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Full text of "Indiana at Vicksburg"

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PUBLIC LIBRARY 

^ORT WAVNE ft ALLEN CO.. ,ND 



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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 




3 1833 00099 3243 



Gc 973.74 In2av 

Indiana. Vickse-.urg h^^ATIONAL. 

military park commission„ 
Indiana at Vicksburg 




"The Father of Waters again gees unvexed to the sea.' 



INDIANA AT VICKSBURG 



Published pursuant to an act 
of the 

SIXTY-SIXTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY 
Approved March 5, 1909. 



By the 
INDIANA-VICKSBURG MILITARY PARK COMMISSION 



Compiled by 
HENRY C. ADAMS, Jr. 

INDIANAPOr.IS 



1910 



INDIANAPOLIS : 

WM B. BURFOED, COXTKACTOR FOR STATE PRlNTfNG AND BIXDIN. 

1911 



Allen County Public Library 
900 Webster Street j 

PC Box 2270 
Fort Wayne, IN 46801-2270 



^'i^V^ 




Governor Thomas R. Marshall, Indiana. 



Letter of Transmittal. 



To Hon. Thomas R. Marshall, Governor of the State of Indiana: 

Sir — The undersigned members of the Indiana- Vieksburg Mili- 
tary Park Commission, appointed under authority of an act ap- 
proved March 2, 1907, herewith submit to you this report, showing 
in detail the work accomplished by said Commission in the erection 
of monuments commemorating the services of Indiana troops which 
participated in the campaign and siege of Vieksburg, March 29 to 
July 4, 1863. , 

This report is published as provided for in an act approved 
March 5, 1909. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Henry C. Adams, 26th Ind. Inf., President. 
George F. McGinnis, Brigadier General. 
John W. Sale, 67th Ind. Inf., Treasurer. 
Lewis C. Moore, 93d Ind. Inf. 
Maberry M. Lacey, 69th Ind. Inf., Secretary. 



(7) 



Contents. 

PAGE 

Letter of Traiismittal to Governor Marshall 7 

1 iitrodnctory 11 

Memorial, George F. McGiunis 12 

Memorial, Henry C. Adams 13 

Vicksbnrg National Military Park 15 

Vicksburg National Cemetery 23 

Indiana Circle 27 

History of the Campaigia and Siege 29 

General Summary of Casualties, March 29-Jnly 4 40 

Position Tablet Inscriptions 41 

Park Inscriptions 63 

Summary of Union Commands 138 

Summary of Confederate Commtuids 139 

Report of General U. S. Grant 143 

The Indiana Soldier at Vicksburg 173 

Regimental Histories 197 

Casualties of Indiana Commands at Vicksburg 405 

Report of the Commission 400 

Dedication Coremouies 433 

Apr>ro]n'iation Act 467 

Acknowledgement 469 

List of Illustrations 470 

Index 472 




^3 c.tAOO 

COLUMBUS.INO. 



FT.V/AYNE,INO. 



Indiana-Vicksburg Military Pfirk Commission. 



Introductory. 



To our comrades, fallen and surviving, who served at Vieksburg 
in '63 this volume is affectionately dedicated. As servants of our 
State and representatives of the soldiery involved, we have en- 
deavored to fittingly perpetuate in granite and bronze the memory 
of your services in the trenches and on the line of battle during 
that long struggle with a worthy foe. 

The monuments herein described have been located at advan- 
tageous points along the avenues of the beautiful national park, 
and fifty-three markers placed at the camp sites, on the sharpshoot- 
ers' line, and at positions of farthest advance occupied by the vari- 
ous commands during the assaults of ]\lay 19 and 22, 1863. The 
positions were in most cases determined by members of the various 
commands who accompanied the Commission on the visit to the parlc 
for that purpose, and have been authenticated by record. 

Each monument bears upon its face a lironze tablet showing the 
designation of the regiment, its commanding officers, the events 
engaged in and the casualties suffered. Unfortunately, in some 
instances there is no report of the latter. 

It was desired that the history of each command in this volume 
should have been written by a member of the organization itself, 
and in many cases this was done. When a member mlling to 
undertake this work could not be found the history was compiled 
from the reports of Adjutant 0?neral Terrell. To those who wrote 
the histories the Commission is grateful. The casualties during 
service have been compiled from Dyer's Compendium. 

Comrades, Ave should be grateful to our State; to the Legisla- 
tures of 1903, 1907 and 1909; and to Governor W. T. Durlnn. Gov- 
ernor J. Frank Hanly. and Governor Thomas R. IMarshall for their 
kindness and interest in this memorial, which is so dear to the heai-t 
of every man who stood before the besieged city of Vieksburg in 
1863. 



(11) 



3n Q^emoriam* 



General George F. McGinnis died at his home at Indianapolis, 
Indiana, May 29, 1910. 

He was born in Boston, Massachusetts, March 12, 1826. His 
youth was spent in Hampden, Maine, and Chillicothe, Ohio. He 
resided at the latter place at the time of the breaking out of the 
Mexican War. 

At the age of twenty years he enlisted in Company A, Second 
Ohio Volunteers, for service in Mexico, and received a commission 
as first lieutenant. In 1847, his term of enlistment expiring, he 
returned to his home. He was commissioned captain of Company 
K, Fifth Ohio Volunteers, and returned to Mexico. He was not 
yet of age, reaching his majority south of the Rio Grande. 

At the termination of the Mexican War he returned to Chilli- 
cothe and in February, 1850, removed to Indianapolis, residing in 
that city when the War of the Rebellion was declared. When 
President Lincoln issued the first call for troops he was one of 
the first to respond, enlisting as a private in the Eleventh Indiana 
Volunteers, Lew Wallace, colonel. He was made captain of Com- 
pany K April 16, 1861 ; lieutenant colonel, April 25, 1861. and was 
mustered out August 4, 1861, the Eleventh being for three months' 
service. The regiment immediately re-enlisted for three years, and 
he became lieutenant colonel. He was promoted to colonel Septem- 
ber 3, 1861, and was appointed brigadier general May 2, 1863. 

Commanding the First Brigade. Twelfth Division, Thirteenth 
Corps, Army of the Tennessee, he took an active part in the cam- 
paign and siege of Vicksburg, participating in the battles of Port 
Gibson and Champion's Hill, his brigade suffering heavy losses. 
-. He was mustered out at the close of the war and returned to 
Indianapolis, which city he made his home until he died. 

He was a member of the IMilitary Order of the Loyal Legion, the 
Mexican War Veterans' Association, George H. Thomas Post, G. A. 
R., the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, and was Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Indiana-Vicksburg Military Park Commission. 



(12) 



Jin Qiemotiam, 



Henry C. Adams died at his home at Indianapolis, November 
14, 1910. 

He was born in Marion County, near Indianapolis, April 8, 
1844. His boyhood was passed in Indianapolis, and when the Civil 
War broke out he endeavored to enlist. He finally gained admis- 
sion to the Twenty-sixth Indiana Volunteers, being at the time a 
few months past seventeen years, and on August 20. 1861, was mus- 
tered in as a musician in Company I, of that regiment. 

He soon gained a position in the ranks as a private soldier, and 
was appointed corporal, sergeant and first sergeant. He was com- 
missioned second lieutenant and mustered as such January 9, 1865. 
During the summer of 1865 he served as aide-de-camp on the staff 
of General M. F. Force, at Jackson, Mississippi. He was appointed 
first lieutenant on January 3, 1866, but was never mustered on this 
conmiission. 

His military service was almost wholly in the South and South- 
west: in 1861, in the Fremont campaign against Price; in 1862. in 
Missouri and Arkansas, under General Schofield; and under Gen- 
eral Herron in the battles of Prairie Grove and Van Buren, Arkan- 
sas. He was in Herron 's Division of the Army of the Frontier at 
the siege of Vicksburg, and in 1864 participated in the campaign 
and siege of Spanish Fort, Fort Blakely and i\Iobile, Alabama. 

He was mustered out of the service January 25, 1866. 

He was a member of George H. Thomas Post, G. A. R., the 
Military Order of the Loyal Legion, serving as Commander of the 
Indiana Commandery in 1909; the Society of the Army of the 
Tennessee, and President of the Indiana-Vicksbure ^Military Park 
Commissions of 1903 and 1907. 



(13) 



The Vicksburg National Military Park. 



The Act of Congress authorizing the establishment of the Vicks- 
burg National I\Iilitary Park was signed by President i\IcKinley 
February 21, 1899. In conformity with its provisions, on March 
1st of that year the Secretary of War appointed Lieut. Gen. Ste- 
phen D. Lee, C. S. Army; Capt. William T. Rigby, veteran of the 
24th Iowa Infantry, and Capt. James G. Everest, veteran of the 
13th Illinois Infantry, commissioners, for inaugurating and carry- 
ing on the work under his direction. Past Commander-in-Chief 
G. A. R. John S. Kountz was elected secretary and historian by the 
Commission, and the choice was approved by the Secretary of War. 
General Lee died iNIay 28, 1908, and Capt. Lewis Guiou, veteran of 
the 26tli Louisiana Infantry, was appointed to succeed him. Sec- 
retary and Historian Kountz died June 14, 1909. 

The park commemorates the campaign, siege and defense of 
Vicksburg, beginning March 29th and ending July 4, 1863. It con- 
tains 1,288 acres, and practically includes the fighting ground of 
the siege and defense operations, from ]\Iay 18th to July 4th. These 
consisted of two assaults by the Union army, on May 19th and 22d ; 
the siege operations of that army from May 23d to July 4th, and the 
heroic defense of the Confederate army under General Pemberton. 
The service of the Confederate army assembled after [May 14th, 
with headquarters at Jackson, JMississippi, under General Johnston, 
and the service of the part of the Union army opposed to Johnston 
during the latter part of the siege, are included in the park work. 
These outside operations and the five battles preceding the invest- 
ment of Vicksburg are described by historical tablet inscriptions. 
The siege and defense operations are commemorated in the same 
way, and also by position tablets and markers established in the 
exact places where the operations were carried on. The nature of 
the operations commemorated and marked in this way give a dis- 
tinctive character to the Vicksburg Park. The main part of the 
battlefield is bounded on the inside by Confederate avenue, closely 
following the line of defense, and on the outside by Union avenue, 
closely following the first parallel (trench) of the T^nion army. 
The park picture, therefore, has definite and exact boundaries. As 



16 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

the approiiclu's, \hv second and the third parallels of the Union 
army were made from its first trench, none of the details of the 
pictnre are mixed or confusing. The student easily follows them 
from i)()int to point with absorbing interest. The deployment of 
the two opposed armies is plainly marked on the respective avenues 
by tablets and monuments. The Confederate line of defense is 
plainly shown by 150 markers; the Union trenches and approaches 
are traced through their respective lines by 363 markers. There- 
fore, a drive in the park of a few hours gives a good idea of the 
nature and extent of the operations, the way in w^hich they were 
])ushed forward and opposed, and the names of the commands en- 
gaged on each side. 

The aggregate length of the park roadway is thirty miles, and 
includes the two principal avenues (Union and Confederate), 
eleven secondary avenues (Grant, Sherman, Pemberton, Connect- 
ing, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Pennsylvania, 
Wisconsin), thirty short circles (Jolinston, Logan, jMaloney, Pem- 
berton, Sherman, Navy, Observation, Tilghman, ^lemorial, Ala- 
bama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Illinois Memorial, Indi- 
ana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, 
Missouri, New^ York, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Ten- 
nessee, Texas, Virginia, Wisconsin), and sections of the public 
roads of this county. Five secondary avenues (Grant, Sherman, 
Kentucky, Louisiana, Pennsylvania) and the short circles give indi- 
viduality and increased appropriateness to the respective sites for 
memorials, monuments, statues and towers, that have been or will 
be, placed in the park. Sixteen bridges have been built, twelve on 
LTnion avenue, three on Confederate avenue, one at Battery Ma- 
loney ; six steel and ten reinforced concrete. 

There are 896 tablets of all kinds in the park, all by the United 
States ; 568 Union, 328 Confederate ; 30 bronze, 866 iron ; 162 his- 
torical, 197 battery, 227 Union trench markers, 150 Confederate 
trench markers, 136 Union approach markers, 19 headquarters, 5 
mortuary. The avenues, circles and sections of public roads are 
marked by 120 guideboards. The Commission has mounted 127 
guns at the old battery sites, like the ones used at each during the 
siege and defense; 65 Union, 62 Confederate, 114 field, 13 siege. 

Congress has appropriated $1,175,000 for the park, including 
$150,000 for the construction of a memorial at the Battery Self- 
ridge, commemorative of the service of the Union navy, at a cost not 
to exceed $200,000. The work has been contracted for and its total 



ViCKSBURG National Military Park. 



17 



cost will b3 less than $150,000. Fourteen States have appropriated 
for the park as follows : Alabama, $25,000 ; Illinois, $260,000 ; In- 
diana, $38,000; loAva, $150,000; Massachusetts, $5,000; ^lichi.^ari. 
$20,000; Minnesota, $25,500; Mississippi, $50,000; New Hampshire, 
$5,000 ; New York, $12,500 ; Ohio, $56,000 ; Pennsylvania, $15,000 ; 
Rhode Island, $5,000 ; Wisconsin, $130,000 ; total, $797,000. These 
appropriations provide for twelve state memorials, 159 regimental 








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fuiou Navy Tablet— Illustrative of the 896 Tablets Placed in the Park 
by the United States. 

and battery monuments (for 198 organizations) and about 274 
markers. Additional to these, Louisiana has given the park twelve 
monuments (for twenty-seven organizations), costing $1,801.80; 
Missouri, three monimients (two Union each for one organization, 
one Confederate for fifteen organizations) and three markers (tw.. 
Union, one Confederate), costing $1,230.70; Tennessee, one monu- 
ment for six organizations, costing $171; and Virginia, one monu- 
ment for the Botetourt Artillery Company, costing $690; total. 



(21 



18 



Indiana at Vicksburg. 



$3,893.50. in most cases these gifts were made in anticipation of 
and to encourage liberal appropriations by the respective legisla- 
tures for state memorials in the Vicksburg Park; in the case of 




Park Observutioii Tuwer, Three of which have been Erected 
at a cost of .$30,000. 



Louisiana, by parish police jury, city of New Orleans and individ- 
ual contributions; in all other cases, solely by individual contribu- 
tions. There are 444 memorials, monuments and markers in the 
park or under construction, by States and as gifts; 404 Union, 40 



ViCKSBURG National Military Park. 19 

Confederate. About 100 more ean be reasonably expected, from 
the other States that had organizations (number stated in each 
ease) engaged in the operations commemorated by the park, 
namely: Arkansas, 15; Florida, 3; Georgia, 21; Kansas, 1; Ken- 
tucky, 12; Louisiana, 41; Missouri, 42; Maryland, 1; North Caro- 
lina, 3 ; South Carolina, 12 ; Tennessee, 29 ; Texas, 15 ; West Vir- 
ginia, 1. Kentucky and Missouri had troops engaged in both 
armies; each, doubtless, will give the park a tine .joint memorial, 
Union-Confederate. 

Two portrait bronze statues are in plaee, both Confederate; 
Lieut. Gen. Stephen D. Lee, full length figure, given by his son and 
friends in twenty-seven States, and Brig. Gen. Isham W. Garrett, 
bust, given by his sons, S. B. and John F. Five more are assured 
for the park (L^nion: Col. William F. Vilas, full length figure, 
given by Mrs. AA^illiam F. Vilas and their daughter, INIrs. Mary 
Vilas Hanks ; Capt. Andrew Hickenlooper, full length figure, given 
by his family. Confederate: Brig. Gen. Lloyd Tilghman, eques- 
trian, given by his sons, Sidell and Frederick B. ; Lieut. Gen. John 

C. Pemberton, equestrian, given by his son, Frank R. ; Col. James 
H. Jones, bust, given by his family and friends). Eight portrait 
tablets are assured (Union: Col. Joseph J. Woods, given by his 
family; Col. James R. Slack, given by Sculptor Adolph A. Wein- 
man. Confederate, given by Louisiana parish police juries ; Gens. 
Louis Hebert and Francis A. Shoup; Cols. Edward Higgins, Leon 

D. Marks, Robert Richardson and Allen Thomas) . 

Portrait statues or tablets of Indiana field officers are desired 
as follows : 

Of division commanders. Brig. Gen. A. P. Hovey, Brig. Gen. N. 
Kimball, Brig. Gen. J. C. Sullivan (3) ; of brigade commanders. 
Brig. Gen. G^ F. McGinnis, Brig. Gen. W. P. Benton, Col. H. D. 
Washburn, Col. D. Shunk, Col. J. R. Slack (portrait tablet se- 
cured). Col. J. Keigwin, Col. W. T. Spicely, Col. J. L Alexander 
(8) ; of field officers, Lieut. Col. W. Swaim, 24th, mortally wounded 
May 16th • Maj. J. C. Jenks, 18th, mortally wounded May 22d; :\raj. 
J. H. Finiey, 69th, mortally wounded May 22d (3) ; total for Indi- 
ana, 14. -PI 

It is reasonable to expect, in the near future, and as gifts by 
relatives and friends, statues of Generals Grant, Logan. Osterhaus, 
Buckland (Union) and Fornev (Confederate). The Commission 
is in correspondence with the friends of many other officers, Lnion 
and Confederate, engaged in the operations commemorated by tb.^ 



20 



Indfana at VicKSBurui. 



park, and is very hopeful of favoral)lo responses in some eases. It 
is expected that the jMinnesota legislature will appropriate for a 
statue of General Baldwin : the Nebraska legislature for a statue of 
General Thayer; the New York legislature for a statue of General 
Potter; the Pennsylvania legislature for a statue of General Parks, 
and that other state legislatures will make like appropriations. The 
attention of wealthy Americans is being invited to the creditable 
opportunity offert^d by this feature of tiie park work foi- ])atriotic 
donations. 




Bridge on Union Avenue. 



In these several ways the Commission hopes to secure the statue 
(equestrian, standing or bust), or the portrait tablet, of each gen- 
eral officer, ITnion and Confederate, engaged in this campaign, siege 
and defense of Vicksburg in 1863. Each will be placed at an ap- 
propriate site in relation to the line of the command during the 
siege and defense, of the officer it portrays. When these liopes have 
been realized, even partially, the park will present a most attractive, 
inspiring and realistic battlefield picture. 

When the Union Navy Memorial is fiinshed, with tlu^ approval 
of the Secretary of War. the Commission will ask the Congress to 



ViCKSBURG National Military Park. 21 

appropriate for the construction of a memorial om the area in the 
park bounded by the Loui.siana circle and the Warrenton road, 
commemorative of the service of the Confederate Navy on the ^lis- 
sissippi River and its tributaries during the Civil War, at a cost 
not to exceed $125,000. 

AVilliam T. Rigby, Chairman. 
Vicksburg, Mississippi, June 1, 1910. 




Main Entrance — National Military Cemetery. 




A Driveway in tiie Cemetery. 



The National Cemetery. 

The National Cemetery at Vicksburg, fronting the river and 
blending into the northern end of the Military Park, although not 
of it, was established in 1865. Its originally beautiful site having 
thus had the benefit of time in which to be developed and appropri- 
ately softened and beautified in harmony with its sacred purpose, it 
stands today one of the most parklike and pleasingly impressive of 
all the national cemeteries. With the possible exception of Arling- 
ton Heights, none can compare with it in beauty. It is certainly 
one of the most magnificent cemeteries ever devoted to the inter- 
ment of the dead soldiers of any nation, and it is also (except 
Arlington) the largest of the eighty-two established and maintained 
by the general government in honor of its valorous defenders. It 
contains the graves of 16,822 Union soldiers who lost their lives in 
nnd around Vicksburg during the Civil War, of which appalling 




A Bit of Scenery in tlie Cemetery. 



number 12,719 are "unknown." The cemetery is a masterpiece of 
landscape engineering, with delightful walks and drives, with ra- 
vines, terraces and plateaus, and with long avenues of trees, mostly 
Spanish oaks, supplemented with tropical plants and picturesque 
parterres of flowere. The grounds occupy what was once the sides 
and crest of a forbidding blufi: overlooking the river, but which is 
now a most charming series of terraces, encircling a beaatifu 
plateau from which is had a magnificent view, grand m extent and 
variety, including the serpentine course of the glittering nver. it. 
opposite shore fringed with verdant forest. 



(23) 




Peace, 



(24) 




c; ^ 



Indiana Circle. 



On the opposite page is pictured Indiana Circle, the spot selected 
by the Vicksburg National Military Park Commission as the site for 
the proposed Indiana State Memorial. This location is a com- 
manding one in the park, and is in the very heart of a colony of 
Indiana monuments. From its elevation can be seen many of the 
interesting views of the park, and a beautiful panorama is observed. 

It is within easy distance of the old camp sites of the following 
Indiana connnauds : 8th, 11th, 16th, 18th, 24th, 34th, 46th, 47th, 
49th, 54th, 59th, 60th, 67th and 69th Infantry, 1st Battery and 1st 
and 4th Cavalry; Hovey's, Keigwin's, Slack's, McGinnis's and Ben- 
ton's headquarters are nearby. 

Surmounted by a beautiful memorial, as some day it must be, 
and surrounded by reminders of the men from Indiana who went 
into the South and clamored for entrance to Vicksburg during those 
weary months, it surely would be a place for a Hoosier to love and 
revere. 




(28) 



Historic Vicksburg. 



THE STORY OF THE CAMPAIGN, SIEGE AND DEFENSE OF VICKS- 
BURG AND OF THE COMMANDS. UNION AND CONFED- 
ERATE. ENGAGED THEREIN. 

Compiled from the Tablet Inscriptions in the Vicksburg National Military Park. 

The Vicksburg campaign opened IMareh 29, 1863, with General 
Grant's order for the advance of General Osterhaus' Division from 
Milliken's Bend, and closed July 4, 1863, with the surrender of 
General Pemberton's army and the eily of Vicksburg. Its course 
was determined by General Grant's daring and to General Peni- 
berton and his division commanders' seemingly impossible plan of 
campaign. This plan contemplated the march of his army from 
Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, to a point on the river below Vicks- 
burg, and the running of the batteries at Vicksburg by a sufficient 
number of gunboats and transports, and the transfer of the army 
to the Mississippi side. These preliminary operations were suc- 
cessfully accomfjlished and the first battle of the campaign was 
fought near Port Gibson, j\Iay 1. The Union army, under com- 
mand of Maj. Gen. U. S. Grant, was composed of the Thirteenth 
Corps and Logan's division of the Seventeenth Corps. The Con- 
federate army, under conunand of Brig. Gen. John S. Bowen, was 
composed of Tracy's, Cockrell's, Green's and Baldwin's brigades, 
the Sixth Missouri Infantry, the Botetourt (Virginia) Artillery 
and a section of Hudson's (Mississippi) Battery. IMost of the 
Confederate regiments made forced marches to reach the battle- 
field and arrived with thinned ranks. Tracy's brigade held the 
right, Green's and the Sixth Mississippi the left of the Confed- 
erate line. The battle was opened at an early hour by the advance 
of Carr's and Hovey's divisions on the right and Osterhaus' on the 
left of the Union line. Smith 's division in reserve. The Conf edei'- 
ate left was driven back about 10:00 a.m., and Baldwin's brigade, 
just arrived, formed a new^ line about one and one-half miles in the 
rear of the first position. Two regiments, just arrived, of Cock- 
rell's brigade, were posted on the new line; Green's brigade and 
one regiment, just arrived, of Cockrell's brigade, were ordered to 
the Confederate right, which had retired a little from its first posi- 

(2fl) 



30 Indiana at Vjc^ksbueg. 

tioii. The First Brigade of liOgan's division was sent, ou arrival, 
to the Union left, the Tliird reinforced the Union right and Smith's 
division became engaged; the Second Brigade of Logan's division 
did not arrive until near the close of the battle. The Confederate 
line was held until about 5:30 p. m., when both wings were driven 
from their positions and fell back across Bayou Pierre, the First 
and Fourth Missouri Infantry (consolidated) of Cockrell's brigade 
arriving in time to assist in covering the retreat. Casualtes — 
Union: Killed 131, wounded 719, missing 25, total 875, one officer 
killed. Confederate: Killed 56, wounded 328, missing 341, total 
725, Brig. Gen. E. D. Tracy and three other officers killed. 

Up to that time General Grant had contemplated the probabil- 
ity of uniting the army of General Banks with his army. He then 
decided not to await the arrival of Banks' army, and the march to 
the rear of Vicksburg, by way of Raymond and Jackson, was begun. 
The next engagement was at Raymond, May 12. The Union army, 
under command of Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson, was composed 
of the Third and Seventh divisions. Seventeenth Corps. The Con- 
federate army, under command of Brig. Gen. John Gregg, was 
composed of Gregg's brigade and a squadron of Wirt Adams' cav- 
alry. The battle was opened by the advance of the Third Division, 
Maj. Gen. John A. Logan commanding — Smith's brigade on the 
right, Dennis' on the left, and Stevenson's at first in reserve, but 
later on the extreme right. The Seventh Division, Brig. Gen. Mar- 
cellus M. Crocker commanding, formed line in support and as re- 
serve. The Confederate line was held for more than two hours, 
when the brigade fell back, mostly in good order, through and 
beyond the town of Raymond. Six mounted companies of the 
Third Kentucky (Confederate) Infantry arrived at the close of 
the battle and assisted in covering the retreat. Casualties — Union : 
Killed 66, wounded 339, missing 37, total 442, seven officers killed. 
Confederate : Killed 73, wounded 251, missing 190, total 514, nine 
officers killed or mortally wounded. The same day the left of 
Grant's army, under McClernand, skirmished at Fourteen-Mile 
Creek with the cavalry and mounted infantry of Pemberton's army, 
supported by Bowen's division and two brigades of Boring's di- 
vision. 

After the engagement at Raymond, Sherman's and McPherson 's 
corps marched toward Jackson, near which city a brief engagement 
occurred May 14. The Union army, under command of Maj. Gen. 
U. S. Grant, was composed of Steele's and Tuttle's divisions, Fif- 
teenth Corps, Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman commanding; and 



Historic Vicksburg, 31 

Logan's and Crocker's divisions, Seventeenth Corps, Maj. Gen. 
James B. McPherson commanding. General Grant was with Gen- 
eral Sherman. The Confederate army, under command of Brig. 
Gen. John Gregg, was composed of Gregg's, Gist's and Walker's 
brigades. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston was in the city. Gist's 
brigade was posted on the Clinton road, about three miles west of 
Jackson; "Walker's supported Gist's, and Gregg's was on the right 
of Gist's. The Third Kentucky Mounted Infantry, a battalion 
of sharpshooters and Martin's battery of Walker's brigade were 
posted on the Raymond road, about two miles from the city. The 
divisions of the Fifteenth Corps marched toward Jackson on the 
Raymond road; Tuttle's formed line of battle ou both sides of that 
road and drove the Confederate forces into the intrenchment ; 
Steele's formed line en both sides of the railroad; the two divisions 
advanced and occupied the intrenchments on their respective fronts. 
The divisions of the Seventeenth Corps marched on the Clinton 
road; Crocker's formed line of battle, with Logan's in reserve, 
drove the Confederate line from its position after a sharp fight, ad- 
vanced and occupied the intrenchment in its front. Casualties — 
Union: Killed 42. wounded 251, missing 7, total 300, one officer 
killed. Confederate : Killed 17, wounded 64, missing 118, total 
199, one officer killed. The Confederate army retreated northward 
in the direction of Canton, and General Grant had placed his army 
between those of General Pemberton and General Johnston. 

Sherman's corps remained at Jackson one day and was ordered 
to destroy the military supplies of all kinds in that city and as 
much as possible of the railroads centering there: INIcPherson's 
corps marched west from Jackson the morning of I\Iay 15, and the 
bloodiest battle of the campaign was Fought the next day at Cham- 
pion's Hill. The Union army, under command of Maj. Gen. U. S. 
Grant, was composed of the Thirteenth Corps, Blair's division of 
the Fifteenth Corps and Logan's and Crocker's divisions of the 
Seventeenth Corps. The Confederate army, under command of 
Lieut. Gen. John C. Pemberton. Avas composed of Stevenson's, 
Bowen's and Loring's divisions and Wirt Adams' cavalry. Reyn- 
olds' brigade of Stevenson's division and two Union regiments 
were detailed as train guards. Logan's and Hovey's divisions were 
on the right. Osterhaus' and Carr's in tlie center, A. J. Smith's and 
Blair's on the left of the Union line. Loring's division held the 
right, Bowen's the center, and Stevenson's the left of the Confeder- 
ate line. The battle was opened about 10 :30 or 11 :00 a. m., by the 
9(iyance of Logan's and Hovey's divisions in line of battle ; Hovey'^ 



32 Indiana at Vicksbukg. 

attack l)i-<)k(' the Confederate line at the angle, captured the guns at 
that point and at the junction of the (Uinton and middle Raymond 
roads, and forced Gumming 's brigade and the right of Lee's to form 
new lines — the former on the middle Kaymond road, the latter on a 
ridge between that road and its first position. Bowen's division 
reinforced the Confederate left, formed line of battle under fire 
about 1 :30 p. m., drove back Hovey's division, recovered the guns at 
the junction of the two roads and most of the ground lost earlier in 
the day. Boomer's brigade of Crocker's division reinforced 
Hovey's and became engaged about 2:00 p.m.; two regiments of 
Holmes' brigade of Crocker's division became engaged a little later 
and Bowen's advance was checked. About the same time the right 
and center of Logan's division reached the middle Raymond road 
and captured the guns on the left of the Confederate line. About 
3:30 p.m., the LTnion batteries concentrated on a commanding 
ridge, opened a heavy fire, the Union line advanced and the Confed- 
erate army was driven from the field. Stevenson's and Bowen's 
divisions crossed Baker's creek and fell back toward Vicksburg: 
Loring's division abandoned its artillery and marched southeast- 
ward to Crystal Springs. Casualties^ — Union: Killed 410. 
wounded 1,844. missing 187. total 2,441, thirty-eight officers killed 
or mortally wounded. Confederate : Killed 380, wounded 1,018. 
missing 2,453. total 3,851, Brig. Gen. Lloyd Tilghman and thirty- 
two other officers killed. 

Part of the Confederate army was (u-dered by General Pember- 
ton to make a stand on the east side of Big Black River and an 
engagement occurred there May 17. The T^nion army, under com- 
mand of jNIaj. Gen. U. S. Grant, was composed of Osterhaus'. 
Smith's and Carr's divisions of the Thirteenth Corps, Maj. Gen. 
John A. McClernand commanding. The Confederate army, under 
command of Brig. Gen. John S. Brown, was composed of Cock- 
rell's and Green's brigades of Bowen's division. Vaughn's brigade 
of Smith's division and the Fourth Mississippi of Baldwin's 
brigade. Smith's division. Carr's division was on the right, 
Osterhaus' in the center, and Smith's on the left of the I^nion line. 
The Confederate line w^as formed in an intrenchment on the east 
side of Big Black River and across a peninsula formed by a bend 
in that river; Cockrell's brigade held the right. Vaughn's and the 
Fourth INIississippi the center, and Green's the left of the line. 
After an artillery engagement of about two hours. Lawler's brigade 
on the right of Carr's division attacked in line of battle with fixed 
bayonets, the TTnion line advanced along its entire front, and the 



Historic Vicksburg. 33 

Confederate army fell hack from the intrenehment in disorder and 
crossed the river. Casualties — Union: Killed 39, wounded 237, 
missing 3, total 279, seven officers killed or mortally wounded. Con- 
federate : Killed 3, wounded 9, missing 539, total 551 (exclusive of 
Vaughn's brigade and Fourth Mississippi of Baldwin's brigade not 
reported), one officer killed. 

The railroad bridge (covered with plank) and the boat bridge, 
on which the Confederates crossed the river, were both burned. 
The morning of May 18 the Union army began crossing on three 
bridges that had been laid during the afternoon and night of the 
17th. Sherman's corps crossed at Bridgeport, on the right, and 
marched toward Vicksburg on the Benton-Jackson road; McPher- 
son's corps, in the center, crossed on a floating bridge borne up by 
cotton bales, and marched on the same road; McClemand's corps 
crossed near the railroad bridge, marched on the Jackson road to 
Mt. Alban, took a cross-road at that point, turned to the left to in- 
tersect the Baldwin's Ferry road and marched toward Vicksburg 
on that road. General Grant believed that his army could storm 
the Confederate works around the city, and ordered an assault at 
2 :00 p. m. of May 19. The Union army under his command was 
composed of three divisions of the Thirteenth Corps, the Fifteenth 
and Seventeenth Corps. The Confederate army, under command 
of Lieut. Gen. John C. Pemberton, was composed of Stevenson's, 
Forney's. Smith's and Bowen's divisions, and Waul's Texas Le- 
gion. The Fifteenth Corps was on the right, the Seventeenth in 
the center and the Thirteenth on the left of the Union line. Ste- 
venson's division held the right, Forney's the center and Smith's 
the left of the Confederate line. Bowen's division and Waul's 
Texas Legion were in reserve, but Cockrell's brigade of Bowen's 
division was engaged. The Union army advanced at 2 :00 p. m. ; 
only a reconnaissance in force was accomplished at most points 
along its line, but Blair's division of the Fifteenth Corps assaulted 
the Stockade Redan on the Graveyard road and carried the colors 
of some of its regiments close to both faces of that work and to the 
curtain immediately west of it. Casualties — Union: Killed 157, 
wounded 777, missing 8, total 942, fifteen officers killed or mortally 
wounded. Confederate: Not fully reported. 

Neither General Grant, nor the rank and file of his army, were 
yet convinced that Vicksburg must be reduced by the slow and 
laborious operations of a siege. The Twentieth and Twenty-first 
were employed in securing positions for the infantry and in placing 
batteries on commanding points. At 10:00 o'clock in the forenoon 

[3] 



34 Indiana at Vn^KyiurRG. 

of the 22d a second assault was made. The two armies were in 
position on their respective lines as on May 19, except that Waul's 
Texas Legion had been assigned a position in the rear of the left 
of Lee's brigade on the left of Stevenson's division. After a heavy 
cannonade by every gun in position on the Union line, assaults were 
made at 10:00 a. m. hy the Fifteenth Corps at the Stockade Redan 
on the Graveyard road; by the Seventeenth on the right and left 
of the Jackson road, and by the Thirteenth at the lunette on the 
Baldwin's Ferry road, the railroad redoubt and the curtain be- 
tween that redoubt and Fort Garrott; Hall's brigade of McArthur's 
division, Seventeenth Corps, advanced close to the Confederate line 
on the Warrenton road, but did not assault ; the colors of the lead- 
ing regiments were carried close to the Confederate works at every 
point assaulted, a brigade headquarters flag was placed on the para- 
pet of the Stockade Redan, flags were placed on the parapet of the 
railroad redoubt and that work was temporarily occupied, but no 
permanent lodgement was anywhere made. Assaults were made in 
the afternoon by the Seventeenth Corps at curtain between the 
railroad redoubt and the lunette on the Baldwin's Ferry road, at 
that lunette, at the Jackson road, and at the curtain north of Glass' 
Bayou; and by the Fifteenth Corps at the curtain south of the 
Graveyard road, at the Stockade Redan on that road, and at a point 
about one-third of a mile w^est of that redan ; the colors of the lead- 
ing regiments were again carried close to the Confederate line, an- 
other flag was placed on the parapet of the Stockade Redan, but the 
effort to carry the Confederate line of defense by assault was un- 
successful at every point. Casualties — Union : Killed 502, wounded 
2,550, missing 147, total 3,199, sixty-eight officers killed or mortally 
wounded. Confederate: Not fully reported. 

As early as May 5, General Grant had ordered Lauman's di- 
vision of the Sixteenth Corps to th.e vicinity of Vicksburg; it took 
position on the left of the Thirteenth on IMay 25, and on June 15 
Herron's division took position on the extreme left, extending its 
line to the river below Vicksburg, and thereby completing its in- 
vestment. Two divisions of the Ninth Corps, two other divisions of 
the Sixteenth Corps and seven brigades detached from the three 
corps that began the campaign were deployed on an exterior line, 
under command of General Sherman after June 22, extending from 
Haynes' Bluff, on the left, to Big Black River bridge, on the right, 
to guard against attack by Johnston's army. This anny was 
assembled after the engagement at Jackson, May 14, in the hope 
that it would be able to raise the siege of Vicksburg, either by de- 



^^^v^ 



Historic Vicksburg. 37 

Seating General Grant's army, or by assisting the Confederatr 
army of Vicksburg to break through the investment lines. Siege 
operations were carried on by the part of the Union army en-aged 
on that line, and were successfully opposed by the Confeder'ate 
a.rmy, from T^Iay 23 to July 3, when a proposal for capitulation was 
sent by General Pemberton to General Grant. They met for con- 
ference that afternoon between the lines and near the Jackson road. 
The terms of capitulation were agreed upon by correspondence 
after the meeting, and the Confederate army of Vicksburg was 
surrendered to General Grant on July 4, and a detachment of his 
army occupied the city. Casualties from ]\Iarch 29 to July 4, in- 
dusive^Union : Killed 1,581, wounded 7,554, missing 1,007, total 
10,142. Confederate: Killed 1,413, wounded 3,878, missing 3,800. 
total, 9,091 ; 29,491 officers and men were surrendered at the end of 
the defense. 

At the beginning of siege operations. May 23, aliout 162 guns 
were on the investment line, most of them in position in hastily 
constructed batteries. These were enlarged and strengthened and 
additional guns successively mounted in new batteries at advan- 
tageous positions. Embrasures of batteries close to the Confeder- 
ate line closed against rifle balls by plank shutters or with bags of 
packed cotton. The first parallel made almost continuous from the 
right on the river to the left of the Thirteenth Army Corps, and. 
as the approaches were carried forward, second and third parallels 
opened. Loopholes for sharpshooters, made either with sandbags 
or in a timber on the parapet; sixteen principal ajiproaches begun 
and eleven carried close to the Confederate line. They were loop- 
holed for sharpshooters wherever opportunity for fire was afforded; 
nine galleries for mines started and two mines fired, both at the 
head of Logan's approach. At the end of the siege, July 4, about 
220 guns, including all from the navy, were on the investment line, 
largely in position ; eighty-nine batteries constructed, but about 
twenty abandoned and their guns moved to the exterior line or to 
advanced positions; aggregate length of Union trenches, twelve 
miles. 

The Confederate line of defense, eight miles long, mounted about 
130 guns in sixty-seven batteries. Works and connecting curtains 
loopholed for sharpshooters. Damage done them by the Union 
batteries repaired at night. A number of guns disabled by the fire 
of the Union batteries and, in most cases, new guns could not ])e 
mounted in their places. Countermines ag-ainst Union approaches 
and mines prepared at nine places and four fired. Retrenchments 



38 Indiana at Vtoksburg. 

made in rear of some works, but not used, as the line of defense was 
not anywhere broken. The defense largely confined to sharpshoot- 
ing and maintained for forty-seven days without relief for the offi- 
cers and men in the trenches, part of the time without sufficient 
rations. 

Reported casualties, May 23-July 4 — Union: Killed 94, 
wounded 425, missing 119, total 638, nineteen officers killed or mor- 
tally wounded. Confederate: Not separately reported. Reported 
casualties. May 18-July 4 — Union: Killed 766, wounded 3,793, 
missing 276, total 4,835, 107 officers killed or mortally wounded. 
Confederate (river batteries not included) : Killed 873, wounded 
2,141, missing 158, total 3,172, 93 officers killed or mortally 
wounded. 

The Vicksburg campaign would not have been planned and 
could not have been conducted on the lines on which it was success- 
fully made without the assistance of the nav3^ About twenty-six 
gunboats and light-drafts of the Mississippi Squadron, with nec- 
essary attendants, Acting Rear Admiral David D. Porter com- 
manding, and during part of the time the Mississippi Marine 
Brigade, Brig. Gen. Alfred W. Ellett commanding, co-operated 
with the army in the operations of the campaign and siege. 

The night of April 16, 1863, eight gunboats, including the ram 
"General Price," and three transports passed the Confederate bat- 
teries on the river line at Vicksburg and at Warrenton, one trans- 
port sunk. Six days later five additional transports passed down 
without material damage, and one was sunk by the fire of the Con- 
federate batteries. The gunboats below Vicksburg bombarded the 
Confederate batteries at Grand Gulf, April 29, without effectively 
silencing them. They and the seven transports ran past these bat- 
teries that night, and, during the two following days, carried six 
divisions of the army across the river, landing them at Bruinsburg 
on the Mississippi side. The other divisions of General Grant's 
army were carried across the river at later dates. 

At the beginning of the investment the gunboats below the city 
attacked the lower Confederate batteries, May 19, May 20, May 21, 
May 22 and May 27. On the last named day the gunboat "Cincin- 
nati" attacked the upper batteries from above the city and was dis- 
abled and sunk. During the siege detachments from the squadron 
co-operated by making the investment on the river side as complete 
as possible and by shelling the Confederate batteries and intrench- 
ments ; served seven mortars on mortar boats anchored behind the 
peninsula and opposite the city, and, during the latter part of the 



Historic Vicksburg. 39 

siege, three heavy guns on scows behind the peninsiihi and at the 
left— north— of the mortar boats ; made expeditions up the Yazoo 
river and its tributaries and co-operated in the repulse of the Con- 
federate attacks at Young's Point, Milliken's Bend and Goodrich's 
Landing. Thirteen heavy guns from the squadron mounted on 
the investment line in eight batteries. 

Detachments from the Marine Brigade were engaged at Rich- 
mond, Louisiana, June 15, casualties, wounded 3 ; co-operated in the 
repulse of the Confederate attack at Goodrich's Landing, casual- 
ties, 1 officer killed ; and served three guns on the peninsula oppo- 
site the city during the latter part of the siege. Reported casual- 
ties in the squadron — including the infantry regiments detailed for 
service on gunboats — in the campaign and siege: Killed 23, 
drowned 14, wounded 102, missing 1, total 140, 1 officer killed. 

The river batteries, under command of Col. Edward Higgins, 
C. S. Artillery, were served by six companies of Tennessee Heavy 
Artillery on the right, four companies of the Eighth Louisiana 
Heavy Artillery Battalion in the center and eight companies of 
the First Louisiana Heavy Artillery on the left. Two companies 
of the Twenty-second Louisiana were attached to the left and the 
Vaiden (Mississippi) Battery I0 the center of the command. It 
was charged with the duty ol opposing the passage of Union gun- 
boats and transports and was in action the night of April 16. 
when eight gunboats and three transports passed without reported 
casualties, one transport sunk; the night of April 22, when six 
transports passed, casualties. 1 killed, 2 wounded, total 3, one trans- 
port sunk; and the night of May 3, when a tug and two loaded 
barges attempted to pass, but were sunk, without reported cas- 
ualties. 

At the beginning of the investment. May 18, about thirty-eight 
heavy guns were in position on the river line and thirteen light 
pieces posted on the city front. All the light and six of the heavy 
guns were successively moved to the line of defense with the de- 
tachments serving them, but one of the heavy guns was moved back 
to the river line. 

During the investment. May 18-July 4, the river liatteries were 
opposed to the gunboats below the city, the mort.ars behind the 
peninsula, and the guns on the peninsula and on scows, and were 
engaged May 19, May 20, May 21, May 22 and IMay 27, Avith the 
gunboats below the city. On the last-named day the gunboat ' ' Cin- 
cinnati" attacked the upper batteries and was disaliled and sunk 
on the Mississippi side of the great bend in the river above tlic city. 



•40 



Indiana at VicKsiuiKci. 



after an action of thirty ininntcs. Reported casualties in command 
during the investment : KiUed and wounded, about 30. 



GENEKAL ST'MMARY OF CASUALTIES. MARCH 29-JULY 4. 

UNION. 

Killed. Wounded. Missing. Total. 

Dunbar's I'laiitation, lyoiiisiana. April 15 2 .... 2 

Port Gibson. May 1 131 719 25 875 

Soiitli Forlv Bayou Pierre, May 2 1 .... 1 

North Forlv Bayou Pierre, May 3 1 6 7 

Pinlioolv, Louisiana, May 10 2 8 3 13 

Raymond, May 12 66 339 37 442 

Fourteen-Mile Creelv, May 12-13 6 10 16 

Jaelison. May 14 42 251 7 300 

Champion's Hill, May 16 410 1,844 187 2.441 

Bis Black River Bridge. May 17 39 237 3 279 

Skirmishes about Yicksburs, ?*Iay 18, 20. 21 13 41 2 56 
Assault on Confederate Line of Defense, May 

. 19 157 777 8 942 

Assault on Confederate Line of Defense. May 

22 502 2,550 147 3,199 

Mechanicsburg, June 4 1 5 .... 6 

Milliken's Bend. rx)uisiana, June 7 101 280 265 640 

Ba.vou Baxter, Louisiana, June 9 1 .... 1 

Birdsong Ferry. June 12 1 .... 1 

Richmond. Louisiana, June 15 1 8 .... 9 

Hill's Plantation. June 22 8 16 23 47 

Ellisville, June 25 37 37 

Near Lake Providence. Ijouisiana. June 29... 1 3 144 148 

On Peninsula opposite yicksl)urg, June 29 1 .... 1 

Edwards Station. July 1 3 .... 3 

On Gunboats, in Detached Infantry Regiments 6 26 .... 82 

Siege Operations, May 23— July 4 94 425 119 638 

Total 1.581 7.554 1.007 10,142 

CONFEDERATE. 

Killed. Wounded. Missing. Total. 

Action of River Battei'ies. April 22 1 2 .... 3 

Grand Gulf, April 29 3 18 21 

Hayne's Bluff (Snyder's Mill). April 30 3 3 

Port Gibson, May 1 56 328 341 725 

Raymond, May 12 73 251 190 514 

Jackson. May 14 17 64 118 199 

Champion's Hill. May 16 380 1.018 2,453 3,851 

Big Black River Bridge, May 17 3 9 539 551 

Hill's Plantation, June 22 5 16 1 22 

Defense Operations. May IS — July 4 875 2,l(i9 1.58 3.202 

Total 1 .413 3.S78 3.800 9.091 



Position Tablet Inscriptions. 

VicKSBURG National Military Park. 



UNION POSITION TABLET. 
Ewing's Brigade; Assaull, May 19, 1863. 

This brigade, with skirmishers in advance, was, formed hdiind 
the crest of the ridge immediately north of JMint Spring Bayou, in 
order, from right to left, as follows: 37th Ohio, -Ith West Vir- 
ginia, 47th Ohio, in line, and the 30th Ohio in reserve. The brigade 
connected closely with Steele's division on its right, and with Giles 
A. Smith's brigade on its left. This brigade moved promptly at 
the appointed time, 2 :00 p. m. Its left two regiments advanced 
close to the Confederate intrenchment, where their colors remained 
until after dark. The right regiment was unable to cross the 
ravine in its front, on account of obstacles, but covered the left 
in its advanced position by a heavy fire. When the line moved 
forward the reserve regiment advanced to the crest of the hill and 
began firing. After dark the brigade retired, under orders, to the 
position where it formed for the assault. This tablet marks the 
farthest advance of the 4th West Virginia. Casualties : 30th Ohio, 
wounded 9 ; 37th Ohio, killed 14, wounded 35, total 49 ; Lieuts. 
Gustav A. Wintzer and Sebaldus Hassler killed; 47th Ohio, killed 
13, wounded 40, missing 6, total 59, Lieut. Edward N. Bernard 
killed, Lieut. Jonathan Castro mortally wounded; 4th West Vir- 
ginia, killed 27, wounded 110, total 137, Maj. Arza M. Goodspeed 
killed, Lieut. Finley D. Ong mortally wounded; aggregate, killed 
54, wounded 194, missing 6, total 254, 

UNION POSITION TABLET. 
Giles A. Smitli's Brigade; A&sault May 19, 1863. 

This brigade, with skirmishers in advance, was formed behind 
the crest of the ridge, about 320 yards in front of the north face of 
the Confederate Stockade Redan on the Graveyard road, in the 
following order, from right to left: 6th Missouri, 113th Illinois 
(detachment), 116th Illinois, 1st Battalion, 13th U. S. Infantry, in 
line, and the 8th Missouri in reserve. The ground in front wtis 
much obstructed by a growth of brush and cane and by felled trees. 

(41) 



42 



Indiana at Vigksbukg. 



The brigade moved promptly at the appointed time, 2 :00 p. m., but 
its lines were soon broken up by the obstacles encountered, and by 
the rugged character of the ground. The 8th Missouri, under or- 
ders, halted on the crest of the first ridge in front of the one be- 
hind which the line was formed, and liegan firing; the battalion of 
the 13tli U. S. Infantry and the 116th Illinois pushed close to the 
Stockade Redan and to the stockade west of that work, some men 
of the battalion getting into the ditch on the north face of the 




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Union Position Tablet. 



redan; the 113th Illinois (detachment) and the 6th Missouri ad- 
vanced close to the stockade and to the curtain west of it. The 
brigade maintained its position until after dark, when it withdrew, 
under orders. This tablet marks the point to which Capt. Charles 
Ewing, 1st Battalion, 13th U. S. Infantry, carried the colors of the 
battalion and where he remained with them until after dark. 
Casualties: 113th Illinois (detachment), wounded 7; 116th Illi- 
nois, killed 6, wounded 64, missing 1, total 71 ; 6th Missouri, killed 
3, wounded 25, total 28 ; 8th Missouri, killed 7, woimded 19, total 
26; 1st Battalion, 13th U. S. Infantry (250 officers and men en- 



Tablet Inscriptions. 43 

gaged), killed 21, wounded 49, total 70, Capt. Edward C. Wash- 
ington and Lieut. Justus A. Boies mortally wounded; aggregate, 
killed 37, wounded 164, missing 1, total 202. 



UNION POSITION TABLET. 
Thomas Kilhy Smith's Brigade; Assault, May 19, 1863. 

This brigade, with skirmishers in advance, was formed about 600 
yards in front of the east face of the Confederate Stockade Redan 
on the Graveyard road, on both sides of that road, in the follo\ving 
order: The 83d Indiana with the 127th Illinois in support, under 
command of Colonel Spooner, 83d Indiana, on the right of the 
road; the 55th Illinois on the left of the 83d Indiana, resting its 
right on the road ; the 54th Ohio on the left of the 55th Illinois and 
the 57th Ohio in support. The ground in front was much ob- 
structed by a growth of brush and cane and by felled trees. The 
brigade moved promptly at the appointed time, 2 :00 p. m., but its 
lines w^ere soon broken up by the obstacles encountered and by the 
rugged character of the ground. The right wing approached close 
to the salient angle of the Stockade Redan, a few men getting into 
the ditch of that work. The left wing halted at the crest of the 
ridge nearest to the Confederate line and advanced companies from 
each regiment close to that line. Both wings maintained their 
positions until after dark, when they retired, under orders. This 
tablet marks the farthest advance of the 83d Indiana. Casualties : 
55th Illinois, killed 4, wounded 22, total 26, Lieut. Levi Hill killed: 
127th Illinois, killed 8, wounded 31, missing 1, total 40, Lieut. 
Hiram McClintock killed, Capt. John S. Riddle mortally wounded; 
83d Indiana, killed 10, wounded 46, total 56, Capts. Metellus Cal- 
vert and John M. Cresswell killed ; 54th Ohio, killed 2, wounded 13, 
total 15; 57th Ohio, killed 5, wounded 13, total 18; aggregate, 
kiUed 29, wounded 125, missing 1, total 155. 

UNION POSITION TABLET. 
Bucljland's Brigade; Assaults, May 19 and May 22. 1863. 
The afternoon of May 19, tliis brigade was in support of Blair's 
division— the 72d Ohio in front, on the right of the road, and the 
95th Ohio in the rear, the 114th Illinois on the left of the road and 
the 93d Indiana on its left. About dusk that evening. General 
Blair's division retired and General Buckland ordered pickets and 
guards to the front. The brigade remained, in the advance, m this 



44 Inmiwa at Vicksi'.i i;r;. 

position until llic evening of May 21, when it was withdrawn, ex- 
cept the !>:^(1 Indiana, which did not withdraw until the morning 
of IMay 22. May 22, the brigade, except the 72d Ohio, ordered to 
take position on the left of the advance of Col. Thomas Kilby 
Smitli's l)rigade, formed line on the left of the road. This tablet 
marks th(> i-ight of the three regiments on that day and the right 
of the 114fh Illinois, the afternoon of iNIay 19. Casualties: INIay 
19, 114th Illinois, killed 2, wounded 10. total 12 ; 93d Indiana, killed 
1, wounded 5. total 6; 72d Ohio, killed 1, wounded 13, total 14; 
95th Ohio, wounded 2; aggregate, killed 4, wounded 30, total 34. 
May 22. 114th Illinois, wounded 2; 93d Indiana, wounded 2; 72d 
Ohio, wounded 1 ; 95th Ohio, wounded 4; aggregate, wounded 9. 

UNION POSITION TABLET. 
Rniisoni's Brigade; Assault, May 19, 1863. 

This brigade was formed for the assault, in two lines, about 450 
yards in front of the Confederate line — the 95th Illinois on the left 
of the first line and the 17th Wisconsin on its right. The position 
of the other regiments cannot be accurately stated. The 17tli Wis- 
consin advanced first, probably a little before the appointed time, 
2 :00 p. m., and the 95th Illinois soon m-oved forward. That regi- 
ment crossed the ravine in front of the Confederate line and ad- 
vanced to within 100 yards of that line, which position was held 
until 4:00 o'clock next morning. None of the other regiments ap- 
proached so close to the Confederate line. This tablet marks the 
farthest advance of the 95th Illinois. Casualties : 11th Illinois, 
wounded 12 ; 72d Illinois, killed 2, wounded 2, total 4 ; 95th Illinois, 
killed 8. wounded 54, total 62 ; 14th Wisconsin, killed 1, wounded 6, 
total 7; 17th Wisconsin, killed 3, wounded 36, total 39; aggregate, 
killed 14. wounded 110. total 124. 

UNION POSITION TABLET. 
Steele's Division ; Assault, May 22, 1863. 

Thayer's brigade, except the 4th Iowa Infantry, took position 
the afternoon tind evening of May 19, under cover of the spur ex- 
tending north from the Confederate line at this point. Wood's 
brigade, except the 76th Ohio, and Manter's were moved from the 
right and passed in rear of Thayer's on May 22. About 4 :00 p. m., 
the advance was ordered by General Steele, and the three regi- 
ments of Thayer's brigade moved forward in line, followed by 



Tablet Inscriptions. 45 

Wood's brigade in column l)y regiments — the 12th. Missuui-i lead- 
ing. Thayer's regiments approached close to the Confederate line; 
the 12th Missouri, of Wood's brigade, climbed the north face of the 
spur and advanced in support of the leading brigade — the four 
right companies reaching a position near the Confederate line. 
The ground gained was held until after dark, when the division 
retired, under orders — Wood's and Manter's brigades returning to 
their respective positions on the right. This tablet marks the 
farthest advance of the 9th Iowa of Thayer's brigade. Casualties: 
ISth Illinois, killed 1, wounded 1, total 2 ; 30th Missouri, wounded 
3; 31st Missouri, killed 1, wounded 1, total 2. Lieut. William Rol)- 
inson killed; aggregate, Manter's brigade, killed 2. wounded "), 
total 7 ; 25th Iowa, killed 5, wounded 27, missing 5, total 37 ; 31st 
Iowa, killed 3, wounded 19, total 22, Lieut. Robert Anderson mor- 
tally wounded; 3d ^Missouri, killed 3, wounded 12, missing 3, total 
18; 12th Missouri, killed 26, wounded 82, total 108, Maj. Gustavus 
Lightfoot, Capt. Christian Andel, Lieuts. Charles L. Kasten and 
George Eggart killed; aggregate, AVood's ])rigade, killed 37, 
wounded 140, missing 8, total 185 ; 9th Iowa, killed 18, wounded 60, 
total 78, Lieuts. Edward Tyrrell and Jacob Jones killed, Capts. 
Florilla INI. Kelsey and Frederick S. Washburn, and Lieut. Leonard 
L. Martin mortally wounded ; 26th Iowa, killed 4, wounded 23, total 
27; 30th Iowa, killed 13, wounded 36, missing 1, total 50, Col. 
Charles H. Abbott, Lieut. James P. I\Iilliken killed, Lieut. David 
Letner mortally wounded; aggregate, Thayer's brigade, killed 35, 
wounded 119, missing 1, total 155. 

CONFEDERATE POSITION TABLET. 
Small Work on left of Shoup's Brigade. 
This work and the lines immediately to the right and left of it 
were held. May 22, 1863, and the assault of the Union force re- 
pulsed by the 26th Louisiana. The 31st Louisiana, on the right of 
Baldwin's brigade, assisted in repulsing the assault. A rough 
stockade in front of this work was begun June 9, and finished the 
night of June 11. A trench, immediately in rear of the stockade, 
was completed June 15. A countermine against the Union ap- 
proach was prepared from the trench, but not fired. Casualties in 
26th Louisiana during the defense: Killed 28, wounded 44, total 
72, Maj. W. W. Martin, Capt. Felix G. Winder, and Lieut. Numa 
Arrieux and Lieut. P. N. Ternier killed. 



46 Indiana at Vicksbukg. 

CONFEDERATE POSITION TABLET. 

Lunette at Left of Stockade. 

This lunette, part- of the stockade to its right, and the line to its 
left were held, the afternoon of May 19, 1863, and the assaults of 
the Union force repulsed, by the 27th Louisiana Infantry with the 
2d Missouri Infantry in support. The casualties in the Louisiana 
regiment were severe, but cannot be accurately stated. 

The position was held. May 22, and the assaults of the Union 
force repulsed, by the 27th Louisiana and five companies of the 
2d Missouri, with five companies of that regiment in reserve. The 
casualties cannot be accurately stated. The lunette, the line imme- 
diately^ to its left, the stockade to its right, and the north face of 
the stockade redan were held, after May 25, by the 27th Louisiana. 
A countermine against the Union approach was prepared at the 
stockade, but not fired. Casualties in 27th Louisiana during the 
defense : Killed 58, wounded 96, total 154, Lieut. Col. L. L. Mc- 
Laurin and Lieut. George Harris killed, Col. L. D. INIarks mortally 
wounded. 

CONFEDERATE POSITION TABLET. 
Stcx-kade Redan ou Graveyard Road. 

This redan, the line immediately to its right, and part of the 
stockade to its left were held, the afternoon of May 19, 1863, and the 
assaults of the Union force repulsed, by the 36th IMississippi, with 
the 5th Missouri in support, on its east face ; and the 1st and 4th 
Missouri (consolidated) on its north face and part of the line of the 
stockade. The 3d Missouri was in reserve. Casualties : In 36th 
Mississippi, cannot be accurately stated; in Cockrell's brigade, 
killed 8, wounded 62, total 70. nearly all in this position. 

The position was held. May 22, and the assaults of the Union 
force repulsed by the 36th Mississippi and six companies of the 1st 
and 4th Missouri on its east face, and the 3d Missouri on its north 
face and part of the line of the stockade. Three companies of the 
1st and 4th Missouri, in reserve, were moved from point to point, 
as required. Casualties: In Hebert's brigade, killed 21, wounded 
39, total 60 (not distributed between this redan and the other points 
on the brigade line) , Maj. Alexander Yates, 36th Mississippi, killed ; 
in Cockrell's brigade, killed 28, wounded 95, total 123, nearly all 
in this position; in 3d Missouri, of that brigade, killed 12, wounded 
52, total 64. 

The stockade and the north face of the redan were held, after 
May 25, by the 27th Louisiana. The east face of the redan was 



Tablet Inscriptions. 47 

held after June 2 by the left reghnent of Green's brigade. Two 
countermines against the Union approach, from the ditch of the 
redan, were fired the night of June 26 ; another was prepared, but 
not fired. 

CONFEDERATE POSITION TABLET. 
Small Redan on Left of Green's Brigade. 

This redan and the line immediately to its right were held, Ww 
afternoon of May 19, 1863, and the assaults of the Union force re- 
pulsed, by the 7th Mississippi Infantry Battalion. Its casualties 
cannot be accurately stated. 

The position was held. May 22, and the assaults of the Union 
force repulsed, by the 7th Mississippi Infantry Battalion, the 5th 
Missouri Infantry and one company of the 1st and 4th Missouri 
Infantry (consolidated). The casualties cannot be accurately 
stated. 

This redan, after June 2, was held by the 20th Arkansas of 
Green's brigade. General Green was killed in it the morning of 
June 27. Two countermines against the Union approach were pre- 
pared, but not fired. 

CONFEDERATE POSITION TABLET. 
Right of Green's Brigade. After June 2. 

The line from the right of the 7th Mississippi Infantry Bat- 
talion to near Glass' Bayou was held. May 19 and May 22, 1863, 
and the assaults of the Union force repulsed, by the 37th and 38th 
Mississippi. The casualties in the two regiments on those days 
cannot be accurately stated. Hebert's brigade shortened its line, 
June 2, by closing to the right, and Green's brigade took position 
in the line of defense, resting its right at this point. 

UNION POSITION TABLET. 
Ewing's Brigade; Assault. May 22. 1863. 
Blair's division was massed for the assault, the morning of ^lay 
22, on the left of the Graveyard road and about 900 yai-ds from 
the Confederate Stockade Redan. A volunteer storming party of 
150 men from, the regiments of the division, under command of 
Capt. John H. Groce, 30th Ohio, with General Ewng's headciuar- 
ters flag, carried by private Howell G. Trodgen, 8th J\rissouri. at 
the head of the column, advanced at 10 :00 a. m., by the flank, on the 
Graveyard road, followed by Ewing's brigade— the 30th Ohio lead- 



48 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

ing. The headquarters flag was placed on the parapet of the Con- 
federate redan, and the storming party took position in the ditch 
and on the north face of the parapet. The 30th Ohio advanced 
close to the angle of the redan but was compelled to seek shelter 
from the Confederate fire, and the brigade was reformed behind 
the crest of the ridge, at the left of the road, and about 140 yards 
from the Confederate line. The position was held continuously, 
and that night the dead, the wounded and the colors were brought 
back to it, and intrenchments were begun. This tablet marks the 
point on the parapet of the Confederate redan where General 
Ewing's headquarters flag was placed. Casualties: 30th Ohio, 
killed 6, wounded 43, missing 2, total 51, Capt. Thomas Hayes 
killed, Lieut. Hiram J. Davis mortally wounded; 37th Ohio, killed 
10, wounded 31, total 41 ; 47th Ohio, killed 6, wounded 26, missing 
1, total 33 ; 4th West Virginia, killed 3, wounded 16, total 19 ; 
aggregate, killed 25, wounded 116, missing 3. total 144. 

UNION POSITION TABLET. 
Mower's Brigade ; Assault, Afternoon of May 22, 1863. 

Mower's and ]Matthies' brigades of Tuttle's division were massed 
for the assault, the morning of May 22, on the left of the Graveyard 
road and in the rear of Blair's division. The two brigades re- 
mained in this position until about 3:00 p.m., when Mower's 
brigade — the 11th Missouri leading, followed by the 47th Illinois, 
advanced to the assault, by the flank, on the Graveyard road, fol- 
lowed by INIatthies' brigade — the 12th Iowa leading. The flag of 
the 11th INIissouri was placed on the parapet of the Confederate 
Stockade Redan, close to General Ewing's headquarters flag; 
Colonel Weber and a few officers and men of that regiment took 
position in the ditch and on the outside slope of the parapet, but 
the brigade was compelled to seek shelter from the Confederate 
fire and was ordered into a ravine, from which it was withdrawn 
after dark. This tablet marks the point of the parapet of the 
stockade redan where the flag of the 11th Missouri was placed. 
Casualties: 47th Illinois, killed 5, wounded 33, total 38; 5th Min- 
nesota, killed 2, wounded 1, missing 7, total 10; 11th Missouri, 
killed 7, wounded 85, total 92, Lieut. Charles H. Brookings mor- 
tally wounded; 8th Wisconsin, killed 3, wounded 17, missing 22, 
total 42, Lieut. Williard D. Chapman killed, Capt. Stephen Estee 
mortally wounded; aggregate, killed 17, wounded 136, missing 29, 
total 182. 



Tablet Inscriptions. 49 

UNION POSITION TABLET. 
Giles A. Smith's Brisiade; Assault, Afternoon of May 22, 1863. 
Blair's division was massed for the assault, the morning of 
May 22, on the left of the Graveyard road and about 900 yards 
from the Confederate Stockade Redan. At 10 :00 o'clock a. m., this 
brigade followed E wing's by the flank, on the Graveyard road. 
When the assault on that road failed, this brigade filed to the left, 
followed a ravine, running south, for some distance, formed line in 
the following order, from right to left : 6th Missouri, 113th Illinois 
(detachment), 116th Illinois, 8th Missouri, 55th Illinois, of T. K. 
Smith's brigade; advanced and took position about 100 yards from 
the Confederate line. In the afternoon, in connection with Ran- 
som's brigade of the Seventeenth Corps, it advanced to the assault. 
but was not able to reach the Confederate line. The ground 
gained was held, and intrenchments begun on it. This tablet 
marks the farthest advance of the 8th Missouri, in the afternoon 
assault. Casualties: lloth Illinois (detachment), killed 7. 
wounded 20, total 27; 116th Illinois, killed 1, wounded 8, total 9, 
Lieut. Nathan W. "Wheeler killed, Lieut. Gusten E. Hardy mortally 
woun,ded; 6th Missouri, killed 2, wounded 13, total 15; 8th ]\Iis- 
souri, killed 10, wounded 40, missing 1, total 51 ; aggregate, killed 
20, wounded 81, missing 1, total 102; 55th Illinois of T. K. Smith's 
brigade, killed 5, wounded 13, total 18. 

UNION POSITION TABLET. 
Ransom's Brigade ; Assault, Afternoon of May 22, 1863. 

This brigade was formed for the assault, in columns of regiments 
by divisions closed in mass, in the following order, from right to 
left: 72d Illinois, 14th Wisconsin, 95th Illinois, 11th Illinois in 
front and the 17th Wisconsin in support. The formation was in a 
ravine, about 100 yards in front of the Confederate line, and was 
completed about 11:00 a. m. At 2:15 p. m., the brigade advanced 
to the assault and placed the colors of the first named four regi- 
ments close to the Confederate line. The 14th Wisconsin ap- 
proached closest and placed the first flag in front of that line. The 
position gained was held for a short time, when, by order of Gen- 
eral Ransom, the brigade, under cover of the flre of the 17th Wis- 
consin, retired to the ravine in which it was formed, except that six 
companies of the 14th Wisconsin, directly under the Confederate 
works, could not be withdrawn until after dark. This tablet marks 
the farthest advance of that regiment. Casualties: 11th Illinois, 



50 INDIANA AT VtCKSBUKG. 

killed 3, wounded 30, missing 9, total 42, Lieut. Col. Garrett Nevius 
killed; 72d Illinois, killed 20, wounded 71, missing 5, total 96, 
Lieuts. Henry C. Mowry and James A. Bingham killed, Lieut. 
Col. Joseph C. Wright mortally wounded; 95th Illinois, killed 18, 
wounded 83, missing 8, total 109, Capts. Jason B. IManzer and 
Gabriel E. Cornwell killed, Capt. Edward J. Cook and Lieut. James 
E. Sponable mortally wounded; 14th Wisconsin, killed 14, wounded 
79, missing 4, total 97, Lieut. Colin Miller killed; 17th Wisconsin, 
killed 2, wounded 12, missing 6, total 20; aggregate, killed 57, 
wounded 275, missing 32, total 364. 

UNION POSITION TABLET. 
John E. Smith's Brigade; Assault May 22, 18G3. 

This brigade was ordered to assault the Confederate Third 
Louisiana Redan on north side of Jackson road. The 31st and 
124th Illinois regiments were deployed as sharpshooters. About 
10 a. m. the 23d Indiana advanced by the flank, in quick time, 
with fixed bayonets, followed by the 20th Illinois. The leading 
regiment advanced to within about 100 yards of the redan, filed 
right and marched in the new direction until its left cleared the 
road. It found in its front a deep ravine covered with a heavy 
abatis, and was ordered to retire by companies. The 20th Illinois 
advanced on the road close to the salient angle of the redan, turned 
obliquely to the left and found shelter on the slope of the ridge in 
front of the Confederate intrenchment. At 2 p. m. the 45th Illi- 
nois, under command of Maj. Luther H. Cowen, advanced on the 
road, by the flank, with fixed bayonets, supported by the 20th Ohio 
of the Second Brigade. The leading regiment advanced close to 
the salient angle of the redan, filed obliquely to the left and found 
shelter on the slope of the ridge immediately in the rear of the 
20th Illinois. Both regiments remained in the positions gained 
until the evening of the 23d, when they retired under orders. The 
20th Ohio was not ordered forward. This tablet marks the place 
where Major Cowen was killed at the head of his regiment. Cas- 
ualties : 20th Illinois, wounded 23 ; 31st Illinois, killed 3, wounded 
21, total 24. Capt. Horace L. Bowyer mortally wounded; 45th Illi- 
nois, killed 1, wounded 19, missing 2, total 22, Maj. Luther H. 
Cowen killed ; 124th Illinois, wounded 2 ; 23d Indiana, killed 3, 
wounded 7, total 10, Lieut. Christian G. Zulauf killed; aggregate, 
killed 7, wounded 72, missing 2, total 81. 



Tablet Inscriptions. 



51 



UNION POSITION TABLET. 
Affair of the Crater; June 25-26, 1863. 
A mine at the head of Logan's approach to the Third Louisiana 
Redan was begun on June 23, finished the forenoon of June 25 
and charged with 2,200 pounds of powder. Leggett's (1st) Brigade 
of Logan's (3d) Division, 17th Corps, occupied the trenches, under 
orders to assault. The mine was fired about 3 .-30 p. m., and be- 
fore the smoke had cleared away the 45th Illinois, at the head of 




One of the Bridges ou Union Avenue. 



the column, occupied the crater made by the explosion and opened 
fire on the Confederates behind the parapet across the gorge of 
the redan. The 20th Illinois relieved the 45th and was relieved 
by the 31st Illinois ; the 56th Illinois relieved the 31st and was re- 
lieved by the 23d Indiana ; the 17th Iowa relieved the 23d Indiana 
and was relieved by the 31st Illinois at 2 a. m. of the 26th ; the 
45th Illinois relieved the 31st at daylight and was relieved by the 
124th Illinois at 10 a. m. That regiment held the position until 
5 p. m., when fighting ceased in the crater. Hand-grenades were 



52 Indiana \'I' Vickshuhc!. 

fi-('(>ly u.scd oil both sides. Shells with lighted fuses, used as 
grenades by the Confederates, were in some instanees thrown baek 
before they exploded. This tablet marks the part of the erater 
nearest the Confederate parapet across the gorge of the redan. 
(Casualties: 20th Illinois, killed 2, wounded 7, total 9; 31st Illi- 
nois, killed 7. wounded 27, total 34, Lieut. Col. John D. Rees and 
Capt. Levi B. Casey mortally wounded; 45th Illinois, killed 8, 
wounded 62. total 70, Capt. Leander B. Fisk, acting major, killed, 
Lieut. Col. Melancthon Smith mortally wounded ; 124th Illinois, 
killed 6, wounded 49, total 55, Lieut. Julius A. Pratt killed; 23d 
Indiana. kiUed 8, wounded 31, total 39, Capt. William M. Dar- 
rougli mortally wounded ; aggregate in First Brigade, Third Di- 
vision, from May 23 to July 4, inclusive, killed 31, wounded 176, 
total 207, largely in crater, all officers named (except Captain Dar- 
rough, wounded July 1) killed or mortally wounded in that affair; 
56th Illinois, killed 4, woimded 13, total 17, Lieut. Andrew E. Wal- 
bright killed ; 17th Iowa, killed 3, wounded 34, total 37 ; aggre- 
gate in Second Brigade, Seventh Division, killed 7, wounded 47, 
total 54. all in crater. 

CONFEDERATE POSITION TABLET. 
Third Louisiana Redan, on left of Jackson Road. 

This redan was held May 22, 1863, and the assaults of the Union 
force repulsed by the 3d Louisiana, with the 43d Mississippi on its 
left. The casualties cannot be accurately stated. 

A Union mine was fired under the redan the afternoon of June 
25, almost destroying its front parapet, making a crater in its 
terreplein, but not injuring a parapet across its gorge. It was 
then held by the 3d Louisiana, supported by the 6tli Missouri, with 
the 38th Mississippi on the right and the 43d Mississippi on the 
left. The Union force assaulted immediately after the mine was 
fired, occupied the crater and attempted to carry the parapet across 
the gorge of the redan, but was repulsed. Colonel Erwin, 6th Mis- 
souri, at the head of some of his men, attempted a countercharge 
and was killed on top of the parapet. The Union force in the 
crater was successively relieved by fresh troops, the fighting con- 
tinued all night and most of the next day and the position was 
firmly held. Hand-grenades and shells with lighted fuses in place 
of grenades were freely used on both sides. After dark of the 
25th the 5th Missouri reinforced this position. Casualties: 3d 
Louisiana, killed 6, wounded 21, total 27; 38th Mississippi, killed 



Tablet Inscrii'tions. 5:5 

1. wounded 3, total -t; 43d I\rississippi, killed 6 (buried l)y firing 
of miue). wounded 5, total 11; 5th Missouri, killed 1, wounded 7, 
total 8 ; 6th ]\Iissouri, killed 3, wounded 22, total 25, Col. Eugene 
Erwin and Lieut. W. S. Lipscomb killed; aggregate, killed" 17, 
wonnded 58, total 75. The 2d Missouri was moved to this position 
the night of June 26, and the 1st and 4th Missouri (consolidated) 
the evening of July 1. In the afternoon of that day a second mine 
was fired under the redan, almost completely destroying both of 
its faces and materially damaging the parapet across its gorge, 
but no assault was made by the Union force. Lieut. Col. Pembroke 
S. Senteny, 2d Missouri, and Lieuts. John T. Crenshaw and John 
Roseberry, 6th IMissouri, were killed, Lieutenant Crenshaw being 
))uried by the firing of the mine. 



UNION POSITION TABLET. 

Stevenson's Brigade; Assault. May 22. 1863. 

This brigade, with fixed bayonets, was fonred in t^vo columns 
of regiments by divisions — the 7th ^Missouri and 81st Illinois on 
the right, the 8th Illinois and 32d Ohio on the left; the 17th Illi- 
nois deployed in front as skirmishers. The formation \vas in a 
ravine in front of the Confederate line. The columns moved to 
the assault about 10 a. m., the right led by Captain Buchanan, the 
left led by Colonel Sturges, and both advanced near to the Con- 
federate intrenehment. The left column was halted and ordered 
to form a reserve to the right, M'hich was ordered to form line, the 
81st Illinois on the left of the 7th IMissouri. This movement was 
made under a heavy fire and the men were then ordered to lie 
down. After a time the fire slackened and the command was or- 
dered forward. The 7th Missouri and the 81st Illinois advanced 
close to the ditch of the redoubt, some men of the 7th, carrying 
scaling ladders, getting into the ditch. The Confederate fire was 
again very severe and both were ordered to retire and reform. 
The other regiments held their positions until ordered to camp at 
nightfall. This tablet marks the farthest advance of the right of 
the line of the 7th Missouri. Casualties: 8th Illinois, killed 4, 
wounded 19, total 23 ; 17th Illinois, killed 3, wounded 23, total 26 ; 
81st Illinois, killed 18, wounded 80, total 98, Col. James J. DoUins. 
Lieut. Zebedee Hammack, Lieut. William L. Farmer and Lieut. 
Hugh Warnock killed, Capt. Cornelius S. Ward and Lieut. Alira- 
ham L. Lippincott mortally wounded; 7th ^Missouri, killed 9. 
wounded 93. total 102. Lieut. Charles H. Brookings mortally 



54 Indiana at Vicksbueg. 

wounded; 32d Ohio, wounded 23; aggregate, killed 34, wounded 
238, total 272. 

CONFEDERATE POSITION TABLET. 
Great Redoubt on Right of Jackson Road. 

This redoubt was held May 22, 1863, and the assaults of tlie 
Union force repulsed by the 21st Louisiana and Companies C and 
D, 22d Louisiana. Casualties: Capt. J. Ryan, 21st Louisiana, and 
Lieut. R. E. Lehman, 22d Louisiana, killed. The other casualties 
cannot be accurately stated. 

The same commands held the redoubt during the defense. Their 
casualties were: 21st Louisiana, killed 16, wounded 50, missing 1, 
total 67, Capt. J. Ryan and Lieut. G. H. Mann killed ; 22d Louis- 
iana (detachment), killed 13, wounded 23, missing 1, total 37, 
Capt. F. Gomez and Lieut. R. E. Lehman killed. 

UNION POSITION TABLET. 

Boomer's Brigade; Assault, May 22, 1863. 

First Position. 

This brigade ^vas formed about 8 a. m., on the right of Quinby's 
Division, in columns of regiments by closed divisions. At 10 a. m. 
the columns advanced to the crest of the ridge in front and were 
halted. The brigade remained in this position, on the left of 
Stevenson's Brigade of Logan's Division, until about 3 p.m., and 
was then ordered to the support of the 13th Corps, on the left, 
where it w^as engaged in the afternoon. This tablet marks the 
head of the left column in the first position. Casualties in this 
position: 5th Iowa, killed 1, wounded 2, total 3; 10th Iowa, killed 
2, wounded 14, total 16 ; aggregate, killed 3, wounded 16, total 19. 

UNION POSITION TABLET. 

Benton's Brigade ; Assault, May 22, 1863. 

This brigade advanced by the right flank at 10 a. m. to assault 
the Confederate lunette on the Baldwin's Ferry road, through the 
ravine that debouches on that road immediately in front of the 
left face of that lunette, in order from right to left as follows : 
99th Illinois, 33d Illinois, 8th Indiana, 18th Indiana. The regi- 
ments encountered a very severe fire as they successively approached 
the head of the ravine, and the brigade took position in front of 
both faces of the Confederate lunette and the curtain south of it — 



Tablet Inscriptions. 55 

the 99th Illinois around the salient angle of the lunette, the 18th 
Indiana on its right, the 33d Illinois on the left of the 99th Illi- 
nois and the 8th Indiana still farther to the left. Detachments of 
the two last named regiments crossed the railroad and took posi- 
tion in front of the Confederate railroad redoubt. The positions 
gained were held either until detachments of the brigade were re- 
lieved by Sanborn's Brigade or until after dark, when all the de- 
tachments not previously relieved retired. This tablet marks the 
right of the 99th Illinois as that regiment first formed, under fire, 
around the Confederate lunette and the point where its right sub- 
stantially remained until the brigade was relieved. Casualties : 
33d Illinois, killed 13, wounded 59, total 72; 99th Illinois, killed 
19, wounded 77, missing 6, total 102, Lieut. Thomas J. Kinman 
killed, Capt. Eli R. Smith and Ijieut. William Gray mortally 
wounded; 8th Indiana, killed 22, wounded 95, total 117, Capts. 
Andrew 'Daniel, Frederick S. Wysong and Hiram Y. Vande- 
vender killed ; 18th Indiana, killed 7, wounded 39, missing 1, total 
47, Maj. John C. Jenks and Lieut. John L. Lowes mortally 
w^ounded; 1st United States (serving siege guns), wounded 3; 
aggregate, killed 61, wT.unded 273, missing 7, total 341. 

UNION POSITION TABLET. 
Burbridge's Brigade; Assault, May 22, 1863. 

This brigade w^as formed for the assault in support of Benton's, 
advanced when that brigade became engaged and took position on 
its right— the 16th Indiana on the left, the 83d Ohio in the center, 
the 67th Indiana on the right, and the 23d Wisconsin, at first in 
reserve, but soon ordered to support the right of the brigade with 
four companies and the left with six. General Burbridge, com- 
manding brigade, was ordered by General Carr to send two regi- 
ments of his command to reinforce General Benton's left. In 
obedience to that order the 67th Indiana and 23d Wisconsin were 
withdrawn from the line; the order, however, was soon counter- 
manded and the two regiments were returned to the brigade line. 
A six-pounder gun of the Chicago Mercantile Battery was ordered 
to the front, and drawn by hand, with the assistance of enlisted 
men of this brigade and of Benton's Brigade, to a position about 
thirty feet from the Confederate lunette, against which it was 
vigorously served. The brigade maintained its position until near 
sunset, when it was relieved by Sanborn's Brigade and retired. 
This tablet marks the right of the 16th Indiana and the left of the 



56 Indiana at Vicksbiibg. 

S'.kl Ohio, as the l)rigade line was formed at the time of its closest 
api)roach to the Confederate intrenchment. Casnalties : 16tli In- 
diana, killed 2, wounded 12, total 14; 67th Indiana, killed 6, 
wounded 23, total 29; 83d Ohio, killed 4, wounded 19, total 23; 
23d Wisconsin, killed 2, wounded 28, missing 2, total 32; aggregate, 
killed 14, wounded 82, missing 2, total 98. 

UNION rOSLTION TABLET. 
Sanborn's Brigade; Assault. May 22, 1863. 

The 4th ]\Tinnesota, with the 48th Indiana in support, was 
formed for the assault at 10:00 a.m., in line of battle on the left 
of Roomer's Brigade, about eighty yards in front of the Confed- 
erate intrenchment and on the slope of a ridge affording some 
protection. The 59th Indiana was temporarily transferred to 
Boomers Brigade and formed with it; the 18th Wisconsin was 
deployed as skirmishers in front of that brigade and the 4th Min- 
nesota. No assault was made from that position, and, about 3 :00 
p. m.. this brigade was ordered to reinforce General McClernand's 
right ; the 59tli Indiana was returned to its command and the 18th 
Wisconsin ordered to remain on the skirmish line. The three regi- 
ments moved to the left, were directed to support Burbridge's 
Brigade in the assault on the Confederate lunette on the Baldwin's 
Ferry road, marched by the Hank through the ravine that de- 
bouches on that road at the lunette, formed line of battle, reliev- 
ing Burl:ridge's Brigade, in front and to the right of the north face 
of that work — 59th Indiana on the right, 48th Indiana in the cen- 
ter, 4th Minnesota on the left ; repulsed an attack on the right, 
held the position until after dark, retired under orders. Company 
C, 4th Minnesota, assisting in the removal of the gun of the Chi- 
cago Mercantile Battery, and returned, next day, to the brigade 
position on the investment line. This tablet marks the right of the 
4th Minnesota and the left of the 48th Indiana, as the three regi- 
ments of this brigade were formed in position at the Baldwin's 
Ferry road. Casualties : 48th Indiana, killed 8, wounded 24, 
missing 1, total 33 ; 59th Indiana, killed 11, wounded 99, missing 1, 
total 111, Lieut. Marcus B. C. Tripp killed; 4th Minnesota, killed 
12, woundred 42. total 54, I;ieut. George G. Sherbrooke killed, Lieut. 
Clark Turaer mortally woiuided; 18th Wisconsin (on skirmish 
line), killed 5, wounded 11, total 16, Lieut. William H. Alban 
mortally wounded; aggregate, killed 36, wounded 176, missing 2, 
total 214. 



Tablet Inscriptions. 57 

UNION POSITION TABLET. 

Boomer's Brigade; Assault, May 22, 1863. 
Second Position. 

This brigade moved from its first position, on the left of Ste- 
venson's Brigade of Logan's Division, about 3 :00 p. m., reported to 
General Carr about 4:00 p. m., and was ordered to assault the Con- 
federate curtain between the lunette on the Baldwin's Ferry road 
and the railroad redoubt. The brigade was formed, in two lines 
with intervals of about fifty yards, behind the crest of the ridge, 
about 400 yards in front of the Confederate curtain, in the follow- 
ing order : The 5th Iowa on the right, in front, with the 26th l\Iis- 
souri in its rear ; the 93d Illinois on the left, in front, with the 10th 
Iowa in its rear. WheiL the formation was completed, the brigade 
advanced, at common time, passed the first ridge and halted, near 
the crest of the second, to correct its alignment for the final 
assault on the Confederate curtain— the 5th Iowa being moved by 
the left flank tc the rear and partly to the left of the 93d Illinois 
and 10th Iowa. Immediately thereafter the brigade commander, 
Col. George B. Boomer, 26th Missoui'i, was instantly killed by a 
musket ball and the final assault was not made. Col. Holden Put- 
nam, 93d Illinois, assumed command, and, under orders from Gen- 
eral Carr, the brigade remained in position until after dark and then 
retired to the position where it was first formed for the afternoon 
assault — returning, next day, to its position on the investment line 
of the Seventeenth Corps. This tablet marks the place where 
Colonel Boomer was killed. Casualties in second position: 93d 
Illinois, killed 4, wounded 51, total 55; 5th Iowa, killed 2, wounded 
16, total 18; 10th Iowa, woimded 12; 26th Missouri, killed 5, 
wounded 5, total 10, Col. George B. Boomer killed; aggregate, killed 
11, wounded 84, total 95. 

CONFEDEP.ATE POSIT [ON TABLET. 
Lunette on Riglit of Baldwin's Ferry Road. 
This salient lunette and the lines immediately on its right and 
left were held. May 22, 1863, and the assaults of the Union force 
repulsed, by the 2d Texas Infantry— the right two companies 
occupying the curtain to the right; the left four companies, the 
curtain immediately north of the Baldwin's Ferry road; and four 
companies in the lunette. The 42d Alabama held the curtain be- 
tween the right of the 2d Texas and the railroad. Green's Brigade, 
about 1:00 p.m., reinforced this position; and, about 5:00 p.m.. 



58 



Indiana at Vicksbukg. 



detachments of the 1st and 3d Missouri Cavalry and of the 1st 
Arkansas Cavalry, dismounted, made a sally from the lunette and 
materially assisted in repulsing the Union assault on the left flank. 
Before the end of May the left foui* companies of the 2d Texas 
were moved into the lunette. A countermine against the Union 
approach was fired, June 28; two others were prepared, but not 
fired. Both the sap rollere in front of the two Union approaches 
to this work were burned on July 1. This tablet marks the salient 



r 




Confeclerate (Jun, Trench and Tablet — City in tlie Baclvtjround. 

angle of this lunette. Casualties : In 2d Texas during the de- 
fense: Killed 38, v^ounded 73, missing 15, total 12fi, Capt. A. F. 
Gammell and Lieut. Robert S. Henry killed, Lieut. William F. 
Kirk mortallv wounded. 



UNION POSITION TABLET. 
Lawler's Brigade; Assault, May 22, 1863. 

This brigade was formed for the assault of the Confederate 
Railroad Redoubt, in the ravine immediately in front of that re- 



Tablet Inscriptions. 59 

doubt, m two lines — the 22d Iowa on the right, supported by the 
21st Iowa, and the 11th Wisconsin on the left, supported by the 
97th Illinois of Landram's Brigade, temporarily attached. The 
brigade advanced to the assault about 10 :00 a. m., detachments of 
the 21st and 22d Iowa reached the ditch of the r(>doubt and the flag 
of the 22d was placed on its parapet ; Sergts. Joseph E. Griffith and 
N. C. Messenger and about twelve other enlisted men of that regi- 
ment mounted the parapet at the salient angle, entered the redoubt, 
captured a lieutenant and about twelve enlisted men, remained a 
short time in the work and then retired to its ditch and the out- 
side slope of the parapet, after sustaining severe loss. The 11th 
Wisconsin passed beyond the redoubt, on its left, took position in 
the ravine in front of the line of the Confederate intrenchment 
and held the position until after dark. About 5:30 p. m. the Con- 
federates made a sortie from the intrenchment in rear of the re- 
doubt, and reoccupied it ; later in tlie evening, Lieut. Col. Harvey 
Graham, 22d Iowa, and about twenty-eight enlisted men of the 
brigade were captured in the ditch of the redoubt. Detachments of 
the 21st and 22d Iowa remained in position on the slope in front of 
the redoubt until after dark, when the brigade retired, under 
orders. This tablet marks the place on the parapet of the redoubt 
where the flag of the 22d Iowa was placed. Casualties: 21st 
Iowa, killed 16, wounded 87, missing 10, total 113, Lieut. Col. Cor- 
nelius W. Duniap killed, Lieuts. Samuel Bates and William A. 
Roberts mortally wounded; 22d Iowa, killed 27, wonnded 118, 
missing 19, total 164, Capt. James Robertson and Lieut. Matthew 
A. Robb killed; 11th Wisconsin, killed 11, wounded 80, total 91, 
Lieut. Hiram E. Smith killed, Capt. Alfred J. Peaslee and Lieut. 
James Lav/ mortally wounded; aggregate, killed 54, wounded 285, 
missing 29, total 368. 

UNION POSITION TABLET. 
Landram's Brigade; Assault, May 22, 1863. 
This brigade was formed, in support of Lawler's, for the assault 
of the Confederate Railroad Redoubt, behind the crest of the ridge, 
about 380 yards in front of that redoubt, in lines of battle— the 
77th Illinois on the right supported by the 48th Ohio, the 19th 
Kentucky on the left, the 130th Illinois in support of both right 
and left. The 97th lUinois was temporarily attached to Lawler's 
Brigade and formed with it, in support of the 11th Wisconsin, on 
the left of that brigade. This brigade advanced about 10 :00 a. m.. 



60 Indiana at Vicksbueg. 

some men of the 7/'lii llliiuus renelied the clitdi of the I'edoubt 
and the Hag of that regiment was phieed on its parapet; the brigade 
took position on the slope in front of the redoubt, and the flag of 
the 130th Uliiuns was placed close to that work. About 5:30 p. m., 
the Confederates made a sortie from the intrenehment in the rear 
of the ]'edoui)t and reoecupied it ; later in the evening, about thirty 
men of the brigade were captured in the ditch of the redoubt. 
Colonel Sullivan, in his report, states that the flag of the 48th Ohio 
was also placed on the parapet and was brought off just before the 
sortie was made. This brigade held its position on the slope in 
front of the redoubt until after dark and then retired, under 
orders. This tablet marks the place on the parapet of the redoubt 
where the flag of the 77th Illinois was placed. Casualties: 77th 
Illinois, killed 19, wounded 85, missing 26, total 130; 97th Illinois, 
wounded 12, missing 2, total 14 ; 130th Illinois, killed 10, wounded 
31, total 41, Capt. "William M. Colby killed; 19th Kentucky, killed 
5, wounded 57, missing 2, total 64, Maj. Morgan V. Evans killed; 
48th Ohio, killed 10, wounded 25, total 35, Maj. Virgil H. Moats 
mortally wounded; aggregate, killed 44, wounded 210, missing 30, 
total 284. 

CONFEDERATE POSITION TABLET. 
The Railroad Redoubt. 

This salient redoubt was occupied, May 22, 1863, by a detach- 
ment of the oOtli Alabama, supported by two companies under 
Maj. 0. Steele, of Waul's Texas Legion. The intrenehment in rear 
was held by the oOtli Alabama, reinforced during the day by the 
46th Alabama, under command of Ijieut. Col. E. W. Pettus, 20th 
Alabama — a large part of the 4Gth. including all its field officers, 
having been captured. May 16, in the battle of Champion's Kill. 
About 11:00 a.m., a detachment of the 1/nion assaulting force 
reached the ditch of the redoubt and placed flas's on its parapet, a 
small party entered this work at its salient angle, where a breach 
had been made hy the Union artillery, captured a lieutenant and a 
few enlisted men, held the redoubt a short time and then retired 
to its ditch, after sustaining severe loss. This work was retaken, 
about 5:30 p.m., by detachments of Captain Bradley's and Lieu- 
tenant Hogue's companies of Waul's Texas Legion, led by Lieut. 
Col. E. W. Pettus, 20th Alabama ; later in the evening, a lieutenant 
colonel and about fifty-eight mem were captured in the ditch. The 
casualties in the commands defending and recapturing the redoubt 



Tablet Inscriptions. 61 

on that day caimot be ac<-iiratcly stated. After May 22, diiriim' 
ihe defense, this work was held by companies of the 46th Alabama. 
Countermines against the Union approach were prepared and one 
was fired the night of July 2. This tablet marks the salient angle 
at which the assaulting party entered this redoubt on May 22. 
Casualties in 46th Alabaina during the defense- Killed 15. 
wounded 45, total 60. 



CONFEDERATE POSITION TABLET. 
Small Work on Line of Lee's Brigade. 

This work was held by the right of the 30th Alal)ama, under 
command of Col. Charles M. Shelley, with the 31st Alabama on its 
right. No direct assault was made on it, but the fire from this 
work materially assisted in repidsing the assaults. May 22, 1863, 
on the lines to its right and left. During the defense, Brig. Gen. 
S. D. Lee, commanding brigade, made his headquarters, in the day- 
time, at this work. The casualties in the 30tli Alabama during the 
defense cannot be accurately stated. 

UNION POSITION TABLET. 

Osterhans' Division, Assault, May 22, 1863. 

This division was formed for the assault in three columns l)\ 
divisions at half distance, as follows : Eight column, 22d Ken- 
tucky, 42d Ohio; center column, 114th Ohio, 49th Indiana, 69th 
Indiana; left column, 7th Kentucky, 118th Illinois, 120th Ohio. 
The 16th Ohio was deployed in front as skirmishers. The division 
advanced about 10:00 a. m. ; the heads of columns approached close 
to the Confederate intrenchment ; the 7th Kentucky leading the left 
column, encountered the severest fire and suffered the greatest loss. 
This tablet marks the farthest advance of that regiment. The posi- 
tions gained were held until after dark when the division retired, 
under orders, leaving strong pickets and a line of sharpshooters 
on the most aflvanced points. Casualties: 118th Illinois, killed 
2, wounded 3, total 5; 49th Indiana, killed 2, wounded 13, total 15; 
69th Indiana, killed 2, wounded 10, total 12, Maj. John H. Finley 
and Lieut. Henry Stratton mortally wounded ; 7th Kentucky, killed 
9, wounded 60, total 69, Lieut. Thomas Buchanan moi-tally 
wounded; 120th Ohio, wounded 1 ; 22d Kentucky, killed 3, wounded 
14, total 17; 16th Ohio, killed 4, wounded 5, total 9; 42d Ohio, 
killed 1, wounded 21, missing 1, total 23; 114th Ohio, killed »i. 



62 Indiana at Vtcksbuko. 

wounded 23, total 29, Lieut. Willis C. Fergusuu luortally wounded; 
aggregate, killed 29, wounded 150, missing 1, total 180. 

CONFEDERATE POSITION TABLET. 

Siimll Work on J/um of Lee's Brigade. 

This work was held, May 22, 1863, and the assault of the Unioii 
force repulsed, by the 31st Alabama, luidev command of Lieut. 
Col. T. M. Arrington, and I\Iaj. G. W. Mathieson, with the 23d Ala- 
bama on its right and tlie 30th Alabama on its left. The casualties 
in the regiment on that day cannot be accurately stated. The regi- 
ment held the same position until the end of the defense. Cas- 
ualties during the defense: in 31st Alabama, killed 21, wounded 
37, total 58 ; in 23d Alabama, killed 17, Avounded 15, total 32. 

CONFEDERAI'E POSITION TABLET. 
Fort Garrott on Right of Lee's Brigade. 

This work and the line immediately on its left were held by the 
20th Alabama. No direct assault was made on it. May 22, 1863, by 
the Union force, but the fire from this work materially aided in 
repulsing the assault of Osterhaus' Division on the line to its left. 
Col. Isham W. Garrott was killed June 17, on duty in this fort, 
and Lieut. Col. E. W. Pettus commanded the regiment from that 
time until the end of the defense. Two countermines against the 
Union approach were prepared, but not fired. The casualties in 
the 20th Alabama during the defense cannot be accurately stated. 

CONFEDERATE POSITION TABLET. 
Salient Work on Left of Hall's Ferry Road. 

This work was held by the right companies of the 57th Georgia, 
under command of Lieut. Col. C. 8. (Tuytoii. No assault was made 
on it by the Union force. Two sorties were made from this work 
by its garrison, reinforced by the left companies of the 43d Ten- 
nessee of Reynolds' Brigade. In the last one, the night of June 22. 
1863, a lieutenant colonel and five men were captured, part of the 
Union trench was filled, and, the next night, a countertreuch from 
this wo]"k was begun. The ground gained was held until the night 
of June 24, when it was retaken by the Union force. A counter- 
mine against the Union approacli v^'as prepared, but not fired. The 
casualties in the 57th Georgia during the defense cannot be accu- 
rately stated. 



Park Inscriptions 

For the Union and Confederate Commands Engaged in the 
Operations Commemorated. 



u. s. 

ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 
Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant. 

Escort and Guards. 
4tu Illinois Cavalry, Compauy A, Capt. Embury D. Osband. 
lOlST Illinois Infantry^, Company K, Capt. Sylvester L. Moore. 

Engineers. 
1st Battalion Engineer Regiment of the West, Maj. Hem-y Flad; 

Maj. Wm. Tweeddale. 
Pioneer Corps, Capt. .John W. Fonts. 

9th Corps, Maj. Gen. John G. Parke. 
13th Corps, Maj. Gen. John A. McClernand; Maj. Gen. Edward O. C. 

Ord. 
15th Corps, Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman. 

16th Corps (detachment), Maj. Gen. Cadwallader C. Washbnrn. 
17th Corps, Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson. 
Herron's Division. Maj. Gen. Francis J. Herron. 
Unattached Cavalry (three regiments), Col. Cyrns Bussey. 
District Northeast Louisiana, Brig. Gen. Jeremiah C. Sullivan ; Brig. 
Gen. Elias S. Dennis. 

Detached for Service on Gmiboats. 
29th Illinois Infantry, detachment. 
101 ST Illinois Infantry, detachment. 
58th Ohio Infantry, Maj. Ezra P. Jackson. 

The 13tli, 15tli and 17th Corps were engaged in the battles and 
movements of the Vicksburg campaign, beginning March 29, 1863 ; 
took position on the investment line May 19— the 15th on the right, 
the 17th in the center, the 13th on the left, and made unsuccessful 
assaults on the Confederate line of defense the afternoon of May 
19 and on May 22. One division of the 16th Corps took position 
on the left of the 13th, May 25, and Herron's Division on the ex- 
treme left, June 15. The 9th Corps, two divisions of the 16th, and 

(63) 



(>4 Indtana a'I" Vk'ksiutkg. 

seven hrigfades from the other corps were deployed on an exterior 
line, from Ilaynes' Bluff on the left to the Big Blaek River Bridge 
on the right, to guard against attack by Johnston's army, and w^ere 
under command of General Sherman after June 22. Siege opera- 
tions were carried on from ]\lay 23 to July 3, when a proposal for 
capitulation came to General Grant from General Pemberton. They 
met for conference that afternoon between the lines and near the 
Jackson road. The terms of capitulation were agreed upon by cor- 
respondence after the meeting, and, July 4, the Confederate army 
of Vicksburg was surrendered to General Grant, and a detachment 
of his army occupied the city. The aggregate reported casualties 
in the army, during the campaign and siege were, killed 1,581. 
wounded 7,554, missing 1,007, total 10.142. 

U. S. 

NINTH CORPS: ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 

Maj. Gen. John G. Parke. 

1st Division. Brig. Gen. Thomas Welsh. 
2d Division. Brig. Gen. Robert B. Potter. 

Artillery Reserve : 2d TTnited States, Battery E, Lient. Samuel N. 
Benjamin. 

The two divisions of the corps were ordered from the Depart- 
ment of the Ohio June 3, 1863 ; arrived in the Yazoo River on trans- 
ports from Cairo ; disembarked June 17 ; took position from Mill- 
dale to Templeton's, and slightly fortified that line. By order of 
General Sherman, the corps took position on the exterior line from 
Haynes' Bluff to the railroad crossing of Big Black River June 29, 
the center of the corps line near Wixon's, fortified that position 
and occupied it until the end of the siege. 

IT. s. 
FIRST DIVISION. 

NINTH rORPS: ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 
Brig. Gtn. Thomas Welsh. 

First Brigade. 

Col. Henry Bowman. 

36th Massachusetts, Lieut. Col. John B. Norton. 

17th Michigan, Lieut. Col. Constant Luce. 

27th Michigan, Lieut. Ool. John H. Riciiardson ; Col. Dorus M. Fox. 

4J>TH Pennsylvania, Col. John T, Curtiii, 



Park Inscriptions. 65 

Third Brigade. 
Col. Daniel Leasube. 

2d Michigan, Col. William Humphrey. 

Sth Michigan, Col. Frank Graves. 

20rH Michigan, Lieut. Col. W. Huntington Smith. 

79th New York, Col. David Morrison. 

100th Pennsylvania, Lieut. Col. Mathew M. Dawson. 

Artillery. 
Pennsylvania Light, Battery D, Capt. George W. Durell. 



U. S. 
SECOND DIVISION. 

NINTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 
Brig. Gen. Robert B. Potter. 

First Brigade. 
Col. Simon G. Griffin. 

6th New Hampshire, Lieut. Col. Henry H. Pearson. 
9th New Hampshire. Col. Herbert B. Titus. 
7th Rhode Island, Col. Zenas R. Vliss. 

Second. Brigade. 
Brig. Gen. Edward Ferrero. 

35th Massachusetts, Col. Sumner Carruth. 
11th New Hampshire, Lieut. Col. Moses N. Collins. 
51st New York, Col. Charles W. LeGendre. 
51st Pennsylvania, Col. John F. Hartranft. 

Third Brigade. 
Col. Benjamin C. Christ. 

29th Massachusetts, Lieut. Col. Joseph H. Barnes. 

46th New York, Col. Joseph Gerhardt. 

50th Pennsylvania, Lieut. Col. Thomas S. Brenholtz. 

Artillery. 
2d New York Light, Battery L, Capt. Jacob Roemer. 



[5] 



(j(J [ndiana at Vtckshuiso. 

u. s. 

TIIIirnOENTII COKl'S; ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 

!\I:i.i. (4eii. John A. McClernand. 
yiA,]. (ien. ErwARi) O. C. Okd. 

Escort. 
oD Illinois Cavalry, Company L, Capt. David R. Sparks, 

Fioneers. 

Kentucky Infantry (inclependent company), Capt. Wnu F. Patterson. 
9th Division, Brig. Gen. Peter J. Osterhaus ; Brig. Gen. Albert L. 

Lee; Brig. Gen. Peter J. Osteiiiaus. 
10th Division, Brig. Gen, Andrew J. Smith. 
12tii Division, Brig. Gen. Alvin P. Hovey. 
14th Division, Brig. Gen. Engene A. Carr. 

The corps held the advance in the march from Milliken's Bend, 
Louisiana; went on board transports at Perkins' Landing, April 28, 
1863, under orders to attack Grand Gulf next day ; crossed the 
river to Bruinsburg, Mississippi, April 30 ; held the advance in the 
march towards Port Gibson ; took position on the investment line 
May 19, and made approaches to three points on the Confederate 
line of defense. Casualties : In the battle of Port Gil)son, May 1, 
killed 125, wounded 678, missing 23, total 826 ; in the engagement 
at Jackson, IMay 14, killed 1, wounded 2, total 3; in the battle of 
Champion's Hill, May 16, killed 231, wounded 987, missing 145, 
total 1,363 ; in the engagement at Big Black River Bridge, May 17, 
killed 39, wounded 237, missing 3, total 279 ; in skirmishes about 
Vicksburg, killed 8, wounded 23, total 31 ; in the assault, May 19, 
killed 7, wounded 93, total 100 ; in the assault. May 22, killed 202, 
wounded 1,004, missing 69, total 1,275; during the siege, killed 21, 
wounded 101. missing 1, total 123 ; in the attack on Milliken's Bend, 
Louisiana, June 7. killed 23, wounded 34, total 57 ; and other minor 
combats, wounded 10. The aggregate reported casualties in the 
corps during the campaign and siege were, killed 657, wounded 
3,169, missing 241. total 4,067. 



Park Inscriptions. (i7 

U. S. 

NINTH DIVISION. 

THIRTEENTH COltPS ; ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 

Brig. Geu. Peter ,T. Ostfehaus. 

Brig. Geu. Albert L. Lee. 

Bi-ig. Geu. Peter J. Osteehaus. 

1st Brigade, Brig. Geu. Tlieopliilus T. Garrard; Brig. Geu. Albert L. 

Lee; Col. .James Keigwiu. 
2d Brigade. Col. Liouel A. Slieldou ; Col. Dauiel W. Liudsey. 
Cavalry (three detaclimeuts). 
Artillery (two batteries), Capt. Jacob T. Foster. 

The division began the march from Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, 
]\Iareh 31, 1863; advanced in three columns with division fronts 
against the Confederate line of defense immediately north of Fort 
Garrott, in the assault. May 22, and carried the colors of its leading 
regiments close to that line. Casualties: In the battle of Port 
Gibson, May 1, killed 36, wounded 175, missing 3, total 214, one 
officer killed; in the engagement at Jackson, May 14, killed 1, 
wounded 2, total 3; in the battle of Champion's Hill, May 16, 
killed 19, wounded 88, missing 26, total 133, three officers killed ; in 
the engagement at Big Black River Bridge, May 17, killed 10, 
wounded 20, missing 1, total 31, one officer killed; in skirmishes 
about Vicksburg, killed 3, wounded 9, total 12 ; in the assault, May 
19, killed 2, wounded 62, total 64 ; in the assault. May 22, killed 29, 
wounded 150, missing 1, total 180, four officers mortally wounded; 
during the siege, wounded 12 ; and other minor combats, wounded 
6. The aggregate reported casualties in the division during the 
campaign and siege were, killed 100, wounded 524, missing 31, 
total, 655. 

U. S. 
First Brigade. 

NINTH DIVISION; THIRTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 
Brig. Gen. Theophilus T. Gaerard. 
Brig. Geu. Albert L. Lee. 
Col. James Keigwin. 

118th Illinois, Col. Johu G. Fouda. 

49th Indiana. Col. James Keigwiu; Lieut. Col. Joseph II. Thorutou ; 

Col. James Kiegwin ; Maj. Arthur J. Hawhe; Lieut. Col. Joseph 

H. Thorutou. 
69th Indiana, Col. Thomas W. Beuuett; Lieut. Col. Orau Perry. 
7th Kentucky, Capt. Elisha B. Treadway; Lieut. Col. Johu Lucas; 

Capt. Elisha B. Treadway ; Col. Reubeu May. 
120th Ohio, Col. Marcus M. Spiegel. 



(3S Indiana at Vicksbueg. 

The brigade was ordered to Big Black River Bridge, »Iay 23, 
1863 under command of General Osterhaus, and remained there 
until the end of the siege. Casualties : In the battle of Port Gib- 
son May 1 killed 18, wounded 102, missing 3, total 123 ; m the bat- 
tle of Champion's Hill, May 16, killed 11, wounded 44, missing 13, 
total 68, three officers killed; in the engagement at Big Black River 
Brido-e 'May 17, wounded 1 ; in skirmishes about Vicksburg, killed 
1- in the assault. May 19. killed 1, wounded 28, total 29; in the 
assault, May 22, killed 15, wounded 87, total, 102, three officers 
mortally wounded; and in skirmish near Edwards, July 1, wounded 
3 The aggregate reported casualties in the brigade during the 
campaign 7nd siege were, killed 46, wounded 265, missing 16, 
total 327. 

U. S. 
Second Brigade. 

NINTH DIVISION; THIKTEENTH COUPS: ARMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 

Col. I.TONEL A. Sheldon; 

Col. Daniel W. Lindsey. 

54th Indiana, Col. Fielding Mausfleld. 

22d Kentucky, Maj. William J. Worthington ; Lieut. Col. George \\. 

Monroe. 
IGtii Ohio, Capt. Eli W. Botsford; Maj. Milton Mills. 
42d Ohio, Lieut. Col. Don A. Pardee; Maj. William H. Williams; Col. 

Lionel A. Sheldon. 
114th Ohio. Col. John Cradlebaugh ; Lieut. Col. John H. Kelley; Col. 
, John Cradlebaugh; Lieut. Col. John H. Kelley. 

The brigade took position on the investment line on the left of 
Carr's Division and the right of Hovey's, temporarily under com- 
mand of General Ilovey ; its regiments (excepting the 114th Ohio, 
sent to garrison, Warrenton, Mississippi) were successively ordered 
to report to General Osterhaus at Big Black River Bridge during 
the siege. Casualties: In the battle of Port, Gibson, May 1, 1863, 
killed 15, wounded 66, total, 81, one officer killed; in the battle of 
Champion's Hill, May 16, killed 6, wounded 42, missing 13, total 
61 ; in the engagement at Big Black River Bridge, May 17, killed 
10,' wounded 14, missing 1, total 25, one officer killed; in skirmishes 
about Vicksburg, killed 2, wounded 8, total 10 ; in the assault, May 
19, killed 1, wounded 34, total 35; in the assault. May 22, killed 14, 
wounded 63, missing 1, total 78, one officer mortally wounded ; dur- 
ing the siege, wounded 12. The aggregate reported casualties in 
the brigade during the campaign and siege were, killed 48, wounded 
239, missing 15, total 302. 



Park Insceiptions. 69 

u. s. 

Cavalry. 

NINTH DIVISION; THIRTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 

2d Illinois (five comiianies), Lienl:. Col. Daniel B. Bush. Jr. 
3d Illinois (three companies), Capt. John L. Campbell. 
Gth Missouri (seven companies). Col. Clark Wright. 

Casualties: In skirmish at Dunbar's Plantation, Louisiana. 
April 15, 1863, wounded 2 (in 2d Illinois) ; in the engagement at 
Jackson, May 14, killed 1, wounded 2, total 3 (in 6th Missouri) ; in 
the battle of Champion's Hill, May 16, killed 2, wounded 2, total 4 
(3d Illinois, wounded 1, 6th Missouri, killed 2, wounded 1, total 3) ; 
and in skirmish at Birdsong Ferry, June 12, wounded 1 (in 6th Mis- 
souri). The aggregate reported casualties in the three detachments 
during the campaign and siege were, killed 3, wounded 7, total 10. 



U. S. 

Artillery. 

NINTH DIVISION; THIRTEENTH CORRS ; ARMY OF THE 
TENNESSEE. 

Capt. Jacob T. Foster. 

Michigan Light, 7th Battery, Capt. Cliarles II. Lani)liere. 
Wisconsin Light. 1st Battery, Lieut. Charles B. Kinilnill; Lieut. 
Oscar F. Nutting. 

Casualties: In the battle of Port Gibson, May 1, 1863, killed 
3, wounded 7, total 10 (in Michigan Battery, killed 3, wounded 3, 
total 6; in Wisconsin Battery, wounded l) ; in the engagement at 
Big Black River Bridge, May 17, wounded 4 (in Wisconsin Bat- 
tery) ; and in skirmishes about Vicks])urg, wounded 1 (in IMichigan 
Battery) . The aggregate reported casualties in the command dur- 
ing the campaign and siege were, killed 3, wounded 12, total 15. 



To Indiana at VrcMCSBURo. 

u. s. 

TENTH DIVISION. 

TIllKTEENTir ('OKI'S; AliMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 
7>i-i.s:. (!on. Anorew J. Smith. 

Escort. 

4th liNuiANA Cavalry. Company C, Capt. Joseph P. Lesslie; Capt. 

Andrew P. Gallagher. 
1st Brigade, Brig. Gen. Stephen G. Burbridge. 
2d Brigade, Col. William .T. Landram. 
ARTir.i.ER"»', two batteries. 

The division held tJie right of the corps inve.stment line and 
made an approach to within ahout ten feet of the ditch of the Con- 




Conteder.-ite Sonili Fori Lonkini;- Nui'tli. 



federate lunette on the Baldwin's Ferry road. Cn.sualties: In the 
battle of Port Gibson, May 1, 1863, idlled 2, wounded 29, missing 
8, total 39; in the battle of Champion's Hill, May 16, wounded 25; 
in the engagement at Big Black River Bridge, May 17, wounded 1, 
missing 1 , total 2 ; in skirmishes about Vicksburg, k'illed 4, wounded 



Park Insckiptions. qi 

14, total 18: m the assault, iMay 19, killed 5, wounded 30, total 35; 
in the assault. May 22, killed 58, wounded 295, missing 32, total 
385, three officers killed or mortally wounded ; and during the siege, 
killed 1, wounded 11, missing 1, total 13. The aggregate reported 
casualties in the division during the campaign and siege were, 
killed 70, wounded 405, missing 42, total 517. 



u. s. 

First Brigade. 

TENTH DIVISION; THIRTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 

Brig. Gen. Stephen G. Burbridge. 

16th Indiana, Col. Thomas J. Lucas: Maj. James H. Redfield. 

60th Indiana, Col. Richard Owen. 

67th Indiana, Lieut. Col. Theodore E. Buehler. 

83d Ohio, Col. Frederick W. Moore. 

96th Ohio, Lieut Col. Albert H. Brown; Col. Joseph W. Vance. 

23d Wisconsin, Col. Joshua J. Guppey; Lieut. Col. William F. Vilas. 

The brigade, in support of Benton's Brigade of Carr's Di- 
vision, attacked the north face of the lunette on the Baldwin's 
Ferry road, in the assault. May 22, 1863, placed its colors close to 
that work, and held its position until relieved by Sanborn's Brigade 
of Quinby's Division, 17th Corps. It held the left of the division 
investment line. Casualties : In the battle of Port G-ibson, May 1. 
wounded 8; in the battle of Champion's Hill. May 16, wounded 16; 
in the engagement at Big Black River Bridge, May 17, wounded 1, 
missing 1, total 2 ; in skirmishes about Vicksburg, killed 3, wounded 
14, total 17. one officer killed; in the assault. May 19, killed 2. 
wounded 15, total 17 ; and in the assault. May 22, killed 14, wounded 
82, missing 2, total 98. The aggregate reported casualties in the 
brigade during the campaign and siege were, killed 19, wounded 
136, missing 3, total 158. 



72 Indiana at Vicksbueg. 

U. S. 
Second Brigade. 

TENTH DIVISION; THIRTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 

Col. William J. Landeam. 

77th Illinois. Col. Djivid P. Grier. 

97x11 Illinois, Col. Friend S. Rutherford; Lieut. Col. Lewis D. Mar- 
tin. 

KlOrii Illinois, Col. Nathaniel Niles. 

19tii Kentucky, Lieut. Col. John Cowan; Ma.i. Josiah J. Maun. 

4STI1 Ohio, Capt. Joseph W. Lindsey; Maj. Virgil H. Moats; Lieut. 
Col. Job R. Parker ; Capt. Joseph W. Lindsey ; Col. Peter J. Sul- 
livan. 

The l)rigade, in support of Lawler's Brigade of Carr's Division, 
attacked the railroad redoubt, in the assault, May 22, 1863, placed 
the colors of the 77th Illinois on the parapet of that work, and held 
its position in front of the redoubt until dark. It held the right of 
the division investment line. Casualties : In the battle of Port 
Gibson, May 1, killed 2, wounded 21, missing 8, total 31; in the 
battle of Champion's Hill, May 16, wounded 6; in skirmishes about 
Vicksburg, 1 officer killed ; in the assault, ]\Iay 19, killed 3, wounded 
15, total 18; in the assault, May 22, killed 44, wounded 210, missing 
30, total 284, three officers killed or mortally wounded ; and during 
the siege, killed 1, wounded 11, missina- 1, total 13. The aggregate 
reported casualties in the brigade during the campaign and siege 
were, killed 51, wounded 263, missing 39, total 353. 

U. S. 
Artillert/. 

TENTH DIVISION; THIRTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 
TENNESSEE. 

Chicago Mercantile Battery, Capt. Patrick II. White. 
Ohio Light, 17th P.attery, Capt. Ambrose A. Blount; Capt. Charles 
S. Rice. 

In the assault, Ma.y 22, 1863, one gun of the Chicago Mercantile 
Battery was dragged by hand to within a few yards of the Confed- 
erate lunette on the Baldwin's Ferry road and served against that 
work for several hours. Casualties: In the battle of Champion's 
Hill, May 16, wounded 3 (in the Chicago Mercantile Battery) ; and 
in the assault. May 22, wounded 3 (in the Ohio Battery). The 
aggregate reported casualties in the two batteries during the cam- 
paign and siege were, wounded 6. 



Paek Insckiptions. 73 

u. s. 

TWELFTH DIVISION. 

THIRTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 
Brig. Gen. Alvin P. Hovey. 

Escort. 

1st Indiana Cavalry, Company C. Capl. William McReynolds; Lieut. 

.Tames L. Carey. 
1st Lrigade, Brig. Gen. George F. McGinnis; Col. William T. Sjiicely; 

Brig. Gen. George F. McGinnis. 
2d Brigade, Col. Peter Kinney; Col. James R. Slack. 
Artillery, three batteries. 

The division held the left of the corps investment line and made 
an approach to within al-ont thirty-five feet of the ditch of the Con- 
federate Fort Garrott. Casnalties: In the battle of Port [libson, 
May 1, 1863, killed 45, wounded 252, missing 12, total 309; in skii-- 
mish on Fourteen-Mile Creek. INIay 13, wounded 4, cannot be dis- 
tributed l)etween the two brigades; in the battle of Champion's Hill, 
May 16, killed 211, wounded 872, missing 119, total 1,202, nineteen 
officers killed or mortally wounded ; and during the siege, killed 19, 
wounded 76, total 95, cannot be distributed between the two 
brigades. The aggregate reported casualties in the division during 
the campaign and siege were, killed 275, wounded 1.204, missing 
131, total 1,610. 

IT. S. 
First Brigade. 

TWELFTH DIVISION; THIRTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 
Brig. Gen. George F. McGinnis; 
Col. William T. Spicely; 
Brig. Gen. George F. McGinnis. 

llTH Indiana, Col. Daniel Macauley; Lieut. Col. William W. Darnall. 

24th Indiana, Col. William T. Spicely. 

34th Indiana, Col. Robert A. Cameron; Lieut. Col. William Swaim; 

Maj. Robert B. Jones; Col. Robert A. Cameron. 
46th Indiana, Col. Thomas H. Bringhurst. 
29th Wisconsin, Col. Charles R. Gill; Lieut. Col. William A. Greene. 

The brigade was in support of Osterhaus' Division in the 
assault. May 22, 1863, and was not seriously engaged ; it held the 
left of the division investment line. Casualties: In the battle of 
Port Gil)son, May 1, killed 30, wounded 187, missing 1, total 218; 
and in the battle of Champion's Hill, May 16, killed 102, wounded 
506, missing 26, total 634, seven officers killed or mortally wounded. 



74 IXDTANA AT VjOKSBURG. 

The aggregate reported casualties in the brigade during the cam- 
paign and siege were, killed 132, wounded 693, missing 27, total 852. 

U. S. 

Second Brigade. 

TWELFTH DIVISION; THIRTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 
Col. Peter Kinney : 
Col. James R. Slack. 

87th Illinois, Col. John E. Whiting. 

47th Indiana, Col. James R. Slack ; Lieut. Col. John A. McLaughlin. 

24th Iowa. Col. Eber C. Byam ; Lieut. Col. John Q. Wilds. 

28th Iowa, Col. John Connell. 

56th Ohio, Col. William II. Raynor. 

The brigade was at Big Black River Bridge during the assault, 
May 22, 1863, and took position on the right of the division invest- 
ment line ]\Iay 25. The 87th Illinois was assigned June 23. Cas- 
ualties: In the battle of Port fribson, May 1, killed 15, wounded 
62, missing 11, total 88; and in the battle of Champion's Hill, May 
16, killed 108, wounded 363, missing 93, total 564, eleven officers 
killed or mortally wounded. The aggregate reported casualties in 
the Ijrigade during the campaign and siege were, killed 123, 
wounded 425, missing 104, total 652. 

U. s. 
Artillertf. 

TWELFTH DIVISION; THIRTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 

1st Missouri Light, Battex'y A, Capt. George W. Schofleld. 
Ohio Light, 2d Battery, Lieut. Augustus Beach. 

Ohio Light, 16th Battery, Capt. James A. Mitchell ; Lieut. Russell 
P. Twist. 

The 2d Ohio Battery was with General Osterhaus at Big Black 
River Bridge during the siege. The Missouri Battery served the 
siege guns on the investment line of Hovey's Division. Casualties: 
In the battle of Port Gibson, May 1, 1863, wounded 3 (in the 2d 
Ohio Battery) ; and in the battle of Champion's Hill, May 16, 
killed 1, wounded 3, total 4 (in the Missouri Battery, wounded 2, 
and in the 16th Ohio Battery, killed Capt. James A. Mitchell, 
wounded 1, total 2). The aggregate reported casualties in the 
three batteries during the campaign and siege were, killed 1, 
wounded 6, total 7. 



Pajik Insojmptions. 75 

U. s. 
FOLIRTEENTII DIVISION. 

THIRTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 
Brig. Gen. Eugene A. Carr. 

Escort. 

3d Illinois Cavalry, Company G. Capt. Enos McPliail; Capt. Samuel 
S. Mari-ett. 

1st Brigade, Brig. Gen. William P. Benton; Col. Henry D. Washburn; 
Col. David Shimk. 

2d Brigade, Col. Charles L. Harris: Col. William M. Stone; Col. Sam- 
uel Merrill; Col. William M. Stone; Brig. Gen. Michael K. Law- 
ler. 

Artillery, two batteries. 

The division was in advance in the march from Briiinslnirg 
towards Port Gibson, held the center of the corps investment line, 
and made an approach to within about thirty feet of the ditch of 
the Confederate Railroad Redoubt. Casualties: In the battle of 
Port Gibson, ]\Iay 1, 1863, killed 42, wounded 222, total 264; in 
the battle of Champion's Hill, May 16, killed 1, wounded 2, total 3; 
in the engagement at Big Black River Bridge, May 17, killed 29. 
wounded 216, missing 1, total 246, six officers killed or mortally 
wounded ; in skirmishes about Vicksburg, one officer killed ; in the 
assault. May 22, killed 115, wounded 559, missing 36, total 710, six- 
teen officers killed or mortally wounded; in the attack on Milliken's 
Bend, Louisiana, June 7. killed 23, wounded 34, total 57 ; and dur- 
ing the siege, killed Capt. Enos McPhail. wounded 2, total 3. The 
aggregate reported casualties in the division during the campaign 
and siege were, killed 212, wounded 1,035, missing 37, total 1.284. 

V. s. 
First Brlcjade. 

FOURTEENTH DIVISION; THIRTEENTH CORPS: ARMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 
Brig. Gen. William P. Benton: 
Col. Henry D. Washburn. 
Col. David Shunk. 

38d Illinois, Col. Charles E. Lippincott. 

99th Illinois, Col. George W. K. Bailey; Capt. Asa C. Matthews: 
Lieut. Col. Lemuel Parke. 
8th Indiana, Col. David Shunk; Maj. Thomas J. Brady. 

18th Indiana, Col. Henry D. Washburn; Capt. Jonathan II. Wil- 
liams. 

1st United States (siege guns), Maj. Maurice Maloney. 



76 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

Thr brigade advanced ay'aiiist the Confederate Lunette on the 
Baldwin's Ferry road in tlie assault. May 22, 1863, and placed the 
colors of its regiments close to that worJc and to the curtain south 
of it, the flag of the 99th Illinois being carried across the curtain. 
The brigade held the right of the division ijivestnient line. Casual- 
ties : In the battle of Port Gibson, May 1, killed 27, wounded 134, 
total 161; in the battle of Champion's Hill, May 16, killed 1, 
wounded 2, total 3; in the engagement at Big Black River 
Bridge, May 17, Icilled 1, wounded 22, missing 1, total 24; in skir- 
mishes about Vicksburg, one officer killed; in the assault. May 22, 
killed 61, wounded 273, missing 7, total 341, eight officers killed or 
mortally wounded ; and during the siege, one officer and one en- 
listed man of the 1st U. S. Infantry mortally wounded. The aggre- 
gate reported casualties in the brigade during the campaign and 
siege were, killed 91, wounded 433. missing 8, total 532. 

u. s. 

Second Brigade. 

FOUKTEKXTII DIVISION; THIRTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 
Col. Charles L. Harris ; 
Col. William M. Stone; 
Col. Samuel Merrill ; 
Col. William M. Stone ; 
Bi'ig. Geu. Michael K. Lawler. 

21st Iowa. Col. Samuel Mprrill ; Maj. Saliie G. Van Aiida ; Lieut. Col. 
Cornelius W. Dnnla]i ; Maj. Salue G. A'an Anda. 

22i) Iowa, Lieut. Col. llarvey (Jrahain; Col. AVilliani M. Stone; Maj. 
Joseph I>. Atlierton ; Cdl. William M. Stuue; Lieut. Col. Harvey 
Graham; Maj. Joseph I>. Atherton; Capt. Charles N. Lee. 

2oi) Iowa, Lieut. Col. Samuel L. (Glasgow; Col. William II. Kinsman; 
Col. Sanniel L. Glasgow. 

11th Wisconsin. Lieut. Col. Charles A. Wood; Col. Charles L. Har- 
ris: Maj. Arthur Piatt. 

The brigade advanced against the Confederate Railroad Re- 
doubt in the assault, ]\Iay 22, 1863, placed the colors of the 22d 
Iowa on the parapet of that work, and temporarily occupied a part 
of it with a small detachment. The 23d Iowa was detailed to guard 
prisoners to Memphis, Tennessee, at the close of the engagement at 
Big Black River Bridge, May 17, and was engaged in the attack on 
Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, June 7, before rejoining the brigade. 
Casualties : In the battle of Port Gibson, May 1, killed 13, 
wounded 88. total 101 ; in the engagement at Big Black River 
Bridge, May 17, killed 27, wounded 194, total 221, Col. William H. 



Park Inscriptions. 77 

Kinsman and five other officers killed or mortally wounded; in the 
assault, I\ray 22, killed 54, wounded 285, missing 29, total 368, Lieut. 
Col. Cornelius W. Dunlap and seven other officers killed or mortally 
wounded; and in the attack on Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, June 7, 
killed 23, wounded 34, total 57. The aggregate reported easualtie^ 
in the brigade during the campaign and siege were, killed 117, 
wounded 601, missing 29, total 747. 




Gun of the First Battery. Indiana Liglit Artillery. 



U. S. 
Artillery. 

FOT^RTEENTH DIVISION; THIRTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 

2d Illinois Light, Battery A, Lieut. Jacob C. Hansel ; Lieut. Frank 

B. Fentou ; Capt. Peter Davidson. 
Indiana Light, 1st Battery, Capt. Martin Klauss. 

Casualties : In the battle of Port Gibson, May 1, 1863, killed 2 
(one in each battery) ; in the engagement at Big Black River 
Bridge, May 17, killed 1 (in the Indiana Battery) ; and in the 
assault, May 22, wounded 1 (in the Indiana Battery). The aggre- 



78 Imiia.na ai' Vh'Ksiiiinii. 

gate i'('])()i-U'(l cnsiiallics in llie two batteries during the campaign 
and siege were, ]<illed ;5, \vounded 1, total 4. 

u. s. 

FIFTEENTH C'OIU'S : ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 
Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman. 

1st Division. Maj. Gen. Frederick Steele. 

2d Division, Brig. Gen. David Stuart; Maj. Gen. Frank P. Blair. 

oD Division, Brig. Gen. James M. Tuttle. 

Cavalry : 4tli luwa, Lieut. Col. Simeon D. Swan. 

Artillery (nine liatteries). Maj. Ezra Taylor. 

The corps took position on the right of the investment line. May 
19, 1863 — Steele's Division on the right, resting its right at the river 
above Vicksburg, Blair's on the left across the Graveyard road, and 
Tuttle 's at first in reserve but later in the center. It made close 
approaches to four points on the Confederate line of defense and 
started mines at all of them. Casualties : In skirmish on Four- 
teen-Mile Creek, May 12, killed 6, wounded 6. total 12; in the en- 
gagement at Jackson, May 14, killed 6, wounded 22, missing 4, 
total 32 ; in skirmishes about Vicksburg, killed 4, wounded 16, miss- 
ing 2, total 22; in the assault, I\Iay 19. killed 134, Avounded 571, 
missing 8, total 713 ; in the assault. May 22, killed 150, wounded 
666, missing 42. total 858 : during the siege, killed 19. wounded 31, 
missing }, total 51 ; in action at Hill's Plantation, June 22, killed 8, 
wounded 16, missing 23, total 47; and other minor combats, killed 
1, wounded 11, total 12. The aggregate reported casualties in the 
corps during the campaign and siege were, killed 328, wounded 
1,339, missing 80, total 1,747. 

u. s. 

FIRST DIVISION. 

FIFTEENTH CORI'S : ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 

Maj. Gen. FREnERicK Steele. 

Cavalry. 
Kane County ( Illinois) Independf:nt Company, Lieut. Thomas J. 

Beebe. 
3d Illinois, Company D, Lieut. .James K. McLean; Capt. Thomas M. 

Davis ; Lieut. Jonathan Kershner. 
1st Brigade, Brig. Gen. Frank P. Blair: Col. Francis II. Manter; Col. 

Bernard G. Farrar. 
2d Brigade, Brig. Gen. Charles II. Hovey ; Col. Charles R. Woods.. 
3d Brigade. Brig. Gen. John M. Thayer. 
Artillery, three batteries. 



Park Inscriptions. 79 

The division marched from Miilikon's Bend, Louisiana, M;\\ 2, 
1863 ; crossed the river to Grand Gulf, Mississippi, May 6 and 7 ;' 
and wa^ engaged at Jackson, May 14, without casualties. In the 
assault, May 22, it advanced, late in the afternoon, against the Con- 
federate line of defense in front of its left (third) brigade, that 
brigade leading, and carried the colors of some of its regiments 
close to that line. The division made an approach to the part of 
the Confederate line of defense which it assaulted, May 22. Cas- 
ualties: In skirmish on Fourteen-Mile Creek, May 12, killed 5, 
wounded 6, total 11; in skirmishes about Vicksburg, one officer 
killed; in the assault. May 19, killed 9, wounded 55, total 64, two 
officers killed ; in the assault. May 22, killed 74, wounded 270, miss- 
ing 9, total 353, fourteen officers killed or mortally wounded; and 
during the siege, killed 16, wounded 11, total 27, two officers killed 
or mortally wounded. The aggregate reported casualties in the 
division during the campaign and siege were, killed 105, wounded 
342, missing 9, total 456. 

u. s. 

Fiist Brigade. 

FIRST DIVISION; FIFTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 

Brig. Geu. Frank P. Blair ; 
Col. Francis H. Manter ; 
Col Bernard G. Fabrar. 

13th Illinois, Col. Adam B. Gorgas. 

27th MissoaRi, Col. Thomas Curly. 

29th Missouri, Col. James Peckliam. 

30th Missouri. Lieut. Col. Otto Sciiadt. 

31ST Missouri. Lieut. Col. Samuel P. Simpson; Col. Thomas C. Fletch- 
er; Lieut. Col. Samuel P. Simpson; Maj. Frederick Jaensch ; 
Lieut. Col. Samuel P. Simpson. 

32d Missouri, Col. Francis H. Manter; Maj. Abraham J. Seay. 

The brigade formed part of the expeditionary force under com- 
mand of General Blair, marched to Mechanicsburg, returned to the 
investment line about June 4, 1863, and took position in the cen- 
ter of the division. Casualties : In the assault, May 19, killed 1, 
wounded 9, total 10, one officer killed; and in the assault, May 22, 
killed 2, wounded 5, total 7, one officer killed. The aggregate re- 
ported casualties in the brigade during the campaign and siege were, 
killed 3, wounded 14, total 17. 



80 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

u. s. 

Second Brigade. 

FlUST DIVISION; FIFTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 
Brig. Gen. Charles E. Hovey ; 
Col. Charles R. Woods. 

25th Iowa, Col. George A. Stone. 

31ST Iowa, Col. William Smyth; Ma.i. Theodore Slimming. 

3d Missouri, Col. Isaac F. Shepard; Lieut. Col. Theodore Meumann. 

12th Missouri, Col. Hugo Waugelin. 

17th Missouri, Col. Francis Hassendeubel ; Maj. Francis Romer; Col. 

Francis Hassendeubel ; Lieut. Col. John F. Cramer. 
76th Ohio. Col. Charles R. Woods; Lieut. Col. William B. Woods. 

The brigade held the right of the division investment line. Cas- 
ualties : In skirmish on Fonrteen-Mile Creek, May 12, 1863, killed 
4, wounded 6, total 10 ; in skirmishes about Vicksburg, one officer 
killed; in the assault. May 19, killed 1, wounded 3, total 4, one offi- 
cer killed; in the assault May 22, killed 37, wounded 145, missing 8. 
total 190, five officers killed or mortally wounded; and during the 
siege, one officer killed. Col. Francis Hassenduebel mortally 
wounded, total 2. The aggregate reported casualties in the brigade 
during the campaign and siege were, killed 44, wounded 155, miss- 
ing 8, total 207. 

U. S. 
l^hird Brigade. 

FIRST DIVISION; FIL^rBENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 

Brig. Gen. John M. Thayer. 

4th Iowa, Col. James A. Williamson ; Lieut. Col. George Burton. 

t)TH Iowa, Maj. Don A. Carjienter ; Capt. Frederick S. Washburn ; 
Maj. Don A. Carpenter; Col. David Carskaddon. 
26th Iowa, Col. Milo Smith. 
30th Iowa, Col. Charles H. Abbott; Col. William N. G. Torrence. 

The brigade held the left of the division investment line and 
made an approach to the part of the Confederate line of defense 
assaulted by the division, Ma^' 22, 1863. Casualties: In the 
assault, May 19, killed 7, wounded 43, total 50 ; in the assault. May 
22, killed 35, wounded 119, missing 1, total 155, Col. Charles H. 
Abbott and seven other officers killed or mortally wounded; and 
during the siege, killed 15, wounded 10, total 25. The aggregate 
reported casualties in the brigade during the campaign and siege 
were, killed 57, wounded 172, missing 1, total 230. 



Paek Inscriptions. 81 

u. s. 

Artillery. 

FIRST DIVISION; FIFTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 
TENNESSEE. 
Iowa Light, 1st Battery, Capt. Henry H. Griffiths. 
2ij Missouri Light, Battery F, Capt. Clemens Laudgraeber. 
Ohio Light, 4tli Batlery, Capt. Lonis Hoffman; Lieut. George Froeh- 
lich. 

Casualties : In the battle of Port Gibson, May 1, 1863, wounded 
1 (in the Iowa Battery) ; in skirmish on Fourteen-Mile Creek, May 
12, killed 1 (in the Missouri Battery) ; and in the assault. May 22, 
wounded 1 (in the Missouri Battery). The aggregate reported 
casualties in the three batteries during the campaign and siege 
were, killed 1, wounded 2, total 3. The casualty in the Iowa Bat- 
tery is credited to the Second Brigade, Fourteenth Division, 13th 
Corps, to w hich it was temporarily attached. 

U. S. 
SECOND DIVISION. 

FIFTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 
Brig. Gen. David Stuart; 
Maj. Gen. Frank P. Blair. 

Caimlry. 

Thielemann's (Illinois) Battalion, Companies A. and B. Capt. Milo 
Thielemann. 

10th Missouri, Company C, Capt. Daniel W. Ballon ; Lieut. Benjamin 
Joel. 

1st Brigade, Col. Giles A. Smith. 

2d Brig\pe, Col. Thomas Kilby Smith; Brig. Gen. Joseph A. J. Light- 
burn. 

3d Brigade. Brig. Gen. Hugh Ewing. 

Artillery, four batteries. 

The division, under command of Maj. Gen. William T. Sher- 
man, made a feint attack on the Confederate batteries at Haynes' 
Bluff, Mississippi, April 30 and May 1, 1863. It made three close 
approaches to the Confederate line of defense, starting mines at all 
of them. Casualties: In skirmishes about Vicksburg, killed 2, 
wounded 3, total 5; in the assault, May 19, killed 120, wounded 
485, missing 8, total 613, thirteen officers killed or mortally 
wounded ; and in the assault. May 22, killed 58, wounded 242, miss- 
ing 4, total 304, four officers killed or mortally wounded. The ag- 
gregate reported casualties in the division during the campaign and 
siege were, killed 180, wounded 730, missing 12, total 922. 

L61 



82 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

u. s. 

First Briijadc. 

SECOND DIVISION; FIFTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 

Col. Giles A. Smith. 

lloTii iLi.iiNois (detachment), Col. George B. Hoge; Lieut. Col. Jobu 

W. Paddock. 
116x11 Illinois, Col. Nathan W. Tu]iper. 
6th Missouri, Col. James II. Blood; Lieut. Col. Ira Boutell ; Col. 

James H. Blood. 
Stii Missouri. Lieut. Col. David C Coleman ; Maj. Dennis T. Kirby ; 

Lieut. Col. David C. Coleman. 
13th United States, 1st Battalion. Maj. Daniel Chase; Capt. Edward 

C. Washington; Capt. Charles Ewing; Capt. Charles C. Smith. 

The brigade marched from Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, May 7, 
1863 ; crossed the river to Grand Gulf, Mississippi, May 11 ; was en- 
gaged in the battle of Champion's Hill, INIay 16, without casual- 
ties; advanced against the north face of the Confederate Stockade 
Redan, in the assault, ]\Iay 19, and carried the colors of some of the 
regiments close to that work ; advanced against the Confederate line 
of defense immediately south of the Graveyard road, in the assault. 
May 22, and carried the colors of some of its regiments close to that 
line. It held the left of the division investment line and made an 
approach to the Confederate Lunette south of the Graveyard road. 
Casualties : In the assault. May 19, killed 37, wounded 164, miss- 
ing 1, total 202, two officers mortally wounded; and in the assault. 
May 22, killed 20, wounded 81, missing 1, total 102, two officers 
killed or mortally wounded. The aggregate reported casualties in 
the brigade during the campaign and siege were, kiUed 57, wounded 
245, missing 2, total 304. 

U. S. 
Second Brigade. 

SECOND DIVISION; FIFTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 
Col. Thomas Kilby Smith ; 
Brig. Gen. Joseph A. J. Lightburn. 

5oth Illinois, Col. Oscar Malmborg. 
127th Illinois, C<»i. Hamilton N. Eldrldge. 
83d Indiana, Col. Benjamin J. Spooner, 
54th Ohio, liieut. Col. Cyrus W. Fisher. 

57th Ohio, Col. William Mungen ; Col. Americus V. Rice; Lieut. Col, 
Samuel R, Mott. 



Paiuv Insukii'tions. ^:> 

The brigade marched from Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, May 7, 
1863; crossed the river to Grand Gulf, Mississippi, May 11; was 
engaged in the battle of Champion's Hill, May 16, without casual- 
ties; advanced against the east face of the Confederate Stockade 
Redan, in the assault the afternoon of May 19, and carried the colors 
of some of its regiments close to that work ; was not closely engaged 
in the assault, May 22; formed part of the expeditionary force 
under General Blair and marched to Mechanicsburg ; returned to 
the investment line, June 4; took position on the right of the di- 
vision ; and, after June 11, carried forAvard the approach to the 
Confederate Stockade west of the redan on the Graveyard road, be- 
gun by the First and Third Brigades of the Third Division. Cas- 
ualties: In the assault. May 19, killed 29, wounded 125, missing 
1, total 155, five officers killed or mortally wounded ; and in the 
assault, May 22, killed 11, wounded 45, total 56. The aggregate 
reported casualties in the l)rigade during the campaign and siege 
were, killed 40, wounded 170, missing 1, total 211. 

u. s. 

Third Brigade. 

SECOND DIVISION; FIFTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 
TENNESSEE. 

Brig. Geu. Hugh Ewing. 

30th Ohio. Col. Tlieodore Jones; Lieut. Col. Geovge H. Hilclt ; Col 
Theodore Jones. 

37th Ohio. Col. Edward Siber ; Lieut. Col. Louis von Blessingh ; Maj. 
Charles Hipp; Col. Edward Siber. 

47th Ohio, Col. Augustus C. Parry. 

4th AVest Virginia, Col. Joseph A. J. Lightburn ; Col. James H. Day- 
ton. 

The brigade marched from Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, May 9, 
1863; crossed the river to Grand Gulf, Mississippi, May 15; 
marched by way of Raymond and Champion's Hill to join the di- 
vision at Vicksburg, arriving at midnight. May 18, advanced 
against the curtain west of the Confederate Stockade Redan, in the 
assault the afternoon of ilay 19, and carried the colors of some of 
its regiments close to the Confederate line : advanced by the flank 
on the Graveyard road, in the assault, ]\lay 22, against the Confed- 
erate Stockade Redan on that road, following the division volun- 
teer storming party which placed General Swing's liendquarters 
flag on the parapet of that redan; held the center of tlic division 



84 Indiana at Vioksburg. 

invcstuieiit line ; and made a close approach to the Confederate 
Stockade Redan. Casualti&s: In the assault, May 19, killed 54, 
wounded 194, missing 6. total 254, six officers killed or mortally 
wounded; and in the assault. May 22, killed 25, wounded 116, miss- 
ing 3, total 144, two officers killed or mortally wounded. The ag- 
gregate reported casualties in the brigade d iiring the campaign and 
siege were, killed 79, wounded 310, missing 9, total 398. 

U. S. 
ArtiUery. 

SECOND DIVISION; FIFTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 
TENNESSEE. 

1st Illinois Light, Battery A, Capt. Peter P. Wood. 
1st liLiNois Light. Battery B, Capt. Samuel E. Barrett; Lieut. Is- 
rael P. Rumsey. 
1st Illinois Light, Battery H, Capt. Levi W. Hart. 
Ohio Light. 8tli Battery, Capt. James F. Putnam. 

Battery B, 1st Illinois Light, went with the expeditionary force 
under General Blair to Mechanicsburg ; later, was with General 
Mower west of the river, and did not return to the investment line. 
Casualties: In skirmishes about Vicksburg, killed 2, wounded 1, 
total 3 (in Battery A, killed 1, wounded 1, total 2, in Battery H, 
killed 1) ; in the assault May 19, wounded 2 (in Battery B) ; and in 
the assault May 22, killed 2, (in Battery B). The aggregate re- 
ported casualties in the four batteries during the campaign and 
siege were, killed 4, wounded 3, total 7. 

Cavalnj. 
Thielemann's (Illinois) Battalion, Companies A and B, Capt. Milo 

Thielemann. 
10th Missouri, Company C, Capt. Daniel W. Ballon ; Lieut. Benjamin 

Joel. 

Casualties : In skirmishes about Vicksburg, one officer of the 
Illinois Battalion mortally wounded and one officer in the Missouri 
company wounded. The aggregate reported casualties in the three 
companies during the campaign and siege were, wounded 2. 



Paek Insckiptions. 85 

u. s. 

THIRD DIVISION. 

FIFTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 
Brig-. Gen. James M. Tuttle. 

1st Brigade, Brig. Gen. Ralph P. Buckland; Col. William L, McMil- 

len. 
2u Brigade, Brig. Gen. Joseph A. Mower. 
3d Brigade. Col. Joseph J. Woods; Brig. Gen. Charles L. Matthies: 

Col. Joseph J. Woods. 
Artillery, two batteries, Cape. Allen C. Waterhouse; Capt. Nelson 

T. Spoor. 

The division marched from Duckport, Louisiana, May 2, 1863, 
and crossed the river to Grand Gnlf, Mississippi, IMay 7. The First 
and Third Brigades began the approach known as "Lightburn's." 
Casualties: In the engagement at Jackson, May 14, killed 6, 
wounded 22, missing 4, total 32; in skirmishes about Vicksburg, 
killed 1, w^ounded 13, missing 2. total 16; in the assault, May 19, 
killed 5, wounded 31, total 36; in the assault, May 22, killed 18, 
wounded 154, missing 29. total 201, three officers killed or mortally 
wounded ; during the siege, killed 3, w^ounded 20, missing 1, total 
24; and other minor combats, killed 1, wounded 11, total 12. The 
aggregate reported casualties in the division during the campaign 
and siege were, killed 34, w^ounded 251, missing 36, total 321. 

u. s. 

Fii'st Brigade. 

THIRD DIVISION; FIFTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 
TENNESSEE. 

Brig. Gen. Ralph P. Buckland; 
Col. William L. McMillen. 

114th Illinois, Col. James W. Jud.v. 
93d Indiana. Col. DeWitt C. Thomas. 

72d Ohio, Lient. Col. LeRoy Crockett; Ma.i. Charles G. Eaton. 
95th Ohio, Col. William L. McMillen; Lieut. Col. Jefferson Brum- 
back. 

The brigade held the right of the division investment line, its 
right connecting with the left of Steele's Division, and, in connec- 
tion with the Third Brigade, began the approach known as ''Light- 
burn's" to the Confederate Stockade west of the redan on the 
Graveyard road. It w^as engaged in the work of the siege until 
June 22, 1863, when it marched to Bear Creek on the exterior line. 
Casualties: In the engagement at Jackson, May 14, killed 4, 



S(j Indiana ai' Vicksiuiik;. 

woiiiidcd !), loliil 1'!; ill sldnnislics ;i!>()iit Vickshury,-, kilk'd 1, 
Avouiidcd l;], inissi.is: 2, total 16; in the assault, ]May 1!). 
killed 4, wounded 30, total 34; in the assault, May 22, wounded 9; 
and dnriiiii- the siege, killed 2, wounded 16, missing 1, total 19. The 
aggregate reported casualties in the brigade during the campaign 
and siege were, killed 11, wounded 77. missing 3, total 91. 




Mint Sprin::: Bayou. 

U. S. 
Second Brigade. 

THIRI) DIVISION: FIFTEENTH COUPS; ARMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 

Brig. Geii. Joseph A. Mower. 

47th Illinois, Col. Jolin N. Cromwell ; Lieut. Col. Samuel R. Baker. 

5th Minnesota, Col. Lucius F. Hubbard. 

11th Missottri, Ma.i. Eli Bowyer ; Col. Andrew .7. Weber; Lieut. Col. 
William L. Bar num. 

Stit Wisconsin. Col. Georire W. Robbins. 



Paek Inscriptions. 87 

The brigade advanced by the flank on the Graveyard road, in the 
assault the afternoon of May 22, 1863, and placed the flag of the 
leading regiment (11th Missouri) on the parapet of the Stockade 
Redan on that road ; formed part of the expeditionary force under 
command of General Blair; was ordered to the west side of the 
river ; marched to Richmond, Louisiana ; returned to the vicinity 
of Young's Point, Louisiana, and remained on that side of the river 
until the end of the siege. Casualties: In the engagement at 
Jackson, May 14, killed 1, wounded 9, missing 3, total 13, Col. John 
N. Cromwell killed near Jackson, May 16 ; in the assault, May 22, 
killed 17, wounded 136, missing 29, total 182, three officers killed 
or mortally wounded; in slvirmish at Mechanicsburg, June 4, 
wounded 2 ; in skirmish at Richmond, Louisiana, June 15, killed 1, 
wounded 8, total 9 ; and in the trenches on the peninsula opposite 
Vicksburg, June 29, mortally wounded 1 (Col. Andrew J. Weher). 
The aggregate reported casualties in the brigade during the cam- 
paign and siege were, killed 19, wounded 156, missing 32, total 207. 

u. s. 

Third Brigade. 

THIRD DIVISION; FIFTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 
TENNESSEE. 

Col. Joseph J. Woods ; 

Brig. Gen. Charles L. ^NIatthies ; 

Col. Joseph J. Woods. 

8th Iowa, Col. James l^. Geddes. 
12th Iowa, Maj. Samuel R. Edgington ; Col. Joseph J. Woods; Lieut. 

Col. Samuel R. Edgington. 
35th Iowa, Col. Sylvester G. Hill. 

The brigade held the left of the division investment line, its left 
connecting with the right of Blair's Division, and, in connection 
with the First Brigade, began the approach known as "Light- 
bum's" to the Confederate Stockade west of the redan on the 
Graveyard road. It was engaged in the work of the siege until 
June 22, 1863, when it marched to Bear Creek on the exterior line. 
Casualties: In the engagement at Jackson, May 14. killed 1. 
wounded 1, missing 1, total 3; in the assault. May 19, killed 1, 
wounded 1. total 2 ; in the assault May 22, wounded 5; and during 
the siege, wounded 1. The aggregate reported casualties in the 
brigade during the campaign and siege were, killed 2, wounded 8. 
missing 1, total 11. 



88 Indiana at VicKSBuna. 

IT. s. 
Aiiillcril. 

rillKl) DIVISION; FIFTEENTH CORPS : ARMY OF THE 
TENNESSEE. 

Capt. Allen C. AVaterliousk ; 
Capt. Nelson T. Spoor. 

1st Illinois I.kitit, Rallory E, I/hmiI. .ToIhi A. Fitch; ('apt. Allen C. 

Waterhonse. 
Iowa Lir.iiT, 2d Battery. I^iout. .Tosepli R. Roed. 

The command served on the investment line to June 22, 1863, 
when it moved with the First and Third Brigades to Bear Cree]< 
on the exterior line. Casualties : In the engagement at Jackson, 
May 14, wounded 3 (in the Illinois Battery, wounded 2, in the Iowa 
Battery, wounded 1) ; in the assault, May 22, killed 1, wounded 4, 
total 5 (in the Illinois Battery, killed 1, wounded 1, total 2 ; in the 
Iowa Battery, wounded 3) ; and during the siege, killed 1, wounded 
2, total 3 (in the Iowa Battery). The aggregate reported casualties 
in the command during the campaign and siege were, killed 2, 
wounded 9, total 11. 

TT. s. 
Caralrji. 

FIFTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 
4tpi Iowa, Lieiil. Col. Simeon D. Swan. 

The regiment occupied Ilaynes' Bluff, Mississippi, INIay 19, 1863, 
and turned over to the commander of the gunboat "DeKalb" the 
guns and stores abandoned there. Casualties : In skirmish on Four- 
teen-Mile Creek, May 12, killed 1; in action at Hill's Plantation 
near Birdsong Ferry, June 22, killed 8, wounded 16, missing 23, 
total 47, one officer mortally wounded. The aggregate reported 
casualties in the regiment during the campaign and siege were, 
killed 9, wounded 16, missing 23, total 48. 

U. S. 

SIXTEENTH CORPS (DETACHMENT) ; ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 

Maj. Gen. Cadwallader C. Washburn. 

Escort. 
2d Wisconsin Cavalry, Company II, Lieut. Ernest ,J. Myers. 

1st Division, Brig. Geu. William Sooy Smith. 
4th Division. Brig;. Gen. Jacob G. Lauman. 
Provisional Division, Brig. Gen. Nathan Kimball. 



Park Inscriptions. 



89 



The divisions of the detachment were successively ordered to 
Vicksburg by General Grant after the beginning of the campaign. 
The First Division arrived at Haynes' Bluff, Mississippi, about 
June 12, 1863, the Fourth at Young's Point, Louisiana, May 19. 
and the Provisional Division at Satartia, Mississippi, June 4. The 
Fourth Division took position on the investment line; the First 
and the Provisional Divisions remained in the vicinity of Haynes' 
Bluff and formed the left wing of the exterior line. The aggregate 
reported casualties in the detachment during the siege were, killed 
8, wounded 39, missing 117, total 164. 



u. s. 

FIRST DIVISION. 

SIXTEENTH CORPS (DETACHMENT) ; ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 

Brig. Gen. William Sooy Smith. 

Escort. 

7th Illinois Cavalry, Company B. Capt. Heury C. Forbes. 

1st Brigade, Col. John M. Loomis. 
2d Brigade, Col. Stephen G. Hicks. 
3d Brigade, Col. Joseph R. Cockerill. 
4th Brigade. Col. William W. Sanford. 

Artillenj. 

Capt. William Cogswell. 

1st Illinois Light, Battery F, Capt. John T. Cheney. 
1st Illinois Light, Battery I, Lieut. William N. Lansing. 
Illinois Light, Cogswell's Battery. Lient. Henry G. Eddy. 
Indiana Light, 6th Battery, Capt. Michael Mueller. 

The division took position at Haynes' Bluff, Mississippi, about 
June 12, 1863, and assisted in fortifying that point. By order of 
General Sherman, dated June 26, it took position on Oak Ridge 
from Neily 's on the right to the postoffice on the left, fortified that 
line and remained on it to the end of the siege. 

First Brigade. 

Col. John M. Loomis. 

26th Illinois, Lieut. Col. Robert A. Gillmore. 
UUth Illinois, Col. Timothy O'Meara. 
12th Indiana, Col. Reuben Williams. 
100th Indiana, Lieut. Col. Albert Heath. 



90 Indiana at Vicksiuuhj. 

u. s. 

Hcc.oiul HiUjade. 

FIKST DIVISION; SIXTEENTH CORPS (DETACHMENT) ; ARMY OF 

THE TENNESSEE. 

Col. Stephicn G. Hicks. 

40tii Illinois, Maj. Hiram W. Hall. 
103d Illinois, Col. Willard A. Dickermau. 
15th Michigan, Col. John M. Oliver. 
46th Ohio. Col. Charles C. Walcutt. 

Third BrUjade. 
Col. Joseph R. Cockerill. 

07th Indiana, Col. Robert F. Catterson, 
99x11 Indiana, Col. Alexandei* Fowler. 
53d Ohio, Col. Wells S. Jones. 
TOrii Ohio, Maj. William P.. Brown. 

Fourth Brigade. 
Col. William W. Sanford. 

48tii Illinois, Lient. Col. Lncien Greatliouse. 
()TH Iowa, Col. John M. Corse. 



U. S. 
FOURTH DIVISION. 

SIXTEENTH CORPS (DETACHMENT) ; ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 
Brig. Gen. Jacob G. Lauman. 

Cavalry. 
15th Illinois, Companies F and I, Maj. James G. Wilson. 

1st Brigade, Col. Isaac C. Pugh. 

2d Brigade, Col. Cyrus Hall. 

3d Brigade, Col. George E. Bryant ; Col. Amory K. Johnson. 

Artillery. 
Capt. George C. Gumbart. 

2d Illinois Light, Battery E, Lieut. George L. Nispel. 
2d Illinois Light. Battery K, Capt. Benjamin F. Rodgers. 
Ohio Light, 5th Battery, Lieut. Anthony B. Burton. 
Ohio Light, 7th Battery, Capt. Silas A. Burnap. 
Ohio Light, 15th Battery, Capt. Edward Spear. Jr. 

The division reported at Young's Point, Louisiana, from May 
J3 to 19, 1863. The First and Second Brigades were ordered to 



Park Inscriptions. 91 

Sijyder's Bluff, Mississippi; arrived there jMay 2(J and marched 
from that place to take position on the extreme left of the invest- 
ment line i\lay 24. They moved to the right by order of General 
Grant, dated May 28, connected with the left of the Thirteentli 
Corps, their own left resting at or near the Hall's Ferrj^ road. The 
Third Brigade proceeded to Grand Gulf, Mississippi, and remained 
there from ]\Iay 18 to June 11, when it started to rejoin the other 
brigades. The division made an approach to the salient Confed- 
erate work on the east side of the Hall's Ferry road. Its aggre- 
gate reported casualties during the siege were, killed 8, wounded 
39, missing 117, total 164, one officer killed and one mortally 
wounded. The division casualties cannot be fully distributed to 
the three brigades. 

u. s. 

First Brigade. 

FOURTH DIVISION; SIXTEENTH CORPS (DETACHMENT); ARMY 

OF THE TENNESSEE. 

Col. Isaac C. Pugh. 

41st Illinois. Lieut. Col. John H. Nale. 
53d Illinois, Lieut. Col. Seth C. Eaii. 
3d Iowa, Col. Aarou Brown. 
33d AVisconsin, Col. Jonatbjui P>. Moore. 

On transport en route to Vicksburg and near Greenville, Missis- 
sippi, fourteen enlisted men of the 3d Iowa were wounded May 18, 

1863. 

Second Britjade. 

Col. Cyrus Hall. 

14th Illinois, Lieut. Col. William Cam ; Capt. Augustus H. Cornmau. 
15th Illinois, Col. Geoi'ge C. Rogers. 
46th Illinois, Col. Beujamin Dornblaser. 
76th Illinois, Col. Samuel T. Busey. 
53d Indiana, Col. Walter Q. (iresham. 

On the picket line west of the Warrenton road 7 officers and 
104 enlisted men of the 46th Illinois were captured the night of 
i\Iay 25, 1863. In the approacli to the salient Confederate work 
on the east side of the Hall's Ferry road Lieut. Col. William Cam 
was captured the night of June 22. The 53d Indiana was trans- 
ferred to the Third Brigade June 22. One officer was killed and 
one mortally wounded. 



92 Indiana .vv VirKsm-RG. 

Third Brigade. 
Col. George E. Bryakt; 
Col. Amory K. Johnson. 

•J.-iii Iii.iNois, Maj. Hinmau Ilhoclos. 

.•!•_'!) IiiiNGis, Col. John Logan; Lieut. Col. William Hunter. 

iL'Tii Wisconsin, Lieut. Col. DeWitt C. Poole; Col. George E. Bryant. 




< (iiirciici ate South Fort — Ltioking South. 



r. s. 

PKoyiSIOXAL DIVISION. 

SIXTEENTH CORPS (DETACHMENT) ; ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 
P.rig. Gen. Nathan Kimbaix. 

Engelmann's P>rigadk, Col. Adoljih Engtlmann. 
Richmond's Brigade, Col. Jonathan Riehniond. 
Montgomery's Brigade, Col. Milton Montgomery. 

A portion of the division l)ore a part in skirmish at Mechanies- 
burg, Mississippi, June 4, 1863, without reported casualties. Unit- 
ing with the reniaindei' of* the division at Ilaynes' Bluff, June 7, 
the whole force held that position until June 15, when it moved 



Park Inscriptions. 93 

to Snyder's Blnff, strongly fortified that point and remained there 
to the end of the siege. 

Engelmann's Brigade. 
Col. Adolph Engelmann. 
43d Illinois, Lieut. Col. Adolph Dengler. 
61ST Illinois, Maj. Simon P. Ohr. 
106th Illinois, MaJ. .John M. Hurt. 
12th Michigan. Col. William H. Graves. 

Rioliijioml's Brigade. 
Col. Jonathan Richmond. 
18th Illinois, Col. Daniel N. Brush. 
54th Illinois, Col. Greenville M. Mitchell. 
126th Illinois, Ma.i. William W. Wilshire. 
22d Ohio, Col. Oliver Wood. 

Monlgonicrifs Brigade. 
Col. Milton ^Montgomery. 

40th Iowa. Col. John A. Garrett. 

3d Minnesota, Col. Chauncey W. Griggs. 

25th Wisconsin, Lieut. Col. Samuel J. Nasmith. 

27th Wisconsin, Col. Conrad Krez. 



U. S. 

SEVENTEENTH CORPS; AKMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 

Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson. 

Escort. 
4th Company Ohio Cavalry, Capt. John S. Foster. 

3d Division, Ma.i. Gen. John A. Logan. 
6tk Division, Brig. Gen. John McArthur. 

7th Division, Col. John B. Sanborn; Brig. Gen. Marcellus M. Crocker; 
Brig. Gen. Isaac F. Quinby; Brig. Gen. John E. Smith. 

The corps took position in the center of tiie investment line the 
morning of May 19, 1863— the Second Brigade of the Sixth Di- 
vision on the right, the Third Division in the center and the Sev- 
enth Division on the left. It made close approaches to two points 
on the Confederate line of defense, starting mines at both. Casual- 
ties: In the battle of Port Gibson, May 1, killed 6, wounded 41, 
missing 2, total 49 ; in skirmish on the south fork of Bayou Pierre, 
May 2, wounded 1 ; in skirmish on the north fork of Bayou Pierre, 
May 3, killed 1, wounded 6, total 7; in skirmish at Pin Hook, Louis- 
iana, May 10, killed 2, wounded 8, missing 3, total 13; m the en- 



94 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

gaiieuuMit <it EtiymoiRl, INliiy 12, killed 66, wounded 339, missing 37, 
total 442 ; in the engagement at Jaekson, May 14, killed 35, wounded 
227, missing 3, total 265; in the battle of Champion's Hill, May 16, 
killed 179, wounded 857, missing 42, total 1,078; in skirmishes 
about Vicksburg, killed 1, wounded 2, total 3; in the assault. May 
19, killed 16. wounded 113, total 129 ; in the assault May 22, killed 
150, woundeil SSO, missing 36, total 1,066 ; in action near Lake Prov- 
idence, Louisiana, June 9, wounded 1; in skirmish near Lake Provi- 
dence, June 29, killed 1, wounded 3, total 4, and during the siege, 
killed 41, wounded 238, total 279. The aggregate reported casual- 
ties in the cori)s during the campaign and siege were, killed 498, 
w^ounded 2,716, missing 123, total 3,337. 

u. s. 

THIRD DIVISION 

SEVENTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 
Maj. Gen. John A. Logan. 

Escort. 
2d Illinois Cavalry, Company A, Capt. John R. Hotaling ; Lieut. Wil- 
liam B. Cummins. 

1st Brigade, Col. C. Carroll Marsh ; Brig. Gen. John E. Smith ; Brig. 
Gen. Mortimer D. Leggett. 

2d Brigade, Brig. Gen! Elias S. Dennis; Brig. Gen. Mortimer D. Leg- 
gett; Col. Manning F. Force. 

3d Brigade, Brig. Gen. John D. Stevenson. 

Artillery live batteries, Maj. Charles J. Stolbrand. 

The division marched from Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, April 
25, 1863, and crossed the river to Bruinsburg, Mississippi, the even- 
ing of April 30 and the morning of May 1; advanced against the 
Third Louisiana Redan on the right and the great redoubt on the 
left of the Jackson road in the assault. May 22, and carried the 
flags of its leading regiments close to both works ; made an approach 
along the Jackson road to the Third Louisiana Redan and tired 
mines under that work the afternoon of June 25 and the afternoon 
of July 1. Casualties: In the battle of Port Gibson, May 1, killed 
6, wounded 41, missing 2, total 49 ; in skirmish on the south fork 
of Bayou Pierre, May 2, wounded 1 ; in skirmish on the north fork 
of Bayou Pierre, May 3, wounded 5 ; in the engagement at Ray- 
mond, May 12, killed 63, wounded 336, missing 37, total 436, seven 
officers killed; in the ])attle of Champion's Hill, May 16, killed 51, 
wounded 329, missing 27, total 407, six oi^cers killed or mortally 



Park Inscriptions. 1)5 

wounded ; in the assault, May 22, killed 41, wounded 316, missing 
2, total 359, nine officers killed or mortally wounded; and during 
the siege, killed 33, wounded 179, total 212, eleven officers killed 
or mortally wounded. The aggregate reported casualties in the 
division during the campaign and siege were, killed 194. wcumded 
1,207, missing 68, total 1,469. 

u. s. 

First Brigade. 

THIRD DIVISION; SEVENTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 
TENNESSEE. 
Col. C. Caeeoll Maesh ; 
Brig. Gen. John E. Smith ; 
Brig. Gen. Moetimee D. Leggett. 

20th Illinois. Lient. Col. Evan Richards; Maj. Daniel Bradley. 
31st Illinois. Col. Edwin S. McCook ; Lieut. Col. John D. Rees; :\la.i. 

Robert M. Pearson. 
45th Illinois. Col. Jasper A. Maltb.v; Maj. Luther II. Cowen ; Col. 

Jasper A. Maltby. 
124th Illinois. Col. Thomas J. Sloan ; Lieut. Col. John H. Howe ; Col. 

Thomas J. Sloan. 
23d Indiana, Lieut. Col. William P. Davis. 

The brigade held the right of the division investment line, its 
left resting at the Jackson road and its camps clustered about the 
''White House"; advanced against the Third Louisiana Redan in 
the assault IMay 22. carrying the colors of some of its regiments 
close to that w^ork ; and again assaulted that redan when the mine 
under it was fired the afternoon of June 25. When the detachment 
of the Army of the Tennessee marched into Vicksburg on the Jack- 
son road at the end of the siege the brigade led the column, the 
45th Illinois leading the ])rigade. Casualties : In the battle of Port 
Gibson, May 1, 1863, killed 5, wounded 27, total 32; in skirmish 
on the north fork of Bayou Pierre, May 3, wounded 5 ; in the en- 
gagement at Raymond, May 12, killed 35, wounded 175, missing 
25, total 235, Lieut. Col. Evan Richards and three other officers 
killed; in the battle of Champion's Hill, May 16, killed 22, wounded 
104, missing 9, total 135 ; in the assault, May 22. killed 7, wounded' 
72, missing 2, total 81, three officers killed or mortally wounded; 
and during the siege, killed 31, wounded 176, total 207, Lieut. Col. 
John D. Rees and five other officers killed or mortally wounded. 
The aggregate reported casualties in the brigade during tlie cam- 
paign and siege were, killed 100, wounded 559, missing 36, totnl 
695. 



96 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

u. s. 
Second Biifiadc. 

THIRD DIVISION; SEVENTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 
TENNESSEE. 

Brig. Geu. Elias S. Dennis ; 
Brig. Gen. Mortimer D. Leggett ; 
Col. Manning F. Force. 

30th Illinois, Col. Warren Shedd. 

20th Ohio, CoI. Manning F. Force ; Capt. Francis M. Slialclee. 

68th Ohio, Col. Robert K. Scott; Lieut. Col. John S. Snook; Col. 

Robert K. Scott. 
7Sth Ohio, Col. Zacbariah M. Cbandler ; Maj. John T. Rainey; Lieut. 

Col. Greenberry F. Wiles. 

The brigade formed part of the expeditionary force under Gen- 
eral Blair and marched to Mechanicsburg ; returned to the invest- 
ment line June 4, 1863 ; was engaged in the work of the siege on 
the division front from that time to June 22; withdrew from the 
investment line on the last named day and took position at Tiffin, 
on the exterior line, June 30 ; constructed earthworks and remained 
in that position to the end of the siege. Casualties: In the battle 
of Port Gibson, May 1, wounded 3 ; in the engagement at Ray- 
mond, May 12, killed 10, wounded 75, total 85; in the battle of 
Champion's Hill, May 16, killed 21, wounded 189, total 210, six 
officers killed or mortally wounded; and in the assault May 22, 
wounded 6. The aggregate reported casualties in the brigade dur- 
ing the campaign and siege were, killed 31, wounded 273, total 304. 



V. S. 
Third Brigade. 

THIRD DIVISION; SEVENTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 
TENNESSEE. 

Brig. Gen. John D. Stevenson. 

Sth Illinois, Col. John P. Post; Lieut. Col. Robert H. Sturgess. 

17th Illinois, Maj. Frank F. Peats; Lieut. Col. Francis M. Smith. 

8] ST Illinois, Lieut. Col. Franklin Campbell; Col. James J. Dollins; 
Col. Franklin Campbell. 

Tth MissoiiRi. Lient. Col. William S. Oliver; Maj. Edwin Wakefield; 
Lieut. Col. William S. Oliver; IMaj. Edwin Wakefield; Capt. Rob- 
ert Buchanan; Lieut. Col. William S. Oliver; Capt. William B. 
Collins. 

32d Ohio, Col. Benjamin F. Potts. 



I 



Park Inscriptions. 97 

The ])rigade held the left of the division investment line, its 
right resting- at the Jackson road, and advanced against the redoubt 
innnediately south of that road in the assault, J\Iay 22, carrying 
the colors of some of its regiments close to that work. Casualties : 
In the battle of Port Gibson, jMay 1, 1863, killed 1, wounded 8, 
missing 2, total 11 ; in skirmish on the south fork of Bayou Pierre, 
i\Iay 2, Lieut. Col. William S. Oliver severely wounded; in the en- 
gagement at Raymond, ]\Iay 2, killed 18, wounded 85, missing 12. 
total 115, three officers killed; in the battle of Champion's Hill. 
May 16, killed 7, wounded 36, missing 18, total 61; in the assault, 
May 22, killed 3-1, wounded 238, total 272, Col. James J. Dollins 
and five other officers killed or mortally, wounded ; and during the 
siege, one officer killed, two officers mortally wounded, total 3. The 
aggregate reported casualties in the brigade during the campaign 
and siege were: killed 61, wounded 370, missing 32, total 463. 

u. s. 

Artillerij. 

THIRD DIVISION; SEVENTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 

Ma.i. Charles J. Stolfrand. 

1st Illinois Light, Battery D, Capt. Ileiiiy A. Rogers; Lient. (Teorgc 
J. Wood ; Capt. Frederick Sparrestrom. 

2i) Illinois Light. Battery G, Capt. Frederick Sparrestroiii ; Lieut. 
Jolin W. Lowell. 

2n Illinois Light. Battery L, Capt. William II. Bolton. 

Michigan Light. Stli Battery. Capt. Sauiuel DeGol.yer ; Lieut. Theo- 
dore W. Lockwood. 

Ohio Light. 3d Battery. Capt. William S. Williams. 

By a collision between the transports "Horizon" and "IMod- 
erator" about 3 a. m.. May 1, 1863, while the command was cross- 
ing the river to Bruinsburg, Mississippi, the "Horizon" was sunk, 
two enlisted men of Battery G, 2d Illinois, were drowned, the guns, 
the equipment and most of the horses of the battery were lost. It 
was sent to Memphis to refit and did not rejoin the division until 
near the end of the siege. The other batteries of the command 
were engaged in the l)attles of the division in the campaign and 
served on its investment line. Casualties: In the battle of Port 
Gibson, May 1, wounded 2 (in the Michigan Battery) ; in the en- 
gagement at Raymond, May 12, wounded 1 (in the INIichigan Bat- 
tery) ; in the battle of Champion's Hill, May 16, killed 1 (in the 

[71 



98 Indiana at Vicksjuiug. 

Micliigan liattery) ; and during the siege, killed 1, wounded 1, 
total 2 (Capt. Henry A. Rogers killed and Capt. Samuel DeGolyer 
mortally wounded). The aggregate reported casualties in the com- 
mand during the campaign and siege were, killed 2, wounded 4, 
total 6. 

U. S. 
SIXTH DIVISION. 

SEVENTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 
Brig. Gen. John McArthur. 

Escort. 
llTii Illinois Cavali^y, Comi)any G. Lieut. Stephen S. Tripp. 

1st Brigade, Col. George W. Deitzler; Brig. Gen. Hugh T. Reid. 
2d Brigade, Brig. Gen. Thomas E. G. Ransom. 

3d Brigade, Brig. Gen Marcellus M. Croclver ; Col. William Hall; Col. 
Alexander Chambers. 

Artilleri/. 
Maj. Thomas D. Maurice. 

2d Illinois Light, Battery F, Capt. .John W. Powell. 

Minnesota Light, 1st Battery, Lieut. Henry Hurter; Capt. William 

Z. Clayton. 
1st Missouri Light, Battery O, Capt. Charles Mann. 
Ohio Light, 10th Battery, Capt. Hamilton B. White; Lieut. William 

L. Newcomb. 

The Second and Third Brigades were engaged in the battles 
and movements of the Vieksburg campaign, beginning March 29, 
1863, and served on the investment line. The First Brigade was 
on duty in the vicinity of Lake Providence, Louisiana, during that 
time. The division artillery served on the investment line of the 
Second Brigade (except that the Ohio Battery went with the Third 
Brigade to take position on the exterior line) without reported 
casualties. Casualties: In skirmish at Pin Hook, Louisiana, May 
10, killed 2, wounded 8, missing 3, total 13, one officer killed; in 
the assault. May 19, killed 14, wounded 110, total 124; in the as- 
sault. May 22, killed 58, wounded 277, missing 32, total 367, nine 
officers killed or mortally wounded ; in action near Lake Providence, 
Louisiana, June 9, wounded 1 ; in skirmish near Lake Providence, 
June 29, killed 1, wounded 3, total 4, one officer killed; and dur- 
ing the siege, wounded 1. The aggregate reported casualties in the 
division during the campaign and siege were, killed 75, wounded 
400, missing 35, total 510. 



Park Inscriptions. lo-l 

u. s. 

First Brigade. 

SIXTH DIVISION; SEVENTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 
TENNESSEE. 
Col. Geoege W. Deitzler; 
Brig. Gen. Hugh T. Reid. 

1st Kansas, Lieut. Col. Otto M. Teiinison ; Col. William V. U(jljei-t.«^. 
IGth Wisconsin, Maj. ^riioiiias Reynolds; Col. Ren.janiin Allen. 

The 1st Kansas served as mounted infantry from about May 1. 
1863, to the end of the siege. Casualties: In skirmish at Pin Hook, 
Louisiana, May 10, killed 2, wounded 8, missing 3, total 13, one 
officer killed; in action near Lake Providence, Louisiana, June 0, 
wounded 1 ; and in skirmish near Lake Providence, June 29, killed 
1, wounded 3, total 4, one officer killed. The aggregate reported 
casualties in the brigade during the campaign and siege were, killed 
3, wounded 12, missing 3, total 18. 



U. S. 

Second liiifiiule. 

SIXTH DIVISION; SEVENTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 

Brig. Gen. Thomas E. G. Ransom. 

11th Illinois. Lieut. Col. Garrett Nevius ; Lieut. Col. James H. 

Coates. 
72d Illinois. Col. Freilerick A. Starring. 
95th Illinois. Col. Thomas W. Humphrey; Lieut. Col. Leander P.lan- 

den ; Col. Thomas W. Humphrey. 
109th Illinois, Col. Alexander J. Nimmo. 
14th Wisconsin, Col. Lyman M. Ward. 
17th Wisconsin, Lieut. Col. Thomas Me:Mahou ; Col. Adam G. Malloy. 

The 109th Illinois was assigned to the brigade IMarch 30. 1863. 
The officers of Company K and the enlisted men of the regiment 
were transferred to the 11th Illinois April 23. The brigade marched 
from Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, April 26; crossed the river to 
Grand Gulf, Mississippi, May 12; marched by way of Raymond 
and Champion's Hill, arriving on that battlefield at close of the 
fighting; held the right of the corps investment line; advanced 
against the Confederate line of defense north of Glass' Bayou in 
the assaults May 19 and May 22, carrying the colors of sonu^ of 
its regiments close to that line in both assaults; and made an ap- 
proach to the Confederate work immediately north of Ghuss' 



102 Indiana at Vkmvsbttrg. 

Bayou. Casualties: In this assault, May 19, killed 14, wounded 
110, total 124; and in the assault May 22, killed 57, wounded 275, 
missing 32, total 364, Lieut. Col. Garrett Nevius and eight other 
ofificers killed or mortally wounded. The aggregate reported casual- 
ties in the brigade during the campaign and siege were, killed 71, 
wounded 385, missing 32, total 488. 



U. S. 
Thvrd Brigade. 

SIXTH DIVISION; SEVENTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 
TENNESSEE. 
Brig. Gen. Marcellus M. Crocker; 
Col. William Hall ; 
Col. Alexander Chambers. 

11th Iowa, Col. Williiini Hall; Lieut. Col. John C. Abercrombie; Col. 

William Hall. 
13th Iowa, Col. John Sliaue. 

15th Iowa, Col. Hugh T. Reid; Col. William W. Belknap. 
16th Iowa, Lieut. Col. Addison H. Sanders ; Maj. William Purcell ; 

Lieut. Col. Addison H. Sanders. 

The brigade was engaged in guarding a portion of the road from 
Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, to Llard Times, Louisiana, during the 
first part of May, 1863 ; was stationed at Grand Gulf, Mississippi, 
when Vicksburg was first invested; advanced on the Warrenton 
road in the assault May 22, and drove the Confederate skirmishers 
within their entrenchments, advancing its own skirmishers to within 
about forty yards of the Confederate line ; formed part of the ex- 
peditionary force under General Blair and marched to Mechanics- 
burg; returned to the investment line June 4 and was engaged in 
the work of the siege in connection with the Second Brigade until 
June 22, when it marched to the rear ; took position on the exterior 
line in the vicinity of Fox's plantation and remained on that line 
to the end of the siege. Casualties : In the assault, May 22, killed 
1, wounded 2, total 3 ; and during the siege, wounded 1. The aggre- 
gate reported casualties in the brigade during the campaign and 
siege were, killed 1, Avoinulcd 3, total 4. 



Park Inscriptions. 103 

U. S. 
SEVENTH DIVISION. 

SEVENTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 
Col. John B. Sanborn; 
Brig. Gen. Marcellus M. Crocker; 
Brig. Gen. Isaac F. Quinby; 
Brig. Gen. John E. Smith. 

Escort. 
4th Missouri Cavalry, Company F. Lieut. Alexander Mueller. 
2d Illinois Cavalry, Company E, Capt. Samuel P. Tipton. 

1st Brigade, Col. Jesse I. Alexander; Col. John B. Sanborn. 

2d Brigade, Col. Samuel A. Holmes; Col. Green B. Raum. 

3d Brigade, Col. George B. Boomer; Col. Holden Putnam; Brig. Gen. 

Charles L. Matthies. 
Artillery four batteries, Capt. Frank C. Sands ; Capt. Henry Dillon. 

' The division marched from Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, April 
18 to 25, 1863, and crossed the river to Bruinsburg, Mississippi, 
May 1. Casualties : In skirmish near the north fork of Bayou 
Pierre, May 3, killed 1, wounded 1, total 2; in the engagement at 
Raymond, May 12, killed 3, wounded 3, total 6 (in the escort com- 
pany, killed 1, wounded 1, total 2) ; in the engagement at Jackson, 
May 14, killed 35, wounded 227, missing 3, total 265, one officer 
killed; in the battle of Champion's Hill, May 16, killed 128, 
wounded 528, missing 15, total 671, ten officers killed or mortally 
wounded ; in skirmishes about Vicksburg, killed 1, wounded 2, total 
3 ; in the assault May 19, killed 2, wounded 3, total 5 ; in the assault 
May 22, killed 51, wounded 287, missing 2, total 340, six officers 
killed or mortally wounded ; and during the siege, killed 8, wounded 
58, total 66. The aggregate reported casualties in the division dur- 
ing the campaign and siege were, killed 229, wounded 1,109, miss- 
ing 20, total 1,358. 

U. S. 
First Brigade. 

SEVENTH DIVISION; SEVENTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 
Ool. Jesse I. Alexander; 
Col. John B. Sanborn. 

48th Indiana, Col. Norman Eddy. 

59th Indiana, Lieut. Col. Jefferson K. Scott; Col. Jesse I. Alexander. 
4th Minnesota. Lieut. Col. John E. Tourtellotte. 
18th Wisconsin, Col. Gabriel Bouck. 



104 Indiana at \'i(Ksi!ii;(i. 

Tlic hriundr ;i(lv;iiicc(l l;itc in llic iit'tcniooii in the nssault May 
22, 186;i. ;i<;;iiiisl llic north l;icc dl' the C'onfederate Lunette on the 
Riildwin's Kerry r(i;i(l, fclicvin^- Jim-bridge's Brigade of Smith's 
Division, 'riiirlccnlli Corps; \v<is ])art of the expeditionary force 
nndn- (iciicfjil l>laii- and inarclicd to Mechanicsburg ; returned to 
its place on the h'l'l of tlie division investment line June 4; re- 
mained in tliat position nntil June 24, when it moved to the right 
and occnpie(l the |)ar1 of the line vacated l)y the Third Brigade. 
Casnallit's: In skii'misli near the north fork of Bayou Pierre, IMay 
'A. killed 1, wounded 1. total 2; in the engagement at Raymond, 
^lay 12, wonnded 1 ; in the engagement at Jackson, May 14, killed 
4. wounded A'A, total 37; in the battle of Champion's Hill, i\Tay 16, 
killed 5. wounded 51, total 56; in the assault May 22, killed 36, 
wounded 176, missing 2, total 214, four officers killed or mortally 
wounded; and during the siege, killed 1, wounded 11, total 12. 
The aggregate reported casualties in the brigade during the cam- 
paign and siege were, killed 47, wounded 273, missing 2, total 322. 

u. s. 

f^ccond Brif/ude. 

SKVENTH DIVISION ; SIOVEXTEENTII CORPS: AUMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 

Col. Samuel A. Holmes ; 
Col. Green B. Raum. 

."(•TH Illinois, Col. Green B. Raum; Capt. IMiickney J. Welsh. 

ITxn Iowa, Col. David B. Hillis; Lieut. Col. Clark R. Wever; Col. Da- 
vid B. Hillis; Col. Clark R. Wever; Maj. John F. Walden. 

10th Missoitri, Lieut. Col. Leonidas Horuey ; Ma.i. Francis C. Deini- 
ling. 

24th Missouri. Coinpiuiy E, Lieut. Vincent Clialifoux ; Lieut. Daniel 
Drisooll. 

80th Ohio, Col. Matthias II. Bartilson; Ma.i. Pren Metham. 

The brigade held the center of the division investment line; 
marched south of the railroad late in the afternoon of May 22 to 
reinforce Osterhaus' Division, bat did not assault, and returned 
to its place in the line next day. The 56th Illinois and 17th Iowa 
were engaged in the assault following the firing of the mine under 
the Third Louisiana Redan, June 25. Casualties : In the engage- 
ment at Raymond, May 12, 1863, killed 2, wounded 1, total 3; in 
the engagement at Jackson, May 14, killed 30, wounded 182, miss- 
ing 3, total 215, one officer killed; in the l)attle of Champion's Hill, 
May l(i. killed 12, wounded 87, missing 4, total 103, Lieut. Col. 



Paek Inscriptions. 105 

Leonidas Horney killed; in the assault May 22, killed 1, wounded 
11, total 12, one officer mortally wounded; and during the siege, 
killed 7, wounded 47, total 54. The aggregate reported casualties 
in the brigade during the campaign and siege were, killed 52, 
wounded 328, missing 7, total 387. 



U. S. 
Third Brigade. 

SEVENTH DIVISION; SEVENTEENTH CORPS; AKMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 

Col. George B. Boomer ; 

Col. HoLDEN Putnam ; 

Brig. Geu. Charles L. Matthies. 

03d Illinois, Col. Holrten Pntnaiu ; Lieut. Col. Nicholas C. Buswell ; 
Col. HoUleu Putnam. 
5th Iowa, Lieut. Col. E/.ekiel S. Sampson ; Col. .Tabez Banbury. 
10th Iowa, Col. William E. Small. 
2(;th Missouri, Maj. Charles F. Brown; Capt. Benjamin D. Dean. 

The brigade advanced late in the afternoon of May 22, 1863. 
against the curtain immediately north of the Confederate Railroad 
Redoubt ; held the right of the division investment line to June 22, 
when it withdrew from that line, marched to the rear, and June 30 
took position in the vicinity of Tiffin, on the exterior line, fortified 
its front and remained in that position to the end of the siege. 
Casualties : In the engagement at Jackson, May 14, killed 1, 
wounded 10, total 11; in the battle of Champion's Hill, May 16. 
killed 111, wounded 388, missing 11, total 510, nine officers killed 
or mortally wounded ; in skirmishes about Vicksburg, killed 1, 
wounded 2, total 3 ; in the assault IMay 19, killed 2, wounded 3, 
total 5 ; and in the assault ]\ray 22, killed 14, wounded 100, total 
114, Col. George B. Boomer killed. The aggregate reported casual- 
ties in the brigade durirg the campaign and siege w^ere, killed 129, 
wounded 503, missing 11, total 643. 



106 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

U. S. 
Artillery. 

SEVENTH DIVISION; SEVENTEENTH CORPS; ARMY OF THE 

TENNESSEE. 

Capt. Frank C. Sands ; 
Capt. Henky Dillon. 

1st Missouri Light, Battery M, Lieut. Junius W. MacMurray. 

Ohio Light, lltli Battery, Lieut. Cyrus Sears; Lieut. Fletcher E. 

Armstrong; Capt. Frank C. Sands. 
Wisconsin Light, Gth Battery, Capt. Henry Dillon; Lieut. Samuel F. 

Clark. 
Wisconsin Light, 12tb Battery, Capt. William Zickerick. 

The Missouri Battery served on the investment line until June 
22, when it was ordered to the rear ; went with the Third Brigade to 
take position on the exterior line. The Ohio Battery went with the 
First Brigade on the march to Mechaniesburg, under General Blair, 
and was temporarily assigned to Kimball's Division, 16th Corps, 
June 6, 1863. Casualties : In the engagement at Jackson, May 14, 
wounded 2 (in the 6th Wisconsin) ; and in the battle of Champion's 
Hill, May 16, wounded 2 (in the 6th Wisconsin). The aggregate 
reported casualties in the command during the campaign and siege 
were, wounded 4. 

u. s. 

HERRON'S DIVISION. 

ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 
Maj. Gen. Francis J. Herron. 

1st Brigade. Brig. Gen. William VandeA'er. 
2d Brigade, Brig. Gen. William W. Orme. 

The divisicn arrived at Young's Point, Louisiana, June 11, 1863, 
on transports from the Department of the Missouri ; and took posi- 
tion on the left of the investment line, June 15, resting its left at the 
river below Vicksburg and connecting its right with the left of 
Lauman's Division at or near the Hall's Ferry road. The First 
Brigade held the left, and the Second Brigade the right of the 
division investment line. The division began an approach to the 
Confederate Redoubt immediately west of the Warrenton road. Its 
aggregate reported casualties from June 15 to the end of the siege 
were, killed 5, wounded 16, total 21. 



Pakk Inscriptions. 107 

u. s. 

First BrifjadG. 

HEBRON'S DIVISION; ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 
Brig. Gen. Wilijam Vandever. 

37th Illinois, Col. Jobu C. Black. 

26th Indiana, Col. John G. Clark. 

20th Iowa, Col. William McE. Dye. 

34th Iowa, Col. George W. Clark. 

38th Iowa, Col. D. Heury Hughes. 

1st Missouri Light Artillery, Battery B, Capt. Nelson Cole. 

1st Missoitri Light Artillery, Battery F, Capt. Joseph Foust. 

The aggregate reported casualties in the brigade from June 15. 
1863, to the end of the siege were, killed 4, wounded 6, total 10. 

Second Brigade. 
Brig. Gen. William W. Orme. 

94th Illinois, Col. John McNulta. 

19th Iowa, Lieut. Col. Daniel Kent. 

20th Wisconsin, Col. Henry Bertram. 

1st Missouri Light Artillery, Battery B, Capt. Martin Welfley. 

The aggregate reported casualties in the brigade from June 15, 
1863, to the end of the siege were, killed 1, wounded 10, total 11. 

U. S. 
UNATTACHED CAVALRY; ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 
Col. Cyrus Bussey. 

5th Illinois, Maj. Abel H. Seley; Maj. Thomas A. Apperson. 
3d Iowa, six companies. Maj. Oliver H. P. Scott. 
2d Wisconsin, Col. Thomas Stephens. 

The troops composing this command arrived in the Yazoo River 
on transports at intervals from June 1 to 16, 1863. The command 
was engaged in skirmishing, out-post duty, and reconnaissances. It 
was massed on Bear Creek, June 29, to watch the lower Benton road 
and the ford on Big Black River below Birdsong Ferry. Casual- 
ties : In skirmish at Mechanicsburg. June 4, killed 1, wounded 3, 
total 4 (in 5th Illinois) ; in skirmish near Bllisville, June 25, miss- 
ing 37 (in 5th Illinois). The aggregate reported casualties from 
June 4 to the end of the siege were, killed 1, wounded 3, missing 37, 
total 41. 



108 Indiana at Vickrburg. 

TJ. S. 
DISTRICT XoltTIlKAST LOFISIANA ; AKMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 
Wv'iis:. C.vu. JkremiahC. Sullivan; 
P.ri.LC. <!(ML Elias S. Dennis. 

Detached Brigade, Col. George W. Neely. 
African KRicAnr:. Col. Isnne F. Shepard. 

The headquarters of the District were at Young's l*oint, Louis 
iana. The command was employed in guarding the approaches to 
the right bank of the river. The Detached Brigade was assembhnl 
and the African Brigade enrolled, organized, equipped, and armed 
after the beginning of the siege of Vieksburg. Casualties : Killed 
78, wounded 246, missing 409, total 733. 

Detached Brigade. 
Col. George W. Neely. 

63d Illinois, Col. Joseph B. McCown. 
IOSth Illinois, Lieut. Col. Charles Turner. 
120th Illinois, Col. George W. McKeaig. 

131sT Illinois, Col. George W. Neely; Maj. .loseph L. Turvis. 
IOtit Illinois Cavalry. Companies A, D. G, and K. Maj. Elvis P. 
Shaw. 

The command was assembled after the investment of Vieksburg, 
the selection of its regiments being determined by necessity or con- 
venience. The 108th Illinois was engaged in the battle of Port 
Gibson, May 1, 1863, and in the battle of Champion's Hill, May 16. 
attached to the Second Brigade, Tenth Division, 13th Corps. No 
casualties are reported in the command during the siege. 

u. s. 

African Brigade. 

DISTRICT NORTHEAST LOUISIANA; ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 

Col. Isaac F. Siikpard. 

POST OF MILLIKEN'S BEND, LOUISIANA. 
Col. Hiram Scofield. 

8tii Louisiana. Col. Hiram Scotleld. 

0th Loitisiana, Col. Herman Lieb ; Maj. Erastus N. Owen; Lieut. 
Col. Charles L. Paige. 
11th Louisiana, Col. Edwin W. Chamberlain; Liciil. Col. Cyrus Sears. 
13tii Loitisiana, Lieut. Herman Knoll. 
1st Mississippi, Lieut. Col. A. Watson Webber. 
3n Mississippi, Col. Kichai-d I.'. P.allenger. 

Casualties: In the attack on IMilliken's Bend, Louisiana, June 
7, 1863, killed 78, wounded 246, missing 265, total 589. 



Park Inscriptions. Ill 

roST OP GOODRICH'S LANDING, LOUISIANA. 
Col. William F. Wood. 

1st Arkansas, Lieut. Col. James W. Campbell. 
10th Louisiana, Col. Frederick M. Crandal. 

Two companies (numbering 144 officers and men) of the 1st 
Arkansas were captured June 29, 1863, at Mounds, near Goodrich's 
Landing. 

U. S. 
Detached for tierolce on Gunboats. 

ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 
29th Illinois Infantry (detachmeut.) 

Companies D and K were assigned to duty on gunboats by order 
of Maj. Gen. U. S. Grant, dated February 18, 1863; Company D. 
under Capt. Eberlee P. H. Stone, served during the campaign and 
siege of Vicksburg on gunboat "Tyler" and a detachment from 
the company for a time on U. S. S. "Tuscumbia;" Company K, 
under Capt. Elijah P. Curtis, with enlisted men of other companies 
of the regiment attached to it, served on gunboat "Petrel" and on 
other boats. Casualties : In the bombardment of Grand Gulf, 
April 29, killed 1, wounded 2, total 3 (in Company D). The de- 
tachment was borne on the returns for January 31, 1863, in First 
Brigade, District of Jackson, 16th Corps, Army of the Tennessee. 

U. S. 
Detached for Service on Otuiboats. 

ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. 
lOlsT Illinois Infantry (detachment.) 

Company A was detailed for service on gunboats, March 6, 1863. 
Its operations after that date, during the campaign and siege of 
Vicksburg, are not of record ; Company D served for a time at Gen- 
eral Grant's headquarters, and, later was assigned to duty on the 
gunboats "Cricket" and "Rattler;" Company G was detailed for 
duty, about March 1, 1863, on the ram "Switzerland" and appears 
to have served on that ram during the campaign and siege ; Com- 
pany H served on the gunboat "LaFayette;" a detachment from 
the company served on the ram "Monarch;" Company K was on 
duty as provost-guard at General Grant's headquarters; a detach- 
ment from the company was, for a time, in charge of coal fleet. 
Casualties in detachment during the campaign and siege, not re- 
ported. The detachment was borne on the returns for January 31, 



112 Indiana at Vicksisuro. 

lS(i;}. in Si'cdiul UriiiJidc, ["'oui'l li Divisidii, KJtli ('(H'ps, Army of the 
Tciiiu'ssee. 

U. S. 
Ddiiclicd for Hci'iucc on (IiiiiIkxiIs. 

AUMV OF Till-: TIOXXESSEE. 
nsni Ohio Infantry. M;i.j. Kzi:\ P. J.-icki^oii. 

This reoiment was dctnilod for service on gunboats liy order of 
JMaj. Gen. AVilliani T. Sliernian, dated February 6, 1863; before that 
ilate it was attached to First Brigade, First Division, 15th Corps,- 
Army of the Tennessee. Casualties: In the l)ombardment of 
Grand Gulf, April 29, killed 1, wounded 18, total 19; near Yazoo 
City, IMay 28, killed 1; near Vicksburg, ]\Iay 28, wounded 5; near 
Vieksburg, IMay 27, killed 8, wounded 1, total 4; and during the re- 
mainder of the siege, not reported. Aggregate reported casualties 
in regiment during the campaign and siege, killed 5, wounded 2-1, 
total 29. 



CONFEDERATE|[ARMY. 

c. s. 

ARMY OF yiCKSBUIUJ. 

Lieut. Gen. John C. l'[:MnERTON. 

Stevenson's Division, Maj. (^eii. C. L. Stevenson. 
Mai'ry's-Forney's Division. MnJ. <!en. Dr.lmcy II. Manry; Maj. Gen. 

John H. Forney. 
Smith's Division, Mnj. Gen. M. L. Smith. 
Forney's-Bowen's Division, Ma.i. Gen. John H. Forney; Maj. Gen. 

John S. Bowen. 
Waul's Texas Legion. Col. T. N. Waul. 
River Batteries, Col. Ed. Iliggins. 
Miscellaneous, one detachment and t\\() companies. 

The army was engaged in the battles and movements of the 
Vicksburg campaign beginning March 29, 1868, and began taking 
position on the line of defense, IMay 18 — Stevenson's Division on the 
right, Forney's in the center, and Smith's on the left. Bowen 's Di- 
vision and Waul's Texas Legion in reserve. The assaults of the 
Union army, IMay 19 and May 22, were repulsed. The siege opera- 
tions of that army were successfully opposed from IMay 28 to July 3, 
when a proposal for ca])itulation was sent by General Pemberton to 
General Grant. They met for conference that afternoon l)etween 
the lines and near the Jackson road. The terms of capitulation 



Park Inscriptions. 113 

were agreed upon by correspondence after the meeting and, July 4, 
the army was surrendered to General Grant. The aggregate re- 
ported casualties in the army during the campaign and defense 
were, killed 1,302, wounded 3,486, missing 3,448, total 8,236. 

c. s. 

STEVENSON'S DIVISION; AKMY OF VICKSBUIUi. 

Mfij. (tOU. C. L. Stevenson. 

1st Brigade, Brig. Gen. S. M. Barton. 

2d Brigade, Brig. Gen. E. D. Tviicy ; Col. Isham W. Garrott ; Brig. 
Gen. S. D. Lee. 

riD Brigade, Brig. (ien. Thomas H. Taylor; Brig. Gon. AlfiVMl rum- 
mi ng. 

4th Brigade Artillerv (six batteries and a section). Gol. A. W. Rey- 
nolds. 

Attficli'd. 

Carter's 1st Tennessee Cavalky, Company C, Capt. R. S. Vand.vke. 

Signal Corps. Lieut. C. H. Barrot. 

The division was at Vickshurg at the beginning of the campaign, 
March 29, 1863, and took position on the right of the line of defense 
May 18 — the First Brigade on the right resting its right at the re- 
doubt west of the Warrenton road, the fourth on the right center, 
the third on the left center, and the second on the left, resting its 
left at the railroad. Countermines against saps were prepared at 
three points and fired at one. Casualties: In the battle of Port 
Gibson, May 1, killed 18, wounded 132, missing 142, total 292, three 
officers killed; in the battle of Champion's Hill, T^Iay 16, killed 233, 
wounded 527, missing 2,103, total 2,863. I\Iaj. Joseph W. Ander- 
son, chief of artillery, and twelve other officers killed; and in the 
defense, killed 145, wounded 350, missing 37, total 532, eleven offi- 
cers killed. The aggregate reported casualties in the division dur- 
ing the campaign and defense were, killed 396, wounded 1,009, miss- 
ing 2,282, total 3,687. 

c. s. 

First Br i (jade. 

STEVENSON'S DIVISION; ARMY OF VICKSBURG. 

Brig. Gen. Seth jNI. Barton. 

40th Georgia, Col. Abda Joliuson ; Lient. Col. R. M. Young. 

41ST Georgia, Col. William E. Cixrtiss. 

42d Georgia, Col. R. J. Henderson. 

43d Georgia, Col. Skidmore Harris; Capt. M. M. (Jrantliam. 

52d Georgia, Col. C. D. Phinii)s; Ma.i. John Jay :\Ioore. 

[81 



114 Indiana at Vioksbukg. 

Casualties: In the battle of Champion's Hill, May IG, 1863, 
killed 58, wounded 16, missing 737, total 901, Col. Skidmore Harris 
and two other officers killed ; and in the defense, killed 6, wounded 
20, missing- 16, total 42. The aggregate reported casualties in the 
brigade during the campaign and defense were, killed 64, wounded 
126, missing 753, total 943. 

c. s. 

Second Brigade. 

STEVENSON'S DIVISION; ARMY OF VICKSBURG. 
Brig. Gen. E. D. Tracy; 
Col. Isham W. Gakrott; 
Brig. Gen. S. D. Lee. 

20th Alabama, Col. Isham W. Garrott; Lieut. Col. Edmund W. Pet- 
tus; Col. Isham W. Garrott; Col. Edmund W. Pettus. 

23d Alabama, Col. F. K. Beck. 

30th Alabama, Col. C. M. Shellejs Capt. John C. Francis. 

31ST Alabama, Col. D. R. Pluudley; Lieut. Col. T. M. Arrington; Maj. 
George W. Mathieson ; Lieut. Col. T. M. Arrington. 

46th Alabama, Col. M. L. Woods ; Capt. George E. Brewer ; Lieut. 
Col. Edmund W. Pettus ; Capt. George E. Brewer. 

The brigade reinforced by "Waul's Texas Legion, repulsed a de- 
termined assault on its front and especially at the railroad redoubt 
on its left. May 22, 1863, Colonel Pettus leading a detachment of 
the Legion that reoccupied the redoubt in the afternoon. Counter- 
mines were prepared at that redoubt and at Fort Garrott on the 
right of the brigade, one of which was fired at the redoubt the night 
of July 2. Casualties : In the battle of Port Gibson, May 1, killed 
17, wounded 112, missing 142, total 271, Brig. Gen. E. D. Tracy and 
one other officer killed, Brig. Gen. S. D. Lee assigned to command 
May 2 ; in the battle of Champion's Hill, May 16, killed 44, wounded 
142, missing 604, total 790, two officers killed; and in the defense. 
killed 70, wounded 147, missing 7, total 224, Col. Isham W. Garrott 
and two other officers killed. The aggregate reported casualties in 
the brigade during the campaign and defense were, killed 131, 
wounded 401, missing 753. total 1,285. 



. Park iNscrarTiONS. 115 

C. s. 
Third Brigade. 

STEVENSON'S DIVISION; ARMY OF VICKSBIiRG. 
Brig. Gon. Thomas H. Taylor; 
Brig. Gen. Alfred Gumming. 

34th Georgia, Col. James A. W. Johnson. 
36th Georgia, Col. Jesse A. Glenn ; Maj. Charles E. Bl■oylei^. 
39th Georgia, Col. J. T. McConnell ; Lieut. Col. J. F. B. Jackson. 
56th Georgia, Col. E. P. Watkins ; Lieut. Col. J. T. Slaughter. 
57th Georgia, Col. William Barkuloo. 

Two sorties were made from the salient redoubt on the east side 
of the Hall's Ferry road at which the right of the brigade rested; 
in the last one, the night of June 22, 1863, a lieutenant colonel and 
five men were captured. A countermine was prepared at that re- 
doubt during the night of July 2. Casualties: In the battle of 
Champion's Hill, ]May 16, killed 121, wounded 269, missing 605, 
total 995, seven officers killed; and in the defense, killed 43, 
wounded 128, total 171, one officer killed. The aggregate reported 
casualties in the brigade during the campaign and defense were, 
killed 164, wounded 397, missing 605, total 1,166. 

c. s. 

Fourth Brigade. 

STEVENSON'S DIVISION; ARMY OF VICKSBURG. 

Col. A. W. Reynolds. 

3d Tennessee (Provisional Army), Col. N. J. Lillard. 
31ST Tennessee, Col. W. M. Bradford. 
43d Tennessee, Col. James W. Gillespie. 
59th Tennessee, Col, William Tj. Eakin. 

The left of the brigade rested at the Hall's Ferry road and a 
detachment of its left regiment was engaged in the sortie the night 
of June 22, 1863. Casualties: In the battle of Champion's Hill, 
May 16, missing 152 (including 12 at Big Black River), the brigade 
having been ordered to take charge of and guard the army train to 
Brownsville north of the railroad, and not actively engaged in the 
defense, killed 16, wounded 25, missing 14, total 55, six officers 
killed. The aggregate reported casualties in the brigade during the 
campaign and defense were, killed 16, wounded 25, missing 166. 
total 207. 



116 Indiana at Vicksbueg. 

C. S. 

Arlillcrn. 

sTKVKxsoNs nnisiox: ai;mv of vicksbiimj. 

Alabama Bath:i:y, (";ii)t. J. F. Waddell. 

Botetourt ( Vir.:j;ini;i ) Artillery, Cnpt. J. W. Jolmsloii ; Lieut. Fran- 
cis G. Obt'iK'liaiiL 

I'liEROKEE (Georgia) Artillery, ('apt. .Ma.\ Van Di-n ("(irjait. 

oi) Maryland Battery, Capt. F. (). ("i.-iilxane ; Capt. Jolm B. Ilowan. 

Hudson's (Mississijipi^ P.attery. Lieut. J. H. .Sweaney; I..ieut. M. IL 
Trantliam. 

PoiNTE Coupee (L(iuisian:i) Artillery, ('(nni)an.v A (Section). Lieut. 
Jolin Yoist. 

Pointe Coupee (Louisiana) Artillery. ('(»uiiian.v C. Capt. Alexander 
CImst. 

Capt. J. W. Johnston served as Division Inspector-General of 
Light Artillery dnring the defense. Casualties : In the battle of 
Port Gibson, ]\Iay 1, 1863, killed 1, 'ivounded 20, total 21 (in the Vir- 
ginia Artillery, one officer killed; in the Mississippi Battery, 
wounded 20) ; in the battle of Champion's Hill, INIay 16, killed 9, 
wounded 10, missing 5, total 24 (in the Alabama Battery) ; and in 
the defense, killed 10, wounded 30, total 40 (in the Alabama Bat- 
tery, killed 9, wounded 30, total 39 ; in the IMaryland Battery, Capt. 
F. 0. Claiborne killed). The aggregate reported casualties in the 
six batteries and section during the campaign and defense were, 
killed 20, wounded 60, missing 5, total 85. 

c. s. 

MAUKY'S-FORNEY'S DIVISION; ARMY OF VICKSBI'RG. 
Maj. Gen. Dabney II. Maury; 
Ma.i. Gen. John H. Forney. 

IIebert's Brigade, Brig. Gen. Louis Ilebert ; Col. William W. Wither- 

spoon ; Brig. Gen. Louis Hebert. 
Moore's Brigade, Brig. Gen. .John C. Moore. 

The division held the line from Haynes' Bluff on the right to the 
Mississippi River at the beginning of the Vicksburg campaign, 
March 29, 1863; General Forney assigned to command April 17; it 
took position in the center of the line of defense, IMay 18 — Moore's 
Brigade on the right resting its right at the railroad, and Hebert 's 
Brigade on the left resting its left at the Graveyard road. Coun- 
termines against saps and mines were prepared at three points and 
fired at one. Casualties: In the defense of Haynes' Bluff, April 
30, wounded 3 ; and in the defense, killed 340, wounded 759, missing 



Pake Inscriptions. 117 

21, total 1,120, thirty-three officers killed or mortally wounded. 
The aggregate reported casualties in the division during the cam- 
paign and defense were, killed 3-10, wounded 762, missing 21, total 
1,123. 

c. s. 

lieheit's Brigade. 

MAURY-S-FORNEYS DIVISION; ARMY OF VICKSBURG. 
Brig. Gen. Louis Hebert ; 

Col. W. W. WiTIIEESPOON ; 

Brig. Gen. Louis Hebert. 

3d Louisiana, Maj. David Pierson ; Liont. Col. Samuel D. Russell ; 
Maj. David Fiersoii. 

21ST Louisiana, Col. Isaac W. Pattou. 

22d Louisiana (detaoluiient). Lieut. Col. Jobn T. Plattsuiier. 

oGth Mississippi, Col. W. W. Witlierspcon. 

37T1I Mississippi, Col. O. S. Holland. 

38th Mississippi, Col. I'reston Brent: Capl. D. B. Seal. 

43d Mississippi, Col. Rieliard Il.-irrisnn. 

7th Mississippi Battalion, Capt. A. M. Dozier. 

2d Alabama Artillery Battalion. Coniiiany C, Capt. T. K. Emanuel ; 
Lieut. John R. Sclater. 

Appeal (Arkansas) Battery. Capt. William N. Hogg; Lieut. Christo- 
pher C. Scott ; Lieut. It. N. Gotten. 

The brigade, reinforced bv regiments of CockreU's Brigade of 
Bowen's Division, repulsed determined and repeated assaults on its 
front. May 19 and ]\Iay 22, 1863 ; and with the same reinforcement, 
repulsed the assault following the firing of the mine under the 
Third Louisiana Redan, June 25. It closed to the right, June 2, 
thereby making room for Green's Brigade between its left and the 
Graveyard road. Countermines were prepared at two points. Cas- 
ualties: In the defense of Haynes' Bluff, April 30, wounded 3; 
and in the defense, killed 219, wounded 455, missing 21, total 695, 
twenty-five officers killed or mortally wounded. The aggregate re- 
ported casualties in the brigade during the campaign and defense 
were, killed 219, wounded -458, missing 21, total 698. 



118 Indiana a'I' Vkvksbukg. 

C. S. 
Moure's Brifjadc. 

MAURY-S-FORNEY'S DIVISION; ARMY OF VICKSBURG. 

Biii;-. Gen. John C. Moore. 

37th Alabama. C*u1. Jaiues F. Dowdell. 

40th Alabama, Col. .Johu H. Higley. 

42d Alabama, Col. John W. I'oi'tis ; Lieut. Col. Thomas C. Lanier; 

Col. John W. Portis. 
35th Mississippi, Col. William S. Barry; Lieut. Col. C. R. Jordan. 
40th Mississippi, Col. W. B. Colbert. 
2d Texas, Col. Ashbel Smith. 
1st Mississippi Light Artillery, Companies A, C, D, E, G and I, 

Col. William T. Withers. 
Alabama Battery, Copt. II. II. Sengstalv. 
PoiNTE Ct)UPEE (Louisiana) Artillery, Company B, Capt. Wm. A. 

Davidson. 

The brigcide, reinforced by regiments of Green's Brigade, re- 
pulsed determined and repeated assaults on its front, May 22, 1863. 
Countermines were prepared at the lunette on the Baldwin's Ferry 
road, one of which was fired June 28. Casualties : In the de- 
fense, killed 121, wounded 304, total 425, eight officers killed or mor- 
tally wounded. 

c. s. 

SMITH'S DIVISION; ARMY OF VICKSBURG. 
Maj. Gen. M. L. Smith. 

Baldwin's Brigade, Brig. Gen. William E. Baldwin ; Col. Allen 
Thomas ; Col. Robert Richardson ; Brig. Gen. William E. Bald- 
win. 

Vaughn's Brigade, Brig. Gen. J. C. Vaughn. 

Lee's-Shoup's Brigade, Brig. Gen. S. D. Lee; Brig. Gen. Francis A. 
Shoup. 

Mississippi State Troops. Brig. Gen. Jeptha V. Harris. 

Attached. 

Detachment, Maj. J. R. Stevens. 

14th Mississippi Light Artillery Battai.ion. Maj. M. S. Ward. 

Mississippi Partisan Rangers, Capt. J. S. Smyth. 

Signal Corps, Capt. Max T. Davidson. M 

The division was at Vicksburg at the beginning of the campaign, 
March 29, 1863 ; took position on the line of defense, May 18, and 
the morning of May 19 — Shoup 's Brigade on the right resting its 
right at the angle in the Stockade Redan on the Graveyard road. 



Park Inscriptions. 121 

Baldwin 's in the center, and Vaughn 's on the left resting its left at 
or near the river ; and repulsed determined and repeated assaults on 
its right, IMay 19 and May 22. Countermines against saps and 
mines were prepared at three points and fired at one. Casualties : 
In the battle of Port Gibson, ]\Iay 1, killed 12, wounded 48, missing 
27, total 87;. in the engagement at Big Black River Bridge, May 17, 
not reported ; and in the defense, killed 151, wounded 338, missing 
18, total 507, fifteen officers killed or mortally wounded. The ag- 
gregate reported casualties in the division during the campaign and 
defense were, killed 163, wounded 386, missing 45, total 594. 

c. s. 

BaJdniii's BiUjade. 

SMITH'S DIVISION; ARMY OF VICKSBUKG. 

Brig. Geji. AVii.liam E. Baldwin ; 
Col. Allen Thomas ; 

Col. IJOBERT E-ICHARDSON ; 

Brig. Gen. William E. Baldwin. 

17th Louisiana, Col. Robert Richardson ; Lieut. Col. Madison Rog- 
ers; Maj. W. A. Redditt; Col. Robert Richardson. 

31ST Louisiana. Col. C. IT. Morrison; Lieut. Col. S. H. Griffin; Maj. 
James W. Draughon. 
4th Mississippi, Col. P. S. Layton ; Liout. Col. T. N. Adaire; Capl. 
Thomas P. Nelson. 

40th Mississippi, Col. C. W. Sears. 

Tennessee Battery, Capt. Thomas F. Tobin. 

One regiment was engaged at Big Black River Bridge, INIay 17, 
1863. Casualties : In the liattle of Port Gibson, May 1, killed 12, 
wounded 48, missing 27, total 87 ; in the engagement at Big Black 
River Bridge, May 17, not reported ; and in the defense, killed 30, 
wounded 85, missing 6, total 121, Lieut. Col. Madison Rogers, Lieut. 
Col. S. H. Griffin and one other officer killed. The aggregate re- 
ported casualties in the brigade during the campaign and defense 
were, killed 42, wounded 133, missing 33, total 208. 



122 Indiana at Vigksburg. 

C. S. 
Vaufjhn's Brigade. 

SMITH'S DIVISION; ARMY OF VIGKSBURG. 
Kriij. Gen. J. C. Vaughn. 

(KtTii Tenjnessee, Col. .1. II. ("r:iwl"<>rd; Lieut. Col. N. Gregg; Capt. 

J. W. Baclimai). 
GlsT Tknnkssee, Col. F. E. Pitts; Lieut. Col. James G. Rose. 
G2d Tennessee, Col. John A. Rowan. 

Casualties: In the engagement at Big Black River Bridge, 
May 17, 1863, not reported ; and in the defense, killed 9, wounded 
22, missing 10, total 41. 

C. S. 

Lee's-Shouifs Brigade. 

SMITH'S DIVISION; ARMY OF VIGKSBURG. 

Brig. Gen. S. D. Lee; 

Brig. Gen. Francis A. Shoup. 

26th Louisiana, Col. Winchester Hall ; Lieut. Col. William C. Crow. 
27th Louisiana, Col. L. D. Marks; Lieut. Col. L. L. McLaurin ; Maj. 

Alex S. Norwood; Col. L. D. Marks; Capt. Joseph T. Hatch. 
28th (29th) Louisiana, Col. Allen Thomas. 
McNally's (Arltansas) Battery, Capt. Francis McNally. 

The brigade, reinforced by regiments of Coekrell's Brigade of 
Bowen's Division, repulsed determined and repeated assaults on its 
front, I\Iay 19 and May 22, 1863. Countermines were prepared at 
two points and fired at one. Casualties : In the defense, killed 
107, wounded 199, total 306, Col. L. D. Marks, Lieut. Col. L. L. 
McLaurin and ten other officers killed or mortally wounded. 

C. S. 

Mississippi State Troops. 

SMITH'S DIVISION; ARMY OF VIGKSBURG. 
Brig. Gen. Jeptha V. Harris. 

5th Regiment, Col. H. C. Robinson. 

3d Battalion, Lieut. Col. Thomas A. Burgin. 

The command arrived at Vicksburg about May 10, 1863. Cas- 
ualties : In the defense, killed 3, wounded 28, total 31. 



Park Inschiptions. 123 

Attached. 
Detachment, Maj. J. R. Stevens. 

14th Mississippi Light Arthxeey Battalion, Maj. M. S. Ward. 
Mississippi Partisan Rangers, Capt. J. S. Smyth. 
Signal Corps, Capt. Max T. Davidson. 

The detachment under Major Stevens was composed of officers 
and men of Loring's Division, largely of the 6th Mississippi, de- 
tached from that command at the close of the battle of Champion 's 
Hill, May 16, 1863. Casualties : In the defense, killed 2, wounded 
1, missing 2, total 5. Battery C, 14th Mississippi Light Artillery 
Battalion, was engaged in the battle of Champion's Hill, May 16; 
Batteries A and B and one section of Battery C served in the de- 
fense. Casualties : In the defense, wounded 3. Neither the Mis- 
sissippi Partisan Rangers nor the Signal Corps are mentioned in the 
"Official Records" except in the statement of the organization of 
the Confederate Army of Vicksbiu^g. The aggregate reported cas- 
ualties in the attached commands during the defense were, killed 2, 
wounded 4, missing 2, total 8. 

C. S. 
FORNEY'S-BOWEN'S DIVISION; ARMY OF VICKSBURG. 

Maj. Gen. J. H. Forney; 
Maj. Gen. John S. Bowen. 

First (Missonri) Brigade, Brig. Gen. Jolni S. BoAven; Col. Francis 

M. Cockrell. 
2d Brigade, Brig. Gon. Martin E. Green; Col. T. P. Doclvery. 

The headquarters of the division were at Big Black River 
Bridge at the beginning of the Vicksburg campaign, March 29, 
1863 ; General Bowen assigned to command, April 17. The division 
was nominally in reserve at the beginning of the defense, but was 
engaged in repulsing the assaults. May 19 and May 22, and in all 
the work of the defense. Casualties: In the defense of Grand 
Gulf, April 29, killed 3, wounded 18, total 21, Col. William Wade, 
Chief of Artillery, killed; in the battle of Port Gibson, May 1. 
killed 26, wounded 148, missing 172, total 346, one officer killed; 
in the battle of Champion's Hill, May 16, killed 131, wounded 430, 
missing 307, total 868, sixteen officers killed ; in the engagement at 
Big Black River Bridge, May 17, killed 3, wounded 9, missing 539, 
total 551 (cannot be distributed to the two brigades), one officer 



124 Indiana at VrcKSBUR(4. 

killed; and in the defense, killed 1!)(), wounded 504, missing 74, total 
7()S, twenty-four offieers killed. The aiigregate reported casualties 
in the division during the campaign and defense were, killed 353, 
wounded 1,109, missing 1,092, total 2,554. 

c. s. 

First (Missouri) lirinadc. 

FORNEVS BOWKN'S DIVISION; AKMY OF VICKSmiJG. 

P>ri:i. Gen. John S. Bowen ; 

Col. FllANCIS M. COCKEELL. 

1st and 4th Missoeui. Col. A. C. Kiley. 

2d Missouri, Col. Francis i\I. Cockrell ; IJcut. Col. rcmln'oke S. Sen- 

teny; Maj. Tliomas M. Carter. 
3d Missouri, Lieut. Col. F. L. Ilnbbell ; Col. W. IJ. (iaust": Maj. J. K. 

McDowell. 
5th Missouri, Col. James McCown ; Lieut. Col. It. S. Bevier ; Col. 

James McCown. 
Gth Missouri, Col. Eugene Erwin ; Rlaj. S. Cooper ; Col. Eugene Er- 

wln ; Ma.i. S. Cooper. 
Guieor's (Missouri) Battery, Capt. Henry Guibor ; Lii-ut. William 

Corkery; Lieut. Cornelius Heffernan. 
Landis' (Missouri) Battery, Capt. John C. Tjandis : Lieut. John M. 

Langan. 
Wade's (Missouri) Baitery, Lieut. R. C. Walsh. 

The Fifth and Sixth Regiments were engaged in the repulse of 
the assault following the firing of the mine under the Third Louis- 
iana Redan, June 25, Col. Eugene Erwin and one other officer 
killed. Casualties : In the defense of Grand Gulf, April 29, killed 
2, wounded 18, total 20; in the battle of Port Gibson, May 1, killed 
13, wounded 97. missing 96, total 206, one officer killed ; in the bat- 
tle of Champion's Hill, May 16, killed 65, wounded 293, missing 
242, total 600; in the engagement at Big Black River Bridge, j\Iay 
17, cannot be stated ; and in the defense, killed 113, wounded 446, 
total 559. The aggregate reported casualties in the brigade during 
the campaign and defense were, killed 193, wounded 854, missing 
338, total 1,385. 



Park Inscriptions. 125 

c. s. 

Second Brigade. 

FORNEY'S-BOWEN'S DIVISION: ARMY OF VlCKSHlIRli. 

Brig. Gen. Martin E. Green ; 

Col. T. P. DOCKERY. 

15th Arkansas, Lieut. Col. W. W. Reynolds; Capt. Caleb Davis. 

19th Arkansas, Col. T. P. Doekery: Capt. James K. Norwood. 

20th Arkansas, Col. D. W. Jones. 

21ST Arkansas, Col. J. E. Cravens ; Capt. A. Tyler. 

1st Arkansas Cavalry Battalion (dismounted), Capt. W. S. Catter- 

son ; Capt. John J. Clark. 
12th Arkansas Battalion Sharpshooters. Capt. (4riff Bayne; Lieut. 

John S. Bell. 
1st Missouri Cavalry (ilismounted). Col. E. Gates; Maj. Willinm C. 

Parker. 
3d Missouri Cavairy Battalion (dismounted). Lieut. Col. D. Todd 

Samuel ; Capt. Felix Lotspeich. 
3d Missouri Battery. Capt. William E. Dawsnn. 
Lowe's (Missouri) Battery. Capt. S'liuyler Lowe; Lieut. Thomas B. 

Catron. 

The bricrade took position on tlie line of defense, June 2, 1863, 
resting its left at the angle of the Stockade Redan on the Grave- 
yard road and connecting its right with the left of Hehert's 
Brigade. Detachments only of the First and Third Missouri Cav- 
alry were engaged in the defense. General Green was killed in the 
trenches, June 27, and Colonel Dockery assigned to command. Cas- 
ualties: In the battle of Port Gibson, lAIay 1, killed 13, wounded 
51, missing 76. total 140; in tlie battle of Champion's Hill, i\Iay 16 
(estimated), killed 66, Avounded 137, missing 65, total 268; in th^' 
engagement at Big Black River Bridge, IMay 17, cannot be stated; 
and in the defense (estimated), killed 77, wounded 58. missing 74. 
total 209. The aggregate reported and estimated casualties in the 
lirigade during the campaign and defense w^ere, killed 156, wounded 
246, missing 215, total 617. 

c. s. 

WALL'S TEXAS LEGION; ARMY OF VICKSBIKG. 
Col. T. N. Waul. 

1 SI Battalion (Infantry), Maj. Eugene S. Boiling. 
2d Battalion (Infantry), Lieut. Col. James Wrigley. 
Zouave Battalion (Infantry). Capt. J. B .Fleitas 
Cavalry Battalion, Lieut. Thomas J. Cleveland. 
Artillery' Company, Capt. J. Q. Wall. 



126 Indiana a'I' Vicksburg. 

The Legion was at Fort Pemberton, Mississippi, during March 
and April, 1863. By order of General Pemljerton, dated May 4, 
Colonel Waul moved on transports to Snyder's Bluff, leaving 300 of 
his troops at Fort Pemberton. He reported that the part of the 
Legion that entered Vieksburg, May 17, and served in the defense, 
consisted of eleven infantry companies, one artillery company, a 
detachment of mounted scouts, and a battalion of attached Zouaves. 
The afternoon of May 19, the command reported to General Ste- 
venson and was assigned a position in rear of the left of Lee's 
Brigade, that being the most assailable and threatened point on the 
line of Stevenson's Division. It assisted in repulsing the assaults 
on General Lee's line, May 22, with a detachment from two of its 
companies — about thirty-five men, led by Col. Edmund Pettus, 20th 
Alabama, reoccupied the railroad redoubt. Casualties : In the de- 
fense, killed 47, wounded 190, missing 8, total 245, ten officers re- 
ported killed. 

c. s. 

RIVER BATTERIES; ARMY OF VICKSBURG. 
Col. Ed. Higgins. 

1st Louisiana Heavy Artillery, Col. C. A. Fuller ; Lieut. Col. D. 

Beltzhoover. 
8th Louisiana Heavy Artillery Battalion, Maj. F. N. Ogden. 
22d Louisiana (detachment), Capt. Samuel Jones. 
1st Tennessee Heavy Artillery, Col. A. Jackson, Jr. 
Tennessee Battery, Capt. J. B. Carutbers. 
Tennessee Battery, Capt. T. N. Johnston. 
Tennessee Battery, Capt. J. P. Lynch. 
Vaiden (Mississijipi) Battery, Capt. S. C. Bains. 

The command, at the lieginning of the defense. May 18, 1863, 
was in charge of thirty-one heavy guns in position on the river front 
line, and thirteen light guns on the city front. All the light and 
six of the heavy guns were successively ordered to the rear line of 
defense with the detachment serving them. The attacks of the 
Union gunboats were repulsed, May 22 and May 27, the gunboat 
"Cincinnati" being sunk in the great bend of the river by the upper 
batteries on the last-named day. Casualties: In opposing the 
passage of the Union transports, the night of April 22, killed 1, 
wounded 2, total 3; and during the defense, about 30 killed and 
wounded. 



Park Inscriptions. 129 

C. S. 

MISCELLANEOUS; ARMY OF VICKSBURG. 

54th Alabama (detachment), Lient. Joel P Abney. 
City Guaeds, Capt. E. B. Martin. 
Signal Corps, Capt. C. A. King. 

The detachment of the 54th Alabama, Buford's Brigade, T or- 
ing's Division, was engaged in the battle of Champion's Hill, jlay 
16, 1863, and served in the defense. Neither the Detachment, the 
City Guards, nor the Signal Corps are mentioned in the "Official 
Records" except in the statement of the organization of the Con- 
federate Army of Vicksbiirg. 

C. S. 

JOHNSTON'S ARMY. 

Gen. Joseph E. Johkston. 

Breckinridge's Division, Maj. Gen. John C. Breckinridge. 
French's Division, Maj. Gen. S. G. French. 
Loring's Division, Maj. Gen. W. W. Loring. 
Walker's Division, Maj. Gen. W. H. T. Walker. 
Cavalry Division, Brig. Gen. William H. Jackson. 
Reserve Artillery, Maj. W. C. Preston. 

The army was assembled after the engagement at Jackson, Mis- 
sissippi, INIay 14, 1863, in the hope that it would be able to raise the 
siege of Vicksburg, either by defeating the Army of the Tennessee, 
or by assisting the Confederate Army of Vicksburg to break through 
the investment line. Loring's Division and Gregg's, Gist's and 
Wilson's Brigades of Walker's Division were engaged in some of 
the battles of the campaign. The army was on the march toward 
Vicksburg, July 4, and its leading divisions were close to nnd on the 
east side of Big Black River. It fell back to Jacksci when the 
Army of Vicksburg surrendered. The aggregate repoited casual- 
ties in the army during the campaign were, killed 111, wounded 
392, missing 352, total 855. 

C. S- 
BRECKINRIDGE'S DIVISION; JOHNSTON'S ARMY. 
Maj. Gen. John C. Breckinridge. 
D. W. Adams' Brigade, Brig. Gen. D. W. Adams. 
Kentucky Brigade, Brig. Gen. Ben H. Helm. 
Stovall's Brigade, Brig. Gen. M. A. Stovall. 
Arthlery, Maj. Rice E. Graves. 

The division arrived at Jackson, Mississippi, June 1, 1863, from 
the Department of the Tennessee. Its headquarters were at Bolton. 
July 4. 

[^1 



130 Indiana at Vtcksbukg. 

D. W. Adiniix' Brif/ade. 
Brig. (Jen. D. W. Adams. 

32d Alabama, Lient. Col. Henry Maury. 

13th and 20th Louisiana, Col. Augustus Ricliard. 

IGth and 25th Louisiana, Col. D. Gober. 

19th Louisiana, Col. Wesley P. Winans. 

14th Louisiana Battalion Sharpshooters, Maj. John E. Austin. 

C. S. 

Kentucky Brigade. 

BRECKINElIKiE'S DIVISION; JOHNSTON'S ARMY. 
Brig. Gen. Ben H. Helm. 

41st Alai!Ama, Col. M. L. Stansel. 

2d Kentucky, Lieut. Col. James W. Hewitt. 

4th Kentucky, Col. Joseph P. Nuckols ; Lieut. Col. John A. Adair. 

6th Kentucky, Lieut. Col. M. H. Cofer. 

9th Kentucky, Col. J. W. Caldwell. 

StovaJVs Brigade. 
Brig. Gen. M. A. Stovall. 

1st and 3d Florida, Col. W. S. Dilworth. 
4th Florida, Lieut. Col. Edward Badger. 
47th Georgia, Col. George W. M. Williams. 

COth North Carolina, Col. Washington M. Hardy ; Lieut. Col. James 
M. Ray. 

ArtiUery. 
Maj. Rice E. Graves. 

Tennessee Battery, Capt. .J. W. Mebane. 
Kenti--::y Battery. Capt. Robert Cobb. 

Wasiii-'!Ton (Louisiana) Arthxery, (5th Company), Capt. C. H. Slo- 
comb. 

C. S. 

FRENCirS DIVISION; JOHNSTON'S ARMY. 
Maj. Gen. S. G. French. 

McNair's Brigade, Brig. Gen. E. McNair. 
Maxey's Brigade. Brig. Gen. S. B. Maxey. 
Evan's Brigade, Brig. Gen. N. G. Evans. 

The division was organized and General French assigned to its 
command, June 21, 1863. Its headquarters were at Jackson, Mis- 
sissippi, July 4. 



Paek Inscriptions. 131 

McNair's Brigade. 
Brig. Geu. E. McNair. 

1st Arkansas Mounted Rifles (tlismountecl). Col. K. W. Harper. 

2i> Arkansas Mounted Rifles (disuiouiited), Col. J. .\. Williamson. 

4th Arkansas, Col. H. G. Buun. 

25th Arkansas, Col. Charles J. Tnrubiill. 

31st Arkansas, Col. T. H. McCray. 

29th North Carolina, Lieut. Col. William B. Creasmau. 

39i'H North Carolina. Col. D. Coleman. 

The brigade was ordered from Shelbyville, Tennessee, May 9, 
1863. It was near Canton, Mississippi, May 26, and at Yazoo City, 
Mississippi, June 10, at both dates temporarily in Walker's Di- 
vision. 

Artillery. 

Louisiana Battery, Capt. C. E. Fenner. 

McBeth (South Carolina) Artilli;ry, I, lent. B. A. Jeter. 

South Carolina Battery. Capt. .J. F. Culpeper. 

C. S. 
Maxey's Brigade. 

FRENCH'S DIVISION; JOHNSTON'S ARMY. 
Brig. Geu. S. B. Maxey. 

4tli Louisiana, Lieut. Col. William F. Pennington; Col. S. E. IIuu- 
ter. 
30th Louisiana, Lieut. Col. Thomas Shields. 
42d Tennessee, Lieut. Col. Isaac N. Hulme. 
40th and 55tii Tennessee, Col. Alexander J. Brown. 
48th Tennessee, Col. W. M. Voorhies. , 

49th Tennessee, Maj. David A. Lynn. 
53d Tennessee, Lieut. Col. John R. White. 
1st Texas Battalion Sharpshooters, Maj. James Burnet. 

The brigade was ordered from Port Hudson, Louisiana, to Vieks- 
burg. May 4, 1863, by General Pemberton. It was at Brookhaven. 
Mississippi, May 12; and at Jackson, Mississippi, May 30, tempo- 
rarily attached to Loring's Division. 

Evan's Brigade. 
Brig. Gen. N. G. Evans. 

17th South Carolina, Capt. James Beaty; Maj. John R. Gulp. 
18th South Carolina, Col. W. PI. Wallace. 
22d South Carolina, Capt. A. C. Pease. 

23d South Carolina, Capt. John M. Kinloch ; Col. H. L. Benbow. 
26th South Carolina, Col. A. D. Smith. 

HOLCOMBE Legion, Lieut. Col. W. J. Crawley; Ma.i. Martin G. Zieg- 
ler; Lieut. Col. W. J. Crawley. 



182 Indiana at Vicksbukg. 

llie brigade was ordered from the Department of South Caro- 
lina, Georgia and Florida. It was at Jackson, ]\Iississippi, IMay 30, 
18G3, temiK)rarily attached to Loring's Division; and was in Breck- 
inridge's (Oiiiiiiand. June 3. 

c. s. 

I.OKING'S DIVISION; JOHNSTON'S ARMY. 
Miij. Gen. W. W. liOiuNG. 

3 ST Brigade. Brig. Gen. Ll^yd Tilgbman ; Col. A. E. Reynolds; Brig. 

Geu. Johu Adams. 
2d Brigade, Brig. Gen. W. S. Featberston. 
3d Brigade, Brig. Gen. A. Biiford. 

The division was engaged in the battles and movements of the 
Vicksburg campaign, beginning March 29, 1863 ; was partially re- 
organized, April 15 ; abandoned its artillery at the close of the battle 
of Champion's Hill, May 16, and marched to Crystal Springs; 
marched to Jackson, IMay 19, and from that date became a part of 
Johnston's army; and w^as camped on Bogue Chitto the evening of 
July 1. Casualties: In the battle of Champion's Hill, May 16, 
killed 16, wounded 61, missing 43, total 120, four officers killed. 

C. S. 
First Brigade. 

LORING'S DIVISION; JOHNSTON'S ARMY. 
Brig. Gen. Lloyd Tilghman ; 
Col. A. E. Reynolds ; 
Brig. Gen. John Adams. 

1st Confederate Battalion, Lieut. Col. G. H. Forney. 
Gth Mississippi, Col. Robert Lowry. 
14th Mississippi. Col. G. W. Abert. 

15th Mississippi, Lieut. Col. J. R. Binf(n-d ; Col. M. Farrell. 
.20th Mississippi, Col. D. R. Russell; Lieut. Col. William N. Brown. 
23d Mississippi, Col. J. M. Wells. 

26th Mississippi, Col. A. E. Reynolds; Maj. T. F. Parker. 
1st Mississippi Light Artiljjcry, Company G, Capt. J. J. Cowan. 
14th Mississippi Artillery Battalion, Company C, Capt. Jacob Cul- 
bertson. 

The brigade was at Fort Pemberton, IMississippi, at the begin- 
ning of the Vicksburg campaign, March 29, 1863, and was reorgan- 
ized April 15. Part of the officers and men of the two artillen- 
companies fell back to Vicksburg at the close of the battle of Cham- 
pion 's Hill, IMay 16, and served in the defense. Casualties : In the 



Park Inscriptions. 1;^:} 

battle of Port Gibson, May 1, one regiment (6th Mississippi) en- 
gaged, not reported; and in the battle of Champion's Hill, May 16. 
killed 5, wounded 10, missing 42, total 57, Brig. Gen. Lloyd Tilgh- 
man killed. 

c. s. 

Second Bru/ade. 

LORING'S DIVISION; JOHNSTON'S ARMY. 

Brig. Gen. W. S. Featitebston. 
3d Mississippi, Col. T. A. Mellon. 
22d Mississippi. Lieut. Col. H. J. Iteid; Col. Frank Sclialler. 
31ST Mississippi, Col. J. A. Orr. 
33d Mississippi, Col. D. W. Hurst. 

1st Mississippi Battalion Shaepshootkrs, Maj. W. A. liayburn. 
1st Mississippi Light Akitllery, Company D, Capt. Jeff L. Wofford. 
Alabama Battekv. Capt. S. Charpentier. 

The brigade was at Fort Pemberton, Mississippi, at the begin- 
ning of the Vieksburg campaign, ]\Iarch 29, 1863. Casualties: In 
the battle of Champion's Ilill, May 16, wounded 2, missing 1, total 
3. Captain Wofford and the men of his company fell back to Vieks- 
burg and served in the defense. The Alabama Battery was attached 
after May 16. 

c. s. 

Third Brigade. 

LOUING'S DIVISION; JOHNSTON'S ARMY. 
Brig. Gen. Abraham Buford. 

27th Alabama, Col. James Jackson. 

35th Alabama, Col. Edward Goodwin. 

54th Alabama, Col. Alpheus Baker. 

o5th Alabama, Col. John Snodgrass. 

9th Arkansas, Col. Isaac L. Dunlop. 

3d Kentucky, Col. A. P. Thompson. 

7th Kentucky, Col. Ed. Crossland. 

8th Kentucky, Col. H. B. Lyon ; Lieut. Col. A. R. Shacklett. 

12th Louisiana, Col. Thomas M. Scott. 

3d Missouri Cav.\i.ry Battalion (dismounted), Lieut. Col. D. Todd 

Samuel. 
Pointe Coupee (Louisiana) Ariillery, Capt. A. Bouanchaud. 

The brigade was at Port Hudson, Louisiana, at the beginning of 
the Vieksburg campaign, March 29. 1863; was organized April 15. 
and at about that date was ordered to TuUahoma. Tennessee, but 
was recalled, April 18. Some of the men of the Pointe Coupee 
Artillery, under Lieut. John Yoist, and a detachment of the 54th 



184 



Indiana at Vtcksburg. 



.\l;il>;iin;i, iiiulcr Tjieut. Joel P. Abney, fell back to Vicksbiirg at the 
close ol' the battle of Champion's Hill, May Ki, and served in the 
defense. The 3d Missouri Battalion was of Bowen's Division and 
was also cut off from its command at the close of that battle ; a de- 
tachment of the battalion, under Capt. Felix Lotspeich, fell back to 
Vicksburg and served in the defense. Casualties : In the battle of 
Champion's Hill, May 16, killed 11, wounded 49, total 60, three offi- 
cers killed. 




Shirley House after Restoration. 

C. S. 

WALKER'S DIVISION; JOHNSTON'S ARMY. 

Maj. Gen. W. 11. T. Walker. 



E.icori. 

Independent Company, Georgia Cavalry, Cnpt. T. M. Nelson. 

Ector's Brigade, Brig. Gen. M. D. Ector. 

Gregg's Brigade, Brig. Gen. John Gregg; Col. Robert Farquharson ^ 

Brig. Gen. John Gregg. 
Gist's Brigade, Brig. Geiu S. R. Gist. 
Walker's-Wilson's Brigade. Biig. Gen. W. II. T. Walker; Col. C. C. , 

Wilson. 



Pakk Inscriptions. 135 

The headquarters of the division were at Canton, Mississippi, 
May 26, 1863 ; at Yazoo City, Mississippi, June 10 ; and near Ver- 
non, Mississippi, June 15. The division was camped on Bogue 
Falia the evening of July 1. 

Ector's Brigade. 
Brig. Gen. M. D. Ector. 

9th Texas, Col. William H. Young. 
IOth Texas (dismounted cavalry), Lieut. Col. C. R. Earp. 
14th Texas (dismounted cavalry), Col. J. L. Camp. 
32d Texas (dismounted cavalry), Col. Julius A. Andrews. 
Alabama Battalioist Sharpshooters, Maj. T. O. Stone. 
Mississippi Battalion Sharpshooters, Capt. M. Pound. 
McNally's (Arkansas) Battery (section), Lieut. F. A. Moore. 

The brigade was ordered from Shelbyville, Tennessee, May 9. 
1863. It was at Meridian, Mississippi, May 17 ; and joined the 
division about May 21. 

c. s. 

Gregg's Brigade. 

WALKERS DHISIOX; JOHNSTON'S ARMY. 
Brig. Gen. John Gregg : 
Col. Robert Farquhaeson ; 
Brig. Gen. John Gregg. 

oD Tennessee ("N'olunteers), Col. C. H. Walker. 

10th and 30th Tennessee, Col. R. W. MacGavock; Lieut. Col. James 

J. Turner. 
41st Tennessee, Col. Robert Farquharson. 
50th Tennessee, Lieut. Col. Thomas W. Beaumont. 
1st Tennessee Batt.\lion, Maj. S. H. Colnis. 
7th Texas, Col. H. B. Granbury. 
Missouri Battery, Capt. H. M. Bledsoe. 

The brigade was at Port Hudson, Louisiana, at the beginning of 
the Vicksburg campaign, March 29, 1863. It was ordered to Jack- 
son, Mississippi, May 1, by General Pemberton. Casualties in the 
engagement at Raymond, Mississippi, May 12, killed 73, wounded 
251, missing 190. total 514; Col. R. W. MacGavock and eight other 
officers killed or mortally wounded ; and in the engagement at Jack- 
son, Mississippi, May 14, not reported. 



136 Indiana at Vicksbukg. 

c. s. 

tlisVs Brigade. 

WALKERS DIVISION; JOHNSTON'S ARMY. 
Brig. Cen. S. R. Gist. 

46th Georgia, Col. Peyton H. Colquitt. 

8th Georgia Baitai.ion, Capt. Z. L. Watters. 

16th South Carolina, Col. James McCullough. 

24th South C.-vrolina. Lieut. Col. Ellison Capers ; Col. C. H. Stevens. 

South Carolina B\ttery, Capt. T. B. Ferguson. 

The brigade was ordered from South Carolina about May 5, 
1863, by General Beauregard. A battalion of the 46th Georgia and 
the 24th South Carolina were engaged at Jackson, Mississippi, May 
14. Casualties : Killed 15, wounded 60, missing 118, total 193, one 
officer killed. A battalion of the 14th Mississippi (First Brigade, 
Loring's Division) and the Brookhaven (Mississippi) Artillery 
were then temporarily attached and engaged. Casualties: Killed 
2, wounded 4, total 6. 

Walker'' s-Wilson''s Brigade. 
Brig. Gen. W. H. T. Walker; 

Col. C. C. Wilson. 

25th Georgia, Lieut. Col. A. J. Williams. 
29th Georgia, Col. William J. Young. 
30th Georgia, Col. Thomas W. Mangliam. 
1st Georgia Battalion Shakpshooters. Maj, Arthur Shaal't. 
4th Louisiana Battaijon, Lieut. Col. J. INIcEnery. 
Martin's (Georgia) Battery, Capt. Robert Martin; Lieut. E. P. 
Howell. 

The brigade was ordered from South Carolina about May 5, 
1863, by General Beauregard. It was engaged at Jackson, Missis- 
sippi, May 14 ; casualties not reported. 

c. s. 

CAVALRY DIVISION; JOHNSTON'S ARMY. 

Brig. Gen. William H. Jackson. 

Escort. 

7th Tennessee Cavalry, Company A, Capt. W. F. Taylor; Lieut. J. 

W. Sneed. 
1st Brigade. Brig. Gen. George B. Cosby. 
2d Brigade, Brig. Gen. J. W. Whitfield; Col. Lawrence S. Ross; Brig. 

Gen. J. W. Whitfield. 



Park Insckiptions. I37 

The division was ordered from the Department of the Tennessee 
about May 26, 1863. Its headquarters was near Canton, Missis- 
sippi, June 4, and at Vernon, Mississippi, from June 13 to June 23 
When the army marched toward Vicksbur-, the division covered 
the heads of its eolumns. 

First Brigade. 
Brig. Gen. George B. Cosby. 

I^scort. 

Independent Company Louisiana Cavalky, Lieut. Nathaniel M. Mar- 
tin; Capt. Junius Y. Webb. 

1st Mississippi, Col. E. A. Pinson. 

4th Mississippi, Lieut. Col. James Gordon. 

28th Mississippi, Col. P. B. Starke; Maj. Joshua T. McBee. 

Adams' (Mississippi) Regiment, Col. Wirt Adams; Lieut. Col. Robert 
C. W^ood, Jr.; Capt. Stephen D. Cleveland; Lieut. Col. Robert C. 
Wood, Jr. ; Col. Wirt Adams. 

Ballentine's (Mississippi) Regiment, Lieut. Col. W. L. Maxwell- 
Maj. William H. Ford. 

17th Mississippi Battalion. Maj. A. C. Steede. 

Clark (Missouri) Artllleey, Capt. Houston King. 

Adams' and the 28th Mississippi regiments were engaged in 
action at Hill's plantation near Birdsong Ferry, Mississippi, June 
22. Casualtes : Killed 5, wounded 16, missing 1, total 22. 



c. s. 

Second Brigade. 

CAVALRY DIVISION; JOHNSTON'S ARMY. 
Brig. Gen. J. W. Whitfield; 
Col. Lawrence S. Ross ; 
Brig. Gen. J. W. Whitfield. 

3d Texas, Lieut. Col. J. S. Boggess. 

6th Texas, Col. Lawrence S. Ross. 

9th Texas, Col. D. W. Jones. 

1st Texas Legion, Lieut. Col. J. H. Broocks. 

Bridges' Battalion, Maj. H. W. Bridges. 

Reserve Artillery 
Maj. W. C. Preston. 

Columbus (Georgia) Artillery, Capt. Edward Craft. 
DuRRiVE's (Louisiana) Battery, Capt. Edward Durrive, Jr. 
Culpeper's (South Carolina) Battery, Capt. James P. Cnlpeper. 

(Also for a time reported with French's Division.) 
Waties' (South Carolina) Battery, Capt. John Waties. 



188 Indiana at Vtcksbttko. 

T'NION SrMMARY COMMANDS. 

ILLINOIS— Infanfiy (8th. Illh, IStli, 14tli, l.llli, ITtli. ISth. 20tli. 
2(ltli, 2Sth, 29th, ;!Oth, 31st, 32(1. ;'.3<1. 37tii, 40tli. 41st, 43(1, 45th, 4()th, 4Ttli, 
4Sth, 53d, 54th, "i.^th, 5(3th, Gist. {i3(l. 72(1, TCdi. 77th, 81st. 87th, 90th, 93(1. 
94th, 95th, 97th, 99th, lOlsl. 103(1, lOOth, lOStli. 113th, n4th, llGth, 118th. 
120th, 124th, 12Gth, 127th, 130th, 131st) 55; Cavalry (Thielemann's Bat- 
talion, Kane County, Independent Coinpany, 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, 7th, 10th. 
11th, 15th) 10; Artillery (Cogswell's Battery. Chicago Mercantile Battery, 
Batteries A, B, D, E, F. H and I, 1st Light and Batteries A, E, F, G. 
K and L, 2d Light) 15; total 79. 

INDIANA— Infantry (8th, 11th. 12th, 16th, 18th, 23d, 24th, 26th, 34th, 
46th, 47th, 48th, 49th. 53d, 54th, 59th, 60th, 67th, 69th, 83d, 93d. 97th, 99th, 
100th) 24; Cavalry (1st, 4th) 2; Artillery (1st, 0th) 2; total 28. 

IOWA— Infantry (3d, 4th, 5th. (jth, 8th, 9th. 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th. 
15th, IGth, 17th, 19th. 20th, 21st, 22d. 23d. 24th, 25th, 2Gth, 28th, 30th, 31st, 
34th, 35th. 38th, 40th) 28; Cavalry (3d, 4th) 2; Artillery (1st. 2d) 2; 
t(vtal 32. 

KANSAS— Infantry (1st) 1. 

KENTLTCKY — Infantry ( Inde])eiiilc]it Cdnipany of Pi(inoevs, 7th, 19th, 
22d) 4. 

MASSACHUSETTS— Infantry (29th. 3nth. 3Gth) 3. 

MICHIGAN— Infantry (2d, 8th, 12th. 1."tli, 17th, 20th, 27th) 7; Ar- 
tillery (7th, 8th) 2; total 9. 

MINNESOTA— Infantry (3d. 4l]i. 5tli ) 3; Artillery (1st); total 4. 

MISSOIlil— Infantry (3d, (Jth. 7th, Sth. 10th, 11th, 12th, 17th, 24th. 
2(;:h, 27th. 29th. 3.0th. 31st, 32d, 35th, Engineer Regiment of the West) 
17: Cavalry (1th. Gtli. tilth) 3; Artillery (Batteries A, B, C, E, F, and 
M. 1st Liglit. and Batt(n-y F ( Landgraeber's), 2d Light) 7; total 27. 

NEW HAMrSIIIKK— Infar.try ((Uh, 9th, 11th) 3. 

NEW YORK— Infantry (4<;rh. 51st, 79th) 3; Artillery (Battery L, 
2d Light) 1; total 4. 

OHIO— Infantry ( KUh. lloih. 22d. 30th. 32d, 37th. 42d. 4Gth. 47th, 48th, 
.13d, 54th, 5Gth, 57th, ."81h, CSth TO.ii, 72(1. 7(;th. 78th, SOth, 83d. 9.1th, 9tith. 
114th, r20th) 26; Cavalry (4tln 1: Artillery (2d, 3d, 4th, Sth, 7th, Sth, 
10th, 11th, 15th, K^th. 17th. Yost's) 12; total 39. 

PENNSYLVANIA- Intaniry (l.jth, 50th, 51st, 100th) 4; Artillery 
(Dnrell's Battery) 1; total 5. 

RHODE ISLAND— Infantry (7th) 1. 

FNITED STATES AR:\IY— Infantry (1st, 13th) 2; Artillery (E. Sec- 
ond) 1; total 3. 

WEST V1R(4INIA— Infantry (4th) 1. 

WISCONSIN— Infant) y (Sth, 11th. 12tli. 14th. 16th, 17th, ISth, 20th, 
2.3d. 25th. 27th, 29th, 33d) 13; Cavalry (2d> 1; Artillery (1st. 6th, 12th) 
3; total 17. 

AGGREGATE: Infantry, 194; Cavalry. 19; Artillery. 47; total 260— 
not inclnding eight reginu-nts of negroes in process of enlistment. 



Park Inscriptions. 139 

CONFEDERATE COMMANDS. 

ALABAiAIA— Infantry (20th, 23d, 27th, 30th, 31st, 32d, 35th, 37th. 40th, 
41st, 42d, 46th, 54th. 55th, Stone's Battalion of Shai-pshooters) 15; Ar- 
tillery (Company C, 2d Battalion; Waddell's Battery; Sengstak's Battery; 
Charpeutier's Battery) 4; total 19. 

ARKANSAS— Infantry (4th, 9th, 15th, 19th. 20th, 21st, 25tli, ;jlst, 12th 
Bsittalion— Sharpshooters) 9; Cavalry (1st Rifles— Dismounted, 2d Rifles 
—Dismounted, 1st Battalion — Dismounted, Bridge's Battalion— Sharp- 
shooters) 4; Artillery (Appeal Battery, McNally's Battery) 2; total 15. 

P^LORID A— Infantry (1st, 3d, 4th) 3. 

GEORGIA— Infantry (25th, 29th, 30th, 34th, 36th. 39th, 40th. 41st. 
42d, 43d, 46th, 47th, 52d, 56th, 57th, 1st Battalion of Sharpshooters, 8th 
Battalion) 17; Cavalry (Nelson's Independent Company) 1; Artillery 
(Cherokee Battery. Martin's Battery, Columbus Battery) 3; total 21. 

KENTUCKY— Infantry (2d, 3d, 4th, Otli. 7th, Sth, 9th) 7; Ai-tillery 
(Cobb's Battery) 1; total 8. 

LOUISIANA— Infantry (3d. 4th. 12th, 1.3th. 16th, 17th, 19th, 20th, 21st, 
25th. 26th, 27th, 28th (sometimes knoAvn as 29th), 30th, 31st, 4th Battal- 
ion, 14th Battalion of Sharpshooters, Fleitas" Zouave Battalion) 18; Cav- 
alry (Martin's Independent Company) 1; Artillery (Bond's Bruce's But- 
lei-'s. Capers', Grayson's, Hajne's, Lamon's. and Robertson's companies of 
the 1st Heavy; Barrow's, Grandpre's, Hart's and McCrory's companies of 
the 8th Heavy Battalion; Companies A, B and C of Pointe Coupee; 5th 
Company, Washington-Fenner's Battery ; Durrive's Battei-y ; Gomez's. 
Marks', Morlot's and Theard's companies of the 22d Regiment — ^Gomez's 
and Theard's companies served as infantry during the defense) 22 ; total 
41. 

MISSOURI— Infantry (1st. 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th) 6; Cavalry (1st— 
Dismounted, 3d — Dismounted) 2; Artillery (3d Battery, Guibor's Battery. 
Landis' Battery, Wade's Battery, Lowe's Battery, Bledsoe's Battery, Clark's 
Battery) 7; total 15. 

MARYLAND— Artillery (3d Battery) 1. 

MISSISSIPPI— Infantry (Sd, 4th. 5th— State Troops, fith, 14th, 15th, 
20th, 22d, 23d, 26th, 31st, 33d, 35th, 36th, 37th, 38th, 40th, 43d, 46th, 1st 
Battalion — Sharpshooters, 3d Battalion — State Troops, 7th Battalion. 
Pound's Battalion — Sharpshooters) 23; Cavalry (1st, 4th, 28th. Adams' 
Regiment, Ballentine's Regiment, 17th Battalion) 6; Artillery (Companies 
A, C, D, E, G and I of the 1st Light; Companies A, B and C of the 14th 
Light Battalion; Hudson's Battery, Yaiden Battery) 11; total 40. 

NORTLI CAROLINA— Infantry (29th, 39th, 60th) 3. 

SOUTH CAROLINA— Infantry (16th, 17th, 18th, 22d, 23d, 24th, 2Gth, 
Holcombe Legion) 8; Artillery (Cnlpeper's Battery, Ferguson's Battery, 
Watie's Battery, McBeth's Battery) 4; total 12. 

TENNESSEE— Infantry (3d— Volunteers, 3d— Provisional Army, 10th, 
30th, 31st, 41st, 42d, 43d, 46th, 48th, 49th, 50th, 53d, 55th, 59th, 60th. 61st, 
62d, 1st Battalion) 19; Cavalry (Company O, 1st Company A, 7th) 2; Ar- 
tillery (Companies A, B, C and D, 1st Heavy. Johnston's Battery, Lynch's 
Battery, Tobin's Battery, Mebane's Battery) 8; total 29. 



140 . Indiana at N'lcKsiu'iKi. 

TEXA8— InlJintiv ('Jd. TUi. Tth, Jst Battalion — Sharpshooters. 1st Bat- 
talioii. 2(1 Battalion) (1: Cavalry (M, Gth, 9th, 10th — Dismounted. 14th— 
Dismounted, 32d — Dismounted, Whitfield's Legion. Cleveland's Battalion) 
8; Artillery (Wall's Battery) 1; tctal 15. 

VIRGINIA— Artillery (Botetourt Battery) 1. 

CONFEDERATE STATES ARMY— Infantry (1st Battalion) 1. 

MISCELLANEOUS — Davidson's Signal Corps, King's Signal Corps, 
Barrot's Signal Corps, City Guards. Partisan Rangers — total 5. 

AGGREGATE: Infantry 134. Ca\alry 25. Artillery 03, miscellaneous 
5. total 227. 




Major General Ulysses S. Grant. 
Army of tlie Tennessee. 



(142) 



Report of Major General U. S. Grant. 



MADE TO THE WAR DEPARTMENT FOLLOWING THE SURRENDER 
OF VICKSBURG, JULY 4, 1863. 



Headquarters Department of the Tennessee, 
ViCKSBURG, Miss., July 6, 1863. 

Colonel: I have the honor to submit the following report of 
the operations of the Army of the Tennessee, and co-operating 
forces, from the date of my assuming the immediate command of 
the expedition against Vicksburg, Miss., to the reduction of that 
place : 

From the moment of taking command in person, I became satis- 
fied that Vicksburg could only l)e turned from the south side, and, in 
accordance with this conviction, I prosecuted the work on the canal, 
which had been located by Brig. Gen. (Thomas) Williams across 
tlie peninsula on the Louisiana side of the river, with all vigor, 
hoping to make a channel which would pass transports for moving 
the army and carrying supplies to the new base of operations thus 
provided. The task was much more herculean than it at first ap- 
peared, and was made much more so by the almost continuous rains 
that fell during the whole of the time this work was prosecuted. 
The river, too, continued to rise and made a large expenditure of 
labor necessary to keep the water out of our camps and the canal. 

Finally, on March 8, the rapid rise of the river, and the conse- 
quent great pressure upon the dam across the canal, near the upper 
end, at the main Mississippi levee, caused it to give way and let 
through the lowlands back of our camps a torrent of water that 
separated the north and south shores of the peninsula as effectually 
as if the Mississippi flowed between them. This occurred when the 
enterprise promised success within a short tune. There was some 
delay in trying to repair damages. It was found, however, that 
with the then stage of water some other plan would have to be 
adopted for getting below Vicksburg with transports. 

Capt. F. E. Prime, chief engineer, and Col. G. G. Pride, who 
was acting on my staff, prospected a route through the bayous which 
run from near IMilliken's Bend, on the north, and New Carthage, on 
the south, through Roundaway Bayou, into the Tensas River. Their 

(143) 



144 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

repoi't of the practical)ility of this route determined me to commenee 
work upon it. Having three dredge-boats at the time, the work of 
opening this route was executed with great rapidity. One small 
steamer and a number of barges were taken through the channel 
tlius opened, but the river commencing about the middle of April 
to fall rapidly, and the roads becoming passable between Milliken's 
Hend and New (Virthage, made it impracticable and unneccessary 
to open water communication between these points. 

Soon after commencing the first canal spoken of, I caused a 
channel to be cut from the Mississippi River into Lake Providence ; 
also one from the Mississippi River into Coldwater, by way of 
Yazoo I'ass. 

I had no great expectations of important results from the former 
of these, but having more troops than could be employed to advan- 
tage at Young's Point, and knowing that Lake Providence was 
connected by Bayou Baxter with Bayou Macon, a navigable stream, 
through which transports might pass into the Mississippi below, 
through Tensas, Washita and Red rivers, I thought it possible that 
a route might be opened in that direction which would enable me 
to co-cperate with General Banks on Port Hudson. 

By the Yazoo Pass route I only expected at first to get into the 
Yazoo by way of Coldwater and Tallahatchee with some lighter 
gunboats and a few troops, and destroy the enemy's transports in 
that stream and some gunboats which I knew he was building. The 
navigation, however, proved so much better than had been expected 
that I thought for a time of the possibility of making this the route 
for obtaining a foothold on high land above Haynes' Bluff, Mis- 
sissippi, and small-class steamers were accordingly ordered for 
transporting an army that way. 

Maj. Gen. J. B. McPherson, commanding 17th Army Corps, was 
directed to hold his corps in readiness to move by this route, and one 
division each from the 13th and 15th Corps were collected near the 
entrance of the pass, to be added to his command. It soon became 
evident that a sufficient number of boats of the right class could not 
be obtained for the movement of more than one division. 

While my forces were opening one end of the pass, the enemy 
was diligently closing the other end, and in this way succeeding in 
gaining time to strongly fortify Greenwood, below the junction of 
the Tallahatchee and Yalabusha. The advance of the expedition, 
consisting of one division of McClernand's Corps, from Helena, 
commanded by Brig. Gen. L. F. Ross, and the Twelfth and Seven- 
teenth Regiments Missouri Infantry, from Sherman's Corps, as 



Report of General Grant. 145 

sharpshooters on the gunboats, succeeded in reaching Coldwater 
March 2, after much difficulty and the partial disabling of most of 
the boats. From the entrance into Coldwater to Fort Pemberton, 
at Greenwood, Mississippi, no great difficulty of navigation was 
experienced, nor any interruption of magnitude from the enemy. 
Fort Pemberton extends from the Tallahatchee to the Yazoo at 
Greenwood. Here the two rivers come within a few hundred yards 
of each other. The land around the fort is low, and at the time of 
the attack was entirely overflowed. Owing to this fact, no move- 
ment could be made by the army to reduce it, but all depended upon 
the ability of the gunboats to silence the guns of the enemy and 
enable the transports to run down and land troops immediately on 
the fort itself. 

After an engagement of several hours, the gunboats drew off, 
being unable to silence the batteries. Brig. Gen. I. F. Quinby, 
commanding a division of McPherson's Corps, met the expedition 
under Ross with his division on its return near Fort Pemberton, on 
March 21, and, being the senior, assumed command of the entire 
expedition, and returned to the position Ross had occupied. 

On March 23, I sent orders for the withdrawal of all the forces 
operating in that direction, for the purpose of concentrating my 
army at Milliken 's Bend. 

On March 14, Admiral D. D. Porter, commanding the Missis- 
sippi Squadron, informed me that he had made a reconnaissance up 
Steele's Bayou, and partially through Black Bayou toward Deer 
Creek, and, so far as explored, these water courses were reported- 
navigable for the smaller iron-clads. 

Information, given mostly, I believe, by the negroes of the coun- 
try, was to the effect that Deer Creek could be navigated to Rolling 
Fork, and that from there through the Sunflower to the Yazoo 
River there was no question about the navigation. 

On the following morning I accompanied Admiral Porter in 
the ram Price, several iron-clads preceding us, up through Steele's 
Bayou to near Black Bayou. 

At this time our forces were at a deadlock at Greenwood, and I 
looked upon the success of this enterprise as of vast importance. 
It would, if successful, leave Greenwod between two forces of ours, 
and would necessarily cause the immediate abandonment of that 
stronghold. About thirty steamers of the enemy would have been 
destroyed or fallen into our hands. 

Seeing that the great obstacles of navigation, so far as I had 
gone, was from overhanging trees, I left Admiral Porter near Black 
L101 



146 Indiana at Vtoksburg. 

Bayou, niid pusheil back to Young's Point, for the purpose of send- 
ing forWfird a pioneer corps to remove these difficulties. Soon 
after niy return to Young's Point, Admiral Porter sent back to me 
for a co-operating military force. Sherman was promptly sent with 
one division of his corps. The number of steamers suitable for the 
navigation of these l)ayous l)eing limited, most of the force was sent 
up the Mississippi River to Eagle Bend, a point where the river 
runs within one mile of Steele's Bayon, thus saving an important 
part of this difficult navigation. 

The expedition failed, probably more from want of knowledge 
as to what would be required to open this ronte than from any im- 
practicability in the navigation of the streams and bayous through 
which it was proposed to pass. Want of this knowledge led the 
expedition on until difficulties M^ere encountered, and then it would 
become necessary to send back to Young's Point for the means of re- 
moving them. This gave the enemy time to move forces to effect- 
ually checkmate further progress, and the expedition was with- 
drawn when within a few hundred yards of free and open naviga- 
tion to the Yazoo. 

All this may have been providential in driving us ultimately to 
a line of operations which has proven eminently successful. 

For further particulars on the Steele's Bayou expedition, see 
report of Maj. Gen. W. T. Sherman, forwarded on April 12. 

As soon as I decided to open water communication from a point 
on the Mississippi, near Milliken's Bend, to New Carthage, I de- 
termined to occupy the latter place, it being the first point l)elow 
Vicksburg that could be reached by land at the stage of water then 
existing, and the occupancy of which, while it secured to us a point 
on the Mississippi River, would also protect the main line of com- 
munication by water. Accordingly, the 13th Ariny Corps, Maj. 
Gren. J. A. McClernand, commanding, was directed to take up its 
line of march on March 29 for New Carthage, the 15th and 17th 
Army Corps to follow, moving no faster than supplies and ammu- 
nition could be transported to them. 

The roads, though level, were intolerably bad, and the move- 
ment was therefore necessarily slow. Arriving at Smith's planta- 
tion, two miles from New Carthage, it was found that the levee of 
Bayou Vidal was broken in several places, thus leaving New Car- 
thage an island. 

All the boats that could be were collected from the different 
bayous in the vicinity and others were built, but the transportation 
of an army in this way was found exceedingly tedious. Another 



Report of General Grant. 147 

route had to be found. This was done by making a further march 
around Vidal to Perkins' plantation, a distance of twelve miles 
more, making the whole distance to be marched from Milliken's 
Bend to reach water communication on the opposite side of the 
point thirty-five miles. Over this distance, with bad roads to con- 
tend against, supplies of ordnance stores and provisions had to be 
hauled by wagons with which to commence the campaign on the 
opposite side of the river. At the same time that I ordered the 
occupation of New Carthage, preparations were made for running 
transports by the Vicksburg batteries with Admiral Porter's gun- 
1ioat fleet. 

On the night of April 16, Admiral Porter's fleet and the trans- 
l)orts Silver Wave, Forest Queen and Henr.y Clay ran the Vicksburg 
l)atteries. The boilers of the transports were protected as well as 
possible with hay and cotton. IMore or less commissary stores were 
put on each. All three of these boats were struck more or less 
frequently while passing the enemy's batteries, and the Henry Clay, 
by the explosion of a shell or by some other means, was set on fire 
and entirely consumed. The other two boats were somewhat in- 
jured, but not seriously disabled. No one on board cf either was 
hurt. 

As these boats succeeded in getting by so well, I ordered six 
more to be prepared in like manner for running the batteries. 
These latter, viz.. Tigress, Anglo-Saxon, Cheeseman, Empire City, 
Horizon and IModeratcr, left Milliken's Bend on the night of April 
22, and five of them got by, but in a some^vhat damaged condition. 
The Tigress received a shot in her hull below the water line, and 
sunk on the Louisiana shore soon after passing the last of the bat- 
teries. The crews of these steamers, with the exception of that of 
the Forest Queen, Capt. C. D. Conway, and the Silver Wave, Cap- 
tain McMillan, were composed of volunteers from the army. Upon 
the call for volunteers for this dangerous enterprise, officers and 
men presented themselves by the hundreds, anxious to undertake 
the trip. The names of those whose services were accepted will be 
given in a separate report. 

It is a striking feature, so far as my observation goes, of the 
present volunteer army of the United States, that there is nothing 
which men are called upon to do. mechanical or professional, that 
accomplished adepts cannot be found for the duty required in 
almost every regiment. 

The transports injured in running the blockade were repaired In- 
order of Admiral Porter, who was supplied with the ma.terial for 



l-l-S Indiana at V^icKSJUimi. 

such i-ei)aii's as they required, and who was and is ever ready to 
afford all the assistance in his power for the furtherance of the 
success of our arms. In a very short time five of the transports 
were in running order, and the remainder were in a (ondition to 
be used as barges in the moving of troops. Twelve barges loaded 
with forage and rations were sent in tow of the last six boats that 
run the blockade. One-half of them got through in a condition to 
1)6 used. 

Owing to the limited number of transports below Vicksburg, it 
was found necessary to extend our line of land travel to Hard 
Times, Louisiana, which, by the circuitous route it was necessary 
to take, increased the distance to about seventy miles from Milli- 
ken 's Bend, our starting point. 

The 13th Army Corps being all through to the Mississippi, and 
the 17th Army Corps well on the way, so much of the 13th as could 
be got on board of the transports and barges were put aboard, and 
moved to the front of Grand Gulf on April 29. The plan here was 
that the navy should silence the guns of the enemy, and the troops 
landed under the cover of the gunboats, and carry the place by 
storm. 

At 8 a. m. the navy made the attack, and kept it up for more 
than five hours in the most gallant manner. From a tug out in the 
stream I witnessed the whole engagement. Many times it seemed 
to me the gunboats were within pistol-shot of the enemy's batteries. 
It soon became evident that the guns of the enemy were too ele- 
vated and their fortifications too strong to be taken from the water 
side. The whole range of hills on that side were known to be lined 
with rifle-pits ; besides, the field artillery could be moved to any 
position where it could be made useful in case of an attempt at 
landing. This determined me again to run the enemy's batteries, 
turn his position by effecting a landing at Rodney, or at Bruins- 
burg, between Grand Gulf and Rodney. Accordingly, orders were 
immediately given for the troops to debark at Hard Times, Louis- 
iana, and march across to the point immediately below Grand Gulf. 

At dark the gunboats again engaged the batteries, and all the 
transports run by, receiving but two or three shots in the passage, 
and these without injury. T Imd some time previously ordered a 
r-econnaissance to a point opposite Bruinsburg, to ascertain, if pos- 
sible, from persons in the neighborhood the character of the road 
leading to the highlands back of Bruinsburg. During the night I 
learned from a negro man that there w^as a good road from Bruins- 
burg to Port Gibson, which determined me to land there. 



Report op General Grant. 140 

The work of ferrying the troops to Brui^sburg was eomnieuced 
at daylight in the morning, the gunboats as well as transports being 
used for the purpose. 

As soon as the 13th Army Corps was landed, and could draw 
three days' rations to put in haversacks (no wagons were allowed to 
cross until the troops were all over), they were started on the road 
to Port Gibson. I deemed it a matter of vast importance that the 
highlands should be reached without resistance. The 17th Corps 
followed as rapidly as it could be put across the river. 

About 2 o'clock, May 1, the advance of the enemy was met eight 
miles from Bruinsburg, on the road to Port Gibson. He was forced 
to fall back, but, as it was dark, he was not pursued far until day- 
light. 

Early on the morning of the 1st, I went out, accompanied by 
memliers of my staff, and found McClernand with his corps en- 
gaging the enemy about four miles from Port Gibson. At this 
point the roads branched in exactly opposite directions, both, how- 
ever, leading to Port Gibson. The enemy had taken position on 
both branches, thus dividing, as he fell back, tlie pursuing forces. 
The nature of the ground in that part of the country is such that 
a very small force could retard the progress of a nuich larger one 
for many hours. The roads usually run on narrow, elevated ridges, 
with deep and impenetrable ravines on either side. On the right 
were the divisions of Hovey. Carr and (A. J.) Smith, and on the 
left the division of Osterhaus, of McClernand 's Corps. The three 
former succeeded in driving the enemy from position to position 
back toward Port Gibson steadily all day. 

Osterhaus did not, however, move the enemy from the position 
occupied by him on our left until Logan's Division, of McPherson's 
Corps, arrived. McClernand, who was with the right in person, 
sent repeated messages to me before the arrival of Logan to send 
Logan's and Quinby's Divisions, of McPherson's Corps, to him. 

I had been on that as well as all other parts of the field, and 
could not see how they could be used there to advantage. How- 
ever, as soon as the advance of McPherson's Corps (Logan's Di- 
vision) arrived, T sent one brigade to McClernand on the right, and 
sent one briagde. Brig. Gen. J. E. Smith commanding, to the left, 
to the assistance of Osterhaus. 

By the judicious disposition made of this l)rigade, under the im- 
mediate supervision of McPherson and Logan, a position was soon 
obtained, giving us an advantage which soon drove the enemy from 



150 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

llijil i>;irt of the field, to make no further stand south of Bayou 
Pierre. 

The enemy was here repulsed with a heavy loss in killed, 
wounded and prisoners. The repulse of the enemy on our left took 
place lale in the afternoon. He was pursued toward Port Gibson, 
but night closing in, and the enemy making the appearance of an- 
other stand, the troops slept upon their arms until daylight. 

In the morning it was found that the enemy had retreated across 
Hayou Pierre, on the Grand Gulf road, and a brigade of Logan's 
Division was sent to divert his attention, while a floating bridge 
was being built across Bayou Pierre immediately at Port Gibson. 
This l)ridge was completed, eight miles marched by McPherson's 
Corps to the North Fork of Bayou Pierre, that stream bridged, and 
the advance of this corps commenced passing over it at 5 o'clock 
the following morning. 

On the 3d, the enemy was pursued to Hankinson's Ferry, with 
slight skinnishing all day, during which we took quite a number of 
prisoners, mostly stragglers, from the enemy. 

Finding that Grand Gulf had been evacuated, and that the ad- 
vance of my forces was already fifteen miles out from there, and on 
the road, too, they would have to take to reach either Vicksburg, 
Jackson, or any intermediate point on the railroad between the two 
places, I determined not to march them back ; but taking a small 
escort of cavalry, some fifteen or twenty men, I went to the Gulf 
myself, and made the necessary arrangements for changing my basL^ 
of supplies from Bruinsburg to Grand Gulf. 

In moving from IMilliken's Bend, the 15th Army Corps, Maj. 
Gen. W. T. Sherman commanding, was left to be the last to start. 
To prevent heavy reinforcements going from Vicksburg to the 
assistance of the Grand Gulf forces, I directed Sherman to make a 
demonstration on Haynes' Bluff, and to make all the show\possible. 
From information since received from prisoners captured, this ruse 
succeeded admirably. 

It had been my intention, up to the time of crossing the Missis- 
sippi River, to collect all my forces at Grand Gulf, and get on hand 
a good supply of provisions and ordnance stores before moving, and 
in the meantime to detach an army corps to co-operate wdth General 
Banks on Port Hudson, and effect a junction of our forces. 

About this time I received a letter from General Banks, giving 
his position west of the Mississippi River, and stating that he could 
return to Baton Rouge by May 10; that by the reduction of Port 
Hudson he could join me with 12,000 men. 



Report op General Grant. 151 

I learned about the same time that troops were expected at Jack- 
son from the Southern cities, with General Beauregard in command. 
To delay until May 10, and for the reduction of Port Hudson after 
that, the accession of 12,000 men would not leave me relatively so 
strong as to move promptly with what I had. Information received 
from day to day of the movements of the enemy also impelled me to 
the course pursued. 

While lying at Hankinson's Ferry waiting for wagons, supplies 
and Sherman's Corps, which had come forward in the meantime, 
demonstrations were made, successfully, I believe, to induce the 
enemy to think that route and the one by Hall 's Ferry, above, were 
objects of much solicitude to me. Reconnaissances were made to the 
Avest side of the Big Black to within six miles of Warrenton. 

On IMay 7, an advance was ordered, JMcPherson's Corps keeping 
the road nearest Big Black River, to Rocky Springs, McClernand's 
Corps keeping the ridge road from Willow Springs, and Sherman 
following, with his corps divided on the two roads. All the ferries 
were closely guarded until our troops were well advanced. It was 
my intention here to hug the Big Black River as closely as possible 
with McClernand's and Sherman's Corps, and get them to the rail- 
road at some place between Edwards Station and Bolton. JMcPher- 
son was to move by way of Utica to Raymond, and from there into 
Jackson, destroying the railroad, telegraph, public stores, etc., and 
push west to rejoin the main force. Orders were given to ]\IcPher- 
son accordingly. Sherman was moved forward en the Edwards 
Station road, crossing Fourteen-Mile Creek at Dillon's plantation; 
McClernand was moved across the same creek, farther west, sending 
one division of his corps by the Baldwin 's Ferry road as far as the 
river. At the crossings of Fourteen-Mile Creek both INIeClernand 
and Sherman had considerable skirmishing with the enemy to get 
possession of the crossings. 

McPherson met the enemy near Raymond, two brigades strong, 
under Gregg and Walker, on the same day ; engaged him, and, after 
several hours' hard fighting, drove him, with heavy loss in killed, 
wounded and prisoners. ]\Iany threw down their arms and de- 
serted. My position at this time was with Sherman's Corps, some 
seven miles west of Raymond, and about the center of the army. 

On the night of May 12, after orders had been given for the 
corps of McClernand and Sherman to march toward the railroad by 
parallel roads, the former in the direction of Edwards Station and 
the latter to a point on the railroad between Edwards Station and 
Bolton, the order was changed, and both were directed to move 



152 Indiana at Vicksbukg. 

toward Raymond. This was in consequence of the enemy having 
retreated toward Jackson after his defeat at Raymond, and of in- 
formation that reinforcements were daily arriving at Jackson, and 
that Gen. Joe Johnston was hourly expected there to take command 
in person. I therefore determined to make sure of that place and 
leave no enemy in my rear. 

McPherson moved on the 13th to Clinton, destroyed the railroad 
and telegraph, and captured some important dispatches from Gen- 
eral Pemberton to General Gregg, who had commanded the day 
before in the battle of Raymond. Sherman moved to a parallel 
position on the Mississippi Springs and Jackson road. McClernand 
moved to a point near Raymond. 

The next day Sherman and McPherson moved their entire force 
toward Jackson. The rain fell in torrents all the night before and 
continued until about noon of that day, making the roads at first 
slippery, and then mir3^ Notwithstanding, the troops marched in 
excellent order, without straggling and in the best of spirits, about 
fourteen miles, and engaged the enemy about 12 m. near Jackson. 
McClernand occupied Clinton with one division, Mississippi Springs 
with another, Raymond with a third, and had his fourth division 
and Blair's Division, of Sherman's Corps, with a wagon train, still 
in the rear near New Auburn, while McArthur, with one brigade of 
his division, of McPherson 's Corps, was moving toward Raymond on 
the Utica road. It was not the intention to move these forces any 
nearer Jackson, but to have them in a position where they would 
be in supporting distance if the resistance at Jackson should prove 
more obstinate than there seemed reason to expect. 

The enemy marched out the bulk of his force on the Clinton road, 
and engaged McPherson 's Corps, about two and one-half miles from 
the city. A small force of artillery and infantry took a strong 
position in front of Sherman, about the same distance out. By a 
determined advance of our skirmishers, these latter were soon driven 
within their rifle-pits, just outside the city. It was impossible to 
ascertain the strength of the enemy at this part of the line in time 
to justify an immediate assault; consequently McPherson 's two 
divisions engaged the main bulk of the rebel garrison at Jackson 
without further aid than the moral support given them by the knowl- 
edge the enemy had of a force to the south side of the city and the 
few infantry and artillery of the enemy posted there to impede 
Sherman's progress. Sherman soon discovered the weakness of the 
enemy by sending a reconnoitering partv to his right, which also 
had the effect of causing the enemy to retreat from this part of his 



I 



Report of General Grant. I53 

line. A few of the artillerists, however, remained in their places, 
firing upon Sherman's troops until the last moment, evidently in- 
structed to do so, with the expectation of being cajftured in the end. 

On entering the city it was found that the main body of the 
enemy had retreated north after a heavy engagement of more than 
two hours with McPherson's Corps, in which he (the enemy) was 
badly beaten. He was pursued until near night, but without fur- 
ther damage to him. 

During that evening I learned that General Johnston, as soon as 
he had satisfied himself that Jackson was to be attacked, had ordered 
Pemberton peremptorily to march out from the direction of Vicks- 
burg and attack our rear. Availing myself of this information, I 
immediately issued orders to MeClernand, and Blair of Sherman's 
Corps, to face their troops toward Bolton, with a view to reaching 
Edwards Station, marching on different roads converging near 
Bolton. These troops were admirably located for such a move. 
McPherson was ordered to retrace his steps early in the morning of 
the loth on the Clinton road. Sherman was left in Jackson to de- 
stroy the railroads, bridges, factories, workshops, arsenals, and 
everything valuable for the support of the enemy. This was accom- 
plished in the most efi'ectual manner. 

On the afternoon of the 15th, I proceeded as far west as Clinton, 
through which place McPherson's Corps passed to within support- 
ing distance of Hovey 's Division, of MeClernand 's Corps, which had 
moved that day on the same road to within one and one-half miles of 
Bolton. 

On reaching Clinton, at 4:45 p.m., I ordered ]\IcClernand to 
move his command early the next morning toward Edwards Depot, 
marching so as to feel the enemy if he encountered him, but not to 
l)ring on a general engagement unless he was confident he was able 
to defeat him ; and also to order Blair to move with him. 

About 5 o'clock on the morning of the 16th, two men, employes 
on the Jackson and Vicksburg Railroad, who had passed through 
Pemberton 's army the night before, were brought to my headquar- 
ters. They stated Pemberton 's force to consist of about eighty 
regiments, with ten batteries of artillery, and that the whole force 
was estimated by the enemy at about 25,000 men. From them I also 
learned the positions being taken by the enemy, and his intention of 
attacking our rear. I had determined to leave one division of Sher- 
man 's Corps one day longer in Jackson, but this information deter- 
mined me to bring his entire command up at once, and I accordingly 
dispatched him, at 5 :30 a. m., to move with all possible speed until 



154 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

he came up witli the main force at Bolton. My dispatch reached 
him at 7 :10 a. m., and his advance division was in motion in one 
hour from that time. A dispatch was sent to Blair at the same time 
to push forw^ard his division in the direction of Edwards Station 
\\-ith all possible dispatch. McClernand was directed to establish 
communication between Blair and Osterhaus, of his corps, and keep 
it up, moving the former to the support of the latter. McPherson 
was ordered forward, at 5 :45 a. m., to join McClernand, and Lieu- 
tenant Colonel Wilson, of my staff, was sent forward to communi- 
cate the information received, and with verbal instructions to Mc- 
Clernand as to the disposition of his forces. 

At an early hour I left for the advance, and, on arriving at the 
crossing of the Vicksburg and Jackson Railroad with the road from 
Raymond to Bolton, I found McPherson 's advance and his pioneer 
corps engaged in rebuilding a bridge on the former road, that had 
been destroyed by the cavalry of Osterhaus' Division, that had gone 
into Bolton the night before. The train of Hovey's Division was 
at a halt, and blocked up the road from farther advance on the 
Vicksburg road. I ordered all quartermasters and wagonmasters to 
draw their teams to one side and make room for the passage of 
troops. McPherson was brought up by this road. 

Passing to the front, I found Hovey's Division, of the 13th Army 
Corps, at a halt, with our skirmishers and the enemy's pickets near 
each other. Hovey was bringing his troops into line ready for 
battle, and could have brought on an engagement at any moment. 
The enemy had taken up a very strong position on a narrow ridge, 
his left resting on a height where the road makes a sharp turn to the 
left, approaching Vicksburg. The top of the ridge and the precip- 
itous hillside to the left of the road are covered by a dense forest and 
undergrowth. To the right of the road the timber extends a short 
distance down the hill, and then opens into cultivated fields on a 
gentle slope and into a valley, extending for a considerable distance. 
On the road and into the wooded ravine and hillside, Hovey's Di- 
vision was disposed for the attack. McPherson 's two divisions — all 
of his corps with him on the march from Milliken's Bend, until Ran- 
som's Brigade arrived that day after the battle — were thrown to 
the right of the road (properly speaking, the enemy's rear), but I 
would not permit an attack to be commenced by our troops until I 
could hear from McClernand. who was advancing with four divi- 
sions, two of them on a road intersecting the Jackson road, about 
one mile from where the troops above described were placed, and 



I 



I 




Major General William T. Sheiiman, 
Fifteenth Corps. 



(156) 



Report of General Grant. I57 

about the center of the enemy 's line ; the other two divisions on a 
road still north, and nearly the same distance off. 

I soon heard from McClernand through members of his staff 
and my own, whom I had sent to him early in the morning, and 
found that, by the nearest practicable route of communication, he 
was two and one-half miles distant. I sent several successive mes- 
sages to him to push forward with all rapidity. There had been 
continuous firing between Hovey's skirmishers and the reliel ad- 
vance, which by 11 o'clock grew into a battle. For some time this 
division bore the brunt of the conflict ; but, finding the enemy too 
strong for them, at the instance of Hovey, I directed first one and 
then a second brigade from Crocker's Division to reinforce him. 
All this time Logan's Division was working upon the enemy's left 
and rear, and weakened his front attack most wonderfully. The 
troops here opposing us evidently far outnumbered ours. Expect- 
ing IMcClernand momentarily with four divisions, including Blair's, 
I never felt a doubt of the result. He did not arrive, however, until 
the enemy had been driven from the field, after a terrible contest of 
hours, wdth a heavy loss of killed, wounded and prisoners, and a 
number of pieces of artillery. 

It was found afterward that the Vicksburg road, after following 
the ridge in a southerly direction for about one mile, and to where 
it intersected one of the Raymond roads, turns almost to the west, 
down the hill and across the valley in which Logan was operating on 
the rear of the enemy. One brigade of Logan's Division had, un- 
conscious of this important fact, penetrated nearly to this road, an 1 
compelled the enemy to retreat to prevent capture. As it was, much 
of his artillery and Loring's Division of his army were cut off. be- 
sides the prisoners captured. 

On the call of Hovey for more reinforcements just before the 
rout of the enemy commenced, I ordered McPherson to move what 
troops he could by a left flank around to the enemy's front. Logan 
rode up at this time, and told me that if Hovey could make another 
dash at the enemy, he could come up from where he then was and 
capture the greater part of their force. I immediately rode forward 
and found the troops that had been so gallantly engaged for so many 
hours withdrawn from their advanced position, and were filling 
their cartridge-boxes. I directed them to use all dispatch, and push 
forward as soon as possible, explaining to them the position of 
logan's Division. Proceeding still farther forward, expecting 
every moment to see the enemy, and reaching what had been his 
line, I found he was retreating. 



158 Indiana at VirKSBURO. 

Arriving at tlie Raymond I'oad, I saw to my left and on the next 
ridge, a column of troops, which proved to be Carr's Division, and 
JMcClernand with it in person; and to the left of Carr, Osterhaus' 
Division soon afterward appeared, with his skirmishers well in ad- 
vance. I sent word to Osterhaus that the enemy was in full retreat, 
and to push up with all haste. The situation was soon explained, 
after which I ordered Carr to pursue with all speed to Black River, 
and across it if he could, and to Osterhaus to follow. Some of Mc- 
Pherson's troops had already got into the road in advance; but 
having marched and engaged the enemy all day, they were fatigued 
and gave the road to Carr, who continued the pursuit until after 
dark, capturing a train of cars loaded with commissary and ord- 
nance stores and other property. 

The delay in the advance of the troops immediateh^ with Mc- 
Clernand was caused, no doubt, by the enemy presenting a front of 
artillery and infantry where it was impossible, from the nature of 
the ground and the density of the forest, to discover his numbers. 
As it was, the battle of Champion's Hill, or Baker's Creek, was 
fought mainly by Hovey's Division, of MeClernand's Corps, and 
Logan's and Quinby's Divisions (the latter commanded by Brig. 
Gen. M. M. Crocker), of McPherson's Corps. 

Ransom's Brigade, of McPherson's Corps, came on to the field 
where the main battle had been fought immediately after the enemy 
had begun his retreat. 

Wcrcl was sent to Sherman, at Bolton, of the result of the day's 
engagement, with directions to turn his corps toward Bridgeport, 
and to Blair to join him at this latter place. 

At daylight on the 17th, the pursuit was renewed, with MeCler- 
nand's Corps in the advance. The enemy was found strongly 
posted on both sides of Black River. At this point on Black River 
the bluffs extend to the water's edge on the west bank. On the east 
side is an open, cultivated bottom of nearly one mile in width, sur- 
rounded by a bayou of stagnant water, from two to three feet in 
depth and from ten to twenty feet in width, from the river above 
the railroad to the river below. Follo^ving the inside line of this 
bayou, the enemy had constructed rifle-pits, with the bayou to serve 
as a ditch on the outside and immediately in front of them. Carr's 
Division occupied the right in investing this place, and Lawler's 
Brigade the right of his division. After a few hours' skirmishing, 
Lawler discovered that by moving a portion of his brigade under 
cover of the river bank he could get a position from which that 



Report of General Grant. 159 

place could be successfully assaulted, and ordered a charge aecord- 
ing-ly. Notwithstanding the level ground over which a portion of 
his troops had to pass without cover, and the great obstacle of the 
ditch in front of the enemy's works, the charge was gallantly and 
successfully made, and in a few minutes the entire garrison, with 
seventeen pieces of artillery, were the trophies of this brilliant and 
daring movement. The enemy on the west bank of the river imme- 
diately set fire to the railroad bridge and retreated, thus cutting off 
all chance of escape for any portion of his forces remaining on the 
east bank. 

Sherman by this time had reached Bridgeport, on Black River, 
above. The only pontoon train with the expedition was with him. 
By the morning of the 18th, he had crossed the river, and was ready 
to march on Walnut Hills. McClernand and McPherson built float- 
ing bridges during the night, and had them ready for crossing their 
commands by 8 a. m. of the 18tli. 

The march was commenced by Sherman at an early hour by the 
Bridgeport and Vicksburg road, turning to the right when within 
three and one-half miles of Vicksburg, to get possession of Walnut 
Hills and the Yazoo River. This was successfully accomplished be- 
fore the night of the 18th. ]\IcPherson crossed Big Black River 
above the Jackson road and came into the same road with Sherman, 
but to his rear. He arrived after nightfall with his advance to 
where Sherman turned to the right. McClernand moved by the 
Jackson and Vicksburg road to Mount Albans, and there turned to 
the left, to get into Baldwin's Ferry road. By this disposition the 
three army corps covered all the ground their strength would admit 
of, and by the morning of the 19th the investment of Vicksburg was 
made as complete as could be by the forces at my command. 

During the day there was continuous skirmishing, and I was not 
without hope of carrying the enemy's works. Relying upon the 
demoralization of the enemy, in consequence of repeated defeats 
outside of Vicksburg, I ordered a general assault at 2 p. m. on this 
day. The 15th Army Corps, from having arrived in front of the 
enemy's works in time on the 18th to get a good position, were 
enabled to make a vigorous assault. The 13th and 17th Army Corps 
succeeded no farther than to gain advanced positions covered from 
the fire of the enemy. 

The 20th and 21st were spent in perfecting communications with 
our supplies. Most of the troops had been marching and fighting 
battles for twenty days, on an average of about five days' rations 



160 Indfana at Vicksbukg. 

drawn i'rom tlie commissary department. Though they had not suf- 
fered from short rations up to this time, the want of bread to accom- 
pany the other rations was beginning to be much felt. 

On the 21st, my arrangements for drawing supplies of every 
description being complete, I determined to make another effort to 
carry Vicksburg by assault. There were many reasons to determine 
me to adopt this course. I believed an assault from the position 
gained by this time could be made successfully. It was known that 
Johnston was at Canton with the force taken by him from Jackson, 
reinforced by other troops from the East, and that more were daily 
reaching him. With the force I then had, a short time must have 
enabled him to attack me in the rear, and possibly succeeded in 
raising the siege. 

Possession of Vicksburg at that time would have enabled me to 
have turned upon Johnston and driven him from the State, and pos- 
sessed myself of all the railroads and practical military highways, 
thus effectually securing to ourselves all territory west of the Tom- 
bigbee, and this before the season was too far advanced for cam- 
paigning in this latitude. I would have saved the Government 
sending large reinforcements, much needed elsewhere ; and, finally, 
the troops themselves were impatient to possess Vicksburg, and 
would not have worked in the trenches with the same zeal, believing 
it unnecessary, that they did after their failure to carry the enemy's 
works. 

Accordingly, on the 21st, orders were issued for a general assault 
on the whole line, to commence at 10 a. m. on the 22d. All the 
corps commanders set their time by mine, that there should be no 
difference between them in movement of assault. Promptly at the 
hour designated the three army corps then in front of the enemy's 
works commenced the assault. I had taken a commanding position 
near McPherson's front, and from which I could see all the ad- 
vancing columns from his corps, and a part of each of Sherman's 
and McClernand's. A portion of the commands of each succeeded 
in planting their flags on the outer slop&s of the enemy's bastions, 
and maintained them there until night. 

Each corps had many more men than could possibly be used in 
the assault over such ground as intervened between them and the 
enemy. More men could only avail in ease of breaking through the 
enemy's line or in repelling a sortie. The assault was gallant in the 
extreme on the part of all the troops, but the enemy's position was 
too strong, both naturally and artificially, to be taken in that way. 



Report op Generai. Grant. KJl 

At every point assaulted, and at all of them at the same time, the 
enemy was able to show all the force his works would cover. 

The assault failed, I regret to say, with much loSvS on our side 
in killed and wounded, but without weakening the confidence of the 
troops in their ability to ultimately succeed. 

No troops succeeded in entering any of the enemy's works with 
the exception of Sergeant Griffith, of the 21st (22d) Iowa Volun- 
teers, and some eleven privates of the same regiment. Of these none 
returned, except the sergeant and possibly one man. The work en- 
tered by him, from its position, could give u.s no practical advantage, 
unless others to the right and left of it were carried and held at 
the same time. 

About 12 m. I received a dispatch from McClernand that he was 
hard pressed at several points, in reply to which I directed him to 
reinforce the points hard pressed from such troops as he had that 
were not engaged. I then rode around to Sherman and had just 
reached there when I received a second dispatch from IMcClernand, 
stating positively and unequivocally that he was in possession of, 
and still held, two of the enemy's forts; that the American flag 
then waved over them, and asking me to have Sherman and McPher- 
son make a diversion in his favor. This dispatch I showed Sher- 
man, who immediately ordered a renewal of the assault en his front. 
I also sent an answer to McClernand, directing him to order up Mc- 
Arthur to his assistance, and started immediately to the position I 
had just left on McPherson's line, to convey to him the information 
from McClernand by this last dispatch, that he might make the 
diversion requested. Before reaching McPherson, I met a messen- 
ger with a third dispatch from McClernand, of which the following 

is a copy : 

Headquarters Thirteenth Army Corps. 
In the Field, Near Vick.sburg, Miss., May 22, 1863. 

Ma,i. Gen. U. S. Grnnt. 

General: We liave gained the enemy's intrenchnients at several 
l>oi]its, but are brought to a stand. I have sent w(n-d to INIeArthuv to re- 
enforce me if be can. Would it not be best to coiHcntrate the whole or a 
part of liis command at tliis point? 

John A. M'-Giernanu, 
Ma.ior-(;en(M-al. Connnanding. 

p. !^. — I have received yoni disjiatch. My troops are all engaj-'od. and 
I cannot witll■^ra^v any to re-enforce others. 

The position occupied by me during most of the time of the 
assault gave me a better opportunity of seeing what was going on 



162 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

in front ni' the ]'.\\h Anny Corps than I l)elioved it possible fur the 
conniiandci- of it to liave. I eonld not see his possession of forts, 
nor necessity for reinforcements, as represented in his dispatches, 
up to the time I left it, which was between 12 m. and 1 p. m., and 1 
expressed doubts of their correctness, which doubts the facts subse- 
quently, but too late, confirmed. At the time I could not disregard 
his reiterated statements, for they might possibly be true ; and that 
no possible opportunity of carrying the enemy's stronghold should 
be allowed to escape through fault of mine, I ordered Quinby's Di- 
vision, which was all of ]\IcPherson 's Corps then present but four 
brigades, to report to McClernand, and notified him of the order. I 
showed his dispatches to McPherson, as I had to Sherman, to satisfy 
him of the necessity of an active diversion on their part to hold as 
much force in their fronts as possible. The diversion was promptly 
and vigorously made, and resulted in the increase of our mortality 
list fully 50 per cent., without advancing our position or giving us 
other advantages. 

About 3:50 p.m. I received ^IcClernand's fourth dispatch, as 
follows : 

Headquarters Thirteenth Army Corps 
May 22, 1863. 
Maj. Gen. V. S. (iraiit. 

Department of tlie Tennessee : 

General: I have received your dispatch in regard to General Quin- 
by's divisioon and General McArthur's division. As soon as they arrive I 
will ]>ress tlie enemy with all possible speed, and doubt not I will force my 
wa.v throuirh. I have lost no ground. My men are in two of the enemy's 
forts, lint they are conunanded by rifle-pits in the rear. Several prisojiers 
have been taken, who intinmte that the rear is strong. At this moment 
I am hard pressed. 

John A. McClernand, 
Ma jor-( Jeneral, Connnanding. 

The assault of this day proved the quality of the soldiers of this 
army. Without entire success, and with a heavy loss, there was no 
murmuring or complaining ; no falling back, nor other evidence of 
demoralization. 

After the failure of the 22d. I determined upon a regidar siege. 
The troops being now fully awake to the necessity of this, worked 
diligently and cheerfully. The work progressed rapidly and satis- 
factorily until July 3. when all was about ready for a final assault. 

There was a great scarcity of engineer officers in the beginning, 
but under the skilled superintendence of Capt. F. E. Prime, of the 



Report op General Grant. 163 

Engineer Corps; Lieutenant Colonel Wilson, of my staff, and Capt. 
C. B. Comstock, of the Engineer Corps, who joined this command 
during the siege, such praotieal experience was gained as would en- 
able any division of this army hereafter to conduct a siege with 
considerable skill in the absence of regular engineer officers. 

On the afternoon of July 3, a letter was received from Lieuten- 
ant General Pemberton, commanding the Confederate forces at 
Vicksburg, proposing an armistice and the appointment of commis- 
sioners to arrange terms for the capitulation of the place. The cor- 
respondence, copies of which are herewith transmitted, resulted in 
the surrender of the city and garrison of Vicksburg at 10 a. m.. July 
4, 1863, on the following terms : 

The entire garrison, officers and men, were to be paroled, not to 
take up arms against the United States until exchanged by the 
proper authorities; officers and men each to be furnished with a 
parole, signed by himself; officers to be allowed their side-arms and 
private baggage, and the field, staff and cavalry officers one horse 
each ; the rank and file to be allowed all their clothing, ])ut no other 
property; rations from their own stores sufficient to last them be- 
yond our lines ; the necessary cocking utensils for preparing their 
food, and thirty wagcns to transport s^uch articles as could not well 
):e carried. 

These terms I regarded more favorable to the Government than 
an unconditional surrender. It saved us the transportation cf them 
North, which at that time would have been very difficult, owing to 
the limited amount of river transportation on hand, and the expense 
of subsisting them. It left cur army free to operate ag diiSt Johns- 
ton, who was threatening us from the direction of Jackson, and our 
river transportation to be used for the movement of troops to anv 
point the exigency of the service might require. 

I deem it proper to state here, in order that the correspondence 
may be fully understood, that after my answer to General Pember- 
ton 's letter of the morning of the 3d, we had a personal interview 
on the subject of the capitulation. 

The particulars and incidents of the siege will be contained in 
the reports of division and corps commanders, which will lie for- 
warded as soon as received. 

I brought forward during the siege, in addition to Lauman's 
Division and four regiments previously ordered from Memphis. (W. 
S.) Smith's and Kimball's Divisions, of the 16th Army Corps, and 
assigned Maj. Gen. C. C. Washburn to command of the same. 



I(i4 Indiana at Vicksiukc. 

Oil June 11, Maj. Gen. F. ■}. llerron's Division, from the Depart- 
ment of the Missouri arrived, and on the 14th two divisions of the 
9th Army Corps. Maj. Gen. J. G. Parke, commanding, arrived. 
This increase in my force enabled me to make the investment most 
complete, and at the same time left me a large reserve to watch the 
movements of Johnston, llerron's Division was put into povsition 
on the extreme left, south of the city, and Lauman's Division was 
placed between Herron and McClernand. Smith's and Kimball's 
Divisions and Parke's Corps were sent to Haynes' Bluff. This 
place I had fortified on the land side, and every preparation made to 
resist a heavy force. Johnston crossed Big Black River with a 
portion of his force, and everything indicated that he would make 
an attack about June 25. Our position in front of Vicksburg hav- 
ing been made as strong against a sortie from the enemy as his 
works were against assault. I placed Major General Sherman in 
command of all the troops designated to look after Johnston. The 
force intended to operate against Johnston, in addition to that at 
Haynes' Bluff, was one division from each of the 13th, 15th and 17th 
Army Corps and Lauman's Division. Johnston, however, not at- 
tacking, I determined to attack him the moment Vicksburg was in 
our possession, and accordingly notified Sherman that I should 
again make an assault on Vicksburg at daylight on the 6th, and for 
him to have up supplies of all descriptions, ready to move upon 
receipt of orders, if the assault should prove a success. His prep- 
arations were immediately made, and when the place surrendered 
on the 4th — two days earlier than I had fixed for the attack — Sher- 
man was found ready, and moved at once with a force increased by 
the remainder of both the 13th and 15th Army Corps, and is at 
present investing Jackson, where Johnston has made a stand. 

In the march from Bruinsburg to Vicksburg, covering a period 
of twenty days, before supplies could be obtained from Government 
stores, only five days' rations were issued, and three days' of these 
were taken in haversacks at the start, and were soon exhausted. All 
other subsistence was obtained from the country through which we 
passed. The march was commenced without wagons, except such as 
could be picked up through the country. The country was abun- 
dantly supplied with corn, bacon, beef and mutton. The troops 
enjoyed excellent health, and no army ever appeared in lietter 
spirits or felt more confident of success. 

In accordance with previous instructions, IMaj. Gen. S. A. Hurl- 
but started Col. (now Brig. Gen.) B. II. Grierson with a cavalry 



Report of General Grant. 165 

force from La Grange, Tenn., to make a raid through the central 
portion of the State of Mississippi, to destroy railroads and other 
public property, for the purpose of creating a diversion in favor of 
the army moving to the attack on Vicksburg. 

On April 17, this expedition started, and arrived at Baton 
Rouge on May 2, having successfully traversed the whole State of 
Mississippi. This expedition was skillfully conducted, and reflects 
great credit on Colonel Grierson and all of his command. The no- 
tice given this raid by the Southern press confirms our estimate of 
its importance. It has been one of the most brilliant cavalry ex- 
ploits of the war, and will be handed down in history as an example 
to be imitated. Colonel Grierson 's report is herewith transmitted. 

I cannot close this report without an expression of thankfulness 
for my good fortune in being placed in co-operation with an officer 
of the navy who accords to every move that seems for the interest 
and success of our arms his hearty and energetic support. Admiral 
Porter and the very efficient officers under him have ever shown the 
greatest readiness in their co-operation, no matter what was to be 
done or what risk to be taken, either by their men or their vessels. 
Without this prompt and cordial support, my movements would 
have been much embarrassed, if not wholly defeated. 

Capt. J. W. Shirk, commanding the Tuscumbia, was especially 
active, and deserving of the highest commendation for his personal 
attention to the repairing of the damage done our transports by the 
Vicksburg batteries. 

The result of this campaign has been the defeat of the enemy in 
five battles outside of Vicksburg; the occupation of Jackson, the 
capital of the State of Mississippi, and the capture of Vicksburg 
and its garrison and munitions of war; a loss to the enemy of 37,000 
prisoners, among whom were fifteen general officers ; at least 10,000 
killed and wounded, and among the killed Generals Tracy, Tilgh- 
man and Green, and hundreds, and perhaps thousands, of strag- 
glers, who can never be collected and reorganized. Arms and muni- 
tions of war for an army of 60.000 men have fallen into our hands, 
besides a large amount of other public property, consisting of rail- 
roads, locomotives, cars, steamboats, cotton, etc.. and nuich was de- 
stroyed to prevent our capturing it. 



IQQ Indiana at Vicksburg. 

. Our loss in the series of battles may be summed up as follows : 

Kilted. Wounded. Missing. 

',,,,., 130 718 5 

Port (iilisou 

Fourteen-Mile Creek ( skirinish) -i -■* 

, G9 341 32 

f-V ... 40 240 6 

Champinii s IIiU 

Big Black Kaili-«'--i<l r.i'uti.'e ^^ 

„. , , „ 545 3,088 303 

Vicksburg ' 

Note: See general summary, page 172. 

Of the wounded, many were but slightly wounded and continued 
on duty ; many more required but a few days or weeks for their 
recovery.' Not more than one-half of the wounded were perma- 
nently disabled. 

My personal staff and chiefs of departments have in all cases 
rendered prompt and efficient service. 

In all former reports I have failed to make mention of Company 
A, Fourth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Cavalry, Capt. E. D. Os- 
l)and commanding. This company has been on duty with me as an 
escort company since November, 1861, and in every engagement I 
have been in since that time rendered valuable service, attracting 
general attention for their exemplary conduct, soldierly bearing 
and promptness. It would not be overstating the merits of this 
company to say that many of them would fill with credit any posi- 
tion in a cavalry regiment. 

For the brilliant achievements recounted in this report, the 
Army of the Tennessee, their comrades of the 9th Army Corps, 
Herron's Division of the Army of the Frontier, and the navy co- 
operating with them, deserve the highest honors their country can 

award. 

1 have the honor to be. Colonel, very respectfully, your obedient 

servant, 

U. S. Grant, 

Major General U. S. Army, Commanding. 

Col. J. C. Kelton. 

Assistant Adjutant-General. Washington. D. C. 



Report of General Grant. 167 

(Inclosure No. 1.) 

Headquarters. 

ViCKSBURG, Miss., July 3, 1SG3. 
Maj. Gen. U. S. Grant, 

Commanding United States Forces, etc. 

General, : I have tlie honor to propose to you an armistice for f 

hours, ^Yith a view to arranging terms for the capitulation of Viclisburg. 
lo this end, if agreeable to you, I will appoint three commissioners to meet 
a like number, to be named by yourself, at such place and hour to-day as 
you may find convenient. 

I make this proposition to save the further effusion of blood, which 
nmst otherwise be shed to a frightful extent, feeling myself fully able to 
maintain my position for a yet indefinite period. 

This communication will be handed you under a flag of truce by Maj. 
Gen. .J. S. Bowen. 

Very respectfully, youi' obedient servant, 

J. C. Pemi'.erton, 

Lieutenant-General. 



(Inclosure No. 2.) 

Headquarters Department of the Tennessee, 
In the Field, Near Vicksburg, Miss., July 3. 1863. 

Lieut. Gen. J. C. Pemberton, 

Commanding Confederate Forces, etc. 

General : Your note of this date is just received, proposing an armis- 
tice for several hours, for the purpose of arranging terms of capitulation 
through commissioners to be appointed, etc. 

The useless effusion of blood you propose stopping by this course can 
be ended at any time you choose, by an unconditional surrender of the city 
and garrison. Men who have shown so much endurance and courage as 
those now in Vicksburg will always challenge the respect of an adversar.y, 
and I can assure you will be treated with all the respect due to prisoners 
of war. 

I do not favor the projiosition of appointing commissioners to arrange 
terms of capitulation, because I have no terms other than those indicated 
above. 

I am, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

U. S. Grant. 
Major-Genera 1. 

tin Pemberton's report, "several." 



1(3^ Indiana at Vicksburg. 

(Inclosure No. 3.) 

Ukauquabters Department ok the Tennessee, 

Near Vicksburg, Miss.. July 3, 1863. 

Lieut. Gen. J. C. Pemberton, 

Commanding Confederate Forces. \'iflvsburg, Miss. : 

General: In conformity with agreement of this afternoon, I will sub- 
mit the following proiwsition for the surrender of the city of Vicksburg, 
public stores, etc. : 

On your accepting the terms proposed, I will march in one division 
as a guard, and take iwssession at 8 a.m. to-morrow. As sonn as rolls can 
be made out. and paroles signed by officers and men. you will be allowed 
to march out of our lines, the officers taking with them their side-arms 
and clothing, and the field, staff and cavalry officers one horse each. The 
rank and tile will be allowed all their clothing, but no other property. 
U these conditions are accepted, any amount of rations you may deem 
necessary can be taken from the stores you now have, and also the nec- 
essary cooking utensils for preparing them. Thirty wagons also, counting 
two two-horse or mule teams as one. \Aill be allowed to transport such 
articles as cannot be carried along. 

The same conditions will be allo^eil to all sick and wounded officers 
and soldiers as fast as they become able to travel. 

The paroles for these latter must be signed, however, while officers 
are iiresent authorized to sign the roll of prisoners. 

I am. General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

U. S. Grant, 
Major-General. 



(Inclsonre No. 4.) 

Headquarters, 
Vicksburg. IMiss.. July 3. 1803. 
Maj. Gen. V. S. Grant. 

Commanding United States Forces, etc.: 
General: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of .vour com- 
munication of this date, proposing terms of capitulation for this garrison 

and post. 

In the main, your terms are accepted; but in .instice both to the honor 
and spirit of my troops, manifested in the defense of Vicksburg. I have to 
submit the following amendments, which, if acceded to by you, will per- 
fect the agreement between us. 

At 10 a.m. tomorrow I propose to evacuate the works in and around 
Vicksburg. and to surrender the city and garrison under my command, by 
marching out with my colors and arms, stacking them in front of my pres- 
ent lines, after which you will take ])nssession. 

Officers to retain their side-arms and personal property, and the 
rights and ]iroperty of citizens to be respected. 

I am, General, very respectfully, your (ibodient servant. 

J. C. Pemkbrton, 
Lieutena nt-Genera 1 . 



^W0^i^^.r^ 




'g^ 




1 



(170) 



Report of General Grant. 171 

(Inclosure No. 5.) 

Headquarters Department of the Tennessee, 

Before Vicksburg, Miss.. July 4, 18i)."i. 
Lieut. (Jeu. J. C. Pemht'iton, 

Couuuantliug CVuil'ederate Forces, Vicksburg, Miss. : 

General : I have the honof to ackno^ieuge the receipt of your com- 
unuilcatlou of July .'>. The ameuclment proposed by you cannot be ac- 
ceded to In full. It will be necessary to furnish every otlicer and man with 
a parole signed by himself, which, with the completion of the rolls of pris- 
oners, will necessarily take some time. 

Again. I can make no stipulalions with regard to the treatment of 
citizens and their private proiierty. While I do not propose to cause them 
any undue annoyance or loss, I cannot consent to leave myself under any 
restraint by stipulations. The property which officers will be allowed to 
take with them will be as stated in niy proi)osition of last evening; tnat 
is. othcers will be allovscd their private baggage and side-arms, and 
mounted officers one horse each. 

If you mean l)y your proposition for each brigade to march to the 
front of the lines now ()ccu])ied by it, and stack arms at 10 a.m., and then 
return to the inside, and there remain as prisoners until properly paroled, 
I will make no objection to it, 

Should no notification be received of .vour acceptance of my terms by 
'.) a.m.. 1 shall regard tlieui as having been rejected, and shall act accord- 
ingl.v. Should these terms be accej)ted. white flags should be displayed 
along .vour lines to prevent such of my troops as may not have been no- 
titted from firing upfui your men. 

I am. General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

U. S. Grant, 
Major-General. 



(Inelosiire No. 6,) 

Headquarters, 
Vicksburg, Miss., July 4, ISGo. 
Maj. Gen. U. S. Cirant, 

Commanding United States Forces, etc. : 
General: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your com- 
munication of this day, and in reply to say that the terms proposed by 
you are accepted. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant. 

J. C. Pemberton. 
Lieutenant-General. 



172 



Indiana at N'mivMukc. 



GENERAI> SUMMARY OF CASUALTIES IN THE UNION FORCES DURING THE OPER- 
ATIONS AGAINST VICKSBURG, MAY 1-JULY 4, 1863. 

(Compiled from nominal lists of casualties, returns, etc. ) 





Killed. 


Wounded 


Captured 

or Missing. 




Engagements. 


t 

O 


s 
o 

S 
1 

W 


O 


s 

■n 


t 
O 


B 

E 

1 


IS 
< 


Battle of Port Gibson, Thompson's Hill, or Magnolia 


1 


130 


44 

1 

1 

17 

108 
16 


675 




25 


87.5 




1 


Skirmishes on the North Fork of Bayou Pierre, at 
Willow Springs, Ingraham's Heights, Jones' Cross- 


7 


1 

59 

6 

40 

383 

36 


8 

322 

24 

237 

1,736 

221 

1 

180 

712 

2,377 

399 

3 

1 

4 

10 

1 






10 


Engagement at Raymond, May 12 


2 


35 


442 
30 




2 

27 

3 


.....^ 


183 
3 


300 


Battle of Champion's Hill or Baker's Creek, May 16. 
Engagement at Big Black River Bridge, May 17 


2,441 

279 

1 


Skirmishes about Vicksburg, May 18, 20, and 21 


3 

10 
37 

8 


40 
147 
465 

96 

1 


14 
65 
173 
20 


1 
1 


2 

146 
6 


239 

942 




3,199 


Siege of Vicksburg, May 23-July 4 

Skirmish at Liverpool Landing, Near Yazoo City 
May 23 . . ... 


530 
4 










1 














4 






2 








12 










1 












2 
27 








10 


1 


8 
2 


1 


47 






2 
















Total 


98 


1,416 


474 


6,921 


10 


443 


9,362 



The Indiana Soldier at Vicksburg. 



A BRIEF NARRATIVE OF THE PART TAKEN BY INDIANA TROOPS 
DURING THE CAMPAIGN AND SIEGE, MARCH 29-JULY 4, 1863. 



During the latter part of March, 1863, General Grant began the 
concentration of his forces at Milliken's Bend, and set on foot a 
movement to New Carthage, where he hoped to effect a passage 
across the Mississippi, below the Vicksburg batteries. 

McPherson came down from Lake Providence and the Yazoo 
Pass, whither he had lately dispatched part of his corps. Sherman 
arrived from Steele 's Bayou. Hurlbut sent forward every man who 
could be spared from the rear. Boats were brought from Chicago 
and St. Louis. 

By the 29th of March the roads by way of Richmond were con- 
sidered sufficiently dried, as the distance was but about twenty 
miles, and on that day orders were issued for McClernand to move 
his corps without tents, blankets, or baggage of any kind. 

Osterhaus took the lead with his division, sending a detachment 
in advance to capture Richmond, reported to be fortified by a small 
force, and to explore the route. The detachment was under the 
command of Colonel Bennett, formerly Major in the 36th, and 
always an officer of excellent ability and character, and consisted of 
the 69th Indiana, a section of artillery and a portion of the 2d Illi- 
nois Cavalry. Bennett started at 7 on the morning of the 31st, 
directed his course toward the west, and gathering up, for future 
necessity, all the boats he could find in the watery region through 
which his road led him, reached Roundaway Bayou at 2 in the after- 
noon. He dislodged the enemy from the further bank, took posses- 
sion of Richmond, and from that point turned his course southward. 
He was stopped by a break in the levee of Bayou Vidal, which, unit- 
ing with the Mississippi, encircled New Carthage, and made ap- 
proach undesirable, as well as impossible. The 49th soon came uj). 
Explorations were at once instituted " in search of a clue through 
the maze of water-courses. General Osterhaus, with Captain Gar- 
retson's company, made a voyage on the Opossum (a gunboat built 
by the 69th, and armed with two homtzers) , propelling it with oars 

( 7:^) 



174 Indiana .vv Vicksiu'iu;. 

tlii-()U!4-li a forest to the Mississippi levee, gained a i)ositioii en a i)lot 
of twenty acres, whose elevation had preserved it from the general 
overflow, and awaited there the arrival of the 49tli Regiment, and 
of the residue of the (iHth. But neither these regiments nor any 
other attemjjted to follow, and the little foree remained on the 
isolated spot five days, protecting itself, by sham artillery, which it 
made from the smokepipes of the Indianola, and l)y its two real 
howitzers, from a threatening gunboat on the river, and a body of 
rebels at Hard Times, a mile or two below. 

Meantime, General Osterhans, continuing his explorations, met 
General Ilovey, also on a voyage of discovery, with three men, in a 
skiff. The two generals compared notes, and reported a pi'acticable 
route round Bayou Vidal to Perkins' plantation, on the IMississip])!, 
thirty-five miles from INIilliken's Bend. 

Osterhaus and Carr made roads, as far as roads were made, at 
the beginning of the movement. The 18th Indiana headed Carr's 
Division, marching in single file on the levees, with water on either 
side, or moving on tiatboats and rafts, made with tedious delay. 
Hovey's division was in the rear when it started, ])ut passed to the 
right of Ost(>rhaus and Carr as the march progressed, and gained 
the van. It built more than two thousand feet of bridging in four 
days, and cut two miles of military road through an almost impassa- 
ble sw^amp,' men working for hours up to their necks in water. 
Capt. George W. Jackson, of the 34th Indiana, with his pioneer 
corps. Avas distinguished in the herculean labor. 

McPherson followed McClernand, but on account of the tedious 
character of the march Sherman was directed to remain at IMilli- 
ken's Bend until further orders. 

To carry the troops across the river and to protect their land- 
ing, eight gunboats and three transports ran the batteries. Al- 
though the night was dark, they were speedily dis-.'overed, and the 
river was made lighter than day by the glare of burning houses on 
both shores. Mobile all the artillery on both bluffs opened. Nobody 
was killed, and but few were w^ounded, though many of the boats 
were broken to pieces and men were picked up from pieces of float- 
ing wrecks. 

Another night, April 26, six unprotected transports made the 
fiery voyage. As had been the case with the former expedition, the 
crews refused to venture, and their places were promptly supplied 
by volunteers from the army. J ogan's Division, which had not yet 
begun the march, rapidly manned the vessels, our 23d furnishing 
seventy hands. IMen seldom do a nobler thing than to volunteer a 



The Indiana Soldier at Vicksburg. 175 

dangerous and untried Kerviee, in addition to known and allotted 
duties of the most exacting character. 

The army, meantime, moved down to Hard Times Landing, 
making the distance traversed from Milliken 's Bend seventy miles, 
and there awaited transportation. 

General Grant now endeavored to distract the attention of the 
rebels while he should eflfect a landing and gain a position in the 
rear of Vicksburg. He gave directions for an extended cavalry 
raid, and a demonstration in force on Haynes' Bluff. The former 
was performed by Illinois soldiers under the lead of Grierson, and 
cut from La Grange, through the center of Mississippi, to Baton 
Rouge. The latter was made by Sherman, with the 15th Corps and 
so much of the fleet as lay at the mouth of the Yazoo. 

Accepting the guidance of events as they opened, without any 
attempt to hold to an arbitrary plan. General Grant was (piite suc- 
cessful in effecting a landing. During five hours of the 29th of 
April, as large a portion of McClernand's Corps as could be crowded 
on the boats waited in front of Grand Gulf, with the expectation of 
assaulting that strong position, when Admiral Porter should have 
succeeded in silencing its guns. Happily the guns were not af- 
fected by Porter's fire, fierce, heavy and w^ell-directed though it was, 
and the army was spared a repetition of the murderous scene en- 
acted before Chickasaw Bluff's. The troops debarked and marched 
to a point below, where they re-embarked and crossed the river on 
transports and gunboats which had run the Grand Gulf guns unin- 
jured. They were landed at Bruinsburg, and as soon as landed 
were supplied with three days' rations in their haversacks and 
started toward the bluffs, three miles inland, where it was possible 
for the enemy to make a strong defense. Benton 's Brigade pushed 
out in advance without waiting for rations, a detail at the river fol- 
lowing after several hours, each stout-hearted fellow trudging along 
under the broiling sun with a cracker box, a hundred pounds in 
weight, on his shoulders. 

Benton's Brigade w^as in Carr's Division, and included the Indi- 
ana 8th, Colonel Shunk. and 18th. Colonel Washburn, and the 1st 
Battery, Captain Klauss. 

Osterhaus' Division followed Carr's; Hovey's came next in 
order, and A. J. Smith's brought up the rear of IMcClernand's 
Corps. 

Hovey's Division was more largelv Indianian than any other iii 
Grant's army. In General McGinnis' Brigade were the llth. Coh)- 
nel T^IacauleV: the 2-tth, Colonel Spicely; 34th, Colonel Cameron, 



176 Indiana at Vioksburg. 

and 46th, Colonel Bringhurst. The 47th, Colonel McLaughlin, was 
in General Slack's Brigade. Company C of the 1st Indiana Cav- 
alry was General Hovey's escort. 

The 69th, Colonel Bennett; 49th, Colonel Keigwin, and 54th, 
Colonel Mansfield, were in Osterhaus' Division. 

In Bnrl)ridge's Brigade, of A. J. Smith's Division, were the 
16th, 60th and 67th. 

Two of McPherson's divisions followed McClernand's Corps. 
His remaining division joined him several days later. The 23d, 
48th and 59th Indiana were in McPherson's Corps. The 97th was 
also one of his regiments, but it had been left in IVIoscow, Tennessee. 

All the regimental officers were on foot, and continued on foot 
during the succeeding day, in consequence of an order forbidding 
them to liring their horses across the river. Neither officers nor men 
carried more than their blankets. ]\Iany had only a rubber poncho. 

After midnight, and about eight miles from Bruinsburg, the 
enemy began to give evidence that he was not unobservant, assail- 
ing the van with artillery and a light infantry fire. Klauss has- 
tened his battery to the front, and replied. The fire continued with 
something of the character of question and answer through nearly 
two hours, when there was an entire lull. 

Noah Havens, a scout of the 18th, crept within the hostile lines, 
and ascertained that the enemy was withdrawing ; but as the moon 
had set, and it was quite dark, no effort was made to follow. The 
troops rested on their arms, and marched again at daylight. 

The march led through an exceedingly broken region, down deep 
ravines, up abrupt heights, and, where the country was not opened 
in plantations, through heavy timber, tall and strong wild cane, and 
other tangled underbrush. The roads, however, were hard and 
most delightful after the oozy soil of Louisiana ; and, in spite of the 
bloody days they knew were now close upon them, the soldiers were 
enraptured with the luxuriance and splendor of magnolias, olean- 
ders and wild roses. 

It was the first day of May, and in the serene and cool morning 
twilight, promised to be the loveliest of May days. But the sun rose 
blazing hot, and poured his blinding rays directly in the face of the 
troops. 

The march was toward Port Gibson, the possession of which 
would force the enemy to evacuate Grand Gulf. The road dividing, 
Osterhaus advanced on the left, and Carr, Hovey and Smith directed 
their movement toward the right. General Benton still led the head 
'if Carr's column. Major Brady, of the 8th, with a company from 



The Indiana Soldier at Vicksburg. 177 

each regiment of the ])rig'ade, skirmished in front of his line. Cap- 
tain Klauss kept all his gnns firing. Following the enemy from 
height to height, Benton's troops reached a deep, dark ravine, and 
wound and climbed through it in single file. Beyond it the rebels 
made a resolute stand, and Benton formed line of liattle on a 
ridge, the 18th on his left, near a little church, Magnolia church; the 
8th on his right, and two Illinois regiments in his center. Firing 
grew hot, the enemy threatening, now the front and now the flank, 
and, with a battery directly before the 18th, sweeping the line. 

Stone's Brigade was soon engaged on Benton's left. Ilovey has- 
tened forward to his right, but restrained by instructions not to join 
in the battle until supported by Smith 's, the hindmost division, he 
waited a long and anxious half hour, during which his troops lay 
behind the crest of the ridge. When Smith came up, Hovey pushed 
forward through a narrow, deep gulch chocked with vines and ( ane. 
and as soon as Slack's Brigade and the left of McGinnis' had g lined 
the front, Klauss having pointed cut to him the rebel ]:)attery with 
a line of rebel heads in its rear, he gave the order to Colonel Cam- 
eron, and a few moments later, to the residue of his division, to 
charge bayonets. The troops obeyed, charging over fences, pitching 
over logs, tearing through bamboo. Cameron's voice, "Come on, my 
brave boys!" Colonel Spicely shouting, "Come on! Come on!" the 
deportment of all the officers, and the sight of the breaking rebel 
line, animated them to the highest pitch. 

Our 46th ran over the colors of the 23d Alabama. Captain 
Charles, of the 18th. leaped upon a cannon and claimed it as his 
trophy. Amos Nagle, of the 18th, killed the color-bearer of the 15th 
Arkansas, and captured his colors, inscribed all over with the names 
of battles— "Oak Hill," "Elk Horn," "Corinth," "Hatchie 
Ridge." A triumphant shout reverberated among the hills. 

Colonel ]\IcLaughlin, with the 47th, held a conspicuous position 
on the right of Slack's Brigade, and after the charge repeatedly re- 
pulsed a flanking force. 

At last the whole Confederate line fell back. Hovey 's Division 
paused to take breath and to exchange congratulations. The early 
and swift success was a good omen. 

It was impossible to pursue the rebels with rapidity, and when 
they were next confronted, they were strongly posted in a creek 
bottom, protected by trees and bushes, and commanding the ap- 
proach, which was over open fields and exposed slopes. A short 
halt for rest and water was followed by a resolute advance ; and a 

ri2i 



178 



Indiana a'I' Vi<'Ksmi;(!. 



Icrrihic (-(indict, lastiii'^' ;in hour and lliii ty-si'\cn iiiiiiiites, by utter 
(Icl'cal 1(1 llic ciKMiiy. 

On tlic road to the left, General Osterhaiis, with the 49th Indi- 
ana dcphiycd as skirmishers, eneounter-ed pickets at 6 o'clock, and 
soon carae in fi'ont of heavy hostile lines. The 49th charged single- 
handed on a l)attery and captured it. 

As he endeavored to push on, he replaced the 49th hy the 120th 
Ohio, and the 12()th l)y the f)9th Indiana. The last lay on a ridge, 



■s:'r.M6, 




A Bivonac of the Dead. 



somewhat isolated, at 3 in the afternoon, and had there a spirited 
tight with an attacking force of double its num])er. During a 
cessation of the combat, the 69th sang ''Rally 'Round the Flag. 
Boys." At length, reinforced by the 49th and the 120th Ohio, il 
routed the opposing force. 

Osterhaus' column, however, was too light for the force opposed 
to it, and though he fought well, he made little advance until rein- 
forced by a brigade from Logan's Division. The 23d Indiana was 
in Logan's advance, and engaged the enemy as soon as it appeared 
on the field. 



The Indiana Soldier at Vicksburg. 17!) 

The battle of Port Gril)son continued through the entire day, 
and was exceedingly wearisome, as much on account of the maneu- 
vering which the tactics of the enemy necessitated, as because of 
the severity of the fight. Many men in the 24th were barefoot and 
could not walk without difficulty. They had been supplied witli 
shoes at Helena, but had already worn them out. Ill-fitted as it was 
from this circumstance to move rapidly, the regiment was hurried 
from Hovey to Osterhaus, and from Osterhaus back to Hovey, 
craf-hing through cane, and at one time supporting the 29th Wis- 
consin, under a heavy fire from a concealed force. 

General Burbridge reached the ground at 7 in th(> morning, and 
forming in the rear of Hovey, constituted his reserve. He shifted 
ground rapidly, as weak points presented themselves, and late in 
the afternoon advanced to the extreme front and drove the enemy 
from the last hill he attempted to hold. At night, his ])vigade sank 
down exhausted, not having had a mouthful of food since the pre- 
vious evening. 

The troops slept on their arms. In the morning they found 
their front clear, the rebels having retreated acroi-s Bayou Pieri-e. 

Our loss in the battle of Port Gibson was 180 killed. 718 
wounded. Of these a large i)roportion were Indianians. The 8th 
lost 32; the 11th, 25; the 23d, 25: the 24th, 23; the 18th, 98, or one- 
fifth of the r(\giment ; the 69th, 71 ; the 46th, 43. The number who 
fell in the 34th. 47th and 49th is unknown. 

The conduct of the Indiana troops in the battle of Port Gibson 
received high commendation. ''Indiana continues to be glorified 
in her sons," said General Carr in his report. 

Hovey 's Division suffered a loss of 308. It captured 400 pris- 
oners and four guns. The whole number captured was 580 men, 
with six guns and four flags. 

General Grant had 19,000 men engaged. The Confederates had 
not 8,000, until in the afternoon they received reinforcements from 
Vieksburg. Their positions, hov\'ever, were exceedingly strong. 

Early in the morning of the second, ]\IcClernand's troops 
pushed on two miles and entered Port Gibson, finding it evacuated. 
The enemy had retreated across Bayou Pierre, and burnt the bridge 
over the South fork. A heavy detail rebuilt the bridge, more than 
120 feet long, tearing down houses for timber, and working with 
great rapidity, though waist deep in water. Meanwhile, :McPher- 
son effected a crossing and continued the pursuit, reaching the 
bridge over the North fork in time to extinguish the flames and save 
all but the planks, which Avere soon relaid, pressing on to Ilankin- 



180 Indiana at Vicksiuirg. 

son's Ferry ou the Big Black, fifteen miles from Port Gibson, and 
taking several hundred prisoners. The enemy fell back with great 
reluctance through a country that afforded him every advantage. 

General Grant rode in person to Grand Gulf on the third, find- 
ing that post also evacuated by the rebels, and the naval force in 
possession. Thirteen heavy guns, which it had been impossible for 
the enemy to withdraw, fell into his liands. He now set himself to 
the task of gathering up his strength for further progress. Since 
leaving Milliken's Bend his army had marched by night and l)y 
day, through mud and rain and burning heat. Since leaving 
Bruinsburg it had been constantly engaged in battle or in skir- 
mishing. But it had not murmured nor straggled, it was now 
nearly thirty tliousand strong, witli the prospect of the early addi- 
tion of Sherman's Corps, and it had gained that for which it had 
been for five months ineffectually struggling, a foothold in the rear 
of Vicksburg. Grierson's raid had done all that was desired in 
distracting the attention of the enemy. Sherman's feint had ac- 
complished its purpose. 

Thus far the prospect was inexpressibly encouraging. But it 
had a very dark side. General Pemberton was in Vicksburg and 
along the Vicksburg and Jackson railroad with many thousand men. 
General Johnston was on his way to Jackson, where reinforcements 
were constanly arriving from the South and collecting from the 
North and East. If Grant met these forces united, they might 
easily overwhelm him ; if he succeeded in striking one separate, the 
disengaged force could cut his line of communication with the Mis- 
sissippi. President Lincoln disapproved, and General Halleck was 
opposed, both desiring that he should turn his efforts against Port 
Hudson. His subordinate officers were full of doubt and mis- 
giving. Sherman, one of the most daring, had offered an earnest 
remonstrance before the expedition started from Milliken's Bend, 
and his views remained unchanged. 

It may be supposed that General Grant weighed the question 
well. It is certain that he was resolute in his determination to ad- 
vance. He was rapid in his preparations. Meantime, the army 
lay on the Big Black, with the exception of strong reconnoitering 
parties, which pushed out on the west side of the river, witliin six 
miles of Vicksburg. 

On the 8th of May Steele's and Tuttle's Divisions of Slierman's 
Corps arrived. The army immediately began to move out. On the 
11th all preliminaries were consummated, and Grant solved one of 
the greatest difficulties, the question of defending his line of com- 



The Indiana Soldier at Vicksbukg. 181 

mimication. in Alexander's style of cutting the Gordian knot. He 
swung loose from his base, and, being supplied with hard bread, 
coffee and salt, became dependent on the country for other rations. 
To prevent the union of the rebel forces, he directed his march 
toward the northeast. McClernand had the right, moving on a 
ridge; IMcPherson the left, hugging the Black, and Sherman the 
rear, following on both roads. In Sherman's Corps were the 83d 
and 93d Indiana. 

The enemy fell back, lightly skirmishing, until the 12th, when, 
two miles south of Raymond, General Gregg, with artillery and in- 
fantry, about 5,000 strong, took a positive stand. His artillery, on 
an elevation, commanded the approach, and his infantry was wholly 
hidden by a thick woods bordering a small stream. 

The relative position of Grant's Corps had changed, and Mc- 
Pherson was now^ on the right. In his advance was Logan, and in 
Logan's advance was the 23d Indiana, under the command of Lieu- 
tenant Colonel Davis. Logan moved briskly to meet the fire of the 
enemy. The fight w^hich followed was severe. It lasted two hours 
and a half, and threatened at one time to be disastrous, but was, 
in the end, a complete victory. The First Brigade of Crocker's 
Division, in which were the 48th and 59th Indiana, reached the 
ground just in time to lend wings to the already flying rebels. The 
48th took position under a shower of shot and shell, which wounded 
several, but killed none. The 23d went into the field 375 strong, 
rank and file, and lost 132, 18 killed 87 wounded and 27 captured ; 
nevertheless it maintained its place in the line of battle. The en- 
tire loss was 442. The rebels lost 405, killed and wounded, and 415 
captured. General Grant called the battle of Raymond one of the 
hardest small battles of the war. 

Resting that night in Raymond, McPherson resumed the march 
early the next morning, through Clinton, and destroying the rail- 
road. Sherman advanced at the same time on the direct road from 
Raymond. Their movements were so timed as to enable them to 
press simultaneously upon Jackson from the southwest. On the 
14th, they were marching vigorously in the midst of pouring rain, 
when several pieces of artillery, advantageously posted, gave notice 
that Jackson was not to be tamely surrendered. The 1st and 2d 
Brigades of Crocker's Division, which was in McPherson 's ad- 
vance, immediately took position, distant about one mile from the 
rebel line of battle. The 48th was posted near the right of the line, 
in a cornfield. The 59th was on the extreme right. Thick and fast 
came shells and balls, but. as for the most part they passed harm- 



182 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

lossly over. Ilu'v were only a subject of inerriinent to the l)i"ave men. 
who were anxiously awaiting- the order to advance. Soon it came. 
With fixed ])ayonets, they moved to the eharf!:e. Drenched to the 
.skin, and weary with marching over miry and slippery roads, thev 
nevertheless went forward on double-quick, shout answering shout 
throughout the line. Passing over one hill, they rapidly began the 
ascent of another, on which the enemy was posted, dashing to the 
ground fences that intervened, and never flinching under a leaden 
hail. They gained the heights. The enemy broke and fled. They 
pursued into Jackson. The skirmishers of the 59th Indiana, under 
Captain Simpson, were the first to enter the city, and the tattered 
flag cf the 59th was the first to wave over the capitol of Mississippi. 

The same night Sherman reached the city, having broken the 
force below him by pressing both the front and the left flank. 

McPherson's loss in his fight before Jackson was 265. He in- 
flicted a loss of 845 upon the enemy, seventeen pieces of artillery 
and a large amount of army stores. 

General Grant, who accompanied Sherman to Jackson, faced 
about the next morning, moving IMcPherson's Corps along the line 
of the railroad towards P]dwards Station, which is half way be- 
tween Vicksburg and Jackson, and ordering IMcClernand, who, 
with Blair's Division, was now in the vicinity of Raymond, in the 
same direction. The sudden turn was due to intelligence which 
Grant had received that General Johnston had, on the day of his 
retreat from Jackson, the 14th, ordered Pemberton to move with all 
the force he could muster, at least 25,000 men, upon Grant's rear. 

On the evening of the 15th. Pembert<m, having become aware 
of the loss of Jackson and the retreat of Johnston, and having 
already freed himself of encumbrances by sending his train back 
to Vicksburg, took up an immensely strong position a few miles 
east of Edwards' Station. His line was about four miles long. His 
left, and the key to his position, was on Champion's Hill, which 
rises sixty to seventy feet above the surrounding country. Its bald 
top afforded his artillery a wide sweep, while its wooded and pre- 
cipitous sides threatened to hold entangled an advancing force. 

General Grant immediately sent back for Sherman, whom he 
had left in Jackson to destroy the railroad and rolling stock, in 
order to prevent the possible use of that place in the future for the 
concentration of forces in his rear; he ordered McPherson, who was 
moving north of the Vicksburg road and parallel to it, and INIc- 
C'lernand, who was southeast with Blair, Carr and Osterhaus, to 
hasten up ; and directed Hovey, who was sweeping on toward the 



The Indiana Soldier at Vicksburg. 183 

enemy's center, and not far from it, with right and left unpro- 
tected, to hold off. McPherson found no difficulty in carryino- his 
order into effect. McClernand met with some detention. Ilovey 
was already and inevitably within the outer limits of the maelstrom 
of battle. 

It was about 9 in the morning, and while his skirmishers were 
engaged with the enemy's pickets, that Hovey formed his line, 
McGinnis on his right, Slack on his left. The skirmishers grad- 
ually drew together ; their firing, from being warm at intervals, be- 
came incessant. It was necessarily supported by the masses on 
either side. Against Ilovey w ere two or three times his number, 
yet he persisted in crossing two cornfields, and in ascending an 
open slope, and he succeeded in pushing the rebels from their first 
line of protecting woods. He was nobly seconded by his sul)ordi- 
nate officers, as they were by their men. Seldom, perhaps never, 
was a battle more earnestly fought. Vicksburg, so long striven 
for, was understood to hang in the balance of this day, as it was 
the garrison of the city which contested the field. Two batteries 
were captured — the 11th Indiana and the 29th Wisconsin, with a 
desperate struggle, taking one, and the 46th assisting in the cap- 
ture of the other. 

McPherson, shortly after the opening of the contest, reached the 
ground. He advanced oup brigade after another of Crocker's Di- 
vision to Hovey 's support, while with Logan's Division he fell upon 
the enemy's left and threatened his rear. If Carr, Osterhaus and 
Blair had come up on the right, according to orders, Hovey would 
not have found the pressure on his front more than he was able to 
bear. Even without them he stood and withstood, bravely ad- 
vancing and skilfully retreating, until the sun, in the east when 
the battle was joined, declined toward the western horizon. 

Lieutenant Colonel Swaim, of the 34th Indiana, fell mortally 
wounded, and with Colonel Macauley, who was dangerously 
wounded, was carried from the field. 

Lieutenant Colonel Barter, of the 24th, seizing the falling colors 
of his regiment, was shot in his right arm. 

When out of ammunition, the men of several regiments in 
Slack's and INIcGinnis' Brigades supplied themselves from the 
caitridge-boxes of their dead and wounded comrades. 

It is impossible to enumerate the In-ave deeds which were done, 
or the brave men who fell. Men and officers all. and e-iuallN-. did 
their dutv. 



184 



TxniAXA AT Vk'KSRIIRG. 



Ilovey's troops swjiycd, rising and falling like a sea lashing the 
shore; receding at last, though temporarily, before overpowering 
force, and leaving the captured guns, spiked, behind. Tlovey 
turned his backwai-d movement to the best account, to ti'iumph, 
indeed, by massing his artillery on high gi-ound at his I'ight and 
i-aining on the i-iisiiing Rebels an entilading fire. The advancing 
host was checked. One more charge was made upon it. Exultant 
cheers proclaimed the success of that last desperate onset and the 



"1 




View from Comiecting Avenue. 

Shovvino; Place where the "Cincinnati" Sank, and the Canal through which the Yazoo River now 

Runs into Lake Centennial. 



proud delight of the victors. Then they were withdrawn. Hovey 
rode along their thinned and broken ranks as they rested. He 
stopped in front of his old regiment, the 24th, missing many a 
familiar face. "Where are the rest of my boys?" "They are 
lying over there," replied the men to whom he spoke, pointing to 
the hollow across which the division had rushed forth and back 
according as it drove or was driven, and had at last made the de- 
cisive charge. General Hovey turned his horse and rode away 
weeping. 



The Indiana Soldier at Vicksbukg. 185 

The Rebel retreat was hastened into flight by the timely, though 
hard won, success of McPherson, who, charging through ravines 
and over hills, gained the road in the rear of Pemberton's left and 
threatened to cut him off from Vicksburg. As it was, he separated 
General Loring's command from the main force and sent it on a 
wide march around the XTnion army to Jackson. 

Carr's and Osterhaus's divisions of IMcClernand's Corps, newly 
arrived and waiting on the Raymond road for orders, advanced as 
soon as the Confederates turned to retreat and chased them as fast 
as the men could run until after dark. 

The battle of Champion's Hill was the hardest fought ])attle of 
the campaign and the most important, as it definitely and forever 
separated the forces of Pemlierton and Johnston. 

Hovey's Division bore the brunt of the fighting and suffered 
nearly half the entire loss, losing 1,202 men, or one from every 
three, and 59 officers. The same division captured 700 men and 
3 batteries. 

The Indiana loss was as follows : 

The 11th, 167, 28 of whom were killed; 24th, 201; several com- 
panies in the 11th and 24th lost more than half; 34th, 69; 47th, 
140; 48th, 38; 59th, 10; 23d, 18. The 46th took into actiou but 
350 men, of whom it lost 84 in killed and wounded. The flag of 
this regiment was riddled \vith balls. 

Several of the 16th and 69th were wounded in the pursuit. 
Lieutenant Colonel Darnall had command of the 11th after 
Macauley was carried from the field. Spicel>'. Cameron, Bring- 
hurst and McLaughlin were all unhurt, although under the hottest 
of the fire from three to five hours. 

Grant had about 15,000 men engaged in the battle and Pember- 
ton had nearly 25,000. 

In the flight Pembertou's troops were scattered and demoral- 
ized, and Grant's pursuing force was superior in number as well 
as in spirit. MePherson's Corps and Carr's and Osterhaus's Di- 
visions pushed on until eight o'clock in the evening. 
Hovey's tired heroes slept on the bloody field. 
Shortly after daylight the next morning, the 17th, the eneniy 
was found posted for resistance, his main force west of the Big 
Black, on a high bluff, and a brigade on the east behind earthworks 
along a semi-circular bayou which flows into the river shortly after 
flowing out. Carr's Division led McClernand's Corps. Benton's 
Brigade was in advance of Carr. and the 8th Indiana was at the 



1S() Indiana at Vicksburg. 

hc;i(l (>r Ihc brigade. There were no ravines to give shelter to 
sharpshooters, l)nt thick groves, of which the Rebels took advan- 
tage, falling back, however, behind their bayou and steadily await- 
ing an onset there. It came sooner than they could have expected, 
and with irresistible impetus. While Carr's front kept up a regu- 
lar fire, artillery pouring in rapid volleys, his right brigade, Law- 
ler's, 150 of its men falling by the way without checking its sweep, 
reached the bayou, plunged into the stagnant w-ater, went at the 
Rebels with fixed bayonets and forced them to surrender or fly. 
The Rebel officers ordered, exhorted and threatened to no purpose. 

The panic-stricken fugitives, who first gained a footing on the 
further side, fired the railroad bridge and a hastily constructed 
bridge of steamboats. Officers and men less fortunate sprang pell- 
mell into the stream, large numbers sinking to rise no more. A 
whole l)rigade surrendered in the trenches. In all 1,500 men sur- 
rendered, with eighteen guns and several thousand stand of arms. 

General Grant's entire loss in the Black River Bridge fight was 
279. 

From Bruinsburg to Black River General Hovey's Division lost 
more men and took more prisoners and material of war than any 
other division. Its captures almost ecjualed those of all the rest 
of the army, as did also its losses. 

To ascertain whether the river was passable four bold fellows 
from the 8th plunged in and swam across under a shower of bul- 
lets. The fire of their comrades protected their return. 

Floating bridges were built during the night. INIcClernand and 
McPherson pushed on the next day, meeting no resistance, finding 
constant proofs of the demoralization of the enemy and hoping to 
enter Vicksburg with him or close after him. 

Meantime Sherman, having struck out to the right, crossed the 
Big Black at Bridgeport on a pontoon and marched toward the 
Yazoo. At noon he stood on the very bluff which had so terribly 
repulsed him six months before, and seeing for the first time the 
wisdom of General Grant's plan acknowledged it. "This is a cam- 
paign," he declared; "this is a success if we never take the town." 

General Grant, who was at his side, made no reply, as free from 
elation now as he w^as from despondency in the dreary months of 
the past. 

The army was not able to press into Vicksburg on the heels of 
the retiring enemy; but by the 19th of May it as nearly invested 
the city as its strength would permit, Sherman's corps lying on 
the right, McPherson 's in the center and McClernand's on the left. 



The Indiana Soldier at Vicksburg. 187 

Allowing no time for the recuperation of Pemberton or for the 
advance of Johnston, who, with large reinforcements, was close at 
hand, General Grant at two o'clock in the afternoon moved to a 
general assault. His left and center succeeded simply in getting 
good positions nearer the works with little loss. Sherman engaged 
in severe battle, Blair's Division struggled under fire through 
rugged ravines which were choked with standing and felled tim- 
ber, and three of his regiments, one of which was the 83d Indiana, 
gained the exterior slope of the Rebel earthworks only to be with- 
drawn at night. 

During twenty days the troops had but five days' rations and 
the gleanings of the country. They now received supplies which 
Admiral Porter brought up the Yazoo and landed near Haines's 
bluff. 

Neither General Grant nor his army was willing to sit down to 
the regular and tedious approaches of a siege until another assault 
had been attempted. His soldiers, it is said, "felt as if they could 
march straight through Vicksburg and up to their waists in the 
Mississippi wdthout resistance." Accordingly roads were con- 
structed, cannon were planted and all necessary preparations were 
rapidly made. The hour was set at ten in the forenoon of Friday 
the 22d. Orders were given for columns of attack to advance with 
fixed bayonets and without firing a gun till they had stormed the 
outer works. • 

During- Thursday night and until nearly noon of Friday Ad- 
miral Porter kept six mortars firing into the city, and much of the 
time engaged the batteries along the river with his gunboats. At 
three o'clock in the morning all the batteries of the besiegers 
opened and a tremendous cannonade began. Fire girdled and 
lashed the city. Smoke hovered over and dropped down upon it. 
Unbroken, overwhelming roars shook it to its center and rocked 
hills and waters. 

At ten the cannonade ceased ; a sixty-four pounder pealed forth 
a signal ; the troops on right, left and center moved with stern faces 
and swift steps from under cover toward redoubts, liastions, pits 
and forts in which the Rebels were well sheltered and were keenly 
on the alert. Steele, on Sherman's right and resting upon the 
Mississippi, rose over hills and plunged into gullies, advancing with 
desperate fighting. Sharpshooters skirmished in front of Blair's 
Division, which was a half mile to the left of Steele's; a storming 
party — a forlorn hope — carried rails to bridge the ditch; Ewing's 
Brigade, Giles Smith's and Kilby Smith's followed, and for a lit- 



188 • Indiana at VicKSiunui. 

tie while, under the partial shelter of the road and the protection 
of five batteries, which concentrated their fire on a bastion com- 
niandino- the approach, made rapid progress. Suddenly the head 
of the ( oluiun came under a terrific fire and was fairly beaten down, 
l^ut E wing's Brigade pressed on, crossed the ditch, climbed the 
outer slope of a bastion which commanded the approach and set 
its colors on the outside of the parapet. Giles Smith's Brigade 
swen^ed to the left, and, finding or making cover, formed line three 
hundred yards to the left of the bastion. Kilby Smith also found 
a good position and fired on every head peering above the parapet. 
Giles Smith, with Ransom, of McPherson 's Corps, attempted at last 
to storm the parapet. Thej^ were repulsed with fearful loss. 

Of McPherson 's Corps Ransom had the right, in ravines, Logan 
was in the center, on the main Jackson road, and Quinby had the 
left, also in ravines. Their assault was not less daring, nor bloody, 
nor vain. 

A. J. Smith was on Quinliy's left. Carr joined Smith's left. 
Osterhaus was next, Hovey was still further to the left, McCler- 
nand's advance was comparatively steady and continuous, but not 
the less was it also a bloody failure. 

Lawler's and Landrum's Brigades at the first rush carried 
ditch, slope and bastion, a dozen men even gaining the interior of 
one of the forts. 

Burbridge wound along a hollow, up a ridge, crossed the ditch 
and climbed the slope of a strong earthwork, planting his colors on 
the left and standing side by side with Benton. 

General Benton, en the extreme right of McClernand's corps 
and on the right of the Jackson railroad, marched to the attack 
with steady tread and compressed lips. 

His regiments, the 18th in reserve, moved by the flank along a 
hollow which ran directly to. the fort. When about half way up 
they turned and passed over the ridge on the left, receiving a kill- 
ing fire of musketry and cannister. "Come on, my brave 33d, I 
will lead you!" shouted Colonel Shunk as he saw the field officers 
of the 33d Illinois had fallen and that the regiment was without a 
leader. At the word the faltering 33d sprang forward and, with 
the 8th, came within fifty yards of the fort. 

Scarcely ten minutes from the moment of starting had elapsed 
when the 18th was ordered in advance. The men pressed forward 
with bounding steps, turning neithei' to the right nor left, and 
proudly bearing the battle flag from height to height. The gallant 



The Indiana Soldier at Vicksbitrg. 189 

Washburn led directly to the fort, from whose embrasures torrents 
of death poured and over whose ramparts a serried line of bayonets 
glittered. Fifty men on the right of the regiment rushed into the 
deep, wide ditch, while the remainder crowded up to its edge, Sergt. 
Francis M. Foss planting the colors there. Over the ramparts and 
into the embrasures they poured an incessant fire. The fort was 
silenced. 

Meanwhile the fifty men in the ditch found they could get out 
on neither side, and wrote a line to that effect, wrapping the paper 
around a lump of earth and throwing it over to their comrades. 
An answer was written on the same paper and thrown back, while 
a trench into the ditch was commenced as soon as the tools could 
be obtained. A third line was added by the men in the ditch with 
the intelligence that they were making steps with their bayonets 
by which they could effect an escape, and again the paper was 
thrown up. It fell at the feet of a man who was unaware of the 
previous communication. Supposing it to be a taunt from the fort, 
he instantly hurled it over to the Rebels. Soon round shells with 
lighted fuses, rolled from the top of the fort into the ditch, an- 
nounced that the Rebels had read the dispatches. But fortunately 
the bayonet steps were completed and the men were already clam- 
bering out. 

To the .joy of Benton and Burbridge, Crocker, with two bri- 
gades, came to their relief shortly before dark, marching directly 
in the face and fire of the enemy and over multitudes of dead and 
dying. But the Rebels, relieved at other points, had massed their 
forces here, and all that could be done was to guard against a 
charge by digging a rifle pit across the road, running around the 
right of the fort ; by keeping up an incessant fire till darkness would 
give an opportunity to retire. A piece of artillery was dragged up 
the hollow by a long rope and planted within a few yards of the 
large embrasure in the corner of the fort, into which it hurled shell 
after shell. The Rebels, much annoyed, rolled a bale of cotton into 
the embrasure. The 18th set the cotton on fire by sending with 
each ball a wad of tow, with which almost every man had provided 
himself from the artillery cartridge boxes for the purpose of wiping 
out his gun. The bale was rolled away and the interior of the fort 
again exposed. 

Meantime, in a renewed assault made by the center and right to 
distract the forces concentrating on ]\IcClernand, Steele was se- 
verely repulsed, although not driven from the hillside beneath the 



1!)() 



IxilTAXA AP VlCKSlU'RG. 



I\('l)('l pai-apet ; 'ruttlc Miccccded in placinti' his coloi's on the works 
in a line with Blair, and AicPhcrson could lual^c no proi^-ress. On 
the extreme left Osterhaus and llovey assaulted and were re])ulsed. 
Never was night and never were clouds and rain more welcome. 
Under their friendly cover and coolness the assailants slowly with- 
drew, leaving nearly 8,00') wounded and dead who could not bf 
carried from the field. 




Confederate Ho^^itzer in I'l 



11^1(11111(1; I 111(111 I 111' 11 the r> u k mound : 
Mint Spriiiii' ISayon lUiwccii llic 'I'wo Lines. 



The 8th Indiana lost 117. Among its slain were three cai)tains 
— 'Daniel, Wysong and Vandevender. 

Maj. John C. Jencks. of the 18th, acting as chief of Benton's 
staff, while waving his sword and cheering his comrades onward, 
received a rifle shot in the thigh, from the effects of which he die.l 
a few days afterward, regretted by all for his excellence as an 
officer and a man. 

The 69th lost twelve. Alaj. John II. Finley and Lieut. Henry 
Stratton were mortallv wounded. 



The Indiana Soldier at Vicksburg. 191 

The 67 th lost twenty-nine. 

The 59th, which was attached to Boomer's Brigade until Crocker 
moved to the relief of Biirbridge and Benton, lost 111. 

General Grant had been under a misapprehension in regard to 
the number and spirit of Pemberton's force, occasioned by the 
rapidity and disorder of its retreat from Black river. That force 
was now most formidable. Falling back through the fortifications 
of Vicksburg and taking position behind them, it had been com- 
forted and inspirited by the extraordinary aspect of ..strength dis- 
played both by the natural and artificial defenses. Reinforced also 
b.y 8,000 fresh troops who had remained in the city, it now amounted 
to upward of 30,000, slightly outnumbering the army which at- 
tempted the assault. 

Grant's troops were the better satisfied to make, slow and cau- 
tious advances, as the situation was not unhealthy and not by any 
means the most disagreeable of their experience. 

Sparkling springs, pleasant breezes and the cool shades of the 
forest refreshed all the camps. 

The corps retained their relative positions — IMcPherson in the 
center, on either hand Sherman and McClernand. In the course 
of the siege McClernand was superseded by General Ord. The 
Rebel center was commanded by Forney, its right by Stevenson 
and its left by Bowen. Pemberton was ill prepared for a siege. 
He had rations for not more than thirty days, one meal a day, and 
but a small amount of ammunition. Nevertheless he declared that 
he would hold out until the last pound of beef, bacon and fiour, 
the last grain of corn, the last cow, and hog, and horse, and dog 
should be consumed, and the last man should perish in the trenches. 
I\Ioreover, he was powerfully supported by his superior officer, Gen- 
eral Johnston, who soon had a force of 20,000 or 25,000 at Canton 
and Jackson, and still received reinforcements. 

Thus General Grant, lying between two large hostile armies, 
required immediate and strong reinforcements. He never suffered 
for lack of men if men could be obtained, and he now pressed into 
his investing line or formed into a reserve to watch the movements 
of Johnston not only all the troops which could be drawn from 
other points in his department, but all that his necessity could 
wring out of the departments of other commanders. 

On the 2-4th of May Lauman's Division of Washburn's Corps. 
Mdth four additional regiments, arrived and went into position on 
the south side of the city. 



192 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

General Kimball, who, after reL-overing from the wound received 
in the assault on Fredericksburg, was appointed to the command of 
Washburn's third division and assigned to the district of Jackson, 
was ordered to the Yazoo, which he reached the 3d of June. He 
went up to Satartia, whence with two brigades he marched to ]\Ie- 
chanicsburg, where he had a successful engagement with a large 
force of the enemy. Repeated dispatches from Grant warned him 
against venturing to such a distance as to endanger his rear, and, 
finding the troops he had driven reinforced 1)y a large l)ody of 
cavalry, Kimball fell back to Haynes' Blutf. 

On the 8th another division under Gen. Sooy Smith arrived 
from IMemphis and was ordered to Haynes' Blufif, where also two 
of Burnside's divisions were posted on their arrival. General Her- 
ron's Division arrived from Missouri on the 11th and was stationed 
on the left of Lauman, completing the line of investment. 

These reinforcements increased Grant's army to 75,000. One- 
half remained in the trenches ; the other half formed a corps of 
observation. It was like a double-edged sword, or rather like a 
sword which turned every way. 

Sherman, in command of Haynes' Bluff, lengthened and 
strengthened his line of defense until it extended from the Yazoo 
to the Big Black. As occasion demanded he added to his force Lau- 
man 's Division, a division from McPherson's Corps and one from 
his owai corps, and abundantly obeyed the order to "whip John- 
ston, fifteen miles oflf. " 

The Indiana troops included in Sherman's force at Haynes' 
Blutlf and in the defense of the rear of the besiegers were the 12th, 
Lieutenant Colonel Goodnow, Colonel Kempton having resigned on 
account of his health, though too late for its restoration ; 100th. 
Colonel Stoughton ; 99th, Colonel Fowler, and 6th Battery, Cap- 
tain Mueller, in Smith's Division, and the 53d, Colonel Gresham. 
in Lauman 's Division. The 97th, Colonel Catterson, separated from 
its proper corps. General McPherson's, remained on duty in Mis- 
souri until it joined Sherman 's force. fl 

The siege was conducted vigorously. Forts were erected, bat- " 
teries were planted and breastworks were advanced quite near the 
Rebel works. Sharpsliooting, for a time exercised only in the day. 
soon ceased neither day nor night, and reached such a degree of 
accuracy that in one instance a hat placed on a stick and held above 
a wall was pierced by fifteen bullets in two minutes. The mortars 
on the peninsula opposite Vicksburg after they opened, which w^as 



The Indiana Soldier at Vicksburg. 193 

at an early date in the siege, threw every twenty-four hours 10,000 
mortar shells into and over the city. The pick, the spade and the 
barrow were in as lively requisition, and were used to as deadly 
purpose as the recognized instruments of war, roads being opened, 
covered ways made, the regular approaches of a siege constructed 
and mines built. During the siege eighteen miles of trenches were 
dug and eighty-nine batteries were constructed, the guns being 
moved forward from the rear as the troops pushed up. 

The enemy's activity was also sleepless. His cannonading was 
not alarming, as his ammunition was scarce, but he countermined 
and picked off with the sharpshooter's rifle every visible head. So 
ceaseless was the rain of fire on the extreme left that the 26th In- 
diana, posted there, after entering advanced trenches was unable 
to leave them for seventeen days. Firing all day, digging all night 
and sleeping only by snatches, this regiment was worn out at the 
end of the time, and of 800 healthy, cheerful men who came from 
IMissouri but 400 were fit for duty. In all the regiments constant 
labor in the trenches, frequent picket duty and sharpshooting, to- 
gether with the excessive heat of the day and the heavy dews of 
the night, caused much sickness toward the latter part of June. 

The western bounds of the besieging army, from Lake Provi- 
dence to Richmond, were frequently assailed in the anxiety of the 
Rebels to open commanication between Vicksburg and Louisiana. 
June 6 a heavy attack on Milliken's Bend was most bravely re- 
pulsed by negro soldiers. 

On the 25th of June from the center around to the river the 
army and navy stood ready to add to the tumult and terror of the 
explosion of a heavy mine, while a chosen band Avas thrown for- 
ward to rush into the anticipated breach. The undermined strong- 
hold was Fort Hill, in front of McPherson's Corps. The storming 
party consisted of one hundred picked men of the 45th Illinois and 
one hundred of the 23d Indiana, and was supported by the main 
part of Logan's Division. 

It stood breathless, and utter stillness prevailed after the fuse 
was lighted until a dull, thundering sound and the trembling and 
heaving of the ground indicated that the powder, 2,200 pounds, in 
the vaults beneath was on fire. Through heavy smoke and dust 
masses of earth and huge timbers rose slowly and fell back. A can- 
nonade opened along the line of the army and the river front, such 
a cannonade as Vicksburg, with all its experience, had never known, 
nor had yet any other city. The storming party rushed to the 
breach. Logan advanced his division rapidly to its support. 

[13] 



194 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

A furious struggle took place in the crater. The combatants 
were covered with powder, dirt and blood. The Rebels gradually 
fell hack to a new line, from which, unseen and sheltered, they 
hurled hand grenades with deadly etfect. The soldiers called the 
crater "the death hole," but they held it until three days later 
another mine expelled the Rebels and left a vast chasm where one 
of the strongest works had stood. 

Port after fort was undermined. Closer and more deadly with 
each day drew the investing line. One grand assault and the city 
would fall. General Grant fixed the day — the 6th of July. 

^leantime the citizens of Vicksburg were in sad straits. Many 
of the wealthy, as well as the poor, were on the verge of starvation. 
Flour was a thousand dollars a barrel, ^leal was a hundred and 
forty dollars a bushel. Beef was two or three dollars a pound. 
Mule meat was a dollar a pound. Caves dug in the hillsides, and 
which were damp and low, afforded the only security against shell, 
and they scarcely. The Rebel soldiers, on insufficient rations com- 
posed chiefly of bean meal, corn coffee and mule meat, lay in the 
trenches without relief day or night. Nevertheless a copy of the 
Vicksburg Whig, which found its way to the Union pickets, gave 
out and reiterated assurances of Johnston 's speedy approach. Gen- 
eral Johnston indeed was their only hope; but he never ventured 
within fifteen miles. 

On the 3d of July, after forty-seven days of isolation, General 
Pemberton displayed a fiag of truce and sent two officers with a 
letter asking an armistice with the view of arranging terms for 
capitulation. The Rebel officers were blindfolded and taken to 
Burbridge's tent, where they received Grant's reply demanding an 
unconditional surrender. Pemberton requested an interview, and 
at three in the afternoon met his antagonist in front of McPher- 
son's lines under a spreading oak. "Never so long as I have a man 
left me will I submit to unconditional surrender," declared the 
Confederate general. "Then, sir, you can continue the defense," 
replied the national commander. Pemlierton, however, was not sat- 
isfied, and after some consultation it was agreed to continue the 
armistice until nine the next morning, when, if surrender was not 
determined on, hostilities should he resumed. 

The next morning white flags were displayed all along the Rebel 
lines. At ten the Rebel soldiers poured out of their trenches and 
forts, laid down their colors and went back within their works, 
prisoners of war, 



The Indiana Soldier at Vicksbfrg. 195 

Logan's Division was the first of the besieging army to enter 
the city. General Grant rode at its head. Dismounting at a Rebel 
headquarters he entered in order to confer with General Pember- 
ton. The Rebel commander and his generals were sitting on a 
porch. They received the conqueror in sulky silence; when he 
asked for a drink of water they told him he could find it inside, 
and they allowed him to remain standing, while they sat, during 
an interview of a half hour, so ignobly did they bear themselves in 
adversity. 

If anything could add to the rapture of the hard-won, long-de- 
layed victory it was the fact that it was consummated on the Fourth 
of July. When the national banner rose over the court house ten 
thousand men struck up the song ' ' Rally Round the Flag. ' ' The 
shattered walls of Vicksburg, so long trembling under the roar of 
guns, now quivered with the song of triumph. 

The surrender of Vicksburg gave into Grant's hands the largest 
capture of men and guns ever made in war— 31,600 men, including 
sick and wounded, and 172 cannon. Twenty-eight thousand eight 
hundred and ninety-two men were paroled, and after being sup- 
plied with three days' rations were sent across the Big Black. Seven 
hundred and nine who refused their parole were sent North. More 
than one thousand avoided being paroled by escape or disguise. 
Many died in the hospital before their names had been taken. 

Throughout the United States cannon fired and bells rang, the 
nation rejoicing at once for the turning back of the Rebel tide at 
Gettysburg and that the Mississippi once more flowed "unvexed to 
the sea," 



Regimental Histories. 




Indiana State Seal. 

Used on All Monuments. 



(W) 




;M()i!unieiu of 8lh Infantry, 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

1st BRIGADE 14th DIVISION 13th CORPS 
8th INFANTRY 

Colonel David Shunk 
Major Thomas J. Brady 

Engaged: Port Gibson, May 1; Champion's Hill, May 16; Big Blacli River Bridge, May 17; 
Assault, May 22; Siege, May 23-July 4. Casualties: Killed 27, wounded 133, missing 1, total 161, 
Captains Andre.v O' Daniel. Frederipk S. Wyson;, and Hiram T. Vandevender killed. 



(108) 



EIGHTH REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 
VOLUNTEERS. 

The 8th Regiment was one of the first six regiments of three- 
months' men who answered the eall of President Lincoln for 75,000 
volunteers, and was mustered into the United States service at 
Indianapolis, April 25, 1861, by 2d Lieut, (afterwards IMaj. Gen.) 
T. J. Wood; with Wm. P. Benton as colonel; Silas Colgrove, lieu- 
tenant colonel; David Shunk, major; A. I. Harrison, adjutant; 
John Robinson, cjuartermaster ; James Ford, surgeon, and George 
W. Edgerly, assistant surgeon. 

The line officers at muster were as follows : 







Captain. 


1st Lieutenant. 


Zd Lieutenant. 


Co. 


A. 


Jacob Widaman, 


Francis C. Swigget, 


George Adams. 


Co. 


B. 


O. H. P. Carey, 


John Reuss, 


Jacob M. Wells. 


Co. 


C. 


Geo. W. H. Riley, 


E. M. Ives, 


Allan 0. Neff. 


Co. 


D. 


Thomas J. Brady, 


Joseph Kirk, 


William Fisher. 


Co. 


E. 


Hiram T. Vandevender, 


John T. Robinson, 


James Fergus. 


Co. 


F. 


Frederick Tykle, 


Henry Ray, 


Joseph W. Connell, 


Co. 


G. 


Reuben Riley, 


Henry C. Rariden, 


G. W. H. Riley. 


Co. 


H. 


Charles 0. Howard, 


A.J. Kenney, 


Robt. A. Douglas. 


Co. 


I. 


M. M. Lacey, 


Irwin Harrison, 


James Connor. 


Co. 


K. 


Chas. S. Parrish, 


Joseph M. Thompson, 


Franklin Daily. 



The regiment was composed of men from Wayne, Randolph, 
Delaware, Grant, Hancock, Wabash, Madison and Henry counties. 
Companies A, H and I all being Wayne County men. The regi- 
ment rendezvoused at Indianapolis, using for shelter the buildings 
and horse stalls at the state fair grounds north of the city, which 
was called Camp Morton. About May 15th, the 8th and 10th Regi- 
ments marched about four miles east of Indianapolis and, having;' 
received their supply of tents and camp equipage, established a 
camp, where they remained until the 19th of June, 1861, when they 
received orders to proceed to western Virginia. On leaving Indian- 
apolis the 8th was taken by rail to Clarksburg hy the way of Cin- 
cinnati, ]\Iarietta and Parkersburg, remaining there two days, and 
then marched to Buchannon, Va., where it was supposed the Con- 
federates were encamped in considerable force. The regiment was 
here assigned to the army of Gen. W. S. Rosecrans July 4t]i. Gen- 
eral Rosecrans' army was reviewed on the morning of July 10th, 
and then the 8th, Math Rosecrans' army, inarched against the Con- 
federate troops, who were said to be in considerable force and well 
fortified at Rich Mountain, Virginia, reaching the foot of the moun- 
tain on the evening of the 10th and bivouacked for the night. 

It remained in camp but a sliort time when General Rosecrans, 
with the 8th and 10th Indiana and the 9th Ohio, having a native as 

(199) 



200 Indiana at Vickrbukg. 

a guide, made a iiiijht inarch, flanking the enemy, and at daylight 
surprised the pickets and attacked the enemy vigorously. The Con- 
federates were about three thousand strong, with six pieces of ar- 
tillery and well fortified, under command of General Pegram. 

The battle lasted about two hours and was hotly contested, and 
the gallantry of the troops was thoroughly tested. The war cry of 
the 8th and 10th was "Remember Buena Vista." General Pegram 
was defeated with a loss of nearly one hundred killed and a large 
number wounded, while all of his camp and garrison supplies and 
artillery fell into Union hands. Our forces pursued the retreating 
Confederates as far as Beverly and there went into camp. The 8th 
lost four men killed and fifteen wounded. The regiment remained 
in camp until July 24th, when it was ordered to return to Indian- 
apolis for muster out by reason of expiration of term of service. 
The regiment marched to Webster, Va., and from thence by rail 
to Indianapolis, where on the 6th of August it was mustered out 
of the United States service. 

The work of reorganizing the regiment for three years' service 
was begun at once, and on the 5th of September, 1861, the reor- 
ganization was completed and the regiment was mustered into the 
service for three years with William P. Benton as colonel. 

On the 10th of September the regiment received orders to move, 
and proceeded to St. Louis, Missouri, by rail, where it arrived on 
the day following, joining the army then being formed by General 
Fremont. A few days after the regiment marched towards the 
state capital, reaching Jefferson City on the 14th of September, 
where it remained in camp a week, during which time it was placed 
in the brigade commanded by Col. Jeff C. Davis, of the 22d Indiana 
Volunteers. On the 22d the march was resumed to Springfield. 
The 8th made the march to that place in fourteen days and re- 
turned to Otterville in seven days. The regiment remained in 
camp at Otterville until the 17th of December, when it marched 
to Warrensburg and assisted in the capture of thirteen hundred 
prisoners. Returning to Otterville, it remained in camp until the 
24th of January, 1862, when it marched for Springfield, joining 
the command of General Curtis on the route. 

From this point the march was continued to Cross Timbers, 
Arkansas. From here the 8th, with the forces, marched to Pea 
Ridge, where on the 6th, 7th and 8th of March a great battle was 
fought, resulting in a complete victory for General Curtis' army. 
The 8th 's loss was thirtv-eight killed and wounded. In this en- 



Eighth Infantry. 201 

gagement the rebel generals MeCullough and Mcintosh were killed 
and the former general's son was also killed. 

After the engagement at Pea Ridge the forces went into camp 
at Cross Timbers. Soon after the 8th, with other troops, made a 
diversion toward Bentonville. The enemy retreating from that 
place, our forces returned to camp, where they remained until the 
6th of April, waiting for supplies to come up, of which they were 
greatly in need. On the 6th of April the army marched in the 
direction of Forsythe, Mo., over the Ozark Mountains, and then 
proceeded down the valley of the White River and across the coun- 
try to Batesville, Ark., halting at Sulphur Springs for nearly two 
months. Leaving the latter place June 22d it reached Helena, on 
the Mississippi River, on the 13th of July. The command suffered 
greatly on this arduous march by reason of the scarcity of pro- 
visions, there being but a scanty supply with the command, and 
very little in the country. Very often the daily rations consisted 
of four ears of corn, with a very small allowance of meat. 

During this march some sharp skirmishing was had with the 
enemy in the canebrakes of White River, and a sharp engagement 
was fought at Cotton Plant. In August while on an expedition a 
skirmish was had with a small force of the enemy at Austin, Miss. 
On the 6th of October the 8tli was assigned to the command of 
General Steele and proceeded by steamer to Sulphur Hill, near St. 
Louis, Mo., from which place it marched to Ironton on the 11th of 
October, and from thence marched and countermarched through the 
southeastern portion of the State until March 6, 1863, when the 
regiment embarked on a steamer at St. Genevieve to join General 
Grant's army, then organizing at Milliken's Bend, La. Here it 
was assigned to Benton's First Brigade, General Carr's Fourteenth 
Division of the Thirteenth Army Corps, Gen. John A. McClernand 
commanding. 

April 12th the 8th Regiment, with its division, marched to Per- 
kins' plantation, arriving there the 21st day of April, where was 
left all regimental property and transportation and the troops put 
in light marching order. April 29th the 8th embarked on a steamer 
that had run by the batteries at Vicksburg and passed down the 
river to near Grand Gulf, a position the enemy had strongly forti- 
fied. Our troops remained on the boats nearly all day watching 
our gunboats in their attempt to silence and destroy the heavy guns 
at Grand Gulf, which they were unable to do, and our troops dis- 
embarked and marched across a neck of a bend in the river. 



202 Indiana at Vtcksburg. 

That night, the 29th, Porter's fleet of gunboats and the steamers 
ran by Grand Gulf, and the next day the troops re-embarked and 
passed down the river to Hard Times Landing and disembarked on 
the east side of the IMississippi, and the 8th, with its command, took 
up the march and participated in the battle at Port Gibson on the 
1st day of May, losing four enlisted men killed and thirty-eight 
wounded. After an all-day engagement the enemy was driven 
from the field late in the evening with a considerable loss and fell 
back across the south fork of the Big Bayou Pierre, burning the 
bridge in their retreat. 

On the 3d day of May the Pioneer Corps had a bridge completed 
and the 8th Regiment, with its division, crossed the river and 
marched by way of "Willow Springs, Rocky Springs and Five Mile 
Creek to Fourteen Mile Creek. May 12th it w-as in supporting dis- 
tance of Logan's Division during the engagement at Raymond, May 
12th, when Logan's Division completely routed Gregg's Confeder- 
ate forces. 

The 8th Regiment marched through Raymond and went into 
camp near the town. On the 13th it marched to Clinton, near Jack- 
son, and was in supporting distance of our forces in the capture 
of Jackson, the capital city of Mississippi. On the 15th the regi- 
ment marched back to near Raymond, where it camped and, being 
without tents, had all the pleasures of a deluge of rain. On the 
16th the regiment marched to near Champion's Hill, where the di- 
vision was held in reserve until late in the afternoon. About 
that time the enemy was beginning to give way, and the 8th was 
ordered to the south side of the Raymond road, and, advancing 
rapidly, deploying as skirmishers to the front, captured several 
prisoners who seemed willing to be captured. Just before the 8th 
crossed Baker's Creek, as it was crossing an elevated piece of 
ground, it came in full view of a Confederate regiment which was 
quite near, evidently being sent to the front as reinforcements and 
not aware that their army had given up the field. The 8th fired 
into them, and at about the same time Captain Klauss' First In- 
diana Battery, on the Raymond road near by, seeing the rebel regi- 
ment, wheeled into position and was on the point of firing when 
the enemy, taking in the situation, surrendered. The volley the 8th 
fired into them killed their colonel and wounded a number of men. 
General Loring's Division, that escaped on our extreme right, fired 
several shots from their artillery at the 8th without injury. 

The regiment marched to Edward's Station, on the Vicksburg 
and Jackson Railroad, arriving there after dark. At this station 



Eiciirrji In'1''antky. 20:^) 

the enemy's ammunition train fell into our hands, whidi they set 
on fire before abandoning it, and the bursting shells and flashes of 
fire in the dark looked like a battle. Notwithstanding the danger, 
our men uncoupled a lot of cars and pushed them out of danger, 
saving a large quantity of ammunition. 

On the morning of the 17th, the 8th, with its command, marched 
to Black River Bridge, and with Benton's Brigade formed in line 
on the south side of the railroad, and as they advanced they were 
met with a sharp fire from the enemy's artillery on the bluffs of 
the west side of the river and with their artillery and small arms 
in the trenches on the east side of the river. About ten o'clock 
a. m., our troops having gotten in position, a general assault was 
made, capturing the enemy's strongly fortified position, together 
with seventeen pieces of artillery and two thousand prisoners. 
Quite a number succeeded in escaping over the high trestle bridge 
across the river, and after doing so set fire to the bridge and de- 
stroyed it. 

The Pioneer Corps began at once the construction of a pontoon 
bridge across the Big Black River, and at 7 o'clock on the morning 
of the 18th troops began crossing to the west side; Smith's Tenth 
Division leading and the 8th Regiment and Benton's Brigade fol- 
lowing, and advanced thus in front of the enemy's works at Vicks- 
burg. 

They formed on the left of Smith's Division, their left being on 
the railroad, and here they remained during the night of the 18th, 
and on the 20th Carr's Division relieved Smith's Division, which 
was close to the enemy's works. 

May 22d the 8th took part in the general assault, and with Ben- 
ton 's Brigade advanced against the lunette on the Baldwin's Ferry 
road, on or very near the parapet of which some of its colors were 
planted. The assault proved unsuccessful, and the men of the 8th, 
being greatly exposed to a flank fire, sought such protection as 
they could find, some of them crossing to the south side of the rail- 
road, where they lay until darkness gave them a chance to slip away. 
In this assault the 8th lost 3 officers killed— Captains 'Daniel, 
Wysong and Vandevender — 19 noncommissioned officers and en- 
listed men killed and 1 officer and 94 enlisted men wounded. 
Among these were three color sergeants shot down, and when Color 
Sergeant Swafford fell his son grasped the colors and held them 
aloft through the storm of shot and shell. 

The 8th remained with the brigade during the siege and held 
the right center of the corps line of investment, its right resting 



204 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

ou the railroad, and made an approach on the railroad redoubt. 
This approach was bnt thirty feet from the enemy's trench at the 
surrender. 

During the siege, and especially the latter part of it, there was 
a kind of mutual understanding between the pickets of the two 
forces that there should be no firing at each other after dark, and 
a general conversation was kept up by the men on picket duty and 
a good deal of trading done. The rel^els were short of coffee and 
had tobacco, and this suited the men of our army. 

During the night of the 3d of July it was pretty generally un- 
derstood that some kind of a truce was on, and firing ceased along 
every part of the line, and eight or ten of the enemy who belonged 
to a Texas regiment came over the trenches and spent an hour or 
two with the boys of the 8th, who filled them up with coffee and 
hardtack, they expressing the opinion that they had enough fight- 
ing and if opportunity offered would go home. 

On the 5th of July, after the surrender, the 8th, with its com- 
mand, began the march to Jackson, Miss., in pursuit of Johnston's 
army. The regiment returned to Vicksburg on the 24th of July, 
where it remained until the 20th of August. During this time a 
part of the regiment was furloughed home for twenty days, the 
balance of the regiment embarking on a steamer for Carrollton, 
near New Orleans, where they arrived on the 23d and went into 
camp. September 3d the regiment moved across tjie river to Al- 
giers, and from there marched by rail to Berwick Bay, seventy-five 
miles northwest of New Orleans. 

From this point the army, under General Banks, made a cam- 
paign through the Teche country, passing through Franklin, New 
Iberia, St. Martinsville, Vermilion to Opelousas, La. Here the 
army remained until October 26th, when it returned by the same 
route to Berwick Bay. On the 12th of November the 8th, with other 
troops, embarked on the steamship St. Mary for Texas, and after a 
pleasant voyage of three days anchored off Brazos Santiago, and 
on the night of the 16th disembarked on Mustang Island and with 
other troops, under connnand of General Eansom marched in the 
direction of Aranzas Pass, and at daylight on the morning of the 
17th surprised and captured the garrison of that place, with one 
hundred prisoners and small arms and three .pieces of artillery of 
heavy caliber. During the night of the 17th a severe norther, or 
blizzard, struck that part of the coast, which lasted for three days. 
The blankets and camp equipage having been left on the boat, the 
men suffered severely. 



1 



Eighth Infantry. 205 

On the 23d our forces crossed Aranzas Pass and proceeded up 
St. Joseph Island, and crossed Cedar Bayou on rafts and continued 
the march up Matagorda Island, arriving in the vicinity of Fort 
Esperanza on the 27th. This fort was strongly fortified and de- 
fended by nine pieces of artillery and ahout one thousand men. 

Ransom 's men immediately invested the fort, the 8th leading in 
the attack, and was met with a sharp resistance by the enemy. A 
continuous fire was kept up all day, the Union forces gradually 
closing in on the fort, and during the night of the 17th the enemy 
evacuated their well fortified position, blew up their magazine and 
set fire to everything that would burn. A few prisoners were cap- 
tured, the rest escaping. The 8th lost one man killed and several 
slightly wounded. On the 28th the troops marched to Indianola, 
where they went into camp. The citizens having deserted the town, 
many of our troops used empty houses. 

The troops remained here for several weeks, during which time 
they were engaged in regimental and brigade drill. The locality 
was a healthy one, the men feasted on fish and oysters as well as 
fresh beef, and it was not long before there was hardly a sick man 
in the command. 

During the month of January, 1864, the 8th was busy with the 
work of veteranizing, and on February 9th, 417 out of 515 men 
present veteranized and were mustered for three years' further 
service, and soon after left for Indiana and their respective homes 
on veteran furlough. The nonveterans were assigned to the 69th 
Indiana and reported to that regiment at once for duty. Prior to 
re-enilstment the 8th sustained the following losses by death : Killed 
in action, 48; died of wounds, 32; died of disease, 137; total, 217. 

On the 22d of April the 8th arrived at Indianapolis on veteran 
furlough, where it remained until the latter part of June, when it 
returned to New Orleans by boat and from there by rail to Terre- 
bonne, La., arriving there July 7th, and on the next day the non- 
veterans were returned to the 8th in charge of Adjt. M. M. Lacey, 
of the 69th Indiana. July 9th the regiment broke camp and pro- 
ceeded by rail to Algiers, where it remained in camp until July 
23d, when at midnight it was ordered to break camp and march 
on board the steamer "The Star of the West," but did not do so 
until the morning of the 24th, when the steamer ran down the 
river, crossing the bar into the gulf at sunrise the next morning. 

The 8th arrived at Washington. D. C, on the 2d of August and 
had supper at the Convalescent Home, near the Baltimore and Ohio 
depot. The regiment was then ordered to turn in all tents and ex- 



206 Indiana at Vicksiuik;. 

tra camp equipage and retain only what could be carried by each 
soldier, and were marched by rail to Harper's Ferry, where the 
I'egiment camped for a few days, and on the 6th moved camp a 
few miles. Officers were ordered to send their tents and baggage 
back to Harper's Ferry. On the 17th we were assigned to the 
Nineteenth Cor})s and marched to Winchester by way of Middle- 
town. Xe\\town and Currentown. 

The 8th took part in the campaign of the Shenandoah Valley 
under Gen. Phil Sheridan, and was at Opequan on the 19th of Sep- 
tember and took ])art in the liattle of Fisher's Hill on the 22d of 
September, and participated in the campaign and engagement at 
Cedar Creek on the 19th of October. 

The regiment left the valley on the 6th of January and arrived 
at Savannah, Ga., by steamer from Baltimore on the 16th of Jan- 
uary. It remained on duty in Georgia until the 28th of August, 
when it was mustered out of the service. 

On the 17th of September, 1865, the 8th arrived at Indianap- 
olis, Lieut. Col. John R. Polk commanding, with 14 officers and 
245 nonconnnissioned olficers and enlisted men, when it wavS finally 
discharged from the service of the United States after being pub- 
licl}^ received in the Capitol grounds by Governor Morton on be- 
half of the State. 

The 8th Regiment had a total enrollment of : commissioned offi- 
cers, 46 ; enlisted men, 1,626 ; total enrollment, 1,672. Lost during 
service, 7 officers and 88 enlisted men killed and mortally wounded, 
and 5 officers and 169 enlisted men bv disease ; total, 269. 




Monument of 11th Inlantry. 

Brig. General Geo. F. McGinnis Tablet. 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

1st BRIGADE 12th DIVISION 13th CORPS 
11th INFANTRY 

Colonel Daniel M.vcauley 
Lieut. Colonel William W. Darnall 

Engaged: Port Gibson, May 1; Champion's Hill, May 16; Assault, May 22; Siege, May 23-July 4. 
Casualties: Killed 29, wounded 149, missing 14, total 192. 



(208) 



ELEVENTH REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 
VOLUNTEERS. 

Under the call of the President of the United States the 11th 
Regiment was organized and mustered into the service of the United 
States for three months at Indianapolis, April 25, 1861, with the 
following officers : 

FIELD AND STAFF. 

Lewis Wallace Colonel. 

George F. McGinnis Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Charles O. Wood Major. 

DanMacauley Adjutant. 

Henry Rice Quartermaster. 

Thomas W. Fry Surgeon. 

John C. Thompson Assistant Surgeon. 



COMPANY OFFICERS. 







Captain. 


1st Lieutenant. 


Sil Lieutenant . 


Co. 


A. 


Robert S. Foster, 


George Butler, 


Cyrus J. Dobbs. 


Co. 


B. 


John Fahnestock, 


Obed S. Fahnestock, 


Daniel B. Culley. 


Co. 


C. 


Jesse E. Hamill, 


John E. Moore, 


Francis G. Scott. 


Co. 


D. 


Jabez Smith, 


Nesbit L. Brown, 


Thomas F. Wells. 


Co. 


E. 


DeWitt C. Rugg, 


Henry Tindall, 


Nicholas R. Ruck'e 


Co. 


F. 


Edward T. Wallace, 


John Stevenson, 


Isaac M. Rumsey. 


Co. 


G. 


Henry M. Carr, 


H. B. Wilson, 


John F. Caven. 


Co. 


H. 


VVm. J. H. Robinson, 


Fred Knefler, 


Wallace Foster. 


Co. 


I. 


Lsaac C. Elston, Jr., 


A. C. Wilson, 


John W. Ross. 


Co. 


K. 


William Darnall, 


John A. McLaughlin, 


John W. Ram.sey. 



Numerically it was the sixth of Indiana 's quota of six regiments, 
but the first regiment organized and to receive marching orders in 
obedience to the order of Adjutant-General Thomas, U. S. A. 

The regiment broke camp at Indianapolis and proceeded by rail 
to Evansville, Ind., camping near that city. The time was occu- 
pied in guarding against the shipment of supplies to the States in 
rebellion, Kentucky having assumed the attitude of neutral regard- 
ing the war. 

On June 7th, in compliance with the order of Lieutenant-Gen- 
eral Scott, the regiment proceeded by rail over the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad to Cumberland, Md., arriving on the evening of June 
10th. Colonel Wallace having l^een informed when passing through 
Grafton, W. Va., of the presence at Romney, W. Va., a day's march 
from Cumberland, of a force of the enemy, variously estimated at 
from one to two thousand, determined upon an attack. Locating 
a camping ground near the town and assigning two companies to 
guard the train and put up tents, they began the march to Ronuiey 
with eight companies — five hundred men: — Colonel Wallace maroh- 



[14] 



(209) 



210 IXDIAXA AT ViCKSBURG. 

ing at the head of the column. Soon after daybreak the town was 
reached, a bridge over a small stream was crossed on the double 
quick, and soon after the rear of the rebel column was to be seen 
leaving the town as if an army had appeared. A small quantity of 
supplies, consisting of tents, guns and medical supplies, were cap- 
tured. A fair estimate placed the numl)er of the enemy at twelve 
hundred, with two pieces of artillery. 

General Johnston was induced to evacuate Harper's Ferry and 
the regiment returned to its camp, having made a march of forty- 
six miles by night, well satisfied with the results — a victory (the 
first one) and not a man lost. General Scott, appreciating the lit- 
tle campaign and its results, wired Colonel Wallace his congratula- 
tions. The time spent at Cumberland was employed to perfect the 
regiment in drill and discipline. A company of mounted scouts was 
organized by Colonel Wallace, who every day impressed the regi- 
ment with his keen foresight as if he were the educated soldier. 
Dave Hays, a corporal in Company A, was selected to be the leader 
of this small band of men who were soon to electrify the country 
with deeds of daring. 

On the 27th of June, while Hays and his detail were scouting in 
the vicinity of the village of Frankfort, Hays discovered forty-one 
of the enemy, black horse cavalry. Hurriedly informing his detail 
of the number and saying, "What do you say, boys, shall we fight 
'em?" the answer was, "Yes; all ready, Dave; go in." The leader 
commanded "come on," and, leading the way with pistol and saber, 
the fight was on, and in the short interval to follow eight of the 
Virginia Black Horse Cavalry lay dead. Later in the day, Hays 
having received two bullet wounds and several saber cuts, and being 
cared for by two of the men. Baker and Dunlap, the command de- 
volved upon Farley. The enemy now being reinforced, the scene 
of conflict changed and the battle with ten of the scouts to meet it. 
Results show how they did it. They all dismounted, turning their 
horses loose, and took advantage of the rocks overhanging Patter- 
son's Creek at Kelly's Island. Here the battle raged until sun- 
down. On the porch of a farm house near by, as told by the owner, 
lay twenty-three Confederates, only three of whom were alive. 

Richmond papers in commenting on this initiatory battle at 
Kelly's Island gave their losses in killed and wounded at thirty- 
five, saying that two companies of Black Horse Cavalry had en- 
gaged the 11th Indiana Regiment at this point. Loss of our troop, 
Hollenback killed and Corporal Hays severely wounded. The 



Kleventu Infantry. 211 

writer, who belonged to Company I of the 11th, was there willi il. 
and ever after during the entire service believes that the heroic 
conduct of this little band of Indiana volunteers justifies the re:-ital, 
the truth of which has been fully attested. The names of the thir- 
teen are as follows : 

Corporal Dave Hays, Co. A, 
Private E. N. Baker, Co. A, 
Private J. C. Hollenback, Co. B, 
Private Tim Grover, Co. C, 
Private James Hallowell, Co. C, 
Private Thomas Brazier, Co. D, 
Private George W. Wudbarger, Co. E. 
Private C. E. Lewis, Co. F, 
Private Frank Harrison, Co. H, 
Private P. M. Dunlap. 
■Private Eobert Dimlap. 
Private E. P. Thomas. 

President Lincoln. General McClellan, General Patterson all 
sent congratulations in the most complimentary terms, General 
Patterson publishing it to his army in general orders. It began 
to look as though one Southerner was hardly a match for five 
Yankees. 

July 8th the regiment was to report to General Patterson at 
Martinsburg, Va. Here we came in contact with the 1st and 2(1 
Massachusetts regiments, the 12th New York, Colonel Butterfield. 
all the Pennsylvania three months' troops, among them the 11th and 
"Bucktails. " Here, too, M^ere Colonels Abercrombie, Fitz.iohn 
Porter, George H. Thomas and Stone, two of whom became distin- 
guished leaders in the Union army. 

While doing duty, putting in time, an impromptu competitive 
drill (regimental) with the 1st Massachusetts Volunteers, where the 
11th, with Colonel Wallace in command, gave to the army under 
General Patterson an exhibition of what a regiment of Western 
soldiers could do. The regiment was deployed as skirmishers over 
a rough field with a call of the bugle, something never before wit- 
nessed by Eastern troops. The regiment was easily winner, and 
prejudices heretofore existing because of our rather soiled zouave 
dress in comparison with the inmiaculate uniforms of our Eastern 
compatriots disappeared. 

The 16th of Julv finds us under orders to march. Rujuors of a 



212 Indiana at Vicksbueg. 

battle with the enemy under General Johnston, then at Winchester, 
were current. The day passed and we are at Bunker Hill, six miles 
from Winchester. On this day General McDowell's army left 
Washin^on, having the assurance from General Scott that General 
Patterson 's army of 15,000 troops would take care of General John- 
son and see that he did not interfere in the impending battle at 
Bull Run. 

On the 17th, while Johnston, with less than 9,000 men and twenty 
pieces of artillery, was marching from Winchester to reinforce Gen- 
eral Beauregard's army, General Patterson was returning from 
Bunker Hill to Charlestown, there to remain in peaceful security 
while the Union army was, on the 21st, to suffer ignominious de- 
feat at Bull Run. At the very moment of Johnston's disappear- 
ance from the vicinity of our army, twice his (Johnston's) strength, 
General Patterson wired General Scott, "I have succeeded in ac- 
cordance with your wishes in keeping Johnston at Winchester." 

The writer begs indulgence for injecting what may seem irrele- 
vant in presenting this story of the 11th Regiment. The writer was 
on duty as sentinel at the headquarters of General Abercrombie on 
the day following the battle of Bull Run. When it was known in 
the camps that our army had suffered defeat and that no effort had 
been put forth to prevent the army of General Johnston from rein- 
forcing the army of General Beauregard, the open and defiant de- 
nunciation of General Patterson as he rode through the camps of 
his army, which was in no way resented, was of such character as 
to preclude any description. Soon following this the President ap- 
pealed through General Patterson to the troops under him to con- 
tinue their service (the term of enlistment expiring) until their 
places could be supplied by new troops. The question of staying 
was put to a vote of the regiments. Onl^^ Im'o consented to remain 
— the 2d Wisconsin and the 11th Indiana, and these were the only 
two Western regiments in this army. The troops, largely from Gen- 
eral Patterson's State (Pennsylvania), apparently resented the 
stigma they felt had been put upon the army for failure to do its 
part in preventing the reinforcement of General Beauregard's 
array. 

The regiment returned to Indianapolis, arriving on July 29th, 
and was mustered out of service on August 2d. Recruits for the 
three years' service sufficient to fill the regiment to the aggregate 
of 101 officers and men to each company, in conformity to the re- 
vised regulations of the army, had been enlisted. These were being 



J 



Eleventh Infantry. 213 

drilled. The regiment was quartered at Camp Robinson, and the 
returning men who had re-enlisted enjoyed a brief furlough. On 
the 31st of August it was mustered into service for three years. 

September 6th Colonel "Wallace moved his regiment to St. Louis, 
]\Io., being ordered to report to General Fremont. On the 8th or 
9th following he was directed to report his regiment to Gen. Charles 
F. Smith at Paducah, Ky. Here we became associated with the 8th 
IMissouri Infantry, 23d Indiana Infantry, Battery A, Chicago Light 
Artillery, and Company I, 4tli U. S. Dragoons, with Brig. Gen. 
Lew Wallace commanding. With the exception of an expedition 
to Viola and one to Galloway, Ky., the time occupied here was de- 
voted to drill, one company — K, Captain Darnall — being detailed 
to man the several heavy guns placed in position to command the 
Ohio River. 

On the 5th of February the l)rigade received orders to march to 
Fort Heiman, the enemy evacuating on our approach. It should 
be noted that all of General Smith's command participated. On 
the night of the 12th an orderly came to the tents of company com- 
manders informing them that they should be in readiness to move 
at an early hour without other than haversack with rations and 
eighty rounds of cartridges. 

The 11th Regiment being part of the division of General Smith, 
occupying the center of the line of battle, were among the first 
troops to enter the enemy's works, and were accorded full credit 
for their part in the battle, the results of which are well known. 

The regiment returned to Fort Heiman after the surrender of 
Fort Donelson, where it was assigned to the 1st Brigade, 3d Di- 
vision, Army of the Tennessee, Gen. Lew Wallace commanding, and 
on the 6th of I\Iarch moved by transport to Crump's Landing. 
Owing to a confusion of orders the 3d Division did not participate 
in the first day's battle at Shiloh. There was a time when un- 
friendly criticism placed the responsibility for the absence of this 
command from active participation in this day's battle upon Gen- 
eral Wallace. History has confirmed the .iudgment of men who fol- 
lowed Gen. Lew Wallace on the march and on the battlefield, and no 
one can in truth say he was at fault, or that he was ever lacking in 
courage, keen intelligence as a ccmmander. or in patriotic devotion 
to the cause of the Union. 

The rising sun on May 7th found the division of General Wal- 
lace in line and ready for action. By direction of General Grant, it 
took position on the right of General Sherman and on the extreme 



214 Indiana a r N'lcKsnriji!. 

right of the ;ii-iiiy. and, as the writer rei-alls, fired the iir.st i;iiiis and 
steadily drove the enemy until the ])attle elosed. 

On the 2()th of June the regiment reaehed IMemphis, Tenn., after 
a mareh of 120 miles, where it remained until July, and was ordered 
to Helena, Ai-k., where the time was spent in occasional expedi- 
tions into the .adjacent country, Duvall's Bluff and Yazoo Pass. 
Colonel McGinnis was commissioned hrigadier general and Dan 
IMacauley was promoted to colonel. On the 11th of April, 1863, the 
regiment embarked on transport, reaching Milliken's Bend on the 
14th. At this time Brigadier-General McGinnis, commanding 
brigade, and Gen. Alvin P. Hovey, commanding division, the regi- 
ment attached to 18th Army Corps, General IMcClernand connnand- 
ing. On its arrival was marched to Carthage, thence to Perkins' 
l)lantation, neni' Grand Gulf, thence to a point opposite Bruinsburg, 
and on the 80th of April crossed the river and on the 1st of May 
attacked Port Gibson. The 11th captured a rel)el ])attery, sustain- 
ing a loss of 25 men. On the 16th of May, the army, under General 
Grant, attacked the enemy under General Pemberton at Champion's 
Hill, Hovey 's Division occupying center of the line, sustaining the _ 
heaviest loss. The enemy was defeated. The loss of the 11th Reg- I 
iment, killed and wounded, was 167. ^larched to Black River 
Bridge on the 19th, and on the 21st, to its position in rear of Vicks- 
burg, remaining in the trenches until the surrender, July 4th. 

July 5th it formed a part of the expedition to the capital of 
Mississippi, under General Sherman, and returned soon thereafter 
to its camp at Vicksburg, remaining until August, when it moved 
by transport to New Orleans, thence by land to Brashear City. 
Louisiana, thence up through the Teche country to Opelousas, re- 
turning from this point to camp at Algiers and Madisonville. At 
the latter place the regiment re-enlisted for three years, or during 
the war. It embarked at New Orleans for New York on the 4th of 
March, thence by rail to Buffalo, N. Y., the boyhood home of Colonel 
Macauley. Here the regiment was royally entertained by the citi- 
zens of Buffalo, thence proceeded to Indianapolis, arriving on the 
21st, and was publicly received by the Governor and citizens. The 
11th being in large part an Indianapolis regiment, its reception 
home was cordial and enthusiastic. * 

The veteran furlough having expired, it returned to the Depart- X 
ment of the Gulf, reaching New Orleans on the 8th of IMay, and 
was assigned to 2d Brigade, 2d Division, 19th Army Corps, and 
on the 19th embarked on the steamship Cassandra under sealed 



Eleventh Infantry. 215 

orders, reaching Fortress Monroe, Virginia, on the 28th, thenee to 
Washington, D. C, arriving on the evening of the 29th, marching 
up Pennsylvania avenue, passing the White House, was reviewed 
by President Lincoln. The regiment camped near Georgetown, and 
on the following morning proceeded by rail to Harper's Ferry. 
West Virginia, reporting to General Sheridan. Advancing to 
Cedar Creek, with skirmishing on the 13th and 14th of August, sus- 
taining losses at Halltown and Berryville. 

On the 19th it participated in the battle of Winchester, losing in 
killed and wounded 81, pursuing the enemy to Fisher 's Hill on the 
20th. The Confederates, being flanked, retired on the 22d, and on 
the same night the 11th was, by direction of General Sheridan, 
given the head of the column, marching all night with two com- 
panies, E and D, covering the advance wdth a line of skirmishers, 
advanced to New Market and Harrisonburg, which place was 
reached by the army on the 26th, skirmishing frequently during the 
advance. On the 6th of October the return began, arriving on Sep- 
tember 10th, and going into camp on the east bank of Cedar Creek. 

Early on the morning of the 19th, Sheridan's army was sur- 
prised by the enemy under General Early, and but for the fact that 
the 2d Division (Grover's) was under arms, having been ordered by 
General Wright, in the absence of General Sheridan, to make a 
reconnoissance (the 11th belonged to Grover's Division), the assault 
would have been more disastrous. Sheridan 's ride, and his arrival, 
tells the story of victory snatched from the jaws of defeat, and one 
of the most signal and decisive battles of the war. 

The Shenandoah Valley ceased to entertain any portion of the 
Army of Northern Virginia. The regiment's loss in this battle 
was 52 killed and wounded. This closed the active field service of 
this regiment. 

The regiment was, on the completion of General Sheridan's cam- 
paign in the Shenandoah Valley, assigned to duty at Baltimore, 
Maryland, and reported to General Wallace on the 7th of January, 
1865, and remained on duty until its muster out on the 26th of July, 
1865. On the 3d day of August it returned to Indianapolis and 
was received with great enthusiasm by the citizens of Indianapolis, 
paid off and discharged, having made a record of creditable service 
covering a period of four years and three months, as well as having 
attained great proficiency in drill and discipline. 



216 IxDiAN-.v AT Vtckrbtuc;. 

Aggregate August 31, ISGl, field and staff and uonconimissidiied 

staff", musicians, company ollicers and enlisted men 1,048 

Itecruited during the war 824 

Total 1.872 

Lost in battle 402 

Discharged on account of wounds and disease 1()4 

Loss by desertion 12 

Mustered out and discharged because of transfer and promotion and 

by reason of expiration of service 30r> 

Dismissed and sent to prison <> 

Total !>4!t 

Approximately 700 recruits were assigned to the regiment early 
in 1865, and saw no field service. The regiment did service in eight 
States, three different armies — the Tennessee, Army of the Gulf and 
Shenandoah — and served in three army corps — the 8th, 13th and 
19th. It maintained a brass band throughout the entire service, the 
officers paying the band a stipulated sum monthly in addition to 
their pay as enlisted men, this after the government ordered all 
regimental bands maintained at government expense to be discon- 
tinued. Its travels amounted to 9,300 miles. 

The regiment lost during its two terms of service one officer and 
114 enlisted men killed and mortally W'Ounded, and three officers 
and 171 enlisted men by disease. Total, 289. 




Monument of 12tli Infantry, 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

1st BRIGADE 1st DIVISION lOtli CORPS 
12th INFANTRY 

Colonel Reuben Williams 

Served on the exterior line in the vicinity of Haynes' Bluff and at Oak Ridge from about June 12 
to the end of the Siese, July 4. 



(218) 



TWELFTH REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 
VOLUNTEERS. 

The 12th Regiment answered the first call for volunteei's made 
l)y the President in April, 1861, for six regiments of three months' 
troops, and was made up of the surplus of companies that had 
reached Indianapolis, and was accepted for state service for one 
year, on the 11th of IMay, 1861, with John ]^.I. Wallace as colonel. 

On the 11th of June, the regiment left Indianapolis for Evans- 
ville, Indiana, where it went into camp. July 18th, orders were re- 
ceived from the War Department for its transfer to the United 
States service for the remaining period of its term of enlistment, 
and on the 23d the regiment left Evansville for Baltimore, INIary- 
land, where it arrived on the 27th, and on the following day moved 
by rail to Sandy Hook, near Harper's Ferry, where it was assigned 
to Abercromhie 's Brigade, of General Banks' Army of the Shenan- 
doah, where it remained in camp until the 16th of August. While 
here Colonel Wallace resigned, and Lieut. Col. AVilliam II. Link 
was promoted to the colonelcy. On the 16th of August the regi- 
ment marched ^^dth the army to Hyattstown, where it remained in 
camp for some time, watching for Gen. Joe Johnston, who was re- 
ported to be at Leesburgh, on the opposite side of the Potomac, with 
a large force of rebel troops. 

During the time the command remained here, marches were 
made to Darnestown, Nolen's Ferry, Seneca Creek and Tuscarora 
Creek, and in October, to Point of Rocks, Urbana and Frederick. 
On. the 11th the regiment, with the command, marched to Boons- 
boro, Middletown and Williamsport, Maryland, where it was 
engaged in picket and outpost duty until March, 1862. While here, 
Capt. Reuben Williams, with seven men, were taken prisoners by 
the enemy, while out on a scouting expedition. 

March 1st, the 12th crossed the Potomac at Williamsport and 
marched to Winchester, through Martinsburg and Bunker Hill. 
On the 11th, it had a skirmish with the enemy near Winchester, and 
on the following morning was the first regiment to enter the town, 
which had been evacuated the night before. On the 21st the regi- 
ment marched to Berryville, and thence across the Shenandoah and 
over the Blue Ridge, through Snicker's Gap, to Aldie, where they 
learned of our victory at Winchester Heights. The command 
marched back to Warrenton Junction, which place was reached on 
the 8d of April, after passing over the l^attlefield of Bull Run. to 

(210) 



220 Indiana at Viuksburg. 

Catlett's Station, where the regiment remained until the 5th of 
May, when it marched to Washington, where, on the 14th, it was 
mustered out and immediately returned to Indianapolis. 

The 12th Regiment, having served its full term of enlistment for 
one year, immediately after its return to Indiana the work of reor- 
ganizing this regiment for three years' service was begun. The reg- 
iment was rendezvoused at Indianapolis during its reorganization, 
and on the 17th day of August, 1862, was mustered into the service, 
with William H. Link, its old commanding officer, as colonel. 

The regiment was composed of men from Allen, Jennings, Bar- 
tholomew, Jay, Wells, Noble, Grant, White, Morgan, Kosciusko and 
Hancock counties. The field and staff officers were, at the time of 
organization, as follows : 

William H. Link Colonel. 

Reuben Williams Lieutenant-Colonel 

Solomon D. Kempton Major. 

Jared D. Bond Adjutant. 

James A. McClelland Quartermaster. 

Moses D. Gage Chaplain. 

William Lomax Surgeon. 

Noble P. Howard Assistant Surgeon. 

Captain. 1st Lieutenant. 2d Lieutenant. 

Co. A. James Goodenow, John B. Conner, George W. Wright. 

Co. B. Elbert D. Baldwin. Frank H. Aveline, William H. Harrison. 

Co. C. David P. Clubberly, Hezekiah Bee-ion, Edward S. Lenfisty. 

Co. D. George Bowman, John A. Blackwell, Benjamin F. Pri(e. 

Co. E. Samuel F. Rooker, Thomas M. Peoples, Caleb Day. 

Co. F. Samuel Bou^hter, Alonzo H. Hubbard, Edward H. Webster. 

Co. G. Jame.5 Huston, Eastley Helms, Robert Altonf. 

Co. H. George M. Trotter, Joseph E. Hart, Jo.seph Bills. 

Co. I. Samuel W. Wells, Heiiry S. Westpott, Thomas J. .Anderson. 

Co. K. George Nelson, John M Godown, James O'Shaughnessy. 

On the same day the regiment was mustered into the service for 
three years it moved by rail to Louisville, Ky., to take part in the 
threatened invasion of the rebel general, Kirby Smith, and from 
Louisville it immediately marched by rail to Frankfort and Lex- 
ington, Kentucky, where it remained a few days. 

It then marched to Richmond, where, with other regiments, it 
was placed under the immediate command of Gen. Mahlon D. Man- 
son, who at once moved his forces some eight or ten miles south of 
Richmond. 

The 12th Regiment, since its reorganization, had never had com- 
pany or battalion drill, and most of Manson's forces were new and 
in the same condition, amounting in all to about 6,000 men. On 
the morning of August 30th, the 12th took part in the disastrous 
battle of Richmond, Kentucky, against Gen. E. Kirby Smith's 
force of 30,000 seasoned troops. 



Twelfth Infantry. 221 

In this engagement the 12th lost 173 killed and wounded, in- 
cluding the gallant Colonel Link, who died of his wounds September 
20, 1862. Nearly the entire regiment was captured, and a few 
days afterward was paroled and immediately returned to Indiana. 

Upon being exchanged as prisoners of war, the regiment was re- 
organizjd at Indianapolis, Lieutenant-Colonel Williams was com- 
missioned colonel of the 12th on the 17th of November, and soon 
after the regiment was ordered to Memphis, Tenn., where it arrived 
on the 25th, and on the following day it marched toward Holly 
Springs. In December the regiment marched to the Tallahatchie 
River, and was stationed at Grand Junction in January, 1863, and 
in the spring was placed on duty at Colliersville, Tennessee, guard- 
ing the line of the Memphis and Charleston Railroad. 

In June the regiment marched to Memphis, where it was as- 
signed to the 1st Brigade, 1st Division of the 16th Army Corps, and, 
by order of General Grant, this division went to Vicksburg, and em- 
barked about the 8th of June, arriving at Haynes' Bluff June 12th, 
took position and helped in fortifying that point. By order of 
General Sherman, dated June 26th, the 12th, with its division, took 
position on Oak Ridge, near Niely's, on the right to the postoffice on 
the left, where it remained in the trenches until after the capitula- 
tion, when it marched with General Sherman's army to Jackson, 
Mississippi, and after the evacuation of that city returned to Black 
River, where it remained until the 28th of September, 1863, when 
the 12th, with its command, embarked on steamboats for Memphis, 
and participated in Sherman's long march across the country to 
Chattanooga, to the relief of the Army of the Cumberland. 

On the 25th of November, it took a prominent part in the battle 
of Mission Ridge, losing in killed and wounded 110 men and offi- 
cers, and immediately took part in the pursuit of Bragg 's fleeing 
army to Graysville, Georgia, and from there it marched to the relief 
of General Burnside, at Knoxville. After relieving Burnside's 
command and raising the siege, the regiment returned to Chatta- 
nooga, and from there marched to Scottsboro, Alabama, reaching 
that place on the 26th of December, where it went into winter 
quarters and remained until May 1, 1864. 

On all these long marches many of the men, being wthout shoes, 
suffered severely from its midwinter weather. May 1, 1864, the 
12th marched with its corps to Chattanooga and took part in the 
Atlanta campaign, participating in the battles at Dallas, Resaca, 
New Hope Church, Kenesaw Mountain, from the 22d to the 28th of 
July. Also at Jonesboro and many other skirmishes, losing in 



222 Indiana at Vicksiukc. 

killed and wounded during the eanipaign. 240 men. The regiment 
then took part in the chase after Hood, through northern Georgia 
and Alabama. 

Returning to Atlanta, it took part with Sherman's army in the 
"IMarch to the Sea." It left Atlanta on the 14th of Noveml^er, and 
arrived at Savannah on the 10th of December, from whence it 
marched through South Carolina to Goldsboro, North Carolina. 
During these marches it engaged the enemy at Griswoldshire, Sa- 
vannah, Columbia and Bentonville. 

Upon the surrender of Confederate General Johnston's army, at 
Raleigh, the regiment marched to that city and then to Richmond, 
Virginia, and thence to Washington City, where it was mustered 
out of the service on the 8th day of June, 1865, and returned to 
Indianapolis on the 14th of June, 270 strong, and was publicly re- 
ceived by Governor IMorton the same day. During its four years' 
service the 12th lost 8 officers and 92 enlisted men, killed and mor- 
tally wounded, and 2 officers and 217 enlisted men by disease ; total. 
319. 




Mouument of 16th Infantry- 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

1st BRIGADE 10th DIVISION 13th CORPS 
16th INFANTRY 

Colonel Thomas J. Lucas 

Major James H. Redfield I 

Engaged; Port Gibson, May 1; Champion's Hill, May 16; Big Black River Bridge, May 17; 
Assault, May 19; Assault, May 22; Siege, May 23-July 4. Casualties: Killed 3, wounded 22, total 25, 



(224) 



SIXTEENTH REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 
VOLUNTEERS. 

This regiment, in its first organization, was composed of men 
who responded to the first call of the government in April, 1861, for 
seventy -five thousand volunteers for three months' service, but who 
were unable to get into that service, Indiana's quota being already 
filled. 

Governor Morton organized the 12th and 16th Regiments out of 
these volunteers as state troops for one year's service, but on the 
day the country was startled by the news of the defeat of the first 
Bull Run battle, the services of these two regiments were tendered 
to the general government, and gladly accepted. 

The 16th Regiment was at once ordered east, and left Richmond, 
Indiana, July 23, 1861, being the first regiment to march through 
Baltimore after the firing on the 6th Massachusetts Volunteers in 
the April before. 

The regiment was assembled and sworn into the United States 
service at Richmond, Indiana, in ]\Iay, 1861, with the following offi- 
cers: 

Pleasant A. Hackleman, Rushville Colonel. 

Thomas J. Lucas, Lawrenceburg Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Joel Wolfe, Rushville Major. 

Robert Conover, Shelbyville Adjutant. 

Henry B. Hill, Carthage Quartermaster. 

Edward Jones, Aurora Chaplain. 

Ellas Fisher, Richmond Surgeon. 

George F. Chittenden, Anderson Assistant Surgeon. 



COMPANY OFFICERS. 







Captain. 


1st Lieutenant. 


2d Lieutenant. 


Co. 


A. 


Thomas A. McFarland, 


David T. Sleeth, 


Wm. H. F. Randall. 


Co. 


B. 


John S. Lee, 


Thomas S. Reading, 


John H. Finley. 


Co. 


C. 


James P. Gillespie, 


Henry B. Austin, 


Chas. P. Williamson. 


Co. 


D. 


John C. McQuiston, 


Wm. H. Weyer, 


Conrad Shomber. 


Co. 


E. 


John M. Orr, 


Wm. H. Greer, 


John M. Hartley. 


Co. 


F. 


Paul J. Beachbard, 


John L. Grove, 


Silas D. Byram. 


Co. 


G. 


Albert G. Dennis, 


William J. Fitch, 


Philip Dexheimer. 


Co. 


H. 


William Judkins, 


Henry L. Francis, 


'^^f Samuel Tull. 


Co. 


I. 


John A. Platter, 


William Copeland, 


Israel Phalin. 


Co. 


K. 


Alfred J. Hawn, 


Robert Smith, 


Courtland C. Matson 



The men for the several companies were recruited mostly from 

the several counties following: ''A" and "H," Shelby county; 

"B," Wayne County; '^C," Floyd County; ''D," Ripley County; 

''E," Fayette County; "F," Rush County; "G" and "I," Dear- 

! born County; ''K," Putnam County. 



[15] 



(225) 



226 IxDiAXA .vv VicKSP-riui. 

The regiment participated in the l)attle of Ball's Bluff and other 
skirmishes in October and November, while encamped at Seneca 
Creek, Maryland, until December 2d, when it was ordered to Fred- 
erick City, at which place it went into winter quarters. 

On February 22, 1862, the regiment was again ordered to Har- 
]ier's Ferry, and thence early in March to Charleston, and during 
the months of March and April it crossed and recrossed the Blue 
Ridge Mountains three times in pursuit of the enemy. 

On May 12th, the regiment was ordered to Washington, D. C, 
and on the l-lth of May, 1862. its term of service having expired, it 
was mustered out and returned soon thereafter to Indiana. 

Colonel Hackleman w^as promoted and appointed brigadier-gen- 
eral, and was afterwards killed in battle at luka, Mississippi. 

Colonel Lucas was promoted and in command of the regiment at 
the expiration of its term of service ; and, under his direction, in 
pursuance of directions from the government and state officials, the 
regiment was reorganized for three years' service, some of the offi- 
cers and men re-enlisting in the same regiment, while many of the 
officers and enlisted men were appointed officers of new regiments 
then organizing, so that the majority of the men in the new organ- 
ization were new recruits who had not seen service. 

The great majority of the enlisted men in at least one of the 
companies in the first year's service were commissioned officers be- 
fore the close of the war. 

The men composing this new organization were mostly from the 
following counties: "A," Fayette County; "B," Washington 
County; "C," ''G" and "H," Rush County; "D," Lawren-e 
County; "E," Dearborn County; "F," Miami County; "I," Vigo. 
Clay and Putnam counties; "K, " Madison County. 

The field officers of this new organization were as follows : 

Col. Thomas J. Lucas, promoted to brigadier-general. 

Robert Conover, formerly adjutant, promoted repeatedly until 
he became colonel. 

Lieut. Col. Joel Wolfe, killed in battle at Richmond, Kentucky. 

John M. Orr, former major, promoted and resigned on account 
of wound received at battle of Arkansas Post. 

Also James H. Redfield, promoted from major. 

In addition to the above, James M. Hildsette and James R. S. 
Cox, former captains, were promoted to major; John E. Wilkins, 
promoted and made adjutant ; Quartermaster Henry B. Hill re- 



Sixteenth Infantry. 227 

signed, succeeded by George W. Wooster, resigned, succeeded by 
George F. Williams, all of Carthage; chaplain, Rev. George F. 
Gatch, Dillsboro ; surgeon, George F. Chittenden, Anderson ; assist- 
ant surgeon, James D. Gatch, Dillsboro, resigned and succeeded in 
order named hy John H. Spurier and John C. Cullen, both of Rush- 
ville, and Joseph J. Sadler, of Franklin. 

There were so many fatalities, resignations and discharges for 
disability of the field, staff and line officers of this regiment and the 
places filled by promotion, that few of the officers remained long 
in the same position, and many offices M^ere filled by promotion from 
the ranks of the enlisted men. 

The regiment left Indianapolis for Kentucky August 19. 1862, 
as soon as the men were all mustered out, and, on August 30th, was 
hotly engaged all day in the battle of Richmond, Kentucky, with a 
greatly superior force of veteran troops, commanded by Gen. Kir])y 
Smith, in which it lost 200 men in killed and wounded, having 
inflicted an equal loss upon the enemy in its front; but at the 
close of the day the regiment was completely surrounded and the 
greater portion of those remaining were captured. The prisoners 
were paroled and sent to Indianapolis, where they remained and 
drilled until November 1st, when they were exchanged, newly 
equipped and sent via Cairo, Illinois, to Memphis, Tennessee, where 
they arrived soon after and were assigned to brigade commanded 
by Brigadier-General Burbridge, Smith's Division of the 13th 
Army Corps, and became a part of the army which proceeded from 
Memphis down the Mississippi River on transports, in command of 
General Sherman, in the first expedition against Vicksburg. 

December 25, 1862, a part of this brigade was landed at IMilli- 
ken's Bend, above Vicksburg, and the brigade, under command of 
General Burbridge, marched sixty-five miles in thirty-six hours, 
destroyed ten miles of the railroad from Vicksburg to Shreveport 
and Texas, includiDg bridges, and destroying a million dollars' 
worth of cotton, returned to the transports in time to join the army 
and take part in the unsuccessful assault on the well-fortified blutfs 
at Chickasaw Bayou, near Vicksburg, on the 1st day of January-, 
1862. 

Being repulsed by the enemy in front, and driven from the low- 
lands by the rising waters of the Yazoo River, the regiment re- 
embarked and, with the rest of the attacking army, joined in the 
expedition that proceeded up "White River and attacked the enemy 
in strongly fortified works at Arkansas Post, on January 10. 1863, 



228 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

which was surrounded by troops on land and gunboats on the river, 
and, after a hot engagement on January 11th, was captured, with 
5,000 prisoners, with cannon, small arms, stores, etc. 

In tliis chaj-ge and assault the 16th was right in front of the 
main fort and was the first regiment to plant its colors inside the 
works. It lost 77 men in killed and wounded, out of about 400 
engaged. The surrender was made by the same officer. General 
Churchill, to whom a large portion of the 16th surrendered at Rich- 
mond, Kentucky, in August before, and among the wagons captured 
were some taken from the 16th at Richmond. 

As soon as possible after the capture of this stronghold the army 
re-embarked and returned down the river on their respective boats, 
and on January 17th the regiment landed at Young's Point, Louis- 
iana, where it remained for a time in the low swamp land, assist- 
ing in digging the famous canal, which was later abandoned as im- 
practical, spending a portion of the time in strengthening the levee 
along the river bank to prevent the overflow of the water in the 
river, which was several feet higher than the land where the soldiers 
slept. Here they suffered greatly by sickness. Afterward the reg- 
iment removed to Milliken's Bend, a few miles up the river, where 
the army, commanded by General Grant, was being concentrated for 
the spring cam])aign against Vicksburg, which really began March 
27, 1863. 

The 16th, 60th and 67th Indiana, 23d Wisconsin, 83d and 96th 
Ohio Regiments, and 16th Ohio Battery, composed the 1st Brigade, 
commanded by General Burljridge, of the 10th Division, com- 
manded by Brig. Gen. A. J. Smith, of the 13th Army Corps, com- 
manded by Maj. Gen. John A. MeClernand. 

On April 14tli Burbridge's Brigade commenced the onward 
movement across the country and down the west side of the Missis- 
sippi River, by land and boats, through bayous and overflowed 
creeks, which in good time resulted in the arrival of the troops, 
after many hardships, on dry land at Bruinsburg, on the east side 
of the Mississippi River, to which they were transported from the 
Louisiana side by transports and gunboats that had riin the enemy's 
heavy batteries at Vicksburg and Grand Gulf. 

Here the troops received five days' rations, ammunition, etc., 
which were the last army rations issued to the lirigade until arrival 
near the outer works of Vicksburg, on the 18th of May. 

The brigade then began an all-night forced march toward Port 
Gibson on the night of the 30th of April. General Hovey 's Division 
of the 13th Army Corps, having preceded Smith's Division, had 



Sixteenth Infantry. 2"^9 

already opened the battle at daylight on May 1st, and the 10th Di- 
vision was placed in reserve of Hovey's Division early in the morn- 
ing for support, but later in the day it marched forward drivino- 
the enemy from hill to hill in front, holding positions, and' at niglU 
bivouacked on the battlefield. 

On May 2d, the enemy having retreated, the army marched into 
Port Gibson and remained there until the day following, when the 
16th moved forward with its brigade and division. 

The 16th remained with the 10th Division in the country about 
Raymond, makng advances towards Edwards Ferry and Black 
River Bridge, to keep the Confederate army about Vicksburg, while 
other portions of General Grant's army, under General Sherman, 
drove General Johnston's Confederate army away from Jackson. 

On May 16th, in the battle near Edwards Station, the 10th Divi- 
sion first discovered the enemy on the Raymond road, to the north 
of the Federal line ; the 16th was in the front all day until dark, 
constantly under fire, while the fierce battle about Champion's Hill 
was waging to their right. It was under a fierce artillery fire 
imtil dark, and on the next day it pursued the enemy in their 
front and took part in the charge at Black River Bridge, and after 
crossing Black River the 16th had the advance of the 10th Division 
as it marched in pursuit of the enemy to the fortifications about 
Vicksburg, and joined in the assault on these works May 19th, and 
secured a good position at the front, near one of the main forts of 
the enemy, which was intrenched and held by the brigade during the 
siege, and participated in all the operations of the siege until the 
final surrender, on July 4th. 

In the assault on the enemy's works. May 22d, the 16th bore a 
conspicuous part, holding an important position for nearly ten 
hours, perfectly exposed, near one of the main forts of the enemy, 
within about twenty-five feet a great part of the time, and from this 
same fort came to members of the 16th, then on duty, the Confeder- 
ate officers, under flag of truce, on July 3d, which resulted in the 
surrender next day. 

Immediately after the surrender of Vicksburg, the regiment, 
with the 13th Army Corps, marched to Jackson, Mississippi, and 
participated in the recapture of that place, causing the retreat of 
Johnston's army farther to the east. 

Returning to Vicksburg after this campaign, the regiment went 
into camp and had a few weeks' rest, but soon afterwards was trans- 
ferred by boat to New Orleans, Department of the Gulf, mounted, 
and became a part of a cavalry division,which was distributed along 



280 Indiana at VirKsurRCi. 



the shore of the Mississippi River, to protect transportation along 
tlio stream, making a nnmber of expeditions up the river. 

In October, 1863, the regiment took part in an expedition to the 
Hayou Teche country, Louisiana, in wliich section the regiment re- 
mained until January, ISG-t, when it returned to New Orleans, and, 
after being refitted and remounted, it marched as a part of the cav- 
alry force of General Banks in the unsuccessful expedition up the 
Red River country, in which campaign it had fifteen engagements 
with the enemy. 

While on this expedition this regiment took the chief part in a 
most remarkable surprise of an outpost of the army of the Confed- 
erate General Dick Taylor, resulting in the capture of almost an en- 
tire regiment of the 2d Tjouisiana Cavalry and a Texas battery of 
four cannon. 

Leaving Alexandria, JNIarch 21, 1864, General Lucas, with a por- 
tion of the cavalry connnand, including the 16th Indiana, by direc- 
tion of A. J. Smith, the commanding general, reported to General 
Mower, and by him was ordered to take the advance, and when 
about thirteen miles out beyond Alexandria, met the enemy in small 
force and drove them seven miles, to Henderson's Hill, where the 
enemy was found at dark, holding the hill, occupying a strong posi- 
tion, not many miles in advance of the main Confederate army. 

The 16th Regiment, mounted infantry, equipped with field rifles, 
was assigned to the advance of a detachment of infantry and one 
section of a battery. It was ordered to make a detour, and take the 
enemy in the rear, nuddng a march of about sixteen miles in dense 
darkness and through the cold rain and sleet, when, at a distance 
direety in the rear of the enemy. Captain Jones, of Company I, a 
brave young officer who was killed in battle a short time later, in 
command of thirty or forty men deployed on both sides of the road 
(he and a comrade following the road), where a company of about 
forty Confederates approached along the road, and were com- 
manded, "Halt, advance one and give the countersign," which 
order was complied with. Having secured the countersign. Cap- 
tain Jones, holding his revolver in the face of the officer, who had 
so innocently furnished the desired information, ordered him to 
surrender his command, which command was likewise obeyed. The 
Confederates, being ordered forward, advanced slowly, utterly ig- 
norant of the situation, and as they halted in front of Captain 
Jones they found themselves surrounded by the United States ad- 
vance, who had, by previous direction, came from each wing, expect- 
ing to surround a picket post. When ordered by their conrnander 



Sixteenth Infantry. 231 

to surrender, the click of the carbine was heard, but fortunately the 
men surrendered without any alarm, and no noise except i-:ome ])itter 
oaths, heaped on the head of the officer who had ordered the sur- 
render. 

These men were marched back under guard of men from the 16th 
Regiment until they reached the advancing column of infantry, who 
formed a hollow square to receive these and other prisoners as they 
were captured. A portion of the regiment continued the advance 
toward Henderson's Hill, a portion covered the road towards Gen- 
eral Taylor's army, a short distance away, at the same time Colonel 
Redfield, commanding the 16th Regiment, noticed a light in a house 
in the w^oods but a short distance from the road and sent another 
detachment, who surrounded the house, and, after sharp resist- 
ance, captured Smith, the famous rebel scout, and fifteen of his 
men. The advance soon after coming to the picket post, halted, 
and Captain Jones advanced, gave the countersign and the 16th 
Regiment rode into the camp of the enemy without the least disturb- 
ance, until it had taken position just beyond the rebel camp at 
the side of the road, and, while it was doing that the infantry 
advanced along the road, covering the other side and almost the 
whole rebel regiment and a battery was captured without a man 
being killed or seriously wounded. 

The Confederate officers were found sleeping in residences. The 
commotion awoke Colonel Vincent, in command, in time to make his 
escape through the w^oods in the darkness. This was all done so 
quietly that a courier, with dispatches from the general in com- 
mand, to Colonel Vincent, rode up to the hoiLse formerly occupied 
by the Confederates before a guard had been put out, and was 
captured by a number of the 16th Regiment, who, wet and cold, 
had taken possession of the house to warm themselves. 

And, about the same time, two or three men of the 16th Regi- 
ment, having a disposition to be inquisitive, ventured out a short 
distance along a new road they discovered, and were captured by a 
picket post still remaining on duty, utterly oblivious of what had 
transpired, and were carried away to Tyler, Texas, as prisoners. 

The 16th was actively engaged on April 8th at the battle of 
Sabine Crossroads, and the battle at Pleasant Hill the next day. 
In both engagements it suffered loss in killed and wounded, and in a 
charge made in the second day's battle it captured the flag and a 
number of the men of a Texas regiment. 

During this expedition the regiment took part in fifteen engage- 
ments. 



232 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

On the return of this expedition the regiment was ordered to 
report to General Cameron, commanding the Lafourche District of 
Louisiana, and was the only cavalry organization on that frontier 
doing active outpost duty. Here it remained on duty till ordered to 
report at New Orleans for muster out at the close of the war, where 
they were reviewed by General Grierson, who highly complimented 
the regiment for its appearance and faithful service. I 

The recruits belonging to the regiment whose terms had not ex- 
pired were transferred to the 13th Indiana Cavalry, and the old 
16th, by order of General Canby, was mustered out of the service 
June 30, 1865, and proceeded to Indianapolis, where it arrived, July 
10, 1865, with 365 officers and enlisted men, and it was enthusias- 
tically received, addressed by Governor IMorton, General Hovey, 
and others. 

The 16th lost in killed and mortally wounded three officers and 
83 enlisted men, and 227 enlisted men by disease, making a total of 
313 deaths, and very few of this three years' organization escaped 
without wounds more or less serious. 




Monument of IStli Infantry. 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

1st BRIG.4DI"; 14th DIVISION 13th CORPS 
18th INFANTRY 

Colonel Henry D, W.vshburn 
Captain Jonathan H. Williams 

Engaged: Port Gibson, May 1; Champion's Hill, May 16; Big Black River Bridge, May 17; 
As.sault, May 22; Sieje, May 23-July 4. Casualties: Killed 26, wounded 103, missing 1, total 130; 
Major John C, Jenks and T^ieut. John L. Lowes mortally wounded. 



(234) 



EIGHTEENTH REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 
V(3LITNTEERS. 

The 18th Indiana Infantry was organized at Camp Morton, In- 
dianapolis, in the summer of 1861 . 

At a special session of the General Assembly of that year, pro- 
vision was made for organizing six regiments of state troops in 
addition to those accepted by the general government under call of 
President Lincoln for 75,000 men for three months. 

When the next call of the President was issued, a portion of 
these state organizations entered service of the United States, but 
a number remained in the state service as parts of companies, and 
also many individuals from other regiments. These were all trans- 
ferred to Camp ^Morton and organized into battalions, designated as 
the 18th Indiana Infantry in part. 

After a short sojourn in this camp, it Avas determined to dis- 
charge all of these troops except such as would enter service of the 
United States, and therefore the companies were recruited to the 
maximum number, and by addition of new companies arriving in 
camp the 18th was made up to a full regiment, and was mustered 
into service of the United States August 16, 1861. 

Field and staff officers were mustered and commissioned as fol- 
lows: 

Thomas Pattison, Aurora Colonel. 

Henry D. Washburn, Newport LieulenanL-Colonel. 

DeWitt C. Thomas, Saleii Major. 

Geore S. Marshall, Indianapolis Adjutant. 

John H. Popp, Richmond Quarterma.sler. 

Georae W. Ame?, Greencastle Chaplain. 

Samuel W. Pe^k, Washington Sur-reon. 

John W. Hitchcock, Te-re Hau'e Assistant Surgeon. 

Many of the field and staff o'a.eis i esigned cr were promoted to 
higher rank and were duly succeeded by those next in rank, from 

time to time. 

The following company officers were mustered in with the regi- 
ment : 



Co. A. 
Co. B. 
Co. C. 
Co. D. 
Co. E. 
Co. F. 
Co. G. 
Co. H. 
Co. I. 
Co. K. 



Captain. 
Jesse L. Holman, 
Samuel W. Short, 
John C. Jenks, 
Rinaldo R. Rufer, 
James R. Bryant, 
Peter C. Woods, 
John W. Jone3, 
Wm. Stanley Charles 
Jonathan H. Williams, 
Samuel Donalson, 



1st Lieutenant. 
Andrew P. Dau-^h e-s, 
William S. Cooke, 
Jamei A. Bell, 
William W. Shephe-d, 
George M. Harrold. 
George W. Kimb'e, 
JameiT. Howell, 
James B. Black, 
Charles F. Johnson, 
Elijah N. Wine.s, 

(-'35) 



2d Lieutenant. 
Robert G. Cunningham. 
Parker Pearson, 
Jasper Nebeker. 
William F. Davis. 
Silas A. Wadsworth. 
David E. .\dams. 
Theophilus F. Morrisor. 
Hiram W. Rooker. 
John Tilson. 
Michael Imhoff. 



236 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

Vacancies of commanding company oiificers occurred in all these 
companies, caused by promotion, fatalities in battle, death from 
wonnds, sickness or resignations during the service, and promotions 
followed by worthy officers next in rank. 

The next day after muster the regiment proceeded by rail and 
boat to St. Louis, Missouri, where it was camped for a time in 
Lafayette Park, named "Camp Jessie," in honor of the wife of 
General Fremont. From thence the regiment went by rail to Jef- 
ferson City, and on foot to Boonville, Missouri, where it embarked, 
with other Indiana troops, on l5)oat and proceeded up the Missouri 
River to reinforce the besieged city of Lexington, but before it could 
reach that place our troops there had surrendered. After an adven- 
ture io rear of Glasgow, known as the "Paw Paw" fight, wherein 
the Union troops fired on each other in the dark, the whole force 
returned to Boonville. 

During the fall and winter of 1861 and 1862 the regiment occu- 
pied various camps in Missouri at and near what was then the ter- 
minus of the Missouri Pacifie Railroad, and in the autumn of 1861 
went with Fremont to Springfield, and after he was superseded by 
General Hunter, returned to the railroad and participated in a 
campaign to and capture of Blackwater, where it, with other troops, 
captured a large body of recruits en route to join Confederate Gen- 
eral Price's army. 

In the spring of 1862 the regiment took part in a general ad- 
vance, as ordered by the President, and took part in battles of Pea 
Ridge, Elk Horn and Lee Town. At the latter place it assisted in 
the recapture of the Peoria, Illinois, battery of artillery, which had 
been captured from the Union troops at Pea Ridge. Later in the 
spring the regiment marched to Batesville, Arkansas, where it re- 
mained in camp some time, and from thence it marched with other 
troops down the valley of White River to Clarendon, Arkansas, and 
from thence across to Helena, on the Mississippi River. 

In the fall of 1862 the regiment returned up the river and spent 
the winter in south and central Missouri in severe campaigning. 
Early in the spring of 1863 the regiment embarked on boats at St. 
Genevieve, ]\Iissouri, and, proceeding down the IMississippi River, 
landed at INIilliken's Bend, Louisiana, where it joined General 
Grant's army, being concentrated at this point for the campaign 
and final capture of Vicksburg, Mississippi, and was attached to the 
14th Division of the 13th Army Corps. With these commands it 
participated in the flanking of Grand Gulf, under General Carr; 



Eighteenth Regiment. 237 

battle of Port Gibson, May 1, Avhere the regiment captured a stand 
of colors from the enemy, and also the battle of Champion's Hill, 
May 16th; Black River, 17th, and on the 18th of May arrived at, 
and was stationed in line of works besieging Confederate fortifica- 
tions in rear of the city of Vicksburg, where it actively participated 
until the fall and surrender of that stronghold, July 4, 1863. 

During the assault of the Confederate fortifications, i\Iay 22d, 
the 18th gained and placed its colors on the enemy's works, where 
they remained for eight hours, but because of reinforcements of the 
enemy and heavy cross-fire on the regiment, it was unal)le to cap- 
ture and hold the works in its front. Immediately after the sur- 
render of Vicksburg the regiment, with other troops commanded by 
General Sherman, marched to Jackson, IMississippi, where, after the 
evacuation of this place of Confederate General Johnston's force, 
the regiment returned to Vicksburg, and was soon thereafter trans- 
ferred to the Gulf Department, and proceeded by boat to New 
Orleans. 

In this department the regiment first took part in the campaign 
of General Banks, in the fall of 1863, in the Teche country, in oper- 
ations in western Louisiana, from whence it returned to Atcha- 
falaya and from thence, on the 12th of November, embarked for 
Texas when, on the 17th of November, it engaged in the capture of 
a fort on Mustang Island, and on the 27th in the capture of Fort 
Esparanza. 

January, 1864, the greater part of the regiment re-enlisted at 
Indianola, Texas, and started home on veteran furlough. 

On arriving at or near Baton Rouge, the regiment disembarked 
to aid in defending the Union garrison of that place. After dis- 
persing the Confederate forces, who were organized for an attack, 
the regiment proceeded to Indiana, where, after its thirty days' 
furlough, it was ordered to Washington. D. C. and joined the East- 
ern Army on the James. After short service at Bermuda Hundred 
and Deep Bottom, it returned to "Washington and joined the 19th 
Army Corps, to which it had been attached, and with that corps 
took part in the campaign under General Sheridan of the Shenan- 
doah Valley, participating in battles of Opequon, Fisher's Hill and 
Cedar Creek. In each of these engagements the regiment lost heav- 
ily in killed and wounded. 

On the 6th of January, 1865, the regiment was ordered to Sa- 
vannah, Georgia, and reached that point by transports on the 16th, 
and was occupied for three months building fortifications. On the 



238 Indiana at VicKsisriK;. 

3(1 of Al;i\- it was (Ictaclicd ffoiii (leneral Grover's Division and or- 
dered to Aug'usta, Georgia, and was first to raise the stars and 
stripes on the old United States Areenal at that place. 

Returning to Savannah, the regiment was later transferred to 
the southern part of Georgia, where it remained iintil mustered out 
on August 28th, 1865, and, being ordered home to Indiana, it ar- 
rived September 17th and was publicly welcomed by state officials 
and its former colonel, H. D. Washburn, and in a few days was 
finally discharged from the service. 

The regiment lost during service 5 officers and 68 enlisted men 
killed and mortally wounded, and one officer and 130 enlisted men 
by disease ; total, 204. 




Mdiniineiit of 23(1 Infaiitrv. 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

1st BRIGADE 3rd DIVISION 17th CORPS 
23rd INFANTRY 



Lieut. Col. William P. Davis 

Engaged: Port Gibson, May 1; Near North Fork of Bayou Pierre, May 3; Raymond, May 12; 
Champion's Hill, May 16; Assault, May 22; Siege, May 23-July 4. Casualties: Killed 31, wounded 
157, missing 24, total 212, Lieut. Henry C. Dietz and Lieut. Christian C. Zulauf killed, Capt. William 
M. Darrough mortally wounded. 



TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 
VOLUNTEERS. 

The 23d Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry was organized 
pursuant to an order of the Adjutant-General of the State, dated 
June 24, 1861, issued under the authority of the first call 'of the 
President for troops for three years' enlistment, although a num- 
ber of the companies had been recruiting for two or three weeks 
prior to that date, anticipating the call for additional troops. The 
regiments included in this call from the State of Indiana were the 
19th to 28th, inclusive. 

The companies of the 23d Indiana were assigned to rendezvous 
at the old fair grounds at New Albany, afterwards designated as 
"Camp Noble," from which point southern Indiana recruited and 
forwarded several other regiments during the continuance of the 
war. Companies A, B, C, F, H and I were mustered into the serv- 
ice July 27th, and Companies D, E, J and K July 29, 1861, the en- 
tire regiment having been accepted on the latter date. 

The following officers mustered in with the regiment : 

FIELD AND STAFF. 

William L. Sanderson Colonel. 

DeWitt C. Anthony. Lieutenant-Colonel. 

William P. Davis Major. 

Eugene Commandeur Adjutant. 

Isaac P. Smith Quartermaster. 

John D. Rogers Chaplain. 

Thomas D. Austin Surgeon. 

Robert Kay Assistant Surgeon. 



COMPANY OFFICERS. 







Captain. 


1st Lieutenant. 


M Lieutenant. 


Co. 


A. 


Frederick Pistorius, 


Thomas Krementz, 


William P. Orth. 


Co. 


B. 


William W. Caldwell, 


William M. Darrough, 


Daniel Trotter. 


Co. 


C. 


David C. Kay, 


Marion W. Smith, 


Hiram Murphy. 


Co. 


D. 


George S. Babbitt, 


John T. Gleason, 


Madison M. Hurley. 


Co. 


E. 


Thomas Clark, 


John T. McQuiddy, 


Louis P. Berry. 


Co. 


F. 


William P. Davis, 


John S. Davis, 


Harvey C. Moore. 


Co. 


G. 


Alonzo Tubbs, 


Lemuel C. Mahlon, 


Conrad H. Hiner. 


Co. 


H. 


William E. Abbott, 


William H. Bullington, 


George H. Kendrick 


Co. 


I. 


Henry C. Ferguson, 


Benjamin F. Walter, 


Joshua W. Custer. 


Co. 


K. 


Vincent Kirk, 


Jerome Beers, 


Silas E. Warden. 



It was not until the 15th of August that the command left Camp 
Noble for the field, fully equipped, except as to arms. The first 
march from Camp Noble to the depot at Jeffersonville, a distance of 
about eight miles, where it embarked by rail for Indianapolis, was 
an extremely severe one, incident to the heavy knapsacks and per- 
sonal belongings with which the raw recruit was wont to equip him- 

(241) 



242 Tn' DIANA AT ViCKSBTiKG. 

self — though he learned better later. The regiment arrived at In- 
dianapolis after midnight and dragged itself wearily to an already 
established camp, two miles from the station. 

Late in the afternoon of the following day it eommenced its 
journey by rail to St. Louis, where it arrived during the afternoon 
of August 17th, undergoing another weary march from the ferry to 
camp in liafayette Park — these little insights into marching being 
profitable in giving the new soldiers a slight idea of what was to 
confront them during the four years that were to follow. 

Within a few days the regiment was provided with arms and 
remained at St. Louis until September 9th, during which time every 
spare moment was devoted to instruction in the duty of the soldier ; 
and that, coupled with the constant drill that they had received at 
Camp Noble, had so improved them as soldiers that as they marched 
from camp to the steamer to embark upon their first duty in the 
field, at Paducah, Kentucky, they no longer appeared as raw re- 
cruits, but bore themselves with the nonchalance of tried veterans. 

Paducah was reached on September 11, 1861, at which point a 
brigade was organized under command of General Lew Wallace, 
consisting of the 23d and 11th Indiana and the 8th JMissouri, and 
attached to the army under command of Gen. Charles F. Smith. 

Paducah, while within the Union lines, was harassed to a great 
extent by guerillas, and the service was constant and warlike, picket 
duty was exacting and arduous during the winter, and night alarms 
were frequent and exciting, all of which, together with one or two 
small skirmishes with the guerillas, inured the men to the hard- 
ships of grim-visaged war, and placed the regiment in the list of 
seasoned troops. 

On November 6th or 7th, the regiment was attached to the com- 
mand of Brigadier-General Payne, for a march to the relief of 
General Grant at the battle of Belmont, Missouri. Although not 
reaching that point in time to participate in the battle, the march 
was probably one of the most severe of the many in which the 23d 
participated. Leaving camp at Paducah about 7:00 o'clock in the 
morning, the march was continuous until after 9 :00 the following 
morning, with only four or five short stops, not one of which ex- 
ceeded thirty minutes; but, even then, before reaching the battle- 
field, the cominand was turned to the rightabout and started back 
towards Paducah (the necessity for which is not apparent to the 
writer) , and the march on the return trip was continued until past 
midnight. At that time, not yet having reached Paducah, Colonel 



Twenty-Third Infantry. 243 

Sanderson, in his devotion to his men, deliherately witlidi'ew his 
regiment (then inside of our own lines) and went into camp, at 
the risk of court-martial for his action, although the halance of the 
command continued the march into Paducah, arriving about 6 :00 
o'clock the next morning. The 23d had marched continuously for 
forty-one hours without even time to cook a meal. 

On this march the men learned from bitter experience the ne- 
cessity for lightening their burdens, and the line of march was 
strewn with heretofore treasured possessions — extra clothing, sur- 
plus bedding, fancy toilet articles, cooking utensils, anything and 
everything that would tend to make the way harder Avas thrown 
away, and when the regiment again reached the original camp at 
Paducah the personal belongings of the men had been reduced to the 
minimum, and gnn, cartridge-box, blanket and haversack only re- 
mained. 

Returning to Paducah the following morning, after the men had 
recuperated, the regiment remained until January 2, 1862, during 
which time fortifications were constructed, the 23d furnishing its 
full (juota of men for the work. On January 2d, accompanying a 
division under Gen. Charles F. Smith, it took up the line of march 
for a reconnaissance in force that was to develop the Confederate 
fortifications on the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, convoyed 
by the gunboat "Conistoga," skirting the south bank of the Tennes- 
see. Having located Fort Henry, on the north, and Fort Hieman, 
on the south bank of the Tennessee (which resulted also in fixing 
the location of Fort Donelson, on the Cumberland) with the sole 
intention of developing the fact that these forts were garrisoned, 
shots were exchanged by the ' ' Conistoga ' ' with Fort Henry, while 
the infantry made a slight attack on Fort Hieman. retired at once 
and took up the line of march for the return trip, arriving at Pa- 
ducah on the 14th. 

Little mention has ever been made in history of this particular 
campaign, which was one of exceeding hardship, on account of the 
rise in the bayous and streams, incident to what is knoAvn as the 
''January thaw." The troops were compelled to ford numerous 
streams, often more than waist deep, and wagons and artillery were 
buried in the mud and swamped in the streams to an extent that 
compelled the infantry, at all times, to furnish assistance in order 
that the wagon trains and artillery might be moved at all; and m 
several instances guns and wagons were entirely dismantled and 
dragged piecemeal through the seas of mud, and mire. While the 



244 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

entire distniice going and returning was scarcely 150 miles, yet it 
required the greatest effort, constant labor and much suffering to 
complete the journey in twelve days. 

Returning to Paducah, the command embarked on steamers, 
February 2d, for the now famous campaign of General Grant 
against Forts Henry and Donelson, where he earned the sobriquet of 
"Unconditional Surrender Grant." Proceeding up the Tennessee 
River, convoyed by the fleet under command of Commodore Foote, 
the troops disembarked at Camp Union, some five or six miles below 
Fort Henry, on the south side of the river, on the evening of the 
5th. On the morning of the 6th the command marched up the 
south bank of the river and engaged and captured Fort Hieman, 
while the gunlioats battered down the earthworks of Fort Henry, 
which unfurled the white flag of surrender early in the afternoon of 
the same day. 

During the engagement at Fort Henry, Company B of the 23d 
Indiana was assigned to service on the gunboat "Essex," one of 
the heaviest vessels of the river navy, and incident to the cutting 
of a steam pipe, caused by a shot from the enemy, a number of the 
men were killed and seriously injured, and Lieutenant Trotter, of 
Company B, was instantly killed. 

The weather, in the interim between the fall of Fort Henry and 
Fort Donelson, was extremely severe. Snow fell to the depth of 
six inches, freezing at night and thawing in the daytime, and the 
regiment was fortunate in not being pushed to the front at Fort 
Donelson, remaining on duty holding the ground that had been 
gained at Fort Henry and Fort Hieman. During a period of a 
week or more the regiment was absolutely without blankets or 
other protection than ordinary clothing, and the suffering was ex- 
tremely severe. 

After the surrender of Fort Donelson, Febiiiary 16th, on or 
about March 14th, the regiment again embarked on steamers and 
moved up the Tennessee River, on what is known as the Yellow 
Creek Expedition, a preliminary move to the concentration of 
forces at Pittsburgh Landing for what was afterward known as the 
battle of Shiloh. Stopping en route for a short interior expedition, 
the command under Gen. Lew Wallace, to which the 23d was at- 
tached, returned to the steamers and disembarked therefrom at 
Crump's Landing, located some five miles below Pittsburgh Land- 
ing, about the 19th of March, and from that point, through one of 
the most terrific rain and electric storms ever experienced, marched 



Twenty-Third Infantry. 245 

five or six miles into the interior to what is known as ' ' Stony Lone- 
some." 

The 23d Indiana was the first regiment of the command to leave 
the steamers, and to the best of the writer's knowledge and belief 
was the first on the gronnd in the concentration of forces which 
afterwards participated in the battle of Shiloh — at least, it was 
positively the first on the ground of the command under Gen. Lew 
Wallace at Stony Lonesome, although it is possible that other regi- 
ments had disembarked at Pittsburgh Landing earlier in the day. 

It was while at this point that the members of the 23d were com- 
pelled to discard the very handsome cadet gray uniform which the 
State had provided on their entering the service and assume the 
blue blouse and "camp-kettle" hat — very much to the chagrin of 
the boys, who had always been proud of their natty gray suits. Of 
course, the necessity for the change was fully appreciated, the Con- 
federates having by that time fully adopted the gray. This neces- 
sity, however, did little to soothe the feelings of the members of the 
regiment, who were particularly proud of the appearance of tbe 
23d, which up to that date had been unexcelled, if equalled, by any 
regiment in the service. 

Up to this time the 23d had not been engaged in the heated con- 
test of any severe battles, although it had had a campaign experi- 
ence in the way of arduous marches and a number of skirmishes, 
which cannot be mentioned in detail, had sustained losses by death 
and wounds and a depletion of ranks by sickness, and had experi- 
enced hardships and privations, which entitled it to be designated as 
a "veteran regiment," having had in all probability m-ore field ex- 
perience than 75 per cent, of all the volunteer troops that were en- 
gaged in the battle of Shiloh. 

The history of the battle of Shiloh, fought on April 6th and 7th, 
1862, has been too frequently written and criticised to make it nec- 
essary for the writer to attempt any elaborate description of that 
memorable engagement, or to try to give any reasons why General 
Wallace 's command did not reach the field of battle until near dark 
of the first day. Yet, neither the 23d Indiana nor any of General 
Wallace's command was idle during the period, as they were march- 
ing constantly and making every effort to reach the field, from 8 :00 
o'clock in the morning until nearly 6 :00 at night. While an earlier 
hour of reaching the field undoubtedly would have brought de- 
cidedly different and possibly better results, the writer questions 
if their efforts were wasted or if it was not better, in the long run, 



24() Indiana a i Vk ksiu \ni. 

that Wallace's veteran eoininand sliould l)e on the ii'i'ouiul aiul in 
I'ondition for tlie second day's tight, rather than to have inevitably 
suffered severe losses in the tirst day's onslaught. However that 
may be, the record of Wallace's command on the second day should 
fully compensate for any errors of judgment that may liave oc- 
currcHl on the first. 

It was the 23d Regiment, supporting the !)th Indiana Battery, 
that opened the engagement on the extreme right at 5 :00 o'clock on 
the morning of the 7th, and there was no period from that time in 
the morning until the command reached the point occupied by the 
skirmish line of the enemy on the first day, about 6:00 o'clock at 
night, that the regiment was not advancing and driving the enemy 
before it, excepting of course the intervals when the retreating 
Confederates made their determined stands and required sharp 
fighting to dislodge them. It is true that the loss of the 23d was 
not extremely heavy on this date, as compared with those of some 
other regiments, yet it was under heavy fire constantly, repulsed a 
vicious charge from a regiment of Texas cavalry, and closed the 
day with a loss of one officer and 51 men killed and wounded, which 
seems almost miraculous when one considers the opposition and the 
constant and heavy fire with which it was confronted. 

During the campaign, from the time of leaving Paducah until 
this date, the regiment was attached to the 2d Brigade, 3d Division 
of the Army of the Tennessee. 

Remaining on the battlefield of Shiloh until April 17th, the 23d. 
with the rest of the anny, was moved forward to participate in the 
siege of Corinth, jMississippi, at which place it was attached to the 
right wing of the 13th Army Corps, which formed the reserve sta- 
tioned at Pea Ridge. But before the siege was raised, the regiment 
was detailed for outpost duty and, accompanied by the 9th Indiana 
Battery, moved to Bolivar, Tennessee, which forces for a consider- 
able period held that point, notwithstanding the continued annoy- 
ance of Confederate cavalry and guerillas. The command was re- 
inforced from time to time, until finally it reached the proportions 
of a division, under command-of Gen. Leonard F. Ross. 

During the summer months spent at Bolivar, the regiment, with 
other portions of General Ross' Division, was engaged in a number 
of skirmishes, two or three expeditions to Purdy, which was in- 
fested with Confederate cavalry, and finally in the action at Purdy, 
on August 30th. In the meantime a number of small engagements 
occurred in the vicinity of Bolivar, mostly fought by the cavalry. 



Twenty-Third Infantry. 247 

but supported l).v infantry, of which the 23d contributed its full 
share. 

On September 1. 1862, the regiment embarked by rail for Jack- 
son, Tennessee, en route to luka, Mississippi, and participated in the 
battle at that place and the several skirmishes incident thereto. On 
September 19th it made a return march to luka and participated in 
a small way at the second battle of Corinth and the battle of Mat- 
amora. Returning to Bolivar, it marched to the Hatchee River on 
October 5th. and, while not reaching there in time for the heated 
portion of the engagement, was still in time to participate and ren- 
der valuable assistance in the routing and pursuit of the enemy. 

Returning after the battle of the Hatchee River to Bolivar, 
which, by this time, was occupied by two divisions under command 
of General Hurlbut, the 23d remained until the organization of the 
17th Army Corps, under command of Maj. Gen. James B. McPher- 
son, to which corps it was attached, remaining during the balance 
of the war. 

During October the 23d, with a number of other regiments, made 
a forced march in pursuit of Ripley, during which time it accom- 
plished the marvelous feat of marching fifty-two miles in two days, 
going from and returning to Bolivar. After the concentration of 
the 17th Army Corps at La Grange, Tennessee, in the early part 
of November, it took up the line of march, participating in Grant's 
central Mississippi campaign toward Granada in his efforts to reach 
Vicksburg from that point — which, as is well known, failed because 
of Van Dorn's capture of Holly Springs, Mississippi, and the de- 
struction of supplies, which forced the abandonment of the expedi- 
tion and a return to Memphis. 

On the return trip the regiment, having occupied for a few days 
Oxford, Mississippi, reached the Yocknapatafa River on Christmas 
Eve, 1862, at which time practically the wdiole command, and espe- 
cially that portion to which the 23d was attached, was without ra- 
tions, and for a period of nearly ten days was dependent for subsist- 
ence entirely upon a country through which two armies had already 
marched. That the supply of provisions was extremely limited will 
be realized when it is known that it became necessary to issue ordi- 
nary dry corn as the only ration, from which subsistence was prin- 
cipally derived by grinding the same into meal and also by popping 
it in ashes, which is very delightful to the children on a winter night, 
but it is not a food that is calculated to give strength or encourage- 
ment to a soldier in a hard campaign, nor at all appropriate as a 



248 Indiana at Vioksbiteg. 

"Christmas dinner." A variety, however, was secured in some 
instances by the use of what the soldiers designated as "nigger" 
beans, being field beans raised largely for the support of the slave 
field hands. Later, the railroad having been repaired to some ex- 
tent, supplies were received, and on January 10, 1863, the command 
marched to Colliersville, Tennessee. The period spent at Colliers- 
ville was extremely severe, because of the extraordinary cold and 
heavy snow, followed hy thaws, which made the roads almost im- 
passable. 

On January 20th the regiment took up its line of march to Mem- 
phis, Tennessee — not, how^ever, in its full strength, for, because of 
the exhaiLstion growing out of the severe campaign, inadequate food 
and lack of shoes for a large number of men, fully 125 were com- 
pelled to move to that point by rail, being unable to march. On 
this trip, however, the men were encouraged by the prospect of se- 
curing a much needed rest after the arduous marches through cen- 
tral Mississippi, as well as clothing of all kinds, of which the troops 
were much in need, preparatory to the lieginning of the campaign 
against Vicksburg. 

At ]\Iemphis the army was fully recuperated and newly 
equipped, and on February 21st the regiment embarked by steamer 
for Lake Providence, Louisiana, at which point Grant was concen- 
trating his army for his combined assault on Vicksburg by the 
army and navy, from the front and rear. Colonel Sanderson was 
detached and left at Memphis in conmiand of the troops at that 
point, and Lieut. Col. W. P. Davis assumed command of the regi- 
ment. During the stay at Lake Providence the levees of the Mis- 
sissippi River were cut by command of General Grant and the sur- 
rounding country overflowed, as a protection from assault upon the 
army from the rear, which precaution proved wise and successful. 
This measure forced the command to move to a point of high 
ground a few miles above, locally known as Beriy 's Landing, where 
it remained during the concentration of troops. On April 17th it 
moved to Milliken 's Bend. 

Grant's effort to divert the channel of the Mississippi River 
having failed, he then decided to run the blockade of the Vicksburg 
batteries and carry his supplies and ammunition to a point below 
where the armies would concentrate, using the same boats after 
their arrival to transport the troops, which were then marching by 
land, across the river to a safe footing on the Vicksburg side. 

The date for the running of the blockade was fixed for April 
21st. Volunteers were called for to man these boats, and the 23d 



Twenty-Third Infantry. 249 

Indiana, being largely composed of steamboat men, volunteered in 
numbers far in excess of the demand. The steamer "J. AV. Chees- 
man" was manned largely by members of the 23d, including the 
captain, pilot and a part of the engine-room crew, as well as many 
subordinates. In addition to that, a portion of the crew of the 
steamer ' ' Horizon, ' ' which was severely injured by the batteries at 
Vicksburg, were members of the 23d Indiana. When it is consid- 
ered that these were simply the ordinary passenger boats, without 
any protection whatever except such as could be temporarily made 
by piling cotton bales around the boilers for safety against the 
enemy's shells, that the pilot houses were torn away entirely, and 
that the bulkheads (which shielded the engineers and crew from 
storm and weather, but were no protection from shot and shell) 
were entirely removed, so that the officers and men who manned the 
boats worked in the open, in plain view of the gunners who were 
firing at them, it will be understood that it required more than ordi- 
nary nerve for men to volunteer to fill such positions. And yet 
there were a hundred men still remaining in the 23d Indiana who 
bem.oaned their fate when they learned that their services were not 
required and they must remain behind. It is true that the loss of 
life in the 23d in this instance was not great, yet it stood its full 
proportion of wounded and sustained one death. 

On April 25th the regiment marched from Millil<en's Bend to a 
point opposite Grand Gulf, a campaign lasting until April 30th; 
was with the shore forces at the time of the terrific naval engage- 
ment at the latter point, and was actually in the engagement at 
Port Gibson on April 30th. It was now thoroughly launched into 
Grant's famous campaign in the rear of Vicksburg. On May 1st, 
the 23d was engaged in the battle of Thompson Hill, or Port Gib- 
son, losing one officer and nine men, which was followed on the 3d 
by a severe skirmish at Bayou Pierre. 

Continuing the march towards Vicksburg, the enemy was again 
encountered in force on May 12th, at the town of Raymond, about 
thirty miles from the enemy's stronghold. In this engagement the 
23d Indiana lost 127 ofHcers and men in killed, wounded and miss- 
ing, the missing consisting of one officer and 23 men of the skirmish 
line, who were taken prisoners, the most severe engagement for the 
time occupied during the whole Vicksburg campaign. The regi- 
ment, having become detached from the main body, had marched 
into what was practically an ambush and alone met the onslaught of 
five Confederate regiments, two on one side and three on another, 
being almost entirely surrounded. But, notwithstanding this fact 



•joO Indiana ai V^icksiumm;. 

and tlic iii<il)ility of the incii to reload theii' 4)i:uns after the first dis- 
charge, witli fixed l)ayonets and ('lubl)ed niuslcets, they sneeessfally 
emerged from what seemed to be an almost hopeless position, fell 
baek to the main line, reformed, and eontinned in the engagement 
until its elose, near nightfall, when the command took up the pur- 
suit of the enemy in its flight towards Jackson. In this engagement 
the color-bearer was killed, but through the heroism of the second 
lieutenant of Company C, who rescued the flag and reached the 
rallying point, the regiment was reorganized without disorder, and 
without a. single soldier continuing in the rear of the color line. 

At Jackson the enemy was again overtaken on the morning of 
the 14th, where an open field battle was fought, lasting until late in 
the afternoon, but on account of the protected position the loss of 
the 23d in killed and wounded, of which the writer has no exact 
record, was comparatively small. 

On the morning of the 15th the command retraced its steps 
towards Champion's Hill, arriving on the field of that battle on the 
night of the 15th, and was the first regiment to come to the assist- 
ance of Hovey's division during the heat of the battle on the 16th. 
Although engaged from morning until nightfall, the 23d was fortu- 
nate in the loss of only 4 officers and 14 men, killed and wounded. 

The enemy was pursued during the greater part of the night and 
was again overtaken at Black River on the 17th — the 23d, however, 
not reaching that point until after the enemy had been driven back 
towards Vicksburg. The latter point was reached on the 18th of 
May, the regiment participating in the assaults on the Confederate 
strongholds IMay 19th and 22d. During the latter engagement the 
23d reached a position immediately at the base of the enemy's en- 
trenchments, and many of its members gained the top, led by Lieu- 
tenant Zulauf, of Company A, who met a gallant death at the very 
crest cf the enemy's works. 

The 23d Indiana, together with the 45th Illinois, held the posi- 
tion at the very base of the enemy's works, which was the center of 
the line, in Logan's Division on the White House road, until the 
surrender of Vicksburg, more than forty days later, during which 
time these two regiments constructed and exploded the mine under 
the particularly strong stronghold of the enemy, known as Fort 
Hill, and after the explosion, which occurred at 4:00 o'clock on the 
afternoon of June 25th, alternate details. of 100 each from these 
regiments occupied the crater caused by the discharge, from 4:00 
o'clock in the afternoon until daylight the following morning. 
This engagement, because of the peculiarity of the situation, was 



Twenty-Third Infantry. 251 

conducted by the interchange of hand-grenades and six-pound shells 
thrown by hand, between our own troops and the enemy. 

It was also a volunteer detail of Companies E and B of the 23d 
Indiana Regiment which, taking advantage of their position at the 
foot of the enemy's works, constructed the famous ol)servation 
tower, so frequently written of and illustrated in publications of 
the time. 

During the whole period of occupation of the position in front 
of the enemy's works, the regiment was, of course, without any pro- 
vision for shelter, and those immediately under the enemy's line; 
were not in position even to prepare their meals. Consequently it 
was necessary to dig zig-zag trenches for ingress and egress, and the 
food was prepared outside of the location and carried back and 
forth under the protection of the friendly trenches. In the mean- 
time, not only that portion of the regiment immediately under the 
enemy's works, but the entire command, lived and slept in holes 
dug in the hillsides for that purpose, which served as a protection 
from the enemy's shells as well. 

During the period of the investment of Vicksburg, independent 
of the battles in the approach thereto, the loss of the 23d Indiana 
was 5 officers and 50 men killed and wounded in the trenches. 
During the entire campaign, from the crossing of the IMississippi 
River, at Grand Gulch, to the surrender of Vicksburg, the total 
loss in killed, wounded and missing was 212. 

When the troops entered Vicksburg on July 4, 1863 (although 
the surrender was practically on the 2d), the 23d Indiana and the 
45th Illinois were designated, as a post of honor in reward for their 
services, as two of the few regiments to enter the city to receive the 
surrender, marching in by the well-known White House road. In 
the meantime, General McPherson having been promoted to com- 
mand the Army of the Tennessee, the 17th Corps was assigned to 
Gen. Frank P. Blair, of beloved memory, who was its commander 
until the close of the war. The regiment remained in camp within 
the Confederate fortifications at Vicksburg until August 28th, when 
it was selected, with three others, under command of Brigadier-Gen- 
eral Leggett, for the expedition across the State of Louisiana to 
Monroe, on the Ouachita River, for the purpose of ridding the coun- 
try of guerillas that were then harassing the inhabitants and pre- 
venting their return to legitimate pursuits. Upon the return f i-om 
this expedition it remained in camp at Vicksburg until October 
12th, when it was again called upon to. participate in the expedi- 
ton to Canton. Mississippi, and return, lasting until Octo1)er 22d, 



252 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

for tile purpose of destroying the railroad and equipment to pre- 
vent tlieir use by the enemy in moving troops and supplies. 

Keturning to Vicksburg, winter quarters were established at 
Hebron, a short distance from Vicksburg, and during the winter 
encampment the regiment re-enlisted "for three years more," or 
until the close of the war, though at that time the regiment was 
very much depleted in numbers. Having as yet received but few 
recruits, there were, according to the best records at hand, 280 odd 
of the enlisted men who re-enlisted, out of a total number of less 
than 500 then reported for duty, though a number of the members 
of the regiment not re-enlisting were before and at that time trans- 
ferred, at their own request, to the navy. 

Returning again to Vicksburg, the 23d Indiana remained until 
February 3, 1864, when it accompanied Sherman on his raid to 
Meridian, Mississippi, accomplishing the destruction of the rail- 
road track, its equipment and supplies, the entire distance of more 
than one hundred miles east from Jackson to Meridian, thus depriv- 
ing the enemy of facilities to reach either Jackson or Vicksburg. 
to harrass Grant's and Sherman's armies encamping at or near 
those points. 

In the latter part of March the regiment left Vicksl)urg on the 
regulation thirty-day veteran furlough and returned in a body, by 
steamboat up the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers, from Vicksburg to 
New Albany, the place of enlistment, at which point arms were 
stacked and equipment stored, and the members dispersed to their 
various homes for the enjoyment of a well-earned and much-needed 
rest. 

At the expiration of the veteran furlough the men again re- 
ported for duty and moved directly from New Albany, by steamer, 
to Bird's Point, IMissouri, where the regiment remained for a short 
time, receiving a considerable number of recruits. From that point 
it proceeded, on May 5, 1864, by steamboat up the Tennessee River 
to Pittsburgh Landing, marching through the old battlefield of 
Shiloh, via Huntsville, Alabama, to join the Army of the Tennes- 
see, then concentrating for the campaign against Atlanta, reaching 
Ackworth, Georgia, June 9th, where it was again attached to the 
17th Array Corps, under Gen. Frank P. Blair. 

During the many operations incident to the siege of Atlanta, the 
23d participated in the engagements at Kenesaw IMountain and 
Busby Mountain, between June 9th and June 15th ; at Big Shanty, 
June 19th ; the assault on Kenesaw Mountain, June 27th ; Nickajack 
Creek, July 4th, and engagements at the latter point, July 6th and 



Twenty-Third Infantry. 253 

Stli. It also took part in the various engagements in the approach 
to the Chattahoochie River, July 8th to 12th ; at Decatur, July 19th; 
the engagements at Leggett's Bald Hill, July 20th, and Peach Tree 
Creek, July 21st (where Gen. W. Q. Gresham, division commander, 
was seriously wounded and succeeded by Gen. Giles A. Smith), 
and the battle of Atlanta, July 22d, which commenced the actual 
siege of Atlanta, lasting from that date until September 2d, includ- 
ing the well-known engagement at Ezra Chapel, July 28th (which 
battle is frequently referred to as "Logan's Battle," that general 
having assumed command of the Army of the Tennessee after the 
death of General McPherson, on July 22d), and also participated in 
the heavy skirmishes about Utoy Creek, between August 5th and 
7th. During the entire period, from July 22d to September 2d, the 
regiment, when not participating in the engagements named above, 
occupied the trenches and was under daily constant fire. 

On July 27th and 29th (or within a few days thereof, as the 
discharge papers were received), the original officers of the regi- 
ment then remaining were all mustered out by reason of the expira- 
tion of their term of service, except only Capt. George S. Babbitt, 
who was promoted to lieutenant-colonel and assumed command of 
the regiment, and the writer, who had before been mustered in as 
adjutant. Vacancies were promptly filled, however, by promotion 
of non-commissioned officers, selected by their respective companies. 
So that each company had a full complement of of^cers, but the 
vacancies in the field and staff were not filled and the regiment 
was without field officers other than the lieutenant-colonel and 
adjutant until the close of the war, except by detail. 

When Sherman made his flank movement, with the view of en- 
ticing the enemy out of the works at Atlanta, the command to 
which the 23d was attached moved on to Jonesboro and engaged in 
a heated battle at that point during the whole day of August 31st. 
During the heat of the battle at Jonesboro, the regiment moved 
from its position near the center of the line to the extreme right, 
to reinforce General Kilpatrick's cavalry, which was being hard 
pressed, and in this engagement the 23d was under a heavy fire 
from the Confederate batteries, occupying the rifle-pits of the 
enemy, from which it had been driven by the advance of the 23d. 

From Jonesboro the regiment moved to Lovejoy Station, Sep- 
tember 2d, and on September 6th returned to Aekworth on outpost 
duty, until it joined in the pursuit of Hood into Alabama in a 
campaign lasting from Octo])er 3d to 26th, during which time it 
took part in the second engagement at Snake Creek Gap, October 



251 TXDIAXA AT VlCKSBriU). 

IStli. liavinii' folldwcd Hood's coinniand almost to the Tennessee 
River, when a rightabout was made and Sherman returned to At- 
hmta for the ])urpose of making preparations for the famous IMarch 
to the Sea. 

During the period of preparation the 23d Indiana was en- 
eamped at West Point, ckwe to Athmta, and with the rest of Sher- 
num's army eommeneed its iNIarch to the Sea November 15th, reach- 
ing Savannah on December 10th. During the march the regiment 
was actively engaged at the battle of the Oconee River, where, on 
November 24th and 25th, it was confronted by a heavy force of 
Wheeler's cavalry, and again encountered the same force at the 
Ogoochee River, Deceml)er 7th and 8th, these two engagements 
causing the greatest delay and the heaviest fighting that Sherman's 
army confronted during the entire March to the Sea. 

Arriving at Savannah on December 10th, the 28d Indiana par- 
ticipated in the siege, which lasted eleven days, during which time 
there was heavy firing all along the line, though fortunately the 
casualties were not great and the regiment sutfered but slight loss, 
there being none killed and only a few of its members wounded. 
During the period of siege, however, as is well known, the troops 
suffered to a very considerable extent because of the lack of rations. 
Having trusted to foraging the country through which they had 
just passed for supplies, and none having reached the command on 
arrival at Savannah, the army was sorely pressed for provisions 
until the day following the evacuation, December 22d, when sup- 
plies were received in abundance from the vessels lying in the offing. 

The command remained in camp around Savannah until the 
early part of January, 1865, when it again took up the line of march 
for the campaign through the Carolinas. The 23d moved by ves- 
sel from Savannah to Beaufort, South Carolina, and experienced 
its first and only voyage by salt water. After remaining at Beau- 
fort a few days, it took up the line of march northward, participat- 
ing in engagements at Pocotaligo, South Carolina, January 14th to 
16th; at Salkehatchie, February 3d to 5th; at South Edistoe River. 
February 9th ; at North Edistoe River, February 12th and 13th ; at 
Coiigaree Creek, February 15th, and reached Columbia, South Car- 
olina, February 16th, and remaining there until the 18th. was pres- 
ent at the burning of that city, many of its members assisting, un- 
organized, in the effort to suppress the conflagration. 

Leaving Columbia, it proceeded north and took part in the cap- 
ture of Cheraw, March 2d and 3(1. and practically alone ca]")tured 
Fayetteville. North Carolina, March 11th. having double-quicked 



Twenty-Third Infantry. 255 

for a distance of four miles to the relief of a detachment of Sher- 
man's Bummers, who had had the audacity to attack and attempt 
to capture the place unaided; and, but for the quick relief of the 
23d Indiana, which was afterwards reinforced by other regiments, 
the original captors would have been forced to abandon it, and 
possibly a severe battle would have ensued to regain it. 

Proceeding north, the regiment was engaged actively at the l)at- 
tle of Bentonville, North Carolina, March 19th and 20th (with but a 
small casualty list), which was the last of the battles fought by 
Sherman's army, as no actual engagement occurred after that date, 
although it occupied Goldsborough, North Carolina, on the 23d of 
March. 

So thus it will be seen that the 23d Indiana, which marched to 
the relief of Grant at Belmont in November, 1861, and actually 
engaged in the battle of Bentonville in March. 1865, can be truth- 
fully said to have engaged in Grant's first battle of the war and in 
Sherman's last, having, directly and indirectly, participated in 
forty-three engagements, large and small, exclusive of the forty 
days in the trenches at Vicksburg and the eighty-seven days before 
Atlanta, forty-two of which were actually spent in the trenches, 
every hour of which time was one of exposure to the shot and shell 
of the enemy. 

At Goldsborough news was received of the fall of Richmond, 
and, with light hearts, the regiment started forth from that point, 
April 10th, to continue its march north with Sherman's army and 
assist, with these commands, in receiving the surrender of Johns- 
ton's army to Sherman, at Raleigh, North Carolina, on April 26, 
1865, the glorious and befitting ending of an arduous campaign of 
almost four years. 

Following the surrender, the regiment proceeded north by easy 
marches through Richmond and on to Washington, at which point 
it participated in the triimiphal march of the concentrated armies 
of the United States through the streets of the capital and past the 
reviewing stands of the great commanders, whose ability and cour- 
age had brought to a successful ending the most wicked war that 
had occurred during the age of civilization ; and only the presence 
of the great guiding mind of the loyal side of the conflict, whose 
thread of life had been snapped by the hand of an assassin, could 
have added to the joy and pride of this crowning occasion. 

From Washington the 23d Indiana proceeded to Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, where, on the 23d of July, 1865, it was honorably discharged 
and mustered out of the service. 



256 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

Notwithstanding the fact that the 23d Indiana Regiment did 
not suffer as serious losses in specific engagements (except only at 
Raymond) as did many other regiments, yet the constant drain 
upon its members from deaths and wounds, which it incurred by 
the small numbers killed and wounded here and there in skir- 
mishes and smaller engagements, made the aggregate, as set forth 
in General Terrell's report, from the time of its muster-in until 
its muster-out, killed in battle and died of wounds 345 men, died of 
disease 179, making a grand total of loss by death alone 524, to 
say nothing of the great number that were necessarily discharged 
from service on account of diseases contracted and wounds re- 
ceived. There may have been many other regiments participating 
in war whose death losses and campaigns were greater, but the 23d 
Indiana achieved a record of Avhich the State, as well as its mem- 
bers, should be justly proud. 



117 






Moiiunient of 24th Infantry 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 



1st BRIGADE 12th DIVISION 
24th INFANTRY 



13th CORPS 



Colonel William T. Spicely 

Engaged: Port Gibson, May 1; Champion's Hill, May 16; Assault, May 22; Siege, May 23-July 
4. Casualties: Killed 32, wounded 184, missing 8, total 224; Capt. Felix G. Welman killed, Lieut. 
James H. Baldwin, Lieut. Jesse L. Cain and Asst. Surg. T. W. C. Williamson mortally wounded. 



(258) 



TWENTY-FOURTH REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 
VOLUNTEERS. 

The 24th Regiment, Indiana Infantry Volunteers, was one of 
the ten regiments called for by Governor Morton, under authority 
of the general government, dated June 22d, 1861. The several 
companies rendezvoused at Camp Knox, near Vincennes, and were 
under the supervision of Hon. Cyrus M. Allen until regularly mus- 
tered in. The companies were recruited and organized principally 
in the counties in the southwestern part of the State. 

The 24th was mustered into the service on July 2ist, 1861, by 
Lieut. Col. T. J. Wood, U. S. A., with the following officers: 

Alvin P. Hovey Colonel. 

John Gerber Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Cyrus C. Hines Major. 

Richard F. Barter Adjutant. 

John M. Clark Quartermaster. 

Robert B. Jessup Surgeon. 

John W. Davis Assistant Surgeon. 

Charles Fitch Chaplain. 

COMPANY OFFICERS. 







Captain. 


1st Lieutenant. 


2d Lieutenant. 


Co. 


A. 


Hugh Erwin, 


George Sheeks, 


Hiram F. Braxton. 


Co. 


B. 


Solomon Dill, 


John W. Tucker, 


Stephen H. Southwick 


Co. 


C. 


John F. Grill, 


Charles Larch, 


William Miller. 


Co. 


D. 


Nelson F. Bolton, 


Jacob Covert, 


Samuel M. Smith. 


Co. 


E. 


Samuel R. Morgan, 


John E. Phillips, 


John T. DeWeese. 


Co. 


F. 


Amazon Connett, 


Thomas E. Ashley, 


Joseph A. Sanders. 


Co. 


G. 


William T. Spicely, 


Charle? S. Jenkins, 


Arthur W. Gray. 


Co. 


H. 


William L. Merrick, 


John B. Hutchins, 


James I. Jones. 


Co. 


I. 


Samuel F. McGuffin, 


James Wood, 


Benjamin J. Summers. 


Co. 


K. 


Thomas Johnson, 


Francis M. Redburn, 


William S. Pollard. 



On August 18, 1861, the 24th left Camp Knox to join Fremont's 
army at St. Louis. The regiment was encamped at Carondelet, 
guarding gunboats being built by the government, and drilling 
until the middle of September, when it moved to Jefferson City, and 
then to Georgetown. In October it took part in the march of Gen- 
eral Fremont's army to Springfield and back again to Otterville, 
marching 250 miles in two weeks. 

The regiment then camped at Lamine River bridge, and started 
to build winter quarters, when, on December 15th, it was ordered to 
join an expedition to Warrensburg, forming part of the auxiliary 
force that captured 1,300 prisoners, 1,200 stand of arms, nearly 100 
wagons and a large quantity of supplies and driving General Price 
back towards the southern part of Missouri. 

(259) 



2()0 Indiana at Vioksbttrg. 

The regiment returned to its Lamina camp and remained until 
Februar\^ 7, 1862, when it was ordered to reinforce Grant's army, 
then investing Fort Donelson. On arriving at Paducah the news of 
the surrender of Fort Donelson was received, but the regiment pro- 
ceeded up the Cumberland to Dover, where it went into camp for 
several days, then moving to Fort Henry, and thence, with Grant's 
army, up the Tennessee River. The 24th was at that time in the 
1st Brigade, 3d Division, Army of the Tennessee. The 3d Division, 
commanded by Gen. Lew Wallace, camped at Crump's Landing, 
From there the regiment went on several scouting expeditions, re- 
turning from one in the evening of April 5th, mud-bedraggled, wet 
and tired out. Sunday, April 6th, opened up a fine day, and the 
men of the 24tli anticipated rather a restful time, with no other 
duty than the regular Sunday morning inspection ; but the distant 
boom of cannon gave intimation of more serious work. The battle 
of Shiloh was on. 

General Wallace at once formed his division, ready to move at 
the order, which was received a little before noon. After proceed- 
ing several miles, a staff officer from General Grant informed Gen- 
eral Wallace that the right of the Union lines had been forced back ; 
this necessitated a countermarch, consequently the division did not 
arrive on the battlefield until evening, after the fighting had ceased. 
The soldiers bivouacked on the field, and partook of a cold supper, 
fires net being permitted. Several drenching showers during the 
night, and the firing, at regular intervals, of the big guns of the 
gunboats Tyler and Lexington, prevented unbroken sleep. The 
piteous cries of the wounded could be heard throughout the night. 

At daybreak next day the division was quietly formed and 
moved to its position, on the extreme right of the line of battle. 
The first shot of the day was fired by the 9th Indiana Battery, and 
soon thereafter the 24th received its baptism of blood. It was tried 
in the line of battle and proved itself worthy. The regiment ad- 
vanced steadily the whole day, being several times subjected to se- 
vere fire, both by artillery and musketry. Every company of the 
24th was, at some time during the fight, deployed as skirmishers. 
It fought gallantly the whole day, and halted on the south side of 
Shiloh Branch, when the enemy was in full retreat, and victory was 
assured to the Union arms. The loss of the 24th in this, its first 
battle, was 6 killed and 45 wounded. Lieutenant-Colonel Gerber, 
Captain McGuffin, Lieutenant Southwick were among the killed. 

During the latter part of April the regiment engaged in sev- 
eral scouting expeditions, and, on May 4th, marched to Pea Ridge, 



Twenty-Fourth Infantry. 261 

Mississippi, going into camp as a reserve for the army investing 
Corinth. 

June 2, 1862, Wallace's Division started on the cross-country 
march for Memphis, where it arrived June 17th, going into camp 
on the bluff in front of the city, and remained two weeks. 

July 1st, the 24th embarked on a steamboat and moved down 
the Mississippi and up White River, scouting along the stream as 
far up as Clarendon, and then returned, going into camp at Helena, 
Arkansas. 

The following nine months were put in by the regiment in cam- 
paigning over Arkansas, and scouting up and down the Mississippi 
and its tributaries, with headquarters at Helena. Frequent skir- 
mishes with the enemy tended to add a little spice of danger to the 
otherwise rather tame and tiresome tramping over the wilds of Ar- 
kansas. 

On April 10, 1863, the 24th boarded transports and moved down 
the river towards Vicksburg, arriving at ]\Iilliken 's Bend, and went 
into camp to prepare for a strenuous campaign. All impedimenta, 
wagons, tents, camp ecpiipment, etc., w^ere left here. Officers and 
men were put in light marching order, ammunition was issued, 100 
rounds per man. The regiment at that time was in the 1st Brigade, 
General McGinnis ; 12th Division, General Hovey ; 13th Army Corps, 
General McClernand. On the march from Milliken 's Bend to Hard 
Times Landing, Hovey 's Division did an immense amount of work 
in building bridges and cutting roads through swamps, at times 
working in water nearly waist deep. 

On April 28th, the 24th, with other troops, embarked on "The 
Forest Queen, ' ' and at 3 o 'clock next morning a fleet of transports, 
protected by gunboats, steamed down the river. It was as highly 
interested spectators that the 24th Regiment, during five or six 
hours of April 29th, witnessed the bombardment of Grand Gulf, 
with the possibility staring them in the face of having to storm 
that strong position, as soon as Admiral Porter had succeeded in 
silencing the guns. The rebel batteries were not affected by Por- 
ter's fire, however fierce and heavy and well-directed though it was, 
so the troops disembarked and marched across the point to Hard 
Times Landing, where they bivouacked. During the night the gun- 
boats and transports successfully ran the Grand Gulf batteries, and 
early next day, April 30th, the soldiers embarked on them. The 
24th was put on the gunboat "Benton," Admiral Porter's flagship. 
General Grant and his staff were also on the Benton. The fleet 
dropped down the river a few miles and landed at Biiiinsburg, 



262 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

where the troops disembarked, taking np the march toward the 
hliiff bite in the day. 

May 1st the l)attle of Port Gibson was fought, the 24th doing 
its full share of fighting and maneuvering. The regiment's loss in 
killed and wounded wa,s 18. The march into the interior was re- 
sumed May 3d, the 21:th acting as flanking regiment the whole day. 

During the following two weeks, often drenched to the skin by 
thunderstorms, weary with marching on slippery roads, the soldiers 
bivouacked at night on miry ground. Although put on one-fourth 
rations the troops did not suffer hunger, considerable corn meal and 
bacon being picked up here and there along the route, and roasting 
ears were to be had for the mere picking. , 

The battle of Champion's Hill. May 16th, was the hardest fought 
battle of the Vicksburg campaign, and Ilovey's Division bore the 
brunt of the fighting, losing 1,202 men and 59 officers. The 24th 
lost 201 officers and men, killed and w^ounded. Among the killed 
were Felix G. Welman, Lieut. Jesse L. Cain and Assistant Surgeon 
Thomas W. C. Williamson. Lieut. Col. R. F. Barter was severely 
wounded as he seized the falling colors. Capts. Ewing Roberts and 
Samuel M. Smith also were wounded. In this battle several com- 
panies of the 24th and 11th Regiments lost more than one-half of 
their members engaged. 

With the enemy outnumbering him three to one, Hovey fought 
him with bulldog tenacity and fierce combativeness. He was ably 
seconded by his subordinate officers, as they were by the men. 
Vicksburg, so long striven for, was understood to hang in the bal- 
ance, as it was the garrison of that citadel w^hich contested the field. 

Seldom, perhaps never, was a battle more stubbornly fought. 
Hovey 's veterans, hard pressed, swayed backward and forward, and 
back again, rising and falling, like a sea lashing the rocky shore, 
Can they hold their ground until the promised help comes ? was the 
cry. Again and again they rally to the colors. At last the long- 
looked-for reinforcements arrive. The foe is checked. One more 
determined charge is made on his lines, and exultant cheers pro- 
claim the success of that last desperate onset, and the enemy is in 
full retreat. The pursuit is taken up by fresh troops, and Hovey 's 
tired heroes rest on the bloody field. The enemy routed and the 
battle won, General Hovey rode along the thin and broken lines of 
his division as they rested. He stopped in front of the 24th, his 
old regiment, missing many a familiar face. "Where are the rest 
of my boys?" "They are lying over there," replied the man to 
whom he had spoken, pointing to the hollow across which the di- 



Twenty-Fourth Infantry. 263 

vision had fought and across which the last decisive charge had 
been made. General Hovey turned is horse and rode away weep- 
ing. 

General McGinnis' Brigade halted on the field of battle a couple 
of days and was detailed to bury the dead and care for the wounded. 
Tenderly were these duties performed. 

On May 19th the regiment marched to Black River. From 
Bruinsburg to Black River, General Hovey 's Division lost more 
men and took more prisoners and material of war than any other 
division. Its captures almost equaled those of all the rest of the 
army, as did its losses. 

On May 21st the brigade of General McGinnis crossed the Big 
Black River and marched to the supporting lines of the Union 
army then encircling Vicksburg. On the 22d the 24th moved to the 
front and was placed in a ravine near the rebel works. General 
Grant ordered an assault along the whole line, but the Union troops 
were repulsed with considerable loss. The regiment intrenched in 
the ravine and gradually advancing, protected by trenches, reached 
a position where its sharpshooters were able to pick off the Con- 
federate gunners, rendering their artillery useless. On the 26th the 
regiment acted as support to heavy artillery, until the guns were 
placed in position, and the next day returned to the trenches. For 
forty-three days the 24th was actively engaged in the siege. 

On July 4th, Vicksburg, together Avith the army of General 
Pemberton, surrendered, and the Union troops marched in. 
Hovey 's Division was not permitted to enter the city, but was or- 
dered to Jackson, and started for that place on the morning of the 
5th. The Jackson expedition was attended with a great deal of 
hardship and suffering. The weather was very hot, roads dusty 
and there was very little water. The 24th did considerable skir- 
mishing and marching on this trip. After the evacuation of Jack- 
son the Union forces returned to Vicksburg, arriving there on the 
23d. The regiment encamped on the banks of the Mississippi, 
about two miles below the city. 

From Vicksburg the 24th moved in succession to Natchez, Car- 
rollton, Algiers and Brashear City. It took an active part in Gen- 
eral Franklin 's campaign into the Teche country, October and No- 
vember, returning to Algiers, opposite New Orleans, December 22d. 
Here the regiment re-enlisted, being the first regiment to veteranize 
in the Department of the Gulf. 

After its return from veteran furlough the 24th was encamped 
for several months at Baton Rouge, Louisiana. It took part in the 



2fi4 Indiana at Vicksiujrg. 

engagement at Olive Branch, May 3, 1864. In the fall of the year 
the regiment was moved to Morganza Bend, where it remained sev- 
eral months, protecting the navigation of the Mississippi. On Jan- 
uary 10, 1864, by reason of the depletion of men in both regiments, 
the 24th and 67th Indiana, were consolidated into one command, 
which was continued and officially known as the 24th Indiana In- 
fantry until final muster-out in July, 1865. 

In January, 1865, the regiment embarked on an ocean steamer, 
and, passing down the Mississippi, proceeded to Dauphin's Island, 
then to Barrencas, Florida. Here the regiment was brigaded with 
the 69th Indiana and the 76th and 97th Illinois Regiments, desig- 
nated as the 2d Brigade, 2d Division, 13th Army Corps. Colonel 
Spicely assumed command of the brigade and Lieutenant-Colonel 
Sears of the regiment. The brigade was then detached to join 
General Steele 's column at Pensacola, preparing to move to Florida 
and Alabama, with the purpose of diverting the attention of the 
enemy, while General Canby moved wdth the 13th and 16th Corps. 
on the defenses of Mobile. 

On the 2d of April Colonel Spicely 's Brigade took position in 
the line of troops besieging Fort Blakely. and the 24th, being in 
the front line, had strenuous active service. On the 8th Spanish 
Fort was evacuated by the rebels. This left Blakely the only de- 
fense of Mobile. It was decided at once to carry these works by 
assault, and that was made April 9th. Colonel Spicely formed his 
brigade, with the 69th Indiana and the 97th Illinois in front 
and the 24th Indiana and the 76th Illinois in the supporting 
column. As the order to charge was given the brigade arose, and, 
with a rush and a shout, scaled the rebel works. The fighting on 
the parapets was brief but desperate ; the Union troops swarmed in 
and compelled surrender. The 24th was the first regiment to plant 
its colors on the works of the enemy. The regiment's loss was 30, 
killed and wounded. Among the killed was Capt. George E. Mer- 
chant. Thus ended the last glorious battle of the 24th Regiment. 

The regiment took part in several minor expeditions into the in- 
terior, and on May 12th moved to Mobile, where it remained until 
July 1st, when it sailed for Texas, arriving at Galveston after a 
disagreeable voyage of ten days. Soon after its arrival there the 
members of the 67th, that had been consolidated with the regiment, 
were mustered oiit and sailed for home. Colonel Spicely and Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Sears were mustered out ^^dth the 67th, and Capt. 
W. S. Pollard was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the 24th. 



Twenty-Fourth Infantry. 265 

The remnant of the regiment remained on duty in Galveston 
until November 15, 1865, when it was ordered home to be dis- 
charged. At Indianapolis the 24th was accorded a public recep- 
tion, with addresses of welcome by Governor Morton, General 
Hovey and others, with the approving sentence of "Well done, good 
and faithful servants." 

The regiment lost during service 8 officers and 80 enlisted men 
killed and mortally wounded and 3 officers and 204 enlisted men by 
disease ; total, 295. 




Mouument of 2Gtli Infantry. 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

1st BRIGADE HERRON'S DIVISION 
26th INFANTRY 

Colonel John G. Clark 
Engaged: Siege, June 15-July 4. 



(266) 



TWENTY-SIXTH REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 
VOLUNTEERS. 

The 26th Indiana Infantry was organized under the call of 
President Lincoln for 300,000 troops for three years' service. 

It was assembled at Camp Morton, Indianapolis, in the early 
part of August, 1861, where the regiment remained until companies 
were filled up, and assigned for formation of the regiment, when 
they reported to Camp Sullivan, near Indianapolis, and were duly 
mustered into the United States service, August 31, 1861. 

The officers at muster were : 



FIELD AND STAFF. 
William M. Wheatley, Indianapolis Colonel. 







Richard O'Neal, Indianapol 


IS 


Lieutenant-Colonel. 






John G. Clark, Clark's Hill 




Major. 






Henry Schraeder, Indianapolis 


Adjutant. 






John B. Routh, Winchester. 




Quartermaster. 






Samuel R. Adams, Moores Hill 


Chaplain. 






Robert N. Todd, Southport 




Surgeon. 






George A. Torbet, Cannelton 


Assistant Surgeon. 






LINE OFFICERS. 








Captain. 


1st Lieutenant. 


2d Lieutenant. 


Co, 


A. 


Milton L. Miner, 


Percival G. Kelsey, 


David Rader. 


Co. 


B. 


Benjamin Hargis, 


Campbell Greenfield, 


Thomas B. Coachman. 


Co. 


C. 


Mortimer C. Holman, 


William P. Gard, 


Robert M. Sharp. 


Co. 


D. 


Augustine D. Rose, 


Aaron L. Hunt, 


William J. Wallace. 


Co. 


E. 


Lewis Manker, 


Os3ar W. Kelly, 


James T. Caldwell. 


Co. 


F. 


Harvey Johnson, 


James A. Burkett, 


Thomas J. De La Hunt 


Co. 


G. 


Newton A. Logan, 


Robert F. Braden, 


Samuel Milligan. 


Co. 


H. 


Nathaniel J. Beachley, 


Thomas T. Walker, 


Samuel W. Leipner. 


Co. 


I. 


Courtland E. Whitsit, 


Henry H. Wheatley, 


John A. Whitsit. 


Co. 


K. 


Alden H. Jumper, 


Abram Hill, 


Nathan W. Manning. 



During term of service of the regiment all these officers re- 
signed, or were discharged for disability, from rank, as commis- 
sioned and mustered, or were advanced by promotion to higher 
rank, and all made enviable records. 

The companies composing the regiment were generally from coun- 
ties in the central and south-central part of the State, no one county 
furnishing a full company alone. 

In September the regiment left camp and proceeded by rail- 
road to St. Louis, where it remained, drilling and learning first 
principles of its future duties until early November, when, vv'ith 
other troops, it started to the relief of the besieged Union garrison 
at Lexington, Missouri, but before arriving at Lexington, learning 
of the surrender of this place, the regiment returned to Boonville. 
Missouri. Soon afterward the regiment was attached to the Army 

(267) 



'JfiS Indiana A'I' Vicksi'.i'ro. 

of the Frontier, iindei" eoninuind of General Fremont, and beiJ^an the 
campaign to Springfield, Missouri. After this campaign the regi- 
ment returned to Otterville, Missouri, and from this place the regi- 
ment, with others, participated in the engagement at Blackwater, 
Missouri, which resulted in the capture of a large force of the 
enemy. 

July 2, 1862, the regiment was again ordered to Springfield, 
with other troops of the army, and afterward campaigned in south- 
ern Missouri and northern Arkansas during the fall. 

On December 3, 1862, Herron's Division, to which the 26th was 
attached, started to the relief of General Blunt, at Prairie Grove, 
Arkansas, 110 miles distant. The regiment arrived there on the 
6th and were hotly engaged on the 7th, losing in a charge more than 
200 in killed and wounded. The troops slept that night under a 
truce agreement and discovered, in the morning, that the Confeder- 
ates had stolen away during the night, leaving the Union forces in 
undisputed possession of the territory north of the Arkansas River. 

December 27th was ordered to Van Buren, Arkansas, to attack 
the enemy under their General Hindman, and later returned to 
camp and was on daily duty, keeping touch with the enemy and 
dispersing his marauding bands of detached troops, roaming over 
the country until June 1, 1863, when Herron's Division, of whi'-h 
the 26th was a part, was ordered to St. Genevieve, on the Mississippi 
Eiver, to take boats to join General Grant's army, then engaged in 
the siege of Vicksburg. 

The regiment arrived at Vicksburg on June 13th, and by the 
15tli Herron's Division was duly established on the extreme left of 
the line of approaches to the enemy's fortifications in this locality, 
which was on the left of the 13th Army Corps ; thus completing a 
strong line against the enemy, and relieving troops already sta- 
tioned at this point, so they could be placed on duty further to the 
south and east to defend the line against the Confederate General 
Johnston, who was planning to attack the rear of the army to re- 
lieve the garrison in Vicksburg. 

The 26th entered advanced trenches and were exposed to such 
ceaseless firing that they were unable to emerge for seventeen days. 
During this time they were so constantly employed in defense by 
day and extending their trenches by night, that when they were 
finally able to -v^dthdraw from their position, but 400 men, or one- 
half of the regiment, were fit for duty. 

Soon after the surrender of Vicksburg the i-(^gimont was ordered 
with an expedition to Yazoo City, to take part in an attempt to in- 



Twenty-Sixth Infantry. 26'J 

tercept forces of the enemy on the Big Black River before they 
could retreat to join Johnston's army, then concentrating at Jack- 
son, ]\Iississippi. 

July 26th the regiment was ordered into camp at Port Hudson, 
Mississippi, where the regiment suffered unusual loss of men by a 
seemingly fatal sickness, and Avas later ordered to and reached 
Carrollton, Louisiana, in time to participate in General Grant's 
grand review of the armies concentrating at that point. 

From thence the 26th was ordered to INIorganza Bend, Louis- 
iana, on the Mississippi River, where Herron's Division was sta- 
tioned, and with the 19th Iowa was camped at Sterling's planta- 
tion, to guard the crossing of the Atchafalya River from the enemy 
crossing at a point some eighteen miles out from the Mississippi 
River. 

On September 29tli Gen. Dick Taylor's Confederate command 
effected a crossing, and after a stubborn engagement, during which 
the troops exhausted their ammunition in defense of their position, 
were finally defeated and, besides losing their colors, fully one-half 
of the 26th were captured and sent as prisoners of war to T^^ler, 
Texas, and were held there for months, until exchanged. 

With those who escaped, who were absent, sick in hospitals, on 
furlough or detached service, the regiment finally was again assem- 
l)led at New Orleans, maintaining their organization, and on Oc- 
tober 23, 1863, left with Herron's Division for Brownsville, Texas, 
where the regiment was stationed until February 4, 1864, when they 
re-enlisted and returned home to Indianapolis on veteran furlough, 
arriving there April 1st, after which the regiment returned to New 
Orleans and the different companies were assigned to duty in dif- 
ferent localities in that district until March 16, 1865, when the com- 
panies were assembled again in one camp at Chalmette, below New 
Orleans, and assigned to the 16th Army Corps. 

On March 20th the command went by transports to Mobile Bay 
and disembarked on the east side of the entrance of the bay, and 
immediately began the march around to the rear of the old Span- 
ish Fort and Fort Blakely, which were part of the enemy's defenses 
of Mobile on the east side of the bay. These works were completely 
invested on jMarch 27th and April 2d, respectively, by the army 
under General Canby, and constant fighting was the rule until the 
night of April 8th, when Spanish Fort fell, followed next day by 
the capitulation of Fort Blakely. 

April 13th the 26th, with others of the corps, was ordered to 
march to Montgomery, Alabama, arriving there on the 30th. Proceed- 



270 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

ing via Thelma, the regiment arrived, on May 18th, at Meridian. 
Mississippi, where the companies were again detached and stationed 
at different points in that part of the State in guarding cotton, until 
December 25, 1865, when the scattered companies were assembled 
at Vicksburg, Mississippi, and ordered to Indianapolis, Indiana, 
arriving there January 15, 1866, and were paid off and discharged, 
ciftcr a continuous service of four years, four and one-half months, 
luiving campaigned in Missouri, Arkansas, Tennessee, Louisiana. 
Mississippi and Alabama, and marched many thousand miles. 

The regiment lost during service 96 enlisted men killed and 
mortally wounded and 3 officers and 265 men by disease ; total, 364. 



i 




."Momunent of o4th lulaiiti'y. 



(Monument Tablet Inscription ) 

1st BRIGADE 12th DIVISION 13th CORPS 
34th INFANTRY 

Colonel Robert A. Cameron 

Lieut. Col. WiLLUM Swaim 

Major Robert B. Jones 

Engaged: Port Gibson, May 1; Champion's Hill, May 16; Assault, May 22; Siege, May 23-July 4 
Casualties: Killed 14, wounded 106, total 120; Lieutenant-Colonel William Swaim mortally wounded 



(272) 



THIRTY-FOURTH REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 
VOLUNTEERS. 

This regiment was organized at Anderson on the 16th of Sep- 
tember, 1861, and was composed of companies from the counties of 
Wells, Jay, Huntington, Grant, Howard, Madison and Blackford. 

The various companies were mustered into the service of the 
United States at different times, from September 21st to October 
10th. The officers at final date of muster were as follows : 

FIELD AND STAFF. 

Asbury Steele Colonel. 

Townsend Ryan Lieutenant-Colonel. 

John L. Wilson Major. 

Jacob M. Wells , Adjutant. 

Thomas N. Stilwell Quartermaster. 

Francis A. Griswold Chaplain. 

Jacob S. White Surgeon. 

Daniel W. Taylor Assistant Surgeon. 

COMPANY OFFICERS. 







Captain. 


1st Lieutenant . 


Sd Lieutenant. 


Co. 


A. 


William Swaim, 


James Gorrell, 


WilUam Wilmington. 


Co. 


B. 


James W. Campbell, 


Nimrod Headington, 


Benjamin G. Shinn. 


Co. 


C. 


David Y. Whiting, 


Elmer B. Warner, 


George W. Jackson. 


Co. 


D. 


Jonathan Jones, 


Samuel Henry, 


David H. Wall. 


Co. 


E. 


Francis M. Hunter, 


Hiram G. "Fisher, 


Francis M. Boyden. 


Co. 


F. 


Robert B. Jones, 


Jasper Seegar, 


Carelus M. Crawford. 


Co. 


G. 


George G. Morrison, 


Edward D. Bobbitt, 


John W. Thompson. 


Co. 


H. 


Thomas S. Terrell, 


Thornburgh Baldwin, 


John R Cox. 


Co. 


I. 


Josiah Twibell, 


Isaac Goodin, 


James J. Maddox. 


Co. 


K. 


Amos H. Lawshe, 


Richard V. Sped man, 


Edward W. Loring. 



On October 10th the regiment started for the field via Indian- 
apolis, and on arrival at Louisville, Kentuckj^ went into camp, 
where it remained until the middle of November, when it was or- 
dered to Camp Wickliffe, Kentuck}^ and from thence to Green 
River in February. On the 14th of February, 1862, the regiment 
was ordered to West Point, twenty miles below Louisville, where it 
was assigned to the division of General Nelson, and embarked on 
boats, arriving at Cairo on the 20th of February, where the 34th 
was detached from Nelson's Division and sent to New^ Madrid, 
Missouri, arriving there on the 3d of March. The regiment was 
engaged in the siege of that place until its evacuation, on the 14th 
of March, when it marched to a landing, fourteen miles below, 
drawing with it, by hand ropes, two thirty-pound siege guns, which 
were placed in position on the night of the 15th, and resisted the 
attack the next morning of seven rebel gunboats in a two hours' en- 



[181 



(27:i) 



274 Indiana at Vioksbt no. 

gagenient, siiil^iiig one boat and compelling the withdrawal of the 
remainder. 

The battery also cut off the retreat of the enemy from Island 
No. 10, which was the means of its subsequent capture, with its 
guns and garrison. 

Keturning to New Madrid, the regiment remained there on gar- 
rison duty from April 7, 1862, to June 1-ltli. during v.hich time it 
assisted in the capture of Fort Pillow. 

Soon thereafter the regiment was ordered to Memphis, and from 
there during the summer and fall made short campaigns into 
Arkansas as far as Duvall's Bluffs, and finally settled down to post 
duty at Helena, Arkansas, during the fall and, winter of 1862, with 
short expeditions, driving off, defeating or capturing the enemy. 
A very important duty was the clearing out the Yazoo Pass of tim- 
ber, fallen trees, etc., which the enemy had felled to obstruct navi- 
gation, endeavoring to prevent the reaching of Vicksbui'g by the 
rear. 

On the 10th of April, 1863, the regiment was assigned to the 
1st Brigade, General McGinnis commanding, of Ilovey's 12th Di- 
vision of the 13th Army Corps, and remained in this connnand 
during the campaign and siege of Vicksburg. 

On the 10th of April it was started en the Vicksburg campaign 
from Milliken's Bend. Louisiana, to a point on the west side of the 
jMississippi River, and crossed the river on transports and gunboats, 
to Bruinsburg, on the east side of the river, on the 30th of April, 
marched all that night and engaged the enemy at daylight on the 
1st of May, near Port Gibson, JMississippi. The regiment, by com- 
mand of General Hovey, supported by the 56th Ohio, charged a 
Confederate battery during the battle, early in the morning, and 
captured two field pieces of artillery and 49 prisoners. In this 
battle the regiment lost 49, killed and wounded. 

On the 16th of May the regiment engaged in the battle of 
Champion's Hill, and, while advancing in line of battle, captured 
the 46th Alabama Confederate Regiment, with its colors, all field 
officers and 127 men. In this battle the 34th suffered heavy losses 
in killed and wounded, and among the latter was Lieutenant- 
Colonel Swaim, who died of his wounds on the 17th of June, 1863. 

Moving forward with the army, the 34th, with IMcGinnis' 
Brigade, took position in front of the Confederate defenses at 
Vicksburg, opposite Confederate Fort Garrott, and participated in 
the siege. until the final surrender, July 4, 1863, suffering a loss oT 
13 men in killed and wounded during the siege. 



Thirty-Fourth Infantry. 275 

On July 5th the regiment moved with its brigade and division 
in pursuit of Johnston 's Confederate army, until he retired within 
the defenses of Jackson, Mississippi, where, after a siege of nine 
days, Johnston evacuated in the night, crossing Pearl River and 
escaping eastward toward Meridian, Mississippi. In the siege of 
Jackson the regiment lost 8 men, killed and wounded. 

Returning to Vicksburg, the regiment embarked on August 4th 
for New Orleans, and from thence, on the 12th of September, it 
moved to Brashear City, Louisiana, and while in that section it 
took part in Banks' expedition up the Teche country, as far as 
Opelousas. On the return march it engaged the enemy at Carrion 
Crow Bayou on the 3d of November, after which it proceeded to 
New Iberia, where, on the 15th of December, 1863, 460 of the regi- 
ment re-enlisted, and on the 23d of December it embarked on a 
vessel for Pass Cavallo, Texas, reaching there Januars^ 8, 1864, 
where it remained until the 21st of February and then returned to 
New Orleans, and on March 20th left on veteran furlough for In- 
dianapolis, reaching there April 1st. 

Returning to the field the regiment was placed on duty in New 
Orleans, where it remained until December, 1864, when it em- 
barked for Brazos Santiago, Texas. 

The regiment fought the last battle of the v/ar at Palmetto 
Ranch, Texas, May 13, 1865, and had a spirited engagement. Some 
250 of the regiment fought 500 of the enemy, mounted with a bat- 
tery of six field-pieces, driving them three miles in the space of 
three hours, but the enemy, getting their battery in position, poured 
a destructive fire into our ranks, compelling the main body of the 
regiment to fall back, leaving Companies B and E behind as skir- 
mishers to cover the movement. These companies, being unsup- 
ported, were finally surrounded and forced to surrender. The loss 
of the regiment was 82 in killed, wounded and prisoners. 

After this engagement the regiment fell back to Brazos Island, 
and from thence it moved to Brownsville, where it remained until 
June 16th, and then marched to Ringgold Barracks, Texas, 260 
miles up the Rio Grande, and were the first Union troops to occupy 
that place, which had been an important U. S. military post before 
the Civil War. 

After more than four years of military service, the regiment 
was mustered out at Brownsville, Texas, February 3, 1865. 

The regiment lost during service 2 officers and 32 enlisted men 
killed and mortally wounded, and 5 officers and 204 enlisted men 
by disease; total, 243. 




Monument of 4(Jth Infantry- 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 



1st BRIGADE 12th DIVISION 
46th INFANTRY 



13th CORPS 



Colonel Thomas H. Bringhurst 

Engaged: Port Gibson, May 1; Champion's Hill, May 16; Assault, May 22; Siege, May 23-July 4- 
Casualties: Killed 28, wounded 97, missing 3, total 128; Lieut. Joel Ferris killed, Lieut. William A. 
Andrew mortally wounded. 



(276) 



FORTY-SIXTH REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 
VOLUNTEERS. 

The order authorizing the assembling of this regiment was 
issued September 30. 1861. On the same day one company re- 
ported, and before October 20th eleven, almost full companies, re- 
ported at Camp Logan, in Logansport, Indiana. The last com- 
pany was mustered in December llth and the regimental organiza- 
tion was complete Avith the following officers in command : 



FIELD AND STAFF. 

Graham N. Fitch Colonel. 

Newton G. Scott Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Thomas H. Bringhurst Major. 

Richard P. De Hart Adjutant. 

David D. Dykeman . Quartermaster. 

Robert Irwin Chaplain. 

Horace Coleman Surgeon. 

William S. Haymond Assistant Surgeon. 







Captain. 


Co. 


A. 


John H. Gould, 


Co. 


B. 


Aaron M. Flory, 


Co. 


C. 


B. F. .Schermerhorn, 


Co. 


D. 


John Guthrie, 


Co. 


E. 


William Spencer, 


Co. 


F. 


David Howell, 


Co. 


G. 


Robert W. Sill, 


Co. 


H. 


Felix B. Thomas, 


Co. 


I. 


James H. Thomas, 


Co. 


K, 


Benjamin A. Grover, 



COMPANY OFFICERS. 

1st Lieutenant. 
William A. Pigman, 
John T. Castle, 
Anthony Garrett, 
Willaim M. De Hart, 
Eli R. Herman, 
Bernard B. Dailey, 
Joseph H. Cowdin, 
George Burson, 
John W. F. Liston, 
Robert M. Shields, 



2d Lieutenant. 
James M. Watts. 
John Arnout. 
Andrew B. Robertson. 
Charles A. Brownlee. 
Henry Snyder. 
Attalas A. Benham. 
John M. Berkey. 
James W. Brown. 
Napoleon B. Booth. 
Jacob H. Leighter. 



On December 12, 1861, the regiment broke camp and marched 
to the Wabash depot, and proceeded, via Lafayette, Indianapolis 
and Madison to Louisville, Kentucky. 

The 18th of December the regiment left Camp Oakland, Ken- 
tucky, arriving at BardstoM^n the 21st. January 6, 1862, the regi- 
ment moved to Camp Wickliffe, when it was brigaded with the 
41st Ohio and 47th Indiana, Colonel Hazen commanding. Febru- 
ary 14th the brigade commenced the march to the Ohio, where it 
arrived on the 17th and embarked on boats awaiting. After six 
days it landed at Commerce, Missouri, and became a part of Gen- 
eral Pope's army against New Madrid. February 24th the regi- 
ment was on the march to Benton, where it arrived on the 25th. 
March 1st the 46th left Benton for New Madrid. The march was 
the hardest the regiment had. The rain came down in torrents. 
The mud was so deep that six horses and 200 men were required to 



(277) 



278 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

drag a twelvc-ponml gun. The utmost exertions were required to 
move five miles in six hours. 

Tlie 46tli was placed in the Third Division, General Palmer eom- 
iiianding, and on the 3d met Jeff Thompson and captured three of 
his gims. Arriving at New Madrid on the 3d, it was ortlercd to 
the support of General Granger, who was driving the Confederates 
to the river. Skirmishing and maneuvering gave the men no rest. 
On the 1-ith, at 3 o'clock in the morning, this regiment marched 
through swamps, rains, water and mud to a battery of heavy guns. 
Its flag was raised over the Confederate fort upon finding it evac- 
uated. 

On the 17th the regiment was ordered to Riddle's Point, erect- 
ing a battery during a rainstorm, lasting from midnight till morn- 
ing. At daylight the men dug rifle pits. At 8 o'clock a steamer 
passed up. The guns were fired on her, one ball striking and 
splintering her works! It was not long until four Confederate 
gunboats came down from Tiptonville and opened fire, which con- 
tinued an hour and a quarter. All this time a tempest of shot 
and shell was rained on the command. On the 9th of April the 
regiment embarked and landed at Tiptonville. New Madrid, 
Island No. 10, Tiptonville and all outlying fortifications were cap- 
tured and the campaign against those positions ended. General 
Halleck said to General Pope : 

''I congratulate you and your command on the success that has 
crowned your toils and exposure — and proved yourself worthy 
meml)ers of the brave army of the West." 

General Pope said to his soldiers: 

"The success of our operations required unusual courage and 
patriotism, and an exhibition of the highest qualities of the 
soldier." 

On the 15th of April the regiment embarked and moved down 
the river to Osceola, Arkansas. Preparations were at once made to 
capture Fort Pillow. General Pope having gone up the Mississippi 
with all of his army except the 43d and 46th Indiana Regiments, 
and the gun and mortar boats, but the force was insufficient to 
attempt the capture of the fort. The location was a very unfavor- 
able one for the health of the men. At least 50 per cent, were sick 
and more than 100 unfit for duty. Scouting and hunting for the 
weak point in the Confederate lines was kept up. June 5th the 
enemy abandoned the strong position and a detail from the regi- 
ment went down and landed. Signaling back to the fleet, all the 
vessels moved down. 



Forty-Sixth Infantry. 279 

On the evening of June 5th the fleet, accompanied by all of the 
46th except Company B, started for Memphis, where the Federal 
gunboats and rams destroyed the Confederate fleet. The 43d and 
46th landed and took possession of the city. Company B joined 
the regiment at Memphis on the 8th and remained until the 14th, 
when it embarked on steamers, preparatory to taking part in the 
White River expedition, carrying stores to General Curtis' army. 
From March 4th to June 5th the regiment was never out of hearing 
of heavy guns, day or night. 

Reaching the vicinity of St. Charles on the 16th, a squad under 
command of Lieutenant Swigart went aboard a tug, scouted up the 
river, finding the CJonfederate boom, works and sunken boats in the 
channel, and preparations made to resist further progress of the 
Union fleet. The next morning, the 17th, the transports ap- 
proached as near the hill as safe, disembarked, the regiment de- 
ployed against the Confederate position and captured it. 
While the regiment was making the charge a sixty-four-pound 
parrot shell from a Confederate gun penetrated the steam chest 
of the "Mound City." The boat was instantly filled with steam, 
scalding almost every man of the 175 on board the boat, and but 
few lived. On the 22d the fleet continued up the river. During 
this expedition the men were annoyed by constant guerilla warfare. 
The fleet retui'ued to St. Charles that night because of low water. 
On the 28th of June, having received reinforcements and lighter 
draft vessels, the regiment turned up the river again, and went as 
far as Clarendon. They sustained more severe fire from the guer- 
illas than previously. 

Not finding Curtis, or getting any word from him, and the 
river rapidly falling, the fleet returned to St. Charles July 4th. 
On the 5th the fleet again turned up the river. On July 6th two 
companies of the regiment, with other troops, were sent to attack 
a cavalry force. The enemy was found and dispersed and the 
detachment returned to the fleet. At 4 o'clock that day the entire 
brigade was on the road to Duvall's Bluff. For artillery, two 
boat howitzers w^ere lashed on the hind axle of wagons. That night 
a Confederate force was encountered, and after a few shots from 
the improvised battery the infantry broke and ran; it was not an 
orderly retreat. Then orders came to come out to the river. On 
the 12th another effort was made to connnunicate with General 
Curtis. Six companies of the regiment, on two boats, were sent up 
to Clarendon. Learning the general had passed, conducting his 



280 Indiana at Vioksbukg. 

army to Helena, the detachment returned to St. Charles, and on the 
14th of July returned to Helena. 

During this expedition the men were daily fired on by guerillas. 
To stop it, Colonel Fitch issued his proclamation threatening rigor- 
ous measures if the practice was not stopped. General Hindman 
and Jeff Davis issued counter-proclamations, threatening retalia- 
tion. Jeff Davis grouped Colonel Fitch, General Hunter, General 
Phelps and General Butler as felons. They did not succeed in 
getting one of the regiments in their hands. So ended the White 
River expedition. 

August 3d an expedition was organized, General Hovey com- 
manding, to disperse a rebel force west of Helena. The 46th was 
made a part of it. This force marched to Clarendon and back, 
suffering much from the heat and dust. The regiment was at Hel- 
ena, Arkansas, from July 15, 1862, to April 9, 1863. During this 
time it was engaged in expeditions, fights and skirmishes with 
guerillas. It was on White River four times; to Duvall's Bluff 
twice ; to Arkansas Post ; down the Tallahatchie ; east from Helena ; 
the Yazoo Pass and other points. 

The Tallahatchie expedition, of which the 46th was a part, 
started November 26, 1862, and went down the river in boats to 
the Delta, disembarked and marched through water and mud to 
the Coldwater, arriving on the 30th, and, crossing the river, some 
Confederates appeared and were pursued, but escaped. The march 
was continued until the Tallahatchie was crossed. The return 
march was begun January 2, 1863. 

On the 10th of January the regiment made another of its many 
trips up the White River, going to Duvall's Bluff, returning to 
Helena on the 22d. On the 14th of February the regiment started 
on the Yazoo Pass expedition. Cutting the levee, passing out 
through a crevice into Moon Lake, a landing was made nine miles 
from "Hunt's Mills," to which the regiment marched that night. 
The next morning there was three feet of water on the road, along 
which it had marched. As soon as relief could reach the regiment 
it was taken back to Helena, where it arrived February 21st. On 
landing, the men were ordered to embark in other boats on another 
expedition. Although tired, hungry and dirty, the men immedi- 
ately prepared to embark. General Ross was to command. 

This was intended to open a waterway to the rear of Vicksburg. 
Many trees had to be cut away to permit the passage of boats. The 
everhanging trees and limbs were very destructive to smokestacks, 
pilot houses and the upper works of boats. When the boats came 



Forty-Sixth Infantry. 281 

out of the Pass they looked like wrecked scows. Reaching the Cold- 
water, sailing improved. Entering the Tallahatchie, there were no 
obstructions to its progress until Fort Pemberton was reached on 
March 11, 1863. Within two miles of the fort the troops disem- 
barked, and the 46th, Colonel Bringhurst commanding, leading, 
advanced toward the fort. There was a strong Confederate force 
outside. A brisk little battle was on. The regiments were driven 
back into the fort. General Ross and Colonel Slack were present 
and congratulated the regiment on its fine work. 

April 4th the expedition started on its return, arriving at 
Helena on the 8th. On arriving at Helena, Gen. A. P. Hovey came 
on board and ordered the regiment to remain on the boat, as it was 
going to Vicksburg. 

On the 11th of April the "Volunteer" dropped down the river 
and the 46th commenced its part of the memorable campaign. Ar- 
riving at Milliken's Bend, above Vicksburg, all baggage except 
what could be carried was piled on a steamboat and left. On April 
16, 1863, the regiment left Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, for Grand 
Gulf, Mississippi. On the 29th of April Hovey 's Division was 
placed on boats and barges to cross the river and assault the fort 
at Grand Gulf, as soon as the navy silenced the guns. The attack 
failing, the regiment was disembarked. The battle between the 
gunboat fleet and Confederate batteries was a grand display. 
During the night the gunboats, transports and barges ran the bat- 
teries at Grand Gulf, and on the morning of the 30th the 46th em- 
barked on board the ' ' Benton, ' ' and was stationed on the gun deck. 
General Grant and Commodore Porter were on the wheelhouse of 
that boat. The 46th was the first to land on the east side of the 
great river in the rear of Vicksburg. That day the grandest cam- 
paign of the war was commenced. The regiment marched all night, 
arriving at Magnolia Hills at daylight. The 46th was ordered to 
support the 18th Indiana, it being pressed. To reach the position 
assigned it was necessary to lift the men of Company B up a per- 
pendicular wall of the hill. The capture of a two-gun battery was 
the joint work of the 46th. 11th and 34th Indiana. The battle of 
Port Gibson, or, as sometimes called, Magnolia Hills, ended mth 
the day a Union victory. 

The regiment made some short marches until the 12th of May, 
when the division advanced to Fourteen-Mile Creek, and Com- 
panies A, B and C of the 46th, detailed as skirmishers, crossed the 
creek and engaged in a lively skirmish with some cavalry, which 
soon retreated. Arriving at the top of a hill, the men heard the 



282 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

lon^ roll of the Confederfites in every direction except the one they 
came from — they did not tarry. The division was withdrawn and 
rapidly marched to Raymond, where General Logan's division was 
engaged in battle, and on the 14tli entered the town. 

May 16, 1863, the regiment, with the division, left Bolton, on 
the road to Vicksburg, and three miles from the former town found 
the Confederate lines. The division was deployed, skirmishers 
thrown to the front, and was ready for the advance. General 
Grant was present and personally directed the movements of the 
troops, but was not ready to bring on the battle. At 11 :45 Gen- 
eral Grant gave General Hovey the order to advance. After mov- 
ing a short distance the advance was halted until 12 :15, when the 
battle began. The whole line was fiercely engaged. Advancing 
rapidly, the rebels Avere driven back over their guns in great con- 
fusion. Crossing a ravine the Confederates reformed. Here was 
desperate fighting. The most desperate and protracted fighting 
of the 46th was around a log cabin. The battle ebbed and flowed, 
the ground lost and regained, and at last the victory was won. 

General Grant, in his book, says : ' ' The battle of Champion 's 
Hill lasted about four hours' hard fighting, preceded by two or 
three hours of skirmishing, some of which almost rose to the dig- 
nity of a battle. Every man of Hovey 's Division, and of Mc- 
Pherson's two divisions was engaged during the battle. No other 
part of yny command was engaged at all, except as described be- 
fore." (Vol. 1, page 518.) Again he said: "Hovey was bearing 
the brunt of the battle at the time." (Page 519.) General Hovey 
says in his report : ' ' The eflPective force of my division at the com- 
mencement was as follows : 1st Brigade 2,371, 2d Brigade 1,800, 
making a total of 4,180. Of this number 211 were killed, 872 
wounded and 119 missing; total, 1,202." (Rebellion record. Vol. 24, 
part 2, pp. 45, 46.) "Took 350 men into the battle and the 46th lost 
84, killed and wounded, 25 per cent. The per cent, of loss of di- 
vision, 28.7." 

On the 19th of May the 1st Bngade marched to Vicksburg, 
arriving at the enemy's fortifications on the 21st. The 22d, when 
the assault was made, the 46th was held in reserve. After the de- 
feat of the assault it took a position in front and sustained a fire 
all day. The daily duty of the regiment during the siege was 
much the same one day with another. Two companies were fur- 
nished daily for duty in the advance works. Each man usually dis- 
posed of forty rounds of ammunition. On July 3, 1863, white flags 
were raised on the Confederate fortifications, which indicated an 



Forty-Sixth Infantry. 283 

intention to surrender. At ].0 o'clock, July 4th, a large white flag 
appeared on the courthouse, telling- the besieging army the strong- 
est position of the Confederacy, in the West at least, had surren- 
dered. More than a hundred of the Confederates were feasted by 
the 46th, that best aud most glorious Fourth of July, 1863, when, 
after forty- three days' siege, the city surrendered. 

On the 5th of July the regiment marched with the army sent to 
Jackson, Mississippi, to capture or drive Gen. J. E. Johnston out of 
that city and State. On the 10th the army commenced closing in 
on Jackson. Some hard skirmishes were allotted to the 46th, but it 
gained its position without serious loss. The siege went on until 
the 21st, when General Johnston, to avoid capture, evacuated the 
city and retreated east. After assisting in destroying the railroads, 
the regiment commenced the return march to Vicksburg, where it 
arrived on the 23d, ending the most memorable campaign of the 
war. The results were more far-reaching than any other cam- 
paign. The Confederacy could not live without Vicksburg. Cham- 
pion 's Hill opened the door to Vicksburg, and the fall of the Con- 
federacy, and it should be made the sixteenth decisive battle of the 
world. It should be added to Creasy 's fifteen decisive battles. For 
ninety days the regiment never was out of hearing of hostile can- 
non. The Confederates lost 40,000 men, killed, wounded and pris- 
oners; 170 cannon, 50,000 small arms and immense stores, and the 
territory of Vicksburg, Jackson and Port Hudson and control of 
the Mississippi River. 

AugTist 4th the regiment embarked for Natchez, arriving there 
the 7th, rested until the 15th, and on that date it embarked for New 
Orleans, arriving the 17th. Its occupation at New Orleans was 
dress parades and grand reviews. The 12th of August it was or- 
dered to march. It left Carrollton and landed at Algiers, and the 
same night got aboard cars previously loaded with commissary 
stores for Brashear City, arriving the next day. On the 28th it 
crossed Berwick Bay, and on October 3d the regiment was again on 
the march and passed through Centerville and Franklin, camping 
at New Iberia. At the latter place a school for field officers and 
brigade drill was established. Fortunately it only lasted three 
days. On the 15th the Confederates broke it up by making an 
attack on General "Weitzell's command, and the 1st Brigade, to 
which the regiment belonged, was ordered to his support. He was 
able to take care of himself. 

On the 16th the Confederates made an effort to get away with 
a large drove of cattle. The 1st Brigade advanced and drove the 



284 Indiana at Vicksburo. 

enemy away, keeping the cattle. On the 20th the 1st Brigade led 
the advance on Opelousas, where a large Confederate force was 
assembled. It fled — there was no battle. General Franklin rode 
with the regiment during this advance and highly complimented 
the men for the precision of its maneuvering. The brigade 
marched through Opelousas to Barre's Landing, on the Bayou Car- 
tableaux. 

November 3d the Confederates attacked General Burbidge's 
Division, encamped at Carrion Crow Bayou. As soon as the attaclc 
connnenced the 46tli Regiment was assembled, and before the staff 
officer reached the camp was on the march at double-quick to the aid 
of Burbridge's Division, three miles away, and arrived in time to 
save a battery and many soldiers from capture. The day after tlu' 
battle, General Burbridge personally thanked the regiment for its 
timely assistance. 

The night of the 6th the regiment reached Vermillionville. The 
army had passed through the town. The regiment was halted at 
the edge of it, and ordered to remain until all property belonging 
to the army was removed. 

The Confederate army, at least 10,000 strong, was within three 
miles of the town, formed in a crescent. Its wings extended beyond 
arid almost surrounded the town. On the other side of the town, and 
about the same distance away, was the Union army. Between the 
two was the regiment, 300 men and twenty -five cavalrymen. This 
position was maintained until 1 o'clock a. m., when the regiment 
was called in, and on the 16tli the regiment marched to New Iberia. 
At midnight on the 19th the regiment was ordered to fall in, and to 
take eighty rounds of ammunition, and, keeping quiet, was to march 
to Camp Pratt, on Lake Mauripas. The enemy was caught asleep, 
pickets and entire force, except two men, being captured. The 
regiment mounted the prisoners on mules, two and three on an ani- 
mal, and returned to camp. On the 19th the march to Brashear 
City was commenced, arriving there on the 22d, went aboard cars 
and reached Algiers the same day. 

December 29th Companies C, F, H and I embarked on a steamer 
for Texas. It landed at Matagorda Bay, where it remained two 
weeks and then returned. January 19th, 1864, the 46tli crossed 
Lake Pontchartrain to Madisonville. Leaving Madisonville Feb- 
ruary 27th, it returned to Algiers and re-enlisted as veterans. 
Those not re-enlisting were assigned to Varner's Battalion. 

March 3d orders were received to march to Alexandria. Pass- 
ing Alexandria the 26th, the regiment reached Natchitoches April 



Forty-Sixth Infantry. 285 

1st. On April 7th, 1864, the regiment encamped at Pleasant Hill. 
On the 8th the regiment accompanied the division, which, exclu- 
sive of train guards, numbered about 1,200 men. The army was 
advancing along a single wagon road, through dense pine forests, 
crossed by deep gullies and spanned by narrow bridges. The army 
was stretched out on thirty miles of this road, and when this road 
became blocked the army could neither reinforce the front or the 
rear. The cavalry was in advance and was the first to be attacked 
by the enemy and defeated; then the 4th Division, 13th Army 
Corps, 2,200 men, was brought up and defeated. Then the 3d 
Division, 1,200 strong, was marched four miles, through into the 
battle and was also defeated. The regiment fought until sur- 
rounded and then fought its way out with a loss of 7 killed, 13 
wounded and 86 prisoners. Those who succeeded in fighting their 
way out joined the 19th Corps and helped defeat the enemy that 
night. The Confederate force in line was at least 8,000 men. The 
Union army lost 600, killed and wounded, and 1,250 captured. 
The Confederate loss, from official reports, was 3,100, of whom 
1,000 were dead within ten days. This was the battle of Sabine 
Cross Roads. 

April 9, 1864, the entire army was in line of battle at Pleasant 
Lake Hill. This was the only time since leaving Alexandria. Here 
the Confederates, 10,000 strong, were badly defeated. The 46th 
Regiment participated in the victory. The Union army was then 
marched back to Grand Ecore, arriving on the llth. The regi- 
ment was engaged on entrenchments. This was the only defeat 
the regiment acknowledged. The men here defeated had stood at 
New Madrid, Port Gibson, Champion's Hill, Jackson, Port Hud- 
son and many other engagements Avithout turning their backs to the 
foe. 

The 23d of April it fought at Cane Hill, and the Confederates 
were defeated with great loss. From the 23d of April to the 22d of 
May was a constant skirmish and sometimes a severe battle. Not a 
day passed without an engagement, large or small. The regiment 
lost more than 33 per cent. The regiment assisted in the con- 
struction of the dam in Red River to save Admiral Porter's fleet. 
But the disatrous Red River campaign was ended. 

The regiment was ordered to Baton Rouge. The third day after 
arriving, a fine steamer came down the river for New Orleans and 
the regiment marched aboard. There was always a mystery where 
the order came from and Avhere it was. When Colonel Bringhurst 
was asked for it. Adjutant Watts had it. When Watts was found 



286 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

the absent Colonel had it. The regiment landed and went into camp 
at CarroUton. No trouble was made about this unauthorized voyage. 
June 15th embarked on the "Sultana" for Cairo, where it arrived 
on time. Leaving that city, it arrived at Indianapolis the 22d, and 
was welcomed by Governor Morton. The regiment landed in Lo- 
gansport on the 23d of June, receiving a warm welcome. Thou- 
sands of people filled the streets, and dinner was prepared for the 
regiment by the ladies. Judge Biddle welcomed the regiment, and 
in closing his address said : 

"You have brought home the rugged laurels of the soldiers, 
and innocent maidens will give you wreaths of flowers to tsvine 
with them. They welcome you back from your dangers. Their 
tender arms ill befit the battlefield, and they look to you for pro- 
tection. You will give it to them. Remember, each one of you is 
dear to some heart, and I trust that each of you has some object 
of love, reverence or affection to keep your hearts true to your- 
self, your country and your God. ' ' 

At the close of the judge's address, 200 young girls advanced 
and presented a beautiful bouquet to every officer and soldier, and, 
after dress parade, it was dismissed to enjoy its well-earned veteran 
furlough. July 20th an order was published for the regiment to 
assemble on the 26th. On that date every man reported except 
three, who were sick. From the 26th of July to the 27th of August 
the regiment was employed in southern Indiana and northern Ken- 
tucky, defeating a Confederate raid into Indiana. On the 27th 
the regiment moved by railroad to Lexington, Kentucky. Sep- 
tember 13th left Lexington for Cincinnati, and from there to Big 
Sandy River. On November 24th went to Louisville and Lexing- 
ton, arriving there the 25th. In December the Sabine Cross Roads 
prisoners joined the regiment. Father Rabb, chaplain, will never 
be forgotten by any member of the 46th Regiment. He was a 
practical Christian. He lived his faith. 

A general officer said : ' ' The 46th has had the good fortune to 
always please commandants, under whose authority it has been 
placed. But on the field and in garrison, its officers and men have 
given such satisfaction as to have been given up with reluctance 
by those in command. This has much to do with keeping the regi- 
ment in the service." 

The regiment was mustered out at Louisville on the 4th of Sep- 
tember, 1865, transported to Indianapolis and paid off on the 11th. 
The officers and men returned home as citizens and were given a 
rousing reception. 



Forty-Sixth Infantry. 287 

And so the 46th Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry passed 
into history. The members faithfully served their terms of enlist- 
ment and re-enlisted and again merged into the citizenship of the 
nation. All felt proud of the record of their regiment. No page 
of it brought discredit to its members or the State. The 46th sim- 
ply claims it was an Indiana regiment, and that its members are 
satisfied with its record. 

The regiment lost during service 4 officers and 66 enlisted men, 
killed and mortally wounded, and 3 officers and 191 enlisted men by 
disease. Total, 264. 




I 



Monument of -ITtli Infantry. 



1 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

2d BRIGADE 12th DIVISION 13th CORPS 
47th INFANTRY 

Colonel James R. Slack 
Lieut. Col. John A. McLaughlin 

Engaged: Port Gibson, May 1; Champion's Hill, May 16; Siege, May 25-July 4. Casualties: 
Killed 37, wounded 111, missing 18, total 166: Lieut. James F. Perry killed, Lieut. George W. Cole 
mortally wounded. 



(2S8) 



I 



FORTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 
VOLUNTEERS. 

The nucleus of the 47th Regiment, Indiana Volunteers, was 
formed at Bluffton, Indiana. Early in September, 1861, John A. 
McLaughlin, a Mexican war veteran, came to that town to organize 
a company for the war, expecting to join the 34th Regiment, then 
in camp at Anderson, Indiana. On the 25th day of September he 
went into that camp with an enrollment of 83 men, but found the 
regiment already full, and, holding the men a few days, he was 
ordered to Camp Sullivan, Indianapolis. Here the required num- 
ber for a full company was soon added, and on the 2d day of No- 
vember the company, with 101 men, including officers, was mus- 
tered into the United States service for ' ' three years or during the 
war," by mustering officer Jolm B. Ely, of Company A, of the 
47th. 

The regimental officers were as follows: 

James R. Slack Colonel. 

Milton S. Robinson Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Samuel S. Mickel Major. 

Marion P. Evans Adjutant. 

George Nichol Quartermaster. 

Samuel W. Sawyer Chaplain. 

James L. Dicken Surgeon. 

James R. Mills Assistant Surgeon. 



COMPANY OFFICERS. 







Captain. 


1st. Lieutenant. 


2d Lieutenant. 


Co. 


A. 


John A. McLaughlin, 


Albert Moorehouse, 


Nicholas Van Horn. 


Co. 


B. 


Lewis H. Goodwin, 


Wm. M. Henley, 


Christian B. Rager. 


Co. 


C. 


Esaias Daily, 


Byron H. Dent, 


Henry C. Weimer. 


Co. 


D. 


James R. Bruner, 


T. J. Siling, 


Conrad H. Lines. 


Co. 


'E. 


James Wintrode, 


John Swaidner, 


Elijah Snowden. 


Co. 


F. 


Sextus H. Shearer, 


Silas S. Hall, 


Aurelius Purviance. 


Co. 


G. 


John T. Robinson, 


John F. Eglin, 


Wm. Woodbeck. 


Co. 


H. 


Samuel J. Keller, 


George H. Brinkerhoff, 


James Gordon. 


Co. 


I. 


Joshua W. Bowersock, 


John Emory, 


Edward J. Williams. 


Co. 


K. 


Ellison C. Hill, 


Wm. H. Hayford, 


Joseph A. McKinsey 



On the 13th of December, 1861, Colonel Slack had his regiment 
drawn up in line and formally presented to the United States. On 
the 15th it broke camp and departed for Louisville, Kentucky. 

From thence it marched to Oakland, camped and was assigned 
to General Wood's Brigade of Buell's Army. From this place, by 
short stages, it marched to Camp Wickliffe, then under General 
Nelson; on the 14th of February, it marched through Elizabeth- 
town to West Point, on the Ohio River, where it took transport for 
Commerce, Mo., on the Mississippi River, arriving on the 24th, and 



119[ 



(289) 



290 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

marched out to Benton, Missouri, and March 1st it marched to a 
point lielow Island No. 10, on the Mississippi River, and operated 
along the river between that point and New Madrid, and was the 
first regiment to enter Fort Thompson, IMarch 14th. 

With the 34th, 43d and 46th regiments, under General Palmer, 
it participated in the action which cut off communications with 
Island No. 10, and joined in the surrender of that point. This 
was the first action that tested the mettle of the men. The guns 
were pulled in place on the river bank by hand, with ropes, in the 
darkness of the night, and the men, with no other protection than 
the rifle-pits scooped out in the sand, held their ground against 
the fire of the rebel gunboats, disabling one and driving off the 
others. From this point the regiment moved to Tiptonville, Ten- 
nessee, remaining there from April 15th until June 15th. 

The next move was to Memphis, remaining until July 25th, 
Colonel Slack being in charge of the post. The regiment was then 
taken by transport to Helena, Arkansas, where it remained until 
February 24, 1863. While at Helena the regiment made several 
raids into the enemy's territory, one of which, on the 11th of 
August, 1862. on Brown's plantation, in Mississippi, resulted dis- 
astrously, especially to Company A, which was guarding a large 
amount of cotton. The men had traveled till midnight, and, tired 
and sleepy, had thrown themselves down in the open without proper 
guard and were attacked about 3 o'clock in the morning, losing 11 
killed and badly wounded. 

The 47th participated in three of Grant's five attempts to get 
around Vicksburg; those of the Yazoo Pass, the Coldwater, the 
Tallahatchie Eiver, which brought them up to Fort Greenwood, on 
the Yazoo River, occupying the time from February 25th until 
April 8th. This was followed by the march across Milliken's Bend 
to New Carthage, via Perkins' and James' plantations. The regi- 
ment crossed the river by transports and was landed at Bruinsburg 
April 30th. Here it was assigned to Hovey's Division, McCler- 
nand's Corps, and now commenced the real Vicksburg campaign. 
At this point it is deemed proper to give the real state of the 47th 
regiment's field and staff officers, as many changes had been made 
by resignation, death and promotion. 

James R. Slack Colonel. 

John A. McLaughlin Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Lewis H. Goodwin Major. 

Wm. H. Vance .\djutant. 

James L. Dicken Surgeon. 

Thos. H. Crosby Assistant Surgeon. 



Forty-Seventh Infantry. 291 

Immediately on landing, the evening of April 30th, the regiment 
took up its line of march, and, after an all-night tramp, confronted 
the enemy under General Bowen near Port Gibson. Hovey's Di- 
vision had the brunt of this battle, and the 47th, assisted by a bat- 
tery of field guns, repulsed charges made by one of Bowen 's 
brigades. 

General McClernand's Corps now consisted of Carr's, Oster- 
haus', Hovey's and Smith's Divisions, and drove the enemy from 
the field with heavy loss. But little opposition was encountered 
until May 16th, on Champion's Hill, when the army encountered 
General Pemberton's army, which came out from Vicksburg and 
gave battle. Here, again, Hovey's Division was brought on and had 
the hardest of the battle. Company A of the 47th was on the skir- 
mish line, and a retrograde movement of tlie forces engaged brought 
the lltli Regiment to the rear of that line, and the charge made by 
that regiment swept the skirmishers with it. The guns of a rebel 
battery were captured, but had to be abandoned, for just at that 
time our force was outnumbered. We had to fall back for a space, 
but were soon reinforced and the enemy was swept from the field. 
The Champion's Hill fight has been set down in history as one of 
the three great battles that decided the fate of the Southern Confed- 
eracy. It was certain that Pemberton would now have to fall back 
to Vicksburg, and as certain that Vicksburg, with its army, must 
fall, and that the Confederate States would be completely divided 
by the Mississippi River, which would be held against them in its 
entirety. 

At Champion's Hill, the entire loss was 2,441 killed and 
wounded, and of Hovey's Division, 1,202, or over 40 per cent, of the 
men engaged. The 47th Regiment's loss was 140, and Licuts. 
James F. Perry and George W. Cole, of Company B, were killed, 
and Major Goodwin, Captain Sturgis and Lieutenant Bender were 
wounded. 

From this time our progress was rapid. Some opposition at the 
Black River Bridge, on the 18th, was met with. On May 26th the 
47th was assigned to its position in the rear of Vicksburg, and com- 
menced the process of fighting the enemy with pick, spade and 
starvation. 

Capt. S. J. Keller, of Company H, a Mexican War veteran, still 
lives. He permitted us to quote from his diary a few of his daily 
records during the siege: "May 26th, ordered out as sharpshoot- 
ers and are in trenches within 200 yards of the enemy's forts. No 
enemy dare show his head. We shoot so close or pick them off as to 



292 Indiana at Vicksburg, 

warn them to keep hid. Had heavy artillery firing on both sides. 
A flag of truce sent out to bury the dead and bring in the wounded. 
The men from both sides came together and talked friendly. Our 
hoys jollied them and advised them to give up and save their city 
and many lives. They replied that they still had hopes General 
Johnston would come to their relief. May 28th — We are back in 
camp. Had only one man wounded in our regiment the two days 
we were out, but some of the men had many narrow escapes. June 
11th — Last night was dark and stormy. Was on duty the forepart. 
Thundered and lightened and poured as if the earth and sky were 
coming together. Went into camp, wet, muddy and half dead. 
June 25th — Blew up one of the enemy's forts. Heavy artillery 
duel which lasted two hours. June 30th — Busy working on our 
paj'rolls. A cannon ball from the enemy's guns struck my tent and 
threw dirt and dust all over us. July 3d — Have dug our trench 
almost into the enemy's works and our men are lying flat on the 
ground. July 4th — This is a glorious old Fourth of July. Vicks- 
burg has surrendered. ' ' 

After the surrender of Vicksburg the 47th participated in the 
recapture of Jackson. Returning to Vicksburg, it was sent to 
New Orleans, and, under General Banks, went on the first Red 
River campaign, up the Teche country, in western Louisiana, and 
after the engagement at Bayou Grand Coteau it returned to New 
Iberia, and while there, in December, 1863, the regiment re-en- 
listed and was furloughed home to Indianapolis, where it arrived 
on the 18th day of February, 1864, with 416 veterans who had re- 
enlisted. 

On February 19th, at a public reception given to the veterans 
of the 21st and 47th Regiments, in Indianapolis, addresses were 
made by Governor Morton and Colonel Slack. 

Upon its return to the field the 47th moved with Banks ' army on 
the Red River expedition in the spring of 1864, engaging in the 
marches, battles and retreats of that disastrous campaign. On the 
28th of July it engaged the enemy at Atchafalya Bayou, having 
many wounded. 

The regiment was then stationed at Morganza Bend, Louisiana, 
at which post it remained on duty some time. On December 31st, 
1864, Col. James R. Slack was commissioned brigadier-general, and 
Lieut. Col. John A. McLaughlin succeeded him as colonel of the 
regiment. 

In February the 47th was transported to the mouth of Mobile 
Bay and took an active part in the campaign of March and April, 



Forty-Seventh Infantry. 293 

1865, which resulted in the capture of the city of Mobile and de- 
fenses. After the fall of Mobile the regiment was transferred to 
Shreveport, La., with the division of General Herron, to receive 
the surrender of Confederate General Price's army, where it re- 
mained until October 23, 1865, when it was mustered out and re- 
turned home to Indianapolis, reaching there November 1, with 532 
enlisted men and 32 conunissioned officers. 

Before the final discharge, on the 2d of November, the regi- 
ment was addressed in the capitol grounds by Governor Morton. 
General Slack, Colonels McLaughlin and Robinson, after which the 
regiment departed for their respective homes, to resume their places 
as patriotic citizens. 

The regiment lost during service 2 officers and 80 enlisted men 
killed and mortally wounded, and 4 officers and 250 enlisted men by 
disease; total, 336. 




Moiuuiient of 4Sth Inlantry- 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

1st BRIGADE 7th DIVISION 17th CORPS 
48th INFANTRY 

Colonel Norman Eddy 

Engaged: Near Bavou Pierre, May 3; Raymond, May 12; Jackson, May 14; Champion's Hill, 
May 16; Assault, May 22; Siege, May 23-July 4. Casualties: Killed 14, wounded 71, missing 1, 
total 86. 



(294) 



FORTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 
VOLUNTEERS. 

The 48th Regiment was organized at Goshen, Indiana, and mus- 
tered into service December 6, 1861, and its field and stafif commis- 
sioned to serve as follows : 

Norman Eddy, Goshen Colonel. 

Melvin B. Hascall, South Bend Lieutenant-Colonel. 

DeWitt C. Rugg, Indianapolis Major. 

Edward P. Stanfield, South Bend Adjutant. 

Charles L. Murray, Goshen Quartermaster. 

John W. Smith, Middlebury Chaplain. 

Levi J. Ham, South Bend Surgeon. 

Frank T. Bryson, Middlebury Assistant Surgeon. 

The companies of the organization composing the regiment were 
from St. Joseph, Elkhart, Laporte, Noble and Jasper counties. 

Owing to resignations, severity of the service, which caused 
retirement for disability, wounds in battle, and like causes, the field 
and staff originally mustered in with this regiment were nearly all 
replaced during its enlistment with officers next in rank, and was 
most ably commanded from time of its muster until disbandment 
at the close of the war. 

COMPANY OFFICERS ORIGINALLY AS FOLLOWS: 







Captain. 


1st Lieutenant. 


Zd Lieutenant. 


Co. 


A. 


Benjamin D. Townsend, 


Abner J. Dean, 


Edward J. King. 


Co. 


B. 


William H. Sutphen, 


Asa Knott, 


George H. Loring. 


Co. 


C. 


Daniel Crumpacker, 


Welcome Rice, 


George Baldwin. 


Co. 


D. 


Orrison Wilson, 


Jasper Packard, 


Derick Brinkerhoof. 


Co. 


E. 


Thomas B. Roberts 


David F. Spain, 


George W. Hart. 


Co. 


F. 


Barnet Byrkett, 


William A. Judkins, 


Crawford McDonald 


Co. 


G. 


Riohard F. Mann, 


Henry A. White, 


George W. Thayer. 


Co. 


H. 


Gustavus Paulus, 


Gotheb Schauble, 


Henry Milburn. 


Co. 


I. 


Edward J. Wood, 


Abraham S. Fisher, 


George W. Gibben. 


Co. 


K. 


David S. Snyder, 


Albert J. Guthridge, 


John Miller. 



Owing to the fatalities of war, resignations, because of disabil- 
ity, and worthy promotions to rank in field and staff, all these line 
officers that were mustered Avith organization of the regiment were 
succeeded during the service by officers next in rank. 

February 1, 1862, the regiment broke camp, and, under orders, 
proceeded to Fort Donelson, via Cairo, where it arrived the day 
after the surrender of that fort. From thence to Padueah, and in 
May moVed up the Tennessee River and engaged in the siege of 
Corinth, and after evacuation of this place was assigned to 1st 
Brigade, 2d Division, Army of the Tennessee, and took part in cam- 
paigns against Confederate General Price's army during the sum- 
mer of 1862. 

(295) 



296 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

On the 19th of September the regiment participated in the 
battle of Tnka, losing 116 men in killed and wounded, out of 420 
engaged. 

October 3d and 4th engaged in second battle of Corinth, under 
Rosecrans, losing 26 killed and wounded. 

After further campaigning in Tennessee the regiment marched 
into Memphis and was, in January, 1863, assigned to 1st Brigade, 
7th Division, 17th Army Corps. After remaining in Memphis and 
vicinity two months, the regiment was transported by boat down the 
Mississippi River to join General Grant's army, organizing for the 
campaign of Vicksburg. 

During this campaign the regiment was engaged in action at 
Forty Hills, Mississippi, May 3ci ; battles of Raymond, May 
12th; Jackson, May 14th, and in engagement at Champion's Hill, 
May 16th, in which battle the regiment's loss was 33, killed and 
wounded. 

It was actively engaged in the trenches during the siege of 
A^icksburg, from the 18th of May until the surrender, July 4, 1863. 
and in the dreadful assault on May 22d suffered a loss of 33 in killed 
and wounded. After the surrender of Vicksburg the regiment re- 
mained in that vicinity until August, when it again returned to 
jMemphis and from thence, with other troops, marched across the 
country to Chattanooga, and while in that vicinity engaged tlic 
enemy at Tunnel Hill. 

From thence l)ack to Huntsvillc, Alabama, and while stationed 
there, in January, ]S64, the regiment re-enlisted as a veteran or- 
ganization and returned home to Indiana on furlough, rea-hing 
Indianapolis the 6th of February, with 369 veterans, who were 
])nblii'ly received and welcomed, February 8th, by Governor ]\Torlon 
and others. 

After expiration of furlougli the regiment again returned to 
Huntsville, Alabama, where it remained until June, and later 
inarched to Cartersville, Georgia, where it was on duty guarding 
General Sherman's railroad communications during the campaign 
to Atlanta. It was continued on this duty until ConfedsM-ate Gen- 
eral Ilocd's invasion, when the regiment joined Sherman's army 
and marched with 1st Brigade, 3d Division, 15th Army Corps, in 
campaign from Atlanta to Savannah. 

From Savannah it moved to Beaufort, and then on with the 
army through the Carolinas, going through Columbia, Cheraw, Fay- 
clteville and Goklsborough to Raleigh. 



Forty-Eighth Infantry. 297 

From Raleigh it moved northward, after the surrender of John- 
son's army, to Petersburg, 165 miles on forced marches, and from 
Petersburg marched to Washington. Soon after arrival there it 
was transferred to Louisville, Kentucky, where the regiment was 
nmstered out of service July 15, 1865. 

Returned to Indianapolis, where it was present at a reeeptit)ii 
of a large number of Indiana troops in the capitol grounds, July 
18th, and heard commendatory addresses by Governor iMorton and 
others. 

During term of service this regiment lost 88 enlisted men, killed 
and mortally wounded, and 4 officers and 175 enlisted men by dis- 
ease ; total, 267. 




Monument of -iiJtli lulantry- 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

1st BRIGADE 9th DIVISION 13th CORPS 
49th INFANTRY 

Colonel James Keigwin 

Lieut. Col. Joseph K. Thornton 

Major Arthur J. Hawhe 

Engaged: Port Gibson, May 1; Champion's Hill, May 16; Big Black River Bridge, May 17; 
Assault, May 19; Assault, May 22. Duty at Big Black River Bridge, May 24-July 4. Casualties: 
Killed 10, wounded 52, missing 2, total 64. 



(298) 



FORTY-NINTH REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 

VOLUNTEERS. 

During the closing days of August, 1861, and the following 
month, September, the nucleus of what became the 49th Regiment 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry entered ' ' Camp Joe Holt, ' ' a rendez- 
vous for troops, situated on the north bank of the Ohio River and 
just west of Jeffersonville, Indiana. By the 18th of October the 
formation of the regiment was completed, and it was mustered into 
the United States service November 21, 1861. 



FIELD AND STAFF. 



John W. Ray... 
Jame.s Keigwin . . 
Joseph H. Thornton 

Jame.s W. Gwin 

Charles H, Paddaek. 



.Colonel. 

. Lieutenant-CJoloncl . 

.Major. 

.Ad,iutant. 

.Quarlerma.sler. 



William Maple Chaplain. 

Charles D. Pearson Surgeon. 



Co. A. 
Co. B. 
Co. C. 
Co. D. 
Co. E. 
Co. F. 
Co. G. 
Co. H. 
Co. I. 
Co. K, 



Captain. 
Arthur J. Hawhe, 
John W. Kane, 
John Nafius, 
James Leeper, 
Edward B. Cutler, 
Wm. H. Peckenpaugh, 
John A. Ritter, 
Samuel M. Johnston, 
John .Alles, 
McHewet Iveck, 



COMPANY OFFICERS. 

1st Lieutenant. 
Thomas A. Fleming, 
Thomas Bare, 
Isaac Buzby, 
Upshur S. Reynolds, 
Hiram Evans, 
Caleb Temple, 
William Charles, 
George W. Riddle, 
John F. B. Widmer, 
James W. Higgins, 



id Lieutenant. 
Jas. C. McConaliay. 
James W. Thomp.son. 
James Fulyard. 
J. A. C. McCoy. 
Ira B. Hyde. 
Emory P. Toney. 
Elijah T. Pennick. 
James K. Holcroft. 
Edward Bohart. 
William W. Pate. 



On the 11th of December the regiment began its first march. 
Crossing the river it proceeded through Louisville, Kentucky, to 
Bardstown, Kentucky, which place it reached on the 13th of De- 
cember, and where it entered a camp of instruction. 

On the 12th of January, 1862, the regiment left Bardstown 
under orders to reinforce General Thomas, who was watching the 
movements of the rebel General Zollicoffer, who seemed to threaten 
another invasion of Kentucky, he having been soundly defeated a 
few months before, at Wild Cat, Kentucky. 

The regiment had reached a point five miles south of Lebanon, 
when it received the news of General Thomas' victory at ]\Iill 
Springs, Kentucky, in which engagement General Zollicoffer was 
killed. The regiment then proceeded through Lebanon, Crab Or- 
chard, Mt. Vernon, London and Barboursville, to Cumberland Ford, 
Kentucky, which place was reached February 15, 1862. 



(299) 



:]{)() Indiana at Vicksburg. 

The winter of 186h throughout the line of march, was not cold, 
but it supplied great quantities of snow, slush and rain, and, in 
the effort to reach its destination, the regiment was compelled to 
build roads to enable the wagons to get along. While unpleasant, 
and a new experience for the men, they bore everything cheerfully, 
but later, as spring came in, the effects of exposure developed. For 
a time scarcely a hundred men could be mustered for duty. Some 
died, some were discharged, while others were slow in returning to 
health. 

In the month of June, 1862, the army of General Morgan, of 
which the 49th was a part, occupied Cumberland Gap and pro- 
ceeded to add to the strength of an already well fortified position. 

In the month of August the rebel General Kirby Smith, with a 
strong force, came through the mountains and succeeded in cutting 
off supplies and all communication between the two Union forces. 
At the time this occurred supplies in Cumberland Gap were some- 
what at a low ebb, and the men were in need of clothing. By the 
17th of September rations were all gone, and the clothing sadly in 
need of repair. Then it was that the evacuation was begun and 
accomplished. Through the eastern part of Kentucky, over almost 
impassable roads, harrassed night and day by rebel cavalry, the 
army plodded, reaching Greenupsburg, Kentucky, on the Ohio 
River, October 4th, where it crossed into Ohio for "eats" and 
outfits. 

Going into camp at Oakland, Ohio, Col. John W. Ray met the 
regiment, he having been absent on detached service since June. 
He tendered his resignation and was succeeded by James Keigwin, 
who continued as colonel to the close of the war. But little time 
was given for recuperation, as orders came to the regiment to march 
to Gallipolis, Ohio, and there cross the river into Point Pleasant. 
"West Virginia, and proceed up the Kanawha Valley, which it did 
as far as Coal's Mouth, where it went into winter quarters. 

The winters must have been exceptionally short in that section, 
for November 17th found the regiment back at Point Pleasant em- 
barking on transports bound for Memphis, Tennessee, where it 
arrived on the 30th of said month and became a part of General 
Sherman's expedition against Vicksburg. 

All details being completed, the army embarked December 19, 
1862, that part to which the 49th belonged landing at Chickasaw 
Bayou, Mississippi, on Christmas eve. For seven days the Union 
army engaged the enemy, but without success. Withdrawing on 
the morning of January 2, 1868, the army proceeded to Young's 



Forty-Ninth Infantry. 301 

Point, Louisiana, where a change of commanders took place, Gen- 
eral John A. McClernand succeeding General Sherman in com- 
mand. Without landing, the troops were ordered up the Arkansas 
River to Arkansas Post, a strongly fortified position held by a force 
of over five thousand men under General Churchill. On the 11th 
of January, after a fierce fight and a gallant defense, the enemy 
surrendered. Returning to Young's Point, Louisiana, the regiment 
assisted in digging the canal which, it was hoped, would change 
the course of the Mississippi River, thereby making it possible to 
convey transports and gunboats to a point below Vicksburg. On 
the 2d of April the regiment moved with General Grant's forces 
down the west banl^ of the river to a point below Grand Gulf, where 
it boarded transports which, with gunboats, had run past the bat- 
teries of Vicksburg and Grand Gulf, and were landed at Bruins- 
burg, near the mouth of Bayou Pierre. On the 30th of April the 
regiment crossed the river and marched toward Port Gibson, where, 
on the morning of May 1st, began the battle which was the first of a 
series of engagements preliminary to the complete investment of 
Vicksburg. 

At Champion's Hill, Black River Bridge, the charges on the 
enemy's works of the 19tli and 22d of May, the engagements at 
Jackson, the 49th Indiana Regiment did its full duty. On its re- 
turn to Vicksburg it embarked, August 10th, for Port Hudson, and 
in a few days proceeded to New Orleans, where it was assigned to 
the Department of the Gulf. From New Orleans the regiment was 
transported by cars to Brashear City, on Berwick Bay, from whence 
it joined an expedition up the Teche, going as far as Opelousas, 
Louisiana, passing through the towns of Pattersonville, Franklin 
and New Iberia. It was ordered back to New Orleans w^here, on the 
10th of December, 1863, it boarded the steamer Blackstone en route 
for the Texas coast. Coming out of the Mississippi River into the 
Gulf of Mexico a heavy storm was encountered, w^hich constituted a 
new experience, one scarcely appreciated. Landing at Decroe's 
Point, on Matagorda Island, and at the entrance of Matagorda 
Bay, the regiment went into camp, removing shortly after to In- 
dianola, farther inland, and situated on the bay. At this point, on 
February 2, 1864, a portion of the regiment re-enlisted for another 
three years, or during the war, the President having called for en- 
listments of men of two years', or longer, service. 

In March the regiment moved to Fort Esperanza, on Matagorda 
Island, where it remained until April 19th, when it re-embarked 
and recrossed the Gulf of Mexico, back to New Orleans. Here it 



302 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

took passage on the steamer Emma for Alexandria, Louisiana, to 
reinforce General Banks' army on Red River. The regiment, on 
arrival at its destination, was moved to the front, where it was en- 
gaged thirteen days, driving the enemy or holding it in check until 
the naval forces could get their gunhoats below the falls, they hav- 
ing been delayed above on account of low water. This accom- 
plished, the army took up its march to Morganza Bend, on the INTis- 
sissippi River. From Morganza Bend the regiment was ordered to 
New Orleans, where it went into camp at Fort Chalmette, General 
Andrew Jackson's old battle ground. 

From this point those of the regiment who re-enlisted left for 
home, tliey having been granted a thirty-day furlough. 

After departure of the veterans the regiment was ordered to 
Algiers, Louisiana, for garrison duty until November 5, 1864, when 
it embarked on an ocean steamer for New York, where it arrived 
on the 20th of the month, after a rough voyage. It then proceeded 
to Indianapolis, where, on the 29th of November, 1864, so much of 
the regiment constituting the old part, was mustered out. At the 
expiration of furloughs the re-enlisted men reported at Indianapolis 
for duty, and were ordered to Lexington, Kentucky, where they did 
provost and guard duty until September 13, 1865, when they were 
ordered to Louisville, Kentucky, and there mustered out of service. 
The regiment then proceeded to Indianapolis, where the men turned 
over government property, received their final pay, and separated 
forever as an organization. 

During the time of its service the 49th Indiana Regiment trod 
the soil of many States. It served in Kentucky, Tennessee and 
West Virginia with the Army of the Ohio and the Army of the 
Cumberland; in Arkansas, IMissisippi and Louisiana with the Army 
of the Tennessee, and in Louisiana and Texas wdth the Army of the 
Gulf. Long and weary as were its marches, numerous as were its 
losses, in battles and through exposure, its officers and men were 
loyal and true, never faltering in the performance of every duty. 

The regiment lost during service one officer and 40 enlisted men. 
killed and mortally wounded, and 3 officers and 192 enlisted men by 
disease ; total, 236. 






Monument of 53d Infantry. 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

2d BRIGADE 4th DIVISION 16th CORPS 
53d INFANTRY 

Colonel Walter Q. Gresham 
Engaged: Siege, May 25-July 4. Transferred to 3d Brigade June 22. 



(304) 



FIFTY-THIRD REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 
VOLUNTEERS. 

The 53d Indiana was made up from what was originally in- 
tended for two regiments. In the latter part of 1861, Lieut. Col. 
Walter Q. Gresham, of the 38th Indiana, was authorized to recruit 
and organize the 53d Indiana at Camp Noble, New Albany, Indi- 
ana. "William Jones, a merchant of Gentryville, Spencer County. 
Indiana, was authorized to organize and recruit the 62d Indiana at 
Camp Reynolds, near Rockport. In both organizations, recruiting 
was slow, neither having a sufficient enrollment to complete a regi- 
mental organization. Late in February consolidation was ordered 
and the 62d embarked on the steamer John T. McCombs for New 
Albany. 

The organization was completed February 26, 1862, and the 
various companies were mustered into the service of the United 
States in the latter part of February and the early part of March. 

The regimental officers were as follows : 

Walter Q. Gresham Colonel. 

William Jones Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Roger Martin Major. 

Thomas McGrain, Jr Adjutant. 

George Thomas Quartermaster. 

John W. Julian Chaplain. 

Solomon Davis Surgeon. 

John S. Hoagland Assistant Surgeon. 

In the consolidation, the 62d furnished four companies : 

Captain. 1st Lieutenant. ?d Lieuienant. 

Co. C. Jchn F. Townsend, John W. Lamar. Francis Boyce. 

Co. F. Alfred H. MoCoy, Lewis B. Shively, Martin B. Mason. 

Co. G. .lohnSumne-, Joseph Whitaker, John Donnelly. 

C.^. L William S. Langford, Benjamin Fuller, David White. 

The 53d furnished six companies: 

Captain. 1st Lieutenant. U Lieutenant. 

Co. A. Robert Curry, Taylor W. Thomas, George W. Hays. 

Co. B, Charles P. Long John I. Rush, Richard H. Heth. 

Co. D. Seth Daily, John W. Marshall, Pleasant T. Matthis. 

Co. E. Rufus A. Peck, Ormsby H. Huston, Henry Pennington. 

Co. H. George B. McQueen, Nathaniel Martin, Samuel S. Sims. 

Co. K. Wiley R. Reeves, Mereda McDonald, William T. Cloud. 

The regiment was ordered to Indianapolis, where it remained, 
guarding prisoners until the 15th of March, when it was ordered by 
rail to St. Louis. There it embarked on a steamer for Savannah, 
Tennessee, by way of Cairo and Paducah, then up the Tennessee 
River, and arrived at Savannah March 25th. 

[20] (305) 



306 Indiana at VicKSBURn. 

General Grant's headquarters were at Savannah, and the 5od 
was assigned to duty at liead(iuarters, and to provost duty in the 
town. Here, during the battle of Shiloh, the regiment was within 
hearing of the musketry and artillery all day Sunday, Sunday 
night and ^londay. The gunhpats Lexington and Tyler each fired 
a shell into Beauregard's camp during the night every fifteen min- 
utes. 

On the 15th of April the regiment left Savannah hy steamer for 
Shiloh, and was assigned to the 3d Brigade, 4th Division. The ad- 
vance on Corinth began at once, a regular siege being instituted, 
and after each advance heavy works were thrown up, until May 
30th, when the town was evacuated. During the siege Governor 
]\Iorton visited the Indiana troops. He was hailed with cheers, not 
only by the Indiana troops, but by troops all along the line. 

On June 2d, the regiment marched through and ten miles west 
of Corinth, where it was camped several days. The march contin- 
ued west to Grand Junction and the regiment camped south of the 
town. It made a raid on Holly Springs, returning and spent 
Fourth of July at Grand Junction. 

Soon after it moved west to Lagrange, camping west of the 
town, near AVclf River, at a place called Sand Hill. It made an- 
other raid on Holly Springs, but after marching all night found 
the enemy gone on arrival. It then returned to camp, where it 
remained but a short time. The regiment's next march was to 
Memphis, where it arrived late in July. The first camp Avas five 
miles below the city. Llere the regiment drew clothing and 
changed its camp nearer the city, where it spent the month of 
August in camp and scouting the country in pursuit of guerillas 
and cotton burners. The first of September it moved to Bolivar, 
Tennessee, and remained in camp there until October 4th. 

The regiment met the enemy retreating from Corinth at Davis' 
Bridge on the Hatchie River, and a severe battle by the entire 4th 
Division ensued, lasting until 4 o'clock p.m. The Confederates 
were driven back as a result of the battle. The 4th Division lost 
500 men, the 53d lost 13 killed and 91 wounded, 2 missing, total 
106, which was the severest loss of any regiment in the division. 

On the 7th of October the regiment returned to camp at Bolivar. 
On the 1st of November it marched south through Lagrange, Holly 
Springs, Waterford and Oxford, to Coffeyville. Van Dorn having 
destroyed supplies collected at Holly Springs, the army was forced 
to retire. The 53d spent Christmas at Waterford Station, and 
remained there two weeks. 



Fifty-Third Infantry. 307 

Early in January, 1863, the regiment moved to Moscow, tlien to 
Collinsville, where they were guarding the railroad until March 
15th. It then moved on to Memphis, on the 9th of May, and the 
53d was ready to embark with tlie 4th Division for Vicksburg. The 
first stop was at Milliken's Bend, then at Young's Point, remaining 
only a few days at each place. The next move was across Young's 
Point to the river below Warrenton, where the regiment embarked 
for Grand Gulf. On arrival. General Grant's army was too far 
inland to be reached in a practical way over the route to be trav- 
eled, so the regiment's stay was short and it re-embarked for 
Young's Point. Landing beloAV, the regiment marched across the 
point to the river above Vicks])urg, and then re-embarked and went 
up the Yazoo River to Haynes' Bluff. 

The 53d remained at the Bluff with the 4th Division, guarding 
the right of the army, receiving and forwarding supplies to the line 
of investment that was closing in on the doomed city. The base of 
supplies having been changed from Grand Gulf to Haynes' Bluff, 
it was necessary to be amply protected until it was safe to uncover 
the landing. As yet the 4th Division, to which the 53d belonged, 
had not been assigned to any corps. Immediately after the assault 
on the 22d, it was ordered to take a position on the left wing of the 
army on the Halls Ferry road, south of a little creek. Instruc- 
tions were to put out strong advance posts, with pickets, on all the 
approaches leading to the city from the front and between the 
Mississippi River, with every precaution to prevent a surprise from 
front or rear, to prevent any one from passing in or out of the city, 
and resorting to every means to harrass the enemy. 

Shortly after taking position on the line, the 53d was trans- 
ferred to the 3d Brigade, Col. George E. Bryant. The first evening 
on the line of investment the regiment was given a reception by the 
famous rebel gun "Whistling Dick." That night, June 24th, the 
14th Illinois occupied the picket line. In the early part of the night 
the enemy made a charge on the picket line and captured Colonel 
Gam. of the 14th Illinois, together mth five men, killed five and 
wounded four of his men. On the following evening it was the 
turn of the 53d Indiana to picket the front, Colonel Gresham in 
command. After nightfall the regiment moved quietly to the 
scene of action of the night before, and in a rapid charge regained 
the ground of the previous night. In the affair, Captain AVake- 
field, of Company A, was wounded in the left arm. The advantage 
gained was held and so strongly fortified that it was never taken. 
On the left the armies were much further apart than on the right. 



308 Indiana at Vickshukg. 

The 53d was camped near a large brick house, on a low ridge run- 
ning east from Hall's Ferry road. 

For forty days the regiment remained on the line of invest- 
ment, never for a moment doubting that the city would be captured, 
and while the 53d was not in the active campaign and lines of 
battle leading up to the assaults on May 19th and 22d, yet the regi- 
ment bore an honorable part and did its whole duty in advancing 
the lines, digging trenches with pick and shovel and defending them 
with guns. On the evening of July 3d the word was passed to 
stop firing, and that terms of surrender were being considered, and 
all firing ceased. By early morning on the 4th, terms of surrender 
were agreed upon and at 10 o'clock the bugles blew the call to fall 
in line. The Union guards were jilaced along their works to keep 
the Johnnies in, and Yankees out, and Vicksburg was ours. 

No prouder achievement fell to an army or individual than the 
participation in and capture of Vicksburg. 

Scott Long, a member of Company G, 53d Indiana, piloted the 
ram ' ' Queen of the West. ' ' the first vessel which ran past the bat- 
teries of Vicksburg on the night of February 2, 1863. Thomas 
Garvy and Josiah Reeder, regular pilots, were ordered by Colonel 
Ellett, of the ram fleet, to take the vessel past the batteries, but 
refused to do so. Long, a former private soldier, took the post of 
danger, made a successful run past the formidable fortifications 
without serious injury to vessel or crew. 

On the day following the surrender, the 53d Indiana marched 
with Sherman to Jackson, Mississippi, in pursuit of Joe Johnston, 
who had been annoying General Grant's forces in the rear. The 
march was a hot, dusty one, with scarcity of water a marked feature 
of the expedition. Some skirmishing occurred as the army neared 
Jackson, where Johnston was found to be well fortified. 

By the 15th Sherman had all his army and lines well fortified. 
On the night of the 16th Johnston evacuated the city. 

The 53d returned again to Vicksburg, where the regiment re- 
mained but a feM^ days, when it was ordered to Natchez, Mississippi. 
The balance of the summer and fall was spent at this place. Wliile 
here Colonel Gresham was appointed a brigadier-general, and Lieu- 
tenant Jones was promoted to colonel. The 53d, with other troops, 
made an expedition sixty miles distant, into Louisiana, capturing 
Fort Beauregard on the Ouehita River. But little resistance was 
offered, casualties light, and several hundred stands of arms were 
captured and the fort destroyed. The camp at Natchez was first on 
Mr. North's farm, within a short distance of the town, but later 



Fifty-Third Infantry. 309 

moved into the town, and pitched in a park of juniper trees on the 
river bank, on a very high blufif, and one of the most beautiful 
camps occupied during the war. From Natchez the regiment again 
returned to Vicksburg and went into winter quarters at what was 
known as Camp Hebron, twelve miles east of the city. 

On February 2, 1864, the 53d left Camp Hebron with the 3d 
Brigade, 4th Division, 17th Army Corps, for an expedition to 
Meridian, Mississippi, for the purpose of destroying the railroads 
in that vicinity. On the 4th and 5th the enemy was encountered 
and severe skirmishing occurred with small loss. Meridian was 
reached without further incident of note. By the 15th railroad 
bridges, trestles, depots, cars and public property amounting to 
millions o£ dollars were destroyed. The 53d lost 6 men, 2 wounded 
and 4 captured, near Decatur. The return was made without any 
event worthy of note. Camp Hebron was reached on IMarch 4th, 
the regiment having marched 375 miles. While on this expedition, 
and after returning to camp, 383 members of the regiment re- 
enlisted and were paid off at Camp Hebron. 

Early in March the veterans, or those who re-enlisted, were fur- 
loughed and took passage on the steamer "E. H. Fairchilds" for the 
regiment's original camp and homes in Indiana, near New Albany. 
The 23d, an original New Albany regiment, who, like the 53d, had 
re-enlisted, were passengers on the same steamer, which was a large 
side-wheel boat, and before the war had been a Louisville and New 
Orleans packet, a veritable floating palace. During the voyage the 
boat took fire two or three times, but in each instance the fire was 
controlled without serious results. On our arrival at New Albany 
we were accorded a hearty reception by the loyal citizens, after 
which each individual departed for his respective home, to spend 
his thirty days with kindred and friends after two years' absence. 
While on board the boat, the veterans were paid the veteran boun- 
ties offered for their re-enlistment. 

The furlough and visit home of the 53d was thoroughly enjoyed, 
yet all were ready to answer to the roll call at the termination of 
the furlough at New Albany. The regiment embarked on board 
the steamer "John T. McCombs," with orders to report at Bird's 
Point, Missouri, and stayed a night and day there, and then em- 
liarked for Paducah to await a concentration of the veterans at that 
point to join General Sherman in his campaign to Atlanta. 

The trip up the Tennessee was a pleasant one, retracing the old 
line of march of two years before, the destination this time being 
Clifton instead of Savannah. The regiment stayed at Clifton, leav- 



310 Indiana at Vicksp.urg. 

ing on the 6tli of IMay with 600 head of cattle, to be joined the fol- 
lowing day by 1,800 additional, for Sherman's army. The weather 
was warm and the marches hurried, being made by the way of Pn- 
laski, Pluntsville, Decatur and Rome, to Acworth, where, on the 7tii 
of June, the 17th Army Corps, to which the 53d belonged, joined 
Sherman's advancing and victorious army. M 

On June 10, 1864, the 53d took its place in the line of battle at 
Big Shanty, 103 miles south of Chattanooga, and immediately went 
under the fire of the enemy, which continued without ceasing for 
ninety days, while it was advancing, intrenching, repulsing an 
assault, or marching to reinforce the firing line, inspired by the 
wild grand music of war, the drum and fife, the rifle, the cannon 
and the "rebel yell." 

The position of the regiment at Big Shanty was well to the left 
of the army. For ten days it rained almost incessantly. The rebel 
signal corps was located on top of Kenesaw Mountain, and at this 
point our signal of^cers obtained the key to their signals and could 
read them as fast as the signals were shown, but through the im- 
prudence of a newspaper correspondent, who gave the matter gen- -m 
eral publicity, our friends, the enemy, soon learned of our discovery 
and changed their code, depriving us of much useful information. 
We remained on this line for seven days, on the 17th moving for- 
ward to a position in front of Kenesaw Mountain, on the left of the 
railroad, too close under the mountain for the enemy to depress 
their cannon to reach us, and too far away to be reached by mus- 
ketry. 

In Sherman's charge on Kenesaw Mountain, on June 27th, four 
companies of the 53d, who were on picket duty that day, were in 
the charge A, B, D and I. From Kenesaw, on the left, we were i 
transferred to the extreme right of the army on the Nickajack 
Creek, near the Chattahootchie River. The regiment remained at 
this point until the 15th of July, when it was again shifted to the 
extreme left to Roswell, on the Chattahootchie. It crossed the river 
at this point, moved to Decatur, then turned west toward Atlanta. 
On the 20th, General Gresham. commanding the 4th Division, was 
wounded. The 53d participated in the battle of Leggett's Hill on 
the 21st, and also in the furious battle on the 22d. Its position 
"was on the extreme left of the 17th Corps. At the opening of the 
battle. Colonel Jones, Captain Shively, Company F ; Captain Mat- 
thews, Company D ; Lieutenant Smith, Company A ; Lieutenant 
Gibson, Company D ; Lieutenant Huston, Company H, were killed, 
and Major Vestal severely wounded. Several others of the com- 



Fifty-Third Infantry. ;U1 

pany officers were wounded, so that in several instances sergeants 
toolv command of the companies. 

With Capt. George H. Beers, Company E, in command of ihe 
regiment, from the extreme left it was transferred to the right of 
the army. On the 28th the 15th Corps, on the extreme right on 
Lick Skillet road, near Exra Church, fought a severe hattle with 
Stuart's rebel corps. The 53d was in line immediately to the left 
of the 15th Corps, far enough away not to be engaged, yet close 
enough to witness the battle in all its fury. It was a sore defeat of 
Stuart, with heavy loss to the assaulting column. For the next 
thirty days it remained in this vicinity. Heavy works were thrown 
up, strong pickets kept out on our front, but we had no general en- 
gagement. There was only picket and artillery firing, but this 
was almost incessant. Many casualties occurred from the sharp- 
shooting on the picket line. The regiment's position was so close 
to the enemy that it was necessary to keep under protection of the 
fortification during daylight. 

At 8 p. m., on August 26th, the regiment was withdrawn from 
the works. The night was intensely dark and it marched all night 
to the right and rear of the rebel army. The 30th of August found 
it in front of Jonesboro. Next morning the regiment moved to the 
right, crossing Flint River and driving in the enemy's skirmishers, 
who hotly contested the advance. During the night the enemy 
evacuated the Union front, also Atlanta. Moving in pursuit to 
Lovejoy Station, where the enemy concentrated, heavy works were 
thrown up by both armies. On the night of September 5th the 
commands were withdrawn from the works. The night was so 
dark the file leaders could not be seen. The 53d was detailed to go 
in advance and build fires with rails by the wayside, in order that 
the army might be enabled to move. Daylight found the 53d at 
Flint River, from where it moved by easy marches to East Point, a 
distance of fifty miles. 

The regiment stayed in camp at East Point until October 5th, 
and then started north in pursuit of General Hood, who had passed 
the right flank of his army in his campaign to Nashville. He was 
followed to Gaylesville, Alabama, almost to the Tennessee River. 

While returning to Atlanta, near Marietta, early in November, 
the regiment was paid off. AA^iile at this point the presidential 
election occurred, and the vote of such troops as were entitled to 
vote was cast. The returns were gathered and sent north. 
Troops not being entitled to vote in the field could only stand by 
and watch their more favored comrades vote. 



312 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

While at this camp, Capt. Henry Duncan, of Company F, who 
had been recommended for promotion to major, relieved Captain 
Beers, of Company E, who had been in command of the regiment 
since the death of Colonel Jones, on July 22d. 

On November 13th the 53d broke camp near IMarietta and 
marched to Atlanta, and on November 15th left Atlanta on the fa- 
mous March to the Sea. By the 21st it had reached Gordon, one 
of the objective points in the campaign, and on the 23d reached the 
Oconee River, where the enemy was found disputing the passage. 
By the 25th they were dislodged and the river crossed. The regi- 
ment arrived at Ogeeehe River December 1st, which was crossed on 
pontoons. On the lOtli the 53d was in advance of the 17th Corps. 
It encountered the enemy's pickets and drove them inside their 
works near the city of Savannah. From here the regiment was 
transferred to King's Bridge, on the Ogeeehe River, and was de- 
tailed to guard, load and unload supplies for the army. On the 
20th the city was evacuated and on the 24th, with the balance of 
the army, the 53d marched into the city, camped near Fort Bona- 
venture, where General Sherman reviewed the army. On January 
6th the regiment embarked on transports at Fort Thunderbolt for 
Bufort, South Carolina. 

The regiment remained at Bufort until the 13th, when it moved 
with the army for Poeotaligo, on the Savannah and Charleston 
Railway. It remained at Poeotaligo until the 29th, when it started 
on a march through the Carolinas. On the 3d of February it was 
at the Salkahatchie River, on the 12th at North Edisto, near 
Orangeburg. At both places the enemy was encountered, and the 
53d bore an honorable part in dislodging them. It reached Colum- 
bia on the 17th, and remained near that city two or three days, de- 
stroying the railroads. On March 3d it was at Cheraw, on the Big 
Pedee River. An immense amount of military stores from Charles- 
ton were captured here. On the 12th it reached Fayetteville, N. C, 
on the Cape Fear River. A steamer from the fleet came up, bring- 
ing the first mail for forty-four days. The regiment then moved on 
towards Goldsboro the day following. On the 19th it encountered 
Joe Johnston at Bentonville, where it exchanged the last hostile 
shots with the enemy. It arrived at Goldsborough on the 24th. 

The 53d stayed at Goldsborough until April 10th, when it 
marched for Raleigh, where it arrived on the 14th. Upon arrival 
news was received of the surrender of Lee, soon followed by the 
news of the assassination of President Lincoln. The surrender of 
Johnston followed. On the 24th Generals Grant and Sherman re- 



Fifty-Third Infantry. 313 

viewed the army. On April 29tli left Raleigh by way of Peters- 
burg, Manchester, Richmond and Fredericksburg, arriving at Alex- 
andria on the 19th of May, where the regiment remained until the 
2-tth. when the armies passed in grand review before the President 
and Generals Grant and Sherman. 

June 5th it left Washington by the B. & 0. Railroad, to Park- 
ersburg, then by steamer to Louisville, Kentucky, where, on July 
21st, the regiment was mustered out of the United States service, 
after a little more than three and a half years' service, and sent on 
to Indianapolis. On the 7th of August the men received their 
final pay and returned to their homes, again to take their places as 
private citizens of Indiana. 

The regiment lost during service 9 officers and 98 enlisted men, 
killed and mortally wounded, and 4 officers and 248 enlisted men 
by disease; total, 359. 




Monuiuent of 54th Infantry. 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

2d BRIGADE 9th DIVISION 13th CORPS 
54th INFANTRY 

Colonel Fielding MANSFrELD 

Engaged: Port Gibson, May 1; Guard at Raymond, May 16, and for Prisoners, May 17-June 4; 
Siege, June 4-June 22. Duty at Big Black River Bridge, June 22-July 4. 



(314) 



FIFTY-FOURTH REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 
VOLUNTEERS. 

The 54th Regiment of Indiana Infantry Volunteers was first 
organized under special orders to serve three months, and for this 
term was mustered in at Indianapolis June 10, 1862, with field and 
staff officers as follows : 

D. Garland Rose Colonel. 

L. Gilbert Knox Lieutenant -Colonel. 

Fielding Mansfield Major. 

William F. Spurgeon Adjutant. 

William C. Lupton . .Quartermaster. 

William H. Cyrus Assistant Surgeon. 

The companies composing the regiment in three months' serv- 
ice were enlisted from the following counties: 
Company A from ]\Ionroe County. 
Company B from Vigo County. 
Company C from Switzerland County. 
Company D from Jefferson County. 
Company E from Switzerland County. 
Company F from Vigo County. 
Company G from Jackson County, 
(^orapany II from Hendricks County. 
Company I from Wayne County. 
Company K from Decatur County. 

The regiment, during its three montlis' enlistment, remained at 
Indianapolis, on duty at Camp Morton until in August, when it 
was ordered to Kentucky, with other troops, to resist invasion of 
that State by General Kirby Smith, and remained on duty in cen- 
tral Kentucky until expiration of its term of service, when it was 
returned to Indianapolis and mustered out. 

The 54th Regiment was then organized and mustered into serv- 
ice as a twelve months ' regiment, under special orders, on November 
16, 1862, with the following regimental officers : 

Fielding Mansfield Colonel. 

Herman Sturm Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Daniel Shrader Major. 

Marshall P. Hayden Adjutant. 

Thomas F. Purnell Quartermaster. 

Ephraim A. Banks Surgeon. 

Henry C. Davidson Assistant Surgeon. 

Adjutant Marshall P. Hayden died in the rebel prison at Vicks- 
burg, January 30, 1863, from wounds received in engagement at 
Chickasaw Bayou in December previous, and the remainder of the 

(315) 



316 IXDTANA AT VlCKSBURG. 

field and staff officers who did not resign during term of service 
were mastered out with the regiment. 
The company officers were : 







Captain. 


1st Lieutenant. 


Sd Lieutenant. 


Co. 


A. 


John W. Thomas, 


Absolom Thomas, 


James Lockridge. 


Co. 


B. 


Ohver M. Wilson, 


William M. Conner, 


Josiah Ralston. 


Co. 


C. 


Albert Eggleston, 


Eli R. Shook, 


Isaac B. McGogy. 


Co. 


D. 


Lewis C. Beckford, 


John A. Howard, 


Joseph Lugar. 


Co. 


E. 


John V. Bowman, 


Paris Julian, 


Rufus C. Carpenter. 


Co. 


F. 


William H. Neff, 


David D. Jones, 


Benjamin F. Davis. 


Co. 


G. 


Andrew J. Lyon, 


William Hall, 


William W. Messina 


Co. 


H. 


John Ferree, 


John W. Mauzy, 


William M.Brooks. 


Co. 


I. 


Henry Carter, 


Samuel P. Strahan, 


William P. Beeber. 


Co. 


K. 


Samuel J. Wilson, 


Samuel R. Fielder, 


Thomas D. Lawe. 



Captains Thomas and Carter resigned, Capt. 0. M. Wilson pro- 
moted major, and balance of company captains were mustered out 
with the regiment. 

Lieutenant Ralston, of Company B, died of wounds received in 
battle at Chickasaw Bayou, and, with one or two exceptions, the 
balance of the line officers remained with and were mustered out 
with the regiment at the end of service. 

On the 9th of December, 1862, the regiment left Camp Mor- 
ton, Indianapolis for Memphis, and on arrival there was assigned 
to Col. John DeCourcey's Brigade, of Gen. G. W. Morgan's Di- 
vision of the 13th Army Corps, and on the 20th of December em- 
barked on boats with General Sherman's expedition to Vicksburg, 
and on the 26th of December, with brigade to which the regiment 
was attached, it moved up the Yazoo River to reconnoiter the enemy 
under cover of the gunboats, but was forced to retire until rein- 
forced by other troops. 

On the three following days the regiment was exposed on its 
front, in line of battle, and participated in two separate charges on 
rebel works, on Chickasaw Bluffs, near Vicksburg, and lost in all 
264 men in killed, wounded and missing in these engagements. 

Withdrawing from Yazoo River, it was next engaged with the 
expedition and capture of Arkansas Post on the Arkansas River.. 
January 10 and 11, 1863, and on return down the river was en- 
camped at Young's Point and Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, on the 
Mississippi River, opposite Vicksburg, until in April, when the 
regiment was assigned to the division of General Osterhaus, leading 
in the advance in opening the way for Grant's army in the Vicks- 
burg campaign. 

During this campaign the regiment participated in the battle 
of Port Gibson, and was on duty guarding prisoners at Raymond 



Fifty-Fourth Infantry. 317 

until it was sent by transport, with three other regiments, as an 
escort of prisoners of war to Memphis, Tennessee. 

Returning, it was assigned to duty in the trenches, and partici- 
pated in the siege on the enemy's works around Vicksburg. Dur- 
ing the siege the regiment, with its brigade, was moved to Big 
Black River to assist in preventing Johnston's Confederate army 
from attempting to raise the siege, in aid of Pemberton's army, 
which was cooped up within the lines of Vicksburg by the Union 
army. 

After the surrender, this regiment moved with the advance on 
Jackson, driving Johnston's army into the defenses of the city, 
which, after some days of sharp fighting, he was forced to evacuate 
and retreated in the night, across and beyond Pearl river, leaving 
the Union troops in possession of the works and city. After de- 
stroying all munitions of war. Confederate army stores, etc., the 
Union army again retired to Vicksburg, and soon after the 54th 
was transferred with a number of other regiments to the Gulf De- 
partment, and joined troops in the vicinity of New Orleans, which 
were organizing for a campaign in western Louisiana. 

On September 6th the regiment moved with this expedition up 
the Teche country, going as far as Opelousas and Vermilionville, 
but returned to New Orleans November 1st, and the term of enlist- 
ment of its twelve months' service being terminated the regiment 
was mustered out at New Orleans the 8th day of December, 1863, 
and returned home to Indianapolis. 

The regiment lost during its fifteen months of service 2 officers 
and 44 enlisted men, killed and mortally wounded, and 2 officers 
and 224 enlisted men by disease ; total, 272. 




Mouument ol 59tb Infantry- 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

1st BRIGADE 7th DIVISION 17th CORPS 
oOtli INFANTRY 

Lieut. Col. Jefferson K. Scott 
Colonel Jesse I. Alex.\nder 

Engaged: Near Bayou Pierre, May 3; Raymond, May 12; Jackson, May 14; Champion's Hill, 
May 16; Assault, May 22; Siege, May 23-July 4. Casualties: Killed 13, wounded 113, missing 1, 
total 127; Lieut. Marcus B. C. Tripp killed. 



(318) 



FIFTY-NINTH REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY . 
VOLUNTEERS. 

The 59th Indiana Regiment was recruited during the fall of 
1861 by the assembling of companies at Camp Morton, Indianapolis, 
but did not complete organization sufficiently for muster until Feb- 
ruary 11, 1862, at which time it was duly sworn into the United 
States service. 

On the 13th of February the regiment was ordered to New 
Albany, where, after being armed and ec[uipped, it left by trans- 
port for Cairo, arriving there on the 20th, and on the following day 
was ordered to Commerce, Missouri. On arrival there, February 
22d, it was the first regiment to report to G-eneral Pope for duty 
with the Army of the INIississippi. 

On February 25th it moved to Benton, Missouri, where it was 
brigaded with the 34th, 43d, 46th and 47th Indiana Regiments, Col. 
James R. Slack, of the 47th, commanding brigade. It was after- 
wards transferred to Colonel Worthington 's brigade. 

The field and staff officers of the 59th when mustered were as 
follows : 

Jesse I. Alexander Colonel. 

Jefferson K. Scott lieutenant-Colonel. 

Elijah Sabin Major. 

James"W. Archer Adjutant. 

James M. Alexander Quartermaster. 

Perry M. Blankenship Chaplain. 

Dudley Rogers Surgeon. 

John M. Stuckey Assistant Surgeon. 

Through promotions or resignations all these original officers 
commissioned as the field and staff of the regiment were succeeded 
by other officers of lower rank during the term of service, but from 
first to last the 59th had splendid officers. 

Company officers that were attached to the regiment on muster- 
in were : 

Captain. 1st Lieutenant. M Lieutenant. 

Co. A. Thos. A. McNaught, James E. Hyden, William A. Bartholomew. 

Co. B. Andrew Wilson, Philip McDade, WiUiam A. Rogers. 

Co. C. Will Van Fossen, John S. Akin, Edward Maxwell. 

Co. D. Russell A. Belden, Andrew J. Mason, ^ 

Co. E. Aden G. Cavins, Benj. L. Brookshare, Merrett C. T.aylor. 

Co. F. Wilford H. Welman, Thomas Riley, James N. Murphy. 

Co. G. John W. Branch, George W. Brown, Ephraim J. Holiis. 

Co. H. John E. Simpson, Edward A. Kellogg, James H. Hughes. 

Co. I. Thos. T. Graves, Alexander Jones, John Phillips. 

Co. I^. Edward J. MoBride, Craven S. Hudson, Howard Webber. 

Captain IMcNaught, promoted to major, lieutenant-colonel and 
colonel; Captains Simpson and McBride, promoted to major; Cap- 

(319) 



320 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

tain Cavins, promoted to major of the 97tli Indiana Regiment; 
Captain Welman, mustered out at expiration of term of service; 
and remaining captains resigned and line officers next in rank suc- 
ceeded them. 

On March 1, 1862, the regiment engaged with other troops in 
siege of New Madrid, and, on evacuation, was one of the first regi- 
ments to enter the town and take possession of Fort Thompson. 

Crossing the Mississippi River on April 7th, it assisted in cap- 
ture of 5,000 prisoners at Tiptonville. 

Returned to New Madrid, and on the 12th of April embarked on 
boats and participated in expedition to Fort Pillow, returning on 
the 17th; then by boat went again to Cairo; thence to Hamburg. 
Tennessee, where, on disembarking and going into camp, it was 
joined in brigade with the 48th Indiana, and from that time until 
final muster-out of both organizations, these two regiments re- 
mained together. 

From April 24th to May 29th the regiment was engaged in a 
number of skirmishes with the enemy, and during the march to and 
siege of Corinth, Tennessee, and, after its evacuation, was with the 
column which pursued the enemy to Boonville, returning to the 
vicinity of Corinth by June 12. June 13th moved camp to Clear 
Creek, where the regiment remained until in August, after which, 
until October 1st, it camped and occupied various places for offen- 
sive and defensive purposes. 

On October 1st the 59th went to Corinth and was there engaged, 
October 3d and 4th. in the ])attle of Corinth. After defeating the 
Confederates it joined in pursuit of Price to the Hatchie, and on 
October 10th had returned to Corinth. 

During the month of November, 1862, the regiment marched in 
various expeditions against the enemy, with General Quinby's 
Division. December 26th it started to Memphis, arriving at 
that city on January 3. 1863. where the re,giraent went into camp 
and remained there, doing guard duty until March 1st, when it 
embarked on boat and proceeded down the Mississippi River to 
Helena and Woolfort's Landing, in Arkansas, and after partici- 
pating in the Yazoo River expedition, arrived at the general ren- 
dezvous of Grant's army at Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, on April 15, 
1863. 

On April 24th, with the arm3^ marched down the west side of 
the Mississippi River, to Grand Gulf, and crossing over the river, on 
May 1st, at Bayou Pierre, started at once for battle-ground of Port 
Gibson, reaching there in the evening after the battle closed. 



Fifty-Ninth Infantry. 321 

Marching forward with Grant's army in 1st Brigade, 7th Di- 
vision, in 17th Army Corps, the 59th was engaged in battles of 
Forty Hills, Raymond and Champion's Hill. In the first attack 
and capture of Jackson, Mississippi, the regiment's skirmishers, 
under Capt. John E. Simpson, were first to enter the city and place 
the regimental flag on the dome of the state house. 

After the capture of Jackson, the Division commenced march 
from there to Vicksburg, and formed the rear guard of the 17th 
Corps, part of its duty being the destruction of bridges behind it 
over Big Black River and other streams. 

On arriving at Vicksburg the regiment took its place in line of 
battle in front of the Confederate fortifications, and being engaged 
in the assault on the enemy's works. May 22d, lost heavily, and 
among the killed was Lieutenant Tripp, and Lieutenants Riley and 
Maxwell were wounded. 

During the siege of Vicksburg the 59th formed part of General 
Blair's command, and with it went with an expedition up the 
Yazoo River and, returning June 4th, took up its old position in 
the trenches, where it remained on duty until the surrender of 
Pemberton's Confederate army, July 4, 1863. 

On July 4th it marched into Vicksburg, and General ]\IcPherson 
issued a congratulatory order in highest terms of praise to the 17th 
Array Corps. 

The regiment remained at Vicksburg until the 13th of Septem- 
ber, when it embarked on transports and proceeded up the Missis- 
sippi River to Helena, and on October 17th, with the remainder of 
the division, arrived at IMemphis. 

On the 19th cf October the regiment commenced its weary march 
to Chattanooga, arriving there in time to participate in the battle of 
Mission Ridge. 

On the 17th of December it marched to Bridgeport. Alabama, 
where, on going into camp, the regiment was assigned to the 3d 
Division of the 15th Army Corps, and started for Huntsville on the 
23d of December, reaching there and going into camp on the 26th. 
While there the regiment re-enlisted as a veteran organization on 
January 1, 1864, and remained in camp at Huntsville until March 
3d, when it left for home, reaching Indianapolis on the 8th, and on 
the 10th had a public reception in the state house grounds, and was 
addressed by Governor Morton and others, after which the regiment 
was furloughed home for thirty days. 

On reassembling it was ordered south again, passing through 
New Albany, Louisville and Nashville, and reached former camps 

[21] 



322 Indiana at VicKsin'Ra. 

at Iluntsvillc. Alabninn, on April 8d, remaining there until 
June 22d. 

Starting for Kingston, Georgia, and reaching there July 1st, it 
joined Sherman's army, then on the march to Atlanta. 

The balance of July and August it was guarding bridges on the 
Etowah River and other streams in the rear of Sherman's army, 
until late in August, when it was ordered to report to G-eneral 
Steadman, at Chattanooga. 

On arriving there, it was ordered in pursuit of Wheeler's Cav- 
alry, but, after four days, returned to Chattanooga, and from there 
was ordered to report to General Milroy. at Tullahoma, where it 
remained on duty until September 21st. From there it escorted a 
wagon train to Cartersville. Georgia, arriving there on the 28th of 
Setpember, after which the regiment took up its old position guard- 
ing bridges on Etowah River. 

On the 12th cf November it moved towards Atlanta, and on the 
15th, with Sherman's army, began the grand iNIarch to the Sea, fol- 
lowing the fortunes of this army through Georgia to Savannah. 

From Savannah the regiment marched through the Carolinas to 
Raleigh, and from thence to Washington, where it participated in 
the grand review. 

From Washington it was transferred to Louisville, Kentucky, 
where on July 17, 1865. the regiment was mustered out of service. 

On arriving at Indianapolis, on July 18th, it was again ad- 
dressed by Governor Morton and other prominent men, and in a 
few days was finally discharged, disbanded, and the men forwarded 
to their homes. 

Besides men who were originally nuistered into service on organ- 
ization of the regiment, it received in recruits, drafted men, etc., 
7~7, and lost in killed and mortally wounded, 1 officer and 36 en- 
listed men, and 229 enlicfed men by disease; total, 266. 

It traveled by rail 3,736 miles, by water 4,618 miles, and by land 
5,305 miles, making in all 13,679 miles, during its term of service. 




Moiiuiueut of GOth Infantry. 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

1st BRIG.\DE 10th DIVISION 13th CORPS 
60th INFANTRY 

Colonel Richard Owen 

Engaged at Perkins' Landing, Louisiana, from April 28 to about May 28. Siege, June 1-June 22. 
Duty at Big Black River Bridge, June 23-July 4, 1863. 



(324) 



SIXTIETH REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 
VOLUNTEERS. 

The 60th Regiment was raised under orders authorizing Lieut. 
Col. Richard Owen, of the 15th Regiment, to recruit a regiment and 
rendezvous it at Evansville. A partial organization was made at 
that place in November, 1861, and during the progress of enlisting 
the regiment was ordered to Camp Morton, Indianapolis, on the 22d 
of February, 1862, to guard rebel prisoners, and, while on duty 
there, the organization was completed, the last companies being 
mustered in during the month of March, with — 

Richard Owen Colonel. 

William J. Templeton Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Joseph B. Cox Major. 

Eugene F. Owen Adjutant. 

John J. Palmer Quartermaster. 

William H. Carter Chaplain. 

Madison J. Bray Surgeon. 

Jonathan R. Tilman Assistant Surgeon. 

The line officers were as follows : 

Captain. 1st Lieutenant. 2d Lieutenant. 

Co. A. Theodore Pleisch, Nicholas Steinhauer, Ernest Ivipp. 

Co. B. Wolfgang Hyne, Alfred Dale Owen, William M. Holton. 

Co. C. Jesse Nash, Richard A. Wilsey, John O'Neal. 

Co. Di John Burns, Samuel L. Young, John A. Savage. 

Co. E. Henry F. Tilton, Walter E. Thrall, Philip L. Cox. 

Co. F. Joseph B. Cox, George W. Merrill, Horace P. Owen. 

Co. G. Augustus Goelzer, Ferdinand G. Borges, Frederick Merz. 

Co. H. Samuel T. Walker, William Camron, Hermus P. Downing. 

Co. I. George S. Walters, Oliver H. P. Ewing, John M. Denny. 

Co. K. William B. Givens, Michael B. Craner, Charles M. Murray. 

On the 20tli day of June the regiment moved by rail to Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, and from there it marched to Lebanon, where it 
remained for some weeks, when it moved to Munfordsville, where, 
on the 14th of September, the advance of Bragg 's army surrounded 
the place and its works, which, after a gallant defense of three days 
under Colonels "Wilder and Dunham, were compelled to surrender 
to Bragg 's whole army. The enemy attacked on the 14th and were 
repelled with heavy loss, and surrender was refused until Colonel 
Wilder was permitted to personally inspect the enemy's position 
and satisfy himself that Bragg 's whole army was besieging him. 

The garrison consisted of the 67th, 68th and 89th Indiana, and 
seven companies of the 60th. The other three companies were, at 
the time of the capture, guarding a railroad bridge over Rolling 
Fork, near Lebanon Junction, under command of Major Cox, and 
thus escaped capture. 

(.325) 



326 Indiana at Vtcksburg. 

'riic captured (•(;iiii)anies were paroled, and proceeded to In- 
dianapolis, where they went into parole camp, and were there joined 
by the three companies that escaped captuf'e. 

Upon being exchanged in November, the regiment moved by rail 
to Cairo, and then by river boats to IMemphis, Tennessee, where it 
became a part of the Army of the Mississippi, and participated in 
the movements of the army during the winter of 1862. After the 
repnlse of Sherman's army at Chickasaw Bayon. January 1, 1863, 
it moved with the troops by steamer to Arkansas Post, where, on the 
nth of January, it took part in the assault and capture of that 
sti'ong position, losing a number of men killed and wounded. 

In the campaign against Vicksburg, the 60th was assigned to the 
1st Brigade (General Burbridge), 10th Division, 13th Army Corps, 
and moved with the command from INIilliken's Bend, on the 14th of 
April, making a rapid and fatiguing march through swamps, bayous 
and streams, under scorching suns, drenching rains, arriving at 
Smith's plantation, where, with its brigade, it moved by boats to 
Perkins' plantation, from which place it marched to Hard Times, 
crossing to the east side of the Mississippi River, at Bruinsburg, on 
the 30th, and, marching towards Port Gibson, was among the first 
to enter that city after the defeat of the enemy under General 
Bowen. 

At Champion's Hill, on the 16th of May, it was in the advance, 
and at Black River, on the 17th, it behaved with gallantry. In the 
siege of Vicksburg, it took an active part, remaining in the trenches 
until the surrender on the 4th of July. 

After the capitulation, the 60th marched with its brigade to 
Jackson, losing several killed and wounded. Returning to Vicks- 
burg, it remained there until August, when it was transported to 
New Orleans, where it was assigned to Banks' army. From New 
Orleans it moved to Berwick City, and from thence moved up the 
Teche, engaging in the battles of Grand Coteau Plains and Carrion 
Crow Bayou on the 3d of November, losing a number of killed and 
wounded. 

Returning to the vicinity of New Iberia, it remained there a 
short time, and proceeded to Algiers, near New Orleans, where it 
embarked on steamers for Texas. Landing in that State, it was 
stationed at Pass Cavallo for a short time, when it was ordered to 
return to New Orleans, where it was made a part of General Banks' 
unfortunate expedition up Red River. This expedition was organ- 
ized early in INfarch, 1864, and proceeded with but little opposition 
to Alexandria, Louisiana, reaching there on the 19th. The rebels 



Sixtieth Infantry. 327 

were concentrated at Shreveport. On the 28th General Mower's 
Division defeated the rebel General Dick Taylor, at Cane River. 

After passing Grand Ecore, the cavalry, supported by the 4th 
Division of the 13th Corps, encountered the enemy in force at 
Sabine Cross Roads on the 8th of April. The rebels charged our 
forces, who were routed and fell back in great disorder. In this 
battle the 60th lost heavily in killed, wounded and missing, the 
latter being mostly prisoners. The 3d Division came up and were 
also driven from the field in disorder. The 16th Corps, commanded 
by Gen. A. J. Smith, came up just after the battle and held the 
rebels in check, and the following day fought and defeated the 
enemy at Pleasant Hill. After this campaign the army made a 
long, tedious march back to the Mississippi River, and went into 
camp at Morganza Bend. 

Soon after the 60th went to Indiana on veteran furlough, the 
regiment having re-enlisted. Its re-muster was not, however, ap- 
proved by the War Department, the regiment not having, in its 
opinion, served a sufficient length of time to entitle it to be re- 
mustered as a veteran organization. 

Returning to the field, it was stationed at Thibodeaux, Louis- 
iana, where it remained until the fall of 1864. After this duty the 
regiment was stationed at Algiers, near New Orleans, remaining 
there until February 24, 1865, when the recruits were transferred 
to the 26th Indiana and the balance of the regiment proceeded to 
Indianapolis, where it was mustered out on the 21st of March, 1865. 

The 60th Regiment lost, during the term of service, 2 officers 
and 43 enlisted men killed and mortally wounded, and 3 officers 
and 165 enlisted men by disease. Total, 213. 




Monument of 6Tth Infantry. 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

1st BRIGADE 10th DIVISION 13th CORPS 
67th INFANTRY 

Lieut. Col. Theodore E. Buehler 

Engaged: Port Gibson, May 1; Champion's Hill, May 16; Big Black River Bridge, May 17; 
Assault, May 19; Assault, May 22; Siege, May 2.3-July 4. Casualties: Killed 6, wounded .35, total 41 . 



(328) 



SIXTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 
VOLUNTEERS. 

This regiment was organized in the 3d Congressional District of 
Indiana, and was composed of companies is follows : One company 
from Owen and Monroe, one from Bartholomew, one from Jennings, 
one from Jefferson, two from Lawrence and four from Jackson 
County. 

Assembled at Madison about middle of August, 1862, and was 
sworn into the United States service August 19th and 20th. 

The regiment was commanded both by field and line officers from 
the above named counties, with regimental officers as follows : 

Frank Emerson Colonel. 

Theodore E. Buehler Lievltenant-Colonel. 

Augustus H. Abbett Major. 

George W. Richardson Adjut jitvt. 

Joseph B. Newcomb Quartermaster. 

Stephen Bowers Chaplain. 

James W. F. Gerish Surgeon. 

The company officers who mustered in were: 

Captain. 1st Lieutenant. 2d Lieutenant. 

Co. A. Francis A. Sears. ' George W. Rahm, Leander P. Leonard. 

Co. B. Samuel Dennj', William R. Carlton, John Campbell. 

Co. C. Simeon H. Crane, William T. Days, Thos. E. McLeland. 

Co. D. George R. Sims, Benjamin L. Smith, Horace L. Brown. 

Co. E. Byford E. Long, James B. Stilwell, Andrew J. Hamilton. 

Co. F. William C. Hall, James W. Owen, Charles D. Prow. 

Co. G. Nelson Crabb, Stephen Story, George T. Poison. 

Co. H. David Ivelly, Allen C. Burton, Wiley G. Burton. 

Co. I. Shepherd F. Eaton, George W. Friedly, William H. Aikin. 

Co. K. Ralph Applewhite, Stephen Bowers, Tazwell Vawter. 

Nearly all the original line officers during term of service of the 
regiment were promoted, resigned or discharged for wounds or dis- 
ability, and vacancies were filled by promotion from the companies. 
The gallant Major Abbett, who had already seen service of one 
year in the 6th Indiana as an officer and commissioned major in 
this regiment, was killed in action at Munfordsville, Kentucky, on 
September 16th, less than one month after the regiment went into 
service, and was the only field officer killed during its term of serv- 
I ice, though Colonel Emerson was twice wounded, first at Arkansas 
I Post and again at Cane River, Louisiana ; from this last wound he 
: was so invalided that he resigned. 

August 21st, soon after muster in of the regiment, it left j\Iad- 
; ison by boat for Louisville, where, after being in camp a few days, 
• was further ordered to INIunfordsville, Kentucky, where the L. & N. 
i Railroad crosses Green River. The post was garrisoned only by a 

j (329) 

] 



330 



Indiana at Vicksburg. 



small for. e jiiiarding the railroad bridge, but a larger force had 
occupied the place some time before, and had constructed a couple 
of forts, widely separated, but connected by lines of rifle pits and 
breastworks, which made very good defenses. 

This was the summer when the Confederate army, under Bragg, 
was making the famous advance north to capture Louisville and 
Cincinnati, and as T^Iunfordsville was not on direct line of his 
march, he detached Chalmers' Division to capture Munfordsville, 
which 'was supposed to be only a camp of instruction. 

Other Indiana troops, with a battery of artillery, soon collected 
at this point, making in all some 3,000 troops, and the attack was 
made on the'works on the 14th and 16th of September, with great 
vigor by the Confederate forces, with some 8,000 troops, who, after 
repeated charges almost up to the works, were driven from the field 
with a loss of some 750 killed and wounded, while our loss was only 
47 killed and wounded. This defense on the Union side was made 
l)y Indiana troops who had never been under fire before. 

Being thus defeated, Bragg 's whole army deviated from their 
course, and by the 17th had surrounded the little garrison at ISIun- 
fordsv'ille, who had so ably defended the post and planted sixty- 
six cannon on hills bearing directly on the works and deployed 
some 35,000 men of all arms for an attack. 

Knowing full well the result of such an attack, the Confederate 
commander sent in a flag of truce after nightfall, demanding sur- 
render, but as General Wilder, who was the commander, hesitated, 
he was given privilege to go out and be taken around Bragg 's lines 
to verify the truth of the report. On finding conditions as repre- 
sented he returned at 3 o'clock in the morning, reported, and ad- 
vised surrender, rather than be slaughtered almost entire. 

Accordingly, terms of surrender were drawn up and signed, and 
on the morning of the 18th the entire garrison marched out, sur- 
rendered and grounded arms, stretching out a long distance along 
the old Louisville and Nashville pike road to perform this uncom- 
mon maneuver. 

The whole force was then paroled, and during the afternoon and 
night marched through lines upon lines of the Confederate force, 
entering the lines of Buell's Union army early in the forenoon of 
next day, and. as per terms of surrender, were formally delivered 
to the Unicn lines at Bowling Green, Kentucky, some forty miles 
south of Munfordsville. 

It was a matter of common regret that Buell did not come to the j 
relief of the Union forces at Munfordsville, a? his troops said that ; 



Sixty-Seventh Infantry. 331 

they had heard the firing all day of the second day's fight, and were 
chafing to corae to the relief of the troops engaged which, it was 
thought, could have been done. 

From Bowling Green the regiment marched to Brandenburg, on 
the Ohio River, and shortly thereafter reached Indianapolis. Thus 
was the 67th mustered into service August 19th, sent into the ene- 
my's country, fought two battles on September 14th and 16th, taken 
prisoners, paroled and back home again in our own State almost 
within thirty days, having seen more service and experience than 
some regiments who were out two or more years. 

Soon after the men were assembled at Indianapolis they were 
furloughed home for thirty days, and on return were held in parole 
at Camp Morton, Indianapolis, and, in the meantime, other Indiana 
regiments, having been captured in battles in Kentucky, were also 
camped with this regiment ; but all were exchanged in November, 
drew new clothing, new tents, improved arms, and on December 
5th again started south, via Cairo on the Vandalia Railroad and 
from thence hy boat to Memphis, Tennessee. While there the regi- 
ment was brigaded with the 16th and 60th Indiana, 83d and 96th 
Ohio and 23d Wisconsin, and, with only slight changes, these com- 
mands retained this brigade formation during term of service. 
General S. B. Burbridge ccmmanded the brigade, and A. J. Smith 
the division, until after the campaign of Vicksburg, when changes 
of brigade and division commanders occurred. The command was 
known as 1st Brigade, 10th Division, 13th Army Corps, Army of 
the Tennessee, until its transfer to the Department of the Gulf, in 
the fall of 1863. 

From jNIemphis, on December 20, 1862, the regiment was ordered 
to proceed by boat with General Sherman's command to make the 
first attack on Vicksburg at Haynes' Bluff, via Yazoo River and 
Chickasaw Bayou. After landing from boats, the forces made re- 
peated attacks from day to day without success, and, as it was 
found impossible to gain the expected advantage from this source, 
and learning General Grant had met with reverses en route from 
Memphis, via Holly Springs, to attack the forts from the rear, the 
Confederates daily receiving reinforcements, it was found neces- 
sary to retire from the attack, inasmuch as there was great danger 
of being surrounded, cur boats, artillery and stores captured. Ac- 
cordingly, Sherman's force retreated and retired to the boats on 
December 31st, the enemy following so closely they had to be driven 
back by fire from the gunboats. It was a fortunate escape, as we 
have since learned. 



332 Indiana at Vicksbueg. 

During the balance of the winter of 1862 and 1863, with the 
army, the regiment lay in eamxjs at Milliken's Bend and Young's 
Point, Louisiana, opposite Vicksburg, except to occasionally join 
expeditions sent up the river to attack points where the Confeder- 
ates would gather to fire on and impede navigation of our boats 
carrying troops and supplies to the army General Grant was col- 
lecting for his intended spring campaign against Vicksburg. 

In January divisions of the 13th and 15th Corps were carried 
l)y boat up the White and Arkansas rivers to co-operate with gun- 
l)oats in an attack and capture of Arkansas Post, in Arkansas, 
which was successfully accomplished on January 11, 1863, our 
forces capturing some 5,000 prisoners after hard fighting. Both 
sides lost heavily. 

The 67th bore a prominent part in the engagement, losing pro- 
portionately with the whole army, the union loss entire being 129 
killed and nearly 900 wounded. 

After capture of the fort, it was disarmed, prisoners sent north 
and earthworks leveled and the troops, within a few days, returned 
to camps at Milliken's Bend. 

On April 1st of this year, all things being in readiness, the 
whole of Grant's army began its flank movement across country 
opposite Vicksburg, to strike the river miles below, opposite Brnins- 
burg, Mississippi, where the regiment crossed on gunboats on the 
30th of April and, by a forced night march, arrived early May 1st 
on the battlefield of Port Gibson, the first engagement on the east 
side of the river, and beginning of the advance on Vicksburg. 

The engagement lasted from early dawn until nightfall, com- 
pletely routing and defeating the Confederates, causing their re- 
treat toward Vicksburg. This battle was always referred to as the 
"May Day party of 1863." 

Besides large numbers of killed and wounded of the enemy, we 
captured some 700 prisoners, but our losses were 130 killed and 718 
wounded. The 67th, in the evening, was on the advance lines and 
in the last charge of the day on the enemy. 

Following this engagement there was daily marching and skir- 
mishing with the enemy, some engagements being important enough 
for battles, until arrival of the forces at Champion's Hill, where 
.junction was formed with the 13th and 15th Corps, and on the 
16th of May was fought one of the hardest battles of the war, the 
Confederate General Pemberton having brought out from Vicks- 
burg almost his whole force and made a desperate stand to prevent 
Grant's army from approaching Vicksburg from the rear. 



Sixty-Seventh Infantry. 333 

After terrific fighting on both sides, the Confederate army was 
defeated with heavy loss, and at night retreated to and across 
Black River, burning the railroad bridge before their forces were 
all across the river. 

The Union array followed up the next morning, and the 10th 
Division being in advance, after a sharp battle in a bend of the 
river on the east side, captured a fort with some 1,500 prisoners 
and eighteen pieces of artillery. On the 18th the army crossed 
Black River on hastily constructed bridges and hotly pursued the 
Confederate forces during the day to within cannon shot range of 
the Confederate works at Vicksburg. After unsuccessful assaults 
on the fortifications, on the 19th, orders were for commands to take 
safe positions as near as possible to the enemy and hold him down 
by sharpshooters, and rest and draw rations on the 20th and 21st, 
which was done. 

Gunboats on the river having got into position, as well as land 
forces, a general assault v»^as made along the whole line on the 22d 
against the Confederate works, at 10 o'clock a. m., from which hour 
until nightfall the fighting was terrific, but our troops failed to 
make a permanent lodgment within the enemy's works at any 
place, but secured and held advanced positions in many places near 
the works until the final surrender. The 67th was near the center 
of the line and got so near the fort in their front that they could 
neither advance nor retreat, and were only relieved and fell back in 
dusk of the evening. Fighting ceased at night and, while our 
losses were heavy, great advantages were gained, that in the end 
aided in capture of the works. It was said that Grant lost one- 
tenth of his army engaged that day, and the 67th suffered propor- 
tionately. From this date until July 4th gradual approaches, by 
rifle-pits, trenches, mining and other ways, were made day and 
night, until final surrender on July 4, 1863. On the same date was 
achieved the victory to Union arms in the great battle of Gettys- 
burg, and the backbone of the rebellion was broken, both east and 
west. 

Immediately after the fall of Vicksburg, the larger part of the 
army was ordered to Jackson, Mississippi, to capture or drive off 
Johnston's army, which had been hai-assing the rear of Grant's 
troops during the siege, and in this movement the 67th also par- 
ticipated. 

After the capture of Jackson and the retreat of Johnston, 
Grant's forces returned to Vicksburg, and in due time the 13th 
Army Corps was ordered to the Gulf Department and all assembled 
at New Orleans and vicinity during the latter part of August. 



334 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

In this depai'tinent the regiment remained until the close of the M 
war and participated in the two unfortunate Red River campaigns ^ 
in western Louisiana. In the one in the fall of 1863, the regiment 
was again captured at the battle of Grand Coteau, November 3d, 
while acting as rear guard in the retreat of the division and away 
from supports but, after being held as prisoners of war until De- 
cember, the men were paroled and sent into the Union lines at New 
Iberia, Louisiana, on Christmas day, and were eventually ex- 
changed, after which the different detachments were again assem- 
bled at Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 

In the spring of 1864, after returning from ^Matagorda, Texas, 
where the 67 th had been sent on an expedition, they again partic- 
ipated in the second Red River expedition to Alexandria and be- 
yond, in western Louisiana, during which they were skirmishing 
and fighting almost daily in the months of April and ^Nlay, partic- 
ipating in some twelve engagements during those months, and were 
in the retreat from Alexandria to the vicinity of New Orleans. 

All prisoners who had been captured at Grand Coteau in No- 
vember, 1863, were exchanged and rejoined the regiment early in 
July, 1864, and on the 29th of July the regiment, with its brigade, 
under command of Gen. Gordon Granger, embarked on boats for 
the campaign of Mobile Bay, and, disembarking on Dauphine 
Island, at the mouth of tlie bay on the 3d of August, deployed 
across the island in the rear of the Confederate Fort Gaines, on 
extreme east point of the island, and by the usual tactics of rifle-pit 
approaches, until the evening of August 5th. when, after a heavy 
bombardment from the fleet and land forces, the troops made a 
charge all along the line and captured the Avorks with its garrison, 
cannon, a large supply of small arms, ammunition and stores, with 
the loss of but one man killed and a number of wounded. 

On the 6th. after the fall of Fort Gaines, the grand naval battle 
of Mobile took place in full view of the land troops. Admiral Far- 
ragut's fleet of monitors and naval vessels bombarded Fort IMorgan 
and ran the batteries with the loss of one of his monitor fleet, with 
nearly all on board. The fleet passed the fort and captured the 
Confederate ram "Tennessee" and a number of other boats of the 
enemy, but one escaping. 

take up its duties of citizenship and lasting peace in its own be- 
On August 9th the land forces crossed over the bay on vessels of 
the fleet, out of range of guns of the fort, and, being deployed 
across the narrow strip of land above the fort, began the Vicksburg 
fashion of making approaches in regular siege to the fort. This 



Sixty-Seventh Infantry. 335 

was continued by sharpshootiug and artillery- by land, and bom- 
bardment by the fleet, until the night of the 23d, when, by a com- 
bined attack of bombardment for twelve hours by sea and land, 
Fort Morgan surrendered. 

After resting here a few days, and at Fort Powell, on the oppo- 
site side of the bay, the regiment again embarked for New Orleans, 
arriving there on the 12th of September and disembarked at Al- 
giers, from where the regiment soon after moved by boat to Mor- 
ganza Bend, Louisiana. From this point the regiment participated 
in a number of expeditions and skirmishes during the fall. 

On December 21, 1864, the regiment being decimated in num- 
ber by casualties, disease and discharges, orders were issued for 
consolidation of the 67th and 24th Indiana Regiments, and from 
that date to end of service, the 67th 's companies composed the left 
wing of the 24th and were officially recognized as of that regiment. 

In the winter of 1864 and 1865, preparations were made for ex- 
peditions for the capture of Mobile and defenses, and the part of 
the army to which the 67th was attached went by boat to Pensacola, 
Florida, where, soon after being assembled, they marched by land 
across the western Florida strip through Alabama, and reached 
Fort Blakely, on the east coast of Mobile Bay, opposite the city of 
Mobile. Here they entered a nine days ' siege of these strong works, 
which were captured by a general assault along the lines for some 
six miles in extent, on April 9, 1865, being the last engagement of 
the 67th, and nearly the last battle of the war, as in April, through 
Confederate sources, the good news of Lee 's surrender was made 
known. 

Soon after the general surrenders the 67th made an expedition 
to Selma, Alabama, and from thence was ordered to Galveston, 
Texas, by boat, where the regiment was discharged July 19th, but 
was paid oif and term of service ended August 4, 1865, at Indian- 
apolis, Indiana. 

Having entered the service with over 1,000 enlisted men and 
officers, fought twenty-nine battles and in many skirmishes, trav- 
eled over nine Southern States, under fire 170 days, twice captured, 
paroled and exchanged, it returned with only 236 war-worn veter- 
ans of the number on its original enlistment rolls, to sever its con- 
nection with the armies of the Union, and return to civil life to 
loved State of Indiana. 

The regiment lost duiin'j;- service 1 officer and 52 enlisted men 
killed and mortally wounded, and 2 officers and 194 enlisted men by 
disease: total, 249. 




Momijueiit ut GDtli Infantry. 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

1st BRIGADE 9th DIVISION 13th CORPS 
69th INFANTRY 



f 

f 

I 



Colonel Thomas W. Bennett 
Lieut. Col. Or.\n Pekky 

Engaged: Port Gibson, May 1; Champion's Hill, May 16; Big Black River Bridge, May 17; 
Assault, May 19; Assault, May 22. Duty at Big Black River Bridge, May 24-July 4. Casualties; 
Killed 16, wounded 72, missing 7, total 95; Major John H. Finley and Lieut. Henry Stratton mortally 
wounded. 



(336) 



SIXTY-NINTH REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 
VOLUNTEERS. 

The 69th was organized at Richmond, Indiana, in July, 1862, 
and was mustered into the United States service August 19, 1862, 
under the following named officers : 

William A. Bickle Colonel. 

Job Stout Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Thomas S. Walterhouse Major. 

Oran Perry Adjutant. 

William M. Smith Quartermaster. 

Alvin L. Hobbs Chaplain. 

David S. Evans Surgeon. 

William B. Witt Assistant Surgeon. 

Captain. 1st Lieutenant. 2d Lieutenant. 

Co. A. John H. Finley, Maberry M. Lacey, George G. Garretson. 

Co. B. David Nation, David K. Williams, Alvin M. Cowing. 

Co. C. George H. Bonebrake, John K. Martin, John S. Way. 

Co. D. John Ross, Samuel J. Miller, Jacob A. Jackson. 

Co. E. Joseph L. Marsh, Cornelius Longfellow, Francis French. 

Co. F. Lewis K. Harris, Joseph R. Jackson, George W. Thompson. 

Co. G. Wilmington Wingett, William Mount, Cordon W. Smith. 

Co. H. Frederick Hoover, David Yount, Hiram B. Brattain. 

Co. L Robert IC. Collins, Andrew J. Slinger, John H. Foster. 

Co. K. William Kerr, Jesse Holton, William G. Plummer. 

The regiment left ' ' Camp Wayne, ' ' Richmond, August 20, 1862, 
1,000 strong, under command of Lieut. Col. Job Stout, going to 
Lexington, Kentucky, via Indianapolis and Louisville, where it was 
assigned to Hanson's Brigade, Army of Kentucky. 

Kirby Smith's Confederate army of 30,000 to 40,000 was ad- 
vancing northward, with the intention of capturing Louisville and 
Cincinnati, and the advance troops of the Army of Kentucky, 
under General Manson, about 7,000 strong, met it at Richmond, 
Kentucky, where the Federal forces, after an all-day's battle, dur- 
ing which three stands were made, suffered a crushing defeat. 

The 69th Regiment participated in this unfortunate battle, 
losing 20 per cent, of its strength in killed and wounded, and 
nearly all of the rest by capture. The prisoners were paroled a 
couple of days later and, under orders from the War Department, 
made their way back to "Camp Wayne" as soon as possible. 

While in camp at Ijexington, the colors of the 69th were placed 
in the hands of Eli Almon, Company C, who carried them through 
the battle until the third and last stand, when, realizing defeat, he 
slipped the flag from the staff and, concealing it under his clothes, 
made his escape through the lines of the enemy and turned up at 
' ' Camp Wayne ' ' a few days later. The career of this color bearer 
was remarkable, from the fact that he carried the flag from the be- 

[22] [337] 



338 Indiana at Vicksbttrg. 

ginning" cf tlie service to llie end without l)real< of any kind, always 
on duty, never sic-k, never wounded, and it is probable it has no 
|)arallel in the service. 

The paroled prisoners of the 69th were quickly exchanged and 
the regiment was fitted out for active service without delay. 

AVhile m "Camp Wayne" Colonel Bickle, who had not accom- 
l)anied the regiment to the field, resigned his commission, wliich 
was accepted, taking effect October 24, 18G2, and Thomas W. lien- 
nett, major of the 36th Indiana, was promoted to the colonelcy of 
the 69th, assuming command November 1, 1862. 

The battle of Richmond, Kentucky, had a sobering but bene- 
ficial effect on the men of the 60th. They realized that war was 
just what General Sherman said it was, and that if they were to be 
successful in the future they must study the game, so at this camp 
was esta])lis'hed the policy of drill and discipline, which was never 
dej)arted from, and which redounded to the credit of the regiment 
throughout its career. 

The regiment left "Camp Wayne" again November 1, 1862, 
going to Indianapolis for a few days, thence to Memphis, Tennes- 
see, via Cairo, where it was assigned to the 1st Brigade, 9th Di- 
vision, 13th Army Corps. 

It took part in Sherman's Tazoo expedition, sailing from Mem- 
phis December 20, 1862, on the old steamer "Sam Gaty," whose 
dilapidated condition caused its passengers more distress of mind 
than all of the anticipations of battles to conie. 

The 69th was engaged in all of the actions at Chickasaw Bluffs 
and Chickasaw Bayou, December 26-29, none of which were a suc- 
cess, and it had the honor of covering the retreat of the disap- 
pointed troops, it being the last regiment to embark, heavily pressed 
by tlie enemy, and saved from, capture only by the timely arrival of 
the gunboat "Tyler," Capt. James Pritchard, whose guns swept 
the cotton fields clean. 

Returning from the Yazoo as gracefully as the circumstances 
would permit. General Sherman lost no time in useless repining, but 
headed his fleet for Arkansas Post, where it arrived January 10, 
1863. 

On the 11th of January, the regiment participated in the 
assault on Fort Hindman, which resultel in the capture of the 
works, some 5,000 troops, a large quantity of stores and munitions 
of war and two steamboats. It was the cleanest sweep of the war, 
not a single one of the enemy making his escape. 



Sixty-Ninth Infantry. 339 

While at Arkansas Post, Gen. P. J. Osterhaus arrived and was 
assigned command of the 9th Division, which he retained through- 
out the Vicksburg campaign, until August, 1863. 

Immediately after the affair at Arkansas Post, the army was 
transported down to Young's Point, Louisiana, near Vicksburg, 
on the west bank of the Mississippi, where it arrived January 17th. 
At that time the river was very high and General Grant hoped that 
by digging and dredging the high water might be induced to cut 
through the abandoned "Williams Canal" and thus afford safe 
passage for the fleet past Vicksburg. The men of the 69th did their 
share of this work, encamped on sodden ground all the while, and 
doing their best to keep down a heavy sick list. In spite of the 
best efforts of the surgeons and tho nurses the regiment lost thii-ty- 
one men by death in the six weeks it was stationed there. 

As the river showed no signs of receding or any intention of 
taking advantage of the "Williams Canal," the work was sus- 
pended and the troops were sent to IMilliken's Bend, twenty-five 
miles above Vicksburg, the 69th arriving there March 8th. 

Lieut. Col. Job Stout had resigned, taking effect Januaiy 21, 
1863, and Maj. Thomas S. Walterhouse, February 16th, both on 
account of wounds received in battle, from which it was impossible 
to recover while in the field. To fill these vacancies commissions 
were received at Milliken's Bend, promoting Adj. Oran Perry to 
lieutenant-colonel, and Capt. John H. Pinley, Company A, to be 
major. On account of a lame foot First Lieut. IMaberry M. Lacey 
waived his promotion to the captaincy of Company A and was ap- 
pointed adjutant. 

During the winter there had been several attempts to find a 
foothold in the rear of Vicksburg on the east side of the river, 
without success, which determined General Grant to try his for- 
tunes by the way of the west bank of the river. To General ]\Ic- 
Clernand, of the 13th Corps, was entrusted the task of finding a 
route practicable for the passage of the army from ]\Iilliken's Bend 
to New Carthage, or some other point below Vicksburg, where it 
could meet the gunboats and transports, which were to run the 
blockade. 

The flood Avas still at its height, the bayous were over their 
banks for miles, all known roads were out of sight, and the prospect 
of finding a route without a very wide detour to the west seemed 
extremely doubtful. The experiment had to be made nevertheless, 
and it is the especial pride of the 69th that it was chosen for the 



340 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

work and that it was successful in every particular. The orders 
for the detail may be found in "Rebellion Records," Series 1, Vol- 
ume 24, page 445, and are quoted below : 

Hkadqxiarters Thirteenth Army Corps, March 30, 18G3. 
Briffiidier General P. J. Osterhaus, 

Commanding Ninth Division, 
General: You will order one regiment, armed and equipped with 
forty rounds of ammunition in their cartridge boxes, and ammunition 
wagon laden with suitable ammunition, their camp and garrison equip- 
age and four days' rations to report opposite these headquarters by 8 
o'clock tomorrow, for further orders. I would suggest that the Sixty- 
ninth Indiana, Colonel Bennett, be detached for the serA'ice contemplated. 
By order of Major General McCleruand, 

Walter B. Scates, 
Lieutenant-Colonel and Adjutant-General. 

Headquarters Thirteenth Army Corps, 

Milliken's Bend, March 30. 
Colonel Bennett, 

Commanding Sixty-ninth Indiana Volunteers, 

Colonel: Besides your own regiment, you will have command of de- 
tachments of cavalry and pioneers for the purpose of the important ex- 
pedition with which you are charged. The main purpose of the expedi- 
tion is to open a practicable communication for our forces via Richmond, 
La., between this camp and New Carthage. Of course, the shortest route, 
whether by land or water, all other things being equal, would be prefer- 
able. It is certain that there is a navigable communication between Rich- 
mond and New Carthage, by Roundaway and. Bayou Vidal, and it is also 
believed that there is a road along the bank of Roundaway Bayou almost 
the whole distance. That route which you can make available for the 
passage of troops and trains with the least labor and in the shortest time 
you will select and make available at the earliest practicable moment. The 
detachment of pioneers, as already mentioned, will be at your command 
for that pui-pose, and Lieutenant William R. McGomas, aid-de-camp and 
engineer on my staff, will give any assistance in his power. If a prac- 
ticable route can be found, you will not only consider it with reference 
to passage, but also with reference to its capability of defense, and for 
this puifiose you will select and report suitable sites for posts or garrisons 
along it. If no practicable route can be found, you will immediately re- 
port that fact. 

Starting tomorrow, you will march to Richmond, and upon personal 
examination you will decide, in view of military considerations, whether 
you will encamp on this or the other side of Roundaway Bayou. Upon 
reaching the bayou at Richmond, it may be found expedient to cross the 
cavalry first, and send it forward rapidly, under orders, to scout the 
countr.v around Richmond, as far as water will permit, lor the purpose 
of capturing hostile parties, preventing the destruction of cotton and other 



Sixty-Ninth Infantry. 341 

property, verifying the names and political antecedents of its owners, and 
bringing in beef cattle. 

All cotton abandoned by its owners or forfeited by treasonable acts, 
may be brought in and condemned by a Provost Marshal for the use of 
the United States, in which case the particular lot of cotton, and the facts 
relating to it. will be reported to these headquarters. You will also re- 
port to these headquarters daily of the progress of your operations. Any 
reinforcements you may request will be promptly forwarded. While you 
are authorized to draw provisions and forage from the country, giving re- 
ceipts to owners, payable upon satisfactory proof of their loyalty at the end 
of the rebellion, you will be strict and promjjt to prevent marauding. Let 
nothing be taken except by your orders. 

Until otherwise ordered, you will report to these headquarters, through 
your Division Commander. Brigadier-General Osterhaus. 

Your obedient servant, 

John A. McClernand, 
Major-General Commanding. 

The expedition, which was placed under the command of Colo- 
nel Bennett, as noted above, was composed of the following named 
organizations: A squadron of 2d Illinois Cavalry, with howitzer 

battery, Captain commanding; a pioneer corps of 200 

men, with yawls and pontoon boats. Captain Patterson, and the 
69th Indiana, Lieut. Col. Perrj^ This force left Milliken's Bend 
March 31, 1863, at 8 a. m., arriving at Roundaway Bayou, opposite 
Richmond, Louisiana, about 2 p. m., which was crossed in boats by 
a battalion of the 69th, under the fire of the enemy, who were 
driven through the town into the country beyond. For the next 
two weeks the troops were engaged in exploring the country in 
boats and locating roads, during which time they built over 2,000 
feet of bridges and corduroy roads. The scout boats brought in- 
formation that the enemy was occupying a fine camping ground 
four or five miles south, and its capture was determined upon. A 
large scow, which had been used as a ferry boat by the planters, 
was secured, its ends and sides armor-plated with thick boards, the 
ends pierced with port-holes, through which the brass howitzers 
showed their muzzles, the motive power being side oars, after the 
fashion of war galleys of old. Manned by Companies A and F. 
the ferocious looking craft paddled through the woods and over 
the fields, accompanied by small boats, cariying Generals McCler- 
nand and Osterhaus, the field and staff officers of the 69th, except 
the major. 

The expedition passed Ncav Carthage under water, and at Ion 
plantation, owned by Mr. James, encountered the Confederate 



342 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

]iickets and clinsod them to their eamp at Perkins' plantation, a 
conple of mik-s l)elo\v. Ion phxntation was high and dry. It con- 
tained acreage enough to hold a large army, and it was deter- 
mined to hold it all hazards. The next morning, April 8th, the 
rest of tiie 69th came forward and the day was spent in erecting 
saw-log barricades against the enemy. Every day for a week the 
rebel artillery slielled the position, while their infantry made dem- 
onstrations that seriously threatened the success of tiie expedition. 
To add to the i)eril, a rebel gunlioat appeared in the water front 
and kept the little force in a very anxious frame of mind for one 
day. It was saved from shelling by the close proximity of the 
mansion of Mr. James, an ardent friend of the enemy, and whose 
two sons were officers in the Confederate force at Perkins. 

The tension was finally relieved by the passage of the batteries 
at Vicksburg, on the night of the 16th, by the gunboats and trans- 
ports and their arrival at Ion plantation at noon next day. Early 
next morning the 49th and 69th Indiana, supported by the gun- 
boats, made a reconnoissance to Perkins' plantation, which they 
found had been abandoned by the enemy the night before. Per- 
kins' plantation had several hundred acres of tine camp ground, a 
river front with a good landing, making it an ideal place for assem- 
bling an army. 

Hither came the 13th and 17th Corps, occupying several days 
in closing up, during which time a number of additional trans- 
ports ran past the Vicksburg batteries, providing sufficient trans- 
portation for the movement General Grant had in mind. 

It was while camped at this place that Chaplain Alvin I. Hobbs 
resigned, because of nervous prostration, caused by overwork in the 
hospitals at Young's Point. The men of the regiment were very 
fond of him and pai'ted with him with sincere regret. Here also 
was received four months' pay, the bulk of which was sent home 
with the chaplain. 

On the 28th of April the 13th Army Corps embarked on trans- 
ports and followed the gunboats to the vicinity of Grand Gulf, 
where it watched the bombardment by the gunboats until night- 
fall, when it disembarked and marched across the neck of land to 
Hard Times, where it met the gunboats and transports again and 
was ferried over the river to Bruinsburg on the afternoon of April 
30th. Marching all night with the rest of the division to gain the 
high land back of the river, the 69th was one of the first to engage 
in the battle of Port Gibson, which was an overwhelming victory 



Sixty-Ninth Infantry. 343 

for the Federal forces. Further maneuvering by the army during 
the next two weeks resulted in the victory at Champion's Hill, May 
16th, in which the 69th had a prominent part, having the good 
fortune to be in position favorable to the pursuit of the enemy, 
during which it captured over 2,000 prisoners and seven stand of 
colors. The pursuit was pressed until late in the night, the 69th 
bivouacking in an advanced position near Edwards Station. 

The next day, May 17th, the enemy was found to be strongly 
entrenched at Black River Bridge, and Gen. M. K. Lawler, 2d 
Brigade, 14th Division, was ordered to dislodge or capture them. 
Having but four regiments in his brigade. General Osterhaus 
loaned him the 49th and 69th Indiana, a distincticn which was 
regarded by the troops engaged as a great compliment. The result 
of the assault was the capture of the works with about 5,000 pris- 
oners and twenty pieces of artille^3^ 

Being disabled by a piece of shell at Black River, General Os- 
terhaus was, for a few days, succeeded by Gen. A. L. Lee. 

Retreating from Black River, the enemy had taken refuge be- 
hind the line of works outside of Vicksburg. Hoping to profit by 
their demoralization and quickly end the campaign, General Grant 
ordered an assault on the morning of May 19th, which failed of 
success. Among those seriously wounded was Gen. A. L. Lee, 
commanding the 9th Division, who was immediately succeeded by 
General Osterhaus, who had just arrived on the ground. This was 
followed by another assault on the morning of INIay 22, also unsuc- 
cessful, during which the 69th lost two of its most valued young 
ofificers, Maj. John H. Finley and Lieut. Henry Stratton, Company 
E. The next day Colonel Bennett left for home on sick leave, and 
was succeeded by Lieutenant-Colonel Perry, who, with the exception 
of four or five months, retained command to the end of the war. 

The commanding general having decided to settle down to a 
siege of Vicksburg, General Osterhaus, with the 9th Division and 
a force of cavalry and artillery, was ordered back to Black River 
to protect the rear, and the 69th on the morning of the 23d took 
up the line of march with the rest, and for the next six weeks did 
strenuous duty along the banks of the Big Black. 

Immediately after the surrender of Vicksburg, the troops at the 
Big Black, reinforced by the bulk of the army which had con- 
ducted the siege, the whole under command of General Sherman, 
crossed the river and drove the Confederate army under Johnston 
back to the works at Jackson. During the advance, July 4th to 



344 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

10th, the 9th Division leading, the 69th took part in all of the 
actions that occurred, also performed efficient service during the 
siege of Jackson, July lOtli to 17tli. 

Leaving Jackson, July 21, 1863, the 9th Division returned to 
Vicksburg, where General Osterhaus, having been made a major- 
general, was transferred to a larger command. 

On the 8th of August the brigade to which the 69th was attached 
embarked for Port Hudson, where it arrived the next evening and 
remained until the 19th, when embarking on the steamer "St. 
Thomas," it sailed for New Orleans and landed at Carrollton, a 
suburb, on the evening of the 20th. An army was gathering here 
for an expedition against Texas, by the way of western Louisiana, 
and the time was principally spent in drill. 

The 69th had the honor of assignment to the right of the 9th Di- 
vision on the grand review of the 13th Army Corps by General 
Grant on September 2, 1863. It was held on the great plain back 
of Carrollton, and was a function the splendor of which was never 
equaled at any other time during the service of this regiment. 

The Teche campaign having gotten under way, the 69th took 
the cars at Algiers, opposite New Orleans, Sunday, September 6th, 
and arrived at Brashear City, on Berwick Bay, the same after- 
noon, at which point the army was getting together for its final 
start to Texas, via Franklin, New Iberia and Opelousas. 

About this time Capt. George H. Bonebrake, Company C, re- 
ceived his commission as major, vice Finley, killed. 

The trip through the beautiful Teche country, the last home of 
Evangeline, was something in the nature of a picnic because of the 
lovely landscape, the delightful climate and the friendly disposi- 
tion of the inhabitants, who seemed to hold no grudge against the 
invaders. When the army arrived at a point some distance be- 
yond Opelousas, it turned back because of lack of water on the vast 
plain which had to be crossed, and it jogged back by easy stages 
until it reached Algiers, November 23d. The military authorities 
had decided to try the gulf route to Texas, landing on the coast at 
the mouth of the Rio Grande, with the intention of capturing the 
coast defenses by the rear. 

On Wednesday, November 25, 1863, the 69th, accompanied by 
other regiments of the brigade. General Lawler in command, em- 
barked on the steamship "St. Mary," and after a stormy voyage, 
occupying several days, made an ineffectual attempt to land at 
Corpus Christi, which was finally abandoned, the fleet sailing fur- 



Sixty-Ninth Infantry. 345 

ther east and landing the troops at Decrow's Point, Matagorda 
Bay, December 1st. This proving a good base, a large number of 
troops were gathered here for the invasion of Texas, and it was 
here that the famous ' ' cold snap ' ' of January 1, 1864, nipped the 
fingers, toes and ears of the boys in blue, reminding them of ''Home, 
Sweet Home." 

A few days later the division moved up the bay to Indianola, 
where it remained for six weeks, and from which point the 69th 
regiment, with a section of artillery and a company of Texas 
scouts, made several incursions into the back country, bringing in 
over 1,000 head of fine cattle, a large quantity of lumber and over 
twenty wagon loads of dry hides, an extremely valuable commodity 
at that time. 

By this time the military authorities at New Orleans had 
changed their minds again, and all the troops except the 1st Divi- 
sion had been recalled to New Orleans to take part in the Red 
River campaign, the 1st Division to march across the coimtry to 
Tyler, Texas, and meet the main body there. With this object in 
view the troops of this division were directed to assemble at INIata- 
gorda Island. In obedience to this order the 69th Indiana broke 
camp at Indianola at 5 a. m., Sunday, March 13, 1864, and arrived 
at the ferry connecting with the island at 3 p. m. 

The ferry was a raft made of pontoon boats, carrying about 
three companies at a time. The distance between shores was about 
300 yards, and a stiff tide was running in. Two loads had crossed 
safely, but en the third trip the float swamped in midstream, car- 
rying with it Companies B, G and K of the 69th, together with the 
camp followers. Dr. W. B. Witt, assistant surgeon ; Lieut. Joseph 
Senor, Company K, and twenty-one enlisted men were drowned, 
while the rest were saved with great difficulty, many of them being 
carried a mile away before assistance could be rendered. The fol- 
lowing day, the 14th, Dr. D. S. Evans, surgeon, received notice of 
the acceptance of his resignation, on account of ill health, which 
left the regiment with but one medical officer, Assistant Surgeon 
Jacob S. Montieth, who, though in ill health himself, remained on 
duty until mustered out in July, 1865, dying at home a few weeks 
later, a victim of his conscientious devotion to duty. 

On the 10th of February, 1864, 101 of the enlisted men of the 
8th Indiana, who did not care to re-enlist in the "veteran" organ- 
ization, were transferred to the 69th to serve until the "veteran" 
organization should return from its furlough. They were assigned 



346 Indiana at Vicksbuhg. 

to companies most in need of them until July 7th, when orders 
were received to return them to the 8th Regiment at Algiers, Louis- 
iana. To Adjutant Lacey was assigned the duty of making the 
transfer. 

While the division was awaiting orders at Matagorda Island, 
there was a great rivalry between regiments in drill, guard mount 
and dress parades, which resulted in a competitive drill under 
direction of a board composed of the following named officers: 
Col. W. D. Washburn, 18th Indiana; Maj. L. B. Huston, 23d Iowa, 
and Capt. A. B. Cree, 22d Iowa. The following named companies 
were entered: Company K, 16th Ohio; Company C, 34th Iowa; 
Company I, 49th Indiana ; Company A, 69th Indiana, and Com- 
l)any K, 114th Ohio. Six points of excellence were allowed. No. 5 
indicating the highest mark of merit in each. The drill took place 
April 14, 1864. in the presence of the whole division, and Company 
A, 69th Indiana, won in a total of 24. General Lawler, announcing 
the result in General Orders No. 11, added: ''AH companies are 
entitled to praise. The report reflects great credit on the com- 
panies of the 69th Indiana, 34th Iowa and the 16th Ohio, showing 
that they have attained a degree of proficiency in drill and sol- 
dierly appearance highly praiseworthy and worthy of the emula- 
tion of the brigade. ' ' 

A steamship from New Orleans brought the news of Banks' de- 
feat at Sabine Cross Roads, together with orders for Lawler 's Di- 
vision to reinforce it via New Orleans. Losing no time the 69th 
Indiana took passage at Matagorda Island, April 20th, on a dilapi- 
dated tramp steamer, the "Alabama," and after a stormy passage, 
during which it narrowly escaped shipwreck, arrived at New Or- 
leans, April 23d, where it transferred to the steamer "Polar Star" 
and arrived at Alexandria at 9 p. m., April 27th. 

The coming of Lawler 's Division was a fortunate thing for 
Banks' demoralized army, as it immediately took the field, drove 
Dick Taylor's victorious troops back for twelve miles, where it 
held them until Banks' troops could be reorganized, the 69th taking 
part in all of the actions covering the movement. From the 12th 
of May until the 20th the regiment performed various duties in 
connection with protection of the camp and fatigue duty on the 
Bailey Dam, which was built for the rescue of the gunboat fleet. 

The return of Banks' army from Alexandria to the Mississippi 
River began May 12th, covered by Lucas' Cavalry Division, sup- 
ported by Lawler 's Infantry Division, and was the most exhaustive 



Sixty-Ninth Infantry. 847 

service ever experienced by the 69th Regiment, the enemy display- 
ing a most persistent activity day and night until finally checked 
l)y defeat at Bellow Bayou. The army reached Morganza Bend, 
May 20th, and during the ensuing summer the 1st Division, to 
which the 69th still belonged, was engaged in keeping the Missis- 
sippi River open to traffic, military and commercial. The regi- 
ment took part in the expeditions to Atchafalya, White River, St. 
Charles, Natchez and Baton Rouge, finall^^ being ordered from 
the latter place to Dauphin Island, ^Mobile Bay, where it reported 
to Gen. Gordon Granger, commanding the District of South Ala- 
liama, on December 7, 1864. 

Wilson's Cavalry was making a raid from the Mississippi River, 
which was threatening Mobile, in support of which General Gran- 
ger, on the 14th of December, sent a brigade composed of the 69th, 
four other regiments and a battery of artillery to the mainland near 
Pascagoula, where connection was made with a portion of the cav- 
alry. A scouting party, composed of the 69th Indiana and one 
company of cavalry, succeeded in approaching within eleven miles 
of Mobile, but the force under General Granger lieing too small to 
accomplish any practical results, it was withdrawn to Pascagoula 
on Christmas night. 

While at Pascagoula, January 22d, the regiment having fallen 
below the standard in numbers, was consolidated into a battalion 
of four companies, under Special Orders No. 4, M. D. W. M., Jan- 
uary 4, 1865, numbering 350 officers and men, retaining the follow- 
ing named officers : 

Lieut .-Col. Oran Perry Commanding. 

Lieut. Maberrs^ M. Lacey. . Adjutant. 

Lieut. William Mount Quartermaster. 

Capt. J. S. Montieth Assistant Surgeon. 

1st Lieutenant. H Lieutenant. 

Joseph G. Messick, Alex. Horney. 

John Macy, William M. Reeves. 

James E. Huston, Charles C. Shredon. 

Cordon W. Smith, N. B. Cogshall. 

The supernumerary officers mustered out were : 

Col. T. W. Bennett, Major George H. Bonebrake, 

Capt. John LinvUle, Co. B., Capt. W. Wingett, Co. G., 

Capt. Robert K. Collins, Co. I., Capt. Jesse Holton, Co. K., 

Lieut. John Goodnow, Co. I., Lieut. Harvey Zimmermann, Co. K. 

On the 31st of January, 1865, the battalion was ordered to Bar- 
rancas, Florida, where it was assigned to the 2d Brigade, Col. W. 
T. Spicely, 2d Division, Gen. C. C. Andrews, 13th Army Corps, 







Captain. 


Co. 


A. 


Gearse C. Garre;son, 


Co. 


B. 


Lewis K. Harris, 


Co. 


C. 


David Yount, 


Co. 


D. 


Joseph R. Jackson, 



348 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

serving without further assignment until the muster out. The di- 
vision marched to Pensacola, March 14th, joining Steele's ex- 
pedition, which left Pensacola March 20th, marching through 
Florida to Pollard, Alabama, thence westward to the Alabama 
River, joining the main army at Blakely on April 1st. While on 
its march through Florida, the 69th, with two other regiments, 
supported Lucas' Cavalry Division in its fight with the Confederate 
forces under General Clanton, on the south bank of the Escambia 
River, during which General Clanton was killed, his force defeated, 
many being taken prisoners, while the rest escaped by various 
fords. To make the victory secure and provide for the passage of 
the army next day, the 69th was detailed to occupy the north bank 
of the river by crossing, during the night, over a half-mile railroad 
trestle. 

After the advance guard had safely established itself on the 
opposite bank, the rest of the battalion followed in single file, each 
man carrying a pine torch to light the way. An artist for Harper's 
Weekly made this scene the subject of a wierd picture for his paper. 

To end the siege on Blakely an assault of the works was ordered 
for April 9th, which took place at 5 :30 p. m., participated in by all 
of the Federal troops, resulting in the capture of all of the defenses 
of Mobile and of the troops defending them, together with all of the 
material for war. It occurred on the day of Lee's surrender, and 
was virtually the last battle of the war. Colonel Perry was seri- 
ously wounded, and for the time being the command devolved on 
Captain Harris, of Company B. From April 10th to 18th the 
69th Battalion was employed in guarding prisoners and conduct- 
ing them to the prison camp at Ship Island, after which it joined 
the brigade again at Blakely. Practically the war was ended, and 
for a few weeks the principal duty of the troopers was to scour the 
country, picking up the stray detachments of the enemy still under 
arms, and succoring helpless people. Confederate or Union, black 
or white, of whom there were many. The 69th finally settled down 
on April 28th in a beautiful camp at Selma, Alabama, where it en- 
joyed a good rest until May 11th, spending the most of the time 
in caring for the stranded Confederate soldiers who straggled 
through the town on their way home. 

Colonel Perry returned from the hospital at New Orleans on 
May 3d and again resumed command. While in this camp at 
Selma, it became the fashion of the town to attend the evening 
parade of the 69th, and it was not an uncommon thing to have sev- 



Sixty-Ninth Infantry. 349 

eral hundred spectators, composed of ladies and gentlemen, colored 
folks and a large number of Confederate officers and soldiers, 
whose sincere and generous applause at the termination of the 
manual at arms was extremely flattering to the 69th men. 

The Confederate troops east of the Mississippi having surren- 
dered or disbanded, and there being no further necessity for troops 
at Selma in large force, the 2d Division was ordered to Mobile, the 
69th Battalion taking passage on the "Tarascan" May 11th, land- 
ing and going into camp three miles north of Mobile on May 13th. 
Here the ^'hard up" soldier was made glad by a six months' pay. 

On the 25th of May occurred the terrific explosion of the am- 
munition depot at Mobile, destroying an immense amount of prop- 
erty and killing a large number of people, among them Frederick 
M. Lasley, Company C, 69th Indiana, who was in town on leave. 

The battalion was ordered into the city on the 27th, camping on 
Dauphine street, where it remained until its departure for home. 
Here for the first time during the entire term of service the men 
had absolute rest, no enemy to disturb them, no duties to perform, 
except drill, with plenty to eat, money to spend, and clothed in new 
full dress suits, they enjoyed their freedom to the fullest extent 
and rapidly developed into a strong, healthy lot of men. 

The conduct of the men while in this camp was such as to com- 
pel the admiration and win the respect and friendship of the cit- 
izens in the neighborhood, whose good opinion was voiced by a very 
flattering editorial in the Mobile Register, whose interests and 
sympathies all were with the South, and coming as it did, so soon 
after the close of a bitter civil war, was indeed a remarkable com- 
pliment. 

About this time the government was concentrating an army on 
the Rio Grande, under command of General Phil Sheridan, with the 
intention of driving the French out of Mexico. All of the troops at 
Mobile were included in the order, and the 69th only escaped the 
service because of a lack of transportation, which delayed it until 
an order came to muster out of service all troops whose term 
would expire before October 1st. With the exception of the re- 
cruits who were transferred to the 24th Indiana to finish their term 
of service, the 69th was mustered out on July 5th, and next day 
departed for home on the steamer "White Cloud," transferring at 
New Orleans to the "Silver Moon," arriving at Evansville, Indi- 
ana, 6 a.m., July 15th. It was the first organization to return 
from the war through that city. Early as it was, the whole popu- 



350 IxXDTANA AT ViCKSBURG. 

Inlioii seeiiKul to luivo tni'iied out to weleoine it, and the ovation it 
I'l'ceived was tiattering in the extreme. The event was chronicled 
by the Evaiisvilh' -lonrnal of the 17th in an article highly com- 
plimcnlary to th<' discipline of the command, which is inserted 
liclow : 

"KETT RNINiJ HOME. 

"The '►Silver Moon' arrivtcl here on Saturday ninrnlni;-. oarly, having on 
board the G9th Indian.-, rejiinipnl. about oOU str(.ng, en route for Indianap- 
olis to be mustered out of servi< e. 

"Lieutenant Colonel I'erry was in connnand, and the men looked 
hearty and robust. 

"They were directly from Mobile, :'.nd went forward by the regular 
mail train for Indianaiiulis. 

"Their conduct while in the city awaiting the hour for the train to 
leave, was in the highest degree creditable, and illustrated the fact that 
Indiana soldiers are as gentlemanly among their friends as they are ter- 
rible to their foes. 

"Captain Conway, of the 'Silver Moon' boasted of their good conduct 
on the trip, assuring us that there had not been a single man among them 
in the least degree intoxicated, disorderly or disobliging to the officers of 
the boat on the entire trip from New Orleans. 

"Their appearance, as they marched ujy Main Street, was the subject 
of warm eulogy. 

"A number of them had brnught with them from the South mocking- 
birds and other pets, and we noticed one bronzed veteran with a large 
chicken code perched cozily upon his knapsaclv, which loolved as if he had 
been through the heavy campaigns with the regiment." 

The battalion arrived at Indianapolis July 15th, at 8:45 p.m., 
detrained in a drenching rain and was quartered in the Soldiers' 
Home for the night and moved to Camp Carrington next morning, 
Sunday. 

The Journal of Monday, July 17th, had the following: 

"RECEPTION TOMORROW. 

"The G9th Regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel I'erry commanding, number- 
ing about 350 men, arrived from Mobile on Saturday evening and will be 
received with the customary honors tomorrow." 

Under date of July 18th, the Journal also says: 

"The C9th will be inspected and have an exhibition drill in the State 
House yard at 1 ]>. m. The (!!)th is an old and well-drilled regiment, and 
will doubtless make a good display." 



Sixty-Ninth Infantry. 351 

"RECEPTION OF SOLDIERS. 

"The 38tli. 4Stb. 59tb, G9Ui, and 142cl regimeuts and (Uh and 25Lh bat- 
teries. (Indianapolis Journal, Wednesday, July 19, 1865.) 

"Tbe reception of tbe veteran soldiers yesterday exceeded anytbiug 
since tbe war commenced. At least 3,000 veteran sunburned beroes were 
in tbe State House yard. How sball we desci'ibe tbe faces of tbese de- 
termined men wbo have made tbe battlefield their home for four long and 
bloody years? It cannot be done except by saying that honesty, heroism 
and simplicity mark their features. They look as if they were all ready 
to do or die for their country and they have proved it by their works." 

Then followed the speeches of Governor Morton, Chaplain Lo- 
zier and Generals Hovey, Bennett and Chapman. 

Wednesday, the 19th, was spent in turning in arms and equip- 
ment, and on the 20th the men of the battalion drew their last pay 
and received their final discharge, and then this fine organization 
melted away into the currents of civil life like snow before the sun. 

It began its career with exactly 1,000 officers and men, to which 
had been added seventy-four recruits, making an aggregate of 
1.074, and had seen service in eleven States. 

It had lost in killed 3 officers and 77 enlisted men, a total of 80, 
and by disease, w^ounds, drowning and accident 3 officers and 248 
enlisted men, a death roll of 331. 

Four hundred and twenty-two officers and men had been lost to 
the organization by resignation or discharge for wounds, or. phys- 
ical disability, or transfer of recruits to other regiments. 

Sixteen officers and 305 enlisted men, a total of 321, were mus- 
tered out, whose average age was a little over 25 years. 




Monument of SSd Intantry. 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

2d BRIGADE 2d DIVISION 15th CORPS 
83d INFANTRY 

Colonel Benjamin J. Spooner 

Engaged: Assault, May 19; Assault, May 22; Siege, May 23-July 4. Casualties: Killed 10 
wounded 56, total 66; Captain Metellus Calvert and Captain John M. Cresswell killed. 



(352) 



EIGHTY-THIRD REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 
VOLUNTEERS. 

The 83d Indiana Infantry was organized in the 4th Congres- 
sional District, composed of the counties of Pearborn, Ripley, Ohio, 
Decatur and Jennings, and was rendezvoused at Lawrenceburg. 
The regiment was composed of nine companies of three years' vol- 
unteer men and was mustered into the service of the United States 
in September. 1862. with the following officers : 

FIELD AND STAFF. 

Benjamin J . Spooner Colonel. 

James H. Cravens Lieutenant-Colonel. 

James S. Jelley Major. 

George R. Robinson Adjutant. 

George D. Tate Quartermaster. 

James M. Crawford Chaplain. 

Samuel Davis Surgeon. 

William Gillispie Assistant Surgeon. 



COMPANY OFFICERS. 







Captain. 


1st Lieutenant. 


3d Lieutenant. 


Co. 


A. 


Samuel P. Chipman, 


Grin T. Darling, 


Wm. H. Snodgr.ass. 


Co. 


B. 


Jacob W. Eggleston, 


Henry Gerkin, 


DandridgeE. Kelsey. 


Co, 


C. 


Metellus Calvert, 


Benjamin North, 


Thomas Shehane. 


Co 


D. 


John Lemuel, 


John M. Fender, 


William M. Dunn, Jr. 


Co. 


E. 


Robert W. I^oyd, 


William R. Lanius, 


Benjamin Bridges. 


Co. 


F. 


Benjamin H. Myers, 


John H. Roerty, 


Oliver P. McCullough 


Co. 


G. 


George W. Morris, 


George Oldt, 


Levi M. Hazen, 


Co. 


H. 


James M. Crawford, 


John Rawling, 


Ferris J. Nowlin. 


Co. 


I. 


Henry J. Bradford, 


William N.Craw, 


George W. Lowe. 


Co. 


K. 


John M. Cresswell, 


Eli F. Scott, 


James H. St. John. 



The regiment was supplied with Company D of nine months' 
drafted men, who joined the regiment at jMemphis, Tennessee, and 
were discharged November 15, 1862, their term of enlistment hav- 
ing expired. These men performed their duty well during tlieir 
term of service. 

Lieut. William M. Dunn, Jr., of Madison, Indiana, was made 
first lieutenant of Company F, of the 83d, for three-year service, 
and was afterwards, at the personal request of General Grant, de- 
tailed for staff duty and promoted captain and assistant adjutant- 
general, and served on the staff of General Grant until the close of 
the war. i 

The regiment remained at Camp Laz Noble, near Lawrenceburg. 
until November, doing picket duty along the Ohio River, and 
guarding the railroad bridge across the Miami River. Having 
been supplied with Belgian rifles, it was instructed in the manual 

[23] (353) 



354 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

of arms and company and regimental drill by Colonel Spooner, 
who proved to be a splendid drillmaster and a good disciplinarian. 

On October 11th the regiment was given a three days' furlough 
to return to their homes and participate in the state election, and 
evers^ man returned promptly on time. 

November 7, 1862, the regiment broke camp and went by rail 
to Cairo, Illinois, where it embarked on the steamer "Dakota" for 
Memphis, Tennessee. Arriving there on the 11th, it went into 
Camp Ben Spooner, east of the city. November 25th general 
orders were read, which assigned the 83d to the 2d Brigade, com- 
manded by Col. Thomas Kilby Smith (afterwards commanded by 
Brig. Gen. Joseph A. J. Lightburn) ; 2d Division, commanded by 
I\raj. Gen. Frank P. Blair; 15th Corps, Maj. Gen. William T. Slier- 
man. 

The regiment participated in the expedition to the Tallahatchie 
cind returned to Memphis on the 10th of December, having marched 
150 miles. 

General Sherman, having completed the organization of his 
forces for a campaign against Vicksburg, his entire force was, on 
the morning of December 20, 1862. embarked on some fifty or sixty 
steamboats, the 83d being assigned to the "Sioux City," a leaky old 
tub, and under convoy of Commodore Porter's fleet of gunboats, 
floated down the Father of Waters to take part in the disastrou-i 
attack at Chickasaw Bluffs, a strongly fortified position on the 
north and east of Vicksburg. 

December 26th the fleet passed out of the Mississippi and 
ascending the Yazoo River some five miles, disembarked at John- 
son's plantation and went into camp. The next morning the 
line of battle was advanced and soon encountered the enemy and 
drove in their advanced line and by 9 o'clock the roar of battle 
was on. Severe fighting was kept up until the night of January 
1st, when our army quietly slipped away, and re-embarked mid 
steamed down the Yazoo into the Mississippi. In this engagement 
the 83d lost in killed. Lieutenant Bridges, Company E, and 3 en- 
listed men, and one officer, Adjutant Robinson, and 15 men 
wounded. 

The night of December 30th will be remembered as one of the 
most dismal of the regiment's three years' service. Our position 
was on low ground, covered with a heavy forest of cypress timber. 
All night long the rain came down in torrents, and from the bluffs 
the enemy kept up a continuous fire from their heavy guns and the 
shells came crashing through the timber, several men being wounded 



Eighty-Third Infantry. 355 

by falling limbs. The army had no tents and could build no fires, 
as they would be targets for the enemy. 

On the night of January 1. 1863, Sherman's army withdrew 
from in front of the enemy, re-embarked on the boats and passed 
down the Yazoo into the Mississippi, thence moved up to Milliken's 
Bend, where it lay until the morning of January 6th. 

The fleet of steamboats moved up to the mouth of White River 
and up to the cut-off and into the Arkansas River to "Old Arkansas 
Post," which was strongly fortified with a number of heavy guns 
and about 5,000 troops. Our troops disembarked on the evening 
of the 10th and by 1 o'clock of the 11th had the enemy closely in- 
vested. Porter's fleet of gunboats had dismounted the heavy guns 
on the water front and had dismantled the forts, and at 4 o'clock 
an assault was made along the whole line, Avhich was entirely suc- 
cessful, and over 5,000 prisoners and 8,000 stand of arms were 
captured. The 83d lost 4 men killed and 15 wounded in this en- 
gagement. 

After completing the dismantling of the fort and gathering up 
the spoils of war, the army again embarked on the boats and passed 
down the Arkansas into the INIississippi, and down that river to 
Young's Point, on the Louisiana side, and nearl.y opposite Vicks- 
burg. There it disembarked and went into camp on the 21st of 
January, 1863. It rained almost constantly for more than thirty 
da.ys and the country around being naturally low, the camp soon 
became so wet and muddy that it was almost impossible to get 
around, and soon one-half the men in the entire command were 
sick and were dying by the hundreds. The dead march of the fife 
and muffled drum and the report of the firing squad could be heard 
constantly from morning until night. 

This and the dissension caused by the President 's Emancipation 
Proclamation created conditions which were the darkest the Army 
of the Tennessee passed through. IMarch 17th, the 83d, mth the 2d 
Division, embarked on transports and passed up the river a few miles 
where it disembarked and marched to a point on the Big Sunflower 
River to the relief of five of Porter's gunboats, that were in danger 
of being captured by the enemy, and after some severe skirmishing 
with the enemy, in which the 83d lost one man killed, the expedi- 
tion returned to camp at Young's Point. April 29th the divi- 
sion again embarked on boats and ascended the Yazoo River and 
made a demonstration against Haynes' Bluff, which was strongly 
fortified. A part of Porter's gunboats were there and a severe 
artillery battle was kept up for some hours, dismounting some of 



356 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

the enemy's heavy guns. This demonstration was made to divert 
the attention of the enemy from Grant's main movement below 
Vicksburg. 

On May 1st the regiment returned to its old camp, and on the 
following day moved by transports to Milliken's Bend on the 
Louisiana side. sOn the 7th it moved on the march by way of Rich- 
mond, Louisiana, to join Sherman and the 15th Corps, which was 
then on the east side of the Mississippi River, and reached Hard 
Times, opposite Grand Gulf, where it crossed the river on the even- 
ing of the 11th on transports which had run the batteries at Vicks- 
burg. On the next morning it again took up the march and 
reached Raymond on the 15th. 

The 83d was not engaged in the battle at Champion's Hill, but 
was held in reserve on the extreme left, and with its division re- 
joined the 15th Corps on the 17th at Big Black River. May 18th 
it crossed the Big Black River and began the march on Vicksburg, 
and at 2 p. m. began skirmishing with the enemy near the outer 
works and drove them inside their strong line of fortifications. 
May 19th Grant's entire army had got into position and soon heavy 
skirmishing began all along the line and our artillery was thunder- 
ing at their forts, which was kept up until 2 p. m., when an assault 
by our entire army was ordered and executed, but met with a 
bloody repulse. The 83d lost two captains killed. Captain Calvert, 
of Company C, and Captain Cresswell, of Company K; and Cap- 
tain Chipman and 22 enlisted men, killed and wounded. 

On the 20th, the 83d was detailed to guard a supply train and 
build a corduroy road and a bridge across the Chickasaw Bayou, in 
order to get supplies from the transports on the Yazoo River. It 
returned at midnight of the 21st, after completing the work, to its 
position with the Division, hungry and weak, and having had no 
rest for two days and nights. 

The 83d participated in the assault upon the enemy's works on 
the 22d and furnished part of the 150 volunteers who assaulted 
Fort Shoup, which was in immediate front. Each man carried a 
rail or pole to assist the men in crossing the trenches in front of the 
fort. Many of the men succeeded in reaching the trenches, but 
were unable to cross and were compelled to retire with heavy loss. 
The failure of our entire army to get possession of any part of their 
impregnable fortifications convinced General Grant that it was a 
useless sacrifice of men to again assault the rebel works, and his 
army settled down to a regular siege. 



Eighty-Third Infantry. 357 

The 83d formed a part of the expeditionary force under the 
command of General Blair and marched, May 27th, to Mechanics- 
Inirg and Yazoo City. This expedition was made for the purpose 
of ascertaining whether the enemy was concentrating an army in 
the rear of General Grant's forces or not. It returned June 4th 
and took position on the right of the 2d Division, in the investment 
line, and made an approach to the stockade, or lunette, in its front. 
The 83d remained in the trenches and assisted in digging trenches, 
saps and mines, and was constantly on duty with pick and shovel or 
sharpshooting, until the 4th of July, when the Confederate General 
Pemberton surrendered. 

The regiment formed a part of the army under General Sher- 
man, and on July 6th started in pursuit of General Johnston's 
army, which had been organized to relieve Vicksburg, and on the 
day that Pemberton surrendered was but ten miles from Grant's 
forces. On the approach of Sherman's forces Johnston retired be- 
hind the strong fortifications around Jackson, where he withstood a 
siege until the night of the 16th of July, when he quietly slipped 
away with all of his artillery and supplies, and Sherman's forces 
took possession of the city. After destroying the railroad for sev- 
eral miles east of Jackson, the army returned to the west side of Big 
Black River, where it went into camp and remained for several 
weeks, during which time 5 per cent, of the army was furloughed 
home for thirty days. Among those furloughed were the men who 
volunteered to storm the rebel fort on May 22. 

On the 27th of September the 83d, with Sherman's 15th Corps, 
marched to Vicksburg, and embarked on steamers for ]\Iemphis, 
Tennessee, where they arrived October 4th. 

On the 7th the regiment turned in their old Belgian rifles to 
the ordnance department and received in exchange new Springfield 
rifles, and on the 8th, with Sherman's army, started on their long 
march across country to Chattanooga, arriving at Corinth, Missis- 
sippi, on the 15th and at Cherokee Station on the 20th, where they 
remained until the 26th, when it again moved toward Tuscumbia, 
skirmishing with the enemy constantly, and drove them out of the 
latter city, continuing the march to Eastport, Avhere it received 
two months ' pay. On the 1st and 2d of November the army crossed 
the Tennessee River and continued the march through Florence, 
Alabama; Pulaski and Fayetteville, Tennessee. On the 9th the 
army turned to the right, leaving the Winchester road, passed 
through Newmarket, Scottsboro. Bridgeport and Shell IMound. On 



358 Indiana at Vioksbukg. 

the 21st it passed in full view of Lookout Mountain and c-ampod 
on the battlefield of General Hooker, in the valley, and during the 
night silently crossed the Tennessee River and captured the enemy 's 
pickets and took up the long, tedious inarch up the slopes of ]\Iis- 
sion Ridge with little opposition. 

At 9 a. m., on the 25th of November, the 83d was detailed to 
support a battery on Lightburn Hill, called such in honor of Gen- 
eral Lightburn, commander of the 2d Brigade, which so gallantly 
charged and captured this hill on the 24th. On the 25th a great 
victory was gained and Bragg 's army was completely routed, and 
the 83d, with its division, pursued the fleeing army for two days, 
when the division was ordered to return and build a bridge across 
Chickamauga Creek, which the enemy had destroyed in their re- 
treat. It arrived on the morning of the 27th and on December 
3d had the bridge completed. 

December 13th the army was again on the move and passed 
through Chattanooga, reerossed the Tennessee River and through 
Shell Mount to Bridgeport, Alabama. Here the 83d was supposed 
to pass the winter, but soon l)roke camp and was on the march to 
Bellefonte, where it arrived on the 29tli and again ])egan to prepare 
winter (juarters, but was once more bitterly disappointed. It broke 
camp and marched to Larkensville, Alabama, where splendid win- 
ter quarters were built and occupied until the 11th of February, 
1864, when the regiment left its comfortable quarters and took up 
the march, by way of Chattanooga, to Cleveland, Tennessee, where 
it arrived on the 6th of ^March and again camped in the old quar- 
ters. 

During the month of March Colonel Spooner returned to the 
regiment after an al)sence on account of sickness, and was soon 
afterward presented with a handsome sword, box and belt, which 
cost $350.00, by the noncommissioned officers and the privates of 
the regiment, as a mark of esteem and admiration which they had 
for him as a man and soldier. On its reception the Colonel thanked 
them in eloquent and patriotic terms. 

May 1st the army, under General Sherman, broke camp and 
marched by way of Bridgeport and Chattanooga over the Chicka- 
mauga battleground, through Snake Creek, Cap and Horn Moun- 
tains, and on May 13th moved on Resaca and drove the enemy into 
their strong fortifications. On the next day the 83d was a part 
of the assaulting column which charged and captured a part of tlif 
enemy's line, and soon afterwards they attempted to regain this, 
Init were repulsed with heavy loss. During the afternoon the arm>- 



Eighty-Third Infantry. 350 

charged the works that protected Resaea and the conflict raged 
until night put a stop to the bloody assault. During the day and 
night of the 15th the enemy abandoned their defenses from Rocky 
Face to Resaea. On the morning of the 16th Sherman's army 
started in pursuit, the 15th Corps being on the extreme right. It 
crossed the Saluda River and marched to Kingston, arriving there 
on the 20th and at Dallas on the 26th, where it struck the enemy's 
pickets and drove them into their strong fortifications around 
Dallas. On the 27th protecting defenses were built in front, under 
a galling fire by the enemy, which was continued until the evening 
of the 28th, when the enemy assaulted the 83d 's position and were 
repelled with heavy loss. The 83d lost two men killed and wounded 
in this assault. 

Heavy skirmish firing was kept up until the night of June 4th, 
when the enemy withdrew. On the 10th the army marched to Big 
Shanty and found the enemy occupying Kenesaw Mountain. 

During the following three weeks, the 83d was constantly en- 
gaged on the skirmish line and in fortifying and advancing the line, 
and on the 27th participated in the general assault on "Little Ken- 
esaw," which proved to be one of the most deadly contests of the 
war, and the 83d was particularly unfortunate in the loss of 19 
men killed and wounded, and noble Colonel Spocner, who fell with 
a shattered arm, which subsequently had to be amputated at the 
shoulder. 

After participating in the battles of Resaea, Dallas, New Hope 
Church, Kenesaw IMountain, the repulse of Hood's army and the 
battle of Jonesboro. the 83d, with the 15th Corps, moved northward 
in the pursuit of Hood's army and aided in driving the enemy into 
northern Alabama. It then returned to Atlanta, having marched 
425 miles. 

General Sherman's army remained in camp in and near Atlanta 
until about the middle of November, 1864, getting a much-needed 
rest, and most of the troops were supplied with new uniforms and 
many other necessary articles. 

November 14, 1864, General Sherman's army of well-seasoned, 
true and tried soldiers began his ever-memorable March to the Sea, 
which has been shouted and sung- by every loyal soldier and citizen 
in the land, and will ever remain one of the greatest campaigns and 
marches in the history of all wars. It reached Savannah Decem- 
ber 21st. The 83d took part, with its command, in the wonderful 
expedition and assault of Fort McAllister, near Savannah, which 
opened Sherman 's communication with the sea. 



:]Q0 Indiana at Vicksbukg. 

After the a^sfuilt and capture of Fort McAllister, the 83d, with 
its division, marched thirty miles to Mclntyre Station, on the Gulf 
Railroad, and for two days was engaged in tearing up the railroad, 
hurning the ties and twisting the rails, and doing all the damage 
possible, in order to put the road out of commission, and returned 
to camp near Savannah on the 21st. On the evening of the 22d 
news came that the enemy had evacuated Savannah. This opened 
Sherman's "Cracker" line with the sea. The 2d Division remained 
here in camp until the 9th of January, 1865, when the regiment 
moved into the city and camped near the docks, on a vacant square, 
where the 83d was on duty at the wharf until the 15th, when :t 
was relieved and moved some miles down the Savannah Tliver to 
Fort Thunderbolt, where, on the 16th, it embarked on the steamer 
"Delaware" and at sunset the same day arrived at Beaufort, South 
Carolina, and disembarked on the 17th and went into camp on the 
outer edge of the city, where it remained until the 27th, waiting 
for the remainder of the army to come up. On the 28th the army 
was reviewed by General Sherman. The field officers all being ab- 
sent, the command fell to Captain Craw, of Company I. 

On the 29th Sherman's army began the march through the 
Carolinas. The troops, after their long marches and the many 
battles and skirmishes followed by a good rest, were in splendid 
condition and spirits. Their haversaks were full of rations and 
their heads were full of knowledge. Every American soldier, after 
two or three years of service, becomes a past master in the seien-^e 
of war, and they knew that their march to the sea was the death 
knell to the Southern Confederacy, and after four years of war, 
and its thousand battles, they were on their last march. 

As the 83d marched by Division IIead(iuarters. General Hazen 
was watching, and seemed especially pleased with the jolly good 
nature of the men and their well-filled haversacks and knapsacks, 
and some wag in the regiment called out, "General, we are draw- 
ing nine feet of water." The general gave back a good-natured 
smile in response. 

On the march from Savannah to Goldsborough, the 83d partici- 
pated in the engagements at Columbia, South Carolina, and Ben- 
tonville, North Carolina. The army reached Goldsborough, North 
Carolina, March 24th, where it took a much-needed rest for a few 
days. The 83d was detailed for provost duty in the city, where it 
served until April 10th, when it joined its division and the corps 
and Sherman's army was once more on the move to attack Gen. 
.Jose])h E. Johnston, who was supposed to be at Raleigh with a large 



Eighty-Third Infantry. 361 

army, strongly fortified. The army crossed the Weldon and Wil- 
mington Railroad at Pikeville and camped one mile from the town, 
having marched eighteen miles, and the following day marched to 
Lowell Mills, and before camp was broken the following morning 
news was received of Lee's surrender to Lieutenant-General Grant, 
which produced a sensation in Sherman's army that cannot be de- 
scribed in words. A deafening roar of cheering started and it was 
taken up by the men along the miles of camping ground that 
sounded like the distant roar of thunder, and echoed and re-echoed 
like the wailing of a dying storm. Men climbed into the trees and 
yelled, hugged each other, and rolled on the ground until worn out. 

The army again took up the march and reached Raleigh on the 
14th of April and marched through the streets of the capital, com- 
pany front, and went into camp near the city. This was the end of 
the pursuit of Johnston, for he had made terms with General Sher- 
man. 

The Sundays were spent at the camp very pleasantly, going into 
the city almost at pleasure until the 29th. On the 27th the whole 
army was reviewed by Lieutenant-General Grant. About the 20th 
word was received of the assassination of President Lincoln, which 
produced the most intense indignation among the men of every 
class, and the deepest sorrow was expressed by all. 

On the 29th of April the whole army broke camp for its last 
march, which led through Raleigh, Petersburg, Richmond and Fred- 
ericksburg to Washington. Camped near Alexandria May 20th, 
and on the 23d the army moved to near Longbridge and prepared 
for the grand review, which took place May 24th, and the 83d 
farmed a part of the grand review of Grant's and Sherman's vic- 
torious armies. 

After the review the 83d went into camp a few miles north of 
the capital, where it remained until June 3d, when it was mustered 
out of the United States service. At 6 o'clock a. m., the regiment, 
on June 5, 1865, broke camp for the last time after nearly three 
years of active service, and marched into Washington with some 
other Indiana troops and took the train for Indianapolis. The 
transportation consisted of forty-six box cars without seats, but the 
war was over and the boys were getting home, and the absence of 
parlor cars and cushion seats had no terrors for the heroes of a 
hundred battles, who had not seen their loved ones for long, weary 
years. The regiment arrived at Indianapolis Saturday, June 10th, 
and was marched to the Soldiers ' Home, where it had dinner, after 
which it was escorted by the city military band to the ordnance 



362 Indiana at Vicksbueg. 

depot, where it, for the first time, surrendered its guns and equip- 
ment and was then escorted to the State House and came to a 
"front" at the speal^er's stand. Forty rounds were fired as a 
salute to the heroes now returned, crowned with victory and honor. 

Governor Morton, the soldiers' idol, then addressed the returned 
soldiers who were present, in glowing words, thanking them for 
their loyal service to the State and to the Union, which was re- 
sponded to on behalf of the 83d by General Spooner, the 83d 's first 
colonel. General liovey and others also made remarks. 

After the reception the 83d marched to Camp Carrington, 
where it remained until Monday, June 12th, when it was finally 
discharged, and upon receipt of their pay every man, once more a 
free American citizen, went quietly to his home and loved ones. 

The original enrcllment of the 83d Regiment consisted of nine 
companies with 39 tonmiissicned officers, and enlisted men num- 
bered 832; aggregate cf enrollment, 871. It received recruits, 
which were assigned to the different < ompanies, 85. Total to be 
accounted for, 956. Company D, of nine months, drafted. Men 
were assigned to the 83d, but should not l)e included in the aggre- 
gate, for the reason that they were with the regiment only a few 
days. 

The casualties in the 83d during the camjiaign and siege of 
Vicksburg were as follows : Commissioned officers killed, 2 ; en- 
listed men killed, 8 ; commissioned officers wounded, 4 ; enlisted 
men wounded, 52. Total, 66. 

The regiment lost during service 4 officers and 34 enlisted men 
killed and mortally wt)unded, and 1 officer and 82 enlisted men by 
disease. Total, 121. 




Monument of 93d Infantry. 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

1st BRIGADE 3d DIVISION 15th CORPS 
93d INFANTRY 

Colonel DeWitt C. Thomas 

Engaged: Jackson, May 14; Assault, May 19; Assault, May 22; Siege, May 23-June 22; Duty on 
Exterior Line, June 22-July 4. Casualties: Killed 6, wounded 20, total 26. 



(364) 



NINETY-THIRD REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 
VOLUNTEERS. 

The 93d Regiment was org-anized in the then Third Congres- 
sional District, rendezvoused at Madison, Indiana, and was mus- 
tered into service in the months of September and October, 1862, 
with the following officers : 

DeWitt C. Thomas Colonel. 

George W. Carr Lieutenant-Colonel. 

John W. Poole Major. 

Irving Moody Adjutant. 

Abraham L. Whitesides Quartermaster. 

Miles Wood Chaplain. 

Rinaldo R. Ruter Surgeon. 

John H. Ford Assistant Surgeon. 



COMPANY OFFICERS. 







Captain. 


1st Lieutenant. 


Sd Lieutenant. 


Co. 


A. 


Charles A. Hubbard, 


Cyrus H. Maxwell, 


John G. Hunter. 


Co. 


B. 


Samuel S. Crowe, 


James M. Paxton, 


John P. Carr. 


Co. 


C. 


William W. Shepherd, 


Samuel B. Davis, 


John K. Baxter. 


Co. 


D. 


Daniel B. Jaynes, 


Frederick L. Courvoiser, 


Theodore Livings. 


Co. 


E. 


Michael McGrayel, 


Marion Mooney, 


Alonzo Hubbard. 


Co. 


F. 


Samuel J. Bartlett, 


Alexander Hawkins, 


Lafayette Bodenhamer. 


Co. 


G. 


Jerome Spilman, 


Campbell Welch, 


Benjamin F. Wilson. 


Co. 


H. 


William T. Swift, 


John W. Parks, 


Wesley Shoulders. 


Co. 


I. 


Sanford Elliott, 


William B. P. Hebbard, 


Darius Neel. 


Co. 


K. 


LaFayette Frederick, 


William Lamb, 


Frederick Miller. 



On the 9th of November, 1862, the regiment moved by railroad 
for Cairo, Illinois, and from thence proceeded by river to Memphis, 
Tennessee, where it was assigned to Buekland's Brigade, and, on 
the 26th of November, moved with the army of General Sherman to 
Hurricane Creek, near Oxford, Mississippi. 

While at Hurricane Creek, the brigade to which the 93d be- 
longed was transferred to the 8th Division, 16th Army Corps. On 
the 20th of December, 1862, the regiment marched with its divi- 
sion for LaGrange, Tennessee, arriving there on the 28th of De- 
cember, 1862. On the 8th of January, 1863, the regiment broke 
camp at LaGrange, Tennessee, and marched for Corinth, ^lissis- 
sippi, arriving there January 14, 1863. 

Prom Corinth, Mississippi, the regiment moved by rail to the 
vicinity of Memphis, Tennessee, and upon reaching that point on 
the 22d of February, 1863, was assigned to guard duty along the 
railroad and detailed to build block houses. The regiment was 
engaged in the performance of these duties until the 13th of March, 
1863. when it moved to Memphis. Tennessee, and, embarking on a 
steamer, sailed to Helena, Arkansas, and from thence to Duckport, 

(365) 



366 Indiana at Vicksbukg. 

Louisiana. Here the troops landed and the regiment was trans- 
ferred, with its division, to the 15th Army Corps, then commanded 
hy General Sherman. 

On the 2d day of May, 1863, the regiment marched with its 
corps across the peninsula opposite Vicksburg, Mississippi, which 
was the opening movement of General Grant that culminated in the 
captui'e of Vicksburg. 

JMarching by the way of Richmond and Carthage, Louisiana, 
the command reached Hard Times Landiiig and crossed the Missis- 
sippi River at Grand Gulf, Louisiana, on the 7th of May, 1863. 
The corps then pressed forward by the way of Rockford and Ray- 
mond, to Jackson, Mississippi, and on the 14th of May, after a 
sharp artillery duel, the command entered Jackson, the capital of 
Mississippi. The 93d lost in this affair, which was its first en- 
gagement, 3 killed and 7 wounded. The two following days were 
spent in tearing np the railroad tracks centering in Jackson, Mis- 
sissippi. 

On the afternoon of the 16th the whole force moved towards 
Vicksburg, and, crossing the Big Black River, reached the rear of 
the enemy's stronghold on the evening of the 18th. On the 19th 
and 22d of May the regiment participated in the assault upon the 
defenses of Vicksburg, and, intrenching in front of the enemy's 
works, was actively engaged in pushing the line of investment 
until the 22d cf June, 1863. During these operations the regiment 
lost 3 killed and 14 wounded. 

At this time the rebel General Johnston had crossed the Big 
Black River with a portion of his force and threatened our rear. 
General Sherman was dispatched to attend to Johnston, with 
orders to mcve upon the enemy the moment Vicksburg was in our 
possession. The regiment marched with its division on the move- 
ment and reached Little Bear Creek on the 23d of June. Here it 
remained, throwing up works, until the 4th of July, when Vicks- 
burg surrendered. Sherman at once moved his army toward Jack- 
son, Mississippi, and on the 10th of July arrived in front of that 
place and proceeded to invest it. 

For six days there was sharp skirmishing and artillery firing, 
and on the night of the 16th the enemy evacuated and our forces 
entered the city the next morning. In the siege of Jackson the reg- 
iment lost 1 killed and 3 wounded. 

The re-jiment remained at Jackson until the 23d of July, en- 
gaged in destrcying the railrcads. and then moved to a camp near 
Black River and remained there until September 5, 1863. It then 



Ninety-Third Infantry. 367 

moved to Oak Ridge, where it camped until the 14th of October, 
1863, when the brigade moved on an expedition to Brownsville, 
Mississippi, and on the 17th of October had a sharp engagement 
with the enemy near that place. The regiment then marched to the 
vicinity of Vicksburg and went into camp. On the 17th of Novem- 
ber, 1863, the 93d left Vicksburg on boats for Memphis, Tennessee, 
and upon arriving there was assigned to provost and picket duty, 
which it performed until the 10th of May, 1864. During this 
period it accompanied several expeditions into JMississippi, having 
numerous skirmishes with the enemy. 

On the 1st of June, 1864, the regiment started on the Gun Town 
expedition. Upon reaching Brice's Cross Eoads, on the 10th, the 
cavalry of the enemy was encountered. The infantry, exhausted 
witJi rapid marching and the heat of the summer, was rushed to 
the front. The battle was severe for a short time, when our forces 
were driven from the field, and a stampede ensued, sorrowful to 
contemplate. The regiment lost in this affair 13 killed, 56 wounded 
and 184 taken prisoners, making a total loss of 253. The remainder 
of the regiment reached Memphis on the 12th day of June, 1864. 

On the 22d day of June the regiment composed part of the 2d 
Division, under command of Gen. A. J. Smith, and left Memphis, 
and on July 13th, 14th and 15th fought the rebel General Forrest at 
Old Town Creek and Tupelo, IMississippi, won a victory and re- 
turned to Memphis July 22, 1864. 

On July 29th the command made the Holly Springs campaign 
in northern Mississippi. The regiment then returned to INIemphis, 
reaching there on the 23d, having several skirmishes with the 
enemy on the return march. On the 29th of July the regiment 
started on another expedition, reaching the Tallahatchie River on 
the 8th of August, 1864, crossed the river on driftwood, and was 
engaged in skirmishing with the enemy until the arrival of the main 
army. It then marched to Oxford, Mississippi, and, returning, 
arrived at Memphis on the 29th. 

On September 2, 1864, the regiment embarked on transports, 
sailed down the Mississippi and up the White River to Duvall's 
Bluff, Arkansas, where it disembarked and marched to Cape Girar- 
deau, Missouri. Then it proceeded by the way of Jefferson City 
to Little Santa Fe, Kansas. The regiment then moved to St. 
Louis, reaching there en the 11th of November, 1864, and embark- 
ing on transports, proceeded to Nashville, Tennessee. 

The regiment arrived at Nashville December 1. 1864. and par- 
ticipated in the battle of Nashville December 15 and 16, 1864, and 



368 Indiana at Vicksbukg. 

then pursued General Hood's retreating army south into Alabama. 
The regiment went into winter quarters at East Fort, Mississippi, 
January 7, 1865, where it remained until February 6, 1865. It 
embarked on boats and went to New Orleans, Louisiana, landing 
there February 22, 1865. It took ship February 28, 1865, sailed 
over the Gulf of Mexico, and landed at Fort Gaines, on Dauphine 
Island. After several weeks of preparation the command joined 
General Canby's expedition against Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely. 
The regiment, on March 27th, took part in the attack on Spanish 
Fort and besieged it thirteen days and nights, when it was surren- 
dered to our forces on the night of April 8, 1865. The next day 
Fort Blakely was carried by storm by our army, thus compelliug 
the surrender of Mobile. 

On the morning of April 13th the 16th Corps, under the com- 
mand of Gen. A. J. Smith, of which the 93d Indiana was a part, 
took up the line of march to Montgomery, Alabama, arriving there 
April 25th, learning for the first time of President Lincoln's assas- 
sination. The regiment remained at Montgomery until May 10th, 
when one division, of which the 93d was a part, marched to and 
arrived at Selma, Alabama, May 14th. The 93d was sent to 
Gainesville, Alabama, doing guard duty and receiving Confederate 
stores and cotton. The regiment remained here until it was or- 
dered home. The regiment was mustered out of the service at 
Memphis, Tennessee, to date August 10, 1865, with the exception 
of two companies, ''I" and "K, " which were mustered out in Oc- 
tober, 1865. The regiment arrived in Indianapolis August 11, 
1865, and, upon arriving here, was greeted with a public ovation 
and welcomed by an address from Governor Baker and others. 

The regiment left for the field with an aggregate of 923 men. 
It returned with 18 officers and 200 men. It traveled during the 
time of service 1,060 miles by rail, 3,972 miles by river and marched 
2,452 miles, making a grand total of 7,432 miles. 

The regiment lost during service 1 officer and 37 enlisted men, 
killed and mortally wounded, and 3 officers and 250 enlisted men 
by disease; total, 291. 



(241 




JNIonument of OTtli Inlaatry. 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

3d BRIGADE 1st DIVISION 16th CORPS 

97th INFANTRY j 

Colonel Robert F. Catterson 

Served on the Exterior line in the vicinity of Haynes' Bluff and at Oak Ridge from about June 12 
to the end of the Sie^e, July i. 



(370) 



NINETY-SEVENTH REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 
VOLUNTEERS. 

The companies that made up the 97th Indiana Volunteers were 
enlisted in the counties of Greene, Owen, Putnam, Clay, Vermillion 
and Sullivan, and went into Camp Dick Thomp&on at Terre Haute 
in August, 1862, and were mustered into the service of the United 
States on September 20, 1862, by Capt. James Biddle. 

In October, 1862, Bragg was marching on Louisville, Kentucky, 
and the regiment received its first marching orders and left for 
Louisville via Indianapolis, and, arriving at Indianapolis, was or- 
dered into "Camp Morton." While here Capt. Robert F. Catter- 
son, of the 14th Indiana Infantry, who was then at home on leave 
of absence, by reason of wounds received at the battle of Antietam, 
was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the regiment. Capt. Aden 
G. Cavins, Captain of Company E, 59th Indiana Infantry Volun- 
teers, was commissioned major; Alexander McGregor, adjutant; 
William Johnson, quartermaster; Alexander M. Murphy, surgeon; 
J. C. Ililburn, assistant surgeon, and George Terry, chaplain. 

The following company officers were mustered in : 







Captain. 


1st Lieutenant. 


2d Lieutenant. 


Co. 


A. 


Andrew i . Axtel, 


Nathaniel Crane, 


John Catron. 


Co. 


B. 


J.imes Watts, 


Luther Wolf, 


John Dalgam. 


Co. 


C. 


John W. Carmichael, 


Jacob E. Fletcher, 


William F. Jerauld. 


Co. 


D. 


James J. Smiley, 


Joseph W. Piercy, 


William H. Sherfey. 


Co. 


E. 


Thomas Flinn, 


Joseph T. Oliphant, 


Elijah Mitchell. 


Co. 


F. 


Zachariah Dean, 


George Elliott, 


John Dickinson. 


Co. 


G. 


John Fields, 


William Hatfield, 


Henry Gastinean. 


Co. 


H. 


James Robinson, 


James S. Meek, 


Joseph P. White. 


Co. 


I. 


James Holdson, 


Albert P. Forsyth, 


Josiah Stanley. 


Co. 


K. 


David Shelby, 


James Jordan, 


Edward Groenendyke 



The regiment remained at Camp JMorton until October 20, 1862, 
when it was ordered to Louisville, Kentucky, and from there was 
sent to guard a wagon train with supplies for Buell's army, as far 
as Bardstown, Kentucky. Returning to Louisville, Kentucky, No- 
vember 9, 1862, the regiment was ordered to Memphis, Tennessee, 
and went aboard transports "The Mary Miller" and "Hettie Gil- 
more," arriving at Memphis November 15, 1862. Here the regi- 
ment was brigaded with the 53d and 70th Ohio and 99th Indiana 
Regiments, General Denver commanding. 

It advanced with the army under Grant and Sherman, Novem- 
ber 25. 1862. going south toward Holly Springs and Vicksburg, 
Mississippi. Arriving at the Yacknapatafa River, it remained a 
week and then retraced its steps, by reason of the rebels having 
captured the garrison and supplies at Holly Springs, Mississippi. 

(37!) 



:}72 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

At this place Robert F. Catterson received his commission as 
colonel, and Aden G. Gavins as lieutenant-colonel. William H. 
Schlater was appointed major of the regiment, but never joined 
the regiment, having been appointed on the military staff of Gov- 
ernor Morton. The regiment came back to LaGrange, Tennessee, 
January 8, 1863, and went into winter quarters. March 8, 1863, it 
was sent to Fort Grierson to guard a bridge on the Memphis and 
Charleston Railroad ; then to Moscow and LaGrange, and in June, 
1863, was ordered to Vicksburg via Memphis, and went down the 
Mississippi River with thirty or forty other transports loaded with 
troops, stores, artillery, wagons and munitions of war. 

It went up the Yazoo River and disembarked at Haynes' Bluff, 
where the regiment built breastworks and fortifications, and 
watched the movements of Gen. Joe Johnston, whose army was 
expected to raise the siege of Vicksburg, if possible. 

June 26, 1863, the regiment, with others, moved directly east 
of Vicksburg to Oak Ridge, and remained there until Vicksburg 
surrendered, and then marched in the direction of Jackson. Sharp 
opposition was met at the crossing of Black River, and the regiment 
was in the thickest of the fight at Jackson. After this the regiment 
returned to Camp Sherman, on Black River, where it remained 
until ordered to Chattanooga. It went to Memphis and marched 
from there October 10, 1863, and arrived in the neighborhood of 
Chattanooga, Tennessee, November 20, 1863. It was then a part 
of the 4th Division, 15th Army Corps, under command of General 
Ewing. It crossed the pontoon bridges on the left of the Army of 
the Cumberland, and was in the advance on Mission Ridge, front- 
ing that part of the ridge through which the railroad tunnel passes, 
which was thoroughly fortified. 

When the Confederate army retreated from this place the regi- 
ment followed to near Ringgold Pass. The regiment, with its 
corps, was then sent to relieve General Burnside at Knoxville. Ten- 
nessee, as he was besieged by General Longstreet. After the re- 
treat of Longstreet the regiment returned to Chattanooga, and then 
marched to Scottsboro, Alabama, and went into quarters December 
24, 1863. The regiment remained here until May 1, 1864, making 
but one march, to Cleveland, east Tennessee, and one to Lebanon, 
Alabama. 

May 1, 1864. the division, commanded by General Harrow, and 
the brigade, commanded by Gen. C. C. Walcott, started for Chatta- 
nooga to join the armies of the Cumberland and Ohio for the At- 



Ninety-Seventh Infantry. 373 

lanta campaign, this army being the Army of the Tennessee, nnder 
General McPherson. Arriving at Chattanooga, the Army of the 
Tennessee went to the right and was in the battle of Resaea, Dallas 
and New Hope Church. On June 15, 1864, the brigade, composed 
of the 97th Indiana, 46th Ohio. 103d Illinois, 104th Illinois and 6th 
Iowa, made a charge on the left of Kenesaw Mountain, Georgia, 
and captured an Alabama regiment. 

The regiment was moved to the right and on June 27, 1864, it 
was selected from the division, along with certain brigades of other 
divisions of the 15th Army Corps, as an assaulting column under 
Gen. Morgan L. Smith. At 9 o'clock the troops moved on the rebel 
works and routed the enemy from their first line, but never reached 
their second, and by 10 o'clock the assault was over and was a 
failure. The 97th Regiment lost several officers killed and wounded 
and about 70 men, and other regiments of the brigade lost heavily. 

In a few days the Confederates retired across the Chattahootchie 
River and into the works around Atlanta. July 22, 1864, the 97th 
Indiana was engaged during the entire battle and captured the 5th 
Tennessee, the regiment which was responsible for the death of Gen- 
eral McPherson. The regiment was in the battle of Ezra Church, 
July 28th, and at Jonesboro, south of Atlanta. After General Hood 
left Atlanta and started north, the regiment followed Avith the army 
as far as Resaea and Taylor's Ridge, and Sherman, leaving Hood to 
the tender mercies of "Pap" Thomas, went back to Atlanta. 

November 15, 1864, the regiment, with the army, started on 
"the March to the Sea." The brigade, near Macon, Georgia, was 
sent out to reconnoiter, and served as a protection to the wagon 
train. It encountered a whole division of Georgia militia near 
GrisAvoldsville, who fought for three hours, and were finally driven 
from the field and many of them captured. Those captured and 
wounded were all old men and boys. A large fire was built, the 
wounded carried in and left with the captured ones, and the 
brigade silently moved away, catching up with the army about day- 
break. 

General Walcott, commanding, was wounded and was carried 
to the sea in a carriage. Col. Robert F. Catterson, of the 97th Indi- 
ana, commanded the brigade until the end of the march, when he 
was appointed chief of staff on General Logan's staff; and Captain 
Elliott, of Company F, commanded the regiment until it reached 
Goldsboro, North Carolina. No further resistance was met until 
the army reached the neighborhood of Savannah, and, after Hazen's 



:^74 Indiana at Vicksburo. 

Division of tlie 15th Army Corps, captured Fort McAllister on the 
21st of December, we entered Savannah. After waiting there until 
January 17, 1865, the regiment was put aboard an ocean steamer 
and taken around to Port Royal, South Carolina. 

In the last days of January the army was on the march, and on 
the 15th of February met the enemy, Wade Hampton's Cavalry, 
fifteen miles from Columbia, and drove them in. The next night 
the regiment, with its brigade, camped on Broad River, and the 
next morning, February 17th, it entered the city — the second 
brigade that went in. IMarching through the main street of the 
city, it was found that the Confederates had placed bales of cotton 
end to end along this street, in the gutter, and had set it on fire, and 
as our brigade marched past, the Iowa Brigade, which preceded us, 
were trying to put the fire out. The 97th marched out nearly a 
mile and went into camp. In the night, looking toward the city, a 
great fire was seen sweeping over it, and at daylight the 97th was 
ordered into the city to do patrol duty, where it remained until 
the army left. 

The next place of any importance was Cheraw, South Carolina, 
on the Big Fedee River. From here the regiment marched to Fay- 
etteville, North Carolina, on Cape Fear River, and no sound of 
battle reached it until the guns of the 14th and 20th Corps, who 
were engaged with Johnston's army off to the left of Bentonville, 
North Carolina, were heard, and the 15th and 17th Corps were 
marched in quick order for two days to reach and assist the bal- 
ance of the army in the engagement, on the left flank of Johnston's 
army. The morning of the third day the division struck the 
enemy 's outposts and skirmished wdth them all day ; and late in 
the afternoon ran up against their breastworks, where it remained 
fighting for two days, when the enemy withdrew and the division 
moved on to Goldsborough. Here Lieutenant-Colonel Cavins met 
the regiment, he having been oji leave of absence when it started 
for the sea, having had an important command in Tennessee. Other 
officers and men of the regiment met it here also. At this place, 
also, Gen. C. C Walcott, the old brigade commander, returned and 
was given command of a division of the 14th Army Corps, and Col. 
Robert F. Catterson again took command cf the brigade, which at 
this time was composed of the 97th Indiana, the 46th Ohio, the 26th, 
40th and 103d Illinois Regiments and the 6th Iowa, and the divi- 
sion, the first of the 15th Corps, was commanded by Gen. C. R. 
Woods. 



Ninety-Seventh Infantry. 375 

The regiment remained at Goldsborongh until April 10th, and 
drew clothing, which was hadly needed, and started for Raleigh, 
which place was reached about April 20, 1865. While here news 
came of the assassination of President Lincoln and the surrender 
of Lee. Then Johnston surrendered, and the regiment started for 
Washington and home, coming up by way of Petersburg and Rich- 
mond, arriving in Washington May 20th and marching in the grand 
review, May 24th. It was mustered out at Washington, D. C, June 
9, 1S65, came to Indianapolis and was received by Governor ^Tor- 
ton and welcomed home. 

The regiment lost daring service 3 officers and 51 enlisted men 
killed and mortally wounded, and 6 officers and 172 enlisted men 
by disease; total, 232. 




■Monument of 9!)tli Infantry. 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

3d BRIGADE 1st DIVISION 16th CORPS 

99th INFANTRY 

Colonel Alexander Fowler 

Served on the Exterior line in the vicinity of Haynes' Bluff and at Oak Ridge from about June 12 
to the end of the Siege, July 4. 



I 



(376) 



NINETY-NINTH REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 
VOLUNTEERS. 

The 99th Regiment was organized during the months of August 
and September, 1862, in the Ninth Congressional District, and ren- 
dezvoused at South Bend. Three companies recraited in the Sixth 
Congressional District for the 96th Regiment were assigned to the 
99th, completing its organization, and it was mustered into the serv- 
ice on the 21st of October, 1862, with Alexander Fowler as colonel ; 
Richard P. De Hart, lieutenant-colonel ; John ]M. Berkey, major ; 
Lorenzo D. McOlashan, adjutant; James L. Cathcart, quartermas- 
ter ; Daniel R. Lucas, chaplain ; William W. Butterworth, surgeon ; 
Lawson D. Robinson, assistant surgeon. 







Captain. 


1st Lieutenant. 


2d Lieutenant. 


Co 


A. 


David F. Sawyer, 


Kellogg M. Burnham, 


James M. D. Craft. 


Co. 


B 


James H. Carr, 


George Tague, 


Robert P. Andis. 


Co. 


C 


Jacob Brewer, 


William Mackey, 


William Harmon. 


Co. 


D. 


Josiah Farrar, 


John Clifton, 


Joachim M. Hamlin. 


Co. 


E. 


Daniel Ash, 


Samuel Moore, 


Elias M. Shaner. 


Co. 


F. 


George H. Gwinn, 


Andrew Cochran, 


George S. Walker. 


Co. 


G. 


Tilberry Reid, 


John Worrel, 


Benjamin F. Thomas. 


Co. 


H. 


Joseph B. Homan, 


John F. Parsons, 


William M. Walker. 


Co. 


I. 


William V. Powell, 


Ira B. Myers, 


James B. McGonigal. 


Co. 


K. 


William R. C. Jenks, 


George W. Julian, 


George C. Walker. 



The regiment moved in November to Memphis, Tennessee, and, 
upon its arrival there, was assigned to the 3d Brigade, commanded 
by Col. J. R. Cockerill, 70th Ohio, 1st Division, commanded by 
General Denver, 15th Army Corps, commanded by Gen. W. T. 
Sherman. 

On the 26th the regiment moved with its corps on the Talla- 
hatchie campaign, and returning, was transferred to the 16th Army 
Corps, IMajor-General Hurl])ut conunanding corps; Gen. W. S. 
Smith commanding the division, and was placed on duty on the 
Memphis and Charleston Railroad, at LaGrange and Moscow, Ten- 
nessee, where it remained during the winter of 1862 and 1863. 

On the 6th of May, 1863, the regiment moved to Memphis and, 
embarking on steamers, sailed down the Mississippi River and joined 
the besieging forces of General Grant in the rear of Vicksburg, 
arriving at Hayne^s' Bluff, June 12th, reporting to Gen. C. C. Wash- 
burn, and took position there and helped in fortifying that point. 
By order of General Sherman, dated June 23d, it took position 
with its brigade and division on Oak Ridge, from Nelly's, on the 
right, to the postoffice on the left, fortified the line and remained 
there to the end of the siege, being temporarily assigned to the 9th 
Coips, Maj. Gen, Parks commanding. 

(.377) 



378 Indiana at Vtcksbitrg. 

On the 5th of July the regiment marched with Sliermau's com- 
mand to Jackson, Mississippi, and was engaged in a skirmish on 
the Big Black River during the march. The advance reached Jack- 
son on the 9th and its investment was complete on the 12th. The 
siege progressed vigorously and for four days the regiment lay 
under a heavy artillery fire from the enemy and was constantly 
engaged in picket duty and sharpshooting. On the night of the 
16th the enemy evacuated Jackson, and our troops moved into the 
city, and the regiment assisted in destroying the railroads for sev- 
eral miles out of Jackson and the capture of Brownsville. The 
regiment, with its command, marched back to Big Black River, and 
was assigned to the 4th Division, commanded by Gen. Hugh Ewing, 
15th Army Corps, where it remained in camp until the latter part 
of September, when it moved with its corps to Memphis, Tennessee, 
and in October marched by the way of Corinth, luka, Florence, 
Dechert, Stevenson and Trenton, to Chattanooga, arriving at the 
latter place on the 22d of November. 

On the morning of the 24th the 99th at once took possession of 
Indian Hill, the eastern extremity or ^lission Ridge, and worked all 
the following night building breastworks. By daybreak the next 
morning the regiment had well enti'cnched and protected itself by 
the use of tin plates and bayonets, there being no shovels or picks to 
be had. On the 25th the regiment was engaged in the battle of 
Mission Ridge. 

Immediately after the battle the regiment marched with Sher- 
man's army in pursuit of Bragg 's, in the direction of Graysville, 
and found the road lined with broken wagons, abandoned caissons 
and the debris of the retreating army. As the head of our col- 
umn emerged from a heavily timbered and swampy piece of coun- 
try, the rear guard of the enemy was encountered and a sharp 
fight ensued, but night put a stop to the operations. 

Upon reaching Graysville, the column moved east, for the pur- 
pose of cutting communications between Bragg and Longstreet, 
and to relieve General Burnside, then besieged at Knoxville. The 
regiment accomplished this long, dreary march, almost entirely des- 
titute of clothing, blankets and shoes, and without regular rations 
or supplies of any kind, and marched barefoot over rocks and 
through mud in midwinter and compelled Longstreet to raise the 
siege of Knoxville. Returning with its command, the regiment 
marched to Scottsboro, Alabama, on the 26th of December, having 
made a march of over 400 miles, and fought its part in the battle 
of Chattanooga. 



Ninety-Ninth Infantry. 379 

At Scottsbcro, the regiment remained in camp until the 11th 
of February, 1864. It then moved into east Tennessee, Capt. Jo- 
siah Farrow, Company D, commanding, and was engaged at Rocky 
Face Ridge on the 25th. The regiment then returned to Scotts- 
boro and remained in camp until the first day of May. 

General Sherman's army, Gen. John A. Logan commanding the 
1 5th Army Corps ; General Harrow, commanding the division ; 
Colonel Oliver, 15th Michigan, commanding the brigade, then 
moved on its campaign, of which Atlanta was the objective point. 
The 99th met and fought with the dashing Army of the Tennessee. 
and was engaged in every skirmish, assault and battle in which 
that army took a part, under the gallant IMcPherson. The regi- 
ment was engaged at Resaea May 14th. At Dallas, on the 28th, 
the enemy made a bold assault upon our column, but met a bloody 
repulse. On the 15th of June the regiment participated in a charge 
at Big Shanty. 

Subsequently it was engaged in skirmishes for seven days near 
Kenesaw Mountain. The regiment also took part in skirmishes at 
Nickajack Creek and at Atlanta on the 20th and 21st of July. On 
the mcrning of the 22d it had gained a high hill which gave us a 
commanding position, in full view of the heart of Atlanta. At 
noon Hood's forces made a desperate assault and a terrible battle 
raged on the entire front, and after four hours of fierce fighting 
the enemy were cheeked and driven back. In this assault and de- 
fense the noble MePherson fell. 

On the 28th another battle was fought in front of Atlanta, in 
which the 15th Corps, to which the 99th belonged, was chiefly en- 
gaged. The result was victory to our arms. In both these san- 
guinary contests the 99th was an active participant, and was en- 
gaged every day in skirmishes from August 3d to the 15th. 

The regiment marched with Sherman's army on its flank move- 
ment around Atlanta, and was in the engagement at Jonesboro on 
the 31st of August, and at Lovejoy's Station on the 1st of Septem- 
ber. It then returned to Atlanta and went into camp at Bast 
Point, the 3d Brigade being transferred to the 2d Division, and on 
the 3d of October it joined in the pursuit of Hood, and, commanded 
by Maj. J. B. Homan, was engaged in the battle at Little River, 
Georgia, on the 26th, and after a march of 200 miles reached At- 
lanta. 

On the 15th of November the 99th marched from its camp and 
moved \^dth Sherman on his great "March to the Sea," and after a 
march of 300 miles it reached the front of Savannah. On 



380 Indiana at Vicksbukg. 

the 15th of December, the riigimeiit took part in the charge upon 
Fort McAllister, which, after a hand-to-hand struggle with its gar- 
rison, the enemy surrendered, and opened Sherman's communica- 
tion with the sea. 

After a short rest at Savannah, the regiment was transferred by 
ship to Buford, South Carolina, and, commanded by Capt. Josiah 
Farrar, marched with Shennan's army through the Carolinas; was 
engaged in a skirmish at Duck Creek and Edisto River, and occu- 
pied Columbia, South Carolina, on February 17, 1865. On the 
19th of March the regiment reinforced the 20th Corps at the battle 
of Bentonville. The march was then made to Goldsboro; from 
thence to Raleigh, and from thence, by the way of Warrenton, 
Petersburg and Richmond, Virginia, to Washington ( -ity, where it 
took part in the grand review, and on the 5th of June, 1865, the 
regiment, then commanded by Colonel Farrar, was mustered out 
of the service of the United States. 

Six coinpanies of the regiment only were entitled to be dis- 
charged, but by a special order from the War Department, the 
other four companies were discharged with the regiment. The re- 
maining recruits were transferred to the 48tli Indiana Veterans, 
with which they served until it was mustered out. 

The 99th left for the field with 942 officers and enlisted men, 
and returned from its campaigns with 500 officers and men, and 
had marched during its term of service over 4,000 miles. Upon 
arriving at Indianapolis, the regiment was present at a reception 
to returned soldiers on the 11th of June in the state house grounds, 
and were welcomed by Governor Morton and others, and its mem- 
bers then went to their various homes. 

The regiment lost during its term of service 45 enlisted men, 
killed and mortally wounded, and 5 officers and 147 enlisted men 
by disease ; total, 197. 




Moiuuneut of lOOtli Infantry. 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

Its BRIGADE 1st DIVISION 16th CORPS 
100th INFANTRY 

Lieut. Col. Albert Heath I 

Served on the Exterior line in the vicinity of Ilaynes' Blufl and at Oak Ridge from about June 12, 
to the end of the Siege, Julv 4. 



(38?) 



ONE HUNDREDTH REGIMENT INDIANA INFANTRY 
VOLUNTEERS. 

This regiment was raised principally in what was the Tenth 
Indiana Congressional District, but now known as the Twelfth, 
and rendezvoused at Camp Allen, in I<^ort Wayne, in the latter 
part of the summer of 1862, and was mustered into the United 
States service September 10th of that year. 

At organization the following field and staff were commis- 
sioned : 

Stanford J. Stoughton Colonel. 

Albert Heath Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Robert Parrott Major. 

Edward P. Williams Adjutant. 

Alba M. Tucker Quartermaster. 

Charles A. Munn Chaplain. 

William C. Matchett Surgeon. 

David J. Swartz Assistant Surgeon. 





Officers of the r 


espective companies were : 








Captain. 


1st Lieutenant. 


2d Lieutenant. 


Co. 


A. 


Marquis L. Rhodes, 


Ezra D. Hartman, 


Lucius Barney. 


Co. 


B. 


Joseph W. Gillespie, 


OrlaJ. Fast, 


Edwin Goldsmith. 


Co. 


c. 


Harvey Crocker, 


John K. Morrow, 


James W. Bond. 


Co. 


D. 


Ruel M. Johnson, 


William H. Venamon, 


William J. Myers. 


Co. 


E. 


William M. Barney, 


Merwin F. Collier, 


Ichabod S. Jones. 


Co. 


F. 


Abram W. Myers, 


Daniel F. Smith, 


Leonard Aker. 


Co. 


G. 


Godlove 0. Behm, 


William Burnside, 


Elijah Young. 


Co. 


H. 


John W. Headington 


, Gideon Rathbun, 


Stephen B. H. Shanks. 


Co. 


I. 


James N. Sims, 


James M. Harland, 


Thomas C. Dalby. 


Co. 


K. 


Charles W. Brouse, 


Jeremiah M. Wise, 


Henry G.CoUis. 



During the service nearly all of these company officers were 
either promoted to higher rank, discharged for disability, or re- 
signed, their places being ably filled by promotions of line officers 
of their companies. 

The regiment was ably commanded by both field and line offi- 
cers, and was brought to a high standard of efficiency during the 
periods of command by Lieutenant-Colonels Heath, Headington 
and Johnson. All these were gallant officers, loved and respected 
by all officers and men of the regiment, and both field and line offi- 
cers stood high in the estimation of commanders of the higher com- 
mands. 

The 100th was especially in favor as an efficient regiment with 
brigade, division and corps commanders, and was, at near close ^of 
service in the Carolina campaign, mentioned and complimented by 
]\Iajor-General Sherman. 

Lieut. Col. R. iM. Johnson was a fine executive officer, strict dis- 

(383) 



384 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

ciplinarian, and highly qualified for his position, and during his 
service as commanding officer brought the regiment to a high 
standard of efficiency. 

No history of this regiment would be complete without mention 
of an efficient body of men, known as ''Hall's 15th Army Corps 
Scouts. ' ' Henry J. Hall was from Lima, Indiana, and at organiza- 
tion of his company was appointed first sergeant, but, tiring of the 
monotony of such service, obtained permission to organize and 
use in the service a body of men for scouting the country in the 
vicinity of the army, to gain general information of the enemy. 
Hall enlisted men from his own and other companies of the regi- 
ment, who were as brave and daring as himself, among them Har- 
low Hein, John Ryanson, John Whitlock, James Taylor, Nelson 
Austin, Theodore Upson, and others known as being expert marks- 
men, and so useful were these men under the command of Hall that 
they attracted the attention of Generals Logan, Sherman and Grant, 
and Hall was given permission to select and have detailed from 
the commands in the division 100 men, mount and use these picked 
men as a special body for scouting purposes, and they gained dis- 
tinction in the army for their successful service. 

In one instance, near Florence, Alabama, Hall, with five of his 
men, captured a whole company of the enemy, along with a colonel, 
major and the line officers of the company, and turned them over 
to the gunboats at East Port. 

Many more hazardous and daring deeds were successfully ac- 
complished by Hall and his men, but one night on an expedition 
the command was ambushed by a superior force, and the intrepid 
Hall mortally wounded. 

After Hall's death the scouts retained their organization for '<\ 
time, but as no one was found to fill his place they were practically 
disbanded and assigned to various headquarters as scouts, couriers 
and orderlies. These men were nearly all originally members of 
the 100th Indiana. 

Soon after organization of the regiment. Companies A, B, C, D 
and E were uniformed, armed and sent to assist Colonel Gray, of 
the 2d Indiana Cavalry, in guarding the Ohio River at Madison 
and other points. 

On November 11, 1862, the regiment, as a whole, was assembled 
at Jndianapolis, and, after a parting speech from Governor Morton, 
started by cars to Cairo, Illinois, and from thence by boat to Mem- 
phis, Tennessee, where they were encamped a short time and used 



One Hundredth Infantry. 385 

as a command to pursue, on short expeditions, Confederate forces 
infesting that part of Tennessee, in which they had rough experi- 
ences, more or less, with Van Dorn's Cavalry and other rebel com- 
mands. 

After the capture of Grant's immense army supplies at Holly 
Springs, which changed his entire plans for capture of Vicksburg, 
"grub" being short, the regiment when on some of these expedi- 
tions almost subsisted on persimmons, and hence gained the ever- 
lasting sobriquet of the "Persimmon" Regiment. At first this 
title was derisively given by older regiments of the command, but 
after the regiment had shown its staying qualities in battle, the 
title became an honorable distinction, and today, if old-time vigor 
is desired to be raised among the survivors of the 100th, shout 
"persimmons" and the result will be gained at once. 

The regiment's headquarters in time were moved to Junction, 
Mississippi, where it spent a disagreeable winter in 1862 and 1863, 
camped in a muddj^ cornfield, and many men of the command sick- 
ened and died from measles and other diseases. 

In early spring the regiment was stationed at Collinsville, Ten- 
nessee, from which it made expeditions against the enemy, and, on 
June 7th, was again in Memphis and took boat on the Mississippi 
River, and in due time landed at Haynes' Bluff, near Vicksburg, 
and aided in the memorable campaign of that stronghold. 

(rcneral Grant's army had been in this campaign for months, 
fighting battles and gaining strong positions, making the invest- 
ment of Vicksburg complete, but was harassed by an army in the 
rear, under the Confederate General Johnston, and it was neces- 
sary to have a strong force out some distance to protect the rear of 
his army and, with other large bodies of troops, the 100th Regi- 
ment was ordered into position on Black River, some sixteen miles 
east of Vicksburg, to watch and repel Johnston's army, if it ad- 
vanced to attack the forces besieging Vicksburg. 

Rifle-pits were dug, trenches opened, forts built and armed, and 
in all this work the 100th gladly did its share, until the surrender, 
on July 4, 1863. 

Immediately on the 5th, the regiment, with a large part of the 
army, crossed Big Black River in pursuit of Johnston's retreating 
army, following it, almost without halt, until it was driven within 
its fortifications at Jackson, where the 100th received its first bap- 
tism of fire — standing the test bravely and losing many men, killed 
and wounded. 



[25] 



386 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

After the capture of Jackson and destruction of Confederate 
supplies and property, the regiment returned to the vicinity of 
Vicksburg, and in reorganization of the army was assigned to the 
4th Division of the 15th Army Corps. After a short rest, having 
done their share in the Vicksburg campaign, the division and regi- 
ment were again ordered to return to ]\Iemphis, arriving there Oc- 
tolier 9, 1863. 

Soon after arrival at Memphis, the command started on that 
long and memorable march to Chattanooga, across the country, via 
Stevenson. Bridgeport, Sand Mountain, Trenton, Georgia, etc., and 
after rapid and forced marching, tinally reached Chattanooga on 
the 23d of November, with 320 men, so weak in numbers had the 
regiment been made by death and disease. 

Soon thereafter the regiment participated in the battle and 
storming of Missionarv^ Ridge, in which its loss was 135 men in 
killed and wounded, or 43 per cent, of its number engaged. 

Shortly after this battle, the regiment was ordered to join the 
force to go to the relief of Knoxville, where Longstreet's Confed- 
erate army was besieging Burnside, of the Union army, and, after 
the Confederates were defeated and driven away, the 100th re- 
turned to Chattanooga, going into winter quarters at Bellfort, 
Alabama. Nothing exciting occurred during the mild winter, and 
Maj. R. M. Johnson, who was in command, took opportunity to drill 
the regiment to perfection, gaining for it the reputation of being 
the best drilled regiment in the army. 

May 1, 1864. the regiment left winter quarters, and, with Sher- 
man's grand army, started on the Atlanta campaign and partici- 
pated in battles of Resaca, Dallas, New Hope Church, Burnt Hick- 
ory. Kenesaw Mountain. Big Shanty, Decatur, Jonesboro, Lovejoy's 
Station, siege and battles around Atlanta, and other engagements, 
in all of which it sustained losses, being ever at the front ; and, as 
the records have it, under fire one hundred days, until it gained 
a brief rest in camp at East Point. 

After the enemy had retired within the defenses of Atlanta, the 
regiment was assigned to duty guarding immense stores at IMarietta, 
Georgia, and while on this service IMajor Johnson was assigned to 
duty on General Harrow's staff. 

The regiment soon returned to the front and saw hard fighting 
at Ezra Church, losing heavily in killed and wounded. 

It also ])articipatecl in pursuit of Hood's army to the Tennessee 
River, from which poiat it was ordered back to Atlanta to join 



One Hundredth Infantry. 387 

Sherman's army on the March to the Sea, and in due time arrived 
at and participated in the capture of Fort McAllister and Savan- 
nah. 

On January 8, 1865, the regiment left Savannah, going by boat 
to Beaufort, North Carolina, and from thence marched to join the 
army on its campaign of the Carolinas. Was at the burning of 
Columbia, South Carolina, aiding in extinguishing the fires on that 
occasion, and from thence forward to Bentonville, North Carolina, 
where the regiment was in its last fight. 

With the grand army of Sherman, after the surrender of John- 
ston and Lee, the regiment's march was through Richmond to Wash- 
ington, in one continued halo of triumph, after so many long days 
of fighting, and marching from the Mississippi River to the capital 
of the Nation. 

At Washington, on the 24th day of May, 1865, in that grand 
review down Pennsylvania avenue, past the reviewing stand in 
which were generals and all prominent men of the nation, under 
the eye of our grand old General Sherman, the 100th Indiana Regi- 
ment of Infantry Volunteers had the honor to lead first in line on 
that last grand march. 

A few days later the regiment started by train for Indian- 
apolis, where it was royally welcomed by Governor Morton and 
other state authorities, and. in due time, paid ofi', discharged and 
once more, as veterans, having served the country well, went forth 
as private citizens. 

On entering the service the regiment mustered in officers and 
enlisted men 986, which, with recruits added during service, in- 
creased total enlistments in the regiment to 1,250 men, out of which 
58 were killed in action and many more died from wounds. The 
regiment also lost heavily from sickness and disease, so that at the 
date of muster-out only 408 answered to the final roll call, and out 
of this number 365 w^ere all that were left of the original 986 enlist- 
ments. The 100th did an honorable part in its service from In- 
dianapolis, in 1862, to its muster-out, in 1865. 

The regiment lost during its term of service 2 officers and 56 
enlisted men killed and mortally wounded, and 3 officers and 173 
enlisted men bj^ disease ; total, 234. 




Mdiiuiiiciil (if First l'>:i1tery Liyiit Artillery 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

14th DIVISION 13th CORPS 
1st BATTERY LIGHT ARTILLERY 

Captain Martin Klaus 

Engaged: Port Gibson, May 1; Champion's Hill, May 16; Big Black River Bridge, May 17; j 
Assault, May 22; Siege, May 23-July 4. Casualties; Killed 2, wounded 1, total 3. ■ 



(388) 



FIRST BATTERY, LIGHT ARTILLERY, INDIANA 
VOLUNTEERS. 

The 1st Indiana Battery, better known in the service as "Klaus' 
Battery," was organized at Evansville, and mustered into service 
August 16, 1861, with Martin Klaus, captain. 

F. Arnold Schrauder 1st Lieutenant. 

John Louis Bittrolff 1st Lieutenant. 

John Rothengatter 2d Lieutenant. 

Casher Tomhemelt 2d Lieutenant. 

The organization was composed chiefly of an independent com- 
pany of artillery that had done duty at Evansville a few months 
previous. Soon after its muster the battery moved to St. Louis and 
was assigned to the army of General Fremont. In September, the 
battery moved with the army to Springfield, Missouri, and later the 
movement was abandoned and the army withdrawn from south- 
west iMissouri. In Decemlier of 1861 the battery was a part of the 
expedition of the Blackwater, in Missouri, and in action assisted in 
the capture of a large number of the enemy on this stream. On the 
29th of January, 1862, Klaus' Battery moved with the division of 
Gen. Jeff. C. Davis in pursuit of the enemy under General Price, 
who was then located in the vicinity of Springfield. The enemy 
was encountered in force and driven four days with constant skir- 
mishing, but having retreated into the hills of Arkansas, further 
pursuit was abandoned. 

Early in March a general movement was made by all divisions 
of the army in opposition to the forces of the enemy under General 
Van Dorn, then moving north with a large Confederate army. 

On March 6th the enemy was encountered near Leetown and a 
severe battle resulted. On the 7th an engagement was fought at 
Elkhorn Tavern, and on March 8th the whole force of the enemy 
was encountered at Pea Ridge and decisively defeated. 

Klaus' Battery rendered efficient service in all these engage- 
ments, closing with Pea Ridge. 

The 1st Battery then encamped for some weeks at Cross Tim- 
bers, Arkansas, and then participated in the spring campaigns in 
Arkansas and southern INIissouri. 

In July the battery was ordered to Helena, Arkansas, where it 
arrived on the 13th of the month. In October the battery moved 
to Ironton, Missouri, and from thence through southeastern Mis- 
souri. During these severe campaigns in Arkansas and Missouri 
the 1st Battery had marched 3,600 miles. . 

(389) 



390 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

On March 14, 1863, the 1st Battery embarked on steamer at St. 
Genevieve, Missouri, and moved to Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, 
where it arrived on the 25th, and was assigned to the 2d Brigade, 
14th Division, 13th Army Corps. 

On April 12th orders were received by this battery to join in 
the general movement of the army through the country to a point 
southward on the west bank of the Mississippi River, far below 
the batteries and guns of the enemy's fortifications of Vicksburg, 
on the east side of the river. In due time the battery arrived on 
the west side of the river, opposite Bruinsburg, ^Eississippi, and, 
after being transported across the river by boats that had run the 
batteries of the enemy at Vicksburg and Grand Gulf, set out imme- 
diately on forced march to join in the attack and battle of Magnolia 
Hills, or better known as Port Gibson. The enemy was encountered 
during the night of April 30th, and on the day following. May 1st, 
the battle was fought during the whole day and the enemy de- 
feated. 

During this engagement the battery was continually engaged, 
losing one man killed, four wounded and six horses killed. May 2d 
it passed through Port Gibson and continued in the forward move- 
ment until arrival at a crossing of Black River, which the battery 
was ordered to hold and guard, with other troops, during the battle 
of Raymond. 

On May 16th the battery was engaged in the battle of Cham- 
pion 's Hill, in which the enemy was defeated, and on the 17tli was 
in pursuit of the enemy, and, coming up with their rear at Black 
River Bridge, a lively engagement occurred, resulting in the cap- 
ture of hundreds of prisoners and seventeen pieces of artillery. In 
this engagement the battery lost one man killed. 

On the 18th of May the battery continued with the Union army 
in pursuit of the enemy to the line of his defenses at Vicksburg, 
and during the night of the 19th was permanently stationed in posi- 
tion on the Union line, to the right of the Baldwin's Ferry road, 
and remained in this position during the siege. 

The loss of the battery during the siege was light — only one man 
killed, and several wounded, but none seriously. 

After the surrender of Vicksburg the battery was ordered to 
join in the movement on the 5th of July against Johnston's army, 
which during the siege had been harassing the rear of the Union 
army. Johnston, finding it useless to withstand the attacks of the 
victorious Union army, immediately began a retreat from the Big 



First Battery Light Artillery. 391 

Black River to Jackson, Mississippi, to where he was pursued vig- 
orously, and withstood a siege until the 17th, when the Confeder- 
ates evacuated the city, and the Union army immediately took pos- 
session. The battery then took up its return march to Vicksburg, 
arriving there on the 24th of July. 

In August the 1st Battery was ordered to New Orleans by boat 
and from thence to Brashear City, Louisiana, on September 5th, and 
soon thereafter joined the expedition under General Franklin for 
the Upper Teche country, in western Louisiana, passing through 
Franklin, New Iberia, Vermilion, etc. 

This campaign not meeting with desired results, the troops were 
ordered back to Brashear City, and the battery to Donaldsville, 
Louisiana, where it remained during the holidays and again arrived 
January 8, 1864, in New Orleans. 

In March, 1864, the 1st Battery moved with G-eneral Banks' 
army on the Red River campaign, and in this expedition took part 
in the battles of Yellow Bayou, Cane Hill and Sabine Cross Roads. 
In the Sabine Cross Roads battle, the battery lost four guns and 
equipment. It was then attached to the 16th Army Corps, and was 
daily engaged in resisting the enemy until it reached Morganza. 
when it was again assigned to its old place in the 13th Army Corps. 

On the 20th of June, 1864, Captain Klaus resigned and First 
Lieut. Lawrence Jacoby was promoted captain. A number of men 
re-enlisted as veterans while stationed at New Orleans. In the fall 
of 1864 the non-veteran portion of the battery severed connection 
with the organization and proceeded to Indianapolis, where they 
were mustered out of the service. 

In March, 1865, the 1st Battery was again assigned to the 16th 
Army Corps and took an active part in the siege and capture of 
Spanish Fort, Alabama. 

After the surrender of Mobile, the 1st Battery moved to Mont- 
gomery, Alabama, and was stationed at that place until ordered to 
Indianapolis to be mustered out. 

It arrived at Indianapolis on the 17th of August, 1865, mth 
three officers and 102 enlisted men, and, after a reception by the 
state officials, was paid off in full, and mustered out of the service 
August 22, 1865. 

The battery lost during service 3 enlisted men killed and mor- 
tally wounded, and 1 officer and 31 enlisted men by disease; 
total, 35. 




Monument of Sixth Battery Ijight Artillery. 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

1st DIVISION 16th CORPS 
6th BATTERY LIGHT ARTILLERY 

Captain Michael Mueller 

Served on the Exterior line in the vicinity of Haynes' Bluff and at Oak Ridge from about June 12 
to the end of the Siege, July 4. 



(392) 



SIXTH BATTERY, LIGHT ARTILLERY, INDIANA 
VOLUNTEERS. 

The 6th Battery was recruited at Evansville and mustered into 
the United States service at Indianapolis, September 7, 1861, with 

Frederick Behr .Captain. 

Cliarles Adelmann 1st Lieutenant. 

William Mussman 1st Lieutenant. 

Michael Mueller 2d Lieutenant, 

Lewis Kern 2d Lieutenant. 

On the 2d of October the battery proceeded by rail, via Evans- 
ville, to Henderson, Kentucky. From Henderson the battery was 
on duty campaigning with the troops in northern Kentucky during 
the winter of 1861 and 1862, and in the spring joined General 
Sherman's command at Paducah. 

March 4th the 6th Battery moved, with Sherman's Division, up 
the Tennessee River by boat and disembarked at Pittsburg Landing, 
and was stationed to guard the bridge over Owl Creek in the Purdy 
road, on the extreme right of the army, and was in that position on 
the morning of the 6th of xVpril, when the battle of Shiloh opened. 

For over two hours, at the beginning of the battle, the battery 
held its position, supported by McDowell's Brigade, but eventually 
was forced back by strong columns of the enemy. While the bat- 
tery was retiring. General Sherman met it at the intersection of 
the Corinth road and gave orders to Captain Behr to bring his 
guns into battery. The captain had hardly given the order when 
he was struck by a musket ball and fell from his horse, fatally 
wounded. The death of the captain caused confusion, and the 
enemy, pressing forward, captured most of the guns and killed 
sixty-eight horses. 

After the battle, the battery, being supplied with new guns, 
took a prominent part in the siege of Corinth, in an advanced posi- 
tion on the line, which it held until the evacuation of this place by 
the Confederate forces. 

The battery then moved with General Sherman 's troops to Holly 
Springs, where it had a sharp engagement, driving the enem}^ from 
the town. From thence, in June, it moved to Memphis and was 
stationed in Fort Pickering until the 26th of November, 1862, and 
after this date w^as on an expedition in western Tennessee until 
June, 1863, when it returned to Memphis, and, embarking on a 
steamer, moved down the Mississippi River to Vicksburg, where it 

(393) 



394 Indiana at Vicksbueg. 

was stationed on the line of the Union approaches and was attached 
to the 1st Division of the 16th Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee. 

After the surrender of Vicksburg, the battery moved with Sher- 
man's coluiim in pursuit of the Confederate General Joe Johnston's 
army. After having quite an engagement with the enemy at Big 
Black River, it moved on to Jackson, Mississippi, with the army, 
where it was engaged in the siege of that place until its evacuation 
in the night by the Confederate forces, who escaped across Pearl 
River, retreating eastward toward Meridian, Mississippi. 

After the expedition the battery moved to Oak Ridge, Missis- 
sippi, where, after being attached to the 3d Brigade, 3d Division 
of the 15th Army Corps, it finally settled down for rest in camp at 
Bear Creek, Mississippi. 

Moving with General McPherson's command, the battery en- 
gaged in an expedition to Brownsville, Mississippi, and then, re- 
turning to Vicksburg, embarked on boats, November 7, 1863, for 
IMemphis, and from thence to Pocahontas, Tennessee, and went into 
camp. 

At this place, January 1, 1864, a majority of the battery re- 
enlisted and soon after removed to Memphis, and there embarking 
on boats, returned to Vicksburg and marched to Black River 
Bridge, where it remained until March, 1864, when it was again 
ordered to Vicksburg, and marched from thence to Memphis. In 
May it marched with the command of General Sturgis, engaging in 
the battle of Gun Town, having three men wounded and ten horses 
killed in this engagement. 

On the 14th of July the 6th Battery was engaged in the battle 
of Tupelo, Mississippi, losing one man killed and seven wounded. 
It then moved with the command of Gen. A. J. Smith to Oxford, 
Mississippi, and from thence returned to Memphis on August 31, 
1864, and was assigned to duty as a regular post battery, occupy- 
ing Fort Pickering. 

It was ordered to Indianapolis to be mustered out, arriving July 
15th, with two commissioned officers and forty-eight enlisted men. 
It was present at a reception in the state house grove on the 17th, 
and was welcomed by Governor Morton. 

The 6th Battery was mustered out July 22, 1865. 

The battery lost during service 1 officer and 1 enlisted man 
killed, and 15 enlisted men by disease. Total, 17. 




Monument of Co. C, First Cavalry- 



(iMonuinent Tablet Insniption.) 

12th DIVISION 13th CORPS 
COMPANY C 1st CAVALRY 

Captain William McReynolds 
Escort at Division Headquarters during campaign and seige. 



(396) 



COMPANY C, FIRST CAVALRY (28th) REGIMENT INDIANA. 

VOLUNTEERS. 

Following instructions of the War Department, orders were 
issued on June 10, 1861, for the organization of a cavalry regiment 
in the Ohio River counties, the companies to rendezvous at Evans- 
ville and Madison. Eight of these companies were encamped at 
Evansville and were mustered in as the 1st Cavalry, August 20, 
1861, with Conrad Baker as colonel. The Madison companies were 
assigned to another regiment. 

Company C was recruited from Posey County, and was com- 
manded by the following officers : 

John K. Highman Captain. 

Josiah Forth 1st Lieutenant. 

Julian D. Owen 2d Lieutenant. 

It was assigned to the 1st, following the fortunes of this regi- 
ment until detached in February, 1863. 

AVith the regiment, Company C left Evansville August 21st, and 
proceeded to St. Louis. On arrival it was at once ordered to Iron- 
ton, IMissouri, w^here it almost immediately entered into real war- 
fare, for, on September 12th, a detachment was engaged in a skir- 
mish with a party of Confederates on Black River, the enemy losing 
several in killed, wounded and captured. 

Shortly thereafter, in Octol^er, the regiment was ordered to duty 
near Pilot Knob. It was while campaigning in this vicinity that 
the regiment participated in the battle of Fredericktown, on Octo- 
ber 21st, and in a charge, which turned the tide of the battle, com- 
pletely routed the enemy. In this engagement Lieutenant-Colonel 
Gavitt, who had that day been promoted from major, and Captain 
Highman, Company C, w^ere killed. Lieut. Josiah Forth, Company 
C, was promoted to major, in line of promotion, and Second Lieut. 
Julian D. Owen was made captain of Company C. 

The regiment remained in the vicinity of Ironton, campaigning 
and making short expeditions until February, 1862. when it was 
moved into Arkansas, and in ]\Iay was attached to the Army of 
Southwest Missouri, Gen. S. R. Curtis; 1st Division, Gen. Frederick 
Steele. With the regiment. Company C engaged in a skirmish 
with the enemy at Litchfielcl on May 2d, and at Eleven Points, IMis- 
souri, on June 1st. 

The regiment campaigned in this neighborhood in June, and on 
the 26th started the march to Helena, Arkansas. En route it par- 
ticipated in the battle of Round Hill, the 7th of July, 1862. 

(397) 



;-{98 Indiana at Vkiksritrg. 

On ;irriv;il <it lleleiin the regrini(>iit was assigned to the District 
of Eastern Ai-kansas, l)ei)artment of the Missouri. While with this 
arui.w the 1st CaA^alry marched with expeditions to Clarendon in 
August ; to Lawrenceville in September ; to Moro and Arkansas Post 
in November, and went to Grenada, Mississippi, in the latter part of 
the same month, passing en route Tallahatchie River, Mitchell's 
Cross Roads and Oakland. 

Other expeditions to Coldwater and Yazoo Pass, in February, 
mai'k the departure of Company C from the regiment. At this time 
the company was commanded by William W. McReynolds, captain ; 
James L. Carey, first lieutenant, and Charles H. Randolph, second 
lieutenant. It was detached and attached to the 12th Division, 13th 
Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee, and assigned as escort at Gen- 
eral Hovey's headquarters. 

General Grant was now moving towards Vicksburg, and Com- 
pany C saw much service, accompanying the division in many of 
the important engagements, viz. : Marched with the Yazoo Pass ex- 
pedition, February 24. 1863. Returning from there in April, it 
moved to Milliken's Bend on the 12th. Advance on Bruinsburg 
and Grand Gulf, April 25-30 ; Port Gibson, May 1 ; Fourteen-Mile 
Creek, May 12 and 13; Champion's Hill, May 16; campaign and 
siege, May 18- July 4. 

After the surrender of Vicksburg the company was in the ad- 
vance on Jackson, and was stationed there during the siege. 

In August it was ordered to New Orleans, and from thence went 
into the western Louisiana "Teche" campaign. After this. Com- 
pany C was in the defenses at New Orleans until August, 1864, 
when it rejoined its regiment at Pine Blui¥, Arkansas. In the lat- 
ter part of that month the regiment was ordered home. Leaving 
behind the recruits of the regiment, who were organized into a sub- 
sidiary battalion, the 1st Cavalry departed for Indianapolis, ar- 
rived there on the 6th of September, 1864, and was mustered out of 
the service on the 12th of that month. 




IMoiuuiieut of Co. C, Fourth Cavalry. 



I 



(Monument Tablet Inscription.) 

10th DIVISION 13th CORPS 
COMPANY C 4th CAVALRY 

Captain Joseph P. Leslie. 

Captain Andrew P. Gallagher 

Escort at Division Headquarters during Campaign and Siege. 



(400) 



COMPANY C, FOURTH CAVALRY (77th) REGIMENT 
INDIANA VOLUNTEERS. 

The 4th Cavalry (77th) Regiment, of which Company C was a 
part, was organized at Indianapolis on the 22d of August, 1862, 
with Isaac P. Gray as colonel. On the completion of its organiza- 
tion the aspect of affairs in Kentucky was so threatening that the 
regiment was divided, four companies being sent under command 
of Maj. John A. Platter to Henderson, Kentucky, and the remain- 
ing companies to Louisville, from whence they were ordered into 
the interior, where they were joined by Colonel Gray. 

The battalion, under command of Major Platter, had a skirmish 
with the enemy at IMadisonville, Kentucky, on the 26th of August, 
and again at JMount Washington, on the 1st of October, in which a 
number were killed and wounded. On the 5th of October it en- 
gaged the rebels at Madisonville, suffering some loss. In the spring 
of 1863 this battalion joined the other companies, and after this the 
regiment served together until December, 1862, when Company C 
became the escort of Gen. A. J. Smith, commanding 10th Division, 
13th Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee. 

The officers of the company at this time were : 

Joseph P. Leslie Captain. 

Amos F. Leamon 1st Lieutenant. 

Andrew P. Gallagher 2d Lieutenant. 

From December 20, 1862, to January 3, 1863, Company C was 
with General Sherman's army in the Yazoo expedition. During 
this time the company engaged in the actions at Chickasaw Bayou 
and Bluff, December 26-29. Marching with the command the com- 
pany participated in the engagement at Arkansas Post, which re- 
sulted in the capture of Fort Hindman. 

Company C moved to Young's Point, Louisiana, and was on 
duty there and at Milliken's Bend until April. While here Cap- 
tain Leslie was promoted major, being succeeded by Second Lieut. 
A. P. Gallagher. It participated in the movement on Bruinsburg, 
April 25th to 30th. It was actively engaged in the events leading 
up to the surrender of Vicksburg; being engaged at Port Gibson, 
May 1st; Champion's Hill, May 16th, and in the siege until Gen- 
eral Pemberton accepted the terms of surrender on July 4th. 

Leaving Vicksburg Company C advanced with the army on 
Jackson, where it was engaged until the evacuation. It moved to 
New Orleans in August, and was engaged in the western Louisiana 

[26] (401) 



402 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

campaign in October and November, particiyjating- in actions at 
Opeloiisas, October 20th and 21st., and at Grand Coteau, Novem- 
ber 3d. 

Returning to New Orleans, the company was engaged in the 
defenses there until September, 1864, when it rejoined the regi- 
ment. With the regiment, Company C was engaged against the 
enemy at Columbia, Tennessee, in October. 

In November it was stationed near Louisville, serving with the 
2d Brigade of the 1st Cavalry Division of the Cavalry Corps of the 
Military Division of the Mississippi. In January, 1865, it was in 
the vicinity of Nashville, and in the following month at Waterloo, 
Alabama. IMoving into Alabama with General Wilson's forces, it 
participated in the active campaign in that State and Georgia, en- 
gaging in the battles of Plantersville and Selma. Leaving IMacon. 
Georgia, in May, it reached Nashville and went into the provisional 
cavalry camp at Edgefield, where it remained until mustered out of 
service on the 29th of June, 1865. After its muster out the regi- 
ment remained at Nashville a few days until it was finally dis- 
charged and paid, when the organization was broken up, and the 
officers and men returned to their respective homes without coming 
to the state capital in a body. 

Company C lost during service 20 enlisted men by disease. To- 
tal, 20. 



I 




Indiana Regimental Marker. 

Fifty-three of these have been erected, marking camp sites, sharpshooters' hnes and advanced 
positions on May 19 and 22, 1863. 



(404) 



Indiana Casualties. 



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1 



Report of the Commission. 



ACT AUTHORIZING APPOINTMENT OF A COMMISSION. 

The Sixty-third General Assembly passed the following act, 
which was introduced by Senator Fortune, January' 14. 1903, and 
approved by Governor Durbin, March 9, 1903 : 

AN ACT autliori^/.iiig the appointment of a connnission to ascertain and 
exactly determine tlie positions of Indiana troops in the siege of Vieks- 
burg and to make an appropriation to pay the necessary traveling ex- 
penses of the members of the connnission. 

(S. 107. Approved March 9. 1003.) 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State 
of Indiana, That the Governor of the State be, and is hereby author- 
ized to appoint a commission consisting of five members, being 
members from Indiana organizations participating in the campaign 
and siege of Vicksburg. Each member of the said commission shall 
have served with honor in the campaign and siege of Vicksburg, in 
some organization which participated in said siege and shall serve 
on the commission without pay except as to necessary traveling ex- 
penses, and said commission shall have the power to appoint a sec- 
retary, who shall receive the same amount of expenses as any one 
member of said commission. 

Sec. 2. It shall be the duty of the commission to co-operate 
with the National Park Commission in ascertaining and exactly 
determining the position of each Indiana organization in the siege 
of Vicksburg, and also to recommend to the Governor of the State 
such subsequent legislation as will, and in the opinion of the com- 
mission, permanently and suitably mark the positions, then ascer- 
tained, and worthily commemorate the valor and services of Indi- 
ana soldiers in the campaign and siege of Vicksburg. 

Sec. 3. The sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000.00), or so 
much thereof as may be necessary, is hereby appropriated out of 
tlie funds of the state treasury, not otherwise appropriated, to be 
drawn and used by said commission to pay the necessary traveling 
expenses of the members thereof in the discharge of the duties 
aforesaid, on the presentation of such certified vouchers as the 
Auditor of State shall direct. 

(406) 



Report op The Commission. 407 

Sec. 4. Said commission shall make a full report of the execu- 
tion of its trust to the Governor on or before the 30th day of Janu- 
ary, 1905. 

FIRST REPORT OF THE COMMISSION. 

In obedience to said act set out above, Governor Durbin ap- 
pointed the following Commission: Henry C. Adams, Adelbert B. 
Crampton, M. M. Lacey, E. L. Semans and Phillip Lester, who, 
upon the completion of their duties, submitted the following report : 

To Hon. Winfield T. Durbin, 

Governor of the State of Indiana: 
Sir : The commission appointed by you in pursuance of Senate 
Bill No. 107, passed by the Legislature of Indiana, and approved by 
the Governor March 9, 1903, respectfully makes the following re- 
port: 

In response to notice from the Governor, there met at the Governor's 
Office, May 18, 1903, Heniy C. Adams, Adelbert B. Crampton, M. M. Lacey, 
and E. L. Semans, Phillip Lester being absent. 

The Commission organized by electing Henry C. Adams President; 
Thomas M. Hardy, Secretary. 

The president was directed to con*espond with Capt. W. T. Kigby, 
Chairman of the Viclisburg National Park Commission, with reference to 
the best time for a visit to the Park. Such correspondence was had, and 
in accordance with the views of Capt. Rigby, the Commission met at Vicks- 
burg, November 21, 1903, and spent November 22d and 23d, in company 
with Capt. Rigby, in visiting the land which has been acquired by the 
United States from the former owners, for the purpose of establishing a 
National Military Park, in accordance with Act of Congress passed in No- 
vember, 1899, and approved by the President on the 21st day of the same 
month. 

We found that 1,245.7 acres of land had been purchased, and that 
avenues had been, and were still being constructed, as follows : 

Confederate Avenue: 

7.19 miles in length, which marked the Confederate line as nearly 
as possible at the time of the surrender, July 4, 1863. 

Union Avenue: 

7.43 miles in length, which begins at the east gate of the National 
Cemetery, and following the line of the main works of the Union 
Army at the time of the surrender, and just immediately in the 
rear of the same, continuing to a point at the Confederate Fort Gar- 
rott, where it intersects Confederate Avenue. 

Other avenues are: Grant Avenue; Sherman Avenue (which have 
their beginnings on Union Avenue), Indiana Avenue, Wisconsin Avenue, 
Illinois Avenue, and Iowa Avenue. 

The total length of all these avenues is 26.5 miles. 



408 Indiana at Vicksbueg. 

There has been si>ent by the National Commission in acquiring the 
land and constrnttinj; avenues, building bridges, and other improvements, 
about .$4tK).(Xl0.t)0, and the worlv which is in comtemplation by the National 
Commission embraces the restoration of the lines of earthworlvs, restoring 
battery redoubts, mounting one hundred and twenty-five pieces of artillery, 
and placing many tablets showing the positions of regiments in the charges 
of May 19th, 21st and 22d, asi well as showing other important move- 
ments of troops engaged in the siege; and when this great work of the 
nation is supplemented by that of the states whose troops were engaged 
in the siege of Vicksburg, the Vicksburg National Military Park will be 
grand in all of its parts, in all of its features, and simple and easily under- 
stood in all of its details. 

At the time of the meeting in November, 1903, there was considerable 
work to be done by the National Commission, in surveys on a part of the 
Tnion line, principally on the left; and it was not practicable for the Com- 
mission, at that time, to fully and satisfactorily perform its whole duties 
under the law. and another meeting was arranged for, in November, 1904. 

The Conmiission met again at Yiclvsburg. Wednesday, November 16, 
1904, in the evening, and early the next day proceeded, in company with 
Chairman Rigby, of the National Commission, to the work of designating 
the positions for monuments and tablets, for the Indiana troops, which 
work occupied November 17th and 18th. 

These positions were marked by iron markers, which were numbered, 
record of which was made by the National Conmiission and the Indiana 
Commission. 

There were engaged in the siege of Vicksburg the following Indiana 
organizations : 

Twenty-four regiments of infantry: The 8th, 11th, 12th, 16th. 18th, 
23d, 24th, 26th, 34th, 4(;th. 47th, 48th. 49th. 53d, 54th. 59th, 60th, 67th, 
(;9th, 83d, 93d, 97th, 99th, and 100th. 

Two batteries of artillery: The 1st and 6th. 

Two companies of cavalry : Co. C, of the 1st, and Co. C, of the 4th. 

The selection of positions began with that of the 93d Indiana Infan- 
try, whose position was nearest to the right of the Union line and end- 
ing with the 26th Indiana Infantry, which was nearest to the left of the 
Union line. 

We submit herewith a copy of these records, which are as follows: 
93d Regiment of Infantry. 
Col. DeWitt C. Thomas. 
First Brigade; First Division; Fifteenth Corps. 

Site selected for monument: On Union Avenue, on the line of Buck- 
land's Brigade. 

Marker No. 832. 

Site selected for the tablet marking the farthest advance in the as- 
sault of May 19. 

Marker No. 835. 



Report of The Commission. 409 



12th; 97tli; 99th; and 100th Regiments of Infantry, and 0th Battery. 
12th Infantry. 
Col. Reuben Williams. 
97th Infantry. 
Col. Robert F. Catterson. 
99th Infantry. 
Col. Alexander Fowler. 
100th Infantry. 
Lieut. Col. Albert Heath. 
6th Battery. 
Capt. Michael jNIueller. 
First Division ; Sixteenth Coiijs. 
These troops were stationed at Haynes' Bluff, and occupied no place 
on the interior investment line. 

Therefore, a .ioint monument is recommended to be erected on site 
selected on Sherman Avenue, near General Sherman's Headquarters. 

Marker No. 833. 

83d Regiment of Infantry. 
Col. Benjamin F. Spooner. 
Second Brigade; Second Division; Sixteenth Corps. 
Site selected for monument : On Union Avenue on the line of Light- 
burn's Brigade. 

Marker No. 834. 

Site selected for tablet marking the farthest advance in the assault 
of May 19. 

Marker No. 846. 

23d Regiment of Infantry. 
Lieut. Col. William P. Davis. 
First Brigade ; Third Division ; Seventeenth Corps. 
Site selected for monument: On Union Avenue, on the line of Gen. 
John E. Smith's Brigade. 

Marker No. 836. 

Site selected for tablet marking the farthest advance in the assault 
of May 22d. 

Maeicek No. 837. 



410 Indiana at Vicksbukg. 

48th and 59th Regiments of Infantry. 

48th Infantry. 

Col. Norman Eddy. 

59th Infantry. 

Col. Jesse I. Alexander. 

Lieut. Col. Jefferson K. Scott. 

First Brigade; Seventh Division; Seventeenth Corps. 

Site selected for ])roposed joint monument: On the line of Sanborn's 

Brigade. 

Marker No. S38. 

If a separate monument for each regiment is erected, the sites for 
each should be on the same line on the right and left of. 

Marker No. 838 

Site selected for tablet showing the advanced position of the 48th In- 
fantry in the assault of May 22d. 

Marker No. 841. 

Site selected for tablet showing the advanced position of the 59th In- 
fantry in the, assault of May 22d. 

Marker No. 920. 

16th ; 60th ; and 67th Regiments of Infantry ; and Co. C, 4th Cavalry. 

16th Infantry. 

Col. Thomas J. Lucas. 

60th Infantry. 

Col. Richard Owen. 

67th Infantry. 

Lieut. Col. Theodore E. Buehler. 

First Brigade ; Tenth Division ; Thirteenth Corps. 

Co. C, 4th Cavalry. 

Headquarters Escort Tenth Division ; Thirteenth Corps. 

Site selected for joint monument • On Union Avenue, on the line of 

Burbridge's Brigade. 

Marker No. 839. 

If separate monument? are erected, they should be on the same line, 
on the right and left of, 

Marker No. 839. 

Site for tablet marking the farthest advance of the 16th Infantry in 
the assault of May 22d. In Hebrew Cemetery. 

Marker No. 914. 

Site for tablet marking the farthest advance of the 67th Infantry in 
the assault of May 22d. 

Marker No, 919, 



1 



i 



Report of The Commission. 411 

8th and 18th Regiments of Infantry ; and 1st Battery. 
8th Infantry. 
Col. David Shunli. 
Maj. Thomas J. Brady. 
18th Infantry. 
Col. Henry D. Washburn. 
Capt. Jonathan H. Williams. 
First Brigade ; Fourteenth Division ; Thirteenth CorjiS. 
1st Battery. 
Capt. Martin Klauss. 
Fourteenth Division ; Thirteenth Corps. 
Site selected for joint monument : On Union Avenue, on the line of 
Benton's Brigade, Carr's Division. 

Marker No. 842. 

If separate monuments are erected, they should be on the same line, 
on the right and left of, 

Marker No. 842. 
Site selected for tablet showing the farthest advance of the 8th In- 
fantry in the assault of May 22d. 

Marker No. 918. 

Site selected for tablet showing the farthest advance of the 18th In- 
fantry in the assault of May 22d. 

Marker No. 917. 

49th ; 54th ; and 69th Regiments of Infantry. 

49th Infantry. 

Col. James A. Keigwin. 

Lieut. Col. James H. Thornton. 

54th Infantry. 

Col. Fielding Mansfield. , 

69th Infantry. 

Col. Thomas W. Bennett. 

Lieut. Col. Oran Perry. 

First Brigade; Nineteenth Division; Thirteenth Corps. 

Site selected for joint monument : On Union Avenue, on the line of 

Osterhaus' Division. 

Marker No. 843. 

If separate monuments are erected, they should be on the same line, 
on the right and left of. 

Marker No. 843. 

Site selected for tablet marking the farthest advance of the 49th In- 
fantry in the assault of jNIay 22d. 

Marker No. 921. 

Site selected for tablet marking the farthest advance of the 69th In- 
fantry in the assault of May 22d. 

Marker No. 922. 



412 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

47th Kefiiment of Infaulry; and Co. C, 1st Cavalry. 

47th Infantry. 

Col. James R. Slack. 

Lieut. Col. John A. McLaughlin. 

Second Brigade; Twelfth Division; Thirteenth Corps. 

Co. C, 1st Cavalry. 

Capt. William McReynolds. 

Liei't. James L. Carey. 

Headquarters Escort; Twelfth Division; Thirteenth Corps. 

Site selected for joint monument : On f'nion Avenue, on the line of 

Slack's Brigade. 

Marker No. 844. 

If separate monuments are erected, they should be on the same line, ^ 
on the right and left of, 

Marker No. 844. 

11th ; 24th ; 34th ; and 46th Regiments of Infantry. 

11th Infantry. 

Col. Daniel Macauley. 

Lieut. Col. William W. Darnall. 

24th Infantry. 

Col. William T. Spicely. 

34th Infantry. 

Col. Robert A. Cameron. 

Lieut. Col. William Swaim. 

Maj. Robert B. Jones. 

46th Infantry. 

Col. Thomas A. Bringhurst. 

All of (Gen. McGinnis') First Brigade; Thirteenth Division; Thirteenth 

Corps. 
Site selected for joint monument : On Union Avenue, opposite the line 
of General McGinnis' Brigade. 

Marker No. 845. 



If separate monuments are erected, they should be on the same line, 
on the right and left of. 

Marker No. 845. 

Tablets .showing the advanced positions of the 11th; 24th; 34th, and 
46th Regiments will be placed on Sharpshooters' Line by the National Com- 
mission. 

53cl Regiment of Infantry. 
Col. Walter Q. Gresham. 
Second Brigade; Fourth Division; Sixteenth Corps. 
Site selected for monument: On Illinois Avenue, near the north end 
of Illinois Circle. 

Marker No. 846. 



I 



Report of The Commission. 413 

26th Regimtiit of lufaiitry. 
Col. John G. Clark. 
First Brigade ; Herrou's Division. 
Site selected for monument : On Iowa Avenue, at the point of the 
farthest advance of Vandiver's Brigade. 

Marker No. 847. 

Proposed site for Indiana State Monument: On Union Avenue. Po- 
sition designated by. 

Marker No. 851. 

The Commission reserved, sub.iect to the approval of the Legislature 
of the State of Indiana, a site for a state monument, which we believe is 
the most beautiful position on the Union line, and in the immediate lo- 
cality where were encamped the greatest number of Indiana Kegiments. 

All of the positions designated were selected by the .Indiana Commis- 
sion and the National Commission, in perfect harmony, and we have had 
valuable advice of no less than nineteen of the Indiana organizations which 
were engaged in the siege, these comrades being present with us on the 
occasion of our meetings at Vicksburg in 1903 and 1904. 

We cannot speak too highly of the skill, ability, and erticiency of the 
Chairman of the National Commission, Capt. W. 1\ Rigby. He has been 
engaged in his duties at Vicksburg for more than tive years, and has not 
only surveyed and made himself thoroughly acquainted with the topog- 
raphy of the country surrounding Vicksburg; the location of all of the 
earthworks of both Union and Confederate armies, but by careful, thorough 
and painstaking studies of the reports of the regimental. Brigade, Divis- 
ion, and Corps Commanders, and the Generals chief in command of both 
armies, has acquired a wonderful knowledge of the movements of all the 
troops engaged in the battles, which preceded and led up to the invest- 
ment of Vicksburg, as well as during the siege proper. The work of con- 
struction which he has carried on is of a high character, and the kindness 
and patience he has shown to all who visit Vicksburg Park, cannot be 
excelled. 

We have, heretofore, set out in this report that there were twenty-four 
regiments of infantry ; two batteries of artillery, and two companies of 
cavalry, from Indiana, engaged at the siege of Vicksburg. 

There were company organizations in these regiments from seventy- 
one counties in Indiana. There is probably not a battle in the war in 
which a greater part of the State of Indiana was represented by its sol- 
diers. 

The State of Illinois furnished fifty- five (55) regiments of infantry; 
eight (8) cavalry organizations, one (1) battalion, one (1) independent 
company, of cavalry; and fifteen (15) batteries of artillery. In all, eighty 
(80) organizations. 

Ohio furnished tv^^enty-six regiments of infantry, (26) ; one (1) regi- 
ment of cavalry; and twelve (12) batteries of artillery. In all, thirty-nine 
(39) organizations. 



414 Indiana at Vicksbukg. 

luwa furuisbed twenty-eight (2S) regiments of infantry ; two (2) regi- 
ments of cavalry; and two (2) batteries of artillery. In all. thirty-two 
(32) organizations. 

Indiana comes fourth in the niunber of troops furnished. 
There has been appropriated by the State of Illinois for State, Kegi- 
mental, and Battery monuments $250,000.00. 
Iowa has appropriated $150,000.00. 
Ohio has appropriated $56,000.00. 

New York, with three regiments, and one battery, has approi)riated 
$12,500.00. 

Some other states have made liberal appiopriations. and we would 
respectfully recommend and ask for an appropriation from the Legislature, 
of the session of 1905, for the erection of monuments, which will give to 
Indiana troops engaged at Vicksburg, a recognition which would be in 
harmony with that given by other states to their soldiers Who served at 
Vicksburg, and which will carry out the provisions of Section 2 of the 
Act 107 of 1903, which says: 

"That it shall be the duty of the Commission to recommend to the 
Governor of the State such subsequent legislation as will in their opinion 
permanently and suitably mark the positions, then ascertained, and worth- 
ily commemorate the valoi- and services of Indiana soldiers in the cam- 
paign and siege of Vicksburg." 

Respectfully submitted : 

Henry C. Adams, President. 
Thomas M. Hardy, Secretary. 
Adelbert B. Ceampton. 
M. M. Lacey. 
E. L. Semaks. 
Phiixip Lester. 



ACT AUTHORIZING THE APPOINTMENT OF A COMMIS- 
SION TO CONSTRUCT THE MONUMENTS. 

The Sixty-fifth General Assembly, acting upon the foregoing 
report, passed an act introduced by Senator Kimbrough, January 
23, 1907, and approved by Governor Hanly March 2, 1907, provid- 
ing for the appointment of a commission empowered to erect such 
monuments as had been recommended, and making an appropria- 
tion therefor. 

AN ACT to provide for the appointment of commissioners to procure and 
sui>ervise the erection of monuments in the Vicksburg National Park, 
as memoi-ials for the organizations of Indiana soldiers who took part 
in the siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi, in the year 1S63 ; to provide for 
the dedication of the same; to perform all other duties naturally in- 
cident and pertaining to such, and making an appropriation to pay 
therefor. 

(S. 252. Approved March 2, 1907.) 



Report of The Commission. 415 

Pi'eamble. 

Whereas, Under the act of Congress of the United States, ap- 
proved November 21, 1899, establishing the Vicksburg National 
Military Park, the Government of the United States has purchased 
more than twelve hundred (1,200) acres of land, embracing the bat- 
tlefield of Vicksburg, for a national military park, and has ex- 
pended in laying off and improving the same, about five hundred 
thousand dollars ($500,000) and is still engaged in perfecting such 
improvements ; and, 

Whereas, The said acts of Congress leave the duty of erecting 
monuments to memorialize the services of the soldiers of the various 
states in said battle to the states from which they came ; and. 

Whereas, The Legislature of Indiana, by an act approved 
March 9, 1903, provided for the appointment of a commission to 
select and locate places for monuments to be thereafter erected, and 
said commission was appointed by the Governor and has performed 
its duties and made report thereof, as provided in said act ; and. 

Whereas, The State of Indiana had engaged in said siege of 
Vicksburg twenty-four (24) regiments of infantry, two (2) com- 
panies of cavalry and two (2) batteries of artillery; and. 

Whereas, The States of Iowa, Illinois, Ohio, New York, Massa- 
chusetts. Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, New Hamp- 
shire, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island, by the legislatures thereof, 
have made appropriations amounting in all to $623,500, and have 
appointed commissioners for the purpose of erecting memorial mon- 
uments to commemorate the services of the troops of said States ; 
now, therefore, 

Vicksburg National Park Commission — Appointment. 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the general assembly of the State 
of Indiana. That the Governor be and is hereby empowered to select 
and appoint a commission of five citizens of the State of Indiana, 
who shall have ser\^ed as soldiers in Indiana organizations in the 
war of the rebellion, and were present at and engaged in said siege 
of Vicksburg, to contract for the construction and erection of 
memorial monuments and tablets, under the supervision of the 
Vicksburg National Military Park Commission, and to cause the 
same to be paid for in compliance with the provisions of this act 
hereinafter set out. 

Officers of Conimssion. 

Sec. 2. The officers of said commission shall be selected by the 
members thereof, and shall be a president, who shall be a member, 
m^ such other officers as tho comjnission may find necessary. 



416 Indiana at Vicksbueg. 

Under Direction of Governor. 

Sec. 3. The commission shall be subject to the direction and 
control of the Governor, to whom said commission shall report, as 
directed by said Governor, who shall have power of removal and 
appointment, so long as said commission shall continue its service. 

Expenses. 

Sec. 4. Said commission shall serve without pay, other than 
actual expenses necessary to the discharge of their duties: Pro- 
vided, however, That one of the members thereof may be employed 
for a reasonable compensation to perform service for such commis- 
sion, if such commission shall deem such employment advantageous : 
Provided, however. That any such employment shall be in writing, 
and, to be binding, shall have the consent and approval of the Gov- 
ernor endorsed thereon. 

Monuments and Markers — Contracts. 

Sec. 5. All contracts for designs or monuments and markers, 
and for the transportation and erection of the same, to be valid and 
binding, shall be in triplicate, in writing, signed by the president 
of the commission, and approved by the Governor, and copies of 
such contracts shall be delivered, one to the Governor, one to the 
contractor, and one to be retained by the commission. 

Cotitracts — Notice — Atvards. 

Sec. 6. Due notice of time and place of awarding contracts for 
monuments and markers shall be given by notices published weekly 
for four consecutive weeks, in two daily newspapers of largest cir- 
culation, published in the city of Indianapolis. 

Payme7its. 

Sec. 7. Payments shall be made upon warrants drawn by the 
Auditor of State upon vouchers approved by said commission for 
the work and expenses provided for in this act, such vouchers to be 
in compliance with the law prescribed for vouchers now in force. 

Appropriation. 

Sec. 8. To carry out the provisions of this act, there is hereby 
appropriated out of any fund in the state treasury, not otherwise 
appropriated, the sum of thirty-eight thousand dollars ($38,000), 
to be expended in the following manner: In the erection of mon- 
uments for twenty-eight (28) organizations, not less than the sum 
of thirty-three thousand six hundred dollars ($33,600), or as much 
thereof as may be necessary, which sum shall be available on and 
after November 1, 1907. The sum of fortv-four hundred dollars 



Report of The Commission. 417 

($4,400), or so much thereof as may be necessary, to be available 
on and after June 1, 1907, for the expense of the commission as 
traveling expenses, and for the expenses of the Governor and of the 
participation of the State in the dedication ceremonies of said mon- 
uments, at a date to be hereafter agreed upon, clerk hire, labor em- 
ployed, office rent, and other necessary expenses, and any other nec- 
essary and legitimate expense incurred by tliis commission in accom- 
plishing the purpose for which the commission is created: Pro- 
vided, That should there remain a balance of said appropriation 
after the erection of the monuments, as above provided for and the 
dedication of the same, such balance, not exceeding four thousand 
dollars ($4,000), is hereby appropriated for markers for the differ- 
ent historical points occupied by respective regiments and batteries 
during the progress of the battle, where monuments can not be 
erected, and other than those provided by the govenment. 

Diligence and Promptness. 

Sec. 9. The work of the commission must proceed with dili- 
gence and promptness, and wherever practicable the representatives 
of the different regiments and batteries may be consulted as to their 
wishes in regard to designs and sites of the monuments, and their 
wishes shall control where no delay is occasioned thereby. 

Maximum Cost — Contrih utions. 

Sec. 10. The maximum limit for each monument for each or- 
ganization may be increased by contribution by persons who desire 
to make such, and the commission shall use contribution in con- 
junction with the provision by the State in the erection of the 
monument, which shall be selected by those especially interested, 
but in all instances the contrilnition must be in the hands of the 
commission before the design is selected; otherwise the proposed 
contribution shall not be considered. 

Commission — AYlien Discontinved. 

Sec. 11. When the work of the commission is done, or in the 
judgment of the Governor it is no longer proper or expedient to 
continue it, it shall be discontinued by order of the Governor, 
whereon all contracts must be at once closed out and a complete 
report made to the Governor, all debts paid and any balance re- 
maining unexpended shall at once be returned to the general rev- 
enue fund of the State. 



[27] 



418 Indiana at Vicksbueg. 

SECOND REPORT OF THE COIMMISSION. 

Governor J. Frank Hanly, in compliance with the provisions of 
this act, named the following participants in the campaign of Vieks- 
burg as members of this commission : General George F. McGin- 
nis, M. M. Lacey, John W. Sale, Henry C. Adams and Lewis C. 
Moore. 

The following report was made to Governor Hanly: 

Indianapolis, January 4, 1909. 
To the Honorable J. Frank Hanly, , 

Governor of the State of Indiana: 
Sik: The Indiana-Vicksburg Military Park Commission respectfully 
submit herewith the report of duties performed by said Commission under 
the authority of an act of the 65th General Assembly of the State of In- 
diana. 

May 29, 1907, in response to call of the Governor, the Commission 
met at the State House, in the city of Indianapolis, and organized by 
electing Henry C. Adams, President ; George F. McGinnis, Vice President ; 
John W. Sale, Treasurer, and M. M. Lacey, Secretary. 

August 22, 1907, the Commission met to discuss the matter of designs 
for the monuments to be erected. It was then suggested that it might be 
best to have six classes of monuments, one class for cavalry companies, 
one class for batteries of artillery, one for regiments which were not in 
brigades with other Indiana regiments, one for two regiments in same bri- 
gade, one for three regiments in same brigade, one for four regiments in 
same brigade. Mr. H. L. Ogborn was selected as designer to present plans 
and designs for monuments in accordance with suggestions made. 

September 30. 1907. The Commission met and resolved to adopt the 
designs presented by Mr. H. L. Ogborn, and that the monuments should 
be erected in harmony with the designs adopted. It was also resolved 
that a sufficient number of markers should be constructed and placed to 
designate the most important positions occupied by the various regiments 
in the charge of May 19 and 22, 1863, and during the siege until date of 
surrender. 

November 6, 1907. The Commission, after correspondence with Capt. 
W. T. Rigby, President of the Vicksburg National Military Park Commis- 
sion, visited the park at Vicksburg for the purpose of finally locating the 
positions of the following named organizations : the 8th, 11th, 12th, 16th, 
18th, 23d, 24th, 26th. 34th, 46th, 47th, 48th, 49th. 53d, 54th, 59th, 60th, 
67th, 69th, 83d, 93d, 97th, 99th, 100th Regiments of Infantry; Co. C. First 
Cavalry, Co. C, Fourth Cavalry, 1st and 6th Batteries of Light Artillery- 
It was finally decided to erect single monuments for the two cavalry 
companies, the two batteries . of artillery, and for the 28d, 26th, 47th, 
53d, 83d and 93d regiments of infantry. Two-regiment monuments for 
the 8th and 18th regiments, and the 48th and 59th regiments. Three-regi- 
ment monuments for the 16th, 60th. and 67th regiments, and the 49th, 
54th, and 69th regiments, and four regiment monuments for the 11th, 
24th, 34th, and 46th regiments, and for the 12th, 97th, 99th, and 100th 
regiments. The appropriation for monuments to be allotted equally as 



Report of The Commission. 419 

possible among the regiments, and the monuments to cost in proportion 
to the allotments made to the regiments represented. It was also agreed 
that fifty-three markers would be needed to adequately mark the important 
positions occupied by the various regiments. 

November 28, 1907. The Commission met, adopted and approved the 
designs for the bronze inscription tablets and state seals to be placed on the 
monuments. Plans and specifications for material and erection, and mat- 
ter connected therewith were adopted. Copies of same are filed herewith. 
Notices giving time and place of receiving bids were prepared and approved 
by the Attorney-General. The time for receiving bids was set for Janu- 
ary 8, 1908, 10 o'clock a. m., at Room 25, State House. Due notice was 
given by publishing the same in the Indianapolis News, the Indianapolis 
Star and the Monumental News. 

January 8, 1908. The Commission met and there were submitted 
thirteen bids for the granite work of sixteen monuments and fifty-three 
markers. The Angola Monument Company, in the opinion of the Commis- 
sion, being the best bidder, was awarded contract for same, the cost to be 
thirty-two thousand five hundred and eighty-five dollars ($32,585.00.) 
There were also submitted nine bids for the bronze work, including in- 
scription tablets for twenty-eight organizations and copies of the seal of 
the State of Indiana in bronze for sixteen monuments. The bid of the 
American Bronze Foundry Company was the lowest, being twenty-three 
hundred and sixty-six and 85/100 dollars ($2,366.85) and said com- 
pany was awarded the contract for the same. These awards wei*e made 
subject to the approval of the Governor, and his approval being given, the 
Attorney-General, at the request of the Commission, prepared the neces- 
sary contracts and bonds, which were sent to the successful bidders for 
signatures. The same were finally I'eturned properly signed, the bonds with 
sufficient sureties, and they were duly approved by ' the Governor and 
signed by the Commission Febraary 13, 1908. Copies of contracts and 
bonds are filed herewith. 

April 2, 1908. The Commission, owing to difficulties of transporta- 
tion, agreed that the large bases for the "four regiment" monuments might 
be divided in two parts, and a reduction of three hundred dollars in the con- 
tract price was made by the Angola Monument Company as compensation 
therefor. 

The work of construction of monuments did not begin until some time 
in May, 1908. Shipments of complete work to the National Park did not 
begin until September 30. reaching Vicksburg October 12, 1908. The last 
shipments arrived at Vicksburg November 11, 1908. As the granite was 
received and inspected and approved, payment of fifty per cent, therefor 
was made to the Angola Monument Company. 

January 4, 1909, the contracts with contractors having been fully com- 
pleted, the balance due was paid them. 

The appropriation was for $38,000. There has been paid for granite 
work, and bronze work for monuments, the sum of $34,705.85, of which 
$33,600 is the amount specifically appropriated therefor; $1,105.85 was 
applied to payment for markers from the amount appropriated for the 
expenses of the Commission, expenses of dedication ceremonies, etc. The 
act making the appropriation provided that unexpended balance remain- 



420 Indiana at Vicksbueg. 

iiig after the payment of such exptuses might be applied to the purchase 
of markers, 'i'liere lias been paid for all expenses of the couuBission for 
all puri)oses and for all expenses of dedication $2,653.94, making total of 
$37,;'r);>.79 expended as shown by vouchers and accounts on file in the office 
of the Auditor of State, leaving balance on baud .$640.21. 

In closing tlie report, the Connnisslon takes pleasure in acknowledging 
the excellence of the work furnished by the Angola Monument Company 
and the American Bronze Foundry Company, wbicb is of sucli character 
as to give satisfaction to the representatives of the State who were inter- 
ested in its construction, and we take tlie libeity of quoting from an ofli- 
cial letter from Capt. W. T. Kigby, ('hairman of the National Conuuission, 
siiowing their satisfaction : 

"I desire again, in this official way, to express my satisfaction in the 
work of the Indiana State Commission in the Vicksburg Park. Tlie Indi- 
ana monuments and markers are second to none in this park in beauty and 
appropriateness of design and finish, and the work of your commission on 
these two lines is complete and perfect ; eacli Indiana command is fully 
cared for, its service during the campaign and siege being accurately re- 
corded and its positions during the siege, adequately marked. As regards 
markers, no othei- State Conuuission has (piite so thorougiily (bme its work 
as yours. 

"Replying to your intpiiry as to approitriatlons by states for the Vicks- 
burg National Military Park, I herewith hand you a printed circular let- 
ter, in which the facts in regard to this matter are fully set forth." 

"Alabama ; commands ]!>, .appropriation .$25,000, State Memorial. 

"Illinois; eonmiauds 79, appropriation $260,000, State Memorial {$200,- 
000,) 79 monuments, 85 markers. 

"Indiana; commands 28, appropriation $38,000, 16 monuments (for 28 
commands), 53 markers. 

"Iowa; commands 28, appropriation $1.jO,0<)0. State Memorial ($100,- 
000), 13 monuments (for 32 commands), .^9 markers. 

"Massachusetts ; conmiands 3, appropriation $5,000, State Memorial. 

"Michigan ; commands 9, appropriation $20,000, State Memorial. 

"Minnesota; commands 4, appropriation $25,500, State Memorial ($23,- 
0(X)), 3 monuments, 3 markers. 

"Mississippi ; commands 40, appropriation $50,(XK), State Memorial 
($45,000), 23 markers. 

"New Hampshire ; conunands 3, appropriation $5,000, State Memorial. 

"New York ; commands 4. appropriation $12,500, State Memorial. 

"Ohio ; commands 39, appropriation $56,000, 39 monuments, 21 markers. 
Another appropriation for a State Memorial and for additional markers 
(camp and sharpshooters' line) is expected. 

"Pennsylvania ; commands 5. appropriation $15,000, State Memorial. 

"Rhode Island; commands 1, appropriation $5,000, State Memorial. 

"Wisconsin; commands 17, appropriation $130,000, State Memorial 
($100,000), 13 monuments (for 17 commands), 36 markers. 

■'States 14, commands 283. Total of appropriations, $797,000 — more 
than $2,800 for each command." 

Wm. T. Rigby, 
Chairman of Commission. 



Report of The Commission. 421 

The Indiana Conmiission heartily joins in the recommendation of the 
National Commission that an apiiropriatlon lor a State Memorial be made 
by the Legislature of Indiana. 

In printing the reports of the Chiekamauga and Shiloh Commissions 
of Indiana, and the reports of the Commissions of other states who have 
had in charge the placing of monuments on all of the National Military 
Parks, it has been the rule to give the histories of the military organiza- 
tions engaged on the various battlefields, where parks have been estab- 
lished, and to properly illustrate the same, and we i-espectfully ask and 
recommend that an appropriation for three thousand dollars, or so nuich 
as may be necessary, be made for that purpose. 

In conclusion, the men\bers of this Commission gratefully acknowledge 
the assistance given and courtesies shown by the oflicers of the State with 
whom we have come in contact in the performance of our duties. 

To the Governor we tender thanks for the honor confert-etl upon us 
in our appointment u.pon this Commission, and we gratefully acknowledge 
the kind treatment and wise counsel received from him. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Henry C. Adams, President. 

George F. McGinnts. 

John W. Sale. 

Lewis C. Moore. 

M. M. Lacey, Secretary. 



AGREEMENTS, SPECIFICATIONS, BIDS AND CONTRACTS 

The Commission, after inspection of the preliminary designs and 
specifications of Harry L. Ogborn, accepted the designs and entered 
into the fcllowdng contract with Mr. Ogborn : 

Agreement Between Commission and Designer. 
(Executed in duplicate.) 

This Agreement, Made and entered into this 8th day of October, 1907. 
by and Between Harry L. Ogborn, Designer, party of the first part, here- 
inafter known as the Designer, and The Indiana Vicksburg National 
Park Commission, of the City of Indianapolis, County of Marion and State 
of Indiana, parties of the second part, hereinafter known as the Commis- 
sion. 

WITNESSETH : That the said Designer, for and in consideratic:: cf 
the payments to be made to him by said Commission as hereinafter oro- 
vided, does hereby covenant and agree to furnish to said Commission one 
complete set of plans and speciflcations for the erection of the various 
Regimental, Battery, and Cavalry Company Monuments, as per general 
outline of designs submitted, said plans and specifications to be complete 
in every respect, give full details and sizes, so that the work may be in- 
telligently figured from same. These plans are to follow general outline 
of designs adopted by the Commission with such changes as they here- 
after make. These plans and specifications are to be completed at such 



422 Indiana at Vicksbueg. 

tiuie as the Commission shall designate. There shall be furnished to them 
also water color perspective designs of the various Monumeuts, in good 
size, showing all details for the purpose of newspaper reproduction. The 
said work to be done in a skillful and workmanlike manner. Said Com- 
mission, for and in consideration of said Designer strictly performing the 
covenants and agreements above specified by, and at, the times mentioned, 
hereby do agree to pay said Designer, a sum equal to Three Hundred 
(.$oOO.CO) Dollars. The said sum to be payable when the above mentioned 
work has been completed in compliance with the above contract. 

(Signed) Harry L. Ogborn, 

(Designer, party of the first part.) 

(Signed) Henry C. Adams, President. 

(Signed) M. M. Lacey, Secretary, 
(For the Commission, party of the second part.) 

At a meeting of the Commission, held November 28, 1907, the 
designs for the bronze tablets, the designs for the monuments and 
markers and the following specifications were approved and 
adopted : 

SPECIFICATIONS. 

For the Monuments and Markers to be Erected in the National 
Military Park at Vicksburg, Mississippi. 



MONUMENTS AND MARKERS. J 

The monuments and markers to be built in accordance with the Spe- • 
cifications and accompanying drawings, details, diagrams, etc., prepared 
for and adopted by the Commission, of granite, the general dimensions 
of which are as follows : 

Class No. 1. Four Regiment Monuments (2 in number). 
B. Base, 11- 0x11- 0x2-0 
2d Base, 8-10 x 8-10x1-6 

7- 6x1-6 

5-10 X 5-0 

5- 3x2-0 

6- 4 X 3-3 

Class No. 2. Three Regiment Monuments (1 in number, may be in- 
creased to 2 in number). 

B. Base, 12-0x7-8x2-0 
Base, 9-8 x 5-4 x 1-6 

Die, S-6 X 4-4 x 5-2 

Cap, 8-6 X 4-0 x 1-8 

Finial. 4-0 x 40 x 1-8 



3d Base, 


7- 6x 


Die, 


5-10 x 


Plinth. 


5- 3 x 


Cap, 


6- 4x 



Report of The Commission. 423 

Class No. 3. Two Regiment Monuments (3 in number, may be les^ 
sened to 2 in number). 

B. Base, 10- x 6-6 x 2-0 
Base, 7-10 x 4-4 x 1-6 

Die, 7- 2x3-8x4-2 

Cap. 7- 6x4-0x3-0 

Class No. 4. One Regiment Monuments (7 in number, may be lessened 
to 6 in number). 

B. Base, S-0 x 5-2 x 2-0 
Base, 6-2 x 3-4 x 1-6 
Die, 5-4 X 2-6 x 3-3 

Cap, 6-2 X 3-4 x 2-4 

Class No. 5. Cavalry Company Monuments (2 in number). 
Base. 5-10 x 3-4 x 1- 8 
Die. 4- 6x2-0x2-11 
Cap, 2- 2x2-2x1- 2 

Class 6. Artillery Monuments (2 in number). 

Base, 5-10 x 3-4 x 1- 8 

Die, 4- 6x2-0x2-11 

Cap, 2- 2x2-2x1- 2 
Class No. 7. Markers (53 in number). 

2-6 X 3-7 X 3-0 

MATERIAL. 

All material of whatsoever kind to be used in the construction of this 
work must be of the best quality procurable for the purpose intended, 
each of its kind, and the workmanship must be strictly first-class in every 
detail. j | 

EXCAVATION. 

The work of excavations and foundations will be done by the Vicks- 
burg National Military Park Commission free of cost. 



The granite for the monuments and markers may be either Barre 
(Vermont), or Westerly (Rhode Island), or other equally as good, as the 
Commission may elect, of the best quality, free from imperfections of any 
and every description : it being understood that Icnots, cracks, seams, shakes' 
flaws, or discolorations from any cause will be classed as imperfections. 
It must be of even color and texture. 

The workmanship must be strictly first class twelve cut. and executed 
from full size detail drawings or models furnished by the Commission. 
The faces of the markers will be polished where the inscriptions appear. 

The joints must be straight and true with a firm bearing of not less 
than four inches (4") on each bed. Each stone must be solid and all lat- 
eral sections where shown by witness lines on drawings. Each stone must 
be to the dimensions shown on drawing and no vertical joint will be per- 



424 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

niissible. All an-ises and coiners must be straigWt and true and all cor- 
nors square and full. Mouldings and carvings must be cut with sharp 
outlines and arrises. No pieces of artificial filling or patches in any part 
of tlie work will lie permissible. 



Each pie<^e of granite must be set in a full bed of Lafarge Cement mor- 
tar, with %-iuch joint neatly calked \\ith wedge lead and thoroughly 
cleaned n^'c completion. 

GENERAL INTENT. 

It is the intent of these Specifications that a full and fair understand- 
ing between the Contractor and Commissioners shall be of record, and that 
perfect harmony should prevail between all parties. 

It is understood that anything shown on the drawings and not speci- 
fied, or anything specified and i^ot shown on the drawings, necessary to 
the proi)er com]iletion of the work, shall be considered as both shown on 
the drawings and specified, and will be binding in the contract. 

Any work or material condemned as being inferior or unsuitable for 
the requirements of the Contract are to be promptly removed at the cost 
of the Contractor. 

The Contractor shall provide all labor, material, appurtenances, scaf- 
folding, and utensils necessary for the execution and completion of the 
work in accordance with the drawings and specifications. 

REQUIREMENTS. 

The Contractor or Contractors will be required to furnish indemnity 
bond or bonds of a Surety Company approved by this Conuuission, in 
amounts equal to the contracts which may be awarded to him or them, 
as an earnest and for the faithful performance in carrying out the provis- 
ions of these Specifications, and fulfilment of the contract or contracts 
entered into. 

Bidders may give separate prices on each kind of monument and mark- 
ers proposed to be furnished, and bidders may give price on monuments and 
markers as a whole. The Commission reserves the right to award con- 
tracts either separate or as a whole, as may be for the best interests of 
the State of Indian.-i. 

The Contractor will furnish with his bid, small samples of granite to 
be used, both 12 cut ;)nd polished, and the material and work must be equal 
in all respects to {he sample submitted and accepted by the Commission. 

All (Icbi-is from tlie execution of the work is to be promptly removed, 
and any damage to the surrounding property is to be repaired by the Con- 
tractor, and the Contractor will be held responsible for damage or accident 
to employes or other jiersous. damage to streets, roads or other public prop- 
ei'ty, or infringement upon any regulation occasioned by the prosecution 
of work in the fulfillment of his contract. 

The Conuuission reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids, 
and to a])i»oint their Supervising Architect, 



Report of The Commission. 425 

Should at any time the Commission require any alterations, additions 
to. or omissions from the contract, the same shall not in any way affect the 
validity of the contract, but the price of such work shall be added to or 
deducted from the contract, as the case may be. Extra work, however, 
will not be paid for unless the price of same is agreed to in wi-itin;^ and 
the signatures of both Contractor and Commission are affixed thereto, such 
orders being produced and surrendered at final settlement or no payment 
of work will be allowed. 

All work done and material furnished shall be to the satisfaction of 
the ('ommission and Supervising Architect. 

Sealed bids for this work will be received by the Board of Conunis- 
sioners up to 10 o'clock A. M.. Wednesday, January 8, 1908. Address all 
communications to the undersigned at Room 25. State House, Indianapolis, 
Indiana. • 

Henry C. Adams, 
George F. McGinnis, 
John W. Sale, 
M. M. Lacey, 
Lewis C. Moore, 

Commissioners. 



BIDS. 

Invitations to bid on the work w^ere widely advertised in the 
daily press and in technical journals, and on the day appointed, 
January 8, 1908, tliirteen bids for the stone work were submitted. 
The best bid, in the opinion of the Commission, was that cf the An- 
gola Monument Company, Angola, Ind., which was as follows: 

ANGOLA MONUMENT COMPANY. 

Angola, Indiana, Jan. 3, 1908. 

lo The Indiana Vicksburg Military Park Commission, 
Indiana])olis, Ind. 
Dear Sirs : We will furnish monuments and markers as per blue 
prints and i)rinted specifications furnished by you, from the best Burre 
Yerniont granite, as per sample submitted, as follows: 

Two 4-regimeut monuments. 

One 3-regiment monuments. 

Three 2-regiment monuments. 

Seven 1-regiment monuments. All woik to be examined and 

Two Cavalry Co. monuments. passed upon by supervising archi- 

Two Artillery mc^numents. tect at the quarries. 



Fifty-three markers. 
I'or S32.585. 



Angola Monument Co., 

Per Hetzler. 



426 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

Nine bids were received for the bronze tablets, the best of which 
was that of the American Bronze Foundry Company, of Chicago. 

AMERICAN BRONZE FOUNDRY CO. 

Chicago, Jan. 6th, 1908. 
[lulinna M.ksburg Military Pavk Commission, 

Koom 25, State House, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Gentlemen : We have < xamined the plans and specifications, as pre- 
pared by Arch't H. L. Ogbor: covering the bronze medallions and inscrip- 
tion tablets to be placed on liie granite monuments erected by your Com- 
mission at Vicksburg, Miss., and for this work as per the plans and specifi- 
cations submitted to us, delivered F. O. B. cars Vicksburg, Miss., ready for 
erecting, with the necessary fastening devices, etc., we can quote you a 
price of Two Thousand three hundred sixty-six and 85/100 dollars ($2,- 
366.85.) 

Awaiting your favors in regard to same, we beg to remain, 

Yours truly, 
American Bronze Foundry Co., 

By L. D. Burns, Secy-Treas. 



CONTRACTS. 

After suitable bonds had been filed and approved by the Gov- 
ernor, the following contracts were drawn by the Attorney-General, 
and were entered into with the successful bidders: 

CONTRACT WITH THE ANGOLA MONUMENT CO. 

This Agreement, made and entered into this 30th day of January, 
1908, by and between the State of Indiana, acting through the Indiana 
Vicksburg Military Park Commission, constituted by an act of the General 
Assembly of the State of Indiana, approved March 2, 1907. and consisting 
of Henry C. Adams, George F. jNIcGinnis, John W. Sale, Lewis C. Moore 
and M. M. Lacey, hereinafter designated as party of the first part, and W. 
T. Lazenby and E. M. Hetzler, partners doing business under the firm name 
of the Angola Monument Company, hereinafter designated as parties of 
the second part, 

WITNESSETH : That said parties of the second part, for and in con- 
sideration of the agreements hereinafter made by the party of the first 
part, hereby agree to furnish, complete, to said party of the first part, 
and to securely put in place on foundations to be laid by the National Park 
Commission, at the National Military Park at Vicksburg, Mississippi, the 
following granite monuments and grante markers; all of which shall be 
made by said parties of the second part from the best grade of Barre 
granite, to wit: 

Two monuments commemorating the services of four Indiana regi- 
ments each ; 

Two monuments commemorating the services of three Indiana regi- 
ments each ; 



I 



Report op The Commission. 427 

Two monuments commemorating the services of two Indiana regiments 

each ; 
Six monuments commemorating the services of one Indiana regiment 

each; 
Two monuments commemorating the services of an Indiana battery 

of artillery, each ; 
Two monuments commemorating the services of an Indiana company 

of cavalry, each ; 
Fifty-three markers, showing position of various Indiana regiments 

during the siege of Viclisburg. 

Said parties of the second part agree to furnish, construct and erect 
all of said monuments and markers, strictly in accordance with the plans, 
specifications, drawings, details and diagrams prepared and furnished for 
said monuments and markers by said Indiana Vicksburg Military Park Com- 
mission, now on file with it. and identified by the signature of Henry C. 
Adams. President thereof; which plans, specifications, drawings, details 
and diagrams are hereby referred to and are hereof made parts as fully 
as though incorporated bodily herein ; and said parties of the second part 
agree to cut upon each of said markers the inscriptions shown by said 
plans and specifications. 

Said parties of the second part further agree to securely put in place 
upon said monuments respectively, to the satisfaction and approval of said 
party of the first part, such bronze inscription tablets and bronze seals as 
shall be furnished to said parties of the second part by said party of the 
first part ; and to perform said work of placing said tablets and seals in 
strict conformity with the plans and specifications hereinbefore referred to. 

Said parties of the second part agree to fully complete all of said 
work, including the construction, transportation, placing and completion 
of all of said monuments and markers and the placing of said bronze tab- 
lets and seals, on or before September 15, 1908; delays by strikes or from 
causes wholly beyond the control of said parties of the second part ex- 
cepted ; and for each and every day beyond said last named date, during 
which said work, or any part thereof, remains uncompleted, said parties of 
the second part agree to pay to said party of the first part the sum of ten 
dollars ($10.00) per day for each and every day of such time, as liquidated 
damages and not by way of penalty; and in the event that said parties of 
the second part shall finish said work in all its parts ten (10) days or more 
before said fifteenth day of September, 1908, said parties of the second 
part shall be allowed a bonus of $5.00 per day for each day be.v<md such 
ten day period that said work is so completed; not to exceed, in all, credits 
for ten days' anticipation of the time for the completion of said vork. 

Said parties of the second part further agree to furnish to said party 
of the first part a good and sufficient surety company bond in the penal sum 
of $32,585.00, with surety or sureties to the approval of the f-aid Indiana 
Vicksburg Military Park Commission, conditioned for the faithful per- 
formance of this contract. 

It is further agreed by the said parties of the second part that they 
will furnish to said party of the first part within thirty days from the exe- 
cution of this agreement, a schedule stating the prices of each of said mon- 



428 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

uiiu'i'ls aiul markers respectively; the price of each being indicated in said 
scho(hile oi)p()site the amount and marlcers therein described; 

Said parties of tlie second part further agree that said monuments and 
marlvers sliall he at their sole risk until the same are finally placed and are 
accepted and approved by said party of the first part; and that said par- 
ties of the second part shall be absolutely liable to said party of the first 
part for any loss of or damage to, said monuments and markers prior to 
sucli final acceptance and approval, and shall be liable to said party of 
the first part for any loss of or damage to, said bronze tablets and bronze 
seals after the same are delivered by said party of the first part to said 
parties of the second part, and until the said monuments upon which they 
shall be placed are finally accepted as aforesaid. 

In Consideration Whereof, said party of the first part agrees to ])ay 
to said parties of the second part, in full for furnishing, constructing, erect- 
ing, placing and completing all of said monuments and markers, and in full 
for all labor, materials, freighit and other charges and expenses connef;ted 
ill any wise therewith, and in full for the placing of said bronze tablets 
and seals and the inscribing of said markers, the total sum of $;52,riS5.00, 
to be pa;d as follows : 

Fifty per cent, of the cost price, as determined by said Indiana Vicks- 
burg Military I*ark Connnission. of such of said monuments and markers 
as shall be shipped by said parties of the second part to said Indiana Vicks.- 
burg Military Park Commission, and delivered in good condillon to said 
Commission, f. o. b. cars at Vicksburg, Mississippi, shall be paid by said 
parties of the first part to said parties of the second part from time to 
time as said shipments are delivered ; but in no event sliall such payment 
ba made upon shipments of less than four car loads at one time. 'Die bal- 
ance of the contract price shall be due and payable when all of said mon- 
uments and markers are erected and completed according to the reiiuire- 
ments of this contract, and are approved and formally accepted by said 
Indiana Vicksburg Military Park Commission. 

It is mutually agreed by the parties hereto that any (.-haiiges in I he 
pians or specifications aforesaid, whether relating to additions to or de- 
ductions therefrom, shall be agreed on between the parties hereto before 
the same are made, and such changes and the addition to or deductions 
from the contract jtrice in (oupequenee thereof, shall be indorsed upon 
this agreement. 

In Witness Whereof said parties have hereunto set th'Mr hands and' 
seals tliis :iOth day of January, 1908. 

The State of Inpiana. 
l<y 'IMie Tndian;i Vicksburg Military Park Commissioi). 

K,v Henry ('. Adams, Pi-esldent. 

AiiiiroM'd this IMi'i day of P\^I>ruary. IOCS. 
J. FitANK Hani v, 

(Jovernor of (he State of Indiana. 

Angola Monument Co., 

W. T. Lazenby, 
E. M. Hetzler. 



Report of The Commission. 429 

INDORSEMENTS. 

It is hereby agreed between the Angola Monument Company, of An- 
gola, Indiana, and the Indiana Vicksburg Military Park Commission, that 
the bases of the two, "four regiment monuments," to be erected by said 
company, in Vicksburg National Military Park, at Vicksburg, Mississippi, 
may each be divided in two equal ])arts, and in consideration therefor, the 
said Angola Monument Company is to give a credit of one hundred and 
fifty dollars on each monument, making a credit of three hundred dollars, 
on the contract price set out in contract hereto attached, for which said 
company is to furnish and erect monuments in said Vicksburg National 
Military Park, for the State of Indiana. 

The Indiana-Vicksdurg Militaiiy Park Co]\j mission. 

By Henry C. Adams. President. 
Angola Monument Co.. 

Per E. M. Hetzler. 

CONTRACT WITH THE AMERICAN BRONZE FOUNDRY CO. 

This Agreement, made and entered into this 23rd day of January. 
1908, by and between the State of Indiana, acting through the Indiana 
Vicksburg Military Park Commission, constituted by an act of the General 
Assembly of the State of Indiana, approved March 2, 3907. and consist- 
ing of Henry C. Adams, George F. McGinnis. John W. Sale. Lewis C. Moore 
and M. M. Lacey. hereinafter designated as party of the first part, and 
the American Bronze Foundry Company, of Chicago, a corporation organ- 
ized and existing under the laws of the State of Illinois and having its 
principal place of business at Chicago, Illinois, party of the second part. 

WITNESSETH : That said partj^ of the second part, for and in consider- 
ation of the agreements hereinafter made by the party of the first part, 
hereby agree to furnish complete to said party of the first part certain 
bronze tablets, approximately tliirty in number, and certain bronze state 
seals, numbering approximately twenty-three, the exact number of each 
being indicated in the plans and specifications hereinafter referred to; 
and to deliver the same free on board cars at Vicksburg. Mississippi, on or 
before July 1, IOCS, consigned to the Indiana Vicksburg Military Park 
Commission ; and for each and every day beyond said first day of July, 
1908, during whicli said tablets and state seals, or any of them, shall re- 
main undelivered as aforesaid, said party of the second part agrees to pay 
to said party of the first part the sum of ten dollars per day as liquidated 
damages and not by way of penal'ty. 

Said party of the second part further agrees to make an exact clay 
model of the state seal of Indiana, as the same will finally appear in bronze 
as provided herein, and to send the same tc Henry C. Adams, President 
of said Commission, on or before thirty days from the date of this contract. 

Said party of the second part further agrees to prepare and furnish 
to the satisfaction and approval of said Commission all of said tablets and 
seals, in strict accordance with the plans and specifications prepared there- 
for, which are now on file with said Commission and are identified by the 
signature of said Henry C. Adams, President of said Commission, which 



430 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

plaus and specifications are here referred to and made parts of this agree- 
ment as fully as though incorporated bodily herein; 

Said party of the second part further agrees to furnish to said party 
of the first part a good and sufficient siirety company bond in the penal 
sum of $2,366.85, with surety or sureties to the approval of said Commis- 
sion, conditioned for the faithful performance of this contract. 

In Consideration Whereof, said party of the first part agrees to pay 
to the said party of the second part, in full for all labor, transportation 
charges and material furnished in connection with the work aforesaid and 
in full for all of said tablets and seals, to be made and delivered as afore- 
said, the total sum of two thousand three hundred and sixty-six dollars 
and eighty-five cents ($2,366.85), the same to be paid when all of the said 
tablets and seals are completed and delivered, and formally approved and 
accepted at Vicksburg. Mississippi, by said party of the first part, acting 
by said Commission. 

Said party of the first part further agrees to furnish to said party 
of the second part on or before thirty (30) days from the date of this con- 
tract, certified copies of all inscriptions to be placed upon said tablets, with 
the tablet on which each is to be placed, distinctly indicated. 

In Witness Whereof, said parties have hereunto set their hands and 
seals this 23rd day of January, 1908. 

The State of Indiana, 
By The Indiana Vicksburg Military Park Commission. 
By Henry C. Adams, President. 
Approved this 13th day of February, 1908. 

J. Frank Hanly, 
Governor of the State of Indiana. 

American Bronze Foundry Company, 

By C. A. Tinkham, President. 
Attest : L. D. Burns, Secretary. 



Report of The Commission. 431 



Financial Report 

Of the Indiana-Vicksburg Military Parlv Commission. 



Appropriation, 1907 $38,000 00 

Expenses of tlie Connuission $693 93 

Teleplione, telegraph, postage, advertising and steno- 
graphic work 137 44 

Printing 46 80 

H. L. Ogborn, plans and additir 3ial drawings 327 00 

Photographs and framing 103 50 

Expenses of the dedication 1,575 13 

Recutting granite work 37 00 

Angola Monument Company 32,285 00 

American Bronze Foundry Company 2,420 So 

Balance 373 35 



$38,000 00 $38,000 00 

(Signed) John W. Sale, 

Treasurer. 

I have examined the above report and have found the same to 
be correct. 

W. H. O'Brien, 
Auditor of the State of Indiana. 




(432 



Dedication Ceremonies. 



Owing to labor disturbances in the granite quarries, the Angola 
Monument Company was unable to comply with the contract to 
complete the monuments by September 15, 1908. This necessarily 
postponed the dedication of the same. November 21, 1908, after 
consultation with Governor Hanly, the time of dedicatory cere- 
monies was set for December 29, 1908. 

On December 27, 1908, at 8 p. m., the Commission, with Gov- 
ernor Hanly and staff, ex-Governor Durbin and a few others as 
their guests, and many others from various points in the State, 
boarded a special train and departed for Vicksburg, over the Penn- 
sylvania and Illinois Central Railroads. 

The party arrived at Vicksburg at 5 :40 in the evening of Decem- 
ber 28th, and established headquarters at the Hotel Carroll. They 
were later guests at a reception given in honor of Governor and 
Mrs. Noel, at the home of Colonel Scudder. The citizens of Vicks- 
burg, on the day following, after the dedication ceremonies, ten- 
dered a reception to Governor and Mrs. Hanly and the Commission 
in the parlors of the hotel. 

The morning of the 29th was spent in sight-seeing, and later the 
party went to the park, where, at 2 p. m., the dedicatory ceremonies 
were held, the program being as follows : 

PROGRAM. 

Governor's salute, by the Warren Light Artillery, Captain Dennis Hassley, 

commanding. 

Music Band, 12th Regiment Cavalry, U. S. Army 

Invocation Rev. W. T. Stqtt, Captain 18th Indiana 

Song, "America" School children of Vicksburg 

Call to order Henry C. Adams, President of Commission 

Song, "Star Spangled Banner" Miss Clarissa K. Koous 

Delivery of Monuments by Henry C. Adams to Governor J. Frank Hanly, 

representing the State of Indiana. 
Acceptance of monuments by Governor Hanly. and delivery to the United 

States. 
Acceptance of monuments by Captain W. T. Rigby, Chairman of National 

Park Commission, representing the United States. 
Song. "Just Before the Battle. Mother" .Miss Clarissa K. Koons 

[28] (433) 



434 Indiana at Vicksbueg. 

Vddress Governor E. F. Noel, of Mississippi 

Sou" "Dixie" Scliool ctiildren 

rresentiitioii of flowei's by Mrs. E. F. Noel to Gen. George F. McGinnis, a 
representative of tiie Union veteran soldiers. 

Address Ex-Governor Winfield T. Durbin, of Indiana 

Son" "Taps" Miss Clarissa K. Koons 

benediction l^ev. W. T. Stott 

Volley. Company A. Volunteer Southrons. Capt. .James E. Gorman, com- 
manding. 

Music, Patriotic .Medley 12th U. S. Cavalry Regiment Band 

National Salute Warren Light Artillery. Capt. Dennis Hassley 

Rev. W. T. Stott delivered the invocation as follows : 

"Our Heavenly Father — We gladly recognize Thee as the God 
of the ages and the nations. Thou dost give the people of the earth 
tlieir boundaries in time and place, if largely they may seek after 
Thee and find Thee, though Thou are not far away from every one 
of us. Thou wast vdth our fathers when they came to these shores ; 
and Thou wast with them and hast been with us in all our struggles 
for liberty. As we gather today to dedicate these monuments to the 
memory of our comrades who gave their lives that the Republic 
might live, do Thou bless us, and help us to resolve upon a deeper 
devotion to the welfare of our common country, so that these dead 
may not have died in vain. We thank Thee for the patience and 
perseverance of the men whose work made these exercises possible. 
Bless, we pray Thee, the many in all parts of our land whose eyes 
and hearts turn towards this place ; bless the children and soldiers 
and friends who kindly unite with us in these exercises ; and bless, 
we pray Thee, this city and commonwealth into whose keeping we 
commend these sacred places. May our whole country. North, 
South, East and West, join to make this nation one whose God is 
Jehovah and whose task is to carry the light and truth to all the 
nations of the earth. May the panoply of Thy presence and power 
fall upon those who today guide our thoughts and dictate our emo- 
tions. We ask all and offer all in the name of Jesus Christ, our 
Lord and King. Amen." 



Dedication Ceremonies. 435 

ADDRESS OF PRESIDENT HENRY C. ADAMS IN PRE- 
SENTING THE MONUMENTS TO THE 
STATE OF INDIANA. 

Governor Hanly, Comrades, Ladies and Gentlemen : The 
first steps taken toward the erection of the monuments which we 
have met here today to dedicate were by the Sixty-third General 
Assembly of the State of Indiana, who, upon the suggestion of 
Governor Winfield T. Durbin, passed Senate Bill No. 107. approved 
by the Governor March 9, 1903. The act provided that the Gov- 
ernor of the State be and is hereby authorized to appoint a Commis- 
sion of five members who Avere from Indiana organizations partici- 
pating in the campaign and siege of Vicksburg, said Commission 
to ascertain and exactly determine the positions of each Indiana 
organization in the siege of Vicksburg, and to make full report t3 
the Governor on or before the 30th of January, 1905. 

The Governor appointed as members of this Commission, E. L. 
Semans, Stli Indiana; M. M. Lacey, 69th Indiana; Philip Lester, 
16th Indiana; A. B. Crampton, 48th Indiana, and Henry C. Adams, 
26th Indiana. INIay 18. 1903, upon call of the Governor, the mem- 
bers appointed met at the state house and organized by selecting 
Henry C. Adams, president, and Thomas M. Hardy, of the 16th In- 
diana, secretary. After correspondence with Capt. W. T. Rigby, 
president of the Vicksburg National Park Commission, the Commis- 
sion visited Vicksburg November 21, 22 and 23, 1903, and again 
November 16, 17 and 18, 1904. and with the advice and assistance 
of Captain Rigby designated and appropriately marked the positions 
of the various Indiana organizations, which were the 8th, 11th, 12th. 
16th, 18th, 23d, 24th, 26th, 34th, 46th, 47th, 48th, 49th, 53d, 54th, 
59th, 60th, 67th, 69th, 83d, 93d, 97th, 99th and 100th Regiments of 
Infantry; Company C, 1st Cavarly; Company C,<4th Cavalry, and 
the 1st and 6th Batteries of Artillery. The selections of positions 
were made in perfect harmony by representatives of the National 
Commission, the Indiana Commission and representatives of nine- 
teen different Indiana organizations who had served at Vicksburg. 
and who were present in November, 1904. At the time of the selec- 
tion of the positions of the organizations, the Commission desig- 
nated, subject to the approval of the Legislature of Indiana, a posi- 
tion for a state memorial, and the place we occupy today is the one 
so selected. 

The Corarnission made report of the same to Governor Durbin, 
and in his message to the Sixty-fourth General A.ssembly, which 



436 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

convened in 1905, he recommended "That an appropriation be 
made of an amount sufficient to permit the erection of monuments 
and markers of the simple hut massive character adopted by the 
National Military Parks at Shiloh and Chickamaui^a. " A bill to 
carry out the provisions of this recommendation was introduced in 
the House of Representatives, but no vote was taken thereon. In 
1907, at a meeting of the Sixty-fifth General Assembly, a bill was 
introduced in the Senate, providing for an "Act for the appoint- 
ment of a commission to procure and supervise the erection of 
monuments in the Vicksburg National Military Park as the memo- 
rials for the organizations of Indiana soldiers who took part in the 
siege of Vicksburg in the year 1863, and to provide for the dedica- 
tion of the same; and to perform all other duties naturally inci- 
dent and pertaining thereto and make an appropriation to pay 
therefor." This act, which provided for an appropriation of 
$38,000, was passed by the Senate without a negative vote, and by 
the House of Representatives with but three dissenting votes. And 
was promptly signed by Governor Hanly March 2, 1907. 

Governor Hanly appointed as members of the Commission, 
Gen. George F. McGinnis. John W. Sale, 67th Indiana; M. M. 
Lacey, 69th Indiana; Lewis C. Moore, 93d Indiana, and Henry C. 
Adams, 26th Indiana. Upon call of the Governor the Commission 
met at Indianapolis May 29, 1907, and organized by electing Henry 
C. Adams, president; Gen. George F. McGinnis, vice-president; 
John W. Sale, treasurer, and M. M. Lacey, secretary. It was de- 
cided by the Commission that the best effect could be produced, in 
the erection of monuments, to allot to each organization a propor- 
tionate share from the amount appropriated for monuments, and 
when there were two or ]nore organizations serving in the same 
brigade, to unite the amounts allotted to each regiment and erect 
monuments costing the total of said allotments. Single monuments 
to be erected for the 23d, 26th, 47th, 53d, 83d and 93d Regiments, as 
these regiments were not in brigades with other Indiana regiments. 
Two-regiment monuments to be erected for the 8th and 18th Regi- 
ments, and for the 48th and 59th Regiments. Three-regiment mon- 
uments for the 16th, 60th and 67th Regiments and for the 49th, 
54th and 69th Regiments, and four-regiment monuments for the 
11th, 24th, 34th and 46th Regiments, and for the 12th, 97th, 99th 
and 100th Regiments. Single monuments to be erected for the 
companies of cavalry and batteries of artillery, making in all six- 
teen monuments. Specifications were prepared, and the Commis- 



Dedication Ceremonies. 437 

sion secured the services of Mr. Harry L. Ogborn to design the 
monuments, and this he has done to our satisfaction. 

On the 9th of November, 1907, the Commission, after corre- 
spondence with Captain Eigby, visited Vicksburg for consultation 
with the National Commission, and in company with Captain 
Rigby. chairman, visited the National Military Park and carefully 
examined the positions which had been assigned to the various In- 
diana organizations and found no occasion to change any one of 
them. 

We then agreed upon the style of fifty-three markers, which 
should mark the various positions of organizations during the siege. 

The Commission desires to testify to the skill, efficiency and 
ability of Captain Rigby. He has been actively engaged in this 
great work for about ten years, has become thoroughly acquainted 
with the location of the earthworks of both armies and with the 
topography of the country surrounding Vicksburg, and by careful 
and painstaking studies of the reports of regimental, brigade, di- 
vision and corps commanders, and those of the generals, chief in 
conunand, of both armies. He has acquired a wonderful knowl- 
edge of the movements of the troops in all the battles which pre- 
ceded and led up to the investment and siege proper, and the part 
taken by all in the siege, and we express our grateful appreciation 
of the unfailing courtesy, kindness and patience which he has 
shown to us on all occasions. 

After the preparation of specifications and plans had been com- 
pleted, notice according to law was given that bids for monuments, 
markers and bronze work would be received on the 8th day of Janu- 
ary, 1908, and upon said day there were received for the granite 
work thirteen bids ; and for the bronze work nine bids. The bids of 
the Angola Monument Company for the granite work, and of the 
American Bronze Foundry Company for the bronze work, were 
deemed the best, and contracts were awarded in accordance. Bonds 
were filed, and approved and accepted by the Governor and the 
Commission, Februai'v 18, 1908. Owing to labor disturliances in 
the granite quarries, the completion of the monuments and markers 
has been delayed beyond the time provided in the contract for the 
same. 

In the judgment of the Commission, the granite work and 
bronze work both have been well done, and we hope will meet the 
approval of the representatives of the State of Indiana and of the 
United States. 



438 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

At all times during our visit to Vicksburg, we have received 
from the people of the city a cordial welcome, and the deepest inter- 
est in our labors has been shown by all Avhom we have met, and on 
this day of the finality of our labors, we wish to make acknowledg- 
ment of the same. To Governor Noel, who so kindly and promptly 
accepted our invitation extended to him to be present today, we 
extend our sincere thanks. To Professor Carr, superintendent of 
the Vicksburg schools, and to these school girls, who have added 
so much to our ceremonies with their sweet songs, we tender our 
grateful appreciation. We are much indebted to Captains (xor- 
man and Hassley and their splendid companies for their presence 
and assistance, and we wish them continued success in the days to 
come. 

From the representatives of the local press of Vicksburg we have 
always received kind and courteous treatment, for which we ask 
them to accept our continued regard and gratitude. 

And now, Governor Hanly, the work of the Commission in the 
matter of erection of these monuments, has been completed. We 
have, at all times, and in all matters, acted in perfect harmony. 
We greatly appreciate the honor which you have conferred upon us 
by appointing us members of this commission, and we thank you 
for the same. Our sole aim has been to render to our comrades, 
to the State of Indiana, and to you, the best service in our power 
to give. The law providing for the appointment says that the 
Commission shall be subject to the direction and control of the 
Governor, and to you we have often gone for advice and direction. 
This you have always given us in the most kindly manner. You 
have shown more than official interest in this great work, it has 
also been personal and patriotic, and we now deliver to you, as the 
representative of the people of Indiana, these monuments, which 
are commemorative of the valor and patriotism of the men of Indi- 
ana who served here more than forty-five years ago. 




Hon. J. Frank Hanly. 
Governor of Indimia. 1905-1909. 



(440) 



Dedication Ceremonies. 441 

ADDRESS OF GOVERNOR HANLY. 

AT THE DEDICATION OF THE MONUMENTS ERECTED UNDER THE 

AUTHORITY OF THE STATE OF INDIANA, AT VICKSBURG. 

MISSISSIPPI. DECEMBER 29, 1908. 

Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen of the Indiana- Vicksburg 
Monument Commission : To you this is no new stage. Its re- 
motest confines were once familiar. You looked upon it, front and 
rear. You stood before its footlights. You knew its comedy — its 
tragedy. You had honorable and distinguished cast in the great 
drama that gave it fame in every land beneath the sun and place 
in the country's every annal — a drama as real as human life in 
tensest mood — in which every character was a hero ; every actor an 
inspired patriot, and every word a deed — a drama, the memory of 
which is enduring, fadeless, and the scenes of which take form and 
color even now and rise before you vivid as a living picture. How 
clear the outline is : 

Time^ — The Nation's natal day, forty-five years ago. 

Place — This historic field; yon majestic river; that heroic city 
there — a beleaguered fortress, girdled with these hills. 

Scene — The rivers' broad expanse; Admiral Porter's fleet — grim 
engines of war, with giant guns and floating l)atteries, facing deep- 
mouthed and frowning cannon on terraced heights; the intrepid 
Army of the Tennessee, with camp and equipage, occupying a line 
of investment twelve miles in length, with sap and mine, battery 
and rifle-pit, marking a progress that would not be stayed, fronting 
a system of detached works, redans, lunettes and redoubts on every 
height or commanding point, with raised field works connected with 
rifle-pits; numerous gullies and ravines — nature's defenses, impas- 
sable to troops; all in all more impregnable than Sevastopol; with 
here and there ensanguined areas where brave men met death in 
wild, mad charge against redoubt and bastian, or fell, in the de- 
lirium of frenzied struggle, on parapets, Avhere torn and ragged 
battle flags, borne by valorous arms, leaped and fluttered for a mo- 
ment amid cannon's smoke and musket's glare, only to fall from 
nerveless hands, lost in the chagrin and grief of repulse, crushing 
and disastrous. 

Denouement — Fortifications sapped and mined! A city 
wrecked, subdued by want ! An army in capitulation ! A mighty 
host, surrendered ! Flags furled ! Arms stacked ! One hundred 
and seventy-two captured cannon ! Sixty thousand rifles taken ! 
Twenty-nine thousand, four hundred and ninety-one men, prisoii- 



442 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

ers of war — hungry, emaciated, broken, dejected men, worn by 
sleepless vigil the ordeal of war, the alarm of siege — men who suf- 
fered and endured but would not yield until dire distress com- 
pelled — men whose gallant valor challenges admiration and re- 
spect, and gives them equal claim to fame with their invincible 
captors, whose iron grip and ever-tightening hold they could not 
break! Victory complete and splendid! And over all — river, 
field and city — where crash of musketry, roar of cannon, scream of 
shell, and all the tumultuous din of war, had reigned — the hush 
and awe of silence, unbroken by cheer or shout or cry of exultation ! 
Result — The fall of Port Hudson, an impregnable fortress, 250 
miles below; the disenthrallment of the Mississispi — unvexed by 
war — its waters free to seek the sea in peace ; the bisecting of the 
Confederacy — cut in two — severed completely — its doom decreed — 
its fate forever sealed — all thereafter dying in its defense going 
hopeless and in vain to sacrificial altars ; the establishment of the 
Union's indissolubility — its power made manifest east and west — 
faith in its ultimate triumph, though the pathway led through 
toil and blood, became assured, the Nation saw the end, distant 
but sure^it found itself and it found a man, and that man 
had found himself and had found others, too — Sherman, McPher- 
son, Logan, Hovey, Osterhaus, McGinnis — a quiet, silent man, of 
grim determination, who "looked upon side movements as a waste 
of time" — a man of immovable purpose, who went to his ob"ject 
unswerving as a bullet — a man of sublime courage, who wanted "'on 
the same side of the river with the enemy" — a man of calm confi- 
dence, who relied upon himself and the disciplined, hardy men who 
followed him, who, under him, knew no defeat and who were un- 
willing to learn what it was — a man who knew the trade of war, its 
s( ience and its rules, but who dared ignore its long-accepted axioms 
when occasion required, who, when he could not protect his com- 
iiumications with his base without delay and the diminution of his 
force, could cut loose from all communications and have no base, 
though moving in the heart of the enemy's country — a man of 
daring l)rilliancy, who could fight in detail a force superior in the 
aggregate to his own and defeat in turn its scattered fragments 
before they could consolidate — Avho had no rear, whose every side 
was front — who knew that "time is worth more than reinforce- 
ments" and that delay only gave "the enemy time to reinforce and 
l()i-ti fy" — whose strategy, celerity and rapidity of movement threw 
confusion into the councils of opposing generals, in a land strangi- 



Dedication Ceremonies. 443 

to him and filled with his enemies — a land with which they were 
familiar and where every denizen was an ally — a man who could 
keep two governments guessing for weeks both as to his purpose and 
his whereabouts — who could refuse to obey an order that had been 
so long in transmission as to be obsolete when it reached him, and 
ride away to victory and to fame — whose blows fell so thick and 
hard and fast that his foe had neither time nor rest nor food nor 
sleep — a man who was gentle and considerate enough when his foes 
surrendered to forbid his men to cheer lest they should wound the 
sensibilities of their captives — who, in the hour of supreme and final 
triumph could speak for peace and give back to his captured coun- 
trymen their horses, that crops might be put in and cultivated. 

Time, place, scene, denouement and result, taken together, and 
all in all, have no parallel in all the six thousand years of human 
history. 

It was, therefore, inevitable and in accord with man's nobler 
self, that this spot — ^the place where the great drama was staged 
and played — should become hallowed ground to those who struggled 
here to retain or to possess it ; that it should be held forever sacred 
by the Blue and by the Gray — ^the victors and the vanquished — by 
the Blue, because of what was won; by the Gray, because of what 
was lost — by both, because of heroic effort and devoted sacrifice 
made and endured ; because of the new national life begun, the new 
birth of freedom had, through their spilled blood. 

Vicksburg was the most important point in the Confederacy, 
and its retention the most essential thing to the defense of the Con- 
federacy. And, after the safety of Washington, its capture was 
the first necessity of the Federal government. It commanded the 
Mississippi River, and "the valley of the Mississippi is America." 
The control of this great central artery of the continent was neces- 
sary to the perpetuation of the Confederacy and indispensable to 
the preservation of the Union. To lose it was death to the one ; to 
gain it was life to the other. The campaign for its capture was 
therefore the most important enterprise of the Civil War. Its im- 
portance was understood and appreciated by the authorities at both 
capitals, and no one in authority in either capital understood it 
more clearly, or appreciated it more fully, than the commanders of 
the two opposing armies — Grant and Pemberton. Both knew the 
stake and its value, and both were conscious that the fight to possess 
it by the one and to retain it by the other would be waged to the 
last extremity. And each was resolved that the great issue would 



444 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

he with him. They connnanded armies equally brave and well dis- 
ciplined, efficiently officered and equally devoted to them and to the 
i-cspei tive cause for w^hich they fought. 

Strength of i)Osition, natural and artificial, was with Pemberton. 
His task was defensive — to hold what he had. Grants' was offen- 
sive to possess what he did not have. But the initiative was with 

hi 111. and to genius that itself is an advantage. 

Pemberton knew the ground — the scene of the campaign. Its 
every natural adaptation of advantage or defense was to him as a 
Wuuii- iiiLii-aiued in his consciousness, and every denizen of the 
country about him was the friend of his army and his cause. 

Grant was in a strange land, wdthout accurate knowledge of its 
topography or of its natural difficulties of approach or opportun- 
ities of defense, and concerning which such knowledge could be 
acquired only by the exercise of infinite patience, by unremitting 
toil and constant investigation. Its inhabitants looked upon him 
as an invader come to desj^oil their country — to lay waste their 
homes. Among them all, his army had no friend, his cause no ad- 
vocate. 

But, while position and natural advantage were wdth Pember- 
ton, the ability to command armies, the genius of concentration, to 
decide quickly and accurately, to design wdth daring boldness and 
to execute with celerity and rapidity, the tenacity of purpose that, 
come what will, cannot be bent or turned aside, and the grim deter- 
mination that rises in some men — God 's chosen few ' ' supreme over 
everv^ let or hindrance" — w^ere wdth Grant. And it w^as this ability 
to command, more than all other things, that finally enabled him to 
wrest the great prize from the hands of Pemberton and the Con- 
federacy and give it into the keeping of the Union. 

The campaign was Grant's — his alone — in concept and in execu- 
tion, from the beginning to the end. Its details his government did 
not know. For a time even its immediate object was unknown in 
Washington. Its design was without successful military prece- 
dent. His most trusted general was opposed to it. But Grant saw 
and understood. The day he crossed his army at Bruinsburg he 
was "born again." He caught a vision that inspired him. He 
was transformed. There came to him a confidence that thence- 
forth was never shaken — a faith in which there was no flaw. Less 
than two years before he had doubtfully asked himself whether he 
might justly hope ever to command a division, and if so, whether he 
could hope to command it successfully. Now he knew he could 
command an army ; that he could plan campaigns, and that he could 



Dedication Ceremonies. 445 

execute them with high skill and matchless vigor. He had found 
himself. 

General Banks, with a substantial force, was at Port Hudson, 
250 miles down the river. The two armies were expected by the 
authorities at Washington to co-operate with each other in an attack 
either upon Pittsburg or Port Hudson. Grant had heard from 
Banks that he could not come to him at Grand Gulf for weeks. In- 
stantly his purpose crystallized. His resolve was made. He would not 
go to Banks at Port Hudson, nor would he wait for him at Grand 
Gulf. Waiting meant delay. Delay meant strengthened fortifica- 
tions and a reinforced enemy. He would move independently of 
Banks. His army was inferior in numbers to the aggregate forces 
of the enemy, but he would invade Mississippi, fight and defeat 
whatever force he found east of Vicksburg and invest that city 
from the rear. And he would not wait a day. He would move at 
once. He would go now — go swiftly to Jackson, destroy or drive 
away any force in that direction, and then turn upon Pemberton 
and drive him into Vicksburg. He would keep his own army a 
compact force — round as a cannon ball, and he would fight and de- 
feat the enemy in detail before his forces could be concentrated. 
The concept was worthy of Napoleon in his best moments. It was 
remarkably brilliant, audaciously daring. It was the turning point 
in Grant's career — a momentous hour, big with destiny for him, his 
army and his country. In its chalice was Vicksburg, Chattanooga, 
Spottsylvania, Appomattox — deathless personal fame — national 
solidity. The decision was made without excitement, without a 
tremor of the pulse, in the calmness of conscious power. John Hay 
fancifully compares his action at this time ' ' to that of the wild bee 
in the western woods, who, rising to the clear air, flies for a moment 
in a circle, and then darts with the speed of a rifle bullet to its des- 
tination. ' ' 

A long established and universally accepted opinion of war — 
one that oaght in no case to be violated — required any great body 
of troops moving against an army to go forward only from an estab- 
lished base of supplies, which, together with the communications 
thereto, should be carefully covered and guarded as the one thing 
upon which the life of the movement depended. The idea of sup- 
porting a moving column in the enemy's country from the country 
itself was regarded as impractical and perilous, if not actually im- 
possible. The movement he had determined upon would uncover 
his base and imperil his communications. Defeat meant irreme- 
diable failure and disgrace. The hazard seemed so great, and the 



446 Indiana at Vicksbukg. 

proposal so contrary to all the accepted maxims of war and military 
precedents, that Sherman, seeing the danger, nrged Grant "to stop 
all troops till the army is partially supplied with wagons, and then 
act as quickly as possible, for this road will be jammed as sure as 

life." 

Grant knew the difficulty and the peril, but he was not afraid, 
lie knew the military and the political need of the country. He 
knew his officers. He knew the army he commanded. And, know- 
ing all, he assumed the responsibility and took the hazard ; cut loose 
from his base, severed his communications, went where there was no 
way, and left a path that will shine while history lasts. 

Having decided his course, he telegraphed the government at 
Washington: "I shall not bring my troops into this place (Grand 
Gulf), but immediately follow the enemy, and if all promises as 
favorably hereafter as it does now, not stop until Vicksburg is in 
our possession." Here 'was the first and the only intimation of 
his purpose given the government. The execution of his purpose 
was immediately begun and pressed with personal energy, attention 
and vigor without parallel in the life of a commanding general of an 
army. Sherman, who of all men had the best opportunity to know 
and the best qualified to weigh the extent and character of his work, 
declares : "No commanding general of an army ever gaVe more of 
his personal attention to detail, or wrote so many of his own orders, 
reports or letters. I still retain many of his letters and notes in his 
own handwriting, prescribing the route of march of divisions and 
detachments, specifying the amount of food and tools to be carried 
along." 

Washburn wrote: "On this whole march of five days he has 
had neither a horse nor an orderly or servant, a blanket or overcoat, 
or clean shirt or even a sword. His entire baggage consists of a 
tooth brush. ' ' 

John Hay says of him : "All his faculties seemed sharpened by 
the emergency. There was nothing too large for him to grasp; 
nothing small enough for him to overlook. He gave directions to 
generals, sea captains, quartermasters, commissaries, for every inci- 
dent of the opening of the campaign, then mounted his horse and 
rode to his troops." And then, for three weeks, in quick and 
dazzling succession, came staggering, stunning blows, one after the 
other— Raymond, Jackson, Champion's Hill, the Big Black— until 
he stood with his army at the very gate of Vicksburg. 

The government, hearing that he had left Grand Gulf for the 
interior of Mississippi without supplies or provision for communi- 



Dedication Ceremonies. 447 

cation with his base, telegraphed him in concern and alarm to turn 
back and join Banks at Port Hudson. This dispatch reached him 
days after at the Big Black Bridge, while the battle there was in 
progress. The message was handed him. He read it. Said it 
came too late. That Halleck would not give it now if he knew his 
position. As he spoke the cheering of his soldiers could be heard. 
Looking up he saw Lawler, in his shirt sleeves, leading a charge 
upon the enemy, in sight of the messenger who bore the dispatch. 
Wheeling his horse, he rode away to victory and to Vicksburg, leav- 
ing the officer to ruminate as long as he liked upon the obsolete 
message he brought. 

I have spoken much of Grant. There is reason that I should. 
No campaign of the war is so insolubly linked with the personality 
of the commanding general as the Vicksburg campaign. 

For three weeks he was the Army of the Tennessee. He domi- 
nated it absolutely. His personality, with its vigor and its action, 
was in all, through all. over all. His corps and divisions were com- 
manded by great men, but, with a single exception, they were loyal 
and devoted, and reflected his will, and sought the achievement of 
his purpose in every act and movement. During these days Sher- 
man was his right arm, McPherson his left, and neither ever failed 
him. The whole army, officers and men, caught his spirit and 
shared his indomitable purpose. Nothing could daunt it or turn it 
aside. There was no service it did not perform, no need it did not 
meet. It had capacity for everything. Grant justly said : ' ' There 
is nothing which men are called upon to do, mechanical or profes- 
sional, that accomplished adepts cannot be found for the duty re- 
quired in almost every regiment. Volunteers can be found in the 
ranks and among the commanding officers to meet any call." Every 
obstacle was overcome ; every difficulty surmounted. When bridges 
were burned, new ones were built in a night, or the streams forded. 
In every event, the light of the morning found his soldiers on the 
same side of the river with the enemy. If rains descended and 
floods came, they marched on though the roads were afloat with 
water. They fought and marched, endured and toiled, but they 
did not complain or even murmur. They, as well as their officers, 
understood the value of the stake for which they struggled. They 
knew they were marching and toiling under the eye of a great com- 
mander, one who knew where he was going and how to go; that 
there was no hardship which he did not share, no task from which 
he shrunk. Weary from much marching, they marched on; worn 
from frequent fighting, they fought on, all but exhausted from in- 



448 Indiana at Vicksbueg. 

eessant toil, they toiled on, in a hot climate, exposed to all sorts of 
weather, through trying and terrible ordeals, watching by night 
and by day, until they stood in front of the rifle-pits and of the bat- 
teries of the city, and even here they would not be content until 
they were led in assault upon the enemy's works and had stood 
upon their parapets in vain but glorious struggle for their posses- 
sion. 

What a story it is ! How it stirs the blood ! How it inspires to 
love of country! How it impels to high endeavor! And what a 
valorous foe they met ; they were, and are, thank God, our country- 
men — besiegers and besieged. In their veins flow kindred blood — 
blood that leaps and burns in ours today. They differed, differed 
until at last the parliament of debate was closed, and then, like men, 
they fought their differences out, in open war — on the field of battle 
— sealing the settlement with their blood and giving the world a 
new concept of human valor. 

There were wounds. There was suffering. There was heart- 
ache. There were asperities. There was death. There was be- 
reavement. These were inevitable. But there was a nobility about 
it all, that, seen through the intervening years, silences discord, 
softens hate and makes forgiveness easy. Today we laugh and 
weep together. Wounds are healed ; asperities are forgotten ; the 
past is remembered without bitterness, gloiy hovers like a benedic- 
tion over this immortal field and guards with solemn round the 
bivouac of all the dead, giving no heed to the garb they wore. Their 
greatness is the legacy of all — the heritage of the Nation. Recon- 
ciliation has come with influences soft and holy. The birds build 
nests in yonder cannon. The songs of school children fill the air. 

Indiana has come to Mississippi to dedicate monuments erected 
by her to the memory of her soldiers, living and dead, who strug- 
gled here, but she comes with malice toward none, with love for all. 
With you, sii', the Governor of this Commonwealth, and with your 
people, she would pour her tri})ute of tears upon these mounds 
where sleep sixteen thousand of our connnon dead. Her troops 
were here with Grant. One of her regiments, the 69th, sought out 
the way for the army beyond the river yonder. They were the 
"entering wedge." They were in every battle. At Champion's 
Hill, Hovey 's Division bore for hours the battle 's brunt. Fighting 
under the eye of the great general himself, they captured a battery, 
lost it, and recaptured it, and at night slept upon the field wet with 
their blood, 



Dedication Ceremonies. . 449 

This gray-haired general here was with them. (Indicating Gen. 
George F. McGinnis.) He is a member of the Commission that 
erected these granite tributes, and has in charge these ceremonies. 
He has come to lend the benediction of his presence to this occasion 
and to look again upon the ground where so many dramatic and 
tragic scenes were enacted — scenes in which he had honorable share 
— scenes that were burned into the very fibre of his young man- 
hood's memory, and which he would not forget if he could. His 
days have been long lengthened. We are glad and grateful that he 
is here. His associates on the Commission were here. And so 
were these battle-scarred veterans standing here around about you. 
They give character and purpose to this occasion and a benediction 
to this service. Through them and their comrades, and the great 
army in gray with whom they contended, both we and you are be- 
ginning to understand the message and the meaning of the war. 
They have taught us charity and forgiveness. We are coming "to 
know one another better, to love one another more." Here upon 
these hills and heights was lighted the torch of a national life, that 
today is blessing, enlightening and enriching the people of the 
earth. Our prayer — a prayer in which we are sure your hearts are 
joined with ours — is that this mighty nation, grown great and 
powerful, may know war no more forever; that it may walk up- 
rightly, deal justly with its own people and with all nations ; that 
its purpose may be hallowed, its deeds ennobled, its glory sancti- 
fied, by the memories of the crucible through which it came, and 
that in the future, if war must come, its sword may be drawn only 
in freedom's cause, and that its soldiery in such case may acquit 
themselves as nobly as did those who struggled here. 

Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen of the Commission, in the name of 
the State of Indiana and on her behalf, I accept these splendid 
monuments and these markers you have erected and which you have 
so eloquently tendered me, and in the name of the State and on 
behalf of her people, Captain Rigby, I now present them to you, as 
the representative of the national government, and give them 
through you into its keeping, to be held and kept forever as a sacred 
trust — a reminder to the countless thousands that in the gathering 
years may look upon them, of the share Indiana had in the great 
campaign that ended here July 4, 1863. 




('aiitiiiii William T. Kigby, 
Chairman National Military Park Commission. 



(150) 



Dedication Ceremonies. 451 

CAPTAIN RIGBY'S SPEECH OF ACCEPTANCE. 

In accepting the momnnents and markers on behalf of the gov- 
ernment of tlie United States, Capt. W. T. Rigby, chairman of the 
Vicksburg National I\rilitary Park Commission, said : 

Governor Hani.y, Veterans and Citizens op Indiana: We 
are proud to have you with us today, are in fullest sympathy Avith 
your mission to this battlefielr] and join with you in honoring your 
heroes. In recalling their valor and achievements we also honor the 
brave American soldiers opposed to them at Port Gibson, Raymond, 
Jackson, Champion's Hill, Big Black River Bridge, and on this 
battlefield. From 1861 to 1865 our country gave the noblest exam- 
ples of patriotism the world has ever known and on a scale un- 
dreamed of before. The heroic constancy of our soldiers, North 
and South alike, during those battle years, proves the moral sound- 
ness of American character, is the pledge and prohpesy of the great- 
ness of a united country. In commemorating their devotion, we are 
building for a nobler manhood and womanhood in every part of our 
broad land. This is the purpose and spirit of the National Military 
Park work. It makes no discrimination between Union and Con- 
federate and expects the example of each to be alike inspiring to all 
generous Americans. 

Veterans of Indiana, you have been well served hy the Com- 
mission appointed by your Governor to commemorate on this battle- 
field park your glorious service in the campaign and siege of Vicks- 
burg. May I express my strong desire that the work so well begun 
by the monuments and markers you have seen and admired may 
be completed and crowned by a state memorial, second to none in 
beauty and attractiveness, erected on the commanding knoll where 
we are now assembled. No more appropriate site for an Indiana 
memorial can be found on this or any other battlefield. Of the 
State's sixty-nine monuments and markers in the park, thirty -five 
are south and thirty-four are north of the Baldwin's Ferry road at 
our left. To our front, on ground now included in the Jewish cem- 
etery, stood the Confederate lunette on this road. During the day 
of May 22, 1863, six Indiana regiments marched through the ravine 
at our right to assail that strong work. The story of their bravery 
and the record of their casualties are borne on the tablets and the 
Indiana markers that stand in and near the cemetery. 



_^-2 .Indiana at Vicksburg. 

CJovernor Hanlv. hy direction of the Secretary of War, for and 
on liolialf of the United States, I accept from you the sixteen beauti- 
ful monuments (for twenty-eight commands) and the fifty-three 
,„assive markers placed hy your State in the Vicksburg National 
Military Park. 



1 




Governor E. F. Noel, 
Mississippi. 



(454) 



Dedication Ceremonies. 455 

ADDRESS OF GOVERNOR E. F. NOEL, OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Governor Hanly and Other Distinguished Representatives 
OP THE Grand State op Indiana, Survivors op the Vicksburg 
Campaign, Ladies and Gentlemen : The State which supplied the 
only President of the Confederacy and a considerable part of the 
soldiery which made this spot historic, and in which occurred the 
memorable scenes of the Vicksburg campaign, extends to you and 
to each one of you a most cordial welcome. Nothing could bt^ 
more different from our coming and welcome now, and that of the 
representatives of our respective States, who, forty-five years ago, 
met in deadly conflict, in battle and in siege. Now we are all fellow 
citizens of a happily reunited country, the grandest and best of 
earth, and gladly exchange friendly greetings. Between these visits 
there were military demonstrations which forever removed from 
question the completeness of our Nation's reunion. In our war with 
Spain, Indiana, Mississippi and all other States vied with each 
other in promptly responding to our Nation's call for volunteers 
to uphold its flag, prestige and power. The 2d Mississippi, of which 
I was a member, with the 151st Indiana and 4th Nebraska, consti- 
tuted the 1st Brigade of the 3d Division of the 7th Army Corps. 
Our brigade and corps commanders had served in the Confederate, 
and our division commander in the Union army, and all were 
equally true and devoted to the cause in whose support they offered 
their lives. 

Our connuon country seeks to blot out and to forget all that 
might excite or perpetuate bitterness on account of the late unpleas- 
antness, and, through its national parks, to commemorate the valor 
and heroism of officers and of men of each of the contending armies 
without reference to victory or defeat. Our Nation's work here is 
an embodiment of this patriotic sentiment. Pride of ancestry en- 
nobles individuals and nations. AVithout it neither is capable of 
highest manifestations of courage and of self-sacrifice for convic- 
tion, or for country. Gratitude, duty and enlightened self-interest 
impel us to use our best endeavors to transmit to our posterity, for 
their inspiration and emulation, enduring memorials of these who 
offered life and property in defense, as they viewed it, of the honor 
and welfare of their country. History tells us of no better soldiery 
than that engaged in the Vicksburg and other campaigns of the 
Civil War. In behalf of Mississippi, I cheerfully attest the skill, 
courage and fortitude of the troops of Indiana and of other North- 
ern and Western States and would not dim that glory which we 



456 Indiana at Vicksbukg. 

have just heard so eloquently praised. Such acknowledgment takes 
nothing from, but adds much to the splendid achievements of the 
('onfederate soldiers, and especially of the 30,000 who, for forty- 
seven days and nights, without reliefs and with short rations, arma- 
ment nnd anniiunition, made successful defense, an alert and gallant 
foe of eight miles of entrenchment, besides a long river front, con- 
santly assailed by a strong, active and fearless fleet. In that con- 
flict, on each side occurred so many instances of noble self-sacrifice, 
each worthy of the most splendid monument that could be designed, 
that to recall a few would be unjust to the omitted many. 

The people of Indiana and of all other States, North and South. 
honor themselves by honoring the living and the dead who partici- 
pated in those marvelous exhibitions of courage and of patriot- 
ism which characterized those death-dealing events which forever 
make sacred the park in which we are assembled. Many of those 
consecrated spirits then closed their earthly career and quietly sleep 
in their beautiful nearliy resting place, which should forever be tlie 
recipients of our Nation 's loving care. Others have laid their bur- 
dens down and rejoined them from different and far-away spots 
and a small and honored remnant yet survive, having here appreci- 
ated representation. To the living and the dead, Mississippi joins 
Indiana in expressing the gratitude and appreciation of a fully re- 
united country. We rejoice in whatever adds to the luster of our 
American soldiers, in each army, and heartily unite in every effort 
to perpetuate their name and their fame for the guidance and in- 
spiration of all patriots of all lands, more especially those of our 
own, the best and greatest the world has ever known. 




Mrs. E. F. Noel, 
Mississippi. 



(458) 



Dedication Ceremonies. 459 

SPEECH OF MRS. E. F. NOEL. 

A short while ago, when the Rhode Island delegation came to 
dedicate their monument, I brought them an offering of good-will 
as well as tribute of respect for their heroes, living and dead. I 
could not do less for the old soldiers of Indiana. My people are 
Southern — have been for many generations, and all my relatives 
and interests are here in the Southland. Still that does not prevent 
us, in common with our neighbors and friends, from recognizing 
bravery and heroism, even when these qualities are possessed by 
those opposed to us. Not one soldier shut up in this beleagured 
city from May 19 to July 4, 1863, ever questioned the fighting qual- 
ities of the foe, and the monuments scattered over these hills bear 
eloquent testimony that the invaders experienced much personal 
discomfort, difficulty and danger in entering the city. After forty- 
five years some of you who were here then, are with us today. If 
our greeting is less warm, it is nevertheless cordial, and right here 
I wish to impress the fact that patriotism is not always synonymous 
with fireworks (of the kind then indulged in). 

I am a daughter of the Confederacy, my father and relatives 
laying not a part but all they had upon the altar of their convic- 
tions. One marched away from Charlotte, North Carolina, with 
the Hornet Nest's Rifles, upon whose roster our family name has 
been continuously since the battle of King's Mountain. He gave 
up his life in the Wilderness. Another died at Gettysburg, another 
at Atlanta. Of all who went out, only my father returned. 

From my earliest remembrance I heard my father relate inci- 
dents of this siege, but, best of all, was to sit in black mammy's 
lap and listen, in terrified ecstasy, to blood-curdling tales of when 
she ' ' was wid de Yankees. ' ' Longing for freedom this faithful old 
servant had driven away, arrayed in mother's best silk dress, seated 
in the family carriage. ( She only rode over the hill, we afterwards 
learned.) Cooking at Vicksburg headquarters was not like caring 
for the children at home, especially when she had expected to be a 
"lady." Falling ill, a message came to my mother, who sent for 
her. In after years, in answer to my childish question of why she 
came back, she always replied, ' ' Home de best, honey. Mammy am 
gwine nebber go away no more," and she never did, though she 
lived many years. 

The Vicksburg National Park is one, if not the most interesting 
spot in our Southland. Here our fathers, uncles and relatives of 
every degree gave their lives gladly for the cause they loved. Your 



460 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

loved ones, too, fought for conscience sake. All alike were patriots 
and heroes. It seems to me it is sacred groimd, sanctified by heroic 
blood, both Northern and Southern. The young and many of the 
older generations cherish no bitterness over the result. "We rejoice 
to be a part of our great united country, the greatest on which the 
sun ever shone. To North, East and West, Mississippi and the 
South extends a message of peace and good-will to all man. These 
flowers a IMississippi woman offers in memory of her father, one of 
General Pemberton's artillery officers, who did his duty, accepted 
the inevitable philosophically, came home, and when his children 
grew around him, taught them to love their country, and were he 
here today would approve my act. Nor would he have me withhold 
one flower, even though it were to be placed on a monument erected 
to commemorate the valor of a former foe. 

There being no monuments as yet erected on this spot, I'm 
going to do the next best thing and present these flowers to your 
gallant general who sits facing me — brave General McGinnis, who 
led his men through the defile to our right, facing the murderous 
guns of Port Garrott. All honor to him and the men who followed. 




HOU. WlJ^FIELD T. DURBIN, 

Governor of Indiana, 1901-1905. 



(462) 



L'KDKATioN Cerkm<:)nies. 463 



SPEECH OF COL. WINFIELD T. DITRBIN. 

Governor and Mrs. Noel: Forty-five years ago today, after 
marching through the mud of the Yazoo River bottoms, I knocked at 
your door — Vicksburg — and was denied entrance. You told me 
and my comrades "to go hence and stand not upon the order of 
going, or what you would do to us would be good and plenty." 
Your expression was not polite, nor your langniage elegant. We 
went, but returned soon and again asked admission, which was de- 
nied; and when we were finally told to come in, the greeting was 
most lacking in cordiality. Now when I come again, accompanied 
by friends and comrades, Vicksburg opens wide her welcoming 
gates — we are most cordially invited to enter. We have tasted of 
your hospitality and like it. You make us feel almost as much at 
home as though we were beside our own firesides in happy Hoosier- 
dom. AVhen I came first, it was as a soldier demanding admission 
and with no kind feeling for you. We bore hatred in our hearts 
against you — we were seeking your heart's blood, and you will agree 
with me that our feeling for you was heartily reciprocated. But 
now, after the lapse of years, we come at this Yuletime, bringing the 
proclamation that has come down through the ages to us, "Peace 
on earth — good-will to men"; and, as we come in peace, so are we 
received. We come on a mission which recalls all the horrors of 
war, and yet we forget all but the memory of those who struggled, 
and sacrificed for the cause they espoused and the flag they loved. 
Indiana cherishes in memory dear her soldiers in all wars — not only 
on this battlefield has the State had erected monuments and mark- 
ers, but likewise on the fields of Shiloh and Chickamauga, a shaft at 
Andersonville, and in the capital city of our State there stands a 
magnificent shaft, erected in memory of the "Soldiers and Sailors" 
of all wars, at a cost of $750,000.00 We revere the name of our War 
Governor, Oliver P. Morton, whose first concern was for the welfare 
of the soldiers — sick and wounded. A battle was hardly finished 
until his agents of mercy were there to care for the wounded. He 
looked vigilantly after them in hospitals. It was my good fortune 
during part of my service in the Spanish-American War to serve 
with regiments from Texas, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, the 
two Carolinas and Virginia, in the 7th Army Corps, commanded by 
that gallant cavalry leader of the C(mfederate army, General Fitz- 
hugh Lee, and in a brigade commanded for a time by a son of Mis- 



4(i4 Indiana at VicKSiufHG. 

sissip])!. who also served in the Confederate army, and where Lee 
wduld have ordered and IMontgoraery led, the regiments from the 
Xoi-th wouUl have folhnved as gallantly and bravely as though com- 
manded l)y those who had worn the hlne during the Civil War. If 
there was. further need of eliminating the old sectional feeling grow- 
ing out of the Civil War strife, the mingling of the organizations 
din-ing tlie Spanisli trou])le from the North and South furnished the 
()pi)orl unity, and now from all parts of our glorious nation, comes 
Ihe universal acclaim, "one country and one flag." The union of 
states, tlie union of hearts, and a union of adoration of the stars 
and stripes forever. Reference has been made and eulogy paid to 
the commanding generals. Very properly so. Likewise the man 
lieliind the gun has received due and very proper recognition, and 
yet there has been to my mind an oversight — not intentional at all — 
of the strongest element that entered into the contest on both sides 
— Avoman, from whom came all the loyalty, the inspiration, devotion 
to the flag we followed, and for which we bravely fought. ^Mother 
— Oh ! for the gift to portray to ycui the full meaning of what she 
was. is, and ever will be. Could I but speak the magic word in all 
its loving tenderness, or had I the tongue of the gifted orator to 
adorn my expression with choicest ornaments of the language, I 
would fall far short of giving full and just due to the wonderful 
influence of woman in shaping the destiny of the contending forces, 
^lother it was that rocked the cradle, who taught us to lisp the lov- 
ing word — who instructed us in taking our first step in babyhood, 
and who ever afterwards would have guided us along life's pathway 
aright To her is due the credit for creating in hearts, love and 
affection. It was she who told us our first love was to be for our 
Creator, j?nd our second for our country and its flag. From her 
sprang our patriotism, our devotion. ^Mother told us to be brave, 
good and true. Mother gave us to the cause and followed us to 
camp, on the march, in the bivouac, at the "battle front when their 
fircest charge thev made," she whispered, be brave, be steady, 
.brother's letters kept us up. Sweetly has been sung to us. "Just 
hefoi'e the battle, mother. I am thinking most of you," and "Oh. 
you will not forget me, mother, if I'm numbered with the slain." 
Appropriately also might have been sung, "In the prison pen I sit, 
thinking mother, dear, of you and our bright and happy home so far 
away: and '>u'ne eves they well with tears, in spite of all that I can 
do, tb' "H) T t»'v to eheer mv eonu-ades and be gay." Mother, ever 
present in spirit as a guardian angeb directing, controlling. The 



Dedication Ceremonies. 465 

boy, recognizing- at all times, in all places, under the most trying 
conditions, the influence of mother. Mother on the Ijattlefield, in 
the midst of the fight, encouraging — in the hospital blessing and 
alleviating pain. In death it was mother's voice that gave the final 
blessing and words of consolation. Angel mother, may the God of 
heaven give you constant companionship and support in life, and 
in the world to come a crown. 

There is another to whom great and just credit is due — the wife. 
In the buoyancy of youth we could leave parents^ — but parting from 
her, whom we had vowed to love, honor, and protect through life and 
until death do us part, was very different. Wife at home looking after 
the little ones, many times in need of maintenance and subsistence, 
struggling to make ends meet. Her letters full of hope, and yet 
she could not conceal that all was not just right at home — "So lone- 
some without you. Oh, won't this cruel war soon end, so that you 
can return to home and little ones ; ' ' and then brighten up in her 
letters and cheer you on. You could not do anything but your 
duty, for wife told you and wanted you to do so. The wife had a 
most important part in the struggle and was a most potent factor 
therein. 

There is yet one other just as conspicuous, just as strong, just 
as inspiring and hopeful — "The girl I left behind me." What 
influence she exerted, no man can justly estimate. When you 
parted and she watched you wend your way down the road, you 
could not refrain from looking back, nor restrain a tear — she loved 
you and you reciprocated ; a vow had been plighted, to be consum- 
mated when you returned from the war. You could not, you 
would not, be other than brave and true and endure for the cause 
you espoused, for she wanted it so, and you would not fail her. 
Where duty called you would be found for her sake. In the thick- 
est of the fight — you felt the little locket wherein was a likeness 
of her sweet face pressing your heart. How could it be otherwise 
than that your service should be honest and faithful. Give full 
measure of credit to the generals, the colonels and all who com- 
manded, and issue full rations of praise for the man behind the 
gun. but all praise and all honor now, henceforth and forevermore 
to woman, and her proper place in war as well as peace. 

And now. Governor and Mrs. Noel, we from the good old 
Hoosier State have come down to call on you Mississippians. We 
have tested your hospitality and like and appreciate it, but. lest 
you may think our appreciation is only in words, won't you return 



[30] 



466 Indiana at Vjoksrlirg. 

our I'Jill. pull our historic latoh-string and give us the very great 
pleasure of doing the rest? . 

BENEDICTION. 

REV. W. T. STOTT. 

"May the benediction of God, the everlasting Father, and His 
Son, the Prince of Peace, and the guidance and inspiration of the 
Holy Ghost, be with you all, now and evermore. Amen." 



I 



Appropriation Act. 



Senator Hanna introduced the bill providing for an appropria- 
tion to cover the cost of the publication of the report of the Com- 
mission on February 12, 1909, and this act was approved by 
Governor Hanly, March 5, 1909. 

AN ACT to provide for an appropriation to tlie Indiaiia Viclisburg Military 
Parli Commission for the purpose of the publication or the report of 
said Commission, and the ceremonies held when the Indiana monu- 
ments were dedicated, and delivered to the United States government. 

(S. 350. Approved March 5, 1909.) 
Preamble. 

Whereas, The Legislature of Indiana, by an act approved 
INIarch 2, 1907, provided for the appointment of commissioners to 
procure and supervise the erection of monuments in the Vicksburg 
National Park, as memorials for the organizations of Indiana sol- 
diers who took part in the siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi, in the 
year 1863, and to perform all other duties naturally incident and 
pertaining thereto, and making an appropriation therefor ; and. 

Whereas, The commissioners who were appointed according to 
the provisions of said act have procured and had erected the monu- 
ments provided for in said act, and have provided for the dedica- 
tion of the same, which was done December 29, 1908, and have made 
a report to the Governor of the doings of said commissioners; and. 

Whereas, There is no fund provided for the payment of the 
expenses of the publication in book form of the report of said 
Commission, together with the histories of the various Indiana 
organizations that participated in the siege of Vicksburg, Missis- 
sippi. 

Appropriation — Vicksburg Commission. 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State 
of Indiana, That there is hereby appropriated out of any fund in 
the state treasury not otherwise appropriated, the sum of three 
thousand dollars ($3,000) or so much thereof as may be necessary 
to pay the expenses of the publication of the report of the Indiana 
Vicksburg Military Park Commission, the ceremonies of the dedi- 

(467) 



468 Indiana at Vicksburg. 

cation of the histories of the various Indiana organizations which 
participated in the siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi, in the year 
1863, with sueli illustrations as may be proper, and to pay the ex- 
penses of the distribution of the copies of said report. Said sum to 
he available on and after June 1, 1909. 

Gover)ior\'i Powers. 

Skc. 2. The commission in the publication of said report, and 
distribution of the same, shall be subject to the direction and con- 
ti'ol of the Governor, to whom said Commission shall report, as 
directed by said Governor, who shall have the power of removal 
and appointment so long as the Commission shall continue its 
service: Provided, That in the distribution of said report, five 
copies of such report shall be delivered to each member of the Leg- 
islature. 

Compensation. 

Sec. 3. Said Commission shall serve without pay other than 
actual expenses necessary to the discharge of their duties : Pro- 
vided, however. That one of the members thereof nuiy be employed 
for a reasonable compensation to perform service for said Commis- 
sion if such Commission shall deem such employment advanta- 
geous: Provided, however, That any such employment shall be 
in writing, and to be binding shall have the consent and approval 
of the Governor endorsed thereon. 

Discontinuance of Service. 

Sec. 4. When the work of the Commission is done, or, in the 
judgment of the Governor, it is no longer expedient to continue it, 
it shall be discontinued by the Governor, whereon all contracts must 
be closed out, a complete report made to the Governor, all debts 
paid, and any balance remaining unexpended shall be returned to 
the general fund of the State. 



Acknowledgment. 



In the preparation of this volume, the Indiana-Vicksburg Mili- 
tary Park Commission gratefully acknowledges its obligation to 
Capt. W. T. Rigby, chairman of the National Commission, for data 
concerning the park, the siege and defense, the historic tablets, and 
the map in the cover. 

To the Illinois Central Railroad Company, for the use of the 
half-tones of the views in the park and cemetery. 

To Col. C. C. Schreeder, for the photograph of the dedication 
ceremonies. 



(469) 



List of Illustrations. 



PAGE 

Abraliaiu Liucolu Frontispiece 

Governor T. R. Marsliall 6 

Indiana Vidisburg Military Park Commission 10 

Landscape in the Parli 14 

Inion Navy Tablet 17 

Observation Tower 18 

Bridge on Union Avenue 20 

Main Entrance, National Cemetery 22 

A Driveway in the Cemetery 22 

A Bit of Scenery in the Cemetery 23 

Peace 24 

Indiana Circle 26 

Map Illustrating Movements Leading up to the Investment of Vicksburg 28 

Confederate Railroad Redoubt 36 

Union Position Tablet 42 

Bridge on Union Avenue 51 

Confederate Gun, Trench and Tablet 58 

Confederate South Fort, Looking North 70 

Gun of 1st Indiana Light Artillery 77 

Mmt Spring Bayou 86 

Confederate South Fort, Looking South 92 

Shirley House During the Siege 100 

Shirley House in 1868 110 

Shirley House Before Restoration 120 

Rear of Shirley House After Restoration 128 

Shirley House After Restoration 134 

Maj. Gen. U. S. Grant. . 142 

Ma j. Gen. W. T. Sherman 156 

Surrender Monument 170 

A Bivouac of the Dead 178 

View from Connecting Avenue 184 

Confederate Howitzer 190 

Indiana State Seal 197 

Monument of 8th Infantry 198 

Monument of 11th Infantry 208 

Monument of 12th Infantry 218 

Monument of 16th Infantry 224 

Monument of 18th Infantry 234 

Monument of 23d Infantry 240 

Monument of 24th Infantry 258 

Monument of 26th Infantry 266 

(470) 



List of IiiMTSTKATioNS. 471 

PAGE 

Monument of 34th Infantry 272 

Monument of 46th Infantry 276 

Monument of 47th Infantry 288 

Monument of 48th Infantry 294 

Monument of 49th Infantry 298 

Monument of 53d Infantry 304 

Monument of 54th Infantry - 314 

Monument of 59th Infantry 318 

Moumnent of 60th Infantry 324 

ISIonument of 67th Infantry 328 

Monument of 69th Infantry 336 

Mcmument of 83cl Infantry 352 

Monument of 93d Infantry 364 

Monument of 97th Infantry 370 

.MoMument of 99th Infantry 376 

Monument of 100th Infantry 382 

?ir,nnunent of Ist Battery Light Artillery 388 

.Alonument of 6th Battery Light Artillery 392 

:\lonument of Co. C, First Cavalry 396 

Monnment of Co. C, Fourth Cavalry 400 

Indiana Regimental Marker 404 

Dedication Ceremonies 432 

Hon J. Frank Hanly 440 

Captain Wm. T. Rigby 450 

Governor E. F. Noel, Mississippi 454 

Mrs. E. F. Noel 458 

Hon. W. T. Durbin 462 



Index. 



PAGE 

Adams. Heury C, Memorial 13 

Army, Johnston's — tieu. Josopli E. Johnston 12!) 

Breekenritlge's Division 129 

French's Division 130 

Loring's Division 132 

Walker's Division 134 

Cavalry Division 136 

Reserve Artillery 137 

Army of the Tennessee. Maj. Gen. U. S. Grant 63 

Escort 63 

Engineers 63 

Gunboat detacliment 63. 111. 112 

Ninth Corps. Maj. Gini. John (i. Parke 64 

Artillery Reserve 64 

First Division 64 

Second Division 65 

Thirteenth Corps, Ma.i. Gen. John A. McClernand, ^Nlaj. Gen. Ed- 
ward O. C. Ord 66 

Ninth Division 67 

Tenth Division 70 

Twelfth Division 73 

Fourteenth Division 75 

Fifteenth Corps. Maj. Gen. W. T. Sherman 78 

First Division 78 

Second Division 81 

Third Division 85 

Sixteenth Corps (Detachment ). Mnj. Gen. C. C. Washburn 88 

First Division 89 

Fourth Division 90 

Provisional Division 92 

Seventeenth Corjis, ]Maj. Gen. J. P.. McPherson 93 

Third Division 94 

Sixth Division 98 

Seventh Division 103 

Herron's Division. Maj. Gen. F. J. Herron 106 

Cavalry (unattached) 107 

District N. E. Tx)uisiana 108 

Milliken's Bend. Post of 108 

Goodrich's Landing, Post of Ill 

(472) 



Index. 473 

PAGE 

Army of Vicksburg. Gen. John C. I'emberton 112 

Stevenson's Division 113 

Maury's-Forney's Division 116 

Smitli's Division 118 

Forney's-Bowen's Division 123 

Waul's Texas Legion 125 

River Batteries 126 

Miscellaneous 129 

Assault, May 19 33, 159, 186 

Assault, May 22 33, 160, 187 

Batteries, Confederate 39 

Batteries, Running of 147 

Big Black River Bridge, Battle of 32, 15.8, 185 

Canals 143, 144 

Casualties, General Summary, March 29- July 4 40 

Casualties, Summary Union Forces, May 1-July 4 172 

Casualties, Indiana, March 29-July 4 405 

Cemetery, National 23 

Champion's Hill, Battle of 31, 154, 185 

Cincinnati, sinking of 39 

Commands, Summary of Confederate 139 

Commands, Summary of Union 138 

Commission, Report of the — 

Act of 1903 406 

First report of the Commission, determine location of monuments. 407 
Act of 1907, authorizing appointment of a Commission to construct 

the monuments 414 

Second report of the Commission 418 

Agreement between Cummission and Designer 421 

Specifications for monuments and markers 422 

Bid of Angola Monument Co 425 

Bid of American Bronze Foundry Co 426 

Contract with Angola Monument Co 426 

Contract with American Bronze Foundry Co 429 

Financial Report 431 

Act providing for the publication of report 467 

Dedication Ceremonies^ 

Departure of special train 433 

Reception at Vicksburg 433 

Program of Ce:'emonies 433 

Invocation 434 

Address of President Adams 435 

Speech of Governor Hanly 441 

Speech of Captain W. T. Rigby 451 

Address of Governor Noel, of Mississippi 455 

Address of Mrs. Noel 459 

Speech of Colonel W. T. Durbin 463 



474 Indiana a'J' Vicksburg. 

Grand Gulf 38,148,180 

iinmt, Correspondence with Pemberton 167 

Grant, Maj. Gen. U. S., Report of 143 

Indiana Circle • - ' 

Indiana Commands, Designation of 405 

Indiana Commands, Histories of — 

8th Infantry 199 

11th Infantry 209 

12th Infantry 219 

l(jth Infantry 225 

18th Infantry 235 

23d Infantry 241 

24th Infantry 259 

20th Infantry 267 

34th Infantry 273 

46th Infantry 277 

47th Infantry 289 

48th Infantry 295 

49th Infantry 299 

53d Infantry 305 

54th Infantry 315 

59th Infantry 319 

00th Infantry 325 

67th Infantry 329 

09th Infantry 337 

83d Infantry 353 

93d Infantry 365 

97th Infantry 371 

99th Infantry 377 

100th Infantry 383 

1st Battery, Light Artillery 389 

6th Battery, Light Artillery 393 

Co. C, 1st Cavalry 397 

Co. C, 4th Cavalry 401 

Indiana commands, Reference to — 

8th Infantry 54, 75, 175, 17ii. 177, 179. ISS, 190 

11th Infantry 73, 175, 179, 183, 185 

12th Infantry 89, 192 

16th Infantry 55, 71, 176, 185 

18th Infantry 54, 75, 174, 175, 176, 177, 179, 188, 189, 190 

23d Infantry 50, 51, 95. 174, 176, 178, 179, 181. 1S5, 193 

24th Infantry 73, 175, 179, 183, 184, 185 

26th Infantry 107, 193 

34th Infantry 73, 174, 175, 179, 183, 185 

40th Infantry 73, 176, 177, 179. 183, 185 

47th Infantry 74, 176, 177, 179, 185 

48tli Infantry 56, 103, 176, 181, 185 

49th Infantry 61, 67, 173, 174, 176, 178, 179 

53d Infantry 91, 192 



Index. 475 

PAGE 

54th Infantry 6S, 176 

59th Infantry 56, lO!!, 176, 181, 182, 185, 191 

60th Infantry 71, 176 

. 67th Infantry 55, 71, 176, 191 

69th Infantry 61, 67, 173, 174, 176, 178, 179, 185. 190 

83d Infantry 43, 82, 181 

93cl Infantry 43, 85. 181 

97th InfaQtry 90, 176, 192 

99th Infantry 90, 192 

100th Infantry 89, 192 

Ist Battery, Artillery 77, 175, 177 

6th Battery, Artillery 89, 192 

Co. C, 1st Cavalry 73, 176 

Co. C, 4th Cavalry 70 

Indiana Soldier at Vicksburg 173 

Introductory 11 

.Taclvson, Battle of 30, 152, 181 

Line, Union .34, 163 

Line, Confederate 37 

McGinnis, George F., Memorial 12 

Navy, Union 38, 187 

Park, Vicksburg National Military 15 

Pemberton, Correspondence with Grant 167 

Port Gibson, Battle of 29, 148. 176 

Pr.sitions, Confederate — 

Baldwin's Brigade, May 22 45 

Cockrell's Brigade, May 19 46 

Green's Bi-igade, small redan on left of, May 19 47 

Green's Brigade, right of 47 

Hebert's Brigade 46 

Lee's Brigade, small w irk on lin? of 61, 62 

Lee's Brigade, small worlv on right of 62 

Lee's Brigade, Fort Garrott 62 

Lunette on left of Stockdale, May 19 46 

Lunette on Right of Baldwin's Forry Road 57 

Redan, 3d Louisiana 52 

Redoubt, Great, Right of Jackson Road 54 

Redoubt, Railroad 60 

Shoup's Brigade, May 22 45 

Stockade Redan. May 19 46 

Work on left of Hall's Ferry Road 62 

Positions, Union — 

Benton's Brigade, May 22 54 

Boomer's Brigade, May 22 54, 57 

Buckland's Brigade, May 19 and 22 43 

Burbridge's Brigade. May 22 55 

Crater, AfCair of 51 , 193 

Ewing's Brigade, May 19 41 



47(j L\DIA^'A A'l' VlCKSliUKG. 

PAGE 

Ewing's Brigade, May 2'1 47 

Landranrs Brigade, May 22 59 

Lawler's Brigade. May 22 5S 

I>t>ggett's Brigade 51 

Manter's Brigade, May 22 44 

Matthie's Brigade,, May 22 48 

Mower's Brigade, May 22 48 

Osterliaus' Division. May 22 Gl 

Kansoni's Brigade, May 10 44 

Bansonrs Brigade, May 22 4!) 

Sanborn's Brigade, Miiy 22 55, 50 

Sniitli's (G. A.) Brigade, May 19 : 41 

Smith's (G. A.) Brigade, May 22 40 

Smitli's (J. E.) Brigade, May 22 50 

Smith's (T. K.) Brigade, May 10 43 

Stevenson's Brigade, May 22 53 

Tliayer's Brigade. May 22 44 

Wood's Brigade, May 22 44 

Kayniond, r.atlle of 30, 151, ISO 

Richmond 30 

Siege 37, 102 

Surrender 103, 194 

Transmittal, letter of 1