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Full text of "Indiana Vocational Technical College Catalog, 1990-1992"

1990-92 

Indiana Vocational 

Technical College 

Catalog 




sr Indiana's Technical College 




/ 



/ 





COLLEGE CALENDAR 
1990—91 






Fall Semester 1990 




August 27 
September 3 
October 23—24 
November 22—23 
December 22 


Spring Semester 1991 


Classes Begin 
Labor Day Holiday 
Midterm Break 
Thanksgiving Holiday 
Classes End 


January 14 
March 11—15 
May 11 


Summer Session 1991 


Classes Begin 
Midterm Break 
Classes End 


May 28 
July 4 

August 12 


COLLEGE CALENDAR 
1991—92 

Fall Semester 1991 


Classes Begin 
Independence Day 
Holiday 
Classes End 


August 26 
September 2 
October 22—23 
November 28 — 29 
December 21 


Spring Semester 1992 


Classes Begin 
Labor Day Holiday 
Midterm Break 
Thanksgiving Holiday 
Classes End 


January 13 
March 9—13 
May 9 




Classes Begin 
Midterm Break 
Classes End 



IVY TECH 
CATALOG 
1990-1992 



INDIANA VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL COLLEGE 

February 1 990 



IVY1ECH 



?=" Indiana's Technical College 



NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY AND EQUAL 
OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PROGRAM 

Indiana Vocational Technical College seeks to develop degree credit programs, courses, and 
community service offerings and to provide open admission, counseling, and placement services 
for all persons, regardless of race, color, creed, religion, sex, national origin, physical or mental 
handicap, age or veteran status. 

CATALOG DISCLAIMER 

This catalog is intended to supply accurate information to the reader. From time to time, certain 
information may be changed. 

The College may revise any matter described in this catalog at any time without publishing a 
revised version of the catalog. Information which appears to apply to a particular student should 
be verified by the Office of Student Services. This publication and its provisions are not in any 
way a contract between the student and Indiana Vocational Technical College. 



February 1 990 



STATE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Robert E. Schumann 

Chairman 

St. John 

V. William Hunt 

Vice Chairman 

Columbus 

Casper J. Alessi, Jr. 

Secretary 

Indianapolis 

Gilbert E. Betulius 

Evansville 

Pauline V. Carter 

Richmond 

John Robert Davis 

Logansport 



Robert George Dunderman 

Fort Wayne 

William R. Gutzwiller 

Batesville 

Jess F. Helsel 

Campbellsburg 

Robert A. Holt 

Muncie 

Vernon E. Hux 

Terre Haute 

Herbert Petrich 

Monticello 

Thomas E. Taylor 

South Bend 



COLLEGE CENTRAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 



Gerald I. Lamkin 
President 

Thomas E. Reckerd 
Executive Vice President/ 
Chancellor 



Charles W. Harris 

Vice President/ 

Development 

William D. Kramer 

Vice President/Planning & 

Administrative Operations 

Thomas H. Taylor 

Vice President/Treasurer 



COLLEGE CENTRAL 

OFFICES 

One West 26th Street 

P.O. Box 1763 

Indianapolis, IN 46206-1763 

Phone (317) 921-4882 




MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT 

Indiana Vocational Technical College is at work across Indiana providing technical educa- 
tion that matches job opportunities with job skills. 

The variety in Ivy Tech's instructional programming and the convenience of a statewide 
instructional network encourage individuals to attend Ivy Tech to prepare for initial 
employment or job upgrade. 

In addition to Ivy Tech's associate degrees and certificate programs that provide the skills 
demanded by today's employers, the College offers custom-designed training for Indiana 
business and industry. 

I invite you to examine this catalog and then put Ivy Tech to work for you. From the list on 
page vi, you may contact the instructional center closest to you for detailed information 
on registration, programs of study, or industrial training services. 



Gerald I. Lamkin, President 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

1990 — 92 College Calendars inside Front cover 

State Board of Trustees ii 

College Central Office Administrative Officers . . . ii 

Message from the President iii 

College Profile v 

Instructional Centers . . . vi 



STUDENT SERVICES INFORMATION 

Admissions 1 

Academic Assessment 1 

Transfer 2 

Registration 3 

Cost 3 

Refund Policy 4 

Financial Aid 4 

Student Records 7 

Grading 8 

Withdrawal 8 

Status 8 

Grade Point Averages 9 

Converting Hours and G PA 10 

Improving Grades 10 

Standards of Progress 10 

Graduation 10 

Student Services 11 

Student Organizations 12 

Student Rights and Responsibilities 13 



INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS 

Associate in Science (AS) Degree Programs . . .16 
Associate in Applied Science (AAS) 

Degree Programs 16 

Technical Certificate (TC) Programs 17 

Short-Term Programs 17 

Business and Industry Training Programs 17 

Basic Skills Advancement Program 17 

Course Numbering System 18 



DIVISION OF BUSINESS, 
OFFICE AND INFORMATION 
SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGIES 

Accounting Technology 21 

Computer Programming Technology 26 

Culinary Arts Technology 30 

Distribution Management 33 

Hotel/Motel Management . .35 

Industrial Supervision Technology 39 

Information/Data Management 43 

Marketing Technology 46 

Paralegal Technology 49 

Secretarial Sciences 52 

Small Business Operations 56 

Statistical Process Control Technology 59 



DIVISION OF VISUAL 
COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES 

Commercial Video Technology 63 

Commercial Art Technology 66 

Commercial Photography 69 

Graphic Media Production Technology 73 

Interior Design Technology 78 

DIVISION OF HUMAN SERVICES AND 
HEALTH TECHNOLOGIES 

Child Care Technology 83 

Early Childhood Development 86 

Dental Assistant 88 

Food Service Technology 90 

Health Care Administration Technology 92 

Human Services Technology 94 

Medical Assistant 97 

Medical Laboratory Technician 101 

Mental Health Rehabilitation Technology .... 104 

Nursing, Associate of Science in 107 

Nursing, Practical 111 

Radiologic Technology 114 

Respiratory Care 117 

Surgical Technology 120 

DIVISION OF APPLIED SCIENCE 
AND TECHNOLOGIES 

Agricultural Equipment 123 

Applied Fire Science Technology 126 

Automated Manufacturing Technology 129 

Automotive Body Repair Technology 132 

Automotive Service Technology 135 

Barbering Technology 138 

Building Construction Technology 141 

College/Industry Job Title Program 145 

Diesel Power Technology 146 

Drafting/CAD Technology 148 

Electronics Technology 152 

Heating/Air Conditioning/Refrigeration Technology . 156 

Industrial Laboratory Technology 159 

Industrial Maintenance Technology 161 

Machine Tool Technology 164 

Mining Operations Technology 167 

Plastics Manufacturing Technology 171 

Pollution Treatment Technology 173 

Welding Technology 1 76 

INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT 

General Education 181 

Related Education 185 

Basic Skills Advancement 188 

ACCREDITATIONS 191 

IVY TECH FOUNDATION 198 

INDEX 199 



COLLEGE PROFILE 

Moving Forward 

In just over a quarter of a century, Indiana Vocational Technical College, popularly known as Ivy Tech, 
has grown from an idea to a thriving post-secondary institution. In 1963, the Indiana General Assembly 
established Ivy Tech as Indiana's first statewide vocational technical college by appropriating $50,000 
for its development. Following appointment of a State Board of Trustees, a president was named and the 
first training program established in 1965. Later amendments to the enabling legislation authorized Ivy 
Tech's present regional structure of thirteen administrative centers designed to provide accessible tech- 
nical educational opportunities to all Indiana citizens. Between 1966 and 1969 thirteen regional boards 
of trustees were appointed and thirteen regions chartered. 

The mission of Ivy Tech is stated in the authorizing legislation: "There shall be, and hereby is created 
and established, a new state post-high school educational institution to be devoted primarily to occu- 
pational training of a practical, technical, and semi-technical nature for the citizens of Indiana." 

Ivy Tech's mission was broadened in 1 971 by the added authority to grant diplomas and certificates, 
including one-year Technical Certificates and two-year Associate degrees, to students successfully com- 
pleting prescribed programs. Furthermore, the College was granted permission to offer general education 
courses for vocational technical education programs. 

The College has shown impressive growth in its relatively short history. Enrollment increased from 
3,233 students in the fall quarter of 1968 to 28,924 in the fall of 1989. 

Ivy Tech serves the following target population groups: 

(1) students who have not graduated from high school; 

(2) high school graduates interested in continuing their education in a vocational-technical type insti- 
tution with programs of shorter duration than a four-year college program; 

(3) students who have not completed college work; 

(4) college graduates interested in supplementing their education with vocational-technical training; 

(5) adults needing and desiring retraining or additional training in a vocational-technical specialty. 

Within the statewide Ivy Tech system, some 1 ,500 full- and part-time faculty members teach in more 
than 50 program areas offered in four instructional divisions: Business, Office and Information Systems 
Technologies; Visual Communications Technologies; Human Services and Health Technologies; and 
Applied Science and Technologies. 

The College's regional offices of Business and Industry Training work closely with Indiana businesses 
to offer customized training and retraining in response to specific company needs. These training pro- 
grams are available at Ivy Tech or in-plant. 

College Goals 

In order to focus on the mission of the College more specifically and to enable the means and processes 
to be developed by which this mission will be accomplished, the College has formulated seven goals. 
These goals, as adopted by the State Trustees in June 1985, are as follows: 

1 . The College will offer, through a flexible delivery system, education consistent with the economic 
development needs of the State of Indiana. 

2. The College will offer a range of occupationally oriented programs with multiple entry and exit 
opportunities as well as a range of student services consistent with the individual student's interets, 
needs and abilities. 

3. The College will strive to provide the opportunity for citizens of the state to enroll in the College 
regardless of their financial resources, previous educational experiences or geographic location. 

4. The College will strive to provide the opportunity for each applicant to gain occupational competence 
regardless of age, race, sex, or religious affiliation. 

5. The College will promote throughout the State of Indiana a better understanding and appreciation 
of the value of occupationally based education and will encourage increased support for this education. 

6. The College will provide within its occupational program offerings educational experiences sup- 
portive of the social, cultural, and personal development of the individual. 

7. The College will strive to cooperate with other providers of occupationally oriented education in all 
educational sectors. 

Ivy Tech's rapid growth and educational achievement can be attributed to firm adherence to its mission 
and goals and to strong support and encouragement from state and community leaders. 



INSTRUCTIONAL CENTERS 



Ivy Tech — Anderson 

Jack Voelz 

Director of Operations 
325 West 38th Street 
Anderson, IN 46014-2694 
Phone:(317)643-7133 
Moving soon to: 
104 West 53rd Street 
Anderson, IN 46013-1502 

Ivy Tech — Bloomington 

Jeff Pittman 
Director of Operations 
3116 Canterbury Court 
Bloomington, IN 47401-0393 
Phone:(812)332-1559 

Ivy Tech — Columbus 

Homer B. Smith 

Vice President/Chancellor 

James R. Wells 

Executive Dean 

4475 Central Avenue 

Columbus, IN 47203-1868 

Phone:(812)372-9925 

Ivy Tech — Elkhart 

Jane Roberts 
Director of Center 
2521 Industrial Parkway 
Elkhart, IN 46516-5430 
Phone:(219)493-4657 

Ivy Tech — Evansville 

H. Victor Baldi 

Vice President/Chancellor 

3501 First Avenue 

Evansville, IN 47710-3398 

Phone:(812)426-2865 

Ivy Tech — Fort Wayne 

Jon L. Rupright 
Vice President/Dean 
3800 N. Anthony Blvd. 
Fort Wayne, IN 46805-1489 
Phone:(219)482-9171 

Ivy Tech — Gary 

Ernest Jones 

Vice President/Chancellor 

1440 East 35th Avenue 

Gary, IN 46409-1499 

Phone:(219)981-1111 



Ivy Tech — Hammond 

Luis Gonzalez 
Acting Center Director 
5727 Sohl Avenue 
Hammond, IN 46320-2356 
Phone:(219)937-9422 

Ivy Tech — Indianapolis 

Meredith L. Carter 

Vice President/Chancellor 

One West 26th Street 

Indianapolis, IN 46208-4777 

Phone:(317)921-4800 

Ivy Tech — Kokomo 

M. Ken Martin 

Executive Dean 

1 81 5 East Morgan Street 

Kokomo, IN 46901-2599 

Phone:(317)459-0561 

Ivy Tech — Lafayette 

Betty J. Doversberger 
Executive Dean 
3208 Ross Road 
Lafayette, IN 47905-5217 
Phone:(317)477-7401 

Ivy Tech — Lawrenceburg 

Gwen Wright 
Director of Operations 
575 Main Street 
Lawrenceburg, IN 47025-1661 
Phone:(812)537-4010 

Ivy Tech — Logansport 

Daniel Mordenti 

Director of Center 

Eastgate Plaza 

U.S. 24 Highway East 

Logansport, IN 46947-2149 

Phone:(219)753-5101 

Ivy Tech — Madison 

Gregory K. Flood 

Executive Dean 

Highway 62 and Ivy Tech Drive 

Madison, IN 47250-1659 

Phone:(812)265-2580 

Ivy Tech — Marion 

Ken Wenger 
Acting Site Director 
2983 West 38th Street 
Marion, IN 46953-9370 
Phone:(317)622-9843 



Ivy Tech — Muncie 

Carl T. Swift, Interim Dean 
Regional Operations 
4301 So. Cowan Road 
Muncie, IN 47302-9448 
Phone:(317)289-2291 

Ivy Tech — Richmond 

Judith A. Redwine 
Vice President/Chancellor 
2325 Chester Boulevard 
Richmond, IN 47374-1298 
Phone:(317)966-2656 

Ivy Tech — Sellersburg 

Jonathan W. Thomas 
Executive Dean 
8204 Highway 31 1 
Sellersburg, IN 47172-1829 
Phone:(317)246-3301 

Ivy Tech — South Bend 

Carl F. Lutz 

Vice President/Chancellor 

1 534 West Sample Street 

South Bend, IN 46619-3892 

Phone:(219)289-7001 

Ivy Tech — Terre Haute 

Samuel E. Borden 
Vice President/Dean 
7377 S. Dixie Bee Road 
Terre Haute, IN 47802-4898 
Phone:(812)299-1121 

Ivy Tech — Valparaiso 

J. Robert Jeffs 
Center Director 
2401 Valley Drive 
Valparaiso, IN 46383-2520 
Phone:(219)464-8514 

Ivy Tech — Warsaw 

106 N. Buffalo Street 
Warsaw, IN 46580-2728 
Phone:(219)267-5428 
Moving soon to: 
One Tiger Lane 
Warsaw, IN 46580-4546 



COLLEGE INFORMATION AND SERVICES 



ENTERING THE COLLEGE 

Admissions — Non — Degree Objective 

Ivy Tech offers courses in many special career areas, 
including college preparation. Persons interested in taking 
any of the Ivy Tech courses are invited to do so. Admis- 
sion as a non-degree student is easy. Simply file a com- 
pleted registration form in the Office of Student Services 

Admissions — Degree Objective 

For admission as a regular student to one of Ivy Tech's 
programs leading to an Associate Degree or Technical 
Certificate, the standard requirement is a high school 
diploma or GED certificate. The Office of Student Ser- 
vices will assist the student, on request, in obtaining an 
official copy of the diploma or GED certificate, which 
must be issued from the previously attended institution. 

Applicants are advised to participate in assessment 
testing. The purposes of assessment testing are to 
measure the student's achievement in basic skills areas 
of mathematics, reading, writing, reasoning, and com- 
munication, and, secondly, to assist the student in the 
selection of an occupational program. If assessment 
indicates that the applicant has the basic skills needed 
for success in the chosen program he/she may be allowed 
to begin program level coursework. If the assessment 
reveals skill deficiencies, the applicant will be advised 
to complete appropriate remedial coursework. Appli- 
cants may enroll in program courses when identified 
academic deficiencies are not prerequisites for suc- 
cessful completion of the program course. Students may 
or may not be eligible for financial aid during this period. 

If the assessment indicates that the applicant is unlikely 
to achieve success at Ivy Tech, at that point in time, he 
or she will be referred to an appropriate community 
resource offering the needed assistance. The applicant 
may enter the admissions process at a later date, fol- 
lowing completion of skills upgrading. 

Assessment testing may be waived if the applicant sub- 
mits either: 

(a) an official transcript from an accredited post- 
secondary institution indicating achievement 
consistent with Ivy Tech's admission standards; 

(b) acceptable standardized test scores (i.e., SAT, 
ACT). 

The College reserves the right to guide the enroll- 
ment of students in particular programs or courses on 
the basis of past academic records, vocational/tech- 
nical counseling, and testing. 



Students seeking admission to certain health occu- 
pation programs may be requested to take part in spe- 
cific pre-enrollment assessments and/or interviews to 
fulfill College or external agency requirements. Certain 
prerequisites, such as health examinations, may be 
required before enrolling in specific programs or courses. 

Basic Skills Advancement Program 
Services 

Ivy Tech technical institutes and major instructional centers 
offer Basic Skills Advancement Programs to help insure 
the success of students in the completion of their edu- 
cational goals. This supplemental program is designed 
for students enrolled in regular programs or courses at 
the College who are encountering academic difficulty 
or have been identified as having encountered aca- 
demic difficulty in the past. Ivy Tech is concerned about 
the success of its students, and this program is designed 
to insure that every student has had the opportunity to 
be successful. 

Services provided through the Basic Skills Advance- 
ment Program include diagnostic testing and assess- 
ment, financial aid counseling, career counseling, 
placement services and instruction. The need for these 
services may be identified at the time of admission; 
however, a student may utilize any or all services upon 
encountering academic difficulty during a course of study. 
Professional basic skills advancement instructors and 
laboratory technicians provide supplemental instruc- 
tion in the areas of math, communications, sciences, 
human relations, GED preparation and study skills. The 
delivery of instruction may be a basic skills advance- 
ment course in a classroom setting, it may be offered 
to students one-on-one as tutorial assistance, or as a 
self-paced study in the Basic Skills Center. For further 
information about the College's Basic Skills Advance- 
ment Programs, the student should contact either the 
Student Services Offices or the Basic Skills Center. 

Readmission 

Should a course of study at Ivy Tech be interrupted, 
students may request readmission at a later date. This 
may be accomplished by contacting the Office of Stu- 
dent Services. Information on eligibility for financial aid 
will be available to returning students. 

Limited Admissions Enrollment 

Sometimes the number of students admitted and enrolled 
in programs and/or courses may be limited by College 
resources or facilities — including available lab equip- 
ment and related support, or the number of available 



College Information and Services 



health program clinical work stations. The Office of Student 
Services should be contacted regarding programs which 
have limited access. 

Admission Procedures and Support 
Documents — Degree Objective 

1 . The College requires all students to complete the 
student admission data form, which establishes 
records in the Admissions Office. 

2. Proof of high school graduation or GED comple- 
tion is normally required for admission into a pro- 
gram leading to a certificate or a degree. The high 
school graduate or individual who has the GED 
should request the secondary school or testing 
center to send an official copy of the transcript or 
GED certification to the Admissions Office by the 
end of the first semester of attendance. 

3. The College has counselors available to assist 
students in selecting a course of study at Ivy Tech. 

4. The College recommends that program declared 
students either provide acceptable standardized 
test scores or participate in the College's diag- 
nostic testing program. 

5. Should a student wish to transfer a credit to 
Ivy Tech from another college or similar post- 
secondary institution previously attended, the 
student must forward an official copy of the grade 
transcript or other document from that institution 
to Ivy Tech before enrolling for courses if applying 
for financial aid or no later than halfway through 
the first semester of enrollment or re-enrollment. 

6. The College requires a health examination for certain 
programs. 

Transferring to the College 

The College encourages students who have previously 
attended other recognized colleges and universities, 
adult education programs, and high school vocational 
technical programs to have their transcripts forwarded 
to Ivy Tech so the College can consider them for trans- 
fer of credit and/or advanced placement by the mid- 
point of the first semester of enrollment or re-enrollment. 
Students are responsible for providing pertinent course 
descriptions and/or copies of the college catalog(s) if 
further documentation is needed to facilitate the trans- 
fer credit review. The College will be glad to assist indi- 
viduals with the evaluation of their prior educational 
experiences. 

The College reserves the right to refuse admission 
or to accept conditionally those students who have been 
dismissed for disciplinary reasons from other colleges 
or universities. 

Transferring to Other Colleges 

It is the right and responsibility of the receiving insti- 
tution to decide whether to accept credits from another 



institution. The associate of applied science degree 
(A.A.S.) and the certificate programs offered by Ivy Tech 
are intended to prepare students with the necessary 
knowledge and skills to enter or advance in the work- 
place. In general, the A.A.S. and certificate programs 
are not designed to transfer to other institutions. How- 
ever, some receiving institutions will permit a student 
to receive credit for a course upon successful comple- 
tion of an examination or to receive credit for courses 
completed as part of an A.A.S. or certificate program. 
Ivy Tech does offer associate of science (A.S.) degree 
programs at certain sites which, through agreements 
with specific institutions, are designed to transfer. Stu- 
dents interested in transfer programs and credit by 
examination should check with the Office of Student 
Services. 

International Students 

International students must meet the College admis- 
sion standards and certain other requirements. Inter- 
national students should apply for admission to Ivy Tech 
at least ninety (90) days prior to the beginning of the 
term they wish to attend. 

An international student must also provide proof of 
adequate financial support for College fees and living 
expenses for each year while attending the College. 
The international student should submit a letter from 
an appropriate sponsor, government official, or bank 
official stating that sufficient funds are available to cover 
the cost of the student's education and that these funds 
will be available to the student while attending college 
in this country. 

Handicapped Students 

College programs and facilities are designed to be 
accessible to handicapped students. Each regional institute 
has designated parking and special restroom facilities 
for the physically handicapped. Support services will 
also aid handicapped students with career planning, 
financial aid, personal counseling, and placement. The 
College staff works with The Department of Vocational 
Rehabilitation and other service agencies to assist 
physically and psychologically impaired students through 
available local community resources. 

Students with handicaps are urged to contact the 
Student Services Office for help with their special chal- 
lenges as students at Ivy Tech. 

Student Orientation 

All new degree students are encouraged to participate 
in an orientation program prior to or during the first week 
of classes. The purpose of the orientation is to assist 
students in making the transition to the college envi- 
ronment. Topics discussed include student services, 
financial aid, business services, instructional pro- 
grams, and college activities, policies and procedures. 



College Information and Services 



TEST-OUT PROCEDURES 

Policies regarding testing out of courses vary from pro- 
gram to program. A student who wishes to test-out of a 
course should contact the program advisor. A $5.00 per 
credit hour fee may be charged for the tests. 

The general guidelines for test-out are as follows: 

1 . Test-out examinations should be taken before 
registering for the course for which the test — out 
is attempted. 

2. Test-out examinations are normally completed at 
one sitting (unless the test is offered in two parts, 
i.e., lab and written exams). 

3. Test-out credits are not included in credit com- 
putations for financial aid programs or student grade 
point averages. 



REGISTRATION 

Registering for Courses 

The registration process includes financial aid and pro- 
gram counseling, selection of courses, and payment of 
fees. Newly admitted students will be notified of when 
to register for their first semester classes. 

Specified days are set aside for registration before 
the beginning of each semester. Students should seek 
assistance in course selection from faculty advisors or 
counselors in the Office of Student Services before 
registering for classes. 

The Student Services Office of each Ivy Tech region 
can supply information concerning registration. 

NOTE: STUDENTS ARE REGISTERED WHEN FEES 
HAVE BEEN SATISFIED. 

Open/Late Registration 

Open registration will begin three weeks before the start 
of the term. Registration after the first day of classes 
each term is considered late. Students may register 
after the first week of classes with the permission of 
the instructor, however, a late registration fee may be 
assessed any time after the first day of classes. For 
further information, students are asked to contact the 
Office of Student Services. 

Drop — and — Add 

Courses may be dropped or added during the first two 
weeks of the regular semester. Students may be eligi- 
ble for a full or partial refund of the assessed fees for 
courses dropped during the first four weeks of the semester. 
Courses are not officially dropped until the necessary 
forms have been completed and returned to the Office 



of Student Services. After the first week of the semes- 
ter, students will need to receive the permission of the 
instructor to add a course. 

Student Withdrawal 

From the beginning of the third week to the end of the 
week marking the completion of 75% of the course, a 
student may withdraw from a course by filing a with- 
drawal form at the Office of Student Services and dis- 
continuing class attendance. (Students may be eligible 
for a full or partial refund of the assessed fees — see 
below.) Records will then indicate status of "W" in place 
of a grade for that course. The Student Withdrawal is 
complete when the necessary forms have been sub- 
mitted to the Office of Student Services. 

A student who discontinues class attendance after 
the last day to withdraw with a "W" will receive a grade 
commensurate with the course requirements. 

Further information is available from the Office of 
Student Services. 



COLLEGE FEES 

The College seeks to provide quality education at the 
lowest possible cost. General fees are based on the 
number of credit hours for which the student has reg- 
istered. Additional costs include Divisional fees and special 
fees pertaining to particular courses or College activi- 
ties. Out of state students pay an additional fee per 
credit hour. 

Additional Expenses 

The following additional expenses may apply, depend- 
ing upon the program of study: 

BOOKS: All students are expected to purchase the 
textbooks for their respective programs. The cost 
of books will vary according to classes taken. 

TOOLS: The College furnishes major equipment items 
for instruction; however, in many programs or courses 
students must furnish additional hand tools and 
equipment. 

UNIFORMS AND OTHER SPECIAL EQUIPMENT: 

Several programs require students to furnish uni- 
forms and special safety clothing. 

ROOM AND BOARD: Since Ivy Tech is not a resi- 
dential college, room and board fees are not 
applicable. 

TRAVEL: Transportation costs to and from the Col- 
lege vary according to the distance and the type 
of transportation used. 

For a current schedule of fees and further information, 
contact the Office of Student Services. 



College Information and Services 



Payment of Fees 

All enrolled students must make arrangements at the 
time of registration to pay all applicable fees. A student 
is officially registered and allowed to attend classes 
when all fees have been satisfied. 



REFUND POLICY 

Students choosing to drop or withdraw from a course 
or courses must notify the College in writing using the 
drop-and-add or withdrawal form. The fee refund for 
voluntary withdrawal from a class, when applicable, will 
be processed only after the student files a College drop- 
and-add form or withdrawal form with the Student Serv- 
ices Office. 

The College will refund students' assessed fees, with 
the exception of the late registration fee, on a schedule 
computed as follows for a regular semester: 
From registration to end of first 
week of semester 1 00% refund 

To end of second week of semester 75% refund 
To end of third week of semester 50% refund 
To end of fourth week of semester 25% refund 
After fourth week of semester No refund 

The effective date for calculating the fee refund is 
the date of written notification of the drop-and-add form. 

Certain other fees may be refundable. Further details 
are available from the Office of Student Services. 

All refunds will be issued by check and mailed to the 
address shown on the student registration form. 

Cancellation of credit courses by the College will result 
in total refund of fees collected for those courses. 

FINANCIAL AID 

Indiana Vocational Technical College offers various types 
of financial aid to students who need assistance to con- 
tinue their education. Students are encouraged to carefully 
survey the variety of financial aid options available. 
Students must be accepted for admission to the Col- 
lege in an eligible program. Full-time and part-time stu- 
dents may be eligible. Financial aid is available to eligible 
students regardless of age. The Office of Financial Aid 
will help with information concerning student aid programs. 

Some aid programs are administered by the College 
Financial Aid Office under the policies and guidelines 
established by the state and federal governments; other 
programs are administered directly by a state or federal 
agency or outside organization. A few programs may 
be available on a regional basis only. Eligibility for most 
financial aid at Ivy Tech is based upon the student's 
demonstrated financial need. To qualify for any form of 



financial aid the student must complete either the Financial 
Aid Form (FAF) or the Application for Federal Student 
Aid (AFSA) each year and meet additional eligibility 
requirements (i.e., citizenship or permanent resident status, 
draft compliance, satisfactory academic progress). 
Additional information concerning federal, state and college 
financial aid is available in the financial aid brochure. 

Grants and Scholarships 

Following are the various forms of aid available to Ivy 
Tech students. 

Pell Grants 

Pell Grants represent the largest federal student assist- 
ance program for Ivy Tech students. Since the grant is 
based on the student's need, enrollment status, and 
cost of education at Ivy Tech, the amount may vary from 
semester to semester. To apply, the student should file 
the Application for Federal Student Aid or the College 
Scholarship Service Financial Aid Form available at any 
Ivy Tech Financial Aid Office. The Pell Grant applicant 
will receive a copy of the Student Aid Report in the mail. 
The Student Aid Report must be presented to the Financial 
Aid Office before or at the time the student enrolls in 
order to determine the amount of the grant. 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity 
Grant (SEOG) 

SEOG is a federally funded student aid program which 
enables colleges to make grants to financially needy 
students to assist in the payment of educational costs. 
Applicants must file the Application for Federal Student 
Aid or the Financial Aid Form to establish eligibility. 
Since the amount of SEOG funds allocated to the Col- 
lege by the federal government is limited, awards vary 
each year. 

Hoosier Scholar Program 

The State Student Assistance Commission of Indiana 
may award from one to three scholarships per high school, 
based on the size of the graduating class. Candidates 
are nominated by their high schools. The Hoosier 
Scholarship is a one-time, nonrenewable merit award 
in the amount of $500 for one academic year. 

Higher Education Award Program (HEA) 

Residents of Indiana may apply for Higher Education 
Awards (formerly called State Grants). Applicants must 
file the Financial Aid Form by March 1 preceding their 
enrollment for the following fall semester. Awards are 
based on demonstrated financial need. Recipients of 
HEA awards must be enrolled full-time each semester 
in order to be eligible to receive the grant. 



College Information and Services 



Lilly Endowment Educational Awards 

Lilly Endowment Educational Awards are intended to 
help meet remaining financial need after federal and 
state dollars are applied. Applicants must file the Finan- 
cial Aid Forms by March 1 preceding the enrollment for 
the following fall semester. Recipients of Lilly awards 
must be enrolled full-time each semester in order to be 
eligible to receive the grant. 

Ivy Tech and Foundation Scholarships 

Many Ivy Tech regions award scholarships provided by 
the Ivy Tech Foundation and local civic and service 
organizations. Students should contact the regional 
Financial Aid Office for details concerning availability 
of these scholarships. 

Ivy Tech Grants — in — Aid Program 

Ivy Tech provides an extensive grants-in-aid program. 
Each Ivy Tech Regional Center has a fee remission 
grant fund for students with special needs arising from 
unusual circumstances. Fee remissions are available 
under five separate programs: 



Ivy Tech Grant 


awarded on the basis of need. 


Ivy Tech 


awarded on the basis of merit. 


Award 




Ivy Tech 


new students' grants awarded 


Part-time 


to first-time students enrolling 




in 1 -5 credit hours. 


Statutory Fee 


provided to certain groups of 


Remissions 


students such as children of 




Disabled Veterans or orphans of 




deceased police and firefighters 




as determined by the Indiana 




Legislature. 


Out-of-State 


may be available in certain 


Fee 


cases to deserving students 


Remissions 


who are residents of other 




states but live in counties which 




are contiguous to Ivy Tech loca- 




tions in Indiana. 



amount of the student's financial need, the student's 
class schedule, and the student's family or personal 
obligations. The starting hourly rate will be at least the 
federal minimum wage level. Employment may consist 
of, but is not limited to, secretarial and clerical office 
work, maintenance or custodial work, duties in the Learning 
Resource Center (LRC), or work as lab assistants. Where 
possible, students are offered work — study assign- 
ments in areas related to their career objectives. 

State of Indiana Summer Work — Study 
Program 

Ivy Tech participates with the State Student Assistance 
Commission of Indiana in the administration of a state- 
funded Summer Work-Study program for full-time financial 
aid students who are residents of Indiana. The purpose 
of this program is to increase employment opportuni- 
ties in order to meet the remaining financial needs of 
students who have received state-funded grants and 
scholarships. 

Stafford Loans 

Students who attend classes on at least a half-time 
basis may borrow up to $2,625 per year from private 
lenders, such as commercial banks, savings and loan 
associations, or credit unions. The Federal government 
determines the interest rate on a Stafford loan. Cur- 
rently the rate is 8 percent. The federal government 
pays the interest on the loan to the lender during the 
time the student is in school, provided the borrower has 
met certain criteria set by the federal government for 
the interest subsidy. 

Students begin repayment six months after gradua- 
tion or reduction of class load to fewer than six credit 
hours. Applications for Stafford Loans may be obtained 
from any Ivy Tech Financial Aid Office or from the stu- 
dent's hometown bank, savings and loan association, 
credit union, or other financial institution. The regional 
Financial Aid Office must complete a portion of the loan 
application and approve it before it can be forwarded 
to the lender for processing. 



EMPLOYMENT AND LOANS 

Federal College— Work— Study Program 

The federally funded College-Work-Study Program 
provides part-time employment to students who need 
financial assistance. Job assignments may be within 
the College or in public non-profit agencies in the com- 
munity. The student is required to submit the AFSA or 
the FAF to the Office of Financial Aid, which will coor- 
dinate the job placement, taking into consideration the 



Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students 
(PLUS)/SLS 

The PLUS/SLS program is intended to assist students 
and parents in financing education when all other types 
of financial assistance have been denied or exhausted. 
An independent undergraduate student is eligible to borrow 
a maximum of $6,625 per year through the PLUS/SLS 
and Stafford programs combined. 

Parents of dependent undergraduate students may 
be eligible to borrow a maximum of $4,000 in addition 



6 



College Information and Services 



to the $2,625 that the student may be eligible to borrow 
under the Stafford Loan Program. The interest rate is 
currently 12 percent, and repayment begins within thirty 
to sixty days after the loan is made. The federal gov- 
ernment does not pay an interest subsidy on this loan. 

Veterans' Benefits 

Students who served in the armed forces may be eli- 
gible for veterans' benefits. The Veterans Administra- 
tion, and, in many instances, the Department of Defense, 
determine eligibility for veterans. 

The amount of monthly educational allowance will 
depend on (1) enrollment status and (2) individual en- 
titlement of each veteran. 

The veteran should meet with the Veteran Affairs 
Coordinator at the campus of his or her choice at the 
earliest possible date. The College is responsible for 
reporting the attendance of veterans and certifying that 
they are making reasonable progress toward an edu- 
cation objective. 

Selected Reserve Educational 
Assistance Program 

Members of the U.S. Army Reserve, Naval Reserve, Air 
Force Reserve, Marine Corps Reserve, Army National 
Guard or Air National Guard may be eligible for benefits 
under Chapter 106 of the VA Regulations. Eligible stu- 
dents should contact any of Ivy Tech's Student Services 
offices for additional information and applications. 

Child of Disabled Veteran (CDV) Benefits 

Children of deceased or disabled veterans may be eli- 
gible for veterans' benefits. Students should contact the 
Ivy Tech regional Office of Student Services for further 
information and assistance in applying for benefits. 

Indiana residents who are the children of deceased 
or disabled veterans, or of veterans awarded the Purple 
Heart, may be eligible for a fee waiver at Ivy Tech if the 
parent's death, disability, or Purple Heart award occurred 
as a result of military service during wartime. Inquiry 
concerning this benefit may be made at the Ivy Tech 
regional Office of Student Services. 



OTHER SOURCES OF FINANCIAL 
ASSISTANCE 

Police and Fire Fighters' Orphans 
Benefits 

Children of deceased, regularly paid, law enforcement 
officers and fire fighters are eligible for a fee waiver if 
the parent's death occurred in the line of duty. The fee 



waiver is granted only to full-time students under the 
age of 23. Certification from the appropriate agency 
must be presented to the College in order to obtain the 
fee waiver. 

Vocational Rehabilitation 

Students with disabilities that may be considered hand- 
icaps to employment may qualify for benefits through 
the Indiana Rehabilitation Services Board. The local 
office of the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) 
establishes the conditions of eligibility and awards 
assistance, based on individual need. The DVR expects 
students to apply for the Pell Grant and other forms of 
financial aid through the school. However, if these 
resources are not sufficient to meet their needs, the 
DVR may provide additional funding. Further informa- 
tion is available from the local DVR counselor. 

Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) 

Students from economically disadvantaged back- 
grounds may be able to obtain assistance in acquiring 
vocational training or in upgrading occupational skills 
through the Job Training Partnership Act as imple- 
mented in October 1983. For further information, the 
student should contact the local Private Industry Coun- 
cil (PIC) Office. 

Trade Readjustment (TRA) 

The Trade Readjustment Act provides full tuition and 
fees, books, and supplies to eligible students. Students 
should check with their local Indiana Employment Security 
Division to determine eligibility. 

Employer Funded Education 

Many employers are willing to fund courses taken at Ivy 
Tech in full or in part when the training offered relates 
to the employee's job responsibilities. Interested stu- 
dents should contact their employers to determine if 
such an arrangement can be made. 

Industry — Union Training Funds 

Many unions have training funds available for mem- 
bers. Interested students should contact their union 
regarding availability of training funds for use at Ivy Tech. 



APPLICATION PROCEDURES FOR 
FINANCIAL AID 

Application forms are available in the Financial Aid Office 
at all Ivy Tech regional locations. Because application 
procedures, deadlines, eligibility regulations, and refund 
policies vary with different types of student aid pro- 
grams, interested students are encouraged to contact 



College Information and Services 



the Financial Aid Office at their earliest opportunity. 
Students should allow from six to eight weeks process- 
ing time for most financial aid programs although stu- 
dents are encouraged to apply for assistance at any 
time. The fall semester marks the beginning of the financial 
aid award year. 

APPEALS— FINANCIAL 
ASSISTANCE 

The following steps are recommended to the student 
who feels that he or she has received unfair treatment 
in the financial assistance process: 

1 . Schedule a personal conference with the regional 
Financial Aid Manager to discuss and resolve the 
issue. 

2. If Step 1 is unsatisfactory, schedule a consulta- 
tion with the regional Director of Student Services. 

3. If Step 2 is unsatisfactory, schedule a conference 
with the Student Status Committee. This com- 
mittee will make a recommendation to the regional 
Vice President/Dean to resolve the issue. 

STUDENT RECORDS 

Ivy Tech maintains an educational record for each stu- 
dent who is, or has been, enrolled at Ivy Tech. In 
accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy 
Act of 1974, as amended, the following student rights 
are covered by the Act and afforded to all students at 
Ivy Tech: 

1 . The right to inspect and review information con- 
tained in the student's educational records. 

2. The right to challenge the contents of their edu- 
cational records. 

3. The right to a hearing if the outcome of the chal- 
lenge is unsatisfactory. 

4. The right to submit an explanatory statement for 
inclusion in the educational record if the outcome 
of the hearing isunsatisfactory. 

5. The right to prevent disclosure, with certain 
exceptions, of personally identifiable information. 

6. The right to secure a copy of the institutional policy. 

7. The right to file complaints with the Department 
of Education concerning alleged failures by Ivy 
Tech to comply with the provisions of the Act. 

Each of these rights, with any limitations or excep- 
tions, is explained in the institutional policy statement, 
a copy of which may be obtained in the Office of Stu- 
dent Services. 

At the discretion of College officials, Directory Infor- 
mation may be provided in accordance with the provi- 



sions of the Act without the written consent of the student 
unless the student requests, in writing, that such infor- 
mation not be disclosed (see below). The items listed 
below are designated as Directory Information and may 
be released for any purpose at the discretion of Ivy Tech 
unless a request for nondisclosure is on file: 

Category I. Name, address, telephone number, dates 
of attendence. 

Category II. Previous institution(s) attended, major 
field of study, awards, honors, degree 
conferred. 

Category III. Past and present participation in offi- 
cally recognized sports and activities, 
physical factors of athletes (height and 
weight), date and place of birth. 

Students may request the withholding of Directory 
Information by notifying the Office of the Registrar in 
writing, specifying the categories to be withheld, within 
ten (10) calendar days from the first scheduled day of 
the term. Ivy Tech will honor the request for one term 
only; therefore, the student must file the request on a 
term basis. The student should carefully consider the 
consequences of any decision to withhold any category 
of Directory Information. Regardless of the effect upon 
the student, Ivy Tech assumes no liability for honoring 
a student's request that such information be withheld. 
Failure on the part of a student to request the with- 
holding of specific categories of Directory Information 
indicates the student's approval of disclosure. 

In addition, student records are held in security by 
the College. Transcripts on file with the College from 
high schools and other institutions of higher education 
cannot be released by Ivy Tech. A student needing a 
transcript from high school or another college should 
request it directly from that institution. 

The Office of Student Services will assist students 
wishing to see and review their academic records and 
student files. Any questions concerning the student's 
rights and responsibilities under the Family Educa- 
tional Rights and Privacy Act should be referred to the 
Office of Student Services. 



DEPENDENCY PROVISION 

Ivy Tech reserves the right, as allowed under the Fed- 
eral Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, to dis- 
close educational records or components thereof, without 
written consent to parents of dependent students as 
defined according to the Internal Revenue Code of 
1 954, Section 1 54 (as amended). However, All Ivy Tech 
students will be assumed to be "independent. " A cer- 
tified copy of the parents' most recent Federal Income 



8 



College Information and Services 



Tax Form establishing the student's dependency status 
shall be required before any educational records or 
components thereof will be released to the parent of 
any student. 



ACADEMIC GRADING 

The academic grading system has both grades and status 
codes. Grades reflect the quality of performance and 
level of competency achieved by students who com- 
plete a course. Formal grades will be assigned both in 
the middle of fall and spring semesters (at the discre- 
tion of the technical institute or major instructional cen- 
ter), and at the end of each enrollment period. Instructors 
determine and assign grades and status based on objective 
appraisal and evaluation of students' performances. 
Semester grade reports are sent to each student. The 
semester grade report is not sent to students who still 
owe fees. 

In all courses, the quality of the student's work is 
important in determining the grade given. For some 
courses, quantity of work, speed of work, or both, are 
considered in determining the grade. Class participa- 
tion may also be considered by instructors in awarding 
grades. 

In certain instances, a status code will appear on the 
student's record in place of a grade. Status represents 
a condition to which no letter grade can be assigned. 

Grades 

The quality of student performance or competency level, 
as determined by the instructor at the completion of a 
course, is indicated by a letter grade of A, B, C, D, or 
F. Each designation has a numerical value per credit 
hour, referred to as "quality points." The meaning and 
quality point value per credit hour of each letter grade 
are shown in the table below: 

Grade Points 

Status Per Credit 

A Outstanding achievement 4 

B Above average work 3 

C Average work 2 

D Poor, Below average work 1 

F Failing work 

Status Codes 

Status codes describe the state or condition of a course 
appearing on the student's record that has not received 
a grade. Status code indications carry no grade points. 
The types of status codes and the symbols used to 
indicate them are shown below: 



Status 

I Incomplete 

AU Audit 

S Satisfactory 

U Unsatisfactory 

T Transfer 

V Verified Competency 

NW No-Show Withdrawal 

W Withdrawal 

These non-grades are used for the following reasons: 

I — Incomplete 

"I" designations are received by students who have actively 
pursued a course and are doing passing work at the 
end of the course, but who have not completed the final 
examination and/or other specific course assignments. 

To remove an "I" designation, a student must meet 
with the instructor to make arrangements to complete 
the course work. The instructor must submit the grade 
within 30 calendar days after the end of the term in 
which the student received the "I" designation. 

AU— Audit 

Audit (AU) status indicates enrollment in a course for 
no grade or credit. The fees for audited courses are the 
same as those for courses taken for credit. Audit status 
must be declared no later than the end of the first week 
of classes with approval of the Instructor or Program 
Chairperson. 

NW— No— Show Withdrawal 

Instructors will authorize the Registrar to withdraw a 
student from any course for which the student did not 
report for the first two weeks of the semester and failed 
to notify the instructor of intention to continue. This 
administrative action will be reflected on the official class 
list. No refund will be processed. A petition for a refund, 
with documentation for extenuating circumstances, can 
be filed at the Business Office. 

Students can petition to be reinstated by receiving 
the approval of the instructor and completing the drop/ 
add process. 

W— Withdrawal 

A "W" status code will be used for student and aca- 
demic withdrawals. 

Student Withdrawal (W) is a terminal status, referring 
to voluntary student withdrawal by a student beginning 
at the start of the third week of the course up to the 
end of the week marking the completion of 75 percent 
of the course. To be considered officially withdrawn from 



College Information and Services 



a course, the student must file a withdrawal form at the 
Student Services Office. 

After 75 percent of the term has elapsed, a student 
may withdraw (with the same result as indicated above) 
only if documented extenuating circumstances are 
submitted to, and approved by, the Chief Administrative 
Officer or his/her designee. The "W" status code des- 
ignation will be entered on the students' academic records. 

Instructors may also recommend that a student receive 
a "W" status code for student nonparticipation in class 
or student disciplinary reasons, with final approval from 
the Program Chairperson. 

S — Satisfactory 

The "S" indicates satisfactory completion of course work 
in situations where either a status of satisfactory or 
unsatisfactory (pass/fail) has been arranged by prior 
agreement. Requests for this type of grading— S/U— 
must be declared at time of registration. 

U — Unsatisfactory 

The "U" indicates unsatisfactory completion of course 
work in situations where either a status of satisfactory 
or unsatisfactory (pass/fail) has been arranged by prior 
agreement. Requests for this type of grading — S/U — 
can only be made for non-program related courses and 
must be declared at time of registration. The "U" differs 
from an "F" in that quality points are not computed. 

T — Transfer 

Transfer (T) status indicates acceptance by Ivy Tech of 
credit earned at other accredited postsecondary insti- 
tutions. Transfer credit for grades of A, B, or C can be 
granted upon evaluation for equivalency and rele- 
vance. The final authority for T credit rests with the 
Chief Academic Officer. 

V— Verified Competency 

The "V" indicates satisfactory completion of course work 
in situations such as test-out, credit for experience or 
training, College Level Examination Program (CLEP), 
and so forth. Credit gained through this method may 
be used to satisfy degree requirements. This status is 
approved by the Chief Academic Officer upon recom- 
mendation of faculty advisor, following completion of 
necessary verification and documentation of competency. 

CREDIT HOURS 

Credit is described in semester hours (the number of 
credits taken per semester). The number of credits is 
determined by the demands of the course, course work 



and by the number of contact hours — the hours actually 
spent in the classroom or laboratory. 

Credit Hours/Load 

A credit hour represents one hour of lecture, two hours 
of laboratory or three hours of clinical instruction 
per week for the semester. A three credit hour lecture 
course, for example, meets 48 hours during the semes- 
ter (3X16). 

An average full-time class load per semester in most 
Ivy Tech programs consists of 12 — 15 credit hours. To 
take a class load of more than 1 7 credit hours, a student 
must have the approval of the Chief Academic Officer 
or his/her designee. 

Enrollment Status 

Enrollment status is determined by registered total 
semester credits: 
Full — time student 



3/4 time 
1/2 time 



12 or more credits per 

semester 

9 — 1 1 credits per semester 

6 — 8 credits per semester 



Less than 1/2 time 1—5 credits per semester 

A first-year student, by definition is one who has com- 
pleted fewer than 30 semester credit hours; a second- 
year student is one who has completed 30 or more 
semester credit hours. 

Quality Points 

Quality points are numerical values indicating the qual- 
ity of student performance in credit courses: A =4; B = 3; 
C = 2; D = 1 ; F = 0. The quality points earned for a course 
equal the quality point value times the number of cred- 
its. A student who earns an "A" in a 4-credit course 
earns 1 6 quality points: the quality point value (4) X the 
number of credits (4) = total quality points (16). 

Grade Point Averages 

The Grade Point Average (GPA) is a numerical indi- 
cation of the student's performance in all courses earn- 
ing quality points. The GPA is obtained by dividing the 
number of quality points earned by the number of cred- 
its earned. The term and cumulative GPA, calculated 
to three decimal places, will appear on each grade report. 

Under extenuating circumstances, a student may petition 
the Academic Status Committee to exclude up to fif- 
teen (15) semester hours of course work from the 
cumulative GPA calculation. Course statistics that are 
excluded from the cumulative GPA calculation as a result 
of a petition will not be counted as earned and cannot 
be used to satisfy program requirements for degree 



10 



College Information and Services 



declared students. Please see the Office of Student 
Services for additional information. 

Converting Hours Earned and Attempted 
and GPA from Quarters to Semesters 

To convert cumulative quarter earned and attempted 
hours to cumulative semester earned and attempted 
hours, multiply the cumulative hours by .7 and round 
up to the nearest whole number. For example, the stu- 
dent has earned 67 quarter hours at the end of fall 
quarter 1 989 (8902) . The semester hours should reflect 
47 hours earned (67 quarter hours earned x .7 = 46.9 
semester hours earned and rounded up to 47). This 
calculation will only be undertaken on the cumulative 
credit hours earned and attempted for all quarters of 
the student's tenure (i.e., the calculation will not be done 
on a quarter by quarter basis). 

To calculate semester quality points, multiply the 
semester hours earned (rounded up) calculated above 
by the student's cumulative GPA and round up to the 
nearest whole number. For example, the above student 
has a 2.50 cumulative GPA. Multiply 47 semester hours 
earned X 2.50 cumulative GPA = 117.5 rounded up to 
1 18 for the student semester quality points. 

To calculate semester GPA, divide cumulative semester 
quality points by cumulative semester hours earned. 
Calculating on the above, 118 semester grade points 
divided by 47 semester hours earned = 2.51 semester 
GPA. (Rarely will the semester GPA equal the quarterly 
GPA. The student will benefit by this calculation.) 

Improving a Grade 

Students, with the approval of faculty advisors, may 
attempt to improve D or F grades by repeating courses 
(allowable once in most programs). Financial Aid recip- 
ients, however, should review their situations carefully 
since payment for repeated courses can be disallowed. 
Permanent student records contain complete files on 
all activity. The student's grade point average will reflect 
the highest grade earned. 

Dean's List 

The Dean's List, prepared and published each semes- 
ter, gives recognition to students who achieve a mini- 
mum 3.50 grade point average or higher with no F's 
while earning 12 or more credits during the semester. 

Grade Reports 

Final grades are mailed to the address on the registra- 
tion form. Grade reports are not sent if there are out- 
standing financial obligations to the College. 



Attendance 

Regular attendance is expected at scheduled class 
meetings or other activities assigned as part of a course 
of instruction. Attendance records are kept by instructors. 

If personal circumstances may occasionally make it 
impossible to attend scheduled classes and activities, 
the College expects the student to confer with instruc- 
tors in advance when possible. Instructors can offer 
students the option of making up the material missed. 
When circumstances are unforeseen, students should 
consult with instructors to arrange make-up work, if 
possible. 

Absences may be considered by instructors in awarding 
grades and considering involuntary withdrawal. Stu- 
dents who must interrupt their Ivy Tech training to fulfill 
Reserve and National Guard annual tour requirements 
should present official military orders to their instruc- 
tors prior to departure for duty. Students are not excused 
from completion of the course work and should make 
arrangements with their instructors to complete all work. 

STANDARDS OF PROGRESS 

Students who have declared a certificate or degree 
objective and who have fifteen (15) or more cumulative 
credit hours attempted must maintain a 2.00 minimum 
cumulative grade point average (GPA) to be considered 
in satisfactory academic standing. Students receiving 
financial aid must demonstrate satisfactory progress 
toward completion of a program within a specified time 
frame, based on their enrollment status. Also, students 
must successfully complete the minimum number of 
credit hours required for that status each semester. All 
students are expected to maintain a cumulative 2.00 
GPA for graduation eligibility. Questions on maintaining 
standards of progress and academic standing should 
be addressed to the Office of Student Services. 

Special Problems 

The Director of Student Services is available to help 
with special problems, granting exceptions, and filing 
grievances (see Student Grievances). Special prob- 
lems, exceptions, and grievances are ultimately the 
responsibility of the Chief Administrative Officer of the 
region and designated staff and committees. 



GRADUATION 

The Associate in Science degree, the Associate in Applied 
Science degree, or Technical Certificate is awarded by 
the College to students who meet graduation and cer- 
tification eligibility requirements. Graduation ceremo- 



College Information and Services 



11 



nies are held at least once a year. Graduating students 
are charged a fee to cover the cost of the ceremonial 
cap and gown. 

A student is considered eligible for graduation when 
the requirements for graduation and certification have 
been fulfilled at the selected program level. Each stu- 
dent entering the final semester of training prior to grad- 
uation will complete an Application for Graduation form. 
The application will be certified by the student's pro- 
gram advisor and forwarded to the Office of Student 
Services, where the appropriate diploma will be prepared. 

To graduate with an Associate in Science or an Asso- 
ciate in Applied Science degree, the student must: 

1 . attain a minimum grade point average of 2.0 in 
the required technical and general education 
courses, with not more than one course in each 
of these areas at a "D" or lower performance level; 

2. complete successfully all courses within certifi- 
cation requirements with a minimum grade point 
average of 2.0; 

3. earn the last 1 5 credits as a regular student of Ivy 
Tech, rather than by test-out or other means of 
advanced placement; 

4. complete successfully the Ivy Tech certification 
requirements; 

5. satisfy all financial obligations to the College. 

To graduate with a Technical Certificate, the student 
must: 

1 . attain a minimum grade point average of 2.0 in 
the required technical courses with not more than 
one course at a "D" or lower performance level; 

2. complete successfully all courses within certifi- 
cation requirements with a minimum grade point 
average of 2.0; 

3. earn the last 1 5 credits as a regular student of Ivy 
Tech, rather than by test-out or other means of 
advanced placement; 

4. complete successfully the Ivy Tech certification 
requirements; 

5. satisfy all financial obligations to the College. 

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES 

Career Counseling 

The Office of Student Services in each region offers 
counseling to all interested students. Students may obtain 
individual counseling and/or assessment to assist them 
in identifying their abilities or occupational interests. 
Counseling and assessments are also helpful in devel- 



oping realistic education and career plans and occu- 
pational outlook data. Students are encouraged to seek 
assistance in selecting an occupation and the neces- 
sary training by contacting the Office of Student Services. 

In addition to the counseling program offered by the 
Office of Student Services, the College utilizes a fac- 
ulty advisor system. On admission, each degree stu- 
dent is assigned a faculty advisor, whose purpose is to: 

1. assist the student in course selection and pro- 
gram planning; 

2. guide the student in meeting the requirements for 
graduation as prescribed by the College; 

3. insure that appropriate technical and general 
education electives are included in the chosen 
course of study. 

Placement 

Candidates for graduation who desire placement 
assistance should contact the Office of Student Serv- 
ices, which will: 

1 . advise candidates of the College placement services; 

2. distribute registration forms for the placement service; 

3. provide occupational information, including 
employment trends and local and state occupa- 
tional outlook data; 

4. assist the registered candidate in preparing a packet 
of credentials for use in finding a job. The packet 
may include: 

a. a resume of the candidate's education and 
employment experience; 

b. personal letters of recommendation verifying 
the student's employability; 

5. create folders containing original copies of the 
candidate's credentials for all registered candidates; 

6. prepare copies of credentials released by the 
candidates for referral to prospective employers. 
Alumni may update their credentials whenever they 
wish to use the placement service. 

Students registered with the College Placement Office 
will be informed of employment opportunities known to 
the regional Placement Offices. 

Employers who register with the Placement Office 
are given the names of all qualified candidates without 
regard to sex, race, age, national origin, or handicap. 
Registered students are eligible for interviews with 
appropriate prospective employers. 

Library 

The library at each region is a Learning Resource Cen- 
ter (LRC). New acquisitions are carefully selected to 



12 



College Information and Services 



augment the needs of the students in the technologies 
offered and for the skills advancement program. 

Special features of the LRC include career explora- 
tion materials, interlibrary loans, periodicals both gen- 
eral and technical in focus, leisure reading offerings, 
and audio-visual materials and equipment. Basic Skills 
Advancement centers are located in the LRCs or a related 
area. 

College Bookstore 

The College maintains a bookstore in each regional 
institute where students may buy textbooks and sup- 
plies. College sweaters, jackets, souvenirs, and other 
items may also be available for purchase. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Organizations and Activities 

The College recognizes the educational, recreational, 
and social values of student organizations and extra- 
curricular activities which complement the institution's 
academic programs. Students are encouraged to par- 
ticipate in any or all phases of the student activities 
program as long as participation does not interfere with 
studies. 

All student organizations operate under the policies 
and guidelines set for the College by the State Board 
of Trustees. Approval by the Student Senate and the 
administration is required of all student organizations 
seeking to make use of the College facilities. All approved 
organizations must be open for membership to all eli- 
gible candidates and must make available to the Stu- 
dent Senate all records of officers, membership, and 
financial transactions. 

Student Senate 

Students in each region are provided opportunities to 
participate in student government through membership 
in the Student Senate. The Student Senate is the rep- 
resentative governing body of the students. Student Senate 
representatives are elected or selected according to 
the bylaws of each regional Student Senate constitu- 
tion and serve as stated in those bylaws. 

The student body membership may consist of rep- 
resentatives of the first-year class, the second-year class, 
each program area and an advisor as established in 
the bylaws. 

The Student Senate was established by students to 
encourage participation in student government and to 
promote College spirit and recognition. The Student 
Senate exercises the authority, unless otherwise del- 



egated, to legislate on student matters, subject to the 
approval of appropriate College administrative offices. 

The constitutions of all student organizations must be 
approved by a quorum of the Student Senate, consist- 
ing of a simple majority of the total membership and 
one staff advisor, or as otherwise stated in the bylaws. 

The functions of the Student Senate include: 

1 . communication of bona fide concerns of the stu- 
dent body and suggestions for improvement to 
appropriate College officials; 

2. approval of those student organizations deemed 
beneficial to student life and worthy of being a 
part of the College; 

3. assurance that copies of the constitution, bylaws, 
and statement of purpose and objectives of each 
recognized student organization are on file in the 
Office of Student Services; 

4. referral of student grievances concerning disci- 
plinary matters or student status to the Commit- 
tee on Student Status; referral of other types of 
student grievances to appropriate College officials; 

5. planning and conducting of appropriate extracur- 
ricular student activities; 

6. submission of student activity budgets for review 
and approval by the regional administration. 

Intramural Sports 

College sports activities consist of intramural sports 
sponsored by the Student Senate. Leagues can be formed 
when student interest justifies their organization. All sports 
activities of the College must be approved and spon- 
sored by the Student Senate and the administration. 

Class Organizations 

The primary purpose of class organizations is to pro- 
mote classwide social activities and sports functions. 
Each first-and second-year class may elect a class 
president, vice-president, secretary-treasurer, class 
reporter, and representatives-at-large for the Student 
Senate. Class organizations must be sponsored by the 
Student Senate. 

Clubs 

Students wishing to organize hobby, social, or special 
interest clubs should submit proposals to the Student 
Senate, which will determine whether sufficient interest 
exists to form or continue a club. The Student Senate 
is authorized to charter the club upon approval by the 
administration. Each club must have the following elected 
officers: president, vice-president, secretary-treasurer, 



College Information and Services 



13 



club reporter, and a Student Senate representative. Each 
club must also have a staff advisor. 

Social Activities 

All group activities of the College must be approved 
and sponsored by the Student Senate and the admin- 
istration. Classes, clubs, and other groups should plan 
and conduct social activities pertaining specifically to 
their members. The Student Senate organizes and 
conducts social activities and gatherings in which all 
students and their guests may participate. 

Professional and Trade Societies 

Student chapters of various professional and trade 
societies will be formed in the same manner as other 
student organizations and are subject to the same 
requirements. 

Housing 

While Ivy Tech is a commuter campus and does not 
operate residence halls, the Student Services Office 
may be able to answer questions concerning housing. 
Ivy Tech accepts no responsibility for locating, approv- 
ing, or supervising local student housing. 

Student Parking 

As a part of registration, students may need to register 
their motor vehicles. Some campuses will require a parking 
sticker from the cashier's office. A special permit is required 
to park in the handicapped zone. Stickers are to be 
displayed in the vehicle while it is parked on campus 
and students are expected to park only in designated 
student parking areas. Vehicles improperly parked in 
areas reserved for the handicapped, visitors, or others 
may be towed away at the owner's expense. 

Student Insurance 

For students registered in credit courses at Ivy Tech, 
the College provides insurance in a designated amount 
for injuries sustained while participating in College- 
sponsored activities. The activity must take place on 
College premises or on any premises designated by the 
College. Students are also covered while traveling to 
and from College-sponsored activities as a member of 
a group under College supervision. 

It is the student's responsibility to report injuries promptly 
to the instructor or to the Office of Student Services. 

The insurance is for a specified minimum amount of 
coverage. It is not intended to replace insurance cov- 
erage students may already have. It is suggested that 
students review their own coverage. 

The Master Policy for this insurance is issued to Indi- 
ana Vocational Technical College and is on file at the 



office of the Director of Personnel Services at College 
Central Offices. The description of the hazards insured, 
benefits, and exclusions is controlled by the Master Policy. 
Should students have questions, they may contact the 
regional Office of Student services. 

An insurance company offers health insurance to Ivy 
Tech students. Insurance coverage is purchased directly 
from the insurance company by the student. Applica- 
tion forms and brochures explaining coverage and rates 
are available through Student Services during course 
registration periods. Coverages and rates are subject 
to change. 

Emergency Closing of Campus 

It is possible that severe weather conditions or other 
emergencies will make it necessary to close a campus. 
Each region has designated local radio stations that will 
announce information on closings. 



STUDENT RIGHTS AND 
RESPONSIBILITIES 

Standards of Conduct 

Students enrolled at Indiana Vocational Technical Col- 
lege are expected to conduct themselves in a mature, 
dignified, and honorable manner. The reputation of the 
College in the community depends in large part upon 
the behavior of its students. 

Students are subject to College jurisdiction on Col- 
lege matters while enrolled at Ivy Tech. The College 
reserves the right to take disciplinary action against any 
student whose conduct, in the opinion of Ivy Tech rep- 
resentatives, has not been in the best interests of other 
students or the College. Disciplinary action may consist 
of verbal reprimand, restitution for damages, restriction 
of privileges, suspension, or dismissal. Students, in turn, 
have the right of due process. 

All Ivy Tech students are expected to abide by the 
following College rules of conduct. 

College Rules 

1. ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Any student found 
guilty of drinking, being under the influence of, 
or possessing intoxicating beverages on Col- 
lege property is subject to disciplinary action and 
state law. 

2. ILLEGAL USE OF DRUGS The illegal use of drugs 
is strictly prohibited on College property. Any stu- 
dent found using, under the influence of, in pos- 
session of, or distributing illegal drugs is subject 
to disciplinary action and state law. 



14 



College Information and Services 



3. SMOKING Students may smoke in private offices, 
conference rooms, and other areas as desig- 
nated by the Vice President/Dean. Smoking is 
generally prohibited in carpeted areas and in posted 
"No Smoking" areas, in accordance with fire reg- 
ulations and consideration for campus environment. 

4. ASSEMBLY Persons shall not assemble in a manner 
that obstructs the free movement of others about 
the campus, inhibits the free and normal use of 
the College buildings and facilities, or prevents 
or obstructs the normal operations of the College. 

5. SIGNS Students may not erect signs on campus 
or display signs or posters, except on designated 
bulletin boards, without the authorization of the 
Vice President/Dean or designee. Also, students 
shall not deface, alter, tamper, destroy, or remove 
any sign or inscription on College property. 

6. SOLICITATION OF FUNDS No student or stu- 
dent organization may use campus facilities or 
schedule activities to solicit funds without the 
approval of the Vice President/Dean or designee. 

7. ARMS/DEADLY WEAPONS Firearms (except for 
those possessed by police officers) are strictly 
prohibited on College property or at any College- 
sponsored activity held elsewhere. Any student 
possessing deadly weapons at these locations 
is subject to disciplinary action. 

8. CHEATING Any student found cheating on papers 
or tests is subject to disciplinary action. Such action 
may be taken in accordance with College pro- 
cedures as deemed necessary by the instructor. 

9. COUNTERFEITING AND ALTERING Students 
shall not copy or alter, in any manner, shape, or 
form, any record, document, or identification form 
used or maintained by the College. 

10. THEFT OF PROPERTY Any theft of personal or 
College property will be treated as a violation of 
College rules. 

11. VANDALISM The destruction or mutilation of 
College books, magazines, equipment, or build- 
ings is prohibited. Such action may result in res- 
titution and/or other disciplinary measures. 

12. USE OF COLLEGE FACILITIES Students are 
permitted on campus during normal College hours 
and at other times established in the College 
calendar. Students wishing to utilize College 
facilities at other times must request permission 
from the Vice President/Dean or designee. 

13. FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY Students owing 
fees, fines, or loans shall not be permitted to 
register for a succeeding session. Grades, rec- 
ords, degrees, etc., will not be awarded until debts 
to the College are paid. 



14. MOTOR VEHICLES The College has estab- 
lished student, staff, and visitor parking areas. 
All persons are required to park in their respec- 
tively designated areas and to adhere to College 
parking regulations. Posted speed limits must 
be obeyed. 

Violations 

The College maintains jurisdiction over matters such 
as, but not limited to, alcoholic beverages, illegal use 
of drugs, smoking, financial responsibilities, motor vehicles, 
assembly, soliciting, use of College facilities, the post- 
ing or erection of signs, theft, arms/deadly weapons, 
cheating, counterfeiting, and vandalism. 

Students are protected from those who might violate 
laws and ordinances. Violators shall be subject to pros- 
ecution by the appropriate law enforcement officials. 

Anyone found in violation of College regulations shall 
be subject to disciplinary action by the College through 
due process procedures for student conduct violations. 
The Vice President/Dean designee in the Office of Stu- 
dent Services will make available copies of the student 
conduct regulations to all students not later than the 
first day of instruction. 

DUE PROCESS PROCEDURES FOR 
STUDENT CONDUCT VIOLATIONS 

1 . Cases or appeals of student misconduct and/or 
lack of academic integrity are to be referred to the 
appropriate designee of the Vice President/Dean 
or to the Chair of the Student Status Committee 
for evaluation. This College representative: 

a. will be responsible for all initial disciplinary 
procedures; 

b. may recommend temporary suspension of a 
student to the Vice President/Dean for a period 
of time until the Student Status Committee can 
meet. 

c. may recommend to the Vicfe President/Dean 
(on recommendation of the instructor) that a 
student be withdrawn from a course of program 
or from the College for disciplinary reasons. 

2. Students recommended for dismissal will be noti- 
fied by their advisors in writing. Students will be 
given an opportunity to appeal the decision of the 
Student Status Committee if they so choose. 

3. The Student Status Committee deals with all cases 
relating to disciplinary actions or the academic status 
of students. Each regional institute has a Student 
Status Committee that makes recommendations 
to the Vice President/Dean. 



College Information and Services 



15 



a. The Student Status Committee will be com- 
posed of at least six members, including two 
full-time instructional staff members and two 
administrative staff persons appointed by the 
Vice President/Dean of the region. The addi- 
tional two members will be students desig- 
nated by the Student Senate. The Committee's 
review and subsequent disposition of a formal 
complaint will begin no later than thirty (30) 
days after receipt of the written complaint. Staff 
legal counsel, as needed, will be available to 
the Committee. 

b. The Student Status Committee will assure the 
student due process. A written statement will 
be presented to the student by the chairman 
of the Student Status Committee. The student 
will be invited to speak on his or her own behalf. 

c. The Student Status Committee will issue a rec- 
ommendation to the Vice President/Dean fol- 
lowing its deliberation. Disciplinary probation 
or dismissal from the College will be final only 
after review by the Vice President/Dean, who 
may approve or disapprove the recommenda- 
tion of the Student Status Committee. (Stu- 
dents dismissed for disciplinary reasons will not 
be entitled to refunds.) 

d. The student will be informed in writing of the 
decision of the Student Status Committee and 
of the subsequent recommendations to the Vice 
President/Dean, whose decision is final. A copy 
of the written recommendations from the com- 



mittee will be filed in the student's folder in the 
Office of Student Services. 

e. If the student disagrees with the Student Status 
Committee recommendation, he or she may file 
a complaint with the regional Vice President/ 
Dean within 72 hours after notification of the 
Student Status Committee's decision. 

f. Exceptions to these rules may be made in 
extenuating circumstances at the discretion of 
the Vice President/Dean or his designee upon 
request by the party involved. 

Student Grievances 

Students may bring legitimate grievances to the atten- 
tion of their instructors or other advisors. Time will be 
provided for a grievance conference within two weeks 
of the complaint. The purpose of the conference is to 
discuss the problem and to find, if possible, a mutually 
satisfactory resolution. 

If the grievance concerns an instructor or an advisor, 
the student may request a conference with a depart- 
ment head, chairperson, the Director of Student Serv- 
ices, or the Director of Instruction, as deemed appropriate. 
The conference will be held within two weeks of notice 
of the complaint. 

The student who feels his or her grievance has not 
been adequately addressed by these methods may fol- 
low a prescribed grievance procedure. A full explana- 
tion of this procedure is available from the Office of 
Student Services. 




INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS 

In keeping with its mission and goals, the College serves people 16 years and older with edu- 
cational programs consistent with projected job requirements and personal interests. Ivy Tech 
programs complement secondary vocational, two-year engineering technology, four-year pro- 
grams, and basic adult education programs. The purposes of Ivy Tech's technology programs 
are to develop competent workers for initial employment, to upgrade the skills of those already 
employed, and to provide a foundation of thinking and analytical skills to meet the requirements 
of society's expanding knowledge base. Ivy Tech programs provide skills training and instruction 
in recent technological advancements and developments. 

Ivy Tech programs are designed to meet the needs of the student population, accommodating 
those who wish to enroll in a few classes as well as those who prefer a full program. Credit 
programs normally culminate in the Associate in Science degree, the Associate in Applied Sci- 
ence degree or the Technical Certificate. The College's 50 degree programs are offered in these 
four divisions: 

Business, Office and Information Systems Technologies; 
Visual Communications Technologies; 
Human Services and Health Technologies; 
Applied Science and Technologies. 

Short-term training is available in selected credit courses, in sequences of credit courses, and 
in custom-designed credit courses for local businesses and industries. Also available are con- 
tract training programs, and non-credit institutional activities, such as seminars, workshops, and 
conferences. 

In addition to program and custom-designed courses, Ivy Tech offers basic skills instruction 
for students who request or require academic support and/or study skills to assist them in suc- 
cessful completion of a regular program of study. Additionally, enrollment in certain basic skills 
courses are designed to prepare the student for the GED examination. 



Associate in Science (AS) Degree 
Programs 

Associate in Science Degree Programs prepare stu- 
dents for technical career opportunities and also enable 
students who have an interest and ability to transfer a 
predetermined amount of Ivy Tech credits to cooper- 
ating four-year institutions. The degree requires the 
satisfactory completion of a program of study repre- 
senting a planned progression of learning experiences. 
These technical programs emphasize cognitive skills 
intended as pre-baccalaureate study and provide courses 
equivalent to those prescribed in the lower division of 
the receiving four-year college or university. Students 
enrolling in the program are required to take the Gen- 
eral Education courses with a recognized four-year 
institution. 

On December 11,1 987, the Indiana Commission for 
Higher Education authorized an expansion of the Col- 
lege to offer an Associate in Science Degree. Currently 
the College has approval to award the Associate in Sci- 
ence Degree in Early Childhood Development, Nurs- 



ing, Computer Programming Technology, Commercial 
Art Technology, Accounting Technology, Marketing 
Technology and Architectural Drafting Technology at 
selected Ivy Tech sites. Students should contact Regional 
Instructional Offices to receive information about addi- 
tional transfer-oriented programs being developed at 
other Ivy Tech locations. 

Associate in Applied Science (AAS) 
Degree Programs 

Associate in Applied Science Degree Programs pre- 
pare students for career mobility within occupational 
clusters at the technician or technology level. The pro- 
grams offer training in recognized technologies and 
specialities with emphasis on analysis, synthesis, and 
evaluation. The program content, which is approxi- 
mately 75 percent technical and 25 percent general 
education, provides both depth and breadth in concep- 
tual and manipulative skills. The general education courses, 
offered in the areas of communications, humanities, 
mathematics, life and physical sciences, and social sci- 



16 



Instructional Programs 



17 



ences equip students with the occupation-related tech- 
nical and social skills they need to compete successfully 
in the job market. Elective courses, determined region- 
ally, provide flexibility in the programs to meet the spe- 
cific needs of local employers. 

Technical Certificate (TC) Programs 

The Technical Certificate Programs provide training in 
conceptual and manipulative skills for specific occu- 
pations. Each program contains a sequence of required 
courses in a recognized specialty within one of the 
technologies taught at the College. The program con- 
tent, which includes general education instruction, is 
designed to develop competency in the comprehension 
of and technical skills in that specialty. 

Short-Term Programs 

Ivy Tech provides short-term programs for individuals 
who desire to develop competencies in a specific area. 
These programs are less than 32 semester credits in 
length. Instruction is delivered through methods that 
include regular courses and specifically designed courses. 
Many of these courses are based on a sequence of 
learning experiences determined by a certifying state 
or national association or organization. Completion of 
certain short-term programs qualifies a student to sit 
for a certification exam in a specific area. The number 
and types of short-term programs vary among the Ivy 
Tech locations. 

Business and Industry 
Training Programs 

Ivy Tech offers specialized training services for busi- 
ness and industry. Directors of Business and Industry 
Training are responsible for the development of cus- 
tom-designed programs and services that meet the training 
needs of local businesses. Through its offices state- 
wide, the College provides training services in which 
Ivy Tech consults, designs, produces, conducts, and 
evaluates courses specifically prepared to satisfy employer 
needs, on a one-time or on-going basis. The Directors 
work with business and industry, trade unions, and public 
and community economic development groups to assess 
training needs and to deliver training when and where 
it is needed, often in-plant. 

The services provided by the Business and Industry 
Training programs help ensure that the skills of employ- 
ees of Indiana firms are current with changing tech- 
nology. Instruction that best meets a company's specific 
needs is delivered through methods that might include 
regular courses, short-term courses, seminars, confer- 
ences and the use of mobile computer labs. 



As the third largest of Indiana's public institutions of 
higher education, with more than 25 years of experi- 
ence in vocational and technical instruction, Ivy Tech 
has been and continues to be a leader in promoting 
Indiana's economic development by providing compre- 
hensive training services to Indiana businesses and 
industries. 

For detailed information, contact the Director of Busi- 
ness and Industry training at the Ivy Tech regional cen- 
ter near you. 

Basic Skills Advancement Program 

Ivy Tech technical institutes and major instructional centers 
offer Basic Skills instruction and services designed to 
prepare people with skills and attitudes that meet the 
General Education course entry requirements. In addi- 
tion, the Basic Skills Advancement Program offers 
assistance to help students get from "where they are" 
to "where they want to be." Ivy Tech Basic Skills courses 
are non-degreed credit courses, meaning the credit 
awarded does not count toward a degree/graduation. 

Services provided through the program include diag- 
nostic testing and assessment, financial aid counsel- 
ing, career counseling, placement services and instruction. 
The need for these services may be identified at the 
time of admission; however, a student may utilize any 
or all services upon encountering academic difficulty 
during a course of study. Professional Basic Skills 
Advancement instructors and laboratory technicians 
provide supplemental instruction in the areas of math, 
communications, sciences, GED preparation, and study 
skills. The delivery of instruction may be a Basic Skills 
Advancement course in a classroom setting, it may be 
offered to students one-on-one as tutorial assistance, 
or as a self-paced study in the Basic Skills Center. For 
further information about the College's Basic Skills 
Advancement Program, the student should contact either 
the Student Services offices or the Basic Skills Center. 

Programs 

On the following pages are the current listings of credit 
programs offered by Ivy Tech at College locations. Contact 
the center nearest to you for information concerning 
program offerings in your area. 



COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM 

Courses are identified by a three-letter prefix that designates the program area, followed by 
three numbers for course identification. Courses numbered in the 100 series are first year and 
200 series numbers indicate second year courses. Courses numbered 001 to 099 indicate Basic 
Skills Advancement Courses. 

Prefix Program Title 

Division of Business, Office and Information Systems Technologies 

ACC Accounting Technology 

CPT Computer Programming Technology 

CUL Culinary Arts Technology 

DSM Distribution Management 

HMM Hotel/Motel Management 

1ST Industrial Supervision Technology 

INF Information/Data Management 

MKT Marketing Technology 

LEG Paralegal Technology 

SEC Secretarial Sciences 

BUS Small Business Operations 

SPC Statistical Process Control Technology 

Division of Visual Communications Technologies 

AVC Commercial Video Technology 

ART Commercial Art Technology 

CIP Commercial Photography 

GRA Graphic Media Production Technology 

INT Interior Design Technology 

Division of Human Services and Health Technologies 

CCT Child Care Technology 

ECD Early Childhood Development 

DEN Dental Assistant 

FST Food Service Technology 

HCA Health Care Administration Technology 

HST Human Services Technology 

MEA Medical Assistant 

MLT Medical Laboratory Technician 

MHR Mental Health Rehabilitation Technology 

NUR Nursing, Associate of Science in 

PNU Nursing, Practical 

RAD Radiologic Technology 

RES Respiratory Care 

SUR Surgical Technology 

Division of Applied Sciences and Technologies 

AGR Agricultural Equipment 

AFS Applied Fire Science Technology 

AMT Automated Manufacturing Technology 

ABR Automotive Body Repair Technology 

AST Automotive Service Technology 

BAR Barbering Technology 

BCT Building Construction Technology 

CIJ College/Industry Job Title Program 

18 



Course Numbering System 19 



Prefix 


Program Title 


DPT 


Diesel Power Technology 


DCT 


Drafting/CAD Technology 


ELT 


Electronics Technology 


HEA 


Heating/Air Conditioning/Refrigeration Technology 


ILT 


Industrial Laboratory Technology 


IMT 


Industrial Maintenance Technology 


MTT 


Machine Tool Technology 


MIN 


Mining Operations Technology 


PMT 


Plastics Manufacturing Technology 


PTT 


Pollution Treatment Technology 


WLD 


Welding Technology 




Instructional Support 


BSA 


Basic Skills Advancement 


ENG 


Communications 


HUM 


Humanities 


MAT 


Mathematics 


SCI 


Life and Physical Sciences 


SOC 


Social Sciences 


IND 


Business and Industry 


REL 


Related Education 



DIVISION OF BUSINESS, OFFICE AND 
INFORMATION SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGIES 




Career opportunities in business and offices are expanding rapidly for those who 
have the technical skills to meet the demands of the automated office. Programs 
offered through Ivy Tech's Division of Business, Office, and Information Systems 
Technologies reflect the needs of Indiana businesses. The student is advised to 
contact the nearest center concerning specific course and program offerings. 

ACCOUNTING TECHNOLOGY 

The Accounting Technology program develops an understanding of accounting principles, busi- 
ness law, communications, business equipment, and related areas of study in the field. Instruc- 
tion is offered in computerized accounting systems. Technical skills in financial accounting, cost 
accounting, and tax preparation are emphasized. 

Typical duties in accounting include maintaining journals and ledgers, processing banking 
transactions, billing, preparing payroll, maintaining inventory records, purchasing, processing 
expense reports, preparing financial statements, and analyzing managerial reports. Position 
titles may include junior or staff accountant, junior auditor, cost accounting clerk, bookkeeper, 
payroll clerk, inventory clerk, accounts receivable clerk, accounts payable clerk, and financial 
management trainee. 

The Division of Business, Office and Information Systems Technologies offers an Accounting 
Technology program that leads to an Associate in Applied Science Degree. Technical Certificates 
are also available in specialized areas. 

Programs are offered in Anderson, Bloomington, Columbus, Evansville, Fort Wayne, Gary, 
Hammond, Indianapolis, Kokomo, Lafayette, Lawrenceburg, Logansport, Madison, Marion, Mun- 
cie, Richmond, Sellersburg, South Bend, Terre Haute, Valparaiso, and Warsaw. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 

Technical Courses (27 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title Semester Credits 

Accounting Principles I 3 

Accounting Principles II 3 

Business Law 3 

Income Tax I 3 

Intermediate Accounting I 3 

Intermediate Accounting II 3 

Cost Accounting I 3 

Electronic Spreadsheets in Business 3 

Introduction to Microcomputers 3 

Course (15 Credits) 

Title 

Elective (Regionally Determined) 3 

Elective (Regionally Determined) 3 

English Composition 3 

Speech 3 

Human Relations or 

Psychology or 

Sociology (Regionally Determined) 3 

Regional Electives (22 Credits) 22 

Total Credits 64 



21 



ACC 


101 


ACC 


102 


BUS 


102 


ACC 


105 


ACC 


201 


ACC 


202 


ACC 


203 


ACC 


213 


INF 


101 


General E 


iducati 


Prefix 


No. 


soc 


XXX 


MAT 


XXX 


ENG 


101 


ENG 


103 


soc 


101 


SOC 


102 


SOC 


104 



22 



Division of Business, Office and Information Systems Technologies 



ACCOUNTING TECHNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



ACC 101— ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES I 

3 Credits 

Introduces the fundamental principles, techniques, and 
tools of accounting. The mechanics of the accounting 
cycle include collecting, recording, summarizing, ana- 
lyzing, and reporting of information pertaining to serv- 
ice and mercantile enterprises. Internal control, deferred 
charges, notes and interest, valuation of receivables, 
payrolls, inventories, and plant assets are also covered. 

ACC 102— ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES II 

3 Credits 

Continues the study of accounting to include partner- 
ship and corporate accounting systems. Financial 
statements including the cash flow statement are pre- 
pared and analyzed. Topics covered include long-term 
liabilities and investments. Cost, managerial, branch and 
nonprofit accounting techniques may be introduced. 

ACC 105— INCOME TAX I 

3 Credits 

Offers an overview of federal income tax law for indi- 
viduals including: taxable income, capital gains and losses, 
adjustments, standard and itemized deductions, tax credits 
and appropriate tax forms. Also introduced are tax con- 
cepts needed by a sole proprietorship. 

ACC 106— PAYROLL ACCOUNTING 

3 Credits 

Covers the calculating and reporting of payroll includ- 
ing various federal and state withholding taxes, employer 
payroll taxes, typical insurance and other arrange- 
ments affecting the preparation of payroll registers and 
employees' earnings records. May include computer- 
ized payroll. 

ACC 107— ACCOUNTING FOR RECORDKEEPING 

3 Credits 

This course is for non-accounting majors, with special 
emphasis on the trade professions. The cash basis of 
recordkeeping for materials, payroll, depreciation and 
financial statements will be covered. Also included will 
be an introduction to the operation of petty cash funds, 
basic cash budgeting, and controlling cash through the 
use of a checkbook. The following may be covered: 
financial ratios, construction accounting methods, and 
computing customer estimates. 

ACC 108— CAREER ESSENTIALS OF 
ACCOUNTING 

3 Credits 

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of 



accounting as utilized in a variety of office settings. The 
course includes principles of debit and credit, double 
entry bookkeeping, use of journals and analyzing 
transactions. Uses of ledgers, posting procedures, petty 
cash, banking procedures, payroll, depreciation, work 
sheets, balance sheets, and income statements are 
covered as well. 

ACC 109— PERSONAL FINANCE 

3 Credits 

Examines the process of setting and achieving finan- 
cial goals. Emphasizes financial management, bud- 
geting for current expenses, projected cash flow and 
management of short and long-term credit. Includes 
use of insurance to reduce risks and vehicles for saving 
and investing. 

ACC 111— ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES LAB I 

1 Credit 

Presents a series of planned accounting learning prob- 
lems and activities to accompany concepts and theo- 
ries included in an accounting principles course. The 
touch-method of numeric input on a calculator may be 
introduced, and some computerized problems may be 
included. 

ACC 112— ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES LAB II 

1 Credit 

This course presents a series of planned accounting 
learning problems and activities designed to accom- 
pany concepts and theories included in the Accounting 
Principles II course. Computerized problems may be 
used. 

ACC 113— INCOME TAX ACCOUNTING LAB 

1 Credit 

This course presents a series of planned accounting 
learning problems and activities to accompany con- 
cepts and theories included in the Income Tax course. 
Computerized problems may be used. 

ACC 114— PAYROLL ACCOUNTING LAB 

1 Credit 

Presents a series of planned accounting learning prob- 
lems and activities designed to accompany concepts 
and theories included in the Payroll Accounting course. 
Computerized problems may be used. 

ACC 118— FINANCIAL CONCEPTS FOR 
ACCOUNTING 

3 Credits 

This course develops math skills needed in the busi- 



Accounting Technology 



23 



ness field and serves as a basis for course work in 
business. It includes the study of business applications 
using rational numbers, algebraic equations, time value 
of money concepts, and basic statistics. 

ACC 201— INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I 

3 Credits 

Studies accounting principles and applications at an 
intermediate level pertaining to the income statement 
and balance sheet, cash and short-term investments, 
receivables, inventories, plant assets and intangible assets. 
Included are analysis of bad debts, inventory valuation, 
repairs and maintenance, depreciation of plant assets 
and present value applications. 

ACC 202— INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II 

3 Credits 

Continues studies of Intermediate Accounting I and 
includes long-term investments, current and contingent 
liabilities, long-term debt, stockholders equity, special 
accounting problems and analysis, statement of cash 
flows and financial statement analysis. Also included 
are corporate capital and treasury stock transactions, 
dividends, earnings per share, accounting for income 
taxes, corrections of errors and creation of financial 
statements from incomplete records. 

ACC 203— COST ACCOUNTING I 

3 Credits 

Examines the manufacturing process in relation to the 
accumulation of specific cost of manufactured prod- 
ucts. Various cost accounting report forms, material, 
labor control, and allocation of manufacturing costs to 
jobs and departments are studied. 

ACC 204— COST ACCOUNTING II 

3 Credits 

Continuation of Cost Accounting I. Studies the master 
or comprehensive budget, flexible budgeting and cap- 
ital budgeting. Tools for decision making and analysis 
are emphasized. Human resource accounting is 
introduced. 

ACC 205— SEMINAR IN ACCOUNTING 

1 Credit 

Allows accounting students to pursue (a) specific area(s) 

of interest at a more advanced level in Accounting. 

ACC 206— MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING 

3 Credits 

This course provides an understanding of accounting 
records and management decision making, with topics 
including internal accounting records and quantitative 
business analysis. 



ACC 207— ACCOUNTING FOR GOVERNMENT 
AND NONPROFIT ENTITIES 

3 Credits 

This course will emphasize the similarities and differ- 
ences between government and nonprofit and com- 
mercial accounting methods and procedures. The student 
will be exposed to the basic fund accounting cycle for 
the general fund and other special funds. 

ACC 208— INCOME TAX II 

3 Credits 

Continues Income Tax I. Studies procedures and prob- 
lems pertaining to federal and state income tax laws 
for partnerships and corporations. Includes a review 
and a more in-depth study of concepts related to pro- 
prietorships covered in Income Tax I. 

ACC 209— AUDITING 

3 Credits 

Covers public accounting organization and operation, 
including internal control, internal and external audit- 
ing, verification and testing of the balance sheet and 
operating accounts and the auditor's report of opinion 
on the financial statements. 

ACC 210— MONEY & BANKING 

3 Credits 

Monetary and banking theories as they relate to pres- 
ent-day domestic and international problems. Topics 
include banking operations, price changes, interna- 
tional monetary relationships, and application of mon- 
etary and fiscal policy. 

ACC 212— BUSINESS FINANCE 

3 Credits 

Basic tools and techniques of financial analysis and 
management are introduced as are sources of financial 
and economic theory as applied to business finance. 
Included are conceptual materials related to valuation, 
capital structure formulation and risk-return considerations. 

ACC 213— ELECTRONIC SPREADSHEETS IN 
BUSINESS 

3 Credits 

Provides instruction in the use of all modules of a 
spreadsheet software package including spreadsheet, 
graphics, and database operations, applying these 
modules to business problems. The student will be 
instructed with an input-processing-output orientation 
and will develop user skills in quick, efficient business 
problem solving using electronic spreadsheet technology. 



24 



Division of Business, Office and Information Systems Technologies 



ACC 214— CONSUMER & COMMERCIAL CREDIT 

4 Credits 

Theory, principles, and practice of consumer and com- 
mercial credit related to business activity and eco- 
nomic impact are explored. Examines managerial functions 
of collecting and controlling credit to consumers and 
business. Emphasizes credit plans, credit and sales, 
short-term and intermediate credit, and legal aspects 
of credit. Intended for retail, service, wholesale, and 
manufacturing firms extending credit to clients. 

ACC 215— CREDIT PROCEDURES & 
COLLECTIONS 

3 Credits 

Examines credit as a means of extending purchasing 
power i.e., increased buying power, immediate use of 
money, merchandise, or services and delayed pay- 
ment. Concepts of credit, principles and methods of 
credit administration involving individuals and busi- 
nesses are examined. Includes information on credit 
policy, credit control, credit decision-making, and legal 
remedies. 

ACC 216— CREDIT MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Functions of acquiring cycle of credit and management 
function of control cycle are explored in seminar/project 
setting. Combines lectures, discussions, individual 
research and projects with written and oral presenta- 
tion of findings and results. 

ACC 217— INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING LAB I 

1 Credit 

This course presents a series of planned accounting 
learning problems and activities designed to accom- 
pany concepts and theories included in Intermediate 
Accounting I. Computerized problems may be used. 

ACC 218— INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING LAB II 

1 Credit 

This course presents a series of planned accounting 
learning problems and activities designed to accom- 
pany concepts and theories included in Intermediate 
Accounting II. Computerized problems may be used. 

ACC 219— COST ACCOUNTING LAB 

1 Credit 

This course presents a series of planned accounting 
learning problems and activities designed to accom- 
pany concepts and theories included in Cost Account- 
ing I. Computerized problems may be used. 



ACC 220— SPECIAL APPLICATIONS ACCOUNT- 
ING LAB I 

1 Credit 

This course presents a series of planned accounting 
learning problems and activities designed to accom- 
pany concepts and theories included in an accounting 
course. Computerized problems may be used. 

ACC 221— SPECIAL APPLICATIONS ACCOUNT- 
ING LAB II 

1 Credit 

This course presents a series of planned advanced 
accounting learning problems and activities designed 
to accompany concepts and theories included in an 
accounting course. Computerized problems may be used. 

ACC 222— ACCOUNTING SOFTWARE 
APPLICATIONS 

2 Credits 

Accounting problems will be solved using software sim- 
ilar to software currently being used in business. Planned 
learning activities will include installation, operation and 
analysis of an accounting software package. 

ACC 223— ADVANCED TOPICS IN ACCOUNTING 

2 Credits 

Discusses topics of current interest in accounting. Attention 
is given to special interest projects for students in 
accounting. Field trips, guest speakers, audio-visual 
activities, and seminars may be utilized. 

AC 224— CONSTRUCTION BIDDING 

3 Credits 

Examines bidding procedures, contract documents, 
contracts, bonds, and insurance. It also follows a for- 
mat of describing the materials and how the different 
types may affect the bid, installation procedures as they 
may affect the bid, the unit of measure of the work, 
estimating the quantity of materials, and the relation- 
ship of the specifications. 

ACC 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN ACCOUNTING 
TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 

ACC 298— FIELD STUDY/COOPERATIVE 
EDUCATION 

3 Credits 

The student will work at a job site that is specifically 



Accounting Technology 



25 



related to his/her career objectives. The course will be 
a field project within the framework of actual work 
experience in accounting. 

ACC 299— ACCOUNTING PRACTITIONERS' 
REVIEW SEMINAR 

3 Credits 

Prepares individual candidates for the Indiana State Board 
for Accountancy Accounting Practitioner's Examina- 
tion. Currently, this examination consists of the practice 



sections of the Uniform Certified Public Accountant (C.P.A.) 
Examination, which is given on the first Wednesday and 
Thursday afternoons in May and November. Because 
of the broad subject area covered and the constant 
revision of areas tested, as well as the difficulty of the 
examination, the emphasis of this course is to prepare 
the candidate to have a solid understanding of the cen- 
tral concepts of accounting and the ability to apply these 
concepts in unusual situations. 



COMPUTER PROGRAMMING TECHNOLOGY 

The two-year Computer Programming Technology program leads to an Associate in Applied 
Science Degree. It provides the student with a minimum of five (5) programming courses in two 
(2) languages and information in the areas of data processing techniques, computer operations, 
job control language and operating systems, systems analysis and design, business program- 
ming application, data communications and problem solving techniques. Additionally, the pro- 
gram offers instruction in effective written, oral, and interpersonal communications. 

The curriculum provides an integrated study of the theory and practice of data processing for 
business, industry, and other applications. Laboratory activities using a variety of equipment 
emphasize programming and software applications and hands-on experience. The practical 
hands-on teaching/learning approach develops the skills needed in the workplace. 

The program is directed toward preparing the computer information systems technician most 
commonly sought by businesses. It also provides resources for those individuals who wish to 
pursue selected courses only, in conjunction with another program of study or for the purpose 
of job upgrading. 

The Associate in Applied Science degree program requires 64 credits for completion. Technical 
Certificates are also available in specialized areas. An Associate in Science degree program is 
offered in Evansville, enabling a student to transfer to the University of Southern Indiana. Pro- 
grams are offered in Gary, Hammond, Valparaiso, South Bend, Warsaw, Fort Wayne, Lafayette, 
Kokomo, Logansport, Anderson, Muncie, Terre Haute, Indianapolis, Connersville, Richmond, 
Bloomington, Columbus, Madison, Evansville and Sellersburg. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (33 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



CPT 


101 


CPT 


102 


CPT 


103 


CPT 


104 


CPT 


201 


CPT 


202 


CPT 


203 


CPT 


204 


ACC 


101 


BUS 


101 


INF 


101 



Data Processing Fundamentals 

Introduction to COBOL Programming 

Logic and Documentation 

Operating Systems 

Advanced COBOL Programming 

Data Communications 

Systems Analysis and Design 

Systems Development with High-Level Tools 

Accounting Principles I 

Introduction to Business 

Introduction to Microcomputers 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



General Education Requirements (15 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title 

ENG 101 English Composition 

ENG 103 Speech 

SOC 101 Human Relations 

SCI 101 Physical Science 

MAT 109 Finite Math 

Regional Electives (16 Credits) 



Total Credits 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

16 

64 



26 



Computer Programming Technology 



27 



COMPUTER PROGRAMMING TECHNOLOGY COURSE 

DESCRIPTIONS 



CPT 101— DATA PROCESSING FUNDAMENTALS 

3 Credits 

Introduction to data processing and programming, with 
emphasis on hands-on computer experience. Exam- 
ines the role of data processing in an organization including: 
data processing applications, computer hardware and 
software, internal data representation, stored program 
concepts, systems and programming design, flow- 
charting, and data communications. 

CPT 102— INTRODUCTION TO COBOL 
PROGRAMMING 

3 Credits 

An introduction to COBOL (Common Business Ori- 
ented Language) with emphasis on developing struc- 
tured programming skills. Develops proficiency in applying 
the programming development cycle to elementary 
business problems. 

CPT 103— LOGIC AND DOCUMENTATION 

3 Credits 

Presents structured techniques for the efficient solu- 
tion of business related computer programming logic 
problems. Includes program flowcharting, pseudocod- 
ing, and hierarchy charts as a means of solving these 
problems. Documentation procedures include creating 
file layouts, print charts, program narratives, user doc- 
umentation, and system flowcharts for these business 
problems. 

CPT 104— OPERATING SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

Astudy of computer operating systems, purposes, structure 

and various functions. Covers comprehensive sets of 

language translators and service programs, operating 

under supervisory coordination of an integrated control 

program which form the total operating system of a 

computer. 

CPT 105— PRACTICAL COMPUTER OPERATIONS 

3 Credits 

Demonstrates workstation and minicomputer opera- 
tions including peripheral devices. Information is given 
on entire data processing area including job responsi- 
bilities, standards and run manuals, message control 
functions, documentation and backup procedures. 



CPT 106— UNIX V OPERATING SYSTEM 

3 Credits 

Studies the UNIX V Operating System and its use as 
a powerful time-sharing operating system. Includes basic 
UNIX commands, use of the visual editor, the UNIX 
directory structure and file management with SHELL 
commands. Offers opportunities to apply skills and 
knowledge in a laboratory environment. 

CPT 107— BASIC PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE 

3 Credits 

Provides an introduction to the basic concepts of pro- 
gram design and programming using the BASIC pro- 
gramming language. BASIC is the primary language for 
use with microcomputers. Some topics included are: 
basic arithmetic operations, accumulating and printing 
totals, comparing, array processing and interactive pro- 
gramming. This course offers students an opportunity 
to apply skills in a laboratory environment. 

CPT 201— ADVANCED COBOL PROGRAMMING 

3 Credits 

Continues topics introduced in Introduction to COBOL 
with more logically complex business problems. Devel- 
ops a higher level of COBOL proficiency as well as a 
greater familiarity with debugging techniques and the 
structured approach through class instruction and lab- 
oratory experience. 

CPT 202— DATA COMMUNICATIONS 

3 Credits 

Introduces the concepts of data communications in order 
to build a foundation of knowledge upon which to add 
the new technologies as they are developed. 

CPT 203— SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN 

3 Credits 

Provides instruction in creating or modifying a system 
by gathering details, analyzing the data, designing the 
system by creating solutions, and implementing and 
maintaining the system. 

CPT 204— SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT WITH 
HIGH— LEVEL TOOLS 

3 Credits 

Analyzes established and evolving methodologies for 

the development of business-oriented computer infor- 



28 



Division of Business, Office and Information Systems Technologies 



mation systems. Develops competencies in techniques 
that apply modern software tools to generate applica- 
tions directly, without requiring detailed and highly technical 
program writing efforts. 

CPT 205— DATABASE DESIGN 

3 Credits 

Introduces program applications in a database envi- 
ronment with emphasis on loading, modifying, and querying 
the database by means of a host language (COBOL). 
Discussed data structures; indexed and direct file orga- 
nizations; models of data, including hierarchical, net- 
work, and relational; storage devices, data administration 
and analysis; design; and implementation. 

CPT 206— COBOL III 

3 Credits 

Offers advanced study in COBOL programming, including 

programming with direct access devices and using the 

COBOL sort feature. Covers structured programming 

and documentation. Continues study of job control 

language. 

CPT 208— RPG II PROGRAMMING 
FUNDAMENTALS 

3 Credits 

Provides a general introduction to the RPG II program- 
ming language with emphasis on "hands on" program- 
ming experience. This course presents the most important 
features of the RPG II language — from input/output 
processing to applications requiring handling. Lan- 
guage concepts are introduced in class lecture and then 
applied by students in programming lab assignments. 

CPT 209— "C" PROGRAMMING 

3 Credits 

This course provides a basic understanding of the fun- 
damental concepts involved when using a low level 
development language. The emphasis is on logical pro- 
gram design using a modular approach involving task 
oriented program functions. The role of data types, storage 
classes and addressable memory locations is thor- 
oughly discussed. Since C is a language quite unlike 
anything most students have been exposed to, the phi- 
losophy of this course is to provide a sound foundation 
of fundamental concepts such as the C function and 
the proper use of pointers. 

CPT 210— ASSEMBLER LANGUAGE 
PROGRAMMING 

3 Credits 

This course will give the student a very basic under- 
standing of the Assembler process using IBM main- 



frame computers. This course will stress the importance 
of byte-wise manipulation of data fields when using low 
level languages. The emphasis is on the actual work- 
ings of a computer during the execution of a computer 
program. The role of data types, EBCIDIC format of 
data storage and addressable memory locations is 
thoroughly discussed. Since Assembler is so vastly dif- 
ferent from most languages that students are exposed 
to, the philosophy of this course is to provide a sound 
foundation of fundamental concepts associated with the 
assembler process. 

CPT 211— PASCAL PROGRAMMING 

3 Credits 

This course provides a basic understanding of the 
structured programming process necessary for suc- 
cessful Pascal programming. The major emphasis is 
top down program design and modularity, using Pascal 
procedures, functions and independent subprograms. 
Simple and advanced data types are discussed as well 
as program control aids, algorithm development and 
program debugging. The goal of this course is to pro- 
vide the student with a fundamental understanding of 
good programming technique in a basic knowledge of 
Pascal syntax and structure. 

CPT 21 5— FIELD STUDY 

4 Credits 

Provides opportunity for a field project or research case 
study within the Computer Technology field. The proj- 
ect or study will include collection and analysis of data 
and/or actual work experience in business or industry. 

CPT 216— ADVANCED RPG II PROGRAMMING 

3 Credits 

Offers advanced study in the use of the compiler lan- 
guage RPG II in solving business problems. Attention 
is given to the various file processing methods and a 
working knowledge of advanced features and tech- 
niques through laboratory experience. 

CPT 217— C.I.C.S. COMMAND LEVEL 
PROGRAMMING 

3 Credits 

Familiarizes the student with CICS Command Level 
Programming Language, its organization and use, the 
principles of data communication, and the incorpora- 
tion of these principles in CICS. Students will write pseudo- 
conversational CICS programs, then test and debug 
these programs. 

CPT 218— ADVANCED ASSEMBLER LANGUAGE 

3 Credits 

Continues those topics introduced in Assembler Lan- 



Computer Programming Technology 



29 



guage Fundamentals with emphasis placed on table 
handling and disk programming techniques. 

CPT 219— ADVANCED C.I.C.S. COMMAND LEVEL 
PROGRAMMING 

3 Credits 

Expands the student's knowledge of CICS Command 
Level Programming Language. Students will write pseudo- 
conversational CICS programs, then test and debug 
these programs. 

CPT 220— SHELL COMMAND LANGUAGE FOR 
PROGRAMMERS 

3 Credits 

This course teaches the student how to write, test and 
debug Shell procedures on a computer utilizing a UNIX 
operating system. Topics include: the Shell and how it 
works, shell processes, variables, keyword and posi- 
tional parameters, control contructs, special substitu- 
tions, pipelines, debugging aids, error/interrupt processing 



and the shell command line. The course offers students 
the opportunity to apply skills in a laboratory environment. 

CPT 221— ADVANCED C PROGRAMMING 

3 Credits 

Continues those topics introduced in C Language Pro- 
gramming with emphasis on array processing, file 
processing and advanced debugging techniques. Stu- 
dents will have the opportunity to apply skills and a 
laboratory environment. 

CPT 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMPUTER 
PROGRAMMING TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 




CULINARY ARTS TECHNOLOGY 

Ivy Tech offers a comprehensive Culinary Arts program which will familiarize students with culi- 
nary styles of both outstanding chefs and experienced instructors with food preparation tech- 
niques. The program will provide students with numerous opportunities for actual food preparation 
experiences. 

The Culinary Arts program covers food, beverages, menu planning, ethnic food preparation, 
classical cuisines, and pastries. Special attention is given to center-of-the plate items with emphasis 
on the presentation of prepared food. It also focuses on nutrition, sanitation, personal hygiene 
and safety regulations. 

A two-year Associate in Applied Science degree is offered. Technical Certificates are also 
available in specialized areas. Programs are offered in Hammond, Fort Wayne and Indianapolis. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE 



Technical Courses (55 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



CUL 


101 


Basic Foods Theory and Skills 


CUL 


102 


Sanitation and First Aid 


CUL 


103 


Nutrition 


CUL 


104 


Soups, Stocks and Sauces 


CUL 


105 


Institutional Food Service 


CUL 


106 


Pantry and Breakfast 


CUL 


107 


Purchasing Procedures and Controls 


CUL 


108 


Baking 


CUL 


109 


Meat Cutting 


CUL 


201 


Food and Beverage Cost Control 


CUL 


202 


Special Cuisines 


CUL 


203 


Table Service 


CUL 


204 


Classical Pastries 


CUL 


205 


Fish and Seafood 


CUL 


206 


Externship 


CUL 


207 


Catering 


CUL 


208 


Garde Manger 


CUL 


209 


Menu Design 


CUL 


210 


Food Service Supervision 


CUL 


211 


Classical Cuisine 



Semester Credits 

3 
2 
2 
3 
2 
3 
2 
4 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
2 
2 
3 



General Education Requirements (18 Credits) 



Prefix 



No. 



Title 



INF 


101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


ENG 


101 


English Composition 


ENG 


102 


English Composition II 


ENG 


103 


Speech 


HST 


115 


Applied Behavioral Psychology or 


SOC 


101 


Human Relations 


MAT 


101 


Algebra I or 


MAT 


107 


Math of Finance 



Total Credits 



_3 
73 



30 



Culinary Arts Technology 



31 



CULINARY ARTS TECHNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



CUL 101— BASIC FOODS THEORY AND SKILLS 

3 Credits 

Fundamentals of food preparation service procedures, 
sanitation and safety practices in the food service busi- 
ness. Also provides a background and history of the 
hospitality industry and introduction to hospitality/food 
service organizations and career opportunities. 

CUL 102— SANITATION & FIRST AID 

2 Credits 

Develops understanding of basic principles of food service 
sanitation and safety in maintaining a safe and healthy 
environment for the consumer. Laws and regulations 
related to safety, fire, and sanitation. 

CUL 103— NUTRITION 

2 Credits 

Examines characteristics, functions, and food sources 
of the major nutrient groups and how to maximize nutrient 
retention in food preparation and storage. Nutrient needs 
throughout the life cycle and related applications of menu 
planning and food preparation. 

CUL 104— SOUPS, STOCKS, AND SAUCES 

3 Credits 

Introduces the four major stocks, five major sauces, 
and the soups that are derived from them. Time will be 
given to help develop the necessary skill development 
in the fourteen major cooking methods. 

CUL 105— INSTITUTIONAL FOOD SERVICE 

2 Credits 

Introduction to various institutional food service facili- 
ties. Includes converting recipes for quantity food pro- 
duction, calculating per portion cost, and determining 
profitable selling prices. 

CUL 106— PANTRY AND BREAKFAST 

3 Credits 

Techniques and skills needed in breakfast cookery and 
knowledge of the pantry department. Preparation of 
eggs, pancakes, waffles, and cereals. Experience in 
salad prep, salad dressing, hot and cold sandwich prep, 
garnishes and appetizers. 

CUL 107— PURCHASING PROCEDURES & 
CONTROLS 

2 Credits 

Development and implementation of an effective pur- 



chasing program. Focuses on supplier relations and 
selection, negotiation, and evaluation. In-depth exam- 
ination of major purchase categories. 

CUL 108— BAKING 

4 Credits 

Fundamentals of baking science, terminology, ingre- 
dients, weights and measures, formula conversion and 
storage. Preparation of yeast goods, pies, cakes, cook- 
ies and quick breads. Use and care of equipment. San- 
itation, hygienic work habits and conformance to health 
regulations are emphasized. 

CUL 109— MEAT CUTTING 

3 Credits 

The study of meat cutting which includes the break- 
down of beef, pork, poultry, lamb and veal. 

CUL 201— FOOD & BEVERAGE COST CONTROL 

2 Credits 

Mathematical principles applied to the food service 
industry. Development of skills in food related tasks. 

CUL 202— SPECIAL CUISINES 

3 Credits 

Introduction to foods from various cultures: historical 
background and skill development in preparation of these 
foods. Further study of table service and table-side food 
preparation is included. 

CUL 203— TABLE SERVICE 

3 Credits 

Practical knowledge of and skills in various types of 
service in a variety of operations. Relationship between 
"front" and "back" of the house. Emphasis is on devel- 
oping the service techniques of the major table service 
styles. 

CUL 204— CLASSICAL PASTRIES 

3 Credits 

Classic French, Italian and European desserts. Includes 
the preparation of goods such as puff pastry, specialty 
cookies, ganache, parlimose creams and fillings, and 
specialty sauces. Emphasis is on size, consistency, 
presentation, eye appeal and taste of pastries produced. 

CUL 205— FISH AND SEAFOOD 

3 Credits 

The importance of fish and seafood in today's market. 

Types and categories of American and imported fish 



32 



Division of Business, Office and Information Systems Technologies 



and shell fish, proper buying, storage, preparation, and 
merchandising of fish and seafood. Experiences in boning, 
cutting, and various methods of cooking appropriate to 
aquatic dishes. 

CUL 206— EXTERNSHIP 

3 Credits 

Offers students practical work experience in chosen 
areas of specialization. Students will be required to work 
a minimum of 144 hours in an approved hospitality 
establishment. Emphasis is on skills at the dishwasher, 
prep-cook, and station cook. 

CUL 207— CATERING 

4 Credits 

The fundamentals of catering: the business of supply- 
ing food, goods, and organized service for public and 
private functions. Includes staffing, equipment, trans- 
portation, contracting, special arrangements, bever- 
age service, and menu planning. Also covers cold food 
preparation and presentation techniques. 

CUL 208— GARDE MANGER 

3 Credits 

Basic garde manger principles and functions and duties 
of the garde manger department as they relate to other 
kitchen operations. Introduction to specialty work: ice 
carving, artistic centerpieces, and buffet decorations. 
Proper equipment and garde manger area planning. 



CUL 209— MENU DESIGN 

2 Credits 

Develops skill needed for menu planning in various types 
of facilities and service. Covers menu layout, selection 
and development, and pricing structures. 

CUL 210— FOOD SERVICE SUPERVISION 

2 Credits 

Designed to prepare the student for the transition from 
employee to supervisor. Evaluation of leadership styles 
and development of effective skills in human relations 
and personnel management. 

CUL 211— CLASSICAL CUISINE 

3 Credits 

Advance and sophisticated classical culinary methods 
following the principles and techniques of Escoffier. 
Includes cooking techniques, timing, presentation, his- 
tory, and terms pertaining to classical foods and menus, 
with emphasis on French cuisine. Practical experience 
in table service operation, kitchen coordination and timing. 

CUL 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN CULINARY 
ARTS TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



DISTRIBUTION MANAGEMENT 

Distribution Management is an essential aspect of the manufacturing and marketing of goods, 
representing "the second largest employer in the United States." Distribution Management includes 
the five major components of the physical distribution system: material handling, warehousing, 
inventory control, order processing and customer service, and transportation (road, rail, water 
and air carriers). 

Career opportunities are found with shippers, carriers and receivers. Entry level positions 
could include assisting a line supervisor of one of the major physical distribution and logistics 
areas or assisting in a staff capacity in the coordination of several of their business activities. 
Advancement opportunities could include management of one or more of the PD/L systems. 

The program is offered in Indianapolis. 
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 

Technical Courses (30 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title Semester Credits 

Distribution and Logistics 3 

Transportation Systems 3 

Warehousing 3 

Case Studies 3 

Career Essentials of Accounting. 3 

Introduction to Business 3 

Business Law 3 

Principles of Management 3 

Introduction to Microcomputers 3 

Integrated Business Software 3 

General Education Courses (1 5 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title 

ENG 101 English Composition 3 

ENG 102 English Composition II 3 

ENG 103 Speech 3 

MAT 107 Math of Finance 3 

SOC 101 Human Relations 3 

Regional Electives (15 Credits) 15 

Total Credits 60 

DISTRIBUTION MANAGEMENT COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

DSM 101— DISTRIBUTION AND LOGISTICS DSM 102— MANUFACTURING 

3 Credits 3 Credits 

The foundation course for the study of the physical dis- Introductory manufacturing course. Focuses on basic 

tribution of materials. Reviews basic physical distribu- principles, practices, and functions of manufacturing 

tion and logistics systems related to warehousing, materials management. Includes applications in the service 

handling, inventory control, order processing, and industries, such as utilities, hospitals, and government. 

transportation. 

33 



DSM 


101 


DSM 


201 


DSM 


202 


DSM 


204 


ACC 


108 


BUS 


101 


BUS 


102 


BUS 


201 


INF 


101 


INF 


206 



34 



Division of Business, Office and Information Systems Technologies 



DSM 103— MARKETING 

3 Credits 

Introductory marketing course. Focus is on basic mar- 
keting strategy for targeting markets and developing a 
marketing mix of product, price, distribution and promotion. 

DSM 201— TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

Traffic and transportation management applied to rate 
negotiation, routing, risk and claims, expediting and tracing. 
Distinguishes between types of transportation opera- 
tions, including rail, motor, water, air, and pipelines. 

DSM 202— WAREHOUSING 

3 Credits 

Examines the warehousing function and management 
system controls. Differentiates between the various 
inventory control systems. Reviews material handling 
methods for the preparation, placing, and positioning 
of materials to facilitate movement or storage. Focus is 
on computer utilization in warehousing and inventory 
control management. 

DSM 203— SALES SERVICE 

3 Credits 

Designed to develop the art of selling. Sales knowledge 

and sales skills are applied to choices of products. Sell- 



ing principles and the order processing cycle are 
emphasized. 

DSM 204— CASE STUDIES 

3 Credits 

Designed to apply, by the case study method, the 
knowledge, principles and skills acquired in students' 
program concentration (eg., small business, manufac- 
turing, marketing, physical distribution). Seminar for 
individualized case analysis, presentation, discussion, 
and solution. 

DSM 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN DISTRIBU- 
TION MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY 

1 -5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



HOTEL/MOTEL MANAGEMENT 

The hospitality industry is the third largest in the nation and, in Indiana, it ranks as the second 
largest. Ivy Tech's curriculum, with guidance from the American Hotel and Motel Association, 
has recognized this trend and has made a commitment to meet the present and projected needs 
of the hospitality industry. The courses are shaped by input from hotel and restaurant manage- 
ment experts and prospective employers. These constant reviews of industrial changes have 
indicated that hands-on training is in great demand and Ivy Tech has structured its offerings to 
reflect those changes. 

Ivy Tech endeavors to assist employers and employees to keep abreast of changes in the 
industry. Education in courses ranging from management and marketing to food and beverage 
purchasing form a solid base of theoretical and practical knowledge. To keep the hospitality 
industry running smoothly, industry needs a wide variety of experienced personnel. 

A two-year Associate in Applied Science degree requires 65 credits for completion. ATechnical 
Certificate is also available. The program is available in Indianapolis. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (47 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



HMM 


101 


HMM 


102 


HMM 


103 


HMM 


104 


HMM 


105 


HMM 


106 


HMM 


107 


HMM 


201 


HMM 


202 


HMM 


203 


HMM 


204 


HMM 


205 


HMM 


206 


HMM 


207 


CUL 


203 


ACC 


101 



Hospitality Organization and Administration 

Sanitation and First Aid 

Purchasing Procedures and Controls 

Hospitality Law and Security 

Hospitality Computer Systems 

Food Production Principles 

Organization and Human Resource Development 

Layout and Design 

Hospitality Marketing and Sales 

Practicum 

Food and Beverage Management 

Front Office 

Housekeeping 

Food and Beverage Cost Controls 

Table Service 

Accounting Principles I 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



General Education Requirements (18 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



ENG 


101 


English Composition 


ENG 


103 


Speech 


HST 


115 


Applied Behavioral Psychology 


MAT 


101 


Algebra I 


ENG 


102 


English Composition II 


SOC 


104 


Introduction to Sociology 



Total Semester Credits 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_3 
65 



35 



36 



Division of Business, Office and Information Systems Technologies 



HOTEL/MOTEL MANAGEMENT COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



HMM 101— HOSPITALITY ORGANIZATION AND 
ADMINISTRATION 

3 Credits 

Analyzes management functions and responsibilities in 
administration, organization, communications, accounting, 
marketing, and human relations. 

HMM 102— SANITATION AND FIRST AID 

3 Credits 

Instruction in how to effectively manage sanitation to 

achieve high standards that will cause customers to 

return. 

HMM 103— PURCHASING PROCEDURES AND 
CONTROLS 

2 Credits 

Methods in the development and implementation of an 
effective purchasing program. Focuses on issues per- 
taining to supplier relations and selection, negotiation, 
and evaluation. Includes in-depth consideration of major 
categories of purchases. 

HMM 104— HOSPITALITY LAW AND SECURITY 

3 Credits 

Provides awareness of the rights and responsibilities 
that the law grants to, or imposes upon a hotelkeeper, 
and illustrates the possible consequences of failure to 
satisfy legal obligations. Also examines the wide variety 
of security procedures and systems for guest protec- 
tion and internal security for asset protection. 

HMM 105— HOSPITALITY COMPUTER SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

An overview of the information needs of lodging prop- 
erties and food service establishment. Addresses essential 
aspects of computer systems, such as hardware, soft- 
ware, and generic applications. Focuses on computer- 
based property management systems for both front and 
back office functions and on computer-based restau- 
rant management systems for both service-oriented and 
management-oriented functions. 

HMM 106— FOOD PRODUCTION PRINCIPLES 

3 Credits 

Techniques and procedures of quality and quantity food 
production. Based upon principles of selection, com- 
position, and preparation of the major food products. 
Includes an extensive set of basic and complex recipes 
for practice purposes. 



HMM 107— ORGANIZATION & HUMAN RESOURCE 
DEVELOPMENT 

3 Credits 

The assessment and analysis of training and non-training 
needs of organizations and personnel within the con- 
text of the basic evolution of a company. Also covers 
the systematic design of instruction, evaluation of train- 
ing programs, and management of the training func- 
tions. Prepares an individual for the transaction from 
employee to supervisor. 

HMM 201— LAYOUT AND DESIGN 

3 Credits 

Principles of selection, operation, and maintenance of 
equipment for hotels and restaurants. Covers mate- 
rials, structural details, design, cost, performance and 
specifications. 

HMM 202— HOSPITALITY MARKETING AND 
SALES 

3 Credits 

Designed to provide students with basic knowledge and 
practical experience that will enable them to develop 
strategic marketing plans for various hotel properties. 

HMM 203— PRACTICUM 

3 Credits 

Provides students with practical work experience in chosen 
areas of specialization. Students are required to work 
a minimum of 144 hours under managers of selected 
hospitality establishments. 

HMM 204— FOOD AND BEVERAGE 
MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Provides a basic understanding of the principles of food 
production and service management, reviewing sani- 
tation, menu planning, purchasing, storage, and bev- 
erage management. 

HMM 205— FRONT OFFICE 

3 Credits 

A systematic approach to front office procedures, detailing 
the flow of business through a hotel, beginning with the 
reservation process and ending with billing and collec- 
tion procedures within the context of the overall oper- 
ation of a hotel. Examines front office management, the 
process of handling complaints, and concerns regard- 
ing hotel safety and security. 



Hotel/Motel Management 



37 



HMM 206— HOUSEKEEPING 

3 Credits 

Provides an overview of the fundamentals of house- 
keeping management. Describes the management 
functions, tools, and practices required in modern lodg- 
ing and institutional housekeeping departments. 

HMM 207— FOOD & BEVERAGE CONTROLS 

3 Credits 

Covers principles and procedures in an effective food 
and beverage control system, including standards 
determination, the operating budget, income and cost 
control, menu pricing, and computer applications. 

HMM 208— HOUSEKEEPING TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

The basic tools required in institutional housekeeping. 

Instruction in accepted cleaning techniques. 

HMM 209— APARTMENT MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Examines the responsibilities of landlords and tenants 
in apartments, townhouses, condominiums, and other 
permanent rental properties. Includes study of small 
and large complexes, business and maintenance details, 
and roles of personnel in each setting. 

HMM 210— HOTEL SUPERVISION 

3 Credits 

Offers case problems in hospitality management. Stu- 
dents are expected to assess realistic situations that 
confront modern hospitality executives. 

HMM 211— FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Special applications of accounting principles to the 
hospitality industry Includes business principles per- 
taining to food and lodging, methods of recordkeeping 
for creditors, owners, and government, and payroll con- 
trol. Emphasis is on tax laws specific to the industry, 
expense control, and techniques of profitable management. 

HMM 212— INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Management problems unique to institutions, including 
boarding schools, professional sports training camps, 
summer camps, hospitals, nursing homes, prisons, and 
facilities for retirement, mental health, and extended 
care. Develops awareness of basic common needs 
throughout the hospitality industry. Guest lectures and 
field trips to institutions highlight the study. 



HMM 213— PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Covers all phases of property management including 
first impression, staffing, training, capital investments, 
cost analysis, rentals, and renovation. 

HMM 214— TOURISM 

3 Credits 

Provides comprehensive study of tourism principles, 
practices, and philosophies. Offers practical education 
in the business of tourism. 

HMM 215— HOTEL— MOTEL SEMINAR 

3 Credits 

Offers opportunities by means of guest lectures and 
group discussion to explore particular problems or top- 
ics of current interest. 

HMM 216— BASIC COOKING I 

3 Credits 

Lectures and demonstrations in the fourteen basic forms 

of food preparation. 

HMM 217— FISH AND SEAFOOD 

3 Credits 

Preparing hot and cold fish, crustaceans, shellfish, and 
mollusks. Includes baking, poaching, braising, saute- 
ing, deep fat frying, broiling, grilling, and gratin methods. 

HMM 218— MEAT PREPARATION 

3 Credits 

Basic methods of preparation for beef, veal, pork, lamb, 

poultry and game. Includes sauteing, broiling, grilling, 

stewing, simmering, poaching, boiling, and braising 

methods. 

HMM 21 9— MEAT I 

3 Credits 

Focuses on meat identification as established by the 
National Association of Meat Purveyors. Demonstrates 
the cutting of carcasses into primal cuts and the break- 
down of beef, lamb and pork. 

HMM 220— NATIONAL DISHES 

3 Credits 

Application of basic cooking methods and forms of pre- 
paring national dishes. Features the preparation of Swiss, 
French, German, English and American, Italian, Aus- 
trian, and other fine cuisine. 



38 



Division of Business, Office and Information Systems Technologies 



HMM 221— BASIC COOKING II 

3 Credits 

Skill development in the preparation of bases, stocks, 

sauces, and soups. 

HMM 223— BUFFET CATERING 

3 Credits 

Advanced instruction in cold food preparation and pre- 
sentation techniques: charcuterie, specialty canapes, 
hors d'oeuvres, appetizers, pates, galantines, chaud- 
froids, terrines, tallow and ice carving, aspics, mousses, 
cold sauces, vegetable carving, and food decoration. 
Covers food materials' utilization, buffet planning, lay- 
out, equipment, zoning, and services. Provides a prac- 
tical approach to decorating platters for industrial and 
classical buffets. Students plan, prepare, present and 
serve a cold buffet. 



HMM 225— SERVER TRAINING 

3 Credits 

A seminar class for training professional waiters and 
waitresses in proper serving techniques. Special emphasis 
is placed on human relations and communication skills. 

HMM 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN HOTEL/ 
MOTEL MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



HMM 224— BLOWN AND PULLED SUGAR 

3 Credits 

Basic course for learning the fundamental techniques 
of sugar work which prepares culinarians to blow and 
pull sugar to create unique table decorations. 



INDUSTRIAL SUPERVISION TECHNOLOGY 

The Industrial Supervision program provides formal training in supervising techniques and prin- 
ciples. Students learn how to set goals, plan, organize, staff, direct, motivate, and control oper- 
ations in an industrial setting. These skills are applied to supervision, quality control, production 
control, safety, and methods improvement. Emphasis is placed on team building and employee 
in-service training. The program prepares students for entry-level supervisory positions in man- 
ufacturing, the service industry, and government agencies. 

A two-year program, requiring 60 credits, leads to an Associate in Applied Science Degree. 
Technical Certificates are also available in specialized areas. Programs are offered in Anderson, 
Evansville, Fort Wayne, Gary, Indianapolis, Lafayette, Marion, Muncie, South Bend, and Warsaw. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (30 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



1ST 


101 


1ST 


102 


1ST 


103 


1ST 


104 


BUS 


102 


ACC 


101 


INF 


101 


1ST 


201 


1ST 


202 


1ST 


211 



Quality Control Concepts and Techniques I 
Techniques of Supervision I 
Industrial Safety I 
Techniques of Supervision II 
Business Law 
Accounting Principles I 
Introduction to Microcomputers 
Personnel Management and Training 
Production Planning and Control 
Labor Relations 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



General Education Requirements (18 Credits) 



Prefix 



No. 



Title 



ENG 


101 


English Composition 


ENG 


103 


Speech 


MAT 


101 


Algebra I 


MAT 


108 


Statistics 


SOC 


101 


Human Relations 


SOC 


106 


Principles of Macroeconomics 



Regional Electives (12 Credits) 



Total Credits 



12 
60 



INDUSTRIAL SUPERVISION TECHNOLOGY 
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



1ST 101— QUALITY CONTROL CONCEPTS AND 
TECHNIQUES I 

3 Credits 

Covers current quality control concepts and techniques 

in industry, with emphasis on modern manufacturing 

requirements. 



1ST 102— TECHNIQUES OF SUPERVISION I 

3 Credits 

Introduces basic employee development with empha- 
sis on the responsibilities of a newly appointed super- 
visor. Special attention is given to organizational structure, 
motivation, delegation of authority, interviews, orien- 



39 



40 



Division of Business, Office and Information Systems Technologies 



tation and induction of new employees, employee per- 
formance evaluations, and dealing with employee conflict. 

1ST 103— INDUSTRIAL SAFETY I 

3 Credits 

Covers the day-to-day responsibilities of management 
and supervision toward attaining an accident-free orga- 
nization. Emphasizes first aid, fire prevention and con- 
trol, safety procedures in starting and stopping machines, 
accident investigations, and other preventive mea- 
sures. Also covers methods of advertising good safety 
practices, rules of plant protection in relation to safety 
and OSHA. 

1ST 104— TECHNIQUES OF SUPERVISION II 

3 Credits 

Further develops skills for effective supervision of 
employees by utilizing analysis of cases, group discus- 
sion, in-basket exercises, and role-playing. Includes 
problem-solving techniques, labor relations, legal 
guidelines, policy making, counseling troubled employ- 
ees, effective communications, and human relations 
skills. 

1ST 105— BUSINESS MANAGEMENT/ 
MANUFACTURING 

3 Credits 

Introductory manufacturing course. Focuses on basic 
principles, practices, and functions of manufacturing 
management. Includes applications in the service 
industries, such as utilities, hospitals, and government. 

1ST 106— SURVEY OF POSTAL SYSTEM 

3 Credits 

Survey of the major components and subdivisions of 
the postal service system. Traces the delivery of written 
communication and merchandise, postal philosophies, 
policies, procedures, rules and regulations from earlier 
eras to the present. 

1ST 201— PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT AND 
TRAINING 

3 Credits 

Manpower planning, employee recruitment, selection 
and placement, promotions, transfers.separations, and 
wage and salary administration. Emphasizes employee 
training as an organizational resource. Demonstrates 
development and implementation of effective training 
programs. Attention is given to the nature of learning, 
concept teaching, the creation of a motivating learning 
atmosphere, use of audiovisual aids, planned versus 
spontaneous learning, rote teaching, mnemonic devices, 
learning curves, and learning as problem solving. 



1ST 202— PRODUCTION PLANNING AND 
CONTROL 

3 Credits 

Production planning concepts and inventory control 
techniques and applications. Areas of concentration include 
the production function, design and development of 
products/services, location and layout, forecasting and 
scheduling, materials purchasing and inventory man- 
agement, and quality control. 

1ST 203— RELIABILITY OBJECTIVES 

3 Credits 

Introduces development and principles of reliability 
engineering. Establishes mathematical and physical bases 
of reliability and applies basic elements of reliability data 
analysis. Surveys concepts basic to modern reliability 
requirements, with emphasis on practical applications 
in manufacturing processes and production operations. 

1ST 204— MECHANICAL METROLOGY 

3 Credits 

Provides instruction and laboratory experiments in the 
use of mechanical testing and measurement equip- 
ment for quality control. 

1ST 205— TECHNIQUES OF LEADERSHIP 

3 Credits 

With the aid of personality testing, the student learns 
about various approaches to effective leadership and 
discovers an appropriate personal leadership style. Specific 
qualities and skills needed for conference leadership 
(organizing, facilitating, controlling, summarizing, speaking, 
and problem defining and solving) are also explored. 

1ST 206— TIME AND MOTION STUDY 

3 Credits 

Examines industrial applications of time and motion studies 

in establishing rates. 

1ST 207— MANUFACTURING COSTS AND VALUE 
ANALYSIS 

3 Credits 

Applies recognized techniques and tests to measure 
value and eliminate unnecessary costs in design, 
development and manufacturing without affecting quality; 
differs from cost control in that it is directed toward ana- 
lyzing value, not cost. 

1ST 208— MATERIALS HANDLING 

3 Credits 

Applied stresses and quality controls pertaining to the 

handling and storing of industrial materials. Attention is 



Industrial Supervision Technology 



41 



given to shelf life of materials, weight and mass config- 
uration, and specifications of vendors materials. 

1ST 209— PLANT LAYOUT AND PROCESS 
PLANNING 

3 Credits 

Principles and practices of factory planning, including 
layout fundamentals, layouts for small and medium sized 
plants, and selection of equipment for the production 
and handling of materials. Also covers tooling deter- 
mination and operational time, setup, and sequence. 
Emphasizes efficiency in the arrangement of work areas 
for reduction of costs. 

1ST 210— CASE PROBLEMS IN MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Application of quantitative and qualitative skills to case 
study problems in management. Solutions demand 
planning, leadership, and financial analysis. 

1ST 211— LABOR RELATIONS 

3 Credits 

Examines labor laws and practices pertaining to indus- 
trial relations. Covers development and applicationof 
laws, mediation conciliation, collective bargaining, 
arbitration, and handling of grievances. 

1ST 212— MANUFACTURING ORGANIZATION I 

3 Credits 

The organization of a typical manufacturing operation, 
with attention to functional components and their inter- 
relationships. Reviews organizational principles as they 
apply to the operation, and examines the duties and 
responsibilities of the first-line supervisor. Develops the 
basic tools of managerial decision-making and applies 
them to typical case problems. 

1ST 213— MANUFACTURING ORGANIZATION II 

3 Credits 

Quality control, research and development, marketing, 
production, inventory control, personnel, and mainte- 
nance functions. Involves forms of ownership, analysis 
of financial data, capital investment, and budgeting. 

1ST 214— INDUSTRIAL SAFETY II 

3 Credits 

Establishes procedures following an accident. Covers 
the preparation and maintenance of accident records, 
severity rates, workmen's compensation and insurance 
claims. How effective safety programs are managed in 
compliance with the law and contractual agreements. 



1ST 215— PURCHASING AND INVENTORY 
CONTROL 

3 Credits 

A practical approach to procurement of materials with 
regard to price, quality, quantity, and delivery; as well 
as the purchasing department's place in the organi- 
zational structure. Defines responsibility of the pur- 
chasing department and its relationship to other 
departments. Legal aspects, ethics and standards as 
they relate to procurement. 

1ST 216— TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION MAN- 
AGEMENT I 

3 Credits 

Transportation systems, federal regulations, freight 

classification, rates, tariffs, and claims. 

1ST 217— TIME MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Trains supervisors and other personnel in more effec- 
tive management of the business day. Covers time 
management strategies and behavior patterns. Exer- 
cises in scheduling and allocating time, identifying and 
handling time wasters, dealing with interruptions, and 
planning for better use of the working day. 

1ST 218— STATISTICAL CONCEPTS AND 
TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

Deals with various topics pertaining to statistical appli- 
cations of quality control, including frequency distri- 
bution, probability theory applications and sampling 
techniques. 

1ST 219— CUSTOMER SERVICE 

3 Credits 

Provides functional knowledge of mail delivery and col- 
lection systems and in-depth knowledge of all services 
provided to postal customers. 

1ST 220— MAIL PROCESSING 

3 Credits 

Designed to provide an in-depth view of revenue deter- 
mination procedures and flow characteristics involved 
in receipt, processing, and dispatch of all classes of 
mail. 

1ST 221— POSTAL PROBLEM ANALYSIS 

3 Credits 

Postal problems are presented for which the students 



42 



Division of Business, Office and Information Systems Technologies 



must use systems analysis, problem solving grids, and 
decisions by objectives in arriving at solutions. 

1ST 222— EMPLOYEE SERVICES 

3 Credits 

Covers the functions of a personnel unit in relation to 

the services it provides employees of the Postal Service. 



1ST 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN INDUSTRIAL 
SUPERVISION TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concept presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



INFORMATION/DATA MANAGEMENT 

Information/Data Management is a user-oriented program with an emphasis on microcomputer 
applications within a business environment. Demand for employees with computer and business 
skills is particularly high in small and medium-sized firms which create, transmit, and control 
information by using computer technology as a management tool. 

Business automation systems allow for the integration of several functionally related appli- 
cations such as word processing, database management, spreadsheet, programming, electronic 
mail systems, electronic filing, graphics generation, and telecommunications. These systems 
may be stand-alone, shared logic, distributed, or integrated. 

The Associate in Applied Science Degree is awarded upon successful completion of 60 credit 
hours. Technical Certificates are also available in specialized areas. Students may pursue selected 
courses only, in conjunction with another program of study, or for career advancement. 

The program is offered at Valparaiso, Elkhart, Fort Wayne, South Bend, Kokomo, Anderson, 
Muncie, Terre Haute, Indianapolis, Richmond, Columbus, Madison, Evansville and Sellersburg. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 

Technical Courses (33 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

Regional Electives (9 Credits) _9 

Total Credits 60 



INF 


102 


Microcomputer Operating Systems 


INF 


103 


Microcomputer Programming 


INF 


201 


Microcomputer Database Management Systems 


INF 


202 


Electronic Spreadsheets 


INF 


203 


Computer Business Applications 


CPT 


101 


Data Processing Fundamentals 


CPT 


103 


Logic and Documentation 


CPT 


202 


Data Communications 


CPT 


203 


Systems Analysis and Design 


BUS 


101 


Introduction to Business 


ACC 


101 


Accounting Principles I 


General Education 


Requirements (18 Credits) 


MAT 


101 


Algebra 1 


ENG 


101 


English Composition 


ENG 


102 


English Composition II 


ENG 


103 


Speech 


SOC 


101 


Human Relations 


INF 


101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 



43 



44 



Division of Business, Office and Information Systems Technologies 



INFORMATION/DATA MANAGEMENT COURSE 
DESCRIPTIONS 



INF 101— INTRODUCTION TO MICROCOMPUTERS 

3 Credits 

Introduces the physical components and operation of 
microcomputers. Focuses on computer literacy, and basic 
concepts of word processing, spreadsheet processing 
and database processing as examples of common 
microcomputer applications used in business. 

INF 102— MICROCOMPUTER OPERATING 
SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

Introduces the organization, structure, and functions of 
an operating system for a microcomputer. Presents stu- 
dent with operating system concepts such as: com- 
mands, error messages, interrupts, function calls, device 
drivers, structure, files, and organization, with practical 
applications. 

INF 103— MICROCOMPUTER PROGRAMMING 

3 Credits 

Introduces a structured microcomputer language. Con- 
cepts in input output commands, arithmetic expres- 
sions, conditional control, iteration techniques, and 
subroutines are emphasized. Offers application oppor- 
tunities for solving business problems. 

INF 201— MICROCOMPUTER DATABASE 
MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

Presents an overview of relational, hierarchical and network 
database models with emphasis on microcomputer 
relational database management systems (DBMS). Using 
database software, students have hands-on experi- 
ence creating, modifying, retrieving and reporting from 
databases. Students also develop business applica- 
tions using the database language. 

INF 202— ELECTRONIC SPREADSHEETS 

3 Credits 

Presents an in-depth study of an electronic spread- 
sheet. Focuses on business applications using menu 
commands, formulas, functions, macro commands, 
graphs, printing, database, and file operations. 

INF 203— COMPUTER BUSINESS APPLICATIONS 

3 Credits 

Advanced course in which the students apply business 

skills, microcomputer skills, and communication skills 



within business applications. Emphasis is placed on 
application of several forms of computerized informa- 
tion processing including data processing, word processing, 
Spreadsheets, graphics, and communications. Stu- 
dents will also analyze the effects of automation on the 
office worker, management, and the work environment 
and prepare written and oral presentations. 

INF 204— OFFICE AUTOMATION 

3 Credits 

Presents a perspective on the needs, potentials, and 
urgencies of systems to support modern office func- 
tions. Concentration is on structured analysis and design 
of hardware/software systems for creating, maintain- 
ing, printing, and communicating data files utilizing text 
processing systems. Methodologies for creating pro- 
cedures to produce letters and reports from data files 
are covered. Concepts and techniques will be incor- 
porated into practical applications. 

INF 206— INTEGRATED BUSINESS SOFTWARE 

3 Credits 

Presents knowledge of integrated microcomputer 
software concepts. Students will design a complete 
business system utilizing all parts of an integrated 
microcomputer software package which can share the 
same data, manipulating it in different ways. Projects 
will include usage of word processing, electronic 
spreadsheets, graphics, databases, and command 
language. 

INF 210— HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE 
TROUBLESHOOTING 

3 Credits 

Presents an in-depth analysis of the components of a 
computer system and their relationship to each other. 
Includes concepts of parallel and serial connectivity, 
installation and maintenance of software, peripheral 
devices, interface cards, and device drivers. The stu- 
dent will analyze realistic hardware/software problems 
encountered in the workplace and learn techniques and 
procedures to implement solutions. 

INF 211— ADVANCED DATABASE MANAGEMENT 
SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

A continuation of INF 201 Microcomputer Database 
Management Systems. Emphasis is on the develop- 
ment of advanced applications in database management. 



Information /Data Management 



45 



INF 212— ADVANCED ELECTRONIC 
SPREADSHEETS 

3 Credits 

A continuation of INF 202 Electronic Spreadsheets. 

Emphasis is on the advanced application of electronic 

spreadsheets. 

INF 214— TOPICS IN INFORMATION 
MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Discusses topics of current interest in information man- 
agement. Attention is given to special interest projects. 
Field trips, guest speakers, audio-visual activities, and 
seminars may be utilized. (Program Advisor approval 
required) 

INF 220— COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 

1-9 Credits 

This course is designed to give students the opportu- 
nity to apply concepts learned in the classroom to actual 
work situations. College credit is earned by satisfying 
both academic standards of the College and the work 
performance standards of the employer. (Program Advisor 
approval required) 

INF 230— SEMINAR 

1 Credit 

Discuss topics of current interest in computerized infor- 
mation management with an emphasis on the appli- 



cation of information management skills during lab time. 
Various seminar topics may be identified and offered 
each term under this course number. 

INF 231— SEMINAR 

2 Credits 

Discusses topics of current interest in computerized 
information management with an emphasis on the 
application of information management skills during lab 
time. Various seminar topics may be identified and offered 
each term under this course number. 

INF 232— SEMINAR 

3 Credits 

Discusses topics of current interest in computerized 
information management with an emphasis on the 
application of information management skills during lab 
time. Various seminar topics may be identified and offered 
each term under this course number. 

INF 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN INFORMATION/ 
DATA MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



MARKETING TECHNOLOGY 

The Marketing Technology program offers extensive business training to prepare the student for 
employment opportunities in marketing operations and management. Courses include market- 
ing, management, sales techniques, retailing, advertising, accounting, mathamatics and 
communications. 

Career opportunities may be found in management, advertising, distribution, professional 
sales, retailing, wholesaling, and merchandising, for employment in profit as well as in nonprofit 
organizations. 

A two-year program, requiring 60 credits, leads to an Associate in Applied Science Degree. 
Technical Certificates are also available in specialized areas. The program is offered in Ander- 
son, Evansville, Fort Wayne, Gary, Indianapolis, Kokomo, Lafayette, Muncie, Terre Haute, and 
Valparaiso. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 

Technical Courses (33 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title Semester Credits 

Introduction to Business 3 

Principles of Marketing 3 

Principles of Selling 3 

Principles of Retailing 3 

Advertising 3 

Introduction to Market Research 3 

Logistics/Purchasing Control 3 

Marketing Management 3 

Accounting Principles I 3 

Principles of Management 3 

Organizational Behavior 3 

General Education Requirements (18 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

Regional Electives (9 Credits) _9 

Total Credits 60 



BUS 


101 


MKT 


101 


MKT 


102 


MKT 


103 


MKT 


104 


MKT 


201 


MKT 


202 


MKT 


204 


ACC 


101 


BUS 


201 


BUS 


208 



SOC 


107 


Principles of Microeconomics 


ENG 


101 


English Composition 


ENG 


103 


Speech 


MAT 


101 


Algebra I 


INF 


101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


MAT 


107 


Math of Finance 



46 



Marketing Technology 



47 



MARKETING TECHNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



MKT 101— PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 

3 Credits 

Introduces the marketing role in society and how it affects 
the marketing strategy, with emphasis on the market- 
ing mix, product planning, and the effects of the demo- 
graphic dimension on the consumer market. 

MKT 102— PRINCIPLES OF SELLING 

3 Credits 

Provides an overview of selling and the selling process. 
Includes the psychology of selling and develops selling 
skills through a series of selling situations. 

MKT 103— PRINCIPLES OF RETAILING 

3 Credits 

Studies retailing concepts and practices, including retail 
merchandise planning, buying, pricing, promotion, and 
control in established retail operations. Attention is given 
to managerial and operational skills. 

MKT 104— ADVERTISING 

3 Credits 

Focuses on advertising as the key element in the pro- 
motion of goods and services in the marketplace. Attention 
in given to advertising media and media selection, 
advertising copy strategy, advertising regulations and 
organizations of advertising functions. 

MKT 201— INTRODUCTION TO MARKET 
RESEARCH 

3 Credits 

Applies basic research methods entailing procedures, 
questionnaire design, data analysis, and effectively 
communicating research results. 

MKT 202— LOGISTICS/PURCHASING CONTROL 

3 Credits 

This course introduces the student to the framework of 
logistics, the logistics environment, customer services 
and materials management. Subjects of current inter- 
est, to include material resources planning (MRP) and 
just-in-time (JIT) principles, are also introduced. 

MKT 204— MARKETING MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Focuses on the analysis, implementation, and control 
of marketing strategy. Emphasis is placed on the major 
decisions managment faces in its effort to harmonize 
the objectives and resources of the organization with 
the needs and opportunities of the marketplace. 



MKT 205— PRINCIPLES OF INSURANCE 

3 Credits 

Introduces the risks faced by business firms and how 
they might be handled, to include property, liability and 
personal losses, with attention to insurance contracts 
and their uses of life, health and pension insurance, as 
well as public policy including government regulations, 
and social insurance. 

MKT 206— SALES MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Studies the role of the sales manager emphasizing the 
leadership function. Attention is given to building a sales 
team, judging sales performance, territorial manage- 
ment, techniques of sales recruiting and interviewing, 
training and development, and management of the field 
sales office. 

MKT 207— PUBLIC RELATIONS 

3 Credits 

This course provides a broad coverage of the public 
relations field and is designed to acquaint students with 
the role of effective internal and external public rela- 
tions in business and industry. It will examine the goals 
and benefits of public relations, the tools of the public 
relations practitioner, and the principles and trends of 
the field. 

MKT 208— DISTRIBUTION CENTER 
MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

The introduction and study of warehousing from both 
a depositor and operator viewpoint. Topics will include 
the study of warehousing functions, location and spe- 
cific site criteria, labor productivity, cost controls, equipment 
and packaging, and customer service. 

MKT 209— EXPORT/IMPORT I 

3 Credits 

Studies the practical application of export and import 
techniques and concepts, government regulations, 
documentation, and financial and transportation con- 
siderations of the movement of commerce from and to 
the United States. 

MKT 210— EXPORT/IMPORT II 

3 Credits 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with 
import practices, governmental regulations and carrier 
rate making practices. Students will complete practical 



48 



Division of Business, Office and Information Systems Technologies 



exercises, solve importing problems and work with the 
tariff schedule of the United States. 

MKT 219— FIELD STUDY/COOPERATIVE 
EDUCATION 

4 Credits 

The student will work at a job site that is specifically 
related to his/her career objectives. The course is designed 
to give students on-the-job experience while receiving 
college credits toward an associate degree. 



MKT 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN MARKETING 
TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



PARALEGAL TECHNOLOGY 

The demand for trained paralegals is increasing and the number of job opportunities is projected 
to increase significantly by the mid 1990s, according to employment analysts. Ivy Tech recog- 
nizes this demand and has shaped a curriculum with input from attorneys and professionals 
associated with the legal field. These advisors offer Ivy Tech the opportunity to establish the 
qualifications necessary for success in the paralegal field. Ivy Tech's courses meet these qual- 
ifications, providing trained, knowledgeable paralegal professionals. 

The duties of trained specialists can range from assisting in complicated legal research to 
managing the scheduling of court appearances. The educational training provides a wide variety 
of job opportunities and mobility. Classroom lectures in such areas as civil law, real estate, 
research and writing, wills and trusts, combined with on-the-job training, prepare students for 
an exciting job as a paralegal. 

The program, requiring 75 credits for completion, is offered in Indianapolis. 
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (51 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



LEG 


101 


LEG 


102 


LEG 


103 


LEG 


104 


LEG 


105 


LEG 


106 


LEG 


107 


LEG 


108 


LEG 


109 


LEG 


110 


LEG 


111 


LEG 


112 


LEG 


201 


LEG 


202 


LEG 


203 


ACC 


108 


INF 


206 



Office Management and Ethics 

Research and Writing 

Civil Procedure 

Torts 

Business Associations 

Claims Investigation 

Contracts and Commercial Law 

Property Law 

Family Law 

Wills, Trusts and Probate 

Criminal Law and Procedure 

Bankruptcy Law 

Appellate Procedure 

Litigation 

Computers in the Law Office 

Career Essentials of Accounting 

Integrated Business Software 



Semester Credits 

3 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 



General Education Courses (18 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



ENG 


101 


English Composition 


ENG 


102 


English Composition II 


SOC 


101 


Human Relations 


MAT 


107 


Math of Finance 


INF 


101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 



SCI 



XXX Life and Physical Science Elective 



Regional Electives (6 Credits) 



Electives must include a minimum 

of 6 credits in non-technology specific areas. 



Total Credits 



75 



49 



50 



Division of Business, Office and Information Systems Technologies 



PARALEGAL TECHNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



LEG 101— OFFICE MANAGEMENT AND ETHICS 

3 Credits 

Instruction on automated and manual docket and con- 
flict control systems, file organization, closed file con- 
trol systems, file organization, closed file control research 
segregation, client funds handling and management 
principles. Emphasizes internal communication skills 
and compliance with the Rules of Professional Conduct. 

LEG 102— RESEARCH AND WRITING 

4 Credits 

The study and use of legal research tools such as digests, 
loose leaf services, reporters, statutory compilations 
and forms books. Legal writing format and methodol- 
ogy are presented through practical application in draft- 
ing memoranda and correspondence. Shepardizing and 
proper case citation skills are emphasized. 

LEG 103— CIVIL PROCEDURES 

3 Credits 

A study of the Indiana Trial Rules and miscellaneous 
local rules. Filing requirements, computation of time and 
form drafting are emphasized. 

LEG 104— TORTS 

3 Credits 

Torts includes a survey of the law of comparative neg- 
ligence, products liability, defamation, false arrest and 
other civil wrongs, including knowledge of the elements 
of such causes of action. 

LEG 105— BUSINESS ASSOCIATIONS 

3 Credits 

The study of various business structures and the rights, 
duties, liabilities and formalities attendant to such 
structures. A survey of partnership, agency and cor- 
poration law is included. 

LEG 106— CLAIMS INVESTIGATION 

3 Credits 

The study of witness interview techniques, preserva- 
tion of evidence, organizational skills and alternative 
methods of gathering facts. Professional client intake 
and client communication skills are emphasized. 

LEG 107— CONTRACTS AND COMMERCIAL LAW 

3 Credits 

A survey of contract law and the Uniform Commercial 
Code. Special statutes regarding state unfair trade 
practices, consumer deception and consumer rights are 
also presented. 



LEG 108— PROPERTY LAW 

3 Credits 

A survey of the law of real and personal property. Pro- 
vides practical exposure to title searches, loan docu- 
mentation, zoning requirements, financing statements, 
leases and deeds. 

LEG 109— FAMILY LAW 

3 Credits 

Asurvey of the law of dissolution, custody, child support 
and visitation, marriage and adoption. Financial dec- 
laration forms, client intake, Child Support Guidelines 
and available social services are presented as practical 
information. 

LEG 110— WILLS, TRUSTS, AND PROBATE 

3 Credits 

Survey of the law of estates, wills, probate and guard- 
ianship, as well as intestate succession. Preparation of 
probate and administration forms, asset inventories and 
valuations, certain tax forms and accountings are included. 

LEG 111— CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURES 

3 Credits 

Survey of Indiana criminal statutes and selected fed- 
eral criminal laws. Investigative and administrative skills 
are emphasized. 

LEG 112— BANKRUPTCY LAW 

3 Credits 

Bankruptcy Law includes a survey of the Federal Bank- 
ruptcy Act. Emphasizes skills needed to accumulate 
personal financial information, compile initial sched- 
ules, collect and organize data for first meeting of cred- 
itors, complete proofs of claim and pursue of creditor's 
rights. 

LEG 201— APPELLATE PROCEDURE 

2 Credits 

In-depth study of the Indiana Rules of Appellate Pro- 
cedure, with concentration on the mechanical aspects 
of preparation and filing of the record on appeal and 
the format required for briefs submitted. 

LEG 202— LITIGATION 

3 Credits 

Litigation includes the study of the Indiana Rules per- 
taining to actual trial. The discovery process and its 
tools are reviewed. Skills such as document organi- 
zation and retrieval, witness statementizing, deposition 



Paralegal Technology 



51 



summarizing, indexing and scheduling are presented. 
The Federal Rules of Evidence are surveyed. Trial 
notebook preparation is surveyed. 

LEG 203— COMPUTERS IN THE LAW OFFICE 

3 Credits 

A survey of software support available to the law prac- 
titioner such as litigation support and estate planning 
support. Also includes instruction on availability and use 
of research databases such as Dialog, Nexis, Lexis and 
Westlaw. 



LEG 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN PARALEGAL 
TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



SECRETARIAL SCIENCES 

The Secretarial Sciences program prepares students for an office environment which is becom- 
ing automated and will approach the electronic office predicted for the future. Students develop 
not only the basic, traditional office skills, but also skills using technology such as computer 
hardware, software, and other electronic equipment. 

The Secretarial Sciences program is designed to accommodate students with different levels 
of training and experiences. Courses are offered which provide initial, advanced, and refresher 
education and which assist individuals in achieving professional recognition and career pro- 
gression. The Associate in Applied Science degree program prepares graduates as administra- 
tive office workers and provides opportunities for specialized training in such areas as legal 
secretarial, medical secretarial, office management, stenography, and information/word processing. 
Students who complete the recommended sequence of courses are eligible to take the Admin- 
istrative/Information Processing Specialist (AIPS) or the Certified Professional Secretary (CPS) 
exam administered by the Institute for Certifying Secretaries of the Professional Secretaries 
International Association (PSI). Technical Certificates are also available in specialized areas. 

Programs are offered in Anderson, Bloomington, Columbus, Connersville, Elkhart, Evansville, 
Fort Wayne, Gary, Hammond, Indianapolis, Kokomo, Lafayette, Lawrenceburg, Logansport, Madison, 
Marion, Muncie, Richmond, Sellersburg, South Bend, Tell City, Terre Haute, Valparaiso, and 
Warsaw. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (33 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



SEC 


101 


SEC 


102 


SEC 


103 


SEC 


104 


SEC 


201 


SEC 


202 


SEC 


203 


SEC 


204 


SEC 


205 


ACC 


101 


INF 


101 



Basic Formatting 
Document Management 
Information/Word Processing Concepts 
Document Production 
Specialized Formatting/Transcription 
Information/Word Processing Applications 
Principles of Office Management 
Administrative Office Procedures 
Business English for Information Processing 
Accounting Principles I 
Introduction to Microcomputers 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



General Education Requirements (15 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



ENG 101 

ENG 102 

MAT 107 

SOC XXX 



English Composition 
English Composition II 
Math of Finance 
Social Sciences 



Regional Electives (17 Credits) 



Total Credits 



17 
65 



52 



Secretarial Sciences 



53 



SECRETARIAL SCIENCES COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



SEC 100— KEYBOARDING 

3 Credits 

An introduction to keyboarding. Emphasis is on mas- 
tery of the keyboard and developing basic keyboarding 
skills. 

SEC 101— BASIC FORMATTING 

3 Credits 

This course develops keyboarding competencies. 
Emphasis is placed on increasing keyboarding speed, 
improving accuracy, developing formatting skills, applying 
communication skills, and learning document produc- 
tion skills. 

SEC 102— DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Designed to acquaint students with alphabetic, numeric, 
geographic, and subject filing procedures. Exposure to 
the latest equipment, automation and the newer meth- 
ods of managing, storing and retrieving records. Role 
of the file worker and place of document management 
within the overall business enterprise is emphasized. 

SEC 103— INFORMATION/WORD PROCESSING 
CONCEPTS 

3 Credits 

Introduction to the concept of information/word processing 
systems. Offers hands-on experience in the operation 
of word processing systems. 

SEC 104— DOCUMENT PRODUCTION 

3 Credits 

Provides experience producing documents found in 
business offices. Major focus is on productivity and 
excellence in document production. Also emphasizes 
composition skills and the application of communica- 
tion skills. 

SEC 106— REFRESHER SHORTHAND 

1 Credit 

Designed to bring old, unused shorthand skills to an 

employable level. Taught in a lab setting emphasizing 

three areas of skill development: speed, theory, and 

transcription. 

SEC 107— REFRESHER TYPEWRITING 

1 Credit 

Designed to bring old, unused typing skills to an employable 

level. Taught in a lab with four areas of skill develop- 



ment: speed and accuracy, business letters, tables and 
tabulations, and reports. 

SEC 108— SHORTHAND/NOTETAKING I 

3 Credits 

Introductory course emphasizing basic theory, brief forms, 
and speed in reading from notes and the textbook. Focuses 
on the correct way to write shorthand. Dictation with 
emphasis placed on writing and transcription techniques. 

SEC 109— PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

2 Credits 

Enables students to analyze and improve themselves 
in terms of posture, weight control, personal hygiene, 
grooming, wardrobe, personality, communication, and 
job application skills for success in employment fields. 
Designed to foster greater self-esteem and to make a 
good first impression by being confident, poised, and 
well groomed. Includes resume and interviewing 
preparation. 

SEC 110— KEYBOARDING SKILL DEVELOPMENT 

1 Credit 

This course is designed to improve speed and accuracy 

through drills on the typewriter and/or personal computer. 

SEC 111— SHORTHAND/NOTETAKING II 

3 Credits 

Develops dictation, notereading, and transcription skills 
through drills and tests. Emphasizes speed, accuracy, 
and use of correct English. Reinforces and builds 
on principles and skills learned in Shorthand/Notetak- 
ing I. 

SEC 11 2— DATA ENTRY 

3 Credits 

Prepares for employment in data entry or related data 
processing positions in an up-to-date computerized 
business. Basic keyboarding skills and experience with 
typical applications and a variety of data entry techniques. 

SEC 113— OFFICE CALCULATING MACHINES 

1 Credit 

Designed for the acquisition of competence on the 10- 
key electronic printing/display calculator. Competence 
on the desk calculator and familiarity with the types of 
business problems commonly solved on them are essential 
elements of the course. 



54 



Division of Business, Office and Information Systems Technologies 



SEC 114— INTRODUCTION TO TYPEWRITING 

2 Credits 

An introduction to keyboarding and typewriting. 
Emphasizes keyboard mastery and the ability to type 
easy copy and perform simple typing exercises. May 
be taught on the PC, to include basic file manipulation 
of the Disk Operating System (DOS). 

SEC 115— INTRODUCTION TO MICROCOMPUTER 
KEYBOARDING 

2 Credits 

A course for beginners in keyboarding on the micro- 
computer. Covers the development of fundamentals: 
touch keyboarding techniques, familiarization with key- 
board including numbers, introduction of major parts of 
computer, and skill measurement. 

SEC 116— BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS 

3 Credits 

Development of communication skills for use in busi- 
ness and industry. Special attention is given to busi- 
ness correspondence and to problems in oral and written 
communication. 

SEC 201— SPECIALIZED FORMATTING/ 
TRANSCRIPTION 

3 Credits 

Production techniques which include correspondence, 
business forms, manuscripts, tabulation, and secretar- 
ial projects. Correct use of grammar, spelling, and letter 
formats are stressed, along with a high degree of pro- 
ductivity and skill. Transcription from machine dictation 
and introduction to products, services, and terminology 
encountered in business organizations. 

SEC 202— INFORMATION/WORD PROCESSING 
APPLICATIONS 

3 Credits 

Knowledge acquired from Information/Word Process- 
ing Concepts will be further enhanced as more sophis- 
ticated features of a word processing package are learned 
and applied. 

SEC 203— PRINCIPLES OF OFFICE 
MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Covers a broad range of topics including: hiring prac- 
tices, supervision, motivation, decision-making, time, 
space, and environment management. The course also 
includes: basic management principles, problem solv- 
ing techniques, selecting, orienting, and supervising human 
resources, motivating workers, labor/management 



relations, office personnel problems and practices, 
managing office systems and improving productivity. 

SEC 204— ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE 
PROCEDURES 

3 Credits 

Emphasizes skills, techniques and attitudes busi- 
nesses desire in office personnel. Provides experience 
applying skills and knowledge gained in previous tech- 
nical courses. Identifies professional standards of con- 
duct and appearance necessary to successfully work 
in the business environment. 

SEC 205— BUSINESS ENGLISH FOR INFORMA- 
TION PROCESSING 

3 Credits 

Basic grammar, punctuation, spelling, proofreading, and 

other language skills needed in word processing. 

SEC 206— SHORTHAND/NOTETAKING III 

3 Credits 

Review of fundamentals learned in Shorthand/Notetak- 
ing I & II. Continued emphasis on skill in taking new 
matter dictation with more emphasis on transcribing 
mailable letters. Essentials of good English principles 
are stressed. 

SEC 207— INTEGRATED OFFICE AUTOMATION 

3 Credits 

Designed to be the culmination of the student's word 
processing studies. After a complete overview of word 
processing principles and applications, the student will 
obtain experience integrating this knowledge with var- 
ious software packages to solve problems in the elec- 
tronic office. Development of critical thinking skills is 
emphasized. 

SEC 208— MICROCOMPUTER/WORD 
PROCESSING 

2 Credits 

Covers production techniques including typing, for- 
matting, editing, and printing variable output, and use 
of the electronic dictionary. Includes production appli- 
cations such as merging letters with mailing lists, math 
computations during document creation, sorting files, 
printout of newsletters, and other multiple-column formats. 

SEC 209— ADVANCED MICRCOMPUTER/WORD 
PROCESSING 

2 Credits 

Techniques for maximizing the operating speed and 
convenience of a word processing software, including 
installation with a ram disk and print spooler. Editing 
macro files with M-Edit and Notebook. Use of ready- 



Secretarial Sciences 



55 



made macros, multiple-column formats, and configu- 
ration and operation of software with various types of 
printers. Electronic grammar checking and other sup- 
plementary programs are integrated with the software. 

SEC 210— OFFICE SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGY 
MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Advanced course designed to acquaint the student with 
the management of office systems, technology, and 
procedures. Includes the improvement of productivity 
through technology and systems; optimization of per- 
sonnel resources; systems selection, configuration, design, 
and implementation; and procedures development. 

SEC 211— WORD PROCESSING FILES 
MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Designing and managing the file system - creating files, 
adding, revising and deleting files. Designed to dem- 
onstrate how to create, use, change, and update files 
on a word processing system or personal computer using 
a database software. 

SEC 212— MICROCOMPUTER WORD 
PROCESSING 

3 Credits 

Deals with business application uses of word process- 
ing software on microcomputer work stations. Practical 
applications in the use of a microcomputer word processing 
software. 

SEC 213— ADVANCED INFORMATION/WORD 
PROCESSING APPLICATIONS 

3 Credits 

Introduction to a second software or equipment. Devel- 
ops the ability to transfer word processing skills. 



SEC 214— DESKTOP PUBLISHING 

3 Credits 

Provides computer skills in the production of camera- 
ready materials through electronic publishing. 

SEC 215— LEGAL TERMINOLOGY/PRACTICE 

3 Credits 

Provides basic understanding of the secretarial duties 
and responsibilities pertinent to the legal profession. 
Presents ethics of law and professional conduct. Includes 
laboratory experience. 

SEC 216— PRACTICUM/INTERSHIP 

3 Credits 

Students gain on-the-job experience while earning col- 
lege credits toward an associate degree. 

SEC 217— MACHINE TRANSCRIPTION, MEDICAL I 

2 Credits 

Provides a basic understanding of the techniques of 

dictation and transcription used by medical assistants. 

SEC 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN SECRETARIAL 
SCIENCES TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 




SMALL BUSINESS OPERATIONS 

The Small Business Operations program develops the ability to learn and apply the managerial 
skills needed for self employment and/or for general administrative positions in a variety of 
business environments. These business environments may include retailing/wholesaling, man- 
ufacturing, agriculture, service industries and office administration. 

A two-year program, requiring 64 credits leads to an Associate in Applied Science Degree. 
Technical Certificates are also available in specialized areas. Programs are offered in Valparaiso, 
Columbus, Evansville, Fort Wayne, Indianapolis, Lafayette, Muncie, Richmond, Sellersburg, South 
Bend, Terre Haute and Madison. Selected courses may be offered at other locations. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM (Pending Approval) 

Technical Courses (34 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
7 

General Education Courses (18 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title 

English Composition 3 

Speech 3 

Algebra I 3 

Life and Physical Science Elective 3 
Principles of Macroeconomics or 

Principles of Microeconomics 3 

Social Science or Humanities Course 3 

Related Education (6 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title 

ACC 101 Accounting Principles I 3 

ENG 102 English Composition II 3 

Regional Electives (6 Credits) _6 

Total Credits 64 



BUS 


101 


Introduction to Business 


BUS 


102 


Business Law 


MKT 


101 


Principles of Marketing 


1ST 


102 


Techniques of Supervision I 


BUS 


201 


Principles of Management 


BUS 


202 


Human Resource Management 


BUS 


203 


Entrepreneurship 


BUS 


204 


Case Problems in Management 


MKT 


202 


Logistics/Purchasing Control 


XXX 


XXX 


Electives 



ENG 


101 


ENG 


103 


MAT 


101 


SCI 


XXX 


SOC 


106 




107 


XXX 


XXX 



56 



Small Business Operations 



57 



SMALL BUSINESS OPERATIONS COURSE 
DESCRIPTIONS 



BUS 101— INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS 

3 Credits 

Examines our business system in relation to our eco- 
nomic society. Studies business ownership, organiza- 
tion principles and problems, management, control 
facilities, administration, and development practices of 
American business enterprises. 

BUS 102— BUSINESS LAW 

3 Credits 

Describes the Judicial system and the nature and sources 
of law affecting business. Studies contracts, sales, and 
negotiable instruments with emphasis on Uniform 
Commerical Code applications. Includes appropriate 
remedies for breach of contract and tort liabilities. Examines 
business structures and agency. 

BUS 103— OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 

3 Credits 

Covers broad areas of administrative office services 
and management, including office organization, site 
location, layout and environment, records manage- 
ment, systems control, and office communication serv- 
ices and devices. 

BUS 104— INVESTMENT 

3 Credits 

This course presents the basis of investing, with atten- 
tion to the various ways in which investment vehicles 
operate. 

BUS 107— TRANSPORTATION LAW 

3 Credits 

Reviews judicial systems and regulatory agencies, reg- 
ulatory acts, Motor Carrier Act-1 980, Staggers Rail Act- 
1980, obligations, rights and liabilities, regulation of rates 
and rate-making agreements. 

BUS 108— PERSONAL FINANCE 

3 Credits 

Emphasizes management of individual financial resources 
for growth and maintenance of personal wealth. Covers 
home buying and mortgage financing, installment financing, 
life and health insurance, securities, commodities, and 
other investment opportunities. 



BUS 201— PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Focuses on the functions of managers, including the 

management of activities and personnel. Focus is placed 

on application of guidance principles in management 

work. 



BUS 202— HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Overview of the activities of a human resource man- 
ager with emphasis on employer-employee relations, 
job analysis and evaluation, salary administration, work 
measurement and standards, performance appraisal, 
and legal compliance. 

BUS 203— ENTREPRENEURSHIP 

3 Credits 

Explores business operations for the self-employed or 

as a manager employed in a small business enterprise. 

BUS 204— CASE PROBLEMS IN MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Applies business concepts and principles to specific 

case studies or problems. 

BUS 205— RISK MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Examines risks faced by business firms and considers 
ways of handling them. Covers property, liability, and 
personal losses, with attention to insurance contracts 
and their uses. Studies individual life, health, and pen- 
sion insurance, public policy, government regulations, 
and social insurance programs. 

BUS 207— INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL 
BUSINESS 

3 Credits 

Provides an overview of the international environment 
within which business operates today. There will be an 
attempt to demonstrate the global relationships between 
business activities and how events in one part of the 
world can influence business decisions and activities 
in other parts of the world. 



58 



Division of Business, Office and Information Systems Technologies 



BUS 208— ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR 

3 Credits 

Studies human behavior in organizations at the individ- 
ual and group level, including the effect of organiza- 
tional structure on behavior. Specific attention will be 
given to using organizational behavior concepts for 
developing and improving interpersonal skills. 



BUS 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN SMALL 
BUSINESS OPERATIONS TECHNOLOGY 

1 -5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL TECHNOLOGY 

The Statistical Process Control program provides students with the opportunity to enter the 
statistical process and quality control field with application knowledge of the latest concepts in 
these areas. The SPC or quality control technician, through application of statistical process 
quality control technology, may advance to supervision or related manufacturing support func- 
tions. The program also offers employed persons the opportunity to upgrade skills. 

Areas of study consist of courses in statistical process control, quality control, manufacturing, 
data processing, math, science, and human relations. The emphasis is placed upon advanced 
statistical concepts, data collection and presentation, machine and process capabilities, advanced 
measurement systems, control of purchased component quality, and the use of computers for 
optimum data analysis. 

A two-year program, requiring 62 credits, leads to an Associate in Applied Science Degree. 
Technical Certificates are also available in specialized areas. The program is offered at Fort 
Wayne, Kokomo, Muncie, Terre Haute, Indianapolis and Columbus. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (32 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title 

SPC 101 Statistical Process Control 

CPT 101 Data Processing Fundamentals 

1ST 101 Quality Control Concepts and Techniques I 

1ST 102 Techniques of Supervision I 

1ST 215 Purchasing and Inventory Control 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Seventeen semester credits of regional technical courses are to be selected from the following courses: 

SPC 102 Advanced Statistical Process 

Control 

SPC 103 Employee Participation Tech- 

niques and Quality Improvements 

SPC 104 Introduction to Nondestructive 

Testing 

SPC 105 Nondestructive Testing Applica- 

tions I 

SPC 106 Nondestructive Testing Applica- 

tions II 

SPC 107 Quality Control Concepts and 

Techniques 

SPC 108 Quality Control Engineering Prin- 

ciples and Techniques 

SPC 109 Engineering Materials Quality 

Control 

SPC 110 Quality Control Engineering The- 

ory and Applications 

SPC 1 1 1 Reliability Objectives 

SPC 1 1 2 Reliability Techniques 



SPC 201 Analysis of Metallurgical Failures 

SPC 204 Statistical Concepts and 

Techniques 
SPC 205 Nondestructive Tests 

SPC 206 Mechanical Metrology 

SPC 207 Electrical Metrology 

SPC 281 -293 Special Topics in Statistical 

Process Control (1-5 Credits) 
AMT 101 Manufacturing Processes 

BUS 101 Introduction to Business 

IMT 102 Introduction to Print Reading 

1ST 104 Techniques of Supervision II 

1ST 203 Reliability Objectives 

1ST 206 Time and Motion Study 

1ST 207 Manufacturing Costs and Value 

Analysis 
1ST 208 Materials Handling 

1ST 21 1 Labor Relations 



Related Education (6 Credits) 



XXX 
XXX 



XXX 
XXX 



Regional Technical Course 
Regional Technical Course 



59 



60 



Division of Business, Office and Information Systems Technologies 



General Education Requirements (18 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



soc 


101 


ENG 


101 


ENG 


103 


MAT 


101 


SCI 


101 


XXX 


XXX 



Human Relations 

English Composition 

Speech 

Algebra I or MAT 1 04 Algebra/Trigonometry I 

Physical Science or SCI 103 Physics I 

Social Science or Life/Physical Science Course 



Regional Electives (8 Credits) 



Total Credits 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

_8 
64 



STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL TECHNOLOGY 
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



SPC 101— STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL 

3 Credits 

Fundamental tools of statistical process control used 
in industry to reduce cost and increase productivity, at 
a predictable quality level. Emphasis on principles and 
techniques of statistical process controls applied to 
prevention instead of detection of problems. 

SPC 102— ADVANCED STATISTICAL PROCESS 
CONTROL 

3 Credits 

Advanced techniques used in industry to ensure eco- 
nomic production of goods based on defect prevention 
rather than defect detection. Deals with modification 
change or adjustment processes based on statistical 
evidence. 

SPC 103— EMPLOYEE PARTICIPATION 
TECHNIQUES & QUALITY IMPROVEMENTS 

3 Credits 

The development of an employee involvement program 
such as "circle," "team," "group" and other concepts. 
Includes problem-solving techniques of brainstorming, 
cause and effect diagrams, data gathering, check sheets, 
Pareto analysis, central location, frequency distribu- 
tion, and histograms. Covers the role of management 
and employees in the process and relationship to par- 
ticipative management. 

SPC 104— INTRODUCTION TO NONDESTRUCTIVE 
TESTING 

2 Credits 

This course will acquaint the student with the principles 
and various types of nondestructive examination meth- 
ods, their advantages, limitations, and applications. 



SPC 105— NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING 
APPLICATIONS I 

3 Credits 

Theoretical and practical aspects of NDE in the follow- 
ing areas are covered: liquid penetrant, ultrasonic test- 
ing, magnetic particle testing, and visual inspection. 

SPC 106— NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING 
APPLICATIONS II 

3 Credits 

Theoretical and practical aspects of NDE in the follow- 
ing areas are covered: radiography, eddy current test- 
ing, acoustic emission, and leak testing. 

SPC 107— QUALITY CONTROL CONCEPTS AND 
TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

Emphasizes recent technological developments in quality 

control. 

SPC 108— QUALITY CONTROL ENGINEERING 
PRINCIPLES AND TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

Presents principles and techniques of modern quality 
control engineering, with attention to management, 
engineering, economic and production factors. Empha- 
sizes the assurance of quality at the hardware, processing, 
and systems levels. 

SPC 109— ENGINEERING MATERIALS 

3 Credits 

Includes the basic principles of metallurgy and the 
properties of materials in the section of parts and man- 
ufacturing processes. Explores the various ways in which 



Statistical Process Control Technology 



61 



the strength and hardness of metals can be altered by 
heating and cooling. Ceramics, composites, polymers, 
and other exotic metals are examined. 

SPC 110— QUALITY CONTROL ENGINEERING 
THEORY AND APPLICATIONS 

3 Credits 

Presents current theory and applications of quality 
engineering for assurance and verification of product 
quality at the hardware, processing and systems levels. 
Emphasizes statistical analysis, laboratory experi- 
ments, and test and case problem solving applications. 

SPC 111— RELIABILITY OBJECTIVES 

3 Credits 

Introduces the development and principles of reliability 
engineering. Establishes the mathematical and physi- 
cal bases of reliability and applies the basic elements 
of reliability data analysis. Surveys concepts basic to 
modem reliability requirements, with emphasis on practical 
applications in manufacturing processes and produc- 
tion operations. 

SPC 112— RELIABILITY TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

Study of reliability techniques and applications designed 

to obtain or improve reliability analysis. 

SPC 201— ANALYSIS OF METALLURGICAL 
FAILURE 

3 Credits 

Study of the factors responsible for the failure of com- 
ponents or structures, which may be motivated by either 
sound engineering practice or by legal considerations. 
Covers the proper application of failure analysis tech- 
niques to provide valuable feedback to design prob- 
lems and material limitations. 

SPC 202— PROCESS CONTROL GAUGING AND 
MEASUREMENTS 

3 Credits 

Deals with the science of measurement for obtaining 
accurate and reliable data, using computerized statis- 
tical process control, and mechanical metrology. Includes 
selection of various instruments for specific applications. 



SPC 203— CODES, SPECIFICATIONS AND 
PROCEDURES INTERPRETATIONS 

3 Credits 

Explores the different types of codes, specifications and 
procedures used in modern industry and provides 
opportunity for use and interpretation. Blueprint read- 
ing is included. 

SPC 204— STATISTICAL CONCEPTS AND 
TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

Presents various topics pertaining to statistical appli- 
cations of quality control, including frequency distri- 
bution, probability theory and applications, and sampling 
techniques. 

SPC 205— NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING 

3 Credits 

Presents an overview of the relationship of nonde- 
structive testing to the total quality function. Attention 
is given to the advantages and limitations of various 
test methods. 

SPC 206— MECHANICAL METROLOGY 

3 Credits 

Provides instruction and laboratory experiments in the 
use of mechanical testing and measurement equip- 
ment for quality control. 

SPC 207— ELECTRICAL METROLOGY 

3 Credits 

Offers instruction and laboratory experiments in the use 
of electrical testing and measurement equipment for 
quality control. 

SPC 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN STATISTICAL 
PROCESS CONTROL TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



DIVISION OF VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS 
TECHNOLOGIES 




62 



The Division of Visual Communications Technologies offers opportunities to com- 
bine creative talent with practical applications. Hands-on instruction encourages 
originality, technical development, and familarity with sophisticated equipment in 
the graphics and media field. Courses are structured to give a broad understand- 
ing of principles and to develop the skills needed for their efficient and effective 
commercial use. The student is advised to contact the nearest center concerning 
specific courses and program offerings. 

COMMERCIAL VIDEO TECHNOLOGY 

The Commercial Video Technology program prepares students for a professional career in the 
visual communications field. The program is reflective of the visual communications industry's 
needs and standards. The program provides experiences in research, problem solving and hands- 
on-procedures in video and multi-image program production. 

The program focuses upon pre-production planning, production, post-production and distrib- 
utive procedures. Students learn to produce scripts and storyboards, plan activities, develop 
production schedules and produce a project budget based upon production costs. In video 
production, students learn to use all appropriate types of equipment, direct the production and 
supervise production personnel. Students gain experience in studio and remote location tech- 
niques. Post production activities include audio dubbing, voice over narration, roll back or time 
code editing, creation of computer graphic visuals, animation, and character generated titling. 
Students learn techniques in audio recording, mixing and electronic audio enhancement, using 
both reel-to-reel and cassette systems. Students also learn techniques in 35mm photography 
and multi-image controlled micro-processor slide production. 

The faculty bring to the classroom the knowledge and procedures they gained through their 
professional activities and industry associations. A student may elect to do an externship at an 
area organization which has a video or AV department. All students produce an exit portfolio 
which demonstrates the quality and scope of their knowledge and skills. 

The Associate in Applied Science degree in Commercial Video Technology requires 72 credits 
for completion and can be completed in 4 semesters. The program is offered at South Bend. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 

Technical Courses (36 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title Semester Credits 

Audio/Video Systems Theory 3 

Audio/Video Equipment and Maintenance 3 

Audio Production I 3 

Video Production I 3 

Production Planning 3 

Video Production II 3 

Script Writing 3 

Multi-Track Sound System 3 

Video Tape Editing 3 

Advanced Audio Production 3 

Advanced Video Production 3 

Multi-Image Design 3 

63 



AVC 


101 


AVC 


102 


AVC 


104 


AVC 


105 


AVC 


106 


AVC 


107 


AVC 


108 


AVC 


109 


AVC 


110 


AVC 


201 


AVC 


202 


AVC 


203 



64 



Division of Visual Communications Technologies 



Technical Related (6 Credits) 

ART 204 Art History Survey I 

ART 208 Art History Survey II 

General Education Requirements (18 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title 



ENG 


101 


English Composition 


ENG 


103 


Speech 


SOC 


102 


Introduction to Psychology 


SOC 


104 


Introduction to Sociology 


MAT 


107 


Math of Finance 


SCI 


101 


Physical Science 



Regional Electives (12 Credits) 



Total Credits 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

12 
72 



COMMERCIAL VIDEO TECHNOLOGY COURSE 
DESCRIPTIONS 



AVC 101— AUDIO/VIDEO SYSTEMS THEORY 

3 Credits 

The theory and practices of electronic systems as related 
to audio and video recording and playback systems. 
Students will learn about amplification, modulation, 
equalization and signal processing. 

AVC 102— AUDIO/VIDEO EQUIPMENT USE AND 
MAINTENANCE 

3 Credits 

Hands on experiences in set-up, maintenance and uti- 
lization of AV equipment such as film projection sys- 
tems, overhead projectors, audio and video playback 
and recording systems and 35mm projection systems. 

AVC 104— AUDIO PRODUCTION I 

3 Credits 

Provides knowledge and studio practices necessary to 
successfully perform sound recording, editing and nar- 
ration. Skill development in selecting microphones for 
specific use, and basic audio mixing. 

AVC 105— VIDEO PRODUCTION I 

3 Credits 

Covers video recording systems, systems design and 
videography for post-production editing. Course proj- 
ects include studio lighting, hidden "miking" , audio 
"dubbing" , titling and supportive production proce- 
dures such as inter-connecting equipment, operating 
video cameras and proper video recorder operation. 



AVC 106— PRODUCTION PLANNING 

3 Credits 

Focuses on knowledge and skills needed to prepare 
objectives, audience analysis, and overall planning for 
video and audio productions. Students learn to develop 
visual flow and continuity, and apply principles of visual 
design to video storyboards. Special attention is given 
to coordinating audio cues to visual action. 

AVC 107— VIDEO PRODUCTION II 

3 Credits 

Course activities include remote video "shoots" plan- 
ning, such as location scouting and site preparation. 
Projects in lighting, miking, camera and recorder set- 
up, and on-iocation directing. 

AVC 108— SCRIPT WRITING 

3 Credits 

Projects in developing scripts for specific markets such 
as commercial, industrial, public information and edu- 
cational. Specific scripting functions of format selec- 
tion, content organization, message design and audio 
and visual cues are included. Emphasis is on instruc- 
tional design in scripting. 

AVC 109— MULTI-TRACK SOUND SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

Theory and application of multiple track audio record- 
ing. Hands-on studio practice includes projects in elec- 
tronic reverberation, parametric equalization and audio 



Commercial Video Technology 



65 



special effects. Special attention is given to timing, pacing, 
and stereo imaging in mixdown. 

AVC 110— VIDEO TAPE EDITING 

3 Credits 

Techniques and procedures in electronic video tape editing. 
Projects include assemble and insert editing, audio 
dubbing, lip sync and micro processor controlled edit- 
ing. Both rollback and time code editing systems are 
covered with emphasis on the advantages and processes 
of each system as related to audio and video signal. 

AVC 201— ADVANCED AUDIO PRODUCTION 

3 Credits 

Theory of acoustical principles are applied to projects 
involving multiple microphone recording, post produc- 
tion sweetening and creation of synthesized sound. 
Development of critical listening abilities and prepara- 
tion of audio for media distribution. 

AVC 202— ADVANCED VIDEO PRODUCTION 

3 Credits 

Combines all aspects of video production for a com- 
prehensive program: budgeting, procedures for staff 
assignments, and techniques of client relations. Proj- 
ects include generation of computer graphics, real-time 
animation, and electronic image enhancement. 

AVC 203— MULTI-IMAGE DESIGN 

3 Credits 

Students learn to script, storyboard and shoot 35mm 
slides for a slide tape program. Projects include audio 
narration production and sequencing on the micro- 
processor system. 

AVC 204— SPECIAL PROJECTS I 

3 Credits 

Course is designed to accommodate student interest 
in specific interest areas. Projects are by mutual agree- 
ment between faculty and student. Performance and 
completed work must be portfolio quality and reflect 
applicability to the main areas of student program. 

AVC 205— SPECIAL PROJECTS II 

3 Credits 

Designed to provide specific experience in selected areas, 

which may be combined or concentrated. Two projects 

are recommended and additional projects require instructor 

approval. 



AVC 206— INDEPENDENT STUDY I 

3 Credits 

Provides the opportunity to design a project for a spe- 
cific area of a student's program. Development of proj- 
ect plan and expected outcomes. Work is restricted to 
student program area and must be portfolio quality. 

AVC 207— INDEPENDENT STUDY II 

3 Credits 

Provides opportunity to develop high skills in specific 
areas of a visual communications program or to elect 
a course from the college curriculum which is suppor- 
tive of a career in their chosen program. Other areas 
might include computer programming, marketing, 
advertising, an externship or supervision with approval 
from program chairperson. Program projects require course 
instructor's approval. 

AVC 208— PORTFOLIO PREPARATION 

3 Credits 

The summary of the student's efforts in the Visual 
Communications Division. The student's and instruc- 
tor's efforts are directed to providing a student with quality 
portfolio work demonstrating knowledge and skills needed 
to perform as a professional visual artist. Contents of 
the portfolio should demonstrate knowledge and skills 
in the major areas of their specific program and in peripheral 
areas studied through the Independent Studies and Special 
Projects courses. A resume and cover letter should be 
considered a necessary part of a completed portfolio. 
A student may elect to select one credit hour from the 
required three for a field study for their program. This 
requires program chairperson approval and can only 
be elected if portfolio project work can be accom- 
plished in the remaining time frame. 

AVC 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN AUDIO VISUAL 
COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



COMMERCIAL ART TECHNOLOGY 

The Commercial Art Technology program prepares students for a professional career in the 
visual communications field. The program provides experiences and competency skills in layout 
design, keylining, storyboarding, black and white illustration, package design, type fitting and 
specification, computer graphics and pre-printing processes. Special attention is given to design- 
ing for print (collateral), space and time. Students learn to develop and produce multi-media 
campaigns for product and service organizations, corporate logos, corporate identity programs 
and reproduction quality illustrations. Procedures in research, problem-solving, developing a 
target marketing plan, concept/theme development, client presentations and studio practices 
are investigated. 

The culmination of the students' activity is the completion of an exit portfolio which demon- 
strates cumulative skills and knowledge of the graphic design field. The portfolio is the primary 
tool used in job seeking efforts. Students also develop skills in resume and cover letter writing 
and interviewing techniques. 

There is a continuous interaction between the program and the professional field through the 
jury evaluation system, guest speakers, field trips, program advisory committees and the field 
experience programs. Faculty are professionally experienced and bring their expertise into the 
studio environment. 

The Associate in Applied Science degree requires 72 credits for completion and can be com- 
pleted in 4 semesters. An Associate in Science degree is offered in Evansville, enabling a student 
to transfer to the University of Southern Indiana. The program is offered in Columbus, Evansville, 
Sellersburg and South Bend. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 

Technical Courses (33 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

General Education Courses (18 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

66 



101 


Fundamentals of Design 


103 


Fundamentals of Drawing 


104 


Graphic Design I 


105 


Typography 


106 


Drawing for Layout and Illustration 


107 


Production I 


108 


Graphic Design II 


109 


Production II 


110 


Situation Drawing 


201 


Graphic Design III 


215 


Desktop Publishing 



ENG 


101 


English Composition 


ENG 


103 


Speech 


MAT 


XXX 


Math Elective 


SOC 


102 


Introduction to Psychology 


SOC 


104 


Introduction to Sociology 


SCI 


101 


Physical Science 



Commercial Art Technology 



67 



Related Education (6 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



ART 
ART 



204 
208 



Art History Survey I 
Art History Survey II 



Regional Electives (15 Credits) 



Total Credits 



15 
72 



COMMERCIAL ART TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 
DESCRIPTIONS 



ART 101— FUNDAMENTALS OF DESIGN 

3 Credits 

Design theory and color dynamics as applied to com- 
posing the visual field. The manipulation and use of 
color is also addressed. Projects in visual design pro- 
vide experiences in applying design theory. 

ART 103— FUNDAMENTALS OF DRAWING 

3 Credits 

Techniques in contour, gesture and modeled form drawing. 
Awareness and control of scale, proportion and per- 
spective are developed with studio projects. The effects 
of lighting, eye level and station point and how they 
effect the visual are of major concern. Students also 
learn proper support selection as related to technique 
and medium used. 

ART 104— GRAPHIC DESIGN I 

3 Credits 

Develops knowledge and skills in creating designs for 
print (collateral). Provides experiences in designing 
brochures, posters, stationery packages and newsletters. 

ART 105— TYPOGRAPHY 

3 Credits 

Using type as design element. Includes techniques in 
the layout of type, typographic history, type specifica- 
tion, copyfitting, copy proofing and marking up type for 
the typesetter. 

ART 106— DRAWING FOR LAYOUT AND 
ILLUSTRATION 

3 Credits 

Techniques of developing drawings for layout and illus- 
tration in appropriate media. 

ART 107— PRODUCTION I 

3 Credits 

Deals with production techniques and procedures. Course 



projects provide an experimental base in production 
techniques. 

ART 108— GRAPHIC DESIGN II 

3 Credits 

Developing skills in the design of space media. Includes 
experiences in designing newspaper, magazine, out- 
door, transit and display advertising. Of special con- 
cern will be the relationship of concept to viewer needs 
and interests. 

ART 109— PRODUCTION II 

3 Credits 

The production of art and mechanicals for space media. 
Includes: photographic procedures, jobber selection in 
the areas of printing, typesetting, illustration, and pho- 
tography, video graphics and desk top publishing. 

ART 110— SITUATION DRAWING 

3 Credits 

Techniques of producing visuals for specific activities 
and visual situations. Pencil, markers and ink will be 
used for the drawing projects. 

ART 201— GRAPHIC DESIGN III 

3 Credits 

The planning and development of multi-media cam- 
paigns for print, space and time. Focuses on bro- 
chures, catalogs, and direct mail print; newspaper, outdoor 
and magazine space; and television time advertising. 
Also transit, terminal display and yellow pages space 
advertising, point-of-purchase display and poster. 

ART 202— SPECIAL PROJECTS I 

3 Credits 

Designed to accommodate student interest in specific 
areas of interest or in areas where there is a need to 
strengthen skills. Performance and completed work must 
be portfolio quality and reflect applicability to the main 
areas of their program. 



68 



Division of Visual Communications Technologies 



ART 203— INDEPENDENT STUDY I 

3 Credits 

Provides students with opportunities to design projects 
for specific areas of interest. The project plan must be 
approved by the instructor. Work is restricted to student 
program area and must be portfolio quality. 

ART 204— HISTORY OF ART SURVEY I 

3 Credits 

A survey of painting, sculpture and architectural styles 
dating from ancient Mediterranean cultures to the Ren- 
aissance period. 

ART 205— SPECIAL PROJECTS II 

3 Credits 

Designed to provide specific experience in selected areas. 
Areas may be combined or concentrated. Two projects 
are recommended and additional projects must have 
instructor approval. All projects must be approved by 
the instructor prior to the start-up of project work. 

ART 206— INDEPENDENT STUDY II 

3 Credits 

Skill development in specific areas of a Visual Com- 
munications program or a related program such as 
marketing, advertising, an externship or supervision. 
Program projects require course instructor's approval. 
Program chairperson's approval is required to elect non- 
program coursework. 

ART 207— PORTFOLIO PREPARATION 

3 Credits 

Culmination of student efforts in the Visual Communi- 
cations Division. Efforts are directed toward providing 
students with quality portfolio work demonstrating 
knowledge and skills needed to perform as a profes- 
sional visual artist. Includes resume and cover letter. A 
student may elect to select one credit hour from the 
required three for a field study for their program. 

ART 208— HISTORY OF ART SURVEY II 

3 Credits 

Survey of the painting, sculpture, printing and archi- 
tecture from the Renaissance through 20th century 
cultures. 

ART 209— AIRBRUSH RENDERING 

3 Credits 

Presents concepts and practices in the use of the air- 
brush to render visuals in black and white and in color. 



ART 210— ILLUSTRATION TECHNIQUES I 

3 Credits 

Develops dexterity in the application of transparent and 

opaque media. 

ART 211— CREATIVE ILLUSTRATION CONCEPTS 

3 Credits 

Introduces montage illustration through experience in 

actual problems. 

ART 212— SPECIAL DARKROOM TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

Examines photographic processes, chemicals, and paper. 

ART 213— SPECIALIZED LAYOUT CONCEPTS I 

3 Credits 

Introduces advanced students to the concept board and 
its value in selling a campaign. Emphasizes the outdoor 
board as the initial step in campaign development. 

ART 214— SPECIALIZED LAYOUT TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

Advanced study of corporate identity. Emphasis is on 

the designer's role in creating a desirable, consistent 

corporate image. Experience with specific design 

problems. 

ART 215— DESKTOP PUBLISHING 

3 Credits 

A basic course in desktop publishing with special emphasis 
on transference and application of conventional skills 
gained in the preparation of mechanicals for printing. 

ART 216— COMPUTER GRAPHICS 

3 Credits 

A study of the historical development of computer images 
which includes: business graphics, typesetting, soft- 
ware packages, pagination, video and cinematics. 

ART 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMMERCIAL 
ART TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY 

The Commercial Photography program prepares students for a professional career in the visual 
communications field. The program is reflective of and responsive to the industry needs and 
quality standards — both technical and societal. The program provides experiences and com- 
petency skills in camera techniques, both color and black and white darkroom techniques, studio 
and location lighting for products and portraiture, composition and design, business and com- 
munications skills, as well as conceptualization and creative problem solving. 

There is a continuous interaction between the program and the professional field through the 
jury evaluation system, program advisory committees and the field experience programs. Fac- 
ulty are, primarily, professionally active and bring professional expertise into the studio environ- 
ment. The culmination of the students' activity is the completion of an exit portfolio which demonstrates 
cumulative skills and knowledge of the commercial photographic field. The portfolio is the pri- 
mary tool used in job seeking efforts. Students also develop skills in resume and cover letter 
writing and interviewing techniques. 

The program requires 72 credits for an Associate in Applied Science degree. Technical Cer- 
tificates are also available in specialized areas. The program is offered in Terre Haute, Columbus, 
Evansville, South Bend and Sellersburg. 

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 

Technical Courses (39 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title Semester Credits 

Fundamentals of Design 3 

Photography I 3 

Photographic Science and Theory I 3 

Studio Practice I 3 

Photography II 3 

Photographic Science and Theory II 3 

Studio Practice II 3 

Principles of Color Photography 3 

Advanced Processes and Techniques 3 

Professional Portraiture 3 

Commercial Photography Techniques I 3 

Commercial Photography Techniques II 3 

Portfolio Preparation 3 

General Education Requirements (18 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title 

English Composition 3 

Speech 3 

Math of Finance 3 

Life and Physical Sciences or Social Science Electives 9 

Regional Electives (15 Credits) 15 

Total Credits 72 



69 



CIP 


103 


CIP 


104 


CIP 


105 


CIP 


106 


CIP 


107 


CIP 


108 


CIP 


109 


CIP 


201 


CIP 


202 


CIP 


203 


CIP 


204 


CIP 


205 


CIP 


211 



ENG 


101 


ENG 


103 


MAT 


107 


XXX 


XXX 



70 Division of Visual Communications Technologies 

COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



CIP 103— FUNDAMENTALS OF DESIGN 

3 Credits 

Application flat pattern design concepts to black and 
white still photography. Projects in visual design pro- 
vide experience in applying design theory. 

CIP 104— PHOTOGRAPHY I 

3 Credits 

Covers basic black and white photographic processes 
using 35mm, medium format, and 4x5 large format 
cameras. Basic black and white darkroom processes 
are taught, as well as basic lighting techniques. 

CIP 105— PHOTOGRAPHIC SCIENCE AND 
THEORY I 

3 Credits 

Basic theories pertaining to black and white photog- 
raphy. Study of cameras and lenses, characteristics of 
films and papers and the chemistry of emulsions expo- 
sure and development. Includes basic physics of light 
and filters. 

CIP 106— STUDIO PRACTICE I 

3 Credits 

Introduction to studio work in black and white photog- 
raphy using continuous light sources. Basic set-up 
techniques and lighting methods for a variety of subject 
matter. Practice with photo flood lamps and quartz lamps, 
both floods and spots, and a variety of equipment used 
to modify light. 

CIP 107— PHOTOGRAPHY II 

3 Credits 

Students will develop advanced camera skills with 35mm, 
medium format, and view cameras. Techniques for 
photographing in a variety of picture taking situations 
will be covered. Special darkroom techniques and 
processes are included. Good composition and the use 
of photography as a communication tool will be 
emphasized. 

CIP 108— PHOTOGRAPHIC SCIENCE AND 
THEORY II 

3 Credits 

This course covers special black and white processes 
such as push processing and the zone system. Port- 
able and studio flash systems are studied as well as 



lighting ratios and the Inverse Square law. Basic processes 
for reproduction of images are taught. 

CIP 109— STUDIO PRACTICE II 

3 Credits 

Advanced techniques of multiple lighting set ups, stu- 
dio electronic flash, location lighting, special effects, 
and large sets. 

CIP 110— HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY 

3 Credits 

Survey of the technological, aesthetic, social, and polit- 
ical changes that the medium of photography has 
undergone. Nineteenth century processes are studied 
and recreated. Visits are made to historical archives to 
view prints. 

CIP 201— PRINCIPLES OF COLOR 
PHOTOGRAPHY 

3 Credits 

Development of camera and laboratory skills needed 
for both color negative and color positive process. Work 
with state-of-the-art equipment. The course encom- 
passes color psychology and esthetics, as well as the 
physics and the chemistry of color photography. 

CIP 202— ADVANCED PROCESSES AND 
TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

A darkroom course dealing with specialized techniques 
used by commercial photography labs; masking, inter- 
negatives, use of print film, litho film, production tech- 
niques, and retouching. 

CIP 203— PROFESSIONAL PORTRAITURE 

3 Credits 

Exploration of approaches and methods in traditional 
and alternative portraiture in studio and on-location 
photography. Emphasis is on creative approaches to 
commercial portraiture. 

CIP 204— COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY 
TECHNIQUES I 

3 Credits 

Introduction to studio and lab techniques used in adver- 
tising and industrial photography. Business practices 



Commercial Photography 



71 



are emphasized, as well as creative problem solving 
techniques. 

CIP 205— COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY 
TECHNIQUES II 

3 Credits 

Special techniques in advertising and industrial pho- 
tography, such as those used in fashion, food, and product 
illustration. 

CIP 206— SPECIAL PROJECTS I 

3 Credits 

Accommodates student interest in specific areas of their 
field in which they wish to concentrate or in areas where 
there is a need to strengthen skills. Performance and 
completed work must be portfolio quality and reflect 
applicability to the main areas of design, production, 
and/or illustration. 

CIP 207— SPECIAL PROJECTS II 

3 Credits 

Provides specific experiences in selected areas. All projects 
must be approved by the instructor prior to the start-up 
of project work. 

CIP 208— INDEPENDENT STUDY I 

3 Credits 

Provides students with opportunities to design a proj- 
ect for specific areas. A plan must be developed to show 
what the project outcome/results will be. Work is restricted 
to the program area and must be portfolio quality. 

CIP 209— INDEPENDENT STUDY II 

3 Credits 

Provides opportunities to develop skills in specific areas 
of a visual communications program or to elect a course 
from the college curriculum which is supportive of a 
career in their chosen program. Suggested areas that 
are not program specific could be computer program- 
ming, marketing, advertising, an externship, or supervision. 

CIP 210— VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS 

3 Credits 

Examines visual communications in all visual profes- 
sions in our society. Provides historical perspectives 
and encourages development of critical awareness of 
the contemporary arts. 

CIP 211— PORTFOLIO PREPARATION 

3 Credits 

A summary of student achievements in the Visual Com- 



munications Division. Efforts are directed to providing 
students with quality portfolio work which demon- 
strates knowledge and skills needed to perform as a 
professional photographer. The portfolio should dem- 
onstrate knowledge and skills in the major program areas 
and in Independent Studies and Special Projects courses. 
A student may elect to select one credit hour from the 
required three for a field study. 

CIP 212— BUSINESS OF PHOTOGRAPHY 

3 Credits 

Examines issues related to managing a photography 
business. Marketing and promotion, estimating and pricing, 
legalities, insurance, business correspondence, and the 
use of computers are included. 

CIP 213— COMPUTER GRAPHICS 

3 Credits 

An introductory course in design with a microprocessor 
computer terminal. Students produce black and white 
and color projects with a variety of software packages. 
Emphasis is on uses of illustration and type of com- 
mercial art projects. 

CIP 214— JOURNALISTIC AND EDITORIAL 
PHOTOGRAPHY 

3 Credits 

Students will photograph events and human interest 
features to gain experience in contributions to various 
publications. Establishing visual relations in the photo 
essay is emphasized. 

CIP 215— ADVANCED PORTRAITURE 

3 Credits 

Further exploration of advanced approaches to por- 
traiture. Emphasis is on creativity and quality. 

CIP 216— NATURAL LIGHT PORTRAITURE 

3 Credits 

Photographing people by natural light including posing 

techniques, location selection, props, film, and equipment. 

CIP 217— FASHION PHOTOGRAPHY 

3 Credits 

An introduction to the field of fashion photography with 

emphasis on commercial application. 

CIP 218— FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY 

3 Credits 

Examination of current issues in non-commercial pho- 
tography. Explores attitudes of photographers and crit- 



72 



Division of Visual Communications Technologies 



ics on a wide range of topics through directed reading, 
class discussion, and gallery visits. 

CIP 21*— SPECIAL PHOTOGRAPHIC 
PROCESSING 

3 Credits 

This course deals primarily with unconventional pho- 
tographic processes that are important from a historical 
viewpoint. 

CIP 220— SENSITOMETRY 

3 Credits 

Estimation of response of photographic materials to radiant 
energy, including methods of exposing, processing, 
measurement, and data evaluation. 

CIP 221— FIELD STUDY/COOPERATIVE 
EDUCATION 

3 Credits 

The course is designed to give students on-the-job 



experience at a job site that is specifically related to a 
chosen occupational area. 

CIP 222— ELECTRONIC PHOTOGRAPHY 

3 Credits 

Examines the area of still video photography and var- 
ious electronic darkroom software packages. Experi- 
ence with the electronic darkroom environment includes 
editing processes, manipulating images in black-and- 
white and color, and working with various output devices. 

CIP 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMMERCIAL 
AND INDUSTRIAL PHOTOGRAPHY TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 




GRAPHIC MEDIA PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY 

The Graphic Media Production Technology program provides comprehensive instruction to pre- 
pare students for entry level positions in the graphic media field. Instructional areas include: art 
and copy preparation, camera and darkroom fundamentals, layout and stripping flats, plate- 
making, offset presswork, composition, production control, special effects and ink and paper 
selection. 

The program prepares students for jobs in a variety of fields from the traditional craft area of 
typographic composition, or pre-press preparatory work, to binding and finishing. 

The two-year program, requiring 65 credits, leads to an Associate in Applied Science Degree. 
The program is offered in Terre Haute. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (35 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



GRA 


101 


GRA 


102 


GRA 


103 


GRA 


104 


GRA 


105 


GRA 


106 


GRA 


201 


GRA 


202 


GRA 


203 


GRA 


204 


GRA 


206 


GRA 


236 


SEC 


110 



Computer Graphics I 
Introduction to Machine Printing 
Photography Fundamentals I 
Art and Copy Preparation 
Basic Design Principles 
Introduction to Color Printing 
Photomechanical Reproduction 
Science of Color 
Graphic Design 
Designing with Type 
Budget and Planning 
Employment Orientation 
Keyboarding Skill Development 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
1 



General Education Requirements (18 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



ENG 


101 


English Composition 


ENG 


102 


English Composition II 


ENG 


103 


Speech 


SOC 


101 


Human Relations 


MAT 


107 


Math of Finance 


INF 


101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 



Regional Electives (12 Credits) 



Total Credits 



12 
65 



73 



74 



Division of Visual Communications Technologies 



GRAPHIC MEDIA PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY COURSE 

DESCRIPTIONS 



GRA 101— COMPUTER GRAPHICS I 

3 Credits 

Study of the historical development of computer images 
which includes business graphics, typesetting, soft- 
ware packages, pagination, video and cinematics. 

GRA 102— INTRODUCTION TO MACHINE 
PRINTING 

3 Credits 

History and overview of the interrelationships of processes, 
materials, and techniques utilizing equipment and tools 
necessary in platemaking, bindary/finishing and offset 
press. Class allows student to take assigned projects 
from design to bindary 



GRA 107— COMPOSITION SYSTEMS I 

3 Credits 

The use, operation, and application of machine prin- 
ciples and mechanisms related to typesetting; labora- 
tory projects in setting composition photographically; 
utilization and examination of various input systems. 

GRA 108— STUDIO PHOTOGRAPHY I 

3 Credits 

Introduction to basic studio procedure and lighting set- 
ups. Control of artificial light and creative composi- 
tional techniques are explored through assigned exercises. 
Procedures in equipment handling, controlling lighting 
ratios and further contrast and printing techniques in 
the darkroom. 



GRA 103— PHOTOGRAPHY FUNDAMENTALS I 

3 Credits 

Introductory course in basic black-and-white photog- 
raphy with the 35mm camera. Introduces film devel- 
opment, darkroom techniques and visual interpretation 
of photographic design problems. 

GRA 104— ART & COPY PREPARATION 

3 Credits 

A foundation course in design, typographic and com- 
munication concepts. Traditional techniques as well as 
computer-aided technologies are used in the consid- 
eration of color, format and use of visuals in illustration. 
Problem solving emphasis with assignments executed 
through strip-up of the negative into a flat and proofing 
the same. 

GRA 105— BASIC DESIGN PRINCIPLES 

3 Credits 

An introduction to fundamental design concepts used 
in two-dimensional media. Explores shape, color, line, 
pattern & Gestalt principles through creative exercises. 

GRA 106— INTRODUCTION TO COLOR PRINTING 

3 Credits 

A study of basic color theory, materials and methods 
used in the reproduction processes. Techniques and 
materials are covered with assignments utilizing differ- 
ent processes including: 4-color from pre-separated 
negatives, register and run. Includes inks and systems. 



GRA 109— COLOR METHODS IN PHOTOGRAPHY I 

3 Credits 

The course is designed to introduce students to color 
negative photographic materials with 35mm format 
camera. Topics include processing, printing and appli- 
cation of theories on color and perception. 

GRA 110— ADVERTISING DESIGN 

3 Credits 

Covers newspaper ads, magazine ads, two-color and 
full-color folders, brochures, calendars and P.O.P. mer- 
chandising aids in a comprehensive form for national 
advertising. 

GRA 201— PHOTOMECHANICAL REPRODUCTION 

3 Credits 

A basic course in image conversion in black and white 
as well as color theory. Photo chemistry, halftones, 
darkroom techniques and diffusion transfer are examined. 

GRA 202— SCIENCE OF COLOR 

3 Credits 

Physical properties of light and color, and psychological 
aspects of color perception and color relationships through 
creative exercises. Color theories of Itten, Munsell, Goethe, 
Chevreul and Albers are examined. 

GRA 203— GRAPHIC DESIGN 

3 Credits 

Analysis and review of basic theories of graphic layout 

and design and their underlying principles and processes. 



Graphic Media Production Technology 



75 



Includes alphabet design and design language, impo- 
sition, design steps, rough, thumbnail, comprehensive 
and final layout and preparation of dummy. 

GRA 204— DESIGNING WITH TYPE 

3 Credits 

Introduction to Typography. Type classification, identi- 
fication and selection. Copy fitting, mark-up systems 
and proofreading. Fundamentals of layout and design 
for print media. 

GRA 205— SURVEY OF PRINTING PROCESSES 

3 Credits 

Presents topics not normally covered in other courses. 
Examines those types of printing businesses in local 
area, utilizing guest lecturers from these businesses. 
Local market is surveyed and students are responsible 
for a research project concerning local business with 
presentation of oral or written report. 

GRA 206— BUDGET AND PLANNING 

3 Credits 

Estimating various types of printing produced by the 
major processes. Includes use of standard price cata- 
logs, analysis of material, labor and machine cost factors. 

GRA 207— AUDIOVISUAL PRESENTATION 

3 Credits 

The use of design principles in 35mm color transpar- 
encies and fundamentals of audio production and edit- 
ing. Each student will present a slide/tape production 
that conveys a concept through the effective combi- 
nation of images, music and/or narration. 

GRA 208— STUDIO PHOTOGRAPHY II 

3 Credits 

Concentration in advertising photography including fashion 
and product shots. Advanced studio lighting techniques 
and medium-to-large format camera operation with special 
purpose films, high print quality and technical control 
are emphasized. 

GRA 209— PHOTOGRAPHY FUNDAMENTALS II 

3 Credits 

Advanced printing techniques introducing the use of 
medium-format cameras and black-and-white films, flash 
illumination and special purpose films. 

GRA 210— PORTRAITURE 

3 Credits 

Designed to examine approaches and methods in tra- 



ditional and alternative portraiture in studio and on-location 
photography. Emphasis is on creative approaches to 
commercial portraiture. Special darkroom techniques 
for printing portraits is introduced. 

GRA 21 1— FLEXOGRAPHY 

3 Credits 

Includes study of high-speed roll-fed press operation. 
Emphasis on safety, set-up and register. Theory class 
will also utilize field trips to flexo-webb printing plants. 

GRA 212— COMPOSITION SYSTEMS II 

3 Credits 

An extension of the skills introduced in Composition 
System I, with assignments of greater difficulty and 
complexity utilizing available equipment, including 
computer controlled graphics and text. 

GRA 21 3— DESKTOP PUBLISHING 

3 Credits 

Covers computer techniques in pre-preparatory and 
preparatory composing procedures, including typeset- 
ting and typographic concepts. Emphasis is on com- 
puter skills and output. 

GRA 21 4— SCREEN PRINTING 

3 Credits 

Explores screen construction and process reproduc- 
tion methods. Includes paper, tusch, knife-cut and pho- 
tographic stencils and printing media surfaces applications. 

GRA 215— COMPUTER GRAPHICS II 

3 Credits 

An overview of computers and their creative potential 
in graphic design focusing on videotext graphics. Stu- 
dents create and manipulate images using a keyboard 
and a graphics tablet. Some projects will be photo- 
graphed for student portfolio. 

GRA 216— BUSINESS OF GRAPHIC DESIGN 

3 Credits 

Examines operational procedures that have worked 
successfully to build efficient, effective design depart- 
ments, while maintaining aesthetic consideration. 

GRA 217— SAFETY TECHNIQUES 

1 Credit 

Proper procedures, rules, regulations and safety 
requirements for fire, electrical, mechanical and chem- 
ical dangers. Examines use of color to identify hazards 
and emergency measures. Emphasis is on shop safety, 



76 



Division of Visual Communications Technologies 



layout, storage and practices to avoid accidents and 
injuries. 

GRA 218— TROUBLESHOOTING AND 
MAINTENANCE 

1 Credit 

Upkeep, lubrication and techniques of spotting mal- 
functioning equipment and corrections on problem 
concerning paper feed, dampening, inking systems. 

GRA 219— SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PRINTING 

3 Credits 

Individual investigation, research, studies and/or sur- 
veys of selected problems will enable students to iden- 
tify objectives, procedures, equipment and key check 
points on selected projects. Includes color separation, 
plant management and quality control. 

GRA 220— LOCATION PHOTOGRAPHY 

3 Credits 

Deals with special problems in the control of natural 
and artificial light in on-location photography, with emphasis 
on publicity-related photography for community effort. 

GRA 221— COPY METHODS 

3 Credits 

Introduction to methods used in high-contrast and con- 
tinuous tone flat copy work. Uses 35mm and 4x5 films 
in color and black-and-white, emphasis on appropriate 
printing skills. 

GRA 222— LARGE FORMAT PHOTOGRAPHY 

3 Credits 

Introduction to the operational features of the view camera 
in studio and on-location photography with black-and- 
white films. Emphasizes professional standards in exe- 
cution and presentation. 

GRA 223— IMAGES IN OUR CULTURE 

3 Credits 

Examines images and issues represented in fine-art 
and mass media publications. Students gain historical 
perspective and are encouraged to develop a critical 
awareness of contemporary image-making issues through 
discussion and written exercises. 

GRA 224— PHOTOJOURNALISM 

3 Credits 

Students photograph community events and human 

interest features to gain experience in freelance con- 



tributions to local publications. Gain skills in fact gath- 
ering, editorial writing, developing of a story and 
establishing visual relationships in the photo essay. 
Focuses on contemporary photojournalism. 

GRA 225— COLOR METHODS IN 
PHOTOGRAPHY II 

3 Credits 

Advanced application of color film materials in studio 
and on-location photography. Study of contemporary 
color photography in periodicals. The fine-tuning of 
exposure and printing skills is emphasized. 

GRA 226— HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY 

3 Credits 

Designed to familiarize students with the advances in 
photography since its invention. Explores the interre- 
lationship between the technical, aesthetic and com- 
mercial aspects of photography through selected readings 
and gallery visits. 

GRA 227— SENSITOMETRY FUNDAMENTALS 

3 Credits 

The fundamental operation, principles and equipment 
associated with reflection and transmission densitom- 
eter basics. Students will produce large format nega- 
tives in black-and-white and in color for the purpose of 
controlling densities through exposure and development. 

GRA 228— STUDIO PHOTOGRAPHY III 

3 Credits 

Builds on previous experience gained in the studio. The 
coursework is comprised of individual projects devel- 
oped by students. Students will execute a coherent body 
of studio work to become part of their final portfolios. 
Regularly scheduled individual evaluations are consid- 
ered part of the coursework. 

GRA 229— DIGITIZED PHOTOGRAPHY 

3 Credits 

Introduces methods of transferring line illustration and 
continuous tone photographs to the computer screen 
for further modification. Students will also digitize video 
images. Creative exercises strengthen student skills in 
advertising design and desktop publishing. 

GRA 230— PHOTOGRAPHY AND TYPOGRAPHY 

3 Credits 

Commercially oriented approaches to the combination 
of type and photography. Creative exercises in cap- 
tioning and advertising photography are formulated to 



Graphic Media Production Technology 



77 



allow students to combine principles of design, adver- 
tising and photography. 

GRA 231— ARCHITECTURAL AND INTERIOR 
PHOTOGRAPHY 

3 Credits 

Advanced study of special lighting and placement prob- 
lems as encountered in on-location photography with 
large-format cameras. For those students already familiar 
with artificial and existing-light controls. 

GRA 232— FINE ART APPROACHES IN 
PHOTOGRAPHY 

3 Credits 

An introduction to a number of non-silver photographic 
processes and the experimental application of hand- 
work to these and silver-gelatin images. Includes sur- 
vey of fine art, photographic history and technical overview 
of 19th and 20th centuries. 



GRA 234— SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ADVERTISING 

3 Credits 

Covers advertising in the U.S. economy, broadcast reg- 
ulations, the advertising media, audience measure- 
ment and the future of cable and pay television. 

GRA 235— AGENCY OPERATIONS 

3 Credits 

Considers methods agencies use to prepare advertis- 
ing budgets and to develop creative and media strat- 
egies. Other aspects involved in day-to-day agency 
business practices will also be covered. 

GRA 236— EMPLOYMENT ORIENTATION 

1 Credit 

Investigation of employment opportunities in the print- 
ing field. Examines sources of occupational information 
and preparation for job-seeking. 



GRA 233— SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN 
PHOTOGRAPHY 

3 Credits 

For sixth-quarter majors. Individual, long-term projects 
in areas appropriate to student needs and interests. 
Includes weekly evaluation of progress by instructor and 
program advisor. Work produced to be included in final 
portfolio, and considered preparatory for transfer to a 
baccalaureate program. 



GRA 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN GRAPHIC 
MEDIA TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



INTERIOR DESIGN TECHNOLOGY 

The Interior Design Technology program is designed to prepare graduates to participate in the 
field as qualified designers and to participate in professional association activities. Minor options 
permit specialization in various areas such as computer-aided design. 

The structure of courses in drafting, color and light, materials of interior design and the ele- 
ments and principles of design and composition permit students to link theory and practice. 
Students are assisted in developing individual portfolios by working on client profiles and problem 
solving, while executing projects in various media. 

Connecting students of the Interior Design Program to potential employers is accomplished 
through projects juried by area professionals, supervised work in design problem-solving for 
community service organizations, placement in field study, related field trips, and active faculty 
links within the design profession. 

The two-year program requiring 64 semester hours leads to an Associate in Applied Science 
degree. Technical Certificates are also available in specialized areas. Programs are offered at 
South Bend, Kokomo, and Evansville. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (34 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



INT 


101 


INT 


102 


INT 


103 


INT 


104 


INT 


105 


INT 


106 


INT 


107 


INT 


108 


INT 


201 


INT 


202 


INT 


203 



Fundamentals of Interior Design 
Structural Systems 
History of Art and Design I 
Survey of Textiles 
Interior Design Graphics 
Environmental Systems 
History of Art and Design II 
Environmental Psychology 
Materials of Interior Design 
Contract Environments 
Professional Practices 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 



General Education Courses (15 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title 

ENG 101 English Composition 

ENG 102 English Composition 

ENG 103 Speech 

MAT 107 Math of Finance 

SOC 101 Human Relations 

Regional Electives (15 Credits) 



Total Credits 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 

64 



78 



Interior Design Technology 



79 



INTERIOR DESIGN TECHNOLOGY COURSE 
DESCRIPTIONS 



INT 101— FUNDAMENTALS OF INTERIOR DESIGN 

3 Credits 

Survey of the elements and principles of Interior Design 

as applied to active living environments. 

INT 102— STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

Provides the interior design student with a basic knowl- 
edge of building structures, construction techniques, 
and building materials. Introduces technical skills needed 
to read and draft blueprints. 

INT 103— HISTORY OF ART AND DESIGN I 

3 Credits 

Survey of the development of the interrelationship of 
architecture, art, and interior environments from antiq- 
uity through the 18th century. 

INT 104— SURVEY OF TEXTILES 

3 Credits 

Basic textile identification and classification from fiber 

to finish. 

INT 105— INTERIOR DESIGN GRAPHICS 

3 Credits 

The elements of two and three dimensional design con- 
cepts as related to interior representational drawings. 
Emphasis is on interior space perception for realistic 
presentation to clients. 

INT 106— ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

Introduction to environmental systems concepts in 
architecture. Drafting exercises are utilized as an aid 
to understanding these systems. 

INT 107— HISTORY OF ART AND DESIGN II 

3 Credits 

Continuation of the study of the development of the 
interior environment from the 19th century to the pres- 
ent. 

INT 108— ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 

3 Credits 

Emphasizes the relationship between individuals and 
their surroundings. Explores the psychological con- 
cepts pertaining to the design of space. 



INT 201^MATERIALS OF INTERIOR DESIGN 

3 Credits 

Examines physical properties and characteristics of various 

building materials including textile products. Addresses 

problems in specifying, estimating, and installing these 

materials. 

INT 202— CONTRACT ENVIRONMENTS 

3 Credits 

An introduction to the various categories of commercial 
design and their specialized requirements. 

INT 203— PROFESSIONAL PRACTICES 

4 Credits 

Introduction to business principles and practices as they 
relate to the Interior Design Profession. Topics include 
business and installation procedures, methods of charging, 
and the steps involved in business formation. 

INT 204— COLOR AND LIGHT 

3 Credits 

Introductory study of color theory, including additive and 
subtractive systems. Covers the effects of various types 
of lighting on color. 

INT 205— HOTEL AND RESTAURANT DESIGN 

3 Credits 

Intensive study of all aspects of the planning of hotel 

and restaurant installations. 

INT 206— CUSTOM DESIGN IN INTERIORS 

3 Credits 

Development of original design for furnishings, textiles 

and accessory pieces. 

INT 207— STUDIO I 

3 Credits 

Laboratory experience with case studies designed to 

provide experience in creating a complete design selection. 

INT 208— STUDIO II 

3 Credits 
Continuation of Studio I 

INT 209— PORTFOLIO PREPARATION 

3 Credits 

Summary of student achievements in the Interior Design 



80 



Division of Visual Communications Technologies 



department. Efforts are directed to providing student 
with quality portfolio work which demonstrates the 
knowledge and skills needed to perform as a profes- 
sional interior designer. 

INT 210— PROJECT MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

The selection of accessories and specific procedures 
for installation of various categories of materials. The 
sequence of installation procedures for a job from the 
signing of the contract to completion of the job. 

INT 211— SUPPORT SYSTEM PLANNING 

3 Credits 

Requirements and space planning for kitchens, baths, 
and support systems. Standardization of cabinetry and 
fixtures, as well as expectation for the areas in the planning. 

INT 212— HISTORIC PRESERVATION 

3 Credits 

The process of establishing historic properties will be 
researched. Preservation, restoration and adaptive reuse 
will be differentiated as applied to both public and pri- 
vate properties. 

INT 213— FIELD STUDY I 

3 Credits 

Field placement or research project within student's 
occupational specialty, to include collection and anal- 
ysis of data and work experience in business and industry. 



INT 214— FIELD STUDY II 

3 Credits 

Continuation of Field Study I. 

INT 215— INDEPENDENT STUDY 

3 Credits 

Projects will be developed from specialty areas which 
will allow design resolution, presentation and job man- 
agement to be experienced by the students. 

INT 216— INDEPENDENT STUDY II 

3 Credits 

Continuation of Independent Study I incorporating 

community service projects, and barrier free design. 

INT 217— VISUAL MERCHANDISING 

3 Credits 

Principles of display and special techniques and equip- 
ment required in display work. 

INT 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN INTERIOR 
DESIGN TECHNOLOGY 

1 -5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 




81 



DIVISION OF HUMAN SERVICES AND 
HEALTH TECHNOLOGIES 




82 



The Division of Human Services and Health Technologies recognizes the increas- 
ing employment opportunities in the expanding health field. Ivy Tech prepares 
students to become technically trained members of the health care team. Class- 
room, laboratory, and clinical experience prepare students for service in hospitals, 
laboratories, nursing homes, child-care facilities, physicians' offices, and other 
health care-related settings. 

College health occupation programs are recognized and accredited by appro- 
priate external accrediting agencies. The student is advised to contact the nearest 
center for information concerning programs and course offerings. 



CHILD CARE TECHNOLOGY 

The Child Care Technology program focuses on early childhood growth and development includ- 
ing adult-child relationships. Emphasis is placed on the development of skills and techniques 
for providing appropriate environments and care for young children. Instruction is provided in 
the physical, emotional, social, and cognitive areas of early childhood. The training is appropriate 
for candidates seeking the Child Development Associate (CDA) credential. The student develops 
competencies through classroom instruction, observation, and participation in early childhood 
settings. 

Employment opportunities include: Day Care, Nursery School, Head Start, Family Day Care, 
Pediatrics Setting, Nanny Care, School Aide, School Age Care, Employer Sponsored Day Care, 
Infant/Toddler Care, Resource and Referral Services, Intergenerational Care, Respite/Sick Care, 
and other settings as they develop. 

The two-year program, requiring 63 credits, leads to the Associate in Applied Science Degree. 
Technical Certificates are also available in specialized areas. 

Programs and courses are offered in Fort Wayne, Muncie, Richmond, and Indianapolis. In 
addition, selected courses may be available in other regions. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 

Technical Courses (39 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title Semester Credits 

4 
3 
3 
3 
2 
4 
3 
4 
3 
2 
3 
3 
2 

83 



CCT 


101 


Introduction to Early Childhood Education 


CCT 


102 


Child Growth and Development I 


CCT 


103 


Health, Safety and Nutrition 


CCT 


104 


Practicum I 


CCT 


105 


Seminar I 


CCT 


108 


Curriculum I 


CCT 


112 


Child Growth and Development II 


CCT 


201 


Curriculum II 


CCT 


203 


Practicum II 


CCT 


204 


Seminar II 


CCT 


205 


Children's Literature and Language Arts 


CCT 


207 


Practicum III 


CCT 


208 


Seminar III 



84 



Division of Human Services and Health Technologies 



General Education Requirements (18 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title 

English Composition 
English Composition II 
Math of Finance 
Physical Science or 
Biology 

Human Relations 
Introduction to Psychology or 
Intercultural Relations 

Regional Electives (6 Credits) 



ENG 


101 


ENG 


102 


MAT 


107 


SCI 


101 


SCI 


109 


SOC 


101 


SOC 


102 


SOC 


103 



Total Credits 



_6 
63 



CHILD CARE TECHNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



CCT 101— INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILD- 
HOOD EDUCATION 

4 Credits 

A basic introduction to philosophy of early childhood 

education. Includes theories of discipline, parent 

involvement, self-concept, and an overview of various 

early childhood settings. (Lecture, field trips, and 

observation.) 

CCT 102— CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT I 

3 Credits 

Introductory study of the physical, social, emotional and 
cognitive development of the young child, conception 
to age three, as well as quality care and education of 
infants and toddlers. (Lecture and observation.) 

CCT 103— HEALTH, SAFETY AND NUTRITION 

3 Credits 

Analysis of basic safety, health, and nutrition needs. 
Applications as they relate to early childhood programs 
are emphasized. 

CCT 104— PRACTICUM I 

3 Credits 

Provides opportunity for practical experience through 
observation and supervised participation in child care 
settings. Successful completion of the practicum is required 
to advance to Practicum II and III. 

CCT 105— SEMINAR I 

2 Credits 

Companion course to Practicum I. Overview of Child 
Development Associate (CDA) competencies and 
observation techniques and skills. 



CCT 108— CURRICULUM I 

4 Credits 

Examines materials, methods, and teaching for provid- 
ing creative experiences for the young child. Offers 
appropriate music, movement, art, drama, etc. experi- 
ences for use in early childhood settings. Reviews the- 
ories of development of the young child. 

CCT 112— CHILD GROWTH AND 
DEVELOPMENT II 

3 Credits 

A lecture/laboratory course studying the physical, social, 
emotional, and cognitive development of the young child, 
3-8 years. 

CCT 201— CURRICULUM II 

4 Credits 

Students will review cognitive theories to develop 
appropriate practices in activities as they relate to prob- 
lem solving skills, math, science, and social studies in 
early childhood settings. Reviews multi-cultural education. 

CCT 202— ISSUES AND RESOURCES 

3 Credits 

Covers current early childhood issues, ethical and legal 
responsibilities, and working relationships with families 
and community resources. Analyzes the caregiver's role 
as a member of a multidisciplinary team. 

CCT 203— PRACTICUM II 

3 Credits 

Provides opportunity for practical experience through 
observation and supervised participation in child care 
settings. Successful completion of the practicum is required 
to advance to Practicum III. 



Child Care Technology 



85 



CCT 204— SEMINAR II 

2 Credits 

Companion course to Practicum II. Further develop- 
ment of observation skills and techniques will be explored. 
An examination of positive guidance techniques to meet 
individual and group needs is presented. 

CCT 205— CHILDREN'S LITERATURE AND 
LANGUAGE ARTS 

3 Credits 

Provides for understanding of the development and 
acquisition of language in order to provide materials 
and activities for optimum growth. Students will explore 
and evaluate literature for young children. Introduces 
audiovisual material, methods, techniques, and various 
types of equipment which are utilized in early childhood 
programs. 

CCT 206— EARLY CHILDHOOD ADMINISTRATION 

3 Credits 

Introduces principles of managing a child care pro- 
gram. Emphasizes the role of the manager to include 
personnel and program administration and fiscal man- 
agement. Client-community relations are explored. 

CCT 207— PRACTICUM III 

3 Credits 

Provides opportunity for practical experience through 
observation and supervised participation in child care 
settings. 

CCT 208— SEMINAR III 

2 Credits 

Companion course to Practicum III. The integration of 
skills is employed to develop a thematic teaching unit. 

CCT 210— INTRODUCTION TO IN-HOME CARE 

4 Credits 

Offers an overview of child care offered in a home-like 
setting. The course includes providing a safe, healthy 
learning environment in the home setting, parent- 
provider relationships, and recommendations for 
developing a professional support system. 

CCT 211— SCHOOL AGE PROGRAMMING 

3 Credits 

Examines materials, methods, and teaching styles for 
providing creative experiences for the school age child. 



Offers experiences such as appropriate music, move- 
ment, art, and drama for use in school age child care 
settings. Reviews theories of adolescent growth and 
development. 

CCT 212— ADOLESCENT CHILD GROWTH AND 
DEVELOPMENT 

3 Credits 

A lecture/laboratory course studying the physical, social, 
emotional, and cognitive development of the child, 
8-1 5 years. 

CCT 213— INFANT/TODDLER CARE 
PROGRAMMING 

3 Credits 

A lecture/laboratory course studying the physical, social, 

emotional, and cognitive development of the child 0-36 

months. 

CCT 214— FAMILY DEVELOPMENT 

3 Credits 

Examines the stages of the family life cycle and inter- 
personal relationships among family members. 

CCT 215— CHILD DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE 
PREPARATION 

4 Credits 

Course meets requirements of the Council for Early 
Childhood Professional Recognition for academic 
preparation for the Child Development Associate cre- 
dential. Course will provide students with the technical 
knowledge to support competent performance in a child 
care setting. The course is organized around the CDA 
competencies. 

CCT 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHILD CARE 
TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT 

The Associate in Science degree program in Early Childhood Development is designed for 

students who wish to earn a career-oriented degree at Ivy Tech and who plan to continue their 
education to a baccalaureate degree in Early Childhood/Elementary Education. 

Employment opportunities upon completion of the A.S. degree are the same as those described 
under A.A.S. Child Care Technology program. Students who complete the Baccalaureate degree 
will qualify for certification as elementary teachers in the State of Indiana. The program is offered 
at Richmond. 

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 

Technical Courses (31 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title Semester Credits 

Introduction to Early Childhood Education 4 

Child Development I 3 

Child Development II 3 

Curriculum I 4 

Early Childhood Issues and Resources 3 

Advanced Practicum I 3 

Seminar I 2 

Advanced Practicum II 3 

Seminar II 2 

Curriculum II 4 

General Education Requirements (31 Credits); to be completed at a four-year institution. 

Prefix No. Title 

English 3 

Public Speaking 3 

Children's Literature 3 

Math For Elementary Teachers I 3 

Computer Literacy for Education Majors 3 

Earth Science for Elementary Teachers 4 

Basic Science Skills 3 

American History or U.S. History 3 

Introduction to Music Fundamentals 3 

Crafts and Design _3 

Total Credits 62 



ECD 


101 


ECD 


102 


ECD 


103 


ECD 


105 


ECD 


106 


ECD 


201 


ECD 


202 


ECD 


203 


ECD 


204 


ECD 


208 



86 



Early Childhood Development 



87 



EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT COURSE 
DESCRIPTIONS 



ECD 101— INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILD- 
HOOD EDUCATION 

4 Credits 

A basic introduction to philosphies of early childhood 

education. Includes theories of discipline, parent 

involvement, self-concept, and an overview of various 

early childhood settings. (Lecture, field trips, and 

observation.) 

ECD 102— CHILD DEVELOPMENT I 

3 Credits 

Introductory study of the physical, social, emotional and 
cognitive development of the young child, conception 
to age three, as well as quality care and education of 
infants and toddlers. The influence of cultural environ- 
ment and individual differences in development are 
considered. (Lecture and observation.) 

ECD 103— CHILD DEVELOPMENT II 

3 Credits 

A lecture/laboratory course studying the physical, social, 
emotional, and cognitive development of the young child, 
four to eight years. 

ECD 105— CURRICULUM I 

4 Credits 

Examines materials, methods, and teaching for provid- 
ing creative experiences for the young child. Offers 
appropriate music, movement, art, drama, etc. experi- 
ences for use in early childhood settings. Reviews and 
analyzes theories of development of the young child. 

ECD 106— EARLY CHILDHOOD ISSUES AND 
RESOURCES 

3 Credits 

Covers current issues, ethical and legal responsibilities 
and working relationships with families and community 
resources. Analyzes the caregiver's role as a member 
of a multidisciplinary team. 



ECD 201— ADVANCED PRACTICUM I 

3 Credits 

Provides opportunity for practical experience through 
observation and supervised participation in child care 
settings. Successful completion of the practicum is required 
to advance to Practicum II. 

ECD 202— SEMINAR I 

2 Credits 

Companion course to Advanced Practicum I. Overview 
of Child Development Association (CDA) competencies 
and observation techniques and skills. An examination 
of positive guidance techniques to meet individual and 
group needs is presented. 

ECD 203— ADVANCED PRACTICUM II 

3 Credits 

Provides the final opportunity for practical experience 
through observation and supervised participation in child 
care settings. 

ECD 204— SEMINAR II 

2 Credits 

Companion course to Advanced Practicum II. The inte- 
gration of skills is employed to develop a thematic teaching 
unit. 

ECD 208— CURRICULUM II 

4 Credits 

Students will review cognitive theories to develop 
appropriate practices in activities as they relate to prob- 
lem solving skills, math, science, and social studies in 
early childhood settings. Reviews multi-cultural education. 

ECD 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN EARLY 
CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



DENTAL ASSISTANT 

Students in the Dental Assistant Program receive instruction in preparing patients for treatment 
and in assisting chairside as the dentist examines and treats patients. The dental assistant will 
expose and process X-ray films, sterilize instruments, provide oral health instruction, assist with 
record keeping and other office management practices. Students gain necessary knowledge 
and skills in general education, basic science, dental anatomy and materials, chairside assisting, 
laboratory techniques, radiology and basic office procedure. In addition to academic and clinical 
course work on campus, students are provided with practical experience in dental offices under 
the supervision of college personnel and dental office personnel. 

A one-year program, requiring 47 credits, leads to a Technical Certificate. Graduates are 
eligible to take the certification exam administered by the Dental Assisting National Board, Inc. 
The program is available at Lafayette. 

TECHNICAL CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (41 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



DEN 


101 


DEN 


102 


DEN 


103 


DEN 


104 


DEN 


105 


DEN 


106 


DEN 


107 


DEN 


108 


DEN 


109 


DEN 


110 


DEN 


111 


DEN 


112 


DEN 


113 



Basic Integrated Sciences 
Dental Materials and Laboratory I 
Dental Anatomy 
Dental Radiography 
Preclinical Practice I 
First Aid/Pharmacology 
Dental Office Management 
Preventive Dentistry/Diet and Nutrition 
Dental Materials and Laboratory II 
Dental Radiography Laboratory 
Preclinical Practice II 
Clinical Practice I 
Clinical Practice II 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
4 
1 
7 



General Education Requirements (6 Credits) 



Prefix No. Title 

SOC 101 Human Relations 

DEN 114 Health Office Communications 



Total Credits 



3 
_3 
47 



DENTAL ASSISTANT COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



DEN 101— BASIC INTEGRATED SCIENCES 

3 Credits 

Examines the human body as an integrated unit; includes 

anatomy, physiology, medical terminology. 

DEN 102— DENTAL MATERIALS LABORATORY I 

3 Credits 

Properties of dental materials, proper modes of manip- 



ulation, necessary armamentarium used, and technical 
duties dental assistants can perform. Stresses clinical 
behavior of materials and biological factors of impor- 
tance to dental assistants. 

DEN 103— DENTAL ANATOMY 

3 Credits 

Focuses on oral, head and neck anatomy, basic 



88 



Dental Assistant 



89 



embryology, histology, tooth morphology, and charting 
methods related to the dental field. Includes dental 
anomalies, pathological conditions, and terminology 
relevant to effective communication. Also drawing and 
carving of teeth. 

DEN 104— DENTAL RADIOGRAPHY 

3 Credits 

Principles, benefits, effects and control of X-Ray pro- 
duction. Covers history, radiation sources, modern dental 
radiographic equipment and techniques, anatomical 
landmarks dental films and processing. Emphasizes 
avoidance of errors in exposing and processing dental 
radiographs. 

DEN 105— PRECLINICAL PRACTICE I 

4 Credits 

Introduces qualifications and legal-ethical require- 
ments of the dental assistant. History and professional 
organizations are surveyed. Emphasizes clinical envi- 
ronment and responsibilities, housekeeping, chairside 
assisting, equipment and instrument identification, tray 
setups, sterilization, characteristics of microorganisms 
and disease control. 

DEN 106— FIRST AID/PHARMACOLOGY 

3 Credits 

Surveys the most commonly utilized and required first 
aid measures for emergencies. Examines proper tech- 
niques and procedures as well as equipment, medi- 
cations, and position care of the patient. Reviews anatomy/ 
physiology, and cardiopulmonary rescue as provided 
by the American Heart Association. 

DEN 107— DENTAL OFFICE MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Principles of administrative planning, bookkeeping, fil- 
ing, recall programs, banking, tax records, computer 
software, insurance, office practice, and management 
as related to the dental office. Attention is given to tech- 
niques of appointment control, record keeping, and credit 
and payment plans. 

DEN 108— PREVENTATIVE DENTISTRY/DIET AND 
NUTRITION 

3 Credits 

Emphasizes the importance of preventive dentistry and 
effects of diet and nutrition on dental health. Presents 
techniques of assisting patients in the maintenance of 
good oral hygiene. 



DEN 109— DENTAL MATERIALS AND 
LABORATORY II 

3 Credits 

Continues Dental Materials and Laboratory I. 

DEN 110— DENTAL RADIOGRAPHY LABORATORY 

1 Credit 

Course provides students with opportunity to use man- 
ual skills on actual patients, previously practiced on 
mannequins in Dental Radiography. 

DEN 111— PRECLINICAL PRACTICE II 

4 Credits 

A continuation of Preclinical Practice I. Anesthesia is 
presented. The following dental specialties are pre- 
sented: oral and maxillo facial surgery, periodontics, 
endodontics, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, prostho- 
dontics, and dental public health. Terminology relevant 
to this subject is stressed. 

DEN 112— CLINICAL PRACTICE I 

1 Credit 

Applications of manual skills, knowledge of dental materials 
and clinical procedures in a simulated office situation 
with actual patients. 

DEN 113— CLINICAL PRACTICE II 

7 Credits 

Provides chairside dental assisting experience in pri- 
vate dental practices in both general and specialized 
areas of dentistry. Includes weekly seminars as an inte- 
gral part of the learning experience. 

DEN 114— HEALTH OFFICE COMMUNICATIONS 

3 Credits 

Health auxiliary personnel must have communication 
skills to effectively function in their chosen field. Com- 
munication is the key to successful business relation- 
ships. Health care workers must be able to productively 
communicate with patients, co-workers, employers, and 
various business associates if they are to meet the 
demands of today's dental market. 

DEN 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN DENTAL 
ASSISTANT TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



FOOD SERVICE TECHNOLOGY 

The Food Service Technology program prepares students for careers in regional or national 
food establishments or in health care facilities and institutions. Students are trained to select, 
purchase, prepare, and produce food in quantity. Included are courses in volume purchasing 
and preparation of foods, supervision of food service operations, sanitation and safety, operation 
and scheduling of food production and proper service techniques, and marketing and merchan- 
dising of the establishment product. Students may elect courses in nutrition, cost controls, bev- 
erage management, bakery products, and catering. 

A one-year program, requiring 36 credits, leads to a Technical Certificate. The program is 
offered in Richmond. 

TECHNICAL CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (24 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



FST 


101 


FST 


102 


FST 


103 


FST 


104 


FST 


105 


FST 


106 


FST 


107 


FST 


108 



Introduction to Food Preparation 
Food Service Equipment Operations 
Food Service Sanitation and Safety 
Food Production Methods and Procedures 
Quality Service Standards 
Application of Food Service Production I 
Fundamentals of the Catering Business 
Application of Food Service Production II 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



General Education Courses (9 Credits) 



Prefix 



No. 



Title 



ENG 


101 


English Composition 


SOC 


101 


Human Relations 


REL 


111 


Technical Mathematics I 



Regional Electives (3 Credits) 



Total Credits 



_3 
36 



90 



Food Service Technology 



91 



FOOD SERVICE TECHNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



FST 101— INTRODUCTION TO FOOD 
PREPARATION 

3 Credits 

An introduction to preparation principles, nutrition, and 
menu writing. Emphasis is on basic food preparation 
techniques, food interactions during cooking and stor- 
age, and evaluation of finished products. 

FST 102— FOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT AND 
OPERATIONS 

3 Credits 

An in-depth study of food service equipment including 
cleaning, preventative maintenance, specifications, and 
legal requirements, with emphasis on usage. 

FST 103— FOOD SERVICE SANITATION AND 
SAFETY 

3 Credits 

Examines sanitation procedures for the elimination of 
food borne illnesses and food contamination in food 
service facilities. Stresses accident prevention through 
proper safety methods. 

FST 104— FOOD PRODUCTION METHODS AND 
PROCEDURES 

3 Credits 

Application of food production methods and proce- 
dures with emphasis on soups, sauces, and gravies. 

FST 105— QUALITY SERVICE STANDARDS 

3 Credits 

Skill development in the techniques of serving, clearing 

and cashiering in dining operations. 

FST 106— APPLICATION OF FOOD SERVICE 
PRODUCTION I 

3 Credits 

Applications of the principles of pantry production, bak- 
ing, vegetable and fruit preparation, pastries, and breakfast 
cookery. 



FST 107— FUNDAMENTALS OF THE CATERING 
BUSINESS 

3 Credits 

An introduction to the fundamentals of owning and 
operating a small catering business to include per- 
sonal, legal, and operational requirements. 

FST 108— APPLICATION OF FOOD SERVICE 
PRODUCTION II 

3 Credits 

Application of production methods and procedures 
for meat, seafood, poultry, dairy products, and hot 
hors d'oeuvres. 

FST 109— COMPUTER FOODSERVICE 
SPREADSHEETS 

3 Credits 

An introduction to Microcomputers with specific Food- 
service applications. Basic Procedures for Foodser- 
vice spreadsheet applications involving analysis and 
reporting using Lotus 1 -2-3 or compatible software. 

FST 110— PROFESSIONAL DINING ROOM 
SERVICE 

3 Credits 

This course provides students with skills in French and 
Russian service techniques. Included are table-side 
cooking, wine and beverage service. 

FST 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN FOOD 
SERVICE TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION TECHNOLOGY 

The Health Care Administration Technology program is designed for individuals who want to 
become administrators in long-term care health facilities or for those who want to upgrade their 
skills as nursing home administrators. Individuals who have completed the 200-hour nursing 
home administrator's course and who have been working in the field can enter the program at 
an advanced level. 

Through the program, students will develop an understanding of the rules and regulations 
governing nursing homes and gain knowledge about the aging process and the needs of older 
adults. They will also develop an understanding of the different disciplines involved and admin- 
istrative skills necessary to head a long-term care facility. 

The Associate in Applied Science degree program requires completion of 61 credits and pre- 
pares the student to take the licensing exam. 

The program is available in Indianapolis. 
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (52 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



HCA 


101 


HCA 


102 


HCA 


201 


HCA 


202 


HCA 


203 


HCA 


204 


HCA 


205 


HCA 


206 


HCA 


207 


HCA 


208 


HST 


106 


HST 


108 


BUS 


101 


BUS 


202 


MKT 


101 


1ST 


215 



Introduction to Long-Term Care 
Interdisciplinary Team Management 
Health and Aging 
Long-Term Care Internship I 
Long-Term Care Internship II 
Long-Term Care Internship III 
Long-Term Care Internship IV 
Long-Term Care Internship Seminar I 
Long-Term Care Internship Seminar II 
Issues of Long-Term Care 
Physiology of Aging 
Psychology of Aging 
Introduction to Business 
Human Resources Management 
Principles of Marketing 
Purchasing and Inventory Control 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
5 
5 
5 
5 
1 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



General Education Courses (9 Credits) 



Prefix No. Title 

ENG 101 English Composition 

ENG 102 English Composition II 

MAT 107 Math of Finance 



Total Credits 



3 

3 

_3 

61 



92 



Health Care Administration Technology 



93 



HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION TECHNOLOGY COURSE 

DESCRIPTIONS 



HCA 101— INTRODUCTION TO LONG TERM CARE 

3 Credits 

Explores the history of health care provided outside the 
home, and offers an overview of long-term health care 
facilities. Includes rules and regulations of nursing homes, 
resident rights, legislation, and physical plant require- 
ments. 

HCA 102— INTERDISCIPLINARY TEAM 
MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Explores principles and relationships of the interdisci- 
plinary team, the various departments which may com- 
pose the team, and the services which the department 
provides. 

HCA 201— HEALTH AND AGING 

3 Credits 

A holistic overview of the physical, psychological and 
social needs of individuals who live in extended care 
facilities. Examines effective treatment modalities to meet 
the residents' various needs. 

HCA 202— LONG TERM CARE INTERNSHIP I 

5 Credits 

Provides practical "hands-on" experience in a long-term 
care facility. The internship will serve as a basis for 
acquiring the knowledge, skills and attitudes one needs 
to function as an effective administrator. 

HCA 203— LONG TERM CARE INTERNSHIP II 

5 Credits 

Continuation of Long Term Care Internship I. 

HCA 204— LONG TERM CARE INTERNSHIP III 

5 Credits 

Continuation of Long Term Care Internship I and II. 



HCA 205— LONG TERM CARE INTERNSHIP IV 

5 Credits 

Continuation of Long Term Care Internship I, II and III. 

HCA 206— LONG TERM CARE SEMINAR I 

1 Credit 

Taken concurrently with Long Term Care Internship I 

and II; allows students to explore nursing home issues. 

HCA 207— LONG TERM CARE SEMINAR II 

1 Credit 

Taken with Long Term Care Internship III and IV, the 

seminar provides students the opportunities to discuss 

internship experiences and other relevant nursing home 

topics. 

HCA 208— ISSUES OF LONG TERM CARE 

3 Credits 

An overview of various issues to familiarize students 
with responsibilities of nursing home administrators. 
Management styles, models, quality circles and per- 
sonal improvement are covered. 

HCA 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN HEALTH 
CARE ADMINISTRATION TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



HUMAN SERVICES TECHNOLOGY 

The Human Services program offers students the opportunity to become Human Services gen- 
eralists and/or to concentrate in the areas of Substance Abuse or Gerontology. 

As a Human Services professional, one reaches out to individuals, to families, and to com- 
munities. The Human Services program provides the broad understanding to help others meet 
their psychological, social, and environmental needs. The Human Services Generalist may find 
employment in a variety of settings such as community centers, group homes, substance abuse 
centers, and nursing homes. All enrolled in the program take a core of Human Services courses. 

Those who study Human Services with a focus on Substance Abuse may find positions in 
substance abuse centers (residential, detox, hospitals) as counselors or residents-in-training. 
(The program is certified by Indiana Counselors Association on Alcohol Abuse, ICAADA.) Those 
who focus on Gerontology may find jobs in adult day care centers, senior citizens centers and 
extended care facilities. 

Program objectives include training the entry-level worker, providing education and training 
to upgrade the skills and knowledge of those currently employed, and providing development 
and enhancement. Throughout the program, students examine their values and attitudes which 
reflect upon their interactions with others. 

The Associate in Applied Science Degree requires 64 credits. The program is offered in Indianapolis. 



ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 

Technical Courses (34 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title 

Introduction to Human Services 
Helping Relationship Techniques 
Interviewing and Assessment 
Internship I 
Internship II 
Internship Seminar I 
Internship Seminar II 
Behavioral/Reality Techniques 
Group Process and Skills 
Program Planning/Policy 

General Education Courses (18 Credits) 



HST 


101 


HST 


102 


HST 


103 


HST 


201 


HST 


202 


HST 


203 


HST 


204 


HST 


205 


HST 


206 


HST 


207 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
5 
5 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Prefix No. Title 

ENG 101 English Composition 

ENG 103 Speech 

SOC 102 Introduction to Psychology 

SOC 104 Introduction to Sociology 

SOC 105 Introduction to Political Science 

MAT 107 Math of Finance 

Regional Electives (12 credits) 



Total Credits 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

12 

64 



94 



Human Services Technology 



95 



HUMAN SERVICES TECHNOLOGY COURSE 
DESCRIPTIONS 



HST 101— INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICES 

3 Credits 

Exploration of the history of human services, career 
opportunities and roles of the human service worker. 
Focuses on target populations and community agen- 
cies designed to meet the needs of various populations. 

HST 102— HELPING RELATIONSHIPS 
TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

Provides opportunities to increase effectiveness in helping 
people. Examines the helping process in terms of skills, 
helping stages, and issues involved in a helping rela- 
tionship and introduces major theories of helping. 

HST 103— INTERVIEWING AND ASSESSMENT 

3 Credits 

Develops skills in interviewing and provides a base for 
students to build personal styles. Introduces a variety 
of assessment approaches and treatment planning. Case 
studies and recording exercises are utilized. 

HST 104— CRISIS INTERVENTION 

3 Credits 

This course is designed as a beginning training unit for 
people who anticipate or are presently working with 
people in crisis situations. 

HST 105— CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

This course introduces the study of crime and criminals 

and how society is affected. 

HST 106— PHYSIOLOGY OF AGING 

3 Credits 

This course will focus on the physical changes and 
common pathologies associated with the aging process. 
It also will focus on the psychological and social impli- 
cations of such changes for human behavior. Through- 
out the course, there will be a focus on health promotion 
and disease prevention during the later years. 

HST 107— HUMAN SERVICES TOPICAL SEMINAR 

3 Credits 

Discusses topics of current interest in human services. 
Attention is given to special interest projects for stu- 
dents in Human Services. Field trips, guest speakers, 
audio-visual activities, and seminars may be utilized. 



HST 108— PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING 

3 Credits 

Covers the major behavioral changes in adulthood and 
aging. Students explore their own feelings about aging, 
as well as societal attitudes. 

HST 109— FAMILIES IN AMERICAN CULTURE 

3 Credits 

The impact of change on the role and function of the 
modern family, the nature of the socialization process, 
and socioeconomic, cultural and ethnic factors that nurture 
or inhibit the family's capacity to function are areas of 
study included in this course. 

HST 111— L.T.C. ACTIVITY DIRECTOR 

3 Credits 

Explores the philosophy and investigates the devel- 
opment of therapeutic activity programs for residents 
living in nursing homes. It focuses on offering activities 
which will meet an individual's physical, social, emo- 
tional needs. 

HST 112— RECREATION FOR SPECIAL 
POPULATIONS 

3 Credits 

Studies the nature and etiology of impairments includ- 
ing developmental disabilities, mental illness, physical 
disabilities and geriatrics, and their potential impact upon 
an individual's ability to participate in recreational activ- 
ities. Techniques needed to conduct a recreation pro- 
gram which allows successful participation by an individual 
with a disability will be explored. 

HST 113— PROBLEMS OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE IN 
SOCIETY 

3 Credits 

Provides basic information about alcohol and drugs, as 
well as the various laws which pertain to them. It also 
explores current attitudes and practices which pertain 
to alcohol and drug use, misuses, and dependence. 

HST 114— SOCIAL SERVICES IN LONG-TERM 
CARE 

3 Credits 

A specialized course which gives practical and useful 

information about aging and institutionalization. It focuses 

on the role of Social Services with the long-term care 

facility. 



96 



Division of Human Services and Health Technologies 



HST 115— APPLIED BEHAVIORAL PSYCHOLOGY 

3 Credits 

A study of unique capacities and personal strengths of 
self and others. Emphasis is on discovering, clarifying, 
and affirming individual potential for living more fully. 
Students discuss the complex nature of human devel- 
opment, human behavior and related social problems. 

HST 116— INTRODUCTION TO MENTAL 
RETARDATION/DEVELOPMENT DISABILITIES 

3 Credits 

This course provides the participant with background 
knowledge of the field of mental retardation/develop- 
mental disabilities and issues pertinent to the field. 

HST 117— INTRODUCTION TO RESIDENTIAL 
TREATMENT 

3 Credits 

Introduces information, skills, and attitudes necessary 
to become an effective worker in residential treatment. 
Explores the therapeutic "milieu", basic developmental 
needs, planning and use of activities, and issues related 
to the team approach. Discusses and demonstrates 
observation and recording of behavior. 

HST 201— INTERNSHIP I 

5 Credits 

A field work experience in social, educational, law 
enforcement (corrections) or other community service 
organizations. The student will be supervised by a prac- 
ticum site professional and a college faculty member. 
Fourteen-sixteen hours of work experience each week. 

HST 202— INTERNSHIP II 

5 Credits 

Continuation of Internship I. Location of this practicum 
experience will be determined cooperatively by the stu- 
dent and the Human Services Department. Fourteen- 
sixteen hours of work experience each week. 

HST 203— INTERNSHIP SEMINAR I 

3 Credits 

Discussion and analysis in small groups of the human 
services practicum experience. There will be special 
learning objectives related to the kind of work the stu- 
dent will do in an organization after completion of the 
program. 

HST 204— INTERNSHIP SEMINAR II 

3 Credits 

Continuation of Internship Seminar I with different learning 



objectives. These objectives will be related to the work 
the student will do after completion of the program. 

HST 205— BEHAVIORAL/REALITY TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

Focuses on theories of behavioral and reality approaches. 
Develops understanding of terms and practical appli- 
cations of the behavioral and reality approaches used 
in working with people. 

HST 206— GROUP PROCESS AND SKILLS 

3 Credits 

A study of group dynamics, issues, and behavior. Includes 
group functioning and leadership, guidelines on work- 
ing effectively with a co-leader, and practical ways of 
evaluating the group process. 

HST 207— PROGRAM PLANNING/SOCIAL 
POLICY ISSUES 

3 Credits 

Deals with the components of administration of human 
service agencies. Addresses practitioner skills needed 
to be an administrator or supervisor. Discusses social 
policy issues and impact on human services. 

HST 208— TREATMENT MODELS OF SUBSTANCE 
ABUSE 

3 Credits 

Describes the various treatment models used with 

chemically dependent clients. 

HST 209— COUNSELING ISSUES 

3 Credits 

Explores practice strategies for the worker who coun- 
sels chemically dependent clients. 

HST 210— CODEPENDENCY 

3 Credits 

This course presents the definition of codependency 
and the issues related to it. Students learn skills and 
techniques to confront codependent behavior. 

HST 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMAN 
SERVICES TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



MEDICAL ASSISTANT 

The graduate of the Medical Assistant Program is a professional multi-skilled person dedicated 
to assisting in patient care management primarily in a physician's office. The practitioner per- 
forms administrative and clinical duties and may manage emergency situations, facilities, and/ 
or personnel. Competence in the field also requires that a Medical Assistant display profession- 
alism, communicate effectively, and provide instruction to patients. A required externship under 
the direct supervision of a physician provides valuable on-the-job experience. 

Graduates of the Medical Assistant Program will be prepared to take the Certification Exam- 
ination of the American Association of Medical Assistants (AAMA) and the American Medical 
Association (AMA). 

The two-year Associate in Applied Science program requires 65 credits for completion. Tech- 
nical Certificates are also available. Programs are offered in Columbus, Evansville, Fort Wayne, 
Indianapolis, Kokomo, Lafayette, Madison, Muncie, Sellersburg, South Bend, Terre Haute, and 
Valparaiso. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (37 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



MEA 


102 


MEA 


104 


MEA 


111 


MEA 


112 


MEA 


113 


MEA 


114 


MEA 


115 


MEA 


120 


MEA 


121 


MEA 


201 


MEA 


202 


MEA 


203 


MEA 


204 



First Aid and CPR 

Medical Assisting-Administrative 

Medical Typing and Transcription 

Medical Assisting-Clinical 

Pharmacology 

Medical Assisting Laboratory Techniques 

Medical Insurance 

Medical Assisting-Clinical Externship 

Medical Assisting-Administrative Externship 

Medical Word Processing-Transcription 

Medical Assisting-Advanced Clinical 

Disease Conditions 

Medical Office Management 



Semester Credits 

2 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
2 
4 
3 
2 



General Education Requirements (18 Credits) 



Prefix 



No. 



Title 



ENG 
ENG 
MAT 


101 
103 

107 


English Composition 

Speech 

Math of Finance 


SOC 

SCI 

SCI 


102 
113 
115 


Introduction to Psychology 
Anatomy and Physiology I 
Anatomy and Physiology II 


Related Education (7 Credits) 


INF 

MEA 

MEA 


101 
101 
103 


Introduction to Microcomputers 
Medical Terminology 
Medical Law and Ethics 



Regional Electives (3 Credits) 



Total Credits 



_3 
65 



97 



98 



Division of Human Services and Health Technologies 



MEDICAL ASSISTANT COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



MEA 101— MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 

3 Credits 

Addresses basic terminology required of the allied health 
professional. Greek and Latin prefixes are presented, 
as well as suffixes, word roots, and combining forms. 
Emphasis is on forming a solid foundation for a medical 
vocabulary including meaning, spelling, and pronunci- 
ation. Medical abbreviations, signs, and symbols are 
included. 

MEA 102— FIRST AID AND CPR 

2 Credits 

Provides students with information necessary to rec- 
ognize emergency situations, know the proper course 
of action with different types of emergencies, and apply 
appropriate first aid, including CPR. 

MEA 103— MEDICAL LAW AND ETHICS 

1 Credit 

Presents ethics of medicine and medical practice, as 
well as legal requirements and implications for allied 
health professions. 

MEA 104— MEDICAL ASSISTING— 
ADMINISTRATIVE 

3 Credits 

This course provides a basic understanding of the 
administrative duties and responsibilities pertinent to 
medical offices. It also develops communication skills 
specifically directed toward a medical office and the 
role of the professional Medical Assistant as a member 
of the health care team. It includes instruction in med- 
ical correspondence and records, case histories of patients, 
filing, financial administration, telephone procedures, 
appointment scheduling, receptionist duties, process- 
ing mail, pegboard accounting, and care of facilities 
and equipment. It also includes development of desir- 
able personality traits, interpersonal relationships and 
attitudes within the medical office. 

MEA 1 1 1— MEDICAL TYPING AND 
TRANSCRIPTION 

3 Credits 

Focuses on improving typewriting ability in the medical 
field, including transcription with emphasis on produc- 
tion, speed and accuracy. Course includes formatting, 
typing, and transcription of articles, medical reports, 
case histories, and correspondence using medical 
terminology. 



MEA 112— MEDICAL ASSISTING— CLINICAL 

4 Credits 

Provides students the opportunity to become familiar 
with clinical duties and to gain the skills needed to per- 
form them. Includes: vital signs, asepsis, sterilization, 
medications, ECGs, X-ray, nutrition, physical therapy, 
and other technical skills needed to assist the physician. 

MEA 113— PHARMACOLOGY 

3 Credits 

The most common medications in current use are dis- 
cussed according to body systems with emphasis on 
classifications, uses, routes of administration, dos- 
ages, interactions, incompatibilities, and side effects. 
Also addressed are special precautions, legal aspects, 
and patient education. 

MEA 114— MEDICAL ASSISTING LABORATORY 
TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

Prepares students to perform various basic laboratory 
procedures to include preparation of patients, collect- 
ing and preparing appropriate specimens, familiariza- 
tion with purposes and expected norms of laboratory 
test results. Course also includes current safety and 
quality control standards. 

MEA 115— MEDICAL INSURANCE 

2 Credits 

An overview of medical insurance programs with skills 
developed in handling insurance forms, CPT and ICD- 
9-CM Coding, and reports as applied to the medical 
office. 

MEA 120— MEDICAL ASSISTING CLINICAL 
EXTERNSHIP 

3 Credits 

Provides the opportunity to discuss and perform clini- 
cal procedures under supervision, with learning expe- 
riences obtained in selected physicians' offices, clinics, 
or hospitals. 

MEA 121— MEDICAL ASSISTING ADMINISTRATIVE 
EXTERNSHIP 

3 Credits 

Course provides opportunities to observe, perform, and 
discuss various administrative competencies under 
supervision, with learning experiences obtained in selected 
physicians' offices, clinics, or hospitals. 



Medical Assistant 



99 



MEA 201— MEDICAL WORD PROCESSING/ 
TRANSCRIPTION 

2 Credits 

Advances skills and knowledge of medical dictation, 
machine transcription, and use of word processing. 
Includes typing medical reports, terminology, and 
correspondence. 

MEA 202— MEDICAL ASSISTING— ADVANCED 
CLINICAL 

4 Credits 

Advances the knowledge and skills enabling the stu- 
dent to assist in clinical management in the medical and 
surgical specialities. Addresses health services in the 
community which are directed toward prevention of dis- 
ease and maintenance and restoration of health. 

MEA 203— DISEASE CONDITIONS 

3 Credits 

Presents the basic concepts of diseases, their courses 
and functional disturbances as they relate to body sys- 
tems. Includes the precipitating risk factors and appro- 
priate methods of patient education regarding various 
disease processes. 

MEA 204— MEDICAL OFFICE MANAGEMENT 

2 Credits 

An in-depth study of various influences on office func- 
tions providing a background for organization and man- 
agement of a physician's office. Includes government 
and professional sources for consultation. 

MEA 211— ECG INTERPRETATION 

3 Credits 

Covers basic cardiovascular anatomy and physiology; 
basic electrophysiology; ECG techniques to define, identify 
and analyze ECG measurements; ECG hotter and stress 
testing instrumentation; nomenclature and derivations 
of ECG leads. 

MEA 212— PHLEBOTOMY 

3 Credits 

Presents the principles and practices of laboratory 
specimen collection and processing. Also covers med- 
ical terminology, infection control, patient identification, 
anatomy and physiology, anticoagulants, blood collec- 
tion, specimen processing, and interpersonal skills. 

MEA 213— ADVANCED INSURANCE CODING 

3 Credits 

Introduces the medical office administrator to codes 



necessary to bill insurance claims and provides expe- 
rience in coding claim forms using the correct combi- 
nation of codes to maximize reimbursement. 

MEA 214— ADVANCED FIRST AID AND CPR 

3 Credits 

Provides students with information necessary to rec- 
ognize emergency situations, know the proper course 
of action with different types of emergencies and apply 
appropriate first aid. Handling of victims of hazardous 
materials accidents will be addressed. CPR including 
one and two rescuer adult, infant, and child resuscita- 
tion will be taught. 

MEA 215— ADVANCED MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 

3 Credits 

Includes more detailed and advanced study of the 
derivatives of medical terms, symbols, and signs. Pre- 
sents an in-depth study of the correlation between medical 
vocabulary and the application of those terms to the 
anatomy and physiology of the body, related diseases, 
conditions, and treatment. 

MEA 21 6— NUTRITION 

2 Credits 

Presents the importance of a balanced diet; methods 
of evaluating a diet; the basic four food groups; the 
functions, requirements and food sources of fats, pro- 
teins, carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals; and the 
deficiency diseases. Introduces meal planning, nutri- 
tion for various age groups, religious and nationality 
food habits, and diet therapy. Explains special diets for 
diabetes, disease of the Gl tract, urinary tract, blood, 
cardiovascular system, obesity, cancer, allergy, and 
pregnancy. 

MEA 217— GERONTOLOGY 

3 Credits 

Presents a multidisciplinary study of the sociological, 
psychological, and physiological aspects of aging. Included 
will be patient education and the impact all facets of 
aging have on the total person. 

MEA 221— SEMINAR I 

1 Credit 

Discusses topics of current interest in the medical assisting 
profession. Attention is given to special interest proj- 
ects for students in the Medical Assistant program. Field 
trips, guest speakers, audio-visual activities, and sem- 
inars may be utilized. 



100 



Division of Human Services and Health Technologies 



MEA 222— SEMINAR II 

2 Credits 

Discusses topics of current interest in the medical assisting 
profession. Attention is given to special interest proj- 
ects for students in the Medical Assistant program. Field 
trips, guest speakers, audio-visual activities, and sem- 
inars may be utilized. 

MEA 223— SEMINAR III 

3 Credits 

Discusses topics of current interest in the medical assisting 
profession. Attention is given to special interest proj- 
ects for students in the Medical Assistant program. Field 
trips, guest speakers, audio-visual activities, and sem- 
inars may be utilized. 



MEA 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN MEDICAL 
ASSISTANT TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 

MEA 299— COMPREHENSIVE CERTIFICATION 
REVIEW 

3 Credits 

This course is designed to review fundamentals and 
principles of medical assisting, thereby preparing the 
student to sit for the certification examination upon 
graduation from the program. Administrative, clinical, 
and general information is covered. Testing procedures 
are addressed. 



MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNICIAN 

The Medical Laboratory Technician program is designed to prepare graduates to work in clinics, 
physicians' offices, hospitals and research laboratories as medical laboratory technicians. Med- 
ical laboratory technicians perform laboratory procedures, define and solve associated prob- 
lems, and use quality control techniques to aid in the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of 
patients. Courses in bacteriology, parasitology, chemistry, hematology, immunology, anatomy, 
physiology, and immunohematology provide both theory and practical applications. 

The two-year program requires completion of 69 credits. Programs are offered in South Bend 
and Terre Haute. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 

Technical Courses (47 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title Semester Credits 

Fundamentals of Laboratory Techniques 3 

Routine Analysis Techniques 3 

Immunology Techniques 3 

Immunohematology Techniques 3 

Instrumentation 2 

Microbiology Techniques 4 

Hematology Techniques I 3 

Hematology Techniques II 3 

Chemistry Techniques I 3 

Chemistry Techniques II 3 

Routine Analysis Applications 1 

Hematology Applications 3 

Microbiology Applications 4 

Immunology Applications 1 

Immunohematology Applications 3 

Chemistry Applications 4 

Parasitology and Mycology Techniques 1 

General Education Courses (16 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title 

3 
3 
3 

1 
3 
3 

Regional Electives (6 Credits) _6 

Total Credits 69 



MLT 


101 


MLT 


102 


MLT 


201 


MLT 


202 


MLT 


203 


MLT 


204 


MLT 


205 


MLT 


206 


MLT 


207 


MLT 


208 


MLT 


209 


MLT 


210 


MLT 


211 


MLT 


212 


MLT 


213 


MLT 


214 


MLT 


215 



ENG 


101 


English Composition 


SOC 


101 


Human Relations 


MAT 


101 


Algebra I 


MEA 


103 


Medical Law and Ethics 


SCI 


107 


Chemistry 


SCI 


113 


Anatomy & Physiology I 



101 



102 



Division of Human Services and Health Technologies 



MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNICIAN COURSE 
DESCRIPTIONS 



MLT 101— FUNDAMENTALS OF LABORATORY 
TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

Introduces elementary skills required in the medical 
laboratory. Subject matter includes: laboratory math, 
quality control, pipetting skills, veinipuncture tech- 
niques and microscope skills. 

MLT 102— ROUTINE ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

Principles, practices and clinical laboratory techniques 
associated with the routine analysis of urine and other 
body fluids. 

MLT 201— IMMUNOLOGY TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

Designed to provide the student with a basic under- 
standing of the principles of the human immunologic 
system and experience routine serologic testing. 

MLT 202— IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

Instruction in the practice, principles, and procedures 

used for blood banking in the clinical laboratory. 



MLT 206— HEMATOLOGY TECHNIQUES II 

3 Credits 

Continues the study of principles and procedures in 
hematology and hemostasis. Introduces procedures which 
lie outside those routinely performed. Continues cell 
differentiation, with emphasis on early and less com- 
monly encountered abnormal cells, with associated special 
stains. Includes clinicopathologic correlations. 

MLT 207— CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES I 

3 Credits 

Principles, procedures and clinicopathologic correla- 
tions in routine chemical analysis of the blood and other 
body fluids. Provides laboratory experiences in basic 
methods, selected to develop routine analytical abili- 
ties and to promote the ability to recognize sources of 
error. 

MLT 208— CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES II 

3 Credits 

Continues the study of principles, procedures and clin- 
icopathologic correlations in the chemical analysis of 
blood and other body fluids. Introduces procedures which 
lie outside those routinely performed in the clinical 
chemistry laboratory, including clinicopathologic 
correlations. 



MLT 203— INSTRUMENTATION 

2 Credits 

Includes instrumentation theory and practices as applied 
to electronic equipment and automated systems in the 
medical laboratory. 

MLT 204— MICROBIOLOGY TECHNIQUES 

4 Credits 

Principles of bacteriology including gram negative and 
positive bacilli and cocci, fastidious organisms and an 
overview of anaerobic and acid-fast bacteria. Basic lab- 
oratory techniques in clinical bacteriology. 

MLT 205— HEMATOLOGY TECHNIQUES I 

3 Credits 

Theory of blood formation and function and routine 
hematologic procedures, with emphasis on differentia- 
tion of normal and commonly encountered abnormal 
blood cells. Includes basic theory of hemostasis and 
associated routine coagulation procedures and clini- 
copathologic correlations. 



MLT 209— ROUTINE ANALYSIS APPLICATIONS 

1 Credit 

Clinical applications of routine urine analysis in the hos- 
pital laboratory including physical, chemical and micro- 
scopic examination of urine. 

MLT 210— HEMATOLOGY APPLICATIONS 

3 Credits 

Knowledge and skill development pertaining to the 
principles and techniques of hematology in the hospital 
laboratory. 

MLT 211— MICROBIOLOGY APPLICATIONS 

4 Credits 

A study of the applications and clinical practices of 
microbiology found in the hospital laboratory. 

MLT 212— IMMUNOLOGY APPLICATIONS 

1 Credit 

Study and practice in the clinical application of serology 

in the hospital laboratory. 



Medical Laboratory Technician 



103 



MLT 213— IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY APPLICATIONS 

3 Credits 

Applications of principles and procedures used in blood 
banking in the hospital laboratory. 

MLT 214— CHEMISTRY APPLICATIONS 

4 Credits 

Designed to study and practice the analytical aspects 
of clinical chemistry in the hospital laboratory. 

MLT 215— PARASITOLOGY AND MYCOLOGY 
TECHNIQUES 

1 Credit 

Examines the isolation, identification, life cycles and 

disease processes of pathogenic fungi and parasites. 

MLT 216— ELEMENTARY ORGANIC AND 
BIOCHEMISTRY 

3 Credits 

The chemistry of carbon-containing compounds and 

the biochemistry of lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, nucleic 

acids and enzymes. Includes related laboratory 

procedures. 



MLT 217— ADVANCED CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES 

1 Credit 

Principles and techniques of chemistry procedures out- 
side of routine clinical chemistry testing, such as toxi- 
cology, endocrinology, and inborn errors of metabolism. 

MLT 218— CLINICAL PATHOLOGY 

3 Credits 

Examines various disease conditions, diagnosis, etiol- 
ogies, clinical symptoms and related laboratory find- 
ings. Includes anemias, leukemias, autoimmune and 
immunodeficiency disorders. 

MLT 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN MEDICAL 
LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



MENTAL HEALTH REHABILITATION TECHNOLOGY 

The Mental Health Rehabilitation Technology Program prepares paraprofessionals with the skills 
necessary for employment in the mental health field. The program develops technicians in activ- 
ity therapy, work therapy, supportive therapy, and educational and recreational programs. The 
curriculum offers specialized and technical courses in physical and behavioral client-treatment 
techniques, management of client living units, recreational and creative activities, client assess- 
ment and documentation. 

The two-year program, requiring 73 credits, leads to the Associate in Applied Science Degree. 
Technical Certificates are also available in specialty areas. The program is offered in Fort Wayne 
and Muncie. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (56 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



MHR 


101 


MHR 


102 


MHR 


103 


MHR 


104 


MHR 


105 


MHR 


106 


MHR 


107 


MHR 


108 


MHR 


201 


MHR 


202 


MHR 


203 


MHR 


204 


MHR 


205 


MHR 


206 


MHR 


207 


MHR 


208 


MEA 


102 



Physical Care 

Behavior Management 

Physical Systems 

Clinical I 

Human Growth and Development 

Evaluation and Assessment 

Special Populations Needs and Activities 

Clinical II 

Applied Psychology 

Abnormal Psychology 

Clinical III 

Issues and Resources in Mental Health 

Management and Supervision 

Legal Aspects 

Aging Process 

Chemical Dependency 

First Aid and CPR 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



General Education Requirements (12 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



MAT 


101 


Algebra I 


ENG 


101 


English Composition 


SOC 


101 


Human Relations 


MEA 


113 


Pharamacology 



Regional Electives (5 Credits) 



Total Semester Credits 



_5 
73 



104 



Mental Health Rehabilitation Technology 



105 



MENTAL HEALTH REHABILITATION TECHNOLOGY 
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



MHR 101— PHYSICAL CARE 

3 Credits 

Designed to provide entry level skills in assessing the 
physical and emotional status of clients. Skill devel- 
opment in identifying major symptoms, and learning 
therapeutic interventions. Includes recording of vital signs 
and terminology used in the mental health field. 

MHR 102— BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Introduction to principles and applications of behavior 
modification. Identifying target behaviors and design- 
ing behavioral programs to affect change. Issues of ethics, 
mental retardation, positive reinforcement, and pro- 
gram evaluation are emphasized. 

MHR 103— PHYSICAL SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

Deals with the physical care of clients within a unit. 
Surveys muscular patterns, body systems, seizures, 
and first aid. 

MHR 104— CLINICAL I 

4 Credits 

Experience is gained through internship at a mental 
health agency. Includes assessment, establishing ther- 
apeutic relationships, knowledge of community resources, 
and learning to function as part of a mental health team. 
Choice of agency is determined jointly by the student, 
agency, and clinical supervisor. 

MHR 105— HUMAN GROWTH AND 
DEVELOPMENT 

3 Credits 

Introduces cognitive, social and psychological theories 
of human development from the prenatal period through 
the adolescent years. Examines human development 
from the adolescent years through later adulthood. Includes 
adjustment to the roles of adulthood, the aging process, 
and death and dying. 

MHR 106— EVALUATION AND ASSESSMENT 

3 Credits 

How to observe, assess, and document behavior in a 
professional manner. Skills are obtained in conducting 
interviews, writing progress notes, and completing intakes. 
Emphasis is on learning to be accurate, objective, and 
professional with any assessment of human behavior. 



MHR 107— SPECIAL POPULATIONS/ 
NEEDS AND ACTIVITIES 

3 Credits 

Considers recreation as a vital form of therapy. Skills 
are acquired in identifying client needs and limitations. 
Focus is on providing comfortable, therapeutic activi- 
ties to promote client interaction. 

MHR 108— CLINICAL II 

4 Credits 

This course allows students to build upon skills and 
experience gained in Clinical I. 

MHR 201— APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY 

4 Credits 

A survey of humanistic, behavioristic and psychoana- 
lytic theories of personality as they relate to dealing 
effectively with the adjustment demands of everyday 
life. Includes the dynamics of stress and coping, inter- 
personal relationships, and approaches to personal growth. 

MHR 202— ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 

4 Credits 

A framework for understanding maladaptive behavior 
including common misconceptions and accepted defi- 
nitions. Course details the clinical pictures, causal fac- 
tors and treatment and outcomes of maladaptive patterns. 
Areas of assessment, therapy and prevention are also 
addressed. 

MHR 203— CLINICAL III 

4 Credits 

Offers supervised clinical experience with emphasis on 

client interaction and assessment. 

MHR 204— ISSUES AND RESOURCES IN MENTAL 
HEALTH 

3 Credits 

Focuses on current issues and resources that impact 
upon client treatment. Topics such as client rights, advocacy 
and accurate diagnosis/treatment are explored. Leg- 
islative issues affecting both the mentally retarded and 
the mentally ill client will be addressed. 

MHR 205— MANAGEMENT AND SUPERVISION 

3 Credits 

Needs and methods of providing service to the client 

in a residential facility. Skills obtained in identifying spe- 



106 



Division of Human Services and Health Technologies 



cific client needs, as well as managing activities of daily 
living, therapeutic- relationships, and role clarification 
for the mental health worker as part of a team. 

MHR 206— LEGAL ASPECTS 

3 Credits 

Application of the least restrictive alternative and Pub- 
lic Law/58 to resident programming including JCAH 
accreditation requirements. Outlines treatment proce- 
dures available from policy B-11, including extinction, 
over correction, and restrictive techniques and the legal 
and ethical considerations of each. 

MHR 207— AGING PROCESS 

3 Credits 

Develops understanding of the physical and psycho- 
logical changes that occur with aging. Adaptations of 



nursing techniques, treatment approaches and the 
environment to meet these changing needs are explored. 

MHR 208— CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY 

3 Credits 

Offers an approach to the assessment and treatment 
of alcohol and drug addiction, with emphasis on treat- 
ment. Attention is given also to theories of alcoholism 
and drug abuse as a disease. 

MHR 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN MENTAL 
HEALTH REHABILITATION TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN NURSING 

The Associate of Science in Nursing program is available to the student with no previous nursing 
education and provides the LPN mobility to continue education to the associate degree level. 
Graduates of the ASN program are eligible to write the NCLEX-RN to become registered nurses. 
The program is designed to accommodate students who are entering nursing for the first time 
as well as LPNs seeking educational mobility. Those interested in the ASN program are encour- 
aged to contact the nearest region offering a program for information concerning course and 
program offerings. 

Under articulation agreements, students complete technical courses at Ivy Tech and general 
education courses at a four-year institution in the region. Program locations and the cooperating 
institutions are: South Bend/Indiana University-South Bend; Lafayette/St. Joseph's College at 
Rensselaer; Richmond/Indiana University-East; and Evansville/University of Southern Indiana. 



ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM (TRACK I) 

Technical Courses (38 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title Semester Credits 

Fundamental Nursing Concepts 4 

Fundamental Nursing Concepts Practicum 4 

Life Cycle Nursing I 4 

Life Cycle Nursing I Practicum 4 

Life Cycle Nursing II 5 

Life Cycle Nursing II Practicum 5 

Life Cycle Nursing III 5 

Life Cycle Nursing III Practicum 5 

Issues in Nursing 2 

General Education Courses 

Courses include Chemistry, Anatomy and Physiology, Microbiology, Psychology, 

Sociology, Lifespan Development, and English (Requires Approval of Program Supervisor) 28-32 

Total Credits 66-70 

COMPLETION OPTION PROGRAM, LPNs ONLY 

Technical Courses (38 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title Semester Credits 

NLN Mobility Profile I, Book 1 5 

Transition to Associate Degree Nursing 5 

Transition to Associate Degree Nursing Practicum 3 

Comprehensive Competency Skill Review 3 

Life Cycle Nursing II 5 

Life Cycle Nursing II Practicum 5 

Life Cycle Nursing III 5 

Life Cycle Nursing III Practicum 5 

Issues in Nursing 2 



107 



NUR 


101 


NUR 


102 


NUR 


103 


NUR 


104 


NUR 


201 


NUR 


202 


NUR 


203 


NUR 


204 


NUR 


205 



NUR 


105 


NUR 


106 


NUR 


107 


NUR 


199 


NUR 


201 


NUR 


202 


NUR 


203 


NUR 


204 


NUR 


205 



108 



Division of Human Services and Health Technologies 



General Education Courses 

Required courses include Chemistry, Anatomy and Physiology, Microbiology, 
Psychology, Sociology, Lifespan Development, and English 



Total Credits 



28-32 
66-70 



Regions offering the Completion Program only will utilize the following format. The Completion Program is only 
available to LPNs. 



COMPLETION OPTION PROGRAM, LPNs ONLY (TRACK II) 

Technical Courses (38 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title 

NLN Mobility Profile I, Book 1 
Comprehensive Competency Skill Review 
Issues in Nursing 
Life Cycle Nursing I 
Life Cycle Nursing II 
Life Cycle Nursing Practicum 
Life Cycle Nursing III 
Life Cycle Nursing IV 
Life Cycle Nursing Practicum 
General Education Courses 
Required courses include Chemistry, Anatomy and Physiology, Microbiology, Psychology, 
Sociology, Lifespan Development and English 

Total Credits 



NUR 


105 


NUR 


199 


NUR 


205 


NUR 


211 


NUR 


212 


NUR 


213 


NUR 


221 


NUR 


222 


NUR 


223 



Semester Credits 

5 
3 
2 
5 
5 
5 
4 
4 
5 



28-32 
66-70 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE NURSING COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



NUR 101— FUNDAMENTAL NURSING CONCEPTS 
(TRACK I) 

4 Credits 

Introduces the role of the associate degree nurse, and 
the facts, concepts, and principles underlying the nurs- 
ing process. Emphasizes physical and psychosocial 
assessment. Identifies the components of the program 
philosophy, conceptual framework, and terminal objectives. 

NUR 102— FUNDAMENTAL NURSING CONCEPTS 
PRACTICUM (TRACK I) 

4 Credits 

Provides campus and clinical laboratory experience to 
utilize the role of the associate degree nursing student 
employing the nursing process. Simulated/actual client 
care provides opportunity to develop assessment skills 
and to initiate beginning level of analyzing, planning, 
implementing and evaluating therapeutic measures. 

NUR 103— LIFE CYCLE NURSING I (TRACK I) 

4 Credits 

Identifies the role of the associate degree nurse in assisting 

people in meeting their needs during the childbearing 



process through adolescence. The nursing process is 
utilized to comprehend the assessment, analysis, plan- 
ning, implementation, and evaluation of therapeutic 
measures that promote, maintain, and/or restore health. 



NUR 104— LIFE CYCLE NURSING I 
PRACTICUM (TRACK I) 

4 Credits 

Provides campus and clinical laboratory experience to 
function in the role of the associate degree nursing stu- 
dent in providing care to clients during the childbearing 
process through adolescence. The nursing process is 
employed to promote, maintain, and/or restore health 
while providing quality nursing care. 



NUR 105— NLN MOBILITY PROFILE I, BOOK 1 
(LPNS ONLY TRACKS I AND II) 

5 Credits 

Evaluates previous learning and experience to facilitate 

education mobility. 



Associate of Science in Nursing 



109 



NUR 106— TRANSITION TO ASSOCIATE DEGREE 
NURSING (LPNS ONLY TRACK I) 

5 Credits 

Socializes the LPN into the role of the associate degree 
nurse. Identifies the role of the associate degree nurse 
in assisting people in meeting their needs during the 
childbearing process through adolescence. The nurs- 
ing process is utilized to promote, maintain and/or restore 
health. 

NUR 107— PRACTICUM: TRANSITION TO ASSOCI- 
ATE DEGREE NURSING (LPNS ONLY TRACK I) 

3 Credits 

Provides campus and clinical laboratory experience to 
function in the role of the associate degree nursing stu- 
dent in providing care to clients during the childbearing 
process through adolescence. The nursing process is 
employed to provide quality nursing care. 

NUR 199— COMPETENCY SKILL REVIEW 
(TRACKS I AND II) 

3 Credits 

Includes but is not limited to demonstration of specific 
procedures by faculty or other personnel, student lab- 
oratory practice, return demonstration of the specific 
skill by the student, and the viewing of AV aids pertinent 
to the clinical setting. 

NUR 201— LIFE CYCLE NURSING II (TRACK I) 

5 Credits 

Examines the role of the associate degree nurse in 
prioritizing human responses which interfere with basic 
needs contributing to physical and psychosocial ill- 
ness. The nursing process is employed to promote, 
maintain, and/or restore health in young to middle aged 
clients. 

NUR 202— LIFE CYCLE NURSING II PRACTICUM 
(TRACK I) 

5 Credits 

Provides clinical experience to demonstrate the role of 
the associate degree nursing student in providing care 
to clients in the young to middle aged adult period. Nursing 
skills are based on identified scientific facts, concepts, 
and principles. Decision making and appropriate ther- 
apeutic communication are emphasized. 

NUR 203— LIFE CYCLE NURSING III (TRACK I) 

5 Credits 

Examines the role of the associate degree nurse in 
management and advanced communication concepts 
which are explored, for groups of clients with multiple 



health care needs. The nursing process is employed to 
promote, maintain, and/or restore health in the older 
adult client. 



NUR 204— LIFE CYCLE NURSING III PRACTICUM 
(TRACK I) 

5 Credits 

Provides clinical opportunity for demonstration and 
evaluation of personal effectiveness in fulfilling the role 
of the associate degree nursing student in assisting 
older adults in meeting their physical and psychosocial 
health needs. Provides opportunity to utilize the nurs- 
ing process incorporating management and advanced 
communication techniques. 

NUR 205— ISSUES IN NURSING (TRACKS I AND II) 

2 Credits 

Examines issues and nursing responsibility to meet 
changing needs of persons in their environment. His- 
torical aspects, current developments, future trends, 
improvement of nursing practice, legal/ethical consid- 
erations, and personal/professional growth are inte- 
grated into the examination of the role of the associate 
degree nurse. 

NUR 211— LIFE CYCLE NURSING I (TRACK II) 

5 Credits 

Socializes the LPN into the role of the associate degree 
nurse. Identifies the role of the associate degree nurse 
in assisting people in meeting their needs during the 
childbearing process through the preschool years. The 
nursing process is utilized to promote, maintain and/or 
restore health. 

NUR 212— LIFE CYCLE NURSING II (TRACK II) 

5 Credits 

Examines the role of the associate degree nurse in 
prioritizing human responses which interfere with basic 
needs contributing to physical and psychosocial ill- 
ness. The nursing process is employed to promote, 
maintain, and/or restore health from preschool through 
early adulthood years. 

NUR 213— LIFE CYCLE NURSING PRACTICUM 
(TRACK II) 

5 Credits 

Provides campus and clinical laboratory experience to 
function in the role of the associate degree nursing stu- 
dent in providing care to clients during the childbearing 
process through early adulthood. The nursing process 
is employed to provide quality nursing care. 



110 



Division of Human Services and Health Technologies 



NUR 221— LIFE CYCLE NURSING III 
(TRACK II) 

4 Credits 

Examines the role of the associate degree nurse in 
prioritizing human responses which interfere with basic 
needs contributing to physical and psychosocial ill- 
ness. The nursing process is employed to promote, 
maintain, and/or restore health during the middle adult- 
hood period. 

NUR 222— LIFE CYCLE NURSING IV 
(TRACK II) 

4 Credits 

Examines the role of the associate degree nurse in 
management and advanced communication concepts 
which are explored, for groups of clients with multiple 
health care needs. The nursing process is employed to 
promote, maintain, and/or restore health in the older 
adult client. 



NUR 223— LIFE CYCLE NURSING PRACTICUM II 
(TRACK II) 

5 Credits 

Provides clinical opportunity for demonstration and 
evaluation of personal effectiveness in fulfilling the role 
of the associate degree nursing student in assisting 
adults in meeting their physical and psychosocial health 
needs. Provides opportunity to utilize the nursing process 
incorporating management and advanced communi- 
cation techniques. 

NUR 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN ASSOCIATE 
DEGREE NURSING 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



PRACTICAL NURSING 

The Licensed Practical Nurse is an integral part of the health care team. The Practical Nursing 
program is a one-year course of study leading to a Technical Certificate. This accredited program 
prepares the individual to take the state licensure exam to become a Licensed Practical Nurse 
(LPN). The program is designed for students to gain knowledge and technical skills necessary 
to appropriately care for patients in a variety of health care settings, such as hospitals, conva- 
lescent centers, and physician offices. Students learn to administer medications and treatments 
commonly performed by Licensed Practical nurses. 

The program is offered in Valparaiso, Fort Wayne, Lafayette, Indianapolis, Richmond, Colum- 
bus, Evansville, South Bend, Terre Haute, Muncie, Bloomington, Madison, Sellersburg and Gary. 

TECHNICAL CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (50 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



PNU 


101 


PNU 


102 


PNU 


103 


PNU 


104 


PNU 


105 


PNU 


106 


PNU 


107 


PNU 


108 


PNU 


109 


PNU 


110 


PNU 


111 


PNU 


112 


PNU 


113 


PNU 


114 


PNU 


115 


PNU 


116 


PNU 


117 


PNU 


118 



Foundations of Nursing 
Therapeutic Measures 
Holistic Approach to Health 
Nutrition 

Introduction to Clinical Nursing 
Anatomy and Physiology for PN 
Cardiopulmonary Nursing 
Endocrine/Genitourinary Nursing 
Gastrointestinal/Sensorimotor Nursing 
Introduction to Pharmacology for PN 
Pharmacology for Practical Nurses 
Medical/Surgical Clinical Nursing I 
Medical/Surgical Clinical Nursing II 
Nursing Issues and Trends 
Gerontology 

Geriatric Clinical Nursing 
Maternal/Child Nursing 
Maternal/Child Clinical Nursing 



Total Credits 



Semester Credits 

4 

3 

2 

2 

3 

5 

3 

3 

3 

2 

2 

3 

2 

1 

3 

3 

3 
_3 
50 



PRACTICAL NURSING COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PNU 101— FOUNDATIONS OF NURSING 

4 Credits 

The art and science of practical nursing: the goals and 
the role of the licensed practical nurse on the health 
care team. Concept of the nursing process as practiced 
within the wellness/illness continuum. Includes basic 
nursing care, collection and recording of data. 

PNU 102— THERAPEUTIC MEASURES 

3 Credits 

Focuses on the art and science required for the prac- 



tical nurse to carry out preventative, therapeutic, and 
rehabilitative nursing interventions requiring advanced 
skills and knowledge. Integrates the nursing process 
and the role of the practical nurse. 

PNU 103— HOLISTIC APPROACH TO HEALTH 

2 Credits 

Orientation to the holistic approach to the art and sci- 
ence of practical nursing. Includes holistic aspects of 
care, the wellness/illness continuum, and therapeutic 
relationships. 



111 



112 



Division of Human Services and Health Technologies 



PNU 104— NUTRITION 

2 Credits 

Basic principles of nutrition and diet therapy in wellness 
and illness for various age groups. Considers socio- 
economic, ethnic and religious factors related to diet. 
Emphasis on the role of the practical nurse in assisting 
patients in meeting nutrition needs. 

PNU 105— INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL 
NURSING 

3 Credits 

Provides students with opportunities to implement basic 
nursing skills in the clinical setting. Emphasizes the hygienic 
and comfort needs of the adult patient and developing 
basic assessment skills utilizing the nursing process. 
Concise, accurate documentation of assessments and 
care delivery is stressed. 

PNU 106— ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY FOR PN 

5 Credits 

Presents structure and function of the human body. 
Examines the physical and chemical factors enabling 
human beings to interact with and to maintain homeo- 
stasis of the internal environment. Fundamental well- 
ness/illness relationships are integrated. 

PNU 107— CARDIOPULMONARY NURSING 

3 Credits 

Utilizes the nursing process in understanding the path- 
ophysiology and nursing care of patients with cardio- 
vascular/ventilation needs. Emphasizes developing nurse 
as a communicator and care giver with a holistic approach. 

PNU 108— ENDOCRINE/GENITOURINARY 
NURSING 

3 Credits 

Utilizes the nursing process in understanding the path- 
ophysiology of hormonal imbalances and urinary elim- 
ination needs. Emphasis is on developing the nurse as 
a communicator and caregiver with a holistic approach; 
identifying community supports for patients; and devel- 
oping patient awareness of healthful lifestyle. 

PNU 109— GASTROINTESTINAL/SENSORIMOTOR 
NURSING 

3 Credits 

Utilizes the nursing process in understanding the path- 
ophysiology of digestion, elimination, mobility, and sen- 
sorimotor needs. Develops the nurse as a communicator 
and caregiver with a holistic approach. Relates patients' 
psychosocial needs and opportunities for support through 
community agencies. 



PNU 110— INTRODUCTION TO 
PHARMACOLOGY-PN 

2 Credits 

The art and science of meeting biopsychosocial needs 
through administration of pharmacologic agents within 
the preventative, therapeutic and rehabilitative envi- 
ronment. Defines LPN responsibilities in medication 
administration. Nursing process is used to assess patient 
wellness/illness status. 

PNU 111— PHARMACOLOGY FOR PRACTICAL 
NURSES 

2 Credits 

A survey of common pharmacologic agents. Nursing 
process is the framework used to meet biopsychosocial 
needs of individuals along the wellness/illness contin- 
uum through the administration of pharmacologic agents. 
Drug therapy is developed as one aspect of preventa- 
tive, therapeutic and rehabilitative care of patients in 
their environment. 

PNU 112— MEDICAL SURGICAL CLINICAL 
NURSING I 

3 Credits 

Correlates medical surgical content and nursing prac- 
tice. Nursing process is used as the basis of decision 
making within the practical nurse role. Emphasis is on 
the holistic aspects of individuals along the wellness/ 
illness continuum. 

PNU 113— MEDICAL SURGICAL CLINICAL 
NURSING II 

2 Credits 

Correlates medical surgical content with advanced nursing 
practice. Nursing process is implemented within the role 
of the practical nurse. 

PNU— 114 NURSING ISSUES AND TRENDS 

1 Credit 

Introduces organizational patterns and the role of Licensed 
Practical Nurses in the health care delivery systems. 
Emphasizes continuing education as a means to main- 
tain competencies. Ethical, legal, and historical aspects 
included to develop awareness of privileges, obliga- 
tions and responsibilities of the practical nurse. 

PNU 115— GERONTOLOGY 

3 Credits 

Focuses on the normal aging process along the well- 
ness/illness continuum in later life. Trends in preven- 
tative, rehabilitative, and therapeutic care are surveyed. 



Practical Nursing 

PNU 116— GERIATRIC CLINICAL NURSING 

3 Credits 

Correlates gerontologic content with holistic care of the 
older adult. Implements nursing process within the role 
of the practical nurse to prevent illness or to maintain, 
promote, and restore health. 

PNU 117— MATERNAL CHILD NURSING 

3 Credits 

Examines conditions and selected interventions based 
on the nursing process, in providing preventative, reha- 
bilitative and therapeutic care for the mother and child. 
The role of the Licensed Practical Nurse is identified in 
providing holistic care within a dynamic environment. 



113 



PNU 118— MATERNAL CHILD CLINICAL NURSING 

3 Credits 

Correlates maternal child content with holistic care of 
the mother and child. Emphasis is on the normal mater- 
nity cycle and normal growth and development of the 
child within the wellness/illness continuum. 

PNU 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN PRACTICAL 
NURSING TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY 

The radiologic technologist prepares patients for X-rays; positions them; determines the proper 
voltage, current, and exposure time; and operates the equipment. Trained radiologic technolo- 
gists are in demand in hospitals, medical laboratories, physicians' and dentists' offices and 
clinics, federal and state health agencies and certain educational institutions. 

The program includes courses in the following areas: radiologic technique, exposure, posi- 
tioning, protection, radiation physics, and ethics. Clinical practice and supplemental instruction 
are provided in accredited hospitals. Upon completion of program requirements, graduates are 
eligible to take the National Registry Examination. 

The program is offered in Indianapolis and Terre Haute. 
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 

Technical Courses (55 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title Semester Credits 

Orientation & Nursing in Radiologic Technology 3 

Principles of Radiographic Exposure 4 

Radiographic Positioning I 3 

X-Ray Clinical Education I 4 

Radiographic Positioning II 3 

X-Ray Clinical Education II 3 

Radiation Physics 3 

Radiographic Quality Assurance 2 

Imaging Techniques 2 

Radiographic Positioning III 3 

X-Ray Clinical Education III 6 

X-Ray Clinical Education IV 6 

X-Ray Clinical Education V 5 

Pathology for Radiologic Technology 2 

Radiobiology 3 

General Exam Review 3 

General Education Requirements (19 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title 

English Composition 3 

Human Relations 3 

Anatomy and Physiology I 3 

Anatomy and Physiology II 3 

Medical Terminology 3 

Medical Law and Ethics 1 

Technical Math for Health Occupations 3 

Regional Electives (3 Credits) _3 

Total Credits 77 



RAD 


101 


RAD 


102 


RAD 


103 


RAD 


104 


RAD 


105 


RAD 


106 


RAD 


107 


RAD 


108 


RAD 


109 


RAD 


201 


RAD 


202 


RAD 


203 


RAD 


204 


RAD 


205 


RAD 


206 


RAD 


299 



ENG 


101 


SOC 


101 


SCI 


113 


SCI 


115 


MEA 


101 


MEA 


103 


RAD 


110 



114 



Radiologic Technology 



115 



RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



RAD 101— ORIENTATION AND NURSING 
PROCEDURES FOR X-RAY TECHNOLOGY 

3 Credits 

History and application of diagnostic X-ray from its dis- 
covery to modern procedures. Introduces principles, 
properties, and safe usages. Emphasizes patient, 
technologist, and physician safety, along with patient- 
technologist relationships, asepsis, isolation, and first 
aid. Introduction to abdomen and chest positioning. 

RAD 102— PRINCIPLES OF RADIOGRAPHIC 
EXPOSURES 

4 Credits 

Presents individual and group characteristics needed 
to produce the ideal radiograph. Knowledge of inter- 
changeability of mAs, kVp, film/screen combinations, 
distance, and grids. Also factors and considerations needed 
for pediatric techniques, calibration, heat unit calcula- 
tion, and technique chart construction. 

RAD 103— RADIOGRAPH POSITIONING I 

3 Credits 

Correlates positioning, terminology, techniques and film 
evaluation with exams of the upper extremity, upper 
and lower gastrointestinal tract, and intravenous py- 
elogram examinations. 

RAD 104— X-RAY CLINICAL EDUCATION I 

4 Credits 

Implements Clinical Category 1 of the Competency Model. 
Includes laboratory demonstration, clinical practice, and 
supervised clinical experience. 

RAD 105— RADIOGRAPHIC POSITIONING II 

3 Credits 

Correlates positioning terminology and techniques and 
film evaluation with exams of the lower extremity, addi- 
tional contrast studies. 

RAD 106— X-RAY CLINICAL EDUCATION II 

3 Credits 

Category 2 of the Competency Laboratory Model, test- 
ing competency and proficiency of skills from Category 
1 and 2. Includes supervised clinical experience. 

RAD 107— RADIATION PHYSICS 

3 Credits 

Introduces physics as utilized in the production of X- 

rays. Includes laws of physics pertaining to atomic structure, 



chemical properties and reactions, and electrical cir- 
cuitry. Also covers equipment and methods of gener- 
ation and measurement of electricity. 

RAD 108— RADIOGRAPHIC QUALITY 
ASSURANCE 

2 Credits 

Presents theories and practices pertaining to the 
establishment of department exposure standards. Includes 
equipment tests for reliability, problem solving, reject 
analysis, and cost containment. Hands-on experience 
in processor monitoring, record keeping, and radio- 
graphic quality control tests. 

RAD 109— IMAGING TECHNIQUES 

2 Credits 

Theories, principles, and demonstrations of current imaging 
modalities, including the image intensifier, to- 
mography, video and cine camera, serial changers, 
subtraction technique, polaroid, thermography, ultra- 
sound, and xeroradiography. 

RAD 110— TECHNICAL MATH FOR HEALTH 
OCCUPATIONS 

3 Credits 

Basic instruction in technical mathematics for students 
in health occupations. Includes review of arithmetic, 
basic concepts of algebra, graphing geometry, and 
logarithms. 

RAD 201— RADIOGRAPHIC POSITIONING III 

3 Credits 

Covers positioning terminology, techniques, and film 
evaluations of the cranium, vertebral column, mam- 
mography, and routine special radiographic procedures. 

RAD 202— X-RAY CLINICAL EDUCATION III 

6 Credits 

Introduces Category 3 of the Competency Model, pro- 
ficiency testing over Category 1 and 2, skills and com- 
petency testing over Category 3. Includes supervised 
clinical experience and skill maintenance. 

RAD 203— X-RAY CLINICAL EDUCATION IV 

6 Credits 

Introduces Category 4 of the Competency Model in lab- 
oratory proficiency testing of skills learned in Category 
1 , 2, and 3, and competency in Category 4. Includes 
supervised clinical experience. 



116 



Division of Human Services and Health Technologies 



RAD 204— X-RAY CLINICAL EDUCATION V 

5 Credits 

Includes final competency testing for students who have 
not completed X-ray Clinical Education IV. Continues 
maintenance over all categories. Includes supervised 
clinical experience. 

RAD 205— PATHOLOGY FOR RADIOLOGIC 
TECHNOLOGY 

2 Credits 

Examines basic concepts concerning disease, its causes, 
and the resulting changes as viewed radiographically. 
Emphasis is placed on needed technical changes to 
produce optimal radiographs from correlations to patient 
symptoms. 

RAD 206— RADIOBIOLOGY 

3 Credits 

Theory and principles of the effects of ionizing radiation 
upon living tissues. Includes a review of dosage, mea- 



surements, DNA structure and function, and cellular 
radiosensitivity. 

RAD 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN RADIOLOGIC 
TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 

RAD 299— GENERAL EXAMINATION REVIEW 

3 Credits 

Reviews content of program, emphasizing anatomy, 
physics, exposure principles, and positioning. Simu- 
lated Registry exams prepare the student for American 
Registry of Radiologic Technologist Examination. 



RESPIRATORY CARE 

A respiratory care practitioner is an allied health professional who works under the direction of 
physicians in the diagnosis, evaluation, treatment, education and care of patients with cardio- 
pulmonary diseases or abnormalities. 

A graduate of the Associate in Applied Science program will be eligible to sit for the Entry 
Level and Advanced Practitioner exams given by the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC). 
Successful exam candidates will be awarded the Registered Respiratory Therapist credential. 
A graduate of the entry level program will be eligible to sit for the entry-level practitioner exam 
given by the NBRC. Successful exam candidates will be awarded the Certified Respiratory 
Therapy Technician credential. 

The two-year Associate in Applied Science degree requires 81 credits for completion. Tech- 
nical Certificates are also offered. Programs are offered in Fort Wayne, Indianapolis, Lafayette 
and Valparaiso. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (57 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



RES 


101 


RES 


102 


RES 


103 


RES 


104 


RES 


105 


RES 


106 


RES 


107 


RES 


108 


RES 


109 


RES 


110 


RES 


111 


RES 


201 


RES 


202 


RES 


203 


RES 


204 


RES 


205 


RES 


206 


INF 


101 


1ST 


102 



Respiratory Care Science I 
Respiratory Care Science II 
Respiratory Care Science III 
Respiratory Care Science IV 
Biophysics for Respiratory Care 
Clinical Medicine 
Cardiopulmonary Physiology 
Clinical Practicum I 
Clinical Practicum II 
Clinical Practicum III 
Clinical Practicum IV 
Respiratory Care Science V 
Respiratory Care Science VI 
Pathophysiology and Monitoring 
Clinical Practicum V 
Clinical Practicum VI 
Clinical Practicum VII 
Introduction to Microcomputers 
Techniques of Supervision 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



General Education Requirements (24 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



ENG 


101 


English Composition 


SOC 


101 


Human Relations 


MAT 


101 


Algebra I or 


RAD 


110 


Technical Math for Health Occupations 


SCI 


107 


Chemistry 


SCI 


111 


Microbiology 


SCI 


113 


Anatomy & Physiology I 


SCI 


115 


Anatomy & Physiology II 


MEA 


113 


Pharmacology 



Total Credits 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_3 
81 



117 



118 



Division of Human Services and Health Technologies 



RESPIRATORY CARE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



RES 101— RESPIRATORY CARE SCIENCE I 

3 Credits 

Includes condensed history of respiratory care: prin- 
ciples/practices of oxygen administration; equipment 
cleaning and sterilization techniques; and gas analyz- 
ers. Includes patient care needs, asepsis, body mechanics, 
physical assessment, isolation techniques, medical 
terminology and medical records. 

RES 102— RESPIRATORY CARE SCIENCE II 

3 Credits 

Includes principles and practices of oxygen adminis- 
tration: gas blenders; humidity and aerosol therapies; 
environmental therapy; introduction to manual resus- 
citators; and therapeutics of incentive spirometry. Includes 
selected aspects of ethical practice. 

RES 103— RESPIRATORY CARE SCIENCE III 

3 Credits 

Covers medicinal aerosol therapy and respiratory phar- 
macology, ultrasonic therapy, positive pressure breath- 
ing modalities, chest physiotherapy and pulmonary 
rehabilitation. Introduces basic pulmonary function testing. 
Selected aspects of ethical and legal respiratory prac- 
tice are presented. 

RES 104— RESPIRATORY CARE SCIENCE IV 

3 Credits 

Covers basic airway care, basic arterial blood gas anal- 
ysis and interpretation and basic medical laboratory data. 
Concepts and techniques of critical respiratory care of 
adults and infants. Includes adult, pediatric, and neo- 
natal mechanical ventilators and related monitoring 
equipment. 

RES 105— BIOPHYSICS FOR RESPIRATORY CARE 

3 Credits 

Basic principles of physics related to respiratory care. 
Emphasis is placed on principles of motion, work, energy, 
electricity and bioelectricity and properties of liquids 
and gases. 

RES 106— CLINICAL MEDICINE 

3 Credits 

Introduces etiology, symptomatology, diagnosis, ther- 
apeutics and prognosis of selected pulmonary diseases. 



RES 107— CARDIOPULMONARY PHYSIOLOGY 

3 Credits 

Covers the cardiopulmonary system including ventila- 
tion, perfusion, and gas exchange. Introduces arterial 
blood gases, acid-base regulation and physiologic 
monitoring. 

RES 108— CLINICAL PRACTICUM I 

3 Credits 

Introduction to the hospital environment. Experiences 
in various hospitals with respiratory care departments, 
patient charts, patient identification and communication. 

RES 109— CLINICAL PRACTICUM II 

3 Credits 

Provides supervised experience in oxygen therapy, 
incentive spirometry, humidity/aerosol therapy and 
charting. Continuing certification in CPR is required. 

RES 110— CLINICAL PRACTICUM III 

3 Credits 

Supervised experience in selected therapeutic modal- 
ities. Introduction to chest physiotherapy, medicinal aerosol 
therapy, intermittent positive pressure breathing and 
ultrasonic therapy. Continuing certification in CPR is 
required. 

RES 111— CLINICAL PRACTICUM IV 

3 Credits 

Additional supervised experience in selected thera- 
peutic modalities. Introduction to basic cardiopulmon- 
ary testing and mechanical ventilation is included. 
Continuing certification in CPR is required. 

RES 201— RESPIRATORY CARE SCIENCE V 

3 Credits 

Includes in-depth approaches to the respiratory care 
management of critically ill neonatal, pediatric and adult 
patients. Special emphasis on techniques of patient 
evaluation, monitoring, transportation and management. 

RES 202— RESPIRATORY CARE SCIENCE VI 

3 Credits 

Covers advanced techniques of mechanical ventilation 
of neonatal, pediatric and adult patients. Includes advanced 
techniques of patient assessment through pulmonary 
function testing and other selected assessment techniques. 



Respiratory Care 



119 



RES 203— PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND MONITORING 

3 Credits 

Includes etiology, symptomatology, diagnosis, thera- 
peutics and prognosis of disease conditions related to 
respiratory care including relationships of body sys- 
tems. Covers various equipment, techniques of data 
collection, interpretation and evaluation of data used in 
monitoring the cardiopulmonary system. 

RES 204— CLINICAL PRACTICUM V 

3 Credits 

Provides additional supervised experience in selected 
therapeutic modalities. Includes advanced patient 
assessment, clinical experience in adult critical care, 
arterial blood gas analysis and airway care. Continuing 
certification in CPR is required. 

RES 205— CLINICAL PRACTICUM VI 

3 Credits 

Additional supervised experience in selected thera- 
peutic modalities. Includes advanced clinical experi- 
ence in adult, pediatric and neonatal critical care and 
experience in adult education. Continuing certification 
in CPR is required. 



RES 206— CLINICAL PRACTICUM VII 

3 Credits 

Includes additional supervised experience in selected 
therapeutic modalities. Includes advanced cardiopul- 
monary diagnostic techniques, application of invasive 
and non-invasive monitoring of the cardiopulmonary 
system, experience in respiratory care departmental 
management and quality assurance roles. Continuing 
certification in CPR is required. 

RES 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN RESPIRATORY 
THERAPY TECHNOLOGY 

1 -5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides student with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 

RES 299— COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW 

3 Credits 

Reviews selected material to prepare students for the 
National Board of Respiratory Care examinations. Course 
content is based on the current matrix for the examinations. 



SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY 

The surgical technologist is a highly skilled member of the surgical team, qualified by didactic 
and clinical education, to provide safe and efficient care to the patient in the operating room. 
The didactic education consists of courses in Anatomy and Physiology, Microbiology, Pharma- 
cology, Medical Law and Ethics, Surgical Techniques, and Surgical Procedures. 

Closely supervised clinical education is provided in local area hospitals. The surgical tech- 
nologist actively participates in surgery by performing scrub and/or circulating duties which 
include: passing instruments and supplies to the surgical team members, preparing and posi- 
tioning the patient, operating equipment, assisting the anesthesiologist, and keeping accurate 
records. Obstetrical and Emergency Room clinical experiences may be provided by specific 
hospitals. The program is one calendar year in length requiring 55 credits leading to a Technical 
Certificate. The program is offered in Valparaiso, Lafayette, Indianapolis and Evansville. 

TECHNICAL CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

Technical Courses (39 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title Semester Credits 

Surgical Techniques 3 

Surgical Procedures I 3 

Fundamentals of Surgical Technology 6 

Surgical Procedures II 6 

Clinical Applications I 9 

Surgical Procedures III 3 

Clinical Applications II 9 

General Education Courses (16 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title 

SOC 101 Human Relations 3 

SCI 111 Microbiology 3 

SCI 113 Anatomy & Physiology I 3 

SCI 115 Anatomy & Physiology II 3 

MEA 103 Medical Law and Ethics 1 

MEA 113 Pharmacology _3 

Total Credits 55 



SUR 


101 


SUR 


102 


SUR 


103 


SUR 


104 


SUR 


105 


SUR 


106 


SUR 


107 



120 



Surgical Technology 



121 



SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



SUR 101— SURGICAL TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

Introduction to principles of sterile technique and the 
operative care of the surgical patient. Includes the roles 
of scrubbing and circulating duties. 

SUR 102— SURGICAL PROCEDURES I 

3 Credits 

Orientation to the role of a surgical technologist. Intro- 
duction to the surgical facility, aseptic technique, and 
basic surgical procedures with review of total patient 
care including pre-operative care, diagnostic tests, and 
immediate post-operative care. 

SUR 103— FUNDAMENTALS OF SURGICAL 
TECHNOLOGY 

6 Credits 

Demonstration and supervised practice of general sur- 
gical procedures. Students correlate theory to clinical 
by actively participating as members of surgical team. 
Includes laboratory and clinical components. 

SUR 104— SURGICAL PROCEDURES II 

6 Credits 

A study of advanced surgical procedures in relation to 
the total physiological aspects of surgical intervention. 
This includes a knowledge of the involved anatomy, existing 
pathology, surgical hazards encountered, the surgical 
procedure, and a review of total patient care. 

SUR 105— CLINICAL APPLICATIONS I 

9 Credits 

Correlates the basic principles and theories of the study 



of advanced surgical procedures to the clinical per- 
formance in affiliating hospitals. This includes the 
knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for success- 
ful implementation of safe patient care in an operating 
room. 

SUR 106— SURGICAL PROCEDURES III 

3 Credits 

A study of specialized surgical procedures in relation 
to the total physiological aspect of surgical intervention. 
This includes a knowledge of the involved anatomy, existing 
pathology, surgical hazards encountered, the surgical 
procedure, and a review of total patient care. 

SUR 107— CLINICAL APPLICATIONS II 

9 Credits 

Correlates the principles and theories of specialized 
surgical procedures to the clinical performance in affil- 
iating hospitals. This includes the knowledge, skills, and 
attitudes necessary for successful implementation of 
safe patient care in an operating room. 

SUR 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN SURGICAL 
TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 




4 ftf c *n&. 



DIVISION OF APPLIED SCIENCES AND 
TECHNOLOGIES 




122 



The Division of Applied Science and Technologies provides broad, practical train- 
ing for those seeking employment and advancement in craft and technical occu- 
pations. The programs emphasize the ability to think and plan in the job setting. 
Initial laboratory experiences develop skills in the use of modern industrial equip- 
ment and measuring instruments. Later classroom and laboratory work provide 
training in industrial applications of theory, analysis, design, and construction 
techniques. Each program provides opportunities for the student to advance from 
basic skills to proficiency on a high technological level. 

Program advisory committees, composed of experts in each area of industry, 
serve the important function of keeping the content of the programs current with 
changes in technology. Ivy Tech's programs and courses are designed to meet 
the needs of local industries. The practical value of the coursework is substanti- 
ated by its use in the training programs of many local industries. The student is 
advised to contact the nearest center for information concerning programs and 
course offerings. 

AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT 

The Agricultural Equipment Technology program develops technicians who service, maintain, 
and repair on- and off-farm agricultural equipment. Technicians are trained in preventive main- 
tenance, including testing, adjustment, cleaning and tuning engines as well as servicing and 
adjusting other farm equipment. Courses are offered in general farm equipment repair, diesel 
and gas powered engine overhaul, transmissions and drive train repair, air conditioning, elec- 
trical repair, lawn and garden equipment and hydraulics. Students are provided with practical 
experiences with hands-on training. 

A two-year program requiring 66 credits leads to an Associate in Applied Science Degree. The 
program is offered at Lafayette. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 

Technical Courses (51 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title Semester Credits 

Introduction to Microcomputers 3 

Farm Machinery I 3 

Farm Machinery II 3 

Agricultural and Industrial Power Trains 3 

Mobile Hydraulics 3 

Gas and Diesel Engine Theory and Design 3 

Farm Machinery III 3 

Lawn and Garden Equipment 3 

Diesel Overhaul I 3 

Diesel Fuel Systems II 3 

Diesel Overhaul II 3 

Diesel Engine Tune Up 3 

Introductory Welding 3 

Basic Electricity 3 

Start and Charge Systems 3 

Fluid Power Basics 3 

Heating and A/C Principles 3 

123 



INF 


101 


AGR 


101 


AGR 


102 


AGR 


103 


AGR 


105 


AGR 


106 


AGR 


201 


AGR 


202 


DPT 


201 


DPT 


202 


DPT 


205 


DPT 


206 


WLD 


114 


ELT 


113 


AST 


104 


IMT 


104 


AST 


201 



124 



Division of Applied Sciences and Technologies 



General Education Requirements (15 Credits) 



Prefix 



No. 



Title 



ENG 


101 


English Composition 


ENG 


103 


Speech 


MAT 


107 


Math of Finance 


SOC 


101 


Human Relations 


SCI 


101 


Physical Science 



Total Credits 



3 
3 
3 
3 
_3 
66 



AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



AGR 101— FARM MACHINERY I 

3 Credits 

Introduces basic and special tools and uses in the 
maintenance and repair of farm equipment. Covers: fuel 
requirements and specifications for fuels used in inter- 
nal combustion engines; coolant service requirements 
with emphasis on preventive maintenance; friction and 
anti-friction bearings; and, dust seals and proper instal- 
lation procedures, with attention to proper preload and 
end play of bearings. Also, belt and chain types, load 
ratings and installation with attention to alignment. 

AGR 102— FARM MACHINERY II 

3 Credits 

Examines primary and secondary soil tillage tools; setup, 
adjustment and predelivery performance of plows, disk, 
harrows. Covers setup, adjustment and calibration of 
the components of planters, drills, and chemical, fer- 
tilizer, and cultivation machinery with emphasis on 
environmental factors and safety in using crop chemicals. 

AGR 103— AGRICULTURAL AND INDUSTRIAL 
POWER TRAINS 

3 Credits 

Operation and repair of manual transmission and related 
components of the power train including clutches, dif- 
ferentials, final drives, power take off mechanisms, manual 
steering and brakes. Includes components of hydraulic 
assist transmissions, brakes and clutches, and hydro- 
static drive transmissions including variable flow hydro- 
static pumps, motors, and related components. 

AGR 105— MOBILE HYDRAULICS 

3 Credits 

Emphasizes the maintenance and repair of hydraulic 
systems in agricultural and industrial equipment. Includes 
overhaul of pumps, cylinders, and motors and replace- 
ment of relief valves and their hydraulic components. 



Also covers trouble-shooting, flow and pressure tests, 
hitch adjustments, and repair on agricultural tractors. 

AGR 106— GAS AND DIESEL ENGINE THEORY 
AND DESIGN 

3 Credits 

Fundamentals of gas and diesel engines. Design and 
construction of the internal combustion engine: the basic 
parts; the principle of heat and combustion; and differ- 
ences in two-cycle and four-cycle engines. 

AGR 201— FARM MACHINERY III 

3 Credits 

Types of harvesting and handling machinery commonly 
used on farms. Includes predelivery performance, 
adjustments, repair and maintenance on mowers, hay 
rakes, bean and corn combines, balers, forage har- 
vesters, grain dryers, elevators, and related equipment, 
with emphasis on operation safety. 

AGR 202— LAWN AND GARDEN EQUIPMENT 

3 Credits 

Covers the maintenance, adjustment, and repair of internal 
combustion engines of less than 35 horsepower and 
lawn and garden equipment such as tillers, seeders, 
harrows, rakes, mowers, standby alternators and irri- 
gation pumps. 

AGR 203— SERVICE DEPARTMENT 
MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Instruction in operating the service department under 
accepted management procedure with selling of a pur- 
chased commodity-labor as the basis for the course; 
includes recovered labor costs, incentive programs, 
scheduling show flows, flat rate, shop tickets, mer- 
chandising, and customer relations. 



Agricultural Equipment 

AGR 204— FARM MACHINERY MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

A study of efficient farm production including tract work 
capacity, expected tractor and machinery depreciation, 
custom work, leasing ownership, operating costs, and 
long range plan for replacement. 



125 



AGR 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN AGRICUL- 
TURAL EQUIPMENT TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



APPLIED FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY 

The Applied Fire Science Technology program provides students with course work in theory, 
formula, and application of the science of firefighting. This is coupled with extensive "hands-on" 
practical skills, abilities, and knowledge training, to prepare graduates for employment and pro- 
motional advancements in fire departments, industrial plants, fire underwriters groups, and build- 
ing fire safety organizations. 

The two-year program, requiring 63 credits, leads to the Associate in Applied Science degree. 
Technical Certificates are also available in specialized areas. The program is offered in Gary, 
Fort Wayne and Indianapolis. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (30 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



AFS 


101 


AFS 


102 


AFS 


103 


AFS 


104 


AFS 


105 


AFS 


106 


AFS 


108 


AFS 


201 


AFS 


202 


AFS 


204 



Fire Technology 

Fire Apparatus and Equipment 

Firefighting Strategy and Tactics 

Building Construction Fire Service 

Fire/Arson Investigation 

Hazardous Materials 

Fire Prevention/Inspection 

Fire Alarm and Protection Equipment 

Fire Service Organization and Management 

Fire Service Hydraulics 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



General Education Courses (18 Credits) 



Prefix 



No. 



Title 



ENG 


101 


English Composition 


ENG 


103 


Speech 


MAT 


101 


Algebra I 


SOC 


101 


Human Relations 


SCI 


107 


Chemistry 


INF 


101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 



Regional Electives (15 Credits) 



Total Credits 



15 
63 



126 



Applied Fire Science Technology 



127 



APPLIED FIRE SCIENCE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



AFS 101— FIRE TECHNOLOGY 

3 Credits 

A general introduction to the study of fire science. Cov- 
ers the history of fire fighting, types of fire apparatus 
and protection systems, and general fire problems. Includes 
study of the chemical and hazardous properties of 
combustion and related by-products. 

AFS 102— FIRE APPARATUS AND EQUIPMENT 

3 Credits 

An in-depth examination of the various types of fire 
apparatus in current use, including pumpers, aerials, 
elevating platforms, and rescue apparatus. Course- 
work, utilizing N.F.P.A. 1500 and 1901, develops skills 
in the selection of appropriate apparatus and the prep- 
aration of specifications. Includes evaluating bids, financing 
and equipment selection. 

AFS 103— FIREFIGHTING STRATEGY AND 
TACTICS 

3 Credits 

Focuses on decision-making related to fireground 

strategies and tactics at the company level. Various priority 

scenarios are presented, which include preparation for 

incident command and commanding the initial response. 

Emphasizes company operation and basic command 

decisions. 

AFS 104— BUILDING CONSTRUCTION FIRE 
SERVICE 

3 Credits 

The design principles involved in the protection of a 
structure from fire involvement are examined. Exam- 
ines the signs, symptoms, and indicators of partial or 
total building collapse in firefighting operations. Includes 
study of legislative codes and laws concerning: Build- 
ing Design, Building Fire Safety, Classification of Build- 
ing Construction, and Blue Print Reading. 

AFS 105— FIRE/ARSON INVESTIGATION 

3 Credits 

Focuses on the responsibility of the firefighter, the 
investigator, and the department in fire scene investi- 
gations. Includes fire cause and loss, collection and 
preservation of evidence and determination of fire ori- 
gin, with emphasis on the application of various sci- 
entific aids that assist in investigations. 



AFS 106— HAZARDOUS MATERIALS 

4 Credits 

Introduces basic chemistry in the study of the proper- 
ties, derivations and uses of explosives and other dan- 
gerous materials. These include flammable liquids and 
solids, oxidizing materials, corrosives, and compressed 
gases. The identification of chemicals, storage, and 
handling of hazardous materials are emphasized. 

AFS 107— COMMANDING INITIAL RESPONSE 

3 Credits 

Designed to provide participants with information and 
skills needed to establish command, perform size up, 
develop and implement an action plan, transfer com- 
mand and organize an incident using an effective com- 
mand system. 

AFS 10a— FIRE PREVENTION/INSPECTION 

3 Credits 

Examines the function of the fire inspector and orga- 
nization of the fire prevention unit. Emphasizes the 
identification of the various codes and regulations uti- 
lized by the inspector, with special attention given to 
the Indiana Fire Code. Includes: the legal authority 
governing fire prevention, application of the fire code, 
and management principles as applied to a bureau. 

AFS 201— FIRE ALARM AND PROTECTION 
EQUIPMENT 

3 Credits 

Provides a basic introduction to fire alarm monitoring 
devices and extinguishing systems, with implications 
for fire protection and commercial applications. Tech- 
nical areas of study include: fire extinguishing agents, 
portable fire extinguishers, carbon dioxide systems, dry 
chemical systems, halogenated/foam systems, and 
building monitoring systems. 

AFS 202— FIRE SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND 
MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

The principles and functions of fire science administra- 
tion and management personnel are introduced. Areas 
of study include: department organization; administra- 
tive and management procedures, personnel selection; 
line and staff functions; communications; the fire com- 
pany unit; public relations; and, current problems in 
administration. 



128 



Division of Applied Sciences and Technologies 



AFS 203— INCIDENT COMMAND 

3 Credits 

Emphasizes leadership in the application of knowledge 
pertaining to fire hazards and cause, firefighting strat- 
egy and tactics, fire technology and safety practices as 
described in N.F.P.A. 1021. 

AFS 204— FIRE SERVICE HYDRAULICS 

3 Credits 

This study of compressible fluids includes: fluid prop- 
erties, principles of fluid statics, flow system principles, 
pipe friction and heat loss, flow measurements, pumps 
and other hydraulic devices and machinery, with appli- 
cations for fire protection and water supply systems. 

AFS 205— AIRCRAFT FIRE FIGHTING 

3 Credits 

The hazards associated with aircraft firefighting are 
examined. Emphasizes the use of airport fire fighting 
equipment, extinguishing agents, strategy and tactics, 
rescue methods, and aircraft design and construction. 

AFS 206— SHIPBOARD FIRE FIGHTING 

3 Credits 

Focuses on fire fighting strategy and tactics for land- 
based fire department personnel and equipment. Includes 
survey of equipment, hookups, procedures, incident 
command, the use of foam, and support systems on 
ships. 

AFS 207— FIRE SAFETY HAZARD RECOGNITION 

3 Credits 

An intensive study of "the fire problem." A survey of 
physical, chemical and electrical hazards and their 
relationship to loss of property and/or life. Safe storage 
and handling of hazardous material. 



AFS 208— INDUSTRIAL SAFETY AND FIRE 
CONTROL 

3 Credits 

Provides for comprehensive study of industrial fire loss 
prevention and control management programs. Includes: 
procedures for fire risk and loss control; standards and 
specifications for equipment; laws, codes and regula- 
tions; organization of fire brigades; and, administrative 
control of industrial operation. 

AFS 209— FIREGROUND MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Emphasizes the command and control of major fire 
department operations at an advanced level, linking 
operations and safety. Areas of study include: pre-incident 
preparation, size-up, incident command system, and 
incident management. Utilizes simulated incidents requiring 
the applications of appropriate solutions. 

AFS 210— COMPUTERS FOR THE FIRE SERVICE 

3 Credits 

Examines the use of computers in the fire service. Includes 
computer-ordered dispatch, data information retrieval 
of hazardous materials control, and intervention, as well 
as text-editing abilities. 

AFS 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN APPLIED FIRE 
SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



AUTOMATED MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY 

The Automated Manufacturing Technology program prepares technicians to design, install, cal- 
ibrate, program, operate, test, analyze, troubleshoot, service and repair advanced manufactur- 
ing, assembly, and materials-handling systems and data computer networks. This is a multi- 
disciplinary program which utilizes mechanical, electrical, thermal, and fluid technology to: shape, 
form and process raw materials into finished products; assemble parts into finished products 
using sensing, vision, and robotic techniques; use automated modern material handling tech- 
niques including conveyors, manless parts vehicles, and storage systems; and use computer 
data communications networks such as machine controllers, robot controllers, cell computers 
and computers adapted for inventory control and manufacturing. 

Coursework includes studies in technical math, physics, written and oral communications, 
interpersonal and human relations. Technical study covers electricity electronics, solid state 
devices, digital electronics, microprocessor and computer fundamentals, programmable con- 
trollers, hydraulics, pneumatics, servo-mechanisms, drives and drive-trains, robots, work cells 
and flexible manufacturing systems, machine tools, computer-aided drafting/computer-aided 
manufacturing, computer numerical control, and computer integrated manufacturing. 

The two-year program requiring completion of 70 credits leads to the Associate in Applied 
Science Degree. Technical Certificates are also available in specialized areas. The program is 
offered at Gary, South Bend, Fort Wayne, Lafayette, Kokomo, Muncie, Terre Haute, Indianapolis, 
Richmond, Columbus, Madison, Evansville and Sellersburg. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 

Technical Courses (44 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title Semester Credits 

Manufacturing Processes 3 

Introduction to Robotics 3 

Manufacturing Systems Control 3 

Work Cell Design and Integration 3 

Automation Electronics 3 

Automation Management 3 

Automated Manufacturing Systems 3 

Digital Principles 4 

Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 

Solid State I 3 

Circuits I 4 

CAD Fundamentals 3 

Fluid Power Basics 3 

CNC Programming I 3 

General Education Requirements (18 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title 

ENG 101 English Composition 3 

MAT 1 04 Algebra/Trigonometry I 3 

SCI 103 Physics I 3 

SCI 105 Physics II or 3 

SCI 203 Advanced Physics 

129 



AMT 


101 


AMT 


102 


AMT 


201 


AMT 


202 


AMT 


203 


AMT 


204 


AMT 


205 


ELT 


103 


ELT 


104 


ELT 


105 


ELT 


100 


DCT 


103 


IMT 


104 


MTT 


204 



130 



Division of Applied Sciences and Technologies 



SOC 
ENG 



101 
201 



Human Relations 
Technical Writing 



Regional Electives (8 Credits) 



Total Credits 



70 



AUTOMATED MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY 
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



AMT 101— MANUFACTURING PROCESSES 

3 Credits 

A basic survey of manufacturing processes, tools and 
equipment used by modern industry to convert bars, 
forgings, castings, plates and sheet materials into fin- 
ished products. Includes basic mechanics of materials 
removal and forming, metrology, quality control, and 
safety of operations. 

AMT 102— INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS 

3 Credits 

Introduces robotics and automated systems and their 
operation. Includes robotics principles of operation and 
work envelopes. Various coordinate systems and how 
hydraulic, pneumatic and electromechanical systems 
function together as a system. Also covers servo and 
nonservo controls, system capabilities and limitations, 
and safety. Robot tooling is investigated including weld- 
ers, grippers, magnetic pickups, vacuum pickups, com- 
pliance devices, adhesive applicators, and paint sprayers. 

AMT 104— CNC MILL PROGRAMMING I 

3 Credits 

A review of the various industrial applications of CNC 
milling machines. Lectures will involve discussions of 
numerous milling cycles found on state-of-the-art 
equipment. Manual programming, set up, and opera- 
tion will be practiced. Basic tooling used on industrial 
CNC mills will be identified and used in laboratory set- 
tings. Precision measurement techniques will be iden- 
tified and practiced. 

AMT 105— CNC MILL PROGRAMMING II 

3 Credits 

CNC Mill Programming II presents advanced training 
on the manual programming of CNC machining cen- 
ters. Milling, drilling, reaming, pocket milling, and tap- 
ping cycles will be practiced. Sub-routine programming 
will also be practiced along with machine set up, 
processing, machining center operation and tooling 
requirements. 



AMT 106— COMPUTER ASSISTED MILL 
PROGRAMMING 

3 Credits 

The study and applications of advanced computer pro- 
gramming techniques using menu driven software to 
generate part programs for CNC machining centers. 
Post processing, interactive graphics, program simu- 
lation and CAD/CAM will be covered. Students will practice 
these techniques of state-of-the-art programming sta- 
tions and CNC machining centers. 

AMT 107— CNC LATHE PROGRAMMING I 

3 Credits 

A review of the various industrial applications of com- 
puter numerically controlled lathes. Lectures will involve 
discussion of numerous turning cycles found on more 
sophisticated lathe controllers. Manual programming, 
set up, and operation of industrial lathes will be prac- 
ticed. Basic tooling used on industrial CNC lathes will 
also be covered. Students will practice these tech- 
niques of state-of-the-art programming stations and CNC 
machining centers. 

AMT 108— CNC LATHE PROGRAMMING II 

3 Credits 

The study and operation of advanced manual program- 
ming techniques used on industrial turret lathes. Turn- 
ing, boring, grooving, and threading cycles will be practiced 
with advanced sub-routine programming methods. 
Students will also receive further training on set up, 
processing, machine operation, and lathe tooling. 

AMT 109— COMPUTER ASSISTED LATHE 
PROGRAMMING 

3 Credits 

The study and application of advanced computer pro- 
gramming techniques. Students receive hands-on training 
using menu driven software to generate part programs 
for CNC lathes. Post processing, interactive graphics, 
program simulation and CAD/CAM will be covered. 
Students will perform these techniques on state-of-the- 
art programming stations and CNC turret lathes. 



Automated Manufacturing Technology 



131 



AMT 110— ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATED 
SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

This course introduces the student to robotics and 
automated systems and their operating characteristics. 
Topics to be covered include robotics principles of operation 
and work envelopes. Students will learn the various 
coordinate systems and how hydraulic, pneumatic and 
electromechanical systems function together as a sys- 
tem. Other subjects to be covered include servo and 
nonservo controls, system capabilities and limitations, 
and safety. Robot tooling will be investigated including 
welders, grippers, magnetic pickups, vacuum pickups, 
compliance devices, adhesive applicators, and paint 
sprayers. 

AMT 201— MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS 
CONTROL 

3 Credits 

An introduction to the field of industrial controls. Covers 
the principles of control systems as applied to a pro- 
duction system to achieve automation. Systems included 
are stepper motors, programmable logic controllers, 
microprocessors, computers, and feedback systems. 
Emphasis is on programmable logic controllers and the 
local area network. 

AMT 202— WORK CELL DESIGN AND 
INTEGRATION 

3 Credits 

Investigates principles of design and implementation of 
robots in industrial work cells. Covers selection of the 
best work site and robot system, application of cell sen- 
sor, development of cycle times, economic analysis, 
safety considerations, proposal preparation, and human 
resources development. 

AMT 203— AUTOMATION ELECTRONICS 

3 Credits 

The operation and application of electronic devices in 
the automation field. Applications include linear inte- 
grated circuits, sensors and interfacing systems, actuators 
and drive controls, and process control techniques. 

AMT 204— AUTOMATION MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Designed to provide training in basic principles appli- 
cations in short and long term planning and control of 
operations for production and services and improve- 
ment programs in any organization. Includes: charac- 
teristics of systems and solution of problems for process 



of products and service operations; methods analysis; 
cost estimating; facilities planning, tooling and services 
acquisition and maintenance; production, project, and 
program scheduling; materials and inventory manage- 
ment; safety and loss prevention; decision making tools 
and the evaluation of alternatives. 

AMT 205— AUTOMATED MANUFACTURING 
SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

Students, working in teams and under the instructor's 
supervision, will select equipment, write specifications, 
design fixtures and interconnects, integrate systems, 
provide interfaces and make the assigned systems 
operational to produce "marketable" products. 

AMT 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN AUTOMATED 
MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 




AUTOMOTIVE BODY REPAIR TECHNOLOGY 

The Automotive Body Repair Technology program prepares students to become qualified body 
repair technicians. Courses are offered in body, frame, and chassis repair, collision damage, 
paint refinishing, fiberglass/plastics repair, sheet metal repair, and welding. Training laboratories 
offer experience on up-to-date, sophisticated equipment, such as the bench measuring and 
pulling systems used in precision alignment. 

A one-year program, requiring 42 credits, leads to the Technical Certificate. The programs 
are offered in Gary, Indianapolis, Kokomo, Lafayette, Madison, Muncie, Terre Haute and Sellersburg. 

TECHNICAL CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

Technical Courses (27 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title Semester Credits 

Body Repair Fundamentals 3 

Auto Paint Fundamentals 3 

Collision Damage Analysis and Repair 3 

Conventional Frame Diagnosis and Correction 3 

Body Repair Applications 3 

Automotive Refinishing Technology 3 

Unibody Structural Analysis and Repair 3 

Collision Damage Appraising 3 

Introductory Welding 3 

General Education Requirements (6 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title 

sh Composition or, 

3 
3 

Regional Electives (9 Credits) _9 

Total Credits 42 



ABR 


101 


ABR 


103 


ABR 


104 


ABR 


105 


ABR 


106 


ABR 


107 


ABR 


108 


ABR 


109 


WLD 


114 



ENG 


101 


English Composition or, 


SOC 


101 


Human Relations 


REL 


111 


Technical Mathematics I 



132 



Automotive Body Repair Technology 



133 



AUTOMOTIVE BODY REPAIR TECHNOLOGY COURSE 

DESCRIPTIONS 



ABR 101— BODY REPAIR FUNDAMENTALS 

3 Credits 

Examines the characteristics of body metals and includes 
the installation of mouldings, ornaments and fasteners 
with emphasis on sheet metal analysis and safety. 

ABR 103— AUTO PAINT FUNDAMENTALS 

3 Credits 

Introduces auto paint with emphasis on the handling of 

materials and equipment in modern automotive 

technologies. 

ABR 104— COLLISION DAMAGE ANALYSIS AND 
REPAIR 

3 Credits 

Instruction in analyzing extensive body damage and 

determining the tools and procedures needed to replace 

panels. 

ABR 105— CONVENTIONAL FRAME DIAGNOSIS 
AND CORRECTION 

3 Credits 

The use of tools, frame machines and equipment for 
frame and chassis repair. Includes study of terms per- 
taining to front suspension and rear axle. The use of 
frame gauges, tram gauges and other measuring devices. 

ABR 106— BODY REPAIR APPLICATIONS 

3 Credits 

Fundamentals of using hand and power tools in the 

repair of minor collision damage, with emphasis on safety. 

ABR 107— AUTOMOTIVE REFINISHING 
TECHNOLOGY 

3 Credits 

Instruction in the total refinishing of an automobile with 

emphasis on advanced and specialty painting techniques. 

ABR 108— UNIBODY STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS 
AND REPAIR 

3 Credits 

Unibody repairs; identification and analysis of damage; 
measuring and fixturing systems; straightening sys- 
tems and techniques; mechanical component service 
and knowledge of suspension; and steering systems 
on front wheel drive unibody vehicles. 



ABR 109— COLLISION DAMAGE APPRAISING 

3 Credits 

Uses of estimation guides, procedures for itemizing 
damage, abbreviations, parts numbers, and uses of time 
and money conversion tables. Emphasizes damage 
inspection, recording on estimate sheets, and the cal- 
culation of costs. 

ABR 110— AUTO BODY POWER TOOLS 

3 Credits 

Diagnoses problems associated with the use of power 

tools in auto body work. 

ABR 111— AUTO BODY HAND/HYDRAULIC 
TOOLS 

3 Credits 

The selection, use, and maintenance of hand tools for 

auto body repair. 

ABR 112— BASIC BODY FUNDAMENTALS 
PRACTICUM 

1 Credit 

Provide students with the opportunity to develop skills 

and knowledge in the area of basic body fundamentals. 

ABR 113— BASIC BODY APPLICATION 
PRACTICUM 

1 Credit 

Provides students with opportunities to develop skills 

and knowledge in the area of basic body application. 

ABR 114— COLLISION DAMAGE ANALYSIS AND 
REPAIR PRACTICUM 

1 Credit 

Provides opportunities to develop skills and knowledge 

in the area of collision damage analysis and repair. 

ABR 115— AUTOMOTIVE CHASSIS AND 
ACCESSORY CIRCUITS 

3 Credits 

Fundamentals of electrical theory, automotive com- 
ponents and circuits, and troubleshooting techniques. 
Emphasizes battery construction, function, and operation. 

ABR 116— SUSPENSION AND ALIGNMENT FOR 
AUTO BODY 

3 Credits 

Covers suspension and steering parts of an automobile 



134 



and the theory of wheel alignment and wheel balance. 
Five wheel alignment angles, steering wheel position- 
ing, vehicle tracking, and wheel balancing. 

ABR 117— AUTO PAINT FUNDAMENTALS 
PRACTICUM 

1 Credit 

Develops auto painting with emphasis on materials and 
equipment handling. 

ABR 118— AUTOMOTIVE UPHOLSTERING 

2 Credits 

Techniques of automobile interior refinishing. Includes 
study of spring construction, filling, and fabrics. Devel- 
ops manipulative skills through practice projects on seats, 
panels, and arm rests. 

ABR 119— GLASS INSTALLATION 

3 Credits 

Examines different types of automobile glass and their 
uses. Removal and installation of front or rear glass. 
Install and adjust side glass, bond the rear view mirror 
support, and use rubber channel and synthetic rubber 
adhesive. 



Division of Applied Sciences and Technologies 

ABR 120— FIBERGLASS/PLASTIC REPAIR 

3 Credits 

Introduces types of fiberglass and plastic materials used 

in auto body repair. Covers both interior and exterior 

applications. 

ABR 121— UNIBODY STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS 
AND REPAIR PRACTICUM 

1 Credit 

Development of skills and knowledge in the area of uni- 

body structural analysis and repair. 

ARB 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN AUTOMOTIVE 
BODY REPAIR TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE TECHNOLOGY 

The well trained automotive service technician is in great demand because of the complexity of 
modern vehicles and society's transportation needs. Employment in the transportation industry 
may be found in a franchise automotive business, independent automotive repair centers, tire 
stores, service stations, leasing companies and government service centers. Some graduates 
may choose to become self-employed. Additional opportunities for employment are available in 
related areas such as recreational vehicles, off-highway equipment, insurance business and 
parts and services. 

Automotive Service Technology is a four semester program requiring 69 credits that leads to 
an Associate in Applied Science Degree. Technical Certificates are also available in specialized 
areas. The program offers course work in chassis and suspension; two and four wheel alignment; 
braking systems; electrical fundamentals and electronic system; carburetor and electronic fuel 
injection; tune-up; engine rebuild and air conditioning. Classroom lectures are combined with 
laboratory experiences where students gain diagnostic and service skills. 

The program is offered in Gary, South Bend, Fort Wayne, Lafayette, Kokomo, Muncie, Colum- 
bus, Madison, Terre Haute, Indianapolis, Richmond, Evansville, and Sellersburg. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (51 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



AST 


101 


AST 


102 


AST 


104 


AST 


105 


AST 


106 


AST 


107 


AST 


108 


ELT 


113 


AST 


201 


AST 


202 


AST 


203 


AST 


204 


AST 


205 


AST 


206 


AST 


207 


AST 


208 


AST 


209 



Chassis/Suspension Principles 

Two/Four Wheel Alignment 

Start and Charge Systems 

Fuel Systems 

Electronic Ignition Systems 

Engine Principles and Design 

Electrical Accessory Systems 

Basic Electricity 

Heating and A/C Principles 

Computer Engine Controls 

Engine Rebuild 

Automatic Transmission/Transaxle 

Manual Transmission/Transaxle 

Heating and A/C Service and Repair 

Engine Performance 

Differentials/Drivelines 

Automotive Braking Systems 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



General Education Requirements (18 Credits) 



Prefix 



No. 



Title 



ENG 


101 


English Composition 


ENG 


103 


Speech 


SOC 


101 


Human Relations 


MAT 


101 


Algebra I 


MAT 


XXX 


Math/Elective 


SCI 


101 


Physical Science 



Total Credits 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_3 
69 



135 



136 



Division of Applied Sciences and Technologies 



AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE TECHNOLOGY 
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



AST 101— CHASSIS/SUSPENSION PRINCIPLES 

3 Credits 

Various frame designs and suspension systems used 
in modern vehicles are explained in this course. Repair 
and replacement of steering linkages and chassis com- 
ponents, both front and rear is included. 

AST 102— TWO/FOUR WHEEL ALIGNMENT 

3 Credits 

Investigates principles of two and four wheel alignment 
and wheel balance. Emphasis in the lab is on practical 
work experience covering all the alignment angles. 

AST 104— START AND CHARGE SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

An intensive study of the construction, function and 
principles of operation of starting motors, charging sys- 
tems and their control systems with emphasis on diag- 
nosis and bench repair. 

AST 105— FUEL SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

Study of automotive fuel systems: single, double, and 
four barrel carburetor and fuel injection systems. Emis- 
sion controls as they apply to the fuel system. Focuses 
on shop procedures for trouble shooting, servicing, 
replacing or overhauling fuel system and emission con- 
trol components. 

AST 106— ELECTRONIC IGNITION SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

Introductory course covering basic principles of elec- 
tronic ignition systems. Includes functions and testing 
of the conventional breaker point ignition. 

AST 107— ENGINE PRINCIPLES AND DESIGN 

3 Credits 

Examines engine dynamics, theory of engine operation 
and design characteristics of all engine assemblies and 
sub assemblies. Also covers the removal, tear down, 
visual inspection, precision measuring inspection and 
cleanup of components and parts and rebuilding engines 
according to industry standards. 

AST 108— ELECTRICAL ACCESSORY SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

The function, construction, principles of operation, and 

troubleshooting techniques for various accessories of 



automotive vehicles. Includes electrical accessories: 
windshield wipers and washers, power seats, power 
windows, adjustable steering wheels, power tailgates 
and headlights. 

AST 109— SMALL GAS ENGINE MAINTENANCE 

2 Credits 

Theory, service and repair of small gas engines and 
their components; emphasizing safety, measurements, 
lubricants, fuels and engine design. 

AST 110— SMALL GAS ENGINE OVERHAUL 

2 Credits 

Covers disassembly, inspection, measuring, cleaning, 
machine repair and proper assembly techniques appli- 
cable to small gas engine overhaul. Includes carburetor 
overhaul, ignition system overhaul and maintenance 
procedures on rebuilt two-cycle and four-cycle engines. 

AST 111— BASIC AUTO CARE 

2 Credits 

Basic instruction in auto maintenance for the automo- 
bile owner. Covers routine maintenance, economical 
operation, elimination of objectionable noises, care of 
interior and exterior appearance, warranty regulations 
and emergency road procedures. 

AST 113— AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL ENGINE THEORY 

3 Credits 

Operation of the diesel engine and differences between 
a diesel and gas engine. Also includes instruction on 
shop equipment, fuels, oils, seals, bearings, lubrication 
and cooling system. 

AST 114— SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND PARTS 

2 Credits 

Facility and personnel requirements for efficiently run 
parts and service departments. Emphasis is on prin- 
ciples, practices and procedures necessary to effec- 
tively operate the departments. Includes: manufacturers' 
catalogs and components numbering systems, meth- 
ods of scheduling time and techniques for obtaining 
maximum work efficiency from technicians and specialists. 

AST 201— HEATING AND A/C PRINCIPLES 

3 Credits 

An in-depth study of automotive air conditioning and 



Automotive Service Technology 



137 



heating. Special emphasis on the operation and theory 
of the air conditioning and its components. Vacuum and 
electrical control circuits are included. 

AST 202— COMPUTER ENGINE CONTROLS 

3 Credits 

Examines computerized ignition, carburetor, fuel injec- 
tion and sensors for engine controls on late model pas- 
senger cars. Covers theory, diagnostic procedure and 
repair procedure of the command control, MCU, EEC 
IV, lean burn and other spark control systems. 

AST 203— ENGINE REBUILD 

3 Credits 

Precision machines, precision tools and equipment are 
needed for rebuilding today's modern engine. Their repair, 
proper assembly and installation techniques applicable 
to the modern engine are included. 

AST 204— AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION/ 
TRANSAXLE 

3 Credits 

A lecture and laboratory course dealing with construc- 
tion, functions and principles of operation. Emphasizes 
practical work experience in the lab where students 
overhaul automatic transmissions and transaxle 
assemblies in the lab. 

AST 205— MANUAL TRANSMISSION/TRANSAXLE 

3 Credits 

Theory and overhaul procedures related to the manual 
transmission/transaxle: clutches and transfer cases; 
diagnosing and overhauling the manual power train. 

AST 206— HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING 
SERVICE AND REPAIR 

3 Credits 

Covers diagnosis, service and repair procedures for the 
heating/air conditioning system. Includes replacement 
and overhaul procedures for components related to 
heating/air conditioning system. 

AST 207— ENGINE PERFORMANCE 

3 Credits 

An advanced course in the theory, diagnosis, and repair 
of computer controlled ignition systems and fuel sys- 
tems on late model vehicles, using state-of-the-art 
diagnostic equipment. Emphasis is on recommended 
manufacturer methods for servicing the computer con- 
trolled ignition system. 



AST 208— DIFFERENTIALS/DRIVELINES 

3 Credits 

A study of differential and driveline theory and over- 
haul. Includes overhaul and service procedures appli- 
cable to gear sets, bearings and seals. Theory and overhaul 
procedures related to the driveshaft and axle assem- 
blies for front and rear wheel drive vehicles is included. 

AST 209— AUTOMOTIVE BRAKING SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

Theory, service and repair of automotive braking sys- 
tems and their components. Emphasis on hydraulic theory 
and repair and service of booster units, master cylinder, 
wheel cylinder, caliper rebuilds, and drum and rotor service. 

AST 210— MODIFIED AUTOMOTIVE ENGINES 

3 Credits 

This course is offered for advanced transportation stu- 
dents and employed technicians to familiarize partici- 
pants with higher performance engines, durability and 
economy. Stresses individuality in constructing per- 
formance engines. 

AST 211— AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL ENGINE 
OVERHAUL 

3 Credits 

Identification of the components that comprise an auto- 
motive diesel engine, and operational theory of the 
automotive diesel engine. Includes overhaul proce- 
dures applicable to an automotive diesel engine. 

AST 212— COMPREHENSIVE DIAGNOSIS I 

2 Credits 

Diagnosing and repairing the complete automotive sys- 
tem according to manufacturers recommendations and 
specifications. Students will complete repair orders as 
assigned by the instructor. 

AST 213— COMPREHENSIVE DIAGNOSIS II 

2 Credits 

Students complete work based on flat rate hours. Also 
includes record keeping, parts procurement and meth- 
ods for determining unpaid labor lost on flat rate. 

AST 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN AUTOMOTIVE 
SERVICE TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



BARBERING TECHNOLOGY 

The Barbering Technology program is designed to provide individuals with the background and 
expertise needed to establish themselves in a barbering/hairstyling career. 

Courses contain basic history and ethics of the profession, basic haircutting, shampooing, 
bacteriology, sterilization and sanitation. Additional courses include the art of shaving, perming, 
coloring, processing, and additional work with hairstyling. Shop management, advanced hair- 
cutting and a combined techniques course complete the course work. 

This three semester and one summer session program, requiring 65 credits, leads to a Tech- 
nical Certificate and qualifies a student to take the state administered licensing test. 

The program is offered at the United States Penitentiary at Terre Haute. 
TECHNICAL CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

Technical Courses (65 Credits) 

Prefix No. Title Semester Credits 

History and Professional Ethics of Barbering 3 

Bacteriology, Sterilization and Sanitation 3 

Haircutting I 3 

Shampoo and Rinsing 3 

Shaving 3 

Scalp and Hair Treatment I 3 

Scalp and Hair Treatment II 3 

Theory of Massage and Facial Treatment 3 

Basic Chemistry 3 

Barbering Anatomy and Physiology 3 

Hair Styling I 3 

Advanced Haircutting 3 

Chemical Hair Processing 3 

Hair Coloring 3 

Waving Techniques 3 

Permanent Waving 3 

Shop Management 3 

Hair Styling II 3 

Combined Techniques Shop Application 2 

Haircutting II 3 

Haircutting III 3 

Sales Techniques _3 

Total Credits 65 



BAR 


101 


BAR 


102 


BAR 


103 


BAR 


104 


BAR 


105 


BAR 


106 


BAR 


107 


BAR 


108 


BAR 


109 


BAR 


110 


BAR 


111 


BAR 


112 


BAR 


113 


BAR 


114 


BAR 


115 


BAR 


116 


BAR 


117 


BAR 


118 


BAR 


119 


BAR 


120 


BAR 


121 


BAR 


122 



138 



Bartering Technology 



139 



BARBERING TECHNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



BAR 101— HISTORY AND PROFESSIONAL ETHICS 
OF BARBERING 

3 Credits 

Includes the origin of the barber; Greek, Roman and 

English influence on barbering and modern trends. Includes 

the ethical conduct and standards of the barbering 

profession. 

BAR 102— BACTERIOLOGY, STERILIZATION AND 
SANITATION 

3 Credits 

Examines types of bacteria and their relationship to 
barbering. Emphasizes the sterilization and sanitation 
of barbering implements and facilities. 

BAR 103— HAIRCUTTING I 

3 Credits 

An introductory course in haircutting: surveying imple- 
ments and their correct usages. 

BAR 104— SHAMPOOING AND RINSING 

3 Credits 

Deals with the benefits of proper shampooing and rins- 
ing. Techniques for preparing the patron, selecting the 
shampoo and performing the services. 

BAR 105— SHAVING 

3 Credits 

Develops the techniques of honing and stropping a straight 
razor, and the fundamentals of shaving. Includes fun- 
damentals and techniques of styling mustaches and 
beards and identifying various styles, cutting and shap- 
ing of mustaches and beards. 

BAR 106— SCALP AND HAIR TREATMENT I 

3 Credits 

The study of the skin, scalp, and hair: functions, pur- 
poses and problems. Examines need for scalp and hair 
treatments, and different types of treatments. 

BAR 107— SCALP AND HAIR TREATMENT II 

3 Credits 

Focuses on common names and terms, the nature, effects 
and safe use of high frequency current for therapy pur- 
poses and how and when to perform light therapy. 

BAR 108— THEORY OF MASSAGE AND FACIAL 
TREATMENT 

3 Credits 

Theory of applications in massage treatment. Skill 



development in massage movements of face and scalp. 
Includes different types of facials, supplies required and 
proper steps in the selection of products and perform- 
ance of facials. 

BAR 109— BASIC CHEMISTRY 

3 Credits 

Basic fundamentals of chemistry as applied to Barber- 
ing: composition and chemical effects of barbering 
supplies. 

BAR 110— BARBERING ANATOMY AND 
PHYSIOLOGY 

3 Credits 

Basic study of the physiology of the cell, tissue, organs 

and systems, and their interrelationships in the human 

organism. 

BAR 111— HAIR STYLING I 

3 Credits 

Surveys various cutting patterns, correct balance, height 

in styling and selecting correct styles for patrons. 

BAR 112— ADVANCED HAIRCUTTING 

3 Credits 

Includes basic hairstyling, razor and comb techniques, 

hair sectioning, wet or dry cutting, and other advanced 

techniques. 

BAR 113— CHEMICAL HAIR PROCESSING 

3 Credits 

The fundamentals, techniques and terminology of 
straightening and problems associated with chemical 
hair processing. 

BAR 114— HAIR COLORING 

3 Credits 

Surveys various methods of hair coloring, product 
knowledge, haircoloring procedures, and lightening and 
bleaching procedures. 

BAR 115— WAVING TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

Techniques of waving hair including fingerwaving and 

heat waving. 

BAR 116— PERMANENT WAVING 

3 Credits 

Examines processes, techniques and materials for per- 
manent hair waving. 



140 



Division of Applied Sciences and Technologies 



BAR 117— SHOP MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Techniques for establishing a barbershop: record keep- 
ing, personnel management, supply management and 
public relations. 

BAR 118— HAIR STYLING II 

3 Credits 

Modern day styles and cutting techniques for their 

achievement. 

BAR 119— COMBINED TECHNIQUES SHOP 
APPLICATION 

2 Credits 

Students are expected to perform any of the tasks that 
have been assigned in the entire program with at least 
75 percent accuracy and efficiency. 

BAR 120— HAIRCUTTING II 

3 Credits 

Provides laboratory practice in the art of haircutting in 
preparation for the state licensing examination. 

BAR 121— HAIRCUTTING III 

3 Credits 

Additional laboratory practice in preparation for the state 

licensing examination. 

BAR 122— SALES TECHNIQUE 

3 Credits 

Provides an overview of selling and selling skills, including 
the work of the salesperson. Considers the psychology 
of selling and develops selling skills through a series of 
practical situations. 

BAR 150— INTRODUCTION TO COSMETOLOGY 

3 Credits 

Includes theory of long hair graphics, haircutting, roller 
and pincurl placements, blow dry and ironing, line and 
design, chemical services (perms, chemical relaxers, 
hair coloring) and skin care. 

BAR 151— COSMETOLOGY I 

2 Credits 

Covers hair color, hair related disorders, thermal hair 

straightening, manicuring, hair shaping and hair styling. 

BAR 152— COSMETOLOGY LABORATORY I 

5 Credits 

Provides for practical applications of long hair graphics, 
haircutting, roller and pincurl placements, blow dry and 
ironing, line and design and chemical services. 



BAR 153— COSMETOLOGY LABORATORY II 

2 Credits 

Application of hair color, hair shaping, hair styling, man- 
icuring, thermal hair straightening and thermal waving 
are covered. 

BAR 154— COSMETOLOGY CLINIC I 

3 Credits 

Practical applications of hair cutting, blow dry and iron- 
ing, permanent waving, facials, hair coloring, wigs, 
manicuring and hair relaxing are provided. 

BAR 155— COSMETOLOGY II 

4 Credits 

Written and practical review of hair color, hair-related 
disorders, thermal hair graphics, haircutting, roller and 
pincurl placements, blow dry and ironing, line and design, 
chemical services and skin care in preparation for pres- 
tate examination. 

BAR 158— COSMETOLOGY LAB V 

2 Credits 

Advanced training and application of manicuring, nail 
application, color techniques including bleaching and 
tinting, finger waving, skin care and make up techniques. 

BAR 161— COSMETOLOGY CLINIC IV 

4 Credits 

Practical application of haircutting, blow dry and iron- 
ing, permanent waving, facials, hair coloring, wigs, 
manicuring and hair relaxing. 

BAR 162— COSMETOLOGY CLINIC V 

5 Credits 

Practical application of haircutting, blow dry and iron- 
ing, permanent waving, facials, hair coloring, wigs, 
manicuring and hair relaxing. 

BAR 163— COSMETOLOGY CLINIC VI 

2 Credits 

Practical applicaton of haircutting, blow dry and iron- 
ing, permanent waving, facials, hair coloring, wigs, 
manicuring and hair relaxing. 

BAR 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN BARBERING 
TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



BUILDING CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY 

The Building Construction Technology program develops skilled technicians in one of several 
specialties within the building construction industry. Included in the program are courses in 
cabinetry, carpentry, electrical wiring, masonry, plumbing, heating, air conditioning, refrigeration, 
blueprint reading, and the use of tools and materials. The flexibility of the program allows stu- 
dents to pursue a full course of study or to take courses only as needed to update skills. 

A two-year program, requiring 60 semester hours leads to the Associate in Applied Science 
Degree. Technical Certificates are also available in specialized areas. Programs are offered at 
Fort Wayne, Kokomo, Muncie, Richmond and Sellersburg. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (36 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



BCT 


101 


Introduction to Carpentry 


BCT 


102 


Construction Materials 


BCT 


104 


Floor and Wall Layout and Construction 


BCT 


105 


Roof Construction 


BCT 


106 


Construction Blueprint Reading I 


IMT 


121 


Industrial Safety 


BCT 


201 


Residential Wiring 


BCT 


202 


Plumbing Fundamentals 


BCT 


203 


Masonry Concrete Fundamentals 


BCT 


204 


Construction Estimating and Specifications 


ACC 


101 


Accounting Principles I 


BUS 


102 


Business Law 


General Education Requirements (12 Credits) 


ENG 


101 


English Composition 


SOC 


101 


Human Relations 


MAT 


101 


Algebra I 


INF 


101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Regional Electives (12 Credits) 



Total Semester Credits 



12 
60 



141 



142 



Division of Applied Sciences and Technologies 



BUILDING CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY COURSE 

DESCRIPTIONS 



BCT 101— INTRODUCTION TO CARPENTRY 

3 Credits 

Introductory course for Building Construction Technol- 
ogy. Presents history of building construction to present 
day applications emphasizing future trends and con- 
struction as a career. Provides practice in the opera- 
tion, maintenance and safety of various tools including 
the builder's level and transit. 

BCT 102— CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS 

3 Credits 

Develops skills in identifying building materials com- 
monly used in modern building construction. The stu- 
dent gains experience in the application of locally 
accessible materials. 

BCT 104— FLOOR AND WALL LAYOUT AND 
CONSTRUCTION 

3 Credits 

Examines the design and construction of floor and wall 
systems. Develops skills needed for layout and con- 
struction of floor and wall systems from blueprints and 
professional planning. 

BCT 105— ROOF CONSTRUCTION 

3 Credits 

Study of the design and construction of roof systems. 
Emphasizes use of the framing square for traditional 
rafter and truss roofing. Preparing students in addi- 
tional up-to-date techniques. 

BCT 106— CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT 
READING I 

3 Credits 

Instruction and practice in the use of working drawings 
and applications from the "print" to the "work". Units 
include: relationship of views and details, interpretation 
of dimension; transposing scale, tolerances, electrical 
symbols, sections, material list, architectural plans, room 
schedules, and plot plans. 

BCT 107— FURNITURE DESIGN AND 
CONSTRUCTION 

3 Credits 

Develops skills in the design, layout, and construction 
of furniture. Students are introduced to furniture styles, 
types of materials used, and methods of construction. 

BCT 108— CABINETRY FABRICATION TECHNIQUE 

3 Credits 

Develops skills in the design, lay out, and construction 



of cabinets. Students will lay out and fabricate face- 
plates and cases for cabinets. 

BCT 109— FURNITURE REFINISHING AND REPAIR 

3 Credits 

Develops knowledge and skills in the technology of 
refinishing and repairing furniture. Introduction to proper 
procedures used in stripping, bleaching, caning, veneering, 
and various types of wood fillers. 

BCT 110— CABINETRY 

3 Credits 

Introduction to basic skills and technology of cabinet- 
making, focusing on cabinet design and layout, termi- 
nology, tools, and skill requirements. 

BCT 111— WOODWORKING FUNDAMENTALS 

3 Credits 

Introduction to basic skills and technology of wood- 
working, focusing on tool and machine operations. Stu- 
dents instructed in proper jointry and material selection. 

BCT112— MILLWORK 

3 Credits 

Basic skills and technology of the production of wood 
products, focusing on machinery setup and operations, 
for making moldings, door frames, picture frames, etc. 

BCT 113— CABINETRY/FURNITURE DOOR AND 
DRAWER ASSEMBLY 

3 Credits 

Develops skills in the design, layout, and construction 

of cabinet/furniture doors, drawers, and counter tops. 

Various types of hardware and installation methods are 

introduced. 

BCT 114— EXTERIOR TRIM 

3 Credits 

The focus of this course is to develop necessary skills 
in the finishing of the exterior of a building. The student 
obtains skills in the installation of the cornice, windows, 
doors and various types of sidings used in today's mar- 
ket place. 

BCT 115— AUXILIARY BUILDING DESIGN AND 
CONSTRUCTION 

3 Credits 

Develops carpentry skills in construction of garages, 
storage barns, wood decks and patios, privacy fences, 
and gazebos. 



Building Construction Technology 



143 



BCT 201— RESIDENTIAL WIRING 

3 Credits 

Covers the practice of residential wiring, including elec- 
trical service, metering equipment, lighting, switches, 
outlets, and other common components. Also includes 
methods of installation and maintenance of the resi- 
dential wiring system in accordance with the current 
National Electrical Code. 

BCT 202— PLUMBING FUNDAMENTALS 

3 Credits 

The operation and function of home plumbing systems. 
Introduces pipe drawings, isometric pipe layout and 
blueprint symbols. Roughing in plumbing and installing 
drainage, water systems, fixtures, and water heaters in 
compliance with the plumbing code. 

BCT 203— MASONRY CONCRETE 
FUNDAMENTALS 

3 Credits 

Materials and methods of construction with concrete 
block, brick and forming for poured concrete. Includes 
study in preparation of the building site. 

BCT 204— CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATING & 
SPECIFICATIONS 

3 Credits 

Deals with the estimating process for residential con- 
struction. Emphasis on reading blueprints and speci- 
fications, also labor and material take-off and pricing. 

BCT 205— ADVANCED PROJECTS IN BUILDING 
CONSTRUCTION I 

3 Credits 

Problem-solving applied to common problems in con- 
struction. Emphasis is on the cooperation between several 
trades in the construction industry. Application of skills 
needed to resolve the problem. 

BCT 206— ADVANCED PROJECTS IN BUILDING 
CONSTRUCTION II 

3 Credits 

Problem-solving applied to common problems in con- 
struction. Emphasis is on the cooperation between several 
trades in the construction industry allowing the student 
to practice necessary skills to resolve the problem. 
Concentrates on decision-making skills. 

BCT 207— CARPENTRY-LIGHT COMMERCIAL 

3 Credits 

Introduces carpentry skills required in light commercial 
construction. Focuses on construction methods and 
materials used for office buildings, clinics, small churches, 
and other nonresidential structures. 



BCT 208— PROJECT PLANNING AND 
PRODUCTION 

3 Credits 

Provides opportunity for the students to develop knowl- 
edge and skills under limited supervision in the design, 
selection of materials, project planning and production 
systems used in the fabrication of cabinets and furniture. 

BCT 209— REMODELING AND ADDITIONS 

3 Credits 

Covers all the aspects of light commercial and residen- 
tial remodeling and restoration. Problems of financing, 
permits, utilities and construction will be considered. 
The student will differentiate between new construction 
and remodeling for future reference in estimating and 
bidding work. 

BCT 210— VINYL AND ALUMINUM SIDING 
APPLICATIONS 

3 Credits 

In-depth examination of common and unusual prob- 
lems encountered by a vinyl and aluminum siding appli- 
cator on both new jobs and existing structures. Includes 
sidings, soffit, fascia, rain gutter, and covering of trims 
and windows. Emphasis is on actual installation, cov- 
ering a wide variety of experiences. Also covers stand- 
ing seam and corrugated metal roofing, metal carports, 
awnings, metal storage buildings, ventilators and flashings. 

BCT 211— CONSTRUCTION ORGANIZATION AND 
PROCEDURES 

3 Credits 

Introduction to organization and management proce- 
dures focusing on subcontracting, equipment/tool 
inventories, job materials, codes, inspections and permits. 

BCT 21 2— CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT 
READING II 

3 Credits 

Designed to develop proficiency in the interpretation of 
complex blueprints, including notations, conventional 
symbols, and dimensions. Introduction to basic archi- 
tectural drafting skills. 

BCT 213— MOTOR AND MOTOR CONTROLS 

3 Credits 

Basic study in wiring and design of motor control cir- 
cuits including circuit and conductor calculations, motor 
circuits and controls. Also control transformers and service 
and circuit layout for motor control and machine tool 
hookup and control. 



144 



Division of Applied Sciences and Technologies 



BCT 214— WALL AND FLOOR COVERINGS 

3 Credits 

Modern materials and techniques of interior floor and 
wall coverings; instruction on how to assess the dura- 
bility and maintenance of the materials, and techniques 
in correct installation procedures. 

BCT 215— BASIC THEORY OF PAINT AND STAIN 

3 Credits 

Introduces the basic skills and techniques of finishing 
wood produces with emphasis on proper preparation, 
staining, and finishing procedures. 

BCT 216— ADVANCED RESIDENTIAL DESIGN 

3 Credits 

Study of residential floor plans and elevations. Analysis 
of contemporary living patterns, cost, privacy, conve- 
nience, and efficiency, coordinated with needs. Exte- 
rior styles are compared for cost and aesthetic values. 
Multiple housing, duplex arrangements, apartments and 
condominiums. Floor plans, elevations, and perspec- 
tive drawing will be made to incorporate the conclu- 
sions reached from the above research. 

BCT 217— PLUMBING MECHANICAL 
INSTALLATION 

3 Credits 

Develops skills in the use of plumbing equipment. Cov- 
ers residential and commercial installations trouble- 
shooting, services, and repair in conformance with codes. 

BCT 218— COMMERCIAL PLUMBING 
INSTALLATIONS AND ESTIMATING 

3 Credits 

Offers in-depth study of commercial plumbing with 
emphasis on code requirements and commercial blue- 
prints. Instruction in cost estimation for a complete 
plumbing system. 

BCT 219— SURVEY AND MEASUREMENT 

3 Credits 

Fundamentals of surveying, including use of the transit, 
reading angles, land descriptions, restrictions, and legal 
problems. Covers topographical maps and their uses. 

BCT 220— ELECTRICAL TROUBLESHOOTING 
TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

Methods and techniques for troubleshooting appli- 
ances, motors, motor controls, relay wiring, residential 
wiring, commercial wiring, and industrial wiring systems. 



BCT 221— INTERIOR TRIM 

3 Credits 

Students will develop basic knowledge, skill, and 
awareness of interior trim. Drywall, moldings, interior 
doors, kitchen cabinets, and baseboard moldings will 
be installed by the student. 

BCT 222— COMMERCIAL— INDUSTRIAL WIRING 

3 Credits 

Wiring methods and material selection for commercial 
and industrial wiring systems. Includes mechanical 
installation of hardware, as well as electrical design, 
layout, and installation. Emphasis is on tool use, mate- 
rial selection and installation. 

BCT 223— PLUMBING DESIGN AND 
INSTALLATION 

3 Credits 

Provides techniques for working with pipes and fittings. 
Covers residential and commercial electric hot water 
heating systems, private well water systems, and elec- 
trical components of plumbing systems. 

BCT 224— ENERGY CONSERVATION 
TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

Offers an in-depth study of the many energy conser- 
vation techniques currently being applied and devel- 
oped. Covers new materials, construction concepts, and 
alternative approaches being developed to reduce energy 
consumption. 

BCT 225— FABRICATION 

3 Credits 

Study of the concepts and techniques of industrialized 
housing. Covers prefabrication, jigs and rigging, includ- 
ing mobile homes, sectional homes and modular homes. 

BCT 226— CONSTRUCTION SUPERVISORY 
TRAINING 

3 Credits 

Examines the duties and responsibilities of the super- 
visor of a construction crew. Develops the leadership 
abilities and techniques necessary to deal with special 
problems in daily construction work. Gives attention to 
adjusting to the role of supervisor and indicates what 
is expected from each member of the crew. 

BCT 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN BUILDING 
CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



COLLEGE/INDUSTRY JOB TITLE TRAINING 

The College/Industry Job Title Training program provides linkage between Ivy Tech and business 
and industry. Students who enroll in this program are provided with a combination of academic 
instruction in the College and specific skill training at the job site. Student programs are indi- 
vidualized and tailored to the needs of the employer and student. A Technical Certificate is 
awarded following completion. 

The technical level of training appropriate to the program will require curriculum offerings that 
encompass three areas of preparation. They are: 

Technical Concentrate — Those skills and knowledge that are unique and required in order 
to successfully perform a specific technical job. 

Technical Related — Those fundamental technical principles which support the development 
of skills in the Technical Concentrate area. 

Basic Related — Those basic or general knowledge concepts that enable the student to 
develop knowledge and skills in the Technical Related and Technical Concentrate areas. 

The program is conducted through the College's Business and Industry Training Division and 
interested students should contact this office. Programs are offered in Lafayette and Terre Haute. 




145 



DIESEL POWER TECHNOLOGY 

The Diesel Power Technology program develops technicians who service, maintain and repair 
heavy and medium duty motor trucks. The program includes instruction in preventive mainte- 
nance including testing, diagnosing, adjusting, tuning and overhauling of diesel engines as well 
as other units of heavy and medium duty trucks. Courses are offered in transmission, differ- 
entials, brakes, air conditioning, electrical repair, hydraulics, fuel and suspension systems. Stu- 
dents are given practical experience with hands on training. 

A two year program requiring 69 credits leads to an Associate in Applied Science Degree. 
Technical Certificates are also available in specialized areas. The program is offered in Lafayette. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (39 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



DPT 


101 


DPT 


103 


DPT 


104 


DPT 


105 


DPT 


106 


IMT 


104 


DPT 


201 


DPT 


202 


DPT 


203 


DPT 


204 


DPT 


205 


DPT 


206 


DPT 


207 



Diesel Engine Removal and Replacement 

Hydraulics 

Diesel Fuel System I 

Mobile Air Conditioning and Refrigeration 

Heavy Duty Power Trains 

Fluid Power Basics 

Diesel Overhaul I 

Diesel Fuel System II 

Heavy Duty Chassis and Alignment 

Heavy Duty Brake Systems 

Diesel Overhaul II 

Diesel Engine Tune-Up 

Diesel Engine Diagnosis 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



General Education Requirements (18 Credits) 



Prefix 



No. 



Title 



ENG 


101 


English Composition 


ENG 


103 


Speech 


MAT 


101 


Algebra I 


MAT 


107 


Math of Finance 


SOC 


101 


Human Relations 


SCI 


101 


Physical Science 



Regional Electives (12 Credits) 



Total Credits 



12 
69 



146 



Diesel Power Technology Program 



147 



DIESEL POWER TECHNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



DPT 101— DIESEL ENGINE REMOVAL & 
REPLACEMENT 

3 Credits 

Covers procedures for removal and replacement of die- 
sel engines in motor trucks and farm and industrial 
equipment. Hands-on experience with emphasis on 
identifying and removing and replacing hoses and wiring. 

DPT 103— HYDRAULICS 

3 Credits 

Advanced principles and functions of fluid power and 
terminology and symbols pertaining to hydraulics and 
pneumatics. Emphasis is on system design, fabrica- 
tion, diagnosis repair, maintenance and testing. Exam- 
ines the role of fluid power (hydraulic/pneumatic) in medium 
and heavy duty trucks in the form of air compressors, 
air tanks, gov. power steering units, hydraulic lifts, and 
other related fluid power units. 

DPT 104— DIESEL FUEL SYSTEM I 

3 Credits 

Covers theory of operation of diesel engines and intro- 
duces types of fuel systems and how they work. Includes 
the various combustion chambers used in industrial and 
agricultural engines. 

DPT 105— MOBILE A/C AND REFRIGERATION 

3 Credits 

Theory of operation and function of components, includes 
diagnosis, repair and replacement of various compo- 
nents in mobile air conditioning units and refrigeration 
units. 

DPT 106— HEAVY DUTY POWER TRAINS 

3 Credits 

Deals with the design, function, operation, diagnosis, 
repair and testing of heavy duty clutches and manual 
transmissions. Heavy duty drive lines, differentials and 
rear axle assemblies with emphasis on hands-on over- 
haul and repair. Also covers automatic transmissions 
used in medium and heavy duty trucks. 

DPT 201— DIESEL OVERHAUL I 

3 Credits 

The construction and operation of two and four cycle 
diesel engines with valves, sleeves and bearings and 
the measurement of clearances. Includes the building 
of a non-running diesel engine in the laboratory. 

DPT 202— DIESEL FUEL SYSTEM II 

3 Credits 

Modern fuel injection systems in both 2 and 4 cycle 



engines with emphasis on laboratory work of the disas- 
sembly, inspection, repair and testing of diesel fuel sys- 
tems and components. 

DPT 203— HEAVY DUTY CHASSIS AND 
ALIGNMENT 

3 Credits 

Covers heavy duty truck frame designs and suspension 
components including springs, tandem axles with air 
suspension, shock absorbers and other related com- 
ponents. Also considers front axles, king pins, steering 
linkage, steering gears and alignment of wheels and 
frames. 

DPT 204— HEAVY DUTY BRAKE SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

Hands-on experience with heavy and medium duty trucks, 
air and hydraulic brake cylinder, hydrovacs, brake shoes 
and linings with emphasis on diagnosis and repair of 
brake problems. 

DPT 205— DIESEL OVERHAUL II 

3 Credits 

The disassembly and inspection of the running diesel 
engine. Includes the use of manufacturers service manuals 
and special tools and equipment. Emphasizes impor- 
tance of careful measurements and adherence to 
specifications. 

DPT 206— DIESEL ENGINE TUNE-UP 

3 Credits 

Instruction in performing tune-ups and servicing diesel 
engines. Laboratory work includes removal and testing 
of nozzles and injectors, timing of injection pumps, 
adjustment of valves and injectors, and general service 
connected with improvement of performance in a die- 
sel engine. 

DPT 207— DIESEL ENGINE DIAGNOSIS 

3 Credits 

Considers the malfunction and correction of problems 
associated with the operation of domestic diesel engines. 
Laboratory work includes diagnosing fuel systems, starting, 
and internal engine problems. 

DPT 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN DIESEL 
POWER TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



DRAFTING/CAD TECHNOLOGY 

The Drafting/CAD program reflects state of the art technology using Computer-Aided Drafting 
(CAD) equipment. This equipment, along with the traditional methods of drafting, provides stu- 
dents with necessary skills to be competitive in the job market. The program is designed to 
provide the student with two areas within which to minor; one in Mechanical and one in Archi- 
tectural Drafting. These two disciplines have common areas of study that develop a working 
knowledge used within the building and manufacturing industries. 

Atwo-year course, requiring completion of 64 credits, leads to an Associate in Applied Science 
degree. Technical Certificates are also available in specialized areas. Programs are offered at 
Bloomington, Columbus, Elkhart, Evansville, Fort Wayne, Gary, Indianapolis, Kokomo, Lafayette, 
Logansport, Muncie, South Bend, Sellersburg, Terre Haute and Valparaiso. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM (Pending Approval) 



Technical Courses (27 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



DCT 


102 


DCT 


103 


DCT 


104 


DCT 


105 


DCT 


106 


DCT 


107 


DCT 


202 


DCT 


203 


DCT 


217 



Technical Graphics 

CAD Fundamentals 

Product Drafting 

Facilities Design and Layout 

Descriptive Geometry 

Advanced CAD 

CAD Programming Language 

Statics and Strength of Materials 

Product Design 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



General Education Requirements (18 Credits) 



Prefix 



No. 



Title 



ENG 


101 


English Composition 


MAT 


101 


Algebra I 


MAT 


103 


Geometry/Trigonometry 


SOC 


101 


Human Relations 


SCI 


103 


Physics I 


ENG 


201 


Technical Writing 



Regional Electives (19 Credits) 

To be selected from Architectural or Mechanical Courses listed below: 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

19 



Architectural Drafting 



Mechanical Drafting 



DCT 


108 


Residential Drafting 


AMT 


101 


Manufacturing Processes 


DCT 


109 


Construction Materials 


DCT 


201 


Schematic Drafting 






and Specifications 


DCT 


205 


Introduction to Plastics 


DCT 


110 


Architectural Rendering 


DCT 


207 


Die Design Drafting 


DCT 


201 


Schematic Drafting 


DCT 


214 


Machine Design 


DCT 


204 


Architectural CAD 


DCT 


215 


Electronic Drafting/CAD 


DCT 


206 


Mechanical and Electrical 


DCT 


216 


Jig and Fixture Design 






Equipment 


DCT 


218 


CAD/CAM Design 



148 



Drafting/CAD Technology 



149 



Architectural Drafting Cont. 


Mechanical Drafting Cont. 


DCT 208 Structural Detailing 


DCT 219 Machine Tool Operations 


DCT 209 Estimating/CAD 


DCT 281 -293 Special Topics in 


DCT 210 Surveying 


Drafting/CAD Technology 


DCT 21 1 Commercial Structures I 


(1-5 Credits) 


DCT 212 Commercial Structures II 




DCT 213 CAD Mapping 




DCT 281 -293 Special Topics in 




Drafting/CAD Technology 




(1 -5 Credits) 





Total Credits 



64 



DRAFTING/CAD TECHNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE 



DCT 101— BASIC DRAFTING 

3 Credits 

This is an introductory course in mechanical drafting 
for students who have had no previous drafting expe- 
rience or who wish to review basic drafting techniques. 

DCT 102— TECHNICAL GRAPHICS 

3 Credits 

An introductory course which strengthens basic draft- 
ing skills to a proficient, technician level. Areas of study 
include geometric constructions, orthographic projec- 
tions with auxiliary views, dimensioning, sectioning, and 
introductory tolerancing. Other areas of study are iso- 
metric and oblique views of parts. 

DCT 103— CAD FUNDAMENTALS 

3 Credits 

This course will introduce the student to the funda- 
mentals of CAD (Computer-Aided Drafting). Topics covered 
will be: CAD Overview; System; Software; The Use of 
CAD Systems in Creating Geometry; Screen Control; 
and Plotting. 

DCT 104— PRODUCT DRAFTING 

3 Credits 

An introduction to the "set" concept of working draw- 
ings both in detailing and assembly. Fastening devices, 
thread symbols and nomenclature, surface texture 
symbols, classes of fits, and the use of parts lists, titles, 
and revision blocks are presented. The basics of prod- 
uct design and the design process will be introduced. 

DCT 105— FACILITIES DESIGN AND LAYOUT 

3 Credits 

Focuses on the various aspects of building construc- 
tion, structural applications, space planning and traffic 



flow analysis. Presentation drawings and working drawings 
are a part of this course. 

DCT 106— DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY 

3 Credits 

This course introduces fundamental principles in devel- 
oping graphical solutions to engineering problems. Many 
of the topics covered in this course will lend itself to 
sheet metal developments, transition pieces, and bend 
allowances. 

DCT 107— ADVANCED CAD 

3 Credits 

This course is designed to instruct students in funda- 
mentals of 3-D modeling for design. Topics covered will 
be: Overview of Modeling; Graphic Manipulation; Part 
Structuring; Coordinate Systems; and Developing Strategy 
of Model Geometry. 

DCT 108— RESIDENTIAL DRAFTING 

3 Credits 

This is a basic course covering residential planning and 
drafting. Areas of study will be interior planning, struc- 
tural design, and development of a working drawing. 
The student will design a residence from information 
given in class using accepted building standards. 

DCT 109— CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS AND 
SPECIFICATIONS 

3 Credits 

This course will introduce the student to the different 
construction materials, their composition and applica- 
tion. Specifications of materials, construction contracts 
and application required in the building industry is studied. 



150 



Division of Applied Science and Technologies 



DCT 110— ARCHITECTURAL RENDERING 

3 Credits 

Presents a survey and history of pictorial drawings. Studies 
light and color, rendering media, and application of dif- 
ferent techniques and media through a series of exercises. 

DCT 201— SCHEMATIC DRAFTING 

3 Credits 

This course presents the systematic layout of various 
types of schematic drawings. Students will prepare fin- 
ished drawings for the manufacture or installation of 
plumbing, heating, electrical, electronic and fluid-power 
type drawing. No attempt is made here to teach engi- 
neering design of these highly specialized areas, but 
the concepts of design will be covered. 

DCT 202— CAD PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE 

3 Credits 

This course covers the use of languages to program 
advanced commands. A project-oriented course, with 
projects individualized according to students' interests. 

DCT 203— STATICS AND STRENGTH OF 
MATERIALS 

3 Credits 

This course is designed to instruct the student on the 
fundamentals of theory and application of mechanics. 
Areas covered are vectors, equilibrium; application 
involving beams, trusses, and cables. Stress-strain 
relationships, axially loaded members, torsion, shear 
and bending moment diagrams, and deflection of beams 
and connections are also studied. 

DCT 204— ARCHITECTURAL CAD 

3 Credits 

This is an advanced computer-aided course which cov- 
ers Architectural Design. This course will include floor 
plans, details, and presentation drawings. 

DCT 205— INTRODUCTION TO PLASTICS 

3 Credits 

Introduces the student to the major plastic processing 
industries, techniques and to the most widely used plastic 
polymers— their applications and properties. 

DCT 206— MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL 
EQUIPMENT 

3 Credits 

This course focuses on the mechanical and electrical 
layout drawings required for a structure. Electrical load 
calculations, wire sizing, and circuits are studied. Plumbing 
requirements, fixture units, and pipe sizing are calcu- 



lated and drawn. Heating systems, duct layout, and siz- 
ing are also a part of this course. 

DCT 207— DIE DESIGN DRAFTING 

3 Credits 

The student studies the drafting, detailing, and design 
of blanking, piercing, and forming dies. Material reac- 
tion to shear, cutting clearances, and nest gauging are 
all a part of this course. 

DCT 208— STRUCTURAL DETAILING 

3 Credits 

This course focuses on the detailing of commercial 
structural members, their connections, materials, and 
methods of construction. Primary areas of concentra- 
tion will be the traditional materials such as reinforced 
concrete, masonry, steel, and timber. 

DCT 209— ESTIMATING/CAD 

3 Credits 

A basic course which introduces estimating proce- 
dures used in the building industry. Students will study 
material takeoffs, estimating overhead expenses, con- 
tingencies, labor, and equipment. This course may involve 
the use of computers to generate takeoffs and do pricing. 

DCT 210— SURVEYING 

3 Credits 

Introduces fundamentals of surveying, including use of 
the transit, reading angles, land descriptions, restric- 
tions, and legal problems. Examines topographical maps 
and their uses. 

DCT 211— COMMERCIAL STRUCTURES I 

3 Credits 

Focuses on the planning and drawing of commercial 
structures. Attention is directed to a presentation draw- 
ing and working drawing for concrete structures and 
steel structures. 

DCT 212— COMMERCIAL STRUCTURES II 

3 Credits 

Focuses on the planning and drawing of commercial 
structures. Attention is directed to working drawings for 
pre-engineered and concrete/steel structures. 

DCT 213— CAD MAPPING 

3 Credits 

This advanced computer-aided drafting course covers 
the concepts of map making. Civil engineering appli- 
cations, plat mapping, and topographical mapping areas 
will be covered. 



Drafting/CAD Technology 



151 



DCT 214— MACHINE DESIGN 

3 Credits 

This non-calculus course is designed to present prac- 
tical solutions to mechanical design problems. The stu- 
dent will study the design of machine elements including 
shafts, bearings, keys, pins, and springs. Also the geometry 
and drafting of cams and gears and the study of link- 
ages are included. 

DCT 215— ELECTRONIC DRAFTING/CAD 

3 Credits 

This course introduces the student to electronic sche- 
matics, drill indexing, and printed circuit board design. 
Emphasis is on the creation and manipulation of basic 
symbols, connection diagrams, block and logic dia- 
grams, including the use of figure parts and data extract. 
This course can be taught either as a board drafting 
course or as a computer-aided drafting course. 

DCT 216— JIG AND FIXTURE DESIGN 

3 Credits 

This course introduces the process of drafting and design 
as applied to tooling. Emphasis is placed on tooling, 
locators, supports, holding devices, clearances, and design 
as it pertains to jig and fixtures. 



DCT 218— CAD/CAM DESIGN 

3 Credits 

This advanced computer-aided drafting and computer- 
numerical control course covers the development of 
various machine routines. Primary areas of study will 
be the control of both the CNC mill and lathe. Topical 
areas of discussion will include material handling and 
robotics. 

DCT 219— MACHINE TOOL OPERATIONS 

3 Credits 

This course is designed to teach the student to become 
familiar with the various machine tool operations avail- 
able. The types of machines, their capabilities, limita- 
tions, set-up time, degree of accuracy, etc. will be covered 
in a lecture/lab (observation/some hands-on in the machine 
shop setting). 

DCT 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN DRAFTING/ 
CAD TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY 

The Electronics Technology program provides comprehensive instruction to prepare students 
for entry into a wide range of positions in the electronics field. While receiving a core of general 
electronics, the student has a choice of various technical electives in which to specialize in areas 
such as industrial electronics, digital techniques and communications systems, robotics, auto- 
motive and biological applications. Post-curriculum specialization course are also available. 

Completion of the two year Electronics Technology program of 69 credits leads to an Associate 
in Applied Science Degree. Technical Certificates are also available in specialized areas. Pro- 
grams are offered at Gary, Hammond, Valparaiso, Elkhart, South Bend, Fort Wayne, Lafayette, 
Kokomo, Logansport, Anderson, Marion, Muncie, Terre Haute, Indianapolis, Connersville, Rich- 
mond, Bloomington, Columbus, Madison, Evansville and Sellersburg. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (36 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



ELT 


100 


Circuits I 


ELT 


101 


Circuits II 


ELT 


102 


Electronic Circuits Lab 


ELT 


103 


Digital Principles 


ELT 


104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


ELT 


105 


Solid State I 


ELT 


106 


Digital Applications 


ELT 


201 


Solid State II 


ELT 


202 


Microprocessors 


ELT 


204 


Linear Integrated Circuits 



Semester Credits 

4 
4 
2 
4 
3 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 



General Education Requirements (21 Credits) 



Prefix No. Title 

ENG 101 English Composition 

ENG 201 Technical Writing 

SOC 101 Human Relations 

MAT 104 Algebra/Trigonometry I 

MAT 105 Algebra/Trigonometry II 

SCI 103 Physics I 

SCI 105 Physics II or 

SCI 203 Advanced Physics 



Regional Electives (12 Credits) 



Total Credits 



12 
69 



152 



Electronics Technology 



153 



ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



ELT 100— CIRCUITS I 

4 Credits 

Introduction of DC & AC Theory, use of test equipment 
and fabrication skills. Topics include study of DC elec- 
trical circuits, Ohm's Law, Kirchhoff's Laws, series and 
parallel circuits, power, introductory magnetism, ammeters, 
voltmeters, ohmmeters, inductance, capacitance and 
implementation of basic principles of electrical mea- 
suring devices including verification of lecture mate- 
rials in the laboratory. 

ELT 101— CIRCUITS II 

4 Credits 

A study of DC and AC electrical circuits network theo- 
rems, operator, phasors, reactances, impedances, phase 
relationships, power, resonance, ideal and air-core 
transformers and an introduction to graphical tech- 
niques and transients. 

ELT 102— CIRCUITS LAB 

2 Credits 

Laboratory experiments to complement Circuits I. Hands- 
on practice in the use of shop test equipment. Includes 
troubleshooting skills and care of equipment. 

ELT 103— DIGITAL PRINCIPLES 

4 Credits 

Introduces digital electronics including logic gates and 
combinational logic circuits. Also logic circuit minimi- 
zation techniques, digital decoders/encoders and mul- 
tiplexers/demultiplexers, flip flops and asynchronous 
counters. 

ELT 104— COMPUTER FUNDAMENTALS FOR 
TECHNOLOGY 

3 Credits 

Provides an introduction to microcomputer hardware, 
applications software, and programming. Emphasis is 
placed on computer literacy, operating systems, and 
structured language programming. Commonly used 
microcomputer applications are surveyed. 

ELT 105— SOLID STATE I 

4 Credits 

A basic introduction to the theory and operation of 
semiconductor devices and circuits. Topics covered are 
signal and rectifying diodes and Bipolar Junction tran- 



sistors, single and multistage amplifiers, discreet dif- 
ferential and operational amplifiers, power supplies, 
regulators and oscillator circuits. 

ELT 106— DIGITAL APPLICATIONS 

4 Credits 

Advanced study of digital systems, including memory 
and D/Aand A/D conversion. Construction of specified 
timing, circuits, and design driver/display systems; design 
of selected register, counters, and arithmetic circuits; 
and validation of operation. Hardware and general 
microprocessor system organization are included. 

ELT 107— INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL 
CONTROLS 

3 Credits 

Basics of industrial controls as related to industrial 
electronics. Includes basic and pilot control devices such 
as circuit layouts, industrial schematics reduced volt- 
age starters and multispeed controllers. Also trans- 
former hookups and circuit protection. 

ELT 108— COMMUNICATIONS ELECTRONICS 

3 Credits 

An overview of electronics applied to the communica- 
tion field. Provides various hands-on applications of 
communication systems and various subsystems. 
Introduces voice communications, video communica- 
tions, data communications using various systems. 

ELT 109— TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

3 Credits 

Examines various methods in transmitting digital data 
from one location to another. Includes both classical 
modems over telephone lines and nontraditional methods. 

ELT 110— FIBER OPTICS 

3 Credits 

An overview of fiber optics. Surveys uses for fiber optics, 
advantages, disadvantages, cable details, connectors, 
splices, sources, detectors, and fiber optic systems. 

ELT 111— SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS 

3 Credits 

Theory of satellite operation, site perimeters for, and 
methods of site preparation, and installation of satellite 
dish for TVRO. Aids decision making regarding type of 
dish for use in a particular installation. 



154 



Division of Applied Science and Technologies 



ELT 112— BIO-MEDICAL ELECTRONICS I 

3 Credits 

Study of medical electronics equipment, including ECG, 
EEG defibrillators, heart monitors, other monitoring 
equipment, and respiratory equipment. 

ELT 113— BASIC ELECTRICITY 

3 Credits 

Study of electrical laws and principles pertaining to DC 
and AC circuits. Includes current, voltage, resistance, 
power, inductance, capacitance, and transformers. 

ELT 115— INTRODUCTION TO LASERS 

3 Credits 

An introduction to laser action, laser beam character- 
istics, types of lasers, safety considerations, general 
laser applications and laser and optical equipment. It 
serves to teach any student the basics of laser, laser 
systems, and applications, as well as to prepare begin- 
ning laser students for future courses. 

ELT 201— SOLID STATE II 

4 Credits 

In-depth study of special semiconductor devices and 
circuits. Includes field effect transistors, uni-junction 
transistors, opto-electronic devices, thyristors, and amplifier 
biasing. 

ELT 202— MICROPROCESSORS 

4 Credits 

Introduction to microprocessor system organization, 
operation and programming. A microprocessor instruc- 
tion set is investigated and sample program routines 
are analyzed for their operation. Laboratory experience 
includes the operation and programming of microcom- 
puter systems. 

ELT 203— INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS 

4 Credits 

An overview of electronics applied in the industrial set- 
ting. Introduction to various applications of the indus- 
trial system and how electronics is applied to these 
systems. Introduces power machines, polyphase sys- 
tems, solid state controls, transducers, industrial com- 
puter system. 

ELT 204— LINEAR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS 

3 Credits 

Introduction to Operational Amplifiers (Op Amps), char- 
acteristics and operations. Covers filters, inverters, 
noninverters, feedback operations, gain linear regula- 
tors, switching regulators, voltage devices, voltage 



comparators, electronic timers, voltage controlled 
oscillators, phased locked loops, frequency to voltage 
conversion. 

ELT 205— PERIPHERALS 

3 Credits 

In-depth study of peripherals used with typical com- 
puters and interfacing of the microcomputer with 
peripherals. Includes a study of data communications 
hardware and techniques. How to design circuits to 
interface microprocessors with industrial equipment. 
Includes the interfacing of microcomputers systems with 
input and output transducers for control systems. Tech- 
niques for logical troubleshooting of microcomputer 
systems. 

ELT 206— ANALOG TROUBLESHOOTING 
TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

Techniques for logical troubleshooting of electronic cir- 
cuits and simple systems with emphasis on systematic 
diagnostic methods, signal tracing, and signal injection 
methods. Provides experience in the use of shop test 
equipment and electronic communication skills. 

ELT 207— DIGITAL TROUBLESHOOTING 
TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

Techniques for logical troubleshooting of microcom- 
puters. Includes nodal testers, microcomputer con- 
trolled testers, static stimulus testers, signature analysis, 
and logic analyzers. System oriented troubleshooting 
procedures are emphasized. 

ELT 208— MICROWAVE COMMUNICATIONS 

3 Credits 

Focuses on microwave transmission lines, wave- 
guides, waveguide components, including hybrid cou- 
plers, attenuators, microwave filters, phase shifters, 
T-junctions, irises, and microwave tubes. 

ELT 209— ADVANCED COMMUNICATIONS 
ELECTRONICS 

3 Credits 

The basics of microwave principles and in-depth study 
of matching techniques for transmission lines. Includes 
introduction to antennas and a thorough study of tele- 
vision operation. 

ELT 210— VCR THEORY 

3 Credits 

Video cassette recorder theory with VCR troubleshoot- 
ing techniques and VCR test equipment usage. Includes 



Electronics Technology 



155 



diagnostic testing through signal injection and signal 
tracing. Emphasis on recording, playback and servo 
circuits. Quantitative and qualitative knowledge of fun- 
damental principles and terms used in VCR theory and 
repair are covered. 

ELT 211— WAVE OPTICS AND COMPONENTS 

3 Credits 

Treats the wave nature of light as manifested in inter- 
ference, diffraction and polarization phenomena in optical 
systems. Analyzes and uses optical components that 
modify, control or detect light. Includes light sources, 
wave nature of light interference, diffraction, polariza- 
tion, holography, beam splitters, filters, isolators, grat- 
ings, polarizers and non linear optical materials. Laboratory 
stresses hands on experience in application/evaluation 
of wave optic devices in typical optical systems. 

ELT 212— NETWORKING 

3 Credits 

Study of types of protocol used in data communication 
systems. Includes an overview of networking, network- 
ing control, and interfacing. Areas of emphasis include 
protocols, packet switching systems, and local area 
networks. 

ELT 213— BIO-MEDICAL ELECTRONICS II 

2 Credits 

Examines medical support systems, including X-ray 
equipment, respiration, and analyzers, and their main- 
tenance. Also medical ultrasound, electrosurgery units 
and mechanical recorders. Prepares for licensing and 
certification. 

ELT 214— INDUSTRIAL INSTRUMENTATION 

3 Credits 

A study of techniques and practices involved in the cal- 
ibration of industrial control equipment. Provides emphasis 
on tear down, assembly, alignment, calibration, and 
operations of instruments. 

ELT 215— LASER SYSTEMS AND APPLICATIONS 

3 Credits 

In-depth coverage of laser types and applications: Ion, 
molecular, liquid, solid state and semiconductor lasers. 
Flash lamps, powers supplies (CW and pulsed) and 
energy transfer mechanisms for each laser type are 



examined. Includes lasers in medicine, surgery, dentis- 
try, communications, range finding, alignment, track- 
ing, welding, cutting, drilling, data recording and display. 
Laboratory experiments stress hands-on operation and 
trouble shooting of each laser type and small scale 
examples of applications. 

ELT 216— LASER AND OPTICAL 
MEASUREMENTS 

3 Credits 

Examines the instruments and methods available for 
evaluating laser light and supporting optical equip- 
ment. Includes an introduction to radiometry/photom- 
etry and typical energy/power detectors. Photographic 
recording mediums and major optical measuring 
instruments (spectrometers, spectrophotometers, 
monochromators and interferometers) and methods are 
also covered. Laboratory experiments stress hands-on 
experience with current optical measuring equipment 
and methods. 

ELT 217— LASER PROJECTS 

3 Credits 

Laser projects is an individual project class in which 
students work directly with the instructor while building 
laser related project(s). 

ELT 218— GEOMETRICAL OPTICS AND 
COMPONENTS 

3 Credits 

Applies mathematical and graphical techniques to the 
reflection/refraction of light at typical optical surfaces. 
Analyzes and uses typical optical components. Includes 
ray tracing, imagining with lenses, F-stops and aper- 
tures, mirrors, lenses, prisms, windows, optical flats, 
matrix optics, etalons, beam expanders, collimators and 
autocollimators, optical tables, optical supports, optical 
systems and photographic components. 

ELT 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN ELECTRONICS 
TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION 

TECHNOLOGY 

The Heating, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology program at Ivy Tech is designed to 
offer students the possibility of developing initial employment in this field. 

Heating, air conditioning and refrigeration technicians may work in service, installation, design, 
sales, or estimation areas. Entry level positions may be found in factories, hospitals, theaters, 
restaurants, office buildings, government agencies, service firms or through self-employment. 

A two-year program requires 63 credits and leads to the Associate in Applied Science degree. 
Technical Certificates are also available in specialized areas. 

The program is offered in Gary, Valparaiso, South Bend, Fort Wayne, Lafayette, Kokomo, 
Muncie, Terre Haute, Indianapolis, Richmond, Bloomington, Columbus, Evansville and Sellersburg. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (39 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



HEA 


101 


HEA 


103 


HEA 


104 


HEA 


106 


HEA 


107 


IMT 


103 


ELT 


113 


HEA 


201 


HEA 


202 


HEA 


203 


HEA 


204 


HEA 


205 


HEA 


209 



Heating Fundamentals 

Air Conditioning and Refrigeration I 

Heating Service 

Air Conditioning and Refrigeration II 

Duct Fabrication and Installation 

Motors and Motor Controls 

Basic Electricity 

Cooling Service — Electrical 

Electrical Circuits and Controls 

Heat Loss and Gain Calculation 

Commercial Refrigeration 

Heat Pump Service 

Psychrometrics 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



General Education Courses (12 Credits) 



Prefix 



No. 



Title 



ENG 


101 


English Composition 


MAT 


XXX 


Math Elective 


XXX 


XXX 


General Education Elective 


soc 


101 


Human Relations 



Regional Electives (12 Credits) 



Total Credits 



12 
63 



156 



Heating, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology 



157 



HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION 
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



HEA 101— HEATING FUNDAMENTALS 

3 Credits 

Fundamentals applicable to the heating phase of air 
conditioning. Includes types of units, parts, basic con- 
trols, functions, and applications. Emphasizes prac- 
tices, tools and meter uses, temperature measurement, 
heat flow, and the combustion process. 

HEA 103— AIR CONDITIONING AND 
REFRIGERATION I 

3 Credits 

Introduction to compression systems used in mechan- 
ical refrigeration and air conditioning. Includes the 
refrigeration cycle, compressors, receivers, evapora- 
tors, condensers, metering devices, refrigerants, tem- 
perature conversions, absolute temperatures and gas 
laws. Introduction to soldering, brazing and oxyacety- 
lene gas welding apparatus and basic mechanical pro- 
cedures used in industry. 

HEA 104— HEATING SERVICE 

3 Credits 

Covers procedures used to analyze mechanical and 
electrical problems encountered when servicing resi- 
dential heating systems, including gas, oil, electric and 
hydronic heating equipment. Electrical schematics and 
diagrams, combustion testing, venting and combustion 
air requirements, installation and service procedures 
are considered. 

HEA 106— AIR CONDITIONING AND 
REFRIGERATION II 

3 Credits 

Continues air conditioning and refrigeration fundamen- 
tals, compressors, condensers, receivers, metering 
devices, evaporators and other system components. 
Includes continuation of basic mechanical service pro- 
cedures used in industry and in-depth study of domes- 
tic refrigerators, freezers and window air conditioners. 

HEA 107— DUCT FABRICATION AND 
INSTALLATION 

3 Credits 

Lecture and laboratory course in blueprint reading, lay- 
out of duct work, and construction of duct fittings from 
student layouts. The basic use of hand tools, safety 
procedures and shop equipment specific to the sheet 
metal trade are included. 



HEA 201— COOLING SERVICE— ELECTRICAL 

3 Credits 

Service procedures for residential air conditioning and 
refrigeration systems. Includes low voltage controls (24 
volts) and line voltage controls such as defrost timers, 
defrost heaters, relays and cold controls, with empha- 
sis on schematic and pictorial diagrams. 

HEA 202— ELECTRIC CIRCUITS AND CONTROLS 

3 Credits 

Study of various types of controls used in heating, air 
conditioning, and refrigeration. These include: gas, oil, 
and cooling controls, thermostats, humidistats, aqua- 
stats, electronic thermostats and temperature controls. 
Also applications in the operation of controls and their 
integration in complex control systems, aided by the 
use of schematic and pictorial diagrams. 

HEA 203— HEAT LOSS AND GAIN CALCULATION 

3 Credits 

Methods used in calculating heat loss and gain in sizing 
units for residential and light commercial applications. 
Includes methods used to reduce energy consumption. 

HEA 204— COMMERCIAL REFRIGERATION 

3 Credits 

Examines air conditioning and refrigeration systems for 
commercial use, including medium and low tempera- 
ture applications. Includes refrigeration accessories, 
metering devices and advance control arrangements. 

HEA 205— HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS SERVICE 

3 Credits 

Examines heat pumps of all types, emphasizing resi- 
dential applications and system control balance points, 
COP ratings, pictorial and schematic diagrams. 

HEA 206— ADVANCED COOLING SERVICE 

3 Credit 

Considers methods of troubleshooting electrical and 
mechanical components of air conditioning and refrig- 
eration systems. 

HEA 207— HVAC CODES 

3 Credits 

Study of state and local codes covering installation, repair, 

alteration, relocation, replacement and erection of heating, 



158 



Division of Applied Science and Technologies 



ventilation, cooling and refrigeration systems. Includes 
job-related costs of material and equipment, labor, war- 
ranty, taxes, permits and sub-contracts. Students will 
estimate service and maintenance contracts. 

HEA 208— ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND 
BALANCING 

3 Credits 

Deals with reduction in energy usage in a facility, oper- 
ational and maintenance improvements, new building 
design standards, shut down and consolidation, alter- 
nate energy resources, retrofitting existing buildings and 
energy awareness. Includes practice in adjusting and 
setting fan speeds, dampers and other air regulating 
devices. 

HEA 209— PSYCHROMETICS 

3 Credits 

Covers methods of calculating air qualities and quan- 
tities using the psychrometic chart; with emphasis on 
sizing duct work for residential applications. 

HEA 210— ALTERNATIVE ENERGY 
FUNDAMENTALS 

3 Credits 

Solar energy: methods of collecting, using and storing 
energy for heating and cooling work. Covers space heating 
and cooling, domestic and commercial hot water heat- 
ing, and swimming pool heating. Air and water system 
design, collector cells, pumps sizing, pipe and duct siz- 
ing, design of distribution systems, and operational cost 
and savings. 

HEA 211— ABSORPTION SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

Surveys special cooling systems with emphasis on the 
absorption cycle. Includes ammonia-water and lithium- 
bromide cycles, types of units, arrangements, parts, 
function of various parts and applications of units in air 
conditioning systems, in addition to diagnosis of serv- 
ice problems. 



HEA 212— ADVANCED HVAC CONTROLS 

3 Credits 

Covers control systems beyond ordinary residential and 
single zone commercial jobs. Includes solid state con- 
trols, zoning controls, modulating controls, low ambient 
controls, heat recovery and energy management con- 
trols, economizer controls and pneumatic controls. 

HEA 213— ESTIMATING, MANAGEMENT AND 
SALES 

3 Credits 

The use of blueprints, specifications, AIA documents, 
application data sheets, bid forms and contracts in es- 
timating materials and labor in the HVAC business. 
Also includes advertising, direct labor, indirect labor, 
overhead, warranty coverages, taxes, permits, sub- 
contracts, margins, mark-ups and profit. Students will 
estimate service contracts and study service organi- 
zation, service procedures, record keeping, parts inventory 
control, and insurance liability. 

HEA 214— APPLIED DESIGN 

3 Credits 

Study of complete air conditioning systems through 
analysis of a specific job. Includes calculation of heat 
losses and gains, selection of equipment and layout 
distribution systems, preparation of working drawings 
and determination of operation and maintenance costs. 
Covers design and sizing of refrigerant piping, cooling 
tower piping, and chilled water-hot water piping. 

HEA 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN HEATING, AIR 
CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION 
TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



INDUSTRIAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY 

The Industrial Laboratory Technology program provides comprehensive instruction to prepare 
students for entry level positions as industrial laboratory technicians. Instruction in testing and 
inspecting at various production stages allows students to perform analyses and compile and 
evaluate statistical data to determine quality and reliability standards in the manufacturing process. 
The course of study includes methodologies in compilation and evaluation of statistical data to 
determine adherence to specified quality or reliability standards. The program will offer students 
the opportunity to develop skills to test products for dimensions, performance, or chemical 
characteristics and to develop written and oral reports. 

A two year program requiring 66 credits leads to an Associate in Applied Science Degree. The 
Program is offered in Terre Haute and Indianapolis. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (30 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



ILT 


101 


ILT 


201 


ILT 


202 


ILT 


203 


INF 


101 


1ST 


101 


1ST 


102 


SCI 


103 


SCI 


105 


SCI 


203 


MAT 


106 



Industrial Laboratory Techniques 

Industrial Instrumentation and Techniques I 

Industrial Instrumentation and Techniques II 

Environmental Monitoring 

Introduction to Microcomputers 

Quality Control Concepts and Techniques I 

Techniques of Supervision I 

Physics I 

Physics II or 

Advanced Physics 

Statistics 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

3 
3 



General Education Requirements (24 Credits) 



Prefix No. Title 

ENG 101 English Composition 

ENG 103 Speech 

SOC 101 Human Relations 

MAT 104 Algebra/Trigonometry I 

MAT 105 Algebra/Trigonometry II 

SCI 107 Chemistry 

SCI 111 Microbiology 

ENG 201 Technical Writing 



Regional Electives (10 Credits) 



Total Credits 



10 
64 



159 



160 



Division of Applied Science and Technologies 



INDUSTRIAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY 
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



ILT 101— INDUSTRIAL LABORATORY 
TECHNIQUES 

3 Credits 

Basic skills needed in the industrial laboratory: labo- 
ratory safety identification, care, and operation of basic 
laboratory equipment and glassware; and definition and 
preparation of reagents. Includes laboratory exercises 
in the use of selected equipment and the performance 
of appropriate procedures. 

ILT 201— INDUSTRIAL INSTRUMENTATION AND 
TECHNIQUES I 

3 Credits 

Theoretical aspects of industrial laboratory instrumen- 
tation. Imparts the theories and laws that govern the 
way instruments operate. Laboratory assignments include 
experimentation spectrophotometric, separation, and 
other analytical devices. 

ILT 202— INDUSTRIAL INSTRUMENTATION AND 
TECHNIQUES II 

3 Credits 

Advances theoretical aspects of industrial laboratory 
instrumentation. Laboratory assignments include 
experimentation in atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 

ILT 203— ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING 

3 Credits 

Deals with aspects of environmental pollution, provid- 
ing a realistic and objective view of pollution problems. 
Includes the role of technology in the identification of 
environmental pollution. 

ILT 205— INTRODUCTION TO TECHNOLOGY 

3 Credits 

Reviews disciplines comprising scientific and engi- 
neering fields of study. Covers physics, chemistry, biol- 



ogy, environmental science, and civil, mechanical, 
electrical, and industrial engineering. Introduces the- 
ory, principles, and practices related to the work of a 
scientific or engineering assistant/aide. Also, safety, 
professional ethics, and use of the scientific calculator/ 
computer as a scientific and engineering tool. 

ILT 206— FOOD AND DRUG ANALYSIS 

3 Credits 

Examines the food processing industry. Laboratory 
experiments include various analytical techniques and 
quality control standards utilized by the food industry. 
Includes classification of drugs and various methods 
of purification. Laboratory exercises cover instruments 
and procedures used to monitor the quality and quan- 
tity of the composition of a product. 

ILT 207— WASTEWATER ANALYSIS 

2 Credits 

This course deals with the chemical and biological analysis 
of wastewater. Major pollutants of water are determined 
and quantified. The wastewater treatment steps are 
discussed so as to determine ideal lab sampling loca- 
tions. Various wastewater tests such as BOD's, COD's, 
sedimentation rates and biological examinations will be 
performed. 

ILT 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN INDUSTRIAL 
LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY 

The two-year Industrial Maintenance Technology program requires 70 semester hours for com- 
pletion and leads to an Associate in Applied Science degree. The program provides instruction 
in advanced technologies for individuals seeking employment as technicians who are involved 
in maintaining industrial facilities and equipment. Competencies necessary for industrial main- 
tenance technicians include installation, maintenance and troubleshooting of electrical, mechan- 
ical and fluid power systems; basic heating, air conditioning and welding techniques; technical 
interpretation; automated systems application; safety; and communications, interpersonal rela- 
tions, math, science, and computer skills. 

Industrial maintenance technicians work in a variety of industrial and business settings includ- 
ing manufacturing, production, building management, hotels, hospitals, apartment complexes, 
and other service-oriented industries. Students may specialize in such areas as electrical, machinery, 
facilities, and heating/air conditioning. 

Technical Certificates are also available in specialized areas. The program is offered in Gary, 
Valparaiso, South Bend, Elkhart, Fort Wayne, Lafayette, Logansport, Muncie, Terre Haute, Indi- 
anapolis, Richmond, Evansville and Sellersberg. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (39 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



ELT 


113 


Basic Electricity 


IMT 


102 


Introduction to Print Reading 


IMT 


103 


Motors and Motor Controls 


IMT 


104 


Fluid Power Basics 


IMT 


105 


Heating and Air Conditioning Basics 


IMT 


201 


Fluid Power Systems 


IMT 


202 


Electrical Circuits 


IMT 


203 


Machine Installation 


IMT 


204 


Machine Maintenance 


IMT 


205 


Programmable Controllers I 


AMT 


102 


Introduction to Robotics 


WLD 


114 


Introductory Welding 


MTT 


101 


Machine Fundamentals I 


General Education Courses (18 Credits) 


ENG 


101 


English Composition 


ELT 


104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


MAT 


104 


Algebra/Trigonometry I 


MAT 


XXX 


Math Elective or 


ENG 


XXX 


English Elective 


SOC 


XXX 


Social Science Elective 


SCI 


103 


Physics I 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Regional Electives (13 Credits) 



Total Credits 



12 
70 



161 



162 



Division of Applied Science and Technologies 



INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY 
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



IMT 102— INTRODUCTION TO PRINT READING 

3 Credits 

A basic course in reading and interpreting machine shop 
symbols, welding blueprints, and working drawings used 
in trades and crafts. Attention is given to dimension, 
shape, fabrication and assembly. Applies basic math- 
ematics in the solution of print and performance problems. 

IMT 103— MOTORS & MOTOR CONTROLS 

3 Credits 

This course is designed to give each student a com- 
plete understanding of all types of electric motors, extending 
the small shaded pole fan motors to the large three 
phase motors. The student will receive an education in 
motor theory magnetism and how it effects motor rota- 
tion. Motor starting components and protective devices 
for motor circuits will be explained and shown in detail. 
Heat dissipation from a motor, motor slippage and how 
frequency effects a motor will be discussed. Multi-speed 
motors and how they are wired to obtain different speeds, 
and capacitors and how they effect a motor circuit will 
be included. 

IMT 104— FLUID POWER BASICS 

3 Credits 

This course introduces the student to fluid power prin- 
ciples and components. The student will learn basic 
circuit design, symbols, and schematic diagrams to build 
a foundation for career work in the fluid power technology. 

IMT 105— HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING 
BASICS 

3 Credits 

Fundamentals of heating and compression systems used 
in mechanical refrigeration and air conditioning. Includes 
combustion process, heat flow, temperature measure- 
ment, gas laws and heating and refrigeration cycles 
and components used in systems. Introduces basic 
mechanical service procedures used in industry. 

IMT 108— MEASUREMENTS AND CALIBRATION 

3 Credits 

This course is designed to provide instruction on the 
purpose, function, and application of oscilloscopes and 
related instruments. 

IMT 120— METALLURGY FUNDAMENTALS 

3 Credits 

This course studies the fundamentals of thermody- 



namics and reactions occurring in metals subjected to 
various kinds of heat treatment. Includes classification 
and properties of metals; chemical and physical met- 
allurgy; theory of alloys; heat treatment principles as 
applied to ferrous and non-ferrous materials, tests to 
determine uses; heat treatment for steels, special steels, 
and cast iron; powder metallurgy; use of gas and elec- 
tric furnaces and their controls. 

IMT 121— INDUSTRIAL SAFETY 

3 Credits 

Covers Occupational Safety and Health standards and 
codes with emphasis on applications of codes to typical 
work situations. Includes emergency first aid, safety 
protection, eye protection, chemical handling. Covers 
employer and employee rights, as well as violations, 
citations, penalties, variances, appeals, record keeping. 

IMT 122— ELECTRICAL WIRING FUNDAMENTALS 

3 Credits 

Covers National Electrical Code and its relationship to 
residential and commercial wiring. Includes mechani- 
cal installation of hardware, metering equipment, lights, 
switches, and design. Tool use as well as material selection 
is discussed. 

IMT 201— FLUID POWER SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

This course introduces the student to complex fluid power 
circuits. The student will learn to design, analyze, and 
troubleshoot complex circuits using schematic dia- 
grams. This course studies detailed construction of typ- 
ical industrial fluid power components. Students will 
disassemble and repair fluid power components in the 
lab. 

IMT 202— ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS 

3 Credits 

Fundamentals of single- and three-phase alternating 
current, including parallel circuits, resistance, induct- 
ance, switching, fusing, current requirements, trans- 
former applications and motor and motor control. Also, 
basics of mechanical and electrical installations 
emphasizing tool use and material selection. Includes 
electrical troubleshooting diagnosis and repair. 

IMT 203— MACHINE INSTALLATION 

3 Credits 

Introduces installation and rigging and use of proper 

hand, power tools and measuring instruments. 



Industrial Maintenance Technology 



163 



IMT 204— MACHINE MAINTENANCE 

3 Credits 

Examines procedures for the removal, repair and 
installation of machine components. Methods of instal- 
lation, lubrication practices, and maintenance proce- 
dures for industrial machinery are included. 

IMT 205— PROGRAMMABLE CONTROLLERS I 

3 Credits 

Introduces the basic theory, operation, and program- 
ming of programmable controllers. 

IMT 206— PROGRAMMABLE CONTROLLERS II 

3 Credits 

In-depth study of programmable controllers. Empha- 



sizes program language, installation, maintenance and 
applications. 

IMT 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN INDUSTRIAL 
MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



MACHINE TOOL TECHNOLOGY 

The Machine Tool Technology program provides training in the many facets of the machine tool 
industry through work with machines, machine tools, computer-controlled machines and pre- 
cision inspection equipment. It is the machine tool technician who fabricates the pieces that, 
when assembled with other such pieces, comprise the complex machinery used to manufacture 
millions of products. In other words, most items we use every day trace their history to the hands 
and mind of a skilled machine tool technician. 

Machine Tool technicians are employed in such positions as CNC operator/programmer, tool 
and die maker, jig and fixture maker, statistical quality technician, specialized machine techni- 
cian, metallurgical assistant, tooling supervisor, tooling salesperson, or field service represent- 
ative. In addition to the Associate Degree program, Technical Certificates are also available in 
specialized areas. 

The program is offered at South Bend, Fort Wayne, Lafayette, Logansport, Muncie, Indian- 
apolis, Connersville and Richmond. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE 



Technical Courses (52 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



MTT 


101 


Machining Fundamentals I 


MTT 


102 


Machining Fundamentals II 


IMT 


102 


Introduction to Print Reading 


MTT 


104 


Machinery Handbook 


MTT 


105 


Machine Tool Setup and Operation 


MTT 


106 


Advanced Engineering Print Interpretation 


IMT 


120 


Metallurgy Fundamentals 


MTT 


108 


Precision Measurement 


MTT 


201 


Advanced Machine Tool Processes 


MTT 


202 


Advanced Machine Tool Setup and Operation 


MTT 


203 


Tool Fabrication I 


MTT 


204 


CNC Programming I 


MTT 


205 


Interactive CNC 


MTT 


206 


Specialized Machining Theory 


MTT 


207 


Specialized Machining Applications 


MTT 


208 


Tool Fabrication II 


MTT 


209 


CNC Programming II 


General Education (12 Credits) 


ENG 


101 


English Composition 


SOC 


101 


Human Relations 


MAT 


101 


Algebra I 


MAT 


103 


Geometry/Trigonometry 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Regional Electives (3 Credits) 



Total Credits 



_3 
67 



164 



Machine Tool Technology 



165 



MACHINE TOOL TECHNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



MTT 101— MACHINE FUNDAMENTALS I 

3 Credits 

Covers machine tool processes, the care and use of 

hand tools and measuring devices. Emphasis on basic 

manipulative skills, print interpretation, and lab safety 

features. 



MTT 202— ADVANCED MACHINE TOOL SETUP 
AND OPERATION 

3 Credits 

Includes advanced operational and setup procedures 
for tool processing. Emphasis on surface and cylindri- 
cal grinding with related mathematical applications. 



MTT 102— MACHINE FUNDAMENTALS II 

3 Credits 

Development of bench work, sawing, filing, layout, drill- 
ing and reaming skills in the completion of assigned 
projects. Includes technical terminology and mathe- 
matical applications. 

MTT 104— MACHINERY HANDBOOK 

3 Credits 

Explores the intent and use of the Machinery's Hand- 
book. Applies principles and concepts in the Machin- 
ery's Handbook to projects in the industry. 

MTT 105— MACHINE TOOL SETUP AND 
OPERATION 

3 Credits 

Examines completed, hardened and ground V-block 
construction, internal and external threads. Attention is 
also given to the use of the dividing head. 

MTT 106— ADVANCED ENGINEERING PRINT 
INTERPRETATION 

3 Credits 

Applied mathematics in solving engineering and design 
related problems in the areas of die design, fabrication, 
assembly, special machinery, and die casting. Empha- 
sis on geometric form and position tolerancing. 

MTT 108— PRECISION MEASUREMENT 

3 Credits 

Techniques of linear and angular measurement and, 

applications in machine tool production and quality control. 

MTT 201— ADVANCED MACHINE TOOL 
PROCESSING 

3 Credits 

Advanced machining theories and techniques. Intro- 
duces advanced processing procedures and operations. 



MTT 203— TOOL FABRICATION I 

3 Credits 

Concepts of tooling design, assembly, and standards 
of fabrication. Emphasizes jig and fixture components, 
their application and operational characteristics. 

MTT 204— CNC PROGRAMMING I 

3 Credits 

Introduces the concept of automatic process control 
and fundamentals of feedback elements, transmission, 
control action, and controlling elements as used in 
pneumatics, hydraulic, and electronic systems. Emphasis 
on the relationship between programming language and 
machine components. 

MTT 205— INTERACTIVE CNC 

4 Credits 

Introduces computer-assisted numerical control pro- 
gramming as it relates to automated milling and machining 
centers. Emphasizes proper programming techniques, 
control familiarity, file data, and machining functions. 

MTT 206— SPECIALIZED MACHINING THEORY 

3 Credits 

Advanced machining techniques and specialized appli- 
cations, including a variety of rotary and helical oper- 
ations and procedures. 

MTT 207— SPECIALIZED MACHINING 
APPLICATIONS 

3 Credits 

Applications in advanced machining techniques and 
specialized applications including differential indexing, 
gear cutting, cam milling and tracer design. 

MTT 208— TOOL FABRICATION II 

3 Credits 

Concepts and standards for tooling design and fabri- 
cation. Emphasis on components and operational 
characteristics of blanking, piercing, and progressive 
type dies. 



166 



Division of Applied Science and Technologies 



MTT 209— CNC PROGRAMMING II 

3 Credits 

Examines a variety of programming formats for CNC 
lathe and milling applications. Preparation of program- 
ming manuscripts and canned cycle relevancy. Empha- 
sis on proper programming techniques and control 
familiarization. 



MTT 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN MACHINE 
TOOL TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



MINING OPERATIONS TECHNOLOGY 

The Mining Operations Technology program offers on-the-job training as well as classroom study 
in coal operation and management. Courses include mining law, blasting and explosives, mine 
machinery, operations, reclamation mine planning, and economics of mining. The program pre- 
pares students for mining jobs ranging from apprentice to experienced machine operator. Entry 
positions vary with the type and method of mining. 

The two-year program, requiring 76 credits, leads to an Associate in Applied Science Degree. 
The program is offered in Terre Haute. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (58 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



MIN 


101 


MIN 


102 


MIN 


104 


MIN 


105 


MIN 


106 


MIN 


107 


MIN 


108 


MIN 


109 


MIN 


110 


MIN 


111 


MIN 


112 


MIN 


113 


MIN 


114 


WLD 


114 


MIN 


201 


MIN 


202 


MIN 


203 


MIN 


204 


MIN 


205 


MIN 


206 


IMT 


104 


INF 


101 



Mining Fundamentals 

Surface Mining Machinery 

General Physical Geology 

Electrical Circuits and Systems 

Transmission Systems 

Operation Safety and Accident Prevention 

Elements of Spoil Management 

Coal Sampling and Analysis 

Labor Relations 

First Aid and Safety Management 

Elements of Reclamation 

Coal Preparation Plants 

Water Drainage and Pollution Law 

Introductory Welding 

Mining Operation Planning 

Surface Mine Hydraulics 

Mine Maps and Surveying 

Equipment Operations Lab 

Blasting Technology and Explosives Safety 

Techniques of Supervision I 

Fluid Power Basics 

Introduction to Microcomputers 



Semester Credits 

4 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
4 
2 
3 
3 



General Education Requirements (18 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



ENG 


101 


English Composition 


ENG 


103 


Speech 


ENG 


201 


Technical Writing 


MAT 


101 


Algebra I 


MAT 


103 


Geometry/Trigonometry 


SOC 


101 


Human Relations 



Total Credits 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_3 
76 



167 



168 



Division of Applied Science and Technologies 



MINING OPERATIONS TECHNOLOGY COURSE 
DESCRIPTIONS 



MIN 101— MINING FUNDAMENTALS 

4 Credits 

Fundamentals of mining, with emphasis on manage- 
ment and safety. Deals with geological factors affecting 
mineral formation, U.S. mineral resources, and meth- 
ods of mining. Includes tours of surface mines in the 
local area. 

MIN 102— SURFACE MINING MACHINERY 

3 Credits 

Covers concepts and operating principles of all types 
of surface mining machinery. Includes student reports 
of visits to area mines, focusing on structural defects, 
safe operation and maintenance of mines, operator training 
and skills, and life expectancy of workers. 

MIN 104— GENERAL PHYSICAL GEOLOGY 

3 Credits 

Fundamentals of geology and the geological history of 
North America, with emphasis on the Mississippian and 
Pennsylvanian periods. Examines sediments and sed- 
imentary rock especially those allied with coal beds. 
Includes field trips in the local area. 

MIN 105— ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

Introduces principles of electricity pertaining to machine 
operation. Includes conductors and conductor sizes, 
magnetic circuits, coil polarities, and AC and DC motors. 

MIN 106— TRANSMISSION SYSTEMS 

2 Credits 

Applications of gears and gear drives and mechanical 
advantage in coal transportation systems, including truck, 
rail, slurry, and conveyor belt. 

MIN 107— OPERATION SAFETY AND ACCIDENT 
PREVENTION 

3 Credits 

Knowledge and skills useful in public relations and safety 
education. Develops speaking, listening, and writing skills. 
Introduces use of the Bureau of Mines Dictionary of 
Mines. Includes use of safety films and review of wage 
agreements, forms, and reports required by govern- 
ment agencies. 

MIN 108— ELEMENTS OF SPOIL MANAGEMENT 

2 Credits 

Principles of spoil control, with emphasis on planning, 



use, and management of spoil materials. Includes prin- 
ciples of vegetative survival, deposition of overburden, 
and slope control. 

MIN 109— COAL SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS 

2 Credits 

Provides laboratory training in approved methods of 
coal analysis, with emphasis on the Bureau of Mines 
safety requirements. 

MIN 110— LABOR RELATIONS 

2 Credits 

Investigates labor and management approaches to the 
operation of mines. Emphasis is placed on proper and 
ethical procedures. 

MIN 111— FIRST AID AND SAFETY MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

Covers first aid, dust and noise evaluation, gas detec- 
tion, safe and unsafe practices, accident reduction, 
emergency aid for the injured, mine rescue operations, 
safety duties of mine personnel, and instructor training 
and certification by the Mine Safety and Health 
Administration. 

MIN 112— ELEMENTS OF RECLAMATION 

3 Credits 

Land reclamation as it pertains to the surface mining 
industry. Covers basics of reforestation and reviews the 
types of grasses and legumes found in different geo- 
graphical areas. Examines existing federal and state 
regulations and future trends. Emphasizes the impor- 
tance of production and reclamation as a working unit. 

MIN 113— COAL PREPARATION PLANTS 

1 Credit 

Purposes and processes of coal preparation plants. 
Attention is given to raw coal, disposal of refuse and 
slurry, and coal storage, loading, and mechanics. 

MIN 114— WATER DRAINAGE AND WATER 
POLLUTION LAWS 

3 Credits 

Includes laws and problems pertaining to the control of 
water in mining operations. Covers slurry ponds, pit 
drainage, and acid seepage, with emphasis on federal 
EPA regulations. 



168 



Mining Operations Technology 



169 



MIN 115— BASIC SURVEYING 

3 Credits 

Comprehensive introductory course in performing 
measurements in horizontal and vertical distances using 
standard surveying tools and sophisticated electronic 
equipment. To provide the understanding of proper 
techniques applicable to land surveying and construc- 
tion surveying. Includes classroom instruction and field 
experiences. 

MIN 116— SURVEYING TECHNIQUES I 

3 Credits 

Continuation of classroom and field study providing 
understanding of the relationships of angles and dis- 
tances. Enables student to perform and record the nec- 
essary measurements for land surveying and instruction 
projects. 

MIN 117— SURVEYING TECHNIQUES II 

3 Credits 

Designed to provide the student with working knowl- 
edge to perform detailed surveys for land surveying, 
construction and related projects. Includes the devel- 
opment and understanding of land surveys, field engi- 
neering, construction layout, route surveying and topical 
surveying. 

MIN 11 8— MAPPING 

1 Credit 

A study of map types and applications to the planning 
and design phases of buildings, highways, reservoirs, 
streams and other engineered projects. Provides 
understanding of standard procedural methods of drawing 
and reading of land surveys, construction plans, topo- 
graphic and aerial mapping important to government, 
construction, forestry, land use and utilization compa- 
nies and agencies. 

MIN 119— PLANNING & MAPPING 

1 Credit 

Develops a working knowledge of required detail and 
the relationships and requirements for providing plans 
for conversion projects, forestry, construction and geol- 
ogy. Introduces computer aided drafting systems. 

MIN 201— MINING OPERATION PLANNING 

3 Credits 

Considers effective planning in daily and long-range 

mining operations. 

MIN 202— SURFACE MINE HYDRAULICS 

2 Credits 

Examines hydraulic and pneumatic systems design and 



the use of tools and repairing and troubleshooting hydraulic 
and pneumatic systems. Covers hydraulic and pneu- 
matic valves, oils, gauges, fittings, hoses, and other 
components. 

MIN 203— MINE MAPS & SURVEYING 

2 Credits 

Focuses on the use of mine maps and surveying tech- 
niques applicable to mining. Includes taping, profile lev- 
eling, cross-sections, earthwork computations, and transit 
stadia and transit-tapes surveys. 

MIN 204— EQUIPMENT OPERATIONS LAB I 

2 Credits 

Covers practices and devices pertaining to the extrac- 
tion of overburden and the transportation of coal. Examines 
equipment used in drainage and electric, hydraulic, and 
compressed air power and coal preparation machinery. 

MIN 205— BLASTING TECHNOLOGY & 
EXPLOSIVES SAFETY 

4 Credits 

Instructs persons who are engaged in or directly 
responsible for the use of explosives in surface mining 
and reclamation operations in the proper handling, 
transportation, storage, and use of explosives. 

MIN 206— TECHNIQUES OF SUPERVISION I 

2 Credits 

Examines employee development, with emphasis on 
the responsibilities of the beginning or newly appointed 
supervisor functioning within the organizational struc- 
ture. Also covered are techniques for communications, 
motivation, delegation of authority, interviews, orien- 
tation and induction of new employees, and evaluation 
of employee performance as directed to the Mine Safety 
and Health Administration's federal regulations and the 
United Mine Worker's union contracts. 

MIN 207— SURVEYING TECHNIQUES III 

3 Credits 

Designed to provide the student with working knowl- 
edge to perform detailed surveys for land surveying, 
construction and related projects. Includes the devel- 
opment and understanding of land surveys, field engi- 
neering, construction layout, route surveying and topical 
surveying. 

MIN 208— SURVEYING/LAND MEASUREMENT 
EXTERNSHIP I 

3 Credits 

Field application of surveying techniques. 



170 



Division of Applied Science and Technologies 



MIN 209— SURVEYING/LAND MEASUREMENT 
EXTERNSHIP II 

3 Credits 

Advanced application of surveying techniques. 

MIN 210— SURVEYING/LAND MEASUREMENT 
EXTERNSHIP III 

3 Credits 

Comprehensive application of surveying techniques. 

MIN 211— SURFACE MINING FIELD STUDY I 

4 Credits 

Provides for field projects in surface mining, in compli- 
ance with cooperative education policies. Student proj- 
ects will include data collection and analysis and actual 
work experience. 

MIN 212— SURFACE MINING FIELD STUDY II 

4 Credits 

Provides opportunity for extended practice and skill 

development in coal extraction and haulage in surface 

mining. 

MIN 213— ECONOMICS OF MINING AND COST 
CALCULATION 

3 Credits 

Investigates the evolution of rules and regulations relating 
to production and use of minerals. Examines profit mar- 
gins, taxation, depreciation and depletion allowances, 
foreign competition and interstate commerce regulations. 



of coal. Includes equipment used in drainage and elec- 
tric, hydraulic, and compressed air power and coal 
preparation machinery. 

MIN 215— SURFACE MINING FIELD STUDY III 

4 Credits 

Provides opportunities for extended practice and skill 

development in overburden removal in surface mining. 

MIN 216— SURFACE MINING FIELD STUDY IV 

4 Credits 

Provides further opportunities for extended practice and 

skill development in specified areas of surface mining. 

MIN 217— COAL MINE SUPERVISION 

4 Credits 

Introduces coal mine management and supervisory 
obligations. Attention is given to motivation, employee 
relations, and management by objectives. 

MIN 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN MINING 
OPERATIONS TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



MIN 214— EQUIPMENT OPERATIONS 
LABORATORY II 

1 Credit 

Offers practical experience in handling equipment used 

in the extraction of overburden and the transportation 



PLASTICS MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY 

The Plastics Manufacturing program prepares skilled technicians for the plastics field. Training 
is offered in plastic materials, testing, and fabrication. Attention is given to various types of plastic 
and includes: thermosetting and thermoplastic compounds; operation, setup, and maintenance 
of plastics machines; uses of plastics in production processes; injection and extrusion molding; 
product, mold, and tool design; quality control; print reading ;\electrical circuits; hydraulics; and 
pneumatics. 

The program offers students the opportunity to develop skills in molding and/or die making 
for training in plastics technology, while acquiring a foundation in machine technology. 

The two-year Associate in Applied Science degree program requires 64 credits for completion. 
Technical Certificates are also available in specialized areas. The program is offered in South 
Bend. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (42 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



PMT 


101 


PMT 


102 


PMT 


103 


PMT 


104 


PMT 


105 


PMT 


201 


PMT 


202 


PMT 


203 


PMT 


204 


1ST 


102 


IMT 


102 


IMT 


104 


IMT 


202 


INF 


101 



Introduction to Plastics 
Extrusion 
Injection Molding 
Thermoplastic Materials 
Low Pressure Tooling 
Thermoforming 
Current Topics in Plastics 
Thermoset Materials 
Processing Polyolefins 
Techniques of Supervision I 
Introduction to Print Reading 
Fluid Power Basics 
Electrical Circuits 
Introduction to Microcomputers 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



General Education Requirements (15 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



ENG 


101 


English Composition 


ENG 


103 


Speech 


MAT 


101 


Algebra I 


MAT 


103 


Geqmetry/Trigonometry 


SOC 


101 


Human Relations 



Regional Electives (7 Credits) 



Total Credits 



_7 
64 



171 



172 



Division of Applied Science and Technologies 



PLASTICS MANUFACTURING COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PMT 101— INTRODUCTION TO PLASTICS 

3 Credits 

An introduction to the field of plastics and related 

processes. Includes aspects of material handling and 

safety as it pertains to each process type. Also includes 

information concerning MSDS requirements and 

regulations. 

PMT 102— EXTRUSION 

3 Credits 

Laboratory course examines the extrusion industry. Covers 
equipment, processes and materials. Troubleshooting 
techniques are also explored. 

PMT 103— INJECTION MOLDING 

3 Credits 

Laboratory course concentrates on the injection mold- 
ing industry. Deals with equipment, processes and 
materials and includes troubleshooting techniques. 

PMT 104— THERMOPLASTIC MATERIALS 

3 Credits 

Materials and test methods for thermoplastic materials; 

processing, handling and physical considerations. 

PMT 105— LOW PRESSURE TOOLING 

3 Credits 

Study of the methods and materials needed for the 
production of low cost molds and forms. Students con- 
struct a tool for producing product. 

PMT 201— THERMOFORMING 

3 Credits 

Laboratory course focusing on the thermoforming industry. 
Various methods of forming include: vacuum, pressure 
and combinational processes. 



PMT 202— CURRENT TOPICS IN PLASTICS 

3 Credits 

Presents topics of current interest to students and industry. 

Substantial research and industry contact is involved. 

PMT 203— THERMOSET MATERIALS 

3 Credits 

Materials and test methods for thermoset materials. 
Processing, handling and physical considerations as 
well as composites will be covered. 

PMT 204— PROCESSING POLYOLEFINS 

3 Credits 

Current processes and effects of the most used plastic 
material will be explored. Processes covered include 
rotational casting and blow molding. 

PMT 205— FIBER REINFORCED PLASTICS 

3 Credits 

A laboratory course examining the FRP industry: 
equipment, processes and materials. Troubleshooting 
techniques will be explored. 

PMT 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN PLASTICS 
MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY 

1 -5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



POLLUTION TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY 

The Pollution Treatment Technology program prepares students for occupations in wastewater 
treatment and air pollution control in industry, municipalities and institutions. Because of the 
diversity of Indiana's wastewater and water supply treatment, air pollution control, solid waste 
and toxic substance management, water distribution, and the control of hazardous materials, 
are offered on a regional basis. Course work also covers equipment and maintenance, reporting 
and purchasing, environmental administration and plant operations. The program offers prep- 
aration for initial employment, state licensing examinations and upgrading skills. 

The two-year program, requiring 64 credits, leads to the Associate in Applied Science Degree. 
A Technical Certificate is also available. The program is offered in Valparaiso. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (36 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



PTT 


101 


PTT 


102 


PTT 


103 


PTT 


104 


PTT 


105 


PTT 


106 


PTT 


108 


PTT 


203 


PTT 


204 


PTT 


207 


PTT 


209 


ELT 


104 



Introduction to Environmental Systems 

Environmental Administration 

Environmental Chemistry I 

Plant Operations — Sanitary 

Air Pollution Control I 

Hazardous Materials Management 

Engineering Properties of Earth Materials 

Environmental Microbiology 

Basic Fluid Mechanics 

Water Treatment 

Plant Maintenance 

Computer Fundamentals for Technology 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



General Education Requirements (1 5 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



ENG 


101 


English Composition 


ENG 


103 


Speech 


SCI 


107 


Chemistry 


SCI 


111 


Microbiology 


MAT 


101 


Algebra I 



Regional Electives (13 Credits) 



Total Credits 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

13 
64 



173 



174 



Division of Applied Science and Technologies 



POLLUTION TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY 
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PTT 101— INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL 
SYSTEMS 

3 Credits 

An overview of pollution problems including, water air, 
solid waste, radiation, population and noise. Investi- 
gates current national and international problems and 
concerns. 

PTT 102— ENVIRONMENTAL ADMINISTRATION 

3 Credits 

Reviews local, state, and federal government require- 
ments related to environmental issues. Introduces fun- 
damentals of environmental law. Current events relating 
to environmental enforcement actions and changing 
regulations are covered. 

PTT 103— ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY I 

3 Credits 

Hands-on laboratory training in the application of EPA 
and state required NPDES Permit Parameters to deter- 
mine wastewater facility compliance. Includes tests for 
phosphorus, BOD5, TSS, pH, DO, ammonia as nitro- 
gen, VSS, and fecal coliform. Drinking water testing for 
fluoride, chlorine residual, hardness and coliform is 
included. Sampling techniques and preservation meth- 
ods are reviewed. 

PTT 104— PLANT OPERATIONS— SANITARY 

3 Credits 

Basic principles of aerobic biological treatment processes. 
Includes activated sludge, trickling filter, lagoons, sludge 
handling and disinfection. State and federal regulations 
related to wastewater plants are reviewed. 

PTT 105— AIR POLLUTION CONTROL I 

3 Credits 

Survey of industrial problems, government regulations, 
inspection, enforcements and air quality criteria. Air 
pollution sources, effects, history and ambient air qual- 
ity sampling are studied. 

PTT 106— HAZARDOUS MATERIALS 
MANAGEMENT 

3 Credits 

The characteristics of hazardous materials are related 
to the proper management of chemicals in the work 
place. Topics include hazardous materials and waste 
regulations, worker training, cleanup procedures, and 
waste minimization. 



PTT 107— APPLIED RESEARCH I 

3 Credits 

Involves research in an area of interest in water treat- 
ment, municipal wastewater, industrial wastewater or 
other environmental areas. Practical experience at a 
work site, such as a laboratory, treatment facility, research 
or training center. Students completing the course earn 
credits toward the experience requirement for certification. 

PTT 108— ENGINEERING PROPERTIES OF 
EARTH MATERIALS 

3 Credits 

Introduces the basic principles of geologic structures, 
soil formation, and hydrology. Studies how geologic 
conditions affect environmental problems. 

PTT 109— WATER SUPPLY 

3 Credits 

Covers elementary engineering aspects of water sup- 
ply and distribution and maintenance of collection sys- 
tems. Studies pumping, storage, metering, maintenance 
of lift stations and sewer repair. 

PTT 202— APPLIED RESEARCH II 

3 Credits 

Continuation of applied research with students at the 
work site of an operating facility offering experience 
with participation in the profession. 

PTT 203— ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY 

3 Credits 

A microbiology course with emphasis on microorga- 
nisms specific to water, wastewater and related public 
health and stream sanitation problems. Microbial growth, 
nutrition, metabolism and factors affecting growth are 
covered. Provides laboratory exercises in bacteriolog- 
ical techniques in the analysis of samples for numbers, 
types and effects of microbes in the degradation and/ 
or rehabilitation of our air, food and water supplies. 

PTT 204— BASIC FLUID MECHANICS 

3 Credits 

Introduces principles of flow measurement, metering in 
closed conduits, open channels, streams, storm runoff 
and pump characteristics. Includes basic physics prin- 
ciples related to water hydraulics, and air flow. 



Pollution Treatment Technology 



175 



PTT 207— WATER TREATMENT 

3 Credits 

Basic principles and methods of water purification including: 
coagulation, sedimentation, filtration, treatment chem- 
icals, taste and odor control, bacteriological control, mineral 
control, design criteria, maintenance and operational 
programs. Reverse osmosis and electrodialysis are also 
considered. 

PTT 208— PLANT OPERATIONS— INDUSTRIAL 

3 Credits 

Deals with wastewater treatment processes in various 
industries, including coagulation, sedimentation, acti- 
vated sludge, neutralization, equalization, cyanide and 
chromote removal. Instrumentation, maintenance and 
troubleshooting are also covered. 

PTT 209— PLANT MAINTENANCE 

3 Credits 

Skill development in reading a maintenance manual, 
proper maintenance procedure, maintenance records 
and spare parts inventory. Emphasizes safety in pre- 
ventive maintenance and scheduling of maintenance 
activities. Blowers, pumps, motors, collection systems, 
chemical feeds unit and dewatering systems are con- 
sidered from a maintenance aspect. Safety is emphasized. 

PTT 211— BACKFLOW PREVENTION 
AND DEVICE TESTING 

3 Credits 

Principles of backflow prevention programs suitable for 
both large and small, public and private water compa- 
nies as well as state and local regulations. Skill devel- 
opment in recognizing cross-connections and applying 
appropriate devices to prevent backflow. Laboratory testing 
includes various backflow devices, troubleshooting 
common problems and providing routine maintenance 
on these assemblies. 

PTT 212— SOLIDS HANDLING AND DISPOSAL 

3 Credits 

Principles of treatment and disposal of wastewater sludges 

generated by treatment facility. Types of equipment 



available and its applicability to different sludges are 
reviewed. Examines equipment needed for treatment, 
conditioning, dewatering and disposal. State and fed- 
eral regulations are reviewed. 

PTT 213— AIR POLLUTION CONTROL II 

3 Credits 

In-depth study of various air quality analysis and mod- 
eling techniques. 

PTT 214— ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS 

3 Credits 

Reviews the permitting process and paperwork nec- 
essary to meet air, water and land disposal regulations. 

PTT 215— WASTE DISPOSAL 

3 Credits 

Discusses solid and hazardous waste disposal prob- 
lems. Topics includes landfills, incinerators, compost- 
ing, recycling, and hazardous waste minimization. 

PTT 216— ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY II 

3 Credits 

An in-depth look into the analysis of metals and organ- 
ics. Discussion includes the operation of atomic absorption, 
gas and liquid chromatography and mass spectro- 
photometers. 

PTT 281-293— SPECIAL TOPICS IN POLLUTION 
TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 

PTT 299— OPERATOR REVIEW 

3 Credits 

Designed as a review for a state certification exami- 
nation in municipal or industrial wastewater treatment. 



WELDING TECHNOLOGY 

The Welding Technology program offers instruction in several types of welding processes: MIG, 
TIG, pipewelding, oxy-acetylene gas welding and cutting, and shielded metal arc welding. Course 
work includes interpretation of welding blueprints, electrical fundamentals for welding, metal- 
lurgy, and OSHA requirements. 

A two-year program, requiring 65 credits, leads to the Associate in Applied Science Degree. 
Technical Certificates are also available in specialized areas. Programs are offered in Anderson, 
Evansville, Fort Wayne, Gary, Indianapolis, Kokomo, Lafayette, Madison, Muncie, Richmond, 
South Bend, Terre Haute, Valparaiso, Sellersburg and Tell City. 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM 



Technical Courses (51 Credits) 
Prefix No. Title 



WLD 


101 


Gas Welding I 


IMT 


120 


Metallurgy Fundamentals 


WLD 


103 


Arc Welding I 


IMT 


102 


Introduction to Print Reading 


IMT 


121 


Industrial Safety 


WLD 


107 


Welding Troubleshooting 


WLD 


108 


Shielded Metal Arc I 


WLD 


109 


Oxy-Acetylene Gas Welding and Cutting 


WLD 


110 


Welding Fabrication I 


WLD 


201 


Special Welding Processes 


WLD 


202 


Arc Welding II 


WLD 


203 


Pipe Welding I 


WLD 


204 


Pipe Welding II 


WLD 


206 


Shielded Metal Arc II 


WLD 


207 


Gas Metal Arc (Mig) Welding 


WLD 


208 


Gas Tungsten Arc (Tig) Welding 


WLD 


209 


Welding Certification 


General Education Courses (15 Credits) 


ENG 


101 


English Composition 


ENG 


102 


English Composition II 


MAT 


101 


Algebra I 


SCI 


101 


Physical Science 


SOC 


101 


Human Relations 



Semester Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Regional Electives (3 Credits) 



Total Credits 



_3 
66 



WELDING TECHNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



WLD 101— GAS WELDING I 

3 Credits 

Instruction in oxy-acetylene welding, including gas welding 

techniques, brazing, and flame cutting. 



WLD 103— ARC WELDING I 

3 Credits 

The welding of ferrous metals and alloys using shielded 

metal arc methods, single and multipass techniques, 



176 



Welding Technology 



177 



and flat and horizontal positions. Emphasis is on safe 
practices. 

WLD 105— WELDING EQUIPMENT AND 
ELECTRICAL MAINTENANCE 

3 Credits 

Theory of electricity, its uses and applications in weld- 
ing, and the troubleshooting and maintenance of elec- 
tric welding equipment and power sources. The 
construction and maintenance of oxy-fuel welding and 
cutting equipment will also be covered. 

WLD 107— WELDING TROUBLESHOOTING 

3 Credits 

Concentrates on the evaluation of weldments, welding 

procedures and tolerances, and joint design and alignment. 

WLD 108— SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING I 

3 Credits 

Covers SMAW safety hazards and safety practices, with 
emphasis on SMAW theory. Includes welding of ferrous 
metals and alloys in the flat and horizontal welding posi- 
tions using single and multipass techniques with var- 
ious electrodes. 

WLD 109— OXY-ACETYLENE GAS WELDING AND 
CUTTING 

3 Credits 

Basic instruction in oxy-acetylene welding, with emphasis 
on welding techniques in flat, horizontal, vertical, and 
overhead positions. Includes brazing and flame cutting 
with attention to safety hazards and safe practices in 
oxy-acetylene welding and cutting. 

WLD 110— WELDING FABRICATION I 

3 Credits 

Principles of layout, measurements, and joint designs 
used in the fabrication of steel and aluminum products. 
Students will construct individual and/or group projects, 
focusing on tolerances and fit up of metal products. 
Emphasis is placed on safety procedures in fabrication. 

WLD 111— ARC WELDING I SHOP 

3 Credits 

Provides experience in welding in flat and horizontal 

positions on mild steel, using various electrodes. 



WLD 112— ARC WELDING III 

3 Credits 

Introduces welding in vertical up and down positions. 

WLD113— MIGI 

3 Credits 

Covers various gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes, 
including microwire, flux core, innershield and sub- 
merged arc, in all welding positions. 

WLD 114— INTRODUCTORY WELDING 

3 Credits 

Designed to provide basic skills and fundamental 
knowledge in oxyacetylene welding and shielded metal 
for maintenance welders, auto service and body tech- 
nicians, and individuals in the mining industry. Industry 
welding practices and detailed study of techniques used 
in making all weld positions. Brazing and flame cutting 
and electrode selection and uses are also covered. 
Emphasizes safe practices in welding, cutting and shielded 
metal arc. 

WLD 115— SHOP PRACTICE I 

1 Credit 

Open use of shop to practice various types of welding 

to improve operator skill. 

WLD 116— SHOP PRACTICE II 

1 Credit 

Continued open use of shop to practice various types 

of welding to improve operator skill. 

WLD 117— SHOP PRACTICE III 

1 Credit 

Continued open use of shop to practice various types 

of welding to improve operator skill. 

WLD 201— SPECIAL WELDING PROCESSES 

3 Credits 

Advanced study of welding methods, processes, tech- 
niques, machines and equipment. 



178 



Division of Applied Science and Technologies 



WLD 202— ARC WELDING II 

3 Credits 

Extensive welding practice on mild steel using 60 and 
70 series electrodes. Practice in producing single and 
multi-pass welds in vertical and overhead positions. 
Stressing safety and health of welders will be stressed. 

WLD 203— PIPE WELDING I 

3 Credits 

Techniques of welding pipe in horizontal, flat, vertical 
up, and overhead positions with shielded metal arc welding 
(SMAW) process. Includes electrodes, joint design, and 
fit up. 

WLD 204— PIPE WELDING II 

3 Credits 

Further instruction in welding pipe in horizontal, flat, 
vertical up, and overhead positions with shielded metal 
arc welding (SMAW) process. Includes electrodes, joint 
design, and fit up. 

WLD 205— WELDING CODES AND SPECIFICA- 
TIONS & ESTIMATING 

3 Credits 

Reviews types of welding codes, testing operations and 
procedure specifications; with attention to filler metals, 
positions, preheat and heat treatment, backing strips, 
preparations of base metals, cleaning and defects. Includes 
instruction in specifications and estimations. Student 
will prepare estimates for jobs based on calculations of 
time and materials. 



WLD 209— WELDING CERTIFICATION 

3 Credits 

Prepares students for certification in shielded arc, TIG, 
and MIG welding through study of the qualifications, 
procedures, and equipment standards. Includes a sur- 
vey of qualifying agencies, associations, and societies. 

WLD 210— WELDING FABRICATION II 

3 Credits 

Advanced study of layouts, measurements, and joint 

designs used in the fabrication of steel and aluminum 

products. Students will construct advanced individual 

and/or group projects using tolerances and fit up of metal 

products. Emphasis is placed on safety procedures in 

fabrication. 

WLD 281-293— SPECIALS TOPICS IN WELDING 
TECHNOLOGY 

1-5 Credits 

A Special Topics Course provides students with the 
opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and 
other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area 
(Contact Chief Academic Officer for more information). 



WLD 206— SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING II 

3 Credits 

Extensive welding practice on mild steel using 60 to 70 
series electrodes. Includes practicing producing single 
and multi-pass welds in vertical and overhead posi- 
tions. Safety and health of welders will be stressed. 

WLD 207— GAS METAL ARC (MIG) WELDING 

3 Credits 

Considers various gas metal arc welding (GMAW) 
processes, including microwire, flux-core, innershield, 
and submerged arc, with emphasis on metal inert gas 
welding. Techniques of welding in all positions on var- 
ious thicknesses of metal. 



WLD 208— GAS TUNGSTEN ARC (TIG) WELDING 

3 Credits 

Provides extensive experience in gas tungsten arc welding. 
Demonstrates welds on various types and thicknesses 
of metal, using all welding positions. 




179 



INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT 

GENERAL EDUCATION, RELATED EDUCATION AND 

BASIC SKILLS ADVANCEMENT 




180 



GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES 



Prefix 



No. 



Title 



Credits 



Communications 




ENG 


101 


English Composition 


ENG 


102 


English Composition II 


ENG 


103 


Speech 


ENG 


201 


Technical Writing 


Social Sciences 




SOC 


101 


Human Relations 


SOC 


102 


Introduction to Psychology 


SOC 


103 


Intercultural Relations 


SOC 


104 


Introduction to Sociology 


SOC 


105 


Introduction to Political Science 


SOC 


106 


Principles of Macroeconomics 


SOC 


107 


Principles of Microeconomics 


Mathematics 




MAT 


101 


Algebra I 


MAT 


102 


Algebra II 


MAT 


103 


Geometry/Trigonometry 


MAT 


104 


Algebra/Trigonometry I 


MAT 


105 


Algebra/Trigonometry II 


MAT 


106 


Calculus 


MAT 


107 


Math of Finance 


MAT 


108 


Statistics 


MAT 


109 


Finite Math 


Humanities 




HUM 


101 


Survey of Humanities 


HUM 


102 


Ethics 


HUM 


103 


Art Appreciation 


HUM 


104 


Music Appreciation 


Life and Physical Sciences 


SCI 


101 


Physical Science 


SCI 


102 


Physical Sci Lab 


SCI 


103 


Physics I 


SCI 


104 


Physics Lab I 


SCI 


105 


Physics II 


SCI 


106 


Physics Lab II 


SCI 


107 


Chemistry 


SCI 


108 


Chemistry Lab 


SCI 


109 


Biology 


SCI 


110 


Biology Lab 


SCI 


111 


Microbiology 


SCI 


112 


Microbiology Lab 


SCI 


113 


Anatomy & Physiology I 


SCI 


114 


Anatomy & Physiology Lab I 


SCI 


115 


Anatomy & Physiology II 


SCI 


116 


Anatomy & Physiology Lab II 


SCI 


203 


Advanced Physics 



181 



182 



General Education Courses 



GENERAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
COMMUNICATIONS 



ENG 101— ENGLISH COMPOSITION 

3 Credits 

Emphasizes competence in organizing and expressing 
ideas in writing. Instruction focuses upon writing process, 
structure, patterns, and context. 

ENG 102— ENGLISH COMPOSITION II 

3 Credits 

Builds on the writing skills taught in English 101 and 
emphasizes on-the-job writing situations. Writing 
assignments will include memos, letters, resumes, and 
informal reports. 



ENG 103— SPEECH 

3 Credits 

Fundamentals of speech, includes preparation and 
extemporaneous presentation of informative, persua- 
sive and demonstrative speeches, also oral reports 
appropriate for diverse audiences. 

ENG 201— TECHNICAL WRITING 

3 Credits 

Builds on the writing skills taught in English 101. Stu- 
dents will demonstrate their ability to prepare a tech- 
nical report using standard research techniques and 
demonstrate both written and oral competencies. 



SOCIAL SCIENCES 



SOC 101— HUMAN RELATIONS 



3 Credits 

A study of human motivation and behavior. Students 

learn about themselves and others in order to function 

effectively. 

SOC 102— INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY 

3 Credits 

Provides a general survey of the field of psychology. 
Includes study of learning, motivation, perception, psy- 
chological disorders, therapy, and research methods. 

SOC 103— INTERCULTURAL RELATIONS 

3 Credits 

Examines the cultural values and ethics of foreign countries 

in comparison to those of the United States. 

SOC 104— INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 

3 Credits 

A survey course designed to introduce the student to 

the science of human society, including fundamental 

concepts, descriptions, and analysis of society, culture, 

the socialization process, social institutions, and social 

change. 

SOC 105— INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL 
SCIENCE 

3 Credits 

An introduction to basic principles, theories and major 



factors that influence decision-making within the polit- 
ical process. Contemporary issues of national and world 
politics are studied. 

SOC 106— PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS 

3 Credits 

Provides an overview of macroeconomic issues: The 
determination output, employment, unemployment, interest 
rates, and inflation. Monetary and fiscal policies are 
discussed, as are public and international economic 
issues. Introduces basic models of macroeconomics 
and illustrates principles with the experience of the U.S. 
and foreign economics. 

SOC 107— PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS 

3 Credits 

Introduces the nature and method of economics, the 
price system, and capitalism. In addition, the course 
covers demand, supply, and elasticity, the costs of pro- 
duction, and how these costs are determined. Under 
perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competi- 
tion, and oligopoly concludes with an examination of 
how factors of production are determined under perfect 
competition and the various forms of monopoly. 



General Education Courses 



183 



MATHEMATICS 



MAT 101— ALGEBRA I 

3 Credits 

Presents an in-depth study of the fundamental con- 
cepts and operations of algebra. Introduces algebra 
through linear equations in one unknown. Includes 
graphing, powers of ten, scientific notation and the met- 
ric system. 

MAT 102— ALGEBRA II 

3 Credits 

Provides further study in algebra with emphasis on sys- 
tems of equations. Includes fractions and quadratic 
equations, factoring and logarithms. 

MAT 103— GEOMETRY/TRIGONOMETRY 

3 Credits 

Covers geometric topics including fundamentals of 
geometry, polygons, solid geometry, properties of cir- 
cles, constructions, right triangles and trigonometric ratios 
as they apply to right and oblique triangles. 

MAT 104— ALGEBRATTRIGONOMETRY I 

3 Credits 

Provides study in algebra including factoring, algebraic 
fractions, graphing of functions, polar coordinate sys- 
tems plus right triangle trigonometry. 

MAT 105— ALGEBRA/TRIGONOMETRY II 

3 Credits 

Continuation of Algebra/Trigonometry I with emphasis 

on oblique triangles, graphs of trigonometric functions, 



radicals, complex numbers, exponential and logarith- 
mic functions, inequalities, variation and trigonometric 
identities. 

MAT 106— CALCULUS 

3 Credits 

Presents an overview of analytical geometry and cal- 
culus including conic sections, limits, derivatives and 
integrals. 

MAT 107— MATH OF FINANCE 

3 Credits 

Covers percents, ratios, integers, linear equations, for- 
mulas and statistics as applied to business. 

MAT 108— STATISTICS 

3 Credits 

Study of the collection, interpretation and presentation 
of descriptive and inferential statistics. Includes mea- 
sures of central tendency, probability, binomial and nor- 
mal distributions, hypothesis testing of one and two 
sample populations, confidence intervals, chi-square 
testing, and correlation. 

MAT 109— FINITE MATH 

3 Credits 

Review of algebraic expressions and equations, 
inequalities, metrics, linear programming, conversion 
between number bases, notation, properties and oper- 
ations of set theory. Introduces logic, Boolean algebra, 
and probability. 



HUMANITIES 



HUM 101— SURVEY OF HUMANITIES 

3 Credits 

Familiarizes students with the interrelated disciplines 
within the humanities: literature, fine arts, history, music, 
architecture, and philosophy. 

HUM 102— ETHICS 

3 Credits 

A study of ethical language, methods of justifying eth- 
ical decisions and types of ethical value systems, with 
emphasis on practical applications in terms of personal 
and social morality. 



HUM 103— ART APPRECIATION 

3 Credits 

A broad survey of the world's art, from prehistoric to 
contemporary. Emphasis is on an appreciation of art 
through understanding its purposes and origins. 

HUM 104— MUSIC APPRECIATION 

3 Credits 

A non-technical course designed to familiarize the stu- 
dent with the forms of music. Covers instruments of the 
orchestra, the style characteristics of major compos- 
ers, commonly used musical terms and pertinent infor- 
mation about composers, performers, and conductors. 
Directed listening assignments and readings are required. 



184 



General Education Courses 



LIFE AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 



SCI 101— PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

3 Credits 

A non-mathematical introduction to physical concepts 
and theories demonstrating knowledge of current 
applications and developing trends in the fields of phys- 
ics, chemistry, earth science and astronomy. 

SCI 102— PHYSICAL SCIENCE LAB 

1 Credit 

Provides for applications in experimentation and anal- 
ysis in the physical sciences. 

SCI 103— PHYSICS I 

3 Credits 

A practical approach to the basic physics of force, work, 
rate, momentum, resistance, potential and kinetic energy 
and power. Applications of these concepts to the four 
energy systems-mechanical, fluid, electrical and thermal. 

SCI 104— PHYSICS LAB I 

1 Credit 

Provides for applications in experimentation and anal- 
ysis in Physics 1 . 

SCI 105— PHYSICS II 

3 Credits 

A continuation of Physics I presenting the concepts of 
force transformers, energy converters, transducers, 
vibrations and waves, radiation, optics and optical systems. 

SCI 106— PHYSICS LAB II 

1 Credit 

Applications in experimentation and analysis for Phys- 
ics II. 

SCI 107— CHEMISTRY 

3 Credits 

An introductory study of chemical operations. Includes 
atomic structure, chemical bonding, oxidation-reduc- 
tion, properties of matter, solutions, chemical equilib- 
rium, acids, bases, salts, PH and concentrations. 

SCI 108— CHEMISTRY LAB 

1 Credit 

Applications in experimentation and analysis for Chemistry. 

SCI 109— BIOLOGY 

3 Credits 

Introduction to basic concepts of life forms, structures 



of plants and animals, human body systems, genetics/ 
ecology and behavior. Surveys contemporary issues 
with regard to human interaction with the natural 
environment. 

SCI 110— BIOLOGY LAB 

1 Credit 

Applications in experimentation and analysis in Biology. 

SCI 111— MICROBIOLOGY 

3 Credits 

Applications of science to the problems of sterilization, 
growth and conditions of survival of microorganisms, 
infection, immunity, residence and isolation techniques. 

SCI 112— MICROBIOLOGY LAB 

1 Credit 

Applications in experimentation and analysis for 

Microbiology. 

SCI 113— ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I 

3 Credits 

A study of the structures, functions and relationships 
of the systems of the human body and the physical and 
chemical factors that influence the systems. 

SCI 114— ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY LAB I 

1 Credit 

Applications in experimentation and analysis in Anat- 
omy and Physiology I. 

SCI 115— ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II 

3 Credits 

A continuation of the study of the interrelationship of 

the bodily systems. 

SCI 116— ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY LAB II 

1 Credit 

Provides experience in experimentation and analysis 

in Anatomy and Physiology II. 

SCI 203— ADVANCED PHYSICS 

3 Credits 

A laboratory-intensive course designed for concepts of 
force, work, rate, resistance, energy, power, force 
transformers, energy transformers, momentum, vibra- 
tion and waves, transducers, time constants, radiation 
and how those work in different energy systems. Sequel 
course designed for students of the Tech Prep Program. 



RELATED EDUCATION 

Related Education courses are not part of the technical education specialty, but relate to and 
support the specialty. Related Education courses which bear the REL prefix are used only in 
Technical Certificate programs. Descriptions for these courses follow in this section. Other Related 
Education courses bear the prefix of the programs in which they originate. These course descrip- 
tions are located in the program sections. In addition, General Education courses may also be 
used to fulfill Related Education Requirements. 

RELATED EDUCATION COURSES 



Prefix 


No. 


Title 


Cred 


REL 


101 


Technical 








Communications I* 


3 


REL 


102 


Technical 








Communications II* 


3 


REL 


111 


Technical 








Mathematics I* 


3 


REL 


112 


Technical 








Mathematics II* 


3 


REL 


113 


Fundamentals of 








Math* 


3 


ACC 


101 


Accounting 








Principles I 


3 


ACC 


108 


Career Essentials of 








Accounting 


3 


BUS 


101 


Introduction to 








Business 


3 


BUS 


102 


Business Law 


3 


BUS 


103 


Office Administration 


3 


BUS 


201 


Principles of 








Management 


3 


BUS 


202 


Human Resources 








Management 


3 


BUS 


208 


Organizational 








Behavior 


3 


CUL 


203 


Table Service 


3 


CPT 


101 


Data Processing 








Fundamentals 


3 


CPT 


103 


Logic and 








Documentation 


3 


CPT 


202 


Data 








Communications 


3 


CPT 


203 


Systems Analysis 








and Design 


3 


INF 


101 


Introduction to 








Microcomputers 


3 


INF 


206 


Integrated Business 








Software 


3 


1ST 


101 


Quality Control 
Concepts and 








Techniques I 


3 



Prefix 


No. 


Title ( 


:red 


1ST 


102 


Techniques of 








Supervision I 


3 


1ST 


104 


Techniques of 








Supervision II 


3 


1ST 


203 


Reliability Objectives 


3 


1ST 


206 


Time and Motion 








Study 


3 


1ST 


207 


Manufacturing Costs 








and Value Analysis 


3 


1ST 


208 


Materials Handling 


3 


1ST 


211 


Labor Relations 


3 


1ST 


212 


Manufacturing 








Organizations I 


3 


1ST 


215 


Purchasing and 








Inventory Control 


3 


MKT 


101 


Principles of 








Marketing 


3 


MKT 


102 


Principles of Selling 


3 


MKT 


202 


Logistics/Purchasing 








Control 


3 


SEC 


110 


Keyboarding Skill 








Development 


1 


AMT 


101 


Manufacturing 








Processes 


3 


AMT 


102 


Introduction to 








Robotics 


3 


AST 


104 


Start and Charge 








Systems 


3 


AST 


201 


Heating and A/C 








Principles 


3 


DCT 


103 


CAD Fundamentals 


3 


DPT 


201 


Diesel Overhaul I 


3 


DPT 


202 


Diesel Fuel 








Systems II 


3 


DPT 


205 


Diesel Overhaul II 


3 


DPT 


206 


Diesel Engine Tune 








Up 


3 


ELT 


100 


Circuits I 


4 


ELT 


103 


Digital Principles 


3 



*For Technical Certificates Only 



185 



186 



Related Education Courses 



Prefix 


No. 


Title 


Credits 


Prefix 


No. 


Title < 


"red 


ELT 


104 


Computer 
Fundamentals for 




MTT 


108 


Precision 
Measurement 


3 






Technology 


3 


MTT 


204 


CNC Programming I 


3 


ELT 


105 


Solid State I 


3 


WLD 


114 


Introductory Welding 


3 


ELT 


113 


Basic Electricity 


3 


HST 


106 


Physiology of Aging 


3 


IMT 


102 


Introduction to Print 




HST 


108 


Psychology of Aging 


3 






Reading 


3 


HST 


115 


Applied Behavioral 




IMT 


103 


Motors and Motor 








Psychology 


3 






Control 


3 


MEA 


101 


Medical Terminology 


3 


IMT 


104 


Fluid Power Basics 


3 


MEA 


102 


First Aid and CPR 


3 


IMT 


120 


Metallurgy 




MEA 


103 


Medical Law and 








Fundamentals 


3 






Ethics 


3 


IMT 


121 


Industrial Safety 


3 


MEA 


113 


Pharmacology 


3 


IMT 


202 


Electrical Circuits 


3 


ART 


204 


Art History Survey I 


3 


MTT 


101 


Machine 
Fundamentals I 


3 


ART 


208 


Art History Survey li 


3 



RELATED EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
(FOR TECHNICAL CERTIFICATES) 



REL 101— TECHNICAL COMMUNICATIONS I 
(Only for TC students) 

3 Credits 

A review of the basic written and spoken English required 

for a variety of technical fields. 

REL 102— TECHNICAL COMMUNICATIONS II 
(Only for TC students) 

3 Credits 

A continued study of the basic written and spoken English 

required for a variety of technical fields. 

REL 111— TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS I 
(Only for TC students) 

3 Credits 

Reviews basic mathematics for various technical fields 

with emphasis on measurement, ratio, proportion, per- 



centage, formula evaluation, and problem solving 
applications. 

REL 112— TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS II 
(Only for TC students) 

3 Credits 

Continued application of mathematical principles and 
processes to technical fields. Introduces basic geom- 
etry with emphasis on equations, squares, square roots 
and problem solving. 

REL 113— FUNDAMENTALS OF MATH 
(Only for TC students) 

3 Credits 

Introduces algebra, scientific notation, linear equa- 
tions, graphing, metric system, measurement of plane 
and solid figures. 




187 



BASIC SKILLS ADVANCEMENT COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



BSA 001— ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE I 

3 Credits 

Focuses on the development of English skills and tech- 
nical vocabulary relevant to the student's chosen field 
of study. Designed for students whose first language is 
not English. 

BSA 002— ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE II 

3 Credits 

Builds on English skills gained in BSA 001 and further 
develops English skills and technical vocabulary rele- 
vant to the student's chosen field of study. Also designed 
for students whose first language is not English. 

BSA 007— SPELLING 

1 Credit 

Develops spelling skills by thorough practice in spelling 
with attention to rules and exceptions. 

BSA 024— INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH I 

3 Credits 

Introduces basic writing skills with emphasis on sen- 
tence structure and basic grammar. Paragraph struc- 
ture is introduced. 

BSA 025— INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH II 

3 Credits 

Furthers skills gained in BSA 024 with emphasis on 

paragraph structure and essay writing. 

BSA 028— VOCABULARY BUILDING 

2 Credits 

Concentrates on developing general English vocabu- 
lary, as well as vocabulary of a chosen technology. Dic- 
tionary skills and context skills are included. 

BSA 031— READING I 

3 Credits 

Emphasizes comprehension, vocabulary, and word attack 
skills beginning at a basic level. 

BSA 032— READING II 

3 Credits 

Advances skills acquired in BSA 031 — comprehension, 
vocabulary, and word attack and further prepares stu- 
dents for program-level courses. 



BSA 041— MATHEMATICS I 

1 Credit 

Develops the basic computational skills of whole num- 
bers and fractions. 

BSA 042— MATHEMATICS II 

1 Credit 

Reviews basic computational skills of fractions and 

develops computation skills in decimals. 

BSA 043— MATHEMATICS III 

1 Credit 

Reviews basic computational skills in percents, ratio 
and proportion and measurement. 

BSA 045— MATHEMATICS 

3 Credits 

Reviews instruction in basic computational skills and 

their applications. 

BSA 051— INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE 
ALGEBRA 

3 Credits 

Concentrates on basic algebra skills in preparation for 

college algebra. 

BSA 052— INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE 
TRIGONOMETRY 

3 Credits 

Develops basic trigonometry skills to prepare the stu- 
dent for further study in trigonometry. 

BSA 053— INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE 
GEOMETRY 

3 Credits 

Develops basic geometry skills to prepare the student 

for further study in geometry. 

BSA 060— INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS 

2 Credits 

Provides basic instruction for physical concepts and 
technical vocabulary. 

BSA 061— INTRODUCTION TO CHEMISTRY 

2 Credits 

Introduces basic principles of chemistry and technical 

vocabulary. 



188 



Basic Skills Advancement Courses 



189 



BSA 062— INTRODUCTION TO MICROBIOLOGY 

2 Credits 

Develops a basic understanding of microbiology con- 
cepts and technical vocabulary. 

BSA 063— INTRODUCTION TO ANATOMY/ 
PHYSIOLOGY 

2 Credits 

Studies the basics of the human body as an integrated 
unit. 

BSA 070— COLLEGE STUDY PRINCIPLES 

3 Credits 

Orients and motivates students for success in college. 
Develops the skills of textbook-reading, note-taking, and 
test-taking. 

BSA 071— CRITICAL THINKING 

3 Credits 

Develops critical thinking and problem-solving skills through 
the recognition of patterns, cause-and-effect relation- 
ships, and consideration of alternatives and priorities. 

BSA 073— INTRODUCTION TO KEYBOARDING 

1 Credit 

Deals with basic keyboarding skills applicable to a type- 
writer or computer. 



BSA 074— INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER 
LITERACY 

1 Credit 

Introduces basic computer literacy skills development. 

BSA 090— GED PREP I 

2 Credits 

Presents in-depth preparation for the mathematics and 
science sections of the GED test. 

BSA 091— GED PREP II 

2 Credits 

Offers in-depth preparation for the social studies, read- 
ing, and writing sections of the GED test. 

BSA 095— PRINCIPLES OF GED 

3 Credits 

Reviews all subject areas on the GED test. Includes 
mathematics, science, social studies, reading, and writing 
sections. 



190 



ACCREDITATIONS AND MEMBERSHIPS 

Indiana Vocational Technical College is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges 
and Schools and the Indiana Commission on Vocational Technical Education. Other accrediting 
agencies and affiliates are listed below by region. The College is a member of the American 
Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, the American Association of Com- 
munity and Junior Colleges, the Association of Community College Trustees, and the National 
Association of College and University Business Officers. 



Region Agency 

1 North Central Association of Colleges and 
Schools 

Indiana Commission on Vocational and 
Technical Education 

Northwest Indiana Chef's Association 

The American Culinary Federation Inc. 

U.S. Department of Labor 

The American Medical Association 
Committee on Allied Health Education 
and Accreditation 

Joint Review Committee on Respiratory 
Therapy Education 

Association of Surgical Technologists 

American Association of Medical 
Assistants 

Indiana State Board of Nursing 

Indiana State Board of Health 

2 North Central Association of Colleges and 
Schools 

Indiana Commission on Vocational and 
Technical Education 

The American Medical Association 
Committee on Allied Health Education 
and Accreditation 

American Association of Medical 
Assistants 



Program Area 

All 

All 

Culinary Arts Technology 
Culinary Arts Technology 
Culinary Arts Technology 



Respiratory Therapy 
Technology 

Surgical Technology 

Medical Assistant 

Practical Nursing 
Nurse Aide 
All 

All 



Medical Assistant 



191 



192 



Region Agency 



National Accrediting Agency for Clinical 
Laboratory Sciences 

Indiana State Board of Health 



Indiana State Board of Nursing 

Dietary Managers Association 
National League of Nursing 



Indiana Emergency Medical Service 
Commission 



Accreditations and Memberships 
Program Area 
Medical Laboratory Technician 



Nurse Aide 

Qualified Medication Aide 

Food Handler 

Practical Nursing 
Associate in Science in 
Nursing 

Dietary Manager 

Associate in Science in 
Nursing 

Emergency Medical Technician 
Ambulance/Advance 



North Central Association of Colleges and 
Schools 

Indiana Commission on Vocational and 
Technical Education 

The American Medical Association 
Committee on Allied Health Education 
and Accreditation 

American Association of Medical 
Assistants 

Joint Review Committee for Respiratory 
Therapy Education 

Indiana State Board of Nursing 

Indiana State Board of Health 



All 



All 



Dietary Managers Association 

North Central Association of Colleges and 
Schools 

Indiana Commission on Vocational and 
Technical Education 



Medical Assistant 



Respiratory Therapy 
Technology 

Practical Nursing 

Nurse Aide 

Director of Activities/ 

Extended Care 

Social Services/Long Term 

Care 

Dietary Manager 
All 



All 



Accreditations and Memberships 
Region Agency 

4 National League of Nursing 

Indiana State Board of Nursing 
Indiana State Board of Health 



Dietary Managers Association 

The American Medical Association 
Committee on Allied Health Education 
and Accreditation 

National Accrediting Agency for Clinical 
Laboratory Sciences 

American Association of Medical 
Assistants 



193 



Program Area 

Associate in Science in Nurs- 
ing (Completion Option) 

Associate in Science in 

Nursing 

Practical Nursing 

Qualified Medication Aide 
Nurse Aide 

Dietary Manager 



Medical Laboratory Technician 



Medical Assistant 



Association of Surgical Technologists Surgical Technology 



Joint Review Committee on Respiratory 
Therapy 

American Dental Association 

National Institute for Automotive Service 
Excellence 

North Central Association of Colleges and 
Schools 

Indiana Commission on Vocational and 
Technical Education 

The American Medical Association 
Committee on Allied Health Education 
and Accreditation 

American Association of Medical 
Assistants 

Indiana State Board of Health 

North Central Association of Colleges and 
Schools 



Respiratory Therapy 
Technology 

Dental Assistant 

Automotive Service 
Technology 

All 



All 



Medical Assistant 

Qualified Medication Aide 
All 



194 

Region 

6 



Agency 

Indiana Commission on Vocational and 
Technical Education 

Indiana Emergency Medical Service 
Commission 

The American Medical Association 
Committee on Allied Health Education 
and Accreditation 

American Association of Medical 
Assistants 

Council for Standards and Human Services 



Indiana State Board of Health 



Accreditations and Memberships 
Program Area 
All 



Emergency Medical Technician 
Ambulance/Advance 



Medical Assistant 



Mental Health Rehabilitation 
Technology 

Nurse Aide 

Qualified Medication Aide 



North Central Association of Colleges and 
Schools 

Indiana Commission on Vocational and 
Technical Education 

The American Medical Association 
Committee on Allied Health Education 
and Accreditation 

National Accrediting Agency for Clinical 
Laboratory Sciences 

American Association of Medical 
Assistants 

Joint Review Committee on Education 
in Radiologic Technology 

Indiana State Board of Health 



All 



All 



Indiana Emergency Medical Service 
Commission 



Medical Laboratory Technician 



Medical Assistant 



Radiologic Technology 



Nurse Aide 

Social Services/Long Term 

Care 

Director of Activities/ 

Extended Care 

Qualified Medication Aide 

Emergency Medical Technician 
Ambulance-Advance 



Indiana State Board of Nursing 



Practical Nursing 



Accreditations and Memberships 
Region Agency 

8 North Central Association of Colleges and 

Schools 

Indiana Commission on Vocational and 
Technical Education 

The American Medical Association 
Committee on Allied Health Education 
and Accreditation 

American Association of Medical 
Assistants 

Association of Surgical Technologists, 
Inc. 

American Society of Radiologic 
Technologists 

Joint Review Committee on Respiratory 
Therapy Education 

Indiana State Board of Nursing 

National League of Nursing 

American Institute for Design and Drafting 



Indiana State Board of Health 

American Culinary Federation Inc. 

Chef de Cuisine Association of Indiana, Inc. 

North Central Association of Colleges and 
Schools 

Indiana Commission on Vocational and 
Technical Education 

Indiana State Board of Nursing 
National League of Nursing 



195 



Program Area 

All 

All 



Medical Assistant 

Surgical Technology 

Radiologic Technology 

Respiratory Therapy 
Technology 

Practical Nursing 

Practical Nursing 

Industrial Drafting 
Technology and Architectural 
Drafting Technology 

Qualified Medication Aide 

Nurse Aide 

Social Service/Long Term Care 

Culinary Arts Technology 

Culinary Arts Technology 

All 

All 



Practical Nursing, 
Associate in Science in 
Nursing 

Associate in Science in Nurs- 
ing (Completion Option) 



196 

Region 

9 



10 



11 



Agency 

Indiana State Board of Health 

Dietary Managers Association 

Educational Institute of National Restaurant 
Association 

Indiana Emergency Medical Service 
Commission 

North Central Association of Colleges and 
Schools 

Indiana Commission on Vocational and 
Technical Education 

Indiana State Board of Nursing 

Indiana State Board of Health 

North Central Association of Colleges and 
Schools 

Indiana Commission on Vocational and 
Technical Education 

Indiana State Board of Health 

Indiana State Board of Nursing 

The American Medical Association 
Committee on Allied Health Education 
and Accreditation 

American Association of Medical 
Assistants 

Indiana Emergency Medical Service 
Commission 



1 2 North Central Association of Colleges and 

Schools 

Indiana Commission on Vocational and 
Technical Education 

The American Medical Association 
Committee on Allied Health Education 
and Accreditation 



Accreditations and Memberships 
Program Area 
Nurse Aide 
Dietary Manager 
Sanitation Certificate 

Emergency Medical Technician 
Ambulance/Advance 

All 

All 

Practical Nursing 
Qualified Medication Aide 
All 

All 

Nurse Aide 
Practical Nursing 



Medical Assistant 



Emergency Medical Technician 
Ambulance-Advance 

All 



All 



Accreditations and Memberships 
Region Agency 

12 American Association of Medical 

Assistants 

Association of Surgical Technologists 

Indiana State Board of Nursing 



13 North Central Association of Colleges and 

Schools 

Indiana Commission on Vocational and 
Technical Education 

Indiana State Board of Nursing 

Indiana State Board of Health 



Indiana Emergency Medical Service 
Commission 

National Institute for Automotive Service 
Excellence 

The American Medical Association 
Committee on Allied Health Education 
and Accreditation 

American Association of Medical 
Assistants 



197 



Program Area 

Medical Assistant 

Surgical Technology 

Practical Nursing 
Associate in Science in 
Nursing 

All 
All 

Practical Nursing 

Qualified Medication Aide 
Nurse Aide 

Emergency Medical Technician 
Ambulance/Advance 

Automotive Service 
Technology 



Medical Assistant 



Ivy Tech Foundation 
Ensuring the Margin of Difference 

The Ivy Tech Foundation exists to meet the unmet needs of Indiana Vocational Technical College. 

The Foundation receives tax-deductible gifts from corporations, foundations, organizations 
and individuals. These gifts are applied immediately to urgent needs in each of the College's 
instructional centers which together make up the campus of Indiana Vocational Technical Col- 
lege. Additional classrooms, state-of-the-art instructional equipment, student financial assist- 
ance and faculty enrichment are just a few of the special needs which the Foundation is able 
to fund each year through contributions by concerned companies and individuals. 

Result: the Foundation builds upon the established base of state funding and provides what 
our students and faculty know as the "margin of difference"— that edge of excellence which 
employers demand and Ivy Tech does provide for each student. 



198 



Index 



Academic grading — definitions and procedures, 8 

Grade reports, 10 

Grades, 8 

Improving a grade, 10 

Status, 8 
Accounting Technology, 21 
Accreditations and memberships, 191 
Admissions, 1 

Admissions-non-degree, 1 

degree objectives, 1 

Handicapped students, 2 

International students, 2 

Limited admissions enrollment, 1 

Procedures and support documents- 
Degree objective, 2 

Basic Skills Advancement Services, 1 

Transfer students, 2 
Agricultural Equipment, 123 
Air conditioning, 156 
Applied Fire Science Technology, 1 26 
Applied Science and Technologies, 1 22 
Architectural drafting, 148 
Art, 63, 66, 69, 73, 78 
Assessment testing/services, 1 
Associate in Science Degree, 16 
Associate in Applied Science Degree, 16 
Attendance, 10 
Audit, 8 

Automated Manufacturing Technology, 129 
Automotive Body Repair Technology, 1 32 
Automotive Service Technology, 1 35 
Barbering Technology, 138 
Basic Skills Advancement Courses, 188 
Bookstore, 12 

Building Construction Technology, 141 
Business and Industry Training, 17 
Business, Office and Information Systems 

Technologies, 20 
Cabinetry, 141 
Career counseling, 1 1 
Carpentry, 141 
Child Care Technology, 83 
Class load, 9 
Class organizations, 12 
Clubs, 12 
College, 

Accreditations and memberships, 191 

Administrative Officers, Central Office, ii 

Bookstore, 12 

Calendar, Inside Front Cover 

Fees, 3 

Goals, v 

History, v 

Instructional Centers, vi 

Instructional Programs, 16 

Instructional Support, 180 

Mission, v 

Programs, 16 

Rules, 13 

Work-study program, 5 
College/Industry Job title program, 145 
Commercial Art Technology, 66 
Commercial Photography, 69 
Commercial Video Technology, 63 



Computer-assisted design, 148 

Architectural drafting, 148 

Mechanical drafting, 148 
Computer Programming Technology, 26 
Counseling, 11 
Credit hours, 9 
Culinary Arts Technology, 30 
Custom-designed programs, 1 7 
Dean's List, 10 
Dental Assistant, 88 
Diesel Power Technology, 1 46 
Digital-electronics Technology, 152 
Directory information, 7 
Distribution management, 33 
Division of Applied Science and Technologies, 122 
Division of Business, Office and Information Systems 

Technologies, 20 
Division of Human Services and Health Technologies, 82 
Division of Visual Communications Technologies, 62 
Drafting/CAD Technology, 148 

Architectural, 148 

Mechanical, 148 
Drop-and-add, 3 
Due process procedures, 14 
Early Childhood Development, 86 
Electronics Technology, 152 

Automotive, 152 

Biological, 152 

Communications, 152 

Digital, 152 

Industrial, 152 

Robotics, 152 
Emergency closing of campus, 13 
Employer funded education, 6 
Employment, 5, 1 1 
Enrollment status, 9 
Environmental control, 1 73 
Facilities, vi 
Fees, 3 

Additional expenses, 3 

Divisional fees, 3 

General fee (Indiana residents), 3 

Late registration fee, 3 

Non-refundable fees, 4 

Payment of fees, 4 

Refund policy, 4 

Tuition (out-of-state residents), 3 
Financial aid, 4 

Appeals, 7 

Application procedures, 6 

Employment and loans, 5 

Grants and scholarships, 4, 5 

Veterans' benefits, 6 
Fire fighters and police orphans' benefits, 6 
Fire Technology, 126 
Food Service Technology, 90 
Foundation, 198 

General Education Courses, 181 
Grades, 8 

Grade point, 8 

Grade point average (GPA), 9 

Grade reports, 10 

Improving a grade, 10 

Standards of progress, 10 



199 



200 



Index 



Grades — Cont. 

Unsatisfactory progress, 9 

Special problems, 10 
Graduation, 10 

Associate in Science Degree, 10 

Associate in Applied Science Degree, 10 

Eligibility, 10, 11 

Procedures, 10, 11 

Technical Certificate, 1 1 
Grants and scholarships, 4 

Higher Education Awards (HEA), 4 

Hoosier Scholar Program, 4 

Ivy Tech Grants-in-Aid, 5 

Ivy Tech Scholarships, 5 

Pell Grants, 4 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant 
(SEOG), 4 
Graphic Media Production Technology, 73 
Handicapped students, 2 
Health Care Administration Technology, 92 
Heating/Air Conditioning/Refrigeration Technology, 156 
Higher Education Awards, 4 
Hotel/Motel Management, 35 
Hoosier Scholar Program, 4 
Housing, 3, 13 

Human Services and Health Technologies, 82 
Human Service Technology, 94 
Industrial Laboratory Technology, 159 
Industrial Maintenance Technology, 161 
Industrial Supervision Technology, 39 
Industrial Training and Development, 17 
Industry-union training funds, 6 
Information/Data Management, 43 
Insurance, 13 

Interior Design Technology, 78 
International students, 2 
Intramural sports, 12 
Ivy Tech Foundation, 198 
Ivy Tech Scholarships, 5 
Job Training Partnership Act, 6 
Late registration, 3 
Learning Resource Center, 1 1 
Library facilities, 11 
Loans, 5 

Machine Tool Technology, 164 
Marketing Technology, 46 
Masonry, 141 
Mechanical Drafting, 148 
Medical Assistant, 97 
Medical Laboratory Technician, 101 
Mental Health Rehabilitation Technology, 104 
Mining Operations Technology, 167 
Nondiscrimination Statement, i 
Nursing, 

Associate of Science in, 107 

Practical, 1 1 1 
Orientation, 2 
Paralegal Technology, 49 
Parking, 13 
Pell Grants, 4 
Photography, 69 
Placement, 11 



Plastics Manufacturing Technology, 171 

Plumbing, 141 

Police and fire fighters' orphans' benefits, 6 

Pollution Treatment Technology, 1 73 

Practical nursing, 1 1 1 

Printing, 73 

Professional and trade societies, 13 

Protection of Privacy, 7 

Radiologic Technology, 114 

Readmission, 1 

Refrigeration, 156 

Refunds, 4 

Registration, 1 , 3 

Late registration, 3 

Procedures, 3 
Related Education Courses, 185 
Respiratory Care, 117 
Scholarships, 5 
Secretarial Sciences, 52 

Office Management, 52 

Legal, 52 

Medical, 52 

Information Word Processing, 52 

Stenography, 52 
Short-Term Programs, 1 7 
Skills advancement courses, 188 
Skills Advancement Services, 1 
Small Business Operations, 56 
Social activities, 13 
Sports, 12 

Standards of conduct, 13 
Standards of progress, 10 
State Board of Trustees, ii 
Statistical Process Control Technology, 59 
Student grievances, 15 
Student housing, 13 
Student insurance, 13 
Student organizations and activities, 12 
Student parking, 13 
Student rights and responsibilities, 13 
Student Senate, 12 
Student Services, 1 1 
Student records, 7 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, 4 
Surgical Technology, 120 
Technical Certificate, 17 
Test-out procedures, 3 
Transfer credit, 2 
Transfer students, 2 
Transcripts, 1 , 7 
Trustees, 

State Board, ii 
Tuition (out-of-state), 3 
Veterans' benefits, 6 
Violation of laws and ordinances, 14 
Visual Communications Technologies, 63 
Vocational rehabilitation, 6 
Wastewater management, 173 
Welding Technology, 176 
Withdrawal procedure, 3 
Word processing, 52 
Work-study program, 5 



Cover photo: Tim Yates 
Text photos: Erik Photographic Studio