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UNIV. OF MASSACHUSETTS/AMHERST 
LIBRARY 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 




PART I 



INTRODUCTION 



INDEX 



MASSACHUSETTS LIFE 17 



1965 



ATHLETICS 



85 



^ 



GREEKS 



103 



HOUSING 



145 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



AMHERST 





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machmer bartlett hasbrouck 
emily dickinson goodell morrill 
eyes of the past look at their namesakes 
they see steel they see concrete 

they see a school old enough for brick 
too young for ivy 

names of the past on architecture for the 
future architecture for art 

architecture for expansion for 
growing for building and for living 
September 15 1965 a day for 
returning reacquainting reselling 

remaking resuming revitalizing 




day night bright grey 
always academics lectures labs 
seminars exams and cigarettes 
always assignments notes outlines 
papers syllabi and cigarettes 
always food pizza new england 
boiled dinner eggs eggs eggs 







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and hamburg specials always 

drinks coffee beer coke 
constant talk of classes of 

assignments of sports of parties 
pins religion politics and civil 
rights and occasionally sleep 

through the alarm in a class over 
a book to a hi fi sometimes in 
bed continual emotion anxiety 
expectation laughter tears 
and competition with a bluebook 
with a bell curve with the gilt of 
greek letters 






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competition of a Saturday 
afternoon for some a lark 
against new hampshire 
against uconn 
at holy cross a tough competition 

an exciting afternoon at 
buffalo a disappointment 

at harvard a bid 
tangerine color a flight a 
game a loss 
a competition of everyday for 
others a windsprint 

monday a diagram 

tuesday a film thursday 

a block missed on Saturday 
an aching muscle on sunday 
laughter in buffalo and in 

Orlando silence 




10 




silence broken by the alma mater 
a fight song a cheer a voice in 

support of our wins in defense of 
our losses a voice of loyalty 
applause for a performance 
congratulations for a success some give 
to an individual some to a group 
some to a name a name that is 

building bigger classrooms bigger 
dormitories growing in alumni 
in student body and living on an 

active campus concerts plays 
meetings parties games and big 
weekends 

a fall weekend of parades of tired 
feet sore throats of 

competition beauty sport 
of music a band a folk group 
a juke box a combo of dancing 
a fox trot the frug 



11 




of parties small large noisy noisy noisy 
a frantic weekend preceded by frantic preparation in chicken 
wire napkins toilet paper cloth paint and staples 
in phone calls in clothes selection in state of mind 




a frantic weekend preceded by a face of 
surface serenity held in place by 
brick and steel and concrete held 









in place by tradition 
a face obscuring to the outsider the 
essence of the campus the building 

the growth the life of each student 
the personal triumph and failure 
some days bright exciting 
rewarding others black 

depressing disappointing 
most a blend a combination that 
slides by blurred and distorted 
another five months another 

semester at the university of 
massachusetts 




14 




16 




MASSACHUSETTS LIFE 






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Fun, Excitement, Bewilderment-- | 




Beanies are a great buy! Only a dolliir and you get to wear it weeks and weel^s. 



Once again it was autumn at UMass and the fresh- 
men had arrived. 2600 new faces, each filled with a 
mixture of excitement, bewilderment, and expectation, 
wandered over the campus. 

Although Keys and Scrolls were on hand to greet 



and guide them, sometimes a freshman could get quite 
embarrassed if caught not wearing a beanie. What de- 
gradation to have to button in front of all those peo- 
ple, and in the Hatch no less. But then again, all this 
madness really was fun, as long as it didn't happen to 



18 



2600 Freshmen Engulf UMass 





"I ain't cute and I ain't cunning, I'm just a freshman who likes to button" — in the Hatch. 



you. 

That was only the beginning. Freshmen were intro- 
duced to various other aspects of UMass Hfe; to the 
exalted Hatch, to thousands of upperclassmen, to 
school spirit generated by the Keys and Scrolls, to pro- 



spective dates, to the Commons, to mass confusion at 
registration, and last but not least, to classes. 



19 





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A counselor is a friend in need during orientation. 



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Freshman C onvocation marked 
the official arrival of a record 
number of students. 

20 



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Please, please, please make a touchdown 




so we can stop wearing these beanies. 



These first few days of orientation only mark the 
beginning of a fast-paced existence. 

Doubts, hopes and fears ahernately fill freshman 
minds. "Maybe I should have been one of those 8,000 
rejections," moans a registration-frustrated student. 
But the brighter side of life usually prevails over such 
dismal thoughts, and the college year is once more 
underway. 



21 




SCROLLS 

First Row: C. J. Smith, C. Swift, V. Lippner, K. Harrison, S. Whitcomb, J. McLaughlin. 
Second Row: E. Hatch, Treasurer; C. O'Malley, Secretary; J. Frieden, President; B. Zukroff, 
Vice-President; M. J. Moreau, L. Martin. Third Row: L. Levanthal, B. Ennis, P. McAteer, M. 
C. Lundberg, N. Wright, M. Harrigan, L. Ferreira. Fourth Row: D. Wilder, J. Krupsky, P. 
Pye, B. Butler, C. Chaisty. Fiftlj Row: S. Allen, S. Wood, N. Smolen. R. Dreiblatt, M. 
Denman. Missing: D. Arsenault. E. McClung, B. Taska, S. Strand. 

Veteran Sophomores Devote Time 



Recognizable on campus by their hats and blazers, 
Scrolls together with Keys work hard to help freshmen 
adjust to and enjoy UMass life. 

Besides greeting freshmen, Scrolls also usher at uni- 
versity events, sell beanies, raise money for their schol- 
arships, and sell tickets for various freshmen events. 

During orientation, they give particular attention to 
freshmen commuters. Each Scroll has a "little sister" 
commuter whom she personally helps and advises. 



22 



To Orientating Freshmen 



Maroon Keys will probably be best remembered for 
their bonfires, although they do play a more serious 
role on campus. 

The main objective of this honorary sophomore or- 
ganization is to meet and advise freshmen during ori- 
entation, but they also sell beanies, usher at football 
games, raise money for scholarships, and build bon- 
fires. 

Freshmen would certainly be lost without the sup- 
port and rousing school spirit of the Keys during those 
first few days. 



MAROON KEYS 



First Row: G. Kaplan. Treasurer; B. Healy. President: D. Hunter. Secretary; M. Michelson. 
Vice-President. Second Row: J. Bisbee, H. Goffman, R. Asaro, F. Fitzgerald, J. Davis. Third 
Row: R. Miller, R. Uljua, S. Mullaney, N. Eggert, W. McShane. Fourth Row: A. Stein. R. 
Markham. J. Gilbert, I. Yavner. Fifth Row: R, Pedizani, L. Martin, J. Ledwig, C. Carswell, 
W. First. Sixth Row: G. McNeil, B. Swartz. Missing: K. Feinberg. 




400 Students and a 



The Four Freshmen, accompanied by 
one pigeon, more than entertained stu- 
dents in a concert on Sept. 27. The pi- 
geon, flying around loose in the "Cage," 
tried its best to steal the show but merely 
became the object of humorous remarks 
by the foursome. 

Everyone is familiar with the modern 
harmony of this group. Not only can 
they adapt their vocal blend to ballad as 
well as to swinsins rhythm numbers, but 



they can also provide their own enter- 
tainment. 

Anyone who can play two instruments 
at once, and even do some singing in one 
number is pretty versatile. Multiply this 
by four and the result is sensational. 

Whatever mood they wished to create 
instrumentally, they easily accomplished. 
They could sound like a jazz quartet, a 
percussion group, or almost a full or- 
chestra. 



Although they are called the "Four 
Freshmen," they have talent and profi- 
ciency beyond any "freshman." These 
four, Bob Flanigan, Bill Comstock, Ross 
Barbour, and Ken Albers, have appeared 
in nightclubs, at the Newport Jazz Festi- 
vals, and on campuses throughout the 
country. 

Maybe they will remember UMass as 
that campus with the crazy pigeon in the 
glass "Cage." 




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Pigeon Entertained by Four Freshmen 



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The Oak and Spruce Lodge provided an atmosphere conducive to reflective thought over the 
many social and academic problems of the UMass student body. 




Oak 'n' Spruce 
HostsS.W.A.P. 



Student Workers' Activities Union 
(S.W.A.P.) could be one of the least 
known and most beneficial events of the 
school year. The University calls repre- 
sentatives from every organization, de- 
partment, honor society, and class to- 
gether in a relaxed atmosphere to confer, 
to criticize and to become acquainted. 

On October second and third, the Oak 
and Spruce Lodge in West Lee hosted 
this year's conference. Under the efficient 
chairmanship of Mike Smith, spirits were 
high and enthusiasm prevailed. 

The morning session was divided into 



Mill Wilkinson lends a discussion on promoting 
unity and spirit within the dorms while Kip 
.lohnson and "Hovie" Clifford :iw;iil their 
chance to voice an opinion. 




Lenny Charest, Chairman Mike Smith, and Dr. 
Venman relax during an afternoon break. 



Solutions Sought to 
Campus Problems 



dormitory and Greek discussions — sug- 
gesting methods to develop unity, to in- 
crease spirit, and to do away with apa- 
thy. The Berkshires were at their, au- 
tumnal best, allowing for a delicious bar- 
becue and lawn discussions. These were 
led, concerning image on and off cam- 
pus, extracurriculars — their place and 
importance, and communications. 

Upon leaving, the feeling was one of 
having contributed greatly, yet reaping 
much more than expected ... in ideas 
and friendships. 




The S.W.A.P. Executive Committee — Seated: Dotty Stoklosa, Mike 
Smith, Chairman; Susan GHckman, Carol Sullivan. Standing: Kip John- 
son, Bill Najam, Wayne Goebel, Lenny Charest. Missing: Judy Zenis 
and Lynn Pierce, and Advisors Bill Starkweather and Harold Watts. 



27 



B.U. Defeated 

The Clancy Brothers 

A Whirlwind of Events 



. Homecoming 
1964 




Traditional bonfire sparks pre-game rally. 
28 



A gala weekend was had by all as 
Homecoming 1964 featured the float pa- 
rade, football game, dance and concert. 
The colorful float parade, heralding 
one major thought, "Beat B.U.," 
tromped down North Pleasant Street and 
through town, cheered by thousands of 
spectators, to kick off the weekend's fes- 
tivities. Brilliantly garbed marchers 
adorned some of the creative floats 
which represented weeks of work by so- 
rorities, fraternities, and dorms. 



Following the parade, ushered in by 
our band, was the rally and bonfire 
which saw the crowning of the 1964 
Homecoming Queen, Miss Marylou 
Leonard '66, and the awarding of twelve 
plaques to winning floats. Members of 
the Queen's court included Elaine Howe 
'66, Judith Sturtevant '67, Catherine 
Creedon '68, and Anne Marie Creedon 
'66. 

Saturday . . . 




Chi O's float was a real crowd pleaser. 












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Second place among fraternities went to TKE. 




SDT sings along behind their 2nd place float. 



Miss Mary Lou Leonard — and her Homecoming court. 



29 



Alumni watch Redmen crush B.U. 28-7 



. . . say UMass put on an impressive 
display of sound football to score a solid 
28-7 triumph over Boston University be- 
fore a Homecoming crowd of 10.800 
fans at Alumni Field. Jerry Whelchel 
turned loose with an outstanding per- 
formance, including an 85 yard touch- 
down run. Quite a gamel 

The Redman Marching Band looked 
really sharp in their new uniforms as 
they ran onto the held, in high-stepping 
fashion, and performed a preview of 
election highlights. Hats off to our band; 
they looked "big time!" 

Saturday evening, while the alumni 
were cavorting in Memorial Hall, the 
Student Union sponsored a dance. 

Sunday . . . 



Members of the Alumni Board 
of Directors are: E. K. Cohen, 
G. F. Benoit, Secretary, Major 
General J. J. Maginnis, Presi- 
dent, S. Z. Kaplan, Vice-Presi- 
dent, R. A. Fitzpatrick, Treas- 
urer, D. Gans. 




Governor Endicott Peabody and Major General Maginnis enjoy halftime activities with the Homecoming Queen and her court. 














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The new look of the University marching band thrilled a capacity crowd. 



iROTC's cannon blasted a round each time the Redmen scored. 



The traditional Metawampee prevails. 





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... in wrapping up the festivities a 
bit of Ireland made tiie campus scene. 
The Clancy Brothers and Tommy 
Makem highlighted Homecoming with 
their concert of Irish melodies. A full 
house greeted the group, and the group 
greeted the audience with old time favor- 
ites, as: "Johnson's Motor Car" and 
"The Patriot Game," and new Irish "dit- 
ties." Their fun loving attitude quickly 
permeated the "Cage" with "Hearty and 
Hellish" and "The Boy Won't Leave the 
Girls Alone." It was easy to see everyone 
was having fun. 

All in all. Homecoming '64 was best 
of all!! 



32 





A Bit of Blarney Ends the Weekend. 




The antics , 



of Tommy Makem 



delighted everyone. 



33 



UMass Kappa Omicron chap- 
ter of Alpha Phi Omega spon- 
sors book sales each semester 
and is the steam behind the 
Homecoming float parade and 
concert. Keeping UMass in step 
with the nation, A. P.O. con- 
ducted a mock election in No- 
vember. Chosen top among 
chapters of national service fra- 
ternities for schools of 6,000 to 
10,000 students in 1963-64, 
A.P.O. replaced Yale, last year's 
outstanding chapter. Martin J. 
Rosenberg, chapter president, 
said, "This distinction reflects 
the quality and growth of both 
our service program and our 
membership. 

"Our program could not have 
been successfully carried out, 
nor could we have attained this 
distinction, without the whole- 
hearted co-operation of the stu- 
dents, the faculty, and the ad- 
ministration." 



A.P.O. Executive Committee. Seated: David 
Mitchell, Administrative Vice-President: Mar- 
tin J. Rosenberg, President; John A. Kucharski, 
Membership Vice-President. Standing: Charles 
D. Myshrall, Recording Secretary; Roger 
Crouse. Treasurer: Allan Bunce, Service Vice- 
President. 




A. P.O. Chosen 



Outstanding Chapter 



of the Year 



34 



Homecoming Float Parade and 
Concert Among Many Campus Projects 




First Row: Denny Myshrall, Dave Mitchell, Marty Rosenberg, Al Bill Price. Fourth Row: Lee Norton, Bob Mitchell, Ted Gordon, Karl 

Bunce, Rober Crouse, John Kucharski. Second Row: John Francisco, Poison, Larry Reinhart, Arnie Daniels, Eric Poison, Prescott Farris. 

Dick Knopf, Paul Norris,Cliff Johnson, Jack Kooyoomjian, Glenn More, Fifth Row: Don Haynes, Ray Matusiewicz, Ed Skea, Dave Arlen, 

Ross Jones. Third Row: Dick Strecker, John Goodrich, Steve Pretanik, Howie Nelles, Ralph Lennon, Dennis Spinner, Paul Twohig, Hamir 

Carlos Inacio, Dana Hirst, Norm Holcomb, Dave Haracz, Bob Bass, Merchant. 



35 



Expressions of Revelers 
Mirror Action On the Field 






36 




First Row: Linda Sweeney, Linda Lapeza, Charlie Pike, Mary Jane White, Bob Greenberg, 
Paula Hadley, Sally Minich, Mary Bell, Candy Holtzman. Second Row: Michael Manson, 
Allison Malone, Bev Finkelstein. Tom McMahon, Dick Gothage. Third Row: Dick Brown, 
John Webster, Kathy Patten Art Labrie. Missing: Eldon Goodhue, Ed Rushbrook, Mike 
Chulada, Al Sarno, Anne Richards, Barbara Policow. 



37 




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This is a picture for parents to laugh at and students to admire. 



Revelers Spur UMass Enthusiasm 




Boosting campus spirit, the Revelers, 
in their bright red and white striped 
blazers, introduce freshmen to UMass 
hfe. This spirited group is the only 
UMass honorary society composed of 
men and women from all classes. Each 
fall they provide a "Student Activities 
Night" to acquaint newcomers with the 
various campus organizations. In addi- 
tion to the annual scholarship dance, the 
Revelers together with Adclphia sponsor 
Campus Varieties. They also contribute 
a major effort in the Campus Chest and 
in the selection of "Miss Campus Chest." 





John Webster does a mean monkey. 



Peenuuuuuut, Peanut butter 






Precision 



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Colonel Aykroyd. commander of Army ROTC administers an 
oath, (above) The cadets march onto the field, (below) 
Frozen in geometrical precision the troops stand for inspection 
and parade rest (right). 





1 





iMarching . . . 
Action Demonstrations . . . 
Fall Military Review 



Never let it be said that the University's ROTC pro- 
gram does not move with the times. 

Since the program became non-compulsory last 
year, the Military has tried to make ROTC more ap- 
pealing to students. 

Now, not only do cadets receive higher pay, but 
more scholarships are offered to them. Moreover, the 
Scabbard & Blade, a national military honor society, 
has been formed, which serves the campus and com- 
munity in areas ranging from blood drives to cannon 
firing after every football touchdown. 

This year, the Army ROTC men were not marching 
alone in the Fall Military Review; the ROTC spon- 
sored Precisionettes were also there to display their 
superior drill form. 

Just as the Air Force has its Angel Flight, the Army 
is planning an equivalent coed group, the Gridons. 





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Campus Religious Council Sponsors Blood Drive 




Sealed: Father John Scott, G. Marshall, President; J. Silbert, Vice-President; Father Joseph 
Quigley. Standing: T. MacLachlan, F. Bassel, E. Corsi, Secretary; B. Glickman, Treasurer; K. 
Dounes. Missing: Rabbi Ruchames. 



42 




Students calmly wait for the preliminary blood typing test. 




This boy donates one of the 599 pints of blood received on campus. 



Representatives of Hillel, Protestant 
Christian Council, and Newman Club 
combine to form the Campus Religious 
Council, the aim of which is to promote 
understanding among the religious groups 
on campus and to serve the spiritual and 
physical needs of the University com- 
munity. 

The Council's annual Blood Drive saw 



a favorable response. Just one short of 
600 pints of blood were donated, which 
topped last year's total. This year, the 
Drive received greater and more varied 
participation from campus organizations. 
Over 70 volunteer students and faculty 
members worked at the donation center 
during the three-day Drive to make it the 
most successful one yet. 



43 



Meadowlark in the Cage 




Headlining an evening of sports and 
entertainment, the world-famous Harlem 
Globetrotters frolieked at the Cage, De- 
cember 8. Head showman, Meadowlark 
I,emon, gayly frustrated the referee, 
threw buekets of "water" at the audi- 
ence, and interrupted the basketball 
match by leading the Globetrotters in a 
mock baseball game with the ageless 
wonder of the baseball world, Leroy 
"Satchel" Paige, pitching. Meadowlark 
44 



egged the skilled Washington Generals 
on with his "helpful" comments that 
broke the silence during foul shots. Not 
only did the Globetrotters shine at per- 
forming comical antics, but they also dis- 
played outstanding ability in shooting, 
dribbling, and passing. 

The variety show, that accompanies 
the Globetrotters team on its yearly cir- 
cuit, featured Peg-Leg Bates, veteran 
vaudeville star and famed dancer. Among 




other entertainers were table tennis cham- 
pions Richard Bergmann of England and 
Lee DalJoon of South Korea; Canadian 
acrobat Mike LeMay; Chinese equilibrist 
George Lee; acrobatic juggler Lee Marx; 
and Steve Parry on the trampoline. 

This Cage-packing event was spon- 
sored by the Senior Class to provide a 
trust fund for Scholarships for children 
of members of the Class of 1965. 




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The Christmas spirit appeared early 
on the UMass campus as studems gath- 
ered in the Student Union to decorate the 
building at the annual Trim-A-Limb. As 
the final touches were added to the larger 
trees in the ballroom and lobby. Christ- 
mas music could be heard echoing 
throughout the building, and students 
drank hot chocolate by the fireside. 
Bobby Kay's orchestra supplied music 
for the many couples who attended the 
annual Christmas dance, providing a sea- 
sonal lift. 

In the dorms, fun and frolic prevailed 
in the week before Christmas. The new 
dorms in Orchard Hill, took the lead in 
oificially opening the season by hosting a 
snowball fight with all who felt inclined 
to participate. Throughout all dorms, old 
and new, Christmas parties, trim-a-limbs, 
open houses, and social events ranging 
from mi.xers to dinner-dances kept the 
Christmas spirit alive. Carolers could be 
heard around the campus and town, many 
of them spontaneously organized. 

Even the University Store got into the 
Christmas spirit and bought Yuletide 
gifts in huger quantities than ever before. 
Piggy banks, stuffed animals, ashtrays, 
and gimmicks, as well as the traditional 
sweatshirts and beer mugs, were sold to 
students preparing for that eagerly 
awaited day. 

Religiously, the campus provided a 
host of activities for its students. The 
Newman Club sponsored its annual Liv- 
ing Rosary around the campus pond, and 
the Protestant Christian Council, its 
Christmas Vespers. Also at this season 
was the Jewish holiday of Chanukah 
which was highlighted by the gala 
Chanukah festival. 

Once again, Christmas at UMass 
proved to be one of the most joyous 
times of all. 




46 




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Yuletide Spirit 

Abounds 

on Campus 



Any student who wished to 
could have participated in the 
Student Union Trim-a-Limb. 
Groups were assigned particu- 
lar trees to decorate in any 
manner they wished. After- 
wards they were rewarded with 
refreshments and the satisfac- 
tion of a job well done. 




The finished product warms the darkened Co- 
lonial lounge with a soft glow. 




47 




Newman Club Radiates Christmas Cheer 




Sealed: D. Montanari, Vice-President; Monsignor David J. Power, J. DiFabio. Vice-President. 
Siandinn: K. Forsburg. Recording Secretary; R. Kachanck, Treasurer; M. Finnegan. Corre- 
sponding Secretary. Missing: J. Mulcahy, President. 



The entrance of the chapel si- 
lently speaks the true meaning 
of Christmas. 



48 




Living Rosary Prays for Peace 



The last weekend pre- 
ceding Christmas vacation 
found students stringing 
popcorn and cranberries 
before a crackling fire, 
creating festive decorations 
for the Newman Christmas 
Tree. 

The Center saw that 
Santa did not forget the 
underprivileged children in 
the Springfield area. A 
party was held and every 
child received a present. 

The weekend is con- 
cluded with a living Rosary. 
Lights representing partic- 
ular beads flicker on and the 
mumuring of students pray- 
ing for peace floats into the 
night. 




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Menoralf s Glow Adds to Seasonal Lights 




Each year, Hillel invites all to view the kindHng of the Canukah lights. 



The traditional Menorah symbolizes the 8 day 
miracle. 



The annual Chanukah 
festival, sponsored by the 
B'nai B'rith Hillel Founda- 
tion, was only one of the 
many successes highlight- 
ing this year. Lectures, 
dances, panel discussions, 
Deli-suppers, coffee hours. 
Sabbath services, and clas- 
ses in Hebrew, Yiddish and 
the Bible, were a few of the 
offerings of the Hillel pro- 
gram. Advised by Rabbi 
Louis Ruchames, and Pro- 
fessor Joseph Marcus, Hillel 
has reached all phases of in- 
terest among the Jewish 
students, satisfying their so- 
cial, cultural, and religious 
needs. 




Sealed: A. Gelfman, Vice-President; F. Lazin, ['resident; R. Glickman, L. Luchans. Standinn: 
S. Webber, Treasurer; N. HIank, Recording Secretary; B. Wolf, R. Close, Corresponding 
Secretary; B. Gamcrman, J. Dayton. Missinf^: Rabbi Ruchames, Professor Marcus, Advisor. 



50 





The Rev. John L. Scott gives the closing prayer and dismissal, 



Mr. Melton M. Miller of the School of Engi- 
neering gives the Second Lesson from the books 
of the Prophets Isaiah and Micah. 



4 i. 



A Festival of 



Lessons and Carols'' 



Mr. Robert L. Rivers of the 
School of Business Administra- '• 
tion reads from St. Lukes' ac- 
count on the Birth and the visit 
of the shepherds. 

51 





Sealed: E. Shea, J. Carlson, T. MocLachlan, President; Reverend John Scott, Slcindiiii^: M. 
Clough, B. Cage, R. Evans, George Marshall. 



"A Festival of Lessons and Carols is a joyous offer- 
ing of praise, combined with reverent meditation on 
selected verses of Scripture taken from both the Old 
and New Testaments." So reads the beginning of the 
Program, and it goes on to reveal Lessons read by 
faculty members intermingled with hymns sung by the 
First Church Congregational Choir. 

The Protestant Christian Council is a coordinating 
group for all its constituent faiths.Throughout the year 
it presents programs for the campus. This year one of 
the programs featured Dr. Joseph W. Mathews, Dean 
of the Ecumenical Institute who spoke on "Science 
and Religion." 



Faculty Members Participate 

in Christmas Vespers 

Presented 

by Protestant Christian Council 



52 



Carol Sing 

First 

Freshman 

Class 

Project 



The wondrous spirit of 
Ciiristmas was magically 
captured in the Freshman 
Carol Sing. 

The night was clear, 
touches of snow frosted the 
ground and Christmas lights 
glowed over the faces of 
spirited carolers. 

Christmas excitement and 
joy continued through the 
evening. Class President 
John Robinson led the 
traditional carol sings, and 
later on, not only did Santa 
appear, abounding in pres- 
ents and good cheer, but 
sleigh rides around the 
pond were offered to every- 
one. 

The color, warmth, and 
fun of Christmas at the 
University was festively 
displayed. 




R. Keough, Vice-President; J. Roth, Secretary; S. Forbes, Treasurer; J. Robinson, President. 



Each year the freshman class grows 
larger, and along with this boost in size, 
they abound in exuberance and high spir- 
its. 

During the year, the class officers and 
the Executive Council traditionally spon- 
sor the Winter Carnival toboggan run and 
the Freshman Picnic. They plan to make 
these events more exciting and successful 
than ever before. 

But the Class of 1968 also possesses 
more serious ideals and expectations. 
Class President John Robinson thought- 
fully expresses them, "Our aim as a class 
is not merely graduation nor the earning 
of degrees for all our members. Instead, 
we aim for academic excellence, athletic 
superiority, and the creation of a strong 
bond between student, class, and school." 




ntLtowE HOME REOiHENl 




students rally in front of the Student Union to welcome back the team. 



Tangerine was the most popular color at the Univer- 
sity this fall. It innamed a blaze of spirit not hitherto 
acknowledged at the University and incited letters of 
congratulations and criticism. This Hood of tangerine 
sentiment was due to the superior season of the Red- 
men Eleven and the resultant bid to play in the Tange- 
rine Bowl at Orlando, Florida. 

The students were infused with the vision of the 
great battle and the desire to experience it first hand 
burned in them vividly. Of course, not everyone could 
raise the transportation funds, but the general con- 
census decreed that UMass should be represented in 
Florida by the Marching Band and cheerleaders. 

The Senate led the drive to raise the necessary funds 
swamping the campus with bits of orange paper called 

54 



tangerine pins and also tangerine trees which brought 
the sunny South closer to UMass and the band closer 
to Florida. 

The trees and pins were sold by Gamma Sigma 
Sigma and Alpha Phi Omega, the Greek service organ- 
izations and IFC donated their share of the IFC-Pan- 
Hel Skits proceeds to the band fund. A Highlights 
night was organized to give the band a chance to prove 
it was worth 12,000 dollars and to raise still more 
money for the ever growing fund. Even the COL- 
LEGIAN went tangerine crazy and printed an issue in 
that color illustrating even more the sustenance of the 
spirit which fused the University Community into 
working together toward a goal. 



r S.m 4: 



Senate President George Michael sells the first Tange- 
rine Pin to Dean Field. 




Student Support Sends 

Band And Cheerleaders 

To Florida For 

Bowl Game 



55 



Bill Bastible discusses various aspects of student broadcasting. 



The studio is a busy place. 





WMUA boasts an impressive record library. 





WMUA - 91.1 FM On Your Dial 



Variety is the spice of life — and of radio listening, 
too. WMUA certainly does its best to maintain this 
idea. 

Music to please the majority of campus listeners is 
offered — classical, folk, and beat. Moreover, several 
educational lectures and discussion programs are pre- 
sented. 

One particular program which attracted much stu- 
dent interest was that concerning Sex Education. Dr. 
Gage, along with other members of the University staff 
discussed the topic, and an open telephone line per- 
mitted student participation. A very interesting and 
controversial series of discussions resulted. 



Besides its regular programs, WMUA handles many 
special campus events. The most outstanding example 
was the live broadcast of the Tangerine Bowl from 
Orlando, Fla. Although most students couldn't be 
there in person, WMUA was and broadcasted the 
thrilling yet heartbreaking game to thousands of ex- 
cited students. 

WMUA also rebroadcasts notable concerts and lec- 
tures for those who missed the live event on campus. 
Moreover, because the station is student oriented, 
newscasts concerning campus news exclusively are 
offered. 



57 




WMUA officers include: D. Weaber. M. Cappadonna, K. Moon, Station Manager; G. Robare, 
G. Drake. 



Jeflf Baker adds color to the play by play sports broadcasts. 



WMUA Services 
Campus Community 




Don splices the all important tape. 



George calculates the radius of the new antennae. 






Each senator reflects upon his duties to the community as he takes the oath of oflice. 

(Above) 

President Lederle makes a point at the annual Senate-Administration tea. (Below) 



m 






Larry Rutstein and Bill Landis discuss problems with a member of the administration. 

Executive Turnover - Problem Of Succession 



Every Wednesday evening, the Student Senate meets 
and is the source of much energetic and responsible 
pohtical activity. 

Open to both criticism and approval from all sides 
— student and faculty — the Senate strives to do its best 
and always hopes for improvement. 

Senate meetings can range from exceedingly tame 
sessions to verbally fierce ones, depending upon the 
strength and interest of the issues at hand. However, 
the right to debate openly is a welcome and necessary 
part of the proceedings. 

Although this element of floor discussion is vital, it 
is in the various Senate Committees that most of the 
issues are discussed and resolved. Each committee 
works on problems within its scope, and together, all 
the committees comprise a unified, working organiza- 
tion. From the Finance Committee to Women's 
Affairs, these groups comprise the heart of student 
government. 

Perhaps the most popular issue on hand this year 
was the drive to raise funds to send the band to the 
Tangerine Bowl. President George Michael led the 
campaign, and various profit-making activities were 
initiated. The campaign attracted much student interest 



and spirit, and also gained the necessary monetary 
support. 

How many students will forget the sight of hundreds 
of orange "Boost the Band" buttons seen all over cam- 
pus? And remember the orange trees the Revelers were 
selling — although not many oranges have been grown 
from them, the idea was unique, and more important, 
successful. Finally, Highlight Night was presented, and 
the UMass team was featured in its best form. Team 
enthusiasm and spirit certainly ran high that night. 

A proposal which is under committee inspection 
concerns setting a minimum 2.0 cumulative average 
for students holding offices in RSO organizations. The 
purpose of this is to protect the students' money and to 
insure that academic endeavors do not suffer from too 
much extra-curricular participation. 

In January, to the surprise of the Senate body, Pres- 
ident Michael resigned for health and academic rea- 
sons. Vice President Bill Landis assumed the Presi- 
dency, and a debate followed concerning how to fill 
the vacant V.P. seat. After several proposals had been 
submitted and discussed, it was decided that Landis 
would appoint a Senator, and Larry Rutstein got the 
position. 



61 



# 




',* 








Jackie David listens thoughtfully to Dean Field 
at the Tea. 



vik^^^ 




Senate President, George Michael, 
tangerine trees to UMass. 



brought 






/,#f •»<«-»■; *»*i.K, 



■■m^i<t- 







Dean of Women, Helen Curtis, smiles (Above). Senator Wendy Hall enjoys a Wednes- 
day night session, (left) 



Another issue which gained much attention con- 
cerned the pastry boycott in the dormitories. The Sen- 
ate felt that the price of certain pastries had been 
raised for no apparent reason, and that a strict boycott 
of those goods would force the company to reduce 
their prices. Even though the boycott took place during 
final exams, a time when students are more prone to 
use the vending machines, cooperation among the 



dorms was high, and the result was success. 

Throughout the year, the Senate generally works 
quietly and responsibly on various issues. Student sen- 
ators are usually genuinely interested in this governing 
body and strive to increase its effectiveness. Although 
Senate members and officers change from year to year, 
the body works to remain a responsible and worth- 
while unit. 



63 



Forensic Society Nationally 

First In Yan 




First Row: B. A. Moreau, W. Farren, S. Yokel, Secretary, L. Rutstein, President; A. Davis, J. 
Putnam. Second Row: M. Farrell, Vice-President; A. Dalton, L. Morin, Treasurer; B. Gover- 
nor, P. Biddle, Coach. Missinf>: J. Rhoads, M. Goldberg, D. Goodale, G. Goldhaber, D. 
April. 



During the past two years the Forensic Society has 
developed its prestige both here at UMass and 
throughout New England. The club has built up its 
debating reputation by consistently finishing up among 
the leaders in every tournament in which it competed. 
At the Princeton Tournament they placed 19th out of 
55 schools, and at the Columbia Tournament they 
placed 8th out of 70 schools. However, their most 
impressive performance was at the Yankee Conference 
where they won first place with the best speaker and 
best negative team awards. 



Due to the acquisition of a full time coach, Phillip 
Biddle, the team has grown not only in quality but also 
in quantity. This year twenty members participated in 
the activities, and recognition of their gains is exempli- 
fied by their recent acceptance in the National Hon- 
orary Debate Society, Delta Sigma Rho-Tau Kappa 
Alpha. They have also increased their activities on 
campus. They held a High School Clinic for over 500 
high school debaters in Massachusetts, and they held a 
High School Debate Tournament with 50 high schools 
represented. 



64 



Recognized — Place 
Con Tournament 





YANKEE CONFERENCE WINNERS— M. Farrell, L. Rutstein, W. Farren. Missing: 
M. Goldberg. 



Debating is an intellectual extra-curricular activity. 
At the beginning of each academic year the National 
Debate Council chooses a topic of current importance 
to be debated for the entire year. This years topic was: 
"That the Federal Government Establish a Public 
Works Program for the Unemployed." Then the work 
begins. Many hours are spent in the library doing re- 
search on the various aspects of the subject. Positive 
and negative cases are developed, and then the tourna- 
ments begin. 

Although the tournaments can be grueling at times, 



there is much to liven things up. The debaters get the 
opportunity to travel to other schools and the chance 
to meet many interesting people. Many new friendships 
are developed with debaters from other universities 
and are reinforced at tournament parties (by various 
means.) 

All in all the debaters are able to combine an intel- 
lectual experience that develops logical thinking and 
the art of public speaking with the fun and excitement 
of debate tournaments. 



65 



Concert Band Draws Overflow Attendance In S.U. 





wsiw 


i^H^^^^'^Bf^jj^H 


^^■^^^^^^^^■^H A ^^^^^^^BV ^^^M 


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The University Symphony Orchestra originally began as a twenty 
seven piece string ensemble and under the direction of Ronald Steele 
expanded into a full orchestra, the membership of which is drawn 
from Amherst and its surrounding communities as well as the four 
college campuses. The growth of the orchestra is evidenced in the 
more challenging selections presented in concerts. The opening pro- 
gram included Aaron Copeland's "Fanfare for the Common Man," 
"Symphony No. 9" by Schubert and Franz Liszt's "Les Preludes." 

John A. Jenkins, director of the impressive Redman Marching 
Band, lent his talents to conducting the University Concert Band 
which performed its winter concert for an overflow audience in the 
Student Union. The band appeared at the World's Fair in a com- 
mand performance on Massachusetts Day and also toured the state 
between semesters as a public relations service. 



Twenty Seven Piece 

Ensemble 

Expands To 

UMass Symphony 

Orchestra 





Two students, part of the panel discussion, discuss their experiences in the 
deep South. 



DVP Brings National 
Figures to UMass 



The student-organized Distinguished Visitors Program (DVP) sponsors 
several on-campus appearances of national and international figures dur- 
ing the academic year. 

Featured as the first guest was Washington columnist Drew Pearson 
known as a fearless reporter who gets stories others can't get and dares to 
print what others would hush up. Speaking to a capacity audience in the 
Student Union ballroom, he discussed the four dynamic events of 
October's ^-Week That Was": the Jenkins moral case, Mr. Khrushchev's 
sudden dismissal, England's Labor Party victory, and the explosion of 
Red China's first "A" bomb. He also commented on President Johnson's 



68 



Drew Pearson c;indidly commented on significant inter- 
national events. 




problems one week after assuming office. As a conclusion to what was 
almost a fire-side chat, he ventured a few predictions for the future. 

November brought four young veterans of 1964's long, hot Mississippi 
summer and television personality David Susskind to discuss civil rights 
work in the South. Suskind, known for his part in the "Open End" pro- 
grams as well as for his association with many critically acclaimed "spe- 
cials," directed an in-depth analysis of southern racism. The three stu- 
dents and a junior high school teacher recounted the ideological problems 
and physical hardships faced in Mississippi in the panel discussion titled 
"Murder in Mississippi — Four Who Came Back." The panel concluded 
that their work served to focus national attention on the situation. 

Again people were turned away from the S.U. ballroom, when DVP 
brought the play, "In White America," to campus. Using a sketchbook 
format, the play showed the tribulations of the Negro in America and was 
based almost entirely on documents dating from 1788 to the present. The 
play was divided into two acts, the first dealing with the Negroes' plight in 
slavery and the second with their problems in freedom. The play's high 
points dealt with the Negro and his white opposition in his struggle to gain 
the freedom promised in the Emancipation Proclamation. A stimulating 
play, "In White America" deserved the extended applause it received. 

In March the annual DVP sponsored Social Sciences Workshop was 
held. 



David Susskind moderated a panel discussion of civil rights 
work in the South. 





ANGEL FLIGHT 

Seated: B. Shafer, G. Henry, K. Mitchell, Executive Officer; P. wood, B. Esielionis, S. Rossi. Standing: C. Noel, F. Carmody, B. 

Appicelli, Administrative Officer; N. Baron, Commander; M. Gustin, Fuller, P. Gillis, B. Ennis, A. Pindul, C. Stefanik, R. Connolly, C. 

Operations Officer; M. Martyny, Comptroller; D. Huebel, C. At- Pearson, M. Jones, D. Bangs, C. Belonir, M. Lasher. 



Alpha Theta chapter of Gamma Sigma Sigma was 
formally installed at UMass in June, 1963. The pur- 
pose of the sorority is to assemble college and univer- 
sity women in the spirit of service to humanity. As a 
service organization many of its activities are campus 
oriented. Some projects undertaken throughout the 
year are the semi-annual book exchange with APO, 
conducting tours during high school days, and assisting 
the Red Cross during its blood drive. Gamma Sigs are 
also active in community and national affairs. This 
unique women's organization not only offers new so- 
cial relationships, but also a sense of accomplishment 
and satisfaction through service to others. 



Gamma Sigma Sigma- 

Campus Women Active In 

Community And National 

Affairs 





70 



s»s«:!:k:;^v ;:3S' raBBBBES^i^;^ 




"Best Angel Flight in New England" is not an 
empty title — it's a responsibility filled office. 

When the New England area convention had been 
concluded and all the units had been inspected accord- 
ing to membership, activities and facilities, UMass as- 
sumed the title and began coordinating Angel Flight 
activities for all of New England. 

While assuming the new responsibility, however, the 
Flight did not forget its home campus. The girls ush- 
ered at University functions, entertained women offi- 
cers of the Air Force, gave parties for orphans, and 
planned such social events as Spring Picnic and Mili 
Ball. 

The nation organization was not overlooked either 
as representatives of the UMass Chapter attended the 
national conclave in Washington, D.C. 



Angel Flight 
Adds Color to 



AFROTC 



GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA 

Seated: J. Harty, G. Lord, R, Ames, M. Ferreira. Standing: J. MacLeod, P. Reiser, F. 
Crossley, C. Amoit. 





E. Waterman, W. Houk, L. Charest, Chief Justice; K. Johnson, T. Murphy. 




L. Lazin, K. Meehan, L. Fisher, Chief Justice; M. Smith, S. Neet. 




Men's And Women's 
Judiciary Comprise 
The General Court 



Combining to form the General Court, 
Women's and Men's Judiciary deal with 
cases concerning the Constitution of the 
Student Senate. The Court normally 
functions as two separate bodies. Dis- 
ciplinary cases which do not fall under 
the jurisdiction of the dormitory councils 
are handled by Women's Judiciary which 
is composed of five members, two sen- 
iors, two juniors, and one sophomore, 
elected by the entire body of University 
women. 

Composed of seven men, three sen- 
iors, three juniors, and one sophomore, 
Men's Judiciary also handles disciplinary 
cases with the exception of academic 
honesty and dormitory cases. Justices of 
Men's Judiciary are selected by the pre- 
sent justices and an equal number of 
male senators under the direction of the 
Men's Affairs Committee of the Senate. 
Because of the increasing size of the 
University, two Area Judiciaries work in 
conjunction with Men's Judiciary as as- 
sociate justices who preside over men's 
offenses. 



UMass Expansion 

Means 
Parking Extinction 




As buildings boomed parking spaces 
fizzled. In September, as 4000 cars filled 
3100 parking spaces, UMass realized a 
definite parking problem. In a typical 
three-day period 1000 tickets were is- 
sued to violators by the police. 

Traffic regulations caused much con- 
troversy on campus this year. Letters 
from "Abused Automobile Owners" 
flooded the Collegian office. Irate drivers 
complained of stickers that would not 
stick in the rain. A raging dispute over 
the towing of student and faculty vehi- 
cles from grass areas often indistinguish- 
able because of leaves, cinders or lack 
of grass followed. Several complaints 
were made that, although students and 
faculty members arrived before their cars 
were towed, they were required to pay 
the towing charge rather than the price 
of a parking ticket. Chief of Campus Po- 
lice Blasko noted that the towing charge, 
determined by competitive bidding, was 
the lowest possible and that aU returns 
of fines and penalties are deposited in the 
university scholarship trust funds. 

In response to the traffic issues, Col- 
onel Marchant, director of campus secu- 
rity, said, "Within the decade the 
University of Massachusetts . . . will 
become a 'bicycle campus' in word as 
well as deed." 




Car towing reached epidemic proportions at certain times dur- 
ing the year. 





Student reactions to tickets and towing vary according to the particular instance (Above). 
Armed with tickets. Chief Blasco enforces parking regulations. (Below) 



■•.8'^ 





Bombs drop . . . Students walk. 



Young Independents 

March For 

Viet Nam Protest 



During the heat of the Viet Nam problem the Young Independ- 
ents of UMass staged a silent but effective protest march into Am- 
herst after picketing the ROTC building. Despite a sleet storm, 
UMass students, faculty members, representatives of the Society of 
Friends, and Amherst students, carried placards and distributed lit- 
erature. This peaceful vigil was the culmination of a larger protest 
program. For two days intense debates had filled the Student Union 
lobby where an information booth was established and literature 
distributed. The Young Independents' policy program argued the 
question, "Is there any morally valid reason for the deaths of hun- 
dreds of Americans and thousands of Vietnamese?" In interviews 
with Springfield station WHYN, members stressed that the group 
strongly "advocates negotiations for a neutral settlement of the Viet 
Nam problem as the only morally and politically valid solution." 



76 




Ji 




As some marched 



. . many watched 




WHYN's roving reporter seeks general campus opinion 
to the peace walk. 



rfmmmrmti^iHmm 






Students register for the civil rights conference (Above). Young Independents sell buttons to 
aid the efforts of civil rights workers in Selma, Alabama. (Below) 



A civil rights conference, entitled "The Civil Rights 
Movement: Reform or Revolution," was held on the 12th, 
13th and 14th of February and was sponsored and directed 
by a coalition of the students of the Four College Commu- 
nity in an attempt to increase familiarity with the expanded 
nature of the civil rights movement. 

The weekend began Friday with "Three Views of the 
Revolution" being discussed at Mt. Holyoke. Saturday a 
three panel discussion was held at the University followed 
by seminars at some of the Amherst College fraternity 
houses. The weekend was terminated with an address by 
Noel Day. 

Many of the speakers emphasized that the concept of non- 
violence could no longer be followed if the Negroes were to 
build political power. In addition, three noted economic ex- 
perts called for the establishment of a "Department of 
Peace" to effectively combat the Negro's economic prob- 
lems. During one of the seminars James Shcbazz, the head 
of the organization for Afro-American Unity, spoke on the 
rehabilitation of the Negro and freedom from oppression. 






A Harlem political figure speaks his mind. 




''Reform Or Revolution'' 



The University attempted to encourage the attendance of 
its students by reducing the price from seven dollars to two. 
Registration as a delegate provided round trip transportation 
to Mt. Holyoke on Friday night and reserved seating at 
panels and seminars. In addition, it allowed free admission 
to the party Saturday night, where there was folk singing 
and a dance band. Delegates also received an information 
packet on the speakers and a copy of the proceedings. 

The conference was more successful than anticipated. Ap- 
proximately 1,300 attended the discussions including many 
students from schools in the Northeastern area. 



79 




Spurs Reopening Of 
North Dining Commons 
Snack Bar 






Eight thousand students file through the Hatch each day, some of them pausing 
a few hours to eat, study, relax and meet friends. The University has tried to 
relieve the resulting crowded conditions by reopening the ground floor snack bar 
facilities in the North Dining Commons which had been in operation through 
1957. 

The snack bar serves essentially the same foods as the Hatch with the exception 
of dinners and is in operation during the week. 

Photographs taken by students decorate the walls providing an informal atmos- 
phere for the casual coffee date. A piano is also available for anyone who wishes 
to use it. 



81 




Record Number Of 

Students Writing 

Final Examinations At 

The Boyden Building 

Nationally Publicized 



82 





Preparation For Finals — 
Leisurely Review Or Cram Session 
In Either Case A Time Of Solitude 



84 




ATHLETICS 





Kelly breaks away from UConn defender on 
way to long gain (above). Co-Captain Peter 
Pietz leads interference for Redmen backs J 
(right). 




Hudson cracks through Maine line to hall Bear drive. 



86 




UMASS 6 - MAINE 



Led by quarterback Jerry Whelchel, the Redmen 
plodded their way over the Maine Bears, 6-0. In the 
defensive contest, both teams stalled and were unable 
to gain momentum for a sustained drive. The only 
score of the afternoon resulted when a Whelchel pass 
was deflected by a Maine defender into the hands of 
Bob Meers, who drove into the end zone for the tally. 
Although the Redmen defensive unit performed admi- 
rably, the offensive unit struggled throughout the game. 



• UMASS 14 - HAVARD 20 

Sporting a strong ground attack, the Harvard Crim- 
son upset the Redmen 20-14 before more than 20,000 
fans at Harvard Stadium. Harvard scored after a 63 



yard march. Fullback Pat Conway plunged over from 
the one yard line. This was the first touchdown scored 
against the Redmen in 601 minutes. Harvard quarter- 
back McCluskey, later in the second period, took off 
around left end on a keeper and sprinted 82 yards for 
the second TD. 

In the second half the Redmen appeared revitalized. 
Jerry Whelchel scampered 39 yards to set up a TD 
which he later scored from 1 yard out. With the score 
in Harvard's favor, 14-6, the gridmen of Massachu- 
setts began to roll again. Mixing a passing and running 
game, UMass went to the Harvard 3 yard line. Whel- 
chel then faked into the line and rolled around the left 
end to score unmolested. The Crimson, however, drove 
right back, slashing through the Redmen line, with 
Dave Poe scoring on a 13 yard run for the final tally of 
the game. 





After fifhling through Huskie line for large gain, Kllis is brought down. 



UMASS 24 - BUFFALO 22 



After building up a fine 17-7 halftime lead, UMass 
withstood a second half Buffalo surge for the victory. 
Mike Ross scored the first Rcdmcn touchdown follow- 
ing a Buffalo fumble. Whclchel added to the score by 
booting a 22 yard field goal, making the score 10-0. 
The Bulls rebounded with a score, but a 22 yard com- 
pletion from Whelchel to Meers offset the Buffalo 
tally. In the second half, the Bulls scored two more 



88 



touchdowns on the fine running and passing of their 
quarterback Don Gilbert. Now behind 20-14, the Red- 
men made their comeback. Whclchel passed to Morin 
on the 45 . . . and "Big" Milt raced all the way into 
the end zone. The Bulls refused to relent, however, 
and late in the fourth quarter, UMass, deep in their 
own territory took an intentional safety to prevent 
Buffalo from scoring a touchdown. 




•UMASS 30 - UCONN 

The Redmen virtually rolled over the UConn Husk- 
ies with an impressive show of brute power. 

Mike Ross scored early for the first tally, and Whel- 
chel converted successfully. Later in the first quarter, 
Whelchel tossed passes to Morin and Meers, culmi- 
nated by a 30 yard pitch to Bob Ellis for the TD. 



Heading for a 51 yard touchdown, Mike Ross turns on the steam. 



In the third quarter, the Redmen defense applied the 
pressure. Guard Bob Santucci picked off a deflected 
pass and scrambled 58 yards for the score. 

UMass size predominated in the fourth quarter as 
the Redmen scored for the last time when Phil DeRose 
swept the left end from 20 yards out. 



89 



UMASS 7 - URI 



In spite of rain and a muddy field, the Redmen 
defeated Rhode Island, 7-0. Poor footing and a slip- 
pery pigskin resulted in fumbles and a minimum of 
offensive football. Time after time the Redmen became 
bogged down and were forced to punt. The halftime 
score read 0-0. 

The second half was completely dominated by the 
Redmen, but only one touchdown was salvaged. Grind- 
ing out the yardage, the backfield began to move with 
Phil DeRose finally going over for the score. Whel- 
chel's conversion was good, and that was the only 
score of the afternoon. 



• JC 



-.■\ 



^^ 



^^ 



After faking to Byron, Whelchel moves back on option roll 
out. 



UMASS 28 - BU 7 



Before a capacity Homecoming crowd, the Redmen 
throttled the Boston University Terriers 28-7. 

The first score resulted after a strong ground game 
placed the bail on the BU 16. Whelchel rolled around 
the right end and went in for the score. Applying pres- 
sure, the defensive team forced a BU fumble. After a 
pass completion to Morin and a run by Ellis, Mike 
Ross carried in for the TD. BU had already taken 
advantage of a UMass fumble which set up their only 
score of the day. 

In the second half, with the ball on their own ]5 
yard line, the Redmen broke loose Jerry Whelchel who 
raced 85 yards for a TD. 

90 



^ 




■ ■II 





• UMASS 28 - VERMONT 7 

In the contest which determined the Yankee Confer- 
ence Championship, UMass dumped Vermont, 28-7. 
Concentrating on a powerful ground game, led by a 
stalwart front line, the Redmen dominated all phases 
of the game. 

The first score resulted from a sequence of plays up 




the middle with Ken Palm finally hitting off tackle for 
the score. Following a UVM fumble in the second 
period, Mike Ross on a trap play up the middle, went 
for 13 yards and the score, which now read 14-0. 

The second half began with a kick-off return by Phil 
DeRose, who sprinted 87 yards for a touchdown. This 
play completely broke the spirit of the Vermonters. 
The next time the Redmen received the ball, they ran 
through and over the Catamount line, with Bob Ellis 
scoring the TD. 

With only 5 minutes remaining, Vermont scored 
from two yards out, ending the last of the Redmen 
records set last season. 



Phil DeRose taken from be- 
hind after gaining valuable 
yardage (above). Bob Ellis 
bulls through Bear line (left). 

91 




UMASS 25 - HOLYCROSS 6 



A highly spirited UMass eleven caught the Holy 
Cross Crusaders napping and defeated them 25-6. 

The first Redmen drive consisted of three passes to 
Bob Mcers and a long run by Bob Ellis. Jerry Whel- 
chel carried on a quarterback sneak for the first score. 
Later on in the second quarter, Phil DcRosc picked up 
a Crusader punt and utilizing his blocking, scampered 
79 yards for a TD. At the end of the period Whelchei 
booted a 25 yard field goal, making the haiftime score 
16-0. 



The second half found the Redmen deep in Cru- 
sader territory. Doyle, Hagberg, and Ellis trapped 
Cunnion in the end zone for a safety. Following a poor 
punt, Whelchei hit Mike Ross on a 13 yard scoring 
play. 

The score read 25-0 before the Crusaders led by 
Brian Flatley could score. 

This was the most impressive victory of the year for 
the University. 



92 




UMASS 47 - UNH 



Spidel, Ross, and Palm lead Whelchel for long yardage gains against U-Conn. 



In the final scheduled contest of the season, the 
Redmen trampled the University of New Hampshire, 
47-0. 

Phil DeRose took the opening kick-off 99 yards for 
a score. Several plays later, Jerry Whelchel passed to 
Ken Palm for an eleven yard scoring play. This was 
only the beginning of the romp, as before the half 
ended touchdowns were made by Bob Ellis, Phil De- 



Rose, and Milt Morin. The score read 34-0 at half- 
time. 

Quickly after the third quarter began, Mike Ross 
rambled 52 yards for another TD. The last score was 
made by Joe Morris from the one yard line. 

This ended the Redmen season with a fine 8-1 
mark, 5-0 in the Conference. YanCon teams were out- 
scored 1 18-7. 



93 




m. 



mf\7^ 




^71 




/ ' / /<'. iJclaney. DeMinico, IJjillas, Ross, Pietz, Whelchel, De- 
Rose, Doyle, Biron. Second Row: Caruso, Hudson, Coma, 
Talkarczyk, daCosta, Lewis, Zangrilli, Swanson, Third Row: Mareno, 



Campbell, Gogick, SanUicci, Mcyerhoclcr, Giaria, Munis, Trbovich, 
Kelley, Fourth Row: Spidle, Boyle, Benoit, Burke, Driscoll, Cain, 
Fassell, Rany. Fijih Row: Durkin, Bourdelais, Ellis, Davis, lodice, 



94 




Qualey, Debiak. Kehoe, Pantanella. Si.xrh Row: Scialdone, Seventh Row: Keedy, Schmitt, Shields, Johnson, Karras, Cook, De- 
Schroeder, Morin, Connor, MacKay, Meers, Simensen, Hagberg. laey. Burgin, Fusia. 



95 







Redmen Upended by 
Second Half Surge 




Coach Fusia and President 
Lederle accept the runner up 
trophies with a pang of disap- 
pointment, (top picture). The 
team arriving in Orlando sets 
off to practice (abovej. 



In a truly exciting contest the Redmen of UMass 
were upended by the Pirates of East Carolina, 14-13. 
The 19th annual Tangerine Bowl was to determine the 
Atlantic Coast College Division Champion. 

The first half consisted basically of a defensive con- 
test with the Redmen making the only score. Following 
an exchange of fumbles deep in Carolina territory. 




96 




Whelchel faded back and hit Ken Palm on a 12 yard 
pass scoring play. The conversion was good, and 
UMass led 7-0 at halftime. 

In the second half the Redmen received the kickoff 
and moved to midfield before being set back by two 
penalties. Once again Whelchel faded back and hit 
Palm at the Carolina 23. Ken broke away from the 
defenders and went into the end zone on a 61 yard 
play. Whelchel's conversion attempt, however, went 
wide, and the score read 13-0. 

Late in the third quarter, the Pirates began to drive. 
Ail-American tailback Bill Cline and fullback George 
Richardson accounted for the two touchdowns, the 
second TD followed by a two point conversion play, 
putting the Carolinians in the lead. 

Time ran out on the Redmen with the score, East 
Carolina 14, UMass 13. 



East Carolina 14 - 13 
Overcomes UMass Lead 



Jerry Whelchel hurries off pass 
before being hit by East Caro- 
lina linemen (below). Halfback 
Ken Palm is brought down after 
short gain (below left). Phil De- 
Rose scampers for yardage as 
Pirates close in (above left). 






■■■■*«frV>f*i«H 




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98 




UNIVERSITY 
MARCHING BAND 



Half time saw students proudly watch- 
ing the "new look" in the 1964 Univer- 
sity Marching Band under the direction 
of John Jenkins. 

Jerry H. Bilek nationally noted for his 
imaginative marching band scoring ar- 
ranged all the music used by the band in 
their performances this season. He made 
a surprise appearance at the UNH game. 
Student generated enthusiasm sent the 
Band to the Tangerine Bowl — a fitting 
climax to a fine season. 



PRECISIONETTES 

The University of Massachusetts Pre- 
cissionettes Drill Team, led by Anita 
Handalian '65, made its 1964 debut at 
Buffalo. At home, on our own campus, 
students watched enthusiastically as this 
group performed at parades, military re- 
views and football games wearing their 
new navy blue and gold uniforms. This 
will mark the second year that the group 
will be an independent organization work- 
ing with the Army ROTC detachment on 
campus. 



CHEERLEADERS 

The cheerleaders under co-captains 
Steve Graham and Jay Stevens can al- 
ways be counted on to raise student 
spirit at both football games and rallies. 

This year the squad helped cheer the 
Redmen on as they played East Carolina 
State College in our first Bowl game. 



Soccer Team 





'I 

4! 



Good defense and fancy footwork carried the Rcdmcn over their opponents. 



100 



Finishes With Strong Second Half 




^^^^ 



1& 



Redmen use their heads as well as their feet to score the all important goal. 



101 



1964 VARSITY SOCCER 




First Row. Bubriski, Johnson, Bergan, Whitman, Konieczny, Cooke, Yando, Lyons, Ross, 
Conlon, Blanchard, Ayanaba. Second Row: Alexander, Monnier, Merrill, Dougherty, Dunlop, 
Tanner, Coach Briggs, Martin, Burgess, Gibbons, Tucker, Zumbruski, Tarr. 



After what was a hapless first five 
games, resulting in a disappointing 1 win 
— 4 loss record, the Redmcn hooters be- 
came determined to salvage the season. 
This they accomplished in a more than 
respectable fashion. 

Coach Briggs' Booters began by down- 
ing Rhode Island (3-0) and Tufts (2-0). 
In a contest with Clark, a third shutout 
was maintained, although the UMass 
offense was stifled and the tally was a 
scoreless tie. The Redmcn finished with a 
4-2 victory over Vermont and a 2-1 win 
over Amherst. Thus, the team went over 
the .500 mark with 5 wins, 4 losses and 



one tie. 

Garry Gibbons, only a sophomore, led 
the team in scoring with seven goals, get- 
ting 2 goals apiece in two games. Senior 
Kevin Lyons had three goals as did 
sophomore Aba Ayanaba. 

Defensively, Junior Captain Ray 
Yando displayed fine leadership ability 
from his fullback position, while goalie 
Larry Martin had a great year, giving up 
only 16 goals in 10 games for a 1.60 
average. 

This year's fine frosh team, which ac- 
cumulated a 4-2 record, should insure a 
successful season for the '65 Booters. 



102 




GREEKS 




Greek Life Means Many Things 




To be a Greek is not a 
simple task. It is more than 
wearing Greek letters on a 
pin or a sweatshirt or a sai- 
lor hat when it rains. It is 
more than having a Greek 
insignia on your car or on 
your motor scooter. It is 
having close friendships 
and, it is having noisy fun. 
But more than this, it is 
serving . . . serving a house 
and a system and a univer- 
sity with enthusiasm and co- 
operation which is charac- 
teristic of the Greek way of 
life. 

The most important ac- 
tivity for the Greeks is 
rushing. This activity 
serves not only to strength- 
en and perpetuate the 
Greek system, but also to 
boost the spirit of co- 
operation within the exist- 
ing groups. 

UMass' system of open 
parties functions to famil- 
iarize freshmen with the 
workings of the Greek sys- 
tem and to allow upper- 
classmen to meet the 
rushees in their own sur- 
roundings. 

Formal rush officially 
begins with Round Robins 
when I.F.C. and Panhcl- 
lenic delegates conduct in- 
terested freshmen on a 
brief tour of the various 
sorority and fraternity 
houses. The members of 



Joe Rogers speaks at an Alpha Epsilon Pi smoker. 



104 



You Begin To Understand . . . 




Sisters of Sigma Kappa lead some rushees in a song. 




Spirits run high during rush. 



105 



. As A Nervous Rushee . . 



each house show rushees their living quarters and 
acquaint them with the traditions and ideals of their 
particular group. 

Rushing continues as the fraternities hold smokers 
and the sororities conduct open parties. Here the 
freshman may ask questions about the particularities 
of Greek life and may decide which group is most 
congenial for him. 

Sorority theme parties are the highlight of the rush- 




Rushees enjoy Zela Nu's hospitality. 



106 



ing season as the sisters elaborately decorate their 
houses as tropical islands or French cafes, and cos- 
tume themselves as characters from "The Arabian 
Knights" or "Alice in Wonderland." 

The serious aspect of rush begins when freshmen 
must decide which house they want to join. 

Chaos reigns again, however, as freshmen girls re- 
ceive their bids in Memorial Hall. Then the girls in- 
vade the "Hatch" for singing while the freshmen boys 



celebrate in their famous Pledge Chapel. 

Behind all the festivity and merriment of the rush 
season is the supervision of I.F.C. and PanHel who 
determine the rush policy for each year. 

This year freshmen boys could rush either first or 
second semester. However, to insure high academic 
standing within the Greek system, PanHel decided to 
conduct freshmen rush second semester. 

The main goal of these two groups is to instill a 





Bidding marks the end of the grueling rush period and the beginning of an exciting college 
life in a sorority. 



. . As A Harassed And Happy Pledge . . . 



Brothers harass Mike Goldstein. 



Danny forfeits his hair for a girl's sake during Alpha Epsilon 
Pi's "I Hate Women Week!" 




spirit of co-operation and friendship within the mem- 
bers of all Greek societies. 

After bids are accepted, hundreds of new pledge 
pins can be seen on campus. Suddenly, the sought-after 
freshman finds himself making beds, waiting on tables, 
or polishing shoes. Most spirited pledge classes organ- 
ize retaliation in the form of early morning raids and 
various other stunts. 



The pledge period is an important stage in Greek 
life. It is a period of apprenticeship where the new 
pledge must learn to work with a group to develop 
loyalties to his fraternity and friendships with his 
classmates. "Big Sisters and Brothers" are chosen to 
help the pledge during the time before he is initiated. 
After the pledge has satisfied the requirements and ac- 
cepted the responsibilities of membership, he is iniati- 



Sigma Delta Tau pledges bake cookies to raise funds for a scliolarship. 




Pledges are initiated into Kappa Alpha Theta sisterhood. 



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The sisters of Alpha Chi Omega enjoy an 
early breakfast. 



And Finally As A Proud Initiate — 



110 




Ted Jacobs, Alpha Epsilon Pi's steward, readies the night meal. 



ated and becomes an integral part of the house he 
chose. 

Within each sorority and fraternity there are a vari- 
ety of activities designed to improve the scholastic 
standing, academic atmosphere, or physical appear- 
ance of the house. Most houses have adopted a study 



hall system for pledges where they may be tutored in 
their weak subjects. Interesting professors and other 
speakers are frequent dinner guests at the sororities 
and fraternities. Informal discussion over coffee pro- 
vides an opportunity to become acquainted with the 
members of the faculty and administration. 



Ill 



You Experience Moments Of Fun 




The condition of many 
of the houses has led to an 
effort to expand Greek 
facilities on campus. Three 
new houses, Tau Epsilon 
Phi, Kappa Kappa Gamma 
and Alpha Chi Omega, 
have built accomodations 
for over fifty people. Other 
sororities and fraternities 
are making plans to ex- 
pand. At present, the old 
Q.T.V. is being torn down 
to be replaced by a more 
modern structure. Once the 
problems of zoning laws 
and other obstacles have 
been surmounted, most of 
the old wooden structures 
will be replaced by attrac- 
tive brick buildings. In the 
meantime, the ritual of 
spring cleaning is still ob- 
served at UMass. The 
warm weather finds work 
parties of girls and guys 
cleaning up their yards and 
painting their houses. They 
unite its members in work- 
ing toward success. 




Fraternity 



W^- ^ "^^ 


.9 




1 



Dishes present an ever present chore. 



112 



And Moments Of Serious Discussion 




Informal 



Living 




113 




Tuesday night bingo. 



Saturday afternoon is a good time to catch up 
on correspondence. 



You Learn —The Traditions 

Of Your House 
And Of The Greek System 



114 




H^ 




Mike Tesler voices his opinion at a house meeting. 



One of the most important persons involved in 
maintaining a spirit of warmth and friendship within a 
house is the housemother. One of the most outstanding 
new housemothers on campus is Kappa Kappa 
Gamma's Mrs. Mills. This daundess English lady has 
provided much stimulating activity within Kappa. A 



former concert pianist, Mrs. Mills has entertained sis- 
ters and their guests with her playing on numerous 
occasions. Also Alpha Chi Omega's Mrs. Sheppard 
was invaluable in her aid in decorating their new 
home. 



115 




The serious side of fraternity living is reflected in a house meeting 



Santa Claus visits Lambda Chi Alpha. 



You Give Of Yourself — 
To Your House 
And To Others . . . 



116 







Greeks sponsor annual Christmas parties to entertain children of Amherst area. 



The Greek system has made many contributions to 
outside projects on campus under the sponsorship of 
I.F.C. and PanHel. Many sorority and fraternity mem- 
bers donated blood to the Campus Blood Drive. Also 
PanHel conducted the sale of Christmas cards for 
U.N.E.S.C.O. and a clothing and book drive for Civil 
Rights. Each year at Christmas time, each sorority and 
fraternity hold a joint Christmas party for underprivi- 
leged children. The children sing carols and are treated 



to ice cream and cookies. They are also entertained by 
films of famous cartoon characters before being 
greeted by a pillow-stuffed Santa who presents them 
with many gifts. The only problem involved in this 
activity is in deciding who has more fun — the children 
or the Greeks. Every year at Student Leaders' Night, 
I.F.C. and PanHel each award a scholarship to an 
outstanding fraternity or sorority member. 



117 



. . . Through Active Participation 




Sigma Delta Tail's and Lambda Chi Alpha's take a bow after their skit. 





f 1 


i i i 1' 


i ■ 1 : 






Greeks entertain campus in IFC-PanHel skits 



There are many competitions held between the so- 
rorities and fraternities with the goal of fostering a 
healthy rivalry between the various organizations for 
possession of the coveted awards. PanHel and I.F.C. 
conduct a sing where the houses present a choral inter- 
pretation of a famous song. 

PanHel's Declamation is one of the highlights of 
feminine activity. The dramatic selections are judged 



on the interpretation and presentation of each girl. 
This year Iota Gamma Upsilon's Helen Tefs won first 
place; second place went to Loretta Jennings of 
Lambda Delta Phi; and Donna Logue of Kappa Alpha 
Theta and Merry Halsted of Pi Beta Phi tied for third 
place. 

For the first time this year I.F.C. and PanHel 
worked together in producing the skits held in Novem- 



118 




Half time strategy planning at an IFC football game. 



ber. Kappa Alpha Theta and Q.T.V. won the competi- 
tion with their hilarious interpretation of "Shindig." 

Greeks compete for honors in the sports world. So- 
rority teams vie for first place in basketball and base- 
ball. Also, girls can win points for their house by 
swimming or entering in the Powder PufT Hockey game 
held on Winter Carni Weekend. The fraternities com- 
pete in all intramural sports from football to basketball 



and baseball. This year the UMass intramural cham- 
pions, Kappa Sigma, defeated the U.V.M. intramural 
champions Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

On big weekends, Greeks compete for honors for 
their floats on Homecoming, their snow sculptures on 
Winter Carni and their chariots on Greek Week. 

The I.F.C.-PanHel scholarship trophies are awarded 
to the house with the highest average each year. 



119 



It Is Not All Giving 




The Greek social life generally consists of fraternity 
parties and exchange suppers. Improvisions in the 
form of theme parties lend variety to these events. 
Beta Kappa Phi's Farmer's Frolic, Theta Chi's Bowery 



120 



Ball or Sadie Hawkins Day, and of course the univer- 
sal Mass Grass arc exciting social events. 

Friday night exchange suppers usually become pizza 
parties, toboggan slides, or oldie but goodie sessions. 



There Is A Lot To Be Gained . . . 



Fraternity parties highlight weekend activities. 




This year Chi Omega held a sundae parlor where 
everyone was invited to partake of their ice cream cre- 
ations. Kappa Alpha Theta held an open house with 
entertainment provided by Steve and the Esquires to 



introduce their new pledges to the campus. Kappa 
Kappa Gamma followed suit with an open Hootenany 
for their pledges. 



121 





Zeta Nu and Beta Kappa Phi display good Greek form in the Greek Weekend Chariot races. 




From The Spirit Of Enthusiastic Fun 



The climax of the Greek social season is Greek 
Week. Festivities are kicked off by a mass exchange 
with members of the various houses having dinner at 
other houses. 

The Greek Banquet finds toga (or Gordon Linen) 
clad representatives of sororities and fraternities dining 



in the Student Union. 

Friday night there is the formal Greek Ball where 
the queen is crowned. 

The UMass version of the Olympic Games are held 
on Saturday with the fraternities competing in the 
chariot races. 



122 







Among the Greeks a pinning is occasion for a dunking 
in the campus pond — no matter the season. 





«a*»r- 




And Quiet Friendship Of The Greek Life 



Saturday night fraternity parties are transmuted to 
the weekend by couples dancing in togas. 

The Greek Concert on Sunday marks the end of the 
weekend. The spirit of the entire week exemplifies one 
of the finest aspects of Greek life. 

The spirit of enthusiasm and co-operation extended 



not only to members of one's particular group, but to 
all Greeks is the ultimate goal of the Greek system. 
Inside and outside activities, scholarship and competi- 
tion comprise the ingredients which solidify the spirit 
of enthusiastic fun and quiet friendship the Greek sys- 
tem provides. 



123 



Sorority: Education In Social Living 



"A sorority is a place to eat and live 
with the same people. It provides an edu- 
cation in social living ... in living with 
different types of people in a limited en- 
\ironment. 

"The sorority's major function is social 
... an interaction with people. 

'"As a freshman I joined because of 
the social benefits that I could get from 
the house. As a rushee, I was told about 
sisterhood, but I soon learned it wasn't 
all true. I consider the girls in the house 
as friends, not sisters. I wasn't dissolu- 
tioned ... I learned a simple fact of 
Ufe — that you can't love everyone ... I 
also learned how to work with everyone 
to achieve a specific goal. 

"As a senior, much of the meaning of 
sorority that I once held sacred has been 
lost . . . this is a process of maturing 
and changing ones values. 

"Some people lose their identity as an 
individual by becoming a Greek . . . this 
is true in many cases but much of it is 
imagined . . . you gain from some and 
give to others." 




:-0^' 





Diane Driscoll, Senior, Chi Omega 



124 



Fraternity: Means Of Identification 



"The fraternity provides a means of 
identification for a person that the cam- 
pus cannot provide . . . your scope of 
Hving is defined whereas on campus it is 
not . . . you are able to move more 
freely while living in the house. You also 
learn to live with many different types of 
people in a close environment. 

"As a freshman, I joined the fraternity 
not only because it was the thing to do, 
but because I wanted to limit my sur- 
roundings ... to be identified with 
something. 

"Fraternities function largely as a so- 
cial entity. Freshman want wild parties; 
sophomores want the same thing; but by 
junior year these parties get ridiculous — 
you look for something more refined. As 
a senior, you become a little apathetic 
. . . you've outgrown the fraternity and 
begin to look ahead . . . this is all a pro- 
cess of growing up. 

"The meaning of brotherhood is the 
association of a group of people belong- 
ing to an organization maintaining and 
working for the same goals . . . these 
goals are directed to upholding the fra- 
ternity house as a successful competitor 
within the fraternity system." 





Joel Rice, Senior, Alpha Epsilon Pi 



125 



"The Greek system is growing 
in that it is adding more organ- 
izations into the system . . . this 
is vital to maintain security. 

'The system is dying in that 
its poUtical influence on campus 
has decreased . . . maybe this is 
good but it also can be due to a 
lack of interest among its mem- 
bers. There should be equal in- 
terest for the house and for the 
University. You are not only a 
member of a house but also a 
member of the University com- 
munity." 




Growing? 



Dy i ng? 



7 





The fraternity system is under 
the control of the University Ad- 
ministration; fraternity functions 
fall under University jurisdiction. 
Despite these limitations, how- 
ever, the system is doing quite 
well. 

"I n t e r -h o u s c competition 
unites the houses. Although they 
are competing against each other 
for prestige, they are continu- 
ously strengthening the system 
by bettering themselves." 



Then 



It 



Is 



Theirs 




127 




Theirs 
To 
Cultivate 
Friendship 



Theirs 

To 

Learn 

Responsibility 

And 

Leadership 



Theirs 

To 
Mature 



128 




Henry C. Hyde, William C. Starkweather, President; George G. Dan Melley, Karol Wisheiski, Lawrence Rhoades, John Martin, Carl 
Rogers, Manager; Jeffrey A. Kudsk, Steven R. Graham. Missing: Lombardo. Robert Bennent, Robert Healy. 



FRATERNITY MANAGERS ASSOCIATION 



Fraternity Managers Association is the- cooperative 
buying association for all UMass fraternities and five 
sororities. FMA is headed by a joint student-faculty 
Board of Directors which decides on policy matters 
pertaining to fraternity operations. 

Food, house supplies, physical maintenance equip- 
ment and fuel are purchased on the cooperative plan, 
using the Greek's combined buying volume to purchase 
goods at a much lower cost than the retail market 
could provide. 

The FMA is operated by Mr. George Rogers, Fra- 
ternity Manager. Mr. Rogers has established numerous 
varied services in the FMA in addition to central buy- 
ing. Billing systems, which are especially designed for 
this campus, a central collection agency for student 
payments, financial advice to chapter treasurers, menu 



planning information, references and recommendations 
for cooks and housemothers, advice on the completion 
of state and local tax forms, and information on the 
establishment and availability of house corporations 
and new or remodeled housing are available through 
the fraternity manager. 

The success of FMA on this campus has been noted 
on college campuses across the nation. Most campuses 
have seen the benefits that may be derived from the 
cooperative buying system, and UMass has become the 
model for these systems. 

At other campuses, Mr. Rogers has been called to 
advise fraternity men and their advisors in the forma- 
tion of similar organizations. He has formulated the 
plans for a cooperative buying system and has directed 
its initiation. 



129 



SORORITY PRESIDENTS 




Seated: V. Mallison, R. Lawson, E. Hastings. Standing: L. Fisher, L. Bodwcll, R. Polish. 
Missing: K. Meehan, S. Morse, K. Osterburg, L. Acardi. 



PAN HELLENIC COUNCIL 




.•>c-«/crf; L. McCarthy, S. Minich. N. Downing, J. Zenis, President; Harrison, Vice-PrcsidenI; D. Biirlin, C. Cady, S. Knight, E. Johnson, 
Sue Morash, Treasurer; Joan Bracher. Standing: M. Lockhart, S. Secretary. 
Schmaltz, J. Curns, S. Morris, J. Seddon, L, Arnold. Missing: R. 



130 



FRATERNITY PRESIDENTS 




Seated: B. Capocci, J. Kudsk, D. Healy, B. Garrity, S. Graham. Standing: D. Furush, L. 
Kalevitch, B. McNeil, B. Dallas, N. Carpenter, B. Fiedler. B. Hall, K. Burke. 



INTER FRATERNITY COUNCIL 




First Row: K. Burke, B. Najam, D. Healy, S. Graham. R. Wiberg, L. Third Row: A. Burne, L. Kalevitch, I. Barbutt, D. Paquin, J. Smith, 
Stevens. Second Row: A. Nordberg. J. Webster, J. Rice, S. Monsein, D. Rooney, B. Glass, A. Reid, P. Ponte, J. Slack. 
J. Gardner, D. Greco, P. Ginsberg, L. Hirsch, R. Murphy, J. Reed. 



131 



ALPHA CHI OMEGA 




First Row: E. Fiske, S. Posius. K. O'Sullivan, B. Salome, E. Blanchette, 
C. Atwood. Second Ron-: P. Ostromecki, L. Schmidt, A. Beaupre, S. 
Bodwell, P. Hinton. D. Salvucci, E. Tuttle. Third Row: M. Lavalette, L. 
Willis. L. V'anderwerf. C. Jandris, Vice-President; Mrs. V. Sheppard, 
Housemother: L. Bodwell. President; C. Cody, J. Lodico, Treasurer; J. 
Hitchins. Fourth Row: C. Eggers, Secretary; L. Stetson, H. Wechter, M. 



J. White, J. Kramer, M. Jordan, C. Poshkus, M. McGovern, E. Stawasz, 
N. Reid. Fifth Row: K. Ganutis, M. Soule, A. Cygan, M. Atwater, M. 
McDonald, M. Gibson, M. Dunston, E. MacDbugall, M. Harrigan, S. 
Hanlon, M. Kook. Sixth Row: R. Dreiblatt, M. Ward, J. Panttila, C. 
Evans, A. Yakavonis, B. Esielionis, B. Jann, D. Phyllides, M. Grepp, E. 
McClung, B. Fultz. 



CHI OMEGA 




First Row: K. Furness. P. Carey. K. Hamilton. K. Pallcn. S. Scanlon. 
D. Burlin, K. Eickhorn, L. Pelrci. Vice-President; Mrs. Edward Young. 
Housemother; K. Mcchan, President; J. Ryan, Treasurer; J. Walsh, K, 
Manning, S. Penney. Second Row: K. Yukna, P. Hadley, S. Allen, C. 
Riley. S. Henry. A. Bontcmpo, D. Alvarez, K. Longhi, B. Blake, L. 



Sweeney. V. lippncr. E. Diggle. Tliird Row: B. Bryan, S. Lydon, E. 
Howe, B. Capriole, B. Engel, P. Mosack. M. Kcldman, K. Patitz, K. 
Sciscento, S. Olson, S. Tharl. Fourth Row: B. Policow, B. Koza, A. 
Shcrwin, I.. Small, M. Siitlicrfoot, C . Yukna, S. Smith. M. Lockhart, C. 
Carroll, K. Miller, D. Wunikainen. 



132 



ALPHA EPSILON PI 




First Row: M. Paris, M. Dillon, D. Greengold, N. Sampson, M. Rose, 
M. Kaplan, T. Ufland, L. Click, N. Strauss. Second Row: B. Cohen, A. 
Lebowitz, M. Hecht, F. Nesvet. Treasurer; J. Rosenthal, Secretary; H. 
Shapiro, President; Mrs. H. Tully, Housemother; L. Kalevitch, Vice- 
President; M. Tesler, S. Cohen, P. Griff, E. Linde, T. Weinberg, P. 
Fleishman. Third Row: L. Davidson, M. Schwartz, P. Rodman, J. Par- 



nell, J. Gale, J. Darack, J. Shapiro, B. Hurwitz, S. Karp. Fourth Row: 
B. Rubin, J. Rice, M. Goldstein, L. Marshall, S. Wassersug, M. Paris, D. 
Cotton, L. Ginns, D, Goodman, R. Bloom. Fifth Row: S. Abrams, A. 
Stein, A. Kadish, S. Pyenson. S. Brecher, A. White. M. Swartz, T. 
Jacobs, R. Blitzer, P. Freedman, G. Ferguson, S. Rispler, M. Klickstein, 
R. Jacobsohn. 



ALPHA SIGMA PHI 



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First Row: A. Lavorgna, K. Tarabelli, E. Grunburg, R. Shuhan, D. 
Klein, Vice-President; N. Carpenter, President; Mrs. R. Peters, House- 
mother, T. Orsi, Treasurer; H. Davis, R. Delaney, P. Glastridge, S. 
Brown, T. Lachowicz, J. Lazarovich. Second Row: D. Porteous, J. 
Cunningham, I. Leighton. D. DeHart, D. Feindel, A. Hawes, P. Crotty, 



R. Allen. G. Driscoll, R. Lasky. Third Row: A. Dillon, D. Jarre, G. 
Heller, J. Bates, B. Hickman, B. Connors, A. Bartlett, T. Hofmann, R. 
Gittins, D. Wilcox. Fourth Row: P. Grosso, W. Hennessey, R. Ward, P. 
Lamb, J. Murphy, J. Juby, B. Currie, N. Komich, R. Harriman, R. 
Parmenter, J. DeCellis, J. Lennon. 



133 



ALPHA TAU GAMMA 





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fi>5/ Row: L. Stevens. T. Napoli, Secretary: R. Hall, President; Mrs. L. 
Whitsitt. House Mother: D. Paquin, Vice-President; D. Spencer, Trea- 
surer: E. Toombs, C. Bourne. Second Row: H. Allison, D. Scaca, J. 
Kirkman, J. Johnson, P. Di Pietro, J. Hugnes, B. Bassett, W. Horton, C. 
Zombas, B. Barry. Third Row: W. Robblee, D. Howard, H. Sibley, J. 



Chamberlin, T. Sullivan, J. Sylvia, J. Frydman, J. Bonan, J. Solz, G. 
Cookson, G. Prevost. Fourth Row: R. Callen, J. Boldebook, R. Kubiak, 
B. Snow, J. Hardt, E. Carpenter, S. Birch, S. Parker, M. Bobola, E. 
Bingham. 



BETA KAPPA PHI 




First Row: J. Mann. B. Najam. V. Larkin. Vice-President; J. Kallstrom. 
President: R. Marble. Secretary; R. Peters, Treasurer; A. Reid, C. Spot. 
Second Row: H. Tweed. A. Labrie, T. Wardrop, J. Murphy, J. Dowst, 
G. De Faico, J, Daly. S. Boiteau. L. Caldeira. Third Row: C. Mokinen, 
R. Bailey, D. Sikorski, A. Pontoon, D. Bush, R. Grable, C. Carswell, D. 



Lewis, B. Bolducci, C. Whip, C. Overshoe. Foiinli Row: N. MacLeod, 
K. Stevens, N. Eggcrt, S. Handy, C. Carswell, R. Desrochers, D. 
Adams, B. Reera, P. Fitzpatrick, P. Read. Fifth Row: R. Wietccia, B. 
Fiedler. J. Cee, C. Williams, D. Twig, L. Casscrini, B. Bigonc, A. 
Borshun, S. Crotis, H. Allard. A. Nordberg. .S. Albert, G. Bell. 



134 



IOTA GAMMA UPSILON 




First Row: C. Sakakeeny. Vice-President; N. Jansen, Treasurer; V. 
Mallison, President; Mrs. M. Montanari, Housemother; S. Morash, C. 
Petrucci, Secretary; J. Rosata, Vice-President. Second Row: H. Tefs, P. 
Bish, K. Aucoin. J. Stein, L. McCarthy, C. Etters, N. Bloom, M. 
Shapter, N. Pero, C. Kari, C. Rose, C. Durna. Third Row: K. Johnson, 



P. Ponte, J. Ferris, D. Huebel, L. Heady, J. Brachett, C. Hammond, S. 
Ferrara, N. Morin, A. CarHsee, J. Carr. Fourth Row: S. Barrett, S. 
BonelH, J. Dixon, S. Commons, A. Stawicki, F. Cisek, H. Radowicz, E. 
Lucas, C. Malley, V. Coleman, M. Davis, W. Neilson. 



KAPPA ALPHA THETA 




First Row: J. Sowa, J. Kerr, Treasurer; P. Barry, K. Scandiffio. S. 
Coflan, M. Potvin. Second Row: N. Downing, A. Sutherland, Secretary; 
J. Ross, Secretary; B. Jonas, Vice-President; Mrs. Atwood, Housemother; 
E. Hastings, President; V. Spence, P. Cox, N. Mahlman, E. Bello. Third 
Row: N. Wright, H. Cassoli, C. Holtzman, J. Sharpe, E. Glynn, L. 



Farnh, R. Farrell, A. Malone, J. Bailey, C. O'Malley, A. Schwalen- 
stocker. FoiirtJi Row: B. Bello, C. Chaisty, D. Wilder, J. Rogers, E. 
Garvey, N. Hennessey. S. Catto, C. Pease, B. Taska, J. Destefano, D. 
Dube. Fifth Row: J. Mutti, B. Dadoly, B. Butler, D. Logue, P. Farrell, 
S. Whitcomb, K. Klimas, J. Curns, C. Shuman. 



135 



KAPPA SIGMA 




First Row: F. Gort. L. McCormick, Treasurer; J. Dee. R. Boo, C. Face, 
B. McDonough, B. Dallas. Second Row: E. Godek, J. Johanson, R. 
Brooks. S. Neck, R. Caisse. B. Sylvester, G. Street. Tliird Row: B. 



Leap, B. Shortgun. G. Linenin. R. Nelson, L. Goosh, F. City, R. Gums, 
B. Rooster. Fourth Row: K. Kamena. T. Van Norton, B. Murphy, W. 
Crane. M. Brita, M. Bailey, S. Mitchell, B. Cleary. 



LAMBDA CHI ALPHA 




First Row: S. Williams. W. DiCarlo, P. Kelley, H. Rosenficld, V. 
Donohue. Second Row: B. Leland, R. Ek, E. Sternowski, K. Lyons, 
Mrs. M. Moody, Housemother; R. Repeta, President; R. Taylor, Vice- 
President; P. Varin. J. Korcngel, Treasurer. Third Row: D. Clarke, J. 
Bisbee, R. Hatfield, R. Leete, D. Rooney, B. Fleischner, J. Farrell, A. 



Palatino, C. Monnier, J. Robinson. Fourth Row: P. Celi, J. Davis, L. 
Shaw, J. Striano, C. Long, P. Dougherty, G. Wolf, T. Theriault, D. 
Hertz. /•'////; Row: C. Avakian, B. Keating, D. Sampson, J, Lanson, T. 
Gar, M. Lundin, D. Fenanti, D. Vasil, P. Christie, W. Berglund. 



136 



PHI MU DELTA 




First Row: P. Cutting, D. Gould, C. Short, J. Mine, G. Morrison, D. 
Eaton. Second Row: A. DeLibero, R. Rose, J. Gardiner, Treasurer; R. 
Sherman, Vice-President; Mrs. K. Mann, Housemother; W. Capoui, 
President; D. Slate, Secretary; J. Thundberg, P. Joyce, G. Maloney. 
Tliird Row: J. Fusco, D. Briggs, J. Saart; B. Gale, V. Ascolillo, R. 



Windzka, J. Sullivan, D. Gibbs, V. Greenan, P. Leach. Foiirtli Row: D. 
Rice, D. Kershaw, J. Scherban, B. Zuckerman, G. Oliosi, D. Dacey, W. 
Vannah, P. Healy, J. Blodgett, C. Ciosek. Fifth Row: R. Wood, G. 
McNeill, A. Barton, D. Maegelin, D. Whitworth, D. Connors, J. Pea- 
cock, G. Darling, F. Guidara, B. Boaroman, B. Peoples. 



PHI SIGMA DELTA 




First Row: R. Rodriguez, B. Klickstein, P. Benson, R. Robinson, Secre- 
tary; O. Pawluk, Vice-President; E. Finley, President; E. Hanson, Trea- 
surer; L. Hirsh, Secretary; S. Whitkin, W. Englich. Second Row: J. 
Marquis, R. Fortier, P. Ginsburg, P. Paisner, K. Ross, R. Furash, L. 



Shabman, R. Lerner. Tliird Row: E. Frankl, S. Ezer, T. Dabrowski, G. 
Bliss, J. Shagoury, H. Mednicor. S. Drucker. Foiutit Row: J. Campbell, 
T. Andre, W. Troupe, M. Parker, W. Foisy, R. Goldfarb, R. Rogers, G. 
Creem, M. Southwick. 



137 



KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 




First Row: R. Brown. Vice-President; N. Niziak, Secretary: C. Viens, 
Mrs. K. Mills. Housemother: L. Fisher, President: K. Harrison, J. Bick- 
ley. P. McShane. Second Row: N. Olivier, B. VanGelder, A. Schulte, M. 
Ward. S. Kansas. C. Willis. S. Abernathy. M. Bell, J. Kwapien. Third 



Ron-: C. Jarvela, M. Robison, S. Graham, L. A. Latham, N. Oikelmus, 
S. Bascom, M. Stacy, S. Minich, M. A. Carme, P. Kane. Fourth Row: 
C. Ricci, S. Jones, M. Holovak, J. Furnans, R. Gile, D. Tarrant, L. 
Wall, M. Carlson. D. Diiffin. P. Seibert. 



LAMBDA DELTA PHI 




First Row: J. Brown, Secretary; L. Jennings, M. Stewart, Secretary; R. 
Polish. President; J. White. Vice-President; F. Savage, Treasurer; L. 
Weaver. Vice-President; J. Stevens. Second Row: A. Wong, L. Buck- 
man, R. Cerulli, B. Snyder, J. Wood, C. David, S. Tucci. Third Row: i. 



Graziano, F. Bassil, J. Shusta, D. Pimental, J. Campbell, J. Gosselin, D. 
Parker. Fourth Row: D. Gorenflo, J. Keough, J. Bracker, C. A. Bollen- 
bach, N. Grillo, C. Hcnnigar, K. Cohen. 



138 



PHI SIGMA KAPPA 




First Row: P. Clifford, R. Markham. R. Smith, Mrs. E. Chatel, House- 
mother; J. Batts, President; D. Maloy, J. Nichols, D. Corna. Second 
Row: B. Harding, G. Goulart, J. Enneguess, R. Whitney, P. Ruggs, J. 
Dolar, A. Wolfson, E. Kennedy, R. Goldberg. Third Row: S. Robinson, 



W. Cassidy, W. Derosa, M.Lavelle, R. Lawson, R. Gibbons, E. Leger, 
G. Cummins. Fourth Row: W. Swanson, J. O'Connell, P. Backstrom, 
W. McKenna, C. Litchfield, R. Rost, M. Fisher, A. Fesuk, P. Breen. 



QT V 




First Row: P. Ditchett, R. Hopkirk, Secretary; W. Chenard, R. Vanasse, 
R. Athanas. Second Row: H. Wolfe, A. Bowen, Treasurer; P. McClure, 
W. Goebel, President; Miss Garvey, Housemother; T. Clark, Vice-Presi- 
dent; M. Manson, R. Mason. Third Row: W. Donaruma, S. Wyman, R. 
Rosenblatt, B. Healy, J. Hickey, H. Knutsen, W. Young, G. Thonet, R. 



Niederjohn, M. Moran. Fourth Row: S. Clicaine, R. Allen, L. Michale- 
wich, R. Galluccio, J. Lavoie, D. Gatonska, H. Sopel, J. Webster, B. 
Kellogg, R. Clements. Fiftli Row: G. Crook, B. Lunch, R. Bugenhagen, 
M. Shaughnessy, F. Stick, D. Johnson, G. Goodwin, S. Hall, R. Hill- 
berg, R. Lyonnais, C. Stain. 



139 



SIGMA ALPHA MU 




First Rom-: J. Hartstone. B. Bernstein, President; L. Eisler, Vice-Presi- A. Lipson. Third Row: N. Trump, N. Ephraim, K. Berk, R. Jacobs, B. 
dent: S. Shor. Treasurer: T. Winstanley, Secretary; A, Bronstein. Second SchifF, R. Geitcie, L. Goldberg. 
Row: P. Hoffmann. S. Carp, R. Singer, S. Gordon, J. Slack, B. Wexler, 



SIGMA PHI EPSILON 



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First Row: L. Kurtzman, P. Donovan, T. Fraticelli, S. Youngfellow, 
Dog; S. Lanza, B. Sitek, P. Carroll. Second Row: J. Putney, D. Stack- 
house, A. Kludjian, G. Peterson, H. Iwanowicz, R. Wilbur, P. Mador. 
Third Row: S. Collings, J. Murphy, D, Bushc, Secretary; M. Chulada, 
Vice-President; W. Garrily, President; B. Buxbuam, W. Green, C. Lom- 
bardo, F, Lewis, B. Pudio, M. Jacobson. Fourth Row: R. Younicll, T. 



Schwartz, E. Harrington, R. Brophy, P. Loring, T. Murphy, D. Van 
Howe, S. Bempter, M. Szostak, J. Reed, R. Berry. Fifth Row: D. 
Cummings, W. Houk, R. Franson, G. Tcnczar, D. Nivcn, J. Hurley, T. 
DelVisco, E, Naguszewski, J. Peterson. Sixth Row: R. Joslin, J. Camp- 
bell, J. Gaffey, J. Capclcss, C. Gibson, K. Saila, E. Goodhue, H. Soghig- 
ian, J. Kellar, M. Pitoniak, 1). Murphy. 



140 



PI BETA PHI 




First Row: K. Wessman, P. Hartmann, G. McLean, Vice-President; K. 
Osterberg, President; Mrs. H. Cheyne, Housemother; D. Bangs. Treas- 
urer; T. Wright, Secretary; P. Vernell, S. Farley. Second Row: V. 
DiFruscio. E. Hatch. P. Seibal, L. Martin. E. Shelley, K. McCarty, B. 



Stokes. M. Wyatt, K. Lamond. Third Row: G. Tomaselli, K. Watson, S. 
Neet. J. Proctor. C. Gennari, C. Swift. J. Stumpf. K. Leach. C. Dzioba. 
Fourth Row: D. Mick. M. A. Kuczynski. J. Scafati, S. Berry. J. Jufferds. 
B. Shafer. A. Jordan. C, Wiggins. J. Nagle, G. Mirick. 



SIGMA DELTA TAU 

1^ 




First Row: S. Tye. P. Flanagan. J. Goldman. B. Veneri. M. Rubin. B. 
Rothman, S. Haven. M. Goldman. Second Row: J. Zenis, S. Lepowe, P. 
Chace, Secretary; D. Lindbergh. Secretary; Mrs. N. Moreau, House- 
mother; S. Morse, President; S. Glickman, Vice-President; A. Posner, 
Vice-President; P. Hughes. Third Row: C. Rudge, G. Moseon, P. Owen, 
E. Needleman, L.Mokaba, J. Greenfield, B. Berkovich, L. Slesinger, D. 



Abraham, Lois Mogel. Fourth Row: L. Saltman, G. Freedlander, B. 
Finkelstein, L. Brown, J. Frieden, G. Gordon, L. Kelberman, B. Gold- 
berg. D. Mogel, B. Pearson, K. Liner, S. Berkowitz. Fifth Row: B. 
Barnett, L. Laskey, N. Smolen, A. Kaplan, L. Ferreira, L. Leventhal, E. 
Paster, L. Prouty, J. Novack, J. Gilman, L. Lazin. 



141 



TAU EPSILON PI 




First Ron: R. Hubley. S. Glassman, S. Snieder. Second Row: D. Banks, 
D. Balanoff. B. Sokolove, D. Kasoff. Treasurer; Mrs. "B," Housemother; 
S. Graham. President; B. Greenberg. Vice-President; A. Cohen. R. Rap- 
paport. Third Row: B. Klemer. J. Uretsky, Secretary; S. Shimberg, D. 
Calef. D. Grieco, R. Leavitt, G. Kaplan. L. Horvitz, R. Snyder, D. 



Najjar. B. Rothstein. Fourth Row: B. Wolk. B. Epstein. S. Monsein. B. 
Lowe, U. Fanrquard, A. Fravus, S. Miller, R. Aron, B. Morrison, G. 
Rush. Fifth Row: R. Dwyer, J. McHale, J. Mullin, J. Leabman, T. 
Edwards. E. Freednian. F. Stewart. R. Swartz. M. MoUiver, P. Hopkins. 



TAU KAPPA EPSILON 




First Row: F. Phito. K. Millette. P. Valeri, R. Leonard, F. Shaar, W. Crocker, P. C haniheilain. V. Nero, G. Bourgeois. W. Merino. H. 



Lyford. C. Noonan, C. MacPherson. Second Row: G. Patterson, B. 
BeaL L. Raymond, G. Butler, T, Marino, D. Wcstall, J. Zaleski, M. 
Sullivan, P. Boni, E. Murphy. Third Row: G. Sullivan, I. GarbunI, H 
Kelley, H. Serpa. Treasurer: D, Brown, Vice-President; Mrs. L. Alton, 
Housemother; D. Healey, President; B. Hcaly. D. Kutchukian, B. 
Morse. D. Tabb, A. Burone, B, Nicte. Fmirth Raw: B. fonnor. R. 



Forand, D. Lasasse, F. Fitzgerald, E. Mcllo, A. Raymond, P. Toomey, 
R. C aproni. Fifth Row: J, Reynolds, R. Trusscll, B. Thayer, N. Pappas, 
P. C aisse, F. Foley, B. Stella, D. Stearley, C. Wy.ser, B. Irving, D. 
(ilagowski. Ken l.indberg, B. Cowern. Sixlli Row: F. Smith, R. Qualey, 
D, Smith, J. Pollins, D. Paduchowski, D. Doolcy. B. Burgess, M. Karl- 
son, S. Anderson, J, Hugill, J. Ryan, B. Stokes. 



142 



THETA CHI 



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First Row: T. McKenna, B. Larson, J. Devine, R. Ladd, D. Mulcahy, J. 
Edmands. Second' Row: P. DeMariano, E. DeMore, D. Campbell, D. 
Kish, P. Spears, B. Howard, W. Gammell, E. Zanchi. Third Row: A. 
Dedousis, B. Houoe, W. Benube, D. Hinckley, L. Charest, Secretary; J. 
Kudst, President; M. Smith, Vice-President; R. LaPierre, Treasurer; M. 
MacMann, T, McMahon, K. Johnson, R. Kelly, J. McShane, J. Harris. 



Foiirtli Row: P. Fified, B. Hoff, J. McGarry, D. Meeker, D. Migliaccid, 
H. MacCaughey, E. Graney, G. Surprenant. J. Zdanowicz. Fifth Row: 
M. Scafati, J. McAvoy, R. Bernier, J. Leary, B. Hillson, J. Murphy. I. 
Yavner, J. Meilbye, T. MacDonald, R. Gothage. Sixth Row: J. Belforti, 
W. Gaughan, E. Rushbrook, B. Bernard, D. Warren, H. Authelet, J. 
O'Reilly, J. McKenna, J. Kuczynski, D. Campbell. D. Glaser. 



ZETA NU 




First Row: W. Graff, P. Sargent, K. McCormack, Solomon, Dog; R. 
Keough, R. Durocher, E. Teittinen, E. Sisson. Second Row: W. Radul- 
ski, R. Carr, D. Bond, A. Piecewicz, F. Prince, Secretary; Mrs. L. Stack, 
Housemother; R. Gaudreau, President; R. Scott, Treasurer; C. Sisson, 



C. Rudick. i. Busineau, J. Antil. Fourth Row: R. Crockett, D. Daisy, J. 
MacLean, J. Henning, B. Dunn. G. St. Martin. R. Bjorklund. J. Healy, 
G. .Mollory, J. West. Fifth Row: B. Weiser, B. Miller, J. Ledwick, P. 
Macomber, D. Callahan, W. Orszak, T. Albert, P. Beagen, David Rohrs, 



Vice-President; R. Landry, J. Lawrence. Third Row: T. Gastone, A. J. T. Kinsella, B. Potter. 
Gosselin, D. Hultin, M. Ruberto, R. Edmonston, S. Riemer, K. Keeler, 



143 



SIGMA KAPPA 




First Row: B. Booth. J. Dill. S. Dietch, M. Lasher. N. Stevens, P. 
Appicelli. E. Doyle. Second Row: A. Pinkul. N. Baron, Secretary; M. 
Sullivan. Vice-President; L. Arcardi. President; M. Carroll, Vice-Presi- 
dent: W. Hall, Secretary: C. Geletka. Treasurer: M. Fuller. Third Row: 
S. Rossi. D. Johan. M. C. Lundberg, J. Papuga, S. Howe, S. Slayton, C. 



Belonis, E. Rosenblatt. Fourth Row: B. Ennis, M. Mouth, G. Moron, J. 
Norman, C. L. Broom, C. Bohlin, J, Ferry, L. Gustafson, J. Glossa. 
Fifth Row: A. Sheasgreen, C. Cronin, J. McLaughlin, J. Robinson, K. 
Mitchell, C. A. Caron, C. Schmidt, A. Haveles, C. Leavitt, L. Bylund, 
A. Levin. 



SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA 




First Row: J. Davis, R. Anone, D. Arsenault, J. Janik, M. Giuniara, M. 
Miller, J. Cummings, J. Chaples, J. Beaulieu. Second Row: S. Elder, D. 
Bush. D, Carey. M. Putis, Treasurer; R. Lawson, President; Mrs. A. 
Drake. Housemother; S. Berenson, Vice-President; J. Hripak, C, Hulton, 
N. Ramsledl, B. Eastman, O. Tibbetts, S, Longfellow, Third Row: M. 
Depelteau, J. Latino, M. Kane, C. Wakwitz, B. Lanyon, M. Prcnlice, M. 



Grant, B. Rnos, M. Dugan, L. Cohen, E. Klinker. I'oiirlh Row: S. 
Pelland, J. Kostek, M. Leonard, K. Forsburg, F. Barker, M. Moseley, B. 
Leary, S. Nordstrom, G. Drummond, N. Elwell, J. Felio. Fifth Row: E. 
Boisjolie, M, Sweeney, J. Friar, C. Olsen, K, l-'lood, M. McAdams, 
Elizabeth Wormwood, K. Grant. M. O'Connell, M. Netinho, M. Briggs, 
A. Burke. 



144 




HOUSING 




The Potential Dynamicism of 8000 
An Intensity Of Living Experience 




In the experiment called the 
University Experience, one often 
overlooked variable has been the 
potential dynamicism in the 
community living manner of 
8000 undergraduates. 

These four mobile, mercurial 
years are for many the first and 
last opportunity to interact with 
the full spectrum of American 
pluralism, in class, on the field, 
at meetings and dances. 

But not insignificant are the 
place and mode of day to day 
living in dormitory, fraternity, 
apartment or home. 

The physical facts of housing 
accommodations provide a bar- 
ometer to the probable intensity 
of interaction in this living ex- 
perience. 

During the 1964-65 academic 
year, 13 women's and 15 men's 
dormitories housed over !2800 
women and 3100 men (not in- 
cluding 280 Stockbridge students 
in two dormitories). An addi- 
tional 500 men and 300 women 
lived in fraternity or sorority 
houses. There were thus about 
200 women and over 600 men 
living in off-campus apartments 
or commuting from home. 

To the almost 800 undergrad- 
uates provided for, may be 
added some 2200 Graduate stu- 
dents living almost entirely off- 
campus. 

In 30 University dormitories 
built to house 5890 students, 
statistics for October of 1964 
showed that 6226 students were 
accommodated. Crowded? Sure, 
but less so than in the preced- 
ing academic year. In 1963-64, 
26 dormitories set for normal 
occupancy of 4502, were hold- 
ing (based on figures for Sep- 
tember of 1963) 5473 students 
— nearly 1 000 extra students. 



The storm before the calm — Orchard 
Hill as it looked in September of 
1964, before contractors had cleared 
the field lo leave the area to students. 



Undergraduates In Close Quarters- - 
Prelude To The Stability Of Later Life 





There is hardly an end in sight to the growth of this massive, 
sprawling complex. Future student housing, say officials, will be nur- 
tured in the southwestern corner of the campus where the angular 
outhnes of "Project 4" are already climbing skyward. 

"Project 4" includes four 4-story dormitories aimed at a comple- 
tion date in August of 1965 and two 22-story dorms aimed at readi- 
ness in July of 1966. The six halls will house another 1885 students. 
Accompanying them will be a new dining hall for 850, to be opened 
in January of 1966. 

Three more, of the towering high-rise dormitories will be ready to 
accommodate 1728 students in August of 1966; at about the same 
date, a dining hall for 850 is expected to be ready for customers. 

Also on the boards, says Housing Officer John Welles, is a long 
low-rise residence hall and another high-rise one, to hold 1102 stu- 
dents in August of 1967, and in the further future three more low- 
rise residences and another dining hall. 

In all, he states. University housing accommodations should pro- 
vide for another 5276 students between now and September of 
1968. Man, that's big business. 

A view on Orchard Hill (left). Dorm recreation rooms are common places 
for study for students (above). 

147 



The Bric-A-Brac 
Of Daily Living-- 



Only a fraction of a day is spent in the class room. It is the 
activities of other hours which will make or break the goal of the 
University experiment — the hoped for response of consciousness and 
conscience in each subject which define the 'educated' individual 
(educated for living as well as earning a living). 

The long, exciting, and frequently subversive, thoughts of youth 
are enriched, erased, and reflected no where so clearly as in the 
student's spare moment pleasures and pastimes, friendships and bric- 
a-brac of personal taste and distaste. 

And in these moments, the student is effectively or ineffectively 
the master of his own development. 

A multitude of extra-curricular events and activities provide one 
creative and educative outlet for many students. 

The University has provided another multitude of integrating ac- 
tivities and social taboos within housing quarters. Events, social and 
competitive, under sponsorship of the Women's Interdorm Council, 
such as the Women's Inter-dorm Sing, activities under direction of 
the officers and counselors of each dormitory — dances, speakers, 
Homecoming floats and Winter Carnival snow sculptures — provide 
entertainment and an opportunity to socialize for those who enjoy 
such outlets. 

Dormitory regulations, especially for University women, are 
vearly a topic of comment and controversy. A handbook provided 
each student early in the year lists the commandments of residence 
hall living for undergraduates. These are regularly broken and 
offenders, if caught, are regularly punished. Rare the coed who never 
overstays her curfew, conceals a hot plate in her room, or illegally 
entertains a girl friend overnight at least once in her college career. 
Rarer the University male who never joins a late night bull session 
in the dorm which includes at least one illegal necessity of collegiate 
male entertainment. 






The lounge areas of Grayson and Webster dormitories on the 
Hill — ping pong tables, and female company. 



A hierarchy of student officials, under direction of 
the Offices of the Dean of Men and of Women, help co- 
ordinate and oversee the activities of students in their 
daily lives. 

Counselors in men's and women's dorms, one for 
every 20 to 30 students, provide a liaison between 
student personnel officers and students — enforce Uni- 
versity living regulations, assist students in adjusting to 
college life, provide advice to questioning underclass- 
men, and prescribe punishment for offenders of the 
housing code. 

New counselors are chosen through joint coopera- 
tion of present counselors and University student per- 
sonnel officials. 

Many dormitories also elect representatives from 
among non-counselor students to aid in organizing and 
running dorm social and cultural programs. 



149 



In the case of serious offense against housing restric- 
tions, the elected bodies of Men's and Women's Judi- 
ciaries take over judgment of a student's case from the 
house council and pass their recommendations along 
to the dean concerned. 

An integral part of every dormitory is the presence 
of a woman head of residence to lend help to students 
whenever called on, aid the student officials, and insure 
that University regulations are carried out as pre- 
scribed by the offices of the deans. 

To some students, University living restrictions are 
secure encasements intended to insure a clear study 
atmosphere; to others, anathema. The individual will 
insist on his opinion where his manner of living is 
controlled, criticized or extinguished — and pleasing 
compromises are rare to find. 



The Off-Campus Student 
Responsibilities of Dishes 




The importance of off-campus living is just start- 
ing to be realized in the campus housing shortage 
of recent years which has led to a more lenient 
University attitude toward male undergraduates 
living in private residences. Female students are 
not allowed off-campus, unless living with parents 
or spouse. The present 900 commuting undergrad- 
uates and 2200 graduate students will increase 
considerably in number as the student body 
grows. 

Official University hands-off policy of allowing 
private enterprise to provide for students seeking 
housing has been ample encouragement for 
apartment complexes starting to dot the area 
around Amherst. An increasing number of home- 
owners in the area are renting rooms and apart- 
ments to UMass students. 



Lincoln Hirst prepares all meals for himself and three room- 
mates — plans to combine his business major with culinary skill 
for a career. 

Charlie Cook, Doug Morrison, Lincoln Hirst 
and Eddie Bradley represent a common situation 
among this newly powerful commuter faction. 

Renting a four-room apartment, one of three 
in an old building remodeled by its owner in 
South Decrticld, nine miles from campus, marks 
many aspects of living different from dormitory 
students. 

"The most important difference is the obvi- 
ous," says Charlie, a sophomore civil engineering 
major. "We have a place to entertain dates on 
weekends. On campus, we'd generally only have 
the Student Union to go to — or a show perhaps 
intown. 

"Oh, there's more responsibility — but isn't 
ability to handle responsibility one of the aims of 
our education here?" 




Finds Added 

And Domestic Living . . . 




Prime rule of off-campus living — wash the dishes every third night. 
Eddie Bradley says it's not his favorite chore. 



"Dorm rules are an awful drag. We have two rules of living 
here — wash dishes every third night and clean a room on the 
week-end. Line, who cooks on the Cape in the Summer, plans 
and prepares all our meals. 

"Of course, with four guys next door and us, studying isn't 
always easy for me to settle down to. But I never studied a 
heck of a lot in the dorm either. For other guys, the reverse is 
true. 

"One big advantage to living here, as far as I'm concerned, 
is that I'm not confined to the hmits of the University; I'm a 
part of the outside world while still having all the facilities of 
the University available to me. We have the Connecticut River 
across the street and spent last Sunday afternoon out there in a 
canoe. Eddie lives to hunt and can do so in the woods around 
here. Doug's the mechanic, and can have tools and parts 
strewn all over the yard. 



Meals, Charlie Cook agrees, are more tempting here than on campus. 



. . . Also Enjoys Added Freedom To Entertain 
Being A Part Of The World Outside University 




Doug on guilar, Charlie on banjo, Line on the washtub bass. 



152 



Dates, Of 
Limits 




Studying is not always easy to settle to, says Charlie, but it is necessary. 



"When I lived in a dorm, I used to have to get away on weekends, even if it 
was just to go in town to Amherst center. But here, we have some of both worlds. 

It's a place where we can relax. There's more here than just four walls. We 
have a kitchen and a living room. It's a lot more like a home. 

"One of the big complaints a guy next door has is about intellectual stimulation 
and opportunity — which is just about at a minimum here. But, frankly, this 
doesn't bother me." 

Independent student housing, so common in universities across the nation, has 
been hard put to find a foothold at the University of Massachusetts. But now an 
increasingly important part of University accomodations, it is here to stay — good, 
bad or indifferent in its comparison to campus housing. 

It is, certainly, an important laboratory for those concerned in the ways and 
whiles of independence which all of us must sooner or later become acquainted 
with. 



153 




Diedre Ryan and Faith Hallett, freshmen in Field dorm in the Orchard 
Hill complex, find it enjojable and natural. 

Where Mass Aggie pomologists once experimented 
with apples, educators are now experimenting with stu- 
dents — with an eye to conceiving the ideal environ- 
ment for educating the student in a sprawling univer- 
sity. 

In the four seven-story dormitories, housing 1300 
students, that form the Orchard Hill development in 
one corner of the UMass campus, revolutionary explo- 
ration and experimentation could be taking place. 

TTie trouble with a university is just that — it's too 
big. With an exploding campus comes an apparent 
diminution in importance of the individual, a difficulty 
in maintaining or establishing the faculty-student rela- 
tionship so pertinent to education, a lack of identity 
with the whole of a school without close cohesion to 
one part. 

Several UMass staff members, meeting in conference 
in Nantucket in September of 1963, under auspices of 
the Danforth Foundation, established a committee to 
organize the conceived of pilot project within the 
frame of planned residence halls. 

The Orchard Hill idea, unique in the nation to 
UMass, is Danforth's experiment in combining classes 
in residence hall, fostering student-faculty relationships 
in the close quarters of a dormitory to combat the 
anonymity of hugeness. The idea, if integrated within a 
campus would set up several 'residential' colleges with- 
in the university — loosely arranged to give each stu- 
dent a smaller seminal group to identify and interact 
with, but retaining the diversity and depth of a univer- 
sity. 

Master of the project is Dr. Lcland Varlcy. Four 



The Pilot Project 



preceptors to handle administrative duties for each 
house — the equivalent of principals — were this year 
Professor of Education Ralph Pippert, Commonwealth 
Professor of Government John Fenton, Professor of 
English Richard Haven and Professor of Civil Engi- 
neering Joseph Marcus. 

Living in at each house is a faculty resident availa- 
ble for consultation and advice. Ten faculty fellows 
associated with each dorm teach classes there and 
work to establish an atmosphere of working friendship 
with students. 

First semester of this year saw four classes taught 
on the Hill with about 50% of enrollment from the 
complex. Second semester saw some 50 courses taught 
there with about 75 % class membership fi-om Hill 
residents. 

A variety of social and cultural programming is 
maintained by student committees in each hall. 
Dances, mixes and cultural programs are weekly fare. 
More so than elsewhere on campus, activities for dorm 
members are available within the dorm. 

Each house eats as a unit one night a week at the 
new South Dining Commons, with faculty resident and 
fellows joining students for the meal. In an atmosphere 
difTcrcnt from traditional Commons dining, student en- 
tertainment is generally part of the meal. 

Typical of the cultural programs provided is Gray- 
son House's "Meet the Fellow" scries which put one of 
the faculty fellows in the limelight on Monday eve- 
nings for discussion on topics ranging from James 
Joyce to alcohol, religion and society to relation of sci- 
ence to government. 



154 



Orchard Hill opened for business with 
at least ten days of labor remaining to 
provide hot water, heat and a number of 
other finishing touches for entering stu- 
dents. 

Despite the haphazard living condi- 
tions provided students in the early 
weeks, the decision to open on time was 
made three days before registration day 
in September. 

Arriving students walked a series of 
mud flats those first days to carry their 
luggage, in some cases, to the seventh 
floor — all without aid of elevators, which 
were not yet in operation. 

For the 50% freshman enrollment in 
the four new dormitories, an introduction 
to college life included walking through 
the night to take a shower in Van Meter 
dormitory, living with cold water, no in- 
tercom system, haphazard mail system, 
no heat — but lots of mud outside. 

Complaints were loud and frequent. 
But the routine of dorm living was estab- 
lished quickly and, once the inconveni- 
ences were past, the routine of living was 
unnoticed. 



On Orchard Hill-- An Exciting 
Ideal For A Future University 



Freshman Diedre Ryan and Faith Hal- 
lett are residents of Field House. 

The inconveniences of first days — 
didn't mind them one bit, says Deidre. 
"It was fun for a while, like nothing Fd 
ever done before." 

Though "a little afraid of being cut off 
from the rest of the campus too com- 
pletely," says Faith, "we love it here. 
The atmosphere is very natural." 

"The best part of living here," com- 
mented Diedre, is that boys can come 
and go in the lounges. Nobody thinks 
anything of it. 

"The first semester I wanted to study, 
and didn't go to any of the programs or 
lectures, but I like having classes here 
(Diedre has her English 2 course on the 
Hill)." 

Both were enthusiastic about the 
weekend social events though, and also 
commented on the closeness they felt 
with girls in their dorm, and said they 
have never felt at all away from the flow 
of university life. 

"There's plenty here to keep us busy." 




Professor of Government Luther Allen lectures to a class 
of Hill students in their dormitory. 




A program of classical music on a Sunday afternoon in Grayson. 



155 



Anxious Enthusiasm On The Hill-- 
But Success Demands 
More Than Good Intent 



they should be accompHshing in aiding students with 
their personal problems of adjustment to the college 
living situation and preparation for academic accom- 
plishment. 

"If the Orchard Hill ideal is accomplished, the resi- 
dential college situation will be the mode of living for 
many UMass students on campus — a situation where 
groups of several hundred students live and socialize 
together and have a number of classes within their 
living quarters. 

"Among the things that will aid in establishing a 
healthy environment for groups of students to be 
stimulated intellectually and socially, to learn and de- 
velop an attitude for continued learning, is a good 
sound system of student counseling." 



As a senior counselor in Webster dorm in the Hill 
complex. Bill Mahoney has the vantage point of three 
years active in student administration and comparative 
living experience in other men's dormitories. 

"There is," he says, "enthusiasm for Uving on the 
Hill, though the first semester there was, for many, a 
time of 'anticipation and anxiety,' of asking When?" 

"But as the weeks went by, students in Webster 
found most disturbances disappearing. Recreation 
rooms and lounges were completed, although, even as 
Christmas approached, the complaint of 'echo cham- 
ber' remained, since the dormitory corridors lacked ac- 
coustical tiling. 

"There is a concern among administrators here with 
education for all situations — academic and social. The 
Orchard Hill living situation is seeking to activate all 
facets of social and intellectual intercourse necessary 
to bring about an ideal residential college situation. 

"What is very much appreciated is that girls are 
seen far more frequently in the lounge areas of these 
Hill dorms than in the older men's hall — perhaps be- 
cause of the proximity of the two women's halls in the 
complex. The fact that it is so common to have girls in 
lounge areas makes it a subject of little comment." 

Of his position as counselor. Bill says there are 
"added responsibilities given the counselors in the 
complex, although the ratio of about one counselor to 
25 students remains about the same as elsewhere on 
campus. 

"The position of counselor is potentially more valu- 
able than its present utihzation. This is made especially 
clear from the concentrated living situation on the Hill. 

"Sure, a lot of counselors aren't good counselors. 
But the fault lies not exclusively with the students 
themselves. Counselors are undercompensated, not to 
mention undertrained and underprepared for the job 





Study is a central theme of (he student's life. The doll on Mary's desk comes 
from her summer in Guadalajara. 



The Opportunity To Meet And Mingle- - 
Dorm Life-- Activities Fine If You 



A serious student, active in extracurricular activities, 
senior Mary Hutchinson spoke strongly in favor of the 
residential college ideal of small group interaction and 
sponsoring of faculty-student relations. 

"The great advantage of dormitory living over all 
other types we will experience," she points out, "is in 
the opportunity to meet people — constantly. The infor- 
mal socializing I've done at UMass has made me 
aware of backgrounds and interests other than my 
own, has broadened my depth of human understanding 
as almost no other experience has. 

"The disadvantages of dormitory living — there are 
quite a few of those, too. Dorm parties when many 
girls have no dates can be almost an insult. Dorm 
activities such as float building and inter-dorm events 
are too forced on girls like myself that arc concerned 
with studying and with other activities of my own 
choosing. For those so-inclined these are fine opportuni- 
ties to socialize — especially for freshmen that haven't 



158 



integrated into any non-dorm group. But not for a sen- 
ior, with outside interests." Mary has been active in 
Marching and Concert Bands, on WMUA, and be- 
cause of her Spanish major, spent a summer studying 
in Guadalajara, Mexico. 

"As living conditions on campus are now, the social 
and academic are too separated. In this Orchard Hill 
idea it seems the two are integrated — for the better. 
Although this could be done to extremes, it hopefully 
will be tempered just enough so that students will nat- 
urally speak and live intellectually — each in his own 
way, for intellectual interests cover a wide range. 

"One thing that has always bothered me about this 
University is the near-stigma attached to associating 
with teachers — brown-nosing as it's called. This is 
wrong. 

"Anytime you improve faculty-student relations, you 
help make the student aware that he is more than a 
number." 





Every dormitory provides a laundry and ironing room for students (above). 
Students learn responsibility for personal habits, often hitherto left to Mother. 



Essence Of 
Want Them 



"The interchange of ideas inherent in such re- 
lations is something I feel lacking in my own 
living arrangements (Mary is not a Hill resident, 
lives in Brooks dorm). I enjoy meeting and talk- 
ing with my professors as well as meeting and 
talking with the girls I live with. 

"I think that once such active interchange of 
talk and ideas is established in some way, as it is 
being attempted in the Orchard Hill complex, the 
idea will gain momentum, be accepted. I really 
hope the day will come when such a situation is 
common at the University of Massachusetts, 
when students and professors accept each other's 
company and seek to learn from each other what 
they may. 

"This is, after all the idea behind a university 
the interplay of young mind and mature mind." 




■~ — — f ""■ -m,,. 



l?';!*^^' 






For The Future: 



The Ideal Of Integration 



Within The Residence. 



Multi- Faceted Activities- 



Social And Academic- 



To Comprise The 



Student's Environment 





UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 




^ EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 


n 


^m Susanna rybak 




P ASSOCIATE EDITOR 




anne baltren 




^^ PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR 




^^Ph John lawrence 




' ASSOCIATE PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR 


I ray cry an 




^H BUSINESS MANAGER 




^^^1 michael swartz 




^^H STUDENT LIFE EDITOR 




^^^^1 Ann Posner 




^^H ORGANIZATIONS EDITOR 




^^^^B Ann Kaplan 




^^H ATHLETICS EDITOR 




^^^^B Marshall Karol 




^^H GREEK EDITOR 


m 


^^^^H Theodore Weinberg 


^^^^B HOUSING EDITOR 


m 


^^^^^H M. Ann Miller 


1 


^^^H ACADEMIC EDITOR 


1 


^^^^^^H 


4 


^^^^H SENIOR EDITOR 




^^^^^^^k Nancy 





PART II 



INTRODUCTION 



161 



MASSACHUSETTS LIFE 177 



ATHLETICS 



225 



ACADEMIC LIFE 



273 



SENIORS 



323 



INDEX 



448 



It: 



^— .?,i 



.:^^^ 



Vv 



X^ 



*-^^: 



"yr 



^•-e 



^:A:^^^^:. 



>> 



^'^ 




^ 




;„VXi-*5SS!«S:i-:i_*-^ 




; :e' V ^^ 




snow comes and blots out muddy 
paths covers dead leaves 
february comes and leaves first 
semester an ibm card in south 
college a program on a 
bulletin board a collegian in 
the morgue it is second 

semester the holiday 

frenzy has passed a time of 

hibernation begins the 
campus under a fresh cover of 
snow the student under the 
remnants of new year's 
resolutions activity 

appears non existent 
snow and resolutions continue to 
fall they fall they mix 




164 



M^ 



ii.:^« 






166 




giant snow sculptures 
emerge hockey 
markings appear a 
gently sloping lawn 
is banked steeper 
and becomes a toboggan 
run ski parkas blossom 
the campus shakes 
off the snow the 
resolutions it's 
a winter carnival 

countless hours 
with wet gloves packing 
snow cold snow down 
collars of warm jackets 
hundreds of tissiies 
twice as many cold germs 
all are part of the 
merriment of preparation 

then the merriment 
of a weekend dining 
tray sleds broom 
hockey sticks real 
dog sleds and outdoor 




167 




concerts snow and 
temperatures fall 
faster than resolutions 
activities flourish 
indoors a semi 
formal a fashion 
show a party a 
folk concert everyone 
frolics 






169 



J 










and everyone plays 
for some the play is humorous 
for others tragic for some 

it is all play for others all 
work some take it lightly 

dabbling in it enjoying the 
smell of powder and paint 
others take it seriously 
making a small beginning for the 
future a future with the 

smell of powder and paint 
the activity of an opening night 






172 



activity prevails besting the bell 

curve is forgotten winning the 

yankee conference is paramount 
necessary for a good night necessary 
for a happy date necessary for team 
morale and necessary for personal pride 





173 




I 




174 







personal pride revives interest in 
a blue book mid semester 

marks jar or inflate it 
everyday life continues a 
class a lab an exam 
a paper a pizza and beer at 
the aqua vitae a meeting at 
the union a coffee in the 
hatch on and on and on until 
June a vacation a 

graduation 



175 




MASSACHUSETTS LIFE 




^S^ 



^7^ 




Confusion In Boyden Prelude 



w. 




Enrollment at the University of Massachusetts in- 
creased 1 7 per cent over last year's figure when more 
than 10,000 students registered for classes both semes- 
ters. 

The record enrollment caused a change in the place 
of registration from the Women's Physical Education 
Building to the Curry Hick's Cage, and course changes 
were effected in Boyden instead of the Student Union 
Ballroom. 

Twice a year students become official members of 
the University Community on registration day. Pre- 



registration makes this a formality for many, but for 
some it is a frustrating introduction to the academic 
year. Restricted enrollment, class conllicts and other 
factors can contribute to present the student with a 
schedule that needs drastic revision. The following 
three or four hours are spent finding interesting or re- 
quired courses, competing with other students for the 
last few seats in limited classes and battling with pro- 
fessors to extend a section to include just one more 
student. 



178 



To Fast Paced Semester 




Registration Day finds students juggling their 
courses to eliminate those gruesome Saturday 
classes. An innocent looking slip of white pa- 
per gives rise to a more serious problem by 
informing a student that the enrollment in a 
pre-registered course has been restricted and he 
must begin a frantic scramble to pick up an- 
other before it, too, is closed. 



179 



Junior Class Sponsors Winter Carnival 1965 




Carol Atwood, Treasurer 



Sandy Olson Reigned —What A Smile 




Governor Volpe crowns Queen Sandy Olson while members of the court, Susan Piatt, Ruth 
Rubin, and Joan Ford, look on. 



Once upon a time . . . they said it 
couldn't happen twice, but it did — no 
snow. Here, snowless Winter Carnivals 
seem to be the rule rather than the ex- 
ception. But the lack of white stuff was 
more than balanced off by a really swing- 
ing weekend. 

Opening Ceremonies officially opened 
Winter Carni. Gov. Volpe arrived by 



helicopter, late; flares were lit, torches 
glowed, fireworks boomed, the weather 
was frigid, the Queen Sandy Olson was 
crowned, and it had begun — with a bang. 
Once upon a time . . . the ballroom 
was transformed into an "Ice Palace" — 
fountains, castle ice carvings, and Bobby 
Kaye's music provided the setting. It was 
an evening of fantasy. 



181 




Chefs for a day, the Revelers 
batter up pancakes for the 
Saturday morning feast. 



Linda Sweeney brings pancakes to the "Big D.' 



Project Pancake 



Hmmmmm, Good!! 





T" 




Hey, Bo Diddley! 



The fun began with the Rock n' Roll 
concert Saturday afternoon putting the 
Cage in a swinging mood. What a con- 
cert — one of the Isley Brothers stood on 
the piano swinging his jacket, and the 
audience participated on stage and in the 
aisles. And will anyone ever forget those 
green satin tassled dresses the Shirelles 
stole the show in? It was great fun, but 
the weekend was only beginning tc 
swing. 



Swinging Concert — 
Swinging Audience 




The Remains win new fans. 




The Isley Brothers create a storm with "Twist and Shout.' 



Louder, a Httle bit louder! 




> ! 





A little action from "Mickey Mouse". 




Hank Ballard and The Midnighters. 



Kingsmen At The Kettle 
Presented By Sophomore Class 



Sophomore class officers: John Mullin. Vice-President; Kathy Yukna. Treasurer; Kathleen 
Sciscento, Secretary; David Cummings, President. 




Saturday night was unbelieva- 
ble — less than 1 cu. ft. of space 
for each of the 3600 people. 
People squeezed, squashed, 
laughed, tried to dance, but 
mostly listened to the Kingsmen. 
The evening was both fantastic 
and fierce. If only there was 




Have you heard about the Jolly 
Green Giant? 




more room to dance! The attrac- 
tive night club atmosphere was 
obliterated by the crowded con- 
ditions. This, plus the excitement 
resulted in unfortunate damage 
to the huge giant outside the 
Kettle. 






Britain's 

TW3 

Satirized 
World 

In 
Cage 







Judy Collins demonstrated her versatile voice to an Down to earth music by Josh White captivated 

appreciative audience. an engrossed crowd. 



That was The Weekend That Was 



187 




First Row: Pam Hinton, Pam Econoply, Debbie Lindbergh, Donna Pratt, Sandee Lepowe, 
Linda Willis. Second Row: Barbara Noel, Ruth Kelly, Janice Lombard, Leslie Prouty, Rita 
Cerutti. 



MUSICALS 



The Musigals Swing Out, the title of the long playing album recorded by the 
Musigals, is more than appropriate. This group does swing out — with both modern 
and standard songs, as well as an occasional comical ditty. Founded in 1961, the 
female ensemble is gradually becoming a part of the musical tradition of the 
University. 

Under the able direction of Debbie Lindbergh, the Musigals appeared both on 
and off campus during the year, leaving their audiences more than merely satisfied 
by their melodious perfection. Twelve regulars and four alternates compose this 
hard working group, who honored their parents and friends by inviting them to a 
tea and treating them to a program of music — Musigal style. 




Seated: Ron Weaver, Bill Martin, Steve Glassman, Bernie Pitkin. Standing: Gil McNeill, Dick 
Kershaw, John Gilbert, Larry Martin. 



STATESMEN 



The Statesmen, the only all male singing group on campus, have been singing 
their way through a busy schedule of both on and off campus performances. 

Their programs are presented at campus functions throughout the year — Winter 
Carnival, fraternity Christmas parties, Greek Ball, the Sorority Sing, and Campus 
Varieties, to mention a few. The group also performed at a National Dean's 
Convention held at the Schine Inn in Chicopee. 

A repertoire ranging from folk music and spirituals to modern contemporary 
have made their performances enjoyable to all. But the enjoyment they receive 
themselves from performing is their greatest reward. 



189 



THE MASSACHUSETTS 

colleqiAn 

A FREE AND RESPONSIBLE ^ PRESS 



Rated Fint CroM by ACP 



VOL. XCIC yO. 46 tJNIVEBSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS MONDAY, MARCH 1, 1965 






Ross Jones, Photography Editor 



Sherry Spe.'ir. Feature Rditor 
Dan Glosband, Managing Editor 



190 




Scott Freedland, Editor-in-Chief 




Dave Gitelson, Makeup Editor 




IftT- 




Peter Hendrickson, News Editor 



Alan Lebowitz, Sports Editor 



191 




Oleh Pawluk, Editorial Chairman 




Paul Rodman, Advertising Manager 



Ted Weinberg, Business Manager 



A major endeavor of the almost tripled 
staff of this year's Collegian is to accom- 
modate the growing UMass student body. 
With its now doubled advertising reve- 
nue, the Collegian can increase its circu- 
lation, as well as produce at least one 
twelve-page issue a week, along with its 
standard publications. 

Two special issues, in color, were in- 
augurated this year — the coverage of the 



Tangerine Bowl and of Winter Carni. 

More extensive coverage has been as- 
sured by collaboration with Alvin 
Oickle, Managing Editor of the Greenfield 
Recorder Gazelle, and by the journalism 
students of Alfred Musgravc. 

In the forthcoming expanded newspa- 
pers, readers can depend upon the Col- 
legian's history of responsible writing. 



192 




'65 
INDEX 
STAFF 



The 1965 INDEX is a compilation of 
all the high-points of Massachusetts life, 
sports, the Greeks and organizations. 
Both colorful and functional, the pho- 
tographic history reviews the academic 
year 1964-1965 and profiles the gradu- 
ating seniors. Articles written by the 
many diligent staff members complete a 
composition, comprehensive and scrupu- 
lous. Here, is a lasting expression of 
exuberance and vigor, fun and work, and 
has been, in its making, all those things. 



Susanna Rybak, Editor-in-Chief (Above), Ann 
Kaplan, Organizations Editor, and Mike 
Swartz, Business Manager (Below). 





Ted Weinberg. Greek Editor 

Ray Cryan, Associate Photography Editor 





*?• 



'>M 



.JiiWW 




1^1 



Nancy Niziak, Senior Editor 
Anne Baltren, Associate Editor 





Elaine Corsi, Academic Life Editor 
John Lawrence, Photography Editor 





Ann Posner, Student Life Editor 
Marshall Karol, Sports Editor 



7 18 19 
42526 





Critique 

Dual 
Purpose- 
Twofold 
Results 



Published at the end of each semester. 
Critique provides students with an intel- 
ligent, factual body of information about 
University courses besides giving faculty 
and administration an accurate feedback 
on the success of their teaching methods. 
Each semester students and professors of 
selected courses fill out questionnaires that 
are correlated with the articles of the 
publication. To obtain more accurate, 
representative results, these question- 
naires are constantly being revised and 
improved. Hopefully the information in 
the Critique, first, will better prepare stu- 
dents to choose the courses that best suit 
their needs and most interest them and, 



second, will lead to superior teaching pro- 
grams. 

This year's Critique surveyed more 
courses than ever before and also lent 
more space to freshman and sophomore 
courses. The course surveys touch on 
every aspect of the class: course content, 
effectiveness of lectures, readings, exams, 
labs or discussion sections, and papers. 
In the special feature section, students 
gave vent to opinions concerning school 
scholastic policies, exams, and even the 
effectiveness of Critique itself. 

Critique the forum that hears faculty 
and students equally, serves its dual pur- 
pose and serves it well. 



E. Derosa, Business Manager; R. Littlefield, Editor-in-Chief; M. Berrini, Summary Editor; 
R. Fitzsimmons, Editorial Editor. 





D. Alexrod, M. Elasowich, D. Haracz, N. Trump, M. Hurwitz, Editor-in- 
Chief; T. Weinberg. Business Manager; J. McFate, Secretary; J. Schoppe, S. 
Tracy, Associate Editor; J. Cortese. 



Caesura Offers 

Creative Literary Students 

The Chance To PubUsh 

Their Work 



Caesura offers creative UMass students 
the opportunity for manifest expression of 
their literary and artistic abiUties. Three 
times annually the aspiring poet, short- 
story writer, essayist, or playwright can 
see what his imagination looks like in 
print. Complimenting the written word 
are prints of oil and water painting, 
sculpture, drawing, and photography. 

New members for Caesura's staff are 
interviewed each spring by the present 
staflf. They are selectively chosen, thereby 
assuring the UMass student body of ex- 
tremely capable literary representatives. 

To this already quite expanded literary 
magazine, next year promises a further 
increase in the number of Caesura's pub- 
lished and distributed. 



197 



Four times this year UMass students 
forgot classes, papers and exams, and re- 
laxed and read Yalwo. the campus hu- 
mor magazine. Full of light jokes, tinged 
with "think" humor and speckled with 
downright mudslinging. Yahoo satirizes 
everything from campus parties to world 
affairs. Written by UMass students, 
known as Yushniks. this collection of 
parodies represents the present level of 
modem college humor. For the past few 
vears Yahoo humor has been rated 



among the top of college humor, and se- 
lections have been used in national publi- 
cations of the same type. Named for 
Jonathan Swift's symbolic creature, the 
Yahoo, UMass Yahoo is also a slightly 
obnoxious creature of a flight of fantasy 
with some down-to-earth truth behind it. 
Like the nasty animal that sullied the 
world from its perch in a tree, UMass 
Yahoo attacks those deserving its vilifica- 
tion from its lofty height. 



Yushniks Strike Again 





Peter Utz, Abe Spencer, Mike Mendelson, Dan Glosband, Phyllis Quiqley, Cathy Murray, 
Axel, John Cannery, Pete Svoboda. 
Editor, Roger Jones 



198 




Toils, Tears, Sweat And 

A Lot Of Pancake Makeup 

Resulted In 'Tajama Game '— One Of 

Operetta Guild's Best Productions To Date 



199 



Again the Operetta Guild upheld its 
fine tradition of superior entertainment 
with the fall production of "The Pajama 
Game." Under the direction of Wayne 
Lamb, stars Donna Pratt and Jim Dun- 
can won the hearts of capacity audiences 
with their professional display of talent. 
A star studded list of supporting actors, 
including Ellie Swartz, Steve RosofI, 
Dick Morrel, and Ron Julius, were spir- 
ited on by a vivacious chorus to make 
the Adler and Ross musical the biggest 
success in Guild history. 

It was in 1947 that the Guild began 



producing Broadway musicals. In its his- 
tory, a repertoire of college premiers such 
as Sourh Pacific, original productions 
such as Thunder in the Hill, and modern 
operettas such as Three Penny Opera have 
given students interested in singing, act- 
ing, and techniques of production an out- 
let for their talents. 

This year's Guild is under the leader- 
ship of Stedman Howard, Paul Bartsch, 
Elisabeth Cotton, David Nelson, and 
Joan Jones who comprise the executive 
board. 






Ellie Swartz has Ron Julius in a trance as she 
executes maneuvers calculated to vamp. 



Wayne Lamb had everyone in the cast dancing and enjoying it. 



200 




The pajama factory in the play was not the 
prototype of the grey-flannel industry but the 
scene of one hilarious event after another. 
(Pictures above and to the right) 



201 




Roister Doisters 



Present One Act 

Scenes From Three 

Famous Plays 



The 1965 production of 
Roister Doisters. the stu- 
dent drama organization, 
was presented February 12 
and 13 before an enthusias- 
tic and appreciative audi- 
ence. 

Once again the Roister 
Doisters added to campus 
cultural achievement i n 
their fine performances of 
three one act plays — scenes 
from Brecht's. "The Pri- 
vate Life of the Master 
Race". "The Forced Mar- 
riage" by Moliere and 
"The Bald Soprano" by 
lonesco. 

Since the plays were 
produced the first week of 
the second semester, inter- 
ested, theatrically minded 
students were given an op- 
portunity to put the three 
plays together during inter- 
session. 







. -^z';-^ ^..?-ifei 







.«?' 



»^ 



i 




"Streets Of New York" In Bowker 



The University Theater 
once again had a highly 
successful season in its 
productions of "Born Yes- 
terday", "Streets of New 
York", "Julius Caesar", 
"Romulus" and "The Glass 
Menagerie." 

The curtain at Bowker 
Auditorium was raised time 
and time again to reveal 
accomplished performances 
together with experienced 
acting and spectacular 
scenic effects. 

Exciting and bold con- 
cepts were used by the di- 
rectors of the University 
Theater to make this sea- 
son one of the finest ever. 




Oldest University Honorary 




Seated: Dennis Bushee. Vice-President; Jeff Davidow, President; Bob Lenny Charest, Donald Boyd, Bill Wilkinson, Bill Landis. 

Healy. Standing': Evan V. Johnston, Advisor; Wade Houk, Secretary; 



Adelphians bring Springfield high school students to a university concert. 




Celebrates 50th Anniversary 




Wade Houk, Don Boyd, and Dennis Bushee plan High School Honors Day. 




The ranks of the Adelphians swelled from 
eight to six hundred plus in mid-May, 1965. 
Alumni Adelphians dating from the classes of the 
20's returned to celebrate the 50th anniversary of 
the University's unique senior men's honorary. 

For a day it was reminisce and recall, but 
Adelphians are not men who dwell on the past. 
Even as the 1964-1965 actives planned their pro- 
gram they worked for a "University as we would 
hke to see it." 

Some of their activities served an immediate 
function as sponsorship of rallies and dances 
keeps them economically solvent, while the plan- 
ning of the Homecoming parade keeps a big week 
end running smoothly. ; 



207 



Most of their projects do have a scope beyond 
today, however. Negro children from underprivi- 
leged areas in the Springfield vicinity were ex- 
posed to new cultural horizons because of Adel- 
phian planning. And, academically talented high 
school students from Massachusetts had an op- 
portunity to visit their state university on High 
School Honors Day. Thousands of others had the 
opportunity to become acquainted with the Uni- 
versity's facilities when Adelphians presented 
slide programs at high school assemblies through- 
out the state. The program met with such success 
that alumni clubs and high school groups con- 
tinually sought the Adelphian program for their 
meetings. 




Working 

For A 

University 

As We 

Would Like 

To See It 





Leonard Chearst, Bill Landis, Bill Wilkinson, and Jeff Davidow ready slides for high school 
assembly programs. 





Adelphians Don Boyd, Jeff Davidow, and Bob Healy discuss the qualifi- 
cations of junior men during selection proceedings. 





In structure as well as in programming Adel- 
phia is unique. The honorary has refused national 
affiliations and has remained pecuhar to the Uni- 
versity in order to be free to modify its program 
in the best interests of the campus. Stiff member- 
ship requirements also keep the group selective 
and small. All members of this organization are 
required to be in the upper third of their graduat- 
ing class, to show an interest in class activities, 
and to have general maturity of character. 

Honorary Adelphians, who must be related to 
the university by graduation or by current profes- 
sional standing, are also carefully screened before 
"tapping." 

Quality not quantity in membership has main- 
tained Adelphia's reputation as a usefully func- 
tioning honorary. 



Scholarship, 



Leadership, 




Sealed: Anne Baltren, Jan Rosata, Treasurer; Ann Williams, Presi- 
dent; Janet White, Vice-President; Kathy Eichhorn, Secretary. Stand- 



ing: Sue Tracy, Dottie Stolclosa, Kathy Manning, Sally Kangas, Reg- 
gie Harrison, Sandy Morse, Nancy Stack. Missing: Mary Pat Carroll. 




International Club Coffee Hours afford Mortar Board's a chance to meet foreign students on 
an informal basis. 

210 



Service 



Distribution of room furnishings re- 
lieved relocation problems, informal 
coffee hours and dinners assured a 
friendly atmosphere, and a scholarship 
fund helped alleviate financial worries — 
Mortar Board was at work making for- 
eign students feel at home at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts. 

High school students found out more 
about their state university at High 
School Honors Day, and University 
women were recognized for academic 
achievement at the annual I.Q. Tea. 
Mortar Board was at work promoting 
scholarship. 

Calendar Board, Student Union Gov- 
erning Board, Student Senate Investigat- 
ing Committee and Campus Chest, all 
campus planning committees, had Mortar 
Board delegates as active participants. 
Mortar Boards were at work demonstrat- 
ing leadership. 

"Discriminating service, responsible 
leadership, and the application of schol- 
arly principles to personal and general 
problems; these are the marks of true 
membership in Mortar Board." 




President Ann Williams conducts one of the weekly Thursday meetings. 




Sue Tracy, Anne Baltren, and Sandra Morse consult a list of ehgible junior women during 
selection proceedings. 



211 



University Of Massachusetts 




Among the first and most painstakingly-prepared programs were the University 




Fine Arts Festival 1965 




Theatre's three performances in Bowker Auditorium of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar. 



The University of Massachusetts Arts Festival 1965 
brought to campus attention and enjoyment twenty-three 
different events under the cooperative sponsorship of 
several organizations and academic departments be- 
tween March 4th and April 7th. 

The feature of the musical program was the appear- 
ance for the Concert Association of Leon Fleisher, who 
in 1952 became the first American winner of the 
Queen Elizabeth of Belgium Concours. 

Contemporary music was played at the perform- 
ances of Rey de la Torre and of The Group for Con- 
temporary Music, an in-residence ensemble at Colum- 
bia University. Chamber music reached a high note 
with the appearance for the Music Department and 
DVP of the Stanley Quartet. As the last Festival event, 
the UMass Symphony Band performed contemporary 
band works under the direction of Mr. Jenkins. 



Art aspects of the Fine Arts Festival were present in 
a lecture at the Newman Center by Rev. Clement J. 
McNaspy, S.J., and in One Hundred Years of ReaHsm, 
an exhibition in the Student Union. The film, Lust for 
Life, with Kirk Douglas and Anthony Quinn, portrayed 
the life of Vincent Van Gogh. 

The University Theatre Film Study Series in word 
and picture related A Child's Christmas in Wales and 
Moby Dick. Incorporated in the Festival were the films 
shown during the month. Among the foreign films were 
No Exit, The Virgin Spring, My Name is Ivan, and 
The Trial. For Whom the Bell Tolls, on Hemingway's 
Spanish Civil War novel; A Place in the Sun from 
Dreiser's An American Tragedy; as well as the movie 
of the successful Philadelphia Story all contributed to 
the contemporary meaningfulness of the 1965 Fine 
Arts Festival. 



213 



Bertram Turetzky 

Lectured To 



Music Students 



• • ' • • 





The Hartt Chamber Players accompanied Mr. Turetzky on the flute and percussion as he 
demonstrated his talent with the contrabass. 




215 




A Slice Of 



University Life 




Once out of bed and on the way with friends, students find early morning classes bearable. 



216 



5* ' ''•"*M««<l»S«Sje«IIB(l(!<S^ 







Many introductory classes are taught in large auditoriums. 



217 




Everyone looks forward to a Hatch break . . . coffee, douglinuts, and a chance to catch up on 
everything that's happened since the night before. 



Student Union — 

Hub Of Activity Between Classes 



219 




The lobby counter in the Student Union feels the brunt of the rush between classes. 



Classes and Coffee Breaks, Morning Flies 



220 



fc>S 



■ ■**:*''-*■ 'fi^^/' 



Into Afternoon; 

More Classes, 

Study Or 
Perhaps 

Just Relax 










j>fif^i • 



.:.^:f-M''^\rV 



■•,M;r»^ftnffri 



A Free Afternoon 
Spent In Amherst 
Holds Attractions 
For The Food 
And Fashion Conscious 




Studying Alone Is Lonesome, 
But Companionship Ends With 
The Inevitable Curfew 



224 




ATHLETICS 




Redmen Place Second In YanCon 



Coach Jonny Orr's varsity basketball team finished a 
13-11 season this year breaking six Curry Hicks Cage 
records and displaying proof of how prolific a scoring 
club the Redmen are. 

UMass hoopsters plunged into the 1964-1965 season 
on December 1 with a 93-89 victory over the Boston 
University Terriers on B.U.'s home court. Co-captain 
Charlie Kingston scored with the opening goal giving 
the Redmen the early lead. The lead exchanged hands 



frequently during the contest and the outcome was in 
doubt until Paul Gullicksen and Mike Meola sewed up 
the game with layups just under the wire. After last 
season's absence, Clarence Hill returned to the court as 
the game's high scorer. 

The Massachusetts five went on to top Rutgers, 
Rhode Island and Maine in its next three games. In 
their first home game against Rutgers, the Redmen es- 
tablished an early lead and maintained a sizable mar- 

(cont'd) 



UMass gets set for rebound as BU tries to score (below). Edwards thwarts Cross of BU 
(right). 






40 



s^ 



1 



i 



V 



L 



I! Illl 






/ 



A 




30 



ta^' 





Jump ball ... as John Lisack and 
UConn opponent scramble (far left). 
Charlie O'Rourke displays jump shot 
form (left). O'Rourke and Lisack 
battle for rebound against BU 
(above). 



Action Packed Season 
Tallies At 13-!1 




Edwards goes up for 2 as Cross of BU tries to block. 



gin throughout the game. Hill, Meola, and Kingston 
found the solution to the aggressive man to man de- 
fense of the Knights in a running game which led the 
hoopsters to a 93-82 victory. 

For the first dme this season the Redmen fell below 
the .500 shooting mark in the UMass-URI contest, in 
which both teams showed a strong defense. The game 
which ended in a 79-67 victory for UMass saw Clar- 
ence Hill set one record for scoring 24 points in one 
half and a second for scoring 1 1 straight foul shots. 

Continuing their winning streak, the Redmen 
downed the Black Bears of Maine 82-72. Outstanding 
players of the game were Charlie O'Rourke and Tim 
Edwards, who grabbed 65 rebounds. 

Massachusetts suffered its first defeat at the hands of 
the UConn Huskies. The Redmen were only slightly 
behind during the first half. They took a shortlived lead 
at the onset of the second half, but ran into bad luck 
with the Huskies scoring twenty points to the Redmen's 
two. They were unable to come from behind and the 
game ended in a 77-67 score. 

In Christmas competition, the UMass hoopsters 
sufi'ered three defeats in as many games from the mid- 
western teams of Evansville, Bradley, and Washington 
of Missouri. They did, however, score a 77-66 victory 

(cont'd) 



229 




54 



\ 



over Northeastern and trounced UNH 93-78. 

Redmen lost their next two games to Pittsburgh and 
Boston College respectively. 

As Massachusetts met UVM records fell by the 
wayside. The Redmen tied marks for most points in a 
half, 67, most baskets in a half and most hoops in a 
game, in a contest that ended in a 120-84 victory. The 
following evening, they topped their opponents from 
AIC 93-79. 

In a return match with Vermont, the Redmen scored 
a 96-58 win to put them one game behind UConn for 
the YanCon championship. UMass players O'Rourke, 
Kingston, and Hill scored to put the Redmen on top to 
stay with 17 minutes left in the half. The Redmen 
continued to score consistently until Coach Orr turned 
the boards over to the subs with about five minutes left 
in the game. 



Perhaps the most exciting game of the season was 
the return bout with UConn. A win could put the Red- 
men on equal terms with the Huskies in the Yankee 
Conference. The Huskies scored long before the Red- 
men could get started. 

They maintained a substantial lead throughout the 
game with the Redmen closing within three points sev- 
eral times. In the last minutes the Redmen rallied to 
within one point of a tie, but fell back to lose 63-70. 

The hoopsters went on to top URI, UNH, BU, and 
Maine in return matches and suffer defeat at the hands 
of Army, Holy Cross, St. John's and Providence Col- 
lege. 

A second place finish in Yankee Conference action 
and a 12-5 record against New England opposition 
earned the Redmen the number five ranking for large 
schools in New England. 



Edwards rushes in to defend against Cross of BU (left). 
Students of Nathaniel Hawthorne College entertain dur- 
ing the halftime of the UConn game (below). 





Gullicksen picks as Hill drives past opponent. 



Speed, Excitement, Entertaining Halftimes 



232 




Stewart battles UConn opponent for ball as Edwards looks on. 



Combine To Pack Cage For Every Game 



233 




First Row: Brian Healy, Manager; Rick Ericson, Mike Meola, O'Rourke, Dan Laakso, Jim Painten, Jack Forst. r/nr^i «oii',- Johnny 
Charlie Kingston, Clarence Hill, John Ricci, Ken Feinberg, Manager. Orr, Coach; Jim Babyak, John Lisack, Frank Stewart, Bob Murphy, 
Second Row: Tim Edwards, Paul Gullicksen, Dick Benjamin, Charlie Jack Leaman, Assistant Coach. 



234 





Pucksters fight for possession of puck behind net (above). 




Si 



236 




** 



fm 



"h.: 






>J 



Pucksters Lose To Colgate And 

Bowdoin In Hard Fought Games 



237 



Hampered by loss of seasoned players, 
by graduation and by lack of ice, the 
UMass hockey team suffered a losing 
season. Being the only team in the Yan- 
kee Conference without a rink, practice 
was subject to weather conditions and 
available time at the Amherst rink. The 
team was forced to endure an eighteen 
day stretch without practice which was 
one of the irmin reasons for the dismal 
showing at the Vermont Tournament. 
UMass suffered two defeats at the Tour- 
ney to Vermont and UConn only to re- 
taliate later on in the season after finding 
more ice time. 

Two of the greatest showings were in 
defeats. The pucksters held powerful 
Bowdoin of the number one division to 
two goals while scoring one themselves. 
Asainst E.C.A.C. all team choice Col- 



Goalie and #12 scramble for puck. 
I . 



gate, the sextet played excellent first 
period hockey but injuries and lack of 
players exhausted the UMass lines. Many 
of the teams losses came from exhaustion 
in the final periods or overtime. 

Graduating seniors Clayton, Callahan 
and Bowen will be missed, especially 
Skip Bowen who has been termed one of 
the best goal tenders in the East. 

Ed Poltsik, a sophomore, leads the 
team in scoring this season and his return 
next year will be an asset to the team. 
Sophomores Bisbee and Eaton have 
shown promise this season as wings, as 
have Ledwick and DeMars on defense. 
Always a dangerous scoring threat Bob 
Edmonston also will be returning. With 
more ice time and seasoning, the outlook 
should be more promising next year. 



.•.♦*fr*VV**V#* 







4 ^L 







First Row: Bill Skowrys, Dave Eaton, Peter Celli, Archer Bowen, Paul Donovan, James 
Bisbee, Bob Edmmonston, Dick Callahan. Second Row: Steve Kosakowski, Coach; Ken 
Palm, Peter Hurd, Ken Demars, Ed Sanborn, John Ledwick, Ed Polchloped, John 
Clayton, Dick FeldhofF, Frederick Molander, John Braim, Steve Ezer, Manager. 



.'•A;?* 




Goaltender blocks shot! 



239 




John Medeiros strains to clear bar. 



High jump form is displayed by sophomore Jonathan Hall as he soars over bar. 



Varsity Indoor Track Grabs 





Honors In Pole Vaulting 



Dave Sadowsky eases over bar during meet with Tufts. 






First Row: Daryll Brose, Abateni Ayanaba, Robert Ramsey, Thomas Panke, David 
Sadowsky, Douglas Wenwick, Douglas Sloan. Second Row: Charlie Mitchell, William 
Thomas, Robert Murray, Terrone Carpenter, Jonathan Hall, John Medeiros. Third Row: 
Anthony Divver, Cortland Bassett, Arthur Larvey, Damisn Gaflfney, John Lisack, Ar- 
thur Murray. Fourth Row: William Footrick, Coach; Paul Freedman, Michael Sheeley, 
Robert Craigin. 



Despite injury to John Medeiros, the teams top scorer, the UMass track- 
men finished the dual meet season with a commendable 3-2 record. Consist- 
ent victories by Dave Sadowsky in the pole vault, Terry Carpenter in the 
mile, Art Larvey in the dash and sporadic victories from the ailing John 
Medeiros in the broad jump and dash gave depth to Coach Footrick's Har- 
riers. 

In their meet with UConn the trackmen displayed all their power by 
pulverizing their opponent 65-48. In this meet sophomore Art Larvey 
toppled the school 60 yard dash record with a 6.4 second clocking, thus 
assuring himself a berth in the IC4A meet at Madison Square Garden in 
NYC. Doug Renwick, always consistent in the shot put, won easily rocketing 
the Redmen into a lead which they were able to hold. Carpenter again won 
the mile, while Sadowsky and Murray finished 1 , 2 in the pole vault. 

At Northeastern, even in defeat, the Redmen broke two records. Co-cap- 
tain Sadowsky roared to a pole vault mark of 12'6" to break the school's 
standing record, while Carpenter remained undefeated in the mile while he 
was pushed to his own personal best time and a meet record of 4.22 while 
Bob Ramsey a two mile man placed a strong third. 

At Tufts, UMass finished 1, 2, 3, in the mile with Carpenter, Panke and 
Ramsey all showing excellent form. One, two finishes were also seen in the 
50 yard dash, the 600 meter run with sophomores Gaffney and Thoms lead- 
ing the pack, and in the two mile event with Ramsey winning and Cragin 
placing. 



The release . . . 

. . . and follow through (left) 

243 




Slow Start Snowballs 

To 5 Straight Wins 

At Seasons End 



With the loss of Mike Bjornholm and Mike Rothschild, Coach Joe 
Rogers of the UMass Swimming Team looked toward Dick Daniels 
to fill in the gap left by Rothschild in the free style events, Charlie 
Monnier in the breaststroke competition and Dan O'Mara in the 
medley. 

Despite the 67-28 loss to Southern Connecticut State College, 
Coach Rogers' estimation of his strong spots i.e. his predominately 
underclass team, proved correct. Dick Daniels turned in first places 
in both free style races. Charlie Monnier was forced to take a third 
behind two of New England's top breaststrokers. "Chip" Wyser 
copped two second places in free style filling in the spot vacated by 
Bjornhoim. 

Holy Cross handed the UMass Mermen their first win with a score 
of 60-31. Again Dick Daniels took firsts in the 200 and 500 yard 
freestyles. "Chip" Wyser placed first and second in the 50 and 100 
yard freestyles respectively. 

After suffering three straight losses at the hands of Southern Con- 
necticut, Wesleyan and Amherst, the Mermen came back winning 
five consecutive meets before bowing to MIT. 

In their final meet with Tufts, UMass polished off their opponent 
with a decisive 63-31 victory. The Redmen completely dominated 
this meet, pulling away from Tufts immediately after the medley 
relay. Sophomore and junior performances in this meet and through- 
out the season indicate an even stronger team next year. 

244 



"Chip" Wyser tafces off . . . 





. and hits water on leg of relay. 





First Row: Richard Daniels, Daniel O'Mara, James O'Sullivan, Co- 
captain; Charles Monnier, Co-captain; Thomas Hanley, Frank Wil- 
son. Second Row: Stephen Levy, TTiomas Schwartz, Thomas Hoff- 



man, Norman Lovitch, Wenyon Wyser, Walter Orszak, Richard Len- 
non, Michael Shameklis, Robert Beal, Joe Rogers, Coach. 



Mike Shameklis churns up water while displaying breaststroke 
form. 



Mermen Finish 
With 6-4 Season 




246 



Individual Superiority Sparks Season 



Dave Lizotte performs hand stand during floor exercise. 




Balance, Timing, Soaring Grace— 
VARSITY GYMNASTICS 



■•^i 




MINUTES SEC 



PcmoD 



First Row: Dave Lizotte, Peter Grosso, Tim Dusenbury, Stan Brallier. Second Row: Dick 
Cardiff. Manager; Joe Parner, Al Cohen, Dan St. John, Al Carver, Erik Kjeldsen, Coach. 



In its first year as members of the 
Eastern Intercollegiate Gymnastic 
League, the University of Massachusetts 
Gymnastics Team opened its 1964-65 
with a 78-46 win over Southern Con- 
necticut State College in New Haven. 
The UMass gymnasts took first in six out 
of seven events with Fred Peterson win- 
ning the competition on the parallel bars 
and rings, Dave Lizotte with flloor exer- 
cise, Jim Dusenbury on the side horse, Al 
Carver on the trampoline and Stan Bral- 
lier on the high bar. The Redmen swept 
the side horse, trampoline, high bar and 
ring events. 

At their first meeting with Pittsburg, 
UMass was just nipped by the Panthers 
67-52. The highlight of the meet, though, 
was Al Cohen's longhorse vault, which 
brought a score of 9.45 points of a possi- 



ble 10. 

In a weekend doubleheader, the gym- 
nasts dropped a pair to Syracuse and 
Temple. Al Cohen and Dave Lizotte 
were just edged out in their events in the 
meet with Syracuse which ended in a 
67.5-44.5 score. 

At Temple, UMass took two first 
places, won one event and tied another, 
yet lost by a greater margin because of 
Temple's overall strength. Cohen, 
Lizotte, Parner, and St. John were stand- 
outs for the Redmen during this meet. 

In the final meet of the schedule the 
Eastern Championships, Al Cohen placed 
a strong third at Temple with vaults on 
the long horse of 9.35, 9.55 and 9.70. 
This showing put him in the No. 1 posi- 
tion to represent UMass in the NCAA 
semifinals. 




248 



"The majority of boys who come out for wxestUng 
here either did not wrestle at all in high school or saw 
only limited action, so it's a matter of seeing which 
ones can learn the rudiments of wrestling the fastest, 
and then trying to get good athletes from other sports 
to fill the gaps," says John Douglas, coach of the Uni- 
versity Wrestling Team. 

A look at the UMass roster illustrates his statement: 
Milt Morin is an outstanding football end who com- 
petes on the mats in the unlimited class; Dick Howe 
(157#) and Dick Pulsifer (191 #) are recruits from 
the lacrosse team. 

Perhaps the two best wrestlers on the team are the 
ones with the most experience: Jesse Brogan (137#) 
reached the finals of the Ohio state championships as a 
high school senior, and Dave Kelley (167#) was var- 
sity regular at Hamilton, N.Y. Kelley is also an out- 
standing football player. 

This year, the UMass grapplers placed third to a 
strong Springfield College team, the best showing ever 
by the Redmen team. For the first time the UMass was 
represented at the NCA.A. College Division wrestling 
tournament in Golden. Colo. Brogan and Morin won 
the right to represent UMass by capturing the New 
England Championship in their weight classes at the 
New England Tournament. 




First Row: Richard Howe, Robert Hodge, Arthur Keown. Second Row: 
George Darling, David Balanoff, Paul Barents, Boris Chevone, Milt Morin, 
Ronald Marsh, David Kelley, Jesse Brogan, Richard Pulsifer, William Ritchie, 
Ralph Caisse. 





VARSITY WRESTLING 



Jesse Brogan uses leverage to pin opponent as referee 
looks on (above). Keown loses temporary advantage 
over opponent and struggles to avoid a pin (below). 





Squeeze, Fire— BulFs-Eye 




if^ f?C Cs 



(^ ^ 




fini Run: Coach Capt. McGinnis, Don Hawkes, Gordon La 
Chance, Rog Yee, Assistant Coach M/Sgt. Cudworth. Second Row: 



Phil Reed, Pete Thomas, Bruce Thomas, Bruce Fifield, Eric Mussen, 
Charlie Seavey. Missing: George Wietecha. 



The UMass Pistoi Squad again proved to be one of the KJ top in the nation this 
year with over 20 wins, and an impressive second in the NRA Sectional Tourna- 
ment at the Coast Guard Academy on Feb. 28. The Redmen turned in a fine 1075 
score as they finished ahead of 6 other teams. Charles Scavez, a sophomore, 
George Wietecha, Eric Mussen and Peter Thomas fired around 260 consistently, 
and with all returning next year, save one senior, the squad has a great promise for 
next season. 

252 



Campus 



Sharpshooters 



On Target 




Major Fowler, Rifle Squad coach. 



First Row: J. Carswell, Captain; M. Case, H. Davis, H. Burbonk. 
Second Row: D. Formisoni, Major R. Fowler, O.I.C; J. Bergs. 



Absent: A. Davis, J. Arsenault, E. Butler, Msgt. J. Martin, Coach; 
Sgt. P. Margecony, Coach. 




Intramural Program Supplements General 
Physical Education Curricula 




f 



faaM 





:40 



Redmen Football coach, Vic Fusia, and some of the Varsity players devote 
time to coaching students in intramural football. 



254 




President Lederle and Warren P. McGuirk, Dean of the school of Physical 
Education, officiate at the beginning of the intramural football season. 



255 




Organized Recreational Activities Implant 

Competition In Non-Varsity 



"Vigorous and active recreation is an ideal comple- 
ment to the concentration and study necessary for 
academic success," says William Field, Dean of Stu- 
dents. And. intramural competition is designed espe- 
cially to fulfill the desire for athletic participation 
among the large group of students who because of skill 
level or inclination do not wish to compete on a varsity 
level. All members of the academic community are eli- 
gible to participate in the program which includes such 
varied sports as football, tennis, bowling, handball, 
squash and volleyball. 

The intramural department is administered by the 
Director of Intramurals who, with his staff, directs the 
program and appoints all the game officials. The Intra- 
mural Athletic Council interprets and enforces rules 
and regulations, makes additions and changes when 
necessary and rules on protests. 

Dormitories, Fraternities and RSO groups partici- 
pate for a total point accumulation. The competitive 
unit with the most points at the end of the year is 
awarded the Stephen Davis Memorial Plaque. 



256 





Spirit Of 

Sports Enthusiasts 





Intramural Facilities 
Extended On Campus 




flr^r- _.•_ 




.*:*»•!> 



Basketball backboard a stones throw from ihe koppcr Kettle (left) and volleyball net on the 
"Hill" stimulate intramural participation as well as impromptu matches. 



259 



Excitement Unlimited- 



Sport Parachute Club 









The University of Mas- 
sachusetts Sport Parachute 
Club became the Intercol- 
legiate Parachute Cham- 
pions by defeating teams 
from 13 other colleges and 
universities at the annual 
meet held in Orange, Mass- 
achusetts, May 1964. In 
addition, Phillip Bedaw 
was the individual winner 
in the contest. The Para- 
chute Club's "A" and "B" 
teams captured first and 
third places respectively 
and it was awarded the 
"Gavin Gavel," symbol of 
Collegiate Parachuting su- 
premacy. The gavel must 
be- won for three consecu- 
tive years to be perma- 
nently retained by any 
school and the UMass 
Sport Parachute Club will 
be shooting for its second 
consecutive win at Orange 
in May, 1965. 

The Club also repre- 
sented the University on 
Massachusetts Day at the 
New York World's Fair in 
June, 1964. A static dis- 
play of the Intercollegiate 
Parachuting Trophy and 
parachute equipment was 
erected on the village green 
of the New England Pavil- 
ion. Former Governor Pea- 
body congratulated the 
team members at the 
World's Fair. 



' ^^^.'^ 



-^/^t 



Club member, Bruce Gustau- 
sen, lands on target as Dick 
Fillmore watches. 










Club members are congratulated by former Governor Peabody at the New York World's Fair. 
They are from left to right: The Governor's son Charles, Joe Daly, Governor Peabody, Dick 
Fillmore and Bruce Gustausen. 





Proposed architectural design of original Alumni Field. 




M.A.C. 26, Colby boasts the score of the first football game to have been played on Alumni 
Field, October 9, 1915. 



262 





The 

Construction 

Of A 

College 

Athletic 
Field 




Grading, by contractor George Dickinson, started in June and finished in October, 1914. 





The digging and laying of tiles was done by student volunteers 
in the Spring of 1914. 




Alumni Field, Spring 1914 




^ 




Students digging trenches and laying tiles. 



263 



I'^msM 



:S 



k 



*Vf" 





K?^ 







Student Powered Shovels Overshadowed 

Giant Steel Jaws 



264 




"When I came to M.A.C. 
(Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege) in September 1911, I 
found the college with the poor- 
est athletic equipment of any col- 
lege I had ever seen," wrote 
Curry S. Hicks, General Man- 
ager of Athletics at the College. 
Trustees, after hearing Hicks' 
case in 1913, set aside seven 
acres of land belonging to the 
college for the purpose of athlet- 
ics and gave to the Joint Com- 
mittee on Athletics the right to 
control the same and develop it 
as an Alumni Field. 

The $8200 construction cost 
was left for the alumni and the 
student body, and they re- 
sponded. 

A student laid drainage system 
cut construction cost back 
$1000. Students dug about 5000 
feet of ditch and laid the tile un- 
derdraining the field as well as 
opening a brook on the east side 
to insure a good outlet for the 
drainage. 

A mass student body meeting 
also voted a loan of $1200 to the 
Committee on Athletics to insure 
professional grading of the field. 
The 996 alumni of the college 
contributed over $3000 to the 
project. They also assumed re- 
sponsibility for construction of 
an entrance gate for the field. 

The campaign in 1913 was 
based on the idea that "construc- 
tion of the field must not stop 
until Massachusetts has one of 
the finest fields in all the New 
England colleges, something that 
we may all be proud of." 

The goal posts were torn down 
on Alumni Field in the fall of 
1964. In 1965 a new stadium 
will open insuring that the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts will 
have one of the largest and finest 
fields in all the New England 
Colleges. 



Model of proposed athletic stadium. 



By 

Of Progress 



265 



DISAPPOINTING SEASON 



Redmen Nine Unsuccessful in Yan Con 



The Varsity Baseball team 
slid to a disappointing 7-10-1 
record. This was the first losing 
season for Coach Lorden since 
1958. However, the record was 
not indicative of individual per- 
formances. Captain John 
Awdycki (16) did a highly 
commendable job in the infield. 
while batting a hefty .300. Karl 
Kamena, catcher, outfielders. 



Tony Simone and Neil Harris 
provided consistent hitting, while 
Mike Johnson and Rod Corey 
handled the pitching chores. 

The bright spot for the Red- 
men was the arrival of talented 
sophomores, Dennis Delia Pi- 
ana, Jim Kuczynski, Al Nord- 
berg, and Ross Piken. These in- 
dividuals should provide a nu- 
cleus for future success. 




Mike Brita steps into pitch. 





f^-H 




4 


1 






-1 


U' 



Mike Johnson follows through with a pitch. 






First Row: Ritchie, Apicella, Somone, Corey, Awdycki, Harris, Wojnar, 
Brita, Caisse. Second Row: Nordberg, Kuczynski, Crane, Kamena, 
Johnson, Stewart, DellaPiana, Cleary, Coach Lorden. 



Captain John Awdycki ex- 
changes pleasantries with first 
base umpire (right). Second 



baseman Bill Crane waits for 
the throw on an attempted 
steal (below). 







i 





am 



j^Erii 



First Row: Flaherty, Edmonston, Ryder, Morris, Webb, Infusino, Har- 
rington, Glew, Casey, Vengrow, Baird. Second Row: Meilbye, Mahoney, 
Gustavsen. Doyle, Brown, Rosati, J. Morgan, W. Morgan, Newton, 



Lawson, lcck\. Ilciiiile. Third Row: Neylon, Hoppins, JariL-l. Avakian, 
O'Donnell, Kelly, Stewart, Peters, Gaffey, Goodwin, Stokes, Doktor, 
Coach Garber, Majeski. 



Snakebeaters Continue Win Streak 





Casey cradles the ball while 
circling behind the Rediiien 
goal, (above) Scooping up the 
ball, Webb (20) out-maneuvers 
a defender and passes to Har- 
rington (23). (left) Snakebeat- 
ers slash sticks freely and hit 
hard while battling for a loose 
ball, (far right) 



The Varsity Lacrosse 
Team completed its eigiith 
straight winning season in 
compiling a fine 6-5 rec- 
ord. 

Paced by C o -c a p t s . 
Steve Harrington, Fran 
Casey, and Charles Glew, 
Dick Garber's Snakebeat- 
ers displayed a consistent 
attack. Harrington, who 
never played lacrosse prior 
to coming to UMass., 
ended his career as the all- 
time point producer with 
82 points over three years. 
Casey followed in the scor- 
ing column with 20 points, 
while Glew accounted for 
19 points. 

The 1965 season is ex- 
pected to be a re-building 
campaign, but Coach Gar- 
ber is confident of another 
successful record. 



268 




1964 VARSITY TRACK 
First Row: Medeiros, Erickson, Brouillet, Sadowsky, R. F. Murray. 
Murphy. Panke. Larson, Brose, Collins, Molvar, Sloane. Third Row: 
Anagostopolus, R. K. Murray, Renwick, Pendleton. Wrynn. 



Second Row: Hall, 
Pacquette, Connors, 




\'jt,4 VAKSriV (iOI,F 
Henry Glass John Donasky, Robert McNeil, George Wells, George DeFalco. Francis Pluta, 
Charles O'Rourke, William O'Donncll, Coach Chet Gladchuck. 



Linkmen 
Enjoy Success 



Chet Gladchuk's Varsity 
Golf T e a in won five 
straight victories before 
losing 4-3 to U. Conn. 
However, this did not dis- 
courage the team in the 
least as they continued 
their winning ways for a 
surprising 9-3 record. 

The Redmen were paced 
by Capt. George DeFalco 
who proved to be one of 
the best golfers in New 
England. 

Consistency described 
the efforts of John Do- 
nasky, Frank Pluta, Bill 
Glass, and newcomer Char- 
lie O'Rourke. The individ- 
uals performed in admir- 
able style and should pose 
a future threat to the 
YanCon Crown. 



270 



Trackmen 
Boast 5-2 



The Varsity Track Team sparked by 
some outstanding performances, finished 
with a 5-2 record and a 3rd place in the 
Yankee Conference. 

Led by Capt. Bob Brouillet, UMass' 
greatest distance runner, and the highly 
versatile John Medeiros, Coach Foot- 
rick's Redmen continued their traditional 
winning combination. 

Standouts with potential for the future 
are Sloane and Hall in the dashes, Mol- 
ver and Larson in the distance events, 
and Murray, Sadowski and Renwick in 
the field events. 




1964 VARSITY TENNIS 
Kneeling: Rodger Twitchell, Robert Greenberg, Robert Neal, Roger Harper. Standing: Coach 
Steve Kosakowski, Richard Leete, Michael Rose. William Martin, Stephen Johnson. 




Netmen Second in 
Yan Con 



The University's finest 
showing in the New Eng- 
land League championships 
concluded another out- 
standing season for Coach 
Steve Kosakowski's n e t- 
men. 

Sparked by Capt. Roger 
Twitchell and junior Bill 
Martin, the Redmen placed 
fifth in New England team 
standings. 

During the regular sea- 



son, the team chalked up 
an 8-1 record and placed 
second in the Yankee Con- 
ference. It was the first 
time since 1958 that the 
Redmen failed to win the 
Yankee title. 

The returning nucleus 
will include outstanding 
performers in juniors Bob 
Neal, Mike Rose, Bob 
Greenburg, Martin, and 
sophomore Roger Harper. 



Captain Rodger Twitchell crouches low to return a corner shot. 



271 




Scuba Club Dives From Maine To Florida 




The Scuba Qub provides 
safe and interesting oppor- 
tunities to learn the watery 
skills required in scuba div- 
ing. 

In past years dives have 
been held in various loca- 
tions from Maine to 
Florida. 

The club also conducts 
courses in scuba for begin- 
ners and sponsors social 
functions including dive 
parties. 





The divers prepare to descend for a big salvage operation. 



272 




ACADEMIC LIFE 







''-^^^m 



Bay State Lawmakers In The Driver's Seat 

UM Officials PR Men On 




Bay State law-makers, 
once so criticized for not 
jumping on the education 
bandwagon, have since 
started giving driving les- 
sons. 

The supreme coup, put- 
ting them in the front of 
the motorcade, came last 
year with the speedy man- 
dation of a Boston campus 
of the University (pictured 
on the previous page). 

The relation of the Gen- 
eral Court is, in any tale of 
the University's growth, 
written between the lines 
rather than in bold type at 
the top of the page — but it 
is consistently present from 
beginning to end. 

Like Dad on allowance 
day, the men on Beacon 
Hill give UMass money to 
pay its bills. But more: in 
decreeing the autonomy of 
the University in spending 
- that money or creating a 
Boston campus, they parcel 
out power to a highly con- 
centrated group of educa- 
tion specialists to push 
Massachusetts higher edu- 
cation to the top of the na- 
tional education ladder. 

A legislative committee, 
headed by Senate Majority 
Leader Kevin Harrington 
and Representative J i m 
Nolen, produced this year 
the controversial Willis Re- 
port which stressed the 
University as focal point 
for the future of Bay State 
secondary education. 

This amiable relation- 
ship is largely the product 
of devoted lobbyists at 
UMass. Most prominent 
among these is John 
Lederle, called by House 
Majority Leader Robert 
Ouinn "a great public rela- 
tions man." 



Chairman of the UMass Board of Trustees Frank Boydcn, former President of the Massachu- 
setts Senate John Powers. President John Lederle and former House Speaker John Thompson. 



Of Education Bandwagon; 
Education Front 



Indeed, carrying out his role as president of a state univer- 
sity requires that John Lederle be first and foremost a liaison 
man in communication with the political hierarchy surrounding 
public higher education. 

In conjunction with other masters of this art, particularly 
Dean of Administration Leo Redfern and University Business 
Manager Gerald Grady, he works to draw the attention of the 
state's people, and Legislature to the problems of educating 
Massachusetts" young people of college age. 

Legislators are most sought after people — which is only nat- 
ural since they control rulebooks and pursestrings. Aside from 
the torrent of requests that constantly bombard their eyes and 
ears, there are numerous details of the day to day governmen- 
tal process that must be attended to. In the all-over scheme of 
things, the University of Massachusetts is assuredly not the 
most important; thus, it takes some work to focus the attention 
of a legislature on a state university to the extent that Massa- 
chusetts General Court's has been lately. 

House Majority Leader Robert Quinn, Democrat from greater Boston. 





Western Massachusetts legislators viewing the University's Master Plan 
in Amherst. 



But it's more than good lobbying. It's a change of soul with- 
in the Legislature. "There is," pointed out House Leader 
Quinn, "a more positive orientation toward education in the 
nature of the men in the General Court now. They generally 
have more formal education themselves, for one thing, and are 
more appreciative of such opportunity." 

Former House Leader John Thompson narrows the period 
of change in attitude "evident above and beyond normal ex- 
penditure" to the last seven or eight years, pointing to recent 
actions such as approval of UMass autonomy and med school 
as evidence. The Iron Duke, veteran Democrat from Ludlow, 
has been for many years a staunch supporter of pro-University 
legislation. 

Assuredly, the friendship of Massachusetts' law-makers to- 
ward higher education was never more evident than with the 
passage of Chapter 562, Acts of 1964, directing the establish- 
ment of a branch of the University of Massachusetts "in or in 
the vicinity of the city of Boston . . ." 

And of the action surrounding this bill's passage there is 
much to say. Not only does it symbolize strongly the close 
relationship between UMass and the State House, but the 
speed with which it has been mandated and activated is unique. 
Even California, a renowned leader of public education in this 
country, allows five years for the establishment of a new educa- 
tional institution, such as a branch of their state university. 
The train of events that made UMass-Boston reality got formal 
launching only in May of 1964; and in September of 1965. 
1000 freshmen will attend the University in the former Boston 
Consolidated Gas Company building, at the corner of Stuart, 
Arlington and Piedmont Streets in downtown Boston. 



8000 Applicants 
Rejected In 
Spring 1964 





Education Committee meeting at the State House. 



Impetus For Establishment 



There was, as Senate President Maurice Donahue stated, one 
clearly impelling factor in generating the establishment of a 
Boston branch of the University — 8000 qualified applicants 
from Massachusetts high schools rejected for admission to the 
University in fall of 1964. 

This was the fact headlined on April 7, 1964 on the front 
page of Boston's newspapers. UMass Dean of Admissions Wil- 
liam Tunis had stated that the University had received 12,000 
applications for 2,600 places in the 1964-65 freshmen class. 

Of the 12,000 applications, 2,000 were definitely not quali- 
fied, another 2,000 would have been considered on a "risk" 
basis had room been available. The remaining 8,000 candi- 
dates were considered qualified by past standards. But, of this 
number, only 2,600 of the most highly qualified could enter in 
fall of 1964 because of limited facilities. 

On April 13, the Legislative Research Council, a non-politi- 
cal bureau of the General Court, submitted an independent 
report on "Higher Education for Greater Boston," which had 
been some time in the making. It made the following points; 
"This standard metropolitan statistical area (Greater Boston) 
contains about 2.6 million inhabitants, almost exactly half the 
state's total. Moreover, some 80% of the state's population is 
contained within a 40-milc radius of the State House. No 
American state has its population better situated for a wide 
range of coordinated, metropolitan services, including higher 
education, than docs Massachusetts." 

"The University of Massachusetts ... is the only public 



Representative James Nolen of Ware, in House Lobby. 



276 




Of UM- Boston, September, 1965 



institution of higher learning in the Commonwealth which 
offers comprehensive undergraduate and graduate curricula in 
the arts and sciences . . . 

"Transforming an existing public institution into a university 
or creating a new public university in the Boston metropolitan 
area, within the shadow of some of the nation's finest private 
institutions, pose problems of standards perhaps not found 
elsewhere. More specifically, a public university in Boston 
would not likely attain the necessary public support, faculty, or 
standing in the academic world unless its offerings were ap- 
proximately on a par with those of Boston College, Boston 
University or Tufts . . . 

"The overall planning of public higher education in Massa- 
chusetts relates directly to considerations for promoting higher 
educational opportunities in metropolitan Boston." 

In early May, Senator Donahue was guest speaker at a Sun- 
day morning breakfast in Amherst sponsored by the Newman 
Club. His talk turned into a formal announcement that he 
would soon file a bill calling for a Boston campus of the Uni- 
versity. 

The idea of a public university in greater Boston was not a 
new one. Indeed, earlier in that spring's session, prior even to 
the report of the Research Council, Representative Robert 
Cawley of Roxbury had filed a bill calling for a study of the 
feasibility of just such an expansion that was now becoming 
reality with astounding speed. 




277 



Vice Chairman of Joint Education Committee, Representative 
Allen McGuane. 



S 875, Bearing Emergency Preamble, 
After 36 Hectic Days On Beacon 



S875. sponsored by Senators Donahue and George Ken- 
neally and Representative Quinn, was admitted to the legis- 
lative process on May 14, and referred at once to the com- 
mittee on education. 

As with any contro\ersial bill calling for large expendi- 
ture of the tax dollar, forces for and against UMass in Bos- 
ton activated to bring about the passage or non-passage of 
the bill. 

The task was the same on both sides. It was necessary to 
dig out from the mass of information concerning a Boston 
campus the material most pertinent to pro and con, to pre- 
sent this clearly and concisely to law-makers, unable to per- 
form such an operation for every bill in their consideration. 

Heading up the pro-bill group from the University was 
Lederle, who spoke in a hearing before the Joint Committee 
on Education on May 27: 

"The experience that the University has developed in ad- 
ministering institutions outside of its campus in 
.Amherst — will be of immediate use in establishing and ad- 
ministering the new University . . . 

"in addition, the present cooperative liaison with the re- 
Joint Ways and Means Committee meeting at the State House. 



gional community colleges could be expanded to give more 
of the promising students from those colleges a chance to 
enter the university program upon completion of the two- 
year community college curriculum . . . 

"The University of Massachusetts stands ready to meet 
this new educational challenge. We need only your ap- 
proval." 

A leading antagonist of the bill, the Massachusetts Fed- 
eration of Taxpayers Association, assailed it on the same 
day as a "blind launching with absurd speed and casual- 
ness." 

In a statement presented to the Legislative Committee on 
Education, Federation Executive Director Frank Zeo 
charged that the $250,000 Willis-Harrington Commission 
was bypassed completely when the bill was drawn. He said 
the measure, bearing an emergency preamble, was "sprung 
on the Legislature and the public" without reference to 
either the Willis Commission or the Advisory Board of 
Higher Education Policy, set up in 1962 to advise on just 
such a proposal. 




Becomes Law 
Hill; Legislature 



The bill was reported on favorably by 
the Joint Education Committee on May 
28, following a big public hearing in 
Gardner Auditorium at the State House. 
From there it went to the House. 

The measure received editorial support 
from the majority of Greater Boston 
newspapers. "What makes the UMass' 
1964 application figures significant to the 
Greater Boston area," pointed out the 
Globe's Ian Forman, "is that the largest 
percentage come from this portion of the 
state, despite the university's present sole 
location in Amherst. 

"For example, 5916 high school sen- 
iors applying to the state university came 
from within 30 miles of Boston . . . 
3148 were refused admission, including 
roughly 1 500 qualified students . . ." 





Representative John Thompson 



Provides Staunch Support 



Chairman of the Board of Trustees Frank Boyden wrote to each of the 
Legislators on June 3, sending them a report of a study of the New 
England Board of Higher Education "showing the potential gap between 
the plans of both public and private institutions to expand and students 
seeking a college education in Massachusetts. "This shortage," he pointed 
out, "may reach 34,000 by 1972 . . . As far back as 1941, a report to the 
General Court (Senate 620) pointed out, after investigation and study, 
the need for the Commonwealth to start planning for expanded educa- 
tional facilities, including facilities to serve the Boston area." 

The Boston Traveler on June 1 1 came out strongly for the bill, stating 
that "Time is running out fast for action on the most important education 
bill that has been before the Massachusetts Legislature in the 20th cen- 
tury." 

On June 18, with approval of Governor Endicott Peabody, S875 be- 
came law. 

Meanwhile, things in Amherst were hopping. On July 9, Lederle an- 
nounced formation of a four-man task force to prepare and refine plans for 
the University of Massachusetts-Boston. Named were Dean of Adminis- 
tration Leo Redfern, Associate Dean of Admissions Donald Cadigan, As- 
sistant to the Provost William Venman, and Associate Treasurer Robert 
Brand. 

From the regular state operating budget, the Legislature has appropri- 
ated $200,000 for planning and essentials of the Boston campus. With 
this to back them, the task force has headed up research bodies on curric- 
ulum, student services, library facilities and numerous other activities that 
needed detailed preparation prior to next September. 




Massachusetts House of Representatives in session. 



280 



The Willis-Harrington 

Report - Provides 

Lawmakers Blueprint 

For Future Bay 

State Education 



1964-65 has been the year of the Willis-Harrington Report, 
a legislative commission report that, at this writing, is still little 
more than words on paper, the effect of which, it is foretold, 
will reach all Massachusetts public education. 

What is there in this master plan for Bay State education 
pertinent to the University? Primarily, it names UMass as the 
state's only public 'university', with recommendations throwing 
a wet blanket on the expansion hopes of other leading state 
institutions of higher learning. 

A most notable reprisal to this was a 1500-student demon- 
stration from Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Insti- 
tute during hearings on the report by the legislative Education 
Committee in late February. For, the report quite specifically 
recommends that SMTI, and other state colleges, remain just 
that. 

Senate Majority Leader Kevin Harrington. 





Senate President Maurice Donahue, Democrat from Holyoke. 

The commission, directed by Superintendent Benjamin Willis 
of Chicago, suggests that UMass be the only public institution 
to grant doctoral degrees. The only exception to this would be 
the continuation of Lowell Tech's doctoral program in chemis- 
try, the only non-UM Ph.D. offered in a Massachusetts public 
institution. 

Senate Chairman of the Commission Kevin. Harrington em- 
phasized that he doesn't foresee the report sanctioning UMass 
to "make feters of the rest of the state's public institutions of 
higher learning." 

Major recommendation of the Willis-Harrington Report is a 
board of higher education. It would coordinate growth, budgets 
and programs of 22 public institutions — UMass and its Boston 
campus, regional community colleges, technical institutes and 
state colleges. Approval of such action was given by the major- 
ity of Bay State public college heads at hearings on the report. 

The BHE would be comprised of 11 lay members and a 
chancellor to preside. It would have final say over the Univer- 
sity's trustees and, apparently, veto power over the UMass 
Board. 

House Chairman of the Commission Representative James 
Nolen of Ware, one of 21 commission members, said the com- 
mission had specifically voted that UM not be allowed to as- 
sume jurisdiction of any sort over other elements of the Bay 
State system of higher education. 

Senator Harrington stated it is feasible that UMass could 
build another branch or two in the future, without, however, 
closing any existent state colleges. 

The report also called for a shakeup in the state's public 
school system. 

With the blueprint in front of them and construction materi- 
als in easy gripping distance, Bay State law-makers could con- 
ceivably turn Massachusetts education structure into a national 
showcase. Time, it is said, will tell. 




Three times as many scholarships 
were awarded to needy students this year 
than in previous years. 

The Financial and Placement Service, 
headed by Mr. Robert J. Morrissey, 
aided approximately 1,200 students either 
with outright scholarships or with the 
Undergraduate Assistantship Program. 

This program provides the student 
with a $400 a year stipend and the op- 
portunity to work with the professors in 
his major field. 



Placement and 
Financial Aid 
Expands with 
the University 




Last year the University Placement 
service arranged for over 500 employers 
to visit the campus and supervised inter- 
views for seniors. 

A fund of information on careers, 
graduate programs, fellowships, and as- 
sistantships is made available to the stu- 
dent by the service which also assigns 
part-time work on campus. The office 
also handles military and draft affairs. 

Staff members include: Director Rob- 
ert Morrissey, Staff Assistant Lynn Sant- 
ncr, Women's Placement Officer Edith 
Antunes, and Men's Placement Officer 
George Emery. 



Robert Morrissey (above) di- 
rects Placement and Financial 
Aid while Lynn Sanlncr (be- 
low) is the newly :ippointed 
stair assistant. 



282 




New Provost Calls for 
Academic Excellence 



"Vigilance on a dozen fronts" is maintained at the Provost's office, where 
new Provost Oswald Tippo regulates and coordinates all aspects of academic 
life. 

Dr. Tippo brings to his job a wide variety of experience as teacher and 
administrator, including years of service at the University of Illinois, Yale, 
University of Colorado, and NYU, and an interest in UMass which dates 
from his undergraduate days here. 

In his Opening Convocation speech. Provost Tippo called for a "relentless 
upgrading of standards of performance on the part of students, faculty, and 
business and administrative personnel." 

A 1932 UMass alumnus, he will work towards an intellectual atmosphere 
attractive to the most creative professors, a curriculum designed to produce 
"truly liberally educated men and women," an expanded graduate program, 
and increased library facilities. 




283 




Robert McCartney -- 
A Man of Many Faces 



"Public relations is the responsibility of every student of the 
university" according to Robert McCartney, who serves a multi- 
faceted role as University Secretary and Director of University 
Relations. 

A 1941 graduate of UMass, Secretary McCartney believes 
that "every student is involved at all times in every move he 
takes in making an impression and creating a good climate of 
public opinion." 

Having served here from 1948 to 1956, he moved to the 
University of Maryland where he was Director of University 
Relations for eight years until his return to UMass last June. 



284 





Bill Deminoff, director of publications, (left) looks over university seal 
sketched by graphic arts man, John Roche (right). 



University photographer, Ev Kosarick (left) checks area photo 
with his assistant, Charles Lang fright). 



News Office Creates Image of Umass Life 




To keep the public in- 
formed as to what's going 
on at UMass and to recog- 
nize significant achieve- 
ments are the primary 
functions of the University 
News Office. 

Reorganized last year to 
allow for increased expan- 
sion, communications has 
split into a triad unified by 
the Secretary's office. 

University publications, 
news and photography 
comprise the various 
branches with Bill Demi- 
noff, Dan Melley and Ever- 
ett Kosarick as their respec- 
tive directors. 

Of immeasurable im- 
portance is its role in influ- 
encing applicants and 
creating prestige. 



News Editor, 
Dan Melley 



285 




Dean Field Stresses Student Self Development 



"To continually look at student life on 
campus and see that the students" activi- 
ties are conducive to the improvement of 
self" is the primary concern of William 
Field, Dean of Students. 

In his divers roles as advisor, adminis- 
trator, counselor, and teacher, Dean Field 
looks forward to great physical and cul- 
tural growth for the university declaring 



that "si/.e inherently is neither good nor 
bad: There is a great potential for either." 
Always with an eye towards the needs 
of the student, he has been active in resi- 
dential college cultural programs, and 
will serve as a coordinating figure, with 
an associate dean for the new Boston 
branch. 



286 





Deans Direct Distaff Doings 



Assistant Dean Mrs. Gonon (left) chats with Dean Curtis. 



Miss Helen Curtis, Dean of Women, 
summarizes her campus role as helping 
girls to take full advantage of college, 
and to fulfill their abilities. 

"No monotony" is found in the posi- 
tion which has been hers since 1945. 

Dean Curtis possesses degrees from 
Iowa State and Columbia University. She 
has also studied at the University of 
London. 



Quality in education is a primary con- 
cern of Assistant Dean of Women, Mrs. 
Isabelle Gonon, who finds the dynamic 
growth of the university and its effects 
most exciting. 

With a BA from Smith and an MA 
from Mount Holyoke in addition to 
graduate studies at Middlebury and Bryn 
Mawr, Mrs. Gonon is well qualified for 
the position which she assumed in 1958. 



287 



[ndependence + Responsibility = Composite Ideal Urged by Mens 








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r 





Emphasizing the importance of the in- 
dividual student, Robert S. Hopkins Jr., 
has, since his appointment as Dean of 
Men in 1948, vigorously dedicated him- 
self "to the total welfare of men on cam- 
pus." 

A graduate of Rutgers University, 
Dean Hopkins served as Dean of New 
London Junior College prior to his com- 
ing here. 



Assistant Dean of Men William H. 
Burkhart, stresses the need for close stu- 
dent, faculty and administrative coopera- 
tion and alliance. 

Before his appointment in 1959, Mr. 
Burkhart was a faculty resident in Van 
Meter. He earned his B.A. at Emerson 
College and M.A. in business at UMass. 



Assistant to the Dean of Men, William Barnard counsels 
campus males. He is also advisor to the INDEX. 



New addition to the office is George Ogden, 
assistant to the Dean of Men. 



"Autonomy and responsibility" taken 
seriously by the student create an ideal 
situation at the University according to 
William W. Barnard, Assistant to the 
Dean of Men. 

A 1958 graduate of UMass Mr. Bar- 
nard received his appointment in 1963 
and is now doing graduate work. 



"To meet many students and to instill 
in them a measure of their own self 
worth" is the aim of George B. Ogden, 
Assistant to the Dean of Men. 

A new addition to the Dean's office, 
Mr. Ogden received his position in 1964. 
He was graduated from Hartwick college 
and is now working towards a M.A. 



Always ready to lend a helping 
hand are William Burkhart, 
Robert Hopkings, and William 
Barnard (left to right). 



289 






Edward Lewis. 1401 operator, (left) and Norman Menegat, 
supervisor, (right) make adjustments on computer console. 



Key punching information are Janet Handrich (front) and 
Joyce Edrington (rear). 



IBM -- Backbone of UM 



Admissions, courses, aver- 
ages. ID cards, schedules, stu- 
dent listings and even payroll fall 
into the realm of a group of 
offices located in the basement 
of old South College. In 1966 it 



will move to the new, enlarged 
Administration Building. 

Under the supervision of Mr. 
Norman Menegat, the Data Pro- 
cessing department with its 1401 
computer affects every aspect of 



student life. 

As soon as an application ar- 
rives, IBM works out a predic- 
tion formula of what the stu- 
dent's college performance will 
be. 











Difficult to imagine is the tremendous role played by the console main 
frame (left), accounting machine control panel (bottom at right), and 
magnetic tape file (top at right) in governing university life. 



Overlooking the printing of mid-semester grades are operator 
Edward Lewis, and programmers John Boudreau, Thomas 
Ashe, and Raymond Bombard (left to right). 



291 




Specialists 



With agricultural education at the University 
entering its second century, programs and depart- 
ments have been expanded to meet the demands 
of modern agriculture. 

In June of 1964 President Lederle and the 
Board of Trustees approved a proposal to estab- 
lish a Department of Environmental Science in 
the College of Agriculture. 

The new department results from the consoli- 
dation of the staffs of the Waltham Field Station 
and the Institute of Agricultural Industrial Mic- 
robiology located on campus. 

Contemporary environmental problems of 
plant, animal and man which result from the in- 
teraction of modern agriculture, suburban life, 
and the industrial economy are being studied. 



Iiiit V.ot manipulates aerograph. 



Research workers assemble equipment for experiment. 



292 



Join Forces To Study Agricultural Problems 



The scientific talents of the microbiologist, bi- 
ologist, entomologist, pathologist, ecologist, and 
physiologist are brought together by the consoli- 
dation. 

Greater academic quality and productiveness, 
in addition to an expansion of basic research and 
graduate programs in newly evolving areas of ex- 
perimental science are expected to result from 
the consolidation. 

Responsible for the development, co-ordina- 
tion and administration of the teaching, research, 
and extension programs at both Waltham and 
Amherst is Dr. John A. Naegele. Dr. Warren Lit- 
sky, Commc^nwealth professor of microbiology, 
continues to serve as director. 





John Yablonski prepares for an experiment. 



293 




University Offers 



Fall of 1964 saw the inauguration of a full- 
fledged Master of Fine Arts program at the uni- 
versity. 

Eighteen candidates are now enrolled in the 
program which provides concentrated study in 
the fields of painting, ceramics, sculpture, or 
printmaking supplemented by optional studio and 
art history courses. 

Emphasis in this graduate study program falls 
on creativity. It is hoped that students will in- 
crease their ability in a selected discipline and 
gain expressive strength. 



Artist mixes colors for desired effects. 



Studenl skultlics nude. 




294 



Fine Arts Degree 



Intense involvement on the part of the student 
is anticipated during the minimum two year 
course. 

To fulfill the thesis requirement each candidate 
is required to submit an exhibition of his work 
accompanied by a written statement of intent. 

Also enrolled in the program are ten special 
graduate students. Participation in the full aca- 
demic program is not expected of them but rather 
a concentration on the area of their special inter- 
est. 




Abstract designs capture the eye. 



Work is prepared for exhibition. 








1 



5 




UMass Operates 
Private Network 



Television cameras roll daily at Bartlett Hall where 
special courses are offered for future communications 
experts. 

Dr. Richard Harper of the Speech Department 
teaches two basic and advanced courses in television 
production and direction, which emphasize the studio 
procedure and techniques, besides providing a working 
knowledge of the television industry. 

During their two weekly two-hour lab periods, 
classes work with such standard TV equipment as 
cameras, amplifiers, and control boards to learn the 
mechanical basis of the television art. 

After developing technical skills, students exercise 
their creative abilities by writing, directing and produc- 
ing their own programs in groups of two or three. 

These closed-circuit productions have included a 
narration based on The Family of Man, and news and 
interview shows. 

Offered as part of a broadcasting major in the 
speech department, these television courses provide 
students with an intimate knowledge of one of the ma- 
jor influences of modem American life. 



Professor Richard Harper explains the mechanics of television production. 




Dr. Harper and students plan programing. 




Lights out in studio as cameras begin to roll. 




Freshman Engineers 

Study Modern 
Computer Techniques 






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Machine operator Everard Osbourne adjusts 
3600 computer. 



With increasing emphasis 
being placed on computer work, 
freshman engineers for the first 
time are required to take a 
course in computer science. 

According to Dr. J.A.N. Lee, 
acting director of the Computing 
Center, the modern engineer can- 
not help but be involved with 
computers and calculating de- 
vices. 

For this reason 320 freshmen 
engineers are learning how to 
program computers and to work 
with calculating machines, slide 
rules, and logarithmic and 
trigonometric tables. 

All work is done in the re- 
search computing center which 
was started in 1961 and is lo- 
cated on the third floor of the 
engineering laboratory. 



Checking computer output are analyst Sandy Parker (standing) and special student Tom 
Sullivan. 



297 



» \ s \ . 




Market statistics are analyzed. 

Program participants prepare industry charts under the direction of Dr. Chen. 




Students Recreate 



Business booms at the School of Busi- 
ness Administration where a special 
project enables students to gain practical 
experience in dealing with the business 
world. 

In order to apply the principles of 
management, decision-making, and plan- 
ning in a typical business environment, 
each student acts as a member of a com- 
pany in a three-firm industry and com- 
petes with two rival companies by the 
interpretation of economic situations. 

Some of the administrative problems 
students must handle are profit manage- 
ment, sales forecasting, production and 
inventory control, cost analysis, pricing 
policies, budgeting, and capital manage- 
ment. 



np 





Project data is interpreted for class members by Dr. Chen. 



Miniature Economy 



All the risk and uncertainty of actual business and 
economic situations is included in the exercise. 

Financial reports, fund flows, budgets, and sales 
forecasts are prepared and analyzed by each of the 
student participants. 

Freedom and responsibility on the part of the in- 
dividual student for setting his own company objec- 
tives is emphasized. Each is urged to determine a plan 
of action together with practical measures of control 
and also to evaluate criteria for testing successful per- 
formance. 

This simulated business world does not intend to 
duplicate real situations but rather stresses real rela- 
tionships. 

Of primary importance is the development of a 
manner of applying intellectual resources and a kind of 
scientific method to solve problems that will face fu- 
ture administrators. 




Dr. Gordon Chen readies sales graph for class discus- 
sion. 



299 




Remedial 



Student tests strength. 



Arm muscles are exercised. 





Athlete rests before receiving 
treatment. 



Classes Fulfill Individual Needs 



To develop each student to his physical potential, to 
develop skill and techniques in recreational activity ac- 
cording to the student's limitations, and to assist the 
student in understanding his limitations are the three- 
fold objectives of the men's adaptive physical educa- 
tion program. 

Under the direction of Dr. Robert James, the 
adaptive program works together with Dr. Gage and 
the University health services in determining the stu- 
dents who will take remedial activities. 

Enrolled in the special section are those students 
whose physical condition restricts their participation in 
the regular physical education class. 

Through adaptive physical education, it is possible 
to modify the participation of restricted students by 
excluding them from potentially hazardous activities or 
by creating individualized programs to meet their 
needs. 

Each student, even those with long or permanent 



disabilities, is helped to discover the significant and 
meaningful role that physical activity can play in his 
life. 

The types of disabilities are largely orthopedic in 
nature with a variety of associated neurological dis- 
turbances, organic manifestations and post surgical 
conditions. 

A diversified and individualized program, adaptive 
physical education offers developmental activities, 
games, sports and rhythms. Interests, capacities and 
limitations of the students are considered. 

In addition to adaptive sports, therapeutic exercises 
are offered to the man who might have to strengthen 
muscles or stabilized joints because of an injury. 

With the opening of Boyden gym, adaptive physical 
education acquired many new pieces of apparatus and 
equipment which are located in a specially designed 
therapeutic room. 



Special equipment simulates bicycle. 




I 





: ft 




Women's Athletics 



To help the University woman achieve her role as a 
well-rounded individual is the aim of the women's 
physical education department. 

Available to every female student are courses plan- 
ned "to provide recreational activity, to improve in- 
dividual skills, to develop body grace and efficiency, 
and to increase health and vigor." 

Of special interest to outdoor enthusiasts is the win- 
ter ski program. Beginners, intermediates and ad- 
vanced skiers are all allowed to participate. Thus every 
ability receives the necessary attention. 

Weather permitting students depart every Tuesday 
and Thursday afternoons for the Mt. Tom ski slopes 
where instruction is given by the Mt. Tom ski staff. 

Classes were filled to capacity with 120 registered 
this past winter. 




Student tests prowess on par;illcl bars. 



Fellow gymnasts mark individual scores. 



302 



Develop Feminine Charms 



Of increased interest to women students has been 
the field of gymnastics. 

Emphasis has been placed on the educational as- 
pects of the gymnastics classes which have you "try" 
everything thus discovering what you can do best. 

The purpose of this program is to give the individual 
mastery of himself in a wide variety of situations. 

With the new techniques latent skills are developed 
and many of the less gifted who tend to become easily 
discouraged gain confidence. The student is presented 
a problem and allowed to select his own way to solve 
it. 

Less competent students and the more timid do not 
become so easily discouraged nor do they feel that 
they are challenged beyond their powers. Versatility of 
movement is thus encouraged. 





Students mount ski lift. 
Instructor demonstrates skiing basics. 





Gymnast displays balancing ability. 




Joan Kessler analyzes a blood sample. 




Diane Anzaldi, Paula Witovsky, and Joan Kesblei uie a centrifuge to separate blood com- 
ponents. 




Med Techs 

Intern At 

Holyoke Hospital 



Aspiring medical technicians 
can now participate in a Train- 
ing program which the Public 
Health department is sponsoring 
in conjunction with Holyoke 
Hospital. 

According to the new four 
year curriculum, students intern 
at the aflfiliated hospital for 
twelve consecutive months after 
their junior year to fulfill final 
requirements for a Bachelor of 
Science degree. 

A special examination then 
certifies them with the Registry 
of Medical Technologists. 

In an alternate plan, med tech 
majors follow the regular four 
year university program before 
advancing to concentrated study 
at a specialized school of medi- 
cal technology. 

Graduates of this program are 
also qualified for careers in in- 
dustrial and research laborato- 
ries, civil service, and public 
health. 



Diane and Paula examine cultures while Joan records results. 



304 




Assistant Professor Rachel Smith explains problems in psychiatric nursing. 



Nurses Enjoy On-The-Job Training 



The School of Nursing provides a valuable oppor- 
tunity for interested students to gain actual experience 
in working with the mentally ill. 

In cooperation with the psychiatrists, clinical psy- 
chologists, psychiatric nurses, social workers, and oc- 
cupational therapists of the Northampton State Hospi- 
tal Day Care Center, the student nurse acts as a mem- 
ber of a therapeutic team and is also responsible for 
working directly with an assigned patient. 

This program serves several purposes. The student 
learns to utilize her professional skills as well as to 



collaborate with members of related professional disci- 
plines. In addition, the therapeutic nature of the pro- 
gram helps patients to become more emotionally ma- 
ture and increasingly able to cope with their own prob- 
lems. 

According to Mary A. Maher, Dean of the School 
of Nursing, few baccalaureate nursing programs pro- 
vide learning experiences through such a program, 
whose success is evident from the fact that three of its 
graduates have returned to the Day Care Center in a 
professional capacity. 



305 



UMass Goes Around 



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Seen from the air is the area for the girls' school in Tororo, Uganda. 



306 



The World 









Dean Albert Purvis of the School of Education serves as general supervisor for 
the Uganda school project. 



UMass has gone international with the expansion of its educational 
activities to include an educational experiment in Uganda, Africa. 

In conjunction with the United States Agency for International 
Development, the University is sponsoring construction of a six year 
interracial and interdenominational boarding school for girls at 
Tororo. 

As part of this experiment in transplanting modern American edu- 
cational methods in a new nation, approximately eight University- 
recruited teachers and administrators, in cooperation with an equal 
number of native Uganda educators, will devote two years to organ- 
izing and teaching the curriculum at the new school. 

Meanwhile, thirteen Ugandan teachers will visit UMass for con- 
centrated study of American teaching methods, in preparation for 
eventually replacing the temporary American personnel. 

The school accomodates 420 business, home economics, and col- 
lege preparatory students on a campus whose twenty-one buildings 
include dormitories, a library, an administration building, an audi- 
torium and classroom facilities. 

According to Dean Albert Purvis of the School of Education, 
general supervisor of the project, the Tororo experiment is "a chal- 
lenge to try to develop schools that will function well in an emerging 
country and society." 



f^imiifiTfrffr"^] 



307 



Goodell Keeps Pace 
With Campus Expansion 



"Libraries are not made; they grow" 
states a familiar quotation and so it is at 
Goodell library where increase and ex- 
pansion are the keywords. 

The immediate goal is a one million 
volume collection for 1970. Increase in 
university graduate programs have made 
this a necessity. 

294,672 books filled the shelves last 
year with 40,000 to 50,000 works due to 
be added this year. 

Facilities available to students include 
an outside book return and reference, 
microfilm, copying, reserve reading, and 
periodical services. 

Four College Cooperative Program 
sponsors an inter-library loan system 
which enables junior and senior students 
to borrow freely books by filing a request 
at the reference desk. 

Located on the second floor level is 
the Hampshire Inter-Library Center, a 
cooperative research collection, which is 
owned and supported by UMass, Smith, 
.Mt. Holyoke and Amherst. Consisting 
mainly of scholarly magazines and jour- 
nals, the center is used by students en- 
gaged in honors projects and research 
programs. 

Expansion plans for 1966 include a 
research library which will provide more 
extensive services to graduate students. 
Also scheduled in the near future is a 
physical science-engineering library as 
part of a graduate center. 




A portion of anticipated one million volume collection awaits shelving. 




308 




Stacks open intellectual doors for students. 





Goodell life centers around the circulation desk. 



309 




University Press 



"Roll the presses!" was heard at 
UMass this year when the university 
broadened its intellectual horizons with 
the inauguration of its own University 
Press. 

Under the direction of Leone A. Bar- 
ron and a ten-member Press Committee 
headed by Dr. Howard H. Quint of the 
history department, the Press has had an 
impressive first year. 

It began as an outgrowth of the well- 
established Massachusetts Review, whose 
former co-editor. Dr. Sidney Kaplan, 
served in 1962 as chairman of a commit- 
tee organized to investigate the possibil- 
ity of a full-fledged UMass Press. 

The first accomplishment of this com- 
mittee was "A Curious Quire," a collec- 
tion of poems by Leon Barron, David 
Clark, Stanley Kochler, and Robert 
Tucker of the English Department. 

Since this unofficial first publication, 
the Press has made contributions to sev- 
eral fields of literature. 

Its first official publication The Talka- 
tive President: The Off-The-Record Press 
Conferences of Calvin Coolidge, edited by 
Dr. Quint and Professor Robert H. Ferrell 
of Indiana University, was soon followed 



Mrs. Leone A. Barron, former managing editor and associate editor on the 
Massachusetts Review, directs the UMass press. 



UMass imprint for all books was designed by 
College. 



Elliot Offner, professor of art at Smith 




310 



Publishes First Books 



by Twelve Birds, a collection of poems by 
Herbert Kenny of the Boston Globe and 
drawings by Jack Coughlin of the Art 
Department. 

Further publications included Studies 
in the Philosophy of Charles Sanders 
Pierce: Second Series, edited by Dean 
Moore of the Graduate School and Dr. 
Richard S. Robin of Mt. Holyoke, and 
The Sociology and Anthropology of 
Mental Illness: A Reference Guide by 
Dr. Edwin Driver of the Sociology De- 
partment. 

Another sociology professor, Thomas 
Wilkinson, contributed a book on The 
Urbanization of Japanese Labor, while 
Peter Heller of the German-Russian De- 
partment published Dialectics and An- 
nihilism, a volume of essays on Lessing 
Nietzsche, Kafka, and Mann. 

Final publications included A Check- 
list of the Publications of Thomas Bird 
Mosher of Portland, Maine, prepared by 
associate librarian Benton Hatch, and 
The Symphonies of Ralph Vaughan Wil- 
liams, by Elliott Schwartz, formerly of 
the Music Department. 

Books proposed for publication are 
evaluated by specialists in their fields be- 
fore being discussed by the Press Com- 
mittee including Chairman Quint; Dean 
Moore, German-Russian department head 
Frederuk Ellert, Dr. Luther Allen of the 
Government Department, University Pub- 
lications editor William Deminoff, UM 
Bookstore assistant manager and Press 
business manager Richard Dietzel, Dr. 
F. J. Franus of the Food Technology 
Department, librarian Hugh Montgomery, 
Dr. Merit White of civil engineering, and 
Gilbert Mottla, assistant to the dean of 
the College of Agriculture. 

According to Mrs. Barron, the Press 
plans an equally busy future, with a view 
towards becoming less and less provin- 
cial by making its services available to a 
wider variety of authors. 




Co-editor of the first University press hook is Dr. Howard H. (^iiinl. head of the history 

department. 

Helping in the selection of books for publication is Press Committee member Dean Edward 

C. Moore of the Graduate School. 





312 




The Martyred, currently on the best seller list, re- 
flects Richard Kim's intense involvement in the Korean 
conflict. 

During his youth he was influenced by his father, 
who was active in the resistance eff'orts against the 
Japanese forces. 

The Korean born author came to the United States 
in 1954. A recipient of three M.A. degrees, Kim was 
awarded fellowships for study at Johns Hopkins, the 
University of Iowa, and Harvard. 

He previously taught at Long Beach State before 
coming to UMass as an assistant professor of English. 

Kim, who is married and the father of two children, 
stresses the need for expansion and intensification of a 
creative arts program. He is currently working on a 
new book, the Innocent. 



313 




ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA 




Honor Society For Freshmen Women 

First Row: H. Kucinski, Secretary: L. Sass. President: B. Sandquist, A. Andrade, S. Kyle, E. Scott, J. Golub, C. Amiot. 
Devens. Vice-President: L. Starzyk, Historian. Second Row: P. J, Krupsky, E. Lacliman. 



PHI ETA SIGMA 




Honor Society For Freshmen Men 



First Row: D. Eaton. W. Blackwell. F. Macklcr. Secretary; R. Healy, G. Maloncy, K. Hardy, K. Huruilz. R. Rcisman. G. 
Lebcl, President; L. Brockman. Vice-President; R. Lyford, Rosenberg. A. Ayanaba, G. Johnson. V. Uarrclto. 
Treasurer; M. Sousa. D. Smola. Second Row: Y. Tidhar. B. 

314 



ETA KAPPA NU 




Electrical Engineering Honor Society 



First Row: R. Windyka, A. Sturgis, Bridge Correspondent; J. 
Poulin, Recording Secretary; D. Smith, Vice-President; W. 
Chace, President; D. Hosley, Treasurer; Dr. C. Roys, Faculty 
Advisor; C. Bonneau, Corresponding Secretary. Second Row: 



F. Mason, R. Fillmore, A. Parsons, R. Rockwell, F. ONeil, M. 
Sinasky, A. Taylor, R. Roussin, J. Kos, J. Preble, R. Lydick, J. 
Keenan. 



TAU BETA PHI 




Engineering Honor Society 



First Row: R. Windyka, R. Fillmore, C. Dolan, Recording 
Secretary; A. Parsons, President; R. Rockwell, Vice-President; 
G. Thomas, Cataloger; J. Marcus, Adviser; C. Bonneau. Sec- 



ond Row: S. Shor, H. Thompson, W. Chace. W. Jablonowski, 
A. Piekut, J. Poulin, D. Connors, D. Smith, F. Mason, H. 
Cheever, R. Roussin, M. Sinasky, D. Hosley, C. Fauth. 



315 



OMICRON NU 




Home Economics Honor Society 

C. Olson, Vice-President; C. Beaumont. Secretary; J. Priessler, President; J. Kettumen, Treas- 
urer. Missing: J. Stevens, R. Harrison. 

XI SIGMA PI 




Forestry Honor Fraternity 

S. Johnson. Assistant Forester: R. Ginkus. Secretary — Fiscal Agent; H. Abbott. Faculty Ad- 
visor; A. Valiunas. Forester. Missing: D. Blodgett. Ranger. 



316 



SIGMA GAMMA EPSILON 





Geology and Earth Science Honor Society 



(Top Picture) First Row: J. Inners, Secretary; 
D. Matz, Vice-President; A. Nelson, Advisor; 
J. Wessel, President. Second Row: T. Pike, J. 
Hoodcox, J. Gaffney. 



(Bottom Picture) First Row: J. Cabaup, E. 
Raab, D. Halpin. Second Row: A. Tuukanen, 
K. Dolan, S. Clebnik. D. Carpenter, T. Kilroy. 
Missing: J. Guthrie, H. James, R. Froll, Treas- 
urer. 



317 



PHI KAPPA PHI 



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National All-University Scholastic Honor Society 



(Top Picture) First Row: H. Klinkcr, R. 
Weiner, J. Oltsch. Second How: S. Tracy, L. 
Sironi. J. Prcissler. 



(Bottom Picture) First Row: N. Morin, T. 
Panl<c. D. L'Heureux. Second Row: P. Mc- 
Nally. C. Oiscn. M. Graves. Missina: S. Cole- 
man, J. Dabkowski. B. I.andis, P. Long, R. 
MacLeod. O. Blodgclt, P. Gully. 



318 



HONORS COLLOQUIA 




Directing a weekly seminar is A. W. Boicourt of Floriculture. 



Speaking out on role of individual in society are left to 
right M. Alpert and E. Yorke. 



To Stimulate independent thought and 
challenge the intellect is the aim of the 
University Honors Colloquia Program. 

Until 1960 the Honors Program was 
restricted to seniors but since then has 
expanded to include all four classes with 



112 underclassmen participating this 
year. 

Conducted as relaxed seminars, the 
groups meet informally each week to dis- 
cuss contemporary problems. 



319 



Government professor Lewis Mainser 
served as President of the Associa- 
tion. 




UMass Wins Key 



Miss Audrey Duckert of the English department and Secretary of the 
Association checks student records. 




"The scholar is that man who must 
take unto himself all the ability of the 
time, all the contributions of the past, all 
the hopes of the future" declares Ralph 
Waldo Emerson in his definition of The 
American Scholar. 

Striving for this goal, the members of 
the University Phi Beta Kappa Associa- 
tion have been working since 1938 to 
obtain a Phi Beta Kappa charter for 
UMass. 

Years of hope and hard work were re- 
warded this year when on its third peti- 
tion members were granted a charter be- 
coming Phi Beta Kappa, Nu, of Massa- 
chusetts. 

The Council, which is the legislative 
body of the Society, invites an institution 
to accept a charter in much the same 
way as a chapter invites an individual to 
accept membership. 

Spirit of a college, the quality of its 
work, and the achievements of its gradu- 
ates are weighed by the Committee of 
Qualifications. 



Dean Robert Wagner helped to 
formulate UMass petitions. 




To Scholarship 



Stricter than any accrediting agency 
the Committee emphasizes standards of 
scholarship and encourages support of 
the hberal arts and science. 

The first "Greelc letter" society, Phi 
Beta Kappa was founded in 1776 at the 
College of William and Mary with its 
first chapters granted to Harvard and 
Yale. 

The gold key, insignia of the society, 
with its pointing finger and three stars 
symbolizes the ambition of young 
scholars and the three distinguishing 
principles of their society — Friendship, 
Morality, and Learning. 

On March 30 the chapter was for- 
mally installed at UMass with the induc- 
tion of forty charter members of the fac- 
ulty and staff. 

First student members were elected 
this spring with emphasis placed not on 
"the 4.0 brain student" but on the good 
student with the ability to think inde- 
pendently without memorization. 




Dr. Howard Brogan of the English department acted as Association 
Treasurer. 



321 




SENIORS 





First Row: N. Stack, L. Willis, C. Jandris, S. Longfellow, J. Janik, P. 
Denesanka, M. Gates, A. Richards, J. Kessler, K. Westman, P. Ver- 
nell, S. Glickman. Second Row: R. Healey, L. Charest, M. Smith, R. 



Zuckerman, J. Murphy, J. Murpliy, J Cloodrich, W. Wilkinson, D. 
Bushee, A. Baltren. 



Senior Class Officers And Executive 




Plastic raincoats rather than diplomas 
will be given out at UMass graduation 
this year. 

Weather and time present major prob- 
lems to a smooth running activity, so the 
Council has introduced a series of inno- 
vations to cope with these factors for 
June 13, 1965. 

Plastic raincoats will be provided for 
all guests at commencement exercises 
thus insuring outside commencement. 
With such a program the class is assured 
of graduating from UMass en masse . . . 
and friends and relatives can attend en 
masse as well. 

Another innovation will be the elimi- 
nation of the traditional diploma from 
the ceremony. Each graduate will receive 
his diploma jacket, but the diploma itself 
will be mailed to him. This will eliminate 
complex line-up procedures. 

Graduation has not been the only 
problem to come under the Council's 
scrutiny. An attempt has also been made 
to centralize Senior Week in general thus 
assuring that every senior will be able to 
take advantage of the week's proceed- 
ings. 




R. O'Leary, President; A. Williams, Treasurer; 
D. Podbrbs, Vice-President; D. Stoklosa, Secre- 
tary. 



Council Initiate Important Changes 

In Senior Week And Graduation 



58 Elected To Who's Who Among Students 




In American Colleges And Universities 




RUTH AMES 
DAVID AXELROD 
ANNE BALTREN 
LINDA BODWELL 
DONALD BOYD 
DENNIS BUSHE 
LEONARD CHEREST 
MICHAEL CHULADA 
JUDITH ANN CROOKER 
JEFFERY S. DAVIDOW 
NANCY DOWNING 
KATHERINE EICHORN 
ESTHER EISENBERG 
LINDA FISHER 
SUSAN GLICKMAN 
STEPHEN GRAHAM 
WENDY HALL 
REGGIE HARRISON 
ROBERT HEALEY 
JOHN D. HEALY 
WADE HOUK 
MAIDA HURWITZ 
ROSS P. JONES 
SALLY KANGAS 
MARSHALL KAROL 
THOMAS KIERNAN 
ARTHUR LABRIE 
WILLIAM LANDIS 
RALPH LENNON 
DEBORAH LINDBERG 
RICHARD LITTLEFIELD 
KATHERINE MANNING 
WILLIAM MARTIN 
GEORGE MASSELAM 
SHEILA McREVEY 
KATHERINE MEEHAN 
GEORGE T. MICHAEL 
SANDRA MORSE 
JIM MULCAHY 
WILLIAM NAJAM 
ROBERT O'LEARY 
JOSEPH PIECUCH 
DAVID PODBROS 
RINA POTISH 
RICHARD REPETA 
ANNE RICHARDS 
SUSANNA RYBAK 
JOSEPH SMITH 
NANCY STACK 
TERRY STOCK 
DOROTHY STOKLOSA 
SUSAN TRACY 
THEODORE WEINBERG 
JANET WHITE 
MARY JANE WHITE 
WILLIAM WILKINSON 
ANN WILLIAMS 
JUDITH ZENIS 




RAYMOND H. ABBOTT 




DAVID GORDON ADAMS 




A 



T 




JOHN H. AHO. JR. 







1'. _r 



DAVID N. AMSDEN 



▲% 



PATRICIA A. ALBANO JEFFREY ALLENTUCH 





JOHN W. ANDERSON 



LINDA ANN ALBERTSON CARL J. ALSING 





PAUL L. ANDERSON 



JUDITH ANN ALBETSKl RUTH EVELYN AMES 



CONSTANCE M. AKERLEY 




19 



JAMES H. ALLEN JOHN D. AMIKO 

328 




ROBERT SAMUEL ANNINO 




DIANE M. ANZALDI 




^ 



■^mr- 



4 




SAMUEL WADE APGAR 



65 





PATRICIA ANN APPICELLI VICTOR A. ARONOW 




LYNETTE JO ARCARDI SHEILA ANN ATWELL 




ROBERT JOSEPH ARMATA JOSEPH A. AUGUSTA 





ROSE FRANCES ARNONE ROBERT B. AUSTIN 

329 




JO-ANN MARIE AUTINO 






DAVID B. AXELROD 




RICHARD T. BAILEY 




DALE EDMUND BAILLY 





LOIS ANN BASILISSA 







> 



: ^ -.■■■- .:.■. ::.. v. -■ 1 *. . . 

RICHARD S. BATES 




JAMES L. BATTS 



ANN E. BAKER 





DONALD E. BALLARD 



rHOMAS R. BARRALI MICHAHI, L. BASILE 

330 




BRUCE A. BAUMANN 




FRANKLIN JAY BAVER 



^K 


5V 


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ANN H. BAXTER 





ROGER A. BENNIS 




ROBERT LOUIS BENOIT 




FRANCO, BERAK 



oaij£' .i[£l£e;^^>t^ 



CAROL ROSE BEAUMONT 




SUSAN P. BERENSON 




PETER BECK 




LOUISA BENGEN EDMOND G. BENOIT 

331 




RALPH JAMES BERGER 




RONALD O. BERGER 




PHILIP EDWARD BERLIN 




JOHN EMMETT BERNIER 





EDWARD H. BLANCHARD 




STEPHEN A. BLANKSTEEN 



JOHN M. BLACKMORE 



19 



DAVID H. BICKUM 






ALAN S. BERNSTEIN 



JOYCE E. BIGELOW DAVID T. BLANCHARD 

332 



ROY J. BLITZER 




DAVID S. BLODGETT 




GWENDOLYN BLODGETT 



65 





DAVID A. BOURNE 




ELIZABETH M. BOURQUE 




ARCHER BOWEN JR. 



BRUCE B. BONNER JR. 




LINDA R. BODWELL 





DOUGLAS B. BOND BRUCE JOSEPH BOURGUE DONALD W. BOYD JR. 

333 




RICHARD L. BORDEN 




JOYCE L. BRACKETT 




PAMELA H. BRADY 




BARTON MYRON BRASS 






ESTHER JEAN BRATTIN DAVID L, BROAD 




ELIZABETH ANN BREEN VICTORIA BROOKS 




MARY JANE BRIGGS DARYLL HERBERT BROSE 



r 







'▲ 






MK HAI.I. JOSI I'll likllA DOUGLAS A. BROTHERS 

334 



KAREN BROWN 



, # 4iF^W JUL 




PETER BROWN 




RICHARD S. BROWN 



19 




SHEILA PHYLLIS BROWN 




STEVEN W. BROWN 




JANINA E. BRUELL 



65 




lOHN PETER BUBRISKI 



GAYLE P. BUCKLEY 




MARDA BUCHHOLZ 



LINDA B. BUCK 



VICTOR R. BURDICK 




EUGENE JACOB BURGIN 





NEIL F. BURKE 




PATRICIA A. BURKE 




SANDRA K. BURLINGAME 




BEVERLY JUNE BURNISKE 



MERLE K. BUCKHOUT 



LEO T. BURKE, JR. 



335 







DAVID M. BUSKEY 



JOANNE iM. BURON 






1 



EUGENE W. BUTLER 





PAMELA J. BUTLER 



VIRGINIA IRENE BUSHA 





ROBERT M. CABRAL 




CHRISTINA N. CADY 



19 



i^-« I '-•^'d 






DENNIS MICHAEL BUSHE 



RICHARD J. BUTLER DANIEL C. CAHILL 

336 




DOROTHY M. CAHILL 









PAUL ROBERT CAISSE 



RICHARD W. CALCASOLA 



1| 




•"WET T "^ 1 



dk WJ ^^M 



RICHARD J. CALLAHAN 




CHRISTINE CAMANDONA 




RICHARD A. CAMPBELL 




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ESTHERAE TOBEY CAREY 




ERIC JOEL CARLSON 




MAUREEN J. CARMELL 




MARY P. CARROLL 



PETER HENRY CAMPOLI 




RICHARD D. CARROLL 




CHARLES E. CANANE, JR. 




ROBERT A. CARDWELL ROBERT W. CARLSON 

337 




JAMES T. CARSWELL 




GEORGE CARVALHO, JR. 




ALAN MEREDITH CASE 




PATRICK J. CASTAGNARO 





JAMES S. CHECHILLE 




LAWRENCE H. CHEEVER 



19 



DONALD L. CHAMBERLAIN 






VIRGINIA ANN CAWLEY CAROL JEAN CHAPMAN JOANNE CHARYNA 

338 



BORIS CHEVONE 



IBiiiiiPiPiiSiii 




l^r— /" 




FRANCIS J. CHLAPOWSKI 



k 




ROBERT W. CHLEBEK 



65 





GAIL BENVIE CLAYTON 




SHERMAN CLEBNIK 




THOMAS E. CLELAND, JR. 



THOMAS E. CLARK 




LAURIE M. CHRISTIANSEN 




DAVID VINCENT CLARK VIRGINIA M. CLARK 

339 




ANNE E. CLINCH 




MARSTON CLOUGH 




ROLAND F. CLOUTIER 




PHILIP K. COAKLEY 




BARBARA A. COCCHI 






KENNETH AIME COLLINS 



LILLIAN T. COCHRAN LIL-IUDITH COHEN 




COLIN STEPHEN COE WILLIAM ARTHUR COLE 




SUSAN COFLAN STEPHEN R. COLEMAN 




ANNE E. COHEN WARREN S. COLLINGS 

340 




MARY L. COLLINS 




CHARLES H. COMEY, III 



19 




JOAN E. CONGDON 




RICHARD F. CONLEY 




DAVID M. CONNERS 



65 




DIANE LILLIAN COOK 



IAN NEAL COOKE 




MARILYN M. COPE 




ELIZABETH JEAN COOK BARRY R. COPPINGER 




THOMAS F. CORDIS 




JAMES H. COOPER VIRGINIA MARIE COREA 

341 




ROBERT W. CORMIER 




CHARLES E. CORNELLIER 




ROLAND FRANCIS COTE 




BLANCHE M. COURNOYER 




PAULA C. COX 




JEAN CHRISTINE CRAIGIN 





V. PAMELA CROWELL 




DAVID A. DAISY 




JOHN A. DALY 




JOHN L. DALY 



WILLIAM T. CRANE 





RONALD C. CROCKER 



SHEILA C. CROWLEY JANE DABKOWSKI 

342 




ARNOLD M. DANIELS 




PATRICIA A. DANISINKA 




DONALD F. DARGIE 





RICHARD J. DECILIO 




WALTER S. dePOREST 




FRANCESCO DelULIS 



JACQUELINE M. DAVID 




ELLEN M. DELAHUNT 




JEFFERY S. DAVIDOW 




LEE O. DAVIS GEORGE DeFALCO 

343 




\ 




^7 



X 



THOMAS M. DELVISCO 




LEON E. DENSMORE 




MILDRED A. DEPELTEAU 




WILLIAM C. DEVLIN 




EILEEN JANICE DIGGLE 



SALLY A. DICKSON 



LOIS DiPASQUALE 



SISE 




ALICE P. DOERING 




CHARLES W. DOLAN 



19 




CAROLYN DII.INDIK MAKIA I. DISANO 

344 



KATHRYN H. DONALDSON 






WILLIAM R. DONOVAN 




DONALD J. DOUGLASS 



65 




RALPH H. DRAPER, JR 




GERALD L. DUCHARME 




NORMAN P. DUFRESNE 




JUDITH L. DUNTON 



JOHN M. DUBIEL 




WILLIAM R. DOWDALL 





ARTHUR E. DRISCOLL VALERIE N. DuBOIS 

345 




NOLA A. EARL 




BRUCE EASTMAN 




DA\1D FRANCIS EGAN 




CAROL VON EGGERS 








ESTHER EISENBERG NORMAN E. ELLARD 




RICHARD N. EK MARGARET SUSIE ELLIS 




MARCIA ANN ELASOWICH PATRICIA MARIE ELLIS 



KATHLEEN A. EICHHORN I 




SUSAN JEAN ELDER EVERETT R. EMINO 

346 




BARBARA T. ENGEL 




WILLIAM O. ENNIS 




CAROL EVANS 



19 




KENDALL H. EVANS 




VIRGINIA EWING 




NANCY L. EYLER 



65 




STEPHEN MARTIN EZER JAMES JOSEPH FASSELL 








« 



NEIL F. FALBY 




RUTH H. FEINBERG 




JOHN D. FARRAGHER JOAN CAROLYN FELIO 




MEREDITH LEE FARRELL PAUL JOSEPH FERENZ 

347 




CHARLES D. FERNALD 




MARY GRACE FERREIRA 




SHEILA Y. FERRINI 




JUDITH P. FERRIS 




KATHLEEN FIDDES 




ROBERT L. FIERRA 





RICHARD P. FILLMORE 





FREDERICK J. FISKAALI 



MARY M. FINNEGAN 





RITA WINGFIELD FISHEL 



KENNETH FITZGERALD 



19 




PATRICIA A. FLANAGAN 




JAMES C. FLEMING, JR. 




WILLIAM R. FORAND 



KENNETH E. FIFE 




JOHN L. FILLIO 






LINDA A. FISHER ROBERTA 1 IIZSIMMONS DAVID O. FOKEN 

348 




HELEN B. FORSBERG 




MAXINE D. FORWARD 




CHARLES L. H. FRANCIS 




RICHARD C. FRANSON 




FRANK J. FREDERICK 



65 




THOMAS J. FREEDMAN 





JOHN FRIAR. II 




BRIAN REID FRY 




MARION B. FULLER 




NANCY E. FULLER 




JOHN FRANCISCO 





GAIL FREEDLANDER DONALD E. FRIES 

349 




P. FULLER 




JAMES R. GABRIEL 




LEAH C. GALANDZY 




THELIA T. GALLAGHER 




LORRAINE P. GAUTHIER 




DORIS MILDA GEIGNER 




CHARLOTTE L. GELETKA 



19 



WILLIAM R. GAKRIIY 




JLDITH ANNE GALLANT 




MARILYN GATES SANDRA JLANNK GAY 

350 




LINDA RUIH (il NIRY 




MICHELE B. GERRIG 




BYRON M. GETCHELL 



65 




RONALD PHILIP GILBERT 




WAYNE C. GOEBEL 




FREDERICK T. GOLDER 




GERALD M. GOLDHABER 



SUSAN JANE GLICKMAN 





DONA LEONA GIBERTI RICHARD E. GINKUS EILEEN GLYNN 

351 




BONITA J. GOLDMAN 





DONALD F. GOODELL 



JANET C. GOLDMAN 




d7^ 



RICHARD N. GOLDSTEIN 





LAWRENCE F. GOLONKA 





CLAIRE E. GRAHAM 



SUSAN GORKA 





STEVEN R. GRAHAM 



JOHN H. GOODRICH, JR. CONRAD W. GOSSELIN 





DAVID P. GRALENSKI 



ALAN L. GORDAN DOUGLAS ROY GOULD 




19 



IRA GORI-lNKi.H RICHARD A. GRABIKC, JR. 

352 




MARTHA B. GRAVES 




WILLIAM A. GREEN 




ROBERT B. GREENBERG 



65 





RICHARD L. GREENE 



NELSON C. GREENOUGH 



lANE GREGORITCH 



THOMAS R. GRIFFITH 




ROBERT D. GRIGG 




BRUCE GRIMALDI 




lOANNA GREGORY STANLEY GROMELSKI. JR. 

353 




MARY JANE GROVE 




DOUGLAS JOHN GROWITZ 




PATRICIA A. GULLY 




SANFORD C. GUNN 




MARCIA ANN GUSTIN 




EUGENE J. GUZIK 





DONALD G. HAGBERG 




MICHAEL R. HALEY 




BETSY ANN HALL 





MEREDITH A. HALSTEAD 



ELISABETH B. HALLBERG 




PAUL R. HALLET 



19 




RICHARD ALAN HAMPE 




ANITA HANDALIAN 



VICTORIA G. HAARD 




RICHARD E. HAAVISTO 





WENDY A. HALL KOBLKI BKUf 1. IIALLO( K 



354 




JOYCI-: H. IIANKH 




THOMAS B. HANLEY 




EDWARD W. HANSON 





PHILIP R. HATCH 




ANN HAVILAND 




MICHAEL HAWRYLCIW, JR. 



WILLIAM B. HARMON 




DONALD F. HAYNES 




CHARLES HARRIS 




JANICE LEE HARTY RICHARD N. HATFIELD 

355 




JOHN DENNIS HEALEY 




JOHN JOSEPH HEALY 




ROBERT W. HEAL> 




KAREN E. HEBERT 




ROBERT E. HICKMAN 




D. SCOTT HINKLE 




JUDY HIRSHBERG 



19 



CAROL L. HERMSDOFF 




FREDERICK HKMBROLCjH 




CjIT-N A. HIKSI ^• KOIil Kl I . III! I HI Kfi 



356 




RUI II MAKII HIRST 




SUE HITCHCOCK 




MIGUEL A. HNATOW 



65 





PAULA MACY HUGHES 




ROBERT WILLIAM HUGO 




BARBARA ANN HULICK 



SARAH WESTON HOWE 




MONA H. HODNICKI 




WADE HOUK JUDITH R. HRIPAK 

357 




GERRY JAMES HULL 




CAROLYN L. HULTON 





BARBARA HURSH HENRY COLT HYDE. JR. 



DONALD B. HUNTER 





MAIDA D. HURWITZ WILLIAM D. IRVING 



NANCi J. HURD 





JOHN M. HURLEY, JR. 




f I 




MARY J. HUTCHINSON WILLIAM D, IRVING 




RICHARD H. HUICHINSON DAVID K. ISABELLE 

358 




HARVEY H. ISSENBERG 




THEODORE C. JACOBS 




KENNETH D. JACOBSON 



19 




ROBERT ALAN JACOBSCTN 




SUSAN MARIE JACQUE 




MICHAEL E. JAMISON 



65 




CORNELIA R. JANDRIS 



JOAN CAROL JANIK 



JOHN F. JEKANOWSKI 




CATHLEEN A. JANES THOMAS R. JEKANOWSKI 




ELLEN L. JEWETT 




^1 A 



DOROTHY A. JEKANOWSKI JOHN N. JOHANSON 

359 




CAROL TERESE JOHNSON 




KAY JOHNSON 




LESTER R. JOHNSON, II 




RICHARD W. JOHNSON 




STEPHEN P. JOHNSON 




KAREN F. JOKISAARI 





ROSS P. JONES 




^ 




METRO M. KALAFATAS 




JAMES KALLSTROM 




KARL WILLIAM KAMENA 



BETTE JANE JONAS 





DORIS B. JONES 




SANDRA K. JONES RONALD HARMON JULIUS MARC lA HI.AINH KANH 

360 




SALLY ANN KANGAS 




ARNOLD STERN KAPLAN 





MARSHALL A. KAROL 



65 




WILLIAM J. KELLEY, JR. 




BARBARA E. KELLY 




RONALD CHARLES KELLY 



MICHAEL S. KAPLAN 




JOSEPH A. KEOHANE 




TOBY A. KAPLAN 




JOHN T. KEEN AN CHARLES W. KELLOGG 

361 




JOY F. KERR 




KATHERINE KETLER 



ROGER ALDEN KINNEAR 




ANGELA KLARMANN 




DONALD A. KLEIN, JR. 



19 



GORDON BRYCE KIEFER 




JUDITH ANN KETTTjNEN 




THOMAS G. KIF-.KNAN LAURENCE J. KIRWIN 

362 




LAWRHNC K P. KLEMANN 




LOUIS A. KLIMOSKI, JR. 




RICHARD J. KLIMOSKI 



65 





RICHARD F. KOCHANEK 




RICHARD J. KONIECZNY 




JACK K. KOOYOOMJIAN 



VIRGINIA KOCHANOWSKI 





ELAINE J. KLINKER RICHARD H. KNOPF LOIS A. KOCZERA 

363 




FRANCES M. KOPCINSKI 




JOSEPH M. KOS 




CAROL A. KOSCIW 




STEPHEN J. KOSS 




JOYCE J. KOSTEK 





DAVID G. KOSTKA 



ARNOLD A. KRAFT 





MARTIN S. KOVICK 



^k. 



FRANK L. KRASIN 




JOSEPH F. KOWAL RICHARD KRASNAUSKAS 





LYNDA J. KRETSCHMAR 



BARBARA CAROL KOZA JOHN KRHISMANIS 

364 




KATHLEEN A, KROLL 




PAUL S. KRZYNOWEK 



19 




FRANK J. KUDIRKA, JR. 




JEFFREY A. KUDSK 




MICHAEL L. KURRIER 



65 




LEWIS KURTZMAN 




f^ '^mt <«^ 




ARTHUR J. LABRIE, JR. 




DAVID G. KUTCHUKIAN NORMAN L. LAFLEUR 




JUDITH EVELYN KWOLEK 



PAUL G. LAJOIE 




DANIEL G. LAAKSO 



WILLIAM JOEL LANDIS 









^KP^ ^« 


;'■:■. 


f 1 



MARCIA M. LANGBORT 




ELIZABETH A. LANYON 




LINDA J. LAPEZA 




ROLAND A. LARAMEE 



365 




ROBERT DAMEL LARKIN 




RUTH PHYLLIS LARM 





RICHARD W. LAWSON 




ROSEMARY LAWSON 




PETER ANDREW LEACH 




LOUIS O. LeBLANC 




WAYNE R. LEBLOND 



19 




WILLIAM LEMIECH, JR. 




EDWARD C. LEMIEUX 




LINDA M. LEMIEUX 



MAUREEN H, LAVALETTE 






ANN LAWRENCE ROBERT CARL LEBIDA KK HARD L. LEETE 

366 



EDWAKD h. LEMISH 




RALPH A. LENNON, JR. 



t-:^i:-v^ ^.;..::---:.- o^^:*te^:*Xs -r 




SANDRA H. LEPOWE 





ELLEN L. LIEF 




DEBORAH A. LINDBERGH 




KENNETH A. LINDBERG 



MAXINE ARDEN LESNIAK 




JUDITH ANNE LINDSAY 






JEFFREY S. LESSER 



PETER A. LEVENSON 



KARL H. LIPPMANN 



FREDERICK LINNEMANN 



367 




^A 



MITCHELL J. LIRO, JR. 




CHARLES LITCHFIELD 




L. RICHARD LITTLEFIELD 




JOSEPH H. LUNDERVILLE 




ROGER J. LUSSIER 




RICHARD P. LYDICK 



19 



DORIS LOESER 





DAWN P. L HEUREUX 



PATRICIA EI.LF.N LONG MARILYN M. I.URIE 

368 




SUE ELLEN LYDON 




LUCINDA LYMAN 




BETTY A. LYON 



65 





ANNE W. MacGREGOR 




«W 



<9Sr» 



^ 





CRAIG S. MacPHERSON 




NANCY ANN MAHLMAN 




THOMAS E. MAHONHY, JR. 



NORMAN T. MACLOAD 





GARY LYONS 





ELLEN E. MacGREGOR JOHN D. MacPHAIL, JR. 

369 




THOMAS J. MAHONEY 




WILLIAM J. \L-\.HONEY 





BRUCE K. MAILLET 




ROBERT A, MAIOCCO 




^S^^ 



JOHN J. MAKOS 



GAIL H. MANDELL 




MARY ANNE MARCOTTE 



VIRGINIA MALLISON ALAN MANGANARO 




ELAINE F. MALOOF KATHLEEN M. MANNING 




ARTHUR S. MANASELIAN PAUL D. MANSUR 





ROBERT MARCELL 




JAMES D. MARCUSON 




DANIEL BRIAN MARK 



19 



370 




GERALD ROLAND MARKS 




FLORA CECELIA MARONI 




GEORGE MARSHALL, JR. 




DONALD A. MARGESON 



65 




BARBARA ANN MARTIN RICHARD T. MARTINO 




PETER J. MARTIN 



WILLIAM M. MARTIN 



JUDITH K. MARTINO 



MARILYN J. MARTYNY 




FREDERICK A. MASON 




G. MATRY MASSELAM 




JOANNE MARIE MATHEY 




ANNE E. MATHIESON 




£ 






t 

JAMES F. MATTA 



371 




PETER H. MATTIOLI 




CAROL ANN MAUCIONE 





LAWRENCE McCORMlCK 





NANCY L McKAY 



GAIL KAREN McCUSKER 





MARGARET J. McDONALD 



JAMES KELVIN McKENNA 



19 




MARTHA McMASTER 




PATRICIA A. McNALLY 




JAYNE MAUREEN McNEIL 



PETER w. McCarthy 





mLt>S!D 




JAMES A. McCOMBE 



RALPH D, McDowell gail dorothy McLean 

372 




SHEII.A ANN McREVEY 




STEVEN J. MEDLAR 




KATHLEEN L. MEEHAN 




WILLIAM B. MEEKER, IV 




JUDITH ANN MELLO 




ELINOR JOAN MELODY 



65 




JOAN E. MENDREK 




WILLIAM E. MERCER 




CAROLE JANE MERHAR 




GEORGE T. MICHAEL 




ARTHUR CARL MILLER 




BARBARA RUTH MILLER 




JOHN F. MEILBYE, JR. 




MICHAEL MENDELSOHN SUSAN ANNA MICCOLY 

373 




BEVERLY L. MILLIGAN 




ROY M. MILLIGAN. JR. 




THOMAS G. MINER 





GARY HARDING MILLETT 



HERBERT A. MONGUE, JR. 



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BARBARA WANDA MIRON 




KENNETH L. MOON, JR. 



CHARLES T. MONNIER 



DAVID S. MITCHELL 




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ROBERT W. MOONEY 



19 




DIANA MICK 



DAVID B. MONGUE EDWARD MONTGOMERY DAVID WAGNER MOORE 

374 




FLORENCE E. MOORE 




RALPH WILLIAM MOORE 



65 




NANCY JEAN MORIN 




WALTER K. MORSE, JR. 




FELIX J. MOSAKEWICZ 




LINDA JOAN MOSES 



GORDON R. R. MORRISON 




SUSAN JANE MORASH 




RICHARD ALLEN MORRIL SANDRA RUTH MORSE 

375 




ILANA B. MOTYKA 




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JAMES E. MULCAHV 






JOHN W. MURPHY RICHARD H. NADOLINK 





JOANNE M. MURPHY 




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RICHARD F. MURPHY WILLIAM JOSEPH NAJAM 



JOHN MURPHY 






JOHN P. MURPHY 




MARY JANE MURRAY MICHAEL P. NALEWAJK 




MARTHA JANE NASON 




FRANCINE E. NAVIN 



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ROBERT NEAL 



19 



GERALD M. MYERS WILLIAM I. NANAKIONIS 

376 




KENNETH E. NEEDHAM 




SAUL Z. NEEDLE 




WENDY E. NEILSON 



65 




GRETCHEN L. NELSON 



JOAN MARIE NELSON 



VINCENT PAUL NERO 




MIRIAM NETINHO 




LAURENCE R. NEWEY 




ALICE E. NEWTON 




BRIAN M. NICKERSON 




NANCY JAYNE NIZIAK 




GAIL L. NOBBS 



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CATHERINE J. NOEL 




MARIANNE NOONAN 



377 




JUDITH C. NORMAN 




WILLIAM K. NORMAN 





MARY PAULA NORTON 




WILLIAM A. NORTON 




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EDWARD N. NOWAK 




C. ETHAN O'BRIEN 




LAWRENCE F. O'BRIEN 



19 





FRANCIS J. O'DONNELL 




ANDREW G. OLANOFF 



LUCILLE PALMER NORRIS 




FRANCIS E. NORTON, JR. 




ROBERTA LEIGH OAKS LEONARD R. OBRIKN 

378 




ROBERT DORK OLDACH 




ROBERT W. O'LEARY 




SEAN EDWARD O'LEARY 




ELEANOR MAE OLIVEIRA 






ROBERT A. OLSEN 




JUDITH ANN OLTSCH 



65 




EVA M. OMASTA 




CHARLES D. O'REILLY 




BEVERLY LOIS ORMSBY 




MILAGROS T. ORTEGA 




KATHLEEN J. OSTERBERG 




JAMES S. O'SULLIVAN 






CHRISTINE JOYCE OLSEN 



DANIEL E. O'MARA III 



CHARLES C. O'ROURKE 



ROBERT DONALD PACIFIC 



379 




DONALD PADL'CHOWSKI 



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PAUL H. PAISNER 




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JOHN R. PAJAK 





SUSAN N. PALMER 




RICHARD S. PASKOWSKY 



MICHAEL ALAN PARIS 





19 



CAROL ANN PARKER 



DALIA M. PALUBECKAS 







STEPHEN PALMIERL JR. THOMAS WALTER PANKE DAVI[) I . PARSON 

380 



ERNEST T. PATRIKIS 




OLEH GEORGE PAWLUK 




LEE A. PEARLMUTTER 



65 




FRANCIS EDGAR PELOSI 



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ALAN R. PIECEWICZ 



JANICE G. PETERSON 




RICHARD S. PERLMUTTER 





PHILIP H. PERKINS ROBERT ROY PETERSON 

381 




JOSEPH F. PIECUCH 




ALPHONSE PIEKUT 
MARSHA A. PIERCE 





PETER E. PIETZ 




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DAVID M. PODBROS 



ANNE PINCISS 



ANN RUTH POSNER 




RUTH G. POLLACK RENA EDITH POTISH 




MICHAEL D. POLLARD BARBARA ANN POTOSEK 




LOUIS E, PORRAZZO SHIRLEY RUTH POTTERN 



382 




JpAN A. POWERS 




RICHARD JOHN POWERS 




IRVING PRAGER 



19 




LINDA PRATT 




MARSHA BILLINGS PRATT 




SANDRA PHYLLIS PRATT 



65 





THERESA F. PROKOP 



JOHN E. PREBLE 



JAMES W. PRESCOTT 





IRENE E. PUDDISTER 



EDWARD R. PREISSLER WILLIAM F. PRESCOTT, JR. 






FRANCIS X. PUMPHRET 



JANET RUTH PREISSLER WILLIAM JAMES PRICE 





MARCIA W. PURVIS 



PATRICIA A. PRENGRUBER JEFFREY S. PRINCE 

383 




MARUL^N E. PUTIS 




STEPHEN BRIGGS PYNE 





THERESA RADWANSKI 




ROBERT D. RAMSAY 




NANCY L. RAMSTEDT 




PHILIP READ 



DEBRAH THAYER QLTRK 






JEANETTE MARY RADICE 



JUDITH RAPIER PATKK lA ANNH RAMALT ROBERT W. REDDING 



384 




MARSHA DALE REED 




MARY C. REED 




PATRICIA ANN REED 





RICHARD J. REPETA 




DAVID JAMES REYNOLDS 



65 



SUZANNE J. RHEAUME 




ELAINE MARIE RICCI 






JOEL S. RICE 




ANNE LOUIS RICHARDS 




HUGH JOHN RICHARDS 




THORNTON RICHARDS. Ill 




ROBERT F. REERA 




JOHN DENNIS REYNOLDS RICHARD A. RICE 

385 





m 1 m 



ROBERT LEWIS RIEGER 




STE\EN KULVIN RIEMER 




SHARON A. RIKKOLA 






BASIL W. ROBINSON 




JUDITH ANN ROBINSON 



GORDON H. RIPLEY 



£^ 



WILLIAM R. RITCHIE 



LOUIS J. ROBERTS 



19 





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BILLIE BROWN RISACHER 



DENNIS J. RIVET SUSAN ROBERTS 

386 



SANDRA J. ROBINSON 




ROBERT E. ROCKWELL 



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65 





MARTIN J. ROSENBERG 




MARTIN K. ROSEN DORF 




JOEL BARRY ROSENTHAL 



MICHAEL B. ROSE 




WILLIAM E. ROHAN 




DONNIE ROSATI 



RICHARD B. ROSE 




SHEILA LEE ROSENTHAL 



387 








CHARLES LOUIS ROSOFF 




ELAINE ROSOFF 




JUDITH A. ROSS 






PAVID H. RUSSELL 



RICHARD MICHAEL ROSS NORMA G. RUBENSTEIN 





CHARLES L. RUTSTEIN 



P 



PAUL N. ROSSETTI CHARLES J. RUDICK 





THOMAS A. ROURKE 




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JAMES EDMUND RYAN 



JAMES W. RUEST 



KEITH CHARLES ROSS 




19 



RICHARD G. ROUSSIN ELSIE LOUISE RUGGLES 

388 




JOHN P. RYAN 




JULIE ANNE RYAN 




MAURICE JAMES RYAN 



65 




SUSANNA RYBAK 



KARL F. SAILA 




HAROLD L. RYDER, JR. EDWARD JACK SALTMAN 




BENJAMIN D. SACKMARY CAROLYN F. SAKAKEENY 




DAVID C. SADOWSKY SHEILA JOAN SALTMAN 

389 




LORRAINE A. SALVO 




SUSAN OLIVIA SAMAHA 




HENRY LEON SANGER 



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JANET SANTOS 




DIANE MARIE S.APORITO 




MARILYN GAIL SARGENT 





ALAN L. SCHEINMAN 




PAUL SCHNEIDERMAN 




JOAN C. SCHOPPE 




JOHN R. SCHROEDER 



RICHARD R. SAUVAGEAU 




RONALD B. SAWYER 




'4 y- -J 









BRUCE ALAN SCHIFF LAWRENCE T. SCHMITT 

390 




ARTHUR SCHULTZ 




JOHN A. SCOTT, JR. 




ROBERT A. SCOTT 





RICHARD PAUL SEIDEN 



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HOWARD B. SHAPIRO 




PATRICIA ANN SHAY 




JOHN JAMES SHEEHAN 




ELIZABETH ANN SHELLEY 



JERRILYN SEARLEMAN 




CAROLE L. SHERMAN 




JUDITH ANN SEDDON 




JAMES W. SEVER GEORGE P. SHEA, JR. 

391 




STEVEN LYNN SHERMAN 




STEVEN MICHAEL SHOR 




MARILYN EDITH SHOREY 




HARNEY SHULTZ 




CAROLYN A. SITKOWSKI 




CHARLES H. SISSON 




LOIS SKOLNICK 



19 



MAAJA K. SILDOJA 





JUDITH RUTH SHUMAN ARNOLD D. SILVERMAN LOUISE MARIE SIRONI 

392 



DAVID W. SLATE 




SUSAN L. SLAYTON 




LINDA D. SMALL 



65 





RICHARD J. SODERBOM 




RICHARD A. SOBLE 




HAIG M. SOGHIGIAN 



MARILYN P. SMITH 





MICHAEL M. SMILNAK, JR. ELEANOR GAIL SMITH WILLIAM EDWARD SMITH 

393 




JAMES S. SOKOLOSKI 




JEAN ELIZABETH SOPER 




RAE L. SOUSA 




JOAN SOW A 




STEPHEN JOSEPH SPANG 





RICHARD O. SPARROW JOHN WILLIAM SPERRY 





dt^ 



EVERETT R. SPENCE DENNIS F. SPINNER 




VIRGINIA A. SPENCE RONALD L. SPINNEY 




DENNIS C. STACKHOUSE 




JEFFREY N. STANGER 




KATHLEEN E. STANIUNAS 



19 



EVERETT R. SPENCER, III NANCY 1 OUISf-; STACK 

394 





( jw i^Sw 4^ 




LEO J. STANLAKE 




GARY JOSEPH STEBBINS 




RAYMOND STANLEY STEC 



65 




DAWN ELIZABETH STEELE 



JUDITH STEVENS 




EDMUND J. STEIGMAN 



NANCY K. STEVENS 




JfAm 




EDWARD H. STERNOWSKI 



PETER H. STEVENS 




JANICE ANNE STEVENS DONNA S. STEVENSON 

395 




MARY C. STEWART 




RICHARD H. STEWART 




ROBERT M. STEWART 




CARLTON A. STIDSEN 




SHERON L. STILLMAN 




TERRY LYNNE STOCK 





SARANNE SUSAN STONE 





SALLY WHITON STROUT 



RICHARD W. STRECKER 





GERALD G. STREET 



ARTHUR F. STURGIS 



19 




CAROL A. SULLIVAN 






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DANIEL J. SULLIVAN 




DENNIS M. SULLIVAN 



DOROTHY V. STOKLOSA 




JOHN A. STOLGITIS 



JOHN A. STRIANO SANDRA L. SUDDAIII 

396 




JOANNE SULLIVAN 




JOHN NEVILLE SULLIVAN 




MARY E. SULLIVAN 





GARY R. SWAN SON 




ELLEN S. SWARTZ 




PETER SWENSON 



ROBERT P. SULLIVAN 




WALTER J. SWIATEK, JR. 




CLIFFORD W. SUNDBERG 





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BARRY N. SUTHERLAND FRANCES B. SWARTZ 

397 




HELEN E. SYMONS 




DIANE TARRANT 




NORMAN W. TATE 






1 



ARTHUR R. TAYLOR 







KAREN W. TAYLOR 




ALEXANDRA TEGUIS 





GARY E. TENCZAR 




ROBERT L. TESSIER 



19 




DAVID GORDON TAYLOR 



PATRICIA ELLEN TAYLOR FREDERIC W. TEMPLE 

398 



Si 

WILLIS J. THAYER 




GEORGE S. THOMAS 




HAROLD R. THOMPSON 



65 




RUTH NORMA THURSTON 




DIANE MARIE TOVET 




WILLIAM F. TOWER, JR. 




SUSAN F. TRACY 



PAUL TOOMEY 




RICHARD J. THOMPSON 




'IfiW^f- #fex 




LESLIE BURTON TITCOMB WALTER TORDOFF, III 

399 




JUNE TRAIBMAN 




JOSEPH A. TROCCOLO 




ALICE M. TROMPKE 




NORMAN F. TRUMP 




FREDERICK TRLSSEI., JR. 




STEPHEN TURPACK 



ANN UNGER 




ALLAN R. TUUKANEN RUTH A. UZDAVINIS 




PAUL TWOHIG 



FRED E. VALERIO, JR. 




THEODORE UPLAND ALGIRD JOHN VALIUNAS 

400 




LINDA VANDER WERE 




LAWRENCE L. VANDIFORD 




DAVID B. VAN HORNE 



19 




PETER ARTHUR VARIN 





^ 



ROBERT VECCHIARELLI 




RICHARD A. VENDITTT 



65 




PATRICIA ANN VERNELL BRUCE ALLEN WALL 




CAROL ANN VIENS 




JANET M. VLACH 



LINDA JOYCE WALL 




GEORGE M. WALLER 




PAUL ALAN WACKS HOWARD P. WALLER 

401 




ANN L. WALSH 




JUNE MARY WALSH 




MARILYN ANN WARD 




MARJORIE ANN WARD 




JOHN R. W.-VRNER 




DONALD E. WARREN 





THEODORE J. WEINBERG 




LOUISE B. WELLS 




JAMES ALEC WESOLOSKI 




KATHLEEN C. WESSMAN 



DANIEL H. WASSERMAN 





STEPHEN R. WASSERSUG ALFREDA B. WEINBRECHT DENISE WELCH 

402 




IRMA L. WHEELER 




JOYCE E. WHIPPLE 




BARRY M. WHITCOMB 





KAREN E. WIGGIN 




LINDA WILES 




LAWRENCE J. WILKER 



CONSTANCE H. WHITE 




WILLIAM H. WILKINSON 




JANET A. WHITE 




ROGER WILLIAM WHITE JANET ANN WIGGINS 

403 




ANN M. WILLIAMS 




LINDA J. WILLIS 




RICHARD E. WILSON 





PETER C. WISNIOWSKI 




RICHARD A. WINDYKA 



£k 



KENNETH JAMES WITEK 





HAROLD C. WOLFE, III 




DANIEL EDWIN WIVAGG 




STEVEN ALAN WOLOTSKY 



19 



JUDITH GAIL WOLCOTT 





NANCY J. WINER 



PETER C. WITHERELL GORDON C. WOLFRAM 

404 



JANET A. WOOD 




LINDA FRANCES WOOD 




RAYMOND A. WOODIS 



65 





JUDITH SANDRA ZENIS 




CELIA PHYLLIS ZIEMAK 




STUART M. ZOLA 



BARBARA JANE ZALESKI 




WAYNE C. WOOLEY 




GEORGENA G. YOUNG JOHN ZDANOWICZ 

405 




WILLIAM E. ZOTTOLI 



Seniors Not Pictured 




ROBERT E. ZUCKERMAN 



Frank E. Abarno 
Karl A. Adamski 
Elaine A. Blythe 
F. A. Alexander 
Leon M. Alford 
Diana K. Anastas 
Paul L. Anderson 
James W. Anthony III 
Andrea Beatrice Apsit 
Thomas F. Astaldi 
Rosalynde C. Baker 
Beverly Balestrier 
S. P. Baniukiewicz 
William T. Barry 
Robert M. Beck 
Carol A. Begin 
John E. Belanger 
Theodore Belsky 
Marcia A. Bentley 
Paul J. Bergan 
Norman P. Bernard 
Michael R. Bjornholm 
Roben J. Blair 
Neil H. Blatte 
Donald P. Blood 
James E. Bloom 
Lance R. Boe 
Raymond Bogdan 
Joan Boucher 
Joyce M. Bourgon 
Julia Bourne 
Joseph W. Bradley 
John Braim 
Francis T. Brophy 
Thomas J. Brophy 
Lorraine Brown 
John E. Burke 
Robert E. Burke 
David R. Burnett 
Beverly Burniske 
James E. Byrne 
Robert L. Cady 
David J. Cain 
Alan T. Campbell 
Eleanor Campobasso 
Katherine T. Cane 
Margaret Carey 
Richard G. Carlelon 
Linda H. Carlson 
Wayne P. Carney 
Newton L Carpenter 
Andrea Carr 
Donald T. Carr 
Harris A. Carr Jr. 
Charles B, Carter 
Gail E. Caulfield 
Robert W. Cerretani 
Pamela Chace 
Thomas E. Chalmers 
Roger M. Chase 
Philip B. Cheeney 
Peter W. Clegg 
Dorothy L. Cleveland 



David F. Collins 
John S. Collins 
Patricia A. Collins 
John F. Coman 
Robert L, Conant 
Norman I. Condit 
Peter A. Conlon 
Roderick L. Corey 
Albert H. Corliss 
Francis R. Cottrell 
Vernon K. Coutu 
William L Cowern 
Herbert F. Cowles 
David Paul Cralenski 
Donald J. Curns 
Philip J. Curran 
Theresa A. Daly 
David H. Darcy 
Alfred J. Davis 
Stephen J. Day 
John H. De Amicis 
Lawrence R. Deblasiis 
Thomas E. Decker Jr. 
John F. DeCosta 
Edward A. DeRosa 
Philip E. DeRose 
Ellen O. Derow 
Beatrice Smith Desper 
Joseph E. Diachun 
Richard E. Diniock 
Thomas J. Dirsa 
Joseph Dlugosz 
Kerry M. Dolan 
Donald L. Dostal 
Mary O. Dougal 
Joseph L. Dowst 
Ralph E. Drinkwater 
Michael M. Driscoll 
J. Michael Egan 
Ellen R. Ellis 
Robert R. Evans 
Johnathan D. Fife 
Susan L. Fijux 
C. Melvern Fillmore 
David Finkelstein 
Charles K. Fitts 
Daniel N. Fitzgerald 
Francis Fitzpatrick 
Thomas M. Flaherty 
William H. Flynn 
William R. Forand 
Alan S. Forman 
Robert L. Fortier 
David H. French 
Ronald A. Friel 
Arthur R. Frost 
George C. Gagnon Jr. 
James J. Gallagher 
Katerine E. Guidner 
Ronald E. Gaumont 
David L. Geer 
Thomas A. Gillis 
Robert F. Girard 
Richard A. Glovin 
Earl F. Godfrey Jr. 
David L. Gordon 
Paul L. Graham 
Albert C. Gray 
Alden J. Gray 
Carolyn F. Green 
Peter M. Halbach 
Patricia A. Hall 
Michael F. Hanifan 
John P, Harrington 
Anna B. Hays 
Maynard A. Hodgdon 
Rollin C. Hopkirk 
Carol A. Hyde 
Edward A. Imbier 
Charles L. Jnnis 
Stephanie Jaksina 
Richard H. Johnson 
Russell E. Johnson 
David K. Jones 
Joseph M. Jones 
Robert H. Jones 
Paula A. Joyce 
Joseph B. Kaitz 
Daniel E. Kane 
Elaine A. Kaplinsky 
David KasofT 



Albert R. Kassatly 
Maureen G. Keenan 
Richard M. Kehoe 
William P. Kelleher 
Diana M. Kelly 
John D. Kelly 
Elaine D. Kenseth 
Tom M. Kerrigan 
Jack A. Kessler 
Patricia E. Kicza 
Joseph E. Kielec 
Daniel P. Kiley 
William R. King 
Marilyn Klein 
Raymond M. Kodzis 
Walter A. Korzec, Jr. 
Victor G. Kosmo 
Richard W. Koss 
Mary E. Kattmyer 
Gerald R. Kramer 
Melvin R. Lakutis 
George E. Leary 
John P. Leary 
Richard Lerner 
Anthony J. Leslie 
Stephen C. Levine 
Patricia M. Liberman 
Charles J. Lidman 
Herbert J. Lindelof 
Karl H. Lippman 
Michael F. Loring 
Paul James Loughlin 
John P. Lounsbury 
Angelika Lust 
Robert Lyonnais 
Bruce F. Maccombie 
Jane S. MacFate 
David A. MacKenzie 
Roberta E. MacLeod 
James A. Madden 
John P. Magner 
Robert E. Maguire 
Carl V. Makinen 
William L. Maloney 
Alan P. Maltz 
George A. Marold 
Paul J. McAvoy 
John P. McCarthy 
Eileen C. McGrath 
William V. McHugh 
Dennis R. McManus 
Barry R. McPhee 
Bernadette R. Menz 
Clyde W, Meyerhoffer 
Edward F. Mintiens 
Jeanne L. Mitchell 
Robert A. Moore 
Francis L. Morgan Jr. 
John W. Morgan III 
Robert E. Morgan 
Robert P. Morrill 
Frederic R. Morrison 
James W. Morrissey 
John G. Mortelite 
Bruce C. Morton 
John D. Mulcahy 
Richard L. Murphy 
Lynne Neuhauser 
Mary J. Niedeck 
Michael J. Noferi 
Lee A. Norton 
William N. O'Hare 
Margaret E. Olson 
Francis J. O'Neil 
William J. O'Neill 
Kenneth D. Palm 
Dominick H. Parisi 
Allen G. Parsons 
Anthony F. Pasciuto 
Elizabeth F. Peck 
David L, Pellissier 
David F. Pemple 
Robert G. Peretti 
Gerald R, Perkins 
Robert J. Pero 
William P. Perry 
Russell A. Peterson 
Jean A. Pezzoli 
Charles A. Pike 
James E. Plato 
Edwin L. Podolack 



James G. Police 
Barbara A. Policow 
Maryann M. Polito 
Richard H. Powell 
Carol A. Power 
Gary M. Powers 
Albert E. Pratt 
Donald A. Puntin 
Patricia A. Ramah 
Geoffrey P. Rantilla 
Roberta M. Rayfield 
Philip L. Reed 
Pamela A. Reiser 
Leo M. Renaghan 
Douglas Renwick 
Arthur R. Resendes 
Peter M. Richard 
Laura J. Ricketson 
Richard Rineer 
C. Michael Risch 
William H. Rivers 
Kenneth C. Robbins 
Bernard Y. Robert 
John A. Rock 
Robert E. Rockwell 
Joseph E. Ross 
William B. Rush 
Carol A. Russell 
Sandra S. Ryckebusch 
Harriet S. Schreiber 
Theodore A. Schueler 
Robert J. Schwartz 
Charles Scialdone 
William C. Segal 
Gerald W. Seigel 
Albert V. Sekac 
Jerome F. Shanahan 
Robert R. Sherman 
Donald F. Shugrue 
Walter J. Silva 
Patricia G. Simmons 
James T. Sleeper 
Leonard J. Slomski Jr. 
Claudia A. Smith 
Gordon T. Smith 
John J. Smith 
Ronald R. Socka 
Albert T. Sofi 
Richard E. Souza 
Duane A. Steele 
John R. Stein 
Peter G. Stoll 
Alan J. Suker 
Theron J. Sumner 
Eric I. Swenson 
Roderick F. Swenson 
Owen D. Tabb 
Edward C. Tanner 
David H. Tasgal 
Beatrice Taylor 
Janice Terzieff 
Frank E. Thomas 
Carl A. Thoren III 
Gordon H. Thorner 
Donna G. Titus 
Patricia C. Tonis 
Ralph G. Trussell 
Paula M. Tuck 
Helga D. Tumma 
Rodger T. Twitchell 
Stephen H. Vengrow 
David E. Walsh 
Richard C. Warren 
Norma Kells Waseleski 
Kathleen M. Weibel 
Daryll J. Welch 
Margaret E. Wenzel 
Stewart M. Wilansky 
Richard V. Wilcox 
Philip D. Williams 
Marshall Winokur 
Patricia S. Winship 
Grant E. Winslow 
Robert J. Wise 
Elysc K. Wolf 
Robert A. Woodbury 
Edmimd G. Woods 
Richard E. Woods 
Kenneth P. Woolf 
Jack P. Wysong 
Juris Zauls 



406 



Senior Directory 



RAYMOND H. ABBOTT 

59 School Street, Groveland, Massachusetts 

Transfer from Northern Essex College 

Government 

Collegian 3; Flying Club 3, 4, Vice-President; Political Science 

Association 4; Students for Civil Rights 3. 

DAVID GORDON ADAMS 

4 Stratton Road, Grafton, Massachusetts 

City Planning 

Beta Kappa Phi I, 2, 3, 4, Sergeant at Arms 1; Hookers Club 

4; L.B.C.P.A. 3, 4; Land Arch. Club 1, 2, 3, 4; A.S.L.A. 2, 3, 

4; Dean's List 2, 4. 

JOHN H. AHO, JR. 

22 Pearl Street, Provincetown, Massachusetts 
W.M.U.A. 2; Student Senate 2; House Counselor 3, 4; Gry- 
phon 3; Wrestling 2, 3; Air Cadet Squadron 2. 

LINDA ANN WASKIEWICZ ALBERTSON 

78 Grassy Cutter Road, Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Home Economics 

Dean's List 1; Newman Club I, 2, 3; Commuters Club 1, 2; 

Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3; Spanish Club 1, 2. 

JUDITH ANN ALBETSKI 

40 Granite Street, Webster, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Univ. Economics 

Association 2, 3, 4, Executive Committee 4; String Ensemble 

1; University Orchestra 2, 3, Student Manager 2, 3. 

JAMES H. ALLEN 

28A Croyden Street, Millbury, Massachusetts 
Food Economics 

Student Senate 3, 4, Activities Chairman 4; Men's Judiciary 
Area #1 2; R.S.O. Committee 4; Operetta Guild 2, 3, 4; 
S.W.A.P. 4; Agricultural Economics Club 3, 4, Secretary 3; 
Commuter's Club 3, 4; Athletic Chairman 4; Food Distribu- 
tion Club 2, 3; Future Farmers of America 2, Treasurer 3. 
Square Dance Club 2, 3, 4, Vice President 3. 

JEFFREY ALLENTUCH 

91 Granite Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Worcester Jr. College 

Government 

Hillel 3, 4; Scuba Club 4. 

CARL J. ALSING 

1821 Boston Road, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

WMUA 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1; Amateur 

Radio Association 3; AIEE-IRE 3; Scuba Club 3. 

RUTH EVELYN AMES 
1 Preston Street, Concord, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities; Vice- 
President Women's Inter-dorm Council 2; House Counselor 4; 
Gamma Sigma Sigma I, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Concert Band 3, 
4; Dean's List 2, 4; SWAP 4; Sociology Club 3, 4. 

JOHN D. AMIRO 

20 Brookline Street, Townsend, Massachusetts 
Recreation 

Kappa Sigma 2, 3; Swimming 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2; Recre- 
ation Club 3, 4. 

DAVID N. AMSDEN 

Highland Avenue, Northfield, Massachusetts 

Government 

House Counselor 2, 3; Chorale 1, 2; Operetta Guild 2, 3; 

Opera Workshop 2, 3. 

PAUL LEONARD ANDERSON 
135 Reservoir Road, Quincy, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Sophomore Executive Council 2; Economics Association 1, 2, 
3, 4; Ski Club 1, 2; Outing Club 3; Scabbard and Blade 3, 4; 
Drillmaster, Precisionettes 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Zeta Nu Frater- 
nity 1, 2, 3, Chaplain. 

ROBERT SAMUEL ANNINO 
8 1 Queen Avenue, West Springfield, Massachusetts 
American History 

WMUA 1; House Counselor 3; Dean's List 2; Tennis 1; Ed- 
wards Fellowship 1 ; Italian Club 4; Pre-Law Association 4. 



407 



DIANE M. ANZALDI 

370 Greenlodge Street, Dedham, Massachusetts 
Medical Technology 

Zoology Club 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Medical Techni- 
cal Club 3, 4, Vice-President 3; Dorm Social Committee 2, 
3. 

SAMUEL WADE APGAR 
F-3 Hampshire House, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Production Management 

Intramural Football, Basketball, Baseball 1, 2, 3, Wrestling 2 
class winner; Track, Gymnastics 1; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1; Management Club 4. 

PATRICIA ANN APPICELLI 

54 Cady Street, Ludlow, Massachusetts 

Public Health 

Freshman Directory 3; Student Senate Service Committee 3, 4; 

Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Modern Dance 

Club 2; Angel Flight 3, 4; Administration Officer 4. SU Dance 

Committee 1, 2, 3. 

ANDREA BEATRICE APSIT 
421 Walnut Road, Wrestham, Massachusetts 
Education 

Dormitory Social Council 1, 2, 3; Dean's List 3; Winter Car- 
nival Committee 3; Edwards Fellowship 1, 2; Christian As- 
sociation 1, 2, 3; Elementary Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Col- 
legian 1; Zoology Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

LYNETTE JO ARCARDI 

Ramsey Avenue, Great Barrington, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

House Officer, Publicity 3; President 4, Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 

4; Homecoming Committee 2; SWAP 4; Precisionettes 2, 3; 

Newman Club 1; Sociology Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

ROBERT JOSEPH ARMATA 

80 Upland Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Dance Band 1; Intramural Softball 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Psychology Club 4. 

ROSE FRANCES ARNONE 

Pine Drive, Chatham, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Women's Interdorm Council 2; House Counselor 3, 4; House 

Chairman 4; Sigma Sigma Sigma I, 2, 3, 4; Rush Chairman 3; 

SWAP 4; Newman Club 2, 3; Education Club 4. 

VICTOR A. ARONOW 

303 Franklin Street, Newton, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Ya-Hoo 1, 2, 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Soccer 1; Synthesis 1; 

Young Independents 2, 3, 4, President 2, 3. 

SHEILA ANN ATWELL 

Daniel Shays Highway, Pelham, Massachusetts 

Spanish 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 1, 2; Honors Work 

4; Newman Club 1; Oriental Sports Club 1, Treasurer 1; Luso- 

Brazilian Club 2, 3, Treasurer 3. 

JOSEPH A. AUGUSTA 

17B Bennington, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

Transfer: Suff'olk University 

English 

Dean's List 1; Psychology Club 2; Newman Club 2; Intramu- 

rals 3. 

ROBERT B. AUSTIN 

18 Warren Road, Framingham, Massachusetts 

Recreation 

Theta Chi Fraternity 1, 2, 3, 4; Maroon Key 2; SWAP 2; 

Swimming Team 1; Tennis Team 1; Recreation Club 1, 2, 3. 

JO-ANN MARIE AUTINO 

33 Michigan Street, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts 

English 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

DAVID B. AXELROD 
70 Lothrop Street, Beverly, Massachusetts 
English 

Critique I, 2, 3, 4; Feature Editor 2, 3; Editor-in-Chief 3; 
DOMA Meritus 4; Who's Who in American Colleges & Uni- 
versities 4; RSO Committee 3; Roister Doisters 3; Campus Vari- 
eties 4; SWAP 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Psychology 
Club 2, 3; SINA 2, 3, 4. 



JANE BABKOWSKI 

263 Sanders Street. Athol. Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

University Theater 2: Honors Colloquium 1, 2. 3; Honors 

Work 2; is'ewman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 2, 3, 4. 

RICHARD THOMAS BAILEY 

347 Weston Road, Wellesley, Massachusetts 

Personnel Management 

Beta Kappa Phi 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 2, 3; 

Flying Club 4; Management Club 3. 4; Ski Club 1, 2. 

DALE EDMUND BAILLY 

46 North Maple Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 

General Business & Finance 

Dean's List 3, 4: Newman Club 1. 4: Air Cadet Squadron 1,2: 

Sailing Club 3. 4: Accounting Association 4; Management 

Club 4: Marketing Club 4. 



EDWIN G. BAKER 

13 Barrett Avenue. Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Transfer from Holyoke Junior College 

General Business and Finance 

Dean's List 3; Newman Club 4. 



HERBERT FRANCIS BAKER 
10 Eaton Street, Wakefield, Massachusetts 
Historv 

Dorm Social Activities Committee 3, 4; Baker Treasurer 3, 
Baker Athletic Chairman 3, Thatcher President 4; Flying Red- 
men 1, 2, 3: Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Archaeology Club 3; Air 
Cadet Squadron 1; History Club 1, 2, 3. 

DONALD E. BALLARD 

35 Hinckley Street. Northampton, Massachusetts 

Transfer from Holyoke Junior College 

Electrical Engineering 

Dean's List 3^ 4: Tau Beta Pi 4; IEEE 4. 



ANNE MARIE BALTREN 

35 Battle Street, Orange, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Handbook 3-, Index 3, 4 Student Life Editor, Associate Editor 

4: Class Executive Council 1, 2, 3, 4: House Counselor 3; 

Mortar Board 4: Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 1; 

Winter Carnival 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4: Education Club 

3. 4; Education Exchange Program 3; Who's Who in American 

Colleges & Universities. 

PATRICIA ANN BARNETT 

45 Merrell Drive, Agawam, Massachusetts 

Government 

W.VIUA 4; Newman Club 2. 



NANCY F. BARON 

26 Garrison Street, Fairhaven, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

RSO Committee 2, 3, 4, Treasurer of Dance Committee 3, 4; 
Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, Recommendations Chairman 3, Cor- 
responding Secretary 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Education Club 2, 
3, 4, Treasurer 4; Angel Flight 3, 4, Administrative Officer 3, 
Executive Officer 4. 



THOMAS RICHARD BARRATT 

Water Street, Ashburnham, Massachusetts 

Industrial Engineering 

Alpha Phi Omega 1; AIEE 2, 3; AIIE 4, 5; House Council 

3. 

LOIS ANN BASILISSA 

15 Harvard Avenue, Shrewsbury, Massachusetts 

Education 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club Choir 2; Freshman 

Magazine 1; SU Dance Committee 2; Dean's List 3; Florida 

State University Exchange Student 3; Education Club 4; Junior 

Affiliate National Council of Engl. Teachers 4. 



RICHARD S. BATES 

5 Winlhrop Street, Winchester, Massachusetts 

Forestry — Wood Technology 

Forestry Club 2, 3, 4, President 4; Geology Club I, 2; Outing 

Club 2. 3; Scuba Club 2, 3, 4; President 2; Ski Club 4; 

Zoology Club 1. 

JAMES L, BATTS 

22 Swan Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

English 

Phi Sigma Kappa I, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Cross Country 1; 

Newman Club I, 2, 3. 



BRUCE ASHLEY BAUMANN 

229 Harkness Avenue, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Physics 

Ya-Hoo 3: House Counselor 4; House Officer 4, Treasurer; 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Deseret Club 3, 4; Modern Dance Club 4; 

Physics Club 3, 4. 

FRANKLIN JAY BAVER 

72 Commonwealth Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Pre-Veterinarian 

Fencing Club 2. 

ANN H. BAXTER 

18 Hancock Street, Lexington, Massachusetts 
En glish 

Bridge Club 2, 3; Collegian 1, 2, 3; Ya-Hoo 1, 2, 3, 4; 
WMUA 1; Chorale 1, 4; Honors Colloquium 1; Pioneer Val- 
ley Folklore Society 1,2, 3, 4. 

CAROL ROSE BEAUMONT 

13 Meadowbrook Drive, Hadley, Massachusetts 

Home Economics 

Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4 

cert Band 1, 2; Ensemble 3, 4; 

Nu4. 



Class Representative 3. Con- 
Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Omicron 



PETER BECK 
Amherst, Massachusetts 
Landscape Architecture 

ROBERT J. BELCHER 

76 Virginia Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Business A dministration 

SAE Fraternity 1, 2, 3, Steward & Executive Council 
Management Club 3, 4. 



IFC 2; 



SYLVIA DORIS BELLISLE 

85 Park Avenue, Webster, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Transfer — Anna Maria College; Newman Club 3, 4; Education 

Club 3, 4; Equestrian Club 3, 4; Le Cercle Francais 3, 4. 

LOUISA BENGEN 

26 Essex Road, Sharon, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Student Union Program Council 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 

4; Psychology Club 1, 2; Sociology Club 3, 4. 

PAUL E. BENGER 

126 Brewster Road, Waltham, Massachusetts 

English 

Transfer — Newton Junior College; Collegian 3; Dean's List 1, 

2; Ski Club 4. 

C. WILLARD BENNETT 

34 Parker Street, Chelsea, Massachusetts 

Entomology 

Alpha Phi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; Fernald Entomological Club 1, 2, 

3, 4, Treasurer 4. 

ROGER A. BENNIS 

30 Boulay Circle, Fairview, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Newman Club 1; IEEE 3, 4. 

EDMOND G. BENOIT 

549 State Road, North Adams, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Newman Club 1, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Phi Mu Delta 2, 

4; American Chemical Society 2, 4, President, PMD 3. 

ROBERT LOUIS BENOIT 

8 Greeniawn Avenue, South Grafton, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Dean's List 3; Dorm Intramural Sports 2; Newman Club I, 2; 
ASME 2, 3; Society of Automotive Engineers 4. 

FRANCO BERAK 

1 38 Main Street, Watcrtown, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Transfer — St. Francis Xavier University, Nova Scotia; Engi- 
neering Journal 2, Treasurer 2; AIIE-IRE 2, 3, 4, Program- 
ming Chairman 4; Engineering Council 3, Secretary 3; New- 
man Club 2; Sport Parachute Club 2, 3. 

SUSAN PHYLLIS BHRHNSON 

176 Shurtleir Street, Chelsea, Massachusetts 

English 

Index 2; Jr. Panhellenic Council 2; Sigma Sigma Sigma 2, 3, 4; 

Directory 3, Vice-President 4; University Concert Association 

4; Dean's List 2, 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Hillel 

Foundiilion I, 2, 3, 4; Russian Club I, 2. 



408 



RALPH JAMES BERGER 
34 LaGrange Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 
Marketing 

Transfer — Boston University; Men's Dorm Council 3; Market- 
ing Club 3, 4 Vice-President; University Economics Associa- 
tion 3. 

RONALD O. BERGER 
54 Inwood Street, Yonkers, New York 
Pre-Medical — Zoology 

Student Senate-Non-Senate Member Academic Affairs Com- 
mittee 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Intervarsity 
Christian Fellowship 1, 2, 4; Pre-Medical Club 3, 4; Ski Club 
1; Zoology Club 1, 2. 

PHILIP EDWARD BERLIN 

50 Parker Street, Chelsea, Massachusetts 

Government 

Student Senate 4: Hillel Foundation 1; History Club 3, 4, 

Treasurer 4; Young Democrats 3, 4; Pre-Law Association 3, 4. 

JOHN EMMETT BERNIER 

27 Pierce Avenue, Fitchburg, Massachusetts 

Philosophy 

Lutheran Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4. 

ALAN S. BERNSTEIN 

19 Moore Avenue, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Governmetit 

Transfer — Worcester Junior College; Dean's List 3. 

MICHAEL R. BERRINI 

25 Mountain Road, Burlington, Massachusetts 

History 

Transfer — Stockbridge School of Agriculture; Ya-Hoo 1, 2, 3, 

4; Collegian 3; Critique 3, 4; Summaries Editor 4; Alpha Phi 

Omega 3, 4; Dean's List 1; College Bowl 3; History Club 2; 

Italian Club 4; Young Republicans 1, 2, 3, Chairman 3; Young 

Socialists 4. 

ROBERT R. BIBBY 

14 Oilman Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 
Government 

Men's Interdorm Forum 3, 4, President 4; House Council 3, 4; 
Varsity Skiing 4; Judson Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4; Young Ameri- 
cans For Freedom 2; Health Council 4. 

DAVID H. BICKUM 

West Shore Road, Merrimac, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

JOYCE E. BIGELOW 

2334 North Main Street, Holden, Massachusetts 

Medical Technology 

Operetta Guild 3, 4; Medical Technology Club 3, 4, Treasurer 

4; Student Christian Association 1. 

ROBERT D. BILLINGS 
1107 Boylston Street, Newton , Massachusetts 
History 

Alpha Phi Omega 4; History Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Publicity Chair- 
man 4. 



ROY J. BLITZER 

86 Longhill Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

English 

Collegian 2, 3, Advertising Staff 2; Circulation Manager 3; 

Index 2, 4; Ya-Hoo 3, 4, Business Manager 3, 4; Alpha Epsi- 

lon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Operetta Guild 2, 3, 4; Statesmen 2, 3, 4; 

Dean's List 3; Campus Chest Committee 2; Hillel Foundation 

1. 

DAVID STRATTON BLODGETT 
Amherst Road, Pelham, Massachusetts 
Wood Technology 

Transfer — U. S. Military Academy; Scabbard and Blade 3, 4, 
Captain 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 3; Xi 
Sigma Pi 3, 4; Ranger 4; Bay State Special Forces 2, 3; Army 
ROTC 2, 3, 4, Brigade Commander 4; Forestry Club 2, 3, 4; 
Ski Club 1. 

GWENDOLYN M. BLODGETT 

1 5 Clarendon Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

History 

Transfer — Bates College; Dean's List 1, 2; German Club 4; 

History Club 4; International Relations Club 4; Ski Club 4. 

LLNDA R. BODWELL 

211 East Street, Sharon, Massachusetts 
Govermnent 

Class Executive Council 1, 2, 3, 4; House Counselor 3; Pan- 
hellenic Council 3; Alpha Chi Omega 2, 3, 4, President 4; 
Winter Carnival Committee 3; Precisionettes 2, 3, 4; Naiads 1, 
2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Political Science 
Association; Who's Who in American Colleges and Universi- 
ties. 

CLAIRE JUNE BOHLIN 
9 Chardon Road, Medford, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

R.S.O. Committee 1, 2, 3; Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant 
Rush Chairman 3, House Manager 4; Angel Flight 3, 4, As- 
sistant Pledge Trainer 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Uni- 
versity Health Council 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Educa- 
tion Club 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2. 

EILEEN FRANCES BOISJOLIE 

132 North Street, North Adams, Massachusetts 

Government 

Tri Sigma 2, 3, 4, Publicity Chairman 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Pi 

Sigma Delta 3, 4 Secretary-Treasurer; Precisionettes 2, 3, 4; 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Young Democrats 4. 



8CSBERT BONCQEE' 

22 Highland Street, Revere, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Psychology Club 2, 3, 4; Critique 3; 

Young Democrats 4. 

DOUGLAS B. BOND 

256 Gifford Avenue, Somerset, Massachusetts 
Pre-Dental 

Zeta Nu 1, 2, 3, 4, Alumni Secretary 2, 3; Dean's List 2; 
United Nations Week Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Pre- 
Medical Club 1, 2, 3; Scuba Club 2. 



BLAISE BERNARD BISAILLON 

172 Federal Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Dean's List 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Intramurals 2, 3, 4; Beta 

Kappa Phi 2. 

JOHN M. BLACKMORE 
7 Hills Road, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Government 

Student Senate 3, 4; Co-Chairman, Budgets Committee '64; 
Winter Carnival Committee 3; Commuter's Club 1, 2, 3; In- 
ternational Relations Club 1, 2; Political Science Association 3, 
4; Young Democrats 4; Pre-Law Club 3, 4. 



SUSAN JANE BONELLI 

344 White Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Index 1, 2; Academic Editor 2; Junior Panhellenic 2; Iota 

Gamma Upsilon 2, 3, 4, House Manager 3, 4; Dean's List 2; 

Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Psychology Club 2, 3. 

CHARLES HENRY BONNEAU 

755 Grattan Street, Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 2; Phi Kappa Phi 3, 

4; Eta Kappa Nu 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 4; Tau Beta Pi 

3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; AIEE-IRE 3, 4. 



DAVID T. BLANCHARD 

Elm Street, Duxbury, Massachusetts 

Personnel Management 

Transfer — Nichols College; Management Club 3, 4. 

EDWARD HOUGHTON BLANCHARD 

483 Shrewsbury Street, Holden, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Soccer 4; Accounting Association 4; Intramural Sports 1, 

4. 



2, 3, 



STEPHEN A, BLANKSTEEN 

60 Kipling Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Personnel Management 

WMUA 2; Concert Band 1; ROTC Band 1; Dean's List 2, 3; 

Management Club 3, 4, Vice President 4; Outing Club 2, 3. 



409 



BRUCE BARROWS BONNER JR. 
18 Greenacre Lane, East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Collegian 1, 2: Men's Inter-dorm Council 4; House Vice Presi- 
dent 2; Edwards Fellowship 1; Student Christian Association 1; 
IEEE 2, 3, 4. 

BRUCE JOSEPH BOURGUE 

E. Princeton Road, Princeton, Massachusetts 

Anthropology 

DAVID A. BOURNE 

82 Claypit Hill Road, Wayland, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 3; IFC 2, 3; Basketball 

1; Lacrosse 1; Accounting Association 2, 3, 4. 



ELIZABETH MARIE BOURQUE 

95 Ohio Avenue, West Springfield, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

House Counselor 3: Sigma Sigma Sigma 2, 3, 4; Harmony 3: 

Scholarship Chairman 4: Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Alpha Lambda 

Delta 1, 2: Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 

4. 

ARCHER BOWEN JR. 
45 Ashland Street, Melrose, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; Co-Captain 4; QTV, Treasurer 3. 4, Execu- 
tive Board 4; Lacrosse 1. 2, 

DONALD W, BO^D JR. 
21 Posco Avenue, Leominster, Massachusetts 
Government 

Collegian 3, 4; Student Senate 3, Chairman Public Relations 
Committee 3, 4: House Counselor 3: Adelphia 4; Dean's List 
1, 2, 4; Honors Colloquium 1, 2, 3: Honors Work 4; Phi Eta 
Sigma 1; Pi Sigma Alpha 3, President 4; Homecoming Com- 
mittee 4, Chairman: Collegium Legis, President 3, 4; Political 
Science Club 3. 4; Scuba Club 3, 4: Young Democrats 4; 
Who's Who in American Colleges & Universities. 



RICH.^RD L. BOYDEN 

82 Aldrew Terrace, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Pre-Medical — Zoology 

Transfer — Western New England College; Student Senate 2; 

RSO Committee 2: Operetta Guild 1, 2, 3, Assistant Business 

Manager 2; Opera Workshop 1, 2: Swap 1; Commuter's Club 

2: Oriental Sports Club 1, 2, 3, Vice President 1, President 2, 

3, Instructor 1, 2, 3; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2; Zoology Club 1, 



JOYCE L. BRACKETT 

High Street, Cotuit, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Iota Gamma Upsilon 3, 4; Master of the Ritual 4; Education 

Club 3, 4: Recreational Activities Committee 2, 3. 



BARTON MYRON BRASS 
1 1 Corey Road. Maiden, Massachusetts 

Collegian Subscription Staff 2; Ya-Hoo Business Staff 1; Busi- 
ness \Ianager 2. 3; WMUA 4; Alpha Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, 
House Manager 3: Redmen Marching Band 1; IFC Football, 
Basketball, Softball 2, 3, 4; Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4; Historian 1, 2, 3; 
Political Science Association 2, 3. 

ESTHER JEAN BRATTIN 

18 Elmwood Road, Wellesley, Massachusetts 

Government 

Judson Fellowship 1, 2; Women's Athletic Association 4; 

Dorm Representative. 



ELIZABETH ANN BREEN 

602 South Union Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Lambda Delta 1, 2; Equestrian 

Club 3. 



MARY JANE BRIGGS 

9 Puritan Road, Beverly, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Sigma Sigma Sigma 2, 3, 4, Directory Chairman 3, Music 

Chairman 2; Dean's List 3, 4; Naiads 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 

3. 4; Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 1; Outing Club 2, 3, 

4; WAA 1,2, 3. 



MICHAEL JOSEPH BRITA 

301 Main Street, Milford, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramurals I, 2, 3, 4; T^ Club I, 2, 

3. 4, President 4; BT 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman 

Club 2, 3, 4; Physical Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity "M" 

Club, Baseball 3, 4. 



DAVID L. BROAD 

24 Centerwood Drive, Holden, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Transfer — University of Miami; Sigma Chi 1 ; Dean's List 3, 4; 
Honors Work 4; Accounting Association 3, 4; Business Admin- 
istration Club 4; Finance Club 4; Management Club 4; Zool- 
ogy Club 4; Intramurals Football 2. 



DARYLL HERBERT BROSE 

5 Kenington Court, North Springvale, Victoria, Australia 
Industrial Engineering 

House Counselor 2; House Officer 3, Social Chairman; SWAP 
2; Varsity Track 3, 4; WMUA 1, 2; AIIE 1, 2, 3, 4. 

DOUGLAS ALAN BROTHERS 
59 Wexford Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

WMUA 2, 3; Concert Band 1, 2, 3, Properties 1, 2, 3; March- 
ing Band 1, 2, Properties 1, 2; Operetta Guild 3, Orchestra; 
Roister Doisters 2, Electrician; University Theater 3; Dean's 
List 3. 

KAREN BROWN 

19 Bates Avenue, Winthrop, Massachusetts 

Education 

Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Hillel 1, 2; Northampton Volunteer 

2; WAA 3; House Counselor 4. 

PETER BROWN 

27 Stanton Street, Taunton, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Student Senate 3; Dean's List 3, 4; Football 1; Accounting 

Association 4; Berkshire Faculty Resident 4; Greenough House 

Council 1. 

RICHARD S. BROWN 
90 East Street, Melrose, Massachusetts 
English 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; House Historian 2, Vice Presi- 
dent 4; Revelers 4; Dean's List 2; Varsity Lacrosse 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Captain 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2; Ski Club 2. 

SHEILA PHYLLIS BROWN 

Bridge Street, Montague Center, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Commuter's Club 1, 2, 3. 

STEVEN WHITNEY BROWN 
140 Baxter Avenue, Hyannis, Massachusetts 
Alpha Sigma Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 2; IFC 2; Cri- 
tique 4; Executive Council 1. 

JANINA E. BRUELL 
35 Brandon Road, Dudley, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Physical Education Club in Poland; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion; Gymnastics Club; International Club. 

JOHN PETER BUBRISKI 

South Street, Housatonic, Massachusetts 

Accoutiting 

Baseball 1; Manager 1; Soccer 3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4. 

MARDA BUCHHOLZ 

Colonial Acres, Hatfield, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Dean's List 1; Canterbury Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian 

Association 1; Mathematics Club 3, 4; Concert Association 

3. 

MERLE K. BUCKHOUT (Mrs. Edwin A.) 

200 Hockanum Road, Hadley, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Pi Beta Phi 2, 3, 4; House Corp. Treasurer 3, Chairman 4. 

GAYLE P. BUCKLEY 
Rosenberg Road, Lanesborough, Massachusetts 
Zoology 

Pre-Med Journal 3, 4; Editor 4; SU Dance Committee 2, 3; 
Distinguished Visitors Program 3, 4, Treasurer 4, Program 4; 
Field Hockey 1, 2, 3; 4-H Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Program 3, Secre- 
tary 4; Oriental Sports Club 1; Pre-Med Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Vice 
President 4; Women's Athletic Association 3; Zoology Club I, 
2, 3, 4. 

VICTOR ROBERT BURDICK 

135 Beaver Street, North Adams, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Transfer — General Electric Apprentice Program; Electrical 

Engineering; IEEE 3, 4. 

EUGENE JACOB BURGIN 

153 Kent Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 

Speech 

Football 2, 3, 4, Varsity Head Manager 3, 4. 



VICTORIA BROOKS 

17 Kenney Road, Medfield, Massachusetts 

English and Art 

Girl's Swim Team I, 2; Dean's List 3; Sport Parachute Club 1, 

2. 



410 



LEO T. BURKE, JR. 

17 Fairvicw Street, Newton, Massachusetts 

Zoology '~~' — 

Transfer — Newton Jr. College; Chemistry Club 2; Education 

Club 3; Zoology Club 3, 4. 



NEIL F. BURKE 

17 Brewster Court, Northampton, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Accounting Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 

SANDRA KAY BURLINGAME 

15 Burncolt Road, Florence, Massachusetts 

History 

Collegian 2, 3; Roister Doisters 1; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Honors Colloquium 2, 3; Honors Work 4; French Corridor 2, 

3, 4; Russian Club 3. 



PAUL ROBERT CAISSE 

14 Grand Street, Leominster, Massachusetts 

Matliematics 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 2, 3, 4; Fraternity Discipline Committee 4; 

Winter Track 1, 2; Baseball 1, 3, 4; Spring Track 2; Newman 

Club 1, 2. 

RICHARD WILLIAM CALCASOLA 

60 Cornwall Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Deans List 2; Eta Kappa Nu 4; Wrestling 1, 2; AIEE-IRE 3, 

4. 



BEVERLY JUNE BURNISKE 

14 Harrison Avenue, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Education 

Dean's List 3, 4; Honor's Work 4. 

JOANNE M. BURON 

725 Prospect Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 
Home Economics 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Choir 2; House Committee 2, Dorm 
Captain 3; Exchange Program (New Mexico) 3; Home Eco- 
nomics 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Dean's Student Council 2, 3, 4; 
Freshman Representative. 

VIRGINIA IRENE BUSHA 

73 Seventh Street, Turners Falls, Massachusetts 

English 

Commuter's Club 1; Newman Club 4; Council of Teachers of 

English 4. 

DENNIS MICHAEL BUSHE 

1 1 Wardwell Court, Southbridge, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Class Executive Council 2, 3, 4; Winter Carnival Committee 

3; Advisory Board 4; RSO Committee 4; Sigma Phi Epsilon I, 

2, 3, 4, Rush Chairman 3, Secretary 4; Adelphia 4, Vice 

President 4; Revelers 3; Maroon Keys 2; Campus Varieties 4; 

Distinguished Visitors Program 3, 4, Production Manager 4; 

SWAP 4; ASCE 3, 4; Who's Who in American Colleges & 

Universities. 

DAVID M. BUSKEY 

47 Fernwood Street, Chicapee Falls, Massachusetts 

Le Cercle Francais 1, 2, 3, 4; Literary Society 1, 2, 4; Art 

Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

EUGENE WHEELER BUTLER 

82 Paxton Street, Leicester, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

North Hampton State Hospital Volunteers 3, 4; Rifle Team 4; 

Newman Club 3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Pre-Medical 

Club 1, 2, 3. 

PAMELA J. BUTLER 

91 Harmon Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 

2, 3, 4; Gymnastics Club 1, 2, 3. 

RICHARD J. BUTLER 

5 1 1 Lincoln Apartments, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Accounting Club 4; Newman Club 4; International Club 4. 

ROBERT M. CABRAL 

Amherst Road, Pelham, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Colloquium 2, 3, 4; Phi Eta Sigma 

2. 

CHRISTINA N. CADY 

87 Columbia Boulevard, Kenmore, New York 

Nursing 

Alpha Chi Omega 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 3; Panhel- 

lenic Representative 4; Scrolls 2; Winter Carnival Committee 

3; Student Christian Association 2; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

DANIEL C. CAHILL 

80 Norfolk Avenue, Swampscott, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

IEEE 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

DOROTHY M. CAHILL 
391 Belmont Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 
English 

Critique 3, 4; Gamma Sigma Sigma 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Na- 
tional Council of Teachers of English, First Vice President 3, 
4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Fencing Club, Secretary-Treasurer 2, 3; Literary Society 2, 3, 
4; Psychology Club 1, 2. 



RICHARD J. CALLAHAN 

23 Plymouth Avenue, Milton, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Zeta Nu 1, 2, 3, 4; Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; Physical Education Club 

2, 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 3, 4. 



CHRISTINE ANN-MARIE CAMANDONA 
283 Cornell Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

Dorm Social Committee 2; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Col- 
loquium 1, 2, 3; Canterbury Club 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant Treasurer 3, 4; SNAM- 
NSNA 1, 3, 4, Delegate. National Convention 3. 



RICHARD A. CAMPBELL 

32 Rice Avenue, Rockland, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

House Officer 3, Treasurer; Accounting Association 4. 

PETER HENRY CAMPOLI 

903 Dalton Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

IEEE 3, 4. 

CHARLES E. CANANE, JR. 

6 Third Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Dean's List 3; Swimming Team I; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 

A.S.C.E. 2, 3, 4; Civil Engineering Club 2, 3, 4. 

ROBERT CHARLES CANNISTRARO 

14 Park Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 

History 

Military Ball Committee 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; 

Intramural Touch Football and Basketball 2; Newman Club 1, 

2, 3, 4, Dorm Captain 4; Home Economics Club 2. 

CAROLYN ANNE CANNON 

22 Sumner Avenue, Florence, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Dean's List 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



ROBERT ALAN CARDWELL 

74 West Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

History 

Dean's List 3; International Club 2, 3, 4. 



ESTHERAE TOBEY CAREY 

41 Elizabeth Circle, Framingham, Massachusetts 

Government 

Dean's List 3. 

PATRICIA H. CAREY 

32 Wing Road, Lynnfield, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Chi Omega 2, 3, 4; Musigals 3; Newman Club 1, 4; Education 

Club 3, 4. 

ERIC JOEL CARLSON 

91 Oak Hill Road, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Dean's List 3; Student Christian Association 1, 2; Math Club 

1, 2, 3, 4; Bridge Club 1, 2, 3; Commuter's Club 3, 4. 

ROBERT WALTER CARLSON 

38 Old Mill Road, Shrewsbury, Massachusetts 

History 

Transfer — ^Worcester Junior College; Collegian 4. 



MAUREEN J. CARMELL 

69 Valentine Road, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Dean's List 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Precisionettes 1, 

2, 3, Commander 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 

4; Ski Club 1. 



411 



MAR"V' PATRICIA C.AJRROLL 

18 Groveland Street, Easthampton. Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Student Union Governing Board 2. 4; Sigma Kappa 1. 2. 3, 4, 

Scholarship Chairman 3, 1st Vice President 4; Mortar Board 

4: Dean'5 List 1. 3, 4; Newman Club 1. 2. 3. 4; Education 

Club 3, 4; Angel Flight 3. 4; Pledge Trainer 3. Information 

Officer 4. 

RICHARD DEXTER CARROLL 

20 Maple Street, Marblehead, Massachusetts 

History 

\'a-Hoo 1, 2, 3: Technical Director 2, 3; Concert Band 1,2: 

Dean's List 3: Canterbury Club 1, 2; Home Economics Club 

2,3. 

JAMES THOMAS CARSWELL 

7 1 Mercury Court, West Springfield, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

WMUA 3: Rifle Team 2, 3, 4, Captain 4; Wesley Foundation 

1: IEEE 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 3, 4. 

GEORGE L. C.ARVALHO, JR. 

198 Bolton Street. New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Economics 

House Officer 3. Vice President: Zeta Nu 1, 2, 3; Dean's List 

3, 4: Military Ball Committee 3; Soccer 1: Bay State Rifles 1, 

2; Army ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4 Cadet Major, Distinguished Military 

Student: Newman Club 2. 



ALAN .MEREDITH CASE 

2 Addison Road, Wilbraham, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Collegian I: Engineering Journal 2; Alpha Sigma Phi 1, 2, 3, 

4: Scholastic Chairman 2, Prudential Committee 2: Dean's List 

3, 4; G\mnastics Team 3: Air Cadet Squadron I, 2; AIEE-IRE 

2. 3, 4:' Commuter's Club 2; Flying Club 3; Ski Club 4; Sport 

Parachute Club 4. 

P.\TR1CK JOSEPH CASTAGNARO 

133 Purchase Street, Milford, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

House Counselor 4; Athletic Chairman, Dorm 4; Newman 

Club 1. 2; Dorm Softball 2, 3, 4; Dorm Football 3, 4. 

VIRGINIA ANN CAWLEY 

14 Lucas Street. New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Education Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

FAY L. CHABOT 

20 Vermont Street. Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Speech Therapy 

Dean's List 2. 3: Commuter's Club 1. 



WARREN E. CHACE 

598 Bark Street, Swansea, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Eta Kappa Nu 3, 

President 4; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; I.E.E.E. 4. 



4, Vice President 3, 



DONALD LESTER CHAMBERLAIN 

72 Beacon Avenue, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Government 

Dean's List 3; Newman Club 2; Le Cercle Francais 1. 

CAROL JEAN CHAPMAN 

Ballou Lane, Williamstown, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 3; Chemistry Club 

2, 3, 4. 

LEONARD K. CHAREST 

97 Silver Street, Agawam, Massachusetts 

Government 

Men's Judiciary 1, 2, 3, 4, Chief Justice 4: Class Executive 

Council 4; Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, Chaplain 3, Secretary 4; 

Adelphia 4; Revelers 3; Maroon Key 2; Dean's List I, 3; Pi 

Sigma Alpha 3, 4; Homecoming Committee 4; SCOPE 3, 4; 

SWAP 3, 4, "Treasurer 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3, 

Chairman of Snow Sculptures; Newman Club I, 2, 3, 4, Social 

Chairman 2, Retreat Chairman 4; Young Democrats 1: Who's 

Who in American Colleges & Universities. 



DAVID A. CHARLESWORTH 

548 Colvjn Street, South Attleboro, Massachusetts 

History 

Transfer — Kent State University; Phi Mu Delta 3; History 

Club 3, 4; Young Democrats 4; House Counselor 4; Intervar- 

sity Christian Fellowship 3. 



JOEL BARRY CHARM 

57 Fottler Road, Mattapan, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; American Chemical Association 

4: Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3; Young Democrats 4; Chemistry 

Club 3, 4. 

JOANNE CHAR'VTSIA 

55 Ridlon Road, Mattapan, Massachusetts 

English 

Dean's List 3; Orthodox Club 1; Russian Club 1, 2. 



JAMES S. CHECHILLE 

2000 Boston Road, North Wilbraham, Massachusetts 

Food Technoloqv 

Phi Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4; Sentinel 3; AFROTC 1, 2, 3; 

Military Ball Committee 3; Granville Air Society 3; Food 

Technical Club 3, 4; Newman Club 2, 3. 

LAWRENCE HERBERT CHEEVER 

34 Glazier Street, Morningdale, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

House Counselor 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; 

Newman Club 1; ASME 2, 3, 4. 

BORIS CHEVONE 

238 Worcester Street, Wellesley, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Wrestling 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 4; Zoology Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

FRANCIS J. CHLAPOWSKI 

55 Thompson Road, Webster, Massachusetts 

Pre-Medical 

Men's Area Judiciary 3; Dean's List 3; Newman Club 3, 4; 

Equestrian Club 3; Pre-Medical Club 3, 4. 

ROBERT WILLIAM CHLEBEK 

558 Hicks Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Transfer— S.M.I.T.; Judson Fellowship 3, 4; Scuba Club 3; 

Equestrian Club 3; Mathematics Club 3, 4; German Club 2, 

3. 

LAURIE MAE CHRISTIANSEN 

38 Old Jacobs Road, Georgetown, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Student Union Governing Board 4, Vice Chairman 4, Student 

Union Program Council 3, 4, Secretary 3, Chairman 4; RSO 

Committee 2, 3, 4 Chairman, S.U. Publicity Committee 3, 

Chairman S.U. Personnel Committee 4; S.U. Arts & Music 

Committee 2, 3. 

MICHAEL CHARLES CHULADA 
Power Road, Littleton, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

House Vice President 1; Golf 1; Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Athletic Chairman 2; Social Chairman 3, Vice President 4; 
Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Physical Education 
Major's Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Revelers 4, Traditions Council 4, 
Chairman; Dean's List 4; Who's Who in American Colleges 
and Universities 4. 

STANLEY FRANCIS CIEMPA, JR. 
21 Powers Street, Adams, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 
AIEE-IRE 3, 4. 

CARL P. CIOSEK, JR. 

1205 Roswell Drive, Falls Church, Virginia 

Microbiology 

Phi Mu Delta 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Medical 

Club 1, 2. 

DAVID VINCENT CLARK 

14 Coit Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 
Civ/7 Engineering 

Freshman Lacrosse 1; ASCE 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Intramurals 2, 3, 4. 

GRACE ELLEN CLARK 

41 Backman Avenue, Pitlsfield, Massachusetts 

English 

Transfer — Berkshire Community College; WMUA 4; Student 

Christian Association 3, 4. 

JAMES PATTERSON CLARK, III 

15 Norfolk Place, Sharon, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineer 

Ya-Hoo 1, 2, 3, 4, Literary Editor 2, Associate Editor 3; 
Dean's List 3; Soccer 1; ASME 2, 4. 



412 



THOMAS E. CLARK 

Route 49, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Wildlife Biology 

QTV 1, 2, 3, 4; Vice President 3; Ski Team 1, 2, 3, 4; Captain 

3, 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; QTV Executive Board 4; 

Intramural Sports. 

VIRGINIA M. CLARK 

Furnace Hill, Cheshire, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Women's Sports 1, 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3. 4; Chemistry 
Club 1, 2; American Chemical Society 4; Gymnastic Club 2; 
Mathematics Club 1; Physics Club 2; Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation 1, 2, 3, 4 Corridor Representative; Zoology Club 1. 

GAIL BENVIE CLAYTON 

419 South Franklin Street, Holbrook, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Panhellenic Council 3; Pi Beta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Jr. Pan Hellenic; 

Dean's List 3, 4; Naiads 2; Nursing Club 1,2, 3, 4. 

SHERMAN CLEBNIK 

1 1 Swampscott Avenue, Swampscott, Massachusetts 

Geology 

Dean's List 1, 3; Sigma Gamma Epsilon 3, 4, Treasurer 3; 

Geology Club 1, 2, 3, 4 President 2; Western Massachusetts 

Archaeological Society 3. 



LIL-JUDITH COHEN 

65 Brownell Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 

English 

Sigma Sigma Sigma 2, 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3. 

WILLIAM ARTHUR COLE 

21 Columbia Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Dean's List 3, 4; Newman Club 2, 3. 

STEPHEN ROBERT COLEMAN 

42 Cottage Street, Wellesley, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors 

Work 4. 

KENNETH AIME COLLINS 

151 Homestead Avenue, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

Transfer — Holyoke Jr. College; AIChE 3, 4; Commuter's Club 

3. 

MARY LORRAINE COLLINS 

2 Lebanon Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
English 

Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4; Social Chairman 4; RSO Com- 
mittee 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Precisionettes 2; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



THOMAS E. CLELAND, JR. 

20 Washington Avenue, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Art 

Military Ball Committee 4; Soccer 2; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 

2; Art Club 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Commuter's Club 1; Arnold Air 

Society 3, 4, Executive Officer 4. 

ANNE E. CLINCH 
174 Lane Drive, Norwood, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Chorale 1; Operetta Guild 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 4; Educa- 
tion Club 4; Oriental Sports Club I . 



WARREN S. COLLINGS 

19 Drury Lane, Wakefield, Massachusetts 

Wildlife Biology and Education 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 3, 4, 5, Rush Chairman 5; Dean's List 5; 

Forestry Club 3; Rod & Gun Club 1, 2, 3. 

CHARLES H. COMEY, III 

Lafayette Road, Hampton, New Hampshire 

Government 

Transfer — Washington and Lee University; House Counselor 3, 

4; Delta Tau Delta 1, 2, House Manager 2; Political Science 

Association 3, 4. 



MARSTON CLOUGH 

Main Street, Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts 

Microbiology 

Dean's List 3; Judson Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 

President 4; Protestant Christian Council 4. 



4, Treasurer 3, 



JOAN E. CONGDON 

300 Parker Street, East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Pi Beta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, House Manager 4; Dean's List 3 at New 
Mexico; Education Club 3, 4; Exchange Student to University 
of New Mexico 3. 



ROLAND F. CLOUTIER 

94 Pleasant Street, Ware, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

House Counselor 4; Civil Engineering Club 2, 3, 4; Flying 

Redmen 1; Newman Club 1, 2; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; 

ASCE 2, 3, 4. 

PHILIP KENNETH COAKLEY 
92 Sheridan Street, Newton. Massachusetts 
English 

Collegian 4; Ya-Hoo 2, 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Honors Collo- 
quium 4; Newman Club 1, 2; History Club 2. 



RICHARD F. CONLEY 

151 Derby Road, Melrose, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 

4; IEEE 3, 4. 

DAVID MICHAEL CONNERS 

706 West Housatonic Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Interfraternity Council 3; Phi Mu Delta 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3; 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; Track 2, 3, 4; 

Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1; ASCE 1, 4. 



BARBARA A. COCCHI 
24 Home Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Education 

House Social Advisor 3; House Fraternity Education Chair- 
man 3; House Chaplain 4; Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Newman Club 2, 3. 



DIANE LILLIAN COOK 

98 Mason Street, South Weymouth, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Student Union Dance Committee 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Inter- 
national Weekend Committee 1; Student Christian Association 
1. 



LILLIAN T. COCHRAN 

165 Welles Avenue, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Transfer- — Boston University; Dean's List 3, 4. 

COLIN STEPHEN COE 

Middle Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 

English 

Transfer — Luther College. 



SUSAN COFLAN 

26 Morningside Road, Wakefield, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

RSO Committee 3, 4; Kappa Alpha Theta 2, 3, 4. 

ANNE E. COHEN 

99 Welland Road, Brookline, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

House Counselor 3; Operetta Guild 2, 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 
1; Modern Dance Club 1, 2; Oriental Sports Club 1; Psychol- 
ogy Club 1, 2, 3; Ski Club 1. 



ELIZABETH JEAN COOK 
52 Pine Street, Wakefield, Massachusetts 
English 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Lambda Delta 1, 2, 3, 4 Senior 
Advisor; Student Christian Association 1, 2; Wesley Founda- 
tion 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 1; International Club 2, 3, 4, 
Executive Officer 3; U Massachusetts Student Branch of Na- 
tional Council of Teachers of English 3, 4, Vice President 3, 
4. 

IAN NEAL COOKE 

42 Jackson Street, Weedsport, New York 

Physical Education 

Track 1; Soccer 3, 4; Wesley Foundation 3, Treasurer; Air 

Cadet Squadron 1, 2, Information Officer; Commuter's Club 3, 

4; Granville Air Society 3, 4. 

JAMES H. COOPER 

8 North Atkinson, Newburyport, Massachusetts 

English 

Transfer — Northern Esser Community College; Newman Club 

4. 



413 



MARILVTM M. COPE 

2 Indian Ridge Road. South Natick, Massachusetts 

Psvcbology 

Collegian 4: Newman Club 1. 3. 4; Psychology Club 3, 4. 

B.\RRY R. COPPINGER 

132 Thorndike Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 

English 

WMUA 2. 3, 4: Marching Band 1, 2, 3; Concert Band 3; 

Dean's List 3. 

THOMAS F. CORDIS 

715 Longmeadow Street. Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Business A dministration 

United Nations Week Committee 1; Business Administration 

Club 2; Commuter's Club 3. 

VIRGINIA M.ARIE COREA 

14 Mann Street, Hingham, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

Concert Band 1. 2. 3: Marching Band 1, 2, 3; Newman Club 
1. 2, 3, 4: Assistant Dorm Captain 1. Dorm Captain 4; Nurs- 
ing Club 1. 2, 3. 4. 

ROBERT \V.-\tNE CORMIER 

32 Saratoga Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Student NEA 4; Education Club 4. 

CHARLES EDWARD CORNELLIER 

97 Sandy Pond Road, Ayer, Massachusetts 
Zoology 

Newman Club 1, 2, 4; Zoology Club 3, 4. 



ROL.AND FRANCIS COTE 

26 Brewster Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Anthropology 

Literary Magazine 3; University Concert Association 3, 4; 

Production Manager 4. 

BLANCHE MARIE COURNOYER 

400 Grove Street, Paxton, Massachusetts 

Botany 

Transfer — Anna Moria College; Dean's List 3; Newman Club 

3. 4; Equestrian Club 4; Outing Club 4; Square Dance Club 4; 

■young Republicans 4. 

PAULA C. COX 

4 Hillside Street, Stoneham, Massachusetts 
Go\ernment 

Index 3; Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secre- 
tary 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; I.F.K. Memorial Committee 
3.4. 

JEAN CHRISTINE CRAIGIN 
126 Greenacre Road, Westwood, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Dean's List 3; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Ski Team 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Captain 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1; Physical Educa- 
tion Club 4: Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Board 
Member 2, 3,4. 



DAVID PAUL CRALENSKI 

290 Main Street, Three Rivers, Massachusetts 

House Counselor 4; Spanish Club 2. 

WILLIAM THOMAS CRANE 

35 West Shore Drive, Marblehead, Massachusetts 

Government 

Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 3, 4; Varsity M Club 3, 4; 

Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Political Science 

Club 3. 4; French Club 2. 



RONALD C. CROCKER 

138 Idlewell Boulevard, Weymouth, Massachusetts 
Government 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 2, 3, 4, Vice President 3; Marching Band 
3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Flying Redmen I, 2, 3; 
WHUA 3; Social Activities Committee 3; Interfraternity 
Council 3; Student Christian Association 1; Air Cadet Squad- 
ron 3; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2. 



JUDITH ANN CROOKER 

358 Harkness Road, Amherst, Massachusetts 

French 

Student Senate 3, 4, Secretary 4; Scrolls 2; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; 

Honors Colloquium 3; Non-Resident Student Association 2, 3, 

4. President 4; Belchertown Volunteers 3, 4; Who's Who in 

American Colleges & Universities. 



CYNTHIA NORMA CROOPNICK 

186 Highland Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 

Home Economics 

Class Executive Council 3; Social Activities Committee 2, 3; 

Special Events Committee 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Editor 4. 

V. PAMELA CROWELL 
White Horse Beach, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Christian Association 1; Women's Athletic Association 2; 
Dorm Social Chairman 3; Education Club 3, 4; Young Demo- 
crats 4; Outing Club 3. 

SHEILA C. CROWLEY 

708 Robeson Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

House Counselor 4; Dorm Social Chairman 3; Newman Club 

1, 2, 3, 4; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

MARY ELIZABETH CRUIKSHANK 

26 Rankin Avenue, East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Education 

Transfer — Marietta College; Education Club 3, 4; Movie 

Committee of Student Union 3. 

DAVID A. DAISY 

Benson Road, Truro, Massachusetts 

Fisheries Biology 

Volunteer Fire Department 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2; Forestry 

Club 1, 2; ZetaNu2, 3,4. 

JOHN A. DALY 

103 Francis Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Advanced ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4; Military Ball Committee 4; Swim- 
ming Team 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Finance Club 3; 
University Economic Association 4; Young Democrats 4; Beta 
Kappa Phi 2, 3, 4, 

JOHN L. DALY 

289 Walnut Street, Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts 

History 

Student Senate 1; Curriculum Committee 1; Newman Club 1, 

2, 3, 4; History Club 3, 4; UMITIE 3; Political Science Asso- 
ciation 4. 

ARNOLD M. DANIELS 

71 Bow Road, Npwtpr] Ce">p'' Massachusetts 

Industrial Engineering 

Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 3; Hillel 

Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; AIIE 3, 4; Mathematics Club 1; Chess 

Club 1. 

PATRICIA ANNE DANISINKA 
54 Lincoln Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 
Government 

Class Executive Council 2, 3, 4; Concert Band 1, 2; Dean's 
List 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion 4. 

DONALD FREDERICK DARGIE 

35 Raleigh Road, Belmont, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

American Society of Civil Engineers 2, 3, 4; Kappa Sigma 2, 

3, 4; Literary Society 2; Young Democrats 2, 3; Lacrosse 1, 

2. 

JACQUELINE M, DAVID 

130 Kimball Road, Dedham, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Collegian 4, Associate Makeup Editor 4; Student Senate 4, 

Finance Committee (son-sen.) 3, Finance Committee 4; 

Women's Interdorm Council 2; Fine Arts Council 4; Dean's 

List 3; Newman Club 1, 2; Young Democrats 3, 4. 

JEFFERY S. DAVIDOW 

35 Heath Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 

Collegian I, 2, 3, Editor-in-Chief 3; Handbook, Editor 4; Class 

Executive Council 1, 2, 3; SU Governing Board 4; Adelphia 4; 

SWAP 3. 

THOMAS DAVIDOW 

158 Palmer Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Business A dministration 

Tau Epsilon Phi I, 2, 3, 4, Rushing Chairman 3; Soccer Team 

I ; Winter Carnival 2. 

LOUISE B. DAVIDSON 

2 Lafayette Street, Fairhavcn, Massachusetts 

Speech 

Dean's List 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1; Outing Club 

3,4. 



414 



ELIZABETH G. DAWE 

12 Rock Maple Avenue, Hamilton, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Sigma Delta Tau 1, 2, 3, 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Mathematics Club 1; Sociology Club 
3; Women's Athletic Association 1,2, 3, 4. 

ANTHONY FRANK DEC 

14 Ken Lane, Granby, Massachusetts 

Food Teclinology 

Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4; Bowling; Basketball 3, 4; Flying 

Redmen 1; Air Cadet Squadron 1; Commuter's Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Food Technology Club 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Pre-Medical Club 1, 

2. 

RICHARD JOSEPH DECILIO 

By Pass Road, Lincoln, Massachusetts 
Landscape Architecture 

Transfer — Northeastern University; Alpha Zeta 3, 4; Land- 
scape Architecture Club 3, 4. 

GEORGE DeFALCO 

Armsby Road, Sutton, Massachusetts 

Business Administration & Economics 

Beta Kappa Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Bar Manager 3; Social Chairman 4; 

Golf 2. 3, 4; Golf Captain 3, 4. 



CAROLYN DILENDIK 

36 Eudora Street, Haverhill, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Newman Club 2; Education Club 3, 4. 

JUDITH MAE DIMLICH 

27 1 Salem Street, Andover, Massachusetts 

English 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dorm Captain 4; Women's Athletic 

Association 1, 4; Junior Affiliate of National Council of 

Teachers of English 4. 

ANTHONY J. DiNINNO 

403 Whiting Avenue, Dedham, Massachusetts 

French 

Critique 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Newman 

Club 1, 2; Le Cercle Francais 1; French House 4. 

LOIS DiPASQUALE 

74 Upsala Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Education 

Advisor to Dorm Social Committee 3; SU Dance Committee 

3; House Counselor 3, 4; House Chairman 4; Dean's List 3; 

Newman Club 1. 2; Education Club 4; Sociology Club 1, 2, 3, 

4; Young Democrats 4. 



WALTER S. deFOREST 

23 Lawrence Avenue, Westport Point, Massachusetts 

Government 

Marine Corps PLC Program 1, 2, 3, 4; Zeta Nu 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Scholastic Chairman, Photographer 1, 2, 3; Marching Band 1; 

Psychology Research Assistant 2, 3; Dean's List 3; Honors 

Colloquium 1; Fraternity Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Cross Country 

1; Student Christian Association 1, 2; Equestrian Club 1. 



MARIA T. DISANO 

15 Beaufort Circle, Springfield, Massachusetts 

English 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant Membership 3, 

Public Relations Chairman 4; SU Special Events Committee 3; 

Undergraduate Assistant; Department of English 4; Dean's List 

3, 4; Student Council, American Teachers of English 4; Winter 

Carnival Committee 3; Newman Club 2, 3, 4. 



FRANCESCO DelULIS 

51 Highland Avenue, Lynn, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

ASCE. 

ELLEN MARGARET DELAHUNT 
168 Pond Street, South Weymouth, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Roister Doisters 1; Dean's List 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Mathematics Club 1, 2, 4; Psychology Club 1, 2; Young Dem- 
ocrats 1, 2, 4. 

THOMAS MICHAEL DELVISCO 

8 Marcus Road, North Wilmington, Massachusetts 

Government 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Newman Club 3. 4; 

Young Democrats 4. 

LEON E. DENSMORE 

754 Montgomery Street, Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Transfer — Holyoke Jr. College. 

MILDRED ANN DEPELTEAU 
12 Cherry Street, Adams, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Index 4; House Counselor 3; Sigma Sigma Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 4; Education Club 3, 4; Le Cercle Francais 

1, 2. 

WILLIAM C. DEVLIN 

167 South Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Transfer — Holyoke Junior College; Newman Club 3, 4; SAE 

2, 3, 4; ASME 1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary, Program 
Chairman; Commuter's Club 4. 

SALLY A. DICKSON 

State Street, Richmond, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Senate Committee on Women's Affairs 2; House Counselor 2; 

House Chairman 3, 4; Dormitory Treasurer 1; Operetta Guild 

1: Dean's List 1, 2, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Mathematics Club 2; Nursing Club 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance 

Club 2, 3. 

JOSEPH MARIO DIFABIO 

668 Pearl Street, Stoughton, Massachusetts 

Wildlife Management 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, First 'Vice President 3, 4. 

EILEEN JANICE DIGGLE 

405 Main Street, Acushnet, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

House Counselor 4; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; Vocations Chair- 
man 3, 4, Kitchen Manager 4; University Concert Association 
2, 3; Dean's List 4; Sophomore Banquet Committee 2; Educa- 
tion Club 3, 4. 



ALICE P. DOERING 

82 Meadowbrook Avenue, West Springfield, Massachusetts 
Home Economics 

Social Activities Committee 3; Precisionettes 2, 3, Executive 
Officer 3; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Winter Carnival 
Committee 3. 

CHARLES WILLIAM DOLAN 

755 Great Plain Avenue, Needham, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

House Counselor 4; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4, Recording Secretary 4; 

ASCE 2, 3, 4, President 4; Civil Engineering Club 2, 3, 4. 

KATHRYN HEATHER DONALDSON 

3 Hailes Hill Road, Swansea, Massachusetts 
Art 

House Counselor 3, 4; Choral 2; Canterbury Club 1; Art Club 
3, President 4; Modern Dance Club 1; Outing Club 3; WAA 
2. 

WILLIAM RALPH DONOVAN 

2 Phillips Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 
Government 

Student Senate 2, 3, 4; Services Committee 2, 3, 4, Chairman 
4; Ad-hoc Committee on Absentee Voting, Chairman 4; Rep- 
resentative to SUG Board 3; Pistol Team 2; SODOM 3, 4; 
Non-Resident Student Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Governmental 
Action Committee, Chairman 3; Delegate to Intercollegiate 
Commuter Association Conference 3, 4; Intermural Basketball 
Manager 2; International Relations Club 1; Young Democrats 4. 

DONALD JAMES DOUGLASS 

16 Quirico Drive, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

IEEE 4; Bridge Club 3, 4. 

NANCY J. DOWNING 

4 Park Street, Mattapoisett, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Class Executive Council 4; House Counselor 3; Panhellenic 
Council 3, 4, Co-Rush Chairman 4; Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 
3, 4; Revelers 3; Scrolls 2, Vice President 2; Dean's List 2; 
Campus Chest Committee 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; 
Education Club 4; SU Special Activities Committee 1; Who's 
Who in American Colleges & Universities. 

JOSEPH B. DOYLE 

69 Garrison Avenue, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1, 2, 3; Maroon Key 2; Dean's List 3; 

Football-Lacrosse 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 3, 4; Physical 

Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4. 

RALPH H. DRAPER, JR. 

157 Kensington Avenue, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 



415 



ARTHUR E. DRISCOLL 

615 Broadway. Everett. Massachusetts 

Pre-Dental (Zoology) 

Kappa Siama 1, 2, 3. 4: Football 2. 3. 4; Newman Club 1. 2, 

3. 4; Pre-Sledical Club 1. 2, 3. 4; Zoology Club 1, 2. 3. 4. 

DI.\NE M. DRISCOLL 
624 Main Street. Agawam. Massachusetts 
English 

Index 3: Chi Omega 1. 2. 3. 4. Standards 3. Rush Chairman 4; 
SW.AP 4: Sophomore Banquet 2; Angel Flight 3; Winter Car- 
nival Fashion Show 2. 

MICHAEL ANTHONY DRISCOLL 

41 Tower Avenue. Lynn, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Interfraternitv Council 2. 3; Phi Mu Delta 1, 2, 3. 4, Secretary 

2. 3: Steward 3. 4; Newman Club 1. 2; Pre-Medical Club 1; 

University Economics Association 2, 3, 4. 

JOHN M. DUBIEL 

34 Lincoln Street. Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Dean's List 2. 3. 4; Beta Gamma Sigma 3. 4; Accountmg 

Association 2. 3, 4. 

VALERIE NORCROSS DuBOIS 
58 North Prospect Street, Amherst. Massachusetts 
French 

Student Senate 3. Foreign Student Advisory Board Representa- 
tive: International Club 2. 3, 4, India Association Member 2, 
3. 

GER.A.LD L. DUCHARME 
328 Linden Street. Holyoke. Massachusetts 
Chemical Engineering 

Transfer — Holyoke Jr. College; American Institute of Chemi- 
cal Engineers 3. 4; Newman Club 3. 

NORMAN P. DUFRESNE 
67 Princeton Street. New Bedford. Massachusetts 
Business Administration 

Transfer — New Bedford Institute of Technology and North- 
eastern University; Dean's List 3; Newman Club 4; Manage- 
ment Club 4; Outing Club 4. 



JUDITH L. DUNTON 

26 Percival Street. Boston, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Operetta Guild 2, 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 

Association 1, 2. 



3; Student Christian 



NOLA A. EARL 

63 Colonial Circle. Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Transfer — Sacramento State College 

BRUCE EASTMAN 

95 Court Street. Westfield, Massachusetts 

Government 

Dean's List 2, 3; Pi Sigma Alpha 3, 4; Pioneer Valley Folklore 

Society 1, 2, 3; Luso-Brazilian Club 3. 4, Vice President 3. 

DAVID FRANCIS EGAN 

19 Mowry Street, North Haven, Connecticut 

History 

Phi Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity Football 2, 3; 'i'oung 

Democrats. 

KATHLEEN ANN EICHHORN 

29 Calumet Road, Melhuen, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

House Counselor 3; Chi Omega I, 2, 3. 4, Pledge Trainer 3, 

Personnel 4; Mortar Board, Secretary 4; Scrolls 2; Dean's List 

I, 2, 3; Newman Club I, 2; Women's Athletic Association 1, 

2; Who's Who in American Colleges & Universities. 

ESTHER EISENBERG 

429 East Street, Lee, Massachusetts 

English 

Class Executive Council 2; House Counselor 4, Summer 

School; University Orchestra 3; Concert Band 1,2, 3, 4. Public 

Relations Manager 3, Administrative Assistant 4; Marching 

Band 1, 2, 3, 4 Public Relations Manager 2, 3, Administrative 

Assistant 4; Varsity Band 2, Student Leader; Dean's List 3; 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3; Who's Who in American Colleges & 

Universities. 

RICHARD N. EK 

133 Edson Street, Brockton, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Interfraternity Council 2, 3; Lambda Chi Alpha I, 2, 3, 4, 

Rush Chairman 2, 3; Pledge Trainer 4. 



MARCIA ANN ELASOWICH 
6 Stow Road. Mattapan, Massachusetts 
English 

Collegian 2; Literary Magazine 4; University Concert Associa- 
tion 3. 4; Roister Doisters 2, 3, 4. 

SUSAN JEAN ELDER 

198 Franklin Street. North Adams, Massachusetts 

English 

Index 4. 

NORMAN E. ELLARD 

47 Maple Road, Melrose, Massachusetts 

Government 

Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; History Club 1. 2; Political Science 

Association 3, 4. 

MARGARET SUSIE ELLIS 

Briggs Road, Athol, Massachusetts 
Art 

Operetta Guild 3, 4; Roister Doisters 1, 3, 4; University Thea- 
ter 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Wesley Foundation 1; Art Club 1, 2, 3, 

4. 

PATRICIA MARIE ELLIS 

13 Glendale Road, Burlington, Massachusetts 

History 

History Club 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3. 

EVERETT RAYMOND EMINO 

Hartford Avenue, West Upton, Massachusetts 

Horticultural Science 

House Counselor 5; Stockbridge Student Senate 2; Dean's List 

1, 2, 3, 4, 5; Honors Colloquium 4, 5; Honors Work 5; Alpha 

Zeta 4, 5; Censor 5; Floricultural Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, President 

2; Future Farmers of America 1, 2; Horticultural Society 4, 5, 

Vice President 4, President 5. 

BARBARA T. ENGEL 
37 Dana Road, Reading, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; Scroll 2; Women's Athletic Association 
3; Panhellenic Council 2, 3; Christian Association Representa- 
tive 2. 

WILLIAM O. ENNIS 

95 Harlow Drive, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Government 

Transfer — Holyoke Junior College 

CAROL EVANS 

29 Spadina Parkway, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; Psychology Club 3, 4; Christian 

Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Canterbury Club 1, 3, 4; Ski Club 1, 2, 

3, 4; W.A.A. 1, 2; Girls Ski Team 1. 

KENDALL H. EVANS 

5 Nantucket Avenue, Swampscott, Massachusetts 

Government 

Interfraternity Council 2, 3; Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Treasurer 2, 3; Canterbury Club 1, 2. 3. 4; Astronomy Club 3; 

Political Science Association 2, 3. 

VIRGINIA EWING 

26 Beechwood Avenue, Easthampton, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Arts and Music Committee 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Con- 
cert Association 3, 4, Secretary 4; Education Club 4. 

NANCY L. EYLER 

611 Britton Street, Fairview, Massachusetts 

English 

Equestrian 2; Gamma Sigma Sigma 3, 4; Student Christian 

Association 1; Collegian 4. 

STEPHEN MARTIN EZER 

13 Mulvey Street, Mattapan, Massachusetts 

Pre-Dental 

Collegian 1, 2; Phi Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4; SWAP 3; Winter 

Carnival Committee 3; Hockey Manager 4; Tennis Manager 4; 

Hillel Foundation I, 2, 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4. 

NEIL F. FALBY 

Dry Hill Road, Montague Center, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Transfer — Tufts University 

JOHN DENNIS FARRAGHER 

65 Carmcl Road, Andover, Massachusetts 

English 

Transfer — Merrimack College 



416 



MEREDITH LEE FARRELL 

School Street, West Dennis, Massachusetts 

English 

Women's Inter-dorm Council — Student Chapter; Alpha Chi 

Omega 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary; National Council of 

Teachers of English, Treasurer; Arts and Music Committee; 

Student Christian Association. 

lAMES JOSEPH FASSELL 

133 Cromwell Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

History 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Athletic Chairman; Newman 

Club 3, 4; History Club 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4. 

RUTH HARRIET FEINBERG 

71 Highland Terrace, Brockton, Massachusetts 

Englisli 

Women's Interdorm Council 1, 2, 3, 4, President 2, 3; House 

Counselor 3, 4; Campus Chest Committee 2, 3; SWAP 2, 3; 

U.N. Week Committee 2, 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Young Democrats 4; Women's Affairs 2, 3; J.F.K. Memorial 

Committee 3. 

JOAN CAROL-yiM FELIO 

73 Herbert Street, Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

English 

Index 3; Sigma Sigma Sigma 3, 4, Rush Chairman 4; Dean's 

List 2, 3; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3; Education 

Club 4; Critique 3, 4. 

PAUL JOSEPH FERENZ 

Ware Road, Belchertown, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

House Counselor 3, 4; Military Ball Decorations Committee 

4; Flying Redmen 1, 2, 3, 4, Supply Officer 3; Newman Club 

1, 2, 3, 4, Co-Chairman, Religious Committee 3, 4; Air Cadet 
Squadron 1, 2; Personnel Officer 2. 

CHARLES DENTON FERNALD 

26 Grafton Street, Wakefield, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Dean's J..ist 3, 4; Edward's Fellowship 1; Student Christian 

Association 1; Pre-Med Club 1, 2; Psychology Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 

UMITE 3. 

MARY GRACE FERREIRA 
89 Hathaway Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Physics 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 3, 4, Parliamentarian 3, 1st Vice Presi- 
dent 4; Dean's List 2; Honor's Colloquium 2. 3, 4; Newman 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Dorm Captain 3; Physics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Spanish Club 3, 4; International Club 3, 4. 

SHEILA YOLANDA FERRINI 

52A Eastern Point Road, Gloucester, Massachusetts 

Speech-Theater 

Dean's List 2, 4; Roister Doisters 1, 2, 3, 4; Technical Director 

2, Business Manager 3, 4; Operetta Guild 2, 3, 4. 

KATHLEEN FIDDES 
40 Granite Street, Webster, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Class Executive Council 2, 3; Pi Beta Phi 1, 2; Winter Carni- 
val Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2; Education Club 4. 

ROBERT LAWRENCE FIERRA 

494 Tremont Street, Taunton, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Dean's List 1,2, 3, 4; Tau Beta Pi 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; 

ASCE 2, 3, 4. 

KENNETH E. FIFE 

2339 Boston Road, Wilbraham, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

IEEE 4; General Electric Apprentice Program. 

JOHN L. FILLIO 

237 Columbus Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Wildlife Management 

Dorm Counselor 3; QTV, Chaplain 3. 

RICHARD P. FILLMORE 
36 Dartmouth Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Engineering 

Engineering Journal 4, Managing Editor 4; Eta Kappa Nu 3, 4; 
Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; IEEE 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Flying Club 1, 2; 
Sport Parachute Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 2, 4; Sport Para- 
chute Team 3, 4, Captain 3,4. 

MARY MARGARET FINNEGAN 

33 Woodleigh Road, Watertown, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

House Counselor 4; Dean's List 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Corresponding Secretary 3; Sociology Club 2, 3, 4. 



RITA WINGFIELD FISHEL 

Montague Road, Leverett, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Transfer — Westfield State College, Education Club 3, 4. 

LINDA A. FISHER 

10 Arbor Road, West Newto n, Massachusetts 
Mathematics ~ 

Kappa Kappa Gamma, President, Second Vice President; 
Women's Judiciary, Chief Justice, University Discipline Board; 
Dean's List; Scrolls; Composer of music for Campus Varieties; 
SWAP; Co-Chairman Publicity Winter Carnival; Newman 
Club; Leader of Dorm Sing; Who's Who in American Colleges 
and Universities. 

FREDERICK JAMES FISKAALI 
1 16 Marshall Street, Fitchburg, Massachusetts 
Government 

Marching Band 1; Pep Band 1, 2; Mathematics Club 2, 3, 
Treasurer 3; Political Science Association 4; Young Republi- 
cans 2, 3. 

KENNETH W. FITZGERALD 

150 Joslin Street, Leominster, Massachusetts 

Plant & Soil Science 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Horticultural Society 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, Vice President 4. 

ROBERTA A. FITZSIMMONS 

353 Park Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

English 

Critique 3, 4, Editorial Editor 4; Dean's List 2, 3; Sailing Club 

3; Newman Club 1, 2; Dorm Social Chairman 2. 

PATRICIA A. FLANAGAN 

47 Hatherly Road, Scituate, Massachusetts 

Recreation 

Index 4; House Counselor 3 Summer School; Sigma Delta Tau 

2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Recreation 

Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 

JAMES CHRISTOPHER FLEMING, JR. 

23 Atwood Street, Wakefield, Massachusetts 
History 

Phi Mu Delta 2, 3, 4, Pledge Master 4; Military Ball Commit- 
tee 3; Flying Redmen 1; Newman Club 1; Air Cadet Squadron 
1, 2, Executive Officer 2; Arnold Air Society 3, 4, Squadron 
Administrative Officer 3. Area A-1 Commander 4. 

WILLIAM R. FORAND 

41 Jerome Avenue, Auburn, Massachusetts 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2; 

AIIE 3, 4, Vice President 4. 

DAVID O. FOREN 

53 Willowbrook Drive, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Soccer 1, Intramural 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2. 3; Pre- 

Medical Club 1, 2, 3; Psychology Club 4. 

HELEN B. FORSBERG 
69 Tuttle Street, Dorchester 25, Massachusetts 
Government 

Collegian 3; Senate Committee 1, 2; Student Union Dance 
Committee 2; Interdorm Song Leader 1, 2, 3; WAA 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Women's Tennis Team 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Equestrian Club 2; Scuba Club 3, 4; Ski Club 2; Young Dem- 
ocrats 2; University Theater 3, 4. 

MAXINE DULCIE FORWARD 

82 Hurd Avenue, Saugus, Massachusetts 

Medical Technology (Microbiology) 

Operetta Guild 2, 3, 4, Personnel Coordinator 2, Production 

Coordinator 3; Dean's List 1; Alpha Lambda Delta 1; Pre- 

Medical Club 1; Medical Technology Club 3, 4. 

JOHN FRANCISCO 

1 1 Main Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honor's 
Colloquium 2; Honor's Work 4; Swimming Team 1, 2; New- 
man Club 1; Psychology Club 2, 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 2; 
Belchertown State School, Volunteer 1, 2, 3, 4, Director 3, 
4. 

RICHARD C. FRANSON 

33 McKenney Circle, Andover, Massachusetts 

Botany 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Guide; Intramural Football; 

Intramural Softball; Dean's List 4; Botany Club 3, 4. 

FRANK JOSEPH FREDERICK 

320 Hampden Street, Chicopee, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

House Counselor 2; Phi Sigma Kappa 3, 4. 



417 



GAIL FREEDLANDER 

70 Woodside Road, Pledford, Massachusetts 

Education 

Index 3, 4: House Counselor 3; Sigma Delta Tau 1. 2. 3, 4; 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4: Winter Carnival Committee 2: Hillel 

Foundation 1; Education Club 2, 3, 4. 

THOMAS JEFFREY FREEDMAN 

27 James Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

GEORGE BURTON FRENCH 

378 South Street. Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Transfer — Berkshire Community College 

JOHN FRI.AR. II 

240 Highland Avenue, Fall River, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

House Officer 1, Dorm President; SWAP 1; AIChE 2, 3, 4; 

Chemical Engineering Club 2, 3, 4. 

DONALD E. FRIES 

32 Marsh Avenue. Haverhill, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3. 4; AFROTC Rifle Team 1; Air 

Cadet Squadron 1.2: Flying Club 4: Ski Club 1. 

BRIAN RE ID FRY 

36 Brantford Place, Buffalo, New York 

Business Administration (Finance) 

Transfer — University of Buffalo; Dean's List 3. 

MARION BURBANK FULLER 

North Street, Windsor, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 4; Dean's List 3; 

Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Union Dance Committee 1. 



MARILYN GATES 

285 Centre Avenue. Abington, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Class Executive Council 1,2. 3. 4; Winter Carnival Committee 

3; Gamma Sigma Sigma 3. 4; WAA 1. 2, 3, 4; Field Hockey 

Club 3; Basketball Club 3, 4; Gymnastics Club 2, 4; Newman 

Club 1, 2, 3, 4; History Club 2; Physical Education Club 2, 

3, 



DAVID H. GATONSKA 

4661 Acushnet Avenue 

Zoologv 

QTV Fraternity; Dean's List 1. 3; Football 

1 ; Zoology 1 . 



Newman Club 



RUSSEL ARTHUR GAUDREAU 

18 Sutton Road, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

General Business Administration 

Transfer — Northeastern University; Zeta Nu 2, 3, 4, Rush 

Chairman, Social Chairman 3, President 3, 4; SWAP 4. 

SANDRA JEANNE GAY 

45 Somerset Street. Worcester. Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Critique 3. 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Psy- 
chology Club 1; Sociology Club 3, 4; Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation 2. 

DORIS MILDA GEIGNER 

636 Massachusetts Avenue, Lunenburg, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Chorale 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 4; Education 
Club 4. 

CHARLOTTE LEE GELETKA 

25 Newell Road, Yarmouth, Maine 

Elementary Education 

Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant Treasurer 3, Treasurer 4; 

Canterbury Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 3, 4; Student 

Union Dance Committee 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-Chairman 3. 



NANCY ELIZABETH FULLER 

Broadbrook Road, South Royalton, Vermont 

Elementary Education 

Social Activities Committee 1,2; House Counselor 3, 4, House 

Chairman 4; Aneel Flight 3, 4, Treasurer 3, Commander 4; 

SWAP 4; Winter" Carnival Committee 3; Education Club 1, 2, 

3, 4; German Club 1. 

JAMES R. GABRIEL 

Grove Street. Norwell. Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Christian Association 1, 2, 3; Index 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 4; 

Accounting Association 3, 4; Canterbury Club 3, 4. 

LEAH CAROLE GALANDZY 
212 School Street, Islington, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

House Counselor 4; Precisionetts 3, 4; Squad Leader 4; Distin- 
guished Visitors Program 3, 4, Vice Chairman 4; Winter Car- 
nival Committee 3; Orthodox Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2; 
Russian Club 1, 2. 

THELIA T. GALLAGHER 

106 Oakdale Avenue, Dedham, Massachusetts 

American History 

Transfer — Massachusetts Bay Community College; Operetta 

Guild 3,4. 

JUDITH ANNE GALLANT 
Chamtham Road, Orelans, Massachusetts 
American History 

Transfer — Keene State College, Keene, New Hampshire; 
Dean's List 3, 4; Kappa Delta Pi, Editor Honor Society 3, 4, 
Secretary 3, Life Membership Keene State; J.F.K. Memorial 
Library Committee 3; Newman Club 3, 4; People to People 
University Program 4. 

BEREL R. GAMERMAN 
56 Lewis Avenue, Winthrop, Massachusetts 
Government 

Dean's List I; Honors Colloquium I; Soccer; Intramural Soft- 
ball 2; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4, Executive Council 1,2, 3, 
4; Equestrian Club 4; Young Democrats I, 2, 3, 4, Vice Presi- 
dent 4; Pre-Law Club 4. 

WILLIAM R. GARRITY 

4 Wave Terrace, Wakefield, Massachusetts 

Landscape A rchitecture 

House Counselor 3; Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, 3, 4; Activities 

Chairman 3, President 4; Dean's List 2, 4; Newman Club I, 2, 

3; Landscape Architecture Club 2, 3, 4, Vice President 3; Ski 

Club 1,2. 



LINDA RUTH GENTRY 

150 Buckminster Drive, Norwood, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4, Executive Board 1, 2, 3; Sociol- 
ogy Club 4; Math Club 2, 3; Bridge Club 2, 3, 4. 

MICHELE BARBARA GERRIG 

41 Donald Road, Stoughton, Massachusetts 

Spanish 

Dorm Social Activities Committee 4; Women's Inter-dorm 

Council 4; Roister Doisters 1, 2, 3, 4; University Theater 2, 3, 

4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, Executive Board 1; Spanish Club 1, 

2, 3, Treasurer 2; American Society for Teachers of Spanish 

and Portuguese 4. 

BYRON M. GETCHELL 

1 18 Summit Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 

Plant and Soil Science 

Dean's List 2, 3; Alpha Zeta 3, 4; Outing Club 3; Horticultural 

Society 3, 4, Recorder 4. 

DONA LEONA GIBERTI 

English 

House Officer, Social Chairman 3, 4; Precisionettes 2; New- 
man Club 1, 2; German Club 1; WAA 1, 2. 

MARGARET ANN GIBSON 

27 Leicester Road, Marblehead, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Transfer — Boston University; Alpha Chi Omega 3, 4; Culture 

and Etiquette, Chairman; Student Christian Association 3; 

Education Club 4. 

CHARLES J. GIELDA 

68 Sherbrooke Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

American Society of Mechanical Engineers 4; Society of Auto- 
motive Engineers 4; Outing Club 2, 3, 4; Judson Fellowship 
3. 

RONALD PHILIP GILBERT 

34 Fairchild Avenue, Saugus, Massachusetts 

Government 

House Officer 2, 3; Floor Representative; Dean's List 3; Hillel 

Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Political Science Association I, 2, 3, 

4. 

RICHARD E. GINKUS 

21 Alvarado Avenue, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Phi Eta Sigma 1; Freshman Swimming Team I; Newman Club 
I, 2, 4; Forestry Club I, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club I; Pioneer 
Valley Folklore .Society I, 2; Xi Sigma Pi (National lorestry 
Honor f-ratcrnity). 



418 



ROCHELLE GINSBERG 

80 Donna Lea, Amherst 21, New York 
Speech Therapy 

Dining Commons Counselor 3; Dean's List 3; Hillel Founda- 
tion 1, 2. 

WILLIAM HAROLD GLABACH 

West Leyden Road, Leyden, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Lambda Chi Alpha 2, 3, 4; Varsity Soccer 2, 3, 4; Physical 

Education Club 2, 3, 4. 

SUSAN JANE GLICKMAN 
235 Jackson Stree t, Newton , Massachusetts 
Education 

Class Treasurer 1; Class Executive Council 1, 2, 3, 4; RSO 
Committee 2; Sigma Delta Tau 1, 2, 3, 4, Rush Chairman 3, 
First Vice President 4; Dean's List 4; Student Centennial 
Committee 2; SWAP 4, Activity Co-Chairman 4; Winter Car- 
nival Comittee 3; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities. 



EILEEN GLYNN 

969 Hillcrest Road, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Scrolls 2; Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4; House Counselor 3; 

Education Club 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Exchange Student 3. 



WAYNE CHARLES GOEBEL 

25 Fulton Street, Mansfield, Massachusetts 

Government 

Index 3; Student Union Activities Committee 3; QTV 1, 2, 3, 

4, President 4; Interfraternity Council 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; 

AFROTC 1, 2, 3, 4; SWAP 3; QTV Executive Board 4. 

FREDERICK T. COLDER 

585 Boulevard, Revere, Massachusetts 

English 

Collegian 1, Reporter; Ya-Hoo 1. 2, 3; WMUA 2; Tennis 1; 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 4; Young Democrats 4. 



GERALD MARTIN GOLDHABER 

145 Audubon Road, Milton, Massachusetts 

Speech 

WMUA 2, 3; Student Senate 1; Phi Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3; 

Steward 1, 2, 3, Rush Chairman 2; Scholastic Chairman 2; 

Marching Band 1, 2, Property Manager 1, 2; Roister Doisters 

4; Dean's List 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Campus Chest Committee 

1; Dorm Chairman; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Hillel 1, 2; 

Debating Society 3, 4; Young Democrats 4. 



BONITA J. GOLDMAN 

623 Walk Hill Street, Mattapan 26, Massachusetts 

Lambda Delta Phi I, 2, 3, 4, Historian 3, 4; Operetta Guild I, 

2, 3, 4; Opera Workshop 1, 2, 3; WMUA 1; History Club 2, 3, 

4; Dean's List 1; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2; Hillel 1, 

2; Young Democrats 4; Channing Club 2. 



IRA GORFINKLE 

16 Greystone Park, 
Public Health 

Fraternity 1; Flying Redmen 1; Hillel 1; Public Health Club 
4; Intramural Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Volleyball 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

SUSAN GORKA 

131 Jarry Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

House Counselor 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education 

Club 3, 4. 

CONRAD WILFRED GOSSELIN 

9 Moen Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 
English 

Transfer — Worcester Junior College; Newman Club 4; Na- 
tional Council of Teachers of English 4. 

DOUGLAS ROY GOULD 

Center Street, Carver, Massachusetts 
History 

Phi Mu Delta 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1; Military Ball Commit- 
tee 4; Political Science Association 3, 4. 

RICHARD A. GRABIEC, JR. 

305 Hampden Street, Chicopee, Massachusetts 

Industrial Engineering 

Dean's List 3; Newman Club 3, 4; AIIE 3, 4; AIIE Student 

Conference, Arrangement Committee, Co-Chairman. 

CLAIRE E. GRAHAM 

1 17 Fames Street, Wilmington, Massachusetts 
English 

Ya-hoo 1; Dean's List 3, 4; Geology Club 4; National Council 
of Teachers of English 3, 4; HP Lovecraft Fan Club & Necro- 
mancy Society 4; Critique 3, 4. 

STEVEN R. GRAHAM 

17 Glazer Road, Newton, M assachusetts 
Marketing 

WMUA 1; Class Executive Council 1, 2; Interfraternity Coun- 
cil 2, 3, 4, Rush Chairman 3, President 4; Tau Epsilon Phi 1, 
2, 3, 4, Vice President 3, President 4; Maroon Key 2, Treas- 
urer; Cheerleader 2, 3, 4, Co-Captain 4; Who's Who in Amer- 
ican Colleges & Universities. 

MARTHA BOYDEN GRAVES 
Bardwells Road, Conway, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Student Senate 3; House Counselor 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; 
Alpha Lambda Delta 1; SWAP 3, 4; Women's Athletic Assoc- 
iation 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3; Field Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4, Manager 
2, 4; Basketball 1, 2; Women's Affairs Committee 3, 4. 

WILLIAM A. GREEN 

160 Bellevue Street, W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

Pre-Dental, Zoology 

Collegian 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 2; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3, 

4. 



JANET C. GOLDMAN 
19 Colgate Road, Marblehead, Massachusetts 
Fashion Merchandising in Home Economics 
Special Events Committee, Student UNION 1; Sigma Delta 
Tau 2, 3, 4; Sing Chairman 4; Revelers 3; Dean's List 3; Hillel 
Foundation 3, 4; Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4; Dorm Repre- 
sentative 3; Women's Athletic Association 3, 4. 



ROBERT B. GREENBERG 

68 Littlefield Road, tjewton, Massachusetts 

Business Administration 

Class Executive Council 1, 2; Statesmen 3, 4; Tau Epsilon Phi 

Housemanager 3; Executive Officer 3, 4, Vice-Chancellor 4 

Maroon Key 2; Revelers 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3 

Tennis 2, 3, 4; Flying Redmen 1, 2; Hillel Foundation. 



LAWRENCE F. GOLONKA 

State Road, Whately, Massachusetts 

Pre-Veterinary — Public Health 

Dean's List 1, 3, 4; Men's Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramurals; 

Football, Basketball, Softball; Newman Club 1. 

DONALD FRANK GOODELL 

Cadwell Street, Pelham, Massachusetts 

Geology 

Transfer — American International College; Geology Club 1, 2, 

4; Outing Club 1. 

JOHN H. GOODRICH, JR. 

Amherst Road, Sunderland, Massachusetts 
Government 

Class Executive Council 4; Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4, 2nd Vice 
President 4; Intramural Football and Basketball 2, 3; Com- 
muter's Club 1,2. 

ALAN L. GORDAN 

20 Perry Road, Quincy, Massachusetts 

Forestry 

House Secretary 4; Soccer 1, 2; Hillel Foundation 1; Forestry 

Club 1. 



RICHARD LAWRENCE GREENE 

565 Andover Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

Government 

Dean's List 3; Massachusetts Archeological Society 3; Rifle 

Team 3; Bay State Special Forces 2; Newman Club 1, 4; 

History Club 3. 

NELSON C. GREENOUGH 

174 West Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 
Zoology 

Commuters' Club 1; NRSA 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 2; Chemis- 
try Club 1. 

JANE GREGORITCH 

46 Agawam Road, W. Acton, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Newman Club 1, 2; Education Club 4; Exchange Student to 

UNM 3. 

JOANNA GREGORY 

1 1 Sunny Plain Avenue, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Spanish Club 2, 3, 4; Index 2, 3; Marching Band 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 2, 3, 4; Gamma 

Sigma Sigma 4. 



419 



THOMAS R. GRIFFITH 

72 Tuttle Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

Dean's List 2. 3, 4: Honors Colloquium 3; Honors Work 4; 
Newman Club 1, 2; Le Cercle Francais 1. 

ROBERT D. GRIGG 

56 Shaw Road, Bridgewater, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Enolneering 

Dean's List 3: ASME 3, 4. 

BRUCE GRIM.\LDI 

349 Towne Street, North Attleboro, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4: ASCE 2. 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3. 4: 

Commuters' Club 4: Civil Engineering Club. 



ROBERT BRUCE HALLOCK 
1 1 Plaza Avenue, Easthampton, Massachusetts 
Pliysics 

House Counselor 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Collo- 
quium 2, 3; Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4, Tutoring Chairman 1; 
Phi Kappa Phi 3, 4; Military Ball Committee 3; Air Cadet 
Squadron 1, 2; Granville Air Society 3; Mathematics Club 4; 
Physics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; AFROTC Rifle Team 1, 
2, 3, Captain 3. 



MEREDITH ANNE HALSTEAD 

64 Middle Street, Gloucester, Massachusetts 

History 

House Counselor 4; Pi Beta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Pledge Supervisor 4; 

Scrolls 2; Roister Doisters 1; Campus Chest Committee 2, 3, 

Co-Chairman 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 



STANLEY JOHN GROMELSKI, JR. 
Kingsley Avenue, Haydenville, Massachusetts 
Chemisrrt 

Transfer — Holyoke Community College: Dean's List 3; Hon- 
ors Work 4; American Chemical Society 4. 

NL\R"i JANE GROVE 

66 Hillside Road, Fairfield, Connecticut 

Elemenlarx Education 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3; Education Club 2, 3, 4; 

Psychology Club 3, 4: Dean's List 3. 

DOUGLAS JOHN GROWITZ 

43 Summer Circle, Lynn, Massachusetts 

Geology 

Dean's List 1: Geology Club 3, 4, Treasurer 4. 

SAN FORD CHARLES GUNN 

Depot Street. Montague Center, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Dean's List 2. 3; Accounting Association 3, 4. 

MARCM. ANN GUSTIN 

Main Street, Sandwich, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Women's Inter-Dorm Council 3; Angel Flight 3, 4; Dean's List 

3; Sociology 3, 4; Young Democrats 4. 

EUGENE J. GUZIK 

158 High Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Newman Club 1. 

VICTORIA GRIFENHAGEN HAARD 
75 West Street. Northampton, Massachusetts 
Zoology 

Transfer — Douglass College, Rutgers University, New Bruns- 
wick, New Jersey. 

DONALD G. HAGBERG 

43 Beech Avenue. Melrose, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4, Senior Guard 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Student Christian Association 1, 2. 

BETSY ANN HALL 

158 Sycamore Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Canterbury Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Secre- 
tary 3; Student Christian Association 1; Sociology Club 2, 3, 4; 
Social Activities Committee 3. 



WENDY A. HALL 

15 Deerfield Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Education 

Student Senate 2. 3, 4, Secretary 3. Chairman Budget Commit- 
tee 4; Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities; 
House Counselor 3; House Secretary 4; Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 
4; Dean's List 1, 3; Distinguished Visitors Program 2, 3, 4, 
Chairman of Publicity 4; SWAP 3; Wesley Foundation 1; 
Education Club 2, 3, 4. 

ELISABETH B. HALLBERG 
3 Malone Avenue, Westfield, Massachusetts 
English 

House Counselor 3; Pi Beta Phi 2; Winter Carnival Commit- 
tee 3; Student Christian Association 1; Women's Athletic As- 
sociation 2, 3. 

PAUL R. HALLET 

Bow Street, Townsend, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

IEEE 4. 



RICHARD ALAN HAMPE 
Glen Street, Rowley, Massachusetts 
Government 

House Council 1, 3; House President 3; Dean's List 3, 4; 
SWAP 3; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; History 
Club 3, 4; Political Science Association 3, 4; Young Republi- 
cans 1, 3, 4; UMITIE 3; Pre-Law Association 3, 4. 



ANITA HANDALIAN 

132 A Coolidge Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 

Spanish 

Operetta Guild 3; Concert Association 2, 3; Fine Arts Council 

2, 3; Dean's List 3, 4; Precisionettes 1, 2, 3, 4; Executive 

Officer 3; Commander 4; Spanish Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



JOYCE H. HANKE 

127 Western Drive, Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Fashion Merchandising 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 2, 3, 4, Recording Secretary 3; Student 

Christian Association 1, 2; German Club 1; Home Economics 

Club 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Women's Athletic Association 3. 



THOMAS BERNARD HANLEY 

27 Park Street, Florence, Massachusetts 

Government 

Swimming 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 4; Ski 

Club 2; Sport Parachute Club 4; Varsity "M" Club 3, 4. 



EDWARD W. HANSON 
930 Mammoth Road, Dracut, Massachusetts 
Business Administration 

Phi Sigma Delta 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 4; Military Ball Commit- 
tee 4; Flying Redmen 1, 2, 3, 4; Edwards Fellowship 1, 2; Stu- 
dent Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 2; 
Granville Air Society 3, 4, Area Comptroller 4. 



WILLIAM BURROWS HARMON 

17 Leonard Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Transfer — Cornell University; Dean's List 2, 3; Beta Gamma 

Sigma 3, 4. 



CHARLES HARRIS 

451 Old Somerset Avenue, North Dichion, Massachusetts 
Forestry Club 1; Bay State Rifles 1; Beta Kappa Phi 2, 3, 4, 
Usher 4; Advanced Army ROTC 3, 4; The National Society 
of Scabbard and Blade 3, 4; Military Ball Dining In Commit- 
tee Chairman 4. 



REGINA LEE HARRISON 

133 Sargent Street, Winthrop, Massachusetts 

Home Economics 

Index 1; Panhellenic Council 3, 4, Secretary 3, Vice President 

4; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4; Panhel Representative 3, 

4; Mortar Board 4, Song Leader 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Omicron 

Nu 4; Home Economics Club 3, 4; Ski Club 2; Dean's Student 

Council. Home Economics 2, 3, 4. 



JANICE LEE MARTY 

24 Summer Street, Orange, Massachusetts 

Dietetics 

Transfer — San Francisco State College; Critique 3; Gamma 

Sigma Sigma 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 3; Home Economics Club 3, 

4. 



RONALD S. HARVEY 

K02 Blue Hill Avenue, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

General Business and Economics 

Tennis I; Track 1; Bridge Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Bridge Team 3, 4, 

Captain. 



420 



ELLEN M. HASTINGS 

Harvard Road, Shirley, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4; Alumnae Secretary 3, President 

4; SWAP 4: Winter Carnival Committee 3: Newman Club 1, 

2; WAA 1, 2. 

PHILIP R. HATCH 

1017 West Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Finance 

Christian Association 1, 2; Golf Team 1; Air Cadet Squadron 

1, 2. 

RICHARD NATHANIEL HATFIELD 
169 Sagamore Street, Hamilton, Massachusetts 
Pre-Medical — Chemistry 

WMUA 1, 2, 3; Senate 3, 4; LCA 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 4; 
Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2; Honors Colloquium 2, 3; SWAP 3; Var- 
sity Pistol Team 1, 2; Varsity Lacrosse 3; Flying Redmen 1; 
Oriental Sports Club 2, 4; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2. 

ANN HAVILAND 

Memorial Street, Deerfield, Massachusetts 

Medical Technology 

Dean's List 1, 3; Women's Sports 1, 2; Lacrosse Manager 2; 

Equestrian Club 2; German Club 1; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2; 

Women's Athletic Association 2; Medical Technology Club 3, 

4. 

MICHAEL S. HAWRYLCIW, JR. 

541 Windsor Street, Ludlow, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Interdorm Bowling League 3, 4, Captain 3, 4; Dean's List 3, 4; 

Newman Club 4; ASCE 2, 3, 4: Astronomy Club 3; Civil 

Engineering Club 2, 3,4. 

DONALD F. HAYNES 
Main Street, Hampden, Massachusetts 
Animal Science 

Collegian 4; Student Senate 3, 4, Academic Affairs Chairman 
4: Executive Council 3, 4; Dorm Floor Representative 1; 
Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4, Historian 3, Book Exchange Chair- 
man 3; University Concert Association 2, 3, 4, Technical Di- 
rector 3, President 4; Dean's List 3, 4; SWAP 3, 4; Volunteer 
Fire Department 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 2, 3, 4; Judson 
Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2; Ani- 
mal Husbandry Club 2, 3; SODOM 1, 2, 3, 4. 

JOHN DENNIS HEALEY 
51 Newcastle Road, Peabody, Massachusetts 
Government 

Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities; Class Exec- 
utive Council 1, 2, 3; Interfraternity Council 2, 3, 4, Execu- 
tive Vice President 4; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Rush 
Chairman 2, Vice President 3, President 4; Maroon Key 2; 
Winter Carnival Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

JOHN JOSEPH HEALY 

414 Fellsway East, Maiden, Massachusetts 

Marketing 

Zeta Nu 2, 3, 4; Hockey 1, 2, 3; Newman Club 2, 3, 4. 

ROBERT W. HEALY 

10 Salem Road, North Billerica, Massachusetts 
English 

Collegian 3, 4; WMUA 1, 2, 3, 4, Sports Director 3, 4; Voice 
of Redmen 3, 4; Class Executive Council 1, 2, 3, 4; House 
Officer, Steward 3, 4; TKE 1, 2, 3, 4, Fraternity Managers 
Association Board of Directors 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer; 
Adelphia 3, 4; Campus Varieties 4; Homecoming Committee 
4; SWAP 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Men's Sports 1; 
Frosh Basketball Statistician; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Young 
Democrats 4; Who's Who in American Colleges & Universi- 
ties. 

. KAREN ELIZABETH HEBERT 

14 Edgewood Street, Needham, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Student Senate 1; Social Activities Committee 1, 2; House 

Counselor 3; Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Activities Chairman 

4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 3, 4; Sociology 

Club 1, 2; Ski Club 1, 2; Exchange Student 3. 

FREDERICK STEPHEN HEMBROUGH, JR. 

40 West Eagle Street, East Boston, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Dean's List 1 . 

JOHN HENRY 

27 Parker Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Men's Sports, Intramurals 1, 2, 4; Newman Club 1; ASMG 2, 

4. 



CAROL L. HERMSDOFF 

78 Western Avenue, Saugus, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Sophomore Banquet Committee 2; Newman Choir 2, 3, 4; 
Newman Club 1, 2; Dean's List I, 2, 3; Honor's Colloquium 1, 
2, 3; Honors Work 4; Phi Kappa Phi Scholar 2; Phi Kappa 
Phi 3, 4; Alpha Lambda Delta 1, 2, Historian 2; Chemistry 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, Vice President 4; ACS 4; Student 
Activities Night 3. 

GLEN A. HERSEY 

68 Burt Street, Norton, Massachusetts 

English 

Transfer — Tufts 

MARSHA B. HERSEY 

44 Lamoille Avenue, Bradford, Massachusetts 

Honors Colloquium 1, 2; Wesley Foundation 1; Counselor 3; 

Christian Association 1, 2. 

ROBERT E. HICKMAN 

12 Corinne Road, Medford, Massachusetts 

C/v(7 Engineering 

Interfraternity Council 3; Alpha Sigma Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Winter 

Carnival Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2; ASCE 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Civil Engineering Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

ROBERT E. HILLBERG 

138 Wilson Street, Norwood, Massachusetts 

Pre-Medical 

QTV 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman & Sophomore 

Honors Colloquia; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Zoology Club 

3, 4; Psychology Club 2, 3, 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; 

DVP 3, 4. 

D. SCOTT HINKLE 

Box 101, Westfield, Massachusetts 

English 

Men's Judiciary 2, 3, 4; Soccer 1, 2; Lacrosse 1, 2; Wesley 

Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4. 

JUDY HIRSHBERG 

122 Sewall Avenue, Brookline, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Historian 4; Equestrian Club 2; 

Sociology Club 3; Ski Club 1; Women's Athletic Association 

3. 

RUTH MARIE HIRST 

169 Summer Street, Apt. 22, North Amherst, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Roister Doisters 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3; 
Education Club 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3. 

SUE HITCHCOCK 

Bacon Street, Westminster, Massachusetts 

English 

House Counselor 3, 4; Dean's List 1; National Council of 

Teachers of English 4. 

MIGUEL A. HNATOW 

158 Lakeview Avenue, Ludlow, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Chemical 

Engineering Club 3, 4; House Officer; Recording Secretary; 

Orthodox Club; Young Democrats; Water Ski Club; Guide; 

Intramural Bowling; Intramural Golf. 

RICHARD E. HAAVISTO 

Willard Road, Ashburnham, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

House Officer 2. 3, 4, Athletic Chairman; Baseball 1, 2; Soccer 

1, 2, 3; Physical Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 

3,4. 

MONA H. HODNICKI 
452 South Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 
Art 

Transfer — Holyoke Junior College; Dean's List 3; Honors Col- 
loquium 4; Art Club 4. 

JOAN LEE HOLLEMAN 

190 First Parish Road, Scituate, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Chorale 1, 2, 3, 4; Naiads 1, 2, 3, 4, Solo 3, Senior Naiad 

Trainer 4; Student Christian Association 1; Nursing Club 1, 2, 

3, 4 also SNAM Dist. #)- 2, 3, 4; Recording Secretary 3 and 

NSNA 2, 3, 4; Navy Nurse Corps, Candidate 3, 4. 

E. DAVID HOSLEY 

92 Simonds Road, Williamstown, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Transfer — General Electric Apprentice Program, Pittsfield, 

Massachusetts; Dean's List 3, 4; Eta Kappa Nu 4, Treasurer 4; 

Tau Beta Pi 4; IEEE 3, 4. 



421 



WADE HOUK 

112 Chapel Road, New Hope. Pennsylvania 

Government ,•,-,, 

Interfraternitv Council 2. 3. 4: Sigma Phi Epsilon I. 2, 3. 4; 

Student Christian Association 1. 2, 3; Adelphia 4; SWAP 4; 

Distinguished Visitors Program 3, 4. Chairman 3. 4; Who's 

Who in American Colleges & Universities. 

ALLEN THOMAS HOW.ARD 

76 Roberts Road, Ashland. Massachusetts 
Animal Science 

Alpha Phi Omega 2. 3, 4: Homecoming Float Parade Commit- 
tee Chairman 3rFuture Farmers of America 4. 

ELINORE MADELINE HOWARD 

76 Roberts Road. Ashland, Massachusetts 

Sursing 

House Counselor 3: House Chairman 4; Dean's List 2, 3; 

Newman Club 1. 2; Nursing Club 1, 2. 3. 4. 

SAR.AH WESTON HOWE 

52 Fairview .Avenue. Melrose, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Class Executive Council 3; Student Union Program Committee 

3, 4; Women's Interdorm Council 2; Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Registrar 4; Student Union Dance Committee 1, 2, 3, 4, Co- 

Chairman 3, 4; Winter Carnival Committee 2, 3; Student 

Christian Association 1, 2; Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 

JUDITH R. HRIP.AK 
8 Middle Street. Florence. Massachusetts 
Art 

Index 4; Class Executive Council 4: Sigma Sigma Sigma 1. 2, 
3. 4. Treasurer 2. 3. Corresponding Secretary 4; Winter Carni- 
val Committee 3; Art Club 3. 4, Recording Secretary 4; Com- 
muter's Club 1,2. 



BARBARA HURSH 

75 Whittier Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
English 

House Counselor 3; House Officer, Treasurer 1; Social Com- 
mittee 2; Kappa Kappa Gamma 2, 3, 4, Scholarship Chairman 
4; Dean's List 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1; Education Club 2; 
Equestrian Club 1, 2. 

MARY JUDITH HUTCHINSON 

Mohawk Lane, South Harwich. Massachusetts 

Spanish 

WMUA 3, 4; Concert Band 3; Marching Band 2, 3. 

RICHARD HUGH HUTCHINSON 

496 Humphrey Street, Swampscott, Massachusetts 

German 

Transfer — Colby College. 

HENRY COLT HYDE, JR. 

728 William Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Transfer— Wentworth Institute; IFC Fraternity Managers As- 
sociation 4; Phi Sigma Kappa, Treasurer 3, 4; ASCE 3, 4. 

WILLIAM D. IRVING 

5 Picardy Lane, Dover, Massachusetts 

Pre-Medical 

Dean's List 2, 3; Baseball 1; Soccer 1, 2; Judson Fellowship 2, 

3; Pre-Medical Club 2, 3, 4; Mathematics Club 1, 2, 3; Tau 

Kappa Epsilon 2, 3, 4. 

DAVID K. ISABELLE 

4040 Thornwood Street, Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 
Industrial Engineering 

Men's Sports 1, 2; Lacrosse; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; AIIE 3, 4, 
President 4. 



P-\ULA M.ACY HUGHES 
15 Highland Street, Sharon, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Sigma Delta Tau 1, 2, 3, 4. House Manager 3, 4; Dean's List 
3; Student Centennial Committee 2; Women's Sports 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Basketball, Softball; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Physical Educa- 
tion Club 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 



ROBERT WILLL\M HUGO 

85 Gould Street, Wakefield, Massachusetts 
History 

Collegian 3; RSO Committee 3, 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Campus 
Chest Committee 3, 4; Varsity Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4; Judson Fel- 
lowship 1. 2. 3. 4; Pre-Law Club 4. 



BARBARA ANN HULICK 

15 Plum Street, Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

Microbiology 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 

3, 4. 

GERRY JAMES HULL 

12 Newmarch Street, Ipswich, Massachusetts 

History 

Transfer — Northern Essex Community College 

CAROLYN LOUISE HULTON 

15 Virginia Lane, East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 
Government 

Sigma Sigma Sigma I, 2, 3, 4, House Manager 3, Recording 
Secretary 4; Dean's List 3; Edwards Fellowship 1, 2; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2; German Club 1; Political Associa- 
tion 3, 4, Secretary 4; Women's Athletic Association 3; Young 
Republicans 1, 2. 

DONALD B. HUNTER 

18 Elcott Road, Quincy, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Dean's List 2, 3; Flying Redmen I; Accounting Association 2, 

3. 4; Gymnastics Team 2, Manager 2; House Council 4, 

President 4. 

NANCY J. HURD 

37 Farm Street, Wakefield, Massachusetts 

Medical Technology 



JOHN M. HURLEY, JR. 
64 Gayland Road, Needham, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Class Executive Council 2, 3, 4; Maroon Key 2; Winter Carni- 
val Committee 3; Concert Chairman 3; Track 1; Lacrosse 1; 
Newman Club 1. 2, 3, 4; ASCE 2, 3, 4; Civil Engineering 
Club 2, 3, 4; Sigma Phi Epsilon I, 2, 3, 4, Chaplain 3. 



HARVEY H. ISSENBERG 

80 Tower Street, Methuen, Massachusetts 

Transfer — Stockbridge; Agricultural Economics Club 3, 4; 
Food Distribution Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 2, 4; Hillel Foun- 
dation I, 2, 3, 4. 

THEODORE CHARLES JACOBS 

116 Winifred Avenue. Worcester, Massachusetts 

Government 

Alpha Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Honors Colloquium 

1; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Political Science Association 3, 

4. 

KENNETH DAVID JACOBSON 

83 Stedman Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 

History 

Class Executive Council 1; Dean's List 3; Honors Colloquium 

1, 2, 3; Honors Work 4; Hillel Foundation 1; Collegium Legis 
3, 4, Co-Founder and Vice President of New Pre-Law Associa- 
tion; Debating Society 1, 2; Executive Board. 

ROBERT ALAN JACOBSON 

441 Ward Street, Newton Cen ter. Massachusetts 

Landscape Architecture 

Landscape Architecture Club 2, 3, 4; Student Affiliate, Boston 

Society of Landscape Architects 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 

3; Student Affiliate, American Society of Landscape Architects 

3,4. 

SUSAN MARIE JACQUE 

569 Pleasant Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Education 

Transfer — Holyoke Jr. College; Newman Club 3, 4; Education 

Club 3, 4; Commuter's Club 2; Art Club 4. 

MICHAEL ELDON JAMISON 

Point Breeze, RFD, Webster, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Varsity Swimming Team 2; ASME 2, 4. 

CORNELIA R. JANDRIS 

1 72 North Main Street, South Hadley Falls, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Greek Section, Collegian 2; Junior Executive Council 3; Senior 

Executive Council 4; House Counselor 3; Alpha Chi Omega 1, 

2, 3, 4; Scholarship Chairman 3, First Vice President 4; New- 
man Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Senior Class Advisory Board 4. 

CATHLEEN A. JANES 
2 Phillips Road, Rutland, Massachusetts 
Fsychology 

Operetta Guild I; Dean's List I, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Psychology Club I, 2, 3, 4; Sociology Club 4; Young Demo- 
crats 2, 3. 



422 



JOAN CAROL JANIK 

80 Carew Terrace, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Mathemalics 

Collegian 2; Class Executive Council 4; Sigma Sigma Sigma 2, 

3; Song Leader 3, Editor 4; Chorale 1; Musigals 2. 3, 4, 

Treasurer 4; Dean's List 1, 3; Alpha Lambda Delta 1, 2; 

Treasurer 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Young Democrats 3, 

4. 



DOROTHY ANN JEKANOWSKI 

30 Roosevelt Street, Hadley, Massachusetts 

English 

Transfer — Simmons College 



DORIS B. JONES 

37 Lexington Street, Burlington, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Precisionette 2, 3; Student Christian Association 1; Education 

Club 4; Student Union Publicity Committee 3, 4, Treasurer 4; 

Winter Carnival Fashion Show Committee 3; Special Events 

Committee 4. 

JOAN E. JONES 

169 Rockland Street, South Dartmouth, Massachusetts 

EngUsli 

Operetta Guild 2, 3, 4, Director of Public Relations 3, 4; 

Roister Doisters \, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Work 

4. 



JOHN FRANCIS JEKANOWSKI 
38 Roosevelt Street, Hadley, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Dean's List 3; Newman Club 1, 4; ASCE 2, 3, 4; Civil Engi- 
neering Club 2, 3, 4; Marching Band 1. 

THOMAS RAMON JEKANOWSKI 

Twin Elms, Gorham, New Hampshire 

Governnient 

Flying Redmen 1, 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Law 

Club 3, 4. 

ELLEN L. JEWETT 

4 Liberty Street, Middleton, Massachusetts 

Recreation Leadership 

Dean's List 3, 4; Edwards Fellowship 1, 2; Student Christian 

Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Commuter's Club 3, 4; Recreation Club 

1, 2, 3, 4; Square Dance Club 1; Women's Athletic Association 

1, 2; Zoology Club 1. 



JOHN N. JOHANSON 

52 Hillock Street, Roslindale, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; University 

Economics Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 

4. 



CAROL TERESE JOHNSON 

532 Elm Road, Walpole, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; 

NEP Officer 2, 4; Education Club 1, 3, 4. 

KAY JOHNSON 

162 Greene Street, Hopedale, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

House Counselor 3; Iota Gamma Upsilon I, 2, 3, 4, Social 

Chairman 2, Rush Chairman 3, Activities Chairman 4; Preci- 

sionettes 2, 3, Squad Leader 2, 3, Captain 3; Newman Club 1, 

2,4. 



MARILYN JONES 

144 Jenny Lind Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Dean's List 1; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Canterbury Club 

2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation 1; Education Club 4; Mathematics 

Club 3, 4, President 4; Angel Flight 3, 4. 

ROSS P. JONES 

75 Anniversary Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Government 

Transfer — Colorado School of Mines; Collegian 3, 4, Photo 
Ed. 4; Student Senate 1, 2, 3, 4, Election Committee Chairman 
2, Budgets Committee Chairman 2, Treasurer 3, Finance 
Committee Chairman 3; Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4; RSO Com- 
mittee 2, 3; Fine Arts Council 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 4; Campus 
Varieties 2, Stage Manager 2; SWAP 3, 4; Soccer Manager 2; 
Commuters Club 4; Yahoo Photographer 3, 4; Who's Who in 
American Colleges & Universities. 

SANDRA KATHERINE JONES 

38 Gates Avenue, Hudson, Massachusetts 

Spanish 

Index 4; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Public Relations 3; 

Musigals 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Art Club 4; Spanish 

Club 2, 3, 4. 

KATHERINE ANDREA JORDAN 

24 Williams Street, Taunton, Massachusetts 

Home Economics 

House Counselor 4; Dean's List 2; Home Economics Club 1, 

2, 3, 4; WAA 2. 

MICHAEL E. JOYCE, JR. 

351 Chestnut Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

History 

UMITIE Discussion Group 3; Dean's List 3; Golf 1; Newman 

Club 2. 

RONALD HARMON JULIUS 

32 Country Lane, Sharon, Massachusetts 

English 

WMUA 1; Phi Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, Corresponding Secretary 

2; Operetta Guild 2. 3, 4; Campus Varieties 2. 



LESTER ROBERT JOHNSON, II 

140 Litchfield Street, Brockton, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Lutheran Club 2, 3, 4; ASME 2, 3, 4; Engineering Council 3, 

4, Chairman 3. 



RICHARD WAYNE JOHNSON 

148 Holden Street, Holden, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Dean's List 1, 2. 



STEPHEN P. JOHNSON 

2 West Hampton Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Wood Technology 

Dean's List 3, 4; Alpha Zeta 3, 4; Xi Sigma Pi 3, 4, Assistant 
Forester; Forest Products Research Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis 
1, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2: Forestry Club 1, 2, 
.3,4. 



KAREN F. JOKISAARI 

2 1 3 Horse Pond Road, Sudbury, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Women's Interdorm Council 3, Social Coordinator 3, Social 

Chairman 4; Gamma Sigma Sigma 3, 4; Field Hockey 1; 

Wesley Foundation 1; Equestrian Club 4; Nursing Club 1. 



BETTE JANE JONAS 

23 Quimby Street, Haverhill, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, Vice President 4; Index 3; 

Women's Interdorm Council 1, 2; Dean's List 1, 3; John F. 

Kennedy Memorial Committee, Secretary 4; Honors Colloquia 

1 ; Hillel Foundation 1 ; Psychology Club 1 . 



METRO N. KALAFATAS 
10 Marlow Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
Agricultural Economics 

Alpha Gamma Rho 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity Wrestling 2; Agricul- 
tural Economics Society 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Inter-Frater- 
nity Council 2, 3. 

JAMES KALLSTROM 

90 Park Hill Avenue, Millbury, Massachusetts 

Management 

Management Club 3, 4; Interfraternity Council 3, 4; Beta 

Kappa Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Rush Chairman 3, President 4; Christian 

Association 2, 3, 4; SWAP 4. 

KARL WILLIAM KAMENA 
641 Linden Avenue, Teaneck, New Jersey 
Chemical Engineering 

Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-Captain 4; AIChE; Chemical Engineer- 
ing Club; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4; Kappa Sigma Fraternity. 

MARCIA ELAINE KANE 

5 Prospect Street, Taunton, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Sigma Sigma Sigma 2, 3, 4, Steward 3, House Manager 4; 

Winter Carnival Committee 3; Orthodox Club 1; Art Club 4; 

Education Club 3, 4; Critique 3. 

SALLY ANN KANGAS 
12 Saari Parkway, Fitchburg, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

House Counselor 3; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant 
Pledge Trainer 3, Corresponding Secretary 4; Mortar Board 4; 
Revelers 3; Scrolls 2; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Winter Carnival 
Committee 3; SWAP 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2; 
Dean's List 2, 3 ; Who's Who in American Colleges & Universi- 
ties. 



423 



LAWRENCE P. KLEMANN 

B-3 Suffolk House, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Chemistrv 

Phi Sigma Deha 1, 2, Pledgemaster 2: IFC 2; Chemistry Club 

3. 4. President 4: Deans List 3; .American Chemical Society 4; 

National Science Foundation Research 4. 



LOUIS ALBERT KLIMOSKI, JR. 
59 River Drive, Hadley. Massachusetts 
Agricultural and Food Economics 

Deans List 2, Alpha Zeta 2. 3, 4; Newman Club 2; Agricul- 
tural Economics Club 3. 4. President 4. 



RICHARD J. KLIMOSKI 

129 Nonotuck. Street, Hohoke. Massachusetts 

Psychology 

House Counselor 3, 4; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3: Dean's List 

2, 3: Campus Chest Committee 3: Military Ball Committee 3; 
Newman Club 1; Landscape Architecture Club 3, 4; Psychol- 
ogy Club 2, 3, 4; Sociology Club 3: Spanish Club 2. 

ELAINE J. KLINKER 

1 1 1 Graves Street, South Deerfield, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Transfer — ^Westfield State: Student Union Program Committee 

3. 4: Sigma Sigma Sigma 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi 
Kappa Phi 4; Commuters' Club 2: Sociology Club 3. 4; Cri- 
tique 3: Newman Club 1; WAA 1, 3; Sigma Sigma Sigma, 
Public Relations 3, Jeweler 4. 

WILLIAM J. KNECHT 

Somerset, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Colleeian 1: Intramural Basketball 3, 4; Football 4; History 

Club^l; Philosophy Club 1; Psychology Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 



SANDRA A. KNIGHT 

558 Main Street, West Newbury, Massachusetts 

English 

Class Executive Committee 2; Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, Panhel- 

lenic Representative 3, 4; Panhellenic Council 3. 4; Dean's List 

1, 3; Honors Colloquium 1, 2; Canterbury Club 1, 2; Le 

Cercle Francais 1, 2. 



TIMOTHY KNIGHT 

Everett Avenue, Belchertown. Massachusetts 

Personnel Management 

Transfer — Holyoke Junior College 



ROBERT PAUL KNOPF 

124 Wellington Hill Street, Mattapan, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Accounting Association 3, 4; 

Roister Doisters 2; Dean's List 3. 



HENRY L. KNUTSEN 

66 Lafayette Street, Fairhaven, Massachusetts 

Government 

QTV I, 2, 3, 4; Indoor Track 3; Young Democrats 4. 



RICHARD F. KOCHANEK 
45 Chauncey Drive, Springfield 9, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Transfer — Holyoke Junior College; Dean's List 3, 4; Newman 
Club 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4, Dorm Captain 3; Accounting Asso- 
ciation 3, 4. 



VIRGINIA M. KOCHANOWSKI 

17 Nelson Street, Webster, Massachusetts 

Speech - Therapy 

Precisionettes 1, 2, 3, 4, Squad Leader 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 

3. 



LOIS A. KOCZERA 

I 15 Bullard Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Nursing Club I, 2, 3, 4. 

RICHARD J. KONIECZNY 
95 Russell Street, Hadley, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Transfer — Dean Junior College; Men's Sports I, 2, 3, 4, Soc- 
cer, Baseball, Physical Education Club 3, 4. 



JACK K. KOOYOOMJIAN 
86 Rossetter Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
Mechanicid Engineering 

Alpha Phi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, First Vice President, Treasurer; 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers 2, 3, 4, 5, Chair- 
man of Student Chapter; J.F.K. Memorial Reading Room 
Committee 5: Chairman of Fall 1964 Homecoming Concert; 
International Club 3, 4; Bay State Rifles Drill Team 1, 2; 
Armenian Club 2, 3. 

FRANCES MARIANN KOPCINSKI 

341 Springfield Street, Agawam, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Women's Inter-dorm Council 3, House Counselor 3, 4, House 

Treasurer 3; Dean's List 2, 3; Honors Work 4; Campus Chest 

Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Psychology Club 2, 3, 

4, 

JOSEPH M. KOS 

40 Suffolk Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Eta Sigma 2, 3, 4; Eta Kappa Nu 3, 

4; Tau Beta Pi 4; Intramural Volleyball 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 

3, 4; IEEE 1, 2, Vice Chairman 3, Chairman 4. 

CAROL A. KOSCIW 

86 Marsden Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Education 

Dean's List 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 3, 4. 

STEPHEN J. KOSS 

40 Ridgecrest Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Entomology 

Alpha Zeta 2, 3, 4; Swim Team 1, 2, 3; Fencing Club 1, 2; 

Fernald Entomological Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Canoeing Chairman 3, Caving Chairman, Vice President of 

Trips 4; University Judging Teams Treasurer 3, Chairman 4, 

JOYCE J. KOSTEK 
9 Bowles Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 
French 

House Counselor 3; Sigma Sigma Sigma 2, 3, 4, House Stew- 
ard 3, House Service Chairman 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; New- 
man Club 2, 3; Art Club 4; Art Club Program Committee 4; 
International Relations Club 2. 

DAVID G. KOSTKA 

24 Edgemere Avenue, WhitinsviUe, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

House Counselor 2, 3, 4; Head Counselor 3, 4; SWAP 3; 

Newman Club 1, 2. 

MARTIN STEPHEN KOVICK 
281 Ash Street, Brockton, Massachusetts 
Government 

Class Executive Council 1; House Officer, Scribe 3; Vice Pres- 
ident 4; Tau Epsilon Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Hillel 
Foundation 1, 2. 

JOSEPH F. KOWAL 

82 Cedar Street, Fairhaven, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Transfer — Laredo, Texas 

Dean's List 1, 2, 4; Newman Club 1; Intramural Athletics, 

BARBARA CAROL KOZA 

135 Allengate Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Government 

House Counselor 3; Chi Omega 2, 3, 4; Naiads 1, 2; Newman 

Club 1; Young Democrats 4. 

ARNOLD A. KRAFT 

23 Springhill Road, Framingham, Massachusetts 
General Business and Finance 

House Counselor 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Winter Carnival Com- 
mittee 3; Men's Sports I, Rifle Team; Hillel Foundation 2, 3, 
4; Management Club 4. 

FRANK L, KRASIN 

174 Homestead Avenue, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering — Engineering Science 

Dean's List I, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 2; Phi Eta Sigma 2, 

Historian 2; Tau Beta Pi 4; AICLE 2, 3, 4; Chcm. Engineering 

Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3. 

RICHARD J. KRASNAUSKAS 
I 10 South Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 
AccoHiiling 

Alpha Hpsilon Phi I, 2, 3; Accounting Association 4; Eques- 
trian Club 4; Ski Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

JOHN KRHISMANIS 

17 Pleasant Street, Ipswich, Massachusetts 

(iovernmiiil 



424 



ARNOLD STERN KAPLAN 

45 Beach Road, Salisbury, Massachusetts 
Government 

Transfer — Northern Essex Community College; Men's Judi- 
ciary 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 4; Honors Colloquium 3; University 
Open House Committee 4; Collegium Legis 3. 4; Political 
Science Association 3, 4; Young Democrats 4; UMITIE 4. 



CHARLES KESSLER 

502 Kaufman Road, Somerset, Massachusetts 
Management 

Student Senate 2, 3; House Counselor 4; Class Executive 
Council 1, 2, 3; TKE 2, 3; Dean's List 3; Distinguished Visi- 
tors Program 2; SWAP 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; 
Management Club 3, 4. 



MICHAEL S. KAPLAN 

130 Florence Road, Lowell, Massachusetts 

Public Health 

Alpha Epsilon Pi I. 2, 3, 4, Athletic Chairman 4; Pre-Med 

Club 1; Hillel 1; Public Health Club 4. 

CONSTANCE W. KARI 

44 Meadowbrook Lane, Hampden, Massachusetts 

Historv 

Transfer — ; Iota Gamma Upsilon 2, 3. 4, Pledge 

Trainer 3, 4; Precisionettes 2; History Club 2, 3, Treasurer 2; 

Christian Association 2, 3, 4. 



JOAN MARIE KESSLER 

222 Walpole Street, Canton, Massachusetts 
Medical Technology 

Class Executive Council 4; Social Activities Committee 3, 4; 
House Counselor 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Precision- 
ettes 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Medical Technology Club 
3, 4, President 3; Young Democrats 4. 



KATHERINE KETLER 

32 High Street, Methuen, Massachusetts 

Medical Technology 

Operetta Guild 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1; 

Technology Club 3, 4. 



Medical 



MARSHALL A. KAROL 

58 Cleveland Street, Melrose 76, Massachusetts 

Government 

Collegian 3, 4, Sports Editor; Index 4, Sports Editor; Student 

Senate 4; Alpha Epsilon Pi 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 4; Baseball 2; 

Hillel Foundation 2; Young Republicans 2, 3; Political Science 

Association 4. 



JOHN T. KEENAN 

25 Frank Street, Fort Edward, New York 

Electrical Engineering 

Transfer — General Electric Engineering Apprentice Program; 

AIEE-IRE 4. 



CHARLES G. KELLEY 

N. Main Street, Petersham, Massachusetts 

Pre-Medical 

Alpha Phi Omega; Phi Eta Sigma; Pre-Med Club; Newman 

Club; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4. 



EDWARD E. KELLEY 

9 Oak Street, Amesbury, Massachusetts 

Industrial Engineering 

Newman Club 2; AIIE 3, 4; Oriental Sports Club 2, 3. 

WILLIAM JOSEPH KELLEY, JR. 

38 Rawson Road, Arlington, Massachusetts 

Governt7ient 

Class Executive Council 2; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, 

House Manager 3, Athletic Chairman 3, Social Chairman 4; 

Football 1; Track 1; Newman Club 1, 2. 



CHARLES WARNER KELLOGG 

11 Revell Avenue, Northampton, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Dean's List 1, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 1, 2. 



BARBARA ELIZABETH KELLY 

77 Elliott Road, Haverhill, Massachusetts 

Management 

Transfer — Northern Essex College; Art Club 4; Equestrian 

Club 4; Management Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; Marketing Club 

3, 4; Pre-Law Club 3, 4. 



RONALD CHARLES KELLY 

16 Milan Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Personnel Management 

Dean's List 3, 4; Baseball 1; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Manage- 
ment Club 3, 4. 



JOSEPH A. KEOHANE 

23 East Pleasant Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Plant and Soil Science 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 4; Honors Work 4; 
Alpha Zeta 2, 3, 4, Chancellor 4; Distinguished Visitors Pro- 
gram, College of Agriculture Spring Convocation 4; Science in 
Agriculture Fair, Chairman 4; Editor, Massachusetts Turf & 
Lawn, Grass Council's Turf Bulletin 2, 3, 4; Agronomy Club 
2, 3, 4, President 4; Turf Management Club 4; Horticulture 
Society 4. 



JOY F. KERR 

80 Oxbow Road, Wayland, Massachusetts 

Art 

Dean's List 2, 3; Scrolls 2; Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Activities Chairman 3, Treasurer 4; Dormitory Counselor 3; 

Newman Club 1, 2. 



JUDITH ANN KETTUNEN 

30 Oriole Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 

Dietetics and Institutional Administration 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 2, 3, 4; Phi Kappa 

Phi 3, 4; Omicron Nu 3, 4; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 

4. 

PHILIP C. KIDNEY 

23 Appleton Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

History 

Newman Club 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 3, 4; History Club 3, 4; 

Swimming Team 3, 4; Soccer Team 3. 

GORDON BRYCE KIEFER 

16 Troy Road, Belmont, Massachusetts 

English 

Roister Doisters 1. 

THOMAS G. KIERNAN 

27 Gibbens Street, Weymouth, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Student Senate 2, 3, Chairman Men's Affairs Committee 3, 
Chairman Honorary Societies Committee 3, RSO Committee 
3, 4, Finance Committee 2, 3; Army ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4; Univer- 
sity Economics Association 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Oriental 
Sports Club 2, 3, 4, President 3, 4; Scabbard & Blade 3, 4, 
Vice President 3, President 4; Distinguished Military Student 
3, 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Critique 3; Collegian 3, 4; Military Ball 
Committee 4; Campus Religious Council 1, 3; Newman Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Who's Who in American Colleges & Universities. 

EVERETT THOMAS KILBRIDE, JR. 

2039 Page Boulevard, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts 

Management 

House Counselor 4; Dean's List 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Management Club 4. 



THOMAS MICHAEL KILROY, JR. 

37 Dana Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Geology 

Interfraternity Council 2; Kappa Sigma 1, 

Gamma Epsilon 3, 4, Initiation Committee 4; 

3. 4; Geology Club 3, 4; Water Ski Club 2. 



2, 3, 4; Sigma 
Intramurals 1, 2, 



ROGER ALDEN KINNEAR 
93 Green Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 
Dairy Technology 

Transfer — Stockbridge School of Agriculture; Student Senate 
3, 4; Non-Student Member Budgets Committee; House Coun- 
selor 4; Intramurals 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 
4; American Dairy Association 1, 2; Dairy Judging Team 1. 

LAURENCE JAMES KIRWIN 

194 North Main Street, Andover, Massachusetts 

History 

Transfer — Assumption College 

ANGELA KLARMANN 

1377 Main Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 

Historv 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; History Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Russian Club 

1, 2; Young Republicans 3, 4. 

DONALD A. KLEIN, JR. 

227 Manchonis Road Extension, N. Wilbraham, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Class Executive Council 3, 4; Alpha Sigma Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Athletic Chairman 3, Vice President 4; Dean's List 3; Winter 

Carnival Committee 3, Sub-Committee Chairman; Track 1; 

Psychology Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



425 



LYNDA JEAN KRETSCHMAR 

182 Rivertoa Road, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Art 

Iota Gamma Upsilon 1, 2. 3, Pledge Trainer 2. 3; Precision- 
ettes 2: Student Christian Associaton 1. 2; Operetta Guild 3; 
Art Club 1. 2. 3, 4. 



MARCIA M. LANGBORT 

155 Fairmount Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Index 4; Sigma Delta Tau 1, 2. 3, 4, Alumni Chairman 4; 

Dean's List 4: Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4: Education Club 3, 

4. 



PAUL S. KRZYNOWEK 

Main Street, Housatonk, Massachusetts 

Men's" Inter-Dorm Council 2, 3; Dean's List 2; Military Ball 
Committee 3. 4: Golf 1, 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Air 
Cadet Squadron 2; Business Administration Club 4; Granville 
Ail Society. 3, 4, Commander 4; History Club 3. 



ELIZABETH ANNE LAN YON 

70 Edgewood Avenue, Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Government 

Women's Inter-dorm Council 2; House Social Chairman 2; 

Panhellenic Council 2, 3; Sigma Sigma Sigma 2, 3, 4; Student 

Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Political Science Association 

4; Young Republicans 2, 4. 



FRANK JOSEPH KUDIRKA, JR. 

16 Winthrop Street, Dedham, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Newman Club I. 3. 4: .A.ir Cadet Squadron 1 2,; ASME 1, 2. 3, 

4. 

JEFFREY A. KUDSK 

19 Crosby Road. Wakefield. Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Theta Chi 1. 2. 3, 4, Social Chairman 2. House Manager 3, 

President 4; Physical Education Club 2. 3. 4. 

MICHAEL L. KURRIER 

.\inhersi Road, Leverett. Massachusetts 

bean's List 2. 3: .\stronomy Club 1, 2, 3, Treasurer 2, 3; 
Commuter's Club 2, 3. 

LEWIS KURTZNL\N 

34 Hazelmere Road, Roslindale, Massachusetts 
Pre-Medical — Art 

Interfraternitv Council 2: Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Mens 
Sports 1, 2. 3. Intramural Football; Hillel Foundation 1, 2; Pre- 
Medical Club 1. 2: Zoology Club 1. 

D.WID GEORGE KUTCHUKIAN 
34 Kingdom Terrace. Peabody. Massachusetts 
Economics 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Scholarship Chairman & Chap- 
lain 3, 4; Men's Sports 2, 3, 4, IFC Sports, Football, Softball; 
Economics Club 2, 4. 



LINDA J. LAPEZA 

58 Burnside Road, Needham, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Index 2, 3; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4. House Manager 

4; Revelers 4; Campus Varieties 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Distinguished Visitors Program 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 1, 2. 

ROLAND A. LARAMEE 

23 Perrault Street, Willimansett, Massachusetts 

French 

Roister Doisters 4; French House 4. 

ROBERT DANIEL LARKIN 

40 Pearl Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Government 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, 3; Military Ball Committee 3; Newman 
Club 1; Air Cadet Squadron 1; ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4, Wing Admin- 
istrative Oflicer 4. 

RUTH PHYLLIS LARM 

306 Lexington Street, Woburn, Massachusetts 

Sociologv 

Dean's List 2, 3; WAA Archery 2, 3; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; 

Outing Club 4; Sociology Club 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic 

Association 1, 2, 3; Young Republicans 4. 

MAUREEN H. LAVALETTE 

9 Howland Avenue, South Dartmouth, Massachusetts 

French 

House Counselor 3; Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Historian 3, 

House Manager 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3. 



JUDITH EVEL'^T^J KWOLEK 
43 Moulton Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Animal Science 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Gymnastics 2; Bay State Rifles 3, 4; 
Newman Club 1. 2; Equestrian Club 1. 2. 3, 4; Square Dance 
Club 3, 4; University Dairy Judging Team 4; Women's Ath- 
letic Association 1, 2, 3. 



DANIEL G. LAAKSO 

3 1 Sunnyside Road, Norwood, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Homecoming Committee 2, 3. 4; Winter Carnival Committee 
3, 4; Men's Sports Varsity Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Intramural 
Officiating 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Judson Fellow- 
ship I, 2. 3, 4; Student Christian Association I, 2, 3, 4; Asso- 
ciation for Social Action 4; Modern Dance Club I, 2; Physical 
Education Club 2, 3, 4. 



ARTHUR J. LABRIE, JR. 

136 Weslwood Road, Medford, Massachusetts 

Business Management 

Men's Judiciary 2, 3, 4; Revelers 3, President 3; Maroon Key 

2; Campus Varieties 3; Beta Kappa Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student 

Senate Awards Committee 2; Chairman J.F.K. Memorial 

Committee 2, 3; SWAP 3; Who's Who in American Colleges 

& Universities. 

NORMAN L. LAFLEUR 

901 Grattan Street, Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 

Physics 

Dean's List I; Honors Colloquium 2; Physics Club 4; Pioneer 

Valley Folklore Society 2, 3, 4. 

WILLIAM JOEL LANDIS 

9 Hollywood Heights, Northampton, Massachusetts 
Physics 

Student Senate 3, 4, Vice President 4; Class Executive Council 
2, 3, 4; College Bowl Team Captain 3; Adelphia 4; Alpha Phi 
Omega 2. 3. 4; Dean's List I, 2. 3, 4; Honors f olloqiiiiim 2, 3; 
Phi Eta Sigma I. 2, 3, Vice President 2; Phi Kappa Phi 4; 
Distinguished Visitors Program 4; Tennis I, 2; Hillel Founda- 
tion 2. 3, 4; Physics Club 4; Russian Club 2; Who's Who in 
American Colleges and Universities. 



ANN LAWRENCE 

18 Harwood Avenue, Littleton, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Newman Club 1, 2; Education Club 3, 4; Equestrian Club 1, 



RICHARD W. LAWSON 
84 Glendale Avenue, Quincy, Massachusetts 
Entomology 

Transfer — Stockbridge School of Agriculture; Fernald Entomo- 
logical Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Arboniculture Club 1; Education Club 
4. 

ROSEMARY LAWSON 

212 South Street, Athol, Massachusetts 

English 

Index 4; RSO Special Events Committee 2, 3; Sigma Sigma 

Sigma 1. 2, 3. 4. Social Chairman 3, President 4; SWAP 4; 

Winter Carnival Committee 3; Newman Club I. 2, 3. 

PETER ANDREW LEACH 

Millers Falls Road, Northfield, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Phi Mu Delta 3. 4. Rush Chairman 4; Engineering Council 3, 

4, Vice Chairman 4; ASCE 2, 3. 4, Vice President 4. 

ROBERT CARL LEBIDA 

12 Dunham Avenue, Ware, Massachusetts 

Wildlije Biology 

Transfer — Syracuse University; Dean's List 3; Alpha Zeta 4; 

Forestry Club 4; Scuba Club 3. 

LOUIS O. LcBLANC 

86 Inglesidc Avenue, Worcester, Massachusetts 

French 

Dean's List 2. 3; Newman Club I, 2, 3; Art Club 1; Le Cercle 

Francais 1 ; French House 4. 

WAYNE R. I.IBI.OND 

1480 Grafton Slrccl, Millbiiry, Massachusetts 

Accdiinling 

Beta Kappa Phi I, 2. 3. 4, Pledge Trainer 3; Accounling 

Association 2, 3, 4. 



426 



RICHARD L. LEETE 

17 Salem Street, Andover, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2. 3, 4, Ritualist 3; Men's Sports 2, 3, 4, 

Varsity Soccer. Varsity Tennis 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 4; 

ASCE 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4. 

WILLIAM LEMIECH, JR. 

134 Leary Drive. Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Intramural Softball 3; Intramural Volleyball 2; Newman Club 

1, 2, 3, 4; ASME 1, 2, 3, 4; Society of Automotive Engineers 

3,4. 

EDWARD C. LEMIEUX 

67 Auburn Street, Cherry Valley, Massachusetts 

Wild Life Management 

Critique 3; Men's Inter-Dorm Council 2; Vice President, Van 

Meter 2, President. Webster 4; Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4; 

Alpha Zeta 2. 3, 4, Censor 3; Scabbard and Blade 3, 4; Finance 

Officer 4; Distinguished Military Student 4. 

LINDA M. LEMIEUX 

1 1 Johnson Avenue. Whitinsville. Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

House Counselor 4; Newman Club 1, 2. 3, 4; Mathematics 
Club 1, 4; Social Activities Committee 2, 4; Women's Inter- 
dorm Council 4; Student Centennial Committee 2. 



EDWARD F. LEMISH 

61 Lincoln Street, North Easton, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2; Physical Education Club 

3,4. 

RALPH A. LENNON, JR. 
33 Sweetwater Avenue, Bedford, Massachusetts 
History 

Massachusetts Bay Community College; WMUA 3. 4; Student 
Senate 4; Social Activities Committee 4; House Counselor 3. 
4; Alpha Phi Omega 3, 4; Fine Arts Council 3. 4; Dean's List 
3, 4; Homecoming Committee 3, 4, Chairman 4; Campus 
Religious Council 4; Newman Club 3, 4; History Club 3. 4, 
President 3, 4; International Relations Club 3; Political Sci- 
ence Association 3; Young Democrats 4; Who's Who in 
American Colleges and Universities. 



SANDRA HELENE LEPOWE 

98 Melha Avenue, Springfield, Massachusetts 

French 

Freshman Magazine 1; Sigma Delta Tau 1, 2, 3, 4, Stewardess 

4; Operetta Guild 1; Musigals 2, 3, 4, Business Manager 4; 

Dean's List 1, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 

3,4. 

MAXINE ARDEN LESNIAK 

498 High Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Microbiology 

House Treasurer 4; Gamma Sigma Sigma 1. 2; Newman Club 

1, 2, 3, 4; German Club 1; Women's Athletic Association 1. 2, 

3; Young Democrats 1, 2. 

JEFFREY S. LESSER 

1 198 Stratford Road. S^henectadyJVew York 

Zoology 

Transfer — Green Mountain College 

JEANNE M. LETOURNEAU 

44 Worcester Street, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts 

Microbiology 

Archery; Badminton 2, 3; Bay State Women's Rifle Team 3, 4; 

Newman Club 1.2; Square Dance Club 3, 4. 

. NORMAN CLOVIS LETOURNEAU 
112 East Main Street, Orange, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 
Newman Club 2, 4; ASCE 3, 4; Flying Club 2. 

PETER ALBERT LEVENSON 
688 Humphrey Street, Swampscott, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Critique 3; Student Senate 4; Brett House Secretary 2; Student 
Senate Services Committee 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2; Man- 
agement Club 4; Marketing Club 3, 4; Sociology Club 4. 

ROBIN LEVINE 

1 1 Marion Street, WestNew toa, Massachusetts 

Art ' ' 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Art Club 3, 4; Education Club 3, 

4. 



NANCY LOUISE LEWIS 

172 Robin Hill Road, Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

Art 

Index 3, 4; Student Union Publicity Committee 3; Dean's List 

3; Art Club 3, 4; Education Club 4. 



DAWN P. L'HEUREUX 

213 Lincoln Apts., Amherst, Massachusetts 

English 

Transfer — University of Wisconsin; Dean's List 3, 4. 



DEBORAH A. LINDBERGH 

14 Hartwick Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Education 

Sigma Delta Tau I, 2, 3, 4; Scrolls 2; Musigals 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Director 4; Dean's List 3; Chorale 1; Naiads 1; Hillel 1, 2; 

Education Club 3, 4; Who's Who in American Colleges & 

Universities. 



JUDITH ANNE LINDSAY 
Great Rock Road, Sherborn, Massachusetts 
Englisli 

Transfer — Grove City College, Grove City, Pennsylvania; Col- 
legian at Grove City College 1, 2; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4 — 1, 2 
at Grove City College; Honors Work 4; Mathematics Club 1, 
2 at Grove City College. 



FREDERICK GEORGE LINNEMANN 

87 Weaver Road, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Matliematics 

Mathematics Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



KARL H. LIPPMANN 

127 Granby Road, South Hadley Falls, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Track 1, 2. 4; Commuter's Club 2, 3, 4; Physical Education 

Club 2, 3; Rod and Gun Club 2. 



MITCHELL JOSEPH LIRO, JR. 

129 Lebanon Street. Southbridge, Massachusetts 

Industrial Engineering 

Kappa Sigma 1. 2, 3; Dean's List 3, 4; Gymnastics 1, 2; 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; AIIE 3, 

4. 



L. RICHARD LITTLEFIELD 

205 Brattle Street. Cambridge, Massachusetts 
Business Management 

Transfer — University of Pennsylvania; Index 3; Literary Mag- 
azine 3. 4; Ya-Hoo 4; Critique Managing Editor 3, Editor-in- 
Chief 4; Plymouth Dorm. President 1; Poetry Magazine 1. 2; 
Chorale 1; SWAP 1. 4; Rifle Team 1; Management Club 3, 4; 
Scuba Club 1; DOM Club 1, 2. 3, 4; Bridge Club 1. 2, First 
Place, East-West University Bridge Tournament 2; Who's Who 
in American Colleges and Universities; IFC Rushing Booklet 
3. 



FREDERICK A. LLOYD, JR. 

29 Trowbridge Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 
Pre-Medical 

Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4; Flying Redmen 1, 2; Judson Fellow- 
ship 1. 2. Treasurer 3, Vice President 3; Counsellor 3; Pre- 
Medical Club 1, 2, 3, President 4; Dean's List 3; Parachute 
Club 1; Assistant Instructor, Zoology 3. 



MARCIA LOCKHART 

35 Everett Street, Natick, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Handbook 1, 2, 3; House Counselor 3; Chi Omega 1. 2. 3, 4; 

Panhellenic 3, 4; University Concert Association 3; Dean's List 

1; Winter Carnival Publicity Committee 3; Women's Athletic 

Association 1, 2, 3; Precisionettes 2; Christian Association 1, 

2, 3,4; Math Club 1, 2, 3. 



DORIS LOESER 

323 Florence Road, Waltham, Massachusetts 
German 

Panhellenic Council 3; Sorority 1, 2, 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; 
Honors Colloquium 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1; Rus- 
sian Club 1, 2; Sports Parachute Club 2, 3, Secretary 2. 



PATRICIA ELLEN LONG 

1945 Commonwealth Avenue, Brighton, Massachusetts 

Government 

Collegian 2, 3. 4; WMUA 1, 2; Class Executive Council I; 

House Counselor 4; Roister Doisters 2, 3, 4, Publicity Director 

4; Dean's List 1. 2. 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 1, 2; Honors 

Work 4; Phi Kappa Phi; Newman Club 1, 2; Equestrian Club 

1; University Theatre 2, 3, 4. 



427 



SUSAN LONGFELLOW 
49 Ely Avenue, West Springfield, Massachusetts 
Microbiology 

Class Executive Council 4; Senate Activities Committee 3, 4; 
Siama Sigma Sigma 2, 3, 4, Activities Chairman 4; Marching 
Band. Twirler 2.^3, 4; Naiads 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation 3. 4. 

CAROL ANNETTE LUFKIN 

Mt. Jefferson Road. Hubhardston, Massachusetts 

English 

Collesian 3: Student Christian Association 1; Literary Society 

2. 3. ~ 

JOSEPH HOWARD LUNDERVILLE 

95 Robinson Avenue. South Attleboro, Massachusetts 

Chemislry 

Newman Club 1; Oriental Sports Club 2. 

NLA.RILYN ^L LURIE 

591 Montgomery Street, Fall River, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Class Executive Council 4; House Counselor 4; Dean's List 3; 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2. 



KATHERINE MARY MACKEY 

1 2 Park Street, Maynard, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Dean's List 1; Zoology Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4. 

JOHN DONALD MacPHAIL, JR. 

22 Maple Avenue, Sharon, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Transfer — Brown University; Dean's List 2, 3; Outing Club 2; 

University Economics Association 3, 4. 

CRAIG STEPHEN MacPHERSON 

150 Taylor Street, Wollaston, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 4; Student Christian Association 4. 

NANCY ANN MAHLMAN 
74 Vermont Street, Holyoke. Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2. 3, 4, Archivist and Alumnae Secre- 
tary 4; Index 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Newman Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 2, 3, 4; Sorority Representative for 
Education Club 4. 



ROGER J. LUSSIER 

1 154 South Main Street. Fall River. Massachusetts 

Chc/nistr\ 

Alpha Phi Omega 1, 2. 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Work 4; 

Newman Club 3, 4: Intramurals, Volleyball 3, 4. 

RICHARD P. LYDICK 

Berkshire Avenue. Southwick. Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Yahoo 1: WMUA 3, Chief Engineer 4; Dean's List 1: Eta 

Kappa Nu 3, 4; AIEE 2; IEEE 3, 4. 

SUE ELLEN LYDON 

113 Colonial Avenue. Waltham, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Class Executive Council 1, 2. 3, 4: Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Activities Chairman 4: Homecoming Committee 3; Military 

Ball Committee 1, 2; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Newman 

Club; Angel Flight 3, 4; Pledge Trainer 4; Education Club 3, 

4. 

LUCINDA LYMAN 

Route 66, Westhampton, Massachusetts 

Education 

Precisionettes 3; Naiads 3, 4; Education Club 3, 4. 

BETTY A. LYON 

375 Providence Street. Rehoboth. Massachusetts 

English 

Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Young Democrats 4; Critique 

3. 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; National Association for 

English Teachers 4; Freshman Magazine 1; Equestrian Club 3; 

Women's Athletic Association 2. 



THOMAS EDWARD MAHONEY, JR. 
363 Fredette Street, Athol, Massachusetts 
Marketing 

Fraternity Theta Chi I, 2. 3, 4, Rush Chairman 3; Men's 
Sports 1, Wrestling; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Business Admin- 
istration Club 3, 4; Mathematics Club 2; Marketing Club 3, 
4. 



THOMAS J. MAHONEY 

318 Cross Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 

Marlieting 

Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4; Lacrosse 1, 2. 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 

2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 3, 4. 

WILLIAM J. MAHONEY 

1 16 Montvale Avenue, Woburn, Massachusetts 
Government 

Collegian 3. 4; WMUA 1; Student Senate 2. 3. Elections Com- 
mittee Chairman 3; House Counselor 4; Newman Club 1, 2; 
Young Democrats 4. 

BRUCE KAVANAUGH MAILLET 

9 Rowena Street. Worcester, Massachusetts 

Public Health 

Newman Club 1; Public Health Club 4. 

ROBERT ANTHONY MAIOCCO 

1600 Ruxton Road, Apt. 7-A, Baltimore, Maryland 

Mechanical Engineering 

Transfer — Northeastern University; ASME 2, 3, 4; Intramural 

Sports 2, 3, 4; Commuter's Club 2. 



GARY LYONS 

Monson. Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Dean's List 3, 4, 5; Psychology Club 4. 

KEVIN JOHN LYONS 
Concord Turnpike, Lincoln. Massachusetts 
Physicial Education 

Lambda Chi Alpha I. 2, 3, 4. Pledge Trainer 3, Social Chair- 
man 4; Sigma Delta Psi 2, 3, 4, President 2; Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Co-Captain 1. 

JOHN JOSEPH MACCARIO 

177 Webster Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 

Education 

Weekend Counselor 4; ROTC Band 1; Intramural Bowling, 

Softball, Basketball Teams 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Education Club 4. 

ANNE W. MacGREGOR 

318 West Washington Street, Hanson, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Dean's List 3; Precisionettes 2, 3, 4; Education Club 4; Gym- 
nastics Club 2; Dorm Social Chairman 3, Treasurer 4; Ex- 
change Student to UNM 3. 

ELLEN E. MacGREGOR 

318 W. Washington Street, Hanson, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Precisionettes 2, 3, 4; Education Club 2, 4; Gymnastics Club 

2; Exchange Student to UNM 3. 

BARRIE H. MacKAY 

Fisher Street, Westboro, Massachusetts 

Marketing 

Art Club 4; Marketing Club, Publicity Chairman 4. 



JOHN J. MAKOS 

377 Tyngsboro Road, Dracut, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

House Counselor 4; Zeta Nu 2, 3, 4; Zoology Club 4; Meta- 

wampee 3, 4. 

VIRGINIA MALLISON 

64 Stratton Drive, Cheshire, Connecticut 

Math 

Student Senate 2, 3, Chairman of Public Relations 3; Iota 

Gamma Upsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 1, 2, 3, President 4; 

SWAP 4; Physics Club 2; Women's Athletic Association 1, 

2. 



ELAINE F. M ALOOF 

53 Orchard Street, Randolph, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Transfer — Massachusetts Bay Community College; Women's 

Sports, Tennis 3; Newman Club 3. 

ARTHUR SCOTT MANASELIAN 

29 Lewis Bay Boulevard, West Yarmouth, Massachusetts 

Geology 

Transfer — Norwich University; Dean's List 2; American 

Chemical Society 1, 2; Geology Club 2, 3, 4. 

CjAII, H. MANDELL 

12 Lawnfair Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Recreation 

Student Union Program Council 3; RSO Committee 2, 3, 

Chairman 3; Opcrclla Guild 3, 4; SWAP 3; Winter Carnival 

Committee 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Recreation Club 1, 

2, 3. 4; Bridge Club 2, 3; Class of 1965 Publicity Committee 

2; Volunteer lo Northampton Slate Hospital 3, 4, 



428 



ALAN MANGANARO 

21 Priscilla Road, Swampscott, Massachusetts 

Economics 

KATHLEEN MARY MANNING 
64 Turner Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
History 

Class Executive Council 2; Student Union Program Council 4; 
House Counselor 3; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Cultural Chairman 
4; Mortar Board 4; Scrolls, Treasurer 2; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; 
Campus Chest Committee 2, 3; Military Ball Committee 2; 
Newman Club 1, 2; History Club 4; Exchange Student to the 
University of New Mexico 3; Who's Who in American Col- 
leges & Universities. 

PAUL D. MANSUR 

27 Highland Street, Franklin, Massachusetts 

Forestry 

Transfer — University of Maryland; Alpha Zeta 3, 4; Forestry 

Club 3, 4, 

ROBERT MARCELL 

3 1 Harold Terrace, West Newton, Massachusetts 

History ' 

Transfer — Newton Junior College; Dean's List 1, 2. 

MARY ANNE MARCOTTE 

34 Yale Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Education 

Dorm Social Chairman 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education 

Club 2, 3, 4. 

JAMES D. MARCUSON 
14 Craig Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Physics 

Collegian 3, 4, Photographer; Yahoo 4; Winter Carnival Com- 
mittee 3; Flying Redman I, 2; Air Cadet Squadron 1; Physics 
Club 2. 1 

DONALD ARTHUR MARGESON 

13 Schley Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Dance Band 1, 2; Concert Band 4; Operetta Guild 2, 3, 4; 

Men's Sports, Intramurals; ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4; Distinguished 

Military Student 4; Military Ball Committee 4. 

DANIEL BRIAN MARK 

3 Taylor Road, Lynn, Massachusetts 

Pre-Dental 

Men's Judiciary, Area 4; House Counselor 2, 3, 4, House 

Officer, Athletic Chairman 2; Air Force ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Military Ball Committee 3, 4; Intramural Athletics 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Student Christian Association 1 ; Pre-Medical Club 1 . 



JUDITH KATHRYN MARTINO 

8 Dix Road, Maynard, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

House Counselor; Dorm WAA Representative 2; Women's 

Sports, Field Hockey, Basketball 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 

4; WAA 1, 2, 3. Vice President 4; Zoology Club 3, 4. 

RICHARD THOMAS MARTINO 

8 Dix Road, Maynard, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Physical Education Club 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Soccer 2; 

Intramural Official 3, 4; Dean's List 3, 4. 

MARILYN JOYCE MARTYNY 

90 Birchland Avenue, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Math 

Corridor Treasurer 2, 3; Sophomore Banquet Committee 2, 

University Concert Association 3, 4; Programs Assistant 3, 

Programs 4; Dean's List 3; Student Christian Association 1, 2. 

3, 4; Mathematics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Angel Flight 3, 

4; Comptroller 4. 

G. MATRY MASSELAM 

15 Hillock Street, Roslindale, Massachusetts 

History 

Ohio Wesleyan; Collegian 1, 2, 3, Editorial Editor; Dean's List 

1. 2; Distinguished Visitors Program 3, 4, Program Chairman; 

Wesley Foundation 1, 2; Christian Association 3; Philosophy 

Club 1; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3; Synthesis 1. 

JOANNE MARIE MATHEY 
193 West Street, Hyde Park, Massachusetts 
English 

Dorm Social Chairman 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Psychol- 
ogy Club 1. 

ANNE ELIZABETH MATHIESON 
285 Shays Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Transfer — Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michi- 
gan; Student Senate 3; Services Committee, Student Senate 4; 
Women's Sports 2. 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 4, 
Dorm Representative. 

JAMES F. MATTA 

Bay Street, Taunton, Massachusetts 

Entomology 

Dean's List 3, 4; Newman Club 3; Fernald Entomological 

Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Zoology Club 1. 

PETER HAROLD MATTIOLI 

146 Stratton Brook Road, Simsbury, Connecticut 

Mechanical Engineering 

ASME 3, 4. 



GERALD ROLAND MARKS 

319 Hemlock Street, South Dartmouth, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

House Counselor 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; AIChE 2, 3, 4; 

Chemical Engineering Club 2, 3, 4. 

FLORA CECELIA MARONI 

689 Vine Street, Athol, Massachusetts 

Geology 

Massachusetts Archaeological Society 3, 4; Equestrian Club 1; 

Geology Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2; Le Cercle Francais 3, 

4. 

GEORGE F. MARSHALL, JR. 
119 Alder Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 
Government 

Chorale 2, 3; Campus Religious Council 3, 4; Christian Asso- 
ciation 3, 4; Wesley Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; ROTC Band 1; 
Wheeler House Social Chairman 4. 

BARBARA ANN MARTIN 

153 Ashuelot Street, Dalton, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Operetta Guild 2, 3, 4, Assistant Business Manager 3; Women's 

Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, Manager of Gymnastics 3. 

PETER J. MARTIN 

1 Mary Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

WILLIAM M. MARTIN 

50 Rockland Street, South Dartmouth, Massachusetts 
Music (Pre-Med) 

House Historian 2; Tau Epsilon Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Revelers 3; 
Maroon Key 2; Marching Band 1; Chorale 1; Campus Varie- 
ties 2; Statesmen 1, 2, 3, 4, Director 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 4; 
Varsity Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4; Who's Who in American Colleges & 
Universities. 



CAROL ANN MAUCIONE 

189 Forge Road, Westport, Massachusetts 

English 

Operetta Guild 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Women's Athletic Association 1, 4; Young Democrats 1. 

PETER WHEELER McCARTHY 

142 Hinckley Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 

Marketing 

JAMES A. McCOMBE 

161 Mayflower Road, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

ASME 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 2, 3, 4. 

LAWRENCE E. McCORMICK 

36 Channing Road, Belmont, Massachusetts 

Marketing 

Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 4; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; 

Lacrosse 1, 2; Marketing Club 3, 4, President 4. 

GAIL KAREN McCUSKER 

18 Pine Needle Road, Cochituate, Massachusetts 

Home Economics — Dietetics and Institutional Administration 

Newman Club 1,2, 3; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

MARGARET JANE McDONALD 

49 Dana Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Dorm Social Committee 2; Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Treasurer 3; Tennis Club 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Education 

Club 4; Mathematics Club 1. 

RALPH DOUGLAS McDOWELL 

864 South Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; ASCE 2, 3, 4. 



429 



NANCY I. MCK.A.V 

78 Beech Street, Braintree. Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Ans & Music Committee 3; Outing Club 2, 3, 4. 

JAMES KELVIN McKENNA 

609 Aspen Lane, Edgewood, Maryland 

Mathematics 

QTV L 2. 3, 4, Pledgemaster 3, Master of Ceremonies 4; Bay 

State Special Forces 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Mathematics 

Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

GAIL DOROTH>' McLEAN 

830 Prospect Street, Fairview, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Transfer-^azenovia Junior College; Pi Beta Phi 3, 4, Vice 

President 4; Education Club 4. 



JOAN ELIZABETH MENDREK 
16 Cornell Street, South Hadley Falls, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Alpha Chi Omega 2, 3, 4, Warden 4; Winter Carnival Com- 
mittee 3; Archery 3; Newman Club 2, 3. 

WILLIAM E. MERCER 

9 Whitehall Road, Amesbury, Massachusetts 

History 

History Club 3, 4. 

CAROLE JANE MERHAR 

122 Edgemont Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Speech Therapy 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 3, 4; Concert Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Librarian 

1, 2, 3, 4; Marching Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Librarian 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Varsity Band 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 2, 3; Speech Club 2, 3. 



MARTHA McM.\STER 

7 Columbus Avenue, Southbridge, Massachusetts 

English 

Women's Inter-dorm Council 1,2; House Counselor 3, 4. 

PATRICIA A. McNALLY 

5 Needham Street, North Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

An 

Dean's List 1, 2. 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Newman Club 1, 2; 

Art Club 1, 2, 3. 4, Secretary 4. 

JAYNE MAUREEN McNEIL 

Depot Street, Duxbury, Massachusetts 

English 

Freshman Magazine 1; Co-ordinating Committee 2; Dean's 

List 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; SU Publicity Committee 

3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 4; National 

Association Teachers of English 4. 



SHEILA ANN McREVEY 

Wickaboag Valley Road, Wesy Brookfield, Massachusetts 

English 

Social Activities Committee 3; SU Governing Board 3, 4, Vice 

President 3, President 4; SU Program Council 3, 4; RSO 

Committee; SWAP 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3. 4; Who's Who in 

American Colleges & Universities. 

STEVEN J. MEDLAR 

15 Newtown Road, Acton, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Dean's List 3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; ASCE 4. 

K.A.THLEEN L. MEEHAN 

75 Grove Street, Reading, Massachusetts 

Child Development 

Women's Judiciary 2, 3, 4, Clerk 4; House Counselor 3; 

Scrolls 2, President; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Winter 

Carnival Publicity 3; Dean's List 2, 3; Dean's Council of 

Home Economics 2. 3, 4; Education Club 3; Who's Who in 

American Colleges & Universities. 



WILLIAM BENJAMIN MEEKER, IV 

477 Hancock Street, Abington, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Dean's List 3; Intramural Bowling 1, 2; Wesley Foundation 1; 

Chemistry Club 1. 2; Psychology Club 3, 4; Northampton 

Hospital Volunteer 3, 4. 

JOHN FRANK MEILBYE, JR. 
8 Gold Star Drive, Nantucket, Massachusetts 
Government 

Theta Chi 2, 3, 4; Varsity Lacrosse 3, 4; International Rela- 
tions Club 4. 



JUDITH ANN MELLO 

9 AJmy Street, Fairhaven, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Education Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 

2. 



2, 3, 4; Dean's List 



ELINOR JOAN MELODY 

102 Lexington Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Precisionettes 1, 2, 3. 



MICHAEL ALAN MENDELSOHN 

17 Cummings Road, Brighton, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Collegian 3, 4; Yahoo 3, 4, Literary Editor 4; RSO Committee 

1, 2, 3, 4. Treasurer 1, Chairman 4; SWAP 4; ACU 4; Track 

3, 4; Hillel Foundation 3, 4; Psychology Club 4. 



SUSAN ANNA MICCOLY 
147 Muzzy Street, Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 
Marketing 

University Concert Association 4; Newman Club 1, 2, Book- 
keeper 4; Marketing Club 4; Young Democrats 4. 

GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL 

65 Priscilla Road, Marshfield, Massachusetts 
Food Science & Technology 

Student Senate 3, 4, President 4; Who's Who in American 
Colleges & Universities; RSO Committee 4; Men's Inter-dorm 
Council 2; House Social Chairman 2; Dean's List 3; Home- 
coming Committee Judge 4; Orthodox Club I, 2, 3, 4, Treas- 
urer 2; Food Technology Club 1, 2, 3, 4; International Club 



DIANA MICK 

300 Lake Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Pi Beta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Activities Chairman 3, Social Chairman 

4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 3; Nursing Club 1, 2, 

3, 4; Sociology Club 1. 

ARTHUR CARL MILLER. 

69 Tamworth Road, Waban 68, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Dean's List 3; ASCE 2, 3, 4; Civil Engineering Club 2, 3, 4. 

BARBARA RUTH MILLER 

29 Pinecliff Road, Chappaqua, New York 

Fashion in Retailing and Business 

Transfer — Hood College, Frederick, Maryland; Operetta Guild 

3, 4; Equestrian Club. 



GARY HARDING MILLETT 

54 Wayside Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Tennis Squad 1. 

BEVERLY LOUISE MILLIGAN 
5 1 County Road, Reading, Massachusetts 
Fashion Merchandising 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 3, 4, Public Relations Committee 4; 
Dean's List 3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Sophomore Ban- 
quet Committee 2; Precisionettes 2; Christian Student Associa- 
tion 1, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation 1; Home Economics Club 
1, 2, 3, 4, Senior Class Representative 4; Professor's Assistant 
School of Home Economics 3. 

ROY M. MILLIGAN, JR. 

312 W. Britannia Street, Taunton, Massachusetts 

English 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4; Concert Band 1, 2; 

Marching Band 1. 

WILLARD E. MILLIS, JR. 

Ayer Road, Harvard, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Phi Mu Delta 1, 2, 3, 4; Sociology Club 4, Vice President 4; 

Intramural Football 2, 3, 4; Intramural Baseball 2, 3, 4. 

THOMAS G. MINER 

Balance Rock Road, Lanesboro, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Chemistry Club 2, 4. 

BARBARA WANDA MIRON 

88 Manor Avenue, Wcllcslcy, Massachusetts 

Education 

Concert Band 2, 3, 4; Education Club 3, 4; Zoology Club 2, 3, 

4; Mute I'^nscmble 3, 4. 



430 



DAVID B. MONGUE 
72 Flansburg Avenue, Dalton, Massachusetts 
Political Science 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, Treasurer 3; 
Young Democrats; Scuba Club; Young Americans For Free- 
dom; Pomology Club; Literary Society. 

HERBERT ALBERT MONGUE, JR. 

Main Street, Cummington, Massachusetts 

Art 

Operetta Guild 2, 3, 4, Business Manager 2, 3, Treasurer 3; 

Opera Workshop 2, 3, Business Manager 3; National Society 

of Scabbard & Blade 3, 4, Finance Officer 4; Military Ball 

Committee 4, Decorations Chairman; Art Club 2. 

WILLIAM CHARLES MONIGLE 

364 Greenwood Street, Millbury, Massachusetts 

Marketing 

Concert Band 2; Marching Band 1, 2, 3; ROTC Band 1, 2; 

Dean's List 3; Military Ball Committee 4; Wesley Foundation 

2, 3; Commuter's Club 2, 3; Marketing Club 3, 4; Scabbard 

and Blade 3, 4, Secretary 3,4. 

CHARLES T. MONNIER 

19 Jewell Avenue, Attleboro, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Swimming I, 2, 3, Co-Captain 4; Lambda 

Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4. 



NANCY JEAN MORIN 

5 Noyes, Norton, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Iota Gamma Upsilon 2, 3, 4, Assistant House Manager 3, 

President 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Work 4; Alpha 

Lambda Delta 2; Student Christian Association I; Psychology 

Club 4. 



RICHARD ALLEN MORRIL 

65 Cedar Street, Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts 

Recreation 

Summer Testing Counselor 4; Alpha Phi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Operetta Guild 3, 4; Personnel Coordinator 3, 4; Dean's List 

2, 3, 4; United Nations Week Committee 2; Hillel Foundation 

1, 3. 

JOSEPH J. MORRIS 

405 E. Town Street. Columbus, Ohio 

Government 

Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, House Chaplain 3, 4; Xmas Party Co- 

Chairman 3; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Varsity "M" Club. 



FRANCIS DONALD MORRISON 
Ramgren Road, Fitchburg, Massachusetts 
History 
Dean's List 2, 3. 



EDWARD ANTHONY MONTGOMERY 

17 Berwick Road, Medford, Massachusetts 

Physics 

Sport Parachute Club 2, 3. 

KENNETH L. MOON, JR. 

Foamer Road, Southampton, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

WMUA 1, 2, 3, 4, Station Manager 4; House Counselor 4; 

House Officer, Secretary 2; Military Ball Committee 3, 4; Air 

Cadet Squadron 2; Granville Air Society 3, 4. 

ROBERT WILLIAM MOONEY 

174 Elm Street, North Attleboro, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Chorale 2, 3; Intramural Basketball 1, 2, 3, Captain; Newman 

Club 1, 2; Mathematics Club 4; Physics Club 1, 2. 

DAVID WAGNER MOORE 

43 Fern Street, Lexington, Massachusetts 

J ournalism 

Collegian 4; Flying Redmen 1, 2; Amateur Radio Association 

1; AIEE-IRE 3; Outing Club 2, 3, 4; Student Correspondent 4, 

Springfield Union. 

FLORENCE E. MOORE 

6 Forest Aveiiue, Natick, Massachusetts 

Microbiology 

House Chairman 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 4; SWAP 4; Women's 

Basketball 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Microbiology Club 3, 4. 

RALPH WILLIAM MOORE 

39 Weymouth Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Pre-Medicine 

House Counselor 3; Tau Epsilon Phi 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 3, 4; 

Honors Colloquium 2; Freshman Baseball 1; Varsity Baselsall 

2; Newman Club 1; Pre-Med Club 2. 

SUSAN JANE MORASH 

Edwards Avenue, Nabnasset, Massachusetts 

English-Journalism 

Panhellenic Council 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; lota Gamma Upsilon 

1, 2, 3, 4; Jr. Panhellenic Representative 2, Sr. Panhellenic 

Representative 3, 4; Collegian 1, 2, 3; Dean's List 3; Blood 

Drive 4; Student Centennial Committee 2; SWAP 4; United 

Nations Week Committee 2, 3, Secretary 3; Student Christian 

Association 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2. 

JANE E. MORGAN 

213 Brimbal Avenue, Beverly, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Index 2, 3, 4; Greek Representative 3; Kappa Kappa Gamma 
1, 2, 3, 4, Athletic Chairman 3, Activities Chairman 4; Field 
Hockey 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3; Gymnastics 
Club 2; Physical Education Club 2, 3; Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation 1, 2, 3, 4; Field Hockey 1, 2; Basketball I, 2, 3, 4; 
Bowling 1, 2; Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. 

ROBERT MARSH MORGAN, JR. 

1269 Boston Road, Haverhill, Massachusetts 

Landscape Architecture 

Transfer — Dartmouth College; Dean's List 3; Alpha Zeta 3, 4, 

Treasurer 4; Landscape Architecture Club 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 

4. 



GORDON R. R. MORRISON 

59 Farnum Road, Waltham, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Phi Mu Delta Fraternity 1, 2, 3, 4; ASME 1, 4. 



SANDRA RUTH MORSE 
57 Howland Terrance, Worcester, Massachusetts 
English 

Index 3, 4; Class Executive Council 1; House Counselor 3; 
Sigma Delta Tau 1, 2, 3, President 4; Mortar Board 4, Chap- 
ter Editor 4; Dean's List 1, 3; SWAP 4; Winter Carnival 
Committee 3; Tennis Club 1, 2; Hillel Foundation 1; Manual 
for House Counselors, Co-Editor 4. 



WALTER K. MORSE, JR. 

7 Arcadia Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

English 

Dean's List 3; Newman Club 1; Le Cercle Francais 1. 



FELIX J. MOSAKEWICZ 

71 Pine Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

House Counselor 3, 4; Gymnastics 1, 2, 3, 4; Bay State Rifles 

1, 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; ASME 4; Varsity "M" 

Club. 



LINDA JOAN MOSES 

Brewster, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3; Winter Carnival Com- 
mittee 3; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2; Physical Educa- 
tion Club 2, 3, 4; Gymnastics Club 2; Mathematics Club 1. 



ILANA B. MOTYKA 

198 Maple Street, Winchendon, Massachusetts 

English 

Newman Club 1, 3, 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Young Democrats 4; 

Critique 4; Collegian 4. 



JAMES E. MULCAHY 

131 Summer Street, North Amherst, Massachusetts 
Entomology 

Transfer-— Stockbridge School; Alpha Tau Gamma 1, 2; Cam- 
pus Chest 1, 2, 3, Publicity Chairman 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 
3, 5, 6, 7, Vice President 6, President 7; Judging Team 3; 
Handbook 3; Collegian 3, 6; Operetta Guild 3, 6, 7; Concert 
Association 5; Fernald Club 5, 6; Fine Arts Council 5, 6, 7. 

JOANNE M. MURPHY 

80 Witawaumet Road, N. Weymouth, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Women's Sports, Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4, Basketball 3, 4, La- 
crosse 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 4; Physical Education Majors 
Club 2, 3; WAA 1, 2, 3, 4, Sub-Board 2, 3, Chairman Sub- 
Board 4. 



JOHN P. MURPHY 

186 Whittum Avenue, Springfield, Massachusetts 

History 

Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3; University Theatre 2; Dean's List 3; 

History Club 4. 



431 



JOHN W. MURPHY 

1 1 Chester Road. Belmont, Massachusetts 

Government , r, j . c- . ■, 

Phi Mu Delta 1. 2. 3. Social Chairman 2; Student Senate 3; 

Chairmen Men's Aflfairs 3; Campus Religious Council 3, 4; 

RSO Committee 3; Political Science Association 3. 4; Class 

Executive Council 4; House Counselor 4. 

RICH.\RD F. MURPHY 

Box 397, Nabnassett, Massachusetts 

Marketing .. ^ „ c- . 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 2. 3: Military Ball Committee: Bay State 

Special Forces 2, 3, 4; Newman Club; Advanced ROTC 3, 4; 

Commuters' Club; Psychology Club. 

MARY J.ANE MURRAY 

67 Central Street. Fitchburg, Massachusetts 

Elemental- Education 

Freshman 'Directory 3; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4. Vice 

President 4: Special Events Committee 2, 3; Winter Carnival 

Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 4; Education Club 1, 2, 3, 

4. 

GERALD M. MYERS 
Washington Street. Warren, Massachusetts 
Restaurant & Hotel Management 

Marching Band 1. 2. 3. 4; Concert Band 2. 3, 4; Bands Staff 2, 
3. 4; .-Assistant Equipment Manager 4; Dean's List 3; Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts Innkeepers Club 3, 4. 

RICHARD HUGHES NADOLINK 
47 Maple Street, Millbury, Massachusetts 
Plt\sics 

House Counselor 3. 4. House Officer, Social Chairman 2, Pres- 
ident 3; Dean's List 1; SWAP 4; Newman Club 3, 4: Physics 
Club 3, 4. 

WILLIAM JOSEPH NAJAM 
1 1 Montgomery Street, Danbury. Connecticut 
History 

Who's' Who in American Colleges & Universities; Beta Kappa 
Phi 1, 2. 3, 4. Rush Chairman 3, IFC Representative 3, 4, 
Pledge Trainer 4; IFC 3, 4; Greek Ball Chairman 3, Secretary 
4; Representative to National IFC Convention 4; Revelers 3; 
Freshman Ball Co-Chairman; Maroon Key 2; Dean's List I; 
Phi Eta Sigma 1. 2. 3. 4; Campus Chest Committee 2, 3, 
Chairman 3; Centennial Float Parade Committee 2; SWAP 
Executive Board 3, 4. Special Activities Chairman '64; New- 
man Club 1. 

MICHAEL P. NALEWAJK 

33 Bridge Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Dean's List 1; Sociology Club 3, 4; Newman Club 4; Scuba 

Club 3. 4; WMUA 4. 

WILLIAM T. NANARTONIS 
410 West Street. Amherst. Massachusetts 
Economics 

Newman Club 4; Economics Club 3, 4; Military Ball Commit- 
tee 3, 4. 



MARTHA JANE NASON 

23 Reed Street, Lexington, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

WMUA r, 2, 3. 4, Chief Record Librarian 1, 2, 3, 



Doisters 1 ; 
Club 4. 



^. _,. ,, ^ ., _, _, 4; Roister 

Dean's List 3; Wesley Foundation 1; Education 



FRANCINE ELIZABETH NAVIN 

194 Lindbergh Avenue, Needham, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Newman Club 1, 2; NLSN 1, 2; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 

SNAM 1,2. 

ROBERT NEAL 

263 Wentworth Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain; Psychology Club I, 2, 3; Inlruminal 

Sporu 1, 2, 3, 4. 

KENNETH E. NEEDHAM 

84 Locust Avenue, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Business Administration 

Dean's List I, 2, 3, 4; Beta Gamma Sigma 3, 4; Wesley 

Foundation 1, 2, 3, Social Chairman 3; Intramural Basketball 

1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Softball 3, 4; National Society of Scab- 
bard and Blade 3, 4, Pledgetrainer 4; Bay State Special Forces 

2, 3, Treasurer 3; Student Christian Association 1, 3. 

SAUL' Z. NEEDLE 

81 Undine Road, Brighton, Massachusetts 

Government 

Tau Epsilon Phi 1. 2, 3. 4, Assistant Scribe 2; Dean's List 4; 

House Athletics 2. 3. 4; Hillel Foundation I; Flying Club 3. 



GRETCHEN LYNDA NELSON 
Harrington Street, East Brookfield, Massachusetts 
Art 

Student Union Dance Committee Co-Chairman 3; Pi Beta Phi 
1, 2, 3, 4, Membership Chairman 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Honors 
Work 4; Homecoming Committee 2, 3; Winter Carnival Com- 
mittee 3; Art Club 2, 3, 4. 

JOAN MARIE NELSON 

35 Ridgeway Drive, Quincy, Massachusetts 

Socioloi;v 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sociology Club 2, 3, 4. 

VINCENT PAUL NERO 

23 Legion Drive, Abington. Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 4; Newman Club 

1, 2, 3, 4; American Chemical Society 3, 4. 

FRANK NESVET 

24 Fairlawn Drive, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Alpha Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Member-at-Large 2, Treasurer 3, 
4; Dean's List 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 1; Campus Chest 
Committee 1. 2; Hillel Foundation 1, 2; Accounting Associa- 
tion 3, 4. 

MIRIAM NETINHO 

54 Oaklawn Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

English 

SU Program Council 2, 3; Panhellenic Council 2, 3, 4; Sigma 

Sigma Sigma 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 

2, 3. 

ALICE ELIZABETH NEWTON 
Pine Meadow Road, Northfield, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

House Officer, Dining Commons Counselor 3, 4; Judson Fel- 
lowship 1; Mathematics Club 4; Women's Athletic Association 
2, 3, 4. 

BRIAN MELVILLE NICKERSON 

69 Rock Avenue, Lynn, Massachusetts 

Marketing 

Beta Kappa Phi 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 3. 



NANCY JAYNE NIZIAK 
20 Avon Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 
Personnel Management 

Index 2, 3, 4, Senior Editor 4; Student Senate 2, Non-Senate 
Member, Women's Affairs Committee; Social Activities Com- 
mittee 1, 2, 3, Treasurer 3; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Assistant Treasurer 2, Treasurer 3, Secretary 4; Dean's List 1, 
4; Newman Club 1, 2; Management Club 3, 4, Treasurer 4; 
Undergraduate Assistant, Guidance Office 3, Management De- 
partment 4. 

GAIL L. NOBBS 

17 Ashley Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Transfer — Guilford College; Student Christian Association 2, 

3, 4; Sociology Club 3, 4. 



CATHERINE J. NOEL 

27 Cedar Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 

English 

House Counselor 4; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance 

Club 1, 2, Secretary 3, President 4; Angel Flight 3, 4; WAA 

Executive Board 4. 



MARIANNE NOONAN 

109 Child Street, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

Child Development 

Index 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; International Club 4; Social 

Committee 3, 4; Newman Club Choir 2; Home Economics 

Club 1, 2,3,4. 

JUDITH C. NORMAN 
159 Central Street, Auburn, Massachusetts 
Home Economics — Child Development 

Sigma Kappa 2, 3, 4, Pledge Class, Treasurer 2, Assistant 
Pledge Trainer 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1, 2; Wesley Foundation 2, 3; Home Economics Club 1, 
2, 3, 4; Home Economics Executive Council 2. 



WILLIAM KENNETH NORMAN 

431 High Rock Street, Needham, Massachusetts 

Marketing Club 

Transfer — Massachusetts Bay Community College; Marketing 

Club. 



432 



LUCILLE PALMER NORRIS 

30 Lincoln Street, Medway, Massachusetts 

ElemciUarv Education 

WMUA 3," 4; Education Club 3, 4. 

FRANCIS E. NORTON, JR. 
280 Liberty Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Military Ball Committee 3; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2. Com- 
mander 2; Granville Air Society 3, 4, Information Officer 4; 
Psychology Club 1, 2; Cadet Glee Club 3, Executive Officer 3; 
Newman Club 1; Dean's List 4. 

MARY PAULA NORTON 
101 Dean Road, Brookline, Massachusetts 
English 

House Counselor 3, 4; Roister Doisters 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice Presi- 
dent 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Equestrian Club 3, 4; 
University Theatre 2, 3, 4. 

WILLIAM ALFRED NORTON 

168 Milton Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
Chemislry 

Newman Club 1; Air Cadet Squadron 1,2; American Chemi- 
cal Society 4; Flying Redman 1, 2; Lacrosse 3, 4. 

EDWARD NORBERT NOWAK 

90 Cambridge Street, Chicopee, Massachusetts 

Chemislry 

Transfer — Hoyoke Ir. College; American Chemical Society 4; 

House Counselor 4. 

ROBERTA LEIGH OAKS 

39 Brooklawn Road, Wilbraham. Massachusetts 

Elemenlary Education 

Dean's List 2, 3; Gymnastics Club I, 2; Young Republicans 2, 

3, 4; Exchange Student ot the University of South Florida 3. 



C. ETHAN O'BRIEN 

Shattuckville, Massachusetts 

History 

Collegian 3; Football i; QTV 1, 2, 

Intramural Sports. 



3, 4, Sergeant at Arms 3; 



LAWRENCE F. O'BRIEN 

1 1 1 Upper Beverly Hills, West Springfield, Massachusetts 

English 

Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4; Critique 3, 4; Dean's List 3. 

LEONARD ROBERT O'BRIEN 

29 Gorham Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 

Government 

Newman Club 1; Business Administration 2; Italian Club 2, 3, 

4; Mathematics Club 1; Students for Civil Rights 3, 4; Young 

Independents 4. 

ROBERT O'CONNOR 

621 East 8th Street, East Boston, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Transfer — Massachusetts Bay Community College. 

FRANCIS J. O'DONNELL 

29 Russell Street, Hadley, Massachusetts 

English 

Transfer — Holyoke lunior College; Dean's List 3. 

ANDREW GRANAM OLANOFF 
261 Atlantic Avenue, Swampscott, Massachusetts 
Government 

Men's Inter-dorm Council 1; Zeta Nu 1, 2, 3, 4; Hillel Foun- 
dation 1, 2; Political Science Association 2, 3; Young Demo- 
crats 1, 2. 

ROBERT DORR OLDACH 

412 Union Avenue, Framingham, Massachusetts 

Operetta Guild 1, 2, 3; Canterbury Club 1, 2, 3; Student 

Christian Association 1, 2; Opera Workshop 2. 

ROBERT W. O'LEARY 

402 Union Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Public Health 

Class Officer 2, 3, 4, President 2, 3, 4; Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 

3. 4; Maroon Key 2; SWAP 2. 4; Winter Carnival Committee 

3, General Chairman 3; Public Health Club, President 4; 

Commencement Committee 3, 4; Who's Who in American 

Colleges & Universities. 

SEAN EDWARD O'LEARY 
15 Summer Street, Easthampton, Massachusetts 
English 

Phi Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Hockey 1, 2; New- 
man Club 3, 4; Dorm Captain 3; Debating Society 1; Phi- 
losophy Club 1. 



ELEANOR MAE OLIVEIRA 

64 Cedar Street, Foxboro, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Dorm Social Chairman 4; Dean's List 2; Exchange Student to 

USE 3; Student Union Dance Committee 3, 4; Precisionetts 2; 

Student Christian Association 1,2; Tennis Club 2, 3. 

CHRISTINE JOYCE OLSEN 

117 High Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Home Economics 

University Concert Association 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 4; Sigma 
Sigma Sigma 2, 3, 4, Steward 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi 
Kappa Phi 4; Alpha Lambda Delta 2; Omicron Nu 3, 4, "Vice 
President 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2; Home Eco- 
nomics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Senior State Representative 4, State 
Secretary 4. 

ROBERT A. OLSEN 

40 Pittsfield Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Finance 

Dean's List 2, 3; Judson Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4; Finance Club 3, 

4; Ski Club 2. 

JUDITH ANN OLTSCH 

21 Montgomery Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

WMUA 3; 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Colloquium 2; Alpha 
Lambda Delta 2; Education Club 3, 4. 

DANIEL E. O'MARA III 

26 Waverley Oaks Road, Waltham, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Beta Kappa Phi 2, 3, 4; Athletic Chairman 3; Newman Club 

1; Physical Education Majors Club 3; Hookers Club 2, 3, 4; 

Swimming Team 1, 2, 3, 4, Letterman; AFROTC 1, 2, 3, 4. 

EVA M. OMASTA 

27 1 West Farms Road, Northampton, Massachusetts 

Home Economics Education 

Home Economics Club 4. 



BEVERLY LOIS ORMSBY 

6 Driftwood Lane, Weston, Massachusetts 

Economics 

House Counselor 4; House Treasurer 3; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; 

Judson Fellowship 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 

University Economics Association 3, 4; Young Republicans 

4. 

MILAGROS TFLERESA ORTEGA 

Via Augusta, 6, Barcelona, Spain 
Spanish 

Transfer — Massachusetts Bay Community College; Interna- 
tional Club 3. 

KATHLEEN J. OSTERBERG 

McGregory Road, Sturbridge, Massachusetts 

Journalism 

Collegian 3; Women's Interdorm Council 2; Pi Beta Phi 2, 3, 

4, President 4; Scrolls 2; Distinguished Visitor's Program 2; 

SWAP 2; Student Christian Association 1; Equestrian Club 3, 

4. 

JAMES STEPHEN O'SULLIVAN 

31 Codman Hill Avenue, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

Economics 

House Councelor 4; Phi Mu Delta 1, 2; Swimming 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Co-Captain; Lacrosse 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 

University Economics Association 1, 2. 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 

1, 2, 3,4. 



ROBERT DONALD PACIFIC 

35 Pearl Street, Marlboro, Massachusetts 

Wildlife Management 

Dean's List 3, 4; Newman Club 1. 



DONALD S. PADUCHOWSKI 
19 Linwood Avenue, Methuen, Massachusetts 
Wood Technology 

TKE 1, 2, 3, 4; Discipline Committee 4; Winter Carnival 
Committee 3; Intramurals Newman Club 1. 2; Forestry Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Home Coming Committee 3; Military Ball Commit- 
tee 1;IFC2. 

JOHN R. PAJAK 

549 Piper Road. West Springfield, Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Class Executive Council 2, 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors 

Work 4; Orthodox Club 2, 3; American Chemical Society 4; 

Chemistry Club 2, 3, 4. 



433 



MARE PALMER 

Route 20, Chester, Massachusetts 

Women's Physical Education 

Dean's List 3: Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Equestrian 

Club: Physical Education Club: Women's Athletic Association. 

STEPHEN A. PALMIERI, JR. 
247 Shrewsbury Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Kappa Siama 2, 3, 4: Baseball 1: Interfraternity Council 3; 
House Counselor (Baker) 4; ASCE 2, 3, Corresponding Secre- 
tary- 4: Newman Club 1, 2. 

DALIA M.-VR't' PALUBECKAS 

18 Leland Avenue, Northborough, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

House Counselor 3, 4: House Chairman 4; Dining Counselor 

3, 4; Dean's List 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Math Club 3, 

4. 

THOMAS WALTER P.ANKE 

133 Line Street, Feeding Hills, Massachusetts 

Pre-Medical 

House Counselor 3, 4. Dining Counselor 4; Alpha Phi Omega 

3, 4: Dean's List 1. 2. 3. 4: Honors Colloquium 3: Honors 

Work 4: Cross Country 1, 2, 3, Co-Captain 4; Indoor Track 1, 

2, 3, Co-Captain 4; Outdoor Track 1, 2, 3, Co-Captain 4; 

Newman Club 1, 3. 4; Pre-Medical Club 2, 3, Treasurer 4. 

PHYLLIS HELEN PAPEIKA 

24 Beverly Avenue. Marblehead, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

University Concert Association 3. 4; Public Relations 4; Soph- 
omore Banquet Committee 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Execu- 
tive Board 4, NNCF Treasurer, N.E. Province 4; Mathematics 
Club 2, 3, Vice President 4. 



LEE ALAN PEARLMUTTER 

130 Walnut Avenue. Revere, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

Transfer — University of Michigan (2); Critique 3; Hillel 

Foundation 2; Engineering Journal 2; AIChE 2, 3, 4, Vice 

President 3, President 4; Business Administration Club 2, 3, 

4. 



CAROLYN PEARSON 

628 Cottage Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 2, 3, 4; Phi Kappa 

Phi 3, 4; Alpha Lambda Delta 2; Canterbury Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Secretary 2; Student Christian Association 1, 2; Education 

Club 4; Mathematics Club 3, Secretary 4; Angel Flight 3, 4. 

LYNNE PEIRCE 

91 Metcalf Road, North Attleboro. Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

House Councelor 3: Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, Vice 

President 4; Scrolls 2; Dean's List 3; SWAP 3, 4; Education 

Club 1, 2, 3, 4, State Historian 4; Modern Dance Club 2. 

FRANCIS EDGAR PELOSI 

589 Lincoln Avenue, Saugus, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Collegian 1, 2; House Officer 2, 3, Secretary; Operetta Guild 
3; Newman Club 1, 2; Art Club 4; Psychology Club 3, 4; Pre- 
Medical Club 1; Ski Club 2; Outing Club 1. 

PHILIP H. PERKINS 

50 Ocean Avenue, Bass River, Cape Cod, Massachusetts 

Public Health 

Transfer — Cape Cod Community College; Dean's List 3; 

Newman Club 3; Gymnastics Club 4; Public Health Club 4, 



MICH.\EL ALAN PARIS 
44 Joseph Road, Newtonville, Massachusetts 
Government 

Index, Sports Staff 2, Sports Editor 3; Inter-Fraternity Council, 
Member at Large 2, Rush Committee 2, President 3, Greek 
Week Concert Chairman 3; Alpha Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Revelers Hootenanv Chairman 3; Campus Varieties 3; Dean's 
List 3; SWAP 3; IFC Football, Basketball, Volleyball, Softball 
2, 3, 4; Flying Redmen 1; Hillel Foundation 1, 2. 4; Granville 
Air Society 1; Political Science Association 4; Young Demo- 
crats 4. 



RICHARD STEVEN PERLMUTTER 

1722 Commonwealth Avenue, Brighton, Massachusetts 

Government 



MAURICE G. PERRY 

71 Conway Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

History 

Student Senate 2; Commuters Club 1, 2, 3, Social Chairman 2; 

Intramural Basketball 3; Intramural Softball 3; Intramural 

Football 4. 



CAROL ANN PARKER 

197 Hersey Street, Hingham, Massachusetts 

Botany 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 1; Honors Work 

4. 

D.AVID L. PARSON 

361 Great Road, Acton, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Critique 3; Sales; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquia 3, 4; 

Intramural Football 1, 2: Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Economics 

Club 3, 4; Pre-Medical Club 3; ROTC 1, 2, 3; Undergraduate 

Assistant 4. 

RICHARD S. PASKOWSKY 

42 Lovett Street, Salem, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Chorale 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; Dean's List I; IEEE 3, 4; Spanish 

Club 2. 

ROBERT A. PASTUSZAK 

1 120 Parker Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Geology 

House Counselor 4; Geology Club 3, 4, President 4; History 

Club 1, 2; Outing Club 4. 

ERNEST THEODORE PATRIKIS 
I Hillcrest Circle. Swampscott, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Concert Band 3. 4, Personnel Manager 3, Manager 4; March- 
ing Band I, 2, 3, 4, Properly Manager 2, Personnel Manager 3, 
Manager 4; Dean's List 2, 3; Honors Work 4; Campus Chest 
Committee 2; Campus Religious Council 2; Orthodox Club 1, 
2, 3, 4; University Economics Association 1, 2, 3. 

OLEH GEORGE PAWLUK 
445 River Drive. Sunderland, Massachusetts 
Journalism-English 

Collegian I, 2, 3, 4, Editorial Chairman 4; Yahoo 1. 2, 3; Phi 
Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 3, Vice Presi- 
dent 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Bay State Rifles I ; Bay Slate 
Special Forces 2; Wilbur H. Ward Educational Scholarship I, 
2, 3,4. 



EDWARD A. PETERS 

30 Eustis Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 

Accounting and Finance 

Kappa Sigma 2, 3, 4; Lacrosse 3; Football 1; Hockey 1; 

Orthodox Club 1, 2, 3; Accounting Association 3, 4; Young 

Republicans 3, 4; Pre-Law Club 3, 4. 



JANICE G. PETERSON 

1 9 Louise Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

WMUA 1; Gamma Sigma Sigma 1, 2; Women's Sports, Arch- 
ery 2; Student Christian Association 1; Wesley Foundation 3; 
ASME 2, 3, 4. 



ROBERT ROY PETERSON 

223 Jefferson Street, Dedham, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Phi Mu Delta 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant Pledgemaster 2, Social 
Chairman 3; Track 1; Management Club 3; Economics Asso- 
ciation 4. 



RONALD P. PETERSON 

109 St. Nicholas Avenue, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Finance 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Lutheran Club 2, 3, 

4; Student Christian Association 1; Finance Club 4. 



JEAN ANN PEZZOLl 

120 High Street, Wareham, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

House Counselor 4, Chairman 4; Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2; 

Dean's Li.st 1, 2, 3; Honors Work 4; SWAP 4; Newman Club 

1, 2, 4; Psychology Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4; Summer 
Orientation Counselor 3, 4. 

BARBARA DALE PHILLIPS 

K44 Main Sircet, HoUlcn, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Collegian 2; House Counselor 4; Winter Carnival Committee 

3; Student Christian Association I, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 1, 

2, 3, 4; Outing Club 2. 



434 



ALAN RICHARD PIECEWICZ 
15 Oceanside Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Class Executive Council 1, 2, 3, Chairman Sophomore Ban- 
quet. Sophomore-Freshmen Rope pull, Sophomore-Freshmen 
Night 2; Zeta Nu 1, 2, 3, 4, Athletic Chairman 1, 2; House 
Manager 3, Member-at-Large 4; Winter Carnival Committee 
3; Newman Club 1; American Chemical Society 4. 

JOSEPH F. PIECUCH 

210 Parker Street, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts 

Pre-Dental 

Deans List 1; Honor's Colloquium 1; Soccer 1. 2, 3; Newman 

Club 1, 2, 3, 4; House Officer 2, 3; Russian Club 1; Phi Mu 

Delta Fraternity 2, 3, 4; Student Senate 3, 4, Treasurer 4, 

Finance Committee Chairman 4; RSO Committee 4; Who's 

Who in American Colleges & Universities. 

ALPHONSE PIEKUT 

91 Hathaway Street. New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

House Officer 4. Secretary: Dean's List 1, 2, 3. 4; Tau Beta Pi 
3, 4; ASME 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1. 

MARSHA A. PIERCE 

1275 Massachusetts Avenue, Lunenburg, Massachusetts 

Englisli 

Sigma Kappa 1, 2; Student Union Dance Committee 2, 3, 

Secretary 3; Dean's List 3. 

PETER E. PIETZ 

747 Main Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Markelin q 

Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, Co- 
Captain 4; Marketing Club 3, 4. 

ANNE PINCISS 

50 Judith Road, Newto n Centre, Massachusetts 

English ' ■ 

Collegian 1, 2, 3; Business Manager Literary Magazine 3; 
WMUA 1, 2; Class Executive Council 1, 2, 3: RSO Committee 
2, 3, 4; Women's Interdorm Council 1; Roister Doisters 3, 4; 
Hillel 1 ; Editor Freshman Magazine, LXV 1 . 

DAVID M. PODBROS 

191 Winthrop Road, Brookline 46, Massachusetts 
Collegian 1, 2, 3; Class Officer 3, 4, Vice President; SWAP 3, 
4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2; 
Young Democrats, President; Who's Who in American Col- 
leges & Universities. 

RUTH G. POLLACK 

98 Fearing Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 

English 

House Counselor 3; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Naiads 1; Hillel 

Foundation 1,2; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3. 

MICHAEL DOUGLAS POLLARD 

56 Shelter Street, Orange, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; ASME 2, 3, 4. 

LOUIS E. PORRAZZO 
198 Orient Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 
Government 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 2, 3; Bay State Rifles 1, 2; Grenadiers 3, 
4; Newman Club 1, 2; Flying Club 4; Political Science Associ- 
ation 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. 

ANN RUTH POSNER 

47 KnoUwood Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Collegian 2, 3; Index 2, 3, Editor 4; Class Executive Council 

2, 3; Sigma Delta Tau 1, 2, 3, Vice President 4; Sophomore 

Banquet Committee 2; SWAP 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Secretary 2, President 3; Education Club 4; Winter Carnival 

Committee 3. 

RENA EDITH POTISH 

33 Angell Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Lambda Delta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, First Vice President, Pledge 
Trainer 3, President 4; LXV Magazine 1; Women's Athletic 
Association 1, 2; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Dorm Repre- 
sentative 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Collegian 2; Class Executive 
Council 3, 4; SWAP 4; History Club 2; Education Club 4; 
Winter Carnival Committee, Ticket Co-Chairman; President's 
Council; Who's Who in American Colleges & Universities. 

BARBARA ANN POTOSEK 

23 I Street, Turners Falls, Massachusetts 

English 

Dean's List 1; Newman Club 3, 4; Education Club 4; National 

Association Teachers of English 4. 



SHIRLEY RUTH POTTERN 

102 Shawmut Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

German 

Marching Band 1; University Theatre 1; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3; Commuters Club 2; Spanish Club 3; 

La Casa Hispanica 3. 

JEAN A. POWERS 

73 Foster Street, Everett, Massachusetts 

Government 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Dean's List 3; History Club 2, 3; 

Outing Club; Pioneer Valley Folklore Society; Archaeological 

Club; International Club. 

RICHARD JOHN POWERS 

1 1 8 Parker Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

House Counselor 3, 4; AIEE-IRE 4. 

IRVING PRAGER 

Hinckley Road, Hyannis, Massachusetts 

History 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4. 

LINDA PRATT 

426 Hutchinson Street, Big Rapids, Michigan 

Elementary Education 

House Counselor 4; Volleyball 1, 2, 3; Education Club 3, 4; 

Gymnastics Club 1, 2. 

MARSHA BILLINGS PRATT 
Barton Heights, Greenfield, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Transfer— Keene State College; Chorus 1; WAA 2; Softball 1; 
"Co-Eds" 1; Equestrian Club 2; Nu Beta Epsilon 1; Gymnas- 
tics Club 2; Winter Carnival Committee 1; Modern Dance 
Club 3; House Counselor 3; Physical Education Club 2. 3, 
4. 

SANDRA PHYLLIS PRATT 
3 1 Clark Street, Easthampton, Massachusetts 
Pre-Medical 

Dean's List 1; Honors Colloquium 2; Women's Sports 3, 4; 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Pre-Medical Club 1, Secretary 2; Stu- 
dent NEA 4; University Scholarship 4; Undergraduate Assist- 
ant Fellowship 4; Education Club 4. 

JOHN E. PREBLE 

5 Sherman Avenue, Northampton, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Eta Kappa Nu 3, 4; AIEE-IRE 1, 2, 3, 4. 

EDWARD R. PREISSLER 

57 Adams Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Government 

Sociology Club 4; Newman Club 1, 4. 

JANET RUTH PREISSLER 
7 Linwold Drive, West Hartford, Connecticut 
Dietetics and Institutional Administration 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Omicron Nu 3, President 4; Home Eco- 
nomics Club 2, 3, 4 Skinner Scoop Co-Editor 3, Publicity 
Chairman 4. 

PATRICIA ANN PRENGRUBER 
1 17 Furnace Street, North Adams, Massachusetts 
English 

Newman Club 1, 2; Dean's List 1; Winter Carnival Committee 
3; Women's Interdorm Council 2; House Counselor 3, 4; Din- 
ing Counselor 3, Secretary 4. 

JAMES WENTWORTH PRESCOTT 

116 Main Street, Worthfield, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Dean's List 4; University Economics Association 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Treasurer 3, 4, Executive Committee 4; Water Ski Club 2; 

Sailing Club 3, 4. 

WILLIAM FRANK PRESCOTT, JR. 

16 Turner Road, Marblehead, Massachusetts 

History 

Chorale 3; History Club 2; Outing Club 3, 4; Student Zionist 

Organization 4; Young Republicans 1, 2. 

WILLIAM JAMES PRICE 

1 1 Redwood Road, New Hyde Park, New York 

Government 

Transfer — Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute; WMUA 3; Alpha 

Phi Omega 2, 3, 4; University Concert Association 2, 3, 4; 

Assistant Manager 3, 4; Political Science Association 3, 4; 

Young Republicans 4. 



435 



JEFFREY S. PRINCE 

19 College Road, Wellesley, Massachusetts 

Botany 

Etean's List 1, 2, 3: Honors Work 4; Newman Club 1, 4, 

Coordinator, Newman Club Choir 4; Scuba Club 3, 4. 



THERESA F. PROKOP 

104 Acrebrook Road, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Government 

University Concert Association 1, 2; Campus Chest Committee 
2: Homecoming Committee 3; Winter Carnival 2, 3, 4; New- 
man Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Social Committee 3, 4. Special Events 
Committee 3, 4. Treasurer 4; Student Union Publicity 3, 4, 
Secretary 4; Arts & Music Committee 4: >'oung Democrats 3, 
4; Fall Fashion Show Interviews 3. 4. 



IRENE E. PUDDISTER 
21 Atwood Street, Wakefield, Massachusetts 
English 

Education Club 4: Equestrian Club 2, 3, 4; University Eco- 
nomics Association 1.2. 



FRANCIS X. PUMPHRET 

13 West Street, Pembroke, Massachusetts 

Frencli 

Men's Inter-dorm Council 2: Dorm President 1, 2; Dean's List 

3, 4; Men's Sports, Football 1. 

MARCIA W. PURVIS 

264 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 

English 

Transfer — Louisiana State University; Zeta Tau Alpha 1, 2, 3, 

4. 

STEPHEN BRIGGS PYNE 
5 Lantern Lane, Hingham, Massachusetts 
A !>ricultiiral Economics 

House Council 3, Alpha Sigma Phi 2, 3, 4 Office Prudential; 
Intramural Sports; Canterbury Club 2, 3; Agricultural Eco- 
nomics Club 2, 3, 4. 



DEBRAH THAYER QUIRK 

69 Middle Road. Falmouth. Maine 

Xiirsing 

Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Union Dance Committee 1; 

Ski Club 1: Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



JEANETTE MARY RADICE 

North Plain Road. Barrington, Massachusetts 

Chemistn' 

Dean's List 1, 2; Honors Work 4; Orthodox Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



PATRICIA ANNE RAMALT 
41 Poinsettia Street, Agawam, Massachusetts 
English 

Student Senate 2; Chairman of Public Relations 2; Senate 
Representative to Fine Arts Council 2; Women's Affairs Com- 
mittee 2; Operetta Guild 1; Newman Club 1, 2; SU Dance 
Committee 1,2; SU Special Events Committee 2. 

ROBERT DONALD RAMSAY 
223 Elsie Road, Brockton, Massachusetts 
Food Technology 

House Officer 3, 4, Athletic Chairman 3, President 4; Dean's 
List 3; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Men's Sports 1, 2, 3, 4 Cross- 
country Track Captain 4; Food Technology Club 3, President 
4; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4. 

NANCY L. RAMSTEDT 

83 Lawrence Street, Swansea, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Sigma Sigma Sigma 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education 

Club 3, 4; Young Democrats 4, 

PHILIP READ 

1300 Washington Street, Walpole, Massachusetts 

Food Technology 

Class Executive Council 1, 2, 3, 4; Winter Carnival Committee 

3; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Cheerleader 4; Wesley Foundation 1, 2; 

Physics Club 1; Food Tech. Club 2, 3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 

2; Beta Kappa Phi. 

ROBERT W. REDDING 

150 Rivulet Street, North Uxbridge, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Math Club 3, 

4. 

MARSHA DALE REED 

43 Oakden Avenue, South Weymouth, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Student Christian Association 1, 2; Nursing Club I, 2, 3, 4; 

SNAM 1, 2;NLSN 1,2. 

MARY C. REED 

Steele Road, North Eastham, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 3, 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Canterbury 
Club 1; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Nursing Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; SNAM District #1, Public Relations Chairman 3. 

PATRICIA ANN REED 

723 Pleasant Street, Brockton, Massachusetts 

Home Economics 

Dean's List 2; Newman Club I, 2, 3, 4; Art Club 1, 2, 3; 

Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4; Psychology Club 1; Spanish 

Club 1, 2. 



HELEN JOAN RADOWICZ 

North Silver Lane, Sunderland, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

House Assistant Treasurer 3, 4; Iota Gamma Upsilon 2, 3, 4; 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Work 4; Alpha Lambda Delta 1, 

Vice President 2; Commuters Club 1; Pre-Medical Club 3. 



WALTER T. RADULSKI 

28 Wyman Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 

Government 



ROBERT F. REERA 

30 Hobart Street, Braintree, Massachusetts 

Land Arch 

Dean's List 3, 4; Beta Kappa Phi 3, 4; LBCPA; Hookers 

Club, Area Judiciary 2, 3, 4; House Counselor 4; ASLA 3, 4; 

Land Arch. Club 2, 3, 4. 

DAVID JAMES RE"yMOLDS 

159 Grant Street, North Attleboro, Massachusetts 

Business Management 

Transfer — Northeastern University; Dean's List 3. 



THERESA RADWANSKI 
5 Rich Street, Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Mathematics 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Turf Management Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's 
Athletic Association 1, 2; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Edu- 
cation Club 4. 

JUDITH RAFFER 

1 10 Lowell Street, Peabody, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

House Counselor 4; Northampton Volunteers 3, 4; Hillel 

Foundation 1, 2, 4; Education Club 3, 4; Psychology Club 3, 

4. 

FRANK GASPER RAGUSA 

42 Commonwealth Avenue, Gloucester, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Dean's List 1 ; Newman Club 1 ; ASCE 2, 3 4. 

SHEILA MAY RAINFORD 

42 McClellan Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Sophomore year at Bridgewater State College; Dean's [Jst 1, 
2, 3, 4; Intervarsity Christian Fellowship 3; Student Christian 
Association 3; Wesley Foundation 1, 3. 4; Editor of the Wes- 
ley Witness 4; National Council of Teachers of English 4. 



JOHN DENNIS REYNOLDS 
1026 Pleasant Street, Canton, Massachusetts 
Government 

Student Senate 3; Executive Council 3; Student Union Govern- 
ing Board 2, 3, 4, Vice Chairman 4; Statesmen 2; Winter 
Carnival Committee 3; Basketball 1, 2; AROTC 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 2, 3, 4. 

SUZANNE J. RHEAUME 

18 Tourtellotte Street, Willimansett, Massachusetts 

Physics 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honor's Colloquium 3; Newman Club 1; 

Physics Club 1, 2, Secretary 4. 

ELAINE MARIE RICCI 

94 Louder's Lane, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Index 4; Critique 4; Dean's List I, 2, 3; Winter Carnival 

Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2; Education Club 3, 4. 

JOFL S. RICH 

22 Weslbournc Road, Newton. Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Alpha Hpsilon Pi 1,2, 3, 4, Rush Chairman 3, Steward 4; 

Class Hxcculivc Council 1; Hillel Foundation 1, 2; Accounting 

Association 4; Business Administration Club 4; Management 

Club 4; Young Democrats 3, 4. 



436 



ANNE LOUIS RICHARDS 

181 North Washington Street, North Attleboro, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Class Executive Council 3, 4; House Social Chairman 4; 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 1. 2, 3, 4; Revelers 2, Secretary 4; 
Chairman of Winter Carnival Ball 3; Student Christian Asso- 
ciation 1; Education Club 3, 4; Who's Who in American Col- 
leges & Universities. 

HUGH JOHN RICHARDS 

14 Harrington Road, Fairview, Massachusetts 
Chemistry 

Transfer — Holyoke Junior College. 

THORNTON M. RICHARDS. Ill 

38 Walnut Street, Fairhaven, Massachusetts 
Management 

Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Maroon Key 2; Campus Chest Commit- 
tee 1; SWAP 4; Winter Carnial Committee 3; Management 
Club 3, 4; Senior Week 4. 

ROBERT LEWIS RIEGER 

214-54 Whitehall Terrace, Queens Village, New York 

Accounting 

Freshman Magazine "LXV" 1; Winter Carnival Committee 3; 

Hillel Foundation 1. 2. 3, 4; Accounting Association 2, 3, 4, 

Vice President 3; Equestrian Club 4; Chess Club 4. 

STEVEN KULVIN RIEMER 
34 Moreland Avenue, Newton Center, Massachusetts 
Government 

Class Vice President 1; Class Executive Council 1, 2, 3; Zeta 
Nu 2, 3, 4, Rush Chairman 2, 3; Interfraternity Council 3; 
United Nations Week Committee 3; Carnival Chairman; Ten- 
nis 1, 2, 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4. 

SHARON A. RIKKOLA 

12 Linden Avenue, Salem, Massachusetts 

Education 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 3, 4; Lutheran Club 2, 3; Education 

Club 3, 4; Christian Association 1, 2; Critique 3. 

GORDON H. RIPLEY 

112 Nash Memorial Road, Abington, Massachusetts 

A stronomy 

Wesley Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 

2; Astronomy Club 1. 2, 4; Ski Club 1, 2, 3. 

BILLIE BROWN RISACHER 

422 Lincoln Apartments, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Transfer — Bucknell University; Social Activities Committee 1; 
Phi Mu Sorority 1, 2, 3, 4; Military Ball Court 2; Miss Buck- 
nell Engineer 2; May Day Committee 2; Sig Derby Queen 
Court 1; Freshman Firesides 1. 

THOMAS I. RISSMILLER 

15 Goss Place, Clifton, New Jersey 
Wood Technology 

House Officer, Social Chairman 1; Student Christian Associa- 
tion 1; ROTC Rifle Team 1; Forestry Club 2, 3, Vice Presi- 
dent 4; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Forest Products Research 
Society 4. 

JAMES RITCHIE, JR. 

1 Manor Road, Auburn, Massachusetts 

English 

Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. 

WILLLA.M R. RITCHIE 

19 Corregidor Street, Boston, Massachusetts 
Government 

DENNIS J. RIVET 

161 Avon Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Graduate from Northern Essex Community College; House 

Oflicer 3; Alpha Phi Omega 3, 4; Newman Club 3, 4; Pre- 

Medical Club 3; Psychology 4; 131 Club 4. 

DOUGLAS WALTER ROBB 

26 Riverview Avenue, Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

House Council 3; Fraternity Phi Mu Delta 1, 2, 3, 4; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2; Civil Engineering Club; ASCE 2, 3, 
4; Recording Secretary 4. 

LOUIS J. ROBERTS 

85 Amity Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 

History 

Transfer — Berkley Commercial College; History Club 3, 4. 



SUSAN ROBERTS 

1 1 Pleasant Street, West Brookfield, Massachusetts 

French 

Young Democrats 3, 4; Students for Civil Rights 3, Secretary 

4; Class Executive Committee 4; WAA 2, 3. 

BASIL W. ROBINSON 

34 Forty Steps Lane, Nahant, Massachusetts 
Pre-Medical 

Dean's List 1; Men's Sports 1, 2, 3, 4, Track, Indoor and 
Outdoor; Cross Country; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Medi- 
cal Club 1, 2. 3; Zoology Club 1. 

JUDITH ANN ROBINSON 

Jackson Road, Hardwick, Massachusetts 

English 

Index 4; Sigma Kappa 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1; 

Education Club 4. 

SANDRA J. ROBINSON 
2 Brooks Terrace, Swampscott, Massachusetts 
English 

Class Executive Council 1, 2, 3; Winter Carnival Committee 
3; Tennis WAA 1, 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 2, 4; Homecoming Com- 
mittee 2; Young Democrats 4. 

ROBERT E. ROCKWELL 

1 82 Woods Hole Road, Falmouth, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Beta Chi 2, 3; Dean's List 1, 2; Eta Kappa Nu 3, 4, Publicity 

Chairman 3; Tau Beta Pi 3, Vice President 4; Intramural 

Softball 2, 3; IEEE 3, 4; Sailing Club 4. 

REGINA D. ROGOWSKI 

54 Wildermere Street, Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Newman Club 1,2; Education Club 3, 4. 

WILLIAM E. ROHAN 

Pheasant Lane, Sandwich, Massachusetts 

Government 

Concert Band 1, 2; Marching Band 1, 2; Spanish Club 2; 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Law Association 3, 4. 

LINDA H. ROHLFS 

474 Pomeroy Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Transfer — Berkshire Community College; Education Club 3. 

JANET DIANE ROSATA 

17 Bellevue Avenue, Norwood, Massachusetts 

Math 

House Councelor 3; Iota Gamma Upsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 

1, Vice President 3, 4; Mortar Board , Treasurer 4; Scrolls 2; 
Dean's List 1, 2. 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Mathematics 
Club 4. 

DONNIE ROSATI 

85 Vail Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

Lacrosse 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 4; Amateur Radio Asso- 
ciation 1, 3, 4; AIEE-IRE (AIEE) 3, 4. 

CAROL ANN ROSCH 

375 Eagle Street, North Adams, Massachusetts 

English 

Transfer — Hood College, Fredrick, Maryland; Alpha Chi 

Omega 2; Dean's List 3; Newman Club 2; National Council of 

Teachers of English 4. 

CAROL ANN ROSE 

210 Dutcher Street, Hopedale, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Iota Gamma Upsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Music Chairman 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Chorale 1, 2; Student Christian Association 1; Nursing Club 1, 

2, 3, 4. 

MICHAEL B. ROSE 

10 Edgewood Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Government 

Alpha Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, House Manager 4; Hillel 1, 2; Bridge 

Club 4; Campus Chest 1, 2; Varsity Tennis 1, 2, 3, Co-Captain 

4. 

RICHARD B. ROSE 

10 Highland Court, Cohasset, Massachusetts 

Government 

Phi Mu Delta 1, 2, 3, 4; IFC 2, 3; Secretary Phi Mu Delta 2, 

3; Campus Chest Committee 3; SWAP 4; Winter Carnival 

Committee 3; Lacrosse 1, 2; Political Science Association 2, 3, 

4; Ski Club 1, 2. 



437 



MARTIN J. ROSENBERG 
35 "O"" Street. Hull, Massachusetts 
Pre-Med in Psychology 

Collegian 1; Critique 3, 4; Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4, Alumni 
Secrerary, First Vice President 3. President 4; Dean's List 3; 
Campus Chest Committee 3. 4; United Nations Week Com- 
mittee 2; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 

2, 3, 4; Student Zionist Association 1: Pre-Medical Club 1, 2. 
3.4. 

MARTIN K. ROSENDORF 

535 Commonwealth Avenue. Newton. Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Collegian 1. 2. 3. Business Staff; Alpha Epsilon Pi; Hillel 

Foundation 1. 2. 3; Accounting Association 3, 4. 

JOEL BARRY ROSENTHAL 

54 Ellison Road. Newton, Massachusetts 

Goyernment 

Transfer — Western Reserve University; Alpha Epsilon Pi 2, 3, 

4, Secretary 3. 4; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Pi Sigma Alpha 2, 3, 4; 

Hillel Foundation 2, 3, 4; Astronomy Club 2; Political Science 

Association 2, 3. 4; Bridge Club 4. 

SHEIL.\ LEE ROSENTHAL 

40 Lantern Road, Belmont, Massachusetts 

Microbiology 

Honors Colloquium 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Hillel Foundation 1; 

Student Zionist Organization 1; Outing Club 3, 4. 

CHARLES LOUIS ROSOFF 

37 Cunningham Avenue. Glens Falls. New York 

Marketing 

House President 2; Concert Band L 2, 3, 4; Marching Band 3, 

4; Operetta Guild 1, 2; Orchestra 3; Woodwind Quintet 1, 2, 

3,4. 

ELAINE ROSOFF 

16 Allandale Street. Jamaica Plain. Massachusetts 
Psychology & Elementary (Double Major) 

Women's Interdorm Council 3; House Counselor 3, 4; House 
Officer, Social Chairman 2; Dean's List 2; Student Volunteer. 
Northamption State Hospital 1. 2, 3. 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 

3. 4: Education Club 4; Psychology Club 2, 3, 4. 

JUDITH A. ROSS 

3 Sargent Street. Beverly, Massachusetts 

English 

Transfer — Nonhern Essex Community College; Kappa Alpha 

Theta 3. 4. Corresponding Secretary 4; Interdorm-Sorority 

Volleyball 3; Education Club 4; Women's Athletic Association 

3, Dormitory Representative 3; National Council of Teachers 

of English 3, 4. 

KEITH CHARLES ROSS 

51 Ridge Strret, Arlington, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Men's Interdorm Council 2; House Counselor 3. 4; House 

Officer 2. Social Chairman; Inter-Fraternity Council 3; Phi 

Sigma Delta Fraternity 1, 2, 3. 4, Ritual Chairman 2, 3; Vice 

President 3; Sergeant at Arms 2; Dean's List 1, 3; Military 

Ball Committee 4; SWAP 2; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Arnold 

Air Society 3. 4; Comptroller 3, Area Executive Officer 4. 

RICHARD MICHAEL ROSS 

34 Oakhurst, Sciluate, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Theta Chi; Dean's List 3; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 

2, 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4. 

PAUL N. ROSSETTI 

300 Chestnut Street, Franklin, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Transfer — Dean Junior College 

THOMAS ANTHONY ROURKE 

26 Mulberry Street, Beverly, Massachusetts 

Business A dministration — Management 

Newman Club 3, 4; Management Club 3, 4; Marketing Club 

2. 

RICHARD GEORGE ROUSSIN 

1070 Tobey Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Dean's List 3; Newman Club 3; IEEE 4. 



CHARLES J. RUDICK 
Caswell Court, East Douglas, Massachusetts 
Civil Engineering 

Index 3; WMUA 1; Class Executive Council 2; Zeta Nu 1.2, 
3. 4. Assistant Treasurer I. Assistant House Manager 3; Volun- 
teer Fire Department 3. 4; Newman Club 1, 2; ASCE 2, 3, 4; 
Civil Engineering Club 2, 3, 4. 

JAMES W. RUEST 

10 Spring Street, Plainville, Massachusetts 

Ciyil Engineering 

Engineering Journal 3; Military Ball Committee 3, 4; Newman 

Club 2, 3, 4; Air Cadet Squadron 1; American Society of Civil 

Engineers 2, 3, 4; Civil Engineering Club 3. 4; Granville Air 

Society 1; Arnold Air Society 3, 4; Scuba Club 2; Dean's List 

4. 

ELSIE LOUISE RUGGLES 

50 Echo Street. Melrose. Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 
Education Club 2. 3. 4. 

DAVID H. RUSSELL 

16 Main Street. Easthampton. Massachusetts 

Chemistry 

Transfer — Holyoke College. 

CHARLES LAWRENCE RUTSTEIN 

193 Rolling Road, Cynwyd, Pennsylvania 

Government 

Transfer — Lehigh University; Student Senate 4; Dean's List 3, 

4; Honor's Work 4; Hillel Foundation 3, 4; Debating Society 

3, 4, President 4; Pre-Law Club 3, 4. 

JAMES EDMUND RYAN 

19 Highland Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

House Recording Secretary 3; Phi Sigma Delta 2, 3; Newman 

Club 1, 2; Air Cadet Squadron 1; Granville Air Society 2, 3, 

Area Administrative Officer 3; Mathematics Club 2. 

JOHN P. RYAN 

56 Elm Street. Hingham, Massachusetts 

General Business 

Zeta Nu 1. 2, Rush Chairman 2; IFC 2; Class Executive 

Council 1. 2; Greek Ball 2; Newman Club 1, 2; Dean's List 

3. 

JULIE ANNE RYAN 
9 Fairview Avenue, Ipswich, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Social Activities Committee 3, 4; Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Treas- 
urer 4; House Officer, Treasurer 2, 3; Campus Chest 3; Winter 
Carnival Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Sociology Club 
3, 4;WAA 1,2,3. 

MAURICE JAMES RYAN 

357 Main Street, West Newbury, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Collegian 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; University Economics 

Association 3, 4; Le Cercle Francais 1; Dean's List 2, 3, 4. 

SUSANNA RYBAK 

Upper Church Street, Ware, Massachusetts 

Public Health 

Index 2, 3, 4, Managing Editor 3, Editor-in-Chief 4; Executive 

Council 3, 4; Operetta Guild 2; Who's Who in American 

Colleges & Universities. 

HAROLD L. RYDER, JR. 

7 Clifl' Street, Saugus, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Head of Residence 3, 4; House Officer (Athletic Chairman) 1; 

Football 1, 2; Lacrosse 1, 2, 3; Physical Education Majors' 

Club 2, 3, 4. 

BENJAMIN D. SACKMARY 
36 Long Avenue, Brighton, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Student Senate 1; Dean's List 3; Hillel Foundation 1; Psychol- 
ogy Club 2, 3; Sociology Club 4. 

DAVID C. SADOWSKY 

Conway Road, South Deerfield, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Indoor Track 1. 2, 3, 4, Captain 3, 4; Outdoor Track 1, 2, 3, 

4; Newman Club I, 2, 3, 4; Physical Education Club 2, 3, 4; 

Varsity "M" Club. 



NORMA G. RUBENSTEIN 
17 West Walnut Street, Milford, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Transfer — Boston University; Operetta Guild 3; Hillel Founda- 
tion 3; Education Club 3, 4. 



438 



KARL F. SAILA 

Turnpike Road, Ashby, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Sigma Phi Epsilon I, 2, 3, 4; Basketball I; Student Christian 

Association 1, 2; ASME4. 



CAROLYN FREDA SAKAKEENY 

153 Porter Road, East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Eiii>lish 

Iota Gamma Upsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Recording Secretary 2, 3, First 

Vice President 4; Deans List 3, 4; Canterbury Club 1; Student 

Christian Association 1, 3. 4. 

EDWARD JACK SALTMAN 

7 Oriole Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

Food Science and Technology 

Food Technology Club 3. 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Bridge Club 1, 2, 3,4. 

SHEILA JOAN SALTMAN 
1 5 Alhambra Road, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 
History 

Studeiit Union Program Council 3, 4, Secretary 4, Chairman 
of Publicity 4, Publicity Committee 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 
2; Student Zionist Association 2; History Club 2, 3. 4, Execu- 
tive Council 3, Vice President 4; ACU Conference 4; Critique 
3. 

LORRAINE ANNETTE SALVO 

Wheelwright Road, Barre Plains, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Newman Club 1, 2; Young Democrats 4; Zoology Club 1, 2. 

SUSAN OLIVIA SAMAHA 

1559 Liberty Street, Braintree, Massachusetts 

Microbiology 

Critique 4; Student Senate 4; Elections Committee 4; Arts and 

Music Committee 2. 3; Dean's List 3; Senate Public Relations 

Committee 4; Sophomore Banquet 2; Orthodox Club 1, 2, 3, 

4, Secretary 2, 3, 4; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2. 

HENRY LEON SANGER 

P.O. Box 113. Hopkinton Road, Westboro, Massachusetts 

Landscape Architecture 

Dean's List 2. 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Alpha Zeta 4; Landscape 

Architecture Club 2, 3, 4. 

JANET SANTOS 

94 Commercial Street, Provincetown, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Dean's List 2; Honor's Colloquium 4; Newman Club 1, 2; 

Sailing Club 3; Critique 3. 

DIANE MARIE SAPORITO 

5 Bishops Lane, Lynnfield, Massachusetts 

Medical Technology 

House Counselor 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Medical Technology 

Club 2, 3. 



RONALD JOSEPH SCHLITZ ; 

12 Cherokee Street, Roxbury 20, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Zeta Nu 2, 3, 4, Athletic Chairman; Dean's List 1; Intramurals 

1, 2, 3, 4. 

BRUCE ALAN SCHIFF 

15 Stirling Street, Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Pre-Medical — Zoology 

Hillel Foundation 1, Pre-Medical Club 1; Russian Club 1, 200 

Club 4, WMUA 1, 2; Track 1; Mathematics Club 1, 2, 3. 

JOAN C. SCHOPPE 

Nashua Road, East Pepperell, Massachusetts 
English 

Literary Magazine 4; House Counselor 3, 4; House Officer 4, 
House Chairman, Sing Chairman 3; University Concert Asso- 
ciation 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Chorale 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; 
Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 2; Honors Work 4; 
Phi Kappa Phi 3. 4; Students for Civil Rights 3, 4; Student 
Christian Association 1, 2. 

JOHN R. SCHROEDER 
1767 Front Street, East Meadow, New York 
Physical Education 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1, 2, 3; Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 
3, 4; Lacrosse 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Physical Educa- 
tion Club 2, 3, 4; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4. 

ARTHUR SCHULTZ 

92 American Legion Highway, Dorchester 24, Massachusetts 
Industrial Engineering 
AIIE 3, 4; Outing Club 3. 

JOHN AINSWORTH SCOTT, JR. 

63 1 Western Avenue, Albany, New York 

English Transfer — Lafayette College; Dean's List 3, 4; Honors 

Work 4; Campus Chest Scholarship Award 4. 

ROBERT A. SCOTT 

South Main Street, Northfield, Massachusetts 

English 

Soccer 1. 

JERRILYN SEARLEMAN 
23 Lancashire Road, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Education 

Collegian 1; House Counselor 3, 4; Sigma Delta Tau 1, 2, 3, 
4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 4; Honors Work 
in Education 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, Membership Chair- 
man 2; Education Club 4; Exchange Student to the University 
of South Florida 3. 



MARILYN GAIL SARGENT 

105 East Street, North Attleboro, Massachusetts 
Physical Education 

Index 4; RSO 2; Dean's List 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; 
Basketball 3, 4; Canterbury Club; Education Club 4; Gymnas- 
tics Club 3; Outing Club 4; Physical Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
WAA 1, 2, 3, 4; WAA Dorm Representative 3; WAA Volley- 
ball Chairman 4. 

RICHARD ROLAND SAUVAGEAU 

37 Northend Avenue, Salem, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Transfer — Wentworth Institute; WMUA 4; Concert Band 1; 

Marching Band 1; Newman Club 2; Mathematics Club 3, 4; 

Outing Club 2, 3, 4; Square Dance Club 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 

3. 

RONALD B. SAWYER 

552 Summer Street, Brockton, Massachusetts 
History 

Yahoo 2, 3, 4; Alpha Phi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; Interdorm Bowl- 
ing 1; History Club 4; Sodom 2, 3, 4. 

DIANA SCANDIFFIO 

21 Cedar Hill Terrace, Swampscott, Massachusetts 

English 

Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4; Precisionettes 2. 

VINCENT MICHAEL SCARAMELLA 
Main Street, Barnstable, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

ASME 2, 3, 4; SAE 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Air Cadet Squad- 
ron 1, 2. 

ALAN LAURANCE SCHEINMAN 

13 Chancery Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Government 

Yahoo 1, 2, 3, 4, Business Manager 3, Associate Editor 4; 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4. 



JUDITH ANN SEDDON 
Edgewater Place, Winchester, Massachusetts 
Government 

Panhellenic Council 4; Pi Beta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Union 
Dance Committee 2, 3, 4; Naiads 2; Angel Flight 3, 4, Opera- 
tions Officer 3, 4. 

MARTHA B. SEIBEL 

53 Londonderry Road, Marblehead, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Pi Beta Phi 2, 3, 4; Student Union Dance Committee 2, 3, 4; 

Angel Flight 3, 4; Education Club 3, 4. 

RICHARD PAUL SEIDEN 
110 Siemers Lane, Westwood, New Jersey 
Government 

Class Executive Council 1, 2; Dean's List 2, 3; Young Demo- 
crats 4. 

FRANCIA C. SEIPEL 
Twin Falls Lane, Westport, Connecticut 
English 

Pi Beta Phi 1, 2; Operetta Guild 1, 2; University String Sym- 
phony 2; Newman Club 2; Ski Club 2. 

JAMES W. SEVER 

79 Fair Oaks Park, Needham, Massachusetts 

Government 

Wrestling 1; Intramurals 1, 3; Political Science Association 

4. 

HOWARD B. SHAPIRO 

22 Hatherly Road, Brighton, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Alpha Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, Treasurer 3, Vice 

President 3, President 4; Campus Chest Committee 1, 2; 

SWAP 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3; Accounting Association 3, 

4; Bridge Club 4; IFC 4. 



439 



EDWTN W. SH.\,\R, JR. 

58 1 Parkside Boulevard, Massapegua, Long Island, New York 

Chemistry — Pre-Medical 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1. 2, 3, 4. Pledge Trainer 2, 3; Phi Eta 

Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Council 1. 

PATRICIA -ANN SHAY 

151 Aspen Road. Swampscott, Massachusetts 

Fashion Merchandising 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4: Home Economics Club 3, 4; Ski 

Club 1. 

GEORGE PATRICK SHEA, JR. 

15 Colonial Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Accounting 

Dean's List 2. 3. 4: Beta Gamma Sigma 4: Swimming 1; 
Intramural Basketball 2, 3; Bay State Rifles 1. 

JOHN JAMES SHEEHAN 
91 ,\ldrich Street, Granby, Massachusetts 
Industrial Engineering 

Transfer — Louisiana Polytechnic Institute; Dean's List 3; New- 
man Club 4; AIEE 3. 4. Treasurer 4, Conference Committee 
4. 

ELIZABETH ANN SHELLEY 

21 Beckwith Avenue, Westfield, Massachusetts 

German 

Womens Interdorm Council 3; Pi Beta Phi 2, 3, 4; Winter 

Carnival Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2; German Club 4; 

Critique 3. 

CAROLE LOUISE SHERMAN 
North Street. Mattapoisett, Massachusetts 
Elementary Education 

Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2. 3. 4, Song Chairman 3, 4; Assistant 
House Manager 3: Student Christian Association 1, 2; Educa- 
tion Club 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 

STEVEN LYNN SHERMAN 

50 Pilgrim Road. Marblehead, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Concert Band 1, 3, 4; Marching Band 1, 2, 3, 4; ROTC Band 

1. 2; .A.SME 3. 4; Granville Air Society 3, 4; Military Ball 

Committee 3, 4. 

STEVEN MICHAEL SHOR 

1 2 Ransom Road, Brighton, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

Siema Alpha Mu 3, 4, Historian 4, Treasurer 4; ROTC Band 

1,^2; Honors Work 4; Tau Beta Pi 4; Golf Team 1; AICHE 2, 

3, 4; Chemical Engineering Club 2, 3, 4. 

MARILYN EDITH SHOREY 

1038 North Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

Education 

Transfer — Berkshire Community College; Newman Club 3, 4; 

Education Club 3. 

HARVEY SHULTZ 

33 Columbia Street. Brookline, Massachusetts 

Entomology 

House Council 3. 4; Dorm Athletic Director 1, 2, 3; Intramu- 

rals 1, 2. 3, 4; Fernald Club 3, 4; Dean's List 3, 4. 

JUDITH RUTH SHUMAN 

20 Kiernan Road, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Work 4; Hillel Foundation 3, 4; 

Psychology Club 2. 3, 4. 

JANET E. SILBERT 

16 Howley Avenue, Newton Center, Massachusetts 
Mar(:eling 

Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4; Campus Religious Council 3, 4, Secretary 3, 
Vice President 4; Marketing Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; Bridge 
Club 3, 4; Dean's List 4. 

MAAJA K. SILDOJA 

97 Berkeley Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

English 

Index 3, 4; Winter Carnival 3; Art Club 4. 

ARNOLD DAVID SILVERMAN 

31 Sun Valley Drive, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Pre-Dental 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Colloquium 1; Hillel Foundation 

I, 2, 3; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3; Zoology Club 1, 2. 

MATTHEW R. SINASKY 
24 Lourdes Road. Somerset, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

WMUA 3; Men's Inter-Dorm Council 4; House Council. Sec- 
retary 3: Dean's List 1. 2. 3. 4; Phi Eta Sigma 2; Eta Kappa 
Nu 3. 4; Tau Beta Pi 3. 4; Amateur Radio Association 2; 
IEEE 2, 3, 4; Engineering Council 4. 



LOUISE MARIE SIRONI 
22 Taber Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 
English 

SU Dance Committee 2; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Collo- 
quium 3; Honors Work 4; WAA Archery 3; Newman Club 1, 
2, 3, 4; Junior Affiliate of National Council of Teachers of 
English 4, President 4. 

CHARLES H. SISSON 

7 1 Washington Avenue, Needham, Massachusetts 
Chemistrv 

Zeta Nu'l, 2, 3, 4, Pledge Trainer 2, Rush Chairman 3, Vice 
President 4: Alpha Phi Omega 1; Cross-Country 1, 2, 3; Wres- 
tling 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2; Air Cadet Squadron 1; Flying Club 
1,2; Psychology Club 1; Varsity "M" Club 2, 3, 4; AFROTC 
Rifle Team 2. 

CAROLYN ANN SITKOWSKI 

340 School Street, Webster, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Psychology 

Club 2, 3, 4; Education Club 4. 

LOIS SKOLNICK 

136 Washington Road, Springfield, Massachusetts 

English 

Collegian 3. 4; Literary Magazine 4; House Counselor 3, 4, 

House Chairman 4; Scrolls 2; SWAP 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 

2, 3, 4. 

DAVID W. SLATE 

100 Ducharme Avenue, Willimansett, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Phi Mu Delta Fraternity 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 

2. 

JAMES TRUMAN SLEEPER 

1 14 Washington Street, South Groveland, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Dean's List 3; Newman Club 1. 

LINDA D. SMALL 
41 Water Street, Westboro, Massachusetts 
English 

Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant Secretary 2; Alumni Chairman 
4; Handbook 2; Precisionettes 2, 3; Angel Flight 3; Winter 
Carnival Committee 3; Winter Carnival Fashion Show 2; Can- 
terbury Club 1. 

MICHAEL MONTGOMERY SMILNAK, JR. 

243 Prospect Street, Binghamton, New York 

Pre-Dental 

Transfer — Broome Technical Community College; WMUA 4. 

BARBARA JUNE SMITH 
Gardner Street, Hamilton, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Index 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Student Christian As- 
sociation 1, 2, 3, 4. 



DAVID RUSSELL SMITH 

36 Monrovia Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2; Eta Kappa Nu 3, 4, Vice President 4; Tau 

Beta Pi 3, 4; IEEE 3, 4, Secretary 4; Dean's List 1, 2. 

DOROTHY JEAN SMITH 

229 Elm Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Christian Association 1, 2. 

ELEANOR GAIL SMITH 

32 Cherry Street, Westwood, Massachusetts 

English 

Modern Dance Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

LOIS BAKE SMITH 

West Whately, RED Haydenville, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Transfer — University of Vermont. 

JOSEPH M. SMITH 

12 Hickory Road, Sudbury, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Class Executive Committee 3, 4; Class Advisory Committee 4: 
Theta Chi Fraternity I, 2, 3, 4, Pledge Marshall 2, Vice 
President 4; Revelers 3; Maroon Key 2; SWAP 3, 4; Frater- 
nity Representative 3, Chairman 4; Winter Carnival Commit- 
tee 3; Queens Committee Chairman 3; Baseball 1, 3; Univer- 
sity I-xonomics Association 3, 4; IFC Sports 2, 3, 4; Who's 
Who in American Colleges & Universities. 



440 



WILLIAM EDWARD SMITH 

Brewer Hill Road, Mill River, Massachusetts 

PliYsicol Education 

Transfer — Berkshire Community College; Dean's List 3, 4; 

Newman Club 4; Physical Education Club 3, 4. 

RICHARD A. SOBLE 
22 Wessex Road, Newton, Massachusetts 
Government 

Transfer — Massachusetts Bay Community College; Area Judi- 
ciary 3, 4, Chief Justice 4; House Counselor 2, 3; Tau Epsilon 
Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Intramural Football 2, 3, 4; 
Intramural Baseball 2, 3, 4; Political Science Association 3; 
Pre-Medical Club 3; Flying Club 4. 

RICHARD J. SODERBOM 

153 Main Street, Bridgewater, Massachusetts 

Government 

Transfer — Berkshire Community College 



DENNIS CLAYTON STACKHOUSE 

47 Resevoir Drive, Danvers, Massachusetts 

English 

Yahoo 4; House Counselor 3, 4; Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, 3, 4, 

Scholarship Chairman 4; Marching Band 1; Dean's List 4; 

Winter Carnival Committee 3; Wesley Foundation 1, 2; Air 

Cadet Squadron 2; German Club 2; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2; 

Ski Club 1. 2, 4; Water Ski Club 2. 



JEFFREY N. STANGER 

99 South Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 



KATHLEEN E. STANIUNAS 

21 Gates Avenue, Hudson, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Intramurais 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1. 2, 3, 4; Education 

Club 3, 4; Mathematics Club 2; Women's Athletic Association 

1, 2. 3, 4. 



JAMES S. SOKOLOSKI 

242 Wells Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

Dean's List 1; Newman Club 1, 2; AIChE 2, 3, 4; Chemical 

Engineering Club 2, 3,4. 



LEO J. STANLAKE 

47 Charles Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Dean's List 2, 3; Senior Honors 4; Collegian 2, 3; Psychology 

2, 3, 4. 



JEAN ELIZABETH SOPER 

26 Plummer Avenue, Winthrop, Massachusetts 

Education 

Dean's List 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 2, 

3. 



RAE L, SOUSA 

425 Purchase Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

History 

International Weekend Committee 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 

History Club 3, 4; International Relations Club 1; Pre-Law 

Club 4. 



JOAN SOWA 

222 Hampden Street, Chicopee, Massachusetts 

English 

Kappa Alpha Theta 2, 3, 4; House Counselor 3; Dean's List 1; 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



GARY JOSEPH STEBBINS 

Glasgow Road, Blandford, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Newman Club 1; Pioneer Valley Folklore Society 1; Ski Club 

1. 



RAYMOND STANLEY STEC 

34 St. James Avenue, Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Concert Band 3, 4; Uniform Manager 3, 4; Marching Band 3, 

4, Uniform Manager 3, 4; Mathematics Club 2, 3, 4. 



DAWN ELIZABETH STEELE 

4 Conant Avenue, Gloucester, Massachusetts 

Government 

Transfer — The George Washington University; The College of 

St. Benedict: Student Union Publicity Committee 3; Dean's 

List 2, 3, 4; Pi Sigma Alpha, Political Science Honor Society 

3, 4; Research Assistant 4; Naiads 3, 4. 



STEPHEN JOSEPH SPANG 

15 Leewood Road, Wellesley, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Dean's List 3; Zoology Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 2, 

President 3. 



EDMUND JASON STEIGMAN 

252 Water Street, Quincy, Massachustees 

Pre-Dental 

House Counselor 2, 3, 4; Dining Commons Counselor 4; 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2; Hillel Foundation 1, 

2, 3, 4; Pre-Medical Club 2, 3, 4. 



VIRGINIA A. SPENCE 

30 Melrose Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Kappa Alpha Theta I, 2, 3, 4, Rush Chairman 4; Winter 

Carnival Committee 2, 3; Social Activities Committee 1, 2; 

Education Club 4; Exchange Student 3. 



EDWARD H. STERNOWSKI 

37 Welland Road, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts 

Marketing 

Marketing Club 3, 4; Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 

4; Newman Club 1, 2, 4; Interfraternity Sports 2, 3, 4. 



EVERETT ROYAL SPENCER, III 

462 Main Street, Hingham, Massachusetts 

Art 

Yahoo 2, 3, 4, Art Editor 2, 3, Associate Editor 4; Critique 3, 

4, Art Editor 3, 4; Art Club 1. 



JANICE ANNE STEVENS 

90 Spruce Street, North Attleboro, Massachusetts 

Fashion Merchandising 

Kappa Kappa Gamma I, 2, 3, 4, Registrar 4; Revelers 3; 

Campus Varieties 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Omicron Nu 

4; Cheerleader 2, 3, 4, Co-Captain 4. 



JOHN WILLIAM SPERRY 

54 Perkins Street, Gloucester, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Math Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Education Club 4; 

Dorm Section Representative 2. 



DENNIS FREDERICK SPINNER 
203 Irvington Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors 
Colloquium 2; Phi Eta Sigma 2; Newman Club 1, 2; Mathe- 
matics Club 4. 



NANCY LOUISE STACK 

Main Street, Leeds, Massachusetts 
American History 

Class Executive Council 3, 4; RSO Committee 3; House 
Chairman 3; Dorm Social Chairman 2; Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 
2, 3, 4, Scholarship Chairman 3, 2nd Vice President 4; Mortar 
Board 4, Historian; Scrolls 2, Secretary; Dean's List 1. 2, 3; 
Honors Colloquium 2. 3; Honors Work 2; SWAP 3; Winter 
Carnival Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2; Who's Who in 
American Colleges & Universities. 



JUDITH STEVENS 

443 Old Windsor Road, Dalton, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

University Concert Association 3, 4; Wesley Foundation 1, 2, 
3, 4, Supper Chairman 1, 2, Secretary 4; Membership Chair- 
man 3; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Chairman Student Nurse of 
the Year 3; District Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; State and Na- 
tional Nursing Clubs 2, 3. 

NANCY K. STEVENS 

80 Leonard Street, Seekonk, Massachusetts 

English 

Dorm Social Committee 2; Advisor to Social Committee 3; 

Sigma Kappa 1, 2, 3, 4, Activities Chairman 3, Scholarship 

Chairman 4; Fine Arts Council 3, 4, Secretary 3, Chairman of 

Fine Arts Festival 4; Dean's List 1,3. 

PETER H. STEVENS 

156 Alpine Drive, Amherst, Massachusetts 

English 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3. 4; Honors Work 4; Intramural Track 1; 

Outing Club 3, 4; Psychology Club 3; Scuba Club 2; Zoology 

Club 1. 



441 



DONNA STANFORD STEVENSON 

72 Dartmouth Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Dean's List 1, 2. 3; Edwjirds Fellowship 2, 3; Student Christian 

Association 3. 

M,\RY C. STEWART 

47 Linnet Street, West Roxbury 32, Massachusetts 
Marhemarics 

Class Executive Council 1: Sorority Lambda Delta Phi 2. 3. 4. 
Secretary 1964-1965: Dean's List' 1. 2. 3, 4: Honors Collo- 
quium 2; Alpha Lambda Delta 1: Phi Kappa Phi 3, 4. 

RICHARD HE1WOOD STEW.\RT 

86 S\camore Street. Holyoke, Massachusetts 

An 

Transfer — Holyoke Junior College: Chorale 3. 4, Manager 4, 

Assistant Manager 3. 

ROBERT MILLER STEWART 

448 Wheaton Road. Union, New Jersey 

Marhemarics 

Alpha Phi Omega 3, 4: Operetta Guild 2, 3, 4: Roisters Dois- 

ters 1, 2. 3, 4; Opera Workshop 2: Dean's List 2; Honors 

Colloquium 3, 4; Equestrian Club 3. 

CARLTON A. STIDSEN 
292 June Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Hisrory 

Flying Redmen 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant Commander 3. Com- 
mander 4: Air Cadet Squadron 1: History Club 2: Arnold Air 
Society 3, 4. Pledge Trainer 4: Military Ball Committee 3; 
Lutheran Club 1: Flying Club 2: Sport Parachute Club 2, 3, 4, 
Vice President 3: Distinguished AFROTC Cadet 4. 

SHERON L. STILLMAN 

991 Lancaster Avenue, Lunenburg, Massachusetts 
Physical Educarion 

Basketball. Tennis Softball 1, 2, 3. 4; Student Christian Asso- 
ciation 1. 2. 3. 4: Equestrian Club 3: Gymnastics Club 3, 4; 
Physical Education Club 2. 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 
I, 2, 3, 4, Board Member 3. 

TERRY LYNNE STOCK 

Box 93 Sunset Acres. Florence, South Carolina 

English — Journalism 

Collegian 3. 4, News Editor 4: Public Relations, Non-Senate 

Member 3; Gamma Sigma Sigma 1, 2, 3; Winter Carnival 

Committee. Publicity 3: Who's Who in American Colleges & 

Universities. 

DOROTHY VIRGINIA STOKLOSA 

2 Fourth Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Hisrory 

Class Secretary 4; Class Executive Council 2, 3; Winter Carni- 
val Committee 3: Social Activities Committee 1: Sigma Sigma 
Sigma 1. 2. 3, 4, Rush Chairman 2, President 3; Mortar Board 
4: Dean's List 1. 2, 3. 4; Distinguished Visitors Program 4; 
SWAP 3, 4. Secretary 4; Winter Carnival Committee 2; Cam- 
pus Religious Council 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Who's Who 
in American Colleges & Universities. 

JOHN A. STOLGITIS 

41 1 Lincoln Avenue. Amherst, Massachusetts 

Fisheries Biology 

Transfer — Worcester Junior College; Dean's List 4; Forestry 

Club 2. 3. 4; Recreation Club 2. 



ARTHUR FRANKLIN STURGIS 

74 Livingston Avenue. Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Electrical Engineering 

House Officer 3, Section Representative: Dean's List 1; Eta 
Kappa Nu 3, 4, "Bridge" Correspondent 4; IEEE 4, Refresh- 
ment Chairman; Bridge Club 3, 4. 

SANDRA L. SUDDATH 

120 Parker Road, Framingham, Massachusetts 

Spanish 

House Officer 4, Social Committee: Dean's List 2; Judson 

Fellowship 1, 2; Spanish Club I. 

CAROL A. SULLIVAN 

146 Whittemore Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Marhemarics 

Women's Interdorm Council 2; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; SWAP 

Executive Committee 2, 3; Women's Varsity Basketball 1, 3, 4; 

Education Club 4. 



DANIEL J. SULLIVAN 

1 1 Summer Street. Northampton, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Engineering Journal 2, 3, 4, Art Editor 2, Managing Editor 3, 

Executive Editor 4; Varsity Pistol Team 2, 3, 4, All American 

3, Captain 4; Society of Automotive Engineers 4; ASME 3, 4; 

Commuter's Club 1; Sport Parachute Club 4. 

DENNIS MICHAEL SULLIVAN 

40 Hill Street, Hopedale, Massachusetts 

Government 

Dean's List 1,3; Honors Work 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Political 

Science Association 3, 4; University Economics Association 4; 

Young Democrats 3, 4; Pre-Law Club 3, 4. 



JOANNE SULLIVAN 

57 Valley View Circle, Amherst, Massachusetts 
English 

Transfer — American International College; Engineering Jour- 
nal 4, Treasurer 4; Newman Club 4; Young Republicans 4; Ski 
Club 4. 

JOHN NEVILLE SULLIVAN 

74 Emerson Road, Needham, Massachusetts 

English 

Phi Mu Delta 1, 2, 3, 4, Rushing Chairman 2. Judiciary 3; 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Colloquium 1, 2; Newman Club 

1, 2, 3, 4, Newman Club Captain 2, 3. 



MARY ELIZABETH SULLIVAN 

78 Dwinell Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

SU Dance Committee 1; Class Executive Council 3; House 

Counselor 3; Sigma Kappa 1, 2. 3, 4, Rush Chairman 3, 

Pledge Trainer 4; Dorm Co-ordinator 2; Winter Carnival 

Committee 3; Naiads 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Psychology 

Club 1, 4: Women's Athletic Association 1, 2. 



ROBERT P. SULLIVAN 

7-C Hampshire Heights, Northampton, Massachusetts 

Marhemarics 

Dean's List 1, 4; Honors Colloquium I; AIChE 1, 2; Chemical 

Engineering Club 1, 2; Mathematics Club 3, 4. 



SARANNE SUSAN STONE 

4 Gushing Avenue, Brockton, Massachusetts 

Education 

Dormitory Treasurer 3. 4; Dean's List 1. 2, 3, 4; Newman 

Club I, 2, 3, 4. 

GERALD G. STREET 
65 Grove Street, Scituate, Massachusetts 
Business Administration 

Kappa Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4, Rush Chairman 2, Master of Ceremo- 
nies 3. Vice President 4; TV Club 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Baseball 
1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Athletics 1, 2, 3, 4; PA 2, 3, 4; Market- 
ing Club 2; AFA 1, 2, 3, 4. 

JOHN ALPHONSE STRIANO 

166 Lake Street, East Weymouth, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Lambda Chi Alpha 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 4; Campus Chest 3; 

Newman Club 1, 3, 4; Math Club 1, 2; Mass Merchandising 

Conference 3. 



CLIFFORD WHITTIER SUNDBERG 

67 Pond Street, Winchester, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Student Christian Association 1; University 

Economics Association 4. 



CAROLYN ANN SURMAN 
15 Beverly Hills Avenue, Beverly, Massachusetts 
French 

Lambda Delta Phi 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Collo- 
quium 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 3; Le Cercle Francais 1, 3, 4; 
French Corridor 3, 4. 

ANGELA M. SUTHERLAND 

196 Kenoza Avenue, Haverhill, Massachusetts 

English 

Kappa Alpha Theta 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Winter Carnival 

Committee 3; Index 3; Dean's List 2, 3. 



SALLY WHITON STROUT 

73 Winter Street, Hingham, Massachusetts 

English 

Women's Inter-dorm Council 2; Fine Arts Council 3; Operetta 

Guild 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Literary Society 2; National Council 

Teachers of English 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4. 



442 



BARRY NORMAN SUTHERLAND 

80 Bancroft Avenue, Reading, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Men's Judiciary 4; Class Executive Council 4; Winter Carnival 

Committee 3; Men's Sports, Swimming 1; Psychology Club 

4, 



MARCIA SUTHERLAND 

356 No. Warren Avenue, Brockton, Massachusetts 

English — Journalism 

Transfer — Westminster College; Collegian 3; Critique 3; Chi 

Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Personel 2, Chapter Correspondent 4. 

FREDERICK H. SWANSON 

88 Rolf Avenue, Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 

General Business and Economics 

Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Square Dance Club 1, 2, 3. 

GARY R. SWANSON 

87 Church Street, West Springfield, Massachusetts 

C.E. 

ASCE 1, 2, 3, 4. 

ELLEN S. SWARTZ 

Marblehead. Massachusetts 

Theatre 

Operetta Guild 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance Club 3; Riding Club 3; 

Gymnastics 4. 

PETER SWENSON 

394C North Hampton Avenue, Amherst, Massachusetts 
Management 

Management Club 64; Young Independents; Christian Associ- 
ation. 

WALTER JOSEPH SWIATEK, JR. 

34 Crotteau Street, Adams, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Newman Club 1; ASME 2, 4; Ski Team 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 1, 

2. 

HELEN ELIZABETH SYMONS 

9 High Street, Haydenville, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Outing Club 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Social Action Chairman 3; Students for Civil Rights 3, 4. 

DIANE TARRANT 

45 Lindsay Road, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Mathematics 

Index 2, 3; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Activities Chair- 
man 3, Pledge Trainer 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Stu- 
dent Christian Association 3; Women's Athletic Association 1, 
2,3,4. 

ARTHUR R. TAYLOR 

RED #1, Lyndonville, Vermont 

Electrical Engineering 

Transfer — General Electric Company's Engineering Apprentice 

Program; Engineering Journal 3, 4; Tau Beta Pi 4; Eta Kappa 

Nu 3, 4; IEEE 3, 4. 

DAVID GORDON TAYLOR 

32 Lealand Avenue, Agawam, Massachusetts 

Public Health 

Operetta Guild 1, 2, 3, 4; Opera Workshop 2; Dean's List 3, 4; 

Student Christian Association 1; Pre-Medical Club 3, 4. 



ALEXANDRA TEGUIS 

495 School Street, Webster, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

House Counselor 3; Operetta Guild 3, 4; Roister Doisters 3; 

Orthodox Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, 3, 4; International Club 

1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3; Psychology Club 3, 4; 

University Theatre 2, 3; Spanish Corridor 4; Psychology Club 

Open House Committee 3. 

GARY E. TENCZAR 

65 South Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 
Marketing 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Commuter's Club 1, 3, 4; Mar- 
keting Club 3, 4, Program Director 4. 

ROBERT L. TESSIER 

7 Chapman Avenue, 3-B, Easthampton, Massachusetts 
Hotel and Restaurant Management 

Transfer — Holyoke Junior College & Stockbridge School of 
Agriculture; Dean's List 3; University of Massachusetts; Stew- 
ards Club. 

WILLIS J. THAYER 

RED #1, Box 178, Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts 

Forestry 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 2, 3, 4, Officer 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 4; 

Alpha Zeta 3. 4; Forestry Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3. 

GEORGE STANLEY THOMAS 

65 Eastern Avenue, South Deerfield, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineer 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4, Program Committee 

Chairman 4; ASME 2, 3, 4, Vice President 3; Society of 

Automotive JEngineers 4. 

HAROLD RAND THOMPSON 

Simonds Road, Williamstown, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Engineering 

Dean's List 1, 3; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; ASME 2, 3, 4. 

RICHARD lOSEPH THOMPSON 

62 Reed Street, Agawam, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Dean's List 3; University Economics Association 2, 4. 

ERIC S. THULIN 

22 Pine Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 

Forestry 

Dean's List 2; Forestry Club 3. 

BARBARA GODEK THURBERG 

314N Mill Valley Road, Belchertown, Massachusetts 
Public Health Bacteriology 

Women's Inter-Dorm Council 2; House Counselor 3; Alpha 
Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary; United Na- 
tions Week Committee 2; Newman Club I, 2; Le Cercle Fran- 
cais 1; Medical Technology Club 3. 



JERENE TAYLOR 

91 Raymond Circle, Agawam, Massachusetts 

Home Economics 

Home Economics Club 1, 2, 4; Women's Athletic Association 

1, 3. 

KAREN W. TAYLOR 

144 Summer Street, North Dighton, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 3, 4; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 

3, 4; Education Club 3,4. 

PATRICIA ELLEN TAYLOR 

54 Kendric Road, Wakefield, Massachusetts 

Government 

Women's Service Organization 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; 

Women's Athletic Association 2. 

ROBERT W. TAYLOR, JR. 

11 Lakeview Gardens, Apt. 220, Natick, Massachusetts 

Economics 

House Officer 3, Vice President; Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Men's Sports 1, Track, Indoor and Outdoor; Newman Club 1, 

2; Management Club 3. 

SANDRA ANNE TAYLOR 
143 Mattison Avenue, Ambler, Pennsylvania 
Mathematics 

Transfer — Ursinus College; Johnson Social Activities Commit- 
tee 4; Omega Chi 2; Hockey 1, 2; Basketball 1, 2; Color 
Guard 2; Scuba Club 4. 



RUTH NORMA THURSTON 

141 Washington Street, Westwood, Massachusetts 

History 

Critique 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, Honors Colloquium 1, 2, 3; 

Women's Sports 1, Basketball; Student Christian Association 1, 

2; Outing Club 3, 4; Women's Athletic Association 1. 

LESLIE BURTON TITCOMB 

Box 203 Range Road, Franklin, New Hampshire 

English Literature 

Air Cadet Squadron 3, 4; Pioneer Valley Folklore Society 1, 2, 

3. 

PATRICIA LYSBETH TOBIN 

166 Union Street, Marshfield, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Transfer — International Christian University, Japan; Index 4; 

Dean's List 3; Honors Colloquium 2, 3, 4; International Club 

2,3. 

GERALDINE A. TOMASELLI 

35 Linwood Avenue, Methuen, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Pi Beta Phi 2, 3, 4; Newman Club I, 2; Education Club 3, 4, 

Secretary 4. 

PAUL TOOMEY 

41 Cary Avenue, Revere, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; American Society of Civil 

Engineers 2, 3, 4; Intramural Bowling 2, 3,4. 



443 



W.\LTER TORDOFF. Ill 

387 Weston Road. \\'ellesley, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Dean's List 1. 2, 3. 4; Honors Colloquium 1,2; Honors Work 

3. 4; Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2. Treasurer 2; Zoology Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Treasurer 3. President 4. 

DIANE M.AJUE TOVET 

Box 138, West Hyannisport. Massachusetts 

Geology 

Colleaian 1: Geolos\ Club 2. 3, 4. Secretary 3, 4; Outing Club 

3, 4. ^ 

WILLIAM FAYETTE TOWER, JR. 
51 Hampshire House, Amherst, Massachusetts 
B.S. Landscape Architecture 

Graduate of Stockbridge School of Agriculture, 1962; Land- 
scape Architecture Club 2, 3. 4. 

SUSAN F. TR.A.C\' 

10 A Milton Street, Dedham, Massachusetts 
Zoology 

Literary Magazine 3, 4, Associate Editor 4; Mortar Board 4; 
College Bowl Team 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Collo- 
quium 1, 2. 3: Pre-Medical Journal 3; Archery 1; Wesley 
Foundation 1. 2; Who's Who in American Colleges & Univer- 
sities. 

JUNE TRAIBMAN 

3 1 Young Avenue. Sw ampscott. Massachusetts 
Education 

University Theatre 2; Dean's List 2, 3: Winter Carnival Com- 
mittee 3; Hillel Foundation 1. 2; Education Club 3, 4, Pro- 
gram Director 4. 

ALICE .M.A.RJORIE TROMPKE 

300 Amherst Street, Granby, Massachusetts 

Music 

Transfer — Westfield State; Chorale 3, 4. 

NORMAN FREDERICK TRUMP 

30 Morton Street. West Springfield, Massachusetts 

English — Journalism 

Collegian 4; Caesura 4; Yahoo 1, 2; Sigma Alpha Mu 3, 4; 

Concert Band 1; Marching Band 1, 2; Pep Band 1; Sport 

Parachuting Club 1, 2, Vice President 2. 

FREDERICK E. TRUSSEL, JR. 

Needham. Massachusetts 

Government 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1. 2. 3, 4; Football 1; Newman Club 3, 4; 

Equestrian Club 1, 2, 3. 4; Barbell Club 3, 4; Political Science 

Association 4; Young Republicans 4. 

STEPHEN TURPACK 

East Street. U.\bridge, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

ALLAN R. TUUKANEN 

Prescott Street, Rutland, Massachusetts 

Geology 

Dean's List 3, 4; Sigma Gamma Epsilon 4; Judson Fellowship 

2, 3, 4; Geology Club 3; Spanish Club 2, 3, 4; Intervarsity 
Christian Fellowship 4. 

PAUL TWOHIG 

72 Turner Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

Alpha Phi Omega 3, 4, Historian 4; Dean's List 3; AICHE 2, 

3, 4; Chemical Engineering Club 2, 3, 4; Cross-Country 1. 

THEODORE UFLAND 

33 Wiltshire Road, Brighton, Massachusetts 

Sociology 

Marching Band 1, 2; ROTC Band 1. 2; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 

3; Sociology Club 4; Alpha Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Social 

Chairman 3, Pledge Master 4; Swimming Team 1. 

RUTH A. UZDAVINIS 
State Road, Whately, Massachusetts 
Education 

Transfer — Westfield State College; Education Club 3, 4; New- 
man Club 4; Young Democrats Club 4; Commuter's Club 2, 
3; Dean's List 2, 3. 

FRED E. VALERIO, JR. 

72 Chestnut Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

Spanish 

House Counselor 4; Dining Hall Counselor 4; Phi Mu Delta I, 

2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Club 4; Italian 

Club I, 2. 3, 4; Spanish Club I, 2. 3, 4; American Association 

Teachers of Spanish & Portuguese 4. 



ALGIRD JOHN VALIUNAS 

1 10 Lincoln Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Forest Management 

Alpha Zeta 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Forestry Club 3, 4. 

LAWRENCE LEVIE VANDIFORD 

81 Ingleside Avenue, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Newman Club 1; Astronomy Club 1; Air Cadet Squadron 2; 

Arnold Air Society 3, 4; Counselor 4. 



DAVID B. VAN HORNE 

Huntington Road, Worthington, Massachusetts 

Marketing 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, 3, 4: Ski Club 1, 2; Marketing Club 

Treasurer 4. 

PETER ARTHUR VARIN 

8 Thenius Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Chemical Engineering 

House Counselor 3; Lambda Chi Alpha 2, 3, 4; Athletic 

Chairman 3; Dean's List 1; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; AICHE 2, 

3, 4; Engineering Council 3; Sigma Delta Psi 4. 

ROBERT A. VECCHIARELLI 

8 Mereline Avenue, East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Newman Club 1, 2; ALLE 3, 4. 



RICHARD ANGELO VENDITTI 

68 Fourth Street, Medford, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

House Counselor 4; Math Club 3, 4; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2; 

Newman Club 4; House Council 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 

3,4. 

PATRICIA ANN VERNELL 
West Pelham Road, Shutesbury, Massachusetts 
Government 

Class Executive Council 4; Student Union Program Council 3, 
4; Student Union Dance Committee 2, 3, 4, Chairman 4, 
Student Union Publicity Committee 3, 4; Pi Beta Phi, Special 
Events Chairman 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Angel 
Flight 3, 4; Judson Fellowship 2; Political Science Association 
3, 4; History Club 2; Commuter's Club 1; WAA 2; Homecom- 
ing Committee 3, 4. 

CAROL ANN VIENS 

31 Ferrante Avenue, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Index 4; House Officer 4, Marshall; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 

2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2; Education Club 3, 4; French Club 

1. 



JANET M. VLACH 

647 Main Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Commuter's Club 1, 2, 3, President 1, Social Chairman 2; 

Modern Dance Club 2; Education Club 3, 4. 



CAROL VON EGGERS 

5 Wild Rose Drive, Andover, Massachusetts 

Government 

Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Recording Secretary 4; Student 

Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation 1; Political 

Science Association 4; Ski Club 2; Young Democrats 4; Sailing 

Club 3. 

PAUL ALAN WACKS 

95 Memorial Park Avenue, Lynn, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

AICHE 1, 2; Math Club 3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4. 

BRUCE ALLEN WALL 

125 Gerry Road, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

History 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Zionist Association 2, 3, 

4, President 4. 

LINDA JOYCE WALL 

98 Bullard Street, Holden, Massachusetts 
English 

Index 2, 3; Kappa Kappa Gamma I, 2, 3, 4, Assistant Regis- 
trar 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Lambda Delta I, 2; 
Newman Club 1, 2; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3. 



GEORGE MATIHEW WALLER 

25 Leahy Avenue. South Hadlcy, Massachusetts 

Elementary IuIik iiliiin 

Baseball 1; Education Club 3, 4, President 4. 



444 



HOWARD PRENTISS WALLER 

25 Leahy Avenue, South Hadley, Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Dean's List 1; Mathematics Club 4. 

ANN L. WALSH 

2 Crescent Street, Natick. Massachusetts 

Mathematics 

Dance Committee 2; Education Club 3, 4; Math Club 4; 

Dean's List 2; Pi Beta Phi 2, 3, 4, Scholarship Chairman 4. , 



JUNE MARY WALSH 

1 2 Central Street, Methuen, Massachusetts 

English 

Chi Omega 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 3, 4; 

Association. 



Women's Athletic 



MARILYN ANN WARD 

85 Faneuil Street, Brighton, Massachusetts 

Marketing 

Social Activities Committee 3; Kappa Kappa Gamma 1, 2, 3, 
4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Marketing Club 4; Women's Athletic 
Association 1,2, 3, 4. 

MARJORIE ANN WARD 

76 Clark Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

English ' \ 

AXO 1, 2, 3, 4, Publicity & Editor 3; Dean's List 2, 3; Winter 

Carnival Committee 3; Education Club 4; Angel Flight Girl's 

Association w/ Arnold Air 4; Women's Athletic Association 1, 

2. 

JOHN R. WARNER 

110 Elm wood Street, Auburn, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

ASCE 1, 2, 3, 4; Flying Club 4. 

DONALD EVERETT WARREN 

67 Stone Path Lane, West Springfield, Massachusetts 
Mechanical Engineering 

Transfer — West Virginia Wesleyan College; Men's Judiciary 2, 
3, 4, Area II Judiciary, Chief Justice 3, 4; House Counselor 3, 
4; Theta Chi 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 3; Student Union Dance 
Committee 4; Intramurals 2; ASME 2, 3, 4; Society of Auto- 
motive Engineers 4. 

DANIEL H. WASSERMAN 

24 Hansborough Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

General Business and Finance 

Dean's List 3; Hillel Foundation 2, 3; Business Administration 

Club 2, 3; Finance Club 3, 4; Management Club 3. 

STEPHEN R. WASSERSUG 

102 Chesterfield Street, Hyde Park, Massachusetts 

Public Health 

Yahoo Advertising Staff 2; Alpha Epsilon Pi, Social Chairman 

3, 4, House Manager 2; Campus Chest Committee 1; Bay 

State Rifles 1, 2; Hillel Foundation 1, 2; Public Health Club, 

Corresponding Secretary; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2; Fernandez 

Scholarship 4; Massachusetts Award of Sanitarians 4. 

EARL ALAN WATERMAN 

Swiftwater Road, Woodsville, New Hampshire 

Business Accounting 

Operetta Guild 1 ; Edwards Foundation 1 ; Judson Fellowship 

2, 3. 4; Accounting Association 4; Square Dance Club 1, 2, 3, 

4. 

RITCHIE PAULA WEINBERG 

415 Barnard Avenue, Cedarhurst, Long Island, New York 

Fashion Merchandising 

Class Secretary 1; Class Executive Council 1, 2; Sigma Delta 

Tau 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman Leadership Workshop 2, Social 

Chairman 3; Fine Arts Council 3; Dean's List 3; Volleyball 2, 

3; Bowling 2, 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics 

Club 3, 4, Publicity Chairman 3. 

THEODORE JAY WEINBERG 

85 Knollwood Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Accounting 

Collegian 2, 3, 4, Ad. Manager 3, Business Manager 4; Index 

2, 4, Greek Editor 4; Literary Magazine 3, Business Manager 

3; Senate Finance Committee 3, 4; Class Executive Council 4, 

Advisory Board 4; Alpha Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Historian 3; 

SWAP 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 

2; Who's Who in American Colleges & Universities. 

ALFREDA BERNICE WEINBRECHT 

155 Hesper Street, Saugus, Massachusetts 

English 

Concert Band 1, Secretary 1; Marching Band 1, 2, Secretary 2; 

Chorale 2; Flute Quartet 2, 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Alpha 

Lambda Delta 2; Wesley Foundation 1, UMass Representative 



RICHARD L. WEINER 

149 Chiswick Road, Boston 35, Massachusetts 

Pre-Medical 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Honors Colloquium 3; Honors Work 4; 

Phi Eta Sigma 2; Hillel Foundation 1; Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 

3,4. 



EMILY PHYLLIS WEINSTEIN 
175 WoodclifT Road, Newton Highlands, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Dean's List 3; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Stu- 
dent Zionist Association 1, 2, 3; University Economics Associ- 
ation 2, 3. 



DENISE WELCH 

168 RhineclifF Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's 

Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4. 



LOUISE B. WELLS 

River Road, South Deerfield, Massachusetts 

Animal Science 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 1; Marching Band 1, 2; Dean's List 4, 5; 

An Hus Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 5; Commuter's Club 1, 2. 



LINDA VANDER WERE 

49 Alton Place, Brookline, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 4; Distinguished 

Visitors Program 1, 2; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Student 

Christian Assocfation 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2; Nursing Club 1, 

2, 3, 4, SNAM, District and National 1, 2; Ski Club I, 2; 

Young Republicans 2, 3. 



JAMES ALEC WESOLOSKI 

298 Chapman Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Civil Engineering 

House Treasurer 4; Dean's List 2, 3; SWAP 4; Newman Club 

1; ASCE 2, 3, 4; Civil Engineering Club 2, 3, 4. 



KATHLEEN CREELAN WESSMAN 
45 Magnolia Terrace, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Education 

Transfer — Marietta College; Class Executive Council 4; House 
Counselor 3, 4; Pi Beta Phi 3, 4; University Concert Associa- 
tion 3, 4, Publicity Chairman 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 3; SWAP 4; 
Education Club 4; Equestrian Club 3. 



IRMA L. WHEELER 

250 Campbell Avenue, Revere, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Index 2; Class Executive Council 2; Alpha Chi Omega 1, 2, 3 

4, Editor 4; Dean's List 3, 4; Winter Carnival Committee 3 

Naiads 1, 2; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3; Education Club 3, 4 

Modern Dance Club 1. 



JOYCE E. WHIPPLE 

9331 White Avenue, Brentwood, Missouri 

Nursiitg 

Executive Council 2; House Counselor 3, 4; Scrolls 2; Nursing 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Student Christian Association 1, 
2; Winter Carnival Committee 3. 



BARRY M. WHITCOMB 

Box 82 RED Rt. #20, Charlton, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Dean's List 2; Newman Club 2; Barbell Club, President 1; 

N.E. Weightlifting Champion 1964; Physical Education Club 

3. 



CONSTANCE HARRINGTON WHITE 

Silver Street, North Wilbraham, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Women's Sports 2, Gymnastics; Precisionettes 2; Student 

Christian Association 1; Education Club 2, 3, 4. 



JANET A. WHITE 

70 Bouchard Avenue, Dracut, Massachusetts 
English 

Who's Who in American Colleges & Universities; Class Execu- 
tive Council 2, 3; House Counselor 3, 4; Chairman of Chair- 
men 4; House First Vice President 4; Lambda Delta Phi 2, 3, 
4; Mortar Board 4, Vice President; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Honors Work 4; Phi Kappa Phi 3, 4; Alpha Lambda Delta 
2. 



445 



MARY JANE WHITE 

1077 South Street. Dalton. Massachusetts 
Education 

Who's Who in American Colleges & Universities; Class Execu- 
tive Council 2. ?, 4: Alpha Chi Omega 1. 2, 3. 4, Assistant 
Rush Chairman 2. Activities Chairman 3; Revelers 4; Scrolls 
2: Winter Carnival Committee. Weekend Co-Chairman 3; 
Softball 2. 3: Cheerleader 3, 4; Newman Club 2. 3; Education 
Club 3. 4. 



ROBERT JOSEPH WHITE 

2070 Main Street. Athol. Massachusetts 

English 

Index 4: Literary Magazine 2. 3; Yahoo 2: Social Activities 

Committee 2. 3: Sigma Alpha Epsilon 2. 3. 4; Homecoming 

Committee 3: International Weekend Committee 3; Winter 

Carnival Committee 3, 4; Wrestling 1: Track 3, 4; Lacrosse 2: 

Newman Club 2. 3. 4; Animal Husbandr\ Club 3; Astronomy 

Club 2: Education Club 4; Equestrian Club 3. 4; Fencing Club 

2: Modern Dance Club 3. 4: Pre-Mediccil Club 1; Recreation 

Club 2. 3. 4: Water Ski Club 2. 3: Zoology Club 1. 

ROGER WILLIAM WHITE 

Hazel Street. Uxbridge, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Student Christian Association 1, 2; Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; 

Zoolosy Club 3. 4. 



DELOS R. WHITMAN 

Potter Mt. Road. Hancock, Massachusetts 

Animal Science 

Men's Sports 1. 2, 3. 4. Soccer; Varsity "M" Club 2. 

RONALD F. WIBERG 
41 Bo>d Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Economics 

Theta Chi Fraternity 1. 2. 3, 4; Interfraternity Council 2, 3, 4; 
Administrative Vice President 4; SWAP 4; Pre-Medical Club 
2; Universitv Economics Association 4: Winter Carnival Com- 
mittee 3; Ski Club 2, 3. 4. 



LINDA J. WILLIS 

7 Delmore Circle. Wilbraham. Massachusetts 
Elemenuiry Eiliication 

Class Executive Council 4; Alpha Chi Omega 1. 2. 3, 4, Song 
Chairman 2. Scholarship Chairman 4; Chorale 1. 4; Musigals 
3. 4; Dean's List 2, 3: Winter Carnival Committee 3; Student 
Christian Association 1; Education Club 3, 4; Yoimg Republi- 
cans 2. 



RICHARD EDMUND WILSON 

293 Leonard Street. Agawam, Massachusetts 

Food Technology 

Zeta Nu 1; Lacrosse 3; Newman Club 2; Food Technology 

Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; Pre-Medical Club 2; Pre-Veterinary 

Club 2. 



RICHARD ALBIN WINDYKA 

1 1 Otis Avenue. Ware, Massachusetts 

Electrical Engineering 

Phi Mu Delta 1. 2, 3, 4; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors 

Colloquium 1; Eta Kappa Nu 3. 4; Tau Beta Pi 3, 4; Newman 

Club 1; AIEE-IRE 4. 



NANCY J. WINER 

292 Russell Street. Peabody. Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

House Counselor 4: Hillel Foundation I, 2, 

Education Club 3, 4; Angel Flight 3, 4. 



3; Art Club 4; 



PETER C. WISNIOWSKI 

58 North Summer Street. Adams, Massachusetts 

Marketing 

Newman Club 1, 2; Marketing Club 4. 



KENNETH JAMES WITEK 

6 Exchange Street, Westfield, Massachusetts 

Mechanical Em^inecring 

Dean's List 3; ASME 2, 3, 4; SAE 4. 



KAREN E. WIGGIN 

Box 6. Pattenburg. New Jersey 

Nursing 

House Counselor 3; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3. 4; SNAM 2, 3; 

NLSN 2. 3. 



JANET ANN WIGGINS 

1 1 Fletcher Road. Bedford, Massachusetts 

U. S. History 

Dean's List 3; Education Club 3, 4; History Club 3, 4. 



LINDA WILES 

405 Pleasant Street. Leominster, Massachusetts 
Medical Technology 

Women's Sports, Basketball, Bowling 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Chris- 
tian Association 1, 2, 3; Home Economics Club 1, 2; WAA 1, 
2, 3. 4; Medical Technical Club 3, 4. 



LAWRENCE JACOB WILKER 

81 Arlington Street, Newton, Massachusetts 

Economics 

Roister Doister 1, 2, 3, 4; Campus Varieties 2; Military Ball 

Committee 3, 4, Assistant Chairman 4; Air Cadet Squadron 2, 

Treasurer 2; University TTieatre 2, 3, 4, Business Manager 3, 

4. 



WILLIAM H. WILKINSON 
8 Fidelis Way, Brighton, Massachusetts 
Pre-Medical 

Student Senate 4; Class Executive Council 3, 4; House Coun- 
selor 3, 4; Gryphon 4; Alpha Phi Omega I, 2, 3, 4; Adelphia 
4, Treasurer 4; Maroon Key 2, President 2; Dean's List 2, 3; 
Campus Chest Committee 3; SWAP 4; Winter Carnival Com- 
mittee 3; Bay State Rifles I; Judson Fellowship 1, 2. 3, 4, 
President 3; Student Christian Association I, 2, 3, 4. Treasurer 
3; International Club 2; Pre-Medical Club 2. 3, 4. Vice Presi- 
dent 3; Who's Who in American Colleges & Universities. 



ANN M. WILLIAMS 

33 Hobomack Road, Weymouth, Massachusetts 
Malhemalics 

Class Treasurer 2, 3, 4; Cla.ss Executive Council 2, 3, 4; Alpha 
Chi Omega I, 2, 3, 4, Rush Chairman 3, Vice President 4; 
Mortar Board 4, President; Revelers 3; Scrolls 2; Dean's List 
1, 2, 4; Student Centennial Committee 2; SWAP 2, 3, 4. 
Activities Committee Chairman 3; Winter Carnival Committee 
3; Women's Athletic Association 1, 2; Who's Who in Ameri- 
can Colleges & Universities. 



PETER C. WITHERELL 

53 Crown Street, Westfield, Massachusetts 

Entomology 

Beta Gamma Sigma 2, 3. 4, Scribe 3, Chronicler and Speaker 

Committee Chairman 4; SWAP 1; Fernald Entomological 

Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3; Jazz Workshop 2. 



PAULA ARLENE WITOVSKY 

267 Corey Road, Brookline, Massachusetts 

Medical Technology 

Class Executive Council 2, 3, Historian; Sigma Delta Tau 1, 2, 

3, 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4; Student 

Centennial Committee. 



DANIEL EDWIN WIVAGG 

15 Ferncroft Road, Shrewsbury, Massachusetts 

Zoology 

Dean's List 3; Debating Society 2; Zoology Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



JUDITH GAIL WOLCOTT 

107 Clairmont Avenue, Chicopee, Massachusetts 

Physical Education 

Dean's List 2, 3; Softball, Basketball, Lacrosse 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Naiads 1, 2, 3, 4, Publicity Chairman 3, President 4; Student 

Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation 1, 2; 

Physical Education Club 2, 3; Women's Athletic Association I, 

2, 3,4. 



HAROLD C. WOLFE, III 

96 Wheeler Street, Ciloucester, Massachusetts 

Fisheries Biology 

QTV 1, 2, 3, 4, Pledgemaster 3. Steward 4; IFC Lacross 3, 

Football 3, 4; Military Ball Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2; 

Air Cadet Squadron 1, 2; Flying Club I, 2; Granville Air 

Society 3. 



GORDON C. WOLFRAM 

27 Eastern Avenue, South Deerneld, Massachusetts 
ludnstrial Engineering 

Transfer — Franklin Institute of Boston; Orthodox Club 2, 4; 
AIIH 2, 3, 4, .Secretary 3, 4. 



STEVEN ALAN WOLOISKY 
1326 Blue Hill Avenue, Mattapan, Massachusetts 
Transfer — Boston Latin School; Phi Mu Delta 
Pledgemaster 3; Dean's List 3; Bay Slate '^ifl'-^ 
Foundation 1, 2. 



Rifles 



2, 
2; 



3. 4, 
Hillel 



446 



JANET A. WOOD 

3 Buzzell Street, St. Johnsbury, Vermont 

Elementary Education 

Lambda Delta Phi 1. 2. 3, 4, Activities Chairman 3, Parha- 

mentarian 4; Christian Association 1, 2; Women's Athletic 

Association 2. 3; Women's Athletic Board 3; Winter Carnival 

Committee 3; Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 2. 

LINDA FRANCES WOOD 

Riverdale Street, Northbridge, Massachusetts 

N iirsini; 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 2, 3, 4; Operetta Guild 2, 3; Student. 

Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 

NSNA 1,2. 

RAYMOND A. WOODIS 

Rufus Putnam Road, North Brookfield, Massachusetts 

Animal Science 

Collegian 3; Dean's List 3; Alpha Zeta 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 

2; Animal Husbandry Club 2, 3, 4; 4-H Club 1. 2, 3, 4, 

Treasurer 2; Square Dance Club 1, 2; University Judgmg 

Teams 4. 

WAYNE C. WOOLEY 

333 North Main Street, Natick, Massachusetts 

History 

Student Senate 1, 2; Budgets Committee 1, Finance Committee 

2; House Counselor 3, 4; Gryphon 3, 4; History Honors Work 

2; UMITIE 3; Mihtary Ball Committee 3; Flying Redmen 1, 2, 

3, Assistant Comm. 3; AFROTC 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian 

Association 1, 2; Wesley Foundation 1, 2; Air Cadet Squadron 

1, 2; WMUA 1,2. 

MONA GAY WRIGHT 

197 Ledge Road, Seekonk, Massachusetts 

English 

TERESA ANN WRIGHT 

1 Lexington Street, South Hadley, Massachusetts 

Elementary Education 

Student Union Dance Committee 2; Pi Beta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Recording Secretary 4; Dean's List 2, 3; Education Club 3, 4; 

Education Exchange Student to New Mexico 3. 

SUSAN ELLEN YOKEL 

3 1 Oxford Road, Rockville Centre, New York 

Elementary Education — Minor: Sociology 

Social Activities Committee 1; Dean's List 1, 2, 3; Hillel 

Foundation 1, 2; Debating Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4. 

GEORGENA G. YOUNG 

156 Lansdowne Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 

Speech Therapy 

Dorm Treasurer 2; House Counselor 3; House Chairman 4; 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 1; Operetta Guild 3, 4. 



PAUL J. ZAFF 

47 Winthrop Road, Brookline, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Dean's List 3; Northhampton "Volunteers 3, 4, Co-ordinator 4; 

Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 4; Psychology Club 2, 3. 4, President 

4. 



BARBARA JANE ZALESKI 

21 Garvey Drive, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 2, 3, 4, Membership Chairman 4 

Revelers 3; Dean's List 2; Winter Carnival Committee 3 

Newman Club 1, 2; Nursing Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4 

Women's Athletic Association 2, 3; Special Events Committee 

of Student Union 2, 3. 



JOHN ZDANOWICZ 

6 Ray Street, Danvers, Massachusetts 

Englisli 

Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Maroon Key 2, Secretary 2; Dean's List 

3; Winter Carnival Committee 3; Men's Sports 1, 2, Lacrosse, 

IFC Football, Basketball; Equestrian Club 4; Senior Week 

Committee 4. 

JUDITH SANDRA ZENIS 
18 Allen Road, Swampscott, Massachusetts 
. English 
Class Executive Council 2, 3; Student Union Program Council, 
Special Events Committee 1; Panhellenic Council, Rush 
Chairman 3, President 4; Sigma Delta Tau 1, 2, 3, 4, Panhel- 
lenic Representative 3, 4; Revelers 3; Scrolls 2; Dean's List 3; 
SWAP, Executive Board 4; Who's Who in American Colleges 
& Universities. 



CELIA PHYLLIS ZIEMAK 

79 Asci Drive, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

History 

House Counselor 4; SWAP 4; Newman Club 1, 2. 4; WAA 

1. 



STUART M. ZOLA 

95 Wellington Hill Street, Mattapan 26, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

Executive Council 1; Homecoming Committee 1; University 

Open House Committee 1; Winter Carnival Committee 1, 2; 

Hillel Foundation 1, 4; Pre-Medical Club 1; Psychology Club 

3, 4; Area Judiciary 4; North Hamp. Volunteer 4. 

WILLIAM ERNEST ZOTTOLI 

423 Lincoln Apts., Amherst, Massachusetts 
Business Administration 
Transfer — Clark University. 



WILLIAM P. YOUNG 

68 Yale Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Public Health 

QTV Fraternity 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Senate 2, 3; Class Execu- 
tive Council 1, 2; RSO Committee 2; Winter Carnival Com- 
mittee 3; Cross Country 1, 2; Track 1, 2; Newman Club 1; 
Public Health Club 4, Treasurer 4; IFC Sports 2, 3, 4; Senate 
Men's Affairs Committee 2, 3; Student Union Games and 
Tournament Committee 3. 



ROBERT ELLIOT ZUCKERMAN 
60 Gamwell Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Math 

Collegian 1; Student Senate Activities Committee 3; Class Ex- 
ecutive Council 4; Men's Interdorm Council 3, 4; Phi Mu 
Delta 2, 3, 4, Editor 3; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors Collo- 
quium 2, 3; Phi Eta Sigma 1, 2, 3, 4; SWAP 4; Hillel Founda- 
tion 1, 3; Mathematics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Young Democrats 2. 



447 



INDEX 



Adelphia 208 

Alpha Chi Omega 132 

Alpha Epsilon Pi 133 

Alpha Tau Gamma 134 

Alpha Lambda Delta 314 

Alumni Field 262 

Angel Flight 70 

A.P.0 34 

Art Department 294 

Basketball 226 

Baseball 266 

Beta Kappa Phi 134 

Caesura 198 

Campus Religious Council 42 

Cheerleaders 98 

Chen. School of Business 298 

Chi Omega 132 

Ci\il Right's Conference 78 

Clancy Brothers 32 

Collegian 190 

Computer Science 297 

Concert Band 67 

Critique 199 

Deminoff, William 285 

Dean William Barnard 289 

Dean William Burkhert 289 

Dean Helen Curtis 287 

Dean William Field 286 

Dean Isabell Gonon 287 

Dean Robert Hopkins 289 

Department of Environmental Science 292 

Distinguished Visitors Program 68 

Eta Kappa Nu 314 

Fall Military Review 40 

Finals 82 

Fine Arts Festival 214 

Football 86 

Forensic Society 64 

Four Freshmen 24 

Freshmen Class Officers 53 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 71 

Globetrotters 44 

Golf 270 

Goodell Library 308 

Gymnastics 247 

Harper, Robert 296 

Hillel 50 

Hockey 236 

Homecoming 28 

Honors Colloquia 319 

IBM 290 

Index 194 

Indoor Track 240 

Intermurals 254 

Iota Gamma Upsilon 135 

Kappa Alpha Theta 135 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 138 

Kappa Sigma 136 

Kim, Richard 312 

Lacrosse 268 

Lambda Chi Alpha 1 36 

Umbda Delta Phi 138 

Legislature 274 

Marching Band 98 

Maroon Keys 23 



McCartney, Robert ' 284 

Medical Technology 304 

Melly, Daniel 285 

Men's Judiciary 72 

Men's Physical Education 300 

Morrissey, Robert 282 

Motar Board 212 

Newman Club 48 

Omicron Nu 316 

Operetta Guild 201 

Parachute Club 260 

Peace Walk For Viet Nam 76 

Phi Beta Kappa 320 

Phi Eta Sigma 314 

Phi Kappa Phi 318 

Phi Mu Delta 137 

Phi Sigma Delta 137 

Phi Sigma Kappa 139 

Pi Beta Phi 141 

Pistol Team 252 

Precisionettes 98 

Protestant Christian Council 52 

Provost Tippo 283 

Psychiatric Nursing 305 

Q.T.V 139 

Registration 178 

Revelers 36 

Rifle Team 253 

Roister Doisters 204 

Scrolls 22 

Senate 60 

Senior Class Officers 324 

Senior Executive Council 324 

Sigma Alpha Mu 140 

Sigma Delta Tau 141 

Sigma Gamma Epsilon 317 

Sigma Kappa 144 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 140 

Sigma Sigma Sigma 144 

Snack Bar 80 

Soccer 100 

Santer, Lyn 

Spring Track 270 

S.W.A.P 26 

Swimming 244 

Tangerine Bowl 54 

Tau Beta Phi 314 

Tau Epsilon Phi 142 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 142 

Tennis 270 

Theta Chi 143 

Uganda Project 306 

University Press 310 

University Symphony 66 

University Theater 206 

Who's Who 326 

Winter Carnival 180 

WMUA 56 

Women's Judiciary 73 

Women's Physical Education .302 

Wrestling 250 

Xi Sigma Pi 316 

Yahoo 200 

Zeta Nu 143 



448 



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