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Full text of "Index"

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Student Life 



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Academics 



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Athletics 



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144 



Organizations 



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192 


208 


256 


274 


Being There 


Seniors 


Et Cetera 


Advertisements 


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Getting up at 4:00AM to go out in a 12 foot boat on the 
Connecticut River in 40 weather with no sun is not my 
favorite assignment, but I was told to go shoot the crew 
team. When I returned complaining of frozen hands and a 
cold, everybody said but, Jeff, you had to be there.' 




Photo by Jeff Holland 



niversity Of IVlassachusetts 



Amherst, MA 01003 

Index 1990 



Volume 121 



Allison Kay (right), senior En- 
glish major, takes a break from 
discussing relationships with 
two new-found friends. The 
couches on the Campus Center 
concourse were a popular place 
to hang out between classes or 
relax after a long day. 




Photo by Norman Benrimo 




Photo by Norman benrimo 
Monique Pinsomealt, Matt Malloy, 
Mary Bourret and Randy Krutzler take 
a moment from work to celebrate Ar- 
thur Monterio's (second from right) 
birthday on the 10th floor of the Cam- 
pus Center. Arthur turned 33 years old 
that day. 




Photo by Norman Benrimo 
Bob Surabian, sophomore Zoology ma- 
jor, looks up from his book to see a 
friend. Bob enjoyed going to the Hatch 
after classes because he could study 
and be sociable at the same time. 



2/ Introduction 




It's Not 

All 
Work 

There were many ways of 
spending an evening in the Val- 
ley in 1990, from Comedy 
Night at the Hatch to Judy Ten- 
uta at the FAC, from The Little 
Mermaid to Drugstore Cowboy 
and from the New World The- 
ater's Unfinished Women Cry 
in /Vo Man 's Land While a Bird 
Dies in a Gilded Cage to Free 
Street Theater's Project. 

CIPC sponsored concerts 
throughout the year, including 
The Waterboys, Arlo Guthrie 
and Ziggy Marley. 

But, even if it was only hang- 
ing out at the Bluewall or the 
Pub, GMass students made re- 
laxation and friends an impor- 
tant part of their lives. 



Many students were greeted by Beth 
Martin's warm smile when they went to 
the Hatch bar. Beth, senior Sociology 
major, tended bar there for three years. 



Photo by Norman Benrimo 




Photo by Mason Rivlin 



The brothers and sisters of Delta (Jpsi- 
Ion and Delta Zeta, respectively, ride 
down University Drive on their Home- 
coming float. Homecoming was a time 



when fraternities and sororities could 
unite to show their pride in the Univer- 
sity and its traditions. 




Had To Be 
There To 
Understand 
That The 
Special 
Friendships 
And The 
Memories Of 
Good Times 
Would Last 
Forever 



n 



Introduction/ 3 



(l-r) Paul Buckley, Steve Webb and 
Eric Koffi, students in the College of 
Engineering, research information on 
the characterizations of porous solids, 
polymers and catalysts in Qoessman's 



Characterization Lab. The engineerin< 
facilities available at the University a 
lowed students to gain firsthand exper 
ence on what to expect in the "rea 
world." 



A professor of the Italian department 
passes handouts to his students. The 
sunny and pleasant first floor class- 
rooms of Herter created a positive at- 
mosphere for learning. 



\ Photo by Mason Rlvlin 

Linda Wetzel, professor of philosophy, 
stays after class to help Stuart Rein- 
hard, continuing education, with the 
fundamentals of logic. Professors lilte 
Wetzel helped make students feel that 
they were not just a number when in 
lectures. 




Photo by Norman Benrltno 



4/Introduction 





Had To Be 
There To Feel 
The Effects 
The Budget 
Cuts Had On 
Students' 
Academic Life 



Photo by ISorman Benrimo 



Cuts Hurt Morale 



Oversubscribed classed both 
fall and spring semesters led to 
longer than usual add/drop 
lines. The competition forced 
students to fight for their class- 
es and caused arguments with 
professors who didn't have 
room for additional people as 
well as disputes between stu- 
dents vying for a place in a 
course. 

However, after the first two 
weeks, most people had settled 
into their four or five classes, 
though they weren't necessar- 
ily the ones they needed or 
wanted to take. 

The budget cuts were not 
forgotten when the strike end- 



ed. Evidence of their affect on 
academia was constant. Entire 
departments, such as Food En- 
gineering, were eliminated, but 
there were also more subtle 
changes, like some depart- 
ments discontinuing teacher 
evaluations, that reminded stu- 
dents of the University's chang- 
ing priorities. 

However, despite low mo- 
rale, the University still offered 
a rigorous academic environ- 
ment. Lecturers from all over 
the country visited GMass and 
spoke on topics ranging from 
El Salvador to toxic waste to 
job strategies for people of col- 
or to sexism in the media, t^ 




Photo by Morman Benrimo 

Rita Botelho, sophomore fashion market- 
ing major, studies Chemistry 102. Some 
students found they could study success- 
fully in the Hatch while the regular crowd 
went someplace else for dinner. 

Many students need the seclusion of the 
cubicle-like desks in the Tower Library to 
get work done. This student realized that, 
even on the upper floors, no one was safe 
from distractions. 



Introduction/5 




Photo by Lisa Nalewak 



6/introduction 



"It's a bridge between remembering 
and recognizing our past," said Britt 
Alscliuler, committee member for Civil- 
ity Week 1990 about Hands Around 
UMass. Althougli the turnout was not 
as large as ttie previous year, a full 
circle was made around thie Campus 
Pond. 

These students could be seen minutes 
before, hand in hand running through 
the Campus Center, encouraging stu- 
dents to join their "Hands Around 
(JMass." This event ended Civility 
Week 1990. 






Photo by Paul Agnew 



Students Unite 



While countries tiiroughout 
Eastern Europe were undergo- 
ing dramatic political reforms, 
students here were trying to ef- 
fect changes as well. 

On Oct. 18, 15,000 students 
from across Massachusetts ral- 
lied in Boston to protest budget 
cuts. 

Finding that their concerns 
were being ignored by state leg- 
islators, students began a week- 
long boycott of classes. Strik- 
ers picketed buildings and 
marched around the campus 
and the town of Amherst after 
noontime rallies. 

In April, a Collegian reporter 



exposed the University's viola- 
tion of its own 1977 policy to 
avoid doing business with com- 
panies linked to South Africa. 
The following day. Chancellor 
Joseph Duffy announced that 
the policy would be upheld and 
the stocks sold immediately. 

On May 2, students rallied on 
the Student Union steps to sup- 
port the lesbian, gay, bisexual 
community after repeated ha- 
rassment, including an incident 
involving a group of men dis- 
rupting a class with the intent 
of intimidating the professor 
and his students, irt 




Had To Be 
There To Feel 
The Power Of 
The Students 
Joining 
Together To 
Create Change 




Photo by Russell Kirshy 




Students rally for lesbian, gay and bi- 
sexual rights outside the Student 
Union. The rally was coordinated by 
students and administration in re- 
sponse to homophobic incidents on 
campus. 

A student reads a Collegian in the Cam- 
pus Center Basement. Not only did the 
Collegian inform students of current 
events, it gave them their daily dose of 
Calvin and Hobbes, as well. 



Introduction/7 



Minute 

Men 
Endure 



UMass athletics had some 
notable success during the 
1989-90 school year. The Men's 
Basketball team was so suc- 
cessful that a "Rage in the 
Cage" began a season-long ma- 
nia. Students stood in line for 
hours for each home game and 
even travelled to support the 
team. 

Men's Swimming took the 
New England Championships 
for the fourth year in a row, 
proving their talent and deter- 
mination once again. 

Freshman gymnast Tammy 
Marshall created quite a sensa- 
tion when she finished first all 
round at the Atlantic 10, while 
Cal Booker represented the 
men's gymnastic team at the 
NCAA Championships. 

The Women's Lacrosse team 
and both Men's and Women's 
Tennis had their last season 
this year. The teams were elimi- 
nated as a result of the budget 
cuts. 

The Men's Lacrosse team 
suffered a loss of a different 
kind when Coach Dick Garber 
retired at the end of the season. 
He was awarded an Honorary 
Doctor of Laws degree at the 
1990 Commencement 

ceremony. 




Photo by Jeff Holland 
CJMass forward Harper Williams pulls 
up for a two point shot against Temple 
while fans cheer and "rage in the 
cage." Some students in the crowd 
painted their faces with school colors 
to show their support for our team. 



8/ Introduction 





Had To Be 
There To Feel 
The Suspense 
Of the Game 
And The 
Emotion Of 
The Outcome 



The Minutemen are poised to begin 
a play. Attending the GMass foot- 
ball games was a popular weekend 
activity in 1990. 



Photo by Clayton Jones 



Introduction/9 




Photo by Paul Agnew 



Organizations Help 



All across campus, Regis- 
tered Student Organizations 
provided services and opportu- 
nities for the University com- 
munity that otherwise would 
not have existed. 

The Collegian, for example, 
was made up of 250 staff mem- 
bers, who worked constantly to 
keep students informed of cam- 
pus issues and to provide a fo- 
rum for discussion of those 



The industrious students of 
another RSO, the Five College 
Credit Onion, afforded their 
peers the opportunity to bank 
on campus. 

In some RSO's, members 
banded together as advocates 
for their rights as a group. Abili- 
ties CJnlimiied succeeded in ob- 
taining accessible seating for 
those in wheelchairs during 
basketball games in the Curry 
Hicks Cage, jyi 




Photo by Norm Benrimo 



10/ Introduction 



UMass Marching Band saxophone section 
performs during the Homecoming half- 
time show. ClMass students cheered with 
pride when the band made its entrance. 



John Triana, A! Zadic and Scott Lever (Ir) 
confer in the outer office of WMtJA. The 
student-run radio station played music 
ranging from rap to hard-core to polka. 




Had To Be 
There To Feel 
The Spirit 
Generated By 
A Group Of 
Students 
Working For 
A Single 
Cause 




Ed Baring-Gould, a Grew Club member, 
sells a chance for two Rolling Stones con- 
cert tickets. The club sponsored the raffle 
in order to raise money for the sport. 



Collegian clerk Kristin Spangler proof- 
reads the Classifieds. The Collegian provid- 
ed Kristin with an op|x>rtunity to gain 
working experience. 



Photo by Morman Benrimo 



Photo by Norman Benrimo 
Precious Hill, a theater major, sits at the 
Baha'i Club table in the Campus Center. 
The club provided pamphlets on racism as 
wfetl.as information about the faith. 



Introduction/ 11 



Amherst Is Unique 



Lynley Rappaport, a junior Women's Stud- 
ies major, bikes home from class. Rappa- 
port found that cycling to school helped 
her to both relieved stress and keep in 
shape. 

Photo by Morman Benrimo 



Although the numbers of stu- 
dents traipsing through Am- 
herst during most of the year 
made it difficult for a OMass 
student to notice, the town's 
permanent residents managed 
to keep their unique culture in- 
tact in spite of the noisy 
interruptions. 

Amherst is a town unlike any 
other. Though the number of 



bookstores, colleges and pro- 
fessors in the Valley give it an 
intellectual reputation, the nat- 
ural environment is also an im- 
portant part of Amherst life. 
Whether they farm acres of 
corn or don a helmet for a plea- 
surable bike ride, Amherst resi- 
dents enjoy the openness of the 
landscape and the communal 
spirit of nature. Q 



12/ Introduction 




A child has her face painted at the Am- 
herst Children's Fair. Amherst's fairs, as 
well as its annual Teddy Bear Rally, gave it 
a flair of individuality. 




Had To Be 
There To 
Understand 
The Traditions 
Of The 
Permanent 
Amherst 
Residents 




Photo by Paul Agnew 




Photo bv Paul Agnew 
A PVTA bus stops to pick up pas- 
sengers on North Pleasant Street. 
Many depended on these buses in 
the rain, snow, sleet and shine. 

A patch of pumpkins on the lawn in 
front of the Theta Chi house waits 
to be sold. The fraternity's annual 
pumpkin sale was a sure sign of the 
arrival of autumn. 



Photo by Eric Paul Engel 



Introduction/ 13 



Friends 
Forever 

When fall semester began, 
graduation seemed a long way 
off. Finally, just about every se- 
nior had turned 21, and friends 
could frequent the popular 
night-spots without leaving 
anyone behind. 

But, when spring semester 
arrived, seniors had to start 
planning for life in the "real 
world" by looking for a "real" 
job. 

Suddenly, some graduating 
students were realizing that 
they would no longer be a part 
of ClMass. They would not be 
able to watch the newborn 
ducklings grow into adults. The 
excitement of the Spring Con- 
certs would go on without 
them. And, for the first time, 
many would not be returning to 
school in the fall. 

Yet, the friendships that peo- 
ple made had a special close- 
ness. The bonds created by 
sharing the college experience 
would link friends for a long 
time to come. Q 



Ellen Grossman, Meredith Maust and 
Shoan Razvi (1-r) break from studying to 
share a joke. The Blue Wall's chocolate 
chunk cookies got rave reviews. 



Jennifer Stone and Scott Clark rest be- 
fore studying in Wheeler Hall. Students 
often had to take time out to recover 
from everyday academic pressure. 



14/lntroduction 





Introducti9n/15 



A group of students rally at the State- 
house to protest budget cuts. The cuts 
in education resulted in increasing re- 
purcussions at the University. 

Freshman French major Tracy Han and 
freshman Zoology major Alice Park 
toss a volleyball around in fun in the 
elevator shaft on the sixth floor of 
Grayson. For many CIMass students 
the first place friends were made was in 
the relaxed atmosphere of the Universi- 
ty's forty-one residence halls. 







Photo by David Sawan 
Senior history major David Sells looks 
through a cookbook for something dif- 
ferent to make for dinner. Many stu- 
dents who prepared their own meals 
soon found that daily pasta and pizza 
became very monotonous. 




CUT HACKS 

NOT eNR0LLH£Nr5 
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16/ Student Life 



student Life 






^ 



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Student Life 

Every student soon discovers that life at 
tiie University of Massachusetts 
encompasses more than a course 
schedule and a gray and maroon sweatshirt. 
Around every corner, something is waiting 
to be discovered that makes life interesting 
and more fun, coloring the OMass experience 
with bright hues. 

Whether it involves aerobics or lobbying 
against budget cuts, diversity is always a key 
element, creating an exciting and unique year.Q 






Photo by John Woo 



Student Life/ 17 




Rush Increases Because 

Greek Image Clears 



While the percentage of students en- 
rolled in the University's Greek Sys- 
tem remains at a low of seven per- 
cent, the number of students rushing ap- 
pears to be on the rise. During rush, Sigma 
Kappa, for example, raised their ceiling 
(the maximum number of students a house 
can have) from 60 to^ 75 because of an 
increase in pledges. 

There seem to be many factors associat- 
ed with this rise in interest. For one thing, 
Greeks in general are becoming more visi- 
ble. This year, for example, the Greek Area 
government, consisting of Interfraternity 
Council, UMass Pan-Hellenic Council and 
Panhellenic Council, received office space 
in the Student Clnion. 

Karen Renard from Sigma Kappa 
claimed that people in the Senate who 
rushed brought friends with them. "People 
come into the office and think, 'Oh, they're 
(the Greeks) not that bad after ail,'" said 
Renard. 

In recent months, the Greeks have also 
received their share of positive press. The 
Collegian featured several articles on the 



Sorority members wait for the Greek Awards to begin 
in the Campus Center. The event honored fraternities 
and sororities for philanthropies and improvements 
over the past year. 

Sisters of Sigma Kappa entertain the Greek crowd at 
Pearl Street in Northampton. The Greek Sing gave 
fraternities and sororities an opportunity to playfully 
rag on each other. 



Greek Area, and an article on the Greek 
Area also appeared on the front page of the 
Amherst section in a local newspaper. 

"Sororities are becoming more popular 
at CIMass because people are finding that 
they bring CJMass down to size," said Pan- 
hellenic Council member Jeanne Bolduc. 
Bolduc also felt that sorority stereotypes 
were being dispelled. "You don't have to be 
a blonde to join. It's a place away from 
home that you can call home. 1 have a 
support network of 80 women behind and 
beside me at any time. Women are starting 
to see that this is a benefit in college," said 
Bolduc. 

Locally, the CIMass Greek System had a 
negative image for several years. That 
started to change, however, with the revok- 
ing of charters from Beta Kappa Phi, Alpha 
Tau Gamma and Theta Chi fraternities. 

"There were a string of bad events in the 
Greek Area," said Bolduc. "It seemed that 
everything was going poorly and the good 
things were overshadowed. Now we're 
shining through." Q 

by Mary Sbuttoni 




18/ Greeks 




office provided for the Greek councils in the Student 
Gnion. Members of the Panhellenic Council felt that 
the visibility of the office helped increase the number 
of rush participants that year. 



Photo by David Sawan 



Greeks/ 19 




Julie Parmenter of Chi Omega and Veronica Wolf don 
their evening gowns for the Greek Area Awards Ban- 
quet. The banquet completed Greek Week. 

Amer Syed of Pi Kappa Alpha is awarded the Greek 
Man of the Year award. Syed was also presented the 
Brad Ringquist award. 




Photo by Melissa Reder 
A brother of Delta CJpsilon accepts the Outstanding 
Philanthropy award for his chapter. Delta (Jpsilon 
also received an award for most improved fraternity. 

A sister of lota Gamma Opsilon accepts the Most 
Improved Sorority award. The sorority was also 
awarded with the best chapter president. 




I 



Photo by Melissa Reder 



20/Greeks 







; Greeks 



\ 





Melissa Reder 



The Numerous Activities Kept The Greeks Busy 



Greek Week '90 consisted of numer- 
ous events which united the Greek 
Area. Greek Games kicked the week 
off on Saturday, April 28 on the Southwest 
fields, followed by mud football on Sun- 
day. 

The Greeks encouraged academics and 
honored area members with a 3.0 GPA or 
better at the Scholarship Dessert featuring 
Professor Albey Reiner. Samantha Boyd 
noted, "I think it's great that the Greek 
Area is being encouraged to do well aca- 
demically." 

The annual sorority social was well at- 
tended at Alpha Chi Omega; many gath- 
ered to chat with old and new friends. Sig- 



ma Delta Tau sister Tiffany Sargeant 
remarked, "There were many women I 
hadn't seen since rush; I enjoyed seeing 
them again." 

The always wild Greek Sing at Pearl 
Street lived up to its reputation. Sigma 
Kappa Rachel Klein attended, "Its a lot of 
fun to hear the songs written by the other 
houses, they are usually hilarious!" 

The Greek Area Awards Banquet culmi- 
nated the week, an event which honored 
fraternities and sororities for philanthro- 
pies and improvements over the past year. 
Delta (Jpsilon received most improved fra- 
ternity, best philanthropy, and best frater- 
nity chapter president, lota Gamma (Jpsi- 



lon collected two awards; most improved 
sorority and best chapter president. Amer 
Syed, Pi Kappa Alpha, was honored with 
Greek Man of the Year award, as well as 
the Brad Ringquist Memorial Award. Karen 
Renaud, Sigma Kappa, also received the 
Ringquist award; Melissa Silverstein, Delta 
Zeta, was named Greek Woman of the 
Year. Sigma Kappa, Alpha Chi Omega, Al- 
pha Epsilon Pi and Pi Kappa Alpha were all 
chosen as recipients of the Silver Chapter 
Award. |tT| 

by Elizabeth Lord 



Greeks/21 




Through Hard Work Panhellenic Council 

Outdoes Itself 



Sorority life is a wonderful addition 
to the (JMass experience," said Ka- 
ren Renaud, Panhellenic President. 
"There is a bond that connects you with 
each and every sister of your sorority and 
it is a bond that you will- share for life." 

Many sororities were founded with the 
intentions of fostering participation in phil- 
anthropic activities among their members. 
The Panhellenic Council has a strong com- 
mitment to maintaining this ideal. In the 
past year, the eight GMass sororities 
helped build a playground in Holyoke, 
worked at various community blood drives 
and organized funding campaigns to bene- 
fit local shelters and service organizations. 
Sorority women also participated in Mass 
Transformation, planting the 125,000 daf- 
fodil bulbs that have blossomed all over 
campus. 

In the past year, the Greek Area contrib- 
uted over 5,000 hours of service to various 
organizations, and raised approximately 
$150,000 for local and national causes. 
"Greeks are always more than willing to 



help those in need. We are committed to 
helping society and giving to those who are 
less fortunate than ourselves," said Sandy 
Woo, Panhellenic Vice President for Philan- 
thropy and Fundraising. 

In addition, the Council encourages 
members to achieve scholastically. 

"Scholarship is at the top of the sorority 
agenda," said Renaud. "We have a strong 
academic standing in relation to the Uni- 
versity averages, and we are committed to 
improving our academic position." 

The overall grade point average for the 
University in the Fall of 1989 was 2.75. 
The all-sorority average was 2.84. The 
Council reinforces the importance of scho- 
lastic achievements through recognition 
programs, such as the Annual Scholarship 
Dessert, which honors members with a 3.0 
GPA or higher, and the Order of Omega 
National Honor Society, a leadership frater- 
nity dedicated to scholastic achievement 
and Greek Area involvement. 

The Panhellenic Council also represents 
the sorority area in several governmental 



positions on campus, appointing members 
to the Student Government Association, 
student supreme judiciary board, and other 
various committees. 

"Surely we can afford to be deliberate 
about introducing young members to the 
major challenges of adult life, but there 
would be no advantage in this unless the 
time thus gained were actually filled with 
experiences that develop the personality. 
Through membership in a sorority, we can 
achieve this," Renaud said. 

The Panhellenic Council sponsors many 
worthwhile programs to sorority members 
and the campus. By sponsoring such pro- 
grams as the Mademoiselle Fashion Show, 
Greek Week, leadership workshops and 
speakers, sorority socials and fraternity ex- 
changes, the Council encourages interac- 
tion between members. 

Said Renaud, "It is only through unity 
that we can achieve our mission of positive 
college and sorority life experiences. jol 

by Jeanne Bolduc 



22/Greeks 



Members of the Panhellenic Council sit on the steps 
of lota Gamma Opsilon. With the help and commit- 
ment of the council, sororities volunteered 5,000 
hours of service to various organizations. 




Photo by Jeff Holland 



Members of the Panhellenic Council turn the Sigma Sigma Sigma living 
room into a "Feel Good" clinic. The clinic travelled to all of the 
sororities spreading the message that people should feel good about 
their bodies and minds. 



Greeks/23 




Sophomore Geology major Eric Carter and freshman 
Andreas Pittinger, English major, enjoy a game of 
hacky sack in front of Brett Residence Hall. Having 
many things in common was important to their rela- 
tionship as roommates. 



North Pleasant Street Social Club housemates, Bob 
Holt, junior HRTA major and freshman Chris Carr 
repair a basketball net before a game of oneonone. 
They found that cooperation was key when it came to 
living together. 



Photp by Melissa Reder 



24 / Roommates 



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Elissa, next door, is screaming at her 
roommate, Wendy. 
- "UQok, I'm not the one who stole 
the stupid sign!" she yells. "I'm not going 
to get in trouble! It's your fault!" 

It seems that Wendy took a liking to one 
~~of- the RA's hall signs, so she took it down 
._and put it up over her desk. The very next 
day, she "got bagged" by the RA who saw 
it when she stopped by to chat. Since the 
RA doesn't know which resident actually 
took the sign, both will be held account- 
able. The RA is giving them a chance to 
remedy the situation on their own to avoid 
taking any formal action. The heated argu- 
ment next door is their attempt at figuring 
out what to do about the situation. 
And so the fight continues. ^~~~_^ 
Ah yes, roommates. Since most stu- 
^^nts have lived on campus at some point 
in time, and since affordable housing for 
■ one person off campus is practically non- 
existent, the experience of living with other 
people is not an unfamiliar one. And many 
have come to realize that the fine art of 
occupying the same space requires pa- 
tience to learn how to overlook those little 
things that grated on each others' nerves. 
"My roommate Jeff and I have been to- 
gether for about two years now, and he's a 




swell guy," says Ben Dash, junior philoso- 
phy major. But he rubs his feet constantly 
when he sleepsrk-^ounds like sandpaper, 
and it drives hife crazy." ^■- .^__^ 

Several freshman begatt>dh©if- first se- 
mester of college with an already estab- 
lished roommate, usually a friend from 
home, while others chose to use the lottery 
system and hoped that fate would be on 
their side. The large majority weren't too 
disappointed, and got the chance to estab- 
lish lasting friendships. 

Freshman Maria Diaz wasn't expecting 
to have a roommate. "I had a single last 
semester, and when I found out I was going 
to get a roommate, I was really upset. But 
then I met her, and we got along great. 
We're very much alike. It's like we've 
known each other forever ..T~arid hopeful- 
ly we always will." 

~—-Qf, course, because of all the stress that 
accompanies college life, a living arrange- 
ment can never be perfect. For this reason, 
roommate contracts, agreements between 
roommates stating that they will respect 
each other, their property and their life- 
style, were passed out to all on-campus 
students. 

Jill Christian, a junior majoring in paint- 
ing and comparative literature, feels that a 



roommate contract is a good idea for those 
students living on campus. "The room- 
mate contract insures that people get 
along and understand each others' likes 
and dislikes. Especially for freshmen who 
may not have ever been in this type of 
living situation before." 

Across campus, roommate contracts 
have resulted in varying results. Brad Irish, 
residence director of the Crabtree, Hamlin, 
Knowlton cluster in Northeast says the 
roommate contracts in this area have been 
met with "mixed reviews. It all depends on 
how persuasive the RAs are. If the RAs 
aren't too excited about it, the residents 
pick that up, and the return rate is not 
good." 

For some, however, the roommate con- 
tract served its purpose. Elissa and Wen- 
dy, for example, filled one out shortly after 
their argument over the sign (they ended 
up just putting it back in the hall). Before 
either of them signed it, they both made 
sure that a clause was included that stated 
that neither of them would steal hall signs. 
They can now put that episode behind 
them and hopefully move on to bigger and 
better conquests, frji 

'—* -by Kristin Bruno 



Roommates / 25 



XTpperclass i 
Iitvlng I 






The Importance Of Living is 

"Where Do You Live?" 



There are many housing options both on 
and off-campus for upperclassmen, and 
"Where do you live?" is an often heard 
question. 

Katie Rodden found that the expense of 
an apartment is about the same as that of a 
dorm room. "If you omit the rent paid in 
the summer months, then it breaks about 
even," she said. 

Cooking and doing laundry did not pose 
any problems for Katie, "1 find cooking 
much easier. I only ate half of my meals at 
the dining commons and. ended up wasting 
tons of money. As far as laundry goes, 1 
have easy access to machines that are 
very cheap." 

Living in a tenement apartment is anoth- 
er choice for those who are not tempted by 
huge apartment complexes. Melissa Mano- 
lis lives with six others in a second floor 
apartment. 

The only difficulty she noticed was keep- 
ing in touch with old friends. "It is harder 
to see people. We have to arrange bus 
schedules and make a greater effort. It is 

Senior History major David Sells eats a pasta dinner 
at his Amherst apartment. Living behind Albion 
books was a very convenient location, as buses were 
efficient and frequent. 



also more difficult meeting people, but 1 
would not trade it." 

Pre-med major Beth Callamore lives in 
Holyoke with her family. Even though she 
is 25 minutes from campus, Beth remarks, 
"1 do not feel as though 1 am missing out 
on anything. 1 have met a lot of friends in 
my major. We stick together and we all 
study after classes. 1 can control my life 
more and there isn't as much social 
pressure." 

Similar to living with a family is living at 
a sorority house. Senior Paula Scanlon 
loves living close to campus. "1 can not 
think of any drawbacks," she stated. "I 
love living with twenty-seven other wom- 
en; there is always someone willing to go 
out. I have all of my meals prepared for me 
by a cook and kitchen assistants are there 
to set up and clean up. We have a house- 
mother that handles any repairs or prob- 
lems. It is definitely a family atmosphere, 
the house is very close knit. And the ex- 
pense is comparable to the dorms. I'm go- 
ing to miss it when I graduate!" 



Peter Kravetz, a Management major, has 
lived in Webster in Orchard Hill for eight 
semesters. Peter commented on his 
choice: "I just grew to like it. I figure I will 
be spending most of my life in an apart- 
ment, so why start now? I did think about 
moving off, but I was lazy about it. I do not 
feel cramped in my dorm room, after all, it 
is the size of my room at home. When it 
comes to food, I think people expect too 
much from the Dining Commons. For what 
they have to produce, they do a good job-it 
is edible. My dorm used to be quite loud 
the first two years, but now it is very quiet. 
I do not feel too old living here since there 
are never any loud underclassmen running 
around." 

Also living in the dorms, but as a Resi- 
dent Assistant in Southwest, is senior Paul 
McCadden. He disagrees with Peter, "I am 
finding it hard living in the dorms, I am 
beginning to feel like a babysitter. But, if I 
could do it again, I would do the same!" 
Q -by Elizabeth Lord 




Photo by David Sawan 



26/Gpperclass Living 



Senior English major Bob Bobala take a break from 
the endofthe-semester crunch of homework in his 
room in Wheeler. The combination of the central loca- 
tion and a single room made living on campus a 
satisfying choice of housing. 

Robin Mathans, senior microbiology major, relaxes in 
his room in Baker, on the second floor. The job as a 
resident assistant was beneficial since it provided free 
housing on campus for all emploved. 




Photo by Beth Lord 



The sisters of Sigma Kappa are interrupted in their 
living room. Living in the sorority house was enjoy- 
able due to its homey atmosphere and the camarade- 
rie of other women. 

Senior Ellen Roos exhibits the fatal bottle that caused 
the dishwasher to overflow in her apartment at Amity 
Place. Living off campus meant that students would 
have to deal with all elements of housework. 



Photo by Lisa Nalewak 



Gpperclass Living/27 



4^^<: ^^, •'..^■*^''*W-'''"%,^-^-J, 



Jobs 



< 






Many Students Discover That Education Is 

Working 
For A Living 



For some GMass students education is 
a job in itself. For others, education is 
supplemented by a paying job. 

Julie Livingstone, a Journalism major, is 
in a common situation: she is financing her 
undergraduate years herself. Her jobs in 
the infamous 'DC as a dishwasher and at 
the Collegian as co-associate news editor 
comprise a majority of her time. Her Colle- 
gian position is especially time consuming 
because she puts in extra hours aside from 
the required four. 

Julie comments, "It is giving me valu- 
able on-the-job experience that could not 
be gained through textbooks. 1 am con- 
stantly put in critical situations and 1 am 
improving my writing skills in the 
process." 

A marketing major, Liz Flynn '90, enjoys 
her job working at the information booth in 
the campus center. 

Liz has found, "It is a great way to meet 
people and I can also get some homework 
done while I am there. The only thing that 1 
dislike are the unnecessary questions peo- 
ple ask; they do not always think before 
asking." 

Junior Julie Beer holds three jobs while 
carrying eighteen credits. She works at Mt. 
Snow as a ski instructor during ski season, 
usually Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. 

Julie notes, "It is a great job. 1 teach for 
seven hours and ski with my friends for 
two." 

Julie also makes pizzas at LaCuchina six 
hours a week, between classes. They have 
counted her on their staff for three 
semesters. 

In addition to these two jobs is her full 
time position as a Resident Assistant. She 
loves this job. "1 consider myself a re- 
source to my floor if they ever need help." 

Since fee increases have made the price 
of education steeper, Julie must keep ail 



three jobs to stay in school. 

"My parents pay for my tuition, but I 
must finance room, board, books, car pay- 
ments, and spending money. My RA job 
takes care of rent and I cook rny own food. 
1 definitely would not be holding three jobs 
if tuition were not so high, 1 just want to 
make things easier on my parents." 

Another point of view is held by second 
semester senior Terri Lee Carabillo. She 
works about fifteen hours a week in the 
Greek Affairs office answering phones, typ- 
ing memos, and handling other office 
business. 

Terri Lee remarks, "I need the money for 
Spring break in Jamaica and 1 want to do 
something with myself, as 1 only have two 
classes." 

LaCuchina workers, Jill Hatch and Eloy 
Shepherd, have different situations regard- 
ing work. Eloy works full time in addition 
to taking three courses. 

Eloy said, "It does interfere with my so- 
cial life, but 1 must work since I am paying 
for my own education." 

Jill works the same day every week, so 
it is easy to schedule studying and classes 
around it. "The worst thing about my job is 
the pizza doug underneath my fingernails!" 

Many students opt to keep their job and 
commute on weekends. Michele Skovera 
is a waitress in Williamstown, a northwest- 
ern town on the Mohawk trail. During au- 
tumn, the area attracts leaf-peekers and 
she works every weekend. Otherwise, she 
waitresses one weekend a month. During 
the busy season she finds the long drive 
tiring, "1 am busy all weekend, visiting 
friends, family and working. 1 dislike leav- 
ing college friends and 1 miss all the par- 
ties. 1 do get burnt out, but it only lasts for 
a short period of time." 

- by Elizabeth Lord 




Photo by Beth Lord 
Sophomore finance major Jill Hatch prepares one of 
the many pizzas that she makes each weel< in LaCu- 
cina. Although taking on a job meant less time for 
socializing and studying, a set schedule every week 
made effective time management more feasible. 

Junior RA Julie Beer hangs up one of the many 
educational program signs during International Wom- 
en's Week. Being an RA meant not only helping and 
disciplining students, but also providing important 
information about the services and programs held on 
campus. 



28/Student Jobs 





Photo by Mason Rivlin 
Beth Martin waits behind the bar for someone to order 
a drink. Although working as a bartender meant long 
hours and busy work, tending at the Student Union's 
Hatch provided a good social atmosphere as well. 

Shelley Kleiza stands at her register in preparation for 
her next customer. Working at the Campus Center 
Store was a convenient way to make money while 
still staying on campus and seeing many students. 



Photo by Mason Rivlin 



Student Life/29 




A Chorus Line 



It all began on a cold February week- 
end when 130 nervous dancers en- 
tered the Campus Center Auditorium 
for A Chorus Z./ne audition. Some tried out 
on a whim, while others were carrying out 
I'^iife-long dream. Amy Spanger brought 
Senior Josh Galitsky along for moral sup- 
port when she auditioned; however, Josh 
soon found himself on stage with the oth- 
ers. "I just got the itch to perform, so I 
auditioned with Amy," Josh explained. 

As the auditions continued and the call- 
back list was posted, all became anxious. 
Nicole Chiasson commented, "It could be 
compared to running a race — the tension 
was high, there was lots of sweating and it 
was definately a bloody fight to the finish!" 
Josh, who was cast as Mark, added, "I 
wanted a part more than anything else!" 
Tuesday morning the final cast list was 
posted. Amy recalled, "I was so nervous; 
my stomach was in knots until I found out! 
I was definately relieved when I got the 
part of Diana." 

The five week rehearsal began shortly 
after. The first three weeks were spent 
learning the show, while the second two 
were used for performing in its entirety. 
The dedicated students practiced four 
hours a night, five days a week. Amy re- 
marked, "I did homework after rehearsal 
and between classes. I was careful not to 
get run-down." 

Because they spent so much time to- 
gether, the members of the cast became 
close. Joe Mulligan said, "Everyone was 
very positive. I think Randy, the director, 
had a lot to do with that. He was very 
patient and positive. Many people said that 



we weren't talented enough to do this 
show, so we all wanted to prove them 
wrong. That made the determination even 
stronger in us to put on a great show." 

When an audience sees a musical, they 
only see the finished product, but the time 
and energy needed to produce such a show 
is tremendous. In A Chorus Line the direc- 
tor/choreographer, musical director, pro- 
ducer, vocal coach and publicity were in- 
strumental in organizing the show. The 
director and choreographer. Randy Elkin- 
son, handled all rehearsals and saw that all 
went according to schedule. ; ™ 

The musical director, Chris LaCivita was 
in charge of the orchestra. Chris comment- 
ed, "I worked separately with the orchestra 
teaching them music, and also with tjie 
cast teaching them the songs." '' *" 

Nicole, the producer, was cast as Val, 
the character of "Tits and Ass" fame. Her 
job as producer consisted of setting up 
rehearsal dates, and doing the RSO paper- 
work. She also handled any cast and exec- 
utive board conflicts. "It was very confus- 
ing," Nicole said. "I enjoyed it though. I 
had to take an authority role, but the cast 
was conscientious and listened to me. I had 
been a director, choreographer, and assis- 
tant producer in high school; since I had 
already worked behind the scenes, I want- 
ed to do it again." 

Kathy Engal, the vocal coach, described 
her experience, "I made sure everyone 
could be heard over the orchestra and 
warmed up the cast before rehearsal." In 
addition, she taught everyone their parts 
and focused on dynamics and pronuncia- 
tion. 



Joe Mulligan acted in addition to direct- 
ing publicity. He said, "The best part was 
the creativity I had. It was a challenging 
job, as the show was at an odd time: the 
Sunday after Spring Break through 
Wednesday. Therefore, it was difficult to 
publicize, buf we did well, selling 3100 
seats." 

A Chorus Line taught the performers 
about the world of dancers. Much of the 
show is based on conversations between 
the original director Michael Bennett and 
his cast. Though he kept most of the story 
the same, Bennett created two f ^w phpal 
ters. OMass Director Randy Elkii^sbn'sal 
the need to make it real to his cast as well. 
Randy remarked, "It was important to me 
, that I explain the reason for every song and 
more. The only way they would perform 
with feeling was by doing this. We talked 
about each character in depth-they had to 
know who they were playing." 

Noreen McDonald, Cassie in the show, 
commented, "It was easier for me to put 
myself into character knowing that I was 
playing a real person." 

Senior Josh Galitsky saw the show even ^ 
more personally, "Singing 'What I Did For 
Love' with everyone was moving. In the 
song "No Regrets" is repeated over and 
over and I want to leave here with no fe- 
grets. Everything I have done here has 
been for the love of myself and friends. My 
friends are the world to me-just as the song 
says-what I did for love ..." rti 

by Elizabeth Lord 



30/A Chorus Line 



Photo courtesy of GMass Theater Guild 



Wows UMass 




AClioras 
Line 




Randy Elkinson 
Tells About 
Being There 

The following is taken from an inter- 
view with A Chorus Line director, 
senior Randy Elkinson. 



How did you successfully direct the 
show? 

Well, I have worked with so many 
directors that I used all of their good 
points and was careful to avoid their 
downfalls. It was necessary to en- 
courage the cast; one can't yell at 
them one moment and then expect 
them to perform well the next. I tried 
to be as positive as possible; al- 
though it was difficult to stay calm 
when I was not getting their full at- 
tention. Since everyone was so close, 
they joked around and it came to the 
point when ! had to draw the line and 
say "This is going to be terrible if you 
don't stop fooling around." 

What was special about A Chorus 
Line? 

The essence of A Chorus Line was 
getting across the repetitiveness of a 
dancer's life. We went over "One" 
constantly, it was the final dance 
that showed how every dancer must 
blend together perfectly as a group. 

What were you thinking as the cur- 
tain rose? 

I thought I was having a heart at- 
tack from the stress! 1 lost ten 
pounds; I also had walking pneumo- 
nia. I felt as though I had a lot to 
prove-l needed to show that CJMASS 
could pull off A Chorus Line. And we 
did.jBi 

' — ' Interview by Elizabeth Lord 



Photo courtesy of UMass Theater Guild 
A Chorus Line cast stands on line. The show was a The cast practices "One," the final dance. After five 
tremendous success, selling 3100 seats over four weeks of practice, their performance was worthy of 
nights. Michael Bennett. 




Student Life/31 




Photo by Sara- Jane Leavitt 




One of the three aerobics classes offered in Grayson 
residence hall stretches out before beginning their 
first routine. Many physical education classes were 
offered in the residence halls as an alternative to 
walking to Totman or Boyden gym. 



Photo by Mason Rivlin 

The Body Shop in Totman Gym bustles with activity. 
The importance of being in shape was a main reason 
why the gym was always crowded. 

Julie Rodrigues exercises her calf muscles during the 
first part of her workout. Preparation for summer 
played a major factor in the amount of time spent in 
the gym. 




Photo by Mason Rivlln 



32/ Fitness Craze 



' ntness 
Craze 



€D 



9^ur 



^No 




? 



Pumps Up:Stuyent^ 



My first registration day at GMass saw 
me standing at the end of what seemed like 
a mile-long line at Boyden Gym. Masses of 
people stood before me, already bored and 
listless. I glanced at the clock to make sure 
I was on time. 8:25 A.M.-I am not late. I 
began to panic. Am 1 in the right place? 
this doesn't seem right. 

I was only two credits short in my fall 
semester schedule, so rather than trudge 
through the English or Psychology Add- 
/Drop Lines, I thought 1 could simulta- 
neously fill the gap and stay in shape by 
picking up a phys. ed. class or two. As 1 
glanced at the course offerings on the wall, 
however, I saw that aside from residential 
area aerobics, everything that I had wanted 
was closed. It was then that 1 realized just 
how much exercise meant to students. The 
impact fitness has on this campus is 
amazing. 

Jen Marshall, a freshman Southwest res- 
ident, felt that societal pressures to be thin 
were not the cause of the exercise craze. 
Its about individual goals to feel good, she 
said. "Since I've been at college, I feel most 
of my time is spent indoors studying, so 1 
feel exercise is a good way to release the 
tensions of school, and at the same time 
make myself feel physically fit. 1 have no 
time for an aerobics class, so I try and set 
aside about thirty minutes a day to run or 
swim." 



This point of view was not primarily fe- 
male. After speaking to many men on cam- 
pus, it was clear that they shared the same 
concerns. Steve Jungbluth, a freshman on 
the GMass Swim and Water Polo Teams, 
required constant use of Boyden facilities. 
He said that even when not practicing, he 
liked to take advantage of the gym's 
offerings. 

To some, however, exercising is not that 
important. Senior Rob Saunders explains, 
"I don't exercise on a regular and routine 
basis because I do not find it absolutely 
necessary for my overall well-being. 1 have 
a very tight schedule and therefore do not 
always have the opportunity to exercise." 

Still others, like Sina Pietrosanto, a se- 
nior, try their best to set aside some time 
for exercising. "1 like to exercise and keep 
in shape, but I find it difficult to to make 
the time. When I do get the chance, 1 like to 
go over to Boyden Gym to lift weights or 
pick up an occasional aerobics class. Exer- 
cising is important to me, and I do my best 
to fit it into my hectic schedule." 

Unfortunately, what begins as a healthy 
desire to take care of ones body can often 
lead to a variety of serious problems. Eat- 
ing disorders such as bulimia and anorexia 
were common amoung students during the 
1989-90 school year. 

According to a study at Western Illinois 
University, about one in every twenty un- 



dergraduate women are bulimic. Consider- 
ing that we live in a society that encour- 
ages overindulgence and at the same time 
puts emphasis on being thin and fit, these 
numbers don't seem staggering. These eat- 
ing disorders are not solely disorders of 
eating and weight management, but rather, 
they are complex disturbances in self-per- 
ception and expression. Fortunately, our 
campus has a variety of different options 
for those with a disorder. 

Mental Health Services, a part of the 
University Health Services, is staffed by 
mental health professionals including so- 
cial workers, psychologists, and psychia- 
trists. The department offers weekly edu- 
cational workshops on eating disorders. 

The Everywoman's Center supplies 
short-term personal counseling, support 
groups, and library and reference materials 
on eating disorders. Their facilities are free 
to all students and community women. 
The Psychological Services Center also 
provides short and long term counseling. 

Hopefully, with all the facilities and fit- 
ness opportunities made available to stu- 
dents on the University of Massachusetts 
campus, this unfortunate "trend" will 
disappear. fUj 

-by Lori Markoff 



Fitness Craze/33 



^s ..,../■•' - 



tt 



\ 






oeU/se all ^C ot^er 
class€<. are oxnceiied * 



/ 



A^--^-' 



■'^"tv^i 



Students and concerned supporters of higher educa- 
tion rally at the Statehouse in Boston. Fears of the 
effects of budget cuts were felt statewide, as repre- 
sentatives of colleges statewide voiced their feelings. 




Photo by Paul Agnew 
One of many angry strikers presents his opinion of 
the budget cut crisis. Oversubscribed classes, can- 
celled courses, and limited attention to the ever grow- 
ing monetary crunch made even the most apathetic 
student take a stand. 

The Campus Center is crowded with lines of people 
registering to vote. Budget cut fears prompted the 
non-traditional suite in McNamara to organize a voter 
registration drive that resulted in over 4,000 new 
voters who could voice their concerns regarding the 
future of their education. 




Photo by Paul Agnew 



34/ Budget Cuts 




,/1 

The Flagship University> 



A / 



Who Will Save 




When the University of Massachusetts 
set sail in 1863 as the flagship Mass Aggie, 
its colors were raised to guide the Com- 
monwealth to "a great education at a low 
price." 

Those colors were stricken in 1990 when 
cutbacks swept throught the university, 
and the flagship was sinking fast. Who 
would save the ship? 

If one thing was unforgettable that year 
it was the budget crisis. The cuts literally 
ate away at the University, starting in 1987 
and swallowing nearly $23 million by 1989. 
The final blow came with a request for a 
five percent reversion of funds already ap- 
propriated by the legislature. The students 
and fiscal 1990 were left in great turmoil. 

No one felt these hardships more than 
the students. The number of students ac- 
cepted to the University decreased, while 
the number of seniors not graduating on 
time, increased. Many students who pre- 
registered, did not receive their classes. 
The Add/ Drop period was unbearable and 
extremely disappointing. Many students 
who waited in lines from the "crack of 
dawn" to sign up for classes were not ad- 
mitted due to lack of space. Many students 
could not see the end and felt the school 
was actually sinking them. Michael Jay a 




senior History major, explained why he 
would not be graduating on time in 1990. 

"Pre-registering last May for my remain- 
ing history courses, 1 had no worries, with 
the understanding that seniors had first 
choice. To my dismay my class schedule 
arrived in August three courses too short. 
In September, 1 discovered that the classes 
were no longer offered due to budget cuts. 
Also rather than give seniors priority, 
classes were given on a first come first 
serve basis." 

In response to tfW-Outs, students joined 
together calling and writing their legisla- 
tors. With the faculty and Chancellor Duf- 
fey's support, thousands journeyed to the 
state house in Boston to protest the cuts. 
They were joined by at least ten thousand 
additional students from the other state 
colleges. 

There were many student protests on 
the UMass campus that followed. In No- 
vember the biggest show of campus unity 
took place: the student strike. For one 
week, supported by most faculty, the stu- 
dents boycotted classes, picketed Universi- 
ty buildings and bombarded the State 
House with thousands of calls. All of this 
was to show the legislators that the stu- 
dents care very much about their future. 



and to pressure them to raise taxes to bal- 
ance the budget. The Commonwealth had 
left many seniors in dismay and their admi- 
ration for public education dampened. 

To further illustrate how these "atroc- 
ities" were felt by the students and to re- 
fresh memories. Here is "A Day In The Life 
of a UMass Student ..." 

Michael leaves his Brandywine apart- 
ment to journey to school. Michael arrives 
at his classroom overflowing with stu- 
dents. He must leave the class early, for his 
classes overlap because of fewer classtime 
choices. He stops at noon to join the pro- 
test on the Student Union steps. With the 
students' cheers of "Hey hey ho ho, budget 
cuts have got to go!" echoing behind them, 
Michael joins his next class. Deciding to 
join a student strike, this will be his last 
class for a while. 

The Index went to print with this expose, 
leaving the question of a campus savior 
still unanswered. The University continued 
to sink with Chancellor Joseph Duffey 
standing at the helm shouting, "No more 
cuts!" At the same time, the Beacon Hill 
Boys were striking the colors of their pub- 
lic higher education flagship on the west- 
ern waters of the Connecticut River. El 
-by Carol Sendrowski 





•wjj*; 



Budget Cuts/35 



Jtr'«*ll»«l<M»"»ft>teja..waate»#»*»'iSj^«WM» ^^ ^ 



UMass 
on strike 



' *j><o..*'-4«Ri-'><'-!»^,,i^,ij»rf»a,,«4,,jHEo.^^ 




Students Strike To Save 

Sinking Ship 



Until the fall of 1989, students at the 
University of Massachusetts had of- 
fered only small, isolated protests in 
response to the state budget cuts. One 
example of that is students construction in 
the fall of 1989 of Cutback City, a set of 
crudely — built cardboard houses on the 
banks of the Campus Pond designed to 
protest the cuts. While this city did not 
last, as students hoped, until the cuts were 
stopped, it did warn the University that the 
budget ax was already chopping. 

But for the most part, the University 
watched quietly as Chancellor Joseph Duf- 
fey and the administration, faced with fur- 
ther cutbacks, hacked away at the already 
whittled faculty, staff, and social service 
programs. 

All that changed in the fall of 1989, 
when the University (faced with its third 
round of cuts within 3 years) finally 
reached its boiling point. Fueled by shouts 
of "Fight, fight, fight. Education is a right," 
and "hey hey, ho ho, the budget cuts have 
got to go," at the statewide rally Oct. 18 on 
the steps of the statehouse in Boston, 
UMass formed the Union of Undergradu- 
ates and the Leadership Coalition to orga- 
nize a campuswide strike to shut down the 
University and convince state legislators 
UMass could not survive their proposed 
$25 million in cuts. 

At the statehouse rally, students were 
urged to call or send letters or postcards to 
their legislators, informing them of the det- 
rimental effects of the cuts on UMass, and 
urging them to support a tax package that 
would more evenly distribute education 
throughout the state. However, the Board 
of Trustee's approval Nov. 9 of a $350 
student fee hike for spring 1990, and its 
proposed $3000 tuition hike for out-of-state 
students convinced many at the University 
that the state was not listening. On Mon- 



day, Nov. 13, more than 1,000 students 
walked out of their classes at noon and 
rallied on the Student Union steps in sup- 
port of a week long boycott of classes. 
During the week, the Graduate Student 
Senate, the Faculty Senate, the Graduate 
Employees Organization, the Board of Gov- 
ernors, the Student Government Associa- 
tion, the newly-formed Out-of-State Stu- 
dent Coalition, 20 Amherst college 
students, and various UMass faculty and 
staff members followed the Undergraduate 
Student Senate's earlier example by sup- 
porting and joining in the strike. 

Leadership Coalition and members and 
UMass students Lisa Nelson, Carey Feld- 
mand, and Marc Kenen, along with strike 
organizers Kathy LeMay, and Jonathan 
Leavitt, urged faculty and students to pick- 
et buildings, hold classes and educational 
workshops outside of academic buildings, 
stage teach-ins, organize lobbying trips to 
the statehouse and use the Newman Cen- 
ter to call or write legislators. The strike 
gained daily momentum as each afternoon 
thousands of students rallied and marched 
across the campus shouting and carrying 
signs which read, "On strike," and "Don't 
be fools! Fund our schools!" The strike 
spurred more than 1,000 students to regis- 
ter on Wednesday, Nov. 15, the first of a 
three-day voter registration drive in the 
Campus Center, to make their voices 
heard at the Statehouse. 

While more than two-thirds of the stu- 
dent population joined the strikers by the 
end of the week, the campus was by no 
means unified in its support. Duffey said in 
a statement to the UMass community that 
the strike was not the best means of han- 
dling the budget crisis, "1 appeal to stu- 
dents who are considering striking ... to 
continued on page 38 




Photo by Paul Agnew 
A banner blows in the wind from a university resi- 
dence hail. Flyers, banners, and posters adorned wails 
during the stril<e to gain support and publicity. 



36 / Student Strike 





Photo by David Sawan 
Concerned students rally on Student Union steps dur- 
ing the week of November 13, 1989. Students periodi- 
cally gathered during the strike to stir up support for 
their cause. 

Student strike leader rallies momentum for the strike. 
Student leaders were vital in keeping it well organized 
and efficient. 



Photo by Paul Agnew 



Student Strike / 37 



UMass 
on strike 




Strike 
Continued 

consider carefully whether their actions 
will actively and effectively communicate 
the message they want to send to the pub- 
lic." The Faculty Senate also voted not to 
support the strike, but left the decision to 
professors about whether to hold classes, 
or punish those who did not attend. Many 
students did cross friendly picket lines to 
attend class, or went to alternately located 
classes. 

After a week of rallying, picketing, call- 
ing legislators, and organizing lobbying 
trips to the Statehouse, OMass undergrad- 
uates voted Friday Nov., 17 to end the 
strike the following Monday. Despite strik- 
ers' unrealized hope that all 28 state col- 
leges and universities would join (JMass in 
striking, students' spirits were high Mon- 
day as some 3,000 of ihem joined hands 
and marched across campus to Amherst 
Common. About 1,000 students stopped at 
the Amherst Post Office to mail letters to 
legislators. 

While the University's weeklong boycott 
of classes did not reverse the student fee 
hike, the strike gave students the chance 
to prove they could organize effectively 
and make their voices heard. The Universi- 
ty's ship may be in danger of sinking under 
a tidal wave of cutbacks, but its students 
proved they will not go down quietly. |tJ] 

•by Sarah DeMaster 












Photo by Paul Agnew 






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Graduate students Fight alongside undergraduates in 
tlie stril<e. The budget cuts affected the graduate 
programs at the University as well as programs for 
undergraduates. 

CJMASS strikers are joined by 20 Amherst College 
students as they march through the town of Amherst. 
This event marked the end of the strike which was 
declared successful in its effort. 



■f: V#r^--^- ■::*, 






Photo by Paul Agnew 



38 / Student Strike 





Photo by Paul Agnew 
An enthusiastic stril<er displays his true feelings to- 
ward the increasingly diminishing budget. Even the 
most apathetic students felt that the strike was a 
worthy cause to support. 



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\ ccxo--t ooroe- bouc-R. THey lov^e, 
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Strikers congregate in front of the Fine Arts Cen- 
ter to boost morale. This was followed by the 
march through the town of Amherst. 



Photo by David Sawan 



Student Strike / 39 



Alii Kaplan and Brian Jewell discuss the prevalence 
of AIDS in one of the skits presented by the Not- 
Ready-ForBedtimePlayers. This group performed in 
many areas on campus, educating the public about 
safe sex practices. 

The condom machines in the Campus Center are a 
bargain compared to those in the residence halls. 
Those in the Campus Center cost 50C, but it cost 75C 
for those on campus. 




Photo by Paul Agnew 
Sophomore Brian Dougherty purchases a condom- 
gram from a group of Peer Sex Educators. Condom- 
grams for Valentine's Day provided an interesting and 
safe twist to holiday celebrations. 




Photo by Paul Agnew 



40/ Sex Education 









i 



Education 



UMass Uses Education To 



Play It Safe 



"I was talking to my aunt the other 
day," Ellen told her fellow classmates dur- 
ing a discussion on sexuality," and she told 
me that she is really glad that she isn't part 
of my generation, because she wouldn't 
want to have to deal with the issues of 
AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases." 

In the past decade, many people have 
had to evaluate their attitudes toward their 
sexual behaviors, as more people become 
accustomed to hearing about the increase 
in the spread of STD's, especially on col- 
lege campuses. The new threat of Ac- 
quired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, bet- 
ter known as AIDS, meant that sexual 
practices would have to be changed. 

"Pregnancy is a big enough thing to deal 
with," said Ellen. "Now there's this too." 

Sexually transmitted diseases continue 
to be prevalent on college campuses, but 
the presence of AIDS makes the issue of 
sexual practices an even more vital subject 
to address. In a national study of universi- 
ties across the United States, it was discov- 
ered that anywhere between 2 to 9 out of 
1000 students are thought to be infected 
with HIV, the virus responsible for the dis- 
ease AIDS. 

"I find the whole thing completely deves- 
tating," remarked Steve, as he observed 
the crowd on the Campus Center Con- 
course. "It's shaping the lives of people in 
my age group." 

UMass has responded to this growing 
concern. Many students have become 
used to reading, hearing, or attending pro- 



grams about issues of sexuality, especially 
about the promotion of safer sex practices. 

Health Services plays a major role in the 
education of safer sex practices through 
programs put on by the Health Education 
department. Some programs are offered on 
campus, but even more are sponsored by 
Resident Assistants, given in individual res- 
idence halls. These programs include a pre- 
sentation by Dr. Abel, a funny, interesting 
speaker, regarding AIDS and STD's, but 
more creative forms of education are also 
available, such as the workshop entitled 
"How to Be A Better Lover," stressing 
communication in all types of relationships 
and the performances by the Not-Ready 
For-Bedtime Players, who hope to educate 
while using theater as a medium. 

One thing that is very impressive about 
the educational programs put on by Health 
Education is that many of them are pre- 
sented by students. Sophomore Sharon 
Majewski, an RA in Field residence hall, is 
one of the members of the Not-Ready-For- 
Bedtime Players. She became involved in 
the group after taking the course entitled 
Peer Sex Education, taught by Gretchen 
Krull. "I love it. It's great to make people 
laugh but educate them at the same time." 

Most of the group's skits discuss the 
prevention of AIDS and sexually transmit- 
ted diseases, but one underlying theme is 
the need for communication between sexu- 
al partners. The group also presents exam- 
ples of gay, lesbian, and heterosexual life- 
styles, promoting diversity as well as 



education. "I would say that 9 out of 10 
people who see the show thoroughly enjoy 
it." Sharon said. 

Another initiative taken in the fight to 
prevent the spread of diseases is the instal- 
lation of condom machines in buildings on 
campus. Although the machines in the 
women's and men's bathrooms of the 
Campus Center have been there for over 
two years, their installation in residence 
halls is something new as of the spring 
semester. The cost is 75 cents for one, or 
three for $1.50. 

"I think the machines are a good idea," 
said Michael, a junior economics major." 
"After seeing the AIDS quilt when it came 
to UMass, I realized how much AIDS has 
effected the lives of so many people." 

Some people, however, feel embar- 
rassed about using the machines. "I'd use 
them, but only if nobody else was around," 
said Ginny, a resident of John Quincy Ad- 
ams residence hall. 

"It's a reality," said Rebecca Schaye a 
junior Spanish major. "People will be doing 
things that would require the use of con- 
doms. It's become part of our society. 
Hopefully, people will realize this and not 
be embarrassed." itTj 

-by Kris Bruno 

Editor's note: Some names have been 
changed to protect the identities of those 
interviewed. 



Sex Education/41 



Learning 
Experiences J 



~-'**v^jj,-s;;Sf**«'*w»-»«»^' "^ 



.■'<t««»*?HS''r 



The UMass Experience Equals 

Life Long Knowledge 



A friend asked me a great question the 
other day. 
He asked, "What have you learned 
here at UMass? I mean, really." 

Well, I pondered for a moment, sat back on 
my haunches for another minute, and I didn't 
have a ready-made answer. My ability to re- 
veal the highlights of four years of education 
in a few, short words seemed impossible in 
the late afternoon sun of an 80 degree day. 

Having spent some time thinking, I've 
come up with this. Since I've been at the 
University of Massachusetts, I've learned a 
lot. 

I've met the hypersensitive and the insensi- 
tive, the racially aware and the racists. I've 
seen people laughed at for who they are or 
what they believe in, and I've seen people tell 
jokes about people of color, gays, or the dis- 
abled among "friends," all the time checking 
to see that no one from the said group was 
nearby. I've seen a riot, several building take- 
overs, and a lot of angry students. 

But what else? 

I've taken on members of the administra- 
tion and won. I've taken on members of the 
administration and lost. I've done the same 
with student leaders with equal results. I've 
learned to empathize with some of the people 
who run this school, while ridiculing others 
behind their back. 



I've had my heart broken and broken oth- 
ers. I've been hurt and have hurt others. I've 
learned that no matter how hard you try, you 
can never say the right things to some people. 
I've taken responsibility and I've dished it out. 
I've been yelled at and I've yelled at others. 
I've been praised and have done the same. 

I've taught others tiny things from classes 
in history, political science and economics, 
while allowing others to help me with my 
deficiencies in calculus, physics, and "Intro- 
duction to Logic." I've learned the power of 
teamwork and have tried to show that power 
to others. 

I've run a rally and have been to several 
others. I've started arguments and have been 
the subject of others. Occasionally I've tried 
to make other people feel bad or guilty, as I'm 
sure they've done with me. I've learned that if 
you don't pay your bills, you get into trouble, 
and that the library is a place where a world of 
knowledge is stored. I've also learned that the 
library is a great place to take a nap before 
finding that world of knowledge. 

I've learned why 1 never made my high 
school (or UMass) basketball teams (no defen- 
sive skills and an inconsistent jump shot), but 
at the same time have had the pleasure of 
stripping Lorenzo Sutton of the ball as he 
went in for a lay-up in a game at Southwest. 

I've learned that there is more to an educa- 



tion than the three R's. I learned that there are 
some things I'll never be able to convince 
other people of, and that there are other 
things people will never get me to agree to. 
I've learned that it's impossible not to end a 
sentence every now and then with a preposi- 
tion. 

I've learned that if you work hard enough, 
some of your dreams will come true. I've 
learned that this is not the case with my 
entomology tests and a few other things on 
campus. 

I've made friends and I've lost friends, but 
the ones who have stuck with me for our 
entire stay at UMass hopefully realize that 
while I have a tendency to be naive and talk 
too much, I mean well and have never acted 
maliciously. For the ones who teased me too 
often, I forgive you and hope you get in touch 
with me in these waning days of our educa- 
tion. Oh, yeah — I've learned that there are 
some people 1 can never become friends with, 
sometimes because of them, and sometimes 
because of me. 

Ah yes, education. If there's one thing I 
have learned in four years at UMass, It's that 
I've learned almost everything outside of the 
classroom, and will never be able to thank 
enough people for the experience. 

I've learned a lot. [tjl 

'— ^ by David R. Mark 



42/Learning Experiences 




Carol McClatchey, Sue Hawkins and Stephanie Abela 
enjoy each other's company during Commencement. 
One thing many students gained from their experiences 
at (JMass was strong and close friendships. 

Junior sociology major Jarrett Saunders completes some 
paperwork during his shift in the Webster/Dickinson 
cluster office. Students learned about responsibility and 
authority by being in leadership positions such as those 
of the many resident assistants across campus. 




Photo by Veronica Welch 
Members of the GMass community join the twenty other 
Massachusetts state schools in Boston to protest the 
drastic revenue cuts in higher education. Almost all 
(JMass students had witnessed a rally, protest or building 
takeover during their stay at the CIniversity. 



Photo by Jeff Holland 



Learning Experiences/43 



^^ 



Hurricane 




J 



Thousands Homeless After Hurricane 

Hugo 

Five Day Rampage 



On September 18, the Common- 
wealth of Puerto Rico felt as though 
it were cut off with the world. Hurri- 
cane Hugo tore apart the 3,300 square mile 
island of 3.3 million inhabitants after rip- 
ping through a 350 mile chain of tourist 
Caribbean islands. With no power, sporad- 
ic telephone service, and scarce clean wa- 
ter, they were isolated. 

The winds reached 155 miles-per-hour 
and caused flooding, mudslides and unbe- 
lievable damage. Roofs were ripped off 
buildings. Paths of palm trees laid limply 
on the ground. Telephone poles were 
knocked over like twigs. The plushest 
apartment buildings quickly looked like 
ghetto housing. And the poorest shacks 
vanished with the gusts of wind. Fallen 



trees blocked ambulances on their way to 
rescue. Looters emerged. 

Charlene Smith, a San Juan resident re- 
calls the storm that left over 10,000 Puerto 
Ricans homeless, "It was very spooky. 
With no electricity the city was completely 
dark. The streets were filled with a stench, 
as toilets were not functioning. After four 
days, the water in my sinks and tubs were 
running out. My supply of canned goods 
and batteries were diminishing. My refrig- 
erated food had spoiled; I wondered how 
long it was going to be before everything 
returned back to normal." 

After pounding the Caribbean, Hugo 
headed for Charleston, South Carolina. Al- 
though the winds slowed to 135 miles-per- 
hour, it still was powerful enough to make 



Federal Disaster areas out of seven South 
Carolina counties. In addition, 85 percent 
of Charlotte, North Carolina lost electrical 
power and at least eleven were killed. 

In response, President Bush also de- 
clared the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico 
disaster areas, which made the islands eli- 
gible for financial aid. Aid often includes 
temporary housing and low-cost loans to 
help repair uninsured property. This help 
was especially needed in St. Croix, where 
three-quarters of the housing was demol- 
ished. Drinking water was provided to the 
residents by the United States Navy; the 
Air Force flew medical supplies and ready- 
to-eat meals to the destroyed islands.|(5| 

by Elizabeth Lord 




44/ News 



AP/ World Wide Photo 
Student protestors in Beijing's Tiananmen Square dis- 
play a banner in CIninese and Russian reading, "De- 
mocracy, Our Common goal." The protestors were 
there to welcome Mikhail Gorbachev in May of 1989. 



One Year Later 

Students Still 
Mourn 



Tiananmen 
Square 



In the first large political demonstration 
since the Tiananmen Square massacre 
last year, students marched at Beijing 
University to mourn the deaths of their 
peers on the June 4 anniversary of the 
killings. The New York 7/mes reported that 
approximately 2,000 students and teach- 
ers gathered during the apparently un- 
planned protest. One teacher was quoted 
as saying, "It just happened. They didn't 
plan anything, but they were very angry. 
They couldn't sleep, so they just started 
walking." 

Despite security increases, roadblocks 
blocking the (Jniversity district and govern- 
ment warnings against displays of mourn- 
ing, the students sang songs of protest and 
broke small bottles to show their anger 
toward leader Deng Xiaoping, whose given 
name means little bottle. However, the inci- 
dent remained non-violent. "The authori- 
ties generally tried to deal with protestors 
not by force but by sending officials and 
teachers to urge them to quit for their own 
good," said a New York Times article. 

There were only a few incidents at Tian- 
anmen Square, but in the British Colony of 
Hong Kong over 100,000 people demon- 
strated to commemorate the deaths of the 
pro-democracy students. 

However, the people of Hong Kong be- 
trayed that their fear of the China has in- 
creased since last year when they dis- 
played replicas of the Beijing protestors' 
Goddess of Democracy statue in support 
of the Chinese students. This June 3 there 
were only a few cardboard silhouettes and 
a small 3-D version attached to a bus. 

The colony will once again be under Chi- 
nese control in 1997. Although China's 
government maintains that it will permit 
the two systems to remain separate, many 
people in Hong Kong fear a future under 
the current Chinese regime. 

One of the march's organizers, Martin 
Lee, was quoted in the New York Times: 
"The vast numbers show that in spite of 
fears here — and many people do fear that 
the Chinese photograph these demonstra- 



tions and will later seek to punish those 
who took part — despite those fears, al- 
most a quarter of a million people came 
out. [This] proves that the Chinese policy 
of trying to intimidate Hong Kong over the 
past year has fialed. They need to recog- 
nize that fact and try to win us over, not 
frighten us." 

In the United States, there has been 
much controversy concerning the conces- 
sions made to ease the sanctions impose 
on the Chinese government a year ago. In 
December, President George Bush and Sec- 
retary of State James A. Baker III defended 
a high-level administration trip to China, 
maintaining that further isolating China 
would increase the repression of the peo- 
ple. 

At UMass, many students felt that the 
initial U.S. response to the Tiananmen 
Square incident was inadequate. Tara 
Scopa, a junior history major, was disgust- 
ed with the lack on initiative. "Bush's reac- 
tion was so lukewarm. 'Now we're going to 
slap their wrists and ignore them.' I think 
we should censure China more, but inter- 
national pressure doesn't necessarily af- 
fect China because it can be self-sufficient 
if it has to." 

Paul Agnew, a senior history major, said, 
"I don't know all the circumstances on the 
decisions our government made, but our 
response was about as close to a jellyfish 
as you could get." 

However, Agnew had hope for China's 
future. "When the Chinese people as a 
whole finally say 'that's enough,' there will 
be nothing the government can do," he 
said. 

Another UMass student, English major 
Douglas Miller, said, "Tiananmen Square 
reflects the fact that the desire for freedom 
and individuality cannot be destroyed; it 
can only be contained. The time will come 
when it will be impossible to restrain the 
desire for freedom any longer." O] 

by Marguerite Paolino 




^^^^CMMKfeKtWr*^, 



Other 
News . . . 



June 3 Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah 
Ruhoallah Khomeini died . . . June 4, 18 
Poland's first election since 1947 that in- 
volved opposition candidates . . . June 13 
The Detroit Pistons won National Basket- 
ball Association championship . . . June 21 
It is declared by the US Supreme Court 
that the First Amendment allows burning 
the American flag as a political protest . . . 
June 28 US Supreme Court ruled that 
states may execute murderers mentally re- 
tarded or above age 16 . . . June 28 The 
Who began their twenty-fifth anniversary 
tour . . . July 2 Former Soviet Foreign 
Minister Andrei A. Gromyko died of a 

[stroke in Moscow . . . July 10 The voice of 
; Barney Ruble and Woody Woodpecker, 
Mel Blanc, died . . . July 10 300,000 Siberi- 
an coal miners went on strike demanding 
higher pay and better working conditions. 
It developed into the worst Soviet Labor 
unrest since the 1920's . . . July 11 Actor 
Laurence Olivier died . . . July 14 Former 
Lieutenant Colonel Oliver North given 
three suspended sentences . . . July 17 B-2 

I Stealth bomber makes first flight . . . July 
17 Supreme Court decision permitted 
states to pass laws restricting abortion . . . 
Please turn to page 47 for more. 



1 



\ 



News/45 



Eartliqiialjce] 



Nation's Second Largest 

Quake Rocks Bay 

Area 



On October 17 at 5:03pm fans en- 
tered Candlestick Park and eagerly 
glued their eyes on the San Francis- 
co Giants and Oakland as they warnned up 
for the third game of the World Series. 

At 5:04pm cheers of excitement were 
replaced by screams and shouts of sheer 
terror. The second largest earthquake to 
hit the U.S., registering 6.9 on the Richter 
scale, was in process. And many felt it. 
Tremors shook Los Angeles, 350 miles 
south, and Reno, 225 miles northeast. 

Los Gatos, a small suburb of 27,500, 
was the population center closest to the 
quake's epicenter. Sharon Peart, a Los Gat- 
os resident said, "I was shopping at a San 
Jose mall with my seventy year old moth- 
er. All of a sudden glass fell in sheets and 
everything shook. My mother fell to the 
floor but couldn't get up. Somehow I man- 
aged to get us both out of the swaying 
building." 

The day following the quake, more than 
1,400 aftershocks occurred in the area. 
The earth was readjusting itself slowly, 
and at least 36 of the 1,400 registered be- 
tween 3.5 and 4.0 on the Richter scale. 
Peart continued, "When we finally made it 
home, the aftershocks were so terrible that 
we weren't able to sleep until they were 
over." 

After the 1906 San Francisco earth- 
quake, which experts agree would have 
measured 8.3 on the Richter scale had it 
been developed, the city rebuilt 490 blocks 



of devastation. 139 miles of cast iron and 
ductile water pipes were laid throughout 
San Francisco. A backup system was also 
installed to further prevent the lack of wa- 
ter experienced in the 1906 quake. 

One place where this sturdy system was 
not installed was the San Francisco Marina 
District. In the recent earthquake, the dis- 
trict battled fires and firefighters had diffi- 
culty due to the low water pressure. It is 
believed that the pipes underneath the dis- 
trict broke, causing this. One reason cited 
for the breakage was that the entire district 
was situated on a landfill. 

Although the San Francisco-Oakland 
Bay Bridge was labeled "quake-proof" in 
the early 1970s by California officials, it 
collapsed killing at least 40 persons. It is 
believed that faulty construction or bad 
soil and mud conditions were the cause of 
the collapse. 

President Bush sent Vice President Dan 
Quayle and Secretary of Transportation 
Samuel Skinner to investigate the damage. 
Bush declared the region a disaster area 
and allocated millions in relief aid. 

According to experts, it is believed that 
there is a fifty percent chance of another 
earthquake 7.5 in magnitude in the next 
three decades in the San Francisco Bay 
Area. One can only hope that improved 
engineering techniques will project the 
area from further catastrophe, j^ 

by Elizabeth Lord 



Greta Garbo, who passed away in 1989, is seen at 
Idlewild Airport, New York in 1958. Garbo was fam- 
ous for her portrayal of mysterious women whose 
lives ended in tragedy in such films as Mata Hari and 
Anna Karenina. 

San Francisco public workers begin to restore the 
damage done by an earthquake. The quake struck 
during rush hour, killing at least 62 people and injur- 
ing hundreds. 





46/ News 




August 5 The largest bailout in U.S. histo- 
ry occurred when Congress passed a $166 
billion bailout for savings and loan institu- 
tions . . . August 6 Artist Berke Breathed 
ended comic strip "Bloom County" after 
nine years in syndication . . . August 6 
Unmanned spacecraft Voyager 2 came i 
within 3000 miles of Neptune. The voyage 
lasted twelve years, as they traveled 4.43 
billion miles . . . September 1 The Rolling 
Stones Steel Wheels twenty-fifth anniver- 
sary tour began . . . September 8 The 
Civility Mural was unveiled at ribbon cut- 
ting ceremony. tJMass graduate student 
Jonathon Kohrman illustrated local and 
cultural events concerning racism in the 
mural . . . September 1 1 Hungary opened 
its border with Austria . . . September 26 
Vietnam completed withdrawal from Cam- 
bodia after 1 1 years . . . October 5 The 
Dalai Lama, spiritual and temporal leader 
of Tibet, won the 1989 Nobel Peace Prize. 
It was awarded due to his non-violent at- 
tempt to free his country from China . . . 
October 5 Former PTL leader Jim Bakker 
found guilty of twenty-four counts of fraud 
and conspiracy . . . October 15 Wayne 
Gretzky became leading scorer in National 
Hockey League history . . . Please turn to 
page 49 for more. 



I 



AP/World Wide Photo 



News/47 



Eastern^ 
Europe 



A sign posted on the Tower Library reminds stu- 
dents that budget cuts effect the entire University. 
A benefit dinner hosted by Bill Cosby was given to 
raise library funds. 

Germans celebrate on and around the Berlin Wall 
after restrictions on emigration and travel to West 
Germany are lifted. By midnight, November 10, 
thousands of East Germans had entered the west- 
ern part of the city which had been inaccessible 
only hours before. 



The Downfall Of Communism Makes For A 

Year Of Change 



The year 1989 was synonymous with 
change. Few people foresaw the 
downfall of Communism, and the 
rapidity with which it fell suprised even 
those expecting it. 

In June, Poland ousted Communist lead- 
ers in the first free elections in 40 years; by 
August, Solidarity leaders controlled the 
government. 

in Hungary, Communist Justice Minister 
Kalman Kulcsar called for democracy and 
free elections in March of '89; October 
brought the end of hard-liner Karloy 
Grosz's power. 

Hundreds of thousands of Czechoslova- 
kians marched through Wenceslas Square 
in November, demanding free elections 
and democracy. Party chief Milos Jakes 
resigned. 

In Romania, dictator Nicolae Ceausescu 
was overthrown and executed with his wife 
on Dec. 25. According the the Boston 
Globe, the ruling National Salvation Front 
promised multiparty elections with "only 
extremist groups being barred." 

When Hungary opened its East German 
border on Sept. 20, thousands of East Ger- 
mans left their country and began the trip 
to West Germany. In November, Krenz 
opened East German borders and East Ber- 
lin construction workers began to tear 
down the Wall. By July 1990, East and 
West Germany had reunified economical- 

ly- 

There were still many obstacles to 
come. Poland, for instance, was plagued 
by economic instability. But, the changes 
and struggle in the Eastern Bloc countries 
held the attention of people across the 
globe well into 1990. 

When senior history major Paul Agnew 
enrolled in Professor Edwin Gere's class 



"Comparative Urban Governments" in the 
Fall of '89, he hardly expected anything 
out of the ordinary. 

However, as the upheavel in Eastern Eu- 
rope began to unfold, it became apparent 
that the course would be much more than 
the typical polisci experience. 

Gere, who specializes in German affairs, 
teaches the class as a three-way compari- 
son between the United States and the two 
Germanys. According to Agnew, by the 
time Gere returned from a two-week visit 
to East Berlin during the early part of the 
semester, textbooks were outdated as fast 
as the class could use them. 

To describe the speed of the political 
changes, Agnew said, "At finals time, Pro- 
fessor Gere asked us if we would rather 
take a final on how Germany used to be or 
on how it is now." 

Hungary, Poland, Czechoslovakia, East 
Germany and Romania — all filled with 
people longing for freedom. People rose up 
in 1989 and broke down the barriers that 
had stood for decades. Of all the countries 
that underwent changes of government, 
perhaps the most dramatic and symbolic 
was East Germany. With the fall of the 
Berling Wall, came a resurgence of hope 
and a renewal of faith in humanity. 

The event affected people everywhere, 
not just in Eastern Europe. Douglas Miller, 
a senior English major, said, "I was deeply 
happy when the Berlin Wall came down. 1 
think it means that people have begun to 
realize that they can't solve their problems 
with guns and barbed wire, and that this 
means that the industrialized nations of the 
world will begin to channel their resources 
into saving the world rather than destroy- 
ing it. "1^1 

' — by Marguerite Paolino 




48/ News 




October 18 Thousands of students fronn 
Massachusetts state colleges rallied at the 
Statehouse to oppose cuts to higher educa- 
tion . . . October 20 First day of Civility 
Week, a week in which issues of racism, 
sexism, homophobia and antisemitism 
were discussed. The (JMass Hillel Founda- 
tion, sponsors of the week, hoped that by 
educating students negative discrimina- 
tory events on campus would decrease . . . 
October 27 In hopes of promoting racial 
and cultural harmony, 1,000 students 
joined hands around the Campus Pond . . 
October 28 The Oakland Athletics won the 
World Series . . . November 1 Ceasefire 
ended by Nicaraguan President Daniel Or- 
tega with G.S. backed contra rebels . . 
November 1 The White House agreed to 
increase the minimum wage to $4.25 per 
hour by April 1991 . . . November 3 Over 
150 supporters gathered on the Student 
Onion steps at a rally to begin Lesbian, 
Bisexual, Gay Awareness week. The pur- . 
pose of the week was to educate the com- 
munity about lesbian, bisexual and gay is- 
sues . . . November 7 L. Douglas Wilder 
became the first elected black governor in 
CI.S. history in Virginia . . . Please turn to 
page 51 for more. 



I 



AP/World Wide Photo 



News/49 




After 27 Years In Prison 

Nelson Mandela Is Free 



It was the moment that millions of peo- 
ple all over the world had hoped and 
waited for. After 27 years the fomous 
anti^partheid martyr. Nelson Mandela was 
being released from prison. On this sun- 
filled day of February 11. 1990. thousands 
of blacks and scores of police waited ex- 
pectantly outside the Victor Verster Prison 
to get a glimpse of Mandela taking his first 
few steps as a free man. Gray-haired and 
thin after almost three decades in prison. 
Mandela walked slowly towards the roar- 
ing crowd of supporters with his wife, Win- 
nie. As the chants grew louder, the two 
symbols of the struggle against apartheid 
proudly shot up th^ fists in a black power 
salute. The roar of the crowd heightened 
like never before. 

Indeed, this was a day to rejoice, but 
what would it mean for the future of South 
Africa and its people? For president F. W. 
de Klerk, the decision to finally release 
Mandela was the greatest rise thus far in 
the historic wager to end South Africa's 
racial strife. Since taking office last year, 
de Klerk pressed boldly for talks with black 
leaders. He also lifted a 30-year ban on the 
African National Congress (ANQ. stopped 



hangings and promised to release some 
120 political prisoners. However, in an in- 
terview after his release. Mandela said that 
until the demands for "one man. one vote" 
were met. the future of South Africa would 
remain very unclear. 

Some of the students here at UMass 
were also skeptical about the govern- 
ment's motives for releasing Mandela. 
Many, like senior sociology major Freda 
Swan, felt the release would not be as 
promising as many expected. "1 believe 
Nelson Mandela should have been released 
a long time ago. My feelings are that things 
in South Africa will never change in Man- 
dela's lifetime. He's already 71 years old. I 
think it's important for people to remem- 
ber that even though Mandela is free from 
prison. South Africa is not free from its 
racist regime." Jaison Greene, a commuiu- 
cations major, had similar thoughts on the 
matter "1 truly feel that the South African 
government is playing a psychological 
game that has no real political meaning. 1 
think since [Mandela's] release, the govern- 
ment has not moved any further towards 
dismantling apartheid. In the media we see 
more blood being shed by the black Ac- 



tions and they [the media] make it seem 
like releasing him did more harm than 
good for the blacks." 

If the prevalent violence were to keep 
from spreading. Mandela and de Klerk 
would have to put their diplomatic skills to 
work to produce results quickly. The first 
step would be to end the state of emergen- 
cy, and if protests were kept peaceful Pre- 
toria could abolish the "security laws" in a 
matter of months or even weeks. 

Though de Klerk promised "an end to 
white domination" and a "new era" in 
South Africa, the world and especially 
those living within the country had to be 
prepared to exercise their patience. The 
release of Nelson Mandela was only the 
first in a string of upcoming events. We 
must be cautious of premature celebra- 
tions because the struggle is not over yet. 
The changes that were made thus far 
could only be called "superficial" while the 
reality of apartheid remains a daily fact of 
life for black South Africans. |n 

by Cedra Eaton and Evelise Ribeiro 



50/News 



General Manuel Noriega delivers an anti-American 
speech in Panama City on October 1 1 . Noriega was 
imprisoned in his country because of drug-related 
charges- 




Copy n^t 1989 Twentieth Century Fox FSm Cdrporatuin 




November 9 The Berlin Wall was opened. 
East Genmans allowed free travel for first 
time since 1961 . . . November 14 Thou- 
sands of UMass students went on strike to 
save the future of public higher education 
in respoftse to the budget cuts. Many par- 
ticipated in teach-irts artd forums as alter- 
natives to regular classes . . . November 15 
UMass students registered to vote in three 
day voter registration drive held on Cam- 
pus Center Concourse. Students hoped to 
influence their legislators to vote for new 
taxes by becoming registered voters . . . 
November 15 The Graduate Employee Or 
ganization decided to join the Union of Un- 
dergraduates strike and cancel classes . . . 
November 29 Rajiv Gaixlhi resigrted as 
prime minister of India . . . December 6 
Worst mass murder in Canadian history 
occurred as Mark Lepirte shot fourteen 
woimn engineering students at the Univer- 
sity of Montreal . . . December 17 The . 
Simpsons debut on prime time with a' 
Christmas special . . . December 20 New 
government set up in Panama, headed by 
President Guillermo Ertdara, after invaded 
by the U.S. . . . f^ease turn to p. 53 far 
more. 



The Simpsons are heralded as "the normal American 
femlly in all its beauty and all its horror" by Execu- 
tive Producer James I_ Brook. The Simpsons first 
appeared on 77>e Tracy tUiman Show before going 
primetime. 



News/51 



More On 
Mandela 



Nelson Mandela, African National Congress leader, 
breaks into a smile during a Cape Town, South Africa 
press conference. Tfie day before, he was released 
from custody after serving 27 years in prison. 

The AIDS quilt is seen in Washington D.C. Panels of 
the quilt appeared at the Student Onion Ballroom in 
March. 





AP/World Wide Photo 













52/ News 



Nelson Mandela Isn't 

Just Any Man 



On February 11, 1990, Nelson Man- 
dela, the seventy-one year old im- 
prisoned nnember of the African Na- 
tional Congress (ANC) was released from 
the Victor Verster Prison Farm which is 
located thirty-five miles east of Cape 
Town, South Africa. The release of this 
symbolic leader of the struggle against 
apartheid sent cries of happiness and 
shouts of confusion around the world. To 
gain a better understanding of the impor- 
tance of this event, one must get an idea of 
what preceded his release and who Man- 
dela is. 

Mandela was born into the royal family 
of the Thembu tribe of Xhosa people. In his 
later years he earned a law degree from the 
University of the Witwatersrand. In 1944 
he and classmate Oliver Tambo helped es- 
tablish the Youth League, which helped to 
implement the program of action that 
called for strikes, boycotts and civil disobe- 
dience against the oppressive laws of the 
South African government. In 1952 Tambo 
and Mandela set up the first black law 
practice in the nation. Their specialization 
was representing blacks who failed to car- 
ry the passes that were required of them 
while in white neighborhoods. They sup- 
ported the Freedom Charter, a socialist 
economic credo, and then became active 
members of the ANC. Until 1960, Mande- 
la's actions were all peaceful, but after the 
Sharpeville Massacre in which 69 black 






J^ifl^ir 









^^- 






•^Si 



protestors were killed by the police, he and 
the ANC abandoned the peaceful methods 
and established an underground military 
wing in retaliation. The wing, Gmkhonto 
we Sizure (Spear of the Nation) launched a 
campaign of sabotage. In 1962 Mandela 
and his colleagues were apprehended. 
They were convicted in June 1964 of at- 
tempting to overthrow the government, 
and Mandela's sentence was life imprison- 
ment. 

The first two decades were filled with 
hardships as an inmate at the penal colony 
of Robben Island Prison. He endured hard 
labor swinging a pickax, breaking boulders 
into gravel. He was then transferred to 
Pollsmoor Prison, and later to Victor Ver- 
ster where he remained. While at Victor 
Verster he began negotiating with Presi- 
dent Botha about the release of ANC pris- 
oners and the impending end to apartheid. 
Talks with Botha were stagnant, but with 
the new president, de Klerk, talks became 
more productive. The new president lifted 
a 30 year ban on the ANC, released a few 
prominent black political prisoners and 
gave restricted anti-apartheid groups some 
leeway to operate. The release of Mandela 
was the second to last step in the anti- 
apartheid struggle; the final step is ending 
the oppressive system of apartheid. jLh 

by Evelise Ribeiro and Cedra Eaton 




Other 
News 



January 4 First major earthquake to hit an 
Australian city struck Newcastle; tremor 
measured 5.5 on the Richter scale . . . 
January 8 Writer Samuel Beckett, author 
of Waiting for Godot and numerous plays 
and novels, died in Paris . . . February 7 
290,000 gallons of oil spilled just off the , 
coast of Huntington Beach in California . . 
February 27 Randolph W. Bromery chosen 
as interim chancellor of higher education 
in Massachusetts. Bromery replaced 
Franklyn C. Jenifer; Jenifer departed to 
serve as president of Howard University . . 
February 28 Not guilty given as verdict 
for four protestors involved in Spring 1989 
; anti-military demonstrations on campus . . 
March Indian Awareness Month began at 
UMass. Lectures and educational events 
were held to foster cultural sensitivity on 
campus . . . March 17 Duffey took over 
David Knapp's role as President of the uni- 
versity system. Duffey assumed this role 
in addition to being Chancellor . . . March 
23 Fergie gave birth to second daughter . 
. March 28 AIDS Memorial Quilt displayed 
at Student Union Ballroom. The quilt is 
made up of panels that memorialize AIDS 
victims . . . Please turn to page 55 for more 



The Duchess of York holds her week old daughter, 
Princess Eugenie Victoria Helena, after leaving the 
Portland Hospital in London at the end of March. 
Princess Eugenie is the second child of the Duke and 
Duchess of York and the sixth grandchild of Queen 
Elizabeth II. 



AP/World Wide Photo 



AP/World Wide Photo 



News/53 



Two people 91^ to the Earth Day crowd on the 
Amheist Common. i;300 people made their way to 
the tables set up with environmental information. 



Earth 
Day 



All Celebrated 

Earth Day 1990 



Americans are waking up. Earth Day 
1990, April 22, was a massive 
woridwide attempt at encouraging 
environmental awareness that has become 
so prevalent in recent years. 

Earth Day 1990 was not a weak attempt 
at educating all, sponsored by young ideal- 
ists clad in tiedyes and beads. This one 
was far different than the first Earth Day 
held in 1970 whose primary goal was de- 
veloping national environmental laws. The 
latest Earth Day's hopes was to send the 
message to legislators that stricter laws 
than the Federal Government's are neces- 
sary. Only this time the supfKjrters were 
housewives, fishermen, blue collar work- 
ers, rock stars and everything in between. 

The world celebrated, by planting trees in 
Kenya, protesting the polluted air in Britain 
and speaking out against nuclear power in 
Italy. Closer to home there was shore 
scrubbing in California; Manhattan dis- 
played the world's largest energy-efficient 
light bulb. China's Premier Li Ping spoke in 
Beijing in favor of environmental ■protec- 
tion; the VH-1 cable network aired fifty-two 
consecutive hours of Earth Day program- 
ming. Even the Little Mermaid appeared in 



a video about water pollution distributed 
by Walt Disney Company. 

High school students saw the need for 
change; in New Jersey, at West Milford 
High School, a social studies class' urging 
prompted the local school board to replace 
styrofoam trays with washable dishes. 
Also, students have joined such nation- 
wide groups as Kids Against Pollution, and 
are raising money to buy acreage in the 
endangered rain forests. 

It is not surprising that Americans have 
reacted with such vigor about the environ- 
ment, as the Reagan Administration cut 
the Environmental Protection Agency's 
regulatory clout and budget. As the gov- 
ernment clearly loosened their politics, this 
led Americans to believe their efforts 
would be effective. And they were — in No- 
vember of that year Califomians planned 
to vote on the strongest protection pack- 
age of any state: protecting all food, air and 
water from any chemical contamination. 
Hopefully California will continue its trend- 
setting ways and such proposals will 
emerge in all fifty states. #5| 

by Elizabeth Lord 





54/News 



Rioto by Joei Sohannan 
Jonathan Travers holds a Blue Whale for Greenpeace 
on Earth Day. People without inflatable whales 
showed support by wearing green ribbons which sym- 
bolized the unity of the earth and its inhabitants. 



AP/Wdrid Wide PtnU 
Jim Henson, creator of the Muppc^ts, is shown with 
Kemnit the frog. Henson died of pneumonia. 




March 31 Thousands hit the streets of Lon- 
don revolting the poll tax. Under this new 
syst«n which began April 1, adults pay a 
flat rate based on the cost of their local 
gowemm«jt services . . . April 5 It was 
found that ClMass still had financial ties 
with South Africa . . . April 18 Teactiing 
Assistants held classes in Whitmore Ad- 
ministration building as a plea for iHiion 
recognition by graduate student «npioy- 
ees . . . April 30 Prisoner Frank Reed re- 
leased after forty two ntonths of captivity . 
. . May 1. 1,700 students statewide rallied 
' on Boston Common for pn>ch«ce . . . May ' 
5 Fortieth Anniv^sary df WMCIA . . . May , 
16 Sammy Davis Jr. died . . . May 16 Jim 
Henson. creator of the Muppets, died . . . 
May 27 (lA^ass commemconott hekLKjh 

by Qizabeth Lord 



Pfaoto by Joel Sotoiman 





AP/Worid Wide RioId 
Sammy Davis. Jr. is shown in character in 1973. The 
worid mourned the death of this famous entertainer. 



nntaby I 



I Vamqf 



Silent protestors against apartheid position ttiem- 
sehres on the Wliitmore ramp. Tlie protest took place 
after it was discovered tliat UMass had financial lies 
in South Africa. 



News/55 



An engineering major mixes chemicals 
for hiis lab. Labs were essential in giving 
students a complete understanding of 
their workloads. 

Resource Economics major Eric Gold- 
man studies for a class in his major. 
Time management was essential to bal- 
ance the heavy workload of five class- 




Photo by Melissa Reder 
DeAnna Joseph completes a paper in 
the Computer Room of the Tower Li- 
brary. The Computer Room was an as- 
set to students who didn't own type- 
writers or whose printers didn't work. 




56/ Academics 



Academics 



P^^^Pr 



.»»» 




Academics 

There is no question that when students 
come to the University of Massachusetts, 
they receive a diverse education. Yet, it is 
what students learn in the classroom that 
draws them to the University and helps them 
get a job. 

Whether they take Introduction to 
Communications for a general education 
requirement or Physiological Psychology to 
fulfill a major requirement, students' academic 
experiences at GMass are important to them.Q 



Photo by Jeff Holland 



Academics/57 




Graduating Seniors Who Demonstrate Outstanding Leadership And Service 

To The 
University Conmiunity While Achieving Academic Excellence Receive The 

1990 Senior Leadership Award 



Vir^nia M. Adams 
Laurie J. Aroit 
liancy Ameson 
EsDzabeth A. Azar 
Andiea L. Baksr 
rachael A. BariHaro 
Mkole E. Bdhuntojr 
Marques Boiton 
Ki^lte Bo^dowitz 
Nancy C. Beuschel 
Thoir D. BioFn 
Juifith A. BBSS 
Jennifer Lee BoHz 
Kristine Brenc 
Gabridle D. Bufoid 
Joyce A. Bunill 
Jufie Beth Chaiken 
Claudia M. Chang 
Erin Lynn Code 
EGzabetfi Anne Cohen 
Midiele l_ Companion 
Erin EGzabelh Conley 
Thecq>hilos ConstantinidBs 
Elizabeth A. Dacey 
Bi^nda Daniels 
Tracy Davis 
Erin J. Desmond 



Ramfi M. Dubno 
John Dunlap 
Cedra E. Eaton 
Lisa B. Eidlin 
EBzabelh Ertian 
Laura B. Rlldns 
Rosonary B. Rynn 
Tracy Poole Fowler 
Kim Fountain 
Christine E. Gaboury 
Christi^>heer G. Ganfiner 
Jdfrey Giassman 
James D. Guicfice 
Lauid A. Halxnk 
Caria Halpem 
Dawn T. Hamd 
David A. Hancox 
Jonathan E. Haiti 
Pamela Hewitt 
Meghan A. Hopkins 
Tara Igoe 
HekB A. Jacobs 
Edward B. Kempster 
Surassawadee Keopradit 
MeBssa K. Kem 
PaulE. Kimball 
Pegg^ A. Klekotka 



Kana Patricia LaRene 
Adam Levine 
Nonnan R. Lemcke 
Kristina M. Lentz 
Scott Bradford Lever 
Naomi Elayne Under 
Anne Livamore 
Maria C. Rinaldoiizotte 
Susan W. MacArlhur 
Maria Atecedo 
Beatrice A. Martin 
Matthew E. McCarthy 
Erica L. McKinley 
GaU Marie McLaughlin 
Kathle«) A. Mellen 
Marissa Mdliza 
Jacqueline H.E. Mesang 
Mary Beth Mignosa 
Lynn Minaaan 
Todd Morrison 
Nancy M. Narbut 
Eric Nakajima 
David J. Narkewicz 
JuBa M. Norris 
Amanda Norvell 
Katie O'Brien 
Samantha Lynne Oddo 



Kim Tracy Palmieri 
Ann Marie Partenheinner 
John Andrew Polagruto 
Jenrufer A. Pollock 
Elba M. Quinones 
Beth C. Rawson 
Melissa J. Rach 
Linda Jean Retlfoog 
Guilhermina Evelise Riboro 
William T. Riddell 
Norma Rivera Diaz 
Roscoe F. Robinson. Jr. 
April Marie Rogowski 
Anthony J. Saccavbio 
Vannak Saing 
Jennifer A. Schreiner 
ErickE.Seda 
Maria Serpa 
Robert J. Seward 
Dayna L. Shafer 
Jean Elizabeth Shaw 
Sarah J. SheMon 
Melissa B. Silveistein 
Thomas M. Skiba 
Babar Sobhan 
Thomas J. Spellms 
DonaM R. Steul 



Katie M. Stewart 
Donna A. StirtonOashow 
Sherri L. Sutton 
Amer Syed 
Lori J. Tamke 
Mkrhdle Ann Totfi 
Tom Toan Truong 
Loien E. VanAllen 
Mark Viesta 
Sharon Lee Waldman 
Patricia Anne Walsh 
Teresa Maureen Ward 
Karen V. Watts 
Rafael Wal 
Usa K. Weiner 
Veroinca M. Wekii 
Jeflrey L. Whitney 
Karen E. Willaid 
Veroinca Joy Wolf 
Marguerite Wrona 
Kristen I. Zagarella 
James J. Zervas 
Matthew Zieper 



58/Academics 




Alumni Office Helps Students 

Gain Recognition 



1990 marked the second year 
that Senior Leadership 
Awards were given to se- 
niors. 

Established by the Alumni 
Office in 1989, the Senior Lead- 
ership Award recognized gradu- 
ating seniors who demonstrat- 
ed outstanding leadership and 
service to the University com- 
munity during their study at 
the Amherst campus. In addi- 
tion to active involvement on 
campus, award winners upheld 
a serious commitment to aca- 
demic excellence. 



The Alumni Office also spon- 
sored the Senior Campaign. 
The theme of the camptaign 
was "UMassed For It, You Got 
It" Events included a Senior 
Bash in the Campus Center and 
a Senior Picnic across from the 
Campus Pond. The campaign 
allowed seniors to have fun at 
the University's expense and 
made them feel like they were 
special in the eyes of UMass. 



Q 



by Ana Tolentino 
Mary Sbuttoni 



Vogli and 




PholD by Ana T u tenftio Vo^ 



Academics/59 




David Knapp resigned from thie posi- 
tion of President of the University Sys- 
tem this year. He served as president 
for 12 years. 

Joseph Duffey sits in a meeting room 
with a 1987 Index. Being called "Presi- 
dent Duffey" took getting used to by 
him, as well as the students, faculty 
and staff at the University's campuses. 




Photo by Mary Sbuttoni 



60/ Administration 



In The Midst Of Budget Cuts 

Duffey Takes On Dual Role 



In March of 1990 a system 
that had been in effect for 
20 years was changed. 
From the 60s to the 70s the 
president was the head of the 
(JMass system and (JMass cam- 
pus according to David Knapp, 
former President of the Clniver- 
sity system. Knapp stated that 
the medical campus and Bos- 
ton campuses developed as off- 
shoots. 

"The Board of Trustees rec- 
ommended three campuses 
with the president detached. 
This gave the University more 
power than any other system in 
higher education. It made edu- 
cators and politicians uncom- 
fortable," said Knapp. 

Thus, Knapp resigned as 
president of the University Sys- 
tem, and the Board of Regents 
of Higher Education confirmed 
Chancellor Duffey as the new 
president. Duffey became the 



first UMass chancellor to hold 
the dual role of chancellor and 
president. In addition to his al- 
ready heavy workload, he 
gained the responsibility of 
overseeing and coordinating 
the Amherst, Boston and 
Worcester campuses. 

A March issue of the Colle- 
gian reported that Duffey, who 
was reluctant to accept the 
added position, planned to re- 
duce the ambiguity surround- 
ing the role of the president. 
"The office may have been 
suffering from a lack of defini- 
tion,' [Duffey] said." 

Duffey also planned to de- 
centralize the president's office 
to reduce hassles for the other 
university chancellors. 

"The future of the central of- 
fice is still uncertain because of 
the budget problems, but we're 
diverting as many resources to 
the campus as possible. All 



three campuses are reducing 
staff and the central office is 
smaller," stated Duffey. He 
continued, "We now have few- 
er meetings, as well. It was diffi- 
cult for the large staff to come 
together. There have also been 
reductions in paperwork and 
forms. More available re- 
sources are being put on cam- 
pus." 

Duffey also mentioned that 
two or three years previous to 
Knapp's resignation, time was 
devoted to making the neces- 
sary reductions in the Universi- 
ty's budget without majorly ef- 
fecting the classrooms and 
teaching. "We cut 50% more in 
administration than in academ- 
ics, but I think the University 
coped well," replied Duffey. ryi 

by Mary SbuttonI 



Administration/61 




A student wields some metal in her 
class. The semester went by faster if 
students enjoyed their classes. 



Photo by Lisa Pialewak 



62/ Academtc: 




Distinguished Teacher Award Given To 

Outstanding Teachers 



The Distinguished Teach- 
er Award is presented 
annually by the Gradu- 
ate Student Senate. Usually 
three Acuity members and 
three teaching assistants, nomi- 
nated by students, are honored 
in recognition of good teaching. 
The nominees are evaluated 
in eight categories, ranging 
from motivating their students 
and sensitivity to grading pro- 
cedures and clarity of the pre- 
sentation of subject matter. 



Government Association and 
the Graduate Student Senate. 
The 1990 recipients of the 
Distinguished Teacher Awards 
were; Professor Arthur Kinney, 
English; Professor Jerome 
Meyers, Psychology; Professor 
Frank Kaminsky, Industrial En- 
gineering; Professor Mark 
Sayre, Forestry & Wildlife Man- 
agement (posthumously); Grad- 
uate Student Lou Bemey, En- 
glish; Graduate Student Mary 
Yoko Brannen. School of Man- 



Candidates are judged by a agement.^^ 
committee consisting of repre ^y Mary Sbuttoni 

sentatives from the Student 



Pfnto by J^Hollanci 




A woman studies in her dorm room. A 
professor could make or break a class- 

A man goes over notes for his class. A 
good professor could unknowingly in- 
fluence students to change their majors 
to the one wtiich is the sublet of the 
class. 



Photo by Lisa r^ewak 



Academics/ 63 



In The Face Of The State's Budget Crisis 

Faculty Suffers 



Under the guise of 'busi- 
nessas-usual" at the 
University of Massachu- 
setts at Amherst (CJMASS) 
lurks a disturbing trend. A cam- 
pus movement for the '90s is at 
hand. Faculty, once gazing at a 
bright future on the state's flag- 
ship campus, are now seeking 
greener pastures in the wake of 
budget cuts in the state's high- 
er education system. 

With the state budget deficit 
rapidly approaching $1 billion, 
the state's 27 colleges and uni- 
versities have had to shoulder a 
significant portion of the cost 
trimming over the last year. As 
a result, GMASS, after two de- 
cades of expansion that saw its 
star rise in the academic world, 
now must struggle to retain fac- 
ulty members instrumental to 
its continued growth and suc- 
cess. 

"Although it would be diffi- 
cult to get a member of our 
department to admit it, faculty 
without the relative safety of 
tenure are exploring other op- 



tions," said Amity Lee-Bradley, 
payroll secretary in the Univer- 
sity's entomology department. 
The prevailing feeling is that 
the opportunities are slim and 
aspiring graduate students and 
post-doctorates aren't likely to 
find themselves in a faculty po- 
sition because there simply 
aren't going to be available," 
she said. 

These developments, cou- 
pled with the threat of further 
reductions in funds and normal 
attrition, translate into an un- 
settling situation for University 
administration and faculty. 

"We have an aging faculty," 
said Comparative Literature 
Professor Maria A. Tymoczko, 
a member of the Faculty Sen- 
ate. "There is a gap between 
older and younger faculty 
members that will play a signifi- 
cant role in the coming years. 
Without continued recruitment 
of new faculty, the University 
will not be able to keep pace 
with retirements and faculty 
leaving this institution for a 



more supportive environ- 
ment." 

The task of retaining and re- 
cruiting faculty falls on the ad- 
ministration who are hard 
pressed to offer promises of 
better days ahead. The fight to 
keep positions filled is made 
more difficult by the apprehen- 
sion potential recruits feel at 
the prospect of further cuts 
and layoffs, possibly of tenured 
faculty as well. In other cost 
cutting moves, an early retire- 
ment program was begun last 
year and in 1990 a 10 day hir- 
ing freeze was implemented. 

Speaking at a Faculty Sen- 
ate meeting on April 19, Univer- 
sity Provost Richard O'Brien 
said that 32 professors elected 
to retire early and 24 other fac- 
ulty positions were expected to 
be vacated due to regular retire- 
ment and sabbaticals. In all, 56 
slots remained to be filled as of 
that month. Appointments 
were forthcoming, however, 
under a program to promote 
minorities that will see 23 regu- 



lar teaching positions and 11 
professorships filled. 

"There will be at least 34 
new faces at the University 
next year," O'Brien said. "We 
are not totally stagnant, even 
though indications seem to 
point in that direction. We are) 
continuing to function." 

Combatting the budgetl 
scythe will prove to be a long 
haul for the University. The 
current paralysis of state gov- 
ernment and its apparent desire 
to downsize the higher educa- 
tion to cure budget shortfalls 
could lead to further crisis for 
faculty and the University com-; 
munity at large. In order to pre- 
serve the quality of the aca- 
demic community experience] 
for faculty and student alike at 
UMASS, the state and its larg- 
est university must attempt to 
reach a common fiscal ground. 
In doing so, the future of the 
University and its contributions 
to the state's economy can be 
fully realized. [t^ 

by Glenn D. LaChapelle 



64/ Faculty 




Photo Courtesy of Photo Services 



Professor Kaminsky, who teaches 
courses in Industrial Engineering, 
•seems to be contemplating the status 
the budget crisis has left the faculty 



with. A common fiscal ground must be 
reached between the state and (JMass 
in order to maintain our quality of 
teaching. 



Faculty/65 



A couple take a break from studying on 
a couch in the Campus Center Base- 
ment. Even when students wanted to 
get a lot of work done, sometimes sleep 
took over. 

Journalism major Mark Briggs finishes 
up some homework just as the sun is 
rising. One advantage of studying in a 
residence hall lounge is that it never 
shuts down. 




M 




Photo bv Beth Lord 
Senior Mark Haley does some work at 
the Registration desk in the Campus 
Center's Music Room. A disadvantage 
to studying in a social place was that it 
was easy to be distracted. 




Photo by David Sawan 



66/Studying 




UMass Students Have Different Ideas About 

Points To Ponder 



OK. The midterm's 
done. Just one more 
• exam and that ten- 
page paper to do tonight, it's 
only 9 o'clock and the library is 
open until 12. Suddenly the 
building is filled with the jarn- 
ing sound of the fire alarm. 
Maybe nothing will get done af- 
ter all. 

Junior Jon "Beast" Thomp- 
son was one of the more pre- 
pared types: "I'm lucky be- 
cause I take really, neat 
organized notes although it 
gets to be annoying when ev- 
eryone else wants to study 



Photo by Mason Rivlin 




from them." 

Some students like Scott 
Schaeffer begin projects as 
soon as they are assigned. "If I 
put (assignments from my 
computer classes) off to the 
last minute and I don't under- 
stand what I'm doing, I'm lost. 

Yet some students are at the 
other end of the spectrum en- 
tirely. Sophmore Jessica Jack- 
son, for example, had a totally 
different attitude. "I'm not mo- 
tivated enough. Many times I'll 
go to the library and if there are 
no desks on my favorite floor, 
I'll just turn around and go 

Michael Edelsgin, sophomore Interpre- 
tor Studies major catches up on some 
work. He found an out of the way stair- 
case to be a great place to study. 



home." 

Junior Jean Kelley admitted 
that doing work during the day 
or for more than 3 hours at a 
time is virtually impossible for 
her. For some reason, I am able 
to study harder knowing that I 
have 2 tests the next day." 

While some students study 
well in loud environments, oth- 
ers need the silence of a quiet 
floor in the library. Freshman 
Mark Bourne for example, liked 
to study in his room. "I need a 
relaxed atmosohere to get my 
work done." ^1 

-by Leslie Reisman 



Photo by Beth Lord 



Studying/67 




Photo by Paul Agnew 



Kim Budd, senior trainer, judges a driv- 
er's distance from a cone. The annual 
rodeo challenged students' driving 
skills in a fun atmosphere. 

A bus driver performs a diminishing 
clearance manuever. The cones gradu- 
ally came closer together, testing the 
driver's judgement. 




Photo by Paul Agnew 
Dave Whalen, junior astronomy major, 
stands in front of his "stelth fighter." 
Some students became attached to the 
buses they drove. 



68/ Academics 



Working For The UMass Transit Is 

A Learning Experience 



Many students may take 
the free bus system of- 
fered by the University 
of Massachusetts for granted. 
Carrying nearly 18,000 stu- 
dents, staff, faculty and resi- 
dents to and from classes, 
work, the five-college area, and 
surrounding towns is a massive 
responsibility. Yet, often this re- 
sponsibility is taken on by stu- 
dents. The (JMass Transit Sys- 
tem employs seven 
non-student full-time staff 
members, in addition to me- 
chanics. The remaining 180 
part-time employees are reli- 
able students who man the 
fleet of buses and shuttle pas- 
sengers to and from their desti- 
nation on a daily basis. 

These students start out as 
drivers after obtaining a class II 
learner's permit and success- 
fully completing an interview 
and road test. Then they are 
ready for about 50 hours of 
paid training. By this time, 
about 80 of some 250 appli- 
cants remain, according to 



Lindsey Strongren, safety and 
training coordinator of the Ser- 
vice. 

Jerry Tracy, senior sociology 
major, started working for 
OMass Transit four years ago 
when there was no pay for 
training. "I always wanted to 
drive a bus," Tracy said. "It's 
real fun, and it's one of the best 
jobs on campus. The hours are 
great and the pay's good." 

If students like Tracy prove 
to be reliable and show an Inter- 
est, they have the opportunity 
to be promoted to dispatchers, 
trainers and supervisors, 
among other things. Tracy, for 
example, worked his way up to 
dispatcher, driver supervisor 
and trainer. And, as a require- 
ment, he still drives. 

Although the pay and many 
opportunities for advancement 
work as incentives, there is a 
high turnover rate among driv- 
ers because 1 /4 of student driv- 
ers either graduate, transfer 
from the University or go on an 
internship or coop, according 



to Strongren. However, the stu- 
dents leave the University with 
the experience of working in a 
company, and an appealing re- 
sume. 

"We have high standards 
here. Students have to have 
good time management," said 
Christine Catalano, assistant 
manager of Transit Services. 
"We set up the students' driv- 
ing schedules initially, but then 
the students take care of it." 
Strongren added, "It's a real 
learning experience. Working 
for the UMass Transit is a 'real 
world' type job." 

Dave Lane, Management In- 
formation Systems Manager, 
agreed. He planned to stay in 
the area after graduation in 
May to help out until he found 
a job somewhere else. "You 
meet a wide range of people 
here, and there's some kind of 
bonding," he said. "After all, 
we're all bus drivers.' 



by Mary Sbuttoni 




Photo by Paul Agnew 



Photo by Paul Agnew 
David Lane announces the scores at 
the UMass Transit's 1990 Rodeo while 
Angela McCray and Ed Schiffman ob- 
serve the buses. The winner of the ro- 
deo could go on to the national rodeo in 
Houston. 



Academics/69 




School Of Education's Setbacks Are 

Mixed With Successes 



Like most of the Universi- 
ty's departments, the 
School of Education was 
adversely affected by budget 
cuts in 1990. According to the 
School of Education Newslet- 
ter, the lack of funds allowed 
the replacement of only one of 
the 14 faculty members lost 
since the beginning of the 1988- 
89 school year. 

However, setbacks were 
mixed with successes. The 
School of Education ISewslet- 
ter reported that the state 
Board of Education approved 
the University's 19 teacher 
preparation programs as well 
as its certificate programs, 
which are offered in 78 differ- 
ent areas and/or levels. 

Many of the Class of 1990's 
personal successes, however, 
came during semesters spent 
student teaching in the commu- 
nity. It was there that they 
could apply what they had 
learned and decide if they did 
indeed wanted to teach. 

Senior Amy Baker found her- 
self with a lot more responsibil- 
ity than she expected when her 
cooperating teacher was out 
for weeks due to injury. 



"There were subs in and 
out," she said, "but 1 ended up 
knowing more about the class- 
room than them. I really en- 
joyed it. It gave me a lot of 
good experience. I was able to 
be involved in everything, even 
parent conferences." 

Baker felt that working with 
the first graders in the class 
was the most rewarding aspect 
of her experience. 

"They were pretty involved 
in my life. They become depen- 
dent on you. For a lot of them, 
school is more consistent than 
their home lives," she said. 

"it is very important that stu- 
dents at CIMass continue to 
have as much classroom expe- 
rience as we had," she added. 
"It helped you to determine 
what you wanted to do, if 
teaching was right for you." 

Marcia Santner, a third grade 
teacher at Swift River School in 
New Salem, MA, has found 
GMass students to be a great 
help in her classroom. 

"It's nice to have a younger 
person in there. The kids relate 
well to younger people," 
Santner said. 

"The freshness and enthusi- 



asm of college students is real- 
ly neat," she continued. "And 
the kids, for the most part, at- 
tach themselves to them and 
love them." 

(JMass students helped 
make the 1989-90 school year 
special for Mrs. Santner's 
class. She remembered under- 
water environment that three 
pre-practicum students created 
out of her classroom. 

"They transformed the 
room. The kids loved every 
minute of it," she said. "You 
were actually in a submarine 
looking out. It was really cute. 
Well worth their efforts." 

"It was nice because later in 
the year I taught about whales 
and the kids already had that 
foundation," Santner contin- 
ued. 

The learning didn't end 
there, though. Santner and 
spring intern Michelle Turenne 
planned a whale watch at the 
end of the year. The kids and 
their parents camped overnight 
and then drove to Portsmouth, 
NH. However, it was so foggy 
that they didn't see any whales. 

"This year we're going to try 
again. I have someone covering 



my third grade class so I can 
take the fourth graders to Bos- 
ton," she said. "It seems such a 
shame that it didn't work out 
before. They learned so much 
about whales! It would be great 
for them to see a real one." 

Turenne enjoyed her teach- 
ing experience with Santner. 

"It was a lot of fun. She gave 
me a lot of control; she let me 
experiment," Turenne said, "ft 
was a very open classroom. 
She brings the outside world 
into the classroom as much as 
she can." 

Santner, a 1976 CIMass grad, 
is one of many area teachers 
involved with the University's 
teacher training programs. 

"I've had lots of interns over 
the years," she said. "I enjoy 
working with them to the hilt. I 
enjoy teaching and working 
with the college age group, 
too!" rt^ 

by Marguerite Paolino 



loo! Of Education 




Teaching assistant Susan Etheredge 
goes over some classwork with a stu- 
dent. The state Board of Education ap- 
proved the University's teacher prepa- 
ration programs and certificate 
programs that year. 

Byrd Jones, a professor in staff devel- 
opment, goes over a manual. Due to 
lack of funds, only one faculty member 
out of 14 members lost was replaced. 



Photo by Melissa Reder 



Students in an upper level education 
class discuss potential curriculums. 
Student teaching was a valuable expe- 
rience for education majors. 



Photo by Melissa Reder 



School Of Education/71 




Sam Bastia, engineering major, works 
intently during his weekly lab section. 
All engineers endured labs in chemistry 
and physics. 




Photo by Lee Piazza 
Two contruction workers help continue 
progress on the new Engineering Re- 
search Facility. The building was 
planned as an addition to the engineer- 
ing facilities, providing more office 
space and more up-to-date laboratories. 




Photo by Lisa Malewak 



72/ Engineering 



There Always Seems To Be Something Happening In The 

College Of Engineering 



Encompassing approxi- 
mately 12% of tiie under- 
graduate community and 
120 faculty members, the Col- 
lege of Engineering provides 
technical training to prepare 
students for the engineering 
field of their choice, whether it 
be chemical, civil, electrical, 
computer, industrial, or me- 
chanical. 

The College of Engineering, 
however, is more than just 
structure, skills, and a rigor. It 
also serves as a center for 
events, societies, and pro- 
grams. It holds student partici- 
pation and interaction in as 
high regard as education Itself. 
It is a college which allows stu- 



dents to put analytical skills 
into practical use. 

In its fourteenth year of ser- 
vice, the Minority Engineering 
program is designed to recruit, 
motivate, and graduate stu- 
dents of ALANA descent in en- 
gineering. Asian, African-Amer- 
ican, Latino, and Native 
American students make up 
nearly 10% of the College of 
Engineering undergraduates. 

For future engineering stu- 
dents, October 7, 1989 marked 
a new beginning, as construc- 
tion of the "Engineering Re- 
search Faculty" began. The 
building's resources will in- 
clude remote sensing laborato- 
ries, radar lab, an electronics 




shop, a conference room, and a 
data acquisition center. It will 
also provide office space for 
faculty, staff, and graduate stu- 
dents. Future classes will be 
able to reap the benefits of this 
new facility. 

A new lecture series, Tsuan 
Hua Feng, was also established 
this year to bring distinguished 
speakers in Environmental En- 
gineering to the University. Pro- 
fessor Perry L. McCarty from 
Stanford University began the 
series with a lecture on "Envi- 
ronmental Problems from Haz- 
ardous Substances and Their 
Control," on September 28.rjj 

-by Lori Markoff 

The Engineering Research Facility 
stands tall during fall construction. 
This facility was the newest addition in 
twenty years to the School of Engineer- 
ing. 



Photo by Lisa Nalewak 



Engineering/73 



A landscape architecture student 
works on a studio project in Hills North. 
The preciseness and amount of detail 
put into the projects resulted in late 
night and early morning work for many 
students. 

This comic strip, a daily addition to the 
Collegian, depicts the confusion that 
many people face when discussing the 
Land Arch major. The major basically 
involved the designing of gardens and 
other outdoor facilities. 




Photo by David Sawan 



HEY IG6, 

WHATCHA 

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PROJECT 




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IGGY'S GONNA 
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Copyright 1990 Drew Aquilina 






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74/Landscape Architecture 



Planting Flowers And Budget Cuts Produce 

Not An Ordinary Year 



For the Landscape Archi- 
tecture and Regional 
Planning department 
(LARP), the 1989-90 school 
year has been exhausting. The 
students didn't just have to 
worry about finishing projects 
on time. For many, the fear of 
having their major cut from the 
curriculum led to worries that 
were far greater than whether 
or not they completed their pro- 
jects on time or got good 
grades. 

A five percent cut that was 
considered for the department 
would have major repercu- 
sions, including a 16% reduc- 
tion of faculty due to the elimi- 
nation of four junior faculty 
positions, potential loss of the 
director of the Landscape Oper- 
ations program, and termina- 
tion of at least one degree pro- 
gram offered in the 
department. For LARP, which 
had only been fully accredited 
over the past five years, its pos- 
sible demise would come as a 
major blow because of the hard 
work and commitment put into 
the establishment of its under- 



graduate and graduate pro- 
grams, one of only three pro- 
grams offered in Mew England, 
and the only one of those of- 
fered at a state school. The de- 
partment quickly organized it- 
self to attend the state schools 
rally against budget cuts in Oc- 
tober. Over thirty students and 
faculty from the department 
took part in this event. Their 
motto, fittingly enough, was 
"Don't Cut Our Roots." 

One of the main reasons why 
the march in Boston was 
thought to be negative was due 
to the fact that the flower beds 
surrounding the state house, 
mostly mums, were ruined. "It 
was unfortunate that the flow- 
ers were destroyed; the media 
focused most of their attention 
on this and forgot why the stu- 
dents were there," commented 
senior Drew Aquilina. Junior 
Donald Nunes remarked, "It's 
just incredible. I spend what lit- 
tle free time ! have looking for 
schools to transfer to, because I 
don't know if my major will ex- 
ist anymore, and all the report- 
ers have to say is that a bunch 



of flowers were ruined. It isn't 
right." 

When repair of the state 
house gardens was mentioned, 
it was the LARP department 
that was responsible for it. Se- 
nior John Hancox and four oth- 
ers organized the effort. "I had 
seen the news coverage, went 
to my department with the 
idea, and was backed by forty- 
five others. Thousands of bulbs 
were planted; alumni and cam- 
pus organizations supplied the 
necessary funds." The attitude 
of the department was that the 
rally was destructive, and 
LARP students' tools, money, 
and skills were needed to repair 
the damage and to salvage the 
negative reputation the rally 
had brought. 

The future for the LARP de- 
partment is as of yet unclear, 
although fears are not as in- 
tense as they had been at the 
beginning of the year. Says 
sophomore Sean Barry, "I 
think we'll make it."Pl 

-by Kris Bruno and 
Elizabeth Lord 



Landscape Architecture/75 




Photo by Kristen Darling 
A student nurse makes a patient feel 
more comfortable. Student nurses as 
sisted registered nurses in clinical du- 
ties, enabling tfiem to get more out of 
the nursing program. 

A group of student nurses attend to tfie 
needs of a patient. Students had the 
opportunity to join the Student Nurse 
Association and provide public service. 




Photo by Kristen Darling 



76/rSursmg 



Many New Programs Offered As School Of 

Nursing Regains School Status 



This year, the School of 
Nursing regained its 
school status. The 
school currently has both un- 
dergraduate and graduate nurs- 
ing programs, and a doctoral 
program is in the works. 

A major part of the Nursing 
curriculum occurs at clinical, a 
class in which students assist 
registered nurses (RNs), in their 
duties while being observed by 
their professor. "Once 1 began 
clinical it finally made it worth- 
while. It assured me that nurs- 
ing is what I really want to do," 
remarked junior Kristen Dar- 
ling. 

All nursing students are invit- 
ed to join the Student Nursing 
Association (SNA), a registered 
student organization which pro- 
vides both public service and 
education to the community. A 
recent seminar sponsored by 
SNA was "Am I Afraid To Care 
For My AIDS Patient?" SNA 
President Lisa Watroba said, 
"This one day event consisted 
of a morning speaker, Robert 
Abel, the executive director of 



Dignalife; he addressed myths 
and facts about AIDS. Dignalife 
is a support service for people 
diagnosed with AIDS or whom 
are HIV positive." Christina 
Coates attended this event, "! 
was not aware how prevalent 
AIDS is in Massachusetts. Rob- 
ert Abel brought up local statis- 
tics and it is unfortunate how 
many cases exist. I realized I 
probably know someone that 
has or will have AIDS." 

Virginia Henderson, RN, 
nursing theorist and textbook 
author spoke to a crowded Me- 
morial Hall; another event 
sponsored by SNA. Instead of 
delivering a prepared speech, 
this vibrant ninety-two year old 
went around the audience 
while each person asked a 
question about nursing pro- 
cesses. Erich Goodman heard 
Ms. Henderson speak, "It was 
exciting to finally see her in per- 
son as I have read so much by 
and about her." 

Two new programs have 
been arranged by Dr. Barbara 
Banik to further educate her 



nursing students. The first is 
entitled "From Experts To Nov- 
ices;" each student in her Nurs- 
ing 201 class was matched 
with a registered nurse in Dr. 
Chandler's leadership class 
who are about to graduate. The 
students spent one day with 
their 'expert' nurse during their 
normal work hours. Some stu- 
dents went as far as Boston; 
others worked the nightshift — 
the purpose is to see what nurs- 
ing is really like. 

Over the summer, the RNs in 
Nursing 340 were offered a pro- 
gram, "Homeward Bound." 
The departmental newsletter. 
From 217, describes this, 
"Each student did a collabora- 
tive discharge planning with a 
client and a family in the RNs 
work setting and provided nurs- 
ing care to the client and family 
at home the remainder of the 
summer. They focused on criti- 
cal thinking and making clini- 
cal judgements in the context 
of the nursing process." kt] 

by Elizabeth Lord 



Nursing/77 



Rapid Expansion Is 
Prevalent In The 

School Of 
Management 



The School of Business 
Administration was 
founded in 1947, the 
year that Massachusetts State 
College officially became the 
University of Massachusetts. 
Starting out with ten faculty 
members, the School awarded 
its first B.A.s in business ad- 
ministration in 1949 to 15 grad- 
uates. The growth this school 
has enjoyed is reflected in the 
number of graduates in the 
Class of 1990 — more than 500 
— and a faculty of over 60 pro- 
fessors. 

Characterized by rapid ex- 
pansion, the School's evolution 
is founded in a commitment to 
quality programming. Dean 
O'Brien, faculty and staff share 
a genuine obligation to sustain 



the academic environment that 
is equivalent to the quality of 
the School's student popula- 
tion. Secondly, the School of 
Management is witnessing a re- 
surgence in its recognition of 
the importance of bonding the 
academic community with pri- 
vate and public sector leaders 
in the Commonwealth and be- 
yond. 

The School's undergradu- 
ates stand second to none 
among New England's under- 
graduate business students. Re- 
cently, Edward B. Fiske, riew 
York Times Education Editor, 
awarded the University four 
stars out of a possible five for 
the quality of education and 
value that its students receive. 
The School of Management 



was specifically highlighted for 
its competitive admissions 
standard and first-rate reputa- 
tion. 

Dean O'Brien holds great ex- 
pectations for the School's un- 
dergraduate, M.B.A. and Ph.D 
programs. A growing base of 
private support, especially 
from the School's loyal alumni 
and friends, has helped consid- 
erably by generating resources 
for such vital pursuits as facul- 
ty research, curriculum devel- 
opment, student financial assis- 
tance, the purchase of 
specialized research equip- 
ment, the Office of Placement, 
and the recruitment of talented 
young faculty. |v7) 

Courtesy of School of 
' Management 



78/ Management 





Photo by Elizabeth Lord 



Karen Ryder, SOM major, does home- 
work while waiting for a customer at 
the SOM Coffee Table. Profits made 
selling coffee went to VIBES, a commu- 
nity service organization. 

Jay Yampolsky and Erica Mannion go 
over some information in the SOM 
Placement Office. Company recruiters 
were drawn to the School of Manage- 
ment because of its competiveness. 



Photo by Elizahieth Lord 



Management/79 



^i^f^^^^^^^^^^f^w^w'^'^^Tw^^^^fT^^^'^w'^^^^^^'^^^^^'^'^^'w^ 



Lewis Oliver! hits the nail on the head. 
The baseball team was playing against 
Rutgers. 

A member of the wonmen's soccer 
team attempts to make a goal. The 
team had a successful season after a 
slow start. 





Photo by Ben Barnhart 
A minuteman just misses the ball in 
lacrosse. The lacrosse team made it to 
the NCAA Division 1 Championships 
for the fifth consecutive year. 





80/Athletics 



Athletics 






Athletics 




Students' pride in the University siiines 
through at sports events. 
Vivid memories of a basketball sailing 
through the hoop with the buzzer, breaking a 
tie, could be relived when we saw a member 
of the team on campus. The Marching Band 
echoed our cheers at football games. 

No matter what sport is played or what the 
final score is, CJMass is proud of its athletes. Q 




Photo by Joel Solomon 



Athletics/81 




PORTS EXTRA 



Members of the UMass soccer team wait patiently 
for the Star Spangled Banner to end so the game 
can begin. They received roses in celebration of 
the last game of the season. 




A fanatical fan plays air guitar along with the Pep 
Band at the "Rage in the Cage" in Curry Hicks. 
Some students found that they had to go beyond 
shouting cheers to show their support for the 
team. 



Photo by Jeff Holland 
John Tate, center for GMass, leaves the basket- 
ball on the endline after scoring against Rutgers. 
Fans were drawn to the games by the team's 
extraordinary wins. 




82/Sports Extra 




When They Miss Games 

Students Lose 



When the Minuteman basket- 
ball team started on their 
winter campaign in Novem- 
ber, there was a hardcore base of 
fans and a fair amount of empty 
seats. As the team's winning in- 
creased, however, so did the number 
of fans. 



Other teams with equally exciting 
games performed with almost no stu- 
dent support. The money you pay for 
your mandatory athletics fee sup- 
ports these teams. Why not get your 
money's worth? [tJl 

'— ^ by Jeff Holland 




Sports Extra/83 




PORTS EXTRA 



tIMass forward Willie Herndon moves against 
a Desquesne defender. "Air Herndon" did not 
spend much time on the floor because he was 
too busy slam dunking the ball. 




Photo by Jeff Holland 



84/ Sports Extra 




Jeremy Coffey (left) and Lamar Newsome 
(rigfit) carry Chris Colclough off the field after 
he hurt his leg in a play. Although Colclough 
was shaken up. he returned to the game. 




Photo by Jeff Holland 



Sometimes More Happens 

On The Sideline 



Action on the sidelines can be 
just as exciting and physical 
as on the field. Photographers 
and cameramen fight for the best an- 
gle as security tries to keep the press 
from getting the best shot. 

While keeping an eye on the com- 



petition, members of the press must 
also watch out for 250 pound line- 
backers. So if the action on the field 
seems slow, check the sidelines for a 
photographer crying over a broken 
$3,000 lens. [tJl 

*— ' by Jeff Holland 



Photo by Jeff Holland 
Helen Freeman shoots for the basket as Lisa Hair 
blocks a Dartmouth defender. The women's basket- 
ball team showed a lot of spirit despite their off- 
season. 



Sports Extra/85 




ROSS COUNTRY/ TRACK 



Despite Obstacles 

Team Does Best 



Despite weather inconducive to 
good track times, an inade- 
quate indoor track facility and 
a lack of fan support, UMass' cross 
country team had its best season in 
ten years, said Julie LaFreniere, 
coach of the women's track and field 
team. Women's cross country took 
second place in the Mew England 
Championships. "We beat Provi- 
dence College, and they placed tenth 
in the country," said Coach LaFren- 
iere. 



Shana Smith came in fourth at the 
New England cross country meet. 
She was the New England Champ in 
the 3000 meter outdoor track. 

It was performances like this 
which allowed CIMass to take third 
place at the Atlantic championships, 
following close behind West Virginia 
who took second. GMass later went 
to beat them at ECAC where they 
placed tenth overall. |tj| 



1990 Women's Outdoor Track Team: Front 
Row - Head Coach Julie LaFreniere, Cathy 
Crocker. Laura LaVallee, Shana Smith, Julie 
Muccini. Christina White. Second Row Assis- 
tant Coach Ferdie Adoboe, Maureen Meldrim, 
Lennice Johnson, Dana Smith. Lee Ann Am- 
brose. Sue McFadyen. Third Row - Assistant 
Coach Jim Giroux, Kathy Hennessy, Amy 
Hennessey, Tracey Alsheskie. Top Row - 
Becky Johnson, Rachel Castriotta. Michelle 
St. Laurent, Cate Dean. Jill Cooper. 




86/CrQSS Country And 1 rack 



1990 Men's Outdoor Track Team: Front Row lace, Jim Chute, Ben Nichols, Tom Hooper. Steven Brown, Stephen Doran, Pat Ryan, Jim 
(L-R) • Ben Winther, Bill Scully, Matt Rosen- Third Row ■ Jon Corso, Scott Mambro, Keith Giroux (Asst. Coach). Bacl< Row ■ Jeff Peter- 
berg, Art Piccolo, Tim Campbell, Matt Simon, Willis, Joseph Bell, David Borges, Kevin Wal- son, Luke Simpson, Brian Bednarek. Garfield 
Jim Avery. Second Row - Mike Davis, Joe ters, Ferde Adoboe (Asst. Coach). Fourth Row Vaughn, Mike Derro, Ken O'Brien (Head 
Livorsi, Herb Heffner, Tom Degnan, Bill Wal- Matt Corcoran, James Gerrish, Joe Kourafas, Coach). 







1990 Men's Cross Country Team: Front Row 
(L-R) - Troy Gomez, Bill Wallace, Joe Livorsi, 
Brian Cox, Matt Simon. Middle Row - Pat 
Ryan, Matt Corcoran, Jim Chute, Pat Reed, 



Jeff Day, Scott Allen, Head Coach Ken O'Bri- 
en. Back Row - Mike Davis, Ben Winther, Herb 
Heffner, John Corso, Dave Sjostedt, Tim 
Campbell. 



Photo Courtesy of Sports Info. 



Cross Country And Track/87 




OMENS SOCCER 



Gncertain Start Leads To 

Euphoric Success 



Fortunately, the first three 
games of the season did not re- 
flect how the 1989 Women's 
Soccer team performed overall. The 
Reds began their season in a losing 
position, 1-2 after their first three 
games. What especially contributed 
to the euphoric feeling of success 
this year was the complete turn- 
around of the season after the team's 
slow and shaky start. 

The season's opener at Boyden re- 
sulted in a loss to Virginia. Under- 
neath the cloudy skies, the team suf- 
fered a 2-0 defeat. Their second home 
game, a successful win by a score of 
2-0 over Colgate, was followed by 
their first confrontation on the road 
— a 1-0 loss to Vermont. Although 
the team could have felt the burden 



of their losses, they refused to let 
their losses hinder them, as they 
went on to win 1 1 games and tie four 
times before reaching the NCAA 
playoffs. The Reds established them- 
selves as a threatening force through- 
out New England, and their 11-3-4 
record in regular season play proved 
that they lived up to their reputation. 

Part of the team's success had to 
be attributed to the chemistry of this 
fairly inexperienced team. Head 
Coach Jim Rudy had four captains 
— Sarah Szetela, Mary Curtis, April 
Kater, and Becky Bonzano — to han- 
dle a roster that included seven fresh- 
men, over one-third the team's size. 

They ended the season with a 12-4- 
4 record. 

-by Ric Seto 




The UMass Women's Soccer team rests on the 
sidelines during the first-ever CJMass classic. 
The Reds hosted Central Florida, Florida Inter- 
national, and the University of New Hamp- 
shire, tying the first game and winning the two 
that followed. 




Photo by Mancy Gunther 



88/Women's Soccer 




A OMass player waits for the ball to break free 
during a battle with two Connecticut players. 
The game ended in a 11 tie. 

A UMass fullback gets ready to set the ball 
into play during a bout with Brown. GMass 
crushed Brown by a score of 3-0. 




Photo by Mancy Gunther 
Three Rutgers players attack a Reds offender. 
Rutgers beat OMass by a score of 21, tIMass' 
first loss in 14 games. 



Photo by Mancy Gunther 



Women's Soccer/89 




OMEN'S SOCCER 



Carrie Keeper struggles to secure the ball from 
her Connecticut opponent. The intense com- 
petition between the two teams was resolved 
in overtime play, resulting in a 1-1 tie. 




Photo by Jeff Holland 
Running into the goalie, Mary Curtis unsuc- 
cessfully attempts to score a goal. The Reds 
were not able to get past the strong (JVM 
defense, and lost 1-0. 

The 1989 University of Massachusetts Wom- 
en's Soccer team: front row (L-R) - Marguerite 
Jaede, Kim Eynard, Tracy Arwood, Becky 
Bonzano, Sue Gaudette, Robin Runstein, 
Leanne Swartz, Holly Hellmuth, Jen Leahy; 
back row (L-R) - Robin Holzman, Colette 
Bowler, Alison Hardin, Kathryn Woodside, Sa- 
rah Szetela, Mary Curtis, Skye Eddy, April 
Kater, Lisa Mickelson, Carrie Keeper, Kim 
Montgomery, Assistant Coach Lisa Qozley, 
Head Coach Jim Rudy. 




Photo courtesy of Sports Information 



90 / Women's Soccer 




Reds Enjoy Success 
On The Road 



What was unusual about the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts wonn- 
en's soccer team's 12-4-4 re- 
cord was that their success was 
largely accomplished on the road. 
GMass compiled an 8-2-2 mark on 
the road, and a not-too-shabby 4-2-2 
record on Boyden Hill. 

The Reds didn't start their road en- 
counters well, however. Their open- 
ing game on the road resulted in an 
unexpected 1-0 loss to the University 
of Vermont. The loss dropped GMass 
into an unusual position — a losing 
one. It seemed, at first, that the team 
was going to experience a season of 
rebuilding, drudging through the 
1989 season and hoping for an im- 
provement in 1990. 

From that point on, however, the 
Reds did not lose another game on 
the road until they reached the 



NCAA quarterfinals at Colorado Col- 
lege. The road, whether reached by 
vans, buses, or planes, proved to be a 
home away from home. 

The team finished regular season 
play with an 11-3-4 record, and re- 
ceived an at-large NCAA playoff bid 
into the 12-team field. 

GMass managed to accomplish 
something that no other GMass team 
had done in history — win a playoff 
game on the road. The Reds experi- 
enced sweet revenge in defeating Vir- 
ginia 2-1 at Charlottesville, avenging 
the season-opening loss at Boyden. 

Advancing into the NCAA quarter- 
finals, the Reds suffered a 5-2 loss to 
Colorado College. The season may 
have been over, but it was full of 
pride and achievement. P| 

— by Ric Seto 




Sarah Szetela effectively steals the ball from her 
Hartford competition. Strong offense was key in 
the win against the team, with a score of 4-1. 



Photo by Jeff Holland 
Becky Bponzano prepares to pass the ball while 
keeping it away from her Connecticut opponent. 
The pass to April Kater led to the first and only 
goal scored by the Reds in that game. 



Photo by Jeff Holland 



Women's Soccer / 91 




EN'S SOCCER 



Season's Close 
Shows 

True Talent 



The University of Massachusetts' 
Men's soccer team was better than 
their 7-9-2 record portrays. The first 
half of the season was hard on the 
Minutemen. They started their sea- 
son unprepared and struggled their 
way to a 2-8-1 record at midseason. 
Following a loss in their opening 
game at the CIniversity of Maine, by a 
score of 1-0, the Minutemen won 
only one of their first five games. 

"The problem was not the compe- 
tition. We just came out sluggish," 
said freshman goalkeeper Steve Ar- 
menti. "We couldn't keep the ball in 
the back of . . .' [their] . . . net, and I 
had trouble keeping it out of ours." 

Armenti was able to turn this loss 
around, however, as he secured six 
shutout victories and one 0-0 tie. 



The Minutemen persevered. 

The Minutemen turned the season 
around, taking five of the last seven 
games, beating high-ranking teams 
such as Colgate and St. Joseph's. 
However, this streak came too late in 
the season. Despite the influence of 
seniors Dan Laurence and co-cap- 
tains Tom Skiba, Steve Cesnek, and 
Pete McEvoy, the team's earlier loss 
to the University of Rhode island en- 
sured their absence from the Atlantic 
Top 20. 

Nothing came easy for the men's 
team this year. They received few 
breaks and had to work hard for their 
late season victories. But, their im- 
provement leaves the team at a good 
starting point for success next year. 
1^1 by Dan Sullivan 



Lou Hollmeyer wards off a Northeastern oppo- 
nent as fie dribbles the ball away. The UMass 
Minutemen were victorious against Northeast- 
ern with a score of 30. 




Photo by Jeff Holland 



92 / Men's Soccer 




In his quest to steal the ball, Gael Sullivan 
plows Into his Providence opponent. The Min- 
utemen exhibited agression in their offensive 
plays, resulting in a 2-0 win. 

Successfully keeping the ball away from his 
opponent, Ray Cunha heads it to another area 
of play. The team defeated Delaware by a 
score of 2-0 due to a strong show on the play- 
ing field. 




Photo by Jeff Holland 
The CJMass Men's Soccer Team's ball boys 
squint against the sun's glare to watch the 
action on the playing field. Not only were they 
a big help to the team, the three were good 
friends at school as well. 



Photo by Jeff Holland 



Men's Soccer / 93 




EN'S SOCCER 



John Thompson (23) looks to see the outcome 
of the play executed by Darren Stone (7). The 
team was successful in securing a goal, result- 
ing in a 1-0 win against Fairfield University. 

Bill Kousmanidis is accosted by two North- 
eastern players as he dribbles the ball down 
the field. CIMass held strong both offensively 
and defensively in their victory over North- 
eastern, their first win of the season. 




Photo by Jeff Holland 
The 1989 University of Massachusetts Men's 
Soccer team: front row (L-R)- Bill Kousmani- 
dis, Lou Hollmeyer, Tom Skiba, Pete McEvoy, 
Steve Cesnekk, Evan Buxner. Gael Sullivan, 
Doug Karet; middle row- Trainer Dave Parks. 
Brett Anthony, Scott Jacobs, Ken Smith, 
Steve Armenti, Ray Cunha, Jon Gruber, Kevin 
Perna, Darren Stone, Carl Hanks, Assistant 
Coach Tom Demmeo; back row- Head Coach 
Jeff Gettler, Tom Novajasky, Dan Lawrence, 
Matt Bearce, Brett Shumsky, Matt Mugavero, 
Gonzalo Bearman, Chris Meltzer, John Thomp- 
son, Kire Trajkovski, Assistant Coach John 
Martin. 



94/Men's Soccer 





Soccer Season 
Ends In Success 



Although the season as a whole 
could have been more successful, 
the University of Massachusetts 
Men's soccer team ended the year 
with a finish that couldn't have been 
better. 

The team ended their regular play 
on a positive note, victorious in 3 out 
of their last four games. The slow, 
sluggish start of the season was just 
a memory, as the team whizzed past 
Colgate, Providence, and Rutgers. 

The highlight of the season, how- 
ever, was yet to come. 

A vindicated CIMass salvaged their 
season by capturing first place in the 
Metropolitan Life Indoor Soccer Clas- 
sic, held at the University of 
Connecticut. 

Thanks to a goal by Darren Stone 
in the first half, UMass defeated the 



Photo by Jeff Holland 



University of Maine by a score of 1-0, 
avenging their 1-0 loss in the sea- 
son's opener. 

The award of Most Valuable Player 
in this tourney went to sophomore 
Dan Lawrence. Lawrence, along with 
junior Peter McEvoy and sophomore 
Brett Anthony, were named to the 
All-Tournament team. 

Success in the tournament was at- 
tributed to strong team defense. As a 
team, UMass allowed only three 
goals in seven games. Qoalkeeping 
was also a source of strength, as 
sophomore Jon Gruber and fresh- 
man Steve Armenti demonstrated. 

The success of this relatively 
young team has left the team confi- 
dent in their aspirations for next 
year.O 

•by Kris Bruno. 




A GMass player squares off against Williams. 
UMass defense kept the team in tow, defeating 
them 1-0, 



Men's Soccer/95 




lELD HOCKEY 



Freshman Goalie Aids 

Successful 
Season 



The 1989 Women's Field Hockey 
team enjoyed a fruitful year, 
sporting an impressive 15-6-2 
season and its 9th consecutive year 
of NCAA playoff competition. But at 
the beginning of the season, Coach 
Pam Hixon found that her two top 
goalie recruits would not be coming 
to OMass, and the season's future 
was in jeopardy. The coach was 
forced to look elsewhere, and in this' 
case, elsewhere became Trinidad. 
And what Hixon found there turned 
out to be an important part of the 
team's success: Philippa Scott. The 
freshman goalkeeper proved to be 
more influenc-ial than Hixon could 
have hoped for. 

Early in the season, Scott's and 
Hixon's only worries were the more 
rigorous practice schedule and Tot- 
man Field. Before coming here, Scott 
was accustomed to playing solely on 
weekends with England's National 
CInder-21 team and had to get used to 



a full-time schedule. "I'm doing more 
now than 1 ever have in such a short 
period of time." Philipps explained. 

The fact that Totman Field is natu- 
ral grass was possibly an obstacle for 
the Arima, Trinidad native to over- 
come since she was used to playing 
on artificial turf at home. But this 
worry was soon dispelled when 
Hixon chose to start Scott in the 
team's second game. Scott posted a 
2-0 shutout during her on-grass open- 
er versus Boston College. After the 
game, Scott said, "1 have confidence 
in the people who play in front of 
me." 

Scott finished with a 14-6-2 record 
in the net. She led the Atlantic Ten 
Conference with goals against aver- 
age of only .40 per game. Hixon de- 
scribed "1 knew that she was good 
and would help us but 1 certainly 
didn't think she'd contribute as she's 
done, "fg 

by Dan Sullivan 




The 1989 Oniversity of Massachusetts Field 
Hockey team: front row (LR)- Assistant Coach 
Ruth Vasapolli, Kathy Phelan, Stefanie Rappa- 
port, Kim Hannigan, Lisa Charron, Philiippa 
Scott, Dawn Trumbauer, Denise Breunig, Ber- 
nie Mattel, Assistant Coach Lynn Carlson; 
middle row- Head Coach Pam Hixon, Kara 
Hughes, Kathy Deangelis, Sue Bernegger, Co- 
Captain Carol Smith, Leigh Hallam, Lisa Berar- 
dinelli, Melissa Martin, Mara Frattassio, Nancy 
Philbrick, Tina Rusiecki, Assistant Coach Patti 
Bossio; back row- Kerri Kaminski, Nancy 
Shepard, Kerri Fagan, Beth Thornton, Lauren 
Johnson, Sherlan Cabralis, Jessica Gould, Joy 
Blenis, Co-Captain Kathy Derwin, Ellse McDe- 
vltt. 



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96 / Field Hockey 






The Minutewomen battle against Providence College. 
Providence was ranked number 3 in the MCAA, com- 
pared to (JMass' ranking of number 9. 

Kathy Phelan takes the ball upfield for GMass during 
their home opener versus Boston College. CIMass 
shutout the Eagles 20. 



Photo by Jeff Holland 



Field Hockey / 97 




OLLEYBALL 



Two Home Victories 

Highlight Season 



It was a rebuilding year for tlie 
1989 Women's Volleyball 
team. The team was somewhat 
inexperienced, with only three return- 
ing players. The Minutewomen, 
coached by Carol Ford, finished the 
year with a record of 2 wins, 27 
losses. In spite of this, however, one 
player had fond memories of the 
1989 season: 

"1 had so much fun . . . the team 
was so special," recalled senior exer- 
cise science major Julieta Santiago, 
an outside hitter. The atmosphere 
was very relaxed, and sharing was an 
important team asset. Julieta, who 
was also a letter winner, noted that 
"even practice was enjoyable." 

Even though many good times 
could be remembered, the volleyball 
team's two victories were the high- 



lights of the season. In early October, 
the squad chalked up their first win, 
a five-game battle against St. Bona- 
venture. The Minutewomen, trailing 
2-1, fought back to win the last two 
games and secure a victory of 15-8, 
4-15, 7-15, 16-14, and 15-12. 

Two and a half weeks later, the 
Minutewomen swept Central Con- 
necticut in three straight games with 
a win of 15-6, 15-8, 15-3. The team 
was particularly strong in defense, 
led by back row player Anne DeS- 
warte. 

Both victories for the team came 
at home in Totman Gym, yet Julieta 
Santiageo confided that she will 
"miss the road trips." For this senior, 
playing for the UMASS volleyball 
team was a priviledge.(t3| 

by Linda Gallagher 




The 1989 University of Massachusetts Volley- 
ball team: front row (L-R)- Rachel Bredemeier, 
Susan Richardson, Captain Nancy Sullivan, 
Julieta Santiago, Joy Gmeiner, Sharon Panoff; 
back row (LR)- Cathy Lis, Kelly Ramsey, Anne 
DeSwarte, Karin Horleck, Head Coach Carol 
Ford, Assistant Coach Heather Olsen. 




Photo courtesy of Sports Information 



98 / Volleyball 




Captain Mancy Sullivan and Susan Richard- 
son, both outside hitters, take a fall in a failed 
attempt to block a St. Bonaventure spike. 
Though Umass struggled in the first two 
games, the women came back to win in five 
games. 



Middle hitters, Sharon Panoff and Rachel Bre- 
demeier go up for a block versus Central Con- 
necticut. The CIMass defense held strong and 
was able to secure its second win of the 
season. 



Volleyball / 99 




OOTBALL 



GMass Minutemen 

Salvage Season 



When the University of New 
Hampshire football team rode 
into Amherst on November 19, 
they were looking for a playoff bid. If 
they were to beat GMass, they would 
likely be the ones to represent the 
Yankee Conference in the NCAA divi- 
sion 1-AA playoffs. The team had 
made this trip before- and all three 
times CIMass had kept them out of 
the playoffs. 

When the Minutemen walked into 
Warren McGuirk stadium to face 
their GNH opponents, they were look- 
ing to end their season on an up-note. 
They wanted to salvage the .500 
mark, and to do that they had to ruin 
someone else's day. 

At kickoff the sun was out but the 
wind was chilling. Then, only 4:10 
into the game, CIMass quarterback 
Gary Wilcos warmed up the crowd 
with an 8-yard touchdown run. 
CIMass had its first lead, 7-0. 

Minuteman fans had plenty of time 
to warm their seats after that, the 
next score coming 3:23 into the sec- 
ond quarter for CINH. Wildcat's quar- 
terback Mark Carr connected with 
John Perry for a 75-yard TD pass to 
tie it at 7. 

On GMass' next possession, Wil- 
cos threw to Mike Tobin for 73 yards 
to the GNH 2-yard line. Steve Olson 
would dive the remainder to ring the 
score to 13-7. 

Then the wildcats took over. Carr 
hit twice-once for 6 yards and once 
for 26- to bring the Cats to a 21-13 
lead with only 20 seconds left in the 
first half. 

At the start of the second half, 



GNH appeared in command of the 
game. With 5:23 left in the third, Carr 
struck again. This time for 25 yards 
and a GNH lead of 28-13. 

After that, the wind picked up for 
GMass, and the sky's darkened over 
GNH. After five plays and a sack, 
Wilcos hit Lamar Newsome from the 
GNH 17 to make it 28-19. A second 
GMass point-after attempt hit the 
post. 

After a GNH punt, Wilcos threw to 
Chip Mitchell who beat two defend- 
ers and caught the ball in step, en- 
route to a 72-yard touchdown. GMass 
trailed by two: 28-26. It was now 
snowing, but mostly on GNH. 

The GMass defense held firm, forc- 
ing another GNH punt, and nearing 
the end of the third quarter, Wilcos 
ran for 18 yards and picked up 15 
more on a late hit. The period ended 
with the ball resting on the GNH 15. 

The starting play of the final quar- 
ter saw Ron Blauvelt take a Wilcos 
handoff and head right to the outside. 
Running into a Wildcat wall, he 
turned around and plain outran the 
GNH defense to the left corner of the 
endzone for the winning touchdown. 

The fans braved the cold of the 
fourth quarter to see the score stand 
at 34-28. The Wildcats left the stadi- 
um feeling cold and flat, with an 
abrupt end to a 7-game winning 
streak. Carr left with 4 touchdowns. 
Wilcos left with two TD passes and 
one TD rush, and the Bobby Knight 
award for most valuable player. But 
The Minutemen left warm and hap- 
py, 5-5-1, and with a big win.f^ 

-by Dan Sullivan 




100 / Football 




Photo by Jeff Holland 
UMass football players shiver on the sideline. De- Matt Tulley (60) and Vaughn Williams (24) attack 
spite the inclement weather, the team was able to a OR! player. The strong OMass defense was es- 
warm the crowd with their victory over ONH. sential to the triumphant homecoming win. 



Photo by Paul Agnew 



Football / 101 




OOTBALL 



Marco Gabrielli kicks off after a UMass touch- 
down. The point scored by him brought the 
team closer to the 31-27 victory against North- 
eastern. 




Photo by Clayton Jones 
Although the CJRI defense tries to stop Gary 
V.'ilcos, the UMass quarterback perseveres in 
diving for the goal line. The football team 
crushed Rhode Island with a score of 31-6. 



Witnessing an unhappy sight, Head Coach Jim 
Reid surveys the damage on the CIMass play- 
ing field. The first four unsuccessful games 
along with the many team injuries made the 
first half of the season a difficult one for the 
coach. 




Photo by Paul Agnew 



102/ Football 




A (JMass player takes to the run. He succeeded in 
eluding many would-be attackers. 



(JMass quarterback Gary Wilcos gets taken down 
by a ORI lineman. Wilcos stayed on his feet often 
enough to lead the Minutemen to a 31-6 victory. 




Photo by Mason Rivlin 



Football Team 
Tackles Competition 



The UMass win over the Wild- 
cats from New Hampshire was 
just one of the many memorable 
events of this year's season. Al- 
though devastated by injuries, the 
Minutemen toughed it out to a 5-5-1 
record. 

The season started out on a posi- 
tive note, with a 28-28 tie against 
James Madison, followed by an errat- 
ic effort that left the team with a 1-2-1 
record leading up to Homecoming. 
Amid the high spirits of the fans and 
the (JMass Marching Band, the team 
crushed the CIRI Rams with a score of 
31-6. 

In the eighth game of the season, 
the Minutemen topped Northeastern, 
edging them out by the score of 31- 
27 on the Huskies home turf. Rick 
Kane, a defensive tackle, had eight 
tackles and was responsible for 



blocking the potentially dangerous 
field goal that would have tied the 
game with only five minutes left to 
play. David Mitchell, Paul Tornatore, 
Steve Olson, and Ron Blauvelt also 
came through with key plays. 

At Warren McGuirk Alumni Stadi- 
um in early November, junior Marco 
Gabrielli fired a field goal with 1:27 
remaining in the game to give the 
Minutemen a 17-14 edge over the 
(Jniversity of Richmond Spiders. The 
defense sparked as well, as George 
Karelas and Bobby Burke combined 
for 27 tackles. 

Although the team could not 
match last year's 8-3 showing, it had 
its highlights, and finished off the 
season on a positive and successful 
note.njl 

•by Linda Gallagher 



Football/ 103 




EN'S GYMNASTICS 



Minutemen Start Slow 

Finish Champs 



There's definitely something 
good about tailing an inven- 
tory of a team's strengths. 
The men's gymnastics team was 
able to establish itself as a competi- 
tive force in intercollegiate athletics 
in spite of a sluggish beginning and 
injuries. Co-captain Bart Balocki 
spent the first part of the season off 
the floor due to an infection of the 
achilles tendon. Balocki, who had 
been a strong all-round performer 
throughout his college career, made 
an impressive comeback, and ended 
the year by receiving the coaches' 
Positive Mental Attitude Award and 
also the Outstanding Student Leader 
Award. 

The Minutemen secured an admi- 



rable 6-6 record after overcoming 
their slow start. The team won the 
New England championship and fin- 
ished fifth out of eight in the Eastern 
Intercollegiate Gymnastics League 
Championship. 

"We've had an average season — 
not too many people peaked at the 
same time," said coach Roy John- 
son. 

Yet, when team members Carl 
Russ and Cal Booker represented 
GMass at the MCAA Division I East- 
ern Regional Finals, Russ placed 24th 
in still rings and Booker ranked 19th 
on the floor, fifth on his, floor routine 
and eighth in vaulting.^?] 

by Kris Bruno 



The 1989-90 (Jniversity of Massachusetts 
Men's Gymnastics team: Front row (l-r) Cal 
Booker, Chris Osborn, John Eggers, Bill Say- 
man, Bart Balocki, Steve Christensen, Rob 
Thomas, Dave DiNucci; Back row (Ir) Carl 
Russ, Mitch Hall, Rich Healey, Glen Stubbs, 
Tom Wolkner, Andy Sullivan, Jim McClure. 



#»»% 





:^f 




Photo courtesy of Sports Information 



104/Men's Gymnastics 




Co-captain Bart Balocki takes off on the pom- 
mel horse. Balocki proved to be an impressive 
all-around performer. 

Freshman Steve Christensen works his way 
through the parallel bars. Steve led the list of 
five exceptional freshmen that GMass had this 
season. 




•^ 




Photo by Jeff Holland 
Andy Sullivan holds his pose on the rings in a 
meet against Dartmouth. The Minutemen 
were victorious by a score of 224.05-152.15. 

The versatile Balocki runs through his routine 
on the parallel bars. He was the Minutemen's 
best in that event. 



Photo by Jeff Holland 



Men's Gymnastics/ 105 




OMEN S GYMNASTICS 



Coach Helps Attain 

Excellent Season 



A third-place finish at the North- 
east Regionals summed up an 
excellent season for the wom- 
en's gymnastics team. Headed by At- 
lantic Ten Coach of the year Alfie 
Mitchell, the Minutewomen closed 
with a 13-2 record. 

"We kept out-doing ourselves," re- 
marked all-arounder Kristin Turmail, 
as the Minutewomen enjoyed 12 con- 
secutive victories. New team records 
were established as well, starting 
with a performance of 182 to edge 
out Northeastern University's score 
of 180.95 in late February. The Min- 
utewomen continued to top them- 
selves meet after meet, in late 
March, the team finished second in 



the Atlantic Ten Conference Champi- 
onships at Curry Hicks Cage. 
Tammy Marshall's 37.80 won her the 
all-around title, and Erica Baxter cap- 
tured first place in the uneven paral- 
lel bars. Kristin Turmail received best 
all-around gymnast honors and set an 
Atlantic Ten meet record with a 9.75 
score in the vault competition. 

The A-lOs and the regionals stood 
out in Kristin's mind as the season 
highlights. She and Baxter had tallies 
of 36.7, tying for eighth at the North- 
east Regionals in the all-around com- 
petition. Kristin said, "Alfie's a great 
coach, and we couldn't have done it 
without him. "1^1 

by Linda Gallagher 




1989-90 Women's Gymnastics Team: Bottom 
Row (L-R) ■ Tammy Marshall. Elizabeth Moiin- 
ari, Erin Klier, Lynn Morris, Jennifer Perry, 
Kim Grady, Carrie Pierce. Top Row ■ Lisa-Beth 
Cronen, Jodi Flax, Abby May. Erika Baxter. 
Ann Klocek, Kristin Turmail, Michele Anton- 
elli. 




Photo Courtesy of Sports Information 



106/Women's Gymnastics 




Kim Grady performs on the uneven parallel 
bars. rSew team records were established 
throughout the season. 



/ 





Photo by Eric Goldman 
Jodi Flax perfectly launches herself over the 
pommel horse. The Minutewomen continued 
to top themselves meet after meet. 

Tammy Marshall prepares herself to catch the 
lower of the two uneven parallel bars. She won 
the all-around title at the Atlantic 10 Confer- 
ence that year. 



Photo by Eric Goldman 



Women's Gymnastics/ 107 




EN'S SWIMMING 



Swimmers Exhibit 

Forgotten 
Brilliance 



While most members of the 
CJMass community took a 
well-deserved break over in- 
tersession, the GMass men's swim- 
ming team dominated anyone it 
came into contact with. The team 
won four meets over break, leaving 
them flying high to their 13-0 record 
this year. 

The men's swimming team has al- 
ways been a strong, victorious force 
in intercollegiate athletics, but their 
successes have been overshadowed 
by interests in more popular sports. 
As GMass rallied behind the hot 
streak of the men's basketball team, 
the men's swimming team was enjoy- 
ing success that it had come to be 



quite familiar with over the years. 

Togetherness was the key. The 
team pulled together through long 
hours of practice and constant en- 
couragement from each other to fin- 
ish their season unbeaten. 

One of the highlights of the season 
was the final meet against Boston 
Oniversity. The last time the two 
teams met, BG was victorious. This 
year, GMass was able to defeat the 
Terriers by a score of 138-105. 

So while students cheered in the 
Cage, the men's swimming team con- 
tinued to be forgotten brilliance in the 
realm of college athletics, pi 

by Kris Bruno 




JP 



I*** 





» t « »#A*ia*i 



Jim Robertson prepares for the start of the 200m 
backstroke. Team members gave each other con- 
stant encouragement, which led to an undefeated 
season. 



Photo by Jeff Holland 
Will Kleschinsky performs a one meter dive. Rath- 
er than take a break over intersession, the team 
added several wins to their scoreboard. 




Photo by Jeff Holland 



108/Men's Swimming 



Brian Mclver (right) launches from the block to 
start the 50m Freestyle. Mclver's swimming 
ability was a key part of the teams successful 
season. 

A OMass diver prepares to enter the water in 
the one meter dive competition. GMass' swim- 
mers and divers were a strong, victorious 
force in intercollegiate athletics. 

Dave Ehle competes in the 200m Backstroke. 
The UMass swim team dominated anyone it 
came in contact with. 

Curtis Sawin swims in the 200m Individual 
Medley. Sawin came in second place, bringing 
OMass closer to a victory. 




Men's Swimming/ 109 




OMEN'S SWIMMING 



Swimmers Have Year Of 

Personal Bests 



a Mass Women's Swimming 
Coacli Bob Newcomb couldn't 
be much iiappier about his 
team's performance this season. 
They finished the season at 8-4, and 
Newcomb had confessed that he was 
only expecting about 6-6. The team 
then went on to complete in the New 
England Championships where they 
hoped for a second to Boston Col- 
lege. The team swam well there, lit- 
tering the weekend with meet re- 
cords and personal bests, but only 
came up with sixth place. 

Senior Michelle Leary, who after 
suffering from a heart attack and 
making an amazing comeback, 
grabbed five first places in the meet 
while setting three meet records. 
"Leary was the best swimmer in the 
meet throughout the three days," 
Newcomb said. 



Teresa Konieczny, Teresa Jacobs, 
Amy Bloomstein, Keira Cruz, Nancy 
Wilkinson and Kim Morin all set life- 
time bests in the meet. Leary, Cruz, 
Jodi Schwarz and Traci Young all 
earned spots in the Eastern Champi- 
onships. In addition, Leary, Cruz, Ja- 
cobs and Denise Reimer teamed up 
to beat Boston College in the 400 
meter relay with a New England 
Championship best of 3:32.06. 

So if the team had to settle for 8-4 
and sixth place in the New Englands, 
Newcomb would be happy with that. 
The team improved with each meet, 
repeatedly setting personal bests, 
and were performing very close to 
their potential. They are only losing 
three seniors, so it is likely that 
they'll be back strong next season, 
and that they'll only get better. P| 
-by Dan Sullivan 




,«•- ' *'•' 




r***#i^*^*^ 



The 1989-90 (Jniversity of Massachusetts 
Women's Swim team: front row (L-R)- Rachel 
Rennert, Stacie Kimbrel, Heather Leisman, 
Wendy Frinet, Teresa Konieczny, Lori Shee- 
han, Shannon Connolly; second row (L-R)- Me- 
lissa McCarthy, Michele Leary, Keira Cruz, 
Cathy Burke, Jodi Schwartz, Sue Gorski; third 
row (L-R)- Assistant Coach Stacie Fruth, Nan- 
cy Wilkinson, Amy Bloomstein. Leslie Crom- 
well, Stephanie Tuttle, Tonia Stafford, Tracy 
Young; back row (L-R)- Head Coach Robert S. 
Newcomb, Denise Reimer, Sarah McGorry, 
Kari Edwardsen, Laurie Schwarz, Maureen 
Murphy, Theresa Jacobs, Beth Wadick. 



110/Women's Swimming 






Photo by Jeff Holland 
Sophomore Teresa Jacobs takes off at tfie 
start of the 200 Free. In this meet against 
Vermont, the team blew away the competition 
with a score of 162-139. 

Senior Melissa McCarthy sails through the wa- 
ter doing the butterfly. McCarthy was one of 
the team's thirteen letter winners this year. 



Photo by Clayton Jones 



Women's Swimming/111 




OMEN'S BASKETBALL 



Low Season Eased By 

Euphoric Wins 



It was a losing season for the wom- 
en's basketball team this year, fin- 
ishing the regular season 5-24, but 
their wins came at the right time. 

The women's basketball team had 
taken a back seat to the men's team 
all season, but the Minutewomen, 
seeded last in the A-10 division, were 
able to stun the conference. Under- 
dogs all season long, the team cap- 
tured an emotional win against St. 
Bonaventure in the first round of the 
A-10 championship tournament. The 
Minutewomen defeated the Bonnies 
by a score of 77-72. 

"We came into this game thinking 
that we could win," said Head Coach 
Kathy Hewelt. "We just had two terri- 



ble games [earlier in the season with 
two losses to the Bonnies] and we 
knew that we could beat them, it's 
very tough to beat a team three 
times in the same season." 

The Minutewomen were able to ad- 
vance to the quarterfinals. The oppo- 
nent was Rutgers, who had previous- 
ly crushed the Minutewomen in 
regular season play in two games, 67- 
45 and 68-55. And yet, few people 
had thought that it was possible for 
the Minutewomen to get that far. 
Rutgers, second in the Atlantic 10, 
proved to be too much for the team, 
as the Red Knights defeated (JMass 
by a score of 86-55. pJ| 

Dy Kris Bruno 




Freshman Kim Kristofik tries to keep posses- 
sion of the ball amid three aggressive Dart- 
mouth players. The strong Dartmouth defense 
led to the Minutewomen's upset by a score of 
72-61. 




Photo by Jeff Hollanc 



112/Women's Basketball 





Photo by Jeff Holland 
Senior Sue Serafini and freshman Keyburn 
McCusker try to prevent the opposition 
from scoring during an exhibition game 
against Amager. (JMass stomped on the 
competition by a score of 67-54. 

Kim Kristofik eludes a would be aggressor 
during the Dartmouth game. Kristofik was 
a strong all-around performer throughout 
the season. 



Photo by Jeff Holland 



Women's Basketball/ 113 




OMEN'S BASKETBALL 




The 1989-90 Oniversity of Massachusetts 
women's basketball team: first row (l-r)- Tri- 
cia Riley, Lisa Hair, Patty Robak, Gloria 
Nevarez, Lisa Ireland. Kim Kristofik. Jen 
Olsen. Second row (l-r)- Graduate Assistant 
Coach Louise McCleary. Assistant Coach 
Mary Vail, Michele Pytko. Keyburn 
McCusker, Helen Freeman, Sue Serafini, 
Head Coach Kathy Hewelt. 

Gloria Nevarez searches for a chance to 
pass the ball while trying to elude two Hart- 
ford guards. The Minutewomen were suc- 
cessful in defeating Hartford by a score of 
49-47. 



Photo courtesy of Sports Information 




Photo by Jeff Holland 



n4/Women's Basketball 




Despite Frustrations 

Team Struts Stuff 



It was a time of struggle, con- 
stant frustration and iiard work 
for the (JMass women's basket- 
ball team during the 1989-90 season, 
as inconsistency and sometimes 
sloppy ball playing resulted in a fin- 
ish of 5 wins, 24 losses. The Min- 
utewomen faced a tough season, of- 
ten clouded by the victories of 
CIMass' other teams. And yet, al- 
though the numbers were not favor- 
able for the team, there were still 
some bright moments and strong 
showings that were betrayed by the 
statistics. 

The first conference win of the sea- 
son against Dusquesne resulted in a 
stunning 70-54 victory. The Min- 
utewomen dominated the court, in 
control of the ball almost 75 percent 
of the time. Helen Freeman, a strong 



player throughout the season, scored 
17 points and made 10 rebounds. 
The team proved that they could be 
a united force on the court. 

The team also proved that they 
were capable of being a threatening 
and respectable force by its other 
wins, against Hartford by a score of 
49-47, Central Connecticut, defeated 
76-60, and Harvard, by a score of 78- 
74. 

Said head coach Kathy Hewelt, 
"We didn't play with intensity and 
we didn't play with hustle ... it was a 
disappointment for our fans." 

The team looks forward to next 
year, when hopefully they will gain 
the strength and balance they need 
for more successful play.Kj] 

-by Kris Bruno 



Photo by Jeff Holland 




Center Helen Freeman pops up for a shot 
against Rhode Island. Despite consistent 
baskets, the Minutewomen fell to Rhode 
Island by a score of 57-54. 

Senior guard Michele Pytko blocks the 
shot from Dartmouth's Jen Carter. GMass 
lost to Dartmouth by a score of 72-61. 



Photo by Jeff Holland 



Women's Basketball/ 115 




EN'S BASKETBALL 



Freshman Tony Barbae penetrates the mass 
of guards to score two more points during an 
exhibition game against the Scandinavian 
team Sodertajle. Despite strong efforts, GMass 
lost in a heated contest by a score of 89-88. 




Photo by Jeff Holland 
Despite the pressure from two Duquesne 
guards, William Herndon slams two points for 
the Minutemen. Dusquene proved to be tough 
competition for UMass, beating them by a 
score of 70-69. 




Photo by Jeff Holland 



116/Men's Basketball 



Slamming into a Rutgers guard, Tony Barbee puts 
away two more points in the first game against 
Rutgers. Tine Minutemen won the first game against 
Rutgers by a score of 84-73 at home, although they 
lost the second game 66-61 away. 

(JMass Head Coach John Calipari gives his tired team 
advice before going into the second overtime versus 
Rhode Island. CIMass proved themselves by pulling 
out a 77-74 victory. 




Men's Hoop Revives 

GMass Cage Rage 



Welcome to the infamous Atlan- 
tic 10. This division, which in- 
cludes teams such as the Uni- 
versity of Rhode Island and Penn 
State, has been home to the CIMass 
men's basketball team, although the 
team usually lounges somewhere 
close to the bottom of the roster. But 
for a team that is used to finishing a 
season averaging less than .500, 
coming in sixth for the 1989-1990 
season was a welcome change, a 
change that all hoop fans hoped 
would be permanent. 

The surprising success of men's 
basketball made getting tickets for 
games more difficult. Before the 
spring semester had even begun, all 
tickets for home games were sold 



out. And, with only 2,750 seats out of 
4,024 reserved for students, tickets 
became a hot property, with fans 
waiting in lines as long as 3 hours for 
tickets to the last 6 home games of 
the season. 

But these fans were not disap- 
pointed in what they had come to 
see. They came to watch Gary Merer 
set a single-season assist record of 
228. They came to witness Jim Mc- 
Coy's 100th career point. They came 
to be part of the excitement, to add 
to the rage in the Cage. And, after the 
whirlwind season was over, no one 
was disappointed, and everyone wait- 
ed patiently for the rage to begin 
again in the next season, ftjl 

•by Kris Bruno 



Photo by Jeff Holland 




Men's Basketball/ 117 




EN'S BASKETBALL 



GMass Meets Temple 

In NCAA Playoffs 



When the season began in Octo- 
ber for the men's basketball 
team, no one would have pre- 
dicted that the Minutemen would end 
up battling Temple University for the 
Atlantic 10 Conference champion- 
ship, one game away from an auto- 
matic bid into the NCAA Tourna- 
ment. 

Four buses full of Minutemen fans 
left from Warren G. McGuirk Alumni 
Stadium at 1:30 PM on March 8, 
bound for Philadelphia. Once inside 
Temple University's McConigle Hall, 
Minutemen fans rallied through an 
intense game against a tough team. 
"I was happy. This was a good 
game for our' team," said (JMass 
head coach John Calipari. "This was 
our first opportunity to play in a 
championship game, and it won't be 
our last." 



Down eleven points at halftime, 
the Minutemen, who, according to 
the media, were inferior to the Tem- 
ple Owls, managed to scramble their 
way back into the game. Before 3900 
screaming Owl fans, CIMass played 
one of the best games of the season. 
Temple, however, was able to keep 
the Minutemen in check. After scor- 
ing 2233 points during the season, 
UMass was unsuccessful in earning 
the two that kept the team from win- 
ning the Atlantic 10. Temple won 
with a score of 53-51. 

And yet, as fans rallied and 
cheered when the team returned to 
Amherst, it was clear that no one 
was disappointed. "I'm proud of our 
kids, and we'll be back in the game," 
Calipari said. "Hopefully not at 
McConigle Hall. "[tJ| 

by Kris Bruno 




As the score gets tight, tempers flash and 
aggressions are shown in full force. In attempt 
to steal the ball, sophomore Jim McCoy lashes 
out against the Temple opponents. 



118/ Men's Basketball 





Photo by Joel Solomon 



The CIMass men's basketball team waits outside of the 
Cage for their trip to Philadelphia to meet Temple. Many 
busloads and carloads of students accompanied the team 
for support. 

Head Coach John Calipari watches his players with 
feigned calmness. The playoff game was intensely stress- 
filled due to its close score of 53-51. 



Men's Basketball/ 119 




EN'S BASKETBALL 




Photo courtesy of Sports Information 



The 1989-90 University of Massachusetts 
Men's Basketball team: first row (Ir) Head 
Coach John Calipari, assistant coach 
James Flint, assistant coach Bill Bayno, 
Anton Brown, Cary Herer, Jim, McCoy, 
Rafer Giles, Chris Bailey, Sean Nelen, assis- 
tant coaches Dave Glover, John Robic, and 
Brian Gorman, second row (1-r)- James Pir- 
otti, William Herndon, John Tate, Matt An- 
derson, Ben Qridski, Michael Byrnes, Tom- 
my Pace, Harper Williams, Tony Barbee, 
Dave Gorvine and Brett Weinroth. 

Sophomore Jim McCoy eludes a Dus- 
quesne guard in an attempt to shoot for the 
basket. Amid the cheers of the fans at the 
Cage, the Minutemen defeated Dusquesne 
by a score of 78-72. 




Photo by Jeff Holland 



120/Men's Basketball 




Men's Hoop Enjoys 

Fantastic Season 



What a way to begin a decade. 
It seemed like it would be an- 
other sub .500 year for the 
Minutemen, but to the surprise and 
pleasure of fans, the GMass men's 
basketball team climbed to new 
heights in the 1989-90 season. 

Of course, it didn't look like the 
year would be too successful after 
the first game of the season. The Min- 
utemen bowed to defeat against the 
mediocre Division II team, the Uni- 
versity of Lowell, by a score of 70-69. 
After this embarrassing loss, Coach 
John Calipari's Minutemen would 
have to prove that they had the abili- 
ty to bounce back from defeat . . . 
and no one was disappointed with 
the final result. 

Loyal fans returned to campus af- 
ter winter break, pleased to discover 
what they had been missing. Winning 
their first six games of the decade, 
the team was beginning to take off. 
The Minutemen received a national 
ranking for the first time since 1978, 
turning heads throughout the nation 
to Amherst. As lines for basketball 



tickets grew longer, fans stormed 
Curry Hicks Cage to join the Minute- 
men in their success. The rage was 
back in the Cage, and everyone 
hoped that it would stay for a long 
time. 

It was refreshing to hear the men's 
basketball team being discussed as 
possible contenders in the NCAA 
tournament after the Minutemen 
shocked their opponents in the Atlan- 
tic-10 tournament in Philidelphia. 
CIMass was expected to fold early, 
pack their bags and go home. And 
although the Minutemen did, eventu- 
ally, go home, greeted by their fans 
for their job well done, the team left 
its mark, beating West Virginia 78-55 
and Penn State 64-59 before facing 
Temple. UMass proved that they 
were a team to be respected. After 
showing that they could play with 
the "big boys", the Minutemen, who 
will have 10 out of 15 returning play- 
ers next year, are ready and waiting 
for their chance to hit the big time. 



a 



by John Estrella 



Freshman Harper Williams reaches for a two 
pointer. Williams was a key scorer in the game 
against West Virginia, which was a 83-79 vic- 
tory for the Minutemen. 



A Minuteman scores two points against Dus- 
quesne, helping CIMass to win the game 




Men's Basketball/ 121 




EN'S LACROSSE 



Consistent Season With 

Rule Changes 



For the men's lacrosse team, 
the key to a successful sea- 
son has always been consis- 
tency. For the fifth year in a row, the 
Gorillas made a run for the MCAA 
Division I championships. Their play- 
off journey was a brief one, as the 
team lost the first round of playoffs 
to Brown by a score of 12-9. 

At the beginning of the season, 
there was some concern over how 
the Gorillas would fare with the new 
rules that were changed in order to 
increase the action of the game. The 
rule changes would inevitably raise 
the scores of the game. In spite of 
what Head Coach Dick Garber de- 
scribed as ".an extremely tough 
spring" and in spite of the differences 
in the rules, the Gorilla's record was 
still strong and respectable. 

"It didn't affect us as much as oth- 



er teams," Garber said. "It . . . sped 
up the game, and we're run-and-gun 
anyway. We're always looking for 
the quick clear, sometimes to the 
point of excess." 

(JMass has also described its real 
strength in its offensive play, mean- 
ing that the rule changes were benefi- 
cial for the team. "[The team's] con- 
ditioning was very good, their 
individual skills were good," Garber 
said. 

This year's season was marked by 
the retirement of Head Coach Dick 
Garber, and the team's respectable 
eighth place finish made a fine going- 
away present. 

"The team shaped up very 
strong," Garber said. "My approach 
is to have the best season you can 
have. "Q 

by Kris Bruno 





122/Men's Lacrosse 





Photo by Ben Barnhart 



A GMass lacrosse player strains to keep the 
ball from Providence College. The Gorillas' 
performances corresponded with the change 
in rules that increased action. 

A GMass lacrosse player concentrates on 
catching the ball before Providence. Despite 
an extremely tough spring, the team shaped 
up strong. 



Men's Lacrosse/ 123 




EN'S LACROSSE 




A GMass lacrosse player struggles to keep 
control of the ball away from Providence Col- 
lege. The Gorillas were consistent in gaining 
control, which was the l<ey to a successful 
season. 

A OMass Gorilla prepares to throw the ball in 
Providence College's net. We blew Providence 
away 20-3. 



124/Men's Lacrosse 




After 36 Years, Coach 

Garber Retires 



For 36 years the University of 
Massaclnusetts men's la- 
crosse program has not 
known more than one head coach, 
which makes it hard to believe that 
Dick Garber has coached his last 
game on this campus. Garber, who 
was given an honorary law degree at 
graduation, thought his stay at 
OMass would be much shorter. 

When the cold weather-hating 
Garber graduated from Springfield 
College in 1950, he vowed that he 
would never travel this far north 
again. "Sid Kaufman [head of the 
CIMass athletic department] asked 
me, 'Are you still interested in coach- 
ing lacrosse?'" Garber recalled. "He 
said, 'I'm from CIMass, and we're 
starting a new physical education 
program.'" Garber accepted the job, 
although he told his wife that he 
thought it would be a temporary 
thing. 

Garber mixed his knowledge of 
teaching and coaching to turn CIMass 
into a lacrosse power in the country. 
On May 2, with a 21-18 win at Brown, 
Garber became the ninth coach to 
win 300 games. But of those nine, he 
is the only one who ever did it on the 
collegiate level. 

Although the game has changed 
drastically since Garber began coach- 
ing, the success never stopped, 
"Since 1980 it's been a different kind 
of coaching," he said. "We're recruit- 
ing and getting kids who are excel- 
lent stickhandlers and not teaching 
kids how to hold a stick." 

But Garber has an equal fondness 
for teaching the game, taking some- 
one who thinks lacrosse is just a city 
in Wisconsin and showing him or her 
the way. "I really enjoyed starting 
and building [the program] from the 
ground up," he said. "The first 10 



years 1 had three guys who had never 
played lacrosse before. All the other 
guys I recruited from Phys. Ed. class- 
es." 

In spite of that, his team ran off 
nine consecutive winning seasons af- 
ter an 0-7-1 mark in the inaugural 
1955 campaign. And his undefeated 
1969 team (11-0) consisted of 7 out of 
10 starters who came from Phys. Ed. 
classes. 

"People always ask me, 'Aren't 
you frustrated you've never won the 
national championship?' Hell no ... I 
tell the players when the season 
starts that, rather than set a goal for 
the playoffs, to focus on being the 
best we can be," he said. "If you set 
the Final Four as a goal and lose a 
game or two, the guys start playing 
out of fear of failure, and you can't 
win like that." 

The message that Garber has 
preached to every athlete he has ever 
faced has never changed in his 36 
years. He still understands the impor- 
tance of the "student" part of the 
student-athlete. "People say, 'You're 
too concerned with how [the players] 
are doing in school. Shouldn't you be 
concerned with winning and losing?' 
No, that's a shallow concern," he 
said. "There are more important 
things in the world than lacrosse 
games." 

But Garber is still a coach and 
doesn't forget about the games. "On 
game day, those two hours are the 
most important thing." For 36 years 
Garber has worked hard to turn 
OMass into a respected team 
throughout lacrosse circles. 

"Thirty-six years— I can't believe 
that. It seems like 10, 12, 15, maybe 
20. 1 lost the concept of time. But it's 
been a fun 36 years. "ftj^ 

Dy Jim Clark 



Men's Lacrosse/ 125 




OMEN'S LACROSSE 



Program Cut Produces 

Frustrated Team 



Perhaps the reason why the 
OMass women's lacrosse 
teann had a below average 
season was because they had lost 
their spirit. The 1990 season was the 
last season for the Gazelles due to its 
suspension for economic reasons. 
Knowing that this season was their 
last made the team lose its spunk, 
and it showed in its record. 

The Gazelles wound up their final 
season for GMass with a 4-10 record. 
"We could have just as easily went 0- 
14," said Head Coach Patti Bossio. "1 
really admire [the Gazelles'] courage 
and how they faced this entire sea- 
son through all, the adversity. It was 
an emotional roller coaster." 

The women's lacrosse team con- 
cluded its season with what may be 
its final game ever. The Gazelles fell 
to Dartmouth 18-8. 

"Reality just kind of set in," Bossio 



said. "It has been a season of frustra- 
tion with the program being 
dropped." 

Bossio tried to use the fact that the 
1990 season was the last one for a 
while to psyche up the team for their 
games, but it just did not work, espe- 
cially considering the number of inju- 
ries the team had to deal with. 

"We tried to use that emotion to 
get up for the games, but 1 think it 
might have just had the reverse ef- 
fect," Bossio said. 

Even if the Gazelles had an unde- 
feated season, the program would 
still be cut. "Winning and losing 
didn't mean anything," Bossio said. 

With all that happened during this 
season, there was no way that the 
players' hearts could have been in 
the game. t?| 

^^ by Kris Bruno 




Photo by Jeff Holland 



A UMass Gazelle runs to intercept the ball. 
This was the team's last season due to budget 
cuts. 

The 1989-90 Women's Lacrosse Team. The 
team was suspended until funds were avail- 
able to put the team back on-line. 




126/ Women's Lacrosse 



Photo Courtesy of Photo Services 



A UMass Gazelle attempts to regain the ball 
from the opposing team. The women's la- 
crosse team showed courage and determina- 
tion despite the fact that it was their last sea- 
son. 




Photo by Jeff Holland 



Women's Lacrosse/ 127 





OMEN'S LACROSSE 




Photo by Jeff Holland 



A GMass Gazelle fights to get the ball. The 
program was suspended partly because wom- 
en's lacrosse was not commonly played in 
high schools, thus making it less popular in 
college. 

The UMass goalie prepares herself for the on- 
coming ball. The Athletics Department 
planned to direct athletic fee funds towards 
more promising sports than women's lacrosse. 



128/Women's Lacrosse 





Photo by Jeff Holland 

A OMass Gazelle runs toward her opponent 
who has the ball. Women's lacrosse was the 
hardest hit athletic program on campus. 



Budget Cuts Hurt 

Women's Lacrosse 



Cuts in education due to the 
fiscal crisis in Massaciiusetts 
resulted in complaints from 
all members of the UMass communi- 
ty. Some were due to the reduction 
of course openings and rising tuition. 
Effects of budget cuts, however were 
not limited to GMass academic pro- 
grams, as the athletic department an- 
nounced the suspension of three var- 
sity sports. The hardest hit program 
was women's lacrosse, which was in- 
definitely suspended following the 
completion of the 1990 season. 

State funding for athletics had de- 
creased by more than $100,000. "I 
feel the current fiscal crisis is immea- 
surably more severe and more diffi- 
cult than any time I can recall," said 
CIMass Athletic Director Frank Mcln- 
erney. 

The Board of Trustees approved a 
$16 increase in the existing athletic 
fee of $134, but that could only keep 
current programs alive. The depart- 
ment also planned on directing its 
funds toward more promising sports. 



"This campus is wildly excited 
about basketball. If we're going to 
put together a Division I team, it 
costs money," Mclnerney said. 

One factor that contributed to the 
decision to suspend women's la- 
crosse was that it was not commonly 
played in Massachusetts high 
schools. "The hard thing about wom- 
en's lacrosse is that it has become 
property of the [ivy League]." said 
David C. Bischoff, Dean of the 
School of Physical Education. 

Mclnerney tried to be optimistic 
about the future of women's lacrosse 
at CIMass. "We didn't end women's 
lacrosse, we suspended it. When the 
money is available, we will put it 
back on-line. But at this time, we 
don't have the resources," he said. 

Any sort of relief from the current 
budget situation remains unclear. ". . 
. The prognosis for [the budget cut's] 
ending is not in sight," Mclnerney 
said. 1^1 

by Kris Bruno 



Women's Lacrosse/ 129 




OFTBALL 



Photo by Joel Solomon 
A CIMass Softball player hits a University of 
Hartford pitcher's flyball. Unlike that day, 
weather did not always favor our team. 

Catcher llene Freeman keeps a firm grasp of a 
Holly April pitch. Freeman kept many balls 
from reaching the backstop. 




Foul Weather Means 

CJMass Co-Champs 



Somehow it seems that when- 
ever CIMass is at a point of 
victory, there is always some- 
thing that stands in the way of ulti- 
mate success — Temple. That was 
the situation for men's basketball 
this year, as Temple was the thorn in 
GMass' side that kept the team out of 
the MCAA playoffs. A similar situa- 
tion arose for the GMass softball 
team. 

In what was the cruelest decision 
ever made by the Atlantic 10 com- 
mittee, the University of Massachu- 
setts Softball team had to accept a 
co-championship status with Temple 
University. 

"I'm totally and completely frus- 
trated," said Head Coach Elaine Sor- 
tino. "[The players] were very upset. 
This is something that they've been 
working ten months for." 

What is especially ironic about the 



decision is that GMass has beaten 
Temple in all three games that the 
two teams have played during the 
regular season. 

The A-10 championship for the 
second year in a row seemed to be 
CIMass' destiny — all that was left 
was to win one game against Tem- 
ple, where Temple had to beat 
GMass twice. 

But if anything was at fault for the 
final game's cancellation, it was the 
weather. Blame it on the rain. 

And so, the hard work of the sea- 
son, 25-20 overall record, 9-3 in the 
Atlantic 10, resulted in a stalemate 
due to Mother Nature. 

At the time of publication the teahi 
was contesting their co-champion- 
ship award with Temple, but GMass 
will have to wait a while to see what 
the result will be.jt?] 

by Kris Bruno 




Photo by Joel Solomon 



130/Softball 




Photo by Joel Solomon 



A (JMass base player prepares to slide into 
third as her opponent catches the ball. The 
Minutewoman touched base seconds before 
she could be tagged. 



Softball/ 131 




ASEBALL 



Great Attitudes Equal 

Euphoric Success 



Rising to the top in a whirl of 
euphoric success, CJMass 
baseball enjoyed a victorious 
and profitable season. 

"When we hit in bunches, we 
score a lot of runs," said Head Coach 
Mike Stone. "[The players] are real 
good competitors . . . they don't like 
to lose." 

The team finished their season 
with a very respectable .565 winning 



percentage, with 26 wins and 20 
losses. Pitching coach Bob Rikeman 
felt that the team's success was part- 
ly due to the optimism of his eleven 
pitchers, seven of whom are fresh- 
men. "The competition was definite- 
ly tough," Rikeman said, "[but the 
team's] attitude is great; it's the best 
attitude I've seen in a while. "p3] 

by Kris Bruno 




Photo by Ben Barnhart 



132/Baseball 



A Minuteman pitches against Springfield. Part 
of the baseball's team's success was due to its 
eleven pitchers. 




A OMass baseball player is up at bat against 
Springfield. Despite tough competition, the 
Minutemen had a great attitude about the 
game. 



Paul Ciaglo throws his best at Rutgers. Unfor- 
tunately, Rutgers beat GMass 8-7 during the 
semifinals at the Atlantic Tournament. 



Photo by Joel Solomon 




Baseball/ 133 




ASEBALL 



A (JMass Minuteman runs to catch the ball. He 
caught it, helping to add another victory to the 
team's scoreboard. 





Photo by Ben Barnhart 
A Springfield baseball player tags a Minute- 
man out just seconds before reaching the 
base. The Minutemen pulled through in the 
end and made it to the Atlantic Tournament. 



134/Baseball 




No Injuries 

Strong 

A great attitude among team 
members led the GMass base- 
ball team to the Atlantic Tour- 
nament. The Minutemen entered the 
tournament expecting to do well. 
The fact that there were few injuries 
was definitely a plus. The second 
time in three years that UMass has 
played in the championships, the 
team made it to the semifinals only 
to be eliminated by Rutgers 8-7 and 



Benefits A 

Season 



West Virginia 9-1. 

Several CIMass baseball players 
were named to the Atlantic 10 Ail- 
Star team. Sophomore Derek Dana 
was named First Team A-10 catcher, 
while junior third baseman Ian Tor- 
res, sophomore right fielder Brian 
Bright and sophomore shortstop 
Glenn DiSarcina made the second 
team, it?] 

by Kris Bruno 



Photo by Ben Barnhart 




A (JMass Minuteman slides into base before 
his opponent can catch the ball to tag him out. 
Being competitive, the Minutemen didn't like 
to lose. 



Photo by Ben Barnhart 



Baseball/ 135 



Sarah Szetela attempts to pass the ball to 
an unseen fellow player during the game 
against Virginia. The Minutewomen won 2- 
1 in the first round of NCAA finals, al- 
though they were defeated in the second 
round. 



UM 

3 

2 

1 

1 

1 

3 

4 

5 



1 

2 

9 

2 



2 

6 



1 

3 

3 


1 

1 



UM 

28 

42 

23 

19 

31 

33 

14 

31 

17 

26 

34 



Syracuse 

Boston College 

Old Dominion 

James Madison 

Providence 

Rutgers 

Yale 

St. Joseph's 

Penn State 

Northeastern 

Temple 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Iowa 

Springfield 

Rhode Island 

Boston University 

Connecticut 

Dartmouth 

Atlantic 10 Champs 

Temple 

Old Dominion 

NCAA's 

Boston University 

Old Dominion 



OFF 

2 



James Madison 

Lehigh 

Maine 

Boston University 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Northeastern 

Richmond 

Villanova 

New Hampshire 





4 

2 
1 
1 

1 
1 



1 

2 






1 



136/Scoreboards 




An unidentified player takes to the run dur- 
ing the game against New Hampshire. The 
Minutemen were successful in keeping the 
team out of the Yankee Conference play- 
offs with their 34-28 victory. 



UM OPP 

Virginia 2 

2 Colgate 

Vermont 1 
2 Cornell 

2 Wisconsin 1 
4 Hartford 1 

3 Rhode Island 1 

1 Connecticut 1 
6 Holy Cross 

3 New Hampshire 

1 Central Florida 1 

4 Florida Intl. 

5 Dartmouth l 
4 Harvard 1 

2 North Carolina St. 2 

William & Mary 

1 Rutgers 2 

3 Brown 
NCAA's 

2 Virginia 1 
2 Colorado College 5 



The (JMass field hockey team faces off 
against Providence College. Despite a 
strong defense, UMass was defeated by a 
score of 2-1. 



Photo by Jeff Holland 



Scoreboards/ 137 





UMass player number 9 uses his North- 
eastern opponent to boost himself up to 
take control of the ball. Strong offensive 
playing led to a 30 victory. 


Men's Soccer 
UM 


OPP 


Maine 


1 


1 New Hampshire 
Temple 
Dartmouth 


2 
3 



1 Vermont 


2 


Yale 


1 


3 Northeastern 





2 George Washington 
2 Delaware 


3 



2 Brown 


3 


Rhode Island 


1 


1 Williams 





1 St Joseph 
Connecticut 






2 Colgate 
2 Providence 


1 




2 Rutgers 
1 Fairfield 


3 





Women's Gymnastics 




UM 




OPP 


179.3 


Towson State 


180.8 


181.5 


Rhode Island 


176.6 


181.5 


Towson State 


182.4 


179.7 


Cornell 


171.1 


178.0 


Yale 


172.4 


179.9 


Bridgeport 


178.1 


179.S 


Rhode Island Coll 


139.5 


180.8 


S. Connecticut 


171.0 


182.0 


Northeastern 


181.0 


184.9 


Springfield 


170.6 


185.2 


Rutgers 


180.7 


185.4 


Vermont 


174.2 


186.8 


Northeastern 


183.1 


186.8 


Temple 


181.4 




Precision and concentratior 


1 on the balance 




beam are shown by this female gymnast 




c 


luring the meet against 


Rhode Island. 




Rhode Island was defeated by a score of 






81.5 to 176.6. 





138/ Scoreboards 





Cal Booker grimaces as he falls after his 
vault. Despite injuries, the men's gymnas- 
tics team boasted a strong season with a 
record of 6-6. 



Women's Basketball 

ur«i 



OPP 



72 St Bonaventure 


77 


70 Dusquense 


54 


73 W Virginia 


87 


61 Dartmouth 


72 


54 Rhode Island 


57 


50 Temple 


78 


52 St Joseph 


97 


58 Penn Stale 


91 


49 Temple 


67 


71 George Washington 


72 


55 Rutgers 


68 


78 Harvard 


74 


53 Penn State 


72 


60 St Bonaventure 


66 


60 Dusquense 


72 


55 W Virginia 


85 


58 Rhode Island 


63 


77 St Bonaventure 


72 


55 Rutgers 


86 



Men's Gymnastics 




UM 




OPP 


256.35 


Navy 


265.0 


261.8 


E Stroudsburg 


242.05 


256.35 


Cortland 


256.9 


256.35 


Kent State 


261.2 


256.35 


Vermont 


198.85 


224.05 


Dartmouth 


152.15 


248.15 


MIT 


131.5 


261.30 


S Connecticut 


184.10 


255.65 


Temple 


273.8 


260.25 


Army 


263.45 


262.15 


Springfield 


257.1 


255.7 


Syracuse 


268.9 


261.7 


E Stroudsburg 


249.15 



Guard Michele Pytko pivots to avoid a 
player from the Danish National Team. 
This exhibition game resulted in a (JMass 
victory with a score of 67-54. 



Photo by Jeff Holland 



Scoreboards/ 139 



tIMass rallies against Temple in Philadel- 
phia during the NCAA playoffs. Despite a 
strong season this year, (JMass was unable 
to defeat Temple, keeping them out of the 
playoffs. 



Men's Basketball 

UM OPP 

88 Sodertajle 89 

69 Lowell 70 

76 Boston University 60 

75 Yale 69 
73 Northeastern 79 

108 Marathon Oil 71 

76 New Hampshire 53 
78 Colorado 71 
51 Colorado State 77 

84 Rutgers 73 
64 Penn State 52 

63 Rhode Island 57 
80 George Washington 61 
83 W Virginia 79 
82 St Bonaventure 55 
71 Penn State 74 
69 Temple 86 
69 Dusquense 70 
71 W Virginia 79 
75 Connecticut 95 
78 Duquense - 72 

85 Vermont 70 
61 Rutgers 66 
82 Temple 83 
95 George Washington 101 
75 St Joseph 81 

77 Rhode Island 74 
98 St Bonaventure 60 

80 St Joseph 57 

78 W Virginia 55 

64 Penn State 59 
51 Temple 53 

81 Maryland 91 



A Yale opponent attempts to steal the ball 
from Mario Lopez. Yale was able to pene- 
trate the GMass defense and secure a 19-13 




140/ Scoreboards 




A UMass women's lacrosse player hurls 
the ball down the field. Loss of enthusiasm 
due to the team's suspension because of 
budget cuts led to a depressing 4-10 season 
for the Minutewomen. 



Women's Lacrosse 




UM 




OPP 


10 


Hofstra 


6 


4 


Maryland-Bait Cnty 


11 


4 


Maryland 


15 


3 


Loyola 


10 


6 


Yale 


12 


7 


James Madison 


g 


g 


Boston College 


5 


1 


Brown 


15 


4 


New Hampshire 


15 


4 


Harvard 


16 


7 


Vermont 


6 


9 


Rutgers 


5 


2 


Temple 


10 


8 


Dartmouth 


18 



Men's Lacrosse 
UM 



27 
28 
15 
16 
20 
20 
13 
15 
19 
15 
12 
20 
21 

9 

9 



Arizona 

Whittier 

Cornell 

St John 

New Hampshire 

Providence 

Yale 

Dartmouth 

Army 

Harvard 

Rutgers 

Boston College 

Brown 

Syracuse 

Brown 



OPP 

8 
7 
16 
11 
15 
3 
19 
6 
12 
18 
11 
13 
18 
23 
12 



Photo by Clayton Jones 



Scoreboards/ 141 



In a controversial play leading to the end of 
the sixth inning of the third game, UMass 
third baseman puts the tag on (JRI's #9. 
CJMass played four games against Rhode 
Island, winning three 31, 6-3, 71, and los- 
ing one 14-3. 



Softball 




UM 


OPP 


3 Santa Clara 


1 


6 Santa Clara 


1 


Fresno State 


12 


Fresno State 


7 


Cal-Berkeley 


2 


1 Cal-Berkeley 


7 


4 Utah State 


13 


2 San Jose State 


4 


California 


2 


4 Michigan 


3 


4 Utah State 


5 


5 Northwestern 


1 


6 Virginia 


3 


1 Arizona 


1 


9 Hartford 


1 


3 Hartford 


1 


1 1 St Bonaventure 





1 1 St Bonaventure 


3 


Penn State 


3 


3 Penn State 


4 


3 Boston College 


2 


Boston College 


5 


Connecticut 


2 


2 Connecticut 


1 


3 Maine 


1 


9 Maine 





3 St Joseph 





3 St Joseph 





3 Temple 


2 


6 Temple 





2 Central Connecticut 


4 


10 Central Connecticut 


2 


5 George Mason 





9 Boston College 


1 


1 Kent State 


4 


2 Rutgers 





2 Georgia State 


3 


1 Rhode Island 





3 Rhode Island 


2 


1 Providence 





1 Providence 


4 


Rutgers 


7 


4 Rutgers 


3 


2 Adelphi 


6 


Adelphi 


3 


1 Adelphi 





4 Penn State 


2 


4 Penn State 


1 



A (JMass Softball player is safe at third 
base during the playoff game against Penn 
State. The Minutewomen beat Penn State 
4-2 and went on to beat Temple 41 in the 
finals. 



142/Scoreboards 














^■1 




A Minuteman makes contact with the ball 




^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 




thrown from the Gniversity of Vermont's 




^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 




pitcher. OMass split a pair of games with 




^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^1 




the club, winning the first 6-4 but losing the 




^^^^^^H 




second 4-2. 




^^^^H 






Baseball 


^^^^^^^1 






UM OPP 


^^^^1 


^^^^^^^^^^Hv ^^^^^^^^^^^H 




Maryland Bait. County 17 
12 William Patterson 3 


^^^^^1 


^B^^^yjliiiter ^m^l 




4 South Florida 10 
10 Alabama Birmingham 6 


^^^^^H 


^^^ ^^_gp ^^B^^^B 




1 Florida 3 
Florida 3 


^^^^^^^^^^^^H 


^^r 1^,-^ v^^^^^"" ^^^^^^^^^^^1 




14 Rider 11 


^H 






6 Rider 20 
Connecticut 16 

6 Siena 5 
5 St Joseph 4 

7 St Joseph 3 


^^^^^^^^^^^H 


"wV^ ^^B 




7 St Joseph 2 


^^^^^^^^^^^^H 




8 St Joseph 


N^^^^^^^^^l 


ik, ^^^^A ^1^ ^K^tk. n^^^l 




6 Hartford 15 


^^^l^^^^^^^^l 


E^ ^^Wf^ j&^ ^KHtl^Kt I^^^Hh 




10 Dartmouth 11 


SRHHHHIIJ^H 


HIl:^ ^a^ tb>- St^^^ ^^^^^I 




5 Dartmouth 4 




^^**"««i^l| ^^ 




7 Connecticut 8 

8 Boston University 

9 New Hampshire 4 




« 




5 New Hampshire 1 
3 Rhode Island 1 




Ml 




3 Rhode Island 14 




1 




6 Rhode Island 3 

7 Rhode Island 1 
14 Holy Cross 3 

6 Vermont 4 
2 Vermont 4 
21 Springfield 6 
5 Rutgers 12 
2 Rutgers 1 




wH^ 




1 Rutgers 2 






6 Rutgers 5 




^■SSSPhhih^ 




6 Central Connecticut 8 




.»^B'' 




10 Hartford 11 
1 Temple 




JH^^^K* ~^ 




6 Temple 4 
4 Temple 2 


.^..^ 






14 Temple 7 


M 






2 Maine 4 
17 Amherst 3 


^^ 


.«. ^IpBK 




2 Northeastern 5 


iBHai^^^i^ 


l,,j^_^^^^^^^_^ . ...-^N^-v.-v^. .^--' ., -^,-— *:.. .- ■ **"** '"••V"'«f«'*-"^.«^^|jj|B^4 




1 1 Northeastern 7 


^■^^p^^^ 


., . -^ \ ^.^^ 




13 George Washington 


* 


•'%''■ , ^i. , . . , ■ ^ 




7 Rutgers 8 


- 






1 West Virginia 


g 


Photo by Ben Barnhart 








Scoreboards/ 143 



Taking a break from river runs, Outing 
Club members Jack Donovan, Larry 
Burcoff and Becky O'Donnell warm up 
by a fire. The Outing Club, a popular 
organization at the University, spon- 
sored various outdoor activities, rang- 
ing from kayaking to caving, for tfiose 
in tfie mood for a bit of adventure. 

Training in the position as newscaster, 
junior journalism major William Walsh 
gives the news highlights for the day 
Celebrating its 40th year in broadcast- 
ing, CJMass' WMGA continues to de- 
light its audience with its diverse pro- 
gramming. 




Photo by Berrett Brooker 
Working at the loom in the Craft Center, 
Susan Tomaski, senior art major, makes a 
multi-colored scarf. The Student Union 
Craft Center offered many different types 
of crafts for anyone who wanted to get 
creative. 




144/ Organizations 



Organizations 




Organizations 

With the large number of diverse 
student organizations represented at 
the University of Massachusetts, it 
seems difficult to believe that any two people 
could actually agree. And yet, whether a 
person is a member of the Asian Student 
Association, Board of Governors or the Ski 
Club, there is one factor that all have in 
common — that being a member of a student 
organization is a challenging and rewarding 
way to learn about the world outside of the 
classroom. 13 



Photo courtesy of the Outing Club 



Organizations/ 145 



Students 

Explore 

The Deep 



A group of area students spent their 
spring breal< under water instead of 
on the beach in Florida. The 81 stu- 
dents were mostly from the Oniversity of 
Massachusetts, with a few from Smith Col- 
lege. They and their scuba diving instruc- 
tors spent their vacation in Key Largo, 
learning the intricacies of scuba diving, as 
well as encountering the beauties of the 
underwater world. 

The scuba diving excursion was spon- 
sored by Project Deep of Amherst. David 
B. Stillman, director of Project Deep, said 
that diving is a sport that a lot of people 
try, but no more than 20 percent of those 
people go beyond the basic course. 

Project Deep is an outgrowth of the SCU- 
BA (Self Contained Underwater Breathing 
Apparatus) program at GMass. and pro- 
vides opportunities for people in the area 
to get into and continue diving in a struc- 
tured atmosphere, said Stillman. In 1979, 
the SCUBA program at UMass was 
dropped due to budget woes. Robert 
Sparks, who was running the program at 
the time, decided to start up a nonprofit 
SCUBA program outside of the University 
so that diving wouldn't completely die out 
in the area, said Stillman. 

Stillman got interested in diving after 
seeing the television show "Sea Hunt" 
when he was a kid. In 1966, he took a 
beginning course, but didn't really do any- 
thing with it until he got hooked on diving 
in 1978. He has been diving seriously for 
12 years and has been director of Project 
Deep for the past 1 1 years. Project Deep 
provides basic instruction courses each se- 
mester at UMass, Amherst College, Hanip- 
shire College and Smith, said Stillman.fP) 

by Charles Abel 




Photo by Charles Abel 



Pro/eei 



146/Organizations 




Project Deep divers prepare to start diving. Tfiese 
students were among the 20 percent who went be- 
yond basic scuba diving courses. 



Project Deep students start their second day of diving 
at Molasses Reef in John Pennyl<amp State Park, 
Florida. They were doing something many people 
only dreamed of. 



Photo by Charles Abel 

OMass junior Josh Lavine explores the deep. Project 
Deep was popular with fJMass students. 





Organizations/ 147 



Nommo Is A 
Better Word 

Established in 1968, Nommo News is 
a monthly publication which in- 
tends "to address news and issues 
that concern people of color in the five 
college area," according to Akimi Ko- 
chiyama-Ladson. 

Nommo is a Kiswahili word which 
means the power of the spoken and written 
word. From the publication's beginnings in 
1968, until 1990, the name was Nummo 
News. However, the collective decided to 
change the name to Nommo News be- 
cause it is more correct. 

Nommo News encourages people of all 
backgrounds to contribute articles, poems 
or photographs on progressive issues of 
people of color. The focus of articles in- 
cludes theater, black entertainment, edito- 
rials, health issues and events on campus. 
The May 1990 issue featured a story on the 
history of rap music by Kevin A. Mitchell. 

Anita Bermiss said that this semester 
Nommo increased its popularity. She ex- 
plained, "I'm very impressed with what 
we've accomplished this semester, in 
terms of high quality articles and stories. It 
makes me very happy to see people of 
color coming together to work on some- 
thing that is so important to me." 

Tamara Harris commented: "My experi- 
ence with Nommo News was definitely a 
positive awakening to my idea of the black 
students on campus." Anita Bermiss con- 
cluded, "We're dedicated to the publica- 
tion of Nommo News because we want 
people of color to have something to identi- 
fy with on campus." 

by Amy E. Lord 



A Nommo News member listens attentively during a 
staff meeting. Tfie dedication of the staff fielped in- 
crease riommo's popularity this year. 



Two staff members collaborate on an article. The 
magazine published progressive views of issues of 
interest to people of color. 



148/Organizations 




Nommo News 




II 

Spring Music 
Witii Snoopy 



^ ^ Good grief Charlie Brown, will you 
never learn!" Lucy snorts as she pulls the 
football away from Charlie Brown's unsus- 
pecting kick. 

The University Player's spring musical 
production "You're a Good Man Charlie 
Brown" marked the second year of the 
theater organization's existence, it provid- 
ed students of the five college area with 
the opportunity to partake in theater pro- 
ductions. 

The members vary each semester de- 
pending upon the choice of the production. 
It is customary that the University Players 
perform a drama in the fall semester and a 
musical in the spring, in the fall of 1989, 
the Players produced the drama "Plaza 
Suite." 

Ellen Foley, the president of the Univer- 
sity Players for three semesters, said, 
"Ironically, people try out for our shows 
and then join our club. " However, the Uni- 
versity Players include not only actors and 
actresses but also backstage workers who 
pull it all together. 

For the April production of "You're a 
Good Man Charlie Brown," casting was be- 
gun in February. Rehearsals lasted for two 
months. 

Ellen Foley, who has participated in all 
four productions of the Players' existence, 
remarked proudly, "'Charlie Brown' was 
the best show I've ever done. Everything 
flowed and the network of people was a 
success. We set the goal of making the 
audience a part of it all and we achieved 
our goal." O 

by Linda M. Rowland 



Charlie Brown and friends smile as they jog to the 
edge of the stage. The energetic (Jniversity Players 
made their spring musical come alive for the audi- 
ence. 

Lucy lectures her brother Linus, using a familiar ex- 
ample — the actions of another character. The cast 
worked closely for months to created their final suc- 
cess. 



Urn 



Photo by Lisa [Nalewak 



Pi&j^ers 



Organizations/ 1 49 




Photo by Lisa Nalewak 



Two intent jugglers Henry Lappen and Scott Lewis dis- 
play their hand-eye coordination. They participated in 
The Second Annual Jugglers Convention. 

Exhibiting great poise and concentration, Joe Gaudreau 
and Tully Gendly master the art of a two man juggle. The 
Juggling Club has been active since the mid-1970's. 





Photo by Mason Rivlin 
Making the ring toss look easy, Kim Son, puts on 
quite a show in the Student (Jnion Ballroom. He was 
one of the many participants at the Convention held 
November 10-12, 1989. 



Photo by Lisa Nalewak 



uggiin^ dub 



150/ Juggling Club 





Jugglers Learn 
Skill And Fun 

Have you ever walked through the 
Campus Center on a Friday after- 
noon and caught a glimpse of people 
tossing balls, clubs, devil sticks or even 
more obscure objects? Did you wonder 
what they were up to? Did you ever wish 
you knew how to juggle so you could join 
in the fun? 

The Juggling Club's weekly practice is 
open to anyone who walks in and asks to 
be taught how to juggle. The atmosphere is 
friendly and relaxed, and welcomes anyone 
to try their hand at the tricks of juggling. 
All that is required is some hand-eye coor- 
dination, a little balance, hard concentra- 
tion and a lot of practice. 

In just 30 minutes, the group challenges 
anyone to be taught to manipulate a 3 ball 
toss. However, learning to juggle 3 clubs 
takes at least a month longer (with prac- 
tice). 

As one member, Jim McCombe, demon- 
strated his tricks, he said, "You start with 
balls and then, for me, I began to use clubs 
and devil sticks and then a diablo which is 
similar to the yo-yo effect." The equipment 
is expensive, but the jugglers who own it 
are willing to share. 

Juggling is an acquired skill that in- 
volves constant learning. A juggler can 
master tricks, but never the entire art of 
juggling. It is not as easy as it may appear. 

Jim McCombe began juggling because 
of a curiosity it peaked inside him, now he 
hopes to put his talent to work. "I started 
juggling because it intrigued me, and now 
it is all for fun. Someday, I may even like to 
be a professional juggler — something like 
you see in Harvard Square in Boston." 

ClMass Juggling Club sponsored its Sec- 
ond Annual Jugglers Convention from No- 
vember 10 through the 12 in the Student 
Union Ballroom in the Campus Center. 

The convention was attended by jug- 
glers from across the nation and featured 
professional juggling shows. As one juggler 
established, "We (the Juggling Club) can 
learn so much from just watching the pro- 
fessionals display the mastery of their 
trick." Q 

by Linda M. Rowland 

Juggler Chris Harel from Montreal, Canada shows off 
his juggling ability with clubs. Distracted by the cam- 
era, Chris dropped his clubs one minute after this 
photo was taken. 



Photo by Lisa Nalewak 



Juggling Club/ 151 



We Satisfy 
Every Taste 

In WMUA's 40 years of existence, th 
station had graduated from a ioi 
nnwpr AM freauencv to tiie prom 



nent broadcasting facility of tfie University 
of Massaciiusetts at Amtierst. In tiie past 
year WMCJA has expanded into two offices 
in the basement of the Campus Center 
where they have just installed their second 
compact disc player. 

WMGA has been celebrating its dedica- 
tion and service since its charter was estab- 
lished in October of 1949. The current di- 
rectors are planning an alumni dinner 
titling the affair "40 Years in Your Ears." 
91.1 FM is home to over 150 air person- 
alities ranging from disc jockies to news- 
casters and sportscasters. Block program- 
ming is the format of the station. This 
allows each disc jockey to play a preferred 
style of music although they do deviate to 
different genres of that style ... so a jazz 
show will play the blues, too. 

Becky Zumbruski, a manager at WMUA 
doubles as a disc jockey. She has a rock 
show but occasionally strays to jazz or 
funk to keep her listeners interested. 
Becky, an Education major, has worked at 
the station for 3 years and says, "1 started 
because I liked music, but now I want to 
incorporate music into my skills when I 
become a teacher." Before becoming man- 
ager, Becky was a disc jockey and then the 
Public Affairs Director. She explained, "It's 
a lot of fun, and there are lots of depart- 
ments so you can see different aspects of 
the station." 

WMCIA receives two-thirds of its funding 
from the school and other funds are raised 
in December when the station holds its 
annual telethon. The station also receives 
between 50 and 100 records a week from 
promotional organizations, marketing 
many distinct styles of music. 

The music goes hand in hand with the 
plaidwork of personalities that combine 
over the airwaves to create variety, paral- 
leling the individuality that creates GMass. 
1^1 By Linda Rowland 




Disc jockey Blue Bill enjoys the distraction of a pho- 
tographer during his afternoon show. Each DJ at 
WMGA represented a variety of musical tastes during 
their shows such as jazz, blues, rock and funk. 



Photo by Lisa Nalewak 
Chairperson Scott Lever and Becky Zumbruski, sta- 
tion manager, discuss plans for the "40 Years in Your 
Ears" in a station meeting. The spring event celebrat- 
ed WMUA's charter which was established in October 
1949. 



Organizations/ 152 






AHORA officers, Robert Venator, Carmen Rodriguez 
and Felipe Barreda take pride in tfieir organization 
and friendships they have formed. 



Members of AHORA. Ludiel Santana, Maria Elana 
Rodriguez and Felipe Barreda, collect contributions 
for the victims of Hurricane Hugo. They contributed 
$700 to the American Red Cross, who in turn provid- 
ed food, water and needed supplies to the victims. 




AHORA Is 
In Action 

AHORA, an academic support service 
for latino students, was created in 
1974. Membership is open to the en- 
tire 500-member (Jniversity latino commu- 
nity. 

Ahora has a two-fold purpose. First, it 
creates an opportunity for Hispanic stu- 
dents to recognize and to discuss topics 
that concern them in the latino communi- 
ty. Second, AHORA educates non-Hispan- 
ics on the issues that affect Hispanic peo- 
ple. 

One of the biggest news stories this year 
was Hurricane Hugo. Many Puerto Ricans 
were left homeless. AHORA was responsi- 
ble for setting up a Puerto Rican relief 
fund. They collected $700, which was used 
to provide food, water and other necessary 
supplies to Hugo's victims. "Many of the 
members in our organization had family 
members or friends in Puerto Rico ... we 
decided that we needed to do something," 
said president Felipe Barreda. |tj] 

by Sharon Pratt 



Photo by Paul Agnew 




Photo by Paul Agnew Photo by Chuck Atjel 




^HORA 





AHORA/ 153 



People's Market Offers 
Great Coffee And More 



Where's the best place to get a steam- 
ing cup of coffee or a fresh bagel 
when you're on your way to class? 
The People's Market offers a healthy alter- 
native to any of the Munchies Stores on 
campus. It's fun too! People's Market of- 
fers a progressive selection of music to 
calm the nerves after an intense class. 
Browsing in the student run store, one can 
smell the aroma of freshly brewed coffee 



and organic produce. 

This year the non-profit organization has 
many new products including natural 
health and beauty aids. Looking for blue- 
berry donuts, herbal tea or Paul Newman's 
Olive Oil and Vinegar Dressing? The Peo- 
ple's Market has all of these and morelFOl 

by Amy E. Lord 





Photo by Russell Kirshy 
Hot coffee on a cold morning brings warm smiles to many students. Long lines 
to the cashier were a familiar sight in the People's Market. 



Photo by Russell Kirshy 
The aroma of fresh brewed coffee drifts out the open 
door of People's Market. Daily, the market offered a 
different flavor of coffee as well as dairy products and 
fresh baked bagels. 

Friendly service is always a standard at People's Mar- 
ket. Lesly Cormier was one of the many people on 
staff last year at the People's Market. 



People's Market 




154/ People's Market 




Nutrition Is 
Dirt Cheap 

I walked into the Student Union one 
afternoon after a long day of classes. 
I had missed lunch, and was low on 
cash, as usual. Waiting until 6:00 to eat 
dinner was not going to be easy. After 
dropping off a letter at the post office, I 
headed for the exit. I suddenly saw lots of 
people eating and hanging out in a room 
that looked nicer than a cafeteria. 

Because I was so hungry, I decided to 
check out the place. Before long, I had 
purchased a huge plate of rice for just 80 
cents! A deal like that was too good to pass 
up. Earthfoods satisfied my hunger and 
saved the day! 

Most students that eat in Earthfoods 
give an impression that they eat there all 
the time. Most are vegetarians that are 
unable to find a well-made meal at a low 
price that can be incorporated into their 
special diets. 

The atmosphere in Earthfoods proves to 
be warm and friendly because of the dedi- 
cated students who run it. They're energet- 
ic and always willing to make their fellow 
students/customers happy. O 

-by Stefa Kopystianskyj 



Junior nutrition major Shauna Kelly dices the brocco- 
li for the day's lunch. The dedication and energy of 
the student workers at Earthfoods provided a relaxed 
atmosphere for all patrons. 



Photo by Paul Agnew 

Graduate students Beth Souza and Melissa Herbert 
share an amusing conversation over lunch. Earth- 
foods was an interesting place to meet new people 
and enjoy pleasant conversation. 




Photo by Paul Agnew 
Junior Lisa Ladurantaye steams a vegetable and rice 
dish. Earthfoods strived to provide interesting and 
good-tasting vegetarian dishes for its customers. 




iarthfoods 




Earthfoods/ 155 



AZ Has UMqss 
Hand In Hand 

Alpha Zeta is an honorary, profession- 
al service fraternity of the College of 
Food and Natural Resources. Though 
the organization gives recognition of stu- 
dent scholarship and leadership, its mem- 
bers put most of their energy into helping 
the community. 

Alpha Zeta expressed their commitment 
to the community by participating in 
Hands Around UMass on October 27. The 
fraternity helped organize the Civility 
Week event by coordinating and motivat- 
ing members of the community to partici- 
pate. 

The president of Alpha Zeta, Meghan 
Hopkins, gave her impression of the event: 
"It was great to see people joining in the 
chain as they walked by. Jane Sapp, a civil 
rights activist and gospel singer, was the 
highlight of the event. She was inspiring to 
everyone. She created the energy and spir- 
it of the whole event." In the past, Alpha 
Zeta has worked with the National Student 
Campaign Against Hunger at the North 
Amherst Shelter. The 1989-1990 Alpha 
Zeta officers include Meghan Hopkins, 
Amy Blease, Marianne Lucia, Joyce Bur- 
rill, David Hancox, and Anna Doyle. Not 
just any fraternity. Alpha Zeta is a profes- 
sional service organization committed to 
the betterment of the community. pJ| 

by Amy E. Lord 



Civil Rigiits activist and gospel singer Jane Sapp 
inspires tiie participants of Hands Around UMass. 
The event was one of the highlights of Civility Week 




Photo by Paul Agnew 



Alpha Zeta/ 156 



II 




Photo by Paul Agnew 




Students join hands to show their support for civility 
week. The (JMass community participation was out- 
standing during Civility Week, which was October 23- 
27, 1989. 

AZ pledges, Lacey Halstead, Theresa Conway and 
Michele Wormham, proudly show their paddles. They M 
attended a spaghetti dinner to welcome new members M 
to this professional service organization. 



iefa 



Alpha Zeta/157 




Photo by Paul Agnew 
The men's varsity team practices on the Connecticut Members of the Crew Team display their wares on the 
River. Early morniny practices were a hardship that Campus Center Concourse. Sales of their tshirts 
team members had to face during crew season. earned necessary funds to support the team mem- 

bers. 



Photo by Jeff Holland 
The head oarsman glides his oars across the water. 
An even stroke was able to be maintained in spite of 
the numbing cold. 



w 



few Ciub 




158/Organizations 




UMqss Crew 

Has Winning 

Season 



The CIMass crew team ended its 1989- 
90 season with a climatic boom by 
winning the New England Rowing 
Championships (NEIRC) in May. The year 
1990 marked GMass' first gold medal in 
the NEIRC when the men's novice light- 
weight eight emerged victorious in the race 
against Tufts, the Coast Guard Academy 
and the University of Rhode island. Paul 
Schor, a varsity heavyweight oarsman, 
commented on his teammates' race: "It 
was the most emotional race I've ever 
seen." 

The men's lightweight novice was just 
one of the four squads on the crew team. 
Each squad, varsity men, varsity women, 
novice men, and novice women supported 
25 oarspeople. This year's team was fund- 
ed by the University, crew alumni, and by 
the oarspeople themselves. 

The GMass team raced primarily in the 
spring. The 2000 meter races last about 
seven minutes, but this year's victory boat 
in the NEIRC finished with a time of six 
minutes three seconds. Watching the win- 
ning race at the NEIRC on Lake Quinsiga- 
mond, Schor spoke of the competition at 
the race, "All four boats passed by neck- 
and-neck, but CIMass remained controlled 
and so composed that it seemed they 
would hold their two-seat lead. It was beau- 
tiful to watch." Pj 

-by Linda Rowland and 
Mary Lockyer 

The Crew Team takes a breather in between runs. 
Being on the water early in the morning meant that 
the team could watch the sunrise during practices. 

Men's varsity crew participates in another grueling 
practice. The hard work and dedication of the team 
was beneficial, resulting in a win at the New England 
Rowing Championships. 



Photo by Jeff Holland 



Organizations/ 159 




Hillel members, Cheryl Obedin and treasurer Seth 
Landau, relax in the office after a hectic day. The 
Hillel office served as a friendly retreat for members 
any day of the week. 

Council members, Jeff Weisburger, Gary Kabler and 
vice president Cindy Spungin discuss plans for the 
upcoming 14th Annual Arts Festival. Many cultural 
events were sponsored by Hillel during the festival 
such as an Ethopian Jewish Art Exhibit and the Zam 
rim concert, to name a few. 




Photo by Russell Kirshy 



HIH 



Organizations/ 1 60 




II 



Humanitarian and Nobel Prize winner Elie Wiesel, 
speaks to GMass in September 1989. He inspired a 
crowd of 2000 when speaking on civility and human 
rights. 



Plioto by Russell Kirshy 
Hillel aims to foster closer relationships between stu- 
dents, faculty, and the CIMass community in general. 
Members Wendie Trubow and Amy Amerling had a 
friendly chat after a Hillel council meeting. 



Hillel Fills 
Needs Of 
Jewish 
Community 

The B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation was 
establishied in 1945 to provide for the 
spiritual, cultural and emotional 
needs of the Jewish community at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts. Its aim is to fos- 
ter closer relationships between students, 
faculty, staff and the community in gener- 
al. There are 200 dues-paying members but 
every Jewish student is considered a mem- 
ber. 

Hillel sponsors many events on campus. 
On Sept. 18, 1989, they brought Elie Wie- 
sel, noted author, humanitarian and educa- 
tor to (JMass. "He is a very inspirational 
individual ..." said Randi Dubno, presi- 
dent of Hillel. 

Other events that they have sponsored 
include a Quabbin hike in October; a con- 
cert feating Kolos, a Jewish singing group, 
in November; and the Mini Mall in Decem- 
ber. 

On February 1, 1990, Moshe Waldocks, 
a Jewish humorist, kicked off the 14th 
Annual Jewish Arts Festival. It was filled 
with many cultural events: Beta Israel: A 
House Divided, which was an Ethiopian 
Jewish Art Exhibit; a video documentary 
by Joel Saxe, and a Coffeehouse concert 
with Zamrim and poet/writer Aviva Doron. 

In addition to these events, Hillel has 
many on-going events which occur every 
semester. These include Zamir radio, 
which broadcasts Jewish and Israeli music 
every Sunday morning on WMCIA, Israeli 
Folkdancing every Monday night. Gab with 
the Gang sessions every Thursday and 
Shabbat Services every Friday night. They 
also offer one-credit courses for students. 

For the third time since 1978, Hillel has 
won the William Haber award. This is 
awarded to an organization that best 
strengthens Jewish life on campuses. This 
year they won it for "Building Coalition out 
of conflict," which was a pro-active re- 
sponse to Louis Farrakhan's presence at 
CIMass. P] 

by Sharon Pratt 




Organizations/ 161 




Ski Club members do not spend all their time skiing. 
They also engaged in refreshing extracurricular activi- 
ties, such as soaking in a hot tub. as shown here at 
the Bush Bash. 

President of the Ski Club, John van der Wilden, 
"catches some serious air." He was on Winter Break 
at Snowbird in Utah. 



Photo courtesy of Ski Club 




Photo courtesy of Ski Club 



OAf'^^f Ski Ciub 




162 / Organizations 




Club Enjoys 
The Snow 

Who are "high people in high places?" 
The 750 members of the UMass Ski 
Club, of course! "The club is a fun- 
oriented organization designed to help stu- 
dents enjoy the sport of skiing for the least 
amount of fundage possible," according to 
member Philip H. Thorn, Jr. 

In the fall the club held its 19th Annual 
Ski Sale. This year the event had a new 
twist: fewer vendors and a smaller volume 
of inventory. The proceeds went toward 
weekend trips which feature reduced lift 
tickets, free bus fare and free food for 
members. Roberta Lescher, secretary, 
deemed the event a success: "we raised 
the necessary money to fund bus trips and, 
at the same time, eliminated the inventory 
problems of the past." 

The CJMass Ski Club sponsored several 
ski trips throughout the winter months for 
both members and non-members. Every 
Saturday members were invited to ski at 
New England mountains such as Killing- 
ton, Stowe, Mt. Snow and Stratton. One of 
the most popular trips was the week-long 
Sugarbush Bash, during Intersession. The 
club also sponsors reasonably priced 
Spring Break trips to Killington, Steam- 
boat, Colorado, Jamaica and Barbados. 

John van der Wilden, president, headed 
to Jamaica for Break. His "sun trip" in- 
cluded "swimming, touring on a dirt bike, 
cliff diving, sunset parties and SCGBA." 

The Ski Club president explained that 
most of the officers are interested in pursu- 
ing careers in recreational management or 
in the ski industry. However, if given a 
choice of what to do in the future, van der 
Wilden decreed his priority to be "follow 
the snow." jijl 

by Amy E. Lord 



Members gather for a photo atop a mountain at 
Steamboat, Colorado. Scott Sherman, Paul Plagge, 
Greg Heitman, Adam Koller and Jenn Curran enjoyed 
a break from their rigorous day of skiing. 

While contemplating his next move, senior Account- 
ing major, John van der Wilden plummets down un- 
tamed mountainsides. This manuever exemplified his 
ambition to "follow the snow." 



Organizations/ 163 



Original 

Gifts Are 

Mode To 

Order 

Short on cash? In need of a great gift 
for that special someone? Create a 
masterpiece of your very own at the 
Student Union Craft Center. Charging mini- 
mal fees for materials, the Craft Center 
offers the free use of all its equipment. 

The center welcomes all members of the 
University community to take advantage 
of its facilities. The staff provides instruc- 
tion, for students at all levels of expertise, 
in crafts ranging from linoleum printing to 
ceramics. The Craft Center also offers spe- 
cial month-long introductory workshops 
for a small fee. 

J.D. works at the Student Onion Craft 
Center and commented that "Lots of peo- 
ple come in here to make presents for 
Christmas." Silkscreening, jewelry-making 
and leather-working are common tech- 
niques for popular gift ideas. David Morn- 
ing-Star, a Continuing Education Student, 
made buttons during the Strike of 1989. "It 
was my way of helpingthe strike. I decided 
to give the buttons away supporting the 
strike." Many people made t-shirts for the 
strike as well. 

The Craft Center is usually buzzing with 
excitement. A darkroom is available for 
photographers. Pottery Wheels, sewing 
machines, and looms are often in use at 
the Center. If you feel like candlemaking, 
mask making, or copper enameling, stop 
by at the Student Union Craft Center! 

The Annual Christmas Fair was once 
again a success. It was held in December 
on the Concourse and featured jewelry, 
scarves, hair accessories, pottery and 
woodwork. The pottery face mugs were 
quite an original expression of art at this 
year's Christmas Fair.ftjl 

by Amy E. Lord 



Employees in the Craft Center also take part in the 
activities. Employee, Kevin O'Neill, was using the 
leather cutter. 




Photo by Berret Brooker 



1 



-^^v>^x^;r>": I 



Organizations/ 164 




Photo by Berret Brooker 
' Continuing Education student, David Morningstar, ex- In the fall semester, the Craft Center sponsors a Craft 
bits the results of his work in the Craft Center. His shirt Fair. Art Major Margaret Deering prepared a tapestry 
atured a rising phoenix as a personification of a (JMass to advertise the Craft Fair, 
jdent. 



Cfuft Center 



Organizations/ 165 



MqssPIRG Is 
Involved 

The 135 members of the University's 
MassPIRG chapter work to preserve 
our environment, protect consumers 
and build a civic culture in which students 
and citizens get involved in political pro- 
cess. They provide opportunities for stu- 
dents to take part in solving local problems 
both on campus and in the surrounding 
communities. 

This active organization sponsored 
many events this year. The 6th Annual 
Hunger Cleanup, a student-run volunteer 
fundraiser for the homeless and hungry, 
was held on April 7, 1990. MassPIRG mem- 
bers from tJMass repainted the Amherst 
Survival Center and worked and took part 
in the "Run for Runaways" road race. Over 
$2,000 was donated to local and world 
wide hunger relief as a result of their 
efforts. 

MassPIRG also sponsored an Elemen- 
tary Education Project in which they enter 
the schools to raise childrens' understand- 
ing of the importance of clean air, recy- 
cling and global warming. 

MassPIRG brought Ceasar Chavez to 
OMass on March 2, 1990. Chavez called for 
the boycott of grapes since the harmful 
pesticides used by grape growers are haz- 
ardous both to fie[d workers and 
consumers. 

April 22, 1990 was the 20th Anniversary 
of Earth Day. MassPIRG planned various 
events to celebrate the occassion, includ- 
ing bands, food, juggling, educational 
booths and selling recycled and organic 
products. 

Bonnie Sammon, co-chairperson of Mas- 
sPIRG, felt that her organization is focused 
on taking action. "It gives you an opportu- 
nity to actually have an impact on many of 
the problems that concern us as citizens." 
Pi -by Sharon Pratt 



Co-chairpersons, Bonnie Sammon and Aaron Rome, 
talk with Ceasar Chavez after his lecture on March 2, 
1990. Chavez urged students to boycott grapes. 

On April 22, 1990, MassPIRG takes part in Amherst's 
Celebration of Earth Day. This educational booth 
stressed the importance of recycling. 




Photo by Joel Solomon 



HassPIRO 



Organizations/ 1 66 




Club Needs 
Tradition 



Everyone knows how good the feeling 
of victory and triumph can be. The 
nnembers of the Kodokan Martial Arts 
Club are able to experience that energy 
and motivation during their dally training 
using karate and ancient weapons of the 
Okinawan tradition, they aim to "develop 
the mind and body and spirit." 

The club has been active at OMass since 
1980 and currently has forty to fifty active 
members. Since 1980, over 1000 members 
have trained with the group. 

An interesting part of their organization 
is their service to the GMass students. 
Members of the Kodokan Martial Arts Club 
have been teaching karate and women's 
self-defense in the University Physical Edu- 
cation Department. 

In the past years, the club has held a 
twenty-four hour marathon for the "Save 
the Children" charity for the service frater- 
nity Alpha Phi Omega. President Ted 
Kempster plans to have more fund raisers 
for the same charity. [tJI 

by Stefa Kopystianskyj 



Members of the club practice intensely in Totman Two members of tfie Martial Arts Club go head on in 

Gym as they prepare for bouts. The club displayed competition. The determination was seen in the eyes 

motivation and were ready to take on many of the opponents as well as their desire and love for 

challenges. karate. 



Photo by Mason Rivlin 




MariMAris Club 




Organizations/ 1 67 



Board Of Governors 
Spins Into 1990 



The Board of Governors is a staff of 32 
voting members, 3 officers and 11 
coordinators that oversee the allocation of 
student space and maintenance of the 
Campus Center/ Student CInion Complex. 
Sue Gordon, a BOG member, described the 
organization as "The smoothest space pro- 
gram designed in years." 

During the 1989-90 school year the BOG 
accomplished several tasks benefitting the 
student body of GMass. The signs decorat- 
ing the doors of the fourth floor Student 
CInion offices were replaced. Also, the 
vending policy that allots space was reor- 
ganized. Businesses were obtaining tables 
on the concourse while students' needs 
were being neglected, but now students 
have the first priority. "It is running better 
now. The student groups are using student 
space successfully," remarked Gordon. 

The biggest program the BOG spon- 
sored was the Casino Night charity event 
held on March 8. The University is part of 



an organization called Campuses Against 
Cancer. Each school sponsors an event 
and gives the proceeds to a cancer affiliat- 
ed group. OMass' contribution took the 
form of a cash gambling event. The win- 
nings succeeded $10,000 and were donat- 
ed to the Brain Tumor Society. 

Sean Linnane and Jeff Glassman coordi- 
nated the event with other students on the 
BOG staff. "1 was extremely surprised and 
impressed with the student support in put- 
ting the event together as well as the turn- 
out of over 500 students - especially since 
the UMass basketball playoffs were the 
same night.", said Sean Linnane. 

The BOG also distributed flyers at Casi- 
no Night discussing cancer and the organi- 
zations involved with the charity event. 
Linnane commented, "It was a huge suc- 
cess and The Brain Tumor Society was 
ecstatic!" t3\ 

— -by Linda M. Rowland 




Photo by David Sawan 




Counting his chips, Landy Gilbert is priding himself 
on his winnings. The Casino Night is the first gam- 
bling fundraiser sponsored by the BOG. 



Photo by David Sawan 
A Communications major, Amy Smithies, spins the 
Wheel of Fortune at Casino Night. This charity event 
raised over $10,000 for the Brain Tumor Society. 



168/ Organizations 




Travel Fair 
Sponsored 

Just as everyone is coming back from 
intersession, tlie big question on ev- 
eryone's mind is "Wiiere are you go- 
ing for Spring Breatc?" The options range 
from driving to Florida, wliicin is one of thie 
clieapest ways to get tliere, to spending 
more cash and time on a trip to the Baha- 
mas. The Travel and Tourism Research 
Association, also known as TTRA, plans 
trips and socials, as well as organizing the 
annual Spring Break Travel Fair. The pur- 
pose of the Travel Fair, put on for the past 
two years, is to alert the public to their 
many traveling options when planning a 
trip. 

The main goal for the members of TTRA 
is to provide a social atmosphere for stu- 
dents to learn more about the hospitality 
industry. According to president Nelissa 
Pappas and vice-president Beth White, the 
club is devoted to "improving the quality 
and acceptability of travel research and 
marketing information. The members are 
provided with field trips, activities, and 
guest speakers Massachusetts tourist 
boards. Formed in the fall of 1986, the 
TTRA is still very interested in helping stu- 
dents learn more about the travel and tour- 
ism industry as well as helping students 
find that wonderful getaway vacation. 
-by Stefa Kopystianskyj 



Two dedicated members of the TTRA work at the 
Second Annual Spring Break Travel Fair. More that 
twenty tables were set up to give students as many 
options as possible when planning a vacation. 

Senior members of TTRA direct one of the more 
interesting spots at the Fair. The Mexico/ Jamaica 
table not only offered pamphlets and information but 
pictures from actual trips as well. 





Organizations/ 169 



Senior journalism major and News Editor Lisa Sha- 
piro enters her copy into a computer. News was an 
especially demanding job since it encompassed both 
national and local stories as well as news briefs from 
the Associated Press. 








Photo by David Sawan 



Photo by David Sawan 

Mike Scott pastes up the Arts and Living pages. The 
Graphics department was the final step in preparation 
before being published daily. 

Members of Tuesday's Graphics staff, Christine 
Ashe. Mike Delorey, and Margaret Trudell diligently 
work at pasteup. The sooner paste-up was done, the 
quicke: the pages were sent to the printing company 
in Ware for publication. 




Photo by David Sawan 



Si. . i### 



170/Collegian 




Collegian 
Turns 100 



In 1890, it was called "Aggie Life;" 100 
years later the Massachusetts Daily Col- 
legian had a circulation of 21,000 pa- 
pers and a staff of 250 talented and deter- 
mined students. 

Historically, the Collegian has been a 
place of struggle. In the fall of '89, protests 
surfaced as they had in past years. Third 
World students took over the Collegian to 
protest lack of coverage, as had blacks and 
women in separate instances years before. 

They were granted a page and, in the 
spring, a place on the Board of Editors. A 
request for a lesbian, bisexual and gay is- 
sues page followed, but a place on the 
Board of Editors followed instead. 

The Collegian leadership and staff held 
up under the protests, which drew national 
media attention. Staff members had mixed 
feelings, some maintaining that the stories 
should be integrated into the paper and 
others feeling the pages were necessary in 
light of past events, but people pulled to- 
gether and the Collegian hit the stands ev- 
ery day. 

Collegian writers were also involved in 
exposing controversy. Third World Affairs 
editor Pratip Dastidar broke a major story 
about CIMass' violation of its own policy to 
divest from South Africa. In addition, an 
investigation by reporter Preston Forman 
revealed that the University's largest main- 
frame computer held a forum for sexually 
explicit stories. The artical sparked a fasci- 
nating debate on whether campus adminis- 
trators had the right to censor computer 
mail. ^ 

by Maria Sacchetti 



Lynda Sega! shows her excitement while doing one of 
her many jobs as Classified Supervisor. As a senior 
majoring in Communications, working on the Colle- 
gian staff provided her with valuable experience need- 
ed to succeed in her field. 

Working on the computer makes Pratib Dastidars job 
much easier and more efficient. Handling the section 
of the Collegian titled Third World Affairs added a 
different type of workload than he was used to as an 
Engineering major. 



Photo b> David Sawan 



Organizations/ 171 



UMqss Marching Bond 
Exhibits Pride And Class 



One voice shouting tlie word "feet" 
resulted in hundreds replying "to- 
gether," "chest out," "stomach in," 
"shoulders back," "elbows frozen," "chin 
up," "eyes with pride," "eyes with pride." 
The sole voice continues and asks even 
louder, "Who has the best band in New 
England"— the reply, "UMass." Pride is 
alive within the University of Massachu- 
setts Minuteman Marching Band, The Pow- 
er and Class of New England. 

Jennifer Winchenbach, Psychology '91, 
was a three year marching band member. 
Winchenbach, noticing the change the bud- 
get crisis has caused in morale at GMass 
over the past year, suggested that students 
focus on the school's good points. 

"Nobody has ever said anything bad to 
me about the band," Winchenbach said, 
"but I'm always surprised at the amount of 
people who don't go to the games and have 
not seen the band or the team." 

The only people who could possibly 
have had any complaints with the March- 
ing Band were the Saturday morning hung- 
over Southwesters, who woke up in the 
afternoon to the crash of symbols and the 
excitement of the crowd gazing out their 
windows and gathered on the pyramids. 

"It's good to muster up pride for the 
team and the school in general," she said, 
"but it is an amazing experience being on 
the road and away from home and still be 
able to so easily get a positive reaction 
from the crowd." 

Ellen Wagner, Economics '90, says 
pride is the reason she stayed in the band 
for so long. "You have to be proud or you 
just don't want to do it. And you can instill 
that pride in other people who see you." 
Wagner described pride as a sense of 
knowing that you are working to the best 
of your potential and that everyone around 



you is doing the same. 

"At away games people see what we do, 
how hard it is, and who we are . . . We are 
the power and class of New England." 

Ellen recalls the memorable 1988 Har- 
vard trip. "It was definately an experience. 
During the game, the Harvard Band was 
very cross and rude. Their half-time show 
was very ill prepared, but the GMass Band 
did not say anything. We were above all 
that ... In our opening set, the whole band 
just sounds so wide and the sound is full. 1 
couldn't help but notice a clarinet player 
from the Harvard Band, who was standing 
on the sidelines with his jaw scraping the 
ground. I could tell by the look on his face 
that everything we had worked so hard 
for — the power, the pride, and the class — 
was worth it. It was at that moment that 1 
knew what it meant to have eyes with 
pride." 

Besides entertainment, Wagner pointed 
out two other main goals of the CJMass 
Marching Band. 

"We support the football team and rep- 
resent the University, sometimes at a dif- 
ferent setting," she said. "The Marching 
Band, sitting in the stands at away games 
and at parades, is the people's first impres- 
sion of what ClMass is." 

"The next time you're looking for 
pride," Winchenbach said, "instead of 
looking with the eyes, look into them." 

"The eyes are the mirror of the soul. 
When your feet are together; your stom- 
ach, in; chest, out; shoulders, back; el- 
bows, frozen; chin, up; the only thing left 
to show emotion is your eyes. Your eyes 
are screaming with pride," she said, 
"Sometimes you're just so proud, tears roll 
down your face."jfjj 

by Scott D. Thompson 




Photo by Lisa Malewak 
Trumpeteer Dave Leslie prepares for the beginning of 
the half-time formation at this year's Homecoming in 
October. OMass' half-time shows were always eagerly 
anticipated by fans. 





172/Organizations 




Members of the (JMass Marching Band patiently wait 
for a chance to march at the Boston rally. The re- 
sponse of the rallying crowd clearly represented the 
pride that the (JMass students had in this organiza- 
tion. 



Photo by Paul Agnew 
Letting forth their crystal-clear sound, the trumpet 
players support the melody of the band's rock med- 
ley. The Band's mixture of contemporary sounds and 
traditional favorites delighted both young and old. 



Organizations/ 173 



A (JPC security worker enjoys the show while l<eeping an 
eye out for probiems. Student volunteers received tshirts 
for their efforts. 



Members of UPC chat with Jules Shear after his perfor- 
mance in the Blue Wall, Many students were drawn to 
CJPC because of the opg^tun^^ to meet famous (or 
soontobe) performers. 




OnJM Program Couticij 



1 74/Organizations 




UPC Brings 
The Beat 



It's so much fun hanging out with famous 
people," said senior Ari Weinstein as he 
spoke of the fringe benefits that come 
with being a member of CiPC. "Robyn Hitch- 
cock came to our party after the concert. It 
was great." 

The Union Program Council presented an 
assortment of talent this year ranging from 
the punk band the Dead Milkmen to the folk 
music of Arlo Guthrie to the progressive rock 
of the Sugarcubes. Eight other concerts were 
hosted by (JPC ending with the Pond Concert 
that shook vibrations in the 12,000 people 
who attended. Promotional manager Michael 
Pontecorvo described the event: "We tuned in 
. . . tuned on and freaked out, CJPC rocked the 
pond." 

The Spring Concert of 1990 featured Ziggy 
Marley and the Melody Makers, The Violent 
Femmes, Queen Latifah, The Throwing 
Muses and Hearts and Minds. 

UPC was successful in its programming 
this year because of the teamwork and dedi- 
cation of the staff and general committee 
members who share an interest in music. UPC 
is more than an organization that meets fam- 
ous people — the staff and volunteers that 
work the shows cover a variety of jobs from 
security to promotions to stagecrew. "These 
are the most dedicated people on campus, 
sometimes working 12 to 15 hoursin a day 
for a free t-shirt," said Weinstein. fj\ 

by Linda AlRowland 



Jules Shear, host of MTV's "Unplugged, " plays his 
acoustic guitar at the Blue Wall. CPC tried to get some 
performers to play in the Blue Wall so tickets would be 
cheaper. 



GPC Promotions Manager Michael Pontecorvo introduces 
local resident Arlo Guthrie at the Fine Arts Center. There 
was a question as to whether or not Guthrie would play at 
OMass because of past problems with the University. 




Organizations/ 175 



DVP Press Coordinator Mary Ann Antonellis intro- 
duces Faye Wattleton. Wattleton headed the nation's 
oldest family planning organization. 

The members of DVP and Judy Gagnon, Student 
Activities Office advisor, (bacl< row, fourth from left) 
gather at a weekly meeting. DVP aimed to increase 
sensitivity to world issues and events while keeping 
the interest of the students. 





Photo by Paul Agnew 




MMmSm ^ ^MKMM&rM 



«^tr# 



176/Organizations 




Distinguished Visitor's Program Expands 
University Minds And Increases Awareness 



The lights dimmed, the audience ap- 
plauded and the stars appeared. The 
1989-90 Distinguished Visitors Pro- 
gram began its Fall line-up with Ntozake 
Shange, a black feminist author, and Kyn- 
aston McShine, curator, in October. Robert 
Hastings, UFO researcher, and Christopher 
Childs, environmental activist, were the 
stars of November. 

DVP's Spring guests included Harry 
Mattison, former T/me photojournalist and 
Arlene Blum, mountain climber. Faye 
Wattleton, president of Planned Parent- 
hood, lectured and Dave Marsh, popular 
rock writer visited GMass. 

This year DVP celebrated its 30th anni- 
versary as an established organization at 
GMass. The club had commemorative t- 
shirts featuring this year's line-up of lectur- 
ers, as well as past years guests, printed 
up for the occasion. Over the years, DVP 
has brought such famous names as Jane 
Fonda and Carl Sagan to CIMass. DVP aims 
to increase sensitivity to world affairs, is- 
sues and events. Members keep in mind 
the needs of the UMass community when 



choosing speakers in order to interest stu- 
dents in their programs. 

Ntozake Shange, black feminist and au- 
thor of For Colored Girls Who Have Consid- 
ered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enuf, is 
an example of diversity in comparison with 
Kynaston McShine who is a curator at the 
Museum of Modern Arts and director of 
Andy Warhol: A Retrospective. 

Robert Hastings, (JFO researcher, pre- 
sented a fascinating lecture and slideshow 
entitled "UFO's - The Hidden History." Has- 
tings had a "take it or leave it" attitude and 
did not want to push this information on 
anyone unwilling to believe. Tricia Sperl- 
ing, publicity coordinator, found Hastings 
to be "DVP's ideal speaker of the season 
because he was inexpensive, personable 
and popular." 700 people packed the Cam- 
pus Center Auditorium to hear Hastings 
lecture and see his 30 minute slide presen- 
tation. 

Former Time photojournalist, Harry 
Mattison, was another popular lecturer. He 
spoke about the fact that what the public 
is shown in publications and on television 




is not necessarily accurate. According to 
Mattison, much of the news is "manufac- 
tured to fit the current political party's 
view." His lecture, entitled "Behind the 
Electronic Curtain: Are We Getting the 
Truth from the National Media," focused 
on the ways the media exploits graphic 
photos to capture the viewers attention. 

One DVP member described Arlene 
Blum's presentation as "inspiring." Blum, 
a mountain climber, led successful all-fe- 
male ascents of some of the highest peaks 
in the world. Her lecture and slide presenta- 
tion were called "Women in High Places." 

Faye Wattleton, president of Planned 
Parenthood Federation of America, heads 
the nation's oldest voluntary family plan- 
ning organization. Ms. Wattleton's main 
concern is to protect the rights of all wom- 
en and men, regardless of age and econom- 
ic status, in order to make independent 
decisions concerning childbearing. itJl 



HI 



by Amy E. Lord 



Faye Wattleton addresses the audience in the Student 
Onion Ballroom on the topic of reproductive rights. In 
spite of fears that there would be some problems at 
this lecture due to the nature of the speech, the 
evening vi/ent off without a hitch. 

Discussing her activities as a mountain climber is 
Arlene Blum. Blum also mentioned discrimination, 
saying that many men thought she was too fragile for 
this activity, that she had to overcome. 



Photo by K.A. Burke 



Photo by David Sawan 



Organizations/ 177 



GMass 
Recycles 

Sherill Baldwin, coordinator for the 
Housing Services Recycling Program 
and a newcomer to the Gniversity, 
spearheaded this program in the fall of 
1989. At that point, fifteen student volun- 
teers kept the operation going. In the 
spring, forty volunteers were active in the 
program. Due to the twenty-five tons of 
newsprint recycled during that first semes- 
ter, the program awakened the campus 
community to the need to lower solid 
waste flow from the University to the 
landfill. 

A group of five assistant coordinators 
oversaw the operations of the program and 
planned for future improvements and ex- 
pansions. Volunteer runners and Housing 
Servicers collectors were responsible for 
collecting newspapers in the residential 
buildings. Eleven student-presented work- 
shops' were held this spring, in efforts to 
increase student participation and aware- 
ness. A three credit course. Materials Fu- 
tures and Recycling Education, was held 
each semester in conjunction with the pro- 
gram. One of the many program goals in- 
cluded creating a leaner and healthier cam- 
pus by reducing and recycling wastes. 

In addition to adding to my knowledge of 
recycling, this classroom and volunteer ex- 
perience changed the way I think about our 
'disaposable society.' 1 think more in terms 
of reducing and reusing the materials I buy 
and discard and the importance of my per- 
sonal contribution to the Earth's crisis. 1^1 
-by Susan Corneliussen 

Martha Dion, a junior Food Science major, volunteers 
her time by collecting newsprint to be recycled. Mar- 
tha was collecting papers in Chadbourne, a residential 
building, when she posed for a photo. 

A junior Education major, Jim McCombe, and Genei- 
vieve Pullis, a senior Political Science major, are assis- 
tant coordinators in the program. This school year 
they held many educational workshops in residential 
buildings concerning recycling. 





Photo courtesy of OMass Recycling 



'wm^Mt^ 



Organizations/ 178 




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Club Shows 
Promise 

Do you remember walking by Tot- 
man Gym and seeing all those fun- 
ny-looking people dressed in white? 
Well, if you were alarmed then, it's time to 
clear up the confusion. Those dueling en- 
thusiasts were members of the GMass 
Fencing Club. They often worked out be- 
side Totman Gym, demonstrating their 
technique before the Karate class. 

The 30-member group instructed fenc- 
ing classes for the Physical Education de- 
partment and competed nationally against 
such schools as Brown, UConn and MIT as 
well. 

A woman with 12 years of fencing expe- 
rience served as the club's vice-president 
during the 1989-90 school year. She en- 
joyed being a part of such a unique group. 
"Fencing gives you a chance to compete 
in a rare sport," she said. 

After being cut years earlier, fencing 
was brought back to CIMass just 10 years 
ago. In 1990, with such strong interest in 
the sport, the club was beginning once 
again to thrive. [U] 

by Sharon Pratt 



This Fencing Club member shows off his form, inter- 
ested passers-by often noticed the club practicing in 
the field next to Totman Gym. 

Two fencers practice their dueling technique. In addi- 
tion to teaching the sport to other students, members 
of the Fencing Club competed against other colleges. 



Photo by Mason Rivlin 




Organizations/ 179 



Activities Unite 
AASA 

The Asian American Student Associ- 
ation (AASA) is an umbrella organi- 
zation of five smaller culturally di- 
verse organizations. AASA works with the 
Vietnamese Student Association (VSA), 
Cambodian Student Association, Cape Ver- 
dean Student Alliance, Japan American 
Club (JAC), and the Korean Association. 

AASA has been extremely active this 
year, with its efforts to bring all five small- 
er groups together. Tom Truong, president 
of both AASA and VSA, commented on 
the prosperity of AASA. "AASA is in its 
seventh year, but this year is different be- 
cause we are learning about each other's 
cultures which are individually diverse." 

AASA sponsors co-educational sports 
teams in volleyball and basketball. The 
teams play in intramural leagues. This 
year, they also travelled to Columbia Uni- 
versity and Binghamton, New York, to par- 
ticipate in sporting events. 

AASA helped fund the Banzai Boogie, a 
dance sponsored by the Japan American 
Club held during Japan Week in April. The 
dance featured the traditional Japanese 
dance Bon Odori. 

This year AASA held its seventh Annual 
Asian Night on April 20 in the Campus 
Center Auditorium. Truong remarked, "It 
was a big success and this year there was 
participation from the other cultural orga- 
nizations. 

The JAC and AASA ended the spring 
semester with a send-off of "Goodbye Kiss- 
es." It was a fundraiser where people could 
send chocolate kisses and a farewell wish 
to a friend. 

Tom Truong was smiling proudly when 
he said, "We [AASA] made a lot of things 
happen this year ■ so much more than has 
been done in the past."|t7] 

by Linda M. Rowland 



Students selling "Goodbye Kisses" pass the time 
while waiting for custonners. AASA delivered farewell 
chocolate kisses at the end of spring semester. 

Two players grapple for the frisbee in an intense 
game at the AASA picnic. The event was part of an 
effort to unite the smaller groups that make up 
AASA. 





AASA 



180/ Organizations 




I 



NSP Helps New Students 



Photo courtesy of the New Students Program 
Members of the New Students Program congregate 
on the steps of a Northeast dorm. The group provided 
information and guidance for incoming freshmen dur- 
ing summer orientations. 



Everyone remembers their first "real 
taste" of CIMass. Summer orienta- 
tions were a varietable buffet of cul- 
tural and academic opportunities available 
to the incoming freshman. The three-day 
sessions were led by upperclassmen to in- 
troduce incoming freshmen to the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts and campus life. 

The upperclassmen led small groups of 
freshmen through informational talks and 
casual or personal conversations. This was 
important because it allowed the new stu- 
dents to meet each other, and to realize 
that upperclassmen were students just like 
themselves. 

Throughout this three day period the 



freshmen followed several processes such 
as meeting with advisors, selecting 
courses, photographing i.d.s, and choosing 
a residential area for living on campus. 
Movies, volleyball games, and pizza parties 
were also provided, promoting interaction 
among the freshmen. 

The University recognized its large size 
and desired to represent itself as an institu- 
tion capable of offering extensive pro- 
grams and activities worthy of its stature. 
However, the (Jniversity chose to create a 
homelike environment by orienting the 
freshmen with the school on a smaller 
scale as well.p] 




New Stuijenis Proffram] 



Organizations/ 181 



Dr. Bill Cosby addresses the audience at a faculty 
dinner. BMCP also sponsored speakers for Black His- 
tory Month, held in February. 



Trent Watts (DJ Ice Tee), Kristian Greene (DJ K- 
Hyce), Queen Latifah, RSO advisor Delphine Quarles 
and Keith Cambell (DJ Kool KC) pose at this year's. 
Spring Concert. BMCP was also responsible for bring- 
ing artist George Clinton to campus. 



BMCP Rocks 
UMqss 

A member of the Black Mass Commu- 
nications Project is talking to one of 
the disc jockeys from a residence 
hall. "I'm in Gorman right now, waiting for 
someone to come down and talk to me," 
he says. Less than five minutes later, two 
sisters of the Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority 
come down, having heard this message on 
their radio. The two women are rewarded 
with posters and albums promoting the 
recording artist Little Louie as well as a 
chance to talk on the radio. It's a very 
exciting evening! 

The Black Mass Communications Pro- 
ject was established in 1969 to serve and 
support the African-American community 
at CIMass. The twenty member group pro- 
vides education, information, and enter- 
tainment for the community. 

Aside from broadcasting programming 
everyday on WMCIA, BMCP sponsors 
many other events, such as the fall's 
"Jeans and T-Shirt" dance and the annual 
Funk-a-thon, which winded down the year 
in May. Pi 

-by Sharon Pratt 




Photo by Richard DuCree 




182/Organizations 



Sf *r^ 







Club Fights For Rights 



Photo by Jeff Holland 




According to sophomore English ma- 
jor, Jerry Boyd, Abilities Unlimited 
Is designed to Increase student and 
community awareness about disability is 
sues. "However, what I envision the group 
to be is an advocacy group for other dis- 
abled students on campus as well as to 
raise awareness. But, unfortunately, be- 
cause of lack of Interest within the disabled 
community, we have not been able to raise 
awareness," Boyd explained. 

This year the club succeeded In an advo- 
cacy role by getting a new locking system 
installed in the handy vans. For almost two 
years, Howard Weinstein, Jerry Boyd and 
other students relentlessly called for the 
installation of this new system. The sys- 
tem was imperative because modern mo- 
torized chairs did not fit Into the older ver- 
sion. Thanks to Weinstein, his parents, and 
other student advocates, all handicapped 
students could utilize the van service, even 
those with motorized chairs. 

Abilities Gnlimited wants the GMass 
community to recognize the problems of 
the disabled In terms of accessibility on 
campus. Ignorance and lack of planning in 
the part of the non-handicapped often re- 
sult In major problems for the handi- 
capped. For example, recently Gorman 
Hall was remodeled, complete with cable 



TV hookup but requests for handicap ac- 
cessibility were ignored. 

The Curry Hicks Cage is not accessible 
either. The only places available to sit In a 
wheelchair are the exit ways which are not 
safe. Boyd was once told to sit In a corner 
at a basketball game last fall, but he could 
not see the game. After researching state 
rules, he learned that sitting in the corner 
violated state architectural codes. Meet- 
ings with the Athletic Department, Disabil- 
ity Services, and the (JMass Architectural 
Barriers Board resulted in the decision to 
clear out corners of the Cage where people 
in wheelchairs can sit with an unobstruct- 
ed view of the game. This was the only 
alternative, because the University does 
not have the funds to renovate the Cage. 
As an avid basketball fan, Boyd was satis- 
fled with results of his crusade. 

Boyd commented that the GMass cam- 
pus is good in terms of accessibility, but 
there Is a lot of room for improvement. 
"It's about time that problems of people 
with disabilities become a priority. I realize 
that (JMass is just a microcosm of society, 
so if our problems become priorities on 
this campus, maybe we can change soci- 
ety as well."|tJ| 

by Amy E. Lord 



'^^ar,r 



Photo by Jeff Holland 
Junior psychology major Jana Sorge (top) seems de- 
termined to make changes. The group wanted to 
increase OMass' awareness of the needs of the dis- 
abled community. 



Rob Ellis, a junior forestry major, looks up from his 
newspaper. Abilities Unlimited provided support for 
its members who fought for increased accessibility. 



Photo by Jeff Holland 
Spanish major Mark Kalashian (right) concentrates on 
the proceedings of a meeting. The disabled communi- 
ty had a powerful advocate in Abilities Onlimited. 




AbifiVes Ifnlimited 




Organizations/ 183 



25 - Plus 
Provides 
Support 

For years, Jonathon Starr had wanted 
to return to college. He finally got his 
chance in the fall of 1989, when his 
financial circumstances enabled him to en- 
roll at the University of Massachusetts as 
an electrical engineering major and a phys- 
ics minor. 

Starr is one of some 1500 non-traditional 
students at the University, who, for one 
reason or another, decided to return to 
college. 

Therefore, Starr reactivated the 25-plus 
club, an organization which provides sup- 
port and social activities for non-traditional 
students. 

Starr said he restarted the club because 
"a lot of older students seem to feel isolat- 
ed. It's good to be with a group of people 
who are in similar situations." 

Alice Sewall, a University junior psy- 
chology major and club secretary, said 
most organizations and support groups at 
UMass are aimed at traditional college 
students. 

"1 don't think I've had time to worry 
about socializing between my classes and 
work, but it would be nice to pick up the 
phone and call an older student," Sewall 
said. 

Patty Dusakantas, treasurer, said she 
joined the club because she lives off-cam- 
pus and cannot meet people at the dining 
commons and in the dormitories like tradi- 
tional students. 

Starr said he agrees being an older stu- 
dent has advantages. "You have some 
sense of how what you learn fits into the 
rest of the world, and you bring that knowl- 
edge and experience that you wouldn't oth- 
erwise have."|Ti 

by Sara Demaster 

The members of the 25Plus club take a break from 
stuffing envelopes to relax. The mailing was for a 
membership drive, as there are over 1500 non-tradi- 
tional age students at the University. 

Junior Psychology major Alice Sewall takes notes at 
one of the club's meetings. Her job as secretary along 
with her membership gave her the opportunity to 
meet people with similar thoughts and ideas regard- 
ing their enrollment at the Oniversity. 




184/Organizations 




Students wait in line to cash their checks on a typical 
Friday afternoon. The Credit Onion was established in 
1975 by students for students. 




UMSFCU Meets 

Student 

Needs 



I 




Photo by Jeff Holland 
Junior BDIC major, Brian Hall counts his drawer at 
the end of a shift. He is just was one of the students 
who volunteered their services for the 1989-90 school 
year. 



Cfedit Union 



ntimidated by those stuffy profession- 
als at the bank in your hometown? 
Worried that you cannot get that loan 
for the new car or Spring Break? 

The CIMass Student Federal Credit 
Cinion is run by students for students. 
Their motto is "to become not acquire." 
Volunteers are committed to serving the 
financial needs of their peers in an atmo- 
sphere in which student customers will not 
feel intimidated. 

The group's motto conveys its determi- 
nation to grow and learn. President Melissa 
Dobosz, a Finance Major, described her 
Credit Union position as "quite an experi- 
ence." She believes it will make her much 
more attractive to employers when it's 
time for her to find a job. Melissa has 
gained a sense of responsibility as well as 
learned the importance of being a trustwor- 
thy volunteer. Most valuable of all, howev- 
er, is the experience gained dealing with 
people. 

The CIMass Credit Union is the oldest 
credit union in the country, established in 
1975 by students. The student run organi- 
zation offers a vast range of services to the 
UMass community, such as share ac- 
counts, share drafts, certificates of deposit 
and money orders. Also offered are person- 
al loans, computer loans, new or used car 
loans and traveler's cheques. 

The Board of Directors sets goals for the 
Credit Cinion such as the installation of an 
automatic teller machine. Melissa Dobosz 
said, "This year, the primary goal of the 
organization is to increase student aware- 
ness of the variety of services offered at 
the CIMass Student Federal Credit Cinion." 
|tj| by Amy E. Lord 




Organizations/ 1 85 




Photo by Mike Apri 

(JMOC member Don McFarland skis over a quaint 
bridge in New Hampshiire. Tlie annual 
Weekend" was held Feb 16-19 
Cabin in Bethleham, N.H. 

GMOC's former president, Jen Catlin, manuevers her 
way through a technical rapid on The Chattahoochee 
River in Georgia. The Outing Club sponsored this 
canoe trip during Spring Break. 



Intermediate and advanced paddlers instruct rank beginners on the techniques of white wa 
was the first lesson for many on the Beginners White Water Canoe Trip. 



Photo by Mike April 
ter canoeing. This 



^uiitig Ciub 




186/ Organizations 




Outing Club Heads Outdoors 



Was it the valleys filled with incredi- 
ble autumn foilage we viewed 
from the top of Mt. Lafayette? 
Maybe it was the sound of many voices 
singing in unison around the woodstove 
late at night. Or, perhaps, it was just sitting 
on a rock to eat a PB & J sandwich at the 
peak of a long hike." 

Lisa Rethinger, an exchange student 
from Oregon, found a home away from 
home when she joined the UMass Outing 
Club. The club aimed to involve the Univer- 
sity community in outdoor activities for a 
minimal cost. However, to Rethinger and 
other members, UMOC was more than a 
club, it resembled a family. 

The diversity of age and expertise pro- 
vided club members with the opportunity 
to gain experience and knowledge in a vari- 
ety of activities. The Outing Club spon- 
sored events throughout the year. In the 
fall and spring weekly trips were offered in 
activities such as canoeing, kayaking, hik- 
ing, rockclimbing and caving. Insanity 



Weekend in February, at the clubs' cabin 
in Mew Hampshire, was a popular trip 
which featured cross country skiing and 
hiking. Week long trips for Spring Break 
offered canoeing, caving, backpacking and 
more! 

A sense of "one big happy family" was 
shared by members and was apparent at 
the Monday night meetings. Allison Hart- 
Smith, a junior, explained her feelings on 
GMOC. "Experiences in the Outing Club 
have taught me to challenge my limits. I've 
hiked longer than I thought I could, I've 
slept in sub-zero temperatures, I've been to 
places that I never would have thought of a 
few years ago. I've even learned to climb 
rocks. Taking a chance on a climbing 
move that looks impossible has become a 
metaphor for lots of things in my life. I've 
started to ask myself, 'What's the worst 
that could happen?' Picturing a rock face 
and a friend at the other end of my rope, I 
answer, 'I could fall . . . but not very far.'" 

Lisa Rethinger elaborated on her new 



found home — the CIMass Outing Club. 
"The cabin in Bethlehem, New Hampshire 
has been at the heart of my finest times 
with the club. After a long, tiring day of 
hiking in the Presidential Range, or skiing 
in Franconia Notch, we return to the quar- 
ter-mile hike up the hill to the glow of light 
in the cabin's window. Upon reaching the 
seemingly evasive beacon, we all rush for a 
space around the blazing wood stove. 
Soon, a large, hot meal is served. Everyone 
later helps to clean up in an atmosphere of 
cooperation. The last several hours of the 
evening are spent talking, playing cards 
and listening to Tom strum and sing har- 
monious songs, which wane off into the 
Birches surrounding this haven in the 
mountains. The total escape from the 
stress and hurry of college is always more 
than welcome." |0| 

by Amy E. Lord 




Photo by Mike April 
Adventurous Outing Club member, Don McFarland, 
kayaks down Millers River. An experienced rower, 
Don has enjoyed kayaking for many years. 

Chinese major. Claudia Chang peeks out from behind 
a tree. She was hiking at Buffam Falls in Pelham. 



Ptiolo by MiKe April 




Organizations/ 187 




Photo by Jeff Holland 



Dan Chesnicka speaks at a weekly SGA meeting. As 
Speaker, he was responsible for running the meetings 
as well as doing advocacy work with the administra- 



SGA Works For Students? 



The following article does not reflect 
the opinions of the INDEX. 
Most ClMass alumni would not 
look back to their college days with admi- 
ration for the accomplishments of the 
SGA. In fact, most of the time it seemed 
that the SGA's only publicized accomplish- 
ments were in making a mockery of the 
system within which it was supposed to 
work. 

The September senate elections, for ex- 
ample, were so disorganized that the re- •■ 
suits were rejected and the entire process 
had to be re-done. According to the Colle- 
gian, procedural errors included "a lack of 
volunteers needed to staff ballot boxes, 
which resulted in late ballots to some ar- 
eas." In addition, the article reported that 
"names of some candidates names were 
misspelled or appeared twice in various 
areas." Not to mention the lack of voters. 

February brought more drama to the 
government scene. Four SGA members 
were accused of violating a rule against 
using University equipment for political 
purposes. 

Then, in early March, the Southwest 



Area Government seceded from the SGA 
to protest the unwillingness of some sena- 
tors to increase area government SATF 
allocations at the expense of RSOs. 

Of course SWAG did return to the ac- 
cepted system in time for the March 13 
elections. 

The day after the SGA elections the Col- 
legian reported that the student identifica- 
tion lists for Southwest Morth, Sylvan and 
Northeast which verify the residential area 
of the voter were missing. 

Finally, on March 27, after two recounts, 
election officials announced that Natasha 
Diephuis had defeated John Silveria in the 
presidential race by four votes. 

One SGA member said, "Student gov- 
ernment is the best way to learn about the 
University and to change it for the better." 
When you recall the degree of respect and 
professionalism demonstrated by the SGA 
as a whole, is it possible to agree that such 
an organization could have changed 
CIMass for the better? You were there. You 
decide. |u] 

by Marguerite Paolino 



SGA 



188/ Organizations 




Newman Is 

A Second 

Home 

The front lounge of the Newnnan Cen- 
ter is the home base of the Newman 
Club. The Newman Club exists to 
provide a smaller and more comfortable 
atmosphere for students. It is a friendly 
place which offers its members the securi- 
ty of home. 

Debbie Murphy enjoyed being a mem- 
ber. "It helped me feel good about myself. 
The people touched my life." 

The Newman Club sponsored a variety 
of social and service activities this year, 
including a food drive at Thanksgiving, a 
Phone-a-thon in December, movie nights 
every other Thursday and a special fun- 
draiser in the spring called Run for Run- 
aways. It was a race with over 300 people 
walking and running to raise money for the 
Covenant House (a service for runaways). 
The fundraiser was a success. 

The Newman Club helped to welcome 
people to the University while providing 
the "social Christian atmosphere" de- 
scribed by Debbie Murphy. ^1 

- by LinaarA. Rowland 



A student takes notes on the Newman Club's upcom- 
ing activities. The club was involved in both charity 
causes and social events. 

This Newman Club member thoroughly enjoys the 
meeting. The club's friendly atmosphere often helped 
new students adjust to the size of OMass. 

Members of the Newman Club pose for an Index 
photographer. Their volunteer work raised money for 
several different organizations. 



Photo by Melissa Reder 



mm a^ usm amm k 



Organizations/ 189 



Yearbook 
Preserves 
Memories 

Putting together a 320 page book is 
not easy. 
Nestled in the basement of tiie 
Campus Center, a staff of 30 works at 
transforming tlie highs and lows, the inter- 
esting and the notso-interesting into the 
index yearbook. 

"It can be very difficult, says junior En- 
glish major Linda Rowland. "You don't re- 
alize the importance of what you're doing, 
it's something that encompasses a whole 
year of events." 

"The Index had many goals this year. 
One was to change the structure of the 
book to make it more contemporary. 
We've been using the same structure for at 
least ten years," says Mary Sbuttoni, Edi- 
tor-in-Chief. "Changing the book's struc- 
ture truly ushers in the new decade." 

One of the biggest problems the Index 
had to face was the reputation of the year- 
book on campus. "I talked to a lot of stu- 
dents, and not many were interested in 
buying the book, '^e hope to make stu- 
dents realize that they're going to wish that 
they had one ten years from now." says 
Sbuttoni. 

The Index is proud to be responsible for 
making memories. "What we're really do- 
ing is creating a history book," says Assis- 
tant Photo Editor Paul Agnew. "You have 
to be a little bit crazy to stay in the dark- 
room until 3:00 in the morning or spend an 
entire weekend doing layouts or editing 
copy, but I'm glad 1 got the opportunity to 
do it. It's something I've never done before 
and probably will never do again, but hav- 
ing the chance was definitely worth it. "P| 

by Kris Bruno 




Editor-in-Chief Mary Sbuttoni and staff member Mary 
Dukakis watch as fellow staff member Clayton Jones 
demonstrates a program on the new Macintosh. The 
computer enabled the staff to have more efficient 
production, as actual pages were done by computer. 



Photo by Lisa Nalewak 
Organizations Editor Amy Lord puts together her 
work for the day. Highlighting the many clubs on 
campus meant getting in contact with many mem- 
bers of the GMass community and increased knowl- 
edge of campus resources. 



190/Organizations 




Photo by Kris Bruno 
Assistant Photo Editor Paul Agnew spends the after- 
noon taking candids outside of the Student Union. 
Keeping in contact with the UMass comnnunity was a 
great way to promote the yearbool<. 



Managing Editor Kris Bruno informs a senior about 
the status of the yearbootc. The office became very 
hectic when dealing with a staff of thirty as well as 
the large number of customers. 



Photo by Kris Bruno 
Jeff Holland, Assistant Photo Editor, struggles to 
keep his eyes open after a marathon number of hours 
developing and printing. Deadline times came very 
quickly, and often required extra hours to ensure 
production. 



Organizations/ 191 



Jason Feldman catches Laura LaValle 
preparing a trout for dinner in her Bran- 
dywine apartment. Living off-campus 
gave many students a taste of the re- 
sponsibilities of running a household, 
matting parents all the more appreciat- 
ed. 

It's Monday morning. Your head is 
heavy and everything looks like fuzz. 
Karen Skipper is reminiscent of this 
moment in her photograph entitled 
"Snooze." 




Michael Walker looks down at his post- 
party, shaved chest. You can almost 
feel the ingrown hairs starting to itch in 
this photograph by Alexandra Duncan. 




192/ Being There 



Being There 




Being There 

On April 23, the Index held its third annual 
photo contest, Being There. The rules 
were simple. The Index supplied black and 
white film and developing for 100 entrants. 
Students were then told to take pictures that 
depicted "being here" at GMass. They were 
given the opportunity to have people, places 
and images that they wanted to remember 
appear in the yearbook. In one week almost 
800 pictures were submitted reflecting 
students' pride in the University. The 
following 16 pages exhibit what we (the 
editors) believe are the best of those pictures 
based on quality, creativity, but most 
importantly, what they symbolize. So turn the 
page to get a feeling for what it was like 
being here in 1990. Q 



Being There/ 193 




They're Not That Bad 
Once You're Out Of Bed 



The week seemed so long when 
the alarm went off on Monday 
morning. If we got ourselves out 
of bed and actually trudged off to 
class or at least made breakfast, 
then the haze began to lift! After 



(l-r) Natana Bennett, Trish Jenssen and El- 
len Foley enthusiastically take a break for 
lunch at the Deli Garden in the Hatch. The 
Deli Garden was one of the few places to 
eat on campus where you didn't have to 
pay for grease with your food. Photo by 
Jason Feldman. 



we saw a few familiar faces and 
showed up for some classes, we 
returned to the routine that was 
abandoned for the weekend. It al- 
most seemed like we would make 
it through the week. ^3i 



Lee Piazza observes a familiar sight in his 
photograph of a couple sitting by the Cam- 
pus Pond. If benches along the pond 
weren't occupied by couples, they were 
used by friends or people feeding the 
ducks. 




194/ Being There 




-J0^\'* 



Mlison Cohen took this picture of busi- 
less partner Tammi Gold selling mer- 
rhandise at their concourse table busi- 
less, "Perfect Timing." Tables 



provided by the Board of Governors 
gave students an opportunity to make 
money for their own businesses or by 
sponsoring non-student businesses. 




-HS- '-!*#> 



■^^ 



Ho, John DePolt didn't travel through 
ime to take this photograph. He only 
lad to walk by the Campus Pond to 
ind Jessica Rechstaffer and Sean Slat- 



tery recreating a medieval challenge. 
With a campus this large, one never 
knew what to expect walking around 
campus. 






Brian Scanlon recuperates from the 
weekend with a cup of coffee in Hong 
McGill's photo illustration of "Morning 
Madness." Many students had a diffi- 
cult time getting back on schedule 
Monday mornings after a weekend with 
no alarm clocks. 



9:00 



it's back to classes! Lee Piazza caught this 
student making his way to class in Mar- 
ston Hall on Monday at 



11:00 



Britt Elwell stops by the Campus Center 
Information desk to check on a phone 
number. Working at the Info desk gave 
Meredith Zola a chance to show us what 
it's like being on the other side. 



1:30 



Hannah Donovan snapped this photo of 
yet another Amherst sole ravaging through 
the visually-confusing signs at an Amherst 
Center bus stop. Local merchants and or- 
ganizations had to be competitive and cre- 
ative in order for their advertisements to 
stand out. 



3:10 



Being There/ 195 




■■%■ 



Classes Get Us Back 
On The Academic Track 



And we were already in the 
thick of the week. Weekend? 
What weekend? Suddenly a social 
life seemed the furthest from our 
minds. Once we were adjusted to 



our academic schedule, they 
made the classes longer. But by 
the end of the day it seemed like 
the rest of the week would go by 
like a breeze. G\ 





Two members of Club Communications 
work the cotton candy machine at the car- 
nival they sponsored in the Student Union 
Ballroom. The club gave all proceeds to 
Ronald McDonald charities. Photo by Vivi- 
an Chlkara. 

Sue Nixon met up with these Sigma Kap- 
pa sisters on the porch of their sorority 
house on Allen Street. This was the perfect 
place to recap the days events. 




196/ Being There 



Mercedes Johnson took this picture of 
the deformed bike that has been locked 
to the bike rack at the Hasbrouck side 
of the Campus Center forever. Several 
bikes are left behind each year at mov 
ing time. 



Pete Crafts finds Steve Brykman beat- 
ing on drums in his Gorman dorm room 
before starting his homework. Some 
students had their first performance in 
a band take place in the Hatch. 



M 


^M 


ill 
1 




)» Ttc*n?'fe"' 'Mm 


1 


w. 




11 

i 1 



iV 



■J> 




Little did PVTA passengers know that 
when Jim Corrado got on the bus at 
the Graduate Research Center bus 
stop, he would immortalize them. 



Many students appreciated the free bus 
service when their feet were too tired to 
take them where they wanted to go. 






Brian Scanlon catches Hong McGill in- 
terview bound. For some seniors, the 
interviews seemed endless. 



9:00 



Lee Piazza took this picture when GEO 
members decided to strike rather than 
withhold spring grades. Members 
striked for fall elections to be free and 
impartial (no deans and administrators) 
to decide if they should have a union or 
not. 



1 0:45 



Suky Park takes a picture of Brian 
Richard and John Ewald as they relax 
between classes outside the Student 
Gnion. The Student Union seemed built 
for students to lean against and enjoy 
the sun. 



1:30 



"CIncle John" Nelson teaches class on 
the west side of Bartlett. Cliff Phillips 
listened attentively, despite the distrac- 
tions of being outdoors, as shown by 
Laura Varney. 



3:15 



Being There/ 197 




The End Of The 

Rainbow 

Is Visible On 

Wednesday 

No wonder they call Wednes- 
day "Humpday." We had a 
clear view of the rest of the 
week. The weight of our work- 
loads was starting to lift, put- 




Photographer Jim Butler watches Jeremy 
Chipman eat from a different perspective 
in Franklin Dining Commons. Eating in tlie 
DCs was an experience that made many 
students long for a home-cooked meal. 



198/ Being There 



Cedra Eaton took this photo of a residen- 
tial assistant on duty in a Southwest clus- 
ter office. Cluster office duty was essential 
for lock-outs and recreational equipment 
sign-outs. 



Two people relieve stress near the Campus 
Pond in this photo by Jen Matuslewicz. 
Only two days until Friday! 










Ss 



Jennifer Gordon puts out some French 
fries at the Coffee Shop. After having her 
picture taken by Mellna Daviau, Gordon 
could feel appreciated for the work she did. 



2:05 



Jim Corrado shows us a behind the scenes 
look at a radio operator making an an- 
nouncement to all GMass Transit buses. 
Students depended on transit workers to 
take them where they wanted to go on 
time. 



3:00 



Cedra Eaton's friend, Kelly, helps her with 
accounting homework. Angela Perry's 
photo reminds us that friends made study- 
ing less tedious. 



3:45 



Jason Feldman clicked a picture of his 
roommate, Don Bertrand, while he was eat- 
ing pizza. After a tiring day of classes, 
many students found it easier to order out 
for food rather than prepare a meal. 



6:00 



Being There/ 199 




Stephanie Kepke, Michelle LeRoy, Joanne 
Geishecker and Linda Loiselle discover 
that their refrigerator is full of surprises, as 
illustrated by Meredith Zola. Whether it 
was an empty refrigerator or one filled with 
forgotten food, most college students 
could relate to this scene. 

A hot air balloon, brought to campus by 
IBM to promote computers, is seen behind 
the statue of Metawampe by the Campus 
Center In this photograph Bob Finn cap- 
tured a sense of tradition and modernism, 
a combination which makes OMass what it 
is today. 





200/ Being There 



^ 






'.kC 



You Knew The End 
Was Near On Thursday 



People woke up with a sigh of 
elief. It didn't matter that classes 
/ere longer on Thursdays — 
here was only one day more until 
he weekend. For some people, 



the weekend would start later that 
night. Regardless, students ended 
the day knowing they were one 
step closer to a day when they had 
free time, [u] 




\ 



>^ 



>rraine Horgan couldn t escape from the 
fis of Karen Anderson's camera. Not ev 
y student was eager to appear in the 
ling There section of the yearbook. 



Jason Diez gets his hair cut in the Campus 
Center Barber Shop. Although we walked 
by their windows often, thanks to Mer- 
cedes Johnson, we have an inside view. 



Ian Wahl shows his distaste in eating at 
Worcester Dining Commons, as well as get- 
ting his picture taken by Merce'des John- 
son. Eating the food at the DC was often 
joked about in order to tolerate the food. 



12:10 



Rebecca Himlin reads by the Campus Pond 
as shown by Mercedes Johnson. Some 
students found that being outdoors was 
more conducive to studying than being in a 
building. 



2:00 



Susan Hamilton catches Derek Espindle 
glimpsing through magazines in the 
Worcester Munchy Store. This was a good 
way to pass the time while waiting for 
friends to go to dinner. 



5:15 



Allison Hammer watches Jim Protopa- 
pous play Ninja Gaiden after dinner in 
Worcester Dining Commons. Students 
walking by the video games on campus 
would rarely see one not being used. 



.\S^ 



6:30 



Being There/201 







Lee Piazza was so impressed by this brass 
quartet outside the Old Chapel she Immor- 
talized the moment. (1-r) Don played tuba; 
Jason, trumpet; Craig, trumpet; Kerry, 
French horn. 



Susan Hamilton watches two students 
look for their car in Lot 44. With ali of the 
over-crowded parking lots on campus, it 
was often hard to remember where a car 
was parked. 



^^0mz i 




*'*'-V«fe;^g,^^^rV**'^ 





Melina Daviau has a bird's eye view of the 
men of 9C Brandywine and their friends. 
Living in a ground floor apartment had its 
advantages since one only had to open a 
sliding door and step out to enjoy an after- 
noon in the sun. 

Chris (a.k.a. Mr. Bike) Coop sits on his 
baby (a.k.a. bicycle) in Central on Friday 
afternoon. Many cyclists found the hills of 
Orchard Hill and Central a welcome chal- 
lenge. Photo by Hannah Donovan. 



202/ Being There 





e 



Q 

ml 



ka^m\ 




• > 



Robb Webb and Steve Spring enjoy a 
friendly wrestling match while Hong 
McGill decides to stay on the sidelines and 
take a picture. Sports such as this were 
great for relieving stress. 




"^,' 




Fridays Are A 
Welcomed Sight 



Thank God it's Friday! Some of 
s said tiiis prayer every week, 
"he campus seemed to vibrate 
nth students' enthusiasm to 
lake it through the day. Classes 
ither whizzed by or dragged on. 
"here were no in-betweens on a 
'riday. Later on, bus stops were 



filled with happy faces on their 
way home to prepare for an eve- 
ning of entertainment. When the 
day was through, students went to 
bed relieved that they could get 
up whenever they pleased the 
next morning. lOl 




' M m^^ ^ 



-f _ •if 



A student on the ]8th floor of Coolidge 
can't get himself out of bed as seen in this 
photograph by Michelle Okerholm. The 
temptation to sleep late and miss a class 
on Friday morning could be overwhelming. 



7:05 



A kitten enjoys Friday afternoon on Sa- 
rah's lap in this photo by Hannah Dono- 
van. Although most housing for students 
didn't allow pets, many students couldn't 
resist keeping one, regardless of rules. 



2:45 



Rachel Klein and Alexia Sorkin are found 
enjoying a swing by fellow Sigma Kappa 
sister Sue Nixon. They discovered that 
swing chairs relaxed them after classes 
and placed them In a stressless frame of 
mind for the weekend. 



4:15 



Geoff Hosford and his fellow hockey fan, 
Dolly, watch the Bruins game on the televi- 
sion in this photo by Hong McGill. Many 
seniors preferred to stay home with friends 
enjoying a game on TV rather than waiting 
in lines at the bars in Amherst Center. 



9:30 



Being There/203 




students Enjoy A 
Day With No Classes 



Karen Skipper took this photo of Central 
residents getting food at their Spring Fling. 
Every year residential areas held events 
that brought residents closer together. 



Bill Bergeron, Kathy Benson and Jil 
Tresky enjoy a picnic dinner at Towne 
house in this photo by Kim Lake. Thi 
grassy areas around Townehouse we 
corned many students. 



Saturday was a day of choices. 
One could spend the day catching 
up on studying or one could have 
a day of leisure. We could usually 
hear a pin drop in dormitory halls 
or apartment complexes until stu- 
dents woke from their heavy 
sleep. Once awake, the halls 
buzzed with activity until the eve- 



ning began. Most students took 
advantage of their last weekend 
night. Whether they took in a 
movie, went Uptown, stopped by 
an off-campus party or hung 
around the dorms, CIMass stu- 
dents knew how to have a good 
time. P] 




(l-r) Roger Kennedy, Will Kleshinsky, Bob 
Tilton and John "Chico" Gardner check on 
the "cow" at the swim team's yearend 
"Cow Roast." The roast was held to cele- 
brate a successful season. Photo by Mary- 
beth D'Ambrosio 



Michael O'Connor's friends enjoy a Satur- 
day night together in Brittany Manor. It 
was times like this that students will re- 
member in years to come. 




204/ Being There 




•^ 

^ 



Roscoe Robinson catches a student find- 
ing a parking place. Many students were 
encouraged to bring their cars on campus 
during the weekend since no parking per- 
mits were required. 



11:15 



Jen Meek and Brian Scanlon share a can of 
beans while Hong McGill takes their pic- 
ture by a lake in the Green Mountains of 
Vermont. Going on weekend camping trips 
allowed students to forget about school for 
a few days, invigorating them for another 
week of studying. 



2:00 



Stephanie Kepke snaps a shot of Michelle 
LeRoy lounging around. Students could sit 
back and relax on Saturdays since there 
were no classes. 



4:15 



Natasha Yakouiev makes plans for the eve- 
ning over the phone in Webster. There was 
always something to do or someone 
around in the dorms during the weekend. 
Photo by Veronica Welch 



8:20 



Being There/205 




In Lee Piazza's photo- 
graph a student tries to 
find an ennpty seat in the 
Music Room of the Cam- 
pus Center. On Sundays 
many students realized it 
was time to get back to 
the books. 





(l-r) Mark Semonian watches Josh Gordan 
and Bob Johnston stop their chess game at 
Twisters Terrace when they realize Julie 
Dillon is taking their photo. Semonian, 
Gordan and Johnston founded the comical 
newspaper, ZuNews that year. 



206/ Being There 



i^oori/C^CL^^ 



As The Week Ends, 
Routine Returns 



It was time to get back to the 
aooks, making the transition from 
the weekend to Monday a little 
smoother. The campus seemed 



next day's classes. When the day 
was through, students set their 
alarm clocks, hoping the next 
week of classes would go by as 



quieter, as if students were men- quickly as the last. [D] 
tally preparing themselves for the 




I this photo by Susan Hamilton Rachel 
ledanic studies while on duty in McNa- 
nara cluster office. Many students en- 
Dyed working in the cluster office since 
hey knew schoolwork could be done 
here. 



Lisa and Laura, twin sisters on exchange 
from Puerto Rico, pose for Hannah Dono- 
van by the barrels outside the Student 
Gnion. Students from different countries 
were drawn to (JMass because of the quali- 
ty and cost of the University. 






f/f^r -f.^^l 



Michelle Okerholm finds Heather Gilmar- 
tin taking a study break on the sixth floor 
of the Tower Library. Sometimes there 
wasn't enough time during the weekend to 
catch up on sleep as well as studying. 



10:25 



Peter Crafts catches Stormy Gleason play- 
ing guitar in the fourth floor lounge in Qor- 
man. This afternoon respite put Gleason in 
the mood for studying. 



1:20 



Pete Crafts snaps a photo of himself in 
Gorman. Crafts satisfied the curiosity of 
what he looked like behind the camera, as 
well as finished off his roll of film. 



2:15 



William and Ann Phermans watch con- 
struction workers outside Goessman. Lee 
Piazza reminds us that construction went 
on regardless of the day, time or season. 



3:20 



Being There/207 



A legal studies major celebrates his 
graduation with style. The day he spent 
four years worl<ing towards was finally 
here. 

Marissa Melliza and Tom Truong enjoy 
drinks together at the Senior Bash. The 
theme of the Senior Campaign was 
"OMassed For It, You Got It." 




Photo by Jeff Holland 
Senior Sue Collyer and Junior Brendan 
Saltzer enjoy a day of sun on the steps 
of the Stone Cafe. Many graduated se- 
niors would be missed by their under- 
graduate friends. 




208/ Seniors 



^ 



Seniors 






THERE 



Seniors 



Senior year is when students try to store 
the most mennories. Seniors make a 
point of recognizing their last burger at the 
Hatch; their last chocolate chunk cookie at 
the Blue Wall; their last trip Uptown; their last 
walk around the Campus Pond. 

Yet, it is also a time when students barely 
have enough time to remember anything. 
They're trying to cram in as many interviews 
as possible, while studying for the cumulative 
final that is the only grade in a major class — 
a grade that could determine whether they're 
leaving the University or not. 

There was always time to get the address 
of a friend and say good-bye to GMass.Q 



Photo by Clayton Jones 



Seniors/209 



imm^L 1 1 T-\ 


TV /r • 


Xxbbreviations roi 


^ Majors 


ACCOUNTING 


ACTNG 


AGRICULTURAL & RESOURCES ECONOMICS 


A&RECON 


ANIMAL SCIENCE 


ANSCI 


ANTHROPOLOGY 


ANTHRO 


ART HISTORY 


ARTHIST 


ASTRONOMY 


ASTRON 


BACHELOR'S DEGREE WITH INDIVIDUAL CONG. 


BDIC 


BIOCHEM.1STRY 


BIOCHEM 


BOTANY 


BOT 


CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 


CHE 


CHEMISTRY 


CHEM 


CIVIL ENGINEERING 


CE 


CLASSICS 


CLSCS 


COMMUN IC ATION 


COMM, 


COMMUNICATION DISORDERS 


COMMDIS 


COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 


COMLIT 


COMPUTER & INFORMATION SCIENCE 


COINS 


COMPUTER SYSTEMS ENGINEERING 


CSE 


ECONOMICS 


ECON 


EDUCATION 


EDUC 


ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 


EE 


ENGLISH 


ENGL 


ENTOMOLOGY 


ENT 


ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN 


ENVDES 


ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 


ENVSCI 


EXERCISE SCIENCE 


EXSCI 


FASHION MARKETING 


FSHMKTG 


FOOD SCIENCE 


FOODSCI 


FORESTRY 


FOR 


GENERAL BUSINESS & FINANCE 


GBFIN 


GEOLOGY 


GEOL 


GERMAN 


GERiVI 


HISTORY 


HIST 


■; HOME ECONOMICS 


HOMEEC 


■ HOTEL.RESTAURANT&TRAVEL ADMINISTRATION 


HRTA 


HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 


HUMDEV 


FIUTV'IAN NUTRITION 


HUMNUT 


INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 


IE 


ITALIAN 


ITAL 


JAPANESE 


JAP 


:: : JOURNALISTIC STUDIES 


JS 


t' LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 


LNDARCH 


c LEGAL STUDIES 


LEGSTU 


LEISURE STUDIES & RESOURCES 


LS/R 


LINGUISTICS 


LING 


MANAGEMENT 


MGT 


MARKETING 


MKTG 


MAIHEMATICS 


MATH 


MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 


ME 



MICROBIOLOGY 

NATURAL RESOURCE STUDIES 

NEAR EASTERN STUDIES 

NURSI^■TG 

PHILOSOPHY 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

PHYSICS 

PLANT & SOIL SCIENCES 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

PORTUEGESE 

PRE-MEDICAL 

PSYCHOLOGY 

PUBLIC HEALTH 

RUSSIAN 

SOCIAL THOUGHT & POLITICAL ECONOMY 

SOCIOLOGY 

SPANISH 

SPORTS MANAGEMENT 

THEATER 

WILDLIFE & FISHERIES BIOLOGY 

WOOD SCHIENCE & TECHNOLOGY 

WOMEN'S STUDIES 

ZOOLOGY 



MICROBIO 

NRSTU 

NESTU 

NURS 

PHIL 

PHYSED 

PHYS 

PL/S SCI 

POLSCI 

PORT 

PRE-MED 

PSYCIT 

PUBFILTH 

RUSS 

STPEC 

SOC 

SPAN 

SPTMGT 

THTR 

W/FBIO 

WDSCI/TECH 

WOSTU 

ZOOL 



















210 




ABELA,STEPHANIE,PSYCH 

ABELLS,CHRISTOPHER,SOC 

ABRAMSON,JULIE,COMMDlS 

ABRUZESE,MICHELLE,HUUC 

ACEVEDO-CRESPO,DOLMA,POLSCI 

ACKERJOEL,ENGl- 

ADAMOPOULOS,PATRICIA,ME 

ADAMS,GREG,ECON 



ADAMS,VIRGINIA,ACTNG 

ADlNOLFI,ANDREW,CHE 

ADLERJULIA,HRTA 

ADLER,STEVE,PSYCH 

ADLER,TAHLIA,COMM 

AGAHI,AFSANEH,EE 

AGNEW,PAUL G.JR.,HIST 

AINSWORTH,KERRY,COMM 



AIROLDI,FHILIP,ENGL 

ALBANO,KIMBERLY,EDUC 

ALBERT,LYN,COMM 

ALBERTO,DAVID,ECON 

ALDRICH,AMY,GBFIN 

ALEXANDER<BErHANN,ANSa 

ALLEN,ROBERT,SPTMGT 

ALONI,SHARI,HRTA 



ALPERSTEIN,CARYN,PSYCH 
ALVESJASON M.,ME 
ALZAMORA,STEVEN,ART 
AMERLING,AMY,ECON 
AMIN-HANJANI,SEPIDEH,ZOOL 
AMNOTTE,CAROLE A.,ACTNG 
AMOAH,YAA,FDSCI 
AMOREJOSEPH,HRTA 



AMOS,GARRICK A.^HRTA 
ANDELMAN,RICHARD,ME 
ANDERSEN,B. CAMPBELL,ECON 
ANDERSON,LINDA,HIST 
ANDERSON,RICHARD,ME 
ANDERSON,WILLIAM A.,PSYCH 
ANDRADE,LORI,ECON 
ANGELONE,RAYMOND,ME 



ANNEARJOYCE,PSYCH 
ANTIL,MICHELLE,PSYCH 
ANTONECCHIA,ROSE,ECON 
ANTONELLI,MICHELLE,EDUC 
ANTOSCA,KATHLEEN M.,ME 
ANZIVINO,SCOTT,WDSCI/TECH 
ARAKELIAN,SUSAN,ECON 
ARENT,LAURIE J.,EDUCUH 



ARLEN,DENISE,HRTA 
ARMSTRONG,LYNN,EDUC 
ARNOLD,LEA SUE,ARTHIST 
ARRINGTON,LISA,ENGL 

ASNES,CARRIE,HUMDEV 
ATHAS,NOELLE,OPMGT 
ATKINSON,CARL,HIST 
ATWOOD,DAWN,HRTA 



AUNESJRACY M.,HRTA 
BABB,MELISSA,FSHMKTG 
BABIGIAN,ELISA,POLSCI 
BABINEJENNIFER E.,COMM 
BABNER,DAVID W.,COMM 
BAILEY,ROSEMARY,W/FBIO 
BAIRLEXANDREW T.,COMM 
BAKER,AMY S.,EDUC 



211 



BALDASSARRI,MARIBETH,ACTNG 

BALIS,ALISONvHOME EC 
BAiTER,DEBORAH,C0MM 

baranauskas,kimberly;e,ngl 
barber,christine,educ 

barbieri,ann,polsci 



barbuscio,kurt w.,psych 
barden,loraine,nlirs 

BARILLARO.MTCHAEL A-AIE 

b aron,d aniee e.,h1.st 
barreda^felipe cspan 

BA RRIERE,MARCELL A.ECON 



BARRY,DANlEL;POLSCf 
BARTH,ELANA,FSHMKTG 
BARTLEY,MI,CHAEL C.,HRTA 
BARTOS,CHRlSTI L.;PSYai 
BASCHJEFFREY.CHE 
BATES,ROBIN,FSYCH 



BAUER,DONNA J.,COMM 
B A UMBERG,L AURA.SOC 
B A UMEL,BARB ARAJAP 
BAYER,STEPHEN,SOC 
BAYNEJASON,POLSa 
BhALE,BARBARA,COMM 



BEAN,ERNEST,MGT 
BEANE.TRACI L.,POLSCI 
BEATTY,IAN,PHYSH 
BEAVIS,CARLA J.,CHEM 
BECKER,CARA,ANSC1 
BECKW1TH,LAUREEDUC 



BEHR,LISA,ENGL 
BELL,CARLENE G.,COMM 
BELL,MELISSA,iMATt) 

BELLIL,YOUE,,ENVDES 
BELLINI,CHR!STINA,IVIKTG 

BEMENT,KAREN M.,ACTNG 



benben,cathleen,che 
bennett,andrea n.,bd1c 
benoitjohn m.,me 
benton,mark;econ 
berdick,annamarie,vvostu 
berelowitz,brrgitte,french 



berkenfeld,debra.cc;m m 
berkley,patrick,gbfin 

BERM AN;L AUR A RCBI N , PSYC H 
BERNSTEINJEFFREY L.,Pt )LSC) 
BERRETT,DEAN,ME 
BERTHIAUME,PAMELA,EDUC 





BESSE,ANDREA J.,ZOOL/PRE-MED 

BEUSCHEL,NANCY,MKTG 

BICKFORD,BRENDA,POI.SCI 

BIDEN,ANN,ACTNC 

BIKASH,ROBERT,GBFlN 

BILLINGSLEYJOHN T.,EE 



BILODEAU,MICHELLE A.,ENGL 
BISHOP.EILEEN P.,ENGL 
BLACKJAMES L.JR.,POLSa 
BLACK,LAUREN,ENGL 
BLAKE,ROXANNE C.,COMM 
BLANCHETTE,LORI,EDUC 



BLASI,MICHELLE,NURS 
BLAUSTEIN,STEVEN L.,GBHN 
BLOOM,ELISSA,COMM 
BLUM,WENDY E.,HRTA 
BLUMENTHAL,ANDREW,ECON 
BOBALA,ROBERT,ENGL 



BOC,NOELLE,ENGL 
BODNAR,JONATHAN,HRTA 
BODWlTCH,SUSAN E.,EDUC 
BOLIO,CORRINE CCOMM 
BOND,NANCY,CHE 
BONNELL,WENDY,POLSCI 



BOOTS, YVONNE,ANTHRO 

BORGER^TANYIAJAP 

BORT,SUSAN3IOCHEM 

BOSSE,BRIAN L.,LS/R 

BOSWELL,REBECCA,ENGL/SPAN 

BOUCHER,MICHELLE,COMM 



BOULOS,BARBARA,EDUC 
BOURASSA,PAUL J^ACTNG 
BOUVIER,EDWARD C.,SPTMGT 
BRADLEY,CHRISTINE,HRTA 
BRADLEY,KRISTIN R.,COMM 
BRADY,THOMAS D.,FOR 



BRAND WEIN,HOWARD,LEGSTU 
BRANSCOMBE,ROBERT JR.,COMM 
BRATER,KIMBERLY C.JS 
BRATHWAITE,SONIA Y.,POLSCI 
BREAULT,MICHAEL D.XS/R 
BREEDING, SUZANNE H., Freq 



BRESNAHAN, BRIDGET, Art 
BRIGHTON, HEITH J., LS/R 
BROAD, MANUEL, GBFIN 
BROGAN, PATRICK, Econ 
BRONDER, MICHAEL C, Engl 
BROOKS, JEFFREY, SPT/MGT 



I 



213 



BROSNAN,KEVlN,ENGr^^:S:S:|;::; 
BROUKER,PAMELA,ANXSfe&; 

^ BROWN,CHERVlUA&t::Beilii<: 
^brown,daMan '::?;'S:j :*'#■■ 

BROWN,tJiEAN R.,MGT ■ 
BROWN,LESUE,HOME: EC 



;:iS(SiiiLC,sirEVEN,BNVDES 

?iR0SiibGHRisTOPHER.BCDN 
^ BRTiI^ELi,E,MONIQUE,POESa 
BRUNQ,K1iISTrN M.,FRENCH 
BRYKliiftiiSiSN^ENGL 



..BXJ:CKLEXCHRISTIg»#^iFIN 

^ BUCKLE^AiliiiiK 
BBESO,CARIi(5S:K3l^^'^' ■ :: 
BULtOCK-ECKMANJENiitil:; 

:.Btife0€K>SADMpjDj:c . : «-; ;;;v::s,::-^ 



s^BX)»BAMi^iliiSi^giiiiBW 

? BijRGEsiiiiiiiliiiSiMEM^ 

BU1RGEtT>Biilife,Sl'lTVfGT 
BURKLUJSiif|iiiMA,BE , ;, 



BURREL]L;liiODORE Jf,,ACTNG 

Bl)RRItUiYfcE,ANSa 

BlJRt,JEisiNiFER,PHYSED 

BURT,PAUL,COMM 

BURZLAKR,KRA1G,PSYCH 

BtiiilffiliUE A.JAP 



BUSHMIEtElEtSf SM^ ft^mTA ^ 
BUTERAJAMES N.,PRE-MED 
BUTLER, AMY, ACTNG 
BUTLER,LISA,MKTG 

BUXNER,EVAN D.,POLSa 
BYRNEJAMES,EXSC!, 



cad!z,richard,com:m 

cadorette,neal,pol5cl 
cah! ll,courtn e y,polscr 
cail,tammy,exsci 

CAILLE,LAURA,LBGS'riJ 
CAlSSE,KRlSTEN,E,XSa 



CAiDWELL,MAURA 

CALICK,STEVEN |.,ACrNG 
CALILEO,WENDY,HRTA 
CALLAHAN,DEBORAH,LEGSTU 
CALLAHAN,MARY CCOMM. 
CALLAHAN,!V1ICHAEL J.,GBF1N 




214 




CALLAHAN,R1CHARD D.,ECON 
CALLENDO,FRANCESE.,I'SYCH 
CAMMARATA,DELIZIA,COMMDIS 
CAMPBELL,KERRY A.,EDUC 
CAMPBELL,NANCY CHKTA 
CAMPBELL,NEIL,COMM 



CANDELARIO,NORM,PUBHLTH 

CANDELLA,AARON,CBFIN 

CAPLETTE,NORA,A&R ECON 

CAPONE,CORINNE,EXSCr 

CAPRONI,LESLIE,EDUC 

CARABILLO,TERRI-LEE,LEGSTU 



CARADONNA,LAURA L.,PSYCH 
CARDELLO,JANINE,STPEC 
CAREY,MICHAEL J.,ZOOL 
CARIGLIA,DEAN J.,SOC 
CARINI,DENISE A.,PSYCH 
CARISTI,LAURA A.,NURS 



CARLSON,KAREN,EXSCI 
CARNEGIE,KYLER.,HRTA 
CARON,LISA,LEGSTU 
CARON,MARK D.,PSYCH 
CARPJOANNA.COMMH 
CARR,KATHLEEN A.,ENGL 



CARR,PAUL T.,SPTMGT 
CARR,SUSAN,EDUC 
CARSON,ANITA,IE 
CARTER,CHARLOTTEJAP 

CARUSO,MARC,CE 

CASE,CHARLENE,1H[RTA 



CASEY,DIANA,LS/R 
CASILLOJQSEPH A.,SOC 
CASPEROWITZJOSEPH J.,MAm 
CASSESSO,ROBERT,MKTG 
CEFALO,FRANK,OPMGT 
CERASUOLO,]OELLE,COMMDIS 




CEREGHINO,LAURIE,ECON 

CERRETA,TODD,H 1ST 

CERULLO,NANCYP.,EXSCl 

CH AIKENJULIE,HRTA 

CH A.MBERS JULIANN1E,LEGSTU 

CHANG,CLAUDIA,POLSCI 



CHANSKY,MARK R.,MGT 
CHASE,STEPHANIE,EDUC 
CHASONJEFFREY,MKTG 

CHEN,JUANrTA,PSYCH 
CHENEY,DANIEL AJR.,ME 
CHENG,LYNN,MKTG 



215 



7t 



umna Returns 



Doris Chaves Newman graduated from the University of Massachusetts 
in June of 1947. Doris, one of the founding sisters of Sigma Delta Tau Sorority at 
UMass, has returned to her ahna mater and her much yoimger sisters to docu- 
ment the evolution of the University. 

Doris pledged Sigma Delta Tau in January of 1944. Many of her friends 
were joining the Greek System and the idea was appeahng to her. According to 
Doris, the Greek Area was very different back then and had an overall better 
reputation. "In order to be somebody, you had to become a Greek," said Doris, 

Doris' flame for the University and for the sorority was re-kindled when 
she came back for her fortieth reunion in 1987 and when she attended the 1988 
Sigma Delta Tau bi-annual convention. "I met a lot of the women who had 
pinned me on the Charter Board. They are in their seventies and still young 
and vibrant." 

When she came back to visit in the faU of '88 and in the spring of '89, 
she said she noticed the sorority "desperately needed someone good" to become 
their house Mom. 

Doris said that her friends who are mostly younger than she, warned 
her that kids are different today, but that didn't stop Doris. 

"Ninety percent of the girls are easy to deal with, but I close my eyes to 
somethings," she said, "The house is not a drinking house and it is very orderly." 

In her spare time, when she can relax from the role of house mother, 
Doris continues researching two books that she is writing. Her pri.ncipal book 
is going to be titled The Making of the University . 

"Dr. Harold Keary has written a book onlOO years of history at UMass, 
but my book will focus on how the university became what it is," she said. 

The University of Massachusetts at Amherst came into being on 
May 6, 1947, the month before Doris graduated. "People were afraid of Mass 
State College becoming a university," she said. 

According to Doris, the students had a great role in transfonning the 
college into a university. "Governor Tobin was against the idea of a University 
of Massachusetts. Governor Bradford was electecj in the fall of 1946, partly 
because of a student movement, and signed the legislation." 

Doris also said that another book is in the making, titled / Never Had A 
Daughter, But Look At Me Noiv. Every time Doris talksabout her new sisterhtxjd 
and the old University of Massachusetts, or Massachusetts State College, she 
seemed as young and vibrant as the sisters she described at the convention who 
helped inspire her. 

"All throughout college it was my heart's desire to go to a Phi Sigma 
Kappa Fraternity party," Doris said, "and I finally got to go to one this 
semester." O 

by Scott D. Thompson 



Doris Nexvman stands 
outside the SOT house. 
Nt.vman recorded his- 
toiy while her younger 
sister lived it. 

















216 




CHERNIACK,NATASHA,COINS 

CHEW,CASSANDRA,COINS 

CHIASSON,DANlELLE,EDCUATION 

CHIKARA,VIVIAN,COMM 

CHING,MEILINA.,COMM 

CHIPLEY,TRISTAN,EDUC 

CHIPMAN,WILMOND.,LEGSTU 

CHO,JOYCE,HIST 



CHOATE,PETER J.,ME 
CHOUINARD,DONALD G.,ME 
CHRISTENSENJAMES A.,ENGL 
CHRISTIE,LAURA J.,EDUC 
CHUMBLEY,ANGELA,PSYCH 
CHURCH,TERRI,EDUC 
CHUTEJAMES.SPTMGT 
CIAMPI,THOMAS,BDIC 



CLAREY,TERENCE J.,POLSCI 
CLEARYJAMES S.,ENGL 

CLEMENTE,MARYANN,ECON 
CLEMENTE,VALERIE,SPTMGT 
CLEMONS,TRACEY D.,HRTA 
CLOUTIER,ANDREA L.,ME 
CLOUTIER,LEO C.,EE 
COFFEY,JENNIFER,GBFIN 



COHEN,CAREN,POLSCI 
COHEN,CARYN,HRTA 
COHEN^ERICGBHN 
COHEN,FRANK J.,POLSCI 
COHEN,IRIS,MKTG 
COHEN JENNIFER.ECON 
COHEN,MITCHELL,COMM 
COHEN,SAM,ENVSCI 



COLE,MICHAEL,COMM 
COLEMAN,THOMAS A.^POLSCI 
COLElVIAN,TIMOTHY J.,IE 
COLETTI,GINA,POLSCI 
COLLETTI,MARC,W/FBIO 
COLLINS,KATHLEEN,ENVSCI 
COLLYER,SUSAN,PSYCH 
COLON,NELIDIA N.,COMM 



COMINGS,ELLEN,EDUC 
COMO,KATERA,EDUC 
CONCEPCION,AUDREY M.,EDUC 
CONDON,CAROLYN M.^ACTNG 
CONDON,CHRISTINE,EDUC 
CONLEY,LINDA,PSYCH/SPANUH 
CONNOLLY,KATHLEEN,HIST 
CONNOR,LEIGH,MKTG 



CONNOR,PAULA,ENGL 

CONNORS,ELLEN,HRTA 

CONROY,ALLISON E.,COMM 

CONSTANTINIDES,DAMON,ENGL 

CONSTANTINIDIS,T.GBFIN 

COOKJAMES,POLSCI/PSYCH 

COON,MICHAEL,ME 

COOPERSTEIN,CHERYL,MGT 



COPELANDJOSEPHINE,LEGSTU 
CORBIN,OWEN JR.,COMM 
CORNEHUS,ERIN A.^ANSCI 
CORRIVEAU,TRACY L.,HIST 
COSENTINO,ERIC,HIST 
COSTA,RHONDA,PSYCH 
COSTELLA,THOMAS M.,ECON 
COTE,BRIAN,MGT 



217 



COTTER,MELISSA,yVNTHRO 
COUTTS,CHERYL,rOM M 
COWANJAYNE E.,PSYCH 
COX,BCATHLYN,POLSa 
COYLE,SUSANN,COMM 
CRAKER,NANCY L.,EDL1C 



CREAMER,GRETCHEN,COMM 

CREED,KELLY,GBnN 
CREIGHTONJULIE.FSHMKTG 
CRESTIN,LIANNE,PSYCH 
CRICK,MATTHEW,EXSCI 
CROCKER,NEIL L.,GBF1N 



CROISETIERE,USA M.,MGT 
CROOMJEROME A.JIRTA 
CROTEAUJOHN,COMM 
CROWLEY,USA MARIE,MKTG 
CROWLEY,MICHELLE C.,HRTA 
CUGINI,UNDA A.,ECON 



CULLENJOSEPH,SPTMGT 
CUMMINCWILLIAM ].,PSYCH 
CURLEY,LAUREN A.,.FS.HMKTG 
CURR1ER,PETER,C01NS 
CURRIER,SARAH,MKTG 
CURTIN,CHRISTOPHER,COINS 



CURTISJANET A.,POLSCl 
CUTLER,KATHERINE,EDUC 
CYRPAMELA LEE,CSE 
D'ARCONTE,LARA J.,BDfC 
DACEY,ELIZABETH,ENGL 
DADDARIO,TERRY,FDSCI 



DALLAMORAJEANINE,ENGL 
D ALS ASS,ELIZ ABETH,FSYCH 
DALUZ,MICHELLE A.,ACTNG 
DALXBR"* ON K.,CSE 

DALY,LAURA LYNN,PSYCH 
DALY,SEAN,LEGSTU 



DANCEWICZJOSEPH,LNDARCH 
DANESE,PAUL N.,BIOCHEM 
DANIELS,BRENDA H.,COMMDIS 
DARCY,MELISSA J.>1ATH 
DARRAGH,SUSANE.,PUBHLTH 
DARRER,STUART,MKTG 



DATTILIO,LOUlS,HlST 

DAUKSZ,CATHR1NE,MICR0B10 
DAVID,LEONARD,EE 
DAVlS,ALlSON L.,GBFIN 
DAVISJEANNE M.,GBFIN 
DAVIS,JENNIFER,SOC 




218 




DAV1S,LAURA,ENGL 

DAVIS,STEPHANIE,POLSCI 

DEMARTINO,NICOLE,COMM 

DESILVA,TREVOR,HRTA 

DETORO,CHRISTlNE B.,MKTG 

DEAN,DAVID,PHYS 



DEAN,PAULT.,POLSCl 
DEBRETTI,DIANE M.,EDUC 
DECARLO,CHRISTOPHER J.,MKTG 
DECELLE,HEATHER P.,NURS 
DECRESCENZO,LAURA,OPMGT 
DEEXJEREMYJAP 



DEFILIPPO,TERESA,ENGL 
DEGNAN,THOMAS J.,FOR 
DEGROOT,DEBRA,HRTA 
DELANDY,SCOTT M.,MKTG 
DELANOJILL,EDUC 
DELEMOS,SUZANNE,ME 



DELGADO,ANTONIO,EE 

DELOREY,DOROTHY,HRTA 

DELREJAMES N.,ENGL 

DELSIE,DAWN,PSYCH 

DELUCA,KELEY,ECON 

DELVECCHIO,MATTHEW,LS/R 



DEMILLE,KRISTEN,COMM 

DENMARK,EDWARD D.,LEGSTL( 

DENTON,STACEY,HRTA 

DEROO,KARENLEE,COMM 

DEROSAJEANNE,MATH 

DERUSSO,ELENA,MKTG 



DESAULNIERS,THOMAS,lE 

DESIMONE,SARA,POLSCI/ITALUH 
DESISTO,MARK,ECON 
DESORT,MICHELE,COMM 
DEVEAU,GEORGE,POLSCI 
DEVER,PATRICIA A.,ENGL 



DEVERES,ALYSIA,ME 
DEVLIN,LEE ANN,ECON 
DICAMILLO,ADELE,MGT 
DIAMOND,PAiMELA J.,PSYCH 
DICARLO,AN DREA,HRTA 
DIEHL,GLENDON B.,MKTG 



DIGILIO, VINCENT K.,MKTG 

DILLEY,CATHLEEN A.,EDUC 

DILLON,JULIA,HRTA 

DIMICHELE,BEN,HRTA 

DINARDO,VlCTOR,GBFIN 

D10NIA,R0SALEEN,FSHMKTG 



219 



DIPRIMA,GINA,MKTG 
DlTEtLO,LISA,EDUC 
DITULLIO,SUSAN,POLSa 
DlVEROiJOSEPH M.JR.,MGT 

doering,stei'anie,psych 
doescher,bethany,a:nsci 



DOLATA,CAROLE,POLSa 
DOLINSKY,SHARYN,LEGSTU 
0OMI.N GOS,CATHERINE,PSYCH 
DONATO,CINDXMATH 
DONATO,GINA M.,MTCROBIO 
DONDIS,MARJORIE A.,RUSS 



DONEtAN,MICHAEi SEAII;J 

0ONNELLY,KATHRYNJEf>:a 

DONNELEY,PATRICK,EC0.N : 

DONOHUE,CASSANDRA,BIOCHEM 

DONOHUE,MATTHEW,LEGSTU 

DONOVAN^HANNAHjSHJVIKTG 



: BONOVANJAMES R.,ME 
DONOVAN,THOMA8,eGMM 
OQOLEY/raERESE M,,COMM 

DOW,DEANNA,EDEfC 



DOWN,CARbElSitpME kit:^. 

DDYLE,ANNA,Hliy{iilii;g;;« 
DOYtE,teETH,SOC .' : PiSsS: ?; ■■*< '»* 
DRANGSHO£T,EVEN,Mdf 
DRAPER,NED,OPMGT/GBFIN 



DREYFUS,HOWARC),jS ■ 
DRUKMANJONATMAN S.,ENGL 
DUBINVCHERYL A.,GBFIN 
DUBNO,RANDI M.,MKTG/PSYCH 
DUBOSKY,CHRJSTINE,COMM 
DUBRULE,STEVEN,ME 



DUBUC,K'\RLN RENE,POLSC 
DUCAA'IARISA C.,SOC 
DUDDY,CHERYL ANN,COMM 
DUFRESNE,LISA,MGT 
DUNCAN,ALEXANDER L.,HRTA 
DLINCKLEE,SARAH,NRSTU 



DUNf-I.ANNEMARIE,EXSa 
DUPR,A".!OHN,CE 

;)UQUETTE,MICHELLE,POLSCI 

IURKIN,EIiEENEC'--M 
DUSSERE,ERlK;£i\' .!.., 
DUVALJENNIFER }., i>SY 




220 




EASLEY,MATTHEW,COINS 

EASTMAN,AMBER,ANTHROUH 

EATON,CEDRA,POLSCI 

ECKEL,EDWIN,ASrRON 

EDELHERTZ,DANA ,COMM 

EDINBERG,JEFFREYS.,BDIC 



EGAN,CATHERINE A.,PSYCH 
EGGERS,JOHN,ECON 
EHLE,DAV1D,PSYCH 
EIDLIN,LISA B.,ZOOL 
ELA,HOLLY B.,MUSED 
ELIA,KRISTrN M.,PSYCH 



ELKINSON,RANDY,COMM 
ELLISON,CHRISTOPHER,ENGL 
ELY.DOROTHY A.,EDUC 
ELY,WALTER,EDUC 

EMMETT,STEVEN,MGT 
ENG^DENISE 



ENGBORG,STEPHANIE,SPAN 
ENGELBERGJLENE G.,FSHMKTG 
ENGLEMAN,MARK,PSYCH 
ENINGER,LILLANNE,ZOOL 
ENZIE,GUSTAV C.,POLSCI 
ERBAN,ELIZABETH,MICROBIO 



:rnst,daniel,econ 
erushjennifer l.,comm 
espin ol a,clifford,zcx)l 
essember,trudy e.,actng 
etzler,steven,econ 
faherty,natahe,educ 



FAIRCLOTH,MICHELLE,FSHMKTG 
FALLER,JESS1CA,PHIL 
FARETRAJOYA A.,COMM 
FARNSWORTH,KENNETH,GBFIN 
FARRELL,RUTHANNE A.,ME 
FARREN,MARYANN,COMM 



FARRETTA,DANIEL J.,MUSIC 

FASCIANO,CLAUDIA,HRTA 

FAULS,LYNN S.,ACTNG 

FAY,KIMBERLY,ENGL 

FEE,JENNIFER,COMMDIS 

FEINBERG.MARQCOMM 



FEINBERG,MICHAEL A.,COMM 
FEINSTEIN,NATALIE,COMPLIT 
FEMMINO,SHERRY,MKTG 
FENDER,KIM,GBF1N 
FEODOROFFJANINE D.,POLSCI 
FERACO,DAVID P.,ACTNG 



221 




j^«-wwtkuwu»u»'ju' ,Mi'iM'iii,m"i.,"i'i^i'm,m' M'" 



1(^'-^()»i>Sj>^?i!SW»SJ**' 



t's Worth The Pain 



"It makes you feel wonderful when you know you're helping someone," 
said Lisa Maloney when asked how she felt after giving blood. Caroline 
Tuchscherer admitted, "When I got on the bed and saw the needle, I got nervous 
but the people are really nice." Diane Rowe who works for Red Cross said, "We 
want our donors well cared for." College students are responsible for 40% of the 
blood in Western Massachusetts and "UMass is the best college we have." 

The donors at UMass were in very good spirits and modest after donat- 
ing. Susan Curtis said, "I don't feel like I'm anything special." As she was laying 
on the bed, she thought, "Whatever I'm suffermg now isn't as bad as what some- 
one else is suffering. Somebody needs this blood more than I do." After the unit 
of blood is taken, the donor sits in the canteen to have a snack and make sure 
there is no reaction. 

Ami Lemeris and Dorothy Perkins have been Red Cross Volunteers for 
over twenty years, Dorothy said, "It really is a fun volunteer job. People who 
give blood are wonderful." Patricia Roback surmned up the experience, "It's not 
that much pain to go tlirough if you know you're helping someone." |U] 

by Barbara Goldstein 




Plwto hv David Sawan 







Sharon Cicchetti watches carefullly 
as a Red Cross nurse tests her 
blood iron ievel. She tested fine 
and left the blood drive feeling 
better than when she went in. 



A friendly nurse comforts a student 
while he tries to relax and concen- 
trate on something other than the 
needle. He was one of 96 who 
donated blood that da v. 




Photoby David Sawan 













FERDINAND,? AUL,COINS 
FERNSEBNER,SUSAN R.,HIST 
FERRARA,D1ANE J.,PSYCH 
FERRARl,DONNA,ACTNG 
FERULLO,CHRISTINE M.,MKTG 
FIELD,AUDREY,PSYC II 
FILKINS,LAURA,MGT 
FINCLE,ROBERT J.,HRTA 



FINLAYSON,DONNA L.,ZOOL 
FINN,HOPE,MKTG 
FINN,ROBERT,ENGL/HIST 
FINNERTY,MARIE,ITAL / POLSCIUH 
FIRENZE,MARC J.,MATH 
FISCHER,EDWARD,INTDES 
FISHBURN-PARKER,ROLF,ENT 
FISHBURN,SARA,PSYCH 



FISHERJILL S.^PSYCH 

FISHMAHHE1DI,FSHMKTG 

FITZGERALD,RAISSA,ART 

FITZPATRICK,SUSAN,GERMAN 

FIUTAK,JON,ECON 

FLATTICH,PAMELA,LEGSTU/SOC 

FLECCHIA,STEPHEN J.,CE 

FLE1SCHMANN,KARI,SPTSSTU 



FLETCHER,ALISON,PSYCH 
FLEURYJANET,CHE 
FLORE,MICHAEL J.,ME 
FLORES,CARLOS,POLSCI 
FLYNN,CATHERINE A.JAP 
FLYNN,DAVID T.,ECON 
FLYNN,D1ANE M.,SCX: 
FLYNN,ELIZABETH,MKTG 



FLYNN,MAURA,EDUC 
FLYNN,ROSEMARY,DANCE 
FOLEY,ELLEN C.,EDUC 
FOLEY, JENNIFER,HRTA 
FOLEY,LAUREN A.,ENGL 
FONDULIS,LAURA F.,ACTNG 
FONSECA,ETELVINA R.,HRTA 
FORD,HEIDI L.,ANSCI 



FORMATO,RICHARD M.,MEH 
FORTIER,SALLY A.,EDUC 
FORTSCH,DAVID S.,CHE 
FOSTER,MICHELLE,ECON 
FOSTER,SHAWN A.,ENGL 
FOSTER,WAYNE,ACTNG 
FOURNIER,TIMOTHY,SOC 
FOWLER,AMY,PSYCH 



FOXCHRISTINE,COMM 
FRASERJUSTINE,FSHMKTG 
FRENCH,BRIAN K.,.HIST/POLSCI 
FRIEDBERG,ERIC,SPTMGT 
FRlEDlVLAN,MARK,ECON/POLSCI 
FRISTENSKY,APRIL LYNN,MGT 
FROST,KIMBERLY,PSYCH 
FULCINITI,GAIL,COMM 



GAECHTER,MARTINE A.,PSYCH 
GAGE,LEAH,PSYCH 
GAGNONJEFF,EXSCI 
GAINESJEFFERY P.,ME 
GAINESJULIE A.,COMMDIS 
GALAT,GRETCHEN,EDUC 
GALITSKYJOSHUA,BDIC 
G ALLAGHER,CAILIN,ENG L 



223 



GALLAG,HER,PAVID F.,PSYGH 

GALLO,LISA,FRENCH 

G AMBHIR,MANISHA,ENG L 

GANGEMI,ZOE A.JAF 

GAEDlNER,CHRISTOFHER,COMM 

GARDINEE,KAREN,COMM 



GARDNER,ROBERT A.,GBFIN 
GARLAND,SCOTT,GBFIN 
GARNICK,DARREN M.,COMM, 
GAROFOLO;KlMBERtY„lNTDES 
GARVIN,JENNIFER,]S 
GATELY.BETH A.JS 



GATELYJUDITH A./POLSCi 

GATELY,j|ULIE,COMM 

GATESANDREW,CE 

GATEYJUDITH A.,POLSa 

GATTO,DIANE/POLSCI 

GATTOZZI,SANDRA,FSHMKTG 



G AUDETANNE^AG-FRlfivS' L^ 
G AUVlN,LISA,A3lliiP 
GAVIN,GArL /lA-s-a;:-,.. 
GAVIN,JOE,POLSCr 

gee,robeRt,eb 
gelasco,andrew,che«;: 



GELERMAN,EDWAi©^ MviS** ^-^^ 
GEiLY,PAULM. 
GENTILE JOAN,C0MM 
GENTILI,GINAMARIE,GOMM 
GENTRYiNANCY PRISGILfcAiSOS 
GERE,MARK P.,ME ,\ i 



GERTH.MARY K.;POLSCI 
GHELLI,TlNA,GEOL/FRENCH 
G.IANOULIS,GAlL,COMM 
GILBERT,CATHERINE E.,ART 

GlLLENAMY,COMM 
GIl.LErrE,MARCME 



GFLLIS,ROBERT,CHEM 

GILMARTIN,HEATHER,MGT 
GIMBAD,nMMY,bE 
GIOLANDO,FRANK,Pl HE 
GIORDANOJOHN P.fR.^ANSCI 
GIROUARP,l<'ENNETH W.^EPbC 



GISLESONAN NE,COMPLn 
GiASSMAN,DEBORAH,ECO\i 
GLASSMANJEFFREY D ,CBnN 
GLEIMAN,FREURICK C.,ACT JC 
GLIME,MEG,INTDFS 
GLOVER,CATHERIN E,l AP 




224 




gloyd,wendy,psyc:h 

gluckjulie.econ 

goggin,annmarie,dance 

gold,nikki,legstu 

gold,tammi,gbfin 

goldbergjodie,comm 



GOLDBERG,MARK,ME 

GOLDBERG,MICHELE F.,MKTG 

GOLDEN,]ENNIFER,ENGL 

GOLDSTEIN,TOBI,MATH 

GOLEMBEWSKI,MELISSA,COMM 

GOMESJOAO,SOC 



GOMEZJUAN CARLOS,ECON 
GONDELMAHADAM R.,ECON 
GONTHIERJAME S N.,CHEM 
GONZALEZJOHNCECON 
GONZALEZJORGE,ACTNG 
GONZALEZ,MARIA L.,MICROBIO 



GOOD,DEBORA H,ENGL 
GOODE,SUSAN E.,ENGL 
GOODRICH,SUSAN,EDUC 
GOODRICH,TODD,OPMGT 
GOODWIN,ALEXANDRA M.,ACTNG 
GOODWIN,KAREN,SOC 



GORDONJOSH,ACTNG 

GORHAM,KATHLEEN,ECON/fflST 

GORMAN,JANET,ENGL 

GORMAN,MEUSSA,HUMNUT 

GOROS,TINA,ART 

GOUVEIA,MICHELE M.,P/SSCI 



GRAHAM,PATRICIA,ANSCI 
GRAHAM,PETER L.,HIST 
GRAHAM,WILLIAM J.,OPMGT 
GRANT,HEATHER,COMM 
G R ANTJONATH AN.POLSCI 
GRANT,PAMELA E.,ARTED 



GRAVES,MELISSA ANN,EDUC 
GRAVES,PAUL J-JR^CE 
GRAY,BETH,ENGL 
GRAY,EMJLY P.,ANTHRO/SOC 
GRAZIANO.LYNNE 
GREEN,BARBARA M.,GBFLN 



GREEN,KENNETH R.,HRTA 

GREEN,LAUREN,1\'IKTG 

GREEN,SUSAN,ECON 

GREEN,TERRI,ENVDES 

GREENBERG,SUSAN E.^CO.vrM 

GREENFIELD,RON,PSYCH 



225 



GREENIDGE,DAWN,ECON 
GREENWOOD,KEN,ECON 
GRENON,BRYAN,ECON 
GRIFFlN,GEORGE A.XNDARCH 
GRIFFINJOHRHRTA 
GRIFF1N,PAUL JR. 



GRISW01D.NATAL1E,MATH 

GEOCO'IXHEATHER M.,HRTA 

GROSS,DEVITA,POf.Sa 

GROSS,KlM,POLSa 

GROSSER,MICHAEi,ME 

GROTHE,HIiARY,CON«Vl 



GUARINO,CHRISTINE,ED(JC 

CIJERRA,ANDREA D.,HUMSERV 

GUERRIN,CAROLYN,EDUC 

GUIDICE,JAMES,COMM 

GUlNlY,MARYBETH,COMM 

GUNNING,StJSAN,ECON 



GUPTA,RAJKUMAR,MKTG 
GURWITZ,ALANNA,ACTNG 
GURWITZ,DEBORAH R.,MKTG 
HA BINK,LAUREL,N U RS 
HADDAD,PAMELA R.,EE 
HADLEY,DANIEL P.,HR'rA 



HAGANvItlZABETH,PSYCl-l 

HAGBRJOHNACTNG 

HAGERTY,WILLlAM,BCON 

HAGSTROM,HlATHKRAiKTG 

HALLJENNIPER,COTNS 

HALL,JOCELYN,BXSa 



HALL,LAURA,COMM 
HALL,MlCfIELE B.,SOC 
HALLAHAN,MTCHAELA,ECON 
HALPERN,C ARL A, LIN G / PHIL 
HALVORSEN,ROY M.^POLSCl 
HAMAWI,NICHOLAS,EE 



HAMDAN,IVION!ID,Gl iH 
HAMILrON,D. BOE JR.JS/JAP 
HAMILTON,SUSAN,HIS I' 
HAMMER.MICHAEL D.,COMM 
HANCOXDAVID A.,I NDARCH 
HANLON,KATHLEEN,BDlC 



HAN.NON,SHERREMKTG 

HANSEN,GAYLE S./HIST 

HANSEN,RHETA,W /FPIO 

FIANSEN,TODD A./EE 

T IANSON,CHRISTOP.HER,ACTNG 

MANSON,ERIC,HIST 




226 




HAPPY,MATTHEW,COMM 
HARAZMUS,JOSnPH,COMM 
HARBOLD,KAREN L.,ACTNG 
HARE,LAURIE,HRTAUH 
HARGROVE,MICHAEL P.,ECON 
HARMAN,KATHIE M.,ECON 



HARMON,DEBORAH L.,ECON 
HARMON,LORRAlNE,PSYCH 
HARNEY,KELLY,COMM 
HARNOIS,GINA,ANSCI 
HARPER,DANIEL,A&R ECON 
HARRINGTON,CLAlRE A.,ECON 



HARRIS,KAREN L.,PSYCH 

HARR1S,KATHERINE G.^ENGL 

HARRISON,RHONDA,BDIC 

HART,CHERYL,BIOCHEM 

HART,CHRIS,COMM 

HARTLJONATHAN,COINS 



HARTMAN,CRAIG,SPTMGT 

HATEM,EHZABETH,ENGL 

HATFIELD,PAUL^PTMGT 

HAVILAND,CHRISTINA,ECON 

HAWKINS,BRENDA,PSYCH 

HAWKINS,REBECCA,ENGL 



1 



HAWKINS,SUSAN E.,COMM 

HEALEY,RICHARD S.,GBFIN 

HEBEISEN,MARK,EE 

HEBERLE,JENNIFER,ZOOL 

HEBERT,TIMOTHY,ME 

HEFFERNANJANE,EDUC 



heffner,herb,k'lktg 
heidbrink,kristine,psych 
heimbercmary diane,engl 
hempel,rebecca,engl/soc 
hempstead,ben;psych 
heninger,brian t., a&recon": 






HENLEY,LLOYD,ART 
HENSHAW,MARK C.,ECON 
HERBJULIE,COMM 
HERER,CARY,SPTMGT 
HERLIHY,DANIEL,CE 
HERNANDEZ,RAFAEL JR.,POLSCI 



HERRICK,SAMUEL,ACTNG 
HERSHBERG,MATT,MKTG 
HERTZ,EUGENE S.,BDIC 
HICKEY,GLORIA A.,FSHiMKTG 

HIG GINS,COLLEEN,BDIC 
HIGGINS,KAREN E.,ENGL 



ir 
By 



227 



T 



t's Never Too Late 



Although not everyone chooses to go to coUege immediately after 
graduating from high school it's never too late. A person of any age can enroll 
in UMass and they will experience the same things as the eighteen year olds. 
Virginia Rosen is a 38 year old undergraduate. "When 1 first got here, I was in 
shock." The transition to life at UMass can be more difficult for non-traditional 
students than for traditional students. Gimiy said, "Just like any student, I miss 
my family. My phone bills run high." 

Ginny also had problems with her roommate which is common for every 
student. Ginny moved in before her roomate. When her roommate cnrrived she 
was surprised to see Ginny. She went down to the Resident Director to get her 
room assignment changed. She sfill lived with Ginny until new arrangements 
could be made. By the time the room change was finalized, Ginny had become 
friends with her roommate, but she moved anyway. Ginny ended up with a 
single and remained friends with her former roommate. 

Another incident occurred in the elevator of Ginny's dorm A younger 
student reacted to Gmny without thinking. Ginny recalled the story. "I had 
gone grocery shopping and when another student got in the elevator, she looked 
at me and asked if the food was for my child." Despite all the mishaps, Ginny 
said she does not regret coming to UMass at all. "I got a good education." Ginny 
responded without hesitation when asked if it was all worth it "Yeah 
definitely!" 13 

by Barbara Goldstein 




Two members of the 25+ Club 
prepare a mailing to iion-iradilional 
students. The club tried to help 
older students feel less isolated 
on campus. 



Choloin Nklis!,,) Ki-der 












MiMmm 





228 





HILL,ANDREA,MKTC 
HILL,HOLLY L.,FXON 
HILL,LAURIE B.,HUMDEV 
HILLICKJEFFREY L.,LF,GSTU 
HIRSCH,HILARY J.,HRTA 
HITTNER,LORI,EXSCI 
HLOZIK,ZDENKA,MATH 
HOAGLAND,CARLTON,HIST 



HOFFMAN,LAURA,FSHMKTG 
HOFFMEISTER,MITCHELL ,MKTG 
HOGAN,CHRISTINE E.,ENGL 
HOLDENJENNIFER,MKTG 
HOLLANDJOSEPH,ECON 
HOLLMEYER,LOUISJS 
HOLMAN,MARK C.,EXSCI 
HOLMES,LISA,EDUC 



holmes,nanc:y,folsci 
holmstead,gene m.,me 
holotka,joanna,comm 
holt,melissa,educ 
holt,robert c.,hrta 
holt,susan,hrta 
holter-sorensen,hans,mktg 
hopkins,meghan,ansci 



HORGAN,LORRAINE,EDUC 
HORNJENNIFER A.,MKTG 
HOROWITZ,AMXPHIL 
HORSFALL.BETHANY L.,ENGL 
HORVATH,MICHELE,MICROBIO 
HOSSAIN,LISA,PSYCH 
HOTCHKISS,EMILY,HRTA 
H0TZ,TH01VIAS L.,ENGL 



HOULE,SHERYL D.,ENGL 
HOWARD,BRIAN F.,COMM 
HOWE,GAIL,FSYCH 
HRENKO,SUSAN,FSHMKTG 
HUBAN,SEAN,MKTG 
HURD,WAYNE W.,EE 
HUGHES,COLLEEN,COMM 
HUGHES,KATHLEEN A.,SOC 



HUGHES,PATRICK,GBFIN 
HUGO,MORGAN,COINS 
HUNTER,ANNF K.,COINS 
HUNTLEY,DAVID JR.,ACTNG 
HURLEY,KAREN,SOC 
HURWITZ,LINDA,BDUC 
lACOVELHRONALD H.,FOR 
IAVICOLI,GAIL,FSYCH 



INSERRA,LISA A.,HRTA 
INTHIRATH,VANH,POLSCI 
IRVING,BETH SUZANNE,HRTA 
ISABELLE,KATHLEEN,EDUC 
ISENBERG,STACEY,ME 
JACKSON.ERIC T.,POLSCI 
JACKSON,NINA,COMM 
JACKSON,TIMANGO F.,ECON 



JACQUES,CHERYL,LING/PSYCH 
JAEGER,INGRID,SOC 

JAIN,AJAY,ECON 
JAMES,MICHELLE,HUMDEV 
JANCZURA,STEPHEN J.,COMM 
JANKOSKI,KATHLEEN E.,MATH 
JANNELL,SUZANNE D.,EDUC 
JARDIN,MAUREEN,COMM 



229 



JAREK,LAUBlE,COMM 
JARRINJENNffER A./ANSCI, 

JARVI$,SUSAN GAIL,Ci3siSlE- "'{:': 
JEFFERSORTHERESA L.,ACTNG 
JENSSEN,PATRiGIA E.,BDIC 



fiiel%€!l«lI36PUBHLTH 
^#ttil(E)i>{3lNA,COMM 
JOHNSON,RANDALL,LS/R 
JOHNSON, VVENDY,PUBHLTH 
JOHNSTON,THOMA$,ECON 
^(JOHNSK)N,1MOSW^^!j.,XHTR 



JO?sfM3iBt©&S^SflRl';-«i.S:S 
JONESJACQUEiYNNB jfeiiifc;: 
JOOHOQ,TINA J«HMK3BiHi;ii:. ; 
JORDANJENNIPER DaBfiiSiiNi' 
jGSEmROBERT II^ZOOii^iiiiiEB 



jdYeE,cEfciii?iaiiiagfc-i"E-!« 

jteei^iiilfifNE F.JS/ENG1 
:;j|ii|^&ii^ ■U.,GBHM , ;: 

S^SiiEtfi)AVID M.,MIGROBIO 

5tA;lFER,kEVIN,EGON 

? iCAK AREKA,SHERI,EDUC 



KALERGisjii§iijiiiiiJiii?. . 

KALESNiTK;©ii8ii¥,i(ei#i'ENGL 
KAMARUDDIN,N. }ULIANA,IE - 
KAM1'NER,SUZANNE,FSHMKTG 
KANTERMAN,VLADI8LAVJE; 
KAPILIAN^ALAN tt^Bieji ::=.-:: 



KAPIiIAN,DAVID A„GBFIN: 
KAPLAN,DANIEU'GLSC1 
KAP1AN,ERIC,MKTG 
KAPLAN,JILL,COMM 
KAPLAN,LAUREN B. 
KAFLAN,STUART J.,MKTG 



KARAS,DEENA H./PSYCH, 

KARCHER,ERIC,ART 

KARELAS,GEORGE,S.r'TM;GT 

KAROON YA VAN ICH,P., ECON 

KARP,TRACXGBFI,N 

KASSIS,M1CHEL1NE,HRTA 



KATZ,ROBERT,OPMGT 
KATZEN,HOWARD L.,ME 
KAUFM AN,A L,COM M 
KAVER,RHONDA,PSYCH 
KAY,AEISON J./ENCL 
KEANE,KELLY,HJST 




230 




KEARNEY,MICHAEL,COMM 
KEELEY,KATHLEEN;rHTR 
KEELMAN,WENDY E.,SOC 

KEENANJACK,EE 
KEENANJULIE C.,MGT 
KEENAN,MICHELLE LJIIST 



I 






KEENAN,ROBERT,ECON 
KEEZER,MARC,ECON 
KEIMACH^DAVID R.,ECON 
KELAHER,DANIEL P.,EXSa 
KELLEHER,AMY,GBK[N 
KELLEY,KIM,HRTA 






KELLEY,SUSAN,EDUC 
KtELY,CANDICE A.,HRTA 
KELLY.ICARA M.,EDUC 
KELLY,KAREN,ECON 
KELNER,MICHAEL J.,SPTMGT' 
EMP,DIANE,LEGSTU 



'IH 





kempster,edward,legstu 
KLj\ igs,velg a,psych 
kennedy,! ames f.,gbfin 
ken n-edy,scott,soc 

KENR1CK,FRANK,ME 
KEr'KE,STEPHANIE M.,ENGL 



KERLEY,JANEM.,HRTA 

KERN,\TEUSSA,MGT 

KER/N ER, ANNE,ACTNG 

KESS 1 N GER,HEIDI,LEGSTU 

KfcZERIAN,THOMAS J. 

KH O R ASANIZADEH,S.,CHEM 



K1EGLE,SUZANNE,HRTA 

KIESLING,MARY,ART 

KILGORE,SEAN,ENGL 

KlM,JAY-KOO,MATH 

KIMJONATHAN,BNGL 

KIMBALL,PAUL,CLSCS 



KlNG,ANN,COMM 
K1NG,MICHELLE M.,BDIC 
KIRCHHOF,STEVEN J.,IE 
KIRK,KRISTINE.,BDIC 
KIRSHY,DENNIS AJR.,EE 
KIRSHY,RUSSELL,BDIC 



KISS,SANDRA,COMM 
KITTLER,LISA,COMM 
KEEINJODI,SPAN 
KLEISNER,FREDERICK J.1I,HRTA 
Kl.EKOTKA,PEGGIE,STPEC 
KLINE^DANIEL J.,ME 




I 



231 



KNIG HT,LAURA,ENVSCI / GEOLL 
KN1PPER,MICHAEL R.,:MGT 
KNIZNIK,HARRY,MKTG 
KNOWLES,AMY,ENGL 
KOCHISS,DARCY-LYNNEJS 
KOENIG,SUS ANNA,PSYCH / EDUC 



KOH,AUDREY LINGTIN,HRTA 
K0LLER,D10NNE,P0LSC.I 
KOPER,RONALD JOHN JR.,POLSa 
KOPROSKI,BETH,GBFlN 
KORNGOLD,ELIS S A,BDUC 
KOUCH,SRENG,COINS 



KOUSM ANIDIS,BILt,ACTNG 
KOWALCZYK,KElTH A.;EC0N 
KRAJEWSKISARA J.,Z0ii;M 1; 

kramerjonathan Bi:K:i:cs 

KRAVETZ,PETER C..MGT|3?::g;3 
:KRAJ^GZYK*ARES,HifiSi 



KREI<lipMWiM<®,MKTG 

KRiffetbiv;ifflii,SGON 

KRizj[orii!i|iE:jg!5iV.. 

KROKLUNt>,LlSA: E.;fc:OMf WP 
KRUCHERJENNIEER Wilitit 
KlJBOSIAK,TODD,ME ■;{#,:g:S: 



KUPECANDREA MXOMM niv 

kur,dana,hrta:: o..:,:..j,,,,;:'M 

LABARRE,MARYEWiijlilil:R 
LAGHANCE,EIXEN,|liM;BI::; 
LAFl^SH,MlGHEtiyyil©Bli 



LAFLEURJ[EEFRBY,P/S SGI ;. ^ v i 
LAKE,KIMBERLY,FRENCH 
LALJBERIXSHEILA K.^HUMNUT:: 
LA1VI,MAN,EE 
LAMAY,CURT1S,LS/R 
LAMPAYA,MARIA ELENA,COMM 



LANCILOTI,STEPHEN C.,EE 
LANDAU,SHAWN,POLSCI 
LANDERSJENNTFER,MGT 
LANDERS, JULIE AN N,SOC 
LANDGREN,SCOTT,LNDARCH 
LAPIERRE,DIANE P.,ENC;L 



LAPLUME,DIANNA L.,PSYCH/Si 

LAPORTE,SHERRI,CH£M 

LAPSLEY;FRANK,SPrMGT 

LARKIN,DlANNE,ECON 

LAROCCA,MICHELLE,EDUG 

LARSEN,JOHN,CE 




232 




LARSON,KRISTINA,lE 
LASH,GERALD G.JR.,ECON 
LATHAN,CHRISTOPHER,l3IOCHEM 
LAURENCE,MATTHEW,COMM 
LAWRENCE,KEVIN R.,COMM 
LAYDEN,MATTHEW E.,EE 



LEBLANC,GEORGE,ME 
LEACH,GLENN E.,ACTNG 
LEAHY,PETER M.,PSYCH 
LEARY,MICHELE 
LEAVITT,BETH,H1ST 
LEBOEUF,DAVE,ECON 



LEBOVIDGE,RHONDA,LEGSTU 
LEBRUN,1VHCHAEL,BDIC 
LEDUC,DIANNE,MATH 
LEDWITH,MICHAEL S.^GEOL 

LEE,HELEN,GBFLM 
LEE,PATRICK J.,ENGL 



LEGAULT,COLLETTE,COMM/SOC 
LEMCKE,NORMAN R.,ENGL 
LENFEST,RICHARD,SPTMGT 
LENTZ,KRISTINA M.,HIST 
LEON,PETER,POLSCI 
LEONARD,JULIE,SOC 



LEONTEJOYCE A.,ANSCI 

LEPEL,RENEE,HRTA 

LEROY,MICHELLE,ECON 

LEUNG,DIANA,HRTA 

LEVANSAVrCH,ANNE M.LEGSTU 

LEVENSON,MIYAN,THTR 



LEV1N,DYAN,ACTNG 
LEVINE,DAVID,ME 
LEVINE,LAUREN,GERMAN 
LEVITT,ROBERT M.,CE 
LEVY,MICHELLE TRACY,HRTA 
L1RES,LISA C.,MKTG 



HBOWlTZ,SCOTT ARON 
HM,CHRISTINA P.Y.,HRTA 
LINDER,NAOMI,HRTA 

LINEHAN,NANCY,HOME EC 
LINEHAN,RACHAEL L.,HRTA 
LITMAN,DAVID,GBF]N 



LIVERMORE,ANNE,MUSIC 
LIVORSIJOSEPH A.JR.,SPTMGT 
LIZARDI,ALMAURI,SOC 
LIZARDI,LISSETTE,PUBHLTH 
LOA,UNUS,IE 
LOGAN,DEBRA L.,ECON 



233 



w 



ith Age Comes Wisdom 



The growth of wisdom teeth can be a traumatic experience. Aside 
from the ordinary concerns about going to the dentist, new worries arise. We 
stiLl have to wonder if the dentist is going to use his drill. Chances are an 
attempt will be made to talk to you while you have all kinds of tubes and 
hands in your mouth. Of course, you will be given novicane which is always 
a treat. Your face feels about ten times as fat as normal and you'll drool on 
yourself without knowing it. 

The special treat of having your wisdom teeth is the hospital visit. 
You'll probably be able to go the same day, but you won't be eating much 
for a while. I hope you like yogurt and applesauce. It should only be a few 
days, but I've heard that some people haven't been able to eat for an entire 
week. This could be a good way to get started on a diet. You definitely 
wouldn't want to eat cookies or potato chips. They could poke your gum and 
cause bleeding. You are best off just sticking to the baby food. 

Something else to look forward to is the novicane wearing off. You 
won't feel any pain until then. The doctor will probably give you some codine. 
If you take one of those pills, you'll feet much better. Not only will your teeth 
stop bothering you, but you'll forget your problems and feel great. If you 
don't get the codine, you can just take an ordinary pain killer. That should 
make your pain wain. Not eveiyone needs the strength of codine. 

Of course, the highlight of the experience occurs soon after you get 
home and have to remove the gauze. If you don't have a strong stomach, 
be very careful. Make sure you grab the gauze, not your numb tongue. Both 
of them, feel moist and squishy. You'll know the diffei'ence because your 
tongue shouldn't come out as easily as the gaxize. The gauze tends to be 
fairly disgusting. It is best to remove the bloody, soggy gauze and discard 
it before you get a good look at it. 

If you remember these suggestions, having yoxir wisdom teeth could 
be a lot of fun, especially if you use the codine. You can also take advantage ; 
of the sympathy you'll get. Imagine the compassion people will have when 
they hear you had your wisdom teeth out while they enjoyed Spring Break at-j 
Virginia Beach. Having your wisdom teeth is not a good time, but there is 
one nice thing about it-- it can only happen to you once. 

by Barbara Goldstein 


















LOGIN,STEVEN,EXSCI 
LOHSE,FREDERICK W.III,ENGL 
LOISELLE,LINDA,COMM 
LOMBARDOJON J.,HRTA 
LONG,FLORA L.,BD1C 
LOOMAN,MICHAEL 
LOPEZ,ROLANDO J.,MGT 
LORD,AMY,HIST 



LOTRIONTE,CATHERINE,POLSCI 
LOVITZ,JOANNE,HRTA 
LOWSON,ELIZABETH ANNE,MGT 
LUBOFSKY,EVANJS 
LUCEY,MONICA M.,COMM 
LUGOGINES,SANDRA,HRTA 
LUMIA,PAUL,P/SSCIS 
LUNARDELLI,MlCHAEL,OPMGT 



LUND,KRISTIN,MKTG 
LUND,STEPHEN H.,ANTHRO 
LUX,ALIS0N,B10CHEM 
LYMAN,MICHELLE,CHE 
LYNCH,ELIZABETH,PSYCH 
LYNCH,ERIN,HUMNUT 
LYNG,DAVID,PHIL 
LYNN,ERIC L. 



LYONSJANICE M.,COMM 
MACARTHUR,SUSAN W.,HRTA 
MACAUDA,ALISA,MGT 
MACEDO,MARIA M.,ECON 
MACH,HEATHER,EDUC 
MACINTIRE,SCOTT,ART 
MACIVER,MARYANNE,FSHMKTG 
MACKJONATHAHGBHN 



MACKEEN,DAVID E.JR.,ECON 
MACKEY,MICHAEL J.,PSYCH 
MACKINNON,ANDREW,MKTG 
MACKINNON,KIRK,HRTA 
MACLEAY,CARYN,PSYCH 
MACNAMEE,ROBERT,PSYCH 
MACPHERSON,BRENDA L.,NURS 
MACUMBER,DAN,ZOOL 



MADDEN,MAUREEN,IE 

MADELOFF,LORI,MKTG 

MADIGAN,PAMELA,ENGL 

MAGNAN,KELLY,ENGL 

MAGRANE,DIANE E.,COMM 

MAHAN,MICHAEL,HRTA 

MAHENDRU,SUNDEEP,GBFIN 

MAHONEY,JENNIFER,ANSCI 



MAHONEY,MICHELE,ACTNG 
MAHONEY,NOREEN,SOC 

MAIORE,RACHEL,STPEC 
MALAGUTI,ROBERT,COMM 
MALEY,KATHLEEN,GBnN 
MALLON,KATHRYN E.,ANTHRO 
MALONE,DEBRA A.,ENGL 
MALONE,PAMELA,COMM 



MALONEY,JEAN,PSYCH 

MANNING,LINDA,MKTG 

M ANUEL,MICHEL,SOC / PSYCH 

MANZELLI,STEPHEN,MKTG 

MARC-AURELE,PAUL,ENGL 

MARCEAU,CARRIE,COMM 

MARCELINO,CHELENIA,SPAiM 

MARCHJENIFER DALE,ART 



235 



MARCHANT,KRISTIN,COM\4 
MAIiK,DAVIO R.,KCON 
MARNANE,DANA L.,SPAN 
MARQUlS,HiRNANDO M.,MG'i 
MARQUEZ,CARMEN,GBF1N 
jXlARRAHAVILLIAM^HOVIE EC 



MARRlNER,DOREEN,ECOX 

MARSHALL,ANNETTE,MKTG 
MARTELi,CHRISTINE,MATH 
MARTIN,BEATR1CE,SPAN 
MARTIN,HOLIX/OOL 
MART1N,MARI JOAN,ANTHRO 



MARTlN,MARYANNE,COMM 
MARTlNA,RIOS,ACTNG 
MARTINO^DIANE M.,ECON 
MASASCHI,LISA,HRTA 
MASON,JENNIFER,ENGL 
MASTERSON,THOMAS D^GBFIN 



MASTROVITO,LISA,MKTG 
MATARESE,fESSICA,lsrU"RS 
MAXCEXKRISTINE E.,HRTA 
MAYER3RENNA H.,EN'GL 
MAYZER^MICHELE A.,HRTA 
MAZZOLA,|AMES,GBFIN 



MCALLISTER,ROBIN B.,EDUC 

MCAUEAYJENNIFER,MGT 

MCAULEY,DANIEl G.JR.,MCT 

MCAULIFFE,CAROLANNE,SPTMGT 

MCCANN,JOHN,AClKG 

MCCANN,JOSEPH,GBFLN' 



MCCARTHY,JEAN M.,Mt;T 
MCCARTHY PAUL C.,ECON 
MCCARTY, KEVIN M.,PrON 
MCCLATCHEY,CAROL R.,COMM 
MCCONNELL,ALISON N.,HCa\" 
MCCONNELL,SCOTT,ACTNC 



mccracken,meredith,encl 

mcdermott,kathleen;polsc 1 

mcdonaed,christopher,me 

mcdonald,lisa,engl 

mcdonough,claire,educ 

mcdonough,thomas,lndarcp 



MCDONOUGH, WlLLIAM,POPSa 

mcdowell,laura a.,clscs 
mcelligott,deborah;legstu 

MCEN ANE Y,D EBR A,FSH MKTG 

mcevoy,thomas t.,mktg 

MCGA>IAN,KAREN,H0ME EC 




236 




MCGARRY,BRIAN T.,SI'TMGT 
MCGIBBON,GLENN,COMM 
MCGILUHONG A.,P01.SCI 
MCGONAGLE,PATRICK,MKTG 
MCGOVERN,KEVIN,POLSCI 
MCG OW AN,PETER, M E 



MCGRATHJOHN,LEGSTU 
MCGROVER,MICHELLE,EDUC 
MCHUGH,CHRISTINE,COMM 
MCHUGH,LESLIE,ECON 
MCKENNA,KATHLEEN A.,ME 
MCLAUGHLIN,GAIL M.,COMM 



MCLAUGHLIN,MONICA,COMVrDlS 

MCLELLAN,CHRISTOPHER,MGT 

MCMANUS,KERRY,MGT 

MCMULLEN,PETER,MGT 

MCNABJENNIFER,COMM 

MCROBERTJEFFREY,ME 



MEDREK,TIMOTHY,MGT 
MEEKS,SILAINE L. S.,PSYCH 
MELANSON,DENISE,HRTA 

MELEEDY,KEVlN,COxVLVl 

MELENDEZ,TANJA,FSHMKTG 

MELIKAN,BETH,MCROBIO 



ELLAMN,MICHELLEJS 

MELLIZA,MARISSA,COMM 
MELLO,SHARON,COMM 
MELTON,ROBERT A.,A&R ECON 
MELTZER,LORI B.,HRTA 
MENDELSON,ANDREW,MKTG 



MENDELSON,SUSAN,SPTMGT 
MENDEZJUAN F.,IE 
MERCADO, VICTOR M.,ECON 
MERCIER,HEIDI,HUMNiUT 
MERGEL,TAMARA,PSYCH 
MERMELSTEIN,HAYLEY,BDIC 



MILLER,CHARLES M.,COMM 
MILLER,DOUGLAS G.,ENGL 
MILLERJEFFREY J.,ME 
MILLERJERIS J.,PSYCH 
MILLER,KRISTIN,GBFIN 
MILLER,OLIVE,PSYCH 



lVULLER,SHERII\rE D.,GBnN 

miller,stephanie,comm 
miluken,ralph;hist 
mills,christopher d.,polscl 
minasian,lynn 
mmmirani,amirhadi,me 



237 



1VI1LLER,SHERINE D.,GBFIN 

MILLER,STEPHANIE,COMV! 

M1LLIKEN,RALPH,HIST 

MlLLS,CHRISTOPHER D.,POLSCJ 

MINASIAN,LYNN 

MIRMIRANI,AMIRHAD1,ME 



MlZKACHI,MICHAE,COMM 

MOBERG,KARIN,HRTA 
MOCCIA,LEAN NE,HRTA 
MOHDAMIN,NORAZAH,IE 

MOLINAJOAN,FSHMKTG 
MOLL,EUGENE E.,SOC 



MOLLAHAN,EIiEEN,LEGSTU 
MOL0NEY,KEIXEY,SOC 
MOMPOINT,MARCARET,ACTNG 
MONCARZ,CIN0Y,ACTNG 
MONTGOMERYJEAN C.,HRTA 
MONTYJOSEE P.,PSYCH 



MOORE,CARDETHlA,PSyCH 

MOORE,MELANIE,HRTA 
MORALES,CARLOS M.,HRTA 
MOREHOUSE,SCO'n- A.,ECON 
MORGAN,SUSAN E.,COMM 
MORI,ELLEN,HRTA 



MORIARTXANNAMARIE P.,Z001 

MORlARTY,DAVlD,COMM 

MORlARTXKATHERINE,ENGLH 

MORIARTY,MARY F.,EDUC 

MORRILL,KAREN,HRTA 

MORRIS,DEBORAH,COMM 



MORRIS,L AN A,COMM 
MORRISSEXANN F.,FSHMKT(. 
MORR ISSEY,REBECCA,ENGL 
MORSE,SHARON,CBFIN 
MORTEiLSAR AH,LS/ R 
MOPTON,CHRISTINE M.JHTH 



MOSBY,DAVID ALEXANDER,SOC 
MOSCA,PAUL,GBFrN 
MOSER,BRICTTTE.ANTHRO 
MOSER,SUZANNE M.,MKTG 
MOSKOW,LlSA,ENGL/ DANCE 
MOSSER,KIMBERLY K.,iV1KTG 



MOUREY,LAILA,MRTA ' 
MOWi:>ER,LINDA ANN,ART 
MOYNIHAN,BETH A.,PSYCH 
MUJSEJONMICHAE L,A&R ECON 
IV1ULBARGER,DEANNA,G1>FIN 
MUiCAHY,MlCHAEL J.,EE 




238 




MULCAHY,TARA,BNGL 
MULLANEY,ELIZABETH A.,ENGL 
MULLIGAN,TERESA,MKTC 
MUN,SONG T.,ME 
MURAD,GARY,1 IRTA 
MURADrAN,CLAUDrA,MC;r 



MURDOCK,STEVEN P.,POLSCI 

MURDZIA,MARY,ECON 

MURPHY,A1LEEN M.,MATH 

MURPHY,JOANNE,EE 

MURPHY,KEVIN,HIST 

MURPHY,KRISTA,EDUC 



MURPHY,LANCEJS 

MURPHY,MAUREEN,POLSCI 

MURPHY,MAUREEN,SOC 

MURPHY,PATR1CIA,PSYCH 

MURPHY,SUZANNE L.,SPTMGT 

MURPHY,THOMAS,HIST 



MUSANTE,CHARLES,ENGL 

NACE,BEVERLY,COMM 

NAFTALIN,SUZANNE,PSYCH/SOC 

NAHMIAS,KATE,ECON 

NAKAJIMA,ERIC,POLSCI 

NALEWAK,LISA,ANSCI 



NAPIORJESSE L.,COMM 

NATHANS,ROBIN S.,MICROBIO 

NAWROCKI,C.,HUMDEV 

NAZARIAN,SANDRA,ECOxN 

NAZE,WILiIAM,ENGL 

NEJAME,ALEXIS,PSYCH 



NELLIS,AMY,HRTA 
NELSON,CRAIG,STPEC 
NELSON,ELIZABETH,ENGL 
NELSON,ERIC N.^CHINBSE 
NELSON,RICHARD W.JR.,PSYCH 
NELSON,ROBERT,CE 



newman;,brenda,fshmktg 

newman,gail,comm 

newman,meryl,comm 

newmark,kerr1,mgt 

newton,daniel,actng 

ng,becky,actng 



NGAN,ESTHER,NRSTU 
NICHOLSON,W. SIMONEJS 
NICKOLSON,BEVERLEY,JS 

NICORA,TAMMY,GBFrN 

NIERENBERG,KARYN,COMM 

NIONAKIS,PETER,HRTA 



239 



E 



veryone Reads It 



A typical Collegian reader is a UMass student who picks up the Collegian 
at the Campus Center and not surprisingly reads it during class in the morning 
to early afternoon hours. A random poll was taken on 27 male and 31 female 
UMass students' opinions of the Collegian. 

The results of the poll concluded, six out of ten students pick up the 
Collegian at the Campus Center due to its central location on campus which 
tends to be a liighly trafficked area. In class is the most popular place for 
reading the paper. All you professors out there who have noticed your stu- 
dents' heads down in class, it is more than likely they are glancing at the 
Collegian and not at their notes. 

According to the poll, everyone reads at least two editons per week. 
Half of the respondents said they read the entire paper, and more women than 
men read the front page most often. The majority of students make use of the 
personals and scan housing. Nearly everyone uses the entertainment listing 
and ads. "I like reading the FYI section and the activities listed in the classifieds 
because they keep me up to date on campus events," said Jilhan McGrath, a 
senior HRTA major. 

"The paper has to be more focused than other papers," stated Collegian 
Editor-in-Chief, Maria Sacchetti. "It's college students writing for college 
students." El 

by Mary Callahan and Ashling Burke 








-Maura Caldwell, a 
senior HRTA major, 
reads the Collegian at 
the Hatch. The paper 
made enjoyable light 
reading during lunch. 





Photo by Jason Fetdman 



Liane LaPlaca 
concentrates while 
reading the Collegimi. 
Many of the articles 
deserve the attention 
Liane gave to this 
paper. 






240 




NIXON,SUSAN E.,ECON 
NKETIA,BERNARD,ECON 
NOAH,WENDY,COMM 
NOBREGA,EDWARD A.,ZOOL 
NOH,THEWON,ECON 
NOONANJAMES M. 
NORDSTROM,DEBORAH L.,EE 
NORRISJULIAM.,ANTHRO 



NORTON,PATRICIA,ACTNG 

NORVELL,AMANDA,MICROBIO 
NOTTLESON,KIRSTEN E.,EDUCUH 
NOVOJEFFREY M.,ACTNG 
NOYESJOHNJAP 

NUMAN,SUZANNE,PSYCH 
NUTTING,DEBRAJS 

NYMAN,AMY L.,EE 



0'BRIEN,BRIDGET,COMM 
0'BRIEN,KEVIN,EE 
0'BRIEN,TARA A.,COMM 
0'BRIEN,TOM,ECON 
0'CONNELL,DEBRA ANN,COMM 
0'CONNELL,LIAM,LNDARCH 
0'CONNOR,DARLENE,ART 
O'CONNORJOHN W.,ME 



0'CONNOR,MAUREEN,FRENCH 
0'CONNOR,MICHAEL J.,ME 
0'C0NNOR,PATRICK,ANTHR0 
0'HARA,LOUISA ANN,COMM 
0'HARE,MARTHA J.,ART 
0'KEEFE,JAMES,HIST 
OKERHOLM,MICHELLE,ZOOL 
OKSTEIN,LAWRENCE,POLSCI 



OLBRIS,DIANE G.,ENGL 

0'LEARYJANINE,ACTNG 

0'LEARY,KATHLEEN,PUBHLTH 

0'LEARY,SUSAN,LEGSTU 

OLIVERO,KRISTIN,IE 

OLLMANN,LISA,MKTG 

0'MALLEY,EILEEN,COMM 

0'MALLEY,]ENNIFER,EDUC 



0'NEIL,SUSAN,GBFIN 
0'NEILL,KATHRYN,EDUC 
0'NEILL,MARY,SOC 
ORANSKY,MARIANNE S.,HRTA 
0'REILLY,DOUG,BDIC 
0'REILLY,JAMES,ECON 
ORENSTEIN,SCOTT,CE 
ORRALL,NORMAN J.,CE 



OSTROFSKY,KAREN,GBFIN 
OSTROWSKI,CYNTHIA,GBFIN 
0'SULLIVAN,DAN1EL p.,BDIC 
OTT JENNIFER A.,POLSCI 
PADULSKY,AMY,A&R ECON 
PAGLIERANI,ANDREA,SOC 
PALADINO,PAUL F.,MKTG 
PALINKASJOHN S.,WDSCI/TECH 



PALMIERI,KIM TRACY,COMM 
PANGIONE,STEPHEN R.JS 
PANUCCIO, VINCENT A.,ME 
PAOLINO,MARGUERITE,ENGL / ART 
PAPAUTSKY,SHEILA,HRTA 
PAPPAS,MELISSA,HRTA 
PAPPONE,KEVIN,HRTA 
PARABICOLI,MARK,MKTG 



241 



l'ARA[OUL,l)AV.lD,M(- 

rARF;,SUZANjNL,H.\CI.. 
PAREN"T,JtNNIf'i:R,I-(.X.'. 
PARIKH,ASFilSH,A(. 1\C i 
PARK,MAR1A Y.,}XO\ 
PARK,SHAKONf,VV(")SrL;/sli'!":C 



PARKER^CHERYI, 1,.,FSI !\1K'I C, 
PARKl'R,GARYA1Kr(; 
P ARKS,P.D A VI D,y-X SC i 
PARMENTERJ L-L!E,t .OM M 
PAROVVSKIMARTHA F./XXVIM 
PARSONS,TRACEY S.,H RT A 



PARTENHE1MER,ANN M.,DAN'CE 

PASZEK,AARON,HUMUEV 

PATRON AS,Er-ENA N.,MGT 

PATTERSO.\,LlSA,fiCON 

PATZA,CRAlG,Cflb 

PAUL,LAURA,ACi'.MG 



PA LLl ^ ("),C V\"1>1I A,i i I . M i;»H V 
PA V L 4S,R ICH ARD ) R.J'OR 
PECK,STEVEN B./'.BHK 
PUD R El.L rjJiAH M.;E Dl'C 

pei.i,i;gri,&heila,comm 
pelleyjenn1eer,.hkta 



PELJrER,SA\DRA,COMM 

pi-.i;r rER,suzAN n'e,comm 

PEN\A,C1.AUD1 A,MC f 
PERClVAL,KRlS,i.EC:.S-[UH 
PEREIRA,MARK,i:\'SC! 
PEREZ.INA V.,J (ISr 



pf;rki,i„meryl,actmg 
l'erlmuter,ezra,pbych 

Pf;R\tCEJOSEPH,r,NCI 
PEROCCHI,SHElLA,s( K. 

pruocci n,si lER r v,si.x. 

PEKRV./iMCti A,!.i-!i\ 



PERRY,K)I?I A.,[:(.C)V 
PERUYAIARC iOSEPH/-;( K 
Pi:.TI.R,Bl:RANU'C()\ 
PETERSON.tHRISTOPHr R,( OViVi 
PEIRIT.I 0,KEVI\ R.,AC IXC, 
PETRII I.,0,STr,PHANIi j.,(Xnnj 



philip,manakobtjchi;bd!C 
phillips^laura m.,polsci 
pickerincri chard,econ 
pierce,d1 anee.,econ 
piercejohn m.,me 
pierottij ames f., hrta 





PIKE,KELLY M.,DANCE 

PILETTE,YVAN,.ME 

PINTO,ANGELA N.,PSYCH 

PIPER,CHRISTOPHER,CBFIN 

PlRES,LOURENCO,LtCSTU 

PITINGOLO,STEVEN,JS 



PLAUTJULIE,POLSCI 
POGATCH,STEVEN,ACTNG 
POLANSKY,CHRISTINE,EDUCUH 
POLLINO,SUSAN,FSHMKTG 
POLLOCKJENNIFER A.,HRTA 
POLLOCK^NANCY G.,EDUC 



POLYDORES,DAVlD,BDIC 
PONTECORVO.MICHAEL F.,HIST 
POPP,NANCY E.,PHYS 
POPPLE,CHRISTOPHER,ECON 
POPSUNJOHN M.,ENGL 
PORCHELLI,AMY,ART 



PORTEUS,ALISON,HRTA 

POST,ALISON,HIST 
POST,LISA,PSYCH 
POTTER,ALISON,MGT 
POTVIN,RONALD,HIST 
POULOS,ANDREW J.,COMM 



POWER,MARC,POLSCI 
POWERS,DAWN E.,MlCRO 
POWERS.KIMBERLY A.,GBFIN 
PRAJZNEK,CHRISTOPHER,MKTG 
PRATT,SHARON,PSYCH 
PRAVIDLOJONiACTNG 




PRICE,TAMMI,FSHMKTG 

PRYTZ,ERLEND,MKTG 

PUCHALSKI,SHAWN,CRIMJUS 

PUIG,MARI CARMEN,EE 

PURCELL,BRIAN,COMM 

PURRETTA,MICHELE,FSYCH 



PUTNAM,SHARON L.,GEOL 
PUTT.CORINNE M.,HRTA 
PUTT,CYNTHIA,EDUC 
QUARTULLI,KEVIN,COINS 
QUINN,THOMAS J.,ACTNG 
QUINTILIANI,MELISSA,ECON 



QUINTO,PAUL,GBFLN' 
RACHELLE,MARLENE,CO]VIM 
RACIKE,PAULA,ZOOL 
RADZIK,CYNTHIA,HRTA 
RAMOS,PEDRO,A&R ECON 
ANDALL,TANIA E.,HrUMSERV 



243 



»is™ 



RANDBY^DAVID M.,PHYSBD 
RAPOZA,DJOSEPH,PSYCH 

RAFP,L,I.SAMARlE,BIOCHEM 
RAPP^MICHELLE LEE,SOC 
RASMUSSEN,PAUL,SPTMGT 
RASSIAS,TlMOTHY A.,SOC 



RAUHAUSER,KIRSTIN,CO-\0vl 
RAWSON,BETH C.,MKTG 
RAYNOLDS, ALEXANDRA E,,ENCL 
REAGAN,KELLY ANN,EDUC 
REARDONJAMES J.JR.,POLSCl 
REBEIN,GARY,1E 



REED,DAWN MARIE,COMM 
REGANJENNfEER L.,reYCH/SOC 
RE JCH,MEI,1 SS A,C OMMDIS 
REI1LY,SHA N N O N,POLSa 
REINKE,RLSSELL, THTR 
REITH,KIMBERLY A.,PSY'CH 



RENDLEMAN,BRUCE,ECOM 
RENESJONATHAN S.,CO^■i 
RESNICK,AMY E.,EDUC 
RETTBERG,LINDA JEAN,/yW 
RHEAULTJENNIEER A.,ENVSCI 
RIBEIRO,GUlLHER MINA,POLSCI 



RICCIUTI,KARENANN,ZOOL 
R]DDELL,TRACY LEEJHTR 
RIDLEY,REBECCA C.,ECON 
RIMKUS,MATTHEW J.,EDUC 
RINALDI,STEVEN A.,CSE 
RINALDO,MARIA,LEGSTU 



RlNG,DEBORAH,EDUC 
RINN,STACY R.,BD1C 
RIPPETOE, KELEY^HRTA 
RISTINO,KRlSTEN J.,COMM 
R1VARD,RENEE A.,PSYCH: 
R1VERA,PATR1CIA,PSYC 



ROBERGE,PHILrP A.,POLSCI 
ROBERTSON,HOLLY,SOC 
ROBINSON,GAYLE,I£ 
ROBINSON,PHIL[P K.,H!ST 
ROBINSON.ROSCOE F.,HUMDEV 
ROBINSON,WILLIAM,ME 



ROCHEJHOMAS M.,COMM 
RODDEN,KATHERIN E,C^EO L 
RODIER,AMY,STPEC 
RODRIGUEZ,MARIA E.,FSHMKTG 
ROGOWSKEAPRIL MARIE,LEC;STL 
ROE LER,MICHELE,GBFIN 




244 




ROLLER,ROBIN M.,MATH 
ROMAN,LYDIE,COMM 
ROMANO,CAROLYN,EE 
RONAN,JENNIFER,M KTC 
ROSA,SUSAN M.,ECON 
ROSENAU,ROBYN JILL,I'SYC1I 



ROSENBERG,ADRIENNE,ENGL 
ROSENBERG,SHERI,JS/POLSCl 
ROSENKRANZ,BRI AN,M USIC 
ROSENSWElG,SARA,PSYCH 
ROSKILL,DAMlAN,BDIC 
ROSNER,SHERYL L.,ACTNG 



ROSS,DANl,ACTNG 
ROUGIER,PATRICIA E.,POLSCI 
ROUX,ROXANNE E./MGT 
ROWLES,BETHANY J.,A&R ECON 
ROZETAH,MO-YUNUS,IE 
RUBIN,HILLARD,ZOOL 



RUDNICKJULIEANNA,ENGL 
RUMIANO^RITA 
RUSCHMANN,ELAINE,ART 
RUSSE,ANT0N10 J.,CSE 
RUSSELL,YVETTE MARIE,JS 
RYA NJACQUELYN^MKTG 



RYAN,KATHLEEN,COMM 

RYAN,PAMELA,EDUC 

SABIA,]ODI,COMM 

SABOURIN,MICHAEL,ENGL 

SACHER,DANA,ECON 

SAENZ,NATALIA,ECON 



SALAT,MICHAEL,COMM 

SALERNO,LISA,GBFLN 

SALVADOR,ANDREA P.,COMM 

SALVI,ELLEN,COK'IM 

SAMPSONJULIANNE,FSHiVIKTG 

SANDORFI,CSILLA,JS 



SANDOW,BETSY K.,ENGL 

SANTANA,LUZ A.,PUBHLTH 

SANTIAGOJULIETA,EXSCI 

SANTORO,MICHELE,OPMGT 

SANTOS,CRlSTIANO,LING 

SAPPET,VICTORIA,ME 



SARNO,DAVID,GBnN 
SAUNDERS,CHRISTINE,EXSCI 
SAUSVILLE,BETH,PSYCH 
SAVICKISJENNIEER A.,ART 
SCABIA,CHRrSTOPHER J.,ME 
SCALESE,GAIL M.,OFMGT 



245 



Tf 



elayed Graduation Pays Off 



"Years ago something was wrong if a student didn't complete college in 
four years. You don't really learn in that pressure," said Clark Edwards, Associ- 
ate Director for Placement Services. The staff at the Mather Career Center was 
responsible for the change in students' attitudes about graduating on time. One 
step towards this goal was the combination of the Placement Service and the 
Office of Cooperative Education at the Career Center, with the University 
Internship Program following closely behmd. 

There are disadvantages to the new set up. One being that the Career 
Center is out of the way. Yet, with these three services together, students have a 
better chance at using the University's resources. "Everything was spread out 
before," said Edwards, "It was only by chance if a freshman came across things 
before. Now we're all united to support the concept of being able to legitimately 
test what it's like to go out into the real world, and we can catch stadents early." 

By going on a coop or internship students prepared themselves for what 
the Placement Service had to offer. The Placement Service is designed to help 
students find a career that matches their talents and personal preferences and to 
help students develop a good working knowledge of the job search process. 

The Placement Service remembers students after they have a job, as well. 
They keep recommendations on file "forever." Some of the recommendations 
they have on microfilm date back to the 50s. This service's usage is highest for 
the first five years after graduation. But, it has proven ideal for women going 
back to work after having children, as well as for teachers who want to go back 
to grad school or for men who went into the service. "If we don't have a student 
on record, the person is isolated. They don't have much documentation except 
their transcript," concluded Edwards. 

by Mary Sbuttoni 



Two students look 
through comptiny 
brochures while ' 
waiting to talk to 
counselors. Some 
students chose to 
browse through the 
Career Center rather 
than seek a counselor. 




PlTOtnbyMfnuItand 



The Mather Career 
Center is located 
near Fraternity/ 
Sororitj' Park. With 
the combination of 
career services, the 
building would not 
seem so isolated. 




Photo bv Jefi Holland 















246 




SCANLON,NANCY LESLIE,COMM 

SCANLON,PAULA,CE 

SCHADLER-ALESSIO,LISA,INTDES 

SCHINDEL,SHARI,EDUC 

SCHLACKMAN,MICHELLE,ECON 

SCHLEGEL,HERBERT,EE 

SCHLESINGER,LISA,ZOOL 

SCHNEIDERJANINE,ANSCI 



SCHNEIDER,LAUREN,FSHMKTG 

SCHNEIDERS,SUSAN,PSYCH 

SCHOFIELD JEFFREY D.,W/FBIO 

SCHOFIELD,LAURA,EDUC 

SCHORTMANN,HEATHER,GBFrN 

SCHREINERJENNIFER,PSYCH 

SCHULTZ,ANN-MARIE,EDUC 

SCHUSTER,RANDY,HRTA 



SCHUTTE,STEPHEN C.,ECON 

SCHWAGERJULIE,PSYCHH 

SCHWERD,MARC,COINS 

SCOTT,ERIK,COMM 

SCOTTJANET M.,PSYCH 

SCOTT,KATHE,EE 

SEARS,LAUREN,BIOCHEM 

SEGAL,LYNDA,COMM 



SEGHEZZI,MARK,ECON 
SEKHULUMI,NTSOAOLE,EDUC 
SELIGMAN,BRANDT,HRTA 
SELIGMAN,DEBORAH,PSYCH 
SELLS,DAVID J.,HIST 
SENOSK,KRISTIN M.,SPTMGT 
SEFECK,WlLLIAMT.JR.,W/FBIO 
SERAFIN1,SUSANM.,PHYSED 



SERPA,MARIA M.,COMM 
SERPA,NAZARE,COINS 
SERRIS,SUSAN M.,SPAN 
SEWARD,ROBERT,MICROBIO 
SHAFAJALEH,MICROBIO 
SHAFER,DAYNA,SFAN 
SHAHEEN,DEBRA MARIE,MGT 
SHAPIRO,LISAJS 



SHARPE,KEVIN NOEL.MUSIC 
SHARPE,STEVEN,FDSCI 
SHATZER,SUSAN,EDUC 
SHAW,GREGORY,A&R ECON 
SHAWJEAN E.,PSYCH/ZOOL 
SHAW,JENNIFER A.,ENGL 
SHEA,COLLEEN,reHMKTG 
SHEAJOHN TJR.,ENGLH 



SHEA,LAUREN,PHYS 
SHEA,PAULR.,ECON 
SHEAHAN,KELLY,COMM 
SHEEHANJULIA E.,EDUC 
SHEEHY,ANNE K.,COMM 
SHEEHYJAMES,PSYCH 
SHELDON,GEOFFREY S.,ENGL 
SHERTER,SCOTT A.,ENGL 



SHERWOOD,STACEY,ANSCI 
SHIEPE,LAURA E.,HRTA 
SHINE,KATHLEEN,GBFIN 
SHORES,ROGER W.JR.,ME 
SHRIVER,HOLLY,JAP 
SHUFRO,DEBORAH S.,THTR 
SHULENBURG,M. STUART,COMM 
SIEGEL,MELISSA ANN,MGTH 



247 



S1GLER,ERIC M.,GBFIN 
SILVAJAMES CMICROBIO 
SILVAJOHN PAUL,HRTA 
SILVA,KRISTEN30C 
SILVA,TIMOTHY A.„ANTHRO 
SILVERSTEIINr,ROBERT S.,EE 



SILVESTRI,MARC,FRENCH 
: SIMMONS,STEPHANIE,CHE 

?SlNCt AIR,N ANGY M.,MA3M: 
:&NGER,HE ATHER,lNTsBBS>. V . 
SSi^5SIGALU,AN0REiipiaB 
■ SLATTERX1PAMELA,Ctiffii 



sit;(:jiiy^iacHELLE,HC)Maii 

Smrn^Mwi K„ARTHIST^- >;:';? 
SMITH,ARtHUR,HiST : : 

v8iVIIOT^I3AS»:Bi>iS0^^^^^^ 



:., SMtTH,mTRICIAi&RTi V :fl|! 



sMiTH,RENEE,is ' ''rm^Mamm: 

SMITH;RlGHAR©;;:aifi:>5iSilif 
SMITH/RONAi©,(3BHN.:*aigii 



SNOW,|EMNIPER,PSYCH: 
SNOWDENJULIE^PSYGH 
SNYDER,WEND1,I,EGSTU 
S0B(L,MEUSSA,H01V1E EC 
SODOS,NADJA S.,COMM 



SOJKA,TANlA M.,HRTA 
SOKOLOWSKIEDWARD IILCOMM 
SOLEY JEFFREY, PSYC H 
SOLOMON,DENA,HRTA 
SOLOMONJOEL A.,GBF1N 
SOLOMON,SCOTT 



SOLUP,BETHANN,EDUC 
SOOHOO,TIN A , FSH M KTG 
SOREL,LAURIE A.,BDIC 
SORKlN,ALEXIA,HfST/STPEC 
SOUCY,KlM,COMMniS 
SO!,-? ■\,SHFEl.i,C()MMDIS 




248 




SPAULDINQSHARON E.,reYCH 
SPELLIOS,THOMAS J.,IE 
SPlDLE,RONALD L.,HRTA 
SPIEGELGtASS,JOY,COMM 
SPrLLMAN,LEE,SOC 
SP1TZ,STEVEN D.,ANSCI 



SPREEN,DEBORAH,A&R ECON 
SPUNGIN,CINDY,PSCYH 
ST.GEORGE,MICHAEL J.,EXSa 
ST.PlERRE,ERIC,COM M 
STAEBLER,VICKI,PSYCH 
STAINE-PYNE,GREGORY C.,MKTG 



STANLAKE,DAVID J.]R.,POLSCI 

STAPLES,SUZANNE,MKTG 
STEADMAN^BETHNEY E.,ENGL 
STECHMANN,SCOTT,ECON 
STEFANSKI,DIANA,SCX: 
STEIN,MICHAEL,BDIC 



STEINBERG,ANDY R.,PSYCH 
STEINBERG,BRAD,MGT 

STEINBERG,MARK,HRTA 

STEMPIEN,SUZANNE,HRTA 
STERN,LAUREN,COMM 
STERN,SUSAN A. 



STEWART,BASIL A.,ACTNG 
STEWART,GARY J.,ECON 
STEWART,KATIE,COMMDIS 
STEWART,LISA IVI.,HRTA 
STEWICH, WILLIAM C.,COMM 
STIMPSON,KERRI A.,SOC 



STOKES,STEWART,ECON 
STOLLER,BETH,COMM 
STREETON,SUSAN A.,MUS1C 
STROLLOJENNIFER.INTDES 
STROUT,AARON W.,RUSS 
SUBRAMANLAN,SUMAN,PHYS 



SULLIVAN,ELLEN,ENGL 
SULLIVAN,GAEL E.^POLSCl 
SULLIVAN,LISA 
SULLIVAN.NEAL PATRICK,ME 

SWAN,FREDA,SOC 
SWEENEXANTHONY,EE 



SWEENEY,SHARON A.,LEGSTU 
SWINAND,GREGORY P.,ECON 
SYAT,SCOTT,COMM 
SZEKELY,GIGI,ECON 
TALANLANJANICE.OPMGT 
TALBOTJOHN P.JR.,OPMGT 



I 




249 



T4MRALYN,KI:LLY-ANN,i\SyC"H 

TA M U I O N 1 S,CHARLES,t E 

T A R PI: \ , VI AU REIIN E., E \ G I . 

TARKJLNN'IFER.COMM 

•lAYLOR,APRlL,r\C;,l, 

1 AYLOR,KEVIN B.^UXiSTl. 



"IAYl.OR,S(>rHIA A.,l\(.,i 
TAZZIZ,RAi:D,il? 

Tti.i.o,vic roRrA, 1 1 ria 

rEr'l'ER,LORI.,\4KrC 

IE rRtAULT,PAL!I A J.JuDlX- 

"IHERRIEN,MARn:,[:i)L(. 



THIRKEl.L,COLLEEN,BD!C 
THO,VirSON,Hr:ATHER A.,N 
THOMPSONJOHN E..ECON 
THOMPSO\,SCO'(T,C:OiV1M 
rHOMPSON,SCOTT D.JS 
THORi\,PHlLIP H.J"R.,EK'CI., 



1 HORSTON,KATHRYN S..SO<„ 
■nERNEY,RICHARD,ACi XC 
TINNEY,GlNA,FSU.M.K"a; 
TIRADO,WILFREDO,FH 
TlTUS^MATTHhW.COViM 
ri V N AN/l'HO M AS,COM V. 



1 70NDR0D1PUTR0,DIAN,MC; 
TKACMUK,DEXISE,,V1KTC 

roBiN,DiAN s.,evc;l 

TOBlN,SUSAN B-J-IDUC 

TOl,AND,IJSA,EDL(; 

T01.,PA,CHRIS,E,\G! 



rOMBAR),CHRI.STlNA,(Jl'\4C'r 
'rO\lE!NSON,iVlARK K.,CO!Ns 
TONAIINH.COIXS 
10Rr;LLi,A\ niONY 1..IR.,I 1K1A 
TOTH,MlCHEn,EAtl<TG 
■lRACY,Hil.AUY.i-. 



trainor,kip,com u 

TREACY,STE\nEN D.,ViC: " 

TRESKYJILL^HRTA 

TR01A,L0RI,C0MM. 

TRUDEAU,JOHN,STPEC 

TRUONG,TOMTOAN,ECON 



TSE,ALICE,HRTA 
TUCKER,JENNIFER,ENGL ' 
TUC.KER,KAREN,ACTNG 
TUCKLER,LIZA,BDIC 
TUMEINSKI^PAULA JAYNE,ZOOL 
TUOSTCMICHAEL JR.,GBFIN 




250 




TURCOTTE,l,ISA G.,ARTH1ST 
TURENNE,MICHELLE M.,EDUC 
TUXBURY,CAROLYN,COMM 
TYLER,KIMBERLY,ENGL 
TYLER,VALERIE L.,HRTA 
TYNES,WILMA E.,EDUC 



UDELL,SHAR1,HIST 
URQUHART,SUSAN B.,ARTED 
UZDAVIN1S,KAREN,AR rillST 
VALLE,GAVINE.,ZOOL 

VANDERWILDENJOHN,AC'rNG 
VANNGUYEN,NANG,MATH 



VARMA,MANO JR.,GEOL 
VARRELLJONATHAN,SOC 

VASSAR,C.ELIZABETH,COMM 
VAUGHAN,SONJA,SPTMGT 
VEEK,ROBERT,COMM 
VELEZ,SIGRID,HRTA 



VELSMro,MICHAEL J.IH,BIOCHEM 

VENDITTI,THERESA,COMM 

VENETO,ANGELA,COMM 

VERNXERICLNDARCH 
VIDMAR,SUSAN ANN,COMM 
V1NKEMULDER,SARA,PSYCH 



VOELKER,DEBORAH,EDUCUH 
VOGT,MARYJANE,COMM 
WADMAN,EDWARD M. 
WAGNER,ELLEN M.,ECON 
WAINER,ANDREA,EDUC 
WAKE,SANDRA R.,ENGL 



WALDMAN,SHARON LEE,STPEC 
WALINSKY,MICHELLE,COMM 
WALKER,FRAN,MICROBIO 
WALSH-SPrVEY,TINA,ANSCI 
WALSH,BRIAN P.,COMM 
WALSH,ELLZABETH A.,COMM 



WALSH,MICHELLE M.,EDUC 
WALSH,PATRICIA ANNE,MGT 
WALSH,PENNY J.,ZOOL 

WANG,LINDA,EE 
WANG,PHILIP,CE 

WANTMAN,SCOTT,PSYCH 



WARD,MICHAEL L.ME 
WARD,THERESA M.,MGT 
WARDEN,FATRICIA,COMM 
WARDWELL,LAURIE,ART 
WARMUTHJENNIFER E.,EDUC 
WARNER,BONNIE E.,COMMDIS 



V 



251 



M 



ounted Police Return 



Students returning to classes in the Fall of 1989 were pleasantly surprised 
to see horses trotting around campus. The mounted police had returned. 
Mounted police first appeared on campus in 1972. The program lasted for three 
years, but, due to inadequate stable facilities and lack of funds, the program was 
terminated. Ironically, the mounted police program in Springfield was dis- 
banded because of budget cuts, allowing UMass to receive four of their horses. 
Two more horses were donated. 

The University of Massachusetts poHce wanted to provide the campus 
community with as much visual patrol as possible by reallocating the resources 
they had, according to Patrolman Jimmy Turati, Unit Coordinator for the 
Mounted Police. The remote areas on campus where hard to get to by car or 

foot, but they were no problem for mounted pohce to patrol. 

"The horses make us much more approachable, which is an important 

aspect we try to get across to the community," said Turati. During the day shift 

the mounted pohce patrol the academic areas, the more core parking lots and 

around the Alumni Stadium. "We act as a community relations tool, as well as a 

deterrent to crime," stated Turati. 

During the nigh shifts the mounted police take a more active part m 

various types of calls. They also patrol the remote areas of campus, such as the 

Orchard Hill walkways. 

Turati feels that the mounted police have been a successful public 

relations tool and considers them to be an integral part of the Department. 

"We've received lots of letters and phone calls from happy students, staff and 

faculty. Coeds say at night they can hear the horses clip clop and feel secure," 

said Turati. 

by Mary Sbuttoni 



ShaUo Veritas smiles 
for the camera while 
a mounted policeof- 
ficer waits patiently. 
The horses made the 
police more ap- 
proachable and 
susceptible to 
photographers and 
horse lovers. 
















52 




WATERMAN,BRADFORD,ECON 
WATERMAN,JUDrrH,ART 
WATJUS,DEBORAH,MI<TG 
WATKINS,SUSAN P.,EDUC 
WATSON,ANDREA,SOC 
WATTS,KAREN,HRTA 
WEBB,RICARDO S.,POLSCI 
WEBB,ROBERT L.,HRTA 



weibel,maricella;polsci 
weidler,robln js/psych 
weill,gregory s.,hrta 

WEINBERG,ADAM,GBFIN 
WEINBERQCHRISXING/JAP 
WEINER,AMY L.,MKTG 
WEINER,LISA,ENGL 
WEINER,PENNY B.,FSHMKTG 



WEINGOLD,STEVEN,ANSCI 
WEINSTEIN,ARIJS 
WEISE,PETER A. 
WEISER,KURT A.,LNDARCH 
WEISS,SCOTT,CE 
WEITZMAN,NANCY,HIST 
WELCH, VERONICA M.,SPANH 
WENTWORTH,LISA,HOME EC 



WESCOTT,SHAWN M.,LEGSTU 
WESOLOWSKI,KIMBERLY,EDUC 
WBST,CAROLLNE G.^GERMAN 
WEST,STEVEN D.,LS/R 
WESTLAND,ERIK,C01NS 
WHALING,CHRISTOPHER,POLSCI 
WHEELER,SUSAN V.JS 
WHIFFIN,KEVIN,ENGL 



WHITCOMB,PAMELA,COMM 
WHITE,BETH A.,SOC/HRTA 
WHITE,CHRISTINA,EXSCI 
WHITE,HELAINE,COMM 
WHITEJOEL,SOC 
WHITE,MILDRED N.,UWW 
WHITHED,ELIZABETH,POLSCI 
WHITING,W. MATTHEW,ECON 



WHITNEYJEFFREXBDIC 
WHOOLEYJOANNE^MGT 
WIBERG,MARGARET E.,ART 
WICKMAN,KYLE,MATH 
WILKER,WENDY E.,HRTA 
WILKINS,KIMBERLY,ART 
WILLARD,KAREN,MKTG/COMM 
WILLIAMS,CAROL A.,LNDARCH 



WILLIAMS,KIMBERLY J.,GBFIN 
WILLIAMS,STACEY Y.,HRTA 
WILLIS,CRAIG R.,IE 
WILLIS,MICHAEL,ECON 
WILSON,DARRYL J.,HRTA 
WILSON,DEBORAH,CE 
WILSON,NANCY,ACTNG 
WILSON,PAULA,COMM 



WINBERG,DAVID,MKTG 
WINER,BETH R.,SOC 
WINER,BRITT,ART 

WINNING,KELLY,CmNESE 

WINSLOW,ELAINE,DANCE 

WINTERS,JENIFER-ANN,HRTA 

WIRTH,AMY,BDIC 

WITT,DANIELLE,COMM 



253 



WITTENBERG, RICHARD, MKTG 
WITZER, DIANE GAIL, ENGL 
WOLF, JONATHAN S., IE 
WOLF, VERONICA, BIOCHEM 
WOLFE, DAVID JAMES, ECON 
WOLFE, KIMBERLY, LS/R 



WOLPE, HELAINE, SOC 
WONG, ANDREW, HRTA 
WONG, JOSEPH K., JAP 
WOOD, DAVID S., ECON 
WOOD, MATTHEW H., BIO/WF 
WOOD, TIMOTHY, POLSCI 



WRONA, MARGUERITE, ME 
WRYNN, MICHELLE, FSHMKTG 
WU, LYNNE T., CHINESE 
WU, VERONICA, COINS 
WYATT, RICHARD, COMM 
YEE, LISA, ECON 



YEGERLEHNER, DEBORAH, THTR 
YOKEN, CRAIG, COMM 
YUSOF, AHMAD J., EE 
ZABEK, LINDA, HOME EC 
ZADIG, ALFRED T.K. JR., COMM 
ZAGARELLA, KRISTEN, ENGL 



ZAHYRA, RUSSE, ACTNG 
ZALEWSKl, DIANE, ECON • 
ZAPOLKSI, RICHARD J., CE 
ZATERKA, AMY L., EDUC 
ZDRGEWSKI, MICHAEL, EXSCI 
ZEBERSKY, JUDD, MKTG 



ZECHER, SUSAN, EXSCI 
ZERVAS, JAMES, BIOCHEM 
ZIEPER, MATTHEW, MKTG 
ZIFF, LORI, MGT 
ZINGARELIL, MARK A., EE 
ZISMAN, AMY, CLSCS 





ZOLA, MEREDITH, FSHMKTG 
ZUMBRUSKI, REBECCA, EDUC 
ZWERNER, MICHAEL, MGT 



254/ Seniors 




Photo by Paul Agnew 




Photo by Eric Goldman 



Two seniors appear very happy to be graduat- 
ing. The day was more special when with 
friends. 



Sylvan resident makes some adjustments 
the train set in his lounge. Luxuries such as 
■ing one's own train set at college made 
'ate lounges advantageous. 



Photo by Paul Agnew 



Seniors7255 



The north side of the Campus Center 
glistens with melting snow. Whether 
the snow was christened by feet or not, 
winter at OMass had a beauty of its 
own. 

A trash can is forgotten by the Campus 
Pond. This was a familiar sight to be 
remembered in the scrapbook of stu- 
dents' minds. 




Photo, by David Sawan 
Kristen Miller and M,J, Vogt take a 
break from studying to watch "The 
Brady Bunch." Television was effec- 
tive in relieving stress for some stu- 
dents. 




256/ Et Cetera 



Et Cetera 



/ 



'i- 






^^ 




Et Cetera 

There are certain events on campus that 
students look forward to every year. 
Senior year is especially filled with these 
events. 

The Spring Concert is possibly the last free 
concert students will attend. The Senior Bash 
is one of the first events the University 
sponsors in honor of seniors. And the year 
isn't complete until graduation ceremonies are 
over. 

After having been a part of these various 
events, students can leave (JMass with a 
complete set of memories. Q 



Photo by Lisa Nalewak 



Et Cetera/257 




Had To Be 
There To Feel 
The Energy Of 
The Masses Of 
Students Who 
Gathered To 
Hear The 
Bands At The 
Campus Pond 



258/ Et Cetera 




Photo by Jeff Holland 



Gordon Cano and Brian Ritchie 
bask in the energy of their adoring 
ClMass fans. The Violent Femmes 
kept the crowd satisfied until 
Queen Latifah arrived from Am- 
herst, NY. 



Bands Rock The Pond 



After a long winter and the cold 
rain of early spring, students at 
GMass celebrated the arrival of 
the warm sunshine at the CIPC 
Pond Concert. 

Despite the lingering mud, the 
annual event drew a crowd of stu- 
dents that jammed the fenced in 
area between the Fine Arts Center 
and Campus Center. The pulsat- 
ing mass of people danced to the 



beats of popular musicians Queen 
Latifah, Ziggy Marley and The Vio- 
lent Femmes. 

New security rules prevented 
frisbees and beverages from being 
brought in, but the crowd seemed 
unphased by the change of 
procedure, iffi 

by Marguerite Paolino 




-¥7y% — 

V- 



This child has a view the remaining 
crowd at the Spring Concert longs for. 
The diversity of music played at the 
concert satisfied the tastes of all music 
lovers. 




Photo by Jeff Holland 




Photo by Jeff Holland 

Ziggy Marley's soulful melodies rock 
the Campus Pond. Marley successfully 
performed a concert on campus the 
previous year as well. 

The crowd at the Pond Concert listens 
to the Violent Femmes. The musicians' 
performances helped the crowd forget 
the stricter security policies, such as 
the restriction of frisbees, at the 
concert. 



Photo by Jeff Holland 



Et Cetera/ 259 




A woman falls asleep by the Campus 
Pond while reading a book. The lush 
green grass and cool breezes that drift- 
ed around the pond lured many stu- 
dents out of buildings to enjoy the 
warm spring days. 



Had To Be 
There To 
Appreciate 
The Beauty 
The Campus 
Had To Offer 




Photo by Melissa Reder 
A bumble bee prepares to pollinate 
some lilacs by the Mettawampe statue 
on the north side of the Campus Pond. 
If not for this act of nature, students 
would be unable to enjoy the beautiful 
sights and sweet smells of the campus 
in May. 



TiirffllMhl 
Photo by Jeff Holland 
A weeping willow allowed photogra- 
pher Jeff Holland to show us this artis- 
tic view of the Tower Library. The cam- 
pus underwent a lot of landscaping 
when spring came along so parents 
would appreciate the campus as much 
as students did. 



260/ Et Cetera 





Warmth Is 
Welcome 



It didn't have to be March 20 
for students to start celebrating 
spring at CIMass. All students 
needed were warm weather and 
bright clothes to create a 
spring-like atmosphere. Even 
when temperatures dropped af- 
ter a warm spell, some stu- 
dents refused to wear their win- 
ter clothes again. 

When warm weather won the 
final battle against cold, stu- 



dents wouldn't be kept indoors. 
Jugglers came out to entertain 
students while they absorbed 
the sun's rays. The scent of 
suntan lotion contended with 
scents that the flowers around 
campus gave off. 

No matter where they were, 

the aromatic scent of flowers 

would remind students of the 

Springtime beauty at aMass.Q 

by Mary Sbuttoni 





T.wKmtSKm^^^^^^^^ 




. . - i^^ 




"^-.Mi 


b^ % J 


\:i 


Wc ^ 


">)rH|K^ ' ■ 




" y' ""^^^f • 


-v. 



Photo by Paul Agnew 

Joyce Stephansky, a trumpet player in 
the Marching Band, is caught tailing a 
breath before her performance. This 
brealf from the strictness of routine re- 
minds us that we're only human, and 
proud of it! 

A woman looks through a course cata- 
log to select her classes for the next 
fall. Many students compromised with 
themselves by taking their work out- 
side to enjoy a nice day. 



Photo by Mason RIvltn 



Et Cetera/261 i 




Had To Be 
There To Feel 
The Excitement 
That Arrived 
With The 
Spring Thaw. 



Students Get Happy 



Spring's arrival in Amherst 
was, as usual, a joyous occa- 
sion. Gone were the thousands 
of shivering bodies wrapped in 
ski jackets and wool coats that 
made everyone look heavy and 
shapeless. Gone were the eyes 
that constantly focused on the 
ground, trying to avoid the in- 
visible patches of ice on the 
pathways of the campus, espe- 
cially by Herter Hall. 

Suddenly, there were smiling 
faces on campus. The lucky 



students who visited a sun- 
shiny place during Spring 
Break were the first to bare 
their arms and legs, with the 
sole intention of maintaining 
the tan begun in the tropics, of 
course. 

Others may have waited to 
don the official garb of sum- 
mer, but everyone felt the tin- 
gling, energizing warmth of 
spring. 

by Marguerite Paolino 




Photo by Melissa Raeder 

A woman is interrupted from her thoughts 
by the Campus Pond. Many people found 
the wind rippling the water and rustling the 
grass relaxing after classes. 



Some students take a moment from 
the Senior KickOff Bash held in the 
Campus Center to pose for a picture. 
The Alumni Office was responsible for 
many events such as the Senior Bash 
and Senior Picnic, letting graduating 
students know that they would not be 
forgotten. 








Photo by Paul Agnew 

A man plucks the strings of his guitar 
on the lawn by the Campus Pond. Jug- 
glers, musicians, frisbee players and 
hacky sackers could always be found 
there to entertain interested students. 



262/ Et Cetera 





Photo by Jeff Holland 



Photographer Jeff Holland saw a 
unique perspective of a hot air balloon. 
IBM brought the balloon to campus in 
an effort to promote computer sales 




Chris October, senior Civil Engineering this ptioto session, October thougiit tiie 

major, makes his exit from the Hatch University was too large for him to ap- 

after having several pictures taken of pear in the yearbook, 
him by Norm Benrjmo. Before leaving 



Et Cetera/263 




Had To Be 
There To 
Witness The 
Joy Of 
Graduating 




Jeff Qlassman (second from left), Scott 
Leibowitz (middle with glasses) and 
their fellow Alpha Epsilon Pi brothers 
congratulate each other. Regardless of 



Photo by Eric Goldman 

the size of the graduating class and the 
different schools and colleges within 
the University, friends found a way to 
meet during Commencement. 



264/Graduation 




Changes 
Begin 



Champagne bottles sprayed 
fizz and foam; confetti floated 
in tfie breeze; graduation caps 
soared across Warren 
McGuirck Alumni Stadium. 
The sun was shining and the 
OMass Class of 1990 was cele- 
brating the end of four years of 
college — and facing the begin- 
ning of an entirely new way of 
life. 

Amid the commotion of the 
crowd, some quiet, reflective 
thoughts surfaced in the minds 
of the grads. Cindy Ostrowski, 
a grad from Northampton, re- 
membered when students 
came together to fight against 
budget cuts and changes in the 
alcohol policy. But the rivalry 
between the Schools when 
Chancellor Joseph Duffy be- 
stowed the degrees upon the 
grads reminded her of the sepa- 
ration between groups of peo- 
ple. "OMass can be so unified, 
but at the same time so divid- 
ed," she said. 

Paul Agnew of Braintree, MA 
realized that his friends were all 
leaving the area and that even 
he was uncertain of his future. 

"It's the first time since I was 
about 3 that 1 don't know where 
I'll be in September. 

"I'm going to miss the peo- 
ple I lived with," he said. "It's 
hard to realize that that's not 
going to be there anymore. 
We'll stay in touch, but the fact 
that we all lived in one place for 
two years was what brought us 
together. Now, we'll have to 
make an adjustment." Q 

by Marguerite Paolino 



Several friends gather under maple 
tree branches to make plans for the 
future. Like maple tree leaves, they 
may grow in opposite directions. Yet, 
their roots will always be at UMass. 



Photo by Clayton Jones 



.^y***L.fw,■.~v -.i^v . .^w-s?^^ 



Graduation/265 




Had To Be 
There To 
Share The 
Enthusiasm Of 
The Graduates 



Two students congratulate each 
other on their achievements. They 
were officially University of Massa- 
chusetts Alumni. 




'•J*,'.,- J, — T~"T^ "■ — -■ «i/r- ' ' * " "« ^' -^-7 



*'^,rxmXl 




Ptioto by Clayton Jones 



Photo by Clayton Jones 



Two friends decide they should make 
the most of graduation and catch some 
rays. The sun shined on graduation de- 
spite a forecast of rain. 

Why use your own camera when a 
yearbook photographer will take a pic- 
ture for you? Many students, such as 
these, were eager to get photographed 
since graduation was their last chance 
to appear in the yearbook. 




266/ Graduation 



Photo by Clayton Jones 




Photo by Clayton Jones 



Poetic Or Chaotic? 



"Last year's graduation 
didn't seem very sincere," said 
Susan Goode, senior from Mel- 
rose, MA. "It was like they 
were saying, 'Here's another 
4,000 students graduating — 
let's give them a little ceremo- 
ny and send them on their 
way.'" 

Doug Miller of Marlboro, MA 
felt that 1990 was no different. 
"The lack of intimacy made 
the occasion nothing more than 
a giant free-for-all." 

Susan, however, enjoyed the 
May 27 Commencement. "This 
year it seemed much more sin- 
cere," she said. "The speeches 



were uplifting, and it was more 
of a celebration. They talked 
about the real world, not about 
things that would scare us. By 
talking about Eastern Europe, 
they created an uplifting 
feeling." 

Susan and Doug agreed that 
the ceremony was a little out of 
control. 

"If the University wanted it 
to be a solemn occasion," said 
Doug, "they should have made 
it more personal, instead of 
having people sit there like it 
was a rock concert." t^ 

by Marguerite Paolino 




What graduation ceremony is complete 
without confetti and roses? Students 
could finally enjoy a celebration with- 
out worrying about classes on Monday. 



Photo by Clayton Jones 

Two friends embrace during com- 
mencement. No matter how many 
miles apart or how often they l^ept in 
touch, friends from college would stay 
close to their hearts. 



Graduation/267 




Had To Be 
There To Feel 
The 

Anticipation 
And 

Excitement Of 
The Class Of 
1990 




268/Graduation 



These studpnts were one up on 
yearbook photographers. They 
could watch their video tape of 
graduation and remember exactly 
what they said and did rather than 
reflect on a moment. 



Photo by Clayton Jones 
This student pasted memoramementos 
of her senior year on her graduation 
cap. By writing messages on their 
caps, bringing pets to the ceremony or 
carrying unique balloons, students 
didn't have to blend into the crowd at 
graduation. 



Ceremony 
Flows 



Despite the size of the event, 
many graduates felt that the 
University had done an admira- 
ble job organizing Commence- 
ment '90. Paul Agnew, a grad 
from Braintree, thought that 
the ceremony would feel a lot 
longer than it actually was. 
"There were more speakers 
than I expected, but they kept 
them moving right along. The 
awarding of the honorary de- 
grees was the only part that 
slowed things down." 

Others in the front rows of 
the field noticed the change in 
pace as well. "By the time Duf- 
fy got down to the last few peo- 
ple, we were saying the investi- 
ture speech along with him, 
wondering when it would be 
our turn." Pj 

by Marguerite Paolino 



Four students take a moment to look 
back on their college experiences to- 
gether. Despite their joy in graduating, 
many students wondered "What do I do 
now?!" 



Photo by Eric Goldman 




Photo by Clayton Jones 



Photo by Eric Goldman 





Photo by Clayton Jones 
These students are proud to be gradu- Three students congratulate each oth- 
ates of the University of Massachu- er. There were feelings of camaraderie 
setts. Their years of hard work will between friends, as well as strangers, 
soon pay off. on graduation day. 

Michelle Toth, student speaker, ad- 
dresses her speech to fellow graduates. 
Toth's speech was selected over many 
due to it's content and her public 
speaking abilities. 



Graduation/269 




Had To Be 
There To 
Experience 
The Range Of 
Emotion — It 
Was As Vast 
As Number Of 
Graduates! 



Grads Celebrate! 



"I was touched that they in- 
vited 5,000 of my closest 
friends to graduate with me," 
joked Howard Dreyfus, a gradu- 
ating journalism major. 

There was constant activity 
at the GMass Commencement. 
Relatives ran onto the field to 
take photos of their graduates, 
grads stood up and cheered, 
some went from row to row tak- 
ing pictures. Each School tried 
to outdo the cheers and shouts 
of the ones before it as Chancel- 
lor Duffy awarded the degrees. 
"One of the best parts was 
when the engineers went in- 
sane. They worked hard and it 
was well-deserved. But the 
monitors started telling them to 
sit down! It was our graduation. 
Maybe if they had gotten some- 
one or did something that relat- 
ed more to us it would have felt 



more like our own. They tried 
to make it so formal, but there 
are just too many people. 
We're not Harvard. We can't 
pretend to be." 

Paul Agnew, a senior history 
major, found that with such a 
crowd things did not necessar- 
ily happen according to plan. "1 
was surprised that I saw so 
many people that I hadn't seen 
for 2 or 3 years when 1 saw so 
few people 1 had actually 
planned to see." 

As Howard pointed out, "It's 
one of those days where you 
see everyone you know and 
whether you like them or not, 
you smile, shake hands and 
congratulate one another. I had 
a great time!" dH| 

by — Marguerite Paolino 




This student looks pleased to have her 
picture taken for the yearbook. Being rec- 
ognized as individuals made students ap- 
preciate their college experiences even 
more. 




Photo by Clayton Jones 

A student reflects on his years at 
GMass while he is reflected in his bal- 
loon. Memories of their years at ClMass 
are part of what made graduation so 
special for students. 



Two students wave good-bye to yearbook 
photographer, Eric Goldman. They didn't 
realize they were saying good-bye to the 
thousands of people who glance at the 
1990 Index as well. 



Photo by Eric Goldman 



This photograph speaks for itself. Con- 
gratulations and best wishes to the 
graduated Class of 19901 



r«d 




Two students say good-bye at the end 
of the graduation cerennony. Regard- 
less of what their futures hold, their 
days at tIMass will never be forgotten. 

A senior congratulates himself on grad- 
uating and being able to spot his family 
in the stands. Every aisle was filled 
with proud family and friends who trav- 
elled to show their support for the grad- 
uates. 









t-r^-:^ 




Graduation/271 



tV'^J 



% i: 






ir'^^l 



vP 



'V 




Eric Goldman and Jeff Holland take a 
break from photographing seniors on 
top of the entrance to McGuirck Alum- 
ni Stadium during the graduation cere- 
mony. Many seniors were eager to 
have their pictures taken since this was 
their last chance to appear in the year- 
book. 



Photo by Norman Benrimo 



272/ Index Staff 




The 1990 Index staff: 1. Eric Schlossberg; 2. Elizabeth Lord; 3. Berret 
Brooker; 4. Linda Gallagher; 5. Sara-Jane Leavitt; 6. Karen Willard; 7. 
Mary Sbuttoni; 8. Lauren Green; 9. Lori Madeloff; 10. Dan Sullivan; 11. 
Kristin Bruno; 12. Mason Rivlin; 13. Donna Hardwick; 14. Bob Surabian; 
15. Melissa Reder; 16. Marguerite Paolino; 17. David Sawan; 18. Russell 
Kirshy; 19. Clayton Patterson Jones; 20. Lisa Nalewak; 21. Trebor 
Carey; 22. Mary Dukakis; 23. Paul Drago; 24. Sharon Pratt; 25. Paul 
Agnew; 26. Jeffrey Holland. Not shown: Amy Lord, Stefa Kopystians- 
kyj, Linda Rowland, Barbara Goldstein, Christine Redgate, Lori Markoff. 



1990 Index Staff 



Mary Sbuttoni, Editor In Ciiief 
Kristin Bruno, Managing Editor 
Marguerite Paolino, Copy Editor 



Advisor 



Student Life 



Marketing 



Dario Politella 



Office Manager 

Christine Redgate 



Photographers 

Lisa Nalewak, Fall, Spring Photo Editor 

Jeff Holland, Summer Photo Editor 

Paul Agnew, Assistant Photo Editor 

Berret Brooker 

Eric Goldman 

Clayton Jones 

Russel Kirshy 

Sara-Jane Leavitt 

Melissa Reder 

Mason Rivlin 

David Sawan 



Elizabeth Lord, Editor 
Lori Markoff 



Athletics 

* 

Kristin Bruno, Editor 

Linda Gallagher 

Dan Sullivan 



Organizations 

Amy Lord, Editor 

Stefa Kopystianskyj, Assistant Editor 

Sharon Pratt, Assistant Editor 

Linda Rowland 



Seniors 



Barbara Goldstein 



Trebor Carey 
Mary Dukakis 
Lauren Green 
Lori Madeloff 
Karen Willard 



Contributors 

Charles Abel 

Drew Aquilina 

Ben Barnhart 

Jeanne Bolduc 

Jim Clark 
Kristen Darling 
Sarah DeMaster 

Cedra Eaton 

Evelise Ribeiro 

Joel Solomon 

Scott D. Thompson 

Ana Tolentino Voglie 



Thanks to Dario Politella for his inspirational ideas; Leslie Reisman; Paul Drago; Donna Hardwick; Nancy Gunther; Lori Blasioli; 
Marianne Turley; Bob Surabian; Wayne Kossman; Eric Schlossberg; Felice Cohen; Karen Renaud; Bill Caroll; Carol Sendrowski; 
Glenn LaChapelle; Jennifer McDonough; Joe Mulligan; Maria Sacchetti; Chris Muther; Lauren McDade; Rick and Debbie from 
Jostens; Judy Gagnon; Every one who helped us in SAO; Charlie Lehane, Rick the carpenter and the rest of the people in Building 
Operations; the Collegian for allowing us to reprint articles by Jim Clark and Sarah DeMaster; Clayton's brother, Pete; 
Organizations that provided us with stories, photographs or passes; Sports Information; President Knapp; Chancellor Duffey; 
Cindy Snyder; Dario Politella's journalism class; The University's schools and colleges that provided us with information; Tony 
Smithson and his staff at Indiana State University; Sharon Waldman for the free publicity; Everyone's Mom's and Dad's. 



Index Staff/273 



A Print Shop employee photocopies a 
flyer. University organizations relied on 
the campus' copy services to advertise 
themselves. 

Flyers clutter a billboard in the Campus 
Center. Unless organizations could 
think of eye-catching flyers, their work 
could go unseen. 




Photo by Mason Rivlin 

Erik Liljegren cashiers at the Hatch. 
The Hatch often advertised events by 
placing flyers on tables. 




274/ Advertisements 



Advertisements 



-'''i^^. 




Advertisements 

This book wouldn't be in your liands 
without advertisements. Advertisements 
encouraged seniors to buy yearbooks. Those 
sales, in addition to messages to seniors and 
advertisements from businesses, raised the 
money needed to publish this yearbook. 
Thank you for your support. Q 



Advertisements/275 



Sara Robin DeSimone 



W're so proud of you. Congratulations. You are very special. 
Love, hugs & kisses, Mom, Dad and Maria 



Stephen Greene 



Congratulations! We knew you could do it. Have a good day 
always and in all ways. 

Love from Dad 



Randi M. Dubno 



We are so proud of your success and accomplishments at 
GMass! 

Love ■ Mom, Dad, Gayle and Melissa 



Congratulations Charlene Case 

So happy you're graduating. We are out of money. 

Love, Dad, Mom, Kim, Skip and Jane 

Renee Z. 



Report to work in the morning . . . the limo will pick you up! 
Well done! 

Love, Mom-Dad 



Congratulations Kelly 



"It's been a long four years!" You are very special and I'm 
proud of you. 

Love, Rick 



Congratulations Andy Steinberg! 

You are special to me and I am proud of you! 

Love, Mom 





Photo by David Sawan 

The Not Ready for Bedtime players perform a skit in a Southwest lounge. The players 
humorously educated students on practicing safe sex. 







Photo by Robert Giilis 
Southwest is seen from a different perspective in this photograph. Maybe the campus 
would have been even more interesting if the blue prints were viewed from a different 
angle. 




Photo by Paul Agnew 
Two women sell roses on the concourse of the Campus Center. Working a table on the 
concourse gave students a sense of the responsibilities of owning their own business. 



276/ Ads For Grads 



Congrats Kat 



Four and out. Never a doubt. 

Love, Mom, Dad, TJ, Skittles and the S. 
Queen, Patricia M. 



Congratulations Brian Cashman 



We're proud of your achievements! To a 
bright future. 

Love you dearly. Mom and Len 



ISPOYTC 



Miami, Cape Cod, Concord, ILJARA, Truff, 
Bite, Surgery, LSAT, Police! Find TC 
Honda. 

We love u. Mom, Dad and III 



Lab-curied 



Frosted, layered or spiked, you're a cut 
above — no teasing — Congrats. 



Love, Mom & Dad 



Congratulations 



You made it. We love and are proud of you. 
Mom, Dad and Lynn 



Congratulations 



We are proud. 

Love you always. Mom, Dad, Lynne, Scott, 
Lorrie and Warren 



Valerie Jean 



"You done good." We're very proud of 
you. 



Love, Mom & Dad 



Sylvan Survival 



Run w/Jim '86 — Daytona '89 & 90 — 
Brittany/Southwood ghetto — BKO bros. 
/Gilreath/SC-studio — Fantasyland 



Raissa 



It's potato salad. 

Love, Shannon 



Damon 



Congratulations! I wish you all the best in 
the future. May we be together for many 
months to come. 



I love you, AM 



Debbie, Jodi, Mary, Rhonda, Beatrice 



Here's to a great future and a lasting friend- 
ship. 

Alanna 



Craig Patterson 



These past four years have been special 
because of you. 

I love you always, Vivian 



Happy Graduation, Joanna Carp 



We love you and we're so very proud of 
you. 



Love, Mom and Dad 



Congratulations Daddy! 



We are very proud of you and we love you 
with all our heart. 



Love, Sean, Taylor and Kay 



We are proud Lynne 



One more major step completed in Life's 
master plan. 

Love, Dad, Mom, Harmony & Melissa 



Dawn E. Powers 



Love and congratulations from Mom, Dad 
and Mark. 

We are so proud!!! 



Congratulations Pidge 



We love you. 

Mam, Dad, Al, Mike, Cathleen, Miss Dog, 
Mike and Jim Guinea 



Scott Aron 



A grad on the 4-year plan. Congratulations! 
You're special and we're so proud! 

Love, Mom, Dad and Cara 



Ads For Grads/277 



Congratulations Hope 



We're so proud of all you've accomplished. 

Love, Mom, Dad, Sharyn, Bubba, Zaida, 
Gigi 



Congratulations Rlionda 



You are very special to us and we are so 
proud of your success. 

Love, Mom, Dad and Debl 



Congratulations Lisa Toland! 



The whole family is very proud of your 
success and accomplishments at GMA. 

Love, Mom and Dad plus 7 



Congratulations Carrie Ann Marceau 

We are very proud of you. #1 daughter. 
Love, Mom and Dad, Michele and Rick 

Congratulations Michael Punk! 



We are very proud of your accomplish- 
ments. 

Love and kisses. Mom & Dad Ponte 



To our special Robs 



Congratulations David! 



We love you!! Your proud Mom and Dad. 
We were blessed. 



We are so proud of you and your success 
at UMass. 

Love always, Mom, Dad and Allison 



Congratulations Lisa Kittler 

We are proud of you. 

Love, Mom and Dad 

Tim Fournier 



May your aim of personal achievement bt 
high and God always be your co-pilot. 

Love, Mom-Dad 



Congratulations Michael Velsmid 

Reach for the stars. 

Love, Dad and Snoopy 

Adam R. Gondelman 



Congratulations. We knew you could do it. 
We're super proud of you. 

Mom, Dad, Dana, Jay, Samson. 



Congrats Cappy 



Love ya, Babe. 

Your first southern family, Nana, Beth, Ka- 
tie and Jonna 



Congradulations Veronica Joy 

We are very proud of you. 

Love, Mom, Dad, Teddy, Joey 

Congratulations, Chris Abells 



sisxxaasasaiiiat 



But are you sure Egypt is ready for you? 
Love from your proud Mom & Dad 

Congratulations Noelle 

We are so proud of you. 

Love, Mom and Dad 

Congratulations John Bennett, Jr. 



We are very proud of you. 
Love, Mom, Dad, Jeff and Jason 

Good bye UMass 



Hello Columbia. We are very proud of you. 
Love you. Mom, Dad, Mike, Jackie, Chris, 
Amy. 

Be all you can be. 



Kevin 



Congratulations on reaching this goal. 
You've made us proud. 

Love, Mom, Dad, Chris and Paul 



278/ Ads For Grads 




Nancy 



As a young lady you have exceeded our expectations. We are 
proud of and love you. 

Mom & Pop 



Congratulations Diana! 

We are so proud of you. You are special and we love you. 
Mom, Dad, Susan, Ta, Mike, Brandi 

Michele Santoro 



We congratulate our "shining star" with pride and joy. Keep 
moving those rubber tree plants! 

Love, Mom, Dad and Tommy 



Gail 



Photo by Jim Butler 
A skateboarder makes his way down a patin by Franklin Dining Connmons. Skateboarders 
were one of the obstacles students had to be aware of when walking around campus. 



Maintain your love of life and people. Success and happiness 
will follow. 

Love, Mom, Dad, Leo, Gary, Elaine and kids 



Congratulations Bruce! 

We're very proud of you! 

Love, Mom, Tom and Rufus! 

Dear Cindi-pie 



May you continue your beautiful blossoming as you pursue the 
future. 

With pride and love. Mom 



Yippy Denise Raissa Tkachuk!! 

You have made it! Good luck for your future! 

Love, Mom, Dad & Deanna 



Ads For Grads/279 



Vince Digilio 



Go show the world what you are made of. Much success in 
your endeavors. 

Love, Mom and Dad 



Congratulations Joy 

We are proud of your accomplishments. 

Love, Mom, Dad and Howie 

Congratulations Rose Dinoia! 



You have done our family proud! 
Love and blessings, Mom, Dad, Lot, Stef and Dom 



Rob Cvik, Congratulations! 



God guide you to great success. Our "Love" and "Pride" go 
with you. 

Mom and Dad 



Congratulations Paul 



You have always made us proud of you and we love you very 
much. 

Love, Mom, Dad and Mike 



Congratulations Michelle 

i OTMWw . niM» mum' I MuwwMm><M« aaBmjMK<BgM mwBM»wa M W i w i. a ti iw awi kUUMUtfwt)MjuiU ] m il m tt tmm i mmmn 

The world is your oyster! Go for it! 

Love and kisses, Mom, Dad and Adam 

Tim Hebert 

Congratulations! We are so proud of you!!! 

Love, Mom, Dad, Jim and Kim 




Photo by Sara-Jane Lewitt 
Two men are interrupted from their sfiowers by a flashbulb. While living in the dorms, the 
bathroom was one of the best places to meet people. 




Photo by Tara Corzoran 
Qabe Patt and Rachael Coen wait for their Spanish 1 10 class in Bartlett to begin. Having a 
friend in class made the day go by faster. 




Photo by Sara-Jane Lewitt 
Jim Olsen eats his rice in Franklin Dining Commons. Eating in the DC was more 
pleasurable with friends. 



280/ Ads For Grads 



Congratulations Marc Colletti 



There is always a light at the end of the 
tunnel. 



Love, Mom, Dad, Olga 



Evan Michaels 



Congratulations. We are very proud of you. 
Love, Mom, Dad and Meredith 



J.J. Duval 



Embrace your rainbow. Follow your star 
— Pip would have been as pleased as we 
are! 



Your loving family 



Congratulations Lisa Beth! 

Our bunny rabbit! May God bless you. 
Love, Mom, Dad, John, Carolee 

Congratulations Janice! 



We love you and are so proud. God bless 
you always. 

Love, Mom, Dad, Lorraine and Nana 



To Meryl Newman 

Our graduate who is always in the pink. 
Mom, Dad, Shelly and Lauren 



Congratulations Mark F. Seghezzi 

We are sooooo proud of you. 
Love ya! Mom, Dad and all the family 

Congratulations Susan Darragh 



What a Girl! 



Luv, MM 



Laurel, Congratulations! 



Super job, honor student. Best wishes for 
your future. 

Love, Mom, Dad, Kim, Jen & Pat 



Way to go, Jennifer McNab! 



We're so proud of you! 

Love, Mom, SP, Grandma, SW, JW, RBW 
and RSW 



Congratulations llene 

You are special and we are proud of you! 
Love, Mom, Dad, Jason and Meredith 

We did it. Jack! 



May all your dreams continue to come 
true. All my love. 

Your Mom, Imogene 



Congratulations Dan 



Rob Lowe has nothing on you, or does he? 
Made any videos lately? 

Love, The Bart Crew 



To our Michelle 



We are all happy for you on this special 
day. 

Love, Mom, Torie, Bif, Tommie and Oncle 
Chris 



Congratulations Michelle Tracy Levy 

You are our very special 4 star grad. 
Love, Mom, Dad, Scott and Sharyn 

Congratulations Karen 



Your entire family thinks you are terrific! 



Good luck Class '90 



Congratulations Susan Streeton 

Loads of love and hugs. Mom, Dad and all 
of the Streeton clan 



Congratulations Laura Shiepe 

You did it! We are proud of you! 

Love, Dad, Mum and Jason 



Ads For Grads/281 



Congratulations Erik 



The "Big E" Have a happy, healthy future. 
Love, Mom, Dad and your loving family 



Melissa 



The desire to succeed was always there. 
We are proud of you. Congratulations. 



Love, Mom and Dad 



Richard S. Healey 



Congratulations. Wish you continued suc- 
cess. 

Love, Dad and Carol 



Jennifer D. Jordan 



God loves you and we do, too. The world is 
yours — go for it. 

Mom, Dad and Matt 



Congratulations, Jr. 



You've done real good. We are all so proud 
of you. 

Love, Mom, Dad and Dan 



Congratulations, Patrick McGonagle 



We're very proud and happy for you. 

Love, Ma, Dad, Shelley, Michael and Ste- 
phen, too! 



Congratulations Stephanie Abela 



Your family is very proud of your accom- 
plishment. 

Love, Mom, Dad, Mike and John 



Congratulations Kevin Noel Sharpe 



You made it. We love you. 

Mom and all your brothers and sisters and 
in-laws 



Congratulations Jeanne Marie 



on a job well done. You are extra special to 
all of us. 

Love, Mom, Dad and family 



Congratulations Kerr! A. Stimpson 

We love you and are very proud of you. 
Love, Mom and Ed 

Congratulations Andrea Watson 

We love you and we are so proud of you. 
Love, Mom, Nanette, Danielle 

Congratulations Amy Resnick 

You will be a wonderful teacher. 

Love, Mom, Dad and Rich 



Lyn M. Albert 



We are proud! We love you! We wish you 
happiness! 

Love, Mom, Dad, Michael 



Congratulations . . . "Brooksie' 



We are so very proud of you, Jeff. Much 
success in your future. 

Love, Mom, Dad and Beth 



Congratulations Renee! 

We love you! 
Mom, Dad, Deborah, Sam 

Congradulations iviichael Cunningham 

You are special. We are proud of you. 

Love, Mom, Tom, Grandma, Deanne, Kate, 
Jim 

Great job, Josee! 

You must be proud. We sure are! 

All our love from Dad, Mom, Patrick in 
Vermont 

Congratulations Stephen ivianzelli 

We are all very proud of you! 

Love, Mom, Dad, Mark and Lisa 



282/ Ads For Grads 




Congratulations Judy Pizam 



We are proud of you. 

Mom and Dad 



Photo by Jeff Holland 
^ dog stops on the steps of the Student Onion. Many students who had pets brought them 
to campus each day. 



Lori Meltzer! 



Mom is ecstatic. Daddy is, too. In fact, your whole family's 
delighted with you. 

Congratulations! 



Congratulations Suzy! 



'You done good" God bless you always 

Love, Mom, Dad, John, Jen, Jo 



Congratulations Linda Conley 



You can't believe how proud we are of you. 

Love, Mom, Dad, Mike, Kelly, Shelly and Cindy 

Susan Jean Bort 



Congratulations to someone special. We are proud of your 
accomplishment. 

Love, Mom-Dad-David 



Csilla! 



Buszkek vagyunk rad! Wir sind stolz aut dich! We're proud of 



you! 



Love, Mom, Dad, Miki 



Hats off to Judd Zebersky 



You are A-1 in our book. 

Love, Mom and Bob 



Ads For arads/283 



Congratulations Robin Weidler 



You are the best. We love you and are so proud. 

Mom, Dad, Klera and Robert 



Congratulations Diane! 



You are our sunshine. We love you. 

Mommy, Daddy and Frank 

Congratulations Dani 



Super job by a super girl. We are very proud of you. 

Love, Mom, Dad, Doug and Suzi 

Congratulations Lauren Levine! 



You have always been #1 in our book! We are very proud of 
you. 

Love, Mom and Dad 



Congratulations Kimmie! 



We love you and are very proud! 

Love, Mom, Rick and the whole family 

Congratulations Noreen Mahoney! 



Thanks for sticking with me kid! 

Love, Mom, Dad, Mary Ann and Dan 

Auguri Cristina! 



Sei stata bravissima. 
Bacioni da, Mamma, Papa, Gian and David 

Congratulations Ned and Class of 1990! 

Success to you in the future. 

Love, Mom, Dad and Paige 




Photo by Tammi Gold 
Some women do aerobic exercises on the 19tli floor of Washington. Many resident halls 
held aerobics classes due to their popularity. 




Photo by Meredith Zola 
Stephanie Kepke and Jon Cohen share a chair. Most students depended on family to 
provide furniture for off-campus housing. 




Photo by Karen Skipper 
Humans andanimals could relax during the Central Spring Fling. No pets were allowed on 
the grass without proper attire, however. 



284/Ads For Grads 



KJ 



We're proud of your achievements! We 
wish you much success throughout your 
life. 

Our love, Mom, Dad and Gregg 



Congratulations David Huntley, Jr. 

We are proud of you. 
_ove, Mom, Dad, Brian and Steve 

Hooray for you Michael Edward 



We are very proud of you. We love you. 
Congratulations. 

Mom, Dad and Jason 



Cheryl Louise, Congratulations! 

You are special and we are proud of you! 
Love, Lou, Dee and Prammie 

Stephanie Davis 



\We are so proud of your accomplishments. 
/Always pursue your dreams. 

Love, Mom, Dad and Elizabeth 



Congratulations AnneMarie 



A/e knew you would succeed! We love you 
- Lots!! 



Mom, Dad, Kathy and Rich 



Jodi, Congradulations! 



You have taken a giant step towards your 
goals. You're our world class puppie. 



Love, Mom and Dad 



Congratulations Kyle Carnegie 



We are so very proud of your success. 
Enjoy the good life. 

Love, Mom and Dad 



Way to go, Pam! 
Love, Mom and Dad 

Congratulations Cindy Moncarz 

We love you and are very proud. 

Mom, Dad, Rochelle, Joey 

Rick Cadiz 



Congratulations. We are proud to be your 
family! We love you. 

Mom, Dad and Rob 



Congratulations Jeff Chason 

We are very proud of you and we love you. 
Mom, Dad and Kevin 



Congratulations Deborah Seligman 

You are special and we are proud of you. 
Love, Mom, Dad, Naomi and Melissa 

Dear Amy 



Elizabeth, Tracy and I are very proud of 
you. 

Love, Mom 



Congratulations Keith Kowalczyk! 



We are very proud of you and your accom- 
plishments. 

Love, Mom, Dad and Tracy 



Congratulations Dano 



You're the best. We are sooooo proud of 
you. 

Love, Mom, Tracy, Da, Gram, Tip and Giz 



Congratulations Helaine 



You've made us proud! A college grad with 
a great job! 

Love, Mom, Dad and Larry 



Congratulations Caryn Alexa 



We are proud and happy. Keep it up. 
Love, Dad, Renee and Mary 



Ads For Grads/285 



Congratulations Cassandra! 



We are very proud of you. Follow your 
dreams. 

Love, Mom, Dad, Craig, Chris and Carrie 



Congratulations Michelle Bilodeau 



I always knew you could do it. You are 
very special. 



Love, Mom and Paul 



Felicitations Eric 



Meilleurs voeux de succes. 
Papa, Maman, Robyn, Guy, Helene et John 

To Damon "Q" 



A very special son. You make us proud! 
Mazeltov and Bravo. Success always. 

Love, Mom and Dad 



Congratulations Chris Hart 



We are very proud of your accomplish- 
ments. Good luck in grad school. 

Love, Mom, Dad, Jen 



Joelle 



Congratulations. You will always be on our 
list. 

Dean, Dad, Mom, Chris 



16/ Ads For Grads 



Congratulations Sina Pietrosanto 

We are very proud of you. 
Love, Mom, Dad, Jim and Stephanie 

Congratulations Amy Lord! 



We're very proud of all your success and 
accomplishments. 

Love, Mom, Dad and Beth 



Steven Blaustein 



Congratulations! We're very proud of you. 
Good luck in law school! 

Love, Mom, Dad and Craig 



Joanne Joy! 



Knew you would do well and love you very 
much. Hurry home! 



Love, Mom and Daddy 



Congratulations Sue Peltier! 



Honors Grad '90! We're so proud of your 
success! 

Love, Mom and John 



Congratulations Gail 



We are proud and love you. We hope all 
your dreams come true. 

Mom, Dad, John, Leah and Donna Gianou- 
lis 



Melissa Holt 



We are very proud of you. We know you 
will make a great teacher. 

Love, Dad, Mom and Shannon 



Congratulations Kelly Connors 

We are very proud. 
Love ya. Mom, Dad, Christine and Barbara 

Congratulations Janine O'Leary 



We applaud special you on a job well dona! 
Love, Mom, Dad, Jim, Tim 

Congratulations Brenda Bickford! 

We are so proud of you. 

Love, Mom and Kevin 

Dear Lisa 



Congratulations. We are all very proud of 
you. God bless. 

Mom, Dad, Kim, Kel and Dan love you. 



Congratulations Kristin Olivero! 



We are so proud — God bless and good 
luck. 

Lots of love — Dad, Mom, Nicki and Bun- 
ny 




Congratulations Debby Classman 



Photo by Paul Agnew 

The Joker encourages GMass fans at a football game in the Alumni Stadium. The Joker 
knew how much the fans' enthusiasm meant to the players. 



We are very proud of you and your fine accomplishments. 

Love, Mom and Dad 



Marguerite Paolino 



Congratulations and good luck on another milestone! 

Love, Mom, Dad, Will and Emily 



Congratulations Sue Goodrich 



You did it!! We are proud of you. 

Love, Mom-Dad-Bina 



Congratulations Nimesh and Ashish 



We are so proud of your success and accomplishments at 
(JMass. 

Love, Mom and Dad 



Congratulations Dennis and Russell 



We love you and we are so very proud of you. 

Mom, Dad and Wade 

Congradulations Chris! 



Good luck and God bless. 
Love, Nana, Aunt Virginia, John Joseph, Donald and Barney 

Congratulations Tim Metcalf 



We are all very proud of you and your accomplishments. 

Mom, Dad and Tricia 



Congradulations, our shining jewel, Julie Creighton 

We wish you success in your endeavors. 

Love, Mom and Dad 

Ads For Grads/287 



Congratulations Melissa Ann Siegel 



We are all so very proud of you. 

Mom, Dad, Allison and Jessica 

Congratulations Toots (aka Wendy Wilker) 

We are so proud and we love you! 

Mom and Dad 

Congratulations Alyssa Lingos 

You have so much to offer the world. 

Love, Mom, Dad, Debbie and Nicole 

Congratulations Nancy Sinclair 

You deserve it. We are so proud of you. 

Love, Mom, Dad, Donny and Jane 

Congratulations Leah 



We are proud of you. 

Love, Mom, Dad and Robin 

Congratulations Lisa 



We love you and are very proud of you. 

Love always and good luck. Mom and Dad 

Congratulations Gene Holmstead! 



We are proud of your engineering degree. 

Love, Dad, Mom and Karen 

Congratulations to Joel Acker 



We are so proud of you on this special day! We love you. 

Mom, Dad and Mike 




Photo by Lisa Nalewak 
Elissa Bloom, communications major, and Robert Bikash, finance major, chat during the 
Senior Bash in the Campus Center. Seniors were reminded that they made history while at 
(JMass. 




The Grad Tower stands tall. If one stood at a certain angle, the buildings at UMass could 
be overwhelming. 




Photo by David Sawan 
Nikki Gold, senior legal studies major, takes a break from studying to watch the Brady 
Bunch on TV. One of the advantages of living off-campus waS that there were fewer 
people to fight over a channel with. 



288/ Ads For Grads 



Kimbie-Boo-Boo 



Bear in mind it's beary important to be tiie 
best you can. We're proud of u. 

Love ya, Mom, Dad, Karen 



Congratulations Kenny "Quahog" 

You can't believe how proud we are of you! 
Mom, Dad, Bruce, Karen, Linda, Shawn 

Congratulations Annemarie E. Dunn! 

You are special. We are proud of you! 
Love, Mom, Dad, Christine and Laura 

Congratulations Diane Ferrara! 



A dream has come true. We love you very 
much. 

Mom and Dad 



Bob Silverstein 



(Congratulations! We're very proud of you. 
Love, Mother and Dad 

The Smiths 



are big time proud of our Karen M. Smith. 
We love you. Mom and Dad 

P.S. Done with style. Congrats. 



Congratulations Mike Mackey 

We are all very proud of you. 

Love, Dad, Mom and the family 

Congratulations Diane Gatto 

You are very special and we love you. 
Mom, Dad, Therese, Brandy 

Congratulations Paul Quinto! 



You are very special and deserve the best 
always. 

Love, Mom, Dad, Jaime 



Congratulations to Victor DiNardo! 



We are very proud of you! 

Love, Mom, Dad, Tina, Gram and Gram & 
Gramp 



Congratulations Renee A. Brown 



Thank you for making me so very proud. 
Good luck always. 

I love you, Mommie 



Congratulations Doreen Marriner! 

We love you and are very proud. 
Love, Dad, Mom and all your family 



To Brenda Newman 



Our graduate who is always a starr. 

Mom, Dad, Shelly and Lauren 

Happy Graduation 

Infrared poster girl. 
Love that smile, Mom and Dad 



Congratulations to the chicks in 2F and 
Mark 



Love, the Fitzgeralds 

Congratulations Raissa 

You're always a star in our eyes. 

Love, Mom and Dad 

Michael Hammer 



Congratulations to a special guy — now 
reach for the sky! 

Love-Mom-Michele-John 



Congratulations Danielle Wittikins 



May your future hold peace of mind and 
much joy. 

Love, Mom and Bruce 



Ads For Grads/289 



South Shore Hospital 

congratulates those students 

whose aspirations for excellence 

have led to this 
proud achievement. 

South Shore Hospital, 55 Fogg Road, South Weymouth, MA 02190, (617) 340-8796. 



^pM South Shore 
= = Hospital 

A NEW DIRECTION IN HEALTHCARE. 



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need a company that gives you 
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INVESTMENT 
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This pdsition ofTers intensive exposure to all 
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on your 

achievements and 

best wishes 

for success 

as you 

begin your 

nursing careers. 

Quincy Hospital 

Nursing 

Department 







THE 

MEDICAL 
CENTER OF 

CENTRAL 
MASSACHUSETTS 



HAHNEMANN 



281 Lincoln Street, Worcester, MA 01605 



HOLDEN 



Boy den Road, H olden, MA 01520 



MEMORIAL 



119 Belmont Street, Worcester, MA 01605 



Well-recognized in the Worcester Community 
area for patient care excellence, three unique 
providers have become "one" under the 
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From the small, personalized community 
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Ads/291 



TURNING A 

IMQUE VISION INTO 

A GREAT SITE. 



Boston Department of Healtti and Hospitals is in the 

process of turning a unique vision of thie future into 

ttie most progressive tiospital site in the area. 

As we begin this exciting era of growth and 

renovation, we are more enthusiastic than ever 

about maintaining - and surpassing our 

demonstrated level of excellence. 

Established in 1965, DH&H offers the most ambitious 
professionals a variety of sites to choose from: 

• Boston City Hospital 

A 469-bed acute care teaching facility with a Level 

I Trauma Center. Areas of care include Adult 

Emergency Pediatric Emergency, Surgical ICU, 

Ivledical ICU, CCU, PCU, NICU and Pedi ICU. 

Ivledicine, Surgery, Pediatrics, Labor and 

Delivery/GYN/lvlaternitY, Operating Room/Recovery 

Room, IV Team, Emergency Psychiatric Nursing, 

Geriatric Neuropsychology Evaluation, Continuing 

Care and Ambulatory Care. 

• l^attapan Hospital 

A 151-bed long-term Rehabilitation and Chronic 

Hospital offering rehabilitative services in Oncology, 

Respiratory Dysfunction and Gerontology. 

• Long Island Hospital 

A 193-bed chronic care facility providing long 

term care to the chronically ill patient with 

emphasis on therapeutic activity and Alzheimer's. 

The DH&H family also includes Community Heatth 

Services, a Sctiooi of Practical Nursing and 

Emergency Medical Services. 

if the site of your career lacks the vision that 

mal<es optimum challenge and progressiveness 

possible, it's time you joined our team! 

Our extensive list of Nurses' Benefits includes: 

Competitive salaries with shift differentials, 

13 paid holidays, 15 sick days, a minimum of 3 

weeks' vacation, choice of free HIvIO, free 

malpractice insurance, free parking. City of 

Boston Retirement Plan, Deferred Compensation, 

tuition reimbursement and a variety of 

educational opportunities including a formal two 

week orientation. 

Please contact Anne Piver, RN, Nurse Recruiter 

at (617) 534-5746 or send your resume to tier 

attention at Boston City Hospital, 818 Harrison 

Avenue, Boston, MA 02118. 

An equal opportunity/affirmative action employer 



BOSTON 

Department of Health 
and Hospitals 



^i^lpy^^lni 



^ 



DANA-FARBER 

CANCER INSTITUTE 

The Dana-Farber Cancer Institute is an independent, non- 
profit research! facility specializing in the comprehensive care of 
adult and pediatric cancer patients. Utilizing technical expertise 
in a patient and family oriented environment, nurses combine the 
best tradition of their profession with today's most sophisticated 
technology. 

New graduates are encouraged to apply for admission into the 
Institute's six month long GRADUATE NURSE INTERN- 
SHIP. The intern, working one to one with a preceptor for the 
duration of the program, focuses on the areas of: 



• Primary Nursing 

• Oncology Nursing 



• Clinical Research 

• Autonomy 
Nursing Judgement 



Registered Nurses are assigned to permanent shifts for a 3 or 4 
day workweek. In addition to the one-of-a-kind learning ex- 
perience this program offers, the entrants are eligible for the 
Institute's generous benefits program. 

For further information 

Call collect (617) 732-3501 

Or write: 

Recruiter for Nursing, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute 

44 Binney St., Boston, MA 02115 



Graduate Nurses Can 
Count On Us 



for a more dynamic head start 



r\t Hcilyoke Hospital, a 25()-bed, acute-care hospital in 
western Massachu.setts. you'll find a progressive environment. ..and 
a dynamic approacti reflected in our recently completed major 
reconstruction program. If you're a dedicated graduate nurse looking 
for a .setting that encourages real career growth, you're encouraged 
to count on us. 

Kull-time. part-time, and per diem positions are currently available 
o[i a variety of stiifts. Orientation can begin either the first or 
tliird Monday of each month from June through September. 

We offer a competitive starting salary and complete benefits, 
including: 

• $1,000 HIRING BONUS upon licensure; prorated for part- 
time employees 

• FULLY PAID medical, dental, life and long-term disability 
insurance 

• 15% NIGHT SHIFT DIFFERENTIAL 

• EVENING and WEEKEND DIFFERENTIAL 

• 100% TUITION REIMBURSEMENT for RN's pursuing BSN 
degree 

Please apply to: Employment Coordinator, Personnel Office, 
Holyoke Hospital, 575 Beech Street, Holyoke, MA 01040, 
(413) 534-2547. Kqual Opportunity Employer 



HOLYOKE HOSPITAL 



292/ Ads 





y\'s here. The day that 
used to look so far away. But 
that's the way the future is— 
you know it, it's the present. 

At l\^assachusetts General, we've been a step ahead 
of the future for a century and a half. And our staff— 
from health professionals and therapists to connputer 
programmers and secretaries— has the vision and the 
courage to keep us there. 

Come join us. And don't just meet the future... help us 
shape it. 

To learn more about career opportunifies afMGH, call 
Betty Lang at (617) 726-2209 or send your resume to 
Employment Services, Fruit St., Boston, MA 021I4. We are 

an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer 



Massachusetts 
General Hospital 



CONGRATULATIONS, CLASS OF '90 

If you're looking for a place 
to call your own . . . 




. . . consider 

FRANKLIN MEDICAL CENTER 

A place where you'll feel our 
commitment to nursing. 




164 HIGH STREET 

GREENFIELD, MA 01301 

(413) 772-0211 



Marcella Butler worked her 
way through college at Burger King. 




Today, she helps manage 60 people 
and a $1.4 million business. 



After receiving a degree in Business 
Administration, Marcella made her big move 
She decided to stay at Burger King 

"Up to that time," says Marcella. "Id 
been a crew member with flexible hours and 
plenty of time to study. Now, it was time to 
give all that business theory some practical 
application 

"What's my number one priority? That's 
simple. To be the best restaurant manager in 
the Burger King system Not an easy thing to 
accomplish, but hard work and deter- 
mination have always been my 
specialty," 

And at Burger King, giving 
people like Marcella the opportunity 
to expand their skills has always 
been our specialty. 

At Burger King, our restaurant 
managers are the pride and joy of our 



BURGER 

KING 



organization They are men and wt)mcn from 
all walks of life with one thing in common. 
The desire to excel, to be the best at what they 
do 

So we do our best to help rhem. We give 
them the sophisticated training they need — 
along with the total support of a great busi- 
ness management team. We pay for their 
training. We pay for their talent. We pay for 
everything they need to succeed — except the 
one thing that money can't buy 
The will to win. 
If you have the ambitioa and 
the ability, call 870- 1 700 for more 
information. Or send your resume 
to: Burger KingCorporation, 1800 
West Park Drive, Westborough, 
MA 01581. And start getting all 
you need to succeed. Equal Op- 
portunity Employer M/F/H. 



Best Wishes 
To Nursing Students 
At U-Mass, Amherst 



Choosing a career is one of life's most important decisions, 
and at Betli Israel, we all understand wfiy you chose nursing. 
We also know how important it is for you to find a nursing 
environment that will live up to the expectations you 
developed over the last few years. That's why we offer 
Primary Nurses an environment geared towards professional 
growth and development. Our Primary Nursing philosophy 
gives you more responsibility and provides more opportunity 
to learn from your work. New nurses like yourself benefit 
from an individualized competency-based orientation and 
our preceptor program. 

At Beth Israel, direct patient care is what nursing is all about. 
And no matter how far you advance yourself professionally, 
we'll make sure you don't have to give up patient care to do it, 

330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215/(61 7) 735-3187 

An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F 



W' Beth Israel Hospital 



Get all you need to succeed. 



Ads/293 



McLean Hospital 



115 Mill Street, Belmont, Massachusetts 021 78, Telephone 617 855-3444 
Contact: Nurse Recruiter 



Put Your Knowledge Into Practice 




You're about to make a very important decisioa A 
decision ttiat could stiape your professional nursing 
future 

At McLean Hospital, one of the leading psychiatric 
hospitals in the country we'd like to help you with that 
decision. 

We invite you to investigate the challenges and 
rewards of putting your knowledge into practice in an 
atmosphere of continued professional growth. 

fl/lcLean offers you a 4-week paid orientation pro- 
gram, strong patient-nurse contact, a variety of nursing 
education programs, and educational credits, plus an 
excellent benefit program including tuition reimburse- 
ment. 

Whether you're a recent graduate or an already 
established nurse considering a career change, at 
fi/lcLean you'll play a crucial role in providing quality 
patient care And you'll become a specialist who can 
excel in one of our diverse clinical treatment settings; 

PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 
INTERNSHIP PROGRAM 

This 2-year internship program was designed for the 
recent baccalaureate graduate with no previous nursing 
experience interested in pursuing a career in psychiatric 



nursing The program focuses on both theoretical and 
clinical experience and examines role definition, use of 
nursing process in the care of psychiatric patients, and 
nursing leadership and management Throughout the 
first year nurse interns attend classes and meet in 
ongoing seminars to share experiences, engage in 
mutual problem- solving and identify other learning 
needs. In the second year interns build upon their 
clinical base and engage m a leadership development 
program Interns are hired throughout the summer 
following their graduation The formal program con> 
mences in September Please contact us for more 
information on any of our programs 

GENERAL 

McLean Hospital is a 328- bed private nonprofit psy- 
chiatric facility providing long- and short-term care to 
patients of all ages Established in 1 81 1 , McLean is a 
teaching affiliate of Harvard University Medical School 
and maior schools of nursing our peaceful, 240- acre 
hilltop campus is located only 20 minutes from 
downtown Boston and is accessible by public trans- 
portation 

As a psychiatric nurse at McLean, you'll be a key 
member of a multidisciplinary treatment team. You'll 
provide care in small milieu settings, which house 1 2-24 
inpatients, with a patient/staff ratio of 3:1 . And you'll do 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 



It in an environment where your personality and nursing 
skills can be your greatest therapeutic tools 

FACILITIES 

McLean's extensive range of specialty services include: 
child psychiatry, drug and alcohol dependence treat- 
ment, depression treatment, neuropsychiatry, clinical 
evaluation, geriatric psychiatry, neurobehavioral and 
cognitive behavior therapies, adolescent and family 
treatment, and psychosocialtreatmenl 

EDUCATION 

All new nurses begin with a4- week Competency- Based 
Orientation Program, designed to enable you to direct 
your own orientation Throughout the year Nursing 
Continuing Education seminars and conferences are 
held on clinical and professional topics Your partici- 
pation earns contact hours for C.E, requirements The 
Staff Nurse Leadership Program assists nurses to 
understand and clarify their role as both staff and charge 
nurses Psychiatric l^lursing Grand Rounds give you a 
chance to confirm ideas, open discussion topics and 
share experiences For the RN re-entering the job 
market or interested in a career in psychiatric nursing 
McLean offers a Nursing Refresher Course 



Congratulations and Best Wishes 
Class of 1990 

Pat Di Ruscio 



Leonard 
Morse 



Hospital 

■ 

Leonard Morse Hospital 

67 Union Street 

Natick, MA 01760 

(508) 653-3400 



Conff-aUtlations 
Class Of 

'90! 



c 

^-rfekbrate your achieve- 
ment by interviewing 
with the Pioneer 'Valley's 
most progressive health 
care organization. At Cooley Dickinson Hospital, we have a wide 
array of inviting and challenging opportunities available for graduates 
looking for optimum growth and reward. 

Visit the Human Resources 
Department at Cooley 
Dickinson Hospital, 30 Lx)cust 
Street, Northampton, MA, or 
call 413-582-2420, An equal 
opportunity employer. 



t 



«* 



4 I 




he 
Inc. 



MANAGEMEMT CAREER OPPOHrUNITES 




Stand tall. 

As part of our team, you will, because you stand for the industry leader! McDonald's. 
A billion dollar corporation and One of the Ten Best Managed Companies in America. 



• Excellent Starting Salary 

• Performance/Merit Increases 
•Medical, Dental & Life 

Insurance 



• 3 Weeks Paid Vacations/ 
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• Employee Stock Ownership Plan 

• Tuition Reimbursement 



Stand tall, 
resume to: 



• Company Funded Profit Sharing 
if you have some college and/or supervisory experience, call or send your 

McDonalds 

690 Canton Street 

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iMcDonal 



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■ ■«, 

Povifered By People With Pride. » 



294/Ads 



DO YOU 
MISS UMASS? 



Subscribe to the 

Collegian 



DON'T MISS OUT! 

• sports, campus activities, editorials & more • 

...keep in touch... 

write/call 

113 Campus Center 

UMass 

Amherst, MA 01003 

(413) 545-3500 



Ads/295 



Lauren Beth 



Thanks, Luck, Love, 
Melissa Jane XOXO 



Hey Sport 



You pick up the pieces, you connect the dots * Thanks Gran & 
Mac * Happy b-day Bugs!!! * Jumping someone else's train to 
N. Adams * My heart belongs to Doug * Coolsville * It takes a 
busload of faith to get by * kill a commie for Chris T. Club * 
Camden Town * Glastonbury '89 * Beep Beep-Zip-Bang-Hurri- 
cane ■* Cruzn Le Mans * Tressle Bridge ■* Cable Car * 

Love to Steph, Mom, Trau, Elliott, Dad & Leigh 



Jim Chute and Amy Baker 



Jim - You're my best friend. I'll always love you. 

Otis 



Dan Kelaher 



I remember the first time we met (do you?!). I then got to know 
what a special person you are. We have so many memories — 
thanks for everything! Congratulations — Good Luck! 

Love always — Karen 



Kristin M. 



My favorite redhead. If you have any more dreams, let me 
know. Just kidding. 

Love you, Ron 



'Inherited wealth 



is a big handicap to happiness. It is as certain death to ambition 
as cocaine is to morality." 

W. K. Vanderbilt 



Golden Key National Honor Society 



would like to congro -Ip-te all graduating members. Best of 
luck in the future. 




Photo by Mason Rivlin 
A woman stretches after having her horse trot around the corral at the stables by Sylvan. 
Working with the horses there was a part of college life that not many students shared. 




Jim Chute and Amy Baker 




Photo by Bob Finn 
Students work in a computer lab on campus. There were usually long lines of students 
waiting to use a personal computer. 



296/ Ads For Grads 



Lisa Crowley - LMAC 



It wasn't always easy, but we did it! Whenever I remennber the 
good times, 1'!! thini< of you; You were always there to lean on 
and always a great friend. I'll miss you! 



Love, Marl 



Hey. Rad 



You made it. We never doubted you. We are proud of you. We 
love you. 

Mom, Dad, Jude & Jeff 




Photo by Bob Finn 
Students walk through a path at the Fine Arts Center. With all of the different paths on 
campus, no one had to go to class the same way more than, oh — ten times?! 



Joao 



Thanks! Congratulations and good luck! 

Malkes 



Michaela, Congratulations!! 



I'm so proud of you!! Thanks for the past three years — they 
were awesome! What will ! do without you?!? 

Love, from miles away. Dee 



Suz 



You to me were the best . . . There are some people that you 
don't forget even though you've only seen them one time or 
two ... I remember you! 

Jules 



My favorite blonde 



I don't know how I could have made it these two years without 
you. 

Love you, Ron 



Congratulations Britt & Beth 

You did it! You did it! We are very proud of you. 

Love, Mom & Dad 

Congratulations 

and much love to a graduate who is perfectly Shari! 

Mom, Dad, Rob and Suzanne 

Dan Carberg 

The Music Man. Congratulations! You're really neat. 

Love, Mom and Dad 



Ads For Grads/297 



I Was There 



It has been a long withstanding tradi- 
tion at the Index for the Editor in 
Chief to have a letter published in 
the yearbook. A question for me has al- 
ways been who the letter was for — the 
graduated class, the yearbook staff or the 
editor. With this question in mind, I decid- 
ed to compose the letter for all three. 

Part of the reason I wanted to be the 
Editor in Chief was so I could write this 
letter and try to express to non-yearbook 
geeks how much time and effort goes into 
putting together a yearbook. I was hoping 
this page would be my final piece of copy. 
Instead, we (or rather, I) at the time of this 
writing have several pages that are almost, 
but not quite, finished. Now it's 3 AM and I 
can't sleep because school is going to start 
soon and the pages need to be done. May- 
be that gives you an idea of how much 
work is entailed in producing a yearbook. 

Unfortunately it has also been a tradition 
(although not as long withstanding as the 
letter) for the majority of the book to get 
done over the summer. Regardless of goals 
set at the beginning of the year, this fate 
seems inevitable. This is why you may 
have gotten the book about a month late. 
Still, I hope you think it was worth the 
wait. 

Even though the bulk of the book was 
put together after graduation, it couldn't 
have been done without the help of some 
students who performed above and beyond 
the call of duty, collecting photos and sto- 
ries while still in school, as well as a few 
who stuck it out in the summer. This is my 
chance to thank them. 

Kris: I'd tell you I couldn't do it without 
you, but you probably already think that 
(Just Kidding!). I'm glad we're still friends. 
Yearbook wouldn't have been the same 
without you. I still think you, Tony and I 
are going to meet up at some yearbook 
convention in about 10 years. Thanks for 
taking on Sports. 

Marguerite: You were one of my first 
friends on staff. I'm glad you decided to 
stay on and be Copy Editor. You saved my 
soul this summer writing copy, and I appre- 
ciated it. People iv/7/read your articles, and 
they'll be taken back to Amherst 1990 
when they do so. Good luck with your art, 
even though you don't need it (the luck). 

Jeff: I wish you the best of luck with the 
1991 Index. Your work over the summer 
was invaluable. I know that sounds corny, 
but it's true. The next time you miss a 
flight or get lost in Sunderland, think of 
me. 

Paul A.: I hope one day you realize that 
what they say in the Bette Davis movie 
about green apples is true — luck is a work 
of art — and you've mastered it (or come 
close). Thanks for caring so much about 
the Index. 

Amy: I think you said once that you had 
more pride in the University since you 
were on staff. I'm glad you felt that way. I 
wish more people did. You took on a big 
responsibility going from recording year- 



book orders to Organizations Editor. I 
knew I could depend on you when you 
took on the section and organized it. 

Stefa, Sharon and Linda: Ditto to you, 
too. I haven't seen organizations this orga- 
nized in the three years I've been on staff. 
In the past, the majority of it was done over 
the summer. I really appreciated your ef- 
forts. 

Beth: Don't pay attention to fortune 
cookies that tell you not to travel. I hope 
you liked London, but don't forget us here. 
You should be proud of all the work you 
did for your section. Best of luck. 

David: You were one of the most reliable 
people on staff. Your work was appreciat- 
ed. If you care about everything else in life 
as much as you seenqed to care about year- 
book, you're bound to be successful. Best 
of luck. 

Mason: Thanks for your help moving 
around the office furniture. You have a lot 
of talent (in photography and in moving 
furniture!). I also appreciated your help in 
the darkroom. 

Clayton: You were one of the first people 
I met on staff. I'm glad you stayed with the 
yearbook. I Just want to let you know I 
respected your opinions, photography and 
computer knowledge. Thanks for being 
there when I needed your help. 

Barbara: Thanks for coming up over the 
summer. You helped me keep my sanity 
for a few days. I hope you like how the 
Senior section came out. Good luck in 
France next year. 

Dan: Thanks for working on Athletics, 
even though you were interested in photog- 
raphy. You're idea for a flyer was great. 

Mary D., Melissa, Berret and Sara-Jane: 
I'm sorry that I'm putting you all together, 
but I think I'm running out of room. I just 
wanted to let you all know your enthusi- 
asm for the book was contagious, and I 
think you'd be assets to the 1991 book, if 
you return to staff. Thanks. 

Norm: I appreciated your concern about 
the book and your quick attention to what- 
ever problems or concerns we had. I also 
enjoyed going around shooting with you. 
Thanks. 

Judy: I hope you realize what a big help 
you were this year. I think future Index 
staffs are on their way to standing on solid 
ground. Thanks for your help. 

Bob Sasena: I can't thank you enough 
for working on the Senior Section when we 
were having problems with the computer. 
Again, thank you! Best of luck in your new 
marriage. 

P.S. -If anyone is still reading this besides 
Bob, because it's below his name, I just 
want to say I'm proud to have been a part 
of a staff that had so many newly convert- 
ed yearbook geeks. We really pulled to- 
gether as a team when we were the subject 
of an editorial in the Collegian. Everyone 
who had a part in this book should pat 
themselves on the back and be proud. rtJI 



Quote Of The Year 



I Figure, Socially, 1 Don't Have 
A Chance In The United States. 



Rejected 

Caption Of The 

Year 

An Unidentified Friendly Nurse 
(UFN) Comforts A Student 
While He Wonders Why He 
Decided To Let Someone Stick 
A Tube In His Arm. 




Photo by Mary Sbuttoni 
Amy Lord, Organizations Editor, and Marguerite Paolino, 
Copy Editor, prepare to do some work in the yearbook 
office. The office provided a friendly atmosphere to work 



I 



/4V^ 






staff Photo Of The Year 




Beth Lord, Student Life Editor, finds herself in a barrel 
while Clayton Jones, photographer, gets ready to take 
out the trash. Friendships were quickly made because of 
the pressure of oncoming deadlines. 




Photo by Mary Sbuttoni 




Photo by Kristin Bruno 
Photographer Mason Rivlin has an unfamiliar view of the 
camera. The view soon became familiar since there were 
several photographers on staff who wouldn't let him 
escape from the other side of the lens. 

Eric Goldman gets caught with his equipment down. He 
was on his way to the athletic field of the Alumni Stadi- 
um to shoot graduation. 



Photo by Jeff Holland 



The End 



Finally 



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JOSTENS 



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olophon 



Volume 121 of the (Jniversity of Massachusetts Index was 
printed by Jostens Printing and Publishing Division in State 
College, Pennsylvania. 

THE COVER, produced at Jostens' Topeka cover plant, is a 
school designed cover, mounted on Basin Material with a 
Mission Grain application. The school design is embossed 
on the front lid. Copper foil is applied on the bevel cut on the 
letter "CI". Base ink is silkscreened on the front cover. The 
school name and year are blind embossed on the spine. 

THE ENDSHEETS are designed by the school. Rick Brooks, 
an artist at Jostens, assisted in the design. Artwork on the 
front endsheet is a marble printed and a black and blue 
duotone. Photographs used on the front endsheet were tak- 
en by various photographers on the yearbook staff. The 
table of contents is overprinted onto the artwork. The back 
endsheet also has marble artwork in duotone format with 
the colophon overprinted. 

THE PAPER STOCK throughout the yearbook is 80# gloss. 

PROCESS COLOR is utilized on 32 pages of the yearbook. 
The Introduction and Et Cetera Section each consist of 16 
pages of process color. 

THE TYPOGRAPHY used primarily throughout the year- 
book is Korinna. In the Senior Section, Palatino typestyle is 
used. The headlines varied throughout the yearbook. 

THE PHOTOGRAPHY in the yearbook is taken by the 
student photography staff. Norm Benrimo from Yearbook 
Associates also contributed photography. The senior sec- 
tion photography was contracted with Yearbook Associates 
from Turners Falls, Massachusetts. All photos were printed 
in the yearbook using a 133 line screen. 

THE DESIGN of each section is created by various people. 
Student Life, Athletics, Organizations and Senior Section 
were designed in consultation with Kristin Bruno. The Intro- 
duction, Being There, Et Cetera and Advertisement Sections 
were designed by Mary Sbuttoni. Debbie Concepcion from 
Jostens assisted with the design of the cover and color 
sections. Rick Brooks from Jostens assisted with the design 
of the endsheets and the Being There Section. 

ADVERTISING revenue is raised from three primary areas. 
The first being yearbook sales which consisted of 
$32,515.00. The second in Ads For Grads/ Personals adver- 
tising. This generated $3,685.00. The third is through Colle- 
giate Concepts $1,325.00. 

THE EXPENSE of the 1990 Index 

The yearbook staff independently raised their revenue with 
no aid from the University. Individuals received the year- 
book for $25.00. The press run for the 1990 Index is 1600 
copies. The number of pages is 300. 



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