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Full text of "Indianapolis cook book"



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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS. 



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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 



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A Piano or Organ, and where is the family that can' not 
afford a first-class instrument at prices and terms which 
we offer ? 

It is not a waste of money, or extravagance, to buy a 
Piano or Organ, even if the means for so doing must be 
carefully economized from other expenditures. Such a 
musical instrument is indeed a luxury ; but it is more 
and better than this, it is thoroughly useful, a means of 
health, happiness, cultivation and refinement; a positive 
economy, taking the place of more expensive amuse- 
ment; in some cases an actual producer of wealth. 
Consider the pleasure of familiar home-songs in the 
evening, in which voices and hearts unite. If there be 
in the family a daughter with some talent for music, 
the giving her an opportunity to cultivate it and qualify 
herself as a teacher, is like giving a boy a trade which 
may be the means of support to him in after life. The 
demand for good teachers of music is greater than the 
supply, and a young lady qualified to teach has an 
accomplishment which may serve her well at need. 

In buying a Piano or Organ of us the purchaser has 
no risk to run, as every instrument we sell must prove 

AS REPRESENTED, OR IT MAY BE RETURNED AT OUR 
EXPENSE, AND THE MONEY WILL BE REF^UNDED. 
Price Lists and Catalogues mailed free to any address. 

thp:o. pfafflin 



&CO., 



58 and 60 North Pennylvania Street, 
INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



WE STAND 

The Acknowleckecl Leading Clotliiim- and Oeuts' 



Funiisliing Goods House of the West. 

a:nd 
THE ONLY MANUFACTURERS AND JOBBERS 

OF 

Men's, Youths', Boys' and Children's 

Fme Clothing 

AKD- 

FURNIBHING-S, 

Who sell at Retail in Indianapolis. 



ORDERS BY MAIL RECEIVE AS PROMPT AT- 
TENTION AS IF GIVEN IN PERSON. 



OWEN, PIXLEY & CO., 

When Clotliing Store 

30, 32, 34, 36, 38 & 40 N. PENNSYLVANIA ST. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 



Recipe to make a Happy Family, 

CONTRIBUTED BY 

MERRILL, MEIGS & CO. 



Take i large Family Bible, 

y^ doz. small Pocket Bibles, 
y^, doz. Hymn Books, 

yz doz. good Histories, 

^ doz. good Biographies, 
y^ doz. good Books of Travel, 
y^ doz. good Poetical Works, 
1 gross good Story Books, 

y^, gross good Toy Books tor the Little Ones, 
^ gross good A, B, C and Building Blocks, 
I doz. Children's Games, 
y^ doz. Stereoscopes, 

I gross Stereoscopic Views, 
I large Faniil)' Photograph Album, 

y^ doz. Autograph Albums, 
I Writing Desk for each member of the family, sup- 
plied with Writing Paper, Envelopes, Ink, Pens, 
Pencils, etc. 
1 large School Satchel for each child, furnished with 
School Books, Slate, Slate Pencils, Ruler and 
Erasers. 
I great variety of other good and useful things in our 
line. 

Mingle all |:hese in proper proportion all times of 
day, and serve upon the sitting room table. 



AH these valuable ingredients can be procured at low 
prices from 

m:errill, m:eigs 8c co., 

BOOKSELLERS and STATIONEKS, 

No. 5 EAST WASHINGTON STREET, 

Indianoipolis, Ind. 



INDIANAPOLIS 



Cook Book, 



COMPILED BY 



THE ^LADIES 



Pattison Methodist Episcopal Church, 

ffJ ' rNDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

VI 




She looketh well to the ways of her household, and eateih not the bread of 
idleness. 

Give her of the fruit of her hands, and let her own works praise her in the 
gates. — Proverbs XXXI, 27 and 31. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

HASSELMAN — JOURNAL CO. PRINT. 

1883. 









L^ 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1882, for the Ladies of the 
Pattison Methodist Episcopal Church, by 

R. D. BLACK, A. M., Indianapolis, Ind., 

In the Office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington, D. C. 



PREFACE. 



The ladies of the Pattison M. E. church, desiring to as- 
sist in the work of re-building the church, decided to pub- 
lish a cook book, hoping that it would be acceptable to the 
public and meet with a large sale. 

During the preparation and arrangement of recipes and 
directions, the committee has received much encourage- 
ment. The contribution of valuable recipes from other 
Indianapolis ladies, and from friends at a distance, have 
been gratefully received and appreciated. 

The advertisements of leading business firms will very 
materially assist in defraying expense of publication. 

With so much inspiration received, and so much effort 
already expended, those most interested in the cause will 
prosecute it with vigor. The book, it is believed, will not 
disappoint the purchaser. 

The recipes are good and practical ; adapted to the wants 
of the most fastidious ; of those who desire elaborate cooking- 
or who wish to prepare for large companies, and of those 
who have a limited purse, plain taste, and upon whom 
society makes few demands. 

It will be noticed that " The Indianapolis Cook Book " 
is a temperance book. Not a drop of that which intoxi- 
cates is recommended in any recipe for fruit cake, pudding- 
sauce or rqince pie — and not even in the excellent medical 
department. 

Indianapolis, Ind., December 20th, 1882. 



Indianapolis Cook Book. 

BUTTER, BREAD, Etc. 



BUTTER. 

Mrs. Owings, Sr. 
Have crocks very clean. Don't put them on the stove, 
nor in the oven, but scald them with hot water. Never 
put warm milk, such as strippings, in your sour-milk or 
cream jar. Don't let the milk stand longer than to get 
thick. If it keeps sweet, it is well to put buttermilk in it 
the night before churning, so that it will be ready to churn. 
The milk from different cows differs in the length of time 
for bringing the butter. Some will form the butter in five 
minutes, some in fifteen, and some in an hour. It is best 
to churn slowly until the milk is the right temperature. If 
it needs to be warmer, warm water can be added ; if cooler, 
cold water. Wash the buttermilk all out with water, and 
add salt as you work it. 

BUTTER. 

Mrs. Black. 
If in winter, set the crock of sour cream in a vessel of 
hot water, and stir until the heat is even. Scald the churn 
with well water. Bring the milk or cream to a tempera- 
ture of 72° F. When the butter breaks, empty a bucket 
of cold water into the churn. Let it stand a few minutes 
until the granules of butter are hardened. Draw off the 
buttermilk, and strain it through a sieve. Put more water 
with the butter in the churn, having dissolved salt in the 
water. Rinse the butter two or three times, and draw off 
the water. Great care needs to be taken of the churn after 



INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



churning to keep it sweet. Good soapsuds should stand 
in it, and be dashed about ; then hot water to take away 
all the soap ; then cold well water. 

BUTTER. 
Mrs. Robertson, Sr, 
After churning until the butter breaks, gather it by 
dashing a little cold water around the churn ; but never 
wash the buttermilk out with water, unless the butter is to 
be used immediately. To keep it, and especially to pack 
it, the buttermilk should be beaten out with paddle, or 
absorbed by the salt. 

BREAD. 

Mrs. Black; 

The health of the family is very dependent upon good 
bread. Good flour, good yeast, and great care are neces- 
sary. It is important to sift the flour. Good flour will 
easily crumble after being pressed in the hand. Yeast may 
be tried by adding a little to a small quantity of flour, and 
putting it in a warm place. If it rises, or lightens in ten 
minutes, it is right to use. It is well to make the sponge 
at night, in winter, and the dough next morning in time to 
be baked by ten o'clock. In the summer, it may be all 
made and baked in one day. The sponge may be baked 
in mufifin rings, or on a griddle, for breakfast ; or if very 
thick, can be touched lightly, in shaping rolls, that will 
very soon rise. Good bread dough can he made into 
cake, rusk, dumplings, chicken, or fruit pie. It should 
not stand very long in baking pans. If light when molded, 
it may sour or lose its freshness, and the sooner become dry 
and tasteless. 

STOCK YEAST. 
Mrs. T. H. K. Ends. 

Grate six large potatoes, raw. Boil a handful of hops, 
ten minutes Strain this hop water upon the grated pota- 
toes, and boil slowly until thoroughly cooked. Add a half 



BUTTER, BREAD, ETC. 



teacup of salt and one of sugar. After it has cooled, put 
in one cup of good yeast, and let it rise. Then bottle, or 
put it in a jar with tight-fitting cover. In making bread, 
use one cup of this yeast for potato sponge. The grated 
potato can be kept white by. being put into the hop-water 
as fast as grated. 

SELF-WORKING YEAST. 
Marion Harland. 
Eight potatoes, two ounces hops, four quarts cold water, 
one pound of flour, one-half pound white sugar, one table- 
spoonful salt. Tie the hops in a coarse muslin bag and 
boil one hour in four quarts of water. Wet the flour with 
the hop water. Put in the sugar and salt, and beat up the 
batter. Set it away for two days in an open bowl covered 
with a thin cloth, where it is moderately and evenly warm. 
On the third day, peel, boil and mash the potatoes, and 
stir in the thin batter. After it has stood twelve hours in 
the warm kitchen, put it away in perfectly clean and sweet 
jars. This yeast will keep four weeks in a cold cellar. 

POTATO YEAST. 

Mrs. Benson. 
Take four potatoes and boil. Pour the potato water over 
one pint of flour. Then mash the potatoes ; or better, put 
them through the cullander that there may be no lumps ; 
and when cool, add a cup of good yeast. 

DRY YEAST. 

Mrs. Ferrell. 
Thicken your stock yeast with corn meal, roll out, and 
cut in cakes. Dry them in the air, turning them often. 
Make enough in May to last all summer ; and in October, 
for winter use. 

BREAD. 
Mrs. Hereth. 
Make potato yeast in the evening, and early next morn- 
ing make bread sponge. For six loaves of bread, make a 



4 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



thick batter of flour and two quarts of water. Add the 
potato yeast, and afterwards one tablespoonful of salt, one 
of sugar, and one of lard. Set to rise, and when risen, 
knead it well, and if it rises again before being made into- 
loaves, it will be the whiter and better. 

POTATO YEAST. 

Mrs. Patton. 
Boil and mash six potatoes ; pour boiling water on them, 
in which a bag of hops has been boiled ; thicken with 
sifted flour, and when cooled, add one small cake of com- 
pressed yeast, or any other good yeast. 

BREAD. 

Miss Bugbee. 
Two quarts of flour, one large tablespoonful of salt, a 
teacup of yeast, one pint of warm milk, and one tablespoon- 
ful of sugar. Mix stiff with flour and let it rise. Then 
knead, and put into pans. 

SOUR-MILK BREAD. 

Mrs. Kring. 
Scald one quart of sour milk. When cool enough, set 
your sponge with the whey. Take one quart of flour, 
one tablespoon of salt, one teacup of yeast, and stir stiff 
with a spoon. In the morning, add flour and knead well. 
Set in pans to rise. 

MILK BREAD. 
One quart milk, one teacup yeast, one-half teacup butter, 
and one tablespoon white sugar. Let the milk be warm, 
add to it the flour and sugar. Beat all together and let 
them rise four hours. Add melted butter, and lastly, the 
yeast and salt. In warm weather it will probably be neces- 
sary to add a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in warm water, 
as the milk may sour. 



BUTTER, BREAD, ETC. 



BREAD WITH DRY YEAST. 

Miss Sue Bugbee. 
In the evening, make a potato sponge with four potatoes 
boiled and mashed in a cup of flour. When cool, add a 
cake of yeast that has been soaked in tepid water. Next 
morning, add one quart of milk, two tablespoonsful salt 
and flour to make a dough. Knead well, and let it rise 
and make into loaves. When they are light, bake one hour. 

ACTON BREAD. 

Mrs. Ella Miller. 
Put thin slices of stale bread in milk with beaten egg, 
and a little sugar. When soaked, fry in hot lard. 

SWEET BREAD. 

Mrs. Ella Miller. 
One cup yeast, one cup milk, one cup sugar, one cup 
currants or chopped raisins, one-half cup butter ; stir in 
flour and let rise. When light make into a loaf. Spread 
with butter and sugar before baking. 

RYE BREAD. 

Mrs. Ends. 
Make a sponge of one quart water, one teacup yeast and 
rye flour; let it rise in a warm place; scald one pint of 
corn meal ; when cool add it to the sponge and knead 
with rye flour; put into deep pans. Wheat flour may be 
used instead of the rye. 

HOMINY BREAD. 

Mrs. Van Wag en en. 
Take about two teacups of fine hominy or grits, and 
while hot mix with it a large spoonful of butter; beat four 
eggs very light and stir them into the hominy ; next add a 
pint of milk, gradually stirred in ; and lastly, half a pint of 
corn meal. The batter should be of the consistency of a 
rich, boiled custard ; if thicker add a little more milk. 
Bake with a good deal of heat at the bottom of the oven 



INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK, 



and not too much at the top, so as to allow it to rise. The 
pan in which it is baked ought to be a deep one, to allow 
space for rising. It has the appearance, when cooked, of 
a batter pudding, and when rich and well cooked it has 
almost the delicacy of a baked custard. Cut with a pie 
knife. Bake about an hour. 

RICE BREAD. 

Mrs. Black. 
Make a sponge of warm water, one cup yeast, one spoon 
sugar, two spoons lard and one quart wheat flour; beat 
well, and in five hours add three pints warm milk and three 
teacups rice flour ; wet to a thin paste with cold milk and 
boil four minutes, as you would boil starch ; let it be luke- 
warm when put into the batter ; if not thick enough add 
wheat flour; knead and put to rise as with wheat bread. 
If you can not get rice flour boil one cup of whole rice, 
mash and beat it smooth. 

SALT-RISING BREAD. 
Mrs. S. E. Wagoner. 
In the evening scald one-half cup corn meal ; next morn- 
ing add one pint of warm water, one-half teaspoon salt and 
a teaspoon of sugar ; make a thick batter and keep warm 
until it rises ; mix it soft, knead well, and put into pans 
immediately. Mashed potatoes improve it. 

SALT-RISING BREAD. 

Mrs. Sappington. 
After breakfast take a cup of new milk and heat quite 
hot ; stir thick with corn meal and keep it warm until next 
morning ; then make a sponge, by taking one quart of milk 
or warm water, adding salt and one spoonful of sugar, mix- 
ing all in the meal. After the si)onge has risen mold into 
loaves and put in pans to rise before baking. 



BUTTER, BREAD, ETC. 



HOMINY BREAD. 

Mrs. Sappington. 
One cup of hominy grits, boiled soft, three eggs beaten 
light, one large teaspoon melted lard or butter, about one 
])int of corn meal, milk enough to make a very thin batter, 
one tablespoon baking powder, or, if sour milk is used, 
one teaspoonful of soda. 

RICE BREAD. 

Mrs. Sappington. 
One cup of rice boiled soft, three eggs beaten light, one- 
tablespoon melted lard or butter, one pint corn meal, milk 
enough to make a very thin batter, one tablespoon baking 
powder, or, if sour milk is used, one teaspoon soda. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

Mrs. Black. 
One teacup yeast, one quart warm water, one tablespoon 
salt, two cups sugar, one small teaspoon soda ; add graham 
flour until stiff enough to drop off the spoon. Grease 
bread pans and put in the dough. When risen bake in a 
moderate oven one hour. 

BROWN BREAD. 

Mrs. Ends. 
Use part of the sponge that has been prepared for white 
bread ; add warm water and graham flour ; put in one cup 
of molasses for three loaves of bread. For brown rolls 
work in a little butter. 

BROWN BREAD. 

Mrs. Kingsbury. 
Three and one-half cups graham flour, two of corn meal, 
three of sour milk, one-half of molasses, one tablespoon 
soda ; steam two and one-half hours and then put in the 
oven for fifteen minutes. 



INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



GRAHAM BREAD. 

Mrs. Hereth. 
For one loaf : One quart of flour, two tablespoons mo- 
lasses, one teaspoon soda, one teaspoon salt, one-half cup 
yeast ; make soft with a spoon ; when risen, bake. 

QUICK BROWN BREAD. 

Mrs. Annie Thurston. 
One quart graham flour, one quart corn meal, one tea- 
cup molasses, one teaspoon soda, one teaspoon salt and 
one quart sour milk. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

Mrs. Bugbee. 
One cup wheat flour, two cups corn meal, one cup rye, 
one cup molasses, one pint sour milk, one teaspoon soda; 
steam three hours. 

STEAMED BROWN BREAD. 

Mrs. Sam Merrill. 
Three and one-half cups unbolted flour, one cup corn 
meal, three teaspoons baking-powder, three-fourths cup 
molasses, two cups sweet milk, salt ; steam two and one- 
half hours. 

YANKEE BROWN BREAD. 

Mrs. Hammond. 
One quart corn meal, one quart unbolted wheat flour, 
one teaspoon soda, one pint molasses, one-half pint sour 
milk, a little salt ; put in enough warm water to make a thin 
batter to pour ; steam three hours, bake one hour. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 
Mrs. G. M. Pee. 
Take two quarts of flour and rub in two tablespoons of 
lard ; boil a pint of sweet milk and let stand until cold ; 
make a hole in the middle of the flour, put in the milk and 
half a teacup of yeast or half a cake of Fleshman yeast ; 
also two tablespoons sugar and a little salt ; let stand until 



BUTTER, BREAD, ETC. 



morning, then mix up and let rise three or four times. In- 
stead of kneading down each time pound with a mallet or 
rolling pin. Roll and cut like pocket-book biscuit. 

POCKET-BOOK ROLLS No. i. 

Mrs. Hereth. 
Make a potato sponge of six potatoes boiled, and added 
to flour and water. When cool, add one-half cup potato 
yeast. When light, add a tablespoon salt, one-half cup 
lard, and flour for stiff dough. After kneading and setting 
to rise three times, cut in large biscuit, turning over one-half. 

POCKET-BOOK ROLLS No. 2. 

Mrs. Springer. 
One quart flour, one tablesi)oon butter, two eggs, one 
small teacup yeast, one and one-half pints milk. After the 
batter lightens, make stiff, and when the dough rises, roll 
thin and spread lightly with butter. Cut with large buscuit 
cutter, and turn over, like turn-over pies. 

STEAMBOAT ROLLS. 
Mrs. Ferrell. 
On bread-baking day, set aside dough for tea rolls. 
Work in a tablespoonful of lard. W^hen risen, work again. 
Cut in rolls one inch thick, five inches long, and one-half 
inch wide. To make the cleft roll, cut down the center of 
a roll almost its length, with a sharp knife. 

ORDINARY LIGHT ROLLS. 

Mrs. Reynolds. 
Take bread dough and add lard and a little sugar. Cut 
either with buscuit cutter or mold with the hand. Put into 
a well-greased pan and set to rise. When they unite, and 
then seam, they are ready for the oven. 



lO INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



SUPERIOR ROLLS. 

Mrs. Reynolds. 
Four cups sweet milk, one small cup lard, add one small 
cup yeast, and three cups flour. Make this sponge at 
night. In the morning, add one well-beaten egg. Knead, 
let rise, and then mold into buscuit. 

CINNAMON ROLLS. 

Mrs. Herith. 

Roll the dough thin, as for pies. Butter, and sprinkle 
with sugar and cinnamon. Roll this sheet of dough, as for 
jelly roll. Cut in slices an inch thick. Lay these slices, 
as you would biscuit, to rise in the pan in which they are 
to be baked. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

Mrs. Baggs. 
Two quarts of flour, one pint of milk, boiled. When 
cool, add one teaspoon salt, two teaspoons sugar, one tea- 
cup yeast. Rub all into the flour. When well risen, work 
into a loaf and let rise again. Then roll, and cut into 
cakes ; butter each one, fold over and set to rise. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS No. 2. 
Mrs. Baggs. 
Make a hole in the center of two quarts of flour. Pour 
into it one pint of sweet milk that has been boiled, with a 
small lump of butter in it. Add one-fourth cup sugar, one- 
fourth cup yeast, and one tablespoon salt. Let it stand 
two hours or more, and then knead. Set to rise, knead, 
and mould. Some leave the flour, milk, butter, sugar, 
yeast, and salt unmixed all night, and next morning beat 
very hard with a spoon, and immediately stiffen and mould. 

IMPERIAL ROLLS. 

Mrs. Enos. 
Beat one-half cup butter with one tablespoon sugar ; roll 
light dough thin and spread with the butter and sugar : roll 



BUTTER, BREAD, ETC. II 



a second layer and spread like the first ; then a third layer ; 
cut in biscuit size and let stand until light. 

ENGLISH ROLLS. 
One quart flour, two ounces butter, one-half cup yeast, 
one pint warm milk ; stir well together and set in warm 
place ; when light make into rolls and let rise again. 

FRENCH ROLLS No. i. 

Mrs. Spahr, Sr. 
One pint milk, one teacup butter, one teacup sugar, three 
eggs, one teacup yeast, and flour to knead. Let the sponge 
be made of the milk, yeast and flour. When light add the 
eggs, butter and sugar, and let rise again. 

FRENCH ROLLS No. 2. 

Rub one-half teacup of butter into one quart of flour ; 
beat the whites of three eggs well ; add one-half cup yeast, 
a little salt and milk to make stiff dough. Let rise in a 
warm place, and when risen bake in ten minutes. 

EGG ROLLS. 

Mrs. Enos. 

Two teacups sweet milk, two eggs, a little salt, three and 
one-half cups flour ; bake in hot gem pans. 

POP-OVERS. 

Miss Crane, Madison, Ind. 
One cup milk, one cup flour, one egg, beaten separately ; 
bake in cups, a tablespoon to each cup. 

GR.\HAM ROLLS. 

Mrs. Osborne. 

These rolls may be made as ordinary light rolls, only 
substituting graham for the white flour. 



12 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



GRAHAM BREAKFAST ROLLS. 

Six potatoes boiled and mashed, one pint of water, one- 
lialf cup of sugar, one tablespoon salt and one-half cup of 
yeast ; make into a stiff dough with graham flour ; let it 
rise over night ; in the morning mold lightly and let rise. 

BROWN ROLLS. 

Mrs. Black. 
One quart graham flour, with milk or water to make 
batter ; one-third cup of yeast ; let it rise over night ; in 
the morning add two eggs, one large tablespoon sugar, 
■one-fourth teaspoon soda, a little butter and a little salt ; 
put in cups, gem pans or mufitin rings. 

GERMAN ROLLS. 
Beat thoroughly two eggs ; add to them one-half pint milk, 
one tablespoon butter, one teacup yeast, all poured into the 
flour and mixed softer than bread ; let it rise before baking. 

GERMAN COFFEE CAKE. 

Mrs. Fletcher Rubush. 
Knead and roll out bread sponge, adding lard, one egg 
and one-half cup sugar ; make it three-fourths of an inch 
thick ; crumble together butter, cinnamon and sugar with 
which to cover the top. It is nice baked in a pie pan. 

SALT-RISING BREAD. 

Mrs. Rubush. 
Set sponge over night in a warm place. Let the sponge 
be made of flour, water and a little salt. In the morning, 
add a little fresh, warm batter. After it rises, boil a little 
sweet milk and scald flour. When cool, stir in the rising, 
knead well, and put in pans to rise. It can rise in ten or 
fifteen minutes. A tablespoonful of sugar put in the batter 
in the morning improves it. 



BUTTER, BREAD, ETC. I 3 



COMPRESSED YEAST BREAD. 

Mrs. Rubush. 
Make a potato yeast in the morning, by using a small 
cake of compressed yeast with the maslied potatoes, flour 
and water. It will be ready to bake before night, if made 
into dough at noon, kneaded, and set to rise a little while» 
This yeast lightens quicker than any other. 

CORN MEAL YEAST CAKES. 

Miss Leslie. 
Boil one-half pound of fresh hops in four quarts of water 
until the liquid is two quarts. Strain it into a pan and mix 
in flour enough to make a thin batter. Add one-half pint 
yeast. When fermented, stir in corn meal to make a stiff 
dough. Cover it, and set in a warm place to rise. When 
very light, roll out into a sheet an inch thick, and cut into 
flat cakes four inches square. Spread them out separately 
to dry in a cool place. While drying, turn them five or 
six times a day. When hard, put them in brown paper 
sacks. Dissolve one in a little warm water, thicken with 
flour ; cover, and put near the fire to rise. Then mix with 
flour for bread, one yeast cake to two quarts of flour. 

BUTTERMILK BREAD. 

Mrs. Owings, Sr. 
Back of the bread is the yeast. Take a large handful of 
hops ; if pressed hops, ten cents worth. Take a large 
stone jar and fill it two-thirds full of sifted flour. Mix in it 
one large coffee cup of brown sugar, and one-half cup salt. 
Boil your hops twenty minutes. Boil eight or ten large 
potatoes until they are soft, and mash them. Strain the 
hops and scald the flour with the hops and potato water. 
Let it be stiff as you can stir it. Add one cup or more of 
yeast, and as fast as the flour rises, stir it down. In the 
evening, add the corn meal, by pouring the yeast into a 
large pan of corn meal. Spread a large, clean table cloth 
in a warm room, and scatter the crumbled corn nieal yeast 



14 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

over it. Use one pint of this yeast, if you want to make 
six loaves of bread. Scald your flour with buttermilk. 
When it is cool enough, add the yeast. Set in a warm place 
to rise. When risen, knead and let rise again. Then put 
it in pans for last rising. This makes good sweet bread. 

SALLY LUNN. 
Mrs. Springer. 
Six eggs, one quart of milk, five pints of flour and one 
teacup of yeast. Make a stiff batter and set to rise in pie- 
pans, after greasing them. Bake when well risen. 

SALLY LUNN. 

Miss Sanie King, Madison. 

One pmt warm milk, three eggs, one tablespoon yeast, 

three spoons lard, one tablespoon sugar, and three pints 

flour. It will rise and be ready to bake in two or three hours. 

SALLY LUNN. 
Miss Howell. 
Two eggs, three tablespoons sugar, one tablespoon but- 
ter, one teacup sweet milk, three teaspoons baking powder 
in three pints of flour. 

SALLY LUNN. 
Mrs. Ends. 
Three pints flour, two ounces butter melted in one pint 
warm water, one teaspoon salt, one teacup sugar, three 
eggs well beaten, one teacup yeast. Beat all together for 
ten minutes ; put in baking-pans ; sprinkle sugar on the 
top after they are baked. 

RUSK. 

Miss E. McLaughlin. 
Make a sponge of one pint milk, one cup sugar, one 
cup butter, five eggs and one teacup yeast. In the morn- 
ing make stiff batter and set to rise. When light, make 
into rolls and set in warm place. 



BUTTER, BREAD, ETC. I 5 



GRANDMA'S RUSK. 

Mrs. Gkaydon. 
One quart milk, three-eighths pound butter, three eggs, 
salt, two tablespoons yeast. Set to rise in one pint milk ; 
melt the butter in the remainder of the milk ; add a heaping 
saucer of white sugar ; when the sponge is well raised mix 
together in a loaf ; let it rise well ; then make out into rolls 
and let rise a second time. 

RUSK. 

Mrs. Levers. 

One cup butter, one pint milk, flour to make stiff batter, 

one cup yeast. When light, add one cup sugar, two eggs, 

one tablespoon salt, and flour to mould like biscuit. Set 

to rise. 

RUSK. 

One pint warm milk, one pint sugar, one cup butter, 
one cup yeast, one tablespoon salt, and one quart flour. 
When risen, make into dough, roll out and cut into biscuit. 

RUSK. 
One pint milk, one-half cup yeast, one and one-half 
cups white sugar, three eggs, one-half cup butter, one 
tablespoon cinnamon, and flour for stiff batter. When 
risen, make into rolls and spread sugar, cinnamon and 
butter over the top. 

RUSK. 

Mrs. Levers. 

Four cups dough, one-half cup butter, one cup sugar, 

three eggs, and the flour necessary. After this dough 

lightens, make into high, narrow rolls, and rub the tops 

with sugar and water. 

WAFERS. 
One quart flour, two tablespoons butter, a little salt. 
Mix with sweet milk ; roll as thin as possible ; lay in a 
large biscuit-shape in pan. They are nice rolled up 
when taken from oven. This is peculiarly Southern. 



l6 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

CRUMPETS. 
Make a sponge as for yeast muffins ; when light, add 
melted butter and a little flour ; bake in muffin rings. 

MUFFINS. 
Two eggs, one pint warm milk, one tablespoon melted 
lard, one-half teacup yeast, salt, flour to make a stiff batter ; 
lighten, and then put batter in gem pans or muffin rings. 

MUFFINS. 
One-half cup sugar, one-half cup butter two cups milk, 
an even tablespoon salt, three tablespoons yeast, one quart 
of flour; when light, or risen, stir in two well-beaten eggs 
and bake in pans or rings in hot oven. 

BUTTERMILK MUFFINS. 
Stir two beaten eggs into one quart of buttermilk ; add 
flour to make batter, one small tablespoon salt, and, lastly, 
one teaspoon soda dissolved in hot water ; bake immedi- 
ately in a hot oven. 

BAKING-POWDER MUFFINS. 
Sift three teaspoons baking powder into three pints of 
flour ; put with one quart of milk two beaten eggs, and then 
add the flour ; bake in gem pans or muffin rings in hot oven. 

MUFFINS. 
One pint sour milk, effervescing with small teaspoon 
soda, two beaten eggs, one tablespoon melted lard, and 
flour to make like pound-cake batter. 

MUFFINS. 
Miss Minnie Wagoner. 
One cup sweet milk, three cups flour, one egg, one table- 
spoon melted butter, one tablespoon sugar and three even 
teaspoons of baking powder. 



BREAD, ETC. 1 7 

CINNAMON MUFFINS. 
One cup sugar, one cup sour milk, small teaspoon soda, 
one egg, one tablespoon cinnamon ; add flour for stiff bat- 
ter, and bake immediately in gem pans. 

GRAHAM MUFFINS. 

Miss Georgia Howell. 
Three cups graham flour, one cup white flour, one quart 
milk, three-fourths cup yeast, one tablespoon lard, one tea- 
spoon salt, two tablespoons sugar. Let rise. 

GRAHAM MUFFINS. 
One egg, one tablespoon lard or butter, three cups gra- 
ham flour, three teaspoons baking-powder, one teaspoon 
salt ; to be mixed with milk or milk and water. 

GRAHAM GEMS. 

Miss Letta Griffith. 
One egg, three cups graham flour, one teaspoon salt, one 
tablespoon sugar, two teaspoons baking-powder in flour ; 
mix with milk. Have gem pans hot, and when put in 
oven use only the upper slide. 

GRAHAM GEMS No. i. 
One egg, one-half pint sweet milk, one pint graham 
flour, one teaspoon salt. Heat the gem pans before filling. 

MINNESOTA GEMS No. 2. 

Mrs. Sam Merrill. 

One pint sour milk, one-half teaspoon soda, one egg, 

one spoonful sugar, one pinch salt, enough graham flour 

to make stiff batter. Have pans hot and buttered, and the 

oven hot, so that the gems will begin to bake at once. 

GRAHAM GEMS No. 3. 
Miss Lida Wheat. 
One quart graham flour, one tablespoon sugar, one table- 
spoon butter, sweet milk to make a thick batter, two and 
one-half teaspoons-baking powder in the flour ; bake 
quickly. 
2 



1 8 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



WATER GEMS. 

Mrs. Mary Bernard. 
Beat in the air (that it may be aerated) three cups gra- 
ham flour and a httle salt into a stiff batter of the flour and 
water. Grease and heat your gem pans very hot, and if 
baked in a quick oven the gems will be very light. 

RICE MUFFINS. 

Mrs. Ends. 

One cup boiled rice, one teaspoon butter, one teaspoon 
salt, two eggs, one cup milk, flour to make stiff batter to 
drop from spoon ; add to the flour two teaspoons baking- 
powder. Bake in gem pans. 

CORN BREAD. 

Mrs. Reynolds. 

One egg, one tablespoon melted lard, one teaspoon 
baking-powder, in three teacups corn meal. Add milk. 

CORN BREAD. 

One pint sour milk, one pint corn meal, one half-pint 
white flour, one teaspoon soda, one tablespoon salt, one 
teaspoon molasses. 

CORN BREAD. 

Mrs. Ella Miller. 

One pint corn meal, one pint buttermilk, one egg, one 
teaspoon soda, one tablespoon salt. 

NONPAREIL CORN BREAD. 
Marion Hakland. 
Two heaping cups Indian meal, one cup flour, three 
eggs, two and one-half cups milk, one tablespoon lard, two 
tablespoons white sugar, three teaspoons baking-powder, 
one teaspoon salt. Beat the eggs very thoroughly, whites 
and yolks separately ; melt the lard. 



BREAD, ETC. I9 

RICE CORN BREAD. 

Mrs. Sai'I'ington. 

One cup rice boiled soft, three eggs beaten light, one 
tablespoon melted lard, one pint corn meal, milk to make 
a thin batter, one tablespoon baking-powder. If sour milk 
is used, one teaspoon soda. 

STEAMED CORN BREAD. 

Mrs. Bugbee. 

Two cups sour milk, one teaspoon soda, one tablespoon 
butter, one egg, one teaspoon salt, and corn meal to make 
dough consistency of pound-cake. Pour in mold and 
steam two hours. 

RISEN CORN BREAD. 
Two cups bread sponge, one pint corn meal, two table- 
spoons molasses, one of sugar, one teaspoon soda, one 
tablespoon lard ; make a stiff batter ; put to rise in greased 
pan. Bake one hour. 

CORN MEAL MUFFINS. 

^ Miss LiDA Wheat. 

Two eggs, one tablespoon melted butter or lard, one 
pint corn meal ; make up with sour milk, in which dissolve 
one teaspoon soda ; have gem pan, muffin rings, or pan, 
hot and well greased. Bake twenty minutes. 

RISEN CORN MEAL MUFFINS. 
Scald one cup meal with one pint milk, add butter size 
of an egg, one table spoon sugar, one egg, one-half cup 
yeast ; flour for stiff batter. When risen, bake in quick 
oven. 

KENTUCKY CORN MEAL PONE. 

One quart corn meal, one tablespoon salt, one tablespoon 
melted lard, cold water for soft dough. 



20 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

CORN DODGERS. 

Same as corn meal pone, only, sugar added and the mix- 
ture thinner. 

JOHNNY CAKE. 
Corn meal, cold water and salt ; the cake patted with 
the hands, and baked on boards before the fire. 

YEAST WAFFLES. 
Three pints flour, three pints of milk, five eggs, salt, and 
one-half cup yeast. Warm the milk, with two tablespoons 
butter in it. Add five eggs well beaten, one teaspoon salt 
and three pints flour. Lastly, one-half cup yeast. Make 
them in the evening, and bake next morning. 

SOUR-MILK WAFFLES. 
Mrs. Spahr, Sk. 
One quart sour milk, three tablespoons mixed butter and 
lard, three eggs beaten separately, one teaspoon soda, one 
teaspoon salt, and flour to make thick batter. 

BAKING-POWDER WAFFLES. 
Beat three eggs separately. Add the yolks to one quart 
of milk, one tablespoon lard and butter, one teaspoon salt, 
two teaspoons baking-powder sifted in flour enough to make 
rather a stiff batter. 

RICE WAFFLES. 

Mrs. Enos. 
One teacup boiled rice, two tablespoons butter, three 
eggs. Sift three teaspoons baking powder into two cups 
flour. Just before putting into the waffle irons, add the 
beaten whites of the eggs. 

RICE CROQUETTES. 
One teacup rice, one pint milk, one pint water, a little 
salt. Butter a tin pan. Put in the rice, milk and water 



BREAD, ETC. 21 

to swell on the stove. When dry, add two beaten eggs, 
two tablespoon sugar, and one tablespoon butter. Roll 
the rice balls in cracker crumbs and fry brown in hot lard. 

BUNS. 
Mrs. John Rubush. 
Make a sponge of one quart flour, one pint milk, and 
one cup potato yeast. When light, add one cup sugar, 
one-half cup melted butter, one teaspoon salt and nutmeg. 
Let this dough rise, and then make into rolls. Let these 
fit close together, as though round balls. When baked, 
brush them over with white of an egg beaten stiff with white 
sugar. 

POTATO BUNS. 

Mrs. Ends. 
One pint mashed potatoes, one pound white sugar, four 
eggs, one cup yeast, one cup melted butter. Flour enough 
to make buns of stiff dough. 

BUNS. 
Miss Miller. 
One tablespoon lard and butter, one cup sugar, one cup 
potato yeast, two eggs, one-half nutmeg. Flour, with one 
pint milk, one teaspoon salt, one cup raisins or currants. 
Make of these ingredients a loaf, and when raised, put it 
into a cake pan. Set to rise, before baking. 

PUFFS. 
Mrs. Patton. 
Two eggs beaten separately, two cups milk, two cups 
flour, one tablespoon butter. Drop into hot gem pans. 

MIXED MUFFINS. 
Mrs. Reakirt. 
One teacup com meal, one pint flour, one tablespoon 
baking-powder, two tablespoons molasses, one of melted 
lard, one-half teaspoon salt. 



22 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



OAT-MEAL CAKES. 

One cup oat meal, one teaspoon sugar, one cup flour, 
one teaspoon baking-powder. Add cold water to make 
batter ; beat well and bake immediately. 

PARSNIP FRITTERS. 
One-half cup milk, one tablespoon butter. Boil pars- 
nips until tender ; mash ; add two eggs, flour and salt ; 
fry brown. 

HOMINY FRITTERS. 
To one quart of boiled hominy add one egg^ two table- 
spoons milk and one of flour. Season with pepper and 
salt ; make into cakes and fry in hot lard. 

SQUASH CAKES. 
Two eggs, one cup cooked squash, one and one-half 
pints milk, salt, flour to make proper consistency for frying 
in hot lard. 

FUNNEL CAKES. 

Miss Miller. 

One quart flour, one teaspoon salt, two teaspoons baking- 
powder, one pint warm milk, three eggs beaten separately. 
Run this batter through a funnel into hot lard, beginning 
in the center and running round and round in rings. 

SNOW CAKES. 

Mrs. Enos. 
Make a batter of milk, flour, and a little salt; add new- 
fallen snow, and immediately drop the batter, in spoonfuls, 
into the hot lard. The snow causes them to be aerated. 

CUCUMBER CAKES OR FRITTERS. 
Peel, slice, and cook in a little water, four large cucum- 
bers ; mash, and season with pepper and salt ; add beaten 
eggs and flour for batter. Fry in hot lard. 



BREAD, ETC. 23 

APPLE FRITTERS. 

Mrs. Patton. 

Chop apples as for mince-meat, and put them in a bat- 
ter made of two cups flour, teaspoon baking-powder, two 
eggs beaten separately, one tablespoon sugar, one teaspoon 
salt, and one cup warm milk. This same recipe can be 
used when sliced apples are substituted for chopped apples. 
Peaches can be substituted for apples, making peach frit- 
ters. 

CLAM FRITTERS. 

Chop clams very fine ; in the batter of flour, eggs and 
milk, add the clam liquid. 

OYSTER FRITTERS. 
Mrs. J. F. Moore, Vincennes. 
Make a batter of two eggs, two cups flour, and milk or 
water ; put one oyster to one spoonful of batter. Cove 
oysters can be used. 

GRAHAM-FLOUR BATTER CAKES. 

One pint milk, two eggs, one quart graham flour, in 
which two teaspoons baking-powder have been sifted, one 
teaspoon salt ; if sour milk is used, one-half teaspoon soda. 

MUSH. 
Mrs. Spahr. 
Either graham flour, oat meal or corn meal can be used. 
Put water in kettle to boil ; when boiling stir in the meal 
by the handful gradually, or by smoothing corn meal with 
cold water and putting into the boiling water ; cook well 
before adding milk. When cold it can be fried in slices. 
The milk causes it to brown nicely. 

FLANNEL CAKES. 
One pint milk, one-half cup yeast, one teaspoon salt, two 
eggs, one tablespoon melted butter. Make, and set to rise 
at night, and bake for breakfast. 



24 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



EGOLESS FLANNEL CAKES. 
One quart milk, one-half teacup yeast, one cup corn meal, 
two cups flour, one tablespoon melted lard, and one teaspoon 
salt. Scald the corn meal, add milk, then flour and yeast, 
and set to rise. 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES. 

Mrs. Patton. 
One pint warm water, five cups buckwheat flour, one 
cup yeast, and one tablespoon sugar or molasses. Make 
a thin batter. If sour in the morning, add a little soda. 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES. 
Sift two teaspoons baking-powder in one quart buckwheat 
flour, one-half pint corn meal, one tablespoon salt, two table- 
spoons New Orleans molasses. Water to make batter. 

CORN CAKES. 
Miss Lida Wheat. 
Scald one pint corn meal, add one cup flour, two eggs 
beaten separately, tablespoon salt, one teaspoon baking- 
powder in the flour, and thin with milk. Do not beat the 
batter after adding the whites of the eggs, or it will be 
tough. If sour milk is preferred, one teaspoon of soda, 
instead of baking-powder. 

RICE CAKES. 
One cup boiled rice, one teacup salt, one pint milk, 
three eggs beaten well, and flour to make thin batter, with 
one teaspoon baking-powder in the flour. Bake on griddle. 

BATTER CAKES. 

Mrs. Patton. 
One quart flour, one tablespoon shortening, teaspoon 
salt, three eggs beaten separately, milk to make thin batter. 
With sweet milk, use two teaspoons baking-powder. With 
sour milk, use one teaspoon soda. 



BREAD, ETC. 2$ 

BREAD CAKES. 

Mrs. Ella Miller. 
Break up stale bread and soak in milk. When perfectly 
soft, add one-half cup flour, three eggs well beaten, one 
teaspoon salt. If needed, more milk can be added. 

RIPE TOMATO CAKES. 

Make a batter of two eggs, flour and water. Slice large 
ripe tomatoes, cover with the batter, and fry in hot lard. 
Season with pepper and salt. 

GREEN TOMATO CAKES. 

Mrs. Black. 
Fry slices of green tomatoes dipped in flour and seasoned 
with salt and pepper. These are a very nice breakfast dish. 

GREEN CORN CAKES. 

Mrs. Enos. 
One dozen ears of corn, three eggs. Grate the com. 
Beat the eggs separately. Add the eggs with a teaspoon 
of butter to the grated corn. Season with pepper and salt. 
Fry in hot lard and butter. If the batter is too thin, add 
one tablespoon of flour. 

CORN MEAL BANNOCKS. 
Scald thoroughly one pint corn meal. Add salt and one 
egg, cream and melted butter. Make into balls, and fry 
in hot lard, turning them from side to side. 

VANITIES. 

Mrs. Ends. 
Beat two eggs, with little salt, teaspoon rose water, and 
flour in which one teaspoon baking-powder has been sifted, 
and roll out. Cut with a cake cutter, fry in hot lard, sift 
powdered sugar over them while hot, and when cool put a 
teaspoon of jelly in the center of each. Nice for tea or 
dessert. 



26 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



BAKING-POWDER BISCUIT. 

Mrs. Lowe. 
Sift together one quart of flour and three teaspoons 
baking-powder ; add one tablespoon salt and one table- 
spoon lard, either melted or distributed over the flour in 
small pieces ; wet the flour with sweet milk and roll one- 
half inch thick ; cut with biscuit cutter and bake in five 
minutes. Milk is better than water in biscuit, but if you 
have not milk add more lard or butter and use water. 

SODA BISCUIT. 
Mrs. Patton. 
Rub into one quart of flour two teaspoons cream tartar 
and one of soda, two tablespoons lard, one tablespoon salt ; 
moisten v/ith sweet milk. 

VIENNA BISCUIT. 
Add to one quart flour three teaspoons baking-powder 
and a tablespoonful of butter ; mix with sweet milk, roll a 
half-inch thick, butter and fold over, and moisten on top 
with milk to give them a gloss. 

BUTTERMILK BISCUIT. 

Miss Bugbee. 
Make a soft dough ; one pint buttermilk, one teaspoon 
soda, two teaspoons melted butter. The soda may be 
sifted with the flour or dissolved in the buttermilk. 

BEAT BISCUIT. 
Rub four tablespoons butter into one quart flour ; beat 
two eggs light and put them into one teacup milk ; stir the 
milk and eggs into the flour; add salt; mold, knead, 
pound, roll thin and bake fifteen minutes. 

BAKING-POWDER BISCUIT. 

Mrs. Sappington. 
One quart flour, one tablespoon baking-powder mixed 
through the flour ; add one even tablespoon of salt and rub 



BREAD, ETC. 2/ 

in one tablespoon lard ; mix very soft with sweet milk or 
sweet buttermilk ; knead as little as possible and bake in a 
quick oven. 

TO FRESHEN CRACKERS, BISCUIT, ROLLS, Etc. 
Dip in water and put in hot oven. 

CRACKER TOAST. 
Butter the crackers, lay them in a bread pan and sprinkle 
lightly with salt ; put milk over them and place in the oven 
to heat thoroughly. 

KENTUCKY BEAT BISCUIT. 
Mrs. Rev. Brown, Madison, Ind. 
One quart flour, one tablespoon lard and sufficient salt, 
mixed thoroughly. Make this into a very stiff dough, with 
equal portions of water and sweet milk ; beat or work with 
a machine until the dough blisters and shines like satin ; 
roll out moderately thin and stick with fork several times ; 
bake in moderate oven until thoroughly done. 

BROWN BREAD. 

Mrs. Hope. 
Two cups corn meal, two cups graham flour, one cup 
molasses, one teaspoon soda, one of salt; mix well and 
boil three hours. 

CORN PONE. 

Mrs. Hope. 
One quart buttermilk, two teaspoons soda, one quart 
meal, two cups flour, one cup syrup, one tablespoon salt; 
bake three hours in a crock with skillet turned over the 
top ; after removing from oven keep skillet on till cool. 



28 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



SOUPS, Etc. 



CELERY SOUP. 

Mrs. John Alling, Chicago. 
Three pints of chicken broth, one small cup of rice, one 
quart of milk, three or four stalks of celery. Cook the rice 
in the milk until very soft ; then add the chicken broth, 
into which you have cut up the celery. Let it boil a few- 
minutes, strain through a collander, season with salt and 
pepper and serve hot. 

BEEF SOUP. 

Mrs. Springer, 
Put on a soup bone. Let the shank be covered with 
water and be kept simmering for several hours. For din- 
ner it should be put on at early breakfast time. A sirloin 
steak is good if bones are used as well as the lean meat. 
All soup meat should be put on in cold water. When a 
scum is formed it should be taken off. Soups may vary, 
by having beef as the base, with a variety of vegetables, 
or fried bread, or noodles, or herbs, or rice, or pearl bar- 
ley, or spices. Vegetables should be sliced. Potatoes, 
turnips, parsnips, carrots, cabbage, tomatoes, onions or 
celery may be used. Salt should be put in at the last, also 
catsup, if desired. If the soup boils at all it should be 
just before taken up, so that the vegetables may be tender. 

VEAL SOUP. 

Mrs. Enos. 

A knuckle of veal, boiled until the meat falls from the 

bone. Onions sliced should be put on with the meat. 

"When the meat is boiled take out the bones and add sliced 



SOUPS, ETC. 29- 

potatoes to the meat and soup ; season with pepper, salt, a 
little cloves, sweet marjorem and a little coriander seed, 
pounded ; make dumplings as biscuit dough, with the ad- 
dition of an egg ; roll them in round balls or cut them in 
squares ; lastly, add chopped hard-boiled eggs, 

MUTTON SOUP. 
A leg of mutton, boiled three hours. After seasoning 
with salt and pepper boil quickly a dropped batter made of 
one egg, milk and flour. 

OYSTER SOUP. 
For one quart of oysters use one pint of water and one 
quart of new milk ; thicken, though not very thick, with 
rolled crackers ; season with butter, pepper and salt. The 
oysters should not be added until the milk is boiling hot, 
and the whole should then boil quickly. 

NOODLE SOUP. 

Mrs. Enos. 
Boil a chicken until tender ; add an onion. Make 
noodles by taking three eggs and working into them flour 
enough to make stiff to roll ; when dry enough to fold, roll 
them over and over ; cut slices from the ends ; put these 
into the soup and season. 

POTATO SOUP. 
Slice the potatoes ; put them on the stove in sufficient 
water; season with pepper, salt and butter; add milk or 
cream thickened with fiour. If desired, add chopped 
hard-boiled eggs. 

CORN SOUP. 
Boil shank of beef for two hours ; add salt, tomatoes, 
corn cut from the cob, one quart of milk, lump of butter 
size of an egg, pepper and powdered crackers. 



30 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

BEAxN SOUP. 

To one quart of beans take two quarts of water; boil the 
beans until they will mash soft. Mutton, beef or pork sea- 
sons the soup. Butter and flour rubbed together are a 
substitute for meat. Put toasted bread into the soup tureen. 

PEA SOUP. 

Boil peas slowly in a little water ; add milk and crackers, 
either rolled or broken ; season with pepper, salt and butter. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

Miss Georgie Howell. 

One quart ripe tomatoes ; boil slowly one-half hour ; 
strain, season with salt, pepper and butter to taste ; to this 
add one-half gallon boiling milk, stirring all the time ; add 
four crackers, rolled or grated fine. Serve immediately. 

TIT-BIT SOUP. 

One pound chicken or turkey, cut fine ; cook till tender ; 
pick and chop ; put back in broth ; season with salt, pep- 
per, butter and a little celery ; boil fifteen minutes. When 
ready to serve add one-half gallon boiling milk and two 
well-beaten eggs. 

POTATO SOUP. 

Rev. Aaron Miller. 

Boil peeled potatoes until they will mash ; slice light 
wheat bread of equal quantity ; stir this with the potatoes 
in melted butter or rich cream, then boil in rich milk until 
thick as mush, adding salt. 



FISH. 31 



FISH 



BAKED FISH. 
Mrs. Craig. 
For a three-pound fish, clean nicely, salt and pepper, 
and roll in flour ; fill with dressing as for chicken ; Tie 
and lay the fish in a pan previously heated and buttered. 
Wooden pins or a saucer may be used to brace the fish 
from the bottom of the pan ; bake two and one-half hours ; 
serve with melted butter. 

BOILED FISH. 
Miss Corson. 
Place over the fire in plenty of cold, salted water; 
bring slowly to the boiling point ; keep the water boiling 
until the fins can be pulled from the fish. Salmon, the 
finest of all fish for boiling, is excellent with a dish of 
buttered green peas in summer. 

EGG SAUCE FOR FISH. 

Mrs. Sappington, Madison. 
Boil four eggs ten minutes. To prevent their turning 
blue dip them in cold water ; peel and chop fine ; stir in a 
large tablespoon butter and a cup of cream. 

SALMON IN A MOLD. 

Mrs. Foltz. 
One can salmon, four eggs beaten light, four tablespoons 
melted butter, one-half cup fine bread crumbs. Season 
with pepper and salt ; chop the fish fine and rub it in a 
bowl with the back of a silver spoon, adding the butter 
until it is a smooth paste ; add the crumbs to the eggs, and 
season before mixing all together ; put into a buttered 
pudding mold, and boil or steam for an hour. 



32 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK, 

SAUCE. 

One cup milk heated and thickened with one tablespoon 
corn starch, the Hquor from the canned sahnon, one large 
spoon butter, one raw egg, one teaspoon mushroom or 
tomato catsup, one pinch mace and one cayenne. Put 
the egg in last ; boil one minute, and when the salmon is 
turned out, pour over it. 

BAKED HALIBUT. 

Mrs. Foltz. 
Take a piece of halibut weighing five or six pounds and 
lay it in salt water for two hours ; wipe dry and cut the 
skin ; set in a baking-tin in a hot oven, basting often with 
butter and water, heating in a tin ; bake one hour, or until 
a fork will penetrate ; take the gravy in the pan ; add water 
if needed ; stir in a tablespoon of walnut catsup, a teaspoon 
of Worcester sauce and the juice of a lemon ; thicken with 
brown flour wet up with cold water ; boil up once and put 
in a sauce boat. Halibut, salmon, herring and other dried 
fish can be heated through by quickly turning from side to 
side in hot frying-pan, or they may be broiled. 

LOBSTER CUTLETS. 
One-half pound canned lobsters, one ounce flour, one 
ounce butter, one gill cold water, a little salt and pepper, a 
few drops lemon juice, and two or three tablespoons bread 
crumbs. Cut up into pieces the meat from the can ; melt 
the butter ; add the flour and cold water ; stir until the 
mixture boils ; add the meat. When cold, form into small 
cutlets, roll them in egg and then in bread crumbs. Fry 
them in hot lard. 

BAKED LOBSTER. 
Mrs. Bently. 
Chop the meat, mix bread crumbs with it, and add a 
dressing of butter, cayenne pepper, a little vinegar, and 



W. H. ALLEN & CO., 

Headquarters for anjrthing in Drug Line, 

Fine Perfumes, Toilet Articles, Soaps, Etc. 

Cor. Pennsylvania & Market Sts, opp. Post Office, 

INDIANAPOLIS, IISTD. 



eiierson 




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DEALER IN 



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57 A.lSnD 59 
WEST WASHINGTON ST. 



Correspondence Solicited. 



1860. THE 1883. 

WASHINGTON 




Life Insurance Company* 

OF NEA^^ YORK. 

W. A. BREWER, Jr., President. WM. HAXTON, Secretary. 

OFFICE, COAL AND IRON EXCHANGE. 



ASSKTS, = = = S6, 500,000 

The motto of the Company has always been, that "SAFETY' and SUCCESS must 

always go hand in hand;" hence, its policy is first to do a SAFE, 

afterwards a LARGE business. 

Its Investments are the very best that can be obtained, and its management has never 

been questioned. 



The grreat and distinguishing feature of the WASHINGTON is 
it» NON-FORFEITABtE DIVIDENDS. 

A policy in the WASHINGTON can not lapse by NON-PAYMENT 
of premium so long as there are any dividends, or accumulation of 
dividends remaining to its credit 

Thereby HOLDING POLICIES in force by their AUTOMATIC 
principle, whether premium be paid when due or not, and prevent- 
ing lapse by ACCIDENT, CARELESSNESS, or INABILITY to pay. 

Giving Policy Holders the right to renew their insurance at the 
expiration of the dividend holding period, without a new Medical 
Examination. 

ITS POLICIE*! are the most liberal issued by any Company. 

ITS CONTRACT is in PLAIN, CONCISE language, contains 
fewer restrictions than any other Company. 



This Company has a reputation, fairly won, and a character, firmly established, the 
foundation of which was laid in a charter wherein the rights of its policy holders were 
made secure, and in the adoption of plans of insurance that have made a policy granted 
by this Company a most desirable possession. * * * We know of no Company that 
we can more cordially recommend to the public than the Washington Life Insurance 
Company of this city. — [New York Christian Advocate. 

J. D. SUTTON, State Agent, 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

DR. S. L. FULLER, M. M. CUMMINGS. 

Gen'l Agt. Michigan, Wisconsin &. Indiana, Special Agent. 

Detroit. Mich. 



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C is the cooler; c its cover; F the filter; / the perforated ice shelf; 
s the filtering stone, and L the ice on the shelf. 



The only Filter in the World that will insure 

Perfectly Pure Water. 

Yellow Fever, Typhoid Fever, Bright's Disease, 
and a very large proportion of the "thousand and 
one diseases that llesh is heir to" are produced by 
the use of 

IMPURE WATER. 

The "Gate City" filters the water 
slowly through a natural stone and 
not only removes all the animalculae, 
sand, clay, etc., but as proven by mi- 
croscopic and chemical analysis, also 
removes all chlorine, albuminoids, 
ammonia and organic matter, which 
are the disease breeding elements of 
ordinary drinking water, leaving the 
water entirely clear, sparkling and 
colorless. Prices less than other fil- 
ters of equal capacity. Write for 
pamphlet and prices. 

References — The Indiana State 
Board of Health, Indianapolis Board 
of Health, and thousands of well- 
known physicians and chemists 
throughout the United States. 
Address, 

Geo. B. Wright ^ Co. 

31 West Market St., Indianapolis. 




I. L. FRANKEM, 



34 E. Wasiiiisgton Street, 

AGENT FOR 



O 



o 

d 
o 

ID 

> 






2 








HULL'S VAPOR COOK STOVE. 

You can bake, broil, fry or stew on them to perfection. For summer 

use they are unexcelled. Warranted to give perfect satisfaction. 

N. B. — Don't fail to get the Hull Burner. 

Shirt Factory and Steam Laundry, 
















§• b 

,^ Co 



74 N. PENNSYLVANIA ST., INDIANAPOLIS. 



OYSTERS, 33 

the yolks of three hard-boiled eggs. Put this into a dish, 
and over the top put a few bread crumbs and bits of butter ; 
bake until brown. It may be eaten hot or cold. 

CODFISH BALLS. 
Wash, soak, and boil one-half hour; pick to pieces and 
take away the bone ; mix the minced meat with mashed 
potatoes and fry the balls. 

SPICED MACKEREL. 

Mrs. Black. 
Let it boil fifteen minutes, then pour on it boiling vine- 
gar, pepper, salt and spices. Serve cold. 

MAYONAISE DRESSING. 

Mrs. Clough. 
Mix the yolks of two eggs with one cup of sweet oil ; add 
one teaspoon mixed mustard, two teaspoons salt and one 
of sugar. 



OYSTERS. 



OYSTER STEW. 
One pint milk, one pint water, one-half can oysters, six 
rolled crackers, pepper, salt and butter. Put in the oys- 
ters when the milk and water have come to a boil. When 
boiled up once, remove. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 
Roll the oysters in corn meal and fry in hot lard. They 
may be dipped in rolled cracker, and then in egg, before 
frying; or, for fritters, they may be dipped in batter, and 
fried. 

3 



34 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

PICKLED OYSTERS. 
Let cook slowly a few minutes ; then put in a jar, cov- 
ering with spices and hot vinegar. 

ESCOLLOPED OYSTERS. 
Cover a well buttered dish with a layer of broken cracker 
• — above this, with oySters — and so continue until the dish 
or pan is filled. Let cracker be the top layer. Season with 
butter, pepper and salt. 

OYSTER PIE. 
Line a dish with plain pastry. Fill with oysters and 
bread or cracker crumbs. Cover with the pastry, and bake 
quickly. 

SWEET-BREAD AND OYSTER PIE. 

Mrs. Binford. 
Stew the sweet-breads until tender ; have a dish lined 
with a good paste. Cut the sweet-breads up in small 
pieces. Put in a dish with the oysters, pepper, salt, table- 
spoon of butter, and yolks of three eggs boiled hard and 
mashed fine. Another layer of oysters and sweet-bread 
until the dish is full. Put on a top crust and bake. 

OYSTER SALAD. 

Mrs. Clough. 
Cut up one-quart can of cove oysters. Make a dressing 
of the beaten yolks of three eggs and one cup of vinegar. 
Add one tablespoon butter, with mustard, pepper, salt 
and celery seed to taste. Put this dressing on the stove, 
and stir all the time to prevent lumping ; let it boil until 
thick, and when cold pour over the oysters, and mix well. 

MACARONI AND OYSTERS. 
Boil the macaroni, and alternate layers of it with oys- 
ters. Put bread crumbs as top layer, and pour over all a 
broth made of milk and the oyster liquor. Season with 
pepper, salt and butter. 



MEATS, ETC. 35 



MEATS, Etc. 



MOCK DUCK. 

Mrs. Enos. 

Either a flank or a round beef steak, with a dressing 

made of bread and onions, seasoned with pepper, salt and 

butter. Spread the dressing over the steak, roll up the 

steak and bake. 

HAM TOAST. 
Mince cooked ham ; add pepper and mustard. Beat up 
egg and mix, adding sufificient milk to moisten, before heat- 
ing. Serve on toast or fried bread. 

LAMB STEAKS. 

Dip them in egg and then in bread crumbs. Fry until 
brown. 

PORK FRITTERS. 
After frying a slice of pork, dip other slices into a batter 
made of corn meal and flour. Fry them in the hot fat; 
season with salt and pepper ; cook until light brown. 

BOILED HAM. 

Mrs. Hereth. 
Wash and scrape the ham. Put on a kettle large enough 
to cover the ham with water. When the water is at the 
boiling point, put in the ham. For every pound of ham, 
allow fifteen minutes' boiling. 

ROAST BEEF. 
Put in a pan with a little depth of water, after rubbing 
over it salt and pepper. Baste frequently, by pouring the 
water from a spoon over it. Fifteen minutes to every pound 
of beef will cook it. 



36 INr3IANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

PRESSED BEEF. 

Mrs. Rubush. 
Get a flank of beef. Boil it until it is real tender. Take 
out all the bone and gristle. Season with salt and pepper, 
put it into a crock, put on it a plate with a weight to 
press it down. Serve in slices. 

PRESSED CHICKEN. 
Prepare as above. Salt while cooking. 

SMOTHERED SPRING CHICKEN. 

Mrs. Kellog. 
Cut open in the back, wash clean and put in a pan ; sea- 
son with butter, pepper and salt ; put in a hot oven and 
bake half an hour ; dredge with flour ; baste frequently. 

CHICKEN PIE. 
Mrs. Black 
Make dough as for biscuit. Stew the chicken thor- 
oughly, and pour the gravy upon slices of potato and the 
pieces of chicken, after lining a deep pan with the dough 
and putting in the chicken and potato in alternate layers ; 
dredge with flour and season ; spread over an upper crust. 
Let both upper and lower crust be cut, that the air as well 
as the gravy may pass back and forth. 

ROAST VEAL. 

Mrs. Kellog. 
Prepare the breast of veal for dressing ; then take one 
quart dry bread crumbs or rolled crackers, the yelks of 
two eggs, one tablespoon powdered sage, one-half cup but- 
ter ; rub all together ; split the veal and put in the dressing. 
Bake in a moderate oven, basting frequently. 

VEAL LOAF. 

Mrs. J. F. Moore, Vincennes. 
A cold roast of veal chopped fine, one cup bread crumbs, 
a lemon rind, two beaten eggs, season weU, according to 



MEATS, ETC. 37 

taste ; mix and make into a loaf ; cover with beaten egg 
and sprinkle on bread crumbs ; bake half an hour. Slice 
when cold. 

FOR CURING MEAT. 

One gallon water, one and one-half pounds salt, one-half 
pound sugar, one-half ounce saltpeter, one-fourth ounce 
potash ; boil together until ready to skim ; pour out to cool. 
When cold pour over the beef, to remain four or five weeks. 
The meat should not be put down for two days after killing. 
Let it be slightly sprinkled during that time with powdered 
saltpeter, to remove the surface blood. 

LARD. 

Skin the leaf lard, or, if careful to stir, it maybe cut into 
inch pieces without skinning. Put a little water into the 
kettle and melt the lard in it slowly. Boil until clear. 
Strain through a cloth or sieve. 

SAUSAGE. 

Take tenderloin or mixed fat and lean pork; season, 
after chopping fine, with powdered sage, black pepper, 
salt, and spices, if desired. 

MEAT PUFFS. 

Mrs. Ends. 
Take cold meat of any kind ; cut it into small bits ; sea- 
son with pepper and salt ; mash some potatoes and make 
into paste with two eggs ; roll out with a dust of flour ; cut 
with a large biscuit cutter ; turn over one half, inclosing a 
layer of meat, and pinch edges together ; fry in butter and 
lard. 

EGG AND APPLE OMELETTE. 

Marion Harland. 
Six large pippins, one tablespoon butter, three eggs, five 
or six tablespoons sugar, nutmeg and rose water. Stew the 



38 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



apples, beat them smooth, adding the butter, sugar and 
nutmeg. When cold, put with eggs, beaten separately. 
Pour into a buttered baking dish. Bake, until a delicate 
brown. Eat warm. 

* HAM OMELETTE. 
Beat six eggs light, separately. Add to the yolks, one 
cup milk ; pepper and salt. Stir in the whites. Have 
heated in frying pan a lump of butter. Pour in the mixture. 
Slip the knife under often to prevent burning. When done, 
scatter over it chopped ham. 

SOUTHERN VEAL STEW. 

Mrs. Basore, Broadway, Virginia. 
Peel and boil one-half dozen onions, drain and slice 
them ; have ready two pounds nice sliced veal ; put in a 
stew-pan ; season with salt and a litde cayenne ; cover the 
veal with the onions, and some sliced Irish potatoes ; lay 
on them some bits of fresh butter, rolled in flour ; put in a 
very little lemon, just as it is done. Lamb, chicken, 
squirrel or rabbit are equally nice. 

CROQUETTS. 
Chop fresh meat fine ; roll dried bread with it, also crum- 
bled fine ; add salt, pepper and cloves, with one egg ; work 
all together and make into balls the size of an egg ; roll in 
bread crumbs and egg ; fry in hot lard ; dish with gravy 
flavored with walnut catsup. 

EGG HASH. 
Take cold veal and chop it fine ; put butter with it in a 
pan ; sprinkle in it a little flour ; brown it ; boil a few eggs 
and add to this veal ; season with pepper and salt. 

VEAL HASH. 
Chop cold veal and add mashed potatoes ; make into 
cakes ; season with pepper and salt, and fry. 



MEATS, ETC. 39 

SCRAPPLE. 
Use hogshead or feet, or any part of pork ; boil until 
the meat falls from the bones ; take out of the pot and 
return the meat, only ; season with pepper and salt, 
sweet marjorem and a little coriander seed ; thicken with 
corn meal or buckwheat. When cold, cut in slices and fry. 

VEAL ROLL. 

Mrs. Isaac Pattison. 
Two pounds veal chopped fine, two eggs, one tablespoon 
salt, six crackers rolled fine, one tablespoon melted butter, 
one-half pound pickled pork, one teaspoon pepper. Bake 
in a loaf one hour. 

IRISH STEW. 
Two pounds potatoes peeled, sliced and parboiled, two 
pounds mutton chops, two pounds beef, six onions sliced, 
a slice of ham or lean bacon, spoonful of pepper and two 
of salt. In stewing, let the lowest layer and the topmost 
be potatoes. 

MINCED VEAL. 
Mince the slices of roasted veal finely, after trimming off 
the brown edges ; chop one small onion fine ; fry it in but- 
ter and add three tablespoons of veal gravy. When boil- 
ing hot turn in the minced veal. If not moist enough pour 
in a little boiling water. Serve with poached eggs on the 
top of it. 

BEEF HASH. 

Mrs. Bently. 

Take cold pieces of beef and chop them fine ; add cold 

boiled potatoes chopped fine ; add pepper and salt and a 

little warm water. Put all in a frying pan and cook slowly 

twenty minutes. 

DRY BEEF HASH. 
Made as above, omitting water and substituting mashed 
potatoes ; pound together in a stone crock ; cut in slices 
and fry in hot lard or butter. 



40 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

CORN BEEF HASH. 
Season with salt and pepper, chop fine, and to one-third 
meat add two-thirds chopped cold boiled potatoes, and 
one onion chopped fine. Place in dripping pan, pour 
water in at sides, and dredge the top with flour. When 
the flour has browned, take out, add a lump of butter, stir 
it through several times. 

BEEF LIVER. 
Fry slices of salt pork ; take them out, and fry slices of 
liver in the fat. Thicken the gravy with flour and water, 
mixed smooth. Pepper and salt. 

MUTTON CUTLETS. 

Mrs. Bentlv. 
Cut from the end of a neck of mutton, making the 
slices one-half an inch thick. Pepper, salt, and boil over 
a brisk fire. 

VEAL CUTLETS. 
Fry slowly to a delicate brown. 

BROH.ED BEEFSTEAK. 
Broil on griddle, not turning until the side is done. 
Season, after taking up, with much butter and pepper. 

FRIED BEEFSTEAK. 
Put into a very hot frying-pan ; turn often : season be- 
fore taking up. 

FRIED BEEFSTEAK WITH GRAVY. 

Put into boiling lard in frying pan. When done, stir in 
smoothly water or milk, with flour. Salt and pepper. 

ITALIAN CHEESE. 

Mrs. Foltz. 
Cover a knuckle of veal with two quarts of water. Boil 
until tender; then strip the meat from the bone, and let it 



MEATS, ETC. 4 1 

cool. Cut into small pieces, strain the liquor, and return 
all to the kettle. Season with a scant teaspoon of cloves, 
and the same of ground allsjMce ; salt to taste. Boil until 
it jellies ; then turn into a mold which has been lined 
with hard boiled eggs, cut into thin slices. When cold, 
turn out and slice after it is put on the table. 

VEAL MARBLE. 

Mrs. Foltz. 
Boil a beef tongue the day before it is to be used, and 
the same number of pounds of lean veal ; chop very fine, 
keeping them in separate vessels. Season the tongue with 
pepper, a teaspoon of made mustard, a little nutmeg, and 
cloves; the veal, in like manner, adding salt. Pack in 
alternate spoonsful in bowls or jars which have been but- 
tered ; press very hard ; cover with melted butter, if you 
wish to keep it several days. Turn out whole, and cut in 
thin slices for tea. 

FRIED CHICKEN. 

Mrs. Binford. 
If a year old, parboil it before frying: let the pieces be 
cut and the legs especially be stripped of their meat; 
spread out these pieces that all may be fried evenly. It is 
the Chinese way, and superior. Season with salt and pep- 
per and dredge with flour before putting into the hot lard. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

Mrs. Clough. 
To a cup full of chopped chicken add a tablespoonful of 
milk, a well-beaten egg, a little salt and pepper ; fry the 
mixture in little cakes, a tablespoonful in each, browning 
nicely on both sides. They may be flavored with celery 
seed. 

PRESSED BEEF. 
Mrs. Will Siddall. 
Boil seven pounds — a neck ])iece— until the bone slips 
out ; boil the liquor down to one pint ; chop the beef, add 



42 . INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



the liquor, set on fire and season with salt, pepper, sage, 
summer savory, nutmeg, and butter the size of an egg; 
beat thoroughly, put in a tin pan and press down with a 
weight for twenty-four hours. 

SANDWICHES. 

Butter thin slices of bread ; spread lightly with mustard ; 
put between them thin slices of beef, ham, tongue, or fried 
oysters. 

HOW TO CORN BEEF. 
Mrs. Dr. Gillette. 
To one gallon water add two pounds salt, one-third 
pound sugar, one-half ounce saltpetre. Boil, skim well, 
and when cool pour over the beef. 

BEEF CROQUETTES. 

Mrs. Etta Reakirt. 
One and one-half pounds lean beef ; chop finely ; add 
one coffee cup of finely rolled cracker, and a small lump 
of butter ; melt, season with salt and pepper and the least 
dust of sage ; take two or three beaten eggs and mix all 
together into a loaf. Bake for two-thirds of an hour. 

STUFFING OR DRESSING. 
Mrs. Black. 
Soak in milk or water pieces of bread ; season with pep- 
per, salt and a little sage. Oysters can be added to bread 
crumbs or powdered crackers, by chopping fine, adding 
butter and the oyster liquor. 

TO ROAST TURKEY OR OTHER FOWL. 
Wash clean; fill with dressing; dredge with Mour and a 
little salt and pepper; put in the pan with a depth of two 
inches of water; baste fre(iuently by taking the water in a 
spoon and pouring over the fowl ; put balls of dressing in 
the pan. 



EGGS. 43 

TURKEY DRESSING. 

MkS. Sl'KINCKK. 

Have butter hot in a skillet ; jjut in it squares of bread. 
When they brown, pour over them oyster licjuor, or milk, 
or water. Season and use. 

TONGUE. 
Beef tongue should be boiled one hour ; after cooling, 
the outside skin should be peeled. Serve in thin slices. 



EGGS 



BOILED EGGS. 
Three minutes or less time is ordinarily given to boiling. 
A better way is, to put the eggs in boiling hot water and 
set them away from the fire. The vessel should be kept 
covered. In fifteen minutes the eggs will be cooked 
through evenly. 

POACHED OR DROPPED EGGS. 
Have enough water in the pans to more than cover the 
eggs. Break the eggs singly in a saucer and slip them in 
the water. As soon as they whiten, take them out with a 
perforated ladle, place each egg on a j)iece of buttered 
toast, and sprinkle with salt and pepper. 

SCRAMBLED EGGS. 
When a tablespoonful of butter, or lard, is hot in the 
frying pan. pour in the eggs and stir rapidly until suffi- 
ciently cooked. 



44 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



OMELETTE. 
Beat three eggs, add two tablespoons each of milk and 
tread crumbs. Put the mixture into ,hot butter and fry. 
Sprinkle with salt and pepper, and roll up like a jelly cake. 

OMELETTE. 
Eight eggs well beaten, one cup sweet milk, pepper and 
salt to taste. Make the skillet hot and grease with butter 
and lard. Pour the mixture in, and when cooked through, 
quarter and turn. Heat the skillet on front of stove, and 
change to the back, before cooking the omelette. 

FRIED POTATOES WITH EGGS. 
Mrs. Ends. 
Fry cold potatoes in a little hot lard. When browned, 
stir in a few eggs. Dish immediately. 

EGG BALLS. 

Mrs. Reynolds. 
Three cups mashed potatoes, one-half cup flour, one- 
lialf teacup sweet milk,' two well-beaten eggs, a little salt 
and pepper ; shape into balls and fry in boiling lard. 

STUFFED EGGS. 

Miss Craft. 
Boil eggs until the yelks are mealy ; peel, and cut into 
halves, round way. Turn out the yelks ; mash them fine, 
mixing with butter, pepper, salt and vinegar, to suit taste. 
Return this mixture to the white cup shape of the egg, 
placing upon the dish. Besides being a good relish, it is 
a pretty dish for the table. 



VEGETABLES, ETC. 45 



VEGETABLES, Etc. 



TOMATO HASH. 
Into a well-buttered dish put a layer of tomatoes, next of 
sliced meat, then of bread and butter until the dish is full ; 
bake in a hot oven after pouring egg over top of last layer 
and seasoning. 

ESCALLOPED TOMATOES. 

Mrs. Binfokd. 
Put in a buttered baking dish a layer of bread crumbs 
seasoned with bits of butter, then a layer of sliced tomatoes 
seasoned with salt, pepper, and sugar, if desired, then a 
layer of crumbs, and so on, finishing with bread crumbs; 
bake about three-fourths of an hour. Sliced onions may 
be mixed with the slices of tomato. 

FRIED TOMATOES. 

Mrs. Patton. 

Either green or ripe tomatoes, sliced and rolled in flour; 

season with ])epper and salt, and fry in lard. The slices 

may be dipped in egg and then in either bread or cracker 

crumbs before frying. 

BROILED TOMATOES. 

Broil the slices on a grid-iron ; turn them on a hot dish, 
and put over them butter, pepper and salt. 

STEWED TOMATOES. 

■ Mrs. Dr. Hester. 
Cook quickly and take up ; add salt, one teaspoon sugar 
and one tablespoon butter, mixed with flour. 



46 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

BAKED TOMATOES AND APPLES. 
Mrs. Hereth. 
Slice good, ripe tomatoes and Vandever apples; put in 
a pan alternate layers, with sugar sprinkled over them, and 
bake slowly one hour. No water is needed. 

SLICED TOMATOES. 

Mrs. John Rubush. 
Scald ripe tomatoes and let them stand in cold water ; 
then take off the skin and slice ; serve with salt, pepper 
and vinegar. 

TOMATOES AND CORN. 

Mrs. Patton. 
Cook together, after stewing separately, one-third corn 
and two-thirds tomatoes. 

STEWED CORN. 

Mrs. Reynolds. 
Cut off the cobs and boil ; season with salt, pepper and 
butter, or add cream. Cook on the cobs, if preferred. 

FRIED CORN. 
Fry corn, either with or without potato, and season. 

CORN PUDDING. 

Mrs. Patton. 
Cut down four ears of corn ; beat two eggs with one pint 
of milk, butter size of an egg, three tablespoons flour; add 
salt and pepper, beat well together and bake one hour. 
Serve as a vegetable. 

SUCCOTASH. 
Mrs. Patton. 
One pint of green corn cut from the cob and two-thirds 
of a pint of either Lima or stringed beans ; stew in water 
enough to cover. When tender, season with butter, pep- 
per, salt and a little milk. Cook together a few moments. 



VEGETABLES, ETC. 47 

LIMA BEANS. 
Put on the stove in cold water and boil until tender; 
season with rich milk, butter, pepper and salt. Let them 
simmer. 

CANNING CORN. 

Mrs. Enos. 

Boil on the cob until half done, then cut it off, and to 

twenty-two quarts of corn, use three and one-half ounces of 

tartaric acid. Boil the corn in a good deal of water. 

When done, add the acid dissolved in a little warm water. 

SOUTHERN GREEN CORN PUDDING. 

Mrs. Rev. Brown, Madison. 
One dozen ears corn, grated into a buttered pudding 
dish. Add morning's milk to consistency of thick batter. 
Season well with butter, pepper and salt, and bake three 
quarters of an hour. 

STRING BEANS. 

Mrs. Rubush. 
Cut each end and take off the string. Boil from one to 
two hours. A piece of salt pork may season thern, or butter, 
pepper and salt. 

BOSTON BAKED BEANS. 
Mrs. Dr. Wilev. 
Pick and wash one heaping pint of dressed beans. Put 
them in a sauce pan with enough cold water to cover them. 
Let them simmer over the fire until they come to a boil. 
Drain off the water, and put in a bean pot with half a 
pound of pork. Pour a little molasses on the top. Let 
cook slowly for six or eight hours. 

BAKED BEANS. 
Mrs. Rubush. 
Boil the beans and pour off the water. Then put them 
into a pan with pork that has just been parboiled, and bake 
them until brown. Season. 



48 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



GREEN PEAS. 

Mrs. Black. 
Shell and put into boiling water. They will cook in 
twenty minutes. Add cream, in seasoning. Broken 
crackers improve them. 

YANKEE BAKED BEANS. 

Mrs. Bugbee. 

Take one quart of white dried beans, or more if neces- 
sary, put them in a vessel with cold water enough to come 
above the beans two or three inches. Boil them until, 
when you take up a spoonful and blow them, the skin will 
crack ; then take them out in a cullendar and pour coll 
water over them to rinse them off ; then put them in a 
brown earthen bean pot. Leave space to put half a pound 
of pickled or salt pork, mostly fat; one small tablespoon of 
molasses, a big teaspoon of salt. Then put a thin cover- 
ing of beans over the pork, and fill up with boiling water 
As fast as the water dries away, fill up with more boiling 
water, until they have cooked five or six hours. When 
done, have them laid away, so they will be moist enough 
to be nice. 

CAULIFLOWER. 
Mrs. Ferrell 

Wash the flower in salt and water ; tie in a floured cloth 
and boil forty minutes, putting it into salted boiling water. 
Make a sauce of a small teacup corn starch, smoothed with 
cold water, and added to one-half pint sweet milk boiled 
with one cup of the water in which the cauliflower was 
boiled. Put in a piece of butter as large as an egg, and 
one teaspoon vinegar. When the butter has melted, pour 
this sauce over the cauliflower, and serve. 

SPINACH. 

Mrs. Ferrell. 
Pick off the leaves and boil in plenty of hot salted water. 
Drain ; chop upon a board or in a tray ; put into a sauce- 
pan with a tablespoonful of butter, a little ])eppcr and 



VEGETABI.KS. ETC. 49 



salt, and a few spoonsful of milk or cream. Stir and heat 
until bubbling hot ; pour out upon small squares of toasted 
bread. 

POTATO CROQUETS. 
Mrs. Reakirt. 
Eight good sized potatoes, boiled and mashed. Add 
butter, and season. Beat two eggs, whites and yolks sep- 
arately. Add one-half cup of flour to the mashed potatoes. 
Make into balls and fry. 

POTATOES AND CAULIFLOWER. 
Chop together both when cold, after boiling. Serve hot 
with a sauce of one cup sweet milk, one cup water, one 
teaspoon vinegar, and one-half cup butter, boiled together. 

SWEET POTATOES. 
After steaming, put them in the oven to dry. 

POTATOES AND TURNIPS. 
Steam, then mash together, add cream, salt and pep- 
per. The potatoes take from the turnips their strong taste, 
and make them delicate. 

TO FRY EGG-PLANT. 
Pare and let it lie fifteen minutes in salt and water ; wipe 
dry and dip in rolled cracker, after seasoning with pepper 
and salt and dipping each piece in the beaten yolk of an 
egg- 

HUBBARD SQUASH. 
Cut in round slices, leaving on the peel, and bake in the 
oven. 

CORN OYSTERS. 

Miss Kittie Lodge. 
One pint grated corn, one teacup flour, one-half teacup 
butter, one egg, pepper and salt. Fry in lard. 



50 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

MUSHROOMS. 

Mrs. S. E. Wagoner. 
Split them and soak in weak salt and water a few hours ; 
flour, and fry in butter to a nice brown. 

SALSIFY, OR OYSTER-PLANT. 
Mrs. S. E. Wagoner. 
Cut, round way, in thin slices ; stew in water, and then 
add milk, butter, pepper and salt, as for oyster-stew. 

SQUASH. 
Steam and dry before mashing. 

ASPARAGUS. 
Boil until tender ; serve with drawn butter on toast ; put 
over it slices of hard-boiled eggs. 

BAKED MACARONL 

Mrs. Reakirt. 
Break up one-half pound into small pieces ; put in boil- 
ing water; stew for twenty minutes ; salt ; drain well; place 
a layer in a buttered dish ; cover with grated cheese and a 
few lumps of butter. Alternate in this way, and add one 
gill of cream or milk. Bake one-half hour. 

MASHED POTATOES. 

Mrs. Col. Merrill. 
Boil the potatoes, but not done. After peeling, put in 
as little milk as is necessary for mashing the potatoes as 
light as cake ; beat them very hard with a spoon. Season 
with salt and butter. 

KALECANNON. 

Boiled cabbage and potatoes in equal proportions as a 
breakfast dish. 



VEGETABLES, ETC. 5 I 

OCHRA. 

Wash, cut in half, season and fry. 

BEETS. 
Young beets boil quickly ; but when a little old, they 
take at least two hours. The skins should not be taken off 
until after cooking. Young j)otatoes boiled separately and 
afterward sliced with the beets, and a dressing of butter or 
cream, are very nice. 

SMOTHERED POTATOES. 
Mrs. Ends. 
Slice raw potatoes and onions ; put them in a frying 
pan, into hot lard ; season with pepper and salt, and cover 
closely. 

POTATO PUFFS. 

Mrs. Ends. 
Take cold meat of any kind ; cut into small bits ; season 
with pepper and salt ; mash some potatoes, and make into 
paste with two eggs ; roll out with a dust of flour ; cut 
with a large biscuit cutter ; turn over one half, inclosing a 
layer of meat, and pinch edges together ; fry in butter and 
lard. 

RULES FOR COOKING VEGETABLES. 

A French cook gives the following general rules for 
cooking all kinds of vegetables : Green vegetables should 
be thoroughly washed in cold water, and then dropped 
into water which has been salted and is beginning to boil. 
There should be a tablespoonful of salt for each two quarts 
of water. If the water boils long before the vegetables are 
put in, it has lost all its gases, and the mineral ingredients 
are deposited on the bottom and sides of the kettle, so 
that the water is flat and tasteless, then the vegetables will 
not look well, nor have a fine flavor. The time for boiling 
green vegetables depends much upon the age, and time they 



52 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



have been gathered. The younger, and more freshly gath- 
ered, the more quickly they are cooked. The following is a 
very good time-table for cooking vegetables : 

Potatoes, boiled, thirty minutes. 

Potatoes, baked, forty-five minutes. 

Sweet potatoes, boiled, fifty minutes. 

Sweet potatoes, baked, sixty minutes. 

Squash, boiled, twenty-five minutes. 

Green peas, boiled, twenty to forty minutes. 

Shelled bean^, boiled, sixty minutes. 

String beans, boiled, one or two hours. 

Green corn, thirty to sixty minutes. 

Asparagus, fifteen to thirty minutes. 

Spinach, one or two hours. 

Tomatoes, fresh, one hour. 

Tomatoes, canned, thirty minutes. 

Cabbage, forty-five minutes or two hours. 

Cauliflower, one or two hours. 

Dandelions, two or three hours. 

Beet greens, one hour. 

Onions, one to two hours. 

Beets, one to five hours. 

Turnips, white, forty-five to sixty minutes. 

Turnips, yellow, one and a half to two hours. 

Parsnips, one or two hours. 

Carrots, one or two hours. 



SALADS. 53 



SALADS. 

SLAW. 

Mrs. Sam. Merrill. 

Chop the cabbage up fine by itself. Put upon the stove 
and boil, one pint of vinegar, butter size of an egg., pepper 
and salt, celery seed. Mi.\ well. Stir, while it boils. Then 
pour over the cabbage, hot or cold, as preferred. 

ONION SLAW. 
Mrs. S. E. Wagoner. 

Slice very thin two large onions, in one-third cup vine- 
gar. Put in saucepan, boil three minutes, add one heap- 
ing teaspoon sugar, one-half teaspoon salt, one teaspoon 
flour, and pepper to taste. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Mrs. Burbridge, Crawfordsville. 

Boil the potatoes with skins on. Peel them. Chop 
onions fine, and the potatoes. Season with pepper and 
salt, and fry with small squares of bacon. 

CHICKEN OR TURKEY SALAD. 
Mrs. S. L. Goode. 

Three joints boned chicken cut into small pieces ; pour 
on this one cup vinegar, two teaspoons mixed mustard, 
one-half dozen chopped pickles, four stalks celery, five 
hard boiled eggs. Mi.x the yolks with three tablespoons 
of butter into a cream. Add two tablespoons sugar. Mix 
well all the above inj^redients. 



54 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Mks. S. L. Goode. 
One cup vinegar, yolks of three eggs, one-third teaspoon 
mustard, one-half teaspoon pepper, one teaspoon salt, one 
and one-half tablespoon sugar, one teaspoon butter, and a 
medium-sized onion chopped fine. Mix and cook until it 
thickens ; then pour over the potatoes which have been 
boiled with skins on, peeled, and cut into small squares. 

VEAL SALAD. 
Mrs. Black. 
Substitute boiled veal for chicken — and, as in chicken 
salad, use celery and hard boiled eggs. 

LETTUCE SALAD. 
Prepare bunches of lettuce by washing and shredding, 
and make a dressing of one teaspoon mustard, one table- 
spoon sugar, yelks of two eggs worked into the mustard 
and sugar, butter size of an egg, one cup vinegar. Chop 
the whole, and mix all together. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

Two hard boiled eggs, one beaten raw egg, one tea- 
spoon each of salt, pepper and made mustard, three tea- 
spoons of salad oil, two teaspoons white sugar, and one- 
half teacup vinegar. 

POTATO SALAD. 
Miss Craft. 

Boil and peel one-half dozen potatoes ; chop them into 
small bits. One large onion, chopped fine ; one-half cup 
sweet milk or water ; one large tablespoonful of butter ; 
one egg, well beaten. Heat milk and butter together, 
stirring in the beaten egg when it comes to the boiling 
point ; pour this over the potatoes and onions, mixing all 
together, with salt and pepper to taste. Then pour in a 
little vinegar to suit taste. This is a nice cold salad ; but, 
if desired warm, it is very nice if fried with some nice 
drippings of breakfast bacon. 



SALADS. 55 

EGG SALAD. 
Miss Craft. 
Boil eggs until yellows are mealy, then peel and cut into 
halves, round way ; turn yellows out into a dish, mash 
them fine, mixing in butter, salt, pepper and vinegar, to 
suit taste. Return this mixture to the white-egg-cups, 
placing upon dish. This, besides being a good relish with 
cold meats, is a very pretty dish for table. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 
Mince the meat of the lobster, and make a dressing of 
hard boiled eggs, salt, cayenne pepper, mustard, sugar 
and vinegar. If to be served immediately, add chopped 
lettuce. 

WHITE-FISH OR TROUT SALAD. 
To the chopped fish that has been boiled, add either 
celery, cabbage or lettuce, with salad dressing. 

TOMATO SALAD. 
Peel and slice the tomatoes. In one raw egg mix hard 
boiled eggs, salt, pepper, sugar, mustard and vinegar. 
Smooth the yelks and season them before putting them 
into the raw egg. Pour this dressing over the tomatoes, 
and set the dish on ice. 

SWEET-BREAD SALAD. 

Mrs. Clough. 
Wash the sweet-breads and parboil them in hot water. 
Let them come to a boil. When tender, take off and put 
in cold water, and let stand until cold ; then take them 
and pull them to pieces. Serve this minced meat with 
dressing: One heaping teaspoon mustard, one and one- 
half cups vinegar, one tablespoon sugar and one of melted 
butter, five eggs beaten separately ; and salt to taste. Mix 
sugar, vinegar, mustard and eggs together. 



56 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



OYSTER SALAD. 

Mrs. Reakirt. 
Two-pound can of cove oysters. Beat up four eggs with 
one cup cream and one cup vinegar, and butter size of an 
egg. Add one tablespoon each, of mustard, black pepper 
and sugar ; also, a little salt and cayenne pepper. Cook 
to the consistency of custard. Add rolled crackers. Mix 
liquor of oysters with this dressing, and pour all upon the 
oysters. Fresh oysters can be used. 

RAW CATSUP. 

Mrs. DiEHL, Cincinnati. 
One peck ripe tomatoes, chopped fine ; two horseradish 
roots, grated fine ; one small teacup each, of salt and mus- 
tard seed, black and white, mixed ; two tablespoons black 
pepper; two ounces celery seed ; one cup onions, chopped 
fine ; one teaspoon ground cloves, one of mace, two of 
cinnamon ; one cup brown sugar, two quarts vinegar. Mix 
the spices, horseradish, mustard and sugar together. Pour 
over the ingredients, and mix all thoroughly. 

OIL PICKLES. 
Mrs. Diehl, Cincinnati. 
One hundred cucumbers sliced, one-quarter peck white 
onions, one quart salt. Put in a press over night ; in the 
morning, add one-quarter pound white mustard seed, the 
same of ground mustard, of celery seed, black pepper, and 
one pint of best table oil ; then add one gallon of the best 
cider vinegar. 

CURRANT CATSUP. 

Mrs. Diehl, Cincinnati. 
Three pints currant juice, one-half pound sugar, one 
tablespoon salt, one teaspoon each of cloves and black 
pepper, two teaspoons cinnamon, one pint vinegar. Boil 
sugar and juice ten minutes. Add vinegar at last. 



SALADS. 57 

CELERY SALAD. 

Cut the celery into bits, and prepare as the tomato salad. 

RED PEPPER CATSUP. 
Cut up red peppers, and cover with good cider vinegar. 
Boil slowly, four hours, until perfectly soft. Rub through 
a sieve. Put up in large-mouthed jars, as the catsup is 
very thick. It will keep for years. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

To one bushel ripe tomatoes add one pint salt. Strain 
and boil down to one-half. Fifteen minutes before taking 
off, add two ounces each of cloves, allspice, cayenne pep- 
per, black pepper ; and six grated nutmegs. Bottle when 
cool. 

GREEN TOMATO SOY. 
Mrs. Mary Kingsbury. 

Two gallons tomatoes, twelve good-sized onions. Alter- 
nate layers of tomatoes and onions, sprinkling salt on each 
Layer. Slice, in a large stone jar, and let stand over night. 
Drain off the water ; cover with good cider vinegar, and 
add spice to taste, two tablespoons each of mustard, pep- 
per and cinnamon, one teaspoon cloves, one pint sugar, 
one tablespoon each, of black and white mustard seed. 
Mix all together, and stew until tender; stirring often, lest 
they should scorch. Seal in small glass jars. 

CUCUMBER SOY. 

Mrs. Mary Kingsbury. 
Take large ripe cucumbers ; peel, quarter, and take out 
seeds ; grate, and squeeze dry in a cloth ; measure the 
water drained from the cucumbers, and add the amount in 
vinegar to the dry cucumbers. Season with pepper and 
salt, a little sugar, and boil about ten minutes. Bottle, and 
seal as you do catsup. 



58 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



PICKLES. 



MIXED PICKLES. 
Mix one-half pound of the best ground mustard and one- 
half cup of sugar with a little cold vinegar ; pour this into 
a pint of boiling vinegar ; let it boil a few minutes and pour 
over the pickles ; slice thin one quart large cucumbers, one 
pint small cucumbers, one pint onions, one quart green 
tomatoes, three or four green peppers, and spice to taste. 
Should cauliflower be added, cut in small pieces. Let all 
stand in salt one night ; drain off and scald in vinegar, and 
pour over the mixture. 

GREEN TOMATO PICKLES. 

Mrs. John McClain. 
One-half bushel green tomatoes, and six large onions 
sliced thin. Put over them one cup of salt, and let stand 
until morning ; drain off and boil ten minutes in one quart 
of vinegar and four quarts water ; drain well and boil in 
four quarts vinegar, with one-fourth pound white mustard 
seed, three pounds brown sugar, two tablespoons each of 
red pepper, allspice, cinnamon, cloves and ground mustard. 

ARTICHOKE PICKLES. 
Rub off the outer skin and lay in salt-water for twenty- 
four hours; drain and pour over cold, spiced vinegar; 
add a teaspoonful of horseradish to each can. 

BEAN PICKLES 
Use the German wax bean, or the Virginia snap bean ; 
string green, young, tender beans ; place them in a kettle 
and boil with salt ; drain them ; put them in vinegar, with 
black i)epper. 



PICKLES. 59 

MANGO PICKLES. 
Take green muskmelons, cut out a strip lengthwise ; 
take out the seeds ; put the melons in brine for twenty-four 
hours; fill, then, with chopped tomatoes, cabbage, cucum- 
bers, onions and nasturtion seed, all salted separately. 
Sew the strip cut out on its own melon, and soak in weak 
cider vinegar all night. In the morning drain off the vin- 
egar and boil it ; pour it with one pint of sugar to each 
gallon of vinegar, boiling hot over the mangoes. Do this 
several days, and at the last pour over fresh, boiling cider 
vinegar. 

TOMATO PICKLES. 

Mrs. Will Siddall. 
One peck tomatoes, one head cabbage, one dozen 
onions, six peppers, one gallon vinegar, one-half pound 
ground mustard, two ounces mustard seed, one ounce cel- 
ery seed, cloves and cinnamon, one teacup brown sugar. 
Let it heat one hour. 

CHOW-CHOW. 

One-half bushel green tomatoes, one dozen onions, one 
dozen green peppers. Chop all fine ; sprinkle over a pint 
of salt ; let it stand one night ; drain off the brine ; cover 
with good vinegar ; let it cook one hour ; drain and pack 
in a jar; boil in vinegar, mustard, sugar and spices ; pour 
over the mixture. 

PICKLED OYSTERS. 
One hundred large oysters, one pint vinegar, one dozen 
blades mace, two dozen each of whole cloves and black 
peppers, and one large red pepper broken. Put oysters 
and liquid in kettle ; salt to taste ; heat slowly, but not to 
boiling. Take out oysters with perforated skimmer; let 
them cool, and add the vinegar and spices to the oyster 
liquor. Boil this liquid, and pour over the oysters. Keep 
in a dark place. 



6o INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



SLICED GREEN TOMATO PICKLES. 
One peck sliced tomatoes. Sprinkle over salt ; put in 
jar, press, and leave over night ; next morning put them 
in colander to drain off the juice. Add to the sliced toma- 
toes twelve onions sliced, one-half dozen black peppers, 
one teaspoon red pepper, one ounce mustard, one-half 
pound mustard seed, one pound brown sugar, one ounce 
«ach cloves and allspice. Put in kettle, cover with good 
vinegar, and boil until tender. 

CUCUMBER PICKLES. 
One pint of salt to every one hundred cucumbers. Pack 
in a fresh jar ; cover with boiling water ; let stand until 
morning ; then wipe the cucumbers, wash out the jar and 
put layer of pickles, then a layer of sliced onions, cloves, 
cinnamon, green peppers, black mustard seed, horserad- 
ish, and a small lump of alum; pour over boiling water. 
"When the vinegar is boiling, wipe and put in several large 
graj)e leaves with the lump of alum. The grape leaves 
will make the pickles green. 

CHOW-CHOW. 

Mrs. Reep, Knoxville, Tenn. 
Two gallons sliced cabbage, one gallon sliced green 
tomatoes, twelve sliced onions, one gallon vinegar, one 
pound brown sugar, one ounce celery seed, one ounce 
cloves, one gill salt, peppers to suit, one-fourth pound 
white mustard seed. Boil all together in porcelain or tin. 

TO PICKLE CUCUMBERS. 
Miss Kittie Lane. 
One gallon of vinegar and one cup of salt. Boil and 
pour over the pickles four or five mornings in succession, 
and on the last morning put in a small lump of alum. 
Scald the pickles a minute or two, then put them in a jar, 
and pour over them fresh vinegar boiled with white ginger 
root, cinnamon bark and a little cayenne pepper. 



PICKLES. 6l 

MIXED PICKLE. 

Mrs. Dickev, MaJison. 
One-half peck green tomatoes, cut small ; one-half peck 
string beans. Boil alone, till tender. One dozen large 
cucumbers, cut in inch pieces ; one-half dozen green pep- 
pers, one-half dozen ochre pods, one-half peck small 
onions, one head cauliflower. Cover all with salt, and let 
stand twenty-four hours ; rinse with water, and drain well ; 
then add one box ground mustard, three tablespoons each of 
ground cinnamon and celery seed, one ounce of turmeric. 
Put in kettle, and cover with vinegar. Seal in glass jars. 
Scrape two or three horseradish roots, and add sugar if 
you like. 

SWEET-PICKLED TOMATOES. 
Mrs. Sam. Merrill. 
Slice the tomatoes and sprinkle salt over them ; let them 
drain over night ; in the morning throw them into cold 
water for a few minutes ; make a syrup of vinegar, sugar, 
and spices ; scald the tomatoes with this for three morn- 
ings, then put them in and let them boil until tender. 

CHOPPED PICKLES. 

Mrs. Col. Merrill. 
One peck green tomatoes, two heads cabbage. Chop 
and put in salt, separately, over night ; also, put one- 
fourth peck onions in salt ; drain the tomatoes, onions and 
cabbage through a sieve ; wash them, rinse them and add 
one root horseradish, one-half cup each of black and yellow 
mustard seed, one-half cup unground black pepper, one 
dozen cloves, and two red peppers, chopped ; pour cold 
vinegar on the mixture. 

COLD SLAW. 
Cut fine one-half head cabbage ; add to it one stalk of 
celery or one teaspoon celery seed, four hard eggs chopped 
fine. 



62 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



COLD TOMATO CATSUP. 
One-half peck ripe tomatoes sliced, two horseradish 
roots grated, one teacup salt, one teacup of sugar, one tea- 
cup celery seed, with black and white mustard seed mixed ; 
one large coffeecup sliced onions, two or three red pep- 
pers, without seeds, chopped ; two or three stalks of cel- 
ery, two tablespoons black pepper, one teaspoon each of 
ground cloves, mace, and cinnamon. Mix, put in jars, 
and pour on boiling vinegar. 

CUCUMBER CATSUP. 

Mrs. Bently. 
Peel a dozen large cucumbers, grate, take out seed 
and chop fine ; add one tablespoon salt ; mix and tie up 
in a thin cloth to drain over night ; chop fine six or seven 
white, medium-sized onions, six or seven green or black 
peppers, two ounces each of white and black mustard. 
Mix and put in stone jar and cover with pure cider vine- 
gar ; tie cloth over jar, and begin using the catsup two 
weeks after its making. 

TOMATO SLAW. 
Peel and seed fresh tomatoes ; chop them with celery. 
Serve with salad dressing. 

WALNUT PICKLES. 
Rub walnuts well with a coarse towel and lay them for 
two weeks in a strong brine of salt and water ; drain them 
and cover them in a kettle with fresh water ; let them keep 
hot for twelve hours, but not boil ; to one hundred walnuts 
take one gallon of the best vinegar, one ounce each of 
pepper and cloves, half an ounce of nutmeg and four 
ounces of ginger. Let it boil five minutes, pour it out, 
cover closely, and stand it away to get cold ; place the 
walnuts in jars, and strew over them four ounces of mus- 
tard seed, then pour over the spiced vinegar and cover 
them closely. 



PICKLES. 63 

WALNUT CATSUP. 
When the pickled wahiuts are soft, mash through tlie 
vinegar, strain and boil thick. Bottle it, put a tablespoon 
of sweet oil on the top of each bottle, and cork them 
tightly ; seal the corks and it will keep for years. 

PICKLED ONIONS. 

Mrs. Sappington. 

Choose small, white, onions, peel, and throw into boil- 
ing salt and water. Place them, when clear, on a seive to 
dry, then put in more, until all are cooked ; add red pep- 
per pods. 

CELERY SLAW. 

Cut up the celery in inch pieces ; make a dressing for it 
of yelks of three eggs, boiled hard, one small teacup vine- 
gar; one tablespoon salad oil, or butter; one teaspoon 
mustard ; salt and pepper. 

HOT SLAW. 
Slice the cabbage in long, thin slices ; add a little water ; 
thicken cream with flour, and pour over the cabbage when 
heated ; season with pepper and salt ; use vinegar, if de- 
sired. 

CHILI SAUCE. 
Mrs. Crane, Chicago. 
Twenty-four large, ripe tomatoes, four onions, eight 
green peppers. Add eight tablespoons brown sugar, four 
even tablespoons salt, fouY teaspoons ginger, same of 
cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg. To the mixture add eight 
teacups vinegar ; stew all together until well cooked. 

CUCUMBER AND ONION PICKLE. 

Mrs. Carrie Munson. 
Equal quantities of large cucumbers and onions ; slice 
and salt them over night, and drain next morning ; add a 
pod or two of green and red peppers, celery seed, cloves, 
and a small quantity of sugar; press into the jars, pour 
over hot vinegar, and seal. 



64 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



PICKLED EGGS. 
Boil the eggs hard ; remove shell ; put in jar of vinegar. 

SWEET-PICKLE TOMATO. 
Mrs. Rev. Brown, Madison, Ind. 

Pick smooth, green tomatoes, slice them and sprinkle 
lightly with salt ; let them stand twenty-four hours in an 
earthen or stone vessel, then drain off all the water ; put 
them in a kettle with enough vinegar to cover them ; add 
four pounds best brown sugar, one ounce ginger, one-half 
pound white mustard seed, one ounce pulverized mace. 
Mix and cook steadily, but slowly, for one hour and a 
quarter. 

CHOPPED PICKLES. 
Mrs. Rev. Brown, Madison. 

One peck green tomatoes, one dozen large cucumbers^ 
one dozen green peppers, one medium-sized white onion, 
one head cabbage, one ounce mace, one ounce Jamaica 
ginger, two ounces cinnamon, five pounds brown sugar, 
one-half pound white mustard seed, two large tablespoons 
celery seed, one gallon cider vinegar. After chopping, 
pour boiling water over the tomatoes and onions ; salt 
lightly and let them lie over night ; next morning squeeze 
gently and put into weak vinegar for twenty-four hours ; 
bring the strong vinegar to a boil, adding the spice, and 
pour over all in a boiling state. 

SLICED CUCUMBER PICKLES. 
Mrs. Stearns, Madison, Ind. 
One peck cucumbers, peeled and sliced as for table use ; 
let them lie in salt and water twenty-four hours ; drain 
well ; cook for two or three minutes in vinegar enough to 
cover, with the following spices : One cup vinegar, one 
tablespoon cinnamon, one spoon each of cloves, allspice 
and white mustard seed. Seal in cans. 



PIES. 65 



PIES 



CREAM PIE. 

Mrs Mendenhall. 
For the crust take two cups flour, two cups sugar, four 
eggs, two-thirds of a cup of cold water, one teaspoon bak- 
ing-powder. Bake in jelly tins — the above being sufificient 
for six layers or three pies. The cream is to be placed 
between two crusts; it is made of one pint of milk, two 
eggs, three tablespoons flour. Let the milk be placed over 
the fire, and allowed to come to a boil. Add the eggs and 
flour, well beaten together; and while boiling, add salt 
and flavoring. 

CREAM PIE. 
Miss Jessie Wiley. 
Beat thoroughly together with the white of one egg, one- 
half teacup sugar and tablespoonful of flour ; then add one 
teacup of milk. Bake with pastry crust, and grate nut- 
meg on top. 

VINEGAR PIE. 

Miss Jessie Wiley. 
One egg, one heaping spoon flour, one teacup sugar; 
beat all well together, and add one tablespoon sharp vine- 
gar, one cup cold water ; flavor with nutmeg. 

GREEN APPLE PIE. 

Mrs. Reynolds. 
Use sliced, sour apples, raw ; season with butter, sugar 
and cinnamon. 

VINEGAR PIE. 
Mrs. L. Henderson, Greenwood. 
One cup sugar, one egg, one cup water, one tablespoon 
flour, one teaspoon lemon, one tablespoon vinegar. 
5 



66 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

TOMATO PIE. 

Mrs. Kellog. 
Select large ripe tomatoes ; scald off the peeling ; slice 
one layer to each pie. Add one-half cup sugar, one tea- 
spoon butter. Flavor with nutmeg and cinnamon, dust in 
a little flour, and cover with a rich paste. 

CREAM APPLE PIE. 

Mrs. Kellog. 
Line pie plate with puff paste ; drop in stewed green 
apples in tablespoonfuls, leaving it rough and uneven ; sift 
in a little flour, one-half teacup sugar and fill with rich 
cream. 

LEMON PIE. 
Mrs. Sam. Merrill. 
To the juice and grated rind of two large lemons, add 
one tablespoon melted butter, yelks of six eggs, whites of 
three eggs, and twelve tablespoons sugar. 

CREAM PIE. 

Mrs. J. M. Binford. 
The yelk of one egg ; two tablespoons sugar, one table- 
spoon melted butter, one heaping tablespoon corn starch 
or flour; milk to fill pie dish. Flavor with lemon, and 
bake. Beat the white of egg, and spread over the pie ; 
return to oven, and brown. 

COCOA-NUT PIE. 

Mrs. Noah Clark. 
Three eggs, one glass of cocoa-nut, one pint of milk. 
Beat the eggs separately, and make as for custard pie, add- 
ing the cocoa-nut. 

LEMON PIE. 
Mrs. E. Carnes, Greenwood, 
One grated lemon, two cups rich milk, one cup sugar, 
two spoons butter, and four eggs beaten separately. Enough 
for two pies. 



PIES. 67 

CHESS PIE. 

Mrs. S. L. Goode. 

Two cups sugar, one-half cup butter, eight eggs, leaving 

out the whites of five for frosting, one tablespoon corn 

starch in one cup milk ; lemon flavoring. Bake in under 

crust ; then ice, and brown slightly. 

LEMON PIE. 

Mrs. Dr. McWhortek, Calhoun, Tenn. 
One cup sugar, one-half cup sweet cream, two small 
lemons, two eggs. If you have no cream, use sweet milk, 
and then add one tablespoon melted butter. Beat the 
yelks of the eggs very light, add the sugar, and beat again ; 
then add the juice of both lemons, and the grated rind of 
one. Line pie-pan with crust ; add the cream to the mix- 
ture, just before putting into the oven. Bake until the 
custard is firm ; draw to the front of the oven, and spread 
evenly over the top a meringue of the whites of the two 
eggs, beaten stiff, with two tablespoons sugar; return to 
the oven until it sets. To be eaten cold. 

LEMON PIE. 

Mrs. Rodman. 
For one pie : One lemon, rind grated and juice squeezed ; 
one cup sugar, one cup sweet milk, two eggs, butter size of 
a walnut, two tablespoons corn starch. Save the whites of 
the two eggs to beat with the tablespoon of sugar. After 
baking the pie, spread over this frosting and put in the 
oven to brown lightly. 

MOCK MINCE PIE. 
Mrs. M. a. E. Eckert. 
One cup bread crumbs, two cups cold water, two cups 
molasses, one cup brown sugar, one cup vinegar, one cup 
melted butter, one cup chopped raisins, one ^gg beaten 
light and stirred in at the last ; add spices. Rolled cracker 
may be substituted for the bread crumbs. 



68 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



DRIED APPLE PIE. 

Mrs. F. Rubush. 
Cook the apples and mash fine ; flavor with lemon peel ; 
sweeten according to the quality of the apples and the rich- 
ness of the sauce ; make neither too thick nor too thin. 

VINEGAR PIE. 

Mrs. Craig. 
One pint of water, one tablespoon each of butter and 
vinegar. In one-fourth of the pint of water beat flour 
sufficient to make a thick starch ; stir and cook all to- 
gether ; sweeten and flavor to taste ; let cool and fill the 
pie-pans. 

CREAM PIE. 

Mrs. Craig. 

Rub fine into crumbs one-half slice of bread, leaving out 

the crust ; add the yelk of one egg, three-fourths of a pint 

of new milk, one tablespoon butter. Sweeten to taste ; 

flavor with nutmeg, and bake. 

DRIED APPLE PIE. 

Mrs. F. Rubush. 

Cook the apples, after soaking, and cook cranberries 

until tender; mash the apples and mix with them the 

cooked cranberries, half and half ; sweeten to taste ; put 

on upper crust. 

BLACKBERRY PIE. 

Mrs. Reynolds. 
Line a deep pie-dish with paste ; fill half full of black- 
berries ; add one-half teacup sugar, one tablespoon butter, 
and if berries are very juicy, sprinkle in a little flour; add 
more sugar and berries ; cover with a good crust and bake 
slowly 

PUMPKIN PIE. 
Mrs. Reynolus. 
Two quarts pumpkin, strained ; one quart milk, three 
eggs, spice and sugar to taste. 



Piles. 69 

PLUM PIE. 

Mrs. Reynolds. 
Let the plums simmer in a little sugar and water until 
tender; take them out, add plenty of sugar to the juice, 
and boil until it begins to thicken ; turn it over the plums 
and set aside to cool ; when cold line pie-pans or plates 
with a rich paste, fill, cover, and bake half an hour. 

LEMON PIE. 
Miss Anna Allisson. 
For two pies: Three eggs, one cup sugar, one table- 
spoon water, three or four teaspoons flour, grate and 
squeeze two small lemons, spread the whites of eggs beaten 
to a froth and sweetened to taste on the top, and return to 
oven to brown slightly. 

COCOANUT PIE. 
One coffeecup milk, two eggs, one grated cocoanut, one- 
half teacup sugar. Flavor with lemon. 

TENNESSEE SWEET POTATO PIE. 
Mr. Erwin. 

Parboil, skin, and slice crosswise, firm sweet potatoes. 
Line a dish with pastry ; put in a layer of sweet potatoes, 
sprinkled thick with sugar ; scatter a few whole cloves 
upon it, and cover with more slices ; fill the dish in this 
way. Add melted butter, pour in a little water, and cover 
with crust. This pie is best as a cobbler, with jelly or 
preserves. 

LEMON PIE. 
Mrs. M. a. E. Eckert. 

Line the pie-pan with good, puff paste ; grate outside 
peel over it ; peel all the white part off ; slice the lemon very 
thin, and put in layers over the grated peeling ; sprinkle 
one cup sugar and one teaspoon flour over the slices; 
almost fill the pan with water and cover with crust. 



yo INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

AUNT CHARLOTTE PIES. 

Mrs. Black. 
Three pints milk, thickened with flour, when boiUng, as 
thick as starch — the flour wet with cold milk. Beat eight 
eggs separately ; add eight tablespoons of sugar to the 
yelks. Melt three-fourths of a pound of butter in the 
boiling milk. Mix all into a batter. Stir in the beaten 
whites, flavor with lemon and nutmeg. Bake until brown. 
This makes five pies, with no upper crust. 

CUSTARD PIE. 
Mrs. Bugbee. 
One pint milk, three eggs, three tablespoons white sugar, 
and a pinch of salt. Beat the eggs and sugar thoroughly, 
and put them into the milk. The pies may be filled imme- 
diately, and set into the oven. 

CHESS PIE. 

Miss Georgie Howell. 

Two cups white sugar, one small cup butter, one cup 

sweet milk, five eggs, one teaspoon lemon or vanilla, one 

tablespoon flour ; grate nutmeg on the crust. This will 

make two pies. 

JELLY PIE. 
Mrs. Springer. 
One cup jelly, one cup butter, one cup sugar, five eggs, 
one-half cup milk. 

PUMPKIN PIE. 
Mrs. Lowe. 
One egg for each pie, three tablespoons pumpkin, two 
tablespoons sugar, one coffeecup milk. 

PUMPKIN PIE. 

Mrs. Yonce, Franklin. 
Stew pumpkin all day ; then strain through the colander. 
Put in butter size of an egg for each pie, two eggs, and 
one-half pint cream or milk. Season with cinnamon. 



PIES. 71 

APPLE CUSTARD PIE. 

Mrs. Bugbee. 
Put apple sauce through the colander. Let there be 
three eggs for each pie, one-third of a cup of butter, and 
same of sugar, for each pie. A frosting of the whites of 
the eggs and sugar improves the appearance of the pies. 
Set them in the oven to brown. 

LEMON CUSTARD PIE. 

Mrs. Hereth. 
Grated rind of one lemon, one egg (omitting the white), 
one-half cup sugar, one tablespoon flour. Beat all together 
and then add one cup milk ; bake in a rich crust. 

LEMON PIE. 
Miss Fannie Bugbee. 
To the beaten whites of the egg add one tablespoon 
pulverized white sugar, and after baking, grate and squeeze 
the juice of one lemon ; place upon the stove to thicken a 
very little ; one cup of water, one cup of sugar, two tea- 
spoons corn-starch, the juice and grated peel of the lemon, 
and four eggs, reserving the whites of two of the eggs for 
frosting. Line the pie-pan with pastry, and bake ; then 
fill with the mixture ; beat the reserved whites to a stiff 
froth ; spread on the top of the pie that has baked, and 
put in the oven to brown lightly. 

LAYER PIE. 

Mrs. Sappington, Madison. 
Make a rich pastry, and bake as thin as possible in jelly- 
pans ; boil until thick one quart of milk, one cup sugar, 
four tablespoonfulls corn-starch. When cold, spread; if 
not wanted the day made, do not spread ; flavor to taste. 

JAM PIE. 

Mrs. Springer. 
One cup jam, such as blackberry or raspberry ; two eggs, 
one cup sugar, one of butter. Excellent. 



^2 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

LEMON PIE. 

Mrs. Craig. 
Juice and pulp of one lemon, one egg, four tablespoons 
sugar, one tablespoon butter. Take the whites of two 
eggs, beaten to a froth, and add one teaspoon sugar, and 
return to the quick oven. 

MINCE PIE. 
Mrs. C. O. Page, Madison. 
Two pounds suet, two pounds apples, two pounds rai- 
sins, two pounds currants, two pounds sugar, three pounds 
beef, one pound citron, one ounce salt, one-half ounce all- 
spice, one-half ounce cloves, one-half ounce cinnamon, 
two quarts sweet cider. 

LEMON PIE. 
Dissolve one tablespoon corn-starch in cold water, and 
then stir it into one cup boiling water; cream or rub one 
tablespoonful of butter with one cup of sugar, and pour 
over the hot corn-starch ; when quite cool, add one lemon 
and one beaten egg ; take inner rind and mince small ; 
bake with one crust. 

LEMON PIE. 

Mrs. Kate Haines, Connersville. 
Add to the grated rind and juice of one lemon, three 
eggs, saving the whites of two ; add to the lemon and 
eggs, one and one-half cups sugar, two tablespoons flour 
and one teaspoon butter ; pour on this two teacups hot 
water, and boil until it thickens ; make crust for two pies, 
and bake ; then pour in the custard and cover with the 
whites of the two eggs. 

MOCK MINCE PIE. 

Mrs. Eckert. 
One teacup bread crumbs, two cups each of cold water 
and molasses, one cup of brown sugar ; one cup each, of 
vinegar, melted butter, and chopped raisins. 



PIES. Ji 

STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE. 
Mrs. Black. 
Bake in jelly cake pans a baking-powder biscuit dough. 
Split open, and cover both parts with butter and ripe straw- 
berries ; put one section upon the other, and cover the 
top with white sugar. Eat with cream. 

POTATO CUSTARD. 

Mrs. Haughey. 
Six potatoes; one cup each, of butter and sugar; five 
eggs and one nutmeg. Bake in crust. 

GERMAN PUFFS. 
Mrs. Haughey. 
One quart milk, one-half pound flour ; eight eggs, beaten 
separately. Prepare boiled sauce. 

LEMON CUSTARD PIE. 

Mrs. Kring. 
One coffeecup sugar; five eggs, leaving out whites of 
two, two tablespoons of flour, one coffeecup hot water. 
Beat yelks of eggs with the flour. Add two grated lemons. 
This makes two pies. Beat together the whites of the two 
eggs with three tablespoons of sugar. Spread over the 
top, and set in oven a moment, but not to brown. The 
best lemon pie that can be made. 



74 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



PUDDINGS. 



CITRON PUDDING. 

Mrs. Basore, Broadway, Virginia. 
Yelks of sixteen eggs, three-fourths pound butter, one 
pound white sugar, twelve drops essence of lemon ; a layer 
of chipped citron and pudding alternately. A choice 
recipe. 

LEMON PUDDING. 
Mrs. Basore, Broadway, Virginia. 
One-half pound sugar, one-half pound butter, yelks of 
eight eggs, a little nutmeg, and two fresh lemons. 

FIG PUDDING. 
Mrs. Binford. 
One pint bread crumbs, one cup suet, one cup brown 
sugar, two eggs, one-half pound figs. Wash the figs in 
warm water ; dry in a cloth ; chop the suet and figs to- 
gether; add the other ingredients, also one nutmeg grated. 
Boil three hours and serve with hard sauce. 

LEMON PUDDING. 

Mrs. S. a. Newton, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
One quart milk, two cups bread crumbs, four eggs, one- 
half cup butter, one cup white sugar, one large lemon rind 
grated. Soak the bread in the milk, add the beaten yelks 
with the butter and sugar rubbed to a cream ; bake in a 
quick oven ; whites beaten and put on the top, return to 
the oven to brown. 

CAKE PUDDING. 

Mrs. Reynolds. 
Layers of raisins and layers of cakes, alternate ; put in 
the dish sufificient milk to moisten the cakes ; steam twenty 
minutes, and serve with sauce. 



PUDDINGS. 75 



A QUICK PUDDING. 

Mrs S. a. Newton, Cincinnati, Ohio, 
Split a few crackers, lay the surface over with raisins, 
and place the halves together ; tie them closely in a cloth 
and boil them fifteen minutes in milk and water. Eat 
with a rich sauce. 

CABINET PUDDING. 

Butter a mold, cover the bottom with raisins and citron, 
next a layer of cake, and so alternate ; mix in a bowl three 
tablespoons sugar and the yelks of three eggs and put them 
in a pint of boiling milk ; pour over the cake and fruit, 
and put into the oven to bake. Serve with sauce. 

COCOANUT PUDDING. 

Mrs. Mendenhall. 
Grate one cocoanut fine ; add to it four ounces of melted 
butter, four ounces loaf-sugar, four eggs, and the rind and 
juice of one lemon ; line the dish with a rich paste ; fill 
with the mixture. Bake, and serve cold. 

FRENCH PUDDING. 

Miss Dods. 
Five ounces bread crumbs, three ounces sugar, three 
ounces raisins, two ounces almonds, two ounces citron, 
one-half pint milk, three eggs, teaspoon lemon juice. Pour 
into a greased mold and steam for an hour and twenty 
minutes. 

RICE DESSERT. 
One quart sweet milk, two-thirds cup rice, a little salt. 
Put this in teacups ; set in a steamer over a kettle of boil- 
ing water. Let it cook until the rice is like jelly. When 
cold, turn out of the cup. Eat with cream or sauce. A 
few raisins in each cup is an addition. 



76 liNDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



BAKED ROLL PUDDING. 
Mrs. Maky E. Lowe. 

One quart flour, one tablespoon baking-powder, one tea- 
spoon salt, two tablespoons lard and sweet milk, sufificient 
to make a dough, as for baking-powder biscuit. Rub the 
baking-powder through the flour; add salt and lard, lastly 
the milk, taking care not to knead too much. Roll out 
quickly on a bread-board ; spread well with fruit of any 
kind. Roll up like a jelly cake roll ; spread the top over 
well with butter first, then with a layer of sugar. Pour in 
the pan a half pint of water, and bake slowly for two hours. 
Serve when a little warm, with cream, or prepared sauce 
as follows : One tablespoon flour, smoothed with a litde 
cold water ; one pint of boiling water, one tablespoon of 
butter, one teacup sugar, one tablespoon vinegar, and a 
very little salt. Let it boil a few minutes, and flavor to 
taste. 

FARMER'S APPLE PUDDING. 
Miss Lida Wheat. 

If apples are juicy, they will require very little water to 
stew them. Add to one pound of the mashed apple when 
hot, one-fourth pound butter and sugar to taste. Beat four 
eggs, and stir in when the apple is cold. Butter the bot- 
tom and sides of a deep pudding dish, strew it thickly with 
bread crumbs, put in the mixture, and strew bread crumbs 
over the top. When baked, sift sugar over. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

Mrs. Reynolds. 
Dissolve one ounce of gelatine in a little tepid water; 
beat one egg in one cup of milk ; add two tablespoons 
sugar ; flavor with vanilla ; pour it over the gelatine ; let it 
stand until cold; whip one quart sweet cream, taking off 
the froth as it rises, into a bowl ; then stir in the mixture ; 
line pans with small sponge cakes, or lady-fingers ; pour 
over the cakes this mixture, and set the pans on ice. 



PUDDINGS. -/J 



CREAM WHIPS. 

Mks. RtVNOLUS. 

Whites of eight eggs, beaten to a stiff froth ; one pint of 
rich, sweet cream. Sweeten and flavor the cream to taste ; 
beat it enough to dissolve the sugar. Stir in the froth 
quickly. Let it stand until cold. Serve in glasses, with 
tablespoonful of jelly at the bottom of each glass. 

STEAMED ROLY-POLY. 
Roll biscuit dough one-quarter of an inch thick ; spread 
it with fruit, leaving an inch each end uncovered. Roll it 
tight; sew it in a cloth, giving room to swell. Boil, or 
steam it one hour. Sponge cake, baked in sheets, makes 
a good roly-poly pudding. Any kind of sauce. 

APPLE MERINGUE. 
Boil tart apples ; mash fine and sweeten. To one pint 
add the beaten whites of three eggs. Flavor with rind and 
juice of a lemon. Put it in a pudding dish, and spread 
over it the beaten white of the eggs, sweetened. 

CHARLESTON PUDDING. 

Mrs. T. E. Springer. 
« ^ 

One cup and a half sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half 
cup milk, three eggs, two cups flour, in which is sifted two 
teaspoons baking-powder. 

SAUCE. 

One pint water, six tablespoons sugar, one large spoon 
butter. Bring to a boil ; add one teaspoon corn-starch ; 
flavor. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 

Mrs. J. E. Springer. 
One-half teacup sugar, one-half small teacup butter, one 
egg, one pint flour, two teaspoons baking-powder. To be 
eaten with sauce. 



78 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



SLICED-BREAD PUDDING. 

Mrs Reynolds. 

Slice bread in thin slices ; spread with butter and lay in 
pudding dish ; pour over them milk and eggs to form a 
custard ; two eggs to one pint of milk. Season with spice 
if you prefer, and keep in oven until custard is formed. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

Soak three tablespoons tapioca in cold water ; when 
perfectly tender, cook it in one quart of milk, to which 
add the yelks of three eggs, one cup sugar ; flavor with 
vanilla ; pour one-half into a dish, and upon that the whites 
beaten to a froth, and over this the other half. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 
One quart tapioca soaked over night in one quart wa- 
ter ; fill pudding dish with the halves of apples ; mix large 
cup of sugar with the tapioca ; pour it over the apples and 
bake one hour. Eat with cream. 

SNOW PUDDING. 
Dissolve one cup gelatine in a pint of boiling water ; add 
two cups sugar, juice two lemons ; strain, and when cold 
add the whites of two eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Beat 
this mixture thoroughly. Make a custard of the yelks of 
two eggs, one whole egg, and one pint of milk to serve 
with the snow pudding. 

APPLE PUDDING. 

Mrs. Springer. 
Peel and slice apples in a pan ; cook them in the oven 
with very little water, and afterwards sweeten them ; while 
hot pour over a batter made of one egg, one tablespoon 
sugar, a piece of butter size of an egg, one cup of milk, 
and flour to make like cake-batter ; add one teaspoon 
baking-powder ; flavor ; eat with cream or sauce. 



PUDDINGS 79 



APPLE PUDDING. 
A layer of sliced apples in the dish ; sprinkle them with 
cinnamon, nutmeg and sugar; then add a layer of bread 
crumbs, with pieces of butter; next a layer of apples, and 
so fill the dish, letting the bread crumbs be on the top. 
Eat with sauce. 

PIEPLANT PUDDING. 

Miss Georgie Howell. 
Cut pieplant into inch-long pieces ; fill a pudding dish 
with alternate layers of the pieplant and bread crumbs, 
putting the bread crumbs, with sugar and butter, on the 
bottom ; let there be one pound of sugar to one pound of 
pieplant ; serve with boiled custard. This pudding is best 
when eaten neither hot nor cold, but only warm. 

CRACKER PUDDING. 
Mrs. Lowe. 
One-half pound of crackers, crumbled fine, or rolled as 
for soup ; cover them with a sauce of one pint boiling 
water, one tablespoon flour smoothed with cold water, one 
tablespoon butter and sugar to make very sweet. Flavor 
with nutmeg. Let the dish be covered tight, after pouring 
the sauce over the crackers. 

CRACKER PUDDING. 

Mrs. Pai'L Hereth. 
Powder crackers finely ; add one-half nutmeg, one-half 
cup sugar and one-half cup butter. Beat eight eggs to a 
stiff froth, and mix with one quart milk. Pour over the 
crackers, to soften them before baking. 

BROWN PUDDING. 

Mrs. S. H. Crane, Chicago. 

One-half cup of melted butter, one cup of molasses, one 

teaspoon soda, one cup cold water, three cups flour ; add 

raisins or currants. Steam three hours. Serve with a rich 

sauce. 



80 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 
Mrs. S. H. Crane, Chicago. 
Five tablespoons grated chocolate, ten tablespoons grated 
bread or crackers, one quart milk with bread scalded in it. 
When partly cold, stir in the chocolate, one cup of sugar, 
and the yelks of five eggs. Bake about half an hour. 
Beat the whites of the eggs, add one small cup of sugar. 
Cover the top of the pudding with this stiff froth, and set 
it in the oven to brown. Serve cold. 

COCOANUT PUDDING. 

Mrs. S. H. Crane, Chicago, 
Soak over night, or for two or three hours, four table- 
spoons of tapioca. Put a pan with one quart of milk into 
a pan of boiling water, until the milk boils ; then add the 
tapioca. Let it boil five minutes. Beat together the yelks 
of four eggs, one cup of sugar, five tablespoons of grated 
cocoanut, juice of one lemon ; add this to the milk and 
tapioca. Pour into a dish, and bake half an hour. Frost 
the pudding with the whites of the eggs and three table- 
spoons of sugar. Over this sprinkle cocoanut thickly. 

PENNSYLVANIA PUDDING. 

Mrs. S. H. Crane, Chicago. 

One small cup gelatine into a quart of milk ; let it come 
to a boil. Beat the yelks of four eggs and one cup of sugar 
together; then pour the hot milk over them, stirring all the 
time. Put on the stove until of the consistency of custard ; 
take off, and stir in the whites beaten to a stiff froth. Fla- 
vor with vanilla, and serve it cold with cream. 

SUET PUDDING. 

Mrs. Jas. Chapin. 

One quart bread crumbs, soaked ; two eggs, one cup of 
suet, one cup currants, one pint flour. Boil, or steam one 
hour and a half. Eat with sauce. 



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GROCERIES, 

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Long experience in the Grocery Business enables him to offer, at all 

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PUDDINGS. 



SUET PUDDING. 

Miss Sue Bugbee. 
One cup molasses, one cup sweet milk, one cup suet 
chopped fine, three and one-half cups flour, one cup rai- 
sins, one teaspoon soda, cinnamon, cloves and allspice, 
Steam three hours ; eat with sauce. 

SUET CORN MEAL PUDDING. 
Boil one quart milk ; mix with it one and one-half cups 
corn meal, one-half cup suet, two eggs, one cup molasses, 
and one teacup raisins. Add cinnamon or nutmeg. 

SUET PUDDING. 

Miss. Wood. 

One cup suet chopped fine, two cups raisins, one cup 

milk, one cup currants, one cup molasses, three cups flour, 

one teaspoon soda dissolved in the molasses. Beat all 

together and boil three hours. Eat with sauce. 

CORN MEAL PUDDING. 
Miss J. M. Crane, Madison. 
One quart milk; let it come to a boil, and then stir in 
two yelks of eggs, one cup of sugar, three heaping table- 
spoons corn meal. When it begins to thicken, turn into a 
pan and stir through it whites of the eggs, beaten stiff; 
flavor and put in oven to brown. Eat warm with cream. 

BAKED INDIAN PUDDING. 

Mrs. Bugbee. 
Boil one quart of milk ; stir in one cup of corn meal, 
one-half cup flour, also two-thirds of a cup molasses ; but- 
ter size of an egg ; bake slowly five hours. 

ENGLISH STEAMED PUDDING. 

Mrs. Lowe. 
One teacup chopped suet, one cup sugar, four eggs, five 
cups flour, one teaspoon soda, one pound raisins, sour milk 
to make stiff batter. Steam three or four hours. 
6 



82 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

PLUM PUDDING. 
Mrs. Hereth. 
One cup sugar, one cup molasses, one cup suet chopped 
fine, one cup sweet milk, flour to make stiff batter; add 
one cup dredged raisins, one teaspoon each of cinnamon, 
allspice and cloves ; sift in the flour two teaspoons baking- 
ing-powder, and a little salt ; steam three hours. Serve 
with sauce. 

RICE PUDDING. 
One-half cup uncooked rice, one quart milk one table- 
spoon butter, little salt. Sweeten to taste. One cup of 
raisins improves rice pudding. Bake well. 

BATTER PUDDING. 

Mrs. Pogue, Madison. 
One egg, one cup sugar, one cup milk, two cups flour, 
one teaspoon baking-powder, one cup currants or raisins ; 
cinnamon or nutmeg. Steam one and one-half hours. 

BLACKBERRY SLUMP. 
Mrs. Black. 
Fill a tin pan half full of the hot-stewed fruit ; cover it 
with baking-powder biscuit dough ; cover tightly with tin 
lid, if baked on the stove ; if it is in the stove, or in a 
covered kettle of boiling water, no lid is needed. Eat 
with a rich sauce. 

CORN-STACH PUDDING. 

Mrs. Springer. 
One quart milk, three eggs, one tablespoon sugar. When 
the milk is almost boiling, rub two tablespoons corn starcli 
in cold milk, and put it with the yelks of three eggs and 
one tablespoon sugar ; then add to the milk, and boil all 
together. Beat the whites of the eggs with a little sugar, 
and, as you take the pudding off the stove, beat into it 
the whites. 



PUDDINGS. 83 



CORN-STARCH PUDDING. 

Make as above, excepting it should get almost cold ; 
spread jelly almost over it, and then the beaten whites of 
the eggs. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 
Miss Jessie Wiley. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one egg, one cup 
sweet milk, one teaspoon soda dissolved in milk, two tea- 
spoons cream tartar in the flour, three cups flour, one-half 
teaspoon extract lemon. Sprinkle a little sugar over the 
top, just before putting into the oven. Bake in a small 
bread pan, and when done, cut in squares. Serve with 
sauce made of two tablespoons butter, cup sugar, table- 
spoon flour wet with a little cold water and stirred until 
like cream. Add one pint boiling water. Let boil two or 
three minutes, stirring all the time. After taking from the 
fire, add one-half teaspoon of extract lemon or nutmeg. 
What is left of the pudding may be served cold for tea. 

CREAM PUDDDING. 

Miss Jessie Wiley. 
Stir together one pint cream, three ounces sugar, yelks 
of three eggs, and a little grated nutmeg ; add the well 
beaten whites, stirring lightly. Pour Into a buttered pie- 
pan, in which has been sprinkled crumbs of stale bread 
to about the thickness of an ordinary pie-crust. Sprinkle 
over the top a layer of bread crumbs. 

GELATINE PUDDING. 
Two tablespoons gelatine ; pour over it one pint boiling 
water, and sweeten to taste ; prepare this at night, and set 
in a cold place ; in the morning make a custard of one 
pint milk, sugar, and the yelks of three eggs ; beat the 
whites to a stiff froth, and just before serving cut the jelly 
into small squares ; pour over the squares the whites of the 
eggs, and then the custard. It is well to let the jelly form 
in the dish from which it is served. 



84 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



ORANGE SOUFFLE. 

Miss Jessie Wiley. 

Peel and slice six oranges. Put into a high glass dish a 
layer of orange, then one of sugar, and so alternate until 
all the orange is used. Let stand two hours. Make a soft 
boiled custard of the yelks of three eggs, one pint milk, 
sufficient sugar, with a grating of orange peel for flavor ; 
pour over the oranges, when cool. Beat the whites of the 
eggs to a stiff froth, stir in sugar, and pour over the pud- 
ding. 

ORANGE PUDDING. 
Mrs. S. M. Sappington, Madison. 

Grate rind and squeeze juice of two dark oranges. Beat 
together one-half cup sugar, one heaping tablespoon butter, 
and the yelks of three eggs. Stir into the orange. Put 
into a buttered dish, after stirring in the beaten whites of 
the eggs. Bake half an hour, and, when cool, grate white 
sugar over. Eat cold. 

SNOW PUDDING. 
One cup gelatine ; pour three and one-half cups water 
over it. Prepare it at night, and next morning add two 
cups sugar and juice of two lemons. Strain, and set in a 
cool place until it begins to jelly. Add the whites of three 
eggs, well beaten. Stir in well, and pour into a mold. 

QUEEN OF PUDDINGS. 
Mrs. Ends. 
One pint of bread crumbs, one quart of milk, one cup of 
sugar, yelks of four eggs, beaten, grated rind of a lemon, 
and a piece of butter the size of an egg. Bake until done, 
but not watery. Whip the whites of the egg stiff, and add 
one teacup of sugar, in which has been stirred the juice 
of the lemon. Spread over the pudding a layer of jelly, or 
any other sweet meats, and cover with the whites of the 
eggs. Replace in the oven, and brown slightly. 



PUDDINGS. 85 



ARROW-ROOT PUDDING. 

Boil one quart of milk and mix arrow-root in it until it 
is a thick batter; add six eggs, one-half pound butter, and 
one-half pound sugar, one-half nutmeg, and a little grated 
lemon peel. When done, sift sugar over the top. 

BUTTER ROLL. 
Mrs. Sappington. 
Make baking-powder biscuit dough ; put in plenty of 
shortening; roll thin; have ready one and one-half tea- 
cups sugar, one cup butter highly flavored with nutmeg; 
spread this mixture over the dough, and roll up ; bake the 
roll in a pan with two teacups of water ; there is then sauce 
enough. This is a royal pudding. 

BIRD'S-NEST SAGO PUDDING. 

Mrs. Ends. 
Soak one-half pint of sago in three pints of water. Pare 
and core ten or twelve apples ; fill the centers of the apples 
with the sago, and put them, without piling one over an- 
other, in a pudding dish, so that the sago will just cover 
them. Bake until the apples are soft. Eat with sauce. — 
Sauce : One teacup sugar, one-half teacup butter, one-half 
cup water, and one teaspoon flour ; boil and flavor. 

BIRD'S-NEST PUDDING 
Mrs. Hereth. 
Make a batter as for batter cakes. Pare apples and core 
them, putting pieces of apple in teacups, filling with the 
egg batter two-thirds of the cups, giving space for rising. 
Steam an hour and a half. Eat with either hard or liquid 
sauce. 

STRAWBERRY PUDDING. 
Mrs. S. H. Crane, Chicago. 
Cover the Queen of Puddings with canned strawberries 
or jelly. Add the well beaten whites, and set in the oven 
to brown. Serve cold, with cream. 



86 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

STEAMED PUDDING. 
Mrs. R. G. Graydon, Southport. 
One cup of molasses, one cup of sugar, one cup suet or 
butter, one cup sweet milk, one teaspoon soda, one cup 
raisins, one cup currants, spice to taste ; add flour until 
very stiff. Steam three hours, and try it with a straw. 
Eat with liquid sauce. Steam, whenever desired for the 
table, as it will keep for weeks. 

BANANA CREAM. 

Mrs. Mary J. Downey, Irvington. 

Dissolve one-half box gelatine in one-half teacup cold wa- 
ter. Put one and one-half cups new milk over the fire, after 
sweetening to taste. When boiling, pour into it the gela- 
tine. Stir until the gelatine is thoroughly dissolved ; then 
boil ten minutes, and when cold, but not stiff, stir in siy 
bananas, sliced with a silver knife. Mix well, and set awa) 
on ice. One hour before using, take a pint of rich cream, 
sweeten to taste, flavor with vanilla, and whip well. Put 
the mixture first made into a glass dish, and pour over it 
the whipped cream. 

PUDDING. 
Mrs. Baggs. 

One quart milk, two tablepoons corn starch, and the 
yelks of two eggs ; boil all together, as for custard. Take 
one heaping cup brown sugar, and place in skillet dry, 
over fire. Stir until dissolved into liquid. Stir in the 
above custard. Flavor with vanilla. Put into pan and 
bake. Then meringue with the white of the eggs and four 
tablespoons sugar. Serve cold, with sweet cream. 

LEMON PUDDING. 

Mrs. Dr. Wiley. 

Take the juice and grated rind of one lemon, one cup 

sugar, yelks of two eggs, three full tablespoons flour, pinch 

of salt, one pint rich milk. Mix the flour and part of the 

milk to a smooth paste. Add the juice and rind of the 



PUDDINGS. 87 



lemon, the cup of sugar, well beaten yelks, and remainder 
of the milk. Line a plate with puff paste, one-fourth of 
an inch thick ; pour in the custard, and bake in a quick 
oven. Beat the whites of two eggs to a stiff froth, and add 
two tablespoons sugar. Spread over the top, and return 
to oven to brown. Serve with very cold cream. Sufficient 
for six persons. 

SWEET POTATO PUDDING. 
Mrs. Josephine Nichols. 
Boil one pound sweet potatoes tender ; rub them while 
hot through a colander ; add six eggs well beaten, three- 
quarters pound sugar, one-half pound butter, a little grated 
nutmeg and lemon peel ; sprinkle the tops with sugar and 
bits of citron. 

HEN'S-NEST PUDDING. 
Mrs. Josephine Nichols. 
Make a hole in the end of an egg and empty it, leaving 
shell to be filled with blanc-mange ; when stiff and cold 
take off the shell. A number of these eggs should be 
placed in a nest made of lemon peel cut into small pieces 
and preserv^ed in sugar. Fill a dish part full of jelly ; place 
the lemon straws on the jelly, and the eggs on the nest. 

CRANBERRY PUDDING. 

Mrs. Baggs. 
One pint cranberries stirred into a batter a little thicker 
than batter pudding. Boil and eat with sauce. 

GELATINE BLANC-MANGE. 

Mrs. Louise TousEY. 
Soak one teaspoon gelatine in one and a half pints of 
milk for one hour ; put it over boiling water, or in a vessel 
set in another of boiling water ; when it comes to a boil 
add the beaten yelks of three eggs with four tablespoons of 
sugar; when cooling add beaten whites of the eggs ; flavor 
with vanilla, cool in a mold and serve with sugar and cream. 



88 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



SAGO PUDDING, WITH APPLES. 
One tablespoon sago to one large apple ; mix sago with 
warm water; pour boiling water over it; cook to thickness 
of starch ; slice the apples and mix the sago with them ; 
add sugar and bake. Eat with sugar and cream. 

SAGO PUDDING. 

Mrs. Josephine Nichols. 
One and one-half pints new milk, four spoons sago 
nicely washed and picked, lemon peel, cinnamon, nut- 
meg. Sweeten and add four eggs ; bake in a dish lined 
with pastry. 

ANGEL FOOD. 

Mrs. Springer. 
Dissolve one and one-half boxes of gelatine in one quart 
milk ; add the well-beaten yelks of three eggs, one cup 
sugar, and the juice of one lemon ; let all come to a boil ; 
take from the stove, and when nearly cold, stir in the 
whites of the eggs, beaten stiff, and turn in a mold to cool. 

CUSTARD PUDDING. 

Mrs. Josephine Nichols. 
Five eggs to one quart of milk and a coffeecup of sugar. 
To make boiled custard, first heat the milk; then mix the 
eggs in a little cold milk ; add the sugar and eggs to the 
hot milk ; stir while boiling. To make baked custard, 
mix all together cold, and put in oven to bake. 

BLANC-MANGE. 

Mrs. J. R. Nichols. 
Mix one tablespoon sea-moss farina with a little cold 
milk ; add one quart milk, and a half teacup powdered 
sugar and two beaten eggs ; a little salt ; heat slowly ; boil 
fifteen minutes, stirring ; when cooling, flavor and pour 
into molds. 



PUDDINGS. 89 



SIMPLE TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

Mrs. Nichols. 
Dissolve one cup tapioca in a little cold water and boil ; 
squeeze the juice of two lemons into it, and then add 
the slices. Eat with cream and sugar when cold. 

BREAD PUDDING. 

Mrs. Stearns, Madison. 
One-third cup butter, two cups sugar, yelks 'of four eggs, 
one pint bread crumbs, one quart milk. Stir well and add 
juice and grated rind of one lemon ; beat the whites of the 
eggs, and stir in two tablespoons pulverized sugar ; spread 
over the top when cold. 

FIFTEEN-MINUTE PUDDING. 

Mrs. Baggs. 
Yelks of six eggs, three tablespoons flour, one pint milk. 
Work together the yelks and flour ; add the milk ; beat 
the whites to a stiff froth ; add little salt, and then the 
beaten whites ; bake fifteen minutes. Eat with sauce. 

STEAMED PUDDING. 
Mrs. Baggs. 
One tablespoon baking-powder in one quart flour, a 
little salt, enough sweet milk to make like mu,iTfin batter, 
one-half pound raisins, seeded. Steam three hours. 

SAUCE. 

Lump of butter size of an egg, two tablespoons flour, 
one pint boiling water. Sweeten to taste ; add juice of 
one lemon. 



90 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



CAKE. 



Calce should be made of good materials. It should be 
baked with a slow, steady heat. Either baking-powder or 
cream tartar should be sifted in the flour. If soda is used, 
it should be put in the sour milk, or if with cream tartar, 
in the flour. To see if the cake is baked, put in a broom- 
straw ; if no dough adheres, the cake is done. 

FRUIT CAKE. 
Mrs. Haughey. 
One dozen eggs, one and one-third pounds brown sugar, 
same of browned flour, one pound butter, two pounds 
seeded raisins, two pounds Zante currants, one pound cit- 
ron, same of figs, one-half pint molasses, one dessertspoon 
soda, twenty cents' worth cinnamon, one nutmeg. 

FRUIT CAKE. 
Miss M. E. Knerr. 
One pound sugar, one pound raisins, one pound cur- 
rants, one-fourth pound citron, one pint hickory-nut ker- 
nels, three eggs beaten separately, one cup milk, three 
cups flour, spices to taste, two teaspoons baking-powder in. 
the flour. Flavor ; bake two hours. 

PORK CAKE. 

Mrs. Newton, Cincinnati. 
One pound pickled pork chopped fine, two cups boiling 
water, two teaspoons each of soda, cinnamon, allspice, 
and cloves, two cups sugar, one pound currants, one-half 
pound seeded raisins, four and one-half cups flour. Pour 
the boiling water on the pork. / 



CAKE. 91 

SCOTCH CAKE. 
Mrs. Todd and Mrs. Pattie, Madison. 
Work to a cream one-half pound butter with one-fourth 
pound sugar and two ounces lard, one pound flour, or 
more, if required to make a stiff dough. Cut in squares, 
pinch the edges, prick with a fork, and put in bread-pan 
covered with white paper ; bake slowly. 

VELVET CAKE. 

Miss M. E. Knerr. 

Three cups sugar, one and one-half cups butter stirred 

to a cream, four eggs beaten separately. Add four cups 

flour with two teaspoons baking-powder ; flavor with lemon, 

FANCY POUND CAKE. 
Repp Brothers, Vienna Bakery. 
Three-fourths pound good butter, one pound sugar, ten 
eggs, one pound flour. Bake in slab ; cut cold, any de- 
sired shape, and ice the top. 

CONFECTIONER'S CAKE. 
Beat one-half pound of butter and one-half pound of 
pulverized sugar to a cream, then add the yelks and whites 
of eight eggs and two ounces candied orange peel, cut 
small ; add one pound sifted flour and one pound and one- 
fourth currants, one-fourth pound almonds. 

CUP CAKE. 

Mrs. Sterns, Madison, Ind. 
One cup butter, three cups sugar, six eggs, five cups 
flour, one cup milk, two teaspoons baking-powder in the 
flour, grated peel and juice of one lemon. 

CORN-STARCH CAKE. 

Miss Kittie Lane. 
One cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup sweet milk, one 
cup corn starch, two cups flour, whites of twelve eggs, one 
teaspoon lemon ; two teaspoons baking-powder in the flour. 



92 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

Miss Kittie Lane. 

Seven eggs, beaten separately ; one pint sugar, one pint 

flour, one-half teacup water. Beat the yelks and sugar 

until quite light, then add water and flour; beat hard, then 

add the whites, and bake slowly one hour. 

CHOCOLATE ICING. 

Mrs. Ikvin. 
One cup brown sugar, two ounces chocolate, one table- 
spoon milk, one-half teaspoon gum arable dissolved in a 
little warm water, one-half teaspoon butter ; boil ten min- 
utes, stirring, and pour over the cake while hot. 

ONE-EGG CAKE. 

Mrs. Wiley. 
One cup butter, one and one-half cups sugar, one egg, 
one cup sweet milk, three cups flour, three teaspoons bak- 
ing-powder, one cup raisins chopped fine. 

WHITE SPONGE CAKE. 

Mrs. Dr. Gillette. 
Whites of eight eggs, beaten to a stiff froth ; stir in one 
goblet of white sugar. Add, gently, one goblet flour, in 
which is one teaspoon baking-powder. Bake slowly twenty 
minutes. 

PINK MARBLE CAKE. 

Mrs, Josephine Pee. 

One cup butter, three cups pulverized white sugar, one 

cup cream or milk, whites of twelve eggs, five cups flour, 

one and one-half teaspoons baking-powder. Flavor with 

lemon. 

for the coloring: 

One drachm of cochineal, one of alum, one of cream 

tartar, one of soda ; have this prepared by a druggist, and 

divided into three powders. Color one-half of the cake 

mixture with one, dissolved in a little water. Use the two 

kinds of dough in alternate spoonfuls. 



CAKE. 93 

WHITE CAKE. 
One cup butter, two cui)s sugar, one cup sweet milk, 
three cups flour, whites of five eggs, two teaspoons baking- 
powder. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Mrs. E. R. Sanders, Greenwood. 

Two cups sugar, two-thirds cup butter, one cup milk, 

three even teaspoons baking-powder in three and one-half 

cups flour ; whites of five eggs ; flavor with lemon. Bake 

one hour in a moderate oven. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

Miss Kittie Lane. 
One cup butter, two cups brown sugar, one cup sour 
milk, three cups flour, three eggs, one teaspoon soda ; one 
pound each, of raisins and currants ; one-half pound citron ; 
spice to taste. 

JAM CAKE. 
Miss Lyle, Madison. 
One cup water or milk ; one cup each, of butter, sugar, 
and molasses ; four eggs, four cups flour, three teaspoons 
baking-powder, one tablespoon mixed spices ; one cup of 
jam or jelly, stirred in ; a pinch of pepper, and one of salt. 
Bake one hour. If desired for pudding, serve warm with 
sauce. 

SPICED CAKE. 
Mrs. McWhorter. 
Three eggs, one cup sugar, one-half cup molasses, one- 
half cup butter, two cups flour ; one teaspoon each, of 
cloves and cinnamon ; one teaspoon soda, stirred in the 
molasses ; one-half cup each, of coffee, raisins and currants. 

HICKORY-NUT CAKE 

Mrs. Crane, Chicago. 
Two cups sugar, two-thirds cup butter, one cup milk, 
three eggs, three cups flour, two teaspoons baking-powder, 
one cup nut-kernels cut fine. 



94 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



CHOCOLATE MARBLE CAKE. 

Miss Maky Page, Madison. 
Two cups of coffee sugar, one-half cup butter, two eggs, 
three and one-half cups flour, one tablespoon baking pow- 
der, one cup sweet milk. Flavor with lemon. Dissolve 
two squares German sweet chocolate in boiling water. Add 
one-half cup sugar, one teaspoon vanilla, and two table- 
spoons of the batter. Alternate spoonsful of this dark part 
with the first batter. 

EGOLESS CAKE. 

Miss Jessie Wiley. 
One and one-half cups sugar, one-half cup butter, one 
cup sour milk, one teaspoon soda, three cups sifted flour, 
one-half teaspoon each cinnamon and grated nutmeg, one 
teacup raisins, chopped and well floured. 

LADY CAKE. 

Mrs. Ends. 

One-half cup butter, one and one-half cups sugar, nearly 
one cup sweet milk, two cups flour, one and one-half tea- 
spoons baking-powder, whites of four eggs ; flavor with 
almond. 

SCOTCH CAKE. 
Mks. Clough. 

One cup butter, one cup sugar, four eggs, one cup sour 
milk, one cup molasses, four cups flour, one teaspoon soda, 
one large tablespoon spices, one cup raisins or currants. 
If no fruit is used, add more spices. 

ORANGE CAKE. 

Miss Lizzie Hackney. 
One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, three eggs, one cup 
cream, three cups flour ; grated rind and juice of two large 
oranges. 

ICING. 

White of one egg, thickened with sugar. 



CAKE. 95 

HOME FRUIT CAKE. 
Miss Annie Brown. 

One cup butter, one cup sugar, one cup molasses, one 
small teaspoonful soda dissolved in four tablespoonsful 
water, four cups flour, one pound seeded raisins kept 
whole, one-half pound currants, one-fourth pound citron, 
one teaspoonful each of cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg. 
Bake two hours in a slow oven. Will keep a year if 
locked up. 

PINK MARBLE CAKE. 

Mrs. P'oltz. 

One cup butter, three cups sugar, one cup sweet milk, 
five cups flour, whites of twelve eggs, two teaspoons 
baking-powder in the flour. Flavor. 

Poioder for Coloring — One drachm each of cochineal, 
alum, cream tartar, and soda; divide into three powders. 
Dissolve one of these powders in a third of a cup of boil- 
ing water, and stir into one-third of the cake mixture. 

COCOANUT LOAF CAKE. 

Mrs. S. L. Goode. 
Two cups powdered sugar, two-thirds cup butter, one 
cup sweet milk (including the milk of the cocoanut), whites 
of five eggs, three cups flour, two teaspoons baking-powder, 
one large cocoanut grated. Beat butter and sugar together, 
add milk, then the flour in which the baking-powder has 
been sifted, alternating with the beaten eggs ; lastly, the 
grated cocoanut ; bake one hour in a square pan ; frost it 
and cut in square blocks. 

SOFT GINGER-BREAD. 
Mrs. Isaac Pattison. 

One quart New Orleans molasses, four eggs, one teacup 
boiling water, one-half cup melted lard, ginger to suit taste ; 
one tablespoon soda in the boiling water. Raisins or cur- 
rents Make as stiff as pound cake. Bake in pie-pans. 



96 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



HARRISON CAKE. 

Mrs. Mary Burbridge, Crawfordsville. 
One cup butter, one cup sugar, one cup New Orleans 
molasses, four eggs, one cup sweet milk, one teaspoon 
soda in water stirred in at the last, one cup raisins, one cup 
currants, three tablespoons ginger, one nutmeg, one tea- 
spoon each cloves and allspice, flour to make stiff. Bake 
one hour. 

GINGER-BREAD. 

Mrs. Rodman. 
Three-fourths cup butter, one cup sugar, one cup New 
Orleans molasses, four eggs, one and one-half teaspoons 
baking-powder in two pints flour, one cup milk — ginger and 
other spices. 

BREAD CAKE. 

Mrs. Enos. 
Three cups light dough, one cup and a half sugar, one- 
half cup lard and butter, four eggs, one cup raisins. Let 
it rise, and when light, bake. Cinnamon or nutmeg im- 
proves this cake. 

FIG CAKE. 

Miss Lida Wheat. 
Two cups sugar, three-fourths cup butter, one-half cup 
milk, three cups flour, whites of three eggs ; three teaspoons 
baking-powder sifted in the flour. After making two lay- 
ers from this white dough, add to what is left, cloves, all- 
spice, and cinnamon, one teaspoon each. Add one-half 
cup molasses ; in it, one-half teaspoon soda and one cup 
flour. This dark dough can be put on as a layer, or can 
be made as marble cake ; spoonsful alternating with the 
white. 

ICING. 

Two cups white sugar with the beaten whites of two 
eggs. Soak one pound figs in boiling water half an hour ; 
split them, and lay thick on the top of the icing, with the 
seeds down. 



CAKE. 97 

FIG CAKE. 
Mrs. Emma Alexander. 

Light Part — Four cups sugar, one and one-third cups 
butter, two cups milk, two cups, corn-starch, four cups 
flour, two teaspoons baking-powder, whites of twelve eggs. 
Flavor with lemon ; bake in six layers ; let the flour be 
light measure. 

Dark Part — Two cu])s brown sugar, one cup butter, 
four eggs, one cup water, one teaspoon soda in water, 
three and one-half cups flour, one nutmeg, two teaspoons 
cinnamon, three cups chopped raisins, one pound figs cut 
lengthwise. Flour the raisins from the measure of flour, 
and stir into the batter; put into the pans a layer of but- 
ter, one of figs, one of batter, and then bake. This will 
make four layers of cakes. After they are all done, join 
the white and dark with icing until you have five layers. 
This will make two large cakes. Very fine. 

CHICAGO GINGER-BREAD. 

One cup sugar, one cup molasses, one cup sour milk, 
two-thirds cup butter and lard, one tablespoon ginger, one 
teaspoon soda in the sour milk, and one teaspoon soda in 
the molasses ; flour enough to stiffen. 

SOFT GINGER-BREAD. 

Mrs. John McClain. 
One pint molasses, one-half cup butter, one egg, one cup 
sour milk, five cups flour, two teaspoons baking-powder, 
one tablespoon each ground cloves and ginger. 

SOFT GINGER-BREAD. 
Mks. S. L. Goode. 
One cup butter, one cup sugar, two cups New Orleans 
molasses, five cups flour, four eggs, one tablespoonful ginger, 
one teaspoon soda. 



98 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

YELLOW CAKE. 

Mrs. Foltz. 
Yelks of twelve eggs, one cup butter, two cups sugar, 
one cup milk, three' cups flour, two teaspoons baking- 
powder. Flavor. 

SNOW CAKE. 

Mrs. Emma Alexander. 
One and one-half glasses sifted sugar, one glass flour, one 
teaspoon cream tartar, one-half teaspoon soda sifted in the 
flour, whites of ten eggs well beaten. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

Mrs. Powell Howland. 
One pound sugar, one-half pound butter, four eggs, one 
cup sour cream, one teaspoon soda, four cups flour, one 
pound raisins, one pound currants, one-half pound citron ; 
one tablespoon each of cinnamon and cloves, and one 
nutmeg. To cook the raisins, currants and citron in a 
little water, and then before they are perfectly cool, to 
dredge them with flour, will prevent their sinking in the 
cake. Then stir in flour until stiff enough for the spoon to 
stand in the dough. 

GOOD CAKE. 

Mrs. J. R. Nichols. 
One and one-half pounds sugar, one-half pound butter, 
four eggs, six coffeecups flour, one pint sour milk, one tea- 
spoon soda. Use with fruit and nuts, if desired. 

POUND CAKE. 

Mrs. Rodman. 
One and one-half cups butter, two cups sugar, seven eggs, 
one and one-half pints flour, one teaspoon baking-])Owder. 
Rub the butter and sugar to a white, light cream ; add three 
of the eggs, one at a time, beating between each addition. 
Add the flour sifted with the powder. Add lemon or va- 
nilla extract. Mix into a smooth batter and bake in a 
steady oven. Line pan with buttered paper. 



CAKE. 99 

SOFT GINGER CAKE. 

Mrs. Mary Kingsbury. 

One cup each of sugar, butter, molasses, sour, or butter- 
milk, two eggs, one teaspoonful soda dissolved in boiling 
water, one tablespoon ginger, one teaspoon cinnamon. 
About five cups of flour, enough to make as thick as cup 
cake. Work in four cups first, and add cautiously. Stir 
butter, sugar, molasses and spice together, and set on the 
stove until slightly warm. Beat the eggs light. Add milk 
to the warm mixture, then the eggs and soda; lastly the 
flour, and beat very hard. Half a pound of seeded raisins 
improves this excellent ginger-bread. First dredge them 
well. 

SPONGE GINGER-BREAD. 
Mrs. Sappington. 

One cup sugar, one cup molasses, one large tablespoon 
butter, one-half cup buttermilk, two and one-half cups 
flour, one tablespoon quick yeast, two teaspoons cinnamon 
and cloves. 

WELCOME CAKE. 
Miss Crane, Madison. 

One and one-half cups sugar, one-half cup butter, three 
eggs, one-half cup milk, three cups flour, one and one-half 
teaspoons baking-powder, raisins or currants. 

INDIANA CAKE. 

Miss Sarah Davison, Madison, Ind. 
Two cups sugar, one and one-half cups butter, seven 
eggs, one cup warm milk, five cups flour, one tablespoon 
baking-powder. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

Mrs. Alexander. 
One and one-half cups sugar, one and one-half cups 
flour, seven eggs. No baking-powder ; beat together very 
lightly. 



lOO INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK 

DAISY CAKE. 
Daisy Hopper. 
One cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup sweet milk, 
two eggs, two pints flour, two teaspoons baking-powder. 
Raisins, currants or sliced citron may be added. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Mrs. a. J. Griffith. 
Two cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup sweet milk, 
two teaspoons baking-powder three and one-half cups 
flour, whites of five eggs. 

CORN-STARCH CAKE. 

Mrs. Goodman, Chicago. 
Two cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup sweet milk, 
two cups flour, three-fourths cup corn-starch, whites of six 
eggs, two teaspoons baking-powder. 

HICKORYNUT CAKE. 

Mrs. S. H. Crane, Chicago. 
Two coffeecups sugar, one coffeecup butter, one coffee- 
cup sweet milk, three and one-half cups flour, one pint 
hickorynut kernels, one pint raisins, three teaspoons bak- 
ing-powder, the whites of eight eggs. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Mrs. Shreve, St. Joseph, 111. 
One cup butter, two cups sugar, one and one-half cups 
flour, one cup corn-starch with one cup milk, three tea- 
spoons baking-powder in the flour. Add the whites of 
eight eggs. 

TO MAKE ICING FOR CAKES. 

Mrs. Rodman. 
Two coffeecups pulverized sugar, whites of two eggs. 
Moisten the sugar, and let it come to a boil. Then stir in 
the beaten eggs, whipped perfecdy stiff, and the juice of 
one lemon. When stiff enough to fall thread like from the 
spoon, it is ready to spread. 



CAKE. lOI 

ANGEL CAKE. 

Mrs. Alling, Newark, N. J. 
The whites of eleven eggs, one and one-half tumblers pow- 
dered sugar, one tumbler sifted flour sifted four times, one 
teaspoon cream tartar sifted with the flour. Add one tea- 
spoon vanilla. Sift the sugar. Beat the eggs to a stiff 
froth. Do not stop beating until the batter is put in pan. 
The pan must not be buttered. Flour the pan. Bake forty 
minutes and when the cake is done, turn the pan upside 
down. Do not stir the fire until the cake is done. 

ROCK CAKE. 
One pint flour, three ounces sugar, and one and one-half 
ounces each raisins and citron, three eggs, a gill of milk, a 
teaspoon ginger, three ounces butter and two teaspoons 
baking-powder. Beat together lightly the whites and yelks 
of the eggs, add the milk and work all together, until the 
spoon will stand stiff in the mixture. Slightly flour the pan. 

POUND CAKE. 

Mrs. Josephine Nichols. 
One pound each of butter, granulated sugar, and flour; 
ten eggs. Work the butter to a cream, pound the sugar and 
add the eggs. Beat all together twenty minutes, then add 
the flour. 

COFFEE CAKE. 
Mrs. George Spahr. 
One cup sugar, one cup butter, two eggs, one cup mo- 
lasses. Add one cup strong, warm coflee, with a teaspoon 
of soda dissolved in it, four cups flour, one pound raisins 
stoned and chopped fine, one tablespoon each of cloves, 
cinnamon and nutmeg. Currants and citron may also be 
added. 

DOVER CAKE. 
One pint sugar, one pint flour, three eggs, one-half pint 
melted butter, one small teacup buttermilk, one small tea- 
spoon soda, nutmeg. 



I02 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

FRENCH CAKE. 

Mrs. F. Rubush. 
One cup butter, two cups sugar, four eggs, one cup milk, 
four cups flour, three teaspoons baking-powder. 

PLAIN CAKE. 

Whites of three eggs, one-half cup butter, one cup su- 
gar, one-half cup milk, two cups flour, one and one-half 
teaspoons baking-powder. 

WHITE CAKE. 
Miss Eliza Howard. 
Whites of twelve eggs, three cups of sugar, one cup of 
butter, one cup of milk, four cups of flour, two teaspoons 
baking-powder. Beat sugar and butter very light. Add 
the whites, not beaten. Put the baking-powder into the 
flour and add the milk last. 

BUCKEYE CAKE. 
One cup butter, two cups white sugar, four cups flour, 
one cup milk, six eggs, three teaspoons baking-powder. 

BEAUTIFUL CAKE. 
One and one-half cups sugar, one-half cup butter creamed 
with it, one cup milk with one teaspoon lemon in it, three 
cups flour, three teaspoons baking-powder. Add beaten 
whites of six eggs. 

WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE. 

One and one-half cups sugar, one-half cup butter, one- 
half cup milk, whites of five eggs, one teaspoon baking- 
powder. Two cujis flour. 

MEASURE CAKE. 
Mrs. Ends. 
Two cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup milk, five eggs, 
three and one-half cups flour. Add to it dredged raisins 
or currants : three teaspoons baking-powder in the flour. 



CAKE. 103 

MARBLE CAKE. 

Mrs. Enos. 

Dark Part — One cup brown sugar, yelks of five eggs, 
one-half cup butter, one-half cup milk, one and one-half 
cups flour. 

Light Part — Substitute white sugar and the whites of the 
eggs. Spice the dark with nutmeg, cloves and cinnamon. 

DRIED APPLE FRUIT-CAKE. 
Mrs. Ends. 
Three cups dried apples soaked over night ; drain off 
the water and cut the size of raisins ; simmer, until dry, in 
two cups molasses. Take one cup sugar, one cup butter 
well beaten, four eggs, one cup sour milk, one-half tea- 
spoon soda, two teaspoons each of cinnamon, nutmeg and 
cloves, four and one-half cups flour, one pound each of 
currants and raisins, one-fourth pound citron. Bake two 
hours. 

FEATHER CAKE. 
Mrs. Louise Tousey. 
Two cups sugar, one cup sour cream, one-fourth cup but- 
ter, three eggs, three cups sifted flour, two small teaspoons 
of baking-powder. Bake in quick oven. Don't move 
until done. 

SPONGE CAKE. 
Miss Bugbee. 
Two eggs ; whites and yelks beaten separately ; one cup 
of powdered sugar, one cup of flour with one teaspoon bak- 
ing-powder sifted in ; flavor with lemon or vanilla. Lasdy, 
stir in one-half cup boiling water. Bake slowly. Frost, 
when done, if you please. 

SHETBURN CAKE. 
Mrs. J. C. French. 
Four eggs, two cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup sour 
cream, one teaspoon soda, one cup raisins, one cup cur- 
rants, mixed spices. Bake three hours. 



I04 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



QUEEN CAKE. 

Miss Bigbee. 
One pound white sugar, one pound fionr, one-half jiound 
butter, six eggs, one cup milk, two teaspoons baking-pow- 
der. Flavor to taste. 

MARBLE CAKE. 

Mrs. Tousey. 

Whiie Fart — Whites of seven eggs, two cups white sugar, 
one cup butter, one cup sweet milk, four cups flour, two 
teaspoons baking-powder. Flavor with lemon. 

Dark Part — Yelks of seven eggs, two cups brown sugar, 
one cup New Orleans molasses, one cup butter, one cup 
sweet milk, two teaspoons baking-powder in five cups flour, 
one teaspoon each of cinnamon, cloves, allspice and nut- 
meg. Put alternate spoonsful in your pan. 

NO-NAME CAKE. 

Mrs. Black. 
One pint sifted flour, one pint sugar, one pint soft but- 
ter, three eggs, one and one-half teaspoonsful baking- 
powder. Flavor with lemon. 

SILVER CAKE. 

Miss Jame Crane, Madison. 
Whites of four eggs, one cup sugar, one-half cup butter, 
three-fourths cup sweet milk, one and one-half teaspoons 
baking-powder, two cups flour. 

GOLD CAKE. 

Miss Janie Crane, Madison. 
Yelks of four eggs, one cup sugar, one-half cup butter, 
three-fourths cup sweet milk, one and one-half teaspoons 
baking-powder in two cups of flour. 

CUP CAKE. 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, three cups flour, four 
eggs, one cup sour milk, one teasjjoon soda. 



CAKE. 105 

SPONGE CAKE. 

Miss Alma Tkuax, Miulison. 
Weight of six eggs in flour, weight of ten eggs in sugar, 
twelve eggs, yelks beaten well with grated rind and juice 
of one lemon. Beat the whites stiff. Add sugar. Stir the 
flour into the yelks, and add the whites and sugar. Line 
the pan with thin j^aper. Bake about one hour. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

Mrs. Wingate. 
Four eggs, two cups sugar, two cups flour, two teaspoons 
baking-powder, one-half teacup boiling water. Flavor. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

Miss Janie Ckane, Madison. 
Twelve eggs, one pound of sugar, three-fourths pound 
flour. Beat the yelks and sugar. Just before adding the 
flour, stir in one-half teacup warm water; add the beaten 
whites with the flour. 

LADY CAKE. 

Mrs. Ends. 
Three-fourths pound butter, one pound sugar, three- 
fourths pound flour, whites of seventeen eggs, and one- 
fourth pound bitter* almonds. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Mrs. Sarah Root. 
The whites of eight eggs, two cups pulverized sugar, one 
and one-half cups butter, one cup sweet milk, three cups 
flour, one cup corn-starch, three teaspoons baking-powder. 
Flavor with lemon. 

TENNESSEE CAKE. 

Mrs. Dr. Cobleigh, Athens, Tenn. 
Yelks of seven eggs and one whole egg, two cups flour, 
two-thirds cup butter, coffeecup sugar, one small teaspoon 
baking-powder and one cup milk. 



I06 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



FRUIT CAKE. 

Mrs. Hereth. 
Beat together one pound white sugar, three-fourths pound 
butter ; mix a glass of grape jelly with one pint of New Or- 
leans molasses, and one pint of milk ; stir this mixture into 
the butter and sugar with one pound of flour (into which 
sift two teaspoons baking-powder), one teaspoon of lemon, 
one-fourth ounce of mace ; beat the whites of eight eggs 
separately, and when beaten to a froth, mix them with the 
cake. Stir well and just before baking, add one pound 
seeded raisins, one pound currants, and one-half pound 
citron or almonds. Bake one and one-half hours. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

Mrs. Hereth. 
Four cups brown sugar, two cups butter, six eggs, one 
cup coffee, seven cups flour, two pounds raisins, two pounds 
currants, one-half pound citron, one cup molasses, three 
teaspoons baking-powder. Add spices. 

GRAHAM CAKE. 

Miss Georgie Howell. 

Two cups sugar, three eggs, three-fourths cup butter, two 
and one-half cups graham flour, two teaspoons baking- 
powder. Beat eggs separately. Add currants or raisins 
to suit the taste. 

TENNESSEE CAKE. 

Mrs. Sehorn, Athens, Tenn. 
One cup butter, two cups sugar, three cups flour, one- 
fourth cup milk, two small teaspoons baking-powder, whites 
of eight eggs. 

SAFFRON CAKE. 

Miss Angie Miller. 

Four eggs, one-half pound sugar, one-fourth pound but- 
ter, a tablespoon saffron, one-half cup water, one pound 
flour, and two teaspoons baking-powder. 



CAKE. 107 

WHITE CAKE. 
Mrs. Emma Alexander. 
Whites of fifteen eggs, beaten very stiff, six ounces butter 
rubbed witli one pound sugar, one pound flour, three tea- 
spoons baking-powder. Flavor with rose-water. Add 
three tablespoons ice-water. DeHcious. 

POOR MAN'S CAKE. 

Mrs. S. E. Wagoner. 

Two eggs well beaten, one-half cup butter, three-fourths 

cup milk, two cups rolled sugar, three cups flour through 

which two teaspoons baking-powder have been sifted. Bake 

in jelly-tins in a quick oven. 

BLACK CAKE. 

Mrs. Hammel. 
One pound powdered white sugar, three-fourths pound 
butter, one pound sifted flour, twelve eggs beaten separ- 
ately, four pounds raisins stoned and chopped, one-half 
pound citron, cut in thin sHces, one-fourth ounce each of 
cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves. Rub butter and sugar to- 
gether, add yelks of eggs, part of flour, the spice and whites 
of the eggs well beaten. One teacup New Orleans molasses 
darkens the cake and requires no more flour. A layer of 
batter may be put upon the buttered white paper with which 
the pan is lined, and next a layer of the dredged raisins 
and citron, until the pan is two-thirds full. Bake nearly 
four hours in a slow oven. 

SPICE CAKE. 

Mrs. Wood. 
Two cups brown sugar, one-half cup butter, yelks of five 
eggs, two teaspoonsful ground cloves, two teaspoonsful all- 
spice, three teaspoons cinnamon, three teaspoons ginger, 
one nutmeg, one cup sour milk, one and one-half tea- 
spoons soda. 



I08 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

MARBLE CAKE. 

White Part — One-half cup butter, two cups sugar, whites 
of four eggs, one cup sweet milk, one cup corn-starch, one 
and one-half cups flour, one and one-half teaspoons baking- 
powder. 

Dark Fart — One-half cup butter, one cup brown sugar, 
one-half cup molasses, two eggs, one-half cup cold coffee, 
two cups flour, one cup raisins, one teaspoon soda, one- 
half teaspoon each cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg. Bake 
either as one cake, alternating the spoons of white and 
dark parts, or in layers. 

CUP-CAKE, WITHOUT EGGS. 

Miss Crane, Madison. 
Two cups sugar, three-fourths cup butter, two teaspoons 
cream, two cups sour milk with one teaspoon soda, five 
cups flour, one-half nutmeg, one teaspoon soda. If milk 
is not sufficiently sour, add one teaspoon cream tartar. 

JACKSON CAKE. 

Mrs. Newton, Cincinnati. 
One-half pound butter, one pound sugar, three-fourths 
pound flour, seven eggs. Flavor to taste. 

FARMERS' FRUIT CAKE. 

Miss Wood. 
Cut two cupsful of dried apples into small pieces, and 
soak over night ; cook in one pint of molasses ; when cold 
stir in one cu])ful of butter, one of brown sugar, one of 
sour milk, one of raisins, one heaping teaspoonful of soda, 
one nutmeg, one tablespoonful of allspice, one tablespoon- 
ful of cinnamon, three eggs, and flour enough to make a 
very stiff batter. 

SPONGE CAKE. 
Mrs. Ends. 
Five eggs, one-half pound sugar, three-eighths of a 
pound of flour. Flavor with lemon. 



CAKE. 109 

CHEAP FRUIT CAKE. 

Mks. S. L. Goode. 
Two cups sugar, one and one-half cups butter, four eggs, 
one cup sweet milk, one cup molasses, in which dissolve 
one teaspoon soda ; one pound raisins, five cups flour. Spice 
as you like. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Mrs. Florence Wood, 
Two cups sugar, three-fourths cup butter, whites of seven 
eggs, one cup milk, two cups flour, one cup corn-starch, 
two teaspoons baking powder. Flavor with lemon. 

JELLY ROLL. 

Mrs. Florence Wood. 
One cup sugar, three eggs, one and one-half cups flour, 
two tablespoons cream, one tablespoon baking-powder. 

MARBLE CAKE. 

Mrs. Florence Wood. 

White Part — Two cups sugar, whites of four eggs, three- 
fourths cup butter, one cup milk, four cups flour, three tea- 
spoons baking-powder. 

Dark Part — One cup brown sugar, one-half cup molasses, 
one-fourth cup butter, one-half cup sour milk, one teaspoon 
soda, cinnamon, cloves, allspice and lemon. 

DELICATE CAKE. 

Miss Sallie Irons, Franklin, Ind. 

Two cups white sugar, one cup butter. When well stir- 
red, add one cup milk, and then the whites of five eggs 
beaten light ; add two teaspoons baking-powder to four 
cups flour ; stir in flour until the proper consistency. Fla- 
vor to taste. 

GOLD CAKE. 

Yelks of ten eggs, one cup butter, two cups sugar, three 
cups flour, three-fourths cup milk, three teaspoons baking- 
powder. 



no INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

FRENCH CAKE. 

Mrs. Rubush. 
Two cups sugar, one cup milk, three and one-half cups 
flour, one-half cup butter, two eggs, two teaspoons baking- 
powder. 

ICE CREAM CAKE. 
Six eggs, one pint sugar, one pint flour, one-half teacup 
water. Beat with the sugar the yelks and one white ; add 
flour, and the whites beaten light. 

FEATHER CAKE No. 2. 
One cup sugar, three eggs beaten well together, butter 
the size of an egg, one cup flour, one teaspoon cream tar- 
tar mixed with flour, one-half teaspoon soda dissolved in 
eight teaspoons water. Flavor to taste. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Whites of ten eggs, two cups sugar, one cup butter, 
three-fourths cup milk, one-half teaspoon soda, two tea- 
spoons cream tartar, two teaspoons lemon. Cream butter 
and sugar together ; then add the milk and soda ; then the 
eggs and flour in which the cream tartar has been stirred. 

CHEAP AND GOOD SPONGE CAKE. 

One cup sugar, two eggs, one cup flour, two tablespoons 
water, one and one-half small teaspoons baking-powder. 

MINNESOTA SPONGE CAKE. 

Mrs. C. a. Mann. 
One cup sugar, one and one-half cups flour after being 
sifted, five eggs beaten separately, one-half cup water, two 
teaspoonsful baking-powder. Flavor with lemon. 

MRS. PARKER'S GINGER SNAPS. 
One pint molasses, one cup brown sugar, one cup butter 
or sweet lard, three tablespoonsful ginger. Flour enough 
to mix soft dough. Roll thin and bake quickly. 



CAKE. I I I 

YANKEE MOLASSES CAKE. 

Mrs. J. R. Nichols. 

Two cups Orleans molasses, one-third cup butter or sweet 

lard melted, two eggs, three cups flour, one teaspoonful 

soda dissolved in one-third of a cup of warm water. Bake 

as quickly as possible without burning. 

OAKALLA'S LADY CAKE. 
Mrs. H W. Davis. 
One and one-fourth pounds white sugar, one pound but- 
ter, one and one-fourth pounds flour, whites of twenty eggs, 
one teaspoonful soda and two cream tartar, mixed in the 
flour, or three teaspoonsful baking-powder. Flavor with 
vanilla. Cream the butter and sugar. Add the flour and 
eggs alternately, a little at a time. The dough must be 
pretty stiff. Bake either in a large loaf, or in a square pan, 
to cut in squares. If iced, will keep moist a long time. 

KENTUCKY GINGER BREAD. 

Mrs. J. R. Nichols. 
Two cups molasses, one tablespoonful butter or sweet 
lard, (if lard, put in a tiny pinch of salt,) one egg, one 
cup sour milk, one teaspoonful soda, one tablespoonful gin- 
ger, three cups flour. Bake in modern oven. Nice to eat 
warm for tea, or use as a pudding for dinner with sauce. 

ANGEL CAKE. 

Mrs. J. E. Springer. 
The white of eleven eggs, one cup of flour after sifting, 
one teaspoon cream tarter. Sift the flour and cream tartar 
four times. Beat the eggs to a stiff froth, and then beat in 
one and one-halt cups granulated sugar, and a teaspoonful 
vanilla. Add the flour and beat lightly, but thoroughly. 
Bake in an ungreased pan, slowly, forty minutes. Cut it 
out when cool. The pan should be a new one. Let it be 
turned over and set on the edges of two other pans to cool. 
The oven should be a slow one. The cake should rise 
gradually. 



112 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

MARBLE CAKE. 

Mrs. John McClain. 
White Fart — Two and one-half cups white sugar, one 
cup butter, one cup sour cream, four cups flour, one-half 
teaspoon soda. Whites of seven eggs. Flavor to taste. 

Dark Fart — Two cups brown sugar, one cup molasses, 
one cup butter, one cup sour cream, one teaspoon soda, 
four cups flour, yelks seven eggs. Spices of all kinds. 
Pour the dark part in the pan first. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Mrs. John McClain. 
Whites of five eggs, one and one-half cups white sugar, 
one of butter, one-half cup milk, two teaspoons baking- 
powder in three cups flour. Flavor with lemon or vanilla. 

FRUIT CAKE. 
Mrs. Enos. 
One pound butter, one pound flour, ten eggs beaten sep- 
arately, one pound sugar, two pounds seeded raisins, two 
pounds currants, one-half pound citron, grated rind and 
juice of a lemon. Add three teaspoons cinnamon, one of 
cloves and one nutmeg. Dredge the fruit with flour. 

FRUIT AND FEATHER CAKE. 

Mrs. McWhortek. 
Six eggs, two scant cups sugar, butter twice the size of 
an egg, two cups flour, three teaspoons baking-powder ; 
mix as usual, and take out rather less than one-half ; into 
this stir one-half pound currants, one-half pound raisins 
seeded and chopped, two tablespoons sliced citron, one 
tablespoon candied orange or lemon, one teaspoon grated 
nutmeg, one of cinnamon, one tablespoon molasses, two 
cups flour. Bake in jelly-pans ; alternate the layers, plain 
cake first and last the fruit layer, with jelly between and 
icing outside. 



CAKE. 



113 



JAPANESE CAKE IN WHITE, RED AND BROWN. 

Miss Angie Miller, 
Weight of eight eggs in sugar, of six in flour, of four in 
butter. Add the whites of eight eggs. This makes the 
white dough. For the red dough, weight of four eggs in 
red sugar, weight of three in flour, weight of two eggs in 
butter. Yelks of eight eggs. Take part of the white and 
part of the red dough, mix together and add one-fourth 
pound grated chocolate. 

SNOW CAKE. 
Miss Miller. 
Whites of twelve eggs, one-half pound sugar, one-half 
pound flour, one teaspoon baking-powder. Flavor with 
lemon. 

RIBBON CAKE. 

Mrs. Binford. 
Two and one-half cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup 
milk, four eggs, four cups flour, two teaspoons of baking 
powder. Reserve one-third of this mixture, and bake the 
rest in two layers. Add to the reserved one-third, one cup 
chopped raisins, one-fourth pound citron, one cup currants, 
two tablespoons molasses ; one teaspoon each of all kinds 
of spice. Put the three cakes together with icing or jelly, 
fruit layer in the middle ; frost the top and sides. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Miss Kittie Lane. 
One coffeecup butter, three of sugar, one and one-half of 
milk, four of flour, whites of twelve eggs ; three teaspoons 
baking-powder, sifted in the flour. Cream the butter and 
sugar ; add milk and flour, then the eggs. Bake six layers. 
To the rest of the batter add one cup grated chocolate, and 
bake also in layers. 

FILLING. 

Whites of four eggs, two ta])lespoons white sugar ; beat 
to a stiff froth, and add one cup of chocolate. 



1 14 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

HICKORY-NUT CAKE. 

Mrs. Enos. 
One pound butter, one and one-fourth pounds sugar, ten 
eggs beaten separately, one pound raisins, one pound cur- 
rants, one pound chopped hickory-nut kernels, one-fourth 
pound citron, one-half pint sweet milk, two teaspoons bak- 
ing-powder in one and one-fourth pounds flour. Flavor with 
lemon and nutmeg. Bake about two hours in large cake 
pan. Very fine. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Mrs. G. M. Pee. 

Two cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup milk, three 

cups flour, three teaspoons baking-powder, yelks of three 

eggs and whites of five, beaten separately and stirred in 

lightly at the last. 

DRESSING. 

One cup sweet chocolate grated, one pint sugar, one- 
half cup milk, butter size of an egg ; boil ten minutes, 
then add two teaspoons vanilla. Both cake and dressing 
should be cold before putting together. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

One cup white sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup 
milk, one and one-half cups flour, one and one-half tea- 
spoons baking-powder. Add the beaten whites of two eggs, 
and flavor with lemon. 

CREAM ROSE CAKE. 

MRS. FOLTZ. 

Whites of ten eggs, whisked stiff; one cup butter, three 
cups powdered sugar, one cup cream, nearly five cups of 
flour, two teaspoons baking-powder ; vanilla flavoring. 
Color with cochineal powder (see Pink Marble Cake), 
and bake in jelly-tins. When cold, spread with filling of 
whites of three eggs, whisked stiff, one large cup pow- 
dered sugar, and one cocoanut, pared and grated. 



CAKE. 115 

NEAPOLITAN CAKE. 

Mrs. H. Foltz. 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup sweet milk, 
three cups flour, whites of five eggs, two teaspoons cream 
tartar, one teaspoon soda. Color one-half of this cake 
with one-half of one of the powders prepared for pink mar- 
ble cake. Bake in jelly-tins. 

Three-fourths cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup milk, 
three cups flour, yelks of five eggs, two teaspoons cream 
tartar, one of soda. Leave half of this yellow, and mix 
with the other half two tablespoons grated chocolate ; bake 
in jelly-tins. When all done, put together with icing made 
with whites of three eggs whisked stiff, one heaping cup of 
powdered sugar, and the juice of a lemon. Lay the brown 
cake (or chocolate part) first, then the pink, the white, 
and the yellow. 

HARLEQUIN CAKE 

Can be made in the same way by putting a large spoon 
of each color at a time into a pan and baking as a loaf. It 
can be still further varied by putting powdered pistachio 
nuts (green, but harmless,) into a part of the white batter. 

NEAPOLITAN CAKE. 
Mrs. Hackney. 

Dark Part — One cup brown sugar, one-half cup butter, 
one-half cup molasses, one-half cup strong coffee, two and 
one-half cups flour, two eggs, one teaspoon each of cinna- 
mon and cloves, three teaspoons baking-powder, one-half 
of a nutmeg, one-half pound each of raisins and currants, 
and a small piece of citron sliced small. 

Light Part — One-half cup butter, two cups white sugar, 
one cup sweet cream, one cup corn-starch, two and one- 
half cups flour, three teaspoons baking-powder ; four eggs, 
beaten separately. 

FOR icing: 

Two eggs, two cups sugar, grated rind and juice of one 
lemon. 



Il6 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



ALMOND CREAM CAKE. 

Mrs. Haughey. 
Two cups sugar, six eggs, three cups flour, one-half cup 
sweet milk, three teaspoons baking-powder, eight table- 
spoons soft butter. Flavor with vanilla. 
filling: 
One cup sweet cream, whipped ; the whites of three eggs 
well beaten, eight tablespoons pulverized sugar, one pound 
almonds, blanched and chopped very fine. 

ORANGE CREAM CAKE. 

Two cups flour, two cups sugar, one-half cup water, the 
yelks of five eggs and whites of four, two teaspoons baking- 
powder in the flour, grated rind and juice of one orange. 
filling: 

Beat the white of one egg to a stiff froth, add powdered 
sugar until stiff, and the juice and rind of one orange. 

JOSEPHUS CAKE. 

Mrs. Siddall. 
Yelk of three eggs, one cup sugar, one tablespoon but- 
ter, one teaspoon baking-powder, one-half cup cold water, 

two cups flour. 

filling: 

Whites of three eggs, one pound sugar, one coffeecup 

chopped raisins, and chopped peel of one-half orange. 

Cover top and sides with this frosting. 

COCOANUT CAKE. 

Mrs. Dr. Wiley. 
One-half cup butter, one cup sugar, one-half cup milk, 
two and one-half cups flour, three eggs (omitting the whites 
of two), two teaspoons baking-powder in the flour. 
filling: 
Whites of two eggs, one cup sugar, one-half grated cocoa- 
nut, four tablespoons sugar, and one-half cocoanut grated. 
on the top. 



CAKE. 



117 



JELLY CAKE. 

Mrs. Bishop, Greenwood. 

Three eggs, not separate, one-half cup butter, two cups 
white sugar, two teaspoons baking-powder, one-half cup 
sweet milk, three cups flour. Bake in layers and spread 
with jelly. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Mrs. Louise Noble Park, Greenwood. 

While Part — Whites of four eggs, one cup sugar, one- 
half cup butter, one-half cup milk, one and one-half tea- 
spoons baking-powder in two cups flour. 

Dark Fart — Yelks of four eggs, one cup sugar, one-half 
cup milk, one-half cup butter, one and one-half teaspoons 
baking-powder in two cups flour. 

Bake in tins ; alternate the white and dark parts in the 
layers. 

FOR FROSTING. 

Whites of three eggs, one and one-half cups powdered 
sugar, and two cakes German sweet chocolate. 

TEA CAKE, OR LAYER CAKE. 

One cup sugar, one-third cup butter, two cups flour, two- 
thirds cup milk, one egg, two teaspoons baking-powder. 
Bake in three layers. 

JELLY ROLL. 

Three cups sugar, one cup butter, five eggs, one cup 
milk, five cups flour, three teaspoons baking-powder. Bake 
in thin sheets. Spread with jelly, and roll when cool. 

JELLY CAKE. 

Five eggs, one cup butter, one cup milk, two cups sugar, 
three cups flour, three teaspoons baking-powder. Spread 
the layers with jelly. 



Il8 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



LOAF CAKE. 

Mrs. Baggs. 

Three cups light-bread dough, same of sugar, one cup 

butter, three eggs, one nutmeg grated, and one large cup 

seeded raisins. Add spices to taste ; mix through the 

dough ; put in pans, and let rise before baking. 

GINGER CUP-CAKE. 

Mrs. Baggs. 
Two eggs, one large cup molasses, one cup butter, one 
cup brown sugar, one-half cup milk, two and one-half cups 
flour, one-half cup each of allspice, cloves and cinnamon, 
one-fourth cup ginger, one teaspoon soda. 

BLACK CAKE. 

Mrs. Baggs. 
Twelve eggs, five cups browned flour, three pounds rai- 
sins, same of currants, four cups butter, five cups brown 
sugar, one cup molasses, three grated nutmegs, two large 
tablespoons each of ground cloves and cinnamon. 

EGGLESS CAKE. 

Mrs. John McClain. 
Two cups sugar, two tablespoons butter, one cup milk, 
three cups flour, three small teaspoons baking-powder. 
Put layers together with cocoanut or jelly, or bake as a 
loaf cake. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 
One cup white sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup 
milk, one and one-half cups flour, one and one-half tea- 
spoons baking-powder. Add the beaten whites of two eggs, 

and flavor with lemon. 

filling: 

Whites of two eggs beaten to a stiff froth, one-half cup 
powdered white sugar stirred in. Grate one-half cake Ger- 
man sweet chocolate and mix with it. If too stiff, add a 
little cold water. 



CAKE. 119 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Mrs. Emma Alexander. 
Two cups white sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup 
sweet milk, three cups flour, whites of seven eggs, three 
teaspoons baking-powder. Bake one-half of the batter in 
jelly-cake pans. In the remaider, grate one-half cake 
Baker's chocolate, and use as dark layers of the cake. 
Put together with a thick custard of milk, eggs and sugar. 

COCOANUT CAKE. 

Mrs. Rodman. 
Two even cups powdered sugar, three-fourths cup butter, 
whites of five eggs, beaten to a stiff froth, one teaspoon 
soda dissolved in hot water, two teaspoons cream tartar 
sifted in the flour. 

FILLING : 

Whites of three eggs whisked stiff, one heaping cup of 
powdered sugar, one cocoanut peeled and grated. Mix 
all together, and when cakes are cold, spread with this 
frosting. 

MOUNTAIN CAKE. 
Miss Mary Spahr. 
Two cups sugar, one half cup butter, yelks of four eggs, 
whites of two eggs, and one cup milk, three and one-half 
cups flour, two and one-half teaspoons baking-powder. 
Put the powder into the one-half cup of flour, and stir in 
lightly at the last. Flavor with lemon. Take the two whites 
not used, beat to a stiff froth, sweeten, and use for icing if 
desired. 

DELICIOUS CAKE. 
Mrs. Reep, Knoxville, Tenn. 
Two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, one cup of sweet 
milk, three cups of flour, three eggs, one tablespoon bak- 
ing-powder. 

filling: 

Lemon jelly, made of two lemons grated ; one cu[) of 
sugar, two eggs, two tablespoons butter ; all boiled together 
until thick. When cool, spread. 



120 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



COCOANUT CAKE. 

Mrs. John McClain. 
Two cups sugar, one-half cup butter, three eggs, one cup 
milk, three cups flour, two teaspoons baking-powder. 
filling: 
One grated cocoanut ; to one-half of this add the whites 
of three eggs beaten to a stiff froth, and one cup sugar ; 
spread this between the layers. Cover the top layer with 
the remaining grated half of the cocoanut and sugar. 

CREAM CAKE. 

Mrs. Lowe. 
One cup sugar, four eggs, two small cups flour, two tea- 
spoons baking-powder. Flavor to taste. 
filling: 
One egg, two small tablespoons flour, two-thirds pint of 
milk ; sugar enough to sweeten. Cook gently until thick. 

LEMON JELLY-CAKE. 

Mrs. Lowe. 
Two cups sugar, one-half cup butter, one cup milk, three 
eggs, two tablespoons baking-powder, three cups flour. 
filling: 
Grate the rind of three lemons, add the juice of the same, 
one egg, one cup sugar, one-half cup water, one teaspoon 
butter and one tablespoon flour ; cook this custard gently 
until it thickens. It is better made some days before using. 

APPLE LEMON JELLY-CAKE. 

Miss Lida Wheat. 
One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, two eggs, one-half 
cup milk, two cups flour, one and one-half teaspoons 
baking-powder. 

FILLING: 

Grate three large apples and the rind of one lemon, 
using the juice ; add one-half cup sugar, one egg, and a 
small piece of butter. Cook, and put between the layers 
while warm. 



CAKE. 12 L 

CORN-STARCH CUSTARD CAKE. ' 

Miss LiDA Wheat. 

Made in same manner as apple lemon jelly-cake. 
filling: 

One tablespoon sugar, one tablespoon corn-starch, two 
€ggs, and one pint jnilk ; flavor with vanilla. Let it cool 
before putting between layers. 

DELICATE CAKE. 

Mrs. Stearns, Madison, Ind, 
Two cups sugar, one-half cup butter, whites of five eggs, 
one cup milk, two and one-half cups flour, two teaspoons 
baking-powder ; flavor. Bake thin, in bread-pans ; ice, 
lay one on another, and cut in squares. 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN CAKE. 

Mrs. Enos. 
Whites of ten eggs, three cups sugar, one-half cup sweet 
milk, one cup butter, three and one-half cups flour, two 
teaspoons baking-powder. Flavor with rose. 
filling: 
One-fourth pound raisins, also of citron, almonds, Brazil 
nuts, figs and one cocoanut. Scald the almonds, after 
taking off shells, in the water. Dry them thoroughly. Cut 
them in small pieces. Grate the cocoanut, and cut up 
figs, currants and raisins. Take the whites of four eggs, 
one pound pulverized sugar, and make an icing. Spread 
the layers with the icing and scatter over them the nuts and 
fruits. 

WHITE CAKE. 
Mrs. Jennie W. Bass. 

Three cups white sugar, one cup butter, one cup sweet 
milk, four cups flour, three teaspoons baking-powder, sifted 
in the flour. Whites of ten eggs beaten very light. Work 
butter and sugar together, add milk, then the flour, and 
last, the eggs. Flavor with lemon. 



122 INDIANAPOLIS COOK. BOOK. 



VELVET SPONGE-CAKE. 
Miss Knerr. 
Two cups sugar, four eggs, two cups flour, two teaspoons 
baking-powder, and one cup hot water. 

ICE CREAM FILLING. 

Three cups white sugar, one-half cup boiling water. Boil 
until it makes brittle candy (test by dropping it into cold 
water) ; whites of three eggs well beaten ; stir into boiling 
candy ; one teaspoon citric acid. Flavor to taste. 

MOUNT BLANC CAKE. 

Mrs. Fannie Vestal. 
Two cups pulverized sugar, one cup butter, one cup 
sweet milk, four cups flour, whites of eight eggs, three tea- 
spoons baking-powder. 

ICING: 

Three cups granulated sugar, one pint boiling water. 
Boil the sugar until it will candy ; previously beat the 
whites of three eggs, and flavor with one tablespoon vanilla ; 
pour the sugar over the eggs and beat until milk warm ; 
the boiling hot sugar may be poured over the well-whipped 
whites, and the beating continued until nearly cold. Fla- 
vor, and spread over the cakes. 

JELLY-CAKE ROLL. 
Three eggs, one-half cup butter, one cup flour, one and 
one-half teaspoons baking-powder, two-thirds cup pulver- 
ized sugar. Grease a dripping pan, and i)ut in the dough 
about one-half inch thick ; when baked turn it on a cloth, 
as it will stick to a board, pan or plate ; spread jelly evenly 
and roll while hot. 

GINGER COOKIES. 

Mrs. Wheatly. 
One cup each of sugar, molasses, shortening and boiling 
water, one teaspoon soda and one tablespoon ginger. Stir 
all together, and add flour to roll nicely. 



COOKIES. 123 

GINGER CAKES. 
Mrs. II. E. Bishop, Greenwood. 
One egg, one quart molasses, five large tablespoons lard, 
five of boiling water, two of ginger, one of soda. Mix, 
roll, and cut into cakes. 

BUNS. 
Mrs, Weyer, Madison. 
Two pints of flour, one cup sugar, one cup butter, three 
eggs, two teaspoons baking-powder. Drop small in pans. 
One cup of fruit may be added. 

COOKIES. 

Mrs. Weyer. 
Three eggs, whites and yelks beaten separately, one- 
half cup butter, one and one-half cups sugar, three full 
cups of flour, and two teaspoons baking powder ; flavor 
with lemon. Cut into round cakes, and bake in a quick 
oven. Use rind and juice of one lemon. 

TAYLOR CAKES. 
Mrs. Enos. 
Three-fourths pound butter, three-fourths pound sugar, 
one quart New Orleans molasses, six eggs beaten separ- 
ately, one pint sour milk, one tablespoon soda, two table- 
spoons ginger and other spices, three pounds flour. Drop 
on tins or in gem-pans. 

GINGER-SNAPS. 

Mrs. Shank. 
One pint New Orleans molasses, one pint brown sugar, 
one cup of butter or salted lard, one teaspoon cloves and 
cinnamon, one teaspoon soda dissolved in one-half cup 
warm water, two tablespoons ginger. 

COOKIES. 
Mrs. Kate Andrews. 
Two cups sugar, two eggs, one cup butter, two table- 
spoons water, one teaspoon soda ; roll thin. Bake quickly. 



124 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



DOUGHNUTS. 
Mrs. Bugbee. 
Two cups sugar, two eggs, one heaping teaspoon soda, 
two and one-half tablespoons melted butter, one-half nut- 
meg, and one pint sour milk. Flour to thicken, and roll 
out. 

SAND CAKES. 

Mrs. Norman. 

One quart sugar, one quart flour, one pint butter, two 

eggs, leaving the white of one ; roll thin. Spread, with a 

feather, the beaten white ; grate loaf sugar, nutmeg and 

cinnamon. 

GINGER SNAPS. 
Miss Mollie Simpson. 
One cup lard and butter, one cup sugar, one cup molas- 
ses ; one-half cup water, one tablespoon each of ginger, 
cinnamon and cloves, one teaspoon soda dissolved in hot 
water; flour for stiff dough. Roll thin and bake quickly. 

TEA CAKES. 

Mrs. L. a. Burleigh. 
Three eggs, three cups sugar, three-fourths cup lard and 
butter, one cup sour milk, one small teaspoon soda. Bake 
in hot oven. 

FOURTH-OF-JULY GINGER CAKES. 

Mrs. Kring. 

Put into a coffeecyp three large spoons melted lard, three 

spoons water, one teaspoon soda, a little salt, one teaspoon 

ginger, and fill the cup with molasses. Add flour to 

thicken, and roll out. 

DOUGHNUTS. 
Mrs. Erwin. 
Two small cups sugar, one cup sweet milk, three eggs, 
one tablespoon melted butter, three teaspoons baking- 
powder. Mix with flour as soft as can be roUed out; fry- 
in hot lard. 



COOKIKS. 125 

FRENCH BISCUIT. 

Mrs. Black. 
Two cups sugar, two cups butter, one egg or the whites 
of two eggs, one teaspoon baking-powder, flour enough to 
thiclcen. Grate sugar on them. There may be used, in- 
stead of the baking-powder, one-haU cup sour milk, and 
one-half teaspoon of soda. 

ALMOND DOUGHNUTS. 

Miss Angie Miller. 
One-fourth pound butter rubbed into one quart of flour ; 
add one teaspoon s.ilt, one pound sugar, four eggs beaten, 
nutmeg, and one-half pint sweet milk ; one and one-half 
teaspoons baking-powder in the flour; roll thin; cut in 
almond-shape and lay in hot lard ; grate white sugar on 
them. 

RAISED DOUGHNUTS. 
Mrs. Ends. 
One quart sweet milk warmed with one-fourth pound 
butter and lard mixed, one cup sugar, five eggs beaten 
light, flour for rather stiff batter, and one cup yeast. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

Mrs. Ends. 
Four eggs, two teacups sugar, one cup butter, one cup 
sour milk with one teaspoon soda dissolved in it. Beat 
the butter and sugar; add the beaten eggs, then the milk, 
and lastly the flour; flavor to taste, with nutmeg, vanilla, 
lemon, or rose-water; make into soft dough and fry in hot 
lard. 

SAND TARTS. 
Mrs. Emma Alexander. 
Two pounds flour, one and one-fourth pounds butter, 
two pounds sugar, three eggs, the white of one beaten 
light to moisten the tops after they have been rolled out 
and cut out; sprinkle cinnamon, sugar and pieces of 
almonds on them. 



126 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



MOLASSES COOKIES. 

Mks. John McClain. 
One cup brown sugar, one cup molasses, one cup butter, 
two eggs, two tablespoons vinegar, two tablespoons ginger, 
two teaspoons soda. Add nutmeg, cinnamon and cloves. 
Let the soda be mixed with the molasses and vinegar. 
When effervescing, stir into the sugar, molasses, butter and 
eggs. Add flour to roll out thin. 

SAND TARTS. 

Mrs. Alexander. 
One pound white sugar, five-eighths pound butter, two 
eggs. Work the butter to a cream with the sugar. Add 
the eggs. Roll very thin and cut. On the top, sprinkle 
cinnamon, sugar and almond pieces, after spreading with 
white of an egg. 

MACAROONS. 

Mrs. Ends. 
Whites of six eggs beaten light, one pound sugar, one 
pound almonds, beaten in a mortar. Hickory nuts, walnuts 
or pecans can be used instead of almonds. 

JUMBLES. 

Miss Belle Reese. 
One pound butter, one pound sugar, one pound flour, 
three eggs, rose-water and cinnamon to flavor. 

COOKIES. 

Mrs. Hereth. 
Two cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup sour milk, one 
teaspoon soda. Add flour to roll them. Flavor with lemon 
or nutmeg. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

Mrs. Spahr, Sr. 
One quart molasses, one pound sugar, one and one- 
fourth pounds butter, ginger, cloves and red pepper to 
taste. Make stiff and roll thin ; bake in a quick oven. 



CAKE. 127 

COOKIES. 
Mrs. Enos. 
One pound sugar, one-half pound butter, two eggs, one 
cup milk, one pound and a half flour, two teaspoons bak- 
ing-powder. Flavor with lemon. Drop them off spoon, 
and sprinkle cinnamon and sugar on them. 

TEA CAKES. 

Mrs. Noah Clark. 
Three eggs, one cup butter, one and one-half cups su 
gar, one-third cup sweet milk, one teaspoon baking-pow- 
der. Flavor with lemon. 

DOUGHNUTS. 
Hoffman's Bakery. 
Three eggs, heaping tablespoon butter, one cup milk, 
two of sugar, three teaspoons baking-powder, teaspoon cin- 
namon, one-half nutmeg and flour. Boil immediately in 
perfectly sweet lard. 

CREAM CRULLERS. 
Hoffman's Bakery. 
Beat two eggs, one cup sugar, and one cup sour cream 
well together. Add a little salt, one teaspoon soda and 
flour to make a stiff dough. Boil in perfectly sweet lard. 
These are very delicious when properly made, but too ex- 
pensive for bakers to throw on the market. 

CREAM COOKIES. 

Miss Annie Brown. 
One cup sweet cream, one cup sugar, one egg, one heap- 
ing teaspoonful baking-powder ; sufficient flour to make a 
soft dough. Roll thin and bake quickly. Season to taste. 

WHITE CAKE. 
Miss Nora Benson. 
One cup butter, three cups sugar, one-fourth cup milk, 
four cups flour, three teaspoons baking-powder, whites of 
nine eggs. Flavor with lemon. 



128 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



CREAM CAKE. 
Mrs. Heketh. 
Three eggs, one cup sugar, one tablespoon water, one- 
half teaspoon soda, one teaspoon cream tartar, and one 
and one half cups flour. Bake in square tin. 

CREAM FOR FILLING: 

One large cup milk, one egg, one-half cup sugar, butter 
size of an egg, two heaping teaspoons corn-starch. Split 
the cake open, and spread on the cream. 

ICE CREAM CAKE. 
Mrs. Barnes, Lafayette. 
Two cups granulated sugar, two-thirds cup butter, two- 
thirds cup sweet milk, three cups flour, two teaspoons bak- 
ing-powder, whites of eight eggs. 

PINK COLORING: 

One drachm cochineal, one drachm alum, one drachm 
bi-carbonate of soda, one drachm cream tartar. These in- 
gredients should be well pulverized and mixed. Take one 
teaspoon of the mixture and dissolve in a little water. Take 
half the batter for the cake and color it with this mixture. 

CREAM. 

Pour one-half pint boiling water on four cups sugar, and 
boil until you can take it up with your fingers, when dropped 
in cold water. Pour the boiling sugar over the beaten 
whites of four eggs. Stir until it is a perfect cream. Add 
one-half teaspoon citric acid, and flavor to taste. Put the 
cream between the pink and white cakes. 

RAISIN CAKE. 

Mrs. M. C. Johnson. 

Two cups sugar, one cup butter, three eggs, one cup cold 

water, three cups flour, two teaspoons baking-powder, three 

cups raisins 

filling: 

Make an icing as for ice cream cake, and mix with it 

hickorynut kernels. 



J. K. JAMESON, D. D. S. W. S. RAWLS, D. D. S. 

JAMESON .*c RAWLS, 

DENTISTS, 

ROOMS 4&5 CLAY POOL BLOCK, 

N. E. Corner Washington and Illinois Streets, opposite Bates House, 

Indianapolis, Ind. 



SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO THE PRESERVATION OF THE NATURAL TEETH. 



We are provided with the latest and most perfect appliances for 
administering 

Nitrous Oxide or Laughing Gas, 

By which the Gas can be taken with perfect safety and the much 
dreaded operation of having teeth extracted, rendered perfectly pain- 
less. Come and try it. 

Being impressed with the idea that a dental office conducted on 
strictly business principles, where first-class operations in all branches 
of Dentistry could be secured at reasonable prices, would receive the 
endorsement and patronage of the people, we opened an office in this 
city with full confidence of success, and the very liberal patronage we 
have received from the citizens of Indianapolis and other parts of the 
State has assured us that we were not mistaken. 

We claim to have had equal advantages and experience with any 
other dental practitioners in the city, and that our work will compare 
favorably with the best. 

We expect to do First-Class Work and Charge Reasonable Prices. 

We do not charge the fancy prices demanded by many good dentists, 
nor the extremely low prices of incompetent ones who can only secure 
patronage by low prices. Our motto is first-class work, guaranteeing 
satisfaction, with charges as reasonable as is consistent with good 
work. 

ARTIFICIAL TEETH 

Inserted on all the various materials: Continuous Gum, Gold, Rub- 
er, Celluloid, etc. 




Jacob Toegtle, 



DEALER IN 



STOVES 



AND 



House Furnishing Goods. 

Special Attention given to Fornisliing of Kitcliens, 

A good Cook Stove is a necessity to a household, and the best of them 
can be found at 

S. I Cor. Wasliiiigta and Delaware Sts., Inilianapolis, Inil. 

BEE HIVE PLANING MILL, 

73 Pendleton Ave., 
INDIANAPOLIS, - INDIANA. 



M. S. HUBY & SON, 



DEALERS IN 



Lumber, Lath, Shingles, 

Fence Posts and Pickets. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Doors, Sash, Blinds, Mantles, Brackets, 

Flooring, Siding, Molding, 

Etc., Etc. 

oa- niisT cij-a-ss oooi^s ajt fa.ir ppiices. 



S. H. Cobb. G. F. Branham. 

COBB & BRANHAM, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
ALL KINDS OF 

doalNdCoke. 

Best quality, full weight and prompt delivery guar- 
anteed. Telephone Connections. 



COAL YARDS: 

458 EAST OHIO STRET, 
140 SOUTH ALABAIVIA STREET 



50 N. Delaware Street, 

BALDWIN'S BLOCK, 

Indianapolis, Incl. 



W. p. CRAFT. J. MILTON DURY G. ALEXANDER. 

SHOE PALACE 

FINE SHOES.-^-^^LATEST STYLES. 

"Common Sense Shoes." 

8 Kast Wastiington Street, 

INDIAN AP( > LIS. 

GEO. J. HAMMEL, 

GROCER! 

A full line of the Best Goods constantly on 
hand, at Lowest Prices. 

HO and 112 ]VIa.ssacIn_isetts Ave., 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



teii.:e:pi3:oi^e ooisrisrECTioisrs. 




(ieo. W. Miller. C. E. Barrett. 

Ed. Dickinson. 



G. W. MILLER & CO. 

CARKIACE ANl) WAGON 

Nos. 72, 74, 76 & 78 
NORTH DELAWARE ST. 

iNmANAI'OLIS. 

R<'I)airingand Job Work done promptly. 



CAKE. 129 

SPICE CAKE. 

Mrs. Shreve, St. Joseph, 111. 
One and one-half cups sugar, one-half cup butter, yelks 
of five eggs, one cup sour milk, three cups flour, one tea- 
spoon each of cinnamon, allspice, cloves and nutmeg, one 
teaspoon soda in the milk. 

BRIDE'S CAKE. 

Mrs. Ends. 
Three-fourths of a pound of butter, three-fourths pound 
of flour, one pound sugar and the whites of seventeen 
eggs Flavor with a (quarter of a pound of bitter almonds. 

SODA POUND CAKE. 
Mrs. M. C. Johnson. 
One pound sugar, one pound flour, one-half pound but- 
ter, five eggs, one cup milk, three teaspoons baking-pow- 
der. This makes two loaves of cake. It is a good recipe 
for cake pudding. 

WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE. 

' Mrs. Frank Evarts, Minneapolis. 

One and one-half cups sugar, one-half cup butter, one- 
half cup milk, whites of five eggs, three small cups flour, 
one full teaspoon baking-powder. 

ORANGE CAKE. 

Mrs Clough. 
Butter size of an egg, two large cups sugar, four eggs, 
beaten together ten minutes, one cup sweet milk, three and 
one-half cups flour, eight teaspoons baking-powder. 

ICING : 

Two cups sugar, enough water to keep it from burning ; 
cook until it drops like candy ; pour over the well-beaten 
whites of three eggs. When the icing becomes cold, lay 
over it slices of oranges 
9 



I30 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

Mrs. Evakts. 
One cup sugar, one cup sour milk, one-half teaspoon 
soda, three spoons melted lard. Add flour to make soft 
dough. 

PEACH CAKE. 
Bake three sheets of sponge cake. Cut ripe peaches in 
thin slices and put in layers between cakes. Pour whipped 
cream over each layer and over the top. 

ORANGE CAKE. 

Mrs. Scott. 
Two cups sugar, eight eggs beaten separately and thor- 
oughly, two cups flour, three teaspoons baking-powder, 
grated rind of one orange. 

WATERMELON CAKE. 

Mrs. John Hart. 

White Part- — Two cups white sugar, one cup butter, one 
cup sweet milk, three and one-half cups flour, whites of 
eight eggs, three teaspoons baking-powder. 

Red Part — One and one- half cups red sugar, one cup 
butter, one-third cup sweet milk, whites of four eggs, two 
cups flour, three teaspoons baking-powder, one cup raisins. 
Keep the red part around the middle of the pan, and the 
white at the outer edge. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

Mrs. Mary Kingston. 
Two cups sugar, one cup butter, three eggs, one cup 
sweet milk, one cup yeast. Add flour sufficient to knead 
like bread dough. Let rise, and when light roll out in 
cakes an inch thick. Let rise again, and when ready to 
bake, rub over with egg or bits of butter, and sprinkle with 
sugar and cinnamon. 



CAKE. 131 

ALMOND SPONGE-CAKE 

Miss Rena Newton. 
One-half pound sugar, five eggs. Beat the yelks first 
and add the sugar to them gradually ; then beat the whites 
to a stiff froth and add ; sift in flour enough to make a bat- 
ter of medium stiffness ; flavor with almond extract, and 
before putting in the pan, butter a paper well and line the 
pan; on the bottom part, put at intervals bits of almond 
which you have blanched by pouring boiling water over 
them; after removing the brown skin, cut in small pieces, 
then pour the batter over until the pan is about half full. 
Bake for one hour in a slow oven. 

NEAPOLITAN CAKE. 

Mrs. H. C. Curtis. 

Black Part — One-half cup each of butter, brown sugar, 
molasses and strong coffee ; two and one-half cups flour, 
yelks of five eggs ; add one teaspoon each of soda, cinna- 
mon and cloves ; one-half pound each of raisins and cur- 
rants, one-eighth pound citron. 

IVIiite Part — One-half cup butter, two cups powdered 
sugar, one cup sweet milk, three-fourths cup corn starch; 
mix with two and one-half cups flour, three teaspoons bak- 
ing-powder ; add the beaten whites of four eggs. Bake the 
light and dark parts separately in jelly-cake pans. Spread 
over the cakes an icing made thus : The white of one tgg, 
the juice of two lemons, and powdered sugar; beat until 
stiff. This makes three layers of each kind of cake. 

WEDDING CAKE. 

Mrs. McConnell. 
Fifteen eggs, beaten separately, one and one-half pounds 
butter, one and one-half pounds flour, three pounds seeded 
raisins, three pounds currants, one and one-half pounds 
citron, a half pint molssses, one ounce each of ground mace 
and cinnamon. 



132 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



CREAM CAKE. 

Mrs. McConnell. 
One cup sugar, three eggs, one cup flour, one teaspoon 
baking-powder and one tablespoon butter. Bake in layers. 
filling: 
One pint sweet milk, two eggs, two-thirds cup sugar, two 
large tablespoons corn-starch and a half cup butter. Fla- 
vor with lemon. Cook the cream well and let it cool be- 
fore putting it in the cake. 

COCOANUT CAKE. 

Mrs. Frank Martin. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, three eggs, two cups 

flour, two teaspoons baking-powder, one-half cup sweet 

milk. Beat the butter and sugar together, and the eggs 

separately. 

filling: 

One egg, three-fourths cup sugar, one-half cup butter, 
one-half cup flour, one cup dessicated cocoanut, and one- 
half pint milk, heated to boiling. Spread this over the 
layers of the cake. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Mrs. J. K. Pye. 
One cup white sugar, one cup butter, one-fourth cup 
sweet milk, whites of four eggs, two cups flour, and one 
teaspoon baking-powder. 

filling: 
Two cups sugar, one-half cup grated chocolate, one cup 
water. Boil until thick, and then spread. 

MADISON CAKE. 

Mibs Nannie I've. 
Four cups flour, four eggs, one cup butter, one cup 
sugar, one cup sour milk, one cup molasses, one cup cur- 
rants or raisins, one large tablespoon spices, and one tea- 
spoon soda. If no fruit is desired in the cake, add more 
spices. 



CAKE. 133 

CUP CAKE. 

Mrs. John Hart. 
One cup butter, two cups sugar, four eggs, one cup 
sweet milk, four cups flour, two teaspoons baking-powder. 

SPONGE-CAKE ROLL. 
Miss Sallie Pye. 
Two eggs, one cup sugar, two cups sifted flour, one tea- 
spoon baking-powder, and one-half cup water. Spread 
and roll while hot. 

COCOANUT CAKE. 

Miss Kittie Alling, Madison, Ind. 
One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup milk, 
three eggs, two cups flour, and two small teaspoons baking- 
powder. 

filling: 

Heat one-half pint milk and mix with it one cup of grated 
cocoanut. 

ORDER OF MIXING CAKE. 
The butter and sugar should first 'be creamed, or thor- 
oughly worked together ; the yelks of eggs should next be 
added, unless it be fruit cake, when the molasses and soda 
should be added to the butter and sugar. If milk be used, 
it should be put in before the yelks of eggs. The whites 
of eggs should be stirred in last. Fruit should be dredged 
with flour before stirred in. 



134 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



SAUCES 



OIL SAUCE FOR PICKLES. 

Mrs. Baggs. 
One-half pint oil, one-half pound mustard, one teaspoon 
each of cayenne and black pepper, one teacup of celery- 
seed ; mix well with strong vinegar. This can be poured 
over pickles before sealing them in cans. 

SAUCE FOR VEGETABLES. 
Mrs. Ends. 
Boil four eggs hard ; rub the yelks smooth with two table- 
spoons olive oil, two teaspoons made mustard, salt and 
pepper ; one teacup vinegar. 

MUSHROOM SAUCE. 

Mrs. Baggs. 

One teacup sliced mushrooms, four tablespoons butter, 
one teacup milk or cream, one teaspoon flour, nutmeg, 
mace, and salt to taste. Stew mushrooms until tender, in 
barely enough water to cover them. Drain, but do not 
press them. Add cream, butter, and seasoning. Stew 
over a bright fire, stirring all the time until it begins to 
thicken. Add flour wet in cold milk. Boil and serve as 
gravy. 

LEMON SAUCE. 
Mrs. Baggs. 

One large cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one egg, juice of 
one lemon and grated half rind, one teaspoon nutmeg, three 
tablespoons boiling water. Cream the butter and sugar ; 
add the well beaten egg ; beat hard ten minutes ; add a 
spoonful at a time of boiling water; put in a tin pail and 
set in the uncovered top of a tea-kettle. The kettle must 
be kept boiling until the sauce is very hot. Stir constantly. 



SAUCES. 135 

LIQUID SAUCE FOR PUDDING. 

Mrs. Carter. 
One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, two tablespoons 
flour ; smooth the flour in cold water. Stir in boiling wa- 
ter to make one quart of sauce. Flavor with vanilla. 

PLAIN PUDDING SAUCE. 

Mrs. Lily Bruce. 

One tablespoon butter, three teaspoons flour ; stir well 

and add two tablespoons sugar ; pour on one pint boiling 

water. When cool, one beaten egg maybe added. Flavor 

with vanilla. 

SNOW SAUCE. 
Mrs. Mary Johnson. 
Lump of butter size of an egg, one pint of white sugar ; 
beat stiff the whites of three eggs, stir them in the butter 
and sugar. Flavor with vanilla. 

HARD SAUCE FOR PUDDINGS. 

Mrs. Springer. 
Smooth butter and sugar, one-fourth pound of butter to 
three-fourths pound of sugar. 

BROWN SAUCE. 

Mrs. Swift. 
Yelks of three eggs, one cup milk, small piece of butter. 
Boil as custard, and when cool flavor with lemon. 

DRAWN BUTTER FOR VEGETABLES. 

Mrs. Reynolds. 
Rub butter and flour; pour on them boiling water, and 
serve. 



136 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK, 



CUSTARDS AND CREAMS. 



MERINGUE CUSTARD. 

Miss Annie Brown. 

One quart milk, four eggs, four tablespoonsful sugar. 
Let the milk come to a boil, have the eggs and sugar beaten 
together and stir the boiling milk into them. Put over the 
fire and thicken without allowing it to boil. Reserve the 
whites of two eggs ; whip with two tablespoonsful powdered 
sugar, and spread over the top after the custard is poured 
into a dish. Serve cold. 

CUSTARD. 

One pint sweet milk, one-half cup white sugar. When 
boiled, add the yelks of seven eggs and two tablespoons of 
flour, well beaten, and flavor with vanilla. 

CHOCOLATE CUSTARD. 

Mrs. Baggs. 
Two sections of chocolate cake dissolved in one quart 
milk, one small cup sugar, yelks of eight eggs, one heaping 
tablespoon corn-starch ; pour the hot milk on the yelks, 
sugar, and corn-starch, after mixing them smoothly. Leave 
on the stove a few minutes. 

FROZEN CUSTARD. 

Mrs. Celia Lester. 
Make a custard of one quart milk and one quart cream, 
six eggs, and three cups sugar. When the milk is almost 
boiling, stir in the yelks of the eggs that have been beaten 
with the sugar; then stir in the beaten whites, and stir 
while the custard boils and thickens. 



CUSTARDS AND CREAMS. 137 



ICE CREAM. 

Mks. John Duncan. 
One quart cream, whites of three eggs, yelks of two eggs. 
Beat separately ; sweetefn until very sweet ; add one-third 
teaspoon vanilla. 

ICE CREAM. 

Mrs. Dk. Wiley. 
Three pints sweet cream, one pint powdered sugar, whites 
of two eggs beaten light, one tablespoon vanilla. Mix 
thoroughly before putting in freezer. 

ICE CREAM. • 

Mrs. Mary Kingsbury. 
To one gallon of cream, take whites of eight eggs; 
sweeten and flavor to taste. Beat eggs very light, add sugar 
and cream, and beat again. Freeze some time before using, 
and let stand with ice surrounding the freezer. 

ICE CREAM. 

Mrs. Kerper. 
One quart cream, one quart new milk, one pound pow- 
dered sugar, and the whites of four eggs. Flavor, lemon 
or vanilla. Freeze. 

ICE CREAM. 
Miss Zula Wilson. 
Two quarts cream, one pound sugar ; flavor to taste. 
Put around the freezer to every three large spoons pounded 
ice, one spoon coarse salt. 

CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM. 

Miss Minnie Carter. 
One quart cream, three-fourths pound sugar, five table- 
spoons chocolate, scraped and mixed with the yelks of six 
eggs. Pour this mixture into the quart of cream, and boil. 
Flavor with lemon and freeze. 



138 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK, 

FRUIT ICE CREAM. 
Mrs. Duncan. 
Same as ice cream. If a juicy fruit, put as much juice 
as cream. 

STRAWBERRY ICE CREAM. 

Miss Romie Enos. 
Mash in a bowl one quart strawberries with one pound 
sugar. Add one quart cream, and freeze. 

RASPBERRY ICE CREAM. 

Mrs. Norman. 
Press red raspberries through a seive ; pour on them a 
rich, boiled custard, and freeze. 

BANANA ICE CREAM. 

Miss Lorena Carter. 
Slice bananas, sufficient to flavor the cream — six bananas 
to one-half gallon of cream. Put the slices into the sweet- 
ened cream just before freezing. 

LEMON ICE. 

Miss Jessie Wiley. 
To one pint of lemon juice, add one quart of sugar and 
one quart of water, in which the rind of three lemons has 
stood until the water has been flavored. When partly- 
frozen, add the whites of four eggs, beaten to a stiff froth. 

STRAWBERRY ICE. 
Miss Emma Hutchings. 
Take from two quarts of berries their juice ; sweeten. 
Add to this the same quantity of water. Add the beaten 
whites of three eggs, when nearly frozen, and freeze. 

ORANGE ICE. 

Miss Ida Norwood. 
Add the grated rind of three oranges, the juice of six, 
and also the juice of two lemons ; dissolve one pint of su- 
gar in one pint of cold water. Mix and freeze. 



CUSTARDS AND CREAMS. 1 39 

LEMON ICE. 

Miss Nellie Hutchings. 
Juice of six lemons, two pounds sugar, two quarts water. 
Freeze. 

FROZEN STRAWBERRIES. 

Miss Nellie Tetaz. 
Mash and freeze the berries ; add sugar. Serve with 
cream. 

CURRANT ICE. 

Miss Mattie Johnson. 
One pound sugar to one pint juice, and one pint water. 
When pardy frozen, add the whites of three eggs. 

LEMON FLOAT. 

Mrs. Wheatly. 
Beat yelks of four eggs, one tablespoon corn starch, one 
quart milk, and sugar to taste. Stir until it boils, then add 
one-half teaspoon lemon essence ; beat whites of two eggs ; 
sweeten and flavor, and pour on top. Cocoanut may be 
added to the whites of the eggs. 

BANANA CREAM. 

Mrs. Mary J. Downey, Irvington. 
Dissolve one-half box gelatine in one-half teacup cold 
water. Put one and one-half cups new milk over the fire, 
after sweetening to taste. When boiling, pour into it the 
gelatine. Stir until the gelatine is thoroughly dissolved ; 
then boil ten minutes, and when cold, but not stiff, stir in 
six bananas, sliced with a silver knife. Mix well, and set 
away on ice. One hour before using, take a pint of rich 
cream, sweeten to taste, flavor with vanilla, and whip well. 
Put the mixture first made into a glass dish, and pour over 
it the whipped cream. 



140 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



SPANISH CREAM. 
Mrs. J. U. Gregor. 
Two ounces gelatine, dissolved in three pints milk ; when 
boiling, stir in the yelks of six eggs ; beat the whites of six 
eggs to a stiff froth with six tablespoons sugar and a half 
teaspoon vanilla ; put together in a bowl and stir well, then 
turn out on a dish to serve cold. 

AMBROSIA. 
Mrs. Reynolds. 
Slice oranges and mix the slices with grated cocoanut. 
Sliced pine-apples, oranges and bananas may be used. 

SUGGESTIONS. 
Custard or cream may be cooked or uncooked before 
freezing. It may be put in a tightly-covered tin bucket 
when there is no freezer, and placed in a wooden bucket. 
The ice and coarse salt should fill the space between the 
tin and wood. The custard should be stirred after becom- 
ing cold, and then left an hour. 



DRINKS. 141 



DRINKS. 

COFFEE. 

Keep the coffee box or can covered tight to prevent 
losing strength of coffee ; do not have much coffee browned 
at once ; a small lump of butter stirred through the coffee 
when browning adds to the richness, and also causes it to 
brown more evenly. Coffee should be browned often, at 
least twice a week. Mocha and Java mixed make good 
coffee ; Java and Maracaibo mixed make a lower-priced 
coffee. 

COFFEE. 

After the grains are evenly browned, the beaten white of 
egg, or the whole egg, may cover it. The coffee is to be 
ground coarse if no sack or seive is used in the coffeepot ; 
very finely ground otherwise, and after mixing in cold wa- 
ter, boiling water should be poured on. For two table- 
spoonsful of coffee allow one pint of water ; after boiling 
fifteen minutes pour in a little cold water and set aside. 

STRAINED COFFEE. 
Have in coffee boiler a thin muslin or flannel bag. If it 
can be tied around the mouth of tin funnel, the lid of cof- 
feepot fitting the top of the funnel, it is excellent. Coffee 
so made requires no egg and no cold water to be poured 
in. It is clear and good. 

MILK COFFEE. 

Make a small quantity of strong coffee with boiling water ; 
have ready as much boiling milk as will be sufficient to add ; 
pour off the coffee into coffeepot and add the boiling milk. 
Serve immediately, or it will not be good. No cream is 
required. 



142 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK 



TO MAKE BOILED COFFEE. 

If egg was not added immediately after browning, mix 
thie ground coffee to be used with a part of the egg, or 
with the broken shell of the egg, and a little cold water ; 
have the boiler well scalded, and pour boiling water on 
this mixed coffee ; only pour one-half as much water as is 
needed, that it may not boil over. Let it boil five minutes, 
stirring it down once, and then add the required boiling 
water. 

COFFEE FROM COLD WATER. 

To one pint of cold water put two tablespoons coffee ; it 
need not boil, but should come to boiling point and be kept 
very hot and simmering for fifteen minutes. The egg or 
shell should be mixed with the coffee before heating. One- 
half teacup cold water should be quickly poured into coffee 
boiler when taking it from stove, unless the coffee is to be 
poured off into a coffeepot. 

TEA. 

Scald the teapot ; pour in boiling water, and afterward 
the tea, that the leaves may swell ; put two teapoonsful 
of tea to one pint of water. 

CHOCOLATE. 

Use powdered chocolate, one-half cup to one pint boil- 
ing water. Boil twenty minutes ; add one pint milk and 
boil five minutes more ; sweeten when boiling. 

SUGGESTIONS. 

When cream is not obtainable, by scalding the milk and 
adding it while hot to the coffee, the absence of cream will 
not be noticed. The sugar and cream should be put in 
the cup before pouring the coffee. The milk or cream 
should be put in the cup of tea before it is poured. 



DRINKS. 143 

CHILDREN'S TEA. 
Boiling water and milk in equal proportions. 

LEMONADE. 
One quart of water ; use two lemons ; slice them and 
press with a potato-masher if a lemon-squeezer is not avail- 
able ; add five tablespoons white sugar ; the water should 
be very cold. 

HOT LEMONADE. 
After pressing the slices of lemon, pour on boiling wa- 
ter. When drank at night an excellent remedy for cold, 
and at any time good for rheumatism. 

WARM MILK. 
This should be used in small quantities and at short 
intervals for weakness, especially in cases of diarrhoea ; the 
milk should not be heated to the boiling point. Another 
way is to boil the milk, and add pepper and salt. 

INVALID'S DRINK. 
Beat up an egg in a glass of lemonade. 

GRUEL. 
Corn meal, oat meal or arrow root maybe used; first 
smooth with cold water, as for gravy ; pour one pint boil- 
ing water on one-half cup of the paste. 

BEEF TEA. 
Put one pound minced beef in one pint cold water; boil 
fifteen minutes and drain thoroughly ; season the tea with 
pepper and salt. 

INFANT'S FOOD. 

Mrs. Van Wagenen, Orange, New Jersey. 
Gelatine, five grains ; arrowroot, twenty-five grains ; water 
one and a half pints. These quantities are always to be 



144 • INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



used ; the milk and cream are to be increased with the age 
of the child. 

Milk, two gills ; cream, one gill. 

For the first three months, milk, three gills ; cream, one 
gill. 

From three to six months, milk, one pint ; cream, one 
and a half gills. 

From six to nine months, milk, one and one-quarter 
pints ; cream, one and one-half or two gills. 

From nine to twelve months. If the child should be 
feeble, make the water one quart. 

Put one and one-quarter pints of water in a sauce pan over 
the fire, and dissolve the gelatine in it. When the water 
boils, pour in the arrowroot, previously mixed with a gill 
of cold water. Let this boil five minutes, then add the 
milk ; when that boils, pour in the cream, and remove it 
immediately from the fire. Sweeten it with loaf sugar, a 
little sweeter than good cow's milk. The milk should come 
from one good cow, and the cream should be not more 
than three or four hours old. If the child is constipated, 
use more cream ; if otherwise, less should be used. Two 
quarts of milk will furnish the cream that is necessary, and 
yet be good for family use. Be careful to measure out the 
specified quantity of milk while it is new, and set it by itself. 
In cold weather, if you take milk of a milkman, make it 
bloodwarm before setting it away, else it will be difificult to 
get the cream in the specified time. 

The above recipe has undoubtedly saved the lives of 
many babies. 



CANNING FRUIT. I45 



CANNING FRUIT. 



Tin cans are liable to become corroded by the action of 
the acid in the fruit upon the tin, and if the inside is dis- 
colored, the can should not be used the second time. 
Glass, self-sealing cans are now generally used by house- 
keepers. There is no danger of breaking the glass if it is 
set on a cold, wet dish-cloth, or towel, in a pan. A silver 
spoon in the can, or a long carving-knife, is also a good 
protection. Fruit should be well cooked. If not "done 
through," it will not keep. The color is lighter and 
fresher if only a small quantity of fruit is cooked at a time. 
The jelly is a brighter color if only one or two glasses are 
made at a time. If the tumblers have not glass tops, it is 
well to put them under glass until the jelly cools, and the 
moisture can be wiped off the glass. Cans should be 
turned upside down, so tliat after contraction, the tops 
can be tightened. The following is a good time-table for 
boiling fruit: 

Time for Boiling, and Quantity 0/ Sugar to one Quart Fruit. 

Minutes. Ounces. 

Cherries 5 6 

Raspberries 6 4 

Blackberries 6 6 

Strawberries 8 8 

Plums 10 10 

Whortleberries 5 8 

Pieplant, sliced 10 8 

Small, sour pears, whole 30 4 

Bartlett pears, halved 20 6 

Peaches S 4 

Peaches, whole 15 4 

Pineapples, sliced 15 6 

Siberian crab apples 25 8 

Sour apples, quartered 10 5 

Ripe currants 6 8 

Wild grapes lo 8 

Tomatoes 20 2 

Gooseberries 8 8 

Quinces, sliced ic 10 

10 



146 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



PRESERVES. 



WATERMELON PRESERVES. 
Mrs. Baggs. 

Dissolve one ounce of alum in one half gallon water. 
Scald the melon rinds until tender ; add one cup vinegar, 
and stew the rinds slowly until green. After this, soak in 
cold water one hour, changing the water often. Make a 
syrup of one quart of white sugar and three-fourths of a pint 
of vinegar. Season with ginger, cinnamon, lemon and 
mace. Pour over the rinds, scalding hot, for three or four 
mornings. 

SPICED GRAPES. 
Mrs. McConnell. 

Squeeze the pulps from the skins. Cook them until 
tender ; put them through the colander to remove seeds ; 
then cook the pulps and skins together. Take seven pounds 
grapes, three pounds sugar, one pint vinegar, and spice to 
taste. Boil until the grape skins are tender and the mix- 
ture thick. 

CITRON PRESERVES. 
Mrs. Clough. 

Prepare the rind by soaking twenty-four hours, or longer, 
in salt water, and then in clear water, changing it several 
times a day. Alternate layers of rind and grape leaves in 
a kettle, beginning with the leaves, and sprinkling a little 
alum on each layer. After scalding well, scald again in 
clear water to remove the alum taste. Then boil in ginger 
water, and to every pound of fruit, put one and one-fourth 
pounds of sugar and one pint of water. Add mace and 
cinnamon to taste. The fruit must be weighed before put- 
ting in salt water. 



PRESERVES. 147 



GRAPE BUTTER. 

Mrs. Enos. 
One-half pound sugar to one pound grapes. Boil the 
pulps ; squeeze through a colander, and add the skins. 
As soon as tender, put in the sugar and boil. 

CRYSTAL JELLY. 

Mrs. Baggs. 
One box Cox's gelatine ; dissolve it and four coffeecups 
sugar in one pint boiling water ; add the juice of four lem- 
ons ; stir well until dissolved. Put in a cool place until it 
begins to congeal, then stir in the well-beaten whites of 
two eggs ; when thoroughly mixed, put in moulds and let 
stand. Serve with whipped cream or a boiled custard. 

GRAPE JELLY. 
Mrs. Baggs. 
One box Cox's gelatine ; dissolve it in two tumblers of 
cold water ; add the grated rind and the juice of four lem- 
ons, two pints of white sugar, and one and one-half tum- 
blers grape juice ; stir well ; add five tumblers boiling wa- 
ter. Strain, and set to cool. 

SWEET PICKLES. 

Mrs. Baggs. 
Seven pounds fruit, four pounds sugar, one pint vinegar, 
one-half tablespoon mace, two tablespoons cinnamon, one 
teaspoon cloves. Boil until the fruit is tender, and seal 
up in cans. 

VIRGINL\ SWEET PICKLES. 

Mrs. Baggs. 
Two gallons cider vinegar, two pounds brown sugar, one 
pint mustard seed, five ounces ginger, three ounces each 
of black pepper and allspice, one ounce each of mace, 
celery seed, and tumeric ; add one handful of garlic, and 
one large horseradish, scraped. Mix, set in the sun, and 
stir frequently before putting the pickles into the mixture. 



148 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

WATERMELON SWEET PICKLES. 

Mrs. Craig. 
Take the white part of two melons and cut in squares 
and scald in salt water ; let stand three hours and then 
drain until dry ; one and one-half ounces each of cinna- 
mon and mace ; boil three cups sugar and one cup vine- 
gar into a syrup for nine mornings, and pour over the 
melon each time — warm, but not hot. 

CITRON PRESERVES. 
Mrs. S. J. Meginnis. 
Slice the citron and take out the seeds, leaving all the 
meat ; let it lay in white sugar over night, and in the 
morning take the melon out of the syrup ; let the syrup 
come to a boil and drop on the fruit ; cook the preserve 
until the syrup thickens. 

PEACH PICKLE. 

Mrs. Flora. 
One pint of sugar to one quart of vinegar. Boil nine 
mornings, and on the ninth heat all together. 

CLING-PEACH PICKLE. 

Mrs. Craig. 
Three pounds sugar, seven pounds peaches, one pint 
vinegar, two ounces cinnamon, two grated nutmegs, two or 
three cloves put into each peach. Boil the vinegar and 
spices and pour over the fruit hot ; pour over every other 
morning for nine mornings. 

WHOLE BAKED APPLES. 
Cut out the core, and fill with sugar, butter and cinna- 
mon. Put a little water in the pan. 

SPICED PEACHES. 
Eight pounds peaches, four pounds sugar, one pint vin- 
egar, and spice to taste. Cook and seal immediately. 



PRESERVES. 149 



SWEET-PICKLED CUCUMBERS. 

Mrs. Flora. 
Let them soak over night in a weak brine ; heat them 
well (to a boil) in vinegar; add sugar, cayenne pepper, 
and boil them ; seal them while hot. 

PRESERVED PEACHES. 

Mrs. McWhorter. 
Seven pounds fruit, one quart vinegar, four pounds su- 
gar, one ounce unground cinnamon, pinch of cloves, nut- 
meg and allspice, three tablespoons lemon extract. Tie 
spices in thin cloth ; put in the vinegar and sugar ; after 
boiling a few minutes take out the peaches ; keep the juice 
boiling and put the fruit in and out several times ; lastly, 
boil the fruit and juice until the juice becomes thick. 

SWEET PICKLES. 
One gallon strong vinegar, four pounds brown sugar, one 
gallon fruit, cloves, cinnamon and allspice to taste. Simmer 
fruit gently until done enough to run a straw through ; take 
out and pack in a jar ; boil syrup until moderately thick, 
then pour over the fruit. If you have more syrup than 
you can use, cut a few more peaches, throw them in and 
cook awhile. They will do for present use. 

BAKED APPLES. 

Miss Lida Wheat. 

Peel and quarter one dozen good apples. Mix one table- 
spoon flour and two tablespoons sugar ; grate on them a 
little nutmeg. Pour in enough cold water to half cover the 
apples. Stir up well, put in the apples and bake in a hot 
oven. 

STEWED APPLES. 

Pare and quarter good stewing apples ; put in a baking 
disli, cover thickly with sugar ; bits of lemon peel may be 
added. Cover with a plate, and bake in the oven — in a 
pan of hot water. 



I50 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

« ^___ 

RHUBARB, OR PIE-PLANT. 
Stew with sugar, putting a very little water in the kettle. 
An excellent sauce, especially for spring. 

STEWED APPLES. 

Mrs. Emma Able, Franklin. 
Make a syrup of water and sugar. When boiling, put in 
quartered apples. They ought not to break. 

STEWED FIGS. 
Mrs. Rickert. 
Put one pound in stew pan with water to cover. Let 
them simmer an hour, Squeeze in the juice of two or three 
lemons. Eat hot or cold. No sugar. 

CRANBERRY JELLY. 

Mrs. Black. 
Two quarts cranberries ; add one pint of cold water ; 
stir occasionally over a quick fire until the berries are soft ; 
mash, boil, and add one quart sugar; boil ten minutes and 
pour into mold. Let the berries be on the fire no more 
than twenty-five minutes. 

CURRANT JELLY. 

Mrs. J. E. Springer. 
Wash the currants, strain them, and then put pound to 
pound, or pint to pint, of the juice and sugar. Boil twenty 
minutes, or, boil ten minutes before straining and fifteen 
minutes after. 

PLUM JELLY. 

Mrs. Reynolds. 
Put them in oven to burst the plums, and then make the 
jelly " pound to pound." 

GR.'VPE JELLY. 
Mrs. Ends. 
Green grapes make a beautiful jelly. Boil fifteen min- 
utes alone ; add sugar, and boil five minutes. 



\ 
PRESERVES. I 5 I 



APPLE JELLY. 

Mrs. IIereth. 

Belleflower, Crab, or Rambo apples make good jelly. 
Cut up the apples and put enough cold water to cover 
them ; boil them soft, strain, and then boil twenty min- 
utes. Don't strain so close but that you can add a little 
water and make an apple sauce. 

Quince jelly is made the same. 

GELATINE JELLY. 

Mrs. Bugbee. 

Dissolve one ounce gelatine in one pint cold water ; add 

the rind and juice of two lemons, and one pound of sugar ; 

pour over all one quart boiling water ; add lemon, orange, 

or raspberry juice. Pour into a mould. 

Blackberry and raspberry jelly are made as currant jelly. 

GRAPE JAM. 

Mrs. Rubush. 
Separate the skin from the pulp. Heat the pulp in 
water, and strain out the seeds ; put the skins with the 
seeded pulp, and to each pound add three-fourths of a 
pound of sugar. Add sufficient water to prevent burning. 
Cook slowly one hour. 

BLACKBERRY JAM. 
Mrs. L. a. Burleigh. 
Three-fourths pound of sugar to one pound of berries. 
Cook and stir about one hour. 

RASPBERRY JAM. 

Mrs. Celia Lester. 
Use red raspberries, and equal quantity of good white 
sugar. 

QUINCE JAM. 
Boil the quinces soft ; pour off the water and mash, then 
add equal quantity of sugar, and stir while cooking. 



152 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



CANDY. 



CANDY. 
Mrs. Lily Bruce. 
Three teacups white sugar, one and one-half teacups 
sweet milk. Boil until hard. Flavor with vanilla. Stir 
constantly. 

BOSTON CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 
One pint grated chocolate, two pints brown sugar, one 
pint molasses, one-half cup milk, butter size of an egg, va- 
nilla flavor. Boil about twenty-five minutes. Pour into 
buttered tins ; when partly cool, mark in deep squares with 
a knife. 

CHOCOLATE KISSES. 

Miss M. E. Kneer. 

One cake Baker's chocolate, one pound granulated sugar, 

whites of five eggs. Beat the eggs to a stiff froth, mix the 

chocolate and sugar. Drop on a buttered pan, and set in 

oven long enough to harden. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

Mrs. Ends. 
Two cups white sugar, four spoons molasses, one small 
cup milk, butter size of a large egg, and one quarter pound 
chocolate. Boil about twenty minutes ; flavor with vanilla. 

COCO AN UT CARAMELS. 

Mrs. Ends. 
One-half pint milk, one and one-half ounces grated cocoa- 
nut. Let the milk boil. Stir in the cocoanut. Add one- 
half pint white sugar and two tablespoons molasses ; pour 
when thick, in buttered pans; cut in squares. 



CANDY. 153 

MOLASSES CANDY. 
One cup sugar, one teaspoon butter, one tablespoon vin- 
egar, one cup water. Let it boil thirty minutes ; when 
cold, break in pieces. 

CARAMEL CAKE. 

Mrs. Rev. Brown, Madison, Ind. 
Two cups sugar, one cup molasses, one tablespoon but- 
ter, three tablespoons flour. Boil twenty-five minutes ; 
then stir in half pound grated chocolate wet in a half cup 
sweet milk, and boil until it hardens on the spoon, with 
which you must stir it frequently. Flavor with a teaspoon- 
iul vanilla. 

COCOANUT CANDY. 

Miss Jessie Wiley. 

Two pounds fine white sugar, whites of two eggs ; mix 

this with the grated meat and milk of one cocoanut. Let 

dry in a warm place, having formed into little flat cakes, 

and placed on buttered paper. 

SUGAR CANDY. 

Mrs. Woodburn. 
One quart brown sugar, one pint water, two tablespoons 
vinegar, butter size of an egg, one-half teaspoon soda. Don't 
stir, or let it get too hard. Pull without twisting. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 
Miss Sanxay, Madison. 
Three pounds brown sugar, one cup Baker's chocolate, 
one cup milk, butter size of an egg. Put all together and 
boil in little water. Must not be stirred. 

FIG CANDY. 

Miss Clough. 

One pound sugar, one pint water ; boil on a slow fire, 

and when done, add a small piece of butter and a few drops 

of water. Turn it on split figs. Do not boil as hard as for 

common sugar or molasses candy. 



154 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

BUTTER-SCOTCH. 

One cup New Orleans molasses, one cup-butter, one and 
one-half cups sugar. Boil until it snaps when dropped into 
water. 

SUGAR CANDY. 

One pound sugar, one-half pound butter, two tablespoons 
vinegar, with water enough to dissolve the sugar. Flavor 
with vanilla. It must not be stirred. 

COCOANUT PUFFS. 
Beat to stiff froth the whites of three eggs, add two cups 
granulated sugar, two teacups grated cocoanul. Drop on 
pans, and bake quickly. 

HICKORY NUT CANDY. 
Miss M. E. Knerr. 
The whites of two eggs, one pound of granulated sugar, 
one tablespoon flour, one pound of nut-kernels, chopped 
fine. Beat the eggs to a froth. Drop on tins. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 
One cup sweet milk, one cup molasses, one-half cup 
sugar, one-half cup grated chocolate, small piece butter; 
stir constantly until thick ; turn upon buttered plates. When 
beginning to stiffen, mark into squares. 

COCOANUT CARAMELS. 
Two cups grated cocoanut, one cup sugar, two teaspoons 
flour, the whites of three eggs, beaten stiff. Bake on a 
buttered paper in a quick oven. 

CHOCOLATE CANDY. 

Mrs, Hereth. 
One-half pound chocolate, one and one-half pounds 
brown sugar, three-fourths cup milk. Grate the chocolate ; 
mix with sugar and a little water. Put the milk on stove, 
and just before it boils, stir in the mixture. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 155 



TAFFY. 

Mrs. Heketh. 

Six cups white sugar, one cup vinegar, one cup water ; 
when nearly boiled enough, add one tablespoon butter and 
one teaspoon baking soda, dissolved in hot water. Boil 
without stirring one-half hour, or until it crisps in cold 
water. 

NUT CANDY. 

To one quart New Orleans molasses, one cup sugar, one- 
half cup vinegar and one-half cup butter, add one teaspoon 
soda. Butter the pans, and when candy is sufficiently 
boiled, pour it over the kernels of nuts — hickory-nuts, but- 
ternuts, pecans or peanuts. 

\ 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



DON'T DO IT.— Foofe's Health Monthly gives the fol- 
lowing good rules : 

Don't sleep in a draught. 

Don't go to bed with cold feet. 

Don't stand over hot air registers. 

Don't eat what you do not need just to save it. 

Don't try to get cool too quickly after exercising. 

Don't sleep with insecure false teeth in your mouth. 

Don't start the day's work without a good breakfast. 

Don't sleep in a room without ventillation of some kind. 

Don't stuff a cold lest you be next obliged to starve a 
fever. 



156 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



Don't try to get along with less than right or nine hours' 
sleep. 

Don't try to get along without flannel underclothing in 
winter. 

Don't use your voice for loud speaking or singing when 
hoarse. 

Don't sleep in the same undergarments you wear during 
the day. 

Don't neglect to have at least one movement of the bowels 
each day. 

Don't toast your feet before the fire, but try sunlight fric- 
tion instead. 

Don't drink ice-water by the glass; take it in sips a 
swallow at a time. 

Don't eat snow to quench thirst; it brings on inflamma- 
tion of the throat. 

Don't try to keep up on coffee and alcohol when you 
ought to go to bed. 

Don't strain your eyes by reading or working with insuf- 
ficient or flickering light. 

Don't use the eyes for reading or fine work in the twilight 
of evening or early morn. 

Don't try to lengthen your days by cutting short your 
night's rest; it is poor economy. 

Don't wear close, heavy fur or rubber caps or hats if your 
hair is thin or falls out easily. 

Don't eat any thing between meals excepting fruits or a 
glass of hot milk if you feel faint. 

Don't take some other person's medicine because you 
are troubled somewhat as they were. 

TO CLEAN WHITE PAINT. 
Add ammonia to the soap and water, and wipe off with 
a rag. 



MISCELLANEOUS, I $7 



GOOD INK. 
One half drachm bi-chromate of potash, one-half drachm 
prussiate of potash, and one ounce extract logwood. Boil 
the logwood in two quarts soft water. Add the other in- 
gredients and the ink will not mould. 

GOOD CEMENT. 
Mix glycerine and litharge to consistency of fresh putty. 
With this cement you can mend dishes, pans, lamps and 
loose nuts. 

TO DESTROY CABBAGE WORMS. 

Sprinkle early in the morning with warm wood ashes. 
Cayenne pepper dusted over them is also destructive. 

FOR POTATO BUGS. 
One teaspoon Paris green to twelve quarts water. 

FOR SICK CHICKENS. 
One teaspoon, or less, according to the chicken's age, of 
melted lard. 

TO PRESERVE EGGS. 
Cover them lightly with melted tallow, and pack in saw- 
dust. 

TO BLACKEN GRATE, OR IRON MANTLE. 

Mix sugar and vinegar in a teacup, and apply with a rag. 

TO CLEAN BLACK CRAPE. 

Mrs. Haughey. 
To a half cup warm water, add a few drops ammonia ; 
dip a small piece woolen cloth in the water and rub with 
the grain of the crape ; lay the pieces on black goods and 
press between blankets until dry. The crape will then 
look fresh and new. If the material is the best, it can be 
done up several times. 



158 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

TO CLEAN WHITE FURS. 

Mrs. Haughey. 
Rub through them thoroughly, dry corn meal. 

TO CLEAN BLACK CLOTH. 
Mix ammonia, alcohol and ether ; one-fourth as much 
ammonia as alcohol, and one-half as much ether as am- 
monia. 

TO REMOVE RUST FROM IRON OR STEEL. 
Dissolve one teaspoon potash in one gallon boiling wa- 
ter ; dip in the rusty article, wash and wipe dry. 

TO REMOVE IRON-RUST OR INK STAINS. 
Oxalic acid dissolved in warm water. 

TO REMOVE FRUIT STAINS. 
Pour boiling water through the cloth, or wash in milk, 
before wetting with water. 

TO REMOVE BLOOD STAINS. 
Cover thick with starch and put in sun, or wet with alco- 
hol, rub with soap and wash in cold water. 

TO REMOVE OIL FROM A CARPET. 
Scatter corn meal or powdered chalk, and let remain 
until the oil is absorbed. Saw-dust has same effect. 

TO REMOVE INK. 
Dip the cloth in milk, or melted tallow. Then wash. 

TO REMOVE GREASE FROM WALL-PAPER. 
Lay folds of blotting paper over the spot and hold a hot 
iron on, to absorb the grease. 

TO RENEW BLACK GRENADINE. 

Mrs. Black. 
Sponge the goods with indigo water, and iron. It black- 
ens and stiffens. 



MISCELLANEOUS. I $9 



TO CLEAN SILK. 
Mix one-half cup each of ox gall, ammonia and soft water. 

TO REMOVE ODORS. 
Throw ground coffee on a pan of hot coals. 

TO MAKE STARCH. 

Mrs. Arndt. 
Smooth three tablespoons starch in cold water. Pour 
into one quart of boiling water. Put in one teaspoon each 
of coal oil and loaf sugar, and a pinch of salt. Boil one- 
half hour. 

TO REMOVE MILDEW FROM LINEN. 
Rub with soap, and then scrape chalk upon it. Lay on 
the grass, and as it dries, the stain will disappear. 

TO MAKE SOAP. 
Twelve gallons water, two and one-half pounds lime and 
five and one-half pounds soda ash boiled together one hour. 
Then add twelve pounds grease, and let all boil until suffi- 
ciently thick. 

TO DESTROY INSECTS. 
Dissolve one pound alum in two quarts boiling water. 
Apply to every crevice. It leaves no odor nor stain, even 
upon the carpet. 

TO DESTROY BEDBUGS. 
Mix one ounce corrosive sublimate in one pint spirits of 
turpentine. One ounce gum camphor may be added. 
Poison. 

TO DESTROY MOTHS. 
Rub a wet towel spread over suspected parts with a hot 
iron. The steam will kill the moths. 



l6o INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



TO DESTROY ANTS. 
Ixjbelia seed or elderberry branches. Cucumber rinds 
will destroy roaches. 

A chalk line around sugar box or barrel will stop ants. 

Tar is very offensive to insects. Tar paper will protect 
furs. Tar in whitewash will keep off insects and cure 
chicken cholera if used on fences and walls of hen-houses, 

TO KILL ROACHES. 
Mix equal parts of red lead, corn meal and molasses. 
Put the mixture on iron plates, such as stove lids, and set 
it where roaches come. 

Pulverized borax will banish roaches. 

Cloves scattered where there are red ants, will drive 
them all away. 

TO WASH GREASY POTS AND KETTLES. 
First take a handful of meal and rub around the inside. 
It absorbs the grease. 

TO PRESERVE GUMARABIC. 
Put in a few drops of oil of cloves. 

Soda will remove spots from tableware. 

Soiled clothes may be put in soap-suds, but never in 
hot, clear water. 

Black pepper sprinkled over furs in box, and then the 
box wrapped in paper or cotton bag, will effectually pre- 
vent moths. 

Stand the kitchen safe in cans of water, and there will 
be no trouble from ants. 



MISCELLANEOUS. l6l 



CURE FOR HOARSENESS. 

Mrs. Reakikt. 
Bake a lemon, or an orange, twenty minutes ; open one 
end ; take out the inside ; sweeten with sugar or molasses. 
A sure cure for a cold. 

FLAXSEED LEMONADE. 

Mrs. M. E. Knerr. 
Four tablespoons flaxseed, one quart boiling water 
poured upon the flaxseed, and the juice of two lemons. 
Sweeten to taste ; steep two hours in a covered pitcher ; if 
too thick, put in cold water. 

FOR A COLD. 

Mrs. L N. Pattison, Sr. 
Drink a glass of cold water in which has been stirred a 
half teaspoon of cayenne pepper. 

TO REMOVE STAINS FROM MARBLE. 
Oil of vitrol and water, or oxalic acid and water. A 
paste of whiting and potash may be put on grease spots. 
When rubbed off, the grease is gone. 

CURE FOR SMALLPOX. 

Sulphate zinc, one grain ; foxglove (digitalis), one grain ; 

one-half teaspoon sugar. Mix with two tablespoons water. 

Take one spoonful every hour. Either scarlet fever, or 

smallpox cured in twelve hours. For a child, smaller doses. 

SCARLET FEVER. 

Three tablespoons sweetened water ; good brewer's yeast, 
one tablespoon. Give three times a day. If throat is 
swollen, make a poultice of the above with Indian meal, 
and gargle with the yeast. Keep the eruption out by 
drinking catnip tea freely. 

The above recipe is good for smallpox, with milk diet. 
It seldom leaves a pox-mark. 
11 



l62 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

TO PREVENT SMALLPOX PITTING. 
Bi-sulphate soda, two drachms ; fresh glycerine, one 
ounce ; carbolic acid, one scruple. 

TO KEEP OFF RATS. 

Grow wild peppermint. 

FOR CHAPPED HANDS. 
Equal parts spirits of camphor, glycerine, ammonia and 
rain-water. 

FOR SORE THROAT. 
Gargle with salt, water and vinegar. Put on the outside 
a slice of fat bacon. 

FOR SICK HEADACHE. 
One teaspoon powdered charcoal in one-half glass of 
water. Another good remedy is to dissolve a small 
piece of gum camphor in the mouth — but too much would 
be very injurious. 

FOR DIPHTHERIA. 

Put sulphur in water and gargle with it. If some is 
swallowed it will do good. 

INGROWING NAILS. 
Burn with caustic. Severe, but sure. Another remedy 
is to scrape the top of the nail thin with glass, and this 
will make the corners turn up and grow flat. 

FOR CONSUMPTION. 
Mullen leaves distilled in water and a syrup made with 
granulated white sugar and the liquid. If the cough is 
troublesome, drink freely and often, mullen tea. 

FOR CONSUMPTION. 

Take a teaspoon of the juice of hoarhound, and mix it 
with a gill of new milk. Drink it warm. It is a wonder- 
ful cure, if persevered in. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 163 



FOR RHEUMATISM. 
Lemon juice in warm water two or three times a day. 

FOR CROUP. 

Beat the white of an egg to a stiff froth, and sweeten. If 
a severe case, rub the chest with camphor and lard. 

FOR WHOOPING COUGH. 

Equal parts goose grease and honey — a teaspoonful for a 
dose. 

FOR CORNS AND WARTS. 

Apply acetic acid every day. Another remedy — mix two 
tablespoons each brown sugar, saltpeter and tar. Warm 
the mixture and spread on leather size of corn, and in a few 
days the corn will come out. 

CURE FOR FELON. 
In the beginning, immerse in lye, as hot as can be borne, 
for half an hour at a time. Apply a plaster of salt, soap 
and turpentine. If it comes to a head, lance it and poul- 
tice with lye and elm bark. Heal with a salve made of 
resin and tallow, two ounces of each. 

Another good remedy is, bathe the finger in ashes and 
water. Take the yelk of an egg, six drops of turpentine, 
a few beet leaves cut fine, a little hard soap, and a tea- 
spoon of snuff or fine tobacco ; add one tablespoon each 
of burnt salt and corn meal. 

SODA LOTION FOR BURNS. 
Mix the soda in water, with or without camphor. Keep 
a soft rag wet with it on the burned place. 

TO REMOVE FRECKLES. 
Alum and lemon juice, one ounce of each, mixed with 
one pint rose-water. Apply three times a day with a 
sponge. It will remove freckles, blotches and pimples. 



l64 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

TO RENEW LARD. 
Heat the lard and throw in sUced raw potatoes. 

FOR CHAPPED HANDS. 
Camphor and glycerine, in equal parts. 

Soiled clothes may be put in hot soap-suds, but never in. 
hot clear water. 

BAKING-POWDER. 

Mrs. Clough. 
Six ounces tartaric acid, eight ounces best soda, one 
quart flour. Mix through a sieve. 

SOFT SOAP. 
Mrs. Bugbee. 
Take two pounds of potash, add three gallons soft water. 
Stir and boil until all is dissolved. Then add five pounds 
of any kind of refuse grease. Boil until well mixed. Let 
stand until nearly cold, and add sufficient warm water to 
make it the required thickness. 

COUGH DROPS. 

Mrs. Weyer. 
One handful each of hoarhound, hops and muUen. Sim- 
mer in one quart water, strain, and to the tea add two 
pounds brown sugar, four lemons and twenty-five cents' 
worth gumarabic. Boil until a thick syrup. 

TO MAKE GOOD VINEGAR IN THREE WEEKS. 
Mrs. Bugbee. 
One quart molasses, one pint yeast, three gallons warm 
rain water. Put all into a jug, and tie a piece of gauze 
over the bung to keep out flies and yet admit the air. In 
hot weather set it in the sun, in cold weather set it by the 
stove, and in three weeks you will have good vinegar. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 1 65 



TABLE OF MEASURES. 

Wheat flour, one pound is one quart. 

Corn meal, one pound and two ounces is one quart. 

Butter, soft, one pound is one quart. 

Loaf sugar, broken, one pound is one quart. 

Sugar, pounded, one pound and one ounce is one quart. 

Sixteen large teaspoonsful are one-half pint. 

Eight large teaspoonsful are one gill. 

Four large teaspoonsful are one-half gill. 

Two gills are one-half pint. 

Two pints are one quart. 

Four quarts are one gallon. 

A common-sized tumbler holds one-half pint. 

Ten eggs are one pound. 

A teacup holds one gill. 

A tablespoon is one-half ounce. 

One teaspoonful is sixty drops. 

Two cups are one pint. 

Ten pounds fine XXX chain makes twenty-eight yards 
rag carpet. One pound and one-half woolen rags to one 
yard ; one and one-fourth pounds cotton rags to one yard. 



WEDDINGS. 

Mrs. Arndt. 

One year, cotton ; two years, straw ; three years, paper ; 
four years, leather ; five years, wooden ; seven years, iron ; 
eight years, woolen ; ten years, tin ; twelve years, linen ; 
fifteen years, glass; eighteen years, silk; twenty years, 
china ; twenty-five years, silver ; thirty years, pearl ; forty 
years, ruby or gem ; fifty years, golden ; seventy-five years, 
diamond. 



1 66 INmANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

TO PRESERVE EGGS FOR WINTER USE. 

Mrs. Bugbee. 

For every three gallons of water, put in one pint of fresh 

slacked lime, and one-half pint of common salt ; mix well. 

Put in the eggs carefully so as not to break the shell. Keep 

the eggs covered with the brine, and this will not fail you. 

CURE FOR BOILS. 
Make a boiled paste of fine flour stiff enough to allow a 
spoon to stand up in it ; take it off the fire ; add a full tea- 
spoon of butter and two of soft soap to every cup of paste. 

BURN SALVE. 
Two ounces Burgundy pitch, half an ounce of beeswax, 
two tablespoons of lard melted together. Soften by heat- 
ing when used, and spread on linen cloth, or kid. 

CURE FOR A CANCER. 

Stir the yelk of an egg with salt until a salve is formed ; 
put it on a piece of sticking-plaster and apply twice a day. 
One-fourfh of an ounce of carbolic acid in one quart water 
makes a good wash for a cancer. 

A SURE PREVENTIVE OF, OR CURE FOR 
CHAPPED HANDS. 

Miss Mamie Sappington, Madison, Ind. 
The juice of one lemon to same amount of glycerine. 
Apply, after washing the hands, and wipe dry. 

TO TAKE PAINT FROM WINDOW GLASS. 
Rub it off with a copper cent. 

TO TAKE OIL FROM CARPET. 

Rub the spot over with hard soap after putting the soap 
in water ; then rub off the soap with a cloth dipped in am- 
monia and water. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 16/ 

TO POLISH NICKLE-PLATE STOVES. 
Mix Spanish whiting with ammonia and water ; rub off 
with flannel. 

TO BLACK A STOVE. 
Mix benzine, black lead and varnish into a thin paste. 

TO CLEAN WINDOW GLASS. 
Cover with dampened Spanish whiting, and when al- 
most dry, rub off with dry flannel. A very little washing 
soda in warm water cleans glass easily. 

TO PRESERVE STOVE-PIPES. 
Wash them, while warm, with linseed oil before putting 
them away in the spring. 

FOR CLEANING HAIR BRUSHES. 

Take corn meal and fill the brush ; rub gently with the 
hand ; as it absorbs the grease, shake it out and use fresh, 
until the brush is clean. 

VARNISH FOR GRATES. 
Asphaltum dissolved in turpentine. 

FURNITURE POLISli. 

Mrs. Fletcher Rubush. 
Five ounces linseed oil, two ounces turpentine, and one- 
half ounce oil of vitrol. Coal oil may be rubbed over fur- 
niture, and give a temporary polish. 

COUGH SYRUP. 

Mrs. Kerper. 
Virginia snake-root, five cents ; elecampane, five cents ; 
spikenard, five cents ; cumfrey, five cents ; liquorice, five 
cents ; wild cherry bark, five cents. Moisten with boiling 
water ; boil with sugar to make a syrup. 

SALTS OF LEMON. 
Equal parts of oxalic and tartaric acid. It will remove 
iron rust or ink stains. 



l68 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



ERASIVE COMPOUND. 

Boil one ounce of castile soap in water until it is dis- 
solved ; powder, and add two ounces washing or sal-soda, 
one-half ounce starch, one-fourth ounce borax, and one 
pint water. When dissolved, pour into cups or boxes. 

SMELLING SALTS. 

To one pint of ammonia add one drachm of ottar of 
rosemary, one drachm of English lavender, one-half 
drachm bergamot, and one-fourth drachm of cloves. 

COLD CREAM. 

Four ounces oil of Almonds, two drachms white wax, 
same of spermaceti. Melt and add four ounces rose-water 
and one ounce orange-water. 

FOR FROSTED FEET. 
Ten cents' worth of oil of organum. 

FOR SORE MOUTH. 
Powdered tannin or powdered yellow-root. 

FOR CHAPPED LIPS. 

Vasaline or glycerine. 



GOOD TONIC. 

TiMBERLAKE, DrUggist. 

I^ Fluid extract sarsaparilla ,5ii 

Fluid extract dandelion §i 

Syrup stillingia co gi 

Iodide potash Tyii 

Syrup Simplex §i 

Aq. fontana §11 

Take one tablespoonful three times a day. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 1 69 



COUGH MIXTURE. 

Mrs. Kerpkr. 
Gumarabic, pulverized, three cents; liquorice, three 
cents; ipecac, three cents; laudanum, three cents; pare- 
goric, six cents ; hive syrup, six cents. Add one cup mo- 
lasses and one cup vinegar ; mix cold ; take a tablespoon- 
ful three times a day. 

REMEDY FOR SORE THROAT. 
TiMBERLAKE, Druggist. 
I^; Tincture iron 5ii 

Chlorate potash Tyn 

Syrup simple and aq. font., of each ^n 

Mix. Take a teaspoonful in a little water, and gargle ; 
swallow a little if necessary. 

MUSTARD PLASTER. 

One tablespoon molasses stirred thick with mustard ; 
spread on a cloth and apply. It will not blister for more 
than an hour. If desired to irritate, mix with water or 
vinegar ; spread on a very thin cloth. 

HOP POULTICE. 
Boil a half teacup of hops in a pint of water; put in a 
bag, or mix with corn meal and spread on a cloth. 

« 
BREAD POULTICE. 

Crumble stale bread : boil until soft, and spread on a 
cloth. 

SLIPPERY-ELM POULTICE. 

Stir pulverized slippery-elm bark into hot milk and wa- 
ter. This poultice removes inflammation. 

EMETIC. 
One-half glass warm water, one teaspoon salt, and one 
teaspoon mustard. 



I/O INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



TO STOP NOSE-BLEEDING. 
Put a key, or a cold, wet towel down the back between 
the shoulders ; or raise the arms above the head ; or, if 
possible, obtain from the drug store Monsel's Powder. 
This powder stops the bleeding of any artery. 

ANTIDOTES. 
If poison has been taken, induce vomiting by using salt 
and mustard in cold water; a cup of strong coffee, and 
then the whites of two eggs, may be given in haste, but it 
is best to send for a physician. 

TO PREVENT HYDROPHOBIA. 

Rub nitrate of silver in the wound. 

COUNTRY SOAP. 

Mrs. S. E. Wagoner. 
Incline the platform on which the ash-barrel stands ; put 
straw in the bottom of the barrel ; pour in hard-wood ashes ; 
dampen them ; when the barrel is nearly full, pour on boil- 
ing water until the lye begins to drip, and then pour in 
cold water; fill a large, iron kettle with this lye ; let it be 
strong enough to strip a feather; then add ham rinds, 
drippings from frying-pans, and other refuse grease, as 
long as the lye will absorb it ; boil until thick. 

FLOUR STARCH, OR PASTE. 
One quart boiling water, three tablespoonsful of flour 
smoothed in cold water. Pour in and stir until it boils ; 
for paste it should be thicker ; strain through a crash towel. 

TO MEND COAL-BUCKETS. 

Mrs. Merrill, 

Paste a cloth on the outside and one on the inside of the 

hole ; make a mortar of one cup coarse salt and two cups 

wood-ashes ; put it on inside of bucket one-half inch thick, 

and let it harden. 



MISCELLANEOUS. I/I 



SUGGESTIONS. 
To blanche almonds : Pour boiling water on them to 
take off the brown skin. 

To candy orange peel : Make a thin syrup of loaf sugar 
and water ; put in the strips of peeling and boil one-half 
hour ; then put the pieces into a thick syrup and boil until 
the sugar clings to them ; take them out, drain and dry. 

To use baking-powder: Always sift it in the flour; 
cream tartar should also be in the flour, and soda used 
with it should be in the sweet milk ; soda used with sour 
milk should be put in the milk to effervesce. 

To prevent juice from soaking into pie-crust, wet the 
crust with the white of an egg. 

Pie crust, or pastry : Puff-paste is one pound of flour 
and one pound of lard and butter crumbled together and 
wet slightly with cold water ; a plainer crust can be made 
with less shortening. 

A little lump of baking soda tenders roast beef when put 
in the pan. It also improves many vegetables, especially 
if the wa^er is hard. 

Stock for soup can be kept by constantly saving from the 
meat platter, and also by cutting the bones out before broil- 
ing the beef steaks. Boiling these fragments furnishes a 
good foundation for soup. 

It is important to systematize the work of the house. 

Washing should be done on Monday. 

Ironing should be done on Tuesday. 

Bread baking and kitchen cleaning, on Wednesday. 

Sewing and visiting, on Thursday. 

Sweeping and dusting, on Friday. 

Bread and cake baking, on Saturday. 



172 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



ADDITIONAL RECIPES. 



CALF-HEAD SOUP. 

Mrs. Irwin Harrison. 
Put the head in strong salt-water for one hour, to draw 
out the blood ; take out the brains carefully and put them 
on to boil ; put the head in as much water as you want 
soup ; add a large spoonful of salt ; when tender, cut the 
head into small pieces and put back into the pot, with one 
onion finely chopped ; add one teaspoon sweet marjorum, 
one of sweet basil, one of summer savory, one of allspice, 
and one-fourth teaspoon cayenne ; add more salt and let 
boil several hours ; one hour before the soup is done mash 
the brains with the yelks of three hard-boiled eggs, a large 
cup catsup, and one-half ]iint browned flour ; thin this with 
cold water and pour in the soup, stirring frequently ; make 
little dumplings or force meat balls ; when dished, add a 
slice of lemon to the soup. 

BEEF SOUP. 
Mrs. J. R. Nichols. 
The stock for beef soup should be prepared the day be- 
fore you wish to use it. To do this take a shin bone, put 
it in a large earthen vessel or porcelain-lined kettle nearly 
full of cold water. Cover closely ; set on top of stove, and 
boil slowly four or five hours, until the meat is in shreds 
and all the marrow is cleaned out of the bone, which should 
have been cracked well before boiling. Set away the ves- 
sel in a cool place until the next day. Skim off the cake 
of tallow from the top ; lift out all the bones and shreds of 
meat with a perforated ladle. You now have the founda- 
tion for any kind of beef soup. Just as good stock can be 
made with the bones cut out of your beef steaks saved up 
for a few days. 



ADDITIONAL RECIPES. 1/3 

CLEAR VEGETABLE SOUP. 

Mks. Will Gkecc, Ilillsboro, Ohio. 
About an hour before dinner, set your vessel with your 
prepared stock, on the stove, hi a separate vessel cook in 
as little water as possible, three or four potatoes sliced, a 
turnip, an onion shredded, some cabbage, also shredded ; 
a few tomatoes and a sliced carrot. When the vegetables 
are tender, turn them into the boiling stock ; cook all about 
twenty minutes, season and strain through a colander into 
the tureen. The potatoes must not be cooked to a mush 
or they will cloud the soup. Pick out a few slices of carrot 
and put them in the tureen. 

MILK SOUP. 

Mrs. Robert Rhodes, Kansas City. 

After your stock becomes hot add a pint of milk, rub to- 
gether a tablespoonful of butter and three tablespoonsful of 
flour, adding a little milk to work it smooth, thicken the 
broth with this, boiling it fifteen or twenty minutes, season 
to taste. Have ready an egg beaten in a little milk or water, 
stir it into the soup after you have removed it from over the 
fire. Eat with crackers like oyster soup, or pour over 
squares of bread fried brown. To make noodle or maca- 
roni soup of this, put the noodles into the soup and boil 
twenty minutes, and after swelling the macaroni in a 
separate vessel, add it to the soup, and boil ten or fifteen 
minutes. 

FOR CURING MEAT. 
Mrs. Ends, sr. 

Six gallons water, nine pounds salt, coarse and fine mixed, 
three pounds sugar, three ounces saltpeter, one ounce pearl 
ash, one quart molasses. Boil, and skim these ingredients 
well, and when cold, pour it over the beef or pork. 

TO MAKE STEAK TENDER. 

Mrs. Heketh. 
Put three tablespoons salad oil and one tablespoon vine- 
gar well mixed together, on a large flat dish. Lay the 



1/4 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 

Steak on this dressing ; after one-half hour turn it on the 
other side. Salt must not be put on. 

VEAL LOAF. 

Mrs. Coburn. 
Three pounds veal chojoped fine, three-fourths pound 
pickled-pork chopped fine, twelve crackers rolled and 
sifted, pepper, salt and butter to season. Bake one hour. 

WASHINGTON CHOW-CHOW. 

Mrs. Baggs. 
One and one-half pecks green tomatoes, two large heads 
cabbage, fifteen large onions, twenty-five cucumbers, one 
pint grated horseradish, one-half pound Welsh mustard 
seed, one ounce celery seed, one-half pint small onions (not 
cut), one-half teacup each ground pepper, tumeric and 
cinnamon. Chop the tomatoes, cabbage, cucumbers and 
large onions in pieces and pack in salt over night ; drain 
well and mix in the spices ; boil one and one-half gallons 
good vinegar and pour over boiling hot ; boil over the 
same vinegar three mornings and pour over hot ; the third 
morning add vinegar, two boxes mustard, one-half pint 
sweet oil, and one pound brown sugar. 

MANGOES. 

Mrs. S. M. Sappington, Madison, Ind. 
Having cut them and taken out the seeds, put them in a 
jar with one pint salt, and cover with boiling water ; next 
morning wipe them ; make a filling of red cabbage, onions, 
horseradish, salt, ground black pepper, and white mustard 
seed ; fill and sew up ; pour over boiling hot vinegar. 

SWEET PICKLES. 

Mrs. Frank Martin. 
Ten pounds fruit, five pounds sugar, one quart good 
vinegar, cloves and cinnamon to suit taste. Boil sugar 



ADDITIONAL RECIPES. I 75 



and vinegar together; skim, and put in the fruit; cook 
done, take out, boil tlie syrup down and pour over the 
fruit ; tie the spices in a cloth and boil in the syrup. 

CHINESE PICKLES. 

Mrs. Bran ham. 
Two dozen green tomatoes, two dozen large green cu- 
cumbers, peeled ; six large green peppers, one dozen onions, 
six heads celery, one head cabbage. Chop all fine, put in 
a jar, stir in a teacup of salt, let it stand over night, then 
drain in a colander. Boil in two quarts of vinegar and two 
quarts of water ; drain and put in a jar. Put in kettle on 
the stove, one gallon vinegar, two pounds brown sugar, one 
cup mustard seed, three tablespoons ground mustard, one 
tablespoon mace, three tablespoons cloves, one tablespoon 
cayenne pepper, one tablespoon allspice, and one ounce 
coriander seed ; scald and pour over the pickles in jar ; 
cover close. 

CURRY POWDER FOR GRAVIES. 

Mrs. Mary E. Lilly. 
One ounce ginger, one ounce mustard, one ounce black 
pepper, three ounces coriander seed, three ounces tumeric, 
one-fourth ounce cayenne pepper, one-half ounce carda- 
mon seed, one-half ounce curnion seed, one-half ounce 
cinnamon. Pound very fine and cork tight. 

NEW ENGLAND BROWN BREAD. 

Mrs. C. J. Parker. 
Four cups corn meal, two cups rye meal, four cups sweet 
milk, two cups sour milk, two cups molasses, one teaspoon 
soda. Steam until done, and then put in oven until it 
forms a light-brown crust. 

GRAHAM AND INDIAN BROWN BREAD. 
Mrs. Myron W. Reed. 
Three cups com meal, two cups Graham flour, one pint 
milk, three-fourths cup molasses, one teaspoon saleratus. 



1/6 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



Pour into a two-quart pan and steam for three hours ; set 
in the oven for twenty minutes, or until a thick crust forms ; 
eat warm. 

SANDWICHES. 

Mrs. Fokgus. 
Sardines chopped fine, a little chopped ham, also chop- 
ped pickles. Mix with mustard, pepper, salt and vinegar. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Mrs. Cady. 
Four potatoes boiled, peeled and sliced ; one-half small 
onion cut fine ; two small bunches celery chopped fine ; 
whites of two hard-boiled eggs. Mix with oil, mustard, 
pepper, salt and vinegar, to taste. 

SPICED PLUMS. 

Mrs. Noel. 
One gallon plums, one pint vinegar, one quart sugar, 
cinnamon and cloves, whole. Boil several hours and seal 
tight. 

PLUM PUDDING. 
Mrs. Mary Ayres, Houston, Texas. 
One quart flour, one pint milk, six ounces suet, six 
ounces sugar, one-half pound raisins, one teaspoon soda, 
one-half teaspoon salt. Roil in a mold ; eat with sauce. 

FIG PUDDING. 

Mrs. Addie C. Forgus. 
One cup bread crumbs, one cup suet, one cup milk, one 
cup sugar, one-half pound figs, one teaspoon baking-pow- 
der ; chop suet and figs together. Steam two hours. 

DELICIOUS PUDDING. 
Mrs. Forgus. 
Yelks of three eggs, white of one egg, two ounces each 
powdered sugar, butter and flour ; beat smooth. Add one- 
half pint milk. Bake in pie pans twenty minutes. Place 
one on top of the other, and cat with sauce. 



LAOEY'S 



_ -FINE* — 

Photographs, 



ALL MADE BY THE 



^'Instantaneous Process.' 



YANCE BLOCK, 



Oor. Virginia Ave. and Washington Street. 



ENTRANCE ELEVATOR. 



J. A. LYONS, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 

STOVES, TINWARE 

And General House Furnisliino; Goods. 



Practical Tin, Copper and Slieet Iron Worfier. 

ALSO, AGENT FOR THE 

MICHIGAN STOVE CO, and tlie celelirated "GARLAND," 

Roofing and Repairing Neatly and Promptly Done. 



86 & 8S ,S. Delawai'e St. ki\(J 88 W. Wafiliir|gtor\ 0t., 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 
KiNGAN & Co. (L''d-) 

PORK PACKERS AND CIERS 

OF THE "RELIABLE" BRAND OF SUGAR CURED MEATS. 

M:K AO: ]VI J^RKET : 

WEST END MARYLAND STREET. 



Fresh. Beef and Pork of Choice Quality. 

Kettle Rendered Lard for Family 
Use. 



A. TIMBERLAKI:, 

Druggist ^ Apothecary, 

Fine Toilet Soaps, Brushes, Combs, etc. 

Pekki'mery and Fancy Toilet Articles, School Books, 
Stationery, Etc. 

Besides, every other article of the best quality, usually kept by a store-keeper. 

N. W. Cop. College Ave. and Seventh St. 

p. S.— iF YoU geT Sick In tHe NiGht, coMe oVeR, I'm HerE. 

capTtal 

ABSOLUTELY PUBE. 

Never fails to make the most delicious biscuit and j)astry. 
manufactured by 

F. JElSriNINaS, 

Far Sale by all Dealers. INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



JOSEPH BECKER, 

"The Confectioner," 

KEEPS CONSTANTl.Y AT HIS RESTAURANT, 

20 W. Washington St., 

Standard Ice Cream % 

Milk Bread^ Hame-made. 

WEDDINGS AND PARTIES FURNISHED ENTIRE A SPECIALTY. 
INDIANAPOLIS, - _ - INDIANA. 



Chartered IS51. Amended IH75. 

INDIANA 

Insurance Company, 

/l/os. 62 and 64 EAST MARKET STREET, 
INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

r ire In^iTr<n]ce, §tock Con|paqy. 

N. S. BYRAM, Pres't. M. V. McGILLIARD, See'y. 

CHAS. E. DARK, Treas. E. G. CORNELIUS, Vice-Pres't. 

HON. VINSON CARTER, Attdrnev at Law. 

CHAS E. DARK, Teller at Indiaua Banking Company. 

R. H. McCREA, of Fahnley & McCrea, Wholesale Millinery. 

ELI LILLY, Manufacturing Phariuacist. 

FRANCIS A. COFFIN, Sec'y and Treas. Indianapolis Cabinet Co. 

M. V. McGILLIAKU, Insurance Agent 

M. V. McGILLIARD, 



Large Lines of Insurance placed promptly any- 
where in Indiana. 

Represents leading American and Foreign Go's. 

Call and see us or correspond with us, at 

62 & 04 East Market Street, 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



ADDITIONAL RECIPES. 1 7/ 

FLOATING ISLAND. 

Mrs. Charlie McMullin. 
One quart milk, four eggs beaten separately. Stir until 
it boils. Remove, and flavor with lemon. Spread over 
the hot custard, the beaten whites of the four eggs, and 
grate loaf-sugar and cocoanut on the top. Serve cold. 

SUET PUDDING. 

Mrs. Mary Kingston. 
One cup chopped suet, three eggs, one cup sweet milk, 
one cup raisins, two cups flour, two teaspoons baking- 
powder, spices, and a pinch of salt. Flour the suet and 
raisins before adding to the batter ; boil two hours ; serve 
with a sauce made of butter and sugar beaten to a cream^ 
and the beaten white of one egg ; flavor to taste. 

CURRANT PUDDING. 

Mrs. John Hart. 
One cup sugar, two eggs, one lump butter size of an egg, 
one cup water, flour to make stiff batter, two teaspoons 
baking-powder; mix in one cup dried currants. 

STEAMED FRUIT PUDDING. 

Mrs. Haughey. 
Make a batter of two cups sweet milk, two tablespoons 
butter, two eggs, and three cups of flour ; add three tea- 
spoons baking-powder. Butter some cups, set them in a 
steamer over boiling water. Drop in a little batter and 
some berries until the cups are two-thirds full. Put the 
cover on the steamer and steam thirty minutes. Eat with 
cream and sugar. 

SCOTCH PIE. 

Mrs. Kerper. 
Mince enough ripe apples to fill a deep dish ; then make 
a stiff batter of one pint sweet milk, one tablespoon melted 
butter, two teaspoons baking-powder in almost one quart 
12 



1/8 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



of flour. With a knife, spread the batter over the apples. 
When either baked or steamed, turn upside down on a 
plate and season with butter and sugar. 

ORANGE PIE. 

Mrs. Gates. 
Juice and part of the rind of one orange, two tablespoons 
corn-starch, one teacup hot water with one-fourth box of 
gelatine dissolved in it. Mix and bake. This is for two 
pies. 

VINEGAR PIE. 

Mrs. Jane Mead, Minneapolis, Minn. 
One cup sugar, one-half cup vinegar. Boil together and 
cool. Add one tablespoon flour, one egg, one rolled cracker, 
one teaspoon butter. Make two crusts. 

MOCK MINCE PIE. 

Mrs. Lizzie Irvin. 
One cup each of sugar, molasses and water ; one-fourth 
cup butter, one-half cup vinegar, three slices of wheat bread 
crumbled, raisins and spices. Make with two crusts. 

APPLE PIE. 

Miss Rena Newton. 
Pare and cut in half, four or five apples ; make a rich 
crust, placing the apples in, and then putting on sugar, 
butter, cinnamon and cream, no upper crust being used. 

CREAM PIE. 

Mrs. Jennie Caldwell. 
Make a rich under crust, and bake until almost done ; 
then put in the custard already prepared, using two eggs, 
one tablespoon corn-starch, sugar and flavoring to taste ; 
add milk to nearly fill the pie-pan. 



ADDITIONAL RECIPES. 1 79 



APPLE MERINGUE. 

Mrs. J. II. Shkeve. 
Line a deep baking-pan with pie-crust ; put in a layer of 
stewed apples ; next a layer of thin-sliced bread buttered 
on both sides ; next another layer of apples. Bake, and 
when done take the whites of two eggs beaten to a stiff 
iroth and spread over the top ; put in the oven and brown. 

CREAM PIE. 

Mrs. Morse. 
One and one-half cups milk, yelks of two eggs, two table- 
spoons sugar, one heaping table-spoon corn-starch, one- 
half of lemon peel grated. Beat well together and cook as 
for custard ; make pastry as for any pie and bake ; turn 
the boiled custard into the crust ; then take the whites of 
the eggs, beaten to a stiff froth with one heaping tablespoon 
sugar ; spread over the top of the pie ; set in the oven and 
brown. 

TRANSPARENT PIE. 
Mrs. Maggie Gregg, Hillsboro, Ohio. 
One cup butter, one cup powdered white sugar, four 
eggs w^ell beaten. Bake the crust and pour in the mix- 
ture ; put back in the oven until the custard stiffens. 

ITALIAN CREAM. 

Mrs. Noel. 
One quart milk, three eggs, six tablepoons sugar, three 
tablespoons corn starch. Boil like custard. Make a mer- 
ingue of the whites and a little sugar ; add vanilla. 

LEMON SPONGE. 
One-half box Cox's gelatine dissolved over the fire in one 
and one-half pints water. Add one pound white sugar and 
the grated rinds of two lemons, with the juice of three 
lemons. Boil a few moments, and when nearly cold add 
the whites of three eggs beaten stiff. Beat well together, 
and especially as it thickens. Pour into molds and serve 
with cream. 



l8o INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK, 



LEMON BUTTER. 

Mrs. Wilson. 
Three grated lemons, three beaten eggs, and one pint 
sugar ; add butter the size of an egg. Boil until it thickens. 

PRESERVED ORANGES. 

Mrs. B. W. Thomas. 
Boil in soft water until you can run a straw through the 
skin. To three-fourths of a pound of sugar, add one pound 
of fruit. Take the oranges from the water and pour the 
hot syrup over them. Let them stand until next day, and 
boil them in the syrup until it is thick. Take them out 
and strain the syrup over them. 

GUAVA JELLY. 

Mrs. Gates. 
Slice the guavas and cover them with water ; cook until 
done, and strain ; add one pint of sugar to one pint of 
juice, and cook until it is jelly. 

PRESERVED CITRON. 
Mrs. T. H. K. Enos. 
Pare the melons, take out the seeds, and cut in squares 
half an inch thick. Lay in salt and water one hour. Wash 
off and boil in strong ginger tea. Make a weak syrup of 
sugar and water. Boil ten minutes, and then make a syrup 
of one pound of sugar to one pound of citron. Boil in this 
until it looks clear, and season with lemon peel. 

ORANGE OR LEMON MARMALADE. 
Mrs. LiNA Graydon. 
Twelve pounds rather sour oranges, or twelve pounds of 
lemons. For the oranges, use twelve pounds of sugar ; for 
the lemons, use eighteen pounds of sugar. Pare the fruit, 
cover the parings twtce their depth with water. Boil until 
tender, then drain. Halve the fruit crosswise, press out 
the juice and soft pulp. Cover the white skins with three 



ADDITIONAL RECIPES. l8l 

quarts cold water, and boil one-half hour. Strain the water 
in the orange juice, cut the rinds into shreds, add them to 
the juice and boil ten minutes ; add the sugar and boil 
down. 

GINGER CRACKERS. 

Miss M. E. Knerr. 

One quart New Orleans molasses, one-half pound butter 

and lard, one-half pound brown sugar, one tablespoon 

each of ginger and cinnamon. Add flour to stiffen, and 

roll out. 

HICKORYNUT MACARONI. 
Miss M. E. Knerr. 
The whites of five eggs, one pound granulated sugar, 
one tablespoon flour, one pound chopped nut kernels. 
Beat the eggs to a froth ; drop on tins. 

DROP CAKE. 

Miss Mary E. Knerk. 
One pound sugar, one-half pound butter, one pound 
flour, one pound currants, four eggs, and flavoring. 

BAKER'S POUND CAKE. 

Mrs. Kerper. 
Two cups sugar, three-fourths cup butter, three eggs, 
one cup milk, three cups flour, two teaspoons baking- 
powder. Add nutmeg. 

TEA CAKE. 

Mrs. Myron W. Reed. 

One cup sugar, heaping tablespoon butter, three-fourths 

cup milk, one egg, two cups flour, two even teas])Oonsful 

baking-powder. Bake in a shallow pan ; is nice warm for 

tea. Warranted good. 

DOLLY-VARDEN CAKE. 

Mrs. Marx E. Lilly. 
Dark Part — One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one- 
half cup molasses, two-thirds cup milk, two cups flour, one 



l82 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



egg and the yelks of four eggs, two teaspoons baking- 
powder in the flour, one teaspoon cloves, two teaspoons 
cinnamon, one-half nutmeg grated, one and one-half cups 
chopped raisins, and one-half cup figs in the icing between 
the layers of cake. 

Light Part — One pound flour, one pound sugar, one- 
half pound butter, one teacup milk, six eggs beaten sep- 
arately, three teaspoons baking-powder, grated rind and 

juice of one lemon. 

icing: 

One-half teacup water, three teacups sugar, whites of 
three eggs. Boil water and sugar until thick ; pour over 
the beaten whites, and beat until cool. 

TO ICE A CAKE. 

Mrs. Jerke Black, Hillsboro, Ohio. 
Break the whites of four eggs into a flat dish with one 
handful powdered sugar ; beat it well with a silver fork for 
five minutes ; then add more sugar until one pound fs 
used ; keep whipping until the icing is fine and firm ; if 
lemon juice is used as flavoring, use more sugar ; pour on 
the center of the cake and spread smoothly with a broad- 
bladed knife dipped in cold water. 

DATE CAKE. 

Mrs. Ira Bugbee. 
One cup butter, two cups granulated sugar, one cup 
milk, four cups flour, four eggs, one-half cup nutmeg 
grated, one-half teaspoon ground mace, grated rind of one 
lemon, one pound dates stoned and chopped and rubbed 
in flour, three teaspoons baking-powder. 

CITRON CAKE. 
Mrs. Rui-us D. Black. 
Two cups butter, two cups sugar, one pound citron, four 
and one-half cnps flour, whites of twelve eggs, one-half cup 
milk, and three teaspoons baking-powder. 



ADDITIONAL RECIPES. 183 

MARBLE CAKE. 
Mrs. \Vm. II. Webb. 
Two cups sugar, one cup butter, whites of eight eggs 
beaten to a stiff froth, three cups flour, with two teaspoons 
baking-powder. 

Dark Part — One and one-half cups brown sugar, three- 
fourths cup butter, two and one-half cups flour, two tea- 
spoons baking-powder, one tablespoon each of cinnamon, 
allspice and cloves. Add one grated nutmeg, and pepper. 

AMBROSIA CAKE. 
Mrs. David Reynolds. 
One-half cup milk, three-fourths cup butter, two cups 
sugar, three cups flour, four eggs, three teaspoons baking- 
powder. Bake in layers. 

filling: 

One pint whipped cream, one grated cocoanut, two 
eggs, one cup sugar, two oranges, and the grated rind of 
one orange, 

IMPERIAL CAKE. 

Mrs. Paul Hereth. 
One pound sugar, one pound butter, one pound flour, 
three-fourths pound citron, one pound raisins, one pound 
blanched and cut almonds, ten eggs, one cup currants, 
one grated nutmeg. Bake one and one-half hours. 

KITCHEN UTENSILS. 

Kitchen table. Wash-bench. 

Water-buckets. Three tubs. 

Wash-board. Range or cooking stove. 

Gas, gasoline, or oil stove. Two frying-pans. 

Two griddles. Tea-kettle. 

Sauce-pans. Steamer. 

Good granite-ware kettles. Bread-pans, 

two sizes. Cake-])ans. 

Gem-pans. One ciuart-measure. 



i84 



INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



KITCHEN 

Scales and weights. 

Cake-turner. 

Iron spoons. 

Tea-caddy. 

Wooden sugar-bucket. 

Dish-pans. 

Pie-pans. 

Potato-masher, 

Grater. 

Hammer. 

Waffle-irons. 

Dish-mop. 

Brooms. 

Perforated ladle. 

Bread-board. 

Tin bread-box. 

Tin cake-box. 

Towel-roller. 

Clothes-stick. 

Clothes-pins. 

Clothes-wringer. 

Clothes-basket. 

Ironing-board. 

Fluting-iron. 

Step-ladder. 

Roller-towels. 

Steel knives and forks. 

Toasting-rack. 

Boiler. 

Baking-dishes. 

Lantern. 

Clock. 

Ash-bucket. 

Crumb-brush and pan, 



UTENSILS— Continued. 
One pint-measure. 
Dippers. 
Coffee-mill. 
Coffee-pot. 
Coffee-can. 
Jelly-cake pans. 
Flour sieve. 
Funnels. 
Flat-irons. 
Can-opener. 
Spice-box. 
Floor-mop. 
Chopping-bowl. 
Shallow, tm skimmer. 
Rolling-pin. 
Meat-knife. 
Meat-saw. 
Flat-iron stand. 
Market-basket. 
Starch-box. 
Salt-box. 
Pepper-box. 
Bosom-board. 
Dust-pans. 
Dish-towels. 
Sausage-grinder. 
Ice-pick. 
Grid-iron. 
Stoneware crocks. 
Stone fruit-bowls. 
Match-box. 
Matches. 
Wood-box or coal-bucket. 



CONTENTS. 185 



CONTENTS. 



BUTTER. 
Butter 



1-3 



BREAD, ETC. 

Stock Yeast, Self-Working Yeast, Potato Yeast, Dry Yeast, 
Salt-Rising Bread, Sour Milk Bread, Sweet Milk Bread, 
Buttermilk Bread, Hominy Bread, Rice Bread, Rye Bread, 
Graham Bread, Yankee Bread, Quick Brown Bread, Steamed 
Brown Bread Compressed Yeast Bread, Light Rolls, Ordinary 
Rolls, Superior Rolls, Steamboat Rolls, Imperial Rolls, Eng- 
lish Rolls, French Rolls, German Rolls, Graham Rolls, Park- 
er-House Rolls, Pocket-Book Rolls, Egg Rolls, Sally Lunn, 
Risen. Sally Lunn, Baking-Powder Sally Lunn, Rusk, Wafers, 
Crumpets, Buttermilk MufBns, Baking-Powder Mufifiins, Yeast 
Mufifins, Mixed Muffins, Cinnamon Muffins, Graham Muffins, 
Rice Muffins, Graham Gems, Minnesota Gems, Rice Corn 
Bread, Steamed Corn Bread, Risen Corn Bread, Corn Pone, 
Corn Dodgers, Com Johnny-Cake, Sour Milk Waffles, Baking- 
Powder Waffles, Rice Waffles, Rice Croquetts, Buns, Puffs, 
Batter-Cakes, Eggless Batter-Cakes, Graham Flour Batter- 
Cakes, Buckwheat Batter-Cakes, Corn Batter-Cakes, Rice 
Batter-Cakes, Bread Batter-Cakes, Bannocks, Vanities, Oat 
Meal Fritters, Hominy Fritters, Corn Meal Mush Fritters, 
Parsnip Fritters, Squash Fritters, Snow Fritters, Cucumber 
Fritters, Apple Fritters, Clam Fritters, Oyster Fritters, Rice 
Fritters, Ripe Tomato Fritters, Green Tomato Fritters, Corn 
Fritters, Baking-Powder Biscuit, Soda Biscuit, Vienna Biscuit, 
Buttermilk Biscuit, Beat Biscuit, Kentucky Beat Biscuit, 
Cracker Toast, To Freshen Crackers, Biscuit and Rolls 3-28 

Additional Bread Recipes 180 



1 86 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



SOUPS. 

Celery Soup, Beef Soup, Veal Soup, Mutton Soup, Oyster Soup, 
Noodle Soup, Potato Soup, Corn Soup, Bean Soup, Pea Soup, 
Tomato Soup, Tit-Bit Soup 28-30 

Additional Soup Recipes 1 72-1 73 



FISH. 



Baked Fish, Boiled Fish, Halibut, Lobster, Mackerel, Cod Fish, 
Salmon, Egg Sauce For Fish, Mayonaise Dressing 31-33 



OYSTERS. 

Fried Oysters, Stewed Oysters, Escalloped Oysters, Pickled Oys- 
ters, Macaroni and Oysters, Sweet Breads and Oysters, Oys- 
ter Pie, Oyster Salad 33-34 



MEATS, ETC. 

Mock Duck, Ham Toast, Lamb Steaks, Pork Fritters, Pressed 
Beef, Pressed Chicken, Boiled Ham, Smothered Spring 
Chicken, Chicken Pie, Roast Veal, Roast Beef, Veal Loaf, 
Meat Puffs, For Curing Meat, Veal Stew, Lard, Sausage, 
Scrapple, Croquetts, Beef Hash, Corn-Beef Hash, Corn-Beef 
Liver, Broiled Beefsteak, Fried Beefsteak, Veal Marble, Italian 
Cheese, Sandwiches, To Roast Fowls, Turkey Dressing, 
Tongue 35-43 



CONTENTS. 187 



EGGS. 

Boiled Eggs, Poached Eggs, Scrambled Eggs, Omelette, Pota- 
toes with Omelette, Stuffed Omelette, Egg Balls 43-44 



VEGETABLES. 

Escalloped Tomatoes, Fried Tomatoes, Broiled Tomatoes, 
Stewed Tomatoes, Baked Tomatoes, Sliced Tomatoes, Corn 
and Tomatoes, Stewed Corn, Fried Corn, Corn Pudding, Suc- 
cotash, Lima Beans, String Beans, Baked Beans, Boston 
Baked Beans, Yankee Baked Beans, Canning Corn, Green 
Peas, Cauliflower, Spinach, Potato Croquetts, Potatoes and 
Cauliflower, Sweet Potatoes, Potatoes and Turnips, Egg-Plant, 
Squash, Corn Oysters, Mushrooms, Salsify or Oyster-Plant, 
Asparagus, Macaroni, Kalekannon, Ochra, Beets, Smothered 
Potatoes, Potato Puffs, Rules for Cooking Vegetables 45-52 



SALADS. 



Slaw, Onion Slaw, Potato Salad, Chicken or Turkey Salad, Veal 
Salad, Lettuce Salad, Egg Salad, Lobster Salad, White Fish 
or Trout Salad, Tomato Salad, Sweet-Bread Salad, Oyster 
Salad, Celery Salad, Raw Catsup, Currant Catsup, Tomato 
Catsup, Oil Pickles, Cucumber Soy, Green Tomato Soy 53-57 



INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



PICKLES. 

Mixed Pickles, Green Tomato Pickles, Artichoke Pickles, Bean 
Pickles, Mango Pickles, Chow-Chow, Pickled Oysters, Pickled 
Cucumbers, Pickled Walnuts, Pickled Onions, Pickled Eggs, 
Cucumber Catsup, Walnut Catsup, Tomato Catsup, Chili 
Sauce, Cold Slaw, Hot Slaw, Celery Slaw, Tomato Slaw, 
Chopped Pickles, Sliced Tomato Pickles, Sliced Cucumber 
Pickles 58-64 

Additional Pickle Recipes 174-175 



PIES. 



Vinegar Pie, Green Apple Pie, Cream Apple Pie, Tomato Pie, 
Lemon Pie, Cocoanut Pie, Chess Pie, Mock Mince Pie, Dried 
Apple Pie, Blackberry Pie, Plum Pie, Tennessee Sweet Potato 
Pie, Aunt Charlotte Pie, Custard Pie, Jelly Pie, Pumpkin Pie, 
Lemon Custard Pie, Potatoe Custard Pie, Mince Pie, Layer 
Pie, German Puffs, Strawberry Shortcake 65-73 

Additional Pie Recipes 1 77~i 79 



PUDDINGS. 

Citron Pudding, Lemon Pudding, Fig Pudding, Cake Pudding, 
Quick Pudding, Cabinet Pudding, Cocoanut Pudding, French 
Pudding, Rice Pudding, Baked Roll Pudding, Farmer's Apple 
Pudding, Charlotte Russe, Cream Whips, Steamed Roly-Poly, 
Apple Meringue, Charleston Pudding, Cottage Pudding, Sliced 
Bread Pudding, Tapioca Pudding, Snow Pudding, Apple Pud- 
ding, Plum Pudding, Batter Pudding, Blackberry Slump, Corn- 
Starch Pudding, Cream Pudding, Gelatine Pudding, Orange 
Souffle, Orange Pudding, Queen of Puddings, Arrowroot Pud- 
ding, Butter Roll, Bird's Nest Sago Pudding, Strawberry 
Pudding, Steamed Pudding, Sweet Potato Pudding, Cranberry 
Pudding, Banana Cream, Gelatine Blanc-Mange, Angel Food, 
Sago Pudding, Bread Pudding, Fifteen-Minute Pudding. ... 74-89 

Additional Pudding Recipes 176-177 



CONTENTS. 



CAKE. 

Fruit Cake, Pork Cake, Scotch Cake, Velvet Cake, Fancy Pound 
Cake, Confectioner's Cake, Cup Cake, Corn-Starch Cake, 
Sponge Cake, Chocolate-Icing Cake, One-Egg Cake, White 
Sponge Cake, Pink Marble Cake, White Cake, Jam Cake, 
Spiced Cake, Hickorynut Cake, Chocolate Cake, Chocolate 
Marble Cake, Eggless Cake, Lady Cake, Orange Cake, Home 
Fruit Cake, Cocoanut Loaf Cake, Harrison Cake, Bread 'Cake, 
Yellow Cake, Snow Cake, Silver Cake, Gold Cake, Pound 
Cake, Welcome Cake, Indiana Cake, Daisy Cake, Angel Cake, 
Rock Cake, Coffee Cake, Dover Cake, Fiench Cake, Plain 
Cake, Buckeye Cake, Beautiful Cake, White Mountain Cake, 
Measure Cake, Dried Apple Fruit Cake, Feather Cake, Shet- 
burn Cake, Queen Cake, Marble Cake, Tennessee Cake, Gra- 
ham Cake, Saffron Cake, Black Cake, Jackson Cake, Cheap Fruit 
Cake, Delicate Cake, Jelly-Roll Cake, Cheap and Good Sponge 
Cake, Ginger Bread, Ginger Cake, Japanese Cake, Cocoanut 
Cake, Cream Rose Cake, Neapolitan Cake, Almond Cream 
Cake, Orange Cake, Josephus Cake, Jelly Cake, Velvet Sponge 
Cake, Delicious Cake, Ginger Cup Cake, Apple Lemon Cake, 
Lemon Jelly Cake, Corn-Starch Custard Cake, Rocky Moun- 
tain Cake, Mount Blanc Cake, Tea Cakes, Ginger Cakes, Gin- 
ger Snaps, Hoffman's Doughnuts, Almond Doughnuts, Sand 
Tarts, Raised Doughnuts, Baking-Powder Doughnuts, Cream 
Cookies, Cream Cullers, Ice Cream Cake, Raisin Cake, Or- 
ange Cake, Bride's Cake, Watermelon Cake, Wedding Cake, 
Madison Cake, Order of Mixing Cake 90-I33 

Additional Cake Recipes 181-183 



SAUCES. 



Pickle Sauce, Vegetable Sauce, Mushroom Sauce, Lemon 
Sauce, Liquid Pudding Sauce, Plain Pudding Sauce, Hard 
Pudding Sauce, Brown Sauce, Drawn Butter Sauce I34~I35 



I90 INDIANAPOLIS COOK BOOK. 



CUSTARDS AND CREAMS. 

Meringue Custard, Chocolate Custard, Frozen Custard, Ice 
Cream, Chocolate Ice Cream, Fruit Ice Cream, Strawberry Ice 
Cream, Raspberry Ice Cream, Banana Ice Cream, Lemon Ice, 
Strawberry Ice, Orange Ice, Currant Ice, Frozen Strawberries, 
Lemon Float 136-139 



DRINKS. 

Coffee, Strained Coffee, Boiled Coffee, Milk Coffee, Cold-Water 
Coffee, Tea, Chocolate, Children's Tea, Cold Lemonade, Hot 
Lemonade, Warm Milk, Invalid's Drink, Gruel, Beef Tea, In- 
fant's Food 141-144 



CANNING FRUIT. 

Time 'for Boiling, and Quantity of Sugar in one Quart Fruit. .... 145 



PRESERVES. 

Watermelon Preserves, Citron Preserves, Spiced Grapes, Grape 
Butter, Crystal Jelly, Grape Jelly, Sweet Pickles, Virginia 
Sweet Pickles, Watermelon Sweet Pickles, Peach Pickle, 
Baked Apples, Stewed Apples, Sweet-Pickled Cucumbers, Pie- 
plant, Stewed Figs, Cranberry Jelly, Currant Jelly, Plu.n Jeily, 
Grape Jelly, Apple Jelly, Gelatine Jelly, Grape Jam, Black- 
berry Jam, Raspberry Jam, Quince Jam 146-151 



CANDY. 



Boston Caramels, Chocolate Caramels, Cocoanut Caramels, Car- 
amel Cake, Cocoanut Candy, Sugar Candy, Fig Candy, Butter- 
scotch, Cocoanut Puffs, Hickorynut Candy, Chocolate Candy, 
Nut Candy, Taffy 152-15S 



CONTENTS. 191 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Miscellaneous IS5~I7I 



ADDITIONAL RECIPES. 

Calf-Head Soup, Beef Soup, Clear Vegetable Soup, Milk Soup, 
For Curing Meat, To Make Steak Tender, Veal Loaf, Wash- 
ington Chow-Chovv, Mangoes, Sweet Pickles, Chinese Pickles, 
Curry Powder, New England Brown Bread, Graham and In- 
dian Brown Bread, Floating Island, Suet Pudding, Currant 
Pudding, Steamed Fruit Pudding, Scotch Pie, Orange Pie, 
Vinegar Pie, Mock Mince Pie, Apple Pie, Cream Pie, Apple 
Meringue, Transparent Pie, Italian Cream, Lemon Sponge, 
Lemon Butter, Preserved Oranges, Guava Jelly, Preserved 
Citron, Orange or Lemon Marmalade, Ginger Crackers, Hick- 
orynut Macaroni, Drop Cake, Baker's Pound Cake, Tea 
Cake, Dolly Varden Cake, To Ice a Cake, Date Cake, Citron 
Cake, Marble Cake, Ambrosia Cake, Imperial Cake 172-183 



INDEX TO ADDITIONAL RECIPES. 

Soups 1 72-1 73 

Meats 173-174 

Pickles, etc 1 74-1 76 

Bread i^r 

Puddings I7S-I77 

Pies 177-179 

Preserves 180 

Cakes 181-183 



KITCHEN UTENSILS. 
Kitchen Utensils 183-184 



Gas Stove 



t=> 


H^^Hi'i 


^ 




CO 

1-1-1 

CO 


"^^^ 




C/O 



Size, 30 in. high, 15 in. wide, 12^2 '"• cleep. Hot-plate, 18 in. 
wide, 15 in. deep, with one oval and one ring Imrner, with sliding 
tray under hot-plate. 

Will roast a joint 7 pounds, couple of fowls, grill chops, steaks, 
bacon and fish, toast bread, bake pastry, rice puddings, potatoes, 
etc., boil, fry or stew. Movable copper reflector, for radiating the 
heat into the room. 

The roasting chamber of this Stove is lined with bright tin plate, 
and is fitted with a movable trivet for supporting the pan at various 
heights; an elbow burner is also inserted in the hot-plate with a 
separate tap. 

No KindliiTLg required. 
No Coal to carry. 
No Ashes to reriT^ove. 
Prices from ^2 to ^16. 

On exhibition and for sale by the 

GAS COMPANY, 

kt 49 South reunsvlvaiiia Street. 



Tlie Woiiian's? F^riemd! 



Sewing Machine. 

AN ENTIRELY NEW MACHINE! 



OUR LATEST SUCCESS ! 

WE CALL SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE FOLLOWINC. 
FEATURES: 

The New Howe is a new machine throughout, differing in every 
point from the machines heretofore manufactured by us. 



It He 



as 



It h 



The Most Room Under the Arm. 

The Perfect Howe Stitch. 

No Holes to Thread except the Needle. 

The Easiest Shuttle to Thread. 

The Most Perfect Take-up. 

The Loose Balance Wheel. 

The Largest Bobbin. 

Absolutely No Vibration. 
[ The Most Perfect Tensions. 
( The Lightest Running. 
I Noiseless. 
( The Most Pleasing in Appearance. 



It is the most acceptable present you could possibly get your wife 
or sweetheart, in return for which have her agree to make for you (in 
special occasions for dessert, from the following recipe : 

DELICIOUS SI^ANISII CREAM. 

Tliree pints of milk, one ounce of gelatint, six eggs, eight table- 
spoonsful granulated sugar. Pour enough only of the milk over the 
gelatine to dissolve it. Beat the yolks of the eggs and sugar together. 
Beat the white of the eggs to a stiff froth. Boil the remainder of the 
milk, and add it to the dissolved gelatine and the beaten yolks and 
sugar, and thoroughly mix. Then pour this mixture over the froth 
made from the whites of the eggs. Flavor to suit. Pour in moulds. 
Serve with cream.