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Full text of "Index"

1984 



* UMASS/AMHERST * 



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Diversity • Variety • Difference • Perhaps tlie 
existence of four distinct seasons engenders sucli 
diversity. Circumstances cliange so rapidly titat 
people learn to accept, and indeed embrace, 
individuality as a matter of course. 





People, people everywhere! Finding 
friends to help share the college 
experience was never difficult Whether it was 
organizations to join, performances to watch, 
or parties to attend, there was always 
'something to do. 

Solitude, however, was equally as important 
Time to reflect on the past, ponder the future, 
or best of all, relish the present 





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Those wonderful, ever-fleeting hours 
spent just ^'hanging out" Was this 
important, we aslied ourselves? Most 
definitely! New activities were 
explored, friendships were created, 
and those ever-present academic 
pressures were temporarily forgotten. 



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Nightlife, UMass-style, It was no 
mistalie tliat a 1982 New York Times 
survey gave tlie area's social scene a 
five-star rating! From ^^Slime Ouf 
and tlie ^^Dralie" (come on, fellas- 
"Brad's Grapevine"?) to ''Delano's 
and ''Plumbley's" (Can you play 
quarters in ''Judie's'% the Amherst 
bar scene can please almost anyone. 
Then there's always Northampton . . 



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CONTENTS 




Living Areas 


16 


News 


56 


Fine Arts 


88 


Organizations 


112 


Academics 


144 


Sports 


152 


Seniors 


212 



15 



LIVING 



With five campus living areas, a Greeli 
system, and various off-campus options, 
tlMass students can be accommodated 
for tlieir diverse lifestyles. 




16 



SOUTHWEST 



More than 5,500 students are 
housed in the cosmopolitan area 
known as Southwest. Southwest is 
the heart and soul of the UMass 
community. Known for its exciting 
social life, Southwest has its own 
identity with five towers and eleven 
low-rises. The area features its own 
residential college, allowing stu- 
dents to take classes in the comfort 
of their dormitory. After a meal in 
the dining commons, one of the 
best ways to relax is to sprawl out 
on the pyramids and watch people 

stroll by. 

Brian Murphy 





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19 



Southwest 





21 



It's tough to meet people behind 
closed doors, and Sylvan's open 
door policy reveals much about its 
residents. With its unique style of 
suite living arrangements, Sylvan 
may be more visible called home: 
the carpeted lounge area is trans- 
formed into a living room, 
equipped with television set and 
stack of empties; a bathroom is 
conveniently located just a few feet 
away. Suites themselves assume a 
character reflective of their occu- 
pants. Sylvan lends itself to be the 
creative expression of its residents. 





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Central Residential Area is 
made up of 10 traditionally-styled 
dorms, half of which are situated 
atop "the hill" (mountain?). The 
climb to "home" is one that not 
only keeps you in shape, but often 
convinces you that there are plenty 
of alternatives to trekking back and 
forth to classes, the D.C., or the 
library. In the winter, these alterna- 
tives include snow wars with other 
residential areas, traying down the 
Baker Hill (of course, you have to 
get down to the D.C. for a tray 
first), and surviving the UMass 
idea of snow removal and sanding. 
With the spring thaw comes the 
flowering of the orchard, most of- 
ten accompanied by parties and 
sunbathing on the fill between Van 
Meter and Orchard Hill. Best of all 
is the Orchard Hill/Central Area 
Concert. It caps off the spring se- 
mester and is usually the biggest 
party on the hill. But, without a 
doubt, Central creates a great deal 
more than parties and snowball 
fights. It creates friendship and 
long-lasting bonds that none of us 
will ever lay to rest. 








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27 



Central 





29 




AST 



The Northeast Residential Area 
is the oldest residential area on 
campus. The area's nine dormi- 
tories surround a quadrangular 
grassy area appropriatley known as 
"The Quad." The Quad is used for 
a variety of extra-curricular activi- 
ties. On any nice day one only 
needs to walk out the door of 
his/her dormitory to take part in 
football, volleyball, basketball and 
soccer games, frisbee throwing, 
hackey sac, sunbathing and even 
occasionally studying. The Quad is 
one of the area's most popular so- 
cial activities centers. 

For relaxation or studying, the 
dormitories are built with study 
lounges and recreation space. 
Northeast provides its residents 
with two computer terminals, the 
Northeast Women's Center, and 
the Northeast Education Program- 
ming Committee. Northeast is fa- 
miliar to those who participated in 
the New Student Summer Orienta- 
tion Program. 





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Northeast 





33 



ORCHAR 



Orchard Hill residential area 
consists of four seven-floor dorms, 
encompassing both coed and single 
sex living. It provides the site for 
the OH Residential College which 
offers students from here and from 
Central residential area three and 
four credit courses in the comfort- 
able and relaxed atmosphere of 
classrooms and lounges. 

The actions of the area govern- 
ment have lent to the creation and 
upkeep of such unique services as 
the Hilltop Snackbar, Women's 
and Men's Centers, Third World 
Center, German Corridor and Aca- 
demic Counseling, among others. 
Each spring the Orchard Hill Area 
Government, together with the 
Central Area Government, spon- 
sors a series of events topped off by 
the spring concert. The courtyard, 
of Bowl, functions as the focal 
point for most activities. 

Activities particular to Orchard 
Hill residents are early morning 
Bowl Wars . . . the first snowball 
fight of the season . . . climbing up 
and down and up hills . . . Bowl 
Day (do they really have to start 
tuning their instruments at 8:00?) 
. . . sunbathing on the hill . . . 
traying down Baker Hill . . . sing- 
ing Secret Santa songs in the Bowl 
. . . Orchard Hill/Central Concert 
. . . trekking down to the D.C. . . . 
studying all night in the lounge- 
/balcony . . . tossing a frisbee in 
the Bowl . . . having fun. 



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37 




NITIES 



Sigma 



The University of Massachusetts 
fraternity men renewed their one 
hundred fifteen year old tradition 
on campus by pledging to become 
the strongest Greek system in New 
England. The fraternities, totalling 
14 chapters, began to set their goals 
toward reducing the impact of al- 
cohol during rush and by setting 
higher standards for membership 
and chapter programming. 

A new fraternity chapter, Theta 
Colony, was started in February to 
expand the fraternity ranks. The 
Theta Colony is expecting to work 
toward an official charter from the 
Theta Chi in early 1985. The new 
chapter is one step to increase the 
number of fraternities on campus 
from 5 percent to 10 percent by 
1986. 

In addition, the Interfraternity 
Council and Panhellenic Council 
approached the Board of Trustees 
with a proposal to build 10 to 12 
chapter houses in the northeast 
Fraternity/Sorority Park area and 
entered into a study to review possi- 
ble improvements of the Greek 
Area. 




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on,Alpha Tau Gamma, Phi Sigma Kappa, Delta Upsilon, Beta Kappa Phi, Pi Kappa Alpha, Phi Mu Delta,Lambda Chi Alpha, Delta Chi 




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Mu Delta, Alpha Tau Gamma, Delta Chi, Kappa Sigma, Alpha Delta Phi, Phi Sigma Kappa, Delta Upsilon, Alpha Epsilon Pi, Zeta 





41 







Phi Mu, Sigma Kappa, 



Sorority membership continues 
to be an important part of the col- 
lege experience for over 500 Uni- 
versity women who are affiliated 
with the nine sororities on campus. 
Life in a sorority provides an atmo- 
sphere of mutual respect and con- 
sideration developed through the 
common bonds of sisterhood. Each 
woman is encouraged to express 
her individual personality and ideas 
and to take advantage of the oppor- 
tunities for social, intellectual and 
emotional growth that a sorority 
offers. 

The sororities' pursuit for aca- 
demic achievement is apparent by 
their cummulative grade point 
average being higher than that of 
the average University undergrad- 
uate. In addition to encouraging 
scholarship, sororities develop the 
individual's leadership capabilities 
through various activities. The 
Panhellenic Association, the gov- 
erning body of the sororities, spon- 
sors a leadership conference for its 
members. 

As interest in sorority life grew 
by more than 30 percent during the 
fall and spring rush, the Panhellen- 
ic Council revised the Rush Pro- 
gram in order to capitalize on the 
increased interest. They also estab- 
lished a commission to evaluate the 
system and develop means by 
which the University and the so- 
rorities can benefit through positive 
interactions. 

The nine sororities include: Al- 
pha Chi Omega, Chi Omega, Delta 
Zeta, Iota Gamma Upsilon, Kappa 
Kappa Gamma, Phi Mu, Sigma 
Delta Tau, Sigma Kappa and Sig- 
ma Sigma Sigma. 




42 



gma Delta Tau, Chi Omega, Iota Gamma Upsilon, Delta Zeta, Phi Mu 




43 



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Sigma Kappa Iota Gamma Upsilon Delta Zeta Alpha Chi Omega Sigma Delta Tau Sigma Sigma Sigma Kappa Kappa Gamma 



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46 




Photo by Kevin J. Fachetti 



47 





AM11TT6 



Who can forget the daily visits to 
the Off-Campus Housing Office to 
find that perfect apartment? That 
cozy apartment you settled on with 
bedrooms for three and bath-room 
for one .... The place was so quiet 
you could hardly hear the aerobic 
dancing upstairs and passing Bio- 
chemistry was no problem with all 
the mold you had growing in the 
fridge .... You couldn't believe 
your roommate's musical taste - 
classical and punk .... And now 
you understand what a good house- 
keeper your mother was, especially 
when you ran out of clean socks 
.... Subletting your apartment in 
May wasn't as easy as you thought 
it would be, especially when 6,000 
other students were doing the same 
thing. Good thing the Off-Campus 
Housing Office was there, you 
could just fill out a form and some- 
one would rent it no problemi .... 
Except you wanted to get at least 
half your rent, and everyone is of- 
fering to pay a third .... Unfortu- 
nately your landlord didn't have 
your forwarding address and your 
security deposit ended up with your 
roommate who loves punk and clas- 
sical and is vacationing in Acapul- 
co .... 





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The Commuter Collective is a 
Recognized Student Organization 
(RSO). The Collective provides 
service and advocacy for off-cam- 
pus undergraduate students. Not 
only does the Collective finance the 
Off-Campus Housing Office 
(OCHO) and University Child- 
care, but it also works to provide 
commuters with certain conve- 
niences. These include a commuter 
lounge and student lockers for 
commuters. The Collective pub- 
lishes the Commuter News, a news- 
letter informing commuters of the 
Collective's activities, and conducts 
surveys, gathering the opinions of 
the commuter. Enhancing the cam- 
pus for all students is also a concern 
of the Collective. It works with the 
Pioneer Valley Transit Authority 
to provide bus service, as well as 
sponsoring the Progressive Film 
Series, several events for Black 
History Month and some political 
caucuses. The Collective attempts 
to eliminate no one from their ser- 
vices. 






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54 




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55 



NEWS 



Campus, national and international 
happenings provided for a rich and 
compelling collection of events and 
news stories. 




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SEPTEMBER 



US demands 
compensation 

On Sept. 12, the United States demand- 
ed compensation from the Soviet Union 
for the 61 Americans killed in the Sept. 1 
Soviet destruction of a South Korean air- 
liner as a pilots' boycott of flights to Mos- 
cow took hold in Europe and NATO gov- 
ernments prepared to bar the Soviet air- 
line from their airports for sixty days. 

Meanwhile, a third body from the 
wreckage of the downed jumbo jet was 
found on Japan's northern-most coast, and 
the Kyodo news agency reported the plane 
did not crash for more that 12 minutes 
after one or more of its four engines was 
hit by a heat-seeking missile from a Soviet 
fighter. 

The U.S. demand for compensation was 
presented in Washington by John H. Kel- 
ley, an acting assistant secretary of state, 
to Oleg Sokolov, second-ranking member 
of the Soviet Embassy staff, but Sokolov 
refused to accept it. 

Cardinal dies 
of heart failure 

VATICAN CITY (AP) — Pope John 
Paul II expressed his "deep, personal sor- 
row" over the death of Cardinal Hum- 
berto Medeiros, the Roman Catholic arch- 
bishop of Boston. 

The pontiff sent two messages of condo- 
lence, one to the archdiocese of Boston 
and the other to Archbishop John R. 
Roach, president of the U.S. National 
Conference of Catholic Bishops. 

Medeiros, 67, died Sept. 17, after heart 
surgery in Boston. 

"As I extend my condolences to the be- 
loved archdiocese of Boston that he, Me- 
deiros, served with such intense pastoral 
zeal, I impart my apostolic blessing to all 
who mourn in Christian hope, "the pope 
said in his message to the archdiocese. 

The pope is not expected to name Me- 
deiros' successor immediatelty. After the 
death of a top prelate, the Vatican normal- 
ly observes at least a two month mourning 
period, and considers suggestions from the 
country's bishops and Vatican delegate be- 
fore naming a successor. 

Medeiros' death reduced the number of 
Roman Catholic cardinals to 132, of 
whom 19 are under the age of 80 and 
eligible to take part in papal election. 



Pres. Marcos orders protests crushed 



Violence in the Philippines continued 
throughout September as citizens 
marched to express their outrage at the 
controversial circumstances surrounding 
the death of political opposition leader 
Benito Aquino, gunned down August 22 
by the bourgeoisie as he returned to the 
Philippines after a three year exile. 

President Ferdinand E. Marcos ordered 
his riot troops to crush all unauthorized 
demonstrations, and warned protesting 
businessmen they had been videotaped 



and would be tracked down and arrested. 

He rejected a proposal by Cardinal Ja- 
mie L. Sin to share power with an advisory 
council and accused priests and nuns of 
teaching schoolchildren to hate him. 

Sin, the archbishop of Manila and lead- 
er of the Philippine Catholic church, de- 
nied the charge and accused Marcos of 
casting "a terrible darkness" over the land 
and forcing Filipinos to choose the path of 
"violent confrontation." 




Club wielding riot police corner a group of terrified youths who were suspected of hurling homemade 
bombs at the police at a demonstration in Manila. 



58 



Student's sculpture dedicated 



By JILL LANG 
Collegian Staff 

A free-standing sculpture by student 
artist Stephen Oakley was dedicated in a 
noontime ceremony with balloons music 
and remarks by University officials. The 
sculpture, entitled 'Playfully Nodding to 
Its Fall," is located on the west (library) 
side of the campus pond. 

Dean of Humanities and Fine Arts 
Murray Schwartz called the sculpture a 
"celebration of community efforts," and a 
"testament to the community that sur- 
rounds and created it." 

"This sculpture is also a perfect coun- 
terpart to the library," Schwartz said. "It 
(the sculpture) symbolizes durability, 
composition, balance, and it lasts forever." 

Chancellor Joseph Duffey called the 
sculpture and its dedication part of an 
"age old activity of creative spirit." 

"There is an old tradition of people tak- 

Pipe job lacks $5M 

By MITCHEL ZEMEL 

Collegian Staff 

A plan devised last year to evacuate 
students from the Southwest Residential 
area in the event of a streamline failure is 
not likely to be used. 

Physical Plant utility design head Hans 
Vanderleeden said that for the evacuation 
to be necessary, large leaks in the steam- 
line would have to occur. Because the 
leaks would probably be found before they 
reached problematic proportions, Vander- 
leeden said he is not worried an evacuation 
will be necessary. 

"As far as we know there are no leaks at 
present," he said, noting that "if a leak 
were to appear before the cold weather 
comes, repairing it would not be a prob- 
lem. The problem would be when the 
amount of heat being lost is greater than 
the amount the dorms receive," Vander- 
leeden said. 

"The line to Southwest is beyond the ser- 
vice life of 20 years and is in need of 
replacement."" Vanderleeden said. His de- 
■ partment makes a list of priority repairs 
each spring, and this line has been at the 
top of the list for a few years, he said. 

Vanderleeden said a request for $5 mil- 
, lion for repairs now before the state legis- 
lature should be approved this fall. Four 
hundred thousand dollars would be allot- 
ted for emergency repairs of the line, 
$300,000 for a plan to repair or replace the 
line, and the balance is to pay the labor, 
Vanderleeden said. A plan is being consid- 
ered to replace the steam line with medi- 
f um temperature hot water. 



ing pride in Amherst," Duffey said. 

"The restoration and well-being of our 
community is in the hands of all of us," he 
said. "It is things like this that help us to 
better stand together as a community." 

"Playfully Nodding to Its Fall" is Oak- 
ley's sixth large sculpture and his first 
piece made of steel. It is ten feet high and 
weighs 1 100 pounds. 

"This sculpture is geometric, hard and 
industrial," Oakley said. "But I feel this 
can be part of the landscape instead of 
alienating it." 

He added that the sculpture is supposed 
to rust, and the strength of the sculpture 
will not be weakened by the rust. 

Oakley received $2950 from the UMass 
Arts Council to cover his expenses. Oakley 
built the sculpture at the UMass foundry, 
and moved it to its present site with the 
help of the Physical Plant. 

UMass students 
left in the cold 

By MICHELLE HYDE 

Collegian Staff 

An unexpectedly low number of "no 
shows" at the University of Massachusetts 
resulted in a large amount of students be- 
ing without housing. 

"A lot more students showed up this 
year," said Joseph Zannini, executive di- 
rector of Housing Services, noting there 
were 235 "no shows" last year as opposed 
to 160 now. He said he thought that as a 
result of this decrease there are approxi- 
mately 200 students without housing, but 
he could not give an exact amount. 

"We've been able to deal with all the 
students that were cleared by the Universi- 
ty, and had gone through the procedure, 
and those we had a contractual responsi- 
bility to," he said. 

The third and fourth-year students are 
without housing because in the spring they 
had planned to live off-campus. Now, he 
said, "they found that none is available. 
They have the money but there is no 
room." 

Zannini said the temporary solutions to 
the housing problems are living with 
friends in off-campus apartments, in a ho- 
tel while looking around for vacancies, or 
in "swing spaces." Swing spaces include 
rooms on the fourth floor of the Campus 
Center Hotel, rooms shared with R.A.s 
who would receive extra pay for their hos- 
pitality and rooms to be shared with other 
students. These students would receive a 
small rebate for their troubles. 



US Marines to 
stay in Lebanon 

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate 
invoked the Vietnam-era War Powers Act 
for the first time and voted 54 to 46 to give 
President Reagan board authority to keep 
1,600 U.S. Marines in Lebanon for the 
next 18 months. 

The joint resolution, approved by the 
Democratic House, gives specific approval 
to Reagan's policies in Lebanon. Reagan 
has said he will sign it. 

The vote ends a month of frequently 
emotional debate triggered by the deaths 
of two Marines in Beirut on Aug. 29. 

The resolution says the Marine deploy- 
ment — plus troops from Great Britain, 
France and Italy — "better enables the 
government of Lebanon to establish its 
unity, independence and territorial integri- 

ty." 

Critics of the resolution said it amounts 
to a blank check which could lead the 
United States into another Vietnam War. 

They also said Reagan, not Congress, 
should invoke the 1973 War Powers Act, 
requiring that the troops be withdrawn in 
60 days unless the House and Senate vote 
otherwise. 

Minority Leader Robert C. Byrd Jr., 
leader of the opposition to the compromise 
resoultion, said just before the vote, "Poli- 
tics is the art of compromise. War is not." 




Months after curious "Josh is coining" signs first 
appeared on campus. Campus Crusade for Christ 
speaker Josh McDowell spoke to a crowd of nearly 
600 at Umass. 

McDowell addressed many controversial and timely 
issues, devoting a large portion of his speech to a 
discussion on sex, love, marriage and God. 



59 



SEPTEMBER 



No registration, 
no financial aid 

BOSTON (AP) — The Massachusetts 
House gave final approval to a bill requir- 
ing college students to swear that they 
have registered for the military draft be- 
fore they accent state scholarship aid. 

On a voice vote, the House sent the 
measure to the state Senate. 

Passage came immediately after the 
members voted 95-47 to reject an amend- 
ment offered by Rep. Thomas M. Gal- 
lagher, D-Boston. 

Gallagher, who opposed the bill when it 
was heard in the Committee on Education, 
proposed to change the legislation so that 
students would become ineligible for state 
aid only after being convicted in court of 
failure to register. 

"I have argued against this bill on two 
grounds — the Pentagon should not be 
allowed to set educational policy, and peo- 
ple should be punished only by a court of 
law," Gallagher said in a floor debate. 

The legislation as passed by the House 
states: "No scholarship or financial aid or 
student loan shall be awarded ... to any 
student who has not registered with the 
selective service system of the armed 
forces of the United States." 

The language is similar to a federal law 
that was declared unconstitutional this 
summer by a U.S. District Court on 
grounds that it violated a young man's 
rights to due process and freedom from 
self-incrimination. The U.S. Supreme 
Court has suspended that court's judg- 
ment and plans to consider the issue dur- 
ing the fall term. 

Man smokes pot 
^religiously' 

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (AP) — A 
Monson farmer told a Hampden Superior 
Court jury in September that he "smoked 
marijuana every waking hour" so he could 
lead a spiritual life. 

"I would be doing it now if smoking was 
permitted in the courtroom," said David 
Nissenbaum, describing the use of mari- 
juana as part of the worship in his faith — 
the Ethiopian Zion Coptic Church. 

"It helps to plant the seed of unfailing 
righteousness in me and allows me to take 
part in the Holy Spirit," he said. Nissen- 
baum, who described himself as a priest in 
the church, and his wife, Christine, both 
35, are on trial on a total of 10 counts, of 
trafficking, possession of marijuana with 
intent to distribute, cultivation of marijua- 
na, and possession of hashish. 



Australia II wins the America's Cup 



NEWPORT, R.I. (AP) — Australia II 
won the America's Cup on Sept. 26, shat- 
tering 132 years of U.S. supremacy with a 
stunning comeback victory over Liberty in 
the most dramatic finish ever for sailing's 
most prestigious prize. 

The 41 second victory, the fourth closest 
in Cup history, brought to an end the 
longest winning streak in sports history. 

The Cup, first won by the schooner 
America in 1851 and defended 25 times 
since, was the only international trophy 
never to change hands. 

Now it belongs to the Australians, who 
ended 21 years of frustration covering six 
previous challenges by taking advantage 
of a crucial mistake by American skipper 
Dennis Conner to win an unprecedented 
seventh and decisive race. 

The victory triggered wild celebrations 
among Aussie supporters in the spectator 



fleet on Rhode Island Sound, on the docks 
and streets of Newport, and Down Under, 
where millions stayed up most of the night 
to watch it on television. 

It also climaxed a determined comeback 
by skipper John Bertrand and his crew, 
who fell behind 3-1 and then won three 
straight races, the last one marking the 
first time a Cup series had gone as far as 
seven races. 

Liberty, with Conner reading the winds 
correctly, held a seemingly safe 57 second 
lead after the fourth of six legs on the 24.3- 
miie course on Rhode Island Sound. 

But there were nine miles to go, and the 
Aussies wouldn't quit. 

Bertrand found a wind shift of his own, 
while Conner let the Australians get unob- 
structed air. 

The American lead — and the Ameri- 
ca's Cup — was gone. 




America's Cup defender Liberty, bottom, and Australia II, head for the starting line before the seventh 
and final race. 



60 



OCTOBER 



Lech Walensa wins 
Nobel Peace Prize 

OSLO, Norway (AP) — Lech Walesa, 
leader of Poland's outlawed Solidarity la- 
bor movement, was awarded the Nobel 
Peace Prize for his fight on behalf of the 
"unconquered longing" of all people for 
peace and freedom. 

Walesa quickly said he would give the 
approximate $190,000 award to Poland's 
Catholic Church, which has been outspo- 
ken in its support of the labor movement. 

Polish authorities did not say wTiether 
they would permit Walesa to leave Poland 
to accept the award, and the labor leader 
said he was considering sending a relative 
in his place. Soviet dissident Andrei Sak- 
harov, the only other Peace Prize from the 
East bloc, did not accept his award be- 
cause he feared he would not be allowed to 
return home. His wife, Yelena Bonner, at- 
tended on his behalf. 

In Warsaw, deputy government spokes- 
man Andrzej Konopacki charged that the 
award was politically motivated and said 
the Peace Prize "used to be a meaningful 
award. Now it is devalued." 

The Norwegian Nobel Committee said 
Walesa had made his contribution "with 
considerable personal sacrifice to ensure 
the workers' right to establish their own 
organization." 




Holiday set for Martin Luther King 



By BOB BURGESS 

and the Associated Press 

The D.S. Senate's approval of a bill pro- 
posing the establishment of a national 
holiday in memory of Dr. Martin Luther 
King Jr. was received with mixed emotions 
by members of the Afro- American Studies 
Department at the University of Massa- 
chusetts. 

"On the one hand I support the idea of a 
national celebration of King, but I also see 
it as a symbolic gesture," Ernest Allen, 
department chairman, said. 

Allen said while the Senate is remem- 
bering King, "it is not doing much to sup- 
port the late civil rights leader's dreams of 
American society," especially by approv- 
ing increases in military spending. 

President Ronald Reagan has promised 
to sign the bill, which designates the third 
Monday in January as a legal holiday in 



King's name. The holiday will be recog- 
nized officially in 1986, and will make 
King the only American besides George 
Washington to be supremely honored. 

Michael Thelwell, professor of Afro- 
American studies, said this legislation 
"will immeasurably improve the image of 
the U.S. in the Third World countries," 
but he had some sharp criticisms of Sen. 
Jesse Helms' attempt to block the bill's 
passage. 

Thelwell said Helms' efforts, which in- 
cluded allegations that King was influ- 
enced by communists, were "disgraceful, 
racist, spiteful, unprincipaled attempts" to 
discredit the Baptist preacher, who won 
the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize while practic- 
ing the creed of non-violence. Sen. Edward 
M. Kennedy told the Senate that King 
"deserves the place which this legislation 
gives him besides Washington and Colum- 
bus." 



Golding covets 
literature prize 

STOCKHOLM, Sweden — British 
writer William Golding, whose novels in- 
clude "Lord of the Flies," won the 1983 
Nobel Prize in literature, the Swedish No- 
bel Committee announced. 

Golding, 72, was cited "for his novels, 
which with the perspicuity of realistic nar- 
rative art and diversity and universality of 
myth, illuminate the human condition in 
the world today." 

"The idea really wasn't in the forefront 
of my mind at all," he said. "But now that 
I have heard I really am delighted." 

He added that he needed no encourage- 
ment to continue his work. "Well, at the 
age of 72 and having been writing since I 
was 7, I don't think one needs encourage- 
ment to carry on," Golding said. "One 
does it almost mechanically." 



61 



Grenada invaded 
by U.S. troops 

BRIDGETOWN, Barbados (AP) — 
Nearly 2,000 U.S. Marines and Army 
paratroopers invaded Marxist-ruled Gren- 
ada in an airborne strike, Oct. 25, clashing 
with Grenadian troops and armed Cuban 
workers. 

The U.S. forces, ordered to protect 
some 1 ,000 Americans on the tiny eastern 
Caribbean island and "restore democra- 
cy" there, were followed by 300 soldiers 
from six Caribbean nations. 

President Reagan called the pre-dawn 
operation "completely successful." 

He said 1,900 Marines and Army Rang- 
er Paratropers had seized the two main 
airports on the mountainous, 21 -mile-long 
island. 

At least two American military men 
were killed and 20 wounded in the initial 
fighting, according to U.S. administration 
and congressional sources in Washington. 
They also reported three members of 
Grenada's 1,200-man armed forces were 
killed, and that 30 Soviet advisers and 
about 600 Cubans were captured. 

Secretary of State George P. Shultz said 
the decision to invade Grenada was taken 
because of the "atmosphere of violent un- 
certainty" and the fear that Amercians on 
the island might be "hurt or taken hos- 
tage." 

Reagan, appearing at a White House 
news conference, listed three reasons for 
the invasion: protecting American lives, 
"to forestall further chaos" and to "restore 
order and democracy." 




Umass students protest Grenada invasion. 



Rent-a-casket for Halloween parties 



INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — With Hal- 
loween coming up, Charles Owens' com- 
pany has a lay-away plan fit for just about 
anyone alive — rent-a-casket. 

"Theatrical companies, office parties, 
birthdays, country clubs," Owens said 
Thursday. "We rent for any purpose you 
would dream of — except burial. Our 
units are brand new and we wouldn't want 
to get into that end of it." 

"The results have been fantastic," he 
said. "Within the first four days of the ad, 
we had a lot of phone calls. People are 
coming in. Every now and then, someone 
will call to see if this is a legitimate busi- 
ness." 



The caskets come in three sizes and rent 
from $25 to $75 for 24 hours. 

The smallest, says Owens, "is animal 
size," the medium one is about 4V'4-to-5 
feet and the largest "would be big enough 
for an average body." 

Owens, 35, said he got the rental idea 
after liquidating "one of the larger funeral 
hotnes in the city. 

Owens, who expects "somewhat of a let- 
down" in business after Halloween, has 14 
rentable caskets, but only six or seven were 
available. He estimated he has rented "at 
least 10 caskets" since he started, but 
didn't want to say how much money he's 
made. 




Michael Jackson's "Beat It" won five Billboard 
awards. 



62 



OCTOBER 



Marines killed in Beirut bombing 



BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP) — At least 
146 U.S. Marines and Navy personnel 
were killed and 59 wounded when a suicide 
bomber crashed a pickup truck packed 
with explosives into the lobby of an airport 
building where the Americans were sleep- 
ing. A revolutionary Islamic group 
claimed responsibility for the blast that 
leveled the four-story building. 

Moments later another suicide terrorist 
drove a truck-bomb into a building hous- 
ing French troops. State radio quoted civil 
defense workers as saying 25 French sol- 
diers were killed and 12 were wounded. 
The French Defense Ministry in Paris said 
the toll was nine dead, 14 wounded and 53 
missing. 

In Washingon, the State Department 
received a report from Beirut saying a 
group calling itself the Islamic Revolu- 
tionary Movement asserted responsibility 
for both attacks. According to the report, 
an annonymous caller telephoned the Bei- 
rut office of the French news agency 
Agence France Presse and said two of the 
movement's fighters, named as Abu Ma- 
zin, 26, and Abu Sija'n, 24, perished in the 
suicide bombings. 

That group had not been heard of be- 



fore in Beirut. The caller reportedly told 
AFP the movement would not rest until 
Beirut was controlled by "revolutionary 
Moslems and the combative democratic 
youth." 

The two bombings were the most savage 
attacks on the multinational force since it 
deployed in Beirut last fall at the Lebanese 
government's request to help keep peace in 
the capital, ravaged by years of civil war 
and foreign intervention. The bombing at 
a Marine command post at Beirut airport 
caused the largest number of casualties 
suffered by American forces since the 
Vietnam War. 

The four-story building housing a Ma- 
rine battalion landing team at the airport 
and the nine-story structure occupied by 
the French about a mile north collapsed in 
the tremendous explosions. 

"I haven't seen carnage like that since 
Vietnam," Marine spokesman Maj. Rob- 
ert Jordan told reporters, his own arms 
covered with blood from helping carry the 
dead and maimed. Most of the leather- 
necks were asleep on cots when the explo- 
sion rained tons of concrete and glass 
shards down on them. 





Former Gov. Edward J. King finally receives honorary degree at the renaming of the new Lederle 
Graduate Tower. 



Pickle employee 
recalls identity 
after amenesia 

He woke up on a park bench with blood 
on his lip and a wedding band on his fin- 
ger. He could list the U.S. presidents but 
couldn't remember his name. After wan- 
dering around for two weeks, pickle fac- 
tory worker Tony Blouserino suddenly fig- 
ured out who he was. 

"I just sort of went to pieces at the 
time," Blouserino said when asked to de- 
scribe the feeling at learning his identity. 
The realization came while he was brush- 
ing his teeth at the Pine Street Inn, a shel- 
ter in Boston. He says he looked in the 
mirror and just knew his name was Tony. 
"Tony, not John, Tony, Tony . . . Blou- 
serino," he repeated slowly, recreating the 
scene. Donna Burns and Stacey Masallo, 
friends of "Blouser's" who work at a near- 
by Woolworth's luncheonette counter, 
were happy to hear of his return. 



63 



NOVEMBER 

UMass receives $19 M in grants 



By LARRY BOUCHIE 

Collegian Correspondent 

The National Science Foundation 
(NSF) and The Department of Defense 
have granted over $10 million to the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts at Amherst for 
research during the fiscal year 1983. 

According to information released by 
the UMass Office of Grant and Contract 
Administration, federal agencies granted a 
total of $19 million to the University. The 
NSF contributed $6.2 million, or 33 per- 
cent of that amount and the Defense De- 
partment gave $4.4 million, or 23 percent. 
Additionally, the Department of Energy 
has commissioned research regarding effi- 
cient use of waste energy produced by 
large chemical plants. 

Federal government agency grants ac- 
counted for almost $19 million of the total 
amount contributed. An additional $5 mil- 
lion came from private businesses, founda- 
tions and agencies. The remaining $1 mil- 
lion was awarded by the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts along with other local 



and state governments. 

The School of Natural Science and 
Mathematics received the bulk of the 
grant money, $12.5 million. The second 
highest recipient was the School of Engi- 
neering, which received $3 million. 

One of the larger projects being re- 
searched at the School of Natural Science 
and Mathematics concerns the chemical 
and biological nature of periodontic bacte- 
ria. This, along with a study of eye disease, 
was commissioned by the National Insti- 
tute of Health. 

"The money awarded goes directly to 
the professors and graduate students doing 
research," Beatty said. "Those who do re- 
search then report their results to their 
sponsors. 

"The reason that the NSF and the De- 
fense Dept. grant the largest amounts is 
because they do not have their own in- 
house capability to carry out all their own 
research. Other federal agencies may have 
larger budgets for research, but they can 
do it within their agency," Beatty said. 





Yuri V. Andropov took power one year ago on Nov. 
8. He vowed to vanquish tlie Soviet Union's endem- 
ic inertia, to set the economy right, to give the 
nation a new sense of direction and to seeic better 
relations with the West. A year later, the 69-year- 
old Andropov is in frail health and out of public 
view and results on his plans are, at best, mixed. 



Firefighters exit Goessman laboratory on November 3 after an experiment left one woman with second- 
degree burns on her hands and face and shattered windows on the building's ground floor. 



Allen revokes 
threat to resign 

By LISA-MARIE CANTWELL 
Collegian Staff 

Charlene Allen said she has decided to 
stay on as Student Government Associ- 
ation (SGA) co-president, despite an- 
nouncing three weeks ago that she in- 
tended to resign from the position for 
financial reasons. 

"I am very surprised and pleased that I 
don't have to resign," Allen said. She 
said she originally threatened to resign 
due to rejected appeals for Massachu- 
setts resident status, and the federal cut- 
backs in financial aid. 

But Allen said that a meeting with the 
University Residency Board has given 
her "good reason to believe that my ap- 
peal will be approved." 

Allen, who has lived most of her life in 
Massachusetts, but graduated from a 
New York high school, told the Under- 
graduate Student Senate that without in- 
state residency status and the reduced 
tuition that brings, she would have to 
quit her SGA position and "get a job that 
pays 40 hours a week," to finance her 
education. 



64 




Boston's Mayor-elect Raymond Flynn poses in a gesture of victory as lie gets some early results at his 
home just after the city's polls closed. Flynn was victorious in his bid against candidate Mel King and 
succeeded Kevin White, who served as Boston's mayor for 16 years. 

Hersh criticizes power imbalance 



By PAUL BASKEN 

Collegian Staff 

The press in the United States is far 
too weak and the presidency is far too 
strong for the former to keep an effective 
check on the latter, according to a Pulit- 
zer Prize-winning journalist who has 
made a specialty of government exposes. 

In a visit November 17 to the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts to pubhcize his la- 
test book, The Price of Power, Seymour 
Hersh discussed the dangers presented 
by this imbalance of power as he saw it 
not only during Richard Nixon's admin- 
istration, but throughout all recent presi- 
dencies. The book, which deals primarily 
with Nixon's secretary of state, Henry 
Kissinger, caused national controversy 
upon its release this summer. Among 
other things, the book made allegations 
of a deal in which Gerald Ford was ma- 
neuvered into the presidency by Nixon in 



exchange for the pardon he received 
after his 1974 resignation during im- 
peachment proceedings. 

"There seemed to be no limit," Hersh 
said of the illegal activities conducted 
during the Nixon Administration, which 
included the secret bombing of Cambo- 
dia during the Vietnam War, phone tap- 
pings, and the famous break-in at the 
Watergate Hotel. 

After detailing the offenses he re- 
searched on Nixon in writing his book, 
Hersh extended to Ronald Reagan the 
trend of absolute authority he said was 
seized by the presidency in the 1960s. 

"Since John Kennedy, we've given our 
presidents. Democratic and Republican, 
two basic rights," Hersh said. These, he 
said, are "the right to lie to the American 
people and the press and the Congress," 
and in specifically dealing with the mili- 
tary, the right "to send our boys any- 
where without consulting Congress." 



LSO Attorney 
loses lawsuit 

By ANNE McCRORY 
Collegian Staff 

SPRINGFIELD — A University of 
Massachusetts Legal Services Office at- 
torney claiming constitutional and con- 
tractual violations in his hiring lost his 
$250,000 lawsuit against three University 
administrators. 

After deliberating for 50 minutes, a six- 
member jury ruled unanimously in favor 
of defendents Dennis Madson, vice-chan- 
cellor for Student Affairs, Larry Benedict, 
then associate vice-chancellor, and Bryan 
Harvey, former staff assistant, concluding 
the four-day, 14-witness trial in U.S. Dis- 
trict Court. 

Plaintiff Michael Pill, with his wife Car- 
ol Holzberg, claimed the three men used 
his past record of student advocacy and 
administrative opposition to deny him 
three professional appointments in 1979 
and 1981. He was seeking compensatory 
and punitive damages for losses suffered 
when he was forced to seek "temporary 
consultant" status when his appointment 
for the position of Student Government 
Association legal counsel, approved by a 
research committee, was rejected in Mad- 
son's office. 

Students' hunger 
drive nets $2,600 

By CAMDEN PEIRCE 

Collegian Staff 

University of Massachusetts students 
raised more than $2,600 for OXFAM 
America, a national organization dedi- 
cated to addressing the problem of hunger. 

A spokesman for the UMass Hunger 
Task Force, which coordinated the event, 
said 1,695 students on the University Food 
Services meal plan, 300 more than last 
year, fasted, resulting in a University Food 
Services donation of $1,941.25 to OX- 
FAM America. The figure donated repre- 
sents the cost of the food the students 
would have eaten. 

Students who didn't wish to fast, or who 
were not on the meal plan, could give di- 
rectly to Oxfam American by dropping off 
donation's at a table in the Campus Cen- 
ter. The Hunger Task Force raised about 
$650 in cash contributions, including do- 
nations of $100 from both Earth Foods 
and the People's Market. 

The money donated to Oxfam Ameri- 
can will go to development projects in 
Asia, Africa and Latin America. 



65 



NOVEMBER 




The space shuttle Columbia rides majestically on the 
back of the external tank as it clears the gantry for 
the start of its nine day mission on Nov. 28 from the 
Kennedy Space Center. 



100 million view 
The Day After" 



44 



By PETER ABRAHAM 

Collegian Staff 

Never before has a television show had 
the potential to change history. The atten- 
tion focused on the ABC movie, "The Day 
After", is unequaled. An estimated 60 mil- 
lion people, more than the number of vot- 
ers in the last Presidential election, looked 
on as the people of rural Kansas had their 
lives destroyed by nuclear war. 

Since its conception, "The Day After" 
has been in the national media spotlight. 
Much has been made of its inability to 
draw advertisers. From the cover of News- 
week to the smallest weekly newspaper, it 
has blossomed into more than just a movie. 
"The Day After" became a national 
event. 

At the University of Massachusetts, the 
UMass Peacemakers organized public 
viewing and discussions following the film. 

Resident Directors were being asked to 
prepare for possible outbreaks of violence 
or acts of vandalism as a result of seeing 
the film. The UMass Mental Health Cen- 
ter and University Health Services had 
additional staff personnel to cope with the 
expected need. 



Memories evoked on JFK's anniversary 



By LARRY BOUCHIE 

Collegian Correspondent 

Warm and sunny weather greeted pa- 
rade watchers in Dallas twenty years ago, 
but in Amherst overcast skies better re- 
flected the tragedy awaiting the nation. 

That Friday afternoon at 12:30, Lee 
Harvey Oswald fired several rifle shots 
from the sixth floor of the Dallas School 
Book Depository, killing President John 
Fitzgerald Kennedy. 

William F. Field, who was the Universi- 
ty of Massachusetts Dean of Students then 
as now, recalled immediately telephoning 
the University Board of Trustees, who 
were meeting in Boston that afternoon. 

"Nobody had the heart to continue as 
usual when they heard the news," Field 
said, "so I asked the board if we should 
close school. They said 'yes."' 

With school closed for the period just 
before Thanksgiving recess. Field called 
Peter Pan Bus Lines, knowing that many 
students would want to go home. 

"The buses were lined up and leaving all 
day, one after the other," Field said. 

The Reverend J. Joseph Quigley, direc- 
tor of the Newman Center, was assistant 
director then. 

"It was pandemonium on campus that 
day. People were fainting and we literally 
had to hold people up at services. We held 
special Chapel services all day and night, 
and many people would come in and just 
cry," Quigley said. 

"Jack Kennedy had been here in Octo- 
ber to dedicate the Robert Frost Library 



at Amherst College, and the news was stu- 
pifying," he said. "Many dreams were tied 
up with him. It seemed to be the end of a 
new era." 

Robert L. Campbell, associate director 
of UMass Housing Services, was in the 
Air Force at the time. 

"I was at the Almandorf base in An- 
chorage, Alaska, when it happened, and 
we were immediately put on nationwide 
high alert status," Campbell said, "Our jet 
aircraft fighters were then armed with nu- 
clear warheads." 

Glenn Gordon, director of the UMass 
political science department, heard the 
news at the end of teaching a class at 
Michigan State University. 

"My first impression was that the presi- 
dent of the University had been shot — it 
was too unbelievable that it had been Ken- 
nedy," he said. 

The assassination was widely discussed 
among his fellow teachers, he said. "It was 
believed that it must have been some right- 
wing fanatic from Dallas who did it. When 
it was revealed that Lee Harvey Oswald, 
who seemed to be more of a left-winger, 
was responsible, there was an air of disbe- 
lief," Gordon said. 

University President John W. Lederle, 
was at the Board of Trustees meeting in 
Boston. "There were conflicting stories for 
a while, and we were all in disbelief. We 
thought that the President was so well- 
protected. We wondered how the country 
would carry on without Kennedy," Le- 
derle said. 




"This is Lawrence . . . This is Lawrence, Kansas ..." A scene from "The Day After". 



66 



DECEMBER 

Discrimination in Henry case 



By DAVID SUMMERSBY 

Collegian Staff 

Despite University of Massachuse;tts 
Chancellor Joseph D. Duffey's statement 
that the fire fiasco is over and is something 
"which we ought not to hang over our 
heads," supporters of the black woman 
charged with setting one fire in Crampton 
Dormitory said Yvette Henry was a scape- 
goat used by the University and her arrest 
was an attack on the whole black and third 
world community at UMass. 

"They (the university) goofed and 
goofed badly. Singling out Yvette Henry 
was an act of hysteria. The heat was on 
and they had to act," said Muriel Wiggins, 
assistant director of Freshman Admis- 
sions, at an information session on the 
Henry case. 

"The University was under pressure to 



make an arrest and they had to find some- 
body. It was an unfortunate choice," said 
Rev. Robin L. Harden, from the United 
Christian Foundation. 

"If it can happen to one black it can 
happen to anyone who is black or third 
minority on this campus," Harden said. 

The information session was attended 
by more than fifty people who listen to a 
four-person panel view their concerns 
about the Henry case. 

Thelma Griffith-Johnson, director of 
Affirmative Action at UMass, and an- 
other panelist said the decision to arrest 
Henry was an act of hysteria by the Uni- 
versity and that Henry was treated unfair- 
ly because she was black. 

"In my view, her constitutional rights 
were violated," Johnson said, referring to 
the night Henry was arrested and forced to 



spend two subsequent nights in jail before 
appearing at her arraignment. 

"I offered my own property, all my jew- 
elry and my future employment to take 
that woman into my home," she said. 

"There was no need except public hyste- 
ria to allow them to post a $10,000 bail 
and take her into custody. 

"I believe if she had been white, I would 
have been allowed to take her into my 
home," Johnson said. 

Johnson and several others at the forum 
made appeals for everyone to support 
Henry through donations and their pres- 
ence at her January 26 pre-trial hearing. 

Legal Services lawyer, Michael Pill said 
Legal Services have dealt with 12 similar 
serious student discipline cases and none 
were suspended. "I support the statements 
made about the problems." 




Actress Jane Fonda jogs in place as she joins an 
early morning exercise class at her Jane Fonda 
Workout Studio in Beverly Hills. She participated 
in the exercises to put to rest recent rumors that she 
had been suffering from heart problems. 




Moira Smith and Katie Hayes sign in to Crampton Dormitory as Timothy Plant, University Officer, checks 
identification cards. Extra security measures were taken at the women's residence following a rash of fires. 



67 




President Reagan works out on an exercise machine in this photo for the December 4 cover of Parade magazine. 
Reagan introduced an article on his physical fitness program with "Move over, Jane Fonda, here comes the 
Ronald Reagan workout plan." 




A crowd of approximately 300 pushed and shoved into this department store, stripping the shelves of 138 
Cabbage Patch Dolls. The crowd formed at 6:30 a.m. to pay $19.98 per doll. 



Republican 
Club stands up 
for patriotism 

By PETER ABRAHAM 
Collegian Staff 

In a rally on the steps of the Student 
Union, the University of Massachusetts 
Republican Club blasted the policies of 
the Soviet Union and pledged their sup- 
port of the United States government. 

A crowd of more than 75 people stood in 
the cold to hear a number of speakers be- 
fore proceeding to Memorial Hall to 
watch the placing of a wreath honoring the 
men killed at Pearl Harbor. 

"We must not forget that 42 years ago 
today the United States was caught sleep- 
ing. We can never let that happen again," 
said Steve Ericson, Republican Club trea- 
surer. 

Bill Pyne, president of the organization, 
said the club was formed to "counter-bal- 
ance the liberal element on campus and 
show support for the United States gov- 
ernment. The rally is for the same reason." 

Matthew Levine, a member of the club, 
spoke on the issues surrounding the inva- 
sion of Grenada by U.S. forces. He said 
the United States was justified in invading 
the island in order to save the medical 
students. He continued by criticizing Rus- 
sian motives across the world and said that 
America must "deal from strength" when 
meeting with the Soviets. 

"They (the Russians) killed 60 to 80 
million of their own people under Stalin 
and today they are led by the former lead- 
er of the KGB, an organization dedicated 
to terror," Levine said referring to current 
Soviet Premier Yuri Andropov. 

Katherine Kurda, a Soviet studies ma- 
jor, presented a long history of Russian 
actions since their revolution in 1917. Ste- 
phen Barrett, a member of the Conserva- 
tive Coalition at UMass, spoke following 
Kurda. 

Barrett challenged people opposing the 
conservative viewpoint to, "Go to Af- 
ghanistan, go to Vietnam, go to Hungary 
ask those people about Communism." 

At Memorial Hall, "Taps" was played 
while six members of the Veteran of For- 
eign Wars Post 8006 stood at attention. 
James Anderson, president of the Amherst 
College Republicans, held a sign reading 
"Support Reagan." 

"We're out here to show that we re- 
member the dead of Pearl Harbor and 
thank them for the ultimate sacrifice," Er- 
icson said. "Let Pearl Harbor be a lesson 
for the United States and may we never let 
down our guard." 



68 



DECEMBER 




King Kong, celebrating his 50th birthday, visits London. The monster was reported 
to have unwittingly spread fear amongst shoppers as he waved 80-foot long inflated 
arms and hurled his 84-foot-tall body about, growling as he did so. 




The National Christmas Tree, the focal point of the Christmas Pageant of 
Peace, stands lighted on the Ellipse near the White House. The tree, a 30-foot 
Colorado blue spruce, was transplanted to this site in 1978. 



Worker fears prompt asbestos tests 



By JOSH MEYER 

and JOHN O'CONNELL 

Collegian Staff 

Fears of asbestos-related health hazards 
by Campus Center employees prompted 
the University of Massachusetts Depart- 
ment of Environmental Health and Safety 
to take air samples to check asbestos levels 
there. 

The Massachusetts Asbestos Program 
found an asbestos concentration of 30 to 
40 percent in the spray-on coating of the 
concourse and University Store ceilings in 
tests taken Oct. 7 and recommended re- 
moval as the most effective method of con- 
trolling the substance. 

Department Director Donald A. Robin- 
son said an industrial hygienist took air 
samples to measure airborne particle lev- 
els in the concourse and store "for a period 
of time" with equipment approved by the 
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 

Asbestos was banned by the U.S. Envi- 
ronmental Protection Agency from use in 
fireproof ing in 1973 and for all other uses 
in 1978 because of medical evidence which 
"suggests that individuals exposed to as- 
bestos fibers are vulnerable to environ- 
mentally-induced cancers," according to 



Joseph Lamalva, chemist for the Asbestos 
Program. 

Both Robinson and University Store 
Manager Win Cummings said asbestos 
concentrations in the concourse and store 
are not dangerous and should not concern 
Campus Center workers, but several mem- 
bers of the University Staff Association 
and the Massachusetts Teachers Associ- 
ation complained that their fears of health 
hazards have been ignored by the Campus 
Center administration. 

"For many years people have been com- 
plaining about the air (quality) and the 
dust that gets over everything," said a 
University Store employee who asked not 
to be identified. "There have been specific 
confrontations over the issue, and it's an 
outright lie that there has been no con- 
cern. 

"Our biggest concern is that when ques- 
tions are raised they are immediately 
brushed off," the employee said. "There 
have been no memos or anything to inform 
people of the potential hazards and remov- 
al of the asbestos. There have been no tests 
on the dust that falls from the ceiling, even 
though it gets on the clothing, the desks 
and everything else." 

Recent laws requiring removal or con- 



tainment of asbestos in public buildings, 
especially schools, were passed "in view of 
the increasing knowledge of the potential 
of asbestos as a cancer-inducing agent at 
low-level exposures," according to an EPA 
"guidance document" for asbestos-con- 
taining materials in school buildings. 

The dangers of heavy exposure to asbes- 
tos in factory or construction workers have 
been Recognized for many years, and the 
lung disease asbestosis "is a classic occu- 
pational disease," the report states. 

The spray-on coating used in the Cam- 
pus Center, Goessman Laboratory, Tobin 
Hall and some other campus buildings is 
considered more dangerous than other 
forms of asbestos because of its tendency 
to crumble and send asbestos fibers into 
the air. Fibers are small — .5 microns in 
diameter — and can stay airborne for as 
long as 80 hours. 

According to the EPA report, asbestos 
fibers can lodge in the lungs or digestive 
system and remain there for years, detect- 
able only with an electron microscope. 

Most asbestos-related diseases do not 
appear for 20 years or more after the ini- 
tial contact with the substance, making the 
connection between the disease and asbes- 
tos exposure difficult to establish. 



69 



JANUARY 




Happy New Year! Welcome to 
1984. Let's all drink a toast to the 
year of Orwell and elections . . . 



and see if we're able to sing and 
dance in a festive holiday spirit . . . 








full of laughter and good will for 
the new year. After all, things look 
pretty good . . . 



70 



our students are back to their stud- 
ies and feeling right at home in tiny 
Grenada . . . 




s 


^?^t^ - m <-^^^H^HH^^^^^^^^SBB^^S^^^^^^^^^^^B9^^^H 


ItjH^ 


^^" . , .-^..^ ■ ^9«^i^. 


nHF 





Our soldiers are trying to feel at 
home in Beirut, Lebanon . . . 



and we can all look forward to the 
spectacle of the upcoming Winter 
Olympics . . . 




71 



JANUARY 




So let 1984 be a time to find and 
make new aquaintances . . . 



and to renew old friendships and 
keep them in a current perspective 





after all, Big Brother and 1984 ex- 
ist only in the pages of fiction 
don't they? 



72 



FEBRUARY 



EDB scares 
UMass 

Compiled by the Massachusetts Daily Col 
legian 

University of Massachusetts Food Ser- 
vices and area supermarkets searched 
their inventories for foods on the state De 
partment of Health's list of 135 foods con 
taining more than 10 parts per billion of 
ethyl dibromide (EDB). The chemical, 
used in crop spraying, has been described 
as a "super-carcinogen" by various health 
authorities. 

Marie Cappadonna, director of Univer 
sity Food Services, reported that her staff 
had checked all stock in the dining com 
mons and Munchie's convenience stores 
for products containing EDB. 

Cappadonna said her staff has found no 
food products in stock that are listed, by 
brand name or code, on the public health 
department's list. 

Cappadonna said her game plan would 
be to pull any products on all official lists 
of contaminated foods delivered to UMass 
Food Services. 

Withdrawal 
defended 

WASHINGTON (AP) — President 
Reagan defended his decision to withdraw 
Marines from Beirut, saying, "we are not 
bugging out, we are just going into a little 
more defensible position." 

"I don't think you can say we have lost 
as yet," he said at his first formal news 
conference of 1984. 

In a long answer to a question whether 
the United States had lost credibility dur 
ing the recent turmoil in Lebanon, Reagan 
referred to the Marine withdrawal as "re- 
deploying" and said American forces 
couldn't just "stay there as a target, hun 
kering down." 

"But as long as there's a chance for a 
peaceful solution . . . we're not bugging 
out, we're just going into a little more de- 
fensible position." 

Some 1,300 Marines are being with 
drawn on Reagan's orders from Beirut to 
U.S. Navy ships offshore as Lebanon's 
government and army are battered by Syr 
ian-backed rebels. 



McGovern denounces foreign policy 



By BILL WALL 

Collegian Staff 

Criticizing the Reagan administration's 
foreign policy and budget priorities. 
Democratic presidential candidate George 
McGovern, at the University of Massachu- 
setts, called for peace abroad and econom- 
ic justice at home. 

McGovern covered a wide range of is- 
sues in his speech to a crowd of more than 
750 people in the Student Union Ball- 
room, including U.S. intervention in Cen- 
tral America and Lebanon, the escalation 
of the nuclear arms race, U.S. — Soviet re- 
lations and the unequal distribution of the 
tax burden. 

While acknowledging legitimate U.S. 
concerns in Central America, McGovern 
denounced President Ronald Reagan's 
"crude gunboat diplomacy" in solving for- 
eign policy questions. 

McGovern, who ran as the Democratic 
presidential nominee in 1972 and lost to 
Richard M. Nixon, suggested the prob- 
lems of Central America were more deeply 
rooted in the history of Central America's 
struggles for freedom and economic jus- 
tice than in any Soviet or Cuban interven- 
tion in the region. 

"If every Russian and Cuban disap- 
peared overnight, there would still be revo- 
lution in Central America . . . We do not 
serve our best interests if we support mis- 
erable dictators. In the name of anticom- 
munism we have been embracing every 
scoundrel who waves a flag saying, 'I'm 
anti-communist, send guns,'" McGovern 
said. 

McGovern related the revolutionary 
struggles of the United States in gaining 
its independence to that of the peoples of 



Central America saymg, "We have to ask 
which side we are going to be on — the 
side of the oppressors or the side striving 
to break free." 

The former U.S. senator from South 
Dakota urged the use of imagination and 
compassion in U.S. foreign policy. "The 
(policy) course that we are taking is no 
way to win friends and influence enemies 
in Central America," he said. 

He went on to express his concerns over 
U.S. — Soviet relations and their effect on 
the continuance of an "open-ended" arms 
race. He spoke of the necessity of negotia- 
tion to reduce the dangers of accidental 
nuclear war caused by the recent introduc- 
tion of first-strike nuclear weapons in Eur- 
ope and the apparent inability of the Rea- 
gan administration to lessen the superpow- 
er tension. 

The prevailing tax system also drew 
McGovern's criticism because of what he 
called 'an unequal shift of the burden' by 
Reaganomics from the rich to the poor. 
He charged that since the beginning of the 
Reagan administration, $55 billion has 
been given to the upper classes while $17 
billion has been taken from the poor and 
working classes. 

"I ask any fair-minded person if that is a 
proper sense of justice for a great country 
such as the U.S.," McGovern said. 

He closed his speech with an attack on 
the most recent Reagan administration 
budget which calls for a $111 billion de- 
fense increase and a $50 billion cut for 
social programs. 

"These are the kind of priorities I find 
unacceptable for a great country such as 
ours," he said. "What we ought to aim for 
... is peace abroad and justice at home." 




Six defendants listen to trial proceedings during the Big Dan's rape trial. Headphones carry a Portugese 
translation. 



73 



Frats abolished 

By PAUL BASKEN 
and ANNE McCRORY 
Collegian Staff 

The 160-year-old fraternity system at 
Amherst College will come to an abrupt 
end effective June 30, according to the 
school's trustees. 

The system has suffered in recent years 
from complaints over rushing and hazing 
activities and its role as the sole place of 
social gatherings on campus, and member- 
ship has declined while school population 
has increased. 

The Board of Trustees voted unani- 
mously to accept the recommendation of 
an adhoc committee which found "the 
quality of the social and residential life of 
the college has become inadequate to the 
needs of the college and its students." 

Fraternity members, staged a 200-per- 
son sit-in demonstration and a fast to pro- 
test what some feel was a lack of student 
input in the decision, met the expected 
news in small and subdued groups in their 
houses. 

Fraternity members posted mock "for 
sale" signs outside their houses and 
hanged and burned in effigy the College's 
Acting President G. Armour Craig and 
Acting Dean of Students Kathleen Deig- 
nan to protest the action. 

While the trustee decision was ex- 
plained to be part of an overall plan to 
improve student life on campus, and in- 
cludes a promise to begin construction of a 
campus center, fraternity members were 
still unconvinced and angered by the deci- 
sion process. 

Most of the eight students participating 
in the planned four-day fast quit after the 
board agreed to meet with four members 
of the Interfraternity Council before their 
vote was taken at their meeting in New 
York City. 

The faculty of the college voted 90-29 in 
November that "the fraternity structure 
has outlived its usefulness" and should be 
abolished. During the past 14 years the 
number of fraternities at Amherst College 
has declined from 13 to eight while the 
student population has increased from 
1,200 to more than 1,500. 

Amherst now joins two other New Eng- 
land liberal arts colleges, Colby College 
and Williams College, in banning fraterni- 
ties. 



Qood grammar Is an essential part 
of fighting crime, Kobln. 
— Batman 



Jackson attacks Reagan's policies 



By PETER ABRAHAM 

Collegian Staff 

Democratic presidential hopeful Rev: 
Jesse Jackson told a crowd of over 1 ,500 at 
the University of Massachusetts that 
America must, "ban the bomb, cut the 
budget, and give peace a chance." 

Jackson was the keynote speaker at the 
Fine Arts Center for a ceremony to kick- 
off Black History Month. The eloquent 
minister, one of eight campaigning for the 
Democratic nomination, used the occasion 
to attack President Ronald Reagan's poli- 
cies dealing with human rights, U.S. 
troops overseas and health care. 

Jackson implored the crowd to register 
to vote in the upcoming election, saying, 
"If you're eligible and you're not a regis- 
tered voter, you're voting for Reagan to 
cut education grants — you're a space 
walker. Come November you can send a 
message and you can retire somebody." 

On foreign policy, Jackson criticized 
Reagan for not taking into account that 
America's population makes up only six 
percent of the worlds'. 

Reagan's appointment of close friend 
and personal advisor Edwin D. Meese III 
to replace William Frence Smith as Attor- 
ney General came under heavy attack by 
Jackson as he said, "We must not let 



Meese take over in the Justice Depart- 
ment." 

"We must change the course of our na- 
tion," commented Jackson. "There must 
be education for the poor. They cannot be 
denied just because they don't have mon- 
ey. Healthy minds will safeguard democ- 
racy." 

This is a man against hungry children, 
against equal rights for women, his posi- 
tions are well known. We must stand tall 
against him and resist and protest to our 
fullest means." 

On the topic of nuclear war, Jackson 
stirred emotion in the crowd saying, "This 
generation must freeze nuclear weapons. 
We must ban the bombs, the madness 
must stop." 

In the beginning of his speech, Jackson 
compared the cost of preventative health 
programs to the cost of receiving govern- 
ment aid. 

Jackson was flanked on the stage by 
members of his "Rainbow Coalition" in- 
cluding students from the Five College 
area running his campaign at their schools. 
Chancellor Joseph Duffey was also on the 
platform and along with Jackson's cam- 
paign manager joined hands with Jackson 
at the end of the speech in a victory pose. 




New Soviet leader Konstantin Chernenko greets Vice President Bush at Yuri Andropov's funeral. 



74 



FEBRUARY 



Trudeau Steps 
Down 

MONTREAL (AP) - Prime Minister 
Pierre Elliott Trudeau, whose rakish style 
and intimidating intellect gave Canada a 
prominent role on the world stage, an- 
nounced Feb. 29 that he is stepping down 
after more than 15 years in power. 

He said it is "time for someone else to 
assume this challenge," but he would stay 
on as prime minister until his Liberal Par- 
ty can hold a convention and choose a new 
leader, probably in May or June. 

His intentions were disclosed in a letter 
hand-delivered in Ottawa to lona Cam- 
pagnolo, the party president. 

Trudeau, 64, vaulted from obscurity to 
power on a wave of what was called "Tru- 
deau-mania" in April 1968, tossing off 
witty remarks and kissing dozens of wom- 
en at every campaign stop. 

He has been in office since then except 
for the short tenure of Progressive Conser- 
vative Joe Clark, who defeated Trudeau in 
May 1979 but fell from power nine months 
later. 

The prime minister, beaming and appar- 
ently happy that the uncertainty was over 
told reporters he reached the decision dur- 
ing "a great walk in the snow" lasting sev- 
eral hours. 

Immediately after the news of Tru- 
deau's decision reached the floor of the 
Toronto Stock Exchange the exchanged 
index jumped more than 10 points to 
2,412.82. 





Senator Gary Hart, left, joins his wife Lee, center, and daughter Andrea, right as they celebrate Hart's 
dramatic, come-from-behind victory in the New Hampshire democratic presidential primary Tuesday, 
February 28, in Manchester. 



OOF! The UMass Mens Speed Skating Team "does the barrels" during a punishing workout on the frozen 
Campus Pond. 

UMass Receives Digital Computers 

By LARRY BOUCHJE 

Collegian Staff 

The University of Massachusetts was recently selected to take part in a research project, 
which exchanges 100 computers at a reduced rate for a year of research by the University. 

The project, called Partners for Advancement of Computers in Education (PACE), is 
sponsored by Digital Equipment Corp. of Maynard. 

Professor of electrical engineering Walter Kohler said, "Not all of these computers will 
be used for the three research projects we're doing for Digital. Some of the computers will 
be used to supplement various ongoing University projects. 

"The projects that we're doing for Digital are software design for microwave applica- 
tions, headed by Professor Robert Mcintosh of the ECE Dept., software design; for heat- 
transfer problems, headed by Professor Ed Sunderland from the Mechanical Engineering 
Dept., and computer aid for tutoring in PASCAL, headed by Professor Edward Riseman 
of the COINS Dept. 

"In exchange for doing this research, Digital will sell the University 100 computers at a 
65 percent discount of their retail price. We have the option of buying 75 or more of their 
professional 350 computers, and less than 25 of their Rainbow 100 computers. The 
Professional 350 retails for about $5000 to $10,000 and the Rainbow 100 retails for about 
$4,000 to $8,000, depending on the options ordered," Kohler said. 



"Bubble Boy" Dies 

HOUSTON (AP) - David, the 12-year- 
old "bubble boy" who spent his entire life 
in sterile rooms because he had no immu- 
nity to disease, died at Texas Children's 
Hospital, spokeswoman Susannah Moore 
Griffin said. 

Death was attributed to heart failure, 
Griffin said. David's family - mother, fa- 
ther and 15-year-old sister - were in the 
room at the time, she said. The boy's fam- 
ily name has never been disclosed. 

"The cause of the heart failure is un- 
known," his doctor, William T. Shearer, 
said in a statement release by the hospital. 

He developed irregular heartbeats and 
later the heart failed, Griffin said. 

The death came just 33 hours after he 
went on the critical list and less than 12 
hours after he was placed on a breathing 
device. 



75 



1984 Winter Olympics, Sarajevo 




Phil, left, and Steve Mahre, took the gold and silver medals in the men's slalom. British ice dancers Jane Torvill and Christopher Dean as seen during their perfor- 
mance. The duo's gold-winning effort was considered "perfect" by twelve judges. 

U.S. Medal Winners 

Kitty and Peter Carruthers; pairs figure skating- 

siiver 
Scott Hamilton; figure skating-gold 
Rosalyn Sumners; figure skating-silver 
Debbie Armstrong; giant slalom-gold 
Christin Cooper; Giant slalom-silver 
Bill Johnson; downhill-gold 
Phil Mahre; slalom-gold 
Steve Mahre; slalom-silver 




U.S. skater Scott flamilton on a victory lap after 
capturing gold in figure skating. 




Kitty and Peter Carruthers, pairs figure skating, win 
the silver, the United States' first medal. 




Debbie Armstrong wins gold in women's giant sla- 
lom. 




The U.S. Olympic Team on opening day in Sarajevo. 



76 



MARCH 




New SGA Co-Presidents Rick Patrick and Jim Keller. 



Keller/Patrick are landslide victors 



By LISA MARIE CANTWELL 

Collegian Staff 

In a landslide victory, Rick Patrick and 
Jim Keller were elected to the Student 
Goverment Association (SGA) Presiden- 
cy, claiming over 58 percent of the total 
votes cast. 

"We are looking forward to following 
through with the issues and strategies we 
have been working on," said an elated Pat- 
rick last night. "We want to bring as many 
people into the president's office as possi- 
ble," he said "to build a solid base for 
student input." 

Despite the poor weather, 17 percent of 
the undergraduate student population par- 
ticipated. 



The Rudolph/Dooley candidacy re- 
ceived over 29 percent of the votes, finish- 
ing second. Gumby and Camel earned 
third place, with an estimated 8 percent of 
the votes while John Michaud, the only 
candidacy running solo with no platform, 
came in fourth, capturing 4 percent. 

Timothy Rudolph congratulated Pat- 
rick and Keller and said "this loss should 
not divide us from the winners. We all 
share the common ground of being stu- 
dents here." 

Patrick and Keller said their first con- 
cern will be the Board of Regents recently 
proposed tuition policy, which would allow 
an annual increase of 12 to 15 percent. 



Smith College president resigns 



By MARY CREESE 

Collegian Staff 

After nearly 10 years as the president of 
the largest women's college in the nation, 
Smith College President Jill Ker Conway 
formally announced her resignation 
March 1. In a letter released to the col- 
lege's board of trustees, the first female 
president of the 110-year old institution 
cited personal and professional reasons for 
leaving. 

Among them is her desire to spend more 
time with her husband, John J. Conway, a 



University of Massachusetts professor and 
director the Canadian Studies department 
in the Five College academic program. 

Conway's resignation will take effect in 
June, 1985. 

A college spokeswoman said Mrs. Con- 
way also wished to finish the second vol- 
ume of her work on the history of Ameri- 
can women, titled The Female Experience 
in Eighteenth-and-Nineteenth-Century 
America. 



Gary Hart wins 
Mass. primary 

BOSTON (AP) — Sen. Gary Hart 
completed a five-state New England 
sweep over Walter Mondale by winning 
the snowbound Massachusetts primary, 
capping a two-month journey from the 
bottom of the political polls to the top of 
the presidential balot. 

George McGovern, in a last stand to 
salvage his Democratic campaign by fin- 
ishing first or second in Massachusetts, 
trailed Mondale for the runner-up posi- 
tion, and said he would drop out of the 
race. 

It was an astounding come-from-behind 
victory by Hart, who trailed Mondale 43-3 
percent in a January statewide poll. 

"We're going to carry Massachusetts in 
the fall for the Democratic party," he said. 
With 1,518 of 2,196 precincts reporting. 
Hart had 157.154 votes or 39 percent; 
John Glenn 29,053 votes or 7 percent; and 
McGovern 82,373 votes or 21 percent; 
Sen. John Glenn 29,053 votes of 7 percent; 
and the Rev. Jesse Jackson, 21,881 votes 
or 6 percent. 

The returns showed Hart held his own 
in cities like Boston and Holyoke, where 
Mondale's organizational support was 
greater, and the Colorado senator won 
suburban areas and small towns across the 
state. President Reagan was the only can- 
didate on the Republican ballot. 

McGovern carried Massachusetts in the 
1972 general election while losing every 
other state. After stating he would drop 
out of the 1984 race if he didn't finish first 
or second in Massachusetts, the former 
South Dakota senator spent most of the 
last two weeks campaigning here while his 
rivals concentrated on southern states that 
also held primaries on Super Tuesday. 

"With all good cheer I full accept the 
verdict of my very special friends — the 
voters of Massachusetts, who gave us a 
very strong showing, far beyond what any- 
one expected a short time ago," McGo- 
vern said in announcing he would bow out 
of the race. 

Hart, riding the momentum from his 
earlier victories in New Hampshire, Ver- 
mont and Maine, led the Massachusetts 
field by 20 percentage points in polls going 
into the primary. 



77 



Students escape 
volcanic eruption 

By PETER ABRAHAM 
Collegian Staff 

A group of University of Massachusetts 
students on a geological expedition in Ha- 
waii nearly had their campsite blown out 
from under them as the active volcano 
they were studying erupted only hours 
after they slept on its rim. 

A member of the group told us she saw 
some ash rising from Mauna Loa (the vol- 
cano) which indicates an eruption, but we 
didn't believe her," said UMass senior Jeff 
Pollock, a geology major and member of 
the Hawaiian expedition. 

"But when we were heading down the 
sheer mountain with a path of lava follow- 
ing us close behind we didn't think it was 
so funny," said the 23-year-old -itudent. 

The trip was part of a • .M.-anolog\ 
course and involved 20 students from 
UMass, Amherst and Mount Holyoke 
colleges along with Massachusetts profes- 
sor Michael Rhodes and Holyoke profes- 
sor Martha Godchaux. 

More than 400 minor earthquakes (ac- 
cording to the observatory scientists) kept 
the group tossing and turning until 12:56 
a.m. when a sizable tremor rocked the 
campsite and woke them for good. At 1 ; 1 5 
Mauna Loa went off. 

"There was a red glow in the sky and 
fountains of molten rock shot into the 
sky," said Pollock. 



UMass China to 
publish dictionary 

By MARY-SHELIA LOUGHLIN 

Collegian Staff 

The ambassador from the People's Re- 
public of China was at the University of 
Massachusetts on March 15 to announce a 
joint publishing project between UMass 
and the People's Republic of China to 
compile a Chinese-English dictionary. 

UMass and the Peking Institute of For- 
eign Languages in the People's Republic 
of China plan to make a new com.prehen- 
sive Chinese-English dictionary with the 
assistance of a Chinese word processor 
donated by An Wang of Wang Laborato- 
ries, Inc. Wang is also a member of the 
Massachusetts Board of Regents of High- 
er Education. 

The project is based on a Chinese-Eng- 
lish dictionary published in 1978 by the 
Peking Institute for native Chinese. 
American language will be used in the new 
dictionary rather than British English. 

Chairman of the department of Asian 
languages and literature Shou-Hsin Teng 
said the goal of the project is to produce a 
dictionary for the English-speaking world 
that will serve as the chief research, learn- 
ing and reference aid for Chinese studies. 

Twenty percent of all American stu- 
dents studying in China are UMass stu- 
dents; the University has about 80 Chinese 
students and scholars there this year. Also, 
50 UMass faculty administrators have vis- 
ited or taken part in exchanges with the 
People's Republic of China. 




KWMIMNG THE BALLOT BOX — Col. Domingo Monterrosa. left, watches as l.S. elections obseriers 
Rep. ,)im Wright, [)- Tex, second from left, I .S. Ambassador Thomas Pickering, third from left. White House 
representative Dennis Thomas, fourth from left and Dr. Howard Penniman, a voting expert, examine a ballot 
box in San Miguel. VA .Salvador, Sunday. March 25. No candidate obtained a clear-cut majority of votes, so a 
runoff election will be held in early June. Former President Jose Napoleon Duarte of the moderate Christian 
Democratic Party, will face the candidate from the ARENA Party, Roberto D'Aubuisson, who has been linked 
in various reports to rightist death squad activity. 



Yellow rain: Bees 
are alleged cause 

CAMBRIDGE (AP) - A Harvard bi- 
ologist jumped "a large abyss from science 
to politics" in concluding that "yellow 
rain" falling in Southeast Asia is bee drop- 
pings, not Soviet-made chemical weapons, 
a critic says. 

The United States has charged that 
"yellow rain" has caused at least 10,000 
deaths in Laos, Cambodia and Afghani- 
stan. 

Harvard biologist Matthew Meselson 
said that he found that Asian honeybees 
make "massive defecation flights" that re- 
sult in showers of yellow droppings that 
villagers mistake for aerial bombardments 
of chemical toxins. 

But Chester J. Mirocha, a plant pa- 
thologist at the University of Minnesota, 
said Meselson had shown only that bees 
can defecate in flight. 

"As far as his connections with yellow 
rain and warfare, he jumps a large abyss 
from science to politics," Mirocha said. 



Meese questioned 

WASHINGTON (AP) - Edwin Meese, 
President Reagan's nominee for attorney 
general, came under sharp questioning 
from senators concerned about his com- 
mitment to ending racial discrimmination 
and whether he would be the president's or 
the people's lawyer. 

Partisan squabbling marked the first 
day of the Senate Judiciary Committee's 
hearing on the nomination of Meese, Rea- 
gan's counselor and close friend, to replace 
Attorney General William French Smith. 

Meese pledged to pursue "even-handed 
policy." 

But the pledges failed to satisfy Demo- 
crats and one Republican, Sen. Charles 
Mathias of Maryland. They questioned 
Meese closely on his role in overturning an 
Internal Revue Service policy against giv- 
ing racially discriminatory schools tax ex- 
amptions, his personal finances, and his 
relations with Reagan's political support- 
ers. 

Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass.. 
noted the change in IRS policy, Meese's 
remark that some Americans join food 
lines because the food is free, and his op- 
position to government-paid lawyers for 
the poor. 



78 



MARCH 

U.S. Senate hopefuls discuss issues 



By LISA MARIE CANTWELL 

Collegian Staff 

A field of five of the seven Democratic 
candidates seeking the U.S. Senate seat 
being vacated by Sen. Paul Tsongas par- 
ticipated in a panel discussion at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts, using it as an 
opportunity to unanimously criticize the 
Reagan administration's economic and 
military policies in Central America. 

The Democratic frontrunners — U.S. 
Rep. Edward J. Markey, Lt. Gov. John 
Kerry, and U.S. Rep. James Shannon — 
were joined by party members William 
Hebert, former executive director of the 
Massachusetts Teachers Association, and 
John Pierce Lynch, former Springfield 
probate, and Republican Dr. Mildred Jef- 
ferson, at the two-hour forum. 

Each of the Democratic candidates and 
their one attending Republican challenger 
responding to a short series of prepared 
questions before an afternoon audience of 
350 at the Student Union Ballroom. 

The discussion was the highlight of the 
annual conference of the Massachusetts 



Public Interest Research Group. 

The three leading candidates said the 
presence of U.S. troops in Central Amer- 
ica could lead to direct involvement, re- 
flective of Vietnam. All three favored im- 
mediate withdrawal of troops and cuts in 
military funding. Hebert and Lynch 
shared similar sentiment, but Jefferson, a 
Boston area physician, came out in sup- 
port of the current policy in Central 
America. 

Markey, Kerry, and Shannon said they 
would work toward a freeze through legis- 
lation once elected to office. The three 
also shared as a political priority the ratifi- 
cation of the Equal Right Amendment. 

They supported strengthening a federal 
law which mandates clean-up of hazard- 
ous waste. They also criticized the Reagan 
administration and the Environmental 
Protection Agency for their lack of re- 
sponse to the problems, and said stronger 
laws and corporate fines must be estab- 
lished. 





^,^ 







A Bible-carrying demonstrator stands among a group of supporters of school prayer outside the U.S. Capitol. 
The proposed amendment was defeated in Congress. 



One of three March blizzards closed school for 1 
1/2 days 

"Big Dan's" rapists 
receive jail terms 

FALL RIVER — Four men were sen- 
tenced to prison terms ranging from six to 
12 years for the gang rape of a woman on a 
barroom pool table. The judge said the 
four "brutalized a defenseless young wom- 
an and sought to degrade and destroy her 
human, individual dignity." 

The lawyer for the victim said afterward 
that she has moved permanently from the 
area. 

"There were five sentences in this case 
— one of them exile," said her lawyer, 
Scott Charnas. 

As friends and family wept, Superior 
Court Judge William Young imposed 
terms of nine to 12 years upon Silva, 27, 
Victor Raposo, 23, and John Cordeiro, 24. 
Silva sobbed as the judge announced his 
decision. 

Young also sentenced Joseph Vieira, 28, 
to a term of six to eight years. 

A crowd of several hundred stood quiet- 
ly outside the century-old courthose while 
the sentences were read. But the silence 
erupted into shouts of "Let them go!" 

All the sentences will be served at Wal- 
pole State Prison, a tough maximum-secu- 
rity facility. Under state laws Vieira must 
serve at least four years of his sentence. 
The others face a minimum of six years 
behind bars before being eligible for pa- 
role. 

"These individuals stand convicted of 
most serious crimes: crimes of extreme 
violence that brutalized a defenseless 
young woman and sought to degrade and 
destroy her human, individual dignity," 
the judge said in a memorandum accom- 
panying the sentences. "Such crimes war- 
rant a significant sanction." 



79 



APRIL 



Mt. Holyoke women camp out in 
protest against the arms race 

By JULIA MAYCOCK 

A group of approximately 20 Mount Holyoke students pitched their tents and hung 
banners at the observatory field on campus creating a women's peace encampment to 
protest the arms race. The encampment was the culmination of three months of planning 
by a group of women in Jean Grossholt's Women Organizing Against Nuclear War class, 
who wanted to participate in the international women's peace movement. 

The women, who came together at the peace encampment, provided an opportunity for 
individuals concerned about the possibility of a nuclear holocaust to express their views and 
to "empower one another", according to participant Kathy Brandt. The organizers of the 
encampment at Mt. Holyoke made decisions by group consensus and said they refused to 
fall into a hierarchical structure. The most difficult question the Mt. Holyoke students said 
they faced was whether to include men in the encampment or to declare the grounds 
"women's space only". "It's important for this to be a women's movement because we're 
reacting against policies which are made and implemented by men. We're reacting to all 
violence against women and it is the same mentality of dominance that has made this (the 
arms race) possible," said participant Julie Baker. Women at the encampment said there 
was still a "fear of Feminism" so that when women unite as a group they are open to 
harassment. There were some incidents over the weekend of men attempting to pull down 
banners and some men also drove by yelling obscenities, but the women said they were 
camping not only to protest but to empower themselves. "This is an example of our 
resources, strength, and our fear," Brandt said. 

"There may be 20 of us here in body but there are hundreds in spirit." 

Tuition battle ends in 6% hike 

dents pay up to 33% of the cost of their 
educaiton, with no single-year tuition in- 
crease exceeding 15%. This translated into 
a $167 increase for in-state undergrad- 
uates and proportionally higher increases 
for out-of-state and graduate students. 

The controversy was lessened somewhat 
on April 25 when the Massachusetts 
House of Representatives passed two 
amendments which limited tuition in- 
creases to 6% for the 1984-85 school year. 
The first amendment tied annual tuition 
increases to the annual increase in dispos- 
able income and put a 6% ceiling on in- 
creases for the following year. The second 
amendment allocated an additional $2.7 
million for the UMass Amherst campus. 

Both amendments were put forward by 
Rep. James Collins (D-Amherst), a Uni- 
versity graduate who said other UMass 
graduates in the legislature "vigorously 
supported" the amendments. The approval 
of the Massachusetts State Senate and 
Gov. Dukakis was needed to put the 
amendments into affect, but Collins was 
optimistic about receiving a positive reac- 
tion from both. 

UMass Chancellor Joseph Duffey had 

attempted to remain uncommitted to the 

increase proposals, although he had pro- 

n „ • ^L- , .. - . „ . posed a $50 increase of his own the pre- 

Pres. Reagan in China for talks with Premier • r n 

Zivang. VIOUS fall. 



By STEPHEN HOWE 

April was a time of great importance 
concerning tuition policies at the Universi- 
ty of Massachusetts. On April 18, the 
Massachusetts Board of Regents of High- 
er Education approved a controversial 
15% tuition hike for UMass students. The 
ruling passed by a 10-4 margin despite 
appeals from students and a suggestion by 
the Legislature's Joint Committee on Edu- 
cation to delay the vote by one month. 
Gov. Dukakis opposed the measure and 
was also in favor of delaying the vote an- 
other month. The vote set into motion a 
new tuition policy designed to have Massa- 
chusetts state college and university stu- 





William Douglas during the Robin Benedict mur- 
der trial. 

Tufts prof, guilty 

Associated Press 

From the first there were doubts about 
prosecuting for murder when no body 
had been found. Several prospective ju- 
rors were excused when they said they 
doubted they were willing to convict. 

But on Friday, April 27, an anatomy 
professor admitted bludgeoning his 
young lover and disposing of her body 
rather than face what his attorney called 
"insurmountable evidence" in a murder 
trial. 

Thomas C. Troy, attorney for William 
H. Douglas, 42, a former anatomy pro- 
fessor at Tufts University, said going to 
trial "would have been a waste of the 
court's time." 

"This is a human tragedy," said Troy, 
a former Golden Gloves boxer who re- 
presented Boston Strangler Albert De- 
Salvo and several other well known 
criminals. "He has unburdened himself 
of the shame and tragedy he feels." 

Douglas stunned a packed courtroom 
when he pleaded guilty to a lesser charge 
of manslaugher in the death of 21 -year- 
old Robin Benedict, a graphic artist 
whom police said was also a prostitute. 

The case was not the first in which 
Massachusetts prosecutors sought a mur- 
der conviction without producing a body. 
One had been previously successful. 

Court records show prosecutors at- 
tempted to introduce testimony that 
Douglas had access to a crematorium 
used to dispose of laboratory animals at 
the university. 

Troy sought to have prosecutor John 
Kivlan dismissed for misconduct before 
the grand jury, citing among other rea- 
sons "inflammatory" testimony about 
the crematorium. 

Douglas, who agreed to reveal ever- 
ything about the killing and the location 
of the body as part of the plea bargaining 
arrangement, was interviewed by investi- 
gators for several hours. 



80 



Holocaust 
Memorial 
held at UMass 

The Holocaust left a "black hole in the 
story of the 20th century," said Chancellor 
Joseph D. Duffey at a service in remem- 
brance of Holocaust Memorial Day at the 
University of Massachusetts on April 26. 
"Selective amnesia is sometimes a merci- 
ful occurance, sparing us the puzzled an- 
guish of trying to explain what we would 
rather forget. But remember we must," 
Duffey told an emotional audience filling 
the Cape Cod Lounge in the Student 
Union Building. 

Many in the audience wept throughout 
the service as they listened to the chancel- 
lor's speech. Many were also wearing but- 
tons bearing the yellow star of David, 
which were distributed on campus several 
days before the service in order to help 
raise awareness of the event. 

Duffey said it does not dishonor the 
memory of the Holocaust to remember 
other events which have contributed a 
"cloud of witnesses to the human propen- 
sities for evil which hovers over this gen- 
eration and this century." The events he 
was speaking of were "the children of My 
Lai and Cambodia, the Armenian martyrs 
of 1915", and the other tragedies of past 
centuries. "The Holocaust itself is not an 
exclusively Jewish event," he said, explain- 
ing that a small percentage of non-Jews 
were also murdered in concentration 
camps like Auschwitz and Dachau. 

"No longer must Americans apologize 
for being different or for cherishing their 
own distinctive heritages and traditions," 
Duffey said. He said ethnic self-awareness 
can be good in many respects but it can 
also in some ways be bad. 



VTC leaves 
campus 

Conference Services at the University 
of Massachusetts lost an $80,000 a year 
account with United Technologies Corp. 
following student protest over the 
group's presence on campus last fall. 
University Conference Services Director 
Elizabeth A. Dale said she learned the 
corporation would no longer hold its ad- 
vanced technical studies program at U 
Mass when she met with members of the 
Hartford-based firm earlier this yer. 

I think they felt uncomfortable on 
campus," she said. During a two-week 
conference in the Campus Center last 
October, students rallied twice on the 
steps of the Student Union and the Cam- 
pus Center and attempted to meet with 
UTC officials to discuss the company's 
military-related work. The Undergrad- 
uate Student Senate then passed two res- 
olutions, one to deny UTC further cam- 
pus access and another to demand full 
disclosure of University contracts with 
the Defense Department. 

UTC representative James L. Hub- 
bard, who signed the conference con- 
tracts, said the UMass protests were the 
first UTC ever encountered, but were not 
responsible for the company's decision to 
not return to the campus. "Our people 
enjoyed the conference and it was not 
disrupted (by the protestors)," Hubbard 
said, claiming a "better" facility has sim- 
ply been found as a conference site. 

Hubbard said UMass was originally 
chosen and had been "very condusive" 
for the training program because of its 
facilities, engineering school and cost. 

Conference Services, which books 
about 200 conferences a year, operates as 
a Lfniversity trust fund and drew about 
$1.8 million in revenue last year. Dale 
said. 




Senate blames 
CIA 

The Senate approved a non-binding res- 
olution on April 1 by a 84- 1 2 vote calling 
for an end to the use of CI A funds to assist 
in the mining of Nicaraguan ports. 

The Republican leadership agreed to 
support the measure in return for Sen. Ed- 
ward M. Kennedy's agreement to defer a 
companion proposal demanding that the 
administration reverse its decision to re- 
,move its Central American policies from 
World Court jurisdiction for two years. 
Nicaragua has appealed the mining issue 
to the world court. 

The resolution adopted by the Senate 
reads: "It is the sense of Congress that no 
funds shall be obligated or expanded for 
the purpose of planning, executing or sup- 
porting the mining of the ports or territori- 
al waters of Nicaragua." Its adoption 
made it part of a pending tax bill, which if 
passed would be sent to the Democratic- 
controlled House for action. Days later, 
anti-Sandinista rebels placed land mines 
on stretches of roads leading from the At- 
lantic port of Puerto Cabezas to the Hon- 
duran border, according to civilian and 
military forces. 

The sources, who spoke on condition 
that they not be identified for security rea- 
sons, said the land mines had been located 
close to towns and roads leading from 
Puerto Cabezas to the border town of Wa- 
span some 60 miles away. They said the 
action was aimed at Nicaraguan troops 
operating in the area, which is North Ze- 
laya province in northeastern Nicaragua. 

The Reagan administration said the 
mining (of the ports) was approved be- 
cause of the Sandinistas' support for leftist 
rebels fighting the U.S.-supported govern- 
ment in El Salvador. The Nicaraguan in- 
surgents deny, however, having received 
U.S. aid to plant the mines. 



Geoff Smith of Providence College, men's division winner of The Boston 
Marathon. 




new 
bctance 






Lorraine Mollcr of New Zealand, women's division winner of The Boston Marathon. 



81 







Tom Kellner working on his project. 

Pond art project vandalized 

By DAVID LINTON 

Collegian Staff 

The mock Trident 2 submarine conning tower in the campus pond, which was supposed 
to be the highlight of Earth Awareness Week, was discovered destroyed early April 25. 

The tower, which was the thesis project of a graduate sculpture major at the University, 
was reported "tipped and partially submerged" at 3:1 1 a.m., according to UMass police. 

The cause of the destruction to the 20-foot high, 20-foot long sculpture installed in the 
pond on April 22 is not known, although vandalism is a possibility. 

"I'm not surprised at all," said Tom Kellner, the graduate student who designed the 
sculpture. "It was something I expected to happen but I didn't expect it so soon." 

The conning tower was made of chestnut beams and pinewood ribs covered with tarpaper 
and was anchored to the bottom of the pond. 

"I doubt it was the elements. It would have needed more wind to take it down," Kellner 
said. 

Although he said he did not know who could have been responsible, Kellner said it was 
"probably someone in support of the military buildup." 

"It was supposed to be a non-representative submarine. It was modeled after a Trident 
but had no connection to any country," Kellner said. 

Francis Crowe, an activist who was arrested and jailed in Rhode Island for painting 
graffiti on a real Trident 2 submarine, had planned to hold a demonstration at the campus 
pond and paint "Peace Now" on the conning tower, Kellner said, "to bring home to UMass 
the things she has done." 

"Even though the piece is destroyed, the memory is there and the imagery is real," he 
said. 

"Ultimately, that's what we should see happen to the submarines," Joyce Greenberg, a 
coordinator of Earth Awareness Week said. 

Charles Francis Carroll, another of the co-ordinators of Earth Awareness Week said, 
"I've heard it said that violence and destruction are the lowest forms of intelligence. For 
whatever reason, this senseless act of vandalism demonstrates the lack of respect for art, 
culture and humanity which a military is capable of." 



APRIL 

No refund for 
arson plagued 
Crampton dorm 

By ANNE McCRORY 

The vice chancellor for student affairs 
at the University of Massachusetts reject- 
ed a student petition seeking a partial re- 
bate of housing fees for residents of a dor- 
mitory plagued by arson in 1983. 

The petition, drawn up by 150 of the 
170 residents living in the all-women 
Crampton House that fall, charges the 
University with negligence in providing 
adequate security during the 16 fire arson 
crisis in the dormitory in the 1983 fall 
semester. It sought full rebate of the se- 
mester's $621 rent fee, an amount reduced 
to $71 during a residential system appeals 
committee hearing, which was confiden- 
tial, according to Ann Koski, committee 
chairperson. 

The document was forwarded to Vice 
Chancellor Dennis L. Madson for approv- 
al, but was later overruled. 

"I am very angry — this is a great injus- 
tice to the women of Crampton," said Sue 
Reiche, one of 51 students who moved out 
of Crampton. 

The petition, charging the administra- 
tion with violations of the residence hall 
contract, states in part that "the Universi- 
ty was negligent because it believed the 
situation was dangerous enough to sum- 
mon the help of the district attorney but 
not dangerous enough to implement 24- 
hour security to protect our physical and 
mental health until late November. It also 
charges physical, mental and academic 
hardships incurred during late night fire 
evacuations, police and media interroga- 
tions." 

Four arrests were made in connection 
with fall 1983 semester's series of small 
fires, three of which were settled in court. 
A Crampton resident assistant charged 
with setting the only fire to occur in a 
student's room had all charges against her 
dropped, and attorney Charles DiMare of 
the UMass Legal Services Office prepared 
lawsuits against University officials and 
investigators. The suits charged rights vio- 
lations in the arrest and investigation of 
the students and were to be filled by the 
end of spring 1984, DiMare said. 



82 



MAY 

Ex-arson suspect 
files lawsuit 

By ANNE McCRORY 
Collegian Staff 

A University of Massachusetts student 
formerly charged with arson is seeking $13 
million in two lawsuits, charging more 
than 15 defendants with violations of her 
rights in connection with her arrest and 
subsequent suspension from the University 
last December. 

Yvette I. Henry, 20, a senior chemistry 
major from Philadelphia, was arrested 
Dec. 2 and charged with setting the 15th 
fire in her dormitory, Crampton House. 

Following the arrest, Henry was held in 
jail, suspended and barred from, the Uni- 
versity and fired from her job as a resident 
assistant. She was later permitted 
back on campus to attend classes only in 
the presence of an escort. All charges 
against her were dropped Dec. 23 for lack 
of evidence. 

The suits, filed in U.S. District Court in 
Springfield, seek $6.5 million each in com- 
pensatory damages on a total of 1 7 counts 
charging law enforcement agencies and 
University officials with violating Henry's 
rights. The case, which requests a jury tri- 
al, will not be heard for three to five years, 
according to Henry's attorneys. 

Defendants named in one suit include 
the FBI, State Fire Marshall Joseph A. 
O'Keefe, the University, Director of 
UMass Public Safety Gerald T. O'Neil, 
Associate Director Philip J. Cavanaugh, 
Dean of Students William F. Field, Execu- 
tive Director of Housing Services Joseph 
A. Zannini, police officers and unidenti- 
fied University personnel. 

The second suit names the University, 
Chancellor Joseph D. Duffey, News Bu- 
reau Director Arthur S. Clifford, Field, 
O'Neil, Cavanaugh and housing staff. 

The complaints allege that the arrest of 
Henry, a black woman, was based on ra- 
cial considerations in connection with a 
psychological profile compiled by the FBI 
to target suspects in the rash of more than 
40 small fires. 

The evening of her arrest, Henry was 
"induced by trickery and deceit" to ac- 
company officers to a trailer near the 
UMass police station, where she was ques- 
tioned for up to three hours without legal 
counsel and then arrested, according to 
the complaint. 



Markey drops out 

BOSTON (AP) — U.S. Rep Edward J. 
Markey, the first Democrat to enter the 
race for the vacant U.S. Senate seat in 
Massachusetts this fall, became the first 
candidate to drop out of the crowded Sen- 
ate field. 

Markey issued a terse statement, saying 
"intense personal reflection" prompted 
him to drop his Senate bid and decide to 
run for a fifth term in the House from the 
7th congressional district. 

The 37-year-old Maiden resident, a 
leader of the national nuclear freeze move- 
ment, said he would elaborate on his deci- 
sion at a news conference. 

"I think it's clear he loves his work in 
Congress and believes in the movement he 
leads," said George Bachrach, co-chair- 
man of Markey's Senate campaign. 

Gillian Gansler, Markey's campaign 
press secretary, said she felt Markey did 
not act due to his heavy opposition for the 
Democratic nomination to succeed U.S. 
Sen. Paul Tsongas. 



CIA accused of 
ordering bombing 

WASHINGTON (AP) — The CIA or- 
dered an air strike against a suspected Sal- 
vadoran guerrilla communications center 
inside Nicaragua in February and then 
told a Nicaraguan rebel group to take re- 
sponsibility for the attack, intelligence 
sources said. 

These sources said the CIA assigned 
specially trained Nicaraguan exiles to car- 
ry out the raid. It is the first known assault 
directed by the CIA against a base alleg- 
edly used by leftist Salvadoran guerrillas 
inside Nicaragua. 

Reps. Bill Alexander, D-Ark., and 
Wyche Fowler, D-Ga., told a news confer- 
ence that a leader of the Nicaraguan 
Democratic Force, known by its Spanish 
acronym FDN, complained to them that 
his group had been ordered by the CIA to 
claim responsibility for the raid. 






'J 



mj 



^^j^yr^":- ^,2, 




The devastating effects of Agent Orange — Top 
photo, taken in 1965, is a lush mangrove forest about 
60 miles from Saigon. Bottom photo shows same 
forest in 1970, 5 years after the United States 
sprayed it with the chemical defoliant Agent Or- 
ange. On May 7, seven chemical companies agreed 
to pay $180 million in a tentative, out-of-court settl- 
ment with 15,000 Viet Nam veterans who claimed 
exposure to Agent Orange. The veterans contended 
they contracted various types of cancer, liver and 



nerve damage, skin problems and mental distur- 
bances because they were forced to handle Agent 
Orange, march through areas sprayed with it and 
drink from streams contaminated by it. Wives of 
some veterans said they had miscarriages because of 
their husbands' exposure, and children of the ex- 
soldiers allegedly had birth defects because of their 
fathers' exposure. Under the settlement, none of the 
chemical companies admit liability for the injuries. 



83 



MAY 

Steinem advocates 
ending injustices 



By REBECCA THATCHER 

Collegian Staff 

SOUTH HADLEY - Feminist writer, 
activist and organizer Gloria Steinem 
urged more than 1,000 men and women to 
work for reproductive rights and economic 
equality for women last night at Mount 
Holyoke College. 

Steinem said it took 150 years for blacks 
and women to become legal entities and 
the next step is legal equality. 

"We need to make sure that no one is 
ever again born into a particular role be- 
cause of race or sex," she said. 

Steinem said institutional changes are 
just beginning, and that the resulting op- 
position means the movement is being tak- 
en seriously. 

"The opposition is a tribute — 10 years 
ago we were being ridiculed," she said. 

Steinem said language is very impor- 
tant. "Now we have words like "battered 
women" and "sexual harrassment." Ten 
years ago, it was just called "life," she 
said. 

Steinem said economic interests are 
vested in keeping women separated and 
unorganized. 

"You can say you are for equal pay for 
equal work, but to say you are for equal 
pay for women — now that is an economic 
revolution," she said. 

"We are roughly one half of the popula- 
tion, we do one-third of the paid work, we 
do two-thirds of all the work, we receive 10 
percent of the salaries paid, and we own 
one percent of the property," she said. 

Women have to gain full reproductive 
rights because reproduction determines 
their economic status and because the lack 
of that control is a major cause of death 
and injury, she said. 

Steinem said reproductive freedom 
must be established as a right which no 
government "of the right or the left, capi- 
tal or communist, has a right to interfere 
with." 

She said democratizing the family is im- 
portant because housewives work the long- 
est hours, have the highest level of drug 
addiction and alcoholism, the highest 
chance of being beaten or killed, and the 
most likelihood of being replaced by a 
younger worker (through divorce), than 
any other job. 




Fn May elections, Filipino President Ferdinand 
Marcos (above left) encountered heavier-than-ex- 
pected opposition from political forces once led by 
his main rival, slain leader Benigno Aquino. 

Soviet bloc v^^ill 
hold its own games 

(AP) — Sports officials in Poland said 
May 14 that Soviet-bloc nations are pre- 
paring to sponsor sports events in various 
countries to substitute for the Los Angeles 
Summer Olympics, which are being boy- 
cotted by the Soviet Union and some of its 
allies. 

Sports officials from the Soviet Union 
and its allies met to discuss organizing a 
"counter-Olympics," but decided instead 
to divide events among Communist na- 
tions, said a Polish sports journalist. 

Reaction to the pull out by U.S. Olym- 
pians and coaches centered on how the 
injection of politics into the Olympics was 
ruining the original spirit of the Olympic 
Games. 

Abie Grossfeld, head coach of the U.S. 
gymnastics team for the Summer Games, 
said, "Politics is becoming much too in- 
volved in the Olympics. I don't think we 
should have pulled out in 1980. It was a 
political ploy." 

Jody Anderson, a competitor in the hep- 
tathlon, said she feels "sorry for the ath- 
letes" because it is all political. Athletes 
have nothing to do with it." 

George Raveling, an assistant to U.S. 
Olympic basketball Coach Bobby Knight, 
called the boycott "another step toward 
what ultimately could be the demise of the 
Olympics." 



Treetop vigil held 
for Stockbridge 

By DAVID LINTON 
Collegian Staff 

A University of Massachusetts senior's 
concern about declining enrollment in the 
Stockbridge School of Agriculture drove 
him up a tree. 

Richard Barrett, 23, a senior landscape 
operations major from Millis, said he 
would stay in a tree off of North Pleasant 
Street until May 1 1 to draw attention to 
and demonstrate the extent of his concern 
"to increase enrollment and awareness of 
the Stockbridge School of Agriculture." 

"If one' person more comes to Stock- 
bridge, I guess that's successful," Barrett 
said. 

A few weeks after Stockbridge Student 
Senate meeting about declining enroll- 
ment in the school, Barrett, who is also 
president of the Stockbridge fraternity Al- 
pha Tau Gamma, said he decided the best 
way to gain publicity was to do something 
"zany and crazy." 

"At the meeting people just blew a lot of 
hot air about what they should do to in- 
crease enrollment and I came up with the 
idea of sitting in a tree for five days to 
increase attention," he said. 

Barrett said enrollment has declined be- 
cause people are not aware of the educa- 
tional opportunities that Stockbridge of- 
fers in fields such as turf management, 
landscape operations, agriculture business 
management and animal agriculture. 

Other Alpha Tau Gamma members said 
they will help Barrett by sending food and 
other necessities in a plastic milk carton to 
the four by eight foot platform located 
about 30 feet from the ground. 




Gdansk, Poland (AP) — Nobel Peace Prize Lau- 
reate Lech Walesa heads Solidarity supporters mo- 
ments before joining an official May Day march in 
Gdansk on May I. 



84 



Gays rally 
for rights 

By LAURA KOESTER 

Collegian Staff 

Despite periods of intermittent rain, at 
least 1,500 people marched May 12 in 
Northampton to rally for Gay and Lesbian 
rights. 

According to Gay and Lesbian Activists 
(GALA) organizers, the march was held 
to "throw off the cloak of invisibility 
which characterizes our lives as gay peo- 
ple." 

Another purpose was to draw connec- 
tions between the oppression of gays and 
lesbians and racism, sexism, imperialism, 
anti-semitism, and economic discrimmina- 
tion. 

The rally included taped and live music, 
dancing, and speakers. GALA member 
Kim Christiansen asserted, "We cannot 
maintain our rights unless we organize and 
fight. We are tired of being tolerated - or 
not tolerated - in this town. We are an 
important part of the cohimunity." 

Originally, Northampton town officials 
denied GALA a march permit for Satur- 
day because they could not guarantee pub- 
lic safety and they anticipated traffic and 
congestion problems. 

"Anytime establishing a good business 
climate becomes more important than in- 
suring people's right to freedom of assem- 
bly, freedom of speech, right to unionize, 
right to a humane environment, we all 
lose," Christiansen said. 

UMass adopts 
motto 

By ANNE McCRORY 
Collegian Staff 

For the first time in its 12 year history, 
the University of Massachusetts at Am- 
herst will have its own motto, "Knowledge 
is beneficial to the Commonwealth," fol- 
lowing an official announcement May 15. 

The slogan, "reipublicae scientia pro- 
dest" in Latin, was written by senior clas- 
sics major Karen McDonald, 22, of Ralls, 
Texas. 

It was selected from 114 entries in a 
contest offering $100 for a motto that 
would represent the educational purpose 
of the University better than the current 
saying, according to the professor who 
came up with the motto idea. 

"We felt often times the University was 
presented in a negative way in the public 
eye," said Vincent Cleary, a professor of 
classics. "We felt this was a positive thing 
to do for the school." 




The last week of May brought heavy rains causing extensive flooding throughout much of western Massachu- 
setts and Connecticut. Above photo, taken on May 30, is of a farm off Rt. 91, near Hadley. Mass. 

Pornography foes encounter protest 

By MIRIAM ZOLL 

Collegian Staff 



Emotional arguments broke out May 10 
in the Campus Center when an anti-por- 
nography group picketing in front of the 
University Store clashed with a counter 
group protesting censorship. 

Peggy Shaw, a sophomore STEPEC 
major who picketed against pornography, 
said the picket was an educational picket. 

"It's not a protest advocating censor- 
ship," she said. "We feel the channels used 
so far, the BOG (Board of Governors) and 
the SGA (Student Government Associ- 
ation), aren't getting the message across 
quickly enough. Everyday women are be- 
ing hurt by pornography and men's defini- 
tion of women is being perverted by it." 

John Wrisley, a 2 1 -year-old theatre ma- 
jor who picketed in the counter demon- 
stration said by choosing the University 
Store as their location to picket, the anti- 
pornography group was "putting political 
pressure on the store and the University." 

Julie Melrose, a member of Ad Hoc 
Committee on Campus Violence, said the 
anti-pornography demonstration was held 



to bring the issue of violence against wom- 
en back into focus. 

"There's a certain point when a political 
struggle reaches a level of verbal debate," 
Melrose said. "When the real issues are 
lost in the struggle, one of the ways to 
bring the issue back to violence against 
women is by communicating through 
guerilla theatre." 

Peter Lee, a 19-year-old COINS major 
from Natick who participated in the 
counter demonstration, said holding a 
picket in front of the store was "exposing 
people to undue pressure." 

"If you're protesting men's magazines 
you have to look at the articles that tell 
women how to control their man," he said. 

Tom Dworkin, the first male to picket 
in the anti-pornography protest, said "men 
feel peer pressure not to picket" against 
pornography because "men are taught to 
be proud of their sexuality, and many men 
connect pornography with sexuality." 

"I'm accepting responsibility because 
it's male problem," he said. "Pornography 
contributes to a society that contributes to 
an attitude of violence against women." 



85 



MAY 



Enforcing "community standards" or censorship? 



The clash on May 10, outside the Uni- 
versity Store between anti-pornography 
demonstrators and the counter-demon- 
strators charging them with attempted 
censorship reflects a larger, societal prob- 
lem with almost unlimited dimensions. 

Assuming the goal of a society is to 
safeguard the well-being of all of its mem- 
bers, one of its central, basic tasks is then 
to isolate and dissuade behavior judged 



f^l^OmN OUR 
W/WD WOUNDEI 



imu G ii) 

W£D ORAILV 




injurious or offensive to others. 

Pornography is offensive to people. 
Why must a scientific, casual link be made 
(and is that enough?) between pornogra- 
phy and violence against women to con- 
cretely define and then legally ban pornog- 
raphy? Simple deductive reasoning should 
be enough to realize the value in eliminat- 
ing themes from our culture which seek to 
portray women as objects to be toyed with. 



dominated or randomly brutalized. Maga- 
zines which espouse such behavior are cre- 
ating dangerous, sometimes deadly pieces 
of fiction and must be eliminated. 
By DON CASSIDY 

(Editor's note: The opinions expressed in 
this article are the opinions of the colum- 
nist, and not necessarily those of the Index 
staff.) 




86 



Gay Pride March, 1984 Northampton 



On May 12, approximately 2000 people 
marched in Northampton in support of 
gay rights and to show the solidarity of the 
gay Community. Homosexuals are esti- 
mated to compromise about 10 percent of 
the U.S. population, or approximately 20 
million people. 

Clearly, the Amherst/Northampton 
area is one of the most tolerant in the 
region. But simple tolerance is not enough. 
Verbal abuse, employment and housing 
discrimination and outright violence all 
still occur. The large gay community in 
San Francisco has tried to combat such 
oppression and ensure equal treatment for 
homosexuals by establishing for itself gay- 
owned banks, apartment complexes and 



department stores. 

Similarly, the gay community in this 
area should flex its economic and political 
muscles. Anti-homosexual enterprises 
should be publicized and avoided, fledg- 
ling, gay-owned businesses must be enthu- 
siastically supported, and politicians 
should be convinced (via the ballot box) to 
support legislation prohibiting discrimina- 
tion based on sexual orientation. In short, 
homosexuals must present themselves as a 
major force to be reckoned with. 
By DON CASSIDY 

(Editor's note: The opinions expressed in 
this article are the opinions of the colum- 
nist, and not necessarily those of the Index 
staff.) 





FINE ARTS 

Art, in itself, is diversity, Tlie University of 
Massacliusetts continues to recognize the arts, 
music, tlieatre, and dance. 




88 




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There's a gold mine of obscure finds in 
the Fine Arts Center at UMass. It's hid- 
den in that great concrete and steel pyra- 
mid of mix and match boxes whose exter- 
nal lines of design only begin to suggest the 
maze within. The sleeping treasures meet 
the explorers who may wander into the 
musical instrument sorage room, an ob- 
scure cache of student art, or an electronic 
music studio. 

The most perplexing find, wedged be- 
tween and overlooking the high walls of 
the choral and orchestral rehearsal rooms, 
is a stark gray door set in concrete. A 
manila folder taped there bears the name 
of the researching archaeologist within: 
Michael McLaughlin. 

Beyond that entrance, the past is being 
excavated. This is McLaughlin's Fine Arts 
Center recording studio where he protects 
and tends to some S200.000 of audio- 
sculpting tools that can work alchemy with 
sound. Much of it sits covered like ancient 
relics harboring musical ghosts. 

Against the wall of this rectangular 
room, a control booth that feeds lines to 
the Concert Hall, the Rand Theatre, the 
Music Department and various recital 
halls for recording playback, stands the 
largest of the old icons. The Pacifica, obvi- 
ously aged but untouched, sulks with a 
well-preserved look of little use. 

"The Peacifica Quad 8 is a potential 24- 
track top-of-the line sound mixing board," 
said McLaughlin. 

The mixing board is the core of multi- 
track recording. State of the art boards 
today boast 32 and 64 tracks, but the Paci- 
fica, McLaughlin says, will fill most appli- 
cations. It can broadcast quality "demo" 
tapes and mix a variety of single sources 



(voices, instruments or synthesizers) down 
to the 2-track tape necessary to create a 
master from which a record is pressed. 

The Pacifica has sat nelgected for years 
as the victim of an austere budget, sheer 
negligence and the myopia of administra- 
tors. The 2-track, next to the Pacifica, is 
dusty and damaged; dust covers drape 
over the deck and its cohabitants. Only 8 
tracks were functional or semi-functional 
when McLaughlin was hired last De- 
cember. 

The innards of these boards and tape 
machines collect dust and oxides that 
eventually decay the fine-tuned equip- 
ment. The result is noise, clicks and pops 
that appear with the turning of knobs and 
moving of switches. Originally priced at 
approximately $70,000, the Pacifica was 
rotting through neglect. 

Somebody, then, has misunderstood the 
potential sitting in this multi-million dollar 
facility. It is well-documented that the ar- 
chitect-designers of the Center arranged 
for the purchase and design of the sound 
and recording devices without setting pa- 
rameters for their use or maintenance. The 
Center opened in 1975 with no sound or 
lights and used borrowed or rented equip- 
ment. Conversely, $100,000 of recording 
equipment would be ignored or misused in 
the next ten years. 

But, all of this will change. There is now 
a three-year plan to revamp the Center's 
sound systems, and McLaughlin will over- 
see the work. 

The short-range goal of the Center is to 
maximize its productivity. Repairs have 
begun on the Pacifica and the three Scul- 
ley decks will be serviced or traded for 
more useful tools. McLaughlin hopes for 
new effects boxes {digital delay, expan- 
der/compressors and microphones), but 
meanwhile is unearthing solutions within 
the Center's means and turning the ram- 
shackled into the resurrected. 

The electronic music studio adjacent to 



the Pacifica's room is another buried trea- 
sure severed from full potential with the 
24-track studio. For synthesizer users who 
wish to keep up with the Eno's, the avail- 
able 4-track is hardly enough. If main- 
tained and supported as a viable recording 
studio by music and non-music majors, 
this could offer technical training in multi- 
track and soundtrack production, and a 
chance for players and composers to cre- 
ate finished works in an interactive work- 
place. 

McLaughlin, who has 15 years exper- 
ience managing sound .systems for touring 
acts, including Fleetwood Mac, claims the 
Center's expansion and renovation is im- 
portant and exciting to students here for 
many reasons. The incoming acts at the 
Center are vibrant and plentiful, and there 
is no lack of students seeking coveted in- 
ternships and work-study for training in 
film, video, or sound production. There 
could be frequent videotaping and record- 
ing of children's plays, theatre with full 
orchestra, and guest performers. The new 
studio could mix down to broadcast qual- 
ity, equalize and sweeten the sound, do 
voice-overs and produce a finished video- 
cassette of live performances. 

McLaughlin also sees students adding 
soundtracks to films they've created, in- 
volving the Communication Studies stu- 
dents. He understands, however, that it 
takes a coordinated desire and the talents 
of people who know how to obtain endow- 
ments and grants and clear legalities with 
performers. But, he concedes that the Fine 
Arts Center and UMass students together 
can create a profitable (in terms of fund- 
ing support) Performance Production 
house. 

For the first time in a decade, the Cen- 
ter believes it has the track record, capable 
personnel and vision to utilize its sleeping 
treasures. The Pacifica may rise from the 
ashes of neglect and prove them correct. 



100 




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CENTER 




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103 



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This year the UMass Music The- 
atre Guild had a busy season. With 
the winter production of "The 
Rocky Midnight Experience" and 
the spring outdoor production of 
"Grease," the Guild worked hard 
to display their talents and to pro- 
vide entertainment for the Univer- 
sity students. 




Photos bv Pam Madnick 



SCENES FROM 

"GREASE" 



104 




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109 



ORGANIZATIONS 

The diversity of UMass is represented by tlie 
extracurricular activities of more tlian 450 
Registered Student Organizations. 



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112 




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113 



PEOPLE'S GAY 
ALLIANCE 



The People's Gay Alliance pro- 
vides a positive, supporting atmo- 
sphere for gay, bisexual, and lesbi- 
an members of the university com- 
munity, as well as offering informa- 
tion to the general public and act- 
ing as an advocacy group. 

The PGA provides a lounge open 
to all, in room 413 SUB, and sched- 
ules regular dances. It also sponsors 
the Speaker's Bureau and Counsel- 
ing Collective, which provides out- 
reach, peer-counseling, and infor- 
mation to anyone concerned with 
gay and lesbian - related issues. 




RADICAL 
STUDENT 
UNION 




The RSU is a political coalition of individuals dedicated to social 
change. We feel that in these times of expansionistic foreign policy, 
vanishing social programs and nuclear madness, widespread apathy must 
be replaced by political awareness. It is our conviction that through 
education around the issues we may stimulate basic change in the system. 
We believe control over one's environment begins at home, and promote 
student involvement concerning such issues as a nuclear-free UMass, the 
elimination of military recruitment ads in course schedule guides, an 
increase in women faculty and other issues. The RSU also brings speakers 
and films to campus, as well as organizing events such as rallies and an 
alternative career day. 



MASS PIRG 



MASSPIRG promotes the gen- 
eral welfare of Massachusetts citi- 
zens through local, state, and na- 
tional political arenas. Issues vary 
somewhat from year to year, evolv- 
ing in response to changing politi- 
cal and social conditions, and spe- 
cific concerns of the members. An 
organization that combines the 



strengths of students, citizens, and 
professional staff, MASSPIRG 
provides a unique opportunity for 
students to explore and act on the 
society around them. We encour- 
age any student interested in the 
issues, the skills, and the education- 
al opportunities PIRG provides to 
stop by the office, ANYTIME! 




115 



HILLEL 



Hillel is a special organization 
made up of special people, Jewish 
people. Jewish people who care, 
who are aware, who are active par- 
ticipants in rallies, social events 
and cultural and religious activities 
as well. 

Hillel thrived during the 1983-84 
year. With an 18-member Execu- 



tive Council, we were able to plan 
events and programs attracting 
200-400 participants weekly. Social 
programs ranged from dances and 
sleigh rides to movies and roller 
skating. We hold Shabbat services 
weekly, host distinguished speak- 
ers, offer a diversified selection of 
academic courses and sponsor fea- 



ture films in relation to their most 
supported Jewish interests. Hillel is 
filled with laughter and friends, 
struggles and challenges, learning 
and growth and memories to last a 
lifetime. Good luck to those leav- 
ing. May you continue to dream 
and hold tight to your beliefs. Re- 
member us with a smile, shalom. 





116 



NEWMAN CLUB 



The Newman Club is a group of 
interested students and community 
members of the Catholic Church 
on campus. Its goal is to help make 
University life more personal and 
meaningful for any student. 



Each semester, the club pro- 
motes activities in three areas: so- 
cial, spiritual, and service. It spon- 
sors spaghetti dinners, cookouts, 
dances, intramural teams, camp- 
ing, retreats, and guest speakers. 



The only requisite for the club is 
the desire for fun and self-satisfac- 
tion through the sharing with one 
another of ideas, values, and tal- 
ents. 



UNITED 

CHRISTIAN 

FOUNDATION 



The United Christian Founda- 
tion is a cooperative ministry of 
four Protestant denominations. It is 
staffed by a full-time chaplain and 
an administrative assistant. 

UCF is an open, inclusive com- 
• munity spanning a variety of the- 
ological viewpoints, and offering a 



wide range of programs and ser- 
vices. These include Biblical study, 
a women's spirituality group, spiri- 
tual direction, counseling and re- 
ferrals, advocacy and organizing 
around issues of social change, jus- 
tice, hunger, and disarmament, and 
drop-in hours for coffee and con- 



versation. 

UCF also serves as a clearing- 
house for other religous organiza- 
tions and interests and participates 
in the Ecumenical Council at 
UMass. 



117 



VETERAN'S SERVICE ORGANIZATION 



The Veterans Service Organiza- 
tion (VSO) consists of concerned 
individuals interested in extending 
social and professional services to 
the population of military veterans 
here at UMass. It offers veterans 
an opportunity to become involved 
actively in issues and programs 
which concern them as veterans. 

VSO programs are designed to 
promote the development of mem- 
bers' full potential, to integrate per- 



sonal skills with academic work, 
and to share the knowledge gained 
through past experience with other 
members of the group and campus 
community. 

Potential areas for member in- 
volvement include general counsel- 
ing and referal services in academ- 
ics, financial aid, veteran-related 
legislation, housing, pre-enlistment 
counseling, fund raising programs, 
and other social events. 




The Handicapped Students Col- 
lective is a group of both handi- 
capped and non-handicapped stu- 
dents. Members of the group work 
together to raise awareness among 
the administrators, faculty, and 



HANDICAPPED 

STUDENTS 

COLLECTIVE 



student body of the problems and 
concerns of the University's grow- 
ing handicapped population, which 
includes physical and attitudinal 
barriers. 

The collective's hope is that 



through education of the communi- 
ty, these barriers can be eliminated 
from all activities that are a part of 
university life. 



118 




SCERA is based on the funda- 
mental principles of student unioni- 
zation and student empowerment, 
the foundation on which the pro- 
gressive education movement was 
built. We recognize the role of a 
union of students, which is to repre- 
sent the interests of students, and 
defend their rights through organi- 
zation and advocacy, as well as the 
crucial mission of empowering stu- 
dents with the necessary skills and 
resources to do their own research 
and analysis to actively advocate 
change to accomplish these goals. 
These are the essence of SCERA's 
roots, as well as being the stepping 
stones to progressive education of 
today and tomorrow. 

Some of the many issues students 
have successfully organized around 
include: opposition to massive fed- 
eral students aid cuts, working to- 
ward eliminating racial and sexual 
harassment on campus, and in- 
creased student control within their 
academic and residential environ- 
ments. Providing research and ac- 
tivism in these different areas is 
done through a team network: the 
Public Policy Team, Women's Is- 
sues Team, Rents & Fees Team, 
Academic Affairs Team, Residen- 
tal Team, and the Anti-Racism 
Team. 





119 



STUDENT 
GOVERNMENT 
ASSOCIATION 




The Undergraduate Student 
Senate is the chief legislative body 
for the undergraduates at UMass. 
It is comprised of 120 elected sena- 
tors from across campus, the Greek 
area, the commuter area, the Third 
World community and area gov- 
ernment representatives. All sena- 
tors are responsible to their respec- 



tive constituencies while at the 
same time they are responsible to 
the larger undergraduate student 
community. 

Many decisions are made by 
members of the Senate. These in- 
clude such matters as approving 
the annual Student Activities Trust 
Fund allocations, running and ap- 



proving the results of campus-wide 
elections, legislating the areas of 
social policy, and establishing uni- 
form financial policies for all 
RSO's. 

Getting involved in the Under- 
graduate Student Senate enables 
you to gain valuable experience in a 
social and political arena. 



^^^K^' 









The Board of Governors is a 32- 
member elected governing body re- 
presenting the various constituen- 
cies around the university. The 
Board's main job is to make the 
policy and decisions regarding how 
the University's multi-million dol- 
lar Campus Center is run. Working 
with the Board gives excellent and 
valuable experience in manage- 
ment, finance, and public service. 

The Board of Governors was 
formed to provide students with a 
direct line to the administration. 
— Bradley Jacobs 





121 



PANHELLENIC COUNCIL 




This past year, the Panhellenic 
Council grew and became stronger 
than it had been in several years. A 
fundraiser for the Kennedy-Shriver 
Foundation was held in the fall. 
The council received an award for 
their outstanding money raising. 
The formal rush programs also 
went well, and the group plans to 
increase sorority membership for 
the 1984 fall semseter. 

The annual Greek Week activi- 
ties were renamed "Greek Fest". 
The event was the highlight of the 
spring semester. Festivities includ- 
ed a barbeque, singing competition, 
charity Softball game, and an 
awards banquet. 





The Interfraternity Council 
(IFC) is the governing body for the 
fraternities. IFC is composed of a 
head council and two representa- 
tives from each fraternity. 

IFC works closely with the Pan- 
hellenic Council, forming the 
Greek Council, in sponsoring fun- 
draisers, philanthropic projects for 
the community and activities for 
the Greek area. Each year at the 
beginning of the fall semester, IFC 
sponsors a plant sale in the Campus 
Center. They are also active in 
planning and preparing activities 
for Homecoming, such as the 
floats. Greek Fest, held in the 
spring, is also an activity sponsored 
by the efforts of IFC and the Pan- 
hellenic council. 



122 



The Index is the yearbook of the 
University of Massachusetts and as 
such is one of the oldest yearbook 
organizations in the country. A 
staff of over twenty students work 
the entire school year and part of 
the summer to produce the book 
and also gain valuable experience 
in editing, writing, layout, photog- 
raphy and business. 

The Index has been accorded 
many awards during its long histo- 
ry, but the new staff each year 
works to create that year's book. 
Dedication, patience and endur- 
ance mark an Index staffer. We 
hope you appreciate the effort. 
Bill Wall 




123 




Fall Board of Editors 




Editor in Chief 


Joel Myerson 


Managing Editor 


Ray Beauchemin 


Production Manager 


J. P. Shanahan 


Business Manager 


Andrew May 


Editorial Editor 


Josh Meyer 


News Editor 


Anne McCrory 


Women's Editor 


Michelle Hyde 


Women's Editor 


David Summersby 


Arts Editor 


Douglas Muise 


Arts Editor 


Lisa Mosley 


Black Affairs Editor 


Yadira Betances 


Sports Editor 


Gerry deSimas 


Photo Editor 


Drew Ogier 




Spring Board of Editors 


Editor in Cliief 


Joel Myerson 


Managing Editor 


Bill Wall 


Production Manager 


J. P. Shanahan 


Business Manager 


Andrew May 


Editorial Editor 


Josh Meyer 


News Editor 


Anne McCrory 


Women's Editor 


Miriam Zoll 


Arts Editor 


Lisa Mosley 


Black Affairs Editor 


Yadira Betances 


Sports Editor 


Gerry deSimas 


Photo Editor 


Dave Deuber 


Photo Editor 


Drew Ogier 




"Hey, see the Collegian today?" 

"Yup, the SGA is at it again but 
at least Scrod was funny. The hoop 
team won, too." 

A familiar sight around campus 
throughout a student's years at the 
University, the Collegian serves, 
for many students, as the only 
source of information each week- 
day. They expect it and take for 
granted that it will be there. If they 
only knew what we go through to 
get it out each day . . . 

The effort a student-run daily 
newspaper requires is extensive but 
never overwhelming because of the 
dedication of its staff. Collegianites 
put in long hours to ensure a good 
paper, much to the detriment of 
their academic and social lives. But 
the experience we obtain is invalu- 
able and the office is an irresistible 
magnet to which we are more less 
drawn to each day. 

Reporting, editing, business, 
photography, production: New 
England's largest college daily of- 
fers it all. 

Starting from 9 a.m. each week- 
day, the office comes to life with 
people showing up to sell advertis- 
ing, collect the bills and write sto- 
ries for the 19,000 circulation pa- 
per. Different groups of people 
work all day and until 4 a.m. the 



next morning to produce the paper 
for little or no pay or academic 
credit. With the help of five full- 
time professionals, the students put 
out one of the best college papers in 
the country. 

Why do staff members devote so 
much time to the paper? Because it 
is exciting, rewarding and just plain 
fun to see the paper come out each 
day to inform the community of 
what is happening. The experience 
derived doesn't hurt, as Collegian 
staff members work on campus for 
the Associated Press, United Press 
International, the Boston Globe, 
Newsweek and other publications. 
Upon graduation, staff members 
parlay their experience into re- 
warding jobs with professional or- 
ganizations. 

The Collegian plays an active 
role in its community, striving to 
formulate debate on the issues af- 
fecting the area as well as reporting 
the news. Covering the arts, sports, 
news, black affairs, and women's 
news in the area is it objective. But 
as it is run by students, the Colle- 
gian is most of all a learning exper- 
iencing, one which has contributed 
greatly to the development of staff 
members. 

— Bill Wall 




125 



V/MiM 91.1 FM 



WMUA is a student-operated 
radio station that offers a wide va- 
riety of programming to serve the 
diverse tastes of Amherst and the 
surrounding communities. 

You can hear almost any type of 



music on WMUA, from bluegrass 
to gospel to progressive rock to 
classical. Most major UMass bas- 
ketball games, football games, and 
other sporting events are broad- 
casted live, both home and away. 



The news and public affairs staff 
provide listeners with information 
and opinions on local and national 
issues. WMUA also provides air 
time to women's and Third World 
media groups. 




WSYL 97.7 FM 



From 9 a.m. to 2 a.m., WSYL 
broadcasts to the University com- 
munity. Staffed and run by stu- 
dents, each disc jockey's three-hour 



air shift consists of music of his or 
her choice. WSYL does make an 
effort to provide programming that 
is not available on the commercial 



stations in the area, and many D.J.s 
play New Wave, reggae, and other 
non-mainstream styles of music. 




126 




"^ZZZ 107.7 FM 



WFCR 66.5 FM 



WZZZ is currently funded by 
the Southwest Area Government 
and is totally student-run. Strictly a 
public service medium for the 
Southwest Residential area and the 
University community, WZZZ ac- 
cepts no advertising. Each disc 
jockey is allowed to develop his or 
her own style, within station and 



WFCR, Five College Radio, is a 
professional, non-commercial Na- 
tional Public Radio member sta- 
tion which was founded and contin- 
ues to be supported by the Five 
College consortium. The station 
devotes roughly 60 percent of its 
time to programming classical mu- 
sic, with the remainder divided be- 
tween public affairs, radio drama, 
jazz, folk music, and special inter- 
est programs. 



Federal Communication Commis- 
sion guidelines. The programming 
features all types of music; daily 
campus, local, national, and inter- 
national news; contests; and live 
political broadcasts, such as debates 
and speeches. The station is on the 
air 17 hours a day, 9 a.m. to 2 a.m., 
seven days a week. 




127 




DRUM, first published in 1969, 
is a black literary and arts maga- 
zine. Printed every year, it provides 
the means by which the Third 
World Community can express its 
artistic and journalistic talents. It 
also gives students the chance to 
learn and be involved in the skills 
required to produce a highly re- 
nowned publication. 




NUMMO 



fianofiAit Ti 







NUMMO News is the largest 
weekly Third World newspaper in 
the Five College area. It began in 
protest of the absence of news per- 
taining to black people in the Mas- 
sachusetts Daily Collegian. Since 
then, it has expanded its coverage 
to include other professed minori- 
tites and oppressed people. 
NUMMO exists to give "the other 
side" of the story. 

NUMMO operates as a three- 
headed entity with an eye on cam- 
pus and local events, national news, 
and global activities. Its staff is 
trained in all phases of newspaper 
production, including reporting, 
writing, photography, typesetting, 
graphic reproduction, and layout. 
The "each one teach one" philos- 
ophy is fully operative from 5 p.m. 
Friday evening to 4:30 p.m. Sunday 
afternoon in the Collegian graphics 
room. 



ics I 



SPECTRUM is the fine arts and 
literary magazine of the University 
of Massachusetts. SPECTRUM 
was conceived in 1967 and will be 
publishing its 30th edition this year 
on the theme of "1984 and Be- 
yond." SPECTRUM is unique 
among collegiate magazines in that 
it is an autonomous publication 
which is completely student-run, 
collectively and voluntarily. SPEC- 
TRUM also publishes only student 
work. 

By doing so, SPECTRUM offers 
students opportunities in magazine 
production, as well as the exposure 
of having work published. SPEC- 
TRUM attempts to reproduce both 
black and white and color artwork 
with absolute fidelity. The staff of 
SPECTRUM typesets and designs 
the magazine's entire format. We 
consider SPECTRUM an impor- 
tant vehicle for art and culture on 
campus. 

— Charles Francis Carroll 



SPECTRUM 




Endangered Species 



AHORA 



AHORA is the organization of 
the UMass Spanish-speaking com- 
munity. Members of the group 
work to recruit Spanish-speaking 
students to the University, promote 
educational programs directed to- 
ward careers and job placement, 
and help encounter the language 
barrier and culture isolation. 
AHORA is also dedicated to elimi- 
nating discrimination and improv- 
ing relations between Spanish- 
speaking and other members of the 
University community. 




129 



SKI CLUB 




The UMass Ski Club is one of 
the most popular and largest orga- 
nizations on campus. The club's 
aim is to provide skiing at its lowest 
possible cost. 



Ski trips were run in January to 
Sugarbush Valley, and on Thurs- 
day evenings and Saturdays during 
the 1984 spring semester. Funding 
for the trips is earned by the club at 



its annual "Ski Snatch" sale held in 
November. The Snatch was a huge; 
success, which in turn led to an ex- 
citing ski season. 



130 



OUTING CLUB 



The Outing Club is a student-run 
organization which offers students 
and faculty a chance to explore 
their environment and get a chance 
to know themselves through chal- 
lenging situations. 

Trips are divided into levels of 
difficulty so that beginners can par- 



ticipate. We offer day and weekend 
trips during the semester. Over the 
vacations we offer longer trips. 
Some trips include canoeing the 
Everglades and the Rio Grande, 
and hiking in the Chesas Moun- 
tains in Texas. The Club does many 
activities, such as Whitewater can- 



oeing, kayaking, rock-climbing, 
mountaineering, x-c skiing, caving, 
and backpacking. We own equip- 
ment for all these activities which 
any member can rent out. We also 
have a cabin in Bethelem, N.H. We 
welcome everybody to the club, so 
come on a trip with us soon. 




CHEERLEADERS 




131 



This year the University of Mas- 
sachusetts Minuteman Marching 
Band (UMMB), under the direc- 
tion of George N. Parks, embarked 
on a "Quest for Excellence", push- 
ing hard for top quality in precision 
marching and musicality. From the 
heat and humidity of band camp in 
August to the frosty November 
mornings, the band was inspired to 
work hard to do the best job possi- 
ble. 

Supporting our football team, 
the band performed three times 
each Saturday: pre-game, half- 
time, and post game. The band was 
led on the field by Drum Majors 
Therese Murry, Jeff Poulton, and 
Mike Los. The UMMB travelled in 
five buses to Harvard University, 



University of Connecticut, Univer- 
sity of New Hampshire, and Uni- 
versity of Delaware. Additional 
away performances included ap- 
pearances at Faneuil Hall, Mullca 
Hill, New Jersey, at the New Eng- 
land Scholastic Band Association 
(NESBA) Competition in Lynn, 
Massachusetts, as well as the annu- 
al Multi-bands pops concert held at 
the Fine Arts Center. 

This year's selections included 
"Mambo", "Godspell", "Hey 
Jude", "Caravan", "Let's Groove", 
"Carnival", "Another Rainy Day", 
"Get It On", "Stars and Stripes 
Forever", and "New York, New 
York", as well as our Alma Mater, 
"When Twilight Shadows Deepen", 
and our fight song, "Fight, Mass!". 



The season was highlighted with 
the making of the band's first mo- 
tion picture: a parody of the ever 
popular "Twilight Zone", which 
was produced by Jeff Meisler. 
Kappa Kappa Psi and Tau Beta 
Sigma, the National Honorary 
Bands Service Fraternity and So- 
rority, colonized chapters of Boston 
University. In addition to other tra- 
dional service projects, the fraterni- 
ty and sorority sponsored the 1984 
District IX Convention held here at 
the UMass campus. 

Our "Quest for Excellence" has 
been long and trying as the band 
pushed itself to its limits, but they 
left no doubt that they are the pow- 
er and class of New England. 
— Karyn Zucker 





132 




Members of the Class of 1984 are: Kathy Gushing, 
Andrea Roth, Chris Cronin, Jeff Meisler, John 
Hubbe, Bob Powers, Jim Grant, Mike Brown, Sue 
Pecinovsky, Debbie Gamble, Martin Peel, Jean 



Faunce, Dan Defenderfer, Tina Sochia, Tina Van Pat- 
ten, Sue Metzger, Tom Savage, Dave Bandler, Diane 
Gunderson, and Alicyn Rotsko. 





133 



PARACHUTE CLUB 



The Sport Parachute Club pro- 
vides students, faculty, and staff of 
the Five Colleges the opportunity 
to gain experience and find recrea- 
tion in the unique and rewarding 
activity of sport parachuting. The 
club is affiliated with both the Na- 
tional Collegiate Parachuting 
League and the United States Par- 
achuting League. 

Jump courses are held each 
weekend, with six hours classroom 



and practical training followed by 
jumping in the afternoon. This in- 
struction is given by experienced 
and certified instructors. 

Membership in the club offers an 
inexpensive introduction to the 
sport using the safest equipment 
and instruction techniques. For 
more information, come by the 
club's office. 

Ed Pershouse 




BICYCLE CO-OP 



U M /\^ ^ 



BICYCLE 




The UMass Bicycle Co-op is a 
non-profit organization concerned 
with providing a variety of bicycle 
services to the Five College Com- 
munity. We sell bike parts and ac- 
cessories at affordable prices and 
provide repairs. Because of our co- 
operative structure, we are able to 
supply our customers with good 
products at low cost. The constant 
support from students has also aid- 
ed in low prices and expansion of 
services. Membership entails at 
least two hours of work for the 
coop. Members acquire manage- 
ment and bicycle maintainance 
skills by being a part of the coop. 



PHOTO 
CO-OP 



The University Photo Co-op is a 
student-run, volunteer business. 
The co-op provides low-cost film, 
processing and darkroom accesso- 
ries to the Valley community. 

Members receive special privi- 
ledges. For example, a member can 
purchase merchandise at cost and 
request special orders. 

Members must work two hours 
per week, usually in sales. There is 
room for enthusiastic people in 
such areas as advertising and in- 
ventory operations. New members 
can either attend an introductory 
meeting (notices are posted on the 
door of the co-op) or visit the co-op 
to request hours. 




135 



DOLTWOOD PROJECT 



The Boltwood Project is a stu- 
dent-run, volunteer organization 
which provides recreation and lei- 
sure activities for residents of the 
Belchertown State School. Some of 
the activities include the Special 
Olympics, arts and crafts, coffee 
houses, and community programs. 

Organized in 1969, the project 
has doubled its volunteer participa- 
tion in the last year and a half. This 
year alone, more than 500 students 
have taken part in the program. 



The Boltwood Project provides a 
chance for students in the five-col- 
lege area to participate in programs 
related to career opportunities in 
human services, psychology, phys- 
ical and occupational therapy, re- 
creation, communication disorders, 
nursing, and medicine. In the fu- 
ture, service will be expanded to 
residents of community homes, in 
addition to the state school. 
— Laurie Brooks 




STUDENT 
UNION 
CRAFT 
SHOP 



The Student Union Craftshop is 
a free workshop open to all Five 
College students. It offers instruc- 
tion in silver, leather, pottery, 
stained glass, woodworking, photo- 
darkroom, and silk screen. There 
are no classes and experience is not 
necessary. 

The Student Union Craftshop is 
located in the Student Union 
Building. It is open daily from 10 
a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through 
Friday, and 12 to 4 p.m. on Satur- 
day. 




136 



ALPHA 

PHI 
OMEGA 



Alpha Phi Omega is a national 
service fraternity. Working with 
Gamma Sigma Sigma, it raises 
money for charity and helps the 
university and surrounding com- 
munities. APO's major fund-raiser 
during the school year is Las Vegas 
Night; prizes are donated from lo- 
cal stores. The funds raised go to 
many organizations. APO is a solid 
brotherhood where members can 
become friends and work together 
under service. 



UJJ..*. 



WTIOMAL SERVICE FRATERNITY 



^ 




GAMMA 
SIGMA 
SIGMA 



The Gamma Sigma Sigma soror- 
ity is a national service sorority that 
has been at UMass since 1963. This 
organization of women is responsi- 
ble for a number of services, both 
on campus and in the community. 
The main function of GSS is to 
raise money for charity, along with 
sponsoring events that serve the 
community. GSS has in the past 
sponsored book exchanges and 
bloodmobiles, visited nursing 
homes and hospitals, and helped 
raise money for numerous organi- 
zations. In addition, the sorority 
brings women together and pro- 
vides many social opportunities for 
fun and friendship under service to 
be shared between members. 




137 



LEGAL 

SER VICE 

OFFICE 



The Legal Services Office is a 
student-funded law office which 
provides free legal services to all 
fee-paying UMass students and 
student groups. We offer advice, 
representation, and/or referral in 
most legal matters affecting stu- 
dents. A full range of services (ad- 
vice and representation at all stages 
of the case) can be offered in most 
consumer, housing, insurance, 
debt-collection, uncontested di- 
vorce, University-related, civil 
rights, and labor problems. These 
services can sometimes be offered 
to students having problems with 




state and federal agencies (such as 
Welfare, Social Security, VA, IRS, 
Immigration), if the problem has to 
do with the person's status as a stu- 
dent. In criminal cases, we will pri- 
marily advise the client about 
his/her situation, and refer to a pri- 
vate attorney sympathetic to stu- 
dents' circumstances. Contested 
family matters will also usually be 
referred out after consultation. The 



LEGAL ?^0?)\XV\"Dr 
\jZ.Cp\ Servicas 



r 



i 



LSO Governing Board, comprised 
of students, sets the policy control- 
ling exactly which cases the LSO 
can actively assist students in. The 
Legal Services Office also offers 
community legal education services 
to the student community. 




STUDENT 

NOTE 
SER VICE 



The Student Note Service offers 
student notes of the larger lecture 
sections. The notes are taken by 
students employed by SNS. 

The notes can be purchased on a 
subscription basis for a half-semes- 
ter. Information about prices and 
the sections for which notes are of- 
fered is availiable in the Student 
Union. 



138 



UMAS5 STUDENT FEDERAL CREDIT UNION 



The UMASS Student Federal 
Credit Union is a non-profit, coop- 
erative financial institution which 
is owned and operated by and for 
its own members. Credit Union 
membership is open to all Universi- 
ty students and their families, as 
well as University employees whose 
salaries originate from the student 
activities fund. A $5 minimum de- 
posit, plus a $2 membership fee are 
all that are required to open an ac- 
count. Present rate of interest on 
the regular account is six percent 
annually. 

All Credit Union members have 
voting rights. The Credit Union is 
not University-regulated, but is 
governed by a Board of Directors, 
consisting of nine elected officers, 
all of whom serve without pay. All 
Credit Union positions are filled by 
student volunteers seeking valuable 
experience in all aspects of busi- 
ness. Students begin as tellers, then 
move on to one of several commit- 
tees such as accounting, marketing, 
credits, collection, and supervisory. 

Currently, the UMSFCU has 
4,700 members and over 100 volun- 
teer workers. They have approxi- 
mately $1,035,510 in assets and 
loaned out $125,520. This is the 
first year that the Credit Union has 
exceeded assets of over one million 
dollars. 

Celeste McCabe 



F 



. u 

FEDERAL 




N^N 





139 



EARTH FOODS, the only vege- 
tarian restaurant in Amherst, is a 
student-run collective with a mean- 
ingful philosophy. It is composed of 
members who desire to get in touch 
with a basic need, food. 

EARTH FOODS is composed of 
20 collective members who are all 
equal in decision making; there are 
no managers. This "consensus deci- 
sion making" enables the collective 
to work together to achieve its 
goals. 

Each school day, EARTH 
FOODS serves 300-400 people 
with wholesome, vegetarian food at 
as low a price as possible. As an 
alternative economic organization, 
EARTH FOOD obtains almost all 
of its food through co-ops. 



EARTH FOODS 



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PEOPLE'S 
MARKET 



Since its opening in the spring of 
1973, the Peoples' Market has at- 
tracted large numbers of people 
who seem to feel that the day is not 
complete without one of the mar- 
ket's bagels with cream cheese. For 
everyone else, the market provides 
an assortment of fresh produce, 
dairy products, canned goods, and 
packaged goods. 

The staff consists of 19 students 
who equally share the tasks of cash- 
iering, stocking, and ordering 
foods. The Peoples' Market is a 
collective, student-run business. 
We encourage everyone to come in 
and shop. 




140 



EVER YWOMAN'S CENTER 



Everywoman's Center is a university-based center which provides free, 
year-round services to campus and community women. A major goal of 
EWC is to provide the fullest possible access for women to the Universi- 
ty's resources. Programs at EWC primarily focus on issues of concern to 
women through advocacy, liaison, counseling, education and training, 
and networking. 

Everywoman's Center offers services in the following areas: Against 
Violence Against Women (direct services and education); Individual and 
Couples Counseling; support groups; Resource and Referral Program; 
Third World Women's Program; Working Women's Program; and 
WAGES (Women's Admission and General Educational Support). 
Women interested in developing their skills by working with any EWC 
programs are sponsored and supervised by professional staff women. 
Training and practicum or internship credit is offered through the Uni- 
versity and other colleges. 

Everywoman's Center, in Wilder Hall, is open Monday, Tuesday, 
Thursday and Friday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Wednesday, 12 to 7 p.m. EWC 
is not wheelchair accessible. Please call so that staff can arrange service. 
For information and referrals call 545-0883. This number is also hooked 
into a TTY for the hearing and speech impaired. For 24-hour sexual 
assault crisis services, call 545-0800. 



UNION 
RECORDS 
UNLIMITED 



On a campus as diverse as 
UMass, where else would you find 
a wide selection of records? 

UNION RECORDS UNLIM- 
ITED, located in the Student 
Union, is a non-profit business 
whose goal is to sell quality music 
at an affordable price. 




141 



DISTINGUISHED VISITORS PROGRAM 



The Distinguished Visitors Pro- 
gram is financed and operated by 
the undergraduate students of the 
University of Massachusetts in or- 
der to keep the University commu- 
nity sensitive to the world in which 
it exists. Since its establishment in 
1959, the Distinguished Visitors 
Program has sought to stimulate 
critical thought and debate by pre- 
senting such diverse speakers as 
Art Buchwald, John Dean, Bob 
Woodward, Bruce Ritter, Robert 
Klein, and Jane Fonda. The con- 
tinuing goal of DVP is to enlighten 
our campus community about con- 
temporary issues and cultural af- 
fairs. 

In order to maintain our long 
tradition of service to the Universi- 
ty community, we in DVP need the 
participation of students willing to 
devote some time and energy to the 
committee. If you are interested in 
working with DVP, please feel free 
to stop by our office (Rm. 415 Stu- 
dent Union) or call us at 545-0920. 
A committee member will be happy 
to discuss any questions you may 
have. 




DVP Programs 1983-84 

Fall 1983 

cartoonist BERKE BREATHED 

writer/journalist SEYMOUR HERSH 

sports attorney RICHARD HORROW 

Spring 1984 

feminist/writer BETTY FRIEDAN 

entertainer GEOFFERY HOLDER 

author ARTHUR SCHLESINGER 

sexual therapist DR. RUTH WESTHEIMER 

music writer GLENN O'BRIEN 

social scientist JEREMY RIFKIN 



I 



Betty Friedan 



Betty Friedan presented a lecture con- 
cerning women's changing roles in the 
1980's. She is a noted feminist activist and 
author whose book, The Feminine Myst- 
ique, was the catalytic work of the wom- 
en's movement. She founded N.O.W., the 
National Organization of Women, and 
was its first president. In recent years, she 
has been a leader in the fight for the Equal 
Rights Amendment and for new ap- 
proaches to divorce, abortion, housing, 
employment, and education. 



Jeremy Rifkin 



Social scientist and author Jeremy Rif- 
kin spoke about a series of books he has 
written in the past five years. He examined 
issues raised by genetic engineering, the 
current Christian rival and its impact on 
American culture and politics, the rela- 
tionship between the first two laws of ther- 
modynamics and economic, political, and 
social development, and the new concept 
of nature that is emerging in science. 




142 




Cartoonist Berke Breathed, creator of 
the popular comic strip BLOOM COUN- 
TY, presented a lecture/slide show about 
his work. Breathed, a 1979 graduate of the 
University of Texas, Austin, has won nu- 
merous awards for his work and has pub- 
lished two paperback anthologies. 
BLOOM COUNTY is seen in over 100 
newspapers around the country. 



Geoffery Holder, a native of Trinadad, 
is a Renaissance man of our times. By the 
time Holder was thirteen, he was a painter 
and a dancer. He formed his own dance 
company and financed it by selling his 
paintings. Holder's numerous talents in- 
clude choreographer, designer, director, 
dancer, actor, painter, author, and gour- 
met cook. 




Berke Breathed 




Dr. Ruth Westheimer 

Dr. Ruth Westheimer is a psycho-sexual 
therapist who helped pioneer the field of 
media psychology with her Sunday night 
pr9gram "Sexually Speaking." She is the 
author of Dr. Ruth's Guide To Good Sex. 



Arthur M. Schlesinger 



Geoffery Holder 



Distingushed author, educator and his- 
torian Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. is cur- 
rently Albert Schweitzer Professor of the 
Humanities at the City University of New 
York. Schlesinger has won many literary 
awards for his books: Age of Jackson; A 
Thousand Days, Robert Kennedy and His 
Times, and is currently working on the 
Age of Roosevelt. 



Richard Horrow 

Attorney Richard Horrow is the key 
spokesman for the issue concerning exces- 
sive violence in professional sports. 



Seymour M. Hersh 

Seymour M. Hersh, a Pulitzer Prize 
winning journalist, spoke about his latest 
book, The Price of Power. Hersh, who 
began his career as a police journalist, is 
currently the national correspondent for 
Atlantic magazine. 



ACADEMICS 



Students can choose from more than 4,000 
courses at the University. Over 80 majors, and 
a faculty as diverse as the students, are offered. 




144 




145 



CHANCELLOR 
JOSEPH D. DUFFEY 




146 



PRESIDENT 
DAVID C KNAPP 




147 



DEAN OF STUDENTS 
WILLIAM F. FIELD 




May 27, 1984 

Congratulations to the Class of 1984. I've enjoyed 
working with and for you for the past four years. I 
hope you have found the four years worthwhile. 

As Dean of Students, a certified Whitmore bureau- 
crat, and as one of the few who can remember UMass 
as a campus of three thousand with fewer than one 
third of those women, I found the Class of 1984 one of 
the very best. 

As a group, you were open and responsive, easy to 
talk with or even to argue with; you behaved as indivi- 
duals, not as clones of the 1970's. The class members 
that I met personally were willing to discuss issues 
thoughtfully and without the stridency that character- 
ized some of the activist years. You were also well 
beyond the superficial politeness which some of your 
parents knew as the administrative norm in their years 
at UMass. 

The Class of 1984 represents a new college era at 
UMass, perhaps more cautious, less willing to commit, 
and doubtful of those who propose sweeping solutions 
to complex problems. In short, I believe you were 
better learners, more satisfying students, and I wish 
you well. 

William F. Field 
Dean of Students 



148 



VICE-CHANCELLOR 

FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS 

D.L MADSON 



,^^-ma.^. 




UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST • BOSTON • WORCESTER 



' 1 8^i^i' 



OFFICE OF THE VICE-CHANCELLOR 

FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS 
WHITMORE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 
AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS 01003 




May 27, 1984 



To The Class of 1984: 

congratulations: 

Graduation is a tremendous accomplishment; a culmination of a 
great deal of hard work, sacrifice, and discipline. 

One of the immediate results of graduation is the necessity of 
saying goodbye; to special friends and special places, but most of 
all, to a special time. Even though the goal has been to complete 
your degree, achievement of that goal brings difficult adjustments. 

Our hope is that you will not leave the University coumunity. 
Your new role as an alumnus can be an exciting one, and not solely a 
financial responsibility. There are unique opportunities for you to 
continue to play an important role in the stability, quality and 
future of your University. 

Involvement with the Alumni Council is just one way to 
continue your association with UMass. Through work with the Council 
you can have a voice in student recruitment, admissions and 
placement. As you continue toward success in your field, you can 
also become instrumental in the University alumni placement 
project. The list goes on and the options are endless. Let it 
suffice for me to say stay in touch; become an active alumnus. 

Once again, congratulations and thank you for your unique 
contribution to the University of Massachusetts. 

Best wishes. 




D. L. Madson 
Vice Chancellor 
for Student Affairs 



149 



SPQTLIQtiT 

DISTINGUISHED TEACHER AWARD 




Andy Anderson 



The Distinguished Teacher 
Award is presented annually by the 
Graduate Student Senate to three 
Faculty members and to three 
teaching assistants, giving recogni- 
tion to good teaching. Each fall, the 
G.S.S. accepts nominations from 
students for those teachers who 
they feel have outstanding teaching 
ability. The nominees are evaluated 
on a scale of 1 to 10, one being the 
poorest and ten the best, in eight 
categories: to what extent does the 
candidate communicate subject 
matter clearly and effectively; 
clearly define course objectives; 
motivate to do your best; display 
command of subject matter; fair 
and open-minded with grading pro- 
cedures; sensitive to background 
and interest of students; accesible 
to students; and deserving of this 
award. 

The candidates are evaluated 
twice; in the fall and the spring se- 
mesters. The committee is com- 



posed of students, past winners of 
the award, and representatives 
from the Student Government and 
Graduate Student Senate. Letters 
are also solicited campus-wide 
from any student wishing to write a 
recommendation for the candidate. 
Winners of the 1984 Distinguished 
Teachers Award are: 

Professor Andy Anderson 
Sociology 

Professor Julius Lester 
Afro-American Studies 

Professor Seymour Shapiro 
Botany 

Teaching Assistants/ Associates 

Mary Brydon-Miller 
Psychology 

William Rising 
Mathematics/Statistics 

W. David Snowball 
Communication Studies 




Mary Brydon-Miller 



Seymour Shapiro 



William Rising 



150 



SPQTLIGflT 

PROFESSOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS 




Bonnie R. Strickland, professor 
of psychology, was appointed to the 
National Mental Health Advisory 
Council by Margaret Heckler, sec- 
retary of Health and Human Ser- 
vices. The council is composed of 
psychologist, psychiatrists, and re- 
presentatives from foundations and 
consumer groups involved in the 
field of mental health. 



Bonnie R. Strickland 

Ronald J. Prokopy, professor of 
entomology, received the J.E. Buz- 
zart Memorial Award from the En- 
tomological Society of America for 
his pioneering research in insect be- 
havior and biological pest control, 
and in recognition of the economic 
impact of his work for fruit grow- 
ers. 




Professors Frank Karasz and 
William MacKnight of the Poly- 
mer Science and Engineering De- 
partment have been awarded the 
1984 Ford High Polymer Physics 
Prize of the American Physical So- 
ciety, sponsored by the Ford Motor 
Company. The award recognizes 
pioneering research done jointly by 
Karasz and MacKnight in defining 
the experimental and theoretical 
factors controlling miscibility and 
compatibility in polymer blends. 



William MacKnight 



151 



SPORTS 



From crew to tennis, lacrosse to gymnastics, 
and everytliing in between, UMass strives for 
excellence and diversity. 




152 




153 



FOOTBALL 



Optimism at start turned into frustration 



The 1983 football season for 
UMass was a frustrating one be- 
cause it was a losing one — 3-8 
overall and 2-3 in the Yankee Con- 
ference. Although every losing sea- 
son is frustrating, what made the 
'83 season eat away at its fans is 
that UMass was better than a 3-8 
ballclub this year. 

Northeastern coach Paul Pawlak 
said, "I won't be deceived by their 
3-7 record (before both teams sea- 
son finales). I know that five of 
those losses could have very easily 
been wins." 

In two of those losses, UMass 
lost the game in the last five min- 
utes (Delaware and Lehigh). 

The season began with the opti- 
mism that UMass would be a con- 
tender for their sixth Yankee Con- 
ference title in the last seven years 
with a veteran defensive line and a 
young offensive line. 

That optimism was shaken with a 
bone-crunching loss to Toledo, a 



Division I- A school, 45-13 in the 
season opener. A 17-0 loss to Holy 
Cross followed as the Minuteman 
offense sputtered and sophomore 
quarterback Jim Simeone ran for 
his life. 

However, the following week, 
UMass jumped out to a quick 21-0 
lead over Harvard in the first quar- 
ter and the defense held for a 21-7 
win. 

With a 1-5 record and faced with 
Yankee Conference elimination, 
UMass faced Maine at Alumni 
Stadium and coach Bob Pickett 
pulled out some tricks to surprise 
the Black Bears. Senior quarter- 
back Barrett McGrath trotted out 
in the second half to replace Si- 
meone for the first time this year. 
McGrath and UMass were back in 
the hunt with a 17-7 victory. 

The following week against Bos- 
ton University, the UMass offense 
put together their finest offensive 
showing of the year with a thrilling 



24-21 win on a 27-yard George Pa- 
poutsidis field goal with 1 3 seconds 
left in the game. The UMass of- 
fense was criticized all season long 
for its lack of imagination and 
staleness, but against BU, the of- 
fense silenced its critics. 

And meanwhile, the defense, led 
by free safety Grady Fuller and 
linebacker Craig Lesiniski, was su- 
perb. UMass was 3-4, 2-1 in the 
Yankee conference at this point. 

In the final games of the year. 
New Hampshire drilled UMass 35- 
10 and Northeastern nailed the lid 
on the worst UMass season since 
1968 (2-8) with a 31-14 victory. 

Senior Rich Jenkins led the 
team with 448 yards rushing while 
George Barnwell and Frank Fay 
also made strong contributions to 
the team. McGrath and Simeone 
both tossed three touchdown passes 
while senior Kevin Jackson (33) 
and Bob Simeone (32) led the team 
in receiving. -Gerry deSimas 




154 




1st Row: George Papoutsidis, Carlos Silva, James Sears, Troy 
Turner, Mark Tabor, Jeff Vecchi, Barrett McGrath, Scott 
Brown, Kirk Williams, Kevin Jackson, Jim Simeone, Tom 
Cioppa, Frank Fay, Peter Anderson, Brian Gibson, John Shay, 
Paul Platek, David Proto, Clifford Molina, Duckworth Grange, 
George Barnwell, John Gnall, David Hunter, Todd Comeau, 
James Rice. 2nd Row: Bob Watroba, Tim Driscol, Alan Blue, 
Craig Lesinski, Gregory Golden, John Jeffries, Glenn Holden, 
Vito Perrone, Michael Favreau, Christopher Wood, Tri-Captains 
Richard Jenkins, Gary Freker and Grady Fuller, Pat Keough, 
Peter Montini, Tom Krawczyk, Phil Pike, Mike Duran, Scott 
Rose, Steven Silva, Paul Manganaro, T)an Sullivan, Bruce 
Strange, Michael Briggs, Tom McEvilly. 3rd Row: Peter Bor- 
sari, Kevin Ouellette, Kenneth Runge, David Cavanaugh, Shel- 



don Hardison, Vincent Reppert, Michael Kowalski, Terry Dev- 
lin, Joe Ribeiro, Ken Johnson, Stan Kaczorowski, Allan Roche, 
Don Day, Edward Kern, John Benzinger, Manuel Fernandez, 
Bob Greaney, Erik LaViscount, George Armstrong, Mike 
Moran, Robert Shelmire, Dan Dellatto, Tom Magee, Rick Samp- 
son, Mike Kelley. Standing: Trainers Vic Keedy, Jim Laughnane, 
and Bob Williams, Grad Ass't. Coach Eric Kemp, Grad Ass't. 
Coach Steve Spagnuolo, Head Coach Bob Pickett, Associate 
Head Coach Jim Reid, Ass't. Coach Mike Hodges, Paul Walsh, 
Robert Simeone, Peter Tracy, Kevin Brown, Ass't. Coaches 
Steve Telander, Doug Berry and Bob MacConnell, Grad Ass't. 
Coach Tony Pasquale, Manager Greg Pierson, Dr. George 
Snook, Dr. James Ralph, Equipment Mgr. Dick Denning. 






FOOTBALL 






(3-8) 




UMASS "^K 


OPP 


13 


TOLEDO ^^ 


45 





HOLY CROSS 


17 


21 


HARVARD 


7 


3 


RHODE ISLAND 


13 


13 


DELAWARE 


16 


17 


MAINE 


7 


24 
6 


BOSTON UNIVERSITY 


21 
16 


CONNECTICUT 


20 


LEHIGH 


21 


10 


NEW HAMPSHIRE 


35 


14 


NORTHEASTERN 


31 



155 



After six years with UMass, 
Bob Piclcett retires as coach 



The job of recruiting was over 
for the 1984 season and with it an- 
other era in UMass football histo- 
ry. After 25 years in coaching, the 
last six as head coach of the Min- 
utemen, Bob Pickett resigned on 
Feb. 11, 1984. 

"It was nothing on the spur of 
the moment," he said. "Twenty- 
five years is a long time coaching 
football. It was the best time to do 
it in the interest of my family. It 
was a hard decision to leave the 
game." 

Pickett posted a 36-28 record at 
UMass and the highlights of his 
coaching career here came in his 
rookie year, 1978, when UMass 
"reached greater heights than any 
other UMass football program." 
That year UMass upset Boston 
College 27-0 and reached the 
NCAA Division title game with a 
"rather easy" win over previously 
undefeated Nevada-Reno, Pickett 
said. UMass also won the Lambert 
Cup which up to that point had 
been won by only one other New 
England team (Maine, 1964). 

In the next six years, UMass 
would also share or win four Yan- 
kee Conference titles (1978, 1979, 
1981 and 1982). 

"Working with the kids day in 
and day out," Pickett said, "keeps 



you young. It was great working 
with kids at that age level." 

His biggest disappointments 
came in 1983 when UMass posted 
its worst record in 15 years. "My 
biggest disappointment is this last 
season and the kind of season we 
had. I would have liked to finish on 
a nicer note." A loss to Boston Uni- 
versity on a rain-swept field in 
1980 by a 3-0 score which kept 
UMass out of the Division I-AA 
playoffs, as well as a 16-10 loss to 
Rhode Island in 1981, are not good 
memories. 

"The program," he predicted, 
"will do well next year. It is in good 
shape." But, Bob Pickett will not be 
a part of it. With one year left on 
his contract, Pickett accepted a job 
in the office of Dean David Bis- 
choff of the Physical Education de- 
partment. 

UMass posted records of 9-4, 6- 
4, 7-3, and 6-3 through the 1981 
season before slipping to 5-6 in 
1982. The 1978 Eastern College 
and 1979 Boston Gridiron Coach- 
of-the-year deserved better than a 
3-8 finale. 

"I have no regrets," Pickett said 
at his resignation. "And as long as 
you have no regrets, it's okay." 
— Gerry deSimas 





156 




157 



FIELD HOCKEY 



Minutewomen reach Final Four again 



There were seven seniors on the 
field hockey team who would see 
1983 as their last year, and they 
"came back in the best possible 
shape they could," coach Pam 
Hixon said. "It's the last year for 
them and they want to go out with a 
bang." And bang they did as they 
took a third place in the NCAA 
Division I championships along 
with posting a stellar 15-2-2 record. 
The backbone of the team was the 
play of the goaltender whose high 
school team had not won a game in 
four years. At UMass, this four- 
year starter was in goal in 1981 
when UMass finished second in the 
NCAA title game to UConn. At 
the Final Four in Philadelphia this 
year, Patty Shea showed her true 
colors playing in the consolation 
game with a crack in her arm below 
her elbow. Shea stopped 20 North- 



western shots in the game along 
with eight shots in the strokeoffs to 
break the 1-1 tie. Senior Patty 
Smith had the winning shot in the 
second strokeoff. UMass ended up 
in the consolation game after strug- 
gling with second ranked Old Do- 
minion. UMass was outshot 22-3 
by the Lady Monarchs, but the 
score was 2-2 at the end of regula- 
tion. While ODU kept the offense 
quiet, seniors Carol Progulske, 
Nancy Goode, along with Lil Hut- 
tin, and Andrea Muccini on de- 
fense kept ODU at bay long 
enough for UMass to fire their only 
shot of the second half. With time 
winding down, UMass put pressure 
on the Monarch goal, got a penalty 
corner and with 10 seconds left in 
regulation, Megan Donnelly 
scored. Old Dominion scored early 
in overtime and UM's title hopes 



were dashed. 

Among the many highlights of 
the season were twelve shutouts. 
UMass toppled Temple 3-1 to 
make it to the Final Four for the 
second time in the last three years. 
So for seniors Shea, Smith, Pro- 
gulske, Goode, Diane Kobel, and 
Chris Coughlin, the Final Four was 
the finale of their UMass careers. 
Shea was named to the Ail-Ameri- 
can team and junior Pam Moryl, 
sophomore Donnelly and Shea 
were named to the Final Four tour- 
nament squad. Next year, the sen- 
ior seven will be gone but the un- 
derclassmen starters, Moryl, Mic- 
cini, Huttin, Donnelly and Chris 
Kocot will attempt to bring UMass 
back to the heights of the NCAA. 
-Gerry deSimas 




158 




1st Row: Chris Coughlin, Maura Coughlin, Patti Smith, Patty 
Shea, Kathryn Rowe, Nancy Goode, Sue Packard, Lil Hultin. 
2nd Row: Assistant coach Paula Petrie, assistant coach Dawn 



Henderson, Carol Progulske, Judy Morgan, Pam Moryl, Andrea 
Muccini, Megan Donnelly, Chris Kocot, Diane Kobel, head 
coach Pam Hixon. 





FIELD HOCKEY 

(16-3-2) 



UMASS 

1 NORTHWESTERN 

1 OHIO STATE 

2 BOSTON COLLEGE 

NORTH CAROLINA 

7 VERMONT 
4 PROVIDENCE 

8 SPRINGFIELD 

2 YALE 
4 MAINE 

3 NORTHEASTERN 

1 TEMPLE 
OLD DOMINION 

2 HARVARD 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

1 DARTMOUTH 

4 RHODE ISLAND 

4 BOSTON UNIVERSITY 

1 CONNECTICUT 

3 TEMPLE 

2 OLD DOMINION 

5 NORTHWESTERN 






I 




1 
1 

3 
3 



159 





Photos by Jim Powers 



160 




161 



SOCCER 



UMass stays strong in disappointing season 



Lack of goal production led to a 
disappointing season for the men's 
soccer team in 1983. Finishing with 
a 3-12-4 record, the UMass offense 
could only score 10 goals on the 
opposition, although the defense, 
led by Frank Neffinger, Lenn Mar- 
golis and Peter Geddes, kept its op- 
ponents scores down to an average 
of three goals a game. The high- 
light of the season came in October 
when the Minutemen hosted an in- 
vitational with three other teams. 
On the first day of the invitational, 



UMass notched its first victory of 
the season over North Adams, 1-0. 
Freshman Paul Serafino scored the 
lone goal in the contest as goal- 
tender Jim Firmage only had to 
make three saves thanks to the play 
of the UMass defense. In the finals 
on Saturday, the Minutemen 
stayed with Rutgers (11th ranked 
in the nation) for 90 minutes of 
regulation play in a close match. 
Although Rutgers scored 29 sec- 
onds into overtime on its way to a 
3-0 win, coach Jeff Gettler was 



pleased with his team's play. Sera- 
fino, Tom Uschok, and seniors 
Steve Berlin and Kevin Flynn made 
the All-Tournament Team. Flynn 
and Uschok made the All-New 
England Team at the end of the 
season. Kayvan Khatami was the 
leading goal scorer for the second 
consecutive year. UMass will be 
losing 1 1 seniors this year and be- 
gin a rebuilding season in 1984. 



-Ellen Richard 



xi^Mm>i»sim»»f*^ 




162 




1st Row: Steve Berlin, Mark Jeffery, John Brigham, Kevin Flynn, 
Mike Mahoney, Herb Sidman, Fritz Pike, Tom Uschok. 2nd Row: 
Ass't. Coaches Kevin Welsh and Mike Gibbons, Manager Lauren 
Paines, Tom Giordano, Paul Serafino, Don Donahue, Jamie Firmage, 
Jeff Smith, Frank Neffinger, Mike Rudd, Nick Marciano, Manager 



Blaine Lesnik, Head Coach Jeff Getler, Ass't. Coach Rick Bryant. 
3rd Row: Mike Bellino, Anthony Richmond, Matt Dowd, Simon 
Ostrov, Lenn Margolis, Peter Geddes, Kayvan Khatami, Mike Run- 
eare. 




SOCCER 

(3-12-4) 



UMASS 



OPP 



David Deuber 



BOSTON UNIVERSITY 

SO. CONNECTICUT 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

CORNELL 

CLEVELAND ST. 

VERMONT 

YALE 

N. ADAMS ST. 

RUTGERS 

PROVIDENCE 

RHODE ISLAND 

CONNECTICUT 

HOLY CROSS 

WESTFIELD ST. 

BOSTON COLLEGE 

SPRINGFIELD 

MAINE - ORONO 

HARVARD 

HARTWICK 



163 




165 



SOCCER 




Blue Collar team reaches final four 



Under the direction of Kalekeni 
Banda, the women's soccer team 
proved that if you work hard 
enough, dreams can be within 
reach. Finishing the injury-plagued 
season with a 12-3-3 slate, the 
women defeated Brown University 
1-0 to advance to the Final Four 
against North Carolina before 
bowing out to the two-time defend- 
ing champions, 2-0. 

Despite the injuries and lack of 
bench strength, the women finished 
third in the nation and came home 
Northeast Champions by defeating 
the University of Connecticut 1-0 
in the consolation game. 

Defense was the key to all of he 
team's victories and was one of the 
best in the nation in 1983. The 
Minutewomen posted 1 1 shutouts 
and the freshman goaltending team 
of Jeanne Paul and Lisa Ellis allow- 
ed only 10 goals the entire season. 



Debbie Harackiewicz scored the 
goal that sent the team to the Final 
Four. In the quarterfinal match 
against Brown, Harackiewicz col- 
lected a pass from tri-captain Sta- 
cey Flionis with her back to the net, 
turned, fired, and watched the ball 
slide through the Brown goal- 
tender's hands. The team was on its 
way to Florida to play defending 
champion North Carolina. 

"Now we're playing to win," 
Banda declared before the final 
four. "We have to attack more and 
force the issue. We'll hang in there. 
There are no superstars here. We're 
a blue collar team." 

The day before the big game, 
Lori Stukes sustained a sprained 
knee which put a dent in the de- 
fense. Stukes, who was named to 
the All New England and All 
American teams, was the squad's 
best defender. During the 2-0 loss 



Photo by Jim Powers 



to North Carolina, defenders Mi- 
chelle Rodney and Deanna Denault 
injured their ankles as the UMass 
defense began to disappear. 

But, the Minutewomen came 
back the following day to defeat 
UConn for the Northeast title. 

Nadia Komarowski, who scored 
the winning goal against UConn, 
was named to the NCAA Cham- 
pionship All Tournament Team 
along with Flionis and Chris Tag- 
gart. Taggart also won the all 
around MVP award. Flionis and 
Taggart were also named to the All 
New England and All American 
teams. 

The outlook for next season is 
promising as the Minutewomen 
only lost Flionis and defenders 
Mary Szetela and Denault to 
graduation. 

-Ellen Richard 



166 




1st Row: Assistant Coach Natalie Prosser, Jeanne Paul, Laurie 
Webber, Lori Stukes, Christine Taggart, Deanna Denault, Deb- 
bie Harackiewicz, Susan Bird, Lisa Ellis. 2nd Row: Coach Kale- 
keni Banda, Michelle Rodney, Jamie Watson, Stacey Flionis, 



Mary Szetela, Deirdre Barrett, Assistant Coach Nina Holm- 
strom, Assistant Coach Laurie Wiater. 3rd Row: Victoria Grey- 
mont, Elaine Borbeau, Ellen Taggart, Kristi Kelly, Beth Se- 
monik, Nadia Komarowski. 






SOCCER 






(12-3-3) 




UMASS 


OPP 


1 


PLYMOUTH STATE 





3 


GEORGE WASHINGTON J 





CAL.- BERKLEY 


01 , 





U of CENT. FLORIDA 





3 


BROWN 


1 ' 


2 


VERMONT 


1 





CONNECTICUT 


1 


3 


NEW HAMPSHIRE 





5 


SPRINGFIELD 








SUNY-CORTLAND 





4 


DARTMOUTH 





2 


GEORGE MASON ^^ 


1 


2 


ADELPHI '^m 


^ 1 


2 


HARVARD 


3 


1 


BOSTON COLLEGE 





1 


BROWN 








NORTH CAROLINA 


2 


1 


UCONN 

1 * 






Photo by Jim Powers 



167 




Photo by Jim Powers 




168 



Pholo by Jim Powers 




^i^ 



169 



VOLLEYBALL 

Young Spikers bring home championship trophy 



With a young team consisting 
mainly of freshmen and sopho- 
mores, the volleyball team reached 
post-season play in 1983 and won 
two hard-fought matches to be- 
come ECAC champions. The team 
had high hopes at the beginning of 
the season and despite injuries to 
two key players, managed to attain 
its goals. 

The spikers started their season 
in mid-September with a big win 
over American International Col- 
lege. Posting a shutout for their 
first win of the year, the team won 
15-3, 15-4, 15-4 in the best three of 
five games. UMass continued its 
tough play during the season and in 
a 16-team tournament placed sec- 
ond, losing only to Occidental Col- 
lege in Los Angeles which placed 
third in the nation in 1982. 

A few weeks later in Central 



Connecticut at a 12-team tourna- 
ment, UMass finished third and 
lost spikers Kirsten Smith 
(sprained ankle) and Leslie Smith 
(dislocated shoulder) to injuries. 
Without the two the team played 
shakey but still racked up the wins. 
At the UMass Classic in October, 
the spikers again placed third and it 
was a disappointment for the team 
which expected to make the finals. 
With Kirsten and Leslie Smith (no 
relation) back, UMass went to the 
Northeast Invitational and came 
home champions. Near the end of 
the successful 34-16 season, UMass 
went to the MAIAW state cham- 
pionships and finished second be- 
hind Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 

At the ECAC Championships, 
UMass avenged a late season loss 
against Northeastern, winning the 



first two games, only to watch the 
Lady Huskies fight back in games 
three and four. UMass silenced 
them in game five and moved on to 
face Springfield in the finals. The 
Minutewomen easily handled the 
Indians in three games, 15-7, 15-2, 
15-10 and were crowned ECAC 
champs. 

"It was a beautiful volleyball 
match, and the greatest night of 
our volleyball program," a proud 
coach Elaine Sortino said. Juniors 
Patty Grant, Joanne Siler and Kir- 
sten Smith lead the young team as 
veterans in its successful campaign. 
Playing 50 difficult matches 
against both division I and II 
teams, the spikers proved them- 
selves as the team to beat. 

-Ellen Richard 

n 




Pholo by Jim Powers 



170 





1st Row: Debbie Cole, Susan Grant, Tri-Captain Kirsten Smith, 
Michele Barys, Tri-Captain Patricia Grant, Ann Ringrose. 2nd 
Row: Manager Hilary Mueller, Tri-Captain Joanne Siler, Ellen 



Deady, Leslie Smith, Sally Maher, Ass't. Coach Sara Bonthuis, 
Head Coach Elaine Sortino. 




VOLLEYBALL 

(35-16) 

AMI-RIC.W INTER. 15-3, 15-4. 15-4 
BROWN 15-5. 15-« 
L VM L'^-in, 15-5 
BRYANT 15-4. 15-.S 
QLARTFR-FIN ALS-B.C. 15-5. \>-') 
SEMI-FINALS-r CONN. l5-(.. 15-1 i 
KINALS-OCCIDF.NTAL «-l5. IM.' 
LOWFLL 15-1.1. 10-15. I 5-9. 15-11 
BRY\NT 15-:. 16-14 
SACRKD HFART 15-6. 15-J 
C.W. POST iO-15. 1.5-L!. LV15 
NORTHFASTFRN I.V15. 15-10. l5->) 
CFNTRAl. CONN 15-10. 11-15, 15-5 
SEMIS-SPRINGFIFLD 15-8. ')-15. 13-15 
HOLY CROSS 15-1.1. 15-i;. 5-15. S-15. 1 
C.W. POST .1-15. 15-10. 15-10 
CORNFLL l5-i:. 11-15. 1.1-15 
HOLY CROSS 15-6, 1.5-6 
NEW HAVEN 9-15. .1-15 
MT, HOLYOKE 6-15. 5-15. 15-11. 15-S, 
ARMY 14-16. 15-9, S-15 
F. STROUDSBLRG 15-S. 16-14 
CENTRAL CONN. 1 1-15. 15-10. 15-') 
NEW HAVEN 11-15. 15-S. 11-15 
VERMONT 15-10. 15-: 
LOWELL 15-4. 15-5 

NEW HAVEN 15-l,;l. 7-15. 9-15. 15-4. 15 
GEORGE WASHIl^GTON 7-15, 10-15 
PRINCETON 14-16~yi-l?' 
.lAMES MADISON 1.5-t). 16-14 
OUARTERS-LASALLE l-S-O, 15-4 
SEMIS-DELAWARE 7.1.C,1I-15 
BRYN MAWR 15-4. 15-1 
WELl.ESLEY 15-5. 15-7 
VERMONT 15-6, 15-') 
' CH WtPIONSHlP-NhW HA VIP, 
SMITH 10-15, 15-4, 15-S, 15-9 
FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON l.l-l^ 
SF.TON IIALL 15-9, iO-15, 15-11 
,IAMF,S MADISON 1 
HOF.STRA 5-15 10-1: 
PRINCETON S-15, 9. 
SOUTHERN CONN 
l.OWELl 15-9, 11-15, 15-.1 
WELLESl FY 15-6, 15-11 
F NAZ\RENE 15-1 1. 15-4 
MIT 6-15, 1-15 

SPRINGFIELD i:-l5, 15-1.1, 15-7. 9-15 
NORTHEASTERN 4-15. .1-15, i:-15 
NORTHEASTERN 15-11. 15-7. 15-17, 
SPRINGFIELD 15-7. 15-:. 1.1>10 



-11. i; 

. 10. L> 



i-4. 



i:-!5. 

15-10, 



II. i5-i: 



15-1.1 
15. 15- 



w 
w 
w 
w 
w 
w 

L 
W 
W 
W 

L 
W 
W 



L 
VV 
L 
L 
L 
W 
W 
L 



L 
L 
W 
W 
L 
W 
W 
W 
W 

L 



I 

W 
W 

w 
w 

L 

w 

L 
W 
W 



171 



CROSS COUNTRY 



Exciting Year For Runners 



The 1 983-84 edition of the men's 
cross country team turned a poten- 
tially "average" season into an ex- 
citing one. The year began with an 
upset win over the Boston College 
Eagles in the season's only home 
meet. It ended with impressive 
marks at the New Englands. 

Seniors Rod LaFlamme, Rick 
Doiron, Dave Doyle, and Jeff 
Woods anchored the young Min- 
uteman squad, adding much need- 
ed depth to an otherwise inexperi- 
enced but enthusiastic group. 

Throughout the year, underclass- 
men such as Jack Marinelli, Paul 
Stanislawzyk, and Tom Carleo 
came through to boost the team 
with some exceptional times. 

The Minutemen grabbed fourth 
place in October's Atlantic 10 
Championship meet over a rugged 
West Virginia course. One week 
later, they were the surprise of the 
field as they finished fifth overall at 
the New England's in Franklin 



Park, Boston. 

The successful ending was an in- 
dication of an impressive founda- 
tion built of dedication and hard 
work. It bodes well for the future. 
-M.E. Murray 





CROSS COUNTRY 


ma 




(3-11) 




tJMass 


OPP 


26 


BOSON COLLEGE 


29 


32 


NEW HAMPSHIRE 


23 


30 


RHODE ISLAND 


25 


32 


.CONNECTICUT 


23 


38 


PROVIDENCE 


17 


37 


DARTMOUTH 


19 


32 


CONNECTICUT 


23 


17 


WILLIAMS 


39 


38 


LOWELL 


19 


24 


KEENE STATE 


33 


41 


NORTHEASTERN 


19 


4th 


Atlantic Ten Conf. Champ. 


47 


ST. JOHNS 


15 


29 


RHODE ISLAND 


26 


47 


MANHATTAN 


15 


5th 


New Englands 






^m^, M£: ,^S,C-iZ^ — 





1st Row: Jeff Woods, John Panaccione, Co-Captains Rick 
Doiron and Rod LaFlamme, Tom Carleo, John Kirk. 2nd Row: 



Head coach Ken O'Brien, Kevin Quinn, Joe Keaney, Jim Mac- 
Phee, Tom Neylon, Dave Doyle, Jack Marinelli. 



172 




CROSS COUNTRY 

(3-2) 

BOSTON COLLEGE 

RHODE ISLAND INV. 

NORTHEASTERN 

HOLY CROSS iNV. 

NEW HAMPSHiRE 

RHODE ISLAND 

VERMONT 

NEW ENGLANDS 

ECAC 

NCAA qualifier 



l^isHisJU 



GPP 

48 



24 
54 

73 




% 



Harriers finish season on upbeat note 



ia^ . 



The 1983-84 women's team 
played catch-up most of the season, 
chasing quicker and more exper- 
ienced rivals before finishing the 
season on an upbeat note. 

An opening season loss to power- 
ful Boston College failed to dam- 
pen the spirit of this young squad, 
which time after time hung on and 
turned in some fine individual per- 
formances. Injuries plagued the 
Minutewomen all year, but they be- 
gan to put it all together when it 
mattered most. 

The team grabbed third place at 



the ECAC Division One Cham- 
pionship meet held late in the sea- 
son at Astern Connecticut State 
University. Senior Dana Mikesell 
came in third overall. Mikesell fig- 
ured again the following week, 
leading UMass to a fourth place at 
the New Englands in Worcester. 

It was the most impressive meet - 
of the year for this young group as 
they finally gained recogniton as 
one of the regions more talented 
teams. 

-M.E. Murray 



173 



BASKETBALL 



Minutemen have best showing in six years at Ye Old Cage 



The 1983-84 men's basketball 
season was one that saw the Min- 
utemen win the most games (12) 
since 1977-78. They broke their 
streak of five, 20 loss seasons, 
snapped a two-year 33 game losing 
streak on the road and posted three 
wins away from the Curry Hicks 
Cage. 

It was the last season for UMass 
in the old Cage, which will be ren- 
ovated during the 1984-85 school 
year, forcing UMass to a new loca- 
tion. 

Horace Neysmith and Donald 
Russell both went over the 1,000 
point barriers and joined senior 
center Edwin Green, who passed 
the legendary Dr. Julius Erving for 
second place on the all-time scoring 
list. Freshman standout Carl 
Smith made the Atlantic- 10 All- 
Rookie team and led the team and 
Atlantic 10 in assists with 212. 

With a 2-3 record, UConn came 
to the Cage before 4,200 screaming 
fans. UMass didn't allow UConn to 
do its thing with a tight man-to- 
man defense. UMass held the ball 
for the last shot and a Neysmith 



tip-in tied the score at 26. Carl 
Smith calmly dribbled around for 
nine seconds before another pump- 
fake to tie the game at 61 and send 
the game into OT. With no time 
left, Russell hit a driving layup over 
Hobbs and UMass had a sweet win. 

Then came January and the road 
trips. UMass walked over West 
Virginia 71-60 at the Cage but pro- 
ceeded to lose seven of its nine 
games before the students re- 
turned. 

With its main supporters back, 
UMass topped URI by two at the 
Cage to give them a 6-10 record. 

The Minutemen topped Penn 
State in Pennsylvania to snap the 
road jinx and proceeded to win four 
of their next five, including a 93-89 
win over powerful St. Joseph, to 
reach the .500 mark at 11-11. 

However, down the stretch, in- 
juries to Neysmith and sixth man 
Bobby Braun, along with a team 
slump, saw UMass lose five in a 
row, to finish the regular season at 
11-16. 

In the Atlantic 10 playoffs, 
UMass slipped by URI and played 



well in the second half against 
Temple, but were crushed in that 

half. 

Smith, who was the runner-up in 
the Atlantic 10 rookie-of-the-year 
honors, won the URI game with 
two seconds to go as he sank two 
foul shots. 

Green, who averaged 12.9 points 
a game, was named to the Atlantic 
10 All-Conference second team. 
Green also led the team and the 
conference with 66 steals. 

John Hempel again led the team 
in scoring for the second straight 
year with a 15.8 average, and his 
big game came against St. Joseph 
with 29 points. After the season, 
Hempel said he would be transfer- 
ring from the school. 

Neysmith steadily improved all 
year. He led the team in rebounds 
(212) and had the best field goal 
shooting percentage (.595) on the 
team. 

Russell had a tough year but still 
averaged in double figures (11.8). 

Braun also saw considerable time 
off the bench to spell relief for the 
forwards. — Gerry deSimas 



■jj^^H^Bj^H 


*<l<>^M^^^^^^faMl 









Photo bv Dave Deubcr 



Photo by Andy Heller 




1st Row: Skip Connors, George Ramming, John Hempel, Co- 
Capt. Edwin Green, Co-Capt. Donald Russell, Tom Emerson, 
Bobby Braun, and Horace Neysmith. 2nd Row: Head Coach Ron 
Gerlufsen, assistant coach Neil Rosa, assistant coach Al Wo- 



lejko, Craig Smith, Jackie Sheehan, Hal Shaw, Carl Smith, John 
King, Ron Young, assistant coach Mike Haverty, assistant coach 
Mark Shea, and trainer Jim Laughnane. 





UMASS 



BASKETBALL 

(12-17) 



all^^HH 



OPP 



75 NEW HAMPSHIRE 73 

80 BENTLEY 75 

STETSON UNIV TOURN. 

55 HOUSTON BAPTIST 68 
64 GEORGIA SOUTHERN 67 

56 DUKE 88 

67 CONNECTICUT 65 
78 DARTMOUTH 75 
64 DUQUESNE 69 
83 RUTGERS 88 
66 TEMPLE 83 
71 WEST VIRGINIA 60 
83 HOLY CROSS 89 
66 ST. JOSEPH'S 67 
64 ST. BONAVENTURE 81 

68 GEORGE WASHINGTON 73 
77 RHODE ISLAND 75 
75 PENN STATE 60 

69 RHODE ISLAND 76 
91 ST. BONAVENTURE 81 
88 PENN STATE 81 
59 MARIST 57 
93 ST. JOSEPH'S 89 
62 GEORGE WASHINGTON 80 
59 WEST VIRGINIA 87 
46 TEMPLE 65 
75 RUTGERS ^t^n. , 76 

'^^ * 74 



64 DUQUESNE 

Atlantic 10 Playoffs 
69 URI 
54 TEMPLE 



67 




175 




176 




177 



BASKETBALL 



Pride and victories prevail for women and new coach 



A new system and a new coach 
can be hard to adjust to, but the 
Minutewomen showed their poise 
as new head coach Bai-bara Stevens 
stepped in and the team doubled its 
1982-83 season output. Barbara 
Hebel lead the team with an aver- 
age of 16.1 points a game, an in- 
crease of about 5 points over her 
last season's average. 

A mid-season win over defending 
conference champion Penn State, 
67-63, was the highlight of the 
Minutewomen season. 

"I look back on it (the win) and 
wonder how it happened," coach 
Stevens said. "We deserved to win 
it. I think it was a real shot in the 
arm for us and our program. You 
need that credibility and it made us 
7-4 and we were thrilled to death at 
how things were going." 

Injuries did hamper the 10-17 
Minutewomen as Kelly Collins was 
knocked out of action in the second 
game of the season and Karen 
Damminger was not up to par due 
to nagging injuries and illness. 

"We were small to begin with 
and that made us even smaller," 
Stevens said of the injuries. 

Two other key victories for 
UMass during the season were a 
one-point nudging of Boston Col- 
lege and an exciting overtime victo- 
ry over Dartmouth, 69-65. 

The Dartmouth win broke a sev- 
en-game losing streak for the Min- 
utewomen. UMass ran off to an 
early lead, 34-25, at the half and 
never lost control. Hebel led the 
pack by scoring 19 points before 
leaving with a sprained ankle. 

With five seconds remaining in 
the match, Dartmouth tied it up at 
58. The Minutewomen scored three 
quick baskets but Dartmouth re- 
taliated with five points before Jer- 



rie Bernier nabbed an offensive re- 
bound to put UMass back into the 
driver's seat. 

"All year long the things we 
wanted to prove was that the team 
was on an upswing and it was a 
competitor and I think we did just 
that," Stevens said "I think the 



pride is beginning to return." 

All in all, it was a successful sea- 
son for the Minutewomen. The 
fight was there along with the tal- 
ent and new coach Stevens accom- 
plished some goals. 

— Ellen Richard 



178 





1st Row: Barbara Hebel, Jennifer Todd, Jerrie Bernier, Karen 
Fitzgerlad, Kelly Collins, Karen Damminger, Patti Kerns, Re- 
becca Kucks. 2nd Row: Assistant coach Jody Lavin, assistant 



coach Valerie DePaolo, Mary Marquedant, Roz Olson, Jean 
Cooper, Karen Rowe, Wendy Ward, assistant coach Pat Glispin, 
head coach Barbara Stevens, manager Susan Skarzynski. 




BASKETBALL 

(10-17) 
UMASS 

68 UCONN 
52 URI 

64 ST. JOHN'S 
62 VERMONT 
74 HARVARD 
73 YALE 

52 SOUTHERN 

CONNECTICUT 
86 SPRINGFIELD , 
76 CENTRAL If 

CONNECTICUT 
67 PENN STATE 
61 GEORGE WASHINGTON 
51 RUTGERS 

65 CONNECTICUT 
76 FORDHAM 

56 BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
40 NEW HAMPSHIRE 
50 PROVIDENCE 
65 NORTHEASTERN 

69 DARTMOUTH 
71 MAINE 

53 BOSTON COLLEGE 
44 ST. JOSEPH'S 

64 WEST VIRGINIA 

61 DUQUESNE 

85 RHODE ISLAND 

64 TEMPLE 

Atlantic 10 Champs. 

65 W. VIRGINIA 




■ 



68 
73 

57 
63 ■■ 

86 ^ 

82 

78 

74 

72 

83 

74 

65 

72 

52 

54 

77 

59 

89 

80 



73 



179 




Photo by Andy Heller 



Photo by Andy Heller 



180 




Hhoto by Dave Deuber 



181 



GYMNASTICS 



Gymnasts have up 
and down season 

The gymnastics season was one 
of extreme ups and downs. Finish- 
ing with a 8-5 record and a sixth 
place at the Eastern Intercollegiate 
Gymnastics League Champion- 
ships, the Minutemen improved 
their pommel horse, floor exercises 
and vaulting scores for the season. 

Their goals were to hit their rou- 
tines, not have any major breaks 
and to not have any scores under 
8.0. Sometimes they made their 
goals, and sometimes not, but over- 
all it was a satisfying season. 

One of the team's better meets 
was against Southern Connecticut. 
Although UMass lost to the de- 
fending EIGL and subsequently 
1984 EIGL champions, it still 
scored a season high 257.1 points 
and only had two scores under the 
8.0 mark, an improvement from 10 
in the first meet of the season. 

In the Minutemen's final meet of 
the season against Springfield, 
UMass topped its Connecticut 
score with a 258.95. It was a fitting 
end to a frustrating season. UMass 
also had a season high 42.35 points 
in the pommel horse event. 

At the EIGL's, the three gradu- 
ating seniors Willy Stevens, Bert 
Mathieson and Jim Corbett made 
it into the individual finals. Stevens 
finished in 11th place, Corbett 
placed ninth in vaulting, and Math- 
ieson placed fourth in the pommel 
horse event. 

placed fourth in the pommel horse 
event with scores of 9.2 and 9.05. 

UMass took first at the New 
England Conference Invitational 
Championships with a team total of 
250.05 and left with a total of 14 
individual awards. Mathieson 
placed in four of six events, includ- 
ing winning the all around with a 
52.95. 

UMass improved in the pommel 




1st Row: Morgan Hanlon, Andy Cubero, Ken Dougherty, Steve Baia, Joe DeMarco, 
Phil Gorgone, Lew Wingert, Dave Sherman, Willy Stevens, Eric Ciccone, Bert Mathie- 
son. 2nd Row: Tony Sbarra, Jim Corbett, Scott Young, Jim Emmett, Mark McGaunn, 
Mark Quevillon, Peter Lucchini, Jim Fitzgerald, head coach Roy Johnson, assistant 
coach John Macurdy. 




horse event, formerly its worst 
event, with the help of Ken Dou- 
gherty and Mark Quevillon. Dou- 
gherty, a transfer student who sat 
out the 1982-83 season, was a con- 
sistent performer. Sophomore Que- 
villon began to mature into a top 
performer for the team. 

Phil Gorgone was important to 
the vaulting lineup and had a high 
score of 9.45 for the season in the 
event. Eric Ciccone filled a void in 
the rings team by performing diffi- 
cult strength moves such as the in- 
verted cross and planche. 
— Ellen Richard 



UMASS 

247.40 

241.85 

248.95 

246.80 

246.80 

251,50 

249.55 

250.95 

257.10 

253.85 

250.45 

247.80 

258.95 

1st of 7 

6th of 8 



GYMNASTICS 

(8-5) 
ARMY 
LOWELL 
SYRACUSE 
NORTH CAROLINA 

STATE 
JAMES MADISON 
NAVY 

DARTMOUTH 
EAST STROUSBURG 
SO. CONNECTICUT 
CORTLAND 
M.I.T. 
TEMPLE 
SPRINGFIELD 
New Englands 
EIGL's 



-,«%^W' 



OPP 

255.65 
197.45 
267.35 

236.70 
219.25 
260.95 
154.60 
260.85 
263.50 
243.65 
173.80 
244.80 
245.15 



182 



Lord, Low lead women to EC AC sin injury-plagued season 



The Minutewomen started their 
season with the goal of reaching the 
NCAA Regionals. However, injur- 
ies and illness interfered and pre- 
vented them from getting there. 
Despite the problems, the women 
still managed to score a 171.55 for 
third place at the Atlantic 10 
Championships. More injuries 
haunted UMass at the ECAC 
Championships as all-around Tri- 
cia Harrity, co-captain and balance 
beam specialist Barbara Lord, and 
Sue Allen could not compete be- 
cause of injuries. The team placed 
fourth at the Championships. 

Senior ail-around Robin Low set 
a UMass record in the floor exer- 
cises with a score of 9.55. Through- 
out the year, Low had been enter- 



taining audiences with a spectacu- 
lar dance routine and some difficult 
tricks. 

The big meet of the year was 
against top ranked University of 
New Hampshire. Although the 
women were defeated, they scored 
a season high 173 points. The Min- 
utewomen also had a season high 
44.60 points in the floor exercises. 

In the final meet of the season 
against Southern Connecticut, 
UMass blasted its opponent out by 
six points and Low scored her high- 
est all-around score of the season 
with 35.5 points. The team had a 
season high 44.2 points in the vault- 
ing event. Lord performed a grace- 
ful yet underscored routine to place 
first with an 8.85 score. 



At the Atlantic 10 Champion- 
ships, Low placed third in the floor 
exercises with a 9.35 and Lisa Grif- 
fin captured third in the vaulting 
event with a 9.2. 

Griffin won the vaulting event at 
the ECAC's with a 9.15 and Low 
came in second on the floor with a 
9.25. Jennifer Pancoast tied for 
third on vault with a 8.8 score. 
— Ellen Richard 



UMASS 
162.05 
162.05 
162.05 
1 70.25 
169.70 
169.70 
166.40 
464.60 
164.60 
164.60 
166.40 
170.25 
173.00 
171.30 
70.80 
165.05 
3rd of 7 
4th of 5 



(10-6) 

UMass Invitational 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

CONNECTICUT 

NORTHEASTERN 

DUKE 

UCONN 

TOWSON 

TEMPLE 

MARYLAND 

DUKE 

RHODE ISLAND 

CORNELL 

SPRINGFIELD 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

SO. CONNECTICUT 

YALE 

RUTGERS 

ATlantic 10 Champs 

ECAC 




GPP 

171.20 
160.60 
159.55 
167.20 
170.15 
161.70 
1 6 1 .65 
174.50 
116.65 
1 64.95 
166.90 
164.75 
177.20 
165.20 
153.30 
1 56.45 




1st Row: Maureen Sutherby, Elizabeth Janney, Barbara Lord, Tami Bianchi, Kim 
Goodrich, Jennifer Pancoast, Lisa Griffin, Yael Kantor, Susan Allen. 2nd Row: Choreo-_ 
"grapher Cheryl Livingston, assistant coach Elizabeth Marino, Hannah Egan, Chris" 
Cloutier, Andrea D'Amadio, Abigail Farris, Patricia Harrity, Linda Jolie, Patricia 
Camus, Robin Low, head coach Ken Anderson. 



183 




184 



WRESTLING 

Four qualify for NCAA championships 



Lack of experience hurt the 
wrestling team in the regular sea- 
son but the season finale was all 
fireworks as four members of the 
young team wound up conference 
champions and qualified for the 
NCAA's at the New England Divi- 
sion I Championships. After a 1-16 
season, it was a welcome sight and 
the first time in ten years that 
UMass had four conference cham- 
pions. 

Senior Scott McQuaide led the 



team at the 167 pound level at the 
championships. Sophomore Mike 
Bossi (150-pounds) also won a title. 
Freshmen All-Americans Chris 
Lee (126-pounds) and Wes Beck- 
with (142-pounds) rounded out the 
champions for UMass. 

The Minutemen's only win of the 
year came against Maine. Al- 
though the record doesn't indicate 
it, the team fought tough all season 
and with a year of experience be- 
hind them, this young team made 




up of mostly freshman is looking to 
go far. 

— Ellen Richard 




UMASS 


GPP 


16 


BOSTON UNIVERSITY 39 


10 


HOFSTRA 42 


12 ol 14 


CO\ST GUARD INV. 


23 


bO. CONNECTICUT 29 


18 


ALBANY 33 


11 


HARVARD 33 


3rd of 3 


SPRINGFIELD TOURN. 


6 


MORGAN STATE 35 


18 


GEORGE MASON 31 


19 


CEORGE WASHINGTON 32 


9 


VIRGINIA MIL. INST. 36 




AMERICAN UNIV. 41 


27 


MAINE 22 


9 


NEW HAMPSHIRE -X 33 


3 


SPRINGFIELD ' 36 


10 


BOSTON COLLEGE 37 


12 


CENTRAL CONNECTICUT41 


17 


BROWN 26 


5 


PRINCETON 45 


3rd of 6 


NEW ENGLAND CHAMPS 





1st Row: Philippe Durant, Tim Heitzman, Mike Hanlon, Alan 
Belanger, Chris Lee, Dan Shanley, Rich Gardiner. 2nd Row: Jeff 
Hammond, John DePolo, Panos Sofianos, Bill Pearsall, Dave 
MacDonald, Wes Beckwith, Paul Hardy, Norm Millis. 3rd Row: 



Assistant coach Ken Tashjy, Fransisco Gutierrez, Mike Bossi, 
Scott McGuaide, Brian Shaughnessy, Scott Buckman, head 
coach Rick Freitas. 



185 



SWIMMING 



Successful 
season for 
men swimmers 

For the Massachusetts men's 
swimming team, the year was suc- 
cessful, with many season highs. 
The Minutemen turned out a 6-4 
dual meet competition record. 

The highlight of the season was a 
trip to Springfield for the New 
England Championships. The Min- 
utemen came in eighth place out of 
thirty competing teams with a 154 
point score in the three day event. 
The first day of the championships 
pvoved to be the best day for the 
swimmers. Paul McNeil finished 
11th in the 1650-yard free style 
race. Phil Surette placed ninth in 
record time in the 400 Individual 
Medley and Mark Surette also set a 
new UMass record in the 800 free 
style while finishing sixth. 

The following days saw less 
UMass placers, but nonetheless 
Neil Kinnon came out with a new 
UMass record and finished sixth in 
the 100-yard breaststroke. Mark 
Surette set yet another record in 
the 100-yard backstroke and 
placed sixth. In the 400 Medley 
Relay, Mark Surette, Kinnon, 
Chris Clarke, and Chris Porter 
placed sixth. In the 400 medley, re- 
lay, Mark Surette, Kinnon, Chris 
Clarke, and Chris Porter placed 
one second out of first and would 
up in fourth. The final placer was 
John Macurdy who finished in sev- 
enth place in the three-meter diving 
competition. 

— Ellen Richard 




1st Row: Mike Hackel, Fred Marius, Rick Bishop, Kit Mathews, Chris Cocca. 2nd Row: 
Kevin Gallagher, Bill Feeney, John Piazza, Bob McGillicuddy, Mike Hoover, Jim 
Jacobson. 3rd Row: Chris Clarke, Bob Cameron, Ben Jurcik, Paul McNeil, Owen 
McGonagle, Adam Markel. 4th Row: Coach Russ Yarworth, Phil Surette, Chris Porter, 
Dave Folweiler, Neil Kinnon, Dave Swensen. 




MEN'S SWIMMING 

(6-4) 
UMASS 
57 TUFTS 

76 LOWELL 

41 SPRINGFIELD 

59 NORTHEASTERN 

36 WILLIAMS 

43 RHODE ISLAND 

63 CONNECTICUT 

69 VERMONT 

55 NEW HAMPSHIRE 

69 AMHERST 

8 of 30 NEW ENGLAND 
CHAMPIONSHIPS 




186 



WOMEN'S SWIMMING 



VM/ 


vss *^-" 


OPP 


80 


VERMONT 


60 


56 


SMITH 


83 


53 


CONNECTICUT 


86 


53 


SPRINGFIELD 


87 


44 


MAINE 


96 


71 


it AMHERST il 
' WILLIAMS f 


61 


46 


94 


39 


BOSTON COLLEGE 


101 


90 


NORTHEASTERN 


50 


102 


RHODE ISLAND 


37 


48 


NEW HAMPSHIRE 


91 


89 


MT. HOLYOKE 


48 


6 of 13 NEW ENGLAND 


48 




CHAMPS. 


■^ 




j%\ %-: \^' 



Hard workers 
in lineup 
for swimmers 

UMass women's swimming fans 
could tell right off what kind of 
season it was going to be for the 
Minutewomen as they defeated the 
University of Vermont 80-60 and 
senior Jeanne Bushee broke a 
UMass school record in the one 
and three meter diving competi- 
tions. Starting off the season, Bu- 
shee established a new record for 
combined points on the one and 
three meter boards with a score of 
243.7. 

That meet set the tone for the 
rest of the season which included a 
lot of hard work and determination. 

In a loss to Springfield College, 
Elizabeth Feinberg qualified for 
the New Englands in the 50-yard 
freestyle and senior Rosemary Kel- 
sall also qualified in the 200 and 
100-yard breaststroke. Freshman 
sensation Allison Uzzo qualified in 
the 200-yard freestyle also. 

In the final home meet for 
UMass, Uzzo stole the spdtlight as 
she set a new Boyden pool and 
school record in the 1650-yard 
freestyle. 

The Minutewomen did well at 
the Championships, finishing with 
a total of 227 points. The top plac- 
ers for UMass were Bushee and 
Feinberg. Bushee took the honors 
in the one and three meter diving 
events as she not only broke her 
own 1982 one meter school record 
but qualified for the NCAA diving 
qualifying meet. Bushee also broke 
a school record in the three meter 
' diving event. Feinberg finished sec- 
ond in the 200 freestyle, beating 
her old school record. 








SKIING 




1st Row: Jay Zwally, Jay Dube, Dan Conway, Dave Greenburg, Andy Clarke, Kris Vanderzee. 2nd Row: Coach Bill 
MacConnell, Tom Boback, Jeff Spenser, Mat Luczkow, co-captain Tim Enright, Jon Segal, co-captain Alan Taupier, coach 
Dave Maynard. 

Segal leads UMass skiers to high finish 



The men's ski team came off the 
slopes in 1984 with some impres- 
sive victories, including winning the 
New England Intercollegiate Ski 
Conference Competition. With 64 
points, UMass was three points 
over second place finisher Plym- 
outh State College. 

Dan Conway led the Minutemen 
with a third placing in the sla- 
lom in a 65-man field. Jon Segal 
finished sixth in the race while 
teammates Matt Luczkow and 



Dave Greenburg finished 12th and 
19th, respectively. 

In the giant slolem, Segal raced 
in a time of 104.16 to capture first 
place. He missed the individual 
league title by three points. Despite 
nagging injuries throughout the 
season, Conway managed to finish 
third in the league. Andy Clarke 
placed sixth, Luczkow 12th and 
Conway came in 14th. 

At the Eastern Intercollegiate 
Ski Conference Championships at 



Waterville Valley, UMass placed 
fourth out of nine teams in the slo- 
lem and third out of nine teams in 
the giant slolem. Segal took the 
men's combined title. The slalom 
race was won with a two-run total 
of 109.12 seconds, almost two sec- 
onds over the second place finisher. 
On his giant slolem run, Segal 
placed second, a half of a second 
behind first place. 

— Ellen Richard 




1st Row: Captain Sue White, Sue Levy, Lisa Tomek, Bobbi Voll. 2nd Row: Coach Bill MacConnell, Julia Wells, Ellen Arcieri, 
Lisa Luczkow, Lauri Webber, Diana Swain, Coach Dale Maynard. 



Minutewomen ski to top finish in 1984 



This year's women's ski team was 
one of the best UMass has ever had 
as the women skied hard and fin- 
ished first place in 11 out of 12 
league races. 

At the Eastern Intercollegiate 
Ski Championships at Waterville 
Valley, the Minutewomen captured 
the spotlight. 

In the slalom, captain Sue White 
finished first with a time of 1 18.51, 
edging out the second place finisher 
by .14 of a second. Alice Gigliotti 
won the giant slolem with a 92.75 
time. Senior Bobbi Voll ended her 
college skiing career with a sixth 
placing in the giant slolem. 

— Ellen Richard 



\ 




189 



LACROSSE 



Gorillas give UMass fans great comeback 

Sitting on Boyden Hill in the hot 
sunshine watching the men's lacrosse 
team was the thing to do this spring - 
as it is every spring. And the team 
gave its fans something to cheer about 
again in 1984 as the Gorillas, coming 
off of only its third losing season in 
thirty years, finished with a lOth-in- 
the country rank and just missed re- 
ceiving the final playoff spot, which 
went to Delaware. 

"It's been a great comeback, even 
if we don't make it. We played a great 
last game," co-captain John Mincone 
said after the final game of the sea- 
son, an 18-8 rout of C.W. Post. Tom 
Lukacovic contributed four goals to 
the victory. 

UMass showed its strength in beat- 
ing powerhouses such as Hofstra, 12- 
5. Greg Fisk had four goals in the win 
and Lukacovic added a hat trick and 
an assist. The team held off Army on 
Boyden Hill with the goaltending of 
Gerry Moreau, who was named Most 
Valuable Player for the season. 
Coach Dick Garber's Gorillas also 
opened up the season with an impor- 
tant 10-9 nipping of Cornell. 

The team had a little more pressure 
on it than usual due to the unexplain- 
ablel983 season. But the Gorillas had 
no problem putting together a suc- 
cessful season, as Garber has accu- 
mulated the best Division I record, 
with a 235-111-4 slate. 

"We played very well," mid-fielder 
Rich messina said. "I loved playing at 
UMass and I loved my four years 
here." 

— Ellen Richard 






-t^ 



1 






~rr* t '-.- 



-J>^ 




•*-•* 




190 





LACROSSE 


UMA 


.SS ^^"*^ OPP 


10 


CORNELL x..-^^, 9 
RUTGERS rlPBI^S 
BROWN (OT) •' ^ 9 


4 


8 


20 


BOSTON COLLEGE 4 


12 


NEW HAMPSHIRE 6 


12 


HOFSTRA 5 


15 


YALE 9 


7 


HARVARD 10 


7 


ARMY 6 


16 


DARTMOUTH 6 


12 


SYRACUSE 5 


18 


C.W. POST 8 








■■'"■■"■.■■■ ■ ''■ ".■.«*'^niiN«'.': 







# 



# 



%m 






1st Row: Karl Hatton, Dan Maselli, Peter Martino, Richard 
Messina, Richard Zoerner, co-captain Stuart Orns, co-captain 
John Mincone, Gerry Moreau, Charles Dwyer, Barry Cain, Doug 
Smith. 2nd Row: Matthew O'Reilly, Steven Fierro, William 
O'Leary, Scott Ciampa, Mark Stratton, Edward Spencer, Perry 
Seale, Stephen Zito, Neal Cunningham, Stephen Moreland, Ken- 



neth Freeman. 3rd Row: Greg Fisk, Richard Abbott, Benjamin 
Stokes, Seamus McGovern, Michael Fiorini, Bubba Sanford, 
Thomas Lukacovic, Thomas Aldrich, Gerry Byrne, Ed Board- 
man. 4th Row: Assistant coach Peter Schmitz, assistant coach 
Eric Kemp, head coach Richard Garber. 



191 




192 




Photos bv Dave Deuber 




193 



LACROSSE 



Young Gazelles team proves to be strong 



This was supposed to be a year 
the University of Massachusetts 
women's lacrosse team was to go 
nowhere. Head coach Pam Hixon, 
who led the Gazelles to the national 
title in 1982 and the Final Four in 
1983, was on sabbatical with the 
U.S. Olympic field hockey team. 

Interim coach Polly Keener in- 
herited an inexperienced squad. 
Still, the Gazelles hung tough. 
Their first two games were can- 
celled due to rain and snow and 
even though they topped New 
Hampshire 10-9 in their season 
opener, people were skeptical. 

It took a while, but once UMass 
got going, they were one good 
team. A team good enough to take 
second at the ECAC champion- 
ships and qualify for its third 
straight Final Four where UMass 
again finished fourth. 

But for UMass, reaching the Fi- 



UMASS 



LACROSSE 

(9-7) 



OPP 



10 


NEW HAMPSHIRE 


9 


4 


HARVARD 


7 


t5 


NORTHWESTERN 


6 




BOSTON COLLEGE 


1 


■feg- •~,- . ' 


DARTMOUTH 


3 


Rf ' 


PENN STATfe 


15 


16 


NORTHEASTERN 





5 


TEMPLE 


13 


10 


RUTGERS 


8 


13 


SPRINGFIELD 


3 


ECAC's 






8 


JAMES MADISON 


7 


4 


NEW HAMPSHIRE 


8 


NCAA' 


s 




6 


YALE 


5(OT) 


5 


HARVARD 


4 


: 3 


MARYLAND 


9 


5 


DELAWi^RE 


9 



nal Four was an accomplishment in 
itself. "I thought the goal of reach- 
ing the Final Four was unattainable 
at the start of the season," senior 
co-captain Carol Progulske said. 

Linda Haytayan, the other sen- 
ior co-captain said, "I thought it 
would be a re-building year. But we 
weren't lucky. We deserved and 
earned everything we got." 

The Gazelles struggled through a 
6-4 regular season, getting shelled 
by Penn State and Temple, while 
dropping losses to Harvard and 
Northwestern. The Gazelles were 
not inept, either. They annihilated 
Boston College, Northeastern and 
topped a strong Rutgers team. 

While the attack was veteran, 
the defense was not. And it gave 
UMass some problems as they fell 
too far behind to catch up despite 
the exceptional scoring of Ail- 
American Pam Moyrl (5 1 goals, 1 5 



assists, 66 points) and Haytaya. 
(33 goals, 16 assists, 49 points). 

Progulske, an AU-American pick 
for the second year, anchored the 
defense while goalie Debbie DeJe- 
sus finished strong. 

Despite losing to UNH 8-4 in the 
ECAC title game, UMass got a bid 
to the NCAA and topped Yale 6-5 
in overtime on Bunny Forbes' goal 
in the first round. That sent UMass 
to Harvard with the prize being the 
Final Four. 

In the semi-finals at BU, Mary- 
land jumped out to a quick 5-0 
halftime lead enroute to a 9-3 win. 
Delaware also jumped out to a 6-3 
halftime lead and beat the Gazelles 
9-5 for third place. 

Still, for UMass to be at the Fi- 
nal Four was impressive and a great 
tribute to the team. 

— Gerry deSimas 



194 








^g'%xsr <4 *M.. 




3 7 "^Asj «n ^u,._ ~ ▼ 




1st Row: Becky Bekampis, Lana Nesmith, Posy Seifert, co-captain Carol Progulske, co-captain Linda Haytayan, Pam Moryl 
Mary Scott, Anne Shine, Chris Kocot. 2nd Row: Patty Shea, Beth Guinivan, Ruthann Tassinari, Barbara Forbes, Sue Kosloski' 
Deb DeJesus, Emily Humiston, assistant coach Polly Keener. 





Photo by Brian Goyne 



Photo by Jim Powers 






»%.i 



■*f 



iil 



Wf^. 




Photos by Brian Gonye 



197 



BASEBALL 




Offense carries Minutemen 



In baseball lore it is said that a 
baseball scout, when telegraphing a 
message back to his big-league em- 
ployer on the prospects of a sandlot 
player, uttered those famous words, 
"Good field, no hit." Taking a cue 
from that anonymous scout, the 
UMass baseball team's 1984 cam- 
paign can be summed up in these 
four words, "Good hit, no pitch." 

Reliving the memories of the 
Red Sox of the late 1970's, the 
Minutemen featured an offense 
that ended '84 with a .302 team 
batting average. Five regulars had 
averages over .300, with Todd Co- 
meau's .378 heading the list. Co- 
meau set a new UMass single sea- 
son hit record with 55. Steve Mes- 
sina (.326) claimed another record 
of 39 RBI and also led the Minute- 
men in homeruns with five, while 
Comeau led in doubles (12 — one 
shy of the UM mark.). 



Other hitters who enjoyed solid 
season include Bruce Kingman 
(.356) and Angelo Salustri (.313, 
with a team-leading 32 walks). The 
sole senior in the regular lineup, 
Andy Connors, produced a .319 
average. 

Pitching-wise, the lowest earned 
run average was held by senior 
Tony Presnal with 4.19. Short re- 
liever Matt Subocz collected the 
most wins, five, despite hurling only 
29 innings. 

The club struggled early, holding 
a 4-13 slate in early April. It re- 
bounded and went 14-13 the re- 
mainder of the season to finish 18- 
26. Highlights include a 15-3 
pounding of UMaine, the number 
one ranked team in New England, 
in the nightcap of a doubleheader, 
and doubleheader sweeps over 
UNH and Providence. 
—Scott Hood 








198 



Photos by Paul Desmarais 



UMASS 



BASEBALL 

(17-26) 



2 
2 
7 

6 
6 
4 
4 
8 
4 
9 
1 
15 
6 
4 
3 
1 

6 
9 
3 
6 
3 
5 
-6 
3 
f 
2 
9 
7 
4 
3 

10 
5 
5 



8 

1 

11 

17 

., 5 



TEMPLE 

TEMPLE 

TEMPLE 

CONNECTICUT 

HOLY CROSS 

BOSTON COLLEGE 

ST. JOSEPH'S 

ST. JOSEPH'S 

ST. JOSEPH'S 

HARVARD 

AMERICAN INT. 

MAINE-ORONO 

MAINE-ORONO 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

RHODE ISLAND 

RHODE ISLAND 

RHODE ISLAND 

JFAIRFIELD 

SPRINGFIELD 

RUTGERS 

RUTGERS 

RUTGERS 

CONNECTICUT 

YALE 

AMHERST 

NORTHEASTERN 

NORTHEASTERN 

PROVIDENCE 

PROVIDENCE 

WYOMING 

DELAWARE 

DELAWARE 

WISCONSIN 

SO. ILL. 

WISCONSIN 

DELAWARE 

WISCONSIN 

SO, ILL. 

DEI \WARL 

WISCONSIN 

SO. ILL. 

NEW MEXICO 



OPP 

4 

8 

14 
4 
3 
1 
5 
7 
7 . 



6 
3 
3 
3 

10 
5 
5 

10 

1 

13 



6 

1 

7 

8 

5 

5 

5 

1 

7 

15 

9 

6 

15 

1 

23 

7 

9 

8 

16 
14 
15 








1st Row: Tim Bishko (batboy) 2nd Row: Dan Clifford, Tim Foster, co-captain Andy 
Connors, co-captain Tony Presnal, John Bloise, Todd Ezold. 3rd Row: Assistant coach 
Dave Littlefield, Steve Allard, Matt Subocz, Jon Martin, Scott Foster, Steve Messina, 
Bruce Kingman, Jeff Cimini, Tony Szklany, head coach Dick Bergquist. 4th Row: Bob 
Kostro, Sean Flint, Andy Clark, Tom Fabian, Angelo Salustri, Jim Knopf, Bill Follans- 
bee, Jeff Jensen. 




199 



- ^ - 




Photo by Paul Desmarais 




Photo by Mitch Drantch 



201 



SOFTBALL 



Women earn most 
wins ever in 1984 

Their accomplishments were 
many. The women's softball team 
posted a 29-12 record, had four all- 
conference all-stars, ran off a 15- 
game winning streak and won the 
Vermont Invitational. But, two 
very big goals were not fulfilled for 
the Minutewomen because they did 
not win the Atlantic 10 or qualify 
for the NCAA tournament. 

However, the most wins ever and 
the naming of sophomore Sally 
Maher (IB), freshman Carol Frat- 
taroli (2B), sophomore Lynn 
Stockley (P) and senior shortstop 
Allyson Rioux as Atlantic- 10 All- 
stars should not be sneezed at, ei- 
ther. Seniors Tina Coffin (CF) and 
Rioux stood out in a starting lineup 
of four sophomores and three fresh- 
men. Rioux led the team in batting 
(.372), hits (45), RBI's (30), ho- 
meruns (3) and doubles (6). The 
Minutewomen had the potential to 
produce this year as was evident in 
routs of New Hampshire (17-1) 
and Holy Cross (12-1). UMass 
swept URI 9-1 and 1-0. 

Other times, UMass was simply 
hammered, as seen in an 8-2 loss to 
Providence and a 7-0 loss to 
Rutgers in the Atlantic- 10. 

"The potential is there," coach 
Elaine Sortino said. "The confi- 
dence of the young has to grow." 
has to grow." 

its weak moments. Cathy Reed, an- 
other sophomore, and Stockley 
both tossed no-hitters in a double- 
header against Harvard. The de- 
fense was sound all year. The loss 
of junior Missy Oman in the sea- 
son's eighth game, however, hurt 
both the offense and defense. 

— Gerry deSimas 




Photo by Paul Desmarais 




Photo by Andy Heller 



Photo by Paul Desmarais 



202 




1st Row: Coach Elaine Sortino, Debbie Cole, Carol Frattaroli, 
Emily Bietsch, Ann Ringrose, co-captain Allyson Rioux, co- 
captain Tina Coffin, Lynn Pekarski, Anne King, Robin Read, 
assistant coach Rhonda McManus. 2nd Row: Assistant coach 



Holly Hesse, Janet Miller, Krista Stanton, Sally Maher, Lynn 
Stockley, Beth Talbott, Cathy Reed, Amy Straut, Missy Oman, 
assistant coach Gina Mantino. 




SOFTBALL 

(29-12) 



UMASS 



2 BOWLING GREEN 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

1 BOWLING GREEN 

3 MICHIGAN ST. 
8 MICHIGAN ST. 

10 SETON HALL 

4 RUTGERS 

3 BOWLING GREEN 

1 OHIO UNIV. 
" 3 OHIO UNIV. 

0^ ADELPHI ^^ 

2 DREXEL ^^. 

1 EASTERN MICH: 

2 PROVIDENCE 

3 PROVIDENCE 

1 RUTGERS 

MIAMI of OHIO 

2 BROWN 

5 BROWN 

7 HOLY CROSS 

12 HOLY CROSS 

5 VERMONT 

17 NEW HAMPSHIRE 

7 MAINE 

3 SPRINGFIELD 

8 SPRINGFIELD 

9 HARVARD 

5 HARVARD 

8 NEW HAMPSHIRE 
12 NEW HAMPSHIRE 

9 RHODE ISLAND 

1 RHODE ISLAND 

CONNECTICUT 

1 CONNECTICUt 
TEMPLE 

^ 7 TEMPLE I 

6 CENTRAL CO§IN. 

2 CENTRAL CONN. 
Atlantic 10 Champ. 

6 PENN STATE 

RUTGERS 

3 PENN STATE 




203 




Pholo by Brian Goyne 



Photo by Brian Goyne 



204 





205 



TENNIS 




1st Row: Frank Rodman, Earl Small, Steven Jordan, Jon DeKlerk, Wayne Peterson. 2nd Row: Paul Zaretsky, Barry Katz, Marc 
Weinstein, John Sommerstein, Andy Pazmany, coach Manny Roberts. 



Minutemen swing into the 
season with a new coach 



The tennis team started fresh 
this year with a new head coach. 
Manny Roberts replaced Bob Slos- 
zek, who resigned after the fall sea- 
son. Most of the team returned 
from 1983 and were raring to go. 
The Minutemen wound up 
breaking even with a final 4-4 slate 
and ended the season on an upbeat 
note by defeating Central Con- 
necticut 8-1 and dominating 
American International College for 
a 9-0 shutout. 

Things did not fair as well at the 
Atlantic 10 Championships as the 
Minutemen finished in sixth place. 
Roberts was just as pleased with his 
troops, however, as four members 
of the team advanced to the conso- 
lation round. Senior Steve Jordan, 
Marc Weinstein and the doubles 
team of Jordan and Wayne Peter- 



son came back from the first round 
losses to win the consolation round. 
Peterson also did well in the singles 
competition as he went to the finals 
of the consolation round before be- 
ing defeated. Singles competitor 
Barry Katz also made it to the con- 
solation round finals. 

— Ellen Richard 



UMASS 



TENNIS 

(4-4) 



BOSTON COLLEGE 
3 RHODE ISLAND 

6 HOLY CROSS 

1 MIT 

6 SPRINGFIELD 

3 CENTRAL CONN. 

1 TUFTS 

9 AMERICAN INT 

ANTLANTIC 10 
CHAMP. 6th of 9 



206 






Up, down year 

The Minutewomen had a tough 
time when they opened their 1984 
season, but things picked up and 
made it a see-saw year. UMass 
ended with a 3-5 record. 

After being shut out by North 
Carolina and the Atlantic Christian 
College narrowly squeezed by with 
a 5-4 win, the Minutewomen dis- 
posed of East Carolina 6-3. A 
match later, the women posted 
their second victory of the season, a 
5-3 nipping of the locals. Smith 
College. UMass also took care of 
Mount Holyoke 9-0. 

At the Atlantic 10 Champion- 
ships in West Virginia, the Min- 
utewomen came in fifth place. The 
team defeated Temple and the Uni- 
versity of Rhode Island while being 
stopped by George Washington. 



— Ellen Richard 



UMASS 


4 

6 

2 

5 

3 

5th of 7 

9 





TENNIS 

(3-5) 

NORTH CAROLINA 
ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN 
COLL. 

EAST CAROLINA 

BOSTON COLLEGE 

SMITH 

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 

ATLANTIC 10 CHAMP 

MT. HOLYOKE 

BROWN 



OPP 

9 



3 
7 
3 
6 




9 




1st Row: Head coach Pat Stewart, Laura Kaufmann, Jillian Nesgos, Laura Morgan, Lisa 
— Corbett, Andrea Giordano Anne Tauger. 2nd Row: Joyce Girasella, Karen Orlowski, Elizabeth 
Sullivan, Patricia Sullivan, Maureen Hanlon, Diana Biagioli, Karen Kranick, Ann-Marie Mack- 
ertich, Christine Frazier. 

207 



Minuteman 
golf places 
sixth in N.E. 

The Minutemen golfers had a 
fine season, including a sixth place 
finish in the Division I NCAA New 
England Tournament, with a total 
of 638. 

Brian Fitzgerald led the golfers 
as he shot 77 and 79, 12th in a field 
of 55 golfers. Scott Simmons shot 
81 and 79 and Bill Meade shot 84 
and 76 to contribute to the team. 

Junior captain Tyler Shear 
would have been the top golfer for 
the Minutemen this year, but a 
thumb injury prior to the season set 
him out of action. 

— Ellen Richard 



GOLF 




First Row: Captain Brian Fitzgerald, William Meade, Marie Zenevitcii, Charles Ross. 
Second Row: Timotiiy Smith, Curt Marion, Alan Vorce, Scott Simmons, Gerald Keller, 
James Ryan, Daniel Fitzgerald, Joseph Petrin, coach Ed Vlach. 



Golfers aim high 
and shoot low 

Depth was the only thing that 
could have prevented the Min- 
utewomen golfers from having a 
bad season. But the team stayed 
tough and finished fifth at its Divi- 
sion I NCAA New England tour- 
nament with a total of 762. 

Judy Guzy lead the Minutewo- 
men and came in 10th with a 94 
and 85. Right behind Guzy was 
teammate Jane Egan who shot a 94 
and 86. Sandy Kupica turned in a 
fine performance while shooting a 
pair of 94's. Freshman Linda Foley 
shot 108 and 99 while senior Tricia 
Collins shot 112 and 99. 

— Ellen Richard 



Women's golf pholo not available. 



208 



TRACK 




1st Row: Maureen O'Reilly, Deborah Duffy, Leah Loftis, Sally Howes, Julia Ott, 
Deirdre Doyle. 2nd Row: Cindy Krupa, Barbara Cullinan, Elizabeth Patterson, Deborah 
Cosans, Mary Lou Morton, Doreen Erickson. 3rd Row: Deborah Smith, Eileen Kelly, 
Kayla Morrison, Susan Doldstein, Christine Pratt, Dwan-Aleise Sims. 4th Row: Head 
coach Kalekeni Banda, assistant coach Julie LaFreniere, assistant coach Curtis Pittman. 

Record breaking season 

The men's track team finished UMass placed third with 99 points, 
fourth this year at the New Eng- White placed first in the 800 me- 
land Championships with Todd ters with a time of 1:54.9. Rashid 



UM records are 
broken by runners 

The Minutewomen runners came 
in seventh out of more than thirty 
schools at the New England Cham- 
pionships. Junior Leah Loftis led 
the way as she won the 400 meter 
dash for the second year in a row 
while also setting a UMass record 
with a time of 57.61. 

Loftis was part of the champion- 
ship 1600 meter relay team with 
Susan Bird, Barbara Cullinan and 
Susan Goldstein. The team also set 
a school record with a time of 
3:56.80. 

Sophomore Liz Patterson placed 
fourth in the shot put. 

At the Eastern Championships, 
UMass continued to set records as 
it finished among the top of the 23 
competing schools. 

Goldstein, Cullinan, Loftis and 
Debbie Smith set a meet record as 
they finished in first place. Gold- 
stein, Cullinan, Loftis and Kayla 
Morrison set another school record 
in the 400 relay as they placed sec- 
ond. 

Morrison finished second overall 



Johnson capturing third place in Piggitt was victorious in the long , , . , jOO meters 

fu^ «^r,t-,+i,i^^ or,ri c<.++;„rT n. c^v,r>,-.i : „,:*u „ 1 p T T -) " c ; „_ ana set a recoro m me zuu meiers 



the pentathlon and setting a school 
record as he finished with 3,514 
points. 

Jerry Espinosa finished sixth in 
the Pentathlon. John Keelan won 
the championship and established a 
UMass record with a time of 
2:10.50 in the 1000 meters race. 
Brian Osborne tied the school re- 
cord and came in second in the 600 
meters. Ted White took third place 
in the 800 meters while just missing 
setting a new record in the event. 

The distance medley relay team 
finished fifth. It was the first time 
Paul Stanislawzyk, John Lynch, 
Rawle Crichlow and Jack Marin- 
elli ran together. 

At the Eastern Championships, 



jump with a leap of 22' 3". Senior 
Rod LaFlamme finished first in the 
steeplechase with a time of 9:19. 

— Ellen Richard 



-Ellen Richard 




1st Row: Head coach Ken O'Brien, Jerry Espinosa, Tom Carleo, Ted White, Ed 
Urquiola, Neal Osborne, John Keelan, Todd Johnson, Dave Reid, John Lamkin, Dave 
Doyle, assistant coach Randy Thomas. 2nd Row: Darren Whitaker, John Kirk, John 
, Panaccione, Jack Marinilli, Kyler Foster, John Okerman, Ron Homer, Mike King, 
Steve Heibeson, Don Champman. 3rd Row: Ferde Adoboe, Brad Smith, Rick Doiron, 
Jay Lynch, Jeff Woods, Neal Martin, John LaCerda, Neil Dickson, Dennis Munroe, 
Wayne Levy, Rawle Crichlow. 



209 



ZOODISC 



210 




INTRAMURALS 





211 



SENIORS 



Throughout, our theme has been diversity, and 
nothing better reflects this than the graduates. 
Without further ado . . . 




212 



vx' V 






> 













f ' 



MU 



'"-;-^,5:S, 



•f S'^ 



213 




214 



Michael A. Abbatessa 


Stephen Abedon 


Roberto Abele 


Claudia M. Arbreau 


English 


Biochemistry 


Economics 


Political Science 


Peabody 


Danbury, CT 


Lexington 


Taunton 





Brian J. Abt 

Legal Studies 
Framingham 



Kelly. Adams 

Hotel & Rest, Mgt. 
Clifton Park. NY 



Leslie A. Adams 

Plant & Soil Science 

Amherst 



Richard Adams 

Marketing 
Quincy 



Ronald F. Adams, Jr. 

Chemical Eng'g. 
Brockton 



Jill M. Aghjayan 

Marketing 

Duxbury 



Paul S. Agranat 

Economics 
Newton 



Amir S. Ahari 

A & R Economics 
Amherst 




Michael A. Ahern 

BDIC 

Maiden 



Andreas Aigner 

HRTA 

Chicopee 



Carolyn Artken 

Chemical Eng'g. 
Westport. CT 



Paula Alborghetti 

Journalism/Eng. 
Dedham 



Catherine Alessi 

HRTA 
Rockville 



Scott J. Allen 

Forestry 

Amherst 



Susan M. Allen 

Electrical Eng'g. 

Foxboro 



Alicia Altieri 

Envdes 
Bethany. CT 



Toni-Ann Amaral 

Psychology 
Somerset 



Kathryn Ambrose 

Art 
Huntington, NY 




Jeffrey W. Ammons 

Political Science 
Raymond, ME 



John N. Anastasi 

Electrical Eng'g. 
Haverhill 



Cynthia R. Andersen 

Comm. Studies 
Scituate 



Andrew G. Anderson 

Mechanical Eng'g. 
Needham 



Christian W. Anderson 

Political Science 
Southbridge 



Oebra A. Anderson 

Forestry 
Westford 



Jennifer Anderson 

Comm. Studies 
Fall River 



215 



Katrlna M. Anderson 


Michele M. Anderson 


Stephen A. Anderson 


Stephen K. Anderson 


Karen F. Andrew 


Enviromental Design 


Human Resource Adm. 


Printmaking 


Comm. Studies 


Food Science 


Danvers 


Pittsfield 


Charlton 


Winthrop 


Sudbury 




Priscilla A. Andrew 

Agricultural Econ. 
Turners Falls 



Janice E. Andrews 

Marketing 
Duxbury 



William P. Annable 

Economics 
Amherst 



David L. Antes 

Engineering 
Montvale, NJ 



Ludwik L. Antkiewicz 

Chemical Eng'g. 
San Francisco, CA 



Stavras G. Antonakas 

Management 
Arlington 



Scott Apgar 

Computer Systems Eng 
Sutherland 



Robert Appleyard 

Economics 
Stoneham 



Frank D. Arcese 

Civil Eng'g. 
Waban 



Lisa A. Arcese 

Fashion Marketing 
Waltham 



Roberta Arena 

Melrose 



Sandra J. Arlco 

Nursing 
Framingham 




Sandra E. AriVistrong 

Marketing 
Wellesley 



Beth Aronowitz 

Fashion Mktg. 
Manhasset Hills. NY 



Marc J. Aronson 

Industrial Eng'g. 
Peabody 



Elizabeth M. Arsenauit 

Psychology 
Hadley 



James H. Arsenauit 

Accounting 
Gardner 



Steven J. Arsenauit 

Accounting 
Reading 



Anne M. Atwood 

Human Services 
Bradford 



David J. Audette 

Electrical Eng'g. 
Greenfield 



Susan M. Avery 

Coindh 
Cotrain 



Tracey L. Ayers 

Political Science 
Stow 



Jennifer Ay re 

Microbiology 
Agawam 



Sheryl L. Azaroff 

Accounting 
Teaneck, NJ 



Ina R. Bachman 

Psychology 
Framingham 



Esther L. Bachrach 

Chemistry 
Maynard 




216 



Joel Bachrach 


Patricia M. Bacon 


Kathleen M. Bagllo 


Naomt J. Baigell 


Steven D. Bailen 


Patricia Baker 


Accounting 


Economics 


Comm. Studies 


Art Hist. Business 


Microbiology 


HRTA 


River Edge. NJ 


Dalton 


Maiden 


Amherst 


Peabody 


S. Weymouth 



Joseph BalduccI 

Accounting 
Fitchburg 



Stephanie Baldwin 

Psychology 
Concord 



David M. Bandler 

Industrial Eng'g, 
Danville. CA 



Susan Banltert 

Painting-Graphic Design 
N. Attleboro 





Bonnie Barber 

BDtC - Law 
Andover 



Stephen D. Barker 

Education 
Amherst 



Mary C. Barney 

Education 
Wayland 



Kalisa Barratt 

Comm. Studies 
Amherst 



Pamela Bassett 

HRTA 
Natick 



Marit E. Batchelder 

Psychology 
Longmeadow 



Rajeev Batra 

Chemical Eng'g. 

Shrewsbury 



Mark A. Baugh 

Electrical Eng'g. 
Amherst 



Jean-Pierre R. Bayard 

Electrical Eng'g. 
Cambrdge 



Karen L. Beacienski 

English/Journalism 
Taunton 



Philip C. Beard 

Nutrition 
Dorchester 




Karen Beaton 

English 
Weymouth 


Monlque A. Beauchamp 

Community Services 
Longmeadow 


Raymond M. 
Beauchemin 

Journalism/English 
Chicopee 


Colleen A. Beaudin 

Computer Science 
Closter. NJ 


Lisa M. Beaupre 

Home Econ. 
Danvers 


Ann R. Beauregard 

Animal Science 
Seekonk 


Irving S. Becker 

Accounting 
Riverside, CT 






Mark Becker 

Comm. Disorders 
Milton 


Edmond J. Been 

English/Journalism 
West Boylston 


Mitchel Bell 

Economics 
Sunderland 


Teresa A. Bellafiore 

JS/Photography 
Cranston, Rt 


Joseph M. Bellofano 

Political Science 
Scituate 




Joanne I. Belsky 

Health Fitness 
Newton 



Leo C. Bene 

Health Fitness 
Berkeley Hts.. NJ 



Garry Benoit 

IE/OR 
Stamford, CT 



Gay L. Benton 

Painting 
Shrewsbury 



Lucie C. Berger 

Geography 
Ridgewood, NJ 



217 



Andrea Bergquist 


Adriana Berhouet 


Paula A. Berksza 


Steven H. Berlin 


Judith S. Bern 


Gerald F. Bernard 


Lisa B. Bernardl 


Althropology 


Sociology 


Nursing 


Accounting 


Psychology 


Civil Engg. 


Fashion Marketing 


Amherst 


Fitchburg 


Brockton 


Amherst 


New Rochelle. NJ 


Berkley 


Rockaway. NJ 




Jody L. Bernstein 

SOM Marketing 
W. Boylston 



Stephen F. Berrigan 

Economics 
Everett 



Heidi E. Best 

HRTA 
Kennebunk 



Sara Best 

Environmental Science 
Amherst 



Rita M. Bevilacqua 

Elementary Educ- 
Assonet 



Christian W. Bibbo 

Civil Eng'g. 
Lynnfield 



David A. Bibeau 

Coins 
S. Hadley 



Mark S. Bice 

Journalism 
Fargo. ND 



Brian D. Billheimer 

Industrial Eng'g. 
Essex Jet.. VT 



Jennifer L. Bird 

Marketing 
Duxbury 



Diane M. Birdsong 

Psychology 
Amherst 




a^ 



Ellen A. Birmingham 

Communications 
Danville. NJ 

Michael R. Blais 

Business 

W. Warwick. Rl 



Robert A. Blrnbaum 

Political Science 
Lawrence, NY 

Michael H. Blanchard 

Accounting 



Melissa J. Blanchette 

Management 
W. Boylston 



Alison Block 

Psychology 
Wyckoff. NJ 





Linda M. Bissonnette 


Walter A. Bizon 




Public Health 


CHE 




Wilbraham 


Chicopee 


Julie A. Block 


Lisa A. Bloom 


Ellen Bluestein 


Marketing 


Marketing 


Journalism 


Wilhamsville, NY 


Hull 


Lexington 




218 



James M. Bock 


Peter J. Boeri 


Lynn E. Boffa 


William J. Bohn 


Diane M. Bolack 


Mark E. Boland 


Michael H. Boland 


Psychology 


Food Marketing 


Chemistry 


Economics 


Environmental Science 


Political Science 


Coms/Econ 


Amherst 


Medford 


Beverly Hills. CA 


Abington 


Grafton 


Haverrll 


Auburn 



John J. Boniface 


Allison Bonlta 


Susan P. Borden 


Lisa K. Borders 


Biochemistry 


Family/Community Serv. 


Comm Studies 


Zoology 


W, Springfield 


Chelsea 


Braintree 


Millville. NJ 




Steven L. Bornstein 

Comm. Disorders 
Chelsea 

Maria J. Botelho 

Education 

Somerville 



Tamblyn Borton 

Conway 



James W. Boughton 

Chemistry 
Amherst 



Katherine J. 

Marketing 
Andover 



Boshar 



Marie G. Boule 

Electrical Eng'g. 
W Newton 



Michael J. Bosselaers 








Biochemistry 








Winchester 








Debra A. Bourn 


Anne E. Bousquet 


Michele A. Bowman 


Lisa A. Boyer 


Animal Science 


Agricultural Econ. 


Spanish 


Marketing 


Worcester 


Westfield. NJ 


S. Deerfield 


Lincoln 




James G. Boyes 

CHE 
Allamuchy. NJ 



Laurie Brackett 

Psychology 
Amherst 



Stephen J. Brady 

A & Rec 

W, Hartford. CT 



Leslie J. Brassard 

Exercise Science 
Oxford 



Russell A. Breckwoldt 

Wildlife Biology 
Goshen. NY 



Dean J. Breda 

Management 

Winthrop 



Stephanie G. Breen 

Spanish 
Norwood 



Geraldine H. Breg 

French 

N. Caldwell. NJ 



Joan Breitung 

Environmental Science 
Springfield 



Timothy W. Brennan 

Comm. Studies 
Auburn 



Robin Brenner 

BFA 
Bergenfield, NJ 



Barrie Brian 

BDIC 
Winchester 



Brenda M. Bridgman 

Psychology 
Chicopee 



Robert S. Brock 

Journalism 

Agawam 




Barbara J. Brodley 


Karen T. Brooks 


Laurie E. Brooks 


Lorraine P. Brooks 


Deboqah A. Brown 


Edward M. Brown 


Gregory B. Brown 


History 


Food Marketing 


Comm. Disorders 


Nursing 


Nursing 


Management 


Plymouth 


Boston 


Winthrop 


Randolph 


Chelmsford 


Burlington 


Jericho, NY 


ME 



219 



Rosa Bruzzese 


Nancy Buccelll 


Andrea Bochman 


Dennis P. Buckley 


Anthony N. Bullock 


Jennifer Buras 


Gregory M. Burg 

Management 


Public Health 


Public Health 


Industrial Eng'g. 


Management 


Management 


Accounting 


Everett 


Somerville 


Brooklyn, NY 


Mansfield 


Manchester 


Amherst 


Acton 




Alison S. Burke 

Exercise Science 
Marlboro 



Cathleen A. Burke 

Nursing 
Holyoke 



Christopher M. Burke 

ME 
Wilimgton 



Thomas F. Burke 

Math/ Neuropsychology 
Glastonbury, CT 



Donna L. Burns 

Communications 
Boston 



David Burr 

Environmental Design 
W. Hartford, CT 



Pamela J. Burstyn 

Human Development 
Minis 



5. Michael Burton 

Gen. Business 
E. Falmouth 



Susan Burwick 

HRTA 
Hartsdale. NY 



Edward J. Butts 

Finance 
Quincy 





Michael B. Byers 

Accounting 
Lowell 



Kenneth W. Byman 

Animal Science 
Congers, NY 



John Byrne 

Economics 
Newton 



Gregory J. Caetano 

Computer Eng'g. 
Belchertown 



Tracy Cain 


James M. Call 


Homec/Fashion Mktg 


Accounting 


Boston 


Danvers 



Mary-Ellen Callaghan 

Computer Science 
Chelmsford 



Nancy L. Callanan 

Accounting 
Framingham 




220 



Glenn T. Callen 

Finance 
Amherst 



Barbara Cameron 

Pep 

Wakefield 



Elizabeth J. Cameron 

Physical Education 
Wakefield 



Chester A. Camoscio 

Marketing 
Newton 



Norma M. Campbell 


Peter J. Canavan 


Brian S. Cantor 


Lisa Marie Cantwell 


Elizabeth L. Capasso 


Andre Caple 


Angela Capoblanco 


Political Science 


Environmental Design 


Psychology 


Journalism/Int 


Biochemistry 


Education 


Legal 


Amherst 


Brockton 


Longmeadow 


Natick 


Brooklyn. NY 


S. Hadley 


National 




Gelsomlna Cappuccio 

Mechanical Eng'g. 
E. Boston 



Glenn R. Cardamone 

BDIC 
Lancaster 



Glenda M. Carey 

English 
Orange 



Mark Carlin 

Electrical Eng'g. 
Northboro 



Michael J. Carmen 

Psychology 
Lexington 



Ann E. Caron 

Fashion Marketing 
Swansea 



Tracey L. Caron 

Fashion Marketing 
Beverly 



Kevin P. Carr 

Aboriculture 
Dedham 



Sean S. Carr 

Economics 
Stoneham 



Joanne A. Carroll 

Political Science 
Worcester 



Mary P. Carroll 

Finance 

E. Longmeadow 




Richard L. Carroll 

Geology 
N. Quincy 

Deborah A. Carson 

Art/Painting 
Holden 



William A. Carroll, Jr. 

HRTA 

S. Windsor. CT 

Beth N. Carvin 

Comm. Studies 
Framingham 



Joseph Carsanaro 

Economics 
Methuen 

Peter A. Casale 

Economics 
Garden City. NY 



David Carson 

Comm. Studies 
Holden 

Alex H. Casanova 

Computer Science Eng'g 
Cali, Colombia 



Linda J. Casey 

Forestry 
N. Reading 



Christine M. Cassidy 

Wildlife Biology 
Wakefield 



Elise Cassuto 

Human Nutrition 
Bayshore, NY 




Leigh Catchepaugh 


Elizabeth M. Cauldwell 


Bethanne Cavanagh 


James R. Cavanaugh 


Gerard M. Celentano 


Robert B. Cellucci 


David S. Chalken 


Art 


Psychology 


Arboriculture 


Economics 


Electrical Eng'g. 


Finance 


Accounting 


Agawam 


Walpole 


Brockton 


Worcester 


Beverly 


Shrewsbury 


Framingham 



221 



Charles D. Champagne 


Roy S. Chan 


Shirley R. Chan 


Donna L. Chapman 


Lawrence S. Chapman 


Robert Charbonneau 


Jack C. Chen 


Accounting 


Mathematics 


Fashion Marketing 


JS/INT 


Accounting 


Environmental Sciences 


Electrical Eng'g 


N. Attleboro 


Brighton 


Quincy 


Plymouth 


Sharon 


Northboro 


Hyannis 




Rosa P. Chen 

Electrical Eng'i 
Oradell. NJ 



Sandra Chevalier Elizabeth A. Chiasson 

Home Ec/Fashion Mktg Agricultural Econ, 

Amherst Waltham 



Linda A. Chichester 

Psychology 
Sunderland 



Allison N. Childs 

Animal Science 
Hyannis 



Deborah S. Chorney 

Psychology 
Sudbury 



Kim S. Chournard 

Accounting 
Somerset 



Daniel Chow 

Finance 
Amherst 



Claire A. Chretien 

Comm. Disorders 
Conventry, Rl 



Claire F. Christ 

Sculpture 
Milton. NJ 



Cynthia J. Christenson 

Fashion Marketing - 
Amherst 





H |'*'|[-*^''^'*~ 



Dianne E. Chronis 

Mass Comm. 
Georgetown 



Dina L. Chu 

BFA 

Dobbs Ferry. NY 



Sharon E. Cieri 

Marketing 
Peabody 



Jeffrey M. Clark 

Management 
Ayer 



Robert J. Clark 

Mechanical Eng'g, 
Beverly 



Alan B. Clement 

Chemical Eng'g. 
Wynnewood. PA 



Keith W. Clement 

Animal Science 
Shelburne Falls 



Sheila E. Clinton 

LS & R 
Lawrence 



Timothy Dwight Coates William R. Cochran John Coelho 

Business Management Mechanical Eng'g. Exercise Science 

Saugus Princeton N. Dartmouth 




222 



Amy B. Cohen 


Andrew M. Cohen 


Benjamin Cohen 


Deborah S. Cohen 


L. Scott Cohen 


Sheila Coleman 


Susan L. Colen 


Comm, Studies 


GBFIN 


Comm Disorders 


Finance 


Political Science 


Coins 


lEOR 


Fair Lawn, NJ 


Framingham 


Atlantic Beach. NY 


N. Babylon. NY 


Amherst 


Tewksbury 


Teaneck. NJ 



Steven M. Collard 


Bruce Colllngwood 


Jeffrey F. Colllngwood 


Katlileen M. Collins 


Industrial Eng'g, 


Chemical Eng'g. 


Civil Eng'g. 


Legal Studies 


Saco 


Sheffield 


Sheffield 


Greenfield 




John P. Collyer 

Psychology 
Amherst 



Michelle A. Comeau 

Spanish 

Leominster 



John 5. Comey 

Plant & Soil Science 
Attleboro 



Greg Conklln 

Math/Biochemistry 
Amherst 



Anne E. Connelly 

Accounting 
Needham 



Carol A. Connors 

Psychology 
Needham 



Jennifer M. Connors 

Accounting 
Needham 



John F. Connors, III 

Management 
Southborough 



Christopher M. Conroy 

Chemical Eng'g. 
Lexington 



Lori A. Conway 

Legal Studies 
Springfield 



Joseph Cooney 

Accounting 
Acton 




Marcia S. Cooper 

Marketing 
Newton 



Suzanne L. Corbeil 

Management 
Had ley 



James Corbett 

Exercise Science 
Winthrop 



Celeste L. Correia 

Comm. Studies 
New Bedford 



Doreen J. Correia 

Legal Studies 
New Bedford 



Patricia A. Corrigan 

Management 
Ctoster. NJ 



Juliann Corsini 

Zoology 
Sandwich 



James F. Costello 

Human Services 
N. Andover 



Patricia A. Costello 

Sociology 
Norwood 



William S. Cotton 

Economics 
Irvine, LA 



Christine Coughlin 

Exercise Science 
Enfield, CT 



John Couig 

Management 



Marya J. Courtright 

Pyschology 
Acton 



Charlene Cousineau 

HRTA 
Amherst 




Staci Coven 


Christopher A. Coyle 


Lawrence M. Crasnick 


Dean Cromack 


Anne M. Cronin 


Edmond G. Cronin 


Heidi K. Cronkrite 


Comm. Disorders 


Animal Science 


Comm. Studies 


Computer Science 


Psychology 


Geography 


HRTA 


Bellmore. N.Y. 


Athol 


Newton 


Hadley 


Needham 


Brighton 


E. Walpole 



223 



Harry J. Crosby 


Elaine J. Crossley 


Daniel S. Crovo 


Joanne Crowley 


Rita K. Crowley 


John R. Cruise 


Michelle D. Cullerton 


Electncial Eng'g. 


HRTA 


Civil Eng'g. 


Sociology 


Education 


Spanish 


Comm, Disorders 


Belchertown 


Andover 


Florence 


Holyoke 


Quincy 


Brockton 


E. Hanover, NJ 




Steven G. Cumming 

Agri & Resource Econ 
Boxboro 



Colleen Cummings 

Comm. Studies 
Fitchburg 



Paul Cunningham 

Political Science 
Wellestey 



Katherine A. Curda 

Sees 
Danvers 



Jeanne Curley 

Zoology DH 
Osterville 



Kelly J. Curran 

History 

Laguna Beach, CA 



Margaret H. Cusack 

Political Science 
Arlington 



Katherine M. Cushing 

English 
Hingham 



Christine M. D'Angeli 

Political Science 
Waltham 



Elizabeth D'Angeti 

English 
Waltham 



Lauren E. Daltch 

Psychology 
Canton 




224 



Elizabeth V. Davidson 


Jeffrey Davidson 


Cheryle K. Davis 


Deborah A. Davis 


Emily R. Davis 


Gary A. Davis 


Ralph G. Davis 


Chemical Eng'g, 


HRTA 


Management 


Marketing 


JS/Eng 


Human Development 


Chemical Eng'g 


Belmont 


Newton 


Saugus 


Lincoln 


Burlington 


Framingham 


Hudson 



Nancye L. Dawley 


Kathleen M. Day 


Dennis M. Dayton 


Louis de Lesdernier 


Lynn M. Dean 


Stephen Defrancesco 


Denlse E. Delaney 


Psychology 


Industrial Eng'g. 


Industrial Eng'g 


ME 


Electrical Eng'g 


Civil Eng'g. 


HRTA 


E Dennis 


Scituate 


Pittsfield 


Shutesbury 


Hanover 


Holliston 


Medford 




Kimberly Delaney 

HRTA 


David Deleo 

Needham 


Medford 




David L. Desrosiers 


Alan Detoma 


Sports Management 
Fall River 


Design 
Holliston 



Lawrence Delia 

Comm. Studies 

Southampton, NY 



Thomas M. Deliso 

Environmental Design 
Agaw/am 



Deanna L. Deanult 

Exercise Science 
Longmeadow 



Noel Dent 

Pre-Physical Therapy 
Buzzards Bay 

Carole T. Devine 

Marketing 
Salisbury 



Brenda M. DePippo 

Accounting 
Lawrence 

Daniel A. Dexter 

Political Science 
Briarcliff Mnr.. NY 




Valerie L. Dextradeur 

Environmental Design 
Barre 

Gina B. DiCarlo 

Management 

Hopkinton 



Kim-Marie E. Di Pasquali 

Forestry 
New Bedford 

Tanya L. Dickinson 

Fashion Marketing 
Northampton 



Carol D. Dickman 

Exercise Science 
Fatrview. NJ 



Scott B. Dickson 

Electrical Eng'g. 
Dedham 



Paul A. DiMattia 

Print Making (Art) 
Westwood 



Steven Diamond 


Thomas P. Diaz 


Comm. Studies 


Electrical Eng'g. 


Amherst 


Haydenville 


Theresa DiMento 


Roslyn D. Diorio 


Chinese 


Accounting 


Rowley 


Peabody 




Jill G. Dischler 

Fashion Marketing 

Persippany, NJ 



Jeannine A. Disviscour 

Anthropology 
Amherst 



Michelle A. Doherty 

Accounting 

Holliston 



Philip J. Doherty 

Accounting 

Andover 



Susan L. Dombrow 

English 

New York, NY 



Heidi L. Dominguez 

Mrcrobiology 
Feeding Hills 



Terry Ann Donahue 

Exercise Science 
Belmont 



225 



Anthony J. Donegan 


Doreen Donnarumma 


Anne N. Donoghue 


Michael S. Donoghue 


Comm. Studies 


Education 


JS/Political Science 


English 


Brockton 


Maiden 


Park Ridge. NJ 


Granby, CT 





Gloria C. Donovan 

HRTA 
Milton 



Robert A. Doolittle 

CSE 
Hingham 



Joseph F. Dorion 

Industrial Eng'g. 
Norwood 



David R. Doucette 

Economics 
Stoneham 



Jean Dougherty 

Psychology 
Tewksbury 



Kelly E. Drake 

Psychology 
Jordan. NY 



Lisa A. Drolette 

Comm. Studies 
E. Haven. CT 



Andrea Drubulis 

Accounting 
Green Brook, NJ 



Jane B. Druker 

Comm. Studies 
Newton 



Leslie P. Duberstein 

Sociology 
Scarsdale, NY 



Daniel H. Dubois 

Zoology 
Upton 




Michael J. Ducatelli 

Industrial Eng'g. 
Tornngton. CT 



Diane L. Ducharme 

Marketing 
S. Hadley 



Marlene M. Ducharme 

English 
Leeds 



Cheryl A. Duclos 

French 
Swansea 



Karen E. Dudeck 

Finance 
Springfield 



Steven J. Dugas 

Journalism 
Attleboro 



Pamela J. Dunigan 

Environmental Design 
Holden 



Allison Dunn 

Sci/Cotns 
Concord 



Diana C. Dunn 

Marketing 
Marlboro. NJ 



John D. Dunn, Jr. 

Education 
Naugatuck, CT 



Lisa M. Durling 

English 
Dennisport 



Beverly J. Dwlght 

Marketing 
Whately 



Donald M. Dwight 

Civil Eng'g. 

Whately 



Christine M. Dynan 

Education 
Arlington 




226 



James P. Earls 

Chemical Eng'g. 

Brighton 



Christopher A. Eaton 

Wood Tech. 
Hingham 



Nola A. Eddy 

Fashion Marketing 
Wallingford. CT 



Elizabeth J. Edwards 

Geog. 
Sudbury 



Jane A. Edwards 
Food Marketing 
Templeton 



Amy Eidt 

Art History Dh. 
Mission Viejo. CA 



Lynn B. Eisenberg 

Comm. Studies 
Oceanside. NY 



Bruce G. Ellas 


Howard J. Ellas 


Susan Ellcker 


Antony S. Elkjns 


HRTA 


Economics 


Marketing 


Accounting 


Fall River 


E. Meadow. NY 


Burlington 


Centerville 





Judith A. Eileen 

Accounting 
Mornstown NJ 



Alfred P. Elliott 

Forestry 
Scrtuate 



Emanuel Ellis 

Comm. Studies 
Marion, PA 



Matthew D. Ellis 

Journalism/English 
BrooklJne 



Lisa C. Elsoffer 

Comm. Studies 
Shaker Hts., OH 



Michael K. Engel 

Management 

Lynnfieid 



Susan A. Englund 

Psychology 
Chelmsford 



Elizabeth Ennis 

Erie. PA 



Amy L. Epifano 

Sport Management 
Wellesley 



William E. Erkkinen 

GB Finance 
Stow 



Nancy J. Eskenazi 

Poiitrcal Sience 
E. Rockaway. NY 




Philip R. Estabrooks 

Electrical Eng'g. 
N. Orange 



David J. Fachetti 

Accounting 
Pembroke 



Kevin J. Fachetti 

Art-Psychology 
Pembroke 



Youssef Fadel 

Marketing/ Advertising 
Amherst 



Christine Fairneny 

Geology 
Forestdale 



Barbara A. Fanning 

Exercise Science 
Lynn 



Martin J. Fanning 

History 
Ludlow 



Steffan Fantini 

Communications 
Amherst 



Thomas P. Fantozzi 

Industrial Eng"g. 

Fitchburg 



Maura L. Farrell 

Fashion Marketing 
Revere 



Amy 0. Fassler 

Sport Management 
Morgenvrlle, NJ 





Lynne M. Feaman 


Daniel E. Feder 


Jeanne E. Feeley 


Brian P. Feeney 


Food & Resource Econ. 


Political Science 


Fashion Marketing 


Mechanical Eng'g. 


Scituate 


Amherst 


Braintree 


Weymouth 



227 



James F. Fein 


Charisse E. Finerman 


Bruce Felnstein 


Todd A. Feinstein 


Jay Feldman 


Beth M. Fendell 


Michael B. Fenn 


Civil Eng'g. 


Animal Science 


HRTA 


Accounting 


Amherst 


Early Childhood Educ 


Industrial Eng'g. 


Brocl<ton 


Floral Park. NY 


Framingham 


Needham 




Edison. NJ 


Dalton 




Michaekl K. Fenton 

Political Science 
Richmond. VA 



Shetly H. Ferman 

Nursing 
Lowell 



Susan M. Fernandez 

Marketing 
Lynbrook. NY 



Jeffrey L. Ferranti 

HRTA 
Plymouth 



Pamela A. Ferreira 

Comm. Disorders 
E. Longmeadow 



Joseph M. Ferrelli 

Industrial Eng'g. 
Weston 



Suzanne M. Ferris 

Hotel Rest. Mgr. 
Tenafly. NJ 



Michael A. Ferry 

Philosophy 

Westwood 



Sarah L. Fiagg 

Comm. Studies 
Reading 



Denise A. Fierro 

Comm. Studies 
Manhasset. NY 



Stephen G. Fil 

Electrical Eng'g. 
Hadley 




John Finguerra 

Comm. Studies 
Virginia. Beach. VA 



Amy E. Finkel 

Accounting 
Springfield 



Amy Finn 

Education 

Framingham 



Torrin D. Fisher 

Economics 
Edison. NJ 



David Fishier 

Economics 
Roc NY 



Brian T. Fitzgerald 

A & R Econ- 
Duxbury 



Edward R. Fitzgerald, Jr. 

Comm. Studies 
Buston 



John N. Fitzpatrick 

Management 
Methuen 



Edward C. Fleck 

Economics 
Pittsfield 



Christopher M. Flood 

Psychology 
Marlboro 



Jeffrey S. Flug 

Accounting 
Plainview, NY 




228 



Catherine M. Flynn 


Kevin J. Flynn 


Kristine A. Flynn 


Michael C. Flynn 


Michael J. Flynn 


Sarah A. Flynn 


Public Health 


Comm, Studies 


Economics 


Economics 


A & R Econ. 


Sociology 


Marblehead 


Madison, CT 


Pittsfield 


Marblehead 


Montague 


Marblehead 



John Polan 


James F. Foley 


Margaret Foley 


Laura FontanI 


James J. Ford 


Susan H. Forde 


Stephen C. Forstund 


Comm. Studies 


Comm, Studies 


Sport Management 


Political Science 


Electrical Eng'g. 


Fashion Marketing 


Business Adm 


Stoneham 


Lowell 


Auburn 


Florence, Italy 


Winthrop 


Scituate 


Ludlow 




Christopher Fortugno 

HRTA 
S. Berlin 



Faith Foss 

Sociology 

Northampton 



Sandra Foss 

Plant & Soil Science 
Concord 



Scott Foti 

Chemical Eng'g. 
Schenectady, NY 



Margo Fournier 

Political Science 
Medfi.eld 



Karen E. Fovargue 

Comm. Studies 
Old Greenwich. CT 



Kim Y. Fowski 

Biochemistry 
Naples. FL 



Elizabeth A. Francisco 

Psychology 

Acton 



Giselda Franco 

Food Science 
Lawrence 



Eric N. Frank 

Computer Science 
Maiden 



Laurie Frank 

BDIC 
Sharon 




Rachael L. Frank 

Zoology DH. 
Lexington 

William M. Frantzen 

Computer Sci. & Mktg 
Framingham 



Diane Franke 

Animal Science 
Hull 

Beth F raster 

Psychology 

Schenectady, NY 



Patrice A. Fredericks 

Exercise Science 
Spring Lake. NJ 



Nancy J. Freedman 

Legal Studies 
Revere 



Scott K, Freedman 

Casiac 

Beverly 



David S. Franklin 

Microbiology 
Hartsdale, NY 

Risa E. Freeman 

English 
Brockton 



Jo-Ellen Franklin 

Education 
Reading 

Theresa L. Freeman 

Management 
Fishkill. NY 




William G. Freeman 


Caroline S. Freitas 


Paul J. Friedman 


Linda A. Fritzler 


Ralph J. Froio, Jr. 


Jack K. Fuchs 


Mary K. Fugatt 


Chemical Eng'g. 


Exercise Science 


Zoology 


Accounting 


Environmental Design 


Psychology 


Animal Science 


Hyde Park 


E. Sandwich 


Braintree 


Lawrence 


Cohasset 


Lido Beach. NY 


N. Oxford 



229 



Wendy S. Fuld 


Yim F. Fung 


Howard Gabor 


Craig C. Gaito 


Brian G. Galeucia 


Daniel W. Gallagher 


Theresa Galvin 


LSR 


Psychoogy 


Framingham 


Hrta 


Marketing 


History 


JS/Int 


Stoughton 


Paterson, NJ 




Niantic, CT 


Medfield 


Brfghton 


W Roxfaury 




Deborah A. Gamble 

A & Rec 
Woburn 


Ellen M. 

Hrta 
Peabody 


Gannon 


Ronald F. Gard 

A & R Econom 
Belmont 


iner 

cs 


Lori A. Gardner 


Kathleen A., Garrity 

History 
Hingham 


Lisa M. Gaspar 

Psychology 
Fall River 


Cheryl L. Gauthier 

Environmental Science 
N. Andover 








Laurie Gay 

Goergraphy 
Onset 




Glen P. Gaylinn 

Finance 
Norwalk 


John 0. Geenty. Jr. 

Political Science 

Southbndge 


Gary Gekow 

Management 
Ruidoso 


Sharj J., Genn 

Comm. Disorders 
Hewlett. NY 





Kenneth A. Gerome 

Accounting 
Framingham 



Kathleen E., Geromini 

Communications 

Franklin 



Fatemeh Giahi 

Chemical Engg- 

Amherst 



Susan Gianetti 

JS Eng 

Franklin 



David R. Gibson 

Accounting 
Marshfreld 



Christopher M. Giglio 

Anthropology 
Wakefield 



Stephen M. Gilman 

Accounting 
Newton 



Douglas R. Gilmore 

Economics 
Stow 



Judith H. Giorgio 

Environmental Science 
S. Yarmouth 



230 




Robin M. Girouard 

Accounting 
Reading 



Cheryl A. Gittelman 

Accounting 

Kew Gardens. NY 



Howard K. Glantz 

Psychology 

W. Hartford. CT 



MIndy G. Glasser 

Psychology 
Oceanside, NY 



Randi B. Glazer 


Sherrlll A. Glidden 


Deborah Glogston 


David L. Glucksman 


Monica M. Godfrey 


Brlgette M. Godwin 


Steven Gogonis 


Food Marketing Econ. 


Mechanical Eng'g. 


Hingham 


HRTA 


Political Science 


Psychology 


Food Marketing 


Middletown. NY 


N. Kingstown. Rl 




Woodbndge, CT 


Quincy 


Lee 


Southbndge 




Jeffrey M. Goldblatt 

Mechanical Eng'g. 
E Honover, NJ 



David S. Goldfield 

Comm. Studies 
Maplewood, NJ 



Sherry L. Goldman 

Accounting 

Englishtown, NJ 



Daniel Goldstein 

Economics 
Lexington 



Jodi L. Goldstein 

Fashion Marketing 
Radnor. PA 



Susan L. Goldstein 

STPEC 
Brighton 



Amy B. Gonick 

Mass Comm. 
Englishtown. NJ 



Mauricio Gonzalez 

HRTA 
Miami. FL 



Richard Gonzalez 

Marketing 
Lynbrook, NY 



Nancy L. Goodman 

Animal Science 
Wellesley 




Karin S. Gordee 

Marketing 
Peabody 



Alan R. Gordon 

Accounting 
W. Newton 



Robert C. Gordon 

Accounting 
Baldwin. NY 



Margaret E. Gosltn 

Wildlife Biology 
Taunton 



Robert F. Goulart 

Computer Systems 

Eng'g. 

Natick 



Linda R. Gould 

Comm. Disorders 
Hauppauge. NY 



Lucia Gour 

Sociology 

E. Longmeadow 



Michael F. Grady 


James F. Graham 


Melissa K. Graham 


Political Science 


English 


English 


Milford 


Monson 


Medfield 




Liljana Granaudo 


Cheryl P. Grasso 


Marc P. G ravel ine 


Paul Green 


Philip D. Greene 


Gail E. Greenstein 


Carolyn P. Griffin 


Comm. Studies 


Education 


Zoology 


Comm. Studies 


Mechanical Eng'g. 


Psychology 


Communications 


E. Longmeadow 


Methuen 


Palmer 


Newton 


Lexington 


E. Meadow. NY 


E. Greenwich, Rl 



231 



Lisa A. Grochmal 


Kim S. Grossman 


Robert Grotyohann 


Susan E. Grout 


Deborah E. Gruber 


EInar C. Gruner-Hegge 


Caroline M. Guarente 


Comm. Disorders 


Comm Studies 


Mathematics 


Finance 


Music 


Finance 


HRTA 


Granby 


Newton Ctr. . 


W. Caldwell, NJ 


Everett 


Boston 


Oslo. Norway 


Middleton 




Bernadette Gubins 

Management 
Concord 



Elaine B. GubJtose 

Comm. Studies 
Stamford. CT 



Elizabeth M. Guerin 

Exercise Science 
Boston 



John Guerin 

Political Science 
Essex 



Philip L. Guillette 

Management 
Worcester 



Krista R. Gullbrand 

Public Health 
Framingham 



Max M. Gulman 

HRTA 
Peabody 



Diane R. Gunderson 

Food Science 
Oceanside. NY 



Danielle C. Guzowski 

Finance 

Andover 



Keith J. Hach 

Human Dev. Gerontology 
W. Orange. NJ 



Janice Hagemann 

English 
Marion 



Wendy L. Hahn 

Economics 
Melville. NY 




Jeanne M. Hakkila 

Electrical Eng'g. 
Hingham 


Carolyn Hall 

Computer & 

Neuroscience 

Bedford 


Michael J. Hall 

Communications 
S. Weymouth 






Sally L. Hall 

Home Economics 
Melrose 


Adam T. Hamada 

Communications 

Newton 






Bruce D. Hamilton 

Resource Econ. 
Amherst 


Harry A. Hamjian 

Geology 
S. Chatham 


Elizabeth Hammann 

Accounting 
Amherst 


Steven H. Handelman 

Accounting 
Englishtown. NJ 


Jonathan A. Handwerger 

Gen. Business Finance 
Jericho. NY 





232 



Joseph D. Hanlon 


Richard J. Hanlon. II 


Karin S. Hansen 


Richard 0. Hansen 


John M. Hansen, III 


Lowell 


GBFIN 


Microbiology 


Economics 


Civil Eng'g. 




Sudbury 


Westboro 


Wellesley 


Huntington Stn.. NY 



Frances J. Haracklewlcz 

Electrical Eng'ge. 
Chicopee 



Karen L. Harding 

Marketing 
Winchendon 



Debora J. Hardy 

Psychology 
New Bedford 



Walter W. Hardy 

Electrical Eng'g, 
Canton 



Linda M. Harley 

Psychology 
Massapequa Park. NY 



MIchal Harling 

Elementary Education 
Westfield 



Marjorle M. Harlow 

Food Science 
Stoughton 




Amy C. Harmon 

Sociology 
Worcester 



Denise M. Harper 

Electrical Eng'g. 
Concord 



Philip D. Harrington 

Political Science 
Fall River 



Shirley M. Harrington 

Political Science 
Randolph 



Amy Harris 

HRTA 
Peabody 



Daniel B. Harris 

Mechanical Eng'g 
Greenfield 



Kelly N. Harris 

HRTA 

N. Miami Bch., FL 



Paul A. Harris 

Economics 
Framingham 



Joseph P. Hart 

HRTA 
Cohasset 



Tracy E. Hatch 

English 
Longmeadow 



Diana L. Haugen 

Political Science 
Niceville, FL 



Michael A. Havener 

Chemical Eng'g. 
Natick 




Robert G. Hayes 


Kathleen Haynes 


Jennifer S. Hays 






Abigail N. Hazlehi 


rst 


Rose Marie E. Healey- 


Finance 


Classics 


Psychology 






Psychology 




Picard 


Amherst 


Franklin 


W. Newton 






Nashville. TN 




Animal Science 
Chicopee 


Thomas P. Healy 


Beth M. Hearn 


Suzen L. Heeley 


Thomas P. Heiser 


Mark F. Helfrich 


Amy J. Henken 




Kurt Henneberg 


Coins 


Marketing 


Art 


Accounting 


Econ. 


Pyschoiogy 




Comm. Studies 


Brockton 


Burlington 


Ardmore, PA 


Shelburne 


Norwell 


Needham 




Canton 




Richard E. Hennessy 


Emily R. Henry 


Yvette 1. Henry 


Catherine Herlihy 


Iris M. Hernandez 


Kristen D. Herndon 


Matthew T. Herreid 


Management 


Accounting 


Chemistry 


Finance 


Education 


Marketing 


Economics 


W. Springfield 


Hamburg, NY 


Philadelphia. PA 


Dalton 


New Bedford 


E. Sandwich 


Concord 



233 



Jeffrey A. Hershberg 


Sharl A. Hershman 


Steven E. Hershman 


Cheryl A. Highwart 


Deborah Hill 


Paul T. Hlllner 


Jeffrey A. HMIt 


Accounting 


Comm. Disorders 


HRTA 


Econ/HRTA 


Economics 


Pep 


Psychology 


Needham 


Newton 


Sharon 


Kingston 


Andover 


Dorchester 


Danvers 




Glenn Hitsinger 

Political Sci. & Eng. 
Westfield. NJ 



Annette Hines 

Zoology 
Hudson NY 



Brenda J. Hnatow 

Finance 
Amherst 



Hue Ho 

Econ Coins 
Amherst 



Meredith Hoban 

Accounting 
Sunderland 



Matthew J. Hochman 

Marketing 

Sharon 



Kathleen Hodge 

Microbiology 
Newburyport 



Gary M. Hodlin 

Accounting 
Pittsfield 



Kathleen J. Hoell 

Marketing 
Tewksbury 



Debra J. Hoffman 

Psychology 
Brewster 



Steven B. Hollander 

Accounting & Econ 
Cranford. NJ 



Scott Holman 

Management 

Holden 




Penny L. Holmes 

Interior Design 
Natick 



Susan C. Holmes 

Art 
Shrewsbury 



Paul S. Holt 

Gen, Business 
Lexington 



Judy M. Holtz 

Fashion Marketing 
W. Orange. NJ 



Jay L. Holzman 

Marketing 
Portland. OR 



Sally A. Hoosick 

Industrial Eng'g. 
Pittsfield 



Janice R. Hooton 

Music Education 
S. Hadley 



Stephen D. Hopkins 

History 

Wilbraham 



Michael W. Horgan 

Electrical Eng'g. 

Revere 



Jon S. Horlink 

Economics 
Newtonville 



John E. Hornfeldt 

Economics 
Brookline 



Diane J. Horwitz 

Psychology 
Brookline 




234 



Johanna E. Hosom 


Daniel T. Houle 


Damlen F. Houlihan 


Beth W. Howitt 


Paula J. Hoyt 


Ann Marie Huban 


John H. Hubbe 


Journalism/ Legal Stud. 


Food Marketing 


Chemical Engg, 


Agri & Res. Economics 


Journalism 


Marketing 


Economics 


Falmouth 


S Deerfield 


Nahant 


Leominster 


Attleboro 


Pittsfield 


Mamaroneck. NY 



Jacquelin E. Huffman 


Ann E. Hu( 


;hes 


Katlierlne HI. Hultln 


Michael B. Hunnlcutt 


Alyson A. Hunt 


Charles Hurlburt. II 


Alison L. Husid 


Interior Design 


Spanish 




Management 


French 


BDIC 


Coins 


Accounting 


Sudbury 


Sherborn 




Rockport 


Washington. DC 


Chestnut Hill 


Florence 


W, Orange, NJ 




Tara M. Hutchines 


Charles L. Hydovltz 


Pamela Hyman 


Lisa K. lerulli 


Mary E. Ingham 


Colleen R. Ingraham 


Diane B. Isaacs 


Microbiology 


Public Adm. In Law 


Accounting 


BDIC 


Coins 


Community Services 


Accounting 


Holliston 


Pittsburgh, PA 


Brockton 


Amherst 


Northport, NY 


Amherst, NY 


Vonkers. NY 


Carlos E. Iturregui 


Christine K. JablonskJ 


Linda JablowskI 


Kevin J. Jack 


Darlene R. Jackson 






Journalism/lnt. 


BDIC International Bus- 


Nursing 


Accounting 


Journalism /Afro-Am. 






Puerto Rico 


Flemington, NJ 


Montague 


Amherst 


Brockton 









Jean M. Jackson 

Comm. Studies 
Brockton 



Bradley M. Jacobs 

Political Science 
Waltham 



Nancy J. Jacobs 

Comm. Disorders 
Brockton 



Cheryl A. Jagolinzer 

Comm. Studies 
Framingham 



Caria L. James 

Psychology 
Bridgeton, NJ 



Lois A. Jandzinski 

Accounting 
Springfield 



Thomas S. Jango 

Forestry 

S. Weymouth 



Gerald E. Janofsky 

Electrical Eng'g. 
Lexington 



Gina L. Jeansonne 

Fashion Marketing 
Littleton 



Samuel Fh. Jeffries 

Env. Des, 
Acton 










Crista M. Jensen 

Exercise Science 
Hatchville 



Richard G. Jenssen, 

Economics 
Lenox 



Douglas A. Johnson 

BDIC 
Bedford 



Dougtas H. Johnson 

Psychology 
Locust Valley. NY 



Jennifer R. Johnson 

Psychology 
Falmouth 



235 



Judi-Anne Johnson 


Keith W. Johnson 


Kevin A. Johnson 


Michael D. Johnson 


Thaddeus Johnson 


Tim Johnson 


Holly Jones 


Electrical Eng'g 


Afro American Studies 


Industrial Eng'g. 


Economics 


Fisheries 


Comm, Studies 


GB Fin. 


Brooklyn, NY 


W. Hempstead. NY 


Wayne, PA 


Springfield 


Westmoreland. NH 


Windsor Locks. CT 


Southborough 




Michael P. Jones 

Accounting 
Falmouth 



Kathleen M. Joseph 

Family & Community Ser, 
Stamford. CT 



Alexander J. JozefowskI 

Psychology 
Millbury 



Oarlene G. Judecki 

Industrial Eng'g. 
Westfield 



Lisa V. Kabler 

Psychology 
Northampton 



Christ M. Kacoyannakis 

Accounting 
Wilbraham 



Jeffrey L. Kadish 

HRTA 

Goldens Bridge. NY 



Shari B. Kaiden 

Microbiology 
Framingham 



A. Zohrab Kaligian 

Environmental Design 
Lexington 



Thomas E. Kalinowski 

Food Marketing Econ. 
Worlester 



Susan Kaminsky 

HRTA 
Westport 



Andrew Kanrich 

EE 
Teaneck. NJ 









Aimee-Beth Kaplan 

f^arketmg 
Lowell 


Andrew J. Karas 

Biochemistry 
Fair Lawn, NJ 


Etisa A. Karas 

Painting Art 
W. Newton 


Lori Karcinell 

Accounting 
Baldwin. NY 


Jyrki J. Karhunen 

International Relations 
Lowell 


Elise L. Karp 

Education 
Brockton 


Scott A. Katarivas 

BDIC 
Randolph 


Lauren J. Kaufman 

Comm. Disorders 
Newton 


Caroline J. Kavanagh 

Painting 
Westford 










236 



Francine B. Kavanagh 


Henry W. Kaylor 


Christopher A. Ka2anti$ 


Michael J. Kearney 


Sport Management 


Accounting 


Finance 


Accounting 


Wenham 


Montague 


Agawam 


Springfield 



Laura Kehoe 


Brian K. Kelley 


John Kelley 


Marianne Kelley 


James G. Kelly 


Psychology 


Geology 


HIS 


Animal Science 


Accounting 


Natick 


Lincoln. Rl 


Northfield 


Braintree 


Hunt Sta.. NY 




Jill A. Kennedy 

Education 
Andover 



Kathleen M. Kennedy 

Comm. Studies 
Hopkinton 



Margo Kennedy 

Marketing 
Holyoke 



Deborah A. Kenny 

Astronomy/ Physics 
Wolcott. CT 



Linda B. Kenyon 

Psychology 
Jerico. NY 



Nancy A. Keough 

Psychology 
Tewksbury 



Jaimie L. Kessler 

Fashion Marketing 
Larchmont, NY 



Jay A. Kessler 

Accounting 

Sharon 



Maryellen Keyes 

Accounting 

Boxford 



Kayvan Khatami 

Civil Eng'g. 
Amherst 



Cornelia G. Kichler 

Zoology 

Amherst 



Timothy C. Kickham 

Political Science 
Brookline 




Sharon M. Kiel 

Accounting 
Huntington, NY 



Lynn Kiete 

Journalism/lnt. 
Orleans 



Leo Kil 

Accounting 
Huntington STN.. NY 



Daryl A. Kilgore 

Community Services 
Holden 



Hyun-Goo Kim 

Computer Sys. Eng 
Brtghton 



Mary E. King 

IE 

Gt. Barrington 



Sylvia L. Kinn 

Psychology 
Boston 



Steven R. Kirsner 

Psychology 
Springfield 



Jonathan T. Klane 

Geology 
Lexington 



Edward L. Klein 

Coins 
Suffield. CT 



Ellen S. Klein 

Comm. Disorders 
S. Weymouth 



Gail B. Klernman 

Comm. Studies 
New Rochelle. NY 



Mark A. Kloza 

Business Management 
Lowell 



Thomas Knight 

German 
Feeding Hills 




Amanda E. Knights 


Kenneth J. Knipple 


Karen L. Kochanek 


Andrew T. Kofman 


Sherril A. Kogos 


David Deke Kohler 


Lavedis Kojoyian 


Chemical Eng'g. 


IE/OR 


Exercise Science 


Accounting 


HRTA 


HRTA 


Newton 


Long Meadow 


Sherman. CT 


Needham 


Sharon 


Newton 


Dorchester 





237 



Jeanne M. Koller 

Management 
Aberdeen, NJ 



Robin B. Kolsky 

Fashion Marketing 
Swampscott 



Nadine H. Koltov 

Accounting 
Randolph 



Oksana G. KondratJuk 

IntI Business 
Roslindale 



Solomon Koppoe 

Finance 
Amherst 



John Koshivos 

HRTA 
Needham 



Charles E. Kostro 

Political Science 
Acton 






i 




^^^ 


\J' 







Nicholas Kourtis 


Emily G. Kovner 


Betsy D. Kraft 


Walter E. Krajewski 


Karen C. Kranick 


Amy J. Krasitousky 


Katarina A. Krek 


Classics 


Human Development 


STPEC 


Accounting 


Communications 


Accounting 


Design 


Boston 


Brockton 


Natick 


Holyoke 


Westport 


New Hyde Park. CT 


Weston 


David E. Kresse 


Brian J. Krol 


Keith L Krutthoff 










Mechanical Eng'g. 


Economics 


Biochemistry 










Needham 


Greenfield 


Hingham 












Betsey G. Krusen 

HRTA 
Boxborough 



Ann E. Kulis 

Comm. Disorders Educ. 
Palmer 



Neal H. Kupferman 

Sculpture 
Hull 



Jennifer Kupper 

Comm. Studies/Journ. 
Amherst 



Cathleen A. Kuras 

Human Nutrition 
Sudbury 



Yong S. Kwon 

Zoology 



Lauren L. L'Esperance 

Electrical Eng'g. 
Longmeadow 



Media Mandana Labbauf 

Biochemistry 
Amherst 





238 



Leeanne Labonte 


Kelly L. Laclaire 


Susan LaFarge 


Mark C. LaFrance 


Linda J. Laliberte 


Early Childhood Educ. 


Chemistry 


Pyschology 


Economics 


Fashion Marketing 


Bnmfied 


Penacook 


Boston 


Hingham 


Chelmsford 



Suzanne Lallberte 

Fashion Marketing 
Chelmsford 



Barbara L. Lamb 

Human Nutrition 
Hingham 



Christopher J. Lamb 

HRTA 
Bolton 



Johires Lamela 

Food Marketing Econ 
Sunderland 



Christopher J. LaMonIca 

Economics 
Newton 



Pamela M. Lamphrey 

Marketing 
Southbndge 



Michael B. Lanahan 

Biochemistry 
Acton 




Robert Lane 

Accounting 
Canton 



Scott C. Lane 

HRTA 
Lawrence 



Scott M. Lane 

Biochemistry 
Stoughton 



Susan Lang 

Education 
Englishtown. NJ 

Michael J. Lapointe 

Computer Systems Eng. 
Princeton 



Sandra Langdon 

Comparative Literature 
Madrid, Spain 

Joan A. Larochelle 

Fashion Marketing 
Andover 



Patricia L. Langway 

HE Fashion Marketing 
Up Saddle Riv.. NJ 

Linda E. Larson 

Comm. Disorders 

Oxford 



Kenneth J. Lapierre 

Finance 
Southbndge 

Lance L. Lashway 

Accounting 
Leeds 




Steven Layer 

Accounting 
Wayland 



Stacy H. Lazzaro 

Education 
Wakefield 



Eric M. Learnard 

Forestry 
Arlington 



Laurie A. Laszczyk 

Zoology 

W. Springfield 

Elaine M. LeBlanc 

Fashion Marketing 
Bridgwater 



Lynn R. Lavallee 

Printmaking/Graphic 

Des. 

Grafton ■ 


Patricia A. Lavallee 

HRTA 
Holden 


Michael C. LaCoie 

A & R Econ. 
Swampscott 


Randi M. Lebo 

Fashion Marketing 
Valley Stream. NY 


Mark F. Leboeuf 

ME 
Douglas 


Augustine J. Leddy 

Marketing 
Cambridge 




Yuen-Pui Lee 


Jodi 1. Leeds 


Irene Left 


Michelle Leger 


Jeffrey A. Leichter 


Jeffrey C. Leighton 


Michael Leiterman 


Marketing 


Marketing 


HRTA 


Sculpture 


Psychology 


Zoology/DH 


Electrical Eng'g. 


Boston 


Edison. NJ 


Woburn 


Methuen 


Paramus. NJ 


N. Andover 


Spencer 



239 



Ronald G. Lemieux 


Robin A. Lempert 


Kathleen Lenahan 


Neil B. Lennertz 


Patricia C. Lennox 


John G. Leoffler 


Mia L. Leondakis 


Comm. Studies 


Marketing 


Accounting 


Electrical Eng'g. 


Comm, Studies 


Chemical Eng'g. 


Comm Studies 


Seekonk 


Swampscott 


Woodcliff Lake, NJ 


Needham 


Attleboro 


Stougtiton 


W, Springfield 




Jane Lesniak 


Eric Lessa 


Economics 


History 


Housatonic 


Watertown 


Jeffrey M. Levine 


Richard Levine 


Accounting 


Accounting 


Syosset, NY 


Newton 



Robin C. Leve 

Judaic Studies 
N. Dartmoutti 



1 


^^H 


1 


B'l 


Sharon F. Levenson 

Nursing 
Worcester 


Nicole J. Levesque 

Psychology 
Eatontown. NJ 


Amanda R. Levick 

Accounting 
Narberth. PA 


Michael J. Levick 

Psychology 
Huntingdon Vail. PA 






Sherri L. Levine 

Marketing 
Brockton 


Lori G. Levinson 

Comm- Studies 
Fairfield. CT 




Daniel E. Levy 

Political Science 
Lowell 



Helene I. Levy 

Comm Studies 
Randolph 



Michael G. 

English 
Dedham 



David K. Li 

HRTA 
Roslindale 



Rosemarie Licciardello 

Accounting 
Melrose 



Elana T. Lichtenthal 

Accounting 
Stamford. CT 



Jeffrey M. Lieb 

Marketing 
Needham 



Pamela B. Liebman 

Communications 
Staten Island. NY 



Roger H. Lincoln 

Coins 
Greenfield 



Susan C. Lindstrom 

Marketing 

Attleboro 



Holly K. Linnehan 

History 

Milton 




240 



Jane D. Lipka 

Business Marketing 
Woodbndge. CT 



Pamela R. Lipousky 

Civil Eng'g 
Sharon 



Elisabeth A. Lipsky 

Fashion Marketing 
Wellesley 



Steven H. Lipsky 

Finance 
Peabody 



Sharon E. Little 

Psychology 
Burlington 



Lori A. Litzinger 

Comm. Studies 
N. Scituate 



Andrew Livingstone 

Plant & Soil Sciences 
Huntington Station NY 



Debra J. Lizotte 


Patrice M. Locke 


Linda LodlgianI 


John P. Loftus 


Joyce A. Login 


Jane E. Lohrer 


Marci J. toman 


Education 


Psychology 


Journalism 


Computer Systems Engg 


Animal Science 


HRTA 


Accounting 


Winchester 


Tewksbury 


W. Springfield 


Forestdale 


W Caldwell. NJ 


Westwood 


Peabody 




Angela R. Lombardi 

Elementary Educ, 
Stratford. CT 

Robin R. Low 

Sports Management 
Norton 



Heidi R. Lomker 

Food Science 
Medfield 

James Lowen 

Mechanical Engg. 
Bedford 



Sharon C. Long 

Environmental Science 
Chestnut Hill 



Jeffrey Longuell 

Economics 
MA 



Cynthia M. Lord 

Education 
W. Springfield 



Douglas R. Lotane 

German 
Marblehead 

Carl D. Lowman 

Finance 
Philadelphia. PA 



Patricia E. Loughlin 

Home Economics 
Roslindale 

Laura Loyola 

Marketing 

Valley Stream. NY 





mMt 




ill -i 




Ari G. Lubowicz 

Economics 
Fair Lawn, NJ 

Kim A. Luthman 

Sociology 
Worcester 



Thomas C. Lucey 

Journalism 
Springfield 

Maria C. Lydon 

Economics 
Hingham 



Scott J. Lynch 

Comm. Studies 
Somerset 



Susan C. Lynch 

Nursing 
Hadley 



Paul Lyons 

Microbiology 
Methuen 



Chi-Keung Peter Lui 


Stephen A. Lukas 


Finance 


Natural Resource Studies 


Amherst 


Auburn 


Idalyn L. Macchia 


Stephen MacCormack 


Comm. Studies 


Chemistry 


Arlington 


Canton 




Andrew T. MacDonald 


Lisa-Anne MacDonald 


Michael R. Machanili 


Manuel S. Machuca 


Heather L. Mackenzie 


Scott F. MacKinnon 


Jill A. MacLaughlin 


Political Science 


Zoology 


HRTA 


Plant Pathology 


Food Science 


Zoology 


Fashion fylarketing 


Newton Ctr. 


Halifax 


Roslyn Harbor. NY 


E. Boston 


Grafton 


Dillerica 


Lancaster 



241 



David A. Maclean 


Eric W. HacLean 


Gregory J. Madden 


William D. Madden 


Robyn C. Madigan 


Finance 


Electrical Engg. 


Political Science 


Resource Econ. 


Legal Studies 


Upton 


Norton 


Quincy 


Quincy 


Amherst 




W. Christian Madsen. Jr. 

Animal Science 
Hackensack, NJ 



Bruce D. Mael 

History 
Newton 



Mercedes C. Magraner 

HRTA 
Puerto Rico 



Colleen M. Mahon 

Community Services 
Somerset 



Peter J. Malamas 

Marketing 
Lowell 



Lisa L. Maleckas 

Comm. Studies 

Milhs 



John T. Matloy 

Music 

S. Yarmouth 



Margaret E. Malone 

Community Services 
Lenox 



Katie L. Maloney 

Comm. Studies 
Hunting. NY 



ina Maltz 

Fashion Marketing 
Newton Ctr. 




Elissa R. Manburg 

NRTA 
Wellesley Hills 



Robin A. Mandel 

English 

Little Neck, NY 



Trish M. Maneri 

HRTA 

Fair Lawn. NJ 



Julio A. Mansilla 

Ind Eng 
Guatemala 



Aurelio D. Manto 

Zoology 
Newton 



Michael D. Manzon 

HRTA 
Needham 



David P. Marceau 

Electrical Eng'g. 
Canton 



Randy D. Marcus 

Marketing 
Deerfield BCH. 



Frederick Margolis 

Comm. Studies 
Coral Springs. FL 



Lenn S. Margolis 

Sports Management 
Woodmere, NY 



Amy B. Marion 

STPEC 
Jericho. NY 



Dana M. Markus 

Accounting 
Peabody 




242 



Cheryl J. Marotta 


Donna J. Marshall 


June A. Marshall 


Charmalne B. Martin 


Peter J. Martin 


Richard Martin 


Thomas W. Martin 


Zoology 


Psychology 


Accounting 


Microbiology 


Personnel Adm. 


Intl. Relations 


Political Sci & History 


Saugus 


Newton 


Westfield 


Amherst 


Pittsfield 


Schenectady, NY 


Wakefield 



William Martin 


Karen Martino 


Suzanne M. Martinson 


Donna Maslak 


Accounting 


Ital. 


HRTA 


Animal Science 


Pittsfield 


Burlington 


Portland. OR 


Lee 



Jean Marie Mastrangelo Judltli Mateo 

Marketing Education 

Melrose Cambridge 



Paul P. Mathisen 

Civil Eng'g 
Longmeadow 




Peter G. Matteson 

Economics 
Northampton 



Daiva T. Matulaitis 

Political Science 
Lexington 



Michael S. May 

Finance 

Williamstown 



Laurie C. Mayer 

Environmental Design 
Norfom 



Ellen Mazukina 

HRTA 
Medfreld 



Patricia A. Mazzoni 

Fashion Marketing 
Dennis 



Donald McAlister, Jr. 

Mechanical Eng'g. 
Wyckoff, NJ 



Susan W. McCaffery 

Comparative Literature 
Westport, CT 



Mary C. McCann 

BDIC 
Winchester 



Timothy J. McCarron 

HRTA 

Franklin 



Jane F. McCarthy 

English 
Fitchburg 




Sheila M. McCarthy 

Finance 

Lowell 



Marian Joy McCarty 

BFA Ed 

Wakefield 



John McConnachie 

Finance 

Port Washington. NY 



Susanne M. McCrea 

Food Marketing Econ. 
Northampton 



Maura McCue 

Coins 
Fitchburg 



Michael E. McDonald 

Geology 
Georgetown 



Maura A. McDonough 

Agri & Resource Econ 
Lowell 



Roy J. McDougall 

Coins 
Saugus 



Mark J. McGaunn 

Accounting 
Wilbraham 



Jill Y. McGee 

Physical Education 
Lincoln 



Maura F. McGee 

Zoology 
Longmeadow 




Joanne M. McGovern 


Eileen McGowan 


Martha M. McGrail 


Barrett V. McGrath 


Bradley T. McGrath 


Brian F. McGrath 


Susan A. McGuigan 


Fashion Marketing 


Comm. Studies 


Animal Science 


Food Marketing 


Education 


Biochemistry 


Finance 


Lynnfield 


Chelmsford 


Worcester 


Milford 


Northampton 


Littleton 


Cinti, OR 



243 



John A. Mclnerny 


Thomas A. McKean 


Jeanne M. McKeefery 


Carol A. McKenna 


Daniel A. McKenna 


Mary A. McKlllop 


David J. McLaughlin 


Forestry 


Public Health 


Industrial Eng'g. 


Political Science 


Finance 


Exercise Science 


Electrical Engg. 


Somerville 


Southwick 


New Paltz. NY 


Norwood 


E. Northport. NY 


Davis, CA 


N Reading 




Walter K. McLaughlin 

Political Science 
Belmont 



Mary-Jo McLear 

Dance 
Auburn 



Maureen P. McManus 

Sociology 
Worcester 



Linda E. McNabb 

Marketing 

Boston 



Jennifer McNabola 

Natural Resource Stud- 
Concord 



Darlene C. McNeice Anastasia McVey 

Human Dev. Gerontology Int Design 
Athol Amhearst 



Ktmberety L. Mead 

Exercise Science 
Orleans 



Marit Meads 

Sports Management 
Revere 



Kevin Meagher 

Urban Forestry 
Westwood 



Michael Meagher 

Journalism 
Westford 




Douglas R. Medeiros 


Robert Medeiros 








Economics 


Animal Science 








Fairhaven 


Stoughton ^^^fl 


1 






Kurt L. Mehrhoff 


Monica C. Meier 


Robert B. Meiner 


Jeffrey D. Melsler 


Moshe A. Meit 


Economics 


HRTA 


HRTA 


Electrical Eng'g. 


HRTA 


Rumson, NJ 


Trumbull. CT 


Wantach. NY 


Boston 





Terri A. Medeiros 

Psychology 
New Bedford 

Elizabeth P. Melbinger 

Home Econ. 
Locust Valley, NY 



Charles C. Mehmel 

A & R Econ 
Cataumet 

Alberto Melendez 

Biochemistry 
Puerto Rico 




244 



Richard D. Menard 

EE 
Auburn 



Joseph C. Merlino 

Political Science 
Stoughton 



Jacic K. Merrill 

Political Science 
Amherst 



Wayne R. Merson 

Mechanical Eng'g. 
Charlton 



Lori Mertzlufft 

Human Nutrition 
Shrewsbury 



Lawrence S. Mestel 

Accounting 
Morganville, NJ 



Joshua S. Meyer 

Journalism/STPEC 
Framingham 



Tracy Meyer 


Victoria S. Michel 


Alan J. MIchon 


Oonna M. Mldura 


Dana MIkesell 


Brian J. MllewskI 


Jeanne A. Miller 


Exercise Science 


Psychology 


Mechanical Eng'g. 


Exercise Science 


Comm, Disorders 


Mechanical Eng'g, 


Comm, Studies 


Fall River 


Kingston, Rl 


Chicopee 


Framingham 


Marblehead 


S, Deerfield 


Norwalk, CT 




Mary Pat Miller 

Fashion Marketing 
Lebanon. NJ 



Risa M. Miller 

Industrial Eng'g. 
Newton 



Andrea C. Millsteln 

Journalism 
W. Orange. NJ 



Jeffrey H. Millsteln 

Zoology 
Jamesville. NY 



Tina K. Milner 

Marketing 
Rocksville Ctr. NY 



Staci Miner 

Early Childhood 
St. James, NY 



Toby Minkovitz 

Home Economics 
Belmont 



Francfne R. Mintz 

Psychology 
Paramus, NJ 



Robert J. Moitozo 

Civil Eng'g. 
Rehoboth 



Karen A. Molin 

Finance 
Peabody 



Jos^ A. Molina 

Accounting 
Puerto Rico 




James Monroe 

lEOR 
Centemfle 



Maruca Monserrate 

Home Economics 
Puerto Rico 




Robert P. Montana 

Computer Systems Eng'g 
Roslindale 



Marcela A. Monteros 

French 
Natick 



Sharon R. Morganstein 

Finance 
Rochester. NY 



Michael T. Morganti 

Coins 
Maiden 



Eileen M. Moriarty 

Political Science 
Worcester 



Mark Moriarty 

EE 

Amherst 



David F. Moriarty, Jr. 

Economics 
Springfield 



Marybeth M. Morin Diane M. Morrissey 

Commercial Recreation Accounting 

Somerville Auburn 




Daniel D. Morse 


Scott D. Moskowltz 


Donna L. Motley 


Fran B. Muchnfck 


Nanette G. Mueller 


John J. Mullen 


Suzanne M. Mullen 


Electricial Eng'g. 


Hotel & Rest. Mgt. 


Psychology 


Psychology 


Psychology 


Industrial Eng'g. 


Human Development 


Framingham 


Lexington 


Amesbury 


Norwalk. CT 


Westport, CT 


Hopedale 


Wakefield 



245 



K(m E. Munroe 


Richard 5. Munroe 


Brian C. Murphy 


Charles J. Murphy 


HRTA 


Accounting 


Journalism 


HRTA 


Norwood 


Natick 


Swampscott 


Medtord 




Darryl P. Murphy 

Accounting 
New Milford. NJ 



Jane D. Murphy 

Psychology 
Woburn 



John L. Murphy 

Nflarketing 
Needham 



Maureen A. Murphy 

Early Childhood Educ. 
Somerville 



Patricia A. Murphy 

Animal Science 
Holyoke 



Richard M. Murphy 

Economics 
Brookline 



Rosemary Murphy 

Marketing 
Concord 



Sarah E. Murphy 

Psychology 

Brookline 



Tara K. Murphy 

Zoology 
Hudson 



Thomas F. Murphy 

Economics 
Pittsfield 



Timothy P. Murphy 

Psychology 
Uxbndge 




Linda D. Murray 

Accounting 
Saugus 



Martin E. Murray 

Journalism 
Syracuse, NY 



Michael P. Murray 

Mechanical Eng'g. 
Andover 



John P. Musante 

Management 
Northampton 



Joan E. Musnick 

Human Nutrition 
Needham 



Joel L. Myerson 

Accounting/ Economics 
Beverly 



Kevin C. Myron 

Comm. Studies 
Foxboro 



Lisa A. Nadeau 

Environmental Science 

Westminister 



Mary Jane Nalewajko 

Economics 
Milford 



Patricia L. Nally 

Economics 
Kingston, Rl 



James P. Nathan 

Chemical Eng'g. 
Granby 



Joseph Nee 

GB Finance 

Walpole 





246 



KImberley A. Nee 


Nancy Jean Needham 


Francis X. Neffinger 


Lisa A. Neilsen 


Kellee M. Newell 


Sociology 


Dance 


Marketing 


Marketing 


JS/English 


Clinton 


Feeding Hills 


W- Springfield 


Needham 


Saugus 



Adrlenne Newman 


Madlyn A. Newman 


Lyndon S. Nichols 


Raymond M. NIetupskI 


William Nlland 


Scott A. Nlrenberg 


Laura Noddin 


Marketng 


Psychology 


Animal Science 


Biochemistry 


Gen. Business & Finance 


Theater Arts 


CHE 


Freeport. NY 


New Rochelle, NY 


Acton 


Hampden 


Belmont 


Hull 


Shirley 




Brendan R. Nolan 

HRTA 
Fall Rive- 



Kevin G. Nolan 

HRTA 
Hyde Park 



Mary Noonan 

English 
Swampscott 



David S. Notkin 

Marketing 

W. Caldwell. NJ 



Sussan Noushzadl-Motia 

Microbiology 
Amherst 



Scott Noyce 

Economics 
Bryantville 



Michael F. Nuvallie 

Gen- Business & Finance 
N. Adams 



Daniel Nwanze - 

Marketing 
Nigeria 



Andrew Nyhart 

Brookline 



James A. O'Brien 

Economics 
Cohaset 



Judith L. O'Kula 

Civi Eng'g. 
Sunderland 



Judith A. Oakes 

Comm. Studies 
Needham 



Catherine A. OConnor 

Mathematics 
Great Barringto 



Joy M. ODonnell 

Political Science 

Saugus 




Robin M. ODonnell 

Animal Science 
Lynn 



Wendy E. Offenberg 

Comm. Disorders 
Bangor, ME 



Nancy B. Okin 

Psychology 
Randolph 



Gina M. Oliveri 

Dance 
Longmeadow 



Karen E. Olsen 

Mathematics 
Acton 



Ruth B. Olwine 

Classics 
Tomball, TX 



Michael D. O'Neal 

Education 
Needham 



Rochelle C. O'Neal 

Business Adm-Mandarin 
Boston 



Joseph M. O'Neil 

Sport St. 
Brewster 



Richard F. O'Neil 

Theater 
Springfield 



Charles I. Ononibaku 

Industrial Eng'g 
Sunderland 



Laurie J. Orchel 

Zoology 
Seekonk 





Mellnda J. Ordway 


Radames R. Orellana 


Caren R. Orlick 


Scon 1. Orsteln 


Nannette Ortlz-Acevedo 


BDIC 


Agricultural Econ. 


Comm. Studies 


Accounting 


Fashion Marketing 


Acton 


Venezuela 


Morganville. NJ 


New Rochelle, NY 


Puerto Rico 



247 



Laurie A. Orton 


Brian A. Osborne 


Laura L. Oshea 


Alan M. Oskowsky 


Simon Ostrol 


Gregory Otto 


Adrienne L. Paine 


Sociology 


Psychology 


English 


Math 


Sport Management 


Economics 


Psychology 


Worcester 


W. Medford 


E. Boston 


Massapequa. NY 


Windsor. CT 


Greenwich. CT 


Cherry Hill. NJ 




Mary L. Palazzo 

English 
Amherst 



Catherine V. Palmer 

Comm. Dis/Elem. Educ. 
Medford 



Patricia A. Palmer 

HRTA 
Holyoke 



Marie Palumbo 

Early Childhood Educ. 
Beverly 



Timothy J. Panaro 

Accounting 
N. Reading 



Tira Pdndolf 

Animal Science 
Stow 



Paul J. Pannter 

Marketing 
Amherst 



Gail M. Panzetta 

Legal Studies 
Norwood 



Edward M. Panzica 

English 
Florence 



Christine Paratore 

Mathematics 
Franklin 



Philip C. Parker 

Chemical Eng'g. 
West Africa 



Art F. Parks 

HRTA 
Wayne, NJ 





Jill T. Parks 

HRTA 
Marion 



Lydia J. Parks 

Finance 
Marshfield 



Michelle A. Parks Ronald M. Parlengas, Jr. Barbara P. Paru 

Comm. Disorders Accounting HRTA 

N. Reading Holyoke Medford 



Myra S. Patoka 

Accounting 
Pittsfield 



Vincent M. Patrund 

CSE 

S. Hadley 



John D. Patterson 

Chen^ical Eng'g. 
Rehboth 



Michele Rene Patterson 

Leisure Stud. & Res. 
Wayland 



Dawna R. Paul 

Sociology 
Danvers 




248 



James S. Paul 


Robyn Paul 


Jamie N. Paulln 


Jennifer A. Paulson 


William J. Paulson 


Finance 


Finance 


Comparative Literature 


Sociology 


CSF 


Newton 


Pittsfield 


Athol 


Paxton 


Westford 



Douglas S. Pauly 


Susan Pease 


Richard A. Peck 


Kirsten F. Pedersen 


Communications 


Comm. Studies 


History 


Biochemistry 


E. Longmeadow 


Chicopee 


W. Springfield 


Springfield 




Lisa A. Pedulla 

Economics 
Agawam 



Nancy Peitavind 

Microbiology 
New Bedford 



Lysa M. PelletJer 

Fashion Marketing 
Lawrence 



Jorge Pena 

Envdes 
Lynn 



Linda M. Pepe 

Sociology 
Bedford 



Jonathan S. Perkins 

Finance 

Centerville 



Jessica M. Perles 

HRTA 

N. Dartmouth 



Anthony T. Perna 

Mechanical Eng'g. 
S. Yarmouth 



Craig R. Perreault 

Mechanical Eng'g. 
Longmeadow 



Lawrence C. Perreault 

Hotel & Rest- Mgt. 
Holyoke 



Keith L. Perrin 

Exercise Science 
Gloucester 




Lee Anne Perry 

Nursing 
Falmouth 



David N. Peterson 

Chemistry 
Jefferson 



Jeffrey D. Peterson 

Biochemistry 
Forestdale 



Stephen E. Petro 

Food Marketing 
Worcester 



Scott M. Pfeninger 

Outdoor Rec. 
N. Dartmouth 



Karen D. Pfister 

Economics 
Newton 



Peter J. Phair 

Communications 
Pittsfield 



Thomas J. Phair 

Accounting 
Pittsfield 



Douglas R. Philipp 

HRTA 
Franklin, CT 



Nancy Phillips 

Comm. Studies 
Marshfield 



Nancy Phillips 

Economics 
Marblehead 



Lisa D. Philpott 

Comm. Studies 

Needham 



Todd M. Picard 

Food Marketing 
S. Windsor, CT 



Kelly Pickrell 

HRTA 
Springfield 




Luane Pigeon 


Frederick Pike 


Steven B. Pilavin 


Sue Anne Piliero 


Phil M. Pin 


Jacklynn D. Pincus 


James V. Pisini 


Political Science 


Civil Eng'g. 


Accounting 


English 


Accounting 


Comm, Studies 


Zoology Hr 


Hatfield 


Greenfield 


Newton 


Eastport. NY 


Holyoke 


W. Yarmouth 


Franklin 



249 



Barbara H. Pitkin 


Donna L. Pliszka 


Jocelyn G. Poblete 


Robert J. Podraza 


Gordon S. Pogoda 


Debra Poklemba 


Michael S. Polewarlzyk 


Human Development 


Marketing 


Accounting 


HRTA 


Chemical Eng'g. 


Early Childhood Educ. 


Industrial Eng'g, 


Pittsfield 


Milton 


Northampton 


Oxford, NY 


Reston. VA 


Acton 


Clinton 




Cheryl L Pollack 

Fashion Marketing 
Framingham 



Jeffrey Pollock 

Geology 
Lexington 



Christopher H. Porter 

Accounting 
Winchester 



Jennifer L. Porter 

Industrial Eng'g. 
Framingham 



Mary E. Pothler 

Comm. Studies 
Haverhill 



James M. Potter 

Journalism 
Lexington 



Steven F. Potts 

HRTA 
Granville 



Paula J. Poturnicki 

Marketing 
Duxbury 



Juan C. Prats 

Mass Comm, 
Puerto Rico 



Tyson H. Preble 

Sociology 
W. Newbury 



Andrew B. Prescott 

Political Science 
N. Dartmouth 




Joel C. Priestley 

Environmental Design 
Boston 



Corey A. Prince 

Legal Studies 
Newton 



Thomas A. Prlnz 

HRTA 
S. Lee 



Jane A. Prokos 

Fashion Marketing 
Southbridge 



Maria A. Przymierskl 

Wallingford, CT 



Lisa A. Pyzynski 

Political Sci. /French 
Maiden 



Bonnie P. Quigley 

Comm. Studies 
Marstons Mills 



Peter J. Quigley 

Civil Eng'g. 
Taunton 



Jeremiah C. Quill 

Finance 
Agawom 





250 



Patricia Quill 


Robert W. Quimby 


Michael F. Quinlan 


Brian J. Qulnn 


Fernando M. Rabell 


English 


Electrical Eng'g. 


Accounting 


Geology 


Accounting 


Agawam 


W. Springfield 


Holden 


Wrentham 


Puerto Rico 



Stuart D. Rachlin 


Joann C. Raducha 


Karen A. Ragusin 


Suzanne M. Raimondl 


Jennifer C. Ralph 


Mathematics 


Wildlife 


BDIC 


Marketing 


Exercise Science 


Brooklyn. NY 


Plainville. CT 


Stoughton 


Natick 


El Cajon. CA 





Anne Ramstad 

Management 
Norway 



James K. Randies 

HRTA 

Clifton Park, NY 



Marian F. Raskin 

Fashion Marketing 
Wellesley 



Martin K. Rasnick 

Economics 

Worcester 



David J. Rath 

Comm. Studies 
Springfield 



Michelle A. Rauer 

Physics 
S. Easton 



Aamer Raza 

Biochemistry 
New York. NY 



Kevin T. Read 

Civil Eng'g. 
Framingham 



Jennifer Reardon 

Animal Science 
Pittsfield 



Peter W. Reardon 

Political Science 
N, Adams 



Chris J. Rebeor 

Electrical Eng'g. 
S. Westerlo, NY 



Glenn M. Redgate 

Economics 
E, Bridgewater 





1 


M 


^ 


NK!>^ /t^^H 


-'m 


^1 


^ 


Ui H 



Dana S. Reich 

Marketing 
Dix Hills. NY 



Francis Reid 

Mechanical Eng'g 
Luneburg 



Kathleen E. Reilly 

Journalism 
Dover 



Michael P. Reilly 

Political Science 
E. Weymouth 



Mary Claire Renzulli 

Management 
Chelmsford 



Alan D. Resnic 

Accounting 
Long Branch. NJ 



Joseph M. Resteghini 

Legal Studies 
Boston 



CynthiaL. Ricciardi 

Interior Design 
Peabody 



Peter S. Rice 

Economics 
S. Orleans 



Lisa B. Rich 

Fashion Marketing 
New York. NY 



Mark Richardson 

Photography 



Peter S. Riddell 

Marketing 
Swampscott 



Ronnie A. Riekin 

Political Science 
Great Neck. NY 



Robert F. Riley 

Marketing 
Brockton 




Patricia A. Ritter 

Community Services 
Holden 



Jos6 H. Rivera 

Biochemistry 
Puerto Rico 



Hilary Robbins 

Education 
Shrewsbury 



Julie A. Robbins 

Humnut 
Methuen 



Ralph L. Roberts 

Journalism 
E. Bridgewater 



Peter R. Robichaud 

Civil Eng'g. 
Gardner 



Brenda J. Robinson 

Fashion Marketing 
N. Andover 



251 



James M. Roche 

Accounting 
Foxboro 



Heather A. Rocheford 

Legal Studies 
Worcester 



John P. Rockwood 

Environmental Sciences 
Gardner 



Andrea L. Rodenstein 

Fashion Marketing 
Wollaston 



Clara Rodriguez 

Education 
Amherst 



Luis F. Rodriguez Douglas C. Roffer 

Computer Systems Eng'g. Marketing 
Apopka. FL Framingham 




Michele D. Rogers 

Fashion Marketing 
Brockton 



Rhonda M. Rogers 

GBFIN 
Beaverton. OR 



Rosemary Rohan-Yahn 

Economics 
Southampton 



Kenneth Rolt 

Journalistic Studies 
Stoughton 



Lisa A. Roman 

Finance 
Needham, MA 



Jacqueline L. Romano 

Comm. Studies 
Cranston, Rl 



Jon J. Romano 

Comm. Studies 
Plymouth 



Diane Romeo 

Accounting 
Burlington 



Suzanne Ronan 

BDIC 
Chelmsford 



Karl A. Roscoe 

English 
Chelmsford 



Laura B. Roseman 

Food Science 
Hull, MA 



Linda J. Rosen 

French 
Ardsley, NY 



Thea E. Rosenau 

Zoology 
Montague 



Bruce Rosenbaum 

Marketing 
Marblehead 




David J. Rosenberg 

Advertising Mgt. 
Randolph 



Richard S. Rosenblatt 

English 
Swampscott 



Paul D. Roske 

HRTA 
Seekonk 



Brandon E. Ross 

Industrial Relations 
Westfield, NJ 



Craig J. Ross 

HRTA 
Piano, TX 



Garret A. Ross 

HRtA 

Locust Valley. NY 



Andrea S. Roth 

Comm. Studies 
Old Greenwich, CT 



Sherry J. Roth 

Fashion Marketing 
Margate, NJ 



Suzanne M. Rother 

Fashion Marketing 

Mendham, NJ 



Alicyn Rotsko 

HRTA 

Boxford 



Jean-Stephen Rovani 

Geology 
Washington, DC 



Karen E. Rowe 

Psychology 
Framingham 




252 



Joseph C. Roy 

Comm, Studies 
Holyoke 



David f. Ruane 

LS & R 

N, Weymouth 



Donna M. Ruane 

Communications 
N. Andover 



Mellsa Rubin 



Ronald B. Rubin 

Microbiology 
Swampscott 



Janice D. Rudenauer 

English 
Hingham 



Lucy M. Ruiz 

Comm, Studies 



Courtney L. Rumbie 

Legal Studies 
Amherst 



Michael J. Runeare 

Enudes 
Fulton. NY 



Stephanie J. Russell 

Psychology 
Pine Brooi*. NJ 



Daniel J. Russo 

Electncial Engg. 
Andover 



David P. Rutyna 

Marketting 
Lexington 




William J. Ryan 


Elaine M. Rymes 


Richard 5. Rymsza 


Kathleen A. Saba 


Elissa G. Sable 


Linda G. Sable 


Marie Sacco 


Education 


HRTA 


Microbiology 


GBFIN 


Mathematics 


Comm. Studies 


Accounting 


W. Newton 


Lexington 


Wilbraham 


Andover 


Randolph 


Livington, NJ 


Norwood 



David M. Sachs 

A & R Econ 
Brookline 



Mitchell Sack 

Economics 
Leonia, NJ 



Stan E. Sadakierski 

Accounting 
Holyoke 



Margaret J. Saillant 

English & Spanish 
Cranston, Rl 




Lee Ann Sakakini 

HRTA 
Newtonville 



Alvaro Saldlvia 

Agricultural Econ. 
New York. NY 



Jay P. Salhaney 

Biochemistry 

Winthrop 



Barry Satloway 

Econ. /Political Science 
Marblehead 



Gayle V. Salomaa 

Coins 
Medfield 



William C. Salomaa 

Civil Eng'g. 
Medfield 



Kerry Salvador 

Finance 
Boston 



Maria D. Samiljan 

HRTA 
Swampscott 



Alejandra Sanchez 

Food Science 

Amherst 





Kenneth M. Sandberg 


Susan. B. Sandler 


Hector Santiago 


Leo D. Saraceno 


Carl R. Saras 


Industrial Eng'g. 


Journalism/Hebrew 


Civil Eng'g. 


HRTA 


Biochemistry 


Needham 


Needham 


Puerto Rico 


Ashland 


Plymouth 



253 













Deborah R. Schaefer 




Carol A. Sardella 


Michelle R. Sargent 


Michael Sartorelll 


Caryn D. Sauertig 


Thomas J. Savage 


BDIC Management & 


Kathrin U. Schaeppi 


Economics 


HRTA 


Biochemistry 


Accounting 


Communications 


Nutri 


Botany 


Winchester 


Teaticket 


Chelmsford 


Hazlet. NJ 


Melrose 


Needham 


Switzerland 




Peter S. Schapero 

HRTA 
Peabody 



Steven J. Schiffman 

Marketing 
New York. NY 



Stephen Schipan) 

BDIC 

Winchester 



Ivey L. Schmitz 

Economics 
N. Falmouth 



David W. Schock 

Fine Arts 
Lexington 



Mark H. Schoefield 

Chemistry 
Needham 



Penny L. Schonberg 

Plant & Soil Sciences 
Boylston 



Katherine A. 
Schortmann 

English 
Needham 



Stacy D. Schott 

BDIC 

Armonk, NY 



Jennifer A. Schumacher 

HRTA 
Armonk, NY 



Elizabeth A. Schwab 

Sociology 
Bethesda. MD 



Steve Schwartz 

Psychology 
Springfield, MA 




Cynthia L. Schwarzstein 

HRTA 

Laguna Bch- CA 



John A. Sciabarrasi, Jr 

Political Science 
Fitchburg 



Mary-Catherine Scoco 

Journalism 
Pittsfield 



Sheera Segelman 

Education 
Randolph 



Judith A. Seifer 

Spanish 
Newton CTR. 



Leslie Seigal 

Psychology 
Frammgham 



Edward D. Seike 

Psychology 
Stockbridge 



George M. Seltew 

Finance 
Natick 



Jeff A. Seltzer 

Interior Design 
N. Dartmouth 



James Seney 

Accounting 
Leeds 



Teresa A. Sentman 

Electrical Eng'g. 
Haddonfield. NJ 



Carol A. Sevigny 

Comm. Studies 
Amesbury 




254 



Terry L. Sevigny 


Elizabeth A. Shaffer 


LonI B. Shamah 


John E. Shane 


Kate E. Shanfield 


MaryJane Shannon 


Patricia Shannon 


Economics 


BDIC Dance Therapy 


Marketing 


Marketing 


Cons. Econ. 


Education 


Nursing 


Amesbury 


Marblehead 


Frammgham 


Wayland 


Natick 


Revere 


Garden City. NY 



Donald 5. Shaw 


James R. Shaw 


Davfd R. Shaye 


Daniel E. Shea 


Patricia A. Shea 


Thomas J. Sheahan 


Beth C. Shear 


Public Relations 


Economics 


Chemical Eng'g. 


Accounting 


Physical Education 


Comm, Studies 


Gerontology 


South Carver 


Framingham 


Marlboro. NJ 


Marblehead 


Belmont 


Worcester 


Wellesley 




Christopher B. Sheehy 

Economics 
Merrimac 



Stuart R. Sheinhait 

Economics 
Peabody 



Daniel J. Shepard 

Legal Studies 

N. Attleboro 



Donna M. Shettler 

Management 
Wappingers FLS. NY 



Michael J. Shoen 

Accounting 
Longmeadow 



Todd L. Shostek 

Management 
Sharon 



Pamela J. Shulkin 

BFA-Education 
Denver. CO 



Cynthia R. Shulman 

Coins 
Sharon 



Anneke E. Shuman 

Comm. Studies/Psych. 
Lexington 



Herbert D. Sidman 

Exercise Science 
Newton 



Scott P. Sigrist 

Computer Science 
Duxbury 




Joanne M. Siler 

Physical Education 
Schenectady. NY 



Jane M. Silveira 

Political Science 
Fairhaven 



Lori F. Silver 

Marketing 
Englishtown. NJ 



Robin Silver 

BDIC 
Amherst 



Michelle Silverman 

Economics 
Nanuet, NY 



Scott Silverman 

GB Fin 
Hyde Park 



Thomas R. Silvia 

Physics 
N. Reading 



Michael J. Simard 

Consumer Econ. 
Somerville 



Melinda A. Simensky 

Marketing 
Biddeford. ME 



G. Nathan Simmons 

Economics 
Dighton 



Joanne C. Simmons 

HRTA 

Springfield 




Scott J. Simmons 


Laurence P. Simon 


Glenda J. 


Singer 


Katlileen E. Singleton 


Diane M. Slnico 


Amy Sklivas 


Jennifer A. Sitoglund 


Marketing 


Comm. Studies 


HRTA 




Economics 


J.S. English 


English 


Communications 


Rehoboth 


Sharon 


Peabody 




Melrose 


Pittsfield 


Peabody 


Fairfield, CT 



255 



Jean Slarsky 


Elizabeth B. Slater 


Karen F. Slavin 


Priscilla J. Sloane 


Sabrlna Y. Smit 


Christian H. Smith 


Craig B. Smith 


Accounting 


Art 


Comm. Studies 


Management 


HRTA 


Plaint & Soil Science 


HRTA 


Ayer 


New City. NY 


Rego Park NY 


Framingtiam 


E. Longmeadow 


E Bridgewater 


Smyrna. GA 




llisa K. Smith 


Karen A. Smith 


Laura A. Smith 


Finance 


Animal Science 


Psyctiology 


Needham 


Bellmore. NY 


Walpole 



Linda A. Smith 

Fashion Marketing 
Swampscott 



Orlando Smith 

Mass Comm- 
E. Cleveland. OH 



Pamela J. Smith 

Journaism 
Salem 



Paul E. Smith 

Marinating 
Peabody 



Susan C. Smith 

JS/INT 



Kelley Smitten 

Ffnance 

Ft. Lauderdale, FL 



Robin S. Snyder 

Marineting 
Randolph 



David A. Sobel 

Comm. Studies 
W. Roxbury 



Daniel O. Socolov 

English 
Brooklyn. NY 



Sandra B. Sohn 

Marketing 

Marblehead 



Robert D. Solis 

Biochemistry 
Pittsfreld 




Andrew P. Sollecito 

Mechanical Eng'g. 
New York. NY 



Michelle Solomon 

Spanish 
Longmeadow 



Joann Some 

HRTA 

W, Orange. NJ 



Eric T. Sondergeld 

Applied Mathematics 
W. Hartford, CT 



Shari Sorkin 

Marketing 
Chelsea 



Nancy C. Sosnik 

Marketing 
Merrick. NY 



Luis A. Soto 

Electrical Eng'g. 
Puerto Rico 



Matthew M. Souza 

Animal Science 
N. Dartmouth 



Andrew Sparks 

Political Science 
Stow. MN 



Pamela J. Spatig 

Zoology 
Pelham 



Bari L. Spielman 

Animal Science 
Woodbury. NY 



Paul A. Spivak 

HRTA 
Framingham 



Sharon N. Sponza 

Fashion Marketing 
Wilton. CT 



Jean M. St. Martin 

Psychology 
Amherst 




256 



Robert C. Stack 


David Stamer 


Deborah A. Stames 


Laurie J. Stanley 


Eliot G. Starbard 


Barbara M. Staubach 


Donna L. Stavis 


English 


Chemical Eng'g. 


Sociology 


Economics 


ME-MFG 


Marketing 


Exercise Science 


Northampton 


Westtield. NY 


Framington 


Manchester 


Holden 


Pittsfield 


Parsipanny. NJ 



Gary A. Steinberg 


Lynne C. Steinberg 


Laurie G. Stenberg 


Kathryn M. Stephens 


Timothy J. Sterrltt 


Donna Lee Stetson 


Sandra H. St 


Arboriculture/Urban For 


Env Des 


Accounting 


Microbiology 


Accounting 


Comm, Disorders 


Physics 


Sharon 


Chestnut Hill 


Marblehead 


Manchester, CT 


Longmeadow 


Framingham 


New Bedford 




Nancy S. Stickler 

Comm. Disorders 
Stoughton 



Tracey A. Stiles 

Mechanical Eng'g. 
Amherst 



Joan A. Stocliman 

Intl. Relations 
Brookline 



Laura D. Stoifa 

Mathematics 
Hanover 



Susan C. Stolier 

Accounting 
Randolph 



Jeffrey L. Stoloff 

Business 
Needham Hts. 



Debbie C. Stone 

Finance 
Oceanside. NY 



Douglas E. Storey 

Political Sci./Econ. 
Hadley 



liona Sturm 

Women's Studies 
New City. NY 



Theodore J. Suchecki 

Enviromental Design 
Salem 



Carol A. Sullivan 

HRTA 
Framingham 




Elizabeth A. Sullivan 

PE 
Seekonk 



Kathleen A. Sullivan 

Education 
Beverly 



Kerry A. Sullivan 

Comm. Disorders 
Marshfield 



Maureen Sullivan 

Fashion Marketing 

Arlington 



Patricia A. Sullivan 

Print Making 
Seekonk 



Peter D. Sullivan 

HRTA 
E. Otis 



Mindy G. Susser 

Education 
Little Silver. NJ 



Mitchell E. Sussman 

Accounting 
Merrick. NJ 



Katarina I. Svensson 

Industrial Eng'g. 
Sherborn 



Bruce Swanson 

Mathematics 
Pittsfield 



Maura C. Sweeney 

Elementary Educ. 
Birstol. Rl 




Sean A. Swint 


Jorge A. Syiek 


Joan C. Sylvain 


Anthony Szanto 


Mary C. Szetela 


Bonnie J. Szynal 


Kim 1. Tamaren 


JNT/ENG 


JS/ Interdepartmental 


Microbiology 


HRTA 


Sport Management 


Human Resource Adm. 


Education 


Newton 


Concord 


Needham 


Hillsborough. CA 


Chicopee 


Florence 


Springfield 



257 



Richard A. Tarantino, Jr. 


L. Eric Taranto 


John M. Tarello 


Ellen H. Tarkln 


Debra F. Taylor 


HRTA 


Art 


HRTA 


Marl<eting 


American History 


Mansfield 


Lynnfield 


Reading 


Oceanside, NY 


Milton 





Ronald A. Taylor 

Painting 
Lynn 



Joanne Tedesco 

Fashion Marketing 
New Seabury 



Christopher teDuits 

Marketing 
Acton 



Liap S. Teh 

Food Science 
Sudbury 



Robert F. Teixiera 

Afro Am Studies 
Boston 



Patricia M. Temple 

Education 
N. Attleboro 



Frank M. Tenore 

Industrial Eng'g. 
Whitman 



Jose A. Teruel 

Accounting 
Puerto Rico 



Caren O. Tessein 

Nursing 
Hyannis 



Andrea M. Thaler 

Animal Science 
Whitestone. NY 



Robert C. Thatcher 

Forestry 
E. Falmouth 



Denlse K. Theodoras 

Psychology 
Lexington 




Adam P. Thier 

Mass Comm. 
Teaneck, NJ 



Anthony Thomas 

Botany 
Lincoln 



Linda J. TInkham 

Industrial Eng'g. 
Lynn 



Lisa D. Thomas 

Electrical Eng'g. 
Greenfield 



Leigh Ann Tischcer 

Fine Arts 
Hackensack, NJ 



Atusko Thompson 

Education Human 

Service 

Amherst 

Marilyn Titus 

Fine Arts 

Fitchburg 



Kenneth J. Thomson 

Botany 
Rockland 



Pamela C. Toben 

Finance 

H. On Hudson, NY 



Susan C. Thornton 

Sociology 
S. Hadley 



David C. Tooher 

Exercise Science 
Norwell 



Richard F. Thorpe 

Communications 
Sharon 



Brenda Torrey 

Comm. Studies 
Northampton 




258 



Lynne M. Toth 


Farrokh A. Tougysserkani 


Joseph Travers 


Todd E. Treacy 


Mark C. Trenchard 


Lisa Anne Tretout 


Joseph Tringalf 


Fashion Marketing 


Chemical Eng'g, 


HRTA 


Accounting 


JS/ENGL 


English/French 


Chemistry 


Granby 


Reading 


Millis 


Seekonk 


Guilford. CT 


Westfield. NJ 


Somerville 



Dana R. Trokel 


Shayne M. Trumble 


Gregory J. Tsongalts 


Linda S. Tunmann 


Louise A. Tuohy 


Lisa Turesky 


Alsxandra W. Turner 


Marketing 


Zoology 


Zoology DH 


Animal Science 


Fashion Marketing 


Sociology 


Political Science/ Econ 


Fort Lee. NJ 


N. Attleboro 


Southbridge 


Framingham 


Yarmouthport 


Brookline 


Bolton 




Jennifer A. Turner 

Psychology 
Baltimore 



James Twigg 

Communications 

Hull 



Margaret E. Twohig 

BDIC 
Holyoke 



Susan E. Twomey 

Economics 

Salem 



Jennifer A. Urban 

Animal Science 
Medfield 



Lori S. Usher 

Animal Science 
Wilbraham 



George M. Vacca 

Industrial Engg. 
Maynard 



Sally A. Vafides 

Food Marketing 
Hingham 



Patricia Vaillancourt 

Comm. Disorders 
Hull 



Emilie A. Valverde 

Comm. Disorders 
Puerto Rico 



Deborah M. Vanaria 

Environmental Science 
Scituate 



Tina L. Vanpatten 

Sociology 

Roslindale 





Xiomara Vargas 

Fashion Marketing 
Lawrence 



Margo Vaux 

Fashion Marketing 
Danvers 



John C. Vega 

Mechanical Eng'g. 
Acton 



David M. Vegan 

Management 
Medford 



Susan L. Vielkind 

HRTA 
Randolph 



Richard L. Vigeant 

Comm. Studies 
Amherst 



Gregory L. Vincent 

HRTA 
Sunderland 



Frank S. Vinciguerra 

Comm. Studies 
Amesbury 



Jeffrey D. Vlselman 

Marketing 
Newton 



Jean Vitagliano 

Human Nutrition 

Natick 



Susan Vogel 

Gen. Business & Finance 

Sunderland 



David G. Volman 

Political Science 
W. Hartford. CT 




Charles E. Vose, III 

Legal Studies 
Greenfield 



Christine A. Vulopas 

Public Health 
Holyoke 



Paula B. Wade 

Comm. Studies 
Framingham 



Brian G. Wallgum 

Forestry 
Westfield 



Wendy Waite 

Legal Studies 
Southboro 



Lisa A. Walako 

Fashion Marketing 
Topsfield 



Richard J. Walcek 

English 

W. Wareham 



259 



Karen A. Wall 


William P. Wall 


Jeffrey Wallingford 


Marianne Walsh 


Paul A. Walsh 


Glenn B. Walter 


Nicole Walters 


Accounting 


Economics 


Marketing 


Microbiology 


HRTA 


Mechanical Eng'g. 


Sport Management 


Pittsfield 


Charlestown 


Sudbury 


Hudson 


Braintree 


Dalton 


Newburyport 




Chenling Wang 

HRTA 
Walpole 



Elizabeth M. Ward 

Human Nutrition 
Reading 



John F. Ward 

STPEC 
Stoneham 



Patricia M. Ward 

Fashion Marketing 
Charlestown 



Wendy A. Ward 

Microbiology 
Brooklyn, NY 



David R. Warnock 

HRTA 
Portland. ME 



Amy E. Warren 

Comm. Disorders 
Auburn 



Steven A. Waryasz 

Civil Eng'g. 
Turners FIs. 



Michael C. Wasserman 

Political Sci & Spanish 
Cambridge 



James H. Watkins. Ill 

BDIC 
Acton 



Lynn M. Watson 

Animal Science 
W, Bridgewater 



Kenneth C. Watt 

HRTA 
Quincy 



John G. Weagle 

Political Sci/History 
Cambridge 



Dana D. Weaver 

Comm. Studies 
Tolland. CT 




Peter J. Weber 


David F. Webler 


Jennifer N. Wefkert 


Karen L. Wein 


Beth L. Weinberg 


Joan C. Weinberg 


Nancy C. Weinberg 


Accounting 


Industrial Eng'g. 


Exercise Science 


Marketing 


Comm. Studies 


Fashion Marketing 


HRTA 


Framingham 


Southington, CT 


Lexington 


Bedford, NY 


Woodmere. NY 


Brighton 


Brighton 





Ellen S. Welnstein 


Mark Welsllk 


Lorl 1. Weiss 


Lisa V. Welsh 


Accounting 


Industrial Eng'g. 


Community Services 


Psychology 


Edison 


Topsfield 


Englishtown. NY 


W. Caldwell, NJ 



260 



Christopher D. West 


David A. Weston 


Kevin Wexler 


Lauren F. Wexler 


Patricia J. Weygandt 


Kim E. Whalen 


Amy L. Wheeler 


Psychology 


Anthropology 


Exercise Science 


Accounting 


Psychology 


Home Econ. 


Geography 


Fairfield, NJ 


Amherst 


Reading 


Randolph 


Belchertown 


Hoiyoke 


Worcester 




Pamela J. Wheeler 

Management 
Wellesley 



Gregory P. White 

Economics 

Berwyn. PA 



David G. Whitenett 

Psychology 
S. Hadley 



John L. Whitney 

Mechanical Eng'g. 

Bridgewater 



James J. Wice 

Mechanical Eng'g. 
Amherst 



Donna Wlckman 

Elementary Educ. 
Paxton 



Douglas J. Widenmann 

Economics 
Topsfield 



MIchele S. Wiener 

Human Development 
Needham 



Cynthia Wild 

Dance & Music Therapy 
Sunderland 



Jonathan Williams 

Resource Econ. 
E. Falmouth 



Judith S. Wlllison 

Psychology 
Schenectady, NY 




Michael Wilser 

Civil Eng'g. 
Berkeley Hts.. NJ 



Marcia E. Winer 

Framingham 



Laurie Wing 

Early Childhood Educ. 
Springfield 



David L. Winmill 

Zoology 
Northboro 



Janice D. Winn 

Accounting 
Methuen 



Jennifer C. Winslow 

English 

La Canada, CA 



Stuart R. Wisel 

HRTA 
Newton Ctr. 



Michael A. Wishnow 

Political Science 
Northampton 



Shelley Witkiewicz 

Printmaking 
Lawrence 



Marilyn L. Witt 

Comm. Disorders 
Framingham 



Linda J. Wltunski 

Home Econ. 
Canton 




Diane Woener 


Cynthia J. Wohler 


Robert J. Wolfe, Jr. 


Adrienne T. Wolfe 


Wendy R. Wolfson 


Christine Wong 


Sharon S. Wong 


Animal Science 


Premed 


Comm. Studies 


Journalism 


Comm. Disorders 


Theatre 


Electrical Eng'g. 


Edison. NJ 


Framingham 


Norwood 


Bergenfield. NJ 


Medford 


Irvington, NY 


Boston 



261 



Steven Wong 


Lynne F. Woodbury 


Bradley A. Woodland 


Carolyn Woods 


James D. Woodward 


Gary S. Wortzman 


George F. Wright 


Civil Eng'g. 


Psyctnology 


ME 


Accounting 


A & Rec. 


Mechanical Eng'g. 


Psychology 


Norwood 


New Britaiii, CT 


Topsfield 


S^ Deerfield 


Holden 


Randolph 


Newton, NJ 




Hilary M. Wright 

Human Nutrition 

Arlington, VA 



Kristen L. Wright 

Socio-Community Serv. 
Longmeadow 



Linda L. Wright 

Finance 
Bloomfield. CT 



Amy F. Wrigiey 

History 

Egg Harbor. NJ 



Gordon M. Wrin 

Industrial Eng"g. 
Framingham 



Debra E. Wyman 

Marketing 
Rigefield, CT 



Micheile A. Xenakis 

Comm. Studies 
Watertown 



Laurie Yacuzzo 

Accounting 

Northampton 



Mary Beth Yanchewski 

Plant & Soil 
Marlboro 



Leyia Yestlada 

Mechanical Eng'i 
Watagh. NY 



David S. Yoffe 

Marketing 

Framingham 



Sheldon Y. Yong 

Environmental Design 
Brighton 



Ann Yorks 

Management 
Natick 




Mark E. Young 

Forestry 
Sturbridge 



Robert C. Yu 

Electrical Eng'g. 
Burlington 



Jennifer M. Zabiocki 

Microbiology 
S. Boston 



Elizabeth A. Zagrany 

Accounting 
Westfield 



Andrew W. Zaioga 

ME 

Windsor Locks. CT 



Sharon A. Zarifian 

Forestry 
Trumbull. CT 



Hossein Zarringehbal 

Chemical Eng"g. 
Worcester 



Ann M. Zavalick 

GB Fin 
Chelmsford 



Nasser Zawia 

North Yemen 



Maria J. Zetes 

Legal Studies 
Swampscott 



Beth A. Zieff 

Education 
Natick 



Ellen J. Ziff 

Sociology 
Marblehead 



Adam Q. Zimmerman 

Astronomy 
Harvard 




262 



Richard S. Zoerner 


Barbara C. Zolty 


Imad Zubl 


Leslie A. Zuckerman 


Sandra Zuckerman 


John D. Zyglel, Jr 


Economics 


Marketing 


HRTA 


Accounting 


Sociology 


English 


Wantagh. NY 


Pompton Plains. NJ 


Feeding Hills 


Milwaukee, Wl 


Fairlawn, NJ 


New Bedford 



Seniors Not Photographed 



Kathy Joan Aalpoel 
Michael J. Abate 
Jamison Hendrie Abbott 
David Charles Abia 
Roger W. Abraham 
Barry S. Abrams 
Richard Adams 
Stacie Brooks Adams 
Emmanuel Olatunji 

Adegbenjo 
Eric J. Adelman 
Jodi A. Acelson 
Paul M. Ahearn 
Tracey M. Ahern 
Steven i. Ahladas 
Craig N. Ahrens 
Eric J. Aijala 
Tevfik Mehmet Aksu 
Susan Isabelle Albanese- 

Connor 
Susan J. Alekson 
Robert M. Alexander 
Antonio Allam Jr. 
Lisa D. Allen 
Stephen L. Allen 
Carol Elizabeth Allman 
Lauren Debra Alloy 
Genipro P. Almeica 
Douglas B. Aloisi 
Loretta L. Alper 
Steven T. Alpert 
Yesim R. Alsan 
William B. Altman 
Eric Alvarez Rodriguez 
Brian F. Alves 
Carl J. Alviti 
Vimal Ramniklal Ambani 
Carol Ann Anderson 
James Philip Anderson 
Matthew A. Anderson 
Peter J. Anderson 
Robin Diane Adams 
Tracy E, Anderson 
Scott E. Andrews 
Rachel Allison Angelinc 
Lisa Marie Angelini 
Tiffany E. Angell 
Jeanne E. Annand 
Karen Marie Ansbacher 
Kenneth N. Anspach 
Carl J. Antunes, Jr. 
Peter John Anzalone 
Eric E. Appleby 
Gloria A. April 
Michelle M. Archer 
Mary K. Arkinson 
Killian A. Arnold 
Leslie Lee Arnold 
Beth Joann Aronowitz 
Charles Michael Atkins 
John F. Atwood 
Rodger Alexander Atwood 
Douglas A. Aube 
Stephen Auffinger 
James Roger Augat 
Alison Judith Aune 
Dwayne R.M. Autery 
Clyde Winston Averill 
Maureen S. Avers 
Richard O. Avery 
Daniel William Awtszus 
Cathy L. Axenfeld 
Caroline Ayres 
Squire K. Babcock 
Ted Michael Babiczuk 
Bert E. Bachrach 
Christopher J. Bacich 
George D. Bacon 
Scott G. Baker 
Susan M. Baker 
Mary Lynn Baldwin 
Ronald C. Baldwin 
James N. Ball 
Kenneth D. Ball 
Thomas W. Balukcnis II 
David L. Banach 
Paul Robert Banks 
Peter Joseph Bannon 
Stawn Barber 
Jeffrey Bard 
Lisa Jeanne Bard 
Matthew Kreger Barez 
Audrey P. Barrett 
Martha J. Barrett 
Robert A. Barrett 
Lynne C. Barrows 
John J. Barry 
Mark Stephen Barry 
Michael J. Barry 
Cari Marie Barstow 
Michael P. Barszewski 
Karina G. Barlelmann 
Lisa Margarita Bartkus 
Barbara Ann Bartlett 
Jane R. Barton 
Leslie A. Balchelder 
Thomas R. Battersby 
Clara G. Baur 
Margaret J. Baxter 
Jennifer A. Bayne 
Kenneth R. Bazinet 
Sharon M. Bean 
Kathleen A. Beary 
Blake Raymond Beattie 
Robert David Beaulicu 
Eric Forbes Beck 
David O. Bccnhouwer 
Alan L. Behao 
Justin D. Benmcasa 
John S, Benjamin 
Amy D. Bennett 
Jeffrey Lee Bennett 
Christopher J. Benoit 
Christopher M. Benoit 
Ruth J. Benson 
Elizabeth Cason Benton 
Marc Paul Bcrenson 
Paul Bcrkelhammer 
Robert W. Bernardara 
Terese M. Bernert 
Catherine C. Bernhard 
Scott R. Bernier 
Jan Bershtein 
Haley E. Berson 



Douglas G. Bezio 
James Anthony Bianchi 
Richard Joseph Biernacki 
Kathryn Ann Driscoll 
Linda J. Biggs 
John Frederick Biltiel 
Mary J. Blazejewski 
Diana E. J. Blazis 
Demitry Blinder 
Elizabeth R. Bliss 
Nena L. Bloomquist 
Carolyn Blum 
Kenneth Boardman 
John Alben Boden 
Eileen M. Bohan 
Marlene N. Bohn 
Byron Bollas 
Thomas J. Bombard 
Susan Bonasia 
Carol Lee Bonsignore 
Carole R. Boole 
Clifford Bordeaux 
Gina Marie Bordoni 
Susa n C. Borwick 
Valerie Maria Boujoukos 
Mary Conraces Bouldin 
Marie Lynn Bourassa 
Brian_£^Bour£oin 
William C. Bourne 
David John Boutin 
Catherine A. Bowdren 
Andrew Baxter Bowler 
Elizabeth Jane Bradley 
Hillary Zvia Bradley 
Robert Allen Brady, Jr. 
John Joseph Braidman 
Joseph Edward Braidt 
Tracy A. Braley 
Walter Joseph Branson 
Mark J. Braska 
Jeffrey M. Bray ton 
Lisa A. Breault 
John C. Breckenridge 
Sean Patrick Breen 
Carla Frances Brennan 
Ellen M. Brenneman 
Ellen M. Brenneman 
Lawrence J. Brenner 
Anne E. Brenton 
Patricia Jean Brewer 
Renee L. Briand 
Donald Shane Brickell 
Timothy Lee Briggs 
Molly C. Brine 
Geoffrey Parker Brinton 
Susan J. Brita 
Bradly Alan Broadwell 
Michael S. Broder 
John L, Broderick 
Robin C. Bronson 
Richard T. Brooks 
Heather Lee Brough 
Janet C. Browde 
Allan Anthony Brown 
Beth M. Brown 
Carol B. Brown 
Carolyn Shaw Brown 
Craig S. Brown 
David Lewis Brown 
Donna J. Brown 
Faith Isabelle Brown 
Joel Eldridge Brown 
Maria A. Brown 
Michael J. Brown 
Michele A. Brown 
Stephen K. Brown 
Toni Pauletta Brown 
Barbara Susan Browne 
Nan Close Browne 
Ellen S. Browning 
James P. Brozek 
Richard Picard Brunelli 
William G. Bruso 
Dirk A. Bryant 
Tracey M. Bryant 
Paul P. Bryden 
Barbara A. Brysh 
Michael Harry Buchsbaum 
Allan C. Buck, Jr. 
Kenneth J. Buck 
Ronald J. Buck 
Dennis P. Buckley 
Michael Joseph BuckTcy 
Lynn Melanie Buddington 
Mark C. Bulat 
David D. Bull 
Charles Edward Burak 
Gregg J. Burgess 
Amy M. Burke 
Diane Leslie Burke 
Edward^ Michael Burke 
Jean Marie Bushee 
Pierre R. Bushel 
Jill S. Busny 
Anne E. Butler 
Thomas H. Butler 
Kurt D. Byrne 
Sheila F. Byrne 
Aida I. Cabrera 
Delia M. Cacho 
Steven Richard Cadmus 
Diane Marie Caldwell 
Joseph J. Camilliere III 
Vincent C. Campanella. Jr. 
Paul Bain Campanis 
Daniel B. Campbell 
Theodore Candiloro 
Rence Susan Cantor 
Karen Rose Caponi 
Edward J. Capstick 
Chris Paul Caputo 
Debra A. Caputo 
Jay Caraviello 
Donna Jean Carbone 
Carolyn Cardella 
Darrell Alan Carlson 
Edwin B. Carlson 
Paul W. Carlson 
Mark V. Carmichael 
Virginia Carmody-Miner 
Michael C. Carney 
Mark J. Carpenter 
James M. Carr 
Melinda S. Carr 



Ann Marie Carra 
Stella Hilda Carrara 
Elizabeth A. Carras 
Charles Francis Carroll 
William R. Carson 
Jennifer L. Carter 
Lauren Cartwright 
Joaquim Mendes Carvalho 
Jose Ignacio Casal Pastran 
Daniel F. Case 
Jon Charles Casey 
MaryElle'n Cclata 
Linda M. Celeste 
Elaine Marie Chaison 
Michael J. Chajes 
Michael D. Chambers 
Derek Sunwai Chan 
Yuen Y. Chan 
Yun Chang 

Jeffrey Edward Chaniien 
Russell S. Channen 
Vivian F. Chapin 
Mark William Chapman 
Susan L. Chapman 
Jacqueline A. Chartier 
Karen Ann Chauvin 
Jose I. Chavez 
Jilda J. Chin 
Ralph M. Chloodian 
Barbara J. Chlup 
Anthony J. Chmiel 
Peter PHillip Chmtelinski 
Anne H. Chmura 
Chae Chong Choi 
Anthony Mark Ciarcello 
Mark Joseph Ciccatelli 
Jill Catherine Cimini 
Frank Alexander Cirino 
Kelly A. Civetti 
Lorraine Claffee 
Frances A. Clark 
Joseph W. Clark 
Nancy L. Clark 
Scott Alexander Clark 
Stephen Paul Clark 
Susan Elizabeth Clarke 
Steven G. Class 
Elaine L. Clements 
Ellen T. Clinch 
Robert J. Cfoonan HI 
Thomas G. Ciough 
William James Ctough 
John M. Cloutier 
Michele C. Cloutier 
Lisa Anne Cobbett 
Elaine Wallace Coburn 
Paul W. Cochrane 
David Lenard Cocuzzo 
Christina Miriam Coffin 
John Aioysius Cogan, Jr. 
Erik A. Cohen 
Laura M. Cohen 
Carey E. Collins 
John Joseph Collins 
Theresa Ellen CoHins 
Terrance C. ColHton 
Joseph J. Colucci, Jr. 
Pamela D. Colwell 
Edward Robert Comeau 
Lauren Jean Comerford 
George E. Como 
Paula K. Como 
Jeanne Sarah Condon 
Susan Mary Congdon 
John F. Conlin 
Leonard M. Conlin, Jr. 
Clifford William Conneil 
Edward J, Conneli 
Maryann J. Connolly 
Scott M. Connor 
Sean William Connor 
Andrew J. Connors 
David B. Conroy 
Donna L, Conroy 
Judith Ann Conroy 
Brenda J. Contarino 
Scott F. Conti 
Marie Christina Conway 
Edmund C. Cook 
Anthony Cbrdeiro 
Matthew C. Corkum 
Christopher Cornell 
Brian D. Corrigan 
James Richard Costa 
Linda C. Costanzo 
Catherine Lynn Costello 
Christine Louise Costello 
Peter W. Cotta 
Kathryn A. Cottingham 
Susan M. Countryman 
Julia A. Courtney 
Kenneth L. Cousins 
Staci Coven 
Carol L. Cox 
Karen Lee Cox 
Alice S. Crawley 
Jane Marguerite Cremisi 
Kathryn Crichton 
Catherine Marie Crimp 
Michael W. Critch 
David Walter Croke 
Dean S- Cromack 
Edmond G. Cronin 
Heidi Katrina Cronkrite 
Maria Victoria Crouse 
Doreen M. Crowe 
Mary J. Crowley 
Michael T. Crowley 
Angel J. Cruz 
Robert M. Cuddihy 
Michael R. Cuff 
Mary C. Culhane 
Dennis J. Cutlilon 
Linda Mary Culliton 
Jacgueiine Ann Cummings 
Sheila Mary Cummings 
Fred Owen Cunliffc 
Laurie J. Cunningham 
John Henry Curry 
John M. Curlin 
Michael J. Curtin 
Paula M. Curtin 
Claude C. Curtis 
Christopher M. Gushing 



Louis P. Cyr 
Michael A. Dacampo 
Steven E. Daccy 
William James Dadoly 
Eric D. Dagostino 
David A. Daiglc 
Leslie J. Dale 
Martin C. Daly 
Terry Lynn Dame 
Elise Frances D'Amiano 
Joseph Michael Danaher 
Kathryn E. Danaher 
Lynne Marie Dandeneau 
Dorothy Edith Darling 
Glenn Edward Dasilva 
Maria Alzira Dasilva 
George C. Daskalos 
James Thomas Dassatti 
Melinda Sue Dauten 
Donna Ruth Davenport 
Cheryl Elizabeth Davey 
Deanna B. David 
Sharon Lee Davies 
Nikki Davis 
Peter G. Davis 
William B. Davis 
Elizabeth Marie Davoren 
Clive Dean Dawkins 
Deborah Gail Dawson 
Elizabeth Minish Dawson 
Sally A. Dawson 
Nicholas A. De Rutter 
Anne Deacutis 
Joseph A. Deangelo 
Constance Ruth Deas 
Linda Susan Debruyn 
Philip C. Debs 
Regina A. Decoster 
Daniel H. Defenderfer 
Suzanne Deforge 
Kenneth L. Degan 
Mary Degrandis- 
Louis F. Dclesdernier 
Robert Mitchell Del Gizzi 
Dana Edward Delisle 
Lisa Mae Delisle 
Scott Francis Delisle 
Peter A. Deliso 
Laurie J. Denkenwicz 
Thomas L. Dcnormandie 
David M. Depasquale 
Diane Mary Depew 
Kevin R. Derby 
David M. Dery 
Richard Joseph JDesantis 
Gina L. £}esterano 
Christopher J. Devine 
Raymond P. Devita 
Elizabeth J. Devlin 
Sean F. Devlin 
Neal William Dewittc 
Brian David Dewolfe 
Kimberly A. Diab 
Angela J. Dicaprio 
Charles Arthur Dicapua 
Leslie A. [>icurcio 
Gregory R. Dillard 
Christopher A. Dilorenzo 
Thomas S. Dimauro 
Daniel Philip DJmento 
PamelaMcKcnna Diperrio 
Carolyn Diessa 
Kelley Jeanmarie Doak 
Barbara A. Dobbrow 
Gaei A, Dobbrow 
Gael A. Dobbrow 
Kenneth J. Dobbs 
Karen M. Dobija 
William F. Dockendorff 
Sean Conway Dolan 
Sean J. Dolan 
Patricia A. Dolbearc 
Cynthia M. Donahue 
Barbara Jean Donald 
Kathy Ann Donfro 
Michael Harold Dorgan 
AmyBeth Dorman 
Barbara Joan Doucette 
Brian Edward Doucette 
Edward Daniel Dowd 
Michael Patrick Downing 
Christopher J. Doyle 
Daniel R. Doyle 
Debra T. Doyle 
Jennifer M. Doyle 
Linda Susan Drake 
John P. Draper 
Stephen Allen Drelick 
Anthony Dreyfus 
Jerome V. Driscoll 
Joanne E. Driscoll 
Michael Arthur Driscoll 
Wilfred C. Driscoll II 
Neil Robert Drooks 
Mary-Jo Drummond 
Jose A. Duarte 
David Joel Dubinsky 
Eileen M. Dubois 
Holly A. Dubow 
Lynn C. Duby 
Kimberly Ann Duffill 
Eleanor Margaret Duffy 
Marko B. Duffy 
Mark Alan Dufva 
Holly Jean Dumanoski 
Michael Joseph Dumont 
Marjorie Baker-Dumpson 
Deborah M. Dunham 
Anna Veronica Dunn 
Dailey A. Dunn 
Judith M. Dunn 
Kathleen J. Dunton 
Denise Christine Dupre 
Damian E. Dupuy 
Susan Fairfielcl Durkee 
Brian Duval 
John E. Dzaugis 
Irene Kosinski Dzicba 
Stanley M. Dziura, Jr. 
Patricia J. Eagle 
Deirdre Lei Earl 
Thomas Richard Estaugh 
Donna L. Eaton 
Paulla A, Ebron 



Steven B. Edelslein 
John Blodgett Edwards 
Linda G. Edwards 
Michael P. Edwards 
Jane Marie Egan 
Davida R. Eichen 
Sara B. Einis 
Marc Reed Ekasala 
Eric J. Ekbcrg 
Shaun M. Ellis 
George E. Ellison 
Joanne M. Emery 
Jayne M. Emma 
Carolyn F. Engel 
William Paul Ennen 
Michelle S. Eovine 
Sandra L. Epst ein 
Lewis G. Evangelidis 
Lynne R. Everett 
Kerim N. Evin 
Kathryn Anne Ewald 
Sigmund Exposito 
Robin Lee Fabry 
Leanne Stacy Fader 
David C. Fagundes 
Lisa O'Connor Fairbanks 
William S. Fairchild III 
Craig Falconieri 
Kathleen Marie Fallon 
Diane M. Fandel 
Joseph John Fantini 
Paul R. Famsworth 
John F. Farrell 
Laurie A. Farrell 
Rebecca A, Farrer 
Ali Fatehi 

Andrew K. Fcnniman 
Ann V. Feroia 
Christopher J. Fcrrero 
Elizabeth C. Ferron 
David A. Fiandaca 
Mary L. Field 
Christopher J. Fierro 
Andrea Sue Fine 
Peter D. Fine 
Michelle Robyn Fineberg 
Annette Emily Finger 
Deirdre Louise Finn 
Kathleen T. Finncgan 
Lisa A. Finneran 
Paula F. Finstein 
Karen M. Fitzgerald 
Laura Jean Fitzgerald 
Lynn A. Fitzgerald 
Alicia Fitzpa trick 
Sarah L. Flagg 
Mary Ann Flaherty 
Mary Jane P. Flahive 
Thomas J. Flanagan 
John M. Fleming 
Frank Lawson Fletcher HI 
Susan H. Fletcher 
Gail H. Flint 
Geoffrey Mark Flocken 
Alexander B. Floyd 
Eugene Louis Flynn 
Alison Foster Fobes 
John Michael Foley 
Michael Jerome Foley 
Susan A, Foley 
Doris L. Forte 
Sioux Forlgang 
Ana Isabel Fossas-Blanco 
Timothy J. Foster 
Catherine Vera Fowkes 
Ariel Winslow Fowler 
Iris Toby Fox 
Marsha Leigh Fox 
Steven Neal Fox 
Jeanne M. Franceschina 
John Daniel Francescon 
Gael Francis 
Calvin W. Frank 
Victor J. Frank 
Julie Ann Fraser 
Betsy A. Frederick 
Gary A. Freker 
Richard Lemuel Friend 
Robert G. Frye 
Lisa A. Fuller 
Lisa L. Fusco 
Michael G. Fusilio 
Robert S. Gadomski 
Peter A. Gaffney 
Brenda Jean Gagnon 
Joan Elizabeth Galanek 
Vladimir Estuardo Galindo 
Kelley Marie Gallagher 
Judith A. Gallant 
Anna Marie Gallo 
Gregory W. Gallucci 
Laura Gamer 
Timothy A. Gannon 
Richard Bruce Garbarino 
George J. Garivaltis 
Nancy Ellen Garner 
Carlos E. Gautier-Lloveras 
Stephen Karl Geiger 
Barry P. Gelinas 
Robert J. Geller 
Ann S. Genden 
Arthur F. Genova Jr. 
Susan Marie Genova 
Thomas A. Genung 
James C. Georgiou 
Ronald R. Gerace 
Felicia Lauren Gershon 
Jeffrey G. Gervickas 
Greer M. Gctzen 
Paula Lisa Gibbes 
Michael G. Gibbons 
Daniel J. Giblin 
Kristian Gibson 
Michael A. Gicra 
Elizabeth Anne Gilbert 
Marie Elena Gillespie 
Neil A. Gitkind 
Jeffrey Alan Gittic 
Vicki M. Giuggio 
Eric C. Glassoff 
Thomas Joseph Glavin 
Anne Frances Gleason 
James A. Glockling 
Sharon B. Glott 



Jeffrey R, Glover 

Michael J. Goddard 
Ann E. Godlcwski 
Paul Joseph Golaski 
Jeffrey M. Gold 
Lisa K. Gold 
Eileen Goldberg 
Karen B. Goldberg 
Lawrence B. Goldberg 
Alan I. Goldstein 
Louise- Ann Gollob 
Rosemary Ooodrow 
Robert C. Goodwin 
Stephen A. Gootkind 
Andrew J. Gordon 
Elena G. Gordon 
Richard J. Gordon 
Robert Carl Gorter 
Anne Marie Gorzocoski 
Paul F. Gossclin 
Peter Courtney Grace 
Stephanie Lee Grady 
Michael A. Graff 
Nadia H, Graham 
James Frederick Grant, Jr. 
Lawrence J. Grasso 
Peter J. Greeley 
Edwin N. Green 
Kathy A. Green 
Susan Elizabeth Green 
Thomas J. Green 
Ann Elizabeth Greene 
Coleman Greene 
Winnie Greene 
Jane Lennox Greenhalgh 
Barbara L. Greenspan 
Jeffery S. Greer 
Larry E. Grenon 
Henry W. Griffin III 
Karen M. Griffin 
Kathleen Mary Griffin 
Robert E. Griffin 
Paul J. Griskevich 
Karl J. Grover 
Jocelyn Claire Grunbcrg 
E>avid G. Guarnaccia 
Daaron P. Guay 
Jeffrey J. Guertin 
Leanora Jo-Gene Guidi 
Antonio Guigli 
Joseph W, Guiles 
Bradley K. Guillerm 
Ralph Peter Guisti 
Peter J. Gurnis 
Karen Haberly 
Margaret M. Hagan 
Henry A. Hagcnah 
Maureen Hagcrstrom 
Steven Judc Hagerstrom 
Joyce D. Haglund 
Aiman Haidar 
Neil J. Haley 
Robert Loren Haley 
Paul Douglas Halkiotis 
Donald F. Hall 
Leon Colson Hall 
Karen Denise Hamilton 
Ronald D. Hamlin 
Karilyn Elizabeth Hammer 
Jeffrey Francis Hancock 
Sam L. Handman 
Robin C. Handy 
Ronald Joe Hankins 
Joel William Hanks 
Samuel R. Hammer 
Paul J. Hanna 
James F. Hannigan Jr. 
John M. Hansen III 
Barry Munir Haq 
Frances J. Harackiewicz 
Karen L. Harding 
Sander Harmat 
Lou Anne Harrison 
Nora M. Harrison 
John Nicholas Hart 
Man Robert Hartke 
Wayne P. Hartt 
Janet E. Harver 
Patricia Ann Harvey 
Amy Elizabeth Hasbrouck 
Ellen L. Haskins 
Steven Kenneth Haskins 
Richard K. Hass 
Kimberly Anne Hatch 
Edward W. Hathaway 
Isaac Forman Hawkins III 
Peter F. Hawkins 
Anthony Michael Hayden 
Douglas A. Hayes 
Karen Marie Hayes 
Leslie A. Hays 
Linda K. Haytayan 
Susan B. Hazen 
Chris E. Healy 
Elaine M. Healy 
Deborah D. Jaworski 
Marianne Hegedus 
Tara A. Heinzmann 
Hans Arthur Helgeson 
Mary C. Hellman 
Susan L. Hendrickson 
Robert L. Hennessey, Jr. 
Frederick J. Hensen 
John William Herbert III 
John R. Herder 
Christopher J. Herlihy 
Lisa J. Hermance 
Jeffrey M. Herold 
Dawn M. Herscy 
Heidi M. Heyden 
Christopher S. Heyer 
Holly Ann Heyner 
Patricia M. Hickey 
Michael Henry Higgins 
Laura Lee Hill 
David D. Hillman 
David T. Hilton 
Michael John Hinchey 
David R. Hinkley 
Jonathan David Hitchcock 
Julia Rae Hite 
Rita M. Hodgman 
Gary Alan Hoeppner 
Peter C. Hoey 



David Joseph Hoffman 
Joseph Edwin Hogan 
Michael Anthony Hogan 
Jennifer A. Holden 
Jay P. Holland 
Annette Holloway 
Carolyn Holmes 
Karin Lynne Holmes 
Kathryn Marie Holmes 
Nina Christina Holmstron 
Anthony J. Holowitz 
Matthew J. Holt 
George C. Holzinger. Jr. 
Robert E. Homayounjah 
William Orvin Hood III 
Sally Prcscoti Hootcn 
Cynthia S. Hornketh 
Debra Ann Horton 
S. Todd Howatt 
Stephen R. Howe 
Lisa H. Hoyl 
Teresa Carmel Hoyt 
Sophia C. Hsieh 
Sheng-Fang Chang Huani 
Richard Scott Hubbetl 
Hillary A. Hughes 
Michael E. Hughes 
Cheryl Ann Huie 
Veronica G. Hummel 
Lawrence D. Hunt 
Maureen Terese Hunt 
Stephen A. Hunt 
Joseph Thomas Hunter 
Edward Stuart Huntley 
Charles Joseph Hurley 
Christopher Hurley 
William J. Hurncy 
Carole Lynn Hutchinson 
Paivi I. Ikonen 
David M. Irland 
Pamela Louise Irvin 
Laurie Marie Irwin 
Linda Jablonski 
Kevin B. Jackson 
Edward Jacobs 
llene C. Jacobs 
Cynthia E. Jacques 
Donna M. Pluta 
Mary K. Jadalz 
Marianne Gail Jakus 
Karol F. Jamrok 
Estelle S. Janakas 
Richard S. Jarvis 
Hannah Jelinek 
Richard A. Jenkins Jr. 
Amy P. Jenness 
Peter H. Jenney 
Eric S. Jensen 
Karen A. Jensen 
Martin James Jewcit 
Peter Blake Johanson 
Jean E. Johnson 
Jennifer V. Johnson 
Robert L. Johnson 
Christopher M. Johnstor 
Mark Andrew Johnston 
Grace K. Johnstone 
Christopher Paul Joliat 
Charies Edward Jones 
Elizabeth Newell Jones 
Favour Jones 
Jeffrey Lee Jones 
Kevin Thomas Jones 
Laura Katherine Jones 
Maureen Buchanan Jonc 
Stephen G. Jones 
Stephen H. Jones 
Steven C. Jones 
Susan E. Jones 
Steven J. Jordan 
Robert Michael Joseph 
John Dimltri Jovan, Jr. 
Gregory N. Joy 
Donna G. Joyce 
Scott A. Jurgelewicz 
Daniel L. Kaczman 
Betsy E. Kadanoff 
Danielle Marie Kadinof 
Ronald George Kahan 
Kenneth Kalinowski 
Mark C. Kalpin 
John Joseph Kaminski 
Mark S. Kaminski 
Arnold Ross Kana 
Clinton R. Kanaga 
Peter J. Kane 
Keyvan Karbasioun 
Aram Nazar Kardjian 
David S. Kardok 
Amin Karimpour 
William P. Kaslawski 
Sharryn Michelle Kasm 
James R. Kaufman 
Matthew E. Kaufman 
Vahid Kaviani 
Thomas Patrick Kcanc 
Gail A. Keddie 
Angela J. Keefe 
Donald William Keefer 
Eileen P. Keegan 
Daniel J. Keelan 
Priscilla H. Keeler 
Timothy Scott Keen 
Susan E. Keevers 
Richard J. Kellerman 
Francis Joseph Kelley, 
Ann M. Kelly 
Joan Patricia Kennedy 
Thomas F. Kennedy. J 
James William Kent 
Keith R. Kessler 
Joel A. Kesienberg 
Catherine A. Ketter 
Jeanne K. Ketterl 
Roger W. Keyes 
Stephanie Kichline M. 
Guy Russell Kidd 
Sharon Audrey Kidd 
Lu Ann Jane ICielbasa 
Lissa Kiernan 
Susan M. Kilpatrick 
Edward J. Kim 
Milly Mihyun Kim 
Lisa J. Kimmick 



Andrew G. King 
Dianne C. King 
Matthew J. King 
William Frederick King 
Ellen Joyce Kinnee 

Catherine A. Kirchner 

Jodi Meryl Kirschner 
Diane Elizabeth Kish 

Susan M. Klassen 

Susan Paige Kleciak 

Sarawit Klinsukont 

Holly R. Kniznik 

Diane M, Kobcl 

Paul R. Koch 

Rhonda Kogos 

Maryann E. Kokoski 

Laura A. Kolb 

Suzanne B. Kole 

Theresa M. Kolish 

Lillian M. Kollar 

Anthony Robert Kopas II 

Pamela Gail Koretsky 

Dana T. Korhonen 

Caria L. Koritz 

Rachel M. Korn 

James S. Kornfeld 

Patricia Helen Korpita 

Robert Korzec 

Richard J. Korzeniowski 

Peter B. Kosak 

Janice M. Kosakowski 

Peter B. Kosak 

Janice M. Kosakowski 

Kurt David Kovacic 

John Joseph Kovich 

Mary Therese Kowalski 

J. Danuia Kozlowski 

Peter Wilson Kracht 

Sariya Kraichitti 

Laura J. Kramer 

Mamye A. Kratt 

Elizabeth Billie Krauss 
Stephen J. Krebs 

Laurie Jo Kreidermacher 

Nancy A. Kromka 

Lauren Gail Kronfeld 
Jeffrey Edward Krunig 

Kevin J. Krupinski 
Allison Lori Laakso 
John A. Lacerda III 
Dana R. Lacey 
Kevin Paul Lach 
Gayle L. Ladue 
Rodney Arthur Laflamnie 
Carole A. Lafleche 
John Andrew Lafleche 
Martha Lafrance 
Lynne M. Lafreniere 
Joseph P. Laliberte 
Abigail J. Lamontagne 
Andre Lamontagne 
William T. Lamothe 
Elizabeth Ami Landrigan 
Brian O. Lane 
Christopher David Lang 
Rebecca Lang 
Joseph Leo Langley 
Mark Lanni 

Gerald Douglas Lanois, Jr. 
Gary Richard Lapidus 
Michael A. Lapolice 
Theresa M. Laprad 
James Martin Laquidara 
Bernard J. Laramee 
Andreas E. Laras 
Meg Largey 
Neal W. Larkln 
Sharon M. Lavalley 
James G. Lavery 
David Richard Lawless, Jr. 
Charles K. Lawrence 
Pamela M. Lawrence 
Ross E. Leach 
Nancy L. Leader 
Richard S. Leahy 
Amy Beth Leavitt 
Sandra J. Leblanc 
Susan Elizabeth Leehey 
Richard W. Lefavor 
Catherine M. Legan 
Cynthia Lynne Lehmbcck 
Ruth Mary Leimonas 
William Lemeshevsky 
Nathaniel David Lemmon 
Eileen Marie Lento 
David A. Lenz 
Alison Marie Leonard 
Darren J. Leonard 
Nancy James Leonard 
Lucille A. Leoni 
Timothy H. Leroy 
Pamela J. Lesperance 
Andrew P. Less 
Jacqueline Michele Lesser 
Lisa A. Letizio 
Stuart Atherton Lever, Jr. 
Arthur J.K. Levesque 
Bruce A. Levine 
Kevin Robert Levreault 
David S. Lewis 
William B. Ley 
Eugene C. Libardi. Jr. 
Susan Alfreda Lieberman 
Keith H. Liederman 
Judith L. Lilienfeld 
Susan Christine Lilly 
Bryant Robert Linares 
Kenneth Andrew Lind 
Kathleen Anne Lingenberg 
Johanna M. Linnehan 
David Linton 
Elizabeth A. Lipari 
David J. Lis 
Catriona M. Little 
David M. Littlefield, Jr. 
Kevin S. Litton 
Michael Yu Liu 
Peter G. Livingston 
Andrew J. Livingstone 
Paul Stanley Lizak 
Deborah Hoxsie Lomas 
Donna Michele Lombardi 
John P. Long 
Leslie J. Longfield 
Barbara E. Lord 
Catherine L. Lord 
Amy Frances Loring 
Nikos Loukopoulos 
Gregory F. Love 



Michael Joseph Love 
Carl J. Lovotti 
David R. Lowry, Jr. 
Rachel E. Lubash 
Steven C. Luby 
Laurie J. Lundgren 
Peter D. Lundquist 
Charles Richard Lutz, Jr. 
Peter Allan Luukko 
Robert F. Luz 
Michael I. Lynch 
Sheila Anne Lynch 
Steven Wayne Lyon 
Marian Jeanne Mabel 
Doreen Marie MacDonald 
Kelly J. MacDonald 
Laurie B. MacDonald 
Malcon E. MacDonald 
Claudia Ruth Mackay 
Duncan Ross Mackay 
Ian Wellington Mackay 
Ross Elwood Mackay 
Neal A. Mackertich 
Lawrence W. Madden 
Steven J, Madore 
Marc 5. Magerman 
Christina B. Maggio 
Amy Elizabeth Magnant 
Guy A. Magrone 
Mark Edward Mahoney 
' Paul F. Mahoney 
Shelley L. Mahood 
Jcanette E. Maillet 
Marian Annette Mailloux 
Cheryl Jean Majka 
Sclina Jane Makofsky 
Marcia L. Malamut 
Gary R. Malcolnison 
Anncmarie P. Maley 
Linda M. Malgeri 
Michael D. Malone 
Brian Boru Maloney 
Paul R. Manchester 
Stephen M. Mandell 
Susan M. Manell 
Kathleen Marie Mansfield 
Paul G. Manton 
Jean Suey Fong Mar 
Dorothy Teresa Marchaj 
Fiona Marcotty 
Melissa Kerr Marcure 
Michael A. Margareci 
Ann M. Margola 
Margaret J. Margolis 
Gene R. Margulies 
Anthony J. Marino, Jr. 
Christopher C. Markcn 
Peter M. Markham 
Jennifer Robin Marks 
Paul Joseph Marmai 
Elizabeth Maroni 
George S. Marr 
Charles Andrew Marram 
Harold C. Marshall 
Laura Ellen Marshall 
Greg E. Martel 
Maria T. Mariel 
Dorothy Olive Martin 
Kim M. Martin 
Diana Martinez 
Howard Martinez 
Michele Ann Martino 
Peter A. Martino 
George J. Martins 
Carolyn Martiros 
Joseph Robert Martorano 
Anne Masloski 
George L. Mason 
James E. Massidda 
Bogdan A. Mastalerz 
Diane D. Maston 
Carla Andrea Matesky 
Avinash Lai Mathur 
George Pierre Matisse 
Michael Leon Matuszek 
Daniel Leo Thomas May 
Paul J. Mayer 
Sharon Mayer 
Marjorie I. Mayor 
Steven Nelson Mazzola 
Peter A. McBride 
Nancy A. McCabe 
Carol Marie McCann 
Andra McCarthy 
David M. McCarthy 
James J. McCarthy 
Paul Edward McDavitt 
John Michael McDcrmott 
Bernard Joseph McDonald 
Donna Ann McDonald 
Steven M. McDonald 
Robin Lynne McElfresh 
John T, McEvoy 
Ralph Peter McFarland 
Gayle Elizabeth McGill 
Anne S. McGowan 
Kimberley McGrath 
Kelly J. McGuiggin 
Patricia Kathleen McGuire 
Bridget M. McHugh 
John Daniel Mclnerny 
Raymond Mclsaac, Jr. 
W. Scott McKechnie 
Carolyn Banks McKenna 
Sharon June McKenna 
Matthew J. McNally 
John McNamara 
Diane Marie McPhee 
Scott W. McPhee 
Michael S. McTigue 
Mary Elizabeth McVey 
Lisa Louise Mead 
John Joseph Mealey 
Rita Marie E. Meany 
David Souza Medetros 
Richard W. Meek 
Karen L. Meeker 
William Eric Meese 
Christopher Alan Mega 
Abbas Mehmandoost 
A jay Mehra 
Joanne V. Mei 
Thomas M. Meigs 
Denise M. Meisse 
Edward Mello, Jr. 
Paula J. Mello 
Maura M. Melvin 
Elizabeth A. Mendelsohn 
Elizabeth M. Mendes 



Mary Ellen Metzgcr 
Carol A. Meyer 
Diana L. Meyer 
Fred J. Meyer 
Evan Charles Meyers 
Janet Ruth Meyers 
Richard A. Meyers 
(-aria M. Miclette 
Frances M. Miffitt 
Pamela Ann Mignault 
Janice Mignosa 
Maria A. Mihaly 
Brent F. Miklavic 
John M. Mileszko 
Paula J. Milka 
Alan Gricr Miller 
Alan P. Miller 
D. Wesley Miller 
Dru Ann L. Miller 

Jeffrey M. Miller 
Laurie Jane Miller 
Mary Ellen Miller 

Robert J. Miller 
Russell Grant Miller 

Boris Milman 

Roger W. Milne 

John V. Mincone 

Kathryn S. Misrock 

Richard MIstretta 

Dean Scott Mitchell 

Kathleen M. Mitchum 

David Moen 

Carol B. Mokrzecky 

Emile Rene Molineaux 

Lisa R. Moliver 

Michael Francis Molway 

Jennifer Maude Monaghan 

Peter Alan Monchamp 

Thomas Moniz 

Paul Jordan Monohon, Jr. 

Cynthia Louise Montano 

Douglas H. Moore 

James G. Moore 

Kathleen A. Moore 

Steven Martin Moore 

Douglas Kefarer Moran 

Joseph A. Moran 

Judith A. Moran 

Laurel M. Morgan 

Andrew B. Moriarty 

f^tricia A. Morin 

Keith L. Morris 

Lennie S. Morris 

Peter Caldwell Mott 

Cynthia Motta 

Jay Richard Moylan 

Kathleen Moynihan 

Maura E. Moynihan 

Morteza MozafTari 

Hilary E. Mueller 

David Alan Mutse 

Paul Gerard Mulcahy 

Kerry L. Mulderig 

Jeanne N. Muldoon 

Robert J. Muldoon, Jr. 

Leland A. Muldowney 

Mary S. Mullen 

Arvid C. Mulier 

Amy J. Murrett 

Edward R. Musiak 

Mark S. Myers 

Thomas Oliver Myers 

William A, Nadeau 

Francis Joseph Nagle, Jr. 

Joseph E. Nagle 

Ellen E. Nahigian 

Laura L. Neitze! 

Barbara A. Nekos 

Jon Mark Nelson 

Rosemarie Nervelle 

Stephen A. Neumcier 

Steven Roger Neveu 

Barry E. Neville 

Oliver J. Newell 

Pamela Shirley Newell 

Patricia L. Newell 

Gillian P. Newson 

Barbara Paterson Newton 

Joanne H. Newton 

Hoang M. Nguyen 

Robin C. Nichols 

Mary L. Nolan 

Paul Stephen Nolan 
Susan M. Nolan 

Edward J. Noonan, Jr. 

Cynthia A. Noret 

Maryellen Norton 

Timothy J. Norton 

Peter M. Noursc 

Carolyn J. Oakley 

Donald A O'Brien 

Kevin David O'Brien 

Michael J. O'Brien 

Michael Thomas O'Brien 

Richard James O'Brien 
Stephen J. O'Brien 

Karen M. Ocatlaghan 

Daniel James O'Conneli 

David J. O'Conneli 
Louise Ohanesian 
Patricia Ann O'Hara 
Michael Arthur O'Hearn 
Adolf Olbert 
Carolyn Mary Olbrych 
Daniel J. Olcary 
Lee M. OHn 
Marilyn A. Oneil 
Elizabeth A. Oneill 
James C. O'Neill 
Kathleen O'Nell 
"Eve S. Onyski 
Laurie L. Orchel 
Pamela R. Orenstein 
Maureen Lucille O'Rourke 
Jose Rafael Ortiz 
Daniel J. Osborn 
Charles S. Osgood 
James M. Oshea 
Kathy Ann Ouellette 
Karen Lynne Outerson 
Lisa J. Owen 
Mary T. Ozereko 
Michael Pacheco 
John Arthur Pagani 
Christopher Newell Page 
Diana R. Page 
Catherine J. Paier 
Thomas L. Paige 
Michael Anthony Palecki 



Kyle R. Parent 
Sharalynn Shane Parker 
Thomas F. Parker 
Philip Pasley. Jr. 
Bruce Paster 
Diane Marie Patnod 
Deborah L. Patterson 
John Michael Pearsall 
Richard Eric Pekkala 
Cheryl A. Pellegrini 
Andrew James Pellman 
Ward Pendleton 
Nathaniel Frederick Penn 
Lee R. Perkins 
Guy F. Pcrrault 
Keith Peter Person 
Jeanne R. Peschier 
Derek Gibson Fetch 
Barbara Jean Peterson 
John J. Peterson 
Laurence V. Peterson 
Lisa Marie Petragtia 
Jill M. Petruccelli 
Mark Andrew Petruzella 
Elizabeth B. Pfeufer 
Lynn M. Phancuf 
James F. Pheian III 
Julianna R. Piepho 
Nancy P. Pierce 
Stanley L. Pietrzyk, Jr. 
Kelly E. Pike 
Cheryl Ann Pikora 
David Pill 
Janice M. Pineau 
Courtney E. Pinkus 
Gregory Jon Pipes 
Fernanda M. Pires 
David G. Pittman 
Anne T. Pizzano 
Sarah B. Plattner 
Josefina Pobleie 
James L. Podolak 
Stephanie J. Post 
Steven F. Potts 
Mark A. Poturnicki 
Marc Paul Poulin 
Justin M. Powell 

James M. Power, Jr. 
Kathleen Power 

Timothy J, Power 
Brenda M. Powers 
Doris Francis Powers 
H. John Powers 
M. Christine Powers 

Siobhan S. Powers 

Thomas Robert Powers 

Brendan Clifford Preston 

Domenic A. Prcvite 

Nicola J, Printer 

Henry R, Prochazka, Jr. 

Andrew Prochniak 

Julie Procopiow 

Annette C. Provencher 

Christopher Browne Prum 

Kathcrinc Prum 

Kathleen T. Prunier 

Keith J. Purcell 

Cynthia Lee Purmort 

Paul R. Putnam 

Patrick William Puzzo 

Patrick R. Quaine 

Mark J. Quealy 

Leo P. Quinlan 

Donna Marie Quinn 

Jeffrey A. Quinn 

Teresa E. Quirion 

Pauline M. Quirk 

John J. Rabel, Jr. 

Dennis R. Racca 

Diane Dyer Racicot 

Richard G. Raczkowski 

Susan E. Radigan 

Heidi' A. Rancin 

Abigail V. Randal! 

Bruce W. Randall 

Robert Michael Raymond 

Samuel J. Read 

Maureen A. Reddin^ton 

Anne H. Reed 

Christopher James Regan 

Susan Reiche 

Geraldlne A. Reilly 

Gregg W. Reilly 

Jeffrey M. Reilly 

Margaret D. Reilly 

Patricia A. Reilly 

Linda Reinen 

Andrea N. Repass 

Susan Ann Repcta 

Stephen D. Rey 

Thomas Rheaume 

Todd J. Rhodes 

Julie P. Ricci 

James M. Rice 

Craig S. Richard 

Sharon A. Richard 

Laura Richards 

Janet Richman 

Daniel H. Rider, Jr. 

Sara J. Rider 

Francis V. Riedy 

Ellis Francis Rinaldi 

Wilfredo Rios-Ramirez 

Allyson Barbara Rioux 

John B. Ritchie 

Bruce W. Ritchings 

Nathalie M. Ritz 

Priscilla Elaine Rivard 

Juanita L. Rivera 

Michael P. Rizzi 

Michelle T. Roach 

Roxane E. Robbins 

Deborah M. Roberti 

Paul Jeffrey Roberts 

Lewis Spence Robichau 

Marta J. Robichaud 

Annette E. Robinson 

Charles H. Robinson 

Edward J. Rocco 

Lorraine Rosalind Rocco 

Allan D. Roche 

Charlene J. Roche 

Geoffrey M. Rockwell 

Kathryn L. Rodenhizer 

Ana Luisa Rodriguez 

Dugald Cameron Rogers 

John C. Rogers 

Steven Scott Rogers 

John L. Rollinson 



Daniel Sheldon Root 
David G. Root 
Miguel Angel Ros 
Laura Ann Rosato 
Cheryl A. Rose 
Michael David Rose 
Barbara A. Rosen 
Barry Alan Rosenberg 
David Jay Rosenberg 
Ruth Ellen Rosenblatt 
Nancy G. Rosenthal 
Patricia Rosier 
Beth L. Rosner 
Behnam J. Rouhi 
Karen M. Roy 
Robert Charles Roy 
Jeffrey T. Royal 
Rebecca Royce 
Lori G. Rubin 
Deborah L. Rubley 
Darryl R. Ruffen 
Vicki A. Ruffner 
Rosemary S. Ruley 
Karen L. Runstein 
Stephen M. Rusiecki 
Kevin T. Russell 
Patricia Ann Russell 
Craig Anthony Russo 
Cathleen M. Ryan 
Donald Lawrence Ryan 
Ellen Ryan 
Kathleen Ann Ryan 
Sheila M. Ryan 
Timothy F. Ryan 
Virginia Anne Ryan 
David Marsh Ryder 
Nancy Ryder 
Patrick S. Sabbs 
Pamela J. Salshutz 
Charles D. Salzman 
Raymond V. Samora 
David Sanclcmentc 
Sonja L. Sanders 
Steven J. Sands 
Cheryl Ann Sandstrom 
Jeffrey R. Sanford 
Gary R. Sanguinetti 
Christine M. Sansoucy 
Edgardo Santiago 
Jose Joaquin Santiago 
Mary Ann Sanlini 
Francis Anthony Santoro 
Joseph C. Santucci 
Julio C. Saramago 
Marilyn Diana Sargeant 
Jacques P. Sasson 
Margaret Kathryn Sather 
Michelle L. Sauve 
Katharine M. Savage 
Susan E. Scanlon 
Deborah Scannell Mann 
Joann F. Scarfo 

Brian K. Schmitz 

Kirsten Marie Schmucki 

Martin E. Schnall 

Eva S. Schocken 

Sandra L. Schoffstall 

Paul M. Schreibcr 

Carl J. Schuiz 

John J. Schuster 

Glen S. Schwartz 

Richard J. Schwartz 

Robert C. Schwartz, Jr. 

Thomas E. Scollins 

Dana Marie Scott 

Jennifer E. Scott 

William J. Scott 

Vincent P. Sczublewski 

Fred Jonathan Sears 

James F. Sears, Jr. 

Valerie A. Sears 

Jerome T. Sebastyn 

Paul A. Seidell 

Judith A. Seifer 

Ernest F- Seneca 1 

Jeanne L. Serino 

Donna Sema 

Joseph Attthony Serpa 

Mary C. Serreze 

Lorraine S. Scvigny 

Thomas P. Sexton III 

Linda D. Seymour 

Marci F. Shaffer 

David A. Shakespeare 

Robert S. Shammas 

John Michael Shanahan 

Michael Shapiro 

Zane O. Shatzcr 

Patrick Shea 

William R. Shea, Jr. 

Eric E. Shear 

Dawn E. Shearer 

Donn-i Marie Shecrallah 

Margaret Keane Sheehan 

Michael K. Sheehan 

Joel E. Shelton 

Jonathan Leigh Sherrill 

Seth F. Sherwood 

Rashid Shidfar 

Kathleen Marie Shiels 

David W. Shilo 

Michal Shorr 

Marji J. Shuffleton 

Karen M. Shulman 

Sherry Lynn Sickler 

Suzanne Siff 

Glenn Alan Silva 

Wendi B. Silver 

Desiree M. Simanski 

Thomas F. Simeone 

Nancy M. Simmonds 

Brian D. Simon 

Suzanne Skelly 

Jonathan M. Skiest 

"Beth L. Sklar 

Alexandra Skopic 

Sheryl L. Slezinger 

Jean Slosek 

Michael Allen Smargon 

Andrew Douglas Smith 

Arthur J. Smith 

Brook Diane Smith 

Cheryl M. Smith 

Daniel J. Smith 

David Ferguson Smith 

Diane M. Smith 

Jeffrey N. Smith 

Lori Jean Smith 

Michael F. Smith 



Nathaniel B. Smith 
Patricia A. Smith 
Roger S. Smith 

Sarah M. Smith 
Martha Sue Snow 

Tod Andrew Snyder 
David H. Solin 

Andre G. Solomita 

Sandra Sorger 

Diane J. Spagnoli 

Steven L. Spector 

Eileen Ann Speight 

Diane L. Spencer 

Anna Maria Spenner 

Susan C. Spielman 

Robert Joseph Spierdowis 

Laurie M. Spinelli 

Christopher Spinney 

Gregory M. Spisak 

Stephen A. Spitzer 

Gordon Lee Spousia 

Marie P. St. Fleur 

Donna Lee Stavis 

Charies H. Steedman 

Erica Steenstra 

Randi L. Steinberg 

William Stepanishen 

Shari Beth Stephany 

Jeffrey J. Stevens 

William Lawrence Stevens 

Mary Stewart 

Donald D. Stickles 

Robert A. Stiefe! 

Douglas F. Stoll 

Kalherine M. Stone 

Amy L. Stoneback 

Deborah C. Storey 

Kenneth C. Stowell. Jr. 

Susan B. Strachan 

Judith Ann Strong 

William Joseph Stroud 

Elizabeth A. Stuart 

Joel P. Stueck 

Peter R. Stupak 

Julia E. Sturges 

Manuela G. Su 

Edward Joseph Sujewicz 

Brian E>ennis Sullivan 

Jacqueline Anne Sullivan 

James Aloysius Sullivan 

Joann Sullivan 

John R. Sullivan 

Kathleen R. Sullivan 

Michael P. Sullivan 

Patricia M. Sullivan 

Peter L. Sullivan 

Sheila M. Sullivan 

Thomas J. Sullivan 

William Butler Sullivan III 

Robert John Suprenant 

Paul Richard Sussenguth 

William K. Sutkus 

Amelia D. Sutton 

Robert K. Sweet III 

Mary M. Sweetman 

Andrew Isaac Sweibel 

Amy Louise Swift 

Rebecca S. Swift 

Brian J. Switzer 

Marek Jan Syska 

Andrea D. Szabo 

Ann N. Szlachetka 

Sandra Jean Szuluk 

Maryam Tabatabaie 

Mehrdad Tabriz! 

Linda M. Tacchi 

Farid Tajallaee 

Mahmood Tajik 

Faridokht Talebi 

Gregory J. Tawa 

Joel W. Teevcn 

William A. Tenanes 

Leslie Jean Tenney 

Deborah R. Teplow 

Barbara Terkanian 

Kammi L. Terstegge 

Grace-Marie Testa 

Julie Anne Tetreault 

Jenifer L. Thayer 

Barry John Theodore 

Thomas G. Thibeault 

Alexander Charies Thole 

Lynne A. Thoma 

Robert Paul Thomas 

Jena K. Thompson 

Patricia M. Thorp 

Michael A. Thurston 
Sandra E. Tibbetts 

David Jay Tierney 
Geoffrey Loren Tillotson 

Pamela A. Tinkham 
Volanda Tirado 
Ralph F. Titone 

Douglas M. Titus 
Gillian R. Titus 

Mary Elizabeth Tobin 
Susan Lisa Toch 
Christopher S. Todd 
Neil P. Toland 
Richard Joseph Trahan 
Stephen J. Traiger 
Lori Lynn Trask 
Carol Travis 
Wilhelmina Rene Trefry 
Jill R. Tregor 
Charles Crane Tretia 
Katherine A. Tremblay 
Michael Arthur Tribou 
Susan Leigh Triolo 
Martha L. Tripp 
Mark William Tucker 
Eve Meriam Turchinetz 
Elizabeth Wingate Turner 
Russell Turner 
Brian Temple Tuttle 
Julianne F. Tuttle 
Paul W. Twombly 
Susan E. Twomey 
Pamela J. Tyning 
Paul Edward Ugolini 
Donna A. Uhlmann 
Dorothy Chinwe Ukaegbu 
Gwen Dale Umansky 
Frederick D. Unkel III 
Richard John Allen Urkie 
Mahmood A. Usman 
Robert D. Vaillancourt 
Vicki A. Valeri 
Joanne B. Van Buren 



Richard Paul Vandalc 

Neal M. Vandam 

Mark Van Parys 

Nicholas C. Varoulsos 

Elaine C, Vasil 

Marina Ann Vazquez 

David M. Vcgliante 

Alma Jcnisse Vcicz 

Lynn A. Vcnncll 

Suzanne G. Vcrcclli 

Matthew David Verdi 

Joseph James Vcrnucci 

Janice P. Vcrrochi 

Christopher Ernest Vesperi 

Michael A. Vincent 

Alison E. Visco 

Patricia A. Vlaun 

Doris Volz 

Kari Edwin Voutila 

Karen Roberta Vuilleumier 

Clyde A. Waitc. Jr. 

Douglas N. Wall 

Maureen E. Wall 

David Eric Wallace 

Nancy Elizabeth Wallace 

Lori Ann Wallander 

Artie H. Walsh 

Joseph C. Walsh 

Laura A. Walsh 

Laurel J. Walsh 

Liza C. Walsh 

Margaret Ruth Walsh 

Maureen Walsh 

Robert Thomas Walsh 

Wendy S. Wanderman 

Virginia M. Warfleld 

Neal F. Warner 

Elizabeth Warriner 

Robin Lorraine Warshaw 

Lisa E. Wary 

Barbara A. Wasielewski 

David N. Wasserman 

Kenneth B. Wasserman 
Kathleen E. Waiters 
Doreen Judith Webb 
Stephen John Webber 
Anthony B. Weigl 
Robert S. Weinberg 
Anna Marie Weisberg 
Aviva Ruth Weiss 
Stephen Weiss 
Tad Allen Weiss 
Frank C. Weitz 
Laura Lee Weitz 
Robin L. Welch 
William Love Welch, Jr. 
Forrest A. Wellman 
Margery Lynn Wells 
Jeanne lorraine Welsh 
Richard E. Welsh 
Cynthia L. West 
David P. Westcott 
Diane Leigh Wester 
Charlotte W. Westhead 
Adrienne M. Wetmore 
David A. White 
Harolyn White 
John C. White 
Paul Francis White, Jr. 
Robert J. White 
Diane Elizabeth Whiteman 
Deborah A. Whitcrell 
Alison L. Whitlock 
Charles A. Wiener 
Robin Eileen Wigandt 
David Paul Wildman 
Michael F. Wilkins 
Laura A. Wilkinson 
James John Wilier 
Shiriey A. Wilier 
Cart D. Williams 
Lynn I. Williams 
Michael Rene Williams 
Monica L. Williams 
Harlan E. Williamson 
John Thomas Williamson 
Samuel R. Williston 
Duane Phillip Wilson 
Jon M. Winegrad 
Lynda W. Winnick 
David D. Winslow 
Gary M. Winslow 
John W. Winters, Jr. 
Alicia G. Wisepart 
Charles Richard Wolff 
Nicole Wolfsfeld 
Crispin S. Wood 
David Michael Wood 
Linda Fossati Wood 
Timothy John Wood 
Jeffrey Adam Woods 
Patricia J. Woods 
Deborah M. Woodward 
Mark Lee Worrall 
Cassandra Louise Wright 
Darren P. Wright 
David C. Wu 
John B. Wyker 
Adam Zachary Wyner 
James Martin Wynn 
Stephen J. Wysocki 
Deborah Ruth Wysong 
Su In Yang 
Gregory H. Yares 
Kimberly Yarlott 
Patrick Yee 
Christopher P. Young 
John B. Young 
Phillip E. Young, Jr. 
Scott L. Young 
Francis J. Zabierek 
Donna Robin Zacks 
Roy Alfred Zalis 
Mary M. Sullivan 

Zamorski 
Stephen Gus Zavoritis 
Mitchel B. Zemel 
John R Zicconi 
Beth Ann Freedman ZiefT 
Diane Elizabeth Ziegler 
Rebecca J. Ziegler 
Joanne Ziemba 
Miriam H. Zoll 
Laurie Michele Zucker 
Eric A. Zuckerman 
David Charles Zullo 
Gary J. Zullo 
Victor Joseph Zumbruski 
Steven Alan Zych 



SPRING CONCERT 



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268 



SENIOR DAY 1984 




270 




GRADUATION! GRADUATION! GRADUATION! GRADUATION! GRADUATION! ( 









272 



DUATION! GRADUATION! GRADUATION! GRADUATION! GRADUATION! GRA 




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273 



SPEECH! SPEECH! SPEECH! SPEECH! SPEECH! SPEECH! SPEECH! SPEECH! SPE 



To us, the class of 1984, commencement means 
much more than mere graduation from a university. It 
is, according to Webster's dictionary, the act or time 
of a beginning. It means progress, a transcendental 
step from one realm of society to another. And with 
this change comes a restructuring of our lives, and a 
whole new set of freedoms and responsibilities. 

To put our newly expanded horizons in perspective, 
we must take time out to reflect on where we have 
been, how we have gotten to where we are today, and 
how our past and present will help to determine where 
we are going. 

While we see this first job or post-graduation period 
as a monumental break with a secure and enjoyable 
past, we must also see it as a time of opportunity. This 
notion of breaking with the past must be rejected, 
because we must never stop being students. If there is 
one universal achievement of everyone graduating, it 
is our ability to educate ourselves, remain aware and 
look toward the future with the willful determination 
to establish our own course of action. 

But to understand our commencement and our fu- 
ture, we need to assess the worth and meaning of our 
college careers. These past four (or five) years have 
been perhaps the most influential and formative we 
have experienced so far. When we entered UMass, 
many people tried to make our transition into college 
easier. Everyone gave us their version of what to ex- 
pect. But they could not have prepared us for what lay 
ahead. That was something we had to experience for 
ourselves, with the help of those around us. Our first 
year was a rite of passage experienced by each of us, 
yet it was different for every one of us. Our first 
collective learning experience was probably the shock 
of being in an alien place, with thousands of others in 
the same predicament. Our second was of course the 
water shortage, when we were sent home just days 
after we came here. In that first year we learned a 





JOSH MEYER 

great deal. We learned to survive in an impersonal 
place, where no one was going to take us by the hand 
and tell us what to do. We were given as much free- 
dom and lack of supervision as we could handle, and 
then some more. Along with this freedom came added 
responsibility both to live independently and to play an 
active role in our own educations. 

We have not received a spoon-fed education; rather, 
we have learned to educate ourselves. We have learned 
how to pick from thousands of courses and come up 
with a coherent curriculum (most of the time). We've 
earned the satisfaction of succeeding in a task or chal- 
lenge we have set for ourselves. Many of us have had a 
semester where nothing seemed to go right; our 
courses were oversubscribed, or too overbearing or 
irrelevent, or we might have faced a sudden withdraw- 
al from school due to an oversight like an unpaid 
dental bill. And we've come through all the stronger 
for it. Through adversity comes the strength of charac- 
ter which typifies the UMass graduate. 

We have learned that education means to question 
conventional wisdom, not to memorize and digest 
them. We have learned that education occurs perhaps 
more outside the classroom than in it. We have tapped 
into the wealth of knowledge, culture, arts and sci- 
ences that make this a great and thriving university, 
and we have emerged from the process more inquisi- 
tive, and appreciative of things new and different. 

With graduation comes an acute awareness of the 
transient nature of college. Semester and summer 
breaks, changes of address and social settings, and new 
friends and opportunities had always been part of the 
experience, but things seemed so much more precious 
to us in our senior year. They were not taken for 
granted anymore. But the realization that we were 



H! SPEECH! SPEECH! SPEECH! SPEECH! SPEECH! SPEECH! SPEECH! SPEECH! 






soon leaving only heightened our mixed feelings of 
anticipation, anxiety, confusion and even fear. A stage 
of inner conflict and intense re-examination of our 
priorities became epidemic. We looked back on our 
time spent here, to see of it was spent wisely. 

Have we been successful in our pursuits? Did we 
achieve our goals? Did we study enough? Or too 
much? Did we take advantage of all the resources 
available to us? Did we engage in worthwhile extra- 
curricular activities, like lobbying against the rising 
cost of public higher education or fighting for a de- 
escalation of the nuclear arms build-up? And what 
about fun? Did we have enough of it? The answers to 
these and many other questions remain to be seen. 

But graduation is not just a day for retrospection. 
We look to the future, and what it holds for us. As we 
hopefully enter the work force, we will ask ourselves 
another set of questions. Will we continue to strive for 
knowledge and the enrichment that comes from exper- 
ience? Our time and committments will be more 
rigidly structured, and we won't have as much free 
time. But will we continue to educate ourselves and 
that which is around us? Granted, we will expend 
much energy on our careers, but will we also defend 
our ideals, and strike out against injustice and oppres- 
sion? Or will complacency prioritize our lives? 

George Orwell, commenting on the dual problem of 
encroaching totalitarianism, and the passivity of man 
said in 1943 that, "We underrate the danger of this 
kind of thing, because our traditions and our past 
security have given us a sentimental belief that it all 
comes out right in the end and the thing you most fear 
never really happens. " 

Well, this is not true anymore. Look what happened 
in 1980 — Ronald Reagan was elected president. Our 





past security has been threatened too many times for 
us to be complacent. Those things we fear most are 
lurking right around the corner, if they are not here 
already. The belief or the hope that good invariably 
triumph over evil breeds passivity and a false sense of 
security, and we cannot afford that. We must not 
forget that to isolate ourselves, and respond passively 
to change is to risk having our lives governed by forces 
outside our control. We cannot allow this to happen. 
We must take action ourselves if we are to determine 
our individual and collective fate. 

So what does this mean for us, the class of 1984? It 
means we must take this awareness, education and 
activism with us when we leave and apply it to all that 
we do in our lives. At this university we have acquired 
the wisdom and strength of character to enable us to 
contribute greatly to society, not just within our cho- 
sen fields, but as well-rounded citizens. The future of 
our country and the world needs us, and we 
are ready and able to meet the challenge. We 
may not change the course of history by our- 
selves, but we do have the moral responsib- 
lity to try. 

— Josh Meyer, 1984 student commence- 
ment speaker. 



275 



GRADUATION! GRADUATION! GRADUATION! GRADUATION! GRADUATION! 









GRADUATION! GRADUATION! GRADUATION! GRADUATION! GRADUATION! 







277 




FROM THE EDITOR 



278 



I hope you have enjoyed the previous 277 pages. They are our 
best attempt to document the year 1984 and your senior year. We 
feel we have done an excellent job, and hope you also feel this way. 

1984 has been an important year in many respects. It has also 
been an important year for the Index. The yearbook has changed 
in numerous ways. Most notably, it was completed on time. The 
theme we thought was more representative of the quality of stu- 
dents who attend the University. The pages were more carefully 
selected and assembled. The staff is younger, larger, more exper- 
ienced and dedicated to future yearbooks. 

The 1984 Index, in mid- April, nearly became the last Index 
produced. The Student Government Association's budgets com- 
mittee voted to no longer fund the yearbook. Through a series of 
meetings, this decision was reversed. We hope that this yearbook 
will be the first of a new generation. Instead of being the end, it is 
actually a new beginning. 

The Index serves many purposes at the University. It is a 
remembrance of your college years, your senior year and your 
University. In a single volume it covers all of the events related to 
the University which occurred this year, and is the only publica- 
tion which does so. 

With a theme of diversity, we have covered as many different 
types of students as the 280 pages would allow, through the living, 
fine arts, organizations, and sports sections. 

This task is the result of thousands of hours of hard work and 
dedication from those involved in the production of the book. I'm 
sure no harder working group of people could have been assem- 
bled for this book than the 1984 Index staff. I would like to extend 
my very special thanks to the following people: 

Cindy Orlowski, managing editor, for always being there when 
the staff needed you, for help in layout, copy editing and for 
staying with and organizing the staff after the semester's end until 
the very last page was completed. Also for aiding me with the 
major decisions regarding the book and reminding me of the 
where and when for my almost daily meeting schedule. Without 
you I may have never made most of them. Cindy, I wish you luck 
and success as editor of the 1985 Index. 

Kattie Watters, for taking over as photo editor very late into the 
year and putting in all of the extra hours needed to gather and 
print the photos for the book. Kattie, you did a great job of a 
difficult task with a smaller than normal staff necessary to do the 
work. I can't say enough for you. 

Lisa Corcoran, organizations editor, your section was a frustrat- 
ing one, with so many organizations and only 40 pages to fill. Your 
work was cut out for you! With this large responsibility of your 
own, you still found time to be a key member of the petition drive 
to save the yearbook, and to help with other sections after the 
semester's end. I know you'll be a valuable editor next year. 
Thanks for everything you've done this year. 

Jane Lipka and Laurie Brooks, senior section editors, talk about 
chaos, organizing the senior portraits for this campus is no job I 
would want, so I'm glad you did. The section was slow to start but 
came on strong in the end. You broke away from the usual panel 
plan to be creative and include more information about each 
student. Great idea, thanks. 

Ellen Richards, sports editor, you also took over a major posi- 
tion very late in the year. As with organizations, there are so many 



different sports here. You had the largest section, the load was 
heavier than one set of shoulders should have to bear, but you did 
it with great strength. I'm sure the sports section for the 1985 
Index will be easier now that you have this year's experience. 

Kim Black, layout editor, the office would have never been as 
organized with out you, especially my desk. Your work in every 
department was a great help to all the section editors, especially 
sports, which you carried alone until Ellen began. As with Ellen 
and Lisa, you were a very big help in the petition drive to save the 
yearbook. That was a hard month for all of us, but even then your 
spirits were never down. You were dedicated from the very begin- 
ning, to the very end of the book. I thank you very much for your 
effort and I wish you luck and success as managing editor for the 
1985 Index. 

Bonnie Ballato, business manager, you were accurate, concise, 
dedicated and everything an editor would want his business man- 
ager to be. For us, it was unfortunate that you had to leave second 
semester for IBM. Thanks for getting things going in the business 
end of the book. 

Don Lendry, Jostens Representative, the best rep. any yearbook 
staff could ever hope for. One would think it was your first day 
everytime you walked into the office, but your 20 years experience 
was always evident in your ideas and suggestions. You were always 
here anytime we needed you, and we all appreciated your commit- 
ment to the Index greatly. You've been both a staff member and a 
friend to us all. Thanks for everything. 

Dario Politella, Index Advisor, your assistance was very valu- 
able to us this year, and I'm sure the 1985 Index staff will be 
calling on you often as a chair of their new advisory board. Thanks 
for all your help this year. I'm glad you were there when I needed 
you. 

To the rest of the 1984 Index staff, especially Don Cassidy, 
Neal O'Shea, Nora Migliaccio, Margaret George, Gayle Sher- 
man, Pete Maloney and Jeff Smith; you were all a vital part of the 
production of this yearbook and I thank you for all you've done 
this year. 

Throughout this year there has been so many more people who 
have helped in one way or another with this book. I could not 
mention them all because their names alone would fill many pages. 
As editor, I thank you all for your help. This yearbook is a better 
book because of you all. 

In closing, I can only say that it feels great to have completed 
this book this year. I am very proud to be a 1984 Graduate of the 
University of Massachusetts and very happy to have this yearbook 
to remind me of the wonderful time I spent here. I hope you, my 
fellow graduates, also share this pride and happiness. See you all 
at the 25th reunion. 
Sincerely, 



SPECIAL THANKS 

Les Bridges 
John Mooradian 
Tim Malone 
Randy Donant 
Bill Wall 
Dan Orlowski 
Marie Perry 
Blanche, Betty, Janet 
Bob Jenal 
Delma Studios 
Ann Paglee 
Collegian Staff 
WMUA 
Spectrum 




Kevin Fachetti 

1984 Index Editor in Chief 



.279 



1984 INDEX STAFF 



Editor In Chief 
Managing Editor 
Photo Editor 
Assistant Photo Editor 
Business Managers 



Assistant Business Manager 
Copy Editor 
Layout Editor 
Arts Editor 
News Editors 

Living Editor 
Assistant Living Editor 
Organizations Editor 
Assistant Organizations Editor 
Sports Editor 
Senior Editors 



COPY WRITERS 

Charles Francis Carroll 
Gerry deSimas 
Scott Hood 
Bradley Jacobs 
Tom Kellner 
Dave Linton 
Anne McCrory 
Brian Murphy 
M.E. Murray 
Bill Wall 
Jeff Young 
Karen Zucker 



Kevin J. Fachetti 
Cindy Orlowski 
Kattie Watters 
Michele Killian 
Bonnie Ballato 
Peter Maloney 
Jeff Smith 
Stacy Schott 
Margaret George 
Kim Black 
Nora Migliaccio 
Don Cassidy 
Neal O'Shea 
Gayle Sherman 
Nancy Stickler 
Lisa Corcoran 
Lucy Berger 
Ellen Richard 
Laurie Brooks 
Jane Lipka 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 

Paul Desmarais 
Mitch Drantch 
Dave Deuber 
Brian Goyne 
Chris Hardin 
Andy Heller 
Pam Madnick 
Drew Ogier 
Jim Powers 



280 



u 



1