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University of Massachusetts 
at Amherst 

/t^piAen^. "M/t Of 003 



1 s 



If there's a stereotypical 
UMass student; there's a stereo- 
typical human being. UMass is 
made from the best melting pot 
the country, and the world, has 
to offer. 

It is fitting that UMass' first 
role was agriculture. Over 125 
years of evolution, our school 
has cultivated a strength in diver- 
sity that draws people from ev- 
erywhere on Earth, every walk of 
life, every culture, spiritual, po- 
litical, social, and philosophical 
background under the sun. 




I 



Layout by Liz Morcone 





Left: Students from every walk of life, every state and foreign countries, 
come together at the UMass campus. 

Photo by Megan Lynch 

Below: Yuki Kato, a sophomore Pre-Communications major, stretches out 
on the campus lawn. 

Photo by Megan Lynch 





From interest groups to so- 
cial functions^ from areas of 
study to special housings every- 
one here is a part of some part 
of life at UMass. 



Far Left: Jessica Dosilva, a freshman Liberal Arts major, reads a 
book by the campus pond. s 

m Photo by Megan Lynch 

Left: English senior Scott Mankain, English junior Jamie Doherty, 
English junior Brant Henne, Anthropology senior Greg Flatt, and 
Stockbridge student James Barrett hang out near the Student 
Union. 

Photo by Megan Lynch 






Two hundred one stu- 
dent organizations are 
currently active at UMass, 
not including clubs and 
groups who are either 
reforming or just starting 
up this year. From the 
juggling club to the Spec- 
trum literary magazine to 
the Cannabis Reform Coa- 
lition^ a large part of life 
isn t just supplemented 
by hobbies and interests. 

Many students revolve 
around extracurriculars^ 
from carhpus politics and 
student government to 
the daily paper (and other 
media groups) to Greeks 
religious^ and cultural 
groups. 

We run offices, earn, 
manage, and control bud- 
gets from hundreds to 
hundreds of thousands of 
dollars, espouse beliefs, 
go hang gliding, debate 
issues, bring speakers to 
campus, and watch Japa- 
nese animation. 

We sometimes earn 
credit, sometimes small 
paychecks, and always 
real world experience. 



Layout by Tina Savoie 




■ Y 





We make connections for 
life after UMass and net- 
work among ourselves on 
campus to bring about 
large scale events. 

We are devoted to 
making sure UMass is con- 
tinuously made from the 
best, most active student 
body we can be, and we 
maintain a vital connection 
to the world that class- 
rooms do not enter. 



i 




Above Left: Senior Astrophysics major Joe Rose, senior English, Political 
Science, and Journalism major Greg Zenon, and senior English and 
Economics major Andy Heiniluona find something to do. 

Photo In/ Perry Heller 

Left: Students take advantage of opportunities for a higher education as 
they check out prospective graduate schools. 

Photo by Megan Lynch 

Top right: Sigma Alpha Mu is one of the Greek organizations that has left 

its mark on academic buildings. 

Photo In/ Scott Galbraith 



Sports at UMass are made from the best 
stuff in the country, and the spotlight shines 
brightest on Coach Cal's Elite squad. Soc- 
cer, field hockey, gymnastics, and lacrosse 
are also among the teams that often play past 
regular seasons, earn wins in regional and 
NCAA championships, and finish with na- 




Above: Sophomore midfielder Mike Bulter's fancy footwork keeps him one step ir 
front of his Dartmouth opponent. 

Photo by Scott T. Kindi^ 

Above Right: UMass Athletics are always looking for new recruits. 

Photo by Gk'inin Radei 

Lower Right: Dionne Nash, a junior outside hitter, passes the ball to her teammate 

Photo by Rcbeccn M. Fitd 




tional rankings. Teams 
including track and fields 
crew^ swimmings and 
cross country had unde- 
feated regular seasons 
either last year or the 
previous one. Women's 
track and field hasn't 
lost a meet in the past 
three regular seasons. 

Our club sports^ from 
fencing to equestrian, 
are a big part of UMass 
tradition, and, like re- 
cent additions women s 
crew and water polo, 
advance to varsity at a 
regular pace. 

As for the fans, from 
tail-gaters to Minutema- 
niacs, everyone 
around here is a 
UMass sports ad- 
dict: students and 
parents, staff, 
alum, the locals. 
Governor Weld, 
and President 
Clinton included. 



Layout hy Scott T. Kina 



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Right: Students taking Gen Eds get to experience 
the large lecture halls such as this one in Thompson 
Hall 104. 

Photo by Megan Lynch 

Center: Forestry junior Jean Bonnett prepares for 
an upcoming midterm. 

Photo by Scott T. .Kindig 



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Layout by Tina Savoie 



Below: Liz Boken, a junior Enivormental Studies major, 
takes advantage of the quiet surroundings to review her 
Organic Chemistry notes. 

Photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Far Below: Home of the Chemistry, Astronomy & 
Physics, Mathematics & Statistics, and Computer Science 
Departments, the Lederle Graduate Research Tower 
dominates the northeast corner of campus. 

Photo hx/ Megan Lynch 




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Right: Greenpeace activist Athena 
Lambrinidou performed a street 
theatre piece next to the Student 
Union in protest of French nuclear 
testing. 

Photo iy Megan Lynch 



• the pond... popcorn-fed 
baby ducks... a cyclist racing 
upside down in the pond a 
reflection... a random activist 
convincing us all that (just 
for a second) our first goal in 
life is banning nuclear 
testing. ..the swan. 

• keggers on frat row... 
Thursday night disco at the 
Blue Wall, Monday night 
jazz... parties in towers on 
Saturday nights. 



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Above: A terrified mallard flees from the nortorious 
UMass swan. 

Photo by Scott T. Kindig 




• Old Chapel s bell tower seen through a 
window up 26 floors of the library... 
Orchard Hill s view of a sm setting over 
the mountains of our Happy Valley. 
The scenery around here always 
remains^ always changes, from rustic New 
England to academian metropolis to 
miniature city, offering as many moments 
of stress release for some twenty thousand 
students and several thousand more 
faculty and staff. 




Above: While the Morrill Science Center makes it 
nearly impossible to find your classroom, it's offers a 
breathtaking view of the pond. 

Photo by Megan Lynch 

Far Above: Students take a break from their academic 
schedules to converse about their day. 

Plioto by Megan Lynch 



Layout by Devin Bioicn 



Arriving here means moving into a building 
with hundreds of people^ onto a floor with 
dozens of strangers^ into a room you split with 
someone whose name you don t know, study- 
ing in a common lounge and sharing a bath- 
room. Dorm life at UMass might be hectic and 
cramped, awkward and even scary at first. It 
usually turns out well enough. Roommates and 
floormates often form friendships for life. We 



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learn how to live socially, 
study responsibly, act re- 
spectfully, and mature, of- 
ten, all too quickly. 

The fact is that dorm life 
is made from the most rigid 
rules at UMass, by which the 
typical undergrad has no 
choice but to live on campus 
for two years. At first it 
seems hard to explain why 
so many juniors and seniors 
remain Jn the dorms. Or- 
chard Hillers mention the 






Above: English freshman Jim Kraeutler and 
Stockbridge freshman Isaiah Salloom hack it outside 
Sylvan. 

Photo by Eleanor Gerome 

Far Left: Good times, good friends... Dorm life in 
Baker. 

Photo by Megan Lynch 

Left: James Guercio and Alyssa Robinson enjoy a 
tranquil moment under the pine trees. 

Photo by Megen Lynch 



Bowl^ the daily hikes down 
to campus^ the close knit 
floor experience. Hearing 
a Southwestie^ one would 
think those dorms them- 
selves are always awake and 
alive. 

From Brown to 
Butterfield^ for many stu- 
dents^ dorm life is made 
from more than just the most 
mandatory rules UMass has 
to offer. 



Layout by Scott T. Kindig 




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19 



Business 




wning and run- 
ning a business is a difficult job. 
Figuring overhead, adjusting 
costs to maximize revenue, and 
juggling working hours for 
employees are some of the many 
chores involved. 

The Center for Student 
Businesses (CSB) gives guid- 
ance, training, and oversight to 
businesses run by undergradu- 
ates for preparation for the cor- 
porate world. 

The most mpo^iit aspect 
idcnt bttf^^S progra m 
>ive students hands-on 
ig and experience in busi- 
ness management. Groups 
must provide goods or services 
! o the University community on 
a continuous, regular basis. 

\e\v student businesses 
must ha\e three undergradu- 
ates to begin operation. The Stu- 

provmes ani^H^^ranl — 
through the StudentActivities 
Trust Fund — for start-up. 

"All grants to new busi- 
nesses are paid back fully and 
the new businesses then become 
self sufficient," said Katja Hahn 
d'Errico, the CSB director. 

Currently, the CSB — an 
agent of the SGA and the Uni- 
versity Administration — pro- 
vides assistance to 10 groups. 
Outlets for food, ticket purchas- 
ing, and bicycle repair are a few 
of the businesses supported by 
the CSB. In the fiscal year of 



m^m-^m^ 



^ 1 UNI 1 1 II13 




advice on a day-to-day b asjj 
on organizing and be 
ing," said 

f Account- ' 

Stucient bLisiiu'SM."i that 
satisfy late night munchies are 
the Sylvan Snack Bar, Green-O ~^ 
in Central, and Sweets & More \ 
m Orchard H ilL Thfeg^ SBa cJc'- 

ries^ rely on t^TjSB for guid- 
how to run their 
^iness. Students are espe- 
cially grateful for these ser- 
vices. 

"Green-O is quick, good 
food, and at bargain prices," 
said Lee Parnell, a senior Com- 
puter Graphics major. "It is re- 
ally convenient because I don't 
have to call up and wait for- 
ever for a restaurant to deliver." 
"The CSB helps Green-O 
:n we need moral and eco- 
lort," said Allison 
!ommuni- 

C,reen-W''Tf¥ ~cii ^is \h^^ 
nucleus of the entire co-op cell; 
helping us with hoiising, Stu- 1 
dent Government Association, 
matters, and other organiza-~^ 
,t we may need " 
CSB looks for inter- 



1995, 161 paid positions and 
over $619,000 were generated 
through student businesses. 
"We provide facilitation 



workshops to help businesses 
run meetings, signature re- 
sponsibility workshops to help 
with purchasing orders, and 



nal gro\ 



ad' increased em- 



ployment of busmlSi^H^cing 

a greater benefit for the^tn;;;^ 

munity as a whole," said Gothie. 

by Daniel Sullivan 



Above: Jessica Bolin and Mike Gothie mind their own business. 



photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 



Far Right: Colleen O'Leary, Sophomore Education major, Lorin Zinter, Sophomore Communications 
major, Nathan^ Carpenter, Junior Communications major, and Catherine Schmitt, Sophomore 

Environmental Science major. 

photo by Danielle Canweau 

Top Right; Sophomore Communications major Lorin Zinter holds all the tickets. 

photo by Danielle Carriveau 

20 i 




ccording lo 
5ara Mt-Qudlin, '^juQWI^^f^ch 
L\nd ConimunicafflliHRible 
maJ^^V "Tix is a wonderful and 
:niont vvav to seo showi. 

V\ hen students want io 
see nationally known bands or 
cuttuig edge talents, they can 
\r,o to Tickets Unlimited, conve- 
niently l<^'-"'i'^t>d^^^^^^EM^"+ 
Union across f^pPPpost of- 
f K^*^' anda^itt-ffie endless busy 
-.ignlflsand service charges of 
huge national companies. 

Tickets Unlimited, 

formed in 1983, is a non-profit 
student run cooperative. It 
handles money and ticket sales 
:for all RSOs (Registered Stu- 
dent Organizations) as well 
some local off-campus shows. 
In addition to concerts, Tix 
takes care of various on-cam- 
pus events like dances, deejays 
and movies. 



"We are involved with 
anything a student group does 
that sells tickets," said 
Catherine Schmidt, a sopho- 
more who has worked at Fix 
-^iiite last year. 

When th^^^_CMicert 
e\ent in the St^^pPwuon Ball- 
rooiijxjy^vet^ty Productions 
and^^micerts (UPC) sells nearly 
all of the tickets for the show- 
through Tix. Tix sells tickets 
before shows and, when tickets 
are left, on concert nights, too. 

This year, bands like 311, 
and Aquarium Rescue Unit, at- 
tracted large numbers of ticket 
buyers this year. In recent past 
years, Tix has sold tickets for 
bands like Pearl Jam (before 
their Ticket Master battles). 
Sonic Youth, Radiohead and 
Rage Against The Machine 

Tix also sells tickets to 
shows at Pearl Street nightclub 
in Northampton, which enjov^ 





the benefits of Tix Unlimited's 
prime location. For big events, 
the student run organization 
has sold more than 500 tickets. 
Fugazi, The Mighty Mighty 
Bosstones and Morphine 
brought mobs of students to 
the ticket window. 

Local favorites like Bim 
Skala Bim, Murphy's Law, 7 
Seconds and Knuckle Sand- 
wich also sold rapidly. 

As far as movies, the con- 
troversial "Kids" brought over 
a thousand people to Tix, which 
has grown accustomed to long 
ines of anxious students. 

Tix is open either five or 
ill seven days depending on 
c^nLs sJudiiKs n week, and 
tickets in cash nl\ 

I y i hitgiJastrow 



NaturaUyj 



mm. It's morning and UMass is wak- 
ing up. Where do groggy students in need of some- 
thing to help them jump-start their dav go? The 
aroma of fresh coffee and blasting music inxite 
visitors to People's Market; which is nestled in the 
back of the Student Union. 

Seven women founded this student run busi- 
ness in 1973. Their goal was to provide a healthy 
food alternative for the University environment. 
Today, People's Market continues working toward 
this goal and offers natural, healthful foods for the 
campus. 

The Market sells iced tea, apple cider, assorted 
cheeses, fruits, and ice cream. But the most popular 
combination is the self-serve fresh coffee and bagel 
with cream cheese. 

"The best combo is definitely a salt bagel with 
muenster cheese," said Rebecca White, a junior Art 
major. 

Junior Communications major Yolima Romero 
noticed that the Market becomes a Mecca for stu- 
dents during warm afternoons. "Everyone hangs 
outside eating their Ben and Jerry's ice cream, stop- 
ping in to buy more food when they are finished. It 
provides a nice service for the people," said Romero. 






While the food is the basis of Peop' 
ket, the music is an important attraction as well. 
People's Market prides itself on its diverse tastes 
in regard to music. A switch from jazz to Cyndi 
Lauper is a typical transition. 

"The People's Market's music is as fresh as 
their bagels," said White. 

Though the Market gets a few complaints 
about song choices, most people secretly like to 
dance to Madonna, according to Sarah Foudy, a 
senior STPEC and Comparative Literature double 
major. 

The music led Foudy to apply for the job. She 
noticed it creates a friendly, relaxed feeling for the 
customers. It also wakes people up while they 
make a quick stop in between classes, she said. 

The Market is run by 27 undergraduate stu- 
dents who have equal say on management. Com- 
mittees are designed to ensure that all aspects of 
the business are operating efficiently. Each week, 
all staff meet to discuss the direction of the Mar- 
ket. 

Workers find that they learn a lot about business at the Market. Worryingi; 
about maintenance, customer service, and keeping costs low, while still making.; 
a profit, takes up the staff's time outside working hours. 

"I never would have imagined I'd worry\ 
about buying a refrigerator and trying to keep a\ 
bagel and cream cheese under 75 cents, while ini 
college," said Kiera Garretson, a Junior Educa- 
tion/English major. 

The Market also helps out the surrounding 
community by donating $80 a month to local 
charities. The Donations Committee finds places 
that need donations like a shelter for batten 
women in Northampton. 

A billboard in the Market offers spaces ti 
promote cultural exents in the Pioneer Valley. 
"We want to make people aware of happenings, 
said Romero. 

by Daniel Sullivan 



Above: Luke Haas is checking on the fresh fruit off 
the day. , 

photo hy Me^nn J i/iicli 

Left: John Beck is cooking up a creation in the 
Earthfoods kitchen. 

?^;'-" ' photo hy Dimidlc Cmriivaii 

Right: Patience West is preparing the infamous 
Earthfoods salads. 

photo by Dniiicllc Caniivnii 



layout by Dcviii Broiori' 




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Our prices may be down to Earth, but out 
food is out of this world!" boasts the sign at the 
Student Union entrance that advertises Earthfoods. 

If you think baba ganoush is a Barba Poppa 
relative, then you have probably never eaten at 
Earthfoods. The cooperative cafeteria is a non-profit, 
collective, student-run business, offering ovo-lacto 
vegetarian food at affordable prices. 

Monday through Friday, Earthfoods serves 
lunch from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. in the Student 
Union Commonwealth room. Rice, beans, salad, and 
vegetables are always offered along with a special of 
the day. At the lunch hour peak, a long line of hungry 
students snakes around the room. Customers emerge 
with heaping plates of food, encouraged to bring 
their own reusable dishes to help keep costs low and 
reduce waste. As an added incentive, patrons receive 
a ten cent discount for their en\'ironmental conscious- 
ness. -■■*;"3 

Janet Merna, a senior Sociology major, said, "At 
Earthfoods you know what you're getting, or rather 
what you're eating. Other places on campus are 
greasy and fatty. Basically, it's good and it's cheap." 

A serving of rice, beans, or vegetable is less than 
a dollar. Special items, like paella, pesto pasta, and 
sesame noodles are usually $3. 

Earthfoods orders from two coops (North East 
and Squash), and Springfield Food Service. Organic 
items are used whenever possible, but they are more 
expensive, which can increase costs. Rice and beans 
are traditionally an inexpensive item. 

A sub-group of students prepares weekly 
menus. Earthfoods has become famous for its cre- 
ativelv named menu selections, but according to one 
employee, since the hippies who founded the restau- 
rant left that aspect is not as common. Behind the 
scenes, the employees cut, peel, chop, bake, and boil, 
in a large rectangular kitchen while listening to Mor- 
phine. 

Spring 1996 marks Earthfoods' 20th anniver- 
sary. In April 1976, Earthfoods began, serving 50 
people a day. It now serves more than 700 people per 
day. 

"When it began," said Baldi, "it was an alterna- 
tive food choice on campus offering healthy food, 
and that's what we keep doing. It's become more 
business-like, though. It's more organized than it 
used to be." 

Earthfoods employs 27 student "worker man- 
agers" who make all major decisions at weekly meet- 
ings. Separate sub committees deal with daily 
operations such as ordering, menu decisions, book 
keeping and training. 

The job is high stress and very hectic, .^^ 
but it beats the pay at the library, said an -4, 

employee. 

Ini Amxj Saner 

' ' ! 23 ; 



The Biaaest College News in 



hat is the one 
piece of literature that nearly 
every UMass student reads? 
You might think it is a work by 
Shakespeare, but you are 
wrong. Is it a great American 
author? No. It is not even the 
Housing Telecommunications 
Guide.. The Massachusetts Daily 
Collegain is read by nearly 
25,000 people a day. 

And you know where 
people read them. Who has 
gone to lunch without seeing 
newspapers left on the tables? 
The Bluewall is littered with 
Collegians. 

Obviously students enjoy 
reading up on national and 
campus news, checking out a 
few of the many student-drawn 
comic strips in the newspaper, 
or completing the crossword 
puzzle. 

What better way is there 
to begin your day than by catch- 
ing up on UMass basketball or 
hockey while you eat break- 
fast? 

Sports editor, senior Jour- 
nalism major Candace 
Flemming said that 
working for the Collegian 
is one of the most impor- 
tant things she has ac- 
complished at UMass. 
"To be honest, it takes 
up a lot of time," she said, 
"But it's all worth it. You 
see everyone enjoying 
your hard work." 

What does it take to 
put together a daily col- 
lege paper? According to 
Flemming , it takes de- 
votion. "There will be 
nights when I don't get 
home until after mid- 
night. Then I still have a 
paper to write or an exam 
to study for," she said. 

Nevertheless, 
many students 



New England 



choose writing for New 
England's largest college daily 
paper over devoting time to 
their school work. It is a tough 
choice, but depending on your 
priorities it may be the right 
one. 

"When you're out there 
looking for a job, newspapers 
aren't going to care if you get a 
C in some class," said junior 
Journalism major Jacob 
Michaels, Jewish Affairs editor. 

"Employers are going to 
want to see clips," said 
Michaels, "and working for the 
Collegian is a great way to build 
a portfolio." 

But Journalism majors are 
not the only ones who work for 
the Collegian. Students from all 
areas of interest are part of the 
paper. Marketing, photogra- 
phy, and graphic design are all 
important departments. Every- 
thing is dependent on every- 
thing else for a successful paper 
to be produced. 

According to editor-in- 
chief, senior Journalism major 




Matt Vautour, the primary goal 
of the Collegian is providing a 




top quality newspaper. The CoU 
legian strives to provide an openr 
forum for the opinions! 
not only of the UMass 
campus, but of the sur- 
rounding communities 
as well. 

The Collegian is al' 
ways looking for peoplee 
to help achieve this goal.l 
"We can always uset 
good writers," said busi- 
ness editor MattI 
Wurtzel, a junior Jour- 
nalism major. 

Although there are 
few things you can count 
on in life, you know that 
every day there will be a 
copy of the Collegian 
waiting for you. 

And you know that 
you can count on it for 
reliable college journal- 
ism. 
by Carol Drzewianoioski 



EHE 





iving in the dormi- 
tories on campus means living with- 
out MTV, which for many students 
can be a difficult thing. So, this year, 
UMass' very own television sta- 
jtion — UVC-TV 19 — has created sev- 
jeral new music shows, among other 
new programs, to better serve their 
student audience. 

"Rhythm and Rhyme," 
"Chocolate Thunder," "Room 307" 
and "Just Kickin It" all air music 
videos. 

"Rhythm and Rhyme," the 
newest addition, concentrates on 
rap and rhythm and blues (R&B), 
and interviews both local guests and 
professional musicians when they 
are in the area. 

"Chocolate Thunder" also airs 
R&B videos, along with Reggae. It 
is hosted by a female, and edited 
with a female perspective. 

Early in the year, the Union Video 
Center changed its name to UVC-TV 19. 
Club president Yusef f Lateef , a Journalism 
senior, explained, "It used to be a place 
where students produced videos. But in 
the spring of 1991, the Housing Services 
Cable Network gave us a channel. So UVC- 
TV 19 gives a more accurate description of 
who we are." 

TV 19 offers a variety of shows which 
are completely student run and organized. 
News is cast both on a weekly program, 
"UMass Update," and through "UMass 5 
Minute Updates." 

TV 19 has also hopped on the band- 
wagon of talk shows and created one, 
though it is still in its initial stages. 

"This year, we also started taping the 
student senate meetings, which are on 
Wednesdays," said Lateef. The Student 
Government Association requested that 
we tape the meetings in order to better 
inform the students about what is going 
on with their student government. We 
broadcast on Thursdays to correspond with 




the Collegian's weekly senate article. This 
gives students the opportunity to actually 
see what is going on, and answer ques- 
tions they may have had that the article in 
the paper didn't address." 

TV 19 has also begun to underwrite 
this year. The SGA funded an underwrit- 
ing director who solicits vendors to fi- 
nance the station. Lateef said TV 19 does 
not receive money, only products that the 
company may sell. TV 19 does not adver- 
tise vendors; they acknowledge and thank 
them for their support throughout pro- 
grams. 

TV 19 also gives sports fans the chance 
to see and talk to their favorite athletes and 
coaches. Gordon Fenwick, producer of 
"Sportstalk," in its second season, said the 
show covers both national and UMass 
sports. 

"We tape both on the set and off," 
said Fenwick. "The show airs highlights 
from games, interviews of athletes and 
coaches on the field, and we also have 
people come on the set. This year we are 
doing more interviews, and doing the show 



in a more journalistic style." 

"We are really trying to become more 
serious," said Lateef. "Besides developing 
new shows, we're working with HSCN to 
improve the signals and images on the 
screen to make it clear." 

by Geri Saliu 

Above Left: Mike Elliot ponders over the 
lastest SGA news. 

photo by Gleuda Racier 

Lower Left: Proofreading is an art, just ask 
Mark McGrath. 

photo by Gleuda Rader 

Above: UVC programming ranges from video 
art and satire to dance and social 
documentary. 

photo by Danielle Carnvcau 



Communkoting Diversity 



he Black Mass Communications 
Project provided cultural programming to 
the diverse ethnic community at UMass all 
year. 

By v^orking with other student 
groups, including Southwest Area Gov- 
ernment, the Black Student Union, WMUA, 
the Distinguished Visitors Program, and 
the Haitian American Students Associa- 
tion, BMCP promotes positive program- 
ming for the ALANA community, which, 
according to Suki Seetheraman, UMass 
badly needs. 

Seetheraman, the music director of 
BMCP, a junior Education/Afro-Ameri- 
can Studies double major, has belonged to 
the group for three years. She said UMass 
does not have many minority students. 
Also, their interests are not always shared 
by larger student groups, so they look to 
BMCP for programming. 

Members network with other 
student organizations and deal 
with professionals to get the expe- 
riences that classes do not offer. 
Whether they become urban disc 
jockeys on WMUA or take charge 
of BMCP events, they get involved 
with the industry. 

Scheduled events are numer- 
ous but three headliners hihglight 
the group's efforts. One is the fall 
Jeans & T-Shirt dance, which draws 
over 1000 students. 

The annual spring communi- 
cations conference offers to hun- 
dreds of students panels, 
discussions, and meeting opportu- 
nities with film, television, print, 
and music industry promoters and 
executives. The third planned head- 
liner, the Funk-O-Thon, annually 
draws thousands of students from 
the whole 5-college area to a rented 
hall to party down with a profes- 
sional DJ. 

"BMCP has opened a lot of 




^1 BLACK MASS 

^ COMMUlVICATia 
° ^ PROJEC'l 






doors for me," said Seetheraman. 
"I have learned key networking skills and 
professionalism. When you deal with pro- 
fessionals, you learn to act like them. 1 
most definitely plan to stay involved next 
year." 

by Gregory Zenon 



Above: Group shot: It was a banner year for BMCP. 

photo by Anita L. Kestin 

Top: Spin Doctors' Tiara Slaughter and Mike Jerry know how to get the 
party started. 

plioto by Anita L. Kestin 



26 




in Amherst, MA 



hile WMUA 
oes not have the sexy blonde 
ecretary, they do have the 
uirky staff who like to com- 
lare themselves to "WKRP in 
ancinnati/' which was a hit TV 
how of the early 1980s. One 
isc jockey described general 
nanager Brad Davidson, a jun- 
or AfroAm/Legal Studies 
ouble major, as having Herb 
arlic qualities. 

WMUA, FM 91.1, is the 
JMass student-run station that 
roadcasts from the basement 
f the Campus Center. The 
tation's mission is to play mu- 
ic that most commercial sta- 
ions do not. During the course 
'f a day, WMUA broadcasts 
ospel, jazz, blues, world, rock, 
rban, contemporary, news 
asts, and talk shows. The sta- 
ion aims to please a variety of 
isteners who are not just lim- 



ited to college students. 

"We're similar to WKRP," 
said senior Kevin Moriarty, a 
Communications major. 
"We're neurotic and antsy. We 
don't really have any Less 
Nessmans, but we do have a 
few Dr. Johnny Fevers." 

Moriarty, who is in charge 
of training, said station mem- 
berships extends from UMass 
students to community mem- 
bers to colleges in the area. 

"It ends up being a weird 
melting pot of shows," said 
Moriarty. "Members range 
from communications majors to 
people with nothing to do." 

WMUA is an outlet for stu- 
dents to learn all the aspects of 
running a radio station. 

"I want to be a radio DJ, 
and this has given me a good 
idea of how a radio station 
runs," said Moriarty. "Except 



here, it's up to me what I play 
during my show." 

Moriarty's radio name is 
Kevin Kinnear and his show, 
"Dreamline," ran in the fall 
from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. 

Keith Stebenne, a senior 
Communications major, has 
been involved with the station 
for a few years and had an early 
morning eclectic show called 
"Polly wog Stew." The time slot, 
2 a.m. to 4:30 a.m., is not the 
most desirable, but Stebenne 
considered it working his way 
up. 

"I'm just paying my dues," 
said Stebenne, who played a 
mix ranging from Waylon 
Jenning's Dukes of Hazzard 
theme song and the new 
Knuckle Sandwich single to the 
Ramones. 

"It's an encouraging envi- 
ronment because it's mostly col- 




lege students," said Stebenne. 
"And you don't have to worry 
about making mistakes. You can 
learn from them." 

But disadvantages of a 
college station include theft and 
accessibility. "The station 
doesn't always have the most 
current compact discs," said 
Stebenne. 

The station also has its crit- 
ics, who commonly consider the 
mix of music too much of a mix, 
too far a cry from the main- 
stream, and too large a style 
change from one song to the 
next. 

"The average person can't 
just turn it on," said Peter Clark, 
a senior Exercise Science major. 
"It's just too extreme. You never 
know what you're going to hear. 
Who can memorize an entire 
schedule of DJ's and their 
shows?" he asked. 

Yet many students do re- 
member when their favorite 
shows come on. 

Jodi Calkins, a junior So- 
ciology major, is one such stu- 
dent. She said she enjoys the 
afternoon blues shows. 

"They play the really old 
things you never hear, the roots 
of blues, " said Calkins. "It's 
the best blues show and some- 
times you can hear the crack- 
ling in the records." 

by Amy Saner 



Left: Blues DJ Gary Deane is true 
blue to WMUA. 

plioto by Scott Gkbraith 



27 




ajor changes 
characterized the office of 
ALANA (Asian, Latin, African, 
and Native American) Affairs 
this year. For starters, the pri- 
marily student-run organiza- 
tion which operates under the 
dual identity of an agency and 
a registered student organiza- 
tion for ALANA students 
changed its name from the Of- 
fice of Third World Affairs to 
ALANA. 

"The name OTWA had 
outlived its time," agency di- 
rector and UMass alumnus 
Nelson Acosta ex- 
plained. "The name 
ALANA focuses more 
on stud ents of color on 
campus, which is ex- 
actly what our organi- 
zation is trying to do," 

Try Sek, a senior 
educatioii major, one 
of three ALANA com- 
munity outreach lead- 
ers, supported the 
name change. "Per- 
sonally, I feel that the 
designation of OTWA 
was exclusive — 'third 
world' is an outdated, 
negative 60s term and 
ALANA is a much 
more inclusive, invit- 
ing name." 

Geographically, 
the office underwent 
another transforma- 
tion, moving form the fourth 
floor of the Student Union to an 
efficient, professional, parti- 
tioned room on the third floor, 
complete with each staff 
member's tri-colored business 
card posted on bulletin boards. 
"The graphics staff is especially 
great this year/' said an office 
worker, noting the business 
cards. 

Many of the modifications 

made in making the office a 

more accessible resource 

were propelled by the 

1^^ ALANA Caucus, headed 

by chairpersons senior 

28 I 



WorkinaJor 

rhange 



Maurice Caston and junior Lisa 
Chu. Working closely with the 
Student Government Associa- 
tion, they helped to give 
ALANA students an influen- 
tial voice in policy issues. 

One of the more visible 
products of the office's labor 
was the ALANA Lecture Series. 
"It informs, promotes aware- 
ness, and develops people's 
consciousness of different cul- 
tures and political views within 
the ALANA community," said 
coordinator Karsten Cash, a 
graduate student of education. 



National events like 
October's Million Man March 
found active support in the 
ALANA community. ALANA 
needs to support occasions that 
allow ALANA people to re- 
empower themselves, said 
Acosta, in what he calls a subtle 
social Darwinism. 

"Although society has in 
most cases overcome institu- 
tional oppression," said 
Acosta, "we still need to over- 
come oppressions of the mind. 
There are groups of people 
who believe they're better than 



i)ve 



111 



other groups of people, and thai 
has to change." 

Working inside and out 
side the University keeps office 
phones ringing, and man^i 
ALANA workers chained to ter 
minals at late hours. 

Sophomore SOM majq; 
Sanda Toro said working as all 
ALANA office accountant ii ^\^ 
great. "The people are very 
friendly. But it's a very profes 
sional atmosphere — when it'! 
time to get to work, we realh 
get to work." ,; 

by Darcie Dennigan' 



i 




Cash said he found his in- 
volvement a positive experi- 
ence. "You find a lot of great 
people here, a lot of support, 
and a lot of room for creativity. 
Nelson really encourages every- 
one to use and develop the un- 
limited resources available to 
us." 

The Alliance Newsletter 
comprises another segment of 
the ALANA office. It represents 
the different ALANA commu- 
nities, the RSOs and the aca- 
demic services open to ALANA 
students, and prints current 
ALANA events and issues. 



Left: Dave Nufiez and Yiran Estrada share a hug for our photographed 

, photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Far Left: Local students pose for the camera at the Million Man 
March. 

photo by Dan Lizann 

Above: Top row (from left to right): Try Sek, Karsten Cash, David 
Nunez, Jeffrey Wong, Jahl Mendoza, Maurice Caston. Bottom row: 
(from left to right): Patricia Pegus, Sokonthea Nong, Nelson Acosta, 
Yinan Estrada, Sandra Toro 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 



/n 



ccording to Black Student Union 
3SU) president Dan Lizana, a junior History major, 
16 organization has a dual role. 

Half of the BSU's work is put into events. As one 
f the larger student groups on campus — with mem- 
ership in the hundreds — the BSU has its own consti- 
ition, positions, and budget allocated by the Student 
jovernment. 

! "This fall we organized three buses for the 
•lillion Man March in Washington D.C.," said 
azana. "Along with the AFROKAM group we ral- 
ed 143 black males to attend the march. We did 
hone calling, held concourse tables, put up flyers 
■nd posters, and used word of mouth to put it all 
)gether. At the same time we started up a voter 
'?gistration drive, which continued after the March 
uied." 

The group also created and sold T-shirts and 
3-sponsored black homecoming events this fall. 

At the Rebecca Johnson Middle School in Spring- 
eld, BSU members talked with junior high and high 
,:hool students as well as their parents, running a 
ireer development workshop. 

The other half of the BSU's work is to assist 
lack organizations on campus. 

"We act as an umbrella organization for all 
lack student groups," said Lazana. "We help fund 
leir events, help them plan their events, take the 
ress off their backs by providing extra hands and 



Keeping Our Ccutidus 





labor. When any black group wants to do something, our mem- 
bers help." 

In the spring, the BSU plans to assist the annual ALANA 
community awards banquet for academics and community in- 
volvement. The BSU also plans to help groups sponsor speakers 
during black history month. 

The BSU also provides academic support as a mediator to 
black students who may need help communicating problems 
with professors. 

By developing recruitment, providing policy review, and 
assisting in retention for black students, the BSU performs yet 
another function as an administrative body working with the 
deputy chancellor, the chancellor, admissions director Arlene 
Cash, and other administrators. While the BSU occasionally meets 
with these people, often administrators attend BSU meetings, 
give reports, and seek opinions. 

The BSU also works to ease racial tensions that erupt during 
the course of the year. "Every year there seems to be one major 
racial issue or incident on campus," said Lizana, "an assault, a 
harassment. Often victims come to the BSU for support." 

Because of its nature, members of the BSU often move on to 
other leadership roles and jobs around campus. 

"We give students skills that satellite out. We succeed be- 
cause our members get good jobs and positions on campus, 
creating networks and connections that hold us all together." 

While this year was largely successful and eventful, Li/ana 
says next year will be even better. - >;: 

"Two years ago we started to rebuild our organizafioif^ 
membership-wise and budget-wise. Last year was good, 
this vear is better. Next year will be even more successful. 
We set the tone this year." 

by Gregory Zcncii 



duMt^n SaUar? 



Unidos, the UMass Puerto 

dent Organization, was founded oiT 

a year ago, it is so active and orga 

nized that many students beheve the 

organization has been around for 

years. 

Two sisters and three brothers 
co-founded the organization. Will- 
iam Davila, a senior Communica- 
tions major chairs the organization. 
Sophomore Malwin Davila heads re- 
cruitment and retention, and An- 
thony Davila, a senior Psychology 
and Education major , is the 5-Col- 
lege representative. Junior Treasurer 
Wilma Crespo and sophomore sec- 
retary Zoraida Crespo are the other 
two founders. 

hi addition to these officers, the 
group has some 85 members, most of 
whom, according to William Davila, 
are very active. This is why the group 
is able to do so much, he said. 

The group coordinated Puerto 
American heritage week this fall to 
celebrate and educate people about 
Puerto Rico, its people and customs. 
A lecture on the culture shock of 
migrating from the island to the 
United States was just one event. 
The Latin American Studies depart- 
ment sponsered a chorus from Puerto 
Rico who gave a musical workshop 
after their performance. The week 
ended with a festive gala of tradi- 
tional music, food, and a poetry read- 
ing by English professor Martin 
Espasa. 

"We've been doing well," said 
William Davila. "I'm especially im- 
pressed with the academic events — 
the lectures and panel discussions, 
— which draw students." 

Davila said part of the large 
student interest was the result of 
networking with othe 
groups. 




"We ti 



the. 



verlap and do 
•raid William 
tliat wo all 
We have 
, but 
id suppt)rt 




li 

■X 

th 

awards ba^ 

volve 200-300 pea 

As far as trends go, 
Davila said he wants to see mor 
members get involved in studen 
political organizations like th' 
SGA, the ALANA caucus, and Stii 
dent Center of Educational Rt 
search Advocacy. He also want 
to branch out awareness o 
Boricuas Unidos to students whi 
do not spend time in the campu 
center and student union. 

"We do a lot, so we get no 
ticed," said William Davila. "Wi 
have accomplished a lot in a year,' 
said William Davila, "and we wi 
continue to be noticed." 

hxj Gregory Zeiioi 





dventures y\bound 



s lights blinked on and off. 
The Empire Strikes Back" theme played, 
our hard-hatted members of the Outing 
lub (UMOC) stormed past the 70 stu- 
^nts gathered in the Campus Center Au- 
^^il^iand walked up tlie stage 

|fctaHhad begun with slides of 
l^^^^^^k^evvatcr ratting, 
mountain ^HH^Hf^^^^^feH^^ i.oun- 
-°y skiing, ice clini^^^^^^^E^ divmg, 
ayaking, and hikinglUJ^^Hv' 

"You can do e\ery activity you just 
iw, ' said senior Exercise Science major 
aid vice president I lelen Wood "And you 
ever have to buy a single piece ot 
qui^^ont We have everything you will 
iver need W'c ha^gjpckers full of etjuip- 
fient For a dollar p^^trip, \ ou can rent as 
nuch equipment as you neeLl, fror 
[Small fleet of kayaks, to a fleet ot carTf 
1) boots, skis, and poles. We have an office 
ii the Student Union complete with a li- 
brary of resources — maps, books, tons of 
iformation." 

Chris Gasbarro, the treasurer, a sopho- 
fiore Forestry major, then exhorted people 
j) get involved. "The club usually does a 
^unch of events each weekend. Whether 
ou want to sign up for a group trip or voii 
/ant to lead one, get involved/^ 

Kayak rolling prat-tii,e-9€^ons in the 
urry Hicks Ca^e tor three hours on a 
irida\ mgii^^fflre just one of the regular 
dturi>s ot the club. 

Spending eight days on a ca\ mg ex- 
'avagan/a in West Virginia was the most 
irilhng experience Mount Holyokesopho- 
lore Biology major Koty Sharp, the secre- 
jiry, has been part of in her i 

^"You basically tunn^^^^P^lind 
ear helmets wi^^^^yj^ffsTit's a play- 
;round undergffsima," explained Brad 
senior Geology major who's been 
^mber for five years. 
Most students who join in the Spring 
;et initiated with a beginner trip weekend 
ip to the club's cabin in New Hampshire 
vhere they get the general winter experi- 
nce of hiking and sleeping in a house with 
wood stove, propane kitchen, and sauna, 
jjelling said that the cabin, which sleeps 
';0-25 people, is in Bethlehem, New Hamp- 
hire, just outside the White Mountain 
i 
i 




National Forest 
members in t 

le cabin involve 
itry skiing, ic 
climbing, and lots of hiking 

Activities like ice climbing and 
kayaking, which include some share of 
physical risk and danger, are headej 
chair people — club members with 
ized experience and skills^^pi-- 

Ice climbing chair Trank Wiles, a 
grad,u^i^^^4^nt in SpuL lal Education, said 
thatpRrctivity is a little insane. "We climb 
u p frozen, vertical waterfalls. It's too cold, 
and scares you to death. There's always a 
party afterwards." 

Wiles, who formerly chaired rock 
climbing while he was a UMass under- 
graduate in the English department, said 
he usually teaches 40-50 people a year. 
"But we end up with a hard core group of 
about 20. We have a lot of fun climbing in 
California, Mexico, and the Canadian 
Rockies." 

But danger has not led to injury. 

"A lot of people on the club are really 
skilled," said Wood. "Half of us are life- 
guard and CPR trained and certified. We 



havi- tour EMTs in the club." 

"Hut we have never had any inju- 
ries, said Sharp. "We have never needed 
to pro\ ide any medical attention to our 
members. We are definitelv a s.irotvamart 
Jub" .^--''" ^'~ 

by Gregory Zcnoii 



Abo\ e The Outing Club camps out in the 
Campus Center. 

photo by Scott Galbmith 

Upper Right: Boricuas Unidas sponsored the 
Boricua heritage night at which the Cayena 
dance group performed. 

plioto by Glciidn Rader 

Lower Right: Boricuas Unidas answers 

questions at their table in the campus center. 

plioto by Glcnda Rader 



31 



Science fiction conventions are great. I love 
talking about my work. I'm always amazed to meet 
people who love my books," said writer Judith Tarr, 
the guest of honor at this year's Not Just Another 
Con (NJAC) 11, the annual UMass science fiction 
convention. 

Tarr was the main attraction of NJAC 11, which 
ran from December 1-3, partly because of her name 
recognition. After Mount Holyoke, Tarr signed a 
six-book contract while she earned a Yale doctorate 
in Medieval Studies. 

Tarr hosted panels all weekend and talked 
about different aspects of science fiction. 

"I'm considered an academic refugee," said 
Tarr, talking about combining fact and fantasy, "be- 
cause I like to write historical fantasy and straight 
historical narrative. I spend as much time research- 
ing each of my fantasy novels as I did on my thesis. 
You have to get the details right — to pick and choose 
and not just throw in quantity, which is boring." 

Tarr talked about writing what you know. 
Egypt, the world of Alexander the Great, and medi- 
eval Europe are some of Tarr's subjects. She studies 
ancient manuscripts, visits museums, and travels to 
places like Rheims, France, to add reality to her 
books. 

Tarr was also picked for her relatively local 
home. 

"We don't pay guests. We cover transporta- 
tion, food, and lodging," said senior Computer Sci- 
ence major Chris Amshey, chairman of the Science 
Fiction Conventioneers of UMass (SCUM) the stu- 
dent group that hosts NJAC. "So we figured on 
someone local." 

But when SCUM members discovered Tarr 
moved from Connecticut to Arizona, they decided 
to stick with her. 

"We all really wanted her here. She's a great 
speaker. She gave a great reading. 
Everyone was impressed." said 
Amshey. 

"Everyone" this year was only 
some 50 people, which is far below 
the numbers NJAC hoped to attract. 

"Usually a small convention is 
a couple hundred," said Amshey. 
"We should have done more public- 
ity. As far as everything else, the 
convention was a big success. Espe- 
cially with events, coordination, and 
organization." 

The convention offered mem- 
bers activities from panels on 
fanzines — fan-published magazines 
— and media science fiction, to a 
movie room showing the Star Wars 
trilogy, animated Tolkein films, and 
"Highlander". 

Prose readings, folk singing, a 

Star Trek room, and a masquerade 

dance co-sponsored by the Lesbian 

Bisexual Gay Alliance all 

_^ added to the festivities. 

A dealer's room hosted 



if 



vendors who sold everything from cloaks to replica( 
phasers. According to Bill from Space Station Stun- 
dios in Bellerica, Massachusetts, the convention wass 
small but worth the drive. 

A gaming room held some members' atten-i 
tions all weekend. Amshey said the "MAGIC" ma-i 
nia has lessened to some degree, but still had fans.^ 

"You just have to throw lots of dice, handfuls,> 
at least fifty," said Frank Nadeau, who hosted ai 
vampire game. "That way, no one knows what you're( 
doing except you. Whoever's playing gets real 
scared. 

Nadeau, a senior Electrical Engineer, was am 
NJAC gopher. He got a free t-shirt, registration, jlai 
special badge, and food. j; 

Gophers have always been an NJAC tradition; If 
said Amshey. "They help with security, registrar ml 
tion, guests, flyers, signs — everything. They're parti ;n 
of the reason we ran so smoothly." j' 

Amshey said dealers and other local profes- ai 
sionals who attended the convention were so im-t m 
pressed with the event's organization they agreed: (i 
to help with publicity next year. ji 

"We're set," said Amshey. "We really laid a 'it 
good foundation this year. We impressed people ; 
because we did a good job. We didn't get the num- 
bers, but we don't really know how. Now we've got 
professionals who will help with publicity." 

While SCUM was disappointed with this year's y 
tournament, Tarr was not. She said small conven- ;| 
tions give her the chance to talk to individual fans, 
answer more questions at panel discussions, and! 
generally make herself available to her audience. 

"Our whole genre is like a family," said Tarr. 
"Fans, writers, editors, publishers, dealers — we're a 
close-knit group. It's unique. We all love to get to 
know each other, and that's what I did at NJAC." 

by Gregory Zenoii - 




! 32 

L 



(0me Mpon 




rom Wordsworth 
3 Kerouac to the student across the 
lall, everyone gets a voice at the 
ingUsh Club. The club promotes 
he sharing and appreciation of great 
uthors of poetry and prose. How- 
ver, far from a critical classroom 
nvironment, poems are read by 
andlelight and performed v^ith 
:usto by fans who truly love the 
k^ritten and spoken word. Com- 
>rised of 15 members, and growing, 
he club attracts all sorts of people, 
'rom English majors to mathemati- 
ians. 

i The club's secretary, sopho- 
nore English major Alyssa 
Crawczyk, feels it is a place to "meet 
: lot of cool people." 

In addition to weekly meet- 
ngs, the club promotes field trips to 
ites of literary and historical im- 
■ )ortance such as Thoureau's famous 
;abin at Walden Pond. They also 
irganize public readings and guest 
peakers throughout the school year. Of- 
'■ en, these guests are authors close to UMass 
ncluding professors and graduate stu- 
lents. 

President Drew Johnson, a sophomore 
inglish major hopes to "encourage com- 
nunication between undergraduate stu- 
ients and faculty" through informational 
?xchange and specialized course requests 
vithin the English Department. 

In between all these activities, the club 
A^eaves in the culmination of the produc- 
;ion of Jabberwocky, the literary magazine 
'or UMass. It is a collection of poetry and 
arose published at the end of the year and 
ivritten by students of every academic area 
3f the student body. 

The editing process of student sub- 
missions is a shared responsibility of all 
club members, in hopes of providing a fair 
and unbiased collection. 

At the end of the school year. 




Jabbenvocky goes to print and is available 
free of charge the following fall semester. 
The cost of printing is paid for partially by 
the Student Government Association and 
partially by "The Coffee Cart." 

Run by club members. The Coffee 
Cart, located in the center of Bartlett, pro- 
vides coffee, tea, and pastries for hungry 
students who can support the arts with 
their purchases. Managing the cart is a 
rough job, but as sophomore English major 
Marc Lussier, a club volunteer and atten- 
dant playfully said, "1 live for the Coffee 
Cart." 

All in all, Krawczyk feels Jabbenvocky 
is the club's main focus. However, the 
weekly meetings draw everyone together 
for something they all enjoy. Johnson casu- 
ally said, "We love poetry, we sell coffee, 
we get by," which pretty much sums up the 
English Club experience. 

by Danielle Carriveau 



Far Left: The members of SCUM follow in 
the footsteps of Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, 
and H. G. Wells. 

photo by Glenda Rnder 

Above; The UMass English Club is good till 
the last drop. 

photo by Danielle Carriveau 



33 



i 



Iiiiium lafc ^^^^ _^^^^ .^■L^lk -j«— jMik .ji—t. .^MHikk mHRMimMI -jlllllfct. .d^aMLjflh. 




located in 416 Student Union, the Central 
Adniinistrative Office for Campus Activities , also 
known as Campus Activities is where student groups 
get the information and the advice to do everything 
from scheduling the Spring Concert to buying rou- 
tine office supplies. 

Campus Activities consists of several distinct 
branches which all handle the specialized needs of 
students, according to Phee Paradise, the Customer 
Service Manager of Campus Activities. 

The Campus Activities Advising Center branch 
focuses on program development and organiza- 



purchases, and revenue are typical financial mat- 
ters that student groups deal with through the 
Campus Activities Business Unit, which turns many 
student group business managers into accountants 
by the time they graduate. 

With its newsletters, free mail and fax ser- 
vices, and records of every group on campus, the 
Customer Service branch, acts as the general infor- 
mation hub for campus activities. 

Campus Activities is running a lot smoother 
than last year because a year ago the office had just 
changed its name from Student Activities Office, 




tional issues. A director, staff assistants, and peer 
advisors all handle subjects like running effective 
meetings, dealing with peer conflict, and evaluat- 
ing group performance and goals. Groups regularly 
need help to host events including Casino Night, 
the ever-popular LBG A dances, movies like "Kids," 
and the Senior Picnic. 

This year for the first time the Advising Center 
has initiated its own programming, called Some- 
thing Every Friday (SEP). SEP hosts comedians like 
Reggie McPadden and Dayna Kurtz and then shows 
movies like "Species" and "Copy Cat." 

"This way students can stay on campus and 
have something to do, as an alternative to going 
out," said Paradise. 

Book keeping, account management, payroll. 



and had just added many of the services, functions, 
and responsibilities that it now performs. 

The office underwent a major furniture rear- 
rangement this year in order to create self service 
stations, desks permanently staved by peer advi- 
sors, and standing shelves with information for- 
merly only available through the office staff 
members. 

by Gregory Zenoii 



Above: Campus Activities provides fiscal and physical 
support to more than 400 campus groups. 

photo Inj Scott Cnlhraith 



:^4 




^ofitAe Students, 

St^ tA& Students 



>\ni can please some of the people 

the time, and allot the people some of 
the time, but never ail of the people all of 
the time," goes the old adage. And at a 
arge university, the thought of keeping 
everyone happy can only be a dream. 

But the Student Government 
Association (SGA) works to improve 
campus life and tries to make deci- 
sions that will benefit the commu- 
nitv-at-large. 

The SGA is composed of un- 
dergraduate student senators from 
all areas of campus including resi- 
dents, commuters, and the Greek 
area. There are also four officers — 
president, student trustee, treasurer, 
and speaker. 

The SGA's underlying goal is 
to maintain the welfare of the stu- 
dents. Weekly meetings provide time 
for the senators to listen to commit- 
tee reports and review motions be- 
fore the senate body that will initiate 
action on various issues of interest 
to the University community. 

An issue of special interest this 
year inclucied the candle policy, 
which outlawed the burning of 
candles and incense in dorm rooms. 
Students made their objections to 
this policy known and the SGA was 
able to amend the policy enough to allow 
candle burning for religious purposes only, 
provided a special container was used that 
was available from RAs. 

According to Junior journalism and 
Math major Dan Sullivan, several points of 
action were taken to improve student life. 
For example, international students no 
longer had to pay for interim housing dur- 
ing the Thanksgiving break by themselves. 
The SGA passed a motion that stated the 
students be put up in the Campus Center 
Hotel and the University pay for a portion 



of that. 

SGA members also lobbied for finan- 
cial aid to help ease the ever-increasing 
burden of tuition expenses. They also 
helped with child care for students with 



knows what's going on," he said. 

"It gave me a good idea of how poli- 
tics are run, though," Sullivan added, "And 
it's a lot of work well worth it." 

by Carol L. Drzeivianoivski 




children, and addressed issues concerning 
disability students. 

SGA members feel the organization 
not only helps build ties within the Uni- 
versity, but it also helps create a positive 
image for those involved. "There are a lot 
of opportunities to be a leader," said 
Sullivan. 

Helping to draw together a commu- 
nity as large as ours is not always easy, but 
Sullivan said that it is possible. "It's diffi- 
cult representing such a large group of 
people and making sure that everyone 



Above: The Student Goverment Association 
exists to promote student interests at all levels 
where University policy is made. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 



35 



Aimin 




rian Julin, vice president and 
founding member of the Cannabis Reform Coa- 
lition, is trying to shatter whatever stereotypes 
of the CRC that people hold. The group tries to 
support the idea of a cannabis community while 
"toning it down" until people begin supporting 
them. 

In the past, the group has focused on social 
events, such as The Rocky Horror Picture Show. 
But this year the group has turned their atten- 
tion toward the public policy aspects of mari- 
juana issues. 

"We're trying to get serious because a lot of 
bills are out there, explained Junior Physics 
major Brian Julin . 

He said the CRC is exploring "black tide" 
activism. This includes lobbying in favor of can- 
nabis issues, letter drives, and producing litera- 
ture to inform the public. "We want to 
demonstrate that serious action can do some- 



thing," said Julin. 

He further explained that there is "a huge 
spectrum of political activism inside the move- 
ment." The CRC believes that if you have an 
idea inside your head of what you want to 
achieve, you should stick with that idea and 
work until it becomes a reality. 

But the CRC is not exclusively concentrat- 
ing on the bureaucratic issues. Plenty of enter- 
tainment stays on the agenda. 

Beside Rocky Horror, the group planned 
Hemp Awareness Week. They also continued to 
organize the annual Extravaganja Rally on the 
Amherst Town Common. 

Although the group is only four years old, 
members are very dedicated. Julin said, "People 
who are here have had their share of action." 

And the CRC shows no sign of letting up. 
by Carol L. Drzewianoivski 




Above: Adria Carter, Brian Julin, Owen Mann and John Leziano 
gather to discuss plans for the upcoming semester. 

photo by Anita L. Kestin 



36 



Safe 



assage 




he purpose of the Lesbian, Bisexual, 
Gay Alliance, or LBGA, is to provide a safe environ- 
ment for LEG students as well as their heterosexual 
allies, to interact and build a strong sense of self- 
concept, and to facilitate the coming out process. "We 
strive to dispel the myths and misconceptions about 
homosexuality and bisexuality within the surrounding 
community. We also provide resources and referrals, 
and education of individuals and groups," said the 
media coordinator of the Lesbian Gay Bisexual Alli- 
ance. 

The LBGA, located at 413 B in the Student Union, 
acts to promote education and awareness, of its mem- 
bers as well as the community, through informational 
meetings and movies and by releasing educational 
publications. It also organizes frequent social func- 
tions, such as dances and coffee socials, where mem- 
bers and allies can interact positively. Kate, whose last 
name has been withheld to protect her identity said 
"the LBGA provides a comfortable place where 1 can 
hang out with other gay people." 

One of the most important events to occur this 
year was Awareness Day which took place in Novem- 
ber. Students wore purple as a symbol of their coming 
out. Members of the LBGA spent the day on the Student 
Union steps, passing out flyers and providing informa- 
tion to curious students. Also this year, the LBGA 
sponsored workshops, films, lectures, info-socials, sev- 
eral dances and a candlelit vigil during December's 
World AIDS Day. Some of the lecturers included Sally 
Munt, Frank Aqueno, and Bonnie Strickland. 




Among 
the most im- 
portant func- 
tions of the 
LBGA is that 
it provides a 

safe space for members of the gay, lesbian, and bisexual 
community. This "safe space" is defined as an open atmo- 
sphere in which LBGA members can feel comfortable 
expressing their identities with other LBGA students. 

Virginia Hanson, a junior theater major said, "It is 
the only organization I have found which has helped me 
develop a positive sense of my sexuality and myself in 
general." 

The LBGA has been active in helping the university 
reform some of its structures to better serve the needs of a 
modern student body through the context of administra- 
tive policies, housing services, and campus media. It is the 
only student group at UMass that offers information, 
advocacy, and educational programming for gay, lesbian, 
bisexual, and heterosexual students. 

courtesy of LBGA 



Above Left: The Steering Committee make important 
decisions for the LBGA. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Above Right: Friends are allowed to enjoy a small coffee 
break in-between meetings. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 



37 



'"^Th 



^m ^Bk 





o you remember 
those childhood dreams of sud- 
denly being able to fly. ..floating 
above the school yard shooting 
spit bombs on all the cool kids? 
For those who never forgot 
those dreams, or who never 
grew up, the UMass Hang 
Gliding Club is for you. 

Club president and 
sophomore Natural Re- 
source Studies major C. 
Walker Korby, feels that 
"hang gliding is the 
closest you can get to 
being a bird." With 
recorded flights as 
long as 32 hours 
and distances as 
long as 287 miles, 
this could be 
true. 

Korby and 
other club members cam 
paign vigorously at the beginning of 
each semester to invite students to join and 
learn how to soar like the birds. It all starts 
with the Beginner's Weekend at 
Morningside Flight Park in Claremont, 
New Hampshire. 

The club transports 15-20 people to 
the park for a two-day introductory train- 
ing weekend. Training begins in a hangar- 
turned-workshop with ground school 
instruction. The class then moves outside 
onto the hill to start actual flight training. 
Under close supervision by professional 
instructors, students walk around and run 
downhill strapped into 50-pound gliders. 
After camping on the hill overnight, stu- 
dents move higher up the hill on Sunday, 
sometimes reaching 50 feet up. Beginners 
learn launching and flare (landing) tech- 
niques, and micro meteorology to under- 
stand local wind patterns. 

Progression to higher ground is 
gradual according to ability. After the ini- 



38 I 



tial weekend, 
however, the club en- 
joys return trips, taking groups 
of five to the Park. After about four 
return lessons, a student achieves a Hang I 
status, a license to fly solo, unsupervised. 
As flyers get better, their ratings increase 
(up to Hang V), allowing them to fly from 
higher rated, more challenging sites, and 
under more sever weather conditions. 

Though the first weekend costs $100, 
it is only half the regular cost, thanks to 
group rates arranged by the club. Student 
Government Association funding and 
group rates decrease return lesson costs to 
$30-40. Licensed flyers use club gliders 
and fly for $10. 

As Korby states, "We teach people 
how to fly safely and cost-effectively." 

The club attracts a wide variety of 



Left: Hang gliding: 
From left to right: 
Nursing major Jarett 
Barrows, Biology 
majorAletta Schnitzler, , 
Computer Science major r 
Dan Glauser. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch i 

members from the commu- 
nity as well as the five-col- 
lege system, and is noi 
limited to student member- 
ship. Members include people 
from Germany, India and Pa- 
kistan. The club gives attention 
to diversity and is made up of 
equal numbers of men and 
women. 

The club and Morningside stress 
safety and help all flyers to work to their 
individual abilities. Korby boasted, "In the 
history of the club, the only injury has 
been a sprained elbow. You are in control 
of what you do," 

The club owns 12 glides ranging in 
value from $400 to $1,500. Licensed flyers 
bring the 15-foot, 65-pound gliders to 
Morningside with them. 

"Everybody dreams of flying at some 
point," said Korby. "We provide a chance 
to live out your dreams." 

by Danielle Carriveau 



LAiass Finance 
rishters 



y the time most people graduate 
from the University, they know at least one person 
who left school because of financial difficulties. 
Attending college is difficult these days, especially 
with rising costs of tuition and fees. And unfortu- 
nately, everyone is affected by it in some way. 

But thanks to the hard work and long hours 
student lobbying organizations contribute, tuition 
and fee hikes have remained low. 

Founded in 1980 in response to cuts in the 
University's budget. Students Advocating Finan- 
cial Aid (SAFA) continues to fight for affordable 
education. 

More than 50 students receive training in lob- 
bying techniques each year and travel to Washing- 
ton, D.C. in the spring to lobby Congress for three 
days. These students also learn about policy analyisis 



which helps them to discuss the importance of fi- 
nancial aid programs with members of Congress. 

Sharing personal stories with legislators helps 
them to know how important the situation is. SAFA 
members let these legislators know how people's 
lives are really affected. 

Some of SAFA's goals include increasing the 
maximum Pell Grant award, increasing the Federal 
Work-Study Program, and keeping the existing lev- 
els of federal funding for both the Perkins Loan and 
the State Student Incentive Programs. 

SAFA believes that financial aid is the key to 
producing a nation of highly educated citizens. Equal 
education is necessary to a more educated society, 
but the only way to maintain that equality is by 
ensuring available financial aid. 

by Carol L. Drzeivianoivski 




Above: SAFA makes yearly trips to Washington D.C. 
and Boston to meet with legislators in order to increase 
the availability of financial aid for students. 

plioto courtesy of SAFA 



39 



• • # 




Above Right: The Campus Crusaders gather 
to often to discuss Catholism 

photo courtesy of Campus Crusade for Christ 

Above: Junior Civil Engineering major Greg 
Fincher looks for divine inspiration. 

photo hy Rebecca M. Fitch 

Far Right: The Pagan Student Organization 
was founded in 1987 to support Pagan 
religions at UMatis. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 




he Pagan Students Organi- 
zation was founded in the fall of 1987 by 
two undergraduate Wiccans, Lewis Stead 
and Alyxx Bergler, who found a need for a 
group to support the Pagan religions. To- 
day, its desk sits nestled in a corner of 
room 415 Student Union, complete with 
informational brochures and the PSO's tell- 
tale poster with the pentagram and natural 
figures. The organization is spearheaded 
by co-presidents Stephanie Kerkow and 
David Carron. 

There are several types of Pagan reli- 
gions including Wicca (witchcraft), Asatru 
(Norse Paganism), and Druidism (Celtic 
Paganism). Kerkow described its function 
as a revival of pre-Christian, Neo-Pagan 
religions whose roots stem from Judaic, 



Celtic, Norse, and Lithuanian practices. 
The Pagan religions all have a common i 
foundation for their faiths; they have ai 
respect for nature, its natural energies,., 
and the physical world. Pagan religions 
do not worship Satan, in fact Satan, as a 
Christian figure of evil, is not recognize® 
by Paganism. 

"We're Pagans and we worship the 
Pagan Cods, and among them there are 
witclies who speak with the moon and 
dance with the Horned One," reads the 
back of a PSO brochure. "But the Wiccan 
way is but one way. There are many; there 
are Pagans the world over who worship 
the Earth Mother and the Sky Father." 

"When the stream flows clear and the 
winds blow pure, and the sun ne\'er more 
rises unrenowned iior the moon rises in 
the skies unkncd; when the stones tell of 
the Horned God and the greenwood grows 
deep to call back her own ones, then our 
work will be ended and the Pagan move- 
ment will return to the beloved womb of 
our old religion, to the nature goddesses 
and god of Paganism." 

by Dawua Ferreirai 



^tp/z/^afvi^s 






wo UMass Wiccans founed the UMass Pagan 
udent Organization (UMPSO)in the fall semester 
of 1987. They wanted to discuss their faith and share 
knowledge about Wicca and other forms of Pagan- 
ism Although followers of the Wiccan tradition 
started the group, UMPSO is open to all neo-Pagan 
religions. These inculde Celtic, Norse, Native Ameri- 
can, and Italian Paganism, as well as interesting 
mixtures. UMPSO is dedicated to helping members 
of these and other faiths come together to discuss 
their beliefs and to educate the community. Each Sun- 
day night's meeting is different like a workshop 
concerning specific aspects of the Craft, making in- 
cense, learning to cast rune stones, or celebrating 
tradtions. UMPSO regularly holds rituals to celebrate 
the major holidays (The Solstices, Equinoxes, and 
Cross-Quarter Days) and cycles of the Moon, as well 
as anything else the group feels would add to the 



depth of Pagan experience. UMPSO tries to promote 
a positive and factual image of Paganism and are 
always glad to answer questions. UMPSO welcomes 
people to celebrations as spectators or participants. 
New people ar invited to meetings to teach, to learn, 
or just to satisfy curiosity. A small but good (and 
always growing!) library offers books of interest to 
people with many different levels of experience with 
all types of Pagan religions. Paying two dollars a 
semester allows members to access these these books. 
This year UMPSO spent a lot of time exploring differ- 
ent ways to compose rituals, so as to best integrate 
and celebrate their diverse beliefs. They explored 
ritual through chanting, motion, and spontaneous 
inspiration. They did a lot of visualization and guided 
meditation, led by people from with very different 
backgrounds. UMPSO is brimming with ideas. 

hy Whitnei/ Salz 



41 



Religions on Camj^ns: From 




ne of the benefits 
oF celebrating Ramadan in the 
United States, particularly New 
England, is that the daily fasting 
time — between sunrise and sun- 
set — is shorter than in Indonesia 
and Malaysia. 

Zureen Khairuddin, a senior 
Accounting major, explained that 
during Ramadan — from late Janu- 
ary until late February, about 100 
members of the Muslim Student 
Association, both graduate under- 
graduate, and including members 
from the Five College area, join 
together every other weekend to 
"break fast," share food, and pray. 

The Association is more of a 
religious than cultural club, said 
Khairuddin, because of the many 
nationalities of students who are 
all Muslim. "We have members 
from Pakistan, Jordan, Indonesia, 
Malaysia. But we're all the same 
religion. Islam is Islam." 

"The club is good for us be- 
cause of the sense of community 
we feel. We share the same reli- 
gion and even though we are dif- 
ferent cultures, we share the same belief. 
When we get together, I feel like 1 am 
home," said Khairuddin, a Malaysian na- 
tive who found out about the club when 
she came to UMass two years ago. 

At the end of the fasting, the students 
take part in "Hari Raya Idilfitri" by visit- 
ing each other in their apartments. The 
student visited prepares food and every- 
one celebrates together, then the whole 
group departs for another apartment. 

Rendang and soto are among the most 
common traditional meals eaten during 
group celebrations. Rendang is a dish of 
meat, either beef or chicken, marinated in 
Malaysian spices, cooked with coconut 
milk, and eaten with a white rice dish called 
ketupat. Soto is a very fine rice noodle 
cooked with shaved chicken and veg- 
etables. Both dishes, common to tra- 
dition, are extremely spicy. 

One of the complaints 




Khairuddin expressed about lif^ 
in America was shared by mem- 
bers of the Association. "The 
food here is not spicy enough at 
all. I have my own spices and 
pepper in my dorm," she said. 
"American food is too bland." 
by Gregory Zenon 



Left: Rana Al-Jammal and Nyanya 
Purwono prepare for the sunset 
rituals. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Lower Left: The Muslim Students 
Association assemble a prayer for 
Ramadan. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Right: Hillel's council gathers for 
a general meeting. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Lower Right: Hillel president 
Jamie Resnick organizes his 
members with a conservative flair. 

photo 
by 
Rebecca 
M. 
Fitch ■ 



! 42 




me Mosque to tfte Synagogue 



f you call the Hillel House 
i)ft North Pleasant Street and happen to 
'each the voice mail, you will hear the 
/Dice of secretary Marjorie Ferris telling 
^ou to dress warm because of the frigid 
emperatures. "Don't worry, springtime 
vill be coming soon!," says the cheerful 



Additionally, events like coffee breaks 
at Bart's, Hanukkah parties, Israeli Cafe 
Night, and the now famous annual Latkke 
versus Hamantash debate have helped 
bring the Jewish community together. 

A residential area located on the top 
floor of the Hillel House houses twenty-six 




students. The Jewish Living Community 
members are treated to home cooked Ko- 
sher meals and attend Friday night Shabbat 
meals as well as the Sunday brunch. 

Judaic Studies courses like Judaism 
of Social Issues and Yiddish continue to be 
offered in the Hillel classroom, evoking 
awareness and candid discussions of so- 
cial issues through the eyes of Jewish tradi- 
tion. 

Community members organize po- 
litical discussions, Jewish poetry readings, 
and movie nights. In November, a student 
version of the MTV show "Singled Out" 
drew a large crowd. 

Discussions focusing on the assassi- 
nation of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzak 
Rabin, student activism, and Jewish 
women's issues allowed students to share 
their personal experiences and opinions. 
The Hillel House takes pride in valuing 
each member's ideas, opinions, and feel- 
ings. Hillel has made students feel at home 
on a big campus, and gives them a strong 
sense of identity and belonging. 

by Dni'id ] a straw 



nessage. 

The Hillel House at UMass of- 
ers a warm and cozy place of security 
or Jewish students interested in Jew- 
sh issues, experiences, or simply 
i:\eeting new people. "I think it is im- 
portant for Jewish students to meet 
3ther Jewish students, and Hillel 
House provides a safe and fun envi- 
ronment to do that," said junior Lisa 
Rubin, a chemical engineering major 

Hillel House, located one block 
from campus, is the largest student 
organization at UMass. It has a Ko- 
sher Dining Room, a library, and spon- 
sors an endless array of activities. In 
the past year, the Hillel House hosted 
Rabbi Debra Orenstein, a seventh gen- 
eration rabbi who lectured about "Cre- 
ating Your Own Jewish Rituals," and 
"Judaism and Sexuality." 




43 




ast spring, the 
fate of the UMass Spring 
Concert, which Univer- 
sity Productions and Con- 
certs has produced since 
1981, was up in the air. 
UPC's budget was cut 
and it didn't look good 
for the annual event that 
so many students looked 
forward to for so many 
years. But petitions and 
hard work ensured 



44 



that Spring Concert find 
itself onto campus pond 
lawn for yet another year. 
But UPC is respon- 
sible for more than just 
Spring Concert. This 
year they brought such 
acts as Battle of the 
Bands, DJ Clue, the band 
311 and singer Faith 
Evans to UMass. UPC 
tries to book musicians 
from all genres of music 



to please the diverse 
tastes of our campus. 

UPC also tries to 
increase people's under- 
standing of women's is- 
sues and issues related 
to people of color. 

Group members 
are trained in various 
aspects of the music in- 
dustry. These include 
handling hospitality, 
promotion, advertising. 



stage crew, security, 
and booking talent. 

This year UPC fo- 
cused on building up 
the waning budget in or- 
der to book better acts 
onto campus. They se- 
cured grants from other 
RSOs and got organiza- 
tions to advertise at 
UPC events. 

"We're all working 
together to make this 
come out all right," said 
Junior Communications 
major, Dana Salmon, the 
promotions director. 
"Next year's budget is 
looking better." 

Senior Communi- 
cations major Jason 
Kleimold, the talent co- 
ordinator, pointed out 
that in all the years of 



UPC's existence, the 
budget has remained the 
same amount, while 
costs have gone up. 

According to 

Kleimod, years ago UPC 
was able to bring big- 
name acts like the 
Allman Brothers and the 
Grateful Dead. But fa- 
mous musicians now de- 
mand more money. 
"Talent and production 
costs are going up, while; 
our budget is going; 
down," he said. 

"In my years at 
UMass, I've seen a lot of 
ups and downs," said 
Kleimold, "I'd like to see 
UPC in a safe state when 
I leave. We have to get 
UMass back into UPC." 
by Carol L. Drzewianowski 




anguage and understanding of several 
cultures is important to the UMass community. The 
New WORLD Theater was founded in 1979 as a pro- 
gram of the Fine Arts Center. It brings dramatic works 
that would increase people's knowledge of other cul- 
tures to the University and the Five-College commu- 
nity. 

These dramatic works are presented as contempo- 
rary theater. This year they included Bones and Ash: A 
Gilda Story by Urban Bush Women. The performance is 
based on a book by Jewelle Gomez. Bones and Ash tells 
the story of a young woman who escapes slavery in 
New Orleans and is taken in by two women who are 
both lovers and vampires. 

Two one-act plays under the title Tales From the 
Flats: Colors and Familias by Sandra Rodriguez was 
collaborated effort with New Vision/Nueva Vision of 
Holyoke, Mass., Teatro Morivivi, and Groupo Bridges 
of New York as part of the Latin American Theater 
Project. 

More Than Feathers and Beads explored the chal- 
lenges faced by Native American women. Numerous 



other acts took to the stage under New WORLD Theater, 
as well. 

The New WORLD Theater celebrates and explores 
experiences that are shared by people worldwide. But the 
also wish to recognize the character of African, Latino, 
Asian, and Native Americans. And it allows thses groups 
to offer their unique cultures to our community. 

by Carol L. Drzewianowski 



Above: New World Theatre performs many educated shows 
throughout the year. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 



men's cross country j V. . . . . . .,. . . 

women'^ cross country . . . . . . . . y 

women's soccer .. . . . .;.,.. . • . . . 

men'si soccer . . . . . . . . . . ..!/.; .. 

field hockey . . . • ■-'- ■ • • • •> • • • • '-■) 

football ....•••••• • ••..•• • • . . . : 

cheerleading . . ..:.... ...... . . . 

women's volleyball . . . . . ... . . . . 

men's water polo . . . ... . ... . . . • 

men's swimming & diving . ... . . 

women' s swimming & diving . . . 
women's indoor track . ..... . . . . 

men's indfe or track . . . . . . . . . . . , . 

ski tearn ... . .... .... ... . . . . . . . 

^nen^s ice hockey . : .... . . ... . . . 

women's basketball . . ; . . . . . ... . 

men's basketball interview . . . . . . 

men's basketbair. . ... . . . . : ; . . . . 

men's gymnastics : . . ...... ... . . 

women's gymnastics ....... . . . . 

women's water polo . . ..... .:^.>. 

men's track and field . . . .... .f I: 

women's track and field . . . . . . . , 

women's tennis .. . . . . .... v . • • • 

; men' s tenriis- ,^ .- . -.^ .-,. . . ; . . . :. .^ .^^^Jf^, 
men's lacrosse .... . . . . . . . • • > • • 

wcnnen's lacrosse . ..i^"^*"^"*' 
women's ere w^^.y>" 
Softball . . . . . . ^^ . . 

baseball 7. . . .s^ 



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layout by Deviii Broicii 



47 




if inishing 23rd at the IC4A Championships 
was not the way the UMass men's cross country team 
wanteci to remember 1995. It was a meet with results that 
coach Ken O'Brien deemed "disappointing and far from 
what we expected." 

However, a minor setback after a groundbreaking 
year cannot ruin everything positive the team accomplished. 

"The IC4A Championships was a poor race for us," 
said O'Brien. "It was definitely discouraging. However, 
this sentiment only lasted about a week or so. One sub par 




-A 

i 

48 I 




race did not take away from an outstanding sea- 
son." 

This was a year where UMass proved it can run 
with nationally ranked teams. It was also a season in 
which the team captured its first-ever Atlantic 10 
Championship. These were huge achievements by a 
young team looking for an identity. 

O'Brien arranged a schedule that ran UMass 
against some of the nation's best teams. It was this 
aggressive "anything is possible" strategy that pre- 
pared the team for the late season success they 
enjoyed. The runners knew what it was like to race 
against the best; this forced them to raise their 
efforts to the level of the teams against whom they 
competed. When it came time for the crucial second 
half push, the Minutemen were more than pre- 
pared. 

It was during the latter part of the season when 
the team came together and reached its peak. 

At the New England Championships the team 
finished fourth overall, and beat the likes of Brown 



d Boston College, both top 20 teams. 

"I believe we belonged somewhere between eighth and 15th 
Ijace. Beating two teams like Brown and B.C. exceeded any expec- 
kions that I could have had," said O'Brien. 

The team then traveled to compete in the A-10 
hampionships. In this tough conference, UMass turned 
lut to be the team to beat. The Minutemen ran hard and easily took 
lie title, the first A-10 title in the school's history. It was at this meet 
\at the team ran as a whole for the first time. That Saturday was the 
:est the team looked. 

The formula for success at the A-lOs was simple. Five runners 
eeded to turn in solid races. This was accomplished with the help 




of gutsy performances by some forgotten heroes. 

These performances came from Paul Blodorn, a Plant and 
Science major, and Jon Way. Both runners were top five perform- 
ers last season. However, at the end of last season they suffered 
injuries that plagued them though the summer, preventing them 
from being in top shape. They could not contribute as much as 
they were expected this year. 

UMass then proved it was a team of great depth when other 
runners stepped up to pick up the slack. 

Sophomore Ryan Carrara turned in many fine runs. Seniors 
Mark Buffone, a Building Material and Wood Technology major, 
Timothy Bollard, and Pat Murphy, a History major, also came up 
big at times. 

"Our seniors really saved us," said O'Brien. 
"They not only turned in huge performances when 
needed, but their leadership and presence held the 
team together." 

The whole team had an outstanding season, 
but two runners truly stood out. 

Juniors Matt Behl and Mike Maceiko were the 
team's workhorses. No other Massachusetts runner 
crossed the finish line before them. Day in and day 
out, they were setting the pace for the team. 

"They were so good you almost took their 
performances for granted," said O'Brien. 

Obviously, the rest of the conference did not, 
as these two were named All-Conference perform- 
ers for the second straight year. Their potential for 
next year is astounding. 

When speaking of where his program stands, 
O'Brien is extremely optimistic. His goal is for ev- 
ery class of runners to compete in an NCAA Cham- 
pionship meet. That goal was almost reached this 
year. The prospects for next year are high. 

adapted from a Collegian article by Jason Rubin 



Far Right: Junior Matthew Behl strives to overtake his 
opponent. 

photo by Scott T. Kindig 

Left: Sophomore Ryan Carrara makes a strong finish at 
the 1C4A Championships. 

photo by Scott T. Kiiidig 

Upper Left: Junior Jonathan Way leads the pack coming 
out of "The Wilderness" in Boston's Franklin Park. 

photo by Scott T. Kindig 



Asainst All Odds 



ncredible, yes. Unbelievable, per- 
haps. Say what you will, but the one way to de- 
scribe the 1995 Massachusetts women's cross 
country team is successful. 

When coach Julie LaFreniere looked at her 
prospective roster in June, she saw opportunities 
for success. But when she looked again in Septem- 
ber, she saw problems. She lost star runner Melissa 
Langevin to a late season injury last year, and had 
to sit out the year on a medical redshirt. LaFreniere 
also lost a runner who transferred. The outlook was 
unclear. But sophomore Rebecca Donaghue and 
senior Jen Waeger helped clear the skies. 

At the first season meet, the UMass squad beat 
New Hampshire, Boston University, Brown, and 
Maine at the Thetford Invitational in Vermont. 

The team then traveled to Maine. Donaghue 
faced serious competition from a Connecticut duo, 
but ran a personal best, 17:59, taking third overall. 
UMass, which overpowered host Maine and tied 
Connecticut, was bolstered by top ten finishes from 
Waeger, sophomore Christy Martin, and junior 
Kristin Donaldson 

The UMass Invitational was the season's only 
home course. Hosting Vermont and Central Con- 
necticut, six runners placed in the top ten to lead 
UMass. Donaghue, who set yet another personal 
record, was named UMass Athlete of the Week 
because of her dominating performance in the meet. 





Above: Sophomore Christi Marti 
keeps a steady pace through the mid d 1 
of the race. 

photo by Scott T. Kiiuti j 

Above Right: On her way to qualify in; 
for the NCAA championships, junio 1 
Kristin Donaldson pulls ahead of th 
pack. 

photo hy Scott T. Kliidi^ 

Left: Sophomore Rebecca Donahue i 
closely pursued at the ECA( 
championships. i 

photo by Scott T. Kindi^\ 




Facing some of the nation's best runners, the 
Minutewomen ran strong at the Paul Short Invita- 
tional in Pennsylvania. Led by Donaghue, the 
Minutewomen placed seventh overall. Waeger ran 
her best race, taking 15th place v^^ith 18:13. 

Franklin Park in Boston was the New England 
Championships site. UMass raced among the best in 
the Northeast, and finished second to Boston Uni- 
versity, who took the meet with 81 points. The meet 
marked the third time in as many years that the 
Minutewomen have placed in the top three at the 
New Englands. Donaghue took second place over- 
all; Waeger, ninth. LaFreniere was especially pleased 
with the performance of her second tier. 

The Atlantic 10 Championship was held at 
Duquesne's Schenley Park. Facing arch-rival St. 
Joseph's, the Minutewomen put forth an incredibly 
balanced attack and took the title. Donaghue, a 
member of the All-Atlantic 10 Team, placed second 
overall, behind winner Sue Yaagielski of St. Joe's. 
Waeger, fourth place, and Greenia, tenth, were also 
named to the All-Atlantic 10 Team. The fourth and 
fifth Minutewomen runners, Donaldson and Mar- 
tin, took 14th and 16th, respectively. 

The title was the third ever for the UMass 



team. LaFreniere was rewarded for her team's effort 
with the A-10 Coach of the Year award. 

At the ECAC Championships in Boston the 
Minutewomen competed against more than 80 run- 
ners. Projected to finish somewhere in the second 
group of ten, the squad took 15th place. Donaghue 
clocked a personal best of 1 7:28 to finish 11th. Waeger 
finished 41st place; Greenia 105th; Martin 121st; and 
Donaldson 210th. 

Donaghue extended her season by qualifying 
for the NCAA Championships. The first Minute- 
women ever to accomplish this, Donaghue traveled 
to the nationals in Iowa. Donaghue completed the 
5000m in 18:08 and earned 50th overall. 

LaFreniere was especially pleased with this 
year's success because of the uncertainty that the 
team faced early on. 

"Cross country is unlike any other sport I can 
think of," said LaFreniere. "There are no breaks, no 
time-outs, no substitutions, nothing like that. You 
can't just take a break. You go hard, and you go long, 
and that takes guts. That means to me that these 
women are incredible athletes, and 1 couldn't ask 
for anything more than that." 

by Casey Kane 



A Successful Season 



It was a good season," said head 
coach Jim Rudy. "This is a great team. 
They give you what they have. They had 
great training, great results. You can't ask 
for too much more than that." 

This year the women's soccer team 
enjoyed tremendous success. They re- 
ceived a national ranking, returned to the 
NCAA's for the third consecutive year, 
and were once again Atlantic 10 Confer- 





i^,-.. 



ence Tournament 
champions. 

The 20 member 
team was led by four 
captains: senior for- 
ward Rachel LeDuc, 
a Sports Management 
major, senior defender 
Nikki Ahrenholz, a 
Marketing major, jun- 
ior defender Erin 
Lynch and junior 
midfielder Rebecca 
Myers. The Minute- 
women ended regu- 
lar season play 11-3-2, 
then added two wins 
during the A-10 tour- 
nament. After going 
1-1 in the NCAA's, the 
team finished 14-4-2, 
ranked 16th in the na- 
tion. 

Several mem- 
bers of the team re- 
ceived individual 
honors this year. 
Lynch was named A- 
10 Player of the Year 
for the second year in 
a row. Sophomore 
goal keeper Danielle 
Dion was ranked sec- 
ond in goal keeping 
for the A-10. She ranked as high as seventh 
nationally for goals-against average, giv- 
ing up 11, and making 69 saves during the 
season. LeDuc broke the team's single- 
season point record with 18 points, total- 
ing 93 career points, which also broke the 
career point record by one. Rudy was 
named A-10 Coach of the Year for the sec- 
ond time in the past three years. 

Lynch, LeDuc, Myers, Dion, and 
sophomore Erica Iversonwere all named 
to the A-10 All Conference First Team. 
Freshman Amanda Thompson was named 
to the Second Team. 








The team received the second seed in 
the A-10 Tournament. They beat Xavier (A 
to win the title, which marked their lOtt 
shutout of the season. The A-l( 
Tournament's most outstanding playe 
award went to LeDuc, who scored ninf 
points in the tournament. Lynch, Iverson 
Myers, and LeDuc were named to the All 
Tournament Team. 

For the 12th time in the past 13 yearsi 
the Minutewomen joined the other 22 
women's soccer teams invited to the NCA/ 
Tournament, out of 180 Division 1 teams it 
the country. Their first game was agains 



iartford, at home on Garber field. With 
1.4 seconds left in the game, Hartford 
Icored, tying the game 1-1, and sending it 
ito overtime. LeDuc scored the winning 
oal with less than two seconds remaining 
1 the second overtime, giving UMass the 
-1 double overtime win. The goal, num- 
er 18 for LeDuc, was her 12th game win- 
'er for the season, which tied her with two 
jrmer UMass players for the record. The 
rin improved their record to 14-3-2 and 
dvanced them into the second round of 
ie tournament to play UConn at Storrs, 
onnecticut. 

These two rivals first met this year at 
larber field in a torrential downpour dur- 
ig homecoming weekend. The Minute- 
/omen were ranked 13 and the Huskies 3. 
Jnfortunately for UMass, the Huskies were 
ble to slip and slide to a 3-0 victory. Dur- 
ig their second meeting, UConn proved 
hey could repeat their performance in good 
/eather, again winning 3-0. UMass was no 
latch for the Huskies' speed. During the 
ntire game they were only able to shoot 
nee, while UConn took 18 shots. 

But Rudy had only praise for his team. 
We had a great season," he said. "I think 
his is probably the finest team I've coached, 
hey play for each other and fight hard. 





This is a fantastic group of kids. I'm 
honored to be their coach." 
by Deb Gaouette and Gregory Zenon 



Left: Junior toward Sandy Shimogaki's 

fancy footwork keeps Cornell at bay. 

photo by Glendn Rnder 

Far Left; With determination, freshman 
defender Amanda Thompson looks to 
move the ball upfield. 

photo by Megan Lynch 

Upper Left: Senior toward Rachel 
LeDuc skirts the sideline to escape 
from the Big Red attack. 

photo by Glenda Rader 

Above: Karin Johnson, a freshman 
toward, successfully maneuvers away 
from a Cornell player. 

photo by Glenda Rnder 



53 



n 



ffense was the name of the game to 
this year's Men's Soccer team. The proof was the 
season record of 54 goals scored. But injuries held 
the team back from repeating as Atlantic 10 champi- 
ons. 

Other team victories included tying a school 
record for victories in a season with 15 and getting 
through the entire season without being shut out. 
Individually, Dave Siljanovski broke records for 
career leader in assists and most individual points 



in a season with 24 and 41 respectively. 

"I expected great things from Dave this sea- 
son," said head coach Sam Koch, "but, he achieved 
more this season than I could have imagined." 

The realignment of the A-10 Conference pro- 
vided new confrontations. La Salle, Virginia Tech, 
Fordham, Xavier, Dayton, and Duquesne, who just 
added men's soccer, joined the conference this sea- 
son. The addition of the schools made the A-10 
much stronger, but included unforeseen obstacles. 




"Traveling to Xavier and Dayton was 
v'ery hard on the players; physically and 
academically because they had to keep up 
their studies," said Koch. 

Co-caption Colin Johnson maintained 
:he cohesiness of the team. He did most of 
:he little things on and off the field to keep 
:he team focused. 

The team visited the West Coast when 
,t played in the Stanford Classic. The team 
von the tournament, dominating the Uni- 
,'ersity of San Francisco 4-1 and tying 
Stanford 2-2. Koch was pleased that the 
eam played well against Stanford, the team 
le guided in the mid-1980s. 

"It was the best road trip I've ever 
)een a part of. The team stayed focused 
vhile seeing the sights of San Francisco 
md enjoying the fine Italian cuisine," said 
Coch. 

Senior goal tender Eric Gruber earned 
he respect of the A-1 Conference through 
lis selection to the All Conference Second 
ream. Gruber worked hard during the off- 
eason to comfortably ease into the role as 
ceeper of the net. He saved over 100 shots 
md recorded 3.5 shut outs for the season. 

Injuries to senior back Bennie Sheally 
lisrupted the defense as he was forced to 
it out a third of the season. However, 
iheally played with pain as he was regu- 
arly assigned to mark the opponent's main 
iffensive threat. 



"Bennie was the best pure back 
on the team and his absence was sorely 
missed," said Koch. 

Even though they beat nation- 
ally ranked Boston University, the 
team does not consider it the most 
important win of the season. Koch ex- 
pected a tough match up against BU 
and knew that the team was prepared 
to play well. 

The biggest win was traveling to 
Xavier for the program's first time and 
leaving with an overtime victory, said 
Koch. 

Brad Miller won the team's most 
valuable player award, scoring eight 
goals out of the back. His consistent 
play — starting all 22 games this sea- 
son — made a significant difference 
for the defense. 

The injuries to 1994'sA-10 Rookie 
of the Year, Karsten Bremke, also hurt 
the team's chance for a repeat as con- 
ference champions. Though he missed 
half the season, Bremke still managed 
to score three goals and have two as- 
sists — finishing seventh on the team 
for points. 

Juniors Steve Jones, Mike Butler, 
and Lee Marlow stepped up this sea- 
son to help the team survive the on- 
slaught of injuries. While Koch is proud of his grad 
team into conference favorites, the underclassmen 





uating seniors who transformed the 
who played makes Koch optimistic 
about next season. 

"Four years ago we were happy 

to be competitive in the conference," 

said Koch, "but now we expect to be 

amongst the elite of the conference." 

(71/ Dan Sullivan 

Far Left: Freshmen midfielder 
Johnathan Hanna prepares to inbound 
the ball. 

photo by Scott T. Kindig 

Left; Junior Joe Jacobson guards the 
midfield against Dartmouth. 

photo by Gleudn Rnder 

Above: Kartsen Bremke, skillfully 
pushes past his Dartmouth opponent. 

photo by Scott T. Kindig 




he UMass field hockey team went 
through a roller coaster ride of a season this fall, 
experiencing more than their share of ups and 
downs. The squad compiled a 7-13 record, and 
while the team showed flashes of brilliance, things 
never really came together for Coach Megan 
Donnelly and the Minutewomen. 

UMass finished 3-1 in the Atlantic 10, falling 
only to eventual champion St. Joseph's 2-1 in Phila- 
delphia. The Minutewomen were upset in the first 
round of the post season A-10 Tournament as the 
Rhode Island Rams came from behind to win 3-2 in 
overtime. 

Junior Kyle Rothenberger was the offensive 
leader for UMass. The mid fielder was team leader 
with eight goals and 19 points, on her way to gar- 
nering 1st team A-10 honors. Rothenberger took up 
the challenge regularly to move in when games got 
rough. 

"When Coach says that someone has to step 
up," said Rothenberger, "I think it's me. When things are tough, 
1 want the ball." 

Freshman Kate Putnam led the team with six assists and 
finished second on her 14 points. The forward from Greenfield 
was named A-10 Rookie of the Year for her performance. 

"Putnam was certainly the premiere freshman in the confer- 
ence," said Donnelly. 

UMass started the season 2-2 before falling to rival Old 





Dominion 2-0. The team then met with top ranked North Carolin 
in Chapel Hill, and lost 5-0. 

The Minutewomen got some measure of revenge when thej' 
defeated Temple at Totman Field. The Owls were the team the ■ 
knocked UMass out of the A-10 Tourney last season. Putnam 
goal, combined with a shutout by senior goalie Stacy Walker, , 
Psychology major, gave UMass the win. 

The highlight of the season came two games later when thl 
Minutewomen got a rematch with Old Dominion £ 
Storrs, Connecticut. Freshman Erica Johnston scores 
her first collegiate goal and Walker made 18 saves t 
lead UMass to the upset win, 1-0. 

UMass finished the regular season with a 3- 
homestand before heading to Philly to face St. Joe'; 
and participate in the A-lO's. 

This year, three of the four senior Minute 
women were a key part of the team. Senior captaii 



Far Above: A determined Kyle Rothenberger flicks thf 
ball past the stick of a Dartmouth defender. 

photo by Megan Lynci 

Right: Streya Volla, a senior foward keeps an eye on tht 
action downfield. 

photo hy Megan LynCi 

Left: The Minutewomen brace themselves against thf 
Big Green attack. 

photo by Megan LyncM 



striving for Greatness 




Streya VoUa, a Resource Economics major, tied for 
second in the team with four goals. Senior defensive 
back Andrea Cabral, an Engineering major, started 
all 20 games and was one of the main cogs in the 
UMass defense. But senior Kerry Metelski, a Re- 
source Economics major, spent most of the season 
out with an injury, appearing only in one game. 
Walker played all 1,493 minutes of the season in 
goal, compiling a 1.64 goals against average, while 
posting five shutouts. 

Other standouts for UMass included sopho- 
more Courtney MacLean with three goals and one 



assist; sophomore sweeper Amy Ott with five as- 
sists; junior Melanie Gore, who started all 20 games, 
and Johnston, whose two goals were both game 
winners. 

Donnelly had mixed emotions summing up 
this year's team. 

"It has been a strange season," said Donnelly. 
"We played some great hockey this year, and it 
seemed inevitable that sooner or later the score 
would reflect that, but it didn't." 

by Brian Peiillo 



Rushing in the Rain 




Mass Football ended this 
season 6-5, making it a winning year. Under leader- 
ship from co-captains Vernard Fennell and Rene 
Ingoglia, an Exercise Science major, the 12 seniors 
supported the team to victory over the likes of Holy 
Cross (51-0), Northeastern (21-19), Buffalo (33-9), 
William and Mary (20-9), Lehigh (44-36), and Bos- 
ton University (28-23). Games against both William 
and Mary and Lehigh were played in pouring rain, 
but as running back Frank Alessio, a Senior Sport 



Management major, said, "Rain is fine with me. In 
fact, the entire team seems to thrive in the rain." 

Fennell sustained an injury in the fourth game, 
causing him to spend the rest of the year cheering 
from the sidelines. Before Fennell's injury, he was 
the team's leader in sacks. After the injury, other 
players stepped up to fill his spot, including sopho- 
more Khari Samuel and junior Justin Reimer. Reimer 
had 21 tackles against Buffalo, and had 18 tackles 
and forced three fumbles (including one after a sack 



j 58 




to set UMass up for a touchdown) against William 
and Mary the following week. Senior safety Jason 
Tudryn, a Sociology major was the team's second 
leading defensive tackier for the season, while se- 
nior linebacker Brett Hammond, a Sports Manage- 
ment major, led the special teams for tackles. 

Hammond was also the long snapper for punts, 
representing something that all of the seniors did 
well — play multipositions. Trejo Rust played many 
different positions while adjusting to something 
lelse — a course load in a difficult major. His coaches 
gave him credit for being able to balance such a 
demanding academic and athletic schedule. While 
Lou Brandt did not start this year, he provided 
depth on the offensive line, helping the team as the 
season progressed, and playing many positions. 

While the team possessed individual flexibil- 
ity, they were also able to play as a single unit. 
Senior safety Jason Mumford provided strong de- 
fense, especially against Boston University, when 
lie ran the ball on a faked fourth down punt, leading 
fO a much-needed field goal. 

Players such as seniors Alex Korentis, a Me- 
chanical Engineering major, and Ken Bello, a Educa- 
ion major, came to play every day, giving their 
eammates and coaches 100 percent of their effort 
md talent. Senior Sports Management major An- 
drew McNeilly stepped down from his starting quar- 
erback position of past years without a complaint. He entered the 
^ame when he was needed, and helped to keep the team together by 
providing encouragement from the sidelines. 

Other seniors who provided leadership and encouragement 
vere cornerback Education major Breon Parker, wide receiver Sport 
vlanagement major Kevin Bourgoin, and running back Ingoglia. 
^arker led the team in interceptions and provided tenacious de- 
ense, which always forced opponents to reconsider their passing 
;ames. 

Although UMass is known for its running game more so than 





its passing, Bourgoin was UMass's leading receiver. 

Finally, Ingoglia broke records almost every time he 
stepped on the field. Before the end of the season, he held the 
top position on the list of UMass's career leading rushers. 
Ingoglia is considered one of the most talented players in I-AA, 
having only attended UMass because of an injury sustained in 
high school (originally, he intended to play for a I-l college 
program). He received the player of the year award, and, 
ironically, was the team's second leading rusher. 

Alessio, earned this season's record for rushing. Ingoglia 
said he was proud of teammate, rather than jealous. 
In the spirit of a good leader, Ingoglia was often 
quoted throughout the season in reference to the 
benefits of having Alessio's skills on the team. 

As Special Teams Coach Rob Talley said, "We 
didn't send them out the way we wanted to, but they 
provided good leadership and went out winners; 
they'll be missed." 

by Ejiiily Kozodoy 



Above: Frank Alessio breaks away to score another 
touchdown. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Far Left: Tailback Alessio rushed for 337 yards against 
BU to break the Yankee Conference record. 

plioto by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Left: This year the Minutemen proved mud 

was their friend as they won a string of games .^^ 

despite the adverse conditions. ^ 

photo by Scott T. KindiK^ 

I 59 



A Spirited Sport 




// 



UMass Cheerleaders," said the front 
of the t-shirt; on the back; "We take no prisoners and 
eat the wounded." 

When they got into the games — from football 
to basketball — everybody got into the games, from 
the coaches to the fans to the players. And the 
UMass cheerleaders ALWAYS got into the games, 
with chants like "Let's GO UMass" at the top of 
their lungs, basket tosses complete with head-over- 
heels flips and twists, pyramids, and gymnastic 
dance routines. 

Coach Kevin Thompson said this year's team 
was exciting. 

"This was a great season," said Thompson, "a 
really big year, with a lot of changes. Except for 
three veterans who are only in their second year on 
the team, everyone was new. So it was very differ- 
ent. We started over from scratch, I did a lot of 
teaching. The squad had a lot of talent, but limited 
experience. In college you are allowed to do more 
than in high school, so we spent a lot of time 
teaching new skills." 

Thompson had no trouble at all recruiting 
most of his squad. He actively recruited high school 
cheerleaders, and began the year with only two 
spots out of 54 open. 100 UMass students tried out 
for those spots. 

But this youngest squad in recent years had to 
grow up the fastest and prove their natural talent 
right at the start of the year. In August they at- 
tended a regional cheering camp for the largest 
cheerleading company in the country, at Boston 
University. UMass competed against stiff competi- 
tion from schools like Boston College, University of 
New Hampshire, and nationally ranked Northwest- 
ern, and won a bid to the national finals as well as 
the Most Collegiate Cheerleading Award. 




"Basically," said Thompson, "we won 
the award that means if you talk about the 
best cheerleaders in New England, you're 

I talking about us." 

I From April 4-7 UMass competed in the 

National Cheerleaders Association 

ICheerleading Competition in Daytonn 
Beach. For the first time, the event was not 

jon ESPN; NBC aired all the action. 

Glory, however, did not come without 
huge responsibilities and a lot of hard work. 

Jhe training and practice — for 12 hours a 
week, in addition to all athletic events — 
began before school started, in August, and 
ran through April. Next to tennis, cheering 
has the longest season among college sports. 

I And according to Thompson, "Tennis is not 
hardly as grueling." 

Glory also came from the support of 

j the teams that the squad supported. Women's 

[basketball expressed their gratitude through- 
out the season, as they usually do, along 
with football. 

"After a football game," said Thomp- 
son, "Coach Hodges called up the team and 

'thanked them for their effort. I've never seen 

j anything like that before." 

j "As far as Men's Basketball," he con- 

tinued, "support came out of the woodwork. 
They even went so far as to get us t-shirts." 
Internally, mutual support was what 





made the squad great. "We're very pyramid ori- 
ented," said Thompson. "We work much better as a 
team than individuals, and the pyramid forces people 
together. We perform what we like to call Stupid 
Human Tricks. The catch is, when people fly up, the 
rest of us are there to catch their fall. That's a trade- 
mark of ours." 

bif Gregory Zenon 



Left; Understanding the importance of teamwork, the 
UMass cheerleading team forms a human pyramid. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Upper Left: Genevieve Nadeau girl helps raise the 
spirit of the crowd. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Above: Meghan Galvin girl celebrates a touchdown. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Far Left: The UMass cheerleading squad gets 
synchronized. 

plioto by Rebecca M. Fitch 



Net Transition 



he University of Massachusetts 
women's volleyball team continued building their 
successful program throughout the 1995 season. 
The sport was dropped in 1990, and is only in its 
third year of reemergence. But coach Bonnie Kenny 
has brought life back into the Minutewomen, mak- 
ing the team one of the up and coming programs in 
the nation. 

The 1 995 season finished with an overall record 
of 24-11 and an Atlantic 10 division third place 
standing, with a record of 15-5. This was not only a 
big year for UMass, but for the A-10 Conference as 
a whole, as it welcomed five new schools into its 
ranks: Dayton, Fordham, La Salle, Virginia Tech, 
and Xavier, making the A-10 12 strong. 

The regular season began at home with some 
tough competition in the Curry Hicks Cage, as the 
Minutewomen hosted the UMass Invitational to 
Michigan, Brown, and Syracuse. UMass finished 
runners up to a strong Michigan squad. 

Kenny's squad got a scare in the middle of the 
tournament when junior outside hitter Giza Rivera, 
an HRTA major, missed a game with an ankle in- 
jury. Rivera, of Toa Alta, Puerto Rico, was the team 
leader throughout the season, with a strong serve 
and the versatility to be an offensive and a defensive 




Wta^m^SSBsmm.-E'^^nm^iSl 





Jb^^^b 



Above: Katie Pearce is awaiting a serve from the Rams 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitc 

Right: Dionne Nash is waiting and ready. 

plioto by Rebeccn M. Fitc. 



Left: Minutewomen in action. 



Far Right: Move, move, move 



photo by Rebeccn M. Fitc 



plioto by Rebeccn M. Fita 



62 



force. After missing a few matches, Rivera returned, 
taking the place of team leader. 

The Minutewomen made their MuUins Center 
debut on September 20 when they hosted the Univer- 
sity of Connecticut. This match was partially a prepa- 
ration for the NCAA Women's Volleyball 
Championships which were held in the MuUins Cen- 
ter December 14 and 16. With Rivera out, sophomore 
Lesley Nola, an HRTA major, stepped up the offen- 
sive attack for the team, posting a match-high 25 kills. 
Despite all the excitement of playing in the campus 
premiere athletic facility, UMass fell to UConn 3-2. 

While the first part of the season brought ups 
and downs, a three game sweep over Boston College 
began the team's season peak. An amazing nine game 
win streak followed. In fact the Minutewomen went 
14-1 to close out their regular season, with a loss only 
to eventual A-10 champions George Washington. The 
streak was highlighted by an amazing five game 
heart-pounding win over the A-10 juggernaut Uni- 
versity of Rhode Island, who had dropped UMass 
earlier in the season. 

Another highlight that accompanied the streak 
was the offensive prowess of junior outside hitter 
Dionne Nash, a Communications major. Nash suc- 



■"^A' 






ft. 4 



iii^ 



» 



A 



U 5 



t^: 



-^^^ 



ceeded in receiving the honor of being the first 
Minutewoman to reach the 1,000 kill mark. 

The A-10 Tournament was also successful. 
Rematched against Rhode Island, the team was 
bounced out of the semi-finals, as they were swept 
in three games. 

UMass wrapped up the season qualifying for 
the National Invitational Volleyball Tournament in 
Kansas City, Missouri. This is the second time UMass 
competed in the NI VC. This year, UMass and Rhode 
Island both represented the A-10 conferences. 

Though still in its early stages, Kenny has 
resurrected the program from the dead. With such 
success in only two years of fielding a varsity squad, 
UMass looks to be a national power in future sea- 
sons. 

by Chris Stuiuiii 



63 



A Splashing Season 



he Massachusetts men's water polo team went 
into the NCAA Championships as the fourth seed, looking to put 
a ripple in the western domination of the sport. 

But the Minutemen flew home from Palo Alto, California 
dejected, as they lost 

both the first round ■■■^^^^^^■■■■^HI^^HHH 
and consolation 
matches to powerful 
California squads. 
UMass finished the 
season at 28-7 
clinching school 
record fourth place 
finish at the NCAAs, 
also the best perfor- 
mance ever for any 
school from the East. 

"I'm really 
proud of the kids. 
They stepped up, as 
they did all season 
long," UMass coach 
Russ Yarworth said. 
"Obviously we 
wanted to come 
away with the win 
but we came as close 
as we could." 

Massachusetts 
was forced to jump 
right into the thick 
of things, taking on 
the Golden Bears of 
California, the No. 1 
team in the country, 
in the semifinals. 

To be successful, 
the Minutemen had to 
minimize their mis- 
takes and come out 
strong early. Before 
three minutes were 
gone, Cal led 3-0 on 
goals from Nick 
Kittredge, Pat Coch- 
ran and Brad Kitt- 
redge. 



UMass made a game of it, pulling to together, when the 
score was 7-6 early in the third quarter. But they eventually fell 
10-6. 

Two Minutemen were named to the All-Tournament team. 





Louise Limardo was 
named to the first 
team. Frank Marrero 
was named to the sec- 
bnd. 

"I think we 
played really well," 
said Limardo. "We 
were hoping to 
prove to the rest of 
the United States 
that we could play 
even with the west. 
We did something 
that no other team 
has done - play with 
the best California 
teams." 

The Minutemen, although losing twice in the tournament, 
secured one of the most successful seasons in Eastern Water Polo 
Association history. Their 28-7 record, their continued domi- 
nance in the EWPA North and the Eastern Championships and 
their No. 13 ranking have made Yarworth and his squad a team to 
watch. 

adapted from a Collegian article by Fred Hinihrink, ]r. 



Above: A minuteman quickly swims to receive a ball before his 
opponent can reach it. 

lihoto by jolio Cordero 

Below: Juan Limardo, Chris Saranchock and Jue Wilmek, all watch 
a game without worries. 

pilioto by lolio Cordero 

Left Page: Frankie Mariani prepares for a throw across the pool. 

photo by lolio Cordero 




Tread in 2 Water 






he perseverance and a desire to succeed drove 
the men's swimming and diving team to a season to 
remember this year. Coach Russ Yarworth helped 
the team win their first-ever Atlantic-10 tourna- 
ment. The team finished the championship with a 
total of 62,050 points, 53 points ahead of LaSalle 
University. Freshman Brian Winsiewski led the team 
to victory. He won the 100 yard butterfly (50.85). 
Sophomore Sean Anderson won the 100 yard 
freestyle (45.86). Other team members set to make or 
break personal records. Geoff Gear, a Freshman, 
placed second with the 200 yard butterfly. He set a 
personal best record with a time of 1:51.90. But 
Senior captain and psychology major Keith McLarty 
broke the 400 yard medley school record he set a 



year ago. He timed 3:58.12. The 200 yard medley 
team's second place finish (1:33.42) also gained 
points for the team and they set the school record in 
this event. The 400 yard freestyle team earned a 
third place finish (3:07.75). In honor of the victori- 
ous season, team members shaved Yarworth's head. 
Yarworth was also named A-10 coach or the year. 
There was much to celebrate. But the team also 
suffered the loss of swimmer Greg Menton. When 
Menton came to UMass in 1992, he had a bright 
future as a swimmer and water polo player. His 
athletic prowess earned him the first-ever full UMass 
aquatics scholarship. Menton was a key member of 
this fall's water polo team which posted a 288-7 
overall record. The team also advanced to the NCAA 




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Above: Second best is never enough. 

fhoio In/ Anita L. Kestin 

Below: Mintumen reaches for the sky. 

photo by Anita L. Kestin 

Far Left: Senior Michael Shannon concentrates on his 
form. 

photo by Anita L. Kestin 




Final Four — the first time in water polo history that 
an Eastern team made the semi-final round. Menton 
also holds three varsity records. He held individual 
school records in the 100 yard butterfly (50.14) and 
100 yard backstroke (51.83). He also swam the an- 
chor leg on the school record 200 yard medley relay 
squad (1:33.71) at the 1995 A-10 Swimming and 
Diving Championships. On January 10, 1996, Menton 
passed away after collapsing during a dual meet at 
Dartmouth College. With his passing, Menton left 
behind a legacy of success at UMass both in and out 
of the pool. A ceremony in April honored Menton. 
"I think this can be a celebration of his life," 
said Yarworth. "He made a large commitment to the 
University, and the University made the same type 
of commitment to him." 

Justin Murphy said, "I don't think it was his 
athletic achievements that attracted most people to 
Greg. It was his love of what he was doing and his 
love of life." 

The ceremony ended with the retirement of 
Menton's water polo No. 6. Water polo captains 
Luis Limardo and John Luviano and swimming and 
diving captains Dave Laporte and Jeff Little un- 
veiled a red banner bearing Menton's name and 
number. The banner will hang on the south side of 
the pool. 

"It will be inspira- 
tional," said Yarworth. "It 
will be bittersweet think- 
ing about what could have 
been. But we'll do what 
Greg wants us to do. We'll 
be champions." 

by Anita L. Kestin and 
Deb Gaouette 




Diving into Action 




ne of the most underrated teams 
on campus this year was the 
women's swimming and diving 
team. This dedicated group that 
not have thousands of fans at their 
home meets, but for those who had 



never experienced a swim 
meet it was a season to be 
remembered. Senior Jessica 
Griffith competed in the 100 
yard, the 200 yard breast 
stroke and the 50-yard free 
style. Karen Sonnwald holds 
the UMass records in the 500, 
1000, and 1650 yard free 
styles. At the New England 
Championships in December, 
UMass placed second — the 
best ever in Newcomb's 12 
years with the team. In a meet 
with 10 other teams, UMass 
accumulated 1,201 points, also 
a career-best for the long-time 
coach. "Last year we finished 
fourth — over 500 points 
behind UConn." Newcomb 
said. Hickey, with a time of 
5:11.80, placed third in the 
500-yard free style,iunior 
Jessica Farley took third in the 
200-yard with a time of 
2:12.23. Baker with her second 
consecutive New England title 
in the 50-yard free style with a 
time of 24.47. She took second 
in the 100-yard free style. The 
200-yard medley team of 
junior Toni Youngdahl, 
freshman Amy Mullen, 
Griffith and Baker seized 
third with a time of 1:39.55. 



68 




Rodriquez captured third 
place in both the three and 
one-meter diving events. 
Last year the team ended 
their season with a record of 
7-4-1, taking fifth in the 
Atlantic-10 Conference, 
fourth at the New England 
Championships and seventh 
in the East Coast Athletic 
Conference. The 1995-96 
women's swimming team is 
proof that with dedication, 
and teamwork anything can 
happen. 

by Anita L. Kestin 



Far Left: Freshman Kim Schadt 
focuses on her next dive. 

photo Inj Anita L. Kestin 

Right: Greg Menton will continue to 
live in our hearts and souls. 

photo by Anita L. Kestin 

Above: Madame Butterfly glides 
across the water. 

piwto by Anita L. Kestin 



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Coming Together 



he most memorable surge 
in the women's indoor track record occurred 
early on in the season. In December the team 
placed second at a tri-meet with Northeast- 
ern University and the University of New 
Hampshire in Durham. UMass finished in 
second place with a score of 50.5 points, 
Northeastern came in first with 84.5, and 
UNH finished third with a score of 13. 

Three Minutewomen captured ECAC's 
honors in their very first meet of the season, 
proving that dedication is the team's man- 
tra. Sophomore Anya Forrest and freshman 
Rosie Bryan both qualified in the 55-meter 
hurdles with times of 8.1 and 8.2, respec- 
tively. Senior Janey Meeks qualified in the 
triple jump with a leap of 38.9 feet. 

Junior Christie Martin commanded 
third in the 20-pound weight throw, with 
45.3 feet. She also set a personal record on 
the shot-put with a throw of 41.3 feet. Even 
though she came in fourth in this event, her 
showing was impressive because Northeast- 
ern had the top throwers in New England. 

In the long jump Bryan came in second 
with a leap of 1 8.75 feet and she placed third 
in the triple jump with 36 feet 8 3/4 inches. 
Meeks took first place with a qualifying 
jump of 38.9 feet. 

Other athletes who fared well this sea- 
son were freshmen Emma Gardiner, Silifata 
Kenku, and Kristen McCabe. In the 55 meter 
dash, Gardiner did well in her first colle- 
giate competition, placing third with a time 
of 7.5 minutes. Kenku led in the 400 meters, 
finishing second with a time of 5.15. McCabe 
finished fourth with 63.3. 

Another highlight of the 1994/95 sea- 
son, occurred in mid-February when the 
Minutewomen placed first in a quad meet at 
the University of Rhode Island. 

UMass finished with a score of 184 
points while URI finished with 158 points. 
Holy Cross was third with 122 points, and 
Dartmouth was fourth with 82. 

Meeks crushed her own personal 
record by winning the high jump event with 
a length of 5-5 1/4. She also placed first in 






the triple jump with a length of 38-1 1/2. Senior Kelly 
Liljeblad, already an NCAA provisional qualifier in 
the mile and 5000 meters, won the mile with a time of 
4:54.51 . Junior Nicole Roberts also had a good perfor- 
mance, finishing fourth in the 55 meter dash with a 
time of 7.39 minutes and second in the 200 meters 
with a time of 26.31 minutes. Junior Jen Waeger 

reveled in personal victory after finishing first in the 
1000 meters with a time of 3:00.15 minutes. Freshman 
Rebecca Donaghue also finished first in the 800 meters 
with a time of 2:18.36. 

The team has great expectations for next year. 
Coach Julie LaFrenniere describes the team as 
"exceptionaly motivated, immensely dedicated, and 
profoundly talented." The future looks bright for the 
multi-talented team and with LaFrenniere's leader- 
ship there's no stopping them. 

by Annabelle Sterling 



Above: From left to right: Melissa Langevin, Christy 
"ipS Martin, and Kristin Donaldson converge to win. 

photo hy Rebecca M. Fitch 

Above Left: Shelanda Irish pulls ahead of her Bentley 
opponent. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Left: Britt Bursell throws the shot put. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 



\ 71 I 





he final game of the sea- 
son, the UMass Minutemen track and field 
teann beat Dartmouth 64 to 63. This tight 
victory wrapped up an incredible — and 
undefeated — season. 

The team's depth and balance provided 
the strength to complete their season so 
successfully. But UMass's competitors, 
Dartmouth and URI held similar skills. 

Twenty-two Minutemen scored points 
at this meet. Seventeen of those registered 
their seasonal bests in nine events. 

Coach Ken O'Brien said, "We had more 
kids in this meet fulfill their maximum po- 
tential in their particular events." 

But O'Brien couldn't name one par- 
ticular event that really helped push UMass 
to the top. 

"There were five events (100, 200, 110 
hurdles, 400 hurdles, and 4 X 100 relay) 
spaced out through the meet that were im- 
portant," said O'Brien. "With a one point 
win I don't think you can look back at the 
match and say that one particular event 
swung the meet." 

Freshman Tom Toye won the 100 and 
200 meter sprints with times of 10.86 and 
21 .80. His performance placed him fourth in 
UMass history in those events. 

Other strong team members included 
Freshman triple-jump specialist Andre 
Roach. His finish of jumping 45-feet-7 1/4 
inches qualified him for competition in the 
New England Championships. 



72 




Senior co-captain Marc 
Lefebvre also qualified for the 
New England Championships. 
He placed second in the shot put 
(49-feet-3-inches) and third in the 
discus (154-feet-ll-inches). 
Lefebvre's discus toss was his 
sixth best at UMass, and this is 
what got him into the champion- 
ships. 

Some members of the track 
team were selected to compete in 
the Penn Relays in Philadelphia, 
Penn. This is the world's largest 
track meet. 

The hard work of everyone 
on the team got them to where 
they are now — celebrating a sea- 
son well-done. 

Compiled from Collegian 
articles 



Above: A UMass runner leads the way at Boston College. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Left: The minutemen can overcome any obstacle. 

plioto in/ Rebecca M. Fitch 



Upper Left: Where's the bathroom? 



plioto by Rebecca M. Fitch 



Dashing through the Snow 



c 



kiing is a rather expensive 
hobby these days, but if you ask the UMass 
Ski Team what the best deal is, they will tell 
you. In exchange for season's passes to 
Berkshire East Ski Area in Charlemont, 
MA, team members cut grass and brush 
from the edges of the trails. And then they 
get to swoosh their way through a great 
season. 

As members of the Eastern College 
Ski Conference, they compete against 
Brown, MIT, UConn, Trinity, Babson, 
Smith, Boston College, and Plymouth State. 
There are nine men's team tournaments 
and ten women's team tournaments a sea- 
son. 

The teams, coached by Bill 
MacConnell, started training on December 
26 and spent the month of January training 



on runs with vertical drops of 1,000 feet. 
They averaged 5,000 gates a week. 

The team begins their competing sea- 
son in mid-January at "the Beast of the 
East," Berkshire East Ski Area. Senior Bio- 
Chemistry major, Tom Schaefer won both 
the Slalom and the Giant Slalom (GS) in the 
first competition, easing UMass into sec- 
ond place under Boston College. 

Strong winds at the Waterville Valley 
race kept the lifts from operating. But bad 
weather did not hinder competition. The 
men placed third in both races, and the 
women placed fifth. Ail-American sopho- 
more Leah Muliero won the GS and placed 
sixth in the slalom. 

The weekend after that the teams at- 
tended a race at Loon Valley hosted by 
UConn. The women placed fifth in the 




74 



slalom overall and fourth in the GS over- 
all. Senior Bio-Chemistry major, Tom 
Schaefer placed second in the slalom. But 
misfortune struck when he fell during the 
GS race for the first time in three years. 

The women placed second to Ply- 
mouth State at the Skutney race, beating 
BC in the slalom. In the GS they placed 
third. Leah Muliero placed fourth in the 
slalom and second in GS. Schaefer placed 
first in the slalom and freshman Forestry 
Todd Fowler placed second. 

The fourteen member team placed 
second overall, just 800 seconds behind 
BC. Freshman Sports Management major 
Tom Holden placed first in the GS. 

Skiers representing the school com- 
peted in the NCAA East Regionals at 
Middlebury College in February. Team 
members also represented UMass at the 
United States College Ski Association at 
Waterville Valley. The maximum number 
of skiers from one school that may race at 





the USCSA Regionals is five. 

Leading the women's team is Muliero 
who competed at the USCSA Nationals 
last year. Sophomore History major Katie 
Keane also shows her strength. She placed 
in the top 15 at four races this season. 

Leading the men's team on the slopes 
is Schaefer, another USCSA AU-American. 
Until this season, he won every race in his 
college career. He placed first in all but 
three races. Other leaders include fresh- 
man Tom Holden and freshman Todd 
Fowler. 

by Deb Gaoiiette 



Far Left: The Ski Team comes down from the 
slopes to pose for the Index. 

photo by Danielle Carriveau 



Above: A job well done. 

photo by Scott Galbriath 

Left: Coach Bill McConnell and a ski team 
member smile for the days victories. 

photo by Scott Galbriath 



The Cup Runneth Over 



W rophies often determine the 
success of a team. For Joe Mallen's ice 
hockey team, success has not been an easy 
battle. When Mallen reestabhshed the pro- 
gram in 1994 after a 15 year hiatus many 
speculated it would be a slow climb for the 
team. However, in 1994 the team made a 
remarkable comeback, accumulating a su- 
perior 20-9 record against mostly Division 
I and Division II teams. Last year they 
finished with a record of 6-28, 4-22 in 
Hockey East. But a more recent victory for 



hockey trophy case were skates in an ex- 
hibit commemorating the history of the 
sport at Massachusetts. The Alumni cup 
set a precedent. 

The Minutemen were supposed to 
crumble after falling behind early. But the 
team refocused, regained its composure, 
and turned in a performance like none 
other. UMass entered the shoot-out with a 
loss in its only previous shoot-out, but this 
time was different. After each team scored 
three times in the five-man set, the game 




the team came in a bigger form than win- 
ning the game. On February 10, 1996 
UMass's hockey history leapt into the fu- 
ture when the team clinched the 5-4 UMass 
shoot-out victory over No. 10 UMass- 
Lowell, claiming the inaugural UMass 
Alumni Cup, annually awarded to the win- 
ner of the season series. 

With the exception of a cup awarded 
for winning the 1972 EC AC Division II 
championships, the only things in the ice 



moved to a sudden death shoot-out. 
Brendan Concannon got one past Brian 
Regan putting added pressure on the Min- 
utemen. Junior forward Rob Bonneau re- 
sponded by beating Lowell's Martin FiUion. 
When Regan denied Jeff Daw, it set the 
stage for Sal Manganaro to sink the final 
goal. As the season's series came down to a 
sudden-death the crowd rose to its feet. 
Chants of "We want the cup" filled the 
arena. 




76 



"That crowd out there was unbehev- 
able," Manganaro said. "It was an unbe- 
lievable feeling listening to them scream. 
That's the kind of support we're looking for 
and hopefully it will continue in the fu- 
ture". 

The team entered the third period with 
a 2-3 disadvantage before the shoot-out. 
Then Bonneau, Warren Norris, and 
Manganaro converged to sink another goal 
and later Bonneau, Manganaro, Warren 
Norris, Tom Perry, and Dale Hooper all 
combined to score the final two points in 
regular play. The tie brought the UMass 
record to 10-16-2 (4-13-2 in Hockey East). 

Some people still refer to the ice hockey 
program as inexperienced, stating that the 
team has a lot to learn before gaining true 
recognition. One lesson the team learned is 
determination. On February 18, the UMass 
squad faced a shoot-out once again after 
tying 4-4 at the end of regulation and a 
scoreless extra period. For the second time 
the Minutemen walked away victorious. 
Manganaro and Norris both meshed goals 
to give UMass the 2-1 shoot-out win. 





Minutemen coach Joe Mallen he 
was skeptical when the idea of the 
Alumni Cup was. "I didn't think that 
our program was developed enough to 
have a good rivalry,' Mallen said. 

He's glad to have been proven 
wrong. 

by Anita L. Kcstin 



Far Left: Senior forward Jon Jacques and 
Sophomore Chris Fawcett plan their attack 
before heading on to the ice. 

photo by Scott Galbraith 

Left: Junior Defensemen Dennis Wright 
fights for the puck. 

f>hoto hy Scott Galbraith 

Above: Sophomore defensemen Tom O' 
Connor pratices his followthrough. 

plioto by Scott Galbiaitii 



77 




or Women's Basketball 
Coach Joanie O'Brien, the 1995-96 season 
meant a step in the right direction for a 
long-struggling program. 

O'Brien's recruiting program for the 
last two years paid off with big divi- 
dends as a talented group of sophomores 
and juniors led the way for the Minute- 
women. 

From the onset of the season in 
November of 1995, the team was relying 
on Octavia Thomas and Melissa Gurile 
to provide the Minutewomen with one of 
the most successful seasons in the his- 
tory of the program. 

The 1995-1996 team was comprised 
of four of five returning starters, 

three key guards, and two fresh- 
men power players. Thomas, who led the 
Minutewomen in scoring and rebound- 
ing last season, was a member of last 
year's A-10 first team, and was named to 
the pre-season first team this year. Gurile, 
second in both categories, and a second 
team selection last year, was picked to 
the A-lO's pre-season third team. UMass' 
other two returning starters, sophomore 
forward Crystal Carroll and sophomore 
guard Beth Kuzmeski were both named 





to the A-lO's All-Rookie team last year. 

Sophomore guard Sabriya Mitchell 
was one of the most notable newcomers on 
the court. What the 5'3 New Jersey native 
lacks in height she makes up for with an 
abundance of stamina, speed and ability. 
Although she sat out the 1993-1994 season 
as a result of Proposition 48 she was named 
to last year's preseason Atlantic 10 "Fresh- 
man of Influence." 

Other distinguished veterans were 
Guards Cass Anderson and Tricia Hopson. 
Anderson, the team's lone senior, is a good 
perimeter shooter and is a three-point threat. 
Her career 75 percentage from the free throw 
line is 10th best in Minutewomen history. 
Freshmen spark plugs Tez Kraft and Kara 
Tudman rounded out the line-up. 

In December, the Minutewomen fell 
to the Detroit Lady Tigers, 66-65. The loss 
dropped the team's record to 0-5 but their 
determination never faltered. Gurile played 
well for the Minutewomen, scoring 18 points 
on 6-11 shooting. She also grabbed four 
rebounds and blocked two shots. Kuzmeski 



78 



Shootins for Grandeur 




had nine points, eight re- 
bounds, and three assists 
while Carroll added seven 
points. 

The Minutewomen 
crushed Duquesne 75-47 in 
January, with Gurile scor- 
ing 19 points, including the 
1,000 of her career, and three 
other players scoring in 
double figures to lead the 
Minutewomen. Thomas, 
who scored her 1,000 point 
against Brown on January 
17, and Gurile made the 
UMass record books as two 
of the eight players to score 
1,000 points in Massachu- 
setts history. 

Gurile once again was 
the leading scorer for the 
Minutewomen in their win 
against St. Bonaventure on 
January 30. She scored a sea- 
son-high 24 points to go 
along with six rebounds. 

With 9:40 left in the 
game, the Bonnies held a 
53-52 lead, but the Minute- 
women stormed back and 
went on a 14-2 run over the 
next five minutes, led by 
Thomas' eight points, and 
took a 66-55 lead with 4:47 
left. UMass went on to 
dominate the scoreboard. 
The Duquesne and 
Bonaventure victories im- 
proved the team's record to 
11-6 overall, 6-1 in the A-10. 
It also marked the fifth con- 
secutive win in a twelve 
game streak. 



An 89 point West Vir- 
ginia victory was the high- 
est Minutewomen point 
total since the 1980-81 sea- 
son when the UMass de- 
feated Maine, 97-62. Kraft 
had one of her best games 
as a collegiate, scoring a ca- 
reer -high 13 points. Hopson 
and Carroll converged sev- 
eral times to produce some 
of the greatest examples of 
teamwork ever seen on the 
court. 

The Minutewomen 
ended their regular season 
18-8, 13-3 in league play 
against the St. Joseph's 
Hawks. The victory tied the 
school record of 18 wins and 
secured UMass' spot as the 
second place team in the 
league — respectable hon- 
ors for a program that has 
never finished above fifth 
in the conference standings. 

The upset is now a bit- 
ter memory of what could 
have been the end of fabu- 
lous season for UMass. But 
for the first time in A-1 his- 
tory, a No. 2 seed did not 
advance past the 

quarterfinal round. UMass 
dropped to 18-9 but still 
qualified for a bid to the 
NCAA Tournament. Look- 
ing back, there is no reason 
they should not be consid- 
ered winners for their out- 
standing performance and 
dauntless determination. 
by Anita L. Kestin 



Above: Danielle Michaud goes up for the lay-up. 

photo In/ Emihj Reily 

Upper Left: At the UMass vs. Temple game, minutewomen 
lend a helping hand to each other. 

photo by Emily Reily 



Lower Left: Emily Robertson tries to avoid the overturn. 

photo by Emily Reily 



Words to Win b 



Right: Carmello 
Travieso looks to 
pass. 

Far Right: Marcus 
Camby effortlessly 
sinks one in. 




\Jk F 



hen John Calipari took over the UMass 
basketball team 10 years ago, there was hardly 
the hype that exists today. The team had been 
down since Julius Erving (Dr. J.) in the 1970s. 

There was no "Rage in the Cage." People 
didn't wake up at 5:00 a.m. and stomp through 
snow and freezing temperatures to get 
tickets. And few people even dreamed 
of entering the Final Four basketball com- 
petition. 

But Coach Cal helped turn things 
around. 

Calipari said in an Esquire inter- 
view that he originally interviewed for 
the UMass coaching position to get his 
name out. He'd been the assistant coach 
at the University of Pittsburgh, but he 
craved bigger and better things. 

UMass needed help and Calipari 
answered those cries. In 1992, the Min- 
utemen worked their way to the Sweet 
Sixteen. They lost to Kentucky, but the 
excitement overwhelmed the campus 



Right: "U!" 



and basketball fans everywhere. Besides, the 
team's performance promised great seasons yet 
to come. 

Last year, Calipari's team ranked number 
one without even a show in the Final Four. But 
Calipari and his Minutemen had arrived. 

Besides becoming a coaching celebrity. 



30 





Left: Hold it! 
It's time for a 
meeting at the 

key. 

Far Left: Edgar 
Padilla and 
Marcus 
C a m b y 
prepare for 
the defense. 



Calipari became a local and national celebrity. 
He has a weekly TV show. Bertucci's restaurant 
hosts Calipari one night a week. Radio station 
99.3 WHMP FM broadcasts live from Bertucci's 
on these nights as fans ask Calipari questions. 
But along with his glory have come prob- 
lems. Last year, a Boston Globe article claimed 
that seven of the 13 scholarship players were 
having academic problems, but none lost eligi- 
bility. Calipari charged that the story was inac- 
curate and an invasion of players' privacy. 

Calipari went on to say that the gradua- 
tion rate of his players is higher than that of the 
university as a whole. 

Another damper on Calipari's smooth 
public image was the ugly scene between 
Calipari and Temple coach John Cheney. 
Cheney's emotions got the best of him in the 
interview room and tried to start a fight with 
Calipari. 

The two have since made amends, but 



many still remember the nasty argument. 

But along with the pond, the swan, and the 
tower library, the basketball team has become a 
UMass landmark. Midnight Madness kicks off 
basketball season every year and gets the cam- 
pus all fired up for some fancy footwork. People 
pack into Rafters sports bar to watch the games. 
And no matter where you are on campus, 
someone's always talking about Cal's personal 
dream team. 

by Carol L. Drzewianowski 



81 



Kings of the Court 



he year was shared by ev- 
ery member of the Massachusetts men's 
basketball team as they rolled to a 35-2 
record, a fifth straight Atlantic 10 tourna- 
ment title and a school first trip to the 
Final Four. 

The 1995-96 season will be remem- 
bered at the year Marcus Camby won as 
much National Player of the Year hard- 
ware as there are Craftsmen tools in the 
do-it-yourself department at Sears. But 
almost every Minuteman down the roster 
provided a classic moment that will be 
forever etched in the memoirs of each 
UMass fan. 

Wake Forest came to Amherst when 
they ranked tenth in the country. They 




82 



came to be the highest ranked team ever to 
play the Minutemen on campus. They 
brought their high profile center, 6-foot-lO 
Tim Duncan, a pre-season Ail-American 
selection. The nationally broadcast game 
was the showcase for the two inevitable, 
whether it be this year or next, lottery picks. 

The Minutemen prevailed 60-46 as 
Camby shut down his counterpart, hold- 
ing Duncan to a measly 3-foot-12 shooting 
and just seven points. 

The Minutemen went into Conference 
play on Jan. 14 against St. Bonaventure — 
one of four unbeatens in the country. Then 
for no apparent reason, the country's best 
college player collapsed for 10 minutes in 
the runway just seven minutes before game 
time. The next four games would be played 
without Camby. While he went under ex- 
aminations looking for answers, the team 
pressed on looking for wins. 

Camby's return didn't rock the UMass 
boat. His Jan. 27 return against St. 
Bonaventure was a 25-point blowout. 
Camby blocked nine shots, tying a school 
record. Not only was he back, he was as 
good as ever. The streak contin- 
ued with a huge scare at Xavier 
and a stiff test at Virginia Tech 
until the proverbial thorn in the 
Minutemen's side finally burst 
the UMass bubble. 

Mike Jarvis and the George 
Washington Colonials came to 
the Mullins Center for the sec- 
ond straight year and beat UMass 
86-76, ending the dreams of a 
perfect season for the Minute- 



Above: Carmello Travieso guards his home territory. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Right: Marcus Camby getting ready to make one of his 
great shots. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Upper Far Right: "C'mon Carmello, open up!" 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Far Right: Coach Cal looking on as the UMass 
basketball team do their stuff. 

plmto by Rebecca M. Fitcli 

Lower Far Right: GW's Alexander Koul tries to take 
the ball from UMass's Dana Dingle. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 



men. They were 26-1 and now sights cou ' 
be set on the ultimate goal — a Natiorl 
Championship. 

Coach John Calipari's crew ran t 
table in the regular season, and breez 
through the A-10 tournament finally en 
ing their four game losing finals to ent 
the NCAAs at a national best 31-1. 

As the top seeded team in the Easti 
well as the entire tournament, Centii 
Florida was the first step along the way f 
UMass. The Golden Knights hung aroui 
for a half before being blown out by Edg 
Padilla's quick hands in the second ha 
among other things. 

In the second round, a pesky Breve 
Knight wouldn't let his Stanford team re 
over until a 10-foot Bright jumper finalil 
put the Cardial to rest. 

On to Georgia and a defensive ma 
terpiece against Arkansas that end^i 
shortly after it started as the Minutemfn 
trap broke the Razorback's back and til 
freshman laden squad in the Sweet Si-i 
teen. 

The Elite Eight was supposed to 1 





the final stop for the UMass express as 
they matched up wit Allen Inverson and 
Georgetown. The Minutemen put the 
clamps on the Hoya scoring machine and 
were never threatened after half time and 
UMass's ticket was punched for New Jer- 
sey and the Final Four. 

It was at the Meadowlands where 
the top two teams in all the land all year 
met it what was billed as the actual Na- 
tional Championship as it was found two 
between the Minutemen and Kentucky. 

A valiant second half run cut a double 
digit Wildcat lead to three with five un- 
precedented ride finally came to an end to 
Calipari mentor Rick Ritino and his even- 
tual champions. 

They had the best record in the coun- 
try when it was all said and done and left 
with memories that will last for- 



by Justin Smith 



m~: 



IS: 



Above the Bar 




An appearance in the NCAA East 
Regionals punctuated the Men's Gym- 
nastics outstanding season. They ended 
the year with a 9-3 overall record under 
the direction of Roy Johnson. Captians 
Steve Johnson, a senior Theatre major; 
Andy Fullmer, a senior Accounting 
major; Ruslan Shupak, a junior Account- 
ing major; and Gabe Columbus, a jun- 
ior Consumer Studies major led the 
squad. Six members of the team com- 
peted in the NCAA East Regional held 
at Iowa's Carver Hawkeye Arena. Se- 
nior Steve Goldman placed highest for 
UMass. He placed 10th on the parrell 
bars with a score of 9.350, missing na- 
tional qualification by only. 025 points. 

"I thought 1 put as much effort as 
I possibly could into my performance," 
said Goldman. "I'm really proud of the 
results." 

Shupak accomplished his best per- 
formance ever on the rings, placing 1 2th 
with a score of 9.625. He also missed 
qualifying for the nationals, this time 
by .05 points. 

Freshman Phil Lieberman, a Mar- 
keting major, and Brad LeClair, a Biol- 
ogy major also represented UMass, 
along with Columbus and junior Na- 
tional Resource Studies major Chris 





Funk. 

The team placed third in the EIGL tournament 
and second in the ECAC tournament. Their success 
continued as they won the New England Tourna- 
ment. 

Deb Gaoiiette 



Above: The 1995-1996 men's gymnastics team 
celebrates their victory in the New England 
Championships. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Left: The still rings are no match for junior Chris Funk. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Far Upper Left: One of Umass' top all-around gymnasts. 
Junior Ruslan Shupak concentrates on his performance 
on the high bar. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Far Lower Left: Sophomore Keith Showstack focuses 
on keeping his body level during a strength 
move on the parallel bars. -ssrr 

plioto by Rebecca M. Fitch 



85 



he Women's 
Gymnastics team celebrated 
what some consider their best 
season ever. The Minutewomen 
won their first ever Atlantic 10 
Championship, and did so at 
UMass in front of their home 
crowd. 

The Minutewomen fin- 
ished with a score of 191.925 in 
front of George Washington , 
Rhode Island, and Temple. 

On the balance beam, the 
Minutewomen took three of the 
first four spots. Lianne Laing 
won the event with a 9.800. Se- 
nior co-captain and psychology 
major J.J. Tolhurst (9.675) and 
Junior jounalism major Tara 
Swartz (9.675) tied for third 
place. 

Swartz was named all- 
around winner finishing with a 
score of 39.050. 

Swartz also was named 
the A-10 Gymnast of the Year. 
"Right now, Tara is only a 
Junior, and she already has 
three A-10 titles," said team 
coach, Dave Kuzara. "She has 
been just outstanding all sea- 
son long." 

Honors also went to 
Tolhurst who was the NCAA 
Regional All-Around and beam 
champion. Spanish major 
Denise Johnson earned Co- 
Freshman of the Year. In addi- 
tion, Kuzara was named the 
A-10 Coach of the Year. 

Kuzara stressed the effort 
and dedication of the team. 

"Your can't exactly enter 
a gymnastics pick-up game," he 
said. "There's nowhere else to 
go after college. It's got to be a 
big transition for the girls. You 
spend 1 5 to 1 8 years of your life 
in a sport, and then it just comes 
to an end." 

But at least the Minute- 
women ended with their most 
successful season. 
Compiled from Collegian articles 




Reaching for New Heights 




Left: Senior Leann Zavotka balances her way to victory. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Below: Junior Lianne Laing captivated the audience 
with her performance in the floor exercise. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Far Left: Freshman Anita Sanyal is one of the best in 
the nation on the balance beam. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 







87^ 



he UMass's Wa- 
ter Polo team has accom- 
plished so much in such 
a short time. One of the 
highlights of this season 
was when the water polo 
team defeated Harvard 
11-9 in double overtime. 
Coach Bob Newcomb 
said, "I still believe we 
are the better team." He 
stuck to his words when 
UMass lost to Harvard 
earlier in the semester 9- 
7 in double overtime. 

When the team met 
up again with Harvard 
at Amherst, UMass 
showed what they were 
made of. During the 
last quarter, UMass led 
Harvard by 7-5. But 
Harvard gained a sec- 
ond wind and scored an 
additional three goals to 
our one. At the end of the game 
UMass tied Harvard 8-8. Both 
teams scored during the first 
overtime making it 9-9. 

In the second overtime 
UMass overcame the strength 
of Harvard and scored two ad- 
ditional goals to make the final 




score 11-9. The major players 
for that game were Junior Vicky 
Bamond with five goals and 
two assists. Junior Cathy 
Leeburg with three goals, two 
assists and four steals and Se- 
nior goalie Jessica Griffith with 
eight saves and three steals. 



Other big wins this sea- 
son have been against M.l.T. 
where the Minutewomen 
crushed them with 17-11. In 
that game Leeburg scored five 
goals and Bamond with one 
goal, five steals and three as- 
sists. Senior Meghan O'Connor 




Swimmins Toward Victor 



scored two goals, three steals 
and two assists, and Griffith 
led with five steals and five 
saves. 

When playing Wellesley 
UMass defeated them by 19- 
10. In this game Leeburg scored 
four goals, one assist, and 
steals. Senior Mirca Martinez- 
Cruz had three goals, two as- 
sists and two steals. 

Top scorers for this sea- 
son have been made by Junior 
Vicky Bamond with 52 goals 
and 19 assists. Junior Cathy 
Leeburg with 36 goals and 16 
assists. Junior Barbara Hickey 
with 28 goals and 13 assists. 
Another major asset to the team 
has been they're captain Senior 
Jessica Griffith as goalie with 
an average of 6.5 goals/game. 
This average has been a mas- 
sive improvement over last 
year. 

Unfortunately the UMass 




» M, 




women's water polo team will 
be losing many seniors includ- 
ing Michelle Hanasan, Mirca 
Martinez-Cruz, Barbara 
Mullen, Meghan O'Connor, 
and Jessica Griffith. 

The team finished with a 
amazing 4-0 in the EWPA, New 
England Tournament. The 
Minutewomen beat Harvard 
(11-9) in 20T, Dartmouth (20- 



6), MIT (17-11), and Wellesley 
(19-10). They also finished with 
2-1 in the EWPA North Eastern 
Tournament beating Queens 
and Wellesley 13-0 for the first 
shut out of the season. They 
ranked 3rd. in the North East- 
ern Tournament and will play 
the No. 1 seed in the South East- 
ern Tournament. 

by Loretta Kivan 



Left: Senior goalie Jessica Griffith watches the action intently. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Lower Far Left: Senior Meghan O'Connor prepares to send the ball 
down the pool. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

~\ Upper Far Left: Junior Cathy Leeburg looks to her teammates before 
passing. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Above: Senior Jessica MGrif fin blocks a shot from the opposing team. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 



Taking it in Stride 





their final 
gamF^of the season, the 
UMass Minutemen track 
and field team beat 
Dartmouth 64 to 63. This 
tight victory wrapped up 
an incredible — and un- 
defeated — season. 

The team's depth 
and balance provided 
the strength to complete 
their season so success- 
fully. But UMass's com- 
petitors, Dartmouth and 
URI held similar skills. 

Twenty-two Min- 
utemen scored points at 
this meet. Seventeen of 
those registered their 
seasonal bests in nine 
events. 

Coach Ken O'Brien 
said, "We had more kids 
in this meet fulfill their 
maximum potential in 
their particular events." 

But O'Brien 

couldn't name one par- 
ticular event that really 
helped push UMass to 



the top. 

"There were five 
events (100, 200, 110 
hurdles, 400 hurdles, and 
4 X 100 relay) spaced out 
through the meet that 
were important," said 
O'Brien. "With a one 
point win I don't think 
you can look back at the 
match and say that one 
particular event swung 
the meet." 

Freshman Tom 
Toye won the 100 and 
200 meter sprints with 
times of 10.86 and 21.80. 
His performance placed 
him fourth in UMass his- 
tory in those events. 

Other strong team 
members included 
Freshman triple-jump 
specialist Andre Roach. 
His finish of jumping 45- 
feet-7 1/4 inches quali- 
fied him for competition 
in the New England 
Championships. 

Senior co-captain 



90 




I -■ 



Marc Lefebvre also 
qualified for the New 
England Champion- 
ships. He placed second 
in the shot put (49-feet- 
3-inches) and third in the 
discus (154-feet-ll- 
inches). Lefebvre's dis- 
cus toss was his sixth best 
at UMass, and this is 
what got him into the 
championships. 

Some members of 
the track team were se- 
lected to compete in the 
Penn Relays in Philadel- 
phia, Penn. This is the 
world's largest track 
meet. 

The hard work of 
everyone on the team got 
them to where they are 
now — celebrating a sea- 
son well-done. 
Compiled from Collegian 
articles 





Far Lower Left: "Hit the Dirt." 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Far Upper Left: The 1996 men's track and field 
tewam was led by determination and strength. 

pihoto by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Above: The relay race was an important event 
this season. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Left: A minuteman glides over the hurdles. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitcli 



fiB 




Above: Rebecca Donaghue, a sophomore Art major, 
sizes up her opponents before her event. 

photo In/ Rebecca M. Fitch 

Right: Relived that the race is over, Cheryl Lyons, a 
Journahsm and Legal Studies major, catches her breath. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Upper Right: Melanie Bell pushes to cross the finish 
line in a relay. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Far Lower Right: Rosey Bryan, a sophomore Afro- 
American major, smiles as she clears the last hurdle 
ahead of the opponents. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Far Upper Right: Melanie Bell's technique on the 
lo)\g jump provides good distance. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 




92 



Runnine for Glor 




he most 
memorable surge in the 
women's indoor track 
record occurred early on 
in the season. In Decem- 
ber the team placed sec- 
ond at a tri-meet with 
Northeastern University 
and the University of 
New Hampshire in 
Durham. UMass fin- 
ished in second place 
with a score of 50.5 
points. Northeastern 
came in first with 84.5, 
and UNH finished third 
with a score of 13. 

Another high- 
light of the 1994/95 sea- 
son, occurred in 
mid-February when the 
Minutewomen placed 
first in a quad meet at 
the University of Rhode 
Island. 

UMass finished 
with a score of 1 84 points 
while URI finished with 
158 points. Holy Cross 
was third with 122 




points, and Dartmouth 
was fourth with 82. 

Meeks crushed 
her own personal record 
by winning the high 
jump event with a length 
of 5-5 1/4. She also 
placed first in the triple 
jump with a length of 38- 
1 1/2. Senior Kelly 
Liljeblad, already an 
NCAA provisional 
qualifier in the mile and 
5000 meters, won the 
mile with a time of 
4:54.51. Junior Nicole 
Roberts also had a good 
performance, finishing 
fourth in the 55 meter 
dash with a time of 7.39 
minutes and second in 
the 200 meters with a 
time of 26.31 minutes. 
Junior Jen Waeger rev- 
eled in personal victory 
after finishing first in 
the 1000 meters with a 
time of 3:00.15 minutes. 
Freshman Rebecca 
Donaghue also finished 
first in the 800 meters 
with a time of 2:18.36. 

The team has 
great expectations for 
next year. Coach Julie 
LaFrenniere describes 
the team as 

"exceptionaly moti- 
vated, immensely dedi- 
cated, and profoundly 
talented." The future 
looks bright for the 
multi-talented team and 
with LaFrenniere's lead- 
ership there's no stop- 
ping them. 

by Annabelle Sterling 



outh is not wasted 
on the young in women's 
tennis. The Minute- 
women, comprised al- 
most entirely of 
freshmen and sopho- 
mores, earned a 13-1 sea- 
son and captured the 
New England champion- 
ship title for the first time 
in UMass history. 

Senior business 
major and returning cap- 
tain Liesl Sitton, hailed 
as one of UMass's finest 
women's tennis players 
ever, won the singles title 
for the second year in a 
row. Sophomore 

Svetlana Gordetskaya's 
stellar performance at 
the New England Cham- 
pionships earned her a 
title as the top No. 6 




^„*-- 




n 



94 



Sitton Prett 




player in the region. 

Coach Judy Dixon 
commends her team for 
an incredible season and 
believes this will be the 
team to turn around 
UMass tennis. 

"The sophomores 
and freshmen are the 
basis of a new UMass 
tennis program," said 
Dixon. "We're consid- 
ered the upstart team in 
New England and the 
East, as well as a threat 
to big-time programs. 
We're knocking on the 
door of a national rank- 
ing." 

In addition to a 
tough schedule against 
Division I teams, the 
Minutewomen had im- 
pressive showings at the 
Cornell Invitational. 
Sitton advanced to the A 
singles finals while Jun- 
ior Co-captain Liz 
Durant made it to the B 
singles semi-finals. 

Freshman Marie- 
Christine Caron also ad- 
vanced to the semi-finals 
for the C singles division. 
And Sophomore Noelle 
Orsini, the No. 2 singles 



player for UMass, won 
the D singles. 

The dynamic duo 
of Sophomore Caroline 
Steele and Sitton led 
doubles play again this 
year and advanced to the 
semi-finals at the Cornell 
Invitational. Steele is 
considered the best 
doubles player on the 
squad and holds the No. 
1 position. Gorodetskaya 
and Caron performed 
impressively in the B 
doubles finals. 

Although Sitton 
leaves the team this year, 
she takes several honors 
with her. These include 
the New England Singles 
Championship title, an 
Outstanding Senior 
Award, and only four 
losses each for singles 
and doubles play since 
her Freshman year. 

With Sitton's guid- 
ance and experience dur- 
ing this season, the 
remaining young and 
talented women hope to 
continue their success for 
the next few years to 
come. 

by Loretta Kimn 



Upper Far Left: Lana Gorodetskaya, the No. 6 singles 
player, demonstrates her forehand. 

photo by Anita L. Kestin 

Lower Far Left: Noelle Orsini and Liz Durat wait out 
the rain delay before the big match. 

photo by Anita L. Kestin 

Above: Senior Co-Captain Leisel Sitton follows 
through. 

photo by Anita L. Kestin 

Left: Sophomore Caroline Steele smashes the ball to 
her Amherst College opponent. 

photo by Anita L. Kestin 



From Court to Court 



e walks to the 
baseline, bounces the 
ball a few times, tosses it 
in the air and serves it 
over the net to his oppo- 
nent. The serve is re- 
turned and the match is 
off to a great start. 

This is how the 
majority of the fall sea- 
son was for the men's 
tennis team ending with 
a record of 3-4. They 
were led by their #1 
singles player, senior co- 
captain Tim Lipsky. Ac- 
cording to Coach Judy 
Dixon, "Tim is a gutsy 
player. I was pleased 
with the way he played 
in the fall. He plays with 
real intensity and desire, 
and that's the kind of 
player we need at the No 
1. singles position." The 
team was also led by jun- 





ior Justin Lynn and se- 
nior co-captain Keith 
Murray. Murray 

and Lipsky combined to 
form the top doubles tan- 
dem. The pair improved 
steadily during the fall, 
finishing with a 2-3 
record. They dropped a 
tough three-set decision, 
in the first round of the 
Rolex Regional. Sopho- 
more Ankur Baishya, 
one of the most consis- 
tent players on the team, 
rounded out the top half 
of the singles draw. He 
made an immediate im- 
pact on the program last 
year, checking into the 
line-up at the top singles 
spot as a freshman. 
Baishya had a strong fall 
finishing with a 4-3 
singles record. Baishya 
had the potential of 
emerging as one of the 
strongest No. 3 singles 
players in the Atlantic 10. 
He combined with jun- 
ior Darren Tow for a 3-2 
record at No 2. doubles 
in the fall. They formed a 
consistent and solid team 
that Dixon was able to 
count on in tight 
matches. 

Several players 
contended for the No. 5- 
6 spots. Eric Peters and 
Greg Hsiao led in singles 
action. Peters finished 
the fall with a 2-0 singles 
and 3-2 doubles record. 
His quick serve and vol- 
ley style made him a key 
entry into the double 



96 I 



line-up and a potential 
singles candidate. 

Hsiao struggled 
this fall to a 2-4 record in 
the lower portion of the 
draw, but possessed abil- 
ity and potential to be 
strong and consistent in 
the spring. A surprise 
semi-finalist in the New 
England Championship 
last spring, Hsiao should 
be a steady addition in 
both singles and 
doubles. 

Dixon feels confi- 
dent that the depth and 
experience should help 
the Minutemen face the 
tough regional competi- 
tion at the New England 
Championship and the 
Atlantic 10 Champion- 
ship. The depth of the 
talent will enable Dixon 



to use a variety of com- 
bination at doubles anci 
singles. 

The spring season, 
which started on Febru- 
ary 25 is the major part 
of the tennis team's 
schedule. At press time 
the team was looking to 
improve their fall season 
during the spring. Ac- 
cording to Dixon, "the 
real goal for this team is 
to have a winning sea- 
son. We are a much 
stronger and deeper 
team then we were last 
year. I am happy about 
the strides we made in 
the fall. 1 think we are 
moving in the right di- 
rection. I feel positive 
about the steps that the 
program is making." 

by Deb Gaouette 






Far Upper Left: Quick- 
handed senior Darren 
Tow shows off his 
forehand. 

photo by Anita L. Kestin 

Far Lower Left: With a 
look of determination 
Eric Peters returns the 
ball to his opponent. 

pjlwto In/ Anita L. Kestin 

Above: Justin Lynn 

practices his forehand 

on the UMass courts. 

photo by Anita L. Kestin 

Left: The men's tennis 
team gathers with 
Coach Judy Dixon 
after a practice to 
discuss strategies 
before a big match. 
photo by Anita L. Kestin 



97 1 



hen you look 
around the lacrosse 
world, there have been a 
lot of upsets and a lot of 
surprises. It just goes to 
prove that no matter how 
good you are, if you 
don't come, ready to 
play, someone is going 
to beat you. If you do 
come to play you can 
beat anybody," said 
Coach Greg Canella in a 
Massachusetts Daily Col- 
legian interview. 

The Men's Lacrosse 
team certainly proved 
Canella's words true 
with their upsets of No. 
10 Duke and No. 6 Notre 
Dame. Ranked No. 16 in 
the beginning of the sea- 
son, their victory over 
both teams and 
unranked Delaware 
earned them a No. 15 
spot. Heartbreaking 
losses to Hofstra, Army 
and Harvard seemed to 
jeopardize the chance of 



competition in the 
NCAA tournament. The 
turning point battle 
against Notre Dame so- 
lidified their chances as 
they reigned victorious 
in the first of three big 
games decisive in the 
Minutemen's chance at a 
tournament showing. 

The Irish entered 
the competition with a 
7-2 record, matched 
against the Minutemen's 
5-4 season. Both teams 
demonstrated strong 
goal-tending and defen- 
sive play throughout the 
game. Sophmore goalie 
John Kasselakis blocked 
14 shots giving up a sea- 
son low of five goals. All- 
America candidate 
Brendan Glass headed 
the Minutemen's first 
scoring streak with the 
first two UMass goals. 
Freshman Jay Negus and 
Junior Chris Grande ex- 
tended the lead to 4-0 



before the end of the first 
half. Junior attackan Ken 
Sussie began the second 
four-goal run to tie the 
game with 12 minutes 
left in the fourth quarter. 
Mike DelPercio an- 
swered Notre Dame's 
first goal in the fourth 
quarter while seniors 
Eric Bailey and Buddy 
Hoffman executed the 
kill with a goal apiece. 
Junior Jay Robbins con- 
tributed to the 
Minutemen's cause by 
winning 1 3 of 1 7 f aceoff s. 
With only No. 7 
Syracuse and No. 8 
Brown standing in the 
way of NCAA action for 
UMass, the 

Minutemen's 2-1 record 
against top ten oppo- 
nents, losing only to 
No.l Virginia, and their 
season record of 6-4 
show that anything can 
happen. 

by Gayle Dolierty 





Upper Far Left: UMass slides across the field to capture 
the ball. 

pboio by Rcbeccn M. Fitch 

Above Left: UMass's #9 overcomes Harvard. 

pihoto by Rebecca M. Fitch 



Left; Pass me the ball! 



photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 



Above: UMass's #5 runs to assist a teammate. 

plioto by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Lower Far Left: This ball is MINE! 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 



Playing with Determination 



ebi. 



ebuilding. That was the 
theme for the Women's La- 
crosse team this year. Only two 
seniors remained on the team, 
but despite a 4-10 record, they 
showed strong signs of growth 
in the first half of most games, 
succumbing to inexperience in 
their losses. 

Their 11-8 victory of the 
University of New Hampshire 
showed promise for next sea- 
son. 

'Tf we play our game and 
we execute well, we'll be all 
right," said assistant coach Jill 
Pearsall. "The New Hampshire 
game was huge. It showed the 
team that they're capable of 
winning. It was a big moral vic- 
tory and you can see that the 





team is really starting to ma- 
ture." 

Tri-captains Erica Bryan 
(junior defense), Trish 
DiBenedetto (junior goalie), and 
Diane MacNeil (senior 
midfielder) led the team. 
MacNeil provided stability to 
the youthful team. 

"The goalie play has been 
solid," said Pearsall. 

Goaltending duties have been 
divided between DiBenedetto 
and first year player Melissa 
Boradinsky." 

The team showed signs of 
improvement against Rutgers. 
But they also took a few steps 




Far Left: The UMass Women's Lacrosse team all perforn 
their pre-game cheer. 

photo In/ Scott Galbraith 

Upper Left: The Minutewomen prepares to pass the ball. 

photo by Scott Galbraith 

Above: The Minutewomen runs from the other team. 

photo by Scott Galbraith 



backwards. The offense was 
well balanced and controlled 
the tempo, but Rutgers scored 
two late goals to edge out a 9 to 
8 victory. 

"We played offense how 
we like to play it: by getting 
everyone involved and playing 
solid in transition," said Dinger. 

The team received key 
game play from junior Michelle 
Warrington. The three-year de- 
fensive starter is described as a 
field leader who dominates the 
game. 

Junior Stephanie Walsh 
also contributed greatly. As an 
attacker, she brings a strong 
shot as a south-paw. She was 
effective in taking draws this 
season and is expected to be a 
prominent figure the 

Minutewomen's arsenal next 
year. 

"We were real pleased 
with our effort against Hofstra," 
said Dinger. "Our defense 
played tough and our offense 
had plenty of opportunities. It 
was a good back and forth game. 
We played hard for 60 minutes." 

Sophomore Jenn Herker 
returned from a knee injury that 
sidelined her last year. She did 
not lose a step as her quickness 
of foot blazed past opponents. 
The midfielders is known as a 
ferocious competitor and she is 
expected to return next year to 
help the Miiiutewomen return 
to prominence. 

The team has a strong core 
of players returning next year. 
The team showed promise. Next 
season is expected to see a dra- 
matic turnaround in the win col- 



by Dan Sullivan 




101 




hH ne of 



ne of the most underrated 
teams on campus this year was the women's 
swimming and diving team. But they made 
up for this by their sliow of spirit, making 
them one of the rowdiest teams. This dedi- 
cated group tliat not have thousands of 
fans at their home meets, but for those who 
had never experienced a swim meet it was 
a season to be remembered. 

In the first meet of the season, the 
team came away victorious with a win 
over Vermont. The Minutewomen defeated 
the Catamounts of the Green Mountain 
State by 140-85. Junior Barbara Hickey 
swam strong in the 1000-yard free style to 
win the event in a time of 10:39.22. Sopho- 
more Irina Kossenko finished first in the 
200 meter butterfly with a time of 2:13.41, 
and was a strong contributor in the Minute- 
women victory. 

Angelica Rodriguez captured both the 
three meter and one meter diving events 
with scores of 209.50 and 224.35 respec- 
tively. According to Newcomb, Rodriguez 
has one of the best diving lists in the East. 

This year's team has 26 members, 21 
in swimming and 5 in diving. Senior Sarah 
Baker returns as one of the biggest assets to 
the team. "She has developed into one of 
the best sprinters in the East," Newcomb 
said. Baker began the season as the Atlan- 
tic-10 Champion in the free style. Senior 
Jessica Griffith competed in the 100 yard, 
the 200 yard breast stroke and the 50-yard 
free style. 

Karen Sonnwald holds the UMass 
records in the 500, 1000, and 1650 yard free 
styles. However, she started the year on 
injured reserve due to a broken foot. 

At the New England Championships 
in December, UMass placed second — the 
best ever in Newcomb's 12 years with the 
team. In a meet with 10 other teams, UMass 
accumulated 1,201 points, also a career- 
best for the long-time coach. 



"Last year we finished fourth — over 
500 points behind UConn." Newcomb said. 
"We picked up almost 200 points on UConn 
this time, which is a very significant ad- 
vance as well as finishing in second place." 

UMass defeated Boston College and 
Providence, two teams that had the nod 
over UMass last year. "Beating BC was a 
major accomplishment for this team," 
Newcomb said. I knew this was going to be 
a tough meet, but our team set their mind 
to it. They continue to impress me every 
time." 

Hickey, with a time of 5:11.80, placed 
third in the 500-yard free style and junior 
Jessica Farley took third in the 200-yard 
individual medley with a time of 2:12.23. 

Baker came away with her second 
consecutive New England title in the 50- 
yard free style event with a time of 24.47. 



She took second in the 100-yard free stylv 
The 200-yard medley team of junioj 
Toni Youngdahl, freshman Amy Mullel^ 
Griffith and Baker seized third with a tinii 
of 1:39.55. Ij 

Rodriquez captured third place i|' 
both the three and one-meter diving event 
This qualified Rodriquez for the NCA/ 
for the one-meter event. It was the fin', 
time a diver has qualified since Newcoin 
became coach. 

Last year the team ended their seasc 
with a record of 7-4-1, taking fifth in tit 
Atlantic-10 Conference, fourth at the Nee 
England Championships and seventh i : 
the East Coast Athletic Conference. Til 
1995-96 women's swimming team is proti 
that with dedication, and teamwork ami 
thing can happen. 

by Anita L. KeshI 




102 




Left: The sun rises with the UMass Crew. 
photo by Scott Galbmith 

Right: Coach Jim Dietz gives a pep talk 
before practice begins in the wee hours of 
the morning. 

photo by Scott Galbmith 

Above: The UMass Women's Crew team 
brings out the daily supplies. 

photo by Scott Galbmith 






he UMass Softball team 
dominated the Atlantic-10 this 
year as they became known as 
"The Minutewomen of the Dia- 
mond." 

Their strength in pitching 
"allowed a number of teams to 
strike out while the Minute- 
women drove home the victo- 
ries. 

In a game against 
Fordham, Dani Ortega, the 
Minutewomen's third pitcher, 
threw tremendously well in her 
first start of the season. She 
went six innings and gave up 
only three hits. 

UMass scored early and 
often in this game and coasted 
until the 10-1 win. 

Freshman outfielder 
Mandy Galas injured her left 



ankle mid-season and was out 
for a while. But she sprang right 
back into action and stole her 
15th base of the season in only 
14 attempts at the Fordham 
game. 

Other strong players in- 
cluded Sophomore Kim 
Gutridge. Gutridge's A-10 
marks for batting average and 
RBI in 12 games were good 
enoughfor second on the Mas- 
sachusetts list. 

Danielle Henderson 
poster her seventh best shutout 
of the season against Fordham, 
and lowered her earned run 
average (ERA) to a conference 
best of 1.04. 

Her dominance became 
even more apparent in the A-10 
where she is 6-0 and barely has 



Stealins Home 



an ERA (0.18). In six starts, she 
went the distance five times and 
strouck out in 31 out of 38 in- 
nings of work. And only one 
earned run was allowed to 
crosss the plate in those 38 in- 
nings. 

The Softball team played 
strong this year and showed all 
the payoffs of hard-work and 
determination. 
compiled from Collegian articles 





Far Left: "1 hear a homerun coming." 

photo by Dniiielle Carriveau 

Middle Left: "You trying to hit the ball to me?" 

plioto by Danielle Carriveau 

Far Lower Left: Rounding the corner toward home. 

photo by Gayle Dougherty 

Above: Cristina Rudden gets ready to pitch. 

photo by Gayle Dougherty 

Left: Catching a ground ball is a cinch. 

photo by Gayle Dougherty 



A Diamond Season 




he 1996 
University of Massachu- 
setts baseball team faced 
the daunting challenge 
of improving last year's 
feats, when the Minute- 
men won the Atlantic 10 
championships. With a 
combination of guts and 
poise, this year's team 
exceeded its expecta- 
tions. 

Head coach Mike 
Stone once again guided 
his team to more than 30 
wins this season. Enter- 



ing the Atlantic 10 Cham- 
pionships, the Minute- 
men had an impressive 
record of 33-9. (15-5 in 
the Atlantic 10). UMass 
rode the longest winning 
streak in Division I base- 
ball with 18 consecutive 
victories. The team 
stretched the streak for 
more than three weeks, 
including a grueling 11- 
game road trip. UMass's 
team batting also 
emerged in the national 
rankings. At one point 




late in the season, they 
reached the top 10 with 
an impressive team av- 
erage of .338. 

Led in hitting by 
scrappy sophomore sec- 
ond baseman Muchie 
Dagliere, the team often 
caused neck strains to 
opposing pitchers, who 
gave up more than ten 
runs 15 times during the 
regular season. Dagliere 
hit .435, as he maintained 
one of the highest bat- 
ting averages in the na- 
tion, while leading the 
team in hits and triples. 

Senior outfielder 
Ryan Jette started in ev- 
ery game this season for 
the Minutemen. He was 
a consistently solid lead- 



off hitter. Jette hit .360, 
stole 28 bases, and led 
the team in runs scored. 
His blazing speed and 
good instincts on the 
base paths led to 80 ca- 
reer stolen bases, sur- 
passing the former 
UMass base-stealing 
king. Matt Sheran. 

"He has been a tre- 
mendous catalyst for us 
this year," said Coach 
Stone. 

Justin Kelly also 
started in every game, a 
true tribute to his dura- 
bility since he earned the 
dubious distinction of 
being hit by opposing 
pitchers 15 times this sea- 
son alone. Kelly batted 
over .300 throughout the 





106 i 




season, and was nearly 
flawless at first base. 
Junior center fielder Nate 
Murphy batted clean-up 
and gave the Minutemen 
another solid threat at 
the plate, leading the 
team in home runs and 
cioubles, while compil- 
ing a .364 average. 

Senior Andy Kiah 
, starting at catcher for 
the first time in his ca- 
reer, filled his role qui- 
etly, but with 
composure. Kiah only 
had one error behind 
the plate, and he 
showed consistency 
with the bat, hitting 
.353 while striking out 
just 16 times. "He's 
done a great job catch- 
ing and receiving, and 
working with the pitch- 
ers," Coach Stone said. 

On the hill, the Min- 
utemen senior left- 
hander David Dart 
posted a 4-1 record. (14- 
3 for his career). Another 
southpaw, freshman Bill 
Cooke went undefeated 
this season (4-0), and he 



should be a solid pitcher 
for the team in the fu- 
ture. At 6-9, 260-pound 
right-hander Steve Levy 
intimidated opposing 
hitters with his fiery 
fastball. 

The Minutemen 
collected a 9-2 record at 
the friendly confines of 
Lordon Field. They also 
enjoyed sviccess at 
Fenway Park, home of 
the RedSox. They de- 
feated cross-state rivals 
Harvard 13-2 at the 
Beanpot Champion- 
ships. 

Although this 
year's team was led by 
its seniors, this season 
provided good experi- 
ence for the younger 
players to maintain the 
Minuteman legacy. The 
team hopes to continue 
its success next season . 
The Massachusetts base- 
ball program should con- 
tinue being a force to be 
reckoned with in 1997. 
by David Jnstroiv 



Left: UMass's own hits a homerun. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fifcli 

Above Left: #13 runs past 3rd. base and prepares to go 
home. 

photo /n/ Rebecca M. Fitch 

Far Left: UMass prepares for a grounder. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 



Far Left: UMass pitches a strike. 



pjhoto by Rebecca M. Fitch 



107 



S*C«0«R«E 




Men's Water Polo 


(28-8) 




Field Hockey (7-13) 


UM- 




OFF 


UM 


OPP 




_ Lsbor Dsv Invit 




0- 
1- 


-NEW HAMPSHIRE 
-BOSTON COLLEGE 


]. 


13 


-Bucknell 


9+ 


0+ 


11 


-George Washington 


9+ 


0- 


-Maryland 


4- 


7 


-Navy 


9- 


3- 


-American 


2+ 


18 


-Richmond 


14+ 


0- 


-Old Dominion 


2- 


26 


-Johns Hopkins 


6+ 


0- 


-North Carolina 


5- 




_P\A^PA T'nnTri^nnpTit 




0- 
1- 


-Yale 
-TEMPLE 


1- 
0+ 


16 


- Ci f ? 1 r\ 1 uuiiiaiiiciii 

-Queens 


8+ 


25 


-Merchant Marine 


12+ 


1- 


-Northeastern 


3- 


26 


-lona 


10+ 


1- 


-Old Dominion 


0+ 




- Rrf^TArn Tn\^if 




1- 

2- 


-Syracuse 
-James Madison 


2- 
3- 


12 


UIUWll illVlL. 

-Brown 


2+ 


20 


-BOSTON COLLEGE 


6+ 


0- 


-Boston University 


1- 




-EWPA 




l . 


— PRDVinPMPF 


0+2OT 
0+ 


24 


-St. Francis 


9+ 


2- 


— 1 i\V_7 V IL^CI NX^L. 

-RHODE ISLAND 


18 


- Harvard 


7+ 


1 - 


-CONNECTICUT2- 




18 


-Fordham 


4+ 


3- 


-LASALLE 


1+ 




\/rTMT TTP\/I A M TM\/TT 




2- 
1- 


-DARTMOUTH 
-St. Joseph's 


3- 
2- 


23 


-RICHMOND 


1+ 


6 


-NAVY 


7- 




A-1 (^Vi3mr>inTiQfiir>Q 








jr\ lU V^-llcllIlL/HJIljIllL/o 




15 


-QUEENS 


9+ 


2- 


-Rhode Island 


3- 


20 


-Harvard 
-FWPA TOIIRN 


7+ 




Football (6-5) 






c vv 1 r^ 1 ^.-'UlVi^i. 




20 


-M.I.T. 


4+ 








21 


-BOSTON COLLEGE 


6+ 


UM- 




OPP 


10 


-BROWN 


9+ 


7 ~ 


-RICHMOND 


21- 


19 

7 


-Chapman 
- Air Force 


5+ 
9- 


51 - 
21 - 


-HOLY CROSS 0+ 
-Northeastern 


19+ 




- B^ldv View Tourn 




- 


-Rhode Island 34- 




22 


-Pomona Pitzer 


1 + 


29 - 


- NEW HAMPSHIRE 


32- 


6 


-UC-Davis 


8- 


33 - 


-Buffalo 9+ 




12 


- Claremont-Mudd 


11 + 


20 - 


-WILLIAM & MARY 


9+ 




-EWPA Playoffs 

-lona 


9+ 


44 - 

21 - 


-LEHIGH 
-Maine 


36+ 


22 


24- 


13 


- Brown 


11+ 


28 - 


-Boston University 


23+ 


8 


-Queens 


10- 


7 - 


~ Connecticut 


20- 




-Eastern Champs 

-Richmond 


5+ 


M 


en's Soccer: (1, 




16 


3-5-2) 


8 


-Queens 


10- 


UM 


— 


OPP 




-NCAA Championships 




4- 


-LASALLE 






1+ 


6 


-CaUfornia 


10- 


1- 


-VIRGINIA TECH 


IT 








4- 


-MAINE 


1 + 


Women's Cross Country (7-0-1) 


1- 


-FORDHAM 


2- 


UM- 




OPP 


3- 


-SIENA 


1+ 


35 — 


-Brown 


74+ 


3- 


— Xavier 


2+ 




"New Hamoshire 


55+ 


2- 


-Dayton 

— New Hampshire 

-BOSTON UNIV. 


0+ 




_ ^laine 


107+ 
72+ 


2- 


4- 




-Boston University 


2- 


1 + 


31 — 


-Connecticut 


31 T 


1- 


-Hartford 


4- 




Mainp 


70+ 
82+ 


4- 


—San Francisco 


1 + 


31 — 


-CENTRAL CONN. 


2- 


—Stanford 


2T 




-VERMONT 


37+ 
7 of 28 
2nd 


2- 


-DUQUESNE 


1 + 




-Pan! *^Vir^rf Tn\;if 


5- 


-GEO. WASHINGTON 


0+ 




-i am oiiuiL iiivii. 
-N.E. Championships 


1- 


-YALE 


0+ 








A 1 n r^u-iwiv^;/..v^(^u;v-*(- 


1st 
15th 


5- 


—St. Bonaventure 


1 + 




-f\-iu ^nampionsnips 
-ECAC Championships 


1- 


-DARTMOUTH 


1 + 



108 



1 —RHODE ISLAND 

2 — St. Joseph's 

3 — Temple 2+ 
A-1 Championship 3 

Xavier 1 + 

Championship Rd. 

2 -Rhode Island 5- 



3- 
1 + 



Men's Cross Country (6-4) 

UM- OPP 

105 — Michigan 36- 

lona 42- 

Brown 82- 

Boston College 96- 

Delaware 188+ 

New Hampshire 207+ 

Northeastern 241 + 

Maine 244+ 

17 VERMONT 48+ 

MAINE 67+ 

Paul Short Invit. 6 of 24 

N.E. Championship 4 of 32 

A-1 Championship 1 st. 

IC4A Championship 23rd . 

Women's Volleyball (23-15) 

UM- OPP 
Hofstra/Spalding Invit 

3 — Lafayette 0+ 

3 — Rider 0+ 

3— -Hofstra 1 + 
Santa Barbara Tourn. 

3 — Toledo 0+ 

1 — Santa Barbara 3- 
— Utah 3- 

2 — San Jose 3- 
UMass Invitational 

— MICHIGAN 3- 

3 — BROWN 0+ 
3 — SYRACUSE 0+ 
2 — CONNECTICUT3- 

3 — St. Bonaventue 0+ 

2 — Duquesne 3- 

3 — NORTHEASTERN 0+ 
3 — TEMPLE 2+ 
3 — FORDHAM 0+ 
3 — LASALLE 0+ 
1 — RHODE ISLAND 3- 

2 — Virginia Tech 3- 
- — George Wash. 3- 

3 — Boston College 0+ 
3 — DAYTON 0+ 
3 — XAVIER 0+ 
3 — DUQUESNE 1 + 
3 — ST.BONA VENTURE 0+ 

3 — HARVARD 0+ 

3 — Temple 1+ 

3 — LaSalle 0+ 

3 — Fordham 0+ 

2 — GEORGE WASH. 3- 
3 — VIRGINIA TECH. 2+ 
3 — Xavier 1 + 
3 — Dayton 0+ 

3 — Rhode Island 2+ 
A-10 Championships 

— Rhode Island 2+ 
N.I.V.C. 

1 — Arkansas 3- 
— Michigan 3- 
— San Diego 3- 
— Butler 3- 



Men's Basketball (35-2) 

UM- OPP 

105 -- DINAMO ( Russia) 75+ (Exh) 
89 -CONVERSE ALL-STARS 94- (Exh) 

92 -Kentucky 82+ 

50 -Maryland 47+ 

80 -Florida 58+ 

60 -WAKE FOREST 46+ 

65 -Boston College 57+ 

77 -N.C.- WILMINGTON 51 + 

75 —Georgia Tech 67+ 
78 -North Carolina State 67+ 
78 -So. Cal. 63+ 
65 —Syracuse 47+ 

64 -Memphis 61 + 

78 -DAYTON 58+ 

94 -St. Joseph's 89+ OT 

65 —St. Bona venture 62+ 
80 - RHODE ISLAND 71 + 
93 -Duquesne 89+ 

79 -Pittsburgh 71+ OT 

72 -ST. BON A VENTURE 47+ 

80 -FORDHAM 50+ 

84 -Temple 35+ 

78-Xavier 74+ OT 

73-Fordham 47+ 

84 -TEMPLE 55+ 

70 -LA SALLE 53+ 

74 -Virginia Tech 58+ 

74 -Rhode Island 69+ 

76 -GEO. WASHINGTON 86- 

68 -ST. JOSEPH'S 66+ OT 
A-10 Championships 

69 —St. Bona venture 56+ 

74 —George Washington 65+ 
Championships 

75 -Temple 61 + 
NCAA 1st. Round 

92 -Central Florida 70+ 

79 -Stanfor 74+ 
NCAA Sweet 16 

79 -Arkansas 63+ 
NCAA Elite 8 

86 —Georgetown 62+ 
NCAA Final Four 

74 -Kentucky 81- 

Women's Gymnastics (6-4) 

j, UM - OPP 

i 197.775 Rhode Island 188.250+ 

'' 191.475 Michigan 193.400- 

■ 190.175 Minnesota 191.000- 

Iowa State 188.250+ 

Oregon State 194.025- 

191.400 Alabama 

196.675- 

i 190.525 EASTERN MICHIGAN 

[.90.175+ 

191.050 NEW HAMPSHIRE 

1.90.250+ 

191.650 BRIDGEPORT 188.425+ 

187.575 Temple 186.175+ 

A-10 Championships 1st 

NCAA Regionals 3rd 



Men's Swimming (8-0) 

UM- OPP 

151 -Vermont 87+ 

1 46 - NORTHEASTERN 97+ 
156 - BOSTON UNIVERSITY 142+ 

NE Championships 2nd 

145 -BROWN 91+ 

Lake Worth Invit. N/A 

Dartmouth PPD 

Rhode Island Invit. CANC. 

1 30 - CONNECTICUT 111 + 

192 -New Hampshire 106+ 

147 -Rutgers 96+ 
George Washington 

211 — FORDHAM 87+ 

NE Invitational N/A 

A-10 Championship 1st. 

ECAA Championship N/A 

NCAA Championship N/A 

Women's Swimming (6-2) 

UM- OPP 

140 -Vermont 85+ 

205.5 -NORTHEASTERN 94.5+ 

161 -BOSTON UNIV. 139+ 

N.E. Championships 2ND. 

Lake Worthy Invit. N/A 

Dartmouth PPD 

Rhode Island Invit Cane. 

113 -CONNECTICUT 130- 

151 -New Hampshire 149+ - 

121 -Boston College 179- 

147 -Rutgers 96+ 

George Washington 

211 -FORDHAM 87+ 

NE Invitational N/A 

A-10 Championships 3rd 

ECAC Championships N/A 

NCAA Championships N/A 

Women's Soccer (14-4-2) 

UM- OPP 

3 — St. Bonaventure 0+ 

1 —GEO. WASHINGTON 0+ 
1 —William & Mary 2- 
1 — George Mason 0+ 

UMASS CLASSIC 

2— TEXASA&M 1 + 

7— WRIGHT ST ATE 1 + 

2 — Colorado College 1 + 
2— Central Florida 2T 
5— YALE 0+ 
2— RHODE ISLAND 0+ 
0— Hartford OT 
1 —Dartmouth 0+ 
0— CONNECTICUT 2- 
7— FORDHAM 0+ 
— Temple 1- 
2— CORNELL 1 + 

A-10 Championships 

2 — George Washington 0+ 

6 — Xavier 0+ 

NCAA 

2— Hartford 1+OT 

— Connecticut 3- 



Ice Hockey (10-19-6) 

UM - OPP 

6 -Army 3+ 
4 -MERRIMACK 3+ 

5 -Merrimack 4+ OT 

5 -UMASS-LOWELL 7- 
7 -UMass-Lowell 4+ 

5 —Providence 7- 

1 -PROVIDENCE 4- 

4 -AIR FORCE 2+ 

7 -AIR FORCE 1+ 
2-BOSTONUNrV. 5- 

2 -Boston Univ. 6- 
4 -Yale 0+ 

3 -VERMONT 4- OT 

6 —Rensselaer 1 + 

3 -Princeton 1 + 
UMass Holiday Classic 

1 -CORNELL 2- 

5 -SLOVAKIA 5T 
1 -MAINE 7- 

4 -Northeastern 4- 

3 - NORTHEASTERN 3 T(L)SO 1-4 

2 -Boston Col. 8- 
3 -BOSTON COL. 5- 

1 -Cornell 8- 

3 -Maine 6- 

3 -Maine 6- 
8 -Merrimack 5+ 

2 -New Hampshire 7- 

1 —Boston Univ. 4- 

4 — UMASS-LOWELL 4 T( W)SO 4-3 
6— NEW HAMPSHIRE 6T(W)S02-1 
4 — New Hampshire 4 T(W)SO 2-1 
2 — PROVIDENCE 2 T(W)SO 4-2 
3 -BOSTON COLL. 7 

2 - NORTHEASTERN 2 T( DSO 1 -2 
HOCKEY EAST TOURNAMENT 

2 — Boston University 5- 

1 —Boston University 14- 

Men's Indoor Track (13-7) 

UM- OPP 
86 — Boston University 

30+ 

New Hampshire 74+ 

Maine/Hartford 10/6++ 

NE Chal. Cup Trials 

2ND 

NE Chal. Cup Finals 

6TH 

1 00 — New Hampshire 1 05.5- 

Holy Cross 35.3+ 

Central CT 24+ 

Hartford 4+ 

67— Rhode Island 65+ 

New Hampshire 48+ 

Hartford 5+ 

Valentine Invit. N/A 

A-10 Championship 3rd 

NE Championships 

IC4A Championships '^^ 

NCAA Championships 



S • C • O • R • E 




Women's Basketball (20-10) 



Men's Lacrosse (6-5) 



Softball (33-1-11) 



UM 




OFF 


UM- 


OPP 


UM- 


- 


OPP 


70- 


-SKA SAMARA (Russia) 


72- 


14 -Hartford 


9+ 


9- 


-Oregon 


8+ 




-Preseason NIT 




9 —Virginia 


15- 


8- 


-Arizona St. 


16- 


56- 


-Maine 


70- 


9 -Yale 


6+ 


4- 


-Ohio St. 


6- 


65- 


-STANFORD 


56+ 


14 -Hofstra 


15(OT)- 


6- 


-Arizona St. 


7- 


67- 


-DETROIT 


61+ 


15 -Boston College 


9+ 


1 - 


-Utah St. 


12- 




-T niiici;4n:4 Tprh T'niirTi^'ni'^it 


8 -ARMY 


9(OT)- 


12- 


-Nw.Mex St. 


3+ 


84- 


-Mississippi Val. St. 


66+ 


13 -DUKE 


9- 


5- 


-Lg.BeachSt. 


2+ 


63- 


-Louisiana Tech 


75- 


13 -Delaware 


11+ 


1 - 


- Florida St. 


4- 


65- 


-BROWN 


51 + 


10 -HARVARD 


12- 


1 - 


-Washington 


6- 


57- 


-St. Peter's 


48+ 


8 -Norte Dame 


5- 


3- 


-Missouri 


4- 




-1 aH\7 r^atnr fls^^ir 




9 —Syracuse 
11 -BROWN 


lO(OT)- 


3- 


-Princeton 


1 + 


54- 


-Florida 


71- 


8- 


5 


-UConn 


0+ 


73- 


-Boston College 


63+ 






10 


-Bradley 


4+ 


50- 


-St. Joseph's 


64- 


Men's Outdoor 


Track & Field 





-Norte Dame 


3- 


73 - 


-Temple 
-Dartmouth 


43+ 






10 


-W.Ilhnois 


7+ 


71 - 


56+ 


VERMONT, MAINE 


1st. 


3 


-S. Florida 


2+ 


74- 


-Rhode Island 


86- 


BOSTON COLLEGE 




9 


-Flor. Atlantic 


2+ 


69- 


-FAIRFEILD 


58+ 


HARTFORD 


1st. 


1 


-Horida St. 


3- 


65- 


-VIRGINIA TECH 


47+ 


HOLY CROSS 







-Drake 


1- 


n 


- LaSalle 


87- 


PROVIDENCE, lONA 


1st. 


8 


-E. Illinois 


0+ 


67 


-ST. JOSEPH'S 


50+ 


Northeastern & 




1 


-E. Illinois 


1 + 


79 


-ST. BON A VENTURE 


65+ 


Rhode Island 


1st. 


4 


-Drake 


2+ 


65 


-George Washington 


72- 






15 


-LongIsl.U.(2) 


2+ 


72 


-FORDHAM 


50+ 


Women's Outdoor Track & Field 


4- 


- 


0+ 


78 


-TEMPLE . 


51 + 






8- 


-Vermont 


5+ 


72 


-XAVIER 


50+ 


VERMONT, MAINE, 




7- 


-CentConn(2) 


2+ 


68 


-DUQUESNE 


47+ 


SPRINGFIELD 


1st. 


11- 


- 


0+ 


62 


-Fordham 


34+ 


BOSTON COLLEGE, 




10- 


-Va.Tech(2)* 


1 + 


65 


-Dayton 

-St. Bonaventure 


53+ 


HARTFORD 


1st. 


16- 


- 


0+ 


66 


68- 


HOLY CROSS, 




6- 


-HARTFD.(2) 


2+ 


82 


-RHODE ISLAND 


75+ 


PROVIDENCE, lONA, 




4- 


- 


4T 




--A-10 Championship 




UMASS-LOWELL 


1st. 




-HARVARD 


ppd 




64 


-Virginia Tech 


42+ 






5- 


-STJOEPH{2*) 


0+ 


51 


-George Washington 


59- 






3- 


- 


2+ 




--NCAA 1st. Round 








3- 


-TEMPLE(2*) 


0+ 


57 


- Michigan State 


60- 






3- 


~HnQfc;fr?i 


0+ 

ppd 

0+ 












4- 


1 HJSI3LICI 

-URI(2*) 












2- 


- 


1+ 












5- 


-LaSalle(2*) 


1+ 












5- 




0+ 












9- 


— Fordham 


0+ 












10- 




1+ 












8- 
2- 
3- 


-UCONN(2) 


7+ 
4- 
0+ 












-St.Bonaven.* 












5- 


— Dayton* 
-B.C. (2*) 


4+ 
ppd 



B*0*A»R»D 




Women's Lacrosse (4-10) 

UM- OPP 

3 --Brown 14- 

4 -Yale 15- 
12 -TEMPLE 15- 
12 -HOLY CROSS 11 + 
11 —New Hampshire 8+ 
8 —Rutgers 9- 
8— Hofstra 11- 
8— St. Joseph's 11- 
8— Villanova 15- 

11 —VERMONT 5+ 

6 — Boston Collge 10- 
8 — DARTMOUTH 21- 
14— BOSTON UNIV. 2+ 

7 — HARVARD 16- 

Women's Water Polo (15-9) 



UM- 


OPP 


11 -Univ. of Redlands 


15- 


8 -ClaremontMcKenna 


7+ 


13 -LoyolaMarymount 


9+ 


Claremont Colleges Tourn. 




10 -Pomona 


6+ 


6 -Redlands 


10- 


6 -So. California 


8- 


8 -Washington 


7+ 


7 -CaL Poly 


4+ 


16 -MIT 


6+ 


7 -Harvard 


9-(OT) 


11 -Boston University 


2+ 


15 -Dartmouth 


6+ 


9 -HARVARD 


11- 


17 -MIT 


11 + 


20 -DARTMOUTH 


6+ 


19 -WELLESLEY 


10+ 


EWPA N.E. Playoffs 




15 -Queens 


5+ 


6 -Brown 


7- 


13 -Wesleyan 


0+ 


Eastern Championships 




4 -Maryland 


9- 


4 -Brown 


5- 


10 -Villanova 


4+ 


14 -Princeton 


0+ 


5 -Harvard 


6- 



Men's Tennis (3-6) 

UM OPP 

2 -Colgate 4- 

3 —Boston Univ .4- 

2 — Duquesne 5- 
7-NewHamp. , 0+ 

3 —Vermont 4- 
4-M.I.T. 3+ 

4 -N.E ASTERN 3+ 
Atlantic 10 5th. 

2 -Hartford 5- 

2 —Providence 5- 

N.E. Champ. 3rd. 

Women's Tennis (5-3) 

UM- OPP 

Cornell Inv. N/S 

5 — Vermont 1+ 
5— Bucknell 0+ 
6 — Connecticut 1+ 
7 — Fairfield 2+ 
3— Williams 4- 
2— Boston Coll 5- 
7— Rhodelsl. 0+ 
4— AMHERST 5- 
A-10 Champ. 4th. 

Women's Crew 

San Diego Crew Classic 3rd. 

Boston University 1st. 

Navy with Villanova 1st. 

Northeast. w/Columbia 1st. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 1st. 

Atlantic 10 Championship 1st. 



Baseball (32-9) 



UM- 


OPP 


5 -Rice 


17- 


7 -Rice 


15- 


3 -Rice 


7- 


8 -Bucknell 


7+ 


17 -Bucknell 


6+ 


10 -Millersville 


3+ 


4 -Northwest. 


6- 


12 -Niagara 


10+ 


8 -Northwest. 


6- 


6 -Boston Coll. 


5+ 


14 -Holy Cross 


3+ 


9 -Hartford 


4+ 


7 -Temple(2*) 


3+ 


16- 


4+ 


1 — Temple(2*) 


5- 


0- 


3- 


10 -CONNECT. 


2+ 


5— FDHAM(2*) 


7+ 


6 — 


3+ 


7— FDHAM(2*) 


4+ 


4... 


2+ 


10 — Providence 


4+ 


4— UR1(2*) 


5- 


5 — 


7- 


3— UR1(2*) 


0+ 


9 — 


2+ 


18 — Cent. Conn. 


12+ 


Beanpot Tournament 




13 — Harvard 


2+ 


4— St.Bon.(2*) 


2+ 


lo- 


2+ 


ll — St.Bon.(2*) 


1+ 


13 — 


3+ 


Beanpot Champion. 




1 — Northeast. 


0+ 


10— Maine (2*) 


3+ 


3 — 


2+ 


9— CT.CONN. 


2+ 


6— ST.JOSEP(2*) 


1 + 


3 — 


2+ 


6— ST.JOSEP(2*) 


5+ 


6 — 


5+ 


Vermont 


ppd 


8 —Northeast. 


4+ 




111 



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112 



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layout by Dcviu Broic}, 



113 



THE 



SNA P P L E 



Effect 



ere at the Index we believe 
Snapple has saved our lives, or at least our 
sanity. If not for an endless supply of Rasp- 
berry Iced Tea and Mango Madness, the 
1995 Index would not have reached frui- 
tion. Snapple provided a constant source 
of nutrition and caffeine to our staff. The 
only problem was choosing what the flavor 
of the week would be. In September of 1 995 
the 127th edition of the Index arrived and 
we all were grateful for Snapple. 

By this time it was agreed that "Made 
From the Best Stuff at UMass" should be- 
come the new Index theme. But we needed 
to ask permission from Snapple to use to 
their trademark. I wrote a letter to Amy 
Shapiro of Kirschenbaum & Bond — the 
ad agency that handles Snapple — and 
explained who we were and what we 



wanted to do. They loved the idea and 
were really receptive to it. 

In October we became a part of the 
best stuff on earth. Then we held a press 
conference to make it official and met with 
Bob Kelly from Specialty Beverage of 
Brattleboro, VT who brought us lots of free 
stuff. 

Publicity had always been difficult 
for the Index; marketing to a school this 
size is not easy. But this year was different. 
People knew Snapple. Each morning the 
Snapple truck pulled up to the front of the 
Student Union to deliver the day's ship- 
ment. People flocked to Snappl e machines 
to get their day's fill. Some visited our 




photos by Danielle Carriveau 



bd bd ba 



Img ggp IB^ Ig^ 




office to tell us about the newest flavors, to 
say our theme was cool or to comment on 
our bulletin boards. 

Pretty soon people were coming to 
the Index to get information about some 
new and hmited edition Snapple flavors 
like Peach Lemonade, Bali Blast, and 
Ralph's Cantaloupe Cocktail. We became 
Snapple Central. We made sure we knew 
what flavors were being sold in the Uni- 
versity store so we could answer the bar- 
rage of trivia questions people asked us. 

Many people helped us collect 
Snapple bottle tops so we could spell 'In- 
dex' on our bulletin boards and brought us 
empty bottles so we could decorate our 
office. We gave the people who helped us 
posters and T-shirts and told them to spread 
the word. 

Everyone loves Snapple. James 



Massosi, a junior Forestry major said 
"Snapple offers healthier alternatives to 
soda because it's made with purer ingredi- 
ents and it's more portable." 

Senior History major Tom 

Schnorrenberg said, "I like Snapple be- 
cause it tastes good and because they have 
the Snapple lady." 

"My favorite Snapple flavors are the 
stranger ones, like Samoan Splash, because 
they're a lot like my personality. Snapple 
has something for everyone," said senior 
Spanish major Michaela Chase. 

Recognition for the Index has been a 
long time in the coming. Now people walk 
around saying things like "Made From the 
Best Stuff at UMass. That's cool. " This 
year, with the help of Snapple, we made a 
name for ourselves — all over again. 

by Anita L. Kestin 






Growing Old Together 

The Fine Arts Center and the Campus Center 
celebrate major Anniversaries 



ry to imagine the UMass campus 
without the Murray D. Lincoln Campus 
Center. Where would you relax with 
friends, study, or find shelter from those 
blistering, icy winter afternoons? Where 
would you sit and read the Collegian? Where 
you buy that last minute gift if not from the 
vendors on the concourse? 

"I like special coffees and the ATM," 
said Ariella Papa, a senior Communica- 
tions major, of her attachment to the cam- 
pus center. 

In the late 1960s, the Student Union 
no longer offered enough space to com- 
pensate for the rapidly growing student 
population. So in 1970 the Campus Center 
was built. Today, more than 5,000 students 
pass through it every day, which makes it 
difficult to envision a time when it was just 
a parking lot. 

To celebrate the 25th anniversary of 
the Campus Center, performers, musicians, 
and dancers have gathered to honor the 
event. 

"Our goal was to give students what 
they really wanted: entertainment on cam- 
pus," said junior Melissa Schragg, coordi- 
nator for the 25th Anniversary Campus 
Center committee. 

On Monday nights, blues and jazz in 
the Bluewall convinced students to drop 
their pens and groove to tunes for a while. 
Talented area musicians such as Wildcat 
O'Halloran, who has shared the stage with 
blues legend John Lee Hooker; and the Art 
Steele Blues Band, which has been playing 
the Pioneer Valley since the early 1970s, 
added to the festivities. 




Every Tuesday afternoon, a series of 
international styles of music and dance 
showed up in the Student Union Cape 
Cod Lounge. Percussionists, Cambodian 
dancers, and belly dancers entertain the 
crowds. 

Street musicians slowed down rush- 
ing students on Wednesday afternoons. 

"It was an inexpensive way to allevi- 
ate the tense atmosphere on the concourse 
while giving street musicians a change to 
play the college scene," said Schragg. 



Thursday nights, UMass studentsi 
showed off their John Travolta talents. Plat-' 
form shoes, bell bottoms, and exposed hairy 
chests were the norm at these retro-disco 
nights at the Bluewall. 

For a quarter century, the Campus 
Center has evolved into a gathering place 
for student activities from protests and 
political discussions to movie nights, blood 
banks, and damn good coffee. 

by David Jnstrow 



ne of the most 
well known buildings on the 
UMass campus is the Fine Arts 
Center, which opened its doors 
to the public in 1975. 

What was conceived as a 
home for the arts on campus, 
as well as a classroom environ- 
ment, has become the biggest 
cultural center in the Pioneer 
Valley, according to Shawn 
Farley, Director of Marketing 
for the Fine Arts Center. This 
year, it celebrates its 20th anni- 
versary. 

Students might recognize 
it as the building near the 
Haigis Mall bus stop. They 
might only know it as the huge 
concrete structure in the 
middle of campus. But the Fine 
Arts Center is indeed the cen- 
ter of the most comprehensive 
assortment of artistic creation 
in Western Massachusetts. 

Although funding has been cut significantly in recent 
years, the Fine Arts Center continues its goal to keep the arts 
alive and well in our community. This season brought such 
acts as jazz singer Cassandra Wilson, dance troupe Saeko 
Ichinohe and Company, and the Broadway touring perfor- 
mance of The Will Rogers Follies ,to Amherst. 

Ticket prices for students are only five dollars this 
year, as part of the celebration. As a result, there has been an 
increase in student attendance at these events, said Farley. 

Special events have taken place throughout the year to 
commemorate the anniversary. Community Day, an after- 
noon of free activities on April 27, showed everyone — 
student, children, and adults from around the Valley — 
what the Fine Arts Center is and what it has to offer. 

"It's really a way to thank our community. It's also a 
way to reach out to those who think we're just here for 




students," said Farley. 

People often think that because it is located on the 
UMass campus, the Fine Arts Center is something for stu- 
dents. But its galleries, concert halls, and theaters as well as 
its classrooms benefit the entire community. 

"Why go to New York? Right here in Amherst you 
have a full-scale center for the visual and performing arts, 
and educational performances," said Farley. 

Hundreds of thousands of UMass students and mil- 
lions of others have attended concerts, performances and 
exhibits at the Fine Arts Center. 

What does it all mean? Twenty years of artistic expres- 
sion. Twenty years of education. Twenty seasons of the Fine 
Arts Center that have brought together a region and invited 
it to celebrate life. 

by Carol Drzeivianowski 




Far Left: The Campus Center 
provides a break from classes 
during the day with coffee and 
food. 

photo by Megan Lynch 

Above: Everything revolves 
around the campus pond. 

photo by Megan Lynch 

Left: A do-wop group performes 
at the Campus Center. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 



1171 



Wfien vegetarianism storms campus^ it Seeomes 



The Attack of the 

Killer Tomatoes 





hey eat at Basics. They fre- 
quent Eart^Bads and People's Market. 
They caiuMJIHiAU the last time they ate at 
McDonald's. The idea of tofu excites them. 
Who are these people? What makes them 
tick? And why won't they eat bacon? 

"Vegetarians are everywhere on this 
campus," said junior Chemistry Sam 
Adkins. "But I'm not one of them. I've heard 



every argument, but I' m still not convinced. 
I'm not anti-vegetable. I'm just not a veg- 
etarian. Vegetarians eat living things, too; 
they're just easier to catch. 

Many people find it difficult to be 
vegetarian on campus. According to fresh- 
man Communications major Julia Durette, 
there is no place to eat. 

Maria Kaminski, a freshman Political 



Science major said, "Basics is worse than 
regular D.C. food. I wind up eating pasta 
every day." 

"Everything here is based on meat," 
said freshman biology major Ryan Marien. 
"When you ask about vegetarian options, 
people point you in the direction of the 
salad bar." 

Alternatively, junior Carrie Colman 
said that she can adjust to any situation, 
including the one at UMass. "There are 
many options on this campus. I like 
Earthfoods a lot and People's Market is 
always good for a quick bagel or a piece of 
fruit." 

Freshman English major Josh Murphy 
agrees. "I find it incredibly easy to be a 
vegetarian here," he said. "Basics is right 
outside my door." 

People become vegetarians for a vari- 
ety of reasons. Carne Colman became a 
vegetarian for health reasons. She was dis- 
gusted by the TV show "You Can't Do That 
On Television" and its depiction of "Barth 
Burgers" — dirty, disgusting hamburgers, 
which did not appear appetizing. 

Colman does not eat any meat prod- 
ucts, but she does eat skim milk and cheese. 
She finds meat processing to be "yucky." 

Josh Murphy said, "Meat makes me 
sick. I don't approve of the senseless dis- 
gusting slaughter of animals. I think we 
should be able to eat people if we can eat 
animals." 

Aspiring vegetarians should not find 
themselves discouraged. "Stick to it," ad- 
vises Colman. "There is much research 
available on campus — you just have to 
find it. Get involved." 

by Kelly Fulchino 




Far Left: An apple a day keeps the doctor 
away. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Above: Many students have turned to 
vegetarianism for a healthier way to life. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 




( 




you 

looking for a quiet hide- 
away to study, or are you 
looking to be a part of a 
community? Either way 
the Sylvan Cultural Cen- 
ter, located in Cashin 
basement, is the place for 
you. 

The Sylvan Cul- 
tural Center, one of eight 
cultural centers at 
UMass, invites a united 
sense of pride and heri- 
tage from Asian, Latin 
American, African 

American, and Native 
American (ALANA) stu- 
dents. Upon entering the 
center it is apparent, 
through wall portraits 
and draperies, that this 
smaller cultural center 
offers a large sense of 
community. 

Freshman 
Cashin resident Renee 
Foster calls the center a 
"very convenient place 
to go and study. It also 
enables me to get in- 
volved in the commu- 
nity." 

Treasurer 
Michelle Arroyo, a se- 
nior communication and 
Spanish double major, 
agrees that the center 
serves a purpose. "It's 
nice to have a place 




120 



q MJMS^Wutiyr- 




Natasha Springer and Quan Hubert pose in front of the 
iSylvan Cultural Center mural. 

I photo by Danielle Cmriveau 



where people of color 
can come and feel com- 
fortable and fit in." 

The center be- 
gan its calendar of 
events quickly, sponsor- 
ing two pizza and movie 
nights in the early fall. 
It also became a haunted 
house for Halloween. 

"These pizza 
party nights really 
help to make us feel 
more a part of the 
UMass community," 
said Taft Bailey III, se- 
nior legal studies and 
business management 
major. "These centers 
are the backbone of our 
community at UMass 
because they allow us 
to support each other 
and organize grass 
roots." 

Another 
planned fall event is the 
ALANA Empowered 
Week during which 
women's and men's is- 
sues will be discussed. 

"Remember the 
Sylvan Cultural Cen- 
ter," said Bailey, "the 
next time you are in the 
area looking to be a part 
of a friendly community 
and learn more about 
other cultures." 

by Rhonda Gnrber 



121 



^Ot^iciACIM^ 




ometimes college students know 
exactly what they want to do with their lives. 
Everyone knows that one person who has known 
all her life what she wants to do. She gets into a 
great school, does really well in her major, and gets 
the job she dreamed of. These people are rare, 
though. 

People usually have a general idea of what 
they would like to do. They have a direction they 
try to follow. But most people will change their 
major at least once before graduating. 

Junior Adam Nicolopoulos is one such stu- 
dent. "When I was a freshman, 1 decided to major 
in Economics with a Japanese minor. My high school 
guidence counselor convinced me that the major 



was perfect for me. It wasn't," he said. 

After taking a variety of classes and taking his 
personal interests into account, Nicolopoulos 
switched his major to Marketing. "I love my Japa- 
nese classes and 1 knew 1 wanted to stick with them. 
I'd love to work with Nintendo. I'm taking a bunch 
of computer science classes, too, so hopefully some- 
thing will work out," he said. 

Sometimes students love their majors, but are 
not sure what to do with them. Sophomore Kelly 
Palmer is an English major facing this dilemma. "I 
love English. I love writing. I'm just not sure what 
happens after I graduate. People ask me all the time 
what I'm going to do with my major, and I tell them 
that I can do anything. And I really try to believe 



122 



Upperdassmen 



that I can." 

For confused students, undergraduate advis- 
ing is offered through the CASIAC office. Freshmen 
are especially encouraged to speak with an advisor 
who will help combine interests, hobbies, and skills 
into a course of study that will be enjoyable as well 
as educational. 

And for students who don't like any of the 
majors offered at UMass, they can design their own. 
The Bachelor's Degree With Individual Concentra- 
tion program allows students to combine classes 
from different areas and create a personalized ma- 
jor. 

Some BDIC programs include Creative Writ- 
ing, and Computer Operations Management. BDIC 
provides great freedom for industrious students 
who are willing to work closely with an advisor to 
formulate their own course of study. 

Choosing a major is stressful for many stu- 
dents, especially when there are so many from which 
to chose. But the number of majors offered at UMass 
gives students great ideas of what is out there. With 
so many possibilities, there must be something for 
everyone. And although the path is not always paved, 
the trip is always rewarding. 

by Carol L. Drzewianoivski 



Left: Mather Career Center provides many services 
for students who need career advice. 

photo by Scott Galbmith 

Right: For students who have questions , career 
library receptionist Heather Barton has the answers. 

photo by Scott Galbmith 




123 



pon entering a new world called 
UMass, students face many pressures on a daily basis: 
where are my classes located, do I like my roommate, 
am 1 in the right major? Along with all of these 
overwhelming questions come the friends, parties, 
academic successes and failures that are shaping and 
developing our character and desire to succeed. 

However, as much as these stresses seem to 
burden our daily existence, one common goal ties the 
entire student body together: Will I find a job when the 
time comes? Also, where do I start the search and will 
I have the necessary skills to be considered a qualified 
candidate? 

As overwhelming and stressful as the job search 
appears, it does not have to be this way. Pat Pier, the 
resume workshop facilitator, at the Mather Career 
Center, feels that "looking for work can be an exciting, 
positive, and fun process." 

Alan Overman, a senior Engineering major, 
agrees. "The biggest thing is to not dread it and have 





ed^im^e 




Ht6/W^ 



Above: Senior Greg Zenon puts the finishing touches 
on his resume. 

•phoio h\j Glenda Rader 



enthusiasm about the job search." 

The resume workshop, held at Mather, 
provides students with a summary of the job search 
process. All are welcomed who are looking to obtain 
an internship, co-op, or a permanent placement. 
The workshop helps students in transition from the 
"artificial" world at UMass into the competitive job 
market. 

The resume workshop begins with a survey 
of how the job market has changed over the years 
and what impact it has on job search candidates. 
Today's job seekers need to know their strengths 
and be assertive. These two messages come through 
loudly and clearly throughout the workshop. 

But where are the jobs? "Everywhere," 
according to Pat Pier. As one participant noted, it is 
not what you know, but whom you know that will 
get you a job. In today's job market, candidates 
need to possess networking skills. This means 
touching basis with friends, family members, 
professors, and alumni in order to spread the word 
that you are lookmg for a job. After all, most jobs are 



Far Right: Accounting Junior Canti Chow looks to 
perfect her resume. 

plwto by Scott Galhraith 



124 1 




Upperdassmen 





not advertised, but acquired through the "positive 
press" that is spread by your web of connectioiis. 

According to senior Hotel Restaurant and 
Travel Administration major Vincent Dello-Iacono, 
the techniques on netw^orking, resume writing, and 
the interview process were most beneficial. He said, "It 
was very helpful to be able to talk to somebody in thej 
job search field." 

Pier pointed out the importance of appearance, 
attitude, and knowledge about the company you are 
seeking during an interview. Additionally, remember 
to go into the interview with a positive attitude and say 
to yourself "1 am not desperate." It is okay to ask 
questions to make sure you want to work for this 
company, said Pier. 

The workshop touches briefly on resume 
referral and campus recruiting, which are two processes 
that allow companies to advertise and search for 
graduating seniors. 

By the end of the one and a half hour workshop 
you will have gained tips on how to start your job 
search, where to look for jobs, the purpose and format 
of a resume and how to prepare for an interview. 

But the most important insight gained will be 
from your own attitude. "It's the enthusiasm you bring 
away with you for finding a job," said senior Mechanical 
Engineer Bob Hathway. 

by Rhonda Garber 



I 
125! 



i^ ittU^ ^4Ma^ hoA 




\s graduation nears, senior under- 
graduaFes^must contemplate a few questions. 
Thoughts like "What sort of job can 1 get with my 
major?," or "What kind of job will 1 like?" cross the 
minds of many. Other wonder, "Have I made a 
terrible decision?" Finding a co-op will provide 
interesting "hands-on" experience that is beyond 
classroom knowledge. 

Internships or co-ops allow students to gain 
valuable experience in their respective fields. They 
can also help decide what to do with the rest of your 
life. 

Senior Computer Science major Jeff Hirsch, 
had a co-op with GTE in Needham, Mass. He worked 
in software engineering and network programming. 
"A co-op helps you decide if it is what you want to 
do. A lot of companies look for experience, which a 
college education doesn't give you," said Hirsch. 

Wayne Parillo, a senior English major, interned 
at Marvel Comics in New York City last summer. "I 
now know what 1 don't want to do. And that's the 
whole idea of an internship," he said. 

Some students, such as senior Communica- 
tions major Melissa Turbin, work at several differ- 
ent internships. She has worked for a talent agency, 
the Ringling Brothers Circus and Channel Four in 
Boston. Most recently she worked for NBC News in 
New York City. "I really learned how network news 
is run," she said. "But unfortunately, it also made 



I 



T 
II 



me realize what I don't want to do." 

An intern is usually hired into a firm 
through school or through contacts. Your 
former baby-sitter might lead you toward 
your dream job. Sometimes interns get stuck 
as gophers, getting coffee or running. Other 
times, experienced executives take interns 
under their wings and become mentors much 
like Obi-Wan-Kannobi was to Luke 
Skywalker. 

Kevin Weyl, from Atlantic Cable Co., 
had only good things to say about the UMass 
interns he has worked with. "My experience 



1> 

o 

o 

K 




126 



UDDerdassmen 



with UMass students has shown them to be 
bright, intelligent, and most of all eager and 
enthusiastic. They have all been hard work- 
ing and show a high level of integrity. 
They're also quite creative. I've been sad to 
see some of the kids go." 

Many local businesses hire UMass stu- 
dents, too. "Since we expanded our pro- 
gram over two years ago, we've found our 
interns to be of good caliber and they've 
given us lots of help," said Stan Moultan 
from The Daily Hampshire Gazette. 

It's relatively easy to obtain a co-op or 
internship. Mather Career Center offers lists 
of companies hiring interns for both semes- 
ters, and for summer. Options are available 
in all majors from Journalism to Engineer- 
ing, and from a variety of companies from 
IBM to MTV. And practical experience helps 
to strengthen a resume. 
by Deb Gaouette, David Jastroiv, and Carol L. 
Drzeivianou'ski 





Above: Senior management student 
Christopher Sutherland awaits an 
interview for a summer intership. 

photo by Scott GaWraith 

Far Left: Katherine Rowley , a 
sophomore finance major, hopes she 
has done enough research to land the 
job. 

photo by Scott Galbmith 

Left: Senior Tom Shen and Scott 
Carpenter, discuss the opportunities 
available for the civil engineering. 

photo by Scott Galbmith 




127 



Adjusting tc Lif< 



a at IJ/Hass 






1. Local bars and liquor stores eat fake IDs for breakfast. 

2. Textbooks work better than sleeping pills. 

3. There's a thing called a laundry machine and your popularity will 
increase with your mastery of it and for God's sake don't mix the 
whites and the darks. 

4. When you get advice from your dorm counselor, it can take the form 
of a condom. 

5. You thought you were glad to leave home, but there's suddenly no 
one to wake you up in time for class, no one to cook you breakfast, 
lunch or dinner, no one to do your laundry, and no one to drive you 
to the mall and give you money to buy things when you get there. 

6. A frat party is just a really, really, really bad idea. 

7. You can get far away from here for a semester or two through 
national and international exchanges. England is especially 
recommended, either Oxford or London. 

8. Yes, theTe are that many different styles of music, and yes, everyone 
on your floor must play all of them, including country, that loud. 

9. Letterman is more than just a study break. Leno's a geek. 

10. There are two types of friends: those with ID and those with 
wheels. 

n. Somebody is always protesting something on the Student Union 
steps. 

12. The Collegian Crossword is useful when you make the mistake of 
going to class. The comics aren't bad either. 




128 



13. Southwest is a great place to party, but you 
don't want to live there. 

14. When you go to Health Services don't be 
offended when they ask if you're pregnant: 
it's the standard first question. 



15. If you've got to do anything at Whitmore, don't make 
plans for the rest of the week. 

16. Orchard Hill is a great place to live but you don't want 
to walk there. 

17. The engineers of the dining commons also designed the 
Pig Trough. 

18. If your R.A. can't be bribed and actually does spend time 
on the floor, it's going to be a long semester for the both 
of you. 

19. If you've got a hobby or an interest, you can bet UMass 
has a club. 

20. Some professors are actually very cool and will help you 
out in classes and life. 

21. There's a thing called a tolerance level, and the sooner 
you find it and respect it, the better. 

22. You can live in the Student Union/Campus Center for 
days: there are general stores, TVs, couches — for sleeping, 
and several coffee shops, and cafeterias. 

23. You have your own college radio station, and whether 
you like it or not, you will hear it through your speakers 
whenever you listen to an audio tape on your stereo. 



Freshmen 



24. THE FOUR BASIC FOOD GROUPS: 

Ramen Noodles 

Coffee 

Mac & Cheese 

Dry Cereal 

25. The Library purposely closes early enough on Friday and 
Saturday nights so that you don't miss out on any parties. 

26. Just because you pay somewhere between $10,000 and $20,000 
a year doesn't mean you're ever going to get basketball tickets. 
And no, you can't sit in the Chancellor's seats even though he's 
not at the game. 

27. The Internet is way cooler than AT&T — it's free and only your 
cool friends are on it. 

28. Unless you like your throat carrying liquid up and down 
stream, when it comes to booze, cheaper is not always better. 

29. Wrinkle Free Clothing. 

30. When your parents visit you, all you have to do is say, "Hey, 
it's my roommate's, not mine." 

31. Some classes are actually worth waking up for. 

32. Instead of wondering when you should go to bed, instead of 
wondering if you should go to bed, now you can wonder with 

whom you should go to bed. 




33. Beer before liquor, never sicker. 
Liquor, then beer, never fear. 

by Gregory Zenoii 



Far Left: Lunch break at the Student 
Union. 

photo by Gleiida Radcr 

Left: Waking up is hard to do! 

photo by Glendn Radcr 

Upper Left: Friends give an 
encouraging hug. 

photo by Megan Lynch 



'-" i » « ■ ■ " null 1 1 1 1 1 n 



^ ^ '^^'^^^^^ t^^^'^^^ ^Wz-^j^ t^ ^^V-^Vt^ -wvt^ l\'Ot)nvryva€ei^ 



The Twelve Traits 

of a Terrible Roommate 



1. The masking tape he walks into the room 
with is to mark off his half versus your half. 

2. He gets up two hours early for his 8 a.m. 
class to work out, make a pot of coffee, and 
then blow-dry his hair. 

3. He vacuums in the nude. 

4. He loves to share — what's yours. 

5. His pet tarantula is de-poisoned, but her 33 
babies aren't. 

6. He says "Borrow," but he means "Keep 
forever." 

7. His family wants to make sure that you're 
"good enough" to live with their "baby." 

8. His little juvenile delinquent brother is 
going to sleep over for a week during exams. 





9. He knows exactly how to make your 
computer work better, your TV get 
clearer reception, and how to rewire 
your stereo to get in the "really good 
stations." 

10. He's not in your major but he knows 
everything there is to know about it. 

11. His dad works for the FBI. 

1 2 . His mission in life is to convert everyone 
over to his religion, Dianetics and the 
Church of Scientology. 



130 



feeshmeft 



The Fourteen Facets 

of a Fabulous Roommate 



11 



1. When you first meet her she's wearing a concert 
shirt of your favorite band. 

2. She is of age. 

3. She has wheels. 

4. She basically lives with her significant other or 
others. 

5. She's got a 20" TV, a VCR, a game system, and two 
computers. 

6. She's the same major as you, taking the same 
classes, except a year ahead — and she always 
keeps all her tests, papers, and textbooks. 

7. She's got a really cute brother. 

8. Her parents bring up tons of homemade food 
every weekend. 



9. She loves to order out but always orders too 
much and hates keeping leftovers. 

10. She works part time at Newbury Comics, part 
time at Pizza Hut, and part time at Liquor 's 44 — 
and what she doesn't bring you home she can get 
you at discounted prices. 

11. Her parents work in the UMass records office. 

12. She goes home every weekend after her classes, 
and doesn't have classes Mondays or Fridays. 

13. She subscribes to Cosmopolitan, Mademoiselle, 
and Glamour. 

14. She wears the same size as you and invites you 
to raid her closet. 

by Gregory Zenon 



Right Busy, busy, busy Eliinannd 
Knsten take a break from their 
work 

jiliotoln/Cliiiiin R,hlci 

Upper Left: Jennifer Burke and Sue 
Boyle share a tender moment in 
JJ^ir room. 

Ik: p!ioto by Gleiuia Racier 

Far Left: Renee Wurtzel reclines in 
spare moment. 




pJioto hy Glendn Rnder 




Another weekend rolls around and 
|est question on most minds? "So, 
anything going on?" For many 
students, weekends revolve around getting drunk, 
passing out, waking up hung over, then stumbling 
to brunch — and doing it all again Friday and Satur- 
day nights. 

Many students get their first taste of carouse at 
fraternity parties, large off-campus parties on streets 
like Hobart Lane, or places with names like "Brown 
House," and "Yellow House." Freshmen easily fall 
prey to stories of loud music, cheap beer, and the 
possibility of picking someone up. The few students 
who do find romance at parties rarely form relation- 
ships. The morning after, someone usually has a 
broken heart and someone feels used. Popular 
phrases like "one-night stand," and "friends don't 
let friends beer-goggle," have emerged straight from 
parties like these. But most discover these parties 
are always loud music and kegs of cheap beer and 
nothing more. 

Not everyone enjoys sweating in a basement 
with 100 
people 
smoking in 
your face 
and spilling 
Golden An- 
niversary on 
your clothes, 
though. Qui- 
eter than the 
big parties 
and louder 
and less 
regulated 
than average 
dorm par- 
ties, off- 
campus 
parties in 
houses or 
apartments 
are a good 
middle 
ground. 
These more 



intimate gatherings are perfect for small groups of 
friends to drink, watch cable television, and blast 
loud music. Friends of friends can also meet and 
actually get to know each other. 

But the easiest place to party is still the dorm. 
Despite the drinking, smoking, incense, noise, flame, 
and number of people in a room regulations; despite 
wandering R.A.s, angry floormates, campus police, 
R.D.s, and the people on the floors above and be- 
low — students still drink and party in dorm rooms, 
hallways, and lounges. Sure, there are round robins 
in Northeast, punch parties in the towers, and saunas 
and jell-o sliding in Butterf ield . But the average dorm 
party is a small gathering of friends over D.P. Dough, 
SEGA, and either a case of Bud or Liquor's 44 brand 
rum. 

As for what students drink, that includes every- 
thing from ales to zinfandels, from Jim Beam to 
Kahlua. While there are beer drinkers, hard drinkers, 
and wine cooler fans in the middle, all groups agree 
on one thing — price is a factor. Usually, the larger the 
party, the cheaper the beer or the punch. When small 




Freshmen 



groups of friends splurge, they usually do on mid- 
priced alcohol like Michelob for beer or Seagram for 
hard liquor. 

Drinking is part of college life — there is no denying 
it. Students drink to relax, to escape from the stress of 
exams and papers, to temporarily forget classes and 
professors, or just as an excuse to hang out. 

But when students abuse alcohol something is 
wrong. To what extent is underage drinking a problem? 
It is the most common problem with which R.A.s must 
deal. Many underage drinkers have not drunk before 
college, do not know what effect drinking has on them, 
and do not know when to stop. These inexperienced 
drinkers are often the ones who cause damage to dorms, 
start arguments that lead to fights, get sick in rooms, 
hallways, bathrooms — and either need medical atten- 
tion or otherwise draw the attention of authorities. 

For those who choose to drink, the parties will go 
on. Although the reputation of "Zoo-Mass" is not as 
prevalent as in the early 1980s, alcohol is still the way 
most students choose to wind down. From an American 
(beer) on frat row to a Jack Daniel's wine cooler in a 
single in McNamara, to a Tanqueray gibson martini at a 
private off-campus party, someone is having a drink. 
by Carol Drzewianowski, Deb Gaoiiette 
and Gregory Zenon 





Far Left: Wlio says you can 't have alcohol in the dorms? 

photo by Glenda Rader 
Left: Teddy bears make good friends because they 
know how to party right. 

photo by Glenda Rader 

Above: Caution: May cause brain damage. 

photo by Glenda Rader 



133 



Fiasco 




o you remember the first 
time you moved into a UMass dorm? 
Chancesare it was stressful and your nerves 
(as well as your parents' nerves) were 
frazzled. Maybe you got lost on your way 
to Amherst, or found yourself in the wrong 
residential area. Maybe you found out you 
had to move everthing to the top floor of a 
Southwest tower, or you forgot to bring 
something important from home. 

Getting settled may not have been the 
easiest transition but at least there was a 
room waiting for you. For nearly 300 stu- 
dents in September, the frustration of mov- 
ing in wasn't even an option. They had to 
deal with an entirely different set of frus- 
trations when they set foot on campus. 
These students arrived at the dorms to 
which they thought they were assigned, 
only to find out that their housing had been 
switched, or worse... they had no housing 
at all. 

Because of an error in the Bursar's 
Office, housing was inadvertently with- 
drawn from many students over the sum- 
mer. These students appeared to have 



unpaid bills — a situ- 
ation that would ex- 
clude them from 
University housing — 
although there really 
was no hold on their 
records. A computer 
in the Bursar's Office 
containing incorrect 
information, con- 
nected with a Hous- 
ing Office computer 
and caused what 
would become a 
disasterous start of the 
school year. 

Freshman Yeon- 
Mi Kwon arrived in 
Sylvan on September 
3, ready to move into 
the room she would 
begin to call "home." 
When she attempted 
to check in, Kwon was told her name 
"wasn't on the list of residents." 

"I had to go down to Whitmore to see 




what's going on. I ended up in swing spa 
in Orchard Hill," said Kwon. 

Many students ended up living 



134 




lounges, like Kwon. Others were put up in the 
Campus Center Hotel until rooms were found for 
them. Kwon didn't want to move again. "I talked to 
my R.A. who talked to the A.R.D. and now I'm 
living in permanent space here," she explained. 

Other students found themselves in even more 
difficult positions. Kate Sawicki, a sophomore trans- 
fer student and Psychology major was supposed to 
live in Southwest, but like Kwon, was told she 
wasn't on the list and there was no place for her to 
stay. 

Luckily, Sawicki's home is about a half-hour 
away from UMass. "I commuted for a week. It 
wasn't too bad, but it was pretty aggravating." 

She finally was assigned a room in Sylvan. It's 
hardly Southwest, but Sawicki said, "It's really nice. 
Everthing's pretty quiet, but everything's fine." 

Still other students were annoyed by little 
changes. Sophomore Fisheries and Wildlife major 
Kristopher Massini expected to return to the same 
room in which he lived last year. "When I talked to 
my R.A. before we moved in, she said that I had my 
room back," said Massini. 

Unfortunately, a different person with the same 
first name was assigned there. Massini was happy 





to get a room on the same floor as last year but he was 
disappointed he wasn't on the same side. "That's my 
room," he said, "It's so wrong to see someone else's 
stuff in there!" 

At least Massini had a room. All of the students 
who were held up in the Campus Center Hotel, swing- 
spaces, or out-of-service rooms were forced to make 
numerous trips to Whitmore Administration Building 
to resolve the problem. 

Within a few weeks, most, if not all of the dis- 
placed students had permanent housing. Although 
these students may have thought their year was jinxed, 
a resolution was ultimately reached. With any luck, 
extra care will be taken to ensure a fiasco like this 
doesn't happen again. 

by Carol Drzcunaiiozoski 

Left: A happy sophomore looks forward to dorm Ufe 
again. 

photo hy Eleanor Gerome 

Far Left: Father and son move a refrigerator into the 
dorms. 

photo by Joseph Minkuus 
Above: (Click, click) There's no place like home. There's 
no place like home. 

photo hy Eleanor Geroiiic ■ 

Above Left; Just the bare necessities. -'-•, 

photo by Eleniior Gerotiie .-J^ 



135: 




...Any Messages 




conomist John Kenneth Galbraith said, "In 
the United States all business not transacted over the phone 
is accomplished in conjunction with alcohol or food, often 
under conditions of advanced intoxication." The same can 
be said of UMass. When students are not talking at dinner 
or parties, they usually can be found on the phone. UMass 
students depend on the phone when they need answers to 
a question; a simple call helps avoid long lines at Whitmore 
Adminsitration Building. The phone is a necessity here. 

Although it is convenient to just place a call, things at 
UMass are no longer so simple. Some time between leaving 
high school and arriving at UMass, students realize that the 
once humble machine called the phone metamorphosed 
into something else. No longer does it merely "reach out 
and touch someone." The UMass phone system has entered 




the realm of voice mail. 

From the day students set foot on campus, voice mail 
becomes an integral part of daily life. Temporary passwords 
wait in mailboxes. Secret codes are punched in to initialize 
students' systems. It is not uncommon to hear, "You can 
launch a rocket from that thing!" when explaining how the 
system works. The endless options can be quite daunting at 
first. 

International exchange student Sam Kirkham found the 
system to be a difficult adjustment, "Back in England we 
don't have anything like that." Navigating the system did not 
take too long, though, and Sam began to discover some of the 
options. He said, "It's great because you can just send some- 
one a message without disturbing them." 

Some people get attached to voice mail and used to 
checking messages from anywhere on- or off-campus. 
They begin to take conference calling and automatic 
call-back for granted. Later, when these same students 
move off-campus it's like a cultural jet-lag; without the 
neat features of voice mail available to them, they must 
suffer with a simple no-nonsense phone. 

Jason Gautreau, a junior Electrical Engineering 
major, is one such student. "I really do miss it," he said, 
"It's really a pain to get a busy signal and have to keep 
redialing until that person hangs up." Jason said the 
voice mail system made it much easier to contact people 
at his own convenience. 

Not everyone shares Jason's opinion, though. Other 
students feel the voice mail system is too complex for 
their needs. 

Adam Nicolopoulos, a junior BDIC major, dislikes 
the system. He said he finds it a hassle to use. "It would 
be fine if people left messages that were important, but 
usually the light's blinking like crazy for no good rea- 



i 136 



son. Usually it's someone saying, 'Hey, what's up?' 
It's useless. It gives me a headache.'" 

Students like Adam could do without voice 
mail. They would much rather have a basic answer- 
ing machine or call-waiting. They do not find all of 
the options exciting — they find them annoying. 
After all, if voice mail requires a flow chart such as 
the one that takes up a page of the Housing Services 
Telecommunication Telephone User's Guide, some- 
one might wonder how necessary are all of the 
extras. 



Ml £L ja 





To others, voice mail is a godsend. Many 
students appreciate the sophisticated system 
that allows them to do so much more than place 
calls or have an answering machine take mes- 
sages. When friends visit from other colleges, 
they notice the convenience of transferring calls 
to another person's room so they are not missed. 
Harried students needing information can check 
to see if the message they sent was retrieved. 
Most people agree that although sometimes it is 
tempting to toss that phone out the window, 
voice mail makes our lives much easier. 

It might be upsetting when the "voice mail 
lady" cuts you off in the middle of a message, 
but there are always those times when life with- 
out voice mail would be unimaginable. And for 
those times, we are lucky to have it. 

by Carol Drzewianozvski 



Left: Jessica Whinthrop -Orey pre- English major reads 
up on her voicemail facts. 

photo by Glenda Rader 

Above: Senior Finance major Emily Ahrens receives a 
hilarious message. 

photo by Glenda Rader 

Far Left: Jill Aordkian, Political Science sophomore, 
taking messages for the Index. 

photo by Glenda Rader 



Layout by Tina Savoic 



137 



"i ^ete ^ t<^ "Tpocci "i^e^iiitt^ 



r\ 



n a typical cold New 
Rnglaiul day at University Health 
Servicer (Ul IS), Chris Bussiere, a 
freshman Mechanical Engineering 
major, sat and waited for a doctor to 
see him. The big hole in his ankle 
was from an accident he'd had with 
a knife. 

"1 was horsing around in the 
dorms," said Bussiere, "and the 
knife fell and went through my 
ankle." 

Bussiere hac^Ken to HS once 
before, for chest f^Ks, and his first 
impression was proven by his sec- 
ond, that servici' was slow. 

"It takes forever for help," said 
Bussiere. "It's nue and organized, 
though." 

Health Ser\ ices is basically a. 
hospital for people tied, to the Uni- 
versity as well as the local commu- 
nity. Sometimes patients are sent to 
Cooley Dickinson hospital in 





\orthamplon, but tor the most part 
HS lb a complete care center. Uoc 
tors who work at UMass also work 
at area hospitals. 

Accidents are common rea- 
sons studentb use HS. Kevin 
Bangor, a junior in the School of 
Management specializing in Sicil- 
ian business ethics, said he acci-i 
dentalty bmisfd the knuckles of^ 
J^j| | g | i j ijti|||tBi|rtile reading the pa-^ 
per. 

"One minute I was reading 
The Wizard of Id in the comics sec- 
tion. The next minute, 1 got these 
bruises on my knuckles. Last time 
this happened, 1 was taking a nap. 
Amazing." He said he uses HS all 
the time. 

"1 used to have to wait like 
everyone else. But then 1 talked to 
them, and now, actually, I get re- 
ally good service," said Bangor. 
"But a lot of the people I refer here 



say they get slow service. I'm just 
lucky, I guess. Go figure." 

Except for Bangor, all the stu- 
dents at HS agreed the service was 
slow. 

The infection on his leg 
wrought senior Finance major Mike 
Proja to HS. "You get good service, 
iure, but everything here takes for- 
ever." 

Students said they were used 

waiting on lines at UMass, 
/whether at Whitmore administra- 
ion, the dining commons, for bas- 
•cetball tickets, or for a doctor. 

Hussein Ibish, a graduate stu- 
dent of Comparative Literature had 

1 damaged foot. He said he liked HS 
3ut had some problems with it. 

"Important services are not p 
\t no cost, such as eye and dental 
;aid Ibish. "Dental and eye 
generally costs as much as an 
ike private clinics." 

Another problem wit^^P is the tact 
:hat students cannot choojfeaoctors Rayna 
Epstein, a sophomore, j^^nursmg ma)or, 
said, "It is not that bad'a place, but would 
oe better if you could use your own doc- 





Freshman Tohtical Science mojot' 
Arhne Price, who was picking up a pre- 
scription, agreed. She said HS was notbad 
She said she liked the doctor she had ■^ccn, 
but would rather have her own 

HS also employs students. Junior Lisa 
Ohven, a Journalism major, said ^-he likes 
working at HS "It's a nice enxnonment 
and It provides a good service to UMass 
students "She said she sees about 50 people 



per day get served. 

As far as staff, Oliveri said there are 
about three doctors on staff at urgent care 
every day, and at night there is always one 
person on call. 

But Oliveri conceded service was 
slow. "It would all be m.uch faster if there 
was a bigger facility. But they do the best 
that they can." 

by Lorettn Kioaii ami Gregory Zciiou 




Upper Left: University Health™ 
Services is where students go tc^ 
receive medical care. "^ 

pliota courtesy of Health Sei vices 

Lower Left: Dr. Frederick Brown 
examining one of his many patients. 

photo courtesi/ ofHcaltJi Ser'ciu's 

Left: "Open up and sa 
ahhhlihhhhhh ' 

photo id 'csi/o*Hi 'l^h 

Above: Dr. Daclapp gi\ es a routine 
check-up, 

piioto iOtiUi^i/ oj tk illti "^Li 






' s usual, homecoming weekend agreed, 
k UMass. Most people who at- Wood then publicized the tournament with 



ing either the Football team or the Women's 
Soccer Team. But a small, dedicated group of 
twenty-some people gathered together in the 
campus center basement from as far away as 
Boston, New Jersey, and New York, many with 
barely enough money left for return bus tickets. 

They were attending the first UMass Virtua 
Fighter 2 arcade game tournament. 

Sophomore IN^fison Wood put a month of 
planning into the event. He called the company 
who ran the game. He told them about his idea, 
and he wanted them to change the cost of the 
game from 50 cents to a quarter. The company 




Internet, where he posted messages on the news 
groups devoted to video arcade games and one 
specifically devoted to Virtua Fighter. 

For the uninitiated, Virtua Fighter 2, simi- 
lar,, to Street Fighter and Mortal Kombat, is a 
one-on-one combat game. A player picks out 
one of a dozen or so characters and has two 
options. He can fight the computer. If he does, 
he fights round after round against opponent 
characters until he either wins or is killed. Or he 
can fight against a human opponent, who 
chooses his character from the same group. 

Each character in the game has a distinct 
fighting style; each uses a special mix of at- 
tacks — punches, kicks, tosses — 
like an elderly monk named Shun 
who drinks himself into a ber- 
serk rage. 

Virtua Fighter is the current 
UMass rage. According to its 
owners, it earns ten ti^nes more 
weekly than the rest of the games 
combined. 

Friday nights are typically 
"practice'nights" where players 
go easy on each other, teaching 
each other combat moves. Satur- 
days are competition nights. 

A typical player. Wood said 
he spends about three hours daily 
playing the game. Regulars 
quickly tire of the computer's pro- 
grammed predictability and only 
enjoy playing each other. 

The tournament started at 4 
p.m. and lasted until 9:30 p.m. 
(though some played past mid- 
night). It took on the form of a 
round-robin: everyone played 
against each other and people 
with the most wins squared off. 
An interesting aspect of the 
tournament, representative of the 
trend of most games at the UMass 
and local arcades, is that men play 
and women, except for a few, do 
not. Several women who do not 
play said they think arcade games 
are pointless and violent. The 
male players agreed, but said that 
was why they love the games. 



iJJ:>«-pr;-;«iSi?i, 



Before Virtua Fighter/ the trend was Doom and 
before that Wolfenstein. These three dimensional 
games offered players the view from the eyes of a 
lone soldier in mazes of monsters and "bad guys." 
But the big difference between these games and 
Doom was the fact that they are personal computer 
games, keeping players isolated in apartments and 
dorms. Doom breached some of that, becoming 
modem and network compatible, but this did not 
bring players physically tagether. 

Virtua Fighter, on the other hand, has brought 
video game aficionados back into the public eye. 

by Gregory Zenon 



Left: The Arcade in the Campus Center provides a 
break from the day's stresses. 

photo by Jesus Maclean 

Far Left: Video games come in all sizes. 

photo by Jesus Maclean 



photo.by Glenda Rader 



Pillo^v%r 



Talk 



/t 



Ithough the performances were not 
X-rated, the Not Ready For Bedtmie Players man- 
aged to make their audiences squirm watching their 
educational skits about safe sex, AIDS, sexual as- 
sault, contraception, GLB issues, and other tradi- 
tionally taboo but quite germane topics. 

"Everything's done with clothes on," explained 
director Carol Rogers, "but the material still makes 
people uncomfortable." 

From humble beginnings in the theater depart- 
ment in 1988 as a project termed "The AIDS Follies," 
to a full-fledged peer education performance group 
sponsored by the Health Education Department, 
the Not Ready For Bedtime Players have evolved 
and nearly perfected the art of making sex educa- 
tion for students an enjoyable, definitely funny, and 
sometimes painful process. 

A graduate student in higher education, Rogers 
became the new director this fall. Though she hails 
from University of California at San Diego with a 
theater degree, she is no stranger to UMass. 

"I went to nursery school in Skinner Hall," 
said Rogers, "and not many people can say that!" 

Also new in the group this fall were Juniors 
Tiffany Staman and Yana Cooper. They were joined 
by 5-semester veterans like senior Vicki Teal, an 
HRTA major, and senior Damion Smith, a Family 
Counsumer Science major, which gave an even bal- 
ance to new and returning actors in the 12 person 
troupe. 

Popular skits included "Drill Sergeant", in 
which ensemble members lined up holding plastic 
bananas, struggling to put condoms on them and 
failing miserably, while a sergeant exalted the one 
"soldier" who could do it right. "Taste Test", an- 
other forthright and funny skit, simulated two lesbi- 
ans having oral sex using a dental dam. "You can't 
really be subtle," said Rogers. 

While the actors treated audiences to no- 
holds-barred performances, they were always care- 
ful to steer clear of stereotypes, and to observe the 
fine line of people's different perceptions on sexual 
choices. There are no demons or angels within the 
skits; for instance, there are no inacho rapists — just 
instances of miscommunication gone out of control. 
Starting in early September with auditions, 
the Not Ready for Bedtime Players assembled 
Wednesday nights, and various times in between, to 
prepare the 20 vignettes that comprised their reper- 
toire for performance. Not only did the uninhibited 




Captions: 

Top Right: Not Ready for Bedtime Players practice sex 

safe. 

Above: Am I doing it right? 



142 



actors learn to execute the scripts 
also helped write some. 

Sophomore actor Ian Weiss 
worked on an original script tentatively 
titled "Coming Out." With numerous 
rehearsals, seven performances on cam- 
pus, and an on-the-road show at Hamp- 
shire College all just in the fall, the 
group's only reward aside from hearty 
applause was an optional independent 
study credit. 

But Rogers said the ensemble ex- 
perience, including the fast bonding and 
the hard work, made Not Ready for Bed- 
time Players worthwhile. 

by Darcie Deunigaii 




143 



Marching to the Beat 
of a Different Drum 




and director George Parks 
characteristically said all year long, "I want 
to see some energy. Make it crazy." 

The band got crazy on a regular basis. 
For example, they piled into six coach buses 
on a Friday night at 5:30 p.m., equipped with 
sleeping bags and overnight belongings, to 
perform an exhibition show at Giant Stadium 
for "Something" to crowds of high school 
students at 11:30 p.m. After spending the 
night on a high school gym floor, the band 
headed for Boston University, got off the bus 
in full uniform, and immediately performed 
a half time show 

The band accomplished such feats with 
energy and. enthusiasm because its purpose 
is more than to play music and march on a 
football field. Theband reaches out to a crowd 
and inspires them. 

It all started in August before classes 
even began. The Minuteman Marching Band 
practiced from sunup to sundown for a week 
to get work started on the field show. This 
week of band camp was just the beginning of 
hard work for the season. After classes began 
the regular schedule settled down, consist- 
ing of rehearsals every day as well as 8:00 
a.m. on Saturdays. The fun and good times 
outweighed the hard work and effort, so no 
one really minded. 

People involved in this year's season 
remember rain and mud. The weather was 
definitely not on the band's side this year. 
But that did not stop them from playing music 
from E.T., selections from Phil Collins, and a 
special treat from the Lion King with a guest 
appearance by the A Cafellas. 



144 




r^\| 



I * 



\ 



~ux^ 



r. 



Bottom Right: Drum Major, Christopher O'Connor, 
salutes the cheering crowd. 

■photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Above: Marc BeauHeu, senior Music major, and 
junior Karen Pocalyko are featured in the marching 
band's arrangement of Island Magic. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Bottom Left: Sophomore Music major, Kate Tice 
plays the marimba with mallets flying at lightening 
speed. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 

Top: David Slipp, sophomore Music major; Eric 
Melley, freshman; and junior Music major, Joel 
Whalen play along with the rest of the trumpets as 
the section is featured. 

photo by Rebecca M. Fitch 



J^^^^i 



Another memorable part of tradition is 
the invitation of high school bands from all 
over the state to come and participate in a 
half time show with the UMass Band. This 
year over 40 bands participated. 

Along with home game participation, 
the band traveled to several away games. 

As the season ended the band performed 
Merry May pole to welcome in the Christmas 
spirit. The band marched down the streets of 
Amherst center, playing Christmas carols and 
singing with the local junior high school cho- 
rus and the crowd. The band was dressed for 
the holidays in combinations of Santa's hats, 
jingle bells, tinsels, and ribbons. 

A banquet marked the last official gath- 
ering of the band for the year. Located in the 
student union ballroom, the gala consisted of 
food, awards, presentations, and dancing. It 
was an emotional night of reminiscing and 
realizing the season was over. 

by Tina Savoie 



145 



MlJLLIIVS IJj^'PLlJGGKD 



alking into 
the Mullins Center moments before 
an important Minutemen basketball 
game is a strange phenomenon. The 
building feels calm and civilized, and 
few voices can be heard. 

Then the students arrive. 

Suddenly, a rowdy mob of hoop 
fans rush into the arena, shoving, 
elbowing, and sprinting into the stu- 
dent section in relentless pursuit of 
the perfect seats. Finally, they all join 
forces in cheering on the Minute- 
men. It is time for another basketball 
game at the William D. Mullins Cen- 
ter. 

Since opening in January 1993, 
the Mullins Center has made its mark 
on the UMass campus and on the 
entire Pioneer Valley. Events that 
once were held at the Springfield 
Civic Center migrated to Amherst. 

Costing nearly $50 million to 
complete, the complex has a capac- 
ity of 10,000, which can be scaled 
down for a concert event. Adjacent 
to the north side of the arena, stu- 
dents can skate on an Olympic-size 
ice rink. 

The first ticketed event took 
place on February 4, 1993 — a bas- 
ketball game against West Virginia 
Now, three years later, it is difficult 
to imagine the campus before the 
construction of the Mullins Center. 

The Mullins Center began as an 
idea in the mind of the late Represen- 
tative William Mullins of Ludlow in 
1985. The arena, which has gained a 
great level of local and national ex- 
posure from countless nationally 
televised basketball contests, actu- 
ally serves as the site of a plethora of 
UMass events. 

Hockey has re-emerged as a big 
sport on campus. Concerts like Phish, 
Alanis Morrisette, and Natalie Mer- 
chant rocked the Mullins Center and 
attracted devoted fans throughout 
Western Massachusetts and beyond. 
Ice shows, circuses, and other large 
scale cultural events too large for the 
Fine Arts Center can also perform in 
front of more people. 

The facility's diversity creates 

a daunting challenge to the Mullins 

Center crew, who often race 



' 146 I 

I I 




against the clock to convert and 
transform the arena from bas- 
ketball games to hockey 
matches, and then from hockey 
to rock concerts. It is a diffi- 
cult, but exciting process. 

A crew of 40 to 60 people 
are prepared for any event 
within three hours. 

There's always pres- 
sure," said Dale Adams, the 
Executive Director at the 
Mullins Center. "But you al- 
ways have faith in the crew." 
Adams, who graduated from 
UMass with a degree in Sports 
Management, said everyone 
working at the Mullins Center 
shows a high level of pride in 
making sure the show goes on 
while maintaining the pleas- 
ant atmosphere of the complex. 

"When I was a student 
here, we never believed we'd 
have something like this," 
Adams said. "Plus, we didn't 
have a basketball team like this 
one." 

by David jastrow 



all photos coursity of Mullins Center 




aas - balaguer . . , , 



178 



bonini - carlson 

camosino - cohen 

cole - davies 

davis - dowd . 

dowd - flamand 

flessner - godley . . . 

goetz - harper . 

harrington - Jacob 

jain - kidd 

kielb - lee 

lee - macwilliams 

madden - mcnamara . . 

mcnamara - motyka 

moughan - o'suUivan . . . 

o'toole - prabhakar 

pratt - rossi 

roth- sheehan 

sheehan - strum wasser 

Stuart - tshibula ...... . ...... . . . ; ..... 

tullie - willius .... ... . . . . . .... . . ...... 

Wilson - zubizarreta; non-davor portraits 








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149 



Jeffrey Picard 




John Ada 


Psychology 


Jennifer Adair 


Psychology 


Sarafi Adams 


English 


Cynthia Adamson 


HRTA 


David Agin 


Comm 


Tara Agnese 


Comm 


Brienn Agnew 


English, Jrn 


Heather K Ahearn 


SportsMgt 


Emily B Ahrens 


Finance 


Christine Aitchison 


AnimalSci 


IVIohamed Alameh 


ElecEngin 


Damian Albergo 


PoliticalSci 


Jason Alderman 


Accounting 


Penelope E Alex 


Accounting 


John D Alexander 


Anthro 


FarahAAIkaf 


CommDis 


Kristen Allegri 


FashMark 


Michael Allen 


HotelRestMgt 


Dolores Almonte 


Microbio 


Amy Alpert 


ApparelMark 


Carlo Alpuerto 


Public Health 


Josh Altwerger 


Biology 


Liza A Ameen 


Accounting 


Christopher L Amshey 


CompSci 


Matthew Anavy 


Finance 


Jennifer S Anderson 


Sociology 


Wendy Anderson 


LegalStu 


Anne Marie Andriole 


Accounting 


Nicholas Anselmo 


PoliticalSci 


Marcia Antos 


Accounting 


Ellyn Applebaum 


CommDis 


Jennifer K Armstrong 


HotelRestMgt 


Andrea Arricale 


Comm 


Michele L Arroyo 


Comm, Span 



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Psych, Econ 


Julie A Asermely 


Psychology 


Randi Asher 


CommDis 


Arthur Ashton 


ExerciseSci 


Marc Assa 


PoliticalSci 


Aysem Atahan 


Psychology 


Teresa Au Yeung 


HotelRestMgt 


Lauren Babel 


CommDis 


Meran Badawy 


English i 


Teresa Baker 


Biochem 


Tina Bal<er 


Biology 


Paul Baldi 


Hist, PoliSci 


Caroline Balint 


AnimalSci 


Eric S Banta 


ExerciseSci 


Gwen Barber 


Comm 


Jennifer J Barker 


Astro 


Candace Barkley 


Econ, Japn 


Wendy Barkman 


CommDis 


Anastasia Barnes 


English 


Erin Barnes 


BDIC 


Elana Barnett 


ErChiEd, Soc 


Arlens Barosy 


ElecEngin 


Robert S Barr 


EnvirSci 


Amy L Barrett 


Psychology 


Jennifer Barrows 


English 


John Barry 


PoliticalSci 


Michael Bateman 


ResourEcon 


Kerry Beagan 


Marketing 


Catherine Bean 


PoliSci, Ital 


Laurie S Beaulieu 


Psychology 


Robert Beaumont III 


Floriculture 


Richard Beausoleil 


WildFishCon 


Carly Beauvais 


LegalStu 


Lisa Becker 


Psychology | 


Melissa A Becker 


Soc, Ed. 



151 



Joy E Belanger 


Nursing 


Rebecca Belanger 


Marketing 


Sherley Belizaire 


Biology 


Christopher Belleville 


Economics 


Jennifer Benecchi 


CommDis 


Jennifer Bennett 


Sociology 


Andrew Berenson 


PoliSci, Hist 


Michael Bergin 


HotelRestMgt 


Deborah Berkowitz 


ApparelMark 


Christian Berry 


TurfMgt 


Daniel J Bessette 


Marketing 


Mark Bevivino 


Biology 


Nicholas Billikas 


Psy, LegStu 


Jennifer Bisognano 


Accounting 


Michael Bita 


Psychology 


Christopher E Blake 


Biology 


James Blanchette 


Accounting 


Bonnie K Blaney 


ElEd, Journ 


Lynna Blasioli 


FashMark 


Jason S Bliss 


Psychology 


Melanie Block 


SportsMgt 


Myles Block 


Accounting 


Dan Blumenthal 


Theater 


Jon M Blumenthal 


SportsMgt 


Christopher L Boarman 


InternatBus 


Doreen Bobala 


ElemEduc 


Anne M Bobowicz 


Comm 


Jennifer Boccardi 


Spanish 


Rebecca G Bogert 


EarlyChildEd 


Serenity Boland 


Educ, Psych 


Lesley J Bolduc 


LegalStu 


Kathleen Bond 


Psychology 


Rachael Bonham 


ConsumStud 


Amy Bonn 


CommDis 


Patrick Bonner 


Accounting 








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Finance 


Joshua H Bound 


NatResStud 


Michael Bowes 


Comm 


Kelly A Boyce 


Comm 


Kirsten Boyd 


Nursing 


Sylvia Boyle 


Sociology 


Chelsea Bradway 


Psychology 


Lori A Brady 


MechanEngin 


Robert Brady 


PoliSci, Hist 


Sarah Braga 


NatResStud 


Kristen Branch 


Psychology 


Michelle Brazeau 


EarlyChildEd 


Tamara Breneus 


Women'sStu 


Colleen N Brennan 


UWW 


Erin Brennan 


Educ, Soc 


Stacey A Brennan 


ApparelMark 


Andrew Bresnahan 


Comm 


Demetria Bridges 


HotelRestMgt 


Matthew Brightman 


Management 


Ethan Britland 


EnvirDesign 


Susan Bronson 


English 


Donald Brophy 


History 


Andrew Brown 


Sociology 


Devin A Brown 


HRTA 


Jennifer R Brown 


Comm 


Mara E Brown 


LegalStu 


Valarie Brown 


Psychology 


Garfield Bruff 


LandArchit 


Lalanya Brun 


Soc, Psych 


James M Bruneau 


ArchitStu 


Andrew Bryce 


Comm 


Dawn Bulge 


Marketing 


Brian Bunger 


ResourEcon 


Jennifer Burgess 


ApparelMark 


Shawn Burgess 


Finance^ 



153 



Brian K Burke 


SportsMgt 


Teresa Burke 


Biology 


Russell S Burman 


Psychology 


Rebecca Burnaska 


Psychology 


Geoffrey Burns 


Biology 


Michael J Burns 


CivilEnvEng 


Kelly Bush 


Geography 


Louis H Cadorette 


Accounting 


Juan A Calabria 


CivilEnvEng 


Craig W Calcasola 


SportsMgt 


David Callard 


LandArchit 


Jennifer Camarra 


Comm 


Alexis Campbell 


EnvirSci 


Justin Campbell 


SportsMgt 


Kristophor Canali 


Bio, Anthro 


Megan Cannon 


Theater 


Barbara A Canzano 


Marketing 


Christopher Capizano 


Marketing 


John Cappelli 


ResourEcon 


David A Carlos 


Mathematics 


Jill M Carlson 


Comm 


Rebecca Carlton 


Accounting 


David A Carom 


CivilEngin 


Jason Caron 


AnimalSci 


Lisa Carparelli 


BDIC 


Scott Carpenter 


CivilEnvEng 


Jennifer A Carr 


Marketing 


Michael Carr 


ExerciseSci 


Michelle Carrazza 


ElemEd, Econ 


Eileen Carroll 


English 


Nicole Carter 


Education 


Royce Carter 


Finance 


Anita Carvalho 


Psychology 


Daniel Castellano 


Marketing 


Louis J Castellano 


SportsMgt 





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Jennifer A Catellier 


HotelRestMgt 


Keya Cesvette 


Psy, AfrAmStu 


Adam Chamberlin 


Theater 


Calvin Clian 


Mathematics 


Elma Chan 


HotelRestMgt. 


Rockey Chan 


EnvirSci 


VanEssa Chan 


GenBusFin 


Waiyip Chan 


ElecEngin 


Yan Chan 


Psychology 


Esther Chang 


Japanese 


Lynn Chang 


Biology 


Kristen Chapelle 


SportsMgt 


Robert W Chapin 


CompSci 


Nigel Charlton 


Mathematics 


Lewis N Chase III 


Geology 


Cheryl L Chaves 


EnvirSci 


Christine Chen 




Tony Chen 


CompSysEng 


Wilson Chen 


Mathematics 


Yi-Chen Chen 


Management 


Lori Chenard 


HotelRestMgt 


Kevin Cheng 


HotelRestMgt 


Bryan Cheong 


IndEng, Econ 


Peter W Cheong 


Economics 


Samuel E Cherubin 


English 


Fan Cheung 


Biology 


Vivian Cheung 


Finance 


Soyeon Chi 


ApparelMark 


Chia Chiang 


Marketing 


Christopher Chin 


PoliSci, Hist 


Karen Chmielnicki 


HotelRestMgt 


Sung H Cho 


HotelRestMgt 


Brian Choi 


SportsMgt 


Lynn H Choi 


English 


Kok Fui Chong 


CompSysEng^. 



155- 



Paige H Christ 


English 


IVIing C Ciiu 


IndustEngin 


Daniel Ciavattone 


HumanResMgt 


Francis J Ciccone 


Biology 


Jennifer Ciliberto 


Accounting 


Diana Cincotta 


Psych, Ed 


Todd Cincotta 


PoliticalSci 


Colleen M Clarl< 


Ed, Psych 


Jeffrey S Claudino 


HRTA 


Jessica Cleary 


WildFishCon 


Michelle Clement 


Psychology 


Cara Cleveland 


InteriDesign 


Brian Clifford 


Comm 


Kelly A Clyburn 


Management 


Adam Cohen 


SportsMgt 


Andrew D Cohen 


HRTA 


Roseann Cohen 


Sociology 


Steven Cohen 


Accounting 


Judith Colantuono 


HRTA 


Robert Coletti 


ExerciseSci 


Karen Collins 


Nursing 


Steven Comeau 


OperationMgt 


Joseph Como 


Accounting 


Brandon Compagnone 


Psychology 


Kevin Conboy 


ResourEcon 


Caitlin Concannon 


Nursing 


Theresa Concannon 


Psychology 


Michael R Condon 


Management 


Colin R Confoey 


History 


Shane Conldin 


Accounting 


Jane H Conlee 


HotelRestMgt 


Tara Connelly 


Journalism 


Allison Connolly 


English 


Joel A Connor 


ExerciseSci 


Kerri Connors 


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Forestry 


Tawnya L Conway 


EarlyChild 


Kimberly Cooke 


Educ, Psych 


Oni A Cooper 


Nursing 


Mark Corbett 


Theater 


Alexandra Cordis 


Psychology 


Gail C Corey 


Sociology 


Brenda Correa 


BDIC 


Joyce Correia 


Biology 


Armando Cortez 


Psychology 


Christopher C Cosentino 


English 


Sergio A Costa 


PoliticalSci 


Alison M Costello 


Dance 


Danielle Cotreau 


French 


Nancy B Couper 


PitSISci, ResEc 


Amy Courage 


SportsMgt 


Amy Courcy 


SportsMgt 


Lisa A Coury 


ApparelMark 


Kathleen Cowan 


LegalStu 


Benjamin C Craft 


History 



Jill Crager Nursing 

Rebecca Crapser OperationMgt 

Cedrian Monique Cross ConsumStud 

Kim Cuddy ExerciseSci 

Jennifer Cull Psychology 




Jeannette Curne 


Biochem 


Timothy Curran 


ExerciseSci 


Shaun Curtin 


Dance 


Marc S Cushway 


WildFishCon 


John Cusick 


ResourEcon 


Kelly L Czernich 


Comm 


Daniel P Czerwiec 


ChemEngin 


Kritapone Dabbaransi 


IndustEngin 


Kate Dacey 


Comm 


Gregory Dagostino 


Accounting 



157 



Jennifer Dahlem 


ErChiEd, Psy 


Martha Daileanes 


Accounting 


Shawn Dalton 


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Andrea Damore 


Ital, Fren 


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Keith J Darois 


ExerciseSci 


Neil Davis 


English 


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Greg J Davie 


HotelRestMgt 


Anthony W Davila 


Psychology 


Erin E Davis 


Biochem 


Kerri Davis 


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HotelRestMgt 


Robert J Dee 


History 


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Art 


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Alissa D Delmonte 


Zoology 


Sara Demenkoff 


Comm 


Elisa Depace 


CommDis 


Purvi Desai 


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EnvirSci 


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Sociology 


Robert Deubel 


EnvirSci 


Michael Deutsch 


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Music 


Michael Didonato 


SportsMgt 


Danna Digesse 


Educ, Psych 


Liza M Digrazia 


SportsMgt 


Jamie Dilorenzo 


Nursing 


Christine Dimeo 


CmpSci, Math 


Rebecca Dimino 


Music 





Jill A Dinnocenzo 


ApparelMark 


Crystale A Dion 


Marketing 


Jennifer Ditullio 


HuReMgt, Soc 


Danjiro Dixon 


HRTA 


Diane C Dodds 


UWW 


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Comm 


Padraic Doherty 


HotelRestMgt 


Page Doherty 


Psychology 


Amy C Dolan 


ExerciseSci 


Matthew J Donahoo 


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Patrick J Donohue 


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Psychology 


William Dresser 


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159, 



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Daniel J Emerson 


History 


Jason Endich 


Finance 


Joshua Endler 


LegalStud 


Jennifer Engle 


Psychology 


Effie M Eraklis 


Biology 


Jim Erickson 


PoliticalSci 


Stacey Eriich 


Theater 


Christina Fagone 


LegalStud 


Erin Fairbank 


Psychology 


Jean Farewell 


Art 


Beth Faria 


Comm 


Deborah Faulkner 


CommDis 


Joyce Fegan 


AnimalSci 


Karyn Feinberg 


Human ResMgt 


Scott Feldman 


MechanEng 


Adrian Feliciano 


English 


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Mimi Fellner 


Journalism 


Vernard Fennel 


BDIC 


Andrew J Ferguson 


Marketing 


Marie Fernandes 


ApparelMark 


Margaret Ferrante 


Biology 


Christopher Ferraro 


HotelRestMgt 


Jean Ferreira 


Comm 


Geoffrey Ferrucci 


Biology 


Jessica Fetterman 


Comm 


Jan Feuerstadt 


LegalStud 


Frederick Fielder 


LandArchit 


Robert Fields 


WoodTech 


Diego R Figueroa 


PoliticalSci 


Jill A Fineman 


Accounting 


Barrie Finger 


Psychology 


Michael A Fiore 


EnvirSci 


Alyssa Firger 


Art 


Rachel M Fischer 


Psychology 


Joshua Fishbein 


Theater 


Rebecca Fitch 


WildFishCon 



Christopher J Fitzpatrick Sociology 

Kathy A Fitzsimmons Nutrition 

Gregory H Flatt Anthropology 

Candice Flemming Journalism 

Jeremy Fluegel CompScience 



Peter F Flynn II 


Mathematics 


Kate P Foley 


Comm 


Edwin Fong 


Computer Arts 


Brian Fonseca 


Comm 


David Fontaine 


BDIC 


Sean Fontes 


English 


Valerie Foran 


LegStud, Psy 


Erica Forman 


Finance 


Kimberly D Forte 


ApparelMark 


Nan Fosse 


HRTA 



161 



Gail Foster 


HumanResMgt 


Karen Fotos 


Marketing 


Leann M Fox 


Art 


Stephanie Fraleigh 


Psychology 


Daphne Francois 


Biology 


Fabienne Francois 


Psychology 


Nicole Freedman 


Psychology 


Suzanne Freeman 


Nursing 


Kim Friedlander 


AnimalSci 


Jeremy llil Fucile 


Marketing 


Amy M Gagne 


English 


Kara J Gagne 


Journ, Educ 


James P Ganley 


Comm 


Patricia Garcia 


Marketing 


Christopher M Gardner 


History 


Christopher Garrity 


ChemEng 


Melissa Gary 


HotelRestMgt 


Sara Geaney 


History 


Aimee S Gelinas 


NatResStud 


Joelle Geller 


Comm 


Rebecca J George 


EnvirSci 


Susan M George 


STEPC 


Michael Giaimo 


History 


Manfredi Giammanco 


Journ, Hist 


Shelly Giang 


Accounting 


Noga Gillat 


Psychology 


Kacey Gillen 


Comm, Edu 


Dennis Gillespie 


English 


Jean Gillis 


French 


Richard Gilluly 


UWW 


Alicia F Giner 


Spanish 


Alissa Ginsberg 


Psychology 


Todd M Gionfriddo 


Envir Sci 


Gino Giumarro 


WildFishCon 


Darlene M Glent! on 


Management 









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Accounting 


Jeffrey Goldberg 


Accounting 


Emily Gold 


Hist, Journ 


Marsha Golding 


Microbio 


Alicia J Goldstein 


EarChiEd.Spa 


Josh Goldstein 


Art 


Jocelyn Goldthwait 


Psychology 


Maribel Gomez 


Comm 


Jay Gondelman 


OperationMgt. 


Craig Goodfriend 


Sports Mgt 


Alissa Goodspeed 


Sociology 


Denise Goren 


ResourEcon 


Howard Gotshalk 


HRTA. 


Dorothy E Gould 


Political Sci 


Elizabeth J Gouveia 


English 


Andrew Graf 


Turf Mgt 


Robert Gramer 


Physics 


Brian Grant 


Turf Mgt 


Michael W Greaney 


Comm 


Jeff Greengrass 


Exercise Sci 


Jill F Greenleaf 


Sports Mgt 


Amy L Griffin 


Photography 


Jeanne Griffin 


Nursing 


Amy Grodsky 


Psychology 


Sean R Grogan 


Finance 


Aimee Guarnera 


Exercise Sci 


Anthony Guido 


Journalism 


Seema Gupta 


Finance 


Laurie A Gwozdz 


Nutrition 


Sussie Gyamfi 


Sociology 


Chan Uk Ha 


Hist.Japan 


Stephanie Haas 


HotelRestMgt 


Leigh Hacker 


ConsumSt,Soc 


Jason Hackerman 


Accounting 


Megan Hackett 


Art History 



James Hagan 


Finance 


Jennifer Hagany 


CommDis 


David Hajjar 


CommDis 


Lucy Halatyn 


Sociology 


Allen E Hale 


Management 


Jennifer Hale 


Sociology 


Carlyn M Haley 


Marketing 


Hasliyati Halim 


BDIC 


E. Kevin Hall 


Biology 


Edward M Hall 


PlantSoilSci 


Melissa Halloran 


Comm 


Tammy Halsted 


Sociology 


John Hamel 


Land Archit 


Karen Hancock 


Exercise Sci 


Kevin B Hanlon 


Envir Sci 


Michelle Hannigan 


Finance 


Kevin F Hanrahan 


Sociology 


Amanda Hanson 


HotelRestMgt. 


Lorraine Hanssen 


Biochem 


Aimee S Hardy 


Accounting 


Nora Harley 


Marketing 


Jennifer Harling 


BDIC 


Alexander Harm 


CompSci 


Christine Harmon 


Biology 


Katherine V Harris 


Animal Sci 


Shannon Harsch 


Psychology 


Tanya Hart 


Exercise Sci 


George Hart III 


Political Sci 


Syed Hasan 


Biochem 


Robert Hathaway 


MechanEngin 


Edmond Hau 


CompSci 


Amy H Hawes 


Animal Sci 


Laui-en L Hazel 


Art Educ 


Tara Hazen 


Animal Sci 


Dennis M Head 


PlantSoilSci 




164 






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Thomas Head 


Psychology 


Lisa Heaton 


Psychology 


Christiana Hegner 


Art Educ 


Jill E Heil 


Microbio 


Kyla Heimert 


Comm 


Maria Held 


Finance 


Marni Helfner 


Eng,WomenStu 


Gerard Henderson 


Management 


Shannon Hennessy 


Psychology 


Johannah Henson 


German 


Justin Heos 


Marketing 


Dorothea Hertzberg 


STEPC 


Carolynn Hickey 


HotelRestMgt. 


Kenneth W Hickman Jr 


Psychology 


Nicole L Hios 


Music 


Audrey Hirsch 


Legal Stu 


Brooke Hirschfelder 


Psychology 


Paula Hirtle 


Classics 


Matthew Hitchcock 


WildlFishCon 


David Hitchman 


Legal Stu 


Hyatt Hodges 


Legal Stu 


Ann Hodkinson 


English 


Joseph Hoffman 


Education 


John Hogan Jr 


HistPoliSci 


Joseph R Hogan 


Civ.EnvEngin 


Brian N Hogg 


Sociology 


Allison H Holden 


IndustEngin 


Jill Holland 


Comm 


Suzanne Holland 


Comm 


Helen Hong 


PoliSci, Comm 


Seok Hong 


HotelRestMgt. 


Susan E Hoover 


Exercise Sci 


Miyuki Hori 


InternatBus 


Tracy L Horrigan 


InteriDesign 


Mariah Chowland 


French 



165 



Lori Hrdlicka 


Biology 


Nathan 1 Hudson 


Comm 


Stephanie Hunt 


EnvirSci 


Jeffrey Hurley 


Sports Mgt 


Isaac J Hurte 


Exercise Sci 


Alison Hussey 


Psychology 


Monet Hutchings 


Dance 


Rebecca Hutchinson 


Animal Sci 


Steven Hutchinson 


Microbio 


Phu X Huynh 


Finance 


Jennifer K Huze 


Psychology 


Marc ladonisi 


Finance 


Gregory lafrate 


Sociology 


Tayfun Icten 


Finance 


Nnenna llomechina 


CompSysEng. 


Richard M Ingham 


MechanEngin 


Wendy Ingles 


AnISciArt 


David Irving 


History 


Adam H Israel 


Psychology 


Jonathan R Ivory 


English 


Alicia M Jackson 


Legal Stu 


Erin Jackson 


PoliSciWoStu 


Andrea B Jacobs 


Fren,PoliSci 


Timothy Jacobs 


Psychology 


Jennifer Jacobson 


English 


Georgette James 


Accounting 


Jed D Jankowski 


Biology 


Matthew Jankowski 


SportsMgt 


Scott Janousek 


CompSci 


Allison M Jarrell 


Marketing 


David Jastrow 


Journalism 


Kevin Jekanowski 


FruitVegProd 


Paul Jekanowski 


PhysicalEduc 


Chris A Jenkins 


Political Sci 


Dawn Jennings 


Psychology 









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Alisa Johnson 


French 


Carrie Johnson 


AnimalSci 


Elisabeth M Johnson 


Hist,PoliSci 


Jennifer J Johnson 


Comm 


Richard E Johnson 


Sociology 


Tina A Johnson 


HotelRestMgt 


Tracy L Johnson 


RescorEcon 


Lori Jones 


PoliticalSci 


Jeremiah Jones-Goldstein 


NatResStud 


Anthony Jordan 


Accounting 


Brian Joyce 


CivilEnvEngin 


J Pedro Juliano 


IndustEngin 


Lisbeth Kahn 


English 


Natasha Kahn 


Comm 


Steven P Kalashian 


EnvirSci 


Keri M Kalman 


HotelRestMgt 


Rebecca J Kan 


Microbio 


Ann Marie Kane 


Comm 


Jennifer M Kane 


Journ,Psych 


Rachel A Kane 


ArtHistory 


Jonathan Kanegson 


English 


Putsaya Kansaksiri 


IndustEngin 


Scott Kaplan 


Psychology 


Stefany Kaplanes 


Sociology 


Emily Karbowski 


Psychology 


Damon Karys 


Comm 


Alex S Kasendorf 


SportsMgt 


Sheri Katz 


Psychology 


Lora Keane 


Spanish 


Amy Keaney 


Psych, Ed 


Robert Kebler 


CpSysEng, Mth 


John Keeler 


Acc,Econ 


Shaheda Keels 


BDIC 


Dawn L Keith 


AnimalSci 


Craig Kelly 


Comm^. 



Denise Kelly 


Soc, Wom Stu 


Melissa L Kelly 


HotelRestMgt 


Elizabeth Kerber 


ConsumStud 


Michael Kerchner 


Sociology 


Patricia Kessler 


Psychology 


Anita Kestin 


English 


Scott L Keyes 


Sociology 


Zureen Khairuddin 


Accounting 


Rebecca Kierner 


Psychology 


Kara Kilduff 


Comm 


Vanessa Kilfoyle 


Comm 


Patrick Killay 


BDIC 


Jiyoon Kim 


BDIC, Ed 


Ji-Young Kim 


HotelRestMgt 


Scott Kindig 


GraphicDesign 


Adam J King 


Geography 


Pierre S King 


Accounting 


Joseph F Kingsley 


History 


Brian Kinnare 


PlantSoilSci 


Allyson Kirl<patrick 


Comm 


John J Kivel 


Comm 


Karl Kjendal 


Hist.Eng 


Julie D Klein 


Psychology 


K IVIatthew Klueber 


Comm 


IVlatthew Koch 


HotelRestMgt 


Pamela Koenig 


Marketing 


Joyce Kok 


HotelRestMgt 


Amy Kokansky 


ApperelMark 


Seth Kornbluth 


PoliticalSci 


Janette J Kosior 


Marketing 


Kerry Kosia 


PoliticalSci 


Heather A Krause 


Education 


Michael Kritzman 


Comm 


Brandt Kronholm 


English 


Barrie Krumholz 


Legal Studies 




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168 




Allan T Ku 


ElecEngin 


Jonna Kuokkanen 


RescorEcon 


Alan Kurzontkowski 


Sociology 


Lucie Kwon 


Legal Studies 


Jonas Kwong 


Comm 


David Kyrouz 


HotelRestMgt 


Charlene La 


Biochem 


Christina Labbate 


Psychology 


Paul J Labbe 


MechanEngin 


Richard Labedz 


Music 


Marianna E Lacanfora 


Spanish 


Todd J Lachance 


Wood Tech 


Kimberly L Ladouceur 


ChemEngin 


Tammy Laffin 


Psychology 


Kristen D Laflamme 


Biology 


Jessica L Lafleur 


Accounting 


Jeremy Lafrancois 


EnvirSci 


Jason Lagnese 


SportsMgt 


Holliann Lajoie 


CommDis 


Jennifer A Lak 


ExerciseSci 


Megan L Lally 


Nursing 


Chi Lam 


HotelRestMgt 


Stephen Lam 


HotelRestMgt 


Robin Lamonda 


ApperelMark 


David Landau 


Legal Studies 


Jennifer Langmaid 


Accounting 


Lanita M Lathan 


ApperelMark 


Jeffrey Lawrence 


Psychology 


Heather M Lawton 


English 


Diemtrang T Le 


Finance 


Hau T Le 


Economics 


Christopher J Leary 


History 


Tracy E Leavitt 


ConsumStud 


Amanda Lebrecht 


EnvirSci 


Deborah Lechner 


Psychology 



169 



Rachel J Leduc 
Francine Lee 
Jennifer L Lee 
Sharon Lee 
Steven M Lee 

Wendy Lee 
Alison Legor 
David E Lehnus 
Jeffrey Lenchiner 
Heather S Lenchitz 



SportsMgt 

ApperelMark 

WildFishCon 

HotelRestlVlgt 

ChemEngin 

HumanResMgt 

OperationMgt 

Geology 

Mathematics 

Eng, ErChiEd. 



Robert A Letteney PoliSci, Hist 

Raymond Leung Management 

Victor King-Chung Leung Accounting 

Eric Leventhal Marl<eting 

Tiffany J Levy HumanResMgt 



Daniel Lew 


HotelRestMgt 


Alexandra Lewis 


Soc, Psych 


Luanne Lilore 


Comm 


Robert M Lima Jr 


Psychology 


Luis Limardo 


HRTA 


Patricia Lin 


Psychology 


Shu Wen Lin 


HotelRestMgt 


Robert W Lindberg 


Finance 


Christina A Linden 


English 


Karen Lipof 


HotelRestMgt 


Isaias Liriano 


HotelRestMgt 


Victoria Lividini 


Music 


Pamela Lloyd 


Music 


Tania Loffreda 


Psychology 


Carolyn H Longbotham 


Psychology 


Christopher R Lopes 


PoliticalSci 


Courtney A Lopes 


CommDis 


Anna Lopresti 


InteriDesign 


Adam Loss 


SportsMgt 


Maria E Lozada 


Spanish 





^ 


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170 




Marisol Lozada 


Span, Psych 


Jesse Lubarsky 


Finance 


Lavonette Wl Luciano 


Comm 


Ada M Lugo 


LegStud, Journ 


Robert Lukacz 


Sociology 


Eric J Lydon 


ExerciseSci 


Carolyn Lyncii 


Psychology 


Christopher Lynch 


Turf Mgt 


IViaria Lynch 


AnimalSci 


Justin Lynn 


Comm 


Bethany C Lyons 


Psychology 


Cheryl Lyons 


Journalism 


Matthew MacAluso 


SportsMgt 


Andrew S MacDonald 


OperationMgt. 


Lorrie MacGilvray 


PolitSci, Soc 


Amy MacKay 


PlantSoilSci 


Lisa MacKinney 


AnimalSci 


Glenda Karen MacLang 


Psychology 


Joseph MacNeil Jr 


BDIC 


Richard J Maggi 


CompSci 


Melanie iVIaguire 


ExerciseSci 


Karen L Maher 


CommDis 


Kristina IVlahony 


EarlyChildEd 


Amanda Makrogianis 


Sociology 


Jara W IVIalikin 


Sociology 


Cynthia K Mallar 


Comm 


Kerry IVIalloy 


Eng, PoliSci 


Valerie Maloney 


MechanEngin 


Tak S IVlan 


ApperelMark 


Joseph Mancuso 


Finance 


Maureen R Manjerovic 


Music 


Yasunori Manoda 


Geology 


Darrell J Marcinek 


PlantSoilSci 


Jacquelyn Marcus 


OperationMgt 


Mitchell Markel 


Marketing 



Lisa M Maronski 


Economics 


Scott Wlarotta 


EnvirSci 


Susan Marshak 


Psychology 


Donald Marshall 


Psych, BDIC 


Jennifer Martel 


ApperelMark 


David G Martell 


Forestry 


Vicki Martell 


FashMark 


Earl T Martin 


Marketing 


Mirca 1 Martinez-Cruz 


HRTA 


James A Martins 


ExerciseSci 


Peppino Marruca 


Marketing 


Taylor Mascovitz 


Economics 


Azman Mashud 


Marketing 


Candice M Masiello 


CommDis 


Joseph R Mason 


Psychology 


Chad Mathieu 


TurfgrassMgt 


Noriko Matsumoto 


Sociology 


Lisa Matucheck 


Psychology 


Elio Mauro 


Finance 


John Maxwell 


ElEd, Psych 


April Mazza 


BDIC 


Kristen Mazzarella 


Biology 


Mark J McCabe 


Music 


Meredith McCabe 


Psychology 


Patrick McCaffrey 


LandArchit 


Amy McCake 


Comm 


Keith McCann 


HotelRestMgt 


Allison M McCarthy 


Ed, Psych 


Ian M McCollum 


SportsMgt 


George McEachern IV 


LegStu, Soc 


Jim McGee 


UrbFor, Ed 


Paul McKechnie Jr 


LandArchit 


Jill McLaughlin 


Finance 


Kerry McNamara 


Economics 


Rich McNeil 


UWW 




1721 










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Stacey McWilliams 
Matthew Meehan 
Jeffrey Meenes 
Emily Megan 
Adam Mehl 

Georgianne Meletis 
Scott Mendlestein 
Christie Meniates 
Tania K Mercado 
Janet E Merna 

Kerry Metelski 
Cory J Metters 
Dina Meuse 
Kirsten B Meyers 
Shan Miao 

Stephen J Michael 
Nicole Michaud 
Andrea L Miles 
Kristin Miles 
Beth L Miller 

Bradford C Miller 
Jessica E Miller 
Lauren Miller 
Lori Miller 
Jessica Milstein 

Joseph M Minkos 
Richard A Miska 
George M Miskiv 
Heather Mitchell 
Karen E Mitchell 

Douglas Moleux 
Nicole Molinari 
Kevin Monahan 
Jennifer Moodie 
Amy L Moorehead 



HotelRestMgt 

SportsMgt 

Accounting 

HotelRestMgt 
SportsMgt 

Sociology 

LegSt, PolSci 

Psychology 

Chemistry 

Sociology 

RescorEcon 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Accounting 

HotelRestMgt 

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LegalStu 

AnimalSci 

ApperelMark 

English 

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HotelRestMgt 

BDIC 

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Comm 

History 

HotelRestMgt 

HumanResMgt 

HRTA 

ExerciseSci 

ExerciseSci 

Biology 

Con^ 



173 



Alissa J Morgenstern 


CommDis 


Alan Morrison 


Biology 


Coleen Morrison 


HotelRestMgt 


Geraid A Morrissey III 


Sociology 


Tracey Moseiey 


Sociology 


Barry Moslier 


ConsumStud 


Erica L Moss 


Psych, Span 


Andrea R Mourad 


RescorEcon 


Eril<a M Moxham 


EnSci, Chem 


Aislin B Moylan 


Mathematics 


Nicole Muclia 


Management 


Jennifer Mudge 


AnimalSci 


Jason P Mullaly 


Finance 


Mark Muliane 


HRTA 


Barbara Mullen 


CommDis 


Laurie E Murch 


History 


Lori Murpliy 


Women'sStu 


Sharon L Murpliy 


Journalism 


Susannah Murphy 


Psychology 


Tara A Myers 


Comm, Psy 


Matthew J Myrdal 


Computer Art 


Sean Myron 


Management 


Michael Nacca 


Psychology 


Eril<a Nager 


Legal Studies 


Mamedov Nazim 


Botany 


Cherese E Nelson 


BDIC 


Erikl<a Nelson 


Animals 


Kevin M Nelson 


Floriculture 


Jennifer Nemours 


Comm, Film 


Tanya V Neslusan 


PoliticalSci 


Julie Neumann 


CommDis 


Jacob R Nevala 


Management 


Michelle Nevil 


BDIC 


Matthew R Newman 


Comm, Film 


HueThi-MyHue 


Accounting 




174 




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Khanh Nguyen 


Chemistry 


Stephen F Nicaiek 


Management 


Kara E Niedbala 


Psychology 


Daniel A Nissenbaum 


Physics 


Truth R Nissenbaum 


Microbio 


Nuth Nitibhon 


InteriDesign 


Amy Noble-Wilson 


Equineind 


Kristan A Nolan 


ExerciseSci 


Karin Nordhausen 


ElecEngin 


Heather Norris 


Dance 


Eliot Nottleson 


Biology 


Matthew Nowak 


Comm 


Adam Nudelman 


Comm 


Norma J Nunez 


HotelRestMgt 


Christopher O'Connor 


Sociology 


Timothy W O'Connor 


SportsMgt 


Meghan O'Handley 


Marketing 


Megan O'Neill 


ExcerciseSci 


Amy O'Brien 


Comm 


Tracey O'Brien 


Soc, PoliSci 


Sean O'Connell 


SportsMgt 


Chika Offurum 


Biology 


Joanne Ogulewicz 


Floriculture 


Kerri O'Keefe 


Com, ApMark 


Dina Okun. 


English 


Lisbel Olivo 


Sociology 


Deborah M Olsen 


HumanResMgt 


Amy J Olson 


SportsMgt 


Christine Marie Olson 


EnvirSci 


Scott Olson 


Geology 


Jennifer Omeara 


Psychology 


Jennifer A O'Neill 


ApperelMark 


Jessica Orpik 


ExerciseSci 


Paige Orsini 


SportsMgt 


George Osborne 


Com, PoliScJ 



175 



Christine O'Suliivan 


Marketing 


Seana O'Suliivan 


AnimalSci 


Pin Ctiili Ou 


AnimalSci 


Caroi Ouko 


Economics 


Emanuel Owens 


Fin, OpMgt 


Ryan Paclcard 


ExerciseSci 


Brian Paige 


LandArchit 


Katy Palm 


Psychology 


Francis Palmer 


Biology 


Jennifer Palmer 


HotelRestMgt 


Christine Palomba 


Eng, Ed 


Margarita Palomino 


Accounting 


Joshua Palter 


Mark,Psych 


Pramila Pandey 


Management 


Darrell Panza 


Biology 


Ariella Papa 


Comm 


Michele Pappas 


ExerciseSci 


Amy H Paradysz 


Journalism 


Wayne Parillo 


English 


Breon L Parl<er 


Education 


Herbert Parnell Jr 


CompArt 


Jonathan Parziale 


OperationMgt 


Himanshu Patel 


PoliticalSci 


Sonal Patel 


Comm, Eng 


Paula IVI Pawloski 


Journalism 


Laurie Payette 


Legal Studies 


Sean R Peach 


HotelRestMgt 


Jeffrey T Peacocl< 


NatResStud 


Rebecca Pegg 


History 


Melanie Pereira 


InternatBus 


Dominica Perez 


PoliticalSci 


Lizbeth Perez 


ComDis, Spa 


Brian Perillo 


SportsMgt 


Jason C Perry 


Finance 


Usa Perticaro 


SportsMgt 














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Management 


Rebecca J Peterson 


Jn,PbHlth,Cm 


Anthony J Petrucci 


PlantSoilSci 


Katumu Pettiquoi 


Psychology 


Letizia Peyla 


Animal Science 


Xuyen T Pham 


FoodSci 


Steven Phillips 


AnimalSci 


Kimberii Philpott 


Comm 


Jennifer Picarelli 


Comm, Dance 


Jill M Pierce 


Accounting 


Mariska Pierce 


Psychology 


Karen Pietrasiak 


SportsMgt 


Shawn P Pike 


SportsMgt 


Amy Pilarski 


Sociology 


Danielle Pilette 


English 


Jenny E Place 


SportsMgt 


Aida Plaud 


IndustEngin 


Allisson E Pleasant 


Nursing 


Helen Plosky 


Biochem 


Erica C Plouffe 


Journalism 


Donna J Pluta 


Comm 


IVlichael Poch 


PlantSoilSci 


Martin Pogacnik 


Economics 


Emily Polakowski 


Comm 


Apostolis Politis 


Biology 


Christian M Pollice 


Philosophy 


Justin Ponte 


Finance 


Liza Post 


Comm 


Sonya R Poulin 


Sociology 


Raymond D. Powell 


AfrAmeStu 


Lori Pozzo 


Music 


Rachael Prendergast 


CommDis 


Stacey Price 


FashMark 


Geoffrey Prudencio 


PoliticalSci 


Melissa A Prunier 


Journalisiru 



Amy J Ptak 


Biology 


Gina Puleo 


STEPC 


Amy R Puliafico 


Soc, ElEd 


Stephanie Pure 


English 


Lisa M Pyenson 


SportsMgt 


Kimberly Quersher 


Economics 


Jennifer L Quill 


Journalism 


Carolyn Quinn 


Biology 


Todd J Quinn 


Biology 


Nelson Quintal 


Finance 


liana Rabinowitz 


Psychology 


Beth A Rainey 


Accounting 


Lori Rapaport 


Psychology 


Esther Rapoport 


LgSt,Ps,AfAm 


VanDana Rastogi 


PoliticalSci 


Caitlin Reardon 


SovE.EurSt 


Mary A Reed 


Nursing 


Karen E Regan 


Economics 


Marc Reinhard 


HRTA 


Jody Renna 


CivilEnvEng 


Jonathan Reynolds 


Comm 


Alison Rich 


Comm 


Deanna M Richards 


ComDis, Psy 


Steve D Richards 


BDIC 


Meagan Richardson 


Forestry 


Elizabeth Richmond 


Psychology 


David Richter 


HotelRestMgt 


David J Richter 


HRTA 


Chad Riikonen 


History 


Darlene Riley 


Accounting 


Kelly L Rines 


ApperelMark 


Julie A Ring 


English 


Belinda Ritter 


Comm 


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HumanResMgt 


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PoliticalSci 







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Jennifer Robbins 


Comm 


Sandor Roberts 


SportsMgt 


Daniel Robichaud 


ExerciseSci 


Renee l\il Robitaille 


CommDis 


Kara E Roclie 


Anthro 


Melanie Roderick 


SportsMgt 


Susanna Rodilosso 


Art 


Ellen M Rodrigues 


Ed, Psych 


Benjamin Rodriguez 


LegalStu 


Brenda L Rodriguez 


Spanish 


Matthew Roebuck 


SportsMgt 


Billie Jo Rogowski 


Accounting 


Laurie Rolland 


Biology 


Daniel C Rosazza 


Comm 




Joseph E Rose Astromomy, Physics 

Steven Rose Marketing 

James Rougemont Biochem 

Amy S Rountree Accounting 

Elena Rozzi Psychology 




Rebecca Rubick 


Ed, Soc 


Hallie Rubin 


Psy, WomStu 


Tare M Rubino 


Ed, Psych 


Adam Rubinstein 


Psychology 


Sarah E Rudd 


Marketing 




Heather Ruest CommDis 

Kenneth Ruggiero Finance 

Monette Russell-Ward Wom'sStuBDIC 

Rebecca Russo ApperelMark 

Mark Ruthfield Marketing 




Alana Ryan 


English 


Eric Saber 


Management 


Christine M Sadlowski 


InteriDesign 


Nazli Safavi 


ArchitStud 


Valerie Sager 


Theater 



Sanser Sahin 


Economics 


Geri Sahn 


Journalism 


Michael Saklad 


NatResStud 


Keri Salmieri 


ApperelMarl< 


Jay Salus 


HRTA 


Jill Sampson 


Psychology 


Lindsey Samuelsohn 


Comm 


Shecyl San Miguel 


PoliticalSci 


Tara G Sanabria 


Psychology 


Yesenia Sanchez 


HotelRestMgt 


Ariane Santagata 


Sociology 


Arthur Santelices 


English 


Maya Saraf 


Comm 


Stephen Saulnier 


HotelRestMgt 


Deborah Sauser 


Sociology 


Jonathan Sawyer 


Animal Science 


Kaile Sayer 


Psychology 


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Dance 


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LandArchit 


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Psychology 


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HotelRestMgt 


Edie Schechter 


English 


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RescorEcon 


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OperationMgt. 


Laura Schmidt 


Journalism 


Thomas Schnorrenberg 


History 


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EnvirSci 


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RescorEcon 


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STEPC 


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BDIC 


Karl Schwartz 


FashMarl< 


Heidi Schwenzer 


HotelRestMgt 


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Journ, Phil 


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Education 


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Comm 


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IndustEngin 


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Psych, Soc 


Gary Seto 


ExerciseScI 


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Spanish 


Harsh Shah 


Management 


Michael Shannon 


RescorEcon 


Daniel Shapiro 


Legal Studies 


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BDIC 


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Theater 


William Sheally 


ConsumStud 


IVIatthew Sheehan 


Economics 


Nancy Sheehan 


SportsMgt 


Karen Sheehey 


Comm 


Stephanie Sheldon 


Psych, Ed 


Catherine Shen 


Comm, Chin 


Ryan Siden 


History 


IVIatthew R Silberhorn 


SportsMgt 


Edward Silva 


LegStud, Soc 


Judith Silva 


Eng, Psych 


Richard Simonetti 


Economics 


Sherri L Simpson 


HRTA 


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RescorEcon 


Ranjit M Singh 


Economics 


Melissa A Skelber 


Finance 


Carrie Sl<lnner 


Education 


Sven SI<oog 


CompSci 


Jennifer R Skorvanek 


Animal Science 


Katherine D SkroskI 


Nursing 


Christine Slade 


WildFlshCon 


Peter Sloan Jr 


GenBusFin 


Meredith Slovin 


Sportsl\i^ 



181 



Ryan Smerillo 


Philosophy 


Amy M Smith 


HotelRestMgt 


Daymion Smith 


Fash Mark 


Jason P Snoonian 


ExerciseSci 


Diiys S So 


Accounting 


Kristina Soares 


STEPC 


Dexter T Soeda 


Accounting 


Stephanie Solcol 


CommDis 


Sal<hana S Som 


Psychology 


Jacqueline Soo 


Psychology 


Lynette Soucie 


Soc, LegStud 


Amy IV! Souza 


Comm 


Debra Spacl< 


AnSci, Bio 


Steve Spanger 


Comm 


Doreen A Sparl(man 


InternatBus 


John Spinale Jr 


Management 


IVIatthew Spirn 


Comm 


Jill E Spitz 


ExerciseSci 


Thomas Spota 


History 


Jawad Squalli 


Economics 


Susan G St Onge 


UWW 


Brenda Stanton 


Marketing 


Aaron C Starr 


Psychology 


Scott C Stathis 


Hist, PoliSci 


Keith Stebenne 


Comm, Soc 


Rebecca Steeves 


WildFishCon 


Heidi Steigman 


Psychology 


Philip G Stevens 


Geology 


Daniel Stevenson 


German 


Emily J Stevenson 


Hist, French 


Coren L Stewart 


NatResStud 


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Art Hist 


Brian Stoller 


BDIC 


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Psychology 


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ApperelMark 








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Ed, Psych 


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SportsMgt 


Julia Sueksagan 


Marketing 


James J Sullivan 


PoliticalSci 


Michael T Sullivan 


Psychology 


Matthew C Summers 


EnvirSci 


Handaya Susanto 


PoliticalSci 


Karen Sutcliffe 


PoliSci, Com 


Donna Sutherland 


ApperelMark 


Edward Sutherland 


Art 


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History 


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BDIC 


Beryl Swados 


Sociology 


Karen Swansey 


Psychology 


Samara Sweig 


Psychology 


Dianne Sykes 


SportsMgt 


Andrew Symington 


MechanEngin 


Kris Szczechowicz 


Soc, LegStud 


Christopher Szczuka 


CpSysEn, Mat 


Matthew Tagliani 


Mathematics 


Audrey Tague 


Phil, Bio 


Billy C Tang 


Accounting 


Winnifred Tang 


HotelRestMgt 


Shih Tao 


HotelRestMgt 


Angela Tassone 


Art 


Christine A Taylor 


PoliticalSci 


Lawrence Taylor 


Turf Mgt 


Toiya L Taylor 


Eng, WomStud 


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HotelRestMgt 


Melissa Terban 


Comm 


Susan Testa 


Comm 


Cam Tewksbury 


PoliticalSci 


Phuong Thach 


Finance 


Montira Thamsurakul 


HotelRestMgt 



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SportsMgt 


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SportsMgt 


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English 


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Comm 


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Germ, Psych 


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Theater 


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Psychology 


Gregory W Thompson 


WildFishCon 


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HotelRestMgt 


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CompSysEng. 


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HumanResMgt 


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Sociology 


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HotelRestMgt 


Francis l\il Tol(arski 


GermLing 


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ApperelMark 


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Hist, LegStud 


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CivilEnvEng 


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BDIC 


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Psychology 


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OperationMgt. 


Delio Tramontozzi 


Computer Art 


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Comm 


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Julie Tripp 


Spanish 


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History 


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BDIC 


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Mark T Urban 


Wood Tech 


Robin Urciuoli 


Accounting 


IViark S Vahedi 


ElecEngin 


Anuradha Vaidyanathan 


Biology 


Nathalie E Valcarcel-Flores 


Psych, Soc 


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Comm 


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Sociology 


Shery Varghese 


Biochem 


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Psychology 


Jeffrey Vasquez 


Accounting 


Vanessa L Velis 


Comm 


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CivilEnvEng 


Richard Venis 


PoliSci, Ec 


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Psychology 


Le G Vien 


HotelRestMgt 


Sergio E Villamizar 


IndustEngin 


Keith A Visco 


CompSci 


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ElecEngin 


Gina Vizzari 


Germ, Span 


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RescorEcon 


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BDIC 


Adrienne M Vrettos 


BDIC 


Jennifer Waeger 


ExerciseSci 


Elizabeth Waggett 


Finance 


John B Wagner 


Accounting 


Rebecca J Walker 


Biology 


Deborah Wallstrom 


LandArchit 


Colleen M Walsh 


ElEd, Journ 


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Ed, Soc 


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Psychology 



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EarChEd, Soc 


Kai Wang 


Accounting 


MarkWarnat 


Microbio 


Karen Washington 


PoliSci, Ed 


Matt Wassesloos 


Turf Mgt 


KelleyJWatkins 


Sociology 


James C Watso 


IndustEngin 


Collin Watson 


Biology 


Richard L Weathers 


Journ, Hist 


Ellen Weber 


Nursing 


Leigh Webster 


Psychology 


Debbie Wee 


HotelRestMgt 


Ronald Weinbaum 


Accounting 


Lee Weiner 


Comm 


Alan Weinfeld 


Finance 


Emily Weisbauer 


Marketing 


David Welch Jr 


Chemistry 


Derek Wesley 


History 


Catherine H West 


Accounting 


Amee Wharton 


Psychology 


Carolyn E Wheeler 


BDIC 


Erin Wheeler 


ExerciseSci 


Timothy J White 


Comm 


Heather Whitehouse 


HotelRestMgt 


Shawn Whittern 


PlantSoilSci 


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PolSci, Jour 


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CompSysEng 


Kerry Wilcox 


CommDis 


Wendy Wilder 


Psychology 


Lydia Willett 


SportsMgt 


Brian R Williams 


Entomology 


Keisa S Williams 


Sociology 


Laura Williams 


Marketing 




186 





Tabitha Williams 


! 

Sociology 


Tara D Williams 


IndustEngin 


Jonathan D Willse 


EnvirSci 


Mario A Wilson 


Sociology 


Teri L Wilson 


Sociology 


Kimberly R Wimbish 


UWW 


Hilary Winters 


CommDis 


Brian Won 


Marketing 


Anne Wong 


Marketing 


Connie Wong 


Accounting 


Jeffrey Wong 


1 
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Mei Wong 


Economics 


Sandy Wong 


HotelRestMgt 


Michelle D Woodland 


Education 


Son H Wooten 


LandArchit 


Julia Wrobel 


Comm 


ChiaFWung 


History 


Gene Yazgur 


ExerciseSci 


Faye Yee 


CompArt i 


Sontra Yim 


CivilEnvEng 


Howard Yoong 


Biology 


David Yorio 


Biochem 


Elisa Young 


BDIC 


Eric Young 


SportsMgt I 


Jason D Young 


Management 


Chin H Yu 


CompSci 


Kin C Yu 


ElecEngin 


Nyuk Yu 


HotelRestMgt 


Violet Yu 


HotelRestMgt 


Rosa L Yum 


Comm 


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IndEng, Math 


Juan L Zaiduondo 


Economics 


Joseph Zanghetti 


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Michelle R Zanoni 


History 


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Psychology 



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Jonathan P Zbikowski 


Biology 


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HotelRestlVigt 


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Psychology 


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HRTA 


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Accounting 


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English 


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ExerciseSci 


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Psychology 


Calla Cole 


Comm 


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CivEnvEngin 


J. David LaFontana 


English 


Gina M. Larson 


Journalism 


Anh H. Ly 


BDIC 


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188 




, 189 



7^ t996 ^^tdex a^fr^mcCate^ t^ 

Narayanan Viswanatfian 




Kari, 

We are so proud of you. May all your dreams come 
true. We love you. 

Mom, Dad, and Jonathan. 



190 



Dear Becky, 

This day is for you. You have 
waited for it and worked faithfully 
towards it. You have grown in character, 
stature, awarness and beauty. You have 
done your best and we are so very proud 
of you. 

We cannot take credit for the 
wonderful way you have turned out. But 
we can and do take a great deal of 
pleasure and pride in all that you have 
become. 

The most we can wish for you at 
graduation and ever after are those 
precious things you have given us — 
happiness and love. Congratulations, we 
love you. Mom, Dad and Dee. 



Tanya, 

It's been a 
privlidge 
watching you 
grow up. Your 
intelligence, 
courage, and 
compassion will 
guide you 
through the 
coming years. 
Words cannot 
express the love 
and pride we 
feel for you. 
Congratulations. 
Mom, Dad, Paul 
and Holly. 





Heather: 

Shaun is 
smiling down 
on you! 
"Shine on you 
crazy 

diamond." 
We're all so 
proud of you! 
Mom and 
Dad, Nana, 
and Grandpa 
(who loves ya, 
baby!) 



Allison, 

You've surpassed even an 
extremely proud mother's 
expectations! Cheers to the 
proof that effort leads to 
success! 

Always, Mom 




Audrey, 

We're so proud 
of you. We wish 
you only the best 
life has to offer. 
Love, 

Mom , Dad, Jackie, 
Tommy, and Kitty. 



Jonathan, 

We've always been proud of 

your achievments. Hope your 

dreams become your future success. 

Where ever life takes you our wish is 

for your happiness. 

Love Always, 
Mom and Dad 



Lorrie, 

Congratulations, I am 
very proud of you. All your 
hard work paid off. 
I love you. 

Dad. 



Tom, 

Congratulations on you 
graduation! We watch with pride 
and encourgement your continuing 
accomplishments. God bless you 
always. We love you. 

Mom, Dad, Kate and Patty 




Maria, 

God surely 
blessed me with a 
wonderful daughter. 
You are beautiful inside 
and out. You have 
always made me so very 
proud of you. I love 
you, mom. 




Georgette, 

You have made us 
very proud. May your 
future hold all the 
blessings and happiness 
from above, and may all 
your dreams come true. 
We love you. 

Mom and Dad. 



Tim, 

Thank you for 
remembering you're precious 
and thank you for making good 
choices. We are so proud! 

Love Ma and Pa. 




193 , 




194 



Dear Dana, 

Life is what happens to you 
when your making othe plans. 
Enjoy your life. We love you. 

Mom, Dad, Keith, Dorito, 

Freeport and Balle. 



Ellen, 

You have made us so proud. 
We hope the future brings you 
only happiness, and may all your 
dreams come true. We love you. 
Mom, Dad and Bill. 



Chris, 

You have done well and 
you did it in four. May only 
good things follow you. We 
love you. 

Mom, Dad, and Pat. 




Vicki, 

With congratulations 
for all that you have 
accomplished and 
pride and all that you 
have become. 
All our love and best 
wishes. 

Mom and Dad. 



Dear Bob, 

Congratulations! 
We are proud of 
everything that you 
have done to reach this 
goal. Keep your eyes 
focused on your 
dreams. 
Love, 
The rest of the Bunch. 





Matt, 

Congratulations! 
You have made us so 
proud. We hope the 
future only brings you 
happiness, and may all 
your dreams come true. 
We love you! 

Mom, Sarah and 

Lauren. 



Aaron, 

We are all so very proud of 
you. May you always have 
smooth sailing and wonderful 
crew. We love you. 

Mom, Dad, and Brian. 



Tim, 

Congradulations, we knew 
you could do it! We are so proud of 
you. We wish you great success in 
the future and don't forget that we 
all love you! 

Mom, Dad, Philippa, Alexandra, 
Greg, Sarah, and Nichola. 



195 



Rebecca, 

We are so proud 

of what you have 

accomplished 

LOVE, 
GREG, SARA, SEAN 



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196 



Congratulations Jon 
We are so proud of you. 

LOVE, 
MOM, DAD, ANDY, AND SUSIE 



Way 

To go! 

Congratulations 

Emily! 

LOVE, 
MOM, DAD, AND MARK 



197 



"The quality of a person's life is in direct 
proportion to their commitment to excellence.' 




Daniel Webster wrote, "he that has a 'spirit of detail' 
will do better in life than many who figured beyond him 
in the university .... Great events happen seldom, and 
affect few; trifles happen every moment to everybody; and 
though one occurrence of them adds little to the happiness 
or misery of life, yet the sum total of their continual 
repetition is of the highest consequence." 

May all your skills and talents, the knowledge you 
possess and your spiriti of detail, open doors to dreams 
fulfilled, success and opportunity. May you always have a 
sense of how unique you are, joy in all you've yet to be 
and faith in your abilities. May tomorrow's promise 
inspire new efforts to achieve and grow — to aim forever 
higher! 

As always we love you and are proud of you. Sui 
generis. 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, and Diana ('95) 



James J. Sullivan 

May there always be work for your hands to do; 
May you pursue always hold a coin or two... 
May the sun always shine on you windowspan; 
May a raindow be certain to follow each rain... 
May the hand of a friend always be near you; 
May God fill your heart with gladness to cheer 
you. 

Love, 

Mom and Dad 

Nana Sullivan-Meme Boulanger 

Billy Jr.-Christine-Erin-Sean-Ryan 

Kathy-Greg-Jake 

Michael-Renee 

Moey 

Remember.... Vote Democrat!!! 





Congratulations 
Anita L. Kestin 



This yearbook contains so much 
of you; your creativity, your humor, 
your organizational abiUties, and 
your hard work. Here's a Httle more. 
We are very proud of you for so 
many reasons. Be happy and chase 
after your dreams. 

With much love. 
Mom, Dad, and Bette 



CONGRATULATIONS 

class of 1996 

Finis Coronat Opus 
Gaudeamus igitur 



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Shrewsbury, MA 01545 



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"Desire is the key to motivation, hut it's the determination 
and commitment to an relenting pursuit of your goal — a 
commitment to excellence — that will enable you to attain 
the sauccess you seek." 



199 



UMass 




1996 Dance Team 




Front Row (L-R): Janine Santilli, Janelle Sidelinker, Colleen Sullivan, Sheila O'Connor, Julia 
Wrobel, Brooke Hirshfelder. 

Center Row (L-R): Kara Lachance, Jessica Suraski, Cara Rucci, Lauren Kneeland, Leslie 
Lightholder, Jenn Cull, Diane Beane. 

Back Row (L-R): Amy Steverman, Julie Ladoucer, Kellie Shea, Jessi Miller, Kimberly Laff, Jill 
Anderson. 




200 



Midnight Madness 
October 14, 1995 





UDA College Dance Team 

Championship 

5th in New England. 



compliments of Micromet Precision Tools, Inc. 




Congradulations Matt! 

We're so proud of you and what 
you've achieved! "Training Camp" is 
over and now the big hame begins-Enjoy- 
Love, laugh and be happy. 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, Eric, David, and Peter 



Lora- 

You have really lived 
the dream at U-MASS - 
we are so proud of you 
and wish for you many 
more fulfilled dreams in 
the years ahead. 

All our love. 
Mom & Dad 



Louis Castellano, 
"Congradulations to our 
#1 College Graduate 
with Love and best 
Wishes for every success 
in the future. Now Get a 
Real Job!" 
Love, 

Mom, Dad, Dina + 
your proud family 



Adam Ross- 

We are so proud of 
you. We know that the 
future holds great things 
for you. May all your 
dreams come true. 
We love you very much. 
Mom, Dad, and Dave 



202 



The University of Massachusetts 

Index wishes to congratulate the 

following seniors for their time 

and dedication to the Index. 



Scott 7U*t^dc<^ - 11t<!Ut<i<^t^ ScUt<^ I'piiil) 
^te^ ^e*f<wf - (}o^ Sditon. I'paii) 



Ton witi always be remembered for 
your patience; long hoiirSj captions, 

quotesj and so much more, 

if it was not for you ; we woutdn t 

have such a wonderful yearbook to 

be so proud of Thank youj we 

[earned from the best 



j 205 j 




ONGRATULATIONS 
CLASS 
OF 
1996 



Marriott Educational Services 
Northeast Region 

220 Washington Ave Extension 

Albany, m^ 12203 

(518) 464-1110 



CARR® LL TRAVEL 

& Cruise Center 



15 Cowles Lane, Amherst 
413-256-8931 
1-800-895-9741 




One Stop Shopping, Dining 
and Entertainment 



(413)586-5700 




Route 9, Hadley 



'RnduMym'Bh^r^jbr 



JOHN S. LANE & SON, INC 

AMHERST QUARRY 
1550 WEST ST . HTE I 16 



HEBST. MA 0IO04 



TEL: 413-253. 2075 



GEORGE J. LADAS 

PLANT SUPERINTENDE^ 



"OUR BEST WISHES 

TO THE 

CLASS OF '96" 



^L 



Polymer Labortories 

160 Old Farm Road 

Amherst, MA 01002 

413-253-9554 



Suppliers of High Quality Instrumentation 
To The Polymer Industry 



waldbauiifs 
foodmart 



m 



TRUST THE QUALITY 
COUNT ON THE PRICE! 

112 Industry Ave., Springfield, MA 01104 




Hadley Country Store 

& Villager Restaurant 

Route #9 

Hadley, MA 

I 586-3238 



204 






from 



NATIONAL EVALUATION SYSTEMS, INC. 

AMHERST • AUSTIN • SACRAMENTO 



Serving the educational 

community with excellence 

for over 20 years. 



TOP TEN SCARIEST 
PEOPLE ON EARTH 

1 0. Prune-eating Sumo wrestler. 
9. High-rise window cleaner 

with bladder problem. 
8. Near sighted knife juggler. 
7. Megalomaniac Third 

World Dictators. 
6. Grown men named "Biff." 
5. Heavily armed hot dog 

vendors. 

4. Carsick brother in the seat 
next to you. 

3. Brain surgeon with hiccups. 
2. Anyone with a cranky 

disposition and a chainsaw. 
I . People who offer you drugs. 

PARTNERSHIP FOR A DRUC-FREE AMERICA 



S CHOLASTIC 
ADVERTISING, INC. 

Yearbook Advertising Specialists 



In fhe East 
1-800-964-0777 



In the West 
1-800-964-0776 



205 



I Nc Name Club I 



P.C. Dcx 4CC€, ereenfleia, HA C13C2 



1141H1H 



CAHILLANE 

AUTO AND TRUCK 

RENTALS 

NOW OPEN IN HADLEY 
AT HOWARD JOHNSON 

'CARS*TRIJCkS*J EEPS 

CARAVANS 
15 PASSENGER VANS 



INSURANCE RENTALS 
MHEC-SPECIAL RATES 



584-8099 
NTON 



549-8099 
HADLEY 



Congratulations Class of 1 996 




D@n 



^D 



U of M Bus Garage 

Amherst, Massachusetts 1 002 

545-0056 



* >]• * iji *j" iji * tji * <« * iji * 

ANIMAL HOSPITAL 

185 LOCUST STREET 
%y# NORTHAMPTON, MA 01060 

AdR. MARKBERENS 

HOURS BY APPOINTMENT (413)584-9477 

** « * tjl * Ijl * <j| * tjl * tjl »> 



Jonn W. Drake 

Attorney 



90 Conz street 
Northampton, MA 01060 




Telephone 586-569a 




ALMER HUNTLEY, JR., P.E., RL.S. 
President 



707 rviain Street 

A.mherst, MA. 01002 

253-5212 




HUNTLEY 

ALMER HUNTLEY, JR. & ASSOCIATES, INC. 
SURVEYORS • ENGINEERS • LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS 



30 Industrial Drive East 

RO. Box 568 

Northampton, Massachussetts 01061 



(413)584-7444 

1-800-227-7723 

Fax (413) 586-9159 



TENNECa 

Packaging 

Tenneco Packaging 
525 Mt Tom Road 
Northampton. Massactiusetts 01060 

Tel 413 584 6132 
Fax 413 586 9652 



Hampton Inn 

101 I Riverdale Road 

West Springfield. MA 01089 

785-5494 




Auto Body Cov Inc. 




1060 BAY STREET 
SPRINGFIELD. MASS^ 
PHONE (413) 736-5481 



1518 OWIGHT STREET 

HOLYOKE, MASS. 
PHONE (413) 532-9413 



a 

VALIC 



LAW'RLNc h R. l>ONN 

\ ASK P 



The Vari.ihic Annuity Lite Insurance C.'unip.iny 

20 H.imr"'" .V.niit. Suict 200 North.impti.n. MA OlOlH^ 

410 Amiu-f-r Str«t. Sinrt 2iO N.i^iiu.i, Nil iOh i 

Bu^■. (41 ?) iX4 7764 Ti.ll Frfi-; 1 ■SOO-44 VALIC Vouc M.nl tx 

Rf^; (41!) 52 5S007 

VAM(.:0 i> .1 l-rokiT Ji-.ikr Mil.-iJi.fi ,.l 

Tho V.itvMl- Annuirv L.to \n^i,T.,mv r,.mpnnv 











J. D. RIVET & CO., INC. 


P.O. BOX 51068 

INDIAN ORCHARD, MA 01151 

543-5660 







Northampton 
Plumbing Supply 

285 King Street, Northampton, MA 
584-4250 



Good People, Good Medicine. 



Physicians caring for 
Health Plan members in 

•Amherst 
•Greenfield 
•Northampton 
•Springfield 



KAISER PERMANENTTE 

GooJFeople. Good Modicine. 

1-800-847-7526 



JjfllCHELIN • BANDAG • GENERAL • DUNLOP • COOPER • YOROHAMA 

1 Pete's Tire Barn's, Inc. I 
\ 508-544-881 1 \ 

< > 

? Serving Central New England v 

S With 7 Stores g 

^ Passenger, Truck, Farm and Earthmover Tires ^ 

i 5 

TVIICHELIN • BANDAG • GENERAL • DUNLOP • COOPER • YOROHAVfe 






■AliilMMdaAMMtlMiM 



•^ "-^^ 



■w 



THE TEXTILE COMPANY 



■»~~7'~~!li" 



Telephone 584-3165 



^>w< 



2:^ 



Power Square, PO Box 508, Greenfield 
773-7516 



TEMP-PRO INC. 



•v 



!:. >^(WSm, .oW. ^^Skoof^i^^** 




200 Industrial Drive 
Northampton, MA 01060 



vl N ^ ^ ^> 







Quality Products, Quality Service 

SALES 

ACCESSORIES 

RENTALS 

REPAIRS 

JOHNCOULL 

319 Mam St , Amherst, MA 

413-256-0880 



N^^ 



3»^' 



413-665-8011 1-800-331-6880 
Fax:413-665-3023 

712 AMHERST ROAD ■ P^O. BOX 369. SUNDERLAND. MA 01375 



MAGNA BUICK 
COMPANY, INC. 



1588 Northampton Street 

Hoiyoke, MA 01040 

534-5681 



PS:- 






.c^V^ 






207 




BafiSKi 



16-G Brandywine Drive 
Amherst, Ma 01002 
Tel (413)549-0600 
Fax (413) 549-1319 

Jerome Alexander, ARM 
Property Manager 



Ualley Praine UJorhs 



131 mam street Telephone 25G< 

Hmherst. IDassachusetts 01002 




Congratulations Class of "96" 



Ken Lopez Book Seller 
5[ Huntington 

Hadley 
413-.'")84-4827 



Oongratu la t/ons 

0\ass of 199© 

A. SIMOS&CO., INC. 

60 Avacado Street 

Springfield 

413-734-8232 




STEPHEN J. ZWIREK, M.D. 



Thank You for Your Business... 

and GOOD LUCK 

in all your endeavors. 



P.O. Box 9674 • North Amherst, MA 01059 • 549-0933 



299 Carew Street 
Springfield, MA 01104 



736-9978 






C(0)]L]L]E<G]E SirRElEir MOIfORS 

COMPLETE FOREIGN & DOMESTIC CAR & TRUCK REPAIR 

24 HOUR TOWING & RECOVERY SERVICE 

260 COLLEGE STREET 

AMHERST MA 01001 

(413)253-3200 



CHARLES THOMPSON 



JOHN STANLEY 







NORTON 



51 Bates Street, Northampton, MA 01060 • 586-4538 



NORTON COMPANY 

175 Industrial Drive 
Northampton, MA 01060 
586-8167 



White 



Hut 



280 Memorial Avenue 

West Springfield, MA 01089 
Telephone 736-9390 



Greenfield OB-GYN Associates 

•William E. Callahan, M.D. 
•William B. Murray, M.D. 
•Ann M. Corrinet, CNM 
•Elizabeth A. Grob, CNM 



196 N. Pleasant Street 
Amherst, MA 01002 



(413) 256-1444 



?()« 



A NATURAL GAS 

j |A| The clean energy alternative 

Isl^ Bay State Gas 

^ The energy to do more™ 

PO Box 2025 
Springfield, MA 01101 
Telephone: 781-9200 


/^fex //^WfflM ORJHOPEDICS, INC 

I iW^ J 6 Hatfield Street 

\J ^/ Northhampton, Massachusehs 01060-1512 


(413) 586-8200 

Henry Drinker, M.D. 
Jonathan R. Kurds, M.D. 


^ ^ 


Charles A. Mick, M.D. 
Thomas C. Wilson, M.D. 
Daniel G. McBride, M.D. 




MARTIN 
MILLWORK, INC. 

983 Page Boulevard 

Springfield. MA 01 104 

788-9634 


1 "XHE TEAM BEHIND 
1 THE TEAMS" 




■ ■■ 



ALL STATES TRANSPORT 

PO Box 80677, Springfield 

737-1402 -lEi 







CUSTOMER SERVICE 

1-800 638-TERM (8376) 

FAX# 413-733-0827 



ELECTRO-TERM, INC. 

90 MEMORIAL DRIVE 

SPRINGFIELD, MA 01104 

TEL (413) 734 6469 




IKI 



kittredge 
equipment 
company, inc. 



BEHIND 
EVERY 
GREAT 
CHEF, 




Richard Lyman 



Catering Division 

(413)584-4145 
FAX: (413) 586-6544 



2155 Columbus Ave. 
Springfield, Mass. 01104 

Telephone: 413-788-6101 

FOOD SERVICES EQUIPMENT- CONTRACT FURNISHINGS 



TL 



UNITED 

PLUMBING 

SUPPLY, INC. 

210 Hickory Street. Springfield, MA 01 139 
413-736-5421 



Berksnire Plastics Co., Inc. 

EAST LONGMEADOW. MASS. 01028 



INJECTION MOLDING 
CUSTOM FABRICATION-PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT 



ARTHUR W.MUNDT 



(413)525-2294 



209 




Contemporary Family Dining 

Route 1-91 rotary. Greenfield, MA 

(413)774-2857 



Palmer Paving 

CaRPDRATIDN 

PO BOX 47 
PALMER, MA 01069 

596-3768 




United Parcel Service 

1700 West Park Drive 

Westborough, MA 01581 

898-0662 



Interim rleaith v_y 



are 




120 Maple Street 
Sprinqlield, Massachusetts 01103 

586-7365 




m 



5ATLRN 



Saturn of Hadley 



Christine L. Pappas 

Sales and Leasing 

40 Russell St. (Route 9) 

Hadley, MA 01035 

(413)584-4600 

Fax 584-0605 




Russell-Hall 

Amusements and Vending 



Russ Mawdsley 

President 



116 Race Street 
Holyoke, MA 01040 



413-536-2124 



TOWN & COUNTRY 
LIQUORS, INC. 

1119 Riverdale Road 

West Springfield, MA 01089 

736-4694 




ALLSTON 
SUPPLY CO. 

2220 MAIN STREET, SPRINGFIELD, MA 01104 
739-4797 



TEL. (413)583-6628 



FAX (413) 583-5187 



New Engbnd Pallets & Sl^ids, Inc, 

WAREHOUSE AND EXPANDABLE 



P.O. BOX 342, 250 WEST STREET 
LUDLOW, MASSACHUSETTS 01056-0342 



210 



[dch meek. 10.000 driuerssiijitch 

their car insurance to GEICO. But there's 

aiuiay s room for one more . 



^ If people suddenly 

flock to a new movie or a 
restaurant, it's probably 
worth checking out. Well 
every week, 10,000 drivers 
do more than check out the rates and 
24-hour service offered bv GFICO Auto 
Insurance. These lOJUO driuerS SUlitCJf. 
So you have to vvoulIi. ; uh.u 'mui'ic 
missmp. For starters, 'n ^^..u 

HtS-mWe call could 

one 15-minute call cayepu15% OTlHOTfi 
to GEICO could save B Ci^ i^Sll«' 

you 15% or more on 

car insurance. You'll even get a 

lttl6-|)U-yne COmpafiSlffi wuh your current 

policy so you can see the savings. In 

fact, we reward new customers with 

millions of dollars in sayinp. And 

because we value the long- 
term relationships we build 





with our policyholders, wc 
offer T8netUaltOQUer58% ol ihcm 
every year. But here's where 
GEICO really excels. While 
any insurance company can 
.mswer your questions or update 
)Oui policy, how many can do u ajlc 
the 11 o'clock news^ That's the beaui\- 

of GEico's C0iplet8 24-fiour sentici 

You can conduct any business an\iinie 
In many cases, your claim can be 

settled UJithin 48 taS ol reporting the 
details ol an incident. So call GEICO at 
|"i!l-B41-3(lE V.'e'll always make room 
for sensible drivers. Particularly drivers 

who are sensible wuh their monev 



The semible alternative. 
1-800-841-3000 anytime. 



shareholder- nuTied compar 



211 



Congratulations^ 

To the 1995-1996 

University of Massachusetts 

Basketball Team. 









NCAA 1st. Round 



entral Florida 92-70 

tanford 79-74 

NCAA Sweet 16 
Arkansas 79-63 

NCAA Elite 8 
_eorgetown 86-62 

fe NCAA Final Four 



Mcky 74-81 



"« \>"V\if<xv'ir,"m$wgvv 




4hi 






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1 |!C:ii#f|*:;<ii:,^, : * 


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Marcus Camby 



Si 


212 


^H£:M. 



For the memories... 
- The Index 



iKMtSAS 
HAOLE'* 
few. FLORIDA 
knQUETTE 



'?^-, 

m 







i 




would like to thank all 
Index graduates 
Emily B. Ahrens 

Devin Brown 

Rebecca M. Fitch 

Anita L. Kestin 

Scott Kindig 

Joseph Rose 

Gregory Zenon 



214 




WOULD ALSO LIKE TO THANK 

ALL 
RETURNING InDEX STAFF 

Jill Aordkian 

Danielle Carriveau 

Carol Drzewianowski 

Scott Galbraith 

Deb Gouette 

LORETTA KwAN 



->-\at<K^ 



r 

1215 



kESTJ? ii 



Paul & Judie Kindig 

AND 

Paul & Roseann Fitch 

congratulate 

Scott and Becky 

(Mr. & Mrs.) 

and wish them 

all the best 



216 



congradulations 
Richard 

WE ARE so PROUD 

OF WHAT YOU HAVE 

ACCOMLISHED 

LOVE, 

MOM, DAD, AND JENNI 



Julie, 
We hope that the 
future brings you 

nothing but 

happiness and may 

all your dreams come 

TRUE 

LOVE, 

MOM, DAD, AND ERIC 



218 



Congratulations 

Kristi 

We are so proud 

ofwhatyouVe 

become at 

UMass 

LOVE, 
MOM, DAD, SHAUNA 



219 




mm 




layout hy Devin Brown 



221. 




Anita Kcstin 

Associate Editor 




Emily Ahrcns 

Business Manager 



Ml^ 


1 


?i 1 


li; 


jj^ 




f 


'■-... -.,^:. ..„ "^ 




^ 




^ 


^BaSs d^^L ^ 


^iRi 


«^ 




I 




fH" 


■ ■-:''.'^, 



Daii Bessette 

Marketing Staff 



Jiff Aordkian 

Office Manager 



224; 




Joscpfi E. Rose 

Marketing Director 




Aaron EccCcs 

Marketing Staff 



Staff Not Pictured 

Tina Savoie 

Layout Editor (fall) 

Copy Staff 

Darcie Dennigan 

Gayit Dou^fterty 

Ktiiy Fufcft-ino 

Dtborak Gaouette 

Kkonda Garbtr 

Amy 5auer 

Geri 5afin 

Dan Suiiivan 

Pfioto staff 

DanidU Carrivtau. 

Gayie Dougherty 

Scott Gaibraitk 

Eleanor Gcromc 

Anita Kestin 

Scott Kindig 

Mc^an Lynch 

Jesus Macfean 

Senior Section 

Emiiy Afirens 
Devin Brown 
Re6ecca Fitcft. 
Anita Kestin 
Scott Kincfi^ 
Loretta Kwan 
Lisa Heaton (Jootf fairy contact) 



All portraits by Rebecca M. Fitch, except for: 
piortrait of Glenda Rader courtesy of herself, 
portrait of Scott Galbraith courtesy of himself, 
pwrtrait of Gregory Zenon courtesy of himself, 
portrait of Rebecca M. Fitch by Anita L. Kestiir 



225 



When I joined staff in the fall 
of 1993 as Office Manager I was not 
too impressed. I did my job, earned 
my pay, and that was that. 

By next fall I was back and 
we were doing an all-color book. 
I was also spending my time as 
manager of the UMass Student 
Federal Credit Union. At the In- 
dex we ran the worst marketing 
blitz in history: we gave out bal- 
loons and directions to bath- 
rooms to 4,500 freshmen on 
moving-in day. 

1 like black and white photos 
better anyway, so 1 still wasn't too 
impressed. 1 was making a few 
friends (the new copy editor), and 
convinced some friends to join 
staff, too. 

By spring the pressure of the 
all-color book was enormous. At 
the Credit Union, 1 was elected Di- 
rector of Collections, and lived in 
my two "homes." The next thing I 
knew I was thrown into the role of 
Index Business Manager. I had no 



idea what I was doing, bypassed 
mandatory interviews, and was 
suddenly attending even more 
meetings. 

That summer our publisher 
picked me up at my home, threw 
me onto a plane headed for 
Marceline, Missouri — population: 
100 people and 500 cows (birth- 
place of Walt Disney and location 
of the unofficial "Dukes of Haz- 
ard" road ramp). Along with the 
EIC and Managing Editor, I spent 
84 consecutive, sleepless hours 
cramped in a tiny room examining 
360+ yearbook pages, checking for 
printer errors, color bleeds, mis- 
placed photos, upside down cap- 
tions. 

We started this year with no 
photo editor, no copy editor, no 
managing editor, no assistant edi- 
tors. We were in debt, too. We 
restructured our Executive Board, 
recruited 30 freshmen, and 1 began 
a series of yearlong, detailed fi- 
nancial meetings with UMass ad- 




When 1 joined the Index in 
the spring of my freshman year it 
was to gain experience writing. I 
had no idea how much more 1 
would gain. In the past four years 
I have written almost two whole 
yearbooks singlehandedly, 

watched editors come and go, and 
have grown chronologically but 
definitely not mentally. 

It's been fun. It's been hard 
work. There were lots of laughs. 
And a few tears. In the past four 
years, I've made many great 
friends, had a few crushes, started 
a couple of salt fights, never drank 
caffeine, remained camera shy 
(yea, right), danced on a desk or 
two, and learned more between 
these walls than in any class. 

It's because of these reasons 
that I am finding it extremely hard 
to break away from here. Of course, 
as always, I have some things to 

say. 
-— Amy Shapiro from 

Kirschenbaum & Bond 



(New York, NY): Thanks for mak- 
ing it so easy to do business and for 
helping to make the Index part of 
'the best stuff on earth'. 

Bob Kelly from Specialty 
Beverage (Brattleboro, VT): Thank 
you for making the trips to see us, 
for providing us with promotional 
items and for always being so pleas- 
ant . 

Neil Wiedman, Rick Kocher, 
and everyone at DaVor Photogra- 
phy: for going out of your way for 
us more times than any of us could 
count. Without your efficiency, 
generosity, and kindness this and 
all Indexes could not have reached 
fruition. Here's lookin' at you! 

Margaret Arsenault: For al- 
ways laughing with us and never 
at us. 

Emily: There is so much to 
say and so little space to say it in. 
Thanks for making coming to the 
Index such a pleasant experience. 
You're crazy and bizarre and one 
of my best friends in the world. 



ministrators. I found us a new ad- 
vertising company and had to 
spend valuable time with legal ser- 
vices to take care of our former 
advertiser. 

We cut back pages, sus- 
pended payroll, tightened budgets, 
increased marketing, hosted a 
movie, and negotiated with our 
photo company and publisher to 
perform acts of insanity (from free 
frisbees to extra sessions) to help 
us out of the red. 

It was a crazy year. There 
were times when we walked to 
Antonio's just to ask which day of 
the week we were in, times we 
were up till 4AM with our senior 
photographer shooting old year- 
books, times I changed my phone 
message to: "I now live in the hall 
between the Yearbook and Credit 
Union. Good luck finding me." In 
the meantime I was job interview- 
ing, applying to the Peace Corps, 
and considering going far, far 
away. 

But three staff members are 
flying to Disney's home this sum- 
mer, the book is done, the bills are 
paid, it looks gorgeous, and even 
has some black and white photos. 
Now I get to spend a year in Bul- 
garia. I learned more working here 
and, I must add, the Credit Union, 
than I have anywhere else during 
my hfe at UMass. At times, it got 
more than a little bit ugly, but now 



that it's all said and done, I c i 

swear, it's been fun. 

And special thanks to: 

Loretta — you had to grow up w 

too fast, but you pulled it o 
Michele — unofficial yearbo ; 

lawyer. 
Devin — I haven't ever done co 

before, what did you mean 

deadline? 
Becky & Sean — the dynamic duo w i 

came to our rescue. 
Allen — wanna be business mana^ 

next year? 
Margaret — if you ever leave us... 
Carol — don't we have a date I ■ 

Brazil? 
Dave & Sandy — okay, when did y- 

want those pages? 
Neil — do you have a century contr; : 

we can sign? 
Rick — next time you shoot us c 

you not get us thrown out 

any diners at 1AM? 
Joe — you're worth more than a grar 
Anita — thanks for letting me use t 

brain sometimes. 
Greg — this page is partially you 

too. 
Jill — congratulations and enjoy t 

ride. 
Dicky Barrett — for all the migh 

mighty help. 
Morphine — my ultimate cure f 

pain. 
Mom, Dad, Collin — for everythinji 

-Emily Ahrens 



Who would have thought we'd be- 
come so close that we'd begin to 
share a brain? Thank you for shar- 
ing your pickles, your positive at- 
titude, and most of all, your humor. 

Joe: For always being the 
voice of reason, even if no one 
listened, and for always being 
'Strong Enough' to be my man. 

Loretta: For stepping up to 
the challenge of a half-finished 
yearbook, two-week deadlines, 
missing pictures, missing layouts, 
and that ghastly senior section 
(what's FP anyway?), and having 
the courage to do it all over again. 
Rock steady, girlfriend. 

Scott K: Who put up with 
more crap from me than you? 
Thank you for taking it all in stride, 
for continually helping Mommy, 
Daddy and Baby reconcile, and for 
answering to the wrong names for 
3 years. Thanks also for always 
helping me up when 1 fell off the 
floor. 

Becky: Thanks for your end- 
less hours of dedication and for 
having an open mind and a heart 
of gold. You are a genuine golden 
girl. Thanks for encouraging me to 
be less camera shy. 

Jill: For your interpersonal 
skills, your ability to laugh at oth- 
ers and at yourself, and for your 
positive attitude. Since you made 
it here, you'll make it anywhere. 



1 

You're going far, my friend. 

Carol, Devin, Greg, Danielll 
Deb, Dave J, and Scott G: Than! 
for pulling together for all those lal ' 
minute deadlines and stiU talking t j 
each other the next day. 

To everyone I leave behinir 
You hold in your hands a very spu 
cial and unique gift. I think of it ; 
a family heirloom, passed on froi 
generation to generation. Be prout 
not frightened. Be strong. Be fui 
Be smart. But most of all, be 
force. 

My ever faithful housi : 
mates. Amy and Kerry: You'v 
quite possibly had the hardest jo: 
of all; dealing with my stress, lal 
night phone calls, bitch session;: ' 
and all the rest of the baggage th? 
comes with living with an Indexe 
Your patience was always ver 
much appreciated. You guys ar ' 
two of the greatest friends anyon ' 
could have. If I ever need an a( 
countant I'll be sure to call you. 

And lastly but never leas 
for Mom, Dad, and Bette: You hav 
been as much a part of this er ' 
deavor as anyone. Thank you foi 
the past, present, and future year ' 
of love, encouragement, respec'i ' 
and laughter. I am who I am bt 
cause of what you have given mt 

Love to all, 
-Anita 



I realized what my job was 
Ivhen blue lines and the cover came 
10 my house over winter break. 
!'or two days I stared at that ugly 
■angerine cover and was freaking 
)ut during all of break wondering 
f I was going to do a good job. I 
':ame to the Index on Feb. 1 and my 
ob started. I came to 304 Student 
Jnion and was immediatly bom- 
larded by questions from Carol, 
i)evin, Becky and Margaret. Ques- 
ion after question about deadlines, 
ihoto's, copy, and layouts. Soon 
leadlines were coming. Dave 
nade an appointment on Feb. 22 
ocome and pick up my first dead- 
ine. That night 1 stayed at the 
ndex and did captions and tittles 
'vith Anita. and Devin. Soon 1 also 
earned that things weren't as easy 
' s Scott/Sean made them look car- 
ter this semester. Being a Manag- 
ng Editor I soon learned how to 
ut pages from the book, move 
hings around, and finally find out 
vfhat a sig means, spending late 

■ lights at the Indes doing captions, 
tory tittles, and fixing blue lines. 

' iowever 1 didn't experience hell 

■ mtil the senior section came in, 
f ort of. The senior photos were 

ate by a week and Dave was 
' hreatning to charge us for late fees, 
inally, the senior photos came in 
fter chem lab on Wed. I 
mmediatly plunged myself into 
hem after sniffing NH, for 3 hrs. I 



spent until 2a.m. in the morning 
doing them until 1 could not look 
at another picture and stick an- 
other sticker. However being a 
Managing Editor was more than 
just spending late nights at the In- 
dex doing captions, tittles and 
bluelines. It was about communi- 
cation. Learning how to talk to the 
editors, knowing that everybody 
understood what was due, and 
begging to Dave about extending 
deadlines. In these few months 
I've learned what it takes to be a 
Managing Editor. Although it had 
given me more headaches than I've 
ever had in my life I'd do it all over 
again. 

Special Thanks to: 
Anita(chickeymonkey): Thanks for 
be there to answer my endless 
amounts of questions and for 
teaching me how to dance on tables. 
What is FP anyways? 
Becky: Thanks for taking time to take 
over as photo editor , to take endless 
amounts of photos, order them, and 
crop them. 

Carol: For endless amount of editing. 
Devin: What can I say, who gave me 
a bigger headache than you. 
Danielle, Dave, Deb, Scott: Ya'U are 
the greatest staff I could ever want. 
You guys ROCK! 

Emily: Thanks for taking care of 
business. 

Joe: For just being you. 
-Loretta 



1, Scott Kindig, being of 
sound mind and body - although 
some people might contest that - 
do hereby inscribe my last will and 
testament. It's been almost five 
months since I left UMass for 
friendlier waters to prospective Art 
majors, so it's kind of weird trying 
to talk about the book when 1 
haven't been directly involved 
since December - unless you count 
the numerous long-distance con- 
sultations I've offered, free of 
charge, to help the staff debug 
Daddy, or to explain what things 
we can "forget" to mention to Dave, 
or to reconstruct the entire Senior 
section using last year's layouts. 
(Do I get a lollipop now?) 

My time with the Index is a 
long and convoluted story. Much 
to my surprise, as an eager fresh- 
men just trying to offer some help, 
I became Layout Editor. I learned a 
lot about yearbooks that year, so 
when I became Managing Editor 
the following fall I thought I was 
all set. But instead I discovered 
that when you throw too many big 
egos into one room, somebody is 
bound to explode and do it very 
messily. I also learned that if you 
step on somebody's toes for long 
enough, their feet get really tough 
and it hurts even more when they 
kick your ass. I also had a lot of 



fun, especially when everybody 
was so tense that we acted drunk 
without having anything except 
caffeine. 

So when nobody else would 
accept their nomination, I was 
unanimously elected to be Editor- 
in-Chief of the 1996 Index. That 
experiment lasted only three 
weeks, when I decided to stop 
messing with Business and going 
back to what I knew best - Produc- 
tion. The next four months were 
filled with the same fun and stress 
except for an added $300 Boston 
car wreck as the Photo editor and 
I tried to photograph some last 
minute sporting events. All of this 
would have been fine if it weren't 
for that little thing called "gradua- 
tion" (and marriage) - something 
that wasn't going to happen for me 
if I continued to be undeclared at 
UMass. 

So I transferred. Being a stu- 
dent at Binghamton University has 
been an adventure. And every now 
and then a Cartwheeling Copy 
Queen drops me a line and reminds 
me that Kurt is, in fact, dead. And 
I tell her to go to Hell because it's 
her second home anyway and she 
tells me to bite her and we both go 
our merry ways, singing, "so long, 
farewell, auf Weidersehen, good 
night!" 



Four years ago I arrived at 
I Jmass. It was this enormous con- 
' rete jungle filled with people who 
, eemed to know exactly where they 
. /ere going. All these people fit in. 
lere I was; this lost freshman with- 
[ ut a friend in the world. What I did 
i ave was a strong desire to make 
' omething of myself here; to be 
[ omeone in this ocean of students. 
\ I remember seeing my first 

' lorm room. It was a corner room on 
, he 14th floor of JFK. I can still re- 
nember thinking how lucky I was 
o get a room to myself when sud- 
lenly in walked my 6ft roommate to 
hare this cubicle. I can still remem- 
[ ler meeting my new floor, having 
, his feeling of awe as I met people 
. vho knew the works, and now see- 
ng that awe from people for me. I 
emember the dining halls and sit- 
ing around for hours talking to you 
it the notorious, no-smurfing back 
able until the cleanup crew would 
. nake us leave. I remember you 
I icross the hall and how you had this 
' soundless patience when we would 
rontinuously barrage your door in 
he name of a feud. You the first girl 
It Umass who ever caught my eye 
md all the times we would stay up 
ate just talking and reminiscing. You 
who let me crash in your room, on 
/our floor or couch on those nights 
A'hen 1 couldn't make it back to mine 
3r more often when I didn't want to. 
i remember you who ordered out 
with me almost every night to avoid 



ha ving to yet again subject ourselves 
to the dining halls. 

I regret that the frequent phone 
calls to you and the rest of those 
friends and family back home be- 
came less and less frequent as the 
days went by. Though you were still 
in my thoughts. All those people 
from high school just seemed to fall 
into the shadows while others like 
you shined in the light. I couldn't 
have made it through these my col- 
lege years without you. The solitude 
when I first arrived holding it all in 
wanting the familiar; wanting to go 
home. Soon enough you became the 
familiar; you became just as much a 
part of me as my real home. It was 
you who comforted me on those 
nights when the stress was almost 
overwhelming, you who lost count- 
less hours of sleep listening to my 
ramblings, you who trusted me 
enough to tell me your innermost 
thoughts and to be patient with my 
tantrums and ravings and all those 
times when I would just space out. 
You who made time to just hang out 
and grab a cup of coffee at Rao's 
despite the course work. You who 
liked the art on the wall. 1 saw you 
daily and never thought the day 
would come when I wouldn't find 
you walking across campus, or in 
the dining hall or in my classes. I 
have you to thank for the nicknames 
that have become synonymous with 
who I am, Pigman, Milt, Tokyo. 
These nicknames distinguished me 



from others. They gave me a better 
sense of individuality (despite their 
oddness). I can still remember tell- 
ing each and every soul the explana- 
tion of where the nickname came 
from and why I had it. It was you 
who would draw forth those memo- 
ries that seemed so far in the past 
and remind me of them like a bright 
canvas thrown over the stresses of 
the now by the joys of the then. I 
would see you in the Index office, 
you who I was strong enough to be 
your man, you who would go to 
Pearl street when everyone else 
didn't care to, you who made all 
those phone calls to parents, you 
who sat at tables on the concourse 
and DC, you who made Exec inter- 
esting despite all the stress of trying 
to sell the first all color yearbook in 
New England. You who gave me a 
ride back to Boston when I couldn't 
get there on my own and you who 
helped with my car when 1 could go 
home to Boston but the car wouldn't. 
You who brightened my days with 
countless email, phone calls and vis- 
its and you who, at other times, 
would cast me down by the same 
methods. I remember seeing you in 
the crowd and remember the first 
time we talked, the first kiss, the first 
room, the first class, the first exam, 
the first spring break, the first ... 

And now you and I must part 
ways, 1 take with me not only a 
degree, but also so much more. The 
knowledge I have gained through 



the many experiences and memo- 
ries of the last four years is some- 
thing I deeply treasure. I wouldn't 
trade it for the world. These make 
me who I am. I sincerely thank you. 
You have given these to me perhaps 
unknowingly, these dreams that I 
hold inside my heart. You have cre- 
ated a bond with me that will never 
die no matter where our lives may 
lead us. 

I give this advice to everyone. 
Hold on to these memories, the small 
ones, you'll never have college again. 
Time flies by quickly. One minute 
you're a freshman saying good-bye 
to your family and friends back home 
and the next you're a senior repeat- 
ing it all again. 

I see people whom I've 
known through it all, I see you as 
you are now and can still remember 
you as you were then. I look back on 
it all and remember always to love 
your friends whether they stay, 
leave, love you or hurt you, never 
forget. 

I have spent four years grow- 
ing with you and making it all fun. 1 
won't say good-bye because I don't 
see this as an ending, but rather a 
continuation for we shall meet again. 

To my family and friends you 
have supported me, given me the 
strength and understanding 
that I needed to make it 
through the jungle alive. You ""^ 
are very special to me and I 
love you all. -Joe. 

[227 



INDEX 



9 6 



Acosta, Nelson 
Ada, John 
Adair, Jennifer 
Adams, Sarah 
Adamson, Cynthia 
Agin, David 
Agnese,Tara 
Agnew, Brienn 
Ahearn, Heather K. 
Ahrens, Emily B. 
Aitchison, Christine 
Alameh, Mohamed 
ALANA 

Albergo, Damian 
Alderman, Jason 
Alex, Penelope E. 
Alexander, John D. 
Alkaf, Farah A. 
Allegri, Kristen 
Allen, Michael 
Almonte, Dolores 
Alpert, Amy 
Alpuerto, Carlo 
Alpuerto, Carlos 
Ameen, Liza 
Amshey, Chris 
Amshey, Christopher 
Anavy, Matthew 
Anderson, Jennifer 
Anderson, Wendy 
Andriole, Anne Marie ' 
Anselmo, Nicholas 
Antos, Marcia 
Aordkian, Jill 
Applebaum, Ellyn 
Armstrong, Jennifer K 
Arrlcale, Andrea 
Arroyo, Michele L. 
Arroyo, Michelle 
Asanoi, Chica 
Asermely, Julie A. 
Asher, Randi 
Ashton, Arthur 
Assa, Marc 
Atahan, Aysem O. 

B 

Babel, Lauren 
Badawy, Meran 
Bailey, Taft 
Baker, Teresa 
Baker, Tina 
Baldi, Paul 
Balint, Caroline 
Banta, Eric S. 
Barber, Gwen 
Bare, Charlie 
Barker, Jennifer J. 
Barkley, Candace 
Barkman, Wendy 
Barnes, Anastasia 
Barnes, Erin 
^.arni^rt, Elana 
Sarosy, Arlens 
(J|^Rob3fiS. 

■ :i8\ 



28 
150 
150 
150 
150 
150 
150 
150 
150 
150,226 
150 
150 

28 
150 
150 
150 
150 
150 
150 
150 
150 
150 
150 
188 
150 

32 
150 
150 
150 
150 
150 
150 
150 
224 
150 
150 
150 
150 
120 
151 
151 
151 
151 
151 
151 



151 
151 
121 
151 
151 
151 
151 
151 
151 
67 
151 
151 
151 
151 
151 
151 
151 
151 



Barrett, Amy L. 
Barrett, James 
Barrows, Jaret 
Barrows, Jennifer 
Barry, John 
Barton, Heather 
Bateman, Michael 
Beagan, Kerry 
Bean, Catherine 
Beaulieu, Laurie S. 
Beaumont, Robert 
Beausolell, Richard 
Beauvais, Carly 
Beck, John 
Becker, Lisa 
Becker, Melissa A. 
Belanger, Joy E. 
Belanger, Rebecca 
Belizaire, Sherley 
Belleville, Christopher 
Benecchi, Jennifer 
Bennett, Jennifer 
Berenson, Andrew 
Bergin, Michael 
Berkowitz, Deborah 
Berry, Christian 
Bessette, Dan 
Bessette, Daniel J. 
Bevivino, Mark 
Billikas, Nicholas 
Bisognano, Jennifer 
Bita, Michael 
Blake, Christopher E. 
Blanchette, James 
Blaney, Bonnie K. 
Blasioli, Lynna 
Bliss, Jason S. 
Block, Melanie 
Block, Myles 
Blumenthal, Dan 
Blumenthal, Jon M. 
BMCP 

Boarman, Christopher 
Bobala, Doreen 
Bobowicz, Anne M. 
Boccardi, Jennifer 
Bogert, Rebecca G. 
Boken, Liz 
Boland, Serenity 
Bolduc, Lesley J. 
Bolin, Jessica 
Bond, Kathleen 
Bonett, Jean 
Bonham, Rachael 
Bonn, Amy 
Bonner, Patrick 
Boricuas Unidos 
Boudreault, James 
Bound, Joshua H. 
Bowes, Michael 
Boyce, Kelly A. 
Boyd, Kirsten 
Boyle, Sylvia 
Bradway, Chelsea 
Brady, Lori A. 
Brady, Robert 
Braga, Sarah 



151 
3 

38 
151 
151 
123 
151 
151 
151 
151 
151 
151 
151 

22 
151 
151 
152 
152 
152 
152 
152 
152 
152 
152 
152 
152 
224 
152 
152 
152 
152 
152 
152 
152 
152 
152 
152 
152 
152 
152 
152 

26 
152 
152 
152 
152 
152 

11 
152 
152 

20 
152 

10 
152 
152 
152 

30 
153 
153 
153 
153 
153 
153 
153 
153 
153 
153 



Branch, Kristen 
Brazeau, Michelle 
Breneus, Tamara 
Brennan, Colleen N. 
Brennan, Erin 
Brennan, Stacey A. 
Bresnahan, Andrew 
Bridges, Demetria 
Bright, Donta 
Brightman, Matthew 
Britland, Ethan 
Bronson, Susan 
Brophy, Donald 
Brown, Andrew 
Brown, Devin 
Brown, Devin A. 
Brown, Jennifer R. 
Brown, Mara E. 
Brown, Valarie 
Bruff, Garfield 
Brun, Lalanya 
Bruneau, James M. 
Bryce, Andrew 
BSU 

Bulge, Dawn 
Bulter, Mike 
Bunger, Brian 
Burgess, Jennifer 
Burgess, Shawn 
Burke, Brian K. 
Burke, Teresa 
Burman, Russell S. 
Burnaska, Rebecca 
Burns, Geoffrey 
Burns, Michael J. 
Bursell, Britt 
Bush, Kelly 



Cadorette, Louis H. 
Calabria, Juan A. 
Calcasola, Craig W. 
Calkins, Jodi 
Callard, David 
Camarra, Jennifer 
Camby, Marcus 
Campbell, Alexis 
Campbell, Justin 
Campus Activities 
Canali, Kristopher 
Cannon, Megan 
Canzano, Barbara A. 
Capizano, Christopher 
Cappelli, John 
Carlos, David A. 
Carlson, Jill M. 
Carlton, Rebecca 
Carom, David A. 
Caron, Jason 
Carparelli, Lisa 
Carpenter, Nathan 
Carpenter, Scott 
Carr, Jennifer A. 
Carr, Michael 
Carrazza, Michelle 
Carriveau, Danielle 
Carroll, Eileen 



Carter, Nicole 
Carter, Royce 
Carvalho, Anita 
Cash, Karsten 
Castellano, Daniel 
Castellano, Louis J. 
Caston, Maurice 
Catellier, Jennifer A. 
Cesvette, Keya 
Chamberlin, Adam 
Chan, Calvin 
Shan, Elma 
Chan, Rockey 
Chan, VanEssa 
Chan, Waiyip 
Chan, Yan 
Chang, Esther 
Chang, Lynn 
Chapelle, Kristen 
Chapin, Robert W. 
Charlton, Nigel 
Chase, Lewis N. 
Chaves, Cheryl L. 
I Chen, Christine 
Chen, Tony 
Chen, Wilson 
I Chen, Yi-Chen 

Chenard, Lori 
; Cheng, Kevin 

Cheong, Bryan 
I Cheong, Peter W. 

Cherubin, Samuel E. 
, Cheung, Fan 
(Cheung, Vivian 
I; Chi, Soyeon 
I.Chiang, Chia 
iChin, Christopher 
i^Chmielnicki, Karen 

Cho, Sung H. 
■ liChoi, Brian 

Choi, Lynn H. 
I Chong, Kok Fui 

Chow, Canti 
'Chowland, Mariah 
''Christ, Paige H. 
!j^Chu, Ming C. 
ICiavattone, Daniel 
ICiccone, Francis J. 
'Ciliberto, Jennifer 
;Cincotta, Diana 
' Cincotta, Todd 

Clark, Colleen M. 

Clark, Peter 

Claudino, Jeffery S. 

Cleary, Jessica 

Clement, Michelle 

Cleveland, Cara 

' Clifford, Brian 

Clyburn, Kelly A. 

'Cohen, Adam 

; Cohen, Andrew D. 

; Cohen, Roseann 

t Cohen, Steven 

Colantuono, Judith 

, Cole, Calla 

Coletti, Robert 

Collegians 

Collins, Karen 

Comeau, Steven 

Como, Joseph 

Gompagnone, Brandon 



154 

154 

154 
28 

154 

154 
28 

155 

155 

155 

155 

155 

155 

155 

155 

155 

155 

155 

155 

155 

155 

155 

155 

155 

155 

155 

155 

155 

155 

155 
155 
155 
155 
155 
155 
155 
155 
155 
155 
155 
155 
155 
124 
165 
156 
156 
156 
156 
156 
156 
156 
156 
27 
156 
156 
156 
156 
156 
156 
156 
156 
156 
156 
156 
188 
156 
24 
156 
156 
156 
156 



Conboy, Kevin 
Concannon, Caitlin 
Concannon, Theresa 
Condon, Michael R. 
Confoey, Colin R. 
Conklin, Shane 
Conlee, Jane H. 
Connelly, Tara 
Connolly, Allison 
Connor, Joel A. 
Connors, Kerri 
Conway, Patrick 
Conway, Tawnya L. 
Cooke, Kimberly 
Cooper, Oni A. 
Corbett, Mark 
Cordts, Alexandra 
Corey, Gail C. 
Correa, Brenda 

Correia, Joyce 

Cortez, Armando 

Cosentino, Christopher 

Costa, Sergio A. 

Costello, Alison 

Cotreau, Danielle 

Couper, Nancy B. 

Courage, Amy 

Courcy, Amy 

Coury, Lisa A. 

Cowan, Kathleen 

Craft, Benjamin C. 

Crager, Jill 

Grapser, Rebecca 

Cross, Gedrian Monique 

GSB 

Cuddy, Kim 

Gull, Jennifer 

Curne, Jeannette 

Gurran, Timothy 

Gurtin, Shaun 

Gushway, Marc S. 

Gusick, John 

Czernich, Kelly L. 

Czenwiec, Daniel P. 



Dabbaransi, Kritapone 
Dacey, Kate 
Dagostino, Gregory 
Dahlem, Jennifer 
Daileanes, Martha 
Dalton, Shawn 
Damore, Andrea 
Daniels, Elizabeth A. 
Daniels, Kelly 
Darby, Heather 
Darois, Keith J. 
Davidson, Erika 
Davie, Greg J. 
Davila, Anthony W. 
Davila, William 
Davis, Erin E. 
Davis, Kerri 
Davis, Neil 
Day, Michael 
Deane, Gary 
Debettencourt, 
158 

Decoteau, Sherry L. 
Dee, Robert J. 



156 
156 
156 
156 
156 
156 
156 
156 
156 
156 
156 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
20 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 



157 
157 
157 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
30 
158 
158 
158 
158 
27 
Pamela 



158 
158 



Delaney, Sara 
Dello-lacono, Vincent 
Delmonte, Alissa D. 
Demenkoff, Sara 
Depace, Elisa 
d'Errico, Katja 
Desai, Purvi 
Desilets, Andrea M. 
Destromp, Diana L. 
Deubel, Robert 
Deutsch, Michael 
Dexter, Ryan A. 
DIdonato, Michael 
Digesse, Danna 
Digrazia, Liza M. 
Dilorenzo, Jamie 
Dimeo, Christine 
Dimino, Rebecca 
Dinnocenzo, Jill A. 
Dion, Crystale A. 
Ditullio, Jennifer 
Dixon, Danjiro 
Dodds, Diane C. 
Doherty, Jamie 
Doherty, Joseph B. 
Doherty, Padraic 
Doherty, Page 
Dolan, Amy C. 
Donahoo, Matthew J. 
Donaldson, Kristin 
Dondero, Nicole M. 
Donnelly, Meghan 
Donohue, Patrick J. 
Donovan, Kathryn 
Doonan, Jessica 
Dorman, Dana 
Dorsey, Melissa 
Doscher, Rachel A. 
Dosilva, Jessica 
Dougherty, Gayle 
Douglas, Eric M. 
Douglas, Jane E. 
Dow, Jane E. 
Doyle, Meredith 
Doyle, Yvonne 
Drazin, Doniel 
Dresser, William 
Drummond, Janice A. 
Drzewianowski, Carol 
Dubois, Michelle 
Ducharme, Jeannine M. 
Duff, Karon 
Dufresne, Nicole 
Dulberger, Andrea 
Dulitsky, Robert 
Dultz, Tracey 
Dumka, Alexandra 
Dunham, Sean 
Dunton, Heather E. 
Duran, Luis 
Durner, Kristin 
Durrigan, Kelly S. 
Dutremble, Matthew 
Duval, Heather M. 
Dziekan, Julie 

E 

Earle, Katherine M. 
Earthfoods 
Eccles, Aaron 



158 
125 
158 
158 
158 
20 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
159 
159 
159 
159 
159 
3 
159 
159 
159 
159 
159 
71 
159 
159 
159 
159 
159 
159 
159 
159 
3 
159,222 
159 
159 
159 
159 
159 
159 
159 
159 
223 
159 
159 
159 
159 
159 
159 
159 
159 
160 
160 
160 
160 
160 
160 
160 
160 



160 



229\ 



Economopoulos, Tashia 
Edwards, John 
Edwards, Mary E. 
Ehrlich, David 
Eisenhaure, Angle 
Ekiuno, Wayne 
Elles, Jeffrey 
Elliot, Mike 
Ellis, Sarah 
Elman, Kimberly J. 
Elwood, Denise 
Emerson, Daniel J. 
Endich, Jason 
Endler, Joshua 
Engle, Jennifer 
English Club 
Eraklis, Effie M. 
Erickson, Jim 
Eriich, Stacey 
Estrada, Vinan 
Estrada, Yiran 



Fagone, Christina 
Fairbank, Erin 
Farewell, Jean 
Faria, Beth 
Farley, Shawn 
Faulkner, Deborah 
Fawcett, Chris 
Fegan, Joyce 
Feinberg, Karyn 
Feldman, Scott 
Feliciano, Adrian 
Fellner, Mimi 
Fennel, Vernard 
Fenwick, Gordon 
Ferguson, Andrew J. 
Fernandes, Marie 
Ferrante, Margaret 
Ferraro, Christopher 
Ferreira, Jean 
FerruccI, Geoffrey 
Fetterman, Jessica 
Feuerstadt, Jan 
Fielder, Frederick 
Fields, Robert 
Figueroa, Diego R. 
Fincher, Greg 
Fineman, Jill A. 
Finger, Barrie 
Fiore, Michael A. 
Firger, Alyssa 
Fischer, Rachel M. 
Fishbein, Joshua 
Fitch, Rebecca 
Fitch, Rebecca M. 
Fitzpatrick, Christopher J. 
Fitzsimmons, KathyA. 
Flatt, Greg 
Flatt, Gregory H. 
Flemming, Candace 
Flemming, Candice 
Fluegel, Jeremy 
Flynn, Peter F. 
Foley, Kate P. 
Fong, Edwin 
Fonseca, Brian 
Fontaine, David 
Fohtes, Sean 

230\ 



160 
160 
160 
160 
160 
160 
160 

25 
160 
160 
160 
160 
160 
160 
160 

33 
160 
160 
160 

28 

28 



160 
160 
160 
160 
117 
160 

77 
160 
160 
160 
160 
161 
161 

25 
161 
161 
161 
161 
161 
161 
161 
161 
161 
161 
161 

40 
161 
161 
161 
161 
161 
161 
161 
222 
161 
161 
3 
161 

24 
161 
161 
161 
161 
161 
161 
161 
161 



Foran, Valerie 
Forman, Erica 
Forte, Kimberly D. 
Fosse, Nan 
Foster, Gail 
Foster, Renee 
Fotos, Karen 
Fox, Leann M. 
Fraleigh, Stephanie 
Francois, Daphne 
Francois, Fabienne 
Freedman, Nicole 
Freeman, Suzanne 
Friedlander, Kim 
Fucile, Jeremy M. 



Gagne, Amy M. 
Gagne, Kara J. 
Galbraith, Scott 
Ganley, James P. 
Garcia, Patricia 
Gardner, Christopher M. 
Garretson, Klera 
Garrity, Christopher 
Gary, Melissa 
Gasbarro, Chris 
Geaney, Sara 
Gelinas, Aimee 
162 

Geller, Joelle 
Gelling, Brad 
George, Rebecca J. 
George, Susan M. 
Giaimo, Michael 
Giammanco, Manfredi 
Giang, Shelly 
Gillat, Noga 
Gillen, Kacey 
Gillespie, Dennis 
Gillis, Jean 
Gilluly Richard 
Giner, Alicia 
Ginsberg, Alissa 
Gionfriddo, Todd M. 
Giumarro, Gino 
Glauser, Dan 
Glendon, Darlene M. 
Godfrey, Anna 
Gold, Emily 
Goldberg, Jeffery 
Golding, Marsha 
Goldstein, Alicia J. 
Goldstein, Josh 
Goldthwait, Jocelyn 
Gomez, Maribel 
Gondelman, Jay 
Goodfriend, Craig 
Goodspeed, Alissa 
Goren, Denise 
Gothie, Mike 
Gotshalk, Howard 
Gould, Dorothy E. 
Gouveia, Elizabeth J. 
Graf, Andrew 
Gramer, Robert 
Grant, Brian 
Greaney, Michael W. 
Greengrass, Jeff 
Greenleaf, Jill F 



161 
161 
161 
161 
162 
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162 
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22 
162 
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31 
162 

S. 

162 
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163 



Griffin, Amy L. 
Griffin, Jeanne 
Grodsky, Amy 
Grogan, Sean R. 
Guarnera, Aimee 
Guercio, James 
Guide, Anthony 
Gupta, Seema 
Gwozdz, Laurie A. 
Gyamfi, Sussie 

H 

Ha, Chan Uk 
Haas, Luke 
Haas, Stephanie 
Hacker, Leigh 
Hackerman, Jason 
Hackett, Megan 
Hagan, James 
Hagany, Jennifer 
Hajjar, David 
Halatyn, Lucy 
Hale, Allen E. 
Hale, Jennifer 
Haley, Carlyn M. 
Halim, Hasliyati 
Hall, E. Kevin 
Hall, Edward M. 
Halloran, Melissa 
Halsted, Tammy 
Hamel, John 
Hancock, Karen 
Hanlon, Kevin B. 
Hannigan, Michelle 
Hanrahan, Kevin F. 
Hanson, Amanda 
Hanssen, Lorraine 
Hardy, Aimee S. 
Harley, Nora 
Harling, Jennifer 
Harm, Alexander 
Harmon, Christine 
Harris, Katherine V. 
Harsch, Shannon 
Hart, George 
Hart, Tanya 
Hasan, Syed 
Hathaway, Robert 
Hathway, Bob 
Hau, Edmond 
Hawes, Amy H. 
Hazel, Lauren L. 
Hazen, Tara 
Head, Dennis M. 
Head, Thomas 
Heaton, Lisa 
Hegner, Christiana 
Heil, Jill E. 
Heimert, Kyla 
Heiniluona, Andy 
Held, Maria 
Helfner, Marni 
Henderson, Gerald 
Henne, Brant 
Hennessy, Shannon 
Henson, Johannah 
Heos, Justin 
Hertzberg, Dorothea 
Hickey, Carolynn 
Hickman, Kenneth W. 



Hios, Nicole L. 
Hirsch, Audrey 
Hirsch, Jeff 
Hirschfelder, Brooke 
Hirtle, Paula 
Hitchcock, Matthew 
Hitchman, David 
Hodges, Hyatt 
Hodkinson, Ann 
Hoffman, Joseph 
Hogan, John 
Hogan, Joseph R. 
Hogg, Brian N. 
Holden, Allison H. 
Holland, Jill 
Holland, Suzanne 
Hollowell, Mark 
Hong, Helen 
Hong, Seok 
.Hoover, Susan E. 
,Hori, Miyuki 
.Horrigan, Tracy L. 
Hrdlicka, Lori 
Hubert, Quan 
Hudson, Nathan I. 
Hue, HueThi-My 
Hunt, Stephanie 
Hurley, Jeffrey 
Hurte, Isaac J. 
Hussey, Alison 
Hutchings, Monet 
Hutchinson, Rebecca 
Hutchinson, Steven 
Huynh, Phu X. 
Huze, Jennifer K. 



'iacono, Vincent 
•adonisi. Marc 
- afrate, Gregory 
! cten, Tayfun 
■lomechina, Nnenna 
•ngham, Richard M. 

■ ngles, Wendy 
Jrish, Shelanda 

■ rving, David 
fsrael, Adam H. 

1 vory, Jonathan R. 



Jackson, Alicia M. 

■Jackson, Erin 

■Jacobs, Andrea B. 

'Jacobs, Timothy 
Jacobson, Jennifer 
Jacques, Jon 
James, Georgette 
Jankowski, Jed D. 
Jankowski, Matthew 
Janousek, Scott 
Jarrell, Allison M. 
Jastrow, David 
Jekanowski, Kevin 
Jekanowski, Paul 
Jenkins, Chris A. 
Jennings, Dawn 

'I Jerry, Mike 

'(Johnson, Alisa 

■ Johnson, Carrie 

I Johnson, Elisabeth M. 



165 


Johnson, Jennifer J. 


165 


Johnson, Richard E. 


126 


Johnson, Tina A. 


165 


Johnson, Tracy L. 


165 


Jones, Lori 


165 


Jones-Goldstein, Jeremiah 


165 


Jordan, Anthony 


165 


Joyce, Brian 


165 


Juliano, J. Pedro 


165 




165 


K 


165 


Kahn, Lisbeth 


165 


Kahn, Natasha 


165 


Kalashian, Steven P. 


165 


Kalman, Keri M. 


165 


Kan, Rebecca J. 


188 


Kane, Ann-Marie 


165 


Kane, Jennifer M. 


165 


Kane, Rachel A, 


165 


Kanegson, Jonathan 


165 


Kansaksiri, Putasaya 


165 


Kaplan, Scott 


166 


Kaplanes, Stefany 


121 


Karbowski, Emily 


166 


Karys, Damon 


174 


Kasendorf, Alex S, 


166 


Kato, Yuki 


166 


Katz, Sheri 


166 


Keane, Lora 


166 


Keaney, Amy 


166 


Kebler, Robert 


166 


Keeler, John 


166 


Keels, Shaheda 


166 


Keith, Dawn L. 


166 


Kelly, Craig 




Kelly, Denise 




Kelly, Melissa L. 


158 


Kerber, Elizabeth 


166 


Kerchner, Michael 


166 


Kessler, Patricia 


166 


Kestin, Anita 


166 


Kestin, Anita L. 


166 


Keyes, Scott L. 


166 


Khairuddin, Zureen 


71 


Kierner, Rebecca 


166 


Kilduff, Kara 


166 


Kilfoyle, VanEssa 


166 


Killay, Patrick 




Kim, Ji-Young 




Kim, Jiyoon 


166 


Kindig, Scott 


166 


Kindig, Scott T. 


166 


King, Adam J. 


166 


King, Pierre S. 


166 


Kingsley, Joseph F. 


77 


Kinnare, Brian 


166 


Kirkpatrick, Allyson 


166 


Kivel, John J. 


166 


Kjendal, Karl 


166 


Kleimold, Jason 


166 


Klein, Julie D. 


166,223 


Klueber, K. Matthew 


166 


Koch, Matthew 


166 


Koenig, Pamela 


166 


Kok, Joyce 


166 


Kokansky, Amy 


26 


Korby, C. Walker 


167 


Kornbluth, Seth 


167 


Kosior, Janette J. 


167 


Kosia, Kerry 



167 


Kraeutler, Jim 


167 


Krause, Heather A. 


167 


Kritzman, Michael 


167 


Kronholm, Brandt 


167 


Krumholz, Barrie 


167 


Ku, Allan T. 


167 


Kuokkanen, Jonna 


167 


Kurzontkowski, Alan 


167 


Kwan, Loretta 




Kwon, Lucie 




Kwong, Jonas 


167 


Kyrouz, David 


167 




167 


L 


167 


La, Charlene 


167 


Labbate, Christina 


167 


Labbe, Paul J. 


167 


Labedz, Richard 


167 


Lacanfora, Marianna E 


167 


Lachance, Todd J. 


167 


Ladouceur, Kimberly L. 


167 


Laffin, Tammy 


167 


Laflamme, Kristen D. 


167 


Lafleur, Jessica L. 


167 


LaFontana, J. David 


167 


Lafrancois, Jeremy 


3 


LaFrenniere, Julie 


167 


Lagnese, Jason 


167 


Lajoie, Halliann 


167 


Lak, Jennifer A. 


167 


Lally, Megan 


167 


Lam, Chi 


167 


Lam, Stephen 


167 


Lambrinidou, Athena 


167 


Lamonda, Robin 


168 


Landau, David 


168 


Langevin, Melissa 


168 


Langmaid, Jennifer 


168 


Larson, Gina M. 


168 


Lateef, Yuseff 


168 


Lathan, Lanita M. 


224, 226 


Lawrence, Jeffrey 


168 


Lawton, Heather M. 


168 


Le, Diemtrang T 


168 


Le, Hau T. 


168 


Leary, Christopher J. 


168 


Leavitt, Tracy E. 


168 


Lebrecht, Amanda 


168 


Lechner, Deborah 


168 


Leduc, Rachel J. 


168 


Lee, Francine 


222 


Lee, Jennifer L. 


168 


Lee, Sharon 


168 


Lee, Steven M. 


168 


Lee, Wendy 


168 


Legor, Alison 


168 


Lehnus, David E. 


168 


Lenchiner, Jeffrey 


168 


Lenchitz, Heather S. 


44 


Letteney, Robert A. 


168 


Leung, Raymond 


168 


Leung, Victor 


168 


Leventhal, Eric 


168 


Levy, Tiffany J. 


168 


Lew, Daniel 


168 


Lewis, Alexandra 


38 


Lilore, Luanne 


168 


Lima, Robert M. 


168 


Limardo, Luis 


168 


Lin, Patricia 



15 
168 
168 
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168 
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223 
169 
169 
169 



169 
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71 
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12 
169 
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71 
169 
188 

25 
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170 
170 
170 
170 
170 
170 
170 
170 
170 
170 
170 
170 
170 
170 



Lin, Shu Wen 
Lindberg, Robert W. 
Linden, Christina A. 
Lipof, Karen 
Liriano, Isaias 
Lividini, Victoria 
Lizana, Dan 
Lloyd, Pamela 
Loffreda, Tania 
Longbotham, Carolyn H. 
Lopes, Christopher R. 
Lopes, Courtney A. 
Lopresti, Anna 
Loss, Adam 
Lozada, 
170 

Lozada, Marisol 
Lubarsky, Jesse 
Luciano, Lavonette M. 
Lugo, Ada M. 
Lukacz, Robert 
Ly, Anh H. 
Lydon, Ehc J. 
Lynch, Carolyn 
Lynch, Christopher 
Lynch, Maria 
Lynn, Justin 
Lyons, Bethany C. 
Lyons, Cheryl 

M 

MacAluso, Matthew 
MacDonald, Andrew S. 
MacGilvray, Lorrie 
MacKay, Amy 
MacKinney, Lisa 
MacLang, Glenda Karen 
MacNeil, Joseph 
Maggi, Richard J. 
Maguire, Melanie 
Maher, Karen L. 
Mahony, Kristina 
Makrogianis, Amanda 
Malikin, Jara W. 
Mailar, Cynthia K. 
Mallen, Joe 
Malloy, Kerry 
Maloney, Valerie 
Man, Tak S. 
Mancuso, Joseph 
Manganaro, Sal 
Manjerovic, Maureen R. 
Mankain, Scott 
Manoda, Yasunori 
Marcinek, Darrell J. 
Marcus, Jacquelyn 
Markel, Mitchell 
Maronski, Lisa M. 
Marotta, Scott 
Marruca, Peppino 
Marshak, Susan 
Marshall, Donald 
Martel, Jennifer 
Martell, David G. 
Martell, Vicki 
Martin, Christy 
Martin, Earl T. 
Martinez-' -ruz, Mirca I. 
Martins, James A. 
Mascovitz, Taylor 



170 
170 
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29 
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Maria E. 

171 
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76 
171 
3 
171 
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172 
172 
172 
172 
172 
172 
172 
172 
71 
172 
172 
172 
172 



Mashud, Azman 
Masiello, Candice M. 
Mason, Joseph R. 
Mathieu, Chad 
Matsumoto, Noriko 
Matucheck, Lisa 
Mauro, Elio 
Maxwell, John 
Mazza, April 
Mazzarella, Kristen 
McCabe, Mark J. 
McCabe, Meredith 
McCaffrey, Patrick 
McCake, Amy 
McCann, Keith 
McCarthy, Allison M. 
McCollum, Ian M. 
McConnell, Bill 
McEachern, George 
McGee, Jim 
McGrath, Mark 
McKechnie, Paul 
McLaughlin, Jill 
McNamara, Kerry 
McNeil, Rich 
McQualin, Sara 
McWilliams, Stacey 
Meehan, Matthew 
Meenes, Jeffrey 
Megan, Emily 
Mehl, Adam 
Meletis, Georgianne 
Mendlestein, Scott 
Mendoza, Jalil 

Meniates, Christie 

Mercado, Tania K. 

Merna, Janet 

Merna, Janet E. 

Metelski, Kerry 

Metiers, Cory J. 

Meuse, Dina 

Meyers, Kirsten B. 

Miao, Shan 

Michael, Stephen J. 

Michaels, Jacob 

Michaud, Danielle 

Michaud, Nicole 

Mieng, Teo Yap 

Miles, Andrea L. 

Miles, Kristin 

Miller, Beth L. 

Miller, Bradford C. 

Miller, Jessica E. 

Miller, Lauren 

Miller, Lori 

Milstein, Jessica 

Minkos, Joseph M. 

Miska, Richard A. 

Miskiv, George M. 

Mitchell, Heather 

Mitchell, Karen 

173 

Moleux, Douglas 

Molinari, Nicole 

Monahan, Kevin 

Moodie, Jennifer 

Moorehead, Amy L. 

Morgenstern, Alissa J. 

Moriarty, Kevin 

Morrison, Alan 
Morrison, Coleen 



172 
172 
172 
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172 
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172 
75 
172 
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25 
172 
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21 
173 
173 
173 
173 
173 
173 
173 
28 
173 
173 
23 
173 
173 
173 
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24 
79 
173 
188 
173 
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173 
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173 
173 
173 
173 
173 
173 
173 
E. 

173 
173 
173 
173 
173 
174 
27 
174 
174 



Morrissey, Gerald A. 
Moseley, Tracey 
Mosher, Barry 
Moss, Erica L. 
Moultan, Stan 
Mourad, Andrea R. 
Moxham, Erika M. 
Moylan, Aislin B. 
Mucha, Nicole 
Mudge, Jennifer 
Mullaly, Jason P. 
Mullane, Mark 
Mullen, Barbara 
Murch, Laurie E. 
Murphy, Lori 
Murphy, Sharon L. 
Murphy, Susannah 
Myers, Tara A. 
Myrdal, Matthew J. 
Myron, Sean 

N 

Nacca, Michael 
Nadeau, Frank 
Nager, Erika 
Nakamura, Yoichi 
Nash, Dionne 
Nazim, Mamedov 
Nelson, Cherese E. 
Nelson, Erikka 
Nelson, Kevin M. 
Nemours, Jennifer 
Neslusan, Tanya V. 
Neumann, Julie 
Nevala, Jacob R. 
Nevil, Michelle 
New WORLD Theater 
Newcomb, Bob 
Newman, Matthew R. 
Nguyen, Khanh 
Nicaiek, Stephen F. 
Nicolopoulos, Adam 
Niedbala, Kara E. 
Nissenbaum, Daniel A. 
Nissenbaum, Truth R. 
Nitibhon, Nuth 
Noble-Wilson, Amy 
Nolan, Kristan A. 
Nong, Sokonthea 
Nordhausen, Karin 
Norris, Heather 
Nottleson, Eliot 
Nowak, Matthew 
Nudelman, Adam 
Nuiiez, Dave 
Nunez, David 
Nunez, Norma J. 



O' Connor, Tom 
O'Brien, Amy 
O'Brien, Ken 
O'Brien, Tracey 
O'Connell, Sean 
O'Connor, Christopher 
O'Connor, Timothy W. 
Offurum, Chika 
Ogulewicz, Joanne 
O'Handley, Meghan 
O'Keefe, Kerri 






Okun, Dina 
O'Leary, Colleen 
Olivo, Lisbel 
Olsen, Deborah M. 
Olson, Amy J. 
Olson, Christine 
Olson, Scott 
Omeara, Jennifer 
O'Neill. Jennifer A. 
O'Neill, Megan 
Onge, Susan 
'Orpik, Jessica 
lOrsini, Paige 
Osborne, George 
O'Sullivan, Christine 
O'Sullivan, Seana 
Ou, Pin Chih 
Ouko, Carol 
; Outing Club 
Overman, Alan 
Owens, Emanuel 



Packard. Ryan 

■ Padilla, Edgar 
; Paige, Brian 

Palm, Katy 

■ Palmer, Francis 

■ Palmer, Jennifer 
Palmer, Kelly 

■ Palomba, Christine 

■ Palomino. Margarita 

■ Palter, Joshua 

! Pandey, Pramila 
' Panza, Darrell 

■ Papa, Ariella 

; Pappas, Michele 
•; Paradise, Phee 
' Paradysz, Amy h. 

■ Parillo, Wayne 

• Parker, Breon L. 
: Parnell, Herbert 
: Parnell, Lee 

' Parziale, Jonathan 
':' Patel, Himanshu 

• Patel, Sonal 

■ Pawloski, Paula M. 
:' Payette, Laurie 

[[ Peach, Sean R. 
[' Peacock, Jeffrey!. 
I Pegg, Rebecca 

■ Pegus, Patricia 

' People's Market 
' Pereira, Melanie 

Perez, Dominica 
■; Perez, Lizbeth 
■; Perillo, Brian 

Perry, Jason 

Perticaro, Lisa 
-: Pessotti, Stephen E. 
•;.i Peterson, Rebecca J. 
-;'; Petrucci, Anthony J. 
-is Pettiquoi, Katumu 
-; Peyla, Litizia 

Pham, Xuyen T. 

Phillips, Steven 

Philpott, Kimberii 

Picard, Jeffrey 

Picarelli, Jennifer 

Pier, Pat 



175 


Pierce, Jill M. 


20 


Pierce, Mariska 


175 


Pietrasiak, Karen 


175 


Pike, Shawn P. 


175 


Pilarski, Amy 


175 


Pilette, Danielle 


175 


Place, Jenny E. 


175 


Plaud, Aida 


175 


Pleasant, Allisson E. 


175 


Plosky, Helen 


182 


Plouffe, Enca C. 


175 


Pluta. Donna J. 


175 


Poch, Michael 


175 


Pogacnik, Martin 


176 


Polakowski, Emily 


176 


Politis, Apostolis 


176 


Pollice, Christian M. 


176 


Ponte, Justin 


31 


Post, Liza 


124 


Poulin, Sonya R. 


176 


Powell, Raymond D. 




Pozzo, Lori 




Prendergast, Rachael 


176 


Price, Stacey 


81 


Prudencio, Geoffrey 


176 


Prunier, Melissa A. 


176 


Ptak, Amy J. 


176 


Puleo, Gina 


176 


Puliafico, Amy R. 


122 


Pure, Stephanie 


176 


Pyenson, Lisa M. 


176 




176 


Q 


176 


Quersher, Kimberly 


176 


Quill, Jennifer L. 


116, 176 


Quinn, Carolyn 


176 


Quinn, Todd J. 


34 


Quintal, Nelson 


176 




126, 176 


R 


176 


Rabinowitz, liana 


176 


Rader, Glenda 


20 


Rainey, Beth A. 


176 


Rapaport, Lori 


176 


Rapoport, Esther 


176 


Rastogi, VanDana 


176 


Reardon, Caitlin 


176 


Reed, Mary A. 


176 


Regan, Karen E. 


176 


Reinhard, Marc 


176 


Renna, Jody 


28 


Reynolds, Jonathan 


22 


Rich, Alison 


176 


Richards, Deanna M. 


176 


Richards, Steven D. 


176 


Richardson, Meagan 


176 


Richmond, Elizabeth 


176 


Richter, David 


176 


Richter, David J. 


177 


Riikonen, Chad 


177 


Riley, Darlene 


177 


Rines, Kelly L. 


177 


Ring, Julie A. 


177 


Ritter, Belinda 


177 


Rivera, Barbara L. 


177 


Rivera, Daniel 


177 


Rizzi, Tania 


150 


Robbins, Jennifer 


177 


Roberts, Sandor 


124 


Robertson, Emily 



177 

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178 
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178 
178 
178 
178 
178 
179 
179 
179 
79 



Robichaud, Daniel 
Robinson, Allison 
Robinson, Alyssa 
Robitaille, Renee M. 
Roche, Kara E. 
Roderick, Melanie 
Rodilosso, Susanne 
Rodrigues, Ellen M. 
Rodriguez, Benjamin 
Rodriguez, Brenda L. 
Roebuck, Matthew 
Rogowski, Billie Jo 
Rolland, Laurie 
Romero, Volima 
Rosazza, Daniel C. 
Rose, Joe 
Rose, Joseph 
Rose, Joseph E. 
Rose, Steven 
Rougemont, James 
Rountree, Amy S. 
Rowley, Katherine 
Rozzi, Elena 
Rubick, Rebecca 
Rubin, Hallie 
Rubino, Tara M. 
Rubinstein, Adam 
Rudd, Sarah E. 
Ruest, Heather 
Ruggiero, Kenneth 
Russell-Ward, Monettte 
Russo, Rebecca 
Ruthfield, Mark 
Ryan, Alana 



Saber, Eric 

Sadlowski, Christine M. 

Safavi, Nazli 

Sager, Valerie 

Sahin, Sanser 

Sahn, Geri 

Saklad, Michael 

Salloom, Isaiah 

Salmieri, Keri 

Salmon, Dana 

Salus, Jay 

Sampson, Jill 

Samuelsohn, Lindsey 

San Miguel, Shecyl 

Sanabria, Tara G. 

Sanchez, Yesenia 
Santagata, Ariane 
Santelices, Arthur 
Saraf, Maya 
Sauer, Amy 
Saulnier, Stephen 
Sauser, Deborah 
Sawyer, Jonathan 
Sayer, Kaile 
Scanlon, Jennifer 
Scanlon, Laurence H. 
Schadt, Kim 
Schaefer, Samantha 
Schalkhaeuser, Nina 
Schechter, Edie 
Schick, Cynthia A. 
Schmidt, Catherine 
Schmidt, Eunice 
Schmidt, Laura 



179 

20 

15 

179 

179 

179 

179 

179 

179 

179 

179 

179 

179 

22 

179 

5 

225 

179 

179 

179 

179 

127 

179 

179 

179 

179 

179 

179 

179 

179 

179 

■ 179 

179 

179 



179 
179 
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180 
180 

15 
180 

44 
180 
180 
180 
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180 
180 
180 
180 
180 
188 
180 
180 
180 
180 
180 
180 

69 
180 
180 
180 
180 

21 



233 



Schmitt, Catherine 
Schnitzler, Aletta 
Schnorrenberg, Thomas 
Schofield, Neil 
Schor, Brian 
Schraga, IVlelissa 
Schragg, IVlelissa 
Schrieber, Jason A. 
Schwartz, Karl 
Schwenzer, Heidi 
Scott, Amy M. 
Scott, Michele 
Scott, Robert 
SCUM 

Seetheraman, Suki 
Segel, Lori 
Seidner, Rebecca 
Seigel, Lauren 
Sek, Try 
Semans, Anne 
Serrano, Cesar 0. 
Serrano, Nerissa M. 
Seto, Gary 
SGA 

Shafiroff, Sarah J. 
Shah, Harsh 
Shannon, Michael 
Shapiro, Daniel 
Shave, Rebecca A. 
Shea, Jill E. 
Sheally, William 
Sheehan, Matthew 
Sheehan, Nancy 
Sheehey, Karen 
Sheldon, Stephanie 
Shen, Catherine 
Shen, Senior 
Siden, Ryan 
Silberhorn, Matthew R. 
Silva, Edward 
Silva, Judith 
Simonetti, Richard 
Simpson, Sherri L 
Sinclair, Brian 
Singh, Ranjit M. 
Skeiber, Melissa A. 
Skinner, Carrie 
Skoog, Sven 
Skorvanek, Jennifer R. 
Skroski, Katherine D. 
Slade, Christine 
Slaughter, Tiara 
Sloan, Peter 
Slovin, Meredith 
Smerillo, Ryan 
Smith, Amy M. 
Smith, Daymion 
Snoonian, Jason P. 
So, Dilys S. 
Scares, Kristina 
Soeda, Dexter T. 
Sokol, Stephanie 
Som, Sakhana S. 
Soo, Jacqueline 
Soucie, Lynette 
Souza, Amy M. 
Spack, Debra 
Spanger, Steve 
Sparkman, Doreen A. 
Spinale, John 
' Spira, Matthew 



234 



20 
38 
180 
180 
180 
180 
116 
180 
180 
180 
180 
180 
180 
32 
26 
18 
18 
18 
28 
18 
18 
18 
18 
35 
18 
18 
67, 18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
127 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
26 
18 
18 
182 
182 
182 
182 
182 
182 
182 
182 
182 
182 
182 
182 
182 
182 
182 
182 
182 



Spitz, Jill E. 
Spota, Thomas 
Springer, Natasha 
Squalli, Jawad 
Stanton, Brenda 
Starr, Aaron C. 
Stathis, Scott C. 
Stebenne, Keith 
Steeves, Rebecca 
Steigman, Heidi 
Stevens, Philip G. 
Stevenson, Daniel 
Stevenson, Emily J. 
Stewart, Coren L. 
Stifler, Timothy C. 
Stoller, Brian 
Stone, Lesley A. 
Strasnick, Heidi 
Strone, Gregory 
Stukuls, Amy 
Sudell, William 
Sueksagan, Julia 
Sullivan, Dan 
Sullivan, James J. 
Sullivan, Michael T. 
Summers, Matthew C. 
Susanto, Handaya 
Sutcliffe, Karen 
Sutherland, Christopher 
Sutherland, Donna 
Sutherland, Edward 
Sutherland, Erin 
Suzuki, Shinichiro 
Swados, Beryl 
Swansey, Karen 
Sweig, Samara 
Sykes, Dianne 
Symington, Andrew 
Szczechowicz, Kris 
Szczuka, Christopher 



Tagliani, Matthew 
Tague, Andrey 
Tang, Billy C. 
Tang, Winnifred 
Tao, Shih 
Tarr, Judith 
Tassone, Angela 
Taylor, Christine A. 
Taylor, Lawrence 
Taylor, Toiya L. 
Teal, Victoria J. 
Terban, Melissa 
Testa, Susan 
Tewksbury, Cam 
Thach, Phuong 
Thamsurakul, Montira 
Theroux, Todd 
Thirkettle, Rebecca 
Thomas, Ethan 
Thomas, Octavia 
Thomas, Victoria 
Thompson, Andrew E. 
Thompson, Geralyn T 
Thompson, Gregory W. 
Thompson, Stacey L. 
Thomson, John 
Thorne, Lauri 
Thul, Melissa 



182 
182 
121 
182 
182 
182 
182 
27, 182 
182 
182 
182 
182 
182 
182 
182 
182 
182 
182 
183 
183 
183 
183 
35 
183 
183 
183 
183 
183 
127 
183 
183 
183 
183 
183 
183 
183 
183 
183 
183 
183 



183 
183 
183 
183 
183 
32 
183 
183 
183 
183 
183 
183 
183 
183 
183 
183 
184 
184 
184 
184 
184 
184 
184 
184 
184 
184 
184 
184 



Thurston, Bridget 
Tix 

Tjiptoharsono, Elizabeth 
Tokarski, Francis M. 
Tomaiolo, Laura E. 
Tomasino, Alisha 
Tomaszewski, John A. 
Tontodanato, Lynn M. 
Toole, Brendan 
Toole, Marianne P. 
Torchio, Amy 
Toro, Sanda 
Toro, Sandra 
Towse, Theodore F. 
Traficante, Joseph 
Tramontozzi, Delio 
Tranfaglia, Jodi 
Travieso, Carmello 
Travieso, Carmelo 
Triolo, Eric 
Tripp, Julie 
Trolio, Marcello M. 
Trovato, Joy 
Trubiano, Tara 
Trudell, Trade A. 
Trunnell, Jason 
Tsang, Michael 
Tucci, Andrea 
Turbin, Melissa 
Turner, Keisha 
Twarog, Leigh 



Umaranikar, Amaresh 

Umphrey, Kari S. 

Umstot, Katharyn L. 

UPC 

Urban, MarkT. 

Urciuoli, Robin 

UVC 

V 

Vahedi, Mark S. 
Vaidyanathan, Anuradha 
Valcarcel-Flores, Nathalie E. 
Valentine, Gina M. 
Van Maanen, Laura 
Varghese, Shery 
Vasilakis, Antonia 
Vasquez, Jeffery 
Veils, Vanessa L. 
Venditti, Jason T 
Venis, Richard 
Venuti, Donna 
Vien, Le G. 
Villamizar, Sergio E. 
Visco, Keith A. 
Viswanathan, Narayanan 
Vizzari, Gina 
Volla, Streya 
Vosker, Adam 
Vrettos, Adrienne M. 

w 

Waeger, Jennifer 
Waggett, Elizabeth 
Wagner, John B. 
Walker, Rebecca J. 
Wallstrom, Deborah 
Walsh, Colleen M. 



Walsh, Courteney J. 
Walsh, Sara 
lA/alters, Melissa 
i/Vang, Kai 
Warnat, Mark 
i/Vashington, Karen 
lA/assesloos, Matt 
i/Vatkins, Kelley J. 
(A/atso, James C. 
lA/atson, Collin 
Weathers, Richard L. 
Weber, Ellen 
Webster, Leigh 
Wee, Debbie 
Weeks, Tyrone 
Weinbaum, Ronald 
Weiner, Lee 
Weinfeld, Alan 
Weisbauer, Emily 
Welch, David 
Wesley, Derek 
West, Catherine H. 
i/Vest, Patience 
Weyl, Kevin 
i/Vharton, Amee 
Wheeler, Carolyn E. 
Wheeler, Erin 
White, Rebecca 
White, Timothy J. 
Whitehouse, Heather 
Whittern, Shawn 
Whritenour, Gregory A. 
Wicke, John 
Wideroe, Karl 
Widjaja, Suparman 
Wilcox, Kerry 
Wilder, Wendy 
Wiles, Frank 
Willett, Lydia 
Williams, Brian R. 
Williams, Keisa S. 
Williams, Laura 
Williams, Tabitha 
Williams, Tara D. 
Willse, Jonathan D. 
Wilson, Mario A. 
Wilson, Teri L. 
Wimbish, Kimberly R. 
Winters, Hilary 
WMUA 
Won, Brian 
Wong, Anne 
Wong, Connie 
Wong, Jeffrey 
Wong, Mei 
Wong, Sandy 
Wood, Helen 
Woodland, Michelle D. 
Wooten, Son H. 
Wright, Dennis 
Wrobel, Julia 
Wung, Chia F. 
Wurtzel, Matt 



Yazgur, Gene 
Yee, Faye 
Yeung, Teresa Au. 
Vim, Sontra 
Yoong, Howard 



185 


Yorio, David 


185 


Young, Elisa 


186 


Young, Eric 


186 


Young, Jason D. 


186 


Yu, Chin H. 


186 


Yu, Kin C. 


186 


Yu, Nyuk 


186 


Yu, Violet 


186 


Yum, Rosa L. 


186 


Yum, Yuk M. 


186 




186 


z 


186 


Zaiduondo, Juan L. 


186 


Zanghetti, Joseph 


212 


Zanoni, Michelle R. 


186 


Zazoff, Rebecca 


186 


Zbikowski, Jonathan P. 


186 


Zehnder, Serena 


186 


Zenon, Greg 


186 


Zenon, Gregory 


186 


Zerlin, Dana 


186 


Zhou, Ruyun 


22 


Zides, Jodi 


126 


Ziegert, Sharon L. 


186 


Zinter, Lorin 


186 


Zwibel, Jonathan 


186 


Zykorie, Joshua 


22 




186 




186 




186 




186 




186 




186 




186 




186 




186 




31 




186 




186 




186 




186 




187 




187 




187 




187 




187 




187 




187 




27 




187 




187 




187 




28, 187 




187 




187 




31 




187 




187 




77 




187 




187 




24 




187 




187 




151 




187 




187 





187 
187 
187 
187 
187 
187 
187 
187 
187 
187 



187 
187 
187 
187 
188 
188 
5 
124,223 
188 
188 
188 
188 
20 
188 
188 




I 236 




Im/oiit by Deviii Brozoii 



237 



^%m; >'!,= 




Once again another year has 
ended. This has been a year like 
no other from the Minutemen 
who really do refuse to lose to the 
cancellation of the Spring Con- 
cert, from the inauguration of a 
new University president to the 
housing fiasco. This has been an 
eventful year, both on campus 
and off, including this year's Presi- 
dential Primaries, the upcoming 
Centennial Olympics in Atlanta, 
and the death of jerry Garcia. 



We have also seen 
our star basketball 
player, Marcus Camby, 
leave the UMass Min- 
uteman for the NBA and 
our Coach of the Year, 
John Calipari, leave 
UMass to go pro in New 
Jersey. We at UMass 
have been rocked by 
change, never-ending 
rain, and record-break- 
ing snow. 






The students at UMass are 
made from the best stuff on 
earth, from our world re- 
nowned professors to the vast 
diversity on campus. At UMass 
we are proud of the melting 
pot that has been created. Many 
clubs and organizations repre- 
sent the vast spread of inter- 
ests, with clubs like ALANA, 
BSU, the Pagan Students, Hillel, 
Boricuas Unidas, Campus Cru- 
sade for Christ, AASA, and 
Muslim Student Association. 
Many of us are responsible in 
creating the diversity at UMass 
and should be proud of what 
we have accomplished and have 
taught the returning students 
here at UMass. 



241 



Our athletic teams 
have also made aston- 
ishing accomplishments 
this year. Women s ten- 
nis placed 4th in the 
NCAA, the highest 
UMass has ever finished 
in history. Women s wa- 
ter polo team traveled 
to California to partici- 
pate in an NCAA tourna- 
ment, and the UMass 
gymnastics team played 
an excellent season in 
95- 96. However, the 
biggest and greatest sur- 
prise might be the 
UMass men s basketball 
team going into the Fi- 
nal Four for the first time 
with a 35-1 record. The 
UMass basketball team 
really did refuse to lose 
this season and had their 
best season in history. 






^^«^ 



'^1 




The lives of UMass stu- 
dents have been changed 
because of their time spent 
at this University. They pass 
through their four years (or 
more) in a fury^ only to find 
graduation come upon them 
sooner than excepted. The 
lessons learned and values 
that are nurtured will be car- 
ried on with the graduates as 
they leave this place and go 
on to their next stage of life. 
Although no college can pre- 
pare a student for all the 
challenges that lie ahead^ it 
is hoped that the goals each 
student has for the future 
will be more attainable be- 
cause of their training and 
education. 



247 



Be proud of what you have accom- 
plished here at UMass. Graduates have 
attained a degree at one of the best 
colleges in the country and have been 
taught by some of the best professors. 




And time passed. Seniors 
found themselves wondering 
how their college years could 
have gone by so swiftly. Some 
were ready to tackle the work- 
ing worlds others weren t quite 
so sure. One thing was for sure^ 
all 4000 graduates got as much 
out of UMass as they put into it. 





Z51 








-■^-i'l 




1lpl. 




As all you graduates continue their jour- 
ney down the road of life^ remember to hold 
tight to your dreams^ enjoy life^ and never 
forget to expect the unexpected. 



m 



mdsu'Oftlj Publishing Coinpatty 



306 Nocih Kansas Avenue / Mai 



, Missouri 64658 USA 



*^- OF MASS. 
ARCHIVES 

OCT zmi 





The 127th volume of the University of Massachusetts 
Index Yearbook was published by the undergraduate student 
staff of the Index, 304 Student Union, UMass/Amherst, MA 
01003. The Index was printed utilizing the DirectlFilm Process 
and offset lithography by Walsworth Publishing Company, 
306 North Kansas Avenue, Marceline, MO 64658. 
Representative: David M. Roth; Desktop Consultant: Sandra 
J. Roth; "Cellular Production Team" Customer Service 
Representative: Joy Boley; Walsworth Creative Services Cover 
Artist: Scott Pyle. 

1,150 copies of this 252 page "ALL-COLOR" 
book were produced. 4,500 copies of the opening signature 
were also produced as a "Preview Book," mailed home 
to senior parents, by the New England Regional Service 
Center of Walsworth Publishing Company, 91 Payson 
Street, Fitchburg, MA 01420-5451. Tel: 508-343-4509. E- 
Mail: Yrbkman@A0L.COM. 

The 1996 Index was produced on a $85,000.00 
printing budget. Funding was raised through book sales, 
senior portrait revenues, commercial advertisements sold 
by College Publications, Inc., and parent ads sold through 
our sixteen-page fall preview. 

Senior portraits were taken by DaVor Photography, 
Inc., 654 Street Road, Bensalem, PA 19020. Representative: 
Neil Weidman. There was no sitting fee. The majority of 
non-senior photographs were taken by staff photographers 
and processed by DaVor. 

The text and layout for each page, except for 
advertisements, were produced on Macintosh PowerMac 
computers. Pages were submitted in the Adobe Pagemaker 
5.0 format. 

Publication was in September 1996. 

The 1996 UMass Index has been named as a National 
Marketing Sample and Gallery of Excellence nominee 
by Walsworth Publishing Company.