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[enerations ago, a new world awoke, unstable, uninhabited, unloved, slowly 

B: evolvins;; creation 



neratrons ago, the world named Earth blossomed with love and lite: humans, 
^K plants, and the like 

|5 generations ago, great minds came together to form technology *, 

4 generations ago, the world grew overpopulated, polluted with many wasf 
selfish, and con-upted lives. People forgot how their ancestors struggled for lifi 

and peace 

3 generations ago, the disentigration of earth and society.. .a pity for the death of 
so many, too late, for the ignorance of some may cause the pain of many. :, 

"■; 
■ ".; 

2 generations ago, survivors opened their eyes and saw the destruction and began 
to bond across the world, overcoming enormous barriers of differences, to ac- 
complish the goal of survival; did the world have to end for the realization of 

peace? 

1 generation ago, the world began to slowly emerge from the ashy edge of 
extinction and a memorial was drawn up to remember the struggles of ances- 
tors, with a saying enscribed upon it, reading, "What you do now has an impact in 

7 generations." 

The world moves and time passes by even as one sleeps. 

One day we will wake to discover a generation come and gone. 

And as you traverse, wander, trample, leap, dive, or sit idle through life 

Remember.... the future lies in our hands. 



- Yvonne Yang '01 





Did you know that CJ-fVciiii'i 
John A. Andrew signed the 
charter on the Massachuseiis 
Agricultural College on Ai>rii 
29th. 1863? In 1 867, Old So'iuli 
College v.as built but it hurncii 
down in 1885. On October 2nd. 
the fu'st class size was only fifi) 
six students with u faculty ol 
four. The first yearbook wa?' 
made in 1869. Did you know 
that Greenough was elected as 
president and he screed tVo'.i 
July 6th. 1883 lo !une 2 I si. 
1 886? 




The President's House c;:illed 1 111 I side 
was built for $ 1 1 ,.500 in 1 885. The 
Campus Pond where the swans live 
was created in 1892. Tn 1899 the 
tuition was free for all U.S. citizens. 
In 1901 , terms were replaced by what 
we now call semesters. 




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Graduate school was esLablished 
in 1908 as a seperale school. Did 
)ou kaow ihat in 1912 the '"free 
tuition" was restricted to 
Massachusetts Students? The 
College signal ( 1901-1914) 
becomes The College Co 
(1914-1967). In 1920, Abigan 
Adams House is the first women's 
dormitory to open. 





In 1923. the college 
catalog mentions 
curriculum credit for 
campus activities. Did 
you know that 
Massachusetts 
agricultural school was 
changed to Massa- 
chusetts State Colle'ie on 
March 26, 1931 by 
Governor Ely? World 
War II decreases the 
male enrollment in 1941 
to 1945. 



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125 I Years 



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huversiiy of Ma.vsiV^ 



1947. Governor Bradt'o 
bill renaming the college 
University of Massachu' -"^ '^'^•^ 
Student Uni«)n was b'j 
years of 19.56-19.57. In I9( 
educational FM radio s! 
ofilciallv begins operaiions oi- 
8th. 



A M tl E a S T 

Franklin Dining Hall was built 
in 1965. In 1968. Johnny 
Carson makes a rare 
appearance at a Winter 
Carnival. In 1970, the 
enrollment was 23, 389. The 
library was built between the 
years of 1971-1973. In 
1981/82, the tuition was 
$952.00. 




UMass Dartmouth and Lowell 
were added in 1991 to the current 
system. Gov. Weld signs a 
legislation creating a new five- 
campus Umass with a single 
president and Hoard of Tnistees in 
1991. 




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UMASS 

Photo by Yvonne Yang 



"(^^/7>^ college) I've bloomed in the most random of classes at the most random 





Recycle, conserve water, don't pollute; Jay Rasku is seen here voicing 
his concern for mother earth. 




.the almost pastoral setting belies the theme of progressive change. 



moments. College is struggle, fear, and enlghttment; in that order and in cycles.' 

-J^naiwinoi/s 



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Fore! Jesper Domargard enjoys first week activities. 



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^Memories of pasty present, 



and future are enfolded in 



the beginning of 



et 




each generation... 





Time for a nap. A parent rests while others wait to 
move in. 



-C^mdf ,1962 



CZ§7have met some of the most interesting and diverse people during my 4 years. 




Season ^s fade and blossom 
with each passing year^ 
decade y and generation... 









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'^/y^jT worth the struggle though we fail to reach th' goal of our ideal. 



My time here has been unsurpassed." -AKmnpmous 



poses ^''^^sejj 






'Syour 



-(W. (3i. ^0llm^ham, 1903 



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nonvmaus 




Working together in the information age. 




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Remember when... 

someone took the time 

to teach you to tie your 
, shoes or when you gave 
^ ^ child 5 minutes of 

your life to explain a 

problem... 

what a wonder... 

to learn and grow 

through another 

generation... 





The devil made Kristof do it. 



'^/m' of great [people] all remind us we can make our lives sublime, and departing 



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Educating the campus about important worldwide problems. 



leave behind us, foot-prints on the sands of time." -(J^ashbum, 1896 



'Time is precious. Don't waste it nor take it for granted. If you do, you will miss 



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I found my way through 

the dark woods 

and past the forked road, 

only to discover what I 

was searching for 

was always here... 

in my mind and spirit... 




Junior forward Emma Kurowski 
about to take a shot at goal. 



I 





Senior tight end Kerry Taylor goes for the touchdown 



^Z^Oii^OSQS can be so unified, but at the same time so dividec . 



an opportunity that will come to you." 

^mv Rahman &0mm major, 200 J 




-&mdp ©strowski, 1990 



^(Z37/>been a roller coaster with lots of ups and downs. But the whole thing was 



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The spirit of PowWow '98 



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^/ Umass I took the time to live a dream, ...and make it into reality by 



overall a blast! I'd love to go again.' 



(Sirica fallen 



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^^nvhion wandering 
toward a future unknown 
with the brightest of dreams^ 
highest of hope ^ strongest of 
willy and the belief for a bet- 
ter world... life is what you 
make of it... ^ - 




Political activist Michael Moore entertained 
many at the Fine Arts Center. 





TGIF! K.J. James enjoys playing the blues at "Something Every Friday.' 



gathering energy and free spirit to meet America." -^amd betters, 1960's 



&0min^\.o Umass gave me the opportunity to start over. I was able to build myself 



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■^/^^/is what you make of it." -^plan ^Mpn, 1987 



a new path and work towards a better future. 

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And life goes on... 







''QSrtdenhQ water 

carved on a rock 
are 3 little words, 
Forget me not." 

-A^nonpmous 




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Assistant Resident Director goes over move-in 
plans with R.D. Lisa Giddens. , 



, Generation #1 

The first generation was a small class 
compared to class sizes today. When Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College was opened for 
the first time, the future of the school was not 
set in stone. Lets go back a litde bit. Governor 
John A. Andrew signed the bill to officially 
establish the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College. The first class was only 56 students. 
Who knew that seven generations later, the 
school's population would be 23,000 or more. 
Back then, the tuition was only $36.00 com- 
pared to the current total of about $ 10,000 
(including room/board, tuition, and other fees). 
At the end of the first generation, the school 
was well on its way to where it is today: the 
University of Massachusetts at Amherst. 



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opening Week 




From September seventh to 
the eleventh, opening week 
this year was filled with fun 
events for everyone, especially 
freshmen and transfer stu- 
dents. The Campus Center 
was bustling with activity. 
There were student informa- 
tion tables, free giveaways, 
music and more. On the first 
day back on campus, there 
were poster sales, a fun fest on 
the library lawn, and a wel- 
come back party at the Cam- 
pus Center. The Outing Club 
had a meeting and the annual 
convocation was held at The 
Mullins Center. There was a 
Hillel gathering on the second 
day of opening week to inform 
new students as to what the or- 
ganization is all about. "Pri- 
mary Colors" made its way on 
film into the Campus Center 
Auditorium. As the week pro- 
gressed, the first day of classes 
had arrived. Many of the new 
students were nervous when 
they took notes and received 
assignments on the first day. 
"The first week of school was 
different. It was a new experi- 
ence from my other college," 
says a transfer student. "The 
classes are bigger from high 
school or maybe another col- 
lege." As the opening week 
came to a close, many of the 
students absorbed what went 
on and moved on to bigger and 
better things. The first week 
was a great experience and an 
ice breaker in meeting a vari- 
ety of people. 
by Amy Coleman 

Photos by Davor 




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Alan jams along with liis band, "Hurricane Dave", 
in Orchard Hill. 



Generation #2 

Eighteen to twenty years later, 
the school went through many 
changes: the tuition climbed to 
$80.00, Henry Hill Goodell served for 
four months as acting president. 
Greenough was the president of the 
college, and, most unfortunately, a 
total of four buildings burnt down. 
The buildings were the Plant House, 
Old South College, William Smith 
Clark's House, and Ridge Burn 
House. Old Smith College was the 
only building that was rebuilt. The 
campus pond, where today the swans 
and ducks happily swim, was created 
in 1892. Varsity basketball was first 
introduced and blossomed into our 
lives. With two presidents during the 
second generation of MAC, things 
were moving towards the future of a 
better school. 




rchard Hill 



Although some think of it as the longest hike from the ;^ || ' ' 

campus, living in Orchard Hill is well worth the tiring 

walk uphill. The Orchard Hill living area consists of 1 

four seven-story dorms: Grayson, Field, Dickinson 

and Webster. The students residing within the cement ' 

walls form a tight, lively community. Orle thing is for S :;,^ «•■ 

sure, there is always something going on in the area. . • 

As the last days of summer dwindle into fall, students |B|jt ■■ 

return back to the area. During these first few weeks, ' „ t^^^^^-; . , 

residents take advantage of the warm air and open ^Sf ' ' " 

spaces. Many spend their time studying or relaxing 

outside on the "hill" or on their balconies. Others take 

part in pickup basketball & football games. When the 

nights begin to get colder and the course work begins 

to pile up, residents move indoors. Often students are 

spotted in their lounges studying or in the Grayson computer lab. Others take 

study breaks at Sweets-N-More, where the can easily satisfy their cravings. As 

the first snow of winter arrives, so does the sights & sounds of residents sledding 

down the hill on stolen Franklin Dining Hall trays and snowball fights breaking 

out in the bowl. Soon spring returns and residents gear up for spring events. The 

biggest being Bowl Day. A day filled with BBQs, live music, and fun in the bowl. 

Perhaps, as it often does, the year will draw to a close with a lighting storm and a 

mud sliding in the bowl. These traditions have been followed for years and years. 

Passed from one generations of students to the next. 

by Cindy Gargano 

Photos by Yvonne Yang 



Todd Casagni and Mathew O'Connor admire their balcony view. 












Central living area is filled with cultural diversity. It is the home to many of the 
University's diverse programs. The New Africa House contains the Afro- American 
studies department, the committee for collegiate education of blacks and other mi- 
nority students, the Augusta Savage Art Gallery, and the Banneker computer Mac 
lab for African American students. Central is also home to the Native American 
students program, as well as the Josephine White Eagle Cultural Center. In the North- 
ern section of this living area resides the only cooperative dining facility, Butterfield. 
The students who reside here work together to cook & serve the food. Next to 
Butterfield is Van Meter , which houses the most students on campus. A ways down 
the hill, Greenough houses a snackbar which is a student run business as well as two 
wellness floors. Gorman residence hall contains the NUANCE program which works 
with students of color to develop leadership skills. The diversity found within Cen- 
tral living area creates a community of tolerance and understanding. 
by Cindy Gargano :';^:^^'k 

Photos by Amy Coleman :5' "^ " 





istian Loiodice and Katina Papson smile pretty. 



Student Life 23 



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van 



With three, eight-story buildings, the Sylvan Residential Area, lo- 
cated on top of a hill past Totman Gym, is by far the most unique 
place to live on Campus. Where else can six to eight friends live 
together in one suite, share a bathroom that is cleaned daily by pro- 
fessionals, and have a wonderful, as a student put it, "spacious 
lounges for furniture and parties?" And how can you beat having 
the four language communities of Brown House, Cashin's Sylvan 
Area Government offices,, and "always having something to eat at 
the McNamara student-run snack bar, especially the scrumptious 
pizza bagels," as the same student enthusiastically exclaims. You 
can't, of course. I remember the first time I saw Sylvan, as I was 
walking through the dormitories during my New Students Program 
(NSP) orientation in late June a few years back. My first impression 
was excitement, and I immediately began planning the living ar- 
rangements I would ideally want to have in the following four years 
of college. When I finally arrived on Campus my freshman year, 
however, I was not assigned to live in Sylvan. For the first couple of 
weeks, I actually felt really fortunate. All I heard from my friends 
was complaint after complaint about living there, such as, "I'm not 
living with my real friends," and "My suite mates are making such a 
mess of the lounge." I couldn't understand why. It just looked like 
so much fun. As the weeks went on though, and the parties raged, 
my friends settled down, they made friends with their suite mates, 
and they realized the real benefits of living in Sylvan. Now, they 
always keep their doors open, and living in Sylvan really did turn 
out to be fun for them. You really can't find a more unique place to 
live in Umass than here. What more can a student ask for? 
by Anonymous Contributor 
Photos from Index Archives 




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Student Life 24 



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During the fall and winter, everybody is cooped up 
in their cozy and warm dorms. But, at the first fore- 
cast of heavy snow, students get their sleds ready 
or prepare to "borrow" DC trays to be used as a 
substitute. There's a sharp decline that almost ev- 
^ ,-" ery sledder trudges to, which is, the hill at Lewis, 
; - : 1 Thatcher, and Johnson dorms that faces the volley- 
a J J :i_2 ball courts. Other times, there are snowball fights. 
- -O,''''^'- :. It's Dwight against Lewis or Northeast against 
,, : r Southwest. Anything goes. 
* Aside from the social gatherings in Northeast, 
1, ,^ ^^ , there are special interest floors. Mary Lyon houses 
'' " ' " the two in twenty SIRP (Special Interest Residen- 
tial Program) floor where LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, 
i I Bisexual, and Transgender) students can live com- 
fortably and in a supportive environment. The same concept goes for Dwight 
where there's an Asian American SIRP floor. Thatcher has an international floor. 
Also there is the all-male dorm at Hamlin and the all-female dorm at Knowlton. 
The only thing to gripe about is the Worcester Dining Commons. Are they ever 
going to serve edible food?? 
by Lillian Chan (contributor) 

Edward Lim and Richard Lan horsing around in Dwight. 

^^^rPhoto by Anh To 



Photo by Dave Finks 





Student Life 25 




outhWest 




Set apart from the rest of campus, sit five, 22 story high rise buildings . South- 
vest, with its city like environment, provides unique opportunities to its residents. Over 
he years it has become a favorite among the different living choices with the students on 
ampus. Built over twenty years ago, the West, as it is referred to by some, has Hamp- 
hire and Berkshire Dining Commons, James and Melville, two of the school's three all 
emale dormitories, Hampden Munchie Store and Theater, Crampton and Prince graduate 
iorms and El-Grecko pizza parlor that is open daily until 1 : 30 in the morning. Southwest 
s also home to the Malcolm X Cultural Center, the Center for Diversity and Development 
.nd the Stonewall Center in Crampton Residence Hall which houses the Lesbian, Gay, 
Jisexual and Transgender Resource Center. The Harambee Program, in Coolidge, pro- 
ides students of African decent academic support through the use and study of African 
ulture and history. The "University through the University" program in Patterson pro- 
ides academic support to freshman undeclared majors, and the variety of Talent Ad- 
'ancement Programs available in Southwest are a few more advantages of living in the 
irea. With the largest population of UMass students living there and so many conve- 
liences available in the area, it is no surprise that Southwest sees the most off campus 
iction. 
by Hussaina Mahmood 

Photos by Ken McDonal 




Student Life 26 









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South Amherst is forever packed with students who 
keep it alive. When reminiscing about the downtown 
area, there is always a few key places that come to 
mind. The first that comes to mind is Antonio's 
Pizzaria. Here, one can purchase a slice of any kind 
of pizza imaginable. Antonio's also has the first web 
cam in the downtown ai'ea. Students can log (into the 
web and see what is going on at their favorite pizza 
place. Another store that comes to mind is Mystery 
Train. This store, with their used CD prices, supplies 
much of the student body with their music. A popular 
place for studying is Starbucks. On cold winter nights, 
especially close to finals, the coffee shop is packed 
with students studying over a warm cup of coffee. The 
area is filled with many other restaurants visited by 
students, such as, D.P Dough, Judie's, The Pub, 
Bertucci's, Bueno y Sano, Bruggers, Pasta E Basta, 
Bart's & Panda East. It is these restaurants that keep 
students going when they can no longer deal with the 
D.C food. 
by Cindy Gargano 
Photos by Dave Finks 













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Herland 



The town that is north of Amherst is called 
Sunderland. It is a town where students can 
get away to and chill. In Sunderland, you 
will see a few recognizable places such as a 
7- 1 1 where students can get coffee and some 
munchies. In Sunderland center there is what 
is called "The Java Hut," another place where 
students can also get coffee. A place where 
students can get food is called: "Bub's Bar- 
B-Q." It is open year round and has a cater- 
ing service for those students or faculty who 
want to have a party. Lantern Court is a place 
where students can get the idea of living on 
their own. It is also a nice way to get away 
from campus. Sunderland has served a lot 
for UMASS students. How will Sunderland 
be 7 generations from now? Who knows? 
We can only wait and see. 
by Amy Coleman 
Photos from Index Archives 




Photo from UMass Archives 






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Student Life 28 



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North Ambers 




Many students find campus life not for them and often move off campus. But 
with all the choices available, who can decide? Why not try North Amherst? It is a 
small, secluded area north of the campus just minutes away. North Amherst provides 
students with an alternative to campus life. To get to North Amherst, one would need 
to travel down Pleasant Street. Almost immediately, you would encounter a variety of 
apartment complexes, among which are the Townhouses Crestview, Hobart, Puffton, 
and Brandywine. Directly across from each other are Puffton Village and Hobart 
Lane, both famous for their parties. You can definitely expect them to come alive 
during weekend nights. Hobart, especially, is well known for its annual Hobart hoe- 
down which is an all day, all night partymania. That is, if you can get pass the UMass 
police. In the last year, UMass police have taken watch to make sure the hoedown 
does not occur. But somehow, one way or another, there is bound to be a party. As we 
near the center of North Amherst, on the right, is the Amherst restaurant; a site for 
many gatherings of UMass students. As we approach the center of North Amherst, we 
are face to face with the North Amherst public library which is located in the middle 
of the busy intersection. Surrounding the center are the Back Walnut Inn and the North 
Congregational Church. 

Traveling straight down to Route 116, one would encounter the Watroba's 
Market which is on the right. The well-known Amherst towing is on the left and 
Mike's Westview cafe on the right. But if one wanted to venture on route 63, you 

towould encounter the Riverside Park and 
its stores: Cumberland Farms and Superior 
Pizza made available for the busy college 
student. With all these available resources. 
North Amherst is home to many UMass 
Students. 
by Anh To 
Photos by AaroKtEccles 




Student Life 29 






ampton 



About thirty minutes away from campus is 
Northampton, a town with about thirty thousand 
residents. Despite its small size, there are a lot of 
things one can do there to make their visit worth- 
while, and many students do visit and find it quite 
worthwhile. 

After one arrives from taking a bus or driv- 
ing in a car, shopping and dining are two big attrac- 
tions, as one chooses from a wide variety of stores 
and restaurants. What is also helpful is that most of 
the stores are within a short distance of one another, 
if you can not find everything you need. One of the 
more popular shopping places is Thome's Market- 
place, which is a thirty store shopping arcade. In 
addition to countless stores, foreign films can be 
seen at the Academy of Music or at Pleasant Street 
Theatre. Northampton is also known for the Iron 
Horse Music Hall and Pearl Street, which are home 
to numerous concerts and performances during the 
year. Other popular night time activities include 
dancing at Club Metro or The Grotto, two dance 

clubs, wm^.^ 

It is also known for Smith College, a pri- 
vate, competitive liberal arts school. It is an all 
women's school with about 2500 students enrolled. 
It is also part of the five-college community. 
by Aron Schor 





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Student Life 30 






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Student Life 32 




Modes of 
Transportation 

Freshman, Chris Morris shows that 

you don't need a dricer's license to ride this 

scooter. 

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Freshmen Dave Grant, and 
Dustin Marceau, display the 
ancient way of traveling. 



937 car- 

ial collections and Archives 




VW Beetles a 1999 car 



With such a big campus, students 
always seem to find different ways to get 
around. The ever popular and most used 
mode is via the many PVTA buses. Students 
can just hop on and go anywhere they need . 
Besides taking the bus, bicycles are very 
efficient on campus. Students find it conve- 
nient to travel from class to class in a matter of 
minutes. Other students prefer to use their 
skateboards to get around. Also very popular 
this year is rollerblading. When weather 
permits, you're bound to see many bladers out 
maneuvering through the crowds. Since the 
new VW beetle came on the market this year, 
many college students have been spotted 

driving them. If nothing else, 
you can always walk. This is 
definitely the most convenient 
form of transportation. You 
don't have to worry about 
parking, locking up or crowded 
buses. And it's a great form of 
exercise. No matter what 
though, UMass is always on 
the go. 

by Anh To and Yvonne Yang 

Photos by Kara Vautour unless 
otherwise noted 



33 



No more potholes. 




Under 
Construction 



While students bustled through crowds and rushed 
off to classes, many changes are happening around cam- 
pus. Not just in sports or classes, but to the actual school 
itself. With the help from various grants, organiztions, and 
alumnae, UMass went through some construction at various 
spots around campus. The Old Chapel gets a "face-lift" and 
new bell installed, the Student Union steps are redone for 
easier accessibility, parking lots were paved over, and the 
FineArts Center gets a new colorful lobby. 

It is no coincidence that as the millenium approaches, 
UMass is changing. As you can see, UMass has always been 
about improving for the good of the students. Someday I will 
return and see newer buildings with the latest technology 
installed. Though for now, I'm glad to witness history in the 
making. 

by Dave Finks 

Photos by Dave Finks 



Softball complex 



34 




Projects large and small from roof recontrction to retrofitting cement 
walkways. 




The New Computer Science building 



,old 



Chap' 



el. " 



olds""' 



,.">'''°* 



s- 






35 



»^' -.V^IMm^ : 



^JTp f. 




Graduate student Jone Ziebell, Labor Studies, tries to 
juggle his time between work and his children in a GEO 
demonstration for "affordable, flexible, childcare." 

Photo by Dave Finks 






STUDENT UNION OBSERVES FAST BIRTHDAY 




bx Alt Luro 

tb Stodent Unkci b obs yoiT 
old Uili kimV. 

ThU wMlc'i celebRdton >rill tn- 
elnde a free tomie. emstUib- 
mant in Ihv Hatch koA t^odaX 
Iirk«* on v&rtoai arttcl** in tha 
Unlvcnlty Store, Suxknui uv 
remindwl to wnteh tin lobby 
counts far dolly flvontA. 

L<ut yooT at thU tittM, llw 
Union rc!obrat«d lU opining 
viOi the Winter Conlvid Ball. 
AC tlilfl rwr'n bdl, PpMlddnt 
MntlKr cut the Urihdaj cakt 
Hhjch tymbolluxl the calmiiu- 
uon of a itAfm BctlviOn. 

Over ITI.OOO *ale» 'hitte been 
m«dp ortr Ihc loMy eoonlcr 
«lnw tho oj>B»lnc of the Btilcri. 
Itolictita numbcrlju; atet Zl,W> 
ha»B beon irivra in tfcr Scalp 
.Shop. Ovur 121,000 ataileiiU, tac- 
ulty and B:uarta han »It«nd«) 
17.G70 \-arioai prOKTAffll. Tlw 
HlKb Fidelity lanitabteg faavs 
nr^'olvcd for MSI neoida, 

Strviiig 01 tlw focal point of 
r^mpua luUviUva and ori^anlt*- 
tioos, tho UnloD 1> al*o Uk abelal 
coflWrof Uie oamiXM- 



Btrltidar SuMiali In Itw i 

1. BookcDrm 3 for 

2. PtDcll* 3 far 
J. Sohjret culilM (.IS> 
4. (Ik. mo<(en> (.10) 

C FUlM ynpir (,1B) 
B. Nolcbook. (.Z6> 
T. Tcrmpiper folden 

> tor 
g. BcraUh paij* <.1S] 
9. Kr*Mn (.10) 

10. Ball pi-M (JI9) 

11. Dudirt book* (.15) 
IL CaleodaTB (.W) 



^^57 



Th 




^turi 



ent 



1958 



36 



^fffpff 



B 



^mi 



Hti 



Stucjent 
? Union 







Off 



The Student Union resides in the center of campus and is 
always filled with activity. The reason the Student Union is such 
a busy place might be that it ofl'ers everything a student needs. 
For instance, on the bottom floor students can play video-games 
in the arcade, play pool, get a haircut at the barber shop, make 
crafts at the Craft Center, get a quick lunch at the Hatch, or get 
stamps and bus tickets at the Post Office. After a quick walk 
upstairs, students once again have a variety of options. For those 
looking for a place to study there is the Cape Cod or Colonial 
Lounge. Earthfoods, People's Market and the Mini Store offers 
students a chance to grab something quick to eat. Students can 
also do their banking at the Five College Credit Union and look 

at art in 
the Art 
Gallery. 
The 
Student 
Union 
ball- 
room is 
always 
holding 
some 
sort of event such as a poster 
sale or craft fair . Up another 
flight of stairs, students will 
find the offices of many of 
the 200 Registered Student 
Organizations on campus. 
With all that the Student 
Union offers it is easy to 
understand why it is often 
filled with people late into the 
night. The Student Union as it 
is today will always be 
remembered by this genera- 
tion of students. 

by Cynthia Gargano 



7957 

Special Collections and Archives 





37 




PUS SENDER 
Postal Substation 



photos by Kara Vautour 
and from Index Archives 
unless otherwise noted 




Junior Sovann-Malis Loeung, rings-up a customer at the 
University Store. 



The waffle-like Campus Center 



38 



sii^yii 




Campus Center 



Seniors Casey Kane and Mike 
* Messaros work on the 
"Massachusetts Daily 
Collegian ". 



80% of the student body walks through the Lincoln Campus 
Center on any given day. People who visit the campus center do so 
for various reasons. Some stop into the Bluewall for a quick bite to 
eat while they study or spend time with friends. During our 
parent's generation the Bluewall was a bar. In fact, in its time it 
served more beer than any other bar in Massachusetts. Now if one 
chooses to partake in alcoholic beverages they must ride the 
elevator up to the top of the Campus Restaurant (TOC). Other 
students come to the Campus Center to shop. The University Store 
sells almost everything a UMass student will ever need, including 
a wide range of items imprinted with the UMass logo. Students can 
also shop on the Concourse where many vendors come to sell their 
goods. If someone needs money they can just venture down the 
escalator to use the ATM machines. Also located downstairs is the 
Collegian which prints the largest daily college newspaper in the 
country. Most people however seem to come to the Campus Center 
to sit and relax or people-watch on the big comfy couches. Here 
commuter students can catch a few winks between classes. 

In all, the Campus Center seems to be the main place on 
campus where students gather to spend time with each other. 

by Cynthia Gargano 



Special Collections and Archive 1905 



39 



I 



Best Place to Eat : Bueno Y Sano 



Best Major: Psychology 



Worst Major: Engineering 
Best Coffee: Starbucks 



Best Place to Study: Bluewall 



Best Place to meet Guys: Dorms 



Best Classroom: Mahar 



Favorite Bar: The Publ 



Vorst Classroom: Thomson 



Worst Thing about UMass: Redtape/Whitmore Administration 



Most Unidentifiable D.C Entree: All of them 




Best Place to meet Girls: RSO's 



Worst way of getting around: PVTA 



Least Favorite activity on Weekends: Studyinc 



Best rule to break: Quiet Hours 



40 






W 



lie 



m 



B 



i[ 



JEJipEEl 



l^t 







I 



Favorite weekend Activity: Slee 



y^ieep 



Best thing about UMass: People 



Best Dining Hall: Hampshire 



Worst Dining Hall: All 



I yours? 



Best pickup line: I seem to have lost my phone #, can 1 1 




What to do in your free time: Sleep 



iBest Spring Break location: Cancun 




Photo by Aaron Eccles 



W.E.B. 
DuBois 




Photo from UMass Archives 



The W.E.B. Dubois Library, which was 
built in 1972, has become a central part of academic life at 
UMass. Until 3 years ago , the Library was referred to as 
"the tower library" because with its 28 floors, it was the 
tallest library in the world. It has since lost this title to the 
University of Texas at Austin. Three years ago, the library 
was named the W.E.B. Dubois Library in honor of the 
scholor-activist and co-founder of the NAACP. The library 
contains more than 4 million books, periodicals, and doc- 
uments. Added to this collection is about one- 
million micro films that is central to 
academic life. 

The W.E.B. Dubois Library also serves 
other non-academic purposes. First, it is a 
symbol of the University itself. Even miles away 
the library is a beacon in the Western Massa- 
chusetts skyline. It symbolizes the strength, size, 
and power of UMass. There are also the many 
tales of bricks of falling from the Ubrary. These 
ales have become legends ingrained in UMass 
history to be retold to future generations. 



by Cythia M.Gargano 



Photo by Todd Casagni 



Copy for caption goes here. The copy can be typed into PageMaker or 
placed from another file. 



Faces in ^ 
the Crowd 





43 




Tony Nguyen, Chemical Engineering, worlis the Blackjack 
table at the Asian Casino Night. 



Photo by Anh To 



F 



h 



m 



n 



As the seventh generation becomes Freshmen, 
we arrived at UMass on September Sixth with 
our eyes filled with awe. We stared at the 
enormous campus which seemed like a town of 
its own. Our hearts pounded as we first walked 
down the halls of our new home. Trembling and 
anxious, we met our roomates who we did not 
know anything about. Freshmen were 
overwhemled with all the energy that a university 
could possess. Opening week was filled with 
excitement as we paraded around meeting as 
many people as we could, and joining clubs to 
keep ourselves busy as the year progressed. We 
searched for that one unique person who was just 
like us and hoped that we could become the best 
of friends. As the first day of classes arrived, we 
started to become nervous. How hard were our 
classes going to be? Would we at least know one 
other person in our class, or would we sit alone 
in a huge lecture hall? How different from high 
school is it? The days flew by and the nights 
were filled with mischief and unfolding chapters 
ahead of us. We were finally out of highschool. 
We were in college. We were free and 
independent. No one was there reminding us of 
our responsibilities that we knew in high school. 
We lived as we wanted to and no one could 
constrain us. We stayed up until all hours of the 
night, but quickly learned of the consequences of 
sleep deprivation. We learned as we went, 
though, and enjoyed it. After getting the hang of 
things here at UMass, the enormous campus 
becam home. We no longer were afraid of a huge 
community. We were now a part of it. 
by Shirley lyn MacDonald 




David Grant, Computer Science, finds out his 



final grade. 



Photos by Kara Vautour 




Cristina Patrick, Microbiology, just loves those Budweiser frogs. 



44 



re 



n 






Sophomore Banquet Huge Succes.s 




IT WAS ALL HAAI at the spaghetti dinner Sophomore banquet. More than 700 people. man>' ciad in 
Roman togas, attended another successful eveat ol the Class or,'6S... 



Sophomore^ 

"LUhat am I going to pick as a major?" "Should 
I keep my roommate?" "Is this year going to 
be better than last year?" "I'ue got to re- 
member not to schedule any eight o'clock 
classes this year." These are some of the 
questions that a sophomore ujould ask. LUe 
are the class of 2001. lUe first came here in 
1997, not knowing uihat uje might encounter. 
LUe picked classes, changed our minds, we 
made neui friends and kept the old. LUhen uje 
mere freshmen, uje didn't knoui the lingo of 
college life. Nouj in our second year, uje got 
the hang of eating D. C. food mhether it looked 
edible or not. 

Nouj uje are the seuenth generation to enter 
into our second year of freedom and haue a 
life eKperience of misdom to come our ujay. 
LUe still haue tujo more years of classes and 
tujo more years of friendships that mill last 
through the generations. 
UJe knoui more than last year, and me knom 
mhat is ahead as me yo tomards the future 
that is laid in our hands. Ilie haue chosen the 
path to take. UJe mill see the eiyhth genera- 
tion start their Journey as me end ours. LUe 
haue come to a conclusion that me mill almays 
see the sun shininy no matter mhere me are 
and me mill almays remember the life here at 
UMass that me came to knom, learn and loue. 
Tmo years from nom me mill be sayiny good- 
bye and enter into the real life misdom, and 
lessons that me haue learned from our days 
at UMass. 
by Hmy Coleman 




Bryan McCallister, English major. 




l.-r. Dan Blownell,. Chris Alger, Wendy Levesque, 



45 



Juniors 




Erin Wolf, Psychology major, and Sean Sullivan 
Photo by Kara Vautour 



Mary Zanzerkia, Computer Science major, 

Photo by Dave Finks 

46 



Erik Shoemaker, HRTA, 

Photo by Kara Vautdir 



Seniors 




Photos by Dave Finks 



'olleen Casey, Business major, 




-rik Jemberg, Journalism major 



Brad Maltz, Computer Engineering, 



47 



Residence Staff 




Senior Yinka Badejo 

The Best of Residence Life Staff 

1. The friendships formed 

2. Positive and negative experiences learned 

3. Supporting and Helping others 

4. Fun Programs and Creativitiy 

5. Memories 

The Worst of Residence Life Staff 

1. When it feels like you're on duty every day 

2. Running after naked, intoxicated residents 

3. Piles of Paperwork 

4. Being the "Bad Person" for writing up negative behavior 

5. Memories! 

Sophomore Jason Trenkle, and Senior Stephanie Kirker 
demonstrate their moves. 




What would Dorm Life be like without 
fabulous Residence Staff who have to g 
through a vigorous application process 
and then a total of three week 
mindracking trainings in August and 
January. Residence Life Staff includes 
hundreds of undergraduate Resident 
Assistants, who live right in the dorms 
with students. RAs are supervised by 
wonderful Assistant Resident Directors 
and Resident Directors, who in turn ai 
supervised by VERY experienced 
Area Directors, and the hierchary 
continues on. Of course, how could wc 
forget all the gorgeously fantastic 
people behind the scenes who make 
Residence Life run so beautifully. 
Yea...we're not perfect but most of us ti 
Thank you for all that was learned! 

by Yvonne Yang 

Tony Fasio, Sophomore Japanese major 




01 Wii2''wmjkmmmm 
>oi ■ i902--i9mMkmmm 

1 'Qi 7:AmM^i , . f l^i^ii 

9&M 



19121913l« 
9011902 

1912 1913 191 
901190219031 

1912 t§13 



01 If 



» « 



UlT 



191219131914, 

•01 1902 IgBj^ 190t 
.1912 19l^yi4 1915 ii 
jl 1902 1903 1904 190SI 
191219131914191519 




„1904>1#« 

1912 1913 1914 19I« 
•01 1902 19«3 190411 • 
1912 191^i914/19l^'S^ 

•01 1902190^ ilOll^ 

ion ioi^ tot/if itiiil 




Generation #3 

Massachusetts Agricultural College 
moved on to new and exciting things, 
although there were bad times too. 
Changes in curriculum requirements took 
place in 1903. Kenyon L. Butterfield 
started his presidency on January 2,1906. 
and it lasted until August thirty-first, 1924. 
Unfortunately, during his presidency 
buildings burned down: the Dairy Building 
burnt down in 1906. It was later rebuilt in 
1907 at a cost of $41,000. New 
departements were started, such as Hu- 
manities, Horticulture & Agriculture in 
1907. In 1908, the Department of Floricul- 
ture and the Department of Landscape 
Gardening was started. Fraternities and 
sororities. The worst time during this 
generation, however, was when Scarlet 
Fever Epidemic hit the campus: twenty- 
five cases, four which were falal. 




3 



aiiiiiiiMiiMliilli 

On-Campus Visual Arts /^ ^ 

Galleries are often used to a,\. ^^_^ 
display students' worb. N. V' 



a 




circa 1938 




The College of Arts and Sci- 
ences is sub-divided into 3 other 
Colleges: 

College of Humanities and Fine An 



College of Natural Sciences ar 
Mathemati( 



College of Social Behavioral Scienc 



Chemistry with a Bang! 



50 



Academics 




Linguistics & Chinese 

Linguistics S- German 

Linguistics & Japanese 

Linguistics & Pliilosopliy 

Linguistics & Psyciiology 



Middle Eastern Studies 



Linguistics & Russian 



Philosophy 



Music 



Protuguese 



W^'':"'' 1 



Russian & East European Studies 



Acting out 

Afro-American Studies 

Art History 
Chinese Language & Literature 

Classics & Philosophy 
Comparative Literature 



Art 



Classics 



Dance 



English 



Design 



French & Francophone Studies 



German 



History 



lapanese Lange & Literature 



Italian Studies 



Journalism 



ludaic Studies 



Linguistics 




Linguistics & Anthropology 



Judaic Studies Professor Noemi Schwarz 
talbs to one of her students. 



Studio Art 



Theater 




Spanish 



Women's Studies 



circa 1953 



Dean Lee R. Edwards 
>\ca(fcmics 51 




Astronomy 



Biochemistry & Molecular Biology 



Biology 



Chemistry 



Computer Science 



Earth Systems 



Geography 
Geology 

Mathematics & Statistics 



Physics 



Sophomore Jason Baniak 



Pre-Medical 




Pre-Dental 



Science (Interdepartmenta 






,^immma)A>^~ ..,^«Mft^' 




M^TH BUILDINi^ 



938 



52 Academics 



CD 



Dean Glen Gorden 





■ fi"-i 



If 



OJ^-* 



9/^ 



i'vmfsmy 




Qe 



circa 1940 



■iW JMt illBfl 



^O 



T^ 



iw5^ 



^^ ', w^-3>' 




Herter Hall holds most of the 
language classes 



Anthropology 



Communciation 



CivU Rights Week 
Features Bob Dylan 



-a 

rj 

5' 

Q 



by DAVE HARACZ 

Students for Civil Rights will 
present a concert by the famed 
folksinger, Bob Dylan on Sun- 
day. AprU 26 at 8 p.m. in the 
Cage. The concert will be the 
climax of the activities of Civil 
Rights Week. April 19-26 at the 
University. 

The week will include panel 
discussions by civil rights lead- 
ers on the progress of the fight 
for equality in the United States, 
talks by students and ministers 
who participated in rights dem- 
onstrations in St. Augustine, At- 
lanta, and Williamston two 
weeks ago, and a Freedom Rally 
outside the Student Union. 

During this Civil Rights Week, 
Student Nonviolent Coordinat- 
ing Committee (SNCC) buttons 
and stickers will be sold by 



workers from Students for Civil 
Rights in the lobby of the Stu- 
dent Union, at the panel discus- 
sions and at the Freedom Rally. 
The proceeds from the Dylan 
concert and the sale of the but- 
tons and stickers will go to 
SNCC, which is the largest and 
most active student group in the 
nation working for civil rights. 

Concentrating on registering 
Negro voters in the South, SNCC 
workers have made an outstand- 
ing contribution to destroying 
the walls of prejudice all over 
the nation. 

Bob Dylan, who has been 
called "the most brilliant folk 
lyricist of the 'new generation' ", 
is chiefly concerned in his music 
with the suffering of the Negro, 
exemplified by "Go Tell It On 





The Mountain", and his restli 
search for a new world, as i 
pressed in his "Blowin' in 1 
Wind." 



Economics 



Legal Studies 



Political Science 



Psychology 



Social Thought & 
Political Economy 



Sociology 



l%Os 



y\farfciiiics 53 



Kareein Abderazzaq 
Biochemistry 



Areaya A Abebe 
Econ, Finance 



Michele L Abraham 
Poh Set, Journahsm 



Jennifer Abromaitis 
Anthropology 



Jennifer J Adams ' 

Enghsh 




Tyler P Adams 
Economics 



Carol A Adamski 
Painting, Art History 



Jacey K Ahnquist 
Communication 



JuUe A Alexander 
Communication 



SaraMAlicandrc 

Sociology 




Mark D Almeida 
Political Science 



Hana B Aitman 
Legal Studies 



Jeffrey D Alulis 
English, Sociology 



SaraA Amiro 
Legal Studies 



Kelly S Andersor 
Communication 




Laura Anderson 
Behav Health Care 



Benj amin Andrews III Briana L Andrews 
S(.x;iology Computer Graphics 



Ruben Andujar Jr 
Sociology 



Miita Aoki 
Afro- American Sti 




■Wehdy^pfeL 
Sociology 



JerHiiferA Ausiello 
Spanish, Legal, Stud 



•Sethpi^alaah- 
Pdliiical Science 



:Erin L Ayers : ;■ 
Journalism. English . 



Alfexij&abitsky' 
: ; EconOrhics : ;'t 



S'deyinlca^'BacJejo : 
Sociology, Econ 



M^an'Cruz : B adi a- Ge S two 
Sociology 



'Stephen Fme.. 
History 



jcydi't Bailey;: 
Enolish, Comm 



MicIielleO Baker 
Psychology 




Nelsoti FBarros^ 
. , Journahsm 



■ Staey A' BMiiOlomeD 
Mathematics, Econ. 



■DaiifelKBassettr 
Political Science 



iViatthew J Bean 
Biology 



Brandon J- feearie 
Political Science, 




irian E Beisheim 
Psychology 



Melissa A TB-eiriis 
Dance, Comni. 



Eriri' S Berts'chy 
Anthropology 



'■'-'^Jillt::BeVis;:- ■ ■ 
. Legal Stud, Poll Sci 



KristiBBillups 

Psychology 




tnrinah L Bianchafd 
. , Sociology 



'Michaeia M Bogart: 
English 



Gina M Bognannd 

Psychology 



Mara Bogoloff 
Communication 



Eindsey M Bo vaird 
Communication 




; Clara S'Bo^iey' 
Anthropology 



Paola A Bowley' 
Economics 



tiffany Braglia 
Communication 



Bethann Brandenbcraer 
Biolocv 



I J7.a A Brass 
Communication 




Jennifer R Brown 
' ■Psychelogy 



Shaiinon L Brow n 
Psyehplogy 



Alexander B Bryant 
. Spanish 



Sinziana I Bularca 
Psychology 



Stephen L Burdid* 
Music 




Danielle J Burger 

Women's Studies 



Stephanie Cadogan 
Sociology 



V. Dina Canducci 
Art History 



Rachel E- Carney 
Theater, English . 



Carolyn M Burke 
Communication 



Matthew M Burke 
French 



SandiaL Bykowski 
Psychology 



Matthew A Byroi 
Histoiy 




Ann E Cadoret 
History 



Kevin L Cahill 

Geology 



Maite Camacho 
Dance. Education 



Kara A Campobas' 

Sociology 




Ayis A Caperonis. 
French 



Sean M Caponigro 
Psychology 



Melissa E Cardenas 
Women's Studies 



Jennifer L Carltoi 

English I 




GasSaMfa-T Carty ■ 
JournaHsrii, Educ 



Eihie D Casadb 
Graphic Desig'^: 



; Patricia A Gasey; 
,■ Psychology 



Julia WGassdii^ 
Journalism: 



Robert C Catlin 
Anthropology 



:Amy-KOiesar 

.. Psychology 



Ljllian Chan 
Journalism 



L. Anne Chao 
Economics 



Leah W Chapin 
STPEC 



Christine Y Chen 
Communication 




■MaryMm'&kx}. 
Communication 



: Yolanda Claudio 

Psychology 



Efriilie A Codega 
History 



Erica L Cohen 

Socioloav 




Jesse Coheh 
Biology 



Itiari G Cionnolly 

History 



JksdnK Corey 
Communication 



Naomi RCohen 
Political Science 



Shana J Cohen 
Psyc.CommDis . 



Tara ECotiant 
Econ,, Sociology 



EisaCCook 
Economics 



Heather L CoOper 

Legal Studies 



Sean M Corcorah:: 
Communication 



Raymond Concannon 
Hisior\ 




Carlos J Cordero 
Sociology 




Michael J Corey- ■JdhatihaniJ^Corliss ■ Ghristophei^Cofneille Patricia A Costa 
Communication , Anthro, Ait,Hi,story Psychology Psychology 




JiistinS, Cotter 
' Psychelogy 



.. Psychology , 



^Ejfearior M Court , 
,v; Biology 



: GKaries T Cronitt- 
, Cornmunicatiort 



:Amaft(ia:M Gj-owiey; : EartiOitt'CroWiey;! 
Psychology Journahstn. Cor 




Sarali'A'CiicinelU 
Enghsh . 



; Ana G:-Depina ■ 
Classics. 



Keviti D-ArrtbrosiO : 
ConimuRicatioh 




CoUKhejfVWiSialli 
, Biology . 




Sharon Ahn DaltOn 

Joqrnafism . 



Belh A Dayidson 

' ' Art- 



5ha\vriyTDaly 
EeonOniics 



Andrew L Damon 

: English 




NiehOlasDarreil 

English; Spanish 



:IsaBel:©aSilwa;^i 

SocioIogyv.PofEuit 




: NikiaC'tSavisi.- 
, Journahsra 



:iose A DelesuS 
Economics ' ■ 



fesepftKeialbrre 

Communication . 



'StefferiyTfeiazzfin 
■ Psychology:;:; i 




JodyLDemt!y 
Communication 



Graiiella'Deschiiieau 
Economics 



fiahiia DeSjihOhe 

: English 



; Amy-S 'DiaTfioiid 
.■'Psychology ■: 



Lauren ;DiBenedett 

Journalism V 



onica F Dickinson Meredith H Dimola Rachd A CHngwell Kathryn E DiSano Margaret M BLtoft 
Sociology STPEC.WOST,PoliSci Psychology Anthropology Dance 




ristie Dmytryshyn Heather M Dohetty Adam K Donati 

Legal Studies Psychology Communication 



Gina M Donchek Viraphanh Donartgmany 
Sociology Sociology 




iaun M Dougherty Andrea J Doughty Nicholas Durastanti Scott H Duskin Michael C Dussault 

Mathematics Psychology Political Science Communication Pohtical Science 




Ceith A Echevarria 
egal Stud, Spanish 



Shawn Eddy 
Biology 



Amy B Edelstein 
Communication 



Chris J Ellis 
Communication 



image is 
nothintr 




4ichael J Endlich 

Art 



Daniel J Ennis Laura A Estee Letitiah M Etheridge Meredith M Everson 

Communication Communication Neuroscience Communication 




Isadora fivGra-Frieri 
Sociology, Spanish; 





taurd'J'Eaitii' 
Classics 




fidiiitaR Faicetti'^^^ ': Jennifer M Falco Daisy Hsiao Mei Fang ' mystery 

.Biochemistry:. Psychology Japanese in a bottle 



:]VIafissa:]|^Favazza Chiisfepher'Fedefer;-^ :;;:■:;: ■■■^ 

Bconomics Eco.n0.mic& to a beat 



: tiding: the' 
road of life. 



Jrai]i3eir:t;:Faiieeti | 

,_:.. :BictlQgy: vi 




;■ Moi}a:l8^BergiiS-;: 
:;: Psychology i; 




:Aibertiiia#eifirtaiides ■ Cheyfehrie T'FeiTa' ■■ . Jdshu :: Bonnie t:,ou Fiegel ■ ^^ Rebecca^A:Filmar 

: Journalism Psychdlogy Eeoiiomics : :. . .History ;: STPEC, WOST 



itMnrie M. Fi<)rilla 
Biology 



JeriTijfer.S Fishman 
Political Science 



Erin B F'itzgei-ald . 
English : , 



Nicole E Fontenault 
Psychology . 



Kathleen A Eorrest 
^History 




Cornmunication 



Jordan A Frascihella 

' ■ STPEC .. . : ■/■;: 



Rebecca LFreitas 
Biology : 



BryariJFrast 

Comraunicatioh 



: Dailiene Pugazy. 
Journalism 




''^Kaotiii; |ni}itib • 
Commanication 



Sharoo^d Fiirtafev 
Psychology 



Thornas A Galanis 
Computer Science 



Cheri M Ganeles 
STPEC 



Cynthia ;M:GargariQ 
Sociology. Pol} Sci 




mjaitiin: 0aunionc}' 
Political Science 



Christine Gauthier. 
English, Art History 



;PauH>Gelin:as " 
Legal St, NAREST 



Kristen, L Gellraa;n: 
Communication 



Elearior M; Gerome 
, Legal Studies . 





-M Geyer 
Philosophy 



AzadehGhaneh 
Communication 



Robert Giariino Jr 
Computer Animation 



Brian PGirard 
Communication 



Atigela R Giroux 
French 



Scdtt\L^Gl^er: V- :;^;", JgfekGoicl'' :^ "; p'R^ Nalhan IVI Goodv,in McSfleySCferai:^ 

. History ^^^ ^^^^ ^ :^.; . M . . Commuriication Histoty Communieatiofr 




: SarahiGorftiley ■ . ,;: SfetlMa-GorodetsKaya . : Geeilla'I^Cjorospfe ' ' Naomi Goto 

■ : Engliish:; : Matiieniatics : , : . Biochemisti-y; . Psychology 



KristiB M Gowd 

Psychology 




Jennifer L Gower 
.Psychology , 



Damon M Grant 
Ja2z Performance 



Thoriias J-GMziario 

'Biology ; 



Angel D Green 
Sociology 



Joffre Green 

Chennstry, Biocht 




vI,aurBii'E Green^alcl; ; .; Jennifer M Griffin: 
:■' Sociology V. Spanish. 



Andrea LGi;irhes, 
Sociology 



Gabrielle; E Grinacof 
Psychology . 



Kenan DGundii 
Coniparafive Lii 




.Courtney Haffliltori Heather A .Haitrion : Jerinifer..M Haydock: 
Communication ; Journalism, English Communicatioh 



Dairen M Hazlett 

Music Education 



AhrieH Heath 

Sociolosv 



el^orah-L Hdler 
Psychology 



Stephanie Hfendier 
Communication 



Ricard(> Herrerias ; 

Pohtical Science 



Kathleen A Her zig 
Psychology. 



Marei^ LHill: 

Psychology 




i^lRifeMirafo: 
Art History 



Trevor V Hoijge 
Music Education 



Heather Hoffttian 

Sociology 



Leslie: A Hopper . 
Art History : 



Aniaiida; Hofowitz 

;;■: Psychology . 




feitssaTHuttef 
Biology 



WilBaniJHyde 
ComrnunicatiOn 



Alejandro -Igiesias 
Journalism 



Erica Hlnerfeld 

Psyc, Sociology 



•Ilysa W Ivler 
Judaic Stud, PoliSci 




ffiey JJa^hlonski;; 
History 



; ;ShadiJalili . 
GommuniGation 



Emma Kate Jaouefl 
Communication 



Craig t Jasie: : 
Legal Studies 



: Stephen B jean ;. 
Music Compositon 




:ife-Lynn Jenn-'mgv 
English 



Tony M Jno Baptisle 
Psychology 



Erica H Johnston 
Sociology 



■ Kristen M Jones 
German, Linguistics 



Jesse B Judelman 
Sociology 




Greer JuUen 

Psychology 




Zoe Kamara 

Political Science 



Gillian D Kane 
Communication 



Caryn M Katz 
Music EducatioJi 



Scott B Katz ■ 
Economics .' 




Raymond E Keenan 
Communication 



Kevin R Kilbride 
Political Science 



Daniel R Knox 
Communication 



Jason D Kotowski 
Economics 



Kathleen Kelley 
Psychology 



Lauren M Kelly 
Sociology 



Jennifer S Kelman 
Sociology 




Un Jung Kim 
Interior Design 



Nicole Kimborowicz 
Political Sci, Math 



Harrison King III 

Communication 




Gregory M Kohler 
Communication 



Sumin Koo 
Biochemistry 



David PKoritlcoski 
Pohtical Science 



James A Kraeuiler 
English 



Peter S Krimstock 
Economics 



Jeffrey Krintzman 
Communication 



Mahasin D Kennt 
Psychology 




Melissa Kotowu 
Sociolocx 




Rachel B KristOj 
Political Scienc 



Elizabeth: Kurz. 

. English ■ 



■BCevinJKylJe 
• Erigiish, . 



.D^riieUe RyricopOulos 
.' ■ ; Biology. : _' ■ 



Michael J Laffin 
Political Science 



Alexi Lammi 
Econ. Political Sci 




^i(ia i-Xanglacle . ■ 
ScOnv Sociology > 



■KristalM Laporta 
Psycliology . "^ 




Jonathan A Larkin 
Graphic DeMgn 



Rodney Lartey-Otoo 
Communication 




Alicia E Laury 
STPHC. Comm 




tlli^m M Lavallee 
> History ;. 



iallie K Leggatt 
Psychology 



Adam S t«ber ^ Srasd S EeGlair ■ ; Jessica D Ledtbrd Larry Lee 

Econorndcs' : ; ;; ^ ■ ;^ ^ -Biology; v EngLErK Chiidhd Ed Computer Science 




Stacey B Lehrer Jacquelyn Leon Kristcn M Lesniak DarleneM Lewis 

English Anthio. Sociology Psychology Psyc, Elem Educ 




LfistiriaA Liberti 
Communication 



CristiRa Licciardeilp 

Psychology ;:;,r'-:'; 



Kyle D Undholm 

'■^•. •■;■>:;.■ Art- ■ 



Yiian M Ling 
Communication 



Emily J Loignon 
Sociology, Educ 



65 



Meredith B Lutz 
Political Science 



Natoya T Madden 
Psychology 




Gina E Loiodice 
Theater 



Michelle Lopresti 
Psychology 



Chia-Chia Lu 

Chinese, Japanese 



Jeffrey Lucia Ji ' 
Economics 




Ronna J'Lytle 

Women's Studies 



Veronica MacDonald 
Psychology, Anthro 



Katherine MacDonough 
Legal Studies 



John M Macug i 
Histoi7 




SamHMagee 
Pre Art Therapy 



Craig M Mait 
Political Science 



Carmela A Makabali 
English 



Sandra Maraalifj 
Psychology | 




Andrea Marblestone 
Dance 



Francine Mari 
History 



Beth A Mardtta 
Psychology 



Jane M Marshall 
Psychology 



Sherri R Martjr 
Women's Studj-e 




,C)liviaL Martinez- 
Music .'Performance' 



•Paul -A Martinez, 
■ English 



. Me'ghaii. G. Mataceia . 
'Political Science ' 



'Thomas I Maxwell'- 
Commnniea'tion ' 



.Geniefie;.May]5ru,' 
,. ;Da;rtce 



66 




\iexis McAuliffe 
Psychology 



Matthew McDonald 
Legal Studies ': 



Mark J.MeDonougl 
.'• Sociology: 



Kerry Aitne McEachern. SheenaM.McGee 
Biochemistry 'Biology 




iteven J McGrath 
ComrouiiTcation 



Deborah J McKenna 
English 



Timothy D McKeon 
Ensjlish Lit, BDtC 



Molly J Mc Knight 
Psychology 



leljssa Mcpherson 
Psychology 



Tara M McRae 
Communication 



Gabriel Medjanis 
Cliemistry 



Ian S Mednick 
Lesal Studies 




JuIieAMcNiilty 
Eeojiomics . 




Kierailyieehatl 
Journaltsra . 




Michael P Melillo 
Journalisni ■ 




Peter Mello 
- "Biology : 



67 



StephariletMerlv ; Michael F;Mes%0S:::r;-liKa:Iv^ 
Comm.Comm Dis V English ^ . English '■■" 



Ernie JMiehaud: 
.Soeiology 



■Elaine MMitoii.: 
GommatiiGation-i 




: Jaliil Metidoza: 
Communication 



.Wendy MMillei-: ■ : Mary A^ctoiria Milo : ; , ■ •■ Philiip.NMilSort i 

Socibtogy, Psyc : : /Biology, : V; STPEC, Education , , : Geography ; ' 




Monica V Mitchell 
Psychology 



Karen A Monahan 
English 



Alison P Monroe 
Sociology 



Andrea Montalbano Audi-a A Montefuj,. 
English. WOST Communication i 




Martha C Monies 
Art 



Maria C Moran 
Sociology 



Amy C Moro 
Psychology 



Tasha M Moms 
Sociolosv 



Kevin R Morse 
Econ. History 




Sean M Murphy, 
English 



Christopher Murray 

Political Science 



Keith B Mutzman 
English 



Elizabeth Mwangi 
Communication 



Genevieve Nadeai 
Political Sci, Ecoi 



latthewDNagler 
Comm, STPEC 



Kristine A Nangle 
Communication 



Oiga D Navedo 
Sociology 



ElizabetkDNellis 
Psychology 



lann S Neumann 
Psychology 




-Ming W Ng 
Economies ■ 



DieuT Ngo 
Psvcholosx 



Heather Nieolaides 
Communication 



Jacklyn A Nkrumah- 
Psychology 



■-' streaiiiof: 
consciousness 




ithieenEvO^Dette 

Sociology 



Meghan A O'Neal 
Communication 



Angela Osei-Nfensah 
Psychology 



Janine M Pacheco 
History 



James Padget I\' 
Economics 




Najinette Pagan 
. Sociology 



KatinaA Papson 
Ail Educ. Photo 



Robert J Pars low 
Mathematics 



Audra K Pearlstein 
Communication 



Marta S Peimei 
Psyc, French 




Jaime V Perez 
Communication 



Yuisa Perez-Sorrentifii 
Communication 



Daniel Perlmuttei' 

. English 



Ken Ferry 

Art 



Jason A Peters 
Communication 




Ann K Pham 
Linguistics 



Leo A Phenix 

Biology 



Paul M Pietsch 
Histoi'y 



Sandy Piti 
Sociology, Educ 



Jonathan Plummer 
English 



Tighe J Poirier 
History 



Andrew B Portnoy 
Communication 



Leah T Previti 
Political Science 



Christina F Puleo 
Psychology 



Adam M Quarelio 
Psychology 



Adam N Quitt 
Sociology 



Allan W Raible 
Communication 



Paolo M Piselli 

Comp Set, Math 




Katherine J Prunie 

Enslish 




Julie C Raina 
Dance 




Andrew I Rainaud Rjja Nonza Rata Mohd Nadzri Russell D Ramm 
Communication English Political Science 



Sousada Rattanasone 
Communication 



Kim Raulsome: 

Sociology ;:i^ 




■LawreticeRedford: 
Journalism : 



;;NJjiUra-KReJ!ly 
English 



Jjuiies' Reyriidlds : Jr 
Sociology 



NeUisa IJ Ribeiro 

Spanish, 



NiicWael J Rtetitttst 

Anthropol£>gy;':| 





Heafher Robertson 
Communication 




Isaias MRodriguez 
Legal St, Sociology 




Paul J Romeo 

Zommunication 



William J Rose 
Psychology 



Gabe S Rosenberg 
Poll Sci, STPEC 



Barry Rosenbloom 
Sociology 



v^nsy:ERotlv 
Psychology 



■iKhaiiRoUlhaG'^ ^ :: Brian TSacawar' ■:;•;■; -"^ 

History, STPEG PsyCCriiTit Justice Communication .Music Gpmmunication 




■.i3SGtt0:%ioisv- , x fe iGsephiM'SaTitoro^: ■ ; BriSiidaSMttys;:/--:^^ 

A,rl, Economics ., • . History ^ ; ; . A STPEC : Economics . 




;Vivian M Saravelas 
V ■ ;Eco!iomics .' 



Kristina Saitiriders 
Communication , 



Ghristife D' Savage 
\ SoeiolGgy 



Aiitbony J; Scanzani; 
Coimnunication . 



■ : Chiist6j>}ier'Sc}iarc 
Tlieater ' 




:MarriS J Sehei:- 
Economics 



Erica Scotto. 
Psychology, Educ 



: JosepH. A Schernia 
. Economics ^ 



'Bryan HSchTegel-: 
History 



, Andtew Sciarretta 
, ' PsycliQ.logy , 



MeHssat^Scbtt' 
:Psyc]iology 




KbTystirie Searles: 
Anlliro, Classics 



S uzahne M -Sfennelt [ 
Art History 



: Staieey E Sh&iKford ■ 
Classics/ 



Susantie'E Shade ) 
Psychology I' 




:Ashni Shall • • ■■ KelUe Sliga . EdwarctSherman IV, Cteytori .H Sbih 
Ssyehplogy , : , \ ■ ■ ^ ■;Dance,.GoTlirn ■ ' : ■ ' ^Conknunication -'■ ■Graphic, Design 




JosliuaJD Siegali.;.,- 
Legal -St, Sbciotogy ■ 



■Jennifer SiiTiatisfci 

BdiiC-atioh, English 



ResaR Singleton 

, . Bioche,tnistry:: 



Amy E-Slater : 
liistGry 



Helena 2 Slomich 
Psychology ; 




■AntliaHy C Smith-. 

:":■', Ecorionjies" \ 



John S Sbares . 
\ Biology ^v 



, Jonathan J' Soares 
Psychology' 



PayidSolrnonsohn.: 

;:;;, Biology 



, Lara A Solomon 
;;: /Psychology, ■; 




Paul Sonenblum 
Biologv 



Heather L Souza 
Bioidgy „■ '- 



,Danielle M Spires; ' 
: Sociology. 



Rebecca J Sprizza 
Journalism , 



Brian DStahi- 
Economics , 




Jennifer L Stahl 
English 



Sam M Sitauffer : 
STPEC. LegaiStud 



■Arriy S SteVerma'n 
•Dance, 



Matthew P Stewart 
Legal; Studies 



,Cynthia L Strock 
Biology, German 



73, 




ShanaLStrothers Susan A Sturtevant CoUeen R Sullivan - Caro-line J Sunshine Fara Surrey 

Biochemistry Psyc, Legal Stud Dance, Comm Psychology Political Science 




Nicholas J' Sweeten 
History 




Erica J Takach 
Biology 




Tiffany N Tammero 
Sociology 




Mark A Tassinari 
Biology 




74 



tifessafenembaum' : : ; ' ; LjDrin 'R Jefes-v ' ' ■ - Laiif a A/'TereSG\ , 
■::..SpanislTi,;' ..:.;.;.;■ -{English ■ - : .; ,^CfemTni^nication■ 



^charclCThayer.■ 
; .Btidish; ' 



Tammy L Terrell 
Political Science. 



,-^ AdaniThaw'. . 
CommuniGatiQii- . 




• ^- Corrie^n:; ; ^ , \, ■; Christopher Ibbiaz; ■ , KristinaA'TQlentinb ' / . ; David. M-lbppi 
Comrnvmicatioh : • .■Sociology; . : .- G<jmTnunication ■ .:' Biology ; 




f«ii6 foiinielTasv ^ .; George P Tripp 

Biology ,■" \ /■, Gornmuiiication -; ^ L^ ;; English . Comm, PoliSci 




;LekhK:Iyler .^ 
/omen's Studies 



:.:]Vlieu 13 %:•;'■' 
iJBiochemistry 



Annette MVadnais: 

Theater ; .: 



Molly J VakuLskas 

' ;Fiistory;V 



. Maju Varghese'- 
Pol- Science, Econ . 



Giovanna Veftr; 
Gommuiiication 




David Voldan 
Communication 



Anthony D Volonis 
Japanese 



Add MWahhas 
Communication 



;'Cyntliia Walendziewic 
.Biology 



75 




EiiabBriy. Wea^ Matthew Wechsler Bryan S Weinberg 

Socioldgy Communication Sociology 




Roahey J-Weinstein Stefanie A Weinstein Anita LWeisberg Diane E Whitcomb Jessica M Wicklun 
::..: Physics Psychology Political Sci, WOST Comparative Lit Psyc, Elem EdUtf 



ara L Wiegand 
Sociology 



attiiew J WHsbri 
Mathematics 



Morgan Wigmarach 
Econornics 



• Wayne Williams 
.Economics 



Brendan P Wilson 
Communication ; 



Da\ id M Wmgard 
STPEC 



Kai K Woffard 
Communication 



Avi S Wolf 
Hj story 



Kathleen A Wilson 
Psychology 




Hillary WonderliG-k' 
Comparative Lit: 




Eric I Wong • 
BioGhemistry 



lianda E Wygant 
' ommunication 



Sonty Yim 
ommunication 



:UaWoTig^^^:^v^^^ S Christopher Wo()dley Am> K.Wright 

Comm, STPEC Communication. . Ecpnomies Geology ■ 




Dana A Yacavace 
Architecture Stud 



Jennifer A Yarro 
Psychology 



Kevin DYee 

Economics 



Michelle Yelencovich 
Communication 




Brett T Young 
Communication 



Wenshu Yu 
Biochemistry 



John Zaccone Ji 
Computer Anim£ition 



Karla C Zinnell 
Theater, Psyc 






''^ 



s 



cnoo 



o 



CEJ 



ti 



uccirion 




Dean Bailey W. Jackson 



'l^^l^^i.^fe 



J^ 



''^Fie wFiofc art of 
teaching is on[^ tFie 
art oj awakening tFie 
naturaf curiousit^ of 
^oung mincfs Jor the 
purpose ojsatisj^ing 
it ajterwarrfs/' 
- ^atofe "prance 



The sleek Distinquished Teaching Award monu- 
ments erected this year in the Campus Center 
were not created by the School of Education 
but it is a constant reminder how important 
teaching is to the world and the next genera- 
tion. 



ark's Meadow students just 
anging" around 




Photos by Dave Finks unless otherwise noted 



Academics 79 









Education Graduate students Marb Burnett and Jennifer Harris 



"^gracfuate of the Qchool of Education acquires an extensive Rnowfecfge not onf^ in their 
area of concentration but afso receives training on the best methocfs necessar-^ to present 
tfieir subject matter to their pupife in the most ejjective manner possibfe. ^ove ail, a gooff 
ecfucator continuaffv strives to be sensitive, supportive, ontf responsive to the feoming st'^fes 
of ever-^ person the^ teach." 
- <J)efphine Quarfes, 1 974 




80 



Future dreams for the next generation 



Academ ics 



smooi 

AllMJS 




1 



The School of Education is 
dedicated to enhancing the prac- 
tice of education through research 
that informs the development of 
academic programs to fully pre- 
pare students to join the ranks of 
educational professionals. The 
school's approach is shaped by 
their commitment to both social 
justice and diversity. The ap- 
proach towards education is also 
impacted by the belief that both 
national and international perspec- 
tives are important to the future of 
education. 

The School of Education 
provides study and professional 
experiences for students inter- 
ested in various aspects of educa- 
tion. The school also offers pro- 
grams that allow teacher certifica- 
tion in middle and high school 
levels of english, math, social 
studies, and the sciences, and also 
in early childhood and elementary 
education. 




An early childhood development classroom 



"^teacRer ajjccts eternity: Fie can never teff 

where Ris inJTuence stops." 

" <lienry Cgrooks >\cfams, <U.S. ecfucator, 1907 



by Cynthia Gargano 



VCA HON 
. TORS 









Education basics 



duct^itlon 



Photos by Dave Finks 



BA\LEY W. ]A( 

Dl \N 



Afadem'ics 8 1 




Beth Aronoff Jamie P Aixoyo Rose C Aubourg 

Elem Ed, Sociolog)- Education, Sociology Education, Psycli 



Jessica D Bailey Kimberlee D Baurr 
Education, Psych Elem Ed, Psyc, Lii 





Kathleen L Begley 
Elem Ed, Sociology 



Melanie N Bell 
Education 



Danika M Budryk Gweneth M Callahan Jennifer Casale 
Education, Sociology Education Elem Education 





loto by Dave Finks 




Leah G Fisher 
Education, Psyc 



Deborah K Garges Anne M Gorham'; :#^^:NIl^elfei ■fi^Jjajris ■ '; v^ Erio;K Himt 
Education, Sociology Elem Ed, Psyc Early Childhd Ed, ConiinDis Elem Ed, Sociology 




;MsaD Jalazo : Nil^^^ Matthews. . ■ Jennifer L McGuirk : Erin E Murphy 

sm Ed, Sociology Elem. Ed, Spanish Early Chjldhd Ed. BDIC Early Childhood Ed Elem Ed. Comni . 




Kathleen O'SuIhvaii Amy Ott Isadora J Prizeman Alyssa J Roberts Joscelyn:^uepi; 

Elementary Education Elem Ed. Sociology Education, Sociology Early Childhd Ed. Socio Education, WOSIP 




Sanit Segal Megan TaHent 

Early Childhd Ed, Psyc Education, Comni 




Judith Tfepperberg 
Education 



CharlaRWatkin 

Education 




Amy E Winnick 
Eaiiy Childhd Ed, Socio 




-o 
3- 
o 

O 

o 
3 

3" 
a 

<3> 




Lauria K Witt 
Elem Educ, Comm 



Trick or treating in NorthEast 



OLLEGEIOF 







"It's a matter of correct cal- 
culations. It's engineerings 
not trial-and-error.'' 



Graduate student 
Juan Cabdevila 
records some 
strange readings. 




Chemical Engineering 



Civil Engineering 



Computer Systems Engineering 



Electrical Engineering 



Industrial Engineering 



Mechanical Engineering 



Graduate student Fei Kong types in his 
test results. 



Dean Joseph I. Goldstein 



-.rtPev'^^i 




Photos by Dave Finks 
unless otherwise noted 



The Knowles Engineering 
Building is a research 
labratory for many graduate 
students. 



y^adeimcs 



85 




Past Facts 

1947 Engineering School started 

* 

1948 On January 10, the newly erected 

Engineering Annex is destroyed by fire 

* 

1 95 7 Engineering Journal begins 

* 

1963 The first Bachelor of Industrial 

Engineering degree is awarded in June 

* 

1968 The School of Engineering awards 

its first doctoral degrees 

* 

1998 Engineering News publication won 

a gold medal in the Council for the 

Advancement and Support of 



Mechanical Engineering Seniors Jeff Quinn and Chris 
Valego talfe about a lab problem. 




Education's Circle of Excellence awards 



Graduate students Marc Bergaba (background) and 
Lihua Li fix some out-of-control wires. 



86 ^adem'xcs 





Senior Yen Wu has some laughs with his mechani- 
cal engineering experiments. 




iU3 



Highlights 

College of Engineering 
Kededication Celebration 

National Engineering Weefe 
Febuary 21-27 






The Heads of Electrical and Computer 
Engineering 



Photos by Dave Finks 



ICarlton L Ho, 
(Associate 
jProfessor for 
JGeotechnical 
JEngineering. 



¥ 



Academics 87 



Angela CAsse Mei Cheng Au Edwai'd M Burdick James Calnan 

Chemical E Civil E. Mathematics Mechanical E Mechanical E 



John A Carroll 
Comp Systems E 




Laura M Castelli 
Civil & Enviro E 



Mathew P Clancy Jonathan F Cohen Katnolsut Dabbaransi Brett A DeS intone 

Chemical E Industrial E, Oper Res Industrial E Electrical E 




Gregory Fagerlund 
Electrical E 



■Karen A'Pisk ' ' 

Civil & Enviro E 



JasonAFranehi 
Industrial E 



Kevin S Gaynor 
Civil E 



Lawrence Hammon 
Electncal E 



T3 

o.- 



■<■■ 

, o ,. 

■3.; 



.,-< 

;* 





hoto courtesy of Judy Gagnon 




v^ustin J HoOoway Kevin A Horgan 

Electric-al E Electrical E 



Dilei Jiang 
Comp Systems E 



George Karayiannis Robert B Lombard! 
Ci\ il & Enviro E Electrical E 




Jornjati M Mfuko Timothy Milmore 

2omp Systems E Chemical E 



Salem NeSheiwat 
Ci\il & Enviro E 



Sara E Northrup 
Civil E 



Gregory M Now ak 
Ci\il & EnMio E 




Istopher O'Conneli Wendy L Parmenter :; Jeffrey Quinn ; StevenJ Rayworth David W Rich 

mputer Systems E Civil & Environ E Mechaiiical E, Econ Civil E Civil E 




Robert M Ryan 

Civil & En\'iro E 



Justin Rl Scbuyler' 
Chemicai E 



SHem S Streeter 
Mechanical E 



Kevin 'fteacy 
Civil &EDviro E 




Christ0pBeT;yai§gp 
Mechanical Bi 




Diego Vargas Martinez Eric J Veronesi 
Industrial E Mechanical E 



William R Wallace 
Mechanical E 



Gregg J Whitaker 
Computer Systems E 



Brent T Williams 
IJecliKal E 



t5 , 
O . 

c 

■v-t 

a> . 
01. 

•< 



a: . 








College of Food 



,.one of the most dis- 



tinct colleges with the 
widest ranges of majors, 
includes the Stockbridge 
School. .."...a family 



within UMass where 



you learn the knowlege 
to help others..." 




Grad. Student John Foley, Food Science 
Master. 



Photos by Dave Finks 



od Science refrigerator for plants. 



Stockbridge Hall, CFNR headquarters. 




91 




and Natural 



o 



o 
3 
C 

> 
■-1 



o 



^^Mi 


ittii ii iiliii^lniMWurtMi^^liliM^lIiM^^^^^Atel^fliB 


- - --^»ii>^ 


1 ..■**^ 


J^^^^^^P^^^^^^^S^mII 


^^^T^T'wtft*''* ««S^^^fc. ShBHhhI 



Environmental Science Chief-Undergraduate Advisor, Guy Lanza 



92 




Resources 




Food Science Lab 



"the support, attention, and oppor- 
tunities provided are what remind 
me of the need to give back to the 



world." 




"this historical foundation chal- 



lenges one to positively change the 
world for future generations..." 



ETL/VNDS-WONDERS WORTH SAVING 



Njimijl ,Vuliil»>i '»»»" 



93 





Adebunmi Abdul 
Food Science 



Priscilla Allendorf AaroaZAlpert OmarEAmeen 

Plain & Soil Science Landscape Architecture HRTA 



BCristy RAndersoi' 

Apparel Marketin 




Michael Anno 
Sport Management 



Sanfqrd I Appell Angela Arsenault 

Sport Managenient Spt Mgt. JournaUt,m 



Howard D Asher 
Pie- Veterinarian 



Tim R Auclair 
ENVIRO Scieocil 




KimberlyE Baker 

Animal Science 



Timothy I> Barton 
ENVIRO Science 



Lynn A Belliveau 
Microbiology 



Brad C Bernstein 

Sport Management 



Christy M Bitet 
ENVIRO Science 




Christopher Blumio Jean M Bonnet Ryan M Bour<iue AlexaJBracht 

HRTA Forestr)- &WCON ENVIRO Science Animal Science 




Brandon J Brei Deena J Brenner r Christopher Brittain Derek P Bruiin 

Entomology. Biology Animal Science Urban Forestry ENVIRO Science 




Aliscvn'H:BtitiHif 
Appai-el MarketiiiS 




Sarah J Buxbaum 
Animal Science 



Kurt M Calderwood 
Turf Management 



Christophei-; Cauifield 
Sport Management . 



AiictaCava 
Apparel Marketing 



Garlindi Ghattitierlain 
Fam&Cons Sciences 




AnneE Chaney 
Vpparel Marketing 



; AaitiVGhayda 
ENVIRG Science 



Gorey J Cherup 
HRTA 



P::-:-iVy; B Cohen . 
Farn&Cohs Science 



Sherri I Gohen 

Fam&Cons Science 




Adam G Gohn 
port Management 



Betsy M Goluccl 
Resouice Economic^ 



Matthew A Cyrulik 
ENVIRO Sciences 



Maic D D' Andrea 
Fuit Manaucmcnt 



Sheri R Dagowitz 
HRTA 




-EriaMDahill 
Animal Science 



Sara E Dalamangas 

Animal Science 



Jennifer Dawoudi 
Animal Science 



James C Decoste 
HRTA 



Ghristopher DeMareo 
W&FGON 




jferemy i Derk 
port Management 



Elizabeth M Devine 
HRTA 



Evaft W Eisfenhafdt 
HRTA 



■ Meggari M, E!dred|e 
ENVIRO Science 



Steven Elliott 

TurfMi't 





Kim M Elorriaga 
Apparel Marketing 



Jean Elysse 
Miciobiology 



Jeffrey R Enehuta 
HRTA 



Robert R Ervin 
Urban Forestr\ 



Kri&ten Farrell 
Animal Science 




Brian Feldberg 

Sport Management 



Abby Fen ton 
Microbiology 



Christina Figenbaum 
W&F CON 



Jennifer h Fitch 
Microbiology 



John JiFifeg'erSld 
Sport Mahagemeni ' 




' Allison B Flato 
Apparel Marketing 



David J Ffeedrnan 
HRTA 



Sara B Fried 
Consumer Studies 



Michael H Gar\7in 
HRTA 



m 

I^tfiait-liGO^S 
Forestry i;i 




Jonathan E Goddard 
Landscape Architecture 



Tiffany Grame 
HRTA 



Janna M Guerrette 
Anmial Science 



Megan A Harford 

Apparel Mar-ketmg 







Dawn E Urn ' Elizabeth A Hoey 

Resource Economics Fam&Cons Sciences 



Jonathan T Hohl 
NAREST 



Gina S Holz 
HRTA 



Gregory ; F:liiifnejr:j) 
TuifManagemehl 




A' Russell Hughes AnnMarieCHussey Da\ id P [asGone , Leah B inman 

NAREST \ Food. Science . Sport Management _ Animal Science 



Michele: R Japlfc 

Microbioloav 




ndraJaquay-Wilson Robert W JarchOW Randy CJaver TehminaJifri 

adscape Architecture Sport Management , HRTA HRTA 



William D Jimenez 
HRTA 




Paul T Jones III 
Iport Management 



Andrew W Joyce Raechelle F Joyner Rcdwan Z Kabbout 

HRTA Fam&Cons Sciences Microbiologv 



Robert Karniin 
Sport Management 




lusan N Kavanagh 
HRTA 



Nikom Keawkumja 
HRTA 



Peter J Khoury 
Focxl Science 



Keny M Kielar 
Apparel Marketing 



■ s'SiielKim 
ENVIRO Science 




Danielle KKk 
HRTA 



Timothy J Kostek 

Urban Forestry 



T6zlyn Y Kraft 
Sport Mgt, BDIC 



Michael R Kramer 
Sport Management 



Jennifer A Ladouceur 
Fam&Cons Sciences 




;; Carrie LLapaire 
Plant & Soil Science 



Peter J Larouche 
Sport Management 



Stuart E Lash 
Sport Management 



Daniel G LeBoeuf 
NAREST. Res Econ 



■Sophie Eecotw 
Sport Management 




Oh Eiin Lee 
HRTA 



Cassandra S Legault 
Apparel Marketmg 



Shellie Lenczner 
HRTA 



Jonathan D LeSage 
Wood Technology 



HeatliferiA'Le\^Sqiie , 
NARBST:- Legal St i 




Shira Y Levine 
Animal Science 



Dan M Levy 
Forestiy 



Keith Lieberman 
Apparel Marketing 



Keith T Lincoln 

Plant & Soil Science 



Karen C Liit 
HRTA 



o 
o 
o 

D 

C 

CO 

'< 

O 



c 
CD 
§ 

3 





Mark Lombardo 
Tuif Management 



'■'•MelaiiiLou: 
Cohsuiiiei* Studies; 



■-^^1 




Sarah C F.ow 
WctF CON 




'oily A MacI^efsOa:'; ■i-RoigaJ^ 
\pparel. Marketing . Sport Management 



Tanya MiManiies, 
V HRTA 



KeitiiFMarliaEer 
HiRTA 



Michelie M Martin 
Anirtial Science , 




sSiifgStfiit^^^ijCue : Keri^ E MciSfajixara : ^Elizabeth A McNeil : .Bryan Meeh'an A-dairi^ Millet: 

iport Management .Microbiology .SportManagement ; : ' HRTA HRTA V 




James Miller 
Mjcrobiology 



Nicholas M Miller 
L rban Forcstrv 



Jasper Moncn Chri.stopher Moran Mil R Motris 

Animal Sci. Biocbem HRTA 'HRTA 




Jeffrey H Moss 
HRTA 



Alison M Munro 
ENVIRO Science 



Aiden E Miitphty 
ENVIRO Science 



LiaKNal^wak 
Miciobiology 



:/Safa-A;Mles;',': 
Animal Science . 




Jtllana R Novich Elanor L Nunn Korrin Nygren Jason S Oliver 

HRTA Microbiolouy, Psyc Resource Economics Micu^bioiosiv 



Sophia Ores te V 
Apparel Marketing 




lessita E Paddwk ^ Thomas PPepe Laura MPhelan Jaime EPicone 

Resource Economies PLSL. SLi-Ttiit Mgt F^am&Cons Science Apparel Marketing 



Jason R Pierangeli 

Turf Management 




, ■ Christian R:PieiTey^:•■ -^'Lauren C Piatt 
JBuild Mat&.WoodTech Apparel Marketing 



Jason D Plucinski 
ENVIRO Science 



Angela D Pollard John F Polmonari Jr 



Animal Science 



W&FCON 




Gatheririe:APbi5je ■ Ajidr^^^ James K Proctor ' Erin Puckett ■ 

Animal Science . Landscape Architecture Landscape Ai'chitecture Animal Science 



■YblandaM: Ray side 
Apparel lylarketing; 




Magdalana H Reis ^^ ^Xjeoffrey A/Rickrode Andre A Roach 

Fam&Cons Science Microbiology Sport Management 



Katherine Robbins 
ENVIRO Sciences 



,Mari#;I- Roberts-: 
Animal Science ■^;; 




: ] Janiie. Rodriguez 
Fam&Gons Science 



Marie BJRoeihlcin 
:,■: N AREST 



Katja Roever 
Sport Management 



Erin J Rothman 
Sport Management 



Chnstophei Rule 
VV&F C()\ 







■^^:JeniiiferL Ryder 
. Sport Management 



Erieli R Salombn 
ENVIRO Science 



Aaron Sandonatb , 
SportManagement 



Stephen C Scheer 
Sport Management . 




:: David^Sfeh^r ■ Airiy M Scjhoeti ^ Andrea L SthwartZ , S^iott, E Shfearfir Ir ; ■ : Adam H:Shermart 

SportManagement Animal Science , ■ HRTA SportManagement SportManagement 




CiBtigitteA Shprey^-^^^ ■ ^^ ■ ' : ^ Gordori; R Sinisi ; Christa D Skow 

Apparel Marketing . . HRTA Plant & Soil Science Microbiology 



Franklin I Siiiith' 
HRTA 




JerernyT Sinyfh 
Animal Science 



Kristin R Sorace 
, Apparel, Marketing 



Joshua MSotiweine Gregg A Spaidafo . L^ureii R Spai^r 

Microbiology . Landscape Architecture , Sport Management 




■; '^Erife L Stern 
Turf Management 



Nichoie M Stone 
Animal Science . 



- Dahielle'ESues's- 
ENVIRO Science 



Patrick J S'jVeeney : 
Sport Management 



Michiko Tamoto 
HRTA 




yCiregctf y ^i^ Taylor; 
Microbiology 



^' ^MiitdH'i "Kixeira ' ;: ■ ■ Amanda Thompson Ksvin-MTiShl- 

Plani & Soil Setence Exercise Science HRTA 



^'^■;:;::^i^Tpy6(iav/;;.^;, 
Sport Manage rcieflt 




Sandra A Traliari 
^ HRTA \ 



V Marion t'Trail:; 
ENYIRO Design 



Sarah A Treanor 
ENVIRO Science 



Matthew A Turner 
HRTA 



Sharon Wagner 
ENVfRO Science 




'A Wallace 
Fam&Gons Science 



Julie A WalsJi 
Apparel. Marketing 



G Marc Walters 
Sport Management 



Misty Watson 
Animal Science 



Karyn Watt 
Sport Management 




Alyssa E WeinStock^ David ^SWeisfeerg': ■ ' -laftSW^ 

Apparel. Marketing HRTA . AnimaTSc.ience ; ■ ■ Fo^^ 



Brian D Whitaker- 
\nimal Science 




JeaniineiMafie Whife:-" Airianda i^^ 
NAREST, Geography - Animal Science ,■ 



— •%, 
Pin H Wong 
HRTA 



Zesar Zorba 
HRTA 



Mark J Zraunig 
Resource Economii. 




he School of Management Library 




Photos by Anh To 



George R. Milne, Associate Professor of Marketing 









D 



D 




103 



Photo from UMass Archives 
c.1950-51 





104 




Tfecis ■Abbatatif eto - 
Management 



MartSa^Aiiiniat^ 
Marketina 



Osa R Anderson" 
Marketing 



lordan J Barnes- 
Management 



ThOEEias C Bean' 
Operations Mgt 




Management, Finance Finance ; 



AnSe;BeriiSjni(3ji.;: 
. Finance 



Brian. D Bernard' 
Finance. Econ 




AdarnW.Biiider 
Operations Mgt 



KeVin.M Blair.. 
Management 



Shannon C Blaney 
Marketing . 



Loreen Boross: 
. Accounting 



vDavasta Brown 
Accoimting 




.Elana.Buclimafi 
Accounting, 



.Patrick €allahan Jr 
Accounting 



Jil! C Caimon 
Marketing; ' 



Joseph A Carney ■ 
. ■ Marketing 



Blossom J ^Gaitier/ 

Accounting 



: Colleen, M.Gasey 
Marketing 



David SChace 
Management 



Theresa Chi u 
Accounting 



Megan. GaiTjineUi. 
Marketing 




Angela Chu 
Finance 




Ghristy Coinparato 
■, ■Marketing 



Kevin T Coai'oy 
Management 



Amy R Coumoyer 

Management 



AleXcindnaCox 
Finance 



JohnPCreighton 

Marketing 




David J'fczaiflSati^;-- Mane E Dagresto Thomas C Daly 

Operations Mgt Finance Management 



Eric Dassow 

Accountmg 



Michael S Delauey 

Marketing 




Edwartl J D^iiipsey ■; ; Xhristophear B Dix Sarah M Downing 

Marketing : Accountms Marketina 



DanieHe D'Urso 

Marketing 



MiiidyjEiijfi&ff; 
Accountins » 




Jesse Falkowski 
Accountms 



Kathleen Ferrigno 
Marketina 



Jonathan Freve 
Accoiintinsi ' 



Marketing. 



Aathony: CSareff a 
: Finance 



Abdiasis Geddi 
'.: AcGOttntins 



Goltytjeiorinini ;; ^./^ Kevin'Glaxer ■■_ 
, Finance • Accounting. SptMgt 




JarioBGoTnes 

Marketing , 



Ryan, P Gonriady 

. Finance. 



DaniekP'Grady ; 

Marketing. 



'MattheAV ;t Grimley : 
' Marketing ; 



EricGGuire 

Accounting 




itricia A Habink 

.Ac count ins 



Jeffrey S JJans;; 
Finance 



Daniel A Hanwacker 
Economics 



Sarah K JJousman 
Apparel Marketing: 



Fadila Insariie 

Acci, Info Syst 




■fiagHanl Jensen : ShaiinQn L Johnsen ■ Bruise FJcmes II ^^ Antanpf it Kandola 
3perations Mgt Management; : V Accounting : Accounting, Psyc 



Brewing Around 




sttn B Kauffiian 

iance,Oper Mgt 



Michael J Kavanagh 
Fi nance, Oper Mgt 



Gregcyry J fCeefev 
Opei^ation^ Mgt 




Kelly EKiHiah 

Human Res Mgt 



Stephanie LKirker 
Management 



■Agm^^zkiiA Kopec ::'-:J^ 

'.'^ .Finance . jr;/,;/ .finance :/.4;v^ Accounting. ; , ^ Finance 



. Blizafefet}V:iv Eeecis: 
:; : ■ Financ^ . v-?' 




Finance : 



Julius DEeWis 

: Busifies-S Mgt 



IDaniei^ypjn;:^ ;Heafbei^i;oitHers^ 
Accounting. : . JVIarlsetins : 



V. Fiiiance v 




Jeffrey J Ludlow 
■. Accounting 



;Petrica^lvUrigii; 
Aceoimting 



JohrtI.;i:urit 
Finance . 



Jeririifer MacDoiidlfl- 

. Management : ■. 



■^Finance vij 




Elizabeth. KMak^ 
Finance. 



Briati P.Martin 
Finance 



Justin RMafidly 

Accounting 



Ellen BMcCabe 
Accounting . 



:Kf Istine M Malla.ftio 
Marketing 




Michael PMeDade 
Finance.Econoniics 




arah J McGuane 

iVIarketins . 



Eric MMsmfieM:, 
Finance; 



OperadorLs Mgt^ ./^^; . , M^ Accounting 




Halona Mui 

Acuountins 



David B, Murray.;. 
^ Marketing ;■■ 



.KathertrieN'g 
Management., 



: Yliet G; T^g: .: . Regirta NortftiirSariderson 
Marketing/ . \v - . Accounting 




feltaire tOjastroV :- ElizabMiGsiiielbski' ;; J^ : ^ Rita G Palo 

larketing, Spt Mgt .■ Marketing .. '. . . Marketing , Accounting 



Federico Pardo 
Marketing 



Jason MPatfyn: 
Accoundng 



Jake Peanainanda 
Management 



Julianne Pescatore 
Maiketins: 



Jonathan Pappalardr 
Marketing 




Neil S Piekny 

Accountina 




l-Qn APriola 
Marketing 



Kenneth HRai ley 

Finance; 



Sean J Rickrode ShawnaRobinsdh Bethani A Rosemark 

Finance Finance Economics Finance 




Ropco Sama Matthew A Schneller photo courtesy of Patrick BrOwn 

Human Resource Mgt Marketing 




"Dana Seitz 
Accounting 



D. Chestlee Settks 
Finance 



Rachel J Slierman 
Marketing 



Katharine M Shivick 
Management 



David A Simon 
Opeiations Mgt 




Raymond L Slapp Stephen M Smith Margaret Snyderman 
Finance Finance Finance 



John R Soto 

Finance 



Daniel Sullivan i 
Marketing 



PavMGSurabian: 

:■':' Finance .: 



veraigM'Suittte.^ 
Managenient-: 



DMel fi^vSzafran, ■ 
Accounting 



'Ho'GHihg Felix Tai 
Aceountina ' 



■ MiGJiael %ssreiiii- ■ 
Marketing .^ 




laka Thi llaiampaJam Bart P Thompson 
Marlceting . . Marketing. 



SeottMTrai^ter, 
Marketing -;. 



Mary F Tuturice.; 
' : :Finance /■ 



Paul Viticetit 
Finance 




•iMyanKWair 

Mgt.Acct,Econ 



Anneiitane G Walson . Catrie M Wegmaii: 
Operations Mgt . Marketing . 



Bviisty IVfehrheim 

■ Marketing 



'; Mitcheir A: Weirifel(3: 
Finance 




Ititew BWeinshartk Shanridrrt Wells -CMstOfiherK Wheeler : Eli S Wilkie Jason S Winter 

Finance Marketing Finance Management Management 




(iflbferlyAWittroCk 
Finance,Psyc 



■EntilyCWu^ 
Operations Mgt 



Jared S Wulfow 

Finance 



Leia C YaGoyone 
Finance 



Kirsten :H Yale 

Marketing. 




Anne York, Receptionist for School of Nursing 



s 

c 
h 
o 
o 

I 



o 

f 



"...A place to warm the body & soul through the care 
of nurses" 

1950 Dean Machmer brings in a report favoring the 
establishment of a five-year nursing program at the 
university. 

1953 In October, Miss Mary Mahar appointed as 
Director of the Division of Nursing with the respon- 
sibility for developing one curriculum, selecting the 
field agencies and selecting a nursing faculty. In 
1958 School of Nursing graduates its first class 




Mary Mireault, Undergraduate Secretary for 
School of Nursing 




Photos by Anh To 



112 





Ruth Adusei ■; 
Nursins. STPEC 




TokUniso O Agesin 
Nursing, Psychcrlogy 



Toto courtesy. of Isabel Iglesias 




Tara L AQen 
Nursiria 




KKMjc M, Bissoti 
Nursing 



Mary ann Boucher 
Nursing 



Shawna M Butler 
Nursing 




iariaC Guerrieri 
V: "Nursing 



Cynthia A Hoover 
Nursing 



Suzanne M Kuncts 
Nursing 




Fung Ming Kung: 
Nursing 



Laura M Lavalley 
".Ntu'sine. 



■Jennifer A Lay den 
Nursing 



Jennifer A Lewis 
Nursing 



Xiao Feng Liang 

Niu'suil; 



Lauren R Mockler 

Nursiim 



Kim A Nathan 

Nursing | 




Lynda Osei-Baateiig 

Nursing . 



Nicole M Palermo 
Nursing 



Irene Olivia Roman 
Nursing 



Mandi A Sergio 
Nursing 



Lon A Szpila ■ 
Nursing 





Julie A Tosches 
Nursing 



Tammy Trzpit 

Nursing 




AmyM.Wliittiei 
Nursing .;. 




in 1979, the then Division ofrUDlIC HGSlTrl received accreditation as a 

School of Public Health, and is, today one of opily twefity-eight 
nationally accredited schools in the coun- 

try. By 1994, the school had expanded to become a school of Public Health and 

Health Sciences (SPHHS) It Is comprisod of s\x dopart" 
ments: Biostatistics and Epidemiology, 
Communication Disorders, Community 
i Health Studies, Environmental Health Sci- 
ences, Exercise Science, and Nutrition. 

The School of Public Health and Health Sciences offers undergraduate majors in the departments of Communication Disorders, Exercise Science and 
Nutrition. The departments of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Community Health Studies, offer courses at the undergraduate level. Environmental 
Health Sciences faculty participate in the interdisciplinary B.S. degree program in environmental Sciences. 

COMMUNICATION DISORDERS 

: The curriculum leading to a Bachelor's degree in Communication Disorders provides a broad introductory background to the normal process of speech, 
' hearing, language, and related functions, as well as a basic understanding of communicative pathologies and familiarization with the various ap- 
proaches to their assessment and treatment. 

In this major, the exploration of normal speech, hearing, and language prepares students to learn to 
assess and treat communication disorders. Graduates who complete appropriate graduate traning and 
state requirements typically begin careers as diagnostic and treatment clinicians in pre-schools, school 
systems, hospitals, trauma centers, and private practice. 

The Communications Disorders Department at UMass is acknowledged by experts around the world 
for its comprehensive investigations into multiculturlism and its impact in communication disorders. 
Testing instruments and language disorders in African American children whose households do not 
speak standard American English. The project-funded by at six-year, $2.7 million grant from the 
National Institute of Deafness and Communication Disorders, a branch of the National Institute of 
Health (NIH)-is a collaboration between SPHHS, the UMass Linguistics Department, the Department 
of Psychology at Smith College and the Psychological Corporation of America, the largest developer 
of assessment instruments in the nation. 



EXERCISE SCIENCE 

Exercise Science is the study of the functions of the human body and how its physiological systems 
respond to exercise. The study of human performance is a multidisciplinary field that builds upon 
foundation sciences and mathematics and critically examines how exercise affects human function. 
The major is a unique approach to the study of human physical activity and how it affects all types of 
people, including athletes, persons who are physically challenged, the elderly and the infirm. 
UMass is also the place that companies turn to when they need answers about how pharmaceuticals 
act upon human muscles and bones, or whether one shoe design or another works better to improve 
performance. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) came to the department for 
expertise about exercise machines that would prevent muscle atrophy for astronauts works with 
police and fire departments in the Pioneer Valley to develop fitness programs for men and women. 
In fact, much of what the world knows about how the human body behaves under exertion, how 
performance can be improved, how damage occurs-and how it is healed-was revealed here at the 
department of Exercise Science. 

t HUMAN NUTRITION 

I Human Nutrition majors study the nutrients in food and explore how they act interact, 

and balance in relation to health and disease. Students examine how humans ingest, 

digest, absorb, store and utilize nutrients, as well as the social, economic, cultural, and 

psychological implications of food and eating. Graduates have careers in health care 

facilities, the food industry educational and research institutions, and community 

service agencies. 

The department supervises federally funded statewide nutrition education programs 

which offers the possibility of work experience for advanced undergraduates. Across 

the state, and around the globe, the Department of Nutrition is helping to put the 

building blocks of knowledge about nutrition directly into the hands of the people 

responsible for feeding the world's children: councils of policy makers, and neighbor- 
hoods of parents. 

Through the federally funding Expanded Food and Nutrition Educational Program, and 

the Family Nutrition Program, UMass researchers and educators train and supervise a 

field staff of peer educators working in targeted low-income communities across the 

state to encourage food safety and to help familes identify the best sources of protein, 

vitamins, and minerals and to teach why they're so important. 





photos by Ben Barnhart, Photographic Services 



Dawn Blackburn Janel C Capellaro Ashley Carrigan Maureen Cole 

CommDi.sorders Nutrition Cornm Disoiders Comm Disordeis 



Jill Colleran 

CoramDisorders- 




Jenifer L Duer 
CommDisorders 



Erin M Durette 
CommDisorders 



Alison C Femiolo 
Comm Disorders 



CandiceL Foster 
ExeicSciHealth&WeU 



Krystn M Gustafsc , 
Exercise Science i 




■ Kristen Hanson 
CommDisorders 



-: vKerryA Holihan .Nicole K Kanaracus 
CommDisorders, Educ Comm Disorders 



Tanisha J Kimber 
CommDisorders 



Katherine Lambropoulos. Alicia BEartiothe : ■■ ;:-Erica L Lawson 
. . CommDisorders ■ Exercise Science . 'CommDisorders 



Gia Lee 
Comm Disordeis 



Laura A Korutz 
Exercise Science i. 




Royce I Libenna| 

CommDisorders" 




Jonathan ,R Mack Debra M Maboriey ^ Kelly L Makris Melissa J McCormack Jennifer M Meo 
Exercise Science CommDisorders . Exercise Science Exercise Science CommDisorders 



Angela Milani : 
Exercise Science 



Cheryl Michallyszyn 
Nutrition 



Karen C Mullen, 
Kutrition ' 



Kimberly L Napierski 
Exercise Science 



, . Melanie 01s<>n . 
CominDisordefs 




Rebecca R Qiig 
Bxereise Science 



Aiffiee E Paradis 
Exercise Science . 



Mafthevv. J Pimental 
Exercise Science 



AlysaMRbmeQ 
CommDisorders 



Eori ASalerna; '/ 
ConiniDisorders 




[aryLynn Scortino 
ComniDisorders 



■ Beth Seligrtian ■ 
ComirlDisOTders, 



PatriciaAShugg 
CommDisorders, 



Sara E Springer 
CommDisorders 



Ann M Stella 
Comm Disorders 




izabeth;J Swanson Daniel Torres Katherine ,M Wagner 

GommDisbrderS ExerSci, Nutrition CommDisorders , 





Daiiielle-E-WeM^^P Brian MZaniewski . D^ielE Young, photo by; Judy Gagnpn. 
ComfminiCatidn Exercise Science, Exercise Science 






© 
© 

^ 
o 



^ 







"^e is 
you make 



And that is exactly 
what these students 
do... 

...creating non- 
raditonal. self- 
motivated majors 
through Bach- 
elors Degree w/ 
Individual Con- 
centration (BDIC) 

...walking the road 
of unlimited 
horizons through 
University With- 
out Walls 

...expanding 
minds with Con- 
tinuing Education 

...being unre- 
strained through 
Bachelor of 
General Studies 

Past Facts 

/ 555 Winter Short 
Courses started 

/907 Summer 

School starts for 

the first time 



Top photo from 
gpeciat Coft^ctions 
and ^cFiives 
Photos by: Dave 
Finks (middle and 
bottom left) and 
WPC (bottom right) 

Director Devin H. Aifeen 
., . , Deputy Provost Norman 

Ir 1* D. Aithen 

1 1 8 Academics 



H 






<^r^ 




^r^ 

^ 
H 



DIVISION OF 

jCONTINUIN( 

EDUCATION 



RSITY OF 
HUSETTS 
AMHERST 





Iill:R^At(rairi& :■":• 


Cheryl S Alper 


Matthew R Baldwin 


Jennifer Carr-. 


■^^ :; -iaraj Ghami 


BDIC- V 


BDIC 


BDIC 


\. uww ■ ■;• 


■■ :; ■ .BDIC 




;KariiiA;Cbnte: 
UWW 



BDIC. Dance 



David tfiFinks 
BDIC 



Dariie}:^ Hildreth 
BDIC 



Ariel taReaii 
BDIC 




Stacy B Irvine 
BDIC 



Nail cy Lin 
BDIC, Econ 



Eileen M Maura' 
BDIC 



Alan.J Morin . 

■. ,uww- ■■ 



Brenda J Peavy 

■ uww; .■ 




photb by Yvonne Yang 




Benedict J Schuman 
BDIC 




Kirjn E Shamberg 
BDIC 





John E Sheehan pPioto by Yvonr>e Yang 

uww 




Nicolas J Steglich 
BDIC 



Melissa A Stiipal: 
BDIC 



Jennifer R Tessler 
BDIC 



Allana E Todman 
BDIC 



Aileen M TYacey] 
BDIC 




Steven Trachtenbroit Caren R Wachtenheim Sarah Walsh 

BDIC BDIC. Leisure Indus BDIC 



Robin Marie Ward 
UWW 



William A Young 
BDIC 



921 1922^^'f92ii 
*1932 :l93i:|M 

'M92219i 



\SSMUm 




ISmUSaSl 



3«1924;»^» 
[9341935:1 




2i::t: 



% 




921 1922 lf23 1924 192 
19321933193419351 

921 1922 1923 1924 1925 
1932193: 









52 



■u 



mid 1 980s 



Generation #4 

Massachusetts Agricultural 
College progressed to a bigger and 
better school. M.A.C had a new 
leaf that was turned over during the 
Depression. Grossmann Chemistry 
Laboratory was built at a cost of 
$300,000 in 1924. Cavalry Barn 
burnt down, and rebuilt in 1925. 
Tuitions rose for in-state residents 
to sixty dollars. The outing club 
began in 1928. On March 26,1931, 
Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege, was renamed Massachusetts 
State College. In 1933, the tuition 
increased again to $100 for Massa- 
chusetts residents. Also, World 
War II effected student enrollment, 
decreasing male registration and 
making the total population 738 in 
1943, where as the year before it 
was 1,410. 



Men's/Women's Indoor Tracks 




Men's indoor track enters their thirty- second season with coach 
Ken O'Brian while the women's enters their eleventh season with 
coach Julie LaFreniere. The UMass minutemen placed first against 
B.U, Yale, New Hampshire and Holy Cross while the women had a 
good season with players like Andrea Comeau, Shelanda Irish and 
Rosey Bryan. They placed second at 
the Terrier classic and the New En- 
gland challenge. Some highlights are 
when Tom Toye broke two records 
which are in the 400 meter for time of 
48.54 and Andrea Comeau also broke 
two records. Both men and women 
had an excellent season. 
By: Shirley Macdonald 




122 



Sten llydar 'S3 ranks among the hesl thmuvrs in school hislory. in the top 
firt in Iht indoor and outdoor that put and the indoor utlj/hl throw. 



Men's/Women's Outdoor Track 



Photos from Sports Media 




The Women's Track and Field team won 
the Atlantic 10 title, with Coach Julie 
LaFreniere receiving the conference's 
top coach award. The women surged 
past the Virginia Tech squad, also beat- 
ing Rhode Island, St. Joseph's, Dayton, 
La Salle, Duquesne, Temple and 
Fordham. UMass had five women 




Tom Toye, UMass Men's Track 

named to the All-Conference team: 

Rose Bryan, Sheland Irish, Raqueil 

Shelton, Abby Rubino and Sally 

Hirsch. Men's track and field with 

coach Ken O'Brien placed second in the Atlantic 10 Championships this 

year, placing second to Virginia Tech. They were led by the efforts of 

Tom Toye, Vic Morency, and B.J. Cardoza. 

By: Shirley Macdonald 



123 



i m & D i 




Home meets held at Joseph R. Rogers, Jr. Pool 



Women's Swim & Dive make a winning splash. 



Players: 
Juniors 

Elizabeth Risotto 
Anne Dettloff 
Andrea Kazanijan 
Andrea Spencer 
Julie Dragon 
Becky Hunnewell 



IVfen 



Players: 

Senior 

Brian Wisniewski 

Junior 

Ed Hefferon 

Sophomore 

Billy Brown 

Mike Sabina 

Coach: Russ 
Yarworth, 20th 
season 

Final Score (Total 
wins:losses) 7 : 4 

Highlights: 
Atlantic 10 Cham- 
pionships: 4th place 
ECAC Champion- 
ship and NCAA 
Championship 
qualified 




Coach: Bob Newcomb, 
15th season 

Final Score (Total 
wins: losses) 9 : 2 

Highlights: 

Atlantic 10 Championships: 

4th place 

ECAC Championship and 

NCAA Championship Senior tri-captain Brian Wisniewsbi receives a gift from Coach Yarwortli 

qualified ' 



Women 




Women's Swim & Dive cheer for teammate: 



124 SpoJ-ts 



Photos by Dave Finks unless noted otherwise 



Men's & Women's 




l.ac 



,toss^ 



13 

a- 
o 



Sr. Midfield Jay Negus plays 

keep -away from 

Duke. 




Sr. Co-Capt. Mike Mckeefrey looks downfield for 
an open snot. 



dens lacrosse is led 
ly Greg Cannella. 
'he last game was can- 
died due to the loss of 
trie Sopracasa. He died 
s a result of a tragic ac- 
ident during a practice. He is re- 
lembered as an enthusiastic player who 
v'ill never be forgotten. 



The Women's Lacrosse team 
was led by Francesca 
McClellan. The women lost 
three seniors last year but they 
still had high expectations. 
They had players like Tara 
Durkin, Jen Nardi and Lynn 
Young. The Minutewomen had 
an excellent season. 

By: Shirley Macdonald 



3 I -M m- It tfl |i»jkj«jiu«»i Uiu>i/U»i.>ai (.»*.f)»^.»' *uf»i I iiifc"! ««J ««*«>" "''"-•'"'•''"" 

^ » ,-„,^ ;wr.^ l»«»rB» «.^.> Mar. ».«« /j«JLi /iortwJ-' *.*#■«. 1/ «l HiaH.ak l\m llstm Ixt) 
lata « I Vl»< rxtmlUt lUnM, W.r«. iWiri Urn , DU U*>'W A»«r'V«. Iloth )firmf< l\im M.«' 

Let's Get It Together! 



Coach Francesca McClellan gives a pep talk. 



125 



K 







^ 



t • 






^ The UMass 
Women's and 
Men's Ski Team 
competed in the 
United States Col- 
legiate Skiing As- 
sociation Regionals 
at Waterville Valley, 
N.H. Each team 
sent five members to 
represent them, and 
the teams hoped to 
place in the top-four to 
qualify for the USCS A 
Nationals at Mammoth 
Mountain, California. 



o 
3 






Pbotos from 



index Mc^^^' 





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Women's Water Polo 




JMjii ■.vumtn', wjtcf poia coachei. Djh McOsker .ind 04v.i\ Cerien (irt up Ihe ledm tor the CoMeqiale Wjicf 
o Ndtion4l Champ40n&htps. 




The UMass Women's Water Polo team, 
led by Coaches Dan McOsker and Dawn 
Gerken blasted the Maryland Terrapins 
to win the Collegiate Water Polo Asso- 
ciation Eastern Championship this year. 
The team finished with a record of 29-6 
and their capture of the title sent them to 
the Collegiate Water Polo National 
Championship in Davis, California to 
compete against the University of Cali- 
fornia at Davis which placed number 
seven with a record of 24-10. The UMass 
team placed number ten in the ratings. 





Men !y 




olo 






Sports 128 





Sports 129 



irr^i 



Womans's Crew 

"You gotta get up how 
early?" is a reaction common to me 
when i tell someone how early I get 
up in the morning. The UMass 
Women's Crew meets at Boyden 
Gym at 5:45 am to get in the van 
and head to the boathouse along the 
Connecticut River. Under the 
coaching of Jim Dietz we train in 
eights, fours, quads and doubles for 
such races as the "The Head of the 
Charles Regatta" and look forward 
to a 4th consecutive win at the At- 
lantic Ten's Championships. And 
ultimately a NCAA victory this 
May. Through hard work and dedi- 
cation, the Minutewomen will race 
against schools such as UVC, BC, 
BU, UNH, UCONN, Temple, Le 
Salle and many more. Jim once 
said, "Rowing is a sport for dream- 
ers. As long as you put in the work 
you can own the dream. When the 
work stops the dream disappears." 
GO UMASS CREW!!! 
by Jules Blight 





<4^.i^t 




Photos from Index Archives 



Sports 130 



wsg 



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^■sfc/'l 




Patty Shea is only in her second year as the Head Coach of 
the Women's Field Hockey Team. "We have a young squad this 
year," said Shea. The team did prove they can win as a young squad, 
as they had 14 wins and 8 losses. The forwards are the quickest out 
of all the years. Leading the forwards is senior Erica Johnson. Last 
year she scored 24 goals. Also leading are sophomore Kristen 
Schmidt, junior Chrissy MiUbauer and Senior Kerry Lyons. The 
new comers to the forward position are Lindsay Abbott and Minnie 
Goodblanket. The midfield.is made up of three returning seniors, 
Vicky Browne, Kate Putnam and Laura Phlan and sophomore Lucy 
Koch and freshmen Kattlyn Byron and Jill Fantasia. "The midfield 
is one of the strongest parts of our team and (it's) definitely the 
most depth," Shea enthusiastically noted. The final position is 
backfleld. This is hardest hit with losing members. They lost Amy 
Ott, Sharon Hughes and Jen Gutzman from last years squad. The 
backflield does have sophomore Patty Robinson, Senior Katharine 
McClellan and newcomers freshmen Kerry Ann Saggassar 
(Trinidad), Anke Bruemmer (Koeln, Germany). The starters are 
junior Michelle Crooks, freshman Erica Yeaton and sophomore 
Zowie Tucker, who was a starter last year. These women did prove 
themselves as a winning team. They all worked hard together, 
by Amy Coleman 
Photos from Index Archives 




Sports 131 




Sports 132 









* » 






Sports 133 



Men'sAVomen's Cross Country 





Nicole Way, UMass Women's Cross Country 
Photos from Sports Media 



The women's cross country team placed 
seventh in the NCAA Eastern Regional 
Qualifiers, which was held in the Bronx, 
N.Y. Coach Julie LaFreniere led them 
to score 268 point and finish ahead of 
rival Vermont. 

134 



The 

Massachusett's 
men's cross coun- 
try team placed 
16th this year at 
the NCAA North- 
east Regional 
Qualifiers out of 
27 teams in an 
attempt to make 
the finals. They 
were led by 
Coach Ken 
O'Brien, who had 
strong hopes for 
the future of his 
young team. 



Kevin Curtin (#5),UMass 



Men's Cross Country 



Jj 



ti 





Home meets held at MuUins Center, Curry Hicks Cage, or Boyden Gymnasium 



1974 Gene Whelan received the prestigious 
AU-American honors 

''..competed in first-ever ECAC Champion- 
ship, which was broadcasted by Fox Sports 
New England & attended by Olympic gold 
medalist Shannon Miller. " 

"First time in campus histoiy competed in 
NCAA East Regional Chcmipionships: 7th 
place. " 

Senior 
Brad LeClair Phil Leiberman 

Stephen Pryor Dan Young 

Junior 
Jeff LaVallee-earned All-American honors in 
4 events at NCAA national championships, 
including all-around, floor exercise, still 
rings, and vault; entered into UM Hall of 
Fame as one of only three Minutemen in 
history to earn these honors 

Sophomore 
Michael Alexander Eric Bacon 
J.J. Hershey Ben Kandel 

Clayton Kent Andy Leis 

Bryan McNulty 



Freshman 



Matt Plumser 



Michelle LoPresti 



Coach: Roy Johnson, 21st season, 1999 
ECAC Men's Gymnastics Coach of the Year, 
1999 NCAA East Region's Coach of the Year 




Women 



Players: 

Coach: David Kuzara 
Final Score (Total wins:losses) 11:7 

Highlights: NCAA Regionals: 5th place 

"...strongest events this season - the bars, beams, and floor, respec- 
tively." 



Mandy Mosby 



Sports 135 



Men's S 



Even with much dedication and effort the 
Men's Soccer team unfortunately did not prove to 
be as successful as in years past. Headed by team 
coach, Sam Kooh, the men pulled in four wins 
against George Washington, La Salle, Duquesne, 
and St. Bonaventure and two ties against Duke 
and Siena out of their eighteen games this season. 
The victories against Duquesne and St. 
Bonaventure, in the Atlantic Ten games, ended the' 
season on a high note with the home court advan- 
tage at Totman Field. 
by Kara paige Vautour 
Photos by Dave Finks 







•,m**n 







f * 



'' \ 'm- 



Junior, Adam Black, defends his team 



mm. 



WkiA 



iiit'rrjv 




Senior, Jake Brodsky, covers midfield. 




irts 136 



K 




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;shman, Emma Kuroski, plays foward and midfielder. 



Sophomore Molly McGrew, gives her all for the team as a midfielder. 



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Ina Morozuk 



j The defending Atlantic- 10 champs 
returned with a tough season. With an 
overall 10-11 record and a 7-4 in the 
Atlantic- 10, the women's soccer team 
did have some memorable games with 
the help of their talented players. 
Leading the team with 35 points. 
Senior Forward Sophie Lecot scored 
the game winning goal in 5 of their 10 
games. She has proven to a be great 
leader for her team. Other returning 
players that will quickly step-up and 
be a force are Sophomore, forward 

\ Kara Green who tallied 34 points and 
led the team with 105 shots on goal. 

^ Junior Forward Emma Kurowski 

finished the season with 28 points and 
' 10 assists. Andlasdy we cannot 

t forget the defense. Goalkeeper Angie 

*^ Napoli recorded her first shut-out 
against Virginia Tech in a 5-0 Adantic- 
10 win. I would not be surprised if 
these girls become captains and 
Atlandc-10 all stars. 

by Dave Finks 
Photos by Dave Finks 



Sports 137 




Todd Cheney gets in 
the swing of things 



Sports 138 



Women's 



f I 1 

e 

n 

n 

1 

s 



Home matches at Upper Boyden Courts 



Highlights: 

Atlantic 10 Championships: 3rd place 



Final Score (total winsdosses) 

Players: 

Coach: Judy Dixon 



8:2 




Marie Christine Caron 




Caroline Steele 




Prepared for flying balls 



lotos from Media Relations unless otherwise noted 



Sports 159 



Women's Basketball 




Photos by Dave Finks 




140 




Men's Basketball 




Coaching the team for the past three 
years is coach Bruiser Fhnt who went 
into the season with high hopes. Both 
FUnt and the UMass minutemen wanted 
to end the season with the champion- 
ship with senior Lari Ketner who 
played center and Ajmal Basit as 
forward. The team's front court was 
strong and aggressive. Also supporting 
the team's desire for the championship 
were senior Charlton Clark and Shoot- 
ing guard Monty Mack During the 
season, the minutemen gave it their all. 
Thanks to guard Mack, scoring his 
season's best of thirty-four points in a 
single game. UMass had their highest 
point total of eighty-seven against 
Niagara. Although the minutemen's 
were strong, they unfortunately did not 
bring the championship home. They 
ended their season with fourteen wins 
and fifteen losses. Just as past genera- 
tions have done, they gave it their best 
efforts, 
by: Shirly Macdonald 



141 



Home games played at Earl Lorden Field 



Players: 

Coach: Mike Stone 

Final Score (Total wins:losses) 26:23 

Highlights: 

\tlantic 10 Championships: 3rd place 




W .i, -..». 



Sophomore Nicfe Sfeirfeanich waits for his signal. 




Photos from Index Archives unless otherwise noted 



^ V 



Graduate student Muchie Dagliere tafees a big swing. 




Senior Bill Coofee throws 
one over the plate. 



142 Spoi'ts 




■"During the past two seasons, 
the Minutewomen have made 
the most of their automatic bid, 
as they quahfy for the College 
World Series. And now they 
have begun to achieve excel- 
lence to sustain it. Fair or unfair, 
the current UM team has inher- 
ited a wealth of distinction and 
responsibility." 
- Daily Collegian,Spring 1999 

Players: 

Danielle "Harry" Henderson, 
awarded top women's collegiate 
athlete in women's Softball & 
Eastern Collegiate Athletic 
Conference/Reebok Division I 
Softball player of the year 
Coach: Elaine Sortino 



Sports 143 





c^ 




Q 




m. 




With such a young team this year, the UMass Mil 
utemen rehed on teamwork to bring them together on til 
ice. Returning junior Jeff Blanchard (right wing) and s 
nior Bryan Fitzgerald join sophomores Kris Wallis ai 
Jeff Turner to welcomed back last years impressive roo 
ies Nick Stephens and R. J. Gates in hopes of a great se 
son. Along with newcomers Jedd Crumb, Martin Miljk 
Darcy King and Dmitri Vasiliev, Coach Mallen saw tht 
team through five victories this season as of Decemb 
13, 1998. Team captain. Dean Stork's team won agair 
Concordia in their first game and Merrimack, Maine, /^ 
Force and Vermont later in the season. 
by Kara paige Vautoiir 



Sports 144 



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Generation #5 

Massachusetts State College truly 
changed for the better. The enrollment 
climbled to 1,002 in 1 945 and the WWII 
veterans come home in 1946. Once again 
there was a renaming on May sixth 1947. It 
is now the University of Massachusetts. On 
lune tenth 1948, the newly erected engineer- 
ing Annex was destroyed by yet another fire. 
The school of Business Administration was 
born in 1948. The 1 950 's brought new 
changes to Umass. New buildings were 
constructed. They are Crabtree House, 
Leach House, Worchester Dining Hall, 
Student Union Building, Lincoln Apartment 
and Wheeler House. In 1953, Mrs. 
Roosevelt gave a speech at the eighty-ninth 
opening convocation. 






-__ .33^,* 




Wriyhl Qrulbers ut Kill) Huivk 











World War I 




Cancer's 14MW toll 
is put at 1.2 million 



R^>^^on Olobe 



WASHINGTON - More than 12 
mifflon people will be diagnosed with 
cancer, and 563.000 will die of il in 
the United States ^m year, the 
American Cancer Sociely predicted 



Lung cancer remained the lead- 
ing US cancer killer, with more than 
150.000 deaths this year, the organi- 
zation said in its annual report 

Cases were declining among 
white men, the society said- They 
were on the iirerease among women, 
probably because fewer men, but 
more women, weire arooldng. 

Cancer was the second-leading 
cause of death in the United States, 
after heart disease, the organization 
said. 

"In the US, men have a 1 m 2 
lifetime risk of developing cancer^ 
while for women the risk is 1 in 3," 
the chanty said in its "Cancer Facta 
and Figures 1999." 

"Hie organization said moat cases 
of lung cancer could be preronted if 
people stopped smoking. 

"In addition, mWiy of the more 
than one million akm cancere that 
are expected to be diagnosed in 1999 
could have been prevented by -pro- 
tection from the sun'a rays," the or- 
ganization said. 

Prostate cancer is expected to 



kUl 37,000 men this year, while 
43,300 women were expected to die 
of breast cancer, the organizatloii 
said. More than 66,000 people were 
expected to die of c<rfon cancer this 
year, and about 29,000 from cancer 
of the pancreas, it added- 

Caneer screening has saved Eves, 
the report said. Better screening for 
colon cancer has helped bring about 
a steady reduction in deaths. 

In a second r^wrt, on cancer 
risk, the society said diet was re- 
sponsible for about 30 percent of all 
cases of cancer. 

It said more Americans knew 
they should eat at least five servings 
of ftuits and v^retables a day - 3S 
percent in 1998 compared to 8 
percent in 1991. And more Ameri- 
cans actual^ were eating healthy 
foods, less meat, and fewer w*rfc-fiat 
dairy products, the organization 
said. 

But no state met the charitys 
goal oi hsvmg 50 percent of its 
adults eating the five recommended 
daily servings of fiiiits and vegeta- 
bles. 

The organization said it also 
would like to see the number of over- 
weight Americans reduced from the 
current 65 percent to 20 percent 
Obe^ty has been associated with 
cancer of the gall bladder, breasta, 
cervix, prostate, and colon. 






Record heat in 1998 



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Mng lanpoMnw an tethd ni- 

' W3 set » new rw«rd by s Hide HMJ^ 
eui. NASA said 



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fe evidence of global wanning, NASA savs 

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'/s ift-e oniy thinf) tltat matters ivhethsr 
you're a good test taicer? . . . What are zm saying to fcitfe ?' 



MSaUN HOL MKOOiniWDfB DEsaAW Mn ' 



7s the only thing that matters whether 
''re a good test taker? . . . What are «oe saying to kids? 



MtSSMM HU. SOMMl FOUMJER OOKHUH MOER 







1998 y 





«w»» ^;^ **^ m #;' *»«F , *** » w» 






Coach Mark Whipple led the Minutemen to the National Division 1-A/ 
versity Eagles in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The team won by a score of 55 
school record for the most single-season wins. The team was anchored b] 
hope for the future with sophomore tailback Marcel Ship, who proved him 




National Champio^ 




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hampionship game against the top-rated, undefeated Georgia Southern Uni- 
] by finishing with a field goal. The team had a terrific 12-3 record setting a 
11- American captains Khari Samuel and Kerry Taylor, and the team has great 
ilf as one of the most talented runners in the country. 



Congratulations, UMass Minuteman Marchin| 







J^ 



As one parent quotes: "This was a very special year which cannot be repeated. Th 
band in the nation to win it and it cannot be awarded more than once to the sam 



5 and! 



¥^m^^' 







8 

iludler Trophy is the highest honor a marching band can receive. UMASS is only the 1^ 
chool. This was an extraordinary accompHshment." 



Mullins 




Tori Amos 





Alanis Morrisette 



The William D. Mullins Cer 
ter opened its doors in Jam 
ary 1993. Since that time, th 
Mullins Center, with it 
10,000 seating capacity ha 
become a mecca for both att 
letics & entertainment o 
campus. A new students fir; 
visit to the Mullins Centc 
occurs the first night whe 
Freshmen attend convocatioi 
an introduction & welcome t 
the university. At games ger 
erations past and present joi 
together to cheer on the horn 

team, (article continued) 



n the past, performers have included Tori 
^os, Alanis Morrissette, & Kom. Lots of 
leople ascend onto the Mullins Center floor 
very fall to search for bargains at the yearly 
. Crew sale. Lastly, through the year, many 



Candlebox 



KRS-ONE at Spring Concert '99 




Students use the Olympic size ice rink at- 
tached to the Mullins Center for free skat- 
ing. The students and Alumni that attend 
events at Mullins Center create memories 
that will last a lifetime. 

By: Cynthia M Gargano 




Soul Coughing 

B-Real of "Cyprus Hill" at 
Spring Concert '99 








f^^^^S^^^^^^m-'' 









^^»f 




® *^ ''^ 1 _ 





\ 




Fine Arts 
Center 



The Center Series presents 
international artists in perfor- 



mances that entertain, inform 



and challenge it's audiences. 




From the excitement re- 



flected in a standing ovation 
to the personal contact with 
some of the worlds renowned 
artists, the Center Series 
seeks to elevate the human 



spirit. 



Class of 1878 
Time Capsule 

Content List 

Poem - delivered at the planting of CLASS 
TREE '78, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College -June 19, 1877 by Charles Francis 
Coburn '78 

Signatures - as listed in the Nov. 1976 In- 
dex , Junior Class of '78 

Future Words - handwritten pages, (see 
below) 

Program - M.A.C. '78, Programme of Ex- 
ercises at the Planting of the Class Tree - 
June 19, 1877 

Business Card - J.L. Lovell, (father of 
Charles Otto Lovell '78) 

Annual Report - 12th annual Report of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, Jan. 
1875 

The Index of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College V ol. VIII/No. 1, pubhshed by 
the Junior Class '78, Nov. 1876. 



Excerpt taken from the "Future Words" 

"If we apply ourselves to this develop- 
ment of our agriculture manufacture and 
commerce and elevate the moral and in- 
tellectual tone of the people then we may 
indulge the hope that our country will 
ever be the abode of peace and prosper- 
ity, the seat of learning and the arts. Our 
nation has but begun to work out her 
possibilities richly endowed by nature 
the wealth of her resources remains to 
be harvested..." 



This page is in 
memory of all 
those we have 
lost in some way 
this academic 
year: 

Friends, family, 
acquaintances, 
peers, and other 
loved ones 

Let us carry their 
dreams and 
hopes to make a 
better future with 
us OS we travel 
down the road of 






', . Wit-'- ■ 





IW2 1975T^4 19 . 
)61 1962 1963 1^64 





elp stop # 

1 fVlass pri 



Generation #6 



As we moved towards the future, more 
changes were bom. Southwest was constructed 
between the years of 1 964 and 1 966. Whitmore 
erected in the years of 1966-1967. Imagine paying 
$200.00 in-state tuition in 1967-1968. More 
buildings were bom, tuition and enrollment climbs 
at the end of this era. In-state tuition was $952.00 
and enrollment was 25,838. Umass is really on its 
way with 166 clubs and organizations. Umass is 
flying towards a bigger and better school. 




uUJJIffS 



1 07^:1 d^.^'i''liii' 





f '• t 



jCeadership Jnmdship Service 

Aa)Q 

J^ational Semce Jmtemitij 

'Ikdkatni to the bettammt of hwmnity tkwu^h ((>mmimity savin on the 
Itxai mtmtal, mtd global stale. 




THE BROTHERS OF THE KAPPA OMICRON CHAPTER WISH TO 

CONGR^VrUIwVIE THE CIASS OF 1999, ESPECIALLY THE SENIORS 

WHO DEDICATED THEIR COLLEGE LIVES TO OUR NOBLE CAUSE. 



Seniors: 



Chad Bcdaid 
Andrea Grimes 
Joe Santoro 
Jeff Carson 



Sara Dalamangas 
Jasper Moiien 
Justine Spinazola 
Wendy Mrozek 



Doug Fitzgerald 
Jeff Moss 
Greg Taylor 




Good Luck and We'll Miss You !!!! 

In Lcadersliip, Friendship and Service, 














Since 




The University of 

Massachusetts 

Outing Club started 
in 1922 with less than 15 
members. Today, 77 
years later, the Outing 
Club has over 400 
members a year and can 
claim the Title of being 
the largest Registered 
Student Organization on 
the Campus. Along being 
the largest, it is the oldest 
The Outing Club's 
mission is to introduce 
our members and the 
UMass community to the 
outdoors in a fun, safe, 
educational and cost- 
effective manner. 
Each year the club 
sponsors a multimedia of 
activities that people from 
all walks of life can take 
part in. Whether it's 
learning how to roll a 
kayak on Friday nights in 
the Curry Hicks pool, or 
attending one of our slide 
shows. There's more than' 
enough that you can take 
advantage of! 



WE Take PEopIhE Out in The Woods 
AND Do Thincbs With Them 




Li 

BuckNaked 




Alumni Cabin 

The 1/«<A44 0*ii*^ Oi*>t owns a 
beautiful Alumni Cabin in 
Bethlehem, NH. The Cabin 
project was conceived in the 
Spring of 1976 by a group of 
enthusiastic and energetic 
UMOCer's. The cabin is 16' by 
40' with sleeping space 
approximately 20 people in the 
upstaii-s loft. A wood burning 
stove that is centrally located in 
the main room downstairs heats 
the cabin. Propane supplies the 
energy source for cooking and 
lighting. A fully supplied kitchen 
with running water from our 
spring well is available. There 
are many things to do in the 
vicinity. 



To contact the Outing Club: 
Office: 545-3131 
Equipment Locker: 545-2020 
Email: outing(5).stuaf.umass.ecJu 
Web page: www-unix.oit.umass.edu/' 



-outing 




page created by Howard Asher 



UMass Republican Club 

The best party on campus! 




Some of our club members with Governor Cellucci and Lt. Governor Jane Swift. 

The UMass Republican Club participated in and organized many great events this year. 
The UMRC hosted speeches by nationally renowned attorney and author Harvey 
Silverglate and nationally syndicated columnist Don Feder. In Addition, the club 

worked tirelessly for the Cellucci/Swift Campaign, through standouts, literature drops 
and attending debates. They also joined in the celebration of the Governor and Lt. 

Governor's victory party at the Boston Park Plaza and the Inaugural Ball. Other Club 

events included the annual Christian Herter Awards reception, the Club Trip and much 

more. 

1998-1999 Officers 

President - Christopher Brittain 
Immediate Past President - Paul Ferro Vice President - Mike Marin 

Treasurer - Jared Brooslin Secretary - Nick Tzitzon 

Membership Dir. - Amy Pellegrino 5-College Rep - Mike Rossettie 

Congratulations to tho Class of 1999 \ 

The UMass Republican Club 

www.umass.edu/rso/republcn 



STUDENT UNION CRAFT CENTER 




We are the S. U. Craft Center located in the Student Union basement across from the 
Hatch. We are the place to learn crafts like silver jewelry making, beading, leather, stain 
glass, batik, tie-die, sewing, photo developing, marbleizing and origami. We have a very 
fiiendly student staff who offers free instructions and free access to tools. We give 
workshops every week in various crafts. We cordially invite to become a member of this 
wonderful resource. 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1999! 




OUR HOURS 

Tuesday- Thursday: 1 1 AM- 5 PM 
Friday: 1 1 AM- 6 PM 

Saturday - Sunday: 1 PM- 6 PM 



S.U. CRAFT CENTER 

www.umass.edu/rso/craftctr/ 

(413) 545 20 96 





■^■■J- 



DELTA ZETA 



SENIORS 1999 

Looking back on days gone by, all the things that we've been through. 23 

girls now stand as one, and our times together just begun. We were brought 

into this house, to learn to love, we've laughed, we've cried. We've changed 

somewhat from what we were...dif ferent people, different lives. We can not 

believe now that it's over and we know that we are growing closer. It ail 

goes back to Delta Z! You've become a second home to me. 

Trying to keep our tears inside, in the future when we're apart. Memories 

will make us smile, of sisters we hold in our hearts. Someday when we're old 

and gray, with our kids will reminisce...Of our Delta Zeta days and all the 

faces that we'll miss. And how we wished it would last forever, how 

comfortable we were together. It all goes back to Delta Zl Friends and 

love, will always be a special memory! 




"^^'^i 



Aimee Acerra 
Sara Binder 
Anne Chaney 
Ivy Cohen 
Amy Edclstein 
Kristen Sellman 
Lisa Goldschmidt 
Ilysalvler 
Greer Julien 
Royce Liber man 
Kim Nathan 



Jann Neumann 
Nicole Pierson 
Lauren Piatt 
Kim Raulsome 
liana Reiser 
Alysa Romeo 
Beth Seligman 
Meena Tondravi 
Stefanie Weinstein 
Alyssa Weinstock 
Michelle Yelencovich 
Volenti na Zuman 



Here's to the guys we loved! Here's to the guys that loved us! 
But to the guys that we loved, that didn't love us, - — them, 
Here's to usi DZ Sisters, bamn straight! 




91.1 _ ^ ^ ^ 91.1 

WMUA 

±e progressive alternative in the Pioneer Valley 

FM FOR REQUESTS CALL 545-FM91 FM 





FM91. WMUA would like to congratulate All the 

seniors. 

Dave duCille - Programmer/ D J Training Director 
Mike Corey - Sports Director 
Matthew Perrult - Sports Director 
Jill Ouellette - Promotions Director 
Jessica Wilson - Women's Affairs Director 
Dan Backer - Fund Drive Director 

Thank You for the Good Times!! 



HAPPY BIRTHDAY FM91, WMUA 
You are 50 years old this year. 



That's 50 years of the Students Voice in the 

Pioneer Vallev !! 




Good Luck and Good Health to 
r All Graduating Seniors! 



The Student Nurses Association 





There are over 200 diverse organiza- 
tions on the University of Massachu- 
setts at Amherst campus. 

Which one have you represented, 

been a part of, or an ally with? 

What part of the community will you 

remember years from now? 



Sophomores Michelle 
Kehyaian (foreground) and 
MeHssa Swift are intense on 
completing onhne Chemistry 
homework. 



Peer Educators "Not Ready For 
Bedtime Players" show off their 
condom-covered bananas. 



I 





Sophomore Todd Casagni and Senior 
Grace Blackwell secure the area for 
alien intruders. 



Swing dance with Style! 



(When t-wifigfit sfiacfo-ws cfcepcn 

and the stucf-^ ^°^^ cfra%vs nigh, 

^Wficn shades of nigfit are JaCfing 

and the evening breezes sigfi, 

'cJ'is then we fove to gather 

'neath the pafc moon's sifVr-^ speff 

^d fijt our hearts antf voices 

in the songs -we fove so -weff. 

f^ejraiii: 

30ns of QC i^ssachusetts, tfevotetf CJ)aughters true; 

CQai State. Qf ^«y Stat"^. 

we give our best to -^ou. 

c5"hec, our ^ma f^ter, we'ff cherish Jor all time, 

shouW auld acquaintance be Jorgot 

iXpssachusetts, -^ours ancf mine. 



^tfaptecf Jrom '^rcd'^J). QrlQQS 




Experiences 



170 gife is 




c^fe is 171 



cTfte 1998-1999 





^^ 


m 




IIM» 


d^M^ 


?1 


^HmK^' ' ^ MaM^ '^«K»-:c:> 


■ ' 


tPL .:jHiB 








%:f 




Madonna says, "Strifee a pose!" 
Index staff goof off after a long day! 



Hmmm...is that an elephant on top of the 
Student Union roof? 




Ifvonne ^ng 





i^EcfUor - in - CliieJ 



QJJice 'J'^^nai^zr 




CJ^usiness and cpuGficity 






^he 1998-1999 




Copy fEcfitor 



Ai^on Qchor 
^yout fEcfitor 



ndcx Qiaff 



Cyntfiia 0argano 





c 

o 
P 

y 

Staff 



gFiiHey ^^\^c'J)onaf(( 






cpRoto <Ecfitor 



o 



^h^b 



t 



See ya in the next millenium! 



o 



graphers 



(patron (up to $50) gponsor ($50-75) benefactor ($75 and up) 



T hank 



Apiy O^ro, wFiom Tm proucf to say made it through coCfege with honors, thanx Jor Jriencfship since ^.g. 
Sarah Yadeta and Mary Franck for always calling me in the Index office to make sure I was still alive 

Judij C^jcignon, Index advI^OT; |"or suppoTting U9 Cj^ being tne ever cneerj-ul morning pairLj sprite 

Delphine Quarles and Jose Tolson, up in Campus Activities, for smiles, Smalltalk, & believing in the Index legacy 

C£)avor cphotography, cine., especiaCf-y flS[ei[ "Wierfmon, Jor working with the '^ndex Sj, giving us a hefping hancf whene-ver we neecferf 

LJove Qti ocrndii |<^otri, N^cil?wortn l-JuDns-ning C_,o. reprefentcitives, [or understanding Qp going tne /\-hva mile [or tne Index 

Walsworth Publishing Company for the 1999 Gallery of Excellence Award, also awarded to the 1996 Index 



Stacy Sportsman and Lori 
for all the help over 

^ichaef SXjf^'wski, senior 
[ibrar-^ paCace in the sk-y, 
wealth oj knowlecfge -you 

special V_ollection9 ana 
I ibrarLj |"or tne ufe o|" 

Isabel Iglesias, mother 

support strength, & 

should hctve) given to 




Cavanah, WPC representatives, 
numerous phone calls 

archives assistant in that 25th jToor 
Jor letting legacies live on with the 
hoW antf share 

A-c^ive. of V.e.B. Du Boi. 
nistoricdl pnotograpn? 

of Alex Iglesias'99, for the 
kindness (that every parent 
the Index & me 



Robert N. Brooks, ~ ~ " Director of Student Affairs 

Special Services, who we promised we'd keep the answering machine on for, thanx for taking the time to include us in the 

DM community 

Chanceffor C[)avi(f ^K^gcott Jor being active on campus 

To various organizations, publications, & UM students - without them most of this yearbooks information wouldn't have 
been possible. ..to find out more updated information in our fickle world, check out these websites: 

www.dailycollegian.com www.umass.edu/chronicle www.umass.edu/newsoffice www.umassalumni.com 

[jcive -Pinlt?, pkoto editor, for doing tde best he could even tliough | 4elled at him a thou<rand times 

cfhe cincfex staJJJor taking an adventurous dive into the unknown waters ojthe ^ndex and surviving (baref-^) 

And all the hundred others who played an essential part in the Index Yearbook and my insanity. .Kara 
Paige Vautour, Hussiana M, Edson R, Andrea Grimes, Peter DiIlion...you people know who 
you are! 




ou 



^HoW onto -your dreams, 

Yvonne ^ng 

'Editor-in-Cfi'^J 



iy»i lysz iy»:) 1^54 iy» 
1991 1992 1993 1994 19 

1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 
1991 1992 1993 1994 If^ 

1981 1982 




.«^ WV.ip<V 



IIIIIIV 



1991 1992 \9m 1994 1 

1981 1982 198M984 198 
1991 1992 1993 1994 1 

1981 1982 1983 1984 198 
1991 1992 1993 1994 1 

1981 



1981 



1981 



1981 





m'^^r^^^m^Mf' 



1981 1982 1983 1984 1 
1991 1992 1993 199 

1981 1982 1983 1984 1 
1991 1992 1993 199 

1981 1982 1983 1984 
1991 1992 1993 199 

1981 1982 1983 1984 




Generation #7 

In the history of Umass, we truly have come a long 
way. We went from a small school to a big well 
known school. From 1983 to the present not much has 
changed but we all have grown to become better 
people. In the years of 1983-1991, the tuition rises 
and so does the enrollment. The new change that 
made its turn was when in 1991, Umass Dartmouth 
and Lowell was added to the system. In 1992, the 
enrollment drops from 24,474 to 23,125. The future is 
still untold. Who knows what will happen twenty 
years from now. The school is on its way to new 
things and better things. What are they? We can only 
sit back and watch. 




4 
t 




Where did all the time go? 
...into memories and legacies 




I once said Ihat 
|iothirig would 
change but it has... 
through the differ- 
ence I make with 
my mind, 
my heart, 
my eyes, 
and 
my hands... 





Remember to live life and 
when you feel lost. . . 
find a garden of peace 
and tranquilty, 
close your eyes, 
breathe deeply, 
think happy thoughts, 
and fly away... 










P^rf'.^fi: 





History and it's 
mysterious truths 
can be learned 
only if we \ 

choose to I 

discover them... 








We can be the 
and peacemak 
our future 



we can be the 
destroyers of 
generation... 

choose your 
adventure... 




ut tfirougR intcractiions wnth others," ^^irfrca primes, 



creators 
^rs of 




'^c arc all interconnected in some wav so what you do nc 






wiff affect the future and anything you care for/ 



,2001 




Remember when... 





/ Hat ma^l^^n end to some 
may be al)eginnmg for others... 




'"'''' ■>v~-'-" 




£, oNQRATULATIOif ^ 



CLASS OF 1 





^Of^Ik^ 




FEOM EVEEVOKE at THE 
CiMiPUS ACTIVITIES OFFICE! 

4^ fr^} 




»'iyi>^ 












Congratulations 

Adam! 

...On Your Graduation Day 

A new chapter in your life is about to begin. 
May your future dreams be as rich and fruitful as 
your college years were. We are so proud of you 
and your accomplishments. The strong will, 
determination and discipline you have shown will 
take you far in life. From the pain of a broken foot 
one year to a shattered finger the next your 
determination and focus is what made you succeed 
in college and is what will steer you in the right 
direction in the real world. Be happy always and 
know that our love and support are constantly with 
you. 

Mom, Dad and Tami 



imib 




;S«5M 









■^ 



M 









#^ 
MM 









Gregory, 



riav you have 



love in vour heart, 



and music in vour soul 




Always follow your dreams. 

The best is yet to be. 

Love, 
riom. Dad, Tanva 



Congratulations J e[[, 



We're all so very proud of you! 
We love you- 

nom, Dad, Brian 



Congratulations [y^r\CY\0 , 

You're the world's 
greatest teacher. We are 

all proud of you! 

Love, Mom, Dad, 
Ray and Rachel, and Rob 












» 

WM 

w^^ 
fe 

Wm 



Elizabeth Kurz, 

Congratulations - 

Cherish the good memories! 

Good Luck, follow your heart 

and your dreams, and 

keep your beautiful smile. 

God Bless You Always, Betsy. 

Love, 
Mom, Dad, Kathy & Jim 




V""" 




Great job Craig, we are 
all proud of your 
accomplishment 

Love Mom, Dad + Cami 








ERIC 



Congratulations, Graduate 1 



f 



You 've come a long way to reach this 
special day in your life. 

We are so very proud of what you have 
accomplished. 

May you always enjoy the success you 
deserve. May this be the start of many special 
times in your life. 

Along with hard work, be sure to take time 
to enjoy your interests and keep on mountain 
biking! 

Love you so much, 

Mom, Erin and "The Friends" 





Alex, 



te felicito por tus logros en estos 4 anos tan 
excitantes y maravillosos, llenos de recuerdos. 
Que Dios y tu Angel de la Guarda te bendigan 
simpre. 

Mucha suerte en el future y te quiere mucho, 



AU 



e\a 



£a 








lYSA IVI.ER 

We are very proud of you. 

With love, 
Mom, Dad, Paisley, Pinwheels 



Tammy, 

We are so proud of you! 
You've come a long way. We love 
you more than peanut butter and jelly 
and even chocolate chip cookies, 



Love, Mom & Dad 



0000 

xxxx 



lason Plueinski 




We wish )/ou a happy 
& succesful "Ride" 

Love. 
Mom, Dad, & Sadie 




Kristin, 

Congratulations on all you have 
accomplished. Your successes are many. 
We are very proud of you and love you 
very much. Always follow your heart. 
Dreams are meant to come true. 

Love 

Mom Dad Erin Brian 



Dear C I N A 

Congratulations to one of the loveliest girls in 

the word. 

During your undergraduate years, you have 

remained focused on your goals and we are 

confident that you will continue to do so. You 

can look back on your accomplishments with 

pride. 

Although the UMASS experience is coming to 

an end, the memories created will last you a 

lifetime. 

As you graduate, we want to wish you sucess in 

your future endeavors and all the happiness you 

deserve. 

Congratulations Graduate- We are 
proud of you, 

Love, 

Isabel, Manny, Alex and Liana. 




s^^ 





Dear Alex, 

What a fabulously gratifying experience. Through perserverance and 
commitment you have achieved another one of your goals, and as you graduate, you 
should feel a sense of pride in your accomplishments. 

You became a part of your school, and as always, your contagious spirit and enthusiasm 
made us feel part of it too. Your four years at UMASS were very exciting. However, 
nothing can top the excitement of your senior year, with the marching band receiving 
the Sudler Trophy, and subsequently traveling to Tennessee to play during the football 
team's first ever national championship. 

Your dream of being part of a big marching band came true at UMASS, where you 
played in the best marching band anywhere. We loved traveling everywhere to watch 
the band performances. It was great fun and a tremendous source of pride. Thanks 
for those warm memories. 

Alex, we are so proud of your achievements. Continue to reach your goals. Follow 
your dreams with confidence and may you find happiness and success along the way. 
Don't lose your passion for living and always keep the sparkle in your eyes alive. 

Congratulations Graduate! 



With all our love, 
Mom, Dad and Liana 










(mi 






SI 



Congratulations Erica! 

As another adventure in your life 
begins, go out and see what is out 
there. And always, remembe r that our 
love is with you. 



Love always 
Mom+ Dad 





ratulations, Jf n 

Youvc reached a milestone 

iovo, 
V\om, Adam + Matt 



Congratulations, 

STEVE! 

We are VERY PROUD 
of you. 



ove. 



^om, /\ an, C^ /\d 



am 



^P 



Pi 

w 
a 



i 









1^' 









We are so proud of 
all that you are and 
all that you will 
become! I 

Congratulations to 
&mg and to the 
class of 1999. 

Love, 
Mom, Dad + Brian 



How very simple life would be 
If only there were two of me... 
The Restless Fellow always wins 
I wish my folks had made me twins. 

Twins of you wouldn't have been bad. 

Love Always, Mom and Dad. 




^ti^ 



Love 

Mom, Dad & Chris 



Congratulations ! 

Allan 



'i^idhii'j'sMMM 





i 

i 



4 






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uh 



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Congratulations, 

Graduate ! 

Life's worth the struggle. 

Bunmi 




Love, 
Mom 
and 
Families 



{LoKQRATLiLPCriONS KIMMV 




and all ljoui hcwe GCCCNmphshed 
C-pcc\ K-icx vi'ilh ijolU A„iUir(L 

STfW TkU^ Tc VOURSELT- 



Christian, 






' ^t'A 










KK9 



For all the smiles 

you've brought and 

everything you've 

done, THANK YOU. 

For all the 

accomplishments 

you've made and the 

things you've 

overcome, 

CONGRATULATIONS 

I wish you every happiness and many 

more smiles. 

Love, and hugs always, 

Jenn 



JRSON R. PIERRNGELI 

STOCKBRIDGE SCHOOL - 1 999 

Jay, Congratulations! 

We're so proud of you. 

Love, 

Mom & Dad 



'J 



Steve, 

Congratulations, graduate! 
We are all proud of you for your 
persistance and perserverance during 
the accomplishment of this great 
pursuit. 

Love, 
Dad, Mom, Mamere, Ann 
Marie, and Maureen 






!S5S 







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irSS-a^KKt; 






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si 




Congratulations!! 



Stacey Beth Lehrer 
Class of '99 

We are so very proud of you and love 
you very much. Wishing you all the 
best life has to offer 
now and forever! 

Mom, bad, and Jessica 




aUuiiiiiifiaUHi 



Congrats to 



Class of '99 

--from a parent'^ 



b 



Congratulations 1 9^ D © 

Love 

^J^m and ^ad 



i 

s 



m 



Dear. Melanie, 

We are so proud of you. We know 

you were a winner when we first laid 

eyes on you. With God's help you made 

it. Continue to be strong in the Lord, 

and the the power of His Might. 

Love, 

Mom and Dad 




m 



Congratulations, 

Philip J. Miner 

YouVe worked hard and 

have come a long way. We 

are very proud of you. 

Love, Mom and Dad 



Dearest Isadora 

Congratulations on your 

graduation. 

With pride and love, 

Mom, Dad, Vanessa & 

Genevieve xxx 



WBtHS? 







Squeege: 

Follow your heart and its own special beat. 



Congratulations with Enormous Love, 



Dad, Jan, Lexi, Amy, Michael & Molly 



m&^mmms^Ms^^ff^ 








SCOTT 



It's not just what you've done 
that makes us so proud. It's 
what you are ! You are one 
terrific kid. 

Love 

HoiTi and David 

Dad and Eileen 

Jordan and Nicole 




Congratulations, 



Jordan 



We are proud of you and wc love you, 




"If mu5ic be the food of \ovc, 
play on" 




We are proud of you and all your 

accomplishments. May your future be 

filled with joy, love, and success. 

Love 



^^Mpm and /^im 





pi 




^ 



Dear Beth, 
CONGRATULATIONS GRADUATE! 

We are so Proud of Your 

ACHIEVEMENT. 

Persistence, Determination, and Hard Work Paved 

the Way. 

May Your Future Bring You 

HAPPINESS, HEALTH A JOY. 

WE LOVE YOU! 
Monr^, Dad, and Sharon 



Mm 



?&im 



^»"^» 




Turn around and you're grown. My baby is graduating. 
Best wishes and God bless you now and always, Michael. 



Love, 

Mom and P.L.R. 



Khrystine, 

Words cannot express our pride, our 
happiness, and our respect for you. 
You are so special and wonderful, 
and now you have accomplished a 
dream. 

Wishing you all the sucess and good 
things you deserve, with much love 
and heartfelt congratulations, 

^fubfa Shirley, Suzanne Jay, 
Priscilla Adissa, and AJ 



To Steffy 



No Father can love or be more 
proud of His Daughter than I am 
this moment. 

Love 

Dad 



VlCKy-We are all so proud of 

your accomplishments. Our 
wish for you is that you will 
always feel secure & loved, that { 
you will be happy with 
yourself, &. know that you are 
the best. Congratulations! We 
love you! 

Mom, Dad &. Andrea 




Congratulations 

We are proud of your 
academic and SGA 
accomplishments . 

May all your Hopes be 
fulfilled and May all your 
Dreams come true. 

Love, 

Mom, Dad and Elaine 








gb the Cgest Sister cjn the Worfcf 

Congratufations on your graduation Jrom 
<XJSX^ssf <We are so proucf oj^ou. ^^We 
[ove ^ou. 

^ve- 

cjonatFian ancf <^rian 






mi 

m 

■ 

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^J% •^ ry* #j* w^ w^ *j* "T* *»• *Ti* *T* if* 'T* *T* 'T* *T* *T* *T* *T* ^T* 'T* *T* *** *t* 'V* *T* 'T* *T* 'T* *T* *»• *T* *T* 



Dear Kristea 

A daughter is a special gift 

God gives a Mom and Dad 
We've always known that we were 
blessed with the little girl we had 

Your smile's so warm and loving, 

it can brighten up our day 
Your kind and tender nature..., 
You always know just what to say. 

As a daughter you are priceless. 
As a sister, you're the best. 
The depth of love we feel for you. 
cannot truly be expressed. 




Four years ago we brought you 

as a freshmen to UMass. 
The years have flown and now it's timt 

for graduation with your class. 

May happiness surround you 

in everything you do. 
You deserve the best of everything, 

Kristen, we love you. 



Congratulations ! 
All our love- 
Mommy and Daddy 



Si 



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r^^l'i53?^>'^?t^^?^R^ip^Tf^?^5^^^^^^5^^)5|^ffjC^??T5^^^?y 



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Congratufations, Caryn 
on a job wcff done. 



You have continued to 
make us very proud. 
We have enjoyed 
sharing all of your 
special moments 
with you and look 
forward to so many 
more. 

May music be in your 
life forever. 




CLASS OF 1999 
CONGRATULATIONS! 

Five Oaks Contruction Co., 

Inc 



Love, 

£Mpm, *J)a(f, 3^ssi, Qma and (grandma 



'AD MAIORA 6t MELIORA' 
Wc arc 50 proud of you. 

OVG/ 

Mom, Dad, and Marc 




Cogratulations Meghan 

Love 
Mom & Dad 



UMASS THEATRE GUILD, THE GREATEST OF 
ALL STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Congratulations Lindsey, 

Tara, Haimc, Dan and all 

the other UMass Theatre 

Guild seniors!! 

May all your dreams come true. See 

you on the big screen. 

gow. qxidi 



Adam. 




the Good Life is over 
...Time for a job! 

Mom & Dad 
Dino & Cody 







Congratulations, Mdtl ! 

You've managed to prevail over many obstacles and 

continuously challenge yourself to succeed! 

...who can forget the memories? 




Love 

Dad, Yvonne, 

& all those who care for Lard 




Congratulations 
Mandi 



Love, 

Mom, Dad 
Keno & Bergie 



J.J. 

We're so proud of you. 
Love Mom, Dad, B.D 



Rigger, Tom, Craig 




To Craig, 

"The baby" has earned his Degree and made us 
proud parents of college grad #5 ! You did the 
work, but we get the bragging rights ! 

Thanks for the memories of your years at U-Mass - 
of special times and special people. You've made 
us very proud. 

Congratulations with love. 

Mom & Dad 

P,S, Don't forget-everything you ever needed to 

know about life you learned in Band... 



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To 

tlie 

smartest 
Kid 
in 

New 
England. 




^ONGRATULAnONS 
TO ALL 

graduating 
Residence Liee 



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Congratulations ^^ob! 

All our love. 
Mom & Dad & Chris 



Stapf ! ! ! 



-Love- 

All future leaders that have been 

helped bv you to create a positive 

world for geRerations to come 



Jr. 



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WJW 



!SB'"?K?!!i"-JJ-'y-Ay,-y. 



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CohgratulatioHs! 

<J)irfion, and ^^¥^'m 



From Framingham - We've come so far! 

It's been a wonderful mixed bag of cherished memories! 

Wishing all of you the best of luck! 

Love, 
I vonne 



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a vegetarian collective 



EARTHFOODS CAFE is a Student Run, co-operatively managed Vegetarian restaurant 

in the Student Union, Ul\/lass. Open for Luncii l\/Ion. - Fri. 1 1am -3pm, we serve rice, 

beans, veggie, salad, soup and dessert everyday as well as a daily entree. Our rice and 

beans are always organic and veggies are all locally grown. 




Happy Graduation to our Earthlings! 

Cheryl Alper, Amy Howland, Liz Karney, Pete Parry, Sharon 
Wagner, Nate Wicka, & Johanna Wilkie 

We are going to miss you all. Your fruit won't carry over but, you can 
still get free rice & bean so come back and visit soon. 



iSUPPORT STUDENT BUSINESSES! 



I 



mi 







ONGRATULATIONS 
CLASS 
OF 
1999 



Sodexho Marriot Services 
Northeast Region 

220 Washington Avenue 

Extension 

Albany NY 12203 

518-464-11140 






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Congratulations 



to the 



Best 



and the 



Brightest 



Baystate Medical Center 

Franklin Medical Center 

Mary Lane Hospital 

VNA & HOSPICE 

Wish the Class of 1999 

The best of luck in future endeavors. 



BajstatelMth system 



! 



I 



t 







24 Hour Towing 
Parts Locating Service 



(413) 549-0828 
FAX (413)549-1322 



AMHERST TOWING & AUTO PARTS 



For parts ask for Leon 

OLD SUNDERLAND ROAD 
N. AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS 01059 



L 



Congratulations Class of 1999 

Fleet National Bank 

1 South Pleasent St. 

Amhurst, MA 01002 

(413)582-6356 



One Stop Shopping, Dining 
and Entertainment 



(413)586-5700 




Route 9, Hadlcy 



Vlndvifiatyoa'tBlook^jbr 




Maria M. Roman 
Assistant Manager 

420 Riverylade Drive • Amherst, MA 01 002 

(413) 253-7377 • Fax i4l3l 236-8161 

millvalley®worldnet.att.com 

TTY- 1-800-439-2370 




I6-G Brandywinc Drive 
Amherst, Ma 01002 
Tel (413)549^600 
Fax (413) 549-1319 



Andrew Newcomb 
Property Manager 



World Tech Travel 

19 Elm St. 
Springfield, MA 011 03 

(413)732-3153 
fax (413)737-6057 

Congatulatlons Class of 1999 




Thank You for Your Business, 
and GOOD LUCK 
In ail your endeavors. 



WATROBA'S 

P.O. Box 9674 • North Amherst, MA 01059 • 549-0933 



s 
o 

X 

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MICHELIN-BANDAG-GENERAL'COOPER-YOROHAMA 

PETE'S TIRE BARN'S INC. 
978-544-881 1 

Serving Central New England 
Passenger, Truck, Farm and Earthmover Tires 



CD 
> 

Z 

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o 
6 

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MICHELIN«BANDAG«GENERAL-COOPER-YOROHAMA 




Congratulations Class of 1999 




U of M Bus Garage 
Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 

545-0056 



IWWS 




4ii^£i^.m!:!i}^:i^^Mi^i^!^J^H&misai^'d^, 



TEL. (4 13)583-6628 
FAX (4 13) 583-5187 



^sfa 'gxiQinnh Palkts 8c ^kths, ^nc. 



P.O. BOX 342 

250 WEST ST. 

LUDLOW, MASS. 01056-0342 



MARTIN 
MILIiWOBK. INC, 

983 Page Boulevazd 

Springfield. MA 01 104 

788-9634 




SATURN 



Saturn of Hadley 



40 Russell St. (Route 9) 
Hadley, MA 01035 
(413)584-4600 
Fax 584-0606 



A-Z STORAGE RENTALS, INC. 


/ 


413-527-9640 


\ 






/ 


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f 


7 




PROFESSIONAL • BUSINESS • PERSONAL 


RO. Box 628 Easthamplon, Ma. 01027 

Three Convenient Locations On Rt. 10 

AZ I & HI Easthamplon/Norlhamplon Town Line 
AZ H Easlhampton/Southampton Town Lino 




Con^rattuations 
Class ot 

1997 

Ken Lopez; Book Seller 

51 Huntington 

Hadley 

413-584-4827 



Greenfield QB-GYN Associates 



•William E. Callahan, M.D. 
•William B. Murray, M.D. 
•Ann M. Corrinet, CNM 
•Elizabeth A. Grob, CNM 



Well Woman Care, Family Planning 

Full Maternity Care & Body Sculpting 

With Tumescent Uposuction 



196 N. Pleasant Street 
Amherst, MA 01002 



(413) 256-1444 



ALLSTON 

Supply Company, Inc. 



Custodial Maintenance Supplies 

"Dedicated to Clean Living" 



2220 Main Street 
Springfield, MA 01 104 



1-800-628-4452 
Fax (413) 737-9251 




Contemporary Family Dining 

Route 1-91 rotary. Greenfield, MA 

(413)774-2857 






^M^MM^^^ 



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Saab vs. the 



Textbook 



How the real world teaches us about safety. 

No two accidents are the same. So Saab engineers 
perform more then the government-mandated number 
of crash tests. We also visit real crash sites. And we 
talk to people who have been in real accidents. This 
research helped us to create the world's first active 
Head Restraint System** designed to help prevent 
whiplash injury. Saab's quest to develop innovative 
safety features with innovative research 

■jBEsr 




PIONEERs«»»SAAB-VOLVO 



CelebnUlng SO yeara In cuatomer tot^factionl 

413-665-2140 

1-800-680-2140 



ROUTES 5 no 
DEERFIELD 



MON.-FRI. 9-5:30 
SAT. 9-5 * SUN. 12-5 



^v^r^-% 




''^;^kc/s^ 



!^^ 



CUSTOMER SERVICE 

1-800-638-TERM (8376) 

FAX# 413-733-0827 



ELECTRO-TERM. INC 

90 MEMORIAL DRIVE 

SPRINGFIELD. MA Oil 04 

TEL. (413) 734-6469 



SANI-CANINC 



295 Pasco Road, Indian Orchard, MA 
543-282" ^ 



TOWN & COUNTRY 
LIQUORS, INC. 

1119RiverdaIeRoad 

West Springfield, MA 01089 

736^694 




U^! 



y'.^>> 



c- 



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V 



Congratulations 
Class of 1998 




JOHN S. LANE & SON, INC. 

AMHERST QUARRY 

1 BSO WEST ST., RTE. I I C 

P.O. BOX 421 

AMHCnsT. MA. 01OO4 



TEL: «I3-2S3'207S 



GEORGE J. LADAS 

PLANT SUPERINTENDENT 



Telephone 584-3165 



TEMP-PRO INC. 




200 Industrial Drive 
Northampton, MA 01060 



Collective Copies 

'Congratulations Class of 1999" 

71 South Pleasant Street 
Amherst, MA 01002 



Phone: 413-256-6425 



Fax:413-253-7475 



PIONEERk^„SAAB-VOLVO 



Celebrating 30 years in customer satitfactionJ 

RouTEssiio 413-665-2140 



DEERFIELD 



l-800-680<2140 



MON.-FRI. 9-5:30 
SAT. 9-5 'SUN. 12-5 



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? 




SCHOLASTIC 
ADVERTISING, INC 



Advertising Specialists and Consultants 

providing professional sales 

and service support for 

University and College Yearbooks. 



800-964-0777 



m 



Widsworth Publishing Ckmipemy 

306 North Kansas Avenue / Marcclinc, Missouri 64658 USA 



^■5'laa/j:^ 



tDKTV* OF MASS. 

:aiichives 



OCT 25 2 



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