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Full text of "Indian industrial school, Carlisle, Pa"

jguv&liMIl \Jt PITTSBURGH LIBRARY 

- - ; 



7 1940 




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Indian Industrial 3 c h°°l 



CARLISLE, PA. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

University of Pittsburgh Library System 



http://www.archive.org/details/indianindustrialOOunit 



Indian Industrial School 

CARLISLE, PA. 



The Carlisle Barracks, established in 1755 as an outpost against Indians, were originally granted rent free to the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania by the Penn proprietors, but in 1801 were purchased from them by the United States. 

The buildings, erected during the Revolution and subsequently, having become dilapidated, were rebuilt in 
1836. These remained until 1863, when they were burned by the Confederates under Fitz Hugh Lee, on the night 
of July 1st, just before the battle of Gettysburg. Rebuilt in 1865-6, the Barracks were occupied as a cavalry school 
for recruits until 1872, at which time the School was transferred to St. Louis, and the place was practically 
unoccupied until turned over to the Interior Department for an Indian School, September 6th, 1879. 

Located in one of the best agricultural regions in the country, surrounded by a thrifty, industrious people, 
Carlisle Barracks merited the 

ENDORSEMENT GIVEN BY GENERAL HANCOCK, 

who, in approving its transfer to the Interior Department for an Indian School, said : " I know of no better place for 
the establishment of such an Institution." 

THE AIM OF THE SCHOOL 

has been to lead the Indians into the national life through associating them with that life, and teaching them 



English and giving a primary education and a knowledge ot some common and practical industry and means of 
self-support among civilized people. To this end there are shops where the principal trades are taught the boys, and 
two farms for their instruction in farming, and suitable rooms and appliances where the girls are taught cooking, 
sewing, laundry and housework. But the crowning influence in the accomplishment of these purposes is an 
extensive and most effective system of placing annually hundreds of boys and girls out in families and in the 
public schools. 

The buildings throughout are well lighted by electricity and heated by steam, which is generated in a building 
entirely separated from the other buildings, and thus the danger from fire is reduced to a minimum, and the light 
and heat are equable and of the best quality. 

There is ample water supply throughout the buildings and grounds, coming from the reservoir which supplies 
the town. 

The School is provided with an excellent hand fire engine, and the boys are trained in its use, so that within 
three minutes it is possible to throw water from two sets of hose upon any building in the School grounds. 
During the sixteen years of the School's existence, only one threatening fire incident has occurred, and that was 
caused by tramps firing a stack of fodder adjoining the School barn. Although more than half a mile distant, the 
boys were so prompt with the engine that the fire was suppressed before the barn was materially damaged. 

There are two athletic fields for foot ball, base ball and other out door games. 

The walks throughout the grounds are granolithic or made stone, conducing greatly to the comfort and 
cleanliness of the place. 

All pupils attend school four hours and work four hours each day at trades or industries of their own selection. 




ENTRANCE AVENUE. 

The School adjoins the borough of Carlisle on the northeast, and is reached by a public road leading into this 

School grounds. 




VIEW OF THE CAMPUS. 

One feature of the School is the beauty of the grounds and their special adaptability to the purposes of a school, 
recreation periods the students spend many happy hours on the campus in playing croquet, tennis, 
ball and other games, or in quietly promenading, reading and chatting. 




THE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 



ji — the carpentering, painting, roofing and spouting being largely done by student labor. It is 50 x , 
contains the general offices of the School, with rooms for employes on the second floor. 




THE GIRLS' QUARTERS 
: 120 feet with ample accommodations for 300 girls, and with a spacious, paved courtyard in the interior used as a tennis 
court, etc. Besides the bedrooms, the building contains sitting and assembly rooms, music rooms, society rooms, 
library and reading rooms, as well as abundant facilities for bathing. 




INTERIOR OF GIRLS' ROOM. 

The sleeping rooms in the Girls' Quarters are about 14 x 16 feet, each occupied by three girls, and in order to forward the use of 

English these girls usually represent three different tribes. The rooms are furnished with wardrobes, single beds, 

bureau, washstand, table, chairs and such decorations as the girls arrange. 

9 




THE SCHOOL BUILDING 

erected on the site of an old barrack building, consists of a centre 86 x 60 feet, and two wings each 90 x 36 feet, and contains fourteen 

school rooms, an assembly hall 86x60 feet, an art room, book and store rooms and the Principal Teacher's olce. 




A SCHOOL ROOM INTERIOR. 

This picture gives a partial view of school room No. 12, occupied by the Senior Class. The school rooms are 28 x 30 x 13 feet, well 

lighted and ventilated, fitted with single desks and slate blackboards, and aggregate accommodations for 700 pupils. 




THE ART CLASS. 

A large number of the pupils show decided ability in drawing from models and nature, and working with clay. For the school yea 

beginning September ist, 1895, a course in Sloyd for the younger pupils will be added to this department. 




THE PUPIL TEACHERS. 

One of the most helpful features of the School is the normal training given students who show ability, and desiri 
teachers. This department becomes more and more important each year as the students thus trained 
increase in number and go out to nil positions in other schools. 



to qualify as 




A MUSIC ROOM. 

Very early in the School experience it was found that there were good voices among the pupils and ability to acquire both vocal and 

instrumental knowledge. Music proves a pleasing study to the Indian youth, and is useful and entertaining to the School. 




THE CHOIR 

jch to the interest of all the services and entertainments of the School, and on different occas 
large audiences in Washington, Philadelphia, New York and other cities. 
'5 



3ns has won applause from 




THE FIRST CLASS OF GRADUATES. 1889. 
Frank Dorian 1 Iowai. Wm. F. Campbell iChippewai. Thomas Wistar (Ottawa!, 
iwkins iCheyennei. Joel Tyndall lOmahai. Edwin Schanandore lOneidai. Jos. B. Harris iGros Ventre*. 
Eva Johnson 1 Wyandotte 1. Lilly Cornelius lOneidai. Julia Powlas lOneidai. 
Esther Miller iMiamii. 
Clara Faber (Wyandotte). Katie Grindrod (Wyandotte). Cecilia Londrosh (Winnebago). 

16 




THE SECOND CLASS OF GRADUATES. 1890. 

Dennison Wheelock (Oneida). Stacy Matlack (Pawnee). Levi Levering (Omaha). 

William Tivis ( Comanche). Jemima Wheelock ( Oneida). Veronica Holliday ( Chippewa). Benjamin Lowry (Winnebago). 

George W. Means ( Sioux). Howard Logan ( Winnebago). George Vallier ( Quapaw). Percy Zadoka ( Keechi). 

Lawrence Smith (Winnebago). William Morgan ( Pawnee). Carl Leider ( Crow). Benjamin Thomas ( Pueblo). 

Rosa Bourassa Chippewa). Nellie Robertson ( Sioux). Julia Bent ( Cheyenne). 

17 




LU THE, THIRDi CLASS OF GRADUATES. i8gi 

Robert Mathews Martin Archiquette John Tyler Wm. H. Froman 

(Pawnee). (Oneida). (Cheyenne). (Mian 

Henry S. Bear Josiah Powlas Etta Robertson Yamie Leeds Levi M. St. Cyr Harry Kohpay 

(Siouxi. (Oneida). (Sioux). (Pueblo). (Winnebago). (Osage). 

18 



Chas. E. Dagenett 
(Peori 













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THE FOURTH CLASS OF GRADUATES. 



1892. 



Thomas Metoxen Hattie Long Wolt Reuben Wolfe Luzena Choteau William Baird 

(Oneida). (Sioux). (Omaha). (Wyandotte). (Oneida). 

Albert Bishop Benajah Miles (Arapahoe). Joseph Hamilton iPiegan). 3enjamin Caswell (Chippewa). 

(Seneca). Frank Everett (Wichita). Lydia Flint (Shawnee). Fred Peake (Chippewa). 

19 




John Baptiste 

(Winnebago). 



THE FIFTH CLASS OF GRADUATES. 1893. 
W. Clarke Fred Big Horse S. Arthur Johnson 



(Piegan). (Sioux). 

Emily E. Peake (Chippewa). 



(Wyandotte). 



John G. Morrison 

(Chippewa). 




THE SIXTH CLASS OF GRADUATES. 1894. 
Thos B. Bear (Siouxi. Susie Metoxen lOneidai. Wm. J. Tygar (Shawnee). 
Flora Campbell Howard Gansworth Martha Napawat Emmanuel Bellefeuille Belinda Archiquette Siceni Nori 
(Alaskan). (Tuscarora). (Kiowa). (Chippewa). (Oneida) (Pueblo). 

Henry 'Warren Wm. Denomie Ida Warren Hugh Sowcea Minnie M. Yandell 
Andrew Beard (Sioux). iChippewa). (Chippewa). (Chippewa). (Pueblo). (Bannock). 

James D. Flannery (Alaskan). Florence L. Wells (Alaskan). Florence Miller ;Stockbndge). 



Ida Powlas (Oneida). 




THE SEVENTH CLASS OF GRADUATES. 1895. 

Clark Gregg David Turkey George Warren Laura Long Wm. Hazlett Wm. Lufkins Isaac Baird Lewis Williams Ida LaChapelle 

(Assinaboinel. (Senecai. (Chippewa!. (Wyandotte). (Piegani. (Chippewa). (Oneidal. iNez Percei. (Chippewa . 

Melissa Green George Suis Alice Lambert Chauncey Y. Robe Wm Moore Nettie Freemont James Van Wert 

(Oneida). (Crow). (Chippewa). (Sioux). (Sac & Fox). (Omahai. iChippewai. 

Antoine Donnell (Chippewal. Samuel Sixkiller Cherokeei. Susie McDougall iChippewai. George Buck (Sioux). 




THE GUARD HOUSE. 

At the entrance gate stands the old Guard House, which is one of the historic buildings of Pennsylvania. It was built by the 

Hessian soldiers whom Washington captured at the battle of Trenton, in 1776, and sent to this place as prisoners of war. The 

School follows a system of military guard duty, and the Guard House is used as the headquarters for the sentinels. 

23 




DINING ROOM AND GIRLS' INDUSTRIAL HALL. 

This building, 125x50 feet, with a rear projection 80x36 feet, was erected in 1884, mainly by student labor under the direction of the 

school mechanics. On the lower floor is the dining room 124x49x16 feet, lighted with two arc lights, the kitchen and 

laundry. On the upper floor is a large sewing room, a room for the cooking-class and the drying room. 




DINING HALL— INTERIOR. 

This room will seat 700 persons 

*5 




THE SCHOOL KITCHEN 

fitted up with large ranges and steam cooking apparatus 




THE SMALL BOYS' QUARTERS 
xommodate ioo of the smallest boys, who are under the care of a matron. The sleeping rooms have three beds, a wardrobe, 
washstand, table and chairs; and the building, 212x36 feet, contains bath rooms, assembly rooms, reading rooms and library. 

27 




THE CAMPUS IN WINTER. 




THE BOILER HOUSE INTERIOR. 
The buildings are all heated by steam from this central plant consisting of three ioo-horse-power w 
digging the trenches, laying the pipes and fitting up the buildings for the system ■ 
Indian boys under the direction of a skilled mechanic. 
29 



er tube boilers. 
as done by the 




THE LARGE BOYS' QUARTERS 
replace an old barrack building that stood on the same site in the early days of the School, and are 392x36 feet. 

Congress had not then faith in Indian education, and after several years of disappointment, the boys from their earnings on far 
contributed to erect the building $1,851,00, and the balance, $14,500.00, was donated by friends of the School. 
It has accommodations for 300 boys, with library, reading, assembly, bath and clothing rooms. 

3° 




BEDROOM— LARGE BOYS' QUARTERS. 
These rooms, 14 x 16 feet, contain three beds each, a wardrobe with three divisions, one for each occupant, a table, chair, wash- 
stand, etc., and are decorated with such pictures and ornaments as the occupants may be able or choose to provide. 




One of the most useful buildi 

regular use for gyn 

supplied v 



GYMNASIUM INTERIOR. 

ngs at the School is the Gymnasium, 150 x 60 feet, built wholly from contributed funds. In additior 
mastic purposes and drills, it is the place for the general social gatherings of the School. It is 
ith apparatus in the use of which, under the direction of an instructor, both girls and 
boys each day drill with great benefit to health and deportment. 

32 




THE FOOT BALL TEAM 



has played games with the teams of the Naval Academy, Lehigh University, Bucknell, Dickinson and other colleges, with credit 
to themselves both for their playing and gentlemanly conduct. 




SKATING ON THE CONEDOGWINET. 

Within a short distance of the School is the Conedogwinet Creek ; in Summer a beautiful place for fishing and bathing, and in Winter, 

when the ice is good, a famous skating resort. The picture shows the Indian students and 

employes on the ice during holiday week. 




THE SCHOOL BAND. 

1 1880 a benevolent lady of Boston presented the school with a set of band instruments. Under its present leader, a graduate of the 

School, it has a recognized place among the good bands of the country, and has performed acceptably before critical audiences 

in our large cities, notably at the parades in New York and Chicago during the Columbian Quadra-Centennial. 




GROUP OF APACHES. 
Of all the Indians Carlisle has undertaken, no tribe presented a more hopeless outlook than the Apaches rom Arizona, who ha 
long held a most unenviable reputation as the outlaws and the Ishmaelites of the Indians. Carlisle's experience with the 
Apaches is that they are as susceptible as others of civilization. They are unusually active and valuable as workers. 







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THE OLD WALNUT TREE, 
prominent objects on the School grounds is the old Walnut Tree, which stand; 
Teachers' Quarters and is a silent sentinel of peculiar interest and beauty. 



close to the 




THE WORLD'S FAIR EXHIBIT. 

The exhibit of Carlisle School at the World's Fair compared avorably with the exhibits from other industrial schools ot the country, 

and won for Carlisle diplomas from the Department of Liberal Arts and the Department of Agriculture. The School has also 

been awarded medals for exhibits made in Paris and Madrid, and other diplomas on less importantjoccasions. 




THE WORKSHOPS. 

The old cavalry stables were remodeled as workshops, and serve the purpose well, being convenient, compact and roomy. Carlisle \ 

the pioneer in Indian industrial education and has followed an original system of its own— producing the clothing, shoes, etc., neces 

sary for the students, and manufacturing wagons, harness and tinware for the Government. In all the shops as little machinery 

as possible is used, in order that each pupil may learn his trade in a way that will make him most skillful with his hands. 

39 




THE CARPENTER SHOP. 

One of the most useful and popular trades taught is that of carpentering. The Master Carpenter 
is able to undertake any job of building required at the School. 



ith his Indian boys 




THE SHOE SHOP 

makes all the shoes used by the pupils except such as are bought from their own unds and kept for Sunday best, 
beginning of the School not a pair of shoes or boots has been sent off the premises to be repaired. 

4i 




THE HARNESS SHOP 

has no difficulty in securing its quota of apprentices. The product of this shop is used by the Government at the 

different Indian Agencies and amounts to 150 to 250 sets of double harness annually— all hand made. 

42 




THE TIN SHOP. 
are of all kinds is made, which the Government buys and sends to the Agencies. Care of the tin roofs 
and the plumbing of the School is an important item in the work of this department. 

43 



vater spouting 




THE TAILOR SHOP. 
Here the uniforms and outer garments for 450 boys are made annually. 




THE BLACKSMITH SHOP. 
The Indian boys soon become adepts in this trade, forging the horseshoe and setting it, learning to fashion the 



3n to any desired 



shape, working bar steel into tools with 



hardly credible unless witnessed. 




THE BLACKSMITH SHOP INTERIOR 

has five forges, each one requiring two hands for morning and two for afternoon work. The principal work is building wagons of 

which the Government is the chief purchaser. Last year one wagon was shipped to a Negro mission school in Africa, the 

missionary, Mr. Stuart, having seen the wagon at the World's Fair. There are also purchasers among the Indians. 

46 




PRINTING OFFICE. 

This department can hardly be surpassed as an educational factor and is open to both sexes. The office is equipped with 

one oscillating Campbell press and two Eclipse, as well as smaller job presses, all run by steam. 

47 




PRINTING OFFICE— MAILING DEPARTMENT. 
The School publishes two papers, "The Indian Helper," weekly, with a circulation of about io,ooo ; subscription price 10 cents a year; 
and "The Red Man," monthly, at 50 cents a year, 



._, vhich is especially devoted to the discussion of 
different opinions and phases of the Indian question. 



48 




GROUP OF PRINTERS. 
Students must be fairly well advanced in their school work before they can enter the printing office. 




THE IRONING ROOM. 
The Laundry is provided with three steam washers, stationary tubs, a centrifugal wringer, a mangle, and a steam drying room. 




THE SEWING ROOM. 

In this department from twenty to sixty girls are daily employed in cutting, making and repairing all the clothing worn by 
the girls of the School, and the boys' shirts and underclothing. 




THE HOSPITAL. 

This necessary adjunct of the School is officered with a resident physician, a trained nurse in charge and an Indian girl 

assistant who is also a trained nurse. It has its own kitchen and special diet table. The rooms are well 

heated and lighted and all usual appliances for the proper care of the sick are provided. 

5= 




THE FARM HOUSE. 

On the School farm of 109 acres is a very pretty, old-fashioned homestead. The farm has a beautiful, never failing spring, and good 

buildings, the barn being 120x72 feet and complete in every respect. The School also owns another farm of 157 acres 

and rents other land, so that in all it has about 300 acres. Dairying is a distinctive part of the farm work. 

53 




This Association, 



THE Y. M. C. A. 

started in 1884 with a small membership, has now about 150 members, with a neat hall, 54 x 29 feet, comfortably 
furnished. It is in full membership in the state and national organizations, sending regular 
delegates and reports to their conventions. 







THE STANDARD DEBATING SOCIETY. 
The Standards represent the oldest Literary Society of the School and have had under various names twelve years of life, 
very crude beginning, through much coaching and fostering, its members have developed a society of debaters in 
which live questions of national and international policy, as well as grave ethical questions, are 
discussed, much to the benefit of the students and the School. 

55 




THE INVINCIBLE SOCIETY. 

This society is an offshoot of the Standard and fairly equals the parent society in all departments of literary 
and is distinguished as the musical society. 
50 




THE SUSAN LONGSTRETH LITERARY SOCIETY. 

This society, bearing the name of one of the first and most honored friends of the School, has existed for more than ten years. 

Including, as it does, the best character and talent from some 300 girls, with a comfortable and tastefully decorated 

room for its meetings, it is an influence for good, mentally and morally, which cannot well be measured. 

All the societies emulate each other in furnishing the School most pleasing entertainments. 

57 



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THE BASE BALL TEAM. 

ays beaten when it comes to a contest with college and other orga 
following base ball as a profession. 




THE ASSEMBLY HALL AND CHAPEL 
in the central part of the School building. It is light and airy and seats 800 persons. 




INDIAN BOYS IN THE COUNTRY 

illustrates the outing system, which is the practical side of Carlisle training. The Indian under the same opportunities 

becomes just as good a hand at all the varied employments of the farm as the white man 




INDIAN GIRLS IN THE COUNTRY 
illustrates the home life and occupations of the girls during their Summer outing; 
school attended by a number of girls during the Winter. 
61 



lso a public 




SOME CARLISLE INDIAN GIRLS IN THEIR COUNTRY HOMES. 
The socially elevating side of the outing is shown by the refined homes and families into which the pupils are received. 







A COUNTRY SABBATH SCHOOL, 

attended by a number of Indian girls during their outing. The Indian girls and boys are cordially received into Church 

and Sabbath School association in all the communities in which they are placed. 

63 




INDIAN GIRLS AS PROFESSIONAL NURSES. 

This picture represents former Carlisle pupils who, having received preliminary training in the School hospital, and havir 

completed their training in Philadelphia, New Haven and Hartford nurse schools, are now profitably employed in 

independent practice in the cities named. In this direction our Indian girls have been especially successful. 

64