3, 4; 
Women's Athletic Association 3, 4; .Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Carnival Committee 3; Soph-Senior Hop Committee 2; 
Political Science Association 1; Debating Club 1; Opera 
Workshop 4. 



MERILEE RUTH ATKINS 

South East Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Chorale 2, 3; Edwards Fellowship 1; Student Christian As- 
sociation 1, 2, 3, 4, Christmas Vespers 1, 2, 3, 4; Volunteer 
Northampton State Hospital 3; Lambda Delta Phi 2, 3, 4, 
Treasurer 3, President 4; Mortar Board 4, Historian, Co- 
Chairman Fine Arts Festival 4; Phi Kappa Phi 3, 4; Dean's 
List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; S.W.A.P. 3; Alpha Lambda 
Delta 1; Class Scholar 1,2. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 

JULIE ATWOOD 

14 Hazen Avenue, Haverhill, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Collegian 2, 3, Sorority Reporter; Index 3; Psychology Club 

3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 
1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 

4, Chapter Editor 4; Ski Club 1, 2, 3; Student Union Special 
Events 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 4. 



LINDA A. ANDERSON 

178 Randolph Street, North Abington, Massachusetts 

English 

Collegian 4; Index 4; Operetta Guild 2, 3, 4; Campus Varieties 
2, 4; Women's Athletic Association l,-2, 3, 4; Student Christian 
Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 3; Carnival Ball Committee 3. 

VIRGINIA M. ANDERSON 

4 Chapel Street, Ashburnham, Massachusetts 
English 

Collegian 1, 2; Roister Doisters 1; Education Club 3, 4; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Homecoming Queen 2. 



WAYNE A. ANDERSON 

77 Orange Street, Attleboro, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Lutheran Club 1; Student Christian Association 1, 3, Vice- 
President 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Dean's Scholar 1, 2, 3, 4; In- 
ter-Varsity Christian Fellowship 2, 3, 4. 

RICHARD C. ANNINO 

81 Queen Avenue, West Springfield, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Bowling 1, 
2, 3, 4, Football 3, 4, Softball 1; Dean's List 1, 2, 3. 




MERILEE RUTH ATKINS 



JULIE ATWOOD 



GEORGE RUSSELL AUSTIN 

24 Stetson Street, Lakeville, Massachusetts 

Animal Science 

Chorale 1, 2, 4; Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Poultry 
Science Club 2. 

RICHARD G. BABEU 

38 Gallup Street, North Adams, Massachusetts 

Forestry 

Forestry Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 3, 4; Dean's List 3. 



RICHARD A. BABINEAU 

32 Lake Shore Drive, North Wilbraham, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

Chemical Engineering Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Tau 
Beta Pi 4; Americau Institute of Chemical Engineers 2, 3, 4; 
Dean's List 3; Engineer's Council 2, 3, 4. 

EDWARD C. BAILEY 

179 Cordaville Road, Ashland, Massachusetts 
Business Administration 

Business Administration Club 4; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Gamma Rho 1, 2, 3, 4, Rushing Chair- 
man 3, 4; Interfraternity Council 4, Rush Committee 4; Gym- 
nastics 1, 2; Dean's List 2; Campus Chest Committee 2; Military 
Ball Committee 3, 4. 



lOHN C. BAIRD 



SANDRA L. BAIRD 




RICHARD A. BABINEAU 



EDWARD C. BAILEY 





JOHN C. BAIRD 

1015 Lincoln Apartments, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Zoology 

Pre-Medical Club 3; Student Christian Association 1; Sigma 
Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4. 

SANDRA L. BAIRD 

161 Albemarle Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

History 

Chorale 1; Collegian 1; International Relations Club 4; High 
School Day Committee 2; Newman Club 1, 2; Kappa Alpha 
Theta 1, 2, 3, 4; Scrolls 2; Ski Club 1, 2; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; 
History Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-PubUcity Director 4; International 
Weekend Committee 4; Alpha Lambda Delta 2; Dean's Scholar 
1,2; Senate Committee 4. 



CAROL'VTSIN BAKER 

541 Haverhill Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 
Speech Therapy 

University Concert Association 4; Campus Varieties 2; Ed- 
ucation Club 3, 4; International Club 4; International Re- 
lations Club 4; Psychology Club 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2; 
Sigma Delta Tau 1, 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance Club 2; Campus 
Varieties 2; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Speech & Hearing 
Therapy Group Student Zionist Association 3, 4. 

PETER C. BAKER 

73 1 Whitman Street, Hanson, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Psychology Club 3, 4; Canterbury Club 1, 2; Student Christian 
Association 1, 2; Soccer Team Manager 3, 4; Ski Club 4; Stu- 
dent Union Arts and Music Committee 2, 3; Collegium Legis 
3, 4, Board of Judges 4. 



CAROLYNN BAKER 



PETER C. BAKER 




ERNEST F. BARBUTI, JR. BERNARD A. BARCELO 




PETER C. BAKER, JR. 

18 Pemberton Road, Cochituate, Massachusetts 

English 

Collegian 2; Chemistry Club 1; Wesley Foundation 1, 2; 
Q.T.V. 1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 3; Carnival Ball 
Committee 2, 3. 

RONALD F. BAKER 

Stoney Hill Road, Chatham, Massachusetts 

History 

Campus Varieties 3, 4; DeMolay 1, 2; Student Christian As- 
sociation 1, 2; History Club 3, 4; Q.T.V. 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 
2, 3, Vice-President 3, 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Flying Redmen 
1, 2; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Military Ball Committee 3, 4; 
Inter-Greek Ball Committee 2, 3; S.W.A.P. 3; Air Cadet Squad- 
ron 1, 2; Granville Air Society 3, 4. 



ELIZABETH L. BALDI 

21 Stewart Terrace, Belmont 78, Massachusetts 
English 

Women's Athletic Association 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Alpha Chi Omega 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 
4; Honors Work 4; S.O.S. 2, Secretary. 

ELIZABETH OUIDA BAMFORD 

1 1 Curtis Avenue, Middleton, Massachusetts 
Zoology 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Pi 
Beta Phi I, 2, 3, 4; Scrolls 2; House Counselor 3; Carnival 
Committee 2, 3; Zoology Club 4; Panhellenic Chorus 4. 



ERNEST F. BARBUTI, JR. 

17 Leete Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Malhematics 

BERNARD A. BARCELO 

141 County Street, Medfield, Massachusetts 
Wildlife Management 

Rod and Gun Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Wrestling 
Team 1, 2. 



BERNARD T. BARRETT 



JEAN-PIERRE BARRETTE 



BERNARD T. BARRETT 

3 1 Summer Street, Attleboro, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Varsity "M" Club 3, 4; Athletics Board 3, 4; Men's Sports 1, 2, 
3, 4, Lacrosse, Football 1, 2; Dean's List 3, 4. 

JEAN-PIERRE BARRETTE 

104 Christian Hill Rd., Great Barrington, Mass. 
Industrial Engineering 

Industrial Engineering Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Soph- 
Senior Hop Committee 2. 



288 



ELEANOR A. BARTLETT 

49 Varnum Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 

Home Economics 

Chorale 2, 3, Publicity Committee 3; Economics Honor So- 
ciety 4; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, Pres- 
ident 4; Edwards Fellowship 1, 2; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Kappa Phi 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4. 

VINCENT D. BASILE 

18 Thurston Street, East Boston 28, Massachusetts 

Government 

Collegian 1, 2, 3, 4, Sports Editor 1, 2, Managing Editor 2; In- 
dex 2, 3, Sports Editor 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student 
Senate Finance Committee 3, 4; Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Secretary 3, 4; Interfraternity Council 2, 3, Chariot Race Com- 
mittee Chairman 3; Lacrosse 1; Carnival Committee 3; Inter- 
Greek Ball Committee 2, 3; Young Republican Club 3, 4, Vice- 
President 4; Delegate National Association of Collegiate Publi- 
cations 2. 

CHARLES G. BEARCE 

87 Porter Street, Melrose, Massachusetts 
Government 

Northeastern University 1, 2; Kappa Sigma 3, 4; Men's Sports 
3, 4; Political Union 3, 4. 

BEVERLY L. BEATRICE 

6 Glendale Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
History 

Operetta Guild 2; Campus Varieties 3; Education Club 4; Stu- 
dent Christian Association 1, 2, 4; Carnival Ball Committee 3. 



JAMES J. BEBKO 
Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Newman Club 1, 4; Ski Club 1, 2; House Counselor 4; Ameri- 
can Society of Mech. Engineers 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3. 

DAVID S. BEIDON 

21 Rankin Avenue, East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Animal Science 

Chorale 3; Animal Husbandry 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian As- 
sociation 1, 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 1, 2, 3. 4; Little International Live- 
stock Show 3; Outing Club 3, 4; Dairy Classic 3. 



ALBERT J. BENOIT 

1657 Dwight Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Newman Club 1, 2, 4; Phi Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, Rushing Co- 
Chairman 2; Maroon Key 2; Ski Club 2, 3, 4; American Socie- 
ty of Mech. Engineers 2, 3, 4. 

ROGER R. BENVENUTI 

58 Lime Street, Adams, Massachusetts 

Forestry 

Forestry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4; Football 2, 
3; Dean's List 3,4; Forest Products Research Society 3, 4. 



289 




ALBERT J. BENOIT 



ROGER R. BENVENUTI 




RICHARD A. BERGLUND 



JAMES A. BERKOWICZ 



ALLAN BERMAN 

39 Strathmore Road, Brighton 46, Mass. ' 

English 

Collegian 1, 2, 3, 4, Sport's Editor 3, Editor-in-Chief 4; Index 
3; Operetta Guild 1, 2, Orchestra Manager 2; Pre-Medical Club 
3; Univ. Open House Day Committee 3, 4; Homecoming 
Weekend Committee 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Centennial 
Committee 3, 4; Beta Iota Sigma 3, 4; Adelphia 4, Secretary 4; 
Extra-Curricular Committee 4; Fine Arts Council 4; Tennis 
Manager 3, 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Student Leaders' Conference 3. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 

THEODORE F. BERNARD JR. 

143 Rosemary Rd., Dedham, Massachusetts 
Animal Science 

Newman Club 1, 2; Phi Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4; Rush Chair- 
man 2, 3; Vice-President 3, 4; Interfraternity Council 3; Little 
International Livestock Show 3; Military Ball Committee 4, 
Chairman Honorary Colonel Committee. 

MARILYN E. BILLINGS 

118 Hopkins Place, Longmeadow, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

University Singers 1; Operetta Guild 2; Education Club 3, 4; 
Women's Athletic Association 4; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1, 2, 3, 4; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Historian 4; Precisionettes 
2, 3, 4; Carnival Committee 3; Panhellenic Chorus 4. 

PAUL T. BISESTI 

48 Converse Street, Longmeadow, Massachusetts 
General Business Management 

Marketing Club 2, 3, 4; Rod and Gun Club 3, 4; Dean's List 
2, 3, 4; Military Ball Committee 3; Management Club 2, 3, 4; 
Economics Association 4; Young Republicans 4. 



290 



GEORGE BERAM 

25 Oak Street, Dedham, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Dean's List 2, 3. 

EILEEN D. BERENSON 

105 Morse Ave., Brockton, Mass. 
Elementary Education 

Education Club 2, 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma 
Delta Tau 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4, Alumni Chairman 3; 
House Counselor 3; S.U. Special Events Committee 4. 



RICHARD A. BERGLUND 

West Street, Amherst, Mass. 
Food Technology 

Chemistry Club 1, 2; DeMolay 1; Food Technology Club 3, 4, 
Vice-President 4; Student Christian Association 1; Sigma Phi 
Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4. 

JAMES A. BERKOWICZ 

32 Hope Street, Whitinsville, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Newman Club 1, 2; Interfraternity Council 2, 3, 4; Football 
1; Dean's List 3, 4. 




ALLAN BERMAN THEODORE F. BERNARD JR, 





MARILYN E. BILLINGS 



PAUL T. BISESTI 



MALCOLM G. BISHOP 

120 Union St., Holbrook, Mass. 

Landscape Architecture 

International Relations Club 3, 4; Class Officer 3, 4; Eques- 
trian Club 3, 4. 

ARTHUR E. BISSON 

72 North Bridge Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 
Physics 

Dean's List 3; Physics Club 2, 3, 4; American Institute of 
Physics 2, 3, 4. 



CONSTANCE M. BLAIS 

175 Arcade Street, Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 
Education 

4-H Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Senior Modern 
Dance Club 2, 3, 4. 

GARY A. BLANK 

12 Blake Road, Brookline, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Chorale 1, 2; Operetta Guild 1, 2; Campus Varieties 1; Psy- 
chology Club 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Tau Epsilon Phi 
1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Northampton Project at Northamp- 
ton State Hospital 3, 4. 





CONSTANCE M. BLAIS 



GARY A. BLANK 



RICHARD J. BOARDMAN 

82 Butler Road, Sudbury, Massachusetts 

English 

W.M.U.A. 1, 2; Flying Redman 1; Air Cadet Squadron 1; 
DeMolay 1, 2, 3; Young Republicans Club 3, 4. 

CAROLE S. BOBRICK 

65 Cleveland Road, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Collegian (Business Staff) 1, 2; Psychology Club 3, 4; Wom- 
en's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3; Hillel Foundation 1; Student 
Union Movie Committee 1, 2. 



FRANK J. BODEN JR. 

195 Main Street, Wilbraham, Massachusetts 

Forestry 

Forestry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3. 

RICHARD M. BODEN 

271 Glen Road, Weston, Massachusetts 

Marketing 

Marketing Club 2, 3, 4; Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Gymnastics 1; 
Cheerleader 1; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 



FRANK J. BODEN JR. 



RICHARD M. BODEN 



291 




NANCY E. BOLLMAN 



RICHARD J. BORGES 



CHARLES A. BOSCO 



JOAN T. BOSKIEWICZ 



NANCY E. BOLLMAN 

140 Highland Avenue, Leominster, Massachusetts 

Home Economics 

Collegian 1; Roister Doisters 2, 3, 4; Marching Band 1; Home 
Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1; Women's Athletic 
Association 1, 2, 3; Sigma Kappa 2, 3, 4; Carnival Ball Com- 
mittee 3; Inter-Greek Ball Committee 3, 4. 



CHARLES A. BOSCO 

30 Cheney Street, Orange, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Gamma Rho 1, 2, 3, 4; Intra- 
murals 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1; Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4; Mili- 
tary Ball Committee 3; Granville Air Society 3; Air Cadet 
Squadron 1,2. 



RICHARD J. BORGES 

State Road, Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts 
History 



Newman Club 1, 
Dean's List 1. 



2, 3, 4; Track 1; Football Manager 2, 3, 4; 



JOAN T. BOSKIEWICZ 

50 St. James Avenue, Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Collegian 1; Roister Doisters 2; Education Club 4; Math Club 
3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, Activities Chairman 4; Precision- 
ettes 2, 3, 4; Carnival Committee 3; S.W.A.P. 2, 3; Women's 
Affairs 4; Pan-Hellenic Chorus 4. 



^. T 





ROBERT P. BOULAIS P. JOSEPH BOVA CONTI 

ROBERT P. BOULAIS 

141 Lincoln St., Holyoke, Mass. 

Mathematics 

Collegian 2; Phi Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, ,4, Treasurer 3, 4; Inter- 
fraternity Council 2, 3; Maroon Key 2. 

P. JOSEPH BOVA CONTI 

199 Boston Post Road, Marlboro, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Electrical Engineering Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers 2, 3, 4; Umass Fly- 
ing Club 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3, 4. 



-!*■«•« 



TWENTY-FIVE seconds to victory. 



292 



JANE M. BRIGHTMAN 

9 Union Avenue, Westport, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Operetta Guild 1; Debating Society 1; University Open House 
Day Committee 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Kappa 1, 

2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Nursing Club 2, 3, 4, Chairman Pub- 
lic Relations Committee 3, Corresponding Secretary 4; Student 
Nurses Association of Massachusetts 2, 3, 4; S.N.A.M. District 
#1 2, 3, 4; National Student Nurses' Association 2, 3, 4. 

FRANCIS IAN BROADHURST 
Benton Hill Road, Becket, Massachusetts 
History 

Collegian 1; Roister Doisters 2, 3, 4, President 3; International 
Relations Club 2, 3, Vice-President 2, 3; Newman Club 1; 
Senate 1; Beta Chi 2, 3, 4; Pistol Team 2, 3; Dean's List 3; 
S.W.A.P. 3; International Weekend Committee 3; Experimental 
Plays 3. 

SANDRA M. BRODSKY 

35 Johnston Road, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

Math 

Index 3, 4, Section Editor 3; Campus 'Varieties 2, 3, 4, Chore- 
ographer 4; Math Club 3, 4; Modern Dance Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
President 2, 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 
4; Revelers 2; Carnival Committee 3; Sophomore Banquet 2; 
'62 Advisory Board 3, 4; Junior Mix 3, Chairman 3. 

ROBERT C. BROGGI 

181 Springfield Street, Agawam, Massachusetts 
Government 

Handbook 2; Assistant Editor 2; Index 3, 4; Campus Varieties 

3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Senate 4, Executive Committee 
and Chairman of Men's Affairs; Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Steward 
4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Calender Board 4. 



GERDA B. BROOKS 

72 Cypress Rd., Milton 86, Mass. 

Elementary Education 

Collegian 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 2, 3, 4; Psychology Club 
4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Delta Tau 2, 3, 4; Cor- 
responding Secretary 4; Dean's List 3, Student U. Special 
Events Committee 3, 4; S.U. Movie Committee 2, 3. 

KENNETH P. BROPHY 

76 Maillout Terrace, Dracut, Massachusetts 
Journalism-Speech 

Collegian 1, 2; Quarterly 3; Roister Doisters 2; Campus Va- 
rieties 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Q.T.V. 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 
4; Carnival Committee 3; WMUA 3, 4; Experimental The- 
ater 3. 



ALEXANDER S. BROUGH 

47 Dorrance Street, Willimansett, Massachusetts 

Management 

Business Administration Club 3, 4; Channing Club 1; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Senate 3; Soccer 1, 2; Intra- 
murals 1, 2, 3; Alpha Phi Omega 1. 

DAVID C. BROWN 

88 Pleasant St., Winchendon, Mass. 
Mechanical Engineering 

Pistol Team 3, 4; Dean's List 3. 




JANE M. BRIGHTMAN FRANCIS IAN BROADHURST 




293 



ALEXANDER S. BROUGH DAVID C. BROWN 




JOSEPH PAUL BUBROWSKI ALLAN CLIFFORD BUCNNOLZ 




DOROTHEA E. BROWN 

308 Boston Avenue, Medford, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Index 4; Roister Doisters 3; Campus Varieties 1, 2, 4; French 
Club 2; Sociology Club 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 
2, 3, 4; Precisionettes 2; Dean's List 2; Carnival Ball Com- 
mittee 3; Carnival Committee 3; Modern Dance Club 1, 2, 3, 
4: Tennis Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

LEMA M. BROWN 

224 North Street, Whalom District, Fitchburg, Massachusetts 
Sociology 



MARGERY D. BROWN 

Main Street, Lancaster, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Operetta Guild 4; Education Club 3, 4, Publicity 3; Women's 
Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 
1, 2, 3, 4, Dorm Representative 4; Carnival Ball Committee 3. 

SUSAN J. BROWN 

2224 Tewksbury Road, Columbus, Ohio 

Mathematics 

Chorale 1; University Singers 1; Math Club 4; Women's Ath- 
letic Association 1; Edwards Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Campus Religious Council 3, 
Treasurer; Ski Club 2, 3, 4. 



JOSEPH PAUL BUBROWSKI 

81 Prospect Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 
Business Administration & Economics 

ALLAN CLIFFORD BUCNNOLZ 

Colonial Acres, Hatfield, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Chemistry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 2, 3; 
Phi Kappa Phi 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Phi 
Eta Sigma 2, 3,4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Young Republicans 

3. 



JOSEPH J. BUCUZZO 

56 Eudora Street, Haverhill, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Math Club 3, 4; U. of M. Broadcasting Association 1, 2; 
Chemistry Club 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Phi Kappa Phi 
4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; WMUA 1, 2. 

CHARLES D. BUCZALA 
Southampton, Mass. 
History 



JOSEPH J. BUCUZZO 



CHARLES D. BUCZALA- 



294 



IRENE H. BUDREWICZ 

25 Roosevelt Street, Maynard, Massachusetts 
Bacteriology 



Bacteriology Club 1, 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 
Historian 4. 



2, 3; Women's Athletic Association 2; 
4; Lambda Delta Phi 2, 3, 4, Steward 3, 



CLIFFORD J. BULLOCK 

167 Wilson Road, Nahant, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Var- 
sity "M" Club 4, Intramural Basketball 2, 3, 4, Intramural Offi- 
cial 3, 4; Physical Education Club 3, 4. 



DAVIS JAMES BUNGAY 

635 Pequoig Avenue, Athol, Massachusetts 
Landscape Architecture 

Landscape Architecture Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2; 
Ski Team 2; Dean's List 3; Military Ball Committee 3; 
Horticultural Show 2, 3, 4. 

LOIS A. BURGESS 

26 Mill Street, Auburn, Massachusetts 

Recreation 

Collegian 1, 2; Math Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Associ- 
ation 1, 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 2, 3, 4; Carnival Committee 3; Rec- 
reation Club 2, 3, 4. 



LOUIS J. BUSH 

292 Wells Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Business Administration 

Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 4; Maroon Key 
2; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1; Football 1; Management 
Club 3, 4; I.F.C. Football 2, 3, 4; I.F.C. Basketball 2, 3. 

JOAN BUTLER 

1 Coldbrook Road, Oakham, Massachusetts 

English 

Education Club 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 3, 4. 



HONOUR-MARIE E. CAMPBELL 

28 Edson Street, Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

English 

Collegian 1; Index 2, 4; Roister Doisters 3, 4; Education Club 
4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Kappa 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 
3. 

ELAINE K. CANTREL 

153 East Central Street, Natick, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Operetta Guild 2, 3; Education Club 3, 4; Newman Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Pi Beta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, House Manager 3, Secretary 
4; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Soph-Senior Hop Committee 
2; Class Advisory Committee 3, 4. 



295 




IRENE H. BUDREWICZ CLIFFORD J. BULLOCK 




sHF M 




HONOUR-MARIE E. CAMPBELL ELAINE K. CANTREL 




WILLIAM F. CARLIN III 



DIANA M. CARLSON 



SARAH-JEAN CARPENTER 



RICHARD H. CASHIN JR. 



WILLIAM F. CARLIN III 

164 Chapin Terrace, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Lambda Chi Alpha 2, 3, 4; Interfra- 
ternity Sports 2, 3, 4; Institute of Radio Engineers 4. 

DIANA M. CARLSON 

48 Merriam Street, East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Chorale 2; Operetta Guild 4; Education Club 4; Naiads 4; 
Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian As- 
sociation 1, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation 1, 2, 3; Wesleyairs 1, 2, 
3; Precisionettes 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Carnival Ball Committee 
3; Women's Gymnastics Club 1, 2; Class Advisory Council. 



SARAH-JEAN CARPENTER 
Main Street, Colrain, Massachusetts 
English 

Education Club 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Lambda Delta Phi 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Square Dance Club. 

RICHARD H. CASHIN JR. 

1 Cottage Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Wildlife Management 

Rod and Gun Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Alpha Gamma Rho 
2, 3, 4; Granville Air Society 3. 





HEY! You might run my nylons! 



» 'T- 



JOSEPH F. CASSIDY 



J. EDWARD CASS, JR. 

7 Meadow Road, Burlington, Massachusetts 
Government 

Campus Varieties 4; International Relations Club 3, 4; Span- 
ish Club 3, 4; Homecoming Weekend Committee 4; Sigma 
Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Football, Basketball, Soft- 
ball 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Campus 
Chest Committee 4; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Soph-Senior 
Hop Committee 2; Political Science Association 3, 4. 

JOSEPH F. CASSIDY 

1 1 Prospect Street, Medway, Massachusetts 
Geology 

Geology Club 4; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4; High School Day 
Committee 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Maroon Key 2; Baseball 1; Indoor Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Outdoor 
Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Granville Air Society 3, 4. 

296 



PAUL J. CASSIDY 

6 Brown Ave., Burlington, Massachusetts 

Government 

Chemistry Club 1, 2; QTV 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 4, Steward 

2, 3; Adelphia 4, Vice-President; Dean's List 2, 3; S.W.A.P. 2, 
3; Fraternity Managers' Association 2, 3, 4; Treasurer 3, 4; 
Political Science Association 4; Distinguished Vistiors Program 

3, 4; Distinguished Air Science Cadet 4. 

Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 

NANCY L. CASSIN 

287 Fairmount Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Sociology Club 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 
4; Precisionettes 2, 3; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Panhellenic 
Chorus 4. 



CAROL CASTELLANOS 

5 Essex Road, Wellesley, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Index 2, 3, Copy Editor 3; Chemistry Club 3, 4; Kappa Kappa 
Gamma 2, 3, 4, Chaplain 3; Dean's List 1; Carnival Committee 
3; Soph-Senior Hop 2; Class Advisory Council 2; International 
Weekend 2, 3, Treasurer 3. 

ORLANDO J. CASTRO 

12 E. Bartlett Street, Westfield, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

American Institute of Electrical Engineers 4; Flying Club 3, 4; 
I.R.E. 4. 



ROBERT J. CATINEAU 

50 Cambridge Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

Landscape Architecture 

Forestry Club 1; Landscape Architecture Club 2, 3, 4; Outing 
Club 3; Newman Club 1,2,?,, A; Intramural Football 1, 2, In- 
tramural Basketball 2; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Horticulture Show 
2, 3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2. 

FRANK J. CESARIO 

40 Central Street, Hudson, Massachusetts 
Industrial Engineering 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Kappa Sigma 2, 3, 4; Maroon Key 2; 
Baseball 1; Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3; American Institute 
of Industrial Engineers 3, 4. 



RUTH E. CHADWICK 

14 Dover Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Chorale 1, 2; Operetta Guild 1; University Open House Day 
Committee 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2; Sigma 
Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, Pledge President 1; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Class Advisory Committee 2; Student Council of the School of 
Nursing 3, 4, Secretary 3, Chairman 4; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Public Relations Committee 3, 4; District #1 Student Nurse's 
Association of Massachusetts 1, 2, 3, 4, Chairman Public Rela- 
tions Committee 3; National Student Nurses' Association 1, 2, 
3,4. 

JAMES J. CHANEM 

35 Daniels Ave., Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Math Club 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Swim Team 1. 

297 




RUTH E. CHADWICK 



JAMES J. CHANEM 




DAVID L. CHENEY 



ROBERT J. CHIESA 



RONALD E. CHOINIERE 

244 Oak Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Math Club 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Basketball 

3, 4; Cheerleader 2; Military Ball Committee 3. 

CYNTHIA CHRISANT 

671 Britton Street, Fairview, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

W.M.U.A. 1, 2; Soph-Frosh Night 2; Orthodox Club 1, 2, 3, 

4, Corresponding Secretary 2; Psychology Club 3, 4, Publicity 
Chairman 4; Winter Carnival 3; Soph-senior Hop 2; Univer- 
sity Open House Weekend 3. 



DONALD R. CHRISTENSEN 

100 Wyoming Drive, Holden, Massachusetts 

History 

Chorale 1; Chess Club 1, 2, 3, 4; German Club 4; Dean's List 
3, 4; History Club 3, 4. 

LYNNE E. CHRISTIANSEN 

13 Elm Street, Georgetown, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Chorale 2, 3, 4, Assistant Manager 4; Sociology Club 3; Stu- 
dent Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Officer 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Philosophy Club 3, Program Coordinator 3. 



298 



SUSAN F. CHAPMAN 

31 Hallock St., Amherst, Massachusetts 

English 

Chemistry Club 1, 2; Olericulture Club 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 
4; Student Christian Association 3; Ski Club 3; Dean's List 1, 
2, 3 ; Honors Work 4. 



RICHARD H. CHASEW 

12 Amherst Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Pre-Dental 

Pre-Medical Club 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Steward 2, 3; 
Varsity Baseball Manager 3; Freshmen Tennis; Pi Alpha Delta 

4. 



DAVID L. CHENEY 

Apple Road, Brimfield, Massachusetts 
Pomology 

Pomology Club 1, 2, 3, Treasurer 2, Vice-President 3; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Gamma Rho 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Social Chairman 2; Interfraternity Council 2, 3; Inter-Greek 
Ball Committee 3. 

ROBERT J. CHIESA 

48 Wildewood Drive, Canton, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Collegian 1, 2; Index 3, 4; Geology Club 2, 3; Sociology Club 
2, 3; U. OF M. Broadcasting Association 3, 4; Varsity "M" 
Club 3; Soccer 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2; Modern Music Club 2, 3; 
Carnival Committee 3. 




DONALD R. CHRISTENSEN 



LYNNE E. CHRISTIANSEN 



WILLIAM H. CHRISTMANN 

152 Barnard Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Forestry 

Forestry Club 2, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3; Al- 
pha Gamma Rho 2, 3, 4; Rifle Team 1, 2; Carnival Ball Com- 
mittee 3. 

NORMA L. CIASCHINI 

159 Dartmouth Terrace, Springfield, Massachusetts 

French 

Index 3; French Club 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 
4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Student Union Special Events Com- 
mittee 1, 2, 3, Co-chairman 2, 3; Student Union Planning 
Council 2, 3; Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4; Assistant House 
Manager 1, 2, 3, 4; Campus Varieties 2; Carnival Ball Com- 
mittee 3; Chairman Fashion Show; Soph-Senior Hop Commit- 
tee 2; Soph-Frosh Night 1; Little World's Fair 3. 



MARYELLEN L. CICCHETTI 

48 Mendon Street, Hopedale, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 3, 4; Alpha Chi 
Omega 2, 3, 4, Assistant Rush Chairman 3, Rush Chairman 4; 
Carnival Committee 3. 

MARIL'iTvl J. CLAPPER 

1 1 1 Eliot Avenue, West Newton, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Education Club 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club 1, 2; Sigma 
Kappa 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 4; Dean's List 1, 3; 
Carnival Ball Committee 3; Student Union Dance Committee 
2, 3, 4, Co-chairman 4; Class Advisory Committee 2, 3, 4; Stu- 
dent Program Council 4. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 




WILLIAM H. CHRISTMANN NORMA L. CIASCHINI 




MARYELLEN L. CICCHETTI 



MARILYN J. CLAPPER 




ELINOR M. CLARK 

35 July Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

English 

Women's Athletic Association 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
U. OF M. Broadcasting Association 1; Carnival Ball Commit- 
tee 2, 3; Special Events Committee 3; Literary Society 3, 4. 

JANET R. CLARK 

Clark Street East, Middleboro, Massachusetts 

Animal Science 

Animal Husbandry Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; Pre-Medical Club 
1, 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2; Wesley Foundation 1; 
Little International Livestock Show 3; Equestrian Club 3, 4. 



JOAN L. CLARK 



DANA H. CLARKE 



JOAN L. CLARK 

19 Leicester Street, North Oxford, Mass. 
English 

Roister Doisters 2, 3; Education Club 3, 4; German Club 2; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival Committee 3; Literary So- 
ciety 3, 4. 

DANA H. CLARKE 

7 Saint Lukes Road, AUston, Massachusetts 
Pre-Medical 

Outing Club 3, 4; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Senate 3, 4; 
Track 1, 2; Cross-Country 1, 2; House Counselor 3, 4; Mili- 
tary Ball Committee 3; Polar Bear Club 2, 3, 4, Rushing Chair- 
man. 



299 




DAVID W. COLLINS 



SUSAN K. COLOGNESI 




NANCY R. CLOUD 

18 Hastings Road, Lexington, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Niads 1, 2; Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Math Club 3, 4; 
Operetta Guild 3; Women's Tennis 4; Women's Field Hockey 

3. 



ROBERT T. COFFIN 

140 Milk Street, Westboro, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering Club 4; Student Christian Association 
1, 3; Wesley Foundation 1, 2; Gymnastics 1, 2, 4; Flying Red- 
men 1; Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3; American Society of Mechani- 
cal Engineers 4; Society of Automotive Engineers 4; S.W.A.P. 
3. 



STEVEN R. COHEN 

53 Hamilton Avenue, Haverhill, Massachusetts 

Government 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2, Membership Chairman 2; Tau Epsilon 
Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Executive Board 2, Assistant Steward 3, Steward 
4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3. 

DAVID R. COLBY 

14 Agawam Avenue, Bradford, Massachusetts 
Wildlife Management 

Rod and Gun Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Gamma Rho 1, 2, 3. 



DAVID W. COLLINS 

67 Ferncliff Avenue, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Chemistry Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2, President 3; Varsity 
Cross-Country 2; Honors Work 4. 

SUSAN K. COLOGNESI 

270 Marcy Street, Southbridge, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Operetta Guild 2, 3; Education Club 3, 4, Reporter 4; Wom- 
en's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Univ. Open House Day 
Committee 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Chi Omega 
1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 4; Dean's List 1, 4; Carni- 
val Ball Committee 3; Carnival Committee 2; Speech Therapy 
Interest Committee 3, 4. 



HAROLD COLTON 

15 Griggs Terrace, Brookline, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Civil Engineering Club 3, 4; Intramurals 2, 3, 4. 

LINA COMPAGNONE 

87 High St., Milford, Massachusetts 

French 

Fencing Club 3; French Club 2, 3, Vice-President 3; Newman 
Club 1, 2, 3; Ski Club 1; House Counselor 3; Russian Club 3; 
French Corridor 3. 



HAROLD COLTON 



LINA COMPAGNONE 



300 




FRANK CONDEZ, JR. 



JEAN A. CONDON 



EDWARD J. CONNOLLY 



JUDITH P. CONROY 



FRANK CONDEZ, JR. 

253 Nash Road, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; American Institute of Electrical En- 
gineers 3, 4; Dean's List 1; Engineering Journal 3, 4. 

JEAN A. CONDON 

114 Franklin Street, West Medway, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Phi-Ed Club 3, 4, Social Chairman 3, Secretary 4; Women's 
Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Playday Manager 3, Head of 
Lacrosse 4; Athletics Board 1, 2, WAA Sub-Board Representa- 
tive 1, 2, WAA Board 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 
3; House Counselor 3, 4, House Chairman 4; S.W.A.P., Dor- 
mitory Representative 3. 



EDWARD J. CONNOLLY 

127 Stoddard Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Marketing 

Marketing Club 3, 4, Membership Chairman; Newman Club 
1 2, 3, 4; Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Executive Committee 
4- Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4. 

JUDITH P. CONROY 

18 Perkins Street, Stoneham, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Scrolls 2; Precisionettes 2; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Student Union 
Program Council 2, Secretary 2; Special Events Committee 1, 
Secretary 1; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 






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PATRICIA A. CONWAY 



MARVIN F. COOK 



PATRICIA A. CONWAY 

35 Stevens Road, Melrose, Massachusetts 

Merchandising 

Campus Varieties, Scenery 3; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Junior State Representative 2; Naiads 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 
2, 3, 4; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Alumnae Chairman 3, Steward- 
ess 4, Standards 4; Mortar Board, Treasurer 4; Precisionettes 

2, 3, 4, Squad Leader 4; Phi Kappa Phi 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 

3, 4; Carnival Committee, Decorations 3; Omicron Nu 4, Vice 
President 4, Editor 4; Alpha Lambda Delta 2. 

Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 

MARVIN F. COOK 

141 Elm Street, Southbridge, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Mechanical Engineering Club 1; Math Club 3, 4; Newman 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Q.T.V. 1, 2, 3, 4, Chaplain 4; Track 1; Dean's 
List 3. 3QJ 



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GUESS WHAT I'M going to do tonite! 



ALLYN W. COOMBS 

Lincoln Apartments #611, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Wildlife Management 

Rod and Gun Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3, 4. 

PERRY COOPER 

415 Pomeroy Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Dean's List 1, 3; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; American Society of Civil 
Engineers 2, 3, 4. 



CATHERINE P. CORBETT 

277 Winter Street, Norwood, Massachusetts 
Home Economics 

Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4; Homecoming Weekend Com- 
mittee 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dorm Social Commit- 
tee 3, Chairman 3; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Carnival Com- 
mittee 3. 

MARY O. CORBIERE 

Turnpike Rd., Turners Falls, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Sociology Club 4. 





CATHERINE P. CORBETT 



MARY O. CORBIERE 




VINCENT P. COUSINEAU 



DIANN COYLE 



WILLIAM E. COTE 

263 Meadow Street, Agawam, Massachusetts 
Geology 

Sigma Gamma Epsilon 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4. 

KEVIN F. COTTRELL 

1 10 Scaddings St., Taunton, Massachusetts 

Business Management 

Business Administration Club 4; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Phi 
Sigma Kappa 2; Dean's List 2; Intramural Softball 2, 3; Intra- 
mural Basketball 2, 3; Intramural Football 2. 



VINCENT P. COUSINEAU 

340 Pleasant Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Business Administration Club 3, 4; Accounting Club 3, 4; 
Chemistry Club 1, 2; Commuters Club 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1, 2, 3, House Manager 2, 3; Base- 
ball 1. 

DIANN COYLE 

74 Woodland Road, Holden, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Index 4; Campus Varieties 3; Women's Athletic Association 1, 
2, 3, 4, WAA Board 1, 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's 
Judiciary 3, 4, Secretary 4; Pi Beta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Activities 
Chairman 3, Censor 4; Mortar Board 4; Scrolls 2; Cheerleader 
2, 3, 4; House Counselor 3; Campus Varieties 3; Carnival 
Committee 2, 3, Co-Chairman of Weekend Committee 3; 
S.W.A.P. 2; Rally Committee 4; Special Events Committee 2, 
3; University Discipline Board 4; Class Advisory Board 3, 4. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 

302 




MARTHA S. CRANE 



JUNE F. CRASCO 



MARGARET R. CRAWFORD 

21 Wedgewood Street, Everett, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Education Club 2, 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival 
Ball Committee 2, 3; Soph-Senior Hop Committee 2; Modern 
Dance Club 3. 

JEAN M. CREAMER 

1 1 Becket Road, Belmont, Massachusetts 

Home Economics, Merchandising and Retailing 

Roister Doisters 4; Campus Varieties 3; Home Economics 
Club 1, 2, 4: Naiads 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



KATHLEEN M. CREEDEN 

321 Boylston Street, Brockton, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Concert Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Operetta Guild 4; Education Club 3, 
4; Women's Athletic Association 2; Univ. Open House Day 
Committee 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pi Beta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Inter-Dorm Council 2; Panhellenic Chorus 4; Woodwind Quin- 
tet 2, 3, 4. 

RAYMOND STANLEY CREEK 

199 Chapman Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Government 

U. of M. Broadcasting Association 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 
2, 4; Bay State Rifles 2; Military Ball Committee 3, 4, Co- 
chairman Ticket Committee 4. 



303 



ROBERT A. CRAFTS 

RFD #1, Shelburne, Massachusetts 

Pre-Medical 

French Club 1, 2; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Chris- 
tian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 2. 

ARTHUR E. CRAGO 

28 Nelson Road, Melrose, Massachusetts 

Pre-Med 

Operetta Guild 2; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chair- 
man 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Tau Kappa Epsilon 2, 3, 
4, President 3, 4; Interfraternity Council 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2; 
Honors Work 4; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Butterfield Treas- 
urer 2. 

MARTHA S. CRANE 

238 Race Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts ' 

Pre-Medical 

Chemistry Club 2, 3, 4; Math Club 3, 4; Pre-Medical Club 2, 
3, 4, 'Vice President 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Kappa Phi 

3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Zoology Club 2 3 

4, Treasurer 2, President 3; Alpha Lambda Delta 2. 

JUNE F. CRASCO 

169 Stratford St., West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

English Literature 

Index 1, 2, 3, 4; Literary Magazine 3, 4; Editorial Board 3, 4; 
University Concert Association 3, 4, Publicity Director- Ed- 
ucation Club 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Dorm Captain 4- 
Young Republican Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Social Activities 
Committee 1, 2, 3, 4, Chairman 2, 4; Interdorm Sing Director 
3; Interdorm Council 2; Women's Tennis Team 1, 2 3- Pre- 
cisionettes 2, 3, 4; Debating Team 1; Special Events Commit- 
tee 2, 3, 4; Class '62 Executive Council 2, 3, 4; Senior Week 
Presidents Reception 4, Co-chairman. 




KATHLEEN M. CREEDEN 



RAYMOND STANLEY CREEK 








I THOUGHT I was a teenage locomotive. 

RUTH H. CRONJE 

1 10 Haverhill Street, North Reading, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Operetta Guild 3, 4; Math Club 3, 4; Outing Club 3; Dorm 
Representative 3; Judson Fellowship 2; Student Christian As- 
sociation 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1. 

LLOYD D. GROSSMAN 

4 East Main Street, Merrimac, Massachusetts 
History 

Roister Doisters 1, 2, 4; International- Club 1, 2; Student Chris- 
tian Association 1, 2; Soph. Advisory Committee 2; Ski Club 3, 
4; Soph-Senior Hop Committee 2; History Club 1, 3, 4, Pub- 
licity Director 4; International Weekend Committee 1, 4; 
Bridge Club 1, 3, 4. 



GRANT CRICHFIELD 



lAMES V. CRONIN 



GRANT CRICHFIELD 

109 High Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 

French 

French Club 3, 4; Canterbury Club 1, 2; Student Christian As- 
sociation 2, 3, 4; Phi Sigma Kappa 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 2, 3, 4; 
Carnival Committee 3; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2. 

JAMES V. CRONIN 

57 Loomis Street, Burlington, Massachusetts 

Forestry 

Forestry Club 3, 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Society of American For- 
esters 3,4. 



MARCEL F. CRUDELE 

214 Slade Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 

Landscape Architecture 

Landscape Architecture Club 3, 4. 

EDWARD T. CUDDY 

33 Thompson Street, Maynard, Mass. 
Production Management 

Management Club 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 3. 




RUTH H. CRONJE 



LLOYD D. GROSSMAN 



MARCEL F. CRUDELE 



EDWARD T. CUDDY 



CAROL J. CUMMINGS 

72 King-Stieet, Palmouth, Massachusetts 

English 

PAUL R. CURLEY 

12 Western Avenue, Wakefield, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Bay State Rifles 1, 2; Dean's List 1; 
American Society of Civil Engineers 2, 3, 4. 



CHARLES B. CURTIS 

144 Sherman Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 
Pre-Dentistry 

Campus Varieties 4; Chemistry Club 1; Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Social Chairman 2, Vice President 3, 4; Executive Board 
Chairman 3, 4; Adelphia 4, Treasurer 4; Maroon Key 2, Sec- 
retary 2; Soccer 1; Hockey 1; Golf 1; Class Officer 3, 4, Vice 
President 3, 4; Carnival Committee 3; S.W.A.P. 2, 3, Co- 
Chairman 3; Class Executive Committee 3, 4, Chairman 3, 4; 
Senate Curriculum Committee 3; Calendar Planning Commit- 
tee 4. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 

ANDREA E. CZAJA 

124 Ellsworth Ave., Springfield, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Collegian 1; Education Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Senior Mix Committee 4; Junior Mix Committee 3; Carnival 
Ball Committee 3; Soph-Senior Hop Committee 2; Modern 
Dance Club 3; A.C.L.A. 3, 4; Art Club 3, 4; Junior Advisory 
Board 3; Senior Advisory Board 4; N.E.A. 4. 



HENRY A. CZELUSNIAK, JR. 

248 Springfield Street, Chicopee, Massachusetts 

Botany 

Collegian 2; 4-H Club 1; Homecoming Weekend Committee 2; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Union Movie Committee 2; 
Phi Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4; Interfraternity Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Intramurals 1; House Counselor 2; Dean's List 3, 4; Campus 
Chest Committee 2, 3, 4; Soph-Senior Hop Committee 2; In- 
ter-Greek Ball Committee 2; ROTC Band 1, 2; Heart Fund 
Drive 1, 2; Blood Drive 3, 4; Clothing Drive 3. 

ALBERT E. DADLEY 

20 Windsor Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Lutheran Club 2, 3, 4; QTV 2, 3, 4; American Society of Civil 
Engineers 2, 3, 4; Interfraternity Basketball 3, 4. 



EDNA M. DAHLQUIST 

35 Winthrop Road, Belmont, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

French Club 1, 2; Pre-Medical Club 3; Psychology Club 4; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

EUGENE A. DANIELS 
R.F.D. 2, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Chemical Engineering 

Chemical Engineering Club 3, 4; Phi Kappa Phi 4; Tau Beta 
Pi 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4. 





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CAROL CUMMINGS 



PAUL R. CURLEY 




HENRY A. CZELUSNIAK, JR. ALBERT E. DADLEY 




305 



EDNA M. DAHLQUIST 



EUGENE A. DANIELS 




LAMBERT J. DECKER, JR. 





SANDRA DELAVEGA 




SUSAN I. DESROSIERS 





LAMBERT J. DECKER, JR. 

4 Wilmont Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Accounting Club 3, 4; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Flying Redmen 
2; Dean's List 2; Military Ball Committee 3; Dormitory Presi- 
dent 3; Granville Air Society 3, 4. 

ROBERT M. DEFILIPPI 

38 William Sands Road, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Chemistry Club 1, 2; Math Club 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 2; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 1, 2; Intramurals 4; Flying 
Redmen 1; Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2; Dean's List 1, 2; Granville Air 
Society 3, 4. 



SONDRA J. DELAVEGA 

805 Providence Road, Whitensville, Massachusetts 
English 

DAVID L. DESJARDINS, JR. 

29 Mt. Pleasant St., North Brookfield, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Education Club 4; Math Club 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Swimming Club 1, 2, 3, 4; House 
Counselor 3; Physics Clutj 3, 4; American Institute of Physics 
3, 4; Dorm Social and Athletic Chairman. 




ROBERT M. DEFILIPPI 




DAVID L. DESJARDINS, JR. 



SUSAN I. DESROSIERS 

310 Amherst Road, South Hadley, Massachusetts 

French 

French Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2. 

JOAN DICKSON 

2 Ivy Road, Wellesley 81, Massachusetts 

Art 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Chi Omega 

3, 4, Historian 4; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Art Club 2, 3, 

4, Treasurer 4. 




JOAN DICKSON 



CYNTHIA A. DIETZ 



CYNTHIA A. DIETZ 

69 Abbott Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Education Club 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4. 

JANICE E. DIMOCK 

6 1 Wood Avenue, East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 
Bacteriology 

Operetta Guild 4; Bacteriology Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; 
Niads 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Dorm Representative 2, House 
Representative 3; Pi Beta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Athletic Chairman 3; 
Precisionettes 3, 4; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Pan Hel Cho- 
rus 4; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Pan-Hel Chorus 4. 



306 




JANICE E. DIMOCK 




RICHARD O. DINUCCI 




SARAH J. PEAVEY 




STUART D. DODGE 




RICHARD O. DINUCCI 

56 Rockland Place, Newton 64, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Chemical Engineering Club 2; Math Club 3, 4; Student Chris- 
tian Association 3, 4; Flying Redmen 1, 2; Dean's List 3; 
Bridge Club 3, 4; Sport Parachute Club 2. 

RAYMOND C. DION, JR. 

1 3 Hume Avenue, Medf ord, Massachusetts 

English 

Operetta Guild 1, 3; Homecoming Weekend Committee 3, 4, 
Co-Chairman 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; House Counselor 
3, 4; S.U. Program Council 3, 4; S.U. Dance Committee 2, 3, 4. 



SARAH J. PEAVEY 

58 Orchardview Street, West Springfield, Massachusetts 
Speech Therapy 

Sociology Club 2, 3; Homecoming Weekend Committee 2; 
Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Chairman Member- 
ship Drive 2; Precisionettes 3, 4, Squad Leader 4; House Coun- 
selor 3; Campus Chest Committee 3; Carnival Committee 2, 3, 
Publicity Chairman 2; Soph-Senior Hop Committee 2; Adviso- 
ry Committee 2, 3, 4; Inter-Dorm Council 1; Speech Club 4; 
Dorm Treasurer 4; Sophomore Banquet Committee 2. 

NICHOLAS P. DI VITTORIO 

1 1 Elm Street, Milford, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Football 3, 4; Dean's 
List 1, 2; Baker Dorm Vice-President 2; Wheeler Dorm Secre- 
tary-Treasurer 4. 



STUART D. DODGE 

91 Sunny Hill Road, Lunenburg, Massachusetts 
C(V(7 Engineering 

Civil Engineering Club 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 2,3, A. 

CYNTHIA J. DOLE 

Peckville Rd., Shelburne, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Chorale 1, 2; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; Nursing Club 2, 3, 4, Re- 
cording Secretary 4; Student Nursing Association 2, 3, 4; Stu- 
dent Council of School of Nursing 4, Secretary 4. 



CAROL A. DOLIBER 



CAROL A. DOLIBER 

4 Nutting Road, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

French 

Collegian 1, 2; Operetta Guild 2; Campus Varieties 2; Educa- 
tion Club 4; French Club 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's 
List 1, 3; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Modern Dance Club 3, 4. 

MARY M. DONOVAN 

96 Magnolia Rd., Swampscott, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Index 3, 4; Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Senate 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Carnival Ball Committee 3, 4; 
Carnival Committee 3; (Student) National Education Commit- 
tee 3, 4; Campus Religious Council 4. 



307 




NICHOLAS P. DI VITTORIO 




CYNTHIA J. DOLE 




MARY M. DONOVAN 




CHARLES H. DOOLITTLE WALTER M. DOOLITTLE 




STEPHEN D. DOYLE DONALD E. DRINKWATER 




CHARLES H. DOOLITTLE 

171 Newton Street, South Hadley Falls, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Chemistry Club 4. 

WALTER M. DOOLITTLE 

76 High Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 
Pre-Medical 

Commuter's Club 3; Pre-Medical Club 3, 4, President 4; Psy- 
chology Club 3; Student Christian Association 3; Zoology Club 
3, 4; Honors Work 4. 



STEPHEN D. DOYLE 

15 Allerton Place, Marblehead, Massachusetts 

English 

Roister Doisters 4; Outing Club 3; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 2; Dean's List 2, 3, 4. 

DONALD E. DRINKWATER 

288 Forest Park Avenue, Springfield, Massachusetts 

General Business and Mathematics 

Math Club 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Ten- 
nis 1; Soccer 1, 2; Honors 4. 



MAURA A. DRISCOLL 

1688 Northampton St., Holyoke, Massachusetts 
Art-Education 

Index 4, Co-Literary Editor; Women's Athletic Association 1, 
2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2; Student Union Special Events Com- 
mittee 2, 3; Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 4, 
Activities 3, District Convention 3; Ski Club 1, 2, 3; Campus 
Varieties 2; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Soph-Frosh Nite 1, 2; 
Art Club 1,2, 3,4. 

RICHARD J. DUBE 

148 Glenallan Street, Winchendon, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

American Society of Mech. Engineers 4; Society of Automotive 
Engineers 4; Dean's List 3. 



LUCY S. DUBIEL 

54 Conant St., Fall River, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Chorale 1; Education Club 3, 4; Sociology Club 3, 4; Student 
Christian Association 2, 3, 4; Senate Women's Affairs Commit- 
tee 2, 3; Senate 2; House Counselor 3, 4, House Chairman 4; 
Carnival Committee 3; S.W.A.P. 3; Class of '62 Advisory 
Board 2, 3, 4. 

BARBARA A. DUBIS 

9 Dubis Street, Adams, Massachusetts 

History 

Bridge Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Soph- 
Frosh Night 1; Sophomore Hop 2; Women's Athletic Associ- 
ation 1, 2; Collegian 1, 2. 



LUCY S. DUBIEL 



BARBARA DUBIS 



308 




WILLIAM H. DUGAN, JR. 



JUDITH A. DUGGAN 



WILLIAM H. DUGAN, JR. 

5 Glenburnie Road, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 
Industrial Engineering 

Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Alpha Gamma Rho 2, 3, 4; American 
Institute of Industrial Engineers 3, 4; Carnival Ball Commit- 
tee 3. 

JUDITH A. DUGGAN 

200 Chestnut Street, East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Math Club 4; Outing Club 2; Women's Athletic Association 1, 
2, 3, 4, Sub Board 2, 3, Softball Manager 3; Newman Club 1, 
2, 3, 4. 



HONEST YOUR HONOR, that's all I did. 



ALFRED A. DUMAS 

120 Tremont Street, Peabody, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Index 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Executive Committee 3, 4; 
Ski Club 3; American Society of Mech. Engineers 2, 3, 4; So- 
ciety of Automotive Engineers 4; Air Cadet Squadron. 



JOHN J. DUNHAM 

21 Spalina Parkway, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Chemistry Club 1, 2; German Club 1, 2, 3; Pre-Medical 1; 
Newman Club 1, 2; Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Golf 1, Manager; 
R.O.T.C. Band 1,2. 



JACQULINE T. DUMOUCHEL 

32 Venture Drive, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Home Economics 

Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's 

List 2, 3. 



DANIEL E. DUNWOODIE 

350 Oxford Street, Fairhaven, Massachusetts 

Zoology 




ALFRED A. DUMAS JACQULINE T. DUMOUCHEL JOHN J. DUNHAM 



DANIEL E. DUNWOODIE 




CAROLE D. EHNES 



KENNETH C. EKBERG 



RICHARD W. ELLIOTT 

29 Marshall Street, Braintree, Massachusetts 
Personnel Management and Industrial Relations 

Industrial Administration Club 3, 4; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President of Campus Relations 4; Sigma 
Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 4. 

RAMEY J. ERICKSON 

50 Blue Bell Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Accounting Club 3, 4; Chemical Engineering Club 1, 2; Ed- 
wards Fellowship 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Alpha Sigma Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Flying Redmen 1; Air Cadet 
Squadron 1, 2. 



FREDA R. ESTNER 

114 Brigham Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Education Club 3, 4, Vice President 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 
2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 3; Sigma Delta Tau 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Arts and Music Committee 4. 

NORMA FAIRBANKS 

41 Hubbard Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Roister Doisters 2, 4; Marching Band 1; Concert Band 1; 
Operetta Guild 4; Education Club 4; Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation 1, 2, 3, 4, Board 2, 3; Student Christian Association 
1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Modern Dance Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice- 
President 3, 4; Zoology Club 3, 4. 



DONALD F. DUVAL 

152 Cheney Street, Orange, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Math Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2; 
Military Ball Committee 4; Phi Eta Sigma 1. 

ALICE L. EDGERTON 

14 Lafayette Circle, Wellesley, Massachusetts 
Merchandising 

Fine Arts Singers 1; Campus Varieties 3; Home Economics 
Club 1, 2; Univ. Open House Day Committee 2; Student Chris- 
tian Association 1; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Pledge Trainer 3, 
Sing Chairman 3, Vice President 4; Revelers 3; Mortar Board, 
Fine Arts Co-Chairman 4; Cheerleader 2, 3, 4, Co-Captain 4; 
Dean's List 2, 3; Campus Varieties 3; Carnival Ball Committee 
3; Musigals 4, Director 4, Founder 3. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 



CAROLE D. EHNES 

Bridge Street, Medfield, Massachusetts 
Home Economics 

4-H Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Math 
Club 2; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3; Alpha Chi 
Omega 2, 3. 

KENNETH C. EKBERG 

42 Ararat Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Education Club 4; Varsity "M" Club 3, 4; Student Christian 
Association 1, 2, 3; Maroon Key 2; Football 1; Baseball 1; La- 
crosse 3, 4; Ski Club 3, 4; Physical Education Club 2, 3, 4. 



RICHARD W. ELLIOTT RAMEY J. ERICKSON 





310 



FREDA R. ESTNER 



NORMA FAIRBANKS 



FRANCIS E. FALBO 

49 Oliver Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 
Production Management 

Management Club 4, Treasurer 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi 
Sigma Kappa 2, 3, 4; Librarian 3, Steward 3, 4; Football 1, In- 
tramural Football & Softball 2, 3, 4; Military Ball Committee 
3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Granville Air Society 3, 4. 

HILDA K. FANNICK 

141 Carver Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Marketing 

Education Club 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Serv- 
ice Organization 1, 3, 4; Carnival Ball Committee 3, Arts and 
Music Committee 2, 3. 



RICHARD J. FARRAR 

Center Street, Segreganset, Massachusetts 

Entomology 

Fernald Entomological Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; Olericulture 
Club 2; Student Christian Association 2, 3, 4; Alpha Gamma 
Rho 1, 2, 3, 4; Judging Teams 2. 

DAVID H. FASSER 

1 Louise Avenue, Easthampton, Massachusetts 

Landscape Architecture 

University Singers 1; Landscape Architecture Club 4; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Sigma Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Secretary 2, President 4; Freshman Swimming 1; Flying Red- 
men 1; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Granville Air Society 3, 4. 





RICHARD J. FARRAR 



DAVID H. FASSER 



JOHN B. FAUCETTE 

48 Gary Avenue, Lexington, Massachusetts 

Government 

International Relations Club 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Alpha Gamma Rho 1, 2, 3, 4, Athletic Chairman 2, Sec- 
retary 3 ; Men's Sports 1 ; Military Ball Committee 4. 

ALAN FEGARSKY 

17 Elizabeth Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Pre-Dental 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2; S.U. Games & Tournaments Commit- 
tee 2, 3, Co-chairman 2, 3; Alpha Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Stew- 
ard 2; Tennis 1, Captain 1; Pi Alpha Delta 4, President 4. 



ELAINE FEINGOLD 

37 Crapo Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Campus Varieties 2, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2; Inter-Dormi- 
tory Council 4, Secretary 4. 

MICHAEL S. FELDMAN 

14 Alton Court, Brookline, Massachusetts 

Government 

Hillel Foundation 1; Tau Epsilon Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Executive 
Board 3; Revelers 4; Football 1; Track 2; Intramural Sports 2, 
3, 4; Campus Varieties Committee 4; Carnival Ball Commit- 
tee 3. 



ELAINE FEINGOLD 



MICHAEL S. FELDMAN 



311 




SIDNEY P. FELDMAN 



DAVID G. FIELD 



SHIRLEY P. FISHMAN 



DANIEL J. FITZGERALD 



SIDNEY P. FELDMAN 

42 Radnor Road, Brighton, Massachusetts 

Government 

Edwards Fellowship 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Dormi- 
tory Representative 3; Alpha Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Sing Chair- 
man 2, Chaplain 3, Phi Award 3; Intramural Football 2; Stu- 
dent Union Arts and Music Committee 2, 3, Chairman 3; Stu- 
dent Union Program Council 3; Student Union Personnel 4; 
Political Science Club 4; Pre-Law Club 4. 

DAVID G. FIELD 

64 Bisson Street, Beverly, Massachusetts 
Zoology 

Newman Club 1, 2; Interdormitory Council 1, Treasurer 1; 
Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, 3, 4, Pledge Trainer 4; Interfraternity 
Council 3; Gymnastics Team 1; Intramural Football 1, 2. 



SHIRLEY P. FISHMAN 

1 1 Placid Road, Newton Centre, Massachusetts 

Microbiology 

Bacteriology Club 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Club 2, 3, 4; Al- 
pha Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant Treasurer 3, Treasurer 4; 
Dean's List 1, 3; Carnival Committee 3; Student Union Movie 
Committee 2. 

DANIEL J. FITZGERALD 

23 Adams Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Civil Engineering Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Lambda Chi Alpha 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3. 




WARREN J. FITZGERALD 

105 Cushing Avenue, Belmont, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Marching Band 1, 2, 3; Freshman Track 1; Intramural Sports 
2, 3, 4, American Institute of Electrical Engineers 4; Dean's 
List 1, 2; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; Eta Kappa Nu 3, 4, Corresponding 
Secretary 4. 

JAMES F. FLAGG, JR. 

148 Oak Crest Drive, Framingham, Massachusetts 
French 

French Club 3, 4, President 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi 
Beta Kappa 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4. 




THIS IS YOUR LIFE— Elaine Chomyn. 



WARREN J. FITZGERALD JAMES F. FLAGG, JR. 



MICHAEL J. FLAHERTY 

444 Franklin Street. Springfield, Massachusetts 

Finance 

Univ. Open House Day Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Men's Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; IFC 
Bowling 3, Bay State Rifles 1; Carnival Ball Committee 2, 
Westview Association 2, 3, 4. 

RAYMOND A. FLETCHER 

60 Crane Avenue, Westfield, Massachusetts 

Marketing 

Marketing Club 3, 4; Wesley Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Lambda 
Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, Financial Committee, House Manager; 
Intramurals 3, 4. 



NANCY A. FLOOD 

171 North Main Street, Leominster, Massachusetts 

Bacteriology 

Bacteriology Club 2, 3; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 
4, Assistant Publicity Chairman 1; Lambda Delta Phi 2, 3, 4, 
House Manager 3, Scholarship Chairman 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 
3; Modern Dance Production Committee 1, 2. 

ROBERT R. FOCOSI 

177 Allen Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Management 

Management Club 3, 4; President 3, 4; High School Day Com- 
mittee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Mu DeUa 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Athletics Board 1; House Counselor 4; Debating Society 1, 2; 
Dorm Council 1,3. 



CHARLES L. FOHLIN 

32 Frances Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Varsity "M" Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Lambda 
Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 
2, 3, 4; Fraternity Football, Volleyball, Swimming 2, 3, 4; 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers 3, 4; Dean's List 1. 

MARILYN C. FOLEY 

482 Ashmont Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Index 2; Education Club 3, 4; Naiads 3, 4; Women's Athletic 
Association 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Special Events Com- 
mittee 3; Pi Beta Phi 2, 3, Activities Chairman 3; Precision- 
ettes 2, 3, 4, Captain and Squad Leader 4; Dean's List 3; Cam- 
pus Chest Committee 2, 3; Carnival Committee 3, Sub Chair- 
man 3; Equestrain Club 4; Winter Carnival Fashion Show 2; 
Student Union Fashion Show 3 . 

CAROL A. FOLLEY 

75 Essex Street, Andover, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Index 4; Roister Doisters 1; Marching Band 1, 2; Bacteriology 
Club 2, Executive Board 2; Sociology Club 3, 4; U. of M. Am- 
ateur Radio Association 4, Assistant Publicity Director 4; Stu- 
dent Christian Association 1, 2, 3; Social Activities Committee 
2; Lambda Delta Phi 3, 4, Expansion Chairman 4; Carnival 
Ball Committee 2, 3. 

ROBERT T. FOOTE JR. 

14 Henshaw Avenue, Northampton, Massachusetts 
Marketing 

Campus Varieties 2; Marketing Club 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 
4; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Kappa Sigma 
2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 3; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Lacrosse 2, 4; 
Carnival Ball Committee 3. 

313 




CAROL A. FOLLEY 



ROBERT T. FOOTE JR. 



STANLEY A. FORYS 

16 Henshaw Street, Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Electrical Engineering Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Dean's List 2, 3. 

SHEELA ANN FOWLER 

73 West Main Street, Merrimac, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Campus Varieties 3; Psychology Club 3; Newman Club 1, 2; 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 2, 3, 4; Precisionettes 3, 4; Women's 
Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 



WAYNE J. FOWLES 

Gunn Road, Southampton, Massachusetts 

Pre-Veterinary 

Pre-Medical Club 4; Dean's List 3. 

KENNETH A. FRAIL 

4 Applegarth Street, Newton Centre, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Accounting Club 4; DeMolay 1, 2, 3, 4, Junior Councilor 2; 
Math Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Square Dance Club 1, 2; Student Chris- 
tian Association 1, 3, 4; Alpha Phi Omega 1, 2; Vice-President- 
Service 2; Student Worker 2. 





WAYNE J. FOWLES 



KENNETH A. FRAIL 



ROBERT W. FRANCIS 

32 Highland Street, Ware, Massachusetts 

Business 

Business Administration Club 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 3, 4; 
Phi Sigma Kappa 2, 3, 4, Rush Chairman 2, 3, President 4; In- 
terfraternity Council 3, 4; Fraternity Manager's Association 
3, 4, Director 4; Carnival Committee 3; Beta Chi 1, 2; Fra- 
ternity President's Association 4. 

ALAN C. FREELAND 

624 South Ashland Avenue, La Grange, Illinois 

English 

Newman Club 1, 2. 
3, 4; Dean's List 3. 



3, 4; Sigma Delta Psi 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 



HOWARD M. FRISCH 



ROY W. FRITZ 



HOWARD M. FRISCH 

44 Breed Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Collegian 1, 2, 3, 4, Advertising Manager 3, Business Mana- 
ger 4; Accounting Club 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; University Open 
House Day Committee 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Al- 
pha Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4, Historian 3, 4, Member 
at Large 3; Campus Chest Committee 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Mil- 
itary Ball Committee 3; Blood Drive Committee 3. 

ROY W. FRITZ 

54 Melville Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Industrial Engineering 

Lutheran Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Executive Board 4; Bay State Rifles 
1, 2; American Institute of Industrial Engineers 3, 4, Treasurer 
4; Pistol Team 3, 4, Captain 3, Coach 4. 



314 




MARILYN L. FULTON 



ELAINE S. FURMAN 



JUDITH A. GAGNE 

472 Amherst Road, South Hadley, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

University Open House Day Committee 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 
2, 3, 4; Interdorm Council 1; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; S.N.A.M. 
2, 3, 4; District #1 2, 3, 4; N.S.N.A. 2, 3, 4. 

CYRILLA S. GARVEY 

260 Northampton Road, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Home Economics 

Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 4; Com- 
muter's Club 1,2; Secretary 2. 



SALLIE S. GATES 

Gardner Road, Otter River, Massachusetts 

Home Economics 

Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha 
Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Stewardess 3, 4. 

GEORGE W. GAVUTIS JR. 

333 Howard Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 
Wildlife Management 

Rod and Gun Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Varsity Fish- 
ing Team 4, Track Team 1 . 



315 



MARCIA FROST 

272 Ash Street, Reading, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Roister Doisters 2, 3; University Singers 1, 2; Education Club 
2, 3, 4; Naiads 1, 2, 3, 4, Publicity Chairman 3; Women's Ath- 
letic Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Canterbury Club 2, 3, 4; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Pi Beta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Assist- 
ant Rush Captain 3; Precisionettes 3, 4; Carnival Committee 
3;NASSCW2, 3. 

PENELOPE FULLAM 

71 Elm Street, North Brookfleld, Massachusetts 
Zoology 

Modern Dance Club 1; Zoology Club 3, 4, Treasurer 3. 



MARILYN L. FULTON 

81 Hawthorne Street, East Weymouth, Massachusetts 

Education 

Roister Doisters 2, 3, 4, Costume Chairman 4; Equestrian Club 
3; Education Club 3, 4; French Club 1, 2; Outing Club 2; 
Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Judson Fellowship 1; 
Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Inter 'Varsity Chris- 
tian Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2; Alpha Chi Omega 2, 3, 
4; Ski Club 2, 3; Dean's List 1; Carnival Ball Committee 3. 

ELAINE S. FURMAN 

River Road, Pepperell, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Russian Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, 3; Math Club 3, 4; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3; Dean's List 1, 2. 




SALLIE S. GATES 



GEORGE W. GAVUTIS JR. 




ELLSWORTH H. GETCHELL HERBERT P. GEZORK 




FRANCIS J. GEORGE 

29 Glenwood Road, Somerville, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Marketing Club 1; Phi-Ed Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, House Manager 2; Maroon 
Key 2; Lacrosse 1; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Carnival Committee 3; 
Military Ball Committee 3. 

PAUL T. GEORGE, JR. 

113A South Main Street, Oxford, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Sigma Phi 1, 2, 3, Rushing 
Chairman 3, Executive Board 3; American Society of Mechan- 
ical Engineers 4; Dean's List 1. 



DIANA J. GERNES 

4 Gerry Road, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Education Club 3, 4, Publicity Committee 3; Newman Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Registrar 4; Spe- 
cial Events Committee 2, 3; Panhellenic Chorus 4. 

ARTHUR G. GERVAIS 

86 West Chapel Street, Abington, Massachusetts 
Wildlife Management 

Rod and Gun Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Gamma Rho 2, 3, 4; Gym- 
nastics Club 1,2. 



ELLSWORTH H. GETCHELL 

23 Adams Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

American Society of Mechanical Engineers 3, 4; Parachute 
Club 2, 3, 4, President 3, 4; Flying Club 3, 4. 

HERBERT P. GEZORK 

196 Herrick Road, Newton Centre, Massachusetts 
English 

Judson Fellowship 1, 2, Treasurer 2; Literary Society 3, 4, 
Treasurer 4. 



JAMES L. GIULIANELLI FRANCIS J. GIULIANO 



JAMES L. GIULIANELLI 

10 Agate Street, Beverly, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Chemistry Club 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4. 

FRANCIS J. GIULIANO 

3 Lyons Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Index 4; Phi-Ed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Kap- 
pa Sigma 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1; Baseball 1; Varsity Basketball 
2; Recreation Club 3, 4; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4. 



316 









VALERICO GIUPPONI 



JANE E. GIVEN 



SANDRA D. GLASS 



AARON J. GLAZER 



VALERICO GIUPPONI 

1085 Sumner Avenue, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Civil Engineering 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 
2,3. 

JANE E. GIVEN 

25 Wyman Street, Burlington, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Women's Athletic Association 1, 2; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1, 2; Wesley Foundation 1, 2; Dean's List 1, 3, 4; Nursing 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Ways and Means Committee 3; S.N.A.M. 1, 2, 
3, 4;N.S.N.A. 1, 2, 3,4. 



SANDRA D. GLASS 

36 Hillcrest Avenue, Beveriy, Massachusetts 

Matliematics 

Math Club 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4; New- 
man Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Chi Omega 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Twirier 2, 
3, 4, Head Majorette 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Dean Scholar 1, 2; 
Carnival Ball Committee 3. 

AARON J, GLAZER 

73 Winthrop Road, Brookline, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering-Mathematics 

Marching Band 1; Concert Band 1; Dance Band 1; Electrical 
Engineering Club 2; Tau Epsilon Phi 1, 2, 3; Gymnastics Team 
3; American Institute of Electrical Engineers 2. 





ARTHUR D. GODDING 

ARTHUR D. GODDING 

Leland Hill Road, Sutton, Massachusetts 

Geology 

Geology Club 2, 4; Student Christian Association 2. 

ERNEST C. GOFF 

53 Southwick Street, Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 
Production Management 

Industrial Administration Club 4; Chemistry Club 1; Chemical 
Engineering Club 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2; Sigma Phi Epsilon 
1, 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 1, 3, 4, Football 3, 4, Softball 1, 4; Fly- 
ing Redmen 1, 2; Carnival Committee 3, Recreation Commit- 
tee 3. 



317 



I BET HE swallows my earring. 




HARRIET E. GOLDTHWAITE 




JOHN C. GOLDEN 

391 Kings Highway, West Springfield, Massachusetts 
Physics 

Newman Club 2; Freshmen Indoor Track 1; Military Ball 
Committee 3; Physics Club 4. 

SANDRA GOLDEN 

19 Lorna Road, Mattapan, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Collegian 1, 2, 3; Education Club 4; Psychology Club 4; Hillel 
Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Delta Tau 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival 
Ball Committee 3; Mademoiselle College Board 2, 3, 4; Music 
Arts Committee 3. 




HARRIET E. GOLDTHWAITE 

63 Pleasant Street, Manchester, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Roister Doisters 3; Operetta Guild 4; Education Club 3, 4; 
Women's Athletic Association 3; Student Christian Association 

1, 2, 3,4; Dean's List 3. 

ROBERT T. GOLITZ 

151 Corbett Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 

Management 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Flying Redmen 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival 
Committee 3; Military Ball Committee 3, 4; Management 
Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; Granville Air Society 3, 4; Dormitory 
Treasurer 2. 



HERBERT P. GOLUB 

24 Rexiford Street, Mattapan, Massachusetts 

History 

DeMolay 1, 2, 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Epsilon 
Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Alumni Secretary 2; Dormitory House Council 1, 
2; Treasurer, Brooks Dormitory 2. 

MARGARET J. GONYEA 

13 Plum Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 



Operetta Guild 3; Education Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 
Modern Dance Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, President. 



4; 



JUDITH A. GOODELL 



JUDITH A. GOODELL 

Cadwell Street, Pelham, Massachusetts 

English 

Roister Doisters 2, 3, 4; International Club 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 
4; Honors Work 4; Commuters Club 1, 2, Vice-President 1, 
President 2. 

KENNETH M. GOODMAN 

26 Parker Street, Saugus, Massachusetts 
Business Administration 

Chorale 2; University Singers 2; Operetta Guild 4; Marketing 
Club 4; DeMolay 1; Hillel Foundation 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon Pi 
2, 3, 4; Flying 2; Talent Show 2, 3. 



318 




SANDRA GOLDEN 




ROBERT T. GOLITZ 




MARGARET J. GONYEA 




KENNETH M. GOODMAN 




CAROL R. GRAEBER 




RICHARD J. GREENE 



BENJAMIN L. GORDON 

125 Bartlett Road, Winthrop, Massachusetts 

English 

Collegian 2, 3, 4, Sports' Editor 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; S.W.A.P. 3; Centen- 
nial Committee 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4; Beta Iota Sigma 3, 4, So- 
cial Chairman. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 

ANDREW J. GRACE 

198 Mill Street, Agawam, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Chemistry Club 1, 2; Lambda Chi Alpha 2, 3, 4; Swimming 1, 
2; Dean's List 1, 2. 



CAROL R. GRAEBER 

25 Bay State Road, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Campus Varieties 3, 4; Education Club 3, 4; French Club 4: 
Lutheran Club 1; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Dorm Representative 3; Kappa Kappa Gamma 3, 4, Social 
Chairman 4; Dean's List 4; Carnival Committee 3, Ice Show; 
Art Club 3, 4; Panhellenic Chorus 4; Soph-Frosh Night Com- 
mittee 1, 2. 

ARTHUR GEORGE GRAVES, JR. 
7 Eddy Street, Oxford, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Math Club 3, 4; Chess Club 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 1, 2; 
Newman Club 1, 2; Phi Mu Delta 2, 3, 4; Track Team 1, 2; 
Cross Country I, 2; Flying Redmen 2; Physics Club 2, 3, 4. 

PATRICIA E. GRAY 

3 McClean Parkway, Ludlow, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Social Activities Committee 2; Dormitory Social Council 2; 
Nursing Club 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3; Student Nurse's Asso- 
ciation of Massachusetts 2, 3, 4; National Student Nurse's As- 
sociation 2, 3, 4; Representative Faculty-Student Affairs Com- 
mittee 3. 

CLARENCE A. GREEN 

15 Maple Valley Road, Lynn, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering Club 4; High School Day Committee 
4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Tau Kappa Epsilon 
1, 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 1, 2, 3, 4; House Counselor 4; American 
Society of Mechanical Engineers 4; Carnival Ball Committee 
3; Dorm Vice-President 2, Dorm President 3. 

RICHARD J. GREENE 

139 East Haverhill Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Social Activities Committee 3, 4; Alpha Gamma Rho 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Vice-President 3, President 4; Interfraternity Council 4, Presi- 
dent 4; Dean's List 2, 3; S.W.A.P. 3; Fraternity Managers; As- 
sociation Board of Directors 4, Chairman 4; F.M.A. House of 
Delegates 3, 4. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 

LINDA M. GRIFFIN 

155 Bellevue Avenue, Melrose, Massachusetts 

Home Economics 

Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Assoc. 2; 
Univ. Open House Day Committee 1, 2, 3; Student Christian 
Assoc. 1, 2, 3, 4; Social Activities Committee 3, 4; Pi Beta Phi 
1, 2, 3, 4, Panhellenic Representative 3, 4, Stewardess 4; Pan- 
hellenic Council 3, 4, President 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Inter- 
Greek Ball Committee 3, 4; Spring Day Committee 3; S.W.A.P. 
3; Omicron Nu 4. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 

319 




ANDREW J. GRACE 




ARTHUR GEORGE GRAVES, JR. 




CLARENCE A. GREEN 




LINDA M. GRIFFIN 




DO YOU REALLY have your own MG? 



Landscape Architecture J, 4; Univ. Open House Day Commit- 
tee 3, 4; Alpha Gamma Rho 1, 2, 3, 4, Athletic Chairman 2, 
Float Chairman 4; Granville Air Society 3, 4; Horticulture 
Shov/ 3, 4, Chairman 4. 

CAROLE E. GROSSMAN 

1 15 Chester Avenue, Chelsea, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Campus Varieties 2; International Relations Club 3; Psychol- 
ogy 1; Sociology Club 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 3; 
Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3; Social Activities Committee 2; Sigma 
Delta Tau 1, 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 1, 2; Campus Chest Committee 
2; Carnival Ball Committee 3; International Weekend 2, 3, 4, 
Chairman 4; Special Events Committee 2, 3, Co-chairman 3; 
Sophomore Advisory Board 2. 



ROBERT J. GUERIN 

2 Rita Circle, South Hadley, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

Engineering Journal 3; Chemical Engineering Club 3, 4; New- 
man Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Men's Judiciary 2, 3, 4; Alpha Gamma 
Rho 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2; Dean's List 1; Dean's 
Scholar 1. 

CHARLES J. GUILFOYLE 

3 1 Ashland St., Quincy, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Newman Club 1, 3, 4; Tau Beta Pi 4; American Society of 
Mech. Engineers 2, 3, 4; Rifle Team 1, 2; Pistol Team 3, 4. 



ALLEN S. GURKA 

1193 Elm Street, West Springfield, Massachusetts 

Business Administration 

Dance Band 1, 2; Marketing Club 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; 
Flying Redmen 1, 2; Dean's List 3. 

IRENE E. GURKA 

8 Grandview Street, Chicopee, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Roister Doisters 1; Education Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, Rec. Committee 2; Dean's List 2, 3; 
Carnival Committee 3; Student Union Dance Committee 1, 2, 
3, Northampton Volunteer Group 4; Senior Week Committee 4. 




ROBERT J. GUERIN 



CHARLES J. GUILFOYLE 



ALLEN S. GURKA 



IRENE E. GURKA 



PAUL H. GURN 

12 Orange Street, Attleboro, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Newman Club 1, 2; Phi Kappa Phi 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Zoology Club 2, 3, 4. 

ROBERT E. GURNEY 

39 Chantilly Avenue, North Adams, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Student Christian Association 1; Alpha Sigma Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Marshal 3, House Manager 4; American Society of Mech. En- 
gineers 3, 4, Secretary 4; Dean's List 1. 



ELISABETH A. GUSTAFSON 
Princeton Road, Sterling, Massachusetts 
English 

Education Club 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2; Edwards 
Fellowship 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 4; Dean's 
List 2; Literary Society 3, 4. 

THERESA V. GWOZDZ 

East Main St., Cheshire, Massachusetts 
English 

Collegian 1, 2; Index 4; Roister Doisters 1, 2, 3, 4; Education 
Club 4; 4-H Club 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 
3, 4; Ski Club 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Carnival Committee 3. 



GARY J. HAGOPIAN 

41 Ridge Road, East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Phi Mu Delta 1, 2, 3, 4; Gymnastics 1, 2, 3, 4; Gymnastics 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; American Society of Mechanical Engineers 4; 
Dean's List 3; Flying Club 3. 

WILLIAM H. HAILER 

52 Riverview Street, Dedham, Massachusetts 
A ccounting 

Accounting Club 4; Chess Club 1; Bridge Club 2, 3, 4, Univer- 
sity Champ 2; Canterbury Club 1, 2, Program Chairman 2; 
Phi Mu Delta 3, 4, Rushing Chairman 3, 4, Finance Commit- 
tee 4; Varsity Lacrosse 2, 3, 4; Intramural Lacrosse 3; Intra- 
mural Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Basketball 3, 4; Carnival 
Committee 3, Co-Chairman Weekend 3; Soph-Senior Hop 
Committee 2, Co-Chairman. 



ANNE HALL 

Dodge Road, Rowley, Massachusetts 

Education 

Campus Varieties 4; Education Club 4; Student Christian As- 
sociation 1, 2, 3, 4, Publicity Chairman 4; Kappa Alpha Theta 
1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Revelers 4, Vice-President 4; 
Scrolls 2; Ski Club 2, 3; House Counselor 3; Dean's List 3, 4; 
Campus Chest Committee 3; Carnival Committee 3; Class '62 
Advisory Board 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4; Dorm Social Chairman 2. 

JANET E. HALL 

78 Franklin Street, Wrentham, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Phi-Ed Club 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 




GARY J. 


HAGOPIAN 


WILLIAM H. HAILER 


i .^ 


i^x 


m^^^^^H 




iy 


^C^j 




r 


V 



321 



ANNE HALL 



JANET E. HALL 



JEFFREY L. HALL 

65 Dascomb Road, Andover, Massachusetts 
Landscape Architecture 

Roister Doisters 2, 3, 4, President 3, 4; University Concert 
Association 2, 3; Operetta Guild 2; Campus Varieties 2; Land- 
scape Architecture Club 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Alpha 
Zeta 2, 3, 4, Chronicler 4; Dean's List 1, 3; Honors Work 4; 
S.W.A.P. 3; Horticulture Show 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4. 

WILLIAM R. HALL 

Brookline Road, Townsend, Massachusetts 

Business Administration 

Industrial Administration Club 4; Marketing Club 4; Outing 
Club 3; Student Christian Association 3, 4; Water-Ski Club 3; 
Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2. 



MARY C. HALLISEY 

2 Denton Street, Brockton, Massachusetts 

English 

Women's Athletic Association 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Work 4; Interdormitory Council 2; 
Literary Society 3, 4. 

GEORGE D. HAMER 

30 Marietta Street, North Adams, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Sociology Club 3, 4; House Counselor 3, 4. 



RICHARD A. HAMILTON JR. 

16 Mt. Vernon St., Lawrence, Massachusetts 

Political Science 

Chemistry Club 1; Civil Engineering Club 1; International 
Relations Club 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Executive Council 3, 4, Pledge 
Trainer 3, 4; Athletic Chairman, Lacrosse 1, 2; Student Senate 
Elections Committee 4; Foreign Students Advisory Board 4; 
Political Science Club 2, 3. 

JUDITH A. HANKINSON 

Amherst Road, Leverett, Massachusetts 

English 

Collegian 1; University Open House Day Committee 4; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Precisionettes 2; Dean's List 
1, 3; Dean's Scholar 1, 2; Carnival Committee 3; Subcommit- 
tees Chairman 3 . 



NANCY P. HANLON 

112 Burlington Street, Woburn, Massachusetts 

History 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Chi Omega 2, 
3, 4, President 4; Isogon 4; Yahoo 2, 3; S.W.A.P. 3; Women's 
Affairs Committee 3; International Weekend 4; Registration 
Dance Committee 4. 

MARSHA J. HARGRAVES 

25 Church Street, Merrimac, Massachusetts 
Home Economics 

Collegian 1; Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4; Student Christian 
Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Chi Omega 2, 3, 4, Recording 
Secretary 3; Carnival Committee 3. 




MARY C. HALLISEY 



GEORGE D. HAMER 




f t 





RICHARD A. HAMILTON JR. JUDITH A. HANKINSON 




322 



NANCY P. HANLON MARSHA J. HARGRAVES 




CONSTANCE A. HARLOW JOHN M. HARRINGTON, JR. 




WILLIAM D. HARTWELL NANCY L. HASTINGS 




CONSTANCE A. HARLOW 

107 Maple Street, West Boylston, Massachusetts 

English 

Home Economics Club 2; Spanish Club 1; Student Christian 
Association 1, 2, 3; Dean's List 3, 4; Carnival Committee 3; 
Soph-Senior Hop Committee 2; Literary Society 3, 4, Vice- 
President; Class Advisory Board 3, 4; Synthesis 4. 

JOHN M. HARRINGTON, JR. 

89 Eddy Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Industrial Engineering 

Univ. Open House Day Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2; 
Flying Redmen 1; American Society of Mechanical Engineers 
2; Granville Air Society 3, 4; Engineers' Council 2, 3, 4. 



RUBY A. HARRISON 

East Shore Road, Lakeside, Connecticut 

Home Economics — Foods and Nutrition 

Chorale 2, 3, Program Committee 3; 4H Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Home 
Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Jr. and Sr. State Representative 3, 4, 
State Vice-President 3, 4. 

MARYANN C. HART 

137 Exeter Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

Education 

Collegian 1; Education Club 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; University Open 
House Day Committee 3, 4; Campus Chest Committee 2; Car- 
nival Ball Committee 3; Speech Therapy Club 3, 4; Interna- 
tional Weekend Committee 3. 



WILLIAM D. HARTWELL 

9 Wingate Road, Wellesley, Massachusetts 

German 

Chorale 1, 2; Operetta Guild 1; DeMolay 1, 2, 3, Master Coun- 
cilor 3; Edwards Fellowship 1; Student Christian Association 
1, 2, 3; Dean's List 1; Campus Varieties 3. 

NANCY L. HASTINGS 

Atlantic Road, Gloucester, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Newman Club 1, 2; Young Democrats 2, Vice-President 2; 
Dean's List 3, 4; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Program Committee 
3, 4; Student Nursing Association of Massachusetts 1, 2, 3, 4; 
National Student Nurses' Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 



JEAN L. HAVEY 

24 Silver Hill Road, Weston, Massachusetts 

Education 

Naiads 1; Women's Athletic Association I, 2, 3, 4; Kappa Kap- 
pa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Pledge Trainer 3, Vice-President 4; 
Scrolls 2, Vice-President; Precisionettes 2; Class Secretary 3, 
4; Carnival Committee 3; S.W.A.P. 

DOUGLAS T. HAWES 

6 Franklin Street, South Dartmouth, Massachusetts 
Agronomy 

Agronomy Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 3, President 4; 
Senate 3; Alpha Zeta 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 3; Dorm Counselor 
3. 



JEAN L. HAVEY 



DOUGLAS T. HAWES 



323 




HARRIET C. HAWKINS 



JAYNE HAYDEN 




ELIZABETH A. HEINZ 



RUTH C. HENDERSON 



HARRIET C. HAWKINS 

92 Laurel Street, Lee, Massachusetts 
English 

Collegian 1, 2; Literary Magazine 3, 4, Secretary 4; University 
Concert Association 3, 4, Secretary 4; Floriculture Club 4; 
Home Economics Club 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 4; Ski Club 
2; Dean's List 1, 3; Carnival Committee 3; Literary Society 3, 
4. 

JAYNE HAYDEN 

Piney Road, Cotuit, Massachusetts 

English 

Roister Doisters 3, 4; Operetta Guild 1, 2; Campus Varieties 3, 
4; U. of M. Amateur Radio Association 1, 2; Student Chris- 
tian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Chi Omega 2, 3, 4; Burnham 
Declamation 2; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Soph-Senior Hop 
Committee 2; Musigals 4; Modern Dance Club 3. 



JOHN D. HAYNES 

88 Clifford Street, Melrose, Massachusetts 
Landscape Architecture 

Landscape Architecture Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian As- 
sociation 1, 2; Alpha Gamma Rho 2, 3, 4; Lacrosse 1. 

EDWARD W. HAZLETT 

149 Mt. Vernon St., Arlington, Mass. 

Personnel Management 

Roister Doisters 2; University Concert Association 2; Operetta 
Guild 4; Campus Varieties 2, 3, 4, Manager 2, Manager-Treas- 
urer 3, 4; Management Club 3, 4; French Club 1, 2; Revelers 
4, Lacrosse 2, 3; Assistant .Manager 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Carnival Ball Committee 3, Chairman; Soph-Senior Hop Com- 
mittee 2. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 



CHARLES D. HEATH 

622 Lincoln Apartments, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Electrical Engineering Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary I.R.E. 4; Dean's 
List 2; Tau Beta Pi 4; Engineering Journal 3, 4, Executive Edi- 
tor 3. 

MARY K. HEATH 

145 State Street, North Amherst, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Collegian 1, 2; Roister Doisters 2, 3, 4; University Singers 4; 
Sociology Club 2, 3, 4; Lambda Delta Phi 2, 3, 4, Recording 
Secretary, Panhellenic Council 4; Dean's List 2; Honors Work 
4; Commuters Club 1, 2, 3, Secretary 1, Publicity 2, Commut- 
er's Mixer 3. 



ELIZABETH A. HEINZ 

32 High Plain Road, Andover, Massachusetts 

Journalism-Zoology 

4-H Club 2, 3, 4, 5; Outing Club 5; Square Dance Club 4, 5; 
Edwards Fellowship 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 
3, 4; Equestrian Club 4, 5; Little International Livestock Show 
3, 4, 5; Bay State Dairy Classic 2, 3, 4, 5; Dean's List. 

RUTH C. HENDERSON 

70 Harding Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Microbiology 

Bacteriology Club 2, 3, 4; Chess Club 1, 2; Naiads 1, 2, 3, 4; 
President 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Swim- 
ming Manager 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Alpha Chi Omega 2, 3, 4, Warden 3, 4; Ski Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
House Counselor 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 4; Honors Work 4; 
Equestrian Club 3, 4. 

324 




FRANK C. HERRON 

R.F.D.#1, Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts 

Agronomy 

Agronomy Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Judging Teams 4. 

RICHARD T. HESLIN 

4 Muriel Avenue, Wakefield, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Psychology Club 3; Newman Club 1, 2; Freshman Football 1; 
House Councilor 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Flying Club 3; Air Cadet 
Squadron 1. 



THEY FORECLOSED the mortgage on my teepee. 



DANIEL M. H. HICKEY 

Plumtree Road, Sunderland, Massachusetts 

Landscape Architecture 

Landscape Architecture Club 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; Horticulture 
Show 3, 4. 

SHERRIL A. HILTZ 

1 1 Lincoln Avenue, Northampton, Massachusetts 

Food Management 

Business Administration Club 3; Outing Club 1, 2; Varsity 
"M" Club 4; University Open House Day Committee 4; Alpha 
Zeta 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Military Ball Committee 3; Ac- 
tive Reserve 1, 2, 3, 4. 



GRANT M. HIRST 

100 South Main Street, Middleboro, Massachusetts 
Animal Science 

Chorale 1, 2, 4; Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing 
Club 1; Edwards Fellowship 1, 2; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1, 2, 3, 4; Bay State Rifles 1, 2. 

ROBERT L. HIRTLE 

20 Oak St., Charlestown, Massachusetts 
Government 

Roister Doisters 2; Student Christian Association 1; Wesley 
Foundation 1; Bay State Rifles 1, 2, 3, Commander 3; Class 
'62 Advisory Board 3, 4; Drare Club 2, 3. 




DANIEL M. H. HICKEY 



SHERRIL A. HILTZ 



GRANT M. HIRST 



ROBERT L. HIRTLE 




WESLEY M. HONEY 



RICHARD W. HOSS 



MYRON H. HITCHCOCK 

28 Mayflower Road, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Electrical Engineering Club 2; Math Club 4; U. of M. Ama- 
teur Radio Association 1; Student Christian Association 2, 3, 4; 
Pre-Veterinary Club 2, 3, 4; Institute of Radio Engineers 2, 3. 

PETER B. HODGES 

39 Madison Street, Taunton, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Accounting Club 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Bay State Rifles 1, 2, 
3; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Carnival Committee 3; Military 
Ball Committee 3; Westview Social Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



LEWIS C. HOPE 

125 Crestview Circle, Longmeadow, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Theta Chi 2, 3, 4, Executive Committee 3, President 4; Ath- 
letics Board 3; Intramurals 2, 3, 4; Winter Carnival Commit- 
tee 3. 

DOUGLAS W. HOLBROOK 

1 8 Westover Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Concert Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Staff Manager 1; DeMolay 1, 2; Elec- 
trical Engineering Club 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 
2, 3; American Institute of Electrical Engineers 2, 3, 4; Dean's 
List 1; Tau Beta Pi 4; Eta Kappa Nu 4. 



DORIS E. HOLLIS 

9 Brewster Place, North Weymouth, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Education Club 3, 4; President Student-Teachers Education As- 
sociation 4; Sociology Club 3; Women's Athletic Association 1, 
2; Edwards Fellowship 1; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 
3; House Counselor 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Campus Chest 
Committee 2. 

ROSANNE H. HOLLOW AY 

82 Montague Road, North Amherst, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Education Club 2, 3, 4; Dean.'s List 4. 



WESLEY M. HONEY 

70 East Hodges Street, Norton, Massachusetts 

History 

Campus Varieties 1, 2, 3, 4, Co- Author 2, Author 3, 4, Co- 
Chairman 4; History Club 2; French Club 1; Univ. Open 
House Day Committee 4; International Weekend 2, 3, 4; 
Ya-hoo 1, 2, 3, 4, Art Associate 1, Literary Editor 2, Editor- 
in-Chief 3, 4; Beta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3; Adelphia 4; 
Italian Club 2; Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4, Tutor 2; Alumni 
Association Student Contact Committee 2; Dean's List 1, 2, 
3,4. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 

RICHARD W. HOSS 

37 Summer Street, Rockland, Massachusetts 

Business Administration 

Business Administration Club 2, 3, 4; Management Club 2, 3, 
4; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Lambda 
Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2, 3; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; La- 
crosse 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 4; North-South All-Star Game 4; 
Dean's List 4; Campus Chest Committee 2, 3. 

326 



MARCIA E. HOWARD 

Bow Street, Duxbury, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Math Club 4; Naiads 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 

1, 2, 3, 4; Channing Club 1; Student Christian Association 1, 

2. 3, 4; Pi Beta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 4, Arrow Board 
Chairman 4; House Counselor 3; Dean's List 1; Carnival Com- 
mittee 3. 

FRANCIS G. HOWARTH, JR. 

North Street, Upton, Massachusetts 
Entomology 

Chemistry 1, 2; Chess Club 1; Fernald Entomological Club 1, 
2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2; Outing Club 2, 3, 4; Student Christian 
Association 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Zeta 
2, 3, 4, Scribe 3; Synthesis 4. 



JOHN D. HOWELL 

284 Lake St., Belmont, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Accounting Club 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 
4; House Counciler 4, Dorm Treasurer 3. 

PATRICIA R. HOWORTH 

27 Sears Avenue, Melrose, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Education Club 3, 4; Naiads 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma 
Kappa 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; House Counselor 3; Dean's 
List 3; Carnival Committee 3; Interdorm Council 2, Secretary 
2. 



DOROTHY E. HUBBARD 

906 Massachusetts Avenue, Lunenburg, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Math Club 3, 4; Christian Association 2; Dean's List 1; Alpha 
Lambda Delta 1. 



JAMES N. HUBBARD 

Main Street, Sunderland, Massachusetts 
Russian Civilization 

Dance Band 1; Student Christian Association 1, 4; Russian 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, House Manager 4. 



MAUREEN ANNA HUGHES 

88 L Street, Turners Falls, Massachusetts 

English 

RICHARD C. HUGO 

85 Gould Street, Wakefield, Massachusetts 
General Business and Economics 

Business Administration Club 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Bay 
State Rifles 1; Ski Club 1, 4; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4. 




327 



MAUREEN ANNA HUGHES 



RICHARD C. HUGO 




CAROL A. HUNNEWELL 



DONALD F. HUNT 



KATHLEEN HUNTER 



PAUL D. HUNTER 



CAROL A. HUNNEWELL 

292 Norwood Street, Sharon, Massachusetts 

Education 

Handbook 2; Index 3, Co-editor of Greeks; Women's Athletic 
Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3; 
Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4, Athletic Chairman 3, Rush 
Chairman 4; House Councilor 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; S.U. 
Special Events Committee 2, 3; S.O.S. 2; Soph-Frosh Night 
Committee 1, 2. 



DONALD F. HUNT 

844 Bryant Avenue, Winnetka, Illinois 
Chemistry 

Chemistry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 3; Honors Work 4. 



KATHLEEN HUNTER 

Old Westfield Road, Granville, Massachusetts 

English 

PAUL D. HUNTER 

796 Main Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Collegian 2; Newman Club 1, 2; Lambda Chi Alpha 2, 3, 4, 
House Manager 3; Gymnastics Team 1, 2; Flying Redmen 1; 
University Economics Association 3, 4. 




ROSEMARY T. HUSSEY 



THEY HAD TO CARRY Carrie from the mix. 



Index 2, 3, 4, Organizations Ed., 3, Managing Ed. 4; Psychol- 
ogy Club 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Board 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Student Christian Association 1, 

2, 3, 4; Student Union Publicity Committee 1, 2; Kappa Al- 
pha Theta 3, 4, Parties Chairman 4; Winter Carnival Commit- 
tee 3; House Counselor 4; Varsity "M" Club 4. 

ROSEMARY T. HUSSEY 

46 Windham Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Government 

Collegian 1, 2; Quarterly 3, 4; Roister Doisters 2, University 
Concert Association 3, 4; Secretary International Relations 
Club 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Revelers 4; Phi Kappa Phi 
4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Carnival Committee 
3; Soph-Frosh Night 2, Co-Chairman; International Weekend 

3, 4; Philosophy 3, 4; President 3. 

Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 



JOANNE HYLAND 

90 Clarence, West Springfield, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Education Club 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 2, 3, 4; 
Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Chi Omega 1, 
2, 3, 4, Scholarship Chairman, Panhellenic Council 4; Dean's 
List 1, 2, 3, 4; Astronomy Club 4; Panhellenic Chorus 4. 

JOSEPH M. HYLAND 

714 Lincoln Apts., Amherst, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Chemistry Club 1; American Institute of Electrical Engineers 
2, 3, 4, Secretary 4. 



JANICE M. INGHAM 

27 Genevieve Road, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Handbook 2; Index 3, Greek Editor; Student Christian Asso- 
ciation 2, 3, 4, Publicity 4; Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Treasurer 3, 4; Ski Club 2; Dean's List 2, 4; Special Events 
2, 3; S.O.S. 2; Women's Athletic Association — Intramural 
Sports 2, 3, 4. 

JUDITH A. IVERSEN 

Nashoba Road, Concord, Massachusetts 

Speech Therapy 

Lutheran Club 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 2, 3; 
Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 4; Mar- 
shall 3; Precisionettes 2; Ski Club 2; House Counselor 3; 
Speech Therapy Club 3, 4. 



JUDITH S. IZENBERG 

34 Rawson Road, Brookline 46, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Education Club 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-Social 
Chairman, Campus Religious Council; Sigma Delta Tau 2, 3, 
4, Treasurer 4; Precisionettes 2; S.W.A.P. 3; Arts and Music 
Committee 1, 2, 3, 4. 

CAMILLO J. JACOBS, JR. 

State Street, Richmond, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Softball 3, 4; Intramural 
Football 4; American Institute of Electrical Engineers 2, 3, 4; 
Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; Eta Kappa Nu 3, 4, 
Treasurer 4; Phi Eta Sigma 2, 3, 4. 



JUDITH H. JARVELA 

1275 Massachusetts Avenue, Lunenburg, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Collegian 1, 2; International Relations Club 3; Math Club 
2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Sigma Kappa 2, 3, 4, House Manager 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 4; 
Carnival Committee 3; Student Union Dance Committee 3, 4, 
Secretary 3, 4. 

EMILY D. JEROME 

15 Hunting Lane, Wilbrahan, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

University Singers 1; Education Club 1, 2, 4; Spanish Club 
1; Edwards Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 3, 4; 
Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2; 
Carnival Ball Committee 2. 




JANICE M. INGHAM 



JUDITH A. IVERSEN 




329 



JUDITH H. JARVELA 



EMILY D. JEROME 



DOUGLAS W. JOHNSON 

83 Sugarloaf Street, South Deerfield, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Phi-Ed Club 4. 

KENNETH D. JOHNSON 

1 1 Sherrill Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachuseitts 

Mathematics 

Math Club 2, 4; Varsity "M" Club 4; Newman Club 1, 4; 
Track 1, 2, 3, 4, Cross Country 1, 2, 4; Phi Kappa Phi 4; 
Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4: Honors Work 4. 



PAUL P. JOHNSON, JR. 

1082 West Street, Stoughton, Massachusetts 

Forestry 

Forestry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Vice-President 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 
4; Society of American Foresters 3, 4. 

OWEN C. JONES, JR. 

424 Lincoln Apts, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

U. of M. Amateur Radio Association 1, 2, 3, Chief Announcer 
1, Member at Large 1, 2; Phi Upsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Tau Beta Pi 
3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 4; American Society of Mechan- 
ical Engineers 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Research Work 2, 
4; Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4; Engineering Council 4. 





PAUL P. JOHNSON, JR. 



OWEN C. JONES, JR. 



JANICE E. JOSEPH 

1999 Commonwealth Avenue, Brighton, Massachusetts 

Education 

Sigma Delta Tau 1, 2, 3, 4; Vice-President 4; Panhell 3, 4, 
Treasurer 4; Yahoo 2, 3, Secretary 3; Education Club 3, 4; 
Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Hillel 1. 

VIRGINIA C. JOY 

49 South Prospect Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

French Club 1; Psychology Club 3, 4; Student Wives Club 2; 
Student Christian Association 1; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Honors 
Work 4. 



KEVIN J. JUDGE 

30 Ellis Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

Marketing 

Marketing Club 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Newman Club 3, 4; 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, Executive Council 
2, 3, 4; Interfraternity Council 2, 3, 4, Executive Vice-President 
4; Football 1; Intramurals 2, 3, 4; Inter-Greek Ball Committee. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 

PATRICIA A. JUSKIEWICZ 

146 Wells Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Womens' Physical Education 

Modern Dance Club 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Honors Collo- 
quium 3, 4. 



KEVIN J. JUDGE 



PATRICIA A. JUSKIEWICZ 



330 




FREDERICK O. KARLE 



ERNEST C. KARSHICK 



FREDERICK E. KARSHICK 

591 East Seventh Street, South Boston, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Men's Judiciary 2, 3, 4, Chief Justice 4; Phi Mu Delta 2, 3, 4, 
Vice-President 4; American Society of Mech. Engineers 1, 2, 3, 
4, Treasurer 4; Dean's List 1; Univ. Flying Club 3, 4; Tau 
Beta Pi. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 

MARSHA KATSEFF 

135 Adams Avenue, West Newton, Massachusetts 

Education 

Student Union Arts Committee 1, 2, 3; Sigma Delta Tau 1, 2, 
3, 4; Dorm Counselor 3; Campus Chest Committee 3; Alpha 
Lambda Delta 1; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Hillel 1, 2, 3. 



CHRISTIAN E. KAUFMAN 

90 Lincoln Street, Winthrop, Massachusetts 

Wildlife Management 

Rifle Team 3; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Rod and Gun Club 2, 3, 4. 

JACQUELINE L. KEARNS 
Brookfield Rd., Sturbridge, Massachusetts 
Spanish 

Finance Club 1; Spanish Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Pi Beta Phi 2, 3, 4; Rush Chairman 4; House Counselor 3. 



JUDITH KAGEN 

39 Mount Vernon Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

History 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Arts and Music Committee 2, 3; 
Campus Chest Committee 2; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Car- 
nival Committee 3; Soph-Senior Hop Committee 2; History 
Club 2, 3; S.O.S. 2. 

RAYMOND KALITA 

123 Prospect Gardens, Ludlow, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Civil Engineering Club 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 3; 
Varsity "M" Club 4; University Open House Day Committee 
4; Tau Beta Pi 4; Dean's List 1, 2. 



FREDERICK O. KARLE 

High St., Medfield, Massachusetts 
Olericulture 

4-H Club 2, Future Farmers of America 1, Olericulture Club 
2, Vegetable Judging Team 2, 3. 

ERNEST C. KARSHICK 

59 1 East 7th Street, South Boston, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Spring Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Indoor 
Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1; Varsity "M" Club 4. 




FREDERICK E. KARSHICK MARSHA KATSEFF 




331 



CHRISTIAN E. KAUFMAN JACQUELINE L. KEARNS 




JUDITH A. KELLEY 



KATHLEEN A. KELLEY 




JUDITH A. KELLEY 

56 Madison Avenue, Wakefield, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Index 4; Chorale 1; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Pi Beta Phi 2, 3, 4, House Manager 4, House Counselor 3; 
Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Student- Alumni Committee 1, 2, Secre- 
tary; Panhellenic Singers 4. 

KATHLEEN A. KELLEY 

55 Summit Street, South Hadley Falls, Massachusetts 

Speech Therapy 

Index 4; University Concert Association 3, 4; Newman Club 
2,11, A; Student Union Activities Committee 2, 3; Kappa Alpha 
Theta 3, 4; House Chairman 4; Carnival Committee 3; Speech 
Therapy Club 3, 4. 



JOAN M. KELLIHER 

58 Euclid Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Education Club 2, 3, 4; Math Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival Ball Committee 2, 3; 
Young Democrats Club 2, 3. 

BRUCE J. KELLY 

15 Friend Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Management 

Chemistry Club 1; Pre-Medical Club 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Pistol Team 3; Granville Air Society 3, 4; Management 
Club 3, 4; AFROTC 1, 2, 3, 4; Military Ball Committee 3. 



LAUREY C. KENERSON 

10 Laurel Street, Saugus, Massachusetts 
Wildlife Management 

Rod and Gun Club 3, 4; Ski Team 1, 4; Cross Country 2; 
Track Team 2. 

FREDERICK M. KEPPE 

195 Haverhill Street, North Reading, Massachusetts 
English 

Phi Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4, Maroon Key 2, 'Vice- 
President 2; Hockey 1, 2. 



CAROL J. KIBITZ 



ARTHUR G. KILBOURN 



CAROL J. KIBITZ 

85 Narragansett Road, Quincy, Massachusetts 
Education 

Collegian 1, 2; Roister Doisters 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 3, 4; 
"Women's Athletic Association 1, 3, 4; Student Christian Asso- 
ciation 1, 2, 3; Sigma Kappa 2, 3, 4; Carnival Committee 3; 
Senior Week Committee 4. 

ARTHUR G. KILBOURN 

Sterling Road, South Lancaster, Massachusetts 

Animal Science 

Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Gamma Rho 1, 2, 3, 
4; Wrestling 1,2; Judging Teams 2, 3, 4. 



332 




CHARLOTTE A. KIMBALL 



DAVID F. KIMPTON 



MARGERY E. KIMPTON 



NANCY A. KING 



CHARLOTTE A. KIMBALL 

22 Albany Circle, Beverly, Massachusetts 
Education 

Handbook 2; Chorale 4; University Singers 1; Education Club 
3, 4, Membership Committee 4; Women's Athletic Association 
1, 2, 3, 4; Christian Science Organization 1, 2, 3, 4, pianist, 
Vice-President, President, Reader; Student Alumnae Contact 
Committee 2; Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4, Scholarship 
Chairman, Historian 4; Precisionettes 2; House Counselor 3, 
House Chairman 4; Dean's List 1; Dean's Scholar 1; S.W.A.P. 
3; Inter-Sorority Sing 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 4. 

DAVID F. KIMPTON 

70 Sunset Avenue, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Business Management 

Business Administration Club 3, 4; Student Christian Associa- 
tion I, 2, 3; Homecoming Weekend Committee 1; Canterbury 
Club 1. 2, 3, 4, President 1, 2; Carnival Committee 3; Military 
Ball Committee 3, 4. 




ARTHUR A. KINSMAN JR. 



HUGH T. KIRLEY 



ARTHUR A. KINSMAN JR. 

Chauncey Apts., South Weymouth, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Marketing Club 3, 4; Chess Club 1, Math Club 3, 4; Square 
Dance Club 3, 4; Newman Club 3, 4; Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 
4; Baseball 1, Intramurals 3, 4. 

HUGH T. KIRLEY 

271 Northampton Road, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Landscape Architecture 

Landscape Architecture Club 4. 



333 



MARGERY E. KIMPTON 

70 Sunset Avenue, Amherst, Massachusetts 

English 

Canterbury Club 1, 2, 3; Education Club 3; Univ. Open House 
Day Committee 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3; 
Summer Social Activities Committee 2; Honors Work 3, Dean's 
List 2, 3; Carnival Ball Committee 2; Freshmen Publicity Com- 
mittee 1. 

NANCY A. KING 

38 Hillside Avenue, Everett, Massachusetts 

Speech Therapy 

Collegian 1; Roister Doisters 2, 3, 4; University Concert Asso- 
ciation 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, President 4; Student Christian As- 
sociation 1; Kappa Alpha Theta 2, 3, 4, Rush Chairman 4; 
Revelers 4, Secretary-Treasurer 4; Dean's List 2; Campus Va- 
rieties 3, 4; Speech Therapy Interest Group 3, 4; Who's Who In 
American Colleges and Universities. 




FOR MY LAST ACT, I'll eat this microphone. 




JOSEPH A. KNYCH 



FRANCIS X. KONSEVICH 



MARCEL KORN 

54 Clark Avenue, Chelsea, Massachusetts 
Zoology 

German Club 2; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 
1, 2; Tau Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Maroon Key 2; Basketball 1; 
Soccer I, 2; Student Union Governing Board 2; Student Union 
Arts and Music Committee 2, Chairman. 

JOANNE I. KOWALSKI 

6 Winthrop Street, Danvers, Masachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Education Club 2, 3, 4; Sigma Kappa 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 2; New- 
man Club 1, 2, 3, 4; WAA 2, 3, 4. 



PATRICIA A. KRAFT 

1 1 Bourne Street, Clinton, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Index 2, 3; Education Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pi 
Beta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; House Counselor 3, House 
Chairman (summer school); Dean's List 1, 3, 4; Campus Blood 
Drive 3; Campus Chest Committee 2, 3, Co-Chairman- 3; Car- 
nival Ball Committee 3; Carnival Committee 3; S.W.A.P. 3. 

DAVID A. KRETSCHMAR 

182 Riverton Road, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Business Management 

Channing Club 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2; La- 
crosse 1; Bay State Rifles 1, 2, 3; Military Ball Committee 3, 4. 



RICHARD KLEIMAN 

282 Ocean Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 

General Business and Economics 

Judson Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Stew- 
ard 3; Cross Country 1; Indoor Track 1; IFC Football, Basket- 
ball, and Softball 1, 2, 3, 4; University Economics Association 
3,4. 

CAROL R. KNUDSEN 

12 Whipple Avenue, Stoneham, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Women's Athletic Association 1, 2; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1, 2; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Massachusetts Student 
Nurses Association 1, 2, 3, 4; National Student Nurses Associa- 
tion 1, 2, 3, 4. 



JOSEPH A. KNYCH 

499 Providence Road, South Grafton, Massachusetts 

Government 

Chemistry Club 1; International Relations Club 4; Newman 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 4; Political Science Association 4. 

FRANCIS X. KONSEVICH 

81 South Prospect Street, Millers Falls, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

American Institute of Electrical Engineers 3, 4; Dean's List 
2, 3; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; Eta Kappa Nu 3, 4; Vice-President 4. 




334 



PATRICIA A. KRAFT 



DAVID A. KRETSCHMAR 



JEANETTE C. KYLE 

30 Harvard Street, Haverhill, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Marching Band 1, 2; Education Club 2, 3, 4, Co-Publicity 
Chairman 3; Judson Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4, Publicity Chairman 
3, Worship Chairman 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 
4; Dean's List 1, 2; Carnival Ball Committee 2. 

JOHN F. LA BRECQUE 

15 Roosevelt Avenue, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Newman Club 2; Dean's List 2, 3. 



JOSEPH T. LaMARRE 

20 Richfield Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Civil Engineering Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Publicity Director 4; Var- 
sity "M" Club 2, 3, 4; University Open House Day Committee 

3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Indoor Track 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-cap- 
tain 3, 4; Outdoor Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Cross Country 1, 2, 3, 4. 

RONALD A. LANE 

6 Neptune Place, Gloucester, Massachusetts 

General Business & Finance 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Mu Delta 1, 2, 3, 

4, Social Chairman 4; Bay State Rifles 1; Military Ball Com- 
mittee 4; Flying Club 2, 3, 4. 




JOSEPH T. LaMARRE 



RONALD A. LANE 




WILLIAM M. LANE 

342 June Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Forestry 

Forestry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Secretary 1, 2; Rod and Gun Club 
1, 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Rifle Team 1, 2; Society of 
American Forester 3, 4. 

CHARLES E. LAPIER 

497 Massasoit Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Industrial Engineering 

Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Lambda 
Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, Rush Chairman 2, Vice-President 4; In- 
tramural Athletics Board 2, 3, Field Supervisor 2, 3; Winter 
Track 1, 2, 3; Spring Track 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-captain 4; Basket- 
ball 3, 4; Sigma Delta Psi 4; American Society of Industrial 
Engineers 3, 4; Dean's List 1. 



LAWRENCE H. LARRIVEE 

436 Franklin Street, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Electrical Engineering Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers 3, 4; Institute of 
Radio Engineers 4. 

JOYCE LARSON 



LAWRENCE H. LARRIVEE 



JOYCE LARSON 



335 




RAYMOND F. LAWLOR 

Union Street, Montague Center, Massachusetts 
History 

Newman Club 1, 4; Senate 3; Tau Kappa Epsilon 3, 4; Dean's 
List 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2, Historian 2; Commuters 
Club 1; Sophomore Honors Colloqium 2; Soph-Frosh Nite 
Committee 2. 

THEODORE M. LEATHEM 

134 Harrington Road, Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Chemistry Club 2, 3, 4, Publicity Chairman 4; Newman Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Military Ball Committee 3, 4; Armor ROTC 1, 2, 3, 

4. 



HENRY LEAVITT 

36 College Road, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

Government 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2; International Weekend Committee 4. 

ADRIAN D. LE BLANC 

200 Lafayette Street, Salem, Massachusetts 
Pre-Medical 

Pre-Medical Club 4; Newman Club 1; Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, 3, 
4, President 4; Maroon Key 2; Swimming Team 1, 2; Dean's 
List 1; Dean's Scholar 1, 2. 



LEO C. LEFEBVRE, JR. 



KATHERINE A. LENKOSKI 



LENDRUM L. LEE 

4 Armory Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Forestry 

Forestry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Wrestling 1; Flying Redmen 1; Dean's 
List 4; Horticultural Show 1, 2; Society of American Foresters 

3,4. 

JOHN P. LEFAVOUR 

53 Eastern Avenue, Beverly, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

American Society of Mechanical Engineers 3, 4. 



LEO C. LEFEBVRE, JR. 

59 Sanders Street, Athol, Massachusetts 
Industrial Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Stu- 
dent Christian Association 4; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Rushing Chairman 3, 4; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Military 
Ball Committee 2; Inter-Greek Ball Committee 3, 4; American 
Society of Industrial Engineers 3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2, 
Treasurer 2. 

KATHERINE A. LENKOSKI 

1070 Hampden Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Handbook 4; Index 2, 3, 4; Roister Doisters 3; Campus Vari- 
eties 4; Education Club 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 
1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pi Beta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Activities 
4, Extra-Curricular Committee 3, 4; Precisionettes 3, 4; Ski 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival Ball Committee 3, Carnival Commit- 
tee 2, 3; Soph-Senior Hop Committee 2, Advisory Board 2, 3, 
4; Special Events Committee 3, 4; Panhellenic Chorus 4; 
Soph-Banquet 2; Soph-Frosh Hop 2. 

336 



WILLIAM J. LENNON 

North Plain Road, Great Harrington, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Collegian 2, 3, 4, Associate Sports Editor 2; Civil Engineering 
Club 2, 3, 4; Landscape Architecture Club 2; Newman Club 1, 
2, 3; Soccer 1; Flying Redmen 1; Water Ski Club 3; Military 
Ball Committee 1; Political Science Association 2; Engineering 
Journal 2. 

JUDITH A. LEONARD 

36 Forest Street, Whitinsville, Massachusetts 
English 

Index 4; Education Club 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 
3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; House Counselor 3, 4; Campus 
Chest Committee 2, 3; Soph-Senior Hop Committee 1, 2; Blood 
Drive 2, 3; Special Events Committee 1, 2, 3. 




WILLIAM J. LENNON 



JUDITH A. LEONARD 



THE BIG TROPHY wouldn't fit on our mantle anyways. 



GEORGE E. LEPINE 

Montague Road, Turners Falls, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

Chemical Engineering Club 3, 4; French Club 1; Dean's List 
1,2, 3,4; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4. 



SAMUEL S. LEVY 

22 Cottage Street, Peabody, Massachusetts 

Government 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis 
1, 3, 4; Student Union Games and Tournament Committees 3, 
4. 



ALAN L. LEVICK 

27 Little Road, Brookline, Massachusetts 

Pre-Dental 

Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Homecoming Weekend Committee 
2; Edwards Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; Tau Epsilon Phi 
1, 2, 3, 4; Flying Redmen 1, 2; Dean's List 1. 



STEPHAN R. LEVY 

462 Boylston Street, Brookline 46, Massachusetts 

Management 

Collegian 1, 2; Roister Doisters 1, 2, Business Manager 2; Hil- 
lel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Epsilon Pi 2, 3, 4, Scribe 2; 
R.S.O. 4; Campus Religious Council 3, President 3; Yahoo 
Business Staff 1, 2; Delegate to A.E. Pi. National Convention 
3; Management Club 4. 




GEORGE E. LEPINE 



ALAN L. LEVICK 



SAMUEL S. LEVY 



STEPHAN R. LEVY 




ANNE C. LEYDEN 




ROBERTA I. LINCOLN 




SANFORD LIPTON 





ANNE C. LEYDEN 

92 Sagamore Avenue, Chelsea, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Index 1, 2; Education Club 3, 4; 4H Club 1, 2; Phi-Ed Club 
1, 2, 3; Homecoming Weekend Committee 2, 3; Newman Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Pi Beta Phi 2, 3; Precisionettes 2, 3, 4, Squad Lead- 
er 4; Dean's List 4; Soph-Senior Hop Committee 2, 3; Softball 
Team 2, 3; Volleyball Team 2, 3, Captain 3. 

PRISCILLA E. LINCOLN 

472 Beechwood Street, Cohasset, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Education Club 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 
4; Varsity "M" Club 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 
4; House Counselor 3, 4; House Chairman 4; S.W.A.P. 3. 



ROBERTA I. LINCOLN 

58 Gates Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 
Government 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Senate 2, Chairman Activities Com- 
mittee 2; Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4, House Manager 4; Ski 
Club 1, 2, Secretary 1; House Counselor 2; Dean's List 3; Car- 
nival Ball Committee 3; Soph-Senior Hop Committee 2; Inter- 
national Weekend Committee 3. 

JOSEPH W. LIPCHITZ 

106 Fairmount Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 
History 

Collegian 1, 2, 3, 4, Associate Sports Editor 2; Newman Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Cross Country Manager 2, Track Manager 2; Bay 
State Rifles 1, 2; House Counselor 2, 3, 4; Military Ball 
Committee 3. 



SANFORD LIPTON 

482 William Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Business Administration 

Business Administration Club 3, 4; U. of M. Broadcasting 
Association 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3; Tau Epsilon Phi 1, 2, 
3, 4; Outdoor Track 1; Management Club 2, 3, 4. 

RITA J. LISCIOTTI 

346 Central Street, Leominster, Massachusetts 

Spanish 

Spanish Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Dorm Captain 3, Executive Board 4; Ski Club 2; House Coun- 
selor 3, 4; Carnival Ball Committee 3. 




JANET A. LIZOTTE 



JANET A. LIZOTTE 

Davis Street, Turners Falls, Massachusetts 

English 

Quarterly 3, 4, Associate Editor 4; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1, 2, 3, 4; Campus Chest Committee 1; Carnival Commit- 
tee 3; Literary Society 3, 4, President 4; Synthesis 4. 

JOSEPH W. LONG 

10 Gordon Road, North Reading, Massachusetts 

Math 

Math Club 2, 3, 4; Spanish Club 4; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 3, 4; Kappa Sigma 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3; Varsity "M" 
Club 3; Carnival Ball Committee 2. 



338 



PRISCILLA E. LINCOLN 




JOSEPH W. LIPCHITZ 




RITA J. LISCIOTTI 




JOSEPH W. LONG 



Pl 


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JOSEPHINE V. LONGO 




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BETTY J. LUKOW 




JOSEPHINE V. LONGO 

79 Haverhill Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Math Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Kappa Phi 4; 
Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Work 4; Carnival Ball Committee 
3. 

SUSAN B. LOTHROP 

20 Miller Street, Medfield, Massachusetts 

English 

Collegian 2; Chorale 1, 2, 3; University Singers 1; Operetta 
Guild 2, 3, 4; Campus Varieties 3, 4; Student Christian Asso- 
ciation 3, 4. 



FRANCIS H. LOVEJOY 

301 King Street, Littleton, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Collegian 1; Dance Band 1; Campus Varieties 3, 4, Musical 
Director 3; Statesmen 2, 3, 4, Director 3, 4; Homecoming 
Weekend Committee 4; Social Activities Committee 4; Tau 
Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Musical Director 3, 4; Revelers 3; 
Adelphia 4, President 4; IPC Skits Committee 3; Economics 
Club 4; Carnival Committee 3, Co-chairman of Activities 
Committee 3; S.W.A.P. 3; Political Science Association 4; 
Commuters Club 4; Class of '62 Executive Council 3, 4; Sum- 
mer Session News Editor 3. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 

BARRY A. LOWE 

65 North Main Street 
Mechanical Engineering 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman Track 1; Intramural Sports 
3; American Society of Mechanical Engineers 2, 3, 4; Society 
of Automotive Engineers 4. 



BETTY J. LUKOW 

423 Thurston Street, Wrentham, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Index 3; Chemistry Club 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 
3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Kappa Kappa Gamma 2, 3, 4; 
Treasurer 3, Recording Secretary 4; Dean's List 1, 2; Dean's 
Scholar 1, 2, 3; Sophomore Banquet Committee 2. 

DOROTHY A. LURIE 

628 Weetamoe Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 
Government 

International Relations Club 2; Women's Athletic Association 
2; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Flying Club 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 
3, 4; International Weekend 4. 



BARBARA J. LYMAN 

5 Ferrante Avenue, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3; Dean's List 1, 3, 4; 
Nursing Club 2, 3, 4; Student Nurses Association of Massa- 
chusetts, District #1 2, 3, 4; National Student Nurses' Asso- 
ciation 2, 3, 4; Student Council of the School of Nursing 4; 
Dormitory Treasurer 2. 

STANLEY A. LYMAN 

7 Claflin Path, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

C/vi7 Engineering 

Civil Engineering Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Mechanical Engineering Club 
1, 2; Landscape Architecture Club 2; Univ. Open House Day 
Committee 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2; House 
Counselor 2, 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 2, 3; Gryphon Society 
4; Professional Assistant to M.E. Dept. 3, 4. 




DOROTHY A, LURIE 




BARBARA J. LYMAN 



339 



STANLEY A. LYMAN 




DERRELL SERIER LYNCH 

Chatham Road, Harwich, Massachusetts 
Finance 

Business Administration Club 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4. 

JOSEPH N. LYONS, JR. 

6 Lothrop Street, North Easton, Massachusetts 

Personnel Management 

Management Club 4; High School Day Committee 3; Home- 
coming Weekend Committee 3; Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Maroon 
Key 2; Freshman Track 1; American Society of Civil Engi- 
neers 2, 3, 4; Carnival Committee 3; Military Committee 4; 
Soph-Frosh Committee 2. 



'r, wK'*' M" 



" f^Sh Wsf^ 





OH! KENNY!— You didn't! 



DERRELL SERIER LYNCH 



JOSEPH N. LYONS, JR. 



RICHARD P. MACKLEM 

59 Kimball Road, Fitchburg, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Collegian 4; Math Club 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 
2, 3, 4; Intramural Basketball 2, 3, 4; House Counselor 3, 4; 
Military Ball Committee 3, 4; Soph-Senior Hop Committee 2; 
Class of '62 Executive Committee 3, 4; Gryphon Society 4. 



DONNA M. MAC QUARRIE 

15 Congreve Street, Roslindale 31, Massachusetts 
Home Economics 

Floriculture Club 4; Home Economics Club 3, 4, Executive 
Board 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2; High School 
Day Committee 3; Student Christian Association 2, 3, 4; Ski 
Club 2; Debating Club 1. 



ELIZABETH O. MAC MILLIN 

96 Greendale Avenue, Needham Heights, Massachusetts. 
Psychology 

Psychology Club 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 
4; Zoology Club 1; Carnival Committee 3. 



JAMES A. MADDEN 

Paric Street, Housatonic, Massachusetts 

Landscape Architecture 

Landscape Architecture Club 2, 3, 4; Lutheran Club 1, 2, 3; 
Ski Club 1, 2. 




RICHARD P. MACKLEM ELIZABETH O. MAC MILLIN DONNA M. MAC QUARRIE 



JAMES A. MADDEN 



JOHN J. MAHAN 

64 Weston Avenue, Braintree, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Industrial Administration Club 3, 4; Accounting Club 2, 3, 4, 
President 4; Marketing Club 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Fresh- 
men Track 1; Dean's List. 

PHILIP S. MAJESKI 

80 Little River Road, Westfield, Massachusetts 

Industrial Engineering 



CAROL ELAINE MAJEWSKI 

324 Chapel Street, Holden, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Index Women's Athletic Association 1, 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Beta Phi 3, 4. 



2, 3, 4; Newman 



HENRY VICTOR MAKIE 

22 Fredrickson Avenue, Holden, Massachusetts 
Food Technology 

Chemistry Club 1, 2; Food Technology Club 3, 4, President 
4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Tau Kappa Ep- 
silon 1, 2, 3, 4, Sergeant at Arms 2, 3, House Manager 2, 3, 
Steward 3, 4; Football 1, Interfraternity Football 2, 3, 4, 
Softball 2, 3, 4, Basketball 2, 3; Steward's Club 3, 4, Execu- 
tive Secretary 3, 4; Fraternity Manager's Association Board 
of Directors 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 3, 4. 



SALLY W. MALLALIEU 

1 1 Saint Joseph Drive, East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Philosophy 

Collegian 1, 2, Editorial Associate 2; Quarterly 3; Women's 
Athletic Association 1; Student Christian Association 1, 2; 
Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Work 2, 3; Philosophy Club 2, 3, 
Vice-President 2, 3. 

JOHN F. MALOOF 

10 Thayer Street, Milford, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

Chernical Engineering Club 3, 4; Intramural Sports 3, 4. 



FRANK S. MANCUSO JR. 
29 Chestnut Street, Palmer, Massachusetts 
Zoology 

Chorale 1; Operetta Guild 3, 4; Student Christian Association 
1, 2; Lambda Chi Alpha 3, 4; Zoology Club 2, 3, 4, President 
4. 

MARILYN R. MANN 

1 19 Warren Road, Framingham, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Operetta Guild 4; Business Administration Club 4; Chemistry 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2; Outing Club 4; Student Christian 
Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Lambda Delta 
I; Dean's List 1, 2; Economics Association 3, 4. 



341 




SALLY W. MALLALIEU 



JOHN F. MALOOF 




FRANK S. MANCUSO JR. 



MARILYN R. MANN 



FRANK A. MARAFIOTI 

9 Prince Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Civil Engineering Club 2, 3, 4; University Open House Day 
Committee 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4. 

JOHN R. MARSDEN JR. 

216 Pine Street, Attleboro, Massachusetts 

Business Administration 

Business Administration Club 4; Mechanical Engineering Club 
2; Student Christian Association 1, 2; Q.T.V. 2, 3, 4; Carni- 
val Ball Committee 3; Military Ball Committee 3. 



ROBERT S. MARSHALL 

7 Lawrence Road, Brookline, Massachusetts 

Business Administration and Economics 

Collegian 3; Math Club 1, 2; Hillel Foundation 1, 2; Alpha 
Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Maroon Key 2, Treasurer; Campus Chest 
Committee 1, 2, 3, Chairman 3. 

ALBERT R. MARTIN 

12 Liberty Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 
Marketing 

Marketing Club 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Newman Club 3, 4; Phi 
Sigma Kappa 3, 4; Intramural Basketball, Swimming, Racing 
3, 4. 




ROBERT S. MARSHALL 



ALBERT R. MARTIN 




ROBERT H. MASON 

80 Hillside Avenue, West Newton, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Industrial Administration Club 4; Student Christian Association 
2, 3, 4; Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Dean's List 

1, 3; Bridge Club 3, 4. 

L. JOHN MASSARELLI 

75 Bateman Street, Roslindale, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Varsity "M" Club 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Kappa Sigma 1, 

2, 3, 4; Freshman Baseball 1; Wrestling 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 4; 
Soccer 3. 



NANCY MASSENBURG ROBERT J. MASTRODOMENIC6 



NANCY MASSENBURG 

24 Fenwick Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Naiads 2; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Nursing Association 
of Massachusetts 1, 2, 3, 4; National Student Nurses' Associa- 
tion 1, 2, 3, 4; Student-Faculty Affairs Committee 3. 

ROBERT J. MASTRODOMENICO 

3 1 Murtle Street, Rockland, Massachusetts 
Journalism 

Collegian 2, 3; Quarterly 3, Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Social Chairman 2, House Manager 4. 



342 




SHIRLEY L. MATTHEWS JOHN J. MC CORMICK, JR. 




GAIL MC CRENSKY ROBERT E. MC GLONE 

CAROLYN M. MC GRATH 

14 Southern Heights 
English 

Campus Varieties 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Chi Omega 2, 
3, 4; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Class Executive Board 
3, 4; Pan-Hellenic Sing 4. 

EILEEN T. MC GUIRE 

Church Street, Marshfield, Massachusetts 

English 

Operetta Guild 3; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



MARY ANN MC KAY 

20 Erickson Street, Stoneham, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

American Society of Mechanical Engineers 1, 2, 3, 4; Presi- 
dent 3, 4; Program Chairman 2; Engineering Journal 3, 4; 
Secretary 3, 4; Alpha Chi Omega 2, 3, 4; Engineering Council 
4; Ski Club ] ; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

GEORGE W. MC KENNA 

17 Antrim Road, Framingham, Massachusetts 

Mathen^atics 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Q.T.V. 1, 2, 3, 4, Rush chairman 3, 
Social Chairman 4; Interfraternity Council 3, 4, Treasurer 4; 
Dean's List 1; Military Ball Committee 3; Inter-Greek Ball 
Committee 3, Publicity Chairman; S.W.A.P. 3. 



343 



SHIRLEY L. MATTHEWS 

198 Pleasant Street, E. Bridgewater, Massachusetts 

Home Economics 

Index 3; Concert Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 
3, 4, Secretary 2, Junior Representative 3, Program Chairman 
4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Recording Secretary 4; Pi Beta Phi 
1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 3, Pledge Trainer 4; Scrolls 2; 
Dean's List 1; Home Economics Student-Faculty Board 3; Wa- 
ter Ski Club 3. 

JOHN J. MC CORMICK, JR. 

221 Lincoln Apts, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Phi-Ed Club 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4; Sigma Alpha Ep- 
silon 1, 2, 3, 4, Pledge Vice-President 1; Varsity Football 1, 2, 
3, 4, Co-Captain 4; Intramural Basketball I, 2, 3, 4; Dean's 
List 3, 4. 



GAIL Z. MC CRENSKY 

99 Witney Road, Medford, Massachusetts 

Education 

Hillel 1, 2; Education Club 3, 4; President 4; Student Union 
Arts Committee 1, 2; Women's Athletic Association 3; Sigma 
Delta Tau 1, 2, 3, 4; House Manager 4; Student Teacher Ed- 
ucation Association of Massachusetts, Historian 4. 

ROBERT E. MC GLONE 

176 Trenton Street, Melrose, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Phi-Ed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 4; Newman Club 1, 
2, 3, 4; Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4, House Manager 3, Vice-Pres- 
ident 4; Football 1, 2; Lacrosse 1, 3, 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Dean's List 4. 




MARYANN MC KAY 



GEORGE W. MC KENNA 





PAULA S. MC MAHON 



SUSAN E. MC MASTER 



WILLIAM S. MC NAMARA 



MARY F. MC REVEY 



PAULA S. MC MAHON 

74 Orchard Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

University Open House Day Committee 1, 2; Newman Club'l, 

2, 3, 4; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant Treasurer 2, Treas- 
urer 3; Mass. State Council Student Nurses 1, 2, 3, 4; District 
#1 M.S.C.S.N. 1, 2, 3, 4; National Student Nurses Association 

1, 2,3,4. 

SUSAN E. MC MASTER 

7 Columbus Avenue, Southbridge, Massachusetts 

English 

Collegian 2, Literary Society 3, Women's Athletic Association 

3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4, (Campus Rela- 
tions 4); Ski Club 2, 3; Modern Dance Club 3, 4; Dean's List 
2; Winter Carnival Booklet Committee 3. 



WILLIAM S. MC NAMARA 

6 Redin Drive, East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Forestry 

Forestry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Gam- 
ma Rho 2, 3, 4; Intramural Football 2, 3, 4; Intramural Soft- 
ball 2, 3, 4; Alpha Zeta 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Dean's List 1, 3. 

MARY F. MC REVEY 

Wickaboag Valley Road, West Brookfield, Massachusetts 

English 

Collegian 2; Education Club 3, 4; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion 3, 4; Century Club 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 




CAN JIM HELP IT if they all love him? 



MARIE J. MEANS ROBERT G. MEANS 

MARIE J. MEANS 

149 Spring Street, Hull, Massachusetts 

English 

Collegian 2, 3; Fine Arts Singers 3; International Relations 
Club 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 
Assistant House Manager 3; Dean's List 3; Special Events 
Committee 2, 3; History Club 2, 3. 

ROBERT G. MEANS 

1 3 Madison Avenue, Greenwood, Massachusetts 

Entomology 

Fernald Entomological Club 3, 4; Flying Redmen 1; American 
Society of Mechanical Engineers 2; Rifle Team 1, 2; Literary 
Society 2, 3, Vice-President 2; Armenian Club 3, 4. 



344 



RAYMOND G. MELLO 

458 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

EMILY R. MERCHANT 

35 Warner Street, Glouster, Massachusetts 
Foods and Nutrition 

University Singers 1; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Wesley 
Foundation 1; Dean's List 1, 2. 



GERTRUDE A. MEYER 

9 Clinton Avenue, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Chemistry Club 1; Education Club 3, 4; Student Christian As- 
sociation 1, 2, 3; Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4, Alumnae Sec- 
retary 3, Recording Secretary 4; House Counselor 3, 4; Dean's 
Scholar 1 ; Campus Chest Committee 2. 

JOHN J. MEYER 

13 K Street, Turners Falls, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Engineers' Council 2, 3, 4, President 4; Civil Engineering Club 
1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; High School Day Committee 2. 



BETTY P. MILLER 

251 Grove Street, So. Braintree, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Math Club 2, 3; Education Club 3; Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation 2, 3; Canterbury Club; Student Christian Association 1, 
2, 3; Wesley Foundation 2, 3; Precisionettes 3; Phi Kappa 
Phi 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Work 3; Alpha Lambda Del- 
ta 1. 

LEE K. MILLER 

295 Corey Street, W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

Industrial Engineering 

Index 2; Operetta Guild 2, 3, 4; Campus Varieties 3; American 
Institute of Industrial Engineers 3, 4; Secretary 4, Program 
Chairman 3, Electrical Engineering Club 2; Univ. Open House 
Day Committee 3; Hillel Foundation 2, 3, 4; Tau Epsilon Phi 
1, 2, 3, 4; Executive Board 3, American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers 2, 3; Engineers Council 3, 4. 



ALFRED MOCHAU JR. 

Main Street, Lanesboro, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Tau Beta Pi 3, 4, Recording Secretary 4; Eta Kappa Nu 3, 4; 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers 3, 4; Engineering 
Journal 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Institute of Radio Engineers 4; 
AIEE-Ire Joint Branch 3, 4, Vice Chairman 3, Chairman .4. 

THOMAS E. MONAHAN 

6A Hampshire Heights, Northampton, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Civil Engineering 3, 4; University Open House Day Com- 
mittee 3, 4, Chairman 3; Dean's List 3, 4; Honor's Work 4; 
Tau Beta Pi. 




345 



ALFRED MOCHAU JR. 



THOMAS E. MONAHAN 



JOHN J. MOORE JR. 

19 Parkside Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Math Club 3, 4, President 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's 
List 3, 4. 

BERNYCE E. MORAN 

29 Upland Road, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

English 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3. 



ROBERT J. MOREAU 

102 West Street, Chicopee, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; American Institute of Electrical En- 
gineers 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Tau Beta Pi 4; Eta Kappa 
Nu 4. 

WAYNE M. MOREAU 

283 Center Street, Chicopee, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Chemistry Club 1, 2, 4; Newman Club 2, 3; Intramural Softball 
3, 4; Intramural Football 3, 4; Dean's List 1; Dean's Scholar 1. 



ROBERT D. MORIN 

9 Smith Street, South Hadley Falls, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Math Club 4; Newman Club 4; Swimming 1; Dean's List 3. 

ALICE M. MORROW 

1531 West Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Home Economics Education 

Roister Doisters 2, 3; 4-H Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 



EDWARD MORTON 

293 Hartmann Road, Newton, Massachusetts 

Pre-Dental 

Pre-Medical Club 2, 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's 
List 1, 2. 

SANDRA L. MORTON 

7 Orchard Drive, West Acton, Massachusetts 

Botany 

Square Dance Club 1, 2; University of Massachusetts Broad- 
casting Association 1; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 
Archery Manager, Secretary; Christian Association 3, 4. 



346 




EDWARD MORTON 



SANDRA L. MORTON 




DEMITRIOS M. MOSCHOS MICHAEL C. MOSCHOS 




DEMITRIOS M. MOSCHOS 

21 Morningside Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Government 

Orthodox Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 1; Univ. State House Day 
Committee 2, 3; Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, Historian 2; Maroon Key 
2; Phi Kappa Phi 4; House Counselor 3, 4, House Chairman 
4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's Scholar 2; Military Ball Com- 
mittee 3; Political Science Committee 3, 4; Phi Eta Sigma 2, 
3, 4; Distinguished Military Student 3, 4. 

MICHAEL C. MOSCHOS 

2 1 Morningside Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Business Administration & Government 

Univ. State House Day Committee 2, 3, Chairman 2, 3; Senate 
1, 2; Orthodox Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Political 
Science Association 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Military Ball- 
Fund Council 4, Chairman 4; Distinguished Military Student 3, 
4; Commencement Speakers Committee 4, Chairman 4. 



EDWARD S. MOSES 

H-2 Hampshire House, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Wildlife Management 

Rod and Gun Club 4, Presiding Officer; Rifle Team 2, 3, 4, 
Captain 3, 4; Dean's List 3. 

CONRAD M. MOTYKA 

1 1 High Street, Three Rivers, Massachusetts 
Forestry 

Marching Band 2; Food Technology Club 1; Forestry Club 2, 
3, 4, Secretary 3, President 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Soccer 1; 
Armenian Club 3, 4. 



BERNARD J. MURPHY, JR. ELIZABETH MURPHY 



DOROTHY C. MOUNT 

239 Green River Road, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Physics 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival Committee 2, Carnival Ball 
Committee 3; Physics Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; American Insti- 
tute of Physics 3, 4. 

WAYNE R. MUCCI 

370 Forest Avenue, Brockton, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Sociology Club 2, 3; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Phi Kappa Phi 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Italian Club 1, 2. 



BERNARD J. MURPHY, JR. 

3 McLaughlin Place, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Government 

Homecoming Weekend Conimittee 4, Co-chairman 4; Newman 
Club I, 2, 3, 4; Social Activities Committee 2, 3, 4; Q.T.V. 1, 
2, 3, 4, Master of Ceremonies 2, 3; Revelers 2; Adelphia 4; 
Class President 2, 3, 4; Carnival Committee 3, General Chair- 
man 3; S.W.A.P. 2, 3, 4; Pohtical Science Association 4, Ex- 
ecutive Committee 4; University Health Committee 4. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 

ELIZABETH MURPHY 

113 Bridge Street, Salem, Massachusetts 

English 

Index 4; Roister Doisters 1; Campus Varieties 3, 4; Education 
Club 4; Naiads 2, 3; Homecoming Weekend Committee 2, 3; 
Student Christian Association 1; Orthodox Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Secretary 2; Panhellenic Chorus 4; Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, 
President 4. 

347 





JAMES J. MURPHY 



ROSEMARY F. MURPHY 



JAMES J. MURPHY 

151 Hampden Street, Chicopee, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Zoology Club 2, 3, 4; Pre-Medical Club 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; Intermurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Beta Chi 4; Young Democrats 
Club 3. 

ROSEMARY F. MURPHY 

8 Cottage Street, Fairhaven, Massachusetts 

German 

University Singers 1; International Club 4; Naiads 1, 2; 
Women's Athletic Association 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Chi Omega 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Campus Varieties 2. 



RICHARD A. MURRAY 

535 East Street, Dedham, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Math Club 3, 4; Alpha Sigma Phi 2, 3; Newman Club 1; Fly- 
ing Redmen 2; Dean's List 1,3; Honors Work 4. 





RICHARD A. MURRAY 



RICHARD L. MUSHROE 




RICHARD L. MUSHROE 

108 Lessey Road, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Math 

Math Club 4; Intramurals 3, 4. 



^A i 



JACQUELINE M. NAPOLITANO 

15 Marion Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Education Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Kappa Kappa 
Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 4; Carnival Com- 
mittee 3 ; Special Events Committee 2. 

CAROL A. NEAL 

63 Bancroft Road, Melrose, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Campus Varieties 3, 4; Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Univ. Open 
House Day Committee 2; High School Day Committee 2; Stu- 
dent Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Secretary 3, Social Chairman 4; House Counselor 3; Carnival 
Ball Committee 3; Modern Dance Club 1, 2; Panhellenic Cho- 
rus 4. 



LINDA K. NELSON 

1 29 Maple Street, East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 
Pre-Med 

Collegian 3; Olericulture Club 2, 3; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3; 
Women's Athletic Association 1, 2; Alpha Lambda Delta 1, 2; 
Dean's List 1, 2, 3. 

JOHN D. NERO 

23 Legion Drive, North Abington, Massachusetts 

Business Administration and Economics 

Operetta Guild 2; Varsity "M" Club 4; University Open House 
Day Committee 4; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 

2, 3, 4; Cheerleader 3, 4, Co-captain 4; Class Advisory Board 

3, 4; Carnival Committee 2; Student Senate Public Relations 
Committee 2. 



LINDA K. NELSON 



JOHN D. NERO 



348 





DONALD A. NEWEY JR. 



GLORIA E. NICHOLLS 



MARY A. NICKERSON 



KAY E. NIEMI 



DONALD A. NEWEY JR. 

State Road, Plymouth, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Square Dance Club 2; Student Christian Association 2, 3; 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers 4; Society of Au- 
tomotive Engineers 4. 

GLORIA E. NICHOLLS 

S. Main Street, Williamsburg, Massachusetts 
Speech 

Varsity "M" Club 4; University Open House Day Committee 4. 



MARY A. NICKERSON 

67 Rybury Hillway, Needham, Massachusetts 

English Literature 

Campus Varieties 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 
4; Chi Omega 3, 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Carnival Ball Committee 
3; Literary Society 2, 3, 4; Arts and Music Committee 2; 
Young Democrats Club 2, 3, 4; Pan-Hellenic Chorus 4; Class 
Advisory Board 4. 

KAY E. NIEMI 

5 Burman Avenue, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Home Economics 

Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4; Christian Association 2, 3, 4; 
Handbook 2; Outing Club 3; Roister Doisters 3. 



PAUL H. NOWILL 



GABRIELA NUNES 



PAUL H. NOWILL 

232 Riverdale Street, West Springfield, Massachusetts 

Physics 

Physics Club 2, 3, 4; DeMolay 1, 2; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1, 3; Wesley Foundation 2, 3; Senate Finance Committee 

2, 3; Summer Sessions Committee 2, 3; Alpha Phi Omega 2, 

3, 4, Treasurer 2, 3, Historian 4; Mihtary Ball Comrnittee 3; 
Summer Testing Counselor 2, 3. 

GABRIELA NUNES 

182 Branscomb Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Spanish 

Spanish Club 2, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2; New- 
man Club 1, 2, 4; Chi Omega 1, 2, 4; Precisionettes 2; Dean's 
List 2. 



349 




CAROL, THERE'S SOMETHING we have to tell you about 
your husband. 




JAMES J. O'LEARY BRENDA CAROLINE OLIVERI 




RICHARD A. ORENSTEIN THADDEUS WALTER OSETEK 



RAYMOND D. NURME 

West Street, West Hatfield, Massachusetts 

Landscape Architecture 

Landscape Architecture Club 3, 4; Horticulture Show 3, 4, 
Co-chairman 4. 

BRUCE W. OGILVIE 

2 Chicopee Row, Groton, Massachusetts 

Pomology 

Pomology 2, 3, 4; Varsity Wrestling 1, 2; Horticulture Show 2, 
3,4. 



JAMES J. O'LEARY 

213 Parkview Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 
History 

Collegian 1, 2; Campus Varieties 3; International Club 4; New- 
man Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Senate 1, 2, 3, Chairman Public Relations, 
Executive Committee 2, 3; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Chap- 
lain 3; Revelers 3, Treasurer 3; Senator at Large 2, 3; Dean's 
List 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Inter Collegiate Debating Team 1, 2, 
3; S.W.A.P. 2; History Club 3, 4, President 4; Young Demo- 
crats 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3, President 4; R.S.O. Committee 
2,3. 

BRENDA CAROLINE OLIVERI 

88 Edgeland Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Histoiy 

Campus Varieties 2, 4; International Relations Club 4; Wom- 
en's Athletic Association 1; Senate Activities Committee 2; 
Senate Budget Committee 4; RSO Executive Committee 2; 
Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2; Scrolls 2; Ski Club 1, 2, 3, Secre- 
tary 2, 3; International Weekend Committee 4, Recording 
Secretary 4; Student Union Program Committee 2, 3; Special 
Events Committee 1, 2, 3, Co-chairman 2, 3; History Club 3, 4. 

MARY L. O'NIEL 

94 Ralph Chapman Road, Swansea, Massachusetts 

English 

U. of M. Amateur Radio Association 1 ; U. of M. Broadcasting 
Association 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

SUSAN E. ONKSEN 

191 Warren Road, Framingham, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Roister Doisters 1, 2, 3, 4; Marching Band 1, 2, 3; Librarian 

2, Public Relations 3, Concert Band 1, 2, 3; Sociology Club 

3, 4; Education Club 3, 4; Judson Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Weekly Vespers 3, Secretary 
4; Senate 2, Chairman Activities Committee; House Coun- 
selor 3, 4. 



RICHARD A. ORENSTEIN 

28 Standish Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

Chemical Engineering Club 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1,3. 

THADDEUS WALTER OSETEK 

129 Center Street, Chicopee, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Math Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Senate 2, 3; 
Budget's Committee 2; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 
3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha 
Phi Omega 3; Dean's List 1; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Mili- 
tary Ball Committee 2; Class Advisory Board 2, 3; Baker Ath- 
letic Chairman. 



350 



ELEANOR A. OSLEY 

Chestnut Street, West Hatfield, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Index 4; Roister Doisters 3; Chemistry 2; Outing Club 2; 
Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Field Hockey Team 
2, 3, Sub-board 4, Basketball Team 1, 2, 3, Head of Field 
Hockey 3; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma 
Kappa 2, 3, 4, Registrar 4; Dean's List 2; PanHel Chorus 4. 

KAREN L. OSTERBERG 

McGregory Road, Sturbridge, Massachusetts 

Home Economics 

University Singers 1; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Senior 
Representative 4; High School Day Committee 2, 3; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Precisionettes 2; Dean's List 
3; Student-Faculty Council 3. 



DAVID STUART OSTERHOUT 

713 East Street, Walpole, Massachusetts 
Zoology 

Geology Club 1, 2; High School Day Committee 2; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Gamma Rho 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Alumni Secretary 3; Maroon Key 2; Varsity "M" Club 2; 
Swimming Team 1, 2; Flying Redmen 1, 2; Dean's List 3; 
Campus Chest Committee 2; Military Ball Committee 3, 4; 
Zoology Club 3; Granville Air Society AFROTC 3, 4; Opera- 
tions Officer 3; Cadet Colonel-Wing Commander 4. 

PETER ALAN O'SULLIVAN 

Mill Street, West Groton, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Phi-Ed Club 3, 4; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Freshman Foot- 
ball 1; Baseball 1, Intramurals 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3. 

MARY T. OWCZARSKI 

24 Ferry Avenue, West Springfield, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Collegian 1, 2; Campus Varieties 2; Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Univ. Open House Day Committee 3, 4; High School Day 
Committee 3, 4; Homecoming Weekend Committee 2, 3; New- 
man Club 1; Student Christian Association 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 
3, 4; Campus Chest Committee 2, 3; Carnival Ball Committee 

1, 2, 3; Carnival Committee 1, 2, 3; Military Ball Committee 

2, 3; Soph-Senior Hop Committee 2, 3; Spring Day Committee 
2, 3; N.E.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; S.O.S. 2; Italian Club 1, 2, 3; Romance 
Language Club 1, 2; Arts and Music Committee 2; Junior Mix 
Committee 3; Senior Mix Committee 4. 

CHESTER D. OZIMINA 

46 Ferry Street, Easthampton, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Society of Automotive Engineers 4; 
Dean's List 1, 2; Tau Beta Pi 4; Eta Kappa Nu 3, 4; Recording 
Secretary 4; Institute of Radio Engineers 4. 



ASTRA M. OZOLINS 

20 Wood Street, North Adams, Massachusetts 

Merchandising 

Roister Doisters 2; University Singers 2, 3; Women's Athletic 
Association 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Alpha Chi Omega 2, 3, 4, House Manager 4. 

JEANNE A. OZON 

Tonset Road, Orleans, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Math Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic 
Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 




ELEANOR A. OSLEY 



KAREN L. OSTERBERG 




DAVID STUART OSTERHOUT PETER ALAN O'SULLIVAN 




351 



ASTRA M. OZOLINS 



JEANNE A. OZON 



i 

I 




RONALD L. PACKARD 

Main Street, Goshen, Massachusetts 
Recreation Leadership 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3; Alpha Gamma Rho 1, 2, 
3, 4, Social Chairman 4; Soccer 1, 3, 4; Ski Team 1, 4, Captain 
4; Golf 1; Ski Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Recreation Club 2, 3, 4. 

RICHARD R. PAGE 

1 6 Eastern Avenue, Beverly, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Accounting Club 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1; Sigma 
Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Maroon Key 2; Bay State Rifles 1, 2; 
Military Ball Committee 3, 4, Finance Chairman 4. 




HIT THE ROAD, Taj. 



RONALD L. PACKARD 



RICHARD R. PAGE 



MARILYN MARTHA PALLYS 

29 Heywood Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 
English 



Chorale 1; International Club 3 
List 1,3; French Corridor 4. 



Newman Club 1, 2; Dean's 



MARY J. PAPP 

Mill Valley Road, Belchertown, Massachusetts 

Bacteriology 

University Singers 1; Bacteriology Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's 
Athletic Association 1, 2, Sub-Board; Univ. Open House Day 
Committee 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1,-2, 3, 4, Executive Com- 
mittee 2, 3, Vice-President 4; Dean's List 1. 2, 4- 



STEPHEN R. PAQUETTE 

485 Bridge Road, Northampton, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

Chemical Engineering Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Alpha Sigma 
Phi 2, 3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Granville Air Society 3, 
4. 

JANET F. PARISI 

75 Warren Street, Fitchburg, Massachusetts 
Histoiy 

German Club 1, 2; Outing Club 3. 




MARILYN MARTHA PALLYS 



MARY J. PAPP 



STEPHEN R. PAQUETTE 



JANET F. PARISI 



GEORGIA E. PARKER 

154 Pleasant Street, Dalton, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Math Club 3; Student Christian Association 2; Wesley Foun- 
dation 1, 2, 3; Dean's List 2. 

JANET L. PARKER 

Plymouth Street, North Carver, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Education Club 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 3, 4; 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Senate 1, 2; Chi Omega 
2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Modern 
Dance Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pan Hellenic Chorus 4. 



JOHN E. PARKER 

Rockmeadow Road, Uxbridge, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Civil Engineering Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; University Open 
House Day Committee 3, 4; Student Christian Association 4; 
Cross-Country 2, 3; Track 2; Phi Kappa Phi 4; Dean's List 
1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4, Vice- 
President 4; Phi Eta Sigma 1. 

LAURA M. PATLOVE 

15 Franklin Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

University Singers 1; Psychology Club 2, 3, 4; HiUel Founda- 
tion 1, 2, 3; Ski Club 4; Honors Work 4. 



ELIZABETH JEAN PATT 

North Brookfield Road, West Brookfield, Mass. 

Elementary Education 

Education Club 3, 4; 4-H Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic 
Association 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Dean's List 1, Campus Chest Committee 2, Dorm Treasurer 
2,3. 

JOAN H. PATTEN 

58 Porter Road, Waltham 54, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

University Open House Day Committee 2; Student Christian 
Association 1, 2; Dean's List 3, 4; Dean's Scholar 1, 2; Nursing 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; District #1 Student Nurses Association of 
Massachusetts 1, 2, 3, 4; National Student Nurses' Association 
1,2,3,4. 



JOSEPH M. PATTEN 

9 Althea Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

Yahoo 2, 3, 4, Literary Editor 3, 4; American Economic Asso- 
ciation 4; Senate 1, 2; Beta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3; Phi 
Kappa Phi 4; Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2, Vice-President 2; House 
Counselor 2; Dean's List I, 2, 3, 4; Dean's Scholar 1, 2; Military 
Ball Committee 3. 

NANCY E. PATTERSON 

23 Van Vechten Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 

Home Economics — Child Development 

Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Student Chris- 
tian Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 




353 



JOSEPH M. PATTEN NANCY E. PATTERSON 




ry 





ROBERT J. PAUL 




CHARLES J. PAYDOS 




CHESTER PELC 




ROBERT J. PAUL 

17 Warner Street, Gloucester, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Electrical Engineering Club 4; Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers 4. 

BORYS V. PAWLUK 

445 River Drive, Sunderland, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Univ. Open House Day Committee 3, 4; Tau Kappa Epsilon 2, 
3, 4; Sergeant-at-Arms 3, 4; Soccer 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3; Cross 
Country 2; Bay State Rifles 2; American Society of Mech. En- 
gineers 2, 3, 4; Chairman of Refreshments Committee 4; So- 
ciety of Automotive Engineers 4. 



CHARLES J. PAYDOS 

47 West Main Street, Ware, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Math Club 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 

2, 3, 4; Gymnastics Club 1, 2; Intramurals 3, 4; Sigma Delta 
Psi 4; Flying Redman 1; Phi Kappa Phi 4; House Counselor 

3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4. 

LESLEY R. PAYZANT 

452 Summer Street, Lynnfield Center, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Newman Club 2, 3; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant Alumni 
Associate 3; Assistant Treasurer 4; Scrolls 2; Carnival Ball 
Committee 3, Chairman of Decorations; Modern Dance 
Club 3, 4; Class Advisory Board 3, 4. 



CHESTER PELC 

59 Grove Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 
Industrial Engineering 

Univ. Open House Day Committee 2, 3, 4; American Institute 
of Industrial Engineers 3, 4, President 3,4. 

PETER J. PELTON 

30 Elm Avenue, Fairhaven, Massachusetts 
Geology 

Marching Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Concert Band 3, 4, Personnel Mana- 
ger 3, Manager 4; Geology Club 3, 4; U. of M. Broadcasting 
Association 3, 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Bridge Club 1, 2. 




PETER J. PELTON 




2, 3, 4, Treas- 



LEO R. PENTTINEN 



LEO R. PENTTINEN 

76 Ash Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 

Marketing 

Lutheran Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Lambda Chi Alpha 1 
urer 2, 3; Intramurals 2, 3. 

MARILYN H. PEOPLES 

32 Century Street, Medford, Massachusetts 
English 

Campus Varieties 1, 2, 3, 4, Make-up Chairman 2, 3; New- 
man Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Revelers 2; Carnival Ball Committee 3; 
Carnival Committee 3; Soph-Senior Hop Committee 2; Class 
Advisory Council 2, 3, 4. 



354 




MARILYN H. PEOPLES 




ROBERT R. PEOPLES, JR. 




RONALD R. PERRY 




HAROLD PETERSEN JR. 




ROBERT R. PEOPLES, JR. 

241 Charles Street, Reading, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Psychology Club 4; Student Christian Association 1; Alpha 
Phi Omega 1,2; Philosophy Club 3, 4. 

RALPH H. PERKINS 

55 Maple Avenue, East Bridgewater, Massachusetts 

Forestry 

Marching Band 2; Forestry Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 




RONALD R. PERRY 

4 Goff Avenue, North Dighton, Massachusetts 
Marketing 

Marketing Club 3, 4; Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 3, 
4, Athletic Chairman 3; Track 1; Campus Chest Committee 3; 
S.W.A.P. 2; Interfraternity Council 2, 3. 

SALLY L. PERRY 

10 Acorn Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Collegian 1, 2; Index 3; Psychology Club 3, 4, Vice-President 
3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3; Univ. Open House 
Day Committee 2, 3; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3; 
Wesley Foundation 1; Senate 2, Women's Affairs Committee 2, 
3; Dean's List 4; Carnival Committee 3; Student Leaders Con- 
ference 3; Student Union Expansion Committee 2; Equestrian 
Club 3, 4. 



HAROLD PETERSEN JR. 

167 Vine Rock Street, Dedham, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Chemistry Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3; Alpha Phi Omega 
2, 3, 4, Historian 3; House Counselor 2, 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; 
AFROTC Rifle Team 1, AFROTC Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2. 

ALLEN E. PETERSON JR. 

Logan Road, North Grafton, Massachusetts 

Wildlife Management 

Rod and Gun Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Chairman 3; Wesley Foundation 
1, 2, 3; Alpha Gamma Rho 1, 2, 3, 4; Lacrosse 1, 2; Cross 
Country 1; Wrestling 1; Sah Water Fishing Team 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Captain 3; Dean's List 3, 4. 



BRUCE EDWARD PETERSON 
Suffolk House, University of Massachusetts 
Business Administration 

Accounting Club 3, 4. 

MICHAEL A. PETRONINO 

115 Fernwood Road, Southwick, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 



RALPH H. PERKINS 




SALLY L. PERRY 




ALLEN E. PETERSON JR. 



BRUCE EDWARD PETERSON 



Newman Club 3; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Kappa 
4; American Society of Mechanical Engineers 3, 4; Dean's 
1, 2, 3, 4; Military Ball Committee 3; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4. 



355 



Phi 
List 




MICHAEL A. PETRONINO 




GARY T. PORTER 



EDWARD J. POSHKUS 



ANTHONY J. PIRAINO JR. 

47 Liberty Avenue, West Somerville, Massachusetts 
Management 

Business Administration Club 4; Industrial Administration 
Club 3, 4; Marketing Club 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 3; Lambda 
Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3; Football 1, 2, 3; Track 1, 2; Carnival Com- 
mittee 2, 3; Soph-Senior Hop Committee 2. 

FRANCIS P. PISIEWSKI, JR. 

32 Jennings Avenue, Dalton, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Math Club 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Q.T.V. 2, 3, 4, President 3, 4; Interfraternity Council 3, 4; 
Baseball 2, 3, 4, Captain 4; Basketball 1; Soph-Senior Hop 
Committee 3; Inter-Greek Ball Committee 3; S.W.A.P. 3, 4. 



NANCY M. PIZZANO 

160 Pond Street, Winchester, Massachusetts 

English 

Handbook 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Senate 1; Social Activi- 
ties Committee 2; Curriculum Committee 1; Chi Omega 1, 2, 
3, 4, Standards 2, Assistant Rush Chairman 3, Rush Chairman 
4; Revelers 3; Scrolls 2; Winter Carnival Committee 3; '62 
Advisory Board 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's Scholar 
2, 3, 4; Carnival Ball Committee 3. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 

ANNE M. PODGORSKI 

23 Laurel Avenue, Schenectady, New York 

English 

Index 4; Naiads 1; Women's Athletic Association 1; Student 
Union Program Council 2; Student Union Dance Committee 
1, 2, 3, Chairman 2; Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; 
Panhellenic Council 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3. 



MARION H. POLACCHI 

30 South Gateway Street, Winchester, Massachusetts 
Education 

Education Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Kappa Kappa 
Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 4; Special Events Committee 1, 
2; Italian Club 1, 2, President 2. 

DONNA A. POPE 

116 West High Street, Avon, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Campus Varieties 3; Math Club 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Kap- 
pa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4; Panhellenic Council 4, Revelers 3, 
Isogon 4, House Counselor 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4. 



GARY T. PORTER 

341 E. Washington Street, Hanson, Massachusetts 
Forestry 

Forestry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 4-H Club 1, 2, Vice-President 2; Foot- 
ball 1; Track 1; Society of American Foresters 3, 4. 

EDWARD J. POSHKUS 

29 Commonwealth Avenue, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Chemical Engineering 

Chemical Engineering Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Air Cadet Squadron 1 , 2. 



356 




GERALD W. POWERS 



MARILYN PRATT 



GERALD W. POWERS 

15 Mc Arthur Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

History 

Newman Club 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Intramural Basketball 4. 

MARILYN PRATT 

504 Ward Street, Newton Centre 59, Massachusetts 
French 

University Singers 1; Operetta Guild 1, 2, 3; Campus Varieties 
3, 4; French Club 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Kappa Kappa Gamma 
2, 3, 4; House Counselor 3; Carnival Committee. 




I DREAMED I was flying in my maiden . 



GREGOR B. PRENTICE 

446 Massachusetts Avenue, West Acton, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Chemistry Club 4; International Relations Club 4. 

CHARLENE M. PRENTISS 

27 Wright Road, Ayer, Massachusetts 

English 

Collegian 1, 2, 3, Exec. Secretary 1, 2, 3; Roister Doisters 2, 3, 
4, Production Manager 4; University Singers 1; Operetta Guild 
4; Campus Varieties 3, 4; Education Club 4; Women's Athletic 
Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; WMUA 4; Fine 
Arts Committee 4, Director 4; Carnival Committee 3; Experi- 
mental Theatre 3, 4, Assistant Director 3; Modern Dance Club 
2, 3, 4; Pioneer Valley Folklore Society 3, 4; Inter-dorm Coun- 
cil 3. 



WAYNE A. PRESCOTT 

Oakdale Road, Wilmington, Massachusetts 

Management 

Management Club 3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Christian 
Association 1,2. 



GLORIA L. PRESSER 

222 Rawson Road, Brookline, Massachusetts 

English 

Hillel Foundation 1; Sigma Delta Tau 2, 3, 4; Sergeant-at-Arms 
4; House Counselor 4; Dean's List 3; Women's Interdorm 
Council 3 ; Women's Interdorm Sing 4. 




GREGOR B. PRENTICE CHARLENE M. PRENTISS 



WAYNE PRESCOTT 



GLORIA L. PRESSER 



ROGER S. PROCOPIO 

43 1 West Housatonic Street, Pittsfleld, Massachusetts 

Industrial Administration 

Industrial Administration Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Italian Club 1; Quarterback Club 3, 4. 

LOUISE B. PROCTOR 

115 Chestnut Street, North Reading, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Operetta Guild 3, 4; Math Club 3, 4; Outing Club 3; Studeni 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Equestrian Club 3, 4. 



KERMIT K. PRUYNE 

58 Cottage Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Business Administration 

Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Granville Air Society 3, 4, Commander 4. 

CHARLES A. PURDY 

7 FuUam Road, North Brookfield, Massachusetts 

Industrial Engineering 

DeMoIay 1, 2; Student Christian Association 4; Air Cadet 
Squadron 1, 2; Ski Club 2; American Institute of Industrial En- 
gineering 3, 4. 



lANE A. PURSGLOVE 

15 Manhan Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 

Home Economics 

Marching Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Concert Band 2, 3, 4; Librarian 3, 4; 
Assistant Librarian 3, 4; Education Club 3; Home Economics 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1; Student Chris- 
tian Association 1, 2, 4. 

CHARLES R. PUTNAM 
Box 75, Oxford, Massachusetts 
General Business and Economics 

Alpha Sigma Phi 2, 3; Dean's List 3; Young Democrats 3, 4; 
YaHoo3,4. 



DIANNE QUERY 

1814 Acushnet Avenue, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Home Economics 

Index 4; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 
3,4. 

ELIZABETH G. QUIGLEY 

Sunderland Road, Sunderland, Massachusetts 

Philosophy 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Honor's Work 4. 




358 



DIANNE QUERY 



ELIZABETH G. QUIGLEY 




GERSON P. RAFER 

138 Lunenburg Street, Fitchburg, Massachusetts 
Math 

Index 2; Chemical Engineering Club 2; Math Club 3, 4. 



RONALD R. RAINKA 

10 Quaboag Street, Warren, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Math Club 4; Newman Club 1, 4; Golf 1; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 
4; Flying Redmen 1, 2; Alpha Phi Omega 2; Carnival Com- 
mittee 3. 



LANCE O. RASMUSSEN 

253 Goodale Street, West Peabody, Massachusetts 

Pre-Dent 

Pre-Med Club 3, 4; University Open House Day Committee 3, 
4; Ski Club 1, 2. 

BARRY RAVECH 

200 Old Farm Road, Newton, Massachusetts 

History 

Collegian 2, 3, Subscription Manager 3; Hillel 1; Alpha Ep- 
silon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Secreta^'y 3, Vice-President 3; Bay State 
Rifles 1; Dean's List 2, 3; Honors Work 4; Campus Chest 
Committee 3; Student Union Board of Governors 4; Pre-Law 
Club 3; Debating Club 3, 4; Student Union Executive Com- 
mittee 2, 3; Student Union Movie Committee 3, 4, Chair- 
man 3, 4. 



ROBERT J. RAVICH 

10 Coolidge Road, Marblehead, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Collegian 1; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2; Hillel Foundation 1, 2; 
Alpha Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Rifle Team 1; University Econom- 
ics Association 3, President 4; Yahoo 1. 

DEBORAH IRENE READ 

1300 Washington Street, Walpole, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Pi Beta Phi 2, 3, 4, 
Treasurer 4; Mortar Board 4; Student Union Governing 
Board Representative 4; Precisionettes 2, 3, 4; House Coun- 
selor 3; Class Treasurer 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1; Campus Chest 
Committee 2; Carnival Committee 3, General Treasurer 3; 
Soph-Senior Hop Committee 2, Treasurer 2; S.W.A.P. 1; 
Soph-Frosh Nite Committee 2; Senior Week Committee 4. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 



JAMES G. REILLY 

93 Douglas Road, Gardner, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Phi-Ed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4; Lutheran 
Club 3, 4; Freshman Indoor and Spring Track 1; Varsity In- 
door and Spring Track 2, 3, 4, Co-captain 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 
3, 4; Dean's List 3. 

RITVARS F. REINBURGS 

16 Dalrymaple St., Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Civil Engineering Club 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1; Student Chris- 
tian Association 1; Phi Mu Delta 1, 2, 3; House Counselor 3, 
4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; Engineers Council 2, 
Secretary. 



JAMES G. REILLY 



RITVARS F. REINBURGS 



359 




DANIEL V. REYNOLDS 



ALBERT L. RHEAUME 



ELDA G. RICALZONE 



WILLIAM A. RICE 



DANIEL V. REYNOLDS 

159 Grant Street, North Attleboro, Massachusetts 

Marketing 

Marketing Club 2, 3, 4; Rod and Gun Club 4; Newman Club 
1, 2, 3, 4^ Rifle Club 3; Dean's List 3. 

ALBERT L. RHEAUME 

18 Tourtelotte Street, Willimansett, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Newman Club 4; Institute of Radio Engineers 3, 4. 



ELDA G. RICALZONE 

59 Perrine Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Marching Band 3; Concert Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club 1, 
2; Education Club 3, 4; German Club 3; Women's Athletic 
Association 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; House Counselor 4; 
Dean's List 3. 

WILLIAM A. RICE 

Timbertrail Farm, Shaftsbury, Vermont 

Civil Engineering 

Wrestling 1, 2, 4; Univ. Open House Day Committee 3, High 
School Day Committee 4, House Counselor 3, 4; Phi Eta Sig- 
ma 1, 2; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4, Cataloguer 4; 
Engineer's Council 3, 4, Treasurer 4; American Society of Civ- 
il Engineers (Student Chapter) 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4. 





WAYNE RICHARDS 



GAIL A. RICHEY 



BOY! THIS IS much better than a fraternity party 



WAYNE C. RICHARDS 

73 Cottage Street, Athol, Massachusetts 

English 

GAIL A. RICHEY 

1 Circuit Road, South Wellfleet, Massachusetts 

English 

Education Club 4; German Club 4; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Precisionettes 2, 3, 4; Car- 
nival Ball Committee, Sub-Chairman 3; Carnival Ball Commit- 
tee 3; Soph-Senior Hop Committee 2; Senior Mix, Co-Chair- 
man 4; Class Advisory Board 2, 3, 4; Soph-Frosh Night Com- 
mittee 2. 



360 



LAURA B. RITTER 

7 Lansing Avenue, Worcester, Massachusetts 
English 

Collegian 1; Handbook 2; Campus Varieties 2, 3, 4; Home 
Economics Club 2; Naiads 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3; Chi Omega 1, 

2, 3, 4; Ski Club 4; Class Officer, Secretary 1, 2; Carnival Ball 
Committee 2, 3; Soph-Senior Hop Committee 2; Pan-Hellenic 
Chorus 4; Frosh-Soph Night 1, 2; Literary Society 4. 

JOHN A. RIZOS 

12 Chalmers Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

Chemistry Club 2; Chemical Engineering Club 2, 3, 4, Vice- 
President 3; Orthodox Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 2; Alpha 
Sigma Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3; Bay State Rifles 1, 2; 
Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2, 3, Treasurer 2; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; Ameri- 
can Institute of Chemical Engineers 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 

3, 4; Honors Work 4. 

EDWARD C. ROBINSON 

5 Morse Court, Manchester, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Math Club 3, 4; Newman Club 3, 4; Baseball 1; Astronomy 
Club 3. 

JEAN RODGERS 

49 Van Meter Drive, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

University Open House Day Committee 2, 3; Student Christian 
Association 2, 3; Phi Kappa Phi 3, 4; Alpha Lambda Delta 1, 
2; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean Scholar 1, 2; Nursing Club 1, 2, 
3, 4, President 2; Student Nurses Association of Massachusetts. 



EDWARD T. RODRIGUEZ 

21 Richmond Lane, Adams, Massachusetts 
English 

Index 2, 3, 4, Editor-in-chief 4; Operetta Guild 2; Campus Va- 
rieties 2, 3, Director 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Theta Chi 1, 2, 
3, 4, Skit Chairman 2, 3; Intramural Sports 2, 3; S.W.A.P. 3; 
R.S.O. Committee 3; Winter Carnival Publicity Committee 3; 
W.M.U.A. 1; Commuters Club 4; Centennial Committee 4; 
Editor Summer Session News 3. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 

ALAN C. ROGERS 

Winchendon Road, Ashburnham, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

Chemical Engineering Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Homecoming Weekend 
Committee 3; Student Christian Association 1; Varsity Pistol 
Team 3, 4, Captain 4; Bay State Rifles 1, 2, Squad Leader 2; 
Tau Beta Pi 4; Rifle Team 1; Military Ball Committee 2; Amer- 
ican Institute of Chemical Engineering 1, 2, 3, 4; Dorm Coun- 
cil 2, 3. 



JUDITH A. ROHLFS 

474 Pomeroy Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Education Club 4; Outing Club 4; Sociology Club 3; Women's 
Athletic Association 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 

4. 

BRADLEY D. ROHRER 

287 Oakland Street, Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts 
Speech 

Collegian 1; Marching Band 1; Concert Band; Operetta Club 
1; DeMolay 1; Outing Club 1; U. of M. Amateur Radio Asso- 
ciation 1, 2, 3; U. of M. Broadcasting Association 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Technical Director 3, Station Manager 4. 




361 



JUDITH A. ROHLFS 



BRADLEY D. ROHRER 



JOANNE ROMANO 

52 Putnam Street, East Boston, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Index 3, 4; Education Club 4; Math Club 3, 4; Women's Ath- 
letic Association 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Kap- 
pa 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 4; Dean's List 2; Carnival Com- 
mittee 3; Senate RSO 4; PanHel Chorus 4; Italian Club 1, 2, 
Vice-President 2. 

CATHERINE S. ROMANSON 

105 Conant Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Education Club 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; Math Club 3, 4; Phi Kap- 
pa Phi 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3. 



MARCIA L. ROSENBERG 

33 Newtonville Avenue, Newton 58, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Collegian 1: Index 4; Operetta Guild 1; Campus Varieties 2, 4 
Accounting Club 4; Math Club 1, 2, 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2 
S.U. Arts & Music Committee 2; Class Advisory Board 2, 3, 4 
Carnival Committee 3. 

ELLIOT I. ROSENFIELD 

318 Arnold Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Chemistry Club 1, 2; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Univ. Open 
House Day Committee 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3; Tau Lp- 
silon Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Historian 3; Dean's List 1; Soph-Semor 
Hop Committee 2; Student Union Movie Committee 1, 2. 





MARCIA L. ROSENBERG 



ELLIOT I. ROSENFIELD 



CHARLOTTE A. ROSENCRANS 

155 Prospect Street, Reading, Massachusetts 

Government 

Operetta Guild 1; Women's Athletic Association 2, 3; Univer- 
sity Open House Day Committee 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Sigma Delta Tau, Recording Secretary 4; Precisionettes 3, 4; 
Dean's List 3, 4; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Carnival Com- 
mittee 3. 

JANE C. ROSS 

149 Blue Hill Avenue, Milton, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Roister Doisters 1; Education Club 3, 4; Women's Athletic As- 
sociation 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma 
Kappa 2, 3, 4, Recording Secretary 4; Carnival Ball Committee 
3; Student Union Dance Committee 1, 2, 3; Senior Week 
Committee 4. 



PETER T. ROSSI 

103 1 Main Street, Agawam, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Math Club 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Sigma Alpha Epsilon 2, 3, 
4; Physics Club 2. 

ANNE RUBIN 

437 Hillside Avenue, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Education Club 2, 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2; Kappa Alpha 
Theta 1, 2, 3, 4, Pan Hellenic Representative 4, Standard Com- 
mittee 3, 4; S.W.A.P. 3; Modern Dance Club 4; Special Events 
Committee 2, 3; Tennis Club 1, 2. 



PETER T. ROSSI 



ANNE RUBIN 



362 




CAROL A. RURAK 



PAUL E. RUSEK 



RICHARD G. RUSH 

28 Knight Avenue, Easthampton, Massachusetts 
History 

MATTHEW J. RUTKOWSKI 

15 Carleton Road, Waltham, Massachusetts 

Math 

Civil Engineering Club 1, 2; Math Club 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 
4; Soccer 1; Lacrosse 1; Swimming 1, 2, 3, 4, Capt. 4; Intramu- 
ral Football and Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Inter-Greek Ball Commit- 
tee 3. 



JUDITH A. RYAN 

112 Woodard Road, West Roxbury 32, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Index 3, 4; Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Spanish Club 1, 2; Wom- 
en's Athletic Association 1,2; Homecoming Weekend Commit- 
tee 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Affairs Commit- 
tee 4; House Counselor 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Campus Chest 
Committee 2, 3; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Carnival Commit- 
tee 3; Student Union Dance Committee 2, 3, 4. 

JESSE A. RYDENSKI, JR. 

37 Fair Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Concert Band 2, 3, 4, Student Conductor 3; Operetta Guild 4; 
Psychology Club 3, 4; Dean's List 1; ROTC Band 1, 2. 



363 



MYRNA A. RUDERMAN 

1 1 Newton Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

German 

Education CluC 3, 4; German Club 1, 2, Secretary 2; Hillel 
Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Carnival Ball Committee 
3; Women's Service Organization 3, 4; Arts and Music Com- 
mittee 3. 

JUDITH M. RUGG 

448 Squantum Drive, Warwick, Rhode Island 

Spanish 

Education Club 3; International Relations Club 3, 4; Spanish 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Social 
Activities Committee 2; Dean's List 1; Carnival Ball Commit- 
tee. 



CAROL A. RURAK 

Pleasant Street, Lee, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Collegian 1; Chemistry Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Newman 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; Alpha 
Lambda Deha 1; Dean's List 1, 2; Honor's Work 4; Sophomore 
Advisory Council 2. 

PAUL E. RUSEK 

65 Chudy Street, Three Rivers, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Chemistry Club 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, President 4; Newman 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 3, 4; Rifle Team 1, 2. 




RICHARD G. RUSH MATTHEW J. RUTKOWSKI 




JUDITH A. RYAN 



JESSE A. RYDENSKI, JR. 




KATHARINE M. SAILA MARJORIE ANNE ST. AUBIN 





BEVERLEY J. SAINTE-MARIE ROBERT J. SALEWSKI 




KATHARINE M. SAILA 

372 Turnpike Road, Ashby, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Home Economics Club 1; Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Dean's List 1 . 

MARJORIE ANNE ST. AUBIN 

55 Rotch Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Speech 

Index 2, 4; Greek Editor 4; Education Club 3, 4; Newman 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dorm Captain 3; Pi Beta Phi 1, 2* 3, 4; House 
Counselor 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Carnival Committee 2, 3, 
Sub-chairman Weekend Committee 3; Soph-Senior Hop Com- 
mittee 2; Co-chairman 2; Soph-Frosh Nite Committee 1, 2; 
Executive Board 2, 3, 4, Scholarship Committee 2, 3, 4; 
Dorm Social Chairman 2, 3, 4; Blood Drive 2. 



BEVERLEY J. SAINTE-MARIE 

24-A Prospect Street, Wakefield, Massachusetts 
Philosophy 

Collegian 1; Operetta Guild 3; Campus Varieties 2; Education 
Club 4; International Club 4; Student Christian Association 1; 
Dean's List 2; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Spring Day Com- 
mittee 1, 2; Modern Dance Club 1, 2; Equestrian Club 4; Pio- 
neer Valley Folklore Society 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4; Internation- 
al Weekend Committee 4. 

ROBERT J. SALEWSKI 

74 Garfield Avenue, Easthampton, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Chemistry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramu- 
ral Baseball 1, 2, 3; Intramural Basketball 1, Flying Red- 
men 1, 2, 3; Campus Chest Committee 1; Air Cadet Squad- 
ron 1,2; Granville Air Society 3. 



BRIAN R. SALTUS 

21 Pearl Street, Westfleld, Massachusetts 

Political Science 

Chemistry Club 1; High School Day Committee 2; Newman 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; BasebaU 1; Track 2; Mili- 
tary Ball Committee 3, 4; Inter-Greek Ball Committee 3; Gov- 
ernment Club 2, 3, 4. 

JESSIE M. SANDERSON 

Harvard Road, Shirley, Massachusetts 

Home Economics 

Roister Doisters 3, 4; University Singers 1; Home Economics 
Club 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 



CARL S. SANDLUND JR. MALCOLM L. SARNA 



CARL S. SANDLUND JR. 

25 Corticelli Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 

History 

Student Christian Association 3, 4; Wrestling 1, 2; Ski Club 
3, 4; History Club 4, Vice-President 4. 

MALCOLM L. SARNA 

324 East New Lenox Road, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Agronomy 

Agronomy Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 4; DeMolay 2; 
Canterbury Club 2, 3, 4, President 3; Honors Work 3; Univ. 
Fire Department 1, 2, 3, 4, Chief 4. 



364 




JEANNE C. SAULNIER 



ELIZABETH B. SCALLY 



ROBERTA E. SCALLY 



JEANNE C. SAULNIER 

122 Fern Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Collegian 1, 2; Index 2, 3, 4; Education Club, NBA 3, 4; So- 
ciology Club 3, 4; Spanish Club 1, 2; Homecoming Weekend 
Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Senate Committee on 
Activities 4; Student Union Dance Committee 2; Sigma Kappa 
2, 3, 4; Ski Club 2, 3; Carnival Committee 3; Soph-Senior Hop 
Committee 2; Panhellenic Chorus 4. 

ELIZABETH B. SCALLY 

Main Street, Lancaster, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Education Club 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance Club 2, 3; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Beta Phi 2, 3, 4; Dean's 
List 3, 4; Panhellenic Chorus 4; Art Club 2. 



MARIE L. SCHELL 



HENRY R. SCHELTER 



MARIE L. SCHELL 

5 Nelson Street, West Springfield, Massachusetts 

Home Economics 

Concert Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Librarian 2, 3, 4; Home Economics 
Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 4; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4: Dean's 
List 2, 3; Skating Club 4. 

HENRY R. SCHELTER 

181 Main Road, Westport, Massachusetts 
Chemical Engineering 

Chemical Engineering Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
American Institute of Chemical Engineering 3, 4. 



365 



CARMEN J. SCARPA 



ROBERTA E. SCALLY 

Main Street, Lancaster, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Operetta Guild 3; Education Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Pi Beta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Music Chairman 4, Censor 4; Carni- 
val Committee 3. 

CARMEN J. SCARPA 

185 Paris Street, East Boston, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Index 3, 4; Physical Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Class Repre- 
sentative 3; Varsity "M" Club 2, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 2, Steward 3, 
4, Executive Committee 2, 3, 4; Athletic Council Student Mem- 
ber 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Lacrosse 1; Intramurals 2, 3, 4; 
S.W.A.P. 3; Stewards Club 3, 4; Fraternity Managers Board of 
Directors 3, 4. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 





SAUL, THE silent butler. 




ELIZABETH A. SCHNECK 



BERNARD P. SCHULTZ 



IRMA L. SCHWARTZ 

602 June Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Arts and Music Committee 4; Education Club 3, 4; Hillel 
Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4, Executive Board 3; Sigma Delta Tau 1, 
2, 3, 4. 

CAROL A. SCOBIE 

69 Judd Avenue, South Hadley, Massachusetts 

Home Economics 

French Club 1, 2; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Musigals 4. 



CAROLE A. SCOFIELD 

30 Beltran Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

English 

Chorale 1, 2, 3, 4; Collegian 1; Student Christian Association 

1,2,3,4. 



NEAL L. SCOTT 

258 High Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Government 

University Concert Association 3; Campus Varieties 3, 4; Rev- 
elers 3, 4, President 4; Cheerleader 3, 4, Co-Captain 3. 



LEONARD D. SCHILLER 

146 Mayfair Ave., Springfield, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Math Club 3, 4; Alpha Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 1, 2; Mili- 
tary Band 1, 2; Carnival Committee 3, Jazz Concert Chair- 
man; Military Ball Committee 3; Inter-Greek Ball Committee 
3; Soph Banquet Committee 3, Entertainment Chairman; Class 
of '62 Executive Committee 3. 

GEORGE B. SCHMOYER 

3 1 Windsor Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
General Business and Economics 

Finance Club 3, 4; Pre-Medical Club 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Flying Redmen 1, 2; Carnival 
Committee 3. 

ELIZABETH A. SCHNECK 
Ashley Falls, Massachusetts 
Journalism 

Collegian 1, 2, 3, 4, Association Editorial Editors 2, Editorial 
Editor 3; Quarterly 2, 3, 4, Art Editor, Associate Editor 3, 
Editor 4; International Club Weekend Committee 2; Dean's 
List 3; Literary Society 4; Fine Arts Council 4; Synthesis 3, 4. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 

BERNARD P. SCHULTZ 

125 Coolidge Road, Worchester, Massachusetts 
Business Administration and Economics 

DeMolay 1, 2, 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Senate 1, 
Men's Affairs Committee 1; Alpha Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Politi- 
cal Science Association 4; Dean's List 3; Campus Chest Com- 
mittee 1; Carnival Committee 3, Chairman Concert Commit- 
tee 3; Class of '62 Advisory Council 3, 4; Ya-Hoo 1, 2; Asst. 
Advertising Manager 2, Student Union Program Council 2, 
3; Director Program Information 3; Commuter's Clulj 4, Presi- 
dent 4. 




366 



CAROLE A. SCOFIELD 



NEAL L. SCOTT 



ROBERT L. SCOTT 

Main Street, Lanesboro, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

A.S.M.E. 4; Air Cadets 1, 2. 

SANDRA ELLEN SEGEL 

124 Porter Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

English 

Roister Doisters 1,3; Campus Varieties 2; Hillel Foundation 1, 
2; Sorority Senator 3; Sigma Delta Tau 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant 
Stewardess 1, 2, Stewardess 2, 3, President 4; Revelers 2; Mor- 
tar Board 4, Vice-President 4; Dean's List 2; S.W.A.P. 3; So- 
rority Dramatization 1, 4; International Weekend Publicity 
Committee 3. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 



NORMAN I. SEIGEL 

56 Rotch Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Roister Doisters 4; Marching Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Personel Mana- 
ger 3, 4; Concert Band 1; Dance Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Manager 4; 
Fencing Club 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2; Burnham Declamation 
2; S.W.A.P. 3; Fine Arts Council 4; Student Union Games and 
Tournaments Committee 2, Chairman 2. 

JOHN B. SELETSKY 

3 Everit Avenue, Hewlett, Long Island, New York 

Business Administration and Economics 

Hillel Foundation 2, 3, 4; Senate 2, 3, 4; Alpha Epsilon Pi 2, 
3, 4, Treasurer 3; Pledge Committee 3; IFC Football, Basket- 
ball, Softball 2, 3, 4; Campus Chest Committee 3; Carnival 
Committee 3; Movie Committee 2, 3; Phi Alpha Delta Award 
2, 3, 4; Men's Affairs Committee 2, 3, Head of Men's Affairs 4. 





NORMAN I. SEIGEL 



JOHN B. SELETSKY 



WILLIAM H. SHAEVEL 

36 Scotney Road, Newton, Massachusetts 

History 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Epsilon Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Stew- 
ard 4; Intramural Football 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 3, 4; Honors 
Work 4; Intramural Debating 3, 4. 

NORMAN R. SHARP 

94 Westbourne Terrace, Brookline, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Psychology Club 2, 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha 
Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Union Arts & Music Committee 
2, 3, 4, Co-Chairman 3, 4; Student Union Executive Program 
Council 3, 4. 



GEORGE R. SHEA, JR. 

3 1 Copley Terrace, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Government 

International Relations Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Dean's List 3; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Ya Hoo 1, 2, 3, 
4; Young Democrats 2, 3, 4. 

JOHN M. SHEEHY 

1 McKim Street, Randolph, Massachusetts 

Government 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 2, 3, 4, Hypophetes 3, 4. 



GEORGE R. SHEA, JR. 



JOHN M. SHEEHY 



367 




BEFORE I CAME TO COLLEGE I didn't smoke, drink 
or ANYTHING. 

NANCY SHERMAN 

17 Arlington Road, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Collegian 1, 2; Education Club 3; Sociology Club 3, 4; 
Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Executive Board 2; Kappa Alpha 
Theta 3, 4; Student Union Committee 1, 2; Dean's List 4. 

CAROLYN L. SHERRIFF 

25 Spruce Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 
Art 

Collegian 4; Index 4; Campus Varieties 4; Operetta Guild 4; 
WAA 1, 2, 3, 4, Representative 4; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1, 2, 3, 4; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Activity Chairman 4; 
Scrolls 2; Ski Club 4; Musigals 4; Nursing Club 1, 2; Art Club 
4. 



ABRAHAM A. SHEINKER 



NANCY SHELDON 



ABRAHAM A. SHEINKER 

3 Parkway Court, Chelsea, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Collegian 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1; 
Indoor Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Outdoor Track 1, 2, 3, 4; American 
Society of Mech. Engineers 3, 4, Publicity Chairman 4; Dean's 
List 1, 3, 4;TauBeta Pi 4. 

NANCY SHELDON 

853 Hill Street, Whitinsville, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Index 3, 4; Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Homecoming Weekend 
Committee 3; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma 
Kappa 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Carnival Ball Committee 3; 
Carnival Committee 3; Military Ball Committee 2; Italian 
Club 1, 2; Panhellenic Chorus 4. 



EDWARD SHEVrrZ 

20 Woodford Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Government 

International Relations Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Edwards Fellowship 1, 
2, 3, 4; Tau Epsilon Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 3, Execu- 
tive Committee 4; Cross Country 1; Indoor Track 1; Outdoor 
Track 1; Rifle Team 2; Young Democrats Club 3, 4. 

FREDRIC G. SHOTZ 

134 Salisbury Road, Brookline, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Chorale 1, 2, 3; Campus Varieties 2, 3, 4; Homecoming Week- 
end Committee 4; Tau Epsilon Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3, 
President 4; Interfraternity Council 4; Adelphia 4; Maroon 
Key 2; Ski Team 1; Flying Redmen 1; Carnival Committee 3; 
S.W.A.P. 3; Student Union Governing Board 4. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 




NANCY SHERMAN 



CAROLYN L. SHERRIFF 



EDWARD SHEVITZ 



FREDRIC G. SHOTZ 



JOHN J. SHUGRUE 

West Street, Medfleld, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Civil Engineering Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
House Counselor 3, 4; Military Ball Committee 3, 4. 

HENRY H. SHULTZ 

132 Armory Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 
Government 

Tau Epsilon Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 3, 4; Carnival 
Committee 3; Military Ball Committee 3; Student Union Arts 
and Music Committee 1, 2, 3, 4. 



STEPHEN SHUSTERMAN 

120 Brewster Road, Waltham 54, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Collegian 1, 2, 3, Advertising Manager 2; Hillel Foundation 1, 

2, 3, 4; Alpha Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Pledge President 1, Exec- 
utive Board 3, Inter-Fraternity Representative 2, 3, President 
4; Inter-Fraternity Council 2, 3, 4, Rush Chairman 3, Admin 
istrative Vice-President 4; Adelphia 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2 
Campus Chest Committee 4; Military Ball Committee 3, 4 
Yahoo 1, 2, 3, Advertising Manager 2, Business Manager 3 
Registration Dance Committee 4. 

Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 

ALFRED J. SIANO 

10 Main Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Pre-Dental 

Univ. Open House Day Committee 2; High School Day Com- 
mittee 2; Homecoming Weekend Committee 2; Newman Club 
1, 2, 3; Phi Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4; Maroon Key 2, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Baseball 1; Campus Chest Committee 2. 

PAUL B. SIBLEY 

102 Salisbury Road, Brookline, Massachusetts 
History 

University Singers 1; Campus Varieties 3, 4, Director of Stag- 
ing 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Tau Epsilon Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Rushing Chairman 3, Vice-President 4, President 4; Revelers 

3, 4, Chairman of Freshman Activities Council 3; Intramural 
Sports 2, 3, 4; Bay State Rifles 1, 2; Dean's List 3, 4; '62 Ad- 
visory Committee 3, 4, Graduation Committee 4; Winter Car- 
nival Queens Committee Chairman 3. 

SUSAN B. SIDNEY 

Main Street, Norwell, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

University Singers 1; Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; German Club 
1, 2; H.E.R. Weekend Committee 2, 3; Student Christian As- 
sociation 1, 2, 3, 4, Deputations 3; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 
3, 4, Public Relations 2, 3, Scholarship 4; Art Club 1, 2; 
Hampshire Field Hockey Club 1; S.W.A.P. Executive Board, 
Secretary 3; Special Events Committee 2, 3, 4, Chairman 4; 
Arts and Music Committee 1, 2, 3, 4, Chairman 2, 3; Student 
Union Program Council 2, 3, 4; Student Union Governing 
Board 3, 4, Vice Chairman 4; Social Activities Committee 4; 
Northampton State Hospital Volunteer Group 2, 3; Freshman 
Orientation Counselor Summer 1961; Ski Club 1, 2. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 

ANTHONY R. SIDOROVICH 

28 Stevens Street, Dracut, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Pre-Medical Club 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1,2; Tau 
Kappa Epsilon I, 2, 3, 4; Flying Redmen 1. 

CARL A. SIGNET 

1037 Dwight Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Marketing 

Marketing Club 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Q.T.V. 1, 2, 3, 4, Ser- 
geant-at-Arms 2; Commuter's Club 4. 




i . i' 

JOHN J. SHUGRUE 



HENRY H. SHULTZ 




369 



ANTHONY R. SIDOROVICH 



CARL A. SIGNET 



DEXTER C. SILVA 

87 Wilbur Avenue, North Dartmouth, Massachusetts 
Marketing 

Marketing Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival 
Ball Committee 3. 

JOAN G. SILVERLIEB 

357 Princeton Blvd., Lowell, Massachusetts 
Spanish 

Handbook 1; Roister Doisters 2; International Club 4; Spanish 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3. 



BARBARA A. SILVERNAIL 

91 Bay State Road, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Government 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 3. 

ANNE M. SILVIA 

Prospect Street, Seekonk, Massachusetts 

English 

Education Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival Ball 
Committee. 





DEXTER C. SILVA 



JOAN G. SILVERLIEB 





BARBARA A. SILVERNAIL 



ANNE M. SILVIA 




WALTER R. SILVIA 

452 Bay Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Men's 
Sports 2; House Counselor 4; American Institute of Elec. En- 
gineers 3, 4; Dean's List 1; Engineering Journal 3, 4, Assistant 
Editor. 

RALPH J. SIMMONS 

295 Center Street, Randolph, Massachusetts 

History 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Activities Chairman 2, 3, Vice- 
President 3, 4. 



CHARLOTTE A. SIMONDISKI 

29 River Road, Millers Falls, Massachusetts 

French 

Index 3, 4, Organization Editor; Operetta Guild 2, Campus Va- 
rieties 3, 4; French Club 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 
3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Honor's Work 
4; Carnival Ball Committee 3. 

ROSEMARY T. SIMPSON 

6 Wallace Road, Marblehead, Massachusetts 

History 

Roister Doisters 2; Chemistry Club 1; Outing Club; Canter- 
bury Club 1; Newman Club 2, 4; Student Christian Club 1; 
Wesley Foundation 1; Dean's List 2, 4; Dean's Scholar I; His- 
tory Club 2. 



CHARLOTTE A. SIMONDISKI ROSEMARY T. SIMPSON 



370 




ROY C. SLATKAVITZ 



AUDREY E. SMITH 



ELIZABETH A. SMITH 

48 Turner Avenue, Riverside, Rhode Island 

Nursing 

Women's Athletic Association 1, 2; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1, 2; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; Precisionettes 2; Dean's List 2, 
3, 4; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; S.N.A.M. 1, 2, 3, 4; N.S.N.A. 1, 
2, 3, 4. 

JOSEPH B. SMITH 

58 Sheffield Road, Melrose, Massachusetts 

English 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Football 1, 2, 3; House 
Counselor 3. 



LESLEY SMITH 

930 Main Street, Hingham, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

University Open House Day Committee 1, 2, 3; Student Chris- 
tian Association 1, 2, 3; Dean's List 4; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Nominating Committee 3, Program Committee 4; District #1 
S.N.A.M. 1, 2, 3, 4, Public Relations Committee 3, 4, Secre- 
tary 3; S.N.A.M. I, 2, 3, 4; N.S.N.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Dorm Social 
Chairman 1. 

MARGARET E. SMITH 

133 Pine Ridge Road, Reading, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Collegian 2; University Concert Association 2; Sociology Club 
3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Founda- 
tion 1; Alpha Chi Omega 2, 3, 4; Panhellenic Chorus 4; Art 
Club 4. 

371 



WILMA SIROTA 

200 Harvard Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

German Club 1, 2, Treasurer 2; Math Club 3, 4; Hillel Founda- 
tion 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Kappa Phi 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Dean's 
Scholar 1, 2. 

ROBERT J. SKIBINSKI 

26 Dresser Avenue, Chicopee, Massachusetts 

Business Administration 

Concert Band 1, 2, 3; Dance Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Lambda Chi Al- 
pha 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3. 



ROY C. SLATKAVITZ 

15 South Prospect Street, Millers Falls, Massachusetts 
Landscape Architecture 

Landscape Architecture Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

AUDREY E. SMITH 

RED # 1 Uxbridge Road, Mendon, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Women's Athletic Association 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Dorm Captain 2; Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant 
Rushing Chairman 3, Chaplain 4; House Counselor 3; Carni- 
vale Committee 3; Sophomore Banquet 2; Class Advisory 
Board 3, 4; Zoology Club 3, 4. 




LESLEY SMITH 



MARGARET E. SMITH 





NANCY R. SMITH 

261 New Boston Road, Fall River, Massachusetts 

Poultry Science 

4-H Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Poultry Science Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary- 
Treasurer 3, 4; Square Dance Club 2, 3, 4; Student Christian 
Association 1, 2; Little International Livestock Show 3; Bay 
State Dairy Classic 3. 

NATALIE J. SMITH 

2 Columbus Avenue, Salem, Massachusetts 
History 

Collegian 2; Operetta Guild 1, 2; Campus Varieties 2, 3; Edu- 
cation Club 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's 
List 3, 4; Campus Varieties 2, 3; History Club 4; Modern 
Dance 3, 4; Class Advisory Board 3. 



NANCY R. SMITH 



NATALIE J. SMITH 





m^ m^ 





ROBERT L. SMITH 



STEVEN J. SMITH 




ROBERT L. SMITH 

124 High Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Speech 

Roister Doisters 1, 2, 3, 4, Business Manager 3, 4; University 
Concert Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Production Manager 4; Op- 
eretta Guild 1, 2, 3; Campus Varieties 2, 3, 4; U. of M. 
Broadcasting Association 1, 2, 3; Wesley Foundation 1; Ex- 
perimental Theatre 1,3,4, Designer 3. 

STEVEN J. SMITH 

15 Watts Street, Chelsea, Massachusetts 

Pre-Medical 

Pre-Medical Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Dean's List 3. 




DOROTHY M. SO J A 

60 Alvord Avenue, Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 

Cheniistry 

Chemistry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Univ. Open House Committee 1, 3; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Kappa Phi 4; House Counselor 4; 
Dean's List 1, 2, 4; Honors Work 4; Student Organization for 
Scholarship 1. 

PATRICIA J. SOKOP 

73 Allengate Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Education Club 3, 4; Math Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; Newman 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 3; Campus Chest Committee 1. 



DOROTHY M. SOJA 



PATRICIA J. SOKOP 






JANET L. SOUZA 

2 Center Circle, Wilmington 8, Delaware 

Education 

JOHN A. SPINELLO 

15 West Street, Braintree, Massachusetts 

Art 

Index 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 
4, House Manager 3; Art Club 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; Baker 
House Council 1, Vice-President 1. 



JANET SAUZA 



JOHN A. SPINELLO 



372 




JUDITH M. SPRAGUE 



MARY J. STACK 



JUDITH M. SPRAGUE 

18 Cherry Street, Islington, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

University Open House Day Committee 2; High School Day 
Committee 2; Edward's Fellowship 1; Student Christian Asso- 
ciation 1, 2; Intervarsity Christian Fellowship 2; Dean's List 
3, 4; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; S.N.A.M. 1, 2, 3, 4, Ways and 
Means Committee 2, School Delegate, District 1, 2; N.S.N.A. 

MARY J. STACK 

1 Mulberry Street, Leeds, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Collegian 1; Roister Doisters Make-up Committee 3; Campus 
Varieties 2, 3, Co-Chairman of Costumes Committee 3; Edu- 
cation Club 4; International Weekend Student Union Co-ordi- 
nator 3; University Open House Day Committee 3; Newman 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Senator-at-Large 3; Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 

3, 4, President 4; Panhellenic Council 3, Chairman of Schol- 
arship Committee 3; Revelers 3, 4, Secretary 4; Mortar Board 

4, Secretary 4; Scrolls 2; Phi Kappa Phi 4; House Counselor 
3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival Committee 2, 3; Interdorm 
Council 2. 

Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 

RICHARD B. STEDT 

375 Worcester Street, Wellesley, Massachusetts 
Business A dministration 

Marketing Club, Secretary 4; Student Christian Association 1, 
2, 3, 4; Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, Pledge Marshal, Secretary; Gym- 
nastics Team 1, 2. 

FRED T. STETSON, JR. 

40 Glen Avenue, Brockton, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

Student Christian Association 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1; Tau Beta 
Pi 4; Dean's List 2, 3; American Institute of Chemical Engi- 
neers 3, 4. 




WON'T ANYONE OFFER more than a dime? 

NANCY R. STILES 

8 Putney Lane, Lynnfield, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Roister Doisters 2; Modern Dance Club 1, 2, 3; Education 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Pi 
Beta Phi 3, 4; House Counselor 3, 4, House Chairman 4; Car- 
nival Ball Committee 3; Military Ball Committee 3; S.W.A.P. 
3. 

JUDITH H. STOLWORTHY 

153 West Bacon Street, Attleboro, Massachusetts 
Home Economics Education 

Collegian 3, Index 3, Education Club 4, Floriculture Club 4, 
Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Publicity Chairman 4; Out- 
ing Club 4; Canterbury Club 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Asso- 
ciation 2, 3, 4; Massachusetts Teachers Association 4; National 
Education Association 4. 




RICHARD B. STEDT 



FRED T. STETSON, JR. 



NANCY R. STILES 



JUDITH H. STOLWORTHY 




EDWARD F. STRATFORD DAVID W. STREETER 




EDWARD F. STRATFORD 

North Leverett Road, Montague, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Math Club 3, 4. 

DAVID W. STREETER 

Bald Moutian Road, Bernardston, Massachusetts 

Business Administration and Economics 

Commuter's Bowling Club 2, 3, 4; Commuter's Club 2, 3. 



JOHN A. STROM 

118 Center Street, North Easton, Massachusetts 

Industrial Engineering 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Gamma Rho 1, 
2, 3, 4; American Institute of Industrial Engineering 1, 2, 3, 4. 



THOMAS W. STUART III 

29 Irving Place, HoUiston, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Chemistry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; German Club 3; Univ. Open House 
Day Committee 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honor's Work 4; S.W.A.P. 2; Phi Eta 
Sigma 1, 2, Secretary 2. 



CHESTER A. SUCHOSKI 

349 Pleasant Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 

Spanish 

PAUL V. SULDA JR. 

84 Second Street, Turners Falls, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Math Club 4; Commuter's Club 1, 2. 



KENNETH W. SWAIN 



PETER SWARTZ 



KENNETH W. SWAIN 

Middle Street, South Amherst, Massachusetts 

Recreation Leadership 

Univ. Open House Day Committee 3, 4, Student Chairman 4; 
Theta Chi 1, 2; Maroon Key 2, President; Campus Chest 
Committee 2; Maroon Key Ad Hop Committee 3; R.S.O. Com- 
mittee 3; Recreation Club 2, 3, 4. 

PETER SWARTZ 

4204 Woodland Drive, Annadale, Virginia 
Mechanical Engineering 

Univ. Open House Day Committee 2, 3, 4; Tau Beta Pi 4; En- 
gineer's Council 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, Vice Chairman 4; Amer- 
ican Society of Mech. Engineers 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice Chairman 4; 
Engineering Journal 2, 3, 4, Business Manager 4; Dean's List 3, 
4. 

374 




MARILYN D. SYLVIA 



CAROLYN L. SZCZEPAN 



STANLEY SZYDLOWSKI 



EDMUND S. SZYMONIK 



MARILYN D. SYLVIA 

59 Valentine Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Education 

Roister Doisters 2, 3; Education Club 2, 3, 4; Women's Athlet- 
ic Association 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 
3, 4; Recommendation Chairman 3, Newsletter Editor 4, Car- 
nival Ball Committee 3. 

CAROLYN L. SZCZEPAN 

464 Sawyer Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
English 

Education Club 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival Ball 
Committee 2. 



STANLEY SZYDLOWSKI 

10 Park Street, Housatonic, Massachusetts 

History 

University Concert Association 3, 4; Chemistry Club 1, 2; 
French Club 1, 2; International Relations Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Ex- 
ecutive Committee 3, Vice-President 4; Newman Club 1, 2; 
Intramural Football 1, 2, Basketball 2; House Counselor 3, 4; 
Physics Club 1, 2; International Weekend Committee 1, 2, 3, 4. 

EDMUND S. SZYMONIK 

50 High Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Government 

International Relations Club 4. 



ARTHUR J. TACELLI 



RALPH I. TAKALA 



ARTHUR J. TACELLI 

107 Princeton Street, East Boston, Massachusetts 
Government 

Newman Club 2; Senate 2, 3, 4, Public Relations Committee 
Chairman 2, 3, President 4; Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Vice-President 3, President 4; Adelphia 4; Maroon Key 2; Uni- 
versity State House Day Committee 2; Baseball 1; Bay State 
Rifles 1, 2; House Counselor 4; R.S.O. 4; Student Union Gov- 
erning Board 4; Debating Society 2; Political Science Associa- 
tion 2, 3; Collegian Publishing Board 4. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 

RALPH I. TAKALA 

Kenwood Drive, Rutland, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Accounting Club 3, 4; Chess Club 2; Chemical Engineering 
Club 1, 2; Edwards Fellowship 1; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Sigma Phi 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, Presi- 
dent 4; Fraternity President's Assembly 4; Flying Redmen 1; 
Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2. 




SHUT UP Gramma! 




JAMES J. TAURAS 



JANET E. TAYLOR 



JAMES J. TAURAS 

25 Stoneham Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Index 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 2; American Society 
of Engineers 2, 3, 4; Society of Automotive Engineers 4; Air 
Cadet Squadron 1, 2. 

JANET E. TAYLOR 

10 Lynde Street,' Maiden, Massachusetts 

English 

Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Sub-board 2, 3; Jud- 
son Fellowship 3, 4, Social Chairman 4; Student Christian As- 
sociation 1, 2, 3, 4, Publicity Co-Ordinator 2, Vice-President 
of Social Responsibility 4; Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Ath- 
letic Chairman 2, 3, Chaplain 4; House Counselor 3; House 
Chairman 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Work 4; Class Ad- 
visory Committee 3, 4; Students for Racial Equality Chair- 
man 3, 4; Field Hockey 1; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. 



MARK F. TAYLOR 



THOMAS W. TA'iXOR 



MARK F. TAYLOR 

Church Street, Yarmouthport, Massachusetts 
Physics 

Phi Kappa Phi 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Phys- 
ics Club 3, 4, President 4. 

THOMAS W. TAYLOR 

15 Bo'wker Road, Waltham, Massachusetts 

Recreation Leadership 

Recreation Club 3, 4; Canterbury Club 1, 2, 3; Student Chris- 
tian Association 1, 2, 3; Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4; Hockey 1, 2, 
3, 4; Baseball 1. 





WILLIAM E. TENNEY 



HOWARD N. TEMKIN 

50 West Allen Ridge Road, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Marketing 

Collegian 2; Marketing Club 3, 4, Program Chairman 4; Hillel 
Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chair- 
man 3; I.F.C. Sports 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Student Union 
Movie Committee 2; Student Union Arts and Music Commit- 
tee 3, 4. 

WILLIAM E. TENNEY 

Aldrich Street, East Northfield, Massachusetts 
History 

Phi Kappa Phi 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4. 



YOU SAY YOU'VE got nose trouble, Barry? 



376 



LLOYD J. TERAN 

7 1 West Selden Street, Mattapan, Massachusetts 
Pre-Dental 

Collegian 2,; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3, 4; U. of M. Broadcast- 
ing Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Production Director 3, Station Man- 
ager 4; Univ. Open House Day Committee 3; Hillel Founda- 
tion 1, 2; Flying Redmen 1, 2; Ski Club 1, 2; S.W.A.P. 3; 
Audio-Visual Board 4; Yahoo 4; Dormitory Counsel 1. 

JANE F. TETREAULT 

44 Devens Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 
French 

Education Club 3, 4; French Club 3, 4; Homecoming Weekend 
Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival Ball Commit- 
tee 3; Carnival Committee 3. 



RONALD W. THATCHER 

404 Chestnut Hill Avenue, Athol, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering Club 3, 4; American Society of Me- 
chanical Engineers 4. 

MARK R. THERAN 

1 1 Walnut Hill Road, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Accounting Club 3; Economics Honor Society 3, 4; Hillel 
Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Pje-Law Club 3; Phi Kappa Phi 4; Phi 
Eta Sigma 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Mil- 
itary Science Trophy 3; Military Ball Committee 3. 



JUDITH A. THOMPSON 

174 Main Street, E. Northfield, Massachusetts 
Recreation 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Soph-Senior Hop 
Committee 2; Recreation Majors Club 2, 3, 4, Program Com- 
mittee Chairman 3. 

FRED E. TIBBETTS III 

Crapo Street, Marion, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Marching Band 1, 2; Chemistry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Chris- 
tian Association 1, 2, 3. 4; Chemistry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Interna- 
tional Relations Club 4; Alpha Sigma Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Social 
Chairman 2, 3; Executive Council 4; American Chemical So- 
ciety 4; Dean's List 4; Astronomy Clulj 4. 



ROBERT C. TIBBETTS 

25 Intervale Avenue, Saugus, Massachusetts 
History 

WILLIAM F. TINNEY 

169 West Elm Avenue, Wollaston, Massachusetts 

Art 

Roister Doisters 3, 4; International Club 1, 4; Outing Club 1; 
Spanish 3; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Wesley 
Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4, Publicity Chairman 2, Yearbook Editor 
4; Dean's List 3; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Art Club 3, 4; 
S.O.S. 2. 




JUDITH A. THOMPSON FRED E. TIBBETTS III 




ROBERT C. TIBBETTS 



WILLIAM F. TINNEY 




LESTER E. TOMKINSON SANDRA A. TOMLINSON 




LESTER E. TOMKINSON 

43 Edgewater Drive, Wareham, Massachusetts 

History 

SANDRA A. TOMLINSON 

280 Rogers Avenue, West Springfield, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Roister Doisters 4; Operetta Guild 3, 4; Campus Varieties 2, 3, 
4; Education Club 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 2; Univ. 
Open House Day Committee 4; Edwards Fellowship 1; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; House Counselor 4; Carnival 
Ball Committee 3. 



MALCOLM TRACHTENBERG 



PAUL G. TRACY 



JOHN A. TOOHEY 

51 Gay Street, Marlboro, Massachusetts 
Production Management 

Industrial Administration Club 3, 4; Accounting Club 3; 
Chemistry Club 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Men's Affairs 
Committee 2; Phi Mu Delta 1, 2, 3, 4, Steward 3, Pledgemaster 
4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Soph-Senior Hop Committee 2. 

DEBORAH TOPPAN 

245 Glen Road, Weston, Massachusetts 

English 

Campus Varieties 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1; High 
School Day Committee 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1, 
2, 3, 4; Scrolls 2, President 2; House Counselor 4; Carnival 
Committee 3; Sophomore Banquet 1, 2; Class Advisory Board 

3,4. 



ROBERT P. TORLA 

1518 Great Pond Road, North Andover, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Treas- 
urer 3; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Carnival Committee 3; 
R.O.T.C. Band 1, 2. 

RICHARD S. TOWNES 

46 Wellesley Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

U. of M. Amateur Radio Association 1, 2; U. of M. Broadcast- 
ing Association 1, 2; Univ. Open House Day Committee 1, 2; 
Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2, 3; Institute of Radio Engineers 2, 3, 4; 
Dean's List 2. 



MALCOLM TRACHTENBERG 

17 Gibbs Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 
History 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2; History Club 4; Political Science 
Club 4; Pre-Law Club 3; Arts and Music Committee 2, 3, 4, 
Treasurer 4; Student Union Movie Committee 2. 

PAUL G. TRACY 

24 Pinewood Road, Hampden, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Electrical Engineering Club 3, 4; Publicity Chairman 4, Joint 
Engineering Club 3, 4; Univ. Open House Day Committee 3, 4; 
High School Day Committee 3, 4; American Institute of Elec. 
Engineers 3, 4; Publicity Chairman 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; President 4, Eta Kappa Nu 3, 4; Engineering 
Council 3, 4; Secretary 3, 4. 



378 




MARCIA F. TRIOLI 



ALBERT J. TUCKER 



BRUCE 



TUCKER 



WILLIAM TUFTS 



MARCIA F. TRIOLI 

Turnpike Road, Fayville, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Judson Fellowship 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2; 
Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Massachusetts Student Nurses Asso- 
ciation 1, 2, 3, 4; National Student Nurses Association 1, 2, 3, 
4. 

ALBERT J. TUCKER 

660 Colrain Road, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Physics 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 3; American Institute 
of Physics 1, 2, 3, 4; Physics Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



BRUCE G. TUCKER 

7 Boylston Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Business Administration — Management 

Campus Varieties 3, 4; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Theta Chi 1, 2, 
3, 4; Track 1; Varsity Basketball 2, 3; Senior Class Executive 
Board 4; Management Club 3, 4; Chairman Senior Mix 4. 

WILLIAM TUFTS 

29 Canton Street, North Easton, Massachusetts 

Student Christian Association 2; Alpha Gamma Rho 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Varsity Fishing Team 1, 2, 3, 4. 




JONATHAN G. TUTTLE 



THEODORE J. TWAROG, JR. 



JONATHAN G. TUTTLE 

15 Cosby Avenue, Amherst, Massachusetts 
History 

History Club 4; German Club 1, 2, Vice-President 2; Alpha 
Phi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Service Vice-President 2, President 2, 
Service Vice-President 3, 1st Vice-President 3; Dean's List 3. 

THEODORE J. TWAROG, JR. 

19 Verge Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Flying Redmen 1,2; American Institute of Electrical Engineers 
3, 4, Program Chairman 4; Engineering Journal 3, 4, Art Editor 
3,4. 



379 




NOW LOOK, JUDGE! She asked me into her bedroom 





IRENE J. TYMINSKI 



MILT TZELLAS 



IRENE J. TYMINSKI 

135 South Street, Chicopee, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Concert Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club 2, 3, 4, Program 
Chairman 4; Pre-Medical Club 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Ski 
Club 3; Phi Kappa Phi 4; Alpha Lambda Delta 2, Junior Ad- 
visor 3, Senior Class Advisor 4; Student Affiliate of American 
Chemistry Society 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Work 4. 

MILT TZELLAS 

2 Cottage Street, Marlboro, Massachusetts 
Government 

Athletics Board 1, 2, 3. 



IF I FELT LIKE being sociable, I'd have a pepsi. 



WALTER F. URBAN, JR. 

16 Smith Street, Adams, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Business Administration Club 2, 3; Accounting Club 2, 3, 4; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Eta Sigma 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 

1, 2, 4. 

HELEN G. VAN KEUREN 

46 Bemis Street, Newtonville, Massachusetts 

English 

University Singers 1; Univ. Open House Day Committee 3; 
Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Pi Beta Phi 2, 3, 4; 
Dean's List 1,3; Campus Blood Drive 1, 2, 3, 4. 



JAMES T. VARELAS 

28 West Alvard Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Business Administration & Economics 

Campus Varieties 2; Business Administration Club 4; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Inter-Varsity Christian Fellow- 
ship 1, 2, 3, 4; Lambda Chi Alpha 2, 3,4; Intramural Sports 1, 
2, 3, 4; Campus Chest Committee 2; Young Republican's Club 
2, 3,4. 

WILLIAM J. VASIL 

44 Mozart Street, Southbridge, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Math Club 2, 3, 4; Orthodox Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Lambda Chi Al- 
pha 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Athletics 1, 2, 3, 4; Inter-Greek Ball 
Committee 3. 




WALTER F. URBAN, JR. 



HELEN G. VAN KEUREN 



JAMES T. VARELAS 



WILLIAM J. VASIL 



CARL I. VASSAR 

28 Highland Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Zoology Club 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Flying Redmen 1, 2; 
Ski Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dorm Dance Committee 2. 

CAROL A. VENO 

348 Commonwealth Avenue, Attleboro Falls, Massachusetts 

English 

Campus Varieties 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Judi- 
ciary 1, 2, 3, 4, Chief Justice 4; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 
4, President 4; Panhellenic Council 3, Secretary 3; Mortar 
Board 4; Scrolls 2; Precisionettes 3; Phi Kappa Phi 4; House 
Counselor 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival Committee 3; 
Co-chairman of Activities 3; S.W.A.P. 3; Alpha Lambda Delta 
1; Class Advisory Board 2, 3. 
Who's 'Who In American Colleges And Universities. 



VIRGINIA M. VENTI 

316 Canal Street, Marshfield, Massachusetts 
French 

French Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pi Beta Phi 
1, 2, 3, 4, Scholarship Chairman 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3. 

JOHN J. VENTO 

58 Silk Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 
Business Management 

Business Administration Club 3, 4; U. of M. Broadcasting As- 
sociation 1; Men's Judiciary 3, 4; Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 
Pledge Trainer 2; Cheerleader 4; House Counselor 4. 



CHARLES J. WABECK 

River Road, East Deerfield, Massachusetts 

Poultry Science 

4-H Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 2; Poultry Science Club 1, 
2, 3, 4, President 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Univ. Open 
House Day Committee 3; Judging Teams 1, 3, Poultry 1, Live- 
stock 3; Campus Chest Committee 2. 

VIVIAN E. WAGNER 

471 Greendale Avenue, Needham, Massachusetts 

University Concert Association 2; Marching Band 1, 2, 3, Staff 
Member 1, 2, Squad Leader 2; Concert Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Secre- 
tary 2, 3, 4; Chorale 1, 2; Operetta Guild 1; Spanish Club 4; 
Women's Athletic Association 1; Student Christian Association 
1, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation 1, 2; Pep Band 2, Secretary 2. 



JOHN C. WALKER 

3 Weston Street, Wilbraham, Massachusetts 
Land Architecture 

Landscape Architecture Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Univ. 
Open House Day Committee 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Honors 
Work 4. 

JUDITH A. WALKER 

33 Berry Street, Framingham, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Education Club 4; French Club 4; Judson Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; 
Carnival Ball Committee 2; Soph-Senior Hop Committee 2; 
Junior Mix Committee 3; Senior Mix Committee 4; Student 
Teacher's Association of Massachusetts 4. 




381 



JOHN C. WALKER 



JUDITH A. WALKER 




DEBORAH C. WALL 

Perkins Row, Topsfield, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Marching Band 1; Olericulture Club 4; Psychology Club 3, 4; 
Publicity Chairman, U. of M. Broadcasting Association 1, 2; 
Edwards Fellowship 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 
3, 4; Frosh-Soph Nite 2; Carnival Committee 3; Nursing 
Club 1, 2. 

ROBERT M. WALLACE 

440 North Main Street, Randolph, Massachusetts 
Government 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, House Manager 2, 3, Steward 4; 
Football 1; Military Ball Committee 3: Heart Fund Drive 2, 3. 



RUTH WALLACE 

619 Miller Street, Ludlow, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

BARBARA WALSH 

334 Lincoln Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Psychology 



JUDITH A. WALSH 

33 Weybosset Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

Education 

Index 4; Roister Doisters 3, 4; Operetta Guild 4; Education 
Club 2, 3, 4; Canterbury Club 1; Student Christian Association 
2, 3, 4; Carnival Ball Committee 3. 

CHARLOTTE WARD 

240 Northampton Road, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Holyoke Junior College; Commuters' Club 4; Sociology. 



EDWARD J. WARD 



DOREEN M. WASKIEWICZ 



EDWARD J. WARD 

14 Stuyvesant Street, Springfield, Massacnusetts 
Landscape Architecture 

Landscape Architecture Club 2, 3, 4; Vice-President 4; Dean's 
List 3. 

DOREEN M. WASKIEWICZ 

7 Stockholm Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Mat)iematics 

Handbook 2, Section Chief 2; Math Club 1, 2; Women's Ath- 
letic Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Manager of Sports 2, W.A.A. Board 
2; Judson Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 
1, 2, 3, 4; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Personnel 4, Manager 4; 
Scrolls 2; House Counselor 3; Carnival Ball Committee 3; 
Soph-Senior Hop Committee 2. 



382 




RICHARD F. WATERS 



MARGARET WATSON 



ELLEN J. WAX 



BONNY L. WAYE 



RICHARD F. WATERS 

17 Flint Street, Danvers, Massachusetts 

Finance 

Varsity "M" Club 2; Lutheran Club 1; Rifle Team 1, 2; Pistol 
Team 3. 

MARGARET WATSON 

37 Webster Street, North Quincy, Massachusetts 

Botany 

4-H Club 2; Naiads 2, 3; Outing Club 2, 3; Women's Athletic 
Association 2, 3; Dean's List 2, 3; Honors Work 4; Riding 
Club 3, 4. 



ELLEN J. WAX 

1732 North Shore Road, Revere, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Handbook 1; Roister Doisters 1; International Club 4; Math 
Club 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4, Cultural Chairman 3; 
House Counselor 4; Dean's List 2, 3. 

BONNY L. WAYE 

27 Woodbury Drive, Needham, Massachusetts 

Home Economics Education 

Marching Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Chorale 2, 3; Operetta Guild 1, 4 
Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Editor 4; Channing Club 1 
Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Kappa Phi 4 
Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Lambda Delta 2, Secretary-Treas- 
urer 2; Omicron Nu 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 4. 




CHARLES H. WEEBER, III 



CHARLES H. WEEBER, III 

Cleveland Street, Norfolk, Massachusetts 
Pre-Medical 

Pre-Medical Club 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 
3, 4; Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, House Manager 3, Vice- 
President 4; Dean's List 1, 4; Flying Club 2, 3, 4. 

GEOFFREY A. WEINER 

2 Mount Vernon Street, Saugus, Massachusetts 

A ceo un ting — B usiness A dm inistration 

Accounting Club 3, 4; Marketing Club 4; Rod and Gun Club. 




383 



WITH A CLOUD OF dust and a hearty hi-ho Silver. 




SILVA J. WEISBERG 

635 Eastern Avenue, Maiden, Massachusetts 

Education 

LESTER G. WELCH JR. 

Box #42, Union Street, Montague, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Psychology Club 2, 3; Intramural Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Intra- 
mural Softball 1, 2, 3, 4; Northampton Volunteer Group 1; 
Parachute Club 2, 3; Flying Club 2, 3; Montague P.T.A. 



MILDRED J. WENIG 

36 Buttonwood Lane, Peabody, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 4, Executive Board 1, 2, 4; Student 
Zionist Organization 2, 4, Secretary 2, President 4; Year 
Abroad — Ismel 3. 

RAY M. WENNINGER 

Linebrook Road, Ipswich, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Civil Engineering Club 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 
4; Dean's List 3. 



ALNA LOUISE WERME 

West Sutton Road, Sutton, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Naiads 1; Phi-Ed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion I, 2, 3, 4, Sub-board Member 4; Student Christian As- 
sociation 1, 2, 3, 4; Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4, Athletic 
Chairman 4. 

MARTHA H. WEST 

795 Main Street, Dalton, Massachusetts 

English 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Kappa Phi 4; House Counselor 
3, 4, House Chairman 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 
4; S.W.A.P. 3; Alpha Lambda Delta 1; Literary Society 3. 



ALNA LOUISE WERME 



MARTHA H. WEST 




RICHARD L. WHIPPLE, JR. 



GAIL WHITCOMB 



RICHARD L. WHIPPLE, JR. 

32 River Street, Bass River, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Civil Engineering Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1, 2, 3; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4. 

GAIL WHITCOMB 

28 Peirce Street, Middleboro, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Concert Band I, 2, 3, 4; Operetta Guild 4; Education Club 1, 
2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3. 



384 




KENNETH A. WHITE 



JOHN P. WIDDISON 



V ' '* I 














m.. 



KENNblH A. WHITE 

83 Wellington Hill Street, Mattapan, Massachusetts 

Pre-Dental 

Collegian 2; German Club 1; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3; Rod 
and Gun Club 1, 2; Hillel Foundation 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon Pi 
1, 2, 3, 4; Golf Team 1; Swimming Team 1, 2; Bay State Rifles 
1, 2; Commuters Club 4; Senior Class Gift Committee 4. 

JOHN P. WIDDISON 

101 Walnut Street, Clinton, Massachusetts 
Business Administration 

Business Administration Club 3, 4; Industrial Administration 
Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Kappa Sigma 2, 3, 4; Var- 
sity Basketball 2, 3, 4; Frosh Basketball 1; Varsity "M" Club 3, 
4; Dean's List 4. 



LEON M. WIELGUS 

6 Pleasant Street, Thorndike, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

LINDA S. WIEST 

15 Penrose Drive, West Springfield, Massachusetts. 

Public Health 

Collegian 1; Bacteriology Club 2, 3; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; 
Honors Work 4; Public Health Club 3, 4; Carnival Ball Com- 
mittee 3; Junior Senior Mix Committee 3, 4; A.C.L.A. 2, 3, 4. 



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YOU CATCH THAT, kid, and I'll belt ya. 

HOWARD A. WILBUR 

333 Union Street, East Bridgewater, Massachusetts 

Mathematics' 

Marching Band 1, 2, 3; Concert Band 1, 2; Alpha Sigma Phi 
1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Gymnastics 2; American Society 
of Mech. Engineers 1, 2; Water Ski Club 4, Treasurer 4. 

JUDITH A. WILLIAMS 
Drury, Massachusetts 
Home Economics 

4-H Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 
3, 4, Publicity 3; Naiads 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Women's Athletic 
Association 2, 3, 4, Ski Marathon 4; Student Christian Assoc- 
iation 3, 4; Alpha Lambda Delta 1; House Counselor 4; Dean's 
List 1, 2, 3. 




LEON M. WIELGUS 



LINDA S. WIEST 



HOWARD A. WILBUR 



JUDITH A. WILLIAMS 











iJ« 






ALLAN J. WILSON III 



MARY E. WILSON 



ALLAN J. WILSON III 

95 Fair Oaks Park, Needham, Massachusetts 

History 

Varsity "M" Club 4; Varsity Cross Country Manager 2, 3, 4; 
Indoor Track Manager 2, 3, 4; Spring Track Manager 1, 2, 3, 
4; Inter-Class Plays 4. 

MARY E. WILSON 

185 Beacon Street, Milton 86, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Education Club 4; Women's Athletic Association 3, 4; New- 
man Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, House 
Manager 4; Dean's List 3. 



DAH — ^WHAT DO I do if I didn't never learn to count. 



TRACY B. WILSON 

67 Tiffany Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Government 

Collegian 1, 2, 3, 4; Fencing Club 4; International Club 3, 4; 
International Relations Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Political Science Club Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Massachusetts 
Assembly 4; Military Ball Committee 2, 3, 4; Spring Day Com- 
mittee 2, 3, 4; Yahoo 1, 2, 3, 4, Art Editor 2, Editor-in-Chief 
3, 4; International Weekend Committee 3, 4; Equestrian Club 
3,4. 

ARTHUR H. WINER 

24 Surf Side Road, Lynn, Massachusetts 
Art 

Quarterly 4, Art Staff 4; Univ. Open House Day Committee 3, 
4; Hillel Foundation 1; Dean's List 3; Honors Work 3, 4; Art 
Club 3, 4, Vice-President 3, 4. 



BARBARA A. WINSLOW 
Grenwich Road, Ware, Massachusetts 
English 

University Open House Day Committee 2; High School Day 
Committee 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, 
President 4; Panhellenic Council 3, 4, Rush Chairman 3; 
Scrolls 2; Cheerleader 1, 2, 3, Co-Captain 3; House Counselor 
3; Carnival Ball Committee 3; S.W.A.P. 3; Panhellenic Chorus 
4. 

CAROL A. WOJCIK 

890 Dwelly Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 

English 

Education Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Union 
Dance Committee 1; Special Events Committee 3; Pi Beta Phi 
2, 3, 4, Correspondent 2, 3, Corresponding Secretary 3, 4; 
Dean's List 3 ; Carnival Committee. 




TRACY B. WILSON 



ARTHUR H. WINER 



BARBARA A. WINSLOW 



CAROL A. WOJCIK 



MICHAEL J. WOJTANOWICZ 

367 North Main Street, South Hadley Falls, Massachusetts 

Mathemalics 

Math Club 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Softball 4. 

JANICE M. WOJTKUNSKI 

4801 County Road RFD#2, East Freetown, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Operetta Guild 3; Chemistry Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; Univ. 
Open House Day Committee 3; Student Christian Association 
1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2; Intramural Sports (W.A.A.) 1, 2, 
3, 4; Student Affiliate of American Chemical Society 2, 3, 4. 



NAN D. WOLTMAN 

8 1 Elsbree Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 

English 

Education Club 1; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Kappa Kappa 
Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 3; Special Events 1, 2. 

BARBARA A. WOOD 

15 Fox Meadow Lane, Wayland, Massachusetts 

Education 

Chorale 1, 2, 4; Education Club 2, 4; Naiads 1; Women's Ath- 
letic Association 1, 2, 4; Student Christian Association 1; Chi 
Omega 1, 2, 4; Scrolls 2; Cheerleader 2, 4; Dean's List 1, 2; 
Musigals 4; Equestrian Club 2, 4; Nursing Club 1, 2. 



H. PETER WOOD 

301 Country Club Road, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Agronomy 

Agronomy Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3; Newman Club 1, 
2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1. 

MARILYN A. WOOD 

88 Middle Street, Lexington, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Math Club 4; Naiads 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 
2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Canterbury Club 1, 4; Student Christian 
Association 4; Senate 1, 2; S.W.A.P. 3; Student Leader's Con- 
ference 2; R.S.O. Committee 2. 



PATRICIA L. WOOD 

1 1 Glenwood Street, Holden, Massachusetts 
English 

Collegian 1, 2, Associate Editorial Editor 2; Student Christian 
Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Editor of Context 2, 3, 4, Inquiry 3; 
Dean's List 2, 3, 4; International Weekend 2, 3, Art Exhibit 
Chairman 2, 3; Literary Society 4, Publicity Chairman 4. 

JUDITH M. WOODBURY 

Monponsett Street, Monponsett, Massachusetts 

Education 

Education Club 2, 3, 4; 4-H Club 1, 2, 4; Women's Athletic 
Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Senate 3, 4; 
Ski Club 4; Carnival Ball Committee 2, 3; Soph-Senior Hop 
Committee 2; Class Advisory Committee 2, 3, 4; Zoology Club 
1, 2, 4; Soph-Frosh Committee 2. 






MICHAEL J. WOJTANOWICZ JANICE M. WOJTKUNSKI 




H. PETER WOOD 



MARILYN A. WOOD 




387 



PATRICIA L. WOOD 



JUDITH M. WOODBURY 




DORIS E. WOODWORTH SHEILA A. WOODWORTH 




DORIS E. WOODWORTH 

34 lames Avenue, Northampton, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Index 4; Operetta Guild 2, 3; Math Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's 
Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, Sub-board 3; Canterbury Club 1; 
Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Carnival Ball Committee 3; Carnival Committee 3; Tennis 
Club 2, 3, 4. 

SHEILA A. WOODWORTH 

30 Lochmere Avenue, North Weymouth, Massachusetts 
Russian 

Index 2, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pi Beta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Historian 3, Vice-President 4; Dean's List 1, 2; Honors Work 
. 4; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Russian Club 3, 4. 



JOANNE E. WRIGHT 

61 Goldsmith Street, Littleton, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Roister Doisters 2, 3, 4; Make-up Chairman 3, 4; University 
Singers 1; Education Club 2, 3, 4; Judson Fellowship 1, 2, 3; 
Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 

ELLEN T. WRIGHTSON 

17V4 Marshall Street, Turners Falls, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Education Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

JOHN R. WYLDE, JR. 

150 Ridge Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Government 

Roister Doisters 2; Campus Varieties 3, 4; Commuter's Club 
4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Q.T.V. 1, 2, 3, 4, Skit Chairman 3, 
4, Secretary 4, Chaplain 2, Social Chairman 2, 3; Revelers 4; 
Bay State Rifles 1, 2, 3, P.I.O. 3; Intramural Sports 3, 4; Dean's 
List 2; Honor's Work 4; Carnival Ball Committee 2, 3, Co- 
chairman 3; Military Ball Committee 3, 4, Chairman 4; Soph- 
Senior Hop 2; S.W.A.P. 3; Pre-law Club 2; Political Science 
Association 3, 4, President 4; Student Union Board of Gover- 
nors 3, 4, Chairman 4; Dormitory Social Council 1; Class Ad- 
visory Board 3, 4; Student Union Expansion Committee 4. 
Who's Who In American Colleges And Universities. 

SOLOMON M. YAS 

18 University Road, Brookline, Massachusetts 

Hotel Management 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2; Tau Epsilon Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 
3, 4, Chaplain 4; Interfraternity Council 1, 2, 3, Chairman 
Greek Banquet 3; Maroon Key 2; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Flying Redmen 1, 2; Dean's List 4; Campus Chest Com- 
mittee 2, 3; Carnival Ball Committee 3; Carnival Committee 
2, 3, Chairman, Queen's Committee 3; Military Ball Com- 
mittee 3, Chairman Queen Committee 3. 

JOHN G. YOUNG 

156 Lansdowne Street, Squantum 71, Massachusetts 
Philosophy 

Edwards Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Sigma Phi 1, 2, 3; Swim- 
ming 1; Tennis 1; Ski Club 1; Phi Kappa Phi 3, 4; Phi Eta 
Sigma 1, 2, President 2; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 
4; S.W.A.P. 1; Northampton Project 3, 4. 

ROBERT C. YOUNG 

4 King Street Ext., Leicester, Massachusetts 
Sociology 



JOHN G. YOUNG 



ROBERT C. YOUNG 



388 




RONALD D. YOUNG 



ROSALYN E. ZACHER 



RICHARD A. ZAGRANSKI 



JOHN ZAJICEK 



RONALD D. YOUNG 

173 Church Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 

Government 

Student Christian Association 3, 4; Kappa Sigma 2, 3, 4; 
Freshman Cross-country 1; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Political Union 4; 
Interfraternity Football 3, 4. 

ROSALYN E. ZACHER 

40 Trinity Place, Boston, Massachusetts 

English 

Index 3; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Rush Chairman 4; 
Campus Chest Committee 2; Carnival Committee 3; Special 
Events Committee 1, 2; Student Organization for Scholarship 
1, 2. 



RICHARD A. ZAGRANSKI 

24 Maplewood Avenue, WilHrnansett, Massachusetts 
English 

U. of M. Broadcasting Association 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Dorm Activities Director 3. 

JOHN L. ZAJICEK, JR. 

7 1 Sunset Avenue, Lawrence, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4; Rush-Chairman 2; In- 
tramurals 2, 3, 4; Interfraternity Council 2, 3; Skit Chairman 
3; Greek Ball 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Math Club 3, 4. 




JUDITH A. ZALESKI 



RICHARD T. ZAMMITTI m. 



JUDITH A. ZALESKI 

21 Garvey Drive, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Women's Athletics Association 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1; Carnival 
Committee 3; Soph-Senior Hop Committee 2; Student Union 
Planning Council 2; Student Union Publicity Committee 2, 
Chairman, Special Events 1. 

RICHARD T. ZAMMITTI 

37 Church Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

U. of M. Amateur Radio Association 2; Institute of Radio En- 
gineers 2, 3, 4. 



389 




NOW, HOW DID I get conned into this? 




CAROL A. ZANGRILLI 



ROBERT M. ZIEMINSKI 



LEONARD J. ZIMMER 



JOYCE A. ZINK 



CAROL A. ZANGRILLI 

14 Sycamore Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Collegian 2, Index 2, 3, 4; Sociology Club 2, 3, 4; Newman 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 2; Dean's 
List; Carnival Committee 3. 

ROBERT M. ZIEMINSKI 

4B Jordan Street, Adams, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Math Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Kappa Sigma 2, 3, 4; 
Freshman Basketball 1; Baseball 1, 2; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; 
House Counselor 3, 4; Dean's List 2. 



LEONARD J. ZIMMER 

81 Park Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Electrical Engineering Club 3, 4; University Open House Day 
Committee 4; Phi Kappa Phi 4; Engineering Council 3, 4; In- 
stitute of Radio Engineering 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Tau 
Beta Pi 3, 4; Eta Kappa Nu 3, 4, President 4; Phi Eta Sigma 2, 

3,4. 

JOYCE A. ZINK 

768 Lynn Fells Parkway, Melrose, Massachusetts 

Government 

Chemistry Club 1, 2, 3; International Club 4; University Open 
House Day Committee 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's 
List 1. 




CAROLYN M. ZOIA 

43 North Central Avenue, WoUaston 70, Massachusetts 
Recreation Leadership 

Collegian 1; Index 4; Roister Doisters 1, 2; Operetta Guild 
2; Sociology Club 1, 2; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 
3; University Open House Day Committee 2, 3; Judson Fel- 
lowship 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 2, President 3, 4; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Lambda Deha Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Historian 2, Rush 3, Chaplain 4; Panhellenic Council 2, 3, 
4; Social Handbook 4, Editor 4; Dean's List 3; Campus 
Chest 2, 3; Carnival Committees 2, 3; Soph-Senior Hop 
Committee 2; Italian Club 1, 2, Treasurer 2; Recreation 
Club 2, 3, 4, Program Council 4. 




TWO WHEELS AND a bell, and you'll be in business. 



390 



CAROLYN M. ZOIA 



WHEREFORE INDEX? 



I MUST AGREE that it isn't the most romantic title ever given a yearbook. 
People are continually getting us confused with the Student Directory, but we 
don't mind. Actually, the name stems from the year 1871 when the first Index was 
published. At that time, it was just that — an index. 

Beginning as a small paperback, it consisted of categorical references to depart- 
ments, subjects, societies, etc., with little emphasis on activities. This is under- 
standable, particularly, since there was little to do outside of studying besides 
watering the horses. However, we've come a long way. The Indexes over the years 
have been large, small, formal, informal, with just about every approach you 
might imagine. This is the big problem — how to approach a publication which must 
cater to the whims and opinions of 6,000 students. 

As Dean Martin says, "You can't love 'em all." Well, we can't please 'em all, 
but we have sincerely tried, at the same time, attempting to maintain certain prin- 
ciples of good taste and practice. There was a time when the yearbook was merely 
a scrapbook with a smorgasbord of pictures and cartoons. Those days are gone. It 
now must be not only a lasting memento, but also a public relations organ which 
completely and accurately covers every major facet of University Ufe. 

I hope you enjoy the 1962 Index, particularly the opening Centennial section; 
the staff has thoroughly enjoyed presenting it to you! 

Yours truly, 
Ed Rodriguez 
Editor-in-Chief 




BAUCOM'S TEXTBOOK EXCHANGE 

PAPERBACKS STATIONERY 




CLIFF ALLEN 

Clothing at its collegiate best 




Featuring 

SHUMWAY'S 

"hamburg with the college education" 




ONE HOUR MARTINIZING 





KEITO'S 

Fine Italian Dishes 



'DON" CALL OPTICIAN 

Everything in Eyewear 



HASTINGS 



tiA^ i 11^'^-' 


NEWS DEALER 


IM 




¥m 





FLAVORTOWNE 





'For your paper supplies" 



"Flavorful delicacies" 
N. Pleasant St. 



392 



"A real service station" 




COLLEGETOWN 
SERVICE CENTER 

Dick Hamilton, Dealer 
"Happy Mobiling" 




MUTUAL PLUMBING 
AND HEATING 

Service over 100 years 





"For our photo needs" 

TRIPOD 
CAMERA SHOP, INC. 



98 N. Pleasant St. 
211 Main St. 



Amherst 
Northampton 



Al. 3-3039 
Ju. 4-6040 



Our Scalp Shop 

UNIVERSITY 
BARBER SHOP 



393 




FRIENDLY ICE CREAM 

63 King St. Northampton 




C & C PACKAGE STORE 

"For everything you need" 



HALLMARK CARDS 

"When you care enough to send the best" 



YOUR AMHERST CINEMA 





MM ~ 



SPECIALTY SHOP 



"Where the better films are shown" 





TOWN HOUSE RESTAURANT 

32 Main St. 



JEFFERY AMHERST MUSIC SHOP 

"On the Corner" 





DRUG STORE 



iReB.2515 

WILLIAM H. MCGRATH.PH.G. 

AL 3-2524 AMHERST, MASS. 



DAN'S GULF SERVICE 




394 




There is always one outstanding clothing shop in a community which is noted 
for its quality merchandise and popular prices. In Amherst it is the ^OUS^E Ot 
SSIhIsI}) which for years has been the home of Haspel, Southwick, Palm 
Beach, H. Freeman and Norman Hilton for all season clothing. 

^on^t of Matef) 

Home of the quality clothier for men and women 



Customers never graduate from the House of Walsh 
AMHERST WILLIAMSTOWN 



395 




HAMILTON I. NEWEll 
INC. 

PRINTING 

for the University Campus 

Printers to the COLLEGIAN 




LOUIS' FOOD 

A market of quaUty foods 




AMHERST LAUNDROMAT 

Let us serve your laundry needs 

9 lbs. - washed, dryed, & folded - $.80 
Shirts and Pants - Hand Ironed 



RUSSELL'S PACKAGE STORE 



Rear Main St. 



opp. Town Hall 



MRAZ FORD INC. 




"Quality Used Cars" 

78 SUNDERLAND RD. 

N. AMHERST 




CHARCOAL HEARTH 

85 Amity St. 



396 



THE 
INTERFRATERNITY 



COUNCIL 



Alpha Epsilon Pi 
Alpha Sigma Phi 



Alpha Gamma Rho 



Alpha Tau Gamma 



Kappa Sigma 
Lambda Chi Alpha 



Phi Mu Delta 



Phi Sigma Delta 



Phi Sigma Kappa 



Q.T.V. 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Tau Epsilon Phi 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 



Theta Chi 



Zeta Nu 



THE 
PANHELIENIC COUNCIL 



Alpha Chi Omega 
Chi Omega 
Kappa Alpha Theta 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 



Lambda Delta Phi 
Pi Beta Phi 
Sigma Delta Tau 
Sigma Kappa 



397 




idea man . . . 

the Keller yearbook 

representative 





To the casual reader a yearbook is often simply an 
"album" of pictures with accompanying identi- 
fications and enough written text to fill up the re- 
maining holes on the pages. Merely ink on paper 
. . . though nice to own and enjoy. 

But to the staff and the adviser the yearbook 
means much more. For yearbook work comprises 
a multitude of details: Layout, Art, Photography, 
Copy, Typography, Covers and Binding (not to 
mention the small detail of money-raising). 
Highly technical and often confusing, these details 
are at the very least time-consuming and a source 
of anxiety to a staff unless the publisher's repre- 
sentative is company-trained to give needed help 
and suggestions. 

All representatives for Wm. J. Keller Inc. are 
skilled in the many facets of yearbook work, hav- 
ing at their finger-tips the answers to yearbook 
problems as well as a multitude of ideas for new 
graphic arts special effects, to enable the staff to 
produce a yearbook that is different and attractive. 
Your Keller salesman is more than a technical ad- 
viser, he is a "clearing-house" of yearbook ideas. 



ROSWELL FaRNHAM 



® 



Wm. J. Keller Inc. 

Publishers of Finer Yearbooks 
Buffalo 15, New Yorl^ 




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IINCOIN STUDIO 

PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHERS 

' Official Portrait Photographers for 
The Index 1953-1957, 1959-1962 



MALDEN, MASS. 









In Memory 



of 



PAUL J. MEIER 



Assistant Professor of Economics 
1928-1962 



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400 




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Massachusetts Agricultural College — 1867