(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Indian land titles of Essex County, Massachusetts"

(lass p 7 '*Z 

Rnnk C '^ . 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE 
ESSEX BOOK AND PRINT CLUB 

NO. Ill 

INDIAN LAND TITLES 

ESSEX COUNTY, MASSACHUSETTS 



c/" e ,, 

^'\ I yjndian Siaamp %C. 

\\ / MERRIMAOK \ , ^, _. J i? 

»-' A * Indian F eld /V 




Map of 

Indian Lands and Localities 

in 

Essex County 
Massachusetts 

By Sidiifj Pirky 



SCALE OF MILES 




MA S SACHUSET T S 



THE 
INDIAN LAND TITLES 

OF ESSEX COUNTY 
MASSACHUSETTS 

BY 

SIDNEY PERLEY 




SALEM, MASSACHUSETTS 

ESSEX BOOK AND PRINT CLUB 

1912 






/ 3L 



£^7 "pt^ 



2 



1? 



CONTENTS 



Introduction .... 

Tribal Territories 
Merrimack River 

Pentucket . . . , . 

Agawam ..... 
Naumkeag . . . . . 

Right to the Soil 

Force and Effect of Indian Deeds 



Deeds 

Ipswich Deeds 

The Deed of Haverhill 

The Conveyance of Andover 

Newbury Deeds . 

The Conveyance of Nahant 

The Deed of Marblehead 

Lynn Deeds . 

Salem Deeds 

The Deed of Beverly 

The Deed of Manchester 

The Deed of Wenham 

The Deed of Gloucester 

The Deeds of Boxford 

The Deed of Rowley . 

Bradford Deeds 

The Deed of Topsfield 

Index 



IX 

3 
3 

4 
6 

7 

i6 

i8 

23 
25 
31 
35 

41 
49 
51 

64 

11 
88 

93 

98 

lOI 

106 
118 
120 

135 



ILLUSTRATIONS 

Indian Map of Essex County . . Frontispiece ^ 

Deed of John Winthrop, Jr.'s, Farm in Ipswich 25 -^ 
Deed of Ipswich . . . . . . 27 ..- 

Portrait of John Winthrop, Jr. . . . 29 , 



Deed of Haverhill 



BLEHEAD 



31 ^ 



Deed of Indian Field, in Newbury . . 43 /-^ 

Deed of Marblehead .... 

Seals on Deed of Marblehead • • • 55 
Attestation of the Witnesses to Deed of Mar- 



51 V 



57 



Release of Joseph Quanophkownatt on Deed of 

Marblehead . , . . . . 59 ;^ 

Acknowledgment of Deed of Marblehead . 61 ^ 

Deed of Salem . . . . . . 77 

Seals on Deed of Salem . . . . . 83 i-- 

Attestation of the Witnesses to, and Acknow- 
ledgment of, Deed of Salem . . .85 

Residence of Thomas Perley, in Boxford . 107 /^ 



INTRODUCTION 

THOUGH this volume bears a title which in- 
dicates a legal character, the treatment of the 
subject is mainly historical. There is not 
much that can be said upon its legal aspect that is new, 
but the moral right to take by force the lands of the 
aborigines is still an open question. Neither is it a 
book of the Indians except as it relates to land titles. 
Most of the original Indian deeds are lost or de- 
stroyed, the records of the transactions are passing 
away, and the names of localities and waters are being 
forgotten. 

Duty demands the preservation of these memorials 
in order that at some future time the history of our 
red men may be written as truly and fully as possible. 

SIDNEY PERLEY. 

Salem, April 26, 191 2. 



INDIAN LAND TITLES 



TRIBAL TERRITORIES 

The Algonquin race of the North American Indians 
were different from the other aborigines in that they 
were less warlike and less nomadic. Being to a con- 
siderable degree an agricultural people, they remained 
within certain localities to which the periodical cultiva- 
tion of the soil confined them. This is especially true 
of the Indians of Essex County. Here, there were sev- 
eral tribes, each possessing certain acknowledged ter- 
ritory. The region north of Merrimack River belonged 
to the Pentucket tribe of the Pennacook Indians. The 
remainder of the present county of Essex was divided 
by a line beginning at a point, on Merrimack River, 
which is the boundary between the present towns of 
North Andover and Bradford (now a part of the city 
of Haverhill), and thence running southerly by the 
eastern boundary line of North Andover to the Middle- 
ton town line, thence southerly to Danvers River, as 
marked on the map, and thence by the river to Salem 
Bay. The territory lying easterly of this line was oc- 
cupied by the Agawam tribe, which is said to have been 
subject to the Pennacooks or in alliance with them. 
Westerly of this line was the land of the Naumkeag 
Indians, who constituted a part of the great Massa- 
chusetts tribe. 

MERRIMACK RIVER 

This river, which constituted a dividing line between 
tribes in this region, was called, by the Indians of the 
North, Merrimack, probably from merruh^ "strong," 

[ 3 ] 



[4] 

and aukcy " a place," meaning a strong place, or a place 
of strong currents, which exist at its mouth.' The 
Massachusetts Indians called it Monomack, from 
mona^ "an island," and auke^ "a place," meaning the 
island place, or a place of islands.' In a deed of Man- 
ancuset alias Annamutaage and others to Captain John 
Evered alias Webb, of Dracut, August 19, 1665, it is 
called " Mynomack River."' 

The earliest mention of this river in records or books 
is the statement of the Sieur De Monts, who wrote 
from the St. Lawrence River, in 1 604, as follows : " The 
Indians tell us of a beautiful river, far to the south, 
which they call the Merrimack." The next year Sam- 
uel de Champlain learned of it, by its location being 
mapped out for him by some Indians whom he met 
upon the beach near a point of land.^ He named this 
attractive stream " Riviere du Gas." 

PENTUCKET 

Pentucket was generally so spelled, though in a let- 
ter to Governor John Winthrop, in 1640, Nathaniel 
Ward wrote it " Penticutt." "• The name means " at the 
crooked river." ^ The northern limit of this tribe is 
unknown. 

Its chief was Passaconaway, and he had been its 
leader for many years before the English occupied the 

' History of Haverhill, by George Wingate Chase, page 20. 

* Old Norfolk Registry of Deeds, book 2, leaf 74. 

3 Voyages of Samuel de Champlain, Boston, 1 880, volume i, page 

51- 

*> History of Andover, by Sarah I.oring Bailey, page 4. 

5 Dr. R. A. Douglas-Lithgow, in his Dictionary of American Indian 

Place and Proper Names in New England. 



[5] 

land of Pentucket. According to Rev. William Hub- 
bard of Ipswich, author of a history of New England, 
this sagamore was " the most noted powwow and sor- 
cerer of all the country." 

The name of Augamtoocooke was applied to the 
region now occupied by Dracut,' which is without Essex 
County, but probably included within the jurisdiction 
of Passaconaway. 

John G. Whittier stated that the ancient name of 
Great Pond, in what is now Haverhill, was Kenoza, 
evidently an Indian appellation, and that he wrote his 
poem bearing that title that the old name might be 
resumed. Dr. Douglas-Lithgow states that the name 
is Indian and means " pickerel."^ 

The large pond in Amesbury, known early as Great 
Pond, and for a long time subsequently as Kimball's 
Pond, is now called Lake Attitash, which is said to 
have been its ancient Indian name. Dr. Douglas- 
Lithgow says that the word means " huckleberry." ^ 

Easterly of Lake Attitash is a great swamp known, 
as early as 1662, as Indian Swamp. ^ Between this 
swamp and Merrimack River is an extensive tract of 
upland called in the early settlement Indian field or 
ground.'* Why the name of Indian became associated 
with this swamp and upland is unknown. 

' Deed of Manancuset alias Annamutaage and others to Captain 
John Evered alias Webb, August 19, 1665. — Old Norfolk Reg- 
istry of Deeds, book 2, leaf 74. 

* Dictionary of American Indian Place and Proper Names in New 
England. 

3 Deed of William Huntington to William Osgood, 24 : i : 1662. 
— Old Norfolk Registry of Deeds, book I, leaf 146. 

4 Deed of William Sargent, Sr., to William Sargent, Jr., March 4, 
1670-71. — Old Norfolk Registry of Deeds, book 2, leaf 201. 



[6] 

Powwow River was almost universally called Paw- 
waus River in the early decades of the English set- 
tlement. If Passaconaway was indeed the greatest 
powwow of his time, probably many of the ancient 
meetings were held upon its banks, and from that fact 
the stream derived its name. 

AGAWAM 

The name of Agawam was spelled in several ways 
in early times. Captain John Smith, in 1 631, called 
it " Augoan," ' and William Wood, in 1634, spelled 
it " Igowam." ^ The difference arose from the sound 
given it by the aborigines. "Agawam" was the gen- 
eral form, however, and this spelling was probably 
adopted after the settlers had become accustomed to 
the pronunciation given it by the natives. Various 
meanings are given to the word, as " A fishing sta- 
tion," " Fish-curing place," and " Ground overflowed 
by water." ^ 

The northern boundary of Agawam was undoubt- 
edly Merrimack River. Naumkeag bounded it on the 
west, and on the other sides it was limited by the 
ocean. 

The first and only chief of Agawam known to the 
English settlers was Masconomet. He died before 
June 18, 1658, and was buried on Sagamore Hill, 
which is now within the bounds of Hamilton. He 
was always well disposed toward the white men. 

' Advertisements for the Unexperienced Planters of New England, 
etc., by Captain John Smith, 163 i. 

* New England'' s Prospect, by William Wood, 1634. 

3 Dictionary of American Indian Place and Proper Names in New 
England, by Dr. R. A. Douglas- Lithgow. 



[7] 

The Indians had given names to the coast in many 
places in Agawam. Wessacucon was practically the 
territory of old Newbury. To the Parker River they 
gave the name of Quascacunquen. William Wood, 
on his map of New England, made in 1634, called it 
Quascunquen. The section of Agawam which was 
more particularly so called was the present town of 
Ipswich. Chebacco' was the name given to the locality 
which is now the town of Essex; and Cape Ann gen- 
erally was known as Wingaersheek.^ Annisquam was 
earliest called Wonasquam, and later by the root word, 
Squam. It was called Wonasquam on the map of New 
England, made by William Wood, in 1634, and that 
was the name given to it on several occasions dur- 
ing the next century. The meaning of the name is 
the same, however, being "At the top or point of the 
rock."* The name of Annisquam is applied to the 
river or inlet of the sea at that place as well as the 
locality on shore. 

NAUMKEAG 

Naumkeag was a part of the extensive region more 
generally known as Massachusetts, which means "At 
or about the great hill," says J. H. Trumbull. Roger 
Williams said that it " was so called from the Blue 
hills." That part of Massachusetts of the Indians lying 
within what are now the limits of Essex County was 

' Chebacco is spelled ** Jebacho " in deed of John Burnum, St., 
of Ipswich, to Jonathan Cogswell, of Ipswich, June 28, 1703, show- 
ing that the first syllable had the sound of je. — Essex Registry of 
Deeds, book 15, leaf 192. 

2 History of Gloucester, by John J. Babson, page 45. 

3 Dr. R. A. Douglas-Lithgow, in his Dictionary of American 
Indian Place and Proper Names in New England. 



[8] 

called Naumkeag, which means " Fishing place," 
from namaaSy fish, ki^ place, and age^ at.' 

The territory of Naumkeag is defined by several 
depositions relating thereto, recorded in the Registry 
of Deeds at Salem, June 19, 1696/ The following is 
an exact copy of this record : — 

EUIDENCES RELATING TO NAUMKEEGE 

James Rumney Marsh aged about fifty yeares y* Son of 
Jn° Indian Testifieth that on his Certaine knowledge that y« 
riuer that runns vp between y^ Townes of Salem & Beuerly 
Called Bafs riuer hath allwaies within his remembrance for 
about forty fiue yeares past been knowne & Caled by y* 
name of Naomkeage riuer & that y*= riuer which lyeth be- 
tween y^ Towns of Salem & Marblehead now Caled fforrest 
Riuer : was formerly Caled by y^ name of Mafhabequa 
James Rumnymash perfonaly appeared tendring his Oath 
to y^ Truth of y^ aboue written whom upon Examination I 
found well to understand y^ Nature of an Oath & accord- 
ingly I admitted him : who made Oath to y^ Truth of y* 
aboue written this 7. "j^^ 1686. before me Barth° Gedney 
one of his Maj''" Councill for his Territory & dominion of 
New England. 

Sufannah Potoghoontaquah daughter of Sagamore George 
afirmed y^ truth of y^ aboue written Euidence of James 
Rumney Marsh this "j^^ September. 86. 

The 17*'' of September 1686. 

Thomas Queakufsen alias Cap* Tom Indian now liuing 

at wamefit neare Patucket Falls aged about Seuenty fiue 

yeares Testifieth & Saith that many yeares Since when he 

was a youth he liued with his father Deceafed named Po- 

' Handbook of American Indians, Washington, 1907, volume 11, 
page 40. 

* Essex Registry of Deeds, book 11, leaves 131 and 132. 



[9] 

quanum who Sometime liued at Sawgust now Called Linn 
he married a Second wife & liued at Nahant and himfelfe in 
after times liued about Miftick & that he well knew all 
thofe parts about Salem Marblehead & Linn & that Salem 
& y^ riuer running vp between that Neck of land & Bafs 
Riuer was Caled Naamkeke & y^ Riuer between Salem & 
Marblehead was Caled Mafhabequash alfo he Sais he well 
knew Sagamore George w*^^ no Nofe who married y^ De- 
ponents Owne Sister Named Joane who died about a yeare 
Since Si. Sagamore George No Nofe left Two daughters 
Named Sicilye & Sarah & Two grand Children by his Son 
Nonnumpanumhow y^ one Caled David & y^ other wut- 
tannoh & I My Selfe am One of thier kindred as before & 
James Rumnimafhs mother is one of Sagamore George his 
kindred & I know Two squawes more lining now about pen- 
nekooke one Named Pahpochkfitt & y^ others name I know 
not & I know y^ Grandmother of Thefe 2 Squawes Named 
Wenuhuf She was a principle proprietor of thofe lands about 
Naamkege & Salem all thefe perfons aboue named are Con- 
cerned in y^ Antient propriety to y^ lands aboue mentioned 

the marke of 

Thomas -^ / Queakussen 

alias Cap' Tom : 

Thomas Queakufsen alias Cap* Tom : psonaly appeared 
before me at Cambridge The Day & yeare aboue written & 
being an Indian of good repute & profefsing y« Christian 
Religion & being Examined Knew y^ nature of an Oath did 
depofe vnto y^ Truth of what is aboue written y^ 17'^'^ of 7 ^^ 
1686. before me Daniel Gookin Sen"^ appointed & author- 
ifed by y"' prefident & deputy prefident of his Maj*'^^ Territory 
in New England to be y^ Ruler among y^ Christian Indians 

Thomas Queakvfsen alias Cap* Tom affirmed y^ Truth 
of his aboue written Euidence on y^ former Oath before me 
Bartho. Gedney one of y' Councill 



[ 'O] 

The Testimony of old Mahanton aged about ninety yeares 
Saith that y« Land that is Testified about by Seuerall ancient 
Indians that are Deceafed which did belong to Sagamore 
George as is Exprefsed in y« Euidence is y^ Truth & pro- 
perly doth now belong to Dauid that is old Sagamore George 
his Grandchild & Scicily & Sarah y^ daughters of Sagamore 
George & y^ wife of John Owufsumug now a widow 
Peter Ephraims wife & y^ wife of Appooquahamock thier 
daughter & old Mahanton & James Rumney Marsh by right 
of his mother a neer kinsman of Sagamore George in his life- 
time & This he y^ Said Nahanton doth offer to Testify vpon 
Oath 

Taken vpon Oath the Seauenth Day of October by old 
Mahanton before me at Cambridge as attes* : Daniel Gookin 
Sen' J : of peace & Ruler of y^ Indians 

Dated ye Seuenth Day of October 1686. 

The Testimony of Daniel Tookuwompbait & Thomas 
Wauban Saith that Sagamore George when he came from Bar- 
bados he liued Sometime and dyed at y^ houfe of James Rum- 
ley Marsh y^ Said Daniel heard y^ Said Sagamore George 
Speake it & y^ Said Thomas Saith he heard his father Old Wa- 
bun Speak it that all that land that belonged to him that is from 
y^ Riuer of Salem alias Nahumkeke riuer: vp to Maiden mill 
brooke running from a pond Called Spott pond that before his 
death he left all this land belonging to him vnto his kinsman 
James Rumley Marsh vpon y^ Condition that he would looke 
after it to procure it This they offer to Testify vpon Oath y^ 
2^ day of October 1686. as Witnis thier hands 

Daniel Tookuwompbait 
Thomas Wauban 
The Two persons aboue named viz Daniel Tookuwompbait 
pastor of ye Church at Natick aged about 36 yeares & 
Thomas Waban a member of y^ Church aged 25 yeares being 
Examined touching y^ Nature of an Oath they both made Oath 
before me this Second of October 1686 vntoy^ Truth of the 



[ ■> ] 

aboues*^ Testimony as is Attested p me Daniel Gookin Juf- 
tice of peace & Ruler of y^ Christian Indians 

John Waabaquin alias John Magus of Natick aged about 
fiuety fiue yeares doe Testifie that I haue not only heard my 
aged father lately Deceafed yt almost a hundred yeares of Age 
when he dyed Say But I know my Selfe that thofe lands where 
Salem Stands & parts adjacent was y^ rightfull pofsefsion & 
Inheritance of Sagamore George no nofe Called winnepur- 
kin & his father & ancestors : & doth now belong to his 
Children & grand Children viz Sicily & Sarah his Two daugh- 
ters & Dauid his Grandson by his father Deced Ma-na-tach- 
que and Dauid had another Brother but I haue not Seen him 
lately And thier other kindred areThomasQuehufson& James 
Rumny marsh alias Munminquash and alfoe I haue under- 
stood that Naamkeke Riuer is y^ riuer that runns vp on y« 
North East of Salem Towne w"^^ is now as I understood 
named Bafs riuer 

Taken upon Oath before me by John Magus who is a 
Christian Indian & a Ruler of them at Natick & well un- 
derstand the Nature of An Oath ; Taken y^ Seuenth Day 
of October 1686. before me Daniel Gookin J: of peace & 
Ruler of y^ Indians p order 

The Testimony of John Devoreux of Marblehead aged 
about Eighty years Testifieth & Saith yt about y« yeare of 
Our Lord One thoufand Six hundred & Thirty I came ouer 
from old England to New England & y^ place of my abode 
and refidence has been at Salem & Marblehead Euer Since 
& when I came hither here was an old Sqwah Called old 
Sqwaw Sachem y^ Sqwaw of y^ Deced Sachem which had 
three reputed Sons viz John James & George whoe were y^ 
Reputed Sachems & Owners of all y« Lands in thefe parts 
as Salem Marblehead Linn & as farr as Miftick & in thofe dayes 
y^ Land where Salem Towne now Stands & y^ Lands adja- 
cent was Called Nahumkege by y^ Indians & English Then 



[ 12 ] 

Inhabiting in thefe parts : Sworne marblehead December y« 
24. 1694. before vs. 

John Hathorne Just. P« iff Coram 

Benjamin Browne 



John Higginson j >^ P'""" 

To y« best of my Remembrance when I came Ouerwith 
my father to this place in y^ yeare 1629 being then about 13 
yeares old there was in these parts a widow woman Called 
Sqwaw Sachem who had 3 Sons Sagamore John kept at Mif- 
tick Sagomore James at Saugust & Sagamore George here 
at Naumkeke Whether he was Actual Sachem here I Cannot 
Say for he was young then about my Age & I thinke there 
was An Elder man y* was at least his Guardian but y^ Indian 
Towne of Wigwams was on y^ North Side of y« North riuer 
not farre from Simondes's & y° bothy^ north & South Side of 
that Riuer was together Called Naumkeke So that I remem- 
ber Seuerall that wrote ouer Then to Their friends in England 
gd yt ye Indian name of y^ place where they were building a 
Towne Called Salem was Naumkeke : 

John Higginson 

Att A Generall Sesfions of y^ peace holden at Salem De- 
cember y^ 25*^^ 16 94 : m^'John Higginson Pastor of y^ Church 
at Salem made Oath to y« Truth of y^ aboue written Euidence 
to which [h]is name is Subfcribed 
Jurat in Court 

attest Steph. Sewall Clere 

Nanepashemet, the chief of the great Massachu- 
setts tribe, was killed in 161 9, and therefore was un- 
known personally to the English settlers. He lived 
at what is now Medford. His widow married Web- 
cowit, assumed the command of the tribe, and was 
known as Squaw Sachem. He left five children, one 
of whom, Sagamore James, became a sachem at Sau- 



[•3] 

gus, and another at Winnesimet,' now the city of 
Chelsea. 

The principal settlement of the Naumkeag Indians 
was apparently within the limits of the city of Salem. 
The bay and streams offered special inducements for 
the home of such a race. The grant made to Gov- 
ernor John Endecott was called by the Indians Wah- 
quainesehcok/ and the point of land granted to Rev. 
Samuel Skelton, Wahquack.^ The river on the north- 
eastern side of Wahquack was called Pouomeneuh- 
cant and is now known as Porter's River. The river 
between the grants was called Conamabsquenooncant; 
and that to the south of the Endecott grant was called 
Soewamapenessett. The river now known as Danvers 
River, leading from Danversport to North River and 
Beverly Harbor, was called Orkhussunt."* Forest River 
was called Massabequash.' Naugus Head, in Marble- 
head, is undoubtedly the ancient Indian name for 
that headland, as it is called very early " Nogg's head," 
which is a phonetic form of writing" Naugus Head." 
Suntaug Lake, in Peabody and Lynn, is supposed to 
have been so called by the aborigines. Squamscott, now 
the town of Swampscott, is a name signifying " broken 

' Handbook of American Indians, Washington, 1907, volume 11, 
page 207. 

* Records of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Boston, 1853, volume i, 
page 97. This grant was made July 3, 1632. 

3 Records of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Boston, 1853, volume i, 
page 97. This grant was made the same day as the Endecott grant. 

4 Records of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Boston, 1853, volume i, 
page 97. 

5 Deposition of James Rumney Marsh, aged about fifty, son of 
John, an Indian, September 7, 1686. — Essex Registry of Deeds, 
book 1 1 , leaf 131. 



[ 14] 

waters." ' Nahant is a short form of the word Nahan- 
teau^ signifying twins/ or two united.^ Dr. R. A. 
Douglas-Lithgow says the word means " At the point," 
or twin islands.'* In a deed of John Gorges to Sir 
William Brereton, of Handforth, Chester County, 
England, baronet, January 20, 1628-29, preserved 
in the Massachusetts archives, it is called Cape 
Nahannte.s Lynn and Saugus constituted the ancient 
Saugus, a word which means the outlet or wet or over- 
flowed grass land.' Hewitt says it means a small out- 
let. Alonzo Lewis stated that it signified " great," or 
"extended."^ The English settlers first called it by 
its Indian name; and the words of the incorporation 
of the town, in 1637, are " Saugust is called Lin."' 
Saugus River was called Abousett River.* The terri- 
tory of Topsfield, on Ipswich River, was known as 
Shenewemedy.^ The original town of Andover was 
called Cochickawick, a word which means " the place 
of the great cascade." ^ This locality was probably so 
called because of the falls at Lawrence. This is the 
usual way of spelling the name. Rev. Nathaniel Ward 

■ Dr. R. A. Douglas-Lithgow, in liis Dictionary of American 
Indian Place and Proper Names in New England. 

' Gazetteer of Massachusetts, by Rev. Elias Nason, page 352. 

3 History of Lynn, by Alonzo Lewis, page 58. 

4 Dictionary of American Indian Place and Proper Names in New 
England. 

5 History of Lynn, by Alonzo Lewis, page 3 1 . 
^ History of Lynn, by Alonzo Lewis, page 57. 

7 Records of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Boston, 1853, volume 
I, page 211. 

^ Gazetteer of Massachusetts, by Rev. Elias Nason, page 504. 

9 New Hampshire Historical Societf s Collections, volume 8, page 
451. 



[ -J] 

wrote it Quichechacke and Quichichwich,' Rev. John 
Woodbridge spelled it Quichichwich in a letter to 
Governor John Winthrop in 1640-41/ The name 
was also called Queacheck and Quy acheck. The stream 
running through Cochickawick was called Shawshin 
River, which is said to mean smooth, or glossy.* The 
name is also spelled Shashene, Shashin, Shashine, 
Shawsheen and Shawshene; but Shawshin appears to 
be the early and most general of the various spellings. 
It is so called by Captain Edward Johnson, in his 
Wonder Working Providence of Zions Saviour in New 
England^ about 1648, and in deed of Job Clements, 
of Dover, and wife Lydia to Joseph Jewett, of Row- 
ley, May 19, 1657-58.'* In the deed of Samuel Blanch- 
ard, of Charlestown, to John Asslebee, of Andover, 
April 7, 1662, this river is called Quechig,' 

The designations given by the Indians to the vari- 
ous localities and streams and ponds were descriptive 
of the places or waters to which they were applied. 

' History of Andover, by Miss Sarah Loring Bailey, page 2. 
' History of Andover, by Miss Sarah Loring Bailey, page 5. 

3 Dictionary of American Indian Place and Proper Names in New 
England, by Dr. R. A. Douglas-Lithgow. 

4 Old Norfolk Registry of Deeds, book i, leaf 72. 

5 Essex Registry of Deeds, book 15, leaf 129. 



RIGHT TO THE SOIL 

The title which the Indians had to the soil has been 
much debated. Though the courts decided many 
years ago that the Indians had no title, it is doubtful 
if the justices understood the substantive facts. The 
Algonquin race were not like most others. They were 
not nomadic, and held possession of the territory 
generation after generation, replanting their fields as 
regularly as spring returned. They cultivated and 
possessed the soil in a manner similar to the English 
settlers of Salem and Beverly, who years later claimed 
that they themselves had title to the land through its 
possession and cultivation. The various tribes had 
boundaries to their tribal territory as definite as their 
occasions demanded, and fully as certain and exact as 
those of the earlier of the English settlers. 

The argument may have been that, as adverse pos- 
session for a long time gives rise to the presumption 
that there was originally a grant, such a presumption 
would not apply to the case of the Indians, as there was 
no person or authority who could have made such a 
grant. This argument proceeds still further, upon the 
idea that all titles to be effective must be transferred 
according to English rules or custom. 

The courts held that these natives had only a right 
of occupancy and enjoyment. Just how they inter- 
preted this right is uncertain. 

Roger Williams claimed that the land was the pro- 
perty of the Indians, and that title thereto could be 
acquired only from them, and not by virtue of the 

[ i6] 



[ ■?] 

King's grant. This was one of his ideas which made 
him unpopular at Salem and led to his banishment. 

Winthrop had written before he left England even 
that " That wh*"^ lies comon & hath never beene 
replenished or subdued, is free to any that possesse 
& improve it. . . As for the Natives in New Eng- 
land, they inclose noe Land, neither have any setled 
habytation, nor any tame Cattle to improve the Land 
by, & soe have noe other but a Naturall Right to 
those Countries. Soe as if we leave them sufficient 
for their use, wee may lawfully take the rest, there 
being more than enough for them & us." ' 

' Life and Letters of John Winthrop, Boston, 1869, volume i, 
pages 3 1 1 and 312. 



FORCE AND EFFECT OF INDIAN DEEDS 

The subject of ostensible transfer of title to the land 
here by the Indians has caused considerable thought 
and discussion. The greatest force given by the courts 
to Indian deeds was in treating them as releases or 
estoppels, — as relinquishing and not conveying an 
interest in the soil. This conclusion of the courts was 
affected by the statute of 1701/ which made all such 
deeds have the force of estoppel only, unless with the 
leave of the general court. Without the passage of 
this statute, it is problematical what the position of 
the court would have been. 

In justice to both Indians and English it should be 
stated that, on the part of the public here, probably 
no attempt was ever made to purchase the lands of the 
Indians. At the very first the authorities discouraged 
such a movement, saying, in the first general letter of 
the governor and deputy of the New England Company 
to the governor and council for London's plantation 
in the Massachusetts Bay in New England, dated at 
Gravesend, April 17, 1629, that if any of the savages 
pretend right of inheritance to the lands the represent- 
atives of the company should endeavor to purchase 
their titles " that wee may avoyde the least scruple 
of intrusion " ; * and this was repeated in the second 

' Acts of I 3 William III, chapter 11 ; Province Laws (Massachu- 
setts), volume I, page 471 ; Noah Clark versus William Williams 
et al., 1 9 Pickering, 499 (1837); Amos Brown et alt. versus 
Inhabitants of Wenham, 10 Metcalf, 495 (1845). 

* Records of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Boston, 1853, volume 
I, page 394. 

[ 18 ] 



[ 19] 

general letter of the company, dated at London, May 
28, 1629.' 

March 4, 1633-34, at a court held at Boston, it was 
"ordered, that noe pson whatsoeuer shall buy any land 
of any Indian without leave from Court."' 

These laws were passed for the protection of the 
Indians, by securing them from deceit and imposition, 
and to enable the government to avail itself of the 
full benefit of the grant from the crown to themselves 
and their grantees, by giving them the exclusive priv- 
ilege of extinguishing or acquiring the Indians' right 
of occupancy. 

It was not a title to be acquired by grant in lands 
in which the Indians' right had once been extinguished 
that the English were prohibited from purchasing. If 
a township had been granted and settled, and the 
aboriginal right extinguished, it was not the intent of 
the general court to prevent an Indian acquiring and 
transmitting title like any settler.* 

The policy of the colonial government always was 
to treat the Indians fairly. It was discussed by the 
general court, and, finally, October 19, 1652, it was 
ordered, that, being " willing that there may be a free 
passage of justice for their right amongst us," as well 
as for the English, and affirmed that what lands the 
natives have by possession or improvement, by sub- 
duing the same, they have just right unto; that if they 

' Records of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Boston, 1853, volume 
I, page 400. 

* Records of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Boston, 1853, volume 
I, page I I 2. 

J Noah Clark versus William Williams et ah, 19 Pickering, 499 
(1837). 



[20] 

come and dwell with the English and live civilly and 
orderly, they shall have allotment amongst the English, 
according to the custom of the English ; and if there 
be enough for a township of themselves, upon their re- 
quest to the general court, they shall have grants of land 
undisposed of for a plantation as the English have.' 

June 26, 1 70 1, an act was passed by the Province 
of Massachusetts Bay, expressly making all deeds 
given by Indians, without leave of the general court, 
after the passage of the order of 1633-34, inoperative, 
except as estoppels against the releasors/ This act Is 
as follows : — 

Whereas the government of the late colonys of the Mas- 
sachusetts Bay and New Plymouth, to the intent the native 
Indians might not be injured or defeated of their just rights 
and possessions, or be imposed on and abused in selling and 
disposing of their lands, and thereby deprive themselves of 
such places as were suitable for their settlement and improve- 
ment, did, by an act and law passed in the said colonys 
respectively many years since, inhibit and forbid all persons 
purchasing any lands of the Indians without the licence and 
approbation of the general court, notwithstanding which, 
sundry persons for private lucre have presumed to make pur- 
chases of lands from the Indians, not having any licence or 
approbation as aforesaid for the same, to the injury of the 
natives, and great disquiet and disturbance of many of the 
inhabitants of this province in the peaceable possession of 
their lands and inheritances lawfully acquired ; therefore, for 
the vacating of such illegal purchases, and preventing of the 
like for the future, — 

■ Records of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Boston, 1853, volume 
IV, part I, page 102. 

^ Acts of 13 William III, chapter 1 1 ; Province Laws (Massachu- 
setts), volume I, page 471. 



[21 ] 

Be it enacted and declared by the Lieutenant-Governour, 
Council and Representatives in General Court assembled, 
and by the authority of the same, that all deeds of bargain, 
sale, lease, release or quit-claim, titles and conveyances w^hat- 
soever, of any lands, tenements or hereditaments within this 
province, as well for term of years as forever, had, made, 
gotten, procured or obtained from any Indian or Indians by 
any person or persons whatsoever, at any time or times since 
the year of our Lord one thousand six hundred thirty-three, 
without the licence or approbation of the respective general 
courts of the said late colonys in which such lands, tenements 
or hereditaments lay, and all deeds of bargain and sale, titles 
and conveyances whatsoever, of any lands, tenements or 
hereditaments within this province, that since the establish- 
ment of the present government have been or shall hereafter 
be had, made, gotten, obtained or procured from any Indian 
or Indians, by any person or persons whomsoever, without 
the licence, approbation and allowance of the great and gen- 
eral court or assembly of this province for the same, shall be 
deemed and adjudged in the law to be null, void and of none 
effect ; provided, nevertheless, that all such purchases, re- 
leases and titles heretofore had or obtained from any Indian 
or Indians by any town or person whatsoever of any lands 
or hereditaments which such town or person also hold and 
enjoy, by virtue of any grant or title made or derived by or 
from the general court of either of the colonies aforesaid, and 
all releases, purchases, conveyances and titles which any town 
or person shall hereafter make, procure or obtain of any 
Indian or Indians for any lands, tenements or hereditaments 
granted, or that shall be granted by the general court to such 
town or person, before such purchase or title made or ob- 
tained from any Indian or Indians, shall be, and hereby are 
excepted out of this act, and be held for good and valid in the 
law, anything herein contained notwithstanding; and that 
if any person or persons, or town in this province to the 
eastward of Piscataqua River, have heretofore purchased or 



obtained any Indian deed or title for any lands, tenements or 
hereditaments in those parts, or if any person or persons have 
heretofore purchased or obtained any Indian deed or title for 
any lands, tenements or hereditaments in the Island of Cap- 
awock, alias Martha's Vineyard, or the dependencies thereof, 
now known by the name of Dukes County, or in the Island 
of Nantucket, for further confirmation of their other lawful 
titles and possessions, this act or any thing therein contained 
shall not extend or be construed to extend in any wise to va- 
cate or make void such Indian deed or title, any thing herein 
contained to the contrary notwithstanding. 

If any person or persons whatsoever shall, after the publi- 
cation of this act, presume to make any purchase or obtain 
any title from any Indian or Indians for any lands, tenements 
or hereditaments within this province, contrary to the true 
intent and meaning of this act, such person or persons so 
offending, and being thereof duly convicted in any of his 
majestie's courts of record within this province, shall be pun- 
ished by fine and imprisonment, at the discretion of the court 
where the conviction shall be, not exceeding double the 
value of the land so purchased, nor exceeding six months' 
imprisonment. 

All leases of land that shall at any time hereafter be made 
by any Indian or Indians for any term or terms of years, 
shall be utterly void and of none effect, unless the same be 
made by and with licence first had and obtained from the 
court of general sessions of the peace in the county where 
such lands lye ; provided, nevertheless, that nothing in this 
act shall be taken, held or deemed in any wise to hinder, 
defeat or make void any bargain, sale or lease of land made 
by one Indian to another Indian or Indians. 



DEEDS 



~f-ni Cy-fi.k< ^^^"o/C ^..^Xfk^ X^i f*-^*^ ^*-t^'f'**^^ Cr-^i:^^ 
"^^-. ^^^***,.^h^ h^fx^ 4^\^ Cc^ it>(^z yp-HtUt^ 



Deed from Masconomet to John Winthrop, Jr., of the 
territory constituting Mr, Winthrop's farm, in Ipswich, 
Reproduced same size as the original, which is in the pos- 
session of the Essex Institute, at Salem, 



IPSWICH DEEDS 

John Winthrop, son of Governor John Winthrop, 
was born at Groton, county of Suffolk, England, 
February 12, 1605-06. He was educated at Trinity 
College, in Dublin, and studied law at the Inner 
Temple, in London. He soon abandoned the law, 
and, entering the naval service, served under the 
Duke of Buckingham in his unsuccessful expedition 
for the relief of the French Protestants at Rochelle. 
After a tour of the Continent he returned to London, 
in August, 1629, and found his father actively en- 
gaged in the interests of the Massachusetts Bay Com- 
pany. He emigrated to New England two years later, 
and, with twelve other men, by permission of the 
general court, in March, 16^2-23, began a plantation 
at what is now Ipswich. The death of his wife and 
daughter, in' the autumn of 1634, caused him to 
change his plans, and he soon afterward returned to 
England. He subsequently became the head of a 
colony which settled in Connecticut, but spent much 
of his time in Boston, and was living at Ipswich again 
in February, 1637, when he was chosen one of the 
prudential men in that plantation. 

A few months later, Mr. Winthrop secured from 
Masconomet, the sagamore of Agawam, a release of 
the land lying between Labor-in-vain and Chebacco 
creeks, which constituted Mr. Winthrop's farm. This 
release is unrecorded, and was in the possession of 
the Winthrop family until 1890, when Robert C. 
Winthrop, Jr., of Boston, deposited it with the Essex 

[ ^5 ] 



[26] 

Institute at Salem. This ancient deed is herewith 
reproduced from the original document, which reads 
as follows : — 

This doth testify that I Mafkonomett did give to m"^ John 
Winthrop all that ground that is betweene the creeke com- 
oly called Labour in vaine creeke, & the creeke called chy- 
backo Creeke, for w*^*^ I doe acknowledge to have received 
full Satiffaction in wampampeage, & other things : and I 
doe heerby alfo for the fume of twenty pounds to be paid 
vnto me by the Said John winthrop, I doe fully refigne vp 
all my right of the whole towne of Ipfw'^'^ as farre as the 
bounds thereof shall goe all the woods meadowes, paftures 
& broken vp grounds vnto the faid John Winthrop in the 
name of the rest of the English there planted, and I doe 
bind my felfe to make it cleere from the claime of any other 
Indians whatsoever, 
witnefses. to this 

Gyles ffyrmin Maskanomet \^ his mark 

Adam Winthrop 

Hugh t-H Hilliard 



H 



his marke 
Deane Winthrop 

Gyles Firman was a physician, and lived in Ipswich 
at that time, a young man of twenty-three. He re- 
turned to his native England about 1654, and became 
eminent as a clergyman as well as physician. Adam 
Winthrop and Dean Winthrop were half-brothers of 
Mr. Winthrop, the grantee in this deed. Adam was 
then eighteen years of age, and Dean but fifteen. 
Hugh Hilliard was living in Salem as early as 1634, 
and probably removed to Ipswich before 1638. 

June 28, 1638, Mr. Winthrop secured from the 
chieftain Masconomet a further release of the territory 



Deed from Masconomet to John Winthrop, Jr., of the ter- 
ritory of the original town of Ipswich, dated June 28, 1638. 
Reproduced nine-tenths of the size of the original, which is 
in the possession of the Essex Institute, at Salem. 



'T^^-^ 











4 "4 

a J-; 



•■^ 



11 : ^ C^^ 



vj 







1 



u 






^s|>l:: 





^ 



\< -■ ^ 

^ S ^ 








[^7] 

of Agawam. This deed included all the land along 
the coast from Merrimack to Chebacco rivers, and 
the land at Chebacco ' which the releasor had reserved 
for his own use, but excepted Mr. Dummer's farm 
in what is now the parish of Byfield. The consider- 
ation paid by Mr. Winthrop was twenty pounds. 

Captain Wait Winthrop, son of the grantee of this 
deed, produced it at the general court, in Boston, 
February 15, 1682, and requested that it be recorded. 
This request was granted, and the deed was recorded 
in the Ipswich Registry of Deeds ^ on the same day. 
It was also recorded in the Town Records of Ipswich, 
and in the Records of the town of Topsfield for 1701. 

The original deed was in the possession of the 
Winthrop family until 1890, when Robert C. Win- 
throp, Jr., of Boston, deposited it in the Essex Insti- 
tute at Salem, where it remains. The original docu- 
ment is reproduced herewith. 

The following is a copy of this deed : — 

I Mufcononimet Sagamoreof Agawam, doe by theifep'fents 
acknoledge to haue Receiued of m'' John Wintrop the Some 
of Twenty poundes, in full fatiffacon, of all the Right, 
property and Cleame, I haue or ought to haue, vnto all the 
land lying and being in the Bay of Agawam, alls Ipfwich 
being foe Called now by the English, as well alfuch land as 
I formerly referued vnto my owne vfe at Chibocco as alfoe 
all other land belonging vnto me in those parts m^ Dum- 
me'"s farme excepted only, And I herby relinquish all the 
Rhight and Intereft I haue vnto all the Hauens Rivers Creekes 
Hands, huntings and fishings with all the woodes Swampes 

' Chebacco was the Indian name of that part of Agawam which 
is now the town of Essex. 

* Ipswich Registry of Deeds, book 4, page 383. 



[28 ] 

Timber and whatfoeever ells, is or may be in or vpon the 
faid ground to me Belonging, and I doe hereby acknoledge 
to haue receiued full Satil'facon, from the faid Jn° Wintropp 
for all former agreements touching the p'^mifes or any part 
of them. And I doe hereby bind my Selfe, to make good the 
forefaid bargaine and Saile vnto the Said John Wintrop his 
heires and aflignes for euer, and to Secure him againft the 
tytle and Claime of all other Indians and natiues what foeuer. 
Wittnefle my hand this 28. of June 1638. 

Wittnefles herevnto 

Jn° Joylife Thomas Coytimor^ Muscononimet 
James Downinge /> 

ROBART HaRDINGE ** \ t- 

his marke 

The persons whose names appear as witnesses to 
this deed were connected with Boston, and apparently 
the deed was executed there. Thomas Coytimorewas 
a resident of Charlestown, and after his death his 
widow married Governor Winthrop, father of the 
grantee, in December, 1647. ^^- Coytimore was 
probably about twenty-one or twenty-two years of 
age at the time of signing the deed. James Downing 
was son of Emanuel Downing, and nephew of Gov- 
ernor Winthrop. He was at this time about fifteen 
years old, and may have lived in Ipswich. Captain 
Robert Harding was of Boston, being a prominent 
man, a supporter of the Hutchinsons' faith, and was 
disarmed therefor in 1637. Immediately after signing 
this deed as a witness he removed to Rhode Island. 
John Joyliffe was of Boston, and later one of the 
patriots who put Governor Andros in prison. 

Masconomet appeared before the general court, 
in Boston, March 13, 1638-39, and acknowledged 



Portrait of John Winthrop, Jr., from the painting now in 
the possession of Robert Dudley Winthrop of New York. 



,rl} 



[29] 

that Mr. Winthrop had paid him twenty pounds as 
the consideration for this deed, and also that he was 
fully satisfied.' 

Subsequently, the matter of the payment by the 
town of Ipswich to Mr. Winthrop of the twenty 
pounds he had paid for this release was brought 
before the general court; and, November 5, 1639, it 
was "ordered, that Ipswich should satisfy M' Win- 
thrope for the 20^ paid the Indian for his right."* 
Apparently the money was not paid to Mr. Win- 
throp, as, February 22, 1705, the town of Ipswich 
"voted, that Samuel Appleton, Esq., and our two 
Representatives treat with the Hon. Wait Winthrop, 
about Masconnomo's deed of Agawam, made to his 
father deceased. Governor of Connecticut."^ 

John Winthrop established salt-works at Salem, 
In June, 1638, and spent much of his time there 
during the next two years. Later, he was active in 
building iron-works at Braintree. In January, 1645, 
he sold his farm at Ipswich, and soon afterward 
removed to what is now New London, Connecticut. 
He had been an assistant in the government of the 
Massachusetts Bay Colony for eighteen years, but 
declined further service, and thereafter devoted him- 
self to the Connecticut colony, of which he was elected 

' The record of this acknowledgement is as follows : — 

♦♦ Maschonomet, the sagamore of Agawam, acknowledged that hec 
had receiued 20' of M' John Winthrope, Junior, for all his land in 
Ipswich, for w*^^^ hee acknowledged himselfe fully satisfied." — 
Records of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Boston, 1853, volume 1, 
page 252. 

^ Records of the Massachusetts Bay Co /ony, Boston, 1853, volume 
I, page 279. 

3 Ipswich Town Records. 



[ 3°] 

governor May 21, 1651. He continued to hold that 
office for seventeen years. He was in England some 
years later and was elected a member of the Royal 
Society, which was a tribute to his scientific accom- 
plishments. He obtained from King Charles II a 
charter uniting the colonies of New Haven and Con- 
necticut, being himself named in the charter as the 
first governor of the united colonies. He died April 
5, 1676, while at Boston, attending a meeting of the 
commissioners of the united colonies, and was buried 
by the side of his father in what is now King's 
Chapel Churchyard. 



Deed from Passaquo and Saggahew to the inhabitants of 
Pentucket (Haverhill), of the territory of the original town 
of Haverh.ll dated Nov. 15, 1642. Reproduced two-thirds 
of the s.ze of the original, which is in the possession of the 
Haverhill Historical Society. 



THE DEED OF HAVERHILL 

Two years after the English settlement was made 
at what is now Haverhill, came the news of an im- 
pending massacre by the Indians to exterminate the 
English in all the region. This was in September, 
1642, and the time appointed for the accomplishment 
of this design was fixed at a time soon after harvest. 
An order was issued by the governor and council to 
disarm Passaconaway, the Sagamore of the Pentuck- 
ets. In consequence of this proceeding, the inhabit- 
ants of Haverhill, or Pentucket, as the settlement 
was then called, secured from Passaquo and Saggahew, 
with the consent of Passaconaway, a deed of release 
of the territory of Haverhill, which was executed No- 
vember r5th following. This ancient document was 
recorded in the old Norfolk Registry of Deeds' April 
29, 1 67 1, in the Town Records of Haverhill in 1680, 
and in the Ipswich Registry of Deeds^ April i, 1681. 
The following is a copy of this instrument transcribed 
from the original : — 

Knowe all men by thefe p''fents that wee : Paflaquo : and 
Sagga Hew, w*'' the confent of Paffaconnaway : haue fold 
vnto the the Inhabitants of Pentuckett all the lands we haue 
in Pentucket ; that is Eyght myles in lenght from the little 
Riuer in Pentuckett weftward: Six miles in lenght fro the 
aforefaid Riuer northward : And Six miles in lenght fro the 
forefaid Riuer Eftward w^'' the Ileland and the Riuer that 

' Old Norfolk Registry of Deeds, book 2, page 209. 
^ Ipswich Registry of Deeds, book 4, page 383. 

Iv ] 



the Ileland ftand in as far in lenght as the land lyes by in 
formerly expreffed, that is, fourteene myles in lenght: And 
wee the faid Paffaquo & Saggahew w^^ the confent of Paffa- 
connaway haue fold vnto the faid Inhabitants all the Right 
that wee or any of vs haue in the faid ground Ileland & Riuer : 
And Doe warrant it againft all or any other Indeans what- 
foeu vnto the faid Inhabitants of Pentuckett & to there 
heyres and aflignes for euer Dated the fifteenth Day of 
nouember Ann Dom 1642. 

witnes ou'^ hands & feales to this bargayne of fale the Day 
& yere aboue written in the pi'fents of vs : wee the faid 
Paffaquo & Saggahew haue Receiued in hand for & in 
confideracon of the fame three pounds & ten shillings 

John Ward the marke of 

Robert Clements ^^S^ 

Tristram Coffyn Passaquo f [seal] 

Heugh Sherratt T 

William white The marke of 

The figne of ^ 

Thomas ^^7 Dauice Saggahew ; .. ^■'"J^'^s. 

Of these Indians, nothing more Is known. The first 
witness to this deed was Rev. John Ward, the first 
pastor of the church in Haverhill. He was at this 
time thIrty-sIx years old ; and was so prominent in the 
town that it was called " Mr. Ward's plantation " In 
official records. He was son of Rev. Nathaniel Ward, 
a lawyer as well as divine, and compiler of the "Body 
of Liberties," the first code of laws established In New 
England, being adopted In 1641. Nathaniel Ward was 
also the author of the " Simple Cobler of Aggawam." 
This colony received Its name of Haverhill from Mr. 
Ward's birthplace in England. Robert Clements, the 
second witness, was one of the earliest settlers. He 



[33 ] 

came from England, lived in Salisbury awhile, and 
then moved up the river and became one of this 
colony. He was about fifty-two years old when he 
witnessed this deed. He was a man of ability and in- 
tegrity, and held numerous public positions. Tristram 
Coffin, the next witness, came from the parish of Brix- 
ham, in Ply mouth, England, and was, at this time, about 
thirty-three years of age. He came from Salisbury with 
Robert Clements. Hugh Sherratt came to this planta- 
tion with Mr. Ward, and was about fifty-three years 
old at the time of signing the deed. William White 
was one of the pioneers of the settlement, having gone 
across the river from Newbury, and at the time of 
signing the deed was thirty-two years old. He was 
one of the staunch citizens of the plantation. Thomas 
Davis, the last witness, was a sawyer by occupation, 
and came from Marlborough, in England. He was 
probably the youngest of the witnesses, being about 
thirty years old. 

In 1680, when this deed was copied into the Town 
Records, the following testimony, taken by Nathaniel 
Saltonstall, Esq., of Haverhill, was recorded with 
it: — 

The Rev^ Teacher of y« Church & Towne of Haverhill 
j\/[r ji^o Ward ; & w™ White, & The. Davis do tesdfie that 
Haverhill Towneship or lands then by y« Indians called Pen- 
tucket, was purchased of y^ Indians as is mentioned in y^ deed 
in this paper contained, w^ is entered upon record, And y* wee 
were then Inhabitants at Haverhill & present w'^^ y^ Indians 
Passaquoi, & Saggaihew (who were then the apparent owners 
of y^ land ; & so accounted) did signe and confirme y^ same; 
And that then wee, (with others now dead) did signe our 
names to y^ deed. Which land Wee have ever sinse en- 



[34] 

joyed peaceably without any Indian molestation from y^ 
Grantors or their heirs. 

Taken upon oath February ye ^.th 1680 before 

Nath : Saltonstall Jssist;^ 

The original document was in the possession of 
William White, one of the witnesses to the deed, and 
his descendants until about 1 860, when it was delivered 
into the custody of the town by E. A. Porter, admin- 
istrator of the estate of the late Charles White, Esq. 
It is now in the possession of the Haverhill Historical 
Society, and is reproduced herewith. 

' Below the record of the deed in the Town Records of Haverhill 
the following affidavit is written: — 

♦' Leiv' Browne & Leiv* Ladd: both affirme upon oath that what 
is entered in y^ Records for Haverhill, as y^ deed of purchase from 
the Indians of Haverhill Towne-ship or lands, of which y^ deed 
above written is a true coppy, was — is a true coppy, extract or tran- 
script of the originall deed given by y^ Indians. 

•' Taken upon oath, February y^ 4*^^ 1680. Before me, 

"Nath: Saltonstall Assist." 



THE CONVEYANCE OF ANDOVER 

The town of Andover originally included the pre- 
sent towns of Andover and North Andover and that 
part of the city of Lawrence which lies southerly of 
Merrimack River. This territory was called by the 
Indians Cochickawick, and was a part of the territory 
of Naumkeag, which was included within the domain 
of the redmen ruled by the Massachusetts tribe. 

The sagamore of the Massachusetts when Andover 
was settled was Cutshamache, otherwise called Cuts- 
make or Cutshamakin, who lived near Dorchester, and 
was a kinsman of Passaconaway, the chieftain beyond 
the Merrimack. In 1636, Cutshamache was allowed by 
the general court sufficient gunpowder for nine or ten 
shots that he might kill some fowls for himself.* In 
1642, he desired the colonial authorities to give him 
a coat, and the matter was referred to the treasurer of 
the colony, Captain Edward Gibbens.^ March 7, 1 643- 
44, he was one of the Indians who voluntarily placed 
themselves under the authority of the Massachusetts 
Bay Colony government.^ 

' Records of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Boston, 1853, volume 

I, page 181. 

* Records of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Boston, 1853, volume 

II, page 27. 

3 Records of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Boston, 1853, volume 
II, pages 55 and 56. 

The submission which the several Indians signed is as follows : — 

" Wee haue & by these presents do voluntarily, & w^^^Qm guy 

constraint or pswasion, but, of o'' ovvne free motion, put o''selues, 0^ 

subiects, lands, & estates under the government & Jurisdiction of the 

[35 ] 



[36] 

The settlement at Cochickawick, which became the 
town of Andover, was begun in 1641 ; and a church 
was formed there October 24, 1645, when Rev. John 
Woodbridge of Newbury was installed as pastor. Mr. 
Woodbridge was born at Stanton, Highworth, Wilt- 
shire, England, about 16 13, his father being the min- 
ister of that parish. He came to Newbury with his 
uncle. Rev. Thomas Parker, and the colony constitut- 
ing that settlement in 1635. ^^ entered Harvard 
College, and was the first graduate. He was master 

Majsachusets, to bee governed & ptected by them, according to 
their iust lavves & orders, so farr as wee shalbee made capable of un- 
derstanding; & wee do pmise for o'selues, & all o^ subiects, & all 
0' posterity, to bee true & faithful! to the said government, & ayding to 
the maintenance thereof, to 0' best ability, & fro™ time to time to give 
speedy notice of any conspiracy, attempt, or evill intension of any 
which wee shall know or l\eare of against the same ; & wee do 
pmise to bee willing fro™ time to time to bee instructed in the 
knowledg & worship of God. In witnes whereof wee have hereunto 
put o' hands the 8*^ of the first m**, @ 1 643-1 644. 

" cutshamache, 
Nashowanon, 

WoSSAMEGON, 

Maskanomett, 
Squa Sachim." 
Before this submission was allowed to be accepted by them, the 

Indians were examined as to their religious belief and moral attitude. 

This examination was as follows: — 

" F. To worship y« onely true God, w^^ made heaven & earth, & 
not to blaspheme him. 

•* An: We do desire to reVence y^ God of y« English, & to speake 
well of him, because wee see hee doth better to y« English than oth^ 
gods do to others. 

"2. Not to swear falcely. An: They say they know not w' swer- 
ing is among y"^. 

** 3. Not to do any unnecessary worke on y^ Saboth day, especially 



[37] 

of the Boston Latin School; married Mercy, daughter 
of Governor Thomas Dudley; and returned to New- 
bury, where he was a justice of the peace and deputy 
to the general court. He was a scholarly, but practical, 
man, patient and of an excellent spirit. He was the 
first minister ordained in Essex County, and the 
second in New England, the service occurring Septem- 
ber 1 6, 1644. He was the leading person in the An- 
dover settlement from his installation in 1645, and, 
in behalf of the town, he purchased of the sagamore 
Cutshamache all the right and interest of the chief in 

w'^in y^ gates of Christian townes. An : It is easy to y^ ; they have 
not to do on any day, & they can well take their ease on y*^ day. 

"4 To honC their parents & all their supio^'s. 

*' An : It is their custome to do so, for the inferiors to honor their 
supio''s. 

** 5. To kill no man wt^^out iust cause & iust authority. 

** An: This is good, & they desire to do so. 

** 6. To comit no unclean lust, or fornication, adultery, incest, 
rape, sodomy, buggery, or beastiality. An : Though sometime some 
of y™ do it, yet they count that naught, & do not alow it. 

'"J. Not to steale. An : Tkey say to y* as to y^ 6'^ quere. 

" To suffer their children to learn to reade Gods word, y* they 
may learn to know God aright, & worship him in his owne way. 

" They say, as oportunity will serve, & English live among y°>, 
they desire so to do. 

" That they should not bee idle." 

To these statements the Indians consented, acknowledging them 
to be good. The authorities were satisfied with the result of the ex- 
amination and accepted their allegiance. The general court ordered 
the colonial treasurer to give each of the Indians a coat of red cloth, 
— two yards of material in each, and a potful of wine. The Indians 
presented the members of the court with twenty-six fathom of 
wampum. 

— Records of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Boston, 1853, volume 
II, pages 55 and 56. 



[38] 

the territory which included the land six miles to the 
south of the English village, which was at the pre- 
sent centre of North Andover village, easterly to the 
then Rowley, now Boxford line, and northward to the 
Merrimack River. No deed confirming this transfer 
was given, as far as known, and the transaction was 
oral and made in the presence of the general court, at 
Boston, May 6, 1646.' 

The consideration of six pounds was paid, it is said, 
by Mr. Woodbridge and Edmund Faulkner. As 
part of the consideration there was also given to the 
sagamore a coat and a provision made that Roger, 
the Indian, and " his company " have liberty to take 
alewives in Cochickawick River for their own con- 
sumption, but that the last privilege should cease if 
the Indians spoiled or stole any corn or other fruit 
belonging to the English inhabitants of any consider- 
able value. Further, it was agreed that Roger should 
continue to enjoy the four acres of ground where he 
then planted. 

• Rev. John Woodbridge closed his pastoral relations with Andover 
in 1 647, and went to England, where he became chaplain of the court 
of commissioners which tried, convicted and executed King Charles I, 
in 1649. Mr. Woodbridge was subsequently settled in a parish in 
Andover, in Hampshire, England. He returned to America in 1663, 
and became assistant to his uncle. Rev. Mr. Parker, at Newbury. 
He died March 17, 1695, at the age of eighty-two. As a Harvard 
graduate. President Dunster called him the "most honorable of his 
class"; Cotton Mather named him: "Leader of the Whole Company, 
A Star of the first magnitude" ; and Doctor Calamy said, '• He was a 
great man every way, the lasting glory, as well as the First Fruits of 
that Academy." 

On that day, Cutshamache was allowed by the general court the 
privilege of buying two or three pounds of swan shot. — Records 
of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Boston, 1853, volume 11, page 148. 



[39 1 

The record of this release is as follows : — 

At a Gene''al Co'^te, at Boston, the 6^^ 3*'' m° 1646, 
Cutshamache, sagomore of y^ Massachusets came into y^ 
Co^'te, & acknowledged y* for y^ sume of 6' & a coate, w*^** 
he had already received, hee had sould to M^ John Wood- 
bridge, in behalfe of y^ inhabitants of Cochichawick, now 
called Andiver, all his right, interest, & priviledge in y« 
land 6 miles southward fro™ y^ towne, two miles eastward 
to Rowley bounds, be y^ same more or lesse, northward to 
Merrimack Ryver, pvided y' y^ Indian called Roger & his 
company may have lib'^ty to take alewifes in Cochichawick 
River, for their owne eating ; but if they eith'' spoyle or steale 
any corne or oth'' fruite, to any considerable value, of y^ in- 
habitantes there, this lib^'ty of taking fish shall forever cease ; 
& y^ said Roger is still to enioy foure acres of ground 
where now he plants. This purchase y^ Co'^te alowes of, Sc 
have granted y^ said land to belong to y^ said plantation for 
ev'', to be ord^'ed & disposed of by them, reserving liberty 
to y^ Co''te to lay two miles square of their southerly bounds 
to any towne or village y* hereafter may be erected there- 
abouts, if so they see cause. Cutshamache acknowledged 
this before y^ magistrates, & so y^ Coi'te appveth thereof, 
& of the rest in this bill to be recorded, so as it piudice 
no former graunt.' 

The name of Roger is perpetuated in Roger's 
Brook, and in Roger's Roclc^ until a generation 
ago, when the latter well-known landmark was re- 
moved. 

At the period when this transaction occurred ale- 
wives swam in the streams here in large numbers, but 

' Records of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Boston, 1853, volume 
II, page 159. 

* Roger's Rock was near the present site of the South Congrega- 
tional meeting house. 



[4o] 

were of the less desirable variety of fish, being sim- 
ilar to herring. 

Whether the provision that the Indians should 
abstain from spoiling or stealing corn or other fruit 
to " any considerable value " indicates that it was as- 
sumed that the planting ground of the white man 
should be free to them on necessary occasions to a 
limited extent is an open question. If it had been a 
concession to the Indians when they were in great 
need of food, the spoiling of the corn would not 
probably have been mentioned. Further, if this were 
true, the imperfect ears, or otherwise second quality 
of the corn or fruit, as in the case of the fish, would 
have been allowed to the Indians. It seems rather a 
recognition of the mischievous, careless, and thieving 
propensity of the red men. This is not to be charged 
against them too severely, however, for rights of pro- 
perty, especially of natural products, was not a part 
of the curriculum of their early training. 



NEWBURY DEEDS 

The earliest deed given by the Indians of land in 
the town of Newbury was that of Great Tom, as he 
was called, under date of April i6, 1650. The prem- 
ises conveyed consisted of thirty acres of planting 
land near Indian Hill. The consideration paid for 
the land was three pounds, and the conveyance was 
made to William Gerrish, Abraham Toppan, and An- 
thony Somerby in behalf of the town. Major Ben: 
Perley Poore, who lived at Indian Hill, possessed this 
ancient deed, and when at work on the history of the 
Poore family, took it to Washington, where he ex- 
pected to complete his work. He died there soon after, 
in 1887. His family instituted a search for his manu- 
scripts and learned that the persons having custody 
of his effects had destroyed his papers, considering 
them of no particular value. The following transcript 
of this deed was taken from a contemporary copy 
made from the original by Anthony Somerby, one of 
the grantees and clerk of the town : — 

Witness by these presents that I, Great Tom, Indian, for 
and in consideration of three pounds in hand paid by and 
received of the townsmen of Newbury, have given, granted, 
covenanted, and fully bargained, and for and by these pre- 
sents do give, grant, convey confirme, bargain, and sell all 
that my thirty acres of planting land as it is fenced in one 
entire fence in Newbury, lying neere Indian hill, with all my 
right, title, and interest in all the woods, commons, and 
lands that I have in the township of Newbury to have and 

[41 ] 



[4^] 

to hold, all the said premises Respectively to bee to the 
proper use and behoof of the said inhabitants of the Said 
Towne of Newbury, their heirs, executors, administrators, 
and assignes for ever, and I, the said Great Tom, Indian, 
doe hereby engage and bind myself, mine heirs, executors, 
and assignes unto Mr. William Gerish, Abraham Toppan, 
and Anthony Somerby, being Townsmen in the behalf of 
Said Towne, to warrantize the said Bargained premises to 
the said Towne and for ever defend. 

In witness whereof I the said Great Tom, Indian, have 
sett my hand and seale April i6, 1650. 

Witness 
John bartlet, the mark X of Great Tom, Indian. 
William titcomb. 

Of these persons who received the title for the 
town, Captain William Gerrish came from Bristol, 
England, to Newbury about 1640, and at the time 
of this transaction with the Indians was about thirty- 
three years of age. A month afterward he was elected 
one of the deputies to the general court and was re- 
elected in 1 65 1, 1652, 1653, and 1673. Abraham Top- 
pan was a cooper by trade, and had come to Newbury 
in 1637. At the time that he appeared as a party to 
this deed, he was about forty-two years old, and was 
somewhat prominent in the affairs of the town. An- 
thony Somerby was a schoolmaster and the town 
cleric at that time. He was about forty years of age, 
and had come from Little Bytham, Lincolnshire, 
England, in 1639. 

Of the witnesses to the deed, John Bartlet was of 
middle age, and lived in Newbury, holding some 
minor town offices. William Titcomb was about forty 
years of age at the time he witnessed the deed. He 



Deed from Job and Mary to Henry Sewall, of Indian field, 
in Newbury, dated May 14, 1681. Reproduced same size as 
the original, which is in the possession of the Ould Newbury 
Historical Society. 




I'^u.ym l^ifl-e.^'Ti- J^{il7t4^ ^ pntir /'art i 
Hc-nrf^ S&uJ<tJi i>&^rc ■j,,^ fe^ij^^ 9^ 3.vm, 



fzC<x/r 



^£> 4^-ti«jt^ 









gi^o \daJl iC^y jj^tl Ip^Lre Lcrto^ar y^i^rrC »!| 



i>«.rz.v Y\Aj^i^ y^«^A^ 14^ jiL. ^xjt^ iAA:^-rcA*-^ <~:- r ^•'<- 




• 



^ 



v 



'4i ^ <-' ' '^' VAST c^ef :^^ ^r%'a^, ^r^.^\ 







''fH ^fU^^di^&n OTte &u^yt^ ^^i^^ o^cre<^\Mh 







[43 ] 

was prominent in Newbury, which he represented in 
the general court in 1655 and 1656. 

Other than in this deed there is no reference to 
Great Tom in existing records. 

The next deed executed by an Indian of lands in 
Newbury is that of Job, H agar, and Mary, Job being 
apparently a grandchild and Hagar and Mary daugh- 
ters of Old Will, who had formerly lived at New- 
bury Falls, now within the limits of Byfield Parish, 
and at the time of drawing the deed was deceased. 
The premises described in the instrument consisted of 
about one hundred and sixty acres of land, called " ye 
Indian field," and all their other land in Newbury. 
The consideration of the conveyance was six pounds, 
thirteen shillings, and fourpence; the grantee was 
Henry Sewall; and the date of the deed was May 14, 
1 68 1. Henry Sewall lived in Newbury, having emi- 
grated with his father from Coventry, England, in 
1634. He was about fifty-five years old at the time 
this deed was executed. He was a prominent and 
influential man in Newbury, being representative to 
the general court in 1661, 1662, 1663, 1666, 1668, 
and 1670. He was father of the distinguished 
Chief-Justice Samuel Sewall of Boston, who was 
connected with the witchcraft trials at Salem in 
1692. 

The original deed is written on paper, and meas- 
ures about nine inches in length and seven in breadth. 
The original document is in existence, and deposited 
with the Ould Newbury Historical Society, at its 
rooms in Newburyport. There is no known record of 
it, and an exact reproduction of it is given herewith. 



[44] 

The following is a copy taken from the original 
instrument : — 

To all People to whom this prefent Deed of Sale shall 
come : Job Indian, Grandchild, Hagar Indian &i Mary Indian 
Daughter to Old Will Indian late of Newbury Falls deceafed 
To Mr. Henry Sewall of Newbury in y« Mafsachufets Col- 
ony in New-England Send Greeting &c. Now Know ye 
that the f"^ Job, Hagar & Mary — Indians for good caufes them 
thereunto moving, and efpecially in Confideration of Six 
Pounds thirteen Shillings & four Pence a piece in Hand paid 
to each of them by f'i Henry Sewall before ye Sealing & 
Delivery of thefe Prefents, with which Sumes they acknow- 
ledg themfelves fully Satiffyed & Paid Have Given Granted 
Bargained Sold and ye f^ Job, Hagar, & Mary doe by thefe 
Prefents fully and abfolutely Give Bargain Sell Aliene, En- 
feoff & Confirm unto ye fd Henry Sewall one parcell of Land 
lying in Newbury abouefaid Buttelled and Bounded as fol- 
loweth viz. on y'^ Northerly Side with y^ great Brook run- 
ning along y^ High-Field, on y^ Westerly side with a Line 
runne from ye head of sd Sewall's Farm to y^ Uper Falls 
at or near Andover Road, and on the Southerly Side with 
Newbury Riuer ; being comonly called y^ Indian Field, con- 
taining by Eftimation one hundred & Sixty Acres be it more or 
Lefs, together with all their Land in Newbury Bounds though 
without ye fd Lines, with Rivers, Brooks & Springs of Water, 
Trees & Herbage To Have and to Hold ye fd parcell of 
Land with all Priviledges & Apurtenances thereto belonging 
unto faid Henry Sewall his Heirs & Afsigns for Ever. More- 
over ye {'^ Job, Hagar and Mary acknowledg themfelves to 
have lawfull authority to Convey sd Lands, and y* no other 
Indians Can lay any rightfull Claim to them ; and they oblige 
themfelves Heirs Sc Afsigns to give up all their Writings & Ev- 
idences concerning it into y^ Hands of fd Sewall his Heir & 
Afsigns and that they will give hereafter more ample Afsur- 
ance of y^ Premlfes to fd Sewall &c. He requiring y^ Same, 



[45] 

by Deed or other legal way : In Witnefs whereof the fd Job, 
Hagar ; & Mary Indians have Set to their Hands & Seals this 
fourteenth day of May one thoufand fix hundred Eighty & one 

Job Indian -r [seal] Mary /y^ [seal] 

his Mark X Indian's mark 

Why Hagar did not sign this deed is unknown. 

The deed of the territory of the town of Newbury 
was executed by Samuel English, son of Sarah, and 
grandson of Masconomet, the sagamore of Agawam. 
The identity of Samuel English was proved by the 
oaths of Joseph Foster of Billerica and Moses Parker 
of Chelmsford January lo, 1700-01, when they ap- 
peared before Daniel Peirce and Thomas Noyes, both 
of Newbury, justices of the peace and of the quorum.' 
These justices were prominent men. Captain Peirce 
was born in Newbury May 15, 1642, being son of 

• «' The Depofition of Joseph fFoster Testifieth & saith that he did 
know Sarah y^ Daughter of Mafchanominet the Sagamore of Aga- 
wam & further that Samuel English was reputed to be her Eldest 
Sonne now Suruiuing Joseph fFoster appeared y® Tenth Day of 
January i 700 & made Oath to y^ Truth of y^ above written Tes- 
timony before vs: 

" Daniel Peirce ] Juftices of 



Thomas Noyes j ^« peace " 

*' The Depofition of Mofes Parker Testifieth & Saith that he very 
well knoweth that Samuel English is y^ reputed Son of Sarah the 
Daughter of y« Sagamore Mafchanominet & Eldest Son now Suruiuing. 

"Mofes Parker appeared the Tenth Day of January 1 700/1 & 
made Oath to y^ Truth of y^ aboue written Testimony before vs. 

Tk D r Juftices of 

Daniel Peirce \ -^ -^ . -^ 

f peace 



Thomas Noyes (^ ^^^^^^ ^,^^^, 
Essex Registry of Deeds, book 14, leaf 67. 



[46] 

Daniel Peirce, a blacksmith, who came from London, 
England, about 1637. Captain Peirce was fifty-eight 
years of age at this time. He had represented the 
town of Newbury in the general court in 1682, 1683, 
and 1692. Colonel Noyes was a son of Rev. James 
Noyes, and was born in Newbury August 10, 1648, 
being at the time these affidavits were made fifty- 
two years old. He represented the town in the general 
court in 1692 (with Captain Peirce), 1693, ^^94-y 1696, 
1698 and 1699. 

The grantees of this deed were Cutting Noyes, 
Joseph Knight, Richard Dole, John Worth, and Jo- 
seph Pike, the selectmen of Newbury "in the behalfe 
& for y^ vfe & propriety of Said Towne of New- 
bury." The consideration paid was ten pounds in cur- 
rent money. Of these selectmen, Cutting Noyes was 
a son of Nicholas Noyes, and was born in Newbury 
September 23, 1649, being at this time fifty-one years 
of age. Deacon Noyes was a prominent man in the 
town and church. Joseph Knight was a son of John 
Knight, Jr., and was born in Newbury June 2 t , 1652, 
being therefore forty-eight years old. He lived in Old 
Town, and apparently led a quiet farmer's life. Richard 
Dole was a son of Richard Dole, a native of Bristol, 
England, and was born in Newbury September 6, 
1650, being at the time this deed was executed fifty 
years of age. He also led a quiet life. John Worth 
was a son of Lionel Worth, and was born in New- 
bury September 18, 1664, being at this time thirty- 
six years old. Joseph Pike was a son of Joseph Pike, 
and was born in Newbury April 17, 1674, being the 
youngest member of the board of selectmen, and 
only twenty-six years of age. 



[47] 

The deed is dated January lo, 1700-01; was ac- 
knowledged on the same day; and recorded, three 
days later, in the Essex Registry of Deeds, book 14, 
leaf 67. The following copy of this deed is taken 
from this record: — 

To all people to whome thefe p'^sents Shall come Samuel 
English Grandfon and hier of Mafconomet the Sagamore of 
Agawam an Indian in y^ province of y^ Mafsachufets in New 
England Sendeth Greeting Know yee that y^ Said Samuel Eng- 
lish good & Sufficient Reafons & confideracons mouing him 
Therevnto but Especialy for & in Confideracon of y« full & 
Just Summe of Ten pounds in Currant money of New Eng- 
land truly paid vnto me by Cutting Noyes Joseph Knight 
Richard Dole John Worth & Joseph Pike Select men of y« 
Towne of Newbury in y^ Countey of Efsex in the Mafsa- 
chufets Bay in New England in y^ behalfe of Said Towne 
of Newbury wherewith I The Said Samuel English doe hereby 
acknowledge my Selfe fully Satisfied paid & Content for Euer 
Haue giuen granted bargained & Sold & doe by thefe prefents 
for me my hiers Executo'^ adminiflirators & afsigns for Euer 
giue grant bargaine Sell & Confirm vnto y^ abouesd Select 
men in the behalfe & for y'= vfe & propriety of Said Towne 
of Newbury and Thier hiers for Euer a Tract of land Con- 
taining Ten Thoufand acres be it more or lefs lying within y^ 
Towneship of Said Newbury & Containeth the whole Towne- 
ship of s'* Towne & is abutted and bounded Eafterly by y*' 
Sea northerly & northwesterly by Merrimack riuer westerly 
by Bradford Line & Southerly by Rowley Line together with 
all y^ wood Timber lands grounds Soyles Waters Streames 
Riuers Ponds fishings huntings stones mines mineralls heredita- 
ments & all The appurtenances belonging to y^ Same & Euery 
part thereof within Said Towneship To Haue & To Hold 
to Them y= Said Cutting Noyes Joseph Knight Richard Dole 
John Worth Joseph Pike Select men in y« name & behalfe 
& for y^ vfe benefit & behoofe of s<^ Towne of Newbury & 



[48] 

Thier hiers Executors adm^s and afsigns in peaceable & quiet 
pofsefsion for Euer freely and Cleerly acquitted releafed & dis- 
charged of all & from all manner of Claims & demands what- 
soeuer and further I y^ Said Samuel English doe hereby Coue- 
nant promife & grant to & with y^ Said Select men in the 
behalfe of s'^ Towne that at and vntill y^ Enfealing & deliuery 
of thefe psents I had good right full power & lawfull author- 
ity to grant & Convey y^ abouesaid premifes with y^ apurte- 
nances and Every part Thereof as aforesaid it defcending to 
me from Mafchanomett Sagamore as aforesaid & I y^ Said 
Samuel English shall & will for Euer hereafter fully & freely 
releafe & relinquish my whole right & Title therevnto & 
Euery part thereof hereby binding my Selfe hiers Executors 
adm^* for Euer to defend y^ Said Select men and The Towne 
of s'^ Newbury in their pofsefsion of all the aboue granted & 
Specified premifes & thier hiers for Euer from y^ Lawfull 
Claimes of all manner of perfons whatsoeuer in any manner 
of wife In Witnefe whereof I The Said Samuel English 
haue herevnto Set my hand & Scale This Tenth Day of 
Jan'y Seuenteen hundred alias Seuenteen hundred & one & 
in the Twelfth yeare of y^ Reign of our Soueraign Lord 
William y^ third King ouer England &c. 

Signed Sealed & Deliuered 

in p^'sence of vs Signum 

Joseph ffoster Sen" Sam'-'- ^"^^ English & Seale 

Moses Parker 

Jon* ffairebank. 

Samuel English y^ Suruiuing hier of y^ Mafconomet y* 
Sagamore of Agawam appeared before vs y^ Subfcribers y* 
Tenth day of January in the Twelfth yeare of his Maj*'«^^ 
Reign Annoq Domini 1 700/1 Si acknowledged This aboue 
written Instrument to be his act & deed before vs. 

Daniel Peirce 1 Juft'ices of 
Thomas Noyes / j« peace 



THE CONVEYANCE OF NAHANT 

PoQUANUM, sachem of Nahant, had a complexion 
much darker than the other Indians of that locality, 
and for that reason was called Black Will. He was 
also known as Duke William. In or before the year 
1632, he conveyed the peninsula of Nahant, for a suit 
of clothes, to Thomas Dexter, who lived near the 
ironworks on Saugus River. He was known as Farmer 
Dexter. There is no record of any deed in confirma- 
tion of this sale, and most that is known about it is 
contained in the affidavits on file in the office of the 
clerk of courts, at Salem, in a suit at law brought by 
Mr. Dexter against the town of Lynn for trespass in 
feeding cattle and building houses on Nahant. This 
was in the year 1657.' 

* Christopher Lindsey deposed as follows : — 

•♦ This I Chriftopher Linfie doeteftifie that Thomas Dexter bought 
Nahant of Blacke will or duke william & Imployed me to fence pte of 
itt when I liued w^ Thomas Dexter 

" This is A coppie of an oath taken before me fFra: Johnfon 
Comiflione' 15''^: 2™°: 1657 

"memorand: Lindfy denyed in court that he was euer prefent at 
any bargaine &c." 

William Winter deposed as follows: — 

*'The teftimonie of william winter Aged 73 years or theirabouts, 
Teftifieth that Black will or duke william foe Called came to my houfe 
^^h ;yas two or three miles from Nahant) when Thomas Dexter 
had bought Nahant of him for a futt of Cloths, the faid Black will 
Afked me what I would giue him for the Land my houfe ftood vppon, 
itt beinge his Land, and his fFathers wigwame ftood their abouts, James 
Sogomore & John, & the Sogomo'' of Agawame & diuers more, And 
George Sogomer beinge a youth was p^fent all of them acknowlidginge 

[49] 



[ 5°] 

Poquanum was always friendly to the English, and 
his end was sad as well as tragical. He was found at 
Richmond's Isle, near Portland, Maine, by a party 
who were in search of pirates, and they charged him 
with the murder of Walter Bagnall, who had been 
killed by Indians a year or two before. He was un- 
doubtedly guiltless of the crime, but one Indian was 
the same as any other Indian, and he was hanged. 
He had several children, — Ahawayet, who married 
Wenepoykin, Queakussen, who was also called Captain 
Tom, or Thomas Poquanum, and lived at Wamesit,* 
near Pawtucket Falls, and a daughter who married 
Sagamore George. 

Black will to be the Right owner of the Land my houfe ftood one & 
Sogomor hill & Nahant was all his and further faith not 

"This is A Coppie of an oath taken before me fFra: Johnfon 
Comiffioner 15^^ 2»o 1657" 

— Salem garter ly Court Files, book 3, leaf I 18, 

' See his deposition on pages 8 and 9. 



Deed from Joane Quanapohkownat and others to Capt. 
Samuel Ward and another, trustees for the proprietors of the 
town of Marblehead, of the territory of Marblehead, dated 
July I 8, 1684. Reproduced about one-fourth of the siz,e of 
the original, which is on parchment and framed and hung on 
one of the walls in the office of the town cleric, in Abbot 
Hall, Marblehead. 







*^ 



r-- ft,,,.-..,,.. 





^^>i:i„J^,^-i; 



foi'.ttiRci^',', 



;^,.„^^, 



aiu- . o.^,..-^J„ ,hc ,.j, ,.„: , ,^, . , , 






' '**J*w«W*<«f»**»««»*»t'" . 



.fort**-,),-; (rr.-/rir;</S?^, ./iwft//,^]', C„rrty ,,,, 



Jtl i. 



':'\h-^i- 












.-«/;;.—.■.,.;» ,^',- .-r: 



Ti^^vrjir^-^ 




C 



THE DEED OF MARBLEHEAD 

In the Indian court held at Natick August 15, 1672, 
Ahawton, of Punkapog,' aged about seventy, the 
native ruler of that town of praying Indians, and an 
old and faithful friend of the English, stated under 
oath that he knew that George with No Nose was 
sagamore of the Marblehead territory, and as such, 
according to the ancient custom of the Indians, he was 
the chief proprietor ; and James Quanapohkowmet was 
a near kinsman to George with No Nose and inter- 
ested in that territory. On the same day, in the same 
court, George with No Nose and his kinswoman, Jone 
Quanapokwait, appeared and agreed and declared that 
all the right of the Sagamore to the territory should 
belong to James to dispose of, and George with No 
Nose agreed to join with James in a deed of it, pro- 
viding he had one half of the consideration. 

June 10, 1681, Wayband and Piam Bowhow, Ind- 
ians, each aged about seventy-seven, appeared before 
Daniel Gookin, Sr., an assistant, and under oath nar- 
rated the events stated in the preceding paragraph.^ 

" Stoughton, Massachusetts. 

» "Old Ahaton of Punkapog aged about Seaventy years affirmeth 
apon his oath y^ he Knows y* George Saggamore w^b no nose was 
Saggamore of y^ place, where marblehead is seated, & according to y^ 
old Indians Custome he y^ s^ George Saggamore was cheife proprietor 
of those lands att marblehead, yet moreover he knows y* James Quana- 
pohkowat is neer Kinsman to y^ s<^ Saggamore & is also interested in 
those lands Sworn in y^ Court att natick y^ 15: 6*^ mo: 1672 
attested by Dan" Gookin affistt: 

*• Wayband aged Seaventy Seaven years & Piam Bowhow aged 

[ 5' ] 



[ 5^] 

Later, James and some other Indians made a claim 
to the territory of Marblehead ; and a meeting of the 
commoners and proprietors of the town was held July 
14, 1684, to consider the matter. It was agreed that 
a committee be appointed to investigate the claim. 
This committee consisted of Moses Maverick, John 
Devereaux, Captain Samuel Ward, Thaddeus Riddan, 
William Beal, Thomas Pitman, Richard Read, and 
Nathaniel Walton, together with the selectmen of the 
town. It was also voted that, in case the committee 
reported that any part of the claim was valid. Captain 
Ward and Mr. Devereaux be authorized to settle with 
the Indians and obtain a deed from them. At the same 
meeting it was also voted that whatever was paid to 
the Indians for their deed and the necessary expenses of 
the service of the committee would be repaid to them.* 

about Seaventy Seaven years doe apon y' oathes affirme to y^ truth 
of y^ above written testimonie y^ lo^b of June 1681 before DanU 
Gookin s^ Assistant 

*' Georg. Sagamore w^^ no nose appeared in y^ Court held at 
Natick among the Indians y« l^^^ of 6 month 1672 & also there ap- 
peared Jone Quanopokowait Kinsman to y^ s^ George they both agreed 
& declared in open Court y* all y« right of George Saggamore in the 
Lands of Marblehead of Antient tyme, George he Consents y*^ : 
James shall have it, dispose of it & he will joyne w*^^ him, to make y^ 
deed for it apon Condition y* Georg Saggamore is to reseeve one 
moiety of y^ paye & y^ : other Contraly to reseeve y^ other half Don 
in Court att Natick y* 15 of august 1672 

" as Attest Dan^^- Gookin 

"These are Copies taken out of y*^ Courts records att Natick this 
19: of June 1684 as Attest: 

"Daniell Gookin s^ Assistant^'' 
— Essex Registry of Deeds, book 7, leaf 8. 

' "Julie 14th 1684 
*' Att a metting of the Comoners and proprietors legally warned 



[53 ] 

Apparently, James convinced the committee that 
he had a claim, as Messrs. Ward and Devereaux paid 
him and his associates fourteen pounds and thirteen 
shillings for the release of their title to the territory. 

Of this committee, Moses Maverick was a mer- 
chant, and lived in Marblehead as early as 1637. John 
Devereaux was a fisherman, and with Mr. Maverick, 
was of the first board of selectmen, in 1648. Captain 
Ward was a vintner and cooper, and had lived there 
for a score of years at least. Thaddeus Riddan was a 
merchant, having moved from Lynn to Marblehead 
ten years or more previously. William Beal had lived 
there as long as Mr. Riddan. Thomas Pitman was 
of Marblehead when it became a town, in 1648. 
Richard Read was a fisherman, and well along in 
years ; and Nathaniel Walton was son of Rev. William 
Walton, the pastor of the church for many years, who 
had died sixteen years before this transaction. 

The Indians who became parties to the deed were 

upon ocation of Jaems the Indeon and sume other Indeons pretending 
a title and Claime to the township of marblhed: 

" it is votted and agread to by generall consent that M^ Mosis 
Maverick m'' John Dev^erix Capt Sam^l Ward m^ Thedeous Riddan 
William Beall Thomas Pittman Richard Read and Nathanill Waltown 
be Joyned as a Comittee with the present Select men of the Town 
to mack Inquierie into the saied afaiere and sarch after the pretended 
Claieme and truth of thear title and upon finding any Reallytie in such 
pretence doe authorieze and Impower Capt'^ Sam'^ Ward and mf John 
Deverix to compound and agre upon Resonabl Terms with the saied 
Indeons taking a ferme deed which may be vallued in law from them 
and macke Returne of the saeme Engaging to Reimburs to the aforesaid 
parsons what ever thay shall engage in the matter and defray all thear 
nesesarie expense about the same and stand to the agreement the afor- 
said parsons shall make in and about the saied afaiere." 

— Marblehead Town Records. 



[54] 

Joane Quanapohkownat, the widow of John Quana- 
pohkownat of Natick, James Quanapohkownat, called 
by the English James Rumney Marsh, Israel Quana- 
pohkownat, James' eldest son, Sarah Quanapohkow- 
nat, James* daughter, all of Natick, Joane Ahaway- 
etsquanie, widow of George, the sagamore, otherwise 
named Wenepawweekin, of Chelmsford, and their 
daughters Susannah and Sarah Wenepawweekin, David 
Nonoponowgo, John Tonotoughoquonug, grand- 
children of said Sagamore George. 

The committee agreed with the Indians quickly, as 
the town meeting was held July fourteenth and the 
deed was prepared and executed on the eighteenth. 
After the deed was drawn and signed, Joseph Quan- 
apohkownat, otherwise called by the English Joseph 
English, a grandson of John Quanapohkownat, de- 
ceased, mentioned in the deed, came in and signed an 
addition to the deed, in which he released his interest 
in the territory of Marblehead, acknowledging it with 
the others. 

The following is a copy of the deed transcribed 
from the original instrument, which hangs in a frame 
on one of the walls in the office of the town clerk in 
Abbot Hall, Marblehead, and is herewith reproduced. 
It is recorded in the Essex Registry of Deeds, book 7, 
page I. 

To all People to whome this present Deed of Sale fhall 
come Joane Quanapohkownat relict Widdow of Old John 
Quanapohkownat of Natick within the Colony of the Mas- 
sachusetts Bay in New England dec^ James Quanopohkow- 
nat als James Rumny Marsh and Israel Quanapohkownat 
eldest Sonne of the s^ James Sarah Quanapohkownat daugh- 
ter of the s^ James all of Natick, Joane Ahawayetsquaine 



The four kinds of impressions used upon the wax seals of 
the deed of Marblehead. Reproduced same size as the original. 



[ 55 ] 

relict Widdow of George Saggamore als Wenepawweekin 
late of Chelmsford in New England afforesaid deC^ Susan- 
nah and Sarah Wenepawweekin Daughters of the s*^ George 
Saggamore David Nonoponowgo John Tonotoughoquonug 
Grandchildren of s'^ George Saggamore deed Send greeting 
Know yee that the s*^ Jone Quanapohkownat James Quana- 
pohkownat Israel Quanapohekownat Jone Ahawayetsquaine 
Susannah and Sarah Wenepawweekin David Nonoponowgo 
John Tonotoughoquonug for and in consideration of the 
Summe of Sixteene pounds Currant money of New England 
to them in hand paid at and before the Ensealing and de- 
livery of thefe presents by Cap Samuel Ward and John 
Devorex of Marblehead within the afFores<^ Colony in New 
England Merchants as Trustees for the proprietors in and 
Purchasers of the Towneship of Marble head well and truely 
paid the receipt whereof they doe hereby acknowledge and 
themselves there w''' to be fFully satisfied and contented and 
thereof and of every part thereof doe hereby acquitt Exoner- 
ate and discharge the said Samuel Ward & John Deverex as 
Trustees abovesaid their heirs Executors and Adminis [trai- 
tors as also all the rest of the Purchasers and Proprietors of 
s^ Towneship of Marblehead and cache and every of them 
for ever by these presents have given graunted bargained 
Sold aliened Enfeoffed and confirmed and by thefe presents 
Doe ffully freely cleerly and absolutely give grant bargaine, 
Sell aliene Enfeoffe and confirme unto them the s'^ Samuel 
Ward and John Devorix as Trustees abovesaid and to their 
heirs and afsignes for ever to and for the Sole ufe benefitt 
and behoofe of the Proprietors in and Purchasers of the 
Towneship of Marblehead afforesaid All the said Town- 
shipp of Marblehead viz As well the Great Neck as the 
Land on Marblehead side being butted and bounded partly 
w*^^ the River and seas from a Certain place comonly called 
and knowne by the Name of Forrest River Bridge to a 
place called Beavour hrooke and partly by Land belonging to 
the Towne of Salem : or howsoever the s'^ Towneship or 



[ 56] 

any part or parcell thereof is butted and bounded or reputed 
to be bounded Together with all houfes Ediffices buildings 
Lands Yards orchards Gardens Meadows Marshes, ffeedings 
Grounds Rocks Stones beach fflatts pastures fFences Com- 
mons Comons of Pasture ; woods underwoods Swampes waters 
water courses damms ponds headwares ffishings ffowlings 
wayes Easements proffitts priviledges rights commodityes 
Emoluments Royaltyes Hereditaments and appurtenances 
whatsoever to the said Towneship of Marblehead and other 
the premifes belonging or in any wise appertaining or there- 
w'^'" now vfed occupied or enjoyed as part parcel or member 
thereof: and also all rents Arreareages of Rents Quitt 
Rents Rights and appurtenances whatsoever (nothing Ex- 
cepted or reserved) And also all Deeds writeings and evi- 
dences whatsoever touching and concerning the premifes or 
any part or parcel thereof To Have and to hold all the 
said Towneship of Marblehead viz as well the Great Neck as 
the Lands on Marblehead side butted and bounded as aboves^ 
with all other granted premises with their and every of their 
rights members and appurtenances and every part and par- 
cell thereof hearby granted bargained and Sold or ment men- 
tioned or intended to be hereby granted and Sold unto the 
s*^ Samuel Ward and John Devorex as Trustees abovesaid 
and to their heires and Afsignes forever to and for the Sole 
use benefitt and behoofe of the Proprietors in and Purchasers 
of the said Towneship of Marblehead: And the said J one 
Quanapohkownat James Quanapohkownat als James Rumny 
Marsh Israel Quanapohkownat Jone Ahawayetsquaine Su- 
sannah and Sarah Wenepawweekin David NonopSnowgo 
and John Tonotoughoquonug for themselves their heirs 
Executors & adm" joyntly Severally and respectively doe 
hereby covenant promise and graunt to and w*^'' the s'^ Sam- 
uell Ward and John Devorix as trustees aboves'^ & their heirs 
heirs and Afsignes on behalfe of the Proprietors and Pur- 
chasers of the said Towne of Marblehead in manner and 
forme following (that is to Say) that at the time of this pre- 









If 



U 



^^1 



^J 




^5 S ^^3^1 : 








Attestation of the witnesses to the deed of Marblehead, 
written on the reverse. Reproduced about same size as the 
original. 



[57] 

sent bargain and sale and untill the Ensealing and delivery 
of these presents they and their ancestors were the true sole 
and Lawfull owners of all the afforebargained premifes And 
were Lawfully Seized of and in the Same and every part 
thereof in their owne proper right : And have in themselves 
fFull power good right and Lawfull authority to grant Sell 
convey and Afsure the Same unto the said Samuel Ward and 
Jn° Devorex As trustees abovesaid their heires and Afsignes 
for the ufe abovesaid as a good perfect and absolute Estate 
of Inheritance, in ffee Simple without any manner of Con- 
dition revertion or Limmitation whatsoever fo as to alter 
change defeate or make void the Same. And that the s*^ Sam- 
uell Ward and John Devorix as Trustees abouesaid their 
heires and Afsignes for the use and benefit of the Proprietors 
and Purchasers of the afforef^ Towneship of Marblehead 
Shall and maye by force and vertue of thefe presents, from 
time to time and at all times forever hereafter Lawfully 
peaceably and quietly have hold use occupie possess and 
Enjoy the abovegranted premifes with their appurtenances 
and every part and parcell thereof free and cleere and cleerly 
acquitted and difcharged of and from all and all manner of 
former and other gifts grants bargaines Sales Leases Mort- 
gages Joyntures dowers Judgements Executions fForfeitures 
and of and from all other titles troubles charges and Incum- 
brances whatsoever had made committed done or Suffered to 
be done by the faid Jone Quanapohkownatt James Quana- 
pahkownat als James Rumney Marsh Israel Quanapohkownat 
Jone Ahawayetsqvaine, Susannah & Sarah Wenepawweekin 
David Nonopownowgo John Tonotoughoquonug or either or 
any of them their or either or any of their heirs or afsignes or 
by their or either or any of their ancestors att anytime or times 
before the Ensealing hereof. And farthur that the s^^ Jone 
Quanapohkownat James Quanapohkownat als James Rum- 
ney Marsh Israel Quanapohkownat Jone Athawayetsquaine 
Susannah and Sarah Wenepawweikin David Nonoponowgo 
John Tonotoughoquonug their heirs Executors and Aadminis- 



[58 ] 

traf^ joyntly and Severally Shall and will from time to time 
and at all times forever hereafter warrant and defend the above 
graunted premifses with their appurtenances and every part 
and parcel thereof unto the said Samuell Ward and John 
Devorix Trustees as aboves*^ and to their heires and Afsignes 
forever to and for the Sole use & benefitt of the proprie- 
tors and purchasers in and of the said Towneship of Marble- 
head against all and every person and persons whatsoever any 
wayes Lawfully claimed or demanding the Same or any part 
or parcell thereof And Laftly that the said Jone Quana- 
pohkownat James Quanopahkownatt als James Rumney 
Marsh Israel Quanapohkownat Jone Ahawayetsquaine Susan- 
nah and Sarah Wenepawweekin David Nonoponowgo John 
Tonotoughoquonug or either or any of them their or either 
or any of their heirs Exec" or Adm" Shall and will from 
time to time and at all times hereafter when thereunto re- 
quired at the cost and charges of the said Samuel Ward 
and John Devorex their heires or Afsignes or the purchasers 
and proprietors of the s'^ Towneship of Marblehead doe make 
acknowledge Execute and Suffer all and every Such ffarther 
act and acts thing and things afsurances and Conveyances 
in the Law whatsoever for the further, more better suerty 
and suremaking of the aboves^ Towneship of Marblehead 
with the rights, hereditaments and appurtenances above by 
thefe presents mentioned to be bargained Sold : unto the s<^ 
Samuel ward and John Devorix Trustees as abovef"^ and to 
their heires and afsignes for the use afforef'^ as by the s^ 
Samuel Ward and John Devorix Trustees as aboves'^ their 
heires or Afsignes or s^ Proprietors or by their Council 
Learned in the Law Shall be reafonably devifed advised or 
required. In Witnefse whereof the s*^ Joane Quanapohkow- 
natt als James Runnymarsh Israel Quanapohkownat Jone 
Ahawayetsquaine Susannah and Sarah Wenepawweekin 
David Nonoponowgo John Tonotoughoquonug have here- 
unto Sett their hands and Seales the Eighteenth day of July 
Anno Dom One Thousand Six hundred Eighty and ffoure 



r J 



9 



"^^^ 









t -Ki 



^ 









\1 



y: 



-J 



^ 'J")- '^ 






>> 



■^r 



- ^ -c^ 











40-^ t 









rife 



^^ 



-^ 



^ «>:. 



Release of Joseph Quanophkownatt of his interest in the 
territory of Marblehead, written on the reverse of the deed of 
Marblehead. Reproduced same size as the original. 



jarialdiEi/. 



[ 59] 

Annoq Regni Regis Caroli Secundi Angliae & tricefsimo 

Sexto 

the mark of James Quanophkownatt 
James [seal] 

Als James Rumny marsh 
the marke of 



7 



[seal] 
[seal] 

[seal] 
[seal] 

[seal] 

[seal] 

[seal] 
Signed Sealed and Delivered by Jone Quanophkonatt 
James Quanophkownatt als James Rumney marsh Jone Aha- 
wayetsquaine Susannah Wenepawweekin and Joseph Quan- 
ophkownatt in the presence of us after y^ Same was firft 
read : 

Henery Bartholmew Jun« 
George monck 
Eliezer Moody Serv* to 
John : Hayward Noty Public. 

Know all men by these presents that I Joseph Quan- 
ophkonatt als Joseph English Grandson of the within men- 



Jone f Quanophkownatt 
the marke of 

w/j; 

Jone Ahawayetsquaine 
the mark of 

Susannah Wenepawweekin 
the mark of 

X 

Sarah Wanapawequen 
his mark 

Israell \\ qvonapakanatt 



[60] 

tioned old John : doe give grant and confirm unto the within 
mentioned Truftees and their heires for ever for y« ufe within 
mentioned all my right title Intereft claime property and 
demand of in and to the Townefhip of Marblehead within 
named: as Witnefs my hand and Seale the daye and yeare 
Within written 

the marke of [seal] 



O 



Joseph Quanophkonatt 

als Joseph English. 

This Instrument was acknowledged by Jone Quanoph- 
kownatt James Quanophkownatt als James Rumney marfti 
Jone Ahawayetsquaine Susannah Wenepawweekin, and Jos- 
eph Quanophkownatt to be their acts and deeds this Eight- 
eenth day of July 1684 before 

S. Bradstreet Goun'' 

There are four different kinds of seals, impressions 
in wax, attached to the deed, and they are shown here- 
with. The interpretation of the designs is left to the 
individual reader. They were probably impressed by 
stamps in the possession of the scrivener and were 
not personal seals of any party to, or person con- 
nected with the execution of, the instrument. 

This deed was probably executed before the gov- 
ernor in Boston, as the committee charged for their 
time in Boston, and all the witnesses were residents 
of that town. Henry Bartholmew was son of Henry 
Bartholmew, a merchant of Salem, where Henry was 
born in 1657. At the time he witnessed this deed he 
was twenty-seven years of age. George Monck was a 
young man, about thirty years old, probably from 
Navestock, Essex, England, and a vintner at the Sign 
of the Blue Anchor. It was probably at his tavern 









-? i 






:i' 



t 



■^ f- ^^JEr SI. 



\ 




... ,.„ji-r*i;- iC/t: 



Acknowledgment of the deed of Marblehead, written on 
the reverse. Reproduced same size as the original. 



[6i ] 

that the committee and Indians were entertained while 
in Boston. Eliezer Moody was a young man, and, as 
he states after his signature, a servant of John Hay- 
ward, the notary. Mr. Hayward was under middle 
age and a scrivener, and the beautiful penmanship 
displayed in this deed is undoubtedly from his quill. 
Governor Simon Bradstreet, before whom the sev- 
eral Indians appeared, was at this time over eighty 
years of age. He was one of the substantial and able 
supporters of the colony. He was a native of Hor- 
bling, Lincolnshire, England. His father, a non-con- 
forming minister, died when Simon was fourteen, and 
the boy then spent a year in study at Emmanuel 
College. He subsequently resided as a steward in 
the family of the Earl of Lincoln, and later with 
the Countess of Warwick. His first wife was Anne, 
daughter of Governor Thomas Dudley, and noted as 
the first American poetess. She had died, and he was 
living in Salem with his second wife Anne, widow of 
Captain Joseph Gardner, and sister of Sir George 
Downing. He was the first secretary of the colony. 
He held that office thirteen years, and was an assist- 
ant forty-eight years, deputy-governor five years and 
had been governor for five years. In 1661, with Mr. 
Norton, he was sent by the colony to England to 
congratulate Charles II on the restoration and to 
secure their charter privileges, in which purposes they 
were successful. He was puritanic in his religion, and 
persecuted the Quakers so severely that Bishop, in 
his "New England Judged by the Spirit of the Lord," 
called him "a man hardened in blood and a cruel 
persecutor." He was a just magistrate, judged by his 
times, possessing prudence, sound judgment, and 



[62] 

strict integrity. Believing fully in his mission, he 
sought usefulness rather than popularity. 

Messrs. Ward and Devereaux made report of what 
had been done, and that the deed had been recorded, 
at a general meeting of the commoners and proprie- 
tors, probably August 6, 1684. The committee pre- 
sented the following bill of the cost and expense 
connected with the securing of the release : — 

August 6''" 1684. The Coraoners and proprietors of 
marblehead aere D"^ 
by Soe much paied the Indeons for the purchase 

of the Township as apears by a deede under 

thear hands 14 13 00 

by soe much expended at boston about the Indeons 

and for a ded of saell and other Charges 02 13 00 

by soe much for a Jornie to Salem to boston 

waietting 4 dayies and 2 daies at horn 02 00 00 

paied m'' John Deverox for time and expenc at 

boston about the Indians 01 18 06 

for Carieng the dede to Salem and expenc 00 00 00 

paied m"^ gerish for Recording the Indeon deede 00 10 09 

The whole sum was twenty-one pounds, fifteen 
shillings, and three pence. To raise this money, it was 
voted to assess it upon the commoners and proprie- 
tors, according to each man's proportion of the privi- 
lege in the township. It was reckoned and ascertained 
that the proportion was nine pence per cow and should 
be payable in money.' The committee appointed to 

' " Att a generall metting of the Comoners and proprietors of 
mablhed upon Report of Samll Ward and m'' John Deverix that ac- 
ording to the towns order thay have agred with the Indeons that laied 
Claiem to our township as will more partickularlie aper by a ded of saelle 
under ther hands and sealls 

'♦ the town for the defraieng the Charg of the above menrioned 



[63] 

ascertain the share were Samuel Cheever, Samuel 
Ward, Thomas Pitman, Nathaniel Walton, and the 
selectmen. 

premises have Impowred m"" Samuell Chevers Samuell ward Thomas 
Pittman and Nathanill Walltown to Joyn as a Comittee with The 
Select men to proportion each mans part acording to his privellidg 
in saied township and thay proportioning by Cows leases fiend it to 
amount to nien pence pf Cow in mony." 

— Marblehead Town Records, 



LYNN DEEDS 

The time of securing the deeds of the territory of 
Lynn from the Indians (1686) indicates that the de- 
mand of the crown for the return of the charters of 
the colonies was in the minds of the people. Though 
Governor Andros had no regard for the signature of 
an Indian, their deeds might embarrass him in the 
execution of his plans. The inhabitants of Lynn were 
careful to secure all means that they could to sub- 
stantiate their claim to the soil ; and therefore obtained 
a release from the Indians. This is suggested by the 
answer made by Rev. John Higginson to Governor 
Andros, in March, 1689, when the latter asked him 
if New England was the king's territory. Mr. Hig- 
ginson replied that it belonged to the colonists, be- 
cause they held it by just occupation and purchase 
from the Indians. 

The first of these deeds is a release of the territory 
lying partly in Lynn and partly in Boston, as the 
country was then divided, and bounded westerly by 
the land of the late Captain Thomas Brattle, north- 
erly by the hills next the Plough Plain, southerly by 
Saugus River, and easterly by land of John White and 
land in the tenure of Samuel Appleton. The deed 
was recorded October 9, 1686, in the Essex Registry 
of Deeds, book 7, leaf 88, and is as follows: — 

To all Christian People to whom this present deed of Sale 
Shall come James Rumney Marsh of Natick and Dauid Son 
& Right hier of Sagamore Sam : an Indian belonging to 
Wamefick in New England Send Greeting Know ye that 

[64] 



[65 ] 

y« Said James Rumney Marsh and Dauid Indians for a Val- 
uable Confideco" to them in hand att & before y^ Enfealing 
and deliuery of Thefe presents by Daniel Hutchin of Linn 
in New England aforesaid well & truly paid ye Receipt 
whereof they do hereby acknowledge and themselues there- 
with fully Satisfied and Contented and thereof & of Euery 
part thereof do acquit Exonarate and difcharge y^ Said 
Daniel Hutchin Sen'^ his hiers Executors administrato'^s and 
afsignes for Euer by thefe presents haue giuen granted Bar- 
gained Sold aliened Enfeoffed and Confirmed and by Thefe 
Psents Do fully freely Clearly & absolutely giue grant Bar- 
gain Sell alien Enfeoff and Confirm vnto him y^ Said Daniel 
Hutchin Sen"^ his hiers and afsignes for euer all that thier 
Tract or parcell of land Lying & being partly within y« 
Township of Linn and Partly within y^ Township of Bos- 
ton being butted and bounded on y^ West Westerly by y^ 
land of y^ late Cap* Thomas Brattle Deceafed north with 
y^ Hills bounding yt part Commonly Caled & knowne by y^ 
name of y^ Plough plain Running Vp to a marked Tree att 
y« Corner on y^ north or northEast Side and by y^ High 
Ledg of Rocks whereon Seuerall pitch pine Trees do Stand 
& from thence to Sawgust Riuer formerly caled Iron Works 
pond and on y^ Easterly End by y« land now in y^ Tenure 
and Occupation of Samuel Aplton and So ranging from Saw- 
gust Riuer to a Tree Marked with y^ Letter L and from 
thence bounded by Said Samuel Appltons Land according as 
y^ old fence Runns to y^ Logg bridge & by y^ land of John 
White from y« Said Logg bridge to y^ land of Said Brattle or 
howsoeuer the Same be Butted & bounded or Reputed to be 
Bounded together with all Rights Profits priuiledges Com- 
modityes Hereditaments & appurtenances whatsoeuer to y* 
Same belonging or in wayes appertaining To Haue & To Hold 
y« Said Tract or parcell of Land with all other y^ aboue 
granted premifes Being butted and bounded as aforesaid vnto 
y« Said Daniel Hutchin his hiers Executors Admin^ and 
afsignes and to y^ Only proper vse benefit and behoof of 



[66] 

y^ Said Daniel Hutchin his hiers and afsignes for euer and 
y* Said James Rumney Marsh and Dauid : Indians : do 
hereby Couenant promis and grant to & with ye Said Daniel 
Hutchin his hiers & afsignes yt they haue in Themselues full 
power good Right & lawfull authority to grant Sell Conuey 
and afsure y* Same unto y^ Said Daniel Hutchin his hiers 
and afsignes as a full firm perfect Sc abfolute Estate of 
Inheritance in fee Simple without any manner of Condicon 
Reuerfion or Limitation on whatsoeuer So as to alter change 
defeat or make Void y^ Same and that y* Said Daniel 
Hutchin his hiers and afsignes Shall & may by force & Vir- 
tue of thefe presents from time to time and att all times for 
Euer hereafter lawfully peaceably & quietly haue hold vfe 
Occupie pofsefs & Enjoy y^ Same and euery part thereof 
fFree and Clear and Clearly Discharged of and from all & all 
manner of former and other gifts grants bargains Sales Leafes 
Mortgages Joyntures Dowres Judgments Executions Entails 
forfietures and of and from all other Titles Troubles Charges 
& Encumbrances Whatsoeuer had made comitted done or 
Suffered to be Done by ym y^ Said James Rumney Marsh &c 
Dauid Indians or Either of Them thier or Either of thier hiers 
or afsigns att any Time or times befor y^ Enfealing hereof 
and further yt y^ Said James Rumney Marsh & Dauid Indians 
Thier hiers & afsignes Shall & will from time to time and att 
all times for Euer hereafter Warrant and defend y* aboue 
granted Pemifes with thier appurtenances & Euery part thereof 
vnto y^ Said Daniell Hutchin his hiers and afsignes against 
all & Euery person and Psons whatsoeuer any ways Lawfully 
Claiming or demanding y^ Same or any part thereof in witt- 
nefs whereof y« Said James Rumney Marsh & Dauid Indians 
haue hereunto Set thier hands and Sealls the Twenty Eights 
day of July ann° Dom : One Thousand Six hundred Eighty 
and Six Annoq. RR^ Jacobi Secundi Angliae &c. Secundo 
Signed Sealed & deliuered his 

in y« prefence of vs James : iames Rumney marsh 

marke & Seal! 



[67] 

John Hayward Not: Pub. his 

Zachariah Shute Serv* Dauid /J Indian 

marke & Seall 

James Rumnymarsh alias Quanupowit and Dauid Kunk- 
skawmushat acknowledged the within written Instr : to be 
thier act & deed : Daniel Hutchin being also prefent auerred 
that he was in y« actuall pofsefsion of the within mentioned 
parcell of Land July iS^^ 1686 P me Peter Bulkeley One 
of his Majesties Councill 

This is apparently a private grant of the territory 
described to Daniel Hutchin of Lynn, who was, at 
that time, about fifty-five years of age. 

Of the witnesses to this deed John Hayward was a 
resident of Boston, and a notary public and scrivener. 
It was probably he who drew this deed of release. 
Zachariah Shute was a servant, probably an appren- 
tice, of Mr. Hayward, learning to write legal papers, 
etc. 

Peter Bulkeley, before whom the deed was acknow- 
ledged by the Indians, was son of Rev. Edward Bulke- 
ley of Concord, and forty-five years of age at this time. 
He was captain and major in the militia, had been a 
representative from Concord, where he lived, from 
1673 to 1676, and was speaker the latter year. He 
was sent to England, as the agent of the colony, to 
defend against the claims of Gorges and Mason, in 
1679; ^"^ w^^ ^" assistant from 1677 to 1685. 

The other deed included the present city of Lynn 
and the towns of Saugus, Lynnfield, Nahant, Swamp- 
scott, and a portion of ancient Reading. The con- 
sideration for this deed was sixteen pounds in silver. 



[68 ] 

The deed purported to convey the territory to the 
selectmen of Lynn, who were Ralph King, William 
Bassett, Sr., Matthew Farrington, Sr., John Burrill, 
Sr., Robert Potter, Sr., Samuel Johnson, and Oliver 
Purchas, and to Mr. John Browne, Captain Jeremiah 
Swain, and Lieutenant William Harsey, trustees for 
Reading, for the benefit of the proprietors of those 
two towns. Ralph King was about forty-five years old 
at this time, and William Bassett about ten years older. 
Mr. Farrington was probably about seventy. Mr. 
Burrill, who was about forty-five, was a prominent 
man in Lynn affairs. Mr. Potter was in the seventies, 
and Samuel Johnson probably about forty. Oliver 
Purchas, who was about seventy years of age, was 
town clerk at the time this deed was given. He had 
represented the town of Lynn in the general court 
in 1660. Of the Reading men. Captain Browne, aged 
fifty-two, was a farmer, justice of the peace, select- 
man and representative. Major Jeremiah Swain, aged 
forty-three, was a physician, justice of the peace, repre- 
sentative, governor's assistant, etc. Lieutenant Harsey 
was also a man of note. 

This deed was recorded in Essex Registry of Deeds, 
book 18, leaf 150, June 28, 1704, seventeen years 
after its execution. The following is a copy of the deed 
as so recorded : — 

To all Christian people to whome this prefent deed of Con- 
firmacon Ratificacon & alienation Shall come Dauid Kunk- 
ftiamoofhaw who by Credible Intelligence is grandfon to old 
Sagamore George no nofe So called alias Wenepawweekine 
Sometime of Rumney Marish & Sometimes at or about 
Chelmsford of y^ Colloney of y^ Mafsachufets So called Some- 
times here & Sometimes there but deceafed y^ Said Dauid 



[69] 

Grandfon to y* Said old Sagamore George no nofe Deceafd 
and Abigail Kunkfhamoofhaw y^ wife of Dauid & Cicely 
alias Su-George y^ Reputed daughter of y« Said old Sagamore 
George & James Quonopohit of Natick alias Rumney Marsh 
and Mary his wife Send greeting &c. Know yee that the 
Said Dauid Kunkshamoofhaw & Abigail his wife & Cicely 
alias Su-George aforesd & James Quonopohit aforesaid with 
his wife Mary who are y^ neerest of Kin & legall Succefsors 
of y* aforesaid George Noe Nofe alias Wenepawweekin whom 
wee affirme was the true & Sole owner of y^ lands that y«= 
Townes of Lynn and Reading stand vpon & notwithstanding 
y* pofsefsion of y^ English dwelling in Thofe Towneships of 
Lynn & Reading aforesaid, wee y^ Said David Kunkshaw 
Moofhaw Cicely alas Su George James Quonopohit &c the 
rest aforesaid Indians doe Lay Claime to y^ lands that thefe 
Two Townes aforesaid Lynn & Reading Stand vpon and 
The dwellers thereof pofsefs that y^ right & Title thereto is 
ours & belongs to vs & Ours but howsoeuerThe Townships 
of Lyn & Reading hauing been Long pofsefsed by the English 
& although wee make Our Clayme & y^ Select men and 
Truftees for both Townes aforesaid pleading Title by Graunts 
of Courts & purchafe of old of our predecefsors George 
Sagamore & Such like matters &c Wee y^ Claymers afore- 
named viz Dauid Kunk Shamoofhaw & abigail his Squwaw 
Cicely alias Su-George the reputed daughter of old Sagamore 
George No Nofe and James Quonopohit & Mary his Sqwaw 
they being of the kindred & Claymers Confidering The argu- 
ments of y^ Select men in both Townes are not willing to 
make trouble to our Selues nor old neighbours in thofe Two 
Townes aforesaid aforesaid of Lynn & Reading &c wee there- 
fore the Clayming Indians aforesaid viz Dauid Kunkshamoo- 
fhaw & Abigail his wife & Cicely alias Su-George the reputed 
daughter of old Sagamore George alias Wenepawweekin & 
James Quonopohit & Mary his wife all & Every of vsas aforesaid 
& Jointly together for & in Confideracon fFor & in Confidera- 
con ofy^Summe of Sixteen poundesof Current Sterlingmoney 



[7o] 

of Siluer in hand paid to vs Indians Clayming viz David 
Kunkfhamoofhaw &c at or before y^ Enfealing & deliuery of 
thefe p'^sents by m"^ Ralph King William Bafsett Sen'' Mathew 
Farrington Sen'^John Burrell Sen"^ Robert Potter Sen"^ Samuel 
Johnfon & Olliuer purchas Select men in Lynn in y« Countey 
of Efsex in New England Trustees and prudentials ffor & in 
y« behalfe of y^ purchafers and novi^ proprietors of y^ Towne- 
ship of Lynn & Reading well and truly payd y« Receipt 
whereof y* viz Dauid Kunkfhamoofhaw Abigail his wife 
Cicely alias Su George y^ Reputed daughter of old Sagamore 
George And James Conopohit of Natick alias Rumney Marsh 
& Mary his wife doe hereby acknowledge Themfelues there- 
with to be fully Satisfied and Contented & thereof Sc of 
Every part thereof doe hereby acquit Exonerat and difcharge 
y« Said m^ Ralph King William Bafset Sen"" with all & Every 
of y^ Select men aforenamed Trustees and prudentials together 
with y^ purchafers and now proprietors of y^ Said Townships 
of Lyn & of Reading thier heirs Executors adminiftrators & 
afsigns for Euer by thefe prefents Haue Giuen graunted and 
bargained a full & a firme Confirmation & Ratification of all 
graunts of Courts and any former alienation made by our 
predecefsor or predecefsors & our own Right Title & Intrest 
Clayme & demand whatsoeuer and by thefe prefents doe fully 
freely Cleerly and abfolutely giue and grant a full & firm 
Confirmation & Ratification of all grants of Court & any Sort 
of alienation formerly made by our predecefsor or predecef- 
sors as alfoe all our owne Clayme of right title Intrest & 
demand vnto them y^ Said m"" Ralph King William Bafset & 
the rest Select men forenamed Trustees & prudentials for y^ 
Towne of Lyn & y^ Worshipfull m"" John Browne Cap* Jere- 
miah Sweyn & Leiv* William Harfey Truflees and pruden- 
tials for y^ Towne of Reading to thier hiers and afsignes For 
Euer To and for y« Sole vfe benefit & behoofe of y« pur- 
chafers and now proprietors of y^ Towneships of Lynn & Read- 
ing aforesaid & all y« Said Towneships of Lynn & Reading 
Joyning one to another Even from the Sea where y^ line 



[ 7- ] 

beginneth between Lyn & Marblehead & So between Lynn 
& Salem as it is Stated by thofe Townes & marked & So to 
Ipswich riuerand So from thence as it is stated betwixt Salem 
& Reading and as y^ Line is Stated & runne betwixt Wills 
hill and as it [is] stated & runne betwixt Reading & Andover 
and as it is Stated betwixt Oburne & Reading & as it is 
Stated Sc runne betwixt Charlestowne Maldin Lynn & Read- 
ing & vpon the Sea from y^ line that beginneth at Lynn & 
Marble [head] & Salem to diuide the Townes aforesaid So as 
well from thence to y^ Two Nahants viz the little Nahant 
& ye great Nahant as y^ Sea Compafseth it about round and 
Soe to y^ riuer called Lynn riuer & Rumney marish riuer or 
Creeke vnto y^ Line from Brides brooke to y^ Said Creeke 
anfwering y^ line that is Stated between Lynn & Boston from 
y^ Said bride brooke vp to Reading this Said Tract of land 
defcribed as aforesaid together with all houfes Edifices build- 
ings Lands yards Oarchards Gardens meadows marriflies 
fFeedings grounds rocks Stones Beach fflatts pastures Com- 
mons & Commons of pasture Woods vnderwoods Swamps 
Waters Watercourfes Damms ponds fishings ffowlings wayes 
Easements profits priuiledges rights Commodities Royalties 
Hereditaments and appurtenances whatsoeuer to y^ Said 
Townships of Lynn & Reading & other y^ premifes belonging 
or in any wife appertaining or by them now vfed Occupyd 
& Injoyed as part parcel or member thereof & alfoe all Rents 
arrearages of Rents quit rents rights & appurtenances what- 
soeuer nothing Excepted or referued & alfoe all deeds writ- 
ings & Evidences whatsoeuer touching y^ premifes or any 
part or parcell thereof. To Haue & To Hold all y^ Said 
Townships of Lynn & Reading as well the Two Na- 
hants aforesaid y^ little & y^ great Nahant as they are 
Encompafd by y^ Sea with thier Beaches from y^ great 
Nahant to y^ little & from the little Nahant homeward 
where Richard Hud now dwelleth & so to m"" Kings with all 
y^ aboue granted premifes with thier & Every of thier rights 
members and appurtenances & Every part & parcell thereof 



[7^] 

hereby giuen granted Confirmed Ratified vnto y« Said m' 
Ralph King William Bafsett & y^ rest Select men in behalfe 
of Lynn And y^ Worshipfull m'' John Browne & y^ rest 
aforenamed for Reading all Trustees & prudentials for y« 
Towneships of Lyn & Reading to them & thier hiers & afsignes 
For Euer to and for y^ Sole vfe benefit and behoofe of y^ 
purchafers and now proprietors of y^ Said Towneships of Lynn 
& Reading And they y^ Said Dauid Kunkshamooshaw&abi- 
gail his wife & Cicely alias Su George the reputed daughter 
of George no nofe Deceafed & James Quonopohit & Mary 
his wife Indians aforesaid for themfelues thier heirs Executors 
adminiftr'^ and afsignes Jointly Seuerally & respectiuely doc 
hereby Covenant promife & grant to & with y^ Said m"" 
King William Bafset Sen' and y« rest of Lynn & the Wor- 
shipfull m'' John Browne & y^ rest of Reading Trustees & 
prudentials for y^ Townes of Lynn & Reading as abouesaid 
thier hiers & afsignes & So the purchafers & now proprietors 
of y* Said Townships of Lyn & Reading &c In manner & 
forme following (that is to Say) that at y^ time of this Graunt 
Confirmacon & alienacon & vntill the Enfealing & deliuery of 
thefe presents thier Anceftor & Anceftors & they the afore- 
named Dauid & Abigail his now wife & Cicely alias Su George 
& y« rest aforenamed Indians Were the True Sole & Lawfull 
Owners of all y^ aforebargained confirmd & aliened pre- 
mifes & were Lawfully Seized off^ & in y« Same & Every part 
Thereof in thier owne propper right And haue in them- 
felues full power good right & Lawfull Authority to graunt 
aliene Confirm and afsure y^ Same as is afore defcribed in this 
deed vnto m^ Ralph King William Bafset Sen'' & y^ rest fore- 
named Selectmen of Lynn and y^ Worfhipfull m^ John 
Browne & y« rest aforenamd Agents for Reading all Trustees 
& prudentials for y^ Two Townships of Lyn & Reading to 
them thier hiers and afsignes for Ever for y^ vfe aforesaid 
viz the benefit & behoofe of y^ purchafers & now proprietors 
of y« Two Townships aforesaid as a good & perfect abfolute 
Estate of Inheritance in fee Simple without any manner of 



[73 ] 

Condition reuerfion or Limitation whatsoeuer So as to alter 
change or make voyd y^ Same And that y^ Said Trustees 
aforesaid and y^ purchafers & now proprietors of y^ Said 
Towneships of Lynn & Reading thier heirs & afsignes Shall & 
May by the vertue & force of thefe prefents from time to time 
& att all times for Euer hereafter Lawfully peaceably and 
quietly Haue Holdvfe Occupy pofsefs & Injoyy^aboue granted 
aliened & Confirmed premifes with y^ appurtenances & bene- 
fits Thereof & Every part & parcell thereof free & Cleer & 
Cleerly acquitted & difcharged ofF& from all & all manner of 
other gifts graunts bargaines Sales leafes Mortgages Joyntures 
Dowers Judgments Execucons fForfeitures & off & from all 
other Titles Troubles charges Incumbrances whatsoeuer had 
made Committed done or Suffered to be done by the Said 
Dauid & Abigail his wife Cicely alias Su George & y^ rest 
Indians forenamed them or any of them or any of thier hiers 
or afsignes or any of thier ancestors at any time or times 
And further that y^ Said Dauid Kunkfliamooftiaw & abigail 
his wife Su George James Quonopohit & Mary his wife &c 
their hiers Executors & adminiftrators &c Jointly & Seuerally 
will and shall by thefe prefents from time to time & at all times 
hereafter Warrant and defend thier foregraunted & Confirmed 
premifes with thier benefits & apurtenances & Every part 
& parcell thereof vnto the Said Trustees or prudentials fore- 
named for y^ Townships of Lyn & Reading & thier hiers 
& afsignes For Euer to & For The Sole vfe & benefit of y« 
purchafers & now proprietors In and off y^ Said Townships of 
Lynn & Reading against all & every perfon or perfons what- 
soeuer any waies Lawfully Clayming or demanding y* Same or 
any part or parcell thereof And Lastly that they y^ Said Dauid 
& Su George & James Quonopohit &c thier wiues or any of 
thier heirs Executors or adm^s Shall & will from time to time 
and at all times hereafter when therevnto required at y^ Cost 
& Charges of y^ aforesaid Trustees & prudentials thier hiers 
or afsignes or y^ purchafers & proprietors of y« Townships of 
Lynn & Reading &c doe make acknowledge Suffer all & 



[74] 

Every Such further act & acts thing and Things afsurances 
& Conveyances in y"^ Law whatsoeuer for y^ further more 
better Surety & sure making of y« abouesaid Townships of 
Lynn & Reading with y^ Rights hereditaments benefits & 
appurtenances aboue by thefe prefents mentioned to be bar- 
gained aliened Confirmed vnto y^ aforesaid Trustees & pru- 
den'" their hiers & afsignes For y^ vfe aforesaid as by the 
Said Truftees aforesaid thier hiers or afsignes or y^ Said pro- 
prietors or by thier Councill learned in y^ Law Shall be reafon- 
ably devifed advifed or required In Witnefs whereof y^ Said 
David Kunkshamooshaw & Abigail his wife & Cicely 
alias Su George & James Quonopohit & Mary his wife 
haue herevnto Set thier hands & Seales y^ day of y^ Date 
being y^ fourth day of September One thoufand Six hundred 
Eighty & Six Annoq Regni Regis Jacobus Secundi Angliae 
Send 

Signed Sealed & deliuered In 
y^ prefence of vs vndernamed 

y« Signe of 

Samuel Bligh David ^^4f Kunkshamooshaw 

» & his Scale 

Daniel Johnson y^ Signe of 




John Hawks Abigail ^Jlt^ Kunkshamooshaw 

Thomas Laughton Sen"* -y ^ Scale 

y^ Signe 
Samuel A. Wardwell y^ Signe of 

Cicely y^""^^^-*^ ^^'^s Su George 
*^ X / & Scale 

y^ Signing of 
James Quonopohit & his Scale 



[75 ] 

y* Sign of 
Mary ^ ^ Ponham aleias Quonopohit 

^.^ & her Scale 




All y« perfons herevnto Subfcribed acknowledged the 
within written to be thier act & deed this 31 day of May 
1687. before me 

Bartho. Gedney one of y^ Councill ' 

James Quonopohit was the only one of the grantors 
of this deed who signed his name. The deed was 
probably executed in Lynn, as all but one of the wit- 
nesses lived there. The first signer of these witnesses, 
Samuel Bligh, was a resident of Lynn, and about 
thirty years of age. Daniel Johnson was of Lynn, 
and probably somewhat older than Mr. Bligh. John 
Hawks was, also, of Lynn. Thomas Laughton was a 
farmer of Lynn, and about seventy years old. Samuel 
Wardwell^ lived in Andover, and was about forty 
years of age. 

Captain Gedney, before whom the deed was ac- 
knowledged, was a native of Salem, and lived there. 
He was at this time forty-six years of age. He was 
by profession a physician, and a captain of the militia. 
In 1678, he was chosen deputy to the general court, 
and the next year was appointed one of the commis- 
sioners for Salem. From 1680 to 1683, he was one 
of the governor's council, but lost the position in the 
latter year, because he advised compliance with the 

" This certificate of acknowledgment was " Endorfed on y^ back 
side " of the deed says the record. 

' He was hanged at Salem, for alleged witchcraft, in 1692. 



[76 ] 

requirements of the officers of the crown in regard 
to the charter. When President Dudley brought the 
charter, in 1686, Captain Gedney was reinstated in 
that office, being specially named in the royal com- 
mission, and retained the position during the adminis- 
tration of Andros.' 

Alonzo Lewis, the historian of Lynn, stated in an 
article published many years ago, that an Indian deed 
of Lynn lands was in the possession of the Hart 
family as late as 1800. Joseph Hart was probably the 
person referred to ; and it was probably among the 
large collection of old papers and documents, which 
were kept in the garret of his house, and to which the 
boys had access, probably to the destruction of the 
instrument. 

' Captain Gedney subsequently became colonel of the Essex regi- 
ment. He was, also, the first chief-justice of the court of common 
pleas under the province charter, one of the special court that tried 
the alleged witches in 1692, and judge of probate. 



Deed from David Nonnupanohow and others to John Ruck 
and others, trustees for the proprietors of the town of Salem, 
of the territory of Salem, within the Naumkeag limits, dated 
Oct. 1 1, 1686. Reproduced nearly one-third of the size of the 
original, which is on parchment and hung in a frame on one 
of the walls of the common council chamber in City Hall, 
Salem. 



V; 



'Ijt^j"! f'^'^'^-^- 




- - ■- > -,r . :• .■ -^; ^^-i^^. .: < C ^-,■,.'7 ^^.o • 







iSI^^^Mt^L^ 






r^,i 






If 








11^ if^ a|^- . , i5> .■ 
*b^ ^* -t >; t: _', ^^r ■ i - ,. s -?■- 




i -i' 






#■>!:; 









ri'^H f 







SALEM DEEDS 

Doubtless the same motives which caused Lynn 
to secure a deed of release of the territory of that 
town led the town of Salem to safeguard its interests 
by pursuing the same course. The circumstances con- 
nected with the acquisition of this deed are not known 
other than what is disclosed in the deed itself The 
consideration of the release was twenty pounds in cur- 
rent money; and the grantees were John Ruck, John 
Higginson, Samuel Gardner, Timothy Lindall, Wil- 
liam Hirst, and Israel Porter, "selectmen and trustees 
for " the town of Salem, and all other " proprietors 
and purchasers " of the town. The territory described 
in it is now that of the present city of Salem and 
towns of Danvers and Peabody. The deed is dated 
October ii, 1686, and was recorded in the Essex 
Registry of Deeds, volume 7, leaf 125, April 26, 1687. 
The original document is written on parchment, and 
was in the possession of Colonel John Higginson 
until May 25, 1713, when he delivered it to the select- 
men of the town, who immediately placed it in the 
care of William Gedney, the town treasurer at the 
time.' It was afterwards preserved by being kept in 
a small tin box. It "suffered somewhat from being 
packed too closely, and frequently folded and un- 
folded," says the writer of a report on the condition 

' " At a meeting of ye Selectmen May 25th 171 3. . . 

"See ye Entry made of ye Grand Indian deed for ye Township 
of Salem ; which has been in Colo Higginfon's hands, but this day 
delivered up by him to y^ Selectmen and now lodged in m^ William 

[ 77] 



[78 ] 

of papers in the city hall, printed in the city docu- 
ments for 1852. In that year a glass frame was pre- 
pared, and in that it was spread and has since been 
inspected without handling. The report further says 
that the deed "is a document of remarkable beauty 
and elaborateness of execution, and of much intrinsic 
value, and local interest." It now hangs in a frame in 
the council chamber at the city hall. The following 
is an accurate copy of the original instrument: — 

To all People To whome this present Deed of Sale shall 
come David Nonnupanohow Sam Wuttaannoh, and John 
Tontohqunne Cicely's Son, Grandchildren of George Saga- 
more Cicely Petaghunclcsq Sarah Wuttaquatimnusk, both 
Daughters of George Sagamore afores^ Thomas Vkquenkuf- 
sennum alias Cap* Tom, all of Waymefsick alias Chelmsford 
In y« County of Middlesex Within his Majesties Territory 
& Dominion of New England In America James Quanoph- 
kownatt; alias James Rumney Marsh, Israeli Quanoph- 
kownatt. Son of s"^ James Joane Quanophkownatt, Relict, 
Widow of Old Jn° Quanophkownatt Yawataw relict widow 
of Jn" Oonsumoq Wattawtinnusk wife of Peter Ephraim,all 

Gedney ye Town Treafurers hands by their order. Which deed was 
dated October ye eleuenth anno 1686: " 

— Salem Town Records, volume 1679-1728, leaf 160. 

" At a meeting of the Selectmen May 25 th 171 ■^, . . 

♦* This day Colo John Higginfon Esqi" brought ye original] grand 
deed from ye Indians, of ye Township of Salem to the then Selectmen 
of Salem as Trustees for ye proprietors & purchafers of s'^ Town and 
delivered ye fame to ye present Selectmen of Salem which deed is 
Lodged with mi" William Gedney ye present Town Treafurer by 
order of ye Selectmen, Colo Higginfon declining to keep ye fame any 
longer, which deed was dated October ye eleventh anno Domini 
1686:" 

— Salem Town Records, volume 1709—1725, page 103. 



[79] 

of Natick, In y« County Middlefex w'^in his Majes*'^*: Ter- 
ritory & Dominion of New-England In America afores'' 
Send Greeting. Know ye. that we y^ aboves'* David Non- 
nuphanohow, Sam Wuttaanoh Jn° Tontohqunne Cicely's 
Son Cicely Petaghuncksq Sarah Wuttaquatinnusk Thomas 
Vkqueakufsennum alias Cap* Thom. James Quanophkownatt 
alias James Rumney Marsh, Israeli Quanophkownatt Joane 
Quanophkownatt Yawataw Wattawtinnusk For and In Con- 
sideration of y^ full & Just Summe of Twenty poundes, 
Currant money of New England, To them in hand, at & be- 
fore y^ Ensealing and delivery of thefe Presents By Jno Ruck 
Jn° Higginson Samuel Gardner, Timothy Lindall, W™ Hirst, 
Israel Porter, Select men and Trustees for the Towne of 
Salem In y^ County of Essex, w'^in his Majesties Territory 
and Dominion of New England, In America. Well and 
truely paied, The Receipt whereof they do hereby acknow- 
ledge, and themfelves therew**^ to be fully satisfied and Con- 
tented and Thereof & of every part thereof doe hereby 
acquitt. Exonerate and Discharge y^ s'^ ]n° Ruck, Jn° 
Higginson Samuel Gardner Timothy Lindall, W™ Hirst & 
Israeli Porter. : as Trustees aboves'* Their Heirs Execut^ and 
Administ^ as also all y^ rest of y^ purchafers and Proprie- 
tors of s^ Township of Salem, and each and every of them, 
for ever by these p''sents Have given granted Bargained Sold 
aliened Enfeoffed and Confirmed and by these p''sents doe 
fully freely clearly and absolutely Giue Grant bargain Sell 
aliene Enfeoffe and Confirme Vnto them y^ s'^ Jn° Ruck, 
Jo° Higginson Samuel Gardner, Tim" Lindall, W^^ Hirstt 
& Israel Porter, as Trustees aboves^, and to Their Heirs and 
afsignes forever. To and for y^ Sole ufe benefitt and behoof 
of the Proprietors in & purchafers of y^ Township of Salem 
afors^^ All y^ s^^ Township of Salem Viz all that Tract and 
Parcell of Land lying to y^ Westward of Neumkeage River 
alias Bafsriver whereupon y^ Town of Salem is Built So 
proceeding along to y^ Head of Neumkeage River, Called 
by ye English Bafsriver, fo Comprehending all y* Land be- 



[ 8o] 

longing to the s'^ Township of Salem according as it is Butted 
and Bounded w*^*^ and upon y^ Towns of Beverly, Wenham 
Topsfeild, Redding Linne & Marblehead, down to y^ Sea, 
w*^'' s'^ Land is a part of w" belonged to the Ancesto'^s of 
y'^ Grantors and is Their proper Inheritance Or howfoever 
y*' s<^ Township or any part or parcell thereof is Butted and 
Bounded or Reputed to be bounded Together w'^^ ^11 houses 
Edifices Buildings lands yards Orchards Gardens meadows 
marshes Feedings Grounds Rocks stones beach flatts pastures 
fences Commons, commons of Pasture, Woods underwoods 
swamps, waters, water courses. Dams Ponds headwares fish- 
ings fowlings wayes Easements, Profitts, priviledges. Rights, 
Commodityes Emoluments Royaltyes Hereditamen*^^. and 
app'^tenances whatsoeuer as also all Mines mettalls mineralls 
w*^'^ all Islands & p''viledges of Neumkeage River alias Bafs- 
river, w*^"^ the Ancesto'^s of s<^ Granters heretofore Right- 
fully pofsefsed w**" all & singular Their app''tenances To y« 
s^ Township of Salem and other y^ p'^mises belonging or in 
any wise app'^taining or therew^*^ now used Occupied or In- 
joyed, as part parcell or member thereof, and alfo all Rents 
Arrearages of Rents, Quitt Rents Rights of all things above- 
named as also all Rivers creeks Coves w*^soeuer w*^*^ all their 
p^^viledges and app''tenances (nothing excepted or Referved) 
and also all Deeds writings and Evidences w*^soeuer Touch- 
ing and Concerning y*^ p''mises or any Part or parcell thereof 
To have and to hold all y^ s<^ Township of Salem Butted 
and Bounded as aboves'^ w'^'' all other the Above Granted 
p''mifes, w*'' their & Every of their Rights members & ap- 
p^'tenances & every part and parcell thereof hereby granted 
bargained & Sold, or mean't mentioned or Intended to be 
Hereby granted & Sold unto y^ s^ Jn° Ruck Jn° Higgin- 
son Samuel Gardner Tim" Lindall W™ Hirst & Israel 
Porter as Trustees aboves'^ and to their Heirs & Assignes 
for Ever To and for y^ Sole Vse Benefitt and behoof of y^ 
Proprietors in & Purchasers of y^ s<^ Township of Salem 
And y^ s^ David Nonnuphanohow, Sam Wuttaanoh Jn° 



[8i ] 

Tontohqunne Cicely Petaghuncksq Sarah Wuttaquatinnusk 
Thomas Vsqueakufsennum, alias Cap*^ Thom. James Quan- 
ophkownat, alias James Rumney Marsh, Israeli Quanoph- 
kownatt, Joane Quanophkownatt Yawataw, Wattawtinnusk 
For themselves Their Heirs Executo" Adm''^ Jointly sever- 
ally & Respectively, Do hereby Covenant promise and 
grant to and with y^ s^ Jn" Ruck Jn° Higginson Samuel 
Gardner Tim° Lindall W™ Hirst and Israeli Porter, as 
Trustees aboves'i Their Heirs and assignes on behalf of y^ 
Proprietors and Purchafers of y^ s^ Town of Salem In Man- 
ner and form following (That is to say) that at y^ Time 
of this p''sent Bargain and Sale and untill y^ Ensealing 
and Delivery of these p^'sents they & their ancestors were 
y« True Sole and Lawfull owners of all y^ afore Bargained 
p'mises and were Lawfully Seized of and in y^ same and 
Every part thereof in Their own proper Right. And haue 
in themselves Full power, good right and Lawfull author- 
ity to grant Sell, convey and assure y^ same unto y« s'^ Jn^ 
Ruck, Jn° Higginson Samuel Gardner, Tim° Lindall W'" 
Hirst and Israeli Porter, as Trustees aboves^ Their Heirs and 
assignes for y^ Vse aboves"^ as a good perfect & absolute 
Estate of Inheritance in Fee Simple w'^'out any manner of 
Condition Reverfion or Limitation w'soever So as to alter 
change defeat or make void y* same And that y^ s^ Jn° Ruck 
Jn° Higginson Sam" Gardner Tim° Lindall W'" Hirst & 
Israeli Porter as Trustees aboves'^ Their Heirs and Afsignes, 
for y« use & benefitt of the Purchasers and Proprietors of 
y* afores'^ Township of Salem Shall & may by force & Ver- 
tue of thefe p''sents, from time to time & at all times forever 
hereafter. Lawfully peaceably & Quietly haue Hold use oc- 
cupy pofsess & Injoy y^ above granted p''emises w^^ their 
app''tenances & every part and parcell thereof. Free & clear 
& clearly acquitted & discharged of & from all & all man- 
ner of Former & other Gifts grants Bargains, Sales, Leases 
mortgages, Joyntures Dowres Judgm^ Executions Forfeitures 
& of and from all other Titles, troubles, charges, & Incum- 



[82] 

brances w'soever had made comitted Done or suffered to be 
done by y^ s'^ David Nonnuphanohow Sam Wuttaanoh Jn<> 
Tontohqunne Cicely Petaghuncksq Sarah Wuttaquatinnusk 
Thomas Vsqueakussennum, alias Cap"^ Tom James Quanoph- 
kownat, alias James Rumney Marsh Israeli Quanophkownat 
Joane Quanophkownatt Yawataw Wattawtinnusk Or Either 
or any of them Their or Either or any of Their Heirs or 
afslgnes, or by Their or either or any of Their Ancestor's at 
any time or times before y^ Ensealing hereof, And farther y* 
y^ s^ David Nonnuphanohow Sam Wuttaanoh Jn° Tontoh- 
qunne Cicely Petaghuncksq Sarah Wuttaquatinnusk Thomas 
Vsqueakufsennum alias Cap*^ Tom James Quanophkownatt 
alias James Rumney Marsh Israeli Quanophkownatt Joane 
Quanophkownatt Yawataw Wattawtinnusk Their Heirs Ex- 
ecutor's & Administr^s Joyntly & Severaly Shall and will from 
time to time & at all Times for ever hereafter Warrant and 
defend y^ above granted Premises w'^ Their appr^tenances and 
every part & parcell thereof unto y^ s*^ Jn° Ruck Jn° Higgin- 
son, Sam" Gardner Tim° Lindall W™ Hirst Israeli Porter 
Trustees as aboves^^ and to their Heirs & assignes for Ever 
To & for y* Sole use & Benefitt of y^ Proprieters & Purchasers 
in and of y^ s'^ Township of Salem Against all & every p^^son 
& pr^sons w'soever, any wayes Lawfully Claiming or de- 
manding y^ same or any part Parcell thereof And Lastly 
That they y^ s*^ David Nonnuphanohow Sam Wuttaanoh 
Jn° Tontohqunne Cicely Petaghuncksq Sarah Wuttaquatin- 
nusk Thomas Vsqueakussennum alias Cap* Tom James 
Quanophkownatt alias James Rumney Marsh Israeli Quan- 
ophkownatt Joane Quanophkownatt Yawataw Wattawtin- 
nusk Or Either or any of Them Their or any of Their Heirs 
Execuf^ or Adminisf^ shall and will from time to time and 
att all times hereafter when thereunto Required at y' cost 
and charges of y^ s'^ Jn° Ruck Jn" Higginson Samuel 
Gardner Tim° Lindall, W™ Hirstt and Israeli Porter Their 
heirs or assignes, Or y^ Purchasers and Proprietors of y^ 
s^ Township of Salem, Do make acknowledge. Execute, 



**M?tT>pv^ 



:^-t 








The two kinds of impressions used upon the wax seals of 
the deed of Salem. Reproduced same size as the original. 



[ 83 ] 

and Suffer all and Every such farther act and acts Thing & 
Things assurances and Conveighances in y^ Law whatso- 
ever For y^ Further and Better Surety and Suremaking of 
y^ aboves'^ Township of Salem w"^ y^ Rights Heredita- 
ments and app''tenances above by These p''sents mentioned 
to be Bargained and Sold vnto y^ s'^ John Ruck John Hig- 
ginson Samuel Gardner Timothy Lindall William Hirst and 
Israeli Porter Trustees as aboves^ and to their Heirs and 
assigner for y^ Vse afores*^ As By y^ s^ John Ruck John 
Higginson Samuel Gardner Timothy Lindall William Hirst 
Sc Israel Porter Trustees as aboves^ Their Heirs or as- 
signes, or s^ Proprietors, or By Their Counsell Learned in 
y'^ Law shall be Reasonably Devised Advised or Required. 
In Witness Whereof The s*^ David Nonnuphanohow Sam 
Wuttaanah John Tuntohqunne Cicely Petaghuncksq Sarah 
Wuttaquatinnusk Thomas Vksqueakussennum alias Cap* 
Tom James Quanophkownatt alias James Rumney Marsh 
Israeli Quanophkownatt Joane Quanophkownatt Yawataw 
Wattawtinnusk Have hereunto Set their hands and Seals 
The Eleuenth Day of October Anno Domini One thousand 
Six hundred Eighty & Six Annoq Regni Regis Jacobi 
IF' angliae Scotiae Franciae & Hyberniae Fidei Defensoris 
Secundo 

The mark of 



^ p' * 



Dauid 

Nonnuphanohow 



[seal] 



The marke of 



7 



Sam' 

wuttaannoh 



[seal] 



The mark of 

John ^4/" 

tontohqunne 



[seal] 



[84] 




The mark of 




Cicely (J/ 


[seal] 


Petaghuncksq^ 






[seal] 


The mark of 




Thomas Q 


[seal] 


VSQUEAKUSSENNUM 




allias Cap'' Tom 





James james 

QUANOPHKOWNATT [sEAL] 

alias RuMNEY marsh 
The mark of 

Israel /^ [seal] 

quanophkownat 

The mark of 
Jane sy^^"^^ [seal] 

QuANOPHKOWNATT 

The mark of 

)C^ [seal] 

Yawataw 

The mark of 

V [seal] 

Wattawtinnusk 



Signed Sealed & Delivered By David Nonnuphanohov^^ 
Cicely Petaghnucksq Thomas Vsqueakussennum alias Cap* 
Tom, James Quanophkownat alias Rumney Marsh Israeli 
Quanophkovv^nat Joane Quanophkownat Yaw^ataw Wattaw- 








v; 


"t^ • i';'>d> 








^. itsjtj 


L.— ■ 




■::. ^ V 





Attestation of the witnesses to, and the acknowledgment 
of, the deed of Salem, written on the reverse. Reproduced 
nearly same size as the original. 



[85] 

tinnusk as Their Act and Deed In y^ Presence of us After 

y* Same was Read to Them 

Andrew Elliott sen" 
Thomas West 
John Hill sr 
Samll Hardie s" 
William woodbery 

This Instrum* was acknowledged By David Nonnuphano- 
how Cicely Petaghuncksq Thomas Vsqueakussennum alias 
Cap^ Tom James Quanophkownat ; alias Rumney Marsh 
Israeli Quanophkownat Joane Quanophkownatt Yawattaw 
Wattawtinnuske To be Their act and Deed This Eleventh 
Day of Octob"^ 1686 

Before me Bartholomew Gedney, One of His Majes- 
ties Councell for his Territory & dominion of newengland 
in America. 

The seals on this deed, which are of wax, have two 
designs. This deed was apparently executed in Bev- 
erly, as all the witnesses were residents of that town. 
Andrew Elliott was then about forty-nine years of age ; 
Captain Thomas West was about forty-three ; Deacon 
John Hill was about fifty ; Samuel Hardy was a 
schoolmaster, and probably under forty at this time ; 
and William Woodberry was of about the same age 
as Samuel Hardy. They were all prominent men of 
Beverly most of them being or having been selectmen. 
The magistrate who took the acknowledgment of the 
deed, Bartholomew Gedney, of His Majesty's Coun- 
cil, was the same one that took the acknowledgment 
of the second Lynn deed.' 

A deed of Misery Island, oflf the Beverly shore, 
was executed by an Indian, and it is proper to insert 
' See page 75. 



[ 86] 

it in this book. This Indian grantor was known as 
Thomas Tyler, and he lived at Martha's Vineyard. 
The grantee was Bartholmew Gale of Salem ; and the 
date of the deed was February 12, 1673. ^^ was re- 
corded in the Essex Registry of Deeds, book 8, leaf 
106, January 19, 1688-89. The following is a copy 
of it as it appears upon the record: — 

Know all men by Thefe p'^sents that I Thomas Tyler of 
Martha's Vineyard haue bargained for & Sold and do by thefe 
p^'sents Sell make Ouerand deliuer Unto Bartholmew Gale 
of Salem in The County of Efsex in the Collony of the Mat- 
tathufetts all my right Title and Intrest Island forty acres 
more or lefs Comonly caled & knowne by y^ name of Moul- 
tons Miferie lying and being between Bakers Hand and Man- 
chester for him y^ s^ Bartholmew Gale to haue & to Hold 
to him his hiers Executo''s Adm"^^ or afsignes from me y^ said 
Thomes Tyler my hiers or afsignes for Ever or any other per- 
son whatsoeuer Claiming any right Title or Intrest thereto 
or to any part thereof from by or under me hereby Couenant- 
ing and alowing that It may and Shall be Lawfull for y« Said 
Bartholmew Gale to inroule or Caufe to be Inrouled the pre- 
mifesin any of his Majes^'^^ Courts of Records in the SaidColo- 
nie in Confideration of which Hand I the Said Thomas Tyler 
do acknowledge to haue received of the Said Bartholmew 
Gale a Ualuable Confideracon and for y^ Confirmation & 
Ratification of y^ p''mifes I haue Caufed This my deed of 
Sale to be made & haue hereunto Set my hand & Seal this 
Twelfth day of fFebruary in y« year of Our Lord One thou- 
fand Six hundred Seuenty three 

Signed Sealed and Deliuered his 

in the p-'sence of us -^^^ » c 1 

T^ U 1 HOMAS / I YLER & a Seal 

Daniel Bacon * ^ 

Benjamin Marston marke 

Thomas Mayhew 



[87] 

With this deed is recorded a statement, signed by- 
Thomas Mayhew, who was also of Martha's Vine- 
yard, being son of the governor. This certificate reads 
as follows : — 

y* Said Thomas Tyler is y* Sonne of y« Sagamore of Aga- 
wamm a knowne man in y^ Countrey he sold y^ Towne of 
Ipswich all or y« most part of it all y^ old planters know him 
that had ought to do w''' y« Indians in thofe dales George 
Can Informe Concerning him he that hath lost his nose I 
mean not Elfe P me Thomas Mayhew 

This deed was not acknowledged, and its execution 
was proved by the oaths of the two Salem witnesses, 
Mr. Bacon and Mr. Marston, in Salem December 14, 
1684, taken before John Hathorne, an assistant, who 
lived at what is now the site of the Holyoke Building, 
one hundred and fourteen Washington Street. Daniel 
Bacon and Benjamin Marston lived near the magis- 
trate. The evidence of these two witnesses, certified 
to by John Hathorne, is recorded with the deed, and 
is as follows : — 

Dan" Bacon & m' Benjamin Marston Gaue Oath that 
y« aboues'i Instrument was Signed Sealed & deliuered in thier 
prefence by Thomas Tyler and that they Set thier handes as 
wittnefses unto y^ Same Sworne Salem Decemb'' 14*^ 84 
befor mee John Hathorne Afis* 



THE DEED OF BEVERLY 

The people of Beverly were greatly exercised over 
the claim to their territory, about 1680, by Robert 
Tufton Mason, grandson of Captain John Mason, and 
probably it was in consequence of this claim that an 
attempt was made to secure a title to the land from the 
Indians. Masconomet, alias John, the sagamore of Aga- 
wam,in whose territory this section of the country was 
included, had died about 1658, and his alleged heirs 
were his grandchildren Samuel English and Joseph 
English and their sister Betty, wife of Jeremiah Wau- 
ches. With these heirs an agreement was made, Oc- 
tober 13, 1686, by order of the selectmen of Beverly, 
for the transfer of the Indian title to all the land 
within the town, upon the payment of six pounds, six 
shillings, and eight pence. Nothing more was done 
about it until October 1 1, 1700, when Cornet Joseph 
Herrick, the town treasurer, at a meeting of the select- 
men, paid to these Indians the amount of money in 
silver ordered to be paid fourteen years before. The 
following is a copy of the record of this transaction as 
found in the Beverly Town Records, volume 2, page 
110: — 

At a meeting of y« felect men on y*^ 11*'' day of October 
1700 Cornet Jofeph Herrick Towne Treafurer did then de- 
liver Vnto Samuel Inglifh Indian or his order the fumm of 
fix pounds fix (hillings & Eight pence due to the fd fam'' In- 
dian and his Brother Jofeph and there fifter as Heirs to there 
Grandfather John Alias mafTquanomenett faggamore of Agga- 

[ 88] 



[89] 

worn which fix pounds fix (hillings and Eight pence is full 
fattiffaction for the Indian Title of all the Lands within fd 
Towneihip the which fume was paid by order of y^ felect 
men according to aggreemt made with fd Indians on y^ 13*^^ 
day of October 1686. 

At Salem, the next day, two " Nashoba " Indians, 
John Thomas and James Speen, testified before John 
Hathorne and Benjamin Browne, both of Salem, 
justices of the peace, that Samuel English, Joseph 
English, and Betty Wauches were the " True & 
Rightfull & Only Surviving hiers" of Masconomet. 
The following is a copy of the record of this evidence 
in the Essex Registry of Deeds, volume 14, leaf 
43: — 

The Testimony of John Thomas & James Speen Nashoba 
Indians both of full age who Testifieth & Saith of thier owne 
Certain knowledge that Samuel English & Joseph English 
Indians together with thier Sifter y« wife of Jeremiah Wauches 
Indian are y^ True & Rightfull & Only Suruiving hiers of 
John The Saggamore of Aggawom alias Mafsquanomenet. 

John Tomas & James Speen Indians abouenamed made 
Oath to y^ Truth of y^ abouesd Euidence 

Salem October the la*'^ 1700. 

before John Hathorne 



Benj'^ Browne ) •' ^- 

At the time this testimony was taken, a deed of 
release was executed and delivered by these grand- 
children of the old sagamore to the selectmen of 
Beverly, who had it recorded in the Essex Registry of 
Deeds, volume 14, leaf 42. The grantees were the 
inhabitants of Beverly. The following is an exact 
copy of this record : — 



[90] 

Be it Knowne vnto all men by thefe prefents that wee Samuel 
English Joseph English & Jeremiah Wawches Indians being 
all y* Suruiuing Grand Chilldren of old Saggamore John of 
agawon alias amasquanamett Doe for & in Confideracons that 
our Grandfather did formerly grant and giue his aprobation 
to y^ English to Settle one a Tract of land Caled Beuerly 
in y^ Countey of Efsex in New England & more Especialy 
for Six pound Six Shillings & Eight pence in Siluer to vs 
paid before y^ Enfealing hereof by the Select men of Beuerly 
aforesaid in behalfe of s"^ Towne doe giue grant bargaine 
Sell alien afsign Set ouer & Confirme & Haue by thefe pre- 
fents fully freely & abfolutely bargained Sold aliened afsigned 
Set ouer & for Euer Confirmed vnto y^ Inhabitants of Beuerly 
aforesaid thier hiers & afsignes for Euer all The vpland 
Swampy meadow marsh ground lying & being within y^ 
Towneship of Beuerly aforesaid with all y^ ponds Streames 
fishing places & all other y« profits priuiledges & appur- 
tenances thereto belonging or pertaining in any wife To 
Haue & To Hold occupy & pofsess for Euer free & Cleare 
& freely & Clearly acquitted of & from all other Gifts grants 
bargaines Sales alienations of what kind soeuer and further 
wee y^ aboues'i Samuel English Joseph English & Jeremiah 
Waches Indians doe Couenant promife & Engage for our 
Selues our hiers Executors adminiftr''^ & afsignes For Euer 
to & with y^ Select men of Beuerly aforesaid in behalfe of 
ye Inhabitants of sd Town thier hiers & afsignes For Euer 
That wee y^ aboues'^ Indians are y^ Day of y^ Date hereof 
The True & Rightfull owners of y^ aboue bargained premifes 
and Haue full power and lawfuU authority to Convey y* 
Same as abouesd & That wee doe warrant acquit & defend 
the quiet and Peaceable pofsefsion of Each & Euery part 
Thereof to them The Inhabitants of y^ Towne of Beuerly 
thier hiers Executors adminiftrators & afsignes for Euer 
against all manner of Indians whatsoeuer laying any lawfull 
claime thereto In Witnefs hereof Wee haue Set to our hands 
& Seales This Twelfth Day of October in y^ yeare of our 



[91 ] 

Lord One thoufand Seuen hundred : y^ words alias masqua- 
nomenit was Interlined before sealing : 
Signed sealed & Deliuered 



in y^ psence of vs 
Thomas Woodbery 

Robert Briscoe 



t 



Joseph ffoster 
Moses Parker 



the f , marke of 

Samuel English & Seale 
y«^ /O ni^rke of 
Jeremiah Wauches & Seale 

y^ y marke of 

Joseph English & Seale 

y^ . marke of Susannah 
y« wife )r ' "* of Sam abouesd & Seale 

y« marke of Bettey y^ 



^ 



wife of Jeremiah Wauches 
& a Seale 

Samuel English & Sufannah his wife and Jeremiah wauches 
and Bettey his wife all acknowledged the abouewritten Instru- 
ment to be thier act & deed Salem October the \i^'^ 1700. 

before me John Hathorne one of y' Council & 'J^ft pe 

The first two of the witnesses were residents of 
Beverly, and had been selectmen and prominent in 
the town. Mr. Woodberry was about sixty years of 
age and Mr, Briscoe was much younger. The other 
witnesses, Joseph Foster of Billerica and Moses Parker 
of Chelmsford, had probably come with the Indians, 
as their sponsors. 

John Hathorne, the magistrate, before whom the 
acknowledgments were made, was one of the judges 



[9^ 

who presided over the witchcraft trials in Salem. He 
lived in Salem, at what is now number one hundred 
and fourteen, on Washington Street. 

The Indians were kindly entertained, in Beverly, at 
the tavern of Mr. Briscoe, who was one of the wit- 
nesses to the deed. The expense of this hospitality 
amounted to nineteen shillings and five pence, which 
represented a good deal in those primitive days. 

The expense of the drawing of the deed and the 
evidence and acknowledging and recording was eleven 
shillings and eight pence. 

The final record of the transaction is that of the 
settlement of the selectmen with the treasurer at a 
meeting of the selectmen, March 21, 1700-01. The 
following is a copy of this record : — 

At a meeting of the Select men on the 21^' day of mach 
1700: 1701 

paid to the Indians for a deed and for acknowledging and 
Recording of fd deed and witneffes — 06 — 18 — 04 

to mf. Robert Brifcoe for Expences on y« Indians — 

00 — 19 — 05' 

» Beverly Town Records, volume 2, page 238. 



THE DEED OF MANCHESTER 

In 1700, the town of Manchester paid the grand- 
sons of Masconomet, the sagamore of Agawam, three 
pounds and nineteen shillings in current silver money 
of New England, for a release deed of all the right, 
title, and interest of the grantors in the land then 
comprising that township. 

The grantors, Samuel English, Joseph English, and 
John Umpee, lived in Middlesex County, at or near 
Chelmsford ; and the grantees were Robert Leach, John 
Knowlton, and Samuel Lee, selectmen of the town of 
Manchester, in behalf of the town. The deed is dated 
December 19, 1700; acknowledged on the same day; 
and recorded in the Essex Registry of Deeds, book 
14, leaf 82, Dec. 31, 1700. The following is a copy 
of this document as thus recorded : — 

Know all men by thefe prefents that Wee Sam. English 
& Joseph English & John Vmpee all liuing in y« Countey 
of Middlefex in y^ prouince of y^ Mafsachufets Bay in New 
England Indians on y^ one party & Robert Leach & John 
Knowlton and Samuel Lee Select men of y^ Town of Man- 
chester in the Countey of Efsex in y^ province aforesaid on 
y^ other party witnefseth y* y^ Said Sam : Inglish Joseph 
English & John Vmpee for & in Confideracon of y^ Summe 
of three pounds nineteen Shillings Currant Siluer money of 
New England to them in hand well and Truly paid before 
then Sealing and Deliuery of Thefe prefents by y^ Said Rob- 
ert Leach John Knowlton & Samuel Ley Selectmen of y^ 
abouesaid Manchester y^ Receipt whereof to full Content 
& Satisfacon They doth hereby Acknowledge and thereof & 
of Euery part and parcel thereof doth acquit Exonerate and 

[93 ] 



[94] 

difcharge y« Said Robert Leach John Knowhon & Samuel 
Ley & Each & Euery of them their and Each & Every of 
thier heirs Executors adminiftrators and afsigns for Euer by 
thefe prefents & as they doe prefent Themfelues Select men 
for and in The behalfe of y« Said Towne of Manchester 
them & thier hiers for Euer the Confideracon of y^ aboue- 
said Summe being Receiued by vs as aboues'i is for that 
whereas y^ Said Towne of Manchester Haue Quietly & 
peaceably without molestacon Enjoyed y« Soil of Thier 
Towneship with y« Growth therevpon & appurtenances 
belonging thereto & Containing therein for y« Space of Sixty 
yeares & vpward & that in the first place by y^ Confent & 
aprobacon of our Grandfather Saggamore John of Aggawam 
alias Masquenomenit & Euer Since by Confent & aproba- 
tion of his Children and by vs his Grand Children being 
y^ now Suruiuing & proper hiers to our Said Grandfather & 
there hath been yet no deed or legall Conveyance Either by 
our Said Grandfather Masquenomenett as aforesaid nor by 
his hiers Succefsiuely vnto this Day of y« Date hereof of y^ 
Soyl of y^ Said Township to y^ Said Towne of Manchefter 
Wee y^ Said Sam. English Joseph English & John Vmpee 
hath giuen granted Bargained Sold alien'd Enfeoff'd and Con- 
firmed and by thefe prefents doth fully freely Clearly & ab- 
folutely giue grant bargaine Sell aliene EnfeofFe Convey and 
Confirme vnto y^ Said Select men namely Robert Leach 
John Knowlton and Samuel Ley as they are for and in 
the behalfe of y* Said Town of Manchester thier hiers & 
afsignes for Euer all That our full & whole right Title pro- 
perty vfe Intrest remainder Claim and demands whatsoeuer 
of in and to all and Singular that Mefsuage or Tenement 
Scituate Lying & being y^ Soyl in y^ Township of y^ abouesd 
Towne of Manchester with all y^ woods & growth of y'= 
abouesd Soyl with all y^ Riuers Waters Water Courfes Is- 
land or Islands fish fishing places & all other apurtenances & 
priuiledges as lands meadows Creeks Coues Rocks Stones 
& whatsoeuer is or May be therein Contained wi^^'in The 



[95] 

bounds of y^ Towneship of y^ Said town of Manchester To 
Haue & to Hold to them y^ Said towne & thier hiers & 
afsignes for Euer to Improue vfe Occupy & Injoy y'^ aboue- 
said premifes to thier profit & behoofe for Euermore And 
that Wee y^ Said Sam English & Joseph English & John 
Vmpee doe for Our Selues our hiers Covenant & promife 
to & with ye Said towne of Manchefter them & thier hiers 
Executors Adm'^s ^nd afsigns that at & before the Enfealing 
& deliuery of thefe prefents Wee are y^ True Sc Rightfull 
hiers of y^ bargained premifes & haue in Our Selues full 
power good right & LawfuU Authority to bargain and Sell 
y^ Same as aforesaid & that y^ Bargained premifes a free 
& Clear & freely & Clearly acquitted & discharged of & 
from all other and former gifts grants bargaines Sales Ti- 
tles Dowers or from any any other Incumbrance from any 
other In whatsoeuer shall pretend to Lay Claime therevnto 
and that wee will warrant acquit & defend the said towne 
of Manchester thier hiers Executors adminiftr'^ and afsignes 
in y^ peacable & quiet pofsefsion of y^ bargained premifes & 
Euery part & parcell thereof from time to time & at all times 
for Euer hereafter against all Indians whatsoeuer laying any 
Lawfull Claime thereto or any part thereof In testimony 
wherof Wee haue herevnto afixed our hands & Seals This 
ninteenth day of December In y* yeare of our Lord God 
One thoufand Seuen hundred 

Signed Sealed & Deliuered in y^ Psents 
of vs Witnefs. y^ marke of 

John Newman Samll ^-"^^^ English & a Seale 

Joseph Herrick y^ marke of 

John ^ Vmpee & Seale 
Thomas Whittridge * 

Samuel English an Indian & John Vmpee an Indian 
both perfonaly appeared before me y^ Subfcriber One of his 



[96] 

^ajties Juftices of y* peace for y^ Countey of Efsex & ac- 
knowledged y« aboue written Instrument with thier hands & 
Scales to be thier act & Deed at Salem 19. December 1700 

John Higginson 

Joseph English, for some reason, did not sign this 
deed. In this and in several other recorded in- 
stances it seemed difficult to find Samuel and Joseph 
English together. 

The grantees of the deed, who were selectmen of 
the town at the time, were otherwise prominent. 
Messrs, Knowlton and Lee were young men, and 
were serving their first term as selectmen. Sergeant 
Leach was middle-aged and had been a selectman 
for several years. 

Of the witnesses to the deed John Newman lived 
in Wenham, and had been a representative to the 
general court for the two years prior to his appear- 
ance at the execution of this deed, and town clerk 
of Wenham since 1 695. He was son of Rev. Antipas 
Newman, pastor of the church in Wenham, and at 
this time was forty years old. Joseph Herrick lived 
in Beverly. Thomas Whittridge also lived in Beverly, 
and was about forty-two years old. 

John Higginson, before whom the acknowledg- 
ment of the deed was taken, lived in Salem, and at 
this time was register of the probate court. He was 
only twenty-five years of age. 

The expense of this deed, including its draft and 
acknowledgment, was six shillings and eight pence. 
This sum, added to the amount paid to the Indians, 
three pounds and nineteen shillings, aggregated four 
pounds, five shillings, and eight pence, which the 
selectmen voted, January 16, 1700-01, to raise by 



[97] 

assessment upon the inhabitants/ This rate was 
accordingly assessed upon the people. 

' *' At a meting of the sealect men of manchester upon the 16'^ 
Day of January 1700: 1701 Thare was a rate made and com- 
mited to Joseph Wodbery constable to collect and gather amounting 
to the sum of fower pounds and five shillings 8 pence which mony is 
to pay the Indians for our town ship and make payment of the aforesd 
sum in unto the sealect men at or before the fifteenth day of march 
nextlnsuing the Date hereof." — Manchester Town Records, volume 
2, page 138. 



THE DEED OF WENHAM 

Samuel English, Joseph English, and John 
Umpee, heirs of Masconomet, the sagamore of Aga- 
wam, claimed to own the territory included within the 
limits of the townof Wenham,and December lo, 1700, 
the town chose a committee to investigate the mat- 
ter, and if they thought best to agree with the Indians. 
Upon the payment of four pounds and sixteen shil- 
lings, by Captain Thomas Fiske and three others of 
Wenham, a deed of release was obtained from them. 
The deed itself, however, states the amount to have 
been three pounds and ten shillings. The difference 
of one pound and six shillings may have been the 
amount of the expenses connected with the acquisi- 
tion of the deed. The amount was raised by the as- 
sessment of a tax upon the inhabitants. 

In this deed Joseph Foster, Sr., of Billerica and 
Moses Parker of Chelmsford joined as sureties, and 
they covenanted that these Indians were the legal heirs 
of the sagamore, that they were the rightful owners of 
the soil and had authority to convey the same. The 
deed was dated on the same day as the deed of Man- 
chester, December 19, 1700. This deed was never 
recorded, and the last known of the existence of the 
original instrument was its production in court in 
the action of Amos Brown et ah versus Inhabitants of 
Wenham, at Salem, in 1 845. At that time it was taken 
from the wrapper in which it had been kept by the 
town treasurer, and never returned. Questions of law 
in this case, one of which was the admissibility of 

[ 98 ] 



[99] 

this deed as evidence of title in the town of the land 
thereby purported to be conveyed, were taken to the 
full bench of the Supreme Judicial Court. In the writ- 
ten opinion of the court, a large part of the deed is 
copied, as follows : ' — 

. . . gave, granted, bargained, sold, assigned, aliened, en- 
feoffed and confirmed, unto the freeholders and inhabitants of 
said town, their heirs, successors and assigns, " the Indian 
title of all that tract or parcel of land, lying within the bounds 
of said township," bounded by the divisional lines of the sev- 
eral adjoining towns, " to have and to hold the said tract of 
land, with the privilege of all rivers, streams, watercourses, 
ponds, fishings and hunting," &c. &c. *' to the inhabitants 
of said Wenham, their heirs and successors, and such others, 
and their heirs and assigns, as have any lands lying within 
the bounds of said township, forever," And the said Samuel 
Inglish, Joseph Inglish and John Umpee, as heirs as aforesaid, 
as principals, and said Foster and Parker, as sureties, jointly 
and severally covenanted with the inhabitants and freeholders 
of Wenham, and such others as had lands lying within said 
Wenham, that said Samuel and Joseph Inglish and said John 
Umpee were the true and only proper heirs of said Mascha- 
nomett, and were the true and rightful owners of said tract 
of land, and had in themselves good right, full power and 
lawful authority to sell, convey and assure the same. And 
the said Foster and Parker, as sureties, covenanted with 
the inhabitants and freeholders of said Wenham who were 
then possessed of the land in said town in their own proper 
right, and such others as were not inhabitants of said town, 
but yet had lands lying within the same, that said Samuel 
and Joseph Inglish and John Umpee, and their heirs, should 
warrant and defend the same and every part of the above 
granted and bargained premises to the said freeholders and 
inhabitants, and proprietors of the lands lying w^ithin the 

• Metcalf's Reports (Massachusetts), volume lo, page 496. 



[ too ] 

bounds of said township of Wenham, against all other In- 
dians whatsoever that should make any claim or challenge to 
all or any part of said granted and bargained premises : And 
said P'oster and Parker further covenanted that said premises 
were " free and clear, and clearly acquitted and discharged 
of all former and other bargains, sales and alienations made 
by said Maschanomett, or any other Indian or Indians hav- 
ing lawful right or authority, and that the freeholders and 
in habitants, and proprietors of the lands lying within the 
bounds of said Wenham, should hold and enjoy the same, 
and every part thereof, to them, their heirs and assigns for- 
ever, as a good and indefeasible estate of inheritance in fee 
simple. 

This deed was executed and acknowledged by Sam- 
uel English, John Umpee, Joseph Foster, and Moses 
Parker, but was not executed by Joseph English. 

On the back of the deed was written, " D. Rex v. 
Parker, Ipswich Court, July ist, 1701," which indi- 
cates that it was used in the court at Ipswich on that 
date. 



THE DEED OF GLOUCESTER 

Samuel English next made demand upon the town 
of Gloucester, and a meeting of the inhabitants was held 
on Christmas Day, 1700, over which Deacon James 
Parsons presided. At this meeting, the selectmen were 
given authority to levy a tax upon the inhabitants 
of the town for "seven or eight pounds in money"; 
and Lieutenant William Stevens and Ensign Joseph 
Allen were chosen to settle with the Indians.' Lieuten- 
ant Stevens was a native of Gloucester, and forty-one 
years of age. He was an officer of the local military 
company, a selectman of the town for several years 
and representative in 1692. Ensign Allen was a native 
of Salisbury, a blacksmith, and had come to Gloucester 
upon his marriage, in 1680. He was forty-six years 
old at the time of this transaction with the Indians. He 
was one of the selectmen of the town that year, and had 
served several years in that and other official positions. 

' Such was the language of the vote, but Samuel English was the 
only Indian who executed the deed. 

The record of this meeting is as follows: — 

•• Att A meeting of the Inhabetants of glocefter december 25th day 
1 700 deacon James parfons moderater. . , 

*♦ the Select men had full powar giuen them at fd meeting to Leuy 
a taxe or ratt vpon the Inhabetants of feven or Eight pounds in money 
to defray the demand of the Indians for and about the Land of our 
townfhip . . 

** Leiut william Stevens and Infigne Jofeph Allin are the men Chofe 
and deputed by the Inhabetants at fd meeting to manage and make A full 
Conclution about our townfliip with thofe Indians that hath Laid Claime 
to the Lands of our townfhip. ' ' 

— Gloucester Town Records. 

[ -o. ] 



[ I02 ] 

This committee came to an agreement with Samuel 
English, and for seven pounds in current money of 
New England secured a deed of release from him. 
He claimed that he was the heir of the sagamore. 
The territory purported to be conveyed was that 
of the town of Gloucester at that time, which then 
Included the present town of Rockport. The deed 
is dated January 14, 1700-01 ; acknowledged on the 
next day, at Ipswich ; and recorded in the Essex 
Registry of Deeds, at Salem, book 14, leaf 214. 
The following copy of this deed is taken from the 
record in the Registry of Deeds : — 

To all People to whome thefe prefents Shall come Samuel 
English an Indian the Grandson & Rightfull hier of Maf- 
chanomett the Sagamore of Agawam Sendeth Greeting Know 
yee that I the Said Samuel English Sufficient reafons mouingme 
therevnto but Especialy for y*= full and Just Summe of Seuen 
pounds of Currant money of New England Truly paid vnto me 
by Leiut William Steuens and Enfign Joseph Allin a Comitte 
or agents for y^ Towne of Glofster in The Countey of Efsex 
in New England wherewith I y^ Said Samuel English doe 
hereby acknowledge my selfe fully Satisfied paid & Content 
for euer and thereof and of every part thereof doe hereby for 
me my hiers Executors & adminiftrators for euer acquit re- 
leafe and difcharge them the Said Comitte thier hiers ex- 
ecutors & adminiftr""^ for euer Haue giuen granted bargained 
Sold & confirmed and doe by thefe prefents for my Selfe hiers 
Executors & adminiftr" for Euer grant Bargaine Sell and 
Confirme for Euer vnto them The Said William Stevens & 
Joseph Allin in the behalfe & for vfe and property of Said 
Towne of Glofster them their hiers Executors adminiftra- 
tors and afsignes for euer a Certaine tract of land knowne by 
y« name of y« Township of Glofster in the Countey aforesaid 
in New England Containing by Estimacon Ten thoufand 



[ I03 ] 

acres be The Contents thereof more or lefs as it is abutted and 
bounded west northwest by Ipswich and west southwest by 
y* Towne of Manchester according as y^ Lines hath been 
already Settled & by y« Salt Sea on all other parts with all y' 
Islands thereto belonging according to y*^ grant of y^ General! 
Court to Said Towne Together with all y^ Lands Soyles 
waters riuers Streames hauens ports Fifhings huntings Wood 
Timber Stones grafs feed and all y^ rights profits priuiledges 
and appurtenances belonging to y^ Same or any part thereof 
To Haue & To Hold to them y^ Said William Stevens & 
Joseph Allen and y^ Said Towne of Glocefster them thier 
hiers Executors adminiftrators and afsignes in quiet & peace- 
able pofsefsion for Euer without the Least lett hindrance or 
molestacon whatsoeuer & further I the Said Samuel English 
doe hereby promife Covenant & grant to & with y« aboues'^ 
William Stevens and Joseph Allin that at & vntill the En- 
fealing & deliuery of thefe prefents I had good right full power 
and Lawfull authority to giue grant convey & confirme the 
Said premifes and Euery part thereof with all the appurten- 
ances as abouesaid it naturaly defcending to me from my 
predecefsor as abouesaid and doe hereby bind my Selfe hiers 
Executors adminiftrators and afsignes For Euer to defend y* 
Said William Stevens & Joseph Allin and The Said Towne 
of Glofster Then Thier hiers Executors adminiftr''* and 
afsignes for Euer from all Indian right and Title & from 
The lawfull Claimes of all perfons whatsoeuer to y^ abouesd 
premifes In Witnefs whereof I y^ abouesd Samuel English 
doe herevnto Set my hand & Scale this fourteenth day of 
January Seventeen hundred & in y^ I2 yeare of his maj''" 
reigne 

Signed Sealed & Deliured 

in prefence of vs his 

Abraham Perkins Samuel ^ English Scale 

Joseph ffoster marke 

Jon* Fairbanks 



[ I04 ] 

The within mentioned Samuel English perfonaly appearing 
before the Subfcriber one of y^ members of his Maj''" Coun- 
fell for the Province of y^ Mafsachufets Bay & Juftice of peace 
in the Same acknowledged the within written Instrument to 
be his act & deed. 

Ipswich Jan'^y y^ 15. John Appleton 

1700 /1701 

Abraham Perkins, the first witness to this deed, was 
a resident of Ipswich, where the deed was executed. 
He was sixty years of age at that time, and a promi- 
nent citizen. The other two witnesses, Joseph Foster 
and Jonathan Fairbank, were acquaintances, probably, 
of Samuel English, and evidently accompanied him 
from Billerica or that vicinity. 

John Appleton, before whom the deed was acknow- 
ledged, was a resident of Ipswich. He was one of His 
Majesty's Council for this province and a justice of the 
peace. He was a native of Ipswich, forty-eight years 
of age at this time, being a merchant, town clerk, 
representative to the general court, clerk of courts and 
colonel of the regiment of militia. 

The Indian had been paid and the deed delivered, 
but the money had not been raised, February 5, 1700- 
01, when a town meeting was held to consider the 
method of securing the necessary sum. The weather 
was so stormy on that day, that after choosing Lieu- 
tenant William Stevens moderator, the meeting was 
adjourned to the eleventh day of the same month. On 
that day the matter was not determined and adjourn- 
ment was made to the next day, when it was voted to 
sell some of the common land for this purpose. The 
lot layers were appointed a committee to ascertain what 
offers could be obtained for the land, and report the 



[ '°5] 

facts at the next general town meeting.' No further 
record relating to the matter has been found. 

' The following is a copy of the record of this meeting: — 

•* Att A Towne meeting Leagally warned according to the direction 
of Law which was the fift day of february in the year i 700-1 70 1 the 
Same day prouing to be Stormy weather the Inhabitants for all mett 
togather and Chofe Liuet: william Stevens moderator for fd meeting 
and did by reafon of the Weather Adjourne the meeting to the 
Leventh Day of the Same month of february and not bringing things 
to A head for what the ^eeting was Appointed for . . the meet- 
ing was Adjourned to the twlueth day of the fame month of febru- 
ary . . 

" it was Agreed vpon by the Inhabitants At fd meeting and by 
Affirmytiue voite there fliould be Land fould viz Som of the town 
Comon Lands to raife money to pay what Charges the towne is 
Indebeted for and About the purchafing of the townfhip of Samuel 
Englifh Indian 

" The Lot Layers was Appointed a Comity and ChofTen att fd 
meeting to treat with any of ye Inhabitants that will buy anv of the 
towne Comon Lands and to bring the reporte of it both for place 
quantity and price to the nex generell towne meeting." 

— Gloucester Town Records. 



THE DEEDS OF BOXFORD 

In the winter of 1700-01, Samuel English, Joseph 
English, and John Umpee, three grandsons of Mas- 
conomet, sagamore of Agawam, claimed title to, and 
demanded money for, the territory then included 
within the town of Boxford, which had at that time 
nearly the same territory as now. A town meeting was 
held January 15, 1700-01, at which John Perley, 
Thomas Perley, John Peabody, Thomas Hazen, and 
Josiah Bridges were chosen a committee to treat with 
the Indians relative to their demand. The first two 
named of this committee were brothers, sons of the 
immigrant Allan Perley, and natives of Ipswich, John 
being sixty-four, and Thomas fifty-nine, years old at 
the time of this transaction. John Perley was an en- 
sign in the militia, a carpenter, and had represented the 
town in the general court in 1690 and 1691. Thomas 
Perley was lieutenant in the militia, and had repre- 
sented the town in the general court in 1689, 1690, 
1692, and 1693, ^"d w^s the deputy at the time of this 
purchase from the Indians. Both were prominent in 
the local public affairs, holding the highest offices in the 
town, John being, at this time, one of the selectmen. 
Captain John Peabody was son of Lieutenant Francis 
Peabody, the immigrant, and was fifty-eight years of 
age. At this time he was the town clerk, having held 
the office since the incorporation of the town, in 1685. 
He was also the first schoolmaster, commander of 
the military company, and had held the highest town 
offices. He had represented the town in the general 
court in 1689, 1690, 1691, 1692, 1695, 1698, 1699, 

[ >°6] 



Residence of Lt. Thomas Perley, in Boxford, where the 
Indians made their agreement with the representatives of the 
town as to release of their interest in the territory of Boxford. 



[ I07 ] 

and 1700. Ensign Thomas Hazen was son of Ed- 
ward Hazen of Rowley, the immigrant, and was forty- 
three years old. He had been a selectman for many 
years. Josiah Bridges was son of Edmund Bridges of 
Ipswich, the immigrant, and was fifty years of age. 
He was a blacksmith, and one of the selectmen at 
this time. John Perley lived in what is now known 
as Barnes' pasture, on the road, now obsolete, which 
led from the present residence of El bridge Perley. 
Thomas Perley lived in the house, still standing, at 
the great elm tree, commonly known as the Isaac Hale 
place. John Peabody lived in a house which stood 
near the barn of the Deacon Palmer place until 1863, 
when it was taken down. Thomas Hazen lived at 
the eastern end of Baldpate Pond, and Josiah Bridges 
lived at the Humphrey Perley place. 

This committee was given full power to agree with 
the Indians both as to the amount of, and time when, 
the consideration should be paid. 

The next day, the committee and Samuel English, 
one of the Indians, met at the house of Lieutenant 
Thomas Perley, who conducted a public-house at 
that time. This house is still standing, and has been 
almost unchanged in its appearance during the two 
hundred and twenty-odd years of its existence. This 
ancient homestead is shown in the engraving on the 
opposite page. The great elm tree was not there then, 
but it is nearly as old as this transaction with the 
Indians. Colonel Dudley Bradstreet of Andover, a 
justice of the peace, was, also, probably present and 
wrote the deed, which the Indian acknowledged be- 
fore him. For this service the colonel was paid five 
shillings and sixpence. 



[ io8 ] 

The Indians proved, by the testimony under oath 
of several other Indians, that they were grandsons of 
Masconomet and his heirs.' 

The committee deHvered to Samuel English eight 
pounds in money, and paid the charges of the several 
Indians, amounting to about one pound and four 
shillings, as well as furnishing them with food and 
drink. The consideration named in the deed was nine 
pounds in current money. Thomas Hazen advanced 
two pounds of this amount, Thomas Perley, one 
pound and ten shillings in money and one pound in 
food and drink, John Perley, one pound and six shil- 
lings, and John Peabody, one pound and four shil- 
lings. Dr. David Wood, a physician of the town at 
that time, and a man of means, lent the committee two 
pounds and four shillings. Thomas Perley also paid 
Colonel Bradstreet the five shillings and sixpence for 
the deed. Doctor Wood was repaid his money as fol- 
lows : by Josiah Bridges thirteen shillings and sixpence 
for himself and his father "for their own share" five 
shillings, and by John Peabody one pound and five 
shillings. 

The deed was dated January i6, 1700-01, and re- 
corded in the Essex Registry of Deeds February 20, 

' The deed signed by Samuel English was recorded in the records 
of the town of Boxford, and at the end of it is the following state- 
ment : — 

" This is a trew Copey of the Indian deed which Samuell English 
an Indian grand son and heair of mafkenominit Sagemoer of aggawom 
who Chalenged the Town of Boxford to bee part of his grandfathers 
Land and proued it so to bee by sevaral Indin testimoney vpon oath 
and so to preuant fother trubbel and to Satisfy the Indian native 
heaier the Town of boxford haue giueen him the full sum of nien 
pound in money." 



[ I09 ] 

1704-05, book 16, leaf 188, and also in the Town 
Records of Boxford. The following copy is taken 
from the record in the Registry of Deeds: — 

To all People to whom these p'^sents shall Come Samuel 
English an Indian y^ Grandson & heir of Maschanomett the 
Sagemore of agawam in y^ County of Efsex in New Eng- 
land Sendeth Greeting Know yee that I the Said Samuel 
English Good & Sufficient Reasons & Consideracons moving 
me Thereunto & for the full & Just Sum of nine Pounds of 
Currant money of New England Truly Paid unto me the 
Said Samuel English y« Receipt w^'of I do hereby acknow- 
ledge in full of all Rights of Indian Claimes & Titles what- 
soever by Ensign John Pearly Lelv*^ Thomas Pearly Ensign 
Thomas Hazen Leiu' John Peabody & Josiah Bridges a 
Comittee & Agents for y^ Town of Boxford in the County 
of Efsex in y^ Province of y^ mafsachusetts In New England 
wherewith I the said Samuel English do hereby acknowledge 
my self fully Satisfied Paid & Content for Ever have given 
granted Bargained Sold & Confirmed & Do by these presents 
Fully Freely & absolutely give grant Bargain Sell & Confirme 
for Ever unto them the Said John Pearly Thomas Pearly 
Thomas Hazen John Peabody & Josiah Bridges & to as 
many others of y^ Proprietors & Inhabitants of said Town 
of Boxford as shall well & Truly pay unto the aboves"^ 
Comittee at or Before y^ First day of may Next Ensuing 
the date hereof Their due & Respective Shares & propor- 
tions of ye Sum of money Aboves^ & all other Charges Ex- 
pended by said Committe in & about the Same to their due 
Satisfaction a Certain Tract of Land Containing by Esti- 
macon Twelve Thousend acres be y^ Contents Thereof 
more or be they Lefs Known by y^ name of y^ Township 
of Boxford in y« County afores'^ being abutted & Bounded 
Northerly by a Marked Pine Tree on the Southerly Side [of] 
merrimack river which is the Corner Bounds and then the 
Line runs by the marked Trees that are Between Andover 



[ "o] 

& Boxford & Southerly according as y^ trees are marked be- 
twixt Andover & said Boxford as it hath Been Preambulated 
till it Come to the Eight mile Tree so called which is a 
bound mark betwixt said Andover & said Boxford & South- 
erly to a white oak which is the Bounds betwixt Will^ Hill 
men & said Boxford & then southerly to a Wild Pear Tree 
or Box tree Standing by Ipswich River side & then easterly 
as the River Runs till it meet with Ipswich Line which said 
Line doth extend six miles from said Ipswich meeting house 
& then upon a straight Line till it Come to an apple tree y* 
is in Leiv*^ Pearlys feild marked & then it runs with Ipswich 
Line untill it meets with Rowley Line near Caleb Jacksons 
& so till it Come to a white cake in Bradford Line as it is setled 
betwixt Boxford & Rowley & then westerly till it meet with y« 
Pine Tree first mentioned Parting betwixt Boxford & andover 
all which said Tract of Land in the said Township of s^ 
Boxford according as it is Bounded or ought to be Bounded 
with all the Lands Soyles Rivers Brooks streams water waters 
Ponds Fishings huntings Wood stone Grafs feed and all y« 
rights proffitts Priveledges Comodities & appurten^es thereto 
belonging or in any manner of wise appertaining to y^ same 
or any part thereof To have & To Hold to them the said 
John Pearly Thomas Pearly Thomas Hazen John Peabody 
and Josiah Bridges and to others of the Inhabitants & Pro- 
prietors of said Town of Boxford Provide as is above Pro- 
vided to them yr heirs Executors admin^fs ^ afsignes in 
Quiet & Peaceable pofsefsioji for Ever In fee simple a good 
& sound Estate of Inheritance freely & Clearly acquitted 
Released & discharged of all & from all Indian rights and 
titles whatsoever y* may Be made by me or any other Na- 
tive in this Land of New England Further I y^ said Samuel 
English do hereby Covenant promise & Grant to & with y* 
aboves'^ Comittee of y^ Towne of Boxford y* at & untill the 
ensealing & delivery of these presents I had good right full 
power & Lawfull authority to grant & Convey y^ same & 
all y^ premises as aboves'^ hereby Binding my self heirs 



[ "' ] 

execut" & adm"^* forever to defend the said John Pearly 
Thomas Pearly Thomas Hazen John Peabody & Josiah 
Bridges & others according as is provided Before them their 
heirs execuf^ adm"^^ & afslgnes for ever from the Lawful! 
Claimes of all persons whatsoever to y^ same or any part of 
y^ abovementioned & granted premises In witnefs whereof I 
the said Samuel English do hereunto set my hand & Seale 
this Sixteenth day of January seventeen hundred seventeen 
hundred & one & In the 12*^ year of y^ Reign of our Royall 
Soveraign William y^ Third over England &c King &c 

Signed sealed & DD 

in presence of us his 

Thomas Baker Samuel a^^ English & a seale 

Joseph ffoster mark 

Moses Parker 

Samuel English an Indian appeared before me y^ Sub- 
scriber one of his maj^'^^ Justices of peace for y^ County of 
Efsex & acknowledged this Instrum^ to be his act & deed 
this ib^** of Jan^ 1700/701 

Dudley Bradstrket 

Captain Thomas Baker, the first of the witnesses to 
this deed, lived in Topsfield, and at this time was 
sixty-four years of age. He was a native of Norwich, 
England. The others were those men who accom- 
panied these Indians in these transactions, Joseph 
Foster being, probably, of Billerica and Moses Parker 
of Chelmsford. 

It is not known why Joseph English and John 
Umpee did not release their interests in the land at 
this time, as all were present apparently. 

On the tenth of the next October (1701), Joseph 
Foster brought the other two Indians, and they signed 
another deed of import similar to that which Samuel 



English had executed. For this release John Peabody 
paid them two shillings and sixpence in silver, and 
they were also furnished with "rum and victuals 
enough." This deed of quitclaim was written by Isaac 
Addlngton of Boston, and he was paid three shil- 
lings. At this time he was fifty-five years of age, 
judge of the court of common pleas, and had been 
Speaker of the House of Representatives. He was 
Instrumental In the overthrow of the government of 
Sir Edmund Andros, and then became clerk of the 
committee which had the affairs of government in 
charge and later secretary of the provisional govern- 
ment which followed. He was a man of great mod- 
esty. Industry, Integrity, and wisdom. 

In this deed all three of the Indians were named 
as grantors, probably erroneously. The deed states 
that nine pounds In silver was its consideration, but 
the evidence of payment is that it represented about 
the sum actually paid to all the Indians. 

This later deed Is dated In 1 701, the acknowledg- 
ment being taken October 22, 1701, and was recorded 
in the Essex Registry of Deeds, book 1 8, leaf 33, Feb- 
ruary 24, 1703-04. The following Is a copy of this 
deed as it Is recorded in the Registry of Deeds : — 

To all People unto whom these presents shall come Sam- 
uel English Joseph English Sc John Vmpee Indians Grand 
Children & the next true rightfull and Lawfull heirs of mus- 
quonomet alias muschonomet Indian Cheif Sagamore & na- 
tive Proprietor of that whole Tract of Land Extending from 
the Southerly Side of the River merrimack unto naumkeeg 
otherwise Called Bafs river lying in the County of Efsex 
within his maj^'^^ Province of the mafsachusetts Bay in New 
England Send Greeting whereas Divers Englishmen many 



[ "3 ] 

years Since in the Life time of the Said musqunomet al^ 
muschonnomet with his Knowledge Lycence & good Liking 
did Enter into Subdue Improve Build & Settle an English 
Plantation Containing about Twelve Thousand acres of 
Land more or Lefs now Called & Known by the Name of 
the Town of Boxford within the afores'^ Tract of Land in 
the said County of Efsex, which said Plantation or Town- 
ship & the Lands thereto Belonging are Butted & Bounded 
Northerly by a marked pine Tree on the Southerly Side of 
merrimack River afores'^ which is the Corner Bounds & 
then the Line Runs by marked Trees that are between 
Andover & Boxford & Southerly according as the Trees are 
marked betwixt said Andover and Boxford, as it hath been 
perambulated till it Come to the Eight mile Tree so called 
which is a Bound mark betwixt said Andover & Boxford & 
Southerly to a white oak which is the Bounds betwixt Wills 
Hill men & said Boxford & then Southerly to a wild Pair tree 
or Box tree standing by Ipswich River side & then Easterly as 
the River Runs till it meet with Ipswich Line which Said Line 
doth Extend Six miles from Said Ipswich meeting house & 
then upon a Straight Line till it Come to an apple tree that 
is in Leiv*^ Pearlys field marked & then it Runs with Ipswich 
Line until it meets with Rouley Line near Caleb Jacksons 
& so till it Come to a white oak in Bradford Line as it is 
setled betwixt Boxford & Rowley & then westerly till it 
meet with the Pine Tree first mentioned parting Betwixt 
Boxford and Andover Now Know yee that we the Said 
Samuel English Joseph English & John Vmpee the true 
Rightfull & Lawfull heirs of the said musquonomonet al= 
muschonnomet as afores^ as well upon the Consideracon 
afores^ as for divers other good Causes & Consideracons 
us thereunto moving more Especially for & in Consideracon 
of the Sum of nine pounds Currant Silver money of New 
England to us in hand at & before the Ensealing & delivery 
of these presents well & truly paid by John Pearly Thomas 
Pearly Thomas Hazen John Peabody & Josiah Bridges all of 



[ -H] 

Boxford afores<^ yeomen a Comittee & agents for the Said 
Town of Boxford The Receipt whereof we do hereby ac- 
knowledge & our Selves to be therewith well Satisfyed Con- 
tented & fully paid Have Granted aliened Enfeoffed Re- 
leased Ratifyed Confirmed & forever Quit Claimed & by 
these presents for our selves & our heirs Do fully freely 
Clearly & absolutely grant aliene Enfeoffe Release Ratify 
Confirm & Quit Claim unto the Said John Pearly Thomas 
Pearly Thomas Hazen John Peabody & Josiah Bridges and 
the Rest of the Freeholders & Proprietors of the Said Plan- 
tation or Township of Boxford in their actuall pofsefsion 
being all the afores'^ quantity and Tract of Twelve Thou- 
sand acres of Land more or Lefs Scituate Lying & being in 
the s'^ County of Efsex & Butted bounded & described as 
afores*^ or howsoever otherwise the Same is bounded or Re- 
puted to be Bounded Together with all & Singular the Trees 
Timber woods underwoods Rivers Brooks ponds Streams 
waters water Courses marshes meadows feilds feedings fish- 
ing fowling hunting Edifices Buildings Rights members pro- 
fitts priviledges Comodities advantages hereditaments Emolu- 
ments & appur^e^ whatsoever upon or Belonging to the Said 
Tract of Land Plantation or Township of Boxford afores<^ 
or to any part or percell thereof & all the Estate Right Title 
Interest Inheritence use property Claime & demand whatso- 
ever of us the Said Sam" English Joseph English & John 
Vmpee & each of us our & each of our heirs of in or to the 
Same & the Reversion Sc Reversions Remainder & Remain- 
ders thereof To Have & to Hold all the said herein before 
granted Released and Confirmed premises unto the said John 
Pearly Thomas Pearly Thomas Hazen John Peabody & 
Josiah Bridges & the Rest of the Freeholders and Pro- 
prietors of the Town of Boxford afores"^ their heirs & af- 
signes to their only proper use Benefitt & behoofe for Ever 
& we the Said Samuel English Joseph English & John 
Vmpee for our Selves & our heirs do hereby covenant grant 
& agree to & with the Said John Pearley Thomas Pearly 



[ -is] 

Thomas Hazen John Peabody & Josiah Bridges & their 
heirs & afsignes on behalfe of themselves & other the fFree- 
holders & Proprietors of Said Town of Boxford their heirs 
& afsignes for evtr that we the Said Samuel English Joseph 
English & John Vmpee are the true Rightfull & Lawfull 
heirs of the beforenamed musquonomonet alias Muschono- 
met & that we shall & will warrant & defend all & singu- 
lar the Lands & premises by us herein before granted Re- 
leased & quit claimed unto y^ s'^ John Pearly Tho : Pearly 
Tho: Hazen John Peabody Josiah Bridges & other the 
Freeholders & proprietors of the Town of Boxford afores'^ 
their heirs & afsignes for Ever against our selves & our heirs 
& all & Every other person or persons Claiming any Right 
title or Interest therein from by or under us any or either 
of us from by or under our Said Grandfather Musquono- 
monit alias muschonnomett In witnefs whereof we have 
hereunto Set our hands & scales the day of 

anno Dom : 1701 annoq R R^ Gulielmi Tertii anglie &c 
Decimo tertio. 

Signed Sealed and DD his 



^ 



by Joseph Foster Joseph ^f j English & seal 
John Boynton 

mark 
his 



JOHN^ 



Vmpee & seal 

mark 

Joseph English & John Vmpee appeared before me the 
Subscriber one of his maj''^^ Justices of y^ peace for the County 
of Efsex & acknowledged this Instrum*^ to be their act & deed 
this 22^ of octobr 1 70 1 

Dudley Bradstreet y peace 

Joseph Foster, the first witness, was the person of 
that name from Billerlca who seems to have accom- 



[ "6] 

panied these Indians upon occasions like this, as he 
appears generally as a witness to their deeds. John 
Boynton was a sergeant in the militia of Rowley, where 
he lived, and was fifty-three years old. His occupa- 
tion was that of a husbandman and weaver. Colonel 
Bradstreet, who took the acknowledgment, was the 
same magistrate who appeared in the execution of the 
deed of Samuel English.' 

' A record of these transactions is contained in the Town Records 
of Boxford, as follows: — 

•• At a legal Town meting hild in boxford the I 5*-'' of Jenewary 
1700/ 1 701: the Town Choes Sargent Thomas Andrus moderator 
for the meeting: also the Town voted to Choues a Commety to treeat 
with the Indians a bought thaier demand of money for our Town 
being with in the tract of land the Indians have claimed to beelong to 
the Sagemoer of aggowam which also thay have proved thay bee the 
grand Children of the s^ Saggamoer: the Commety chosen for this 
sarvis bee as folow 

" Ensien pearly Leftenant pearly John pebody Ensien heazen Jo- 
siah bridges the Toun haue agreead and voted that this Commety or 
the major part of them have full power to agree with the Indians in 
order to thair demand both for quantety of money and for the time 
when it shall bee payed also have voted to levye and Raise the money 
preporsanebly upon all the land with in our township 

"The 16*'^ of Jenewary 1700/ I 701 the Commety a Cording to 
the Towns order have a greead with Samuel English the grandson 
of Mascanomenet Sagemoer of aggawam Conserning his titel to our 
town; and wee have tacken a deed of him from bradford bounds to 
Ipswich River and from wils hill to Ipswich lien a Cording to the 
Court grant to Rowley: and wee have given him Eaight pound of 
money and all thair Charges which is about nien pound and fouer 
shillings in the whol 

"and hear is an account of what Each man layed down to mack 
vp the sum Ensien pearly -01-06-00 Leftenant perly -01-10-00 
Ensien heazen oz-00-00 John pebody -01-04-00 and david wood 
lent the Commety -02-04-00 and Leftenant pearly on pound in vitteh 
and drink -01-00-00 and .5. Shillin and 6'^ for acknowlegment of 
the deed -00-05-06 



i 117] 

" about the lo*'' of October 1701: Josaph foster brout Josaph In- 
glish and John Vmpee to set thair hand to a quit Cleam and Resaived 
of John pebody two Shillings and sixpenc in Siluer and Rum and 
vittels Enouf 

*• alfo John pebody payed m' Adington 3^ for writing the quet 
clame that thes tow Indians suied untow 

*• the -2I -04S lent by david wood is payed agaien. thirten 
Shilingand sixpenc by Josiah bridges and .5^. shilling he payed of it 
for his father and himself for thair owen Shaer and by John pebody 
one pound five Shillings and Sixpenc so that the -2^-/^^ is payed 
agaien ' ' 



THE DEED OF ROWLEY 

As attorneys of Samuel English, Joseph English, 
and John Umpee, Indians, who affirmed that they were 
the heirs of Masconomet, the sagamore of Agawam, 
some men, whose names are unknown, but who were 
probably Joseph Foster of BlUerlca and Moses Parker 
of Chelmsford, demanded possession of the land in- 
cluded within the town of Rowley; and a meeting of 
the Inhabitants was held December 28, 1700, to con- 
sider the claim. Deacon Ezekiel Jewett, Samuel Platts, 
and Captain Joseph Boynton were appointed a com- 
mittee to make inquiry about the claim and endeavor 
to perfect the title of the town to the territory on the 
best terms they could. An agreement was made with 
Samuel English, one of the Indians, and, upon the 
payment of nine pounds, he gave a deed to the town, 
releasing his claim to the land.' There is no known 
record of this deed, and whether the original document 
is in existence or not Is also unknown. 

January 17, 1700-01, a meeting of the inhabitants 
of Rowley was held, and it was voted that the com- 
mittee should be remunerated for the nine pounds 

' ** At a legall meeting of the inhabitants of the town of Rowley 
December zS^ 1700 their was chosen Deacon Ezekiell Jewett, Sam*' 
Plats & Captain J oseph Boynton to treat with Gentlem improved & 
impowered as attorneys for the indians which make a demand of our 
lands who do affirm that they are the proper Heirs to masquenomenet 
Sagamore of Agawam & to make enquiry about our title, & labour to 
cleare up our title to sd lands to their satisfaction if it can bee: or other- 
wise to agree with sd atturneys & what sd comittee shall do therein 
shall be a valued act." — Rowley Town Records. 

[ ifS ] 



[ "9] 

they paid to the Indian for this deed for the levy of a 
tax upon the lands within the town privately owned/ 
Of the committee appointed to adjust this matter 
with the Indians, Deacon Jewettwas then fifty-seven 
years of age, and had been deacon of the church in 
Rowley for fourteen years. Samuel Platts was about 
fifty-two years old, town clerk for several years, and 
wrote most of the deeds and wills of the people there 
for many years. Captain Boynton was fifty-five years 
of age, and a prominent man in the town. He was 
commander of the military company and town clerk 
and representative many years. 

' " At a legall meeting of the inhabitants of Rowley Jan 17*^ } ^ 1 
it was agreed & voated that the rate for raising the money to satisfie 
the nine pounds paid to the Indian Sam^' English for a title to our 
township & the charge thereabout should be proportioned by the 
selectmen upon lands & freeholds belonging to the inhabitants of this 
town & others that have lands or meadows within the town bounds. 
Voated & passed on the afirmative." — Rowley Town Records. 



BRADFORD DEEDS 

The people in Bradford apparently learned, in some 
way, that claims to the title of their territory would 
be made by both Englishmen and Indians. The Eng- 
lishmen may have been those claiming under Robert 
Tutton Mason, who was the successor of his grand- 
father, Captain John Mason, the early grantee of some 
lands between Charles and Merrimack rivers and three 
miles beyond each river; but more likely they were 
Joseph Foster and Moses Parker, as they were associ- 
ated with these Indians in their transactions with the 
several towns. 

A meeting of the proprietors of the town was held 
November 23, 1700, at which Ensign John Tenney 
was the moderator. Ensign Joseph Bailey, Corporal 
Richard Kimball, and John Boynton were appointed 
a committee to treat with these claimants concerning 
titles. Later in the meeting Ensign John Tenney and 
Philip Atwood were added to the committee, which 
was given full power to act in behalf of the town, 
according to the best of their judgment.' 

' <* Att a legall town meting held in Bradford, on the : 23 : of 
nouember 1 700 Insine tenny was chosen modratar fiue men wear put 
to uot to treat [with] the Inglish men and the Indeneswhen thay com 
consarneng the titel of our land namly, John tenny Joseph baly Rich- 
ard Kemball sen'' philip Attwood and John boynton it passed in the 
afermitiue the town gaue them pour to act in the behalf of the 
towne. 

♦♦on the same day weare put to uot how the charges that might 
aris on this account both in purching of the indens if need weare 
and also the charges of the comity should be defrayed it pased in 

[ 120 ] 



[ >^' ] 

Joseph Bailey was about fifty years of age at this 
time; Richard Kimball was forty; John Boynton 
was a weaver, and aged fifty-three; John Tenney was 
about fifty-three ; and Philip Atwood was a weaver, 
aged forty-two, a native of Maiden, and had come 
from Lynn to Bradford several years before this 
time. 

At this meeting of the proprietors the matter of 
defraying the charges of the committee and transfer 
was discussed, and it was voted to levy the amount 
upon the land in proportion to the quantity of land 
each person owned, treating it as all " wilderness 
land." 

The Englishmen did not appear, but the In- 

the afirmitiue: that thay should be lauied upon euery manes propriety 
of land that lyes in the bounds of the Towne." 

— Bradford Town Records, 

The following is a copy of the record of this meeting as recorded 
in the Essex Registry of Deeds, book 15, leaf 137: — 

♦*att aLegall meeting ofy^ proprietors of Bradford in y^zj of novemb' 
1700 Ensign John Tenny was first chosen moderator he appointed 
3 men to treat w^^ y* Englishmen & Indians if they come concerning 
y« title of our land y^ 3 men were put to voat singly namely Insign 
Baly corporall Richard Kimball and John Bointon & they all pafsed 
on y^ afirmatives afterwards at y^ same meeting added to y^ former 
Three Insign Tenny & Phillip Atwood y^ Proprietors gave them full 
power to act in behalf of y^ town according to their best Judgm' or 
any thereof of them on y^ same day y^ 23*^ of novemb' 1700 their 
was a discourse how y^ charges should be defrayd y* might arise as 
to purchasing of y^ heathen if need were & also y^ charges as to y'= 
comittee for their Expences of his was put to voat if y^ charges should 
not be laid on every mans land according to his proportion of land as 
Wildernefs land & it pafsed on y^ affirmative y* so y^ charges should 
arise. 

"the Town clerk being absent y* proprietors then chose me to 
write wt they did act " 



[ 122 ] 

dians did. They were Samuel English, Joseph Eng- 
lish, and John Umpee. An agreement was made 
with them to release, for three pounds and ten shil- 
lings in silver, their interest in the territory, which 
included Gage's Island in the Merrimack River, and 
excepted Mr. Phillips' farm of three hundred acres 
lying between the river and the road leading to 
Rowley. 

The deed was prepared January 30, 1700-01, 
but the Indians afterward came separately, and exe- 
cuted It. Samuel English came March aist, and 
acknowledged It In Haverhill, probably at the house 
of Nathaniel Saltonstall, a justice of the peace, before 
whom the acknowledgment was made. Joseph English 
came July 31, 1 701, and acknowledged the deed, also 
in Haverhill, before Nathaniel Saltonstall, and John 
Umpee appeared October 22, 1701, and executed it 
in Andover, probably at the house of Colonel Dud- 
ley Bradstreet, a justice of the peace, before whom 
the acknowledgment by this Indian was made. Na- 
thaniel Saltonstall was a magistrate, trained in the 
law, and was one of the judges assigned to try the 
first witch cases at Salem In 1692. He was so little 
In sympathy with the whole proceeding that he re- 
fused to further compromise himself by participating 
In the trials. 

This deed was recorded In the Essex Registry of 
Deeds, volume 15, leaf 136, April 13,1702; and the 
following copy Is from this record : — 

To all people unto whom these presents shall come Samuel 
English Joseph English & John Vmpee Indians Grand Child- 
ren Si. y^ next true rightfull & lawfull heirs of Masquono- 
monit al^ Muschonomet Indian dec^ who was cheif Sagamore 



[ 123 ] 

and native proprietors of y' whole Tract of land Extending 
from y« Southerly side of y^ River merimack unto Naumkeeg 
al* Bass. River lying in y^ county of Efsex within y^ province 
of y^ mafsachusetts bay In New Engl*^ Send Greeting whereas 
divers Englishmen many years since in y^ life time of y^ said 
Musquonomitt al^ Muschonomett & by & with his Know- 
ledge licence & Good liking did Enter upon Subdue Improve 
Build & Settle an English Plantation, containing about Eight 
Thousand acres of land more or Lefs now called & Known 
by y^ name of Bradford within & upon part of y^ afores'^ 
Tract of land in y^ county of Efsex afores^ which said 
Plantation or Township of Bradford and y^ lands thereof are 
butted & Bounded Northerly upon y^ Said River Merrimack 
Easterly upon the Line of the Township of Newbury untill 
it come to y^ Run of water in a certain Swamp comonly 
called Beaver Swamp & then Running on a Streight line to 
a certain Rock comonly called Hardys Rock & From thence 
to a white oak mark*^ on Three sides standing near into John 
Pickards fFarme So called & from thence Running near said 
John Pickards house & So over Johnsons Pond so called to 
an oak tree Standing at y^ southeasterly corner of y« Pond 
called Little Pond and from thence to a Run of water on y^ 
North Side of a certain hill comonly called & Known by 
y« Name of Philistine hill & following y' Run of water till 
it come to y^ Line of The Town of Andover & so upon 
Andover Line till it come to y« River Merrimack as also a 
certain Island cal<i & Known by y^ name of Gages Island 
containing about six acres of land more or Lefs lying in 
merrimack River afores^ now Know yee y* we y^ said 
Samuel English Joseph English & John Vmpee y^ true right- 
full and lawfuU heirs of y^ abovenamed Sagamore musquo- 
nomonit al* muschonnomet as well upon y^ consideracon 
afores'^ as for divers other good causes & consideracons us 
thereunto moving more especially for & in consideration of 
y* sum of Six pounds & ten shillings in currant Silver mony 
of NewEngl<i to us in hand at & before y^ Ensealing & 



[ 1^4 ] 

delivery of these presents well & truly Paid by John Tenny 
Phillip Atwood & John Boynton all of Bradford afores'^ 
yeomen appointed a comittee by y^ Rest of y^ Freeholders Si 
proprietors of y^ lands within and belonging to y^ said town- 
ship y^ receipt of which sum of six pounds ten shillings in 
mony we do hereby acknowledge & our selves to be therew"^ 
well satisfied contented & fully paid have given granted 
aliened Released Enfeofed Ratified & confirmed and for 
Ever Quittclaimed and for us & Every of us Each and Every 
of our heirs Do by these presents freely fully & absolutely 
give grant aliene Release Enfeofe Ratify confirm & for Ever 
quittclaim unto y^ s^ John Tenny Phillip Atwood & John 
Bointon & y^ Rest of y^ fFreeholders & proprietors of lands 
within y^ said Township of Bradford their heirs & afsignes 
for ever all y^ beforementioned Tract of land Plantation or 
township called Bradford containing Eight Thousand acres of 
land, more or less & described & butted & bounded as as above 
Exprefsed or howsoever otherwise y^ same is.Butted bounded 
or Reputed to be bounded & also all y* Island afores^ corn- 
only called Gages Island together with all houses Edifices 
Buildings trees timber woods underwoods feilds feedings 
pastures marshes meadows swamps ponds pools Runs Rivo- 
letts Stones herbage Rights members hereditaments profitts 
priveledges Comodities Emolum** & appur'^^^^ whatsoever 
upon y^ afores*^ tract of land & Island or any part thereof or 
to y^ Same or any part or percell thereof belonging or in any 
wise appertaining & also all y^ Estate right title Intrest In- 
heritance use property pofsefsion claim & demand whatso- 
ever of us y^ said Samuel English Joseph English John 
Vmpee & every of us our & every of our heirs of in to and 
out of y^ Same w*^^ y^ reversion & reversions Remainder & 
Remainders thereof & also all & Every Sum & Sums of 
mony or pay™'^ w*soever to be asked challenged or in any 
wise demanded therefore Excepting only a certain percell of 
Land of about three hundred acres comonly called m''^ Phillips 
hir ffarme Extending from y^ afores'^ River Merrimack up 



[ 125] 

to Rouly Road and all y^ meadows Belonging to said fFarme 
Lying within y« s^ Town of Bradford according as said farm 
is Bounded To Have & to Hold all the Before mentioned 
to be granted & Released Lands & premises in y^ actuall 
pofsefsion of y^ said John Tenny Phillip Atwood & John 
Bointon & other y^ freeholders & proprietors of y^ said 
Town of Bradford being (Except only as before is Excepted) 
withall y^ rights members profitts Hereditaments & & ap- 
purtenances thereunto belonging unto y^ said John Tenny 
Phillip Atwood & John Bointon & y^ Rest of y^ fFreeholders 
& proprietors of y^ said town of Bradford their heirs & 
afsignes for Ever To their only proper use Benefitt & behoofe 
respectively for evermore fFreely peaceably & Quietly to 
pofsefs use occupy & Enjoy y^ same as a good perfect & 
absolute Estate of Inheritance In fee without the least lett 
denial! molestation Suit Trouble Eviction Ejection claim or 
demand of us y^ said Samuel English Joseph English & John 
Vmpee or any or Either of us or any or Either of our heirs 
or of any other person or persons from by or under us any 
or Either [of] us & we do hereby for ourselves & our heirs 
covenant grant & agree to & with the said John Tenney 
Phillip Attwood & John Bointon their heirs Exe^s & adm" 
on behalf of themselves & y^ Rest of y« freeholders & pro- 
prietors of y^ town of Bradford afores*^ their heirs & afsignes 
to warrant & defend all y^ said Granted & Released premises 
& Every part & parcell thereof unto y^ said John Tenney 
Phillip Atwood John Bointon & y^ Rest of freeholders & 
pprietors of y« s"^ town of Bradford their heirs & afsignes for 
Ever against ourselves & our heirs & Every of them & all 
& all and Every other person or persons having claiming 
or pretending To Have or claim any Estate Right title 
or Interest in or to y^ same from by or under us any or 
Either of us or from by or under y^ s^ musquonominit al^ 
muschonnomet or any other Sagamore or Indian whatso- 
ever In witnefs whereof we have hereunto set our hands 
& seals y* Thirtieth day of January anno Domini one thou- 



[ 126] 

sand seven hundred, Annoq R R Gulielmi Tertii angliae &c 
Decimo 

Signed seal"^ & DD in presence of us 
By Samuel English on march 21 1700 

Samuel Hasin for Sam ^^ 

Sam'-^ ^7 English & seale 

mark of 

Robert Clement for Joseph 315 1701 

Moses Parkre for sam ^ ^^1- <, , 

Joseph ^ty ■» English & seale 

John Griffin for Joseph 31 5 1701 

ye mark 
John /^ Vmpee & a seale 
Tho: Parley ) for John Vmpee of 
Joseph ffoster ) 22^ octob^ 1701 

Haverhill march 21 1700 or 1701 Samuel English Indian 
one of y* w^^^in named subscribers being present signed owned 
& acknowledged y^ w*^in written to be his act & deed 

Before me Nath'-'- Saltonstall y«;' of Peace 

Haverhill July 31: 1701 y^ w^^^in named Joseph English 
appeared & signed sealed & owned & acknowledged y^ In- 
strum* on y« other side to be his act & deed 

Before me. Nathaniel Saltonstall 'Justice of peace 

andover octob' 22*^ 1 70 1 John Vmpee one of y^ w^Mn 
named subscribers being present owned & acknowledged y^ 
w^'^in written Instrum* to be his act and Deed 

Before me Dudley Bradstreet J : peace 

Recorded with this deed in the Registry of Deeds 
is the following receipt signed by Joseph English and 
John Umpee: — 

Rec'^ on ye Thirtieth day of January 1 700/1 of the 
within named John Tenny Phillip Atwood & John Boynton 



[ 127 ] 

y« sum of six pounds Ten shillings in currant silver mony 
of New England in full payment of y^ purchase consideration 
within mentioned By us 

y^ mark 

Joseph 'f J '^ English on 31 : 5 : 1701 
of 



John ^ 



Vmpee 
his mark 

Of the witnesses to this deed Robert Clement 
lived in Haverhill, John Griffin in Bradford, Thomas 
Perley in Boxford, and Joseph Foster and Moses 
Parker were from Billerlca and Chelmsford respec- 
tively, being the companions of these Indians as their 
attorneys on the occasions of these transactions with 
the several towns. 

In the above deed the Phillips farm was excepted. 
After that deed was drawn and executed by Samuel 
English, he signed a deed of this farm to Rev. Ed- 
ward Payson and Robert Greenough, both of Rowley. 
Mr. Payson was pastor of the church in Rowley, 
having preached there for a score of years. He was 
forty-three years of age at this time. Mr. Greenough 
was of about the same age as Mr. Payson. This deed 
is dated March 26, 1701, and was recorded in the 
Essex Registry of Deeds, book 14, leaf 160, May 
30, 1 70 1. The following copy is taken from this 
record: — 

To all Christian People to whome this Deed of Sale shall 
come Sam: English an Indian hier to y^ old Sagamore Mas- 
quenominet of aggawam Sendeth Greeting Know yee that I 
Sam : English of y^ Towne of Chelmsford in y^ County of 
Middlefex province of y^ Mafsachufets Bay in new England 



[ 1^8 ] 

Diuers good Caufes & Confideracons me therevnto mouing 
but Especialy for & Confideracon of y^ full & Just Summe 
of Eighteen poundes in money by me Receiued which is full 
Satisfacon to me and Thereof acquitt Sc discharge m'' Edward 
Paifon & m'^ Robert Greenough thier hiers Executors adminif- 
trators Haue Granted bargained Sold & doe by thefe Psents 
Giue Grant bargaine Sell Ratifie Confirme aliene EnfeofFe & 
deliuer to y^ aboues'^ m'' Edward Paison & m"^ Robert Green- 
ough both of y^ Towne of Rowley in the county of Efsex a 
Certaine parcell of Land Scituate Lying & being within y^ 
bounds of y^ Towne of Bradford in the County of Efsex y* 
land being by Estimacon three hundred acres be y^ Contents 
thereof more or be they lefs as it is perticularly abutted & 
bounded Eafterly by land formerly laid out to m'' Ezekiel 
Rogers Southerly by a road from Rowley to Bradford West- 
erly by y« broolce Called Johnfons Brooke or Creeke north- 
erly by Merrimack riuer alfoe Twenty acres of meadow 
within the bounds of y^ Towne of Bradford in y^ meadow 
Called Jeremiah meadow all y^ abouesd Land & meadow in 
sd Township of Bradford y* was formerly Granted by Rowley 
Towne to m'' Samuel Phillips Deceafed Each parceles of land 
& meadow as they are perticularly Granted & Entred in y« 
records of Rowley Towne with all and Singular y^ priui- 
ledges & apurtenances Therevnto belonging or in any manner 
of wife appertaining (viz) wood Timber buildings fences 
springs brooks Orchards mines mineralls or any priuiledge 
whatsoeuer to them y« s^ m' Edward Paifon & m'' Robert 
Greenough thier Executors adminiftrators & afsigns To Haue 
& to Hold as a perfect & abfolute Estate of Inheritance in fFee 
Simple for Euer alfoe I doe by thefe prefents Declare that I 
haue good right full power & Lawfull authority in my owne 
name to giue grant Sell & Convey the same as abouesaid & 
that it shall & may be lawfull from time to time & at all 
times hereafter for y^ abouesd m'' Paifon & m'' Greenough & 
thier hiers Executors adminiftrators & afsignes to Haue Hold 
vfe Occupie & Enjoy to y^ Seuerall vfe & vfes free & cleare 



J 



[ 129 ] 

& freely & Clearly acquitted of & from all former & other In- 
dian Claimes orany other Grants Gifts Recognifance Charges 
Sailes at Law or any Incombrance whatsoeuer & shall re- 
maine free & cleare from me my hiers Executors adminiftra- 
tors or afsignes or any other perfon or perfons that Shall Lay 
any LawfuU Claime or Title to or into any part of y^ pre- 
mifes in Witnefs whereof I haue Sett to my hand & Seale 
March the Twenty Sixth One Thoufand Seuen hundred & 
one & in the Thirteenth yeare of William the Third of Eng- 
land Scotland fFrance & Ireland King defender of y** faith : 

Signed Sealed & Deliuered 
in Psence of Witnefses his 

Jaruis Ring Sam : f^ English & Seale 

Samuel Eastman 
Philip Greley 

marke 
Ipsw^h March the Twenty Eight 1701 Then the aboue 
s^ Sam : English an Indian perfonaly appeared & acknow- 
ledged this Instrument to be his free act & Deed before me 

John Appleton J Pe 

These witnesses were all natives and inhabitants 
of Salisbury, and the deed was probably signed and 
witnessed in that town; but It was acknowledged in 
Ipswich, before John Appleton, Esq., on the twenty- 
eighth of the month, two days after it was written. 
Of these witnesses, Jarvis Ring was forty-two years 
of age; Samuel Eastman, forty-three; and Philip 
Greeley, fifty-six. John Appleton resided In Ipswich, 
where he was a merchant, town clerk, representative 
to the general court, clerk of courts, colonel of the 
regiment, and at this time he was forty-eight years 
of age and a member of the Governor's council. 

This last act of Samuel English was probably per- 
formed without the cognizance of Moses Parker and 



[ I30 ] 

certainly without the knowledge of Joseph Foster. 
The latter was so incensed about it that he made the 
following deposition, which was recorded in the Essex 
Registry of Deeds, volume 14, leaf 195, on the day 
it was taken, Sept. 12, 1701 : — 

Joseph ffoster of full age testifieth that Samuel English 
that Claimed a title to Bradford land had no power or right 
of himselfe to Reserue any part of said Bradford to himfelfe 
or to make any perticular Conveyance of any part of Said 
land Ether to Mofes Parker or any other without my Con- 
sent hauing before the time that Bradford Comittey pur- 
chafed thier Indian title Comitted all his power into y« hands 
of Joseph Foster abouesaid & Moses Parker to act in his or 
thier behalfe neither had he any power of himfelfe without y« 
approbation of s'^ foster to Except m^ philipes farme which 
he neuer had for he said Samuel Inglish had by an act under 
hand & seale acknowledged before Majo^ Hinchman that he 
had Comitted the whole Concerne of this matter into y^ hands 
of said Foster & parker abouesaid : 

Sworne Salem September The 12*'^ 1701 before 

John Hathorne 1 fust 
Jonathan Corwine j peace 

These justices were two of the judges who pre- 
sided over the court of oyer and terminer during the 
trials of the witchcraft cases in 1692. 

Mr. Foster was probably appeased in some way, 
as on the twenty-second of the next month he ap- 
peared with John Umpee and witnessed his signature 
to the Bradford deed. 



THE DEED OF TOPSFIELD 

The next and last place to which these Indians 
laid claim was Topsfield. A meeting of the inhabi- 
tants was held February lo, 1700-01, to consider the 
matter, and it was agreed to refer the claim to a com- 
mittee with full power to agree with the Indians. The 
committee chosen for this purpose consisted of Cap- 
tain John Gould, Lieutenant Thomas Baker, Captain 
John How, Ensign Samuel Howlett, and Isaac Pea- 
body.' Captain Gould, at this time, was sixty-five years 
of age. He was the patriot who had led his military 
company to Boston to oppose the government of Sir 
Edmund Andros, and was imprisoned for treason. 
Lieutenant Baker was sixty-four years old. Captain 
How was about fifty-eight and an innholder. Samuel 
Howlett was about fifty years old. Isaac Peabody 
lived on the old Peabody homestead and at this time 
was fifty-two years of age. 

This committee conferred with the Indians, and 
for three pounds in money Samuel English agreed to 
give the town a quitclaim deed of its territory. The 
deed of the Sagamore Masconomet included this 
territory, to be sure, but it was thought best to settle 

' "At a lawfull Towne meeting ye lo*'^ of fabruary 1700 or 
1 70 1 it was agreed to giue full power to a Commity to agree with ye 
Indians as lays claime to our lands voted 

" Cap* John Gould and Leiut Thomas Baker and Capt John How 
and Ens Samuell Howlet and Isaac Pabody are Chosen and haue full 
power in ye behalfe of ye Towne to agree with the Indians as lays 
Claime to our Lands voted" 

— Topsfield Town Records, volume 3, page 108. 

[ UI ] 



[ ^32 ] 

with this grandson of the chief. That the town had 
the deed to John Winthrop in contemplation is evi- 
denced by a vote of the town passed at the same 
meeting when the committee to settle with the In- 
dians was chosen. This vote was to procure a copy 
of the Winthrop deed.' This was done and the copy 
was recorded in the Town Records.' The description 
of the premises in the Winthrop deed is very indefi- 
nite, and this fact may have induced the committee to 
secure a release from Samuel English. 

The deed executed by Samuel English is dated 
March 28, 1701, and recorded in the Topsfield 
Town Records, volume 3, page no. The following 
is a copy of the deed as thus recorded : — 

Know all cristian people by thes preasents that whareas I 
Samuell Inglish Indian Heir to Musquanomenit Sagamore of 
Agawom for and in considerasion of three pounds in mony 
in hand payd to my full sattisfaction doe absolutely quit 
claime to y^ Towne of Topsfield of all my right : that I haue 
had or euer might haue had: within ye bounds or limmits of 
y« Towne of Topsfield : as it hath bene by Genarell Court 
established and to which land by vertue of my aforesaid heir- 
ship I doe look upon my self as the rightfull owner of: also 
I doe hereby oblidge my selfe Heirs Executers : &c : to ye 
Towne of Topsfield to defend them in thare posestion and in 
Joyment of ye afore said premises for euer and to bare them 
harmless and in damnifye from any other persons whatsoeuer 
whether English or Indian that shall lay anny claime to ye 

' *♦ The Towne haue declared by uote y' Quortermaster Pirkins 
shall procure of ye Honnored Generall Winthrup a coppy of ye deed 
as ye Honored Gouernor Winthrup hed of ye Saggemore of ago- 
wam." — Topsfield Town Records, volume 3, page 108. 

' Volume 3 , page 1 1 1 . 



[ ^33 ] 

premisis or any part thare of that hather to bene improued 
or posesed by ye Towne aforesaid : by vertue of any Indian 
title or conueyance I y^ aforesaid Samuell English doe a gaine 
declare that in considerasion of three pounds corrent mony 
in hand paid by a committy apointe by y^ Towne of Tops- 
field to agree with mee in behalfe of said Towne : doe for 
my selfe and Heirs &c : renounce and Relinquish : all my 
reall or soposed Right with in y^ limmits aforesaid : and doe 
hereby confirme to y^ committy aforesaid : in behalfe of said 
Towne and to thare Heirs &c: for euer: (ye names of y^ 
comity being Cap* John Gould Leiu' Thomas Baker Cap* 
John How En^ Samuell Howlet and Isaac Pabody) ye afore 
said premises : and y' it shall be lawfull to and for ye said 
Towne for euer here after to haue hould quietly and peace- 
ably in Joy ye premises thay thare heirs Executors Adminis- 
trators and asigns foreuer in testimony whare of I ye said 
Samuell English haue here vnto set my hand and scale ; this 
twenty eight day of march anno dominj one thousand seuen 
hundred and one : and in y^ thirtenth yeare of his maiastie's 
Reigne William the third of England &c 

signeed sealed and diliuered 
in ye preasence of witnesses 

Joseph Capen z*^ 

John Pricherd ye mark of \ English 

Nathaniell Pearly ^ 



Ipswich may y^ fortenth day 1701 then y« a boue said 
Samuell English personally apered and acknowlidged this 
instrement to be his free act and deede be for mee 

John Appleton : Justis of ye peace 

Of these witnesses, Rev. Joseph Capen was the 
pastor of the church in Topsfield and forty-two years 
of age. He lived in the old Capen house, which is 
still standing. John Prichard was about the same 
age; and Nathaniel Perley lived over the town line. 



[ 134] 

in Boxford, and was much younger. John Appleton, 
the magistrate who took the acknowledgment of the 
deed, Hved in Ipswich and was the same justice who 
took the acknowledgment of the grantors in several 
other of the Essex County Indian deeds. 

At a town meeting held June 24, 1702, it was 
voted that the charges of this deed should be paid 
by levy on the lands within the town.' 

» "At a lawfull Towne meeting ye 2^^^ of June 1 701 theTowne 
did agree that y* ye charge as did arise about a greeing with ye in- 
dians a bout ye lands of our Towne of Topsfield shall be raised on 
ye lands in our Towne only." — Topsfield Town Records, volume 3, 
page 1 10. 



INDEX 



INDEX 



Abbot Hall, Marblehead, 54. 

Abousett River, 14. 

Addington, Isaac, 112, 117. 

Agawam, 6, 7, 25, 27, 29, 45, 47, 48, 
49. ^7, 88, 89, 90, 93, 94, 98, 102, 
106, 108, 109, 116, 118, 127, 132J 
Sagamore of, 6, 25, 27, 29, 45, 47, 
48, 49, 87, 88, 93, 94, 98, 102, 106, 
108, 109, 116, 118, 132. 

Agawam Bay, 27. 

Agawam tribe, 3. 

Agawam, 132. 

Agawon, 90. 

Aggawam, 116, 127. 

Aggawom, 88, 89. 

Aggowam, 116. 

Agowam, 132. 

Ahaton, 51. 

Ahawayet, 50. 

Ahawayetsquaine, Joane, 54, 55, 56, 
57, 58, 59, 60. 

Ahawton, 51. 

Alewives, 38, 39. 

Algonquin race, 3. 

Allen, Ens. Joseph, loi, 102, 103. 

Amasquanamett, 90. 

Amesbury, 5. 

Andover, 4, 14, 15, 35, 36, 37, 38, 
39, 71, 75, 107, 109, no, 113, 
122, 123 ; conveyance of, 35, 39. 

Andover, Hampshire, England, 38. 

Andover road, 44. 

Andrews, Serg. Thomas, 116. 

Andros, Sir Edmund, 28, 64, 112, 131. 

Annamutaage, 4, 5. 

Annisquam, 7. 

Appleton, John, 104, 129, 133, 134. 

Appleton, Samuel, 29, 64, 65. 

Appooquahamock, 10. 

Asslebee, John, 15. 

Attitash Pond, 5. 

Atwood, Philip, 120, 121, 124, 125, 
126. 

Augamtoocooke, 5. 

Augoan, 6. 



Babson, John J., 7. 
Bacon, Daniel, 86, 87. 



Bagnall, Walter, 50. 

Bailey, Ens. Joseph, 120, 1 21. 

Bailey, Sarah Loring, 4, I 5. 

Baker, Thomas, in, 131, 133. 

Baker's Island, 86. 

Baldpate Pond, 107. 

Barbadoes, 10. 

Barnes' Pasture, 107. 

Bartholmew, Henry, 59, 60. 

Bartlet, John, 42. 

Bass River, 8, 9, 11, 79, 80, 112, 123. 

Bassett, William, 68, 70, 72. 

Beal, William, 52, 53. 

Beaver Brook, 55. 

Beaver Swamp, 123. 

Beverly, 8, 16, 80, 85, 88, 89, 90, 91, 

92, 96; deed of, 88, 89, 90, 91, 

92. 
Beverly Harbor, 13. 
Billerica, 45, 91, 98, 104, in, 115, 

1 18, 127. 

Bishop, ,61. 

Black Will, 49, 50. 

Blanchard, Samuel, 15. 

Bligh, Samuel, 74, 75. 

Blue Hills, 7. 

" Body of Liberties," 32. 

Boston, 19, 25, 27, 28, 30, 38, 39, 43, 

60, 61, 62, 64, 65, 67, 71, 112. 
Boston Latin School, 37. 
Bowhow, Piam, 51. 
Box tree, no, 113. 
Boxford, 38, 106, 108, 109, no, 113, 

n4, n5, n6, 127, 134; deeds of, 

106, 107, 108, 109, no, ni, 112, 

113, 114, 115, 116, n 7. 
Boynton, John, 115, 116, 120, 121, 

124, 125, 126. 
Boynton, Capt. Joseph, 118, 119. 
Bradford, 3, 47, no, 113, 116, 120, 

121, 123, 124, 125, 127, 128, 130; 

deeds, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 

126, 127, 128, 129, 130. 
Bradstreet, Anne, 61. 
Bradstreet, Col. Dudley, 107, 108, ni, 

115, 116, 122, 126. 
Bradstreet, Gov. Simon, 60, 61. 
Braintree, 29. 



[ 137 ] 



[ "38] 



Brattle, Capt. Thomas, 64., 65. 
Brereton, Sir William, 14. 
Bride's Brook, 71. 
Bridges, Edmund, 107. 
Bridges, Josiah, 106, 107, 108, 109, 
1 10, III, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117. 
Briscoe, Robert, 91, 92. 
Bristol, England, 42, 46. 
Brixham Parish, Plymouth, England, 

33- 
Brown, Amos, 98. 
Browne, Benjamin, 12, 89. 
Browne, John, 68, 70, 72. 
Browne, Lieutenant, 34. 
Buckingham, Duke of, 25. 
Bulkeley, Rev. Edward, 67. 
Bulkeley, Peter, 67. 
Burnum, John, 7. 
Burrill, 68, 70. 
Byfield Parish, 27, 43. 

Calamy, Dr., 38. 

Cambridge, 9, 10. 

Capawock, Island of, 22. 

Cape Ann, 7. 

Cape Nahannte, I4. 

Capen, Rev. Joseph, 133. 

Capen house, Topsfield, 134. 

Champlain, Samuel de, 4. 

Chaplain of Court of Commissioners which 

tried Charles I., 38. 
Charles I., 38. 
Charles II., 30, 59, 61. 
Charles River, 120. 
Charlestown, 15, 28, 71. 
Chase, George Wingate, 4. 
Chebacco, 7, 27. 
Chebacco Creek, 25, 26. 
Chebacco River, 27. 
Cheever, Rev. Samuel, 63. 
Chelmsford, 45, 54, 55, 68, 78, 9 1, 93, 

98, III, 118, 127. 
Chelsea, 13. 

Christian Indians, 9, 11. 
Church at Natick, 10. 
Cicely, 69, 70, 72, 73, 74, 78, 79. 
Clark, Noah, 18, 19. 
Clement, Job, 15. 
Clement, Lydia, 15. 
Clement, Robert, 32, 33, 126, 127. 
Cloth, 37. 
Clothes, suit of, 49. 
Coat, 39. 

Cochickawick, 14, 15, 35, 36, 39. 
Cochickawick River, 38, 39. 



Coffin, Tristram, 32, 33. 
Cogswell, Jonathan, 7. 
Conamabsquenooncant River, 13. 
Concord, 67. 
Connecticut, 25, 29. 
Connecticut Colony, 29, 30. 
Conopohit, James, 70. 
Conopohlt, Mary, 70. 
Corn, 38, 39, 40. 
Corwine, Jonathan, 130. 
Countess of Warwick, 61. 
Court, Indian, 51. 
Coventry, England, 43. 
Coytmore, Thomas, 28. 
Cutshamache, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39; sub- 
mission of, to government, 35. 
Cutsmake, 35. 
Cutshamakin, 35. 

Danvers, 77. 

Danvers River, 3, 13. 

David, 9, 10, II, 64, 65, 66, 67. 

Davis, Thomas, 32, 33. 

Deeds, Indian, force and effect of, 18. 

Devereaux, John, 11, 52, 53, 55, 56, 

57, 58, 62. 
Dexter, Thomas, 49. 
Dole, Richard, 46, 47. 
Dorchester, 35. 
Douglas-Lithgow, Dr. R. A., 4, 5, 6, 

7, 14, 15- 
Dover, 15. 

Downing, Emanuel, 28. 
Downing, Sir George, 61. 
Downing, James, 28. 
Dracut, 4, 5. 
Dublin, 25. 
Dudley, President, 76. 
Dudley, Anne, 61. 
Dudley, Mercy, 37. 
Dudley, Gov. Thomas, 37, 61. 
Duke William, 49. 
Dukes County, 22. 
Dummer's, Mr., farm, 27. 
Dunster, President, 38. 

Earl of Lincoln, 61. 
Eastman, Samuel, 129. 
Effect of Indian deeds, 18. 
Eight-Mile tree, no, I13. 
Elliott, Andrew, 85. 
Elm tree, great, 107. 
Emmanuel College, 61. 
Endecott, Gov. John, 13. 
England, 60, 61. 



[ 139 ] 



English, Joseph, 54, 59, 60, 88, 89, 90, 
9I) 93) 94' 9S> 9^> 9^' "-'°' '°^' 

III, 112, 113, 114, 115, 118, 121, 

123, 124, 125, 126, 127. 
English, Samuel, 45, 47, 48, 88, 89, 90, 

9') 93> 94) 95) 9^) 9^) 10°) loi) 

102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 
109, III, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 
ii8, 119, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 
127, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133. 

English, Susannah, 91. 
Ephraim, Peter, 10, 78. 
Essex, 7, 27. 
Essex Institute, 25, 27. 
Essex Regiment, 76. 
Evered, Capt. John, 4, 5. 

Fairbank, Jonathan, 48, 103, 104. 

Farrington, Matthew, 68, 70. 

Faulkner, Edmund, 38. 

Firman, Dr. Gyles, 26. 

Fiske, Capt. Thomas, 98. 

Force of Indian deeds, 18. 

Forest River, 8, 13, 55 ; bridge, 55. 

Foster, Joseph, 45, 48, 91, 98, 99, 100, 

103, 104, III, 115, 117, 118, 120, 
126, 127, 129, 130. 

Gage's Island, 122, 123, 124. 

Gale, Bartholmew, 86. 

Gardner, Capt. Joseph, 61. 

Gardner, Samuel, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83. 

Gas, Riviere du, 4. 

Gedney, Bartholomew, 8, 9, 75, 76, 85. 

Gedney, William, 77, 78. 

George, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 49, 50, 52, 

54) 55) 69, 70, 78. 
George with No Nose, 9, 11, 51, 52, 

68, 69, 72, 87. 
Gerrish, Mr., 62. 
Gerrish, Capt. William, 41, 42. 
Gibbens, Capt. Edward, 35. 
Gloucester, 7, 10 1, 102, 103, 104, 105 ; 

deed of, loi, 102, 103, 104, 105. 
Gookin, Daniel, 9, 10, 11, 51, 52. 
Gorges, Sir Ferdinando, 67. 
Gorges, John, 14. 
Gould, Capt. John, 131, 133. 
Great Nahant, 71. 
Great Neck, 55, 56. 
Great Pond, 5. 
Great Tom, 41, 42, 43. 
Greeley, Philip, 129. 
Greenough, Robert, 127, 128. 
Griffin, John, 126, 127. 



Groton, Suffolk County, England, 25. 
Gunpowder, 35. 

Hagar, 43, 44, 45. 

Hale, Isaac, place, 107. 

Hamilton, 6. 

Handforth, Chester County, England, 14. 

Harding, Capt. Robert, 28. 

Hardy, Samuel, 85. 

Hardy's Rock, 123. 

Harsey, Lt. William, 68, 70. 

Hart, Joseph, 76. 

Harvard College, 36, 38. 

Hathorne, John, 12, 87,89, 91,130. 

Haverhill, 3, 4, 5,31, 32, 33, 34, 122, 

126, 127; deed of, 31. 
Haverhill Historical Society, 34. 
Hawks, John, 74, 75. 
Hayward, John, 59, 61, 67. 
Hazen, Edward, 107. 
Hazen, Samuel, 126. 
Hazen, Thomas, 106, 107, 108, 109, 

no, III, 1 13, 1 14, 115, 116. 
Herrick, Joseph, 88, 95, 96. 
Higginson, John, li, 64, 77, 78, 79, 

80, 81, 82, 83, 96. 
Higginson, Rev. John, 64. 
High Field, 44. 
Hill, Dea. John, 85. 
HiUiard, Hugh, 26. 
Hinchman, Major, 130. 
Hirst, William, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83. 
Holyoke Building, Salem, 87. 
Hood, Richard, 71. 
Horbling, Lincolnshire, England, 61. 
How, Capt. John, 131, 133. 
Howlett, Ens. Samuel, 131, 133. 
Hubbard, Rev. William, 5. 
Huntington, William, 5. 
Hutchin, Daniel, 65, 66, 67. 
Hutchinson faith, 28. 

Igowam, 6. 

Indian Court, 51. 

Indian Field, 5, 43, 44. 

Indian Hill, 41. 

Indian Swamp, 5. 

Indians, Praying, 51. 

Inglish, Joseph, 88, 99, 117. 

Inglish, Samuel, 88, 99, 130. 

Inner Temple, 25. 

Ipswich, 5, 7, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 87, 
100, 102, 103, 104, 106, 107, no, 
113, 116, 129, 133, 134; deeds of, 
25, 26, 27. 



[ HO ] 



Ipswich Meeting-House, no, 113. 
Ipswich River, 14, 71, no, 113, 116. 
Ironworks, 29, 49, 65. 

Jackson, Caleb, no, 113. 

James, n, 12,49, S'- 5^, 53. 54, 59- 

Jeremiah Meadow, 128. 

Jewett, Dea. Ezekiel, 118, ng. 

Jewett, Joseph, 15. 

Joane, 9. 

Job, 43, 44, 45. 

John, 8, II, 12, 13, 49, 60, 88, 89, 

90, 94. 
Johnson, Daniel, 74, 75. 
Johnson, Capt. Edward, 15. 
Johnson, Francis, 49, 50. 
Johnson, Samuel, 68, 70. 
Johnson's Brook, 128. 
Johnson's Creek, 128. 
Johnson's Pond, 123. 
Joyliffe, John, 28. 

Kenoza Pond, 5. 

Kimball, Corp. Richard, 120, 121. 

Kimball's Pond, 5. 

King, Mr., 71. 

King, Ralph, 68, 70, 72. 

King's Chapel Churchyard, 30. 

Knight, John, 46. 

Knight, Joseph, 46, 47. 

Knowlton, John, 93, 94, 96. 

Kunkshamooshaw, Abigail, 69, 72, 73, 

74- 
Kunkshamooshaw, David, 68, 69, 70, 

72. 73, 74- 
Kunkshawmooshaw, David, 69. 
Kunkskawmushat, David, 67. 

Labor-in-Vain Creek, 25, 26. 

Ladd, Lt. , 34. 

Laughton, Thomas, 74, 75. 

Lawrence, 14, 35. 

Laws, First code of, 32. 

Leach, Robert, 93, 94, 96. 

Lee, Samuel, 93, 94, 96. 

Lewis, Alonzo, 14, 76. 

Lincoln, Earl of, 61. 

Lindall, Timothy, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 

Lindsey, Christopher, 49. 

Little Bytham, Lincolnshire, England, 42. 

Little Nahant, 71. 

Little Pond, 123. 

Log Bridge, 65. 

London, England, 25, 46. 



Lynn, 9, ir, 13, 14, 49, 53, 64, 65, 

67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 
76, 77, 80, 85, 121 ; deeds, 64, 65, 
66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71. 

Lynn River, 71. 

Lynnfield, 67. 

Magus, John, 11. 

Mahanton, 10. 

Maiden, 71, 121. 

Maiden Mill Brook, 10. 

Manancuset, 4, 5. 

Manatachque, I 1. 

Manchester, 86, 93, 94, 95 ; deed of, 

93,. 94, 95, 96, 97, 103. 
Map of New England, by William Wood, 

7- 
Marblehead, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 51, 52, 

53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 60, 62, 71, 

80; deed of, 51, 54, 62. 
Marlborough, England, 33. 
Marsh, James Rumney, 8, 9, 10, 11, 

13, 54, 56, 57. 58, 59, 60, 64, 65, 

66, 67, 78, 79, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85. 
Marston, Benjamin, 86, 87. 
Martha's Vineyard, 22, 86, 87. 
Mary, 43, 44. 
Mascanomenet, 116. 
Maschanomett, 48, 99, 100, 102, 109. 
Maschanominet, 45. 
Maschonomet, 29. 
Masconnomo, 29. 
Masconomet, 6, 25, 26, 27, 28, 36, 

45, 47, 88, 89, 93, 98, 106, 108, 

118, 131. 
Mashabequa River, 8. 
Mashabequash River, 9. 
Mason, Capt. John, 67, 88, 120. 
Mason, Robert Tufton, 88, lao. 
Maskenominet, 108. 
Masquenomenet, 118. 
Masquenomenett, 94. 
Masquenomenit, 94. 
Masquenominet, 127. 
Masquonomonit, 122. 
Massabequash River, 8, 9, 13. 
Massachusetts, 7. 
Massachusetts Indians, 4. 
Massachusetts tribe, 3, 12, 35, 39. 
Massacre, impending, 31. 
Massquanomenett, 88, 89. 
Mather, Rev. Cotton, 38. 
Maverick, Moses, 52, 53. 
Mayhew, Thomas, 86, 87. 
Medfordj 12. 



[ '41 ] 



Merrimack River, 3, 4, 5, 6, 27, 35, 
38, 39. 47, "2, "3, »20. 122, 
123, 124, 128. 

Middleton, 3. 

Misery Island, 85. 

Misdck, 9, II, 12. 

Monck, George, 59, 60. 

Monomack River, 4. 

Monts, Sieur de, 4. 

Moody, Eliezer, 59, 61. 

Moulton's Misery, 86. 

Munnimquash, 11. 

Murder, 50. 

Muschonnomett, 113, 115, 123, 125. 

Muschonomet, 1 12, 115, 122. 

Muschonomett, 123. 

Musconimet, 27. 

Muscononimet, 28. 

Musquanomenit, 132. 

Musqunomet, 113. 

Musquonomet, 112. 

Musquonominit, 125. 

Musquonomitt, 123. 

Musquonomonet, 113, II 5. 

Musquonomonit, 115,123. 

Mynomack River, 4. 

Naamkeke River, 9, 11. 
Nahant, 9, 11, 49, 50, 67, 71 ; convey- 
ance of, 49. 
Nahanteau, 14. 
Nahanton, 10. 
Nahumkege, 11. 
Nahumkeke River, 10. 
Nanepashemet, 12. 
Nantucket, Island of, 22. 
Nashoba Indians, 89. 
Nashowanon, 36. 
Nason, Rev. Elias, 14. 
Natick, 10, II, 51, 52, 54, 64, 69, 70, 

79- 
Naugus Head, I 3. 

Naumkeag, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, II, 12, 35. 
Naumkeag Indians, 3, 13. 
Naumkeag River, 8, 79, 80, 1 1 2, 113. 
Naumkeeg River, 112, 113. 
Naumkeke, 12. 

Navestock, Essex County, England, 60. 
Neumkeage River, 79, 80. 
Newbury, 7, 33, 36, 37, 38, 41, 42, 43, 

44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 1235 deeds of, 

41, 43, 44, 47- 
Newbury Falls, 43, 44. 
Newbury River, 44. 
Newburyport, 43. 



"New England Judged by the Spirit of 

the Lord," 61. 
New Haven Colony, 30. 
New London, Conn., 29, 
Newman, Rev. Antipas, 96. 
Newman, John, 95, 96. 
Nogg's Head, 13. 
Nonnumpanumhow, 9. 
Nonnupanohow, David, 78. 
Nonnuphanohow, David, 79, 80, 82, 83, 

84, 85. 
Nonoponowgo, David, 54, 55, 56, 57, 

58. 
Nonopownogo, David, 57. 
North Andover, 3, 35, 38. 
North River, 12, 13. 
Norton, Mr., 61. 
Norwich, England, ill. 
Noyes, Dea. Cutting, 46, 47. 
Noyes, Rev. James, 46. 
Noyes, Nicholas, 46. 
Noyes, Col. Thomas, 45, 48. 

Oburn, 71. 

Old Town, 46. 

Old Will, 43, 44. 

Oonsumoq, John, 78. 

Orkhussunt River, 13. 

Osgood, William, 5. 

Ould Newbury Historical Society, 43. 

Owufsumug, 10. 

Pahpochksitt, 9. 

Palmer, Deacon, place, 107. 

Parker, Moses, 45, 48, 91, 98, 99, 100, 

III, 118, 120, 126, 127, 129, 130. 
Parker, Rev. Thomas, 36, 38. 
Parker River, 7. 
Parsons, Dea. James, 10 1. 
Passaconaway, 4, 5, 6, 31, 32, 35. 
Passaquo, 31, 32, 33. 
Pawtucket Falls, 8, 50. 
Pawwaus River, 6. 
Payson, Rev. Edward, 127, 128. 
Peabody, 13, 77. 
Peabody, Lt. Francis, 106. 
Peabody, Isaac, 151, 133. 
Peabody, John, 106, 107, 108, 109, 1 10, 

III, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117. 
Peabody homestead, 131. 
Pear tree, wild, no, 113. 
Peirce, Capt. Daniel, 45, 46, 48. 
Pennacook Indians, 3. 
Pennekooke, 9. 
Penticutt, 6. 



[ H2 i 



Pentucket, 4, 5, 31, 32, 33. 

Pentucket tribe, 3, 31. 

Perkins, Abraham, 103, 104. 

Perkins, Quartermaster, 132. 

Parley, Allan, 106. 

Perley, Elbridge, 107. 

Perley, Humphrey, 107 

Perley, John, 106, 107, 108, 109, no, 

III, 113, 114, 115, 116. 
Perley, Nathaniel, 133. 
Perley, Thomas, 106, 107, 108, 109, 

no, HI, 113, 114, 115, 116, 126, 

127. 
Petaghuncksq, Cicely, 78, 79, 81, 82, 

83, 84, 85. 
Philistine Hill, 123. 
Phillips, Rev. Samuel, 128. 
Phillips', Mr., farm, 122, 127, 130. 
Phillips', Mrs., farm, 124. 
Pickard's, John, farm, 123. 
Pickard's, John, house, 123. 
Pike, Joseph, 46, 47. 
Pirates, 50. 

Pitman, Thomas, 52, 53, 63. 
Platts, Samuel, 1 18, 119. 
Plough Plain, 64, 65. 
Ponham, Mary, 75. 
Poore, Maj. Ben : Perley, 41. 
Poquanum, 8, 49, 50. 
Poquanum, Thomas, 50. 
Porter, E. A., 34. 

Porter, Israel, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83. 
Porter's River, 13. 
Portland, Me., 50. 
Potoghoontaquah, Susannah, 8 
Potter, Robert, 68, 70. 
Pouomeneuhcant River, 13. 
Powwow River, 6. 
Powwows, 6. 
Praying Indians, 51. 
Prichard, John, 133. 
Protestants, French, at Rochelle, 25. 
Punkapog, 51. 
Purchas, Oliver, 68, 70. 

Quakers, 61. 

Quanapakanatt, Israel, 59. 
Quanapohkowat, 51. 
Quanapohkowmet, ^i, 53. 
Quanapohkownat, Israel, 54, 55, 56, 57, 

58, 59- 
Quanapohkownat, James, 54, 55, 56, 57, 

59- 
Quanapohkownat, John, 54. 
Quanapohkownat, Joseph, 54. 



Quanapohkownat, Sarah, 54, 
Quanapokwait, 5 i. 
Quanophkonatt, Jone, 59. 
Quanophkonatt, Joseph, 60. 
Quanophkownat, Israel, 82, 84, 85. 
Quanophkownat, James, 81, 82, 84, 85. 
Quanophkownat, Joane, 84. 
Quanophkownat, Jone, 59. 
Quanophkownatt, Israel, 78, 79 81, 

82,83. 
Quanophkownatt, James, 59, 60, 78, 

79, 82, 83, 84. 
Quanophkownatt, Jane, 84. 
Quanophkownatt, Joane, 78, 79, 81, 82, 

83, 85. 
Quanophkownatt, John, 78. 
Quanophkownatt, Jone, 60. 
Quanophkownatt, Joseph, 59, 60. 
Quanopokowait, Jone, 52. 
Quanupowit, 67 

Quonopohit, James, 69, 72, 73, 74, 75. 
Quonopohit, Mary, 69, 72, 73, 74, 75. 
Quascacunquen River, 7. 
Quascunquen River, 7. 
Queacheck, 15. 

Queakussen, Thomas, 8, 9, 50. 
Quechig River, 15. 
Quehusson, Thomas, n. 
Quichechacke, 15. 
Quichichwich, 15. 
Quyacheck, 15. 

Read, Richard, 52, 53. 

Reading, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 

74, 80. 
Rhode Island, 28. 
Richmond's Isle, 50. 
Riddan, Thaddeus, 52, 53. 
Right, Indian, to the soil, 16. 
Ring, Jarvis, 129. 
Riviere du Gas, 4. 
Rochelle, 25. 
Rockport, 102. 
Roger, 38, 39. 
Roger's Brook, 39. 
Roger's Rock, 39. 
Rogers, Rev. Ezekiel, 128. 
Rowley, 15, 38, 39, 47, 107, no, 113, 

116, 118, 119, 122, 127, 128; 

deed of, 1 18, 1 19. 
Rowley road, 125. 
Royal Society, 30, 

Ruck, John, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83. 
Ruler of the Indians, 10, 11. 
Rum, 112, 117. 



[ >43 ] 



Rumney Marsh, 68, 69, 70. 

Rumney Marsh Creek, 71, 

Rumney Marsh River, 71. 

Rumney Marsh, James, 8, 9, 10, 11, 
13, 54, 56, 57. 58, 59, 60, 64, 65, 
66, 67,78, 79, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85. 

Sagamore Hill, 6, 50. 

Saggahew, 31, 32, 33. 

Salem, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 16, 26, 27, 
29, 43, 55, 60, 61, 62, 71, 75, 77, 
78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 86, 87, 89, 
91, 92, 96, 98, 102, 122, 130; 
deeds, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 
84, 8s, 86. 

Salem Bay, 3. 

Salisbury, 33, loi, 129. 

Salt-works, 29. 

Saltonstall, Nathaniel, 33, 34, 122, 126. 

Sam, 64. 

Sarah, 9, 10, 11, 45. 

Sargent, William, 5. 

Saugus, 9, 12, 14, 67. 

Saugus River, 14, 49, 64, 65. 

Saugust, 12, 14. 

Sawgust, 9. 

Scriveners, 61, 67. 

Seals, 60, 85. 

Sewall, Henry, 43, 44. 

Sewall, Chief-Justice Samuel, 43. 

Sewall, Stephen, 12. 

Sewall farm, 44. 

Shashene River, 15. 

Shashin River, 15. 

Shashine River, 15. 

Shawsheen River, 15. 

Shawshene River, 15. 

Shawshin River, 15. 

Shenewemedy, 14. 

Sherratt, Hugh, 32, 33. 

Shot, 39. 

Shute, Zachariah, 67. 

Sicily, 9, 10, II. 

Sign of the Blue Anchor, 60. 

Silver, 67. 

Simondes's, 12. 

" Simple Cobler of Aggawam," 32. 

Skelton, Rev. Samuel, 13. 

Smith, Capt. John, 6. 

See wamapenessett River, 13. 

Soil, Indian right to the, 16. 

Somerby, Anthony, 41, 42. 

South Congregational Meeting-House, 
Andover, 39. 

Speen, James, 89. 



Spot Pond, 10. 

Squam, 7. 

Squamscott, 13. 

Squaw Sachem, 11, 12, 36. 

Stanton, Highworth, Wiltshire, England, 

Stevens, Lt. William, loi, 102, 103, 

104, 105. 
St. Lawrence River, 4. 
Su-George, 69, 70, 72, 73, 74. 
Suntaug Pond, 13. 
Swain, Capt. Jeremiah, 68, 70. 
Swampscott, 13, 67. 

Taverns, 60, 92, 107, 1 3 1. 

Tenney, Ens. John, 120, 121, 124, 125, 

126. 
Territories, tribal, 3. 
Thomas, John, 89. 
Titcomb, William, 42. 
Tom, Captain, 8, 9, 50, 78, 79, 81, 82, 

83, 84, 85. 
Tom, Great, 41, 42, 43. 
Tonotoughoquonug, John, 54, 55, 56, 

57, 58. 
Tontohqunne, John, 78, 79, 80, 81, 

82. 
Tookuwompbait, 10 
Toppan, AbrahariA, 41, 42. 
Topsfield, 14, 27, 80, III, 131, 132, 

133, 1345 deed of, 131, 132, 133, 

.'34- 
Tribal territories, 3. 
Trinity College, 25. 
Trumbull, J. H., 7. 
Tuntohqunne, John, 83. 
Tyler, Thomas, 86, 87. 

Ukqueakussennum, Thomas, 79. 

Ukquenkussennum, Thomas, 78. 

Uksqueakussennum, Thomas, 83. 

Umpee, John, 93, 94, 95, 98, 99, 100, 
106, III, 112, 113, 114, 115, 117, 
118, 122, 123, 124, 126, 127, 130. 

Upper Falls, 44. 

Usqueakussennum, Thomas, 81, 82, 84, 
85. 

Waabaquin, John, II. 
Waban, Thomas, 10. 
Waches, Jeremiah, 90. 
Wahquack, 13. 
Wahquainesehcok, 13. 
Walton, Nathaniel, 52, 53, 63. 
Walton, Rev. William, 53. 



[ H4 ] 



Wamesick, 64. 

Wamesit, 8, 50, 64. 

Wampampeage, 26, 37. 

Wanapawequin, Sarah, 59. 

Ward, Rev. John, 32, 33. 

Ward, Rev. Nathaniel, 4, 14, 32. 

Ward, Capt. Samuel, 52, 53, 55, 56, 

57, 58, 62, 63. 
Ward's, Mr., plantation, 32. 
Wardwell, Samuel, ".4, 75. 
Warwick, Countess of, 61. 
Washington, D. C, 41. 
Wattawtinnusk, 78, 79, 81, 82, 83, 84. 
Wattawtinnuske, 85. 

Wauban, Thomas, 10. 

V/auches, Betty, 88, 89, 91. 

Wauches, Jeremiah, 88, 89, 90, 91. 

Wawches, Jeremiah, 90. 

Wayband, 51. 

Waymessick, 78. 

Webb, Capt. John, 4, 5. 

Webcovvit, 12. 

Wehehuf, 9. 

Wenepawweekin, 54, 55, 69. 

Wenepawvveekin, Sarah, 54, 55, 56, 57, 

58, 59- 

Wenepawweekin, Susannah, 54, 55, 56, 

57, 58, 59, .60. 
Wenepawweekine, 68. 
Wenepoykin, 50. 
Wenham, 18, 80, 96, 98, 99, 100 ; 

deed of, 98, 99, 100. 
Wessacucon, 7. 
West, Capt. Thomas, 85. 
White, Charles, 34. 
White, John, 64, 65. 
White, William, 32, 33, 34. 
Whittier, John G., 5. 
Whittridge, Thomas, 95, 96. 
Wigwams, 12, 49. 



Will, Black, 49, 50. 

Will, Old, 43, 44. 

WiU's Hill, 71, 116. 

Will's Hill men, no, 113. 

William III., 48, in, 129, 133. 

William, Duke, 49. 

Williams, Rev. Roger, 7, 16. 

Williams, William, 18, 19. 

Wine, 37. 

Wingaersheek, 7. 

Winnepurkin, 1 1. 

Winnesimet, 13. 

Winter, William, 49. 

Winthrop, Adam, 26. 

Winthrop, Dean, 26. 

Winthrop, John, 4, 15, 17, 25, 26, 27, 

28, 29, 132. 
Winthrop, Robert C, 25, 27. 
Winthrop, Capt. Wait, 27, 29. 
Winthrop's, Mr., farm, 25. 
Witchcraft, 43, 75, 76, 91, 122, 150 
Woburn, 71. 
Wonasquam, 7. 
Wood, David, 108, 116, 117 
Wood, William, 6, 7. 
Woodberry, Joseph, 97. 
Woodberry, Thomas, 91. 
Woodberry, William, 85. 
Woodbridge, Rev. John, 15, 36, 38, 39. 
Worth, John, 46, 47. 
Worth, Lionel, 46. 
Wossameagon, 36. 
Wuttaanah, Sam, 83. 
Wuttaannoh, Samuel, 78, 83. 
Wuttaanoh, Sam, 79, 80, 82. 
Wuttannoh, 9. 
Wuttaquatimnusk, Sarah, 78. 
Wuttaauatinnusk, Sarah, 79, 81, 82, 83. 

Yawataw, 78, 79, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85. 



ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-THREE COPIES 

PRINTED AT THE RIVERSIDE PRESS 

CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 

FOR THE ESSEX BOOK AND PRINT CLUB