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niversity of M 







INDEX 

1964 

University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Joseph W. Bradley 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

M. Ann Miller 

MANAGING EDITOR 

Susanna Rybak 

PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR 

Curtis J. Cowley 




massachusetts life 

ANNE BALTREN 



• academic life 

BEVERLY LANG 



• athletics 

MIKE PARIS 



greek life 

BARBARA FARRELL 



33 



101 



155 



219 



BUSINESS EDITOR 

Manny Smith 

ART AND COVER DESIGN 

Hinda Katz 



organizations 

JOYCE BLUM 



261 



LAYOUT 

Nancy Lewis 

EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS 



Sue Klein 
Sandy Magdalenski 
Steve LeClerc 
Pat Savage 
Bob McDonnell 
Joan Felio 
Jackie Beauvais 



Elaine Corsi 
Judy Wilcox 
Anne Posner 
Gail Freedlander 
Sandy Morze 
Pat Simmons 
Bob McAlear 



• seniors 

JAYNE ARNOLD 



1 • 



index 



315 



448 




Growth, Strength: 
The University 



From the Outside 




The campus pond reflects lights strung along Ellis Drive for Senior Week. 



T« 



. HE University must be a strange place to those outside. There is a constant 
busy-ness throughout the normally accepted school year from September to June, 
but the pace seems leisurely to those not involved in the process of learning. To one 
not trained at a university, the movement must be as inexplicable as the swarming 
of bees at the hive, the swirling of snow into a drift or the scudding of clouds to a 
thunderhead: Movements in confusion to a recognizable end. 

Here, the recognizable end is the baccalaureate gained as the fruition of the four- 
year pace of seemingly confused movement, including curricula and non-curricula. 
The pace may be sometimes leisurely, sometimes frenetic, sometimes rhapsodic. 
Sometimes there isn't enough time, and sometimes there's too much time. But 
within four years there will surely be all sorts of times, including good and bad. 

The following looks at nearly a year of that time. 



. . A Strange Place 



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Nightfall 
Redirects 
Studies 



B 



•Y nightfall activity in 
classrooms has ceased for 
most buildings. 

So students move on to 
dormitory rooms, Goodell 
Library, departmental libra- 
ries — anywhere studying can 
be done in earnest. 



Bartlett Hall, liberal arts. 





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G, 



OODELL Library receives the brunt of evening 
study action as the pace continues. 

Yet, a basketball game at the Cage is likely to out- 
draw GoodeH's offerings, as students try to achieve all 
experiences in a four year career. 




A Slackened Pace 

Leads to Leisure and the Pond 



R, 



-URAL hints remain that the University once was agriculturally 
oriented. The pond, at the bottom of the natural bowl ringed by man- 
made brick and steel mammoths, offers a place for leisurely moments 
when a person can afford to lie quietly and soak sun. 

Here, a couple can talk undisturbed, or relax unabashed. Spring 
and Autumn come to life here when the crocuses sprout and the 
leaves turn yellow and red. At the pond the pace slows down, lan- 
guishes, but never stops: it's a refreshing pause. 





10 



A Change In The Weather, Scenery 




A 



change of weather, a change of scenery, and the 
press is on full swing. By the first snowfall, finals are in 
sight. What remains to be done in the way of studies is 
under attack. 

The relaxing pause finds its locale shifted indoors, 
usually the Student Union. The vernal setting becomes 
smokey, semi-obscured, raucous to a juke box tune. 

And the grind goes on through all seasons until the 
goal is reached. 



11 



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To and from classes the 
rush continues, 

The pace quickens as 
time grows shorter 




On the lawn behind Brooks in the lull before finals, coeds develop a tan. 



Campus Springtime 



k3uNSHINE comes into each life, say the sages, and 
students get their share on the spacious lawns of cam- 
pus. Springtime is the nicest time, when the lush ver- 
dure of the Valley swells in its most pregnant beauty. 

Studies become an outdoor activity^ as individuals 
and whole classes find the shade of the elms and the 
moist green carpet a soothing aid to the pursuit of 
academic excellence. 



14 




Students gather between classes on the south side of the Student Union. 



Viewed in Warmth 




In the shade of the Union patio studying comes easily. 



15 



Rains Changed Complexion 





Th 



.HE campus awash is little different from the campus high and dry, but for the 
mud low and wet. 

Brilliant sun given away to gray rain denudes the campus of ornamentation, save 
for yellow slickers, sorority sailor caps and assorted goofy lids to keep hairdos 
more or less in place during brief runs between classes. 



Brightens With Apparel 





Umbrellas Open To Full View 




18 



Limiting What Is Before 




\_^ N the strictly functional side of rain wear, umbrellas take a 
stand. 

That is, the umbrella is enjoying a UMass renaissance, since the 
days of Neville Chamberlain, that has been known before only in 
Harvard Square. 

This undercover movement was formerly held alien to the less 
urbane University. 



19 




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But the almost pastoral 
setting 

Belies the theme of 
progressive change. 



For The Relief Of 




A University crowd gathers at Harvard Stadium for an early Autumn match. 



22 



Academic Pressures 




A, 



..T some point in Fall's early warmth, when spirit 
has yet to be drained by examinations, and the football 
season is still comfortable for the fan in shirt sleeves, 
the social venting of as yet undeveloped pressure be- 
gins. 

This is accepted, generally speaking, by one and all, 
both student and faculty on the basis of a belief that 
something special, exciting or relaxing, ought to be 
included in that academic scheme of things. 



23 





Fast Paced Hoopla 
Is Part Of Fun- 



The Non-Curricula 



I 



N the scheme of things academic falls that 
which is non-academic, or non-curricula. Practi- 
cally unheard of a hundred years or so ago, this 
diversionary channel moves the would-be overflow 
of academic exuberance to safe floor basins: Ath- 
letic fields, student publications and government. 

And possibly-misdirected energy is well spent. 



24 






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25 




Justin S. Morill Science Center reflected in Campus Pond. 



26 



Ivy Covered 
Walls Get No 
Support Here 



X ROM football season to football season, a natural 
beauty pervades the campus, lending an ivy-covered- 
wall affect that could be called a false front, since ivy- 
covered-wall-ism is not traditional at the University. 

There is little traditional at the University at the 
present time. Whether growth provides a poor soil for 
the rooting of tradition, or unseen forces continually 
sabotage the attempts, the University can be "tradition- 
ally" described as one of great natural beauty and few 
traditions. 




Memorial Hall through a Bartlett Hall window. 



27 







Sagging Tradition Keeps Watch On Movement 



Tk 



.RADITION: That's what Metawampe, Old Chapel and South College smack of. 
They stand still watching, used for whatever use can be got out of them. Chapel 
went from what its name signifies, to Old Chapel (vacated four years ago by the 
English department at the completion of Bartlett Hall), to the Music department's 
haven, pending construction of a fine arts building. 

South College houses the administration and IBM, which will move when the 
new administration building is completed. And Metawampe stands by, not sure 
any longer of his function. 



28 



lUV: 



Movement Produces 
Viable Traditions 



\MX I 



I 



N the past fifteen years a new tradition has 
made its mark at the University: holes in the 
ground and derricks in the air. 

UnUke Metawampe, Chapel and South College, 
this tradition seems inexhaustible — in fact, mean- 
ingful — in the face of University growth. 




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The Frenetic Pace of Building 



Skeletal frames of what-wUl-be seemingly sprout from the ground. As if a 
huge harrowing machine were gouging furrows for enormous plants, holes sink into 
the ground literally overnight, as augmented work forces build the University's 
buildings of the future. 

What the future will bring is a matter of speculation. And common sense dictates 
that the physical expansion will have to stop. But what can never cease to grow and 
expand is the intangible reason for a University's being at all. 




Homecoming '63 Saw: 





•1000 Alumni 
and Families 



High Scoring 

Redman 

Football 



• Sandy Pierce, 
Queen 




Massachusetts Life 




. . Now the right eye would be more effective if . . 



Float Construction--Parade Harbinger 




Greenough's float takes first place in the men's dormitory division. 



34 



I NDIAN Summer's warmth and color 
served to heighten and brighten Home- 
coming 1963. 

Brilliantly garbed marchers supple- 
mented a gala float parade through Am- 
herst Friday evening bearing a sole mes- 
sage; "Beat Rhode Island." Thousands 
of spectators lined to watch more than 
forty floats, representing weeks of prep- 
aration by fraternities, sororities, and 
dormitories. 

Prize winners were; fraternities; Beta 
Kappa Phi, QTV, Phi Sigma Delta; so- 
rorities; Sigma Kappa, Kappa Kappa 
Gamma, Pi Beta Phi; Men's dorms; 
Greenough, Baker, Wheeler; and Wom- 
en's dorms; Knowlton, Van Meter North, 
Johnson. 

Blonde Sandy Pierce '67 was crowned 
Homecoming Queen at the foUowing 
Rally- Without-a-Bonfire necessitated by a 
six-week drought. Members of the court 
included; Anne Creedon '66, Elaine 
Howe '66, Judy Sturtevant '67, and 
Vicki Lippner '67. 

A record crowd of 12,000 students and 
alumni saw the undefeated Redraen, 
sparked by Milt Morin and Bernie Dal- 
las, crush the R.I. Rams 57-0 Saturday 
afternoon. 



1 




\ 



Metawampe: John Makos '65 



Homecoming Queen and Court: Vicki Lippner '67, Judy Sturtevant '67, Queen Sandy Pierce 
'67, Elaine Howe '66. Anne Marie Creedon '66 








Final preparations for the 7 p.m. parade. 



SSSSSkS^S 




Indian Summer 
to 57-0 Home 



u 



'MASS' marching band ushered the 
Homecoming Queen and her court on to 
the field with a musical trip to the land of 
the Arabian Nights. The half time show 
also featured the Flying Redmen. 

Game casualties that afternoon in- 
cluded cheerleaders who marked each 
new score with a push-up per point. 

Saturday evening was highlighted by 
the Homecoming Dance in the SU ball- 
room. Other post-game offerings for un- 
dergraduates included the traditional fra- 
ternity parties and the University Thea- 
tre's production of Platus' Twin Menaech- 
mi at Bowker auditorium. 



Homecoming Queen; Sandy Pierce 



36 



Fires Redmen 
coming Victory 



A. 



XUMNI and faculty promenaded to 
the music of the Bob Jeffway Quartet at a 
dance in Memorial Hall sponsored by the 
University Women. A Tailgate Picnic 
numbered among earher alumni activities. 

The Dave Brubeck Quartet of "Take 
Five" fame wrapped up the weekend's 
activities with a jazz concert sponsored by 
Alpha Phi Omega, national men's service 
fraternity. 

Over 2500 people crowded the Cage 
to hear progressive jazz. Proceeds went 
to the Art Acquisition Fund earmarked 
to furnish a gallery in the University's 
projected Fine Arts Center. 




Cheerleaders were driven to physical limits: 57 pushups. 




APO-sponsored Brubeck Quartet raised Art Acquisition funds. 



37 




The ever present card game often lasts into the small hours of the morning. 



Squeeze Is On: 
Dorm Construction 
Misses Deadlines 



u 



A familiar dorm scene on Saturday afternoons. 




NFORESEEN difficulty in housing 
5470 students this year developed when 
four dorms failed to meet completion 
schedules in September. 

Until May, 1963, it was assumed the 
dorms being constructed on the hill north 
of campus would be ready for occupancy 
last fall, and applicants were accepted on 
that premise. 

Students who would have occupied 
these dorms flooded present facilities. 
Result was that the campus' 26 dorms 
housed 845 students above normal ca- 
pacity, and several hundred upperclass- 
men moved to off-campus quarters. 

To help relieve crowding, 600 rooms 
in boys' dorms were converted into triples 
while threesomes of girls were squeezed 
into 245 regular size rooms. Less than 20 
rooms on campus are designed as triples. 

In addition, 139 single rooms were 
furnished to accommodate two. 

Makeshift conditions were partially re- 
heved in January when, as is always the 
case, more students left than arrived on 
campus. 

While overcrowding may never be 
completely eliminated, continuous cam- 
pus expansion wiU force dormitory con- 
struction to keep pace with the growth of 
the student body. 



38 





The all-important phone call. 



Wash day — again. 



Don't forget to sign out, girls. 



R, 



. ESPONSIBILITY for coordinating campus housing for 5470 stu- 
dents in September fell on the University's Housing Office, under the 
direction of Mr. John Welles. 

As an administrative body. Housing is very closely connected with 
students. 

Aiding him are Administrative Assistant Frank Thomas, Staff Assistant 
Bob Van Vliet, Men's and Women's Housing Officers and two Assistant 
Housing Officers. 

Housing exists not only to put out brush fires, but as a planning agency 
for future facilities — planning as much as 20 years in advance by consid- 
ering projected enrollment plans and academic facilities. 

Plans for the future provide for a campus community centered around 
the pond, with dorm areas equidistant from the center. Automobiles will 
be pushed further and further away from the center of campus to periphery 
areas. 




39 




Students' wives enjoy a "hen" session. 





The family budget must be carefully planned each week. 
Family life is planned for studying. 
40 



Books and Brooms and Babies-- 
The Double Life of Married Students 



C 

^EVEN hundred and thirty-five members of the 
campus community lead a double life. 

Daily the occupants of the married students' dorms 
combine books and brain-work with dusting, dish- 
washing, and diapering. 

Typical of the student family are Mr. and Mrs. Dick 
Buck and their three children. 

As a student and family man, Dick, a senior govern- 
ment major, like most husbands doesn't help with do- 
mestic chores in order to devote more time to studies 
and a part-time job. 

Though life is dictated by financial restrictions, the 
low rent in married dorms helps make schooling a real- 



ity for some students who couldn't otherwise afford it. 

Pleasure for the Bucks consists in relaxation from 
studies and chores, usually concerts or football games 
with an occasional movie. Rare nights out are made 
possible by swap babysitting among the ten families 
on the floor. 

More frequent are the evening get-togethers in one 
apartment while special occasions are celebrated with 
corridor parties and dancing in the halls. 

Although separated from the mainstream of UMass 
life, married couples still feel themselves a part of the 
campus because they live so close and can take advan- 
tage of cultural and entertaining programs. 





The inevitable in every home. 



off Campus Living Affords 
New Facets For Many 



±_ OR the first time in many years, off-campus housing 
is being enjoyed by a considerable group of under- 
graduate male students. Suspiciously regarded only a 
few years ago, off-campus housing is something of a 
blessing to harried administrators. 

Most students find it pleasurable to have more than 
one room. Planning meals, shopping and cooking cram 
an already busy schedule, but the challenge is felt to be 
worth it. 

Usually chores are assigned according to one's class- 
hour schedule, thus allowing for all to participate in 
the housework. 

As some students observe: "It's certainly homeier 
than a dormitory and not as strictly run as a fraternity. 
You're more on your own." 





"These things just keep piling up," says Paul Levy, "but 
we've got it set up so all of us get a chance." 



Says Jeff Eisman: "I find it more comfortable here." 

"We eat pretty well," offers George Masselam (left), "but the budget can present problems." 




University Theatre's Roman Holiday 




A 



ROISTEROUS Roman comedy called 
Twin Menaechmi bounded onto the Bowker 
stage to open University Theatre's second season 
as the University's academic theatre. 

Second century Rome would have roared guf- 
faws of recognition at the production. Masks 
made by part-time student Kathy Wrynn added 
authenticity and gaiety to twentieth century puns 
dubbed in for audience identification. 

Jim Wrynn, Kathy Wrynn's husband; Larry 
Wilker, Paula Norton and Deena Ferrigno headed 
up a talented cast, which produced a fine play and 
added even more color to Homecoming Weekend. 

Slipping out of celastic masks and into Victo- 
rian garb, the UT's, aided by Roister Doisters, 
brought UMass the record-breaking Ghosts. 



Masked Ken Feinberg as the Parasite awaits his entrance cue 



Jerri Siegle and Jim Wrynn, Maid and Menaechmus II. 



44 



Plautus' Satire Still Bites 




Masks by Kathy Wrynn. 



I 



BSEN'S penetrating social drama was borne 
onstage by a cast of five, headed by Sheila Ferrini 
as the tragic Mrs. Alving. 

For this drama, so noted for detail, UT used a 
full box-type set, including ceiling. 

Spring semester, UT followed up with Shake- 
speare's Othello and Robert Penn Warren's All 
The King's Men, besides sponsoring a University 
Reading Theatre production of a new play by a 
young American playwright. 

Not only actors, but stage crews — knee deep 
in sawdust and up to elbows in paint — worked on 
shows, whether for academic credit, points toward 
RD membership or sheer fun. 

Set Designer Orville K. Larsen, Directors Har- 
ry Mahnken and Cosmo Catalano, Technical Di- 
rector Terry Wells and Director of Reading The- 
atre Doris Abramson are all of the Speech Depart- 
ment. 




Deena in her role as the shrewish wife of Menaechmus I. 



45 




Frosh begin process of socialization at Summer orientation. 



2200 Frosh Are Introduced-- 



To Each Other 





The Mugbook presents possibilities, if 
not probabilities. 



46 



To University Procedure . . . 




"What do you do next," with the hefty regis- 
tration packet? 




A frosh picks up one of the 
myriad handouts, sheets and 
folders. 




The grind of first-time registration . 



47 



To Interminable, Indiscriminate Lines 




It's hurry up and wait for chow. 



Lines form at the rear — far rear. 



A^ 



^MONG the introductions are the 
lines: registration line, book store line, 
ID line, Hatch line, Commons' line, and 
others. 

With 6800 students enrolled, the suc- 
cession of one upon another in quest of a 
common goal is bound to result in long 
lines. 

However, the physical plant continues 
to grow, thus affording the possibility of 
cut-down lines. Meanwhile, human nature 
will retain a certain hatred for lines, and 
undergraduates will question the value of 
the wait for Commons' food. 

But the problem of lines at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts may yet refute a 
Euclidian axiom about a straight line be- 
ing the shortest route between two points. 




Finally they reach the goal, one at a time. 



48 



U. N. Week Aids South American Project 




Buffy Ste-Marie '62 returns from Greenwich Village and New York City success. 




Buffy Returns; 
Candy Sales 
Boost Funds 

l\ SPEECH by the former President 
of the United Nations General Assembly, 
a concert by a UMass graduate and a 
panel discussion highlighted U.N. Week 
activities, October 20-26. 

Sir Muhammed Zafrulla Khan's ad- 
dress, "United Nations at the Cross- 
roads," outlined the growth and change 
of the U.N. to an audience of 1200 in 
the Student Union Ballroom. 

A panel discussion of "Aid to the 
Agrarian Community" featured UM fac- 
ulty members Dr. Luther Allen, Dr. 
David Leonard and Dr. Bruce Morris. 

Folk song-stylist BufTy Ste-Marie who 
has given several concerts on the UMass 
campus, returned for U.N. Week. 

An International Dance and a dorm 
candy sale completed the agenda. 

Profits from U.N. Week went to aid 
for underdeveloped countries. 



Muhammed Zafrulla Khan, President of the 17th General 
Assembly. 



49 






Members of the "cast" stare in disbelief as the six characters tell their story. 



Memory Of Being — Search For Being 



Tb 



.ENSELY probing and tragically enigmatic 
was Luigi Pirandello's Six Characters in Search of 
an Author, presented to an enthusiastic UMass 
audience of 1200 by the Circle in the Square off- 
Broadway company. 

The October presentation was the first Dis- 
tinguished Visitor's Program offering of the year. 

A slapstick rehearsal of eight actors and their 
director is interrupted by a family of six agonized 
characters, who hang in a horrible existence and 
cannot die. Cries the father — "It's unjust that our 
whole existence is based on one fleeting moment 



of etermty." They have a past with a story, but no 
existence; they beg the director to write their play 
and their lives. 

He agrees, and he has his actors play out the 
story as the characters tell him it has been. "One 
person cannot get into another," cries one of the 
characters in anguish as he sees the play of his 
life. 

Their Uves cannot be performed, their story 
cannot be written — the characters vanish, the 
actors leave, wonderingly. 



50 





In Madame Pace's hatshop, the Step-daughter recreates the confrontation with her Step-father. 



The Step-daughter shrieks her disgust. 





DVFs Shirer Drops 
"Third Reich Secrets" 

For World Situation 



w. 



ILLIAM L. Shirer, DVP's Novem- 
ber offering, put aside the "Problems of 
the Third Reich" to speak a series of 
pronouncements on the world situation. 

"No free democratic country in West- 
ern Europe would stand for a reunifica- 
tion of Germany, for a united Germany 
would become the strongest power in 
Europe," said Shirer. 

But he conceded that within the next 
hundred years Germany would adjust to 
the Democratic process. 

"Russian development in technology 
and education poses a threat to us" 
Shirer told the 1600 in the Student Union 
ballroom. To serve the overflow crowd, 
the Union's public address system piped 
the voice of the man who authored The 
Rise and Fall of the Third Reich and 
Berlin Diary into various lounges in the 
building. 

Shirer stressed the need for U.S. — So- 
viet understanding in the face of the nu- 
clear potential possessed by the two pow- 
ers. 

Shirer cautioned, "Red China can no 
longer be swept under the bed," and 
lauded foreign aid as a tangible form of 
U.S. generosity. 

Said Shirer, looking back, "I think we 
can say we've not had a bad record." 





ving to rhe Cape- Cod" louhfi^, William I.. Shirer an 
• 'ivc and take session. Over 160' 

espondent. 




WMUA radio interview 



Smothers Brothers In S. U. Sponsored Show 

J. X ALF the student body was at home and the "Cage," traditional home 
for campus concerts, was closed for repairs, but the Smother's Brothers 
were a hit anyway. 

The November 10 concert coincided with the Veteran's Day weekend, 
but 1700 students jammed the Union Ballroom and countless more en- 
joyed the concert with a cup of coffee as the program was piped into the 
"Hatch." 

Since their introduction to television audiences on the Jack Paar Show 
the Brothers have been entertaining people across the country through 
records, night spots, and the college concert field. 

Tom and Dick Smothers create their act by combining genuine wit with 
just-as-genuine musical talent. Straight-faced Dick kept the program mov- 
ing, but the seemingly naive stage appearance of Tom captivated the 
audience. 

"If you heard their constant stage bickering, could you doubt they were 
brothers?", as some students observed. 




The bickering "Brothers" on stage 



54 



Rallies Few--Bonfires Fewer 



J_/AD weather, long 
weekends and a sure-thing 
football team put the damp- 
er on Fall rallies. 

First drought, then down- 
pour, ruled out bonfires and 
the final rally. 

By mid-season the Red- 
men seemed to need no 
pre-game boost to trample 
the opposition. 

At one point, to over- 
come the weather, an in- 
door rally was attempted. 
Cheerleaders, band and 
football team turned out as 
usual, but attendance failed 
to be impressive. 





Cheerleaders . 



and band never failed. 




The Maroon Keys were saved from a shutout when good weather allowed construction of the 
first (and as it turned out, the last) bonfire of the season. 



56 




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^ 



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One of 3000 cups of coffee is paid for. 





Stainless steel counter bears up well. 



The quick snack or drink accounts for volume. 



58 




'^ 



2400 Donuts Get Dunked Into 3000 

Cups of Coffee by 
6500 Persons 




OeVENTEEN hours a day, 
seven days a week the Hatch 
caters to the coffee, companion- 
ship, and conversation needs of 
students. 

The Hatch is the real center 
of campus hfe where students 
meet the gang between classes, 
snag weekend dates, discuss the 
assignment for the class they're 
cuttirtg, and sometimes even type 
term papers. 

Its casual atmosphere also at- 
tracts professors who take a rest 
from lecturing or correct the blue 
books they've promised to return 
the next period. Even the admin- 
istration sends Dean of Students 
William Field as the special am- 
bassador to the Hatch. 

Hatch weekend meals provide 
a welcome relief from Dining 
Commons diet. Chicken dinners 
and hamburgs and french fries 
top the list of campus favorites. 
While waiting in the (seemingly) 
endless line, students make new 
acquaintances and enjoy the 
sweet music of the Beatles. 

According to Assistant Mana- 
ger, Mr. A. C. Fontaine, the 
Hatch serves over 500 meals a 
day with Monday and Thursday 
nights the busiest dinner nights. 
Over 24,000 donuts get 
dunked into 3000 cups of coffee 
by 6500 persons who often over- 
flow the 567 customer seating 
capacity. 

The average student spends 
about ten hours a week there 
while the addicted Hatch rat 
takes an occasional break to at- 
tend classes. 




59 



To the Union: 

To Dine, 
To Buy, 

To Relax 




Student Union store provides chewing gum to text books. 




Spacious Cape Cod Lounge otters a spot for relaxation. 



The mezzanine is a challenging place to sleep. 






X OOR Mr. Webster would probably roll over 
in his grave if he could see what connotation has 
done to his English language. 

Take the word Union and ask any University 
student what it means. The Union . . . it's a 
place to buy. A place to buy coffee, papers, 
books, laundry soap, contemporary cards, and 
one way bus tickets in those discouraging mo- 
ments. 

It's a place to relax or just kill time in the 
bowling alley, the pool room, the reading lounge, 
or the music room. It's the place of the Friday 
night dance, the Pep Rally, or the bigger social 
events like Mill Ball. 

It's also a place to learn, in the study areas and 
at the lectures. 

Further it's a place to produce, in the offices of 
the Collegian, the Index, the Senate and the nu- 
merous conference rooms. 

"What did you say Union was, Mr. Webster?" 
Oh well, what's in a name. 



61 




The Class of '66 turns the Student Union Ballroom into a gambling casino. 





The sophs manage to peddle a concoction called "Bernie's 
Busters." 



Sally Minich serves as waitress. 



62 



Sophomore Sports 
Sponsor Spiflfy 
Splurge for Charity 



J^^OR only seventy-five cents apiece two 
thousand University students were treated 
to an evening's entertainment at a Vegas 
night spot — Club 66. 

For five hours on November 16, the 
Ballroom at the Union opened its doors 
under the guise of a gambling casino, 
compliments of the sophomore class. 

Moneychangers, waitresses and ciga- 
rette girls in short skirts, husky bouncers, 
and friendly bartenders all lent atmos- 
phere to the Club. Authentic backdrops 
from Las Vegas and a floor show from 
New York added professionalism to the 
scene. 

Frontier Girl Kathy Patten who 
reigned over the evening's events and 
Host Bernie Dallas mingled with the 
crowd and kept the evening's events run- 
ning smoothly. 

Even the faculty rolled up their shirt 
sleeves and manned the crap tables for 
the benefit of the Campus Chest for 
which the event was sponsored. 




Fortunes were lost in play money. 



Frontier Girl 
Kathy Patten 



63 






Coordinator of Student Activities William D. Scott. 



RSO Financial Adviser Edward A. Buck. 



S.U. Programming Is The Backbone 



kJUCCESSFUL events seldom just happen. Behind 
the scenes of what may appear to be a casual, im- 
promptu party lie the planning and skill of a competent 
host. 

Likewise behind the casual facade of the Student 
Union, the "university's living room," lie a number of 
competent hosts and hostesses. 

Thursday night movies, Friday night dances, Sopho- 
more Banquets, and art shows occur as regularly as 



clock work, but they don't just happen. 

In keeping with University tradition the students plan 
the events, but the real hosts and hostess of the Union 
fill their positions on a forty-hour-a-week basis. 

Anything that takes place on the campus that does 
not concern academic life is handled by Mr. Scott, Mr. 
Buck, Mr. Watts or Miss Alden through their offices on 
the Union mezzanine. 







^^^^^m 






mm ^ -iM 




Director of University Program Office Harold W. Watts. 



Student Union Program Adviser Mary Alden. 



64 




Concert Assn. Offers 
Musical Opportunities 

J_-/IKE most "campus schools" the University is 
geographically alienated from the large cities of the 
state. Thus it is not possible for the students to take 
advantage of Symphony Hall and the Metropolitan 
Opera with any degree of convenience. 

Due largely to the efforts of the Concert Association 
the University students are able to enjoy professional 
productions right on the campus. 

The first production of the '63 season, an English 
translation of Puccini's Tosca, was presented in the 
Cage, as are all large scale productions. On September 
30, however, the floor was still under repair and the 
audience found chairs set up on dirt rather than the 
usual hardwood basketball court. 

Luckily, earlier productions in the series were small 
enough to be performed in Bartlett Auditorium, and by 
the time the Toronto Symphony arrived, the Cage floor 
had been completed. 

The 1963-64 season featured the Schola Cantorum, 
Netherlands String Quartet, Toronto Symphony Or- 
chestra, Raymond Hansor and Leonard Seeber, New 
York Brass Quintet, Robert Joffrey Ballet and Green- 
wich Quartet. 



Josephine Busalacchi sings title role in Puccini's Tosca. 




Toronto Symphony Orchestra in concert. 



65 



'^ 



^. %" 



*fc5S£:%^ 




Assassination Strikes 
Campus Emotional Blow 

X WENTY-SIX days earlier he stood in the 
midst of students from both the University and 
Amherst College where he broke ground for the 
Robert Frost Memorial Library. 

When word of the death of President John 
Fitzgerald Kennedy struck campus, all motion 
ceased and the wait began. Amid confused reports 
from Texas, young, high hopes rose and fell. Stu- 
dents wept unashamedly, and the University went 
into formal mourning. 

All activities, social and academic, were sus- 
pended. And almost immediately, the student 
body left for a suddenly lengthened Thanksgiving 
holiday. Then followed the days of the state fu- 
neral, sharply interrupted on a Sunday by a sec- 
ond irrational act, the televised murder of the 
suspected assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald. 

Only once before had the President been to the 
University, and that, in 1956, as a candidate for 
the United States Senate. But likely, a part of him 
will always remain, whether in the name of the 
new athletic stadium or in the fact that he lived 
when he lived, as he lived. 




At Amherst, too, he walked amongst the people. 



"•*i*«T*'-..^*ir.. H 





The flag of the United States was- immediately lowered to half staff when his death became 
known. The facade of Memorial Hall bearing the names of battles of two world wars and 
the names of men who died in battle, serves as an appropriate background. 



The Twenty- second Of November 



Grief, consternation, disbelief crossed the faces of students who gathered in the Student Union 
ballroom to wait and listen with the rest of the nation for final word. 




A 



new elective has been added to the 
University curriculum — Reserve Officers 
Training Corps. 

This announcement brought about a 
series of changes in the previously man- 
datory system. 

As had been expected, the total enroll- 
ment of the program dropped by nearly 
one half. 

For the 938 men who elected to take 
the ROTC program two new innovations 
were added. One academic credit was 
given to the previously creditless course. 
Also added was the Army Flight Program 
which trains and qualifies selected seniors 
for their pilot's license. 

Innovations also brought University 
women into the realm of the program 
when the Army assumed sponsorship of 
the Precisionettes while the Air Force in- 
troduced the Angel Flight. 

The campus at large benefited by the 
change when Dickinson Hall was opened 
for academic classrooms. 



Army ROTC Becomes New 
Co-eds Enter Ranks 




Special Forces march in Fall Review. 




Jim Blanchard receives military award at Fall Review. 



68 



Course Offering 
For First Time 





Garry Kwist bellows shape up order to AFROTC cadet. 




f»f*,' 



Presentation of the colors at annual Fall Review. 



69 





New Honorary Colonel Nancy Thompson, second from right, 
receives congratulations from last year's Colonel Kathie Mann- 
ing, as members of the military court. Barbara Clauss, Barbara 
Mendelsohn, Nancy Field and Dorothy Donovan look on. 



First Mill Ball In Four Years Without Pranks 




LJHE Wore a Yellow Ribbon," he 
wore his ROTC uniform, and the Ball- 
room wore the trimmings for a military 
formal. 

And for the first time in four years Mill 
Ball was strictly a military affair. There 
were no anti-ROTC pickets, no Revolu- 
tionary War uniforms and no Navy uni- 
forms to dampen the Army-Air Force 
formal. 

Cadet officers and their dates began 
the evening with a buffet dinner at the 
Westover Officer3» Club. 

Then it was to the Ballroom for danc- 
ing to the Guy Ormandy Orchestra. 

Couples were also treated to the debut 
of the Air Force glee club — "The Singing 
Wings." 

It was an evening to be remembered by 
all, but Miss Nancy Thompson '65, who 
was named Honorary Colonel, will prob- 
ably remember it just a little longer than 
anyone else. 



70 



Military Ball goers waltz to the music of the Guy Ormandy orchestra. 






71 



,4^ 



'T- 



**i 




1* **5^'rf 



• ♦ 



Traditional Warmth of 
Continues Despite 



X ADS come and go and so do some "traditions," but 
the Holiday Season at the University will always be the 
Holiday Season. 

It's really not too different from the celebrations 
that we have in our own homes, but by virtue of the 
size of the University family, everything is big. 

We'll always have the Trim-a-Limb Party in the 
Union, the Carol Sing, and Christmas Concerts. Mail 
boxes will continue to overflow with season's greeting, 
candles will appear in residence hall windows, and 
Christmas trees will appear everywhere, including over 
new construction sights. The men will loosen up their 
vocal chords to serenade the women's residences, or- 
ganizations will give parties for themselves and for chil- 
dren, and religious services will be held. 

Chanukah will always have its traditional supper 
and program of religious readings and song. And Israeli 
dancing will continue to follow the program. 

It's nothing new or novel. It's old fashioned tradi- 
tion. But, who wants it any other way? 




Catholic students participate in the Living Rosary beside the 
campus pond. 



72 



University Holidays 
Impersonal Growth 





Union mezzanine takes on Christmas decorations. 



Diane Conforti gets a Christmas buss from Santa. 





73 




Study areas get crowded early, stay crowded till late. 




A day-dream break breaks up study monotony. 




Final Exams: 




The all important study position is assumed. 



74 



Leisurely Study, Cramming, Questioning 




Early morning shadows silhouette a student's solitary study in the Student Union. 



75 




Early morning cramming through a dormitory window. 



Strange Atmosphere Surrounds Finals 



The strain catches up with some, and a moments rest is welcome. 




76 




Final exam post-mortem in the Hatch finds students comparing answers. 



77 



Political Science Association 




Six-time Socialist presidential candidate Norman Thomas. 



78 



Presents Norman Thomas 
Who Urges Revision of "Containment" Policy 



I^PRAINED muscles, tired feet, and eye-strain 
were the common ailments of many University 
students following a speech delivered by the 
American Socialist Party Leader, Norman Thom- 
as. However, the students, the overflow of people 
making up the audience, were not complaining. 
Thomas's impressive lecture, sponsored by the 
Political Science Association, was received enthu- 
siastically by the capacity crowd, including those 
seatless victims who were content to line the back 
walls of the Student Union Ballroom. 

Thomas aroused the student body with his 



strong plea for a revision of foreign policy. Stress- 
ing the transformation that has taken place on 
the world scene since World War II, he stated, 
"In the old days there was only one uncle, Uncle 
Sam, and he could spank the boys when they got 
out of hand. Today there are two uncles," he 
added, "there is also Uncle Nikita." Mr. Thomas 
advocated, in shaping our foreign policy, a steady 
drive towards disarmament, aid to emerging na- 
tions, and disengagement from military commit- 
ments. 



Capacity Student Union ballroom crowd heard Thomas trace history of U.S. post-war policy. 




79 





Gov. Peabody kisses Queen Marty. 



Roxanne Giles, Pam Chace, Queen Marty, Diane Klein and Anne Creeden. 



Weather Foils Winter Carnival Plans 



Cami fireworks explode behind Metawampe. 



Marty Brockway 
Reigns Over 
Weekend 



l)nOW was a problem. First because there wasn't 
any, then because there was too much. 

Only a scant two inches covered the Pioneer Valley 
for days before Winter Carnival Weekend, and through 
early Saturday evening, not a crystal had fallen. 

Snow sculptures were necessarily ruled out. Outdoor 
events were seriously curtailed, including an elaborate 
program of sleigh rides and dog-sled matches. But the 
scheduled fireworks flashed brilliantly Friday evening 
as the Winter Carnival Ball, highlight of the weekend, 
got under way in the Student Union ballroom. The 
Lester Lanin orchestra provided music. 

Queen Marty Brockway, a petite sophomore received 
the crown of her office from the hands of Governor 
Endicott Peabody, who in turn honored the regal lady 
with a gubernatorial kiss. Four more lovely ladies, 
Anne Creedon, Pam Chace, Roxanne Giles and Diane 
Klein, assisted Queen Marty as members of her court. 

Governor Peabody also got the chance to meet with 
the Commonwealth's four most famous TV personali- 
ties of the day, the UMass College Bowl team of Cap- 
tain Bill Landis, Mike Berrini, Dave Mathieson and 
Susan Tracy. 

Carni theme that was to be represented in snow 
sculptures built by fraternities, sororities and dormito- 
ries was "All the World's a Stage" from Shakespeare's 
Mid-Summer Night's Dream in honor of the 400th an- 
niversary of the poet's birth. 

Traditionally the junior class' most impressive pro- 
duction. Winter Carnival suffered at the whim of the 
elements. But the Class of '65 kept up with plans left 
unaffected by the weather in a valiant attempt to pro- 
vide Winter Carnival entertainment. 

In the true tradition of the stage "the show went on" 
despite the lack of snow and a fickleness on the part of 
nature that no other Winter Carnival has had to over- 



come. 




Queen Marty Brockway '66. 



81 



Women's Dorms Down Sororities 3-0 
In Hard Fought Powder Puff Game 



c 



'^AME Saturday afternoon and the Powder Puff 
hockey game faced off on the ice of the Campus Pond. 
A women's dormitory team bested a sorority squad 3-0 
to take the games honors. 

But the hockey game missed by an ice chip from 
becoming another casualty that weekend. Until a few 
days before the match, the pond was dry while work- 
men constructed a small flood control dam at the 
northern end of the pond. 



Once the dam was completed, the pond was flooded 
and the question became one of whether the water 
would freeze. By Saturday an ice cover capable of sup- 
porting the combined weight of the Powder Puff teams 
was on the pond. 

So the girls took to it with brooms and a soccer ball 
to play an approximation of the Canadian national 
game. What the teams lacked in ability was made up 
in comedy. 




82 



i 



Fashion, As You Like It, Modeled 
For The Well-Dressed College Miss 



A 



fashion show, featuring University coeds as 
models, demonstrated the weekend wardrobe of the 
well dressed campus woman during the later part of 
Saturday afternoon. 

Sportswear made the greatest hit as a brilliant array 
of ski parkas, ski pants and other togs for the skiing 
miss were modeled at Bowker auditorium. 

Formal evening dress, casual knits for daytime and a 



host of accessories were displayed for the campus miss. 
An added attraction to the fashion show was the 
appearance of the Winter Carnival Queen and her court 
dressed in Elizabethan period clothing to heighten the 
marked contrast with contemporary styles and to keep 
pace with the weekend's Shakespearean theme, "As 
You Like It." 







83 




Then Came 
The Snow . . 



X ARTY-GOERS returning late Satur- 
day evening were the first to notice the 
long-looked-for, but at present unwanted 
snow. 

The unexpected coastal storm left its 
mark and weekend visitors faced the 
prospect of being marooned in Amherst. 
The bonfire, scheduled to be lighted in 
the afternoon to start final festivities that 
included the concert appearance of the 
New Christy Minstrels, flared briefly and 
died. 



The bonfire that never fired. 



-^\JS7f^-.. JV* 





84 



That Wasn't 
Really Needed 



kJNOW enough for any Winter Carni- 
val nearly forced an abrupt cessation to 
the festivities by delaying the featured 
concert performers, The New Christy 
Minstrels. 

A quick decision on the part of Carni- 
val authorities allowed the troupe to set 
down in New York, then continue by bus 
to the University. 

Again, the show went on, six hours 
later than scheduled, before 4000 stal- 
warts in the Cage. 





85 



Eat, Drink, Merriment: Amherst's Provender 




J /AT, drink, and be merry," caU out 

Amherst stores offering students every- 
thing from books to bottles, pipes to 
pizza. 

Saturday afternoons are spent buying 
supplies for the week and checking stores 
for sales and the latest campus fashions. 

Amherst grocery stores are invaded by 
students stocking up on canned foods, 
soups, crackers, coffee, and sweets. Rolls, 
salami, pickles, and cheese are purchased 
for portable picnics during the warm sea- 
son. 

Lower town prices draw student 
housekeepers to the domestic counters 
where they buy soap powder, shampoo, 
shaving cream, toothpaste and kleenex. 




One of Amherst's finest in the traffic box at the confluence of 
Amity, Main and North Pleasant Streets on a busy Saturday 
afternoon. 



Everyman's form of transportation was somewhat restricted by 
the Selectmen. 



86 



Intellectual, Somatic Broadening 

Are As Close As Downtown 




With the boom in off-campus living, UMass students searched for bargains. 



T, 



HE more intellectual and 
cultured student rushes to the 
town bookstore for his copy of 
Fanny Hill and then to the rec- 
ord shop for the latest Beatles 
album. 

On the Saturday before big 
campus weekends, the UMass 
coed shops for a new outfit in the 
two houses of fashion while her 
date orders a corsage in the flow- 
er shop. 

Odds, ends, and jiffy hooks are 
picked up in the town's only five 
and ten. 

UMass males crowd to the 
smoke-shop to buy cigarettes and 
view the latest in pipes. 




Quick lunch ingredients, such salami, cheese and baloney top the list. 




A group of students can fill a market basket as quickly as a housewife. 



87 




The tables at the Drake — amongst which Willie dwells, under the cover of personalized mugs. 
A popular man with UMass students, since Willie is quick on the pour. 



Eli's "Whiffenpoof " At Home In Amherst 





Relaxation on a Saturday evening in the spirit 
and true." 



;d manner of "good friends, tried 



Pained expression: Big Line. 



D. 



'URING the week students socialize at the Drake in hopes of winning a 
weekend date. Shy males lose their inhibitions after a bit of socializing and take the 
plunge, but forget to appear by the following Saturday night. Early Saturday 
;venings, couples stroll into town heading for supper at the pizza houses or ice 
:ream parlors. Onion rings, grinders, garlic bread, spaghetti, hamburgs, french fries 
and cokes supplement Dining Commons fare. 



Doris Kleinerman, Bobby Jaye, Mary Anderson and Andy Olanoff enjoy dinner by candlelight. 





Amherst's Isolation 
Can't Escape 
Hollywood 

IVl EANWHILE lines are be- 
ginning to form for the 9 p.m. 
showing at the movie theater. In 
the dim interior couples munch 
popcorn, hold hands, and ver- 
bally express their approval or 
disapproval of the showing. 

The movie over, couples race 
to beat the crowds to the ice 
cream shops to warm up with a 
cup of coffee, enjoy a sundae, or 
talk over a cigarette. 




The most casual form of entertainment is the movies, easily 
accessible at Amherst's only theater. 



Don Grant and Sue Tracy take an evening's ease from study to 
view Hollywood's more or less recent offerings. 



90 



UMass Spurs 
Town's Services 



V-/n the more homey side, 
Amherst merchants supply paint, 
prints and mops for the amateur 
interior decorator, as well as 
matching bed-spreads and cur- 
tains. 

For those with a need to get to 
the bustling "downtown," which 
serves the needs of an artifically 
swollen population of 20,000, ful- 
fillment is no problem. 








Sport's Illustrated, Crime and Punishment, Fanny Hill, the 
town's smoke-shop offering is well diversified. 



Amherst's most prominent ice cream parlor serves the Saturday 
night theater crowd and Sunday morning church-goers. 



91 



Six-Week Odyssey Brings Back 
College Bowl, $10,500 And Team 



A. 



lT least six months before the first television ap- 
pearance of the University's College Bowl team, prepa- 
rations were underway to recruit and select team mem- 
bers. 

Assistant professor of English Albert P. Madeira 
volunteered to act as coach and began the screening 
process. 

Nearly 100 applicants went through the first round 
of written exams. By early Fall an alarm system of the 
type used on the nationwide show was being used in 
daily practice. 

The team had been scheduled to make its first ap- 
pearance November 26, but the College Bowl program 
was canceled with all other network programs at the 
death of President Kennedy. UMass was rescheduled to 
January 26. 

To fill the unexpected void, Coach Madeira arranged 
radio appearances for the team on WTTT and WMUA 
and kept weekly practice rounds. However, on January 
13, Mr. Madeira died suddenly of a heart attack while 
shoveling snow. 



The team went on the air Sunday, the 26th, without 
a coach but assisted by University News Editor Dan 
Melley and Ray Castelpoggi of the Office of Institu- 
tional studies. 

A predominantly UMass audience saw the team beat 
the University of Dayton 150 to 125 at the NBC Pea- 
cock studio. The Student Senate had subsidized buses 
to carry rooters back and forth to New York City. 

The following week UMass smashed Rollins College 
310 to 150, and Dave Mathieson came down with 
acute appendicitis. Following a week off while NBC 
programed a special, the team, including Mathieson, 
whipped Iowa State 285 to 140. Then fell St. John's of 
New York 245 to 150, and the finale, a crushing blow 
over the University of Arizona, 360 to 35. 

Returning to campus from New York with a State 
Police escort, the team was greeted by a clamoring 
throng of students, faculty and alumni. Later in the 
week they were received at a State House reception by 
Gov. Endicott Peabody and members of the Massachu- 
setts General Court. 




Adviser Dan Melley, Dave Mathieson, Bill Landis, alternate Jim Crawford, Sue Tracy, adviser 
Ray Castelpoggi, host Robert Earle retire the College Bowl for undefeated mark. 



92 




Coach Albert P. Madeira with varsity squad (left) and B. squad: Jeff Davidow, Sandy Graham, 
Mike Hench, Jim Crawford in a practice session prior to first TV appearance. 




University of Dayton, Ohio, presented first opposition. UMass won 150 to 125. 



93 



Clamoring Throng Greets Victors 




A throng of 800 greeted the team on its arrival at the Student Union. 



94 



Team, Mrs. Madeira Receive UMass Plaudits 




Sue Tracy, the team's distaff lepresentative, takes a ribbing at the Student Union reception, 





Mrs. Albert P. Madeira accepts Student Senate proclamation. 



Score of final game proved UMass true champions. 



95 



Combined Efforts Of Fine Arts Offers 




V_/ O O P E R A T I O N 

among ten campus organi- 
zations, under auspices of 
the University's Fine Arts 
Council, resulted this year 
in a 20 program Fine Arts 
Festival held from March 4 
through March 25, dedi- 
cated to the memory of 
President John F. Kennedy. 

In previous years, week- 
end long Festivals were 
held on campus, originally 
under sponsorship of Mor- 
tarboard. The extensiveness 
of this year's program was 
a University first, one en- 
thusiastically received by 
the University community. 

The Festival opened with 
a lecture by G. B. Harrison, 
noted Shakespearean schol- 
ar, in observance of the 
400th anniversary of the 
birth of the great bard. 

University Theatre con- 
tributed their production of 
Othello to the Festival. 

A concert of electronic 
music by John Cage 
touched off a minor contro- 
versy in the campus com- 
munity about the auda- 
ciously different "music" 
Cage had presented. 

A unique musical work- 
shop under direction of Dr. 
Elliott Schwartz presented 
works of composers from 
colleges and universities in 
the New England area. 

A 45 voice choir from 
Union College in Kentucky 
appeared in concert, spon- 
sored by the Wesley Foun- 
dation. 



Backstage with the Beinhorn Marionettes. 



96 



3-Week Festival To Late President 



R, 



.ENOWNED poets Ro- 
bert Bly, Stephen Spender, 
and Robert Fitzgerald ap- 
peared on campus as part 
of a three-day Poetry Work- 
shop, sponsored by the Dis- 
tinguished Visitors Program. 

The three visited class- 
rooms during the day and 
dehvered addresses and 
readings in the evenings. 

The exciting contempo- 
rary style of the Robert 
JoflFrey Ballet Company was 
enthusiastically applauded 
by an audience of close to 
3000, in the University's 
Cage. 

Four art exhibitions were 
an integral component of 
the Festival. 

The well-known Bein- 
horn Marionettes, noted for 
mysterious black and light 
creations and varied pro- 
gramming, drew a large 
number of youngsters from 
the surrounding area as 
well as a campus audience. 

Musical performanaces 
were also handed in by fla- 
menco guitarist Ron Soe- 
dalter and by Evelyne and 
Bob Beers, who appeared 
in a concert using early 
American folk instruments. 

The University Concert 
Band gave their Spring 
Concert as part of the Fes- 
tival. 

Milton Mayer, author of 
They Thought They Were 
Free, lectured under aus- 
pices of the English, gov- 
ernment and history depart- 
ments. 




The 45 voice choir of Union College in Barbouiville, Kentucky appeared in the Student Union 
Ballroom. 



97 



University's "Tribute Of The Arts" 
High Point Of Festival 



M 



-AJOR event in an event laden Festival was the 
University's "Tribute of the Arts" to the late President 
John Kennedy. Featuring students and faculty as partic- 
ipants, the mid-day program drew an overflow audience 
of 1500 in the Student Union Ballroom. 

Opening the solemn ceremonies, Frederick Ellert of 
the German department stressed the late President's 
commitment to the fine arts. 

Several professors of the English department — Rob- 
ert Tucker, G. Stanley Koehler and Joseph Lang- 



land — read original poems in memory of Kennedy. 

Senior Edward O'Connor read one of Kennedy's fa- 
vorite poems, "The Gift Outright" by Robert Frost. 

A dance, choreographed by Miss Georgia Reid of the 
physical education department, was performed by Miss 
Reid and students Elaine Baxter and Catherine Noel. 

Doris Abramson of the speech department read from 
Shakespeare's works; the UMass Concert Band per- 
formed "Memorial," composed for the occasion by El- 
liott Schwartz of the music department. 



Doris Abramson reads from Shakespeare in "Tribute Of The Arts"; seated in back are G. 
Stanley Koehler, Robert Tucker, Joseph Langland, Frederick Ellert, Seymour Rudin, Edward 
O'Connor. 




98 



Contemporary Art Presented By Joffrey Ballet 
And Electronic Music Of Cage 




Music man John Cage performs on the typewriter. 



Jeffrey dancers in "Time Out Of Mind.' 



99 



Poets Spender, Bly, Fitzgerald Appear In 

3-Day Workshop; Ceasura Presents Reading Of Own 

Works By Four-College Students 




Poet Stephen Spender 



Poet Robert Fitzgerald 



Poet Robert Bly 




Smith student at Ceasura poetry reading. 



Steve Orion reads at Ceasura sponsored poetry program. 




Advancement 
And 

Communication 
Of Knowledge 



A. 



-N emphasis on the in- 
dividual student . . . 

A dedication to produce 
"men and women of sub- 
stance on the greatest pos- 
sible scale" . . . 

A mission "to look upon 
learning not only as a 
means to bread and butter, 
but as a means to the 
knowledge by which we 
fulfill the best interests and 
highest aims of society." 

— remarks by President 
John Lederle at 1963 
Opening Convocation. 



Academic Life 



A Teacher Affects Eternity; He Can 




Dr. George Richason assisting freshman student in chemistry laboratory. 



102 



Never Tell Where His Influence Stops. 



— Henry B. Adams 





He helps students to understand difficult concepts. 



o. 



In an explicit manner, he lectures a class in 
introductory chemistry. 



F all the hierarchy of Academe, it is the teacher who has the 
power, by wit of his own abOity and intention, to most directly en- 
courage or discourage the student's desire for education and the 
extent of that education. 

As a tribute to his ability to teach, Associate Professor of Chem- 
istry George M. Richason was chosen by his colleagues on the 
faculty to receive the second annual "Distinguished Teacher of the 
Year" award at the University's opening convocation in October. 

A member of the UMass faculty since 1947, Prof. Richason 
graduated from the University in 1937, obtained his master's here, 
and did further work at Bowdoin College, Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology and Clark University. 

He is also overseeing the $150,000 renovation of Goessmann 
Chemistry Laboratory under a National Science Foundation grant. 



103 




Pay Hike Puts 
University In National 
Running 



X AY hikes at state universities do more than 
raise the faculty income. 

National ratings showed that the UMass faculty 
pay raise this year put the University, at long last, 
on an equal footing with other universities in 
competing for the country's best teachers. 

Besides granting a 10 per cent across-the-board 
pay hike to all state employees, the Massachusetts 
State Legislature authorized the Boards of Trus- 
tees of the state colleges and University to grant 
an additional increase not to exceed 10 percent of 
the total professional payroll. 

As of February 1, the average salary for 
UMass faculty members was $9496, an increase 
of $1 196 in the average over the November, 1962 
average of $8300. 

Of the additional 10 per cent hike, adminis- 
tered on a graded scale and passed by the Board 
of Trustees, every faculty member got at least two 
per cent. 

Commenting on the merit increases, President 
Lederle said, "We were woefully behind the na- 
tional average in salaries for teachers in the upper 
academic ranks. By concentrating our major ad- 
justments in the upper ranks, we have become 
fully competitive with other universities in the 
country at all levels. This means we are better 
able to keep top faculty members and to attract 
more outstanding teachers . . ." 

The hike meant, for example, that full profes- 
sors, on a year-round basis, went from a mini- 
mum of $13,086 to a maximum of $16,822; full 
professors, on a ten-month basis, from a mini- 
mum of $ 1 1 ,773 to a maximum of $ 1 6,624. 

Under state law, all professionals at UMass 
were placed on the State General Salary Schedule 
at the same time they received their pay raise. 



Dr. Clarence Shute, philosophy. 



104 




Professor Shafer Williams, history. 



UMass Professor -- Man of Many Faces 



T. 



HE University faculty comes in a variety of 
shapes and sizes. 

In origin, according to most advanced degree, 
the UMass faculty is 59% eastern, 25% midwest- 
em, 3V2% foreign, 5% western, and 7'/2% 
southern. About 30% come from Massachusetts. 

Of the over 650 faculty members at the Uni- 
versity, about half hold doctorates in a field of 
academic study. 

The UMass academic community this past year 
held 288 doctor's degrees, 277 master's degrees, 
83 bachelor's degrees, 7 first professional degrees. 

Each of these 650 educators is something 
different to the people around him. 

To some he is a researcher advancing the fron- 
tier of academic dogma; to some he is a publicist 
making a name for himself and, thus, for his insti- 
tution; for some he is a lecturer transcribing the 
complex material of his field into an elemental 
outline for the undergraduate. At his apex he is a 
compromise. 




Professor Lawrence Bartlett, zoology 



105 



Four-College Cooperation In The Pioneer Valley 




Acting head of the UMass government department Loren Beth and government graduate 
student Henry Leavitt. 



Joint Action Provides Variety Of 



X OUR Colleges in the 10 mile radius of the Pioneer Valley interchange is one of 
many programs which endeavor to maintain the University as a "place of light, of 
liberty, and of learning." 

The exchange course program among the academic neighbors of Amherst, Smith, 
Mount Holyoke and the University of Massachusetts oflfers advanced courses in a 
student's major which are not available at his home institution but which are vital 
to his complete education. 

More than 300 undergraduates and graduates were involved in this program this 
past year. Since its inception in 1957, the program has grown rapidly, gaining the 
attention of the academic world. 

Monthly meetings of joint committees from the four institutions discuss ideas, 
plans and problems. Co-ordinator is Stuart M. Stokes of Mount Holyoke College. 



106 



Augments Study In Major Fields For 300 Students 




o. 



Opportunity 

A 

Z\.MONG programs availa- 
ble to the participants are: a 
joint astronomy program; the 
Massachusetts Review; a film 
center; a joint Ph.D. program; 
WFCR, an educational FM radio 
station; and the Hampshire Inter 
Library Center, housed at the 
University's Goodell library. This 
collection contains rarely used 
books which had been duplicated 
by the four colleges. 



F special importance to government majors at the 
University is the cooperative Asian-African studies 
program, which is financed by the Ford Foundation. 

Primary purpose of the program is to pool resources 
and facilities in this specialized field of the four partici- 
pating institutions. 

A faculty interchange is also part of the program and 
many outside experts in individual programs come in 
for a semester. 

Taking full advantage of inter-college inter-change is 
graduate student Henry Leavitt, a 1962 graduate of the 
University. He has been traveling the four college cir- 
cuit since his junior year. 

The challenge of solving the problems of such exist- 
ence led him to choose government as his discipline and 
African studies as his minor. 

Second semester of this year, for example, he en- 
rolled in two seminar classes at Smith, which were 
primarily discussions among students and professors. 

Last year he was the only student in a geography of 
West Africa course at Mt. Holyoke. 

One of three University graduate students actively 
participating in the Asian-African studies program, he 
is at present working on his M.A. thesis on the De- 
velopment of Neo-Destour of Tunisia. 




107 




Powers Lauds Lederle 

For Administrative Ability 



Tc 



O the students at UMass, 
President John Lederle has often 
seemed a phantom figure. 

But as the school's chief rep- 
resentative to the Commonwealth, 
and its elected administration, 
he's been a slamming success. 

When Lederle arrived at 
UMass in 1960 from the Univer- 
sity of Michigan, he had behind 
him vast educative and admin- 
istrative experience. 

Besides holding posts at 
Brown University and the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, he was a 
practicing attorney, a public 
administrator, and has served as 
legislative consultant to the 
United States Congress. 

Working for the University 
in the world of politics and 
appropriations, John Lederle has 
been a prime force in getting 
UMass fiscal autonomy, a new 
capital outlay program, and a 
faculty pay hike. 

"From the legislative view- 
point," said Massachusetts Senate 
President John Powers, "very 
little of this would have been 
possible were it not for Dr. 
Lederle's recognition of the Gen- 
eral Court's interests, rights and 
functions in this as in all state 
areas. 

"We are truly appreciative 
of his understanding of our role, 
our problems and the relative 
importance of the University in 
the general scheme of things. 

"He has truly initiated a new 
era . . ." 




"A . 





President John W. Lederle 



108 




Old Grad Returns 

As New Secretary 

X HE appointment of Robert McCartney as the 
University's new Secretary is like the proverbial 
sheep returning to the fold. 

A 1941 graduate of UM, McCartney served 
here from 1948 to 1953 as University News Edi- 
tor and from 1953 to 1956 as Director of Publi- 
cations and News. 

in addition to his duties as Secretary, McCart- 
ney will take on the responsibility of Director of 
University Relations, a post he has held at the 
University of Maryland for the past eight years. 

In this position he will coordinate University 
communications in the areas of news, publica- 
tions, radio and television. 



University Secretary Robert J. McCartney 



Woodside Resigns 

As UMass Provost 

V^-ONTINUAL flux and change in personnel 
seems to be a part of the life of any growing 
university — but it's always too bad when a good 
man leaves for greener pastures. 

Former Provost Gilbert Woodside came to the 
University 27 years ago as an assistant professor 
of biology, was appointed Head of the Zoology 
Department in 1948. 

He expanded offerings in zoology on both grad- 
uate and undergraduate levels and was instrumen- 
tal in building a successful program of pre-medi- 
cal studies. 

He was named Dean of the Graduate School in 
1950, became Acting Provost in January of 1961 
and Provost in June. In this post, he served as the 
University's chief administrative officer for aca- 
demic affairs. 

Woodside left UMass this year to become As- 
sistant to the Director for Scientific Program 
Planning and Development at the National Insti- 
tute of Child Health and Human Development in 
Bethesda, Maryland. 




Former University Provost Gilbert L. Woodside 



109 




Director of Institutional Studies, Leo Redfern. 



Communication- -Interaction: 



u 



The University , . . . 



'MASS' man with the figures is Dr. Leo Redfern, Director of the University's 
Office of Institutional Studies, a three-year-old storage bin for data on higher 
education in general and UMass in particular. 

Aiming at greater excellence in University academic programming, OIS gathers 
and analyzes information — published or unpublished, about UMass' growth, devel- 
opment, management and operation — including Mass Reviews and salary analyses. 

OIS came into being partly to aid the University's administration in its planning 
and plan-substantiating. A clearinghouse of information about UMass was made 
necessary by the higher level and greater quantity of decisions demanded of officials 
at a rapidly expanding state university. 

"We're here," says Dr. Redfern, "to assist the University community to maintain 
standards in a period that demands increased services, to cooperate with similar 
services throughout the country, exchanging data with them." 

The Office also encourages and undertakes publications dealing with institutional 
progress, plans and future projections. 



110 



L 



/EARNING at UMass isn't confined to the enrolled 
student body and the University Coordinating Office is 
one reason why. 

Under the direction of Mr. Harold Durgin, the six- 
year old office brings some 22,000 persons "back to 
school" yearly for participation in conferences of an 
educational nature. 

The Office originated as a means of further serving 
community and Commonwealth. 

Planned as far as four years in advance, the 125 con- 
ferences that meet at UMass yearly include labor lead- 
ers, school secretaries and government officials. Once it 
is decided to hold a conference on the UMass campus, 
meals, lodging, meeting rooms and times are arranged 
by the Office. 

Though averaging about 250 persons, some groups 
range in the thousands, and one, the summer 1963 
American Institute of Biological Sciences conference, 
brought over 5000 persons to the campus from all over 
the world. 




Conference Co-ordinator, Harold Durgin. 



The Commonwealth And The Nation 

y V HEN a student makes the honor list or a senator visits the campus, people 
find out about it because of the University News Office. The News Office releases 
news items about the University to over 3000 outlets monthly — these include radio 
stations, newspapers, television stations. 

The Office this year reorganized into a triad to allow for further expansion. The 
Office of University Publications is headed up by Bill Deminoff — former News 
Editor; News Editor, in charge of getting news of UM to the press, is Dan Melley; an 
office in charge of funnelling news to radio and television was headed early in the 
year by Woodridge Brown. 



News Editor, 
Dan Melley 




Lanphear Retires After 42 Years As 




Mrs. Polly Ball assists a student changing a course. 



T. 



HERE was one letter waiting to be answered when he 
arrived to take the post of Registrar in 1918," a colleague of 
retired Registrar Marshall Lamphear said. 

With well over 10,000 applications for admission to the 
University received this year, times have certainly changed. 

A living legend to 16,000 alumni and 8,700 students, 
Lamphear retired this year after 42 years as University Reg- 
istrar, under six different presidents. 

Indicative as an individual of the forces that have made 
the University grow he has been cited as "the campus's great- 
est wit', a storehouse for progressive knowledge about the 
University, a man of tremendous integrity. 

In his years as chief admissions officer, Lamphear has seen 
the University grow from Massachusetts Agricultural College 
with fewer than 500 students to the present UMass complex. 

Despite the pell-mell of innovation in admissions procedure 
at the University, including computer handling of much of 
the statistical material, Lamphear was noted for his personal 
approach to selection, interviewing many applicants himself. 

Which may be indicative that a personal element is ever 
necessary to excellence, no matter what the complexity of the 
institution. 



Registrar William Starkweather and Mrs. Marion Markwell. 



112 



Registrar 




Former Registrar Marshall Lamphear 



Applications For Admission 



Leap 47% Over 1963 



A. 



.N astounding 47% in- 
crease in the number of applica- 
tions received this year over 
1963 is one reason why admis- 
sions administration has been ex- 
panded. 

With the retirement of Mars- 
hall Lamphear as Registrar, Dr. 
William D. Tunis was named 
Dean of Admissions and William 
Starkweather took over duties as 
Registrar. 

Breakdown of responsibilities 
formerly handled from one office, 
puts Tunis in charge of appli- 
cants up to their final acceptance 
and Starkweather in charge of 
students until graduation. 

In the decade since 1954 the 
number of applications and ac- 
ceptances at the University have 
tripled. Next year's freshman 
class will have 2600 members. 




Dean of Admissions William Tunis 



113 




Assistant Director of Placement and Financial Aid Services, 
David P. Lawrence. 



w. 



ITH an undergraduate enrollment of 6800 
as of September, 1963, the University Placement 
and Financial Aid Services finds itself keeping 
pace with everyone else. 

Primary functions of the office are vocational 
and financial guidance, including granting of loans 
and scholarships, assignment of part-time on- 
campus work, handling military and draft affairs, 
arranging interviews for seniors with over 350 
employers each year, keeping myriad records and 
having a fund of information available on gradu- 
ate study, fellowships, assistantships and career 
work. 

Some 817 undergraduates were awarded 
$280,000 in scholarships and $158,000 in loans 
through this office for the past school year. 

In this year's freshman class alone, 270 stu- 
dents were awarded about $150,000 in loan and 
scholarship aid. 

On the staff" in the Machmer Hall office are 
Director Robert Morrissey, Assistant Director 
David Lawrence, Women's Placement Officer 
Edith Antunes and Men's Placement Officer 
George Emery. 



Placement And 
Growing Needs 




Director of Placement and Financial Aid Services, 
Robert J. Morrissey. 



114 



Senior chemistry major, Patricia M. Ralicki, works as a 
lab assistant for undergraduate chemistry courses for her 
work-scholarship. 



Financial Aid Meets 



With Work-Scholarship 







A^ 



Sophomore pre-dent major, Andrew M. Hansen, here 
operates a drill press in Goessmann laboratory as part of 
his work-scholarship assignment. 



lVAILABLE to upperclassmen, the new 
work-scholarship program allows students to per- 
form in such categories of their major fields as: 
faculty, lab, and research assistants; department 
and library worker. 

Any student with a 2.5 cumulative average in 
need of financial assistance is eligible to apply. 
The Placement and Financial Aid Services at- 
tempts to match skills with work to be performed. 
A stipend of $200 for one semester of work is 
ofl:ered to 100 students; while 200 places are 
available in the $400 program of one full academ- 
ic year of work. Recipients are required to work 
an eight hour week. 

The project not only provides monetary re- 
wards, but also stimulates interest in a major field. 

Currently, well over 300 undergraduates are 
participating. 



115 




A House 
Of Cards; 
Of Books 
And Ideas 



Librarian Hugh Montgomery 





116 



A 



repository of men's knowledge, to 
serve men must be as alive and vital as 
the University itself. 

Goodell Library serves UMass with a 
permanent staff of 53, a student and part- 
time staif of 65 and stacks with 280,000 
titles. 

At the rate of 700 books daily, the libe 
circulates about 203,000 books a year, 
exclusive of departmental circulation. 

Reference, reserve, microfilm, duplicat- 
ing, periodical services are among those 
available to the UMass community at 
Goodell. 

Librarian Montgomery reports a new 
addition planned for after 1966 will be 
located west of the present building, will 
include study areas, stacks for IV2 mil- 
lion volumes and graduate, honors work 
and special project facilities. 

With an increase in appropriation, he 
adds, a 100% increase will bring to 
45,000 the number of books added 
yearly. 




The card catalogue eases location of books. 




Some 700 books daily pass over the circulation desk. 



117 





Juniors Robert Cabral, Suzanne Buker, Arnold Kaplan and 
Dave Mitchell are engaged in a discussion on Scientific Method 
and the Human Spirit. Directors of this group were Dr. Donald 




Professor Gerald Braunthal of the government depart- 
ment, directing a senior seminar. 



Fairbairn of the zoology department and Professor Paul Pro- 
copio of land architecture. 



B 



Y offering a variety of thought and opinion for 
consumption, the University Honors Colloquia Pro- 
gram encourages independent thought by the student. 

Instituted six years ago, the Colloquia operates as 
relaxed seminars, comprised of no more than a dozen 
students and two directors each. Grouped according to 
class, members are selected because of previous mem- 
bership, nominated by an instructor, or chosen because 
of cumulative average. The students — this year there 
were a dozen seniors and 130 underclassmen — meet in 
their groups one evening a week for discussion of their 
topic. 

Each group is heterogeneously arranged with regard 
to the students' field of study; the directors are instruc- 
tors or administrators of different fields. This interde- 
partmental cooperation provides a maximum range of 
subjects. 




Elana Yorke, Suzanne Gagne, Mr. Bernard Bussel of the math 
department and Allen Davis discuss individual values vs. soci- 
ety's values in a Freshman colloquia. 
118 




Honors 

CoUoquia 
Stimulates 




Thinking 
Man 



kJEVERAL topics under debate this past year were: 
the status of America, with required readings including 
Brave New World and 1984; characteristics, trends, 
and values of contemporary society; philosophical con- 
siderations in higher education; and man in the next 
hundred years. Typical Junior Colloquia subjects were 
corruption in government; the American university; and 
human dilemmas in an age of science. 

Challenging the intellect and providing opportunity 
for each student to speak up on and delve into abstract 
contemporary problems is the goal of the Honors Pro- 
gram. 

Approximately 85% of the participants go on to 
graduate study. 

Director of the University Honors Program which 
includes senior honors projects and the Colloquia, for 
1963-64 was Dr. Leland Varley. 





Trotessor RolDert Tucker of the English depart- 
ment, directing a senior colloquia. 




Senior Mark Cheren discusses resolution of interpersonal 
and international problems. 



119 




First Row: K. Neeld, Secretary; C. Woodcock, President; R. Steere, Vice President. Second Row: S. 
Stowell, S. Snow, M. Prentiss, S. Rowland, J. Beauvais, A. Weinbrecht. Third Row: J. Bracker, N. 
Elwell, A. Bonneau, S. Klein, J. Smith, G. Snook, V, Myshyshyn. 

Alpha Lambda Delta Aids Frosh 

X^ERSONAL contact with freshmen women in the dorms, speeches given at 
frosh convocations, distribution of booklets on proper study habits, tutoring in 
various courses are among the many functions of Alpha Lambda Delta. 

The national scholastic honor society for freshmen women, there are more than 
one hundred chapters of Alpha Lambda Delta throughout the country. Member- 
ship is open to those who received a 3.5 or better first semester, Freshman year, or 
have a 3.5 at the end of Freshman year. 



Phi Tau Sigma 
Plans Scholarship 



J^OUNDED at the University, Phi Tau 
Sigma, a Food Technology Fraternity, 
strives to encourage the application of 
fundamental scientific principles to Food 
Science, to honor and recognize profes- 
sional achievement in the field, and to 
promote fellowship, thereby stimulating 
free exchange of knowledge. 

Future plans include expansion of a 
present scholarship program made pos- 
sible by the contributions of industries 
and individuals, and a continuation of the 
program of speakers on aspects of Food 
Science. 



Dr. C. Stumbo, Dr. W. Nawar, K. Wisnieski, Dr. L. Michelson, Dr. W. 
Mueller. 




120 



Beta Gamma Sigma 
Boosts Business 

JjETA Gamma Sigma, the honor soci- 
ety for faculty and students in Business 
Administration, encourages and rewards 
scholarship and accomplishment in the 
field of business and promotes the ad- 
vancement and spread of education in 
the science of business. 

Since the society also attempts to fos- 
ter principles of honesty and integrity in 
business practice, its members are se- 
lected on the basis of high moral char- 
acter as well as high scholarship. 

In the future, the society is looking 
towards increased activity with the open- 
ing of the new business building. 




First Row: Robert Drew-Bear, Secretary; James Ludtke, President; Himy 
Kirshen. Second Row: Harold Hardy, Peter Doran, John Conlon, Frank 
Singer. 



Tau Beta Pi Honors Engineers 



I ETA Chapter of Tau Beta Pi, national honor society recognizing engineers, 
was established in 1956. It honors academic achievement and exemplary character 
of undergraduate engineering majors and promotes engineering as an academic 
field of interest. 

Among its projects are; slide rule instruction for freshmen; high school visits to 
encourage students to pursue engineering; and a career panel in which guests from 
specialized areas of engineering speak with the students. 



First Row: Horstmann, Re- 
cording Secretary; Foster, Vice 
President; Most, President; He- 
selton, Corresponding Secre- 
tary; Konsevich, CataJoger. Sec- 
ond Row: Gyrbko, Beck, Dami- 
ano, Bodendorf, Allen, Wade. 
Third Row: Miller, Chace, Har- 
rison, Fillmore, Parsons, Strack, 
Smith, Anthony, Sochek, Wex- 
ler. Last Row: Norlund, Jones, 
Beane, Connors, Curto, Roth- 
stein, Burgess, Thompson, Te- 
sar, Huot, Clark. Missing: Ve- 
neri, Labine, Wells. 





First Row: G. Holten, Secretary-Treasurer; L. Beth, Advisor; R. Del 
Guidice, Vice President; G. Kagan, President. Second Row: G. Braunthal, 
J. Kelly, N. Andrade, P. Gully, R. Gilbert, F. Oppenheim, W. Norton. 
Third Row: F. Vali, P. Bittlinger, J. Rosenthal, D. O'Brien, J. Del Vecchio, 
F. Laski. Last Row: J. Harris, J. Kelliher, J. Sullivan, S. Sacra, R. Brauer. 



Pi Sigma Alpha 
New Honorary 

Xn May, 1963, the Delta Lambda 
Chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha, the national 
Political Science Honor Fraternity was 
formed. 

Its purpose is to honor students show- 
ing scholastic excellence in political sci- 
ence, and to encourage further study in 
the field. Members are chosen in the fall 
and spring of the academic year. 

Presently, the society has aimed to 
benefit the campus community by stimu- 
lating interest in the political sciences. 

Future activities will include tutoring 
in this field, speakers, and a series of 
student-faculty forums dealing with prob- 
lems of political science. 



Phi Eta Sigma 
Sponsors Tutoring 

XVX EMBERS of the present sopho- 
more class who have attained an accumu- 
lative average of 3.5 in their freshman 
year are eligible for Phi Eta Sigma. 

As a national honor fraternity, the lo- 
cal chapter, estabUshed in 1955, serves 
to encourage a high standard of achieve- 
ment among freshmen in addition to rec- 
ognizing outstanding scholarship by fresh- 
men men. 

Their activities include sponsoring 
freshman tutoring and assisting in the 
DVP programs. 

The members plan a scholarship aid 
program to be initiated in the spring. 



First Row: B. Kurth (standing). Historian; B. Parker, Secretary; A. Hazel- 
ton, Vice President; T. Shea, President; T. Huse, Treasurer. Second Row: 
C. Pratt, Jr., W. Lysenko, A. Bulotsky, B. Searleman, H. Scott, J. Henning, 
L. Plotkin. Third Row: J. Hugill, S. Gulo, Jr., D. Krause, W. Jablonowski, 
P. Bryan, C. Cranston. Fourth Row: P. Kutrubes, B. Wylie, M. Boyle, P. 
Thomas, D. Hirst, P. Hoyt, J. Glovsr. Missing: R. Murphy. 



f?;»fffii-r;-iil»';tP 




122 




First Row: Richard Darlow, Richard Babeu. Second Row: Thomas 
Leavitt, Robert Hilton, Edmund Dearborn. Missing: Robert Fiori. Assoc. 
Forester; Robert Ellis, Philip Verrier, Ranger; Robert Lucas, Henry 
Perkins, Fred Hunt. 



Xi Sigma Pi 
Hails Achievement 

T 

X HE main objective of Xi Sigma Pi, 
national forestry honor fraternity, is to 
maintain high scholarship standards in 
forestry education, to recognize academic 
achievement, and to promote fellowship 
among majors. 

Selected from the top one-fourth of 
their class, it also includes graduate stu- 
dents and faculty. 

The local chapter provides a program 
whereby freshmen become acquainted 
with the fields and opportunities in for- 
estry. Plans include a newsletter, and pre- 
senting speakers on forestry and natural 
science. 



Eta Kappa Nu Encourages Leadership 
T 

A. UTORING in electrical engineering subjects and bi-monthly films on technical 
topics are among the activities sponsored by Eta Kappa Nu, electrical engineering 
honor society. 

Their prime goal is to develop leadership, character, and scholastic achievement 
in this field. The members plan lectures and a newsletter. 



First Row: A. Koscielniah, 
Corresponding Secretary; W. 
Chace, Vice President; D. Bo- 
dendorf, President; D. Burgess, 
Recording Secretary; P. Tesar, 
Treasurer; R. Wade. Second 
Row: A. Sturgis, F. Mason, R. 
Windyka, R. Lydick, W. Allen, 
D. Mitchell, J. Preble, E. D. 
Hosey, F. Auger. Third Row: 
A. Taylor, M. Sinasky, C. 
Bomneau, A. Parsons, J. Kos, 
P. Damiant, J. Konsevich, L. 
Heselton, R. Rockwell, R. Gus- 
ciora, W. Bozenhard, D. Smith. 





First Row: D. Halpin, E. Raab, G. Popper, President; A. B. Nelson, Advisor; 
D. Hagar, Secretary. Second Row: T. Pike, A. Leger, H. James, R. Merrill, 
C. Carranza, J. Cabaup. Treasurer. Third Row: R. Roy, D. Sommers, S. 
Clebnik, J. Guthrie, J. Woodcox, J. Gaffney, J. Makower. 



Sigma Gamma 
Epsilon Touts 
Excellence 

T 

X HE only national honor society de- 
voted to the recognition of outstanding 
accomplishment in any area of earth sci- 
ence, Sigma Gamma Epsilon encourages 
academic excellence. 

Members, undergraduates, graduates, 
and faculty, arrange guest speakers in the 
various fields of earth science. 

They sponsor and assist the Geology 
Club in its activities such as field trips. 



Alpha Zeta Fosters Achievement In Agriculture 
A 

/^VLPHA Zeta recognizes outstanding character and academic achievement in 
the College of Agriculture. It's members sponsor a "Freshman smoker" and award 
a certificate of merit to the outstanding freshman in this field. All agricultural stu- 
dents unable to decide their major interest benefit from it's program of professional 
job opportunities. 



First Row: E. Lemieux, T. 
Guilford, P. Witherell. Second 
Row: Dr. J. Lilly, E. Johnston, 
Dr. R. Jones, E. Emino, E. 
Lyons, P. Marini, J. Keohan, 
Dean F. Jeffrey, L. Chhuy. 
Third Row: L. Klimoski, R. M. 
Morgan, B. Getchell, L. Miller, 
R. Kane, R. Decilio, A. Valiu- 
nas. 





Phi Kappa Phi Honors 23 Scholars 



JL^ounded in 1897, the national all-university scholastic honor society, Phi Kappa 
Phi, has two ruling purposes. One is the conviction that by recognizing and honor- 
ing those who have excelled in scholarship, other students may be inspired to work 
for a high standing. The other objective is the belief that scholarship is universal, 
not liinited. One of the highest scholastic honors at the University is an under- 
graduate's election to the society in his junior or senior year. Faculty and graduate 
students are also eligible for election. 



Nancy Andrade 
Bruce Albro 
David Baker 
John Baptista 
Dorothy Barnes 
Paul Beck 
Ruth Bock 
Edmund Dearborn 



Neville Doherty 
Jonathan Goldwaite 
Evelyn Hanson 
Charles Harrison 
James Kaplan 
Elaine Kaplinsky 
Carol Kline 
James Konsevich 



Dorothy Kupfer 
Nancy Mello 
Donna Morrison 
Bruce Norland 
Dianne Paskowsky 
Carol Schuts 
Sandra Zarvis 



125 







126 



In Pursuit 
Of The 

Academic 



A, 



.LL of more than 6000 un- 
dergraduates at the University 
are students in one sense or an- 
other, whether they work at it or 
not. 

Some work at diligently. They 
go to classes, even boring ones 
and even for professors who 
don't take attendance. They 
spend their evenings studying — 
in the libe or at the dorm. And at 
the end of four years, they grad- 
uate. 

Some don't work at it. They 
spend their time in the dark 
abyss of extra-curriculars, or in 
the non-academic pursuit of wine 
and women. 

For those who develop the fine 
art of "cram" to peak perfection, 
the game is not lost — and if they 
study the right things for enough 
exams, take enough "gut" 
courses (harder and harder to 
find these days), they will 
graduate. 

Of course, for many, the goal 
was never possible. They study 
the wrong outline series, they try 
in vain to coordinate social and 
academic spheres, they get the 
wrong professors. They lag in the 
race or they fall out — they don't 
graduate. 

But, in some way, they have 
all learned a lesson. 




127 




The "real" Steele — Conductor Ronald Steele. 



A New Note For The Future 



The University of Massachusetts Orchestra in rehearsal. 



/ ^ 



^Y 



'^^ 



* •* ■» ' 


i 


jT^ ^ 


. i 


i 


1 1 



1 




P 


[Hk 4 


i 


^^ 



l^ NDER the direction of Mr. Ronald Steele, the 
new 66 member University Symphony Orchestra made 
its debut in December. 

Steele, former associate conductor of the Michigan 
Youth Orchestra, gathered musicians from the student 
bodies of the University, Amherst, and Mt. Holyoke, as 
well as area residents. Steele joined the Music Depart- 
ment last fall, organizing the orchestra from an embry- 
onic string structure. 



After three weeks spent in recruiting new members, 
the response was so great that rehearsals had to be 
moved from the small Bartlett Auditorium to Bowker. 

Featured in the spring concert were soloists who won 
the concert auditions held on campus during the year. 

Now a member of the Symphony Orchestra League, 
Inc., the orchestra plans to establish a scholarship fund 
for its members. 



A Burgeoning University Orchestra 









Zoology Department 



R, 



.ESEARCH at a university is like a barome- 
ter — it's a good sign of what's to come. 

Augmented research in basic biochemistry by faculty 
and students in the University's Zoology Department is 
indicative of the expanding facilities, more intensive 
learning and resultant training available to students in 
science education at UMass. 

Under a $232,503 U.S. Public Health Service grant. 
Dr. Donald Fairbairn, Commonwealth Head of the Uni- 
versity's Zoology Department, is heading up research 
into the biochemistry of disease-causing animal para- 
sites. 

The research being done at Morrill Science Center on 
the University campus is not directly concerned with 
prevention or cure of parasitic diseases; it is rather 
aimed at uncovering the life processes of the parasites 
which cause such diseases as hookworm, malaria, as- 
cariasis. 




Professor Honigberg supervises tissue culture transfer made 
by Miss Vera King, who is working toward her Ph.D. in 
parasitology. 



Professor Everett Anderson looks on as graduate student 
Eugene Poor examines the ultrastructure of parasites under 
an electron microscope. 



130 



Researches Disease-Causing Parasities 



R, 



.ESEARCH to provide the building blocks of bet- 
ter methods of control and cure for these diseases could 
affect hundreds of millions of persons afflicted, most in 
sub-tropical and underdeveloped countries. 

Describing himself as a biochemist with a deep inter- 
est in zoology, Fairbairn has been conducting work on 
animal parasites for ten years. Before arriving at 
UMass last year, he served as professor of parasitology 
at McGill University, Canada. 

A training program for parasitologists now underway 
will provide basic instruction and opportunity for thesis 
research for graduates. 

Dr. Bronislaw Honigberg, Dr. William Nutting, and 
Dr. Larry S. Roberts, each a specialist in his field, are 
working with Dr. Fairbairn on plans for a collaborative 
program with the Faculty of Medicine at Columbia. 
This program would provide intensive training in public 
health for graduate and post doctoral students. 





Mrs. Martha Livingston and Dr. Rojender Abraham, a post- 
doctoral student in zoology from India, transfer cultures of a 
disease-causing protozoan parasite. 



Dr. Fairbairn oversees graduate student Peter Jezyk as he 
applies techniques of thin-layer chromotography to identifica- 
tion of parasite fats. 



131 



With Easel 
And Sliderule; 
In Studio 
And Laboratory 





132 




The 

Learning 
Process 
Continues 





New Business Administration Building 



Tc 



O be opened for summer session, the new Business 
Administration building will provide extensive opportu- 
nities and facilities for research, conferences, and serv- 
ice. To cope with the increasing number of undergrad- 
uate and graduate students in Business, there will be 
staff expansion and further enrichment of curriculum. 

The Business School is one of the four in New Eng- 
land accredited for graduate study. Plans are now in 
progress for the institution of a doctoral program. 

Conducted by the School of Business in cooperation 
with The Experiment in International Living, is the 
Junior Executive Training Program. During the sum- 



mer, up to 40 foreign students attend six weeks of 
instruction in six basic management fields. This inten- 
sive short program introduces the participants to mod- 
ern American business management and promotes the 
broad objective of international understanding. 

With financial support from the administration and 
state legislature. Dean Himy B. Kirchen and Assistant 
Dean John Conlon worked with the architect on design 
and internal facilities. 

The building is another example of progress at the 
University. 



When completed, the amphitheatre will contain five swivel chairs per bench desk, 
blackboards are brown; there are projector facilities and a loudspeaker system. 



The 




opens Horizons 

OaSEMENT and first floor class- 
rooms are for undergraduate courses. On 
the second floor are located seminar 
rooms, a wall-to-wall carpeted library, 
and the Bureau of Business Research. 
Forty-seven offices, a conference room, 
and faculty lounge comprise the top 
floor. The two octagonal auditoriums 
have a 250 and 500 seat capacity. Sound- 
proofing and radiant heat are just two 
new features of the building. 



View along the third floor corridor of instructor's offices. 





Dean Himy B. Kirchen at his old office in Draper Hall. 

Dean Kirchen shows reporter the built-in shelves of his new office. In the 
background are birch-panelled walls. 





We rose from the banks. For the evening star 
Our casual wishes and shadowy groves 
Welled with a tougher grace. To the barn 
We rocked with the great maternal cows 
And milked them down with our gentlest hands. 
Next morning took us like an old surprise 
Fallen, with old corruption in our arms 
We praised the animal urgencies of love, 
Our long obedience. The mind of man. 
Boyishly wandering out of the eye of God, 
Seemed natural to our wills. Our bruised bones 
Took on this sweet admission. Proud in the sun, 
Calloused and cocked, wicked and wise and young. 
We ran, three golden idols, back to chores. 
Shouldered the wheel of summer, and journeyed on. 

— from Wheel of Summer 
published by Dial Press. 1963 



u 



Professor Joseph Langland-- 



J_^ANGLAND'S poems belong where they are, and where 
they are turns out to belong to poetry, thanks to him," said Archi- 
bald MacLeish of UMass professor and American poet, Joe Lang- 
land. 

It may not be extravagant to say that one of the University's 
outstanding credits is a faculty member respected by his colleagues 
as one of the nation's leading poets and by his students as an 
extremely fine teacher. 

A teacher of poetry and creative writing in the department of 
English, he is found by students an "encouraging teacher," one 
who "urges his students to come to him for help in their work." 

His most recent work, The Wheel of Summer, was published in 
May of 1963; In January, 1964, Langland received for it the 
Melville Cane Award from the Poetry Society of America for the 
outstanding book of poems published in 1963. 

His first book of poetry. The Green Town, was published in 
1956 and in 1962, his work was included in Poets Choice, an 
anthology in which 103 noted contemporary poets chose their 
favorite poem for inclusion. 

His poems have appeared in several anthologies, and have been 
recorded for Folkways Records and for the Archives of the Li- 
brary of Congress. 

Langland came to UMass in 1959 from the University of Wyo- 
ming, and last year he represented UMass on ABC television's 
"Meet the Professor" series. 



A. 



lT the University, he is active also as poetry editor 
of the Massachusetts Review, one of the top literary 
magazines in the country. 

Although a four-college enterprise, it has offices in 
Memorial Hall on the University campus and draws 
funds primarily from the University, with Mount Holy- 
oke, Smith, and Amherst contributing. 

Edited by John Hicks of the UMass English depart- 
ment, it draws material from all over the world, receiv- 
ing articles at the rate of over a dozen a day. 

The March 1964 Review was issued in honor of the 
late President John Kennedy, and included a special 
supplement on twentieth-century Irish literature. 

The proof is in the pudding and the excellence of a 
magazine is well attributed by the contents between its 
covers — the March issue included previously unpub- 
Hshed letters of Yeats, Synge, Shaw; poems by Thomas 
Kinsella, Richard Murphy, John Hewitt; articles by 
Robin Skelton, Denis Johnston and others. 



136 



Acclaimed Outstanding U.S. Poet 




Mass Review editors Jules Chemetsky, Joseph Langland and John Hicks, of the University English department. 



137 




School of 
Principles of 



A 



pilot program initiated this year by 
the School of Home Economics gave 13 
senior women field experience in depart- 
ment store retailing for seven weeks pre- 
ceeding Christmas vacation. 

Unlike other schools' programs in re- 
tailing, the UMass project provides super- 
visory as well as sales training. 

The cooperative work experience aims 
at providing a basis for future specializa- 
tion, by giving students opportunity to 
learn how they work in real-life situa- 
tions. 




Sylvia Oakes at Forbes and Wallace, Springfield. 



Retailing Co-ordinator Mrs. Mary Troxell and 
Dean of the School of Home Economics Dr. 
Marion Niederpruem. 



138 



Home Economics Pilot Program Applies 
The Classroom To Practice In The Field 



yy ORKING closely with store exec- 
utives and students in the program was 
Mrs. Mary Troxell, Retailing Coordinator 
at UMass' School of Home Economics. 

Reports from students and evaluations 
by the stores aided her in judging each 
students' progress. 

With each student's skills and abilities 
pinpointed, a second semester program 
could be built around this knowledge. 

The stores involved were: Filene's, 
Jordan Marsh's and R. H. Steam's in 
Boston; Steiger's, Forbes and Wallace in 
Springfield; and G. Fox in Hartford, 
Connecticut. 





Gunta Austrins at Steigers, Springfield. 



139 




Dave Foster and Professor Denton Harris examine part of the vacuum system for purification of material used in growing crystals. 




UMass School of 
Basic Research, 



J J SSENTIAL to the growth of a university are two 

things — experimentation to extend the boundaries of 
knowledge and a constant emphasis on and encourage- 
ment of the individual student. 

Thus, student participation in basic research in the 
School of Engineering has the effect of advancement on 
two fronts. 

Basic research into the behavior of materials started 
two years ago under a faculty research grant — is 
headed up by Assistant Professor Denton Harris of the 
department of civil engineering. 

Presently carried out as an undergraduate research 
project, it may be elected by senior engineering majors 
with a 3.0 cumulative average or higher. Participants 
this year were Leon Heselton and Dave Foster. 

One important result — the student develops a feeling 
for experimental research. 





Leon Heselton works with the frame holding the crystal growing furnace, 
which produce samples used in testing. 



Professor Harris checks high 
speed oscilloscope, which visu- 
ally shows changes in a varying 
current. On the right is a device 
for impacting the sample. 



Engineering Stimulates 
Accelerated Learning 



X IRST step toward the research objective is preparation of a sample of the 
metal to be tested. For example, a crystal of aluminum may be grown to a 
particular size in a precisely controlled furnace over a period of three or four 
weeks. 

The sample is then subjected to a force pulse to produce imperfection in the 
crystal — such action perhaps produced by firing a high caliber rifle shell at the 
sample. 

Metallographic analysis of the sample crystal follows to determine the 
extent and nature of imperfections produced. The information is analyzed 
toward the ultimate objective of formulating a theory of generation of imper- 
fections. 

Typically accelerated learning in the University's five accredited engineer- 
ing departments — Civil, Electrical, Mechanical, Chemical, Industrial — means 
the engineering student graduates with 145 credits of course work (25 above 
the University minimum for graduation), incorporating essentially five years 
of work into four years. 

Recently instituted was a voluntary Engineering Freshman Orientation 
program, given before the opening of the fall semester, to provide entering 
engineering freshmen with fundamental knowledge needed to keep pace in 
their rapidly advancing field. 

141 





Dr. F. J. Francis checks the spectophotometer, used for transmittance studies 
on opaque objects, in the Food Technology Hatch Laboratory. 




Charles Buziassy observes a tracing from the gas chromatograph. 
Sadik Al-Hakim works on the chromatography machine. 




School of 
Education; 



I 



N terms of student enrollment, the Col- 
lege of Agriculture is second only to the 
College of Arts and Sciences. 

Students in the four-year instruction 
program major in agronomy, dairy and 
animal science, agricultural and food eco- 
nomics, agricultural engineering, entom- 
ology and plant pathology. 

Other major fields not commonly as- 
sociated with "production" agriculture 
are food science and technology, forestry 
and wildlife management, horticulture, 
landscape architecture and poultry 
science. 



Land architecture student designs model 
landscape. 




Agriculture— Progress, Research, Public Service, 
Awarded University's First Endowed Chair 



kJER VICES of the College of Agriculture extend 
beyond the classrooms on the University campus. Mas- 
sachusetts citizens are affected through three other 
main divisions of scientific research, Extension and 
public service activities. 

Research is, for the most part, carried out at the 
Agricultural Experiment Station with facilities at the 
Field Station in Waltham (specializing in horticultural 
crops) and at the Wareham Cranberry Station. On- 
campus research is carried on by the Institute of Agri- 
cultural and Industrial Microbiology and by the Shade 
Tree Laboratory of the department of entomology and 
plant pathology. 

Another task of the College of Agriculture is contin- 
uing education through the Cooperative Extension 
Service, established in 1914. 



Public service activities are another facet of the Col- 
lege of Agriculture. These include administering statu- 
tory regulations pertaining to the sale of feeds, fertili- 
zers, seeds and the use of milk testing glassware. 

These duties have been assigned by the Massachu- 
setts General Court to the Experiment Station, which is 
equipped with the necessary equipment and personnel. 

The University's first endowed chair, the Nicholas 
Appert Endowment Chair, was instituted this year and 
awarded to Dr. Frederic J. Francis of the food technol- 
ogy department in the School of Agriculture. 

The Chair was financed by the Glass Containers 
Manufacturing Institute following the department's 25 
ycEirs of research on food packaging, and awarded Dr. 
Francis for his continuing research and far-reaching 
progress in this field. 



Students of land architecture discuss a model landscape designed as part of their classwork. 







Winona LeBlanc and Ann Fryer 
prepare for a physiology lab at 
the University. 



As part of their hospital pro- 
gram, students receive training 
in X-ray examinations. 





Ann Feeley receives her Army 
Nurses' Corps acceptance from 
Colonel Aykroyd as Dean of 
Nursing Mary Mahar looks on. 



Nursing Students Back On Campus 



N 



EWLY instituted this year by the University's School of Nursing is a program allowing stu- 
ents of nursing to live on campus, thus permitting them a broadened academic scope through 
greater choice of electives. 

Instruction and correlated clinical nursing practice is given at the Wesson Memorial Hospital 
by the nursing faculty of the University. 

Instruction is initiated in the sophomore year when, under supervision, the student is placed 
in charge of a patient's care. As juniors, three days a week at the Springfield Hospital entails 
practical training in child and adult care. 

Seniors are afforded four days a week at the hospital; their studies consisting of pediatrics, 
maternal and public health nursing. 

Thus, their first two years at the University comprises an educational foundation through 
courses in the biological, behavioral and social sciences as well as humanities. 

Opportunities offered to the future nurses are demonstrated in their last two years when 
specialized training in all branches is given. 

Graduates of the School, started in 1954, are eligible for the licensing examination for reg- 
istration in any state. 



Student nurse working with children at Springfield Hospital. 





Dean of the School of Education Dr. Albert Purvis and Exchange Coordinator Dr. 
Robert L. Byrne, Jr. 



School of 
Provincialism, 



w. 



HEN the Universiity 
and Florida State founded a 
Student Exchange Program 
in 1961 as "an initial at- 
tack on the problem of pro- 
vincialism in elementary 
education," the two schools 
swapped seven students for 
a semester. 

Since then, the Univer- 
sity of New Mexico and the 
University of South Florida 
have joined the Program, 
sponsored at UMass by the 
School of Education. 





Exchange student from the University of South Florida Robert Claussen, Jo-Ann Angle, Roni 
Lerner, Rosanne Garcia, chat with President Lederle at a reception early in the semester. 



146 



Education Exchange Program Attacks 
Offers New Views Of Old Topics 



EXCHANGE students pay only the usual tuition 
rates of their own school. Eligible for participation is 
any junior education major with a 2.5 cumulative aver- 
age. Applicants are rated competitively. Plans are un- 
derway to include students in all majors. 

Dr. Robert L. Byrne, Jr., of the UMass School of 
Education, present coordinator, stated the program's 
main value lies in the broadening of educational hori- 
zons. These participants come into contact with teach- 
ing problems they might never encounter at their home 
institution. Dr. Byrne is also responsible for room ac- 
commodations and social and academic adjustments. 

First semester, 14 University students attended the 
three other colleges, and seven students from the Uni- 
versity of New Mexico studied here. Second semester, 
six University coeds trained at the University of New 



Mexico, and UMass played host to 20 visiting partici- 
pants. 

With the wholehearted cooperation of the admini- 
stration, including Dean of Men and Women, Registrar, 
Treasurer's office, and Housing, the program has been 
successful. 

The University of Maine will be included in the ex- 
changes next semester and it is hoped that the program 
will eventually extend across the nation. This will facili- 
tate the selection of a member school whose studies 
could greatly complement the student's major. 

The program serves to broaden the participant's 
views and provide a more complete education via 
travel, adjustment, and perhaps a different approach to 
a particular subject. 





At the Education Complex, University of Mexico, Albuquer- 
que, are UMass exchange students Anne MacGregor, Ellen 
MacGregor. Joan Congdon, Kathleen Manning. 



UMass juniors Anne Baltren, Ellen MacGregor and Lynn 
Pierce at the Education Complex in Albuquerque. 



147 




Crafty Men 
Condemn Studies; 
Simple Men 
Admire Them; 





And 
Wise Men 

Use Them. 



-Francis Bacon 




'yiiAUii, 



w. 



Highlighting His University Education-- 



HEN a student draws together threads of edu- 
cation to produce a pattern of his own, four years of 
academic learning may be termed successful. 

Sam Gorvine is combining interpretive and creative 
aspects of his English major in a literary work of his 
own, a short novel tentatively entitled The Darkness of 
the White Door. 

The novel began as a short story for a creative writ- 
ing course in his junior year and, according to Sam, "It 
just got out of hand." 

Rights to the book have been bought by the Hough- 
ton-Mifflin Publishing Company of Boston. Gorvine 
plans to complete the rough draft by mid-summer, 
1964. 



Theme of the novel is provided by the main charac- 
ter, who wanders through several countries, discovering 
in the course of his journey many concepts which man 
has learned about himself in the past few decades. 

In Spring, 1963, Sam won national recognition from 
the Atlantic Monthly through their Annual Creative 
Writing Contest for Students. 

His story, "Die With Your Pants On," was accorded 
fifth place in the contest and "Joe" received a certificate 
of merit. Both stories appeared in Caesura, the Univer- 
sity's student literary magazine. 

After graduation, Sam hopes to initiate a career in 
publishing. 



"The Darkness Of The White Door" 




150 



The Student Initiates His Own Pattern 




In testing the materials, Mark has been measuring the maximum current flow per unityelectrode surface at a fixed voltage. 

Rothstein Investigates Fuel Cell Conversion 



_L OR his senior honors project, chemical engineering 
major Mark Rothstein made an investigative study of 
the hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell. 

The fuel cell, a unit designed to convert chemical 
energy directly into electrical energy, is of considerable 
importance today because of such space programs as 
Project Apollo. In the cell, hydrogen and oxygen com- 
bine electrochemically to form H-O with a release of 
chemical energy. 

Studies show that the rate of energy conversion in 
the fuel cell proceeds at a rather slow rate. Mark pro- 
posed making measurements to throw light on how this 
rate may be speeded up — aiming at discovering a cata- 
lyst to accelerate this rate. 

If a suitable catalyst was uncovered, the power of 
fuel cells could be used in space cells to provide a type 
of battery that never needed recharging, and perhaps 
ultimately a cheaper means of electricity. 

As a sophomore, Mark made preliminary laboratory 
studies on this problem, continuing them this year on 
the suggestion of his advisor, Dr. H. C. Duus. 

His early studies, Mark says, indicate the slow rate 
of conversion is due to diflficulty in breaking down a 
perhydroxyl ion which is supposed to form at the oxy- 
gen electrode. 

Serving as editorial editor of Engineering Journal 
and program director for the American Institute of 
Engineers, he plans to attend graduate school next year. 




The cell consists essentially of a membrane soaked with 
an electrolytic solution, which separates two nickel 
screens that form the positive and negative electrodes. 



151 




Dorothy Barnes consults with adviser Dr. Clarence King. 




Case Study 

Of Aged 

By Sociology Senior 



Vc 



OLUNTARY Associations among the 
aged was the subject of an exploratory 
study carried out by sociology major 
Dorothy Barnes for her Senior Honors 
Project. 

Specifically, she made a case study of 
the Amherst Golden Age Club to deter- 
mine the manifest and latent functions of 
such an organization and the social char- 
acteristics of those persons who partici- 
pate in it. 

The topic was suggested to her, she 
said, by Dr. Clarence King of the sociol- 
ogy department. 

The method of study involved con- 
structing an interview schedule and ad- 
ministering it to each member of the club. 

Participant observation was exercised 
by her attendance at the Golden Age 
meetings and functions. 

Library research was conducted in 
areas of gerontology and social organiza- 
tion. 

Starting the project with no set ideas, 
she tested members' social class, affilia- 
tions past and present. 

In her paper, she combined informa- 
tion gathered through observation and re- 
search to construct a general picture of 
the Club and its members, specifically, 
and the area of aged associations in gen- 
eral. 

Along with the other 80 or more sen- 
iors involved in honors work, she re- 
ceived three credits for each semester of 
work completed on The Honors Project. 



Library research is a necessary part of the worlc. 



152 



Public Health Seniors 



Submerged In 



Water Problems 



T. 



wo public health seniors are in- 
volved in honors projects of public inter- 
est. 

"The Principles and Practices in Flori- 
dation of Public Water Supply" is the 
topic chosen by Richard Gladstone. Cor- 
relating and analyzing data from texts 
and industry, the major part of his thesis 
concerns the practical aspects of fluorida- 
tion — the advantages of materials and 
methods presently used. 

It attempts to counteract opposition in 
the general public by clarifying the effect 
of fluoridating their local water supply. 

To determine a better method than the 
presently accepted coliform standard as 
an index of pollution in swimming pool 
water, Richard Rose is devoting his pro- 
ject to favor the "cocci" standard over the 
coliform standard. 

Taking weekly samples from the two 
University pools and Smith College pool, 
he collects information to compare the 
two standards. 

In addition, Richard is correlating the 
effects of each halide in different concen- 
trations upon the water. 

Predicating his thesis, to be published 
upon completion, on the relatively fewer 
number of coliforms than cocci present in 
swimming pool water, Richard hopes to 
prove the significance of the use of cocci 
index. 




Richard Rose observes bacterial growth in agar tubes. 



153 




^^m 




154 




Undefeated- -First Since '89 



• Opponents Get 
Only 12 Points 

• Bowl Bids 
Turned Down 



T. 



HE Redmen recorded the 
most successful football season 
in the history of the University. 

While playing their first un- 
defeated season since 1889, 
when they played only two 
games, the Redmen ground out 
3,060 yards for 146 first downs 
and a total of 265 points and de- 
fensively allowed only 475 yards, 
85 first downs and 12 points. 

This record earned them the 
promise of a Tangerine Bowl 
Bid, a solid bid from the Liberty 
Bowl, and undisputed possession 
of the Yankee Conference Cham- 
pionship. 

Head Coach Vic Fusia was 
named major New England 
Coach of the year; U.P.I, rated 
the team first in New England 
small colleges and third in the 
Nation. 

A. P. rated the Fusiamen as 
fourth in the nation in the small 
college class. 



ATHLETICS 




Jerry Welchel eludes would-be tackier. 



Maine Makes A Record: Scoring On UMass 



Welchel flies for a few more yards. 




T 



HE Black Bears provided a rugged opener for the 
Redman eleven. Although the UMass defense held 
them to minus 46 yards on the ground for a total 
offensive record of 83 yards, they managed to tally the 
first and only touchdown and point after scored against 
the Redmen in the 1964 season. 

Jerry Welchel managed to engineer touchdowns in 
the final minutes of each half for a 14 to 7 victory. 






Maine runner about to be cut down. 

156 





UMass defense in its great Harvard showing. 



Defense Shows Its Prowess At Harvard 



J OHN Harvard proved a for- 
midable opponent for the Fusia 
men this year. 

Although statistically the Red- 
men went down in defeat, a bril- 
liant last ditch goal line stand by 
the Massachusetts defensive wall 
saved the day and totally frus- 
trated all Crimson efforts to 
score. 

The bright spot of the day was 
the defense that thwarted all at- 
tempts to move the ball through 
the middle and held the Crimson 
to a 0-0 tie. 




Co-Captain Paul Graham (71) goes all out to block a Harvard punt. 



157 



. * 



• * 



4 



'C 




Beanies fly for first home touchdown of 1963. 



Void TD's Limits UMass 
To 21 Points Over Bucknell 




Milt Morin (82) makes the stop. 



«1 I- ' 



T„ 



HE Redman line shone both offen- 
sively and defensively in the Bucknell con- 
flict as the offensive team picked up 286 
yards through the middle and the defense 
held the Bisons to 44 yards. 

The final score of 21-0 does not accu- 
rately reflect how high the tally could 
have been had three potential UMass 
touchdowns not been nullified by infrac- 
tions. 






f I 




Another Welchel first down. 



158 



Spoilers At UConn's 
Homecoming, 21-3 
As Huskies Get 
Field Goal 



T. 



HE Fusiamen dampened the 
spirits of the UConn Homecom- 
ing crowd as it rolled over the 
Huskies by a score of 21-3. 

The stellar offensive line 
created opportunities for 245 
running yards while the defensive 
line held the Husky offensive to 
66 yards through the middle yet 
could not block the only field 
goal of the year surrendered by 
the Redmen. 




Bob Meers (83) fights for extra yardage. 



Jerry Welchel (10) shows the way for Freddy 
Lewis (42) on an end sweep. 




159 



UMass Takes URI For Homecoming Ride, 57-0 



X HE 1963 Homecoming throng 
was thrilled as the Redmen tram- 
pled the Rhode Island Rams. 

While rolling up their 57 
points the UMass eleven gained 
292 running yards and 143 aerial 
yards and watched while the de- 
fense held Rhode Island to a to- 
tal offense of 123 yards and on 
points. 




Phil DeRose (22) shows why UMass defense was nation's best. 




.#* 







Steve Trbovich (12) puts a 
straightarm to good use. 





Depth Wears B.U. 
To 21-0 As Mass. 
Makes 2d Half Bid 

T 

JL HE Fusia formula of balance and 
consistency led the Redmen to their most 
important and most impressive victory, 
and made B.U. the sixth consecutive 
Homecoming victim of the Redmen in the 
past few years. 

Once again the amazing Redmen de- 
fense shut out their opponents, and the 
explosive offensive ran up the decisive 
total of 21 points — 14 of these coming in 
the second half. 

The depth of the squad was the deci- 
sive factor in this game. Each unit func- 
tioned as smoothly as the other and 
afforded no rest for the weary Terriers. 



All-New England end Bob Meers (83), goes up to make an- 
other grab. 




Helmetless Bob Ellis (41) makes bone-jarring tackle. 



161 



^ •'••. 




,^m^i 



7^ 



Ken Palm (40) springs Jerry Welchel (10) loose for another long gain. 



Coach Vic Fusia on the shoulders of jubilant Yankee Confer- 
ence Champs, being congratulated by Vermont coach. 




Th 



.HE Fusiamen clinched their first ex- 
clusive Yankee Conference Beanpot 
championship by soundly trouncing Ver- 
mont 41-0. 

While amassing these 41 points the 
Redmen gained 278 yards over the Fair- 
ways and 149 yards through the airways. 
The defense held the Catamounts to 74 
yards on the turf and 1 9 aerial yards. 



UMass wins undisputed possession of "bean- 
pot" for first time in history. 




162 



Aces Trumped 
42-0 By UMass-- 
Redmen Rack Up 
394 yds. to 46 



A. 



^.I.C. was outclassed by a far superior 
squad as they valiantly succumbed to the 
UMass eleven 42-0. 

Once again UMass gained impressive 
yardage both on the ground (282 yards) 
and in the air (112 yards) while the de- 
fense allowed the Aces a meager total of 
46 yards. 



Versatile Jerry Welchel gets off the pass. 




163 




7%M 



•rf 





Bob Tedoldi. Sam Tombarelli, Paul Graham, Bruce Jordan, and Dick Warren 
after tough U.N.H. game and a great season. 

U.N.H., Last Obstacle to 
Undefeated Season, Falls 

T 

JL HE Redmen finished their first undefeated season in 74 years by 
mauling the wild cats 48-2. 

The ofl'ense once again compiled an awesome record of 456 yards 
while the defensive unit conceded a scanty 103. 

The only safety against UMass was scored during this contest. 

Exuberant Massachusetts fans call for bigger and better things for the Redmen. 




QB Welchel and Coach Fusia share 
victory. 




The Beanpot-- 
And The Team 



That Won It 




Dean Warren McGuirk takes posses- [: i- 
sion of the Beanpot. ^ I ikk 







fkW !.-■■■' 



First Row: Ted Schmitt. Dick Kehoe, Bob Burke, 
Charles Scialdone. Bruce Jordan, Sam Tombarelli. Dick 
Warren, Paul Graham, Bob Tedoldi, Peter Pietz, Dick 
Bourdelais, John Hudson, Mike Ross, Head coach Vic 
Fusia. Second Row: Fred Glatz, John Schroeder, Art 
Driscoll, Clyde Meyerhoefer, Joe Doyle,_ Ken Palm, 
Roger DeMinico, Phil DeRose, Jerry Welchel, Fred 
Lewis, Don Young, Jim Fassell, Hal Ryder, Don Hag- 
berg, Jack Delaney (coach). Third Row: Chet Gladchuk, 



Mike Scafati, Mike Dineen, Terry Swanson, Joe Hoague, 
Don Rana, Ed Toner, Milt Morin, Phil Vandersea, Bob 
Meers, Art Simensen, Bob Pantanella, Bob Ellis, Don 
Johnson (coach). Fourth Row: Vic Keedy, Bill Connor, 
Dick Cain, Dave Corna, Rod Brooks, Joe Morris, Jim 
Kuczynski, Bernie Dallas, Ed Cody, Dave Egan, Tom 
daCosta, Steve Trbovich, Don Johnson, Bob DeLue, 
Gene Burgin, Manager and Charles Deniers. 




^11 ff^j 



m 




!| l 'ti-'i'T^" 



I '.' 













f 






Jerry Whelchel 



Milt Morin 




i 



All 

Yan-Con 

Choices 





Paul Graham 



Bob Tedoldi 



Bob Meers 



166 





Freddy Lewis hurdles goalward for the score. 



Freddy Lewis 



Gets Pro Bid 



N 



O personality better exemplifies the 
spirit of the team that "gave its all" than 
does Freddy Lewis. Freddy did not see as 
much action as he would have liked this 
year, but in his 36 carries he averaged a 
more than respectable 4.9 yards/carry. 

Freddy's efforts have been justly re- 
warded by a professional bid from the 
Oakland Raiders. 



Lewis in action. 





The marching band tunes up. 




New director, John A. Jenkins, leading the band to great 
heights. 



Left to Right: S. Graham; J. Quinn; D. Lemon, Co-Captain; D. Morrisey; W. Buddenhagen; J. Mann; E. Frado; 
P. Jeibert; M. Leonard; P. Chase; M. J. White; J. Ford; D. Donovan; J. Stevens; P. Boubanais, Co-Captain; S. 
Scanlon. 




inrii^HH 





Cheerleaders do push-ups for touchdowns. 



A New Band 



For the Redmen 



Atunes to Season 




Joan Ford jumps with joy for Redmen. 



Strutting, baton-twirling Jan Kwapien. 




"^itHsjifc-. 



*^S> 




T« 



HE Redmen marching band functions as a show 
band to combine stirring martial music with snappy 
routines for enjoyable half-time entertainment. This 
year the band, led by John A. Jenkins, highhghted all 
the home games and rallies and also traveled to the 
Universities of Connecticut and Harvard. 

Football games this year were spiced with the enthu- 
siasm created by the University of Massachusetts cheer- 
leaders. The squad rallied the crowd with rousing 
cheers, and this year matched the football team with 
pushups for every point scored. 



169 



<^r^ 



'■<%• 



%■ 



#> 









J^ 







m * \ 




First Row: R. Stewart, P. Bergan, R. Lynch, D. French, Capt. 
R. Repeta, K. Lyons, T. Astoldi. W. Glabach, R. Phillips. 
Second Row: P. McDevitt, R. Yando, J. Peicuch, R. Anable, 
D. Whitman, P. Dougherty, C. Monnier, M. Zawrotny. Third 



Row: Col. W. Ackroyd, P. Conlon, A. Palatrino, R. Konie- 
czny, J. Bubriski, L Cooke, R. Merrill, D. Murphy, A. Garsys, 
Coach L. Briggs. 










SfcWii- 



vrv 



\^> 



(mr^: 



-%/ i- 



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PW^'^ .1»' 



t IP 1% f 






Booters End Rugged Season 



I 



NEXPERIENCED and hampered by 
injuries, the UMass booters completed 
the '63 season with a 2-7-1 record. 

The team began the season by bowing 
to Army 4-1. The first half of the game 
ended scoreless, but the second half saw a 
fresh Army team score 4 goals with the 
lone UMass goal coming as a penalty 
boot by Dick Leete. UMass gained an 
early advantage in the Coast Guard 
game, but was unable to capitalize on it 
and Coast Guard edged the Redmen 2-1. 

Williams exhibited a well-drilled, ex- 
perienced team that shut out the booters 
2-0. Play was rough on both sides in the 



Trinity game, adding several names to the 
Redmen's casualty list and making the 
Baigg's Men the underdogs once again as 
the game ended 5-9. 

At the end of the Connecticut game 
UMass was trounced 9-4 — and six of the 
1 1 starters were injured. Spirit and guts 
carried the booters to a 3-3 tie in the 
W.P.I, game. Enthused, the team rallied 
to override Rhode Island 4-0 and Tufts 
5-4. 

Unfortunately, a fighting spirit wasn't 
enough to compensate for the team's lack 
of depth and they ended the season losing 
to Clark 1-0 and to Amherst 2-0. 





.^^•^ 



Rodger Twitchell, 
hampered by a mask 
to protect his broken 
nose, drives for 
the hoop. 



A 



Using his opponenfs 

back for support, Peter 

Bernard takes his 

patented jump-shot. 



/ 






B. 



BASKETBALL '63-'64 was undoubtedly one of the 
most productive in University history. The season ush- 
ered in a new coach and a new type of basketball. 
Johnny Orr brought his fast breaking offense from Wis- 
consin, an offense that featured speed, excitement, and 
explosive scoring, to replace the deliberate and cautious 
style of former years. Even though gifted with the re- 
turn of the starting five from the previous year, most 
experts gave Massachusetts little hope of improving 



Hoopsters 
Leap To 
Winning 
Season 



Charlie Kingston scores on a push shot from the outside. 



Timmy Edwards finds trouble 
getting a shot off against Colby. 



174 



over last year's performance. Few expected what ac- 
tually happened. 

Massachusetts, averaging 83.8 points a ballgame, fin- 
ished among the top 20 in the country in scoring, and 
broke the school record of 76.6 set in '54-'55. They 
scored 833 field goals to surpass the old mark of 710. 
They also had a better shooting average, .427, then the 
previous high of .422. Twice during the season they 



broke the record for the most points scored in a single 
game, throwing in 115 against St. Peters earlier in the 
season and then hitting 120 points against Vermont. 
Not only team but individual records were set. Six- 
seven Chuck O'Rourke had 308 rebounds in the season 
to pass the old mark set by Captain Rodger Twitchell 
at 292. Peter Bernard, averaging 19.5 points a ball 
game, finished number four while Rodger Twitchell 




Tom Ryan is counted out after 
being nailed by an opponent. 




As UConn's Toby Kimball watches 
helplessly, Tim Edwards drives past 
and stuffs it in (left). 



»T 



Balanced Team Work 
Carries Coach Orr's 



Peter Bernard outstretches his com- 
petitor for the rebound (below). 



Jim Painten watches one of his set-shots go 
in. 




Fast Break 
To Success 



(continued from pg. 175) 

was second with 11.51 for 
his career performance. 

It was also noteworthy 
that four of the starting five 
averaged in double figures, 
attesting to the all around 
balance and team work that 
was necessary to make the 
Orr offense a success. Be- 
hind Bernard was Chuck 
O'Rourke with an average 
of 14.9 points a game, the 
Twitch' with 13.8, and 
Tim Edwards with a 10.8 
average. Other support was 
supplied by Jim Painten 
who averaged 8.4 points a 
game, Charlie Kingston at 
4.9 and Paul Gullicksen at 
4.5. 



T, 



HE team finished the 
season with 15 wins and 9 
losses giving them third 
place in the Yankee Con- 
ference. 





xSWWa 



Charlie O'Rourke prepares to let fly 
with a foul shot. 



Paul Gullicksen intently watches the 
action as he rests on the bench. 



Speed, Excitement, Explosive Scoring 




Hard-playing Pete Bernard is floored by offense. 



178 




Charlie O'Rourke out rebounds Toby Kimball Mike Johnson watches his teammates try for rebounds in an early season 

on his way to a record 308. game. 



179 




Zti 




m 



Standing: P. Traveras, K. Rowe, J. Painten. R. Geventer, J. Frost, T. Ryan, C. Kingston. 
Sitting: C. O'Rourke, S. Bonds, R. Twitchell, P. Benard, M. Johnson, T. Edwards, D. 
Benjeman. Missing: P. Gullicksen. 



4B 





I 



N the First Annual Jay- 
cee Basketball Tournament 
at Staten Island, the Red- 
men won the champion- 
ship, set six school records, 
and had one of their tri- 
captains, Rodger Twitchell, 
unanimously chosen as the 
tournament's most valuable 
player. 



Coach Leaman, Coach Orr and 
Coach Eldred beam at the trib- 
ute to the Redmen champions. 




"There ref, you missed another one.' 



Coach Orr repositions his socks after 
a foot-stamping exhibition in either 
praise or disgust. 



Coach Johnny Orr and Pete Bernard in the last home game. 




UMass 


80 


Boston U. 


72 


UMass 


101 


Rutgers 


82 


UMass 


60 


Connecticut 


59 


UMass 


93 


Boston Col. 


74 


UMass 


73 


New Hamp. 


99 


UMass 


79 


Holy Cross 


95 


UMass 


92 


Brandeis 


58 


UMass 


73 


Providence 


89 


UMass 


85 


Vermont 


98 


UMass 


92 


St. Michael's 


90 


UMass 


71 


lona 


80 


UMass 


82 


Colby 


77 


UMass 


87 


Maine 


78 


UMass 


88 


R.I. 


75 


UMass 


84 


A. I. C. 


70 


UMass 


50 


Connecticut 


72 


UMass 


120 


Vermont 


84 


UMass 


74 


R.I. 


81 


UMass 


69 


Northeastern 


63 


UMass 


98 


New Hamp. 


78 


UMass 


67 


St. John's 


81 


UMass 


90 


Maine 


92 



^^^////^ •> «*.•'*-* 





i 




Pucksters Score 
6-9-2 Record 



Feldhoff moves in for a leg check (far right) 
Lee grimaces as he takes a shot, (left'i Feldhoff 
takes the puck away from a New Hampshire 
player, (bottom left) 




Massachusetts splits the Colgate defense. 



Phillipps and a Colgate player fight for the puck. 




183 




First Row: R. Lee, J. Mahoney, A. Bowen. E. Swenson, P. Don- 
oven. Second Row: Coach S. Kosakowski. R. Feldhofif. K. De- 



mars, M. Herman, J. Clayton, R. Callahan, R. Phillips, J. 
Lasher, R. Edmonston. 




D. 



'EFEATING M.I.T., Amherst, and UConn, twice 
each, going down in defeat to Bowdoin, New Hamp- 
shire, Army, Pennsylvania, Colgate, Williams, and Mid- 
dlebury the puckmen tied Vermont twice to compile a 6- 
9-2 season record. 

High scorers for the season were Kenny Palm, 
Charlie Glew, Pete Hurd, Bob Lee and Bob Edmons- 
mon. Captain Glew completed his career fifth in Uni- 
versity history in assists, fourth in total points and 
second in goal scoring. He undoubtedly would have 
shattered each of these records had he not been injured 
in the Colgate conflict with one third of the season left 
to play. Hat tricks were submitted by Glew, Palm and 
Lee. 

Dick Phillips developed into an excellent defenseman 
in his third year of varsity play. Junior goalie Archer 
"Skip" Bowen also performed extremely well allowing 
60 goals but stopping 9 times that many. 

Season highlights were, the UConn victory, that gave 
us third place in the Yan Con tournament, and the two 
victories over our cross town rivals, Amherst College. 



Bowen waits for the rush. 



184 




Trackmen Hurtle Toward Victory 






Bob Murray clears the pole vault at ir6". (Above) Speed, 
coordination and power culminate in a winning broad jump. 
(Below) 



Digger paces the Redmen to a win. 
(Above) John Mederics tops the bar 
at the Northeastern meet. (Below) 






Left to Right; Front: T. Panke, B. Molvar, B. Larson, B. Brouillet, C. Erickson, B. Murray, J. 
Mederios. Second: G. Banks, R. Murphy, D. Brose, D. Renerick, B. Bobinson, B. Ramsey, D. 
Salivan. Third: Coach Footrick, J. Harrington, B. Murray, J. Collins, J. Urban. 



Trackmen Sprint To Victory 



I 



N it's 1963-64 season the varsity indoor track team 
compiled a 2-1 record in dual meets and a fourth place 
finish in the Yan Con Championships. Pacing the Red- 
men throughout the season was senior Bob "Digger" 
Brouillet, the greatest distance runner ever seen at 
UMass. Bob scored 16 points in the dual meets as well 
as winning both the mile and 2 mile at the Yan Cons. 
He also took a fourth in the IC4A's 2 mile while setting 
a school record of 9 : 1 1 . 1 . 

Sophomore John Mederios was top point man for the 
Redmen as he scored 49 points while competing in the 
high and low hurdles, broad jump and dash. The only 
loss for UMass was at the hands of a powerful North- 
eastern squad which triumphed 79-34. Mederios scored 



19 of the Redmen's points. UMass defeated Tufts 75- 
36 and UConn 77-36. Jim Wrynn earned a third place 
position in the Yan Cons and John Harrington set school 
records in both the 60 yard high hurdles and 60 yard 
low hurdles. Dave Sadowsky did not compete because 
of an injury and Fred Lewis hampered by a lack of 
facilities never got near the 13' record he set as a 
sophomore. 

The mile relay team of Doug Sloane, Gene Colburn, 
Craig Erickson, and Jim Collins ran 3:30.3 to record 
the second fastest mile relay run indoors at UMass in 
five years. With the help of this year's undefeated fresh- 
men team, UMass looks forward to an even better 
season next year. 



187 




Mike Rothschild dives 



Rothschild Grabs Two Firsts In N.E. Swim Meet 







' fY. 




V^^ULMINATING the 1964 season, 
Mike Rothschild copped two firsts in the 
New England Championships. 

Coach Joe Rogers' swimmers headed 
by co-captains Rothschild and Bjornholm 
moved to their best season in a decade, 
winning six and losing only three. 

This season saw many new records set. 
Rothschild established a time of 5:18.0 
in the 500 yard freestyle and 1:56.0 in 
the 200 yard freestyle. The backstroke 
record of 2:13.3 went to Bjornholm, 
while O'Sullivan set a 2:36 mark for the 
butterfly. The freestyle relay team of Wil- 
son, Daniels, Rothschild and Bjornholm 
bettered all previous times in a 3:34.6 
win. 

Koss proved to be a key point-getter in 
the backstroke while Monnier and 
Grybko led the team in the breaststroke. 
Wilson, Daniels and Cowern racked up 
points in the freestyle and Hanley took 
his points in the diving competition. 



James O'SulHvan displays butterfly form. 



188 







, pulls through 



breathes. 



Left to right: sitting; Tom Hoffman, Dick Daniels, Co-captains Mike Bjorholm and Mike 
Rothschild, John Grybko, Kip Watt, Standing: Manager Bud Pratt, Bill Roy, Frank Wilson, 
Tom Maney, Bill Cowern, Dick Koss, Danny O'Mara. Charlie Monnier, James O'Sullivan, 
Coach Joe Rogers. 




J 



■■«■■■ 

■«■•■■ 





AI Cohen executes a giant cartwheel (left). 
Dusenbury relaxes during a one arm lever 
(above). 



Gymnasts Post 
3-4 Mark 



OOPHOMORE coach Eric Kjeldson 
and Captain Dave Williams led the gym- 
nastics team to a 3-4 season, defeating 
Southern Connecticut, Ithaca and Cort- 
land, and losing by slim margins to the 
gymnastic giants Temple, Springfield, 
Army and Penn State. Dave Williams, 
one of the best gymnasts in the area, and 
team high scorer for the past two years, 
and Al Cohen and Dan St. John turned 
in consistently outstanding performances. 
Gymnastics is fast growing both in par- 
ticipation and spectator interest. With a 
strong freshman team achieving varsity 
status and brilliant sophomores like Dan, 
Al, and Coach Kjeldson the big time 
dream is sure to become a reality. 



■HnilMiHiiika 



Left to Right; Kneeling: D. Lizotte, S. Beallier, E. Frado, J. Dusenbury, F. Mosakeweicz, D. 
Williams. Standing: R. Forbes, W. Heinold, A. Cohen, Coach Kjeldsen, D. St. John, R. Cardiff, 
E. Frubler. 




«T ■ 



.^,''" ■ • 



N:i; ^ 









Matmen Gain 
Experience 



T. 



HE wrestling team completed an injury plagued 
season. The matmen got off to a slow start, but things 
picked up later in the season when Milt Morin and 
Dave Kelly joined the squad. 

Jesse Brogan, wrestling in the 137 pound class, 
placed second in the New Englands after going unde- 
feated in regular competition. The return of a seasoned 
team and the excellent training facilities offered by 
Boyden gymnasium should combine to insure the suc- 
cess of the team next season. 




Boris Chevone works 
up from the legs for 
an attempted pin. 



Dave CafFerelli struggles to pin opponent as referee looks on. 





First Row; G. Darling, D. Cafferelli, D. Kelly, M. Morin, Second Row: B. Chevone, C. Sissen, J. Brogan, Coach J, Douglas. 



Milt Morin growls as he 

fights a strong Dartmouth 

ride. 



^^^^^^H 




Ji 


1 
1 


S 






mli 


1 


H 


■Li«' 




^L 




tf^i 


^^^^^^B^^^. *\i 






% 





193 




First Row: Dick Wilson, Dave Krukonis, Jim Schmoyer, Tony Johnson, Tony Simone. Third Row: Jim Ritchie, Steve Wojnar, 
WiUiams, Pete Larkin, Lew Pia, Bob Hughes. Second Row: Karl Kamena, Dick Farrell, Gerry Street. Fourth Row: Coach 
Jack Farley, Ken Clark, John Awdycki, Rod Corey, Mike Earl Lorden. 



^; 




«i* 



Corky Schmoyer (s.s.) tags Trinity player in attempted steal. 



Pitching Paces Squad To 10-7 



T. 



HE UMass Nine won their four final games to wind 
up the season with a 10-7 record. 

Brilliant performances from the mound were exhib- 
ited by Lew Pia (4-2) and Dick Wilson (4-4). The ex- 
cellent support afforded by Tony Williams and Corky 
Schmoyer was justly rewarded with major league con- 
tracts from the Orioles and the Red Sox respectively. 

Although Coach Lorden is losing about one-half of 
the starting line-up, the depth yielded by this year's 
squad and upcoming freshmen should amply plug these 
holes and insure another successful season. 



194 





Lew Pia barrels toward safety. 



John Awdycki stretches for the throw at first. 



Steve Wojnar smashes a long drive into center field. 




195 



I' 









33^15^on4^WA'fc 1 s ?! 



First Row: Hartnett, Houde, Moro, Kallio, Dieterle, Gilliatt, rington, Ryder. Third Row: Mahoney, Bowen, Brown, Phillips, 
Clinton. Tremblay. Woodbury, Chiras. Second Row: Fagg, In- Rosati, Shepardson, Vengrow, Webb, Baird, Assistant Coach 
fusino, McLeod, Kirby, Majeski, Prior, Casey, Ruma, Har- Glinski. Fourth Row: Kezer, Coach Garber, Neylon. 



Frank Infusino, '64 captain, charges the New Hampshire goalie. 



Infusino evades a slashing check. 




196 





83^'^^ 







12-2 Record 



t* Clinches N.E. 



Lacrosse Title 







}^ '^rl 






^0^. 



'^^m^- 




UMass on the attack, as net play roughens . 




\ 



\ 




ittm^' 



T. 



HIS year coach Dick 
Garber fielded the finest 
Lacrosse Team ever to rep- 
resent the University. 

The '63 version of U- 
Mass Snakebeaters com- 
pleted the season boasting 
a more than respectable 
12-2 record. 

Along with this the Red- 
men emerged New England 
Inter-Collegiate Lacrosse 
Champions, clinching first 
place with a victory over 
undefeated Amherst Col- 
lege 8 to 6. 

Sparking this team were 
All American Candidates 
Frank Gilliatt and Paul 
Majeski. 




Short-stick defenseman backs up goalie . . . 



to successfully block the UMass shot. 



197 





Kneeling: Bill Martin, Hoh Ncal, lorn Simmons, Captain; 
Bob Greenberg. Standing: Steve Ezer, Roger Twitchell, 
Dick Leete, Coach Kosakowski. 



Netsters Grab 
5th Successive 
Yan-Con Title 



T 

X HE Netmen gained their fifth straight 
Yankee Conference Championship during 
the 1963 season. 

The Redmen whipped Coast Guard 6- 
3 to chmax one of their more successful 
seasons with an 8-3 record. 

Even with the loss of Captain Tom 
Simmons prospects for next year appear 
bright as Coach Kasakowski looks to 
make it six in a row. 




Captain of the 1964 team Roger Twitchell displays 
service form. 



198 



Golf Takes Yan-Con Third On 9-4 Slate 



Coach Gladchuck, 
George DeFalco, 
Frank Pluta, 
Bill O'Donnell, 
Bill Glass, 
Paul Krzynowek. 




XhE UMass Fairwaymen wound up the 1963 season with 9 wins and 4 losses 
taking third place in Yankee Conference play and ninth in NEIGA records. 

Starting with two losses to Rhode Island and Amherst, they evened their record 
at 2-2 with a dual meet victory over Holy Cross and Vermont rolling over the 
Crusaders 6-1 and shutting out the Catamounts 7-0. 

A 4-3 win over AIC and a 2-5 loss to UConn preceeded a six-game winning 
streak that ended with the double defeat over Trinity and Lowell Tech by 
identical 6-1 scores. 



UMass Track, 1963 



(Story, photos on page 200) 



First Row: O'Brien, Garsys, Brouillet, Flagg, Carpenter, Ward. 
Second Row: Caisse, Ramsey, Murray, Connors, Harrington, 
Romeo. Third Row: Erickson, Donovan, Panke, Robinson, 



Lewis, Reed. Fourth Row: Coach Footrick, Sadowsky, Mil- 
lette, Urban, Pendleton. 



I-' 




t 




-.5 



■^ 



L^ 










with inches at a premium, Dick Ward clears the bar. 

Trackmen Bow Once 
On Way to 7-1 Mark 

J_^ED by co-captains Bob Brouillet and Loren Flagg, the 1963 Varsity 
track team sprinted to a 7-1 season record. 

The trackmen, in quest of an undefeated season, soundly trounced all 
their opponents before losing to an undefeated Springfield College squad' 
by one point (67-68). The Redmen also secured second place in the Yan- 
kee Conference Meet at Storrs, Conn. 

Special commendation is deserved by Dick Ward and Ken O'Brien for 
their outstanding contributions. 

Coach Footrick has high expectations for an extremely successful season 
in '64. 



Ramsay works up a speed burst to take the lead. 






Dave Sadowsky soars over the high bar. 



201 




Gunmen On Target 



D. 



'RAWING a bead on their 1964 season, the Uni- 
versity Rifle Team was optimistic. They squeezed, fired, 
scored a bullseye, and finished undefeated in Yankee 
Conference competition for their second straight year. 
In their entire season Co-Captains Wells and Nataup- 
sky found it necessary to call for slight adjustments 
only after meets with Citadel and the Naval Academy. 
All other competitors became victims in their show- 
downs with the UMass gunmen. The deadeyes are con- 
sidered a major threat in the national rifle association 
sectional meet. 

Graduating Hal Butterworth has been the most con- 
sistent shooter. He has been high point man for three 
consecutive years. 




Kneeling: H. Butterworth, H. 
Davis III, M. Greene, J. Cars- 
well. Standing: Capt. R. Fow- 
ler, E. Fowler, M. Nataupsky, 
A. J. Davis. Missing: H. Bur- 
banic, D. Wells. 



202 





Intramural 

Program 

Expanded 




203 




J /XPANSION has been the watchword for the in- 
tramural program. The influx of student participation 
has been absorbed by an increase in the number of 
sports available for competition and increased facilities. 
The roster of events range from ping pong to football 
including tennis, basketball, bowling, badminton, vol- 
leyball, wrestling, softball, lacrosse, and track. The Ste- 
ven Davis award is given annually to the intramural 



champions. 

The major facility expansion was the dedication of 
Boyden gymnasium. The new gym, resembling an air- 
plane hangar, boasts class rooms, a pool, squash courts, 
basketball courts, steam rooms, added locker room fa- 
cilities and weight training equipment, all readily avail- 
able. 



204 




205 






First Row: C. Sylvester, E. Baxter, President; E. Smith, C. Noel, Secretary. Second Row: M. 
Brown, B, Balakier, D. Derrick. L. Ross, A. Allen. Standing: W. Heinold, C. Tucker, E. 
Harrington, M. E. Ward. 



Originality, Self-Expression; Modern Dance 



Elaine Baxter and William Heinold practice 
form and balance. 




/NCOUR AGING original dance routines set to 
music, the Modern Dance Club boasts of three male 
members this year, in addition to 22 girls. 

Combining creative ability and talent is a means of 
satisfaction and self-expression. Their self-choreo- 
graphed dance compositions are meaningful and enjoy- 
able to the viewer and performer alike. 

Members are selected in the fall through competitive 
try-outs. 

There are opportunities throughout the year to at- 
tend guest lectures and demonstrations in various mod- 
ern dancing techniques at the University and at other 
institutions. 

With Miss Georgia Reid as faculty director, their 
tenth annual spring concert was presented in April. 
Aiming for variety, the program included ballet and 
jazz. 



206 





Team captains Paul Jones and Joe Daly receive last minute 
instructions from the jump master (above). Paul Jones has a 
near miss in the Para-Bowl at Orange (right). 



Sky-Divers Assume 

Competition Status 



kJPORT Parachuting at the University has developed 
from a club in 1959 to a competitive team in 1964. The 
highlight of the year is the National Collegiate Sport 
Parachuting meet held at Orange, Mass. which attracts 
participants from the entire nation. Berths on the squad 
are earned through intraclub competition. 

With the expanding interest in this "spaceage sport" 
at the University, the prospects for this team appear 
brighter than ever. 




207 



i:^:^' 




:r/« 




Left to Right: Coach W. MacConnell, N. Carpenter, P. Plasterige, R. Woods, D. Burgess, W. Swiatek, Capt. T. Clark. 

Snow, Blurring Speed, And A Winning Season 

An its third year, the 
UMass Ski Team had a suc- 
cessful season under the di- 
rection of coach MacCon- 
nell. They participated in 
the 11 -college league and 
finished fourth with a 55- 
25 win-loss record. 

Training began about the 
middle of November with a 
5-mile daily crosscountry 
run and two pre-season 
winter training session dur- 
ing Christmas vacation and 
intersession. During the 
season, the team practiced 
Saturdays, Sundays and 
holidays. 

Prospects look bright for 
next year with Tom Clark 
and Dick Woods as co- 
"' captains. 

Slipping through snow and around poles, Dan Burgess runs slalom. 




208 




to UMass 

•IFC Adopts 
Code 

•500 Seek 
Houses 



Fraternities 
Initiate 
Blood Bank 



Greeks 



Round Robins Draw Out Sorority Hopefuls 




Some of the 500 girls to seek a place in feminine Greek circles stroll out on a bright Sunday. 




M, 



Rushees and sisters get acquainted. 



.ORE than 500 University women set out on a 
Sunday in October to find a home. 

Sorority round robins had kicked off. The girls were 
taken in groups to each of the 10 sororities on cam- 
pus for a brief 1 5 minute meeting with the sisters. 

Round robins served the purpose of an appetizer, 
an introduction to the houses and sisters on an ob- 
jective level to allow the potential pledges to get 
acquainted with potential sisters. 

There followed one week of open houses that al- 
lowed girls who had registered at round robins the 
opportunity to investigate their choices more closely. 
During this time open parties introduced the social life 
of the sorority girl. 

Theme parties narrowed the group of aspirants and 
the closed date followed. Once the girls had received 
bids, pledging was about to begin. 



210 



As Panhellenic Rushing Begins 





Memorial Hall functions as a registration center for rushees. 



211 




Rushees receive bids at Memorial Hall. 




Mem Hall Erupts, 



M, 



_EMORIAL Hall bore the brunt of the as- 
sault of hopeful rushees when, following closed 
date, matching bids were distributed. 

Over 160 girls received the small white en- 
velope that invited them to pledge the house 
of their choice. 

In true feminine style emotion burst loose in a 
cacaphony of shouts, shrieks and squeals that 
announced the acceptance of a new Pi Phi, or 
Kappa, or Iota Gam. 

The official act of pledging followed the same 
evening, and with sisters and pledges in the 
ranks, sorority houses took over the Student 
Union's Hatch for a dizzy display of delight. For 
the first time the new pledges acted with the 
sisters as a unit, as a house. 

In the Hatch they sang house songs, clambered 
on to tables and led cheers, and otherwise re- 
leased the thrilling rush of emotion held up for 
this moment. 




212 



Hatch Takes Female Emotional Flood 




Hatch celebration sends new pledges on a spree. 



■ 


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213 



Panhellenic Consolidates Governing Units 




First Row: Linda Swenson, Marsha Lockhart. Judith Zenis, 
Phylis Trabach. Nancy Downing. Second Row: Mirian Ne- 
tino, Eileen Reilly, Marie Makinen, Beth Lanyon, Sandy 

YY ITH growth and expansion comes the ne- 
cessity for new organizations. Last year saw the 
formation of two new sorority organizations: So- 
rority Presidents' Council and Junior Panhellenic 
Council. 

With the formation of new organizations comes 
the necessity of coordination with existing or- 
ganizations. Thus Sorority Presidents' Council 
and Junior Penhellenic Council were incorpo- 
rated within the existing Panhellenic Council's 
Constitution. 

All three organizations retain their identity, 
but this union will permit sorority resources to 
be used more efficiently and will enable the or- 
ganizations to work with a minimum of overlap- 
ping. 

The Panhellenic Council is the organization of 
all UMass Greek-letter sororities. Each College 



Schmalz, Joan Schuster, Sue Morash, Barbara Farrell, Regina 
Harrison, Sandra Knight. Third Row: Gail Benvie, Judy Ros- 
enthal. 



having two or more national sororities has a 
local Panhellenic Association to which each so- 
rority sends one junior and one senior. 

The aim of Panhellenic is to foster a spirit of 
friendliness between sororities and to encourage 
active cooperative interest in the development 
of all college women. The Council regulates 
rushing by making rules which are approved by 
the sororities. 

Sorority Presidents' Council provides a forum 
for the discussion of common individual and so- 
cial problems; to coordinate sororities on the ex- 
ecutive level, and to make recommendations 
and statements of policy on pertinent issues. 

Junior Panhellenic Council is comprised of 
pledges who promote friendliness and spirit 
among pledges and to prepare a training ground 
for the Panhellenic Council. 



214 




Dorothy Stoklosa. Priscilla Bradway, Nancy Andrade, Beverly Elizabeth Mercer, Patricia Genetti. Missing: Eileen Reilly, 
Brent, President Marie Makinen, Jane Buckley, Merry Arnold. Janice Reimer. 




First Row: Linda Swenson, Marsha Lockhart, Judith 
Zenis, Phylis Trabach, Nancy Downing. Second Row: 
Miriam Netino, Eileen Reilly, Marie Makinen, Beth 



Lanyon, Sandy Schmalz, Joan Schuster, Sue Morash, 
Barbara Farrell, Regina Harrison, Sandra Knight. Third 
Row: Gail Benvie, Judy Rosenthal. 



215 



A, 



-LONG with a new house. Delta Mu 
of Alpha Chi Omega has recently insti- 
tuted new scholarship and pledge pro- 
grams. Alpha Chi's study plan, which has 
just been in effect for a year and a half, is 
very successful. Every sister falling be- 
low a 2.5 average is required to put in a 
certain amount of library study hours a 
week. All pledges are included in this 
program. The new pledge program cen- 
ters around the 22 Pearl Plan. Before ini- 
tiation each pledge must fill her lyre with 
twenty-two pearls; each pearl is given for 
certain things, such as attending a cul- 
tural event or getting an A on an exam. 
Alpha Chi participates in all the Pan- 
hellenic events. They placed second in the 
Declamation. Social Calendar (besides 
the exchanges with fraternities and a 
Christmas party for underprivileged chil- 
dren) is climaxed by the annual Pledge 
Formal, held at Wiggins Tavern every 
Spring. 



Alpha Chi Omega Initiates 
Successful Compulsory Study 



A 



X 



il 




A booth in the Hatch taken over by "Van Meter" girls. 



First Row: E. Fiske. D. Dame, C. Kalbko, L. Stetson, E. 
Slavinsky, A. Cygan, M. Farrell, E. Blanchette, S. McDonald, 
A. Tierney, M. Hayes. Second Row: L. Schmidt, S. Keefe, J. 
Lodico, D. Oakes, E. Vyce, A. Williams, L. Shepardson, Vice 
President; M. McDonald, Treasurer; S. Piantoni, J. Praskiwicz, 
G. Wagner. L. Bodwell, C. Atwood, E. Stav\asz. Third Row: M. 



Ricketti, M. Gibson, N. Roulston, P. Sobel, M. Lavalette, M. 
Jordan, M. White, B. Collins, M. Harrigan, S. Hanlon, C. 
Eggers. Fourth Row: J. Panttila, C. Hatch, N. Reid, B. John. B. 
Newman, B. Esielionis, C. Evans, M. Lyons, P. Salvati, K. 
Gavutis, A. Yakavonis, L. Osborn, P. Ostrmecki. 




Chi Omega Places Second In 
Panhellenic Sing Competion 



B, 



'ICYCLES, book bags, and red rain hats — the 
Chi O's were back on campus and another semes- 
ter began . . . Homecoming and the aqua phone 
. . . bridge parties ... 10 Chi O's in Angel 
Flight . . . Frontier Girl Kathy Patten ... a 
brighter Christmas for the Holyoke orphans 
when Chi O and Kappa Sig played Santa . . .the 
dump-on house Christmas party with T-shirts for 
the seniors . . . Junior Senior filet mignon . . . 
the senior toboggan team . . . Palmer Ball . . . 
exchanges, pizza parties and toboggan parties 
. . . Falstaff . . . pledge formal (love those 
lamps) ... the monkey and the Beatles on the 
new stereo . . . laurels for the Who's Whos, 
Clark and Reimer . . . Yay Miss Fitzgerald's la- 
sagna . . . the teachers' torture and the rec ma- 
jors sabbatical ... a rainy spirited welcome to 
Iota Gam, our new neighbors ... 3 1 Chi O 
pledge pins on campus . . . this was Chi Omega 
in '63 and '64, 



X 




Two fall afternoons taken by Round Robins. 



First Row: A. Bontempo, A. Russo, S. Tharl, J. Fitts, K. 
Sciscento, S. Lydon, J. Fiore, M. Perley, S. Henry, B. Mendel- 
sohn, B. Koza, S. Penney, K. Patitz, B. Bryan. Second Row: C. 
Timson, B. Engel, J. Ryan, E. Diggle. M. Policow, N. Leach, B. 
Borges, B. Kelley, Treasurer; J. Reimer. President; Mrs. K. 
Young, House Mother; E. Leahy, Vice President; B. Capriole, 
M. Sutherland, M. Lockhart, S. Allen, P. Hadley, C. Wood- 



cock, D. Eastman. Third Row: M. Brady, J. Scott, D. Sylvester, 
B. Blood, P. Carey, K. Meehan, K. Eickhorn, K. Reagan, C. 
Riley, K. Hamilton, S. Scanlon, G. Whelpley, M. Patten, G. 
Glib, M. Brazao, J. Walsh, J. Regele. Fourth Row: M. Pat- 
tangall, B. Kelley, N. Fish, D. Driscoll, C. Carroll. L. Small, 
M. Gorman, D. Bolton, C. Yukna, G. Cheney, M. Feldman, D. 
Wiinikainen, K. Miller, T. Rogers. P. Mosack, E. Howe. 







^ lit "» 



W .« S# 




First Row: J. Webb, J. Brackett, B. Youngsten, J. Carr. K. 
Johnson, S. Ferrara, N. Pero. D. Maccaferri, F. Cisek, E. 
Malley. Second Row: S. English. H. Tefs, S. Whitehead, L. 
Knubbe, C. Sakaseeny, Secretary; J. Ferris, P. Genetti, Presi- 
dent; V. Mallison, Vice President; S. Morash, A. Stawicki, C. 



Iota Gamma Upsilon 
Moves Into The 
"Gingerbread Castle" 



Laboissonniere, S. Commons, J. Holland. Third Row: C. Ham- 
mond, K. Aucoin, L. McCarthy, J. Mostek. J. Stein, W. Nelson, 
M. Shapter, C. Kelly, L. Kretschmar. C. Ryan, J. Rosata, N. 
Morin. 



ITT 



The Kappas rush — only to move to new house. 




T, 



wo years old and Iota Gam is no longer a 
baby ... a house of their own ... a week to 
move in! . . .A hectic semester, but phone and 
Iotas were finally installed. Candle ceremonies 
serenading, exchanges, corporation meetings . . . 
we're organized! 

In May of 1962 Iota Gamma Upsilon estab- 
lished itself as the tenth and newest sorority on 
campus. Realizing the need for more sororities 
on a rapidly growing campus and hoping to join 
the Greek world, five freshmen women undertook 
the task of forming a local sorority, to be the only 
one on the University campus. 

The effects of nearly a year's independent or- 
ganization are beginning to yield the bounty of its 
investment. What they have learned about budgets, 
contracts, house decorating and a multitude of 
other areas could never be gleaned from textbooks. 
What they have from learning together cannot be 
calculated. 



218 




First Row: A. Malone, S. Glesmann, M. Fitzgerald, B. Taska, 
M. Heap, A. Schualenstocker, E. Hastings, C. Holtzman, M. 
Potvin, S. Hanchett, B. Bello, E. Perriello, C. Pease. Second 
Row: S. Coflan, J. Sharpe. M. Hill, J. Curns, P. Savage, M. 
Walter, Treasurer; R. Labatte, Secretary: Mrs. Eino Toko, J. 
Buckley, President; D. Comeau, Vice President; B. Erker, K. 
Walsh, D. Logue, A. Sutherland, S. Catto. Third Row: N. 



Stack, P. Benton, J. Rogers, D. Richardson, R. Ananis, N. 
Wright, L. Farnham, M. Brockway, J. Ross, ]. Bailey, B. 
Hunter, N. Mahlman, C. O'Malley, S. Kerr, L. Worsdell, E. 
Garvey. Fourth Row: N. Lewis, C. Sherman, P. Barry, J. 
Mutti, C. Graf, K. Klimas, P. B. Farrell, S. Blood, B. Dadoly, 
P. Cox, J. Saunders, G. Sird, N. McLaughlin. 



K A 



a 



lAMMA Eta chapter of Kappa Alpha Theta 
was founded at the University of Massachusetts 
February 6, 1943 from the local sorority of Phi 
Zeta. The Massachusetts chapter has changed 
considerably since its first days. 

More important, though, are the aspects of the 
chapter that have not changed. Twenty years have 
found them still generating warm friendships that 
will last a lifetime, still sending donations from 
their projects to The Institute of Logopedics at 
Wichita, Kansas; still tutoring their pledges in ac- 
ademic and social knowledge. 1963 found them 
particularly happy when one of the sisters took 
first place in the sorority declamation competition 
and several of seniors were appointed to Who's 
Who. 

However, overriding such fleeting honors, is 
the deep glow of pride and happiness felt by 
members of Kappa Alpha Theta and the deep 
hope that Gamma Eta will not change its essen- 
tial good qualities in the years to come. 



Kappa Alpha Theta Cops 
First In Panhellenic 
Sing And Declamation 

A rushee receives bid with quiet happiness and joy. 



219 









First Row: C. Jarvela, M. Robison, B. Van Gelder, C. Cavaioli. 
B. Christo, R. Catalano, C. Marcus. M. Stacy, M. Williams, M. 
Bishop, K. Harrison, D. Klein, S. Bascom, S. Kangas. Second 
Row: L. Doerr. R. Brown, F. Leavitt, N. Oikelmus, C. Ricci, 
N. Niziak, Treasurer; M. Adam. Secretary; Mrs. Don B. Alder- 
man. B. Mercer, President; L. Fisher, Vice President; J. Han- 
Ion, H. Jezioski. J. Morgan. J. Arnold. J. Fisher, R. Harrison, P. 



McShane. Third Row: C. Higgins, S. Minick, J. Simonds, A. 
Schulte, J. Kwapien, M. Carme, M. Ward, C. Viens, M. Wen- 
zel. A. Richards, L. Lapeza, J. Stevens, M. Creanza, D. Dono- 
van, J. Lavoie, L. Brilliant, L, Sperry. Fourth Row: D. Duffin, 
M. Murray, B. Zaleski, P. Gilgut, D. Tarrant, M. Holovak, A. 
Macuga, N. Thompson, L. Hemlin, P. Kelly, J. Furmans, R. 
Gile, P. Seibert, G. Dunn. S. Graham, C. Esonis. 



Kappa Kappa Gamma Moves 
To New Quarters On 
Nutting Avenue 



They predicted a winner with their "Fuchsia.' 




K K r 



Tr 



HE change of address from Lincoln Avenue to Nutting Avenue 
has certainly brought some changes into the lives of the sisters of 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. But the passage of time, however lengthy, 
cannot erase the memories of the little "ginger bread" house and 
the last senior class to live there, or the fun of living amidst the dust, 
plastering and hammering as the new house was completed. 

The old memories are mixed with the new-house meetings sitting 
on barrels and ladders, to "We need a fourth for bridge!" 

We aim to make Kappa Kappa Gamma an integral part of the 
college community, stressing high scholarship and philanthropic ac- 
tivities. Under the guidance of our housemother Mrs. Donald Alder- 
man, and our house officers we feel that, especially this year, our 
aims were accomplished. 



220 




First Row: B. Goldman, J. Keough, M. Pelton, J. Wood, A. 
Roupenian, F. Savage, C. Surman, J. Bracker, J. Brown, R. 
Cerutti, N. Stanton. Second Row: C. Hennigar, L. Lain, S. 
Mary, S. Koons, D. Smith, B. Gerry, Mrs. Mary Kirley, N. 
Andrade, P. Liberman, L. Greenberg, L. Weaver, C. Kane, C. 



Bollenbacl^. P. Viall. Third Row: J. White, J. Miller, P. Tra- 
back, L. Wilcox, D. Loeser, A. Wong, D. Johnson, B. Trull, M. 
Wilcox, F. Bassil, J. Stevens, B. Blittersdorf, J. Graziano, C. 
Johnson. 



Lambda Delta Phi 
Retires Panhellenic 
Scholarship Tray 



A A^ 



Every aspect of college life is touched by 
Greeks. 



I 



N June, 1961, Lambda Delta Phi, with Alpha Chapter at UMass., 
became the first national nondiscriminatory sorority. As stated in the 
constitution, they continue to strive for "living democracy through 
friendship." 

Scholarship doesn't falter at Lambda Phi; for with the scholarship 
program, the sisters combined efforts to win the scholarship tray for 
the third year in succession. 

The various activities in which the sisters participate, such as 
religious groups, Operetta Guild, the Junior and Senior Executive 
Boards and Collegian. Also, turning to the serious side we have 
undertaken such projects as knitting mittens and scarves for under- 
privileged children. 

During the past year, Lambda Delta Phi has continued to grow and 
expand in membership, adding chapters on the West Coast; and 
Alpha chapter announces that its most cherished dream — a new 
house — will soon be realized. 



221 







Bev Botelho Takes Dec, Theta Sing 




G 



IROWTH of the University's sorority com- 
munity rendered it impractical tliis year to con- 
tinue coordinating the Sorority Sing and Decla- 
mation Competitions. 

Thus, separate programs were held for the 
two Panhellenic Council sponsored events this 
year. The dramatization was held in October and 
the sing was presented in early March, dedicated 
to the late President Kennedy. 

Performances at the October competition, in 
which representatives of the campus' ten sorori- 
ties competed for recognition, were rated on 
dramatic interpretation, choice of selection, visual 
and auditory attributes of performers. 

Copping first place was Beverly Botelho of 
Kappa Alpha Theta; second honors went to Al- 
pha Chi Omega's Deena Ferrigno; Frances Cas- 
tine of Iota Gamma Upsilon and Lynette Ar- 
casdi of Sigma Kappa tied for third place. 

A program comprised of folk melodies, jazz 
tunes and traditional classics lent sparkling vari- 
ety to the Spring competition. 

Kappa Alpha Theta again took honors, taking 
first place for their renditions of "Turn Ye to 
Me" and "I Got Rhythm." 

Chi Omega's performance of "Elijab Rock" 
and "Lili Marlene" was awarded second place. 

"Days of Wine and Roses" and "Tzena," 
merited the sisters of Sigma Sigma Sigma third 
place ribbons. 

Song performances are rated on the basis of 
group appearance, choice of number, tone qual- 
ity and balance, expression. The performances 
were, as always, directed by members of the 
sororities. 



Declamation winner Beverly Botelho is congratulated by Dec- 
lamation Chairman. Barbara Farrell. 



Winner of the Sorority Sing was Kappa Alpha Theta. 




Third place honors went to Sigma Sigma Sigma. 




Pi Beta Phi Supports Rural School 
In Gatlinburg, Tennessee 



n 

B 



Th 



HE years have been good to the Pi Phi's, bringing many 
changes and adding new responsibilities, but the ideals and high 
standards on which the chapter was founded still remain intact. 
The sisters are proud of the fact that Pi Phi was the first 
national fraternity for women and that through their efforts, the 
fraternity is able to maintain and operate a school for rural 
children in Gatlinburg, Tenn. The growth of the national frater- 
nity attests to the continued strength of its appeal to college 
women. 

It was a busy year for the Pi Phi's, for they had and will 
continue to have much to live up to. They have always repre- 
sented in campus activities, and this year was no exception. 



Every girl is labelled at rush 
for easy conversation. 



First Row: J. Stumpf, D. Bangs. C. Smith, C. Wiggins, C. 
Swift, E. Hatch, S. Durfee, P. Seibel. S. Shaw, A. Jorden, P. 
Hartmann, C. Zmuda, D. SuUo. Second Row: M. Harte, P. 
Gully, R. Owen, S. Edmands, J. Rose, L. Francescon, J. Carey, 
Mrs. Hugh Cheyne, B. Brent, C. Townsley, J. Crowell. M. 
Makinen. P. Stankiewicz, S. Perreault, M. Smith. Third Row: 
M. Wyath. V. DiFruscio, G. Tomaselli. K. Stibbins, K. Watson, 



J. Congdon, C. Gennari, A. Walsh, L. Wilcox, J. Chiminello, E. 
Holland, J. Alger, A. Russell, J. Smith, K. Merritt, B. Stokes, 
K. Osterberg. Fourth Row: P. Battis, M. Richardson, L. 
Schechterle, M. King, L. Hanson, B. Shafer, L. Carr, G. Mir- 
ick, M. Kuczynski, J. Kelly, J. Seddon, G. McLean, S. Nest, D. 
Leach. 




224 



Sigma Delta Tau Has New 
Campus Advisor, Mary Troxell 

T 

J. HROUGHOUT the past nineteen years, Psi sisters have 
achieved much for the house, and on the University campus. 

To make sure that this tradition continues, SDT entered this 
year's formal rush period with vigor, and came out with a 
wonderful, if mischievous, pledge class. 

Homecoming was about the most hectic weekend of the year. 
The grads arrived just in time to watch the big, 'fuchsia' elephant 
getting scalped by overhanging branches in the float parade. 

The sisters were very happy to hear that Mrs. Mary Troxell 
of the Home Economics School will be our new advisor. The 
sisters spent an enjoyable evening discussing University affairs 
with President and Mrs. Lederle, and discussing European 
travel with the Bracketts. 

Although the year's activities were fun and worthwhile, the 
most valuable experience for the sisters was getting to know 
each other a little better. 



T 




Baking cookies to sell for sup- 
port of philanthropy. 



First Row: J. Greenfield, J. Zenis, S. Cohen, B. Veneri, M. 
Hurwitz, L. Lavin, J. Goldman, J. Wilcox, B. Smith. Second 
Row: K. Liner, S. Glickman, P. Witovsky. A. Posner, M. 
Langbort, J. Keane, D. Shapiro, Secretary; J. Addelson, Vice 
President; Mrs. L. Ryan, M. Arnold, President; C. Chesler, 
Treasurer; P. Pearce, L. Mokaba, R. Weinberg, G. Litchfield. 
Third Row: S. Pierce, B. Berkovich, J. Savage, R. Lewis, J. 



Frieden. S. Esterquest, L. Arnold, B. Finkelstein. G. Moseor, D. 
Lindbergh. D. Mogel, L. Brown, D. Rudnick, C. Rudge, M. 
Garber. Fourth Row: J. Gilman, S. Morse, E. Paster, S. Le- 
powe, G. Freedlauder, A. Kaplan, H. Kliman, S. Tye, J. Rosen- 
thal, L. Saltman, G. Gordon, S. Berkowitz, R. Bernstein, M. 
Zick. 





^ ^ f # f ^ ,f I 
•Sr S Isr 



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ft I t g 



g^asi 



225 




Sigma Kappa Wins The 
Coveted First Place In 
Homecoming Parade 



K 



S, 



The results of a house effort — a float. 



'IGMA Kappa Sorority was founded at Colby 
College, Waterville, Maine in 1874. Since then, it 
has grown in size to a force of 100 chapters scat- 
tered all over the United States with an active and 
alumnae membership of over 36,000. 

Sigma Kappa has enjoyed a very successful 
year, including first prize in the Homecoming 
Float Parade, a tie for third place in the Sorority 
Declamation and a rewarding rush season. 

Central to the chapter's future plans for the 
1963-64 school year is its pledge program which 
includes Mother-Daughter activities. Pledge 
Party, Pledge Picnic, all culminating in Initiation 
and Initiation Banquet. Looking even more to the 
future, they are beginning to dream and plan for 
the eventual building of larger and more modern 
living quarters for Sigma Kappa. 



First Row: A. Pinkul, S. Merriam, M. Shuran, C. Walsh, S. 
Howe, P. McAteer, M. Lundberg, B. Neugeboren, C. Belonis, 
S. Schmalz, C. Cronin, L. MuUane, J. Norman, L. Paul. Second 
Row: L. Arcardi, A. Doty, L. Cody, P. Wickens, First Vice 
President; M. Kapinos, Corresponding Secretary; P. Bradway, 
President; G. Jensen, Treasurer; M. Polito, E. Ferry, C. Oliver, 
J. Spooner. Third Row: A. Levin, C. Bohlin, J. Lunney, J. 



Robinson, N. Keefe, D. Quirk, P. Hatch, J. Harron, J. Ditmars, 
C. Schmidt, L. Noonan, K. Mitchell, J. Smith, P. Wanless, E. 
Kfoury, S. Clapper, C. Leavett, J. Buckley. Fourth Row: S. 
Slayton, B. Booth, M. Carroll, W. Hall, B. Smith, P. Appicelli, 
N. Baron, G. Testa, C. Galetka, N. Stevens, E. Prusky, H. 
Byrne, S. Knight, L. Kunzler, E. Doyle, M. Fuller, J. Papuga, 
E. Rosenblatt, J. Glossa. 




Sigma Sigma Sigma Makes The 
Mc Cune House Their Home 



A XaVING been installed as Gamma Iota 
Chapter in March, 1963, it was an excited group 
of plans for decorating the McCune house which 
was to be theirs for the year. A group project 
made light work of cleaning and painting the rest 
of the house. A tea was held in honor of the 
housemother, Mrs. Alice Drake. 

Housing facilities for 24 members were pro- 
vided at the chapter house. Dining accommoda- 
tions were such that all of sisters and pledges 
were able to eat at the house. The sisters also 
enjoyed several exchange suppers during the year. 
Scholastically, the Sigma's placed second 
among the sororities. Also, rush is not something 
to be overlooked this year. How easy it was to 
decorate for and hold parties in a house of their 
own. The new pledges make a fine addition and 
insure a strong start on next year. The Tri Sigmas 
were also active participants in all campus events. 
Plans are also being formulated for a new house 
which will hopefully be occupied by 1965. 




Much work — fleeting glance — first prize. 



First Row: E. Lanyon, M. Netinho, J. Cohen, L. Niemyski, S. 
Berenson, B. Bourque, E. Boisjolie, M. Putis, C. Olsen, P. 
Tapine, S. Nordstrom, R. Barbadara. Second Row: J. Latino, S. 
Pelland, A. Wormwood, R. Lawson. E. Johnson. E. Worm- 
wood, D. Paul. D. Wilbur, Secretary; C. Ranta, Vice President; 
D. Stoklosa. President; J. Hripak, Treasurer; E. Ogilvie, N. 



Elwell, J. Friar, J. Felio, M. Moseley, J. Kostek. Third Row: C. 
Hulton. E. Klinker, D. Garneau, D. Carey, D. Bush, D. Whit- 
man, N. Ramstedt. J. Janik, G. Tibbetts, C. Walkwitz, M. 
Grant, M. Kane, S. Longfellow, M. Depelteau, M. Prentice, S. 
Elder. 




One Dies, One Born For IFC 



L 



-FC under President Steve Gray moved decisively to cope with problems that 
have long plagued the Greek system at the University. 

To bolster ranks thinned to a little over 20 percent of the campus population, 
a first semester rush period was authorized with no rush rules imposed. With the 
new program went an emphasis on scholastic achievement aimed at keeping 
promising rushees at the necessary academic level for pledging, thus cutting the 
rate of pledge attrition. 

The feeling of IFC was that pressure on the freshman prospect would be 
lessened, and both frosh and brothers could get to know each other on a freer 
basis. 

About the same time, IFC witnessed the passing of Sigma Alpha Epsilon, for 
29 years a fraternity at UMass, when the SAE charter, under directions from 
SAE national was revoked. 

Known as "The Home of Champions" here, SAE housed some of the Uni- 
versity's finest athletes up to the very day of death. 

Toward the end of the first semester, however, IFC sired a new member of 
the family, Sammy, known officially as Sigma Alpha Mu. 




^•^ii -'-r^ ~«<7?>3» 



First Row: W. Houk. B. Sheehan, R. Hickman, F. Shea. Sec- 
ond Row: B. Glass, K. Ross, D. Rooney. R. Ek, W. Najam, D. 
Healy, A. Burne. Third Row: R. Wiberg, S. Wexler, B. Bonni- 



ver, S. Gray, K. Robbins, J. Bradley, J. Burke, W. Goebel. 
Fourth Row: M. Paris, D. Rose, J. Gardner, B. Rodriguez, L. 
Kalevitch, S. Reimer, M. McMahon, B. Monson. 



228 




Leslie Eisler, Joel Hartstone, Stephen Gordon. Standing: Thomas Winstanley. Barry Rosen- 
berg, Kenneth Berk. Richard Zlete. 



"Sammy" Colonizes At UMass 



In line with the Interfraternity Council's planned integration of new fraternities 
at the University, seven undergraduates this year obtained colonization rights 
with Sigma Alpha Mu national fraternity. 

The IFC granted colonization rights to Kenneth Berk, Leslie Eisler, Stephen 
Gordon, Joel Hartstone, Barry Rosenberg, Thomas Winstanley and Richard 
Zlete on January 8, 1964. 

Four days later the executive secretary of Sigma Alpha Mu was on campus 
to pledge the colony. 

The founding brothers had first joined in October, 1963, as the Sigma Alpha 
club, with hopes of affiliating with SAM national. After a series of meetings with 
the University administration, the IFC, and the national officers of the frater- 
nity, the petition for colonization was presented. 

The colony expects to receive its official charter and become a fully authorzied 
chapter of Sammy during the 1964-65 school year. The brotherhood also has 
hopes of living in their own house as of September, 1964. 

Sigma Alpha Mu National was founded at the City College of New York in 
1909, and has continued to grow until it is now among the country's top ten 
fraternities. Among its famous brothers are Allan Sherman of recording fame, 
and Charles Goren, international bridge authority. 

Although the UMass chapter will be only the second in New England (the other 
is at Massachusetts Institute of Technology), it will bring to 54, the number of 
chapters in the country. 



229 



Alpha Epsilon Pi 
Makes Mother's Day 
Banquet A Tradition 



AE n 




First Row: D. Fox, J. Darack. M. Hecht, L. Castle. President; 
M. Paris, Vice President; Mrs. H. Tully, H. Shapiro, Treasurer; 
M. Tesler, M. Dillon, H. Tanzer, M. Swartz. Second Row: L. 
Rutstein, T. Ufland, M. Rose. J. Benjamin, M. Karol, J. Rosen- 



that. J. V. Parnell, L. Aronson, P. Rodinsn, A. J. Kodish. Third 
Row: T, Jacobs, H. Schlosberg. B. Brass, L. Marshall, S. 
Pyenson, J. Rice, R. Blitzer, N. Sampson, A. Lebowitz. 



I 



N December, 1933, Alpha Epsilon Pi was founded on the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts campus. Since that time, the brothers of AEPi 
have compiled an enviable record on campus. 

The brothers held a Christmas Party for underprivileged children, 
enjoyed many exchange parties and weelcend parties, and held their 
annual pledge formal and Mother's Day Banquet in the spring. 

As usual, AEPi, was well represented on campus with brothers on 
the staffs of the Collegian and Index and with others on Adelphia, 
Ceasura, WMUA, University Theater, and Student Union Commit- 
tees. Phi Chapter is especially proud of having won the IPC award 
for scholarship last year. 

In short, Phi Chapter of Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity has come a 
long way from the original handful of students to a large fraternity 
constantly inthe spotlight as a source of campus leaders. 



Traditional Christmas figure spreads traditional 
joy. 



<■/*-. 




230 



A S ^ 



Alpha Sigma Phi 
Homeless First Semester 
- Rents Second 




First Row: B. Peffer, L. Lamoureux, D. Sarret, T. O'Brien, B. 
Allen, R. Henry, S. Brown. K. Watt, W. Hennessey. Second 
Row: D. Cheney, D. Porteous, B. Connors, T. Lachowicz, D. 
Wilcox, B. Cobb, G. Breault, R. Jerrain, B. Hickman, P. Lamb, 
K. Boyle, A. Malatesta, R. Parmenter. Third Row: R. Ward, B. 
Currie, I. Leighton. R. Glackin, Pyneapplp. D. Duck, W. 



Morse, J. Whitfield, J. Vaux, R. Addison, M. Diver, J. Rice, P. 
Winchester, J. Lazarovich, A. Reener. Fourth Row: P. Plas- 
tered, D. Feindel, T. King, A. Pucino. B. M'Carthy. H. Piels, 
K. Tarabehhi, B. Brown, N. Hawes, D. Fuller, P. Grosso, T. 
Hofmann. S. Maskell, J. Sandhaus, D. Dehart, D. Bangs. 



School spirit is part of the fraternity way. 




MASSACHUStnS 




X OR the fall semester, Alpha Sig was the house without a house, 
but a house was rented for second semester. The new quarter of a 
million dollar house will be located on the same lot at 394 North 
Pleasant Street. The social area will cover more square feet than did 
the entire first level of the old house. Living quarters for 46 men will 
be located in a separate wing to minimize study disturbances. 

The absence of a house did not, however, impair the social pro- 
gram. Many off-campus parties were held. Alpha Sig also extends 
appreciation to Theta Chi, Phi Mu Delta, Tau Epsilon Phi, and Zeta 
Nu who invited them to share their social areas. 

Alpha Sigma Phi, the oldest national on campus, was founded in 
1845 at Yale University. In 1913 the charter for Gamma Chapter 
was granted to UMass. 



231 



Alpha Tau Gamma 

A Two Year Fraternity 
A 

.Z^\.LPHA Tau Gamma was founded on January 19, 
1920 as a two-year social fraternity, with membership 
open to all Stockbridge School of Agriculture students 
of the University of Massachusetts. 

The brothers of ATG have made their presence felt 
by filling many worthy positions within the activities of 
the Stockbridge School. Members fill many important 
positions in sports, student government, and Stoso, the 
Stockbridge Service Organization. 

Our social season was studded with parties and ex- 
change suppers, and climaxed with the annual pledge 
formal held in March. 

This year we have a new housemother, Mrs. Lillian 
Whitsitt and we all hope that she will be a permanent 
resident for many years to come. 

As we go our separate ways from the University of 
Massachusetts and Alpha Tau Gamma into the vast 
and rapidly progressing world, we will always remem- 
ber, our brothers, our standards, our ideals, our motto, 
and our Alma Mater. 



A 
T 

r 




Athletic competition merits serious considera- 
tion. 




First Row: R. Perry, D. Jaukouiski, N. Hayes, Secretary; B. 
Johnson, Vice President; "Ma", W. Lyford. President; S. El- 
mont, Treasurer; F. Buck, E. Toombs, E. Mathence. Second 
Row: D. Howard, T. Sullivan, G. Lakas, B. O'Brien, R. Hall. 



C. Bourne, T. Napoli, J. Dimock, G. Gentile, R. Collen. Third 
Row: E. Bingham, B. Reed, D. Paquin. J. Crowell, A. Mantou- 
rides, C. Koines, P. Christo, R. Robbins, J. Kruglewicz, D. 
Spencer. 



232 




Beta Kappa Phi Enlarges 
Property And Renovates House 



T. 



B 
K 



Building a prize-winning float is joint endeavor. 



HIS year has been one of the most successful for 
the Beta Kappa Phi's. The brothers returned from sum- 
mer recess to find that they had purchased the adjacent 
property on PhilHps St. This addition greatly increased 
facilities for 'living in' and is a major step in the future 
building program. 

Physical improvements made in the house include 
further renovations of our now famous Gobie Lounge, 
and another Annual Lawn Planting Party. 

We were proud to present our largest Alumni turnout 
on Homecoming Weekend with a First Place in float 
competition. 

From an academic viewpoint they have initiated a 
program of having faculty guests visit the house. The 
hope is that we can strengthen the student-teacher rela- 
tionship and acquaint the faculty and the brothers with 
the feeling and problems that each have. 




First Row: D. Lewis. B. Stone, K. Chute, P. McDonald, B. 
Fiedler, R. Kodzis, B. Peters, B. Najam, B. Cavanaugh, B. 
Desrochers. Second Row: B. Kruse, J. Salewski, J. KoUstrom, 
S. Albert, D. Wakeley, J. Carlson, R. Francis, F. Thurberg, D. 
Bailey, O. Moonthrow, D. Badias, D. Sikorski, N. MacLeod. 
Third Row: J. Mann, P. Sherman, B. Blurr, J. Belanger, P. 
Fitzpatrick, R. Greenfield, Vice President; L. Koch, President; 
Mrs. M. Yoerj, J. Nevers, Secretary; R. Hooper, Treasurer; M. 



Noferi, R. Bacchieri, L. Reibschlaeger, D. Lemon, T. Astaldi, 
A. Labrie. Fourth Row: D. Rogers, V. Larkin, R. Marble, B. 
Nickerson, C. River, F. Corbett, C. Aarris, A. Durfee, R. 
Ostrowski, A. Nordberg. Fifth Row: P. Kead, J. Daly, E. 
Frado, R. Anable. P. Gibson, L. Caldeira, J. Pollack, H. Carr, 
K. Robbins, J. Gallagher, W. LeBond, G. DeFalco, J. Adams, 
D. Johnson, R. Deorge. 



233 



Kappa Sigma's Ranks 
Include Two-Third 
Varsity Majority 

VJaMMA Delta Chapter of Kappa Sigma, one of the 
University's largest fraternities is currently enjoying its 
61st year on campus. 

This year, in the field of athletics, approximately two- 
thirds of the house participates in varsity sports. Kappa 
Sigs made up the bulk of this year's Yan-Con cham- 
pionship football team. Seven Kappa Sigs earned start- 
ing positions on the Varsity football team. Kappa Sigs 
also captained the hockey, basketball, baseball, la- 
crosse, and tennis teams. 

Guest dinners were initiated at the house this year. 
The purpose of this being to establish a closer relation- 
ship between the fraternity and the University. 

Community service is also important at Kappa Sig. 
This year two brothers coached the Amherst Pee Wee 
hockey team. 

This summer the Chapter house, now 24 years old, 
will be completely renovated. 

At Kappa Sig being first is a tradition. 




Varsity sports participants are pioud of aliiliation. 



K 2 



First Row: E. Godek. J. Jelley. B. Hutchinson. B. Pantanella, 
P. Nichols. E. Ross. J. DeAmicis. Second Row; G. Tokarczvk. 
B. Glass, T. Bridges, B. Ellis, P. Herrd. P. Campbell, T. 
Marena. C. Furlong, A. Jurke, W. Morgan, D. Durkin. Third 
Row: D. Murphy, T. Hoague, D. Benoit, J. Awdycki, J. Mor- 
gan, D. DellaPiana, J. Neary, Secretary; L. McCormick. 
Treasurer; G. Street, Vice President; K. Karmena, L. Ross, F. 



Dargie, L. Bartley. B. Dallas, J. Boyle. Fourth Row: M. Russo, 
M. Morin, R. Twitchell, D. Hagberg, B. Meers, S. Tombarelli, 
E. Peters, B. Jordan. Fifth Row; D. K. Keeley, D. Lorkhart, J. 
Johannssonn, W. Crane, J. Harrington, T. Williams, J. Apicella, 
R. Conley, P. Murray, J. Anderson, H. Murray, S. Palmieri, B. 
Gogick. 




Lambda Chi Alpha Burns Mortage 
And Plans New Quarters 




Academic pressure is constant companion of all days. 



AX A 



VJaMMA Zeta Chapter of Lambda Chi Alpha was 
founded here in 1912 and is now one of 150 active 
chapters throughout the United States. Last year, the 
fiftieth anniversary of Gamma Zeta, one of the goals of 
the founders and house purchasers was realized; the 
burning of our mortgage. Present at this ceremony was 
Murray D. Lincoln, most distinguished alumnus, and, 
at present, president of CARE. 

On campus, Lambda Chi's are active in most Recog- 
nized Student Organizations such as Maroon Keys 
(President), Sigma Delta Psi (President), Eta Kappa 
Nu and Tau Beta Pi. Our future plans include the 
construction of a new brick house to blend with the 
increased building program of the University. Thus, as 
in the past. Lambda Chi Alpha moves forward, build- 
ing leaders of men. 



First Row: A. Cenedella, D. Hankowski, A. Plince, C. Mon- 
nier, B. Glabach, W. Horan. Second Row: G. Gibbons, J. 
Hakanson, A. Coe, E. Sternowski, Secretary; R. Kepetv, Presi- 
dent; R. Taylor, Vice President; D. Fitzgerald. R. Ek, G. Wolf, 
D. Wells. Third Row: J. Kovingul, D. Clarke, T. Powell, F. 






DiGiano, R. Hatfield, B. Ritchie, T. Palatino, B. Blackwell, J. 
Bisbee, R. Clinton. Fourth Row: C. DeLeire, P. Dougherty, T. 
Tyrer, C. Gusciora, C. Hartley, R. Leete, R. McNeil, C. Lun- 
din, P. Varin, M. Valencia. 



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Phi Mu Delta Plans new 
Housing Facilities In 
Near Future 



M 



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The folk music craze is reflected in living-room. 



lU Zeta Chapter of Phi Mu Deha was estab- 
lished on this campus in October of 1953. At 
present there are eleven chapters located in New 
England and the northeastern part of the country. 
As the University expands and builds, so must 
the fraternity system on this campus if it hopes to 
maintain the service it has given to the campus in 
previous years. In keeping with this policy. Phi 
Mu Delta is proud to announce that plans are 
underway to build a new and much larger house 
within the next year and a half. By doing so, they 
will increase the capacity of the fraternity thereby 
allowing more brothers the opportunity to live in 
the fraternity house. They will be in keeping with 
the standards of the University in enlarging to 
meet the growing demands of students. They are 
very pleased that they can reflect the growth of 
the University. 



First Row: J. Mirre, M. Driscoll, D. Gould. Second Row: R. 
Zuckerman. D. Briggs, J. Piecuch, J. Carr, D. Williams, S. 
Wolotsky, J. Rantilla, R. Simmons. Third Row: S. Meehan, D. 
Charlesworth, B. Pond, J. Pianowski, R. Barclay Rose, Secre- 
tary; R. Covalucci, President; Mrs. K. Mann, N. Elder, Treas- 



urer; J. Watson, Vice President; D. Connors, G. Darling, G. 
Morrison, D. Moegelin. Fourth Row: J. Murphy, B. Peoples, J. 
Thurberg, D. Windzka, J. Blodgett, J. Fusco, B. Millis, B. 
Sherman, J. Sullivan, F. Phillips, J. Gardiner, J. Fagan. 




Phi Sigma Delta Places 
Second In Fraternity 
Scholarship 



kJlNCE 1957, when Phi Sigma Delta was 
founded on this campus as a national fraternity, 
they have seen nothing but progress. In six short 
years we have tripled our membership to 5 1 . Un- 
der the able leadership of our president, Robert 
Keene, 1964 has been a banner year. Academi- 
cally they placed second in scholarship with a 
solid 2.3 cumulative average. 

Even our housemother, Mrs. Dorothy Pyle, 
found success in 1963 when her collie. Snake, 
completed her championship. 

Under the early IPC rushing program were 
added 17 new pledges. These pledges have proven 
to be quite a spirited and united group, traveling to 
New England chapters. 

Financially the house is supporting itself 
soundly and the brotherhood has made plans with 
national for the construction of a new house 
within three years. 



^ 



A 




Athletic competition is important concern to 
houses. 



First Row: M. Helfen, E. Finley, K. Ross, P. Paisner. Second 
Row: R. Julius, J. Ryan, P. Ginsburg, R. Meo, B. Lukatch. J. 
Baskin, P. Vecchiarelli, R. Lerner. Third Row: S. Goldstein, 
Secretary; R. Dimock, Vice Master Prater; R. Keene, Master 
Prater; M. Brenner, Treasurer. Fourth Row: S. Axeirod. T. 




fT^ .,0 .f% :^ 



Mosco, T. More, G. Goldhaber, A. Dahl, R. Fortier. O. Pawil, 
R. Furash, S. Drucker, G. Creem, J. Liffler. Fifth Row: M. 
Rothstein, G. Bliss, J. Shagoury. R. Robinson, R. Rodriguez, R. 
Skiba. H. Mednicor. B. Schlosberg, E. Hanson, B. Gale, E. 
Lyons. E. Winston. 




f f f 4 



ISf^ 



FMA Expands Greeks' Dollar for 




Paul Christos, Daniel Melley. Lawrence Rhoades, William Starkweather, George Rodgers, Steve Gray, Steve Elmont. 



X. RATERNITY Managers Asscx:iation is the coop- 
erative buying association for UMass fraternities and 
sororities. FMA is headed by a joint student-faculty 
Board of Directors. 

Fraternities send two representatives to the annual or 
special meetings of the House of Delegates. The Board 
of Directors approves contracts of the fraternity 
suppliers. 

Food, house supplies, physical maintenance equip- 
ment and fuel are purchased on the cooperative plan, 
using the Greeks' combined buying volume to purchase 
goods at -a much lower cost than the retail market could 
provide. 

The FMA is operated by Mr. George Rodgers, Fra- 
ternity Manager. Mr. Rodgers has established numer- 
ous varied services in the FMA in addition to central 
buying. Billing systems, which are especially designed 
for this campus, a central collection agency for student 
payments, financial advice to chapter treasurers, menu 



planning information, references and recommendations 
for cooks and housemothers, advice on the completion 
of state and local tax forms, and information on the 
establishment and availability of house corporations 
and new or remodeled housing are available through 
the fraternity manager. 

The success of FMA on this campus has been noted 
on college campuses across the nation. Most campuses 
have seen the benefits that may be derived from the 
cooperative buying system, and UMass has become the 
model for these systems. 

Mr. Rodgers has been called to advise fraternity men 
and their advisers in the formation of similar organiza- 
tions. 

At the National Interfraternity Conference meeting 
held recently, Mr. Rodgers was asked to outline plans 
for several schools. He was invited to other campuses 
to direct the initiation of cooperative buying. 



238 



More Purchasing Power 



Mr. George Rodgers, 
Fraternity Manager, 
Directs Program 




239 



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.VI 



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First Row: D. Hunter, W. McKenna, R. Markham, P. Breen, 
R. Fox, A. Fesuk, C. Lundberg. P, Briggs, J. Nichols, J. 
Arsennault. Second Row: R, Henry, T. Foss, C. Litchfield, C. 
Mitchell. J. Batts. Secretary; R. Tedoldi, Vice President; Mrs. 
Rose A. Peters. S. Gray, President; T. Nevils. Treasurer; \V. 



Phi Sigma Kappa Is The 
Sole National Alpha 
Chapter at UMass 

The Christmas party holds pleasures for all. 




Vanderburgh, W. Crowther, S. O'Leary, M. Leonard. Third 
Row: P. Clifford. R. Rost, R. Whitney, R. Murphy. F. Freder- 
ick, R. Lawson, O. Wolfson. R. Uljua, A. Dolan, H. Hyde, C. 
Lindeil, A. Hanney. 



<D 2: K 



JL HI Sigma Kappa, founded in 1873 at the 
University of Massachusetts, still remains as the 
only Alpha Chapter on campus. Steeped in the 
tradition of its founders, the chapter excels in the 
cardinal principles on which it was founded. 

The chapter is a part of one of the nation's 
largest national fraternities with 73 chapters 
across the country. 

Phi Sigma Kappa pledges have the cherished 
opportunity to view college life as well as frater- 
nity life from the best possible perspective and 
this life gives them that needed boost to attain the 
academic achievement that they desire. 

The fraternity chapter will boast of its achieve- 
ments during the year, but its real advancement 
lies in the opportunity it gives to the entering 
freshman to acquaint himself with the ever pres- 
ent social aspects of real life and the opportunity 
to see for himself who and what he is. 



240 



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First Row; S. DiMatteo, J. Webster, W. McHugh, A. Souza, G. 
Bobcock, V. Dube, R. Bugley. Second Row: H. Wolfe, J. 
Lavoie, F. Cira, B. Young, H. Sopel. J. Norton, D. Johnson, T. 
Clark, B. Kellogg, G. Thonet. Third Row: L. Doane, C. Gar- 
stang, J. McKenna, W. Goebel, S. Salhus, M. Brown, Secretary; 
J. Medeiros, Mrs. C. Garvey, Housemother; R. French, Presi- 



dent; G. Hachett, Vice President; M. Jaryna, Treasurer; J. Hall, 
W. Butler, J. Fillio, N. Sherman. Fourth Row: E. Romano, S. 
Simon, S. Wyman, A. Labelle, B. Wik, S. Davidson, D. Trues- 
dell, T. OHara, J. Crook, H. Knutsen, W. Chenand, R. Lyon- 
nais. M. Manson, R. Allen. R. Hillberg. 



Q T V 



Q.T.V. Has Building Fund 
Program Well Underway 



Q 



T.V. is the oldest Latin local fraternity in 
the country, founded on this campus on May 12, 
1869. It is also the first fraternity to be estab- 
lished on this campus, and a plaque on South 
College commemorates its founding. 

O.T.V.'s most outstanding attribute is the di- 
versity of personalities and interests among the 
brethren, while still maintaining a close feeling of 
brotherhood. 

Due to the growing needs of the fraternity a 
building fund has been created for a new house. 
Directed by both alumni and active members, the 
present plan calls for the new building to be built 
on the present site. 

Add all things together: the heritage and tradi- 
tion of the house, the diversity of the brethren and 
you have it, Q.T.V., a closely knit group of men 
living together in the true spirit of fraternal broth- 
erhood. 



241 




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First Row: R. Girard, T. Murphy, S. Bergjtrom, C. Sideris, W. 
Houk, P. Loring, J. Reed. Second Row: D. Home, M. Chulada, 
J. Alen. G. Smith, E. Najuszewski, M. O'Connell, C. Strong, J. 
Jurke, H. Jilson. Third Row: K. Saila, S. Le Clere, P. Graham, 
B. Garrity, B. Theroux, Secretary; P. Fraticelli, Vice President; 



Al Rand, President; D. Bushe, J. Hinley, J. Capeless, A. Sarno, 
P. Clark, H. Blackler. Fourth Row: P. Rerry, C. Lombardo, J. 
Murphy, T. de Costa, J. Campbell, A. Doherty, L. Kurtzman, 
T. Fraticelli, Maynard. J. Hickey, S. Lanza, R. O'Leary, R. 
Iwanowicz, J. Diachun, G. Burke. 



Mrs. Chapel is Welcomed As Housemother 
By Sigma Phi Epsilon 



Serious thought goes into each competitive 
event. 




S ^ E 



T. 



HE Mass Alpha Chapter of Sigma Phi Epsilon is now in its fifty- 
second year on campus, and is very happy to have a new house- 
mother, Mrs. Chapel. 

Again this year as in the past the Sig Ep football team was able to 
take first place in its league. The basketball team which won the IPC 
championship last year, is looking forward to a repeat performance 
this year. 

Of the many social events during the year, truly the Christmas 
party for the retarded patients of Northampton State Hospital was one 
of the most enjoyable and rewarding. 

The Sig Eps are well represented on campus this year in many 
organizations. With such a background to rely on, Sig Eps look 
forward to many productive years to come. 



242 



m ' W %^ 




First Row: B. Karesick, R. Ericson, D. Fattlebaum, S. Monsein. 
S. Glassman. S. Obelshy, R. Haglund, R. Swartz, G. Kaplan. 
Second Row: J. O'Donnell, E. Salamoff, M. Kovick, S. Gra- 
ham, L, Bethscheider, G. Kromer. R. Greenberg, J. Uretsky, M. 
Shacat. Third Row: B. Klemer. G. Johnsin, C. Sidman, A. 



Shain. R. Cohen, S. Harrington, L. Hoirrty, H. Maskowitz, J. 
Quinn, R. Shulman, A. Forman. Fourth Row: G. Eastman, W. 
Addelson, C. Colton, T. Edwards, P. Gullicksen. V. Meier, P. 
McKenney. R. Mercer, P. Hopkins. 



Tau Epsilon Phi Structure Houses 
Most Of The Membership 



Inter-Fraternity Sing is traditional performance. 



T E ^ 



X 



AU Pi Chapter of Tau Epsilon Phi was founded on this campus 
in 1938. Our new structure enables us to feed all, and house most of 
the brotherhood. The national fraternity has 68 chapters which are 
distributed throughout Canada and the continental United States 
from coast to coast and border to border. 

The house as a unit is also active on campus. We hope to improve 
our standing this year by again placing in athletic competition, and 
also by having our pledges achieve a high scholastic average, being 
aided by an accelerated study program. 

Socially, thus far, this year has been very successful, having ex- 
change parties with other fraternities and sororities. Everyone en- 
joyed the Christmas Party, which together with the sisters of Chi 
Omega, we sponsored for local orphan children. We anxiously view 
the rest of the year with scholastic, social and athletic success in 
mind. 



243 








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u' 


J 


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w 

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-fi.v : 








Tau Kappa Epsilon Delays Plans 
For Building new Home 



T 
K 
E 



L 



A chariot . . . symbol of past 
and present Greek life , . . 



/AST year was a triumphant one for TKE. First place 
finishes in the Homecoming Float Parade, Greek Weekend, 
Softball and swimming, plus a second in the IFC Sing, and a 
third place in the Winter Carni Snow Sculpture added to a first 
place finish in over-all IFC competition. With the championship 
trophy secured, the enthusiasm of the brothers overflowed. Al- 
though expectations of returning to a new house this year were 
abruptly ended when minor problems delayed the proposed 
construction, the brotherhood showed its usual fine spirit in 
repairing and redecorating the existing structure. Thus, 401 
North Pleasant retained the familiar gray house on the hill — a 
house which saw another fine year in social, academic and 
competitive pursuits. As always, Tekes were found active in the 
Student Senate, WMUA, Collegian, Cheerleaders, Band, 
ROTC, varsity basketball, football, gymnastics and class 
activities. 



First Row: J. Hugill. D. Welch, M. First, D. Bazel, D. Long, B. 
Stello. G. Poulos. B. Kelley, C. McMillan. Second Row; B. 
First. A. Burne, C. Rock, J. Duggan, D. Tabb, L. Alton, D. 
Garber. B. Healy, E. Shaar, D. Paduchowaki, P. Toomey, J. 
Mellen. Third Row: G. Smith, R. Milligan, B. Bonnivier, B. 



Morse, D. McNamara. B. Burgess, D. Lagasse, E. Mello, J. 
Dusenbury. V. Nero, A. Raymond, H. Serpa, P. Zinner, B. 
Watson. Fourth Row: C. Moe Pherson, R. Qualey, D. Narki, F. 
Pluta, K. Lindberg, J. Patterson, B. Cowern, R. Merrill, K. 
Rowe, B. Stokes, W. Thayer, R. Caproni. 




■.■<i>iT:!>.^J,^- ii^ii 



244 



Memory Of Molly Doering 
Becomes Part Of Theta Chi Spirit 

T 

X HETA Chi Fraternity, founded nationally at Norwich Uni- 
versity in 1856, was established on the cainpus of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts in 1911 and has occupied its present 
structure on North Pleasant Street since 1935. 

Always among the leaders on cpmpus, in 1951 Theta Chi 
introduced a new idea to the University fraternity system, that 
of a resident hostess, or housemother. At that time, Mrs. Mary 
C. Doering, or Molly as she was known to the brothers, became 
the first fraternity resident hostess for the growing University. 

Early in 1964, Mrs. Doering passed away, and with her death 
the campus community, the fraternity system, and especially 
Theta Chi lost a truly close friend. 

Her loss is immeasurable, but so too are the benefits gained 
from having known her. Her unselfish devotion to Theta Chap- 
ter of Theta Chi is a virtue more worthy of emulation, and as 
the brothers try to do so, the memory of Molly Doering will 
always be with the brothers of Theta Chi. 



X 




Molly Doering and one of her 
many friends . . . 



First Row: D. Barnicle. D. Hinckley. J. Mackey, H. Mac- 
Caughey, T. Richards, J. Meillbye, R. Bernier, J. Leary. S. 
Trbovich. E. Rushbrook, Jr. Second Row: W. Gaughan, R. 
Gothage, J. Morris, A. Collins, C. DeWallace. R. Cavanaugh, 
Treasurer; J. Bloom, President; J. Bradley, Secretary; G. An- 
derson, J. Murphy, B. Grimaldi. J. Spencer, L. Charest, G. 



Suprenant. E. Cody. Third Row: R. Ives, D. Goodwin, C. 
Meyerheofer. R. Pihl, T. Mahoney, R. Farrell, J. Kudsk, K. 
Johnson. T. McMahon. W. Berube. B. Hoff, D. Toner. Fourth 
Row: R. Glaser, J. Kuczynski, B. Bennard, B. Murphy, J. 
O'Reilly, J. Hudson, M. Ross, N. Tate, D. Warren, D. Murphy, 
M. Smith, R. Wiberg, J. McKenna. 







245 






l ¥ 




Zeta Nu Considers 
"Progress" To Be A 
Keyword For Group 



z 

N 



T. 



Except for the dinner hour . . . always a card game. 



HE story of Zeta Nu has been one of devel- 
opment. Born in 1961, she has since grown into a 
leading house on campus. In September, 1962, 
after a long, hard battle, the Brothers of Zeta Nu 
were able to acquire a house that fulfilled all the 
needs of a fraternity. Since then the keyword at 
ZN has been progress. 

Dedicated 'to augment the existing fellowship 
among members . . . regardless of race, creed or 
color,' ZN has become a fraternity of widely di- 
versified interests which become compatible in the 
fraternal atmosphere. 

Since its founding on the campus less than two 
years ago, Zeta Nu has reason to be proud of its 
leadership and accomplishments. Zeta Nu was 
founded on high ideals and we will continue to 
uphold these ideals in all phases of fraternal life. 



First Row: E. Perreauh, R. Callahan, J. Ledwick, G. St. Mar- 
tin. D. Wood, A. Dean, F. Shea, R. Schlitz, R. Wilson, R. 
Bennert. Second Row: J. MacLean, F. Prince, D. Anderson, S. 
Riemer. S. Bawivkiewicz, G. Carvalitu, Mrs. Stack, House- 
mother; S. Wexler, A. Doe, W. De Forest, B. Pedengen, C. 
Sisson, J. Lynch. Third Row: D. Bond, J. Cutll, G. Mallay, C. 



Rudick, P. Aiken, P. Clegg, R. Landry, R. Edmonston, C. 
Anderson, K. Keeler, J. Busineau, A. Olanoff, W. Walsh. Fourth 
Row: Stephen Smith, E. Starzyk, W. Radulski, D. Daislf, R. 
Foley, P. Macomber, P. Beagen, R. Scott, R. Gaudriau. R. 
Morrill, A. Piecewicz, F. Spates. 






Float Parade Competition 
Takes Much Preparation 
and Work .... 





But Parties Take Nothing 
But Music, Noise, 
And People 



APERONED G 



1^ COLO ^^j 




IFC Initiates First Semester 



Greeks adopted first semester 
rushing on a trial basis. It 
proved successful and has been 
accepted as standard rush 
period. 




248 



Rushing As Aid To Freshmen Pledges 




Brothers at Phi Sigma Kappa greet would-be pledges. Brothers found rush period a grind. 



_rOR the academic year, 1963-64, the Interfrater- 
nity Council instituted an early rushing program. 

The program was on an experimental basis this year 
but success warranted its continued practice, and the 
IFC has adopted the early Fall as the permanent date 
for formal rushing. 

The system was adopted for many reasons. In past, 
rushing was held in the Spring semester so that fresh- 
men could establish a minimum grade point average in 
their first semester. Under the new system, the IFC felt 
that freshmen grades could be favorably improved if 
the incoming freshmen, as pledges, could receive guid- 
ance from upperclassmen in the houses. 

The fraternity group of 50 or 60 men, it was felt, 
could give more personal attention to the freshmen than 
could be provided in the larger dormitory group. 

Fraternity presidents, and the sophomore and junior 
IFC representatives formed plans to strengthen the big 
brother-little brother systems in individual houses, to 
further provide personal attention for freshmen. 




249 



^ -^ .^^Ihfl^^l 



Sig Ep's Alumni Room, Phi Sig's kitchen. 




s ^ 



\ 




Study Hall Requirements 



I 



N conjunction with first semester rushing, the IFC 
established minimum study hall requirements for all 
pledges for the 1963-1964 academic year. 

Supervised study halls were required by each house 
for all pledges. The fraternities used rooms in Machmer 
Hall made available by the administration, or held the 
study sessions in the house, in the study hall or big 
brother-little brother systems. The IFC scholarship 
chairman and his committee regularly reported to the 
IFC and made suggestions to the several houses that 
could improve the study halls. 

Some of the houses merely augmented existing study 
programs, while others established their first formal 
study programs this year. The pledge class averages in 
the fraternities reflect the value of these study halls. 

The system now has more members than ever before. 
The minimum average requirement for pledging was 
not applied to freshmen this year. However, the mini- 
mum requirement was applied to initiation for 
freshmen. 

Many of the houses established requirements far 
above the IFC minimums. The success of these houses 
was higher than those fraternities following only mini- 
mum requirements, and the all-house average was in- 
creased accordingly. 

For the next year, the IFC, through the scholarship 
committee, is providing member fraternities with sug- 
gested study hall plans which can be applied to the 
specific fraternity. 

The success of the study hall program has, it is felt, 
made all the fraternities aware of the benefits which a 
well planned scholarship program can provide and the 
fraternities have taken the responsibility individually. 

It is expected that the new emphasis on academic 
achievement in the fraternity system will provide an 
even higher all-fraternity average, especially among 
freshmen pledges. 



250 



Boost House Averages, Aids Pledges 




Brothers of QTV use Machmer Hall facilities donated by the University for study purposes. 




Rooms of brothers still get a work-out as upperclassmen know better their study needs. 



251 




IFC 



IFC goal is 400 pints of blood renewed annually for all in need. 



I 



FC has established a blood bank at the Cooley Dick- 
inson hospital, Northampton, through donations from 
members of the UMass fraternities. 

The goal is to have 400 pints of blood, on a yearly 
renewable rotation, on reserve. 

The blood is donated in the name of the IFC rather 
than the name of the donor. While most blood bank 
plans insure the donor and his immediate family for a 
year, the blood donated by the fraternity system will be 
available to all through any IFC member. 

The bank was established especially for University 
students, faculty, staff and employees and their fami- 
lies, and the town of Amherst. IFC felt that the blood 
should always be on hand, for those people who gave to 
the Campus Blood drive, as well as those who were 
unable to give, thus alleviating the costly replacement 
of blood. 

The rotational plan was adopted to insure an ade- 
quate supply of blood constantly on hand. 




252 



Rolls Up Sleeves For Blood Donations 





Brothers of Phi Sigma Kappa were first to donate to new program. 



When plan goes to t'lili operation, Greeks will give weekly. 





Blood will he made available to any at University or the town. 



253 




Rapt faces gaze hopefiilh at the gavly wrapped package. 




Greeks Tout 
Tots At Yule 



A^ 



.T Christmas time, Campus fraternities and 
sororities extend the spirit of Christmas to hun- 
dreds of underprivileged children in the Amherst 
area. It is the season of Christmas parties with 
gayly lighted Christmas trees, colorfully wrapped 
gifts and a "good old" Saint Nick in every fra- 
ternity. 

The children are brought to fraternity houses 
where they are greeted by the festive Greeks. 
Santa arrives with a myriad of gifts from pick- 
up-sticks and mechanical robots to fire engines 
and dolls. The tots plow through mounds of ice 
cream and cookies while enjoying their favorite 
cartoons, and finally leave with their arms 
stuffed with gifts and their hearts filled with 
laughter. 




254 




Ken Wolfe joins sorority members in entertaining their small-fry guests. 




255 




Theme Party Night 



»» 




kJORORlTY theme parties represent a de- 
cisive point in feminine Greek circles. At the 
theme party, sisters and likely pledges gather at 
the close of rushing period for a final fun fling 
before bids are offered. 

Themes are demanding on all involved since 
costuming is generally elaborate, and those rooms 
of the house to be used by the group are fully 
decorated to conform to the theme. 




SDT's Arabian Nights delves into passionate legends. 




256 



Magic Transforms Houses 



o, 



/**L'- " •^l'^.-o- 



'NCE a successful theme is hit upon, the 
house managing the production stays with it. 
SDT's Arabian Nights has become an annual 
affair, drawing on the exotic tales of Araby as a 
background suggesting the searing passion of the 
sand. 

In a brief two years on campus, Sigma Sigma 
Sigma has established its theme upon Robert 
Lewis Carroll's Alice In Wonderland complete 
with Mad Hatters, Magic Mushrooms and 
Queens. 







ri Sig's Alice in Wonderland fantasy marks a high, 

V 





257 



Fraternity Presidents Adopt Code For 




First Row: M. Paris, J. Kallstrom, A. Rand. Second Row: S. 
Wexler, Secretary; J. Kudsk, B. Bonniver, Treasurer; S. Gray, 
President; K. Robbins, Vice president; J. Bradley, W. Goebel, 



Vice president; J. Kramer. Third Row: M. Connors, K. Palm, 
B. Rodriguez, B. Henry, R. Repetta, J. Burke, D. Garber. 



A 



seven-point Fraternity Code developed by the 
Fraternity Presidents came into being as a means "to 
establish worthwhile goals, and to strengthen the fra- 
ternity ideal." 

The code was adopted after a poll of fraternity 
members that sought to determine those points con- 
sidered by Greeks to be of use in strengthening the 
system. 

Fraternity Presidents gathered the information and 
formulated the seven points that were in turn ac- 
cepted by all the houses. 

Fraternities pledged themselves to greater coop- 
eration among the several houses, thus inhibiting de- 
visive actions without lessening competition among the 
houses. 

As "an institution dedicated to the pursuit of higher 
learning," the Greeks also determined to create "an 
atmosphere conducive to academic excellence." For 
some time the fraternity system has been underfire for 
a purported lack of intellectual interest. 

Another point called for the expansion of the pres- 



ent scope of social activities to include "a more active 
part in University sponsored events and local commu- 
nity projects." Greeks also pledged a diversity of "so- 
cial opportunities" to benefit members in future. 

Recognition of leadership potential among mem- 
bers was urged to encourage lifelong responsibility in 
members. 

Greeks also agreed to "promote interaction between 
fraternities and all other members of the University 
community." 

They further urged the "importance of the develop- 
ment of scholarship and character and the promotion 
of a sense of brotherhood toward all men." 

They also pledged "through greater participation and 
dedication" to "combat the evils of apathy and neg- 
ligence so prevalent in all formal organizations." 

The code was accepted early in the second semester 
as a guide line for Greek purposes. The code was dis- 
tributed to all members by the Inter Fraternity Coun- 
cil. 



258 



These Results, Among Others . . . 




The social task of the fraternity system depends upon cooperation and responsibility among the members. 




259 



So That Greek's Life Isn't Grim 




260 



Senate Falters, Takes Hold 




OK's Subsidy 
For Buses 
ToN.Y.C 



Organizations 



Compensation 
Bill Is Taken 
Under Study 

VV ORDS by Senate 
President Jon Fife at the 
first Senate meeting of the 
second semester apparently 
were effective. 

For, based on first se- 
mester observations, the 
Student Senate resembled 
early-c e n t u r y Tammany 
HaU. 

But student opinion 
prompted Senators to take 
stock, and President Fife 
called upon the Senate to 
broaden its scope for great- 
er effectiveness. 

The legislators subse- 
quently approved subsidiz- 
ing buses to take students 
to UMass' College Bowl 
matches in New York. 

The Senate also agreed 
to study compensation for 
extra curricular activities. 




Sens. James Watson and Marilyn Singer (fore- 
ground) whose walkout precipitated spree of 
resignations. 



VVhEN the Conflict of Interest bill 
authored by Senators McNamara and 
Mathieson was set to be voted on by the 
Senate, all appeared serene — tiO parlia- 
mentary juggling began. 

The bill, vigorously opposed by Sena- 
tors Singer and Watson as chairmen re- 
spectively of Women's and Men's Affairs, 
seemed unable to gather votes for enact- 
ment. 

The co-authors then moved for recon- 
sideration, attempting to table the bill and 
save it from certain defeat. 

At this point Watson and Singer rose 
to leave, thus ending the quorum. Senate 
President Fife ordered them to their seats. 
They failed to comply. 

By this time, the entire campus was 
aware of Senate doings, if not well in- 
formed. Letters poured into the Collegian 
and WMUA decided to broadcast Senate 
deliberations live for the first time in 
three years. Thus the stage was set for 
the next play. 



Parliamentary Gambits 
Cause Floor Fireworks 




Sens. McNamara and Mathieson rise on points 
of order following Singer's apology. 



262 




Senate Treasurer Ross Jones declares his resignation to gain the floor to comment on Singer's apology. A subsequent 
censure motion against Jones failed. 



T 

X HE next weekly meeting of the Sen- 
ate was slated to bring an apology from 
Watson and Singer and final action on the 
conflict bill. 

The apology read by Senator Singer 
was immediately objected to by Mathie- 
son, who resigned his Services chairman- 
ship. Jones then rose to deliver his resig- 
nation as Treasurer. Singer then moved 
to censure herself. 

Censure motions became the topic of 
discussion, and Senate Treasurer Ross" 
Jones became the target. 

Jones was charged with "using his res- 
ignation as a ruse to gain possession of 
the floor." The executive council had re- 
jected Jones' resignation. 

The vote came on. Three ballots were 
called for before a definite vote could be 
tallied. In the end, the censure motion 
failed to carry and Jones returned to his 
position. 

Collegian editorials and student letters 
reflected harsh campus feelings against 
the Senate in general. But the early erup- 
tion tended to recede. 




Censure motion against Jones took three ballots, 
finally did not pass. 



263 





Marilyn Singer and Women's Affairs Commit- 
tee check the accuracy of campus regulations. 



Ross Jones ponders problems of finance with his committee. 



The Men's Affairs committee headed by Jim Watson draws up its annual report. 





Senate Work Carried 
Carried On 
In Committees 

W ORKHORSE of the Student Sen- 
ate is the committee system modeled on 
that of the United States Senate. 

New bills are introduced to the nine 
standing committees after "a first reading 
on the floor. Following study, the bills are 
reported out for normal legislative pro- 
cedure. 

Standing committees include finance, 
men's affairs, women's affairs, budgets, 
elections, activities, services, academic 
affairs, and public relations. 




Phil Howard with the Activities Committee listens to sugges- 
tions about campus problems. 



265 



\r- 










President Jon Fife 



Vice President Joan Labuzoski 



Secretary Wendy Hall 



Treasurer Ross Jones 




Class of '67 Explodes 
in Size, Efficiency 
and Enthusiasm 

y y HEN the Class of '67 entered the University this 
fall, records of all kinds were broken. 

Besides being the largest class ever enrolled at 
UMass, the freshmen had the distinct honor of wearing 
their beanies longer than any previous class. Despite 
the energy loss because of this beanie toting, the class 
bounced back with traditional Freshman spirit in a furi- 
ous election campaign of class officers. 

With Dave Cummings as their president and an en- 
thusiastic executive council, the Class of 1967 organ- 
ized the Christmas Carol Sing, constructed the Tob- 
boggan Run, which was one of the highlights of the 
Winter Carnival festivities, and celebrated their first 
year of growing with the University at the annual 
Freshman picnic. 




David Cummings, President; Donald Hawkes, Vice Pres- 
ident; Kathy Sciscento, Secretary; Kathy Yukna, Treas- 
urer. 




First Row: D. Richardson, I. Saval, J. Lavoie. B. Capriole, S. 
Hayes, J. McDevitt, S. Lovins, H. Cassoli, B. Taska, A. Yaka- 
vonis, J. Guarino, J. Hynes, M. O'Connell. Second Row: J. 
Garrity, P. Meehan, B. Dadoly, K. Yukna, Treasurer; D. Cum- 
mings, President; D. Hawkes, Vice President; K. Sciscento, 



Secretary; J. Kelley, J. Hermsdorf, P. McAteer. Third Row: 
Mr. Doolan, Advisor; R. Leavitt, D. Migliaccio, H. MacCaugh- 
ey, J. Wilkey, A. Tweedie, J. Mullin, A. Perry, M. Venti. 
Missing: C. Hatch, B. Newman, R. O'Brien. R. Qualey, H. 
Rosenfield. 



267 




First Row: S. O'Hara, K. Patten, A. Russo, K. Hamilton. S. 
Burlin, J. Prue, M. Jordan, K. Watson, P. Farrell, M. Perley, K. 
Galloway. Second Row: B. Esielioni, C. Spezeski. L. Butts. M. 
Brady. S. Swanson. C. Atwood, J. Curns, D. Logue. M. Yancy, 



P. Barry. Third Row: S. DiMatteo, A. Nordberg, S. Blackmore, 
R. Steliga. J. Parnell, B. Dallas, M. Brogan. H. Raid, B. 
Sillman, A. Wolfson. 




Sophomore Class Travels 
Through Activities 

/\cCORDING to tradition, the Class of 1966 set- 
tled down to the serious business accompanying the 
appelation "sophomore" after a light-hearted year as 
freshmen. Early in the year, the sophomores honored 
the incoming freshmen at a post-football game picnic. 
Then there was the night they brought Las Vegas to the 
UMass campus. 

Under the direction of Bernie Dallas and his gam- 
bling class officers and Executive Council, the Ballroom 
was turned into a genuine casino with all the trimmings. 
The UMass community enjoyed an unforgettable eve- 
ning at the gambling tables. 

Next on the Sophomore's busy schedule was the 
Soph Banquet, which this year traveled back through 
the ages to be presented as a "Roman Affair." Now the 
Class of '66 can look forward to two more years of 
growing with the University. 



Top to Bottom: President Bernie Dal- 
las, Treasurer Carol Atwood. Secre- 
tary Sue Swanson, Vice President 
John Parnell. 



268 



Juniors Produce 
Snowless Winter Carni 

I VF.SPITE the lack of cooperation from Old Man 
Winter, the Junior Class managed to present its version 
of the 1964 Winter Carnival "All the World's a Stage" 
in true University tradition commemorating Shake- 
speare's tetracential. 

Although the annual snow sculpture, one of the most 
popular events, which attracts thousands of visitors to 
campus, had to be cancelled because of lack of snow, 
the class officers' and the Executive Council's planning 
was not in vain. They were well rewarded by a well 
attended fashion show, the dreamy dancing to the mu- 
sic of Lester Lanin at the Carnival Ball, and the fun 
filled evening listening to the New Christie Minstrels 
Concert. 

The spirited energy which pervaded all their under- 
takings is expected to serve the class well when they 
take over the reins of the senior class next year. 




President Bob O'Leary, Secretary Penny Kone, Treasurer Ann 
Williams, Vice President Dave Podbros. 




First Row: P. Witovsky, A. Posner, P. Chace, S. Lydon, M. 
White, A. Richards, M. Gates, S. Howe, S. Gluckman, D. 
Stoklosa, A. Baltren. Second Row: M. Sullivan, S. Rybak, C. 



Jandris, D. Podbros, B. O'Leary, A. Williams, S. Kone, P. 
Danisinka, A. Pinciss. Third Row: P. Reed, D. Healy, D. Klein. 
C. Kessler, B, Landis, B. McDonnell. 



269 




W. Houk, L. Charest, Chief Justice B. Albro, J. Bradley, S. Hinkle, A. LaBrie. 



K. Meehan, L. Fisher. Chief Justice 
J. Reimer, M. Walters, M. Smith. 




270 




Judiciaries Serve As Highest 

Courts On Campus 

V-J NDER the Constitution of the Student Senate, a General Court is provided 
for. The Court is divided into the Men's Judiciary and the Women's Judiciary. The 
purpose of the Judiciaries is to determine the constitutionality of any bills adopted 
by the Student Senate if a complaint is made by more than ten undergraduates. 
They also hear cases of individuals referred to them by the dormitories and impose 
suitable penalties. If any student refuses to appear, he is held in contempt of court 
and is dealt with appropriately. 

The Men's Judiciary is made up of three seniors, three juniors and one sopho- 
more while the Women's Judiciary consists of two seniors, two juniors and one 
sophomore. Members of Women's Judiciary are elected by a general vote of all the 
women on campus. Justices of Men's Judiciary are selected by the present justices 
and an equal number of male senators. 

Two Area Judiciaries work in conjunction with Men's Judiciary as associate 
justices who preside over minor offenses. 




271 




Area II: R. Martin, R. Jacobs, R. Johnson, D. Warren, R. Steinberg. R. Rerra, M. Chambers. 



Area Judiciaries Supplement General Court 




Area I: J. Reed, D. Soble, T. Kelleher, P. Dexter, R. Spinney, F. Chlapowski. 



272 



Dorm Residents Secure Increased Representation 
Through Interdorm Council 



1963-64 sees Women's 
Interdorm Council closer to 
their goal of bringing the 
women's dorms and their 
residents to their rightful 
place on campus through 
wider representation in 
campus activities. 

For the first time, the 
Council, consisting of two 
elected representatives from 
each of the women's dorms, 
had a voice in such 
functions as Campus Chest, 
John F. Kennedy Memor- 
ial, SWAP, Women's 
Affairs, Student Social Ac- 
tivities Committee and Ca- 
reer Day. 

Each year, the Council 
presents a plaque to one of 
the women's dorms on the 
basis of points accumulated 
through participation and 
performance in the Inter- 
dorm Sing, Float Parade, 
WAA competition and 
scholastic rating. Due to 
weather conditions, the 
Winter Carnival snow sculp- 
tures did not enter into the 
competition this year. 

A special project under- 
taken by the Council was 
the revision of the Univer- 
sity etiquette booklet, 
"Cues," which is to be dis- 
tributed next year. Through 
their candy sale, they do- 
nated $80 to U.N. Week 
and later in the year, a con- 
tribution was made to 
Campus Chest from their 
treasury 




First Row; Secretary S. Perreault. President R. Feinberg, Vice President E. Barker, Treasurer 
M. Zich. Second Row: J. Lodico, K. McGrath, M. Gustin. J. Sharp, R. Flaschner. V. Guarda, 
D. Huebel. Third Row: M. Atwater, B. Shelley, P. Albano, F. Kopcinski, C. Kozlowski. Fourth 
Row: P. Escot, M. Farrell, G. Drummond, C. Walsh, M. Bishop, C. McLaughlin. Missing: J. 
DeSantos, N. Cockrell, E. Rosoff, N. Roulston. 



273 



/ 



\ 



''m' 



^ «?x 



S\MlilL KOIIOVITZ IS ELSTON ALMOND DAY '{•) CARROLL hnWVPD ' 

■■'iVTONDCHAMDERLIN II. THOMAS WHltlY 0E.SMOND I") JOHN I^PR^R (,; 

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First Row: Secretary D. Truesdell. President D. Clancy, Treasurer M. Smith. 
Brauer, adviser Evan V. Johnston, Missing J. Medeiros. 



Second Row: J. Bradley, B. Albro, B. 



Adelphia Programs Benefit University 



Adelphians serve as escorts for Homecoming Queens: Judy 
Sturtevant with Bruce Albro: Sandy Pierce with Dave Clancy. 




A 



number of state-wide high schools 
that might have missed first hand infor- 
mation about the University benefited 
from the Adelphia slide program de- 
signed to acquaint high school students 
with UMass. 

Adelphians also continued in their usu- 
al committee roles with the Fine Arts 
Council, RSO, Calendar coordinating 
Board and the Student Union Governing 
Board. 

Freshman talks, Homecoming activi- 
ties, football rallies and dances also go 
under the Adelphian belt. 

SCOPE and High School Honors Day 
still remain as prime projects in the 
Adelphian commitment to scholastic 
achievement, as well as extra-curricular 
leadership. 

The Senior men's honor society is 
chosen from the ranks of outstanding jun- 
iors and seniors each Spring. 



274 



Mortarboard Serves Campus 



fjASED on the ideals of scholarship, leadership and 
service, Mortar Board at the University of Massachu- 
setts strives to provide outlets for the abOities of its 
members by active participation in worthwhile campus 
programs. 

At UMass this national senior women's honor soci- 
ety has certain projects which are undertaken each 
year. As an introduction to the University, Mortar 
Board publishes a booklet of helpful hints for the in- 
coming coeds, and in conjunction with Adelphia, its 
members give talks to all the freshman women on the 
topic, "A Chance for Maturity." In their monthly Col- 
legian editorial, "Mortar Board Speaks Out," the group 
investigated and discussed controversial campus issues. 



A major part of its work this year was involved in a 
study of the campus needs of foreign students which led 
to participation in weekly foreign student teas; en- 
couraged dormitories, fraternities, and sororities to in- 
vite foreign students as guests; and initiated a drive for 
bedspreads, curtains and various other student housing 
articles much needed by the foreign students. Mortar 
Board also investigated the possibilities of a "People-to- 
People" Program for the University. 

Through this challenging and rewarding program. 
Mortar Board attempts to strengthen the school and to 
give its members a sense of personal accomplishment of 
the group's goals. 




First Row: Treasurer, J. Rosenthal; President. B. Botelho; Vice 
President, P. Stankowitz; Secretary, N. Andrade. Second Row: 



J. Blum. M. Arnold, E. Stang, J. Knox, 
Needham, J. Clark. Missing: E. Leahy. 



L. Schecterle, E. 



275 



£ , ■ ! ' II' I f 

zn I ' ' i: 




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First Row: Treasurer, A. Nordberg; President, B. Ritchie; Sec- 
retary, T. McMahon. Second Row: D. Lewis, A. Labrie, K. 
Johnson, D. Aziz, A. Burne. Third Row: W. Greene, A. Souza, 
M. Manson. W. Gustavson, P. Breen. Fourth Row: D. Glaser, 



E. Rushbrook, D. Gothage, B. Gaughan. Missing: D. Meeker, 
Vice President, R. Piken; T. Edwards, P. Skerry, P. Cutts, O. 
Fredrickson, A. Sarno, G. Smith. 



A. 



Key's Make First Impression On Visitors 



_S sophomore men's honorary service organiza- 
tion on campus, the Maroon Key consists of twenty-five 
men selected from the freshman class for their potential 
leadership qualities as well as spirit shown in their first 
year at the University. 

During freshman week, the Keys work with the 
Scrolls in freshman orientation, welcoming the Frosh to 
campus and infecting them with some of the enthusiasm 
for which the keys are noted. 

Visiting athletic teams get their first impression of 
UMass from the Maroon Keys, when they act as hosts 
for the Redmen's competition at all home games. In 
this capacity the Keys are responsible for making a 
visitor's first impression a good one. 

Also, these sophomores stand ready to act on all 
occasions when their services are necessary, and to 
work in all areas of campus life willingly and atten- 
tively. 



Building bonfires, participation in rallies, and spon- 
soring dances are typical Key activities. This year the 
group presented $250 in scholarships at Student Lead- 
ers Night, was responsible for the publicity of the Soph- 
omore Banquet and, as its contribution to the Campus 
Chest drive, collected donations from the local mer- 
chants. 

Not content with these diverse activities, the Keys 
managed to finish up all the old business of the previ- 
ous year, usher for various D.V.P. functions, and do- 
nate blood for the use of any needy UMass student at 
Cooley-Dickson Hospital. 

Through continued service to the University, the Ma- 
roon Keys fulfill their purpose of recognizing men of 
leadership and scholarship and providing an outlet 
through which sophomore men can use and develop 
their potential. 



276 



Scrolls Work for a 



Close-Knit Campus Community 



c 



^OMMUTERS have found themselves a more inte- 
gral part of the University through the efforts of the 
Scrolls, the sophomore women's honorary society, after 
the usual Big-Little Sister program was enlarged to 
encompass the commuting element of the University 
campus. Last April saw the tapping of Susan and Sarah 
Eustace, the first commuters to become Scrolls in the 
organization's 19 year history. 

Helping the freshmen to adjust to their new environ- 
ment is one of the Scroll's main objectives. A represent- 
ative spoke to the Class of '67 at their orientation 
program followed by the sale of beanies in conjunction 



with the Maroon Keys upon the freshmen's arrival at 
their respective dorms. The Soph-Frosh picnic found 
Scrolls serving food and mixing with the Frosh to en- 
courage class spirit. 

Within the sophomore class, their sales ability was 
proven. In December, a Scroll cookie sale was held in 
the Union, the proceeds to benefit a student they desig- 
nated to receive a scholarship. Tickets to the Romanus 
Dies Festus, the sophomore banquet, were sold in the 
dorms as a part of their service campaign. 

The Scrolls assisted at Distinguished Visitor's Pro- 
grams in the capacity of ushers. 




First Row: P. Siebert, Vice President L. Arnold, President S. 
Belanger, Secretary D. Wye, Treasurer S. Kerr, S. Stowell. 
Second Row: S. Eustace, S. Eustace, M. Brockway, S. Scanlon, 
M. Ricketts, B. Veneri, K. Patitz, L. Peterson. Third Row: A. 



Schwalenstocker, S. West, A. Russo, E. Garvey, S. Glesman, L. 
Johnson, S. Schmahz, M. Heap. Fourth Row: E. Howe, J. 
Crooker, M. Smith, S. Heine, B. Ford, S. Minich, K. Klinias. 
Missing: C. Woodcock. 



277 




Revelers Goad 



Campus Spirit 



rjRlGHT red and white striped jackets, an abun- 
dance of energy and enthusiasm, and a willingness to 
work characterize the Revelers, the only UMass honor- 
ary society composed of men and women from all clas- 
ses. 

Throughout the football season. Revelers roused stu- 
dents out of dorms, distributed UMass song sheets, and 
at halftime performances, they filled in the formations 
and held props for the marching band routines. 

Fun and scholarships were provided by a Friday 
night Hootenanny; and as their working contribution to 
the Campus Chest, Revelers were responsible for the 
Miss Campus Chest Contest. 

After last year's off-campus production. Campus Va- 
rieties returned to Bowker's stage. As one of Reveler's 
biggest projects, the May show was the result of a 
valiant cooperative effort. 



Ron Eaton and Ron Reynolds hoot. 




First Row: W. Najem, W. Martin, J. Norton, P. Bourbonnais. 
A. Forman, R. McDonald. Second Row: N. Downing, A. Wil- 
liams, S. Kangas, L. Wordsdell, B. Brent, J. Zenis, L. Goldman. 



J. Stevens, H. Feingold. Third Row: D. Burlin, B. Zaleski, L. 
Charest, M. Smith, D. Welsh, D. Logue. Missing: M. Walter, L. 
Swenson, D. Leith, M. Paris. 



278 



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First Row: .1. Goodrich. E. Skea, C. Inacio, D. Greenstein, R. 
Morgan. Recording Secretary, J. Kucharski; Vice President. M. 
Rosenburg; P. Doran. Second Row: C. Hadley. R. Coffin. D. 
Mitchell, E. Lemieux, M. Cheren. J. Kooyoomjian, D. Haracz. 
D. Daggett, D. Dwyer. E. Pelletier. Third Row: President. R. 
Strecker; L. Johnson, D. Kawash, B. Johnson, A. Tuttle. D. 



Lily. F. Smith, P. Nowill, Corresponding Secretary, A. Daniels. 
Fourth Row: B. Landis. J. Chilos, D. Haynes, D. Sterling. I. 
Summerset, A. Howard, Treasurer, R. O'Brien. Fifth Row: L. 
Norton. R. Jones. D. Mathieson. D. Malloy. D. Spinner, G. 
Cusson. J. Francisco. B. Peters, D. Myshrall, B. Barclay. 



K 



APO Aids Art Fund 



.APPA Omicron, the UMass chapter of Alpha 
Phi Omega, the National Men's Service Fraternity, 
completed a year marked by projects valuable to the 
campus at large. 

Beginning the year in fine style, A. P.O. presented a 
profitable Registration Dance that provided funds for 
scholarships and loans. Their non-profit Book Ex- 
change at the start of each semester held in conjunction 
with Gamma Sigma Sigma is a valuable service to the 
students. For insessorial members of the student body, 
A. P.O. had two concrete benches added to the south 
side of the Union terrace. 

Much diligent work went into the production of 
Critique, an evaluation of professors and courses co- 
sponsored by Gamma Sigma Sigma. 

The Dave Brubeck Concert during Homecoming 
Weekend presented by A. P.O. served to raise money 
for the Art Acquisition Fund, which purchases works 
of art for the University. 

Through the efforts of its members and the support 
of the student population, A. P.O. continues to serve the 
UMass community. 




President John W. Lederle and Walter Kamys accept APO 
check from APO representatives Bob Johnson and Dick Streck- 
er for Art Acquisition Fund. 



279 




First Row: S. Williams, F. Crossley. D. Cavelier, B. Walsh, 
S. Rikkola, N. Eyler. Second Row: H. Synns, M. Culverhouse, 
S. Haselton, G. Soid, President J. Sargent, S. FitzGerald, J. 
Hanke, R. Ames. Third Row: J. Boucher. B. Hurlick, P. Tor- 



rence, N. North, M. Reed, A. Lanza, C. Amiot. J. Snyder, M. 
Dearden. Fourth Row: P. Vonlderstein, G. Ferreira, J. Stock, 
L. Carlson, J. Forbes, K. Young, M. Fernino. Fifth Row: C. 
Merhar, D. Chapin, J. Beauchesne, P. Reiser, G. Blum. 



GSS Supports African School Project 



u 



' NDER the guidance of Dean Purvis of the School of Education, Gamma 
Sigma Sigma has undertaken a special two-year project to help in raising the 
educational standards of a girls' school in Uganda. 

Established at the University in June, 1963, campus chapter, Alpha Theta, 
began as the Women's Service Organization in the Spring of 1961, with the ideals 
of friendship, service and equality. 

Open to all University women interested in service, the organization offers 
campus benefits through such projects as a Book Exchange at the start of each 
semester. United Nations Week and the sale of boutonnieres for H.E.R. Weekend 
dance. Many projects on campus are co-sponsored with A. P.O. 

On the social side, the organization holds mixed functions with A. P.O. and has 
an Annual Banquet in the Spring. 



280 



Collegian Joins Ranks Of Forceful Newspapers 




Tv 



wo characteristics of this year's Col- 
legian proved to be stick-to-itivity, and 
follow-through — important characteris- 
tics of worthwhile journalism. 

Collegian reporters grubbed deeply 
through the surface of the news to come 
up with the story of the loss of Japanese 
architect Minora Yamasaki as designer 
for the proposed fine arts building. Colle- 
gian reports bluntly indicated that the 
blame could be shouldered by the State 
House. 

Perhaps the most impressive single 
effort on the part of the campus journal- 
ists was the extra edition published at the 
assassination of President Kennedy. The 
Friday edition was being distributed when 
word of the tragedy flashed through the 
Student Union. 

The printer was alerted to prepare for 
an extra, and the base of operations was 
shifted to WMUA's studios where press 
service wires were available. The extra 
was complete to the capture of the assas- 
sin. 

Striving to improve communications 
between faculty and student body, the ed- 
itors initiated free distribution of the 
paper to faculty members. The faculty re- 
sponded by allowing a reporter to attend 
a Faculty Senate meeting. 

Mounting its crusading charger, the 
newspaper galloped full tilt into the arena 
of extra curricular compensation for the 
oflacers of WMUA, Index and the Colle- 
gian. 



Editor-in-Chief Jeffrey S. Davidow. 



281 



Crusade Draws Readers' Eyes 




(Students reacted swiftly to the front page 
newstories citing the pros and cons of compensa- 
tion, and the editorials calling for a Senate feasi- 
bility study. 

Letters to the editor followed shortly, some 
charging irresponsibility on the part of the Colle- 
gian for espousing the move. Nevertheless, the 
Senate voted to study the proposal. 

By the end of the year the Collegian had estab- 
lished a straight shooting news and editorial pol- 
icy. 




Elwin McNamara, News Editor, checks layout dummies. 



Police reporter Terry Stock demonstrates abilities of dis- 
taff journalist. 



282 




Editorial Editor John Childs. 



Makeup Editor Scott Freeland. 



Feature Editor Dave Axelrod. 



^ 




Business Manager Corky Brickman. 



Advertising Manager Teddy Weinberg. 



Sports Editor Marshall Karol. 



283 




Editor of the Senior Section Jane Arnold presents a problem to editor-in-chief 
Joe Bradley while Maaja Sildoja and Nancy Lewis select pictures to be 
submitted for the January deadline. 




More Color, 
More Pages 
In '64 Index 




Curt Cowley, photography editor, helps Ann Posner choose 
photos for the Student Life section. 



Managing Editor, Susanna Rybak 
takes break from typing to flirt with 
Editor. 



284 



L, 



/IKE preferred stock the 1964 Index should 
become more valuable as the years roll on. 

By committing scenes, events and personages to 
ink and paper, the yearbook attempts to capture 
the color and flavor of the 1963-64 academic year. 
When the Index is filed on dusty shelves it should 
not have ceased to be functional, for when it is 
removed from those shelves in years to come its 
function will be renewed. 

Toward this end, the re-living of this year, the 
thousands of words and photographs will become 
a living entity in themselves, and through the 
printed matter the year will live again. The stu- 
dents who produced this book bring their individ- 
ual craftsmanship and creativeness into this pro- 
duction with these purposes in mind. 

Thus the Index, in the mellowing years to come, 
will find its greatest appreciation. 





Associate Editor Ann Miller goes over layouts for the Aca- 
demic Life with the section's editor, Bev Lange. 




Preparing the budget, Business Manager Manny Smith, totals 
the past year's expenses. 



The staff cuts up a little during a break in their weekly 
Wednesday night editorial meeting. 



285 



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% 




Bobbie Farrell, Greek Editor, finds 
the final deadline creeping up on her 
all too quickly. 




Bob McAlear checks sports' layout needed for 
basketball copy and photos. 




Although participating in the 
student exchange program at 
the University of New Mexico, 
Anne Baltren spent her first se- 
mester as Student Life Editor. 





Sue Klein and Organization Editor Joyce Blum prepare A.P.O. 

page for submission. 



Photography staff provides the backbone of the yearbook. 
Seated: Wally Handy. Standing: Dick Littlefield, Ed Imber, 
Ray Cryan, Dan Crasco, John Lawrence, Craig Musselman. 



286 



WMUA Installs $10,000 In New Equipment 




Educational programming, as well as , 




w, 



ITH almost $10,000 in- 
vested in new equipment, 
WMUA launched its bid to rank 
with professional radio stations 
while maintaining its non-com- 
mercial, educational, student-op- 
erated personality. 

Buckling down to a 96-hour 
week of educational and enter- 
taining programming, the station 
acquired three Gates turntables, 
an Ampex recorder and a Collins 
control board. 

Sounds emanating from this 
equipment were pushed through 
the new Collins transmitter, to be 
received as far north as Benning- 
ton, Vt. and over to Westover 
Air Force Base where Friday 
night's Crazy Rhythms request 
show garnered a large audience. 
Going along with the power 
boost in transmission, is a pro- 
posed WMUA plan to mount the 
transmitter atop one of the new 
seven story dormitories being 
completed on the hilly northeast 
corner of campus. 

The move is expected to boost 
transmission radius 15-20 miles. 



instruction for student broadcasters . 



287 



Beefed Up Programming 
Includes Public Service 




Ne 



(EW this year to the pro- 
gramming log, is Interaction in 
which a member of the adminis- 
tration and a student discuss 
questions phoned in by listeners. 

Folkmusic received recogni- 
tion to the extent of the three- 
hour Standing Room Only pro- 
gram. 

'MUA introduced its own pop- 
ular record list by determining 
the top 30 songs among students. 

At the time of the assassina- 
tion of President Kennedy, the 
station went on the air as soon as 
word was received to relate the 
tragedy as it unfolded. 

A month earlier WMUA had 
broadcast the President's re- 
marks at Amherst College's Rob- 
ert Frost Memorial Library 
groundbreaking ceremonies. 

Important Student Senate 
meetings also received radio cov- 
erage that heightened the impact 
of the debates through broadcast- 
ing's immediacy. 

Arranging a hookup with a 
Springfield television station al- 
lowed WMUA to carry all five 
programs of the College Bowl 
matches featuring UMass. 




requires the dexterity of a gymnast , 




finds Business Manager Barbara Paradise. 



Station Manager Jim O'Hearn. 





Publicity Director Georgia Nason. Education Block Director Pam Leger. Classical Music Director Langdon Lombard. 

Technical Director Norm Precourt. Program Director Ron Engel. 





Yahoo Gains 
National Kudos 



o. 



'FFERING relief from 
academic pressure, Yahoo, the 
campus humor magazine, enter- 
tains its readers with light read- 
ing and cartoons. Material con- 
tributed by the students appears 
tri-annually satirizing various as- 
pects of campus life. 

Now in its tenth year of publi- 
cation, Yahoo prints over 7000 
copies per issue. This year it has 
become a copyrighted publica- 
tion registered with the Washing- 
ton Bureau of Copyrights, and 
has started including contribu- 
tions from across the country, a 
direct result of its appearance in 
Writer's Digest, a national publi- 
cation. 

Another big step for Yahoo 
has been the sale of material by 
staff members to national com- 
mercial magazines, including Cav- 
alier. 

The name Yahoo, over which 
there has been much confusion, 
originally began with an obnox- 
ious and symbolic creature cre- 
ated by Jonathan Swift. Thus it is 
very appropriate for this compos- 
ite of humorous stories and 
laughter provoking parodies of 
campus life. 



Mud Slinging: Jim Clark, Cookie, Ann Baxter, Harold Gushue, Abe Spencer, 
Marty Mould, Mike Berrini. Burried: Dave Axelrod. Editor; Sandy Graham, Al 
Scheinman, Oleh Pawluk, Vic Aronow, Irish Flynn, Roger Jones. 



290 




David Axelrod, Jane MacFate, Maida Hurwitz, Editor-in-chief Deidre Haley, Lone Ishoi, Gerald Goldman, Susan Tracey. 

Magazine's Activity Belies Name 



REQUIEM 

By David Axelrod 

And we shall build a monument 

To honor our war dead; 

Piling stone on stone, 

Cement and one strong figure, 

Armed, atop the inscribed pedestal. 

And date it; and flower it 

Once each year; 

And let the pigeons roost. 

So all who pass can say . . . nothing. 

Just pass and never notice. 



c 



AESURA technically means "stop or pause," but 
it far from labels the work of this year's Caesura. In- 
stead, the word "work" started being used when the '63 
staff stepped in changing the old name "Literary Maga- 
zine," enlivening the cover, and tightening the organiza- 
tion. 

The Senate appropriated additional funds when the 
campaign to refresh Caesura produced budget worries. 
The Senate added 500 copies and okayed the budget 
increase. 

The '63-'64 staff carried on the new tradition with an 
avant-garde Pop Art sculpture on the commencement 
issue's cover. This year's Caesura carried through 
campus wide publicity campaigns and a series of 
coffee hours. 

The effort made the magazine a loud, clear voice on 
campus. Winter's issue set a record for student material 
submitted — over 200 poems and 30 stories. 



291 




D. Sullivan, Managing editor; R. DeWallace, Executive editor; O. O'Neill, Treasurer; and A. Taylor, Features editor. 



I 



New Innovations 
Pave Way For 
Improved 
Engineering Journal 



N the seventh year of publication, the Engineering 
Journal is the only University publication that comes 
close to self-support. With the added incentives of its 
new air-conditioned office and several pieces of new 
equipment, the four issue-a-year Journal has increased 
its number of pages with the help of the staff and the 
approval of the engineering department. 

This year has seen firsts in many new areas of cover- 
age. In addition to regular articles on scientific develop- 
ments in the engineering fields, a student innovation 
section, featuring ideas and inventions of UMass engi- 
neers, has been started. The initiation of a critique of 
Engineering School classes, curriculum and teachers, 
and the use of multi-color printing supplement the well- 
established features which include personal profiles of 
outstanding alumni and a Journal Queen in every issue. 

The forward looking Engineering Journal hopes for 
further growth in circulation and coverage in years to 
come. 



292 



Nc 



(O matter what a student's problem may be, whether 
it concerns a necessary class average for staying in 
school or procedures on student marriages, the place to 
find the answer is the Handbook. If the exact informa- 
tion is not available, the staff, under the direction of 
John Burke, has compiled enough facts concerning 
rules, regulations, and activities to at least direct the 
student to the right office or service to get the answer. 

The experienced staff has not maintained status quo 
but has added many improvements. Through their dili- 
gent efforts, the staff has added diverse bits of informa- 
tion on lost and found belongings, scholastic warnings 
and probation, and Housing Office. 

With its efficient cataloging of the myriad facets of 
campus life, this directory is indispensible to incoming 
freshmen, upperclassmen, and faculty. 



Streamlined, Improved 

Handbook Serves 

Campus Needs 




Peter Graham, Anne Baltren, John Burke, Chairman, Harry Jilson. 



293 




Eight- Concert 
Program Cost 

Nearly $20,000 



Seated: Chris Olsen, Joan Schoppe, Joann Miller. Standing: Don Crasco, 
Langdon Lombard, Concert Manager; Don Hayes, Steve Bowman. Missing: 
Joyce Blum, Bill Price. 



kJUPPORTED by student tax and under the control 
of a student executive board, the UMass Concert Asso- 
ciation has an obligation to the students to provide 
them with the finest musical offerings. A budget of 
$20,000 is appropriated annually through the Senate 
and RSO to be used for eight concerts. 

This program is formulated a year in advance. First 
the Concert Association selects artists they feel that the 
students would enjoy. Then the Executive Board checks 
the dates and prices of each group arriving at a tenta- 
tive schedule. Next the program with definite dates is 
sent for approval by the Fine Arts Council and the 
Senate. The final arrangements are then made with the 
artists and the calendar oflice. 

The results of these efforts produced the 1963-64 
program, with such diversification as an opera, a full- 
scale ballet, dual pianists, a symphony orchestra, a 
string quartet, a brass quintet (the only such group in 
the world), and a chamber music quartet. 



Tosca star signs autographs after Concert Asso- 
ciation performance. 



294 





The Netherlands String Quar- 
tet, an internationally famous 
chamber music group, per- 
formed at the University in its 
first concert tour in the United 
States since 1958. 



Despite the make-shift facilities 
in the Cage, the Robert Joffrey 
Ballet presented a colorful pro- 
gram from classical and con- 
temporary works. 




Chorale's Band Led By New Director 



w,- 



ITH a new director this year, Dr. John Jensen, 
the University of Massachusetts Concert Band has 
worked up to a new level of quality. Approximately 
fifty musicians went on a four day tour of high schools 
and service clubs in Massachusetts during the January 
vacation. 

In a joint performance with Chorale, the Concert 
Band participated in the Fine Arts Festival on March 



21 in a Student Union concert. Among the various 
selections was "Memorial for Concert Band and 
Organ" an original work by Elliot Schwartz of the 
Music Department. 

By providing an outlet for the talents and energies of 
the UMass musicians, the Concert Band helps to fur- 
ther and develop musical ability and excellence. 



The practice sessions of the Concert Band are responsible for the melodious sounds issuing from Old Chapel. 




296 




The 65-voice Chorale provides beautiful music for the University campus. 



kJTRIVING for the performance and appreciation 
of fine choral music, the University of Massachusetts 
Chorale gives its members the opportunity to perform 
for various groups and functions. This year, it pre- 
sented a wide variety of sacred and secular music in- 
cluding works by Handel, Bartok, Brahms, Hindesmith, 
and many others. 

The first appearance of Chorale on campus was a 
joint performance with the Concert Band under the 
direction of John Jensen. In April, their annual spring 
tour enabled the group to demonstrate their talents to 
numerous high schools in Massachusetts. Still another 
opportunity for fine chorale entertainment was pro- 
vided by their spring concert. 

Under the leadership of Larry Lemmel, the group 
this year has expanded and improved to include sixty- 
five members who exhibit fine musical ability and a 
strong interest in promoting worthwhile choral music. 



Chorale's Repertoire 
Includes Sacred, 
Secular Selections 



297 




Musigals Swing Out 
For UMass 



D. 



'RESSED in their pink denim ensembles, the Musi- 
gals are lovely to look at as well as pleasing to the ear. 
Originally formed in 1961 for the personal satisfaction 
of its members, the group now has a real place in 
UMass musical circles. 

Thirteen girls form the nucleus of this hard working 
group. To achieve their melodious perfection each girl 
puts in at least four hours of weekly practice along with 
time for tryouts and special rehearsals. The results of 
this rigorous routine are seen in their performances at 
the inter-dorm sing. Winter Carnival, and Christmas 
festivities. 

Evidences of their success were exemplified when 
they placed second in the national intercollegiate sing at 
Lycoming College, Williamsport, Pa. 



At Winter Carnival, the Musigals gave a Saturday afternoon 
concert in the crisp open air. 




First Row: Nancy Thompson, i^at Carey, Debbie Lindbergh, 
Mae-Ellen Hayes, John Janik, Nathalie Chase, Ruth Kelley. 
Second Row: Donna Pratt, Linda Willis, Sandee Lepowe, 



Elaine Needham, Karen Jacobsen, 
Carol Shelasky. 



Marie Mirliani. Missing: 



298 




Larry Martin, Al Burne, Ray Kodzis, Gil McNeil, Dick Kir- 
shen, Denny Morrissey, Walt Mosher, Bill Martin, Musical 



Director; Bob Greenberg, Dick Lennon, John Gilbert. Missing: 
Jack Farrell, Business Manager; Carl Geller. 



Vocal Variety Keynote Of Statesman 




kJlNGING their way through a busy schedule of 
both on and off campus performances, the UMass 
Statesmen did much to promote the musical interests of 
UMass. This all male vocal group has been in existence 
since 1939 and has become part of the heritage and 
tradition of the University. 

Complete reorganization expanded the group from 
eight to twelve members. Their programs are presented 
at campus functions throughout the year — Homecom- 
ing, fraternity Christmas parties, Winter Carnival, the 
Sorority Sing and Declamation, to mention a few. Not 
content with these numerous engagements, the States- 
men also regularly sing at various area hospitals and at 
the Hotel Northampton. 

The money earned through these activities is used to 
pay their expenses, this year's largest outlay going to 
new sport coats. 

The Statesmen have worked to bring UMass a vari- 
ety of vocal entertainment in the form of ballads, spir- 
ituals, contemporary arrangements, and musical 
comedy. 

The Statesmen's own Denny Morrissey gives the Beatles 
some competition at UMass Winter Carni. 



299 




R. Morrill. Personnel Coordinator: D. Bachman, Business Manager; L. Reynolds, Technical 
Director; M. Forward, Production Manager; J. Jones, Publicity Manager; P. Bartsch, Musical 
Director. 



X 



operetta Guild's 
Campus Stars In 



HE Operetta Guild with the assistance of the Op- 
era Workshop excelled in its colorful rendition of 
Meredith Wilson's The Music Man. 

Jack Singer, alias "Professor" Harold Hill, portrayed 
the role of the swindling Pied Piper who spellbinds the 
folks of River City into organizing a brass band to save 
their youngsters from the demon Pool. Falling in love 
with suspicious Marion the Librarian (Peggy Jones), 
proved to be Hill's downfall as the professional con- 
man. 

Jane Abbiati, as Eulalie McKechnie Shinn, the wife 
of River City's mayor, stopped the show with her hilar- 
ious antics. Others in the large cast sang and danced the 
celebrated songs which made The Music Man the 
smash hit at UMass that it was on Broadway. 

A second production, The Boy Friend, challenged 
the talented UMass students to uphold the fine tradition 
of entertainment established by the Guild. 



300 



Wm 








The Music Man 






Mayor's wife (Jane Abbiati) gasps at her eccentric husband's (Dave Bachmann) 
talk. 



Devil-may-care band leader Harold 
Hill (Jack Singer) finds himself fall- 
ing for prim librarian, Marion Paroo 
(Peggy Jones). 

Rehearsing for their ballet production are the Mayor's wife (Jane Abbiati) and 
her girls (P. Andrew, N. Palmerino, P. Eskot, and A. Clinch). 




Roister Doister officers: Ann Miller, Director of Public Relations; Tom Kerrigan, President; Paula Norton, Vice President; 
Deena Ferrigno, Secretary; Sheila Ferrini, Business Manager. 

Roister Doisters Continue 5 2- Year Tradition 



A, 



.FTER two years void of independent theatre 
work, Roister Doisters, the University's 52 year-old 
student dramatic group, raised the curtain on an "Eve- 
ning of One Act Plays." 

The plays — Edward Albee's The American Dream, 
Tennessee Williams' Something Unspoken, and "Pyra- 
mus and Thisbe" from Shakespeare's Midsummer 
Night's Dream — were presented to the campus January 
31, and February 1, just after registration for second 
semester. 

Since Fall of 1962 Roister Doisters has been work- 
ing cooperatively with the University's academic thea- 
tre, a co-curricular organization under the department 
of speech. 

With the added experience, RD's determined to pro- 
duce something on their own. 

Casting was done before Christmas by director Mrs. 
George Forest of Northampton, and rehearsals were 
held intermittently up to finals. Meanwhile the produc- 
tion crew laid plans for sets, publicity, costuming, light- 
ing. But the overwhelming bulk of work was done 
through intersession. 




Tom Kerrigan as Quince (Prologue) in "Pyramus and Thisbe.' 



303 




Behind the scenes. 



John Urban as Wall stands between lovers Pyramus, played by Jim Wrynn, and Thisbe, 
played by Dave Axelrod. 




R.D.'s Stage Evening 



w. 



ITH a shoestring the hmit, much of the work to be done was revamp- 
ing of old costumes and set material. Props and scenery were kept to a 
minimum to save time and money. 

In charge of turning out the over two dozen costumes needed for the plays 
was junior Sandy Teguis. Most of the actual work here, as on everything else, 
was crammed into the few days preceding the production. 

Set and costume design was handled by part-time student Kathy Wrynn, 
who had done masks for University Theatre's Twin Menaechmi. 

Lighting on the three plays was designed by Deena Ferrigno and Sheila 
Ferrini. Lighting ran the gamut from the modern apartment interior set in the 
Albee play to the pink dream-like effect required in sections of "Pyramus and 
Thisbe." 

To help coordinate efforts, each of the plays had a student assistant direc- 
tor — Tom Kerrigan for the Williams' play, Pat Long for Albee, and Deena 
Ferrigno on Shakespeare. 



304 





^^=* 



ITn 




Jane Abbiati as Grandma and Deena Ferrigno as the clubwoman in The 
American Dream. 



of One- Act Plays 
T 

X HE three plays were chosen for their variety and because they are 
representative of a wide range of drama by outstanding playwrights. 

"Pyramus and Thisbe" is a hilarious composite of excerpts from one of the 
great bard's best comedies — a play within a play in which a group of illiterate 
peasants present ludicrous tragedy to nobility. 

Something Unspoken, by one of the nation's top playwrights, is a tense 
dialogue between two female characters, dramatizing the incommuniability 
between the two. 

The author of The American Dream came to critical acclaim with his 
Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf. His satirical one-acter is intended to typify 
an American family of the 1960's, a group of mechanical individuals lacking 
passion or depth. 

Indeed, characters in the play recall the baby ("bumble" they call it) that 
the family once had, but dismembered when it displeased them. 

Following the successful presentation, RD officers announced their plans 
for a similar production on the same dates next year. 

Ken Feinberg 

Daddy 

The American Dream 




305 




First Row: Dr. P. Norton, N. Stevens, Chairman, Dr. J. Harris; C. IVIerhar, J. Langland. Second Row: R. Jones, F. Laskie, J. 
Labuzoski, J. Mulcahy, H. Watts. 



Fine Arts Council Coordinates Cultural Activities 



H 



(EW on the University's calendar of events this year 
was a three-week Fine Arts Festival in March. Sponsor- 
ing agent was the University's Fine Arts Council. 

The Council, established by the Student Senate in 
1961, is an advisory committee to all fine arts activities 
appearing on campus and serves as liaison between the 
Senate and fine arts organizations. 

An equally important function of the Council is the 
planning and coordinating of general campus fine arts 
programs. 

Under this heading, the Council sponsored the 15 
program Festival. Among the presentations was a 
March 17 program of fine arts dedicated to President 



Kennedy. 

Also included was a program honoring the 400th 
anniversary of Shakespeare's birth, featuring noted 
Shakespearean scholar G. B. Harrison. 

Major fine arts organizations with which the Council 
deals are the Bands, Art Club, and Concert Associa- 
tion. However, a number of other organizations as well 
as academic departments sponsor fine arts activities 
under auspices of the Council. 

The 12-member committee is composed of an equal 
number of faculty and students, and has been chaired 
since its inception by Dr. John Harris of the Univer- 
sity's Government Department. 



306 



X 



HIS year the Campus Religious Council worked 
toward fulfilling its aim of promoting understanding 
among the religious groups on campus and serving the 
spiritual and physical needs of the University commun- 
ity. Working together for all students, members of the 
Newman Club, Christian Association and Hillel; repre- 
sentatives of the Dean of Men and the Dean of Women, 
and the Senate; and one of the rehgious chaplains met 
with the Council each month to discuss methods of 
putting these aims into practice. 

Once again the UMass community responded favor- 
ably to the Religious Council's annual Blood Drive and 
donated over 550 pints of blood. 

On the lighter side, the Council sponsored a marion- 
ette show designed to delight adults and children at the 
Spring Fine Arts Festival. 




The Campus Religious Council Blood Drive netted over 550 
pints in November. 



Religious Council Sponsors Blood Drive 




George Marshall, Janet Silbert, Ralph DiGregorio, Carol Kline, Patricia Kelley. 



307 



spacious Newman 
Center Facilitates 
Expanded Program 



A< 



^CTIVELY promoting its aims of religious, intel- 
lectual, and social functions for all its members, the 
UMass-Newman Club came up with a stimulating pro- 
gram of campus wide interest. 

Weekly philosophy classes, noted guest speakers, a 
growing library, intramural sports' teams, and assorted 
dances, movies, and religious events were stirred to- 
gether to whet the appetites of a large segment of the 
student body. 

A group of hard-working students with two seem- 
ingly inexhaustible advisors Father J. Joseph Quigley 
and Monsignor David J. Power was the driving force 
behind this extensive program. 

After settling in spacious quarters, the Newman 
Club, this year, came up with a new approach to its 
diversified and expanding program. 




Seated: Janet Conlon, Corresponding Secretary; James Mul- 
cahy, President; Carol Johnson, Treasurer. Standing: Edith 



Leahy. 2nd Vice President; Kay Reagen, 1st Vice President. 



308 




President Jim Stevenson, Treasurer Bill Wilkinson, Chaplain Frank Danforth, Bill Dowdall, Betsy Hall. 



Christian Association 



Examines Faith In World Today 



T. 



HE Christian Association, an open fellowship of 
Protestant students of all denominations, is dedicated 
to an examination of the Christian faith and to the 
involvement of this faith in the modern world. 

To promote this type of inquiry C.A. presents guest 
lecturers speaking on significant issues pertaining to 
contemporary problems that have religious implica- 
tions, and encourages enrollment in the United Chris- 
tian Foundation sponsored non-credit courses. C.A.'s 



worship program under adviser Jere Berger includes a 
weekly service and Vespers at Christmas and Easter 
times. 

Members exemplify their Christian spirit in such so- 
cial action projects as slum area work camps, hospital 
volunteer services and tutoring programs. 

Through these various activities C.A. strives to 
achieve its four aims of Study, Program, Service, and 
Worship. 



309 



Hillel Sponsors 

Lecture Series 

XJ "Nai Brith Hillel Foundation gives 
Jewish students opportunities to appro- 
priately observe the traditional religious 
holidays and festivals of Channukah, Pu- 
rim, Rosh Hashonah, and Yom Kippur, 
provides Sabbath services on Friday 
nights, and conducts classes in Hebrew 
and Yiddish, and in the basic tenets of 
Judaism. 

Hillel also serves the campus as a 
whole, not only in acquainting all the stu- 
dents with Judaism by way of deli sup- 
pers and folk song and dance fests, but 
also provides chances for students to 
learn about the current conditions of soci- 
ety. This year the Hillel Foundation 
sponsored a series of four lectures on sub- 
jects ranging from civil liberties to the 
quandary of the modern Negro, thereby 
bringing the problems of "outside world" 
to the campus. 




Emily Weinstein lights the Sabbath candles at one of Hillel's Friday 
evening services. 




First Row: Toby Kaplan, Ann Posner, Paula Witovsky. Second Row: Mike Nataupsky, Ed Salamoff. 



310 



■'-!^'-^' 



■ ■** )* 



'^i^.. 






Flying Redmen show usual good form marching in Holyoke parade. 



Volunteer ROTC Groups 



DerQonstrate Training Efficiency 



Wr 



ITH ten out of the last eleven AFROTC area A 
championships (New England and eastern New York) 
under their belts, this year's Flying Redmen, under the 
able direction of Cadet Commander Warren Vander- 
burg, had quite a tradition to uphold. 

Famed for their precision execution of many compli- 
cated and difficult formations, the Flying Redmen 
represented the University at football games in 
the fall, the Columbus Day parade in Springfield, the 
Saint Patrick's Day Parade in Holyoke, the greater Am- 
herst Community Fair, and the open house at Westover 
Air Force Base on Armed Forces Day. Channel 22 in 
Springfield has also carried their performances. Partici- 
pation in the Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington, 
D.C. added to the team's fine record and completed an 
eventful year. 



T 



HE Army ROTC Special Forces unit is modeled 
after the famed Army Special Forces Counter-Insur- 
gence Troops. Selected by strict physical training tests 
and personal interviews by Capt. John Kiliher and oth- 
ers these Special Forces are trained in activities similar 
to those of its model. 

Summer and winter survival training, scuba, hand to 
hand combat, mountain climbing and small arms in- 
struction head the list of programs common to counter 
guerilla warfare training. 

Cadet Commander Dowdy, Cadet Executive Officer 
Blanchard and Cadet Training Officer McLaughlin di- 
rect the group. Besides their training, the Special Forces 
take part in many community functions such as march- 
ing in Holyoke and Springfield parades and giving exhi- 
bitions at various events like the University Centennial 
Exhibition. 



Cocked berets, padded uniforms and uncanny smiles hide the ferociousness of our littlest guerrilla training force. 




^4 



Angels Join Arnold Unit 



•J OHN P. Granville Squadron of the Arnold Air 
Society in its second year at the University is an honor- 
ary social and service organization of selected 
AFROTC cadets who are responsible for numerous 
services to our campus and surrounding communities. 

The Arnold Air Society gives briefings about the Air 
Force and related fields to groups such as the Boy 
Scouts and Civil Air Patrol Cadets. In addition the 
Society sponsors dinings-in at Westover Air Force Base 
and assists in the extracurricular activities of the 
AFROTC detachment. 

Due to the efforts of the group, the commander Peter 
Gillon and the adviser Lt. Col. Roy D. Simmons the 
society was selected to be the new area headquarters of 
the 1 1 New England schools. This second year has seen 
a widening scope of service and activities culminating 
in a trip by three area cadets to Denver, Colorado for 
the national conclave of the 153 associated Arnold Air 
Squadrons. 




First Row: Chris Fleming, Ed Dearborn, Keith Ross. Second 
Row: John Coggins, Pete Gillon, Ed Herlihy. 



". 'JS^^ - - . /.a-' 'i?5ina 




A, 



^ngel Flight was initiated this year under the spon- 
sorship of the Arnold Air Society, the AFROTC frater- 
nity. 

While pledges, the Angels pulled a unique pledge 
prank: Secretly, they decorated the quarters of the Air 
Force detachment at Dickinson Hall, transforming 
bare, masculine rooms into a stronghold of femininity. 
Before initiation, the pledges attended lectures on mili- 
tary protocol given by the staff of the Arnold Air Soci- 
ety and learned basic drill forms. 

Proceeds from a candy sale helped to establish a 
treasury to be used for future activities. With Arnold 
Air Society, they sang carols at Christmas and later 
formed a glee club. At the annual Commander's Call of 
Arnold Air Societies held on campus, the Angels' Sue 
Lydon was chosen "Little Colonel." 



First Row: Mary Pat Carroll, Alice Pierce, 
Nancy Baron. Second Row: Sharon O'Hara, 
Sheila Mullane, Nancy Fuller. 



312 




First Row: Claudette Cacciabeve, Vice President; Dr. Denys J. 
Voaden, President; Mary Louise Apelian, Treasurer. Second 
Row: Council members: Bradford Giddings, Amr Ismail, Gan- 



esa Chanmugam, Dr. K. Narayanaswami. Missing: Anna Hays, 
Barbara Zebrowski, Joint Secretaries; Maire Cappadona, Coun- 
cil Member. 



Foreign Students Program Expands 



w, 



ITH the increasing number of foreign students 
on both a graduate and undergraduate level, came an 
increasing need of providing a warm welcome and a 
friendly atmosphere. By sponsoring a varied program 
that gives these visitors the opportunity to meet Ameri- 
can students and to get acquainted with other foreign 
students, the International Club fulfills this need. 

Informal coflfee hours, receptions, discussions on so- 
cial, cultural and educational matters are part of the 
regular club agenda. Once a year the organization pre- 
sents a special weekend program featuring a dinner 
with the folk dancing and entertainment of a particular 
country. Their International Club Dance and the U.N. 
Dance are among the activities offered to the campus 
community. 

Many of the Club's members perform an added serv- 
ice to the community by speaking to many local groups 
about their homelands and ways of life, and in doing 
so, help to foster world understanding and friendship. 

Since 50% of its membership is composed of Ameri- 
can students, the International Club provides a wonder- 
ful opportunity for many students to exchange informa- 
tion about their lives in a mutually beneficial and 
worthwhile way. 




313 




Sharon Stowell, Judy Godin, Carl Haarmann. Nancy Devlin. 



Commuters Strive For Campus Recognition 



M. 



. ORE than 900 non-resident students are making 
an attempt for recognition as full time campus citizens 
through the Non-Residents Student Association, known 
as the Commuters Club. 

In their effort to become more of a part of the Cam- 
pus community, the Commuters' Club has sponsored 
skating parties and dances. To bind their ties, the group 
has considered adopting a child overseas and warm 
weather splash parties. 

Rebuffed by Student Union officials in a try to 
acquire facilities in the building, the club got the use of 



Farley Club House for some dances. At present com- 
muters have squatters' rights to the Lodge, a room in 
the games area of the Student Union. 

The non-residents have launched a new assault on 
the Student Union to gain an area suitable for studying, 
eating and relaxing. They have also placed their bid for 
space in the proposed addition to the student facilities 
planned for some years hence. 

With the increase in commuter population, the con- 
stituency was awarded another seat in the Student 
Senate. 



314 




J Class of 1964 

Graduates 

• 1st Class 
Of UMass 
2nd Century 



• Review 

of 64 



• 34 Named 
Who's Who 



Seniors 



WM 




« 




^ 




Hi 



r^ 



34 Named Who's Who Among 

Colleges And 



316 




Students In American 
Universities 



MARTHA B. ADAM 
ROBERT B. ALBRO 
GERALD W. ANDERSON 
MERRY M. ARNOLD 
JOYCE R. BLUM 
BEVERLY D. BOTELHO 
JAMES H. BRADLEY 
JOSEPH W. BRADLEY 
PRISCILLA G. BRADWAY 
ROBERT L BRAUER 
COURTNEY S. BRICKMAN 
ROBERT J. BROUILLET 
JANE M. BUCKLEY 
JOHN E. BURKE 
DAVID L. CLANCY 
JUDITH T. CLARK 
ROBERT J. COVALUCCI 
PATRICIA B. FARRELL 
JONATHAN D. FIFE 
STEPHEN G. GRAY 
JOAN M. LABUZOSKI 
MARIE E. MAKINEN 
DAVID E. MATHIESON 
JAMES A. MEDEIROS 
ELIZABETH MERCER 
M. ANN MILLER 
ELAINE R. NEEDHAM 
JAMES B. O'HEARN 
JANICE K. REIMER 
MANUEL SMITH 
DAVID E. TRUESDELL 
RODGER T. TWITCHELL 
WARREN VANDER BURGH 
MARGARET L. WALTER 



317 







Vice-President Ray Kodzis, Secretary Betty Mercer, President Jim Medieros, and Treasurer Carol Esonis. 




Class Officers 

Lead Student's 

101st Year 



Adviser Captain Keliher and Secretary Betty Mercer confer in 
the Hatch. 



318 




First Row: Ray Kodzis, Vice-President, Captain John Keliher, 
Adviser, Carol Esonis, Treasurer, Jim Medieros, President, 
Betty Mercer, Secretary. Second Row: Jim Gallagher, Judy 
Clard, Bev Botelho, Lee Wilcox, Diane Smith, Kay Reagan, Pat 



Sweeney, Pat Bourbonnais, Edith Leahy, Ann Miller. Third 
Row: Roger Bacchieri, Kim Wallace, Art Collins, Dave Ander- 
son, Paul Mahoney, James Norton, Jack Nevers, Corky Brick- 
man, Dave Lemon, Kenneth Robbins. 



Exec Council Sets Course For Class 



'XECUTIVE Council was established in 1961, 
the sophomore year of the class, to give an even, repre- 
sentative group the legislative reins for the class. 

Thus ended the poorly attended class meeting as a 
means of deciding class policy and expenditures. From 
this group has come various other committees, includ- 
ing Class Gift, Class Picnic, Class Banquet and Class 
Night Committees. 



319 



Capt. Jack, Ex-Surfer, Once A Bostonian 




A 



proper Bostonian by 
way of Honolulu, Hawaii, 
came to be adviser to the 
Class of 1964. 

Son of an army officer, 
Capt. John G. Keliher was 
born in Honolulu where his 
father was stationed. 

But Captain Jack's Yan- 
kee lineage reaches back to 
the land of the bean and the 
cod, the elder Keliher's 
hometown. 

For four years Captain 
Jack got a taste of Mas- 
sachusetts when his father 
was adviser to the Yankee 
Division. 

A 1956 graduate of the 
University of California, 
the six-five student played 
basketball there. 

A paratrooper by trade, 
he served in the Pacific at 
several posts throughout 
the country. 

He leaves in June for Ft. 
Campbell, Ky. where he 
will assume command of an 
airborne company, prior to 
an expected assignment in 
Viet Nam. 




With a 17-hour clasb load 



and three groups to advise. 



320 



Mrs. Keliher Advises, Too: Kappas, Craig And Cathy 



A, 



-DVISING campus 
groups seems to come easy 
to the Kelihers. 

Nancy (Mrs.) Keliher 
has been adviser to Kappa 
Kappa Gamma sorority, 
and besides class adviser, 
Jack has been adviser to 
the Army ROTC Special 
Forces and Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon fraternity. 

The Keliher's have two 
children, Craig, five and 
Kathy, three. 

For a warm-weather Is- 
lander, the captain says he 
finds New England agree- 
able. Still, his favorite sport 
remains "surfin'." 

While carrying a 17-hour 
class load as an assistant 
professor of military sci- 
ence, Capt. Keliher has 
pursued a master's degree 
in government. 

His thesis concerns Com- 
munist activity in Far East- 
ern countries. 

After completion of his 
military career, Capt. Keli- 
her says he'd like to try 
teaching on the college 
level. 




Mrs. Nancy Keliher, Kappa Kappa Gamma adviser. Captain Jack. Craig, five; Kathy, three. 



321 




Charles K. Smith 




Charles Smith First 



Adviser; Followed 
By C B. Shellnutt 

T 

X HREE advisers have charted the 
course of the Class of '64 in its four years 
in the University. 

Originally under the tutelage of 
Charles K. Smith, the class passed 
through a regency-like status under Clar- 
ence B. Shellnutt, then on to Capt. John 
G. Keliher. 

Smith advised the class through the 
sophomore year — the formative period of 
the class. He took leave from the Univer- 
sity for a period of study during the '62- 
'63 academic year. Smith is an instructor 
in English. 

Clarence B. Shellnutt took over from 
there in his position of Student Union 
Program Coordinator. Shellnutt helped 
lay the groundwork for big show of the 
junior class, Winter Carnival. 

However, he left before the event's fru- 
ition to take a post in Boston University's 
student union. 



Clarence B. Shellnutt 



322 




UMass President John W. Lederle, Governor Endicott Peabody, Senator Edward M. Kennedy, 
Centennial Chairman James T. Nicholson and Hokkaido University President Harusada 
Suginome honor 100th anniversary of charter that established the school. 

Centennial Fetes Checkered Course 
Of University's 101st Class 

V.^ELEBRATIONS to denote the University's 100th year were in preparation 
when the Class of '64 first hit campus. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College had come a long way from its inception 
by the 1862 Morrill Land Grant Act and naught was spared to commemorate 
its arrival to the ranks of the country's top educational echelon. 

From September 1962 to June 1963 programs and events — academic and 
otherwise — at the University were almost universally dedicated to the Centennial 
banner, bearing its motto "Toward Higher Learning, More Widely Disseminated." 

Dr. James T. Nicholson, Class of 1916 and General Chairman for the UM 
Centennial, pointed out in his address at the Opening Centennial Convocation 
in October, 1962, that "It is our intent to develop the Centennial in such a way 
as to commemorate the past, to respect the present, and, most important, to look 
to the future." 

Revelry reached its apex at Charter Day ceremonies in late April of 1963. 
Dignitaries from local and national posts gathered at UMass to rever the founding 
of an educational institution and the institution of education. 

Keynote speaker was Nobel laureate Glenn T. Seaborg, chairman of the 
Atomic Energy Commission. Said Seaborg, "the most important response to these 
challenges of education in our times is harder work." 



323 



<•»«**., 

^ 




...^••y^"*^ 



H. Leland 




An unceasing worker for closer 
student-faculty relations, Dr. H. 
Leland Varley of the depart- 
ment of English is recipient of 
the second Metawampee 
Award. 



324 



Varley Receives 2nd Metawampee Award 



I 



N his 25 years with the Uni- 
versity faculty, Dr. H. Leland 
Varley, professor of English, has 
been a constant instigator of 
close ties between students and 
teachers, and has worked unceas- 
ingly for them. 

Thus, he has been chosen by a 
committee of seniors as recipient 
of the second annual Meta- 
wampee Award. 

Varley was chosen to be Mas- 
ter of the new residential college 
area because of his talents in this 
arena. 

The new student residence 
plan, consisting of four seven- 
story dormitories to open in Sep- 
tember, 1964, is a pilot plan 
aimed at bringing students and 
faculty closer together in a ra- 
pidly expanding university. 

At last fall's Student Work- 
shop on Activities Problems 
(SWAP), it was Varley who 
proposed the "20 Cents Plan" — 
that students themselves initiate 
student-faculty ties with invest- 
ment in a cofTee date with their 
professors. 

This past year, he has headed 
up the University's student hon- 
ors program — consisting of Sen- 
ior Honors Projects and Honors 
Colloquia. 

Said President Lederle, "We 
are fortunate to have Professor 
Varley heading this pilot project. 
He is a scholar who has the high 
respect of his teaching colleagues 
and of the student body," 




325 




326 





His dedication to the student was of a sort rarely found in a 
large university. 



A. P. Madeira Dies; 
His Dedication To 



Students Recalled 



A, 



Professor Madeira is shown receiving the first annual Meta- 
wampe Award in 1963. 



.LBERT P. Madeira, for 12 years a member of 
the English department, died suddenly in late January 
of a heart attack after shoveling snow. 

Professor Madeira was 52 years old. At the time he 
was adviser to the Index, Collegian and Roister 
Doisters. He was also coaching the University's College 
Bowl entry. 

In 1959 the yearbook was dedicated to him. He was 
an honorary member of Adelphia and chairman of the 
alumni committee. He had received the first Meta- 
wampe Award in 1963 for his dedication as a teacher. 
His was a familiar face wherever students gathered. 
His usual attire was a well-worn trench coat, battered 
felt hat over his sandburgian hair, and moccasins, a 
green book bag over his shoulder. 

"Friends," he would say at the start of class, betray- 
ing many Summers spent in Maine and undergraduate 
days at Bowdoin. Then informally, he would discourse 
on travel, theater and playwrighting. 

Perhaps the greatest tribute to Albert P. Madeira was 
the performance by his College Bowl charges who re- 
quested that the money be used to establish the Albert 
P. Madeira Scholarship Fund. 



327 





JOSEPH F. H. ADAMS 



NANCY C. ADAMS 



DENNIS I. ACKERMAN ROBERT R. ACKLEY, JR. 



JANE D. ABBIATI 

3 Sharon Road, Melrose, Massachusetts 
Speech Therapy 

Dormitory Song Chairman 3, 4; Operetta Guild 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Personal Director of Freshman Talent Show 2; Roister Dois- 
ters 1, 2, 3, 4; Campus Varieties 1; Opera Workshop 2, 3; 
Freshman Dance-Bali Hai, Entertainment Committee 1; Stu- 
dent Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation 1; 
Psychology Club 1; Young Democrats 3; Speech Club 2, 3, 4; 
Opera Workshop 2, 3. 
E. LOUISE ACETI 

485 Belknap Road, Framingham, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

University Theatre 3; International Weekend Committee 2, 3; 
Flying Club 2; International Club 4; International Relations 
Club 2; Modern Dance Club 1, 2; Oriental Sports Club 2; 
Sociology Club 4; Spanish Club 3, 4. 
DENNIS I. ACKERMAN 
46 Wildwood Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
Government 

Dormitory Social Representative 1; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Hillel Foundation 1, 2. 
ROBERT R. ACKLEY, JR. 
80 Windsor Place, Longmeadovi', Massachusetts 
GB/Fin 

Lafayette College; Dean's List 2, 3. 
DAVID E. ADAM 

Goode Street, R.D. #1, Burnt Hills, New York 
History 

House Social Chairman 4; Intramural Football, Volleyball 1, 3; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3; History Club 1, 2, 3. 
MARTHA B. ADAM 
23 Garrison Road, Wellesley, Massachusetts 
History 

Index 2, 3, 4; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Activities 
Chairman 3, Recording Secretary 4; Revelers 3; Campus Varie- 
ties 3; Dean's List 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1, 3; 
Education Club 4; Gymnastics Club 1, 2; Women's Athletic 
Association 1, 2, 3. 
FANNIE L. ADAMS 

9 West Street, West Brookfield, Massachusetts 
Englisli 

Literary Society 4; Arts and Music Committee 3; Program 
Committee 3; Honors Colloquium 3; Student Christian Associ- 
ation 1, 2. 
JOHN H. ADAMS 

4 Stratton Road, Grafton, Massachusetts 
Government 

Hooker's Club 2, 3, 4; Beta Kappa Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Rush 
Chairman 3, Pledge Trainer 4, House Manager 4, Charter 
Committee 4; Health Club 3, 4; Track 1, 2; Student Christian 
Association I, 2; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; International Rela- 
tions Club 1, 2; "Young Republicans 2, 3. 
JOSEPH F. H. ADAMS 

60 Massasoit Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 
ASME 4. 

NANCY C. ADAMS 
199 Main Street, Millis, Massachusetts 
English 

House Counselor 3, 4; Dormitory Treasurer 2; Dean's List 3; 
Canterbury Club 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1; Literary 
Society 4. 



328 




L^ 




KARL A. ADAMSKI 



JUDITH V. ADDELSON 



KARL A. ADAMSKI 
38 Spring Street, Easthampton, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 
Holyoke Junior College. 
JUDITH V. ADDELSON 
36 Irving Street, Newton Center, Massachusetts 
English 

Student Senate 2; Sigma Delta Tau I, 2, 3, 4, First Vice- 
President 4; Scrolls 2; Hillel Foundation 1, 2. 
ROBERT D. ADDISON 

74 Massasiot Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 
Forestry 

Alpha Sigma Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Interfraternity Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Forestry Club 1, 3, 4. 
ELAINE M. ALARIE 
Oak Street, Housatonic, Massachusetts 
Education 

Westfield State College 1, 2; Index 4; House Counselor 4; 
University Concert Association 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Winter 
Carnival Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education 
Club 3. 4. 

VIOLA P. ALBERTSON 
58 Norman Road, Melrose, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Index 4; Class Executive Council 2, 3, 4; Social Activities 
Committee 3, 4; House Counselor 3, 4; Operetta Guild 1, 2, 3, 
4; Roister Doisters 1, 2, 3, 4; Campus Varieties 3; Opera Work- 
shop 3; Student Centennial Committee 3; Winter Carnival 
Committee 3; Special Events Committee 3, 4; Student Christian 
Association 1, 2, 3; Equestrian Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Experimental 
Theatre 1. 

R. BRUCE ALBRO 

9 Magnolia Terrace, Springfield 8, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Men's Judiciary 2, 3, 4, Chief Justice 4; Beta Kappa Phi 1, 2, 
3, 4; Dorm Council 2, Social Chairman; Adelphia 4; Fine Arts 
Council 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 3; 
Honors Work 4; Phi Kappa Phi 4; SWAP 3, 4, Treasurer-Co- 
Chairman 4; Student Christian Association 1; Ski Club 1. 
M. DIANNE ALDERMAN 
22 Worthington Street, Pittsfleld, Massachusetts 
Government 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 2; Winter Carnival Committee 3; New- 
man Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Political Science Association 1, 2. 
MARCIA A. ALDERMAN 
47 Broad Street, Westfield, Massachusetts 
English 

Dean's List 3; Naiads 3. 
ADRIENNE J. ALLEN 
62 Center Street, Agawam, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Kappa Alpha Theta 3, Athletic Chairman 4; Precisionettes 2; 
Student Christian Association 1, 2; Modern Dance Club 4; 
Physical Education Club 1, 3, 4; Ski Club I, Secretary; Wom- 
en's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 
JOHN B. ALLEN 

45 Barbara Lane, South Weymouth, Massachusetts 
Zoology 

North Adams State College 1; Sigma Alpha Epsilon 2, 3, 4, 
House Manager 4; Swimming 2; Zoology Club 2. 



ROBERT D. ADDISON 



ELAINE M. ALARIE 




VIOLA P. ALBERTSON 



R. BRUCE ALBRO 




M. DIANNE ALDERMAN MARCIA A. ALDERMAN 




ADRIENNE J. ALLEN 



JOHN B. ALLEN 



329 




SUSAN P ALLEN 



WAYNE A. ALLEN 




HOWARD B. ALTMAN 



ANTHONY F. AMICO 



SUSAN P. ALLEN 
199 High Road, Newbury, Massachusetts 
Botany 

Operetta Guild 3; Dean's List 1, 3; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1, 4; Wesley Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4, Supper Chairman 4. 
WAYNE A. ALLEN 
49 Lake Street, Spencer, Massachusetts 
General Electric Engineering Apprentice Program 
Electrical Engineering 

Engineering Journal 3; Engineering Council 4; Eta Kappa Nu 
3, 4; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; Student Christian Association 3, 4; 
AIEE-IRE 3, 4. 
HOWARD B. ALTMAN 
4 Bismarck Street, Mattapan, Massachusetts 
German 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 2; Honors Work 4; 
Phi Eta Sigma 1,2; German Tutor 2, 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 
1, 2, 3; Astronomy Club 1, 2, Treasurer 1; German Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; Philosophy Club 1. 



ANTHONY F. AMICO 

36 Lakeside Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Critique 4; Men's Judiciary 3, Clerk; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; 
Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3. 
BEVERLY L. AMUNDSEN 
22 Carey Avenue, Burlington, Massachusetts 
English 

Edwards Fellowship 1; Judson Fellowship 2, 3, 4, Publicity 3, 
Deputations 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Educa- 
tion Club 4; Outing Club 4, Treasurer 4. 
CHARLES O. ANDERSON, JR. 
112 Centennial Avenue, Glouster, Massachusetts 
Fisheries Biology 

Zeta Nu 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 4, Executive Committee 4; 
Marching Band 1; ROTC Band 1, 2, Drum Major 1, 2; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2. 
GERALD W. ANDERSON 
52 Webster Street, Rockland, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Men's Judiciary 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, Chief Justice 3; Dormi- 
tory Social Chairman 2; Theta Chi 2, 3, 4; Chorale 1; Campus 
Varieties 1; SWAP 1, 3, Chairman 3; Lutheran Club 2; Ac- 
counting Association 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Ski Club 3. 
J. DAVID ANDERSON 
135 Reservoir Road, Quincy, Massachusetts 
Government 

American University; Class Executive Council 4; Zeta Nu 3, 4; 
Winter Carnival Committee 3; Outing Club 4. 
SONJA M. ANDERSON 
Birch Hill Road, Blandford, Massachusetts 
Education 

House Officer 2, 3, W.A.A. Representative; Intramural Volley- 
ball 1, 2; Naiads 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2; Educa- 
tion Club 4; 4-H Club 2; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3. 
NANCY M. ANDRADE 
612 Elm Street, East Wareham, Massachusetts 
Government 

Class Executive Council 2, 3; Lambda Delta Phi 2, 3, 4, Vice- 
President 3, President 4; Mortar Board 4, Secretary 4; Dean's 
List 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Kappa Phi 4; Pi Sigma Alpha 3, 4; SWAP 4; 
Winter Carnival Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2. 




BEVERLY L. AMUNDSEN CHARLES O. ANDERSON, JR. 





GERALD W. ANDERSON J. DAVID ANDERSON 



SONJA M. ANDERSON 



NANCY M. ANDRADE 



330 



JOSEPH A. APICELLA 

104 Freedom Street, Hopedale, Massachusetts 
Government 

Kappa Sigma 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 
3,4. 

CYNTHIA A. APOSTOLOS 
5 Lawn Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Collegian 1; Social Activities Committee 1, 2; Orthodox Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 3, 4. 
STEVEN H. ARBIT 

516 Harvard Street, Mattapan, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Collegian 1, 2, 3; Index 2, 3; Ya-Hoo 2, 3; Men's Inter-dorm 
Council 3; Vice President of Dormitory 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1; 
Intramurals 1. 2, 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Accounting 
Association 3, 4; Pre-Medical Club 2. 
NANCY J. ARCECI 

34 Emerald Street, Winchendon, Massachusetts 
English 

Collegian 2, 3; Index 4; University Concert Association 3; New- 
man Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 4; Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation 1, 2, 3, 4. 
SHEILA B. ARMSTRONG 
14 Murray Hill Park, Maiden, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Women's Inter-Dorm Council 2, 3, Secretary 3; Gamma Sigma 
Sigma 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 3, First Vice President 
4; United Nations Week Committee 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Sec- 
retary 2, 3, Treasurer 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Dorm Cap- 
tain 3; Mathematics Club 1, 2; Women's Athletic Association 2. 

JA'YNE S. ARNOLD 

1 1 Oriole Road, Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Index 2, 3, 4, Senior Editor 4; Special Events Committee 3; 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant Registrar 3, Registrar 

4; Campus Varieties 1; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Newman 

Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Accounting Association 4. 

MERRY M. ARNOLD 

20 Kewadin Road, Waban, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 




JOSEPH A. APICELLA CYNTHIA A. APOSTOLOS 




STEVEN H. ARBIT 



NANCY J. ARCECI 




SHEILA B. ARMSTRONG JA'iTSiE S. ARNOLD 




Class Executive Council 1, 2, 3, 4; House Counselor 3; Student 
Union Governing Board 4; Sigma Delta Tau 1, 2, 3, 4, Activi- 
ties Chairman 3, President 4; Mortar Board 4; SWAP 4; Winter 
Carnival Committee 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2. 
WILLIAM J. ARTHUR 
38 Governor Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; International Weekend 
Committee 3. 
ROY H. ASHLEY 

20 Montana Street, North Adams, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Gymnastics Club 1; 
Mathematics Club 1. 2, 3, 4; Young Republicans 2, 3, 4. 
SONA ASLANIAN 

314 Park Avenue, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

Dean's List 3, 4; Armenian Club 1, 2; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
SNAM 1, 2, NSNA 1, 2. 




MERRY M. ARNOLD WILLIAM J. ARTHUR 



ROY H. ASHLEY 



SONA ASLANIAN 



331 




THOAMAS F. ASTALDI JOSEPH AUCIELLO 





FRANCIS U. AUGER 



CAROL H, AUSTIN 




LEONARD D. AUSTIN, JR. 


GUNTA AUSTRINS 






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THOAMAS F. ASTALDI 

8 I Lincoln Park, Longmeadow, Massachusetts 
liuliislrial Engineering 

Beta Kappa Phi 2, 3, 4; Soccer L 2, 3, 4; Gymnastics 1, 2, 3, 
4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; AIEE-IRE 3, 4; Treasurer 4; Engi- 
neering Associates 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4. 
JOSEPH AUCIELLO 
3762 Paddy Lane, Baldwin Park, California 
English 

Cambridge Junior College; Intervarsity Christian Fellowship 2; 
Language Laboratory Electronics Technician 2, 3, 4; Plymouth 
Social Chairman 2. 
FRANCIS U. AUGER 

21 Garfield Avenue, Northampton, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Dean's List 2; Eta Kappa Nu 4; AIEE-IRE 2, 3, 4; Fencing 
Club L 

CAROL H. AUSTIN 

RED. #2, Amherst Road, Pelham, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Tennis 1, 2, 3; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Educa- 
tion Club L 2, 3, 4; 4-H Club 1; Women's Athletic Association 
1, 2, 3, 4; Dames Club 4. 
LEONARD D. AUSTIN, JR. 
Main Street, Williamsburg, Massachusetts 
Industrial Engineering 

Engineering Council 3, 4, Treasurer 4; AIIE 2, 3, 4, President 
4; Flying Club 3; Management Club 4; Sport Parachute Club 
3,4. 




MARIA D. BADAVAS 



RICHARD A. BAIRD 



JOHN T. AWDYCKI ROGER G. BACCHIERI 



GUNTA AUSTRINS 

R.F.D. #1 Box 450 Russell Road, Albany 3, New York 
Retailing 

Concert Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Staff-at-Large 1, 2, 3; Assistant Li- 
brarian 4; Marching Band 4; Assistant Librarian 4; Precision- 
ettes 2, 4; Home Economics Club 3, 4. 
JOHN T. AWDYCKI 
252 Ash Street, Gardner. Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Beta 
Gamma Sigma 3, 4; Basketball 1; Baseball I, 2, 3, 4, Captain 4; 
Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Accounting Association 2, 3, 4; Varsity 
"M" Club 3, 4. 
ROGER G. BACCHIERI 
95 Progress Street, Weymouth, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Class Executive Council 4; Beta Kappa Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Alumni 
Secretary 3, 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Student Chris- 
tian Association 1, 2; Accounting Association 3, 4; Air Cadet 
Squadron 1, 2; Business Administration 2, 3; Water Ski Club 
1, 2,4. 

MARIA D. BADAVAS 

21 Cedgebrook Road, South Weymouth, Massachusetts 
English 

House Counselor 3, 4; Precisionettes 3; Orthodox Club 1, 2. 
RICHARD A. BAIRD 

C-2 Suffolk House, University of Massachusetts 
Amherst, Massachusetts 
Accounting 
Lacrosse 2, 3, 4. 



332 



CHARLES H. BARKER 

22 Arlington Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 

English 

Dean's List 3, 4. 

DAVID R. BAKER 

Meadowwood Road, Storrs, Connecticut 

Philosophy 

Wesleyan University; Honors Colloquium 2; Phi Kappa Phi 4. 

LOIS G. BAKER 

30 Henry Avenue, Lynn, Massachusetts 
English 

Collegian 3; Social Activities Committee 3; University Theatre 
Guild 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Colloquium 3; Homecom- 
ing Committee 2, 3; Winter Carnival Committee 1; Education 
Exchange Program, University of New Mexico 3. 

BARBARA ANNE BALAKIER 

34 Dresser Avenue, Chicopee, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Precisionettes 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3. 4; Gymnastics Club 3; 

Modern Dance Club 4; Physical Education Club 4; Women's 

Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 

CAROL A. BALDWIN 

68 Nonotuck Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Lutheran Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 2, 3, 4; Home 

Economics Club 2; Women's Athletic Association 2, 3. 





LOIS G. BAKER BARBARA ANNE BALAKIER 



SUE E. BARDEN 



DOROTHY E. BARNFS 



DOREEN A. BANNER 

272 Summer Street. Marshfield, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

House Counselor 4; Edwards Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4; Inter-varsity 

Christian Fellowship 2, 3, 4, Publicity Chairman 3, 4; Student 

Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 4. 

JOHN L. BAPTISTA 

213 Nash Road. New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Dean's List 2, 3; Honors Work 4; Phi Kappa Phi 3, 4, Phi 

Kappa Phi Scholar 3; American Chemical Society 4. 

ANTHONY F, BARAN 

West Street, West Hatfield, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

ASE 4; ASME 4. 

SUE E. BARDEN 

4240 West 202nd Street, Cleveland 26, Ohio 
Elementary Education 

House Counselor 3, 4; Sigma Sigma Sigma 4; Dean's List 2, 3; 
Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3; Student Christian Asso- 
ciation 1, 2; Education Club 3, 4. 

DOROTHY E. BARNES 

44 Ridgewood Terrace, Northampton, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Chorale 'l, 2, 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3. 4; Honors Work 4; Phi 

Kappa Phi 4; Alpha Lambda Delta 1; Judson Fellowship 1, 2, 

3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 4; Association for Social 

Action 2; Commuter's Club 1; Sociology Club 4. 




CAROL A. BALDWIN DOREEN A. BANNER 




JOHN L. BAPTISTA 



ANTHONY F. BARAN 



333 



BETSY H. BARROWS 

16 Pomeroy Terrace, Northampton, Massachusetts 

Malhemntics 

Dean's List 1, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2; IVlathemat- 

ics Club 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2. 

JUDITH C. BARRY 

80 Gatewood Road, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Fashion In Retailing And Business 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Winter Carnival 

Committee 3; Fashion Show 3; Naiads 1; Newman Club 1, 2; 

Home Economics Club 4, Editor 4; Dean's Student Council 

(Home Economics) 3, 4, 

LYNN C. HARTLEY 

6 Greenwood Road, Natick, Massachusetts 

Management 

Kappa Sigma 1. 2, 3. 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Student Christian 

Association 3, 4; Management Club 3, 4; Marketing Club 3, 4. 

DAVID L. BATTIS 

30 Alden Road, Dedham, Massachusetts 

Government 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Lacrosse 1; Hockey 2. 

ELAINE BAXTER 

29 Russel Road, South Weymouth, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

House Counselor 3; Kappa Alpha Theta 3, 4, 2nd Vice Presi- 
dent 4; Women's Sports, Basketball 2; Modern Dance Club 2, 

3, 4, Vice President 3, President 4; Physical Education Club 3, 
4; Women's Athletic Association 3, Playday Manager 3. 

GARY D. BAYLOR 

56 Gates Avenue, East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

WMUA 3, 4; Dean's List 2; Student Christian Association 1, 

2; ASME 3, 4. 

RICHARD W. BEANE 

234 Court Street, Plymouth, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Wentworth Technical Institute; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Honors 

Colloquium 3; Phi Kappa Phi 4; Sigma Xi 3, 4; ASME 3, 4, 

Chairman 4. 

NANCY L. BEATON 

287 Washington Street, Braintree, Massachusetts 

Merchandising 

Collegian 1; Student Senate 3, Women's Affairs Committee 3, 

4, Elections Committee 3, 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Honors Work 4; 
Winter Carnival Committee 3; Field Hockey 1; Student Chris- 
tian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 2, 3; Women's 
Athletic Association 1, 2; Young Republicans 2, 3. 

ANDREA J. BEAUCHEMIN 

50 Summerhill Avenue, Worcester, Massachusetts 

History 

Collegian 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pioneer Valley 

Folklore Society 3, 4; Bridge Club 3, 4. 

PATRICIA L. BECCIA 

15 Como Court, Milford, Massachusetts 

History 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium* 3; Honors Work 4; 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Debating Society I, 2; History Club 2, 

3, 4; Le Cercle Francais 2. 




LYNN C. BARTLEY 



DAVID L, BATTIS 




ELAINE BAXTER 



GARY D. BAYLOR 





RICHARD W. BEANE 



NANCY L. BEATON 



ANDREA J. BEAUCHEMIN 



PATRICIA L. BECCIA 



334 




PAUL A. BECK 



ROBERT M. BECK 




JOSEPH J. BEDNARZ, JR. 



EDNA M. BEIGHLEY 




PAUL A. BECK 

R.F.D. #2, Box 354, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Kappa Phi 4; Tau Beta Pi 3. 4; 

Mihtary Ball Committee 3, 4; Wing Commander, AEROTC 4, 

Cadet Colonel 4: Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; ASME 2, 3, 4; 

Arnold Air Society 3, 4. 

ROBERT M. BECK 

1 59 Aspen Road, Swampscott, Massachusetts 

Pre-Medical 

Dean's List 1; Hillel Foundation 1, 2; Pre-Medical Club 2, 3, 4. 

JOSEPH J. BEDNARZ, JR. 

88 West Street, Easthampton, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Newman Club 3; Amateur Radio Association 4; AIEE-IRE 3, 

4; Astronomy Club 3. 

EDNA M. BEIGHLEY 
1 17 Libby Avenue, Reading, Massachusetts 
Food and Nutrition 

Collegian 4; Women's Inter-dorm Council 2, 3; House Counse- 
lor 4; Precisionettes 3; Newman Club 1, 2; Home Economics 
Club 1, 2, 4, Vice President 4. 

JOHN E. BELANGER 

40 Cedar Street, Winchdon, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Engineering Associates I, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 4; Beta 

Kappa Phi 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; 

ASME 2, 3, 4. 

RONALD BELLISARIO 

63 Stivens Terrace, Ludlow, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Dean's List 1, 2; Phi Eta Sigma I. 

ROBERT S. BEMAN 

101 Court Street, Westfield, Massachusetts 

Industrial Engineering 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Student Christian Association 1, AIIE 3, 4. 

RONALD J. BEMAN 

101 Court Street, Westfield, Massachusetts 

History 

L. JANE BEMIS 

48 Quincy Street, Holbrook, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Class Executive Council 3, 4; Social Activities Committee 2; 

R.S.O. Committee 2, 3, 4, Treasurer of Arts and Music 3, 4; 

Women's Inter-dorm Council 3; House Counselor 4; Winter 

Carnival Committee 1, 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Psychology 

Club 2, 3, 4; Zoology Club 2. 

JACK W. BENJAMIN 

84 Parker Avenue, Newton Highlands, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Alpha Epsilon Pi 1,2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 2; Winter Carnival 

Committee 3; Accounting Association 2, 3, 4. 



JOHN E. BELANGER 



RONALD BELLISARIO 




ROBERT S. BEMAN 



RONALD J. BEMAN 



L. JANE BEMIS 



JACK W. BENJAMIN 



335 




DONALD P. BENOIT KENNETH N. BENOIT 




MARCIA A. BERTOZZI 

Main Street, West Groton, Massachusetts 

Mallienuilicx 

House Counselor 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Alpha Lambda Delta 

1; Basketball 1, 2; Newman Club I, 2. 

LYNN J. BETTENCOURT 
24 Edison Avenue, Seekonk, Massachusetts 
Englisli 

Collegian 1; House President 1; Military Ball Committee 3, 4; 
Winter Carnival Committee 2; Student Christian Association 1, 
2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation 1; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Com- 
muter's Club 4; Scuba 1, 2, 3, 4, Instructor 4. 
DIANE BEZREH 

9 Girdlestone Road, Winthrop, Massachusetts 
English 

University Concert Association 4; Dean's List 2; Orthodox 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Committee 2; International Club 3, 4. 
CELIA A. BIAGETTI 
32 Cochituate Street, Natick, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 
Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Bowling (Manager) 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 

2, 3; Education Club 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 3, 4. 
PATRICIA A. BIK 

6 Roland Road, Peabody, Massachusetts 

Dietetics 

Swimming 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club 

3, 4; Modern Dance Club 3; Pre-Medical Club 1. 

lOSEPH J. BILL 

100 Chicomansett Street, Willimansett, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers and Institute of Radio Engineers 2, 3, 4. 

HENRY F. BILLINGS 

31 Saint James Avenue, Somerville, Massachusetts 

Business Management 

Northeastern University; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Work 4; 

Military Ball Committee 3, 4; Student Christian Association 3; 

International Club 3, 4. 



NORMAN P. BERNARD MARCIA A. BERTOZZI 




LYNN J. BETTENCOURT 



DIANE BEZREH 



CELIA A. BIAGETTI 



PATRICIA A. BIK 



DONALD P. BENOIT 

4 Cordes Court, South Hadley Falls, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Holyoke Junior College 1; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Honors Collo- 
quium 3; Honors Work 4; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; University 
Economics Association 2, 3, 4. 

KENNETH N. BENOIT 
58 Meadow Lane, Falmouth, Massachusetts 
Food Economics 

Newman Club 4; Agricultural Economics Club 4; Food Distri- 
bution Club 4. 

NORMAN P. BERNARD 

70 Foster Street, Brockton, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-Captain 

3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4. 




JOSEPH J. BILL 



HENRY F. BILLINGS 



336 



SALLY A. BILLINGTON 

165 Elm Street, South Dartmouth, Massachusetts 
Elementarv Education 

Naiads 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Education Club 3; Ski 
Club 1,2; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 
ERNEST J. BILODEAU 
10 Thayer Street, South Deerfleld, Massachusetts 
Music 

Collegian I; University Concert Association 2, 3, Technical 
Director 2, 3; Operetta Guild 2, 3, 4, Staff Co-ordinator 3, 4, 
Assistant Director 4; Roister Doisters 1, 2; Campus Varieties 
2, Producer 2; Opera Workshop 2, 3, 4, Staff Co-ordinator 4; 
Bay State Rifles 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer of New 
England Province NNCF 4. 
RICHARD N. BINNALL 
Airport Road, Gardner, Massachusetts 
Recreation 

Alpha Sigma Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 3, 4, Publicity 
Chairman 3; Newman Club 1, 2; Air Cadet Squadron 1; Recre- 
ation Club 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 1, 2. 
ROBERT H. BIRKEMOSE, JR. 
73 Topefield Road, Wenham, Massachusetts 
Pre-Medical 

Freshman Activities Council 1; Campus Blood Drive 2; New- 
man Club 1, 2, 3; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 
GEORGE R. BITHER 
Elm Street, Wareham, Massachusetts 
STEPHEN E. BLACHE 
275 East Center Street, Lee, Massachusetts 
Speech Therapy 

Social Activities Committee 4; Men's Inter-dorm Council 4; 
House Representative 2, House "Vice President 3, House Presi- 
dent 4; SWAP 4; Newman Club 1; Fencing Club 2; Oriental 
Sports Club 4. 
NORMA J, BLAIR 

Hancock Road, Williamstown, Massachusetts 
Zoology 

Student Christian Association 1, 2; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion 3; Zoology Club 4. 





SALLY A. BILLINGTON ERNEST J. BILODEAU 




RICHARD N. BINNALL ROBERT H. BIRKEMOSE, JR. 




GEORGE R. BITHER STEPHEN E. BLACHE 



NORMA J. BLAIR 



ROBERT J. BLAIR 




JAMES A. BLANCHARD, JR. LINDA A. BEILER 



ROBERT J. BLAIR 

158 Eleanor Road, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Clarkson College of Technology 1, 2; Beta Kappa Phi 2, 3, 4; 
Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Engineering Associates 2, 3, 4, Secre- 
tary 4, President 3; ASME 1, 2, 3, 4; Scuba Club 3, 4. 

JAMES A. BLANCHARD, JR. 
Coy Hill, Warren, Massachusetts 
History 

Student Senate 2, 3; Beta Kappa Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Advanced Army 
ROTC 3, 4, Distinguished Military Student, Bay State Special 
Forces 3, 4, Assistant S-1 3, Executive Officer 4; Student Chris- 
tian Association 2; Scuba Club 4. 

LINDA A. BEILER 

79 Minden Street, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 
Speech Therapy 

R.S.O. Committee 3, 4; Operetta Guild 4; Dean's List 2; Stu- 
dent Christian Association 1; Nursing Club 1, 2. 



337 




DAVID J. BODENDORF KATHLEEN A. BOLAND 



CAROLYN S. BLOOD 
22 Richland Road, Wellesley, Massachusetts 
Art 

Index 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Tennis 2, 3; Art Club 
2, 3,4. 

JAMES E. BLOOM 

2 North Woodford Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Indii.slrial Engineering 

Engineering journal 3, 4, Executive Editor 3; Fraternity Presi- 
dents Assembly 4; Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 3, 
President 4; Maroon Key 2; Dean's List 1; Student Centennial 
Committee 2, 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3. 
RITA J. BLUM 

Stockbridge Road, Great Barrington, Massachusetts 
Fashion Retailing 

Index 2, 3, 4, Organizations Editor 4; House Counselor 3; 
Kappa Alpha Theta 3, 4; Mortar Board 4; University Concert 
Association 2, 3, 4, Public Relations Manager 3, 4; Dean's List 
3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2; Home 
Economics Club I, 2, 3, 4. 
MARGUERITE A. BLUM 

Stockbridge Road, Great Barrington, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Index 4; Student Union Program Council 4; Gamma Sigma 
Sigma 4; University Open House Committee 1, 2, 3, 4. 
DAVID J. BODENDORF 

1550 Memorial Ave., West Springfield, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Eta Sigma I, 2; Phi Kappa Phi 3, 4; 
Eta Kappa Nu 3, 4; Bridge Correspondent 3, President 4; Tau 
Beta Pi 3, 4; AIEE-IRE 3, 4, Engineering Council Representa- 
tive 4. 

KATHLEEN A. BOLAND 
342 Summer Street, Framingham, Massachusetts 
Englisli 

Dean's List 3; Newman Club 1, 3; Education Club 4. 
RONALD F. BOLTON 

250 Great River Road, Great River, Long Island, New York 
General Business anil Government 

Interfraternity Council 2, 3; Zeta Nu 2, 3, House Manager 2, 
Social Chairman 3; Dean's List 3; Campus Chest Committee 
3; Flying Redmen 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Flying Club 2. 
BERNARD W. BONNIVIER, JR. 
626 Hancock Road, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

WMUA 1; Interfraternity Council 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Tau 
Kappa Epsilon 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 3, President 3, 4; 
Marching Band 1; Military Ball Committee 3; Student Centen- 
nial Committee 3; Lacrosse 1; Student Christian Association 1, 
2; ASCE 1, 2, 3, 4; Civil Engineering Club 2, 3, 4. 
SANDRA E. BORG 

212 Pratts Mill Road, Sudbury, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Social Activities Committee 2; Women's Inter-Dorm Council 3, 
Social Chairman; House Counselor 4, House Chairman; House 
Officer 2, 3, Social Committee 2, Chairman 3; SWAP 4. 
MADELYN F. BORGES 
368 Chatterton Avenue, Somerset, Massachusetts 
English 

Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Chapter Correspondent 4; Campus 
Varieties 4, Student Playwright 4; Winter Carnival Committee 
2, 3; Newman Club I, 2, 3, 4; Speech Club 1, 2. 




RONALD F. BOLTON BERNARD W. BONNIVIER, JR. SANDRA E. BORG MADELYN F. BORGES 



338 



BEVERLY D. BOTELHO 

2263 Acushnet Avenue. New Bedford, Massachusetts 
English 

Index 3; Class Executive Council 3, 4; Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 
2, 3, 4, Alumni Secretary 3, Rush Chairman 4; Mortar Board 
4, President 4; Campus Varieties 2; Musigals 3, 4, Publicity 
Chairman 4; Dean's List 2. 3; Honors Colloquium 3; SCOPE 
4; Winter Carnival Committee 3. 
PAULA G. BOUDREAU 
Corey Hill Road, Ashburnham, Massachusetts 
Microbiology 

Microbiology Club 3, 4; Scuba Club 3; Synthesis 2; Young 
Republicans 1. 
ALBERT V. BOULERICE 
37 Either Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Freshman Directory 1; Social Activities Committee 1, 2; Inter- 
fraternity Council 3; Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 
2, Rush Chairman 3, Chaplain 2, 3, 4, Correspondent 4; Opera 
Workshop 1; Dean's List 1; Campus Chest Committee 1; Win- 
ter Carnival Committee 1,2. 
PATRICIA A. BOURBONNAIS 
133 Newman Avenue, Seekonk, Massachusetts 
Recreation Leadership 

Class Executive Council 3, 4; Chi Omega 1. 2, 3, 4, Activities 
Chairman 4; Revelers 2, 4, Vice President 4; Campus Varieties 

2, 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Cheerleader 1, 2, 3, 4, Co- 
Captain 4; Student Christian Association 1. 

JOYCE M. BOURGON 

105 Stephen Street, South Dartmouth, Massachusetts 
Zoology 

University Open House Committee 2; Winter Carnival Com- 
mittee 3; Lutheran Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 3, 4; Pre- 
Medical Club 1; Scuba Club 4; Water Ski Club 4. 
DANIEL W. BOUSQUET 
63 West Street, Southbridge, Massachusetts 
Forestry 

Dean's List 3; Lacrosse 1, 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Grounds Committee 4; Forestry Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Program 
Committee 4; Management 4; Outing Club 2, 3, 4. 
STEVEN B. BOWMAN 
101 Blake Street, Mattapan, Massachusetts 
History 

University Concert Association 2, 3, 4, Programs 3, 4; Soccer 1, 
2; Volunteer Fire Department 1, 2, 3; Bridge Club 2, 3, 4. 
WILLIAM J. BOYLE, JR. 
1 1 Maple Terrace, Westfield, Massachusetts 
Chemical Engineering 

Student Senate 3, WMUA Senate Reporter 3; Interfraternity 
Council 2, 3, Publicity Chairman 3; Alpha Sigma Phi 1, 2, 3, 
4, Rush Chairman 2, Pledge Trainer 3, Secretary 3; Dean's 
List 1; Dean's Scholar 1; Winter Carnival Committee 3. 
WALTER F. BOZENHARD 
59 Allen Street, East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Eta Kappa Nu 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2; IEEE 3, 4. 
JAMES H. BRADLEY 
40 Benton Road, Somerville, Massachusetts 
Government 

Index 3, Athletic Editor 3; Men's Judiciary 3, 4, Clerk 4; 
Interfraternity Council 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Theta Chi I, 2, 

3, 4, Secretary 4; Maroon Key 2, Treasurer 2; Dean's List 3. 






BEVERLY D. BOTELHO PAULA G. BOUDREAU 




ALBERT V. BOULERICE PATRICIA A. BOURBONNAIS 




JO^( I M. BOURGON DANIEL W. BOUSQUET 




STEVEN B. BOWMAN 



WILLIAM J. BOYLE, JR. 



WALTER F. BOZENHARD 



JAMES H. BRADLEY 



339 




JOSEPH W. BRADLEY, JR. PRISCILLA G. BRADWAY 

JOSEPH W. BliADLEY, JR. 

27 Belmont Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 
English — Journalism 

Collegian 1, 2, 3, 4, News Editor 2, Editorial Editor 2; Index 
3, 4. Associate Editor 3, Editor-in-Chief 4; Class Executive 
Council 2; Adelphia 4, Calendar Co-ordinating Board 4; 
Dean's List 3; SCOPE 4; SWAP 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Young Democrats 3, President 3. 
PRISCILLA G. BRADWAY 
East Hill Road, Monson, Massachusetts 
Home Economics Education 

Class Executive Council 2, Secretary 2; Women's Inter-dorm 
Council 1, 2; House Counselor 3, House Chairman 3; Sigma 
Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; SWAP 4, Co-Chairman 4; 
University Open House Committee 2; Student Christian Asso- 
ciation 1, 2; Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 2. 
ROBERT I. BRAUER 
3 1 Creswell Road, Worcester. Massachusetts 
Government 



ROBERT I. BRAUER 



MARIE E. BRAZAO 




Student Senate 2, 3; Student Union Governing Board 2, 3, 4; 
Adelphia 4; Fine Arts Council 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 4; Dean's List 
2. 3; Pi Sigma Alpha 4; Homecoming Committee 4; SWAP 3, 
4; Political Science Association 3, 4. 
MARIE E. BRAZAO 

51 Plymouth Avenue, Brant Rock, Massachusetts 
Marketing 

Class Executive Council 2; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Stewardess 
4; Campus Varieties 1, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Management 
Club 4, Secretary 4. 
MARK L. BRENNER 
21 Park Avenue, Newton, Massachusetts 
Horticulture 

Phi Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 4; Dean's List 3; SWAP 
3; Hillel Foundation 1, Executive Board 1; Floriculture Club 3, 
4; University Judging Teams 2; Horticulture Club 4, President 
4, AIBS 4. 

BEVERLY N. BRENT 
21 Britton Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Class Executive Council 2, 3; Pi Beta Phi 1, 2. 3, 4, Executive 
Council 3, President 4; Revelers 4; Dean's List 3; SWAP 4; 
Naiads 2, 3, 4, Junior Naiad Trainer 3; Student Christian 
Association 1, 2, 3; Gymnastics Club 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic 
Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 
COURTNEY S. BRICKMAN 
State Road, Great Barrington, Massachusetts 
Food Technology 

Collegian 2, 3, 4, Advertising Manager 3, Business Manager 4; 
Class Executive Council 3, 4; Alpha Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Social Chairman 3, Secretary 4; Maroon Key 2; SWAP 4; 
Winter Carnival Committee 3, Concert Chairman; Flying 
Redmen 1; Hillel Foundation I; Food Technology Club 3, 4, 
Vice President 4. 
LINDA R. BRILLIANT 
29 West Walnut Street 
Speech 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 2, 3, 4, Scholarship 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 
4; Honors Work 4; Special Events Committee 3; Hillel Foun- 
dation 1, 2; Speech Club 2, 3, 4. 



MARK L. BRENNER BEVERLY N. BRENT 





COURTNEY S. BRICKMAN 



LINDA R. BRILLIANT 



SUSAN A. BRINE 



JEAN E. BROADLAND 



340 




EDWARD M. BRODERICK 



RORY A. BRODERICK 



SUSAN A. BRINE 

24 Windemere Avenue, Arlington, Massachusetts 
Medical Tecluiology 

House Counselor 4; Opera Workshop 2; Dean's List 2, 4; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Education Club 1, 2; Women's Athletic 
Association 1. 
JEAN E. BROADLAND 

652 Shawmut Avenue, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Dean's List 2, 3; Judson Fellowship 2; Church Choir 3; Stu- 
dent Christian Association 1, 2; Education Club 4. 
EDWARD M. BRODERICK 
127 Strong Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Management 

House Counselor 2, 3, 4; Concert Band 1. 2, 3, 4; Marching 
Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Manager 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Air Cadet 
Squadron 1, 2; Management Club 3, 4. 
RORY A. BRODERICK 

854 Wilbraham Road, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

House Counselor 3, 4, House Chairman 4; Dean's List 3; 
SWAP 4; Orthodox Club 1, 2. 
DAVID A. BROOKS 
92 Standish Road, Watertown, Massachusetts 
Management 

Student Christian Association 1, 2; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; 
Management Club 4. 
ROBERT J. BROUILLET 
Baker Lane, Phillipston, Massachusetts 
Forestry 

Cross Country 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 4; Spring and Winter Track 
1, 2, 3, 4, Co-Captain 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Forestry Club 
1, 2, 3,4. 

ELIZABETH H. BRO'WN 
37 Elizabeth Street, Attleboro, Massachusetts 
English 

Edwards Fellowship 1; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 4; 
Art Club 2, 3; Modern Dance Club 2. 
MARYELLEN A. BROWN 
RED #2 Box 85, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 
Modern Dance Club 4; Physical Education Club 1, 2, 4. 





DAVID A. BROOKS ROBERT J. BROUILLET 




ELIZABETH H. BROWN 



MARYELLEN A. BROWN 



JEFFREY L. BRUCE 

9 Squanto Road, North Weymouth, Massachusetts 

Mathei'natics 

Northeastern University; Student Senate 1. 

RICHARD D. BUCK 

R.F.D., Chatham, Massachusetts 

Government 

Finance Committee 3; Student Senate 2, Budgets Committee 2; 

Dean's List 2; Distinguished Visitors Program 2; Pi Sigma 

Alpha 4. 

RICHARD H. BUCK 

212 Amherst Road, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Pre-Dental 

Dean's List 3. 

JANE M. BUCKLEY 

38 Old Colony Road, Arlington, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

House Counselor 3; Kappa Alpha Theta 2, 3, 4, Assistant 

Rush Chairman 3, President 4; Campus Chest Committee 1; 

SWAP 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 

3, 4; Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4: Ski Club 1. 




RICHARD D. BUCK 



RICHARD H. BUCK 



JANE M. BUCKLEY 



341 





WILLARD M. BUDDENHAGEN JAMES E. BULGER 



NANCY H. BULLARD JULIANNE M. BURACZYNSKI 




DONALD A. BURGESS LFF P. BURGESS, JR. 




THOMAS R. BURKE BROOKS A. BURLINGAME 



WILLARD M. BUDDENHAGEN 

19 McClellan Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Marketing 

Dean's List 3; Cheerleader 3, 4; Marketing Club 4, Publicity 
Chairman 4; University Economics Association 2, 3. 

JAMES E. BULGER 

20 Brainard Road, North Wilbraham, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Dean's I^ist 1, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2, 
Treasurer 2; American Chemical Society 4; Chemistry Club 4, 
President 4, 

NANCY H. BULLARD 

Main Street. Germantown, New York 

Elementary Education 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3; Debating Society 3, 4. 

JULIANNE M. BURACZYNSKI 

14 Euclid Avenue, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Matliematics 

Dean's List 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 

3; Commuter's Club 1, 2, Secretary 2; Outing Club 4. 

DONALD A. BURGESS 

92 Bungalow Avenue, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Roister Doisters 1; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Eta Sigma 1; Eta 

Kappa Nu 3, 4; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; Ski Team 2, 3, 4; Lacrosse 

1; Edwards Fellowship 1: Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; IEEE 3, 4; 

Ski Club 1; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4. 

LEE P. BURGESS, JR. 

8 Birch Road, South Easton, Massachusetts 

Wildlife Management 

Chorale 2; Forestry Club 1; Rod & Gun Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Zoology Club 4. 

JOHN E. BURKE 

Old Enfield Road, Belchertown, Massachusetts 
Government 

Handbook 3, 4, Editor 3, 4; Class Executive Council 4, Class 
Night Co-Chairman 4; Interfraternity Council 2, 3, 4, Secre- 
tary 4; Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Revelers 3; Distinguished 
Visitors Program 3, 4, Chairman 4; SWAP 3, 4; Newman 
Club 1,2, 3,4. 

KATHLEEN F. BURKE 

71 Ontario Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Human Development 

Dean's List 3; Orthodox Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics 

Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

THOMAS R. BURKE 

4 Colebrook Street, South Boston, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Boston College: Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Football 1; Newman Club 

3; Education Club 4; Physical Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice 

President; Young Democrats 2. 

BROOKS A. BURLINGAME 

3 1 Jeflferson Street. Newton, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Newton Junior College; Commuter's Club 4. 



342 




RONALD A. BURT 



ROGER A. BURTNETTE 



ROBERT W. BUSSEWITZ HAROLD A. BUTTERWORTH 



RONALD A. BURT 
6 Brown Street, Maynard, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Chorale 4; Dean's List 3; Mathematics Club 3, 4; Bridge Club 
2, 3, 4. 

ROGER A. BURTNETTE 

304 East Fairview Avenue, Altoona, Pennsylvania 
Mechanical Engineering 

American Society of Mechanical Engineers 3, 4; Sport Para- 
chute Club 3. 

ROBERT W. BUSSEWITZ 
North Street, Norfolk, Massachusetts 
Englisli 

Collegian 1, 2; Dean's List 3; Cross-Country 1; Volunteer Fire 
Department 1, 2, 3, 4; Four College Discussion Group 3; 
Outing Club 4; Pioneer Valley Folklore Society 4. 
HAROLD A. BUTTERWORTH 
483 Wahconah Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Rifle Team 2, 3, 4, Captain 3, 4; Newman Club 2, 3; ASME 3, 
4; Fencing Club 2. 
FRANCIS C. CAD WELL 

292 South Mountain Road, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Art 

Fine Arts Council 3; Operetta Guild 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 
3; Art Club 2, 3, 4, President 4; Astronomy Club 1, 2; Scuba 
Club 4. 

MARILYN A. CAIRNS 

738 Brock Avenue, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Field Hockey I, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3. 
4; Lacrosse 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Physical 
Education Club 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Basketball Manager 3, Playday Manager 4. 
ROSEMARY P. CALLAHAN 
36 Lexington Street, Burlington, Massachusetts 
Ejiglish 

Social Activities Committee 2, 3; Gamma Sigma Sigma 3; 
Homecoming Committee 2, 3; United Nations Week Commit- 
tee 1, 2; Winter Carnival Committee 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 4; Women's Athletic 
Association 1, 2. 
ALAN T. CAMPBELL 
20 South High Street, Melrose, Massachusetts 
History 

House Counselor 2, 3; Gryphon 2, 3; Dean's List 3, 4; Intra- 
mural Men's Sports 1, 2, 3; Orthodox Club 1; History Club 4; 
International Relations Club 4; Young Americans for Freedom 
2; Young Republicans 2, 3, 4. 
RICHARD L. CANE 
249 Chapel Street, Holden, Massachusetts 
Landscape Architecture — City Planning 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Alpha Zeta 3, 4; Newman 
Club 2, 3; Landscape Architecture Club 2, 3, 4. 
RICHARD E. CANNING, JR. 
Route 6A, East Sandwich, Massachusetts 
Animal Science 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Volunteer Fire Department 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Captain 4; Square Dance Club 1; Livestock Judging Team 4. 




FRANCIS C. CADWELL MARILYN A. CAIRNS 




ROSEMARY P. CALLAHAN ALAN T. CAMPBELL 




RICHARD L. CANE RICHARD E. CANNING, JR. 



343 




PETER J. CANNONE GEORGE A. CAPPANNELLI 




MERILEE R. CARLSON 



SANDRA CARLSON 



PETER J. CANNONE 

30 St. James Avenue, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Holyoke Junior College; Campus Chest Committee 3. 

GEORGE A. CAPPANNELLI 

99 Crest Road, Lymmfield, Massachusetts 

History 

Norwich University; Men's Intramurals 3, 4; Debating Society 

4; History Club 4. 

JOAN M. CAREY 

1 119 South Delphia Avenue, Park Ridge, Illinois 

Government 

Social Activities Committee 3; House Counselor 3; Pi Beta 

Phi 2, 3, 4, Historian 3, Vice President 4; Newman Center 1, 

2, 3; Political Science Association 3. 

BEVERLY A. CARLSON 

10 Sutcliffe Avenue, Canton, Massachusetts 
English 



Index 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Edwards Fellowship 1, 
2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3; Outing Club 3, 4; 
Psychology Club 1, 2; Young Republicans 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 

3,4. 

MERILEE R. CARLSON 
115 Beacon Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 
Education 

Special Events Committee 2, 3, 4; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 
3, 4, House Co-ordinator 4; Precisionettes 2, 3; Student Chris- 
tian Association 1, 2; Education Club 4, Exchange Student 
(New Mexico) 3. 

SANDRA CARLSON 

55 Aqua Vitae Road, Hadley, Massachusetts 
Home Economics — Education & Extension 
House Counselor 4; Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2; Naiads 4; Eques- 
trian Club 3; Home Economics Club 4; International Relations 
Club 3; Ski Club 1. 

ALFRED L. CARON 

158 Whitman Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Dean's List 3. 

HOWARD E. CARPENTER 

456 Mendon Road, North Attleboro, Massachusetts 

Personnel Management 

Accounting Association 2; Management Club 3, 4; Marketing 

Club 4. 

NORMAN M. CARPENTER 
12 Linden Avenue, Greenfield, Massachusetts 
Landscape Architecture 

Soccer 1; Skiing 3, 4; Newman Club 1; Landscape Architec- 
ture Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 2, 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 3, 4. 

DAVID E. CARR 

377 Main Street, North Easton, Massachusetts 

Forestry 

Forestry Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 




i?-#> 



iHi / 
ALFRED L. CARON 



HOWARD E. CARPENTER 




NORMAN M. CARPENTER DAVID E. CARR 



344 



H. ARNOLD CARR 

33 Ocean Avenue, Oak Bluffs, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Winter Carnival Committee 3; Lacrosse 1, 2; Bay State Rifles 

1, 2; Scuba Club 3, 4, Secretary 3, Vice President 4; Zoology 
Club 3, 4. 

JOHN C. CARR 

30 Burnside Street, Medford, Massachusetts 
Government 

Collegian 3; Phi Mu Delta 4; Tennis 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Political Science Association 4; Intramural Football 1, 2, 3, 4. 
JOAN E. CARROW 
196 Foster Street, Littleton, Massachusetts 
Dietetics and Institutional Administration 

Index 2; Campus Chest Committee 2; Soph-Frosh Committee 
2; Sophomore Banquet 2; Newman Club I, 2, 3; Home Eco- 
nomics Club 3, 4; Ski Club 1; Zoology Club 1. 
JOY A. CARTER 

65 Chenaille Terrace. North Adams, Massachusetts 
Zoology 
Dean's List 1. 3; Campus Chest Committee 1; Newman Club 1, 

2, 3, 4; Italian Club 1; Zoology Club 3, 4. 
FRANCIS M. CASEY 

156 Danforth Street, Framingham, Massachusetts 

General Business and Finance 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 2, 3, 4; Lacrosse 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 

1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 3, 4. 

JOSEPH ANTHONY CASSANO 

62 Howard Street, Haverhill, Massachusetts 

Public Health 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, Social Chairman 3, Pledge Trainer 4; 

Maroon Key 2; Dean's List 1; Honors Work 4; Pre-Medical 

Club 1, 2. 

FRANCIS R. CASTINE 

149 Brooks Road, Athol, Massachusetts 

English 

Dean Jr. College; Literary Magazine 4; Iota Gamma Epsilon 3, 

4; Roister Doisters 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1; Winter Carnival 

Committee 3, 4; Cheerleader 1; Philosophy Club 1; Ski Club 1, 

4. 




FRANCIS M. CASEY JOSEPH ANTHONY CASSANO 





iS^itk 



H. ARNOLD CARR 





JOAN h CARROW 



JOY A. CARTER 




FRANCIS R. CASTINE 



LEONARD H. CASTLE 



MARIORIE M. CASWELL ROGER I. CAVANAUGH 



LEONARD H. CASTLE 
43 Crosby Road, Newton 67, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

R.S.O. Committee 1; Interfraternity Council 3, 4; Alpha Epsi- 
lon Pi 1,2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, Treasurer 3, President 4; SWAP 4; 
Hillel Foundation 1, 2; Accounting Association 4. 

MARIORIE M. CASWELL 

381 East Street, West Bridgewater, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Edwards Fellowship 1; 
Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 3, 4. 

ROGER J. CAVANAUGH 
56 Harvard Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Campus Chest Committee 2; 
Military Ball Committee 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; 
Football 1, 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Accounting Associa- 
tion 4. 



345 




ROBERT W. CERRETANI MARGARET A. CHALMERS 




RICHARD W. CHASE 



MARK CHEREN 




ROBERT W. CERRETANI 

70 Crescent Avenue, Melrose, Massachusetts 
GovenimenI 

Stewards Club 3, 4; Interfraternity Council 3, 4; Kappa Sigma 
2, 3, 4, Steward 3, 4; Football 1; International Relations Club 
3; Political Science Association 3, 4; Fraternity Managers As- 
sociation 3, 4. 

MARGARET A. CHALMERS 

R.F.D. #1, North Adams, Massachusetts 

Home Economics — Relailing 

Operetta Guild 2; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Newman 

Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club I, 2, 3, 4. 

DEBORAH J. M. CHAPIN 

161 West Street, Ware, Massachusetts 

English 

Mount Holyoke College; Gamma Sigma Sigma 4; Canterbury 

Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Art Club 4. 

NATHALIE S. CHASE 

86 Center Street, Dennisport, Massachusetts 

Education 

Operetta Guild 1, 2, 3; Campus Varieties 2; Opera Workshop 2; 

Musigals 4; Newman Club 1; Education Club 3, 4; Italian Club 

2, Vice-President 2; Ski Club 2; Women's Athletic Association 2. 

RICHARD W. CHASE 

21 Bedford Street, Methuen, Massachusetts 
Business Management 

Bates College 1; Canterbury Club 3; Student Christian Associ- 
ation 2, 3, 4. 




JOHN B. CHILDS 



JOAN M. CHIMINELLO 



D. CAROL CHESLER 



LIM CHHEANG CHHLLY 



MARK CHEREN 

17 Lillian Road, Maiden 48, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Collegian 2, 3, 4, Editorial Staff, Critique 3, 4, Editor-in-Chief 
4; Alpha Phi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3; Operetta Guild 1 
ROTC Band 1; Dean's List 1; Honors Colloquium 1, 2, 3 
Honors Work 4; SWAP 3; United Nations Week Committee 3 
Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3. 4; Flying Club 1. 2; German Club 
1; International Club 3, 4, Executive Board 3; Literary Society 
4; Synthesis I, 2; University Economics Association 2, 3, 4; 
Four College Discussion Group 2, 3. 
D. CAROL CHESLER 
22 Crown Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
English 

Index 2, 3; Student Union Program Council 3; Special Events 
Committee; Sigma Delta Tau 2, 3, 4, Assistant Treasurer 3, 
Treasurer 4; Winter Carnival Publicity Committee 3; Hillel 
Foundation 1, 2, 3. 
LIM CHHEANG CHHLLY 
113 Vithei Ouk Loun, Phnom Penh, Cambodia 
Food Science and Technology 

House Counselor 3, 4; Alpha Zeta 3, 4, Treasurer; Food Tech- 
nology Club 3, 4, President; International Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
JOHN B. CHILDS 

90 Spring Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 
A nthropology — Sociology 

Collegian 3, 4, Editorial Editor 4; Ya-Hoo 4; Alpha Phi 
Omega 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 4; Dean's List 2; 
Honors Work 4; United Nations Week Committee 4; Sociol- 
ogy Club 3, 4, President 3. 



346 



JOAN M. CHIMINELLO 

88 Elm Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Social Activities Committee 3; Women's Inter-dorm Council 2, 
Vice President 2; Pi Beta Phi 2, 3, 4, Pledge Supervisor 4; 
Dean's List 3; Homecoming Committee 2; United Nations 
Week Committee 2; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Newman 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
DAVID L. CHIRAS 

45 Andover Street, Worcester 6. Massachusetts 
Pre-Medical 

House Counselor 3, 4; Gryphon 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 4; Mili- 
tary Ball Committee 4; Newman Club 2, 3; Le Cercle Fran- 
cais 1, 2, 3; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
CARLOS D. CHIRIBOGA 
27 Floral Street, Newton 61, Massachusetts 
Food Technology 

Transfer-Newton Junior College; Honors Colloquium 2; Wres- 
tling 2; Bay State Rifles 1; Food Technology Club 3, 4; Geol- 
ogy Club 2. 

BEVERLY A. CHRISTO 
54 Benefit Street. Worcester, Massachusetts 
English 

Class Executive Council 3; Women's Inter-dorm Council 2; 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Membership Chairman 4; 
Scrolls 2; Orthodox Club 1, 2, 3, Secretary 1, Treasurer 2, 
RICHARD CHUTORANSKY 
14 Curley Drive, Hudson, Massachusetts 
Chemical Engineering 





CONSTANCE CLARK 



FREDERICK G. CLARK 



Phi Mu Delta 2, 3, 4, Housemanager 3, 4, Judiciary 3, 4; Golf 
1; AIChE 3,4. 
DAVID L. CLANCY 
30 Willow Avenue, Quincy, Massachusetts 
History 

Student Senate 3, 4; Men's Judiciary 1, 2, 3; R.S.O. Committee 
4; House Counselor 2, 3; Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Treas- 
urer 4; Adelphia 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2; Honors Colloquium 1; 
Phi Eta Sigma 1; Homecoming Committee 4; SCOPE 3, 4; 
SWAP 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 
SHARON A. CLAPPER 
1 1 1 Eliot Avenue. West Newton, Massachusetts 
Home Economics 

Sigma Kappa 1, 2. 3, 4, House Manager 4; Student Christian 
Association 1,2; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
BRUCE P. CLARK 
15 View Street, Dalton, Massachusetts 
CHARLES B. CLARK 
2 West Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Dean's List 2, 3; Tau Beta Pi 4; ASCE 2, 3, 4. 
CONSTANCE CLARK 

56 Sanderson Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 
FREDERICK G. CLARK 
Upper Road, West Deerfield, Massachusetts 
Agronomy 

Dean's List 3; Volunteer Fire Department 1, 2, 3, 4, Deputy 
Chief 3; Student Christian Association 1; Agronomy Club 1, 2, 
3, Secretary-Treasurer 2, Vice President 3. 




DAVID L. CHIRAS CARLOS D. CHIRIBOGA 




BEVERLY A. CHRISTO RICHARD CHUTORANSKY 




BRUCE P. CLARK 



CHARLES B. CLARK 



347 




It's a fact — the Class of '64 registers and begins its career. 



As Frosh, Seniors Step Into Swing Of Things 



Posters shot up as the frosh became engaged in campus poHtics. 




348 




John Yablonski receives the tap from fellow Maroon Key at Student Leaders' Night. 



First bonfire opened season against Maine. 



X ROM the first registration day, the 
Class of '64 was official. And within the 
next few weeks the class began to func- 
tion as a social unit. 

Elections came first, and with them an 
introduction to campus politics. Candi- 
dates wasted no time in preparing politi- 
cal posters and covering entrance ways to 
various buildings with them. 

Soph-Frosh night was the first large 
scale social function to act as binding 
mortar for the class' variegated personal- 
ity. Homecoming followed. Then Winter 
Carnival and rushing. 

By the end of the year the class had 
made its mark for better or worse in the 
University's annals. In early Spring came 
recognition for outstanding classmates at 
the annual Student Leaders' Night. 

Largest order for the class to fill came 
in the junior year with Winter Carnival. 
That Carni tied in with the University's 
Centennial, and the big show rose in im- 
portance. 

The class, in its halcyon at the time of 
this writing, plunged into its last transi- 
tion, to be remembered as: Last year's 
seniors. 




349 



JUDITH T. CLARK 
22 Wright Street, Stoneham, Massachusetts 
English 

Collegian 1: Class Executive Council 3, 4; Class Night 4; 
House Chairman 3; Chi Omega 2. 3, 4 Assistant Pledge 
Trainer 3, Personnel Chairman 4; Mortar Board, Service Co- 
ordinator 4: Revelers, Publicity Chairman 3; Campus Varie- 
ties, Co-ordinator 3; Dean's List 1, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 2, 
3; Honors Work 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3. 
KENNETH E. CLARK, JR. 
114 Lincoln Apartment. Lincoln Avenue 
Amherst, Massachusetts 
PInwical EdiicaUon 

Transfer— Bradley University; Theta Chi 2, 3, 4; Baseball 3, 4; 
Physical Education Club 3, 4. 
RICHARD A. CLARKE 
10 Warwick Road, Watertown 72, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Interfraternity Council 1, 2, 3; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 3; Honors Work 4; 
Campus Chest Committee 2; Homecoming Committee 3; Eco- 
nomics Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 
ROBERT L. CLINTON, JR. 

511 Grove Street, Newton Lower Falls, Massachusetts 
Food Management 

Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; University Concert Association 
1; Chorale 1, 2; Military Ball Committee 3; Canterbury Club 
1; Arnold Air Society 3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2. 
JUDITH E. COBB 

121 West Bacon Street, Plainville, Massachusetts 
English 

House Counselor 3, 4, House Chairman 4; Roister Doisters 3, 
4; University Theater 3, 4; SWAP 4; Christian Association 1, 
2, 3, 4, Publicity 1; Wesley Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4, Publicity 
Chairman 2, Membership Chairman 3; Wesley Players 1, 2, 3, 
4; Wesley Aires 3, 4; Education Club 1, 2, 4; International 
Club 3, 4; Figure Skating Club 3. 
ROBERT H. COFFIN, JR. 
Old Boston Turnpike, Hubbardston, Massachusetts 
English 

Ya-Hoo 3; Class Executive Council 2, 3: Men's Inter-dorm 
Council 3, Social Chairman 3; President, Chadbourne House 
3; Alpha Phi Omega 3, 4, Minuteman Editor 3; Dean's List 2; 
Honors Work 4; Campus Chest Committee 3, 4; International 
Weekend Committee 4; Military Ball Committee Co-Chairman 
4; United Nations Week Committee 3; Winter Carnival Com- 
mittee 3; Chadbourne Bowling Team 2, 3, 4, Captain 2, 3, 4; 
Edwards Fellowship 1; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Young Republicans 1, 2, 3. 
JOHN K. COGGINS 
3 Prospect Street, Nantucket, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Greenough House Council 1, 2, President 2; Military Ball 
Committee 3; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Arnold 
Air Society 3, 4, Executive Officer 4. 
BEVERLY G. COHEN 
20 Belleaire Avenue, Lynn, Massachusetts 
English 

WMUA 2, 3, Secretary 2; Dean's List 2; Hillel Foundation 1, 
2, 3, 4, Dorm Representative 4; Education Club 3, 4; Pre- 
Medical Club 3, 
RALPH S. COHEN 

44 Solon Street, Newton Highlands, Massachusetts 
Pre-Dental 




RICHARD A. CLARKE ROBERT L. CLINTON, JR. 




JUDITH E. COBB ROBERT H. COFFIN, JR. 






JOHN K. COGGINS 



BEVERLY G. COHEN 



RALPH S. COHEN 



SHEILA COHEN 



350 




DONALD R. COLBURN EUGENE J. COLBURN, JR. 




ti m . 

ARTHUR L. COLLINS 



WILLL-iLM M. COLLINS, JR. 



Dean's List 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Medical Club 
1,2,3. 

SHEILA COHEN 

1224 Blue Hill Avenue, Mattapan, Massachusetts 
English 

Index 2, 3, 4; Sigma Delta Tau 2, 3, 4; University Theater 3; 
Winter Carnival Committee 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 3, 4. 
DONALD R. COLBURN 
130 Hockanum Street, Hadley, Massachusetts 
Industrial Engineering 
AIEE 3, 4. 

EUGENE J. COLBURN, JR. 
134 Gorden Street, Needham, Massachusetts 
Personnel Management 

Collegian 2, 3, 4; Cross Country 1, 2, 3, 4; Indoor, Outdoor 
Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Management 4. 
SHARON P. COLE 

70 Stevens Drive, Holbrook, Massachusetts 
Russian 

Russian Club 4, Secretary-Treasurer 4. 
ROBERT K. COLLIER 
28 Pond Street, Billerica, Massachusetts 
Math 

Phi Sigma Kappa 2, 3, 4; Marching Band 1; Swimming 1; 
Literary Society 2; Outing Club 2; Sociology Club 1, 2. 
ARTHUR L. COLLINS 
106 Wendel Street, Winchester, Massachusetts 
City Planning 

Class Executive Council 3, 4; Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4: Maroon 
Key 2; Military Ball Committee 4, Band Chairman 4; Student 
Centennial Committee 2, 3, 4, Finance Chairman 4; Winter 
Carnival Committee 3, Weekend Committee Chairman 3; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Landscape Architecture Club 2. 
WILLIAM M. COLLINS, JR. 
45 Florence Avenue, Arlington, Massachusetts 
Hotel and Restaurant Management 

Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Football 1, 2; Hockey 
1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Innkeepers Association 3, 4. 
JANE COLTON 

80 Laurel Road, West Springfield, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

University Concert Association 3; Musigals 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's 
List 2; Student Christian Association 1; Literary Society 1; 
Sociology Club 3, 4, Vice President 4. 
DOLORES J. COMEAU 
66 Lincoln Avenue, Swansea, Massachusetts 
English 

Index 3, 4; Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding 
Secretary 3, Vice President 4; University Concert Association 
3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2. 
LINDA R. COMERAS 
2 Terrace Avenue, Newton, Massachusetts 
Home Economics 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3; Student Zionist Association 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Secretary 3; Association for Social Action 2, 3, 4, Chairman 4; 
Industrial Administration Club 3; International Club 3. 
LEONARD W. CONDON 

R.F.D. #3 Thompson Street, Middleboro, Massachusetts 
Animal Science 

Dean's List 3; Football 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4, Basket- 
ball 1, Touch Football 2, 3, 4, Softball 3, 4; Newman Club 1; 
Animal Husbandry Club I, 4; University Judging Teams 4. 





JANE COLTON 



DOLORES J. COMEAU 



LINDA R. COMERAS 



LEONARD W. CONDON 



351 




Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1; Future Farm- 
ers of America 1, 2. 3, 4. President 3, State President 4. 
THOMAS F. CORDIS 

715 Longmeadow Street, Longmeadow, Massachusetts 
Business A d ministration 
St. Lawrence University. 
JAMES P. CORMIER 
7 1 Fiske Street, Southbridge, Massachusetts 
Englisit 

Campus Chest Committee 1, 2; Wrestling 2, 4; Newman Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Commuter's Club 4; Education Club 4; Outing Club 
1 ; Scuba Club 3; Spanish Club 1. 
PAUL J. COTE 

Milk Street, Blackstone, Massachusetts 
Physics 
Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Physics Club 

1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4. 
JAMES F. COULTER 

47 Field Street, Dalton, Massachusetts 
Marketing; 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1; Marketing Club 4. 
RONALD C. COURNOYER 
38 Foster Street, Southbridge, Massachusetts 
Government 

Men's Inter-dorm Council 1: Q.T.V. 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1; 
Baseball 1; I.F.C. Sports 1. 2, 3, 4; Newman Club I. 2, 3, 4; 
Air Cadet Squadron 1; International Relations Club 3; Mathe- 
matics Club 2; Marketing Club 4; Political Science Association 

2, 3. 

VERNON K. COUTU 

9 Moore Street, Millers Falls, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Commuter's Club 4. 

ROBERT J. COVALUCCI 

589 Fellsway West, Medford, Massachusetts 

Government 

Interfraternity Council 3. 4; Phi Mu Delta 2, 3, 4, Steward 2, 3, 

President 3. 4; Military Ball Committee 4. Chairman 4; SWAP 

4; Newman Club 1, 4; Equestrian Club 3; Political Science 

Association 4; Fraternity Manager's Board of Directors 3, 4. 



JAMES H. COOPEE 



DONALD S. COOPER 



RICHARD F. CONLEY 

151 Derby Road, Melrose, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4, B-Steward 4; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; 
AIEE-IRE 3, 4. 
JANET M. CONLON 

773 Rockdale Avenue, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Dean's List 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secre- 
tary 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2. 
JAMES H. COOPEE 

7 East Chestnut Street, Easthampton, Massachusetts 
Zoology 

Phi Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's 
Scholar 1; Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2; Phi Kappa Phi 3, 4; Distin- 
guished Air Force ROTC Cadet I, 2; Newman Club 1, 2; Pre- 
Medical Club 1, 2. 
DONALD S. COOPER 
161 Butler Road, Quincy, Massachusetts 
Dairy Technology 




THOMAS F. CORDIS 



JAMES P. CORMIER 






PAUL J. COTE 



JAMES F. COULTER 



RONALD C. COURNOYER VERNON K. COUTU 



352 



CURTIS J. COWLEY 

23 Potomac Street, West Roxbury 32, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Index 3, 4, Photography Editor 4; Ya-Hoo 2; Homecoming 
Committee 2; Fencing Club 1; Synthesis 1, 2; University Eco- 
nomics Association 2, 3, 4. 
CAROL A. COX 

48 Kenwood Avenue, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Campus Chest Committee 1: Student Christian Association 1, 
2; Psychology Club 4; Ski Club 1; Spanish Club 1, 2; Wom- 
en's Athletic Association 1, 2. 
WILLIAM H. COX. JR. 
3 1 Intervale Avenue, Saugus, Massachusetts 
Matheinalics 

Bates College 1, 2; Dean's List 1; Baseball 1, 2; Commuter's 
Club 4: Mathematics Club 3, 4. 
DONALD G. CRASCO 

169 Stratford Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 
German 

Index 1, 2, 3, 4, Photography Editor 3; Student Senate 3; 
Dorm House Council 1, 2, 3; University Concert Association 
1. 2. 3, 4. Publicity Manager 3, 4; SWAP 3; Intramural Sports 
1, Manager 1; Volunteer Fire Department 2, 3; German Club 
1, 2, 3; International Club 3. 
JAMES R. CRAWFORD 
294 Athens Street, South Boston, Massachusetts 
EngUsIt 

Collegian 4; Dean's List 1, 3; Pioneer Valley Folklore Society 
3,4. 

MARIE CRENZA 

95 Osborne Terrace, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Index 3; Class Executive Council 2, 3; Special Events Commit- 
tee 2, 3; Kappa Kappa Gamma L 2, 3, 4, Scholarship Chair- 
man 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; 
Modern Dance Club 2. 
BETH L. CROSBY 

3 Ledgemoor Lane, Westport, Connecticut 
Landscape Architecture 





CAROL A. COX 



WILLIAM H. COX, JR. 



DONALD G. CRASCO JAMES R. CRAWFORD 



Concert Band 1; Operetta Guild 2, 3, 4; Opera Workshop 3, 
Business Manager; Campus Religious Council 3, 4; Christian 
Science Organization 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 1, 2, President 3, 4; 
Landscape Architecture Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3 
JANET R. CROWELL 
621 Haverhill Street, Reading, Massachusetts 
Home Economics 

Pi Beta Phi 2, 3, 4, Assistant House Manager 3, Stewardess 4; 
R.S.O. Committee 2; Precisionettes 2, 3, 4: Student Christian 
Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Co- 
editor Skinner Scoop 2, Treasurer 4; Dean's Student Council 3, 
4. 

WALTER R. CROWTHER, JR. 
17 Maple Court, Maynard, Massachusetts 
Geology 

Handbook 1; Phi Sigma Kappa 2, 3, 4; Concert Band 1; 
Homecoming Committee 2; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Bay 
State Rifl.<;s 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Art 
Club 1; Geology Club 2, 3, 4; Mathematics Club 1, 2; Outing 
Club 2. ^ 




MARIE CRENZA 



BETH L. CROSBY 



JANET R. CROWELL WALTER R. CROWTHER, JR. 



353 



I^H^N^ 1^1 r^ ^^ ^ 




PETER A. CUCCHIARA LAWRENCE E. CUMMINGS 




MANUEL S. CUNHA 



JACK D. CURTISS 





ANTHONY W. CURTO GEORGE E. CUSSON 




PETER A. CUCCHIARA 

30 Hillcroft Road, Boston 30, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Alpha Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4, Executive Committee 2, Treasurer 3, 

Vice President 4; Bay State Rifles 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 

4; University Economics Association 3, 4. 

LAWRENCE E. CUMMINGS 

93 Howard Street, Melrose, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

AIEE-IRE 3, 4. 

MANUEL S. CUNHA 

246 Whitman Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; AIEE-IRE 2, 3, 4, Publicity Chair- 
man 4. 

JACK D. CURTISS 

14 Pierce Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

English 

Dean's List 2, 4; Basketball 1; Baseball 1. 

ANTHONY W. CURTO 

85 Adrian Avenue, West Springfield, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

House Council 4; Engineering Journal 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; 

Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; ASCE 2, 3, 4. 

GEORGE E. CUSSON 

52 East Court Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4, Second Vice President 2; Dean's 

List 2, 3; Campus Chest Committee 3; Homecoming Weekend 

3; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Le Cercle Francais 2; Mathematics 

Club 4; Marketing Club 4. 

JUDITH N. CUTTER 

43 Church Street, Wilmington, Massachusetts 

Education 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Art Club 4; Education Club 2, 4; 

History Club 4. 

JOSEPH M. DALY 

Doctors' Row-Monson State Hospital, Palmer, Massachusetts 
Government 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Flying Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 
2, President 3, 4; Political Science Association 4; Sport Para- 
chute Club 3, 4; Parachute Team 3, 4; Young Democrats 3, 4. 

PETER D. DAMIANO 

5 Gavin Avenue, Adams, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 
Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Eta Sigma 2; 
Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 



Eta Kappa Nu 3, 4; 
IEEE 2, 3, 4. 



BRADFORD H. DAMON 

46 Academy Road, Leominster, Massachusetts 

Government 

Transfer — Worcester Junior College; Intramurals 3, 4; Varsity 

Tennis 4; Student Christian Association 3, 4. 




JUDITH N. CUTTER 



JOSEPH M. DALY 



PETER D. DAMIANO BRADFORD H. DAMON 



354 



MARION E. DAMON 

Bay View Avenue, Hyannis, Massachusetts 

Government 

Women's Inter-dorm Council 3, 4, House Chairman 4; WAA 

1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 
JOHN E. DANIELS 

58 Cottage Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

General Electric Engineering Apprentice Program, Engineering 
Handbook 3, 4, Business Manager 3, Assistant District Man- 
ager 4; AIEE-IRE; IEEE. 
RICHARD W. DARLOW 
Eli Whitney Street, Westboro, Massachusetts 
Forestry Research 

Worcester Junior College; Pi Theta Kappa 1; Dean's List 1, 2. 
4; Honors Work 4; Alpha Zeta 3, 4; Xi Sigma Pi 4; Wesley 
Foundation 2, 3, 4; Forestry Club 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 2, 3, 4, 
Vice President 4; Biology Club 1. 
JUDITH WOOD DAY 

76 Indian Hill Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Index 4; Women's Inter-dorm Council 3, Social Committee; 
House Social Chairman 3; Dean's List 3; Student Christian 
Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 2, 3, 4, Publicity Chair- 
man 4; Zoology Club 2, 3, 4. 
FREDERICK L. DEACON 
27 Reynard Street, Gloucester, Massachusetts 
Chemical Engineering 
Dean's List 1; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation 1, 

2, 3, 4; AIChE 2, 3, 4. 
EDMUND G. DEARBORN, JR. 

19 Grove Street, Hopkinton, Massachusetts 
Forestry 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Phi Kappa Phi 4; Xi 
Sigma Pi 3, 4; Forester 4; Military Ball Committee 3; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2; Wesley Foundation 2, 3; Forestry 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Arnold Air Society 3, 4, Chaplain 4. 
WILLIAM E. DECELLES 
Amherst, Massachusetts 
Chemical Engineering 

Newman Club 1; AIChE 3, 4; Chemical Engineering Club 3, 
4. 

RALPH J. DEGREGORIO 
47 Eaton Road, Dedham, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

House Counselor 3, 4; Social Chairman 4; Winter Carnival 
Committee 3; Campus Religious Council 4, President 4; New- 
man Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Publicity Co-chairman 4, Executive 
Council 3, 4; Equestrian Club 2, 3; Landscape Architecture 
Club 4; Ski Club 1, 2, 3. 
ALICE M. DELANEY 
18 Alfred Road, Arlington, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

University Theatre 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education 
Club 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3. 
ROBERT C. DELISLE 
16 Wall Street, North Adams, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Transfer — North Adams State College; House Counselor 2, 3, 
4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; SWAP 4; Ski Team 2; Outing Club 3; 
Physical Education Club 3, 4, Vice President 4; Ski Club 2, 3, 
4; DOM Club 3, 4, Secretary 4. 





MARION E. DAMON 



JOHN E. DANIELS 





RICHARD W. DARLOW JUDITH WOOD DAY 





FREDERICK L. DEACON EDMUND G. DEARBORN, JR. 




WILLIAM E. DECELLES RALPH J. DEGREGORIO 



ALICE M. DELANEY ROBERT C. DELISLE 



355 




VICTOR DELISLE, JR. 



WILLIAM F. DE LORME 



VICTOR DELISLE, JR. 

196 Irving Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

AIEE-IRE 4. 

WILLIAM F. DE LORME 

Stone Farm Lane, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Forestry 

Dean's List 3; Volunteer Fire Department 2. 

JOSEPH A. DELVECCHIO 

33 Marion Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

Government 

Class Executive Council I; Social Activities Committee 1, 

Publicity Chairman 1; R.S.O. Committee 1, 2, 3, Treasurer 3; 

House Officer 3, 4, Vice President 3, President 4; Dean's List 

2, 3; Speech Department Experimental Theater 1; Pi Sigma 

Alpha 4; .SWAP 4; Young Democrats 3. 

JOSEPH D. DE VAUX 

19 Audrey Road, Belmont 78, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Alpha Sigma Phi 1. 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Bay State Rifles 1, 2, 

4; Special Advisor 4; Accounting Association 3, 4. 





JOSEPH A. DELVECCHIO JOSEPH D. DE VAUX 

ROBERT C. DE WALLACE 

17 Pheasant Avenue, Sudbury, Massachusetts 
Chemical Engineering 

Engineering Journal 3, 4, Editorial Editor 3, Executive Editor 
4; Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, House Manager 3; Lacrosse Team 1, 
2; Wrestling Team 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 4; Chemical Engineering 
Club 2, 3, 4; American Institute of Chemical Engineers 3, 4. 
PAUL D. DEXTER 

82 Wheeler Street, Gloucester, Massachusetts 
English 

Norwich University; Area Judiciary 3, 4, Chief Justice 4; 
House Counselor 3, 4, Chairman 4; Army ROTC Cadet Colo- 
nel 4. 

JOSEPH E. DIACHUN 
10 Overlook Road, Plymouth, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

University of Michigan; Sigma Phi Epsilon 3, 4; Newman Club 
3, 4. 

ANTHONY DI COLA, JR. 
169 Maynard Street, Agawam, Massachusetts 
Marketing 

Freshman Directory 2; Literary Magazine 1, 2; WMUA 1, 2; 
Student Union Program Council 4; House Counselor 2; Theta 
Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, House Chaplain 3, Rushing Chairman 4; Cam- 
pus Chest Committee 2, 3; United Nations Week Committee 
4; University Open House Committee 4; Hockey 1; Golf 1; 
Volunteer Fire Department 1, 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Fencing Club 1; Marketing Club 2, 
3, 4; Scuba Club 3, 4; Sport Parachute Club 3, 4; Young 
Democrats 1, 2, 3, 4. 
FRANCIS A. DIGIANO 
536 Summer Street, Brockton, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 3, 4; Dean's 
List 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; American Society of Civil 
Engineers 2, 3, 4. 
DIANA D'INDIA 

352 Priceton Street, East Boston, Massachusetts 
English-Journalism 

Collegian 2; Dean's List 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Publicity 
Chairman 3, 4. 



ROBERT C, DE WALLACE PAUL D. DEXTER 





JOSEPH E. DIACHUN 



ANTHONY DI COLA, JR. 



FRANCIS A. DIGIANO 



DIANA D'INDIA 



356 




JOHN M. DINEEN 



BARBARA A. DION 



JOHN M. DINEEN 

90 Simpson Drive, Framingham, Massachusetts 

Pliysical Education 

Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4. Secretary 3; Sigma Delta Psi 4; 

Military Ball Committee 2; Indoor-Outdoor Track 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Football 1, 2, 4, Lacrosse 3; Flying Redmen 1; Newman Club 

1, 2, 3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Physical Education Club 
4; Varsity "M" Club 3, 4. 

BARBARA A. DION 

47 Grant Street, Easthampton, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Dean's List 3, 4; SWAP 4: Lacrosse 3, 4; Field Hockey 3, 4; 
Tennis 3, 4; Bowling 3, 4; Softball 3, 4; Basketball 3, 4; 
Volleyball 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Physical Education Club 
3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 3, 4, Publicity Chairman 4. 
JUDITH E. DITMARS 
128 Brooks Avenue, Arlington, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Sigma Kappa 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 4; Educa- 
tion Club 3, 4. 
NEVILLE J. DOHERTY 
19 Phillips Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Food Economics 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 2; Phi Eta Sigma 2, 3, 
4; Phi Kappa Phi 4; Alpha Zeta 2, 3, 4; Agricultural Economics 
Society 4, President 4. 
JOHN M. DONASKY. JR. 
42 Franklin Street, Westfield, Massachusetts 
Government 

Interfraternity Council 2, 3, Greek Week Committee 2, I.F.C. 
Athletics 3; Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1. 2. 3, 4, Secretary 2, 3, 
Steward 3, Alumni Correspondent 3. Rush Chairman 2; Ma- 
roon Key 2, Vice President 2; Campus Chest Committee 2; 
Distinguished Visitors Program 2; Homecoming Committee 2. 
DOROTHY M. DONOVAN 
268 West Street, West Quincy, Massachusetts 
Home Economics 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Cheerleader 1, 

2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Econom- 
ics Club 1, 2, 3, Program Chairman 4; Dean's Student Council, 
Home Economics 3, Secretary 4. 





JUDITH E. DITMARS 



NEVILLE J. DOHERTY 




JOHN M. DONASKY, JR. 



DOROTHY M. DONOVAN 



RICHARD P. DONOVAN 

85 Miles Avenue, Westminster, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Dean's List 3; Golf 1; Track 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Accounting Association 3, 4, Secretary -Treasurer 4. 
PETER R. DORAN 
150 East Street, Lexington, Massachusetts 
Marketing 

Alpha Phi Omega 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 3; Honors Colloquium 
3; Beta Gamma Sigma 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1; 
Marketing Club 3, 4. 
GERALDINE DOW 

19 Steams Road, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 
EDWARD C. DOWDY, III 
1900 South Eads Street, Ariington 2, Virginia 
Accounting 

University of Georgia 1; House Counselor 3, 4; Interfraternity 
Council 1; Phi Kappa Tau, University of Georgia; Dean's List 
1; Phi Eta Sigma 1; Military Ball Committee 3; Men's Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 4; Bay State Rifles 2; Bay State Special Forces 
3, 4, Commander 4. 




RICHARD P. DONOVAN 



PETER R. DORAN 



GERALDINE DOW 



EDWARD C. DOWDY, III 



357 




LAWRENCE E. DOWEING DEBORAH A. DOWNEY 



JACQUELINE R. DOYLE 



JOHN T. DOYLE 




LAWRENCE F. DOWLING 

414 Pleasant Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Pre-Medical 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 1, 2, 3; Phi Eta 

Sigma 1; German Club 1, 2; International Club 2, 3, 4; Ski 

Club 1,2. 

DEBORAH A. DOWNEY 

423 Union Street, South Weymouth, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, House Manager 4; Winter Carnival 3; 

Precisionettes 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sociology Club 4. 

JACQUELINE R. DOYLE 

54 Middle Street, Florence, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Dean's List 1, 2; Honors Colloquium 3; Honors Work 4; 
Newman Club 1, 4; American Chemical Society 4, Vice Presi- 
dent 4; AIChE 1; Chemical Engineering Club 1; Commuter's 
Club 1, 2; Outing Club 3, 4; Ski Club 4. 

JOHN T. DOYLE 

193 Walnut Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Government 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 2, 3, 4, Vice President 4; Newman Club 1. 

MARY P. DOYLE 

82 Wolcott Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

History 

College of New Rochelle; Dean's List 2, 3; Newman Club 2, 4. 

GEORGE K. DRURY 

49 Walnut Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 

Physics 

Phi Mu Delta 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 3, 4; Phi Eta Sigma 1; 

Flying Redmen 1; Air Cadet Squadron 1; Physics Club 4. 

ROBERT M. DUDA 

Conway Road, West Whately, Massachusetts 

General Management 

Dean's List 2; Newman Club 1, 4; Commuter's Club 1, 2, 3; 

Management Club 3, 4. 

JAMES F. DUGGAN 

39 Parkin Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Finance 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 3, President 4; 

SWAP 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 3. 

SALLY ANN DUNLEA 

35 Forest Street, Middleboro, Massachusetts 

Education 

Concert Band 1, 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Art Club 4; 

Education Club 2, 3, 4; History Club 4. 

GRACE M. DUNN 

Washington Street, N. Pembroke, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 3; Nursing 

Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Student Nurse Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 



SALLY ANN DUNLEA 



GRACE M. DUNN 



358 





CONSTANCE M. DWYER 



DANIEL P. DWYER 



ROBERT G. DUCHARME ALLEN C. EASTMAN 



CONSTANCE M. DWYER 

29 Ticknor Place, Scituate, Massachusetts 

Fashion Retailing 

Newman Club I, 2, 3, 4; History Club 4; Home Economics 

Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

DANIEL P. DWYER 

c/o Kirkham, Standard Telephone and Cable Ltd., 

Footscray, Kent, England 

Business A dministration 

Alpha Phi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Alumni Secretary 2; Finance 

Committee 4; Dean's List 3; Bay State Rifles 1, 2; Student 

Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; ASME 1; Management Club 

2, 3, 4; Outing Club 3, 4; Young Republicans 3, 4. 

ROBERT G. DUCHARME 

328 Linden Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Holyoke Junior College; Honors Colloquium 1, 2; Newman 

Club 3, 4. 

ALLEN C. EASTMAN 

Audubon Road, Leeds, Massachusetts 

Art 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 2; Art Club 3, 4. 

SANDRA L. EDMANDS 

Mill Road, South Royalton, Vermont 

Elementary Education 

Class Executive Council 2; Pi Beta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Athletic 

Chairman 3, House Manager 4; Winter Carnival Committee 2; 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 2, 3, 4. 

ROSALYN EFFENSON 

127 Fuller Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2, Executive Committee 2; French Club 1, 

2; Sociology Club 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 4. 

JEFFREY I. EISMAN 

400 Giflford Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Pre-Dental 

Student Union Governing Board 4; Student Union Program 

Council 2, 3, 4, Chairman Personnel Committee 4; Alpha 

Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1; Soccer I; Pre-Medical 

Club 1,2, 3,4. 

LESLIE E. EKBERG 
15 Prospect Street, Needham, Massachusetts 
English 

University Concert Association 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Hon- 
ors Work 4; University Christian Fellowship 2, 3; Judson Fel- 
lowship 1; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3; Education 
Club 2, 3, 4; Literary Society 2. 

NEIL R. ELDER 

29 McKinley Street, Everett, Massachusetts 
Marketing 

Phi Mu Delta 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 4; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1; Marketing Club 4; Spanish Club 1. 

WAYNE P. ELLIOT 

Washington Mountain Road, Becket, Massachusetts 

Wildlife Management 

Men's Inter-dorm Council 3; Dormitory Social Chairman 2, 3; 

Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Judson Fellowship 1, 2; Rod & Gun Club 

2, 3, 4. 




SANDRA L. EDMANDS ROSALYN EFFENSON 




JEFFREY I. EISMAN 



LESLIE E. EKBERG 




NEIL R. ELDER 



WAYNE P. ELLIOT 



359 



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ELIZABETH M. ERKER CAROL E. ESONIS 




DONALD E. EVANS 



PAUL D. FAGG 



ROBERT C, ELLIS 

Box 137, Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts 
Forestry 

Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, Executive Committee 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 
3, 4; Phi Eta Sigma 2; Alpha Zeta 2, 3, 4; Xi Sigma Pi 3, 4; 
Wrestling 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 3; Football 1; Precisionettes Drill 
Master 1, 2, 3, 4; Forestry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 
1, 2,3,4. 

CRAIG E. ERICKSON 
225 Purchase Street, Milford, Massachusetts 
Accoiinling 

House Officer 3, Floor Representative; Dean's List 3; Military 
Ball Committee 3, 4; Varsity Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Chris- 
tian Association 1; Accounting Association 4. 
ELIZABETH M. ERKER 
9 Foster's Lane, Wakefield, Massachusetts 
Speech Therapy 

House Counselor 2, 3, House Chairman 3; Kappa Alpha Theta 
3, 4; SWAP 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Foreign Student 



Advisory Committee 3; Naiads 2; Edwards Fellowship 1, 2; 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Speech Club 2, 3, 4. 

CAROL E. ESONIS 

64 Prescott Street, West Boylston, Massachusetts 

Englisli 

Index 3; Class Officer — ^Treasurer 2, 3, 4; Class Executive 

Council 2, 3, 4; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Chaplain 3, 

Marshal 4; Revelers 3; Campus Varieties Cast 3; SWAP 3; 

Winter Carnival General Treasurer 3. 

DONALD E. EVANS 

29 Spapina Parkway, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Berkshire Community College; Dean's List 3, 4; University 

Economics Association 4. 

PAUL D. FAGG 

5 Andrews Street, Danvers, Massachusetts 

Philosophy 

House Counselor 3, 4; Baseball 1; Lacrosse 2, 3, 4; Philosophy 

Club 4; Pre-Medical Club 3. 

ROBERTA C. FAHLBUSCH 

1 16 Willow Street, South Hamilton, Massachusetts 

Speech Therapy 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 1, 2. 

CAROL A. FARBER 

402 Irene Street, Fairview, Massachusetts 

English 

Holyoke Junior College; Chorale 2; International Club 4. 

ROBERTA N. FARINELLA 

1 13 Samoset Avenue, Mansfield, Massachusetts 

English 

House Counselor 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; 

Publicity 3, President 4; Newman Club 1 

Club 3. 

HELEN H. FARRELL 

274 Bullard Street, Holden, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Work 4 

Society 4; Physics Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3. 

JOHN E. FARRELL 

1 1 Central Street, Brockton, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 



Naiads 1, 2, 3, 4, 
2, 3, 4; Education 



American Chemical 




ROBERTA N. FARINELLA 



HELEN H. FARRELL 



360 



Dean's List 1; Newman Club 1, 3, 4; IEEE 3, 4; Lambda Chi 
Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3, 4; Statesmen 1. 2, 3, 4. 
Business Manager 4. 
P. BARBARA FARRELL 
743 Cambridge Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 
Speecli 

Index 3, 4. Greek Editor 4; House Counselor 3; Panhellenic 
Council 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3. 4, 
Panhellenic Delegate 3, 4; Revelers 3, Secretary, Treasurer 3; 
Scrolls 2; University Concert Association 1, 2; Campus Varie- 
ties 3; Campus Chest Committee 1, 2: United Nations Week 
Committee 3; Student Christian Association 1, 2; Speech Club 

1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2. 
RICHARD L. FARRELL 

93 North Main Street, Florence, Massachusetts 

ANN E. FEELEY 

156 Grove Street, West Medford, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Social Activities Committee 1; Opera Workshop 2; Winter 

Carnival Committee 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Nursing Club 

2. 3, 4; Spanish Club 1. 
HARRIET S. FEINGOLD 

37 Crapo Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Home Economics 

Class Executive Council 3; Sigma Delta Tau 1, 2, 3, 4, Alumni 
Secretary 4; Revelers 4; Dean's List 3; Winter Carnival Com- 
mittee 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, Executive Board 2; Home 
Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
ROBERT C. FELDT 
58 Oxford Street, Auburn, Massachusetts 
Forestry 

Worcester Junior College; Lutheran Club 3, 4; 4-H Club 3, 4; 
Young Republicans 3. 
REST T. FENNER, III 
22 Wynnewood Road, Boston, Massachusetts 
Government 

Men's Inter-dorm Council; Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Social Chairman 3, 4; Military Ball Committee 2; Freshman 
Soccer 1; Freshman Lacrosse 1; Flying Redmen 1, 2; Air 
Cadet Squadron I, 2; Water Ski Club 3. 





JOHN E. FARRELL P. BARBARA FARRELL 




Rl SI T. FENNER, III 



ROBERT F. FERN 



ROBERT F. FERN 

G-1 Hampshire House, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

University of Cincinnati; Collegian 2; Dean's List I, 2, 3, 4; 
American Chemical Society 4; Debating Society 4. 
ROBERT F. FERRARA 
72 Verndale Avenue, Attleboro, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; Dean's List; Winter Carnival 
Committee 3; Lacrosse 2; Newman Club 3, 4; Accounting As- 
sociation 4. 

DEENA T. FERRIGNO 
5298 Flotron Avenue, Dayton, Ohio 
Theatre 

Class Executive Council 2; Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Warden 4; Operetta Guild 2; Roister Doisters 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Secretary 4; Dean's List 1, 3; Alpha Lambda Delta 1, 2; 
Winter Carnival Committee 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Com- 
muter's Club 1, 2; University Theatre 3, 4. 



ROBERT F. FERRARA 



DEENA T. FERRIGNO 



361 




JOANA FERRIS 


JONATHAN D. FIFE 


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ALAN FINKELSTEIN 



SUSAN C. FINLAY 




JOANA FERRIS 

65 Great Woods Road, Saugus, Massachusetts 
History 

Newman Club 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2; Eques- 
trian Club 2, 3; History Club 4; Political Science Association 4. 
JONATHAN D. FIFE 
Eastham. Massachusetts 
General Business 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute; Collegian 2, 3; Ya-Hoo 3, 
Associate Editor 3; Student Senate 3, 4, Treasurer 3, President 
4; Class Executive Council 4; Student Union Governing Board 
4; R.S.O. Committee 2, 3, 4; SWAP 4. 
ALAN FINKELSTEIN 
205 Kent Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Social Activities Committee 4; Winter Carnival Committee 4; 
Intramural Football 1, 2, 3; Intramural Softball 1, 2, 3; Hillel 
Foundation 1, 2, 3; Bridge Club 2, 3; Accounting Association 
3. 4; Business Administration Club 3, 4; Commuter's Club 4; 
Management Club 4; Spanish Club 1, 2. 
SUSAN C. FINLAY 
48 Summit Street, Peabody, Massachusetts 
History 

Dean's List 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
History Club 4. 
ROBERT B. FIORE 
12613 Safety Turn, Bowie, Maryland 
Forestry 

House Officer 2, Secretary 2; Dean's List 3; Xi Sigma Pi 3, 4; 
Forestry Club 2, 4. 




MARGARET A. FISKE 



GEORGE R. FISETTE 



MICHAEL S. FIRST 



NANCY K. FISH 



RONNIE-SUE FIREMAN 
8 Butterworth Road, Beverly, Massachusetts 
Home Economics 

Sigma Delta Tau 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 3, Corresponding 
Secretary 4; Dean's List 3; Student Centennial Committee 3; 
Home Economics Club 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2. 
MICHAEL S. FIRST 

295 Upland Avenue, Newton Highlands, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Index 2; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 
3, 4; Psychology Club 3, 4; Water Ski Club 4. 
NANCY K. FISH 
2830 Serra Drive, Warren, Michigan 
Mathematics 

Women's Inter-dorm Council 3; House Counselor 3, Social 
Chairman Advisor 3; Chi Omega 2, 3, 4, Vocations Chairman 
4; Winter Carnival Committee 2; Precisionettes 3, 4; Mathe- 
matics Club 2, 3. 
MARGARET A, FISKE 

513 Parker Street, East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Exchange Student New Mexico 3; Class Executive Council 2; 
House Counselor 4; Dean's List 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Education Club 2. 3. 4. 
GEORGE R. FISETTE 

168 Montague City Road, Turners Falls, Massachusetts 
Chemical Engineering 

Military Ball Committee 3, 4, Chairman 4; Swimming 1, 2; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Treasurer 2, 3, 4; Air Cadet Squad- 
ron 1, 2; American Chemical Society 1, 2; Chemistry Club 1, 



362 



2; AIChE 3, 4; Chemical Engineering Club 3, 4; Arnold Air 
Society 4. 

MARILYN L. FITCH 
Kannapo Road, Ashley Falls, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Field Hockey, Basketball, Softball, Volleyball, Lacrosse, Bad- 
minton 1, 2, 3, 4; Equestrian Club 1, 2; Physical Education 
Club 3, 4; Pre-Medical Club 1; Women's Athletic Association 
1, 2, 3, 4, Badminton Manager 4, Board 4. 
JUDITH G. FITTS 

14 Coolidge Avenue, Southbridge, Massachusetts 
English 

Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Rush Chairman 4; Scrolls 2; Dean's List 
I, 2, 3; Student Centennial Committee 2; Winter Carnival 
Committee 3; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 
JAMES F. FITZGERALD 
1354 Page Boulevard, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 
AIEE-IRE 2, 3, 4. 
SUSAN H. FITZGERALD 
105 Cushing Avenue, Belmont, Massachusetts 
Government 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4, Parliamentarian 3, 4; Newman 
Club 1, 2, 4; Marching Band 1, 2, 3; Young Republicans 3, 4. 
FRANCIS P. FITZPATRICK 
211 South Street, Foxboro, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Beta Kappa Phi 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 2; Varsity Soccer 2; 
Freshman Soccer 1; ASME 3, 4; Scuba Club 4; Engineering 
Associates 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4. 




MARILYN L. FITCH 



JUDITH G. FITTS 





JAMES F. FITZGERALD 



SUSAN H. FITZGERALD 



PATRICIA D. FOSS 



DAVID C. FOSTER 



GENE K. FLEMING 

Cockle Corners Road, South Chatham, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

House Counselor 3; Tau Kappa Epsilon 3, 4; Flying Redman 2; 
Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Mathematics Club 4. 
RICHARD G. FLOYD, JR. 
Pleasant Street, Middleton, Massachusetts 
Agronomy 

Stockbridge School of Agriculture; Volunteer Fire Department 
1, 2, 3, 4, Chief 3, 4; Agronomy Club 3, 4; Arboriculture Club 
1, 2, 3; Fernald Entomological Club 2, 3; Future Farmers of 
America 4; Outing Club 1, 2. 
ALAN S. FORMAN 
86 Cypress Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 
Government 

Dorm Treasurer 1; Tau Epsilon Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Historian 3, 
Secretary 4; Revelers 4; Campus Varieties 3, 4; Dean's List 3, 
4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; IFC Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Hillel 
Foundation 1. 
PATRICIA D. FOSS 

76 Breckwood Boulevard, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Operetta Guild 2, 3, 4; Canterbury Club 1; Education Club 4; 
Modern Dance Club 2, 3, 4. 
DAVID C. FOSTER 
Walancit Trail, Littleton, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

House Counselor 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Collo- 
quium 3; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4, Vice President 4; Military Ball 
Committee 4; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; ASCE 2, 3, 4; Civil 
Engineering Club 2, 3, 4. 




FRANCIS P. FITZPATRICK GENE K. FLEMING 




RICHARD G. FLOYD, JR. ALAN S. FORMAN 



363 



ANDRE P. FOURNIER 

Bedford Road, Lincoln, Massachusetts 

Mecliaiiiciil En^>ineeriiig 

Gryphon 5; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 5; Air Cadet Squadron I, 

2; ASME 3, 4, 5; Scuba Club 3, 4, 5, Vice President 3, 

President 4, 5. 

EDWARD L. FRADO. JR. 

8 Swan Avenue, South Weymouth. Massachusetts 

Eiiiflish 

House Officer 1, Vice President Hills South I; Beta Kappa Phi 

2, 3. 4; Campus Chest Committee 1; Military Ball Committee 
4; Gymnastics I, 2, 3, 4; Lacrosse 1;, Cheerleader 4; Air Cadet 
Squadron 1, 2; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4. 

LUCILLE D. FRANCESCON 

Howland Road. Lakeville, Massachusetts 

Etcmcniary Education 

Pi Beta Phi 2. 3, 4. Recording Secretary 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 

3, 4; Education Club 2. 3. 4. 
PAMELA MARY FRANKLIN 

56 Washington Street, Plainville, Massachusetts 
Zoology 

Newman Club I, 2, 3; Outing Club 4; Zoology Club 2, 3, 4, 
Secretary 3, Vice President 4. 
GAIL M. FRATAR 

45 Puritan Circle. Springfield, Massachusetts 
Mathemalics 

Chorale 1, 2; University Open House Committee 2; Pioneer 
Valley Folklore Society 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4. 
PAUL J. FRATICELLI 
39 Forest Street, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 
Marketing 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 4; Newman Club 
1, 2; Italian Club 1, 2; Marketing Club 3, 4. 
FAITH E. FREEMAN 
Sturbridge Road, Spencer, Massachusetts 
English 

Student Arts & Music Committee 3; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1, 2, 3; Italian Club 1, 2; Literary Society 4. 
CHERYL L. FRENCH 
710 Park Street, Stoughton, Massachusetts 
History 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Work 4; Honors Colloquium 1, 2, 
3; Intervarsity Christian Fellowship 4; Student Christian Asso- 
ciation 1, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4, Yearbook 
Editor, Supper Co-Chairman, Deputations Chairman 4; Educa- 
tion Club 4; 4-H Club 1, 2; History Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; Le 
Cercle Francais 1, 2, 3. 
RICHARD J. FRENCH 
23 Dodge Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Marketing 

Q.T.V. 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Interfraternity Council 1, 4; 
Marketing Club 4. 
THERESA J. FRENI 

10 Elkway Avenue, Norwood, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Chorale 1; Intervarsity Christian Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4, Secre- 
tary 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3; Mathematics 
Club 4; Outing Club 3; Square Dance Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
BARRY S. FRIEDMAN 

208 Rounds Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Pre-Dentistry 




ANDRE P. FOURNIER EDWARD L. FRADO, JR. 




LUCILLE D. FRANCESCON PAMELA MARY FRANKLIN 




GAIL M. FRATAR 



PAUL J. FRATICELLI 





FAITH E. FREEMAN CHERYL L. FRENCH 



RICHARD J. FRENCH THERESA J. FRENI 



364 





BARRY S. FRIEDMAN 



PATRICIA R. FRUGOLI 




House Officer 2, 3, Vice President 2, President 3; Assistant 

Varsity Basketball Manager 2; Varsity Basketball Manager 3; 

AFROTC Rifle Team I, 2; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre- 

Medical Club 1, 2. 

PATRICIA R. FRUGOLI 

Summer Street, Marshfield, Massachusetts 

Italian-Spanish 

Tennis 1, 2, 3; Bowling 1, 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Italian 

Club 1, 2, 4. Vice-President 4; Spanish Club 4; National Society 

of Teachers of Italian 4. 

ANN L. FRYER 

78 Locust Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

Naiads 1, 2, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2; Nursing 
Club 1,2, 3,4. 

ANTHONY L. GAGLIARDUCCI 
246 Mill Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Business Administralion — Management Department 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Activities Chairman 2, Historian 
3; Revelers 2; Marching Band 1; Campus Varieties 4; Newman 
Club 1, 2; Management Club 3, 4, Publicity Chairman 4. 
CALVIN P. GALE 

182 Pleasant Street, East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 
Forest Management 

Bay State Rifles 1; Judson Fellowship 1, 2; Student Christian 
Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Forestry Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 
President 4; Square Dance Club 1, 2. 
JAMES J. GALLAGHER, III 
151 Davis Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 
Englisli 

Class Executive Council 4; Beta Kappa Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Senior 
Week Committee 4; Greek Ball Committee 2; Winter Carnival 
Committee 3, Publicity Committee 3; Bay State Rifles 1; New- 
man Club 1, 2, 4; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2. 
DAVID J. GARBER 

42 Orchard Road, Brookline 46, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Collegian 1, 4; Student Senate 2, 3; Class Executive Council 2, 
3; Men's Inter-dorm Council 1, 2, 3, 4; House Counselor 2, 3, 
4; Interfraternity Council 2, 3, 4; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Treasurer 3, 4; Homecoming Committee 2, 3; Student Centen- 
nial Committee 3; SWAP 2; Winter Carnival Committee 3; 
Intramurals 1; Hillel Foundation 1, 2; Accounting Association 
1, 2, 3, 4; Management Club 3; Marketing Club 3. 
DOROTHY V. GARNEAU 

79 Wellington Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
English 

Berkshire Community College; Ya-Hoo 1, 2; Sigma Sigma 
Sigma 3, 4, Social Chairman 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Newman 
Club 1,2; Young Democrats 1. 
ALGIMANTAS V. GARSYS 

43 McClintock Avenue, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, Pledge Trainer 3; Sigma Delta 

Psi 2, 3, 4; Track 2, 3. 4; Soccer 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2; 

Physical Education Club 4; Intramurals 1. 2, 3, 4. 

CLARK GAY 

315 Lincoln Apartments, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Business A dministration 

Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 4. 



CALVIN P. GALE 



JAMES J. GALLAGHER, III 




DAVID J. GARBER 



DOROTHY V. GARNEAU ALGIMANTAS V. GARSYS 



CLARK GAY 



365 




BARBARA E. GERRY 

10 North Atkinson Street, Newburyport, Massachusetts 

Miillwmatics 

WMUA 2; Lambda Delta Phi 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 4; Operetta 

Guild 3, 4, Assistant Stage Manager 4; Opera Workshop 3, 4; 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Mathematics Club 3, 4; 

Ski Club 2; Women's Athletic Association 2, 3, 4. 

DONALD A. GIBBS 

71 Crestwood Lane, Marlboro, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

JOHN F. GIBSON, JR. 

59 Lathrop Street, South Hadley Falls, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Dean's List 2, 3; Accounting Association 4. 

PATRICIA A. GILGUT 

259 Lincoln Ave., Amherst, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Special Events Committee 3; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, 

House Manager 4; Dean's List 3; Precisionettes 2, 3, 4, Squad 

Leader 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Commuter's Club 1; 

University Economics Association 3, 4. 

PETER M. GILLON 

34 Winthrop Avenue, Reading, Massachusetts 

Government 

House Counselor 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 3; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 

2, Commander 2; Arnold Air Society 3, 4, Comptroller 3, 
Commander 4; AFROTC Rifle Team 1, 2. 

ANN I. GILLVAN 

17 Winchester Road, Newton, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Student Senate 3, Secretary, Women's Affairs Committee 3; 

House Counselor 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 

3, 4; Education Club 1. 2, 3, 4. 
RAYMOND H. GLABACH 

R.F.D. Bernardston, Leyden, Massachusetts 
Chemical Engineering 

Dean's List 3, 4; Research Project 4; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1, 4; Dorm Representative 1; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; 
American Chemical Society 3, 4; AIChE 3, 4; Chemical Engi- 
neering Club 3, 4. 



PATRICIA A. GENETTI 



BARBARA E. GERRY 



GARY E. GEDACHT 
42 Byron Street, New Bedford, Connecticut 
Accounting 

Student Centennial Committee 3; United Nations Week Com- 
mittee 2; Hillel Foundation I, 2, 3, 4; Calvin Club 3, 4; 
Accounting Association 2, 3, 4; AIEE-IRE 1; Astronomy Club 
1, 2; Business Administration Club 2, 3, 4; Young Republicans 
1,2, 3,4. 

ALLAN E. GEHRING 
1941 Central Avenue, Albany, New York 
English 

House Counselor 2, 3, 4, Social Advisor 3; UMOC Contest 
Winner 3; SWAP 3; Soccer 1; Tennis 1; Ski Club 2. 
PATRICIA A. GENETTI 
34 Loomis Street, Bedford, Massachusetts 
English 

Freshman Directory 3; Iota Gamma Upsilon 2, 3, 4, President 
4; House Counselor 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; SWAP 4; Newman 
Club 1, 2, 3,4. 




DONALD A. GIBBS JOHN F. GIBSON, JR. 




PATRICIA A. GILGUT 



PETER M. GILLON 



ANN I. GILLVAN 



RAYMOND H. GLABACH 



366 



RICHARD M. GLADSTONE 
87 High Street, Florence, Massachusetts 
Public Health 

House Officer 1, Treasurer; Dean's List I, 2, 3, 4; Honors 
Work 4; Track 1, 2, 3; Intramural Football 1, 2, 3; Com- 
muter's Club 4; Microbiology Club 3, 4; Zoology 2, 3. 

SHELDON E. GLAZER 

141 Chiswick Road, Brighton 35, Massachusetts 

Physics 

Bay State Rifles 1, 2, 4, Student Advisor 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 

2, 3, 4; Student Zionist Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Membership 

chairman, Treasurer 2, Vice President 3, President 4; Physics 

Club 2, 3, 4. 

CHARLES E. GLEW 

1 144 Concord Street, Framingham, Massachusetts 

Business Administration 

Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4, Conductor 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 3; 

Hockey 2, 3, 4, Captain 4; Lacrosse 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 

2, 3, 4; Business Administration Club 3. 4; Marketing Club 4; 

University Economics Association 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4. 

EARL F. GODFREY, JR. 

156 Barrington Road, Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Government 

Newman Club 1, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Political Science 

Association 4. 

CLAIRE L. GOLDRICK 

6 Rhode Island Avenue, Natick, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Index 4; House Counselor 3; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Assistant Pledge Trainer 3; Scrolls 2; Newman Club 1, 2; 

Education Club 4. 

JONATHAN J. GOLDTHWAITE 

125 Edgebrook Road, Framingham, Massachusetts 
Botany 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Phi Eta Sigma 1; Phi 
Kappa Phi 4; Varsity Fishing Team 1, 2, 3, 4; Judson Fellow- 
ship 1; Rod and Gun Club 1. 





RICHARD M. GLADSTONE SHELDON E. GLAZER 




CLAIRE L. GOLDRICK JONATHAN J. GOLDTHWAITE 



CHARLES E. GLEW EARL F. GODFREY, JR. 

PATRICIA J. GOODRICH 

Old Amherst Road, Sunderland, Massachusetts 
Microbiology 
Dean's List 1; Musigals I. 
SAMUEL J. GORVINE 
364 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 
English 

Collegian 4; Literay Magazine 3, 4; Bay State Rifles 1. 
LINDA GOULD 

63 Pine Street, Centerville, Massachusetts 
English 

Index 2; International Weekend Committee 3; Student Chris- 
tian Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 
PETER J. GRAHAM 
47 Water Street, Winchester, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Student Senate 4; Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Steward 2, 3, 4; 
Lacrosse 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Physical Education Club 
1, 3, 4; Steward's Club 2, 3, 4, President 4. 





PATRICIA J. GOODRICH SAMUEL J. GORVINE 



LINDA GOULD 



PETER J. GRAHAM 



367 




JOSEPH F. GRALENSKI, JR. BRIAN D. GRAVES 




ALDEN J. GRAY 



STEPHEN G. GRAY 





JOSEPH F. GRALENSKI, JR. 

290 Main Street, Three Rivers, Massachusetts 

Elc/nenlary Ediicalion 

Dean's List 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 4; 

Spanish Club 1, 2. 

BRIAN D. GRAVES 

12 East Cleveland Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Recrealion 

Interfraternity Council 3, 4; Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3, 4; 

Maroon Key 2; Campus Varieties 4; Dean's List 4; Winter 

Carnival Committee 3; Soccer 2, 3, 4; Recreation Club 2, 3, 4; 

Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4. 

ALDEN J. GRAY 

R.F.D. Shelburne Falls, Ashfield, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Chorale 3, 4, Manager 4; Dean's List 1; Judson Fellowship 3, 4; 

AIEE-IRE 3, 4. 

STEPHEN G. GRAY 
51 Parker Road, Wellesley, Massachusetts 
English 

Distinguished Service Awards Committee 3, Chairman 3; Stu- 
dent Senate 2, 3, Chairman Men's Affairs Committee 3; Inter- 
fraternity Council 1, 2, 3, 4, Publicity Chairman 3, Olympics 
Chairman 3, President 4; Phi Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, Rushing 
Chairman 2, 3, Pledgemaster 2, 3, President 4; FMA Board of 
Directors 3, 4, Vice-Chairman 4; Student Centennial Commit- 
tee 3; SWAP 3, 4; Campus Religious Council 3. 

MICHAEL C. GREASON 

312 Lincoln Apts., Amherst, Massachusetts 

Forestry 

Forestry Club 3. 

DAVID F. GREENWOOD 

823 Lincoln Apartments, Lincoln Avenue 
Amherst, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 
Northeastern University. 

BARBARA A. GREGORY 

8 Water Street, Winchester. Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Collegian 2; Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 4; 
Winter Carnival Committee 3; Precisionettes 2; Newman Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion 2. 

STEPHANIE M. GRIFFIN 

18 Stearns Road, Belmont, Massachusetts 

Home Economics 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club 1, 

Executive Board 2, Secretary 3. 

WILLIAM H. GRIFFIN 

79 Curtis Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

Phi Mu Delta 1, 2; AIChE 3, 4; Flying Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

LAWRENCE F. GRILLO 

3 Richardson Road, Peabody, Massachusetts 

Pre-Dental 

Lacrosse 1; Pre-Medical 2, 3, 4. 



2, 3, 4, 



MICHAEL C. GREASON DAVID F. GREENWOOD 




BARBARA A. GREGORY STEPHANIE M. GRIFFIN 



WILLIAM H. GRIFFIN 



LAWRENCE F. GRILLO 



368 



E. PATRICIA GRIMLEY 

15 Birch Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Women's Ski Team 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 

3. 4, Executive Board 2; Nursing Club I, 2, 3, 4, President 4; 
Sociology Club 1: Ski Club 1, 2. 

TRUDY S. GRINDE 

New Marlboro Road, Monterey, Massachusetts 
Botany 

Operetta Guild 3; Roister Doisters 2; Naiads 2, 3, 4; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2; Wesley Foundation 2, 3, 4; Wom- 
en's Athletic Association 2, 3, 4. 

DONNA L. GROW 

Montague Road, Leverett, Massachusetts 

Education 

Education Club 4. 

RICHARD J. GROWITZ 

43 Summer Circle. Lynn, Massachusetts 
Chemical Engineering 

Men's Inter-dorm Council 4; Bowling 2, 3; Chemical Engineer- 
ing Club 2, 3, 4; American Institute of Chemical Engineers 2, 
3,4. 

JOHN A. GRYBKO, JR. 

Main Street. Sunderland. Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Tau Beta Phi 4; Swimming 2. 3, 4; Dean's List 1; Phi Eta 

Sigma 1; ASME 3. 4; Sociology Club 2, 3. 

RONALD P. GUERTIN 

Plantation Street, Northbridge, Massachusetts 

Hotel Management 

Homecoming Committee 3. 4: Winter Carnival Committee 3: 

Fencing Club 1 ; Oriental Sports Club 4; Ski Club 2. 

THEODORE R. GUILFORD 

School Street. Barre, Massachusetts 
Landscape Architecture 

Alpha Zeta 2, 3, 4, Scribe 3, Chancellor 4; Landscape Architec- 
ture Club 1, 2, 3. 4; Zoology Club 1, 2. 

ROBERT H. GUSCIORA 

1969 Central Street. Stoughton, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Lambda Chi Alpha 2, 3, 4. House Manager 3, 4; Concert 

Band 1, 2, 3; Dean's List 1; Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2; Eta Kappa 

Nu 3, 4; AFROTC Chicago Tribune Award 1; IEEE 3, 4. 

Program Chairman 4. 

JOY E. GUSTAFSON 

236 West Main Street, Millbury, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Field Hockey 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Softball 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Bowling 2, 3, 4; Volleyball 3, 4; Lacrosse 3, 4; Naiads 1, 2, 3, 

4, W.A.A. Representative 4; Canterbury Club 1; Physical Edu- 
cation Club 3, 4; Water Ski Club 2: Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation 1, 2, 3, 4. 

RICHARD GUZOWSKI 

82 Welland Road, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts 

Pre-Medical 

WMUA 3, 4; House Counselor 4; Dean's List 1; Track 1; Air 

Cadet Squadron 1,2; Pre-Med Club 2, 3, 4. 




E. PATRICIA GRIMLEY 



TRUDY S. GRINDE 





DONNA L. GROW 



RICHARD J. GROWITZ 




JOHN A. GRYBKO, JR. 



RONALD P. GUERTIN 




THEODORE R. GUILFORD ROBERT H. GUSCIORA 



JOY E. GUSTAFSON 



RICHARD GUZOWSKI 



369 





RICHARD K. GUZOWSKI ELLIOTT J. GVENTER 



CHARLES D. HADLEY, JR. ROBERT A. HAGUE 



RICHARD K. GUZOWSKI 

22 Breen Avenue, Methuen, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 4: Freshman Lacrosse; 

Newman Club 1. 2, 3, 4; ASCE 3, 4. 

ELLIOTT J. GVENTER 

137 Franklin Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Military Ball Committee 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Hillel 

Foundation 1, 2, 3; Intramurals Official 1, 2, 3, 4. 

CHARLES D. HADLEY, JR. 

9 Oakdale Avenue, Westfield, Massachusetts 

Government 

Lowell Technological Institute I; Human Relations in Industry 

Seminar 1; Class Officer, Vice President 1, Lowell Tech.; 

House Officer 3, 4. Treasurer; Alpha Phi Omega 3, 4; Political 

Science Association 2, 3. 4, President 3, 4; Young Republicans 

3,4. 



ROBERT A. HAGUE 

64 Loom is Street. Southwick, Massachusetts 

DORIS A. HAKES 

Willow Street, Stockbridge, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Campus Chest Committee 3; Edwards Fellowship 2, 3. 4, 

Secretary-Treasurer 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Belchertown State School Volunteer 1. 2, 3, 4, Co-ordinator 3, 

4. 

DEIDRE C. HALEY 

25 Circular Avenue, Lee, Massachusetts 

English 

Caesura. Editor-in-Chief 

DAVID N. HALL 

24 Hitchcock Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Industrial Engineering 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 3, 4; Military Ball Committee 3, 4; Winter 

Carnival Committee 3; Bay State Rifles 1, 2, 3; AIIE 4. 

MARIAN A. HALL 

37 Cottage Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Astronomy 

Collegian 1, 2; Index 4; Class Executive Council 2, 3; Winter 

Carnival Committee 3; Canterbury Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 

2; Student Christian Association 1, 2; Astronomy Club I, 2, 3, 

4; Commuter's Club 2, 3; Women's Athletic Association 1. 

JULI C. HAMBLY 

Creek Road, Marion, Massachusetts 

English 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation 1, 

2; Wesleyaires 1, 2; Spanish Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dames Club 4. 

LOUIS S. HAMBLY, JR. 

Creek Road, Marion, Massachusetts 

Wildlife Biology 

Dean's List 3; Student Christian Association 1,2, 3, 4; Forestry 

Club 4; Rod & Gun Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

JUDITH ANN HANLON 

45 Woodcliff Road. Quincy, Massachusetts 

Sociology 





DAVID N, HALL 



MARIAN A. HALL 



JULI C. HAMBLY 



LOUIS S. HAMBLY, JR. 



370 




JUDITH ANN HANLON 



EVHL'lN A. HANSON 



RICHARD J. HANSON BERNARD S. HARLAND 



Index 2, 3; Class Executive Council 2; Kappa Kappa Gamma 
1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant Treasurer 2, Treasurer 3, Corresponding 
Secretary 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Student Christian 
Association 1, 4, Women's Membership Chairman 4. 
EVELYN A. HANSON 
53 Sunridge Drive, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Iota Gamma Upsilon 3, 4, Scholarship Chairman 4; Dean's 
List 1, 2, 3; Phi Kappa Phi 4; Student Christian Association 1; 
Education Club 3. 
RICHARD J. HANSON 
26 Bay State Road. Melrose, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 2, 3, 4; ASCE 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Civil 
Engineering Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4. 
BERNARD S. HARLAND 
82 Madison Street, Chjcopee Falls, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

University of Maryland; House Counselor 4; Dean's List 2; 
University Open House Committee 3; Campus Religious Coun- 
cil 3; Newman Club 2, 3, President 4; Accounting Association 
4; Square Dance Club 2, 3. 
JOHN P. HARRINGTON 
40 Adam Terrace, Lowell, Massachusetts 
Business Administration 

Kappa Sigma 2, 3, 4, House Manager 3, 4; Indoor and Spring 
Track 1, 2, 3, 4. 

STEPHEN T. HARRINGTON 
1 Adams Road, Milford, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Kappa Sigma 2, 3, 4, Athletic Chairman 3, 4; Lacrosse 1, 2, 3, 
4, Captain 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Physical Education 
Club 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4. 
NEIL HARRIS 

255 North Washington Street, North Attleboro, Massachusetts 
Recreation 

Maroon Key 2; Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-Rush 2, Athletic 
Chairman 3, Chaplain 2, 3; Dean's List 4; Campus Chest 
Committee 2; Football 1; Baseball 1, 3, 4; Volunteer Fire 




JOHN P. HARRINGTON STEPHEN T. HARRINGTON 

Department 1, 2; Campus Religious Council 2, 3; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Recreation Club 2, 3, 4. 

VIRGINIA G. HARRIS 

34 Congress Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

Pre-Med 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 2. 

CHARLES B. HARRISON 

I New Meadow Road, Lynnfield, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

House Counselor 3, 4; AFROTC Band 1, 2; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 

4; Phi Eta Sigma I, 2; Phi Kappa Phi 4; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; 

Wrestling 1; Wesley Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; ASME 4; Arnold 

Air Society 3, 4. 

JANET E. HARRON 

80 Mumford Avenue, Groton, Connecticut 

Psychology 

Dance Committee 1, 2; Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, Song Chairman 

4; Student Christian Association 1. 2. 




NEIL HARRIS 



VIRGINIA G. HARRIS 



CHARLES B. HARRISON 



JANET E. HARRON 



371 




You can't know players without a scorecard. 
From the way the game was played, no players 
had scorecards. 



Soph-Frosh Night 



kJOPH-Frosh Night posed the first so- 
cial confrontation for the Class of '64 as 
a class. 

Callous sophomores were to face the 
frosh in a basicetball game, provide varied 
entertainment and a dance. The frosh, for 
their part, came in force to participate. 
Clowning turned out to be the greatest 
contribution to the unintended mock 
hoop match. 

In the end, everyone got into the act by 
means of free-for-all volley ball matches. 




And Joan Chiminello served Cokes. 



372 




First Social Go 






7-~^i'^- 



Varied entertainment include individual gymnastic performances. 



■,J«d 




Fearless Frosh Five take to the floor. Even the score was forgotten. 



373 




NANCY E. HARTE DONNA M. HASTINGS 




DAVID L. HAUTANEN 



LINDA R. HA WES 




ABIGAIL S. HAZEL 



KENNETH B. HEDBERG 





ILONA HEINE 



ROBERT D. HEINOLD 



PENELOPE HAICH CHARLES C. HAUSMANN 



NANCY E. HARTE 
589 Brush Hill Road, Milton, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Transfer from Lasell Junior College; Pi Beta Phi 4, Historian 
4; Newman Club 3; Education Club 4. 
DONNA M. HASTINGS 
47 Schley Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Operetta Guild 2; Dean's List 3, 4; Student Christian Associa- 
tion I, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 2. 3, 4, Smoke Signals Editor 4; 
Philosophy Club 1; Sociology Club 3, 4; Square Dance Club 
1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Women's Athletic Association 1. 
PENELOPE HATCH 

21 Hampton Knolls, Holyoke, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Collegian 4; Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4; Precisionettes 2, 3, 4, 
Squad Leader 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 
CHARLES C. HAUSMANN 
538 South Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 
Accounting 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Accounting Association 2, 3, 4. 

DAVID L. HAUTANEN 

288 Commercial Street, Provincetown, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Interfraternity Council 2, 3; Phi Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4, Record- 
ing Secretary 2, Vice-President 3, Treasurer 4; Alpha Phi 
Omega 1; University Concert Association 2, 3; Winter Carnival 
Committee 3; Canterbury Club 1; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1, 2; Accounting Association 3, 4; Education Club 3. 

LINDA R. HAWES 

9 Princeton Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Index 4; Chorale 1, 2, 3; Dean's List 3, 4; New Mexico 

Exchange Program 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Student 

Christian Association 1, 2; Wesley Foundation 4; Education 

Club 3, 4; Gymnastics Club 2; Zoology Club 4. 

ABIGAIL S. HAZEL 

175 Mount Vernon Street, West Newton 65, Massachusetts 

French 

Centenary College for Women. 

KENNETH B. HEDBERG 
200 Claflin Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 
Production Management 

Tau Epsilon Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, House Manager; Alpha Phi Omega 
1, 2; Chorale I, 2; Bay State Rifles I, Platoon Commander 2; 
Student Christian Association 1. 2; Equestrian Club 2; Manage- 
ment Club 3, Vice-President 4; Scuba Club 3, 4; Zoology Club 1. 

ILONA HEINE 

New Ipswich Road, Ashby, Massachusetts 

Food Technology 

Chemistry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; American Chemical Society 2, 3, 4; 

Food Technology Club 3, 4. 

ROBERT D. HEINOLD 

Wattaquadock Road, Bolton, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 4; Honors Work 4; 

Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2; Phi Kappa Phi 3; Mathematics Club 3, 4; 

Scuba Club 2, 3, 4. 



374 




ELEANOR J. HELGELAND PETER B. HELLIWELL 



ELEANOR J. HELGELAND 

45 1 Court Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Chorale 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 4; Intervarsity Christian Fellowship 

1, 2, 3, 4, President 2, Librarian 3; Mathematics Club 4. 
PETER B. HELLIWELL 

1 1 Church Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Economics 

WMUA 3; House Counselor 1, 2, 3; Skiing 2; Pre-Medical 

Club 2; Ski Club 1, 2; University Economics Association 4. 

MICHAEL M. HENCH 

Star Route, Montague, Massachusetts 

English 

Collegian 2, 3, 4; Index 4; Literary Magazine 3, 4; Student 

Senate 3, Chairman of Public Relations 3; Operetta Guild 2, 

3; Roister Doisters 1, 2; Opera Workshop 2, 3; Dean's List 1, 

2, 4; Honors Colloquium 2, 3; Debating Society 3; Pioneer 
Valley Folklore Society 2, 3; G.E. College Bowl Finalist 4. 
JANE M. HENRIQUES 

5 Columbus Avenue, Northampton, Massachusetts 

Art 

Winter Carnival Committee 3; Student Christian Association 1, 

2, 3; Art Club 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 2. 

ROBERT L. HENRY 

230 State Road, North Adams, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Alpha Sigma Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Student Christian 

Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Society of Automotive Engineers 4; 

ASME 2, 3, 4. 

EDWARD T. HERLIHY 

1 1 Valley Avenue, Lynn, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Military Ball Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Arnold 
Air Society 3, 4, Information Staff Officer 4; Air Cadet Squad- 
ron 1, 2; ASCE 1, 2, 3, 4. 

SUSAN HERRON 

294 West Wyoming Avenue, Melrose, Massachusetts 
English 

House Counselor 3; Pi Beta Phi 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secre- 
tary 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2; 
Education Club 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2. 
LEON W. HESELTON 
22 Phillips Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Kappa Phi 4; Eta Kappa Nu 3, 4; 
Tau Beta Pi 3, 4, Secretary 4; AIEE-IRE 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4. 
LOIS E. HESELTON 
61 Main Street, Northfield, Mass. 
Sociology 

Special Events Committee 3; Gamma Sigma Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Recording Secretary 3, Second Vice President 4; Dean's List 1, 
2, 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1; Psychology Club; Sociology Club. 
STEPHEN B. HEWEY 
71 Ashland Street, Taunton, Massachusetts 
Government 

Collegian 2, 3, 4, 5; Student Senate 2, 3, 4, Chairman Services 
Committee 4; R.S.O. Committee 3; Sigma Phi Epsilon 2; 
Dean's List 3; Pi Beta Phi House Boy 3, 4, 5. 




MICHAEL M. HENCH JANE M. HENRIQUES 





ROBERT L. HENRY 



EDWARD T. HERLIHY 





SUSAN HERRON 



LEON W. HESELTON 




LOIS E. HESELTON 



STEPHEN B. HEWEY 



375 




Pi Bcla Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Athletic Chairman 4; Naiads 3, 4; 
Newman Club 1, 2. 3, 4; Mathematics Club 3. 

JOAN M. HOLLAND 

122 Grosvenor Road, Needham, Massachusetts 

Eleiiicnlciiy Ediicalion 

Class Executive Council 2, 3; House Counselor 3; Iota 

Gamma Upsilon 3, 4; Canterbury Club 1, 2; Education Club 

3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1,3; Zoology Club 2, 3, 4. 

JEFFREY A. HOLLWAY 

1 164 Northampton Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Pxycholofiy 

Holyoke Junior College; Pre-Veterinary Club 3. 

ROGER W. HOOPER 

404 High Rock Street, Needham, Massachusetts 

Wood Technology 

Beta Kappa Phi 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 4; Swimming Team 1; 

Judson Fellowship 1, 2; Forestry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing 1, 2; 

Ski Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Forest Products Research Society 4. 

RONALD W. HOPPER 

1349 Main Street, Holden, Massachusetts 

Mutlwmcilics 

Judson Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4, Publicity Chairman 2, President 

3, Deputations Chairman 4; Student Christian Association 1; 

Oriental Sports Club 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Spanish Club 4. 

WALTER W. HORAN 

209 Beaconsfield Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Transfer U.S. Coast Guard Academy 

Finance 

Lambda Chi Alpha 2, 3, 4, Rush Chairman 3, 4; Newman 

Club 2, 3; Accounting Association 2. 

CHARLES H. HORSTMANN 

165 South Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

House Counselor 3, 4; House Secretary 2; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 

4; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4, Recording Secretary 4; Intramural Sports 

2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; ASCE 2, 3, 4, Vice President 

4; Civil Engineering Club 2, 3, 4, Vice President 4. 



JOHN D. HOLDEN 



EILEEN M. HOLLAND 




JOAN M. HOLLAND JEFFREY A. HOLLWAY 



SHIRLEY C. HODGINS 

6 Belvidere Avenue, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Operetta Guild 4; Dean's List 2; Student Christian Association 

1, 2; Wesley Foundation 1,2, 3, 4; Education Club 2, 3, 4; Le 

Cercle Francais 1; Women's Athletic Association I. 

THOMAS C. HODGKINS 

50 Jackson Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 

General Business and Finance 

Transfer — Colby College. 

JOHN D. HOLDEN 

2195 Demington Drive, Cleveland 6, Ohio 

Horlicidtiire 

Stockbridge School of Agriculture; Collegian 1, 2; Class 

Treasurer 2; Soccer 2; Bowling 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Literary Society 3; Olericulture Club 1; Square Dance Club 4. 

EILEEN M. HOLLAND 

12 Makepeace Street, Saugus, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 



ROGER W. HOOPER 



RONALD W. HOPPER 




WALTER W. HORAN CHARLES H. HORSTMANN 



376 



JILL S. HORTON 

Old State Road, Berkshire, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Dean's List 3; Student Christian Association 1; 

1, 2, 4, 



Nursing Club 



ARTHUR V. HORVITZ 

363 Bedford Street. New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Pie-Dental 

Student Union Governing Board 4; Swimming 1; Intervarsity 

Christian Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 2; Amateur 

Radio Association I, 2; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

NEIL J. HOWARD 

154 Barnard Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

House Council Greenough 4; Dean's List 3: Men's Intramurals 

3, 4; AIChE 2, 3, 4; Chemical Engineering Club 2, 3, 4. 

PATRICIA J. HOWARD 

10459 Jamaica Road, Glens Falls 30, New York 

Speech Therapy 

House Counselor 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Colloquium 3; 

Honors Work 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3. 

PHILIP A. HOWARD 

200 Nichols Street, Norwood, Massachusetts 

Government 

Student Senate 3, 4; Student Union Governing Board 4; Alpha 

Phi Omega 3. 4; Dean's List 2; Campus Chest Committee 3; 

United Nations Week Committee 3. 

DAVID F. HUGHES 

496 Chestnut Street, Athol, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Worcester Junior College. 

JOHN J. HUGHES 

416 Mt. Vernon Street, Dedham, Massachusetts 

Marketing 

Phi Mu Delta 3, 4; Newman Club 3. 4; Marketing Club 3. 4. 




PHILIP A. HOWARD 



DAVID F. HUGHES 





NEIL J. HOWARD 



PATRICIA J. HOWARD 





JOHN J. HUGHES 



FREDERIC E. HUGO 



JUDY E. HULL 



BONNIE J. HUNTER 



FREDERIC E. HUGO 

85 Gould Street, Wakefield, Massachusetts 
Economics 

House Counselor 3; Pre-Medical Club 1; University Econom- 
ics Association 2, 3, 4. 

JUDY E. HULL 

42 Fairfield Street. Amherst. Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Lambda Delta Phi 3, 4; Chorale 4; Dean's List 3; International 

Club 3, 4; Philosophy Club 4. 

BONNIE J. HUNTER 

74 Spring Street, Stoneham, Massachusetts 
English 

Collegian 2; Class Executive Council 2, 3; Women's Inter- 
dorm Council 2; Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4, Marshal 3, 
House Manager 4; Revelers 3; Scrolls 2; Campus Varieties 3; 
Winter Carnival Committee 3; Co-Chairman Ball Committee; 
Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 



377 




ROBERT D. HUOT PRISCILLA A. HURLBUTT 




BARI-LYNNE HURWITZ ROBERT HUTCHINSON, JR. 




SUSANNE C. HYLAND FRANK J. INFUSING, JR. 




ROBERT D. HUOT 

98 Bardwell Street, South Hadley Falls, Massachusetts 
Mccliiiniciil Ennini'criiii; 

Alpha Phi Omega 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Phi Eta Sigma 1; 
Sigma Xi 3,4; ASME2, 3, 4. 

PRISCILLA A. HURLBUTT 

1 1 Gleason Street. Methuen. Massachusetts 

Eleinentury Education 

Judson Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 

2; Education Club 3, 4. 

BARI-LYNNE HURWITZ 

21 Crescent Road. Leominster, Massachusetts 

English 

Hillel Foundation I, 4; German Club 1. 

ROBERT M. HUTCHINSON, JR. 

16 Castle Rock Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

Government 

Literary Magazine 4; House Counselor 2, 3, 4; Kappa Sigma 1, 

2, 3, 4, Scholastic Chairman 3, Pledge Trainer 4; Dean's List 

2, 4; Men's Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4, Tennis 1, 2; Newman Club 

I, 2, 3, 4; Political Science Association 4; Young Democrats 4. 

SUSANNE C. HYLAND 

441 Shoemaker Lane, Agawam, Massachusetts 

Frencli 

Marching Band 1; Dean's List 2; Tennis Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Le 

Cercle Francais 2, 3; French Corridor 3. 




KAREN L. JACOBSEN 



CAROL A. JACOBSON 



JOHN D. IRANY 



LONE ISHOI 



FRANK J. INFUSING, JR. 

6 Rockview Road. Hull, Massachusetts 

Historv 

Football 1, 2; Lacrosse 3, 4, Co-Captain 4; Newman Club 1, 

2; Varsity "M" Club 3, 4. 

JOHN D. IRANY 

River Road, South Deerfield, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Dean's List 3; Honors Work 4; Debating Society 2, 3; Univer- 
sity Economics Association 2, 3, 4. 

LONE ISHGI 

4 Thornton Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 
English — A rt 

Caesura 4; Dorm Treasurer 1, 2; Dean's List 1; Honors Col- 
loquium 1; Art Club 4; Equestrian Club 2; Women's Athletic 
Association 1, 2. 

KAREN L. JACOBSEN 

6 Shawnee Road, Arlington, Massachusetts 

Home Economics 

Musigals 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

CAROL A. JACOBSON 

184 Mount Vernon Road East, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

English 

Marching Band 1; Dean's List 1; Lutheran Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Worship Chairman; Student Christian Association 1; Education 

Club 3, 4, 



378 



DAVID M, JACQUOT 

24 McKinley Terrace, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Berkshire Community College; Newman Club 3, 4, Dorm 

Captain 4; Accounting Association 3, 4. 

DOUGLAS W, JAMES 

147 Willow Street, Leominster, Massachusetts 

Business A dministration 

Dean's List 3; Management Club 3, 4. 

ROBERT J. JARVIS, JR. 
16 Shaw Street, East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 
Landscape Architecture 

Alpha Sigma Phi 1. 2, 3, 4. Secretary 3, Stewart 3, Vice- 
President 4; Dean's List 3; Hockey 1; Lacrosse 1; Canterbury 
Club 1; ASCE 2; Art Club 4; Civil Engineering Club 1, 2; 
Landscape Architecture Club 2, 3,4. 

MICHAEL J. JARYNA 

898 Rodamn Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 

Economics 

QTV 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Interfraternity Athletics 1, 2, 3, 

4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; University Economics Association 4. 

STEVEN L. JENKINS 
26 Red Rock Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 
English 

WMUA 1, 2; University Symphony Orchestra 4, Publicity Di- 
rector 4; Concert Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Personnel Manager 2, 3, 4; 
Operetta Guild 1; Dean's List 4; Hillel Foundation 2; Debating 
Society 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3, 4; Literary Society 4. 




JULIANNE A. JERZYLO 



HELEN M. Jh/IOKSkl 



VIRGINIA A. JENKINS 

1 13 Harvard Street, WoUaston 70, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3. 4; Honors Colloquium 2, 3; Honors Work 3, 

4; Phi Kappa Phi 3, 4; Alpha Lambda Delta 1, 2; Outing Club 3. 

CAROLYN L. JENKS 
19 Greene Street, Wollaston, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

International Weekend Committee 3; Lutheran Club 3, 4; Stu- 
dent Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Sociology Club 3, 4. 

GAIL E. JENSEN 

14 Belvidere Street, Chicopee, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Class Executive Council 3, 4; Women's Inter-dorm Council 2; 
House Counselor 3; Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant Treas- 
urer 3, Treasurer 4; Dean's List 2, 3; Winter Carnival Com- 
mittee 3; Student Christian Association 1, 2; Ski Club 1. 

JULIANNE A. JERZYLO 

5 School Street, Saugus, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Dean's List 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Nursing Club I, 2, 

3,4. 

HELEN M. JEZIORSKI 

89 Hecla Street, Uxbridge, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Education 

Club 1, 2, 3,4, President 4. 




DAVID M. JACQUOT 



DOUGLAS W. JAMES 




ROBERT J. JARVIS, JR. 



MICHAEL J. JARYNA 




STEVEN L. JENKINS 



VIRGINIA A. JENKINS 




CAROLYN L. JENKS 



GAIL E. JENSEN 



379 



HARRY C. JILSON 

1 Morning Drive. Bass River. Massachusetts 

Miiiuii;i'niciit 

Handbook 4: Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, 3. 4, Social Chairman 3; 

SWAP 3; Student Christian Association 2. 3, 4; Management 

Ckib 3. 4; Westview Social Club 2. 3. 4. 

ALLAN W. JOHNSON 
53 Beach Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Theta Chi 1. 2. 3. 4, Executive Council 3; Military Ball Com- 
mittee 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Soccer 1; Hockey 1, 2, 
3. 4; American Chemical Society 1. 2; Mathematics Club 3, 4; 
Varsity "M" Club 2. 3, 4. 

LORIN G. JOHNSON 
Stow Road. Marlboro, Massachusetts 
Landscape Architecture 

Alpha Phi Omega 1, 2, 3. 4, Treasurer 1. 2, Corresponding 
Secretary 2. 1st Vice President 4; Channing Club 1, 2; Land- 
scape Architecture Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

ROBERT J. JOHNSON 

143 Arlington Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

History 

Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4, Recording Secretary 3, President 4; 

Dean's List 3; United Nations Week Committee 3, 4; Newman 

Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Commuter's Club 4; History Club 3, 4; Young 

Republicans 4. 

RUSSELL E. JOHNSON, JR. 

148 Holden Street, Holden, Massachusetts 

Industrial Engineering 

AIIE 3, 4. 

SIGRID M. JOHNSON 

85 Perkins Avenue, Hamihon, Massachusetts 

English 

Senate Activities Committee 3; Roister Doisters 1; Campus 

Varieties 2; International Weekend Committee 3; University 

Open House Committee 2. 

EDWARD J. JOHNSTON 

Stockbridge, Massachusetts 
Dairy Technology 

Dean's List 1; Alpha Zeta 2, 3, 4, Chronicler 4; Future Farm- 
ers of America 1, 2, 3, 4; University Judging Teams 3. 

MARGARET JONES 

132 Amherst Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

PAUL C. JONES 

134 Montague Road, North Amherst, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Dean's List 3; Tau Beta Pi 4; ASME 2, 3, 4; Flying Club 2, 3; 

Sport Parachute Club 2, 3, 4, President 3. 

BRUCE I. JORDAN 

1 Ellis Terrace, Swampscott, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3. 4, Pledge Trainer 3; Dean's List 3, 4; 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Geology Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Physical Educa- 
tion Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 3, 4. 




RUSSELL E. JOHNSON. JR. SIGRID M. JOHNSON 





EDWARD J. JOHNSTON 



MARGARET JONES 



PAUL C. JONES 



BRUCE I. JORDAN 



380 




MARGUERITE T. JORDAN GEORGE H. JOSEPH 




ROBERT J. JOSEPH 



JAMES J. JOSLYN 




MARGUERITE T. JORDAN 

398 Mount Vernon Street, Dedham, Massachusetts 
Goventment 

R.S.O. Committee 1, 2, 3; Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2, 3; Scrolls 2; 
Campus Chest Committee 1; Newman Club 1, 2; Young 
Democrats 1, 2, 3. 
GEORGE H. JOSEPH 
86 Carlisle Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Canterbury Club I, 2. 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2; 
Psychology Club 3. 
ROBERT J. JOSEPH 
86 Carusle Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 
Landscape Architeclure 

House Counselor 3, 4; Gryphon 3; Canterbury Club 1, 2, 3. 4. 
President 2; Landscape Architecture Club 2, 3, 4; Sociology 
Club 2. 3, 4. 
JAMES J. JOSLYN 

18 Beech Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 
Forestry 

Dean's List 2, 3; Commjjter's Club 2, 3, 4; Forestry Club 2, 3, 4. 
GERALD B. KAGAN 
15 Health Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 
Gorernment 

Collegian 1, 2; Student Senate Curriculum Committee 3; 
Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 3; Honors Work 4; 
Pi Sigma Alpha 3. 4, President; Student Senate Tri-mester 
Committee 4; Intramural Softball 2, 3; Eour College Commit- 
tee 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3; Astronomy Club 3; Political 
Science Association \. 2, 3: Volunteer, Northampton State 
Mental Hospital 1, 2, 3, 4; Co-ordinator of University Volun- 
teers 3, 4. 

SUSAN N. KAISER 
95 Dixwell Avenue, Quincy, Massachusetts 
English 

House Counselor 3, Summer Session; Winter Carnival Fashion 
Show Committee 3; Naiads 1, 2, 3, 4, Publicity Chairman 4; 
Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3; Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
ROGER W. KALLSTROM 
90 Park Hill Avenue, Millbury, Massachusetts 
Landscape Architecture 

House Counselor 2, 3; Student Christian Association 1, 2; Air 
Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Landscape Architecture Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Vice President 3. 
SANDRA E. KAMENSKE 

4 Goodwin Avenue. Revere, Massachusetts 
Psycliology 

Dean's List 1; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Zionist 
Association 1, 2, Treasurer 1; Psychology Club 2. 3. 4; Water 
Ski Club 2. 

EDWIN L. KAMINSKAS 

340 Prospect Street, Stoughton, Massachusetts 

Business Administration 

Beta Chi 2, 3; Management Club 3, 4. 

HARVEY L. KANTER 

5 Gerald Road, Milton, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Dean's List 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Equestrian Club 2; 
Psychology Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3, 4. 



GERALD B. KAGAN 



SUSAN N. KAISER 




ROGER W KALLSTROM SANDRA E. KAMENSKE 



EDWIN L. KAMINSKAS 



HARVEY L. KANTER 



381 




MARYANN P. KAPINOS JAMES M. KAPLAN 




LINDA A. KAPLAN 



ELAINE A. KAPLINSKY 



ELAINE A. KAPLINSKY 

35 Coit Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 
History 

Collegian I, Business Staff 1; Sigma Delta Tau L 2, 3, 4, 

Alumnae Chairman 3; Dean's List \. 2, 3, 4; Phi Kappa Phi 4; 

Alpha Lambda Delta 1, 2, Vice President 1; Hillel Foundation 

1; History Club 2, 3, 4, Vice President 4. 

JOHN G. KARAMPATSOS, JR. 

37 Davenport Street, Haverhill, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1; Orthodox Club 1, 2, 

3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sociology 4. 

GEORGE O. KASIERSKI 

194 Kingsbury District, Webster, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Dean's List 3; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club L 2, 3; 

Zoology 1,2. 

HINDA KATZ 

7 Highland Terrace. Beverly, Massachusetts 

English 

Index 4, Art Editor; Literary Magazine 1, 2; Sigma Delta Tau 

2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 2; Winter 
Carnival Committee 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2. 

DEAN KAUPPINEN 

36 South Main Street, Baldwinville, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Kappa Sigma 2, 3; Lacrosse 1, 2, 3; Ski Team 1; Student 

Christian Association 1, 2, 3; ASME 4, 5; Ski Club 1, 2, 3, 

Treasurer 3. 

DONALD A. KAWASH 

379 Hampshire Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

History 

Alpha Phi Omega 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 3, Second 

Vice President 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 2, 

3; Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2; Orthodox Club 1, 2, 3, 4; History Club 

3, 4. 

ANTHONY W. KAZUKONIS 
20 Park Street, Haverhill, Massachusetts 
Political Science 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, Warden 3; Base- 
ball 1, 3, 4; Astronomy Club 3; Le Cercle Francais 1, 2; 
Political Science Association 2, 3, 4. 



MARYANN P. KAPINOS 

177 Main Street, Bondsville, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Student Senate 2; Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding 
Secretary 4; Dean's List 1; Homecoming Committee 2; Student 
Centennial Committee 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; New- 
man Club 1, 2, 4; German Club 1; Mathematics Club 1, 2. 

JAMES M. KAPLAN 

582 Chandler Street, Worchester, Massachusetts 

French 

Chorale 1; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Colloquium 2, 3; 

Honors Work 4; Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2; Phi Kappa Phi 4. 

LINDA A. KAPLAN 

561 Rockdale Avenue, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Dean's List 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Executive Board 3, 4; 

Education Club 4; International Club 3, 4; Le Cercle Francais 

2, 3, 4; Psychology Club 3, 4. 




JOHN G. KARAMPATSOS, JR. GEORGE O. KASIERSKI 





HINDA KATZ 



DEAN KAUPPINEN 



DONALD A. KAWASH ANTHONY W. KAZUKONIS 



382 



JUDITH A. KEANE 
7 1 Eliot Road, Arlington, Massachusetts 
English 

Literary Magazine 3: Sophomore Banquet Committee 2; Stu- 
dent Union Program Council 4; R.S.O. Committee 2, 3, 4; Co- 
Chairman of Arts and Music Committee 4; Sigma Delta Tau 
2, 3, 4, Historian 4; Dean's List 3; Winter Carnival Committee 
NANCY E. KEEFE 
I Richfield Road, Arlington, Massachusetts 
Fashion in Retailing and Business 

Endicott Junior College; Sigma Kappa 3, 4; Newman Club 3, 4, 
Executive Council 3; Home Economics Club 3, 4. 
BARBARA C. KELLEY 
41 Fairview Road, Lynnfield, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Women's Inter-dorm Council 3; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Pledge 
Trainer 3, Treasurer 4; Scrolls 2; Winter Carnival Committee 

2. 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
JOHN A. KELLEY 

101 Parker Road, Wellesley, Massachusetts 
Business 

Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 4; Campus Religious 
Council 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Management Club 4. 
CLAUDIA A. KELLY 
1 Oneida Road, West Acton, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Panhellenic Council 3; Iota Gamma Upsilon 2, 3, 4, Historian 
4; Student Christian Association 1, 2; Education Club 3. 
DIANA M. KELLY 

1537 Riverdale Street, West Springfield, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4; Campus Varieties 1; Home- 
coming Committee 2; Winter Carnival Committee 1; Newman 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 2. 3, 4. 
JUSTINE LESLIE KELLY 

1 1 1 Lansdowne Street, North Quincy, Massachusetts 
Government 
Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 3; Pi Sigma Alpha 

3, 4; Swimming 1; Archery 2; Christian Science Organization 
1, 2, 3, 4; Equestrian Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 
and Display Chairman 3. 





JUDITH A. KEANE 



NANCY E. KEEFE 




BARBARA C. KELLEY 



JOHN A. KELLEY 




LEONA KELLY 

6 Perry Street, North Grafton, Massachusetts 
History 

Ya-Hoo 2; House Officer 1,3, Treasurer 1, Quiet Hour Com- 
mittee 3; University Concert Association 2, 3; Dean's List 3; 
Student Christian Association 1, 2; History Club 3, 4, Program 
Chairman 3; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 
PATRICIA A. KELLY 

1 1 Aldrich Road, West Bridgewater, Massachusetts 
French 

Dean's List I, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 3; Campus Reli- 
gious Council 3, 4, 'Vice President 4; Student Christian Asso- 
ciation 1, 2, 3, 4, Executive Board 3, 4; Le Cercle Francais 3; 
Spanish Club 1, 2. 
WILLIAM J. KELLY 
146 South Street, Hyannis, Massachusetts 
Russian 

Pennsylvania State University; Bowdoin College; Dean's List 3, 
4; Honors Colloquium 4; James Bowdoin Scholar 1; Russian 
Club 3. 




JUSTINE LESLIE KELLY 



LEONA KELLY 



PATRICIA A. KELLY 



WILLIAM J. KELLY 



383 




KATHLEEN P. KERIN ROBERT KESSELMAN 




ELLEN M. KFOURY 



JOSEPH E, KIELEC 




KATHLEEN P. KERIN 

184 Bowles Park, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Dean's List 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Nursing Club 1, 2, 

3. 4, Corresponding Secretary 4, Public Relations Chairman 4. 

ROBERT KESSELMAN 
147 Campbell Avenue, Revere, Massachusetts 
History 

Military Ball Committee 4; Bay State Rifles 2; Hillel Founda- 
tion I, 2, 3. 4; Astronomy Club 2; History Club 1, 2. 

ELLEN M. KFOURY 

230 Highland Road, Andover, Massachusetts 

Speech Therapy 

Class Executive Council 2; Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4; Winter 

Carnival Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education 

Club 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 3, 4. 

JOSEPH E. KIELEC 

319 Bridge Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Alpha Phi Omega 3, 4, Executive Vice President 3; Roister 
Doisters 1, 2; Military Ball Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 4; 
ASME 4; Commuter's Club 1; Debating Society 1, 2, 3; Ar- 
nold Air Society 3, 4; Ski Club 2. 

DAVID H. KILLOY 

20 Putnam Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 
Geology 

Sigma Gamma Epsilon 3, 4; MiUtary Ball Commhtee 4; 
Swimming Team I, 2; Newman Club 1, 3, 4; Geology Club 2, 3. 

LINDA G. KIMBALL 

16 Richardson Road, Newton Upper Falls, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Dean's List 2, 3; Channing Club 1, 2; Student Christian Asso- 
ciation 1, 2; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Revisions Committee 2, 4. 

ARTHUR E. KING, JR. 

584 Randolph Avenue, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Phi Mu Deha 1, 2, 3, 4; Swimming 1, 2, 3; Lacrosse 1; ASCE 

2, 3, 4; Ski Club 3,4. 

MICHELE M. KING 

15 Dow Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Cliemistry 

Pi Beta Phi 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Alpha 
Lambda Delta 1; Gymnastics 1, 2; Newman Club 2, 3; Chem- 
istry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Gymnastics Club 1, 2; Women's Athletic 
Association 1, 2. 

JOYCE KIRKPATRICK 

21 Rice Street, Hudson, Massachusetts 
N ursing 

Roister Doisters 1,2; Dean's List 3, 4; Student Christian Asso- 
ciation 1, 2; Nursing Club 3, 4. 

WILLIAM A. KITCHEN 

27 1 Court Street, Plymouth, Massachusetts 

Mec/ianical Engineering 

House Counselor 1; Q.T.V. 2, 3, 4; Maroon Key 2; R.O.T.C. 

Marchmg Band I; Track I, 2; ASME 3, 4; Publicity Chairman 4. 




ARTHUR E. KING, JR. 



MICHELE M. KING 



JOYCE KIRKPATRICK WILLIAM A. KITCHEN 



384 



CAROL J. KLINE 

12 Columbia Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 2, 3; Honors Work 

4; Phi Kappa Phi 4; Alpha Lambda Delta 1, 2, Secretary 2; 

Precisionettes 2, 3,4, Squad Leader 4. 

RICHARD F. KMON 

63 Portland Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Concert Band 2. 3, 4; Dance Band 1, 2, 3; Operetta Guild 2, 

3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2, Secre- 
tary 2; Education Club 4. 

DOUGLAS R. KNAPP 
Highland Road, Boxford, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

DONNA L. KNOWLTON 
68 TuUy Road, Orange, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Concert Band 1, 2; Marching Band 1, 2, 3; Dean's List 1; 
Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3; Wesley Foundation 1, 2, 
3,4. 

JUDITH C. KNOX 

220 Pearl Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
History 

House Counselor 3; Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, Rush Chairman 3, 
Pledge Trainer 4; Mortar Board 4; Dean's List 1, 2; Honors 
Colloquium 3; Distinguished Visitors Program 4; Winter Carni- 
val Committee 3; Nursing Club 1. 
LESLIE L. KOCH 

140 Leyden Road, Greenfield, Massachusetts 
Government 

Interfraternity Council 4; Fraternity President's Assembly 4; 
Beta Kappa Phi 1, 2, 3, 4. Vice-President 3, President 4; SWAP 
4; Bay State Rifles 1; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3. 
RAYMOND M. KODZIS 
34 Burgess Avenue, Westwood, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Class Officer 3, 4, Vice President; Beta Kappa Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Chaplain 2, 3, 4; Statesmen 4; Student Centennial Committee 
3; SWAP 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Football 1, 3; 
Baseball 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
MARSHA B. KONGIESER 
22 Athelstane Road, Newton Centre, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Index 1; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, Executive Board 2, 3; 4-H 
Club 3; Psychology Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
JAMES L. KONSEVICH 

183 Lafayette Street, Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering (Engineering Science) 
Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2; Phi Kappa Phi 4; 
Eta Kappa Nu 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 3; Tau Beta Pi 3, 

4, Cataloger 4; Engineering Council 3, 4, Chairman 4; New- 
man Club 1, 2, 3; AIEE-IRE, IEEE 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; 
Bridge Club 3, 4. 

JACK K. KOOYOOMJIAM 

86 Rossetter Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Alpha Phi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 1, Vice President 3, 

Treasurer 4; Dean's List 3; Bay State Rifles 1, 2; Orthodox 

Club 3; ASME 3, 4; Armenian Club 1, 2; International Club 

3, 4; Young Republicans 3. 




CAROL J. KLINE 



RICHARD F. KMON 




DOUGLAS R. KNAPP 



DONNA L. KNOWLTON 




JUDITH C. KNOX 



LESLIE L. KOCH 




RAYMOND M. KODZIS MARSHA B. KONGIESER 



JAMES L. KONSEVICH 



JACK K. KOOYOOMJIAM 



385 



0^ 





ALAN J. KOSCIELNIAK RICHARD J. KOSINSKI 



GERALD R. KRAMER 



ROBERT A. KRAVITZ 



ALAN J. KOSCIELNIAK 

67 East Street, Hadley, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Dean's List 1, 2; Eta Kappa Nu 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 
4, Bridge Correspondent 4. 
RICHARD I. KOSINSKI 
19 Leroy Place, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Median ical Engineering 

Dean's List 1; Military Ball Committee 3; Lacrosse 1; Newman 
Club 1, 3. 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; ASME 4; Arnold Air 
Society 3, 4. 

GERALD R. KRAMER 
3 1 Cutler Street, Winthrop, Massachusetts 
Marketing 

Tau Epsilon Phi 1. 2, 3, 4, Historian 2, Treasurer 3, Vice 
President 4; Marching Band 1; Campus Varieties 3; Winter 
Carnival Committee 3; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Hillel Foun- 
dation 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Marketing Club 4; 
Recreation Club 3. 




GAIL S. KRIES 



SUSAN E. KUDRAVETZ 



ROBERT A. KRAVITZ 

9 Nottingham Street, Newton Center, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

WMUA 1, 3. 4; Advanced AFROTC 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 

3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 3; Pre-Medical Club 3; Psychology 

Club 3, 4. 

GAIL S. KRIES 

245 North Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Dean's List 3; Commuter's Club 1; Education Club 3, 4. 

SUSAN E, KUDRAVETZ 

21 Chestnut Street, Westboro, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Nursing Club 2, 3, 4, Nominating Committee Chairman 3. 

ANNE P. KUNDZICZ 

258 Pleasant Street, West Bridgewater, Massachusetts 

English 

Dean's List 2; Wesley Foundation 2, 3, 4. House Management 

3, Publicity 4; Christian Association 1, 2. 
DOROTHY G. KUPFER 

17 Taylor Street, Keene, New Hampshire 

Microbiology 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 2, 3; Phi Kappa Phi 

4; Canterbury Club 2, 3, 4. 

ROBERTA E. LABATTE 

8 Marston Street, Amesbury, Massachusetts 

German 

Student Union Program Council 2; Kappa Alpha Theta 2, 3, 

4, Secretary 4; University Concert Association 3, 4; United 
Nations Week Committee 2; Winter Carnival Committee 1, 2, 
3; Student Christian Association 1. 

PAUL LABINE 

251 Raymond, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

Men's Judiciary 3; House Officer 4, Social Chairman 4; Dean's 

List 1, 2; Honors Colloquium 4; Sigma Xi 3. 4; Newman Club 

1, 2, 3, 4: AIChE 3. 4; Chemical Engineering Club 3, 4. 

JOAN M. LABUZOSKI 

77 East Elm Avenue, Quincy, Massachusetts 

English 




ANNE P. KUNDZICZ DOROTHY G. KUPFER 



ROBERTA E. LABATTE 



PAUL LABINE 



386 




JOAN M. LABUZOSKI SANFORD L. LACK 



MICHAEL P. LAMOUREUX JAMES L. LANE 



Student Senate 2, 3, 4, Vice President 4; R.S.O. Committee 3; 

Sigma Kappa 2, 3, 4; Fine Arts Coimcil 4; Distinguished 

Visitors Program 3, 4; International Weekend Committee 2, 3; 

Student Centennial Committee 3; SWAP 4; Judson Fellowship 

1,2,3. 

SANFORD L. LACK 

118 Irving Street, Everett, Massachusetts 

Marketing 

Class Executive Council 3; Tau Epsilon Phi ]. 2. 3. 4, Social 

Chairman 2, Scribe 3, Pledge Trainer 4; Winter Carnival 

Committee 3; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2. 3, 

4; Marketing Club 3, 4. 

MICHAEL P. LAMOUREUX 

85 Marguerite Street, Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 

History 

Beta Kappa Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Distinguished Military Student 3, 4; 

Military Ball Committee 3. 4; Swimming 1. 2: Newman Club 1, 

2. 

JAMES L. LANE 

39 Valley Road, Milton. Massachusetts 

Marketing 

Collegian 1, 2, 3. 4; Ya-Hoo 3, 4; Pioneer Valley Folklore 

Society 1. 2. 3, 4, Vice-President 4. 

BEVERLY M. LANG 

18 Sewell Street, Brockton, Massachusetts 

Medical Technology 

Collegian 1. 2, 3; Index 3. 4, Academic Life Editor 4; Operetta 

Guild 4; Dean's List 2, 3; Campus Chest 3; Hillel Foundation 

1, 2, 3; Student Union Planning Board 4. 
PHYLLIS I. LANGE 

Ward Road, Southboro, Massachusetts 
Recreation 

Winter Carnival Committee 3: Games and Tournaments 
Committee 3. 4, Treasurer 3; Basketball i; Edwards Fellow- 
ship 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 

2, 3; Recreation Club 2, 3, 4; Sociology Club 1. 
JOSEPH J. LANZILLO 

9 Belmont Street, Everett, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Newman Club 2, 3, 4. 





BEVERLY M. LANG 



PHYLLIS I. LANGE 



ARTHUR J. LAPERRIERE, III 

28 Slocum Street, Acushnet, Massachusetts 

Pre-Medical 

Alpha Phi Omega 3, 4; Dean's List 1; Honors Colloquium 3; 

Honors Work 4; Pre-Medical Club 4. 

NORMAN W. LAPRADE 

6 1 Coes Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Marketing 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3. 4, Activities Chairman 2, House 

Manager 4; Interfraternity Football, Softball 2, 3, 4: Newman 

Club 1. 2, 3. 4; Marketing Club 3, 4; Water Ski Club 3, 4. 

FRANK J. LASKI 

4 Beacon Street, Salem, Massachusetts 

Government 

Student Senate 3, 4, Chairman Budgets Committee 4; House 

Officer, Treasurer 1. Vice President 2; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; 

Honors Colloquium 2, 3; Honors Work 4; Phi Eta Sigma 1; 

Newman Club 4. 




JOSEPH J. LANZILLO ARTHUR J. LAPERRIERE, III 



NORMAN W. LAPRADE 



FRANK J. LASKI 



387 




PHILIP A. LAWRENCE 


NANCY LEACH 


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WINONA M. LE BLANC ALAN L. LEBOVIDGE 




STEPHEN A. LECLERC PHILIP A. LeDUC 





EDITH F. LEAHY 



GEORGE E. LEARY 



PHILIP A. LAWRENCE 

1 8 Harwood Avenue, Littleton, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Dean's List 3; Newman Club 1, 3, 4; Accounting Association 4; 

Bridge Club 2, 4. 

NANCY LEACH 

165 Court Road, Winthrop, Massachusetts 

Governnicnt 

Index 2; Social Activities Committee 3; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Historian 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Precisionettes 1, 2, 

3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Angel Flight 4; Education Club 4; 

Modern Dance Club 2. 

EDITH F. LEAHY 

19 Cole Terrace, Randolph, Massachusetts 
Knglish 

Class Executive Council 4; House Counselor 3; Chi Omega 1, 

2. 3, 4, Secretary 3. Vice President 4; Mortar Board 4, Histo- 
rian; Scrolls 2; Dean's List 1; SCOPE 4; SWAP 4; Naiads 1; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Recording Secretary 3, 4. 
GEORGE E. LEARY 

38 Pearl Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3; AIEE-IRE 1, 2, 3, 4. 

WINONA M. LE BLANC 

163 Leamy Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

House Counselor 4, Chairman 4; Dean's List 2, 3; SWAP 4; 

University Open House Committee 2; Bowling 1; Newman 

Club 1, 2; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, Vice President 3. 

ALAN L. LEBOVIDGE 

60 Boylston Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

Economics 

WMUA 3; Basketball Manager 1, 2; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 

4; Accounting Association 2, 3; Business Administration Club 

3, 4; University Economics Association 2, 3, 4; Young Demo- 
crats 2, 3. 

STEPHEN A. LECLERC 
36 Juniper Avenue, Salem, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Index 3, 4; Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secre- 
tary 3, 4; Rifle Team 1; Track Team 1; ASME 4. 
PHILIP A. LeDUC 

7 O'Connor Avenue, Holyoke, Massachusetts 
Psycliology 

International Club 3, 4; Psychology Club 3, 4. 
ANN K. LEDWITH 

3 Buckingham Road, Milton, Massachusetts 
Home Economics 

Index 3: Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant Public 
Relations 3; Scrolls 2; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Newman 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4. 
ROBERT W. LEE 

513 Heath Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 
Botany 

Lacrosse 1, 2; Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; Canterbury Club 1, 2. 
PAMMELA LEGER 

99 Burbank Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Economics 
WMUA 2. 3, 4, Director of Educational Programming 4; 



ANN K. LEDWTTH 



ROBERT W. LEE 



388 




PAMMELA LEGER 



DA\ ID A. I I I I H 



Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Lambda Delta 2; Economics 
Association 3, 4, Member at Large 4. 
DAVID A. LEITH 
59 Center Street, Granby, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Student Senate 3; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3. 4, Chaplain 2; 
Revelers 4; Campus Varieties 3; Dean's List 2; SWAP 4; 
Swimming 1, 2; Intervarsity Christian Fellowship 1, 2; Ameri- 
can Chemical Society 1. 
DAVID E. LEMON 

40 Progress Street, Hopedale, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Class Executive Council 2, 3, 4; Beta Kappa Phi 2. 3. 4. Social 
Chairman 3; Soph-Frosh Committee 2; Winter Carnival Com- 
mittee 3, Recreation Activities Chairman; Class Gift Commit- 
tee Chairman 4; Cheerleader 3, 4, Co-Captain 4; Advanced 
AFROTC 3. 4. 
ERNESTINE LEMOYNE 
44 Wilkins Road, HoUiston, Massachusetts 
Government 

Collegian 1, 2; Ya-Hoo 1; Winter Carnival Committee 3; 
Precisionettes 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 3; 
Italian Club 4; Le Cercle Francais 2; Political Science Associa- 
tion 4; Women's Athletic Association I. 
MELVIN M. LEVENTHAL 
231 Grovers Avenue, Winthrop, Massachusetts 
Pre-Dentistry 

Phi Sigma Delta I, 2. Social Chairman 2; Dean's List 3; Hillel 
Foundation 1; Pre-Medical Club 1, 4. 
RICHARD J. LEVINE 

13 Hawthorn Terrace, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Roister Doisters 1; Rifle Team 1, 2, 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 
2, 4; Society of Automotive Engineers 4; Amateur Radio As- 
sociation 1, 2, 3, 4, Emergency Co-ordinator 4; ASME 1, 2, 3, 4. 
PAUL F. LEVY 

22 Cottage Street, Peabody, Massachusetts 
Pre-Medical 

Collegian 2, 3; Student Union Program Council 2, 3; R.S.O. 
Committee 2, 3; Alpha Epsilon Pi I, 2; Dean's List 3; Hillel 
Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation 4; Pre-Medical Club 
1,2,3.4. 

HALINA LEWANTOWICZ 
1 1 1 Everett Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Class Executive Council 4; House Counselor 4; Dining Coun- 
selor 4; Dormitory Treasurer 2; Operetta Guild 4: Arts and 
Music Committee 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 4; Sport Parachute 
Club 1. 

STEPHEN J. LIGHTHOIDER 
192 Notch Road, North Adams, Massachusetts 
English 

Men's Intramurals 2. 
CARL T. LINDELL 

4 Brooklawn Road, Wilbraham, Massachusetts 
Production Management 

Phi Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, Rushing Chairman 2, 
3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4: Management Club 4; Sport Para- 
chute Club 1; Advanced ROTC-Flight Instruction Program 3, 




DAVID E. LEMON 



ERNESTINE LEMOYNE 






MELVIN M. LEVENTHAL RICHARD J. LEVINE 




PAUL F. LEVY 



HALINA LEWANTOWICZ 




STEPHEN J. LIGHTHOIDER CARL T. LINDELL 



389 




DONALD E. LITTLEFIELD ROBERT A. LIVELY 




LANGDON F. LOMBARD JO-ANN L. LONG 





DAVID H. LONGEY 



MARGARET-ANN M. LOOMIS 



DONALD E. LITTLEFIELD 

154 Norfolk Street, Holliston, Massachusetts 
General Management 

Dean's List 3; Management Club 4; Marketing Club 4. 
ROBERT A. LIVELY 

35 Larch Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 
English 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2. 3, 4; 

Student Christian Association 1, 2. 

LANGDON F. LOMBARD 

5 Coolidge Hill Road, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

English 

Collegian 3, 4; WMUA 1, 2, 3, 4, Classical Music Director 1, 

2, 3, 4; University Concert Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant 

Manager 3, Manager 4; Soccer 1, 2. 

JO-ANN L. LONG 

36 Birchwood Avenue, Sudbury, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

University Concert Association 2; Dean's List 1, 2, 4; Student 



Christian Association 1; Psychology Club 1; Sociology Club 3, 
4. 

DAVID H. LONGEY 

87 Highview Avenue, Wethersfield, Connecticut 
Landscape A rchilecture 

Faculty Resident 3, 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Soccer 1; Landscape 
Architecture Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
MARGARET-ANN M. LOOMIS 
338 Lincoln Avenue, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Englisli 

Collegian 3; Chorale 1, 2, 3; Opera Workshop 2, 3, 4; Dean's 
List 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 3; Equestrian Club 4; Le Cercle 
Francais 1, 2; Literary Society 2, 3, 4; Psychology Club 3, 
4. 

RICHARD S. LOPATKA 
18 Walnut Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Dean's List 3; Honors Work 4; Intramural Basketball 3; New- 
man Club 1, 2; Commuter's Club 1, 2, 3; Mathematics Club 4. 
ROGER N. LOPIZ 
Maple Street, Northfield, Massachusetts 
Business Administration 

Dean's List 3: Wrestling 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1; 
Flying Club 2; Varsity "M" Club 2. 
LINDA L. LOVELL 

631 Whittenton Street, Taunton, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Social Activities Committee 1; Homecoming Committee 1. 2; 
Winter Carnival Committee 2, 3; Student Christian Association 
1, 2, 3; Education Club 2, 3, 4; Le Cercle Francais 1, 2; Outing 
Club 4. 

JOAN C. LOVETT 

37 Brookside Avenue, Greenfield, Massachusetts 
Government 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Student Centennial Committee 3; Winter 
Carnival Committee 3; Precisionettes 1, 2, 3, 4; Canterbury 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1. 2; Education 
Club 4; Equestrian Club 4; International Relations Club 3, 4; 
Outing Club 4; Political Science Association 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 
4; Young Republicans 3, 4. 




LINDA L. LOVELL 



JOAN C. LOVETT 



390 



CONSTANCE M. LOWELL 

66 Great Road, Maynard, Massachusetts 
Recreation Leadership 

Student Union Program Council 4; Dean's List 3; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 1, 2. 
JANE T. LUNNEY 

10 Redwing Road, Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts 
Art 

Class Executive Council 4; Student Union Program Council 3. 
4; Sigma Kappa 3, 4. Social Chairman 3; Homecoming Com- 
mittee 2. 3, 4; Student Centennial Committee 3; SWAP 3, 4; 
Winter Carnival Committee 3; Student Union Dance Commit- 
tee 1, 2, 3. 4. Secretary 2, 3, Chairman 3. 4. 
EDWARD LUPO 

67 Summer Avenue, Reading, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Ya-Hoo 3, 4, Advertising Manager 3, 4; Alpha Epsilon Phi 1, 2. 

3, 4, Phi Corporation 4, Secretary 4; Campus Chest Commit- 
tee 2; Hillel Foundation 1, 2; Oriental Sports Club 3: Scuba 
Club 4; University Economics Association 3, 4. 

LYYLI E. LUSHER 

Russel Hill Road, Ashburnham, Massachusetts 

Psyclwlogy 

Ya-Hoo 2, 3, 4; University Concert Association 2, 3, 4. 

EUGENE B. LUTZ 

58 W. Bay Path Terrace, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Dormitory Sport Coordinator 3, 4; Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1, 2. 3, 

4, Correspondent 2, 3; Volunteer Fire Department 2; Intramu- 
rals 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Accounting Association 
2, 3, 4. 

EDWARD LYONS 

412 Pleasant Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

Landscape Architecture 

Phi Sisma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4, Rush Chairman 2, 3, Executive 

Council 3. 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Alpha Zeta 4; ASLA 2, 3, 4. 

MAUREEN LYONS 

546 Oxford Street, Auburn, Massachusetts 

Spanish 

Alpha Chi Omega 2, 3, 4, AUruistic Chairman 4; Special 

Events Committee 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Newman 

Club 1,3; Spanish Club 1. 2. 3, 4; American Association of 




EUGENE B. LUTZ 



EDWARD LYONS 





MAUREEN LYONS 



PAUL A. McADAM 



Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese 4; Index 2; R.S.O. Com- 
mittee 4. 

PAUL A. McADAM 
95 Upland Road, Winthrop, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Newman Club I, 2, 3, 4; 
ASME 3, 4. 

CAROL A. MacDONALD 
48 Putnam Circle, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Home Economics 
SHEILAH M. MacLENNAN 
10 Merrill Road, Wilbraham, Massachusetts 
Government 

House Counselor 3, 4, House Chairman 4; SWAP 4; Winter 
Carnival Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education 
Club 1; Political Science Association 4; Chairman of House 
Chairmen's Board 4. 



CAROL A. MacDONALD SHEILAH M. MacLENNAN 



391 







BARBARA L. MacNEIL WAYNE C. MADDALENA 




SHEILA J. MADEN 



SANDRA G. MAGDALENSKI 




DONALD E. MAGEE 



PETER V, MAGGIO 




BARBARA L. MacNEIL 
203 Rocky Hill Road, Hadley, Massachusetts 
Human Development 

Student Christian Association I, 2; Home Economics Club 1, 
2, 3, 4. 

WAYNE C. MADDALENA 
112 Grant Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 
Government 

Tau Epsilon Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Executive Board 4; Dance Band 3; 
Lutheran Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
SHEILA J. MADEN 

15 Richwood Street, Framingham, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Class Executive Council 2; Social Activities Committee 2, 3; 
Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Newman 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sociology Club 2, 3; Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation I. 

SANDRA G. MAGDALENSKI 
Prospect Street, Housatonic, Massachusetts 
Zoology 

Index 4; Dean's List 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; New- 
man Club 1, 2. 3, 4; Zoology Club 3, 4. 
DONALD E. MAGEE 
1259 East State Street, Trenton, New Jersey 
Forestry 

Dean's List 3; Flying Club 2, 3; Forestry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Outing Club 1, 2, 3,4. 
PETER V. MAGGIO 
13 Wickfield Court, Everett, Massachusetts 
Physics 




JOYCE A. MAGOON 



ELLEN E. MAGUIRE 



GERTRUDE F. MAHONEY JOHN P. MAHONEY, JR. 



Air Cadet Squadron 1,2; Fencing Club 2; Physics Club 4. 

JOYCE A. MAGOON 
124 Newton Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Dean's List 2, 3; Edwards Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Chris- 
tian Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Worship Chairman 2; History Club 
3; Psychology Club 4; Square Dance Club 1. 

ELLEN E. MAGUIRE 
50 Bonair Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 
English 

Collegian 1; Ya-Hoo 1, 2; Dean's List 4; Honors Colloquium 
2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Le Cercle Francais 2; Literary 
Society 3, 4; Philosophy Club 1; Pioneer Valley Folklore So- 
ciety 1, 2; Psychology Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Synthesis 4; Young 
Democrats 2; Young Republicans 2. 

GERTRUDE F. MAHONEY 

227 Michigan Avenue, Holyoke, Massachusetts 
Journalism-Government 

Collegian 3, 4; Student Senate 2; Dean's List 1, 3, 4; Gymnas- 
tics 1; Newman Club 1, 4; Mathematics Club 1, 2; Modern 
Dance Club 1; Political Science Association 4; Women's Ath- 
letic Association 1. 

JOHN P. MAHONEY, JR. 

15 Evergreen Avenue, Weston, Massachusetts 

History 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 2, 3, 4; Football 1; 

Golf 1. 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; History Club 1, 2, 3. 4; 

Young Democrats 3, 4. 



392 



MICHAEL J. MAHONEY 

Granby, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

University of Massachusetts Pittsfield Extension; Newman 

Club 3, 4; AIEE-IRE 3, 4. 

PAUL L. MAHONEY 

7 Blewer Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Government 

Boston University; Class Executive Council 3, 4; Lambda Chi 

Alpha 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 3, 4; Dean's List 1; 

Student Centennial Committee 3; Winter Carnival Committee 

3. Chairman of Activities Committee 3; Baseball 1; Newman 

Club 2, 3, 4. 

ANDREW J. MAIN, JR. 

10 Webster Street, Taunton, Massachusetts 

Entomology 

Alpha Phi Omega 3, 4; Roister Doisters 1, 2. 3, 4; Campus 

Varieties 1; Dean's List 3; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 

3; Fernald Entomological Club 3; Zoology Club 1, 2. 

JOAN MAKAREWICZ 

50 Green Pond Road, Millers Falls, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Art Club 4; Commuter's Club 1, 2; 

Psychology Club 3, 4. 

FREDRIC A. MAKI 

West Townsend Road, Lunenburg, Massachusetts 

Agricultural Economics 

Dorm Council 2, 3; Basketball 1; Intramural Sports 2, 3; Air 

Cadet Squadron 1; Flying Club 3, 4. 





MICHAEL J. MAHONEY 



PAUL L. MAHONEY 



MARIE E. MAKINEN 

17 Commonwealth Ave., Dedham, Massachusetts 
Government 

Class Executive Council 2, 3; House Counselor 3; Pan Hellenic 
Council 3, 4, President 4; Pi Beta Phi 1, 2. 3, 4, Pan Hellenic 
Representative 3, 4; Scrolls 2; Campus Chest Committee 3; 
SWAP 4; United Nations Committee 3; Student Christian As- 
sociation 1, 2. 

MAUREEN E. MALONE 

8 Anthony Road, Peabody, Massachusetts 

Psychology and Elementary Education 

Wesley Foundation 1, 2, 3; Education Club 4; International 

Club 4; Outing Club 3, 4; Psychology Club 3. 

SANDRA J. MANGURIAN 

52 Melrose Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 

English 

Dean's List 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Student Christian 

Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Armenian Club 1, 2; Mathematics Club 1. 

DAVID D. MANLEY 

73 Park Drive, Boston, Massachusetts 

English 

Collegian 1, 2; Roister Doisters 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List I; 

Honors Colloquium 2; Young Republicans 2, 3, President 3; 

University Theater 3, 4. 

LILA MARANVILLE 

229 Main Street, Lakeville, Massachusetts 

English 

Christian Association 1, 2; Dean's List 2, 3; Honors Project 4. 




ANDREW J. MAIN, JR. JOAN MAKAREWICZ 




FREDRIC A. MAKI 



MARIE E. MAKINEN 




MAUREEN E. MALONE SANDRA J. MANGURIAN 




DAVID D. MANLEY 



LILA MARANVILLE 



393 



DOLORES M. MARASCA 

23 Mystic Avenue, Winchester. Massachusetts 

Elcincnlary Ediicalion 

Dormitory Social Chairman 2; Tennis Club 4; Education Club 

4; Equestrian Club 4. 

PRISCILLA A. MAREAN 

27 Sibley Street. Grafton, Massachusetts 

Elemenlarv Ediicalion 

Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship 1. 2, 3, 4; Student Christian 

Association 1. 2. 3. 4; Education Club 3, 4; Ski Club 2, 3; 

Square Dance Club 2, 3. 

DOROTHY A. MARGOLA 

71 Vernon Street, Greenfield. Massachusetts 
Elementary Ediicalion 

International Weekend Committee 3, 4; Winter Carnival Com- 
mittee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3,4; Education Club 4, 

PAUL E. MARINI 

25 Spear Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 

Landscape Archilecture 

Beta Gamma Sigma 4; Dean's List 3; Horticulture Show 3, 4; 

Landscape Architecture Club 3, 4. 

JON G. MARION 

125 Whiting Farms Road, Holyoke, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Social Activities Committee 4; Alpha Phi Omega 1, 2; Men's 
Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Campus Religious Council 3, 4; New- 
man Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; University 
Economics Association 2, 3, 4. 

JUDITH M. MARKOSKI 

61Vi Fountain Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

English 

Class Executive Council 2; Soph-Frosh Committee 2; Newman 

Club 1.2,3.4. 

WILLIAM F. MARTIN 

William Street, Housatonic, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

House Counselor 2, 3; Bay State Rifles 1, 2; ASME 4. 

STEPHEN J. MASKELL 

144 Birchview Avenue, Brockton, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Student Senate 2; Alpha Sigma Phi 1. 2. 3, 4, Corresponding 

Secretary 3; Dean's List 1; Hillel Foundation 1, 4; Amateur 

Radio Association 1,2; AIEE-IRE 3, 4. 

HERBERT R. MASSICOTT 

400 East Central Street, Franklin, Massachusetts 

Psycliology 

University of Florida. 

DAVID E. MATHIESON 

Shays St., Amherst, Massachusetts 
Government 

WMUA 3; Student Senate 2. 3, 4. Executive Committee 3, 4, 
Elections Committee Chairman 3, Services Committee Chair- 
man 4. Chairman Ad Hoc Committee on Student Housing 4; 
Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 3, Vice 
President 3. Historian 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; SWAP 3; 
United Nations Week Committee 3; Commuter's Club 2, 4; 
Debating Society 2, 3, Treasurer 3. 




DOLORES M. MARASCA PRISCILLA A. MAREAN 




DOROTHY A. MARGOLA PAUL F. MARINI 




'HS^rrc, 





JON G. MARION 



JUDITH M. MARKOSKI 




WILLIAM F. MARTIN STEPHEN J. MASKELL 



HERBERT R. MASSICOTT DAVID E. MATHIESON 



394 




JUDITH B. MAXFIELD 



SANDRA L. MAY 




STEPHEN W. MAYO 



STANLEY J. MAZUR, JR. 





JUDITH B. MAXFIELD 

24 Boyd Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Edwards Fellowship 1; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3; 

Education Club 3, 4; Nursing Club 1; Outing Club 3; Zoology 

Club 3, 4. 

SANDRA L. MAY 

5 Bryant Avenue, Methuen, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Collegian '3, 4; Lambda Delta Phi 2, 3, 4, Rush Chairman 4; 

Marching Band 2; International Weekend Committee 2; Preci- 

sionettes 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance Club 1, 2; 

Psychology Club 1. 2. 3; Sociology Club 1; Women's Athletic 

Association 1. 

STEPHEN W. MAYO 

33 Commonwealth Road, Watertown, Massachusetts 

Personnel Management 

Freshman Golf 1 ; Management 4. 

STANLEY J. MAZUR, JR. 

19 Abbe Avenue, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Chemical Enqineering 

Newman Club 1; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; AIEE-IRE 3, 4. 

ROBERT T. McALEAR 

79 Arborway Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Index 4; House Council 3; House President 4; Sport Parachute 

Club 3, 4, President 3; University Economics Asociation 2, 3, 4. 

PAUL J. McAVOY 

5 Price Street, Hopkinton, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Chorale 3; Operetta Guild 1, 2, 3; Campus Varieties 2, 3; 

Opera Workshop 2, 3; University Open House Committee 

Chemistry Department 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; American 

Chemical Society 4; Chemistry Club 1, 2, 4; German Club I; 

Bridge Club 1, 2. 

ANN M. McCarthy 

845 Village Street, West Medway, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 3, 4. 

CARYL s. McCarthy 

4 Alpine Street, Dedham, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

House Counselor 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 

4; Gymnastics Club 1, 2; Women's Athletic Association 1; 

Zoology Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

NOREEN M. McDONOUGH 

457 Quincy Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Operetta Guild 2; Campus Varieties 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 

4; Modern Dance Club 3; Sociology Club 2, 3, 4. 

PAULA J. McFADDEN 

421 Pleasant Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Campus Chest Committee 1, 2; Campus Religious Council 4; 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Dorm Representative 4; Mathematics 

Club 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 



ROBERT T. McALEAR 



PAUL J. McAVOY 




ANN M. McCarthy 



CARYL S. McCarthy NOREEN M. McDONOUGH PAULA J. McFADDEN 



395 




From Frosh Sno-Bowl 

To Junior Producers Of 

Winter Carnival 




B 



• ACK in the Winter of '61, the class executed its first snow 
sculpture — the mammoth Sno-Bowl that provided a functional, enter- 
taining work. That was "A Little Bit of Yesteryear." 

A couple of years later, as the junior class, the Centennial Winter 
Carnival was '64"s brainchild. Among novelties introduced for the 
weekend: Log-sawing, sleigh-rides, sport parachuting and a toboggan 
run. 

Chad Mitchell and Trio entertained at the Cage before a crowd of 
3500. Attendance for the weekend was estimated at 43,000. A record 
at the time. 



As frosh: the Sno-Bowl. 



The Chad Mitchell Trio (plus two) drew 3500 to the Cage. 





Fireworks heralded the opening of Carni. 



'64 introduced the toboggan run as a fun ride. 




Winter Carni Committee looks on in pride. 





DAVID P. McGLONE RICHARD J. McLAUGHLlN 





ELWIN C. McNAMARA 
778 Broadway Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 
Government 

Collegian 2, 3, 4, News Editor 4, Executive Board 4; WMUA 
1; Student Senate 4; Dormitory Social Council 2; Alpha Phi 
Omega 3, 4. Parliamentarian 4; SWAP 4. 
JAMES A. MEDEIROS 

160 Durfee Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Government 

Class President 3, 4; Class Executive Council 3; R.S.O. Com- 
mittee 3, 4; QTV 2. 3, 4, Master of Ceremonies 4; Adelphia 4, 
Vice President 4; Maroon Key 2, "Most Valuable Maroon 
Key" Award; Dean's List 1; Homecoming Committee 4. 
JAMES M. MEGA 

Boston Road, R.F.D. #2, Palmer, Massachusetts 
Landscape Architecture 

Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Flying Club 3, 4; Landscape Archi- 
tecture Club 2, 3, 4. 
DOLORES M. MELLO 
1378 Trapelo Road, Waltham, Massachusetts 
German 

House Counselor 4; Dean's List 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Ski Club 2; Water Ski Club 2. 
NANCY A. MELLO 

71 Grape Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

House Counselor 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 
I; Honors Work 4; Phi Kappa Phi 4; Alpha Lambda Delta 1; 
International Weekend Committee 3, Publicity Chairman. 
KATHRYN D. MELNICK 
28 Eustis Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Index 4; Dean's List 2, 3; Honors Work 4; Edwards Fellow- 
ship 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2; Education Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 4; Zoology Club 2, 3, 4. 
RAYMOND E. MELO 
61 Oak Street, Franklin, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Dean's List; Dean Junior College 1; Intramural Sports; New- 
man Club 4; Mathematics Club 4. 



THOMAS A. McMULLIN ELWIN C. McNAMARA 



DAVID P. McGLONE 

7 East Wyoming Avenue, Melrose, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Stewards Club 3, 4; Class Executive Council 2; Lambda Chi 

Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, Steward 3, 4; Newman Club I, 2, 3, 4. 

RICHARD J. McLaughlin 

1 Carter Street, Palmer. Massachusetts 
Chemical Engineering 

U.S. Military Academy; Collegian 3; Men's Judiciary 3; La- 
crosse 2, 3; Wrestling 2, 3; Bay State Special Forces 3, 4; 
Newman Club 2, 3, 4, Acolyte Guild; AIChE 2, 3, 4; Chemical 
Engineering Club 2, 3. 4; Varsity "M" Club 3. 
THOMAS A. McMULLIN 
977 South Street, Roslindale, Massachusetts 
History 

Collegian 1, 2; Student Senate 3, 4, Executive Committee 4; 
Senate Curriculum Committee 3, 4, Chairman 4; Dean's List 3; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Young Democrats 2, 3; Four College 
Student Committee 3. 




I 



JAMES A. MEDEIROS 



JAMES M. MEGA 




DOLORES M. MELLO 



NANCY A. MELLO 



KATHRYN D. MELNICK RAYMOND E. MELO 



398 



BERNADETTE R. MENZ 

55 Sunny Side Avenue, Winthrop, Massachusetts 

Socioloi^y 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Athletics 3, Pledge Tramer 4; 

Revelers 3; Campus Varieties 3; Winter Carnival Committee 

3; Naiads 1; Newman Club 2, 3: Women's Athletic Association 

1, 2, 3. 

ELIZABETH A. MERCER 

157 Aspinwall Avenue, Brookline, Massachusetts 

English 

Index 2; Class Secretary 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Executive Council 1, 

2, 3, 4, Secretary 1, 2, 3, 4; R.S.O Special Events Committee 
2; House Counselor 3; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Second Vice President 3, President 4; Scrolls 2: Marching 
Band Drum Majorette 2, 3, 4; SWAP 1, 2, 3; Winter Carnival 
Committee 3, Secretary; Student Christian Association 1, 3; 
Education Club 4. 

ELLEN L. MESSENGER 

139 West Shore Drive, Marblehead, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Chorale 1, 2, 3, 4, Librarian 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4 
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Softball 1, 2. 3, 4: Bowling 1. 2, 3, 4 
Newman Club I. 2. 3, 4, Choir 3, 4. Co-ordinator 3, 4 
Education Club 3, 4. 
BARRY MEUNIER 

357 Hersom Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Recreation Leadership 

Q.T.V. 1, 2, 3, 4, Sergeant-at-Arms 4, Athletic Chairman 3, 4; 
Maroon Key 2; Dean's List 1; Baseball 1; Games and Tourna- 
ment Committee 3; Recreation Club 3, 4. 
RAYMOND J. MEUNIER 
610 Tremont Street, Taunton, Massachusetts 
Government 

Freshmen Directory 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman 
Club 1, 4: Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; History Club 1, 2; Political 
Science Association 3, 4; Young Republicans 3. 
DEBORAH M. MEYER 
17 Sycamore Road, Squantum, Massachusetts 
German 

House Counselor 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 4; Bowling 2, 3, 4; 
Archery 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 4; 
Women's Athletic Association 3, 4. 




BERNADETTE R. MENZ ELIZABETH A. MERCER 




ELLEN L. MESSENGER 



BARRY MEUNIER 




RAYMOND J. MEUNIER DEBORAH M. MEYER 



BRUCE A. MEYERS 

32 Marland Street, Andover, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

University Concert Association 2; Concert Band 2; Student 

Christian Association 2, 3; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; 

Psychology Club 3, 4; Square Dance Club 4; Haymakers 4. 

GORDON F. MILES 

231 Franklin Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

American Chemical Society 4; Ski Club 3; Chemistry Club 3, 4. 

CONSTANTIN C. MILIONIS 

132 Fort Pleasant Avenue, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Honors Colloquium 4; Orthodox Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry 

Club 3, 4. 

CHARLES D. MILLER 

26 Pond Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Bridge Club 2, 3, 4; Commuter's Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 






BRUCE A. MEYERS 



GORDON F. MILES 



CONSTANTIN C. MILIONIS 



CHARLES D. MILLER 



399 




JOANNE MILLER 



M. ANN MILLER 




N. LAURENCE MILLER RICHARD C. MILLER 




JOANNE MILLER 

North Main Street, Charlton, Massachusetts 

Home Economics 

Lambda Delta Phi 1. 2. 3, 4, Recording Secretary 3, Chaplain 

4; University Concert Association 3, 4; Chorale 1: Operetta 

Guild 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 3, 4; Judson Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Secretary 2, Vice-President 3; Student Christian Association 1, 

2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club 3, 4; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion 2. 3, 4. 

M. ANN MILLER 

14 Orange Street, Woburn. Massachusetts 
Government — Journalism 

Collegian 1, 2, 3, 4, News Editor 3; Index 4, Associate Editor 
4; Class Executive Council 4; Roister Doisters 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Director of Public Relations 4; Pioneer Valley Folklore So- 
ciety 2, 3; Political Science Association 2, 3. 

N. LAURENCE MILLER 

43 Monmouth Avenue, Medford, Massachusetts 

Horticultural Science 

Dormitory Social Chairman 3; Dean's List 3; Alpha Zeta 2, 3, 

4: Honors Colloquium 3; Floricultural Club 2, 3; Outing Club 

3, 4; Horticulture Club 3, 4; Newsletter. 

RICHARD C. MILLER 

6 Storey Avenue, Newburyport, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Dean's List 3; Tau Beta Pi 4; ASCE 4. 

WAYNE L. MILLER 

Main Road, Lyonsville, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

House Athletic Chairman 3; Men's Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 

4; AIChE. 3, 4; Civil Engineering Club 3, 4. 

DAIVE R. MILLIGAN 

63 Milford Street, West Medway, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Football I; Philosophy Club 3, 4, Publicity Committee; Intra- 

murals 1, 2, 3, 4. 

RICHARD F. MINARDI 

7 Phillips Street, Westboro, Massachusetts 
Government 

MARIE E. MIRLIANI 

102 Blue Hills Road, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Art 

Transfer — Annhurst College 1, 2; Operetta Guild 4; Musigals 

4; Dean's List 3; Newman Club 4; Art Club 3, 4; Philosophy 

Club 2, 3. 

RICHARD W. MISIEWICZ 

Lake Shore Drive, Spencer, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

Handbook 4, New Developments Editor; Newman Club 1, 2; 

AIChE 2, 3, 4; Chemical Engineering Club 2, 3, 4. 

CHARLES C. MITCHELL, JR. 

68 Benton Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

History 

Collegian 2; Phi Sigma Kappa 2, 3, Sentinel, House Manager 4; 

Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4. 




RICHARD F. MINARDI MARIE E. MIRLIANI 



RICHARD W. MISIEWICZ CHARLES C. MITCHELL, JR. 



400 



SUSAN E. MOLLISON 
127 Pine Street, Manchester, Massachusetts 
English 

Class Executive Council 2; House Counselor 4, Advisor to 
Social Committee; University Open House Committee 1; Win- 
ter Carnival Committee 2, 3; Sophomore Banquet Committee 
2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Education Club 4; Scuba Club 3, 4. 

DOROTHY A. MOONEY 

33 Fairfax Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

House Counselor 3, 4; Dorm Treasurer 2; Dean's List 1; 
Newman Club 1, 2; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2. 

PAMELA B. MOORE 

16 Creeper Hill Road, North Grafton, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 

2, 3, 4; American Chemical Society 1, 2, 3, 4. 

ROBERT A. MOORE 

54 Pineview Drive, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

House Counselor 4; Intervarsity Christian Fellowship 1, 2; 

Judson Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 

2; American Society of Civil Engineers 1, 2, 3, 4; Granville 

Air Society 3, 4. 

JOHN H. MORAN 

34 Lyn Drive, South Hadley, Massachusetts 
Pre-Medical 

Marching Band 1, 2; Dean's List 1, 2, 4; Honors Colloquium 
2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Medical Club 3, 4. 

DOMINICK D. MORE 

1066 Trapelo Road, Waltham, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Military Ball Committee 4; Bay State Rifles 1, 2; Newman 

Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Accounting Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 

ROBERT E. MORGAN 

256 West Avenue, Seekonk, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4, Fellowship Director 3, 4; Student 

Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; ASME 3, 4; Young Republicans 

1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2, President 3. 

EDWARD J. MORIARTY 

8 1 Lynch Drive, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

General Business and Economics 

Kappa Sigma 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 4; Newman Club 1, 2. 

JOHN F. MORIARTY 

15 Donald Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Economics 

ALFRED F. MORRIS, JR. 

3200 County Street, Somerset, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Dean's List 1, 3, 4; Intramural Supervisor 2, 3, 4; Lacrosse 2, 

4; Cross Country 1; Track 1; Indoor Track 1; Newman Club 

1, 2, 3, 4; Physical Education Club 1, 3, 4, Treasurer 4. 



.M««vy,MO>-»»»XWC»wW?MH BS;^N^K^S^K^«T^P^K;^^y;^^^;^■ ':>■;; SvT .^'NvT^r^v?^ 





SUSAN E. MOLLISON DOROTHY A. MOONEY 




PAMELA B. MOORE 



ROBERT A. MOORE 




JOHN H. MORAN 



DOMINICK D. MORE 




ROBERT E. MORGAN EDWARD J. MORIARTY 



JOHN F. MORIARTY ALFRED F. MORRIS, JR. 



401 




SANDRA A. MORRIS 



DONNA F. MORRISON 



FREDERIC R. MORRISON 



DENNIS L. MORRISSEY 



SANDRA A. MORRIS 

129 Whittum Avenue, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

Pi Beta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Newman Club 1, 2; 
Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation 1. 

DONNA F. MORRISON 
Ramgren Road, Lunenburg, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Kappa Phi 4; Alpha Lambda Delta 
1. 2; Newman Club 1; Psychology Club 3, 4. 

FREDERIC R. MORRISON 

62 Strong Street, Easthampton, Massachusetts 

Geology 

Holyoke Junior College; Geology Club 3, 4. 

DENNIS L. MORRISSEY 

Mayflower Road, Plympton, Massachusetts 

Government 




WARREN C. MORSE 



JOHN G. MORTELLITE 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 2, 3, 4; Concert Band 1, 2, 3; Dance Band 
2, 3; Marching Band 1; Statesmen 2, 3, 4; Cheerleader 4; 
Newman Club 1, 2. 

WARREN C. MORSE 

3 Newhall Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Alpha Sigma Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 4. 

JOHN G. MORTELLITE 

1 8 1 High Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Civil Engineering Club 2, 3, 4. 

BEVERLY A. MORZE 
82 State Road, Westminster, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Social Activities Committee 1, 2, 3, 4; House Social Chairman 
4; University Concert Association 1, 2, 3; Homecoming Com- 
mittee 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Canterbury Club 1, 2, 
3; Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Gymnastics Club 1, 2; Elemen- 
tary Education Exchange Program To The University of New 
Mexico. 

ARNOLD L. MOST 

717 Bernardston Road, Greenfield, Massachusetts 
Industrial Engineering 

SCOPE 3; Tennis 1; Hillel Foundation 1; AIIE 2, 3, 4, Vice- 
President 4; Commuter's Club 2, 3. 

IVAN G. MOST 

717 Bernardstein Road, Greenfield, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Engineering Council 4; Dean's List L 2; Honors Colloquium 2, 
3; Phi Eta Sigma 1; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4, President 4, Honor 
Junior 3; Tennis 1; Hillel Foundation 1; ASME 3, 4; Com- 
muter's Club 3. 

PATRICIA A. MOULTON 

53 Highland Avenue, Sudbury, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Gymnastics Club 

3; Zoology Club 3, 4. 






BEVERLY A. MORZE 



ARNOLD L. MOST 



IVAN G. MOST 



PATRICIA A. MOULTON 



402 




DIANNE D. MUEHL 



JAMES E. MULCAHY 



LINDA C. MULDOON MARY J. MULHOLLAND 



DIANNE D. MUEHL 
County Street, Lakeville, Massachusetts 
English 

JAMES E. MULCAHY 
122 Franklin Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 
LINDA C. MULDOON 
69 Brookline Street, Needham, Massachusetts 
English 

United Nations Week Committee 3; International Club 3, Ex- 
ecutive Committee 3; Modern Dance Club 1; Synthesis 2, 3. 
MARY J. MULHOLLAND 
1 27 Cottage Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 
English 

Ya-Hoo 2; House Officer 3; Quiet Hours Committee 3; Dean's 
List 3; Newman Club 1,3; Education Club 4. 
SHEILA M. MULLANE 
Mill Valley Road, Belchertown, Massachusetts 
History 

Collegian 1; Concert Band 1, 2, 3; Marching Band 1, 2, 3; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Equestrian Club 2, 3, 4; Gymnastics 
Club 2; History Club 3, 4, Secretary 3, President 4; Angel 
Flight 4. 

ANN F. MULLIN 

1 Abbot Street, Fort Village, Massachusetts 
Personnel Management 

House Counselor 3, 4, Chairman 4; University Concert Asso- 
ciation 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; SWAP 4; Winter Carnival Com- 
mittee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Management Club 3, 4, 
Treasurer 4. 

ROBERT C. MULRYAN 
461 Salem Street, Wilmington, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Interfraternity Council 2, 3, Rushing Committee 2, Social 
Chairman 3; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Hegamon 2; 
Engineering Open House Committee 2, 3. 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Softball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; ASCE 1, 2, 3, 4; Civil Engineering Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 




SHEILA M. MULLANE 



ANN F. MULLIN 



ELAINE C. MUNROE 

55 Morse Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Dean's List 1; Newman Club 1, 3, 4; Education Club 3, 4, 

State Historian 4; Fernald Entomological Club 4. 

GENESIO MURANO 

580 East Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Pre-Med (zoology) 

Flying Redmen 1, 2, A.S.C. Award; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Air Cadet Squadron 1,2; Fencing Club 2, 3, 4, President 2, 3, 

4; Italian Club 4; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 3. 

RICHARD L. MURPHY 

14 Cherry Lane, Scituate, Massachusetts 

Government 

Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, Pledge Marshall 2, Rush Chairman 3, 

Steward 4, Executive Committee 2, 3, 4; Student Centennial 

Committee 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Student Christian 

Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 





ROBERT C. MULRYAN 



ELAINE C. MUNROE 



GENESIO MURANO 



RICHARD L. MURPHY 



403 




PAUL D. MURRAY 



PHILIP W. NASON 



MARK NAIAUPSKY 



DAVID K. NAYLOR 




ELAINE R. NEEDHAM 



JAMES E. NELSON 




NANCY J. NELSON LYNNE C. NEUHAUSER 




JOHN V. NEVERS 



TIMOTHY F. NEVILS 



PAUL D. MURRAY 

38 Bartlett Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4, Junior Guard 3, Senior Guard 4, B- 

Steward 4; Football 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Bridge Club 

1, 2; Mathematics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Square Dance Club 1. 
PHILIP W. NASON 

41 Linnaean Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Geology 

Union College 1; House Counselor 3, 4; Canterbury Club 2, 3, 

4, Vice President 3; Geology Club 4. 

MARK NATAUPSKY 

44 Dich Drive, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Collegian 1, 2, 3, 4; Index 2, 3, 4; WMUA 1; Dean's List 3, 4; 

Honors Work 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Rifle Team 1, 

2, 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4, Holiday Co-Chairman 3, 
Treasurer 4; Student Zionist Association 1. 2, 3, 4, Member- 
ship Chairman 2; Pre-Medical Club 1; Psychology Club 2, 3, 
4; Rifle-Pistol Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 1, 2, 3, Vice 
President 4. 

DAVID K. NAYLOR 
108 Westfield Road,, Holyoke, Massachusetts 
English 

Collegian 3; Military Ball Committee 3, 4; Pistol Team 1, 2, 3, 
4. Captain 3; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Flying Club 4; Arnold 
Air Society 3. 4. 
ELAINE R. NEEDHAM 
84 Locust Avenue, Worcester 4, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

House Counselor 3, 4; Mortar Board 4; Operetta Guild 2; 
Musigals 3, 4, Director 4; Dean's List I, 2, 3, 4; Honors 
Colloquium 2, 3; Phi Kappa Phi 3, 4; Alpha Lambda Delta 2, 
President 2; Campus Chest Committee 1; SCOPE 4; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2; Wesley Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Education Club 2, 3, 4. 
JAMES E. NELSON 

41 Fairview Street, Roslindale 31, Massachusetts 
Production Management 

Dean's List 3; Newman Club 1, 2; Management Club 4, Presi- 
dent 4. 

NANCY J. NELSON 
17 Bracmore Road, Natick, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Dean's List 2; Education Club 3, 4; Synthesis 2. 
LYNNE C. NEUHAUSER 
278 Morgan Street, South Hadley, Massachusetts 
History 

International Club 4; Outing Club 3, 4. 
JOHN V. NEVERS 

49 West Neptune Street, West Lynn, Massachusetts 
Chemical Engineering 

Class Executive Council 2, 3, 4; Alpha Gamma Rho 1, 2; Beta 
Kappa Phi 3, 4, Secretary 3; Dean's List 1; SWAP 4; Winter 
Carnival Committee 3; Senior Week Committee 4; AIChE 3, 
4; Chemical Engineering Club 3, 4; Hooker's Club 3, 4. 
TIMOTHY F. NEVILS 

26 Harrison Avenue, Swampscott, Massachusetts 
Marketing 

WMUA 2; Phi Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4. Treasurer 4; Maroon 
Key 2; Dean's List 4; Football 1; Golf 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; Marketing Club 3, 4. 



404 




ROGER A. NICHOLAS 



NANCY A. NICHOLS 



ROGER A. NICHOLAS 

47 Freeman Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 

Landscape Architecture 

House Counselor 3, 4; Dean's List 2; Honors Work 4; Alpha 

Zeta 4; Landscape Architecture Club 2, 3, 4; Water Ski Club 3. 

NANCY A. NICHOLS 

17 Middle Street, Georgetown, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Women's Sports, 
Archery 1, 2, 3, Badminton 3, Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Bowling 1, 
2, Field Hockey 3, 4, Gymnastics 2, Lacrosse 3. 4, Softball 1, 
2, 3, 4; Swimming 2, 3, 4. Volleyball 2, 3, 4; Student Christian 
Association 1; Wesley Foundation 1; Gymnastics Club 2; Phys- 
ical Education Club 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 
3,4. 

CHARLES H. NOBLE, III 
1 10 East Main Street, Gloucester, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 3, Activities 
Chairman 2; Revelers 3; Maroon Key 2; Military Ball Com- 
mittee 3; Golf 1, 3, 4, Captain 4; Bay State Rifles 1; Newman 
Club 1. 2; ASCE 1, 2, 4; Civil Engineering Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Ski 
Club 1; Varsity "M" Club 3, 4. 
KAREN E. NOLIN 
351 King Street, Littleton, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

House Counselor 4; WAA Representative 3; Dean's List 4; 
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Softball 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 3, 4; 
Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Softball Manager 4. 
BRUCE K, NORLUND 
180 King Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4, Sergeant-at-Arms 3; Dean's List 1, 
2. 3, 4; Phi Eta Sigma 1; Phi Kappa Phi 4; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; 
ASME 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Armenian Club 2. 
JAMES S. NORTON, III 

Lovering Street, RED #1, West Medway, Massachusetts 
History 

Berkshire Community College; Class Executive Council 3, 4; 
Q.T.V. 2, 3, 4, Historian 2, Pledge Master 3; Revelers 4, 
President 4; Campus Varieties 4; SWAP 4; Winter Carnival 
Committee 3, Activities Co-Chairman 3; Newman Club 2, 3, 
4; History Club 4. 
LEE A. NORTON 

61 Dorwin Drive, West Springfield, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4, Historian 2, 3; Winter Carnival 
Committee 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Accounting Associa- 
tion 4. 

IRENE M. NUNES 
9 Genoa Avenue, Milford, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Class Executive Council 1; House Counselor 3, 4, Social 
Chairman 2; Dean's List 1, 2; Honors Work 4; Newman Club 
1, 2, 3; American Chemical Society 3, 4. 
SYLVIA M. OAKES 
Middle Road, Clarksburg, Massachusetts 
Retailing 

Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, House Manager 4; Winter Carni- 
val Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics 
Club 1, 2. 4; Sophomore Representative 2. 
CAROLYN H. O'BRIEN 

18 Chestnut Avenue, Leeds, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Newman Club I. 




^ V \1 
CHARLES H. NOBLE, III 




KAREN E. NOLIN 





BRUCE K. NORLUND JAMES S. NORTON, III 





LEE A. NORTON 



IRENE M. NUNES 




SYLVIA M. OAKES CAROLYN H. O'BRIEN 



405 





EDWARD R. O'CONNOR. JR. WILLIAM M. O'DONNELL 




ELINOR M. OGILVIE 



JAMES B. O'HEARN 




CAROLYN E. OLIVER 



HUGH D. OLMSTEAD 



EDWARD R. O'CONNOR, JR. 

Barre Road, Wheelwright, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Military Ball Committee 4; Wrestling 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2. 

WILLIAM M. O'DONNELL 

46 Moulton Street, Newton Lower Falls, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Men's Sports 1, 2, 3, 4, Physical Education Club 1, 

Recreation Club 4; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4. 

ELINOR M. OGILVIE 

103 Pleasant Street, East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

English 

House Counselor 3, 4; Sigma Sigma Sigma 2, 3, 4, 

sponding Secretary 4; Winter Carnival Committee 2, 

wards Fellowship 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 

JAMES B. O'HEARN 

139 Parker Street, East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

English 



3, 4; 



Corre- 
3; Ed- 



Collegian I; WMUA 2, 3, 4, Business Manager 2, Program 
Director 3, Station Manager 4; Dean's List 1, 3; Phi Eta Sigma 
1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
CAROLYN E. OLIVER 
499 Bolton Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
French 

Student Senate 2; Student Union Governing Board 2; R.S.O. 
Committee 2; Panhellenic Council 3, 4; Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 
Social Chairman 4; Dean's List 1, 3; Student Centennial Com- 
mittee 3; Winter Carnival Committee 2; Newman Club 1, 2; Le 
Cercle Francais 1, 2, 3; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2. 
HUGH D. OLMSTEAD 
19 Plum Street, Gloucester, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Colloquium 3, Honors Work 4; 
Judson Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4; American Chemical Society 2, 3, 4. 
CAROL A. O'LOUGHLIN 
19 Mill Road, Littleton, Massachusetts 
Philosophy 

Dean's List 2; Honors Colloquium 3; Newman Club 1; Inter- 
national Club 4; Modern Dance Club 1, 2; Outing Club 2; 
Synthesis 1, 2, 3. 
PAUL R. OLSEN 
Newell Road, Holden, Massachusetts 
Pre-Meclical 

Honors Work 4; Bay State Rifles 2; 4-H Club 3, 4; Pre- 
MedicalClub 1, 3,4. 
WILLIAM F. O'NEILL 
452 Maple Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 
Newman Club 1, 2; AIEE-IRE 2, 3, 4. 
STEVEN L. ORLEN 
33 Carol Lane, Holyoke, Massachusetts 
English 

Collegian 4; Literary Magazine 2, 3, 4, Associate Editor 4; 
Experimental Theater 1, 2. 
MOLLIANNE OSBORN 
37 Webster Road, Lexington, Massachusetts 
Foods and Nutrition in Business 





CAROL A. O'LOUGHLIN PAUL R. OLSEN 




WILLIAM F. O'NEILL 



STEVEN L. ORLEN 



406 



State College at Framingham; University Theatre Group 3; 
Homecoming Committee 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; 
Newman Club 3. 4; Home Economics Club 3, 4; Sport Para- 
chute Club 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 3, 4; Young 
Democrats 4, Secretary 4. 
PAMELA J. OSBORN 

1 1 Lockwood Road, Lexington 73, Massachusetts 
English 

R.S.O Committee 3, 4; Operetta Guild 4; Dean's List 3; Stu- 
dent Christian Association 1. 
MORRIS OSTROFF 
46 Nancy Road, Milton 86, Massachusetts 
Pre-Medical — Zoology 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 2, 3; Honors Work 
4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Treasurer 3, President 4. 
ROBERT S. OSTROWSKI 
1 1 Melody Road, Peabody, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Beta Kappa Phi 2, 3, 4, Pledge President, Chairman of the 
Bar; Dean's List 2: Winter Carnival Committee 3; Newman 
Club 1, 2; Psychology Club 3, 4; Ski Club 2, 3, 4. 
RUTH S. OWEN 

360 Harkness Road, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Education 

Pi Beta Phi 3, 4, Scholarship Chairman 4; Student Christian 
Association 3; Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Young 
Republicans 3. 
ROBERT F. OWENS 

357 Auburn Street, Whitman, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Transfer — Wentworth Institute; Chorale 2; Newman Club 2, 3, 
4; AIEE-IRE 3, 4; Commuter's Club 4; Outing Club 4; Ski 
Club 2, 3, 4. 
DAVID T. PADDEN 
342 Sargeant Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Military Ball Committee, Chairman of Decorations; Newman 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-Chairman of Religious Committee 3, 4; 




RUTH S. OWEN 



ROBERT F. OWENS 





MOLLIANNE OSBORN PAMELA J. OSBORN 




MORRIS OSTROFF ROBERT S. OSTROWSKI 




DAVID T. PADDEN 



NANCY A. PADDEN 



SANDRA L. PALMER 



NANCY O. PALMERINO 



Arnold Air Society 3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Education 
Club 4. 

NANCY A. PADDEN 

63 Sherbourne Avenue, Swansea, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Tennis Club 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 4; 

Sociology Club 3, 4; Arts and Music Committee 3. 

SANDRA L. PALMER 

33 Mystic Avenue, Tewksbury, Massachusetts 
English 

Intervarsity Christian Fellowship 2; Student Christian Associa- 
tion I. 

NANCY O. PALMERINO 
149 Chapin Street, Southbridge, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Collegian 2; Operetta Guild 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Mathematics Club 3, 4; Women's 
Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Sub-Board 3, 4; Sailing Club 4. 



407 




LAURFNCE R. PAQUFTTE BARBARA G. PARADISE 




LOUIS R. PARADISO 



JOANNE PARISEAU 




ROBERT A. PAOLETTI 

8 Wellington Street, Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts 

Zoolof>y 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Eta Sigma 1; Newman Club 1, 4; 

Zoology Club 3, 4. 

CAROLE A. PAQUETTE 

196 Conway Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Enfilish 

Collegian 2, 3; Index 4; Literary Magazine 4; Military Ball 

Committee I, Cheerleader 2, 3; Newman Club 3, 4. 

LAURENCE R. PAQUETTE 
614 Summer Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Holyoke Junior College; Dean's List 2; Honors Work 4; New- 
man Club 2; University Economics Association 3, 4. 

BARBARA G. PARADISE 
Pelham Road, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Mnthemalics 

WMUA 2, 3, 4, Business Manager 4; SWAP 4; Student Chris- 
tian Association 2; Mathematics Club 4; Women's Athletic 
Association 2. 

LOUIS R. PARADISO 

Uxbridge Road, Mendon, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; AIEE-IRE 3, 4. 




DIANNE M. PASKOWSKY 



MICHAEL PASSARETTI 



JOANNE PARISEAU 

138 North Street, Salem, Massachusetts 

Speech 

Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4, Chaplain 4; Winter Carnival 

Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 4; Speech Club 3, 4. 



DOMINICK H. PARISI 

708 Bradley Road, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Forestry 

Alpha Sigma Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 3; 

Council 2, 3. 



Interfraternity 



DOMINICK H. PARISI 



CAROL S. PASCHKES 



CAROL S. PASCHKES 
74 High Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

International Weekend Committee 3, 4; Winter Carnival Com- 
mittee 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 4. 

DIANNE M. PASKOWSKY 

42 Lovett Street, Salem, Massachusetts 

Spanish 

Chorale L 2, 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Kappa Phi 4; 

Judson Fellowship 2; Student Christian Association 2, 3, 4; Art 

Club 4; Italian Club 4; Spanish Club 3, 4. 

MICHAEL PASSARETTI 

49 Clarence Street, Roxbury, Massachusetts 

Pre-Medical 

Dean's List 1, 3; Phi Eta Sigma 1; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3. 



408 



RONALD H. PASTERCZYK 

104 Lafayette Street, Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Dean's List 3; Intramurals 3, 4; Soccer 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 

3, 4; Physical Education Club 1, 3, 4; Program Committee 4. 

JUDITH A. PATENAUDE 
1 Walker Avenue, Taunton, Massachusetts 
Government 

R.S.O. Committee 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Flying Club 
2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4; Modern Dance Club 2; Young Republi- 
cans 2, 3. 

DANIEL N. PATRIE 

32 Hudson Street, Worchester, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Dormitory Secretary 3, 4; Flying Redmen 1, 2; Air Cadet 

Squadron 1, 2; AIEE-IRE 1; ASME 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4. 

DANA PAUL 

34 Woodland Street, Methuen, Massachusetts 

Government 

Sigma Sigma Sigma 2, 3, 4, Panhellenic Representative 3, 

Scholarship Chairman 4; Roister Doisters 1; Dean's List 2, 3; 

Honors Work 4; Special Events Committee 3, Chairman of 

Apple Polish Hour; Equestrian Club 2; Oriental Sports Club 1. 

JOHN L. PAULY 

180 Ames Road, Hampden, Massachusetts 

Matliematics 

WMUA 3; Student Christian Association 1, 2; Air Cadet 

Squadron 1; Mathematics Club 4. 




RONALD H. PASTERCZYK JUDITH A. PATENAUDE 

DOUGLAS G. PEARSALL 
10 Hamilton Drive, East Northfield, Massachusetts 
Economics 

House Counselor 2, 3, 4, Head Counselor 2, 3, 4; Gryphon 3; 
Operetta Guild 4; Student Centennial Committee 3, 4; Tennis 
1, 2, 4; Edwards Fellowship 1, 2; University Economics Asso- 
ciation 2, 3,4, President 4; Sailing Club Founder 4. 
BRYAN J. PEFFER 
42 Ridge Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Class Executive Council 2, 3; Interfraternity Council 3; Alpha 
Sigma Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3, Executive Committee 2, 
Social Chairman 2; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Newman 
Club 1; ASME 3, 4; Ski Club 2; SAE 4. 
ROBERTA PEKIN 

19 Everett Paine Boulevard, Marblehead, Massachusetts 
History 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 3, 4; History Club 
3, 4; Dorm Committee 4. 
EDWARD C. PELLETIER 
441 Miller Street, Ludlow, Massachusetts 
Government 

Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 2, 3; Ama- 
teur Radio Association 2, 3, Treasurer 2; Physics Club 1, 2, 3, 
Treasurer 2. 

KATHRYN M. PELLETIER 
38 Crystal Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Newman Club 1, 2, 4; Psychology Club 2, 3; Women's Athletic 
Association 1, 2, 3. 




DANIEL N. PATRIE 



DANA PAUL 




JOHN L. PAULY 



DOUGLAS G. PEARSALL 




BRYAN J. PEFFER 



ROBERTA PEKIN 




EDWARD C. PELLETIER KATHRYN M. PELLETIER 



409 



MARY-AGNES PELTON 
527 Cherry Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 
An 

Lambda Delta Phi 2. 3, 4, Alumnae Secretary 3, Social Chair- 
man 4; Dean's List 3; Honors Work 4; Naiads 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Art Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; 
Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 
DORIS F. PELTONEN 
269 Falmouth Road, Hyannis, Massachusetts 
Philosophy 

Collegian 4; Dean's List 2; Newman Club 2. 4, Dormitory 
Captain 2. 

ROBERT G. PERETTI 
52 Stockman Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Social Activities Committee 1; Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Executive Council 2, 3, 4; Campus Chest Committee 2, 3; 
Homecoming Committee 2, 3; Winter Carnival Committee 2, 
3: Newman Club 1, 2, 3; ASME 1, 2; Spanish Club 3. 
DONNA L. PERREAULT 
13 Milton Street. Lynn. Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Wesley Foundation 1.2; Education Club 3, 4. 
ROBERT A. PERREAULT 

P.O. Box 64, Main Street, Sunderland, Massachusetts 
Microbiology 

Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2. 
THOMAS A. PERRON 
Mathews Road, Conway, Massachusetts 
Forestry 

Stockbridge School of Agriculture. 
DAVID M. PERRY 
52 Linden Place, Brookline, Massachusetts 
English 

Collegian 1; Literary Magazine 2, 3, 4; Channing Club 2; Hillel 
Foundation 1; Literary Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Synthesis 2, 3. 
MARY E. PERRY 
203 Pond Street, Natick, Massachusetts 
Spanish 

Operetta Guild 2, 3, 4; Opera Workshop 2; Basketball 1; 
Judson Fellowship 1. 2; Student Christian Association 1; 
Equestrian Club 1, 2; Outing Club 3; Spanish Club 4; Square 
Dance Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3. 
ROBERT G. PETERS 
7 Grandview Avenue, Granby, Massachusetts 
History 

Alpha Phi Omega 3, 4; Roister Doisters 1; Dean's List 1, 3; 
Honors Work 2, 4; Newman Club 1; History Club 4. 
JAMES A. PETROUSKY 
83 Sanders Street, Athol, Massachusetts 
Chemical Engineering 

Honors Colloquium 4; Flying Redmen 1; Platoon Leaders 
Class 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; AIChE 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Chemical Engineering Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
RONALD P. PETTIROSSI 
39 East Alvord Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
A ccounting 

Social Activities Committee 2; Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Vice President 3; Interfraternity Council 2, 3, Sports Co- 





MARY-AGNES PELTON DORIS F. PELTONEN 




ROBERT G. PtRElU DONNA L. PERREAULT 




ROBERT A. PERREAULT THOMAS A. PERRON 



DAVID M. PERRY 



MARY E. PERRY 




ROBERT G. PETERS JAMES A. PETROUSKY 



410 




RONALD P. PETTIROSSI PATRICIA A. PEZZINI 




JEAN A, PEZZOLI 



RICHARD F. PHILLIPS 




ALAN R. PIERCE 



^^^y^^?^ 



ALICE L. PIERCE 



ordinator 3; Deans List 2, 3; Campus Chest Committee 2; New- 
man Club 3, 4; Accounting Association 4. 

PATRICIA A. PEZZINI 

659 Dewey Street, West Springfield, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, American Chemical Society 2, 3, 4, 

Treasurer 4. 

JEAN A. PEZZOLI 

120 High Street, Wareham, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

House Counselor 3; Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2, 3; Dean's List 1, 

2; Honors Work 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Gymnastics Club 2, 

3; Psychology Club 1, 2, 3, Secretary-Treasurer 3. 

RICHARD F. PHILLIPS 

1052 Grove Street, Framingham, Massachusetts 

Recreation 

Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, Rush Chairman 2, Vice President 4; 

Maroon Key 2; Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 3, 4; Lacrosse 3, 4; 

Recreation Club 2, 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 3, 4. 

JOHN T. PIANOWSKI 

462 Water Street, Clinton, Massachusetts 

Finance 

Phi Mu Delta 1, 2, 3, 4, President 2, Social Chairman 3, 

Judiciary 4; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; 

Finance Club 3. 4; Rod & Gun Club 1. 

SYLVIA J. PIANTONI 

330 East Main, North Adams, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; 

Tennis 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Zoology Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

ALAN R. PIERCE 

1 156 Main Street, West Wareham, Massachusetts 

Wildlife Biology 

Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Zeta 3, 4. 

ALICE L. PIERCE 

497 Rantoul Street, Beverly, Massachusetts 
History 

Collegian 1; Index 3; Sigma Kappa 2, 3, 4, Recommendations 
Co-Chairman 3; Revelers 2; Concert Band 1, 2, Public Rela- 
tions Manager 2; Marching Band 1, 2, Stafl' 2; Pep Band 1, 2; 
Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Alpha Lambda Delta 2; Winter Carnival 
Committee 3; Sophomore Banquet Committee 2; Hillel Foun- 
dation 1, 2; History Club 3, 4; Angel Flight 4. 

PAUL C. PISINSKI 

22 Crawford Street, Northboro, Massachusetts 

City Planning — Land Architecture 

R.S.O. Committee 3; Interfraternity Council 2; Theta Chi 1, 2, 

3, 4, Senior Executive 4; Maroon Key 2; University Open 

House Committee 2; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Track 1, 2; 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Landscape Architecture Club 2, 3, 4, 

Treasurer 3. 

MARGARET A. PITONIAK 

1 1 67 Western Avenue, Westfield, Masachusetts 

History 

Student Senate 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 2, 

3; Honors Work 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; History Club 1, 

2, 3, 4; Young Republicans 2. 




PAUL C. PISINSKI MARGARET A. PITONL\K 



411 




CHARLES PITTINS 



JULIA B. PLACE 




JAMES E. PLATO 



MARIE C. POIRIER 



CHARLES PITTINS 

25 Sugarloaf Street, South Deerfield. Massachusetts 
JULIA B. PLACE 

29 Allan Avenue, Sudbury, Massachusetts 
History 

Collegian 2, 4; Dormitory Representative 2, 4; House Counse- 
lor 3, 4, House Chairman 4; House Social Chairman 2; Oper- 
etta Guild 1, 2; Roister Doisters 1, 2, 3, Stage Manager 2, 
Business Manager 2, 3; Dean's List 1, 2; Honors Colloquium 
2; SWAP 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; His- 
tory Club 4. 
JAMES E. PLATO 

12 Bethany Road, Monson, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Accounting Association 2, 3; Flying 
Club 2. 3. 4; Marketing Club 2, 3. 4. 
MARIE C. POIRIER 

527 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 




Dean's List 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2; LeCercle Francais 2; 
French Corridor 2, 3, Treasurer 3. 

ARTHUR I. POLAND 

1503 Emory Street, Ashbury Park, New Jersey 

Astronomy 

Dean's List 1, 2; Honors Colloquium 1, 2; Astonomy Club 1; 

Ski Club 4. 

MARCIA D. POLICOW 

34 Allerton Street, Plymouth, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant Treasurer 3. 4, Regalia 3, 4; 
Revelers 2, 3; Campus Varieties 3; Winter Carnival Commit- 
tee 3; Precisionettes 1, 2; Hillel Foundation 1, 2; Education 
Club 4. 

ETHAN A. POLLACK 

10 North Eighth Avenue, Highland Park, New Jersey 

Psychology 

Student Senate 4; House Counselor 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; 

Honors Work 4; Northampton State Hospital Volunteer 2, 3; 

Psychology Club 2, 3, 4, Vice President 3. 

LINDA J, PORRECA 

146 Balch Street, Beverly, Massachusetts 

Marketing 

Campus Chest Committee 1; Student Christian Association 1, 

2, 3, 4; Business Administration Club 4; Sociology Club 1; Ski 

Club 1; Marketing Club 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2. 

LEE PORTER 

26 Mason Road, Needham, Massachusetts 

Retailing 

Sigma Kappa 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Concert Band 2, Secretary 2; 

Health Council 4; Dean's List 3; Student Christian Association 

1. 2; Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4. 

CAROLYN R. POTTER 

Post Office Box 1351, G.A.F.B. Branch, Rome, New York 

Sociology 

Transfer from: Long Island University; Astronomy Club 4; 

Mathematics Club 3; Sociology Club 4. 




ARTHUR I. POLAND MARCIA D. POLICOW 




ETHAN A. POLLACK LINDA J. PORRECA 



LEE PORTER 



CAROLYN R. POTTER 



412 



JAMES F. POWERS 

33 Hicks Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Finance 

Social Activities Committee 1, 2; Sigma Alpha Epsilon 2, 3, 4; 

Baseball 1; Newman Club I, 2, 3, 4. 

JUDITH A. PRASKIEWICZ 

Walnut Street, Upton, Massachusetts 

Mathemalics 

Alpha Chi Omega 2, 3, 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; 

Newman Club 1, 2. 3; Education Club 2, 3. 

DEBORAH PRATT 

426 Hutchinson St., Big Rapids, Michigan 

Elementary Education 

House Officer 3. Treasurer 3; Chorale 1; Basketball 1, 2, 3; 

Student Christian Association 1, 2; Education Club 2, 3, 4; 

Modern Dance Club 1; Outing Club 4; Women's Athletic 

Association 1, 2. 

LAWRENCE V. PREMERLANI 

37 East Street, Great Barrington, Massachusetts 

Government 

Furman University; Theta Chi 1, 2; Golf 1, 3, 4; Basketball 1; 

Newman Club 3, 4. 

ROBERT R. PIRESCOTT 

2 Forest Street, Lexington 73, Massachusetts 

Forestry 

Index 1; Dean's List 3; Hockey 1; Soccer 1, 2; Fencing Club 

2, 3, 4; Forestry Club 2. 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 

2, 3. 

ARLENE R. PRICE 

53 Memorial Drive, Amherst, Massachusetts 

English 

ELLEN T. PRICE 

29 Woodbrier Road, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

English 

Index 3; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; 



Naiads 1, 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 
Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 
ELAINE PRUSKY 
44 Cherry Street. Lynn, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 



3, 4; Outing Club 4; 




JAMES F. POWERS 



JUDITH A. PRASKIEWICZ 




DEBORAH PRATT 



LAWRENCE PREMERLANI 




ROBERT R. PIRESCOTT ARLENE R. PRICE 




Sigma Kappa 2, 3, 4, Registrar, Secretary 4; Concert Band 2; 
Marching Band 2; University Open House Committee 2; Win- 
ter Carnival 3; Hillel Foundation 1; Education Club 3, 4. 
LESLIE R. PYENSON 
28 Oak Street, Farmingdale, New York 
Pre-Medical 

Collegian 1, 2, 3, 4, Subscription Manager 3, Circulation 4; 
Class Executive Council 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Social Chairman 3, Executive Board 3, Alumni Secretary 2, 
Corresponding Secretary 2; Dean's List 2, 3; Honors Work 4; 
Campus Chest Committee 1; Soccer 1; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 
3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Oriental Sports Club 2, 3, 4, 
Secretary 3, 4: Pre-Medical Club 2, 3, 4; Psychology Club 2, 3. 
BARBARA B. QUAY 
65 Appleton Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

United Nations Week Committee 3, 4; Naiads 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Publicity Director 2, Secretary 4; International Club 3, 4, 
Secretary 3; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 





ELLEN T. PRICE 



ELAINE PRUSKY 



LESLIE R. PYENSON 



BARBARA B. QUAY 



413 




CIFOkl.F Ci. QUIRK. Ill MARSHALL H. RAISMAN 




ALBERT B. RAND 



CHRISTINE I. RANTA 



GEORGE G. QUIRK, III 

Villone Drive, Leeds, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Eni>ineering 

Rensselaer Polytechnical Institute 1; Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, 3, 4, 
Activities Chairman 3; Canterbury Club 3, 4; Society of Auto- 
motive Engineers 4; ASME 3, 4; Astronomy Club 3, 4; Ski 
Club 2, 3, 4. 

MARSHALL H. RAISMAN 
21 Leonard Road, Sharon, Massachusetts 
ManagemenI 

Collegian 3; Dean's List 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; 
Hillel Foundation 1, 2; Air Cadet Squadron 1; Management 
Club 3, 4. 

PATRICIA M. RALICKI 
North Silver Lane, Sunderland, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Dean's List 1 ; American Chemical Society 4. 
DONALD RAMOS 

24 Winsper Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
History 

Dean's List 3; Honors Work 4; Military Ball Committee 4; 
Bay State Rifles 1, 2, 4, Drill Team Leader 4; Luso-Brazilian 
Club 4, President 4. 

ALBERT B. RAND 

7 Calumet Lane, Marblehead, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Interfraternity Council 3, 4; Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; 
President 4; Maroon Key 2; Accounting Association 3, 4. 
CHRISTINE I. RANTA 
15 Standley Road, North Easton, Massachusetts 
English 

Sigma Sigma Sigma 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, Vice President 4; 
House Counselor 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Student Christian 
Association 1, 2; Education Club 3; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion 1, 2, 4. 

MICHAEL A. RAPHAEL 

43 Pilgrim Road, Marblehead, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Basketball 3, Assistant Manager 3; Flying Redmen 1, 2; Hillel 

Foundation 1. 2, 3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1; Pre-Medical 

Club 1, 2; Psychology Club 3, 4. 

CONSTANCE A. RAPISARDI 

34 Kendrick Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Social Activities Committee 2, 3; Winter Carnival Committee 

3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 3, 4; Italian Club 1, 2. 

KATHLEEN M. REAGAN 

47 Strong Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
History 

Class Executive Council 4: Women's Inter-dorm Council 2, 
President 2; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; Campus Chest Committee 2; 
Student Centennial Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Vice 
President 3. 4; History Club 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 
I, 2, 3, 4, Executive Board 2. 

BARBARA J. REED 

48 Main Circle, Randolph Air Force Base, Texas 
Nursing 

Women's Inter-dorm Council 2; Dean's List 3, 4; Wesley 
Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Equestrian Club 2, 3; Nursing Club 1, 2, 
3, 4, Revisions Committee Chairman 4; Modern Dance Club 2. 





MICHAEL A. RAPHAEL CONSTANCE A. RAPISARDI 



KATHLEEN M. REAGAN 



BARBARA J. REED 



414 



2, 3, 4, Recording 
Newman Club 1; 



Panhel- 

2, 3. 4, 
3, 
3; 



LORRAINE I. REES 

3 Topping Road, Andover, Massachusetts 
Government 

R.S.O Committee 2; Alpha Chi Omega 1, 
Secretary 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; 
Spanish Club 1. 

JOANNE REESE 

4 Chester Circle, Tewksbury, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

House Counselor 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Newman 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Italian Club 4; Mathematics Club 3, 4; Wom- 
en's Athletic Association 2, 3. 4. 
CHARLES A. REID 

144 Harvard Avenue, West Medford, Massachusetts 
Marketing 

Interfraternity Council 2, 3, 4; Tau Epsilon Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, 
President 4; Maroon Key 2, Vice President 2; Dance Band 1, 
2; SWAP 4; Marketing Club 3. 
EILEEN M. REILLY 

1650 Longmeadow Street, Longmeadow, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Social Activities Committee 3, 4; House Counselor 4; 
lenic Council 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Alpha Chi Omega 1, 
Pan-Hellenic Representative 3, 4, President 4; Dean's List 1, 
4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Orthodox Club I, 2, 
Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
JANICE M. REILLY 

16 Everdean Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Dorm Social Chairman 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education 
Club 3, 4; International Club 4; Political Science Association 
4; Sociology Club 3, 4; Spanish Club 1; Young Democrats 4. 
JANICE K. REIMER 
48 Orchard Road, Swampscott, Massachusetts 
Recreation Leadership 

Women's Judiciary 1, 2, 3, 4, Chief Justice 4; Class Executive 
Council 1, 2, 3, 4; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Panhellenic Represent- 
ative 3, President 4; Scrolls 2, President 2; Dean's List 3; 
Campus Chest Committee 3; Student Centennial Committee 2, 
3; SWAP 1, 2, 4, Executive Committee 4; Winter Carnival 
Committee 3; Hillel Foundation 1. 2, 3, 4; Recreation Club 2, 
3, 4: Panhellenic Council 3. Secretary 3. 
RICHARD F. RICCIARDI 
1 8 Caprera Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Worcester Junior College; Dean's List 4; Baseball 3, 4; Bas- 
ketball 3, 4; Newman Club 3, 4; Education Club 4; Physical 
Education Club 3, 4; Young Democrats 4. 
BARBARA A. RICE 
21 Bacon Road. Newton, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 
Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
STEPHEN W. RICH 
47 Jasper Street, Saugus, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Men's Inter-dorm Council 3, Social Chairman 3; House Officer 
3, 4, Social Chairman 3, Vice President 4; Bowling 2, 3; 
Football 2, 3, 4; Softball 3; Air Cadet Squadron 2; ASCE 2, 3, 4. 
BRIAN P. RICHARDSON 
610 South Pleasant Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 
Judson Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4, President 1, 2; ASME 4. 




LORRAINE I. REES 



JOANNE REESE 




JANICE M. REILLY 



JANICE K. REIMER 




klC HARD F. RICCIARDI BARBARA A. RICE 



STEPHEN W. RICH 



BRIAN P. RICHARDSON 



415 





MAUREEN RICHARDSON MARY M. RISCHITELLI 



VAUGHN F. RIST 



LAWRENCE A. RIIHLY 



MAUREEN RICHARDSON 
135 Warren Street, West Springfield, Massachusetts 
History 

Phi Beta Phi 3, 4; Dean's List 2; Winter Carnival Committee 
3; Student Christian Association 1, 2; History Club 3; Wom- 
en's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 

MARY M. RISCHITELLI 

47 Woodland Avenue, Southbridge, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

House Counselor 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 1, 

2, 3, 4; Modern Dance Club 1; Water Ski Club 1. 

VAUGHN F. RIST 

232 South Main Street, Holden, Massachusetts 
Business A dministration 

Class Executive Council 2. 3; Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Military 
Ball Committee 2; Lacrosse 1, 2, 4; Flying Redmen 2; New- 
man Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Business Administration Club 3, 4; Man- 
agement Club 3, 4; Sport Parachute Club 4. 




JEROME E. ROBBINS KENNETH C. ROBBINS 



LAWRENCE A. RITEEY 
433 West Elm Street, Brockton, Massachusetts 
English 

Basketball 1,2; Intramural Softball 1, 2, 3; Spanish Club 1, 2, 3. 
JEROME E. ROBBINS 
15 Eastern Avenue, Beverly, Massachusetts 
A ccounting 

Boston College; House Counselor 3, 4; Dining Hall Counselor 
4; Men's Intramural Sports 2, 3; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Ac- 
counting Association 2, 3, 4; D.O.M. Club 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 4. 
KENNETH C. ROBBINS 
361 Washington Street, Westwood, Massachusetts 
History 

Class Executive Council 2, 3, 4; Class Night Committee 4; 
Social Activities Committee 4; Interfraternity Council 2, 3, 4; 
Greek Ball Chairman 3; UN Carnival Chairman 3; Adminis- 
trative Vice President 4; Beta Kappa Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Alumni 
Secretary 3, IFC Representative 2, 3; Student Health Council 
4; Campus Chest Committee 3; SWAP 4; United Nations 
Week Committee Vice Chairman 3; Winter Carnival Commit- 
tee 2, 3, Snow Sculpture Chairman; Flying Redmen 1, 2. 
GRACE E. ROBERTS 
64 Richdale Road, Needham, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Equestrian Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 4. 
HELEN A. ROBERTS 
120 Winton Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Social Chairman 4; Dean's List 2, 3; Honors Work 4; WAA 
Bowling Team 1 ; Student Christian Association 1 ; Education 
Club 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1. 
WILLIAM J. ROBERTS 
120 Winton Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 
Air Cadet Squadron 1. 
DAVID L. ROBITAILLE 

177 Corthell Street, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Phi Mu Delta 2, 3, 4; Flying Redmen 1, 2; Newman Club 3, 
4; ASME 3, 4. 






GRACE E. ROBERTS 



HELEN A. ROBERTS 



WILLIAM J. ROBERTS 



DAVID L. ROBITAILLE 



416 




JOHN W. ROCHE 



JUDITH A. ROCHE 



MARY L. ROCHE 



CHARLES W. ROCK 



JOHN W. ROCHE 

80 Shrewsbury Street, Worchester, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

New England School of Accounting; Dean's List 3, 4; Varsity 
Golf 3, 4; Accounting Association 3, 4. 
JUDITH A. ROCHE 

649 Franklin Street, Framingham, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

Dean's List 3; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
MARY L. ROCHE 
138 Main Street, Foxboro, Massachusetts 
Government 

Collegian 1, 2, 3, 4, Photography Editor 4; Ya-Hoo 2, 3; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pioneer Valley Folklore Society 2, 3, 
4; Political Science Association 2. 3; Young Democrats 3; 
CHARLES W. ROCK 

250 Wilson Street. New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Landscape Architecture 

Class Executive Council 2, 3; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Secretary 3; Revelers 3; Dean's List 3; SWAP 2; Winter Carni- 
val Committee 2; Track 1; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Landscape 
Architecture Club 2, 3,4, President 4. 
AGNES M. RODGERS 
58 Dean Road, Cochituate, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

Dean's List 3, 4; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
GILBERT S. ROGERS 
71 Knox Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

House Counselor 2, 3; Gryphon 4; House Officer 2, 3, Athletic 
Chairman 2, 3; Newman Club 1; ASCE 2, 3, 4; Civil Engi- 
neering Club 2, 3, 4. 
FRANK C. ROMITO 
78 1 Allen Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 2, 3, 4, Pledge Secretary 2; Dean's List 
3; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Accounting 
Association 4. 
DAVID W. ROOT 

Smead Hill Road, Colrain, Massachusetts 
Entomology 





AGNES M. RODGERS 



GILBERT S. ROGERS 



Dean's List 3, 4; Alpha Zeta 4; Fernald Entomological Club 2, 
3, 4, President 4; Outing Club 2. 

JANET M. ROSE 

ill Main Street. Bondsville, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Index 2; Class Executive Council 3; Pi Beta Phi 1, 2, 3 Social 

Chairman 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 

2, 3, 4; Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer; Women's Athletic 

Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 

MARCIA L. ROSENBERG 

33 Newtonville Avenue, Newton 58, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Collegian 1; Index 3; Ya-Hoo 1; Class Executive Council 2, 3. 
4; Student Union Program Council 1, 2; Operetta Guild 1; 
Campus Varieties 2. 4; Homecoming Committee 3, 4; Winter 
Carnival Committee 2, 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3; Accounting 
Association 3; Business Administration Club 3; Mathematics 
Club 1, 2, 4. 




FRANK C. ROMITO 



DAVID W. ROOT 



JANET M. ROSE 



MARCIA L. ROSENBERG 



417 




MICHAEL L. ROTHSCHILD MARK B. ROTHSTEIN 






CANDIDA S. ROSS 



JOAN H. ROSS 



BONITA J. ROSENTHAL 

580 Weetamoe Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Collegian 1; Varsity Pep Band 1; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Education Club 4; Equestrian Club 1; Pioneer Valley Folklore 

Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Sociology Club 2, 3, 4. 

JUDITH E. ROSENTHAL 

37 Kilsyth Road, Brookline, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

House Counselor 3; Panhellenic Council 4; Sigma Delta Tau 

1, 2, 3, 4; Exchange Student, University of Nevi' Mexico 3; 

Mortar Board 4, Treasurer; Winter Carnival Committee 1; 

Dean's List 2, 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2; Education Club 2, 4. 

CANDIDA S. ROSS 

47 Main Street, Northfleld, Massachusetts 

English 

Concert Band 1; Marching Band 1; Canterbury Club I, 2; 

Student Christian Association 1, 2; Young Democrats 3; 

Dames Club 4. 

JOAN H. ROSS 

329 Hartmann Road, Newton, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

WMUA 2; Education Club 2, 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 

4; Young Republicans 3. 

RICHARD A. ROSS 

63 Highland Street, Norwood, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Lacrosse 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; AIEE- 

IRE 2, 4; Ski Club 1. 

JOHN P. ROSSI 

549 East Main Street, Orange, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Dean's List 3; Newman Club 1; American Society of Mechan- 
ical Engineers 3, 4. 

MICHAEL L. ROTHSCHILD 

82 Hall Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Collegian 4; Swimming 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-Captain 4; Hillel Foun- 
dation 1, 2, 3, 4; University Economics Association 2, 3, 4; 
Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4. 

MARK B. ROTHSTEIN 

22 Hartshorn Avenue, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Cliemical Engineering 

Engineering Journal 3, 4, New Developments Editor 3, Edito- 
rial Editor 4; Phi Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 3; 
Honors Colloquium 3; Honors Work 4; Tau Beta Pi 4; Inter- 
varsity Christian Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4; AIChE 2, 3, 4, Program 
Director 4; Chemical Engineering Club 2, 3, 4, Program Direc- 
tor 4. 

J. TIMOTHY ROWNTREE 

6 Mount Vernon Street, North Reading, Massachusetts 

Psycliology 

Institute of Environmental Psychophysiology 3, 4. 

RICHARD A. ROY 

50 Middle Street, Florence, Massachusetts 

Geology 

Sigma Gamma Epsilon 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Geology 

Club 2, 3; Sailing Club 4. 



J. TIMOTHY ROWNTREE RICHAJRD A. ROY 



418 




PETER C. ROZANTES 



JACQUELINE RUANE 



MICHAEL A. RUBIN 



JAMES W. RUEST 



, 3; Alpha 
Bay State 



PETER C. ROZANTES 

153 Grattan Street, Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

House President 4; Orthodox Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Air Cadet 
Squadron 1,2. 
JACQUELINE RUANE 
63 Belnel Road, Boston, Massachusetts 
Government 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 2, 3. 4; Political 
Science Association 3, 4; Young Democrats 3. 
MICHAEL A. RUBIN 
149 Dayton Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Pre-Dentistry 

Class Executive Council 1; Interfraternity Council ; 
Epsilon Pi 1,2, 3, 4; Maroon Key 2; Gymnastics 1 
Rifles 1, 2; Pre-Medical Club 4. 
JAMES W. RUEST 
10 Spring Street, Plainville, Massachusetts 
CHARLES J. RUMA 
2 Campbell Road, Stoneham, Massachusetts 
Business Management ' 

Handbook 2; Class Executive Council 1, 2; Social Activities 
Committee 2; Interfraternity Council 2, 3, 4; Kappa Sigma 1, 
2, 3, 4. President 4; Dean's List 3; Campus Chest Committee 
3; Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; Lacrosse 1, 2, 3, 4; Business Administra- 
tion Club 3, 4; Management Club 3, 4; Pre-Medical Club 2; 
Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4. 
ALICE RUSSELL 

334 Winthrop Street, Medford, Massachusetts 
French and Russian 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Landscape Architecture Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Philosophy Club 4; Psychology Club 1, 2; Russian Club 3, 4, 
President 4. 

RICHARD P. RUSSO 

250 Dalton Division Road, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
English 

Berkshire Community College; Dance Band 3; Dean's List 
2, 3. 

KENNETH J. RYAN 
57 Ardale Street, Roslindale, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Board of Directors, Fraternity Manager's Association 3; Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2, 3, Vice President 3, 
President 4; Dean's List 1; SWAP 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 
4; Bay State Rifles 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Mathematics 
Club 3, 4; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2. 
WILLIAM H. RYAN 
807 High Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 
Pre-Medical 

House Counselor 1, 2, Head Counselor 2; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; 
Honors Work 4; Pre-Medical Club I. 
RUTH A. RYER 

54 Farragut Avenue, Somerville, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

Sigma Delta Tau 1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding 4; Dean's List 2, 3; 
University Open Committee 1; Student Christian Association 1, 
2; Nursing Club, Chairman of Revisions Committee 4, Co- 
Chairman of Alumnae Association Committee 4; Student Nurse 
Association of Massachusetts 1, 2, 3, 4; National Student Nurse 
Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 



1, 




CHARLES J. RUMA 



ALICE RUSSELL 




WILLIAM H. RYAN 



RUTH A. RYER 



419 




Four Years Of Change: 
Barely Recognizable . . . 

A N four years the physiognomy of the University has 
changed so that to the casual visitor the place is barely 
recognizable. 

Morrill Science Center, first opened to classes in Fall 
of 1960, is still adding to its structure. Huge Boyden 
Gymnasium, with an acre of floor space, opened in 
Winter of 1964. 

Forestry's Holbrook Hall, the business administra- 
tion building, new dining commons, agriculture build- 
ings have gone up in four years. 



The demise of Abigail Adams dormitory scarred a familiar face in 1963. 




Frame of the roof structure of the new Boyden Gymnasium opened in 1964. 



vLi _.u 



II II I 



niiiiiEi'iii 



llil^ill: 



^ ^ 'i> 



K-fe" 



4 








View of east side of campus from across the pond in early Summer of 1960. To left, under 
construction is the main building of Morrill Science Center. Added since this picture was 
taken have been a wing in front of Clark Hall (center). 



Curry-Hicks Cage stands in the background as Boyden foundation goes up. 



To Visitor 





EDWARD M. SALAMOFF STEPHEN K. SALHUS 




PAMELA J. SALVATI 



CHRISTINE P. SALVINI 



EDWARD M. SALAMOFF 

116 Old Farm Road, Newton Centre, Massachusetts 

Pre-Dentistry 

Tau Epsilon Phi 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; Swimming 1; Hillel 

Foundation 1, 2, 3. 4, Social Chairman 2, Treasurer 3. 

STEPHEN K. SALHUS 

155 Cottage Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Government 

Student Senate 3, 4; Class Executive Council 2, 3, 4; Q.T.V. 1, 

2, 3. 4; Student Centennial Committee 3; SWAP 4; United 

Nations Week Committee 3; Winter Carnival Committee 2, 3; 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Political Science Association 3, 4; 

Young Democrats 3, 4. 

MARY E. SALMON 

86 Fairhaven Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 

English 

Index 3; Student Senate 3, Activities Committee 3; Newman 

Club 1,2. 



STEPHEN M, SALON 

390 Bedford Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Government 

WMUA 1, 2; Roister Doisters 1; Dean's List 3; Air Force 
Rifle Team 1, 2; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3; Political Science 
Association 3, 4; Younq Republicans 2, 3, 4. 
PAMELA J. SALVATI 
Woodland Drive, Framingham, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Alpha Chi Omega 2, 3, 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; 
Special Events Committee 4; Naiads 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 
2, 3, 4: Education Club I, 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion 2, 3. 

CHRISTINE P. SALVINI 
136 Austin Street, Newtonville, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Newton Junior College; Chorale 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2; Psy- 
chology Club 3, 4. 
ABDUL RASUL SAMMA 
Box 3043, Dares Salaam, Tanganyika 
Economics 

Ya-Hoo 3, 4; Student Senate 2, 3; R.S.O. Committee 3; Distin- 
guished Visitors Program 2. 3; International Weekend Com- 
mittee 2, 3, 4; Student Centennial Committee 3, 4; SWAP 3, 
4; United Nations Week Committee 3, 4. 
MARTHA SANDROF 
73 Beverly Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 
English 

Collegian 1; Index 4; University Concert Association 3, 4; 
Roister Doisters 1. 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 
1, 2, 3, 4; Student Zionist Association 1, 2. 
JEAN E. SARGENT 
Winchester Road, Northfield, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4, Book Exchange 
Chairman 3, 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Student Chris- 
tian Association 1 ; Sociology Club 4. 
JANET E. SAUNDERS 

1 1 83 Pleasant Street, East Weymouth, Massachusetts 
English 

Index 3; Kappa Alpha Theta 2, 3, 4, Editor 4; University 
Concert Association 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 




JEAN E. SARGENT 



JANET E. SAUNDERS 



422 



PATRICIA M. SAVAGE 
45 Agnes Drive, Framingham, Massachusetts 
English 

Index 3, 4; Kappa Alpha Theta 3, 4; Winter Carnival Com- 
mittee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion 2, 3, 4. 

JAMES P. SAVIANO 
Caswell Court, East Douglas, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Dean's List 2; Intramural Softball 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Mathematics Club 1. 2, 3, 4. 
ROBERT W. SAVOY 
15 Leonard Street, Chicopee, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Vice-President 2; Class Executive Council 2; Student Union 
Governing Board 2; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; 
Revelers 2; Military Ball Committee 3; Winter Carnival Com- 
mittee 3; Soccer 1; Bay State Rifles 1, 2, 3, 4, Commander 4; 
Campus Religious Council 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Presi- 
dent 3. 

LESLIE N. SCHAIR 

97 Booth Hill Road, North Scituate, Massachusetts 
Recreation Leadership 

WMUA 2; Sigma Delta Tau 2, 3, 4, Rush Chairman 3, 1st 
Vice President 4; University Open House 2, Chairman Student 
Affairs; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Recreation Club 2, 3, 4, 
President 4. 

LINDA M. SCHECHTERLE 
60 Squire Lane, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

House Counselor 3; Pi Beta Phi 2, 3, 4, Membership Chair- 
man 4; Mortar Board 4; Concert Band 1, 2; Marching Band 1, 
2; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Work 4; Alpha Lambda Deha 
1, 2, Treasurer 2; Women's Athletic Association. 
CHRIS B. SCHELL 
Village Street, Northford, Connecticut 
Business Administration 

Dean's List 3; Astronomy Club 4; Food Distribution Club 4; 
Outing Club 3; Amherst Camera Club 3, 4. 
RUTH SCHELL 

118 Division Road, North Dartmouth, Massachusetts 
English 




PATRICIA M. SAVAGE 



JAMES P. SAVIANO 




ROBERT W. SAVOY 



LESLIE N. SCHAIR 




LINDA M. SCHECHTERLE CHRIS B. SCHELL 



DONNA A. SCHELL 



RUTH SCHELL 




EDWARD A. SCHMIDT NANCY MAE SCHMIDT 



Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 3; Honors Work 4; 
Campus Chest Committee 1; Student Christian Association 1, 3. 

DONNA A, SCHELL 

1 Pelham Island Road, South Sudbury, Massachusetts 

Home Economics RetaiUng 

Operetta Guild 3; Dean's List 2; Student Christian Association 

I; Home Economics Club 2. 3, 4; Outing Club 3; Water Ski 

Club 2; Amherst Camera Club 3, 4. 

EDWARD A. SCHMIDT 

RD #2 Glen Street, Dover, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Beta Kappa Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, House Manager 3; Soccer 1, 2, 3; 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3; ASME 1, 2, 3, 4. 

NANCY MAE SCHMIDT 

56 Leo Drive, Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

College of Our Lady of the Elms; Newman Club 3. 



423 





CAROL SCHULTZ 



JUDITH A. SCOTT 




MARILYN D. SELIAN 



DEBORAH F. SELIG 






ROSEMARY K. SEWARD 



DEANNA SHAPIRO 



CAROL SCHULTZ 

32 Jacqueline Road, Waltham, Massachusetts 

Spanish 

Dean's List L 2, 3, 4; Phi Kappa Phi 4; Newman Club 1. 3, 4; 

Spanish Club 3, 4; Young Democrats 2. 

JUDITH A, SCOTT 

97 Chestnut Street, Andover, Massachusetts 

Niirsini- 

Chi Omega I, 2, 3, Social and Civic Chairman 4; Dean's List 3; 

Niads 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 4; Nursing Club I, 2, 3, Recording 

Secretary 4. 

JOHN C. SEELY 

30 Henry Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Marketing 

University of Vermont; Dean's List 3, 4; Homecoming Com- 
mittee 3; Football 1, 2, 3; Skiing 1, 2, 3; Newman Club I, 2, 3; 
Marketing Club 2; Ski Club 1, 2, 3. 

SHEILA J. SEGAL 

52 Hawthorne Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

MARILYN D. SELIAN 

49 Webster Street, Westwood, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

House Counselor 3, 4, House Chairman 4; SWAP 4; Newman 

Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 3, 4. 

DEBORAH F. SELIG 

90 North Main Street, Leominster, Massachusetts 
English 




CLIFFORD G. SHATOS 



SUSAN T, SHEINWALD 



Collegian 1; Dean's List I, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 2; 
Field Hockey 1; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, Executive Board 2, 
3; Literary Society 1. 

ROSEMARY K. SEWARD 

3 I Claremont Terrace, Swampscott, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Student Senate 2, 3; Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4, Athletic 
Chairman 3, Social Chairman 4; Operetta Guild 2; Campus 
Chest Committee 1; Distinguished Visitors Program 3; Field 
Hockey 1, 3; Gymnastics 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Gymnastics Club 3, 4; Physical Education Club 1, 3, 4; Wom- 
en's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 

DEANNA SHAPIRO 

29 Hanover Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 

Government 

Sigma Delta Tau 1, 2, 3, 4, Recording Secretary 4; Edwards 

Fellowship 1, 2; Mathematics Club I; Young Democrats 3. 

CLIFFORD G. SHATOS 

1289 Dwight Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Landscape Architecture 

University of New Hampshire; Sigma Alpha Epsilon 2, 3, 4; 

Dean's List 2; University Open House Committee 3; Newman 

Club 3, 4; Landscape Architecture Club 3, 4; Ski Club. 

SUSAN T. SHEINWALD 

46 Chestnut Hill Road, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

English 

Operetta Guild 1; Dean's List 3; Honors Colloquium 2, 3; 



424 



: 



Honor's Work, English 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4, Religious 
Committee 2, Recording Secretary 3; American Chemical Soci- 
ety 1, 2, 3; Chemistry Club 1, 2, 3, Secretary 3. 

CAROL L. SHELASKY 
1 19 Marengo Park, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Government 

Literary Magazine 1; Operetta Guild 2; Musigals 3, 4, Secre- 
tary 4; Dean's List 2, 3. 4; Hillel Foundation 1; International 
Relations Club 2; Modern Dance Club 1; Political Science 
Association 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4. 

LEAH M. SHEPARDSON 
356 North Street, Dalton, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Class Executive Council 4; Alpha Chi Omega 2. 3, 4, Scholar- 
ship Chairman, First Vice President; Dean's List 3; SWAP 4; 
Winter Carnival Committee 3; Naiads 2, 3; Student Christian 
Association !, 2; Education Club 3, 4; Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation 1, 2, 3. 

STEPHEN O. SHEPARDSON 
74 East Bacon Street, Plainville, Massachusetts 
Management 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 1, Vice President 2; 
Lacrosse 1, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation 2; ASME 1; Manage- 
ment Club 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 3, 4. 

GARY W. SHERLAW 

41 Terry Road, West Springfield, Massachusetts 

Public Health 

House Counselor 4. 




STEPHEN O. SHEPARDSON GARY W SHERLAW 





CHARLES H. SHERMAN EVERETT B. SHERMAN 



CAROL L. SHELASKY 



LEAH M. SHEPARDSON 



CHARLES H. SHERMAN 

9 1 Carsen Avenue, Dalton, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Q.T.V. 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1; Accounting Association 3, 4. 

EVERETT B. SHERMAN 

30 Fort Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 

Business A dministration 

Lambda Chi Alpha 2, 3, 4, Rushing Chairman 4; Tennis 1, 2, 3; 

Swimming 1, 2; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3. 

JOYCE L. SHERMAN 

45 Longwood Avenue, Brookline, Massachusetts 

English 

Hillel Foundation 1; Art Club 4; Fencing Club 2. 

WILLIAM J. SHOEMAKER 

1 Dean Street, Everett, Massachusetts 

Pre-Medical 

Concert Band I, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 4; Honors Colloquium 

3; Football 1; Wrestling 1, 2, 4; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Zoology Club 4. 

PATRICIA M. SHOUGHRUE 

37 Berkshire Terrace, Florence, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Dean's List 3; Newman Club 1, 3, 4; Commuter's Club 1. 

RICHARD P. SIBLEY, JR. 

Spofford Road, Boxford, Massachusetts 

History 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 2, 3; Student Christian 

Association 1, 2, 3; Debating Society 1; History Club 4. 



.'AjIuEhB^^I^^^^^'' , 








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JOYCE L. SHERMAN WILLIAM J. SHOEMAKER 




PATRICIA M. SHOUGHRUE RICHARD P. SIBLEY, JR. 



425 



JANE A. SIDDAL 

10 Wheelock Street, Oxford, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Tennis Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Wesley Foundation 1, 2; Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
ELAINE G. SIDERI 
49 Brimblecom Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4. 
CHRISTOS K. SIDERIS 
Mitilini Samos, Greece 
Food Technology 

Boston University; WMUA I; Sigma Phi Epsilon I, 2, 3, 4; 
Maroon Key 2; SWAP 2; Orthodox Club 1, 2, 3, 4. President 2, 
3; Ford Technology Club 3. 4. Secretary 4. 
DAVID E. SIEK 

34 Richland Road, Wellesley, Massachusetts 
Food Technology 

Concert Band 'l, 2, 3, 4, Staff-at-large 3, Co-Manager 4; 
Marching Band 2, 3, 4, Staff-at-large 3, Co-Manager 4; Soccer 
1; Air Cadet Squadron 2; Food Technology Club 4. 
STEPHEN L. SILVERMAN 
493 White Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Physics 

Student Union Program Council 4; R.S.O. Committee 3, 4, 
Movie Committee Chairman 4; SWAP 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 
2; Astronomy Club 2; International Club 3; Outing Club 3, 4, 
Equipment Chairman 4; Physics Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
EDWARD H. SIMCHES 
15 Audubon Park, Lynn, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Men's Inter-dorm Council Treasurer 2; 
Marching Band 1; Hillel Foundation 1, 2 
ROBERT H. SIMMONS 
41 Ravine Road, Stoneham, Massachusetts 
Government 

Student Senate Curriculum Committee 3, Academic Affairs 
Committee 4; Student Union Program Council 4; Phi Mu 
Delta 2. 3, 4, Vice President 3; Opera Workshop 4; SWAP 4; 
Student Christian Association 1, 2; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2. 
Treasurer 2; Philosophy Club 4; Political Science Association 
2, 3. 4, Vice President, Treasurer 4; Pre-Medical Club 2. 
JANICE L. SIMONDS 

21 Saint Luke's Road, Boston 34, Massachusetts 
Englisli 

Index 3, 4; Student Union Program Council 3, 4; Kappa Kappa 
Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 4; Special Events Commit- 
tee 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, Co-Chairman 3, Chairman 4; 
Canterbury Club 1; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 
ANTHONY C. SIMONE, JR. 
1 7 1 High Street, Lee, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 4; Dean's List 3; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Newman Club 3; Physical Education Club 3. 
GAIL E. SIRD 

15 Longview Road, Palmer, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4, Historian 4; Student Centennial 
Committee 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Special Events 
Committee 2, 3; Precisionettes 1, 2, 3; Student Christian Asso- 
ciation 1, 3; Art Club 4; Education Club 3, 4. 



Dance Band 1, 2 
International Club 4 



3; 




CHRISTOS K. SIDERIS 



DAVID E. SIEK 




STEPHEN L. SILVERMAN EDWARD H. SIMCHES 




ROBERT H. SIMMONS JANICE L. SIMONDS 



ANTHONY C. SIMONE, JR. 



GAIL E. SIRD 



426 




ROBERT A. SKIBA 



FREDERICK E. SLATER 




ANN C. SLAYTON 



ROBERT B. SLOAN 





LEONARD J. SLOMSKI 



MARGARET L. SMALE 




ROBERT A. SKIBA 

21 Mt. View Street, South Hadley Falls, Massachusetts 

Matlieinalics 

Phi Sigma Delta 2, 3, 4; Concert Band 1, 2, 3; Marching Band 

1, 2, 3, Public Relations Manager 1; Newman Club 1, 2; Air 
Cadet Squadron 2; Arnold Air Society 3. 4. 

FREDERICK E. SLATER 
3 1 Thornton Road, Brookline, Massachusetts 
Pre-Dental (Zoology) 

Class Executive Council 2; Tau Epsilon Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Rev- 
elers 3; Campus Varieties 3; Dean's List 1; Winter Carnival 
Committee 3, Queen Chairman; Hillel Foundation 1. 2, 3, 4; 
Pre-Medical Club 1, 2. 3, 4. 
ANN C. SLAYTON 
15 Cottage Street, Sharon, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Collegian 1, 2; Class Executive Council 1; Dean's List 4; 
Winter Carnival Committee 1, 2, 3; Precisionettes 2, 3; Naiads 

2, 3; Young Independents 4. 
ROBERT B. SLOAN 

292 Winter Street, Weston, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Gymnastics 1, 2, 3; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; ASME 4. 
LEONARD J. SLOMSKI 
270 Waterford Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 
Malliemalics 
Baseball 1, 2. 

MARGARET L. SMALE 
263 Norfolk Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

Dean's List 3, 4; Intervarsity Christian Fellowship 2, 3, 4, 
Secretary 3, Mission Secretary 4; Commuter's Club 1, 2: Nurs- 
ing Club 1, 2, 3,4. 
HARRISON T. SMILEY, II 
95 Brow Avenue, South Braintree, Massachusetts 
Pre-Dental in Zoology 

University Concert Association 2, 3, Assistant Publicity Man- 
ager 3; Concert Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Business Manager 2, 3, 4, 
Treasurer 2, 3, 4; Dance Band 3, Business Manager 2, 3, 4, 
Treasurer 2, 3, 4; Marching Band 2, 4, Business Manager 2, 3, 4. 
CLAUDIA A. SMITH 
135 Ontario Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 
English 

Index 2; Class Executive Council 1, 3; Panhellenic Council 4; 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Song Chairman 3, Panhellenic 
Delegate 4; Operetta Guild 2; Campus Varieties 3. 
DIANE M. SMITH 
3 1 Bataan Court, Roxbury, Massachusetts 
Government 

Collegian 4: Student Senate 3; Class Executive Council 2, 3, 4; 
Lambda Delta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Activities Chairman 3, Recording 
Secretary 4; Operetta Guild 2; Student Christian Association I, 
2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation 1, 2, 3; Association for Social 
Action 2, 3; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3. 4. 
JANICE L. SMITH 

162 Copeland Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Index 3; Social Activities Committee 1, 2; Pi Beta Phi 2. 3, 
Program Chairman 4; Winter Carnival Committee 1, 2; New- 
man Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 4; Mathematics Club 3, 4. 




HARRISON T. SMILEY, II 



CLAUDIA A. SMITH 



DIANE M. SMITH 



JANICE L. SMITH 



427 




V r 



^s*^ 



^^ft 



MANUEL R. SMITH 



WAYNE L. SNAPE 



M. JOHANNA SMITH 

42 Glenn Drive, Wilbraham, Massachusetts 

Home Economics — Retailing 

House Counselor 4; Lutheran Club 3, 4; Student Christian 

Association 1, 2. 3, 4; Art Club 4; History Club 4; Home 

Economics Club 3, 4; Ski Club 1, 2. 

LURA E. M. SMITH 

North Washington Street, Belchertown, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Amateur Radio Association 1, Secretary; Education Club 4. 

MANUEL R. SMITH 

142 Fountain Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Index 3, 4, Advertising Manager 3, Business Manager 4; Area 

Judiciary 3; Class Executive Council 1, 2; R.S.O. Committee 

4; Interfraternity Council 3, Scholarship 3; Alpha Epsilon Pi 

1, 2, 3, 4, Alumni Chairman 3, House Manager 3, Phi Award 

3; Adelphia 4, Treasurer 4; Concert Band 1; Marching Band 

1; Operetta Guild 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors 




Colloquium 3; Honors Work 4; Campus Chest Committee 1, 
3; Homecoming Committee 4; SCOPE 3, 4; SWAP 4; Winter 
Carnival Committee 3; Campus Religious Council 4; Hillel 
Foundation 1. 2, 3, 4, Membership Chairman 3, Social Chair- 
man 2; Commuter's Club 4; Mathematics Club 1, 2, 3; Uni- 
versity Economics Association 3, 4; 'Voung Democrats 1, 2; 
Northampton Hospital Volunteer 2, 3. 

WAYNE L. SNAPE 

25 Maple Street, Ludlov/, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

CHARLES A. SOCZEK 

230 Globe Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

Engineering Journal 4; Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's 

List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4; Tau 

Beta Pi 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; AIChE 2, 3, 4; Chemical 

Engineering Club 2, 3, 4. 

BARBARA M. SOLOMON 

660 Chestnut Hill Avenue, Brookline, Massachusetts 

Government 

DIANE B. SOLOMON 
30 Lawrence Road, Medford, Massachusetts 
Government 

Social Activities Committee 3; Sigma Sigma Sigma 2, 3, 4, 
Memorial and Service Chairman 3, 4; Roister Doisters 2; 
Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Winter Carnival Commit- 
tee 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2; Debating Society 2; Political 
Science Association 4; Russian Club 2, 3. 

DORIS B. SOSIK 

Route # 1, Box 78, Fiskdale, Massachusetts 

English 

Collegian 1; Student Senate 2; House Counselor 3, 4, House 

Chairman 4; Dean's List 1; Honors Colloquium 2; SWAP 4; 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 

FREDERICK R. SPATES 

Wood Street, Woodville, Massachusetts 

Government 

Zeta Nu 2, 3, 4, Pledge Trainer 3, 4, Secretary 3; Newman 

Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Young Democrats 3, 4. 




DIANE B. SOLOMON 



DORIS B. SOSIK 



FREDERICK R. SPATES 



JAMES R. SPENCE 



428 



JAMES R. SPENCE 

23 Cedar Street, North Reading, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

ROTC Band 1, 2; Judson Fellowship 1; ASME 3, 4. 

BRUCE A. SPENCER 

Drive Braley Road, East Freetown, Massachusetts 

Forestry 

Springfield College; Dean's List 3; Forestry Club 2, 3, 4, Vice 

President 4; Outing Club 3. 

WILLIAM SPEZESKI 

16 Cameron Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Mathemalics 

Concert Band 2; Dance Band 2; Operetta Guild 2, 3, 4; Dean's 

List 1,3; Newman Club 1, 2; Mathematics Club 1, 2. 

JOHN W. SPIEWAK 

20 Goddard Street, Webster, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

House Counselor 4; Track 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3. 

ELEANOR M. STANG 

1028 Salem Street, North Andover, Massachusetts 
Government 

Index 4; House Counselor 3; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Key Correspondent 3, Vice President 4; Mortar Board 4, Chap- 
ter Editor; Scrolls 2; Dean's List 2, 3; Student Christian Asso- 
ciation 1,3. 

PATRICIA A. STANKIEWICZ 

234 Highland Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

House Counsellor 3; Pi Beta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Mortar Board 4, 

Vice President; Scrolls 2; Dean's List 2, 3; Honors Work 3. 4; 

Newman Club 1, 2, 4; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 4. 

DAVID R. ST. CYR 

2 Clark Street, Auburn, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Track 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

DUANE A. STEELE 

21 Court Street, Provincetown, Massachusetts 
Journalism — EnglisJi 




BRUCE A. SPENCER 



WILLIAM SPEZESKI 




JOHN W. SPIEWAK 



ELEANOR M. STANG 




PATRICIA A. STANKIEWICZ DAVID R. ST. CYR 






MARTIN H. STEIN 

60 Beacon Street, Hyde Park 36, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

University Concert Association 4; International Relations Club 
2, 3, 4; Philosophy Club 1; Physical Education Club 1; Sociol- 
ogy Club 3, 4; Spanish Club 4. 

A. M. STERNAGLE, JR. 

North Street, Middlefield, Massachusetts 

Geology 

Berkshire Community College; Geology Club 3, 4. 

JEANNE E. STEVENS 
186 Thompson Street, Halifax, Massachusetts 
Sociology and Elementary Edtication 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 1, 2; Operetta Guild 2; Edwards Fellow- 
ship 1; Judson Fellowship 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Student Chris- 
tian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Sociology Club 3, 4; Square Dance 
Club 1, 2, 3. 




DUANE A. STEELE 



MARTIN H. STEIN 



A. M. STERNAGLE, JR 



JEANNE E. STEVENS 



429 




JUDITH C. STEVENS JAMES L. STEVENSON 




KENNETH A. STIBOLT GLENDA A. STOCKWELL 




JUDITH C. STEVENS 
Agricultural Avenue, Rehoboth, Massachusetts 
Education 

House Counselor 3, 4; HER Weekend Dance Committee 1; 
Honors Colloquium 2, 3; Soph-Frosh Committee 2; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2; Education Club 3, 4; Women's 
Athletic Association 2. 
JAMES L. STEVENSON 
102 Maiden Street, Worcester 6, Massachusetts 
Pliilosophy 

General Electric Engineering Apprentice Program in Pittsfield; 
Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Honor Colloquium 3; Honors Work 4; 
Edwards Fellowship 2, 3, 4, Worship Chairman 4; Student 
Christian Association 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, President 4; Associa- 
tion for Social Action 2. 
KENNETH A. STIBOLT 
4 Arbor Lane, Wilbraham, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 
Student Christian Association 1; ASME 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 

2, 3, 4, Vice President 4; Ski Club 1. 
GLENDA A. STOCKWELL 

29 Concord Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 
English 

Index 2, 3, 4; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Building 
Committee Chairman 3; Distinguished Visitors Program 3; 
Winter Carnival Committee 2; Student Christian Association 1, 
2; Art Club 4; Psychology Club 1. 
NANCY M. STOKES 
47 Colton Lane, Shrewsbury, Massachusetts 
English 

Dean's List 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 4. 
RONALD M. STONE 
43 Winchester Road, Newton, Massachusetts 
Economics and Marketing 

Babson Institute; Ya-Hoo 4; Dean's List 4; Business Adminis- 
tration Club 4; Commuter's Club 4; Management Club 4; 
Marketing Club 4; University Economics Association 4. 
EDWARD J. STRACK 
2 East St., Hadley, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 
Dean's List 3, 4; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4, Project Chairman 4; ASME 

3, 4, Program Chairman 4. 
JOAN E, STRANDBERG 

65 Fairview Street, East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Home Economics — Retailing 

Dean's List 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Student Christian 

Association 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4, Dorm 

Representative 3, Executive Board 3. 

NURIT B. STRAUSS 

75 Bremen Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Theater 

Collegian 2, 3; Operetta Guild 2, 3; Roister Doisters 1, 2, 3; 

Opera Workshop 1, 2; Hillel Foundation 1. 

LINDA L. STREETER 

Bald Mountain Road, Bernardston, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

House Counselor 3, 4; Gamma Sigma Sigma 2, 3, 4; Dean's 

List 1, 2, 3; Honors Colloquium 2; Alpha Lambda Delta 1; 

Student Christian Association 1; Wesley Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Editor Wesley Witness 3, Chairman of Worship 4; Education 




EDWARD J. STRACK 



JOAN E. STRANDBERG 



NURIT B. STRAUSS 



LINDA L. STREETER 



430 



Club 3, 4; Elementary Education Exchange Student, University 
of New Mexico 3. 
LOUISE E. SUGLIA 

112 North Whitney Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 
History 

International Weekend Committee 2; Winter Carnival Commit- 
tee 3; Hillel Foundation 2, 3, Publicity Co-chairman 3; Student 
Zionist Association 1; History Club 2, 3; Internationl Club 3. 
DENNIS F. SULLIVAN 
395 President Avenue, Fall River, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Newman Club 1, 4; ASCE 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Civil 
Engineering 2, 3,4, Treasurer 4. 
MARGARET T. SULLIVAN 
310 Main Street, Milford, Massachusetts 
Home Economics 

Women's Inter-dorm Council 3; Social Chairman 3; Dean's 
List 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Armenian Club 2, 3; Home 
Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Water Ski Club 1. 
LORETTA J. SWAIN 

29 Bow Street Court, Stoneham, Massachusetts 
Recreation 

Edwards Fellowship 1, 2, 3; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 
3, 4; Nursing Club I, 2, Assistant Treasurer 2; Outing Club 2, 
3, 4, Treasurer 4, Camping Chairman 4; Recreation Club 2, 3, 
4; Northampton State Hospital Volunteer 1, 2, 3. 
PATRICIA J. SWEENEY 

588 West Middle Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Recreation Leadership 

Student Senate 2, Curriculum Committee 2; Class Executive 
Committee 3, 4; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 4; 
Scrolls 2; Dean's List 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Student 
Christian Association 1. 2, 3; Recreation Club 2, 3, 4; Women's 
Athletic Association 2, 3, 4. 
ERIC L. SWENSON 

19 Nashobz Road, West Acton, Massachusetts 
Forestry 

Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; Volunteer Fire Department 3, 4; Forestry 
Club 1,2,3,4. 
LINDA A. SWENSON 
559 Maquan Street, Hanson, Massachusetts 
Recreation 

Class Executive Council 3, 4; Women's Inter-Dorm Council 1, 
Vice-President 1; Panhellenic Council 4; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Revelers 4, Secretary-Treasurer 4; Scrolls 2, Secretary 2; Win- 
ter Carnival Committee 3; Naiads 1; Nursing Club 1; Recrea- 
tion Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3. 
CLAIRE A. SYGIEL 
Sygiel Road. Ware, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

DORIS F. SYLVESTER 

128 Matthew Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
English 

Chi Omega 1, 2, 3. 4, Song Chairman 3, Alumnae 4; Chorale 
1, 2; Musigals 1, 2, 3, 4, Business Manager 3; Winter Carnival 
Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2. 
CLAIRE M. SYLVESTRE 
108 High Street, Winchendon, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Mathematics Club 1, 2, 3; Modern 
Dance Club 2, 3, 4; Physics Club 2; Chemistry Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 




LOUISE E. SUGLIA 



DENNIS F. SULLIVAN 




PATRICIA J. SWEENEY 



ERIC L. SWENSON 




LINDA A. SWENSON 



CLAIRE A. SYGIEL 



DORIS F. SYLVESTER 



CLAIRE M. SYLVESTRE 



431 



nr^, 'T^, 




PAUL A. TAPARAUSKAS 



DAVID H. TASGAL 



PAUL A. TAPARAUSKAS 
4 Vincent Drive, North Grafton, Massachusetts 
Pre-Dental 

Dean's List 3; Football 1: Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Astronomy 
Club 4; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Zoology Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
DAVID H. TASGAL 

42 Leyfred Terrace, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Concert Band 2. 3; Operetta Guild 3, 4; Roister Doisters 1; 
Dean's List 2; Tennis 1, 2; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3; Psychol- 
ogy Club 2, 3; Synthesis 3. 
ALAN F. TAYLOR 

32 Lealand Avenue, Agawam, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Bowdoin College; House Counselor 4; American Chemical 
Society 3, 4; Chemistry Club 3, 4. 
ROBERT H, TEMKIN 

41 DeSoto Road, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 
Accounting 




"' j - s i-:w;-y:-s???s?gi 



WALTER J. TERLIK 



PAUL L. TESAR 





ALAN F. TAYLOR 



ROBERT H. TEMKIN 



Class Executive Council 1; Dean's List 3, 4; Flying Redmen 2; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Ac- 
counting Association 2, 3, 4; Young Democrats 1, 2; Bridge 
Club 2, 3, 4. 
WALTER J. TERLIK 

14 Palmer Avenue, Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Amateur Radio Association 1, 2, 3, 4; ASME 2, 3, 4; Outing 
Club 2; Ski Club 4. 
PAUL L. TESAR 

73-20 194th Street, Flushing 66, New York 
Electrical Engineering 

Dean's List 1. 2, 4; Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2, Vice President; Eta 
Kappa Nu 3, 4, Treasurer; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; Military Ball 
Committee 4; Swimming Team 1; Volunteer Fire Department 
2; Lutheran Club 1, 2, 3, 4; AIEE-IRE 4. 
STEVEN E. THAYER 

3B Hampshire Heights, Northampton, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Beta Kappa Phi 2; Dean's List 3, 4; ASCE 3, 4. 
WILLIAM T. THEROUX 
238 Nonotuck Avenue, Chicopee, Massachusetts 
Pre-Dental 

Collegian 1,2; Engineering Journal 3; Class Executive Council 
2; Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Maroon Key 2; 
Winter Carnival Committee 3; Cross Country 1; Bay State 
Rifles 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
LAURENT L. THIBERT, JR. 
59 Maynard Avenue, Seekonk, Massachusetts 
Chemical Engineering 

Collegian 2, 3, 4; Index 2, 3, 4; Jazz Workshop 3; Rifle Team 
2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; AIChE 2, 3, 4; Chemical 
Engineering Club 2, 3, 4, Vice President 3, Treasurer 4; Intra- 
mural Bowling 2, 3, 4. 
ANNE-MARIE THOMPSON 
103 Cooper Street, Agawam, Massachusetts 
Home Economics 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation I, 
2; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Archery 1, 2, 3, 4. 




STEVEN E. THAYER 



WILLIAM T. THEROUX 



LAURENT L. THIBERT, JR. ANNE-MARIE THOMPSON 



432 




PAMELA H. THOMPSON 



PERRY T. THOMPSON 



FREDERICK P. THURBERG BETTY-ANN TIMMINS 



PAMELA H. THOMPSON 
35 Hemenway Road, Framingham, Massachusetts 
Microbiology 

Ya-Hoo 3; Winter Carnival Committee 2, 3; Sophomore Ban- 
quet Committee 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Equestrian Club 1, 2, 3; Scuba Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; Ski Club 1. 
PERRY T. THOMPSON 
80 Outlook Drive, Lexington, Massachusetts 
Chemical Engineering 

Roister Doisters 1; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Tau 
Beta Pi 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2; Air Cadet 
Squadron 1: AIChE 3, 4; Chemical Engineering Club 3, 4; 
Scuba Club 3, 4. 
FREDERICK P. THURBERG 
321 South Franklin Street, Holbrook, Massachusetts 
Zoology 

Student Senate 2, 3, Election Committee Chairman 3; Class 
Executive Council 1, 3; Beta Kappa Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Winter 
Carnival Committee 3; Swimming 1; Young Republicans 4. 
BETTY-ANN TIMMINS 

2734 Acushnet Avenue, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 2; Mathematics Club 
1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 4; Luso-Brasilian Club 3, Treasurer 3. 
PHILIP TOLIN 

16 Buxton Avenue, Somerset, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Providence College; House Counselor 4; Dean's List 3, 4; 
Honors Work 4; International Weekend Coimnittee 3; Hillel 
Foundation 2, 3, 4; Pre-Medical Club 2; Psychology Club 3, 4, 
Vice President 4. 
EDWARD L. TOLMAN 
34 Warren Avenue, Chelsea, Massachusetts 
Pre-Medical 

Dean's List I, 2, 3; Honors Colloquium 3; Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2; 
Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3; Debating Society 1, 2, Intramural 
Chairman 1; German Club 1; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Treasurer 4; Young Republicans 1, 2, 3. 
SAMUEL J. TOMBARELLI 
Darryl Lane, Salem, New Hampshire 
Marketing 




PHILIP TOLIN 



EDWARD L. TOLMAN 



Kappa Sigma 2, 3, 4, Alumni Secretary 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 
4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 3, 4. 

RONALD S. TOPLITZ 

5 Allendale Road, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Pre-Dental 

House Secretary 2; Hillel Foundation I; Pre-Medical Club 2, 

3,4. 

PAULINE I. TORRENCE 

235 Lebanon Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

English 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 3. 4; Orthodox Club 1, 2; International 

Club 3; Ski Club 2; Spanish Club 2, 3; Women's Athletic 

Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 

CAROL I. TOWNSLEY 

4223 Twelfth Street, Saint Simons Island, Georgia 

Mathematics 

Pi Beta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Dean's List 1; Student 

Christian Association 1, 2; Mathematics Club 3. 




SAMUEL I. TOMBARELLI 



RONALD S. TOPLITZ 



PAULINE I. TORRENCE 



CAROL J. TOWNSLEY 



433 




PHYLLIS B. TRABACH DONALD B. TRACY 



ROBERT H. TRACY 



CATHERINE TREADWELL 




KATHLEEN A, TREMBLAY MARCIA J. TRIMBLE 




RICHARD S. TROWBRIDGE DAVID E. TRUESDELL, III 






LEE ANN M. TRUESDELL BEVERLY E. TRULL 



PHYLLIS B. TRABACH 

7 Washington Street. Peabody, Massachusetts 

Government 

Collegian 1; Lambda Delta Phi 2, 3, 4, Rush Chairman 4; 

Panhellenic Council 3, 4; Operetta Guild 3; Hillel Foundation 

1, 2. 3; Young Democrats 3. 
DONALD B. TRACY 

4 Spooner Street, Plymouth, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Student Senate 3; Men's Inter-Dorm Council 2; Campus Reli- 
gious Council 3; Mathematics Club 1; University Economics 
Association 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Young Republicans 1. 
ROBERT H. TRACY 
1 1 North Street, Milford, Massachusetts 
Production Management 

Boston College; Alpha Sigma Phi 1, 2, 3; Newman Club 2, 3, 
4; Mathematics Club 2; Management Club 4. 
CATHERINE TREADWELL 
Charlton Road, East Brookfield, Massachusetts 
English 

Equestrian Club 2, 3, 4; Literary Society 1, 2, 3, 4, Executive 
Board 2, 3, 4; Zoology Club 2. 
KATHLEEN A. TREMBLAY 
81 Westwood Road, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
English 

Berkshire Community College; Dean's List 2, 3, 4. 
MARCIA J. TRIMBLE 
Tucker Road, Hyannis, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 
Class Executive Council 2; House Counselor 3; Pi Beta Phi 1, 

2, 3, 4; Naiads 2, 3; Student Christian Association 1, 2; Edu- 
cation Club 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3. 
RICHARD S. TROWBRIDGE 

518 Elm Road, Walpole, Massachusetts 
Public Health Bacteriology 

House Counselor 2, 3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron I; Outing Club 1; 
Pre-Medical Club 1. 
DAVID E. TRUESDELL, III 
271 South Main Street, Cohasset, Massachusetts 
Wood Technology 

Student Union Governing Board 3; Q.T.V. 1, 2, 3, 4, House 
Manager 3; Interfraternity Council 2, 3; Adelphia 4; Revelers 
3; Maroon Key 2; Campus Varieties 3; Dean's List 1; Distin- 
guished Visitors Program 4, Production Manager 4; SCOPE 4; 
Forestry Club 1, 2; Outing Club 1, 2; Ski Club 3. 
LEE ANN M. TRUESDELL 
51 West Central Street, Natick, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Student Senate 3; Class Executive Council 3, 4; Social Activi- 
ties Committee 1; Distinguished Visitors Program 2, 3, 4, 
Treasurer 3, Vice-Chairman 4; SWAP 3; United Nations Week 
Committee 4. Chairman 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; 
Precisionettes 3, 4, Squad Leader 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; 
Education Club 3, 4. 
BEVERLY E. TRULL 
24 Dahlia Avenue, Peabody, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Collegian 4; WMUA 2; Lambda Delta Phi 2, 3, 4, Scholarship 
Chairman 4; Operetta Guild 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 3; Student 



434 




PAULA M. TUCK 



JOHN W. TULLOCK, JR. 



Christian Association 1, 2, 4; Amateur Radio Association 2; 
History Club 2, 3; Le Cercle Francais I; Ski Club 2; Young 
Democrats 3. 
PAULA M. TUCK 
7 Barbara Lane, Medford, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Winter Carnival Committee 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2; Educa- 
tion Club 3, 4; Spanish Club 1, 2. 

JOHN W. TULLOCK, JR. 

Long Pond Road, Great Barrington, Massachusetts 

Landscape Architecture 

WMUA 1, 2; House Counselor 1, 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; 

Landscape Architecture Club 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 4. 

BEVERLY J. TURGISS 

16 Partridge Road, South Weymouth 90. Massachusetts 

Sociology 

House Counselor 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2; 

Scuba Club 4. 

M. PAUL TURMEL 

45 Benefit Street, Methuen, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Food Distribution Club 3; International 

Relations Club 2; Outing Club 1, 2; Sociology Club 3, 4; Young 

Republicans 2. 

THOMAS A. TYRER, JR. 

60 Audubon Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Interfraternity Council 2, 3; Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, 

House Manager 3, President 4; Maroon Key Secretary 2; 

Dean's List 1; ASME 4; Fencing Club 2. 

WALDEMAR K. ULICH 

202 North Main Street, Middleboro, Massachusetts 

German 

WMUA 2, 3; House Counselor 3; Gryphon 3; Dean's List 3; 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3; Commuter's Club 1, 4; 

Fencing Club 2; German Club 2; International Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

WARREN M. VANDERBURGH 

20 Royce Road, Framingham, Massachusetts 

Geology 

Phi Sigma Kappa 2, 3, 4, Rushing Chairman 3, 4, Pledge 

Master 3, 4; Military Ball Committee 3; Flying Redmen I, 2, 

3, 4, Commander 4; Air Cadet Squadron I, 2; Advanced 

ROTC — Flight Instruction Program 3, 4. 

BARBARA J. VAUGHN 

43 Carriage Drive, Meriden, Connecticut 

Russian 

Holyoke Junior College; Newman Club 3, 4; Russian Club 3, 

4; French Corridor 4. 

PHILIP A. VECCHIARELLI 

19 Fenwood Road, Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Industrial Em^ineering 

Phi Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; AIIE 3, 4. 

FRANK X. VENERl, JR. 

15 Audrey Road, Belmont, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

Engineering Journal 4; Dean's List 2; Tau Beta Pi 4; Newman 

1, 4; AIChE 3, 4; Chemical Engineering Club 3, 4; Intramu- 

rals 2, 3, 4. 





BEVERLY J TURGISS 



M. PAUL TURMEL 




THOMAS A. TYRER, JR. WALDEMAR K. ULICH 




WARREN M. VANDERBURGH BARBARA J. VAUGHN 





PHILIP A. VECCHIARELLI FRANK X. VENERl, JR. 



435 




PHYLLIS G. VIALL DAVID R. VINCELETTE 




Southern State Teachers College. South Dakota. 
ELLEN L. VYCE 

20 Henry Harris Street, Chicopee. Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Class Executive Council 3, 4; Student Union Program Council 
2, 3; Arts and Music Committee 2, 3; Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 
4. Altruistic Chairman 3, Stewardess 4; Winter Carnival Com- 
mitte 3; Newman Club 1, 2; Education Club 2, 3, 4. 
ROBERT M. WADE 

1 16 Middlesex Street, Springfield. Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

University of Alabama; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Collo- 
quium 1, 2. 3; Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, Senior 
Advisor 4; Eta Kappa Nu 3, 4; Phi Kappa Phi 3, 4; Tau Beta 
Phi 3, 4; AIEE-IRE 2. 3, 4, Vice-Chairman 3, Chairman 4. 
GISELA WAGNER 

15 Blueberry Lane, Lexington, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Alpha Chi Omega 3, 4; Chamber Music Group 1; ASCE 2, 3, 
4, Secretary 3, 4; Fencing Club 2; Gymnastics Club 1, 2. 
ANN T. WALLACE 

183 Myrtle Street, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts 
Art 

Newman Club I, 2, 3, 4; Art Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Association for 
Social Action 4; History Club I, 2; Young Democrats 4. 
PAUL K. WALLACE 

40 Wedgemere Avenue, Winchester, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Collegian 1, 2; Class President 2; Class Executive Council 1, 
2, 3, 4, Chairman 2; Men's Inter-dorm Council 2; Tau Kappa 
Epsilon 2, 3, 4, Rushing Chairman 2, Contest Chairman 3, 4; 
Campus Chest Committee 1,2; Distinguished Visitors Program 
2, 3; Student Centennial Committee 3, Treasurer 3; Winter 
Carnival Committee 3; Swim Team 1; Student Christian Asso- 
ciation 1, 2, 3. 
KATHLEEN WALSH 

646 Country Way, North Situate, Massachusetts 
English 

Class Executive Council 2; Kappa Alpha Theta 2, 3, 4, Corre- 
sponding Secretary 4; Women's Inter-dorm Council 2, 3; Uni- 



RICHARD VIVILEICHIA 



HERBERT L, VRETTOS 



PHYLLIS G. VIALL 

36 Franklin Street, Wrentham, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Social Activities Committee 2; Lambda Delta Phi 3, 4; Ed- 
wards Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Student Christian 
Association 1, 2. 3, 4, Worship Chairman 3; Association for 
Social Action 1, 2; Education Club 3, 4; Modern Dance Club 
2, 3; Sociolocy Club 3, 4. 
DAVID R, VINCELETTE 
6 Spring Street, Adams, Massachusetts 
Psycliology 

North Adams State College; Dean's List 3, 4. 
RICHARD VIVILEICHIA 
53 Dean Street, Everett, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3,4. 
HERBERT L. VRETTOS 
Sunrise Road, Boxford, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 




ELLEN L. VYCE 



ROBERT M. WADE 




fjlSKLA WAGNER 



ANN T. WALLACE 



PAUL K. WALLACE 



KATHLEEN WALSH 



436 



versify Concert Association 2, 3, 4, Assistant Publicity Chair- 
man 4; Student Centennial Committee 3; Winter Carnival 
Committee 3; Sophomore Banquet Committee 2; Tennis Club 
1, 2, 3, 4, Manager 3; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4. 
WILLIAM J. WALSH, JR. 
20 Pleasant Street, Concord, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Zeta Nu 2. 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Accounting Association 3, 4. 
MARGARET L. WALTER 
Forest Road, Millis, Massachusetts 
Art 

Index 4; Women's Judiciary 3, 4, Clerk 4; Class Executive 
Council 3, 4; House Counselor 3; Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 
4, Assistant Treasurer 3, Treasurer 4; Revelers 4, Publicity 
Chairman; Scrolls 2; University Concert Association 2; Winter 
Carnival Committee 3, Co-Chairman of Weekend Committee; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Art Club 3, 4; Women's Athletic 
Association 1, 2. 

GERALDINE L. WALUKEVICH 
135 Pilling Street, Haverhill, Massachusetts 
English 

Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Second Vice President 4; Winter 
Carnival Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3. 
PATRICIA ANNE WANLESS 
28 Sherman Street, Lexington, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Sigma Kappa Sorority 3, 4; Volunteer Work Northampton 
State 2; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Education Club 2, 3, 4, 
Program Chairman 4; Gymnastics Club 2. 
CYNTHIA S. WARD 
28 Gillette Circle, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Dean's List 2; Naiads I, 2, 3, 4, Junior Naiad Trainer 4; 
Student Christian Association I, 2, 3, 4; Astronomy Club 1; 
Education Club 4; Mathematics Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; Wom- 
en's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 
PATRICIA J. WARD 
49 Penny Lane, Stoneham, Massachusetts 
German 




WILLIAM J. WALSH, JR 



MARGARET L. WALTER 





GERALDINE WALUKEVICH PATRICIA ANNE WANLESS 




Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; 

International Club 3, 4. 

JAIRUS C. WARNER 

West Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Pliysics 

Physics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Scuba Club 2, 3. 

JOANNE E. WARNER 

13 Charles Street, Danvers, Massachusetts 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

ROBERT R. WARREN 

541 Montgomery Road, Westfield, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Track 1; Student Christian Association 1; Outing Club 1. 

GORDON M. WEBB 

Green Hill Drive, Atkinson. New Hampshire 

Physical Education 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1. 2. 3, 4; Lacrosse 1, 2, 3, 4; Physical 

Education Club 4; Varsity "M" Club 3, 4. 




JAIRUS C. WARNER JOANNE E. WARNER 



ROBERT R. WARREN 



GORDON M. WEBB 



437 




RACHEL L. WFBBF.R 



MARTIN F. WEIN 




DARYLL J, WELCH 



DOUGLAS R. WELLS 




REYNOLD W. WELLS 



NANCY P. WENDT 




RACHEL L. WEBBER 

132 Belmont Avenue, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Art 

MARTIN F. WEIN 

5 Albert Avenue, Belmont, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Dean's List 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Psychology Club 3, 4. 

DARYLL J. WELCH 

33 Intervale Avenue, Saugus. Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation 1, 

2; Education Club 1. 2, 3, 4. 

DOUGLAS R. WELLS 

12 Linden Terrace, Waltham, Massachusetts 

Pre-Medical 

Lambda Chi Alpha 2, 3, 4; Military Ball Committee 4; Rifle 

Team 2, 3, 4. 

REYNOLD W. WELLS 

23 Old Lane Road, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

House Counselor 4; Dean's List 2, 3; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; Golf 1; 

AIChE. 3, 4, Secretary 3, President 4; Chemical Engineering 

Club 3, 4, Secretary 3, President 4. 

NANCY P. WENDT 

25 Clinton Avenue, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Roister Doisters 1; Dean's List 3; Education Club 4. 

MARGARET E. WENZEL 

49 Wilson Road, Bedford, Massachusetts 

Women's Physical Education 





STEPHEN C. WEXLER 



CLARK M. WHITCOMB 



MARGARET E. WENZEL 



JAMES C. WEST 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Public Relations 3, Chaplain 
4; Winter Carnival Committee 2, 3; Canterbury Club 1; Stu- 
dent Christian Association 1, 2, 3; Outing Club 1; Physical 
Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 1, 2; Women's Athletic 
Association 1, 2. 
JAMES C. WEST 

I Simon Avenue, Adams, Massachusetts 
Government 

Dean's List 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; Political Science Association 4; Young Republicans 4. 
STEPHEN C. WEXLER 
55 Rosalie Road, Newton 59, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Class Executive Council 2, 3; Interfraternity Council 3, 4; Zeta 
Nu 2, 3, 4, President 3, 4; Marching Band 1. 2; Dean's List 1, 2, 
4; Tau Beta Pi 4; SWAP 4; Lacrosse 1; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 
3; ASCE 1, 2, 3, 4. 
CLARK M. WHITCOMB 
76 Graves Street, South Deerfield, Massachusetts 
Econoitiics 

University of Maine; House Counselor 3; Pistol Team 3; Intra- 
mural Volleyball 3; University Economics Association 2, 3, 4. 
DONALD L. WHITE 

I I Cherry Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Pittsfield Extension Program; Student Christian Association 3. 

ROGER L. WHITE 

1 Gates Street, Monson, Massachusetts 

General Business 



438 



House Officer 4, Secretary-Treasurer 4; Dean's List 2; Man- 
agement Club 4. 

RONALD N. WHITE 

19 Albemarle Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Pre-Medical 

Dean's List 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre- 
Medical Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

NANCY A. WHITEHEAD 

Washington Depot, Connecticut 

Elementary Education 

Dean's List 3; New Mexico Exchange Program 3; Tennis 2, 3; 

Student Christian Association 1, 2; Education Club 3, 4; Home 

Economics Club 1. 

ROBERT S. WHITEHOUSE 

17 Tucker Street, Natick, Massachusetts 

Finance 

Dean's List 3, 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; House Social 

Committee 2, 3; Accounting Association 2, 3, 4; University 

Economics Association 2, 3, 4. 

JOHN S. WHITFIELD 
Lake Paradise, Monson, Massachusetts 
Industrial Engineering 

Alpha Sigma Phi 1, Rush Chairman 2, Pledge-Trainer 3, Presi- 
dent 4; SWAP 4; Canterbury Club 1; Student Christian Asso- 
ciation 1, 2; AIIE 3, 4; ASME 2. 

PAULA K. WICKENS 

31 Churchill Road, Quincy, Massachusetts 

Education 




DONALD L. WHITE 



ROGER L. WHITE 



Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, Song Chairman 4; 1st Vice President 4; 
Chorale 1; Dean's List 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 
4; Education Club 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2. 

ROBERT C. WIK 

72 Allison Street, Newton, Massachusetts 
Chemical Engineering 

Engineering Journal 3, 4, Business Manager 3, 4; Class Execu- 
tive Council 2, 3; QTV 1, 2, 3, 4; SWAP 4; Winter Carnival 
Committee 3; Newman Club 1; AIChE 3, 4; Chemical Engi- 
neering Club 3, 4. 

DONNA R. WILBUR 

282 West Britannia Street, Taunton, Massachusetts 

Home Economics 

Sigma Sigma Sigma 2 ,3, 4, Scholarship Chairman 3, Recording 

Secretary 4; Dean's List 3; Naiads 1, 2; Student Christian 

Association 1, 2, 3; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3; Women's 

Athletic Association 1,2. 

JUDITH D. WILCOX 

1 1 Mellinger Lane, Westover Air Force Base, Massachusetts 
Englisli 

Index 3, 4; Ya-Hoo 2, 3; Sophomore Banquet Committee 2; 
Arts and Music Committee 3; Sigma Delta Tau 2, 3, 4, Stew- 
ardess 3, Pledge Trainer 4; Pan-Hellenic Chorus 2; Dean's List 
3; Winter Carnival Publicity Committee 3; Student Christian 
Association 1, 2, 3; Nursing Club 1, 2, Program Committee I, 
Recording Secretary 2; Ski Club 3, 4; National Student Nurses 
Association 1, 2; Massachusetts State Council of Student 
Nurses 1, 2. 




RONALD N. ■WHITE NANCY A. WHITEHEAD 




ROBERT S. WHITEHOUSE JOHN S. WHITFIELD 




DONNA R. WILBUR 



JUDITH D. WILCOX 



439 




440 




Senior Pics, 
The Index -- 
A Class Ago 



Seniors at Index office receive portraits from Lincoln Studio representatives. 



Students gather on the South Lawn of the Student Union to await copies of Index. 




441 



Flying 
3, 4. 



House 

4, Secretary 
4; Women's 



LESLIE A. WILCOX 

North Summer Street, Edgartown, Massachusetts 
Governmenl 

Class Executive Council 2, 3, 4: Pi Beta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Censor 
4; Scrolls 2, Vice President 2; Dean's List 3; Campus Chest 
Committee 2, 3, 4. Co-Chairman 4; Student Centennial Com- 
mittee 2. 3; SWAP 1, 2; Winter Carnival Committee 3; New- 
man Club 1, 2, 3; Political Science Club 3, 4. 
LINDA J. WILCOX 

South Royalston Road, Royalston, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Collegian 4; Lambda Delta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Stewardess 3; Ed- 
wards Fellowship 1, 2, 3. 4; Association for Social Action 2; 
Sociology Club 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 2, 3, 4. 
MARY E. WILCOX 

South Royalston Road, Royalston, Massachusetts 
FRANK A. WILDER 

37 Normandy Road, Lexington, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineerinq 

WMUA 2, 3. 4. Chief Engineer 3, 4; Concert Band 2 
Redmen 1, 2; Intervarsity Christian Fellowship 1 
Treasurer 3; Judson Fellowship 2, 3, 4; ASME 3, 4. 
KATHERINE E. WILDER 
Carlisle Road, Westford, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Women's Inter-dorm Council 3, 4, Vice President 
Counselor 4; United Nations Week Committee 3, 
3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 3, 
Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 
MARY L. WILLARD 

75 Paulson Drive, West Springfield, Massachusetts 
Home Economics 

House Counselor 4; Concert Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant to 
Manager 3, Secretary 4; Marching Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, 

3, 4; Dean's List 3; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Dorm Representative 2. 
ANTHONY R. WILLIAMS 

75 Mount Pleasant Street, Milford, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Student Senate 1; Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4, Rush 

Chairman 2. Guard 2; Dean's List 3; Baseball I, 2, 3, 4, 

Captain 4: Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1; 

Physical Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

BARBARA A. WINANS 

1 1 Cranmore Road, Norwood, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Operetta Guild 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; 

Mathematics Club 3, 4; Outing Club 3, 4; Square Dance 3, 4. 

BENEDICT L. WINIARSKI 

90 Kensington Avenue, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

House Counselor 4; Operetta Guild 3, 4; Opera Workshop 4; 

Dean's List 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Mathematics Club 3, 

4, President 4; Outing Club 3. 
SALLY ANN WINTERS 

330 Elm Street, Fitchburg, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Collegian 1; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Judson 

Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 2, Worship Chairman 

4; International Club 3; Le Cercle Francais 2, 4. 





ANTHONY R. WILLIAMS BARBARA A. WINANS 



BENEDICT L. WINIARSKI 



SALLY ANN WINTERS 



442 




CARL O. WIRSEN, JR. ANN S. WITHKRSPOON 




MARY A. WOLFRUM 



NORMA E. WOLFSON 




CARL O. WIRSEN, JR. 

197 Spring Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 
Zoology 

House Counselor 4; Wrestling 1, 2; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1; Outing Club 1; Zoology Club 4; AFROTC Rifle Team 
1,2. 

ANN S. WITHERSPOON 

Sociology 

Operetta Guild 2, 3; Dean's List 2, 3; Canterbury Club 1: 

Student Christian Association 2, 4; Modern Dance Club 2, 3, 

4; Sociology Club 4. 

MARY A. WOLFRUM 

94 Adams Street. Dedham, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Sigma Kappa 2, 3, 4, Photographer 4; Volunteer Work at 

Belchertown State Hospital 2, 4; Dean's List 2; Newman Club 

1. 2, 3, 4. Dorm Representative 3. Sorority Representative 4; 
Education Club 3, 4, Vice President 4. 

NORMA E. WOLFSON 

173 Grovers Avenue, Winthrop, Massachusetts 

Music 

Concert Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Marching Band 1, 2; Chorale 4; New 

England Intercollegiate Band 3; SWAP 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 

2, 3, 4; Student Zionist Association 1, 2, 3; International Club 
3,4. 

WILLIAM A. WOOD 

35 Folsom Street, North Adams, Massachusetts 

French 

Berkshire Community College: Newman Club 4. 

DIANE E. WOODARD 

364 Davis Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Marching Band 2, 3; Naiads 4: Edwards Fellowship 1; Student 

Christian Association 1; Mathematics Club 4. 

STEPHEN E. WOOGMASTER 

17 Luke Road, Everett, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

AFROTC Rifle Team 1, 2; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Air 

Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3; Psychology 

Club 3, 4. 

BARBARA J. YETWIN 

22 Broson Terrace, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Education 

Collegian 1; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2 3 4- 

Education Club 3, 4. 

KATHERINE G. YOBST 

6 Francis Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

House Counselor 3; Concert Band 1: Dean's List 2, 3; Honors 

Work 4; Newman Club 1; Mathematics Ciub 3. 

CAROLYN G. YOUNG 

169 Rogers Avenue, West Springfield, Massachusetts 

Government 

Tennis 4; Naiads 2, 3; Edwards Fellowship 1, 2, 3; Student 

Christian Association 1, 2, 3: Art Club 3: Equestrian Club 4; 

Gymnastics Club 3, 4; International Relations Club 4; Spanish 

Club 2. ^ 



WILLIAM A. WOOD 



DIANE F. WOODARD 




STEPHEN E. WOOGMASTER BARBARA J. YETWIN 



KATHERINE G. YOBST CAROLYN G. YOUNG 



443 




JUDITH O. YOUNG 





ROBERT A. YOUNG 



RICHARD D. ZAIGEK 



MARCIA J. ZAK 





NORMAN H. ZARKIN 



SANDRA K. ZARVIS 



JUDITH O. YOUNG 

156 Lansdowne Street, Squantum 91, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Chorale 1, 2, 3; Dean's List 1, 2; Alpha Lambda 1; Edwards 

Fellowship 1; Student Christian Association 1; Outing Club 2, 

4, Secretary 2; Ski Club 1, 2, Secretary 2. 

ROBERT A. YOUNG 

12 Greenacre Square, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Physics 

Dean's List I, 2, 4; Student Christian Association 1; Astronomy 

Club 4; Physics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2, 3, President 4; 

Russian Club 4. 

RICHARD D. ZAIGER 

12 Sapphire Avenue, Marblehead, Massachusetts 

Government 

Alpha Epsilon Pi 1. 2, 3, 4, Vice President 3, Pledge Trainer 4; 

Dean's List 2; Campus Chest Committee 1; Hillel Foundation 

1, 2, 3, 4; Political Science Association 1, 2, 3. 

MARCIA J. ZAK 

15 Grove Street. Greenfield, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Commuter's Club 2, 3, 4; Equestrian 
Club 2, 3, 4; Recreation Club 4. 

NORMAN H. ZARKIN 
73 Marlborough Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 
Marketing 

Dormitory Treasurer 1; Business Administration Club 2; Mar- 
keting Club 3, 4; Young Democrats 1, 2. 

SANDRA K. ZARVIS 

16 Richmond Street, Adams, Massachusetts 
English 

Collegian 1; Dean's List I, 2, 3, 4; Phi Kappa Phi 4; Alpha 
Lambda Delta 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 



444 




BARBARA H. ZEBROWSKI ELAINE L. ZEITZOFF 



ROBERT S. ZIDLE 



ARTHUR ZIERZOW 




PAULA E. ZISK 



JO ANNE V. ZYWNA 



BARBARA H. ZEBROWSKI 

Box 103, R.F.D. #1, Flynt Street, Palmer, Massachusetts 

German 

Newman Club 1, 2; German Club 4; International Club 4; 

Modern Dance Club 1, 2. 

ELAINE L. ZEITZOFF 
9 Quincy Park, Beverly, Massachusetts 
English 

Winter Carnival Committee 2; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3. 4; 
Marketing Club 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2; Uni- 
versity Health Council 3, 4. 

ROBERT S. ZIDLE 

18 Linden Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Intramurals 3; Hillel Foundation; Mathematics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Young Democrats 3. 

ARTHUR ZIERZOW 

Holland, Massachusetts 

History 

Dean's List 3; Bay State Rifles; History Club 3, 4; Dormitory 

Treasurer 2, 3. 

PAULA E. ZISK 

Skyline Lodge, Middlefield, Massachusetts 
Art 

Concert Band 3, 4; Marching Band 4; Student Christian Asso- 
ciation 1, 2, 3, 4; Art Club 2, 3, 4. 

JO ANNE V. ZYWNA 

Main Road, Gill, Massachusetts 

English 

Intramural Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2; 4-H Club 

1 ; International Club 4. 



445 



Seniors Not Pictured 



Aho. John H. 
Alen, Joseph S. 
Allard, Francis X. 
Anderson. C. Werner 
Anderson, Carl E. 
Anderson, Myrna J, 
Arnold, G. W. Jr. 
Baker, James A. 
Baniiikiewicz. S. P. 
Barrett. Robert K. 
Barzowskas, Daniel F. 
Baskin. James E. 
Bator, John R. 
Belcher. David B. 
Benbenek. E, J. Jr. 
Benet, Sarah 
Bennett, Sharon A. 
Bergen, George M. 
Blatte, Neil H. 
Blodgett, Gwendolyn M. 
Blum. M. A. Gabrielle 
Blustine. Allen M. 
Bonfilio, R. J. 
Bock. Ruth J. 
Boyden. Lloyd A. 
Briggs. Mary Jane 
Brophy, Francis T. Jr. 
Brown. Dexter Jr. 
Brown, Michael J. 
Buckley, Daniel T. 
Budney, Thomas J. 
Byrne, John R. 
Byrne, Kenneth R. 
Cabral, Guy A. 
Cady, Robert L. 
Cahill. John M. 
Canner. Edward L. 
Carlson. Robert W. 
Carpender. Robert G. 
Carruth, William E. 
Catalano, Rosann M. 
Chalifoux, Homer D. 
Chambers, F. Michael 
Cira, Frederick R. 
Coe, Arthur L. 
Coman. John F. 
Conant. Robert L. 
Connolly, Edward J. 
Cooper, Irving B. 
Corey, Roderick L. 
Crowell, Janet R. 
Curns, Donald J. 
Curtis, Gerald B. 
Curtis, Stephen H. 
Davidson, Geoffrey A. 
Dimock, Richard E. 
Doane. Logan R. 
Dobie, William K. 
Doktor, Joan F. 
Doran. Richard A. 
Duby, Thomas E. 
Ducharme, Robert G. 
Elson, David W. 
Enstrom. Beverly A. 



Fairfield, Diane R. 
Fentross, John F. 
Fortin, Carl M. 
Forward. Phyllis E. 
Fournier. Albert Y. 
Fratar. Thomas J. 
Gambino. Blase P. 
George. Arnold 
Giannoni. Norine E. 
Gianoulis. William 
Gibavic, Annette 
Gibson, John F. Jr. 
Gittins, Charles E. Jr. 
Gleba. Peter P. 
Glennon, John J. 
Goldman, Gerald L 
Goldstein, Steven 
Golfin, Constance E. 
Gorman, Joyce L. 
Grandholm. Erik A. 
Grandholm. Nels H. 
Grant, Henry D. Jr. 
Grueter, Marcia A. 
Haavisto. Richard E. 
Gackett, Gordon A. 
Harney, Harry N. 
Hawrylciw, Michael S. 
Hayes, John W. 
Hays, Anna B. 
Hedlynd. Alan J. 
Henry. Robert S. Jr. 
Herman, Matthew N. 
Hinds, Harold R. 
Hogan, William J. Jr. 
Holmes, Margaret 
Hughes, Robert F. 
Jaszen, Paul J. 
Johnson. Dorothy A. 
Johnson, Michael E. 

Jones. David K. 

Jukins. John W. 

Kane. Paul R. 

Kangisser, Joel S. 

Karbott, Frederic M. 

Katz, Philip H. 

Keene, Robert A. 

Kelly, Jonathan S. 

Kennan. Norman A. 

Kennedy, David W. 

Kelroy, Thomas M. Jr. 

Klyce, Stephen D. Jr. 

Knox, Harland R. 

Krigman, Irwin M. 

Kropp. Norman I. 

Krukonis, David V. 

Kwist, Garry R. 

Lavelle, Albert W. Jr. 

Lampron, Ruth A. 

Lee, Bonnie L. 

Legro. Philip J. 

Leslie, Anthony J. 

Lord, Bruce W. 

Maciver. K. F. Jr. 

Maher, Thomas F. 



Mainwaring, David L. 
Maltz, Alan P. 
Marriott, Bruce A. 
Mayeski. Joseph F. 
McAdam, Paul A. 
McElligott. John M. 
Meehan. David R. 
Merkel, Stanley R. 
Meyers, Bruce A. 
Mintiens, Edward F. 
Morassi, Richard C. 
Morse, Stephen R. 
Mulcahy, Francis D. 
Myers. Linda 
Myers. Lois 
Nadeau, Robert 
Noferi, Michael J. 
O'Brien, John E. 
Olchowy, Peter 
Pacific, Robert D. 
Papalia. Roberta A. 
Park, John H. 
Patnaude, Dennis T. 
Patterson, Richard J. 
Pedersen, Bruce L. 
Pendleton, Robert T. 
Perkins, Kenneth C. 
Peterson. Russell A. 
Phillips. Walton S. 
Pia, Lewis P. 
Poignand. John M. W. 
Proudman, John A. 
Reed, Robert J. 
Reilly, Thomas M. 
Richards, Hugh J. 
Romeo, Charles P. Jr. 
Rose, Richard A. 
Roundy, Charles W. 
Ryan. Peter C. 
Ryan, Robert W. 
Rydenske. Jesse A. 
Salveson, Raymond J. 
Salve, Michael A. 
Savary, Robert L. 
Schlitz, Ronald J. 
Schofield. Thomas F. 
Shea, John A. Jr. 
Sherlaw. Gary W. 
Silverman, Stephen L. 
Small. Robert D. 
Smith, Beverly A. 
Smith, Candida L. 
Smith, Gordon T. 
Souza, Richard E. 
Spencer, Michael D. 
Urban, John C. 
Wacks, Paul A. 
Ward, Richard F. 
Welsh. Barbara A. 
Woods. Edmund G. 
Wrynn, James M. 
Yates, David E. 
Zak, Marcia J. 



446 




Graduation—The Culmination Of The 



College Experience 



447 



Index 



Adelphia 274 

Admissions Office 112 

Alpha Chi Omega 216 

Alpha Epsilon Pi 230 

Alpha Lamda Delta 120 

Alpha Phi Omega 279 

Alpha Sigma Phi 23 1 

Alpha Tau Gamma 232 

Alpha Zeta 124 

Amherst, Town of 86 

Angel Flight 312 

Area Judiciary 272 

Arnold Air Society 310 

Baseball 194 

Basketball 172 

Beta Gamma Sigma 121 

Beta Kappa Phi 233 

Business Administration, School of 142 

Caesura 29 1 

Cheerleaders 169 

Chi Omega 217 

Conference coordinating Office Ill 

Chorale 297 

Christmas 72 

Christian Assoc 309 

College of Agriculture 146 

College Bowl 92 

Collegian 281 

Concert Assoc 65, 294 

Concert Band 296 

Education Exchange Program 134 

Engineering, School of 140 

Engineering Journal 292 

Eta Kappa Nu 123 

Fine Arts Council 306 

Fine Arts Festival 96 

Flying Redmen 311 

Football J55 

Four-College Program 106 

Fraternity Managers' Assoc 238 

Fraternity Presidents' Assoc 258 

Freshmen Class Officers . . . . 267 

Freshmen Orientation 46 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 280 

Golf 199 

Gymnastics 190 

Handbook 293 

Hillel Foundation 310 

Hockey ..........'....'.'. 182 

Housing Office 3g 

Homecoming 33 

Home Economics, School of 138 

Honors Colloquia 118 



Index 



284 



Interfraternity Council 228 

Intramural Sports 203 

Iota Gamma Upsilon 218 

Junior Class Officers 269 

Junior Panhellenic Council ...'...... 215 

Kappa Alpha Theta 219 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 220 

Kappa Sigma 234 

Kennedy, John F 66 



Lacrosse 



196 



Lamda Chi Alpha . . . 235 

Lamda Delta Phi 221 

Langland, Joseph 136 

Lederle, President John W 108 

Lewis, Fred 167 

Marching Band 168 

Maroon Key 277 

Massachusetts Review 136 

Men's Judiciary 270 

Metawampe Award 324 



McCartney, Robert 109 

Military Ball 70 

Modern Dance 206 

Mortar Board 275 

Musigals 298 

News Office 1 1 1 

Newman Club 308 

Nursing 144 

Office of Institutional Studies 110 

Operetta Guild 300 

Parachute 207 

Panhellenic Council 214 

Panhellenic Sing 222 

Phi Eta Sigma 122 

Phi Kappa Phi 125 

Phi Mu Delta 236 

Phi Sigma Delta 237 

Phi Sigma Kappa 240 

Phi Tau Sigma 120 

Pi Beta Phi 224 

Pi Sigma Alpha 122 

Placement and Financial Aid 114 

Precisionettes 168 

QTV ■. '. ; 241 

Registrar's Office 112 

Religious Council 307 

Revelers 278 

Rifle Team 202 

Rodgers, George 239 

Roister Doisters 303 

Scrolls 276 

Senior Class Adviser 320 

Senior Class Officers 318 

Seniors Not Pictured 446 

Shirer, William L. 52 

Sigma Alpha Mu 229 

Sigma Delta Tau 225 

Sigma Gamma Epsilon 124 

Sigma Kappa ' .' 226 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 242 

Sigma Sigma Sigma 227 

"Six Characters ..." 50 

Ski Team 2O8 

Smothers Brothers 54 

Soccer 170 

Sophomore Class Officers 268 

Sorority Presidents 214 

Special Forces 310 

Statesmen 299 

Student Senate , 261 

Student Union 60 

Swimming igg 

Tau Beta Pi 121 

Tau Epsilon Phi 243 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 244 

Teacher of The Year 102 

Tennis ' igg 

Theta Chi 245 

Track .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.''.'.' 188 

Undergraduate Honors 150 

United Nations "Week 49 

University Orchestra 128 

University Theatre 44 

Who's Who 316 

Winter Carnival gn 

WMUA '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 287 

Women's Interdorm Council 273 

Women's Judiciary 271 

Woodside, Gilbert 109 

Wrestling 192 

Xi Sigma Pi 123 

Yahoo 290 

Zeta Nu 246 

Zoology Research 130 



448 



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