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LIFE BUOY 




LIFE BUOY 



INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 

LIFE BUOY. 

DECEMBER. 
VOL. I. No. l. 

To be issued monthly for free distribution to em- 
ployees of the Industrial Department of the Portsmouth 
Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H. 



thousand: We feel its pages will be of real 
value for up to date advertising. Whe shall try 
to select our advertisers with care so that we 
can recommend them unreservedly to our sub- 
scribers. We do not come to you for charity, 
but we feel we can serve you. 



A FOREWORD. 

The Life Buoy is thrown out to you not 
to save life but to instill life and enthusiasm 
in our Yard, to help to draw us together in our 
one common purpose to make this the best 
Navy Yard in the country. Those who have 
lived in small towns will remember how they 
looked forward each week for the town paper. 



Most of the "news" was already known, but 

Still we wanted to read it, for each person riveters; Chief Boatswain W. L. Hill, U. S 

mentioned seemed like one of our family: in on; F. w. Maby, Jr., rivet heater; and A. 

fact, the paper helped to make the town one I rivet P asser - The rivitin s ^ng for S-6 consisted of 

Commander J. E. Palmer, U. S. N., Retired, and In- 



SUBMARINES S-4 AND S-5. 

The keels of Submarines S-4 and S-5 were laid and 
the first rivets driven at 10:30 A. M. on Tuesday, Dec- 
ember 4, 1917, in the new shipbuilding ways. The 
ceremony was attended by most of the Yard officials 
and by a good many of the Yard employees. The band 
was present and opened the ceremony with "The Star 
Spangled Banner. " After the first plate was laid in 
place for each vessel the first rivet in each was driven. 
The riveting gang for S-4 consisted of the Comman- 
dant, Rear Admiral C. J. Boush, U. S. N., Retired, 
and Naval Constructor R. P. Schlabach, U. S. N., as 

N., holder- 
Gamester, 



spector of Naval Construction H. D. Bacon, as riveters; 
Medical Inspector F. M. Furlong, U. S. N.. holder-in; 
R. C. Maby, rivet heater; and R. D. Waaser, rivet 
passer. These are the first vessels laid down on the 
new ways and we expect to make a record on them. 



large family. That is the aim of the Life Buoy, 
to keep us together as one family and, to 
strive, all to the same purpose. When we do 
good work in the Yard we will boast a little, 
and when we fall down.— but, what's the use, 
we won't fall down. It is not to be an office 
publication nor a high-brow publication, but 
simply a little magazine of the whole Indus- 
trial Department. We want it to be personal, 
but in a good natured way, and never in a 
back-biting way. While it is "edited" in the 
main office, it wants the material to come 
from outside. It is proposed to have a man 
in each shop as a regular contributor, but con- 
tributions of "copy" from all others are not 
only welcome but are earnestly requested. We 
want articles of general Yard interest, and 
will appreciate constructive criticism; in a 
word, we want all hands to feel it is your mag- 
azine. If we do not publish every thing sent a f te r the second Liberty Loan and" so near Christmas 
in do not feel hurt, for our space is limited, time, the work was somewhat handicapped but a good 
But, if the magazine fills the purpose for sum was realized. The campaign in the Yard was 



LIBERTY LOAN CLUB. 

We understand the First National Bank has star- 
ted a Liberty Loan Club in anticipation of the next 
Liberty Loan. The idea is that some have already paid 
all their bonds and this Club offers a system by which 
weekly payments can be made at the Bank to apply on 
your bonds for the next loan. The money thus paid in 
will draw interest, of course. As stated elsewheie the 
Boat Shop has already taken up this scheme 



RED TRIANGLE FUND. 

A drive was made in the Yard last month for the 
M. C. A. tund for soldier's camps. Coming right 



which it is intended, we hope to see it grow. 

To prospective advertisers: The Life 

Buoy will have a "paid up" circulation of over 



thirty two hundred and will be read by ten ception to the rule. 



under the charge of Amos Rundlett and he was assis- 
ted by men in each shop and by several Portsmouth 
speakers. It is characteristic of the Portsmouth Yard 
men to back any good project and this one was no ex- 



LIFE BUOY 



SUPERVISORY FORCE DINNER. 

On the evening of November 21st, all the officers 
and members of the Supervisory Force of the Industrial 
Department got together for a dinner and talk fest 
which was a success in every way. While we see each 
other every day in a business way we sometimes forget 
the personal side, and it was thought a dinner would 
give us an opportunity to get acquainted in a social 
way and to drop the cares of the Yard for the evening. 
Chief Boatswain Hill, U. S. N. got enthused with us, 
and it is due greatly to his energy and interest in the 
affairs of the Yard that such a good time and feed were 
enjoyed. Mr. A. B. Duncan of Portsmouth is aslo to be 
thanked for his kindness in giving us the venison for 
the stew. It is understood that his trusty rifle brou- 
ght down the deer. 

The dinner was held in Building 95 where a stage 
has been erected for vaudeville and movies. About 
one hundred and twenty-five were present, represent- 
ing every shop in the Yard, and the way they stored 
away the food is a crime against Hoover. However, 
most of the food was from our own war gardens or 
from the New Hampsaire woods so that we do not ex- 
pect to be indicted for the crime. 

The Industrial Manager acted as Toastmaster and, 
after a short talk with an explanation of the idea of 
the dinner, introduced the Commandant, the guest of 
honor. Admiral Boush gave a short address which was 
enthusiastically received. Captain Hill, Mr. Rausch, 
the Safety Engineer, and the Shop Superintendent also 
made brief remarks. 

After dinner the party was treated to a moving 
picture and vaudeville show from the Colonial which 
was tiptop in every way and it was noted that many of 
the "baldheads" were squirming to get in the front 
row. 

It is hoped that this is but one of many such gath- 
erings, not only of the Supervisory Force but of the 
various shops for it is thought that arrangements can 
be made for similar shop dinners if any shops desire to 
have them. 

Johnny Watts says that Weston may have gotten 
farther from home on his hikes but that he is sure he 
did not cover more ground per day. Johnny's usual 
daily hike is about twenty miles and he carries any- 
thing from a wooden pattern for a safety pin to a deck 
winch. 



Dominick Paola says that, while the "Bigga de 
Stiff " can box and "wrastle, " he will never make a 
champion ring tosser 



SMITH SHOP NOTES. 

While the bowling team of the Smith Shop may 
not always be the winner, it has a bigger manager than 
any other team on the Yard. 



We notice that since Frank Armstrong's wife has 
returned home from New York he has shaved off that 
fuzzy thing under his nose. 



We understand that our doughty "Commodore" 
and "River Pilot," Lemuel Davis, will soon carry a full 
line of notions in his general store. 



On December 14th, the Vulcan Club, an organiz- 
ation of the men in the Smith Shop, held its third meet- 
ing of the year, in G. A. R. Hall. Mr. Rausch, our 
Safety Engineer, addressed the club upon the subject 
"Some Facts." After the talk by Mr. Rausch, a gen- 
eral discussion was held concerning improvments in 
methods of shop practice, followed by the usual feed 
and sing. 

This organization was founded in October, 1916, 
and is, to our knowledge, the first of its kind to be for- 
med in any shop in the history of the Portsmouth Navy 
Yard. Its members hope that similar clubs will soon 
be organized by their fellow workmen in every shop on 
the Yard, as these meetings afford an opportunity for 
good fellowship and frank discussion by everyone, from 
the youngest apprentice to the foreman. The usual 
program consists of a short talk upon some subject of 
intei est by an invited guest, followed by discussion of 
shop practice, a feed, and a sing, in which all hands 
join heartily. 

Last year Naval Constructor Adams gave a very 
interesting illustrated talk upon "The Raising of the 
Dry Dock Dewey and Life in the Philippine Islands. " 
Naval Constructor Schlabach spoke about the manufac- 
ture and testing of steel for Government work. Lieu- 
tenant Dysart explained the manufacture and proving 
of naval guns. 

Several guests have been invited to speak this year. 
At one meeting, Lieutenant Schneider gave an infor- 
mal discussion of some of his experiences while on neu- 
trality duty in the Mediterranen. On this occasion, the 
feed was an Italian supper, prepared under the direc- 
tion of Mr. Dominick Paola, whose compatriot. Mr. 
Lou's Gmella, gave a denr nstration of the approved 
method of eating spaghetti. 

At another meeting, Commander Wyman spoke 
concerning his cruises as Commanding Officer of the 
survey ship Paducah. He also carefully explained to 
the members of the Vvlcsn Club that, wh ; le the Ports- 
mouth Navy Yard workmen aie civilians, they are still 
a pait of the personal of the Navy; that, as members 
of such, they owe a particular duty to the Service at 
this time; that t nly by the closest co-operation between 



LIFE BUOY 



them and the officers stationed at this Yard can out- 
fighting brothers be supplied with many things upon 
which they are dependent. 

We believe that not only the members of the Vul- 
can Club, but every man employed at the Portsmouth 
Navy Yard, is sensible of the duty which he owes to the 
Navy and to his country. We also believe that this will 
be demonstrated in the future, as it has been but re- 
cently by the largest per capita subscription to the sec- 
ond Liberty Loan, by an increase in the efficiency and 
production of this yard commensurate with and even 
surpassing that of the past twelve months. 

STRUCTURAL SHOP NOTES. 

Our worthy leveler says that picking a goose is 
some job. 



There are times when you cannot lay up a cent and 
this is one of them. The scarcity of sugar and the 
high cost of shoe leather are two of the reasons. 



The lucky members of our gang who ride home ev- 
ery night in a private compartment of a car have an 
idea that they have something on the rest of the foun- 
dry crowd when it comes to traveling in style, even 
though it is an old condemned car and the porter is not 
handy. For reservations see George McGee, who says 
he will do his best to fix things although seats are 
about all taken up. 

SHIPFITTERS SHOP NOTES. 

The honor of driving the first rivet in Submarines 
Nos. 109 and 110 should be shared by the officers who 
performed that pleasant task. Mr Joseph N. Parker, 
the efficient joiner in the mould loft, should be added to 
the list, since he has the honor of making and putting 
the handles on the hammers used. 



Some reeds thrive in water, but Elvin was in a 
hurry to get out, forgetting the good it might do him. 



Hannah Jones, our popular identifier, bought a 
piece of tobacco this week. I wonder why. 



The night force in the Shipfitters' Shop is putting 
the work out in a manner that should make the Kaiser 
haul in his pin- feathers. 

Joe Smith, of the mold loft, took a day off last Sat- 
urday to put on his storm windows. He has about 
forty to put on, so the joiners in the loft are going to 
work overtime some Saturday night, and try to get 
them all on before haying time. 



The identifiers at the Main Gate tight with each 
other to see "who is it." I suppose the covering is the 
reason. 



The new guard house at the end of the bridge will 
be a great improvement and should be appreciated by 

the bovs in uniform. 



We hear that Ralph Ham slipped and fell while 
crossing the railroad track, but fortunately was not 
near a "frog" at the time. 



Bill Higgins, one of the leadingmen of the Shipfit- 
ters Shop, has accepted a position, with the consent of 
the Government, at the Texas Yard at Bath, Maine. 
as general foreman, at a big salary. Bill says he is 
going to retire from ship building at the end of five 
years. We give Bill our best wishes, and hope he will 
have great success. 

Owing to the elements and our thin blood we hope 
the end of the Franklin shiphouse will soon be closed 
up- 

One of the shipfitters in the mold loft is thinking of 
exchanging his Ford for a Packard Limousine. 



FOUNDRY NOTES 

Mr. and Mrs.. Hugh Mct'ann were in Boston re- 
cently, called there by the serious illness of the hitter's 
lather. Mr. Isaac Pridham, who recently underwent an 
operation. 



Bill Hunter says it is d 
al at the new shiphouse. 



cold checking off materi 



Mr. Leon B. Shute, our genial casting cleaner, has 
lately joined the ranks of the benedicts. He doesn'1 
need to tell us he is satisfied, for his happy smile has 
been broader than ever since he returned from his trip. 
Cigars are coming, boys. 



The men working down on the iron floor say that 
when it comes to swinging a sledge hammer we have 
all got to hand it to Pete St. Johns, of Dover. Any- 
body doubting this just ask Bill Bates, who got up an 
awful sweat trying to keep up with him when they 
were breaking up that big head the other day. 



Torchy, our brilliant acetylene operator, is enjoy- 
ing few a days vacation looking for a new house. The 
poor fellow is soon to be in the bonds of matrimony. 

Through the good judgment of the Manager of 
the Navy Yard and the foreman of the Shipfitters 
Shop Mr. Gilkey, there has been started a school of in- 
struction in shiplitting in the mold loft to enable the 
helpers to become shipfitters. The school hours are 
from 7 to 1> o'clock Tuesday and Friday nights, and 
they are two hours of very interesting study. The in- 
structor, Mr. Smith (quarterman shipfitter) is giving 
them the knowledge which took him many years to ac- 
quire, and the boys who go to this school are learning 
very fast, and without a doubt they will make very 
efficient shipfitters. 



LIFE BUOY 



SECOND LIBERTY LOAN. 
Portsmouth Navy Yard 

Campaign A Big Success. 

The second Liberty Loan campaign in the Ports- 
mouth Navy Yard, was, as everyone expected it would 
be, a rip-roaring success. From the opening meeting 
at the band stand to the final count on the last day 
great enthusiasm was maintained. The Liberty Loan 
cup aroused much rivalry among the shops and offices, 
and it was not until the last day that anyone could 
prophesy the winner. 

The campaign began with a rousing meeting at 
the band stand. This meeting was held at eleven A. 
M., Saturday, October 13, and all hands attended. The 
Boat Shop as winners of the first loan came up with the 
Navy Yard Band at their head, and carried brooms and 
banners. The meeting opened with the singing of 
America, which was followed by an address by Mr. 
Johnson of the Liberty Loan Committee of Boston. 
After singing the Star Spangled Banner the sale began, 
and in a half hour's time over $75,000 worth of bonds 
were disposed of. 

In order to thoroughly canvas every shop a com- 
mittee was organized, consisting of the Shop Superin- 
tendent, with one man from each shop, and this 
committee met at eleven A. M., each day in the lunch 
room, second floor, where reports were submitted of 
the previous day's business. At different stages of the 



campaign it looked as though the winner might be the 
Power plant, the Smith Shop or one of the Drafting 
Rooms. Although everyone thought the Boat Shop 
was holding back, no one was prepared for the deluge 
that was poured forth on the final count by this Shop. 
But they do say that Charlie Tucker was so worried the 
last morning he made every man in the shop stand on 
his head so he could shake all the loose change from 
their pockets for one final Fifty Dollar Bond. 

The Smith Shop's "Spirit of 76" banner had a 
good power in spurring on all shops. On Wednesday, 
October 24th, large signs were put up in the Yard at 
the direction of the Navy Department, showing the 
amounts subscribed by all Yards, and these showed 
Portsmouth in the lead in the amount subscribed per 
man. Determined to maintain this lead, all hands wor- 
ked like Trojans the last three days, and at eleven A. 
M. Saturday, the 27th, a total of $289, 000. was rolled up 
by the civilian force of the yard. This is an average of 
$103. per man for those employed at the Yard at that 
time. The only report from other Yards which, has 
beon secured is that from Boston, which shows their 
per capita subscription to be about $53. There is no 
doubt that Porstmouth still heads the list on a per cap- 
ita basis, which is the only fair basis for compai-ison. 
When there comes any campaign of this sort in which 
loyalty to the Government and patriotism for this coun- 
try is involved they can always count on the Ports- 
mouth Yard as being there with the goods. The 
amounts subscribed by shops, together with the per- 
centage of their allotment, follows. 



tanding 


Shops 


1 


Boat 


2 


Smith 


3 


Drafting Room (81) 


4 


Drafting Room (Sub.) 


5 


Paint Shop 


6 


Power Plant 


7 


Commandants Office 


8 


Public Works (Whalley) 


9 


Machinists (89) 


L0 


Sail 


11 


Industrial Offiice 


12 


Industrial Officers 


13 


Store 


14 


Laborers 


15 


Rigging Loft 


16 


Shipfitters 


17 


Smelting 


18 


Boiler 


19 


Machinists (80) 


20 


Foundry 


21 


Public Works (Dennett) 


22 


•Joiners 







Per Cent 


Allotment 


Total 


Apportionment 


$13,000 


$54,450 


418.8 


5,300 


15,900 


300.0 


2,800 


6,950 


248.2 


4,300 


10,000 


232.5 


3,150 


6,250 


198.4 


4,200 


7,050 


167.6 


550 


900 


163.0 


2,400 


3,550 


147.9 


7,650 


11,250 


147.0 


1,300 


1,800 


138.5 


5,450 


7,450 


136.6 


3,450 


4,600 


133.3 


9,100 


12,000 


131.8 


5,250 


6,350 


120.9 


1,000 


1,200 


120.0 


19.650 


23,000 


117.0 


1,350 


1.500 


111.9 


2,950 


3,150 


106. 7 


20,300 


20,800 


106.0 


11,550 


12,150 


105.1 


18,250 


18,850 


103.2 


10,100 


10,400 


102.9 



LIFE BUOY 



22 


Plumbers 




11,750 


12,100 


102.9 


24 


Shipwrights 




11,450 


11,550 


101.0 


25 


Pattern 




3,400 


3,400 


100.0 


25 


Transportation 




2,450 


2,450 


100.0 


25 


Electric 




21,400 


21,400 


100.0 




Miscellanious 


Total. 




5,160 






296,600 






jjT> ifight or day we're on the job, to do our little bit 

*l|ur usual task of building boats, has always made a hit 

flt certain times we spend our coin, as freely as we can 

| o lend as much as we can spare, to strengthen 
"Uncle Sam. " 



LIBERTY LOAN MEETING. 



TOAST TO LIBERTY LOAN CHAMPS-1917. 



jo we are ready every man, when next the 3rd loan 

.. comes 

However large the loan may be, we would protect our 

n home 

|Jur duty then ' 'To do our bit, ' ' as we before have said 

push far beyond the other shops, and still remain 
ahead. 



LIFE BUOY. 





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LIP^E BUOY 



NOVEMBER ACCIDENTS. 



Shop 

Gilkey 

Maby 

Waaser 

Dennett 

Wendell 

Connors 

[Make 

Dixon 

Boyle 

Hayes 

Gen'l Store 

Gilker 

Ashworth 

Gamester 

Flanigan 

Ball 

Rose 

Whalley 

Medcalf 

Johnson 

Adams 

Frisbee 



*-Fatal 



Men 


Total 


Frequency 


Minor 


Serious 


429 


58 


13.5 


54 


4 


358 


43 


lLI.ii 


42 


1 


332 


•1<) 


!Ul 


29 


1 


242 


30 


12.3 


28 


2 


203 


10 


4.9 


10 





184 


28 


15.2 


26 


2 


176 


7 


4.0 


6 


1 


166 


4 


2.4 


4 





132 


11 


8.3 


10 


1 


119 


in 


s. 3 


8 


2 


117 


4 


3.4 


4 





89 


6 


6.7 


5 


1 * 


75 


16 


21.2 


12 


4 


74 


13 


17.6 


11 


2 


62 





0.0 





ii 


56 


1 


1.8 


1 





38 


3 


7.9 


3 





36 


2 


5.6 


2 


1 


32 


3 


9.4 


3 





28 


3 


11.6 


3 





16 





0.0 





(I 


10 


II 


0.0 





II 



2974 



Accidents will happen but the records of insurance 
companies, state boards and manufacturing concerns 
show that 85 per cent are due to the fact that MEN DO 
NOT ALWAYS THINK. Some men do - too many do 
not. Because men failed to think 2,000,000 persons 
were injured last year - 22,000 were killed. Get out 
some war statistics and see how accidents and careless- 
ness are hindering the war - then look over the table 
and see where you are hindering. 282 accidents a month 
means 3384 a year - one for every man ! 21 serious 
accidents a month means 1 for every 13 men. 

WHAT'S YOUR NUMBER ? 

"There was ONE didn't know any better. 
And a SECOND to lazy to care, 
The THIRD took a short cut in a hurry, 
The FOURTH took a chance on a dare, 
The FIRST had a month long vacation 

With a steam scalded hand for his pay. 
NUMBER TWO broke the arm of his partner 

When a poorly built scaffold gave way. 
NUMBER THREE was run down by a motor; 

Lost a leg - now he's railing at Fate. 
And the FOURTH - well he begs for a living. 
NUMBER FIVE had his brains where they should 
be. 



282 261 22 

Took no chances - warned other men too; 
Helped to save life and limb for his fellows, 
Tell me, PARTNER, which number are you?" 

YOUR PART 

The Yard Dispensary, Naval Hospital and the ser- 
vices of the Medical Officers of the Yard are available 
for the treatment of all injuries or ailments occurring 
in the regular work hours. These services are provid- 
ed at Government expense. It is intended by their use 
to "nip in the bud" by proper medical treatment those 
injuries which, because of their nature and the tenden- 
rv of men to let things go, become serious. 

Neglect of small injuries where no more than the 
skin is broken, a bruise results or a little dirt gets in 
the eye, opens the way for infection and deformities 
which may result in death or amputation. Don't let a 
dirty-handed, well-intentioned man stick things in your 
eye or tie up your wounds. Play safe; take care ol 
yourself; go to the Dispensary and see the doctor. A 
good job will be done and insure compensation in case 
you lose time. 

A blind eye, a missing finger, a dislocated hip— Say 
men! look here, did you ever stop to think that "It is 
not what you take into the shop - its what you 
take home"? Think first then go ahead - - THAT IS 
SAFETY. - - SAFETY FOR YOU AND THE OTHER 
MAN TOO. 



LIFE BUOY 



THE RESTAURANT. 

An old man whose voice was very feeble used to 
call his hogs by rapping on a dish with a stick. As the 
hogs roamed further away he found it necessary to rap 
on a hollow tree. In the Fall of the year a flock of 
woodpeckers took up their abode in the old man's wood- 
lot and the hogs went crazy. 

Just so with the lunch room. Everybody has knock- 
ed it until those concerned with its operation had got 
bone spavined (not in the legs) trying to keep up. The 
remains are now undergoing changes and modifications 
wh-ch it is hoped will make a decent funeral. 

New cooking equipment is ordered and service is 
be ; ng rearranged for more rapid handling during lunch 
hours. The hopeful thing is the fact that plans are 
drawn, and the whole matter is up for approval, for 
constructing a lunch room to fill the entire open space 
between the present lunch room and the bowling alley 
By this means room will be provided to handle the job 
in the best manner - good food can be served quickly 
and in a good variety consistent with the demand and 
the present food situation. 

Warm light rooms will make it pleasant for those 
who eat in the Yard. 

In the meanwhile we are experimenting with the 
idea of finding out where we can better things. If you 
have a suggestion or a complaint make it to the Safety 
Engineer- it is his job just now. 



CRUMBS. 

So far famine has not hit the lunch room but if 
everybody wasted bread and other things the way some 
men do we would be putting the - "Three Cents a Day 
Saves a Life" - signs in all the shops. Take what you 
can eat, eat what you take. 



suitable for work and wear that is safe - full double 
soles and reinforced box toe. Anybody can have these 
shoes that wants them (as many as they wish) ; simply 
see your timekeepar and deposit the price with him. 
He will give you a receipt and they will be ordered at 
once. If this is not convenient go and see the Safety 
Engineer - he will fix you up. But look the shoes over 
anyhow - they are a good buy. Delivery about 10 days 
from date of order. 



Make up your nrnd what you want when you step 
up to the serving table — there may be a hundred be- 
hind you who don't care a "tinker's dam" what you are 
eating and who will eat as soon as you get out of the 
way. 



Usually there are plenty of tables if a man will use 
his feet just after he uses his eyes. 



Doors were made for two things - to go through 
and to close. The lunchroom doors are just like others. 



THOSE SHOES. 

The shoe stand going the round of the shops has on 
exhibition some of the best work-shoes made. They 
come direct from the maker; are handled without prof- 
it and sold here that the men may have a heavy shoe 



MERRY CHRISTMAS. 

The Industrial Manager and the officers of 
the Department desire to extend their best 
wishes to every man of the Yard for a Merry 
Christmas and a Happy New Year. It is 
hoped that the coming year may bring peace 
and happiness to our Country, and prosperity 
and contentment to us all. Let us all pull to- 
gether to do our- share to make 1918 a banner 
year for the Portsmouth Yard. 



The cover design of the Life Buoy is from the pen 
of A. A. Moore, the blue printer of the Industrial De- 
partment. 



It is a good old motto to "Practice what you pre- 
ach." Our valued Safety Engineer played with an "un- 
loaded" primer and had his hand burned. So if you 
notice his bandaged hand look at him, not scornfully 
but with pity. 



If you approach Mr. F. L. Wasser when he is alone 
and give him a wink to show him you are on to his se- 
cret he will give you a cigar. 



We regret to announce that Industrial Man- 
ager, L. S. Adams, U. S. N., has been ill with appen- 
dicitis. It was found necessary to operate on Sunday 
Dec. 9th. He is recovering rapidly, however, and it is 
hoped he will soon be back on the job. 



10 



LIFE BUOY 



A FEW THOUGHTS FOR MEMBERS 
OF OUR INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT. 
Commander H. L. Wyman, U. S. Navy, 
Assistant Manager. 

With our nation in this World War, the efficiency 
of our navy yards has assumed an importance greater 
than ever before. On the work of the yards is depend- 
ent the material condition of our fleet. The winning of 
the War, today is, and must remain until victory, 
the foremost concern of every individual American, no 
matter what be his other interests, for all such are 
necessarily secondary and dependent upon our winning. 
The success of the Navy depends on two great factors, 
PERSONNEL, and MATERIEL, the one cannot do 
without the other. It is with MATERIEL that our In- 
dustrial Department is concerned. Further, in this 
War it is not the Navy alone that is dependent upon our 
work.it concerns our Army also, for before the Army 
can fight our soldiers must be transported across the 
sea, protected against the enemies' submarines. 

Naturally all of the navy yards of the country are 
called upon to work as never before. Portsmouth, 
while one of the smaller yards, is one of the oldest, and 
no yard possesses a finer record. It behooves us to 
more than keep up that record, and to do that we must 
surpass ourselves. We of the Portsmouth Yard possess 
an advantage over other yards; we are, so to speak, 
one family, in a way that is hardly possible in the much 
larger yards located in great metropolitan centers, 
where officers and workmen cannot know one another 
as we can here. Of course since the War began all 
navy yards have greatly increased their forces. In com- 
parison with other yards our percentage increase doubt- 
less stands well, and in fact it is probably better than 
that of some others because ever since the War began 
we have succeeded in a gradual but steady increase, 
picking the new material and holding it. Before the 
War, Portsmouth gave work to less than one thousand 
employees. Now we have over three thousand, or to- 
day our labor roll stands at approximately that of one 
of the big yards before the War. But at this we can- 
not stop, the wprk in hand is too great; we must keep 
steadily on until we get at least a thousand more em 
ployees, for instead of building leisurely one small sub- 
marine, we are now called upon to construct and deliver 
twelve at the tarliest possible date. From having 
three armored cruisers to care for, we are now the 
repair yard for seven, and likely will have nine of them. 
The vessels of the Mine Force have all been added 
here, and we must take our share of the work on con- 
verted vessels and patrol boats. The demands on the 
yard for manufactured articles have increased tre- 
mendously and in regard to that we must consider how 
our entire Navy is actually dependent upon certain of 
the manufactured products of this Navy Yard. No 



other navy yard is equipped to make them. Private 
establishments are not able to make them, they do not 
understand their manufacture. The electrical fittings 
as made here are generally of special design, necessari- 
ly so since the commercial world does not have to meet 
the requirements that must go into electrical fiittings to 
stand the shock of gunfire and constant exposure to 
atmosphere saturated with salt water. 

Under Naval Constructor Adams' design we build 
here the fast motor boats for the Navy. Our Manager 
ranks among the foremost designers in the country for 
high speed motor boats to meet service requirements, 
and is the Navy's authority on this class of boats. 
While the increased demand for these boats has 
jumped so that it is physically impossible for this Yard 
to now build all that are urgently needed, yet in their 
construction we must lead so others can follow. 

The work of the Spar Shop in manufacturing spec- 
ial articles for the Navy is of great importance. We 
make here special cooperage and spars, such as cannot 
be obtained elsewhere. Others of our shops also have 
their specialties. 

Our responsibilites are very great and to meet 
them means that as long as this War shall last every 
single one of us must put forth, day by day, our utmost 
efforts. We must work as never before, but as we 
CAN work when we have our hearts in it and when we 
constantly exercise that American spirit of working to 
win which can conquer everything. This means team 

i work, TEAM WORK from top to bottom. No individ- 

\ ual can fully count except as he serves his immediate 
leader, and as in turn each leader of men serves his 
senior. There must be loyalty throughout, it must 
work from each and every man up to the Manager, and 
in turn it will so work from the Manager down. There 
must be a common trust, one with another, in order 
that the end may be attained; for maximum output, 
which is the end, can ONLY be attained when the 
TEAM WORK is perfect. That means there must be 

1 directive control, flowing out from the Manager at the 
head in a most orderly fashion until it reaches every in- 
dividual workman. It means the putting aside of petty 
jealousies; it means that each individual must resolve 

i to himself that he will NOT nurse his special difficul- 
ties. There is not one of us who cannot find troubles to 
nurse; a man can do that wherever he is in the world, 
it is entirely independent of the Portsmouth Yard. A 
man who thinks he has troubles here would certainly 
have as many, and probably a great many more, were 
he somewhere else. On the other hand, most of such 
troubles are of man's own making and they are fostered 
by cliques, and by petty agitation that does not dare 
come out in the open. There is no REAL trouble that can- 
not properly be brought out squarly and fail ly, and in 
every case of that sort each and every one of you can 



LIFE BUOY. 



11 



depend upon it, it will receive sympathetic attention 
from your Manager. This does not mean that for every 
trivial thing a man should go running to the Manager, 
taking up his time; it is not fair to him to do that, nei- 
ther is it fair to your immediate leader, be he foreman or 
officer. Further, we cannot expect that EVERY little 
trouble can be eradicated; if that could be, the world 
would be a very different sort of a world, —it would not 
be human. 

For our War service, maximum output, day by day, 
is the duty that we each and everyone of us owe our 
Country. ' To attain that means of team work, team 
woik in every shop, team work betwen foremen, team 
work between officers and foremen, team work between 
officers, and mall of our combined team work giving our 
utmost loyal services under the direction of the Man- 
ager. 

In this there are two parts that must be performed; 
one the manual work itself, the other the directing of 
the work as a whole to the end that every bit of our 
manual labor shall count. Sometimes the worker 
thinks of the men of his Management as sitting around 
in clean clothes and having an easy job; sometimes men 
of the Management think of the workmen as having 
the easy end of it — neither is correct. I he laborer has 
the advantage in being relieved of the anxieties of the 
kind that can come only to the men of Management. 
Those of the Management whose duty it is to carry on 
planning and directing for the benefit of the whole 
must bear the responsibilities that go with their positi- 
ons. For this they are relieved of manual labor. ONLY 
by the combination of these two different classes of 
workers do we gain results, and this combination must 
be one of good will and trust each in the other. 

Our ship repair work has already tremendously in- 
creased since the war began. It likely must further in- 
crease when the casualties occur and as additional 
ships are added to the Navy. Our manufacturing 
activities are only limited by the maximum that we can 
turn out, subject of course to their non-interference 
with new construction work, the urgency of which is 
especially designated, and the urgent work on ships of 
the fleet sent here for repairs. You can count upon it 
that we cannot ever keep entirely up with the orders 
for our manufactures that will come to the Yard 
throughout the war for this class of work. Up to the 
present our Yard has hardly felt the real call that is 
coming for submarine construction, because so far the 
work on eleven boats has largely been confined to the 
drafting room and to preliminary work in the shops 
making ready raw materials. Now the time is close at 
hand when we must take up actual construction work 
of such magnitude as this Yard has never known be- 
fore. We must meet the continual calls for ship repair 
work, and we must continue to do our best on the 
special manufacture work. 

The Navy department has directed that the build- 
ing of the first of our large submarines shall have pre- 
cedence over all other work at the Yard. Ordinarily 
new construction work at a Navy Yard is not given 
precedence over work on ships of the fleet. Hence we 
see the great value that the Department is placing up- 
on this vessel and how important it is that we put forth 
our best efforts to make a record for her completion. 
We want to SET 1 HE FACE for the private shipyards 
building submarines and if we put the determination 
ami spirit into our work of which we are capable, we 
undoubtedly CAN beat them out. 



With the expansion that has already come to us 
since the War began, organization and methods that 

] served well when we were a much smaller Department 
necessarily require a broadening out and in some direct- 
ions readjustment and elaborating to keep pace with 
our growth. New methods to promote efficiency and 
increased output must constantly be sought for. The 
Management is constantly endeavoring to improve its 
organization and is giving study to the possibilities in this 
direction. We must do everything possible to promote 
smooth running for our increased work. You may be 
confident that there will be no doing away with what 
is already GOOD unless we definitely see the way to 
something BETTER. Defects are always bound to 
exist in any organization and no one man can see them 
all. Improvements come through carefully considered 

1 suggestions of those who see particular needs. That 
means that the Management must have suggestions 

I from many throughout the Department and that they 
be not restricted to any one class in our organization. 
Destructive cr.ticism rarely serves any useful purpose, 

j but constructive criticism, wherein a proper remedy for 
an apparent defect is suggested, is always to be wel- 
comed. At this time it is not only the particular desire 

! of the Management, but it is the duty of any individ- 

I ual of the Department who has ideas for improvement 
in any direction to bring them to attention. For the 
workman in the shop, he should freely go to his fore- 
man or to any officer with whom his work is associat- 

j ed. Applying the spirit of loyalty, no one with a sug"- 
gestion to make will ever be in doubt as to whom to 
present it in this Department. Oftentimes it will hap- 

i pen that there are reasons preventing the adoption of 
suggestions that at first seem most desirable. Hence, 
the ultimate handling of them must necessarily lie with 
the Management in order to consider the good of the 
whole. When some suggestion does not bear immediate 
results do not be discouraged and think that it has gone 
unappreciated, but on the contrary be on the lookout 
to turn in a still better one. Remember that we are 
all working for our Country, from top to bottom, that 
the Management cannot accomplish its work without 
the loyal support of the entire working force, and that 
in turn no man in the Department can fully do his bit 
except by loyally supporting those held responsible for 
the work, and who are in turn actually dependent upon 
him. 

NOTE: Since the foregoing was written, our Manager 
was stricken with a severe attact of appendicitis 
necessitating operation, and as a result he must have 
some time for convalescence and recuperation. It, 
therefore, behooves each one of us to constantly bear 
in mind that it is particularly incumbent on us at this 
time to do our bit exactly as the Manager would wish 
; it of us. Let each of us do his bit from hour to hour 
exactly as though the eye of the Manager were direct- 
ly on us all. 



A young missionary went into a wild Western town 
and held meetings. The first Sunday he had a small or- 
gan with which he weezed out the music for the hymns. 
The second Sunday the following sign appeared :- 
"Don't shoot the organist- 
He's doing his damdest. " 

This is our first issue. 

The Editor 





NAVY YARD, 
PORTSMOUTH, N.H. 




INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 



LIFE BUOY. 



PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 
JANUARY, 

1918 



LIFE BUOY 



INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 
LIFE BUOY. 
JANUARY, 1918. 

VOL. I. No. 1. 

To be issued monthly for free distribution to em- 
ployees of the Industrial Department <>(' the Portsmouth 
Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. II. 



thousand: We feel its pages will be of real 
value for up to date advertising'. We shall try 
to select our advertisers with care so that we 
can recommend them unreservedly to our sub- 
scribers. We do not come to you for charity, 
but we feel we can serve you. 



A FOREWORD. 

The Life Buoy is thrown out to you not 
to save life but to instill life and enthusiasm 
in our Yard, to help to draw us together in our 
one common purpose to make this the best 
Navy Yard in the country. Those who have 
lived in small towns will remember how they 
looked forward each week for the town paper. 
Most of the "news" was already known, but 
still we wanted to read it, for each person 
mentioned seemed like one of our family; in 
tact, the paper helped to make the town one 
large family. That is the aim of the Life Buoy, 
to keep us together as one family and to 
strive, all to the same purpose. When we do 
good work in the Yard we will boast a little, 
and when we fall down, — but, what's the use, 
we won't fall down. It is not to be an office 
publication nor a high-brow publication, but 
simply a little magazine of the whole Indus- 
trial Department. We want it to lie personal, 
but in a good natured way, and never in a 
back-biting way. While it is "edited" in the 
main office, it wants the material to come 
from outside. It is proposed to have a man 
in each shop as a regular contributor, hut con- 
tributions of "copy" from all others are not 
only welcome but are earnestly requested. We 
want articles of general Yard interest, and 
will appreciate constructive criticism; in a 
word, we want all hands to feel it is your mag- 
azine, [f we do not publish every thing sent 
m do not fool hurt, for our space is limited. 
But. if the magazine fills the purpose for 
which it is intended, we hope to see it grow. 

To prospective advertisers: The Life 
Buoy will have a "paid up" circulation of over 
thirty-two hundred and will be read by ten 



Two keels were recently laid in the shipbuilding 
ways. The ceremony of driving the first rivets was 
attended by most of the Yard officials and by a good 
many of the Yard employees; The band was present 
and opened the ceremony with "The Star Spangled 
Banner." After the first plate was laid in place for 
each vessel the first rivet in each was driven. The 
riveting gang for one consisted of the Commandant, 
Rear Admiral C. J. Boush, U. S. N. , Retired, and 
Naval Constructor R. P. Schlabach, U. S. N., as 
riveters; Chief Boatswain W. L. Hill, U. S. N., holder- 
on; F. W. Maby, .Jr., rivet heater; and A. Gamester, 
rivet passer. The riveting gang for the other consisted 
of Commander J. E. Palmer, U. S. N., Retired, and In- 
spector of Naval Construction H. D. Bacon, as riveters; 
Medical Inspector F. M. Furlong, U. S. N.. holder-on; 
R. C. Maby, rivet heater; and R. D. Waaser, rivet 
passer. We expect to make a record on this new con- 
struction work. 



LIBERTY LOAN CLUB. 

We understand the First National Bank has stait- 
ed a Liberty Loan Club in anticipation of the next 
Liberty Loan. The idea is that some have already paid 
for all their bonds and this Club offers a system by which 
weekly payments can be made at the Bank to apply on 
your bonds for the next loan. The money thus paid in 
will draw interest, of course. As stated elsewhere the 
Boat Shop lias already taken op this scheme. 



RED TRIANOLE EUND. 

A drive was made in the Yard last month for the 
Y. M. C. A. fund lor soldiers' camps. Coming right 
after the second Liberty Loan and so near Christmas 
time, the work was somewhat handicapped but a good 
sum was realized, 'the campaign in the Yard was 
under the charge of Amos Rundlett and he was assist- 
ed by men in each shop and by several Portsmouth 
speakers. It is characteristic of the Portsmouth Yard 
men to back any good project and this one was no ex- 
ception to the ruli 1 . 



ia iy2J 



LIFE BUOY 



SUPERVISORY FORCE DINNER. 

On the evening of November 21st, all the officers 
and members of the Supervisory Force of the Industrial 
Department got together for a dinner and talk fest 
which was a success in every way. While we see each 
other every day in a business way we sometimes forget 
the personal side, and it was thought a dinner would 
give us an opportunity to get acquainted in a social 
way and to drop the cares of the Yard for the evening. 
Chief Boatswain Hill, U. S. N. got enthused with us, 
and it is due greatly to his energy and interest in the 
affairs of the Yard that such a good time and feed were 
enjoyed. Mr. A. B. Duncan of Portsmouth is also to be 
thanked for his kindness in giving us the venison for 
the stew. It is understood that his trusty rifle 
brought down the deer. 

The dinner was held in Building 95 where a stage 
has been erected for vaudeville and movies. About 
one hundred and twenty-five were present, represent- 
ing every shop in the Yard, and the way they stored 
away the food is a crime against Hoover. However, 
most of the food was from our own war gardens or 
from the New Hampshire woods so that we do not ex- 
pect to be indicted for the crime. 

The Industrial Manager acted as Toastmaster and, 
after a short talk with an explanation of the idea of 
the dinner, introduced the Commandant, the guest of 
honor. Admiral Boush gave a short address which was 
enthusiastically received. Captain Hill, Mr. Rausch, 
the Safety Engineer, and the Shop Superintendent also 
made brief remarks. 

After dinner the party was treated to a moving 
picture and vaudeville show from the Colonial which 
was tiptop in every way and it was noted that many of 
the "baldheads" were squirming to get in the front 
row. 

It is hoped that this is but one of many such gath- 
erings, not only of the Supervisory Force but of the 
various shops for it is thought that arrangements can 
be made for similar shop dinners if any shops desire to 
have them. 

Johnny Watts says that Weston may have gotten 
farther from home on his hikes but that he is sure he 
did not cover more ground per day. Johnny's usual 
daily hike is about twenty miles and he carries any- 
thing from a wooden pattern for a safety pin to a deck 
winch. 



Dominick Paola says that, while the "Bigga de 
Stiff" can box and "wrastle," he will never make a 
champion ring tosser. 



We notice that since Frank Armstrong's wife has 
returned home from New York he has shaved off that 
fuzzy thing under his nose. 



We understand that our doughty "Commodore" 
and "River Pilot," Lemuel Davis, will soon carry a full 
line of notions in his general store. 



SMITH SHOP NOTES. 

While the bowling team of the Smith Shop may 
not always be the winner, it has a bigger manager than 
any other team on the Yard. 



On December 14th, the Vulcan Club, an organiz- 
ation of the men in the Smith Shop, held its third meet- 
ing of the year, in G. A. R. Hall. Mr. Rausch, our 
Safety Engineer, addressed the club upon the subject 
"Some Facts." After the talk by Mr. Rausch, a gen- 
eral discussion was held concerning improvements in 
methods of shop practice, followed by the usual feed 
and sing. 

This organization was founded in October, 1916, 
and is, to our knowledge, the first of its kind to be 
formed in any shop in the history of the Portsmouth 
Navy Yard. Its members hope that similar clubs will 
soon be organized by their fellow workmen in every shop 
on the Yard, as these meetings afford an opportunity for 
good fellowship and frank discussion by everyone, from 
the youngest apprentice to the foreman. The usual 
program consists of a short talk upon some subject of 
interest by an invited guest, followed by discussion of 
shop practice, a feed, and a sing, in which all hands 
join heartily. 

Last year Naval Constructor Adams gave a very 
interesting illustrated talk upon "The Raising of the 
Dry Dock Dewey and Life in the Philippine Islands." 
Naval Constructor Schlabach spoke about the manufac- 
ture and testing of steel for Government work. Lieu- 
tenant Dysart explained the manufacture and proving 
of naval guns. 

Several guests have been invited to speak this year. 
At one meeting, Lieutenant Schneider gave an inform- 
al discussion of some of his experiences while on neu- 
trality duty in the Mediterranean. On this occasion, the 
feed was an Italian supper, prepared under the direc- 
tion of Mr. Dominick Paola, whose compatriot, Mr. 
Louis Ginella, gave a demonstration of the approved 
method of eating spaghetti. 

At another meeting, Commander Wyman spoke 
concerning his cruises as Commanding Officer of the 
survey ship Paducah. He also carefully explained to 
the members of the Vulcan (Tub that, while the Ports- 
mouth Navy Yard workmen are civilians, they are still 
a part of the personnel of the Navy ; that, as members 
of such, they owe a particular duty to the Service at 
thin time; that only by the closest co-operation between 



LIFE BUOY 



them and the officers stationed at this Yard can our 
fighting brothers be supplied with many things upon 
which they are dependent. 

We believe that not only the members of the Vul- 
can Club, but every man employed at the Portsmouth 
Navy Yard, is sensible of the duty which he owes to the 
Navy and to his country. We also believe that this will 
be demonstrated in the future, as it has been but re- 
cently by the largest per capita subscription to the sec- 
ond Liberty Loan, by an increase in the efficiency and 
production of this yard commensurate with and even 
surpassing that of the past twelve months. 



STRUCTURAL SHOP NOTES. 

Our worthy leveler says that picking a goose is 
some job. 



There are times when you cannot lay up a cent and 
this is one of them. The scarcity of sugar and the 
high cost of shoe leather are two of the reasons. 



Some reeds thrive in water, but Elvin was in a 
hurry to get out, forgetting the good it might do him. 



Hannah Jones, our popular identifier, bought a 
piece of tobacco this week. I wonder why. 



The identifiers at the Main Gate fight with each 
other to see "who is it. " I suppose the covering is the 
reason. 



The new guard house at the end of the bridge will 
be a great improvement and should be appreciated by 
the boys in uniform. 



We hear that Ralph Ham slipped and fell while 
crossing the railroad track, but fortunately was not 
near a "frog" at the time. 



FOUNDRY NOTES. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh McCann were in Boston re- 
cently, called there bv the serious illness of the latter's 
father, Mr. Isaac Pndham, who recently underwent an 
operation. 

Mr. Leon B. Shute, our geniai casting cleaner, has 
lately joined the ranks of the benedicts. He doesn't 
need to tell us he is satisfied, for his happy smile has 
been broader than ever since he returned from his trip. 
Cigars are coming, boys. 



The men working down on the iron floor say that 
when it comes to swinging a sledge hammer we have 
all got to hand it to Pete St. Johns, of Dover. Any- 
body doubting this just ask Bill Bates, who got up an 
awful sweat trying to keep up with him when they 
were breaking up that big head the other day. 



The lucky members of our gang who ride home ev- 
ery night in a private compartment of a car have an 
idea that they have something on the rest of the foun- 
dry crowd when it comes to traveling in style, even 
though it is an old condemned car and the porter is ri t 
handy. For reservations see George McGee, who says 
he will do his best to fix things although seats are 
about all taken up. 

SHIPFITTERS SHOP NOTES. 

The honor of driving the first rivets in the keels 
on the ways should be shared by all who performed 
that pleasant task. Mr. Joseph N. Parker, the 
efficient joiner in the mold loft, should be added to 
the list, since he has the honor of making and putting 
the handles on the hammers used. 



The night force in the Shipfitters Shop is putting 
the work out in a manner that should make the Kaiser 
haul in his pin-feathers. 

Joe Smith, of the mold loft, took a day off last Sat- 
urday to put on his storm windows. He has about 
forty to put on, so the joiners in the loft are going to 
work overtime some Saturday night, and try to get 
them all on before haying time. 



Bill Higgins, one of the leadingmen of the Shipfit- 
ters Shop, has accepted a position, with the consent of 
the Government, at the Texas Yard at Bath, Maine, 
as general foreman, at a big salary. Bill says he is 
going to retire from ship building at the end of five 
years. We give Bill our best wishes, and hope he will 
have great success. 

Owing to the elements and our thin blood we hope 
the end of the Franklin shiphouse will soon be closed 
up- 

One of the shipfitters in the mold loft is thinking of 
exchanging his Ford for a Packard Limousine. 



Bill Hunter says it is d - - cold checking off materi- 
al at the new shiphouse. 



Torehy, our brilliant acetylene operator, is enjoy- 
ing a few days vacation looking for a new house. The 
poor fellow is soon to be in the bonds of matrimony. 

Through the good judgment of the Manager of 
the Navy Yard and the foreman of the Shipfitters 
Shop, Mr. Gilkey, there has been started a school of in- 
struction in shipfitting in the mold loft to enable the 
helpers to become shipfitters. The school hours are 
from 7 to 9 o'clock Tuesday and Friday nights, and 
they are two hours of very interesting study. The in- 
structor, Mr. Smith (quarterman shipfitter) is giving 
them the knowledge which took him many years to ac- 
quire, and the boys who go to this school are learning 
very fast, and without 'a doubt they will make very 
efficient shipfitters. 



LIFE BUOY 



SECOND LIBERTY LOAN. 
Portsmouth Navy Yard 

Campaign A Big Success. 

The second Liberty Loan campaign in the Ports- 
mouth Navy Yard, was, as everyone expected it would 
be, a rip-roaring success. From the opening meeting 
at the band stand to the final count on the last day 
great enthusiasm was maintained. The Liberty Loan 
cup aroused much rivalry among the shops and offices, 
and it was not until the last day that anyone could 
prophesy the winner. 

The campaign began with a rousing meeting at 
the band stand. This meeting was held at eleven A. 
M., Saturday, October 13, and all hands attended. The 
Boat Shop as winners of the first loan came up with the 
Navy Yard Band at their head, and carried brooms and 
banners. The meeting opened with the singing of 
America, which was followed by an address by Mr. 
Johnson of the Liberty Loan Committee of Boston. 
After singing the Star Spangled Banner the sale began, 
and in a half hour's time over $75,000 worth of bonds 
were disposed of. 

In order to thoroughly canvas every shop a com- 
mittee was organized, consisting of the Shop Superin- 
tendent, with one man from each shop, and this 
committee met at eleven A. M., each day in the lunch 
room, second floor, where reports were submitted of 
the previous day's business. At different stages of the 



campaign it looked as though the winner might be the 
Power plant, the Smith Shop or one of the Drafting 
Rooms. Although everyone thought the Boat Shop 
was holding back, no one was prepared for the deluge 
that was poured forth on the final count by this Shop. 
But they do say that Charlie Tucker was so worried the 
last morning he made every man in the shop stand on 
his head so he could shake all the loose change from 
their pockets for one final Fifty Dollar Bond. 

The Smith Shop's "Spirit of 76" banner had a 
good power in spurring on all shops. On Wednesday, 
October 24th, large signs were put up in the Yard at 
the direction of the Navy Department, showing the 
amounts subscribed by all Yards, and these showed 
Portsmouth in the lead in the amount subscribed per 
man. Determined to maintain this lead, all hands wor- 
ked like Trojans the last three days, and at eleven A. 
M. Saturday, the 27th, a total of $289,000. was rolled up 
by the civilian force of the yard. This is an average of 
$103. per man for those employed at the Yard at that 
time. The only report from other Yards which, has 
beon secured is that from Boston, which shows their 
per capita subscription to be about $53. There is no 
doubt that Porstmouth still heads the list on a per cap- 
ita basis, which is the only fair basis for comparison. 
When there comes any campaign of this sort in which 
loyalty to the Government and patriotism for this coun- 
try is involved they can always count on the Ports- 
mouth Yard as being there with the goods. The 
amounts subscribed by shops, together with the per- 
centage of their allotment, follows. 











Per Cent 


Standing 


Shops 


Allotment 


Total 


Apportionment 


1 


Boat 


$13,000 


$54,450 


418.8 


2 


Smith 


5,300 


15,900 


300.0 


3 


Drafting Room (81) 


2,800 


6,950 


248.2 


4 


Drafting Room (Sub. ) 


4,300 


10,000 


232.5 


5 


Paint Shop 


3,150 


6,250 


198.4 


6 


Power Plant 


4,200 


7,050 


167.6 


7 


Commandants Office 


550 


900 


163.0 


8 


Public Works (Whalley) 


2,400 


3,550 


147.9 


9 


Machinists (89) 


7,650 


11,250 


147.0 


10 


Sail 


1,300 


1,800 


138.5 


11 


Industrial Offiice 


5,450 


7,450 


136.6 


12 


Industrial Officers 


3,450 


4,600 


133.3 


13 


Store 


9,100 


12,000 


131.8 


14 


Laborers 


5,250 


6,350 


120.9 


15 


Rigging Loft 


1,000 


1,200 


120.0 


16 


Shipfitters 


19,650 


23,000 


117.0 


17 


Smelting 


1,350 


1,500 


111.9 


18 


Boiler 


2,950 


3,150 


106.7 


19 


Machinists (80) 


20,300 


20,800 


106.0 


20 


Foundry 


11,550 


12,150 


105.1 


21 


Public Works (Dennett) 


18,250 


18,850 


103.2 


22 


Joiners 


10,100 


10,400 


102.9 



G 




LIFE 


BUOY 








22 


Plumbers 






11,750 


12,100 


102.9 


24 


Shipwrights 






11,450 


11,550 


101.0 


25 


Pattern 






3,400 


3,400 


100.0 


25 


Transportation 






2,450 


2,450 


100.0 


25 


Electric 






21,400 


21,400 


100.0 




Miscellanious 


Total. 




5,150 






295,600 






LIBERTY LOAN MEETING. 



TOAST TO LIBERTY LOAN GHAMPS-1917. 



|jy night or day we're on the job, to do our little bit 

l|ur usual task of building boats, has always made a hit 

At certain times we spend our coin, as freely as we can 

I o lend as much as we can spare, to strengthen 
"Uncle Sam." 



jo we are ready every man, when next the 3rd loan 

II comes 

However large the loan may be, we would protect our 

n home 

Uur duty then "To do our bit," as we before have said 

push far beyond the other shops, and still remain 
ahead. 



LIFE BUOY. 



4 



m> 




"5V 



y >4- 



r 



xm. 



■Mp^ 



lu-»—-'inir> 



CO 



a, ^ 



r$ 



*< 



>^i 






LIFE BUOY 



NOVEMBER ACCIDENTS. 



Shop 
Gilkey 
Maby 
Waaser 
Dennett 
Wendell 
Connors 
Drake 
Dixon 
Boyle 
Hayes 
Gen'l Store 
Gilker 
Ashworth 
Gamester 
Flanigan. 
Ball 
Rose 
Whalley 
Medealf 
Johnson 
Adams 
Frisber 



*-Fatal 



Men 


Total 


Frequency 


Minor 


Serious 


429 


58 


13.5 


54 


4 


358 


43 


12.0 


42 


1 


332 


30 


9.0 


29 


1 


242 


30 


1L!.:; 


28 


2 


203 


10 


4.9 


10 





184 


28 


15.2 


26 


2 


176 


7 


4.0 


6 


1 


166 


4 


2.4 


4 





132 


11 


8.3 


10 


1 


11!) 


10 


8.3 


8 


2 


117 


4 


3.4 


4 





89 


6 


6.7 


5 


1 * 


75 


10 


21.2 


12 


4 


74 


13 


17.6 


11 


2 


62 





0.0 





o 


56 


1 


1.8 


1 





38 


3 


7.9 


3 





36 


2 


5.6 


2 


1 


32 


3 


9.4 


3 





28 


3 


11.6 


3 





16 





0.0 








10 





0.0 









2971 



Accidents will happen but the records of insurance 
companies, state boards and manufacturing concerns 
show that 85 per cent are due to the fact that MEN DO 
NOT ALWAYS THINK. Some men do - too many do 
not. Because men failed to think 2,000,000 persons 
were injured last year - 22,000 were killed. Get out 
some war statistics and see how accidents and careless- 
ness are hindering the war - then look over the table 
and see where you are hindering. 282 accidents a month 
means 3384 a year - one for every man! 21 serious 
accidents a month means 1 for every 13 men. 

WHAT'S YOUR NUMBER ? 

"There was ONE didn't know any better, 
And a SECOND to lazy to care, 
The THIRD took a short cut in a hurry. 
The FOURTH took a chance on a dare, 
The FIRST had a month long vacation 

With a steam scalded hand for his pay. 
NUMBER TWO broke the arm of his partner 

When a poorly built scaffold gave way. 
NUMBER THREE was run down by a motor; 

Lost a leg - now he's railing at Fate. 
And the FOURTH - well he begs for a living. 
NUMBER FIVE had his brains where they should 
be. 



282 261 22 

Took no chances - warned other men too; 
Helped to save life and limb for his fellows, 
Tell me, PARTNER, which number are you?" 



YOUR PART 

The Yard Dispensary, Naval Hospital and the ser- 
vices of the Medical Officers of the Yard are available 
for the treatment of all injuries or ailments occurring 
in the regular work hours. These services are provid- 
ed at Government expense. It is intended by their use 
to "nip in the bud" by proper medical treatment those 
injuries which, because of their nature and the tenden- 
cy of men to let things go, become serious. 

Neglect of small injuries where no more than the 
skin is broken, a bruise results or a little dirt gets in 
the eye, opens the way for infection and deformities 
which may result in death or amputation. Don't let a 
dirty-handed, well-intentioned man stick things in your 
eye or tie up your wounds. Play safe; take care ol 
yourself; go to the Dispensary and see the doctor. A 
good job will be done and insure compensation in case 
you lose time. 

A blind eye, a missing finger, a dislocated hip— Say 
men! look here, did you ever stop to think that "It is 
not what you take into the shop - its what you 
take home"? Think first then go ahead - - THAT IS 
SAFETY. - - SAFETY FOR YOU AND THE OTHER 
MAN Too. 



LIFE BUOY 



THE RESTAURANT. 

An old man whose voice was very feeble used to 
call his hogs by rapping on a dish with a stick. As the 
hogs roamed further away he found it necessary to rap 
on a hollow tree. In the fall of the year a flock of 
woodpeckers took up their abode in the old man's wood- 
lot and the hogs went crazy. 

Just so with the lunch room. Everybody knock- 
ed it until those concerned with its operation got 
bone spavined (not in the legs) trying to keep up. The 
remains are now undergoing changes and modifications 
which it is hoped will make a decent funeral. 

New cooking equipment is ordered and service is 
being rearranged for more rapid handling during lunch 
hours. The hopeful thing is the fact that plans are 
drawn, and the whole matter is up for approval, for 
(•(instructing a lunch room to fill the entire open space 
between the present lunch room and the bowling alley. 
By this means room will be provided to handle the job 
in the best manner— good food can be served quickly 
and in a good variety consistent with the demand and 
the present food situation. 

Warm, light rooms will make it pleasant for those 
who eat in the Yard. 

In the meanwhile we are experimenting with the 
idea of finding out where we can better things. If you 
have a suggestion or a complaint make it to the Safety 
Engineer— it is his job just now. 



suitable for work and wear that is safe— full double 
soles and reinforced box toe. Anybody can have these 
shoes that wants them (as many as they wish) ; simply 
see your timekeeper and deposit the price with him. 
He will give you a receipt and they will be ordered at 
once. If this is not convenient go and see the Safety 
Engineer — he will fix you up. But look the shoes over 
anyhow — they are a good buy. Delivery about 10 days 
from date of order. 



HAPPY NEW YEAR. 

The Industrial Manager and the officers of 
the Department desire to extend their best 
wishes to every man of the Yard for a Happy 
Mew Year. It is hoped that the new year 
may bring peace and happiness to our Country, 
and prosperity and contentment to us all. Let 
us all pull together to do our share to make 
1918 a banner year for the Portsmouth Yard. 



CRUMBS. 

So far famine has not hit the lunch room but if 
everybody wasted bread and other things the way some 
men do we would be putting the "Three Cents a Day 
Saves a Life" signs in all the shops. Take what you 
can eat, eat what you take. 



The cover design of the Life Buoy is from the pen 
of A. A. Moore, the blueprinter of the Industrial De- 
partment. 

It is a good old motto to ' 'Practice what you preach. 
Our valued Safety Engineer played with an "un- 
loaded" primer and had his hand burned. So if you 
notice his bandaged hand look at him, not scornfully 
but with pity. 

If you approach Mr. F. L. Waaser when he is alone 
and give him a wink to show him you are on to his se- 
cret he will give you a cigar. 



Make up your mind what you want when you step 
up to the serving table — there may be a hundred be- 
hind you who don't care a "tinker's dam" what you are 
eating and who will eat as soon as you get out of the 
way. 



Usually there are plenty of tables if a man wil 
his feet just after he uses his eyes. 



Doors were made for two things— to go through 
and to close. The lunch room doors are just like others. 



THOSE SHOES. 

The shoe stand going the round of the shops has on 
exhibition some of the best work-shoes made. They 
come direct from the maker, are handled without prof- 
it and sold here that the men may have a heavy shoe 



We regret to announce that Industrial Man- 
ager L. S. Adams, U. S. N., has been ill with appen- 
dicitis. It was found necessary to operate on Sunday, 
Dec. 9th. He is recovering rapidly, however, and it is 
hoped he will soon be back on the job. 




OUR LIBERTY LOAN CUP. 

TWICE WON BY THK BOAT SHOP. 



10 



LIFE BUOY 



A FEW THOUGHTS FOR MEMBERS 
OF OUR INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT. 

Commander H. L. Wyman, U. S. Navy, 
Assistant Manager. 

With our nation in this World War, the efficiency 
of our navy yards has assumed an importance greater 
than ever before. On the work of the yards is depend- 
ent the material condition of our fleet. The winning of 
the War, today is, and must remain until victory, 
the foremost concern of every individual American, no 
matter what be his other interests, for all such are 
necessarily secondary and dependent upon our winning. 
The success of the Navy depends on two great factors, 
PERSONNEL, and MATERIEL, - the one cannot do 
without the other. It is with MATERIEL that our In- 
dustrial Department is concerned. Further, in this 
War it is not only the Navy that is dependent upon our 
work, it concerns our Army also, for before the Army 
can fight our soldiers must be transported across the 
sea. protected against the enemies" submarines. 

All of the navy yards of the country are called 
upon to work as never before. Portsmouth, 
while one of the smaller yards, is one of the oldest, and 
no yard possesses a finer record. It behooves us to 
more than keep up that record, and to do that we must 
surpass ourselves. We of the Portsmouth Yard possess 
an advantage over other yards; we are, so to speak, 
one family, in a way that is hardly possible in the much 
larger yards located in great metropolitan centers, 
whore officers and workmen cannot know one another 
as we can here. Of course since the War began all 
navy yards have greatly increased their forces. In com- 
parison with other yards our percentage increase doubt- 
less stands well, and in fact it is probably better than 
that of some others because since before the War began 
we have succeeded in a gradual but steady increase, 
picking our new men and holding them. Now our roll 
is three fold what it was before the War. It stands at 
approximately that of one of the big yards before the 
War. But at this we cannot stop, the work in hand is 
too great; we must keep steadily on until we get many 
more employees. New construction has come to us as 
never before, our building work is now no leisure 
matter, we are called upon to DELIVER at the earliest 
possible date. The large ships assigned to us for 
repair and overhaul have increased in number, and we 
must also take our share of the work on converted 
vessels and patrol boats. The demands on our Yard 
for manufactured articles have increased tremendously, 
and our entire Navy has come to depend upon us for 
certain of them. No other navy yard is as well equipped 
to make them, private establishments do not understand 
their manufacture. The electrical fittings as made 
here are generally of special design, necessarily so 



since the commercial world does not have to meet 
the requirements that must go into electrical Sittings to 
stand the shock of gunfire and constant exposure to 
atmosphere saturated with salt water. 

Under Naval Constructor Adams' design we build 
the fast motor boats for the Navy. Our Manager 
ranks among the foremost designers in the country for 
high speed motor boats to meet service requirements, 
and is the Navy's authority on this class of boats. 
While the increased demand for these boats has 
jumped so that it is physically impossible for this Yard 
to now build all that are urgently needed, yet in their 
construction we must lead so others can follow. 

The work of the Spar Shop in manufacturing spec- 
ial articles for the Navy is of great importance. Others 
of our shops also have their specialties. 

Our responsibilities are very great and to meet 
them means that as long as this War shall last every 
single one of us must put forth, day by day, our utmost 
efforts. We must work as never before, but as we 
CAN work when we have our hearts in it and when we 
constantly exercise that American spirit of working to 
win which can conquer everything. This means 
TEAM WORK from top to bottom. No individ- 
ual can fully count except as he serves his immediate 
leader, and as in turn each leader of men serves his 
senior. There must be loyalty throughout, it must 
work from each and every man up to the Manager, and 
in turn it will so work from the Manager down. There 
must be a common trust, one with another, in order 
that the end may be attained; for maximum output, 
which is the end, can ONLY be attained when the 
TEAM WORK is perfect. That means there must be 
directive control, flowing out from the Manager at the 
head in a most orderly fashion until it reaches every in- 
dividual workman. It means the putting aside of petty 
jealousies; it means that each individual must resolve 
to himself that he will NOT nurse his special difficul- 
ties. There is not one of us who cannot find troubles to 
nurse; a man can do that wherever he is in the world, 
it is entirely independent of the Portsmouth Yard. A 
man who thinks he has troubles here would certainly 
1 have as many, and probably a great many more, weie 
he somewhere else. On the other hand, most of such 
troubles are of man's own making and they are fostered 
by cliques, and by petty agitation that does not dare 
come out in the open. There is no REAL trouble that can- 
not properly be brought out squarely and fairly, and in 
every case of that sort each and every one of you can 
depend upon it, it will receive sympathetic attention 
from your Manager. This does not mean that for every 
trivial thing a man should go running to the Manager, 
taking up his time; it is not fair to him to do that, nei- 
ther is it fair to your immediate leader, be he foreman or 



LIFE BUOY. 



11 



officer. Further, we cannot expect that every little 
trouble can be eradicated; if that could be, the world 
would be a very different sort of a world,— it would not 
be human. 

For our War service, maximum output, day by day, 
is tlif duty that we each and everyone of us owe our 
Country. As we have already said to attain that 
means team work. It means team work in every shop, 
team work between foremen, team work between offi- 
cers and foremen, team work between officers, and in 
all of our combined team work giving our utmost loyal 
services under the direction of the Manager. 

In this there are two parts that must be performed: 
one the manual work itself, the other the directing of 
the work as a whole to the end that every bit of our 
manual labor shall count. Sometimes the worker 
thinks of the men of his Management as sitting around 
in clean clothes and having an easy job; sometimes men 
of the Management think of the workmen as having 
the easy end of it — neither is correct. The workman has 
the advantage in being relieved of the anxieties of the 
kind that can come only to the men of Management. 
Those of the Management whose duty it is to carry on 
planning and directing for the benefit of the whole 
must bear the responsibilities that go with their posi- 
tions. For this they are relieved of manual labor. ONLY 
by the combination of these two different classes of 
workers do we gain results, and this combination must 
be one of good will and trust each in the other. 

Our ship repair work has already tremendously in- 
creased since the war began. It must further increase 
as casualties occur and as additional ships are added to 
the Navy. Our manufacturing activities are only lim- 
ited by the maximum that we can turn out, subject of 
course to their non-interference with the urgent work 
on ships of the fleet sent here for repairs and new con- 
struction work, the urgency of which is especially 
designated. And you can count upon it that we cannot 
ever keep entirely up with the orders for our manufac- 
tures that will come to the Yard throughout the War 
for this class of work. Up to the present we have 
hardly felt the real call that is coming for new con- 
struction, because so far this work has largely been 
confined to the drafting room and to preliminary work 
in the shops making ready raw materials. Now the 
time is close at hand when we must take up actual con- 
struction work of such magnitude as this Yard has 
never known before. We must meet the continual calls 
for ship repair work, and we must continue to do our 
best on tin' special manufacture work. 

Ordinarily new construction work at a Navy Yard is 
not given precedence over work on ships of the fleet. 
Hut for smiii' uf the new construction assigned us the 
Navy Department has directed that it receive preced- 
ence over all other work. Hence we see the value that 
the Department is placing upon it and how important 



it is that we put forth our best efforts to make a record. 
I We want to SET THE PACE for private shipyards 
building similar vessels and if we put the determination 
and spirit into our work of which we are capable, we 
undoubtedly CAN beat them out. 

With the expansion that has already come to us 
since the War began, organization and methods that 
i served well when we were a much smaller Department 
i necessarily require a broadening out and in some direc- 
j tions readjustment and elaboration to keep pace with 
our growth. New methods to promote efficiency and 
increased output must constantly be sought for. The 
Management is constantly endeavoring to improve its 
organization and is giving study to the possibilities in this 
direction. We must do everything possible to promote 
smooth running for our increased work. You may be 
confident that there will be no doing away with what 
is already GOOD unless we definitely see the way to 
something BETTER. Defects are always bound to 
exist in any organization and no one man can see them 
all. Improvements come through carefully considered 
suggestions of those who see particular needs. That 
means that the Management must have suggestions 
from many throughout the Department and that they 
be not restricted to any one class in our organization. 
Destructive criticism rarely serves any useful purpose, 
but constructive criticism, wherein a proper remedy for 
an apparent defect is suggested, is always to be wel- 
comed. At this time it is not only the particular desire 
of the Management, but it is the duty of any individ- 
ual of the Department who has ideas for improvement 
in any direction to bring them to attention. For the 
workman in the shop, he should freely go to his fore- 
man or to any officer with whom his work is associa- 
ted. Applying the spirit of loyalty, no our with a sug- 
gestion to make will ever be in doubt as to whom to 
present it in this Department. Oftentimes it will hap- 
pen that there are reasons preventing the adoption of 
suggestions that at first seem most desirable. Hence, 
the ultimate handling of them musl necessarily lie with 
the Management in order to consider the good of the 
whole. When some suggestion docs not hear immediate 
results do not be discouraged and think that it has gone 
unappreciated, but on the contrary be on the lookout 
to turn in a still better one. Remember that we are 
all working for our Country, from top to bottom, that 
the Management cannot accomplish its work without 
the loyal support of the entire working force, and that 
in turn no man in the Department can fully do his bit 
except by loyally supporting those held responsible for 
the work, and who are in turn actually dependent upon 
him. 

NOTE: Since the foregoing was written, our Manager 
has been stricken with a severe attack of appendicitis 
necessitating operation, and as a result he must have 
some time for convalescence and recuperation. Let 



12 



LIFE BUOY 



each one of us constantly bear in mind thai it there 
fore is particularly incumbenl on us at this time to do 

our bit exact |y as I he Manager would wish if of us. 



RELIEF FOR HALIFAX SUFFERERS. 

When word was received at the Yard of the Halifax 

disaster caused by the explosion of an ammunition ship 
in i he harbor, rendering thousands homeless with a bliz- 
zard raging, making immediate relief necessary, the 
organization formed for promoting the sale of Liberty 
Bonds was hastily summoned and requested to make 
collections for the relief of the sufferers. The response 
was gratifying. At 1:30 p. m. that same afternoon 
$1 707. 75 was deposited m the First National Bank at 
Portsmouth. The Secretarj of the Navy was notified 
bj wire thai this sum was sub j eel to his draft as we 
knew he would be in touch with the relief work, This 
sum was later increased by $187.24 making a total con- 
tribution of $1894.99. In this connection the following 
lei ters are of interest : 



The Secretai j of the Navy, 

Washington, December 13, 1 1*1 T. 

My dear Sir: 

I write to acknowledge receipl of your letter of 
December 8th confirming your telegram with reference 
to the money to which the employees of the navy yard 
have contributed for the relief of the sufferers at 
Halifax. 1 have informed the lied Cross authorities of 
your generous action audi wish to express to you my 
appreciation of the line spirit which the men have 
shown in making this large contribution for the relief 
of the victims of the Halifax disaster. It is the sort 
of spirit which we have come to expeel from the men 

.it our navy yards. 

Sincereh yours, 

JOSEPHUS DANIELS. 

The President, 

Navy 5fard Improvement Association, 

\'av\ Yard, Portsmouth. 



Til 



: AMERICAN RED CROSS, 
Nat ional I leadquarters, 
\\ :i hington, D. ( '. . 

December 15, 

II.. Navy Yard 



1911 



Fortunately, we were able to place in Halifax 

almost immediately alter the occurence of the disaster 
an organization of trained executives, medical and 

nursing personnel and large quantities of supplies of 

the character most i ded. The relief work is being 

conducted with the greatest efficiency and you may feel 
assured that this generous gift from the Portsmouth 
Navy Yard Improvement Association will he utilized in 
a maimer to all'ord the maximum of relied' to the victims 
id' this disaster. 

on behalf of the sufferers at Halifax and of the 
American Red Cross as well I extend to all who have 

participated in this gift appreciation and thanks. 

Yours very sincerely, 

W. frank Persons, 
I in odor General of Civilian Relief. 

Further, certain employees id' the Industrial He 

partment volunteered to go to Halifax at once to do 

rescue work anil for clearing wreckage. These men 
offered their services subject to any conditions that the 

Government might desire. It included volunteering to 

^o at their own expense and without pay, and they 
were prepared to provide and take their own subsist - 

en. e 

To tins the follow ui^ telegraphic reply was received: 
Washington D C Dec 11 L917 

( 'ommandaiil 

Navy Yard Portsmouth N II 

We learn from the ambassador that while the fine 
spirit as shown by the Portsmouth Yard in volunteering 
to assist in clearing the wreckage at Halifax is deeply 
appreciated, it is felt that the services of these men at 
the Yard are so important to the successful prosecution 
of the war as to make it inadvisable for military 

reasons to take them from their work. You may ex- 
press to the men volunteering the appreciation of tin' 
Navy Department as well and explain to them that 
there is really no service they can do either at Halifax 
or at the lighting front that is of more importance than 
t he work they now have in hand. 

franklin I ). Roosevelt. 

The foregoing is printed at the special instance of 

the Manager who cannot but be proud id' the men of tin 1 
Industrial Department who are 
spirit that is bound to win. 



full of the kind of 



The President, 

Portsmouth, \ 

l mpi ovem< ni Vssoi iation, 

\a\ j "laid. I 'ortsmouth, N. II. 

My dear Sir: 

The Honorable the Secretary of the Navy has in. 

formed me of the generous contribution of $1707. 75, 

,.,,.,. i . „. , ,. ., i gan with which he wheezed out the music tor the hymns. 

iron, the civthan employees and officers attached to the | he second Sunday the following sign appear ' 



RED CROSS MEMBERSHIP DRIVE. 

During the Red Cross Membership I Irive more than 
nine hundred employees of the Yard paid for member- 
ship cards. 

A young missionary went into a wild Western town 
held meetings. The first Sunday he had a small or- 



Portsmouth Navj Yard, for the relief of the sufferers 

from the Halifax disaster. The Secretary desires that 
this money he applied by the American Red Cross and 
has taken steps to place the conlrd tition in our hands. 



"Don't shoot the organii t 

He's doing his damdest " 
This is our first issue. 

The Editx 





NAVY YARD, 

PORTSMOUTH.N.H. 




NATIONAL MECHANICS & TRADERS BANK 

1 Congress St. 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire 



GEORGE WASHINGTON SAID: 

"Economy makes happy homes and sound rations. In- 
still it deep." 

This useful advice of the Father of our Country is even 
mere important to-day than it was 150 years ago. Strict 
economy is our duty to-day and should also be our pleasure. 

We welcome small as well as large savings and checking 
accounts and cordially invite new residents in the city and 
vicinity to make this institution their banking home. 

Our officers are always pleased to furnish any information 
concerning financial matters. 

We are prepared to send remittances to our Soldier Boys 
in Europe without charge. 

Travelers Checks issued. 

G. RALPH LAIGHTON, President 
C. F. SHILLABER. Cashier J. M. WASHBURN, Asst. Cashier 

01 RECTORS 

G. RALPH LAIGHTON WILLIAM E. MARVIN 

GUSTAVE PEYSER FREDERICK M. SISE 

('. F. SHILLABER JOHN J. BERRY 

NOKMAN H. BKANE 

". Of 6. 

JAN 19 jg20 • 



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PLAYER PIANOS 



CHICKERING AMPICO (ELECTRIC) 



LESTER PLAYER PIANO (FOOT PEDAL) 



A Piano is the finishing touch of refinement to the 
home. The parlor or drawing room is indeed incomplete 
without a good Piano. However, when selecting a Piano 
or Player Piano it is well to be sure it is a standard make, 
a make which is known the world over, which has been 
tried and proved, such as Chickering and Son, " Oldest in 
America, Best in the World," and the Hardman, used ex- 
clusively by the Metropolitan Opera Co. 

We are exclusive representatives of both of these 
makes and many other fine Pianos including the Lester, 
Haines Bros., Briggs, Hobart M. Cable, Wm. Bourne and 
Sons., DeRivas and Harris, and Martin Bros. 

Our Prices range from $150 to $2000. 



VICTROLAS 

EDISON DIAMOND DISC 
We would be glad to demon- 
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to you any time. Come in and hear 
your favorite selection played as it 
should be played. Our Record 
stock is complete. 

HassetT's 



KODAKS 




£\ 



If you are having 
trouble with your camera, 
come in and let us help 
you. We have the largest and finest 
dep't in town. Everything for the 
amature photographer. Develop- 
ing and Printing done quickly and 
well. 



MUSICK AND ART SHOPPE 
115 CONGRESS ST., PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



YOUR PATRIOTIC DUTY 



Make your dollars serve the Government and help win the war. Buy 
United States Government Liberty Lean Bonds, the world's rafest invest- 
ment, 

Join our Liberty Loan Saving Club now and be ready for the next 
Liberty Loan. 

We have helped thousands to own United States Government Bonds 
on the partial payment plan. 

Have you finished paying for your First and Second Liberty Loan 
Bonds? Why not continue your weekly payments and have them apply on 
the next Liberty Loan when issued? We will allow interest from lime 
payments are made. 

Leave your bonds with us for safe keeping, without charge. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 
United States Depository Assets over Two Million Dollais. 



SAVING 

CONSERVATION and 

THRIFT 

WILL WIN THE WAR 

PATRIOTISM DEMANDS THAT THE CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES 

SPEND LESS and SAVE MORE 

10,000 PEOPLE ARE SAVING THEIR EARNINGS BY THE HELP OF 
( >UR INSTITUTK >NS. NEW SAVING ACC< IUNTS SOLICITED. 

PISCATAQUA SAVINGS BANK 

(FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING) PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 
LIFE BUOY 



FEBRUARY 



1918 



VOL. I NO. II 

To be issued monthly for free distribution to employees of the Industrial Department of the 
Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H. 

OVER-CONFIDENCE 

By CHARLES E. CARPENTER 

No human attribute is as dangerous to its j is even more closely cemented to me in ties of 
possessor and to others as over-confi- 1 fellowship now that we both have an only boy 
dence. Inefficiency, even, isn't as apt j who is "doing his bit." 
to provoke disaster. Our conversation, of course, turned to our 

My patience is small with those who claim boys, and I dropped the chance remark, "But 
that success merely depends on a man's con- will we win?" I did so because my friend had 
fidence in himself. Self-confidence alone come to a stage where he had stopped thinking 
never won any of the battles of life. for himself. Some unreasoned optimist had 

If confidence could win wars, and lack of told him that to be victorious, Americans must 



confidence lose them, the Central Powers 
would have long since been annihilated. 

While it continues to be considered trea- 
sonable for one to express doubt of the success 
of the Allies in th's great vvorld's struggle, the 
possibility of their being victorious will be 
lessened. My opinion is that the genuine trai- 
tor is the egregious ass who gullibly gabbles, 
"We can't lese." His wish is father to his 
unreasoned thought 



assume the "we-cant-lose" attitude, and 
everyone must join the mob in shouting, 
"We're certain to win," even if it be necessary 
to gargle the throat every half-hour in order 
to keep in vocal condition to shout. 

My friend turned on me like a flash, and, 
with a righteous patriotism, proceeded to 
admonish me. 

I didn't answer him; first, because, when 
your friend becomes a crank on any subject, 



Why should we be over-confident fools ! argument does no good, only endangers 

friendship: second, because, like a flash, I 

caught the inspiration for this article. I de- 

„ cided that the sound argument I knew I had 
the precept that echoes down the halls ot , ..,. ,. ■ , , , ,. , 

,.,.,.. r . , wherewith to answer him would help to dispel 

a widely spread delusion, and not endanger 

our friendship, as it might if I gave vent to it 

verbally. 

He has, by his mere vehemence and eager- 
ness to show confidence, revealed that he really 
had greater doubt of the outcome than my 
question had even expressed. I had only 
asked, "Will we win?" and made no admission 
of doubt, while he admitted that there was a 
possibility of losing if folks like me asked 
questions or presumed to want to know "the 
reason why." 

He knew in Iris heart that people would 



when all the precepts of experience teach us 
not to be? 



time and is dinned into the ears of present day 
humanity is — "Take no unnecessary chances 
and give your opponent the credit for wisdom 
and competency— lest you lose the battle." 

We hear this advice from the football 
coach to his team; from the trainer to the 
world champion pugilist; from the lawyer to 
his client; from the head of a business corpor- 
ation to his subordinates; from a father to a 
son who is going out to do battle with the 
world for a living; without end. 

On an evening not long ago, I was visit- 
ing, at his home, an old and dear friend, who 



LIFE BUOY 



ask just such questions as had I and that there 
is no way of preventing them, so, by protest- 
ing, he admitted that there was doubt of a 
triumph for our arms. 

Subconsciously, he gave a detailed cause 
for there being such a probability. 

If I were as mentally defeated as hs is, I 
would be making preparations fcrthe culmin- 
ation of defeat. But I am under no delusion 
that the success of the world's uprising 
against autocracy, murder, village, "fright- 
fulness" and "kultur" is dependent upon my 
mental attitude. I am playing the game and 
playing it stronger because I appreciate that 
though defeat of the Allies is not probable, it 
is possible. It is possible for the Allies to 
make sufficient mistakes to defeat themselves, 
and not the least of these mistakes would be 
over-confidence. 

Our national leaders tell us that the most 
urgent need of our nation now is an awaken- 
ing to a sincere realization of the seriousness 
of the war. 

Why aren't we awake? God knows that 
there has been grim war enough in the last 
three-and-a-half years to awaken us- 

As I see it, this national sluggardliness to 
the war's serious portent is that everyone has, 
like my friend, been shouting, "it's a cinch," 
and now the majority is beginning to believe 
that it is a cinch. 

If over-confidence is obstructing the 
nation's greatest need, for the love of our 
country, our flag, and everything noble they 
stand for, let's begin to sow a little doubt. 

I am writing this in my room at the Hotel 
Astor, overlooking the central position of New 
York's Great White Way. 

The hour is 8:15 p. m., the busiest of the 
day on this thoroughfare; the day is Saturday, 
the busiest of the week, and the streets below 
are jammed with humanity and automobiles. 
In the crowds there is plainly visible a military 
and naval tinge. 99 per cent of those within 
my view are on pleasure bent, and how few 
have any serious thought of the war or its 



outcome? 

As the restaurants, cafes, cabarets and 
hotels pour their masses into the streets to 
replace the throngs the theatres are swallow- 
ing, my one thought is, "If I could only throw 
an appalling war scare into that crowd, what 
a national awakening there would be? what 
untold geed it would do?" 

Reader, did you ever pause to think what 
a national blessing it would be if "Kaiser Bill" 
sent an airship to fly over New York and drop 
a few bombs? It won't suffice to say, "New 
York isn't a patriotic city anyhow," for the 
same condition exists at this writing all over 
the United States, that is, unless a miracle 
or a catastrophe should happen to dispel this 
blind confidence. 

A very small percentage of that crowd 
below, heedlessly taking its pleasure-bound 
way, is composed of resident New Yorkers. 

If the nation could be brought to a reali- 
zation that every effort possible is necessary 
to win the war, then it would be a cinch. 

I discovered a few days later that my 
friend who believed in shouting confidence in 
the outcome, observed neither a wheatless nor 
a meatless day in his own household. Yet, 
were he absolutely certain that the Germans 
might win, he would, though he is my senior 
by several years, beat me to the enlistment 
station. 

One meatless day is worth a hundred 
shouting nights. 

Over-confidence was, and always will be, 
a liability. Caution, which, while not Doubt, 
is akin to it, always has been, and always will 
be, an asset. 

The martyred Kitchener was unquestion- 
ably the greatest man any nation has produced 
in this war. From the very outset, Lord 
Kitchener never lost an opportunity to con- 
demn and fight over-confidence and make the 
British public acquainted with the uncertainty 
of war. 

When Kitchener prophesied that the war 
would be a long one and last over three years, 
did he do his country a bad or a good turn? 

{From Houghton's Herald,) 



LIFE BUOY. 



ACCIDENTS AGAIN 



Did you read "November Accidents" in the last issue? Well 
some directions as you will see by studying the following table: 

TWO MONTHS OF ACCIDENTS 



Men — we have been improving steadily in 



250 H 


our Workers. '"' 


Temporary 


Disability in 


Total In 


juries. 


Injuries per 


Department. 








Days 


Lost. 








Thousand 250 








4 to 28 I 






Hour 


Workers 




Nov. 


Dec. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Total Clerical 


186 


195 














9 


4 


20.51 


48.28 


General Store 


90 


81 














4 


4 


49.50 


44.44 


Power Plant 


49 


50 











II 





3 


60.36 


0.00 


Boat Shop 


149 


162 








II 





4 


7 


43.10 


26.81 


Plumber Shop 


137 


138 








1 


(1 


8 


6 


43.35 


58.24 


Foundry 


142 


149 


1 


l 


1 





28 


23 


154.15 


197.74 


Pigging Flant 


19 


22 


II 











q 


5 


226.44 


161.57 


Electrical Shop 


281 


277 


1 











43 


51 


184.24 


153.13 


Smith Shop 


54 


73 


3 





(1 





16 


4 


55.07 


294.98 


Joiner Shop 


105 


108 


1 





II 


(I 


11 


17 


157.41 


104.95 


Shipfitters 


342 


361 


3 


2 


1 


(1 


58 


58 


160. 75 


169.78 


Laborers 


65 


70 


il 


I) 





II 


8 


6 


86. 1 1 


123.30 


Machinists, Inside 


270 


305 








1 





30 


53 


173.88 


110.94 


Machinists, Outside 


115 


98 


2 


1 








10 


16 


163.27 


87.10 


Boiler Shop 


57 


66 


1 


1 





2 


13 


13 


196.38 


226.95 


Pattern Shop 


27 


25 


1 











.3 


1 


39.06 


111.94 


Rigging Loft 


9 


8 











II 





1 


150.00 


0.00 


Spar Shop 


161 


157 











1) 


1(1 


5 


31.88 


62.19 


Sail Loft 


13 


12 














ll 


n 


0.00 


0.00 


Transportation 


31 


31 


II 











3 


1 


127. 14 


95.42 


Paint Shop 


38 


42 











II 


1 


2 


47.17 


26.37 


Miscellaneous Repair 


29 


28 





1 


1 


II 


2 


2 


71.23 


70.10 


Loborers, Public Works 


198 


178 


1 


3 





1 


30 


20 


148.39 


151.52 


Clothing Factory 


1 


1 








II 











0.00 


0.00 



* This represents tbe average hours worked per month per man. 



Every right-minded man wants his shop to be the 
one in the Yard that leads, leads not only in output but 
in everything else. A low accident record for any shop 
usually means that the men in that shop stand rather 
above the average — that they think, that their gang 
stacks up a little better, plays a steadier game, is more 
careful. 

Heretofore we have simply called an accident one 
unit in the report whether it was a steel splinter in the 
left middle finger that took ten minuits of time to have 
treated at the Dispensary (and its an interesting fact 
that four out of every five injuries to hands are to the 
left hand) or a badly burned foot from the foundry that 
caused two months of disability. ' That was not fair 
because a large shop with a number of small accidents 
might not lose as much time as a smaller one with a 



couple of bad accidents. 

The Compensation Commission found, when they 
compared yards, that some stood high in the number of 
accidents but, at the same time, were low in the amount 
of compensation required. They are, from now on, 
using the table of "Degree of Disability" and its equiv- 
alent in terms of "Days Lost" given below. All 
serious accidents are to be measured by this scale so 
that each shop will have to stand comparison by the ac- 
tual cost in days of work lost to the government. 
Before long we shall know what shops are actually play- 
ing a safe game — then, "We shall see what we shall 
see". Incidentally you can see about how much your 
working capacity will be reduced by a serious accident. 
Incidentally, too, you are your own best safeguard, not 
only here, but hereafter. 



SCALE OF TIME LOSSES FOR WEIGHTING INDUSTRIAL DISABILITIES 
TO SHOW SEVERITY OF ACCIDENTS, 



NATURE OF INJURY 
Death 

Permanent total disability 
Arm above elbow, dismemberment 
Arm at or below elbow, dismemberment 
Hand, dismemberment 



Degree of Disab'y 


in 




pel- cent of permanent 


Days 


total disability 




losts 


100 




n,. II 10 


100 




6,000 


75 




4,500 


60 




3,600 


50 




3,000 



LIFE BUOY 



Thumb, any permanent disability of 

Any one finger, any permanent disability of 

2 fingers do 

:i fingers, do 

4 fingers, do 

Thumb and one finger do 

Thumb and two fingers, do 

Thumb and :i lingers, do 

Thumb amd 1 fingers. do 

Leg above the knee, dismemberment 

Leg at or below knee, dismemberment 

Foot, dismemberment 

Great toe, or any two or more toes, any permanent disability of 

1 toe other than great toe, any permanent disability of 

1 eye, loss of sight 

Both eyes, loss of sight 

1 ear, loss of hearing 

Both ears, loss of hearing 



10 


(«)(] 


5 


:«hi 


12-1 2 


750 


20 


1,2(1(1 


30 


1,800 


20 


1,200 


2. r , 


1,500 


38 L-3 


2,000 


hi 


2,400 


75 


4,500 


.Ml 


3,000 


40 


2. 100 


5 


; Kin 








30 


1,800 


100 


(I, 


l(i 


600 


50 


3,000 



GET TOGETHER. 

Elbert Hubbard used to illustrate what lack of co- 
operation means by telling of a visit he once made to 
an insane asylum, where he found a comparatively small 
attendant in charge of a group of physically powerful 
lunatics at work in the vegetable garden. When asked 
by Mr. Hubbard if there was not danger of being 
attacked by the patients, the attendant said: ''Oh, yes. 
Hut you see they can't get together — they're crazy." 

In the last issue of the "Life Buoy", the value of 
team work in this and other industrial plants was em- 
phasized, but we wish to say a word further in regard 
to this all-important matter. 

No man's part is too small for his work to count 
vitally in this organization of ours. Eye-servants, 
grouchers and knockers are always more unhappy dodg- 
ing work than is the man who does his part cheerfully, 
and they become very soon useless parts of the organ- 
ization. The management of the Industrial Depart- 
ment, and this includes the foremen as well as the 
officers, is ready to work for your collective interest 
but they expect you in turn to be willing to work 
collectively for the good id' all. A man who wastes 
time, shifts responsibility, or spends his working hours 
visiting with his shop neighbors, puts his hand in his 
own pocket and in that of everyone else in the country, 
because he is helping to increase taxation and prolong 
the war by making costs higher and production slower. 
Do not think that because the Government pays the 
bills it does not affect you and your neighbors, because 
you and your neighbors are a part of the Government 
and what affects the Government adversely must, in 
turn, affect you adversely. 

When a new idea is put forward by those in auth- 
ority, give it a fair trial. II', alter a fair trial, you find 
it impracticable, the man higher up will be glad to 
listen to your criticism, which it is your duty to pre- 
sent to him; but make your criticism constructive. 
Anyone can knock, but it takes a good man to propose 
improvements. 



Help to remove, from this Yard at least, the stigma 
that Government Yards do not do as much sound con- 
structive work as is done in private yards. By increas- 
ing the production of our Yard we will force recogniatil n 
of its superiority and so improve our own situation as 
well as that of our fellows. Let this Navy Yard be 
known as the one which, making the best id' conditions, 
turns out the most work in proportion to its facilities 
and personnel. 

We are enlisted under Uncle Sam's banner in his 
industrial forces, without which his fighting forces can- 
not reach their destination properly equipped with 
supplies. If the smallest pinion in a watch proves de- 
fective, the watch is valueless. Every man has a duty 
to perform, and this duty in its place is just as impor- 
tant as that of the highest man in the organization. 
GET TOGETHER. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 

This little slogan appears perhaps a dozen times in 
this issue. It has a real purpose; it is the third party 
in a business arrangement of which you and our adver- 
tisers are the other two. 

Use this quotation when patronizing our adverti- 
sers, because this is the only way that an advertiser can 
tell whether his advertisement is bringing results or not. 

We owe a particular duty to our advertisers be- 
cause their business makes the free distribution of this 
magazine possible. These advertisements were solic- 
ited upon a business basis, and we, as readers, should 
prove to our advertisers that advertising in this maga- 
zine is business, not charity. Since our Navy Yard has 
been, and presumably will continue to be, the largest 
industrial plant in this vicinity, in numberof employees, 
it seems but fair that our advertisers should receive a 
correspondingly large return from their investments. 

It has often been said that prices in Portsmouth are 
higher than elsewhere, but we have the assurance of 
the best merchants and dealers of this section that their 
prices on standard goods cannot, by agreement with 
the wholesaler, be higher than elsewhere. Remember 
the quotation heading this article and use it when 
making purchases from our advertisers. 



LIFE BUOY 



HELP WIN THE WAR 

Are you buying any War Saving Stamps or Thrift 
Stamps? What are they for? Why, to help win the 
war. of course! Every thing we do now should be for 
that purpose. Dj not think just of war, but think of 
winning the war. Bend every energy to that end. 

Thrift Stamps and War Saving Stamps help to do 
just that. 'I hey make it easy to save that quarter that 
now goes to the movies or to the man behind the 
counter where you put your foot on the rail. And you 
will be surprised how easy it is to get a Five Dollar 
War Saving Stamp by spending an occasional quarter 
for thrift stamps. Do you want to know a little more 
about them? Well, then, keep on reading. 

'1 hrift Stamps may be bought at any post-office or 
bank, and at many stores. They cost twenty-five 
cents each. A card is provided free which holds six- 
teen stamps. When you have the card filled (16 
stamps valued at if-1.01)) take it to any post office or 
bank and exchange it for a War Saving Certificate 
Stamp by paying 12 cents, if before January 31, 1918; 
if during February by paying 13 cents; if during March 
by paying 14 cents and so on to December, when 23 
cents must be paid. This War Saving Certificate 
Stamp will be redeemed on ,Ian. 23, 1923 for five dollars. 
Easy, isn't it? Why not start to-day to fill a card of 
Thrift Stamps? It will help you and help our country. 



THE P. N. Y. I. A. MEETINO 

The annual meeting of the Navy Yard Improve- 
ment Association was held in Odd Fellows Hall, Ports- 
mouth, on January 2nd and, despite the cold weather, 
brought out a large crowd. The report of the treasurer 
shows the Association to be in a flourishing condition 
with a balance on hand of $365.00 and with no out- 
standing bills. It was voted to lend financial aid to the 
Life Buoy until such time as the advertising would 
make it self supporting. 

A committee consisting of Mr. I. ('. Hanscom, Mr. 
W. F. Spinney and Mr. Arthur H. Locke was elect- 
ed from the floor to audit the accounts of the Finan- 
cial Secretary and the Treasurer, reporting at the 
February meeting. 

Under the new By-Laws each shop is entitled to 
one member on the Executive Committee who shall 
be elected by the shop he represents. It is hoped that 
the new Executive Committee will be completed at the 
time of the February meeting which occurs on Wednes- 
day the 6th. 

The following officers were elected for the ensuing 
year. President T. F. Flanagan. 1st Vice President E. 
L. Chancy, 2nd Vice President H. J. Chandler, Record- 
ing Secretary P. J. Rossiter, Financial Secretary John 
E. Watts, Treasurer E. V. Wilcox. 



YOUR BODY - IS IT FIT? 

The principal causes for rejection in the first 
draft, and the percentages to the total number reject- 
ed, as determined by a study of 10,000 typical cases 
taken from eight camps, are:— 

Eye 2224 21.68 per cent 

Teeth 871 8.50 " " 

Hernia - 766 7.47 

Ear - 609 5.91 " " 

Heart Disease - 602 5.87 

Tuberculosis 551 5.37 

Mental Deficiency 465 5.53 " " 

Venereal Diseases - 438 4.27 

Physical Unfitness 416 4.06 " " 

Flat Foot -375 3.65 

Every Civil employee in this yard is as much "en- 
listed" as though he wore the uniform of the Army or 
Navy and was at a training camp, and this, too, whether 
he be under, of, or over draft age. Your part here, 
where the risk of injury from actual combat does not 
exist, is as important as though you reported every 
day under military orders. 

If, by any chance, you have any of the ten defects 
mentioned above you are more or less like a wounded 
man; you cumber the place you fill — you delay the 
game — you hinder output. 

To yourself you owe the duty of having these de- 
fects remedied, particularly if you are a young man. 
In these days an ailment, or disease, has to be mighty 
stubborn not to be curable, or at least correctable, by 
medical or surgical treatment. If you have an ailment 
corrected it means you can be happier at work and at 
home. To your government you owe every day a day 
full of real work — to give less is to be a "sponger" 
and where davs, even hours may count, to hinder is 
a treasonable act. 

Your ailment may have been born with you, or be the 
result of an accident or your own foolhardiness — no 
matter get after it. The Dispensary will be glad to 
make examinations and to give advice to any man who 
comes with an honest desire to know what he can do to 
improve his physical condition. They may not be able 
to treat the case, but they can advise the sort of treat 
ment that will best afford help and how to bring this 
about. They are doing this regularly and you would 
be surprised to know how many men, by following 
simple treatment, have been helped by the Medical 
Officers. There is not time to bother with the man 
who goes to the Dispensary as an excuse to kill an 
hour and who comes back with a hang-dog look claiming 
an ailment that he never had. Such men are disgusting. 

Even the days when a man "feels punk" a trip to 
the Dispensary may spoil a headache or stomach-ache 
or a sore throat and save a man from blundering 
through the day, an easy mark for an accident that 
may prove to be serious. No sane man cares to be less 
than 100 per cent fit — most men can be. Think it 
over, men, and let's plug this war game from every 
angle. If a trip to Building 7.''. will pul a dent in the 
Kaiser's bonnet, get on "Shank's mare" and see the 
"M. 0." 



LIFE BUOY 



THINGS IN GENERAL 



VOL. 1. NO. 1. 

The first issue of the Lifebuoy, like any similar effort, 
showed where improvements could be made. So far as 
it is possible, considering the limitations under which 
we are compelled to set type, run presses and bind the 
pamphlets, we are learning how to improve appearan- 
ces and arrangement and to expedite our work. 

A new press and stapling machine will help in the me- 
chanical work and the preparation of the dummy earlier 
in the month preceeding issue will allow more time to 
arrange the printed matter in a different way. Taking 
into consideration the amount of work involved, the diff- 
iculties that naturally arise in starting a new publica- 
tion, the delays in shipment of paper as well as the regular 
work that always must be attended to by crowding in 
somewhere, we cannot speak too highly of the work the 
printer Mr. Tobey, and his assistant Mr. Lowd have done 
on these two issues. 

Helpful suggestions are welcome and, so far as it is 
possible to do so, they will be carried out. If there are 
features you want just speak about them. And just a 
word about copy: each shop is urged to send in news of 
their men, but, all shop news must be free from double 
meaning or malice. That published this month is exact- 
ly what we want. Then, too, since the space is limited 
we must pick, more or less, the best news turned in for 
publication, so that if your pet articles are cut out you 
may know we lack space and nothing else. Possibly too, 
all our urging failed to start your shop man turning in 
the news. What we got took the knees out of one good 
pair of trousers as it was. 



tiekets ready and make operations safer by keeping off 
the platforms or boarding cars in motion. And then 
there is the car in which the women employees ride and 
where common respect demands neither smoking nor 
obscene talk. Fortunately only a few men indulge in 
these abuses and the decent men are rapidly making it 
uncomfortable for them. Help us out men. 

As soon as the ice is out of the back channel, and work 
can be started, a large float is to be installed at the 
Kittery end of the old bridge for the use of the Ports- 
mouth, Dover and York Street Railway ferry so that 
it may furnish additional service to Portsmouth during 
rush hours at odd times for such shops as close about 
six o'clock. If the cars can be found, and leased or 
purchased, it is also hoped to run a limited electric 
from the Yard to Dover for those persons living beyond 
the limits of Kittery, so that the local traffic may be 
less crowded. In the meanwhile other changes may 
take place that will help remove the delays. 



TRANSPORTATION 

The transportation, as we all know, has not kept pace 
with the growth of the yard, and, while the men inter- 
ested in running trains, electric cars and boats have done 
their best with what they had to use, they had to con- 
tnd with a forty year record of ice and snow. 

It may be a simple thing to call for more cars and ex- 
tra trains but when train crews are urgently needed for 
freight movement, when cars must be held in reserve 
for troop movements and when a simple change in a time 
table in one location means extensive alterations else- 
where, it is not so easy. Then, too, it is rather a propo- 
sition to operate an electric road without cars in good 
shape, and, enough of them, r.nd where the traffic is 
bunched at certain hours and slack at others. Just at 
present we are working on what may eventually prove 
to be a solution of the problem but, like all such prob- 
lems ,it requires time and no end of patience. 

The really important thing, however, will be the help 
we are able to secure from the men. Take the trains for 
example. Only the men can themselves spread through 
the empty cars, assist the conductor by having their 



MR. HILL IS RIGHT 

The Director of the Men's Reading Room is pleased 
to have all workmen visit the rooms. They are per- 
fectly welcome and will be treated in all respects as 
the enlisted men of the service, for whom the rooms 
were established. 

The Director requests that when workmen use the 
rooms their clothing be in such condition that the fur- 
niture and reading matter is not soiled, as is frequently 
the case at present. To slip off a dirty suit of overalls 
is only the work of a moment, and is surely worth the 
effort in the direction of cleanliness. Enlisted men are 
not allowed in the Rooms except in clean uniforms. 

This notice is not intended for men whose working- 
clothes are reasonably clean, therefore it is expected 
that this appeal will be met with the spirit of its in- 
tent, and that the authorities of the Rooms will have 
no occasion to call a man's attention to the breaking of 
a very necessary rule. 



AROUND THE LUNCH ROOM 

Thank you — the bread problem is improving be- 
cause some men took the hint. If the few now left 
will only take what they actually intend to eat — and 
eat it — we will not need to mention this again. 

Seegar says "We do a day's work here and only 
ask for a fair day's pay. If you don't think so try 
buying for a lunch room and see if you would swap 
places." Woodward says "Gee whiz '. 

The men using the lunch room are like cream. They 
rise to the top near the serving tables and settle there 
so that those who come in from the bottom of the can 
have to plow their way through. Try moving out 
toward the door to the end tables when you are served 
— it helps service wonderfully. There are two sides to 



LIFE BUOY 



the room also. 

The new "Specials" Counter is working well but 
will go more smoothly if everybody steps lively and 
keeps the line moving. By its use the time of service 
has been cut about a third. It all helps. 

Since the vestibule doors have been put on we have 
all been able to secure exemption — out of the draft, 
you know. 

The new lunch room addition is coming along but 
is suffering just now from growing pains—. 



SAFETY BULLETINS 

It is a good thing to know as much as you can about 
what other people do. It helps to avoid their errors 
and to profit from their experiences. The Safety Bul- 
letin cases being put up are to have in them as much in- 
teresting information concerning accidents, and their 
cause and prevention, as can be gathered from the ex- 
perience of other shops in all parts of the country which 
have made real progress in making safe shops, and 
where accidents have been reduced by as much as eighty 
per cent. The news will be changed weekly, or of tener, 
and you can step up there at any time and get good dope 
--something helpful and worth while. Stop every day 
or so and see what you find, and, if you have an idea 
— the little brass slot at the bottom of the door — that's 
the place. 

PREPAREDNESS 

We are fast approaching the day of another Liberty 
Loan Campaign, one that will require a greater effort 
from each and every one of us than those of last summer 
and fall. Already the Government is organizing the 
General Committees to handle the Third Liberty Loan 
and preparing to marshal forces which will carry the 
world's greatest loan over the top. 

This will mean that we shall again be called to do 
our bit and when the subscriptions are closed to show 
such a total that the Portsmouth Navy Yard may again 
point with enviable pride to its position among the great 
Naval Stations of our country. We can and we will do 
it, but it is going to require a real effort on our part. 

Now is the time to clear the deck for action and in 
the next few weeks to use our best efforts to pay in 
full and receive the bonds already subscribed for. 

Don't ask the bank to carry our bonds for us longer 
than is necessary. They have made it possible for us 
to purchase hundreds of thousands of the safest secur- 
ity in the world — United States Government Bonds. 
Let us pay up the balance and show a desire to co-oper- 
ate with them at this time. 

These bonds are now all issued and are in the hands 
of the banks for delivery. 

Pay the balance on your card, get your bonds and 
learn how to cut a coupon. 



Don't put your bond in your chest or carry it in your 
pocket, but leave it with the bank which handled your 
subscription, get a receipt and let them keep it in their 
vaults for you. They will make no charge for this ser- 
vice. 

Don't sell your bond. If you bought it thru patriot- 
ism that object is lost if you dispose of it except when 
a real need exists. In all cases consult your bank before 
selling. 

We would quote a few suggestions of Secretary of 
the Treasury McAdoo: — 

" The Secretary of the Treasury McAdoo urges the purchasers 
of Liberty Loan Bonds of both the First and Second issues to hold 
fast to their bonds. They are the best investment in the world. 

The Secretary's statement was called forth by the fact that 
Liberty Bond holders are being approached from time to time by 
agents seeking to induce them to part with their Liberty Loan Bonds 
and take in exchange securities which in a number of cases are of a 
very questionable value, and was prompted by a desire to protect the 
bondholders against ill-advised disposition of their bonds. 

The Secretary expresses the hope that every purchaser of a Liberty 
Bond will realize that the only genuine help that he gives his Govern- 
ment is keeping his bonds as an investment so long as it is possible 
for him to do so. He- states, however, that no just objection 
lies to the sale of a Liberty Bond where real necessity exists for its 
sale." 



OFFICE NOTES 

Asst. Naval Constructor Jones was in dry dock for 
a week. (Reported he had trouble with his voice tubes. ) 
Constructor Boyd and Chief Carpenter Floathe were 
working double time and a half on the 8:45 a. m. ferry 
to amuse the girls and are way behind Jones's record. 
Hurry up, Jones. 



Did you see Floathe 's new coat? They say the 
price of wool went up three cents the day they cut the 
cloth. What we want to know is why it smells of 
camphor. 

Have you seen Naval Constructor Schlabach's 
kitchenette, "two rooms and a bath"? $18.00 per 
month. 

Industrial Manager Adams is trimming the edges 
of the Southern states while recuperating and is ex- 
pected back in February after completing special duty. 

Jerry — yes sir, Jerry! Took the plunge into the 
list of those who have. 

"Doc" says he will soon have his system working 
well and then Jake will be a "has been" in Spanish 
pool. 

Every week we see men aspiring for the record 
from the square to the 8:45 a. m. boat, but as yet John 
holds the record, not only in point of time but in the 
number of times. It is understood that the Construc- 
tion Supt. is designing a pantograph gang-plank for 
the convenience of late arrivals for the 8:45 boat. 



LIFE BUOY 



Its capacity will be limited therefore do not plan on us- 
ing it every morning; let the other fellows have a chance 
once in a while. 

Chief Clerk Wasgatt is looking for a mezanine gall- 
ery to accommodate the necessary additions to the force 
quartered in the J. O. Office. He also is planning to use 
meat hooks on the wall for those who do not go out 
oftener than once an hour. All applicants now have to 
pass the shrink fit test to get in. 



If anybody asks what the building in the rear of the 
Commandants Office is for just tell them it's a Zoo for 
the big 'Young' bear at the Main Cate. Some coat. 



Amos Rundlett is looking for a dove to take with 
him next time he goes on Number 1048 so that he can 
tell when the flood will subside. The old ark stood the 
test, but we did not know that Mount Arrarat was so 
near Portsmouth. 



STENOGRAPHER'S NOTES 

Mr. Hammond knows of a good remedy for coughs. 
(Mr. Rundlett please note). 

They say Caesar could dictate nine letters at a time 
to his scribes. We know now why he didn't write them 
himself. 



The stent graphers have all gone to the dentist. 
The ventilators have served their purpose and are no 
longer needed. 



Top. 



Ask Mr. Marden why he is afraid to go "Over the 

Because : - 

Every time I go 'over the top' 
I find what I fear and dread, 
One more hair in the old hair brush 
And one less hair in my head. 

To become a Safety Engineer the following qualifi- 
cations are required: first, a thorough knowledgenf di- 
etetics, and second, a diploma frcm the Pulitzer School. 



SEEN THRU THE PERISCOPE 

We are all glad to see the Supt. of New Construct- 
ion back in the "Central Operating Compartment" 
again. 



Mr Bacon's office during the last days of the L-8's 
stay assumed the aspect of a hotel. 



Inspectors Powers and Grant "expect" to be in 
their new qnarters in the Franklin Shiphouse. 

Mr. Collier one cold day reminded one of the drafts- 
men of "Taco the Terrible Turbaned Turk." 



The west side of the building was so porous that 
Mr. Curtis complained of plans hein„' blown from his 



desk. Some caulkers came down one day and pluggi d 
the building. It is even possible now to walk into 
Mr. Bacon's office without having your hat blown off. 



A very enjoyable dance was held New Years Eve 
under the auspices of the local Marine Draftsmens' 
Uuion, Industrial Manager L. S. Adams and Mrs. 
Adams. Inspector of Naval Construction H. D. Bacon 
and Mrs. Bacon were the patrons and patronesses. 
Music was furnished by "Stan" Gilkey and "Nick" 
Carter. The affair was well patronized by the drafts- 
men, but more so by the public. The committee in 
charge was J. F. Wiseman, W. C. Chase. II. P. Burns 
and I. C. Hanscom, ex-officio. We wish to thank 
these men for their work in preparing the arrange- 
ments for this pleasant evening. 



YARD DISBURSING OFFICE 

It is earnestly requested that all yard employees 
take particular pains to see that their pay voucher 
is signed in ink, exactly the same as written by machine 
on the voucher, before presenting it to the Paymaster 
on pay day for payment. Furthermore, if all men fall 
in line according to their respective gangs— small num- 
bers first and in numerical order — it will hasten pay- 
ments and obviate unnecessary delays. Try it once and 
see. 



It is further requested that all employees give their 
present address to the clerk in their department in 
order that a check may be sent to their residence three 
days after pay day in case they are, unable to be 
present on pay day. The clerk should also be notified 
in case a change of residence is made. Much difficulty 
has been experienced by the Paymaster of the Yard in 
obtaining proper addresses when checks are to be for- 
warded by mail. 



Weekly payments are made to Yard employees on 
the 8th,, 15th, 23rd and last day of each month. In 
case one of these days shoud be a Sunday, payment is 
usually made the preceding day. 

MACHINE SHOP NOTES 

There is a Quarterman Machinist in this shop that 
can tell you the definition of "Hob" in a manner that 
would put the eminent Daniel to shame. 

Now that the ice in Great Bay is in good condition 
orders for smelts will 1 u- taken as usual by "Chick". 
We don't deny but what "Chick" is there in theory 
with his little wooden rig, red bait and burlap bag, but 
we would like to see some evidence of his ability in the 
Ike Walton line besides descriptive narrative. 

Some one here wants to know if the Joiner Shop is 
hot enough to make Jimmy Boyle. 



II is evident that Building No. 80 has set the style 



LIFE BUOY 



for Porte Cochere's this season from the many others 
of like character that are springing up around the Yard. 



Would it Hoyt to Clapp Hams and Fray should 
Dana Fall? Oh My! Oh My! 



It is understood that there are several gentlemen 
in our midst that think they can give Robert a go in the 
poetry line. We are very anxious to hear from them 
if they can produce the goods. 

It has been reported that the two lone fishermen 
from this shop had good luck at Simpson's. And the 
bait? 



SPAR SHOP NOTES 

Probably McCasland works overtime, for heaven 
knows he would never have time to write his lengthy 
poems in one day. 



The Quarterman says that he has never seen so 
much as he has since he took charge of the Second Lib- 
erty Loan. 

We all know that Fuller likes to turn up breakers, 
but it seems as though he might give the rest a chance. 

The blocks that the block makers are turning out 
certainly are good duplicates of the Kaiser's head^ 
Block Head. 



Mr. Wendell says that they have got to hand it to 
the Spar Shop for the work that the men are turning 
out. 



Some fellows in this shop evidently have not read 
the notes in the Safety Bulletin case, but still insist 
upon stopping saws, planers and other busy tools with 
their hands. 



The smelts in Great Bay must be scarce as all of our 
fishermen seem to be checking up and signing in daily. 
If you do not believe me, ask Critchley. 

The Shipwrights are doing their little bit by freez- 
ing to death working, with the object in view of com- 
pleting their end of shipwork to enable ships to meet 
their completion date. 

Pleasant dreams to Taylor, the guy who has visions 
of glue pots and spars in his sleep, probrbly due to ex- 
cessive exercise of manual labor in the Spar Shop. 

No doubt the office will have to be enlarged if the 
Quarterman does not stop growing. We mean in size. 



PAINT SHOP 

Lessons in heating air can be obtained by applying 
to Scott. He has just recovered from his monthly 
attack of rheumatism. 



There are lots of checks hanging when there is a 
water-line to strike. 



The new toilet and wash room is surely a credit to 
the shop. Now, let's see all who are for cleanliness and 
sanitary conditions use it, and those who are not, let's 
teach them. About the only thing we can't furnish is 
towels. At present, we are short of locker facilities, 
but let's continue the watchful waiting a little longer. 
There's hope. 



Otis has been painting boats S3 long that any day 
you can hear him singing, "Sailing, Sailing, Over the 
Bounding Waves." 



Mr. Ball has a new tie. 



Who's got my paint brush? 



We possess several auto painters. 



Farmer Smith has taken a new abode at the Plains 
where he is to enter the cattle business. 



Buck is just aching to go rabbit hunting. So? 



John Pray is now known as "Camouflage John' 



PATTERN SHOP 

War may be as Sherman said but it holds no horrors 
for the patriotic patternmakers who so bravely volun- 
teered their services in the most dangerous part of the 
Army, the U. S. Aviation Corps. Two have already 
received commissions, and four more are engaged in 
the mechanical end of it. 



It looks as if the patternmakers have a champion 
brigade of pin bombers on the firing line in the local 
bowling alleys this season. Out of nine battles they 
have camouflaged seven so that their opponents failed 
to locate them and with their sharpshooters they ought 
to be able to capture the first line trench. 



Mr. Geo. Ayers (our idealist) referring to an item 
in Popular Mechanics, thinks it would be a good "idea" 
if everyone would purchase the blue prints and con- 
tract for themselves a one-passenger White Mono- 
plane. He says, if they would do this, he is positive 
there would be no tardiness in reaching their work 
every morning. 



Our celebrated vocalist, D. A. Twitchill, with his 
melodious voice, is contemplating taking lessons from 
our renowned artist, Prof. Harvey, and after a little 
prompting the roof will have to be removed, as the 
Boss told them that the open air would be excellent 
for their voices. 



10 



LIFE BUOY 



SHEET METAL SHOP NOTES 

Anyone wanting to know what to do with his 
Liberty Bond after paying for it? Ask Lewis, he knows. 

Charles W. says it takes one ton of coal a week to 
run his furnace. Since he can only buy a quarter of a 
ton a week, he is using it as dessert, a little for every 
meal. 

We wonder why Olin and Olaf went out Saturday 
noon? Must be something drawing in Hudson. Ask 
them about their air line operating in Manchester. 

It is rumored that there are autos enough owned by 
men in this shop to take the whole bunch on a picnic, 
providing they don't care what they ride in. 

Everyone is asking where "Those Shoes" are which 
were mentioned in the January "Life Buoy." (Plenty 
of order blanks in the Safety Engineer's office). 

The man leaving a wallet kicking around with any 
amount of money in it ought to pay an income tax. 

Ask Charlie B. how much the Banks make on a 
Liberty Bond if they sell it to a party on the install- 
ment plan. 

The ice coming down the river makes George C. 
think it is almost time to start for the big pond for 
trout. 



Jerry says he has made so many pans that he woke 
up the other night and found he had driven the alarm 
clock through the head of the bed and was trying to 
head it over. 



Quite a good sum was realized in the collection for 
C. W. Chick on account of his sickness. 



STRUCTURAL SHOP NOTES 

David Hermn, in charge of teaming at the structural 
shop, seems to have a lot of business in the hills of old 
New Hampshire. 

You can't make the boys in the gang believe 
Hannah bought any tobacco. 

It is rumored that John Flanagan, the great hunt- 
er and trapper, went on an extended hunt the last of 
the old year. He was full (y) as successful as usual, 
bringing home a large fur bearing animal, the hide of 
which he is going to have made into many useful arti- 
cles of wearing apparel for the family. 

Thr ice met Fred Hayes rather suddenly Friday, 
the 11th inst. Fred says he always sits down on that 
particular spot. Which one? 

SMITH SHOP NOTES 

We understand that since Henry Linscott has been 
feeding his horse cayenne pepper he gets home three 
minutes sooner. Earle Jones, please take notice. 



Eddie Becker says he will stand "meatless, wheat- 
less, or any other less days," but when they stop the 
sale of snuff he will join the army. 

Wanted— a new location for the galvanizing room. 
We live in smoke, though we die in despair! 

"Louie" Ginella says the boss is an "Injun Giver" 
because he wouldn't let him keep his wedding present. 
Better luck next time, "Louie!". Shorter ones are the 
style anyway. 

The "Brown Cows" have been beaten twice by 
our bowling team: seven pins the first time; two the 
second. 



Wanted — To hear from the other shops in regard 
to a bowling league. 

We understand that Walter Clark uses Pompeian 
Massage Cream on his hands so the girls won't suspect 
that he is a blacksmith. 



The Smith Shop hereby challenges the Boat Shop 
to box, wrestle, bowl, tug-of-war, or anything else the 
B. S. A. A. wants to take 'em up for. The Boat Shop 
may be Liberty Loan Champions but the Smith Shop 
concedes it no other flags or cups. 



AT THE DISPENSARY 

Since the provisions of the Federal Compensat : on 
Act of September 16, 1916, and the administration of 
this Act by the United States Employees' Compensa- 
tion Commission have been understood by the Yard 
employees, it is noted that those injured report more 
promptly to the Dispensary than heretofore. 

Plans have been prepared which will greatly in- 
crease the facilities of the Yard Dispensary so that 
there will be an ample waiting room, consultation room, 
surgical dressing room, a small ward for four beds, an 
operating room and a room for women employees. It 
is expected that an X-ray machine will be among the 
equipment of the new building. 

Monday, January 14th, 1918, must have been "Blue 
Monday". There were twenty-two new cases which 
visited the Dispensary on that date, the largest number 
in one day in the history of the Yard. 



When you are hurt come to us and lend your assist- 
ance by giving us willingly the information which is 
required of us for your record, and which is for your 
benefit. 



The cases that cause trouble for the most part are those 
of employees who fail to have their injuries recorded 
at the time they occur, and those who remain away 
from work and report their injury some time after they 
have become complicated by developments, which, at 
the start, could easily have been corrected. 



LIFE BUOY 



11 



BOAT SHOP NOTES 

The Boat shop employees met at the National 
Hotel on Wednesday evening, January 16, 1918, to en- 
joy a banquet that had been arranged for them by the 
Boat Shop Committee. The purpose of the meeting 
was to organize a club to meet each month and talk 
over shop matters and how best to work with the offi- 
cers of the Yard to increase the Boat Shop production. 

The guest of the evening was Assistant for Boat 
Constructor, Chief Carpenter Sverre Floathe, who gave 
an interesting talk on such a club as proposed and how 
it would help the officers and men of the Yard. Mr. 
Floathe's remarks were received with great applause 
and others present followed with a few words on the 
same topic. 

The evening was pleasantly passed and a fine ban- 
quet enjoyed. This club is on the same plan as that of 
the Smith Shop and from the way the men turned out 
and took interest in the first meeting, it is believed it 
will be a great success. The Boat Shop Committee, 
or "OVER THE TOP" Committee, presented Foreman 
Charles F. Tucker with the following letter of appre- 
ciation for his work in the Boat Shop's Liberty Loan 
drives: 

Boat Shop, Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H. 
January 16, 1918. 

Mr. Charles F. Tucker, 
Dear Sir: 
We wish to express our thanks and appreciation 
for your untiring efforts that so successfully led us 
"Over the top" to victory in both Liberty Bond drives, 
thus causing the happy realization of seeing the Pen- 
nant of victory flying over our shop. 

Signed Boat Shop Committee. 

Oscar T. Clark, Frank E. Donnell 

Charles W. Humpheys. 



We wonder why a certain man's wife would not let 
him attend the banquet? 

Well Charlie, you cannot expect to be out every 
night in the week. 



"Bill Gas" is some story teller. 

THINGS WE HAVE HEARD 

That a good run is better than a bad stand. 

That many a game has been lost by starting too 
soon for the (dinner) plate, especially when our genial 
friend "S" is at the bat. 

That we have had the very uncomfortable feeling 
of having our hat rise up and sit on the ends of our hair. 

That we have had to do some of the tight-wad 
stunts, or, in other words, we have been slightly Hoov- 
erized. 

Well - Well - WELL! 



NOTES FROM THE BANQUET 
Our guest, Chief Carpenter Floathe, entertained us 
with some excellent stories. 



The impossible happened, Freemie Lewis lost his 
speech. 

We noticed that our bond salesman Mr. Tucker had 
his big "Kohinoor" in plain sight. It is a wonder he 
was not robbed on his way home. When you want to 
see a real diamond look up Charles. 



Owing to a previous and important engagement, Mr. 
Shaw was not present. Oh! Shaw!! We wonder why? 



Captain Miles had a very rough time on his sub- 
marine trip. Yes, very rough indeed. 

Hats off to our toastmaster. 



The explanation for the peace and quietness in 
Shop 59 on Saturday — Freemie Lewis has a sore throat. 

Speaking about the Boat shop, Liberty Loans and 
Drives, you know we do a lot of driving over here and 
whether it is boats, nails or bonds makes little difference.- 

If you have anything to sell, place it in the hands 
of Charles Tucker. It is a sure thing he will put it 
over the top (if it can be done). 

BONDS 

There are bonds of friendship and bonds of peace. 

But the Liberty bonds will never cease. 
And when at last the final call 

The Boat Shop will put one over them all. 



ELECTRICAL SHOP NOTES 

The new Shop Lunch Room, opened January 21, 
1918 is sure some grille. Louie is the Boss. 

The N. Y. I. A. is 98 per cent strong in 79. 

There are about fifty female operators employed in 
the Assembling Room at present. 

Is it a bowling team or a bawling team that the 
Smith Shop has? Who is the Big Gink, their manager? 

Quarterman Williams has come to an agreement 
with Mr. Jones as to his income tax. 



Our Time Clerk is going to entertain the F. O's. 
with a phonograph recital. Some boy! 

The Shop output for December was $72,848. The 
1916 output was $68,000. The 1917 output was $411,000. 
For 1918 we expect to make $1,000,000 look small. 

It is surmised that Sheriff Leach is gumshoeing to 
find out who stole his dinner basket. Who saw that rat. 



Fred Hatch had a queer little lid 
That covered nine tenths of his head. 

One day when he coughed 

He blew the rim off 
And got a bad cold, it is said. 



12 



LIFE BUOY 



SHIPFITTER'S SHOP NOTES. 

The gambling parlors of Dick Canfield have been 
closed since some of the "profesh" were canned for 
six days. 

Floyd Riley is surely doing his bit laying out frames 
and plates; also, look sharp for he will soon pass the 
cigars around. (Dod Darn). 

A light haired "Thor" man says that cold weather 
and deep snow don't make much difference to him 
when it comes to motor-cycling. (Give 'er the gas). 

The apprentice boys of the shop are wondering 
where their tool kits arc. Hope they don't get disap 
pointed. 

A second school in shipfitting has been started in 
the shop. We hope the hoys will take as much interesl 
as (lie first class. 

A supper of planked steak and all the fixings was 
enjoyed by ten men of the mold loft recently at a cafe 
in Portsmouth. All reported a good time and plenty to 
eat. and hoped the next one would not be far off. 

Mill Higgins. whom we mentioned in the last issue, 
while coming from Bath, Maine, to Portsmouth, N. H., 
fell asleep on the train. He awoke at Salem. He 
must be working pretty hard. Hope it won't hurt his 
health any. 

Mr. Heiser, the "Stealthy Steve" identifier, is 
very much peeved when he has to return to the gate to 
pass some late comers, but he must remember that the 
Fuel Administrator has issued orders that all transpor 
tation lines shall not burn too much coal, and that it is 
not the men's fault if they are late. Never mind, "lleis". 

IT the York Harbor & Beach Railroad changes time 
and leaves the Kittory Point Station earlier in the 
morning, we are wondering how Frastus Stephen Blake 
will catch it, especially if they change conductors, as 
the one on now is very kind and waits for him from ten 
to fifteen minutes each morning. 

The Shop hopes that the men will profit by the 
lesson learned from going to the restaurant before the 
whistle blows. If they cannot get there in time to go 
through the door, lot Seegar give them a sandwich out 
the window. 

Question: Is it the fault of the Fuel Administrator 
or an oversight that the train which was promised for 
the men who quit work at 6:00 does not run? We hope 
that it will soon be put on. (We are still working for it). 

The lights in the shop have been replaced by new 
ones and additional lights have been installed in the 
mold loft, also new heating system direct from the 
main line. 



look in the Franklin Shiphouse and the new shiphouses 
and see the progress from one day to the next. 



If anyone thinks that this shop is lagging, take a 



Some men in the gang would like to see the Civil 
Service Commission at Boston take on more help and 
return the new ratings they are looking for. (Amen). 

The punch gang is keeping all work caught up 
close and are ready for anything that can be put up to 
them. (Only when Riley is out). 

This has been a great winter season for the pick- 
ling gang. They have handled and cut as much ice as 
they have steel. 

WANTFI): More good boys for rivet heating. 

Ernest Spinney says that keeping house is all right, 
but when your water pipes freeze up, and you try all 
night to thaw them out, and in the small hours of the 
morning the whole front of the stove blows out, all the 
covers lodge in the ceiling, the hot coals burn up a 
thirty-six dollar linoleum, the windows in the kitchen 
are broken, the cat scalded to death, and then your 
young housekeeper leaves because you can't afford to 
buy a new stove, that it is about time to find a boarding 
place. 

Willie Grace has stopped smoking and chewing 
tobacco and has taken up eating nails for a pastime. 



The Shop feels proud of the good woi k which the 
bending floor is doing under the leadership of Matt 

.Johns in turning out the difficult channel frames and 
other work. The night shift is also credited with good 
work although a number of men are out sick. 



Hooray! Joe Smith has got all the storm windows 
on except *Y\p skylight. 

The Boat Shop can boast of its athletes in running, 
swimming, tug-of-war, etc., but it has no one who can 
catch Charlie Shepard when it comes to walking. He 
can walk up the shop so fast the trail in the smoke is 
not closed up before he is back. 



Harry Magg, while in the performance of his duty. 

met with a painful accident, lie stuck Ins finger through 
a shell hole to find out if it was countersunk on the in- 
side and some driller with hot) nailed shoes en stepped 
on it. Harry hollered and hollered, "Get off my finger" 
but nothing doing. The man did not hear him so he had to 
suffer for about five minutes until the driller moved. 
The finger was badly lacerated and is now under the 
doctor's care. 



The Shop feels very fortunate that no one was 
seriously injured when the crane on the big rolls broke. 
Many had narrow escapes as it fell without much 
warning. The Safety Engineer is rigV on the job in 
securing the others so that we will feel safe when 
working near them 



MUSIC IN YOUR HOME 

Of all instruments adapted for making home attractive the PIANO 
holds first place. Do your Bit for the family by installing a good 
Piano. We have only the reliable kind and 

KENT OR SELL ON EASY TERMS. 

Let us show you our stock and quote prices. Special rental rate 
till June ist. Piano tuning and repairing. 

MONTGOMERY'S MUSIC STORE 

OPPOSITE POST OFFICE 




ESTABLISHED 1865 




THE EXPERIENCE 

of a paper hanger is not needed to de- 
termine either the quality or artistic 
designing of our new and attractive 

WALL PAPERS 

You can see at a glance the rich ele- 
gance and you can live with the taste- 
fully designed patterns indefinitely 
without tiring of them. 

F. A. GRAY & CO. 

30-32 Daniel St. 



ATTENTION MEN 

TELL YOUR WIVES THEY CAN SAVE A 
LOT OF MONEY BY ATTENDING OUR 

ECONOMY SALE - 

THREE SALES IN ONE 

FIRST-Mark down on Coats, Suits, Skirts, 
Furs and other winter goods. 

SECOND— White sale including Cotton under- 
wear and white goods generally. 
THIRD-New lines of Spring wash goods. 

L. E. STAPLES 

13 MARKET ST., PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



FRED GARDNER 

The man who takes your money in 
exchange for Real Estate and Insurance 
that insures. GLEBE BLDG. 



WE WILL TRY TO FILL YOUR ORDER 

FOR 

STATIONERY AND OFFICE SUPPLIES 

HOYT & DOW 

THE STATIONERS 



REHMCH CO. 

READY TO WEAR COATS, SUITS, SKIRTS AND DRESSES 

GLOVES -- SMALL WARES -- TOILET GOODS 

37-45 MARKET ST. TEL. 202 PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



i SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



CENTRAL LAUNDRY COMPANY 

71 PLEASANT ST. PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



FIRST-CLASS WORK 



PROMPT DELIVERY 



E. E. WHITEHCUSE 
BARBER 

Up one flight Opposite Colonial Theatre 



THE ARTHUR RICHARDSON CO. 

INTERIOR DECORATORS AND DEALERS IN 
SPECIALTIES 

The New Hampshire National Bank B!dg. Rooms 7. 8 & 9 
3 PLEASANT ST. PORTSMOUTH, X. II. 



SUGRUE 
OVERALLS, TOBACCO, PASTRY 

KITTERY. MAINE 

INSURANCE 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 
LOWEST RATES - BEST FORMS 

C. E. TRAFTON 



N. H. BANK BLDG. 



PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



HOOVERIZE 

WHEN BUYING FURNITURE 

If you want to save money buy your 
House Furnishings at less than half 
the prices you are paying elsewhere 
We sell Complete House Furnishings 
at prices within the reach of all. 

E. o. STEPHENSON, Successor 
TO KEMP FURNITURE CO. 

V. A. WOOD, MGR. 

99 Penhallow St., Portsmouth N. H. 



PARSONS the HATTER 



MEN'S FURNISHINGS 



THE "BUSY CORNER" STORE 

BUT NEVER TOO BUSY 

TO HLL YOUR PRESCRIPTIONS 

AND FILL THEM RIGHT 

OUT OF TOWN PATRONS ARE 

WELCOME TO WAIT FOR THE 

CAR AT OUR HOUSE 

BENJAMIN GREEN 

THE DRUGGIST 



A. P. WENDELL & CO. 

HARDWARE, PAINTS & TOOLS 

2 MARKET SO. PORTSMOUTH, X. II. 

TEL. 850 



ADAMS DRUGSTORE 

ON MARKET STREET 
PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



J. VERNE WOOD 

13 DANIEL ST, PORTSMOUTH, X. II. 



FUNERAL DIRECTOR 



TEL. CONN. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 




&&#-<& 



TRY US OUT 
Cur business is men's clothes and fur- 
nishings, and footwear for the whole 
family. We carry only dependable mer- 
chandise, and our prices are reasonable. 
WALK-OVER, RALSTON, DOROTHY DODD 

SHOES, TRIPLE-TREAD RUBBERS 

"IVIASTERCRAFT MENS CLOTHES, PATRICK 

MACKINAWS. ARROW COLLARS, 

CARTER'S OVERALLS 

N. H. BEANE & CO. 

5 CONGRESS ST., PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 







G. L. TREFETHEN 

KITTERY, MAINE 

HARDWARE & PAINTS, PLUMBING & HEATING 

DORE'S CONFECTIONERY STORE 

CARRIES HIGHEST GRADE CANDIES AND PURE ICE CREAM 



37 CONGRESS ST. 



PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



Go to W. D. KENDALL 



>. m 



it 



KITTERY, MAINE 



FOR YOUR 



TELEPHONE 871-M 



MEATS, GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS 



-:<H"! 



FRUITS, CANNED AND STAPLE FOODS 

BEST GOODS AT LOWEST 
POSSIBLE PRICES 



T SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



GOOD SERVICE IS OUR STOCK IN TRADE 

HOME WASHING CO- WET WASH 

MRS. L. M. GROVER, 315 Maplewood Ave. 
TEL. 452-W Not Responsible In Case of Fire PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



C. H. PALM & CO. 
MERCHANT TAILORS 

SUCCESSORS TO ANDREW BRENNAN 
CLEANING PRESSING AND REPAIRING 

24 CONGRESS ST. 

TELEPHONE 1034-M PORTSMOUTH. N. H. 



KITTERY & NAVY YARD EXPRESS 
GENERAL TEAMING 

JOHN O'LEARY 



TEL. CONN. 



I'OKTS.MorTII. N. II. 



THE PORTSMOUTH FLOWER SHOP 

A. C- CRAIG, MANA'-ER 

FANCY CUT FLOWERS 

AGENT VICTOR TALKING MACHINES 

4 MARKET STREET PHONE. 960 

PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



0. W. HAM 

UNDERTAKER 

ROOMS & CHAPEL 

122 MARKET ST., PORTSMOUTH. N. H. 
TEL. 164-W 



FULIS BROS. 



FINE SHOE REPAIRING MEN'S & EOYS SHOES 



157 CONGRESS ST. 



TEL. CONN. 



JOHN SISE & CO. 

INSURANCE 

8 MARKET SQUARE 

PORTSMOUTH. N. H. 



BIY YOUR "SMOKERS" SUPPLIES 



AT 



TOM LECXEY'S 

"Where the INDIAN silently stands" 

29 CONGRESS ST., PORTSMOU'l II, N. II. 



TTS-E OAS FOR 
LIGHTING, HEATING AND COOKING 

PORTSMOUTH GAS CO. 

ALWAYS AT YOUR SERYICE 



VISIT THE PORTSMOUTH 

FRUIT AND CONFECTIONERY STORE 

A. CAPLEN, PROP. 

TEL. CONN. 



L. SHERMAN 

MERCHANT TAILOR 

CLEANING, PRESSING AND REPAIRING 
PRICES REASONABLE 

6H DANIEL ST. TEL. CONN. 



REGULAR DINNER SERVED ALL DAY 
AT 

DOWNING'S 

SEA GRILL & CHOP HOUSE 

CONGRESS ST., PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



SUCCESS TO THE LIFE BUOY 
HARRY I. CASWELL Dist. Mgr. 

NEW ENGLAMD MUTUAL 

LIFE INSURANCE CO. 



D. H. MclNTOSH 
COMPLETE HOUSE FURNISHER, RELIA3LE GOODS AT REASONABLE PRICES 

COR. FLEET & CONGRESS ST. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE EUOY" 



TRY OUR SAViNG SYSTE 



AL"WAYS JLT YOTTPL SERVICE 

KERWIN'S SHOE STORE 



45 CONGRESS ST. 



ALBERT Z. LEACH, MGR. 



A FEW OF OUR SPECIALTIES 

Hart, Schaffner and Marx Clothes, Stetson Hats, Manhattan Shirts, 
Fownes Gloves, Interwoven Stockings 

OUTFITTERS FOR MEN & BOYS -T • VV . -Lil-L'OlUiN (SL V^U. PORTSMOUTH, N. H 




WHITE & HODGDON 

GROCERIES, 1HE4TS, PROVISIONS 
POULTRY AND COUNTRY PRODUCE 



TELEPHONE 123 



20 CONGRESS ST. 



Prompt settlement of accounts are of 
more importance to us than an increase 
of business. 



FRED B. COLEMAN 

APOTHECARY 
CORNER CONGRESS & VAUGHN STS, 

PORTS MOUTH, N. H. 



BICYCLES, SPORTING GOODS 
TYPEWRITERS & SUPPLIES 

W. F. WOODS 

22 Congress Street, Portsmouth. N. H. 



HENRY PEYSER & SON 

IS TO SO MARKET ST. 

For more than forty years Portsmouth's Beading 
Store for Men's and Boys' apparel 

C A- L O W D 
SERVICE STATION AND GARAGE 

338 Pleasant Street 29 to 45 Wentwortli Street 

PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



ALLINSON'S DRUG STORE 

Successor to C. W. BASS Established 1838 

SQUIBBS PURE CHEMICALS AND DRUGS 

PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY 



"I SAW IT IN '1HE LIFE BUOY" 



MARGESON BROTHERS 

FURNITURE, CARPETS, RUGS 
FURNITURE COVERINGS & UPHOLSTERING 

VAUGHAN ST. PORTSMOUTH, IM. H. 

PARAS BROTHERS 

FRUIT AND CONFECTIONERY, ICECREAM AND SODA, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 
TELEPHONE 29 CATERING A SPECIALTY 43 CONGRESS STREET 

THE BEST LINE OF WORK SHOES AND RUBBERS 

F. C. REMICK & CO. 



NO. 11 CONGRESS STREET 



FOOTWEAR 

ELITE AND EMERSON SHOES 



PORTSMOUTH, X. II. 



KEARSARGE HOTEL &, CAFE 

ho:m:e of the people 

Sherman T. Newton, Prop. 

TEL. 1134 THAT'S ALL 

TRADE AT BROWN'S MARKET GASH AND NO DELIVERY 



LOWEST PRICES IN THE CITY 



LET US PROVE IT TEL. 1 94- 



EATS, FISH AND GROCERIES 

• OREN BRAGDON & SON 46 Market Street 

CARRY THE GENUINE SXAG BOOTS, A FULL LINE OF LEATHER GOODS, 

AND ARE EQUIPPED TO DO 
FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING, AND CUSTOM WORK 



ARTHUR B. DUNCAN 

JEWELER AND SILVERSMITH 

DIAMONDS, WATCHES. ! MARKET STREET 
FINE REPAIRING. PORTSMOUTH . N. H. 



THE SEIGELS STORE 
CLOAKS AND FURS 

57 MARKET STREET 

TELEPHONE CONNECTION, PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



ROCKINGHAM COUNTY LIGHT & POWER Co. 

29 PLEASANT ST. 

LIGHTING APPLIANCES AND HOME CONVENIENCES 



•I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY' 



Portsmouth Furniture Co. 



THE MONEY SAVING STORE 



CORNER DEER AND VAUGHN ST. 



NEAR B. & M. DEPOT 



STAR RETT TOOLS 

KYANIZE FLOOR FINISHES 

SHERWIN-WILLIAMS HOUSE PAINTS 

E. C. Matthews Hardware & Paint Co. 



OPPOSITE POST OFFICE 


PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 


CHARLES J. WOOD 

MERCHANT TAILOR 
ARMY AND NAVY UNIFORMS 


C. F. DUNCAN & Co. 

DEALERS IN 

BOOTS, SHOES AND RUBBERS. 

9 MARKET STREET 


PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 
TELEPHONE 15 PLEASANT ST. 


TELEPHONE CONNECTION 

PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 


STEAM HEAT ELECTRIC LIGHTS 


J. W. HODGDON 


LANGDON HOTEL 

ROBERT J. HAYES, PROP. 
Running lint and Cold Water in All Rooms TEL loll 

PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 


OYSTER HOUSE 

AND 

RESTAURANT 

6 Congress St 



I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY 




NAVY YARD, 
PORTSMOUTH, N.H. 




r AWttfv\i l :s s s ss a>^. \\s^ s < > \ , s\s sss: 




WILL THE 

PORTSMOUTH NAVY YARD 

LEAD THE PROCESSION 

AGAIN 
IN THE 

THIRD LIBERTY LOAN? 

YOU 

CAN GIVE THE ANSWER 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 




Why You Should 
Purchase Your 



Yiclrola Here? 



Because 



OUR GUARANTEE OF SATISFACTION IS ADDED TO 

YOUR PURCHASE 



Victrolas are the same everywhere 

Quite true — but there is an added definite security in know- 
ing that this house — the best of its kind in this vicinity — stands 
back of the particular instrument you buy. 



THEVICTROLA (Illustrated) XA $85 
Can be purchased on our Deferred Payment Plan 



You are always welcome at this home of good music. 



HaSSEtT's MUSIC AND ART SHOPPE 

1 I 5 Congress St., Portsmouth, N. H. 

"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 



YOUR PATRIOTIC DUTY 



Make your dollars serve the Government and. help win the war. Buy 
United States Government Liberty Loan Bonds, the world's safest in- 
vestment. 

Join our Liberty Loan Saving Club now and be ready for the next 
Liberty Loan. 

We have helped thousands to own United States Government Bonds 
on the partial payment plan. 

Have you finished paying for your First and Second Liberty Loan 
Bonds? Why not continue your weekly payments and have them apply on 
the next Liberty Loan when issued? We will allow interest from time 
payments arc made. 

Leave your bonds with us for safe keeping, without charge. 

We also have Safety deposit boxes for rent $1.00 per year and up. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

United States Depository Assets over Two Million Dollars. 



SAVING 

CONSERVATION and 

THRIFT 
WILL WIN THE WAR 



PATRIOTISM DFMANDS THAT THE CITIZENS OF THE UNITED 

STATES 

SPEND LESS and SAVE MORE 



10.(1(1(1 PEOPLE ARE SAVING THEIR EARNINGS BY THE HELP OF 
OUR INSTITUTIONS. NEW SAVING ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 



PISCATAQUA SAVINGS BANK 

First National Lank Building Po-i mouth, N. H. 



"! SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 



INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 
LIFE BUOY 



Issued monthly for free distribution to employees of the Industrial Department of the 
Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H. 



VOL. I 



MARCH 1918 



NO. 3 



WHAT ARE YOU DOING ABOUT IT? 



SOMETHING like five years ago a man 
came home one evening well and hear- 
ty, so far as outward appearance went. 
He ate his supper, sat about with his 
family, joked with his wife and children 
just as most men do when night time comes. 
While smoking his cigar after the children 
had gone to bed his attention was attracted 
by a small lump under his tongue about as 
large as a bean. It grew larger so he went to 
his physician who told him, frankly, that he 
had a cancer and who took immediate steps to 
give such treatment as he could. In six 
months this malignant, subtle growth con- 
sumed the greater part of the man's face, an 
eye, an ear, his tongue and finally his brain. 
During that period, though he suffered tre- 
mendously, he fought with all the virility of 
his vigorous constitution and the aid of the 
finest physicians in the country to stamp out 
the growth. In the end he died. 

In August 1914 this old world of ours 
awoke to the fact that one portion of its body 
had become infected with the virulent poison 
of the vilest disease with which humankind 
ever was possessed — -the doctrine that "might 
makes right" — that a few with this right can 
control the life, the health, the happiness of 
individuals and nations ; that they can de- 
termine the destiny of mankind as it suits 
them. 

Since that day in July when a pistol shot 
snuffed out the life of an Austrian archduke 
and thus gave the flimsy excuse for forcing 
into flame a war long since planned, there has 
developed its being and extended itself across 
Europe from the North Sea to the Mediter- 
ranean a tormented strip of country such as 
mankind, or the world never has known, nor 



which, previous to that Summer's day, seem- 
ed possible. Almost four years have come 
and gone. The world, in it's efforts to stamp 
out the ugly sore and to utterly remove its 
devilish cause, has poured into that tortured 
strip such wealth and such a store of life as 
has staggered- humanity. One nation after 
another, in defense of their common love- of 
right and a chance to live as peaceful hu- 
manity should, has added its might until more 
than half of mankind has devoted its men, 
its wealth, its entire time and resources to 
stopping the spread of this sore. We here 
in America are just beginning to feel the 
stress of the circumstances ahead of us, to 
know the heartache of facing the loss of our 
men — many times our personal friends, — of 
suffering, of the pangs of suspense and un- 
certainty and the inconvenience of sacrifice. 
A few days ago there tied up at one of 
the docks in this Yard a ship, ice-covered and 
stained and bearing evidences of the duty 
through which she had passed. She repre- 
sents a link in the long, thin chain of ships 
through which America is already pouring 
her strength, her vast resources of men and 
things into the Allie's trenches and by which 
she will help in winning the war. The 
nourishment to feed these vast armies on the 
ships and in the trenches and to carry men 
and munitions, equipment and supplies, 
nurses, doctors, wounded: the thousand, yes 
the millions of things necessary, depend 
utterly on this chain. This vast store of 
help, flowing like medicine from the huge 
bottle that America represents, can only 
reach the trenches through a neck no bigger 
than this chain of ships. No other war ever 
was waged with a base removed three thou- 



LIFK BUOY 



.sand miles by an intervening ocean, no other 

war has called for so much or in such vast 
quantities. 

Thai strip "over there" is like no other 
place Oil earth. Men die, not in hundreds but 
by millions. Hospitals cannot be built rapid- 
ly enough to care tor the broken and wound- 
ed so that churches, schools, hails, houses; all 
Shelter soldiers for miles and miles away 
from the front. Not hundreds of shells are 
hurled into the enemy's country but whole 
trainloads, whole shiploads. Cemeteries are 
not alone made to care for the wreckage but 
huge open graves and funeral pyres that con- 
sume thousands nay they must even lie un- 
buried to stench the air. Not a few men here 
and there are wiped out but whole cities in 
number; not a few buildings are wrecked, but 
cities, miles of them, to the end that slowly 
but surely and a little at a time we. and our 
Allies, shall gain by paring oil' a bit of rotten- 
ness and so, gradually, but surely, clo e over 
and heal, for all time, this sorry spectacle. 

Already our hospitals here are taking 
injured men by hundreds, our friends greet 
us sad eyed, our ships are being sunk. Slow- 
ly bid surely the grip of this war is reaching 
us. What are we the men right here in the 
Portsmouth Navy Yard — going to do about 
it? Can any man, fit to bear the name, do 
less than to keep every machine, every job. 
every bit of work assigned to him going at 
full blast to the single end that ship-, con- 
voys, material shall reach the Navy on time, 
ahead of time, in shape. Shall we because of 
our personal lack let that chain of ships be- 
come taut, stretched by delay and by poor 
work till it snaps apart. In the midst of some 
huge drive one ship load of men, one cargo of 
shells, one tank of fuel, one steamship of 
grain and food might spell victory; their lack 
might mean the spread into still untouched 
territory of the hordes we an- arming to keep 
from corrupting the face of the earth. 

What are we what are you going to do 
about it — Nay! — what are you doing about 
it? Men! — let's face this game, our game in 
an up-standing, man-fashioned, fearless way, 
without quibble, without bickering, without 
thought of our own personal likes or dislikes 
and so in the least time bring an end — and 
peace. What are you doing about it? 



SECOND DINNER 

ON Wednesday evening, March 6th, something 
like one hundred and thirty or the beads of depart- 
ments, Foremen, quartermen, ami leadingmen sal 
down io a turkey supper iii the Lunch Room. 

Though nol equipped Io serve a banquet I be Lunch 

Room torce turned oul a supper that left nothing 
to be desired iii i lie way of Interior decoration; or 

at leasl every report sounded that way I be following 
morning, some even earlier. A case of near Sighted- 
ness on I lie pari of the Safely Kngineer was re- 
sponsible for the discrepancy in I be hour of serving 
but Ibis delay was more I ban offset by I be great 

promptness with which the vaudeville show began 
After supper Chief Carpenter Ploathe, acting 

as loasl master I under what menial anguish and 

apprehension only those who heard the truth con- 
cerning bis pari in Cue naming of Copper field, Ne- 
vada, can appreciate) presented Captain w. G. Cole 
of the i'. S. s. FREDERICK whose remarks brought 

home wilb considerable force (be need for the ill • 

most effort on all work that every ship assigned to 

this Yard remain for repairs the minimum id' lime. 

lie was followed by Mr. McCourt, Chief Estl- 

malor. whoso plea for increased powers for leading 

and quartermen, comparable with the increase in 
the number of men ami work now assigned to them, 
can result in greater production along the line 

Master Mechanic Flanagan, in a few terse 

words, showed to what extent the personal efforts 

on the pari of the men have resulted in building up 

Hie Yard and having new construction assigned. 

Commander Wyman and Naval Constructor 
Schlabach followed, devoting their talks to coordi- 
nating the facts given by Captain Cole and Mr. 
McCourt into suggestions Bhowlng whereby each 
officer and head could form the nucleus of a group 
of men in each shop, thus bringing the men into 
closer touch with the big Hunt; tor which we are 
working and which Captain Cole so aptly summed 
up when he said "Our principal job now is Io DOWN 
THE SUBMARINES," a slogan we could well adopt 
here to splendid advantage 

After supper the meeting adjourned Io mold- 
ing No. 95 where, through the kindness of chief 
Boatswain Hill, a vaudeville show with moving 
pictures closed the evening 

SLACKERS 

SUPPOSE Ceneral Pershing should issue an 
order that a certain regiment should make a charge 
Of l>. 



JAN 19 |920 



LIKE IJUOY 



to-morrow ill daylight. Then suppose thai one BOl- 
dier shiMihl say "J waul to go sec my brother to- 
morrow," and another should say "it is a little 

cloudy; I think I will slay In my tenl to day." and 
the next should say "the captain spoke roughly to 
me yesterday I do not think I will charge any more" 
and the fourth should say "My big toe is a little 
sore 1 think I had better not charge to-morrow." 
And suppose thai one man out of every nine should 
offer an excuse like that and refuse to charge. How 

long would it take the Germans to "lick time" oul 

Of such a crowd '.' 

Now suppose we talk aboul the Portsmouth 

Navy Yard. The records show that on the average 
one man out of every nine stays away from work 
every day without permission. This is in addition 

to these granted leave with pay. True, some of 
those are sick hut they are in a small minority. The 

great percentage stay away because they are Indif- 
ferent. They place their own in! rests and feeling 
above those of the country; duty im.ir-.s nothing 
to them. 

Bach man thinks he is only one and will not 
be missed, but one man will break up a gang of 
riveters; one missing helper will hold up the work 
of the mechanic, one missing mechanic will cause 
a machine to lie idle. And when you multiply one 
such loss by four hundred, the average number 
ai' eii! each day without leave, you have a loss Im- 
possible le overcome. 

How can the in a na cement meel their promises 
on I be completion of work when eleven per cent of 
the men will not work'.' How can the foremen plan 
their work If they can not depend on their men 
coining to work? How can we win the war if one 
man out of every nine won't tight? 

We call a man who tried to evade the draft 
a slacker Is a man who tries to evade his duty in 
the yard any belter? No, he is worse, for he is ac- 
tually helping the enemy. The men in the field 
must have supplies and amunitlon. To get these 
the country must send ships, and to send ships il 
must have convoys. If by your absence you help to 
delay a ship's gelting away from the yard so that a 
freight ship or troop ship must go with too small 
a convoy, and is sunk by a submarine, on that ac- 
count you have just as surely aided the enemy as 
though you sidd him government secrets. We are 
lighting for our homes and lives here in the Navy 
Yard just as truly as are our friends and brothers 
in the trenches. He a patriot in actions as well as 
words. 



THIRD LIBERTY LOAN 

WHAT is Portsmouth Navy Yard going lo do 
on lln' ne\l loan? II seems lo be the general im- 
pression that the third loan will be put oul April 
eighth and thai il will bear four and one half per 
cent, interest. On the second loan we surely swept 
clean and I have heard no one dispute our claim. 
to being the champion yard. 

If we are going lo sweep clean again il is nol 
too soon lo start Hie campaign, We gol a late start 
in the last sale or we would have reached the half 
million mark. What amount are we going to strive 
for this time and how shall we conduct the run 

paign? 

1 suggest thai each shop elect a committee of 
three to be known as the "Liberty Loan shop Com- 
mittee" lo get the shop in line. This committee 

i eleel a chairman and these chairmen shall com- 
pose Hie "Liberty Loan Yard Co littee." 

In looking back on one's efforts they call soe 
the weak points and, so. in looking back on our 
second loan campaign il seems lo me thai our weak- 
est point was the failure lo make personal appeals 
le each individual in the yard. One man can not 

make a real appeal 10 every one in a shop of three 

or four hundred, but three or more men on a com- 
inillee can reach all hands 

If the shops think well id' this suggestion I 
wish they WOUld get together and elect their com- 
mittees so that we can gel together Hie last of the 

month and outline our work. Foremen, will you 
please call t he meel ings i o order? 

Naval Constructor Schlabach, U. S. N. 
simp Superintendent, 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 
rill': Public Works Department is in charge oi 

the design, construction, and maintenance of the 
Public Works of Ibis Navy Yard, such as buildings, 
dry dock, power plants, crane:,, ways, railroads, 

barracks, storehouses, water supplies, sewage sys- 
tem, etc. 

The past season has been a very busy one for 
this Department, most of the work being done by 
Yard labor. The new submarine building ways, 
recently completed and several temporary store- 
houses have been built in this way and there are 
prospects thai several more will be so constructed. 

The hospital barracks, jusi finished, have been 



I, IKK BUO'i 



bulll under it. Tempbra rj ban acl s now 

» ell under way to ai comodate :i large number ol 
prlsi an being built by i he Turner t Ion true 

i iipn Co , ol New York. The e b: lis when 

plel id will i"' ; (del of i heir I Ind 

\ -I eat de il of work la being done In i he 

Pow er Pla ut New i urbo air pre i ors, which 

will u i in from i h 

cat Ing engine com n turbo in 

coolei nd b I. A 

in hi i in ■, out piei toi ubi la alao b Ing 

bulll , aa well a i gate house at tl I Id if i he 

bi Idge The exten ilon to i he I 
men OtTlc i In nd fl the 

reaent i [Be i bu lldlni w ill be i 
;i i hree story but 
i In oughoul This will 

The "i 1 
I [on and th u Ine 

Draftlni R i will b i i \ ed from i heir pi 

I I and Installed on the 

door of i he office bulldln ■ 

Plan mi a new 

1 1 toreh considerably la r n than i he 

In Bulldln > being coi 

i one i Ion ol i he i a rd w hlch is un- 

r.i in 1 1 1 M to thi majorlt] ol employee 1 1 is i he 
iii. pltal Resen at Ion w hlch has be in i he si ene of 

much acl Ivlt \ Ince i he out bi e 1 1 he wai i his 

attracts one's attention first when visiting thai vi 
clnltj The first emergency arrangement tor car- 
in for Invalids out ilde of i he main building was 

ii stabllahmen! of a small city of tentB where 

general i on>a [ion II eases are handled. 

Thi i a rra ngemenl later ga ve waj to thi ie bo 
called I'lmi .iii.Hi ward buildings The ie are all 
itrong structures, substantially built of wood and 
pla itered Inside and were built under contract with 
Mr. George Baker Long, Worcester, Mass.. on the 
i' i plus percentage basis, A time limit was set 
tor their oompletlon They were all finished ready 
tor occupancy before the expiration of the contract 
time. All ni the painting of these buildings was 
done by yard labor. 

The next contract was tor the construction of 
in emergency hospital bnlldlngs let to Mr Martin 
Kelley of New York These consisted of a one 
itorj ni' a itence building fully equipped as a kitch 
•ii and dining hall; two two-story ward buildings 
jor Ih'iI patients; two two-story barracks tor the 
emergencj corps; a two-story living quarters with 
kitchen and dining room tor the accomodation of 
female nurses; and i two-storj garage with living 



-I irs mi i he : econd n ' tor ' he yard ambu - 

lances, This contract was later increased bj the 
addition of a Laboratory, which is now under con 
structlon, These structures also were painted by 
j : i i<i labor. The ie ni « buildings nei I i he 

in i .1 ii n I., i ni . ompl i e sen Ice bj stems I ei 

i e, in ai in"., lighting, road « a s a and water supply 
tor domeal Ic ui e a nd tor Bre protect Ion. 

re wa ta ken I n la i In ; out I he e buildings 
to ]n i far i i i"i Ible, i he beaut Iful shade 

i ihm well i iir; has been done will be ip 

ii in anyone visiting this re erval Ion. The 
fema : nui ' qua 1 1 ei i ha \ e an especlallj atti u 

iol< over i he b lcV channel of i he Pi itaqua 
River toward the Kllterj ihore 



. II \.\<;ks i.\- supervisory forces 

Several chan ;ea have been made In the super- 

i he Life I 

' i r I-'. W. M iby, formerly Wastei Ele trlclan, 
lias b I Nevi Yi i 

ol ilect rlcal in i teri 1 1 

ii is understood that Mr. Waby has now taken 
n w ii ii i he \ i lani lc Shipbuilding i loi porat Ion 
at Freeman's Point. Everyone In the Navj S ird 
who know i vlr Mabj will wish him the best of iuc 
cess in his new work. 



\h ii ii Hay, formerly assistant Shop Superin- 
tendent, has been transferred to Washington, i> C. 



Mr, A. 1-. Spinney has been promoted i<> assist- 
ant Shop Superintendent, with the additional duly 
of charge of the Brass Finishing shop (formerly 
Elect rlcal Shop i . 



All purely electrical work on ships lias been plac- 
ed under Mr, Flanagan and the electrical force will 
be established In Building No. 89, second Moor. 



,\ii .1 .1 Connors has been appointed foreman 
moulder. 



Mr. F, A. Fagan and Mr, D. J. Leahy have been 
appointed assistant Inspectors. 



LIFE BUOY 



PAINT SHOP 

The human spiders, S. A. Boston and Professor 
Hossley, who aspire tor Scott's job of heating air, 
met recently in a wrestling match. Before the bout 
both could throw each other. After the bout alibis 
were very numerous. From their looks one would 
have thought it was a prize light. Both are very 
tame now. 



Anyone aspiring to be a painter »ill be tried out 
once on the wireless poles and once In the double 
bottoms. Oh yes! and the official Hag staff and the 
roof of the Franklin ship house. 



We ask the foreman of the other shops to please 
be a little more considerate when they have glass to 
set. Instead of invaribly waiting for zero and rainy 
weather we would remind them to have a heart and 
use some of the pleasant days as well. A little safe- 
ty-first might apply to this. Yes — come to think of 
it. 



Some i pic's ili'linition of Painter Ails. Dauber. 

We have some but, thanks, only a few. In the next 
issue we will give you the proper definition with a 
few extra points for the needy. 



We would like to say something about Mr. Ball 
in this issue. Some people are pretty hard to reach,, 
so we will pass him up until the next issue. 



SHIPFITTER'S SHOP 

Edward Payson Weston has nothing on Ernest 
Spinney, whose boarding house is out at Spruce 
Creek. He leaves the car at Hutchins' corner and 
recently lost his way and went to York. When h& 
inquired where he was he was directed back over 
the same road to the Kittery car barn. On his way- 
he saw a signboard which gave directions to Poi 
mouth, live miles away, so he decided to take a 
chance. Alter walking hours he saw a light which 
proved his salvation for, upon knocking at the. door 
one of his old shop-mates came and, recognizing 
him, gave him his Bupper and then took him to his- 
boarding house where they arrived at 11.30 P. IVL 



We ;il I enjoyed a nice 7-20-4 after Eddie Lutts 
entered the bonds of matrimony. We thank him 
very much, and join together to wish both he and 
Mrs. Lutts a long and prosperous life. 



We were very fortunate in one of our recent calls 
to secure the services of an expert letterer, Mr. S. J. 
Mclntire of Kennebunk, Maine. Before his arrival 
the majority of that work waas thrown upon the 
shoulders of our Quarterman Mr. J. H. Morrill. 
So if you want any lettering done just ask Mr. Ball 
for Mac. (Just the same — -Mac will have to 
"hump" to keep in sight of Morrill's record.) 



The Shipfltters have a three-piece orchestra which 
the enlisted men say has 'em all on the Stocks, so if 
you have any serenading to do, or any garden par- 
ties where the refreshments are in plain sight, just 
ring 'em up. 



Our weigher says that the weigh house ,ii the new 
building ways is a bird and is well built. All it 
needs is to have the roof made waterproof and steam 
heal pul in. He says that he is not much on this 
"freeze stuff," and we check him up on that, for we 
And his books and papers frozen to the desk every 
day. GOD BLESS HOOVER. Who says we are 
not doing our bit? 



Dyer's recent dive into a red lead pot still leaves 
him with red in his eyes. 



Anyone who thinks the paint shop was not there 
in the last Liberty Loan is badly mistaken. Look 
up their average then glance at their salary, then 
look up and see if they had any overtime. We will 
be with you, Liberty, just as strong the next time. 



Mr. Schlerer, our weight draftsman, is booming 
things. He has brother Preble now as an under- 
study, in addition to C. E. C. Corkalovitch. Ooo! 



Micott says his motto is: "If I can do anything 
to help out, I will gladly do so." If you don't be- 
lieve it ask Charlie Philbrick or Mr. Nichols. 



8 



LIFE BUOY 



Hold the Fori! ('onion and Pattee of our Sub- 
marine office will have something to say soon — Stop, 
Look. ;iml then LISTKN. Thai will be enough. 



Le Roy has purchased a phonograph and is pre- 
paring an entertainment for the shop; including the 
famous dance which he has perfected. 



The boys are taking up a collection to buy a pair 
of rubber wrist bumpers for Cheney so he won't 
pound his hands off when he goes out on the "lay- 
ing out" platform In cold weather. 



Harry Mitchell walked so fast to the Navy Yard 
from the "Back City" that his felt boots were half 
full of sweat when lie put them on at night. 



Our genial temporary lighting man. Brady, wishes 
that anyone knowing of a good house for rent or for 
sale would let him know. Then the cigars will be 
passed around. 



ELECTRICAL SHOP 

We wonder: 

When the crane goes by why we think of Nora. 

Why some girls are so curious. 

How our worthy leading lady enjoyed her ride on 
the government ferry one morning. 

How will you keep away from the shaft — Gertie. 

Why we can't gel any fresh air hot air gels 
tiresome. 

*** 

it might be well for the men working on the ma- 
chine Boor, to read the sign on the second floor 
"Visitors Not Allowed " what is the attraction? 



Our stock-man has not paid a yi.sit to the Yard 
Dispensary this month Some record! 



A sign of spring, Burke has shed his wristlets 
The shop lunch room is doing line. At present a 

ladies' recreation room is being fitted up in this 

shop. 



1 wonder why 
more joy rides'.' 
lasi trip. 



Mr. Phillips does not go on any 

ll lias been four years since the 



Mr. Morrow was last wending his way to the horse 
races; in company with his three legged dog. 



Our force of female operators has doubled in the 
last month. Some girls. 



Some of the boys are making arrangements to 
take the new time keeper, (with the green suitl 
out for a walk. 



Upon his departure from the Yard Mr. P. W. 
Maliy was presented with a handsome gold watch by 
the employees of this shop. Mr. Barrett made the 
presentation speech, and Mr. Maby responded in a 
manner worthy Of much praise 



Moving day has struck the motor force once 
again, and Pethic's famous "flat car" was much in 
evidence. The "Scottish dialect'' and original 
"horse laugh" will be sadly missed. 



PATTERN SHOP. BLDG. 95 

Patrolman Buckley (detective) found ground 
glass in the candy he purchased in the shop, and 
thinks it is some foul play on the part of the Ger- 
mans Buck says he should be rewarded, as the 
lives id' many pattern-makers were saved by his 
great find. Never-the-less the boys still insist on 
satisfying their fondness tor the sweet stuff. The 

BOSS says, if Buck searches further, he might dis- 
cover that it came from the overhead lights which 
were hurst by a would-be base ball pitcher. 



\sk the married men of our shop, what their 
secret club is doing on the light less nights? 



We are not the least bit jealous of the other 
shops, but, how about having a few female operators 

consigned to our shop'.' Signed "Single GrUys." 



ONE PIANOIPURCHASE 




Should mean 
a life time oi I 
satisfaction : : 




PACKARD PIANOS 

Brings into your home a concert of sweet melody 



H. P. MONTGOMERY, 



OPP0SIT1 mi. I'osi in in i 

PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



OUR SLOGAN: 

Cash and Carry 

Lowest Prices in Town 
Call and Prove It 

Shaws Cash Market 

Telephone 133 
18 PLEASANT ST. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 



10 LIFE BUOY 



We hope that our foreman gets a supply of 
PTPF SHOP wood or coal very soon as he has burned his coal 

bin and shortly will shut on the fence. 
Fred and Sam have it all figured out that 

thirty-two weeks and two days from now they will 

be on their annual hunting trip in the wilds of 

Maine. (Onie boys how about the next get together 

meeting? 



Who left their tobacco lieing around? Bill's 

■chewing it. 

Now that I be clam flats are tree from ice, and 

Eddy is on the job, those wishing a good clam fry 

Reuben Rand lias given us the slip and gone should place their order at an early date as we all 

<to work on the other side of the shop. He wasn't know our efficient "Clammy" has more orders than 

going to give ii]) his job so easy. he can fill. 



Our identifier from Elliot is furnishing cigars 
for the office force with the overtime money he 
h>(JA 1 !SH(J1 receives from bis duties at the gate. How about it 
Charles? 



Ht'NKKK HILL DAY. 

Bunker Hill Day is day thai will last, a bunker SPAR SHOP 

..,,„, . I WONDER, 

of coal is a thing oi the past, but the Bunker whose 

name we wish to recall is the Bunker who umpires If Clem Waterhouse ever bears the whistle 

the game of liase Ball, but the 10 hour days which blow at 11:30? 

the government needs, will bar Mr. Bunker from — : 

the Sunset League, but if you will look and see what 

it means, you will find Mr. Bunker is afraid of If Varney is in love? 

Marines. 



If "Nemo" went broke in Frisco? 
Who said Waterworth could bowl? 



If the female employees will ever come? Gus 
Bill Thompson has been promoted to Broom a „,i Waldo are getting impatient. 
Inspector and he will make a clean sweep. 



if Barney is the pool champion of the Navy 
Charles Tucker can sell Liberty Bonds; who Yard? 
said he couldn't sell second hand clothes? 



fackson and Lewis, men of very few words. 



If Tom Fisher and Scottie (hte painter) came 
from the same country? 



If Keefe will be treasurer of the Wood-worker's 
It a man is in love how does he feel? Oh! Union 7 
Shaw. 



Where Tome Wilson learned how to make 
How many miles to Dover? Ask Miles. benches? 



GLENWOOD RANGES 

KITCHEN UTENSILS GAIiVANIZED ASH BARRELS 

TIN, SHEET [RON AND COPPER WORK PLUMBING, STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING 



PIPE AND FITTINGS 

pSrtom™'™: n!h. the sweetser store 



Tel. 310 



C. P. CARROLL 

GROCERIES, MEATS and PROVISIONS 

145 PENHAJLLOW ST., PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 
Felephone Connection Near A. S. L. Ferry 



JOHN SISE & CO. 
INSURANCE 

8 MARKET SQUARE 



PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



THE PORTSMOUTH FLOWER SHOP 

A. C. CRAIG, Manager 

FANCY CUT FLOWERS 

AGENT VICTOR TALKING MACHINES 

4 Market Street Phone 960 

PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

If you break your Thermos Bottle 
we have the Fillers 



E. E. WHITEHOUSE 
BARBER 

Up One Flight Opposite Colonial Theatre 

A. P. WENDALL & CO. 
Hardware, Paints and Tools 

Telephone S50 
12 Market Square Portsmouth, N. H. 

THE ACORN 

18 Market Sq., Portsmouth 

HEADQUARTERS FOR ALL BOOKS 




W. H. WHITE 



F. E. HODGDON 



BOARDMAN and NORTON 



WHITE and HODGDON 

Groceries, Meats, Provisions 
POULTRY AND COUNTRY PRODUCE 



Druggists We consider credit accounts both a moral and legal 

obligation 
Opposite Post Office Portsmouth, N. H. PLEASE PAY PROMPTLY 



Electric Household Devices 



FOR YOUR COMFORT AND HAPPINESS 



ROCKINGHAM COUNTY LIGHT AND POWER CO. 

29 Pleasant Street Portsmouth, N. H. 

"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 



12 



LIFE BUOY 



Some of the boys are working nine hours in 



eight. 



Plans are under way, by eight of the sports, for 
a camp on Eliot side of the Piscataqua, and if things 
come to a head there will be many more imperson- 
ators of Douglas Fairbanks hopping around the 
yard. 



Patternmaker — "How do you spell work?" 
Apprentice (quickly responds) "S-H-E-L- 
L-A-C-I-N-G!!" 



We the members of the "Little Mandolin Club," 
of the Pattern Shop, do hereby make known to the 
Yard, and surrounding towns, that we will accept 
all engagements issued to us after we make our de- 
but as professional musicians. If you desire faith- 
ful service and excellent harmony, see our leader 
Prof. H. E. Britton, in his studio, or any of the fol- 
lowing members :- 

R. Metelli — Artist on the left handed guitar. 
J. Nicholson — First mandolin (plays only when his 
wife allows him to have the evening off). 

C. Malmquist — Second mandolin, and best little 
string wrestler on this side of the river. 

L. Van Ham — One who harmonizes with the women. 

D. Twitchell & R. Fullam — Comedians. 

Music furnished for all occasions. Reasonable 
prices. 



The bowlers say:- 

Owing to the fact that it is so late in the sea- 
son, and so many men are working nights, we 
couldn't consider it practical to start a regular 
league, but are willing to roll any team from any 
shop on the yard for fun, money or marbles; and the 
stronger they are the better we like them. 



Our Alley Records — 


Lost to: 


Won from 


Brown Cows. 


1 


2 


Blacksmiths. 


1 


2 


Machinists. 


1 


1 


Foundry. 


1 





Sailmakers. 





2 



SHEET METAL SHOP NOTES 

It doesn't matter how long the war lasts, we 
are sure of fuel and food as long as Foreman Drake 
keeps his company together for we can take our 
Cote and hat and go down the Lane where the Gale 
doesn't rage and dig a Murphy or so, then feed the 
Chicks on Cobb and Rice. 



You look around and you can see Cole in one 
end of the shop and a Brush in the other, why 
worry over the fuel question. 



You can Card Cotton from the Ladd near Law- 
erence any time, but it would not be Wright to 
shoot Robbins until you could Call Parker and ask 
what all Seaman do when a woodchuck Burrowes 
into a Stackpole. 



We can Winn the war by going over to York, 
drive Staples through a Door, then Russell the 
leaves just before trying to Prime our gun and 
how many Weeks it would take Lewis to Leav-itt. 



That's the best thing in the shop, Hay! What! 
That new sanitary drinking fountain. 



We understand that a one act comedy is to 
be staged here in the near future entitled "Who Sol- 
dered the Cover on My Dinner Pail?" 



Any one wishing to get inside dope on the 
wrestling matches should ask Harry Wyman. 

A few of the boys are getting the spring fever 
bad. It hurts to get up on a nice warm morning 
with the thoughts of being tied to a bench rather 
than to the steering wheel, doesn't it Charlie? 



We would like to hear from the Boilermakers (es- 
pecially those training at the West End Alleys), 
Tinsmiths, Electricians, and the so-called champion 
Boat Builders. 



Wanted. Several houses for the married men 
of this shop. We can not pay for board and room 
and buy another Liberty Bond on what we get at 
present. 



HOOVERIZE 

WHEN BUYING FURNITURE 

If you want to save money buy your 
House Furnishings at less than half 
the prices you are paying elsewhere 
We sell complete House Furnishings 
at prices within the reach of all. 



E. (). STEPHENSON, Successor 

TO KEMP FURNITURE CO. 

V. A. WOOD, MGR. 



THE "BUSY CORNER" STORE 

BUT NEVER TOO BUSY 
TO FILL YOUR PRESCRIPTIONS 
FILL THEM RIGHT 



99 Penhallow St., 



Portsmouth, N. H. 



YOU OUGHT TO KNOW 

DENNETT and McCARTHY'S 

IS THE BEST PLACE TO BUY 

OVERALLS, SHIRTS, HOSIERY 



OUT OF TOWN PATRONS ARE 

WELCOME TO WAIT FOR THE 

CAR AT OUR HOUSE 

BENJAMIN GREEN 

THE DRUGGIST 



INSURANCE 

OP EVERY DESCRIPTION 
LOWEST RATES BEST FORMS 

C. E. TRAFTON 



N. H. BANK BLDG. 



PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



USE GAS FOR 

LIGHTING, HEATING AND COOKING 

PORTSMOUTH GAS CO. 

ALWAYS AT YOUR SERVICE 



C. F. DUNCAN & CO. 

DEALERS IN 

BOOTS, SHOES and RUBBERS 

9 MARKET STREET 

TELEPHONE CONNECTION 

PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



The Acorn 



BROOKS MOTOR SALES 

PORTSMOUTH, - - NEW HAMPSHIRE 

(periodoIW) p; ne Writing Papers 

18 Market Sq., Portsmouth 



FORD SERVICE 



Flllis BrOS. M en ' s and Boy's Shoes 



Fine Shoe Repairing : 157 congress st. 



TEL. CONN. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 



1 1 



LIFE BUOY 



How the nirn in the balcony like the new lo- 
i sal loo of i he office? 



if "Happy" really thinks thai the now steam 
in the cooper simp is Cor baking pies tor the simp 
restaurant v 



FOUNDRY ITEMS 

The Brown Cows claim they can trim the Poun 
dry bowling team any time If those two profession- 
als from Pennsylvania who were rung in on them 
before are not allowed to appear In the lineup, pro 
vlded Bill leaves his corsets off and Mac learns thai 
it oosts money to roll In a real game, 



Dan says thai If "Dynamite" continues ('loan- 
ing up the way be has been lately be will bave 
enougb saved up to maks that trip to Dover on St. 
Patrick's day in whitewash iiie church green. 



Mike Is still wondering why everything Is so 
quiet around Jack's bench latelj 



Wo notice that <; R P, is wearing a now pair 
of glasses which he recently purchased to use tor 
his "late sessions." we are wondering whether or 
not Charley can make use of George's old ones and 
thereby multiply the Strength he is receiving from 
the double pair be is wearing now. 



banding the laugh to a lot of the "wise guys" who 
have been kidding him about bis attraction for the 
fair sex. 

Hero is the story: When he arrived in Somers- 
WOrth he found that she was not going tO show up. 

li would mil be right to say that he was dis- 
couraged, no Indeed! not that boy! i-'ive minutes 
later found him at another lady's door listening to 
a surprised, but delighted, tone of voice, "Why! 
Frank. Greetings. You must come in and join 
our little parly Ibis evening." Could he refuse? 
Noi him, lie went In and had one wonderful time 

11 n I il be realized I bat hi' bad a home 

Hui. sad though ii is. 'lis true, that time Mies 

when one is in good compain lor when be woke up 
the train tor hover bad gone and he had to rely on 

good old shank's mare and reached borne at S 00 
A. M. the next morning, 



Two mysteries to "Ed" Hayes, is my present 

Job everlasting and why do they Keep i lie so near 
I he Office door'' 



All bough you cannot pass that phoney dollar 
bill you found on the shop stairs. Mike, on anybody 

in Portsmouth, we think il our duly to advise that 
yOU Can most likely dispose Of il readily in your 

borne i own of I >o> er u you i ry. 



Do not be alarmed If you see some bewildered 

looking being wandering about the shop He Is not 

era j nor subject to tits, but merely trying to locate 
a sprinkling can. 



The "boss" has purchased a new Apper.ou 
Bight and believe me II is some swell car. The boys 

are all wondering who be is going to get for chauf- 
feur, "Dynamite' 1 is hoping be will be the lucky 
one and no doubt will be If "Dan" doean'l beat him 
to il 



Deacon Emery has been staying out so late 

at night with his sioU lady friend that he linds great 

difficulty connecting with the 7::!o whistle in the 
morning, 



"The i'!ml of a Perfect Day" 

Our handsome, blond shopmate from Dover 
Who went to Somorswoith recently lo 1111 a date is 



\ n her of our sporting men would like lo 

i ;i real game of pool bel ween Hick ami Hill. 

Both claim lo be the best man bul here is a little 
inside dope, on the merits of each free of charge, 
for the other sports here. Hot on W. C. to win 
although Richard is some shooter just the same. 



We think that one of our genial coremakera 
will soon be era j unless he finds out what Margaret 

told Mac about him. 



Although some from a good cigar was blown 
in bis face Jack still holds to his resolution to quit 
smoking during Lent. 



Hill" Itates has joined the Navy. 



Henry Peyser f> Son 

Hi TO 20 MARKET ST. 

For more than forty years Portsmouth's leading Store for Men's and 

Boys' apparel 

MARGESON BROTHERS 

FURNITURE, CARPETS, RUGS 
FURNITURE COVERINGS AND UPHOLSTERING 

VAUGIIAIN ST. PORTSMOUTH. IN. II. 



FRED B. COLEMAN 

APOTHECARY 

Corner Congress and Vaughan Sis. 

PORTSMOUTH, N. II. 




The Acorn 



... BE AETNA -I ZED ... 

Willi our Accident mid Health Policy in Case of 
DlsabilKj 

AETN A. IN SU U A N (10. CO. 
II. I. CASWELL, Agenl PORTSMOUTH, N. II. 



S U G R U E 
Overalls, Tobacco, Pastry 



Fine Engraving & Stamping 
18 Market Sq., Portsmouth KITTERY, MAINE 



S. S. TRUEMAN 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 



JOHN O'LEARY 

KITTERY and NAVY YARD EXPRESS 

GENERAL TEAMING 
Tel. Con. Portsmouth, N. H. 



tki,i-:im[onk i;r,i 



83 Bow St. 



LOUIS ABRAMS and CO. 

Sole Local Agency tor 

ADLER'S COLLEGIAN CLOTHES 

The Universal Standard of Good Dress 

BOSTONIAN FOREMOST SHOE FOR MEN 

Portsmouth, N. H. 38-4o Daniel Streel PORTSMOUTH, \. M. 



The HARDWARE STORE 

OPPOSITE THE POST OFFICE 

Ulster Pocket Knives and WissScissors. Lunch Kits and Pocket 

Flash Lights 

E. C. MATTEWS HARDWARE AND PAINT CO. 



Tel. I7it 



■11 Pleasant Streel 



PORTSMOUTH, N. II. 



"I SAW IT IN TIIK LIFE BUOY." 



16 



LIFE BUOY 



More from "Us Girls" next month 



STENOGRAPHER'S NOTES 
Congratulations, Tom. 



Back to Monkeydom — Sure sign: Down on the 
upper lip — There are some fur-hearing animals in 
the Industrial Department. 



Thank you, "Mr. Perkins.' 



'When I was with the Boston Music Company.'' 



New Girl: Is he an officer? 
Old Girl: Well he thinks he is! 
New Girl: Why, I thought he was the messen- 
ger boy in the Accounting Office! 



Front seats in the main office were at a pre- 
mium, we are told, the night of the big wind. 



MACHINE SHOP NOTES 



George Hoyt has returned to work after pass- 
A little sprayer, girls, the capacity of the boat j ng tne w j n ter months with his family in London- 
is one hundred. derry. 



Carnation 

Lilac 

Lily of the Valley 

Wisteria 

Rose 

Heliotrope 

Eclat 

Ideal 

Azurea 

Lady Mary 

Floramye 

Mavis 

L'Origan 

Musk 

Corylopsis 

Milaja 

Le Trefle 

Djer Kiss 

Ectera 



Dactylis 

Cashmere Bouquet 
Splendor 
Arbutus 

Peg O' My Heart 
Japan 

Jockey Club 
Violet 
Vogue 

Mary Garden 
Jicky 

Honey Suckle 
Melba 
Narcisse 
New Mown Hay 
Orchid 

Lotus Flower 
Royal Shamrock 
Ectera 
We're here. 



"Buck" got a letter from another dead man 
upstate last week. 



We understand the workers on the tube sheets 
are keeping Lent. They surely have a Holey job. 
One fourth mile of drilling ever get bored? 



The boys in this shop had one sweetless day 
this week. There was a reason. 



We wonder what inducement prompts our 
Ralph to migrate South, is it the call of Spring? 



Everybody pull together; it's team work that 



Captain Frank has solved the tumbler prob- 



lem. 



How far would the cigars distributed by the 
benedicts of this shop in the last five years, reach, 
if placed end to end? Reward. 



Spring has come! The girls have made their Some Shops may beat us on Liberty Loans, 

exodus from the cabin and have driven the rest of but on Matrimonial Bonds we have no peers. 
us in - Waaser matter, Boss? 



Eddie admits she is no Pavlowa, but, give her We are still growing and some better all the 

time. time. Righto! 



Page and Shaw Candies 

Sole Local Agency 

Adams Drug Store 

ON MARKET ST. 
Portsmouth : : N. H. 



Prove It for Yourself 

You can get more real value lor 
your money by wearing Clothes 
made to your measure. 11 you 
Jon t believe it. Just try us. 

WOOD, The Tailor 

Navy Unilorms and Equipment 

15 PLEASANT ST. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



Go to W. D. KENDALL 



KITTERY, MAINE 



TELEPHONE 871-M 



FOR YOUR 



MEATS, GROCERIES and PROVISIONS 

Fruits, Canned and Staple Foods 



BEST GOODS AT LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 





sCHE^RGHET, 



Chevrolet Automobiles, The most Satisfactory Built 
Economical, Powerful, Durable 

CHAS. E. WOODS 

51-60 BOW STREET PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 



18 



LIFE BUOY 



Mr. E. J. O'Keefe is the latest man in this shop 
to do it. We all wondered why it was that "Ed" 
was smiling to himself all the time. Who is the 
next? Would Frank Lynch us if we asked him? 



This shop has enjoyed the pleasant company 
of Mr. S. B. Lawrence. Erecting Engineer, Putnam 
Machine Co., of Fitchburg, Mass., and we sincerely 
appreciate his kind assistance upon the installation 
of our Baby Lathe. 



The Quartermen and Leadingmen of this Shop. 
with their wives, were very pleasantly entertained 
by Foreman and -Mrs. Frank L. Waaser at their 
home in Portsmouth, Washington's Birthday even- 
ing. 



Will some kind friend please consent to help 
"Mark" out in making his income tax return. 
Machine Shop Building No. SO 



SMITH SHOP NOTES 

Billy Critch enjoyed an auto ride one day last 
month. He says he thinks the Railroad charges 
high rates to pedestrians. 



Has anyone a raincoat to sell? See Jack Riley. 



The fellows in the coal fire end of the shop are 
wondering if gas masks will be provided for them 
during the first two hours after lighting up. 



Old Doctor Hoyt has cured many a cold lately 
with his famous snuff. 



Whose turn next to pass around the cigars? 
Mike Burchill says he may surprise us soon. 



Phil Hughes says managing the bowling team 
is hard enough without having to walk across the 
bridge to get to Portsmouth. 



We suppose sheepskin coats and rubber boots 
will still be worn by some (probably residents of 
Eliot ) next July. 



Oscar Hutchins and Mr. Jensen, Sr. are being 
urged to wrestle best two out of three to a finish. 
Tickling the ribs barred. 



Congratulations and success to our two new 
leadingmen, the two Bills. 



The Smith Shop turned out over 60 tons of 
forgings last month, all small stuff, too. They are 
aiming to keep ahead of even that record from now 
on. 



THINGS IN GENERAL. 
The Navy Department has authorized the con- 
struction of a new sawmill. It will be located near 
the timber basin and lumber yard. The construc- 
tion will be of wood and sheet steel, and a travell- 
ing crane will be provided. With the removal of 
the sawmill from Building No. 74 this whole build- 
ing will be used by steet metal workers and plumb- 
ers. 



The Foundry spread itself last month. The 
output per day was the greatest in its history and 
the output per man per day within one pound of the 
best previous record. That's the way to swat the 
Huns. 



Due to the fact that the work of the pipe- 
fitters and the outside machinists is so closely allied, 
it has been decided to put all pipefitters under Mr. 
Hayes, foreman machinist, outside. This will put 
all of Building No. 89, first floor, under Mr. Hayes' 
supervision. 



Try our Saving System Popular Prices 

ALWAYS AT YOUR SERVICE 

Kerwi n's Shoe Store 

45 CONGRESS ST. ALBERT Z. LEACH, M^r. 

A FEW OF LR SPECIALTIES 

Hart, Schaffner and Marx Clothes, Stetson Hats, 
Manhattan Shirts, Fownes Gloves, Interwoven Stockings 

F. W. LYDSTON & CO. °S^5 r E:£;r 



R. L. COSTELLO 



SEED STORE 



HIGH GRADE SEEDS 



115 Market St. Telephone, 57 

PORTSMOUTH 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 



£mx>:ooo.o:ooowooooo<>ooooo^ 



TUSCANIA 



Land of the west your own brave sons 
Proved to the world how they can die; 

America will always proudly own 
Those lads who sang when death was nigh. 

It was no wailing song of fear 

That sounded o'er the Irish sea, 
But through the darkness sounded clear 

My own dear country 'tis of thee. 

As the Tuscania slowly sank 

Engulfed within an ocean grave, 
Americans sang their deathless chant 

May the stars and stripes forever wave. 

And as they wave in freedom o'er the tomb 
Of those who died a world to save. 

The newborn world will sing in tune 
Land of the free, home of the brave. 

R. J. GILKER. 



«)S»ss»»»so<^:o^oo<x>oooo<:k>ooooooooooooooooooo<:'Ooo"c 



,:~ N „ BROWN'S MARKET 

WE PAY CASH SO OUR PRICES ARE AS LOW AS POSSIBLE. TRY US AND 

SEE IF WE ARE RIGHT. 

MEATS FISH GROCERIES 



F. C. Remick Lr> Co. 



11 Congress St. 



THE BEST LINE OF WORK SHOES 

AND RUBBERS ." 

AGENT FOR ELITE AND EMERSON 
SHOES 



PARAS BROTHERS 

FRUIT AND CONFECTIONERY, ICE CREAM AND SODA, WHOLESALE AXD RETAIL 

TELEPHONE 29 W C\TER1NG k SPECIALTY 43 CONGRESS STREET 



RENT A TYPEWRITER 



Prompt and Satisfactory 
Service 



AND QUALIFY FOR A BETTER JOB. 

typewriters fok rent, $3.00 Per Month job Printing Office Supplies 



29 TANNER ST. 



J. E. DIMICK 



TEL. 837 M 



OVERLAND 

"THE THRIFT CAR" 

C. A. LOWD 

SERVICE STATION . . 338 Pleasant St. 

GARAGE . . . 25 to 40 Wentworth St 

The MEN WHO WORK 




Want the goods worth buying. 
We try to have them. We'll put 
our service at your disposal. 

PRICES RIGHT. 



Footwear Clothing Furnishings |g^ 



N. H. BEANE £*> CO. 




22 HIGH ST. 
5 CONGRESS ST. 



'I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 





NAVY YARD, 
PORTSMOUTH, N.H. 




Real Estate eor Sale 

Cottages to Rent, Season 1918 



The town of York offers every inducement for you to make your home 
there, either during the summer or permanently. It is only 20 minutes 
from the Navy Yard by train, with special service. Electric cars offers 
another means of transportation of convenience. 

The pleasures of boating, are offered on the beautiful York river or 
the sea; excellent highways offer the best for the motorists and the pretty 
drives in and around the town are a distinct feature. 

The York Country Club has one of the finest golf courses in the country, 
and hundreds enjoy the pastime there. The bathing beaches cannot be 
surpassed along the coast, and there are both public and private baths. 

The town is modern in convenience, yet ancient in many landmarks, 
and has a history that will delight you to learn. You will thoroughly 
enjoy living here. 

On my list I have a few places that will make excellent all the year round residences 



"SU Arthur t. Bragdon m " K ^ AQE 



"OVER THE TOP" 



SOAK The KAISER 



BUY a LIBERTY BOND 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 





Music and Art Shoppe 



12 



5iL§! 



Represents the musical center of 
the community. All local mu- 
sical activity for the last fifteen 
years has been based on this 
establishment. 

And Why?— Surely there must be 
some reason for this confidence. 
And surely there is. We carry 
the best of everything in music. 

The Best in PIANOS AND PLAYER PIANOS 

Chickering& Sons, "Oldest in America, best in the world," 
Hardman, used exclusively by the Metropolitan Opera 
House. 




The Best in PHONOGRAPHS 

Victrolas, Edison Diamond Disc, Columbias. 



The best in musical instruments. The latest in popular music. 



HaSSEtTs MUSIC AND ART SHOPPE 

1 1 5 Congress St., Portsmouth, N. H. 



'I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 



THE DRIVE IS ON 



HAVE YOU JOINED OUR LIBERTY LOAN CLUB? 
ONE DOLLAR STARTS A $50 LIBERTY BOND 

Help to make the Third Liberty Loan a success 

A little real sacrifice on your part now may save a much greater 
sacrifice later. Subscribe early — you may encourage someone else. 

We are receiving subscriptions on the same partial payment 
plan that has proved so successful in the past two loans; that is, a 
minimum deposit of $1 for a $50 bond, the balance to be paid by 
instalments. 

We will care for your Liberty Loan Bonds without charge. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

United States Depositary Safe Deposit and Storage Vaults. 



SAVING 

CONSERVATION and 

THRIFT 
WILL WIN THE WAR 



PATRIOTISM DEMANDS THAT THE CITIZENS OF THE UNITED 

STATES 

SPEND LESS and SAVE MORE 



10.(100 PEOPLE ARE SAVING THEIR EARNINGS BY THE HELP OF 
OUR INSTITUTIONS. NEW SAVING ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 



PISCATAQUA SAVINGS BANK 

First National Bank Building Portsmouth, N. H. 

"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 



INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 
LIFE BUOY 



Issued monthly for tree distribution to employees of the Industrial' Department of the 
Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth. N. H. 



VOL. I 



APRIL 1918 



NO. 4 



Eratum: 3rd line should be 4th. WE ARE AT WAR 



IT is easier to say pleasant things than un- 
pleasant. But at the present time, in 
all should fully realize involves the fate 

particular, we are facing a crisis that we 
of our Country and our freedom, and the 
whole future welfare and happiness of our- 
selves and those dependent on us. In 
our very lives are to a large degree at stake. 

It therefore stems that each one o 
should pause and look the truth seriously and 
squarely in the face to see if we are doing 
our full share of the great duty that is now 
before us — the saving of our Country and 
ourselves and our families. Probably mo it 
of us are, but there seem to be indict! i 
that some of us are not, and it is to the latter 
class that this article is, in particular, ad- 
dressed. This is no time to shirk our duty 
nor to refuse to face the facts, and it is ex- 
pected that all will take this article in the 
friendly spirit in which it is written. 

It is believed that those that are not do- 
ing their full duty are guilty of thought I 
ness only — that they have not yet fully real- 
ized that we are in a war that is going to 
be very difficult to win, and that they have 
not thought of the consequences should we 
lose. And we can not win unless virtually 
all of us get together and put forth our very 
best efforts. 

The fate of a conquered and subject na- 
tion is not pleasant to contemplate, especially 
with a foe as ruthless as the one we are pitted 
against in his efforts for world domination. 
He and his kind would be the masters and we 



would be virtually -lives and would be allow- 
ed only such rights and privileges as he mighl 
see fit to give us ; and those would not be 
much, judging from what he has already done 
with peoples he has conquered, both in the 
present war and in the p 

It has unfortunately become rather a 
common impression in Portsmouth that a 
man taking a job on the Navy Yard does no^ 
have to do a real days work. Remark 
that effect have been heard many times. It 
has even been stated that men hive openly 

ted that they don't do a full day's work 
on the Yard. Mechanics coming here from 
private plants have expressed surprise at the 

II amount of work done by some of the 
men here, and attempts have been made to 

mrage them from turning out a fair days 
output. Also, a case was recently repo 
of four men taking a full day to get a jack 
down through two decks on one of the vessel 
at the Yard. Cases such as this are undoubt- 
edly in a decided minority. The great ma- 
jority of the men of the Yard are belie 
to be at least equal, and probably superio , 
to any other similar body of men in the Coun- 
try. We have been accustomed to take pride 
in ourselves and in our patriotism and in our 
spirit to let no one else outdo us. Bui in t 
as a single drop of ink will cloud a whole 
of water, so the actions of a few can 
harm the reputation of the many and in any 
large body of men there are bound to be 
some lacke i. Some shops, to a man — nota- 
the Smith Shop— have gone at their wort 



LIFE P.UOY 



in a fine spirit of patriotism, and have shown 
wliai they arc mule of ami have materially 
increased production. Sunn' other shops 
have not done so well, and, individually, there 
are some men that arc not doing their fair 
parts. In such eases foremen, quartermen, 
ami leading-men, are equally responsible. Our 
policy in this grave crisis must he that there 
is no place on the Yard for a slacker or any 
man not willing to do his lair share towards 
winning the War. Every possible effort has 
been made to give every man a square deal. 
If there has been error it has been on the side 
of too much leniency. The Management 
therefore feels that it has the right to expect 
a square deal in return. 

The following is taken from the editorial 
o! I he Boston Sunday American of March 
3rd, L918: 

"Great wealth must do its share, paying 
heav] taxation. 

Labor must ilo lis share, m Willing, 

earnest co operat Ion 

The man with a thousand millions who 
is not willing to give halt or his Income to 
the Government thai protects him ought 

to realize llial Prussia would not lake hall', 
hul ALL. 

The workman aot willing to give eight 
hours of real conscientious work to his 
country would he enlightened if lie could 
see the conquered peasants in Northern 
ttalj working sixteen hours a day under 
the lash, wielded bj Prussians the work- 
era Including Italian ho>s and k"'1s twelve 

J ears of a ge 

capital must h,' prepared to give its 

part, and a hit; part, and labor musl pre 
p. ne to do its part." 

We, here on the Yard, are not concerned 
with great wealth, hut have only our labor 
and our brains to give. These we should 
give freely and fully and no man has the right 
to shirk his share and put an extra burden 

on his fellows. Many of our countrymen are 

at the front and millions will be there before 
long. Those men are risking and giving 
their lives and undergoing hardships to the 
limit of human endurance, while we. who stay 
at home, are living in comparative comfort 
and security. It is distinctly up to us to do 
our very best for them. Our work is for 

«'. 6t 

JAN 19 



them, and every job that is not pushed as 
rapidly as possible means delay at the front, 
and delaj thee means more hardships and 
more of our countrymen killed, and more 
danger to ourselves in the end. Furthermore, 
our present comfort and security will be gone 
if this War is not won on the other side. If 
it is lost there, it will surely come to this 
Country sooner or later, and then we and our 
families will suffer all its horrors. 

This War was forced upon us for self 
protection and for the preservation of free- 
dom in the world. Is any man willing- to give 
that up? Then let us get together and each 
do his share — a real man's share. 

There are probably several causes of in- 
sufficient output, which may be classed as 
follows: 

FIRST. Insufficient or inadequate equipment, 
or obsolete or inefficient methods. 

Efforts are all alone being made to cor- 
rect these faults and much has already been 
done. In some cases such efforts have been 
welcomed and in others they have been re- 
sented through petty jealousies or other 
m es. The Management desires the fullest 
co-operation of the mechanics and men of the 
Yard along this line. Sugge stions to promote 
efficiency are invited and are welcome at all 
times, as is a! i ructive criticism. A 

plan is now being formulated whereby this 
procedure will be put on a working basis. We 
must get toe-ether better than we have. 
There is always room for improvement every- 
where and in every thine-, and we must all 

forget any petty jealousies or antagonisms 
that have existed. We are all working to- 
wards the same end. 

SECOND. Loafing and excessive loss of 
time. 

This has already been partly discussed. 
While confined to a small minority then' have 
nevertheless been glaring instances which 
have undoubtedly hampered the work to a 
considerable extent. This is not fair play 
and the Management asks the co-operation 
of all men to eliminate it. It might also be 
added that a man that loafs is really hurting 
him elf. lie can never rise above his present 
position. The man that rises in the world is 
the one that plays fair and who is willing to 
give a fair days work, and more if need be; 
the man that can be depended upon. 

1 020 



I, IKK IJUOY 



TM1KI). Enemy influences. 

We may take it for granted thai these 
arc at work, in fad we are sure of it. Everj 
one should be on the lookoul lor them. 
Enemy influence must necessarily be brought 
to bear by insidious and underhand methods. 
We may through disguised enemy agitation 
be unwittingly aiding our foes. All slackers 
and all who unnecessarily prolong a job are 

manifestly under suspicion of working, know- 
ingly or not, for the enemy. It seems incon- 
ceivable thai a real American with the pat- 
riotism thai he ought to have would not be 
willing to do his lair part in this War of self 
preservation. 

The general purpose of this article is not 
to find fault, hut so that we may all awake to 
the ereat task that is before US and so that 
outsiders may have not the slightest reason 
to say that the Portsmouth Navy Yard is not 
doing its full share in the War. The Yard 
as a whole has done remarkably well in many 
ways and under adverse conditions, and we 
take pride in whai we are doing. We know 
we are not perfect. No one is, hut we want 
to at least aim al perfection and kill this 
partly justified criticism that is becoming 
more and more prevalent. 

No man that has a clear conscience and 
i." doing his full part need take oil'ense at any 
o! these statements. They are not intended 
lor him, and we know thai he const itides one 
of a vast majority. This article is addressed 
to the small minority of slackers (intentional 
or otherwise), and it is hoped thai they will 
awake and realize what they are doing We 
want to give them a square deal if they too 
will play fair. Otherwise we don'1 want them 
mi the Yard. We would rather see them 
working openly for the enemy. With mosl 
ol them it has probably been a ease of 
thoughtlessness only. Bui the fact that they 
do exist is beyond dispute and the time for 
plain straightforward talk is here. Are we 
going to survive or are we going to lie con- 
quered and lose all thai is of value and dear 
to us? It is up to us and no one else. The 
work of every man c its. 

We are going to win, but we are going 
to do so only by getting together and by each 
doing his full share of the big task, and our 
share counts just as much as if we were at 
the front or on the firing line. The men fight- 



ing there need our work and need it badly. 
Let us do all in our power for them. 

L. S. ADAMS, 

Naval Const ructor, I '. S. Navy, 
Industrial Manager. 



THE TRADE SCHOOL 

THE demand Cor trained mechanics has Increased 
very suddenly in this country, and the Yard has 

[ell iiiis lark of i ihanics as well as other Vards 

and shipbuilding concerns. U lias become neces 
sarj to lake men who already have some experience 
in a trade or who have ambition to Improve them 
selves, and. by proper training, equip them so thai 

they will bee skilled in some particular trade 

wiiii greater rapidity than would be possible If 
thej follow the natural course in a simp. 

A school lias been developed in iiiis Yard ami is 

in session daily in Building No. 12. Unskilled men 

are being trained in become skilled mechanics. It 

will even be possible for men who have already 

worked in one trade to take up and learn another 

I lade. and. by Ibis means, a more flexible orr.ani/.a 
lion, a better grade of wink and more rapid pro 

>;ress iii construction will be maintained, The 

school bas been placed in charge Of Assislanl Naval 

Constructor H. F. McCarthy, U. K. N., as Director 

who is being assisted by Mr. 10. I'inson. I'ormerh 
Of the Bath Iron Works, where be lias been lore 

man of outside work for live years. The Instructors 

are A. Keen. A. Stevens. 'I', lirown, Al. Emery, V 
Vow II. W. I laves and A. Gagnon, 

At present there are enrolled about L10 men, 
ami instruction is being uiven in shipfltting, rlvel 
ing, chipping and caulking, drilling ami reaming, 
ami in work id' outside machinists. 

Men best qualified to pro li I by work in this School 
should be between Ibe ages of nineteen and thirtj 

Ave, and only applications from American citizens 
will be received. 

Tile school will operate daily troni 7:30 a m. In 

4:30 p. in., witb an hour al noon for lunch. The 
genera] rate of pay during Instructions will be 

$2. Illi per day. and eaeb man who enters Ibe school 

wilt be started in I lie elementary stages of I be trade 
iii which be is assigned ami will be advanced step 
by step until be becomes efficient enough to be sent 

to Ibe ships or Into the sbop to do small jobs lie 

will slill be under the Instructor and will continue 

al Ibis work and under Instruction until be is com 



■; 



LIFE BUOY 



petenl to receive a third class rating, at which time 
lir will be placed In the simp for which his Instruc- 
i inn h;i\ I- iii ted him. 

'Die night school, which is now being held on 
Tuesdays ami Fridays in the Mold I. ml will slill 
be continued, but its sessions win be tran 
in Building No. 1-. The classes in the nighl si 
will lir in more advanced courses than the daj 
classes and tin' men attending these classes will 
receive no pay. The purpose of the nighl school 
i in advance a man who lias sufficient interest in 
himself to take tin' course ami broaden his ex 
perience by contact with his instructors and by 
the development or information given in the cla 
which, in the ordinarj course of events, would i 

doin come lo him in I ho day's work. 

In both ol' these I'lasscs the lime which a man 
takes to qualify is strictly up to him Comp 
Instructors have been secured, ami everj tacilitj 
has been placed at the disposal of the school. Those 
who have enrolled will ho given everj advantage 
io acquire a k now I idge ol a i rade. There is no 
reason whj anj man with ordinary Intelligence 
should not secure a third class mechanic's rating 

in twelve weeks. The school is here irious 

purpose and to in men to aid in doing their bit in 
a serious piece ol business the winning or this 

war. \o man will he tolerated in the school for 
any length ol' time who shows no aptitude lor a 
trade or who consider; i( an opportunity to get ill 
a day's time without work. Such men will be drop 

ped without hesitation 

Students in the school must not believe that on 
thi completion or Hiis course they are full-fledged 
mechanics, because a man cannot become a thor 
ough mechanic within a short time He will be 
able io obtain the fundamentals of Mm trade ami 

a ground work on which to build, but lie lnusi 
Stantly hear ill mind that a mechanic i ,ml\ d. 

oped through long experience, and he must con- 
stantl] keep his mind open to receive sug tion 
advice and help, and must take advantage of them 

when received; ami, when graduated from the 

school, each man unci re n 1 1 1 1 1 1 icr ihal he has a 

good I"' winning in his i rade ami i hat his ■ l ,\\ a nce 
men! will depend entirely upon his own applies 
i ion and effoi t 

in any such undertaking there will doubtless be 
opportunities where suggestions from the me 
the simps, foremen and others concerned in the 
welfare of the yard, can be made to advanl - 

There may be thini al I the operation of the 

Choo] that you, as an outsider, think should be 



changed that is Mae of every undertaking — so 
you should make your criticisms helpful. There is 
no place for the destructive criticism of those who 
feel that thej could operate the school better than 
those to whom the task has been assigned, it is 

up to the men in I he yard to give every assir 

lo those who have enrolled and Io use reasonable 

forbearance ami ludgmenl so that the men who are 
endeavoring lo belter themselves maj have a fair 
opportunity, because there is work enough Cor 

everybody to do. 



THIRD LIRERTY LOAN. 

A very satisfying start was made on the Third 
Liberty Loan Campaign, which opened April 6. A 
big meeting was held in front ol' the bandstand. 
which was attended by practically every man in 

i lie yard. The Boat Shop marched up with the 
hand, and all the shops on I he north end ol' the 

yard tell in behind, making a 1 parade from 

that section ol' the Yard The Electrical Shop was 

beaded I ae two hundred Female Operators and 

they were received with cheers. The other shops 

from Hie east end of the Yard marched up in bodies, 
and. while they did not have the baud to head their 

parade, they had the determination to win. 

The exercises opened with the singing of "'I'h" 
Star Spangled Banner" and this was followed by 
an address by Mr, Dingley of Huston. ,1 mined ia 1 1 I J 

after the address, the sale began, and inside of ten 

minutes, $120, I worth of bonds had b in sold. 

thus reaching nearly one half of the official allot 

nl which the yard has set i o r.ii e 

With 50 per cut. more men than we had in the 

last campaign, it is fuih expected that the total 
sales will approach $400,000, and if thej do not, 
it will noi be because the Shop Committees ami 
shop Captains are not working to thai end. 

There will be the usual competition between th ■ 

shops with the award of the Liberty Loan cup to 

the simp selling the greatest amount of bonds in 

rlinn Iii ils pay roll. In addition to this com 

petition, there will he another between the wood- 
working and metal working trades of the Yard, and 
i' is proposed to fly a banner near the .Main (late 
with the name of the winner in this compel ition. 
To further the interest in the CI a banner 

will also be flown by the shop selling the greatest 
nl of bonds each week in proportion to its 
cm roll. 

As was staled at the meeting, the Portsmouth 

Yard must do heller than was done on the last sale, 



LIFE BUOY 



Cor this Yard must maintain its reputation of mak- 
ing better records wil li each effort . 

While there I a committee in each shop to handle 
the bond business, lei even man feel thai he is a 
membei ol a committee to Eurther the sale, for 
everj dollar subscribed means a blow at German 
.1 utocracy. 



THE HOUSING SITUATION. 

l.\ order thai the men of the yard may be more 
fully informed n ;a rdin . the i">: in sit ual ion, I hi 
following brief summary is given with the idea 
thai ii may straighten oul sod.- al iea of the mis- 
understandings i hal ha \ e arisen b i m e of I he a p 
parenl lai i. ol results in any evident form. 

Over a year ago, when ii became evidenl thai 
the Vard must greatly increase its output and thai 
a large number of additional employees would be 
required, the industrial Manager took the ma 
up with the Navy Department and requested that 
some action be taken towards furnishing additional 
housing facilities for yard employees. While the 

matter was givei ideration at that time by the 

Department, there was no money available under 
exi ting appropriations for use in building or com- 
mandeering houses or hotels. 

In the latter part of 1917, when it was found 
thai the housing situation was becoming a serious 
handicap in all shipbuilding cities, the National 
( 'niiii.il of i defense t ooh up t his mat ter and ga . e 
1< their earnest attention, with the result that a bill 
was introduced in Con, cress appropriating ome lift J 
million dollars for providing housing facilities tor 
ship yard and munition workers. During the latter 
part of 1917 the National Council of Defense sent 
a representative to this Yard to investigate the con- 
ditions existing here. His report was forwarded, 
but no action was taken at thai time. A tew weeks 
later a second representative reported here and 
made a further investigation, going into the matter 

\en, carefully, and his report was forwarded to the 

Council and to the Navy Department. 

The original idea was to solve the situation by 

transporting men to and from outlying districts, 
rather than to build new houses in the vicinity of 
the Vard. The Indu trial .Manager was opposed to 
this idea, being fully convinced that it would not 
solve the difficulty, and the Manage] h i con itantly 

ni ged i he consl ruction ol a I number of hou 

in t he immediate vicinity of t he yard. 

In t he meanl ime i t >i ifforl has b en made to 
locate all available rooms anil houses in Ports- 



mouth, Kittery, York and Dover, so llial al least 

si me or i lie men could be a ■ ommodated, and the 
Safety Engineer has a lisl of accommodations on 

tile. Options were al taken on certain hotels and 
oti certain property, with the idea that the hotels 
could later lie opened as lodging houses and that 

houses could he erected, on the land when monej 
became available. 

The bill appropriating the money referred I" 
above has not yet become a law and therefore, while 
plans have been fullj considered and tentatively 

ited, I 'en can be ta ken nut ii this 

money is available for this work. The fact that 
two new shipbuilding concerns have located in 

Portsmouth has made the housing needs much more 

i and ii Is considered t hat seme definite action 
may he expected in the very near future toward re- 
la \ inc. i he sit ual ion. 

It is recognized that in some cases rents lor 
houses and rooms have been raised to exorbitant 
prices and that many hardships have been placed 
on tenants on this account it would seem that such 
a procedure is contrary to the interests not only of 
I h - landlords t hem lelves, imi in i he commercial 

welfare of the towns, ami it is hoped that si 

definite action will he taken in the near inline to 
lemeii , i his evil. 5, 

It is incumbent on every man who has the facili 
lies, lo take into his household some id the war 
workers, and to inform the authorities of the Yard 
where accommodations may he secured. As stated 
above, this information is kept in i he office of the 
Safely Engineer, who will gladly assist men in everj 
way possible to secure ii\ ing quarters. Only by the 
assistance of all persons who are in any way ac- 
quainted with the facts will il be possible to ac- 
commodate the large number of men who are n led 

mil only for the Xavy yard hal for 11 Ilier plant I 

in Portsmouth. 



THE SAFETY ENGINEER. 

About a year ago the United Stales Emplo; 
Compensation Commission began its activities, tak- 
ing over several independent departments and the 
handling of all claims for compensation resulting 

Er accidents incurred by the civil employe' 

the Government while in the actual performance of 
their duties. This includes not onlj the emplo: 
of navy yards and arsenals but the Government 

printing plants and mints and the various depart 

ments of the post office, forestry and fisheries de 



8 



LIFE BUOY 



partments, the custom houses and similar institu- 
tions a very considerable number of employees. 

The Navy Yards and Arsenals formed the two 
largest groups id' employees and were concerned 
almost entirely with manufacturing. They present- 
ed many of the hazards common to industrial plants 

in ordinary commercial lite, hut. unlike them, had 
been developed in a less highly organized fashion 
and without the stress of economy enforced by keen 

tition. For this reason the rather modern 

Idea that many accidents can he reduced in number, 
or prevented entirely, had not been taken fully in- 
to account. 

With the entrance of the United states into the 
war it was early apparent that the number of per- 
sons in the employ of Die Government would verj 
materially Increase and that there would be. in the 

absence of any effort to counteract it, a most de- 
cided increase in the rrequencj and severity of the 
accidents. This would he due not alone to the 
absence of an effort to prevent but to the employ- 
ment of unskilled persons, to an increased speed of 
production and to lack of familiarity with much of 

the work done in such establishments. 

The Commission did not long hesitate in accept- 
ing the Offer id' the National Safety Council and the 
American Museum of Safety to organize and con- 
duct a complete survey of the Government plants 
with the idea id' improving these safety conditions. 
The services of various well known safety experts 
were given and the result of the conditions they 
found was the concrete suggestion, through the 

Chairman of the compensation Commission, to the 

War and Navy Department, that there be appointed 
a Safely Engineer to devote his entire time to the 
work of carrying on the Safety work in each yard. 
Accordingly, fourteen trained men were picked from 

various parts of tile country to till these positions 
and the appointments were ratified by the Depart 
ments, their duties beginning simultaneously at all 
posts in the middle of September 1017. 

Since that time several conferences of these men 
have been held at various Navy Yards under the 
guidance of Mr. Arthur II. Voting. Director of the 
American Museum id' Safety, who has been acting, 
temporarily, as the Chief Safety Expert of the l S 
Employees' Compensation Commission. They have 
formulated a set of safely standards covering o\ei\ 

feature of construction of building and equipment, 
of machine guarding, of health equipment, of cloth- 
ing, and of apparel and body protecting devio 

These sets of standards are now being printed, after 

adoption by the Xavy Department. KToni now on 



they are lo govern all safety work in the Navy 
y aids. 

Mr. Chester C, Kausch yvas assigned to Ports- 
mouth and during the past six months has been 
building up the foundation of what Will eventually 
be the safety organization of the Yard. In addition 
to these duties there have been detailed others 
which Ordinarily come under the general head of 
welfare, but which, were assigned to him as a part 
of his regular work. When an entire stranger 
steps into a Yard and organizes a new field of work 

i' requires time and patience in order that its pur- 
pose may be fully understood and that ils functions 
nen be lilted ill with the regular Operation of things 
without friction and to the end that they may ac- 
complish definite good. Co-operation which was 
given by the heads of departments, the foreman, 
and the men themselves, has been of an exception- 
ally sincere and helpful sort so that much more has 
been accomplished that perhaps might have been 
Ii oked for in the beginning. 

Mr. Rausch has been recently assigned to duty 
in the Bureau of the Yards and Docks at Washing 

ioii where he will have charge of the safety work 
in all the \avy Yards, lie will have an opportunity 
to incorporate in all equipment, plans of structures 
and other Xavy Yard work, the most recent safety 
practices and devices and to act as a clearing house 

for tin- various safely engineers ami their activities. 

The Xavy Department expects to make ils shops 
as line examples of whal Safely can accomplish as 
any in the country. 

Mr Rausch successor is Mr. John R. llugelnian. 
who comes from the Travelers Insurance Coin). any 
where he has been for live years recently acting as 
a special assistant to Dr. \ D Kisteen. the Director 
of Technical Research and Safety Publications for 
ibis company. Mr. Hugelman began his duties on 
March 29th. If the same hearty co-operation be 
given him that was given to .Mr. Rausch when he 
tirst took over Ibis work. Portsmouth should add 
lo its already good record by becoming the best 
equipped yard as relates to Safety work. 

The office of the Safety Engineer is the logical 

place ler men lo come recardin ', their claims when 
I hey have been injured, to ask about rooms, rents 
and all housing problems, to seek information about 
and to report unsafe conditions, (o offer suggestions 
concerning the lunch room and to leave contribu- 
tion for the Cite BUOJ There is never a time when 
il will be impossible to find a ready ear and a help- 
I'ul suggestion. 



Don't Buy This Piano 





Or any other unless 
you first make sure 

of the ABSOLUTE 
INTEGRITY of the 

Dealer. 

In 1865 — This store was established. Can you ask 
for an\ stronger guarantee of Integrity than over 50 
years ofc >ntinous service to the people ol Portsmouth. 
We have always sold Reliable Pianos. 
We alwavs intend to. Your confidence will not be 
misplaced. Easy Terms.— Old pianos taken in exchange. 



MONTGOMERY'S 



MUSIC AND ART STORE 



Opp. P. 0. Portsmouth 



SHAW'S CASH MARKET 



Do you want to help win the war? 
Then practice economy with Mr. Shaw. 
Go to his market for fish and meat, 
Eggs and vegetables fresh and sweet. 

His prices are lowest,— cash you must pay 
And carry your bundles home each day 
Excepting orders of four dollars or more 
Which will be carried straight to your door. 



SHAW'S CASH MARKEl 

18 PLEASANT ST. PORTSMOUTH, N. 

Formerly CLARK'S BRANCH 



H. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 



LIFE I'.UOY- 



YARD LOSES A MASTER SHIPSMITH. 

On April 3rd, 1918, Mr. Luke Ashworth officially 
severed his connection with the Poi i Navy 

i'ard, as Master Shlpsmith He leaves behind a 
hoi i "i friends In this i Iclnll ( . pari Icularly among 
the men of hi own i hop, w ho h n id to ap 

precis te hlni as a ma n and as a mechanic ol si ei lln 
<i i in i,' 

vlr. Ashworth served liis lime and received hi 
earlj i raining In i he ihipyards of I leleware Bay, al 

a i Ime w he 11 i Iggi d Bhips were si ill bi rig 1 

Having i- 11 ned i he fundamental i ol i he old and 

new shipbuilding bj practical applii i n and i lo 

observation u Vshworth was thoroughly [ami 
with his w ork. 

Bi Ide i, being foi a i Ime Superlntendenl i 
forge hop in I !lei el iud, M I \-diw orl h also w a 
■ aged for a i Ime as i conl i ictor tor hip imil h 
alps built in Buffalo and Chii ago No) 
he unui ed to goi ernmenf w ork when he came i o 

i in yard, i ' had pi ei lou ilj w orked In I h 

Boston Navy Vard, \s a result of his knov, 

hi p « ork he w as able to route his materia i i hru 
ihop ic such a degree i hal maximum output 
was constant ly maintained, 

in 1 1 mi ing with in men he relied considerably 
upon i he ntlmenl ol i he w hole to govern the 
always, hi ... otism and 

of duty a mi, mi", i hem \i r, Vsh w ort h was In- 
deed a .im believer In tim "get together" spirit 
and in order i hat It might be i url hered, « hi > bj 
the men mil hi It no .. • tch ol her bi I le of 

working hours, he atai ted the org ini i n of what 

has sin, e become the \ uh a n Club, an orga I 

of i hi men In the hop, i hal ha ■ prei lou Ij 
mentioned in thi maga Ine Consequently, his men 
i, n, >\\ him not only as a capable mechanic, bui 
us a real m in, keenlj Interested In i heir w elfa i e 
and. i miy app "ii heir i o operal Ion. 

Being a nal ural leai er, VIi \ hv oi i h's act 1\ itles 
were man) and \ ai led He wa th e In i he 

Port an, mii n \ acht Club, being i hi Ice II comnn 
and had i he 1 1 ue pi tor i he "roi 

chair fleet.," He was keenly Interested In civil 
i in i n in, 'i ,i n\ » orl Im i in ie v, ,i . ii i e of hi 
mediate untiri port. 



HOAT SHOP 



pumped his tire \ few of us have good reason to 
expect a i rip i .i in le later. Say Weill 

Be ii a or Old Orcha 



inns .ii the Boal Shop who have been buying 
a jar of milk for their lunch « in be pleased i o learn 
thai .liiiiiian Bowden has gone into the milk imsi 

i 



Hois about that, Howe? Did you u<'t locked in 
ol her night " 



win is Tucker like an old rare horse? Because 
he warms up oh the last end of the heal 



ai the Boat simp put your shoulders to the 

i, i,iu ii and look ahead Buckle righl down and do 

In this third Liberty Loan d Ive and 

i orgel 3 our si a nd In - 



Yorl* saw that il was Plane lo see but It didn't 
\i r. Sa w . 



Uncle Ed predicts a ver; drj lunimer; ii - naj be 
m iii ifter all. 



Par oi er the ocean wil ii ii i s t ried and t rue 

Our loved ones arc fighting for the Red White 
Blue 

And those left behind ol whom they arc fond 
Will keep up their coui i bj buying a bond. 

bond i ma s be u Cul for I hose w ho come home 

, ne arm and smut' may ha\ e none 

e all the bonds your money can buy 
ii will cheer up the loved on is you maj greel bye 
and bye. 

The Boat Shop Poet 



SPAR SHOP NOTES. 

The m ' ire buj Ing t he third I ilbei t j Bonds novi 
and the simp Captain wishes them to try and swamp 
him wit b t heir dollars. 



Vlr Barrett wears white Millars nowdays, we 

w iMiilcr w li\ '.' 



ii Is rumored that Gove is bashful, no wonder we 

to ii tve our ups and downs working very 
1 1 he elei ator i . 



\ airr sign thai sprii me our foreman 

i Km i he lacks out from under ins auto and 



i i i:,ii nej i i iioai on digging clams, 



WE II WE JUST RECEIVED OUR 



FLORENCE $ NEW PERFECTION OIL COOK STOVES 

We have them in 1, 2, ii, 4 and 5 Burners 

PLUMBING, HEATING, TIN SHEET IRON AND COPPER WORKS 

1 HL oWt/ll/ 1 oER b I ORE Portsmouth, n. h. 



L26-128 Market St. 



& 



A FEW OF OUR SPECIALTIES 

Hart, Schaffner and Marx Clothes, Stetson Hats, i 

Manhattan Shirts, Fownes Gloves, Interwoven Stockings N^ 

F. W. LYDSTON & CO. VS^^*^ a ^ 



JOHN SISE & CO. 
INSURANCE 



8 MARKET SQUARE 



PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



THE PORTSMOUTH FLOWER SHOP 

A. c. CRAIG, Manager 

FANCY CUT FLOWERS 
AGENT VTCTOB TALKING MACHINES 

i Market Street Phone 960 

PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



kk £J i 



A. P. WENDALL & CO. 
Hardware, Paints and Tools 

Telephone 850 
2 Market Square Portsmouth, N. H. 



THE ACORN 

18 Market Sq., Portsmouth 
IS IICADUUARTtRS FOR MECHANICAL BOOKS. 

Call and li-ll us whal you need 



C. F. DUNCAN 64 CO. 



Men's Packard and Rc(£al 
Shoes for Sprint* 



CELERY AND IRON 

One of the lies! Spring Tonics 
PRICE, $l.o<) 

BOARDMAN and NORTON • market street Portsmouth, n. h. 

Druggists Tel. Connection 

Opposite Post Office Portsmouth, N. II. ' 

SAVE FUEL 

By using Electric Appliances for Cooking 
ROCKINGHAM COUNTY LIGHT AND POWER CO. 

29 Pleasant Street Portsmouth, N. H. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 



11' 



LIFE BUOY 



Johnnie Varrell isn't going to cut any more wood 

tor a couple of years. He has a good supply. 



We are all glad to know that Mr. Cootiey has 
gained three pounds since he came hack from the 
convention. 



Scott ie is making a kick hecause he didn't come 
from the same country, Tom Fisher did. 



Mates and Walker certainly know where to And 
good ice cream. The Eliot dance. 



Bryant has improved since he got over the top 
with tin 1 German measles, but, he prefers French 
measles the next time. 



SEEN THROUGH THE PERISCOPE. 

Leon Scherier our efficient weight draft man has 
purchased a 1918 Cadillac. Lee intends to give 
the niils a ride as soon as Charles Guggisherg gets 
through instructing him how to run the car. 

Messrs. Scriven anil Philhrick were defeated in a 
bowling match at the Arcade Alleys the other even- 
ing. Messrs. Lord and Potter were the ones who 
turned the trick and the boys claim their defeat 
was due to the fact that the previous evening they 
were forced to walk home from Rosemary Junction. 
Jesse says the next time they go to Elliot they are 
going to borrow Kent's flivver, its a little better 
than walking. 

Rosen's Pels, the champions Of the Submarine 
Office are willing to meet either the Boat Shop or 
Brown's Cows any time or place. Mgr. Rosen says 
his team must be considered as a contender for the 
j ard championship. 

Charles Conlon the Menu Brummel Of the Sub- 
marine Drafting Room spent a week in lioston re- 
cently. Charles says the girls were all glad to see 
him. Charley is such a good sport when with the 
girls, we don't wonder why they were glad to see 
him. 

"Little Nemo" the Drafting Room poet is busily 
engaged on his new poem "Concentration." The 
boys say when it comes to writing poems. Nemo is 
some poet 

Congratulations Louie. 

Things are getting better every day at the Sub. 
Drafting Room the latest good news is that Colliton 
is coming down in the price of his candy. Competi- 
tion is a wonderful thing. 



WE WONDER: 

Why Hayward and Kent have that dreamy long- 
ing look. Better gaze at a few of the others before 
you take the final plunge boys. 

Why Guggisherg has so much respect for the 
Portsmouth Police of late. 

Where Pinkham gets those shirts. 

Why the Minneapolis Thunderbolt wears such 
tight fitting trousers. 

Why Emmons and Pinky are so fond of riding in 
the early hours of the morning. 

Why Coffin doesn't open up a hock shop. 



Two minds with but a single thought, (Preble 
and Kent) "Who is she?" 

Mr. Proehl our Bond and Stamp salesman has 
started his third Liberty Loan campaign, we hope 
he will have the same success as he did with the pre- 
vious loans. 

Candidates have reported for the baseball team. 
It will be remembered that the Submarine Drafts- 
men had a great team last year, going through the 
season without a defeat. They are anxious to ar- 
range a game with the Pattern Shop team. The 
battery for the Sub. team is Grant and Hales. 

One of the recent arrivals at the Submarine Diall- 
ing Room is Marvin S. Stephenson of Green Bay, 
Wisconsin. 



PATTERN SHOP. 

THEY SAY:- 

That Fred Pray is now eligible to enter into ('has. 
Pine's new secret order. 



That Jim Nelson has two left hands, which were 
the cause of his being exempt from the Mandolin 
Club. We hope they don't interfere with his feed- 
ing. 



That the 'Little Mandolin Club' has lost two of 
its members, and the rest are gradually weakening. 



That the industrial employees should turn out a 
good team for the sunset games this year. 



That Dick Hart Jr. is somewhat id' an amateur 
wireless operator, and while flashing some messages 
the other evening he was intruded upon by a local 
secret service man. 



Thai Alex Parks has a new style submarine on 

lor in) the river. 



Buy a Liberty Bond 

WE CAN HELP YOU SAVE ENOUGH 
TO BUY ONE 



Our line of Home Furnishings 
is complete in every detail and 
our prices are one half those 
you pay elsewhere. 

E. (). STEPHENSON, Successor 

TO KEMP FURNITURE CO. 

V. A. WOOD, MGR. 

99 Penhallow St., Portsmouth, N. H. 



YOU OUGHT TO KNOW 

DENNETT and McCARTHY'S 

IS THE BEST PIjACE TO BUY 

OVERALLS, SHIRTS, HOSIERY 



THE "BUSY CORNER" STORE 

BUT NEVER TOO BUSY 
TO FILL YOUR PRESCRIPTIONS 
FILL THEM RIGHT 



OUT OF TOWN PATRONS ARE 

WELCOME TO WAIT FOR THE 

CAR AT OUR HOUSE 

BENJAMIN GREEN 

THE DRUGGIST 



INSURANCE 

OP EVERY DESCRIPTION 
LOWEST RATES BEST FORMS 

C. E. TRAFTON 

N. H. BANK BLDG. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



USE GAS FOR 

LIGHTING, HEATING AND COOKING 

PORTSMOUTH GAS CO. 

A U W A Y S AT YOUR SERVICE 



Typewriters for Sale and Rent 



JOB PRINTING 

Quick Service on L^rge Orders 

J. E. DIMICK 

29 Tanner St. Portsmouth, N. H 

Telephone 837 M. 



BROOKS MOTOR SALES 



PORTSMOUTH, 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



FORD SERVICE 



Flllis BrOS. Men's an ^ Boy's Shoes 

: Fine Shoe Repairing : 157 congress st. tel. conn. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 



14 



LIFE BUOY 



That iii of the 'sing! i guys' was properly 

answered, and thai th o have five of the 

female sex installed in the o 



Thai the boys call him Cap . and the craft 

i lit- Pinless Fish. 



"Who will write to a jolly maiden?" 

The above advi ared in one of the 

in papers and intere of our most 

promising bachelors, in fa< I aid judge from 

i he well worn clipping in I cket that 

the luck; i on her way ea 



Mr. Mettlli our eminent musician and instrui 
m \ Twitchell, who is an authi rity on dancing, had 
a dispute as to how many steps it was possible to 
get into a wait,-, as compared to a fox trot. They 
both proceeded to the lavatory where Twitch, by 
demonstrating as best ho could without the aid of 
his prival ind, showed just what was what 

until Mot. amazed at the rhythm and grace shown 
witch, was fully convinc .1 that Twitch was 
right. 



SHIPFITTER'S NOTES. 

Riley savs that ho has heard of human beings 

:; nightmares, but when a "dod-darn Dodge 

junkwagon" gi ius of his Buick Automobile 

and uoos on a rampage in the middle of the night 
while in a garage and smashes his radiator hood 
and springs and then tries to push it out of tin 1 
building, it is some nightmare. 



The men seem to be satisfied with the transporta- 
tion facilities, and appreciate thi made by 
the Yard officials in obtaining them. 



i Tinethy has got one of the best organized 
gangs of "bolter-ups" in the country, and he 
that the bolt factory will have to work overtime to 
keep up with them. 



lleiser was teful for the i tsl of 

pork presented to him last Christmas by "Ski 

and he hopes the ne\ 
will be a flitch. 



Sammy Gardner so they say. 

w (M-ked but eight hours a day. 
Hut now in the "K's" office th' 've hired more men 
So to keep the work going he has to work ten. 
I Poor Samm. 



Barsantee and Bedell will have to stay on their 

lob now, lor lleiser has locked up the gas bouse. 



It is rumored that Chenej refuses to buy any 
more •Liberty Bonds' during this drive. 



FOUNDRY ITEMS. 

Thanks for last mouths compliments. 



irloy Mine: ' . ■. • i hat lie doesn't walk homo 

over the bridge every night simply to save .1 nickel 

bill 10 help to reduce the awful past which he 
carries in front of him. 



Never mind. Mac. you are not tin- onlv Ninas tree 
tor Gallagher and Boyd, Last week they found 
another one in the shop all loaded with presents. 



The other day it was noticed that Frank Emery 
had not outgrown his childhood days, tor he 

bouncing his new rubber ball with a String at- 
tached to it. 



We wonder which one will die first Tucker or 
his nas; "Old Soup Bone." 



Oh you Dan with the light cap. 



to boosl the third liberty loan 



It was as good as a circus to see Hilly running 
he train Monday morning, for he was puffing 
like a steam engine when he climbed aboard the 
platform. Can you imagine Hilly running? 
I'd Hayes about it. 



Pick thinks he will pick up a pretty soft live spot 
when he plays Hill soon for the pool championship. 



The boss got his new hat from Jerry, alright, but 

is still wo w here he comes li 

his share of the 



Some of the boys know that Red copped a sneak 
en them lately for 1 1 has all his time from 
till May. How \ are praying that he 1 

for them to have, when they gel over to town. 



nial time clerk looked very nice on the 
nnday in his brand new suit. Why not 
In' loafed all Saturday afternoon so he might have 
time enough to purchase it. 



Henry Peyser £y Son 

16 TO 20 MARKET ST. 

For more than forty years Portsmouth's leading Store for Men's and 

Boys' apparel 

I\0 you not need a Hoosier Kitchen Cabinet, a lilue Flame stove or one of the many other 
*-* necessities which we can furnish? Come in, our stock will merit your consideration. 

MARGESON BROTHERS 

THE QUALITY STORE 
VAUGHAN ST. Tel. 570 PORTSMOUTH, IN. H. 



FRED B. COLEMAN 

APOTHECARY 

Corner Congress and Vaughan Sts. 

PORTSMOUTH, ------ N. H. 



Two Definitions 

Accident — Unexpected Event 
Income— BE AE TINA-IZED 

H. I. CASWELL, Representative Over Remick's Shoe Store 




The Acorn 



^ERIODICMSuBMIfty .Supplies, Stationery, Engraved 

or Plain 



18 Market Sq., 



Portsmouth 



SUGRUE 

Overalls, Tobacco, Pastry 

KITTERY, MAINE 



S. S. TRUEMAN 



GENERAL CONTRACTOR 



TELEPHONE 651 



83 Bow St. Portsmouth, N. H, 



JOHN O'LEARY 

KITTERY and NAVY YARD EXPRESS 

GENERAL TEAMING 
Tel. Con. Portsmouth, N. H. 

LOUTS ABRAMS and CO. 

Sole Local Agency for 

ADLER'S COLLEGIAN CLOTHES 

The Universal Standard of Good Dress 

BOSTONIAX FOREMOST SHOE FOR MEN 

38-4o Daniel Street PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



O. W. AVERY 

YORK BE4CH 

Real Estate For Sale and to Rent 

If you want to Buy, Sell or Rent Real Estate at York Beach, see me 



'I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 



LIFE BUOY 



OUTSIDE MACHINE SHOP. 

If the young lady who offered a kiss to the man 
taking the largest amount of Liberty Bonds still 
holds to her offer, it will take (Weeks) to get it. 



After Harney gets the Kates to the elevators re- 
paired will the elevators be safely (raisers) razors? 



If it takes Weeks to get the largest amount of 
Liberty Bonds will Lonny take to the Wildes. 



Funny thing about Liberty Bonds, — when yon 
buy, you lend, to yourself, and get interest. 



STRUCTURAL SHOP. 

Why does Ralph go to Newburyport so often; 
the boys want to know if he is going to buy her a 
Bond. By the way Ralph when are the cigars to 
be given out? 



Willis K. sold a pair of white rats to Fred M. of 
the Supply Dept. last week and he states that he 
lost money on them. 



If you want to see C. G. G. smile just tell him 
that there is a load of wood at the Prison to be in- 
spected. 



Oh. Boy! — Have you seen little Cub Cole, he 
certainly is a dear. 



For sale, one green coat, inquire Quarterman 

Ham. 



ELECTRICAL SHOP. 

The girls of the Shop wish Elizabeth Morrissey, 
one of the original 13, success in her new position 
as leading-lady in the Joiner Shop. 



Gertie our champion pugilist and wrestler has 
met her Mate(s). 



Why the reception committee of blue-jackets on 
t he staii s every noon? 

We are told that the next get together supper 
will be served with squibbs mixture on the side. 



Wanted: A dressmaker. Apply to Pettigrew. 



Harry Fisher must have a rabbit's paw. He has 

no competitors. 



Well Anna you'll lie Rich some day. 



Ankle length aprons are the style just now. 



To the "Single Guys" of the Pattern Shop, we 
sa.\ ' Cheer I'p! Your day is coming." 



Jimmie Spencer has returned from his vacation 
Ask him why he does not grow. 



"Cedric" is looking over house plans. Good luck 
Hack! 



They are building a cage for "Jocko" — the Mas- 
ter Painter. 



Hennessey has lost weight since he has had to 
sit up nights waiting for his room-mate. Spell is 
getting next to city life fast. 



Our Boss Plater is all to the berries. Ask 

Charlie to tell you the story of the IS quarts of 

dog-berries he picked, thinking they were blue- 
berries. 



We are fortunate in having such a splendid jani- 
tor as Louie. He does not have to take his hat off 
to any of them. The fact is he is a Prince and 
wears a crown. 



The shop is undergoing a spring cleaning. Let 
us make it permanent and not confine it to this 
season of the year. Cleanliness leads to efficiency 
and increased production. 



Delancey has the menu to prove that he dined 
with Burke at the Rockingham. 



MACHINE SHOP NOTES. 

We hear that some of the boys will be home to 
the evening meal earlier after the 1st of May. 



We have lost our ' Sunday-School." 



Mr. Sloane. our hi ;hlj respected engineer officer, 
is having trouble with his pedometer. It stuck with 



Page and Shaw Candies 

Sole Local Agency 

Adams Drug Store 

ON MARKET ST. 
Portsmouth : : N. H. 



ITS NO USE 



Telling you a long story about advancing prices. 
You know as much about it as I do. But I want to 
tell you that I have a large stock of CLOTHS, 
bought to secure old yarns and dyes, at a much 
lower price than they can be found today. If you 
need a SUIT this year BUY IT NOW. 

WOOD, The Tailor 

15 PLEASANT ST. PORTSMOUTH. N. H. 



Go to W. D. KENDALL 



KITTERY, MAINE 



TELEPHONE 871-M 



FOR YOUR 



MEATS, GROCERIES and PROVISIONS 

Fruits, Canned and Staple Foods 



BEST GOODS AT LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 





I 



Chevrolet Automobiles, The most Satisfactory Built 
Economical, Powerful, Durable 

CHAS. E. WOODS 

51-60 BOW STREET PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 



18 



a hot box on the 3S7th mile, on the fourth days' 
run. Would it do to install forced lubrication or 
use a lit t le graphite. 



Our quartet made a decided hit with the girls 
at the recent meeting of the Machinists' Union, 
when the ladies auxiliary was formed. After the 
meeting one of the .angers as is his usual custom, 
was seen with a lady on each side in a prominent 
ice cream establishment. 



One of our young mechanics has recently taken 
up modeling in clay. He has just finished a busl 
of one of our most distinguished shopmates, a phil- 
anthropist resident of Christian Shore. All who 
have viewed the work pronounced it an excellent 
likeness. "He certainly can scupl." 



Fred says it takes just 1684 steps from his house 
to the boat and he does it in lti minutes flat; some 
morning he will have to walk around an obstructioi 
and will miss his boat. 



lias anybody seen that man from Glasglow? 

The volunteer tire fighting brigade had a practice 
drill a short time ago and showed exceptional pro- 
ficiency. 



STENOGRAPHER'S NOTES. 

"Princess' is standing it pretty well. 



We certainly like to have Dorothy come in and 
remind us of our mistakes. 

Stella thinks "Robbie" is a fine nurse. 



"And it was in Eddie's pocket all the time. 



DRAFTING ROOM, BLDG. SI. 

Say Charlie did you know Albert has got two 
high power rifles? He was examined recently and 
pronounced as sound as a nut. 



Loosen up Perk and send the girls some more 
candy. There is a mark down sale on candy every 
Saturday at Dedes. 

Little Nemo is supplying the girls with candy. 
Have you seen the latest in kimonos? If not 

take a squint at Voss. 



Say Bigelow what is your red lead number? 

Falk has moved his family to the Lanier Camp 
at Eliot. 



It will be a sad blow to some of the boys after 
.May 1st. 

White says "Sugar is awful scarce.'' 



Cap Chase is enjoying a much needed rest. 



Charlie and Nemo were the heroes of the recent 
two alarm fire in Kittery. 



Seine of the force have ordered helmets, for use 
against occasional shrapnel raids. 

Expert advice given on carburetors, by A. E. 
Condon ( ? I 

For general information see C. E. Prince. (He 
knows everything). 



We all wonder what Procter is going to do with 
bis electric sewing machine. (It looks as though 
we would have to dig down into our jeans soon). 



Marshall is running a wet wash. Handkerchiefs 
a specialty. 

We would advise Air. Jennison to get the 7.40 

boat in lie' Inline, thereby saving lime as well as 
money. 

PERSONALS. 

Air. Frank L. Waaser, formerly foreman of the 
Machine Simp has left the employ of the Govern- 
ment and is now with the Atlantic Corporation as 
.Master Machinist. 



Ah. Albert Spinney has been placed in charge of 
i he Machine Shop, Building SO, and things are hum- 
ming. 



Ah-. Marshall has been transferred from Hie Ma- 
chine shop and placed in charge of the Brass Shop. 



Pethic's crew have finally taken quarters in 
Building 89 alter several ineffectual attempts to 
find a home. He looks now like a man who has 
found what he was looking for and the work will 
tell. 



HOW ABOUT THAT SPRING SUIT? 

The new men's clothes are here and we invite you to look 
them over— no obligation to buy. "Mastercraft" Clothes 
are real clothes for real men. Short or tall, lean or fat 
we've a suit for you. Finely tailored— priced rit^ht. 

WALK-OVER, RALSTON, DOROTHY DODD 
SHOES 

N. H. BEANE & CO. 

5 Congress Street : 22 High Street 

C. P. CARROLL E. E. WHITEHOUSE 

Grroceries, Meats and Provisions RARRFR 

145 PENHALLOW ST. FORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

Tel Connection Near A. S. E. Ferry Up 0ne Fli ^ ht °?P- Colonial Theatre 



R. L. COSTELLO 



SEED STORE 



HIGH GRADE SEEDS 



115 Market St. Telephone, 57 

PORTSMOUTH 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY, 



LIFE BUOY 



CO-OPERATION 





'j, '$&. -weVe only 
1 tirtltiQ each 
oihei- — 1<MS 
pull together 




TallC rffeout Co-oj>erMion - 
1 fcueSS we've found it 

■■— *??&« 



_HitV<"^" 



PRACTICE ECONOMY 

Don't help to pay bookeep'ng and delivery charges but buy for cash and reap the 
benefit of lower prices made possible by cash trading. 

=:„ „. BROWN'S MARKET 



THRIFT assures prosperity — 
ex tra vaga n ce i nvites disaster. 
Start saving now — we wel- 
come deposits i n any amount 

N ational Mechanics 
and Traders Bank 

1 Congress St. : Portsmouth 



PARAS BROTHERS 

FRUIT AND CONFECTIONERY, ICE CREAM AND SODA, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

TELEPHONE 29 w CATERING A SPECIALTY 43 CONGRESS street 

Good Service Is Our Motto 



C. A. LOWD 




We do Good (ialranizing 




SERVICE STATION 


GARAGE 


Pleasant St. 


Wentworth St. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 





NAVY YARD, 
PORTSMOUTH, N.H. 




s 0000000<X"X>0000<XhXOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO<XXOOOOOOOOOOOOOO<X 



x>oooooooooooooooo<>oo<xhx»:<<<>ox>oo<x>oooooooooooooooooo.<x 




r. a 



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THIRD LIBERTY LOAN PAUADI: 



^ , : ,, :M; „ : „ : , ):> , ; ,, : , ooooooooooooooooooo^oooo.oo'^^^':M:H:M;M:M;M^ooooooooo<^ 



oooooooooooooooooooo .ooooooooooooc-ooooooooooooooooooooooc 



"1 SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 



COR the convenience of our cus- 
tomers this bank will be open 
SATURDAY EVENINGS 
from 6 to 9 P. M., to receive pay- 
ments on Liberty Bonds and deposits 

Have you a safe place for your Libei ty 
Bonds? We offer the security of 
our Vaults without charge. We in- 
vite you to use our banking service 

COMMERCIAL AND SAVINGS 
DEPARTMENTS 

STORAGE AND DEPOSIT VAULTS 
BOXES TO RENT— $1.00 PER YEAR 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

PORTSMOUTH : NEW HAMPSHIRE 

United States Depository 
ASSETS OVER TWO MILLION DOLLARS 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 



INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 
LIFE BUOY 



Issued monthly for free distribution to employees of the Industrial Department of the 
Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H. 



fOL. I 



MAY 1918 



NO. 5 



THIRD LIBERTY LOAN 



A S was to be expected, the Portsmouth 
Z\ Yard did itself proud on the third 
! V Liberty Loan. While we set out of- 
ficially to subscribe to $250,000, the 
inal subscription was $425,350. 

At the opening meeting, Saturday April 
i, something over $121,000 was subscribed 
in the spot, which gave a first-rate start for 
he campaign. 

The shop contest was won by the Boat 
>hop, to the great surprise (?) of everyone, 
.nd the contest between the wood working 
md metal working trades was won by the 
rood workers, with a very comfoi'table mar- 
gin. The wood workers subscribed 184.4 per 
ent. of their quota, and the metal working 
rades subscribed 151.2 per cent, of their 
[uota. The Boat Shop will therefore fly the 
liberty Loan flag until the next campaign, 
,nd a banner will be flown near the Main Gate 
vith proper inscription, showing that the 
s'ood workers won the contest between the 
wo groups of trades. 

Meetings of the Shop Captains were 
seld twice a week for the first three weeks. 
During the last Week these meetings were 
leld daily. 

When it was seen that the $250,000 was 
aised, it was decided to go to $400,000, and 
iew quotas were allotted to each shop. There 
vere a few near faints when these quotas 
vere announced, and it was necessary to give 
irtificial stimulation to Sam Gardner when 
lis amount was read off. Goldsmith also felt 
i little weak, but is has to be handed to both 
Gardner and Goldsmith that they worked 



like Trojans and came out within $50.00 of 
each other in the final amounts. It will be 
noted that these two shops subscribed ap- 
proximately one-quarter of the Yard sub- 
scription. Bill Palfrey also did some tall 
hustling in the Riggers and Laborers Shop, 
and Brother George Palfrey lost a few hours' 
sleep digging in the Foundry. 

While there may be some Yards that 
have beat us a little on per capita subscrip- 
tion, it must be remembered that the Ports- 
mouth Yard has had three big campaigns, 
whereas in most of the Yards this has been 
the first big, hard campaign. We have sub- 
scribed to something over $290.00 per capita 
for the three loans, and it is doubted if any 
other Yard can beat that record.. At the date 
of writing this, returns from the other Yards 
have not been received. 

The Boat Shop is to be congratulated on 
their Liberty Loan work. They have sub- 
scribed $121,950 in the three loans, or a per 
capita of $762.00. Every man in the Boat 
Shop has at least one bond of every issue. 
That is a record of which any shop can be ex- 
tremely proud. 

On the closing day of the campaign, Cor- 
poral Smith, who has recently returned from 
the trenches, addressed the Yard men, giving 
them a short talk on trench life, and appealed 
to them to back up the men in France. As a 
direct result of this appeal, over two hundred 
men and women came forward at the meeting 
and bought additional bonds, and something 
over $12,000 was subscribed in the next ten 
minutes after his speech. 



LIFE BUOY 



There is appended the official standing and subscription of each shop: 

Allotment Subscription 



1 


Boat shop 


$14600 


$41950 


•* 


Officers 


SSOO 


7450 


i' 


Shipw right shop 


13000 


25200 


4 


Brass Shop 


22400 


43250 


5 


Taint Shop 




6950 


6 


Sail Loft 


1000 


IS50 


i 


Employees 




Sloe 


8 


Foundry 


1 1 


_ 




Smith Shop 


6300 




10 


Smelting riant 


L650 


2750 


11 


Machine shop ( No. SO > 




50500 


12 


Drafting Room 






12 


Drafting Room (No. SI i 




32600 


14 


Submarine Drafting Room 




7800 


15 


imators 






16 


Pattern Shop 






17 


Machine Shop 


14' 


22150 


IS 


Joiner Shop 


9000 




19 


Rigger's and Laborers' Shop 








Transportation 






21 


Shi] Shop 






.. .. 


Supply Oil 


in 


1 (650 




Electrical Workers 


128 


16000 


24 


Boiler Sb 


4250 


_ 


- 


Plum 


112 


12SO0 




Miscellam 








5350 




Woodworkers 




1404roi 




.Metal Trades 


1555 


1650 




n. of B. 

JAN 19 I92J 



LIFE BUOY 



NAVY YARD APPEAL. 



every second of time — we could get our ships 
in service in much less time and thus hasten 
the end of the War?" 



VICE-ADMIRAL William S. Sims, U. S. 
N., commanding the United States 
Naval Forces operating in European 
waters, declares he would like to hear 

. shipyard ringing with chanty souk- to 
fit each kind of activity, for such chanties 
would put "pep" into every man's job, speed 
into his arms and legs, and weight into his 
blows. 

"The point is," the Vice-Admiral de- 
clares, "that every man should feel that 
every blow of his hammer is a blow at the 
enemy ; that a certain number of blows will 
put him down and out ; and that the sooner 
all the-e blows are struck, the more lives will 
be saved and the sooner we shall have peace 
and plenty." 

These statements are embodied in a 
letter Admiral Sims has sent to the ship- 
builders of America relative to the hurrying 
up the building of destroyers and repairs on 
ships. 

"We are sorry for the delay in deliveries, 
but we understand something of the numer- 
ous handicaps caused by the weather, conges- 
tion of traffic, etc.," continues Admiral S.rm. 
"We are assured that the department; and 
officers are doing everything within their 
power to push along all this work, because 
they understand it 3 great importance; but I 
have been wondering whether the men who 
are driving the machines, the splendid vang< 
of foremen, leadingmen, quartermen, skilled 
metal workers, riveters, etc., understand it 
as well. 

"Do they, the men who actually build 
and repair the boats, understand how vitally 
important speed L in building? Do they un- 
derstand that we will win or lose according 
to whether we beat the submarine or it beats 
u - ; that we mu ;t depend chiefly upon des- 
t overs for thh to protect our merchant ves- 
sels and to attack the submarines; that a 
de troyer is worth nothing while in America, 
and that she will be useless if she arrives too 
late? 

"Do they understand that if every single 
man could : peed up his own work — every 
riveter strike more blows per hour, every 
handler of machines, metal ;, tools, etc., save 



A MESSAGE FROM THE FRONT. 

On Saturday noon, May 4th, the Yard was 
favored with the opportunity ot bearing Corporal 
G. E. Smith of Company P., L04th U. S. Infantry 
deliver a message from our hoys "over there" — in 
France. Corporal Smith, who by the way is a Maine 
boy, having been born in Bangor, was one of a par- 
i\ of fifty hoys picked tu come to tin- States and help 
float the Third Liberty Loan. The party landed in 
New York City on May 1st., and will return in the 
course of a few weeks with the messages sent back. 

Corporal Smith enlisted before the Mexican 
trouble started, and went to France sometime in the 
early Fall of last year, lie was in the front line for 
some time and was consequently able to bring back 
a vivid description of actual warfare conditions. 

Naval Constructor Schlabach, the shop su- 
perintendant, in a few fitting remarks introduced 
Corporal Smith to the large audience which had 
gathered in front ot tie- Industrial Department of- 
fice building. 

The message that Corporal Smith brought over 

not only interesting but full of thrills, and 
there is no doubt but that all those who heard him 
i deeply moved, for the response, when the time 
came for buying bonds — our answer to his message 
- -was admirable. Over 230 bonds were subscribed 
in a very short time; a very creditable showing, con- 
sidering the fact that over $400,000 worth of bonds 
were sold in the yard before Corporal Smith began 
his message. 

The vivid description of the terrible havoc 
wrought by the gas shells, especially those filled 
with mustard gas, should have stirred our hearts. 
His explanation of the way the warning of an ap- 
proaching gas bombardment comes and the way the 
gas masks are put on was also good. He not 
only carefully explained the English gas mask 
but also illustrated his talk by demonstrating just 
how this mask was attached and used, and how 
long it was serviceable. The French gas mask was 
also demonstrated to the entire satisfaction of the 
audience. 

Each soldier, when he goes into the front line 
trenches, is provided with both masks, the English 
gas mask being by far the better in that a soldier 



LIFE BUOY 



can endure a gas bombardment, when such ;i mash 
is used, for a period of some six hours. The narrow 
thread upon which the lives of our soldiers hangs 
during a gas bombardment is Indeed thin and many 
of us shuddered when he told us. 

Che i i question was also discussed by Cor- 
poral Smith, and 111" admirable way in which he 
pictured this vital condition should have seiil us all 
iwaj determined to raise war gardens and not to 
u aste a scrap of food. 

There can be no question but that his message 
from the front was timely, anil, consciously or un- 
consciously, a more determined spirit seems to have 

pervaded the Yard. Everybody seems to have been 
touched, and things are beginning to show that a 

LIBERTY BULL. 

Mr. ('. E. Emery of the Outside Machinists' 

.nil. Building No. 89, very generously donated ;i 
thoroughbred Jersey hull calf, two months old. to 
lie sold for war charities. The bull calf has a pedi- 
gree about a yard Ion?;, and Mr. James White, the 
winner, is to be congratulated on getting him. 

Some forty-six hundred chances were sold at 




ten cents a throw, the total proceeds being $ 4 1 "> i > ;,n 
Nine $50.00 bonds were bought with this money. 
Two of the bonds were donated to the Kittery Red 
Cross, in accordance with Mr. Emery's request, and 
ithe other seven bonds and $10.50 were donated by 
She unanimous vote of the Liberty Bond Shop Cap- 
tains to the Navy Relief Auxiliary. 



spirit of determination has set in and that the Yard 
i: showing signs of waking up. 

It would be .i rank oversight if we did not men- 
tion the admirable way in which Naval Constructor 
Schlabach took the stand after Corporal Smith had 
finished speaking, and began to sell Liberty Bonds. 
His spirit of determination in getting a proper mes- 
sage to send back namely, thru the sale of Liberty 
Bonds,— was line, and will long be remembered. 
Resides the tactful way Naval Constructor Schla- 
bach used, an additional inducement was offered — 
namely, all those who bought bonds at this meeting- 
had the special privilege of personally shaking 
hands with Corporal Smith and id' sending a per- 
sonal message of felicitations bach lo our hoys 
"over I here." 

There was much "throwing of the bull" lor 
several days while the sale was on. for it was under- 
stood that each ticket entitled the holder to "Throw 
the bull" one day. lint it was all good natured 
"bull.'' 

The Navy Relief Auxiliary was organized to 
assist the families of enlisted men of the Navy 
whenever special circumstances warrant it. and it 
has been the cause of saving much distress 
among these families when sickness and 
death has entered them. It is a society in 
which Navy Yard men should be particular- 
ly interested, and the action in voting so 
large a portion of the proceeds of the sale to 
this society was very greatly appreciated. 
Mrs. Boush, wife of Hear Admiral C. J. 
Boush. V. S. N., Retired, is President of the 
society, and her letter in thanking you for 
this generous donation follows: 

"Navy Yard. Portsmouth, N. H. 
May 6. 1!US. 
Gentlemen : - 

As the president of the New Hampshire 
Navy Relief Auxiliary. I wish to thank you 
for your splendid gift of Liberty Bonds and 
money to that society. 

Your generous deeds in many direc- 
tions, and especially towards your country, 
are wcdl known everywhere, helping to place 
us as an example to the rest of the world in 
all the years to come. With such men to 
keep the home (ires burning, we have 
nothing to fear from the enemy. 
Again thanking you 
Sincerely, 
ANNA CAMM BOUSH, 
President, New Hampshire Navy Relief 
Auxiliary." 
Mr. Emery is certainly to bs commended for 
his very patriotic spirit in donating such a valuable 
animal for this purpose. 



LIFE BUOY 



WAR GARDENS! 

Have you planted your war garden? There is 
still ample time, so get busy and do "an additional 
bit" by planting a garden. 

The food problem at the present time is more 
acute than ever before. Consequently every avail- 
able plot of land should be made productive 

Since last spring the draft call has greatly de- 
pleted the ranks of the farm workers necessitating 
an additional burden on each one of us. Moreover, 
the demands of our allies for additional food is in- 
creasing daily. You all heard or should have heard 
the touching words of Corporal G. E. Smith who 
spoke on the last day of the Liberty Loan Drive. 
His words ought to have stimulated us all. You 
all responded nobly to his call for money. By such 
action you also apparently put yourself on record 
as intending to send back a further message — plant- 
ing a war garden. Do not forget your pledge but 
do your part. 

In order to successfully wage the war against 
the Huns it is not enough that we work efficiently 
and conscientiously but in our spare time we should 
do voluntarily garden planting. This year our prob- 
lem is a large one but one that really works little 
additional hardship on our part. Is it fair to ask 
our boys to fight our battles over there on an empty 
stomach? Napoleon is credited with saying "An 
army fights only efficiently when properly fed." 

This year, it is our duty to produce enough 
food not only to feed ourselves so we may work ef- 
ficiently but in addition food must be raised to sup- 
ply our boys over there, as well as our allied armies. 

The solution of this problem can be readily 
met if each one volunteers to do his part by plant- 
ing a war garden. Therefore do not delay but start 
at once to do your digging. Utilize every available 
spot and dig, dig, dig! 



MULHAM'S RIVET GANG. 

Somewhere near the top of the honor roll of 
those who are doing their best — not merely their 
bit — for the flag these days let the names of Charlie 
Mulham and his rivet gang be placed. Charlie 
Mulham, whose name, we suspect, is an American- 
ized form of the name that his parents gave him in 
far off Syria, works at the Fore River plant in 
Quincy — one of nearly 15,000 working there to 
make the world safe tor democracy. He is foreman 
of a gang of rivet drivers, and last Wednesday he 
and his gang broke a world's record by driving 2805 



oil-tight rivets into the hull of a steel ship in a 
nine-hour stretch. 

Breaking world's records of one kind or 
another has long been an American specialty. If 
there has been a little faltering in the stride in the 
past year or two it has been because we have been 
playing a new game. Not long ago a rivet gang in 
a Seattle yard set a new mark. Of course the At- 
lantic must beat the Pacific, and Charlie Mulham 
and his gang have shown how to do it. They say 
they are going to do still better and we hope that 
they will start a rivalry that will spread to every 
yard on the two coasts, and from the yards to the 
offices of all in authority over the shipbuilding 
program. 

Charlie Mulham is doing a work as necessary 
as that in the trenches and if you saw his gang at 
work — every man had burned hands when that day 
was over and every man had dodged death no end 
of times — you would perhaps decide to take your 
chances in the trenches. The spirit that animated 
that record-breaking day's work, and the determi- 
nation to do better still, is Americanism at its best 
— and there are not better Americans these days" 
than Charlie Mulham and his fellow Syrians. 
Would that there were a few more millions like 
them here for the work ahead.— -Boston Herald. 



THE DANGEROUS CLIFF PARABLE. 

'Twas a dangerous cliff, as they freely confessed, 

Though to walk near its crest was so pleasant; 
But over its terrible edge there had slipped 

A dupe, and full many a peasant. 
The people said something would have to be done, 

But their projects did not at all tally. 
Some said, "Put a fence round the edge of the cliff;" 

Some, "An ambulance down in the valley.'' 

The lament of the crowd was profound and was 
loud, 

As their hearts overflowed with their pity; 
But the cry for the ambulance carried the day 

As it spread through the neighboring city. 
A collection was made, to accumulate aid. 

And the dwellers in highway and alley 
Gave dollars or cents, — not to furnish a fence, — 

But an ambulance down in the valley. 

"For the cliff is all right if you're careful." they 
said ; 
"And if folks ever slip and are dropping, 
It isn't the slipping that hurts them so much 

As the shock down below — when they're stop- 
ping." 



8 



LIFE BUOY 



So tor years (we have heard), as these mishaps oc- 
curred 

Quick forth would the rescuers sally, 
To pick up the victims who fell from the cliff, 

With the ambulance down in the valley. 

Said one, in his plea, "It's a marvel to me 

That you'd Rive so much greater attention 
To repairing results than to curing the cause; 

Vou hail much better aim at prevention. 
Km i he mischief, of course, should be stopped at its 
source, — 

Come, neighbors and friends, let us rally. 
It is far better sense to rely on a fence 

Than an ambulance down in the valley." 

"He is wrong in bis head." the majority said; 

■'lie would end all our earnest endeavor, 
lie's a man who would shirk this responsible 
work. — 

But we will support it forever. 
Aren't we picking up all. just as fast as they fall. 

And giving them care liberally? 
A superfluous fence is of no consequence. 

If the ambulance works in the valley." 

The story looks queer as we've written it here, 

Hut things oft occur that are stranger. 
More humane, we assert, than to succor the hurt, 

Is the plan of removing the danger. 
The Navj Yard plan is to safeguard the man, 

And to attend to the thing rationally. 
For we build up the fence and we try to dispense 

With the ambulance out in the alley. 



LEAD POISONING. 

One of the most widespread and important of 
the ailments that are due to occupational causes is 
I In' malady or industrial disease known variously as 
"lead poisoning," "plumbism" and "leading." Em- 
ployees of all ages and both sexes are susceptible 
to this indusl rial disease. 

Plumbism is a cumulative disease resulting 
from the continued entrance of minute quantities 
of lead into the system. Although it may be con- 
tracted in numerous ways it is most commonly due 
to swallowing traces of lead compounds or to in- 
haling fumes or dust containing them. Because of 
the fact that lead is so generally used and because 
its effects upon the human organism are insiduous 
whereby they often escape detection in the early 
stages, lead has causs'd more deaths than any other 
metal. 



The harmful effects of lead have b33n known 
for centuries. The use of lead pipes for the con- 
veyance of water was forbidden i ."i r ; . i s and 
Pliny referred to the poisoning as "sla r e's disea 3e." 

One of the first symptoms of lead poisoning is 
a disagreeable metallic taste in the mouth which 
is experienced by lead workers upon getting up in 
the morning. He does not relish his breakfast, suf- 
fers from headache and feels generally indisposed. 
At a later stage attacks of colic with vomiting occur. 
The sufferer may be in constant pain often of ago- 
nizing intensity. Cartful diagnosis is necessary for 
lead colic and appendicitis are often difficult to dis- 
tinguish. 

The patient suffering from leal poisoning has 
usually a peculiar pallor of the face which becomes 
more noticeable as the disease proTres33S. The 
nervous system, kidneys and liver ire directly or 
indirectly affected. The result on the nervous sys- 
tem causes paralysis ol the fingers, hands and wrists 
and often the ankle3 become affected. 

Lead poisoning of the brain is rather unusual 
but may result. At |p rst no other warning than a 
severe headache may result but later the sufferer 
is seized with convulsions and passes into a s'.ate 
of coma during whic'i death may result. Should a 
c is ■ of such severity occur and th 3 sufferer recover 
consciousness and lives, loss of vision, temporary 
or permanent may occur. 

However there need be no fear on the part of 
employees of this Yard relative to lead poisoning 
if they will carefully obey the following recommen- 
dations: 

1. At noontime and upon finishing the days 
work painters and workers engaged in handling 
lead or its compounds should wash their hands and 
especially clean their finger nails. Plentiful sup- 
plies of hot and cold water, soap and nail brushes 
and towels have been provided and should be used. 

2. Personal cleanliness is highly essential and 
the use of tobacco while on the yard should be ab- 
solutely stopped. 

3. Special rooms for the pi:- 33 of eating 
lunch have been provided and should b3 used. Care 
being taken to see that the hands and ftces have 
been first thoroughly cleansed. 

■1. Outside garments should be changed before 
going home at night and preferably during the 
luncheon hour. Lockers have bsen provided for 
the street clothes. An effective form of head cover- 
ing should protect the hair. 

5. The wearing of beards and mustaches is 
likely to increase the possibility of lead poisoning. 

6. When the first symptoms of lead poisoning 
manifest themselves it is urged that the sufferer re- 



LIFE BUOY 



pint immediately to the Medical Officer at the Dis- 
pensary tor necessary treatment. 

Absolute cleanliness, even to the point where 
it approaches apparent foolishness is the keynote 
of success if we hope to prevent cases of lead poison- 
ing from developing in this Yard. 



THE MELTING POT. 

Slowly but surely the scum of the melting pot 
is coming to the top so that the dross, — the insin- 
cere, the selfish and the dishonest can the more 
easily be removed. Now it may seem as if they con- 
stitute a formidable lot, but they do not. 

Due to our carelessness in many ways we have 
allowed ourselves to be grossly imposed upon. 
Most of us have taken it for granted, in our happy- 
go-lucky way, (easy going way), that everything 
was bound to work out alright. In short the rights 
of every other nationality but our own has been 
given its due consideration. It is only recently that 
we have finished a close scrutiny of ourselves and 
have definitely decided we know what the trouble 
is. Consequently, from now on a healthy growth 
should manifest itself. 

The man who plays the partisan game, be it 
in politics, profiteering or what not is no longer 
safe, for we have at last awakened to the point of 
realization that definite concentrated action must 
be taken against such. Not all the traitors are 
Germans or pro-Germans, nor are all profiteers 
millionaires or employers. At this moment when 
we are passing thru the Valley Forge of this great 
war it is vitally essential that the true American 
spirit of honesty, sincerity and loyalty should as- 
sert itself clearly and forcibly. 

Fellow-men, steel your hearts and clear your 
consciences for the fog is about to lift and with it 
the sun will break thru in all its glory and splendor. 



BEWARE OF SPIES! 

In that spies are everywhere, it is essential 
thai no information be given out relative to this 
Yard's activities. 

The following appeal has been sent out by the 
Division of Advertising of the Government's Bureau 
of Information: 

"Our enemies over here are trying to 

hurt our boys over there. Our enemies 

are listening. Don't talk. 



"If you know anything Germany would 
like to know, let this be your Speechless 
Day. 

"A careless remark dropped in the 
street car may f in nish a spy with the miss- 
ing link in a chain. When in doubt, don't 
say it. 

"One German army has already occu- 
pied America. The invisible host of spies 
is everywhere. 

"The German spy Chief, Stieler, said 
that he won the Franco-Prussian War 
with his army of spies ahead of the troops. 
The German spy army invaded America 
long ago. 

"Keep your eyes peeled, your lips seal- 
ed, your hearts steeled. 

"Germans, their agents and sympath- 
izers, are trying to overhear you. Keep 
quiet, don't talk. 

"Don't talk. - If you want to help this 
nation, don't talk. Cut the public con- 
versation. Don't talk. Do not make the 
Germans wiser. If you want to can the 
Kaiser, DON'T TALK." 



SALUTE THE FLAG. 

Naval Regulations require all officers and en- 
listed men to "stand attention'' with their right 
hand at "salute" when the flag is being hoisted at 
S A. M. and when it is being lowered at sunset. 

While this regulation does not apply to the 
civilian force in the yard, the custom of standing 
attention and saluting at "colors" is one which 
Americans should practice more frequently. It 
takes but a minute of your time, but, after it is 
over you stand off with a little more pride in your- 
self, and with a little better realization of what the 
flag stands for. Try it the next time you are around 
the "colors." 



A CHILD'S PRAYER. 

"Now I lay me down to sleep, 
I pray the Lord my soul to keep. 
God bless my brother gone to war 
Across the seas, in France, so far. 
Oh, may this fight for Liberty 
Save millions more than little me 
From cruel fates or ruthless blast 
And bring him safely home at last. 



10 



LIFE BUOY 



NAIL THE FLAG TO THE PLOW. 

Nail the flag to the plow — 

The country needs grain. 
While the sailor boys guard 

The tracks of the main. 
God gave you the fields 

Ami the sun with its light; 
Then double their yields 

While the sailor boys fight. 
Nail the flag to the plow — 

The soldiers must eat 
While defending the trenches 

Or suffer defeat. 
You can help the brave soldier 

At this time of his need 
By increasing your acres 

And planting more seed. 
Xail the flag to the plow — 

Your children and wife 
Must be saved from starvation 

While the world is in strife. 
Your duty is plain; 

Your mission is grand ; 
Each man is a hero 

Wbo's tilling the land. 
You say you're too old 

To light with a gun; 
Then work in the fields 

Till the setting of sun 
And show to the world 

By tire sweat on your brow 
That you're serving your country 

With a Hag on your plow. 

— W. B. Lockwood. 



THE KAISER'S PRAYER. 

O Gott, vill you be mine pardner 
You say you don't know "Who I am?' 
Veil, I'm der Cherman Kaiser, 
Der Emperor Villyiam. 

You know 1 vipped dem Belgiums, 
And trod dem under foot, 
Und mit treason I filled Russia 
Und now I'm gaddering up der loot. 



So, I'll vip France und Italy 
Den blow up dat Chonny Bull, 
Und if you'll be mine pardner 
I'll vip dis whole vorld full. 

Now for all der odder Nations, 
1 don't gift von "Hee Haw,'' 
Hut believe me, dat Uncle Sam, 
Iss tuff, yust like a rip saw. 

You know I got der submarines, 

Vot hass made all Europe yell; 

I tut dey tell me Uncle Sam's man Edison 

Iss going to blow dem all to "H — ." 

Now Gott, if you vill help me. 

Den I vill alvays loff; 

I tid I vill be der Emperor of der Earth 

Und you der Emperor of der skies Aboff. 

But Gott, if you refuse me dis, 
Den tomorrow night at seven, 
I'll let loose all der zeppelins, 
Und start to vipe out Heaven. 

So Gott. if you yust know your liddle book, 

You'll do yust vot I say, — 

If not, den you know darn veil, 

Dere'll be "H — on Earth" to pay. 

I vouldn't ask you dis, Gott, 
Hut can't you plainly see 
If der Allies vin dis Vorld Vawr 
Dey'll say to "H — mit me." 



THE NEW OFFICES. 

The addition to the main office building. No. 
81, was opened for occupancy on Monday, May 6. 

The first floor is now occupied by the Shop 
Superintendent, the Engineering Superintendent, 
the Construction Superintendent, with their as- 
sistants, and the Time Section. The Time Section, 
however, is only a temporary tenant, and upon the 
completion of the raising of the roof of the old 
building, the space now occupied by them will be 
turned over to the Labor Board and the Safety 
Engineer. 

The second floor of the addition is now occu- 
pied by drafting rooms, though upon the final com- 
pletion of the main building, it will be occupied by 
the Accounting Superintendent and the Time and 
Cost Sections. 



LIFE BUOY 



11 



On the third Boor of the addition are located 
the lilt? rooms, blueprint room, and printing office. 

The addition has been very much needed, be- 
cause of congested conditions and it will allow the 
work of the main office to be carried on to much 
better advantage than formerly. 

The rent on the other hand has not been raised, 
due to the increased demand for offices. 



DAYLIGHT SAVING LAW. 

Additional advantages of the daylight saving 
law are being presented in numerous interesting 
ways. Before the new law went into effect the heat 
was most intense between two and three o'clock in 
the afternoon, but now under the new plan for day- 
light saving it is between three and four o'clock. 

Probably the most interesting feature to the 
employees of this yard is the fact that the heat dur- 
ing the noon hour is not so intense as formerly. 
Moreover, as the work for the day is finished we all 
will be able to get out from the shops and offices 
earlier and not have to endure the high tempera- 
tures quite likely to occur frequently during the 
coming summer months. 



COMPENSATION CLAIMS. 

.Ml Civil Employees Portsmouth Navy Yard, 

1. In accordance with a recent ruling of the 
United States Employees' Compensation Commis- 
sion, you are advised that hereafter all injuries in- 
curred in this Navy Yard should be recorded and 
treated at the Yard Dispensary. 

2. The Medical Officers at the Yard Dispensary 
are the only physicians who should treat you. They 
will decide whether injured employee shall go to 
Naval Hospital or Portsmouth Hospital should the 
degree of injury warrant such action. 

:i. Hereafter no bills will be paid to private 
physicians and hospitals unless so designated by 
Medical Officers of this Yard. 



NEW MASTER SHIPSMITH. 

Mr. George E. Chaffee who has been at the 
Boston Navy Yard for the past thirteen years has 
been appointed Master Shipsmith at this Yard. We 
wish him all success in his new work. 



EDITORIALS. 



Our greatest glory consists, not in never fall- 
ing, but in rising every time we fall. 



True friendship is a plant of slow growth. 



Principles are greater than men. Men die, but 
principles are eternal. 



The big man takes kindly to suggestions: the 
little man resents them. 



"The industrial forces of the country are as 
much a part of the great patriotic forces of the 
nation as the men under tire."— Woodrow Wilson. 



"An injury prevented is a benefaction; an in- 
jury compensated, an apology."— The Travelers 
Ins. Co. 



"There is not a single selfish element, so far 
as I can sec. in the cause we are fighting tor. We 
are fighting for what we believe and wish to be the 
rights of mankind and for the future peace and se- 
curity of the world. To do this great thing worthi- 
ly, successfully, we must devote ourselves to the 
service without regard to profit or material advan- 
tage, and with an energy and intelligence that will 
rise to the level of the enterprise itself." 

WOODROW WILSON 
President of the United States. 



THE LIFE BUOY. 

There have been a few rumors circulating re- 
cently to the effect that "The Life Buoy was an Of- 
fice publication; that it was the policy of those edit- 
ing it to publish nothing in it but that pertained to. 
the executive functioning of the Yard." 

How these rumors were started does not par- 
ticularly interest us any more than that we wish 
to state emphatically that this is absolutely untrue. 
The Life Buoy is a Yard magazine or organ and any- 
thing of interest pertaining to the welfare of the- 
employees or the Yard itself will be published. 

Naturally in time of war a censorship must be- 
exercised, otherwise, valuable information may get 
to the enemy. Other than this no censorship or 
partisan feeling exists. 



12 



LIFE BUOY 



It is the policy of the editor to print any arti- 
cle which may prove of interest or help to the em- 
ployees of this Yard. For the Life Buoy is your 
magazine and run strictly in conformity with your 
interests. 

If any criticisms exist they should be brought 
to the Safety Engineer and a ready ear may at all 
times be found. However, constructive criticism 
must be likewise offered. 

The next and future issues of the Life Buoy 
will be printed in the Yard printing office. 

Unless the employees of this Yard submit arti- 
cles naturally none can be printed. At no time 
should an under current of criticism exist relative 
to a general policy. In time of war such action is 
decidedly unpatriotic. Consequently, it is hoped 
that hereafter if anyone has any criticism to make 
they will make it above board and not in the dark 

A special appeal is herewith issued that the 
employees send in articles of general interest and 
due consideration will be accorded. 



JEST JOKE TREE CHIPS. 



"Money talks." 

"Yes, and all my life I've been a poor conversa- 
tionalist." 



"Muriel feared the girls wouldn't notice her 
engagement ring." 

"Did they?" 

"Did they? Four of them recognized it at 
once." 



Freddy:. "Lookit my collection of stamps, 
Teddy, all o' dem foreign, an' all different." 

Teddy: "Ah, that's nothin', I gotta collection 
— all U. S. stamps, an' all alike." 

Freddy: "They can't be much good." 

Teddy: "They're better'n yours, they're war 
saving stamps." 



He — "Of course, dear, you understand our en- 
gagement must be kept secret?'' 

She — "Oh, yes. I tell everybody that!" 



"Mary, did you water the rubber plant?" 
"Sluire, no, ma'am. I thought it was water- 
proof!" 



"Got an opening for me here?" asked the col- 
lege graduate, walking into the busy man's office. 



"Certainly," responded the employer pleasant- 
ly. "Close it as you go out." 

Conductor — "Madam, that child looks older 
than six years." 

Mother — "Yes, indeed he does conductor. That 
child has had a lot of trouble." 



"Razor hurt you, sir?" asked the energetic 
barber. 

"Not a particle," replied the sarcastic victim 
in the chair, "but the blood running down my neck 
is a little annoying." 



BOAT SHOP. 

After going through another Liberty Loan 
Campaign the Boat Shop has once more come out 
victorious. Jim White took the bull by the horns 
and with a grim determination we went "Over the 
Top." 

Thanks to our Shop Committee for their un- 
tiring efforts in the Third Liberty Loan drive. 

Rumor says that our quarterman is trying to 
initiate Tucker on some fancy inside house decora- 
tions. 

Bill Thompson says he will get a rest now. 

Uncle Ed is talking of going down to Jamaica 
during the next season. 



The Bond Sale now is over and' the cup hangs 

on the wall, 
In the place the Boat Shop placed it when they 

put one over all. 
Now that all is quiet and the Flag is flying high, 
We are thinking of another in the Sweet Bye 
and Bye. 

—Boat Shop Poet. 



Why be a hog? We are NOT! We took the 
bull. 

Our foreman is taking a few days off. We hear 
he is getting in a supply of wood for the coming 
winter. 

We are very glad to hear that our brother 
workmen who volunteered for oversea duty are 
making good. Good luck to them and to our latest 
— J. J. Kennedy — who has enlisted in the Artillery. 



OFFICE NOTES. 

It sometimes pays to be meek and quiet. Na- 
val Constructor Boyd never made a kick, but he got 



Something New in Phonograph 

RECORDS! 

The New 9 INCH 

EMERSON 

DOUBLE DISC 

Always as long as the standard 10 inch records and as smoothly 
DON'T TAKE OUR WORD Come in and hear them for yourself 

PRICE 65c 

ALL THE BIG HITS 

Emerson 7 inch Double Disc Records, 35c, 5 for $1.00 

: ; AT : : 

MONTGOMERY'S 

OPPOSITE POST OFFICE 



SHAW'S CASH MARKET 

Do you want to help win the war? 
Then practice economy with Mr. Shaw. 
Go to his market for fish and meat, 
Eggs and vegetables fresh and sweet. 

His prices are lowest,— cash you must pay 
And carry your bundles home each day 
Excepting orders of four dollars or more 
Which will be carried straight to your door. 



SHAW'S CASH MARKET 

18 PLEASANT ST. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

Formerly CLARK'S BRANCH 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 



1 1 



UK 10 BUOY * 



K icK [ng tor a whlli 



the besl office In Building 81. Commander Wyman pole 

, in ,l Naval Constructor Schlabach Bay they wish When it comes to statistics Mr Collier sure 

other people would follow Boyd's example and Btop has gol boi lope sheets on the high cosl of living, 

Mr si lansen « ho has been rest rlcted to his 

In uiiii ;i severe case of La Grippe has returned 

Commander Palmer looked sad and lonesome to his duties 

,,,, a i, „ days last nth n was due to the de Our would !»■ autoists are having e hard n 

parture m "Red Beauty" alias "The Itockj Moun keeping their gas buggies going; 11 they could onlj 
i, ,,,, Qoat." Bui be Bayi he would nol trade his run mi hoi air wouldn'1 Charley <: the uoiseles 

„, u Franklin vi a his "id "hill climber;" in- one, B«1 ■' lol of tree ride 

,i,,i ,,, i, e Hi,' real Improvements which the The Submarine Drafting Room bowling team 

Prankl i had made in their r.n i ""'' •"" l defeated the Hull Drafting R n team the 

other evening. The series now stands one game 
each and the deciding game will be rolled Monday, 

LUNCH ROOM CRUMBS. w 5 wonder: 

Due i" the chani 1 the length of the work Where Downing gets those cheap clgai 

Ing daj whereby the lunch hour Is now common to n flay has his 'Taters' 1 planted yet? 

all, there Is likely to be so congestion, II I When Care} will move to Dover? 

hoped thai ever) "ill have patienoe regarding ir the mi was a help or a hinderance In the 

i he mal tei ol be er\ ed trip to Porl land " 

ii Coffin or Ki'ni will examine the ford more 

i ually after 12 06 there are- numerous vacant eloselj before the) itarl to crank ii again? 
tabli o thai man) ol those an lou to be erved Who will be the Brsl victim of Snow's new 

without being crowded are ai ked to eal later torcycle? 



Ground wa broke tor the new addition to the r C, Coffin ill ii Klever Ko llan from the 

pre 'in existing re tauranl on May 8th and II Is Sub it. mi inc. Room will make his Initial appear 

thoughl thai the new ad'dltion will be finished sonic B nce before the footlights on Tuesday nighl when 

time in July. he will Btar as end man In the P A C Vllnstrel 

show 

ii is temporarily requested thai all those who rhere promises to be some fun 'ai the Play- 

n ii eating Bhould Immedlatel) r. i \ > • up their place grounds nexl Monda) evening when a i i \ » ■ Inning 

to others who may i"' waiting, The necessity of game of baseball will be played between the Bingle 

this requesl will be,onl) toi a ihorl time and married men of the Submarine Office. Many 

oldtimers will i>" Been In the married men's lineup 

"Seegar & Woodard" requeBl thai all the new and they promise to make ii hoi tor the young fel- 

sir.ns be thoroughl) read and followed lows. Mr Curtis will umpire the game and he ims 

requested fifteen days leave, starting nexl Tuesday. 
ii Is rumored thai Seegar and Woodard have Draftsman: Who ims gol the shears, 

organized a baseball team. The) constitute the Pile clerk Periscope or conning tower, 

batter) and ray the "ins and outs." HOBBIES: 

The raan who is always asking for a cigarette 
(C. i'\ G, i 

SEEN THRU THE PERISCOPE. The Embar «° "" freight, (Ask Lord). 

Gugglsberg rolling on a spare (When he gets 

Mi Preble, the boy with the Iron nerve is en- one) 

Joying a Blxteen days leave of absenoe and is vlail Kenl looking tor his nay check, 

Ing his family In Ann Harbor, Mich. IMPOSSIBILITIES: 

Another service Btar was added to the list of Staten ever becoming a bowler, 

the Submarine Drafting Room when Henry D. Bacon Pinkham ever becoming a good musician, ai- 

Jr. recently enlisted In iii«' U. s. M, C though he tries hard as a whistler. 

Mr. Soheirer's Cadillac is again Been on the H seems peculiar thai Hans Bhould be on the 

highway after being temporarily laid up, owing to slek llsl l ' v, ''>' w,,, ' 1( ,, " <l - »'"ybo there are some at- 

Mr. Guggisberg's futile efforts to avoid a telegraph tractions In Fall River. 



Cook with care on a FLORENCE OIL COOK STOVE 

Save what is left in a BALDWIN REFRIGERATOR 

Buy Them At 

126-128 Market St. THE SWEETSER STORE PORTSMOUTH, N. II. 

A FEW OF OUR SPECIALTIES 

Hart, Schaffner and Marx Clothes, Stetson Hats, 
Manhattan Shirts, Fownes Gloves. Interwoven Stockings 

F. W. LYDSTON & CO. °Z^^ r*7 a 



JOHN SISE & CO. 
INSURANCE 

8 MARKET SQUARE 



PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



A. P. WENDALL & CO. 
Hardware, Paints and Tools 

Telephone 850 
- Markel Square Porta ith, N. II. 



PORTSMOUTH MOTOR MART Inc. 

Cadillac Service Station Used Cars for Sale 

Autos for Hire. Accessories and Supplies 

I'd. 22 and 34. Portsmouth, N. H. 



3&™ML Orderlies c - F - DUNCAN & CO. 

Men's Packard and Rerfal 



Pleasant and Effective 

Laxative Shoes 

BOARDMAN and NORTON 
Druggists 



9 MARKET STREET PORTSMOUTH, IV. II. 

Opposite Posl Office Portsmouth, \. M. •■• i , • 







SAVE FUEL 

By using Electric Appliances for Cooking 
ROCKINGHAM COUNTY LIGHT AND POWER CO. 

29 Pleasant Street Portsmouth, N. H. 

"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE I5UOY." 



L6 



LIFE BUOY 



Mr. Collier has a new assistant in G. M. Clark. 

Our handsome new stenographer has certainly 
made a hit with the boys for when it comes to 
bowling, the stenog. is there strong. 
FROM THE PEN OF I. W. S. 

I like I lie girls in Portsmouth, 

In Dover they are line. 

The girls that live in Kittery, 

And Eliot are devine; 

But the one that took my rainy. 

Ami set my head in a whirl. 

That is the best of them all, boys, 

is a dear old Portland girl. 
We will have to take Lee's word for the above 
as he was there and if all reports are true he sure 
fell hard. 

Why is it that the file clerk keeps the hoys 
wailing so long when they receive a telephone call. 
Better be careful .lack and Charley you know about 
his Irips to Dover, Haverhill and Newmarket. 

It there is anything C. Conlon likes to do it is 
to ride over on the boat with the girls. An unusual 
sight is to see Charley in the midst of a group of 
girls depicting some ol his exploits especially when 
he has been out horseback riding the previous day. 



PATTERN SHOP. 

"ALL UP! !" 
The girls are coming. Hurrah! Hurrah!! 
Challenge to the Submarine Dialling Room 
baseball players: We are glad to hear that you 
have a strong team, but why pick on us. as we have 
none. However, we accept your challenge and shall 
start drafting tor a 'earn immediately. You may be 
sure that we are callable of handling anything you 
put up to us on the diamond, as we are in the shop. 



Cressey says he will show any man in the shop 
how to make a bulling wheel. 



The patternmaker's camp (Camp Lookusup of 
Eliot, .Ale. i has been temporarily turned into train- 
ing quarters lor I). Twitchel] (the human spark- 
plug I and Grapler Jim Nelson. They both claim 
the championship of Kittery. Donald is showing 
great improvement and is perfecting his condition 
by partaking of one quart of milk and six eggs 
daily. Great interest is shown by the fans in these 
two sturdy youths, and it is expected when they 
clinch to be one of the toughest bouts ever shown 
in the east. Although the betting is 10 to S in 
favor of Twitchell, Nelson should not be taken too 
lightly. 



WE WONDER: - 

If Metelli is going to stage a 'Rome i & Juliet' 
ad when he masters his mandolin? 

If Portsmouth is really dry? 

Why the teamsters of this yard charge such 
exhorbitant prices for hauling scrap wood from the 
shops to a fellow-workman's home? 

If the wind couldn't be blown so as to conform 
with the Commandant's weathervane? 

Why it insists in opposing the breezes? 

If Coulter Metelli in the Connor of the Park? 
Why he Locke (d) his Hart against Joy? 

If it Hoyt Gerrish to Neil to Pray when the 
fellows took that Blalk cheese he was Eaton away 
from him and let Hanabury it? 

Why Carl Malmquist wears his hat backwards? 
Possibly it is to signify that he is then going full 
speed. 

What there is about a stern bearing that makes 
the boys wish they had a rush job, when one comes 
up to be lined? 

Why they call Henry and Don "Tanks?" 

Why Parks don't want to get well? 



THEY SAY: — 

That the four men of our shop who are so 
patriotic thai they desire to work ten hours per 
day should be allowed to do so without extra com- 
pensation. 

That Coulter is getting a Lina Joy in his new 
auto. 

That Pernalds apron Fitzgerald. 

That Roston seems to hold quite an attraction 
for Van Ham. 

That Peaslee will fall for anything, but you 
can lead Britton no matter how much you Shield 
him. 

That Twitch is Puller L. 

That one of the boys has but one speed all day- 
Swift. 

That Walter Black is wondering if the new 
n. en c;in play checkers any better than the other 
CellOW s in the shop. 

That the Liberty Bull would have been right 
at home in the corner with Cressey and Niles. We 
list the Bull, but we still have Dick. 

That already the boys in camp are going around 
with lame backs and muscles, and it is plain to see 
that they will need some training before they can 
compete with Doug. Fairbanks. 

That Mr. Hoover is going to visit the camp to 
ascertain just what is becoming of all the food re- 
ceived there daily. By the way, they have phone 
connections there now girls!!. 



U A Penny Saved 
Is a Penny Earned" 

We can help you save a 
good many pennies on 

HOUSE FURNISHINGS 

See Mr. WOOD 



99 Penhallow St., 



Portsmouth, N. H. 



THE "BUSY CORNER" STORE 

BUT OER TOO BUSY 

TO FILL YOUR PRESCRIPTIONS 

AND FILL THEM RIGHT 

OUT OF TOWN PATRONS ARE 

WELCOME TO WAIT FOR THE 

CAR AT OUR HOUSE 

BENJAMIN GREEN 

THE DRUGGIST 
INSURANCE and REAL ESTATE 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 
LOWEST RATES BEST FORMS 

C. E. TRAFTON 



33 Pleasant St. 



Opposite Post Office 



YOU OUGHT TO KNOW 

DENNETT and McCARTHY'S 

IS THE BEST PLACE TO BUY 

OVERALLS, SHIRTS, HOSIERY 



USE GAS FOR 

LIGHTING, HEATING AND COOKING 

PORTSMOUTH GAS CO. 

ALWAYS AT YOUR SERVICE 



Typewriters for Sale and Rent 



JOB PRINTING 

Quick Service on Large Orders 

J. E. DIMICK 

29 Tanner St. Portsmouth, N. H 

Telephone 837 M. 



BROOKS MOTOR SALES 



PORTSMOUTH, 



NEW HAMPSHIKK 



FORD SERVICE 



Flllis BrOS. M en ' s an ^ Boy's Shoes 



Fine Shoe Repairing : 157 congress st. 



TEL. CONN. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 



IS 



UKK BUOY 



Thai the boys bought a now axe and were pre- 
paring to 1 1 1 < ■< - 1 the tuel shortage, until Charlie 
Smith, who is reading "King Spruce" and knows 
all about chopping, gave a demonstration. Now 
i he} don'1 k imu « hich i Ide o£ t he axe to use 



MACHINE SHOP. 

While we don'1 like to complimenl ourseivei 
hi our patriotic spirit we do think thai In subscrib 
Ing [or Hi" third Liberty Loan to the amounl of 
10 iOO.OO a very good showing was made, May 
we do i « Ice as well n< xl time, 

We hear thai Mr George Gillen formerly Lead 
[ngman Machinist at (his yard and al present located 
.11 New Orleans, Is to return to his home in Ports- 
iiMMii h, 

ii was a pleasure to welcome our shopmate 
Ralph Spinney on his return to iiis duties after 
several weeks of serious illness with pneumonia. 
We understand al the present time his heart is 
imw aii, ei, ,1 ami he is enjoying the same Immeni e 
[y, There is a good time coming buys. 

dm Mr, Boulter is to shortly lake up his new 
duties at the Auxiliary Machine simp, Building 95 
His going «iii leave a gap to be filled. 

"Chuck"' Fernald doesn't know whether he 
will occupy his cottage ai Newlngton ihis summer 
or inn . .1 usi ask him a boul ii . 

There will be a special meeting of the <'• A. 
Brigade, Memorial Day, All members and pro- 
spective members will please take notice, if any 
member has not received his notice, he should ap- 
ply iit mice in i he Secretary. 

We are still Inclined to think thai Morton is 
putting something over on us. However, he will 
be forgiven If he can make satisfactory arrange- 
ments with Mark in regards to the celebration 
i hlngs, 

one of our esteemed leadlngmen made a trip 
to Boston six days after the flrsl of May. He says 

I hal it is just the same new. wherever you go. 

William J. M. Hackney passed a few days In 
Manchester recently, renewing old acquaintances. 

Uav says lha! although I he girls down in 
Maine are beautiful, (here is one that he has met 

in old New Hampshire that Is Incomparable. 



We understand thai "Bill" and Ralph are play- 
ing (hi 1 society game very strong, Hill says the 
i.niies like him for his disposition and Ralph says, 
(hey like him for his winning ways. 

"Cleato" and Frank made a run to the Bay 



State recently, to have their timepieces adjusted. 
Ms no job ill all to ad.iusl a watch if you know how 

ii s done 

Kill Puller wasn't satisfied until he could 
stand on the fronl end of an electric car. Must be 

some secret Bill. Whal is i! ozone hours, or society'.' 

Lacking a tew of the acoustics "Bud" makes 

an excellent SUbstitUtl for John Walls. Although 
Wi must say thai Hud has found that there is a 
high gear on the "flivver.'' which .lolin could not do. 



SMITH SHOP. 

Wanted by "Happy" Armstrong a safety device 
to keep the pel cock on a crank case locked. Also 
a Ford i hat will run wii hunt oil- 
Thai new concrete door In front of the office 

is the place to put "your bit" to beat the Kaiser; 
in oilier winds its the place to put finished work. 

We all regrel thai one of our regular "old 
timers" "Uncle" frank Lawry has left us. 



SPAR SHOP. 



We wonder why Bill has spruced up so lately? 

Creased pants and polished shoes. Probably sone- 
one is coming up from Bath to look after him or 
possibly to apply for a job in the office. 



We wonder why Whalley yisits the office so 

frequent ly? 



Black cats sometimes bring good luck. 



spiiier has changed his mind about joining the 
Marines so as to have charge of the prisoners, if 
you don't believe it ask Healey. 



Sid says that he likes to buy Liberty Bonds 

from the ladles. He only boughl six of the third 

issue. 



Kiddie is making money fast, selling wooden 
candy and also sawdust for peanuts. 



SHEET METAL SHOP. 

Strange why all of the single fellows need a 
drink of water just when the check hanger is here. 



Henry Peyser £r> Son 

16 TO 20 MARKET ST. 

For more than forty years Portsmouth's leading Store for Men's and 

Boys' apparel 

KEEP YOUR EYES PEELED; 
YOUR LIPS SEALED; 
YOUR HEART STEELED. 

MARGESON BROTHERS 

VAUOHAN ST. Tel. 570 'PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



FRED B. COLEMAN 

APOTHECARY 
Corner Congress and Vaughan Sts. 



If you desire to buy <>r sell It <■ <i I Estate call, tele' 
plume or write 

II. I. CASWELL AGENC1 

telephone I7a « 



PORTSMOUTH, 



N. H. Congress St. 



Port.Muoulh 




BOO KS On The WAR 

The Best Personal Naratlves 

I In' iiin.sl valuable Histories 

|J, KH . ,V THE ACORN 

\H »i..r!n'i Sc|. Portsmouth, I\. II. 

( The place you not thai fine Stationer v i 

18 Market Sq., Portsmouth 



S. S. TRUEMAN 



GENERAL CONTRACTOR 



TELEPHONE 651 



83 Bow St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



S U G R U E 
Overalls, Tobacco, Pastry 

KITTERY, MAINE 



JOHN O'LEARY 

KITTERY and NAVY YARD EXPRESS 

GENERAL TEAMING 
Tel. Con. Portsmouth, N. H. 

You are cordially Invited to examine our 

COLLEGIAN SLITS FOB GRADUATION 

BOSTONIANS FAMOUS SHOE FOR MEN 

LOUIS ABRAMS and CO. 



3 8-4o Daniel Street 



PORTSMOUTH, N. II. 






Chevrolet Automobiles, The most Sa isiactory Built, Economical. Powerful. Durahle 

CHAS. E. WOODS 

51-60 BOW STREET PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 



20 



LIKE BUOY 



One "I the boys came In one morning, recentlj 
;iii dressed up In a now suii and you could smell the 
perfume all over i he shop. 



Some uniform, Wes, but why drop ii so sud- 
denly? 

New men arc t < .m i iija Cast and il looks as 

though some of the cities were Losing all of their 
hi Ip. 



SiTii in i he Tin i an Journal. 

When ii comes to walking Edw. Payson We ton 
has nothing on i.awson and Robbins since the rat 
Ings were passed around. 

When you get tired, we'll swap over 
Yes! when I do I'll slay home. 



ELECTRICAL SHOP. 

Congratulations are extended to Mrs. Lorenze, 

one of the original thir n who recently became a 

bride. 

Cheer up Francis. You are next. 

We wonder why C. libes to ban::, around the 

a i bOr press. 

The first night J. wore his now snil to NTe'fl 

market he musl have met his Waterloo because we 
haven't hoard anything of the suit, the girl, her 
fat her or Newmarket since. 

Miss Payne, con- popular time keeper started 
,ui with a parly on a fifteen mile hike tor May- 
Rowers. She became entangled in a barbed wire 
fence and when sin- reached home she was lookin ■, 
lor a tailor. 

Always look behind you before you sii down, 

Mary. 

Mac. likes blnc'< and white slripos tor a color 

combination, 

Kittery sewing circle meets every morning at 
7. 1 5 ai bench No. ii. 

George Webber, one of the veteran Are fighters 
of York Village, had the experience of his life when 
one of the girls threw a blazing piece of waste over 
her shoulder and it landed on George's head. 

'no' chairman of our shop committee can 
certainly handle financial matters. 

Some speed to mil sheriff. He asked Tor a lew 

moments off. He left at 8.30 returned at 10.30 and 

brought back his man. In a month he expects to 
paj lor his new eight cylinder "Chevrolet " 

We were sorry to lose Miss Celia Dalresue, 

She resigned on Maj 6th and will take up (arming. 



SHIPFITTERS SHOP. 

It has been rumored that a new lace is lo be 

seen in the Cheney family. Congratulations to the 

fori unate family. 



Little Joe the Shop lx, speed boy, somehow or 
other always manages to be around when the checks 

a iv hung. 



George Williams our popular tool-room man 

says tie believes honestly in Hoover. Consequently 
hi' ho|ies thai hereafter all tools will be returned. 



OUTSIDE MACHINE SHOP. 

II is urged thai waste food etc., be placed in 
I he propel' receptacle. 



Leave ii to the Boat shop for knowing a good 



thing. 



Now I lay me down to sleep, 

While on our lines the Germans creep, 

II' someone doesn't disturb me before 1 wake. 

Perhaps our lines the Huns will take. 



Mr. C. E. Emery, generously donated a thor- 
oughbred Jersey bull calf lor war charity work and 
who should win but the Boat Shop. 



STRUCTURAL SHOP. 

George White our Shop Storeman was married 

last week. Good wishes to Mr. and Mrs. Whit • 
are extended by all the men in the Structural Shop. 

II. It. says thai he wished that cement ha ;s 
weii' never made. We wonder why! 



denial Cill has returned after an extended va- 
cation. Since his return tilings are gliding smooth- 
ly. 



"(Mir Cut" certainly gets his money's worth 
when be buys anything. One need simply to remind 

him of this and he will readily understand without 
hearing a word. 



They say that Clarence when be attends the 
I heal re becomes so absorbed that nothing short of 
a fire would move him. 



Page and Shaw Candies 

Sole Local AfioiiLv 

Adams Drug Store 



ON MARKET ST. 



Portsmouth 



N. H. 



THE PORTSMOUTH FLOWER SHOP 

A. C. CRAIG, Manager 

FANCY CUT FLOWERS 
AGENT VICTOB TALKING MACHINES 

4 Market Street I 'hone 960 

PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



ITS NO USE 

Telling you a long story about advancing prices. 
Vou know as much about it as I do. But 1 want to 
tell you that I have a large stock of CLOTHS, 
bought to secure old yarns and dyes, a! a much 
lower price than they can be found today. If you 
need a SUIT this year BUY IT NOW. 

WOOD, The Tailor 

15 PLEASANT ST. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 




THE ACORN 

18 Market Sq., Portsmouth 

Will if el for you any ! I> or any subject 

4iiid thai promptly 

tt's (he place where they entfraved 
those cards for you 



Go To EVERYBODY STORE 

For your Dress Up and Working Clothes 

We give you the best prices and the 

best service in the city 

Y. M. C. A. BUILDING 
Congress Street Portsmouth, N. H. 



SINCLAIR GARAGE 



HORTON SERVICE 

Corner Richard Ave., and Middle St. 



Portsmouth, N. H. 



O. W. AVERY 

YORK BE4CH 
Real Estate For Sale and to Rent 

If you want to Buy, Sell or Rent Real Estate at York Beach, see me 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 



22 



LIFE BUOY 



PAINT SHOP. 



THE DEVIL RESIGNS JOB. 



Hersom was recently marooned on the Pueblo 
and our veteran mountain climber, B. K. Stewart 
came to hi* rescue 



The men of the Paint simp wish to extend 
their best wishes to Mr. Gregone and his fiancee, 
who has recently become Mrs. Gregone 



■.-. i expected we wound up in our usual 
phuf in the third Liberty Loan race. 



Hanscom or Hersom are on record as being 
quite breezy. Well to cultivate their acquaintanci 
oon for it looks like it might be a hot summer 



Let us all (Pra> i and go over the (Trussell) 
to (Flanders); s» up to the haul.' (Point), make 
a hero Hi' ourselves and we will probably be math 1 
la rgent i 



"THE ALLIES' PRAYER TO GOD. 



God, w e ash Thy guid; 
Against this beast ly foe, 

i ii.ii has ra\ aged poor Belgium — 
And In ill little Serbia low 

w e ash that Thou will help us. 
To down t he beast ly King, 
Who by his bloody proclamation; 
this made all Europe feel I he sting. 

So ibul. give strength to us. 
Who stand on Freedom's sido; 
.May we forever keep the trust 
And fight the battles sido by side. 

And God. in closing, in Thy love reposing, 
Keep our daughters, wives and sweethearts, 
Safe from the beastly hordes, 
Who have transgressed the command of God. 



The l»>'\ il sat by a lake of Hre, 
On a pile of sulphur kegs; 

His load was bowed upon his breast, 
His hands clasped upon his head. 

A look of shame was on his face, 
The sparks dripped from nil 

He had sent up his resignation 
To the throne up in the skies. 

"I'm down and out," the Devil said. 

He saiil it w ith a sob; 
"There are others who outclass me 

And I want to quit my job. 

H — isn't in it with the land 
That lies along the Rhine. 

I'm a 'has been' and 'a nogood' 

And therefore I resign. 

Krupp, the ammunition maker 
With his bloody shot and shell, 

Knows more about damnation 
Than all the Imps of h — . 

Give my job to Kaiser Wilhelm, 

The author of this war. 

He understands it better 

\ million I imes by far. 

I hate to lea\ e Hie old home. 

Tile spot 1 love so well. 
Hut 1 feel that I'm not up-to-datl 

In the art of running h — ." 






Solving The Footwear Problem 

Is made easy by getting your shoes here. We carry standard 
makes that are known to be good — we base our profit at the 
minimum of safety — we stand back of the shoes we sell 

Walk-Overs, Ralstons, Dorothy Dodd.s, " Original " Seoul Shoes 
.Standard Tennis and Outing Shoes 

"MasterCraft" and Morse's Clothes, Arrow Collars, Cheney Ties 
Carter's Overalls 

N. H. BEANE & CO. 

5 Congress Street : 22 High Street 

C. P. CARROLL E. E. WHITEHOUSE 

Grroceries, Meats and Provisions RARRFR 

145 PENHALLOW ST. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

Te!. Connection Near A. S. E. Ferry llp ° ne Fli <* ht °PP' Colonial Theatre 



R. L. COSTELLO 



SEED STORE 



HIGH GRADE SEEDS 

115 Market St. Telephone, 57 

PORTSMOUTH 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 



'I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY." 



WE ARE PREPARED 



To ti'i\e you the bivsl ohlnimiblt' of MHATS, 
FISH and VEGETABLES in season for Cash 

Congress St., ]")]"> /^\W7R TtC W 7f A T"> T>^"T"7'"T" f Tel - 19 * 

Portsmouth, N. II 



, BROWN'S MARKET 



VISITORS AND NEW RESIDENTS 



This bank is always pleased to welcome visit- 
ors and new residents to Portsmouth and to 
afford them every assistance in its power. 

Our banking facilities are cordially placed 
at your disposal and our officers will take 
pleasure in extending prompt and courteous 
attention to your requirements. : : : : 

National Mechanics $ Traders Bank 

1 Congress St. : Portsmouth, N. H. 



PARAS BROTHERS 

FRUIT AND CONFECTIONERY, ICECREAM AND SODA, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

TELEPHONE 29 w CATERING A SPECIALTY 43 CONGRESS street 

A SHORTAGE of CARS 

Buy your OVKRLAND "The Thrifty Car" Now 

Immediate delivery for a short time on Model 90 
Touring and Country Club Models 

C. A. LOWD 

Service Station & tiarage: 338 Pleasant St. & 25-45 Wentivorth 



"1 SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY.' 





NAVY YARD, 
PORTSMOUTH, N.H. 




TO EVERY INDUSTRIOUS MAN 



We will send free to the first one thousand 
men sending us their names and address a 
little handy article that can be carried in the 
pocket and is used almost daily by every 
industrious man in this country: the same to 
be sent by us not later than July 10th and 
possibly July 1st, so get your name in early. 

LOTHROPS-FARNHAM CO. 
Dover, N. H. 

DIRECTLY OPPOSITE THE DOVER TERMINAL OF THE ATLANTIC SHORE LINE R. R. 

LARCEST CLOTHIERS, FURNISHERS AND SHOE DEALERS 
IN SOUTHERN NEW ENCLAND. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 




These delightful summer evenings are positively incomplete 
without music. And why be without it? There is absolutely 
no reason why even those of most moderate circumstances 
should not have that which goes so far to make the home 
happy. 



MUSIC 



IT UPLIFTS, IT INSPIRES, IT INSTRUCTS, 

THERE IS A VICTROLA TO FIT EVERY MANS PURSE 

WK HAVE PIANOS AND VICTROLAS FOR SUMMER RENTAL 

AT REASONABLE RATES 

LET US EXPLAIN OUR DEFERRED PAYMENT PLAN 



HASSETT'S 

115 Congress St. 



MUSIC & ART SHOPPE 

PORTSMOUTH, N. II. 



In Soliciting the Accounts of Individuals, Corporations, Firms, Trustees, 
Guardians and Clubs, we call Attention to the Following Services 

Extended to Depositors: 
Certificates of Deposit 

We issue certificates of deposit where occasion requires the deposit of funds which 
must be kept available for investment. 

A special rate of interest is paid. 
Loans 

Loans are made on acceptable security at current rates. 
Drafts 

We issue drafts on foreign countrys or on other cities in the United States. 
Travelers' Checks 

We issue travelers' checks which are available for use in all parts of the world. 
Coupons and Bonds 

We collect and credit coupons and bonds to the customer's account. 
Custody of Securities 

We receive securities for safe keeping subject to the direction of owner, cut and collect 
coupons, crediting the customer's account. This is a .ureal convenience while a depositor is 
traveling. 
Safe Deposit Boxes and Storage Vaults 

A business fortress for the protection of valubles of corporations, firms and individuals 
is had in our mordern vaults on the premises at low rentals. Special rates for large 
packages and trunks. 
Dividends 

We collect dividends and credit proceeds to customer's account. 
COMMERCIAL AND SAVING DEPARTMENTS. 

FIRST NATIONAL HANK 

PORTSMOUTH. N. H. 
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY A SSETS OVER TWO MILLION DOLLARS 

CONSERVATION and 

THRIFT 

WILL WIN THE WAR 



PATRIOTISM DEMANDS THAT THE CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES 

SPEND LESS and SAVE MORE 



10,000 PEOPLE ARE SAVING THEIR EARNINGS BY THE HELP OF 
OUR INSTITUTIONS. NEW SAVING ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 



PISCATAQUA SAVINGS 1!A\K 

First National Bank Building Portsmouth, X. II. 



INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 
LIFE BUOY 



Issued monthly for free distribution to employees of the Industrial Department of the 
Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H. 



VOL. I 



NO. 6 



THE SUBMARINES WE ARE BUILDING 



[T the present time this Navy Yard is part- 
ly engaged in building submarines. Al- 
though one-third of the force of the yard is 
working on them and all the Navy Yard is 
undoubtedly interested, I doubt if many real- 
ize the special reasons why these particular 
submarines should be of interest to us. 

The history of submarine building and 
design really begins with an American named 
Bushnell who was the first to think out and 
build a submarine that would actually oper- 
ate. In 1776 a British fleet was blockading 
the port of New York. Bushnell conceived 
the idea of breaking this blockade by build- 
ing a small vessel to travel under water and 
with which he could attack these big men-of 
war one by one. So he built the fore-runner of 
our present submarines; in this case a little 
vessel, shaped like two clam shells joined to- 
gether, with a water ballast tank and oars 
and just room enough inside to hold one man. 
In this small craft, which it took good nerve 
to operate, Sergeant Lee of the American 
A, my embarked, submerged, and set out to 
attack the English fleet. 

He actually found his prey, but ill-luck 
pursued him, for he could not attach the mine 
and the tide carried him by the fleet. He let 
go the mine which drifted down and ex- 
ploded near the English ships but did no dam- 
age except to the nerves of those on board the 
latter. Bushnell's submarine would just 
about fit inside the conning tower of one of 
the submarines we are building here now, 
but it was, after all, the start of their design 
a i I building. 



Practically up to the present time, all our 
submarines were designed and built by pri- 
vate contractors. In a few cases submarines 
were built in Navy Yards, but even in these 
cases the plans were purchased from private 
contractors building similar vessels. For all 
other naval vessels the Navy Department pre- 
pared its own designs and there seemed no 
good reason why it should not prepare them 
for submarines as well. As a consequence, 
the work was started and after much study 

the design for Submarine was completed. 

In preparing this design the Navy Depart- 
ment was entering directly into competition 
with the private firms who had been design- 
ing and building submarines for many years. 
To carry this new work right through in the 
Government's hands it was decided to build 
the first boat in a navy yard and Portsmouth 
was selected as the best place. Soon after 
came our entrance into the war and more sub- 
marines of the same type were given the yard 
to build. 

We now have the first great reason for 
doing the best we can in every way on these 
submarines, in good workmanship and in 
speed of work, for in these boats the Govern- 
ment is out to show what it can do in design- 
ing and in building its own submarines in 
competition with private contractors, and it 
is up to us to make these boats a little better 
in every way than any other submarine; 
built in this country. 

The next great reason is the war. Many 
of our submarines have gone abroad already 
and thai is where they are mostly needed. 



LIFE BUOY 



The work of the crew of a submarine is 
neither easy nor very safe and yet crews will 
be ready and waiting for these boats to be 
completed so that they may man them. Here 
at this yard we are not asked to do that, — all 
we are asked to do is to build the boats well 
and to build them fast. Keep this in mind 
and think what a small part we are really do- 
ing in simply providing the means to let 
somebody else go abroad into the dangers of 
the North Sea to stop the German Sub- 
marines. Submarines have proved to be the 
I defence against submarines; in fact 
they are the only offensive weapon known, 
for all surface craft must wait until they are 
attacked before ihey can attack in turn. 
Consequently, if we are to rid the world of 
the German Submarine menace, we must 
build submarines and nice submarines. 

We are then, first, in competition with 
private contractors, and they are all watch- 
ing id and all the Navy i i watching us to see 
what the Government itself can do in the 
way of building submarines. Next, and thi ; 
i -. the most important, we need these boats 
in this war and we need them badly. Let us 
work together and let us do our best so that 
to have worked on these submarines which 
we are now building may be a source of pride 
to us through this war and for a long time to 
come. 

H. S. HOWARD 
Supt, New Construction 
Naval Constructor, U. S. N. 



INFECTIOUS DISEASES. 

The recent outbreak of smallpox in York. 
Maine, brings vividly to our attention the ever in- 
creasing need of watchfulness. In time of war. it 
b ihooves us all to be especially on the alert so that 
ri ithing may develop to hinder us from doing our 
part over here without any interruption. 

Just as a locomotive running smoothly at the 
moment of operation may become useless should 
any fine sand get into the engine bearings so the 
human body even though it is working at its maxi- 
mum efficiency (perfect health) may in a very short 
time become useless should it become subjected to 
an infectious diseas t. 

Germs or bacteria, which cause the destruction 

o) live-: wherever an epidemic visits a community 

cters of persons. For, persons sup- 

r> 

JArt 



posedly to be in robust health are as easily attacked 
as the weakest. 

In this enlightsned age, altogether too many 
fallacies still exist relative to public health matters 
and especially so regarding infectious diseases. 
When an epidemic breaks out altogether too much 
stress is laid upon general insanitary conditions, 
such as foul odors, stagnant pools, dust, garbage 
and in fact anything objectionable that may exist 
in the neighborhood. These views may be said to 
belong to the old school of public health. In the 
new school of public health the causes of epidemics 
of infectious diseases are sought for along three 
de inite lines. The first line is the infected indi- 
vidual; ths second is the routes that caused the in- 
fection, being any one of the following — water, 
food, milk, flies or contact; and the third, the routes 
of infection from the infected individual. 

Infectious diseases are "catching" because of 
tin 1 transmissibility of the minute germs or bac- 
teria from one person to another. That is the dis- 
e i is propagated by direct contact. Infected per- 
sons may cause contamination through their dis- 
i targes, and this is believed by many authorities 
to be the most common way. Germs in the body of 
infected persons multiply exceedingly rapidly and 
can only leave the body by definite routes — the 
body discharge passages. These discharge pas- 
age routes are the mouth, nose, bladder, am! 
bowel. Only when other persons take these dis- 
charges into their noses or mouths do they in turn 
become infected. The ways or routes of infection 
are many. Mouth disch irges laden with harmful 
germs may bs transmitted bj mouth sprays when 
people cough, sing, sneeze, or talk. Moreover, they 
may become transmitted by drinking cups, chew- 
ing gum, chewing tobacco, towels, as well as in 
other ways. Nose discharges may become trans- 
mitted by hand, handkerchief, or sneezing. Blad- 
der and bowel discharges are carried by hands, flies 
and other ways. 

Hands are the great carriers of disease. Con- 
equently, hands cannot be too frequently washed. 

Mouth discharges in the way of sputum when 
expectorated on floors, sidewalks, and streets may 
be transmitted by being carried to the home on 
i a calamity if your own creeping baby 
should become infected. It is hoped that ultimately 
a universal law will prevail prohibiting the expect- 
orating cf sputum. The handkerchief should al- 
ways U i used it a spit kit or a spittoon is not avail- 
b 

The chief infectious diseases as found in the 
temperate zone of the I'nited State; are Diptheria, 

Of D. 



19 l?£3 



LIFE BUOY 



6 



Scarlet Fever, Smallpox, German Measles, Whooping 
Cough, Chickenpox, Typhoid Fever, Tuberculosis, 
Trachoma, Cerebrospinal Meningitis, Syphilis and 
Gonorrhea. Of these the last tour diseases are 
transmitted by contact, and the others by milk and 
contact. Typhoid Fever and other intestinal in- 
fections such as Dysentery are carried mainly by 
flies, milk, water, food and contact. Consequent- 
ly, it is seen that contact may cause all diseases, 
milk many, whereas water and food carry only the 
intestinal infectious diseases. 

Contact is the main route by which infectious 
diseases may be transmitted among employees of 
thisYard. Under no circumstances should sputum 
be expectorated on floors. Spit kits have been 
placed throughout each workshop and should be 
made use of. 

When an employee feels the symptoms of 
sneezing manifesting themselves recourse should 
immediately be made to the use of a handkerchief. 
As before stated mouth sprays are thrown out in 
coughing, singing and talking. 

In order to prevent the spread of an epidemic 
it is not necessary to close down the Yard or any 
i id vidual shop. Germs or Bacteria have no eyes, 
neither can they fly, but they do propagate rapid- 
ly. The living body is the best abode, for there the 
germs find plenty of water, the right atmosphere, 
food, temperature, and darkness. When germs 
leave the body the sunlight and drying effect soon 
kill them. Disease germs are carried from an in- 
fected person to one not infected chiefly by dis- 
charges from the mouth, nose, bladder and bowels. 
The dscharges are carried or exchanged by sputum, 
hands and mouth-spray. Consequently, it is use- 
less to shut a shop or group of shops down in order 
to insure the blocking of the spread of an epidemic. 

In summarizing, it is our hope that by pointing 
out these things, the employees of this Yard will 
hereafter govern themselves accordingly with the 
result that sorrow and sickness may be less preva- 
lent. 



THE NAIL HAZARD. 

A little nail, like a little knowledge, is often 
a dangerous thing. A few nails, driven through 
a couple of boards, may be entirely harmless, but 
when the boards are torn apart the points of the 
nails are often left projecting from one of them, and 
here is where the dangerous element enters. If the 
boards are cast aside, they most always fall, with 
tlic usual perversity of inanimate things, so that 



the points of the nails stick upward. 

Projecting nails are met with everywhere. 
They cause many injuries, and the wonder is that 
they do not cause more. Boxes and barrels that 
have been hastily opened are frequently left with 
the covers only partly removed, and the nails that 
held the covers are seldom drawn out or hammered 
down. The nail hazard is especially marked in 
building operations, where scaffolds and other sim- 
ilar temporary structures are used. After these 
have served their purpose, the materials of which 
they are built are thrown carelessly aside without 
giving attention to the projecting nails they con- 
tain. In industrial plants of all kinds the nail 
hazard is also serious, and some manufacturing con- 
cerns report that fully seven per cent, of their ac- 
cidents are caused by nails. The danger from nails 
is, therefore, important, and attention should be 
given to the best means of eliminating it. 

The soundest and best thing to do is to ed- 
ucate the men who are responsible for leaving nails 
in the boards. Teach them the importance from a 
safety standpoint of pulling the nails out. or bend- 
them over, and hammering their points in in a 
proper manner. This is no great task, and if all the 
nails are pulled out or properly bent over, the 
danger is removed. It is the safest, of course, to 
remove the nails entirely, and the next best thins 
is to hammer them in. but if they are bent over and 
hammered down, the work should be done in the 
right way. A nail bent so that its point remains a 
quarter of an inch or an eighth of an inch above the 
level of the board is still dangerous, because it is 
likely to tear the flesh of an employee who has oc- 
casion to handle the board or other object from 
which the nail projects, or who may brush against 
it in passing. A nail-point thus treated is also 
likely to catch in the sole of the shoe and cause a 
serious fall, and if the end of the nail stands up by 
as much as a quarter or a half of an inch, there is 
danger of the point entering the upper or soft leath- 
er of the shoe. 

In bending and hammering down a nail, a 
quarter of an inch or so of the pointed end should 
first be turned over at right angles, by means of 
pincers, pliers, or the claw of a hammer. The body 
of the nail then is bent over and hammered down, 
so that the pointed end enters the wood. All danger 
is then removed. 

Another prolific source of accidents is the leav- 
ing of nails in the staves or hoops of a barrel, after 
the head has been removed. The act of knocking 
in the head tends to turn the point of the nail down- 
ward, and as a person removes the contents of the 
barrel, he is quite likely to have his hand or arm 



LIFE BUOY 



lacerated. In a ease of this kind, the nails can 
sometimes be pulled out without loosening the 
hoops or destroying the unity of the barrel, but it 
is often necessary to leave some of the nails in 
position and care should then be taken to see that 
they are properly bent and that their points are 
firmly imbedded in the wood. 

An injury from a nail should receive immediate 
medical attention and treatment, because septic 
material is likely to be carried Into the wound by 
the nail. Particles of shoe leather or hosiery, or 
germ laden matter of other kinds, are often Intro- 
duced in this way. and unless these are removed or 
sterilized, trouble is likely to follow. Where the 
wound is properly treated, it will usually heal in 
B short time, but blood poisoning or lockjaw is like- 
ly to follow if the wound is neglected, and where 
either Of these occurs, loss of life of limb is a pos- 
sible result . 

TRAVKLKRS INSURANCE CO. 



EFFICIENT PATRIOTISM. 

As the war goes on, it is to lie expected that 
many Of us will from time to time wonder it' the 

world has really forgotten the value of human life. 
Consequently each one of us should wink to the 

end thai civilization, liberty, our lives and our 

homes may be preserved. 

That the boys In the trenches are doing their 
share cannol be denied. The question is: Are we 
backing them as we should;are we giving our most 

efficient work; are we preserving our health and 
ood morals, and are we subscribing generously to 

the various war'ionns and charity work? if sh 

I ne of US can answer "Yes," he or she is doing all 

that can be expected at the present time. 

in order to perform our daily work efficiently, 

it is necessary to gel the proper amount of sleep. 
to eat wisely, and to train ourselves to be careful. 
Just how many hours sleep is necessary for any in- 
dividual person is difficult to say. but at least eight 
hours is a safe basis to work on. As for the food 

question, mucb can be written, it is unwise to eat 

too little and equally as unwise to eat too much. 

Moreover, If a person eats too much, be or she is 
committing an unpatriotic act. Here again dlscre 

lion must be relied upon. To train ourselves to be 
. ireful is not a hard task but many make it so. 
due reason that so many accidents are happening 
may be attributed to the fact that the habit of care- 
lessness has been allowed to gain too strong a 

foothold. An accident to an employee engaged In 
work incidental to pushing the war through to a 



proper and speedy end counts just as much as an 
accident or wound to a soldier at the Front. For, 
without our industrial workers we cannot hope to 
keep our boys at the Front supplied with guns, 
ammunition, food, clothing, medicine, as well as 
means of transportation. We must, therefore, 
train ourselves to be careful, efficient, ablebodied 
men and women, striving to do our allotted task 
just a little better than we have ever done before 

We should always be on the watch to extend a 
hand of help to the new man on the job so that he 
may also become an additional valuable asset to 
his country. 

As we come to the question of preserving our 
health and good morals, it is well recognized that 
a very subtle issue is reached. The arousing of 
everyone of us to the proper understanding of our 
share In protecting our soldier boys from diseases 
due to vice is a task that is difficult. However, it 
must be met and an entirely different attitude must 
be taken ill I be future if this question is to lie pro- 
perly dealt with. 

Education and warning must enter the homes 
of the innocent for the protection of our boys now 
already in the army and for those who may have to 

enter, 

According to the statement Of a special cor- 
lespondent of The levelling Sun, there are only 500 
men Of the 500,000 American soldiers In France in 
hospitals with ailments due to vice. This is the 
best record of any army in history. With such facts 
at hand, mothers and fathers, brothers and sisters 

need not worry about any evil Influences that the 

soldier boys may have In meet, once in (lie army 
and abroad The more important question is that 

the danger is not in the army but in the city, 

not so much in France as right in our own industrial 
towns and country villages. As Bishop Lawrence 

of Massachusetts has so well said, "it is time that 

the lid be Off and men and women meet this problem 
as they have met diphtheria and I nberciilosis. Of 

course there is a difference. The fln?er of scorn 

will point at the victims. Doctors cannot report 
their cases to the public. We are not an army No, 
we are not: inn must we therefore do nothing and 

continue to poison our army? Hut If people begin 
to talk about such things it will lead to impro- 

priet les. 

'People are talking. You are talking I am 
talking Our boys and girls are talking The stage 
is talking. Why not come out into the open and 
let the talk be healthy, sane, medical and practical." 

The Medical Departments of the Army and 
Navy are ready to give tacts so that the conditions 
of society In relation to the Army or Navy may be 



LIFE I'.UOY 



s 



properly viewed and Btudled. This is a w u quea 
nun as \ i t :i l as guns, ammunition, ships, Cood and 
tuel. ir we are to support the Army and Navy and 
win Hiis war. there Mas got in be a tremendous 
cleaning up of ourselves, our own neighborhoods, 
our Btreets and theatres, our hotels and Bummer 
resorts. Last but not least, our buys, when they 
iId come back, are going to demand i be s thing 
as well as mans- other vital questions of right ious 
ii\ in". \\ in not start now and set I he first sc me 
so that when the boys do come bach the play may 
i he more re idily go on to a complete finish? 



SECOND KKI) CROSS WAR FUND. 

The s 'I'liini it ■ I it" appeal was answ ered 
nobly throughout the country and In such a man 
ncr that the tender, brooding heart of the "Great 
est Mother In the World" should be comforted 
once aga In 

The appeal was carried Into practically everj 
American home and today the \m irican Red Cro 
i ; i ii<' targe I organization of any kind In the world 
and ill reatest Corci tor good For the millions 
of dollars will be spent In succoring the stricken 
nations; In ministering to the soldiers In sickne 
and death and Inspiring them with greater courage 

Cash 



and holier purpose. In addition, the Red Cross 

ii food, i i"i iiin.-.. bed i, Btores and other sup 

plies i" the stricken and devastated cities and \ii 
la . 

To those who care to study the details of how 
each penny has been Bpent, It may !»■ stated that 
printed statements covering all War Fund appro 
prlatl n are obtainable from Chapter chairmen. 

in ie MM i ■ « ere offered by t he Assoclat Ion 
of Quartermen and Leadlngm'en of ihis yard to !»• 
given in Hi:' three representatives of the divisions 
receiving the largest percentage of subscriptions 
tor their respective divisions. The first prize, a 
coffee percolator, was won by Mr, J. M. Flanagan, 
who had charge of the Clerical Division; the sei 
mill prize, a clock, was won by Mr. II. C. Moody, 
who represented the Sail Loft; and the third prize, 
b lafety razor, was won by Mr. .1 B Colliton of the 
i Ira ii in!'. I ii\ i lion 

in addition to these prizes, a pig donated bj 
Mr Horace vlitchell ol Kittery was raffled off. The 
sum of $173.35 was realized from the sale of the 
pig tickets and this amount was credited to the 
Spar Shop, Cor a member of i ins simp Mr. i \t 
Schurman was the lucky winner. 

The following table Is the Anal c pilation of 

tin' official standing and subscriptions of each simp: 







Collect Ion i 


Sub script ion 


Allotment 1 


'ercent age 


1 


Clerical Force 


$ 109.79 


' 13.79 


,6 nn 


91.3 


2 


Sail Loft 


6 1 mi 


US. on 


76 nn 


89.5 


3 


i h-a n ing Force 


1 43.00 


: . 1 no 


467.00 


75.8 


1 


Supply Department 


6 10.07 


750.00 


1003.00 


, i , 


e 


lOst i malm's 


28.50 


1 36.00 


1 96.00 


69.4 


6 


Boat simp 


278.00 


. r i2 7.ln 


880.00 


59 'i 


7 


Paint simp 


119.78 


Kin. ns 


'.. 


i8 3 


8 


Smelting riant 


1 ■ ,n 


62.25 


1 1 2.00 


15 6 


9 


Elec Workers Out. i No. 89 i 


1ST 16 


!9 I 'I 1 


i 


5 t . 5 


to 


Boiler simp 


1 II 1 llll 


1 I : 


247.00 


18.2 


1 1 


Power Plant 


1 2 l nn 


1 12.00 


332 nn 


42.8 


1 2 


Pattern simp 


78.00 


96.00 


130 nil 


1 1.7 


13 


Machine Simp ( No. 80 i 


6 : , 15 


si 1.55 


1976.00 


1 I.I 


1 1 


Spar simp 


5 10 M 


476.23 


1 180.00 


in l 


l .i 


Elec Machine simp < No. 79 i 


123.04 


825.00 


■ i 05.00 


19 


1 1; 


Sheet Metal Shop 


247.00 


109.50 


800.00 


38.7 


17 


Joiner simp 


21 .Vim 


256.00 


69 1. 00 


36 :i 


1 s 


Machine simp < No. 89 i 


280.56 


380 56 


1 039 nn 


36.6 


1 9 


Smith simp 


1 12.00 


1 42 00 


1 1 Inn 


: l i; 


20 


Shipfltters' simp 


, 18 60 


7.28 


10 .ii nil 


;.: n 


2 1 


Laborers and Riggers 


i 16 sn 


174.80 


., 1 1 nn 


32.5 


22 


F nli i 


2 | i .,n 


3 1 1. 00 


1077.00 


31.9 


23 


Public Works Shop 


492.32 


192.32 


1821 mi 


27.il 


2 i 


Tra n portal Ion simp 
Total 


52 ..'i 


37.00 


■J. 


1 8 . ■'■ 




$(1051.71 


$81 98. 50 


19 '1 l.iiii 


16.8 



LIFE BUOY 



NEW RIVET-DRIVING RECORDS. 

Figures just reported to the Emergency Fleet 
Corporation show speed records in rivet driving 
rapidly mounting. Since the widely published re- 
cord made by a riveter named Schools at the Haiti- 
more Dry Dock & Shipbuilding Co. plant, a few 
weeks ago, in driving 2720 %-inch snap rivets in 
the floors of an 8800-ton steamer in a nine-hour 
day. B larger number of rivets was driven in a 
shorter day at the Kearny plant of the Federal Ship- 
building Co. On April 26 Edward Gibson and gang 
drove 2919 rivets in eight hours, or 3 5 an hour. 
Not long before, a remarkable performance on 
countersunk shell rivets was made at the American 
Shipbuilding Company's Buffalo yard, when 'JOSH 
rivets of %-inch diameter were driven in 8% hours. 

Two new figures reported to the Emergency 
Fleet Corporation surpass those quoted by a large 
margin, though one of these is shop-rivet work. M. 
K. Knox and gang drove over 4000 rivets on ship 
floors in the fabricating shop of the Northwest 
Steel Company at Portland. Oregon. Of these 3865 
wen' 9& -inch rivets and 224 were 7 s -iiu'h rivets. 
In addition two rivets were cut out, so that the of- 
ficial figure is 4091 rivets. The total working time 
was nine hours. On hull work C. Knight, at the 
Baltimore Dry Dock Company's yard, using a 
double gang — two holders, two passers, two heaters 
and two rivet boys — drove 4875 % -inch rivets in 
nine hours. 

ReCOrd8 are being broken every day. it is said 

at the office of the Emergency Fleet Corporation. 

— Engineering News- Record. 



war . It is the same spirit which drove through 
the ooze at Hog Island tens of thousands of piles 
under the hands of rival crews. Similar enthusiasm 
gradually will spread through all our war industries 
and will be sorely felt by the enemy in due time. 
We need not worry seriously about American labor 
when it originates such competitions and feels the 
fire they kindle. 

CINCINNATI TIMES-STAR 



MAKING WORK A SPORT. 

Charles Knight, an American negro, is the first 
winner of the Nort luliffee prize of $125 for the 
best score above previous records in the driving of 
ship rivets. This husky toiler hammered home 
1ST'' red-hot bolts in a single working day. setting 

a mark which has started International competition 
afresh 

Tin' sporting spirit in our shipyards and boil- 
er factories is something new in history. It will be 
particularly valuable at this time in speeding up 
production. American labor has caught the spirit 
of the tiling and has issued an international chal- 
lenge, Directed to their British competitors, the 
challengers say. "Gangs in every American ship 

yard now are working to add one or more rivets 
an hour to an average gang output. Five addition- 
al rivets per gang per hour means building one more 
sieel treighter of 10,000 tons in ten weeks." 

That is the driving impulse which will win the 



CLEANLINESS. 

It has been noted that some of the Yard em- 
ployees are very careless in regard t<> 'lie cleanli- 
ness of their clothing and person. Cleanliness of 
one's person and surroundings are just as essential 
to health as fresh air and good food. 

The face, head, neck and hands should be 
washed every morning and the scalp should be 
washed twice a week. The hands should be washed 
before each meal and after each visit to the toilet 
Those engaged in occupations which soil the body 
and clothing should bathe as frequently as neces- 
ary. Bathing promotes the functions of the skin 
by cleaning the openings of the sweat glands as well 
as freeing the openings of the sebacious glands 
whose secretions oil the skin and prevent it from be- 
coming hardened and rough. Bathing also removes 
dirt and germs which abound on the skin. The 
hitter may cause boils, carbuncles and in the case 
oi wounds, may cause severe infections even in the 
most trivial wounds. 

Every man should have his own towel and 
change it frequently instead of using one in com- 
mon with others, as it is well known that a number 
of infections may be transmitted in this manner 
such as [tch, skin diseases, gonorrheal infections, 
syphilis, etc. 

In a report of the sanitary conditions of the 
Portsmouth Yard made several months ago by 
surgeons of the I' S. Public Health Service the fol- 
lowing appears in substance ".Maintenance of self 
respect requires that a workman Should have his 
overalls or working clothes washed occassionally. 
So long as there is no one to suggest the necessity 
for a change, he is likely to use the same working 
clothes for a long period of time. As a result, faces 
and hands become begrimed more readily than 
otherwise because the hands when rubbed on the 
overalls find more dirt to carry away." 

This report makes the following remarks 
about another unhealthy practice existing in this 
Yard: "Promiscuous spitting. If. as many auth- 
orities believe, promiscuous spitting on the floors 
of workrooms may spread disease, it would appear 
that the Portsmouth Navy Yard is m danger of an 



LIFE BUOY 



10 



epidemic. There is scarcely a building in the Yard 
it: which promiscuous spitting is not carried on by 
employees. Stairways and walls suffer in par- 
ticular. Fresh marks of tobacco juice and purulent 
cose and throat secretions vie with each other in 
marring the buildings and contributing to possible 
ill health of employees." The above quoted remarks 
are not pleasant reading nevertheless they are true. 
Such diseases as diptheria and tuberculosis are 
transmitted by this unnecessary and Insanitary 
practice and it is to be hoped that future inspec- 
tions of the Yard will not call for such criticism. 

P. M. FURLONG 
Medical Inspector, U. S. N. 



HEALTH ZONE. 

The plans for the establishment of a "Health 
Zone" in the vicinity of the Portsmouth Navy Yard 
are being gradually worked out through the co- 
operation of officials of the U. S. Government, 
the states of Maine and New Hampshire, as well as 
the officials of the cities and town to be included in 
l he zone. 

II is thought that the work will be in charge of 
an officer of the United States Public Health Ser- 
\ Ice assisted by such inspectors as may be necessary. 
The officers of the Public Health Service are experts 
in sanitation and are doing valuable work in I he 
vicinity of our large army cantonments. 

The proposed plans will not interfere with the 
present health organization of the various towns in 
the zone but will supplement their efforts. By these 
means contagious diseases will be under control 
and other faulty conditions considered to be detri- 
mental to the health of all within the zone will be 
corrected. 

The headquarters of the zone will undoubtedly 
be located in Portsmouth. N. H. 



The U-Boats have failed to starve England or 
France; they have failed to stop the transportation 
of American troops over seas, because British, 
French and American men of war have established 
and maintained an oversea patrol that has gone 
far toward reducing the pest of the sea. 

By striking on this side of the Atlantic with 
their U-Boats, in the effort to paralyze American 
Shipping, military ami commercial alike, the enemy 
hopes to divert attention from U-Boat failures to 
realize German hopes off I he French and British 
coasts, by raising German hopes in respect of oper- 
ations in the American Atlantic. Here also Ger- 
man hopes will be short-lived. The chief effect of 
the U-Boats close at hand will not be military, but 
psychological. Their depredations will stir the 
American spirit to a new awakening, but they will 
not stop the transportation of American troops to 
the theatre of war. Some ships have been sunk, 
others probably will be. A transport may be among 
the number, but the U-Boat warfare will be checked 
"over here" as it has been checked "over there." 
II is only a question of time, and we can depend 
upon our Navy to cut the time short. 



THE ENEMY OFF OUR COAST. 

The best evidence that we are getting into the 
war witli both feet is to be found in the reports of 
the operations of an unknown number of German 
t Boats off our Atlantic coast. Ever since General 
March became chief of staff we have been rushing 
troops over seas as fast as we could find ships to 
take them. They are going daily by the thousands, 
trained, ball-trained and some of them considerably 
less than hall-trained, but they are going ami they 
will be trained in England and France. It is an 
emergency which was foreseen and a resort to em- 
ergency measures is therefore necssary. How to 
stop their going is the problem put up to the enemy. 



SAFE USE OF HAND TOOLS. 

Although many operations formerly performed 
by hand are now accomplished by machinery, there 
still remain many operations that require the use 
of hand tools. Among those found in machine 
shops are riling, chipping, benchwork in general and 
blacksmithing. Many persons think that accidents 
only occur incidental to work performed around 
moving machinery, but contrarily a large propor- 
tion of injuries in machine shops result from the 
use of hand tools. 

Hand tools, although they appear to be quite 
harmless, cause many accidents and all such ac- 
cidents may be directly traced to personal careless- 
ness or neglect. Leaving tools lying about promis- 
cously, the mishandling of tools, as well as the neg- 
lect of keeping them in good condition, are all forms 
of carelessness that cause trouble sooner or later. 
When files are used employees should see that all 
tiles are provided with handles and that the handles 
are always tightly attached to the tang of the tile. 
Under no circumstances should a file be used with- 
out a handle. When tightening a Hie by pounding, 
the metal part of the tile should always lie grasped, 
instead of the handle. 

There are two ways of using a wrench — a 
wrong way and a right way. Wrenches should al- 
ways he pulled in such a direction that the pull on 
the handle tightens the jaws, thus ensuring a tight 



11 



LIFE BUOY 



grip of the jaws in the nut. Never use a monkey 
wrench as a hammer. It" the wrench is so used, the 
jaws or the adjusting screws may be damaged so 
that the wrench when again used does not perform 
its duty and bruised knuckles may result. 

Altogether too frequently are hand tools used 
where the heads are worn, burred or mushroomed. 
When such defective tools are used, flying spalls 
or burrs are likely to fly and inflict cuts and bruis- 
es. Should a flying particle strike the eye of an 
employee, permanent injury or even the total loss 
of sight may result. Consequently it is recom- 
mended that punches, chisels and other similar 
tools be properly dressed should the heads in any 
way become burred. 

Split handles and handles insecurely fastened 
to hammers should be replaced by sound handles 
which in turn should be rigidly fastened. 

Broken and bent tongs are unsafe and before 
being used they should be repaired or put in a safe 
condition. 

Whenever an employee is bruised, cut or in any 
way injured, even though the same may appear in- 
significant, he should immediately go to the Dis- 
pensary and be properly treated. Serious cases of 
blood poisoning are often developed from trivial 
injuries. 



silverware and then slide his tray along a foot-wide 
tray-resting board. Meat and vegetables will be 
served first, then the desserts, and finally coffee, 
milk and beverages. By that time the diner comes 
to a point where he is ready to leave the serving 
table and come back to the main dining hall. 
Before leaving, he passes a point where his ticket 
is punched. 

The exit is at a point where the new addition 
meets the former existing restaurant and where a 
cashier will receive payment for amount of food 
eaten. 

One half of the present restaurant space will 
be given over to the new kitchen layout and serv- 
ing table arrangement and the other half to a 
special room for the officers and clerical force. The 
entrance to this room will be by a special door, and 
a special serving table place will be provided. 

The space made available by moving the kitch- 
en will be used as a pastry and preparing room. 

The new addition will be 76 feet 6 inches long 
and SO feet wide and will have a monitor roof some 
24 feet high. When completed there will be ap- 
proximately four times the present available floor 
space. 



NEW RESTAURANT 

The time is rapidly approaching when the pre- 
sent congested condition of our Yard Restaurant 
will be materially relieved, for the new addition is 
nearing completion. 

The new addition was carefully designed rela- 
tive to sufficient light, good ventilation and maxi- 
mum seating capacity and quick service. In ad- 
dition, the end of the new extension for a width of 
thirteen feet, has been given over to a stage with 
its contiguous dressing rooms and lavatories. When 
completed, a total seating capacity of over 500 per- 
sons will be provided. The chairs and tables will 
be designed so that they may be easily removed 
when occasions arise to use the dining room for 
theatrical performances, lectures and other meet- 
ings. 

A double cafeteria plan was followed in design- 
ing the layout, whereby two lines are formed at a 
point most remote from the serving places. In 
other words, the entrance will be at the eastern- 
most part of the new addition. The diners as they 
enter will form two lines, one line moving along the 
south side of the addition and the other along the 
north side past the stage. Each diner when he ar- 
rives at the proper point will pick up a tray and his 



NEW DISPENSARY ADDITION. 

It is expected that the new addition to the Yard 
Dispensary will be ready for service some time in 
July. When completed and equipped it will be dif- 
ficult to find another Dispensary its' equal. 

The present Dispensary building is forty feet 
long and thirty-five feet wide and is three stories 
high. The new addition will be of equal height and 
width but forty-seven feet long, making a total 
length of eighty-seven feet in all. The present ex- 
isting dispensary building will be connected to the 
new addition by a main corridor in the first floor. 

On the first floor of the new addition are locat- 
ed the following rooms: An examining room, a sur- 
gical dressing room, an operating room, a waiting 
room and a ward room with connecting lavatory. 
The surgical dressing room will be connected by 
suitable passage to the operating room so that in re- 
ality these two constitute one large room. The oper- 
ating room will be equipped with the very latest 
scientific devices, and one of the most important 
features will be the method of light distribution. 

The second floor of the new addition will be 
given over to the general hospital corps room, a 
senior medical room, a special room for sick women 
or officers, a Directors' or Board room, and a lava- 
tory. The lavatory will be connected by a passage- 
way to a bathroom where shower baths and other 



LIFE BUOY 



12 



equipment will be found. 

On the third floor will be found the chambers 
and bathrooms for the hospital corps. 

The first floor of the present Dispensary will 
be fitted out somewhat differently than the present 
arrangement. In this section will be found the 
pharmacy room, a room for records, an office, a 
reception room and a medical store room. 

In the new addition there will also be available 
a fine basement and the space will be given over to 
a venereal treatment room and general storage 
rooms. 

The new building is of brick and of colonial 
style architecture. The approach to the new addi- 
tion is indeed unique, for there is a French window 
with a balcony reminding one of the "Romeo and 
Juliet" types. 

When put into service the employees of this 
Yard may truly consider themselves fortunate, for 
it will be one of the most finely finished and equip- 
ped dispensaries to be found in any of our Navy 
Yards. 



AN INDIAN STORY. 

President Wilson some time back related the 
following to an audience gathered to hear a Red 
Cross appeal: 

"I heard a story told the other day that was 
ridiculous but it is worth repeating because it con- 
tains the germ of truth. An Indian was enlisted 
in the army. He returned to the reservation on a 
furlough. He was asked what he thought of it. 
He said, 'No much good, too much salute, not much 
shoot.' Then he was asked 'Are you going back?' 
'Yes.' 'Well, do you know what you are fighting 
for?' 'Yes, me know fight to make the whole damn 
world safe for democratic party.'" 

Evidently the Indian misunderstood some inno- 
cent sentence of the President, nevertheless he hit 
the nail on the head for what he really meant to say 
was to make the whole world democratic in the 
sense of community of interest and of purpose. 



THE AMERICAN'S CREED. 

1 believe in the United States of America as a 
Government of the people, by the people, for the 
people; whose just powers are derived from the 
consent of the Government; a democracy in a re- 
public; a sovereign nation of many sovereign states; 
a perfect union, one and inseperable, established on 
those principals of freedom, equality, justice, and 
humanity, for which American patriots sacrificed 
their lives and fortunes. 



I therefore believe it is my duty to my country 
to love it; to support its Constitution; to obey its 
laws; to respect its flag; and to defend it against all 
enemies. 

— WILLIAM TYLER PAGE 



EDITORIALS 

Failure usually teaches a more valuable lesson 
than success. 

A rule in the Battle of Life — No man is de- 
feated until he acknowledges it himself. 

A man's purpose, like a rudder, though out of 
sight, keeps him straight. 

Some of life's worst bumps are when we tumble 
to ourselves. 

"We must realize to the full how great the 
task is and how many things, how many kinds and 
elements of capacity and service and self-sacrifice 
it involves." 

— WOODROW WILSON 

This is our opportunity to demonstrate the ef- 
ficiency of a great democracy." 

—WOODROW WILSON 

"America's safety. America's ideals, America's 
rights are at stake. Democracy and liberty 
throughout the world depend upon America's valor, 
America's strength, America's fighting power. We 
can win and save the world from despotism and 
bondage only if we pull together. We cannot pull 
apart without ditching the train. Let us go forward 
with unshakable purpose to do our part superlative- 
ly. Then we shall save America, restore peace to a 
distracted world and gain for ourselves the coveted 
distinction and just reward of patriotic service 
nobly done." 

-W. G. McADOO 



SHIPBUILDING ACCIDENTS. 

Due to the present situation in which we find 
ourselves, namely, that of speeding up production 
so that our ships may the more quickly be put into 
service, we know that more accidents are likely to 
result than if we were working under more normal 
conditions. However, if the following recommenda- 
tions are observed by all employees, our accident 
list is sure to lessen. 

Accidents from falling objects are of frequent 
occurence. Bolts, drift pins, wrenches, hammers, 
planks and various other tools and materials are 
often displaced or accidently dropped. Moreover, 
the vibration resulting from riveting and hammer- 
ing cause things lying around promiscuously to fall 



13 



LIFE BUOY 



below where other employees may be working. It 
is asked that all employees working around the 
construction of ships take special care to see that 
tools are not left lying around carelessly. 

If dangerous conditions such as insecure scaf- 
folding are noticed they should be Immediately re- 
ported to the foremen in charge, or a note left at 
the office of the Safety Engineer. 

The platform planks of ship stagings are not 
secured at their supports so that the constant vi- 
bration may cause the planks to shift or "creep'' 
whereby dangerous positions may result. 

Cuts due to handling of steel plates with sharp 
it ragged edges, linger bruises and lacerations from 
hammer blows are quite common. When such ac- 
cidents occur to employees, they should immediate- 
ly go to the Dispensary for treatment. 

The most common injuries are the eye injuries 
and whenever an employee gets anything into his 
eves he should go to the Yard Dispensary Immedi- 
ately and have it removed. Under no circumstances 
should an employee ask a fellow employee to remove 
anything from his eye, for such a proceeding is 
dangerous. Many cases are on record whereby 
workmen losl their sight because of such gross 
carelessness. 

Safety goggles may be procured from your 
foreman upon application. The goggles purchased 
by this Yard are purchased according to the most 
rigid specifications. These specifications were 
drawn up by the Safety Engineers working with 
representatives of the Bureau of Standards and only 
allow the best and safest goggles to be purchased. 
It is hoped I hat each employee will procure a set 
Of safety goggle's and wear them continually, 



WOODWORKING HAZARDS. 

As in all other departments, the careless and 
inexperienced employees are the ones most fre- 
quently Injured. 

The clothing worn by the employees of wood- 
working departments is of great importance if ac- 
cidents are to be reduced appreciably. Loosefitting. 
torn or ragged garments or unbuttoned coats or 
jumpers cause numerous accidents 

Splitter knives have or are being attached to 
all circular saws and should not be removed ex- 
cept in special cases. Sawyers should not stand in 
a direct line with the saw, for "kick-backs," caused 
by saws becoming pinched or striking knots or 
cross-grained sections of the wood, occur occasion- 
ally. 

The cleaning around of moving saws, or the 
brushing off the tables while the saws are in motion. 



is dangerous. Cleaning, oiling or repairing of any 
part of a machine should never be done while the 
machine is in motion. 

Shaper knives should be carefully and securely 
fastened to their spindles to prevent them flying 
out. 



MORE RECORDS SMASHED. 

.John Omir employed at the yards of Workman 
and Clark in Belfast, Ireland, drove on June 6th 
12,209 %-inch rivets in nine hours into a standard 
ship. Last week this chap beat the hour record 
for the United Kingdom. 

During the week ending June 4th a crew at 
the Superior Shipbuilding plant drove 5392 %-inch 
rivets in a day and another crew drove 5179 %- 
inch rivets. 



THE MAN WHO DOES THINGS 

By CHARLES H. HORTON 
There's a call gone out to you, too, 

You men In overalls, 
Who can twist a nut or drive a pin — 

The mightiest of calls. 
A call to the man of mechanics, 

To the man of the bench and tool, 
A call to the Man Who Does Things 

With his eye and a bit of rule. 
A call to the man on engines, 

From base to compression cup. 
A call to the man who can set a valve, 

To the man who can crank her up, 
To the man who can pour out babbitt. 

To the man who can weld a joint. 
To the man who can head up a rivet. 

To the man who can grind a point. 
To the man who can cut a gear tooth. 

To the man who can chip a lug, 
To the man who can face a pipe flange, 

To the man who can sink a plug. 
To the man who can chuck a casting. 

To the man who can chase a thread, 
To l he man who can run a planer, 

And set one up on its bed. 
There's a call gone out — a call men! 

A call from the Boss on High, 
For men who can serve behind the men 

Who fight in the fields — and die. 

A call to the man of mechanics, 

A call that is strident and true. 

A call to the Man Who Does Things, 
A call from the nation to you. 

from The American Machinist. 



LIFE BUOY 



1 |. 



THE WORK THAT YOU 
DO EVERY DAY 

Lil^T the work' I ha I you do every day be dedicated 

To the memory of the babies of France and Belgium who have been impaled 
on bayonets and carried off over the shoulders of German soldiers— that your 
baby may never be in danger o] a like death, 

IjKT the work llml you do every day In' dedicated 

To the memory of the little boys in the invaded districts of Europe who 
have been crucified — ///.^/ your own hoy may not In 1 in danger of being 
crucified 



Let 



THE WORK THAT YOU 00 EVERY DAY BE 0E0ICATEO- 



To the memory of the little girls of Belgium and 
France who have been carried into a slavery far 
worse than death— Hud your daughter may 
mil be in danger of thus falling a victim 
In (I'miiuii barbarians. 



Let 



THE WORK 1 HAT YOU DO EVERY DAY BE 0E0ICATE0- 



To the memory of the mothers of Europe who 
have seen their children slaughtered and their 
husbands with bound hands driven away to a 
fate unknown, that the mothers here may 
not see similar processions in your own 
streets. 



Let 



THE WORK THAT YOU DO EVERY DAY BE DEDICATED - 



To the white-haired women of Belgium and 
France who have seen honest men dig their own 
gr&vea— that the white-haired of your 
family may not suffer n like agony. 



Let 



THE WORK THAT YOU 0C EVERY DAY BE DEDICATED 



To the memory of the Allied soldiers who have 
been crucified upon doors because they fought 
for civilization and justice— that justice mini 
In done you and yours. 



LET THE WORK THAT YOU 00 EVERY DAY BE DEDICATED- 

To the memory of the beautiful cities, villages, 
orchards, and fields of Europe, now blackened 

wastes //nd your own beautiful towns 
nnil 'irlils iniii/ mil In' turned, into 
places men will avoid. 

LET THE WORK THAT YOU DO EVERY OAY BE DEDICATED 

To the memory of the once happy homes in 
Europe which the Hun burned after murdering 
the inmates that your h on i,e mill/ mil In- 
rum <■ the funeral pyre of your family . 

IjET THE WORK THAT YOU DO EVERY DAY BE DE0ICATE0- 

To the memory of the nations thai have been 
crushed and scattered thai your own nation 
may not be destroyed and that your 
people miii/ a nl In 1 driven forth like the 
exiled multitudes who have died in Hie 
jii'hlx nnil the highways. 

Let the work that you do every day be dedicated 

To the manhood that is in you that you may not 
desert your brother who has gone to the battle 
front, that you may not desert your nation now 

that it needs you, that you may not lie tricked 
into imperiling the safety of y( ur wife, your 
daughter, your mother, irlini the smooth- 
tongued enemies of you?' country come 
whispering to j/<>n . 



LET the work llml you do every day lie dedicated— 

To the manhood that is in you, that you shall have no remorse when broken men 

come back from the battle front— so llml empty sleeves and siglitless eyes 

slm II not as instruments of your own conscience reproacli you by day 

and haunt you by night because you at home failed to support our men while 

they fought in France. 

Any Person desiring to know the authority for statements of German atrocity made in the foregoing 
may obtain the information by writing the Conference Committee on National Prepardness. 



10U SHALT NOT PASS 







W "«»»M ARsrN»L 
SArcry !,.,-, 



17 LIFE BUOY 



SOME RECORDS OF OUR OWN JEST JOKE TREE CHIPS. 

On May 7th the employees of the Sheet Metal "A mile on sea is more than a mile on land. 

Shop made up (heir minds to show their neighbor- isn't it?" 

Ing craftsmen that they intended to make an ear- " Yes : "'» aD0U < one-seventh more." 

"Can you tell me why?" 
erst and conscientious effort to drive a blow home ., . 

Oh — well, things swell in the water, you 

against the Huns, As a result of this spirit of de- | U , ()W ■• 

termination the pan-makers on the 7th of May 

smashed records. The record they created was the Customer — "Here, waiter! Olives, half a 



making, assembling and delivering of 800 large 



If the women keep on knitting they'll soon lie 

swapping yarns, 



melon, and some cracked ice." 

The Waiter (loudly) — "Dumdums, half a 
bread pans. There were 4S(MI parts in all to be cut , , _. ,, 

' bombshell ,and a bowl ot shrapnel. 

and assembled and 3200 rivets to be driven. 

On May 28 another record was broken when Doctors always write their prescriptions in 

the same pan makers made 600 roasting pans. Dur- Latln and Dllls in English. There's a reason. 
itiK this run 5400 parts had to be cul and assembled 
and 6000 rivets driven. This pan is one of the 
most difficult manufactured being made of rein- 
forced iron and having three straps. A gentleman traveling on horseback not long 

Hereafter the motto in the Sheet Metal Shop ago came upon an Irishman who was fencing in a 

.,, , ..,, .. , ., _ ., most barren and desolate piece of land, 

will be "Boost the Liberty Pan. 

"What are you fencing in that lot for, Pat? 
On May 23rd, Michael Lynch started in to make sai( , ne „ A herd of c(nvs W()uhl starve to ( , eath on 

a record on driving rivets, and be succeeded in his that land." 

effort. Lynch was driving up frames on submarines "And shure, your honor, wasn't I fencing it to 

in the new building ways. The rivets were 3-4 in. snap ke,,p the I """' bastea out of i,? " 

point rivets. In the eight hours be drove 1938 

Possible Employer — "Hum. My boy. do you 
rivets which is away above any day's work which . .. ij„„?.. 

lias been don,, on the submarines. Jimmie "No sir. but I kin learn!" 

While it is true, as has been said by some, that 
such records cannot be kept up ■■very day, it is The 8ea " [ matrimony contains few thought 



waves; but it requires plenty of sand, the long 
green, some lish stories; and some little buoys al- 
ways make the sailing smoother. 



nevertheless an encouraging Eact that a Yard me 
chanic, of his own volition, will make a record such 
as this, and the Manager desires to commend Lynch 

not only for the number of rivets driven by him, 

but also (or the spirii he has shown in undertaking, 

at his own Initiative, to make such a record. It is Those Rural Profiteers. — And men relate thai 

such a spirii that has enabled the Marines to drive Mrs. N'ewlywed went to the grocery store to do her 

back the Huns in recent battles and it is such a """•""'« marketing. And she was determined that 

the grocer should not take advantage of her youtl 

spirit which will win the war. In fact, il is the real , . . 

and inexperience. 

American Revolutionary and Civil War spirit shown "These eggs are dreadfully small," she critic- 

iu every-day work. ized. 

More strength to your right arm. Lynch. ' know it." he answered, "but that's the k'in 

on May 29th, .1. Crowley, who bad been in the ""' farmer brln & s lm '- T, »'>' ; "' f ' J" st fresh from 

_. . , , , . , (he country this morning." 

Riveters school tor three weeks, drove 21 IS rivets, ,. .'. ., , 

Yes, said the bride, "and that S the 'rou 

These were %-inch sua, mt rivets, while these with those farmers. They are so auxin ,, 

rivets were not driven in new ship work, they re- their eggs sold that they take them off tb test 

quire ihe same amount of strength and the same soon'" — Cleveland Plain De;. 



Draughtsmen! Engineers! 
ATTENTION! 

Scales, Triangles, Papers, Protractors, T. Squares 

Drawing Boards etc. 

YOUR REQUIREMENTS CAN BE MET AT 

MONTGOMERY'S 

Music & Art Store 

OPPOSITE POST OFFICE 



SHAW'S CASH MARKET 



Do you want to help win the war? 
Then practice economy with Mr. Shaw. 
Go to his market for fish and meat, 
Eggs and vegetables fresh and sweet. 

His prices are lowest, —cash you must pay 
And carry your bundles home each day 
Excepting orders of four dollars or more 
Which will be carried straight to your door. 



Shaw's Cash Market 

18 PLEASANT ST. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

Formerly CLARK'S BRANCH 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



1!) 



LIFE BUOY 



MAC1IINK SHOP 

it is mild i hat managt i George Kane 1 1 taking 
mi i c S < "in ie in baseball, 

Since the advent ol our rah' office force n is 
noticed that Ralph and Johnnie don'l drop their 
ohecka ai early aa i hey used to. 

The party thai was to have taken place ai 

Wallla Sanda haa I a postponed, Nothing doing 

"Neddo." 

We hear thai McManua Is very earnestly 0011 
slderlng taking up a resldenoe al Christian Shore 

Pray is getting to like the eight hour law, 

Correal Holbrook haa hardly smiled Blnce he 
w aa in ide I icadlngmo a 

Rheumatism, grippe, Indigestion, fallen arches, 
pneumonia and othi i le r ohronlc ills are on the 
deollne since t he Brst of May. 

feaae spends his week ends at Kennebunk. 

We hope Eddie will be as generous with his 

■ i" 1 1 1 i i he is w uii ills onions and radl 

he nsl from John Watts flivver has be- 
come lous, thai Charlej Lovell is going to 
purchase 

The shipping board is going to lay out the 

ri> er a bo\ e Port imoul b Bi Id ■>• into soi and w in 

try to eliminate all oontroversiea over the po 
slon of drift wood is that so "Chuck ?" 

strong semi pi ofe islonal baseball team 
wishing to isoure b game tor the 4th of July, should 
communloate Immediately with Manage) A R Lord, 
Bids Mo, 80. 

See "Slippery" for tickets on the "Complex," 
He Ib going to purchase a raior with his oommls 
alon 

Ouch I My'aore arm, look out will von; i 
have JubI I n \ accin tted 

Anyone desirous of securing a oottage al York 
lion. 'b (or the Bummer, may do ao bj applying to 
\ir it ii Jonea 

When Taylor of the Old Timers knocked out 

■ home run the other day, n now man was hoard to 

imk ir Hint was one of the apprentice boya We are 

rj to sny that Oscar then "gave himself away" 

by allow lut; his bal tO blow off, 

Clough and Carver think that the tollies arc 
immense, If 11 were not for the footlights, It would 
be almost neoesaary to have a fence oonetruoted 
around the front ol I he stage. 

Klttery Matrimonial tilub moo. Result of the 
0,80 tree tor all olaaa, Dlstanoe, l month, track 
fast. Winning Ways (Ralph) 1, 2, 2, l, l. Dis- 
position I Bill) :'. I. I. 2. 2. 2. Tlmo Ii ilnys, ii days. 

6 days, I daj b, S days, 

in n aensatlonal ball game at the nuig. No. 80 



diamond, Saturday Juno 8th the Old Timers with 
Spinney In the box and Plumpton oatchlng won from 
the Young Stars, with Mog and Oaverly as battery, 
by the score of 8 to 0, This defeat was a blow to 

MM' pennant aspirations of Manager Kane as his 

loam had up to this time a chance for the flag. 
From the outlook now there seems to be nothing 
to it In the larger race but the Old Timers, Great 
credit should be given (he Old 'rimers as they were 
greatly handicapped, by the absence of their Btar 
outfielder Taylor, and shortstop Manager Loud. 
As Manager Kane was under great expense in se- 
curing Mog the star pitcher of the Standplpe In- 
dependents tor this game, he is somewhat grieved 
over the result, 

Manar.or A. R, Loud has secured a most 
promising pitcher In his new recruit, Fred Gilkey. 

Murk Boulter Informs us that owing to the 
great demand for hand bilge pumps and barrel 
boils, he will be unable to furnish any material 

for the Life Buoy this month, however, wo hope 
that by the next Issue he will come forward with a 

number of interesting articles, We assure him that 

his contributions are greatly appreciated by all. 

"Brownie" says that if Bldg, No. 80 was situa- 
ted iii Hampton Beach, he would be wining to work 

nights all the t line 

CONTRIBUTED BY THE TURRET CANG 

We \\ ouhl like to tell a story 
i If a man j ou all know well 

Who buys a lot of candy 

For aome girla who he says are nice. 

lie Bays thai buying candy 

Makes I he coel of living high 

But tor girls like those we spenk of 

Good candy ho must buy. 

Now all you single fellows 

Ami married ones as well 
Please try and keep It quiet 
Or his wife, Bomeone will toil 



KI.ECTKICAL SPARKS 

Miss Elsie M. Clark, our popular time clerk, 
demonstrated her strength when it took throe men 
to hold her while she was being vaccinated. 

Johnnie Bryant, our etllcient storekeeper, failed 
to gel awa> with his self Inflicted scar and nervous- 
ly had his arm scratched. We hope the last result 
will bear inspection. 

We Know that the rainbow has all colors but 
one should see Mobutu's face when it comes to be- 
ing vaccinated 



"A Penny Saved 
Is a Penny Earned 

We can help you save a 
good many pennies on 

HOUSE FURNISHINGS 

See Mr. WOOD 

99 Penhallow St. Portsmouth, N. H 



u 



THE BUSY CORNER" STORE 

But Never Too Busy To Fill Your 
Prescriptions and Fill Them Right 

OUT OF TOWN PATRONS ARE 

WELCOME To WAIT FOR THE 

CAR AT OUR HOUSE 

BENJAMIN GREEN 

THE DRUGGIST 



INSURANCE and REAL ESTATE 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

LOWEST RATES BEST FORMS 

C E- TRAFTON 

x, Pleasant St Opposite Post Office 



^ <>U AUCillT TO KNOW 

DENNET and MCCARTHY'S 

is TUB isrcsT PLACE TO liuv 

Overalls, Shirts, Hosiery 



USE GAS FOR 

LIGHTING, HEATING AND COOKING 

PORTSMOUTH GAS CO- 

ALWAYS AT YOUR SERVICE 



YORK BEACH, MAINE 

and 

THE GOLDENROD 

Clam Chowder, Lobsters, Ice Cream, 
Candies, Soda, Cigars, and Home Bakery] 
Home of the famous Goldenrod Kisses, 
over 13 ton sold last summer. Made fresh 
every day excepl Sunday. A pound box 
mailed any place in New England for 36c. 



BROOKS MOTOR SALES 

PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

FORD SERVICE 



FullS BrOS. Men's and Boy's Shoes 

Fine S hoe Repairing congress st. tel. con. 

"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



21 



LIFE BUOY 



The young fellows have to take off their hats 
to Archie for he knows the Office girls have a sweet 
tooth. 

Nick is putting his men through a weekly 
military practice. They now show marked im- 
provement, obeying Nick's commands instantly. 

The girls in the Office appreciate Happy's un- 
tiring efforts to put them "in right" with the boys. 

The young lady who accepted the invitation to 
ride home on a motorcycle and then got cold feet 
has not yet gathered courage enough to go although 
the invitation still holds good. 

We wonder why Mr. Chesley likes to telephone 
so frequently to Building 8 9. 

We wonder why Freddie forgets to drop his 
check so often. 



PAINT SHOP 

As the rabbit season is gone we are depending 
on Fred Lord to furnish us with berries and other 
good things. 

Anyone wanting change for a twenty or fifty 
see Hanscom as he is more than generous. 

Miss O'Brien our new time-keeper is doing 
well. We wish her the best of luck. 

We were very sorry to hear of the death of 
our old friend Capt. H. D. Conover and our sym- 
pathy is extended to the family in their bereave- 
ment. 

Leach will need some crop to offset the time 
he spends in planting his garden. 

Rossley recently purchased an automobile. We 
have not seen much of him since. 

It is suggested that the men of this shop meet 
and appoint a committee to look after charity funds 
that are so frequently required. It is further sug- 
gested that a sum of ten cents a week be contrib- 
uted each week. Then when a call comes in it is 
automatically taken care of by the committee. At 
the end of the year if there still is money left it 
can be spent in providing amusement or a banquet 
for all the employees contributing. 



TRADE SCHOOL NOTES 

The first term of the Trade School is about 
completed and there is no question about the school 
being a success. There are now over 200 men en- 
rolled in the school and practically every one has 
shown a remarkable interest and exceptionally 
good work. 

For a time the shipfitting branch of the school 
was somewhat handicapped owing to a lack of suf- 
ficient instructors but this has been overcome in 
that a certain number of men in the school have 
been made leaders for the different gangs. 



The instructors in the school have all worked 
very hard and it is due to their determination that 
the school is functioning so highly. 



SHEET METAL SHOP 

Among the recent arrivals in this shop, there 
were three young ladies for the office force. 

The cigars were going the rounds a few days 
ago after Richardson returned from his trip to York 
Beach. 

Speaking of being prepared — only a few men 
from the whole shop had to be vaccinated. The 
rest were all prepared. 

Did you see the large blue print of the record 
made in this shop May 7 and May 28? 
KEEP IT UP. 

Louis had a weak heart the day the Doctor 
was here — But! at last he gave in and was vacci- 
nated without taking ether. He said it didn't hurt. 
Better pick a soft spot out in the open, next 
time you want to fall — Bill. 

The President told Hoover to have us save on 
food, that the boys at the front might have plenty 
to live on — 

So I'm planting corn and taters, 

And raising beans and peas. 

Very soon I'll have tomatoes, 

Even cukes up to my knees. 

For we must raise more foodstuff. 

Or let our boys starve, 

Over in those mud filled trenches 

Where the cooties love to dwell. 



JOINER SHOP 

Bill tried hard to get that Pig by buying a 
heap of tickets. However, he has to content him- 
self by doing his own squealing. 

Some of the boys say that the air in Haverhill 
is of the most invigorating quality to be found in 
New England. It is not nearly so dry and suffo- 
cating as in Portsmouth. It is feared some of the 
boys get lost when they go over the top, for they 
fail to show up on Monday. 

Mel — you saved the basket but where is I he 
contents? 

Charlie is a little chap. 

He being hardly ever seen, 

But whenever things go wrong, 

Charlie's right there and it don't take long. 

It's Charlie this, and Charlie that. 

And Charlie everywhere, 

So let's all get together 

And give Charlie the backing he desires. 



HENRY PEYSER &, SON 

16 TO 20 MARKET ST. 

For more than forty years Portsmouth's leading 
Store for Men's and Boys' apparel 

PERFECTION OIL STOVES REFRIGERATORS PORCH FURNITURE 

THE QUALITY STORE 

MARGESON BROS. 



Vaughn St. 



Telephone 570 



PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



FRED B. COLEMAN 

APOTHECARY 

Corner Congress and Vaughn Sts. 
PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



If you desire to buy or sell Real Estate call, 
telephone or write 

IT. I. CASWELL AGENCY 

Congress St. TELEPHONE 478-W Portsmouth 




18 Market Square 



GRADUATION 
GIFTS and CARDS 

at THE ACORN 

Portsmouth. N. H. 



SUGRUE 
Overalls, Tobacco, Pastry 

KITTERY, ME. 



S- S- TRUEMAN 



GENERAL CONTRACTOR 



TELEPHONE 651 



83 Eow St. 



Portsmouth, N. II. 



JOHN O'LEARY 

KITTERY and NAVY YARD EXPRESS 

GENERAL TEAMING 
Tel. Con. Portsmouth, N. H. 

If you want to be dressed up to the Minute 
from head to foot in dress and work clothes 
come in to see 

LOUIS ABRAMS & CO. 

38-40 Daniel St. Portsmouth, N. H. 




All models have Valve in removable head motor, adjustable, leather face cone clutch, 3-4 floating axles 
Simplest, most economical Auto built. Will pass anything on high and hold the road at 50 to 60 mile speed. 

CHAS. EI. WOODS 

51 to 60 Bow Street Portsmouth N. H. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



23 



LIFE BUOY 



SUB. DRAFTING ROOM 

Expressions of regret at the illness of Mr. Cur- 
tis are heard all over the drafting room and we all 
wish him a speedy recovery to good health. 

A very pleasant surprise was tendered Irvin 
F. Kent on his return from his honeymoon, he be- 
ing the recipient of a cut glass water set from the 
"boys" of the office. In a few well chosen words 
Mr. Coffin expressed the sentiment of his co-workers 
and Mr. Kent responded nobly. 

The Rye delegation is steadily increasing in 
numbers and we expect Ball and Brown (the in- 
separables) will soon start a jitney line in that di- 
rection. 

The next time Ray comes to town it is hoped 
that he will go home before the "wee sma"' hours. 
The number of the telephone in the Sub. Draft- 
ing Room is 64. Farrington. please take notice. 

Anyone wishing to know the best auto road to 
Eliot ask Scriven. There's a reason. 

Do you want to sell a house? Do you want 
to buy a house? See Colliton. We expect John 
will soon be handing in his resignation as treasurer 
of the C. B. O. D. and joining the retired class. 

July (Tentative) A. W. H. & 11. P. B. The 
best of luck, boys. 

My Baby is some kid. L. Z. 
R. E. C. chief Draftsman, (acting). We are 
all with you Bob. 

It is rumored that there will soon he another 
star in our service flag as our efficient file clerk is 
about to join the colors. The best of luck Denny. 

This will introduce our new arrival, L. W. 
Sargent. Howdy, Sarg! 

An echo from Conlon's trips to Portland. 
How much are Pall .Malls? 

ic a box. 
Give me a box of Hassams. 
WE WON' HER 

What happened to Snow on his last trip to Rye, 
How the chicken business of Rosen & Zislin 
is coming along. 

How much the housing situation was helped 
when Carey endeavored to find a few homes in 
Dover for some of the boys. 

If the ball game between the married men and 
the single men will be played at the picnic on July 
4th. 

Why Pattee wears such a pretty bow tie since 
iris started to work in Mr. Collin's office. 
Why Conlon did not want to move his desk 
into the Drafting Room. Cheer up, Charlie, we 
may have some ladies in the drawing room, soon. 



ASK TO SEE 

Stiansen's Patriotic shirt. 
Kimble's Income Tax Return. 
Guggy's Poll Tax Receipt. 
Coffin's list of Creditors. 
Downing's Vaccination Scar. 



PATTERN SHOP 

WE WONDER WHY: 

Twitchell always has the blues when he comes 
back from home. 

"Vivie" Nelson is angry at Brit. 
THEY SAY THAT: 

Neal will not be going to Boston so often now 
as Portsmouth has suddenly become very attractive 
to him. 

McCabe. Hanabury and Xiles have started a 
race, (human race). 

With another year of steady work, Locke and 
Peaslee will be able to retire. 
We don't miss the pig. 

Ralph Nelson is afraid of the Blackhand gang. 
He examines closely all his mail before he 
opens it now. 

The boys here are going over the top for the 
co-operative store. 

The boys are fond of animals at Camp Look- 
usup. 

The Blackhand lias a victim in the Pattern 
Shop. 

Ask Brit about the new mascot that he met at 
Camp l.ookusup at 12.30 A. M. Sunday. They say 
that a tree was his only weapon. 

D. A. and Rummy are well informed on matri- 
mony. Wonder where they got it. 

Does Halfshot still dream of his "Lizzie?" 

"Topics of the Hour" 
Who will be the first one to get married from 
Camp Lookusup? 

The betting is heavy on Brit. Carl and Smithy. 
Why do they call R. Nelson "Vivie?'' 
When does the summer ever come to Ports- 
mouth? 

Britton has brought to Camp both a cat and 
dog. Neither have stayed very long. Perhaps he 
would be more successful with a little "Old Crow" 
or white mice. 

Smithe The Basket. Get ready your turn next. 
Give all your work to Nelson & Nelson Co., 
Buckers-up & Butters-in. Office open night and 
day. Sundays included. 

Up to dale Britton has not caught his first lis'.i. 
We don't think he could catch one in the dry dock 
even if it was pumped out. 



Page & Shaw Candies 

Sole Local Agency 

Adams Drug Store 

ON MARKET ST. 
Portsmouth, : : N. H. 



ITS NO USE 

Telling you a long story about advancing prices. 
You know as much about it as I do. But I want to 
tell you that I have a large stock of CLOTHS, bought 
to secure old yarns and dyes, at a much lower price 
than they can be found today. If you need a SUIT 
this year BUY IT NOW. 

WOOD, The Tailor 

15 PLEASANT ST. PORTSMOUTH. N. H. 



THE PORTSMOUTH FLOWER SHOP 

A. C. CRAIG, Manager 

FANCY CUT FLOWERS 

AGENT VICTOR TAT. KING MACHINES 

4 Market Street Phone 960 

PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



ENGRAVING 

and 

DIE STAMPING 



PebioDICA^UbRABy) Carefully executed by competent artists 




THE ACORN 



18 Market Square 



Portsmouth, N. H. 



GEO. D. BOO 

AGENT 

FOR LEADING FIRE AND LIABILITY INSURANCE COMPANIES 



GOV. ST. 



KITTERY, MAINE 



INDIAN HEAD GARAGE 

REPAIRING, VULCANIZING AND SUPPLIES OPEN DAY AND NICHT 

YORK BEACH, MAINE 

TEL. CONNECTION 

^V^FLTfLEnST JJ 1 . BLAISDELL 

HARDWARE, PAINTS AND MOTOR ACCESSORIES. THE DODD SYSTEM OF 

LICHTNINC PROTECTION. COOKINC UTENSILS 

Telephone 7 YORK VILL AGE, ME. 

JOHN E. WEARE groceries MEAT AND PROVISIONS 



Tel. 169-2 



AUTO DELIVERY 

YORK BEACH, ME. 



TYPEWRITERS FOR SALE & RENT 

J. E. DIMICK 

29 Tanner St. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

Telephone 837- M. 



MYERS LUNCH 

CIGARS UUUIJ OCKVltt TOBACCO 

YORK BEACH, MAINE 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE RUOY" 



LIFE BUOY 



BOAT SHOP 

When this Hunnlsh War is over, Uncle Sam 

And we've shown them how to do it like a man 
We will drive them from our shore 

To return here never more 
Then tin- World will rest in peace Uncle Sam. 
We are waiting for the day 

When tin' smoke has rolled away. Uncle Sam 
Then our sailor hoys in blue 

Will come Bailing home to you 
With their hearts so tried and true Uncle Sam. 

— The Boat Shop Poet. 

Of all the shelled bug8 that roam around, the 
Beetle beats them all. 
Heard in The Boat Shop — 

We wonder why the men in the office have been 
wearing their best clothes to work lately? 

Some of the boys in the shop say that Central 
Park is "SOME" place. 

Dan Cupid has started to make a clean sweep 
in our office force. How about it Kills? 

Shaw has been trying to run his "Vacuum 
Cleaner" without gasoline bill he finds il cannot 
lie done. Twice the engine has suddenly slopped 
while out on the country roads and he was forced 
io telephone in Portsmouth for gas. 

The Boat Shop surely is booming these days. 
The number of employees has increased nearly 25 
percent in the last year. A large order In build 
boats was received recently and the work is now 
well under way. 

We notice several signs have been pill up at 
the Main (late showing how some simps are speed- 
ing uii but the Boat Shop doesn't particularly be- 
lieve in signs. Actions speak Winder than words 
and the beautiful emblem thai floats over building 
No. fill represents the speed of the Boat Shop. 

We wonder why Harry makes so many trips 
to ScarborO in his new Chevrolet? 



"NEW SUBMARINE WAYS" 

Bldg. No. 1 IB, 

II is rumored that Leadingman Ed. Snook has 
taken an Interest in a lobster business as a side line. 

Everyone can tell when i. IB 1". M. arrives 
without consulting their watches for at that time 
our genial Janitor G. H. Strangher makes bis daily 
call. 

The work in Ibis building is progressing rapid- 
ly. 

Kivel Counter Brother Avers is certainly on 
the job now-a-days. 

Osgood the lime keeper says "lie knew il all 
I he lime." 

Who has got il ? 

We cannot And it anywhere. 



FOUNDRY NOTES 

Dick Pullam has returned to work again after 
a l wo years absence. 

Cheer up. boys. We hear from good authority 
that Jack Keenan will pass us all a fine cigar very 
soon. 

Sunset league patrons tell us that .lack O'Brien 
still refuses to give up the idea that he is as young 
as any of the Other players. 

We wonder why some of the boys are always 
anxious lo know where a fellow is going, and when 
he will get back, whenever anybody goes out for a 
few days now. 

If any more of you fellows are thinking about 
buying a new car we know you can learn some- 
thing to your advantage by consulting Walter or 
.lark Here are samples of the good sound advice 
I bey will starl you on A car will mil run without 
gas, — always release your brake before attempting 

lo starl your car, 

We see that the prosperity wave has struck 
you. (liner. If you need an> advice about your car 
don't torget what has just been said. 

If I were you Jerry I would try some oilier 
Lawrence guy who would do more for me than Dirk 
has so far. 

We hope no ill effects (especially to the young 

ladies i will result from the recent vaccinations in 

the shop. 

We can guess how you feel. Marion, but never 
mind, we Know he will return to you a hero. 

We have at least one good singer on our new- 
clerical force. Keep il up. .Margaret, we like lo 
hear you. 

We admire you for your loyally to your home 
town Lillian. 

G. R. P. is taking a vacation to put his war 

/•allien in Shape. 

Charlie Hinckley is still wailing for his Holler 
skates. 

The nickel gang in the coreroom don't care 

what they do with their money. 

O'Keefe is very curious to see York Beach. 
Electric Car rales are high these limes. Jack, why 
don't you consider a fellow's pocWelbook and give 
him a ride over I here in your llivver? 

Somebody said that they recently saw Jake 
Donnelly coming from the public library with an 
edition of "How to express yourself in Italian." 
There's a reason. 

Wauled good items for next month's issue. 
Il is hoped that everyone will have something to 
contribute for a little help from each one makes 

the whole proposition comparatively simple. We 
wish to make our column as good if not better than 
any other on the yard. 



CLOTHES OF RELIABILITY 

At this store you may be certain of finding merchandise that you 
can depend on. This means something in these camouflage times. 
Our prices are right. Our service awaits you. We fit men out 
from head to foot. 

N. H. BEANE & CO. 



5 Congress St. 


Portsmouth 


E. E. WIIITKIIOUSi: 


C. P. CARROLL 


BARBER 


Groceries, Meats and Provisions 

145 PENKAILOW ST. PORTSMOUTH. N. H. 


Up One Fli°rht Opp. Colonial Theatre 


Tel. Citiiiicctiim Near A. S. L. Perry 



R. L COSTELLO 



SEED STORE 



II Hill (JUAJ)K SKKDS 



115 Market St. Telephone, 57 



l'OUTSMOrTII 
new n ami's mm: 



"1 SAY/ IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



21 



LIFE BUOY 



SPAR SHOP 

Howard, one of our Leadingmen, says that he 
doesn't care how often Mr. Young sweeps the floor, 
because there is usually money in it. 

Number 6 5 is on the map, they may not have 
as many as their sister shop No. 4 5 but they are 
nevertheless there. 

What became of the Nails Tobey ordered for 
the Sub. Model building? — Sleuth Williams ironed 
the case out to the satisfaction of all. 

Some of the boys feel uneasy since they were 
vaccinated but, believe me Mr. P. doesn't. 

Varney had his arm scraped but that didn't 
stop him from drowning a 

The ladies are doing grand work, profanity 



whose elimination will mean progress and profit? 

In the doing of these things, even to but an 
approximate extent, I shall be taking the govern- 
ment into partnership for both the successful 
prosecution of the war and the successful prosecu- 
tion of business. 

I have put my creed here in words, that I may 
frequently read and remember, and then act. Anil 
if this creed shall shape me nearer to the standards 
of citizenship America needs now, I have an earnest 
hope that it may serve to do the same for my 
fellowman. 



AN OFFICE. 
An office is a funny thing: Each morning certain 
men 
has ceased amongst the wicked and the boys are And certain girls and certain boys come into it 



sprucing up a bit, — lately. 



MY SPENDING CREED 

In these days the miser is not the patriot 
He hoards. He robs money of its right to circulate, 
and in war times this right becomes a necessity. 
Therefore, I will not be stingy. 

I will try to buy more sensibly than I have 
been. I will often fail at this. But I will strive 
to bear in mind that where my expenditure is going 
to be for a passing sensation of thirst, or a chance 



again 

And hang their coats on certain pegs, their hats on 
certain hooks, 

And sit them down at certain desks in front of cer- 
tain books. 

They all have certain work to do in just a certain 
time, 

Concerning certain dollars for a certain fixed per 
diem ; 

And then at just a certain hour, in sunshine or in 
rain, 



raving for sweets, or a needless submission to the They close their desks and hurry out to catch a 



dictates of vanity, to think of each and every such 
expenditure in the light of my government's need, 
rather than my own. Every quarter is a potential 
'thrift Stamp. Not all of my quarters need to be 
turned into Thrift Stamps; Uncle Sam doesn't wish 



certain train. 
An office is a tragic thing when that is all there is, 
When each one has his certain work and certain 

way of his 
And wallows in a certain rut and never seems to see 



He does, however, hope that I will each week That there are certain other ones in life as well as 



it. 

acquire at least three or more Thrift Stamps, and 
it all fellow-Americans do the same, his Two-Billion- 
Hollar quota for war savings will need re-auditing 
by McAdoo. 

To offset my tendency to spend in the custo- 
mary peace-time manner, I will strive to be doubly 
efficient in my work. Here, after all, is the true 



he. 
For he would find a certain fun in certain other 

ways. 
If he would give a word of cheer on certain busy 

days — 
When problems vex, when certain things require 

a helping hand. 



key to the war strength of a nation which carries Would gi\e a certain sympathy that mortals under- 



it over the top; not niggardliness, not restriction, 
not personal penalization, not the denial of nec- 
essities, is going to win this war; but redoubled 
energy, expanded ability, multiplied contacts. 
keener, quicker and more capable action. I am sure 
that if I apply this standard to the day's work, the 
clay's savings and the day's spending will take care 
of themselves. 

To this end I shall be doubly studious. I shall 
try to discover new outlets for my business and 
overlooked curtailments with other efficiency. I 
shall find that a personal inventory will reveal leaks 



stand. 
An office is a pleasant place — at least, a certain kind 
That has a certain brotherhood, where day by day 

you find 
Some neighbor with a new idea he's glad to pass 

along. 
A certain sort of friendliness, a certain sort of song. 
There is a certain duty that we owe to other men 
To help them when they need a lift, to steady them 

again. 
An office can become in time, to man and girl and 

boy. 



in energy, wastes in thought, dissipations in deed. A certain kind of fellowship, and work a certain joy. 



SAVE FUEL BY USING A FLORENCE OIL COOK STOVE 
BALDWIN REFRIGERATORS ALASKA ICE CREAM FREEZERS 

126-128 Market St. THE 8WEET8ER STORE Portsmouth, N. H. 

A FEW OF OUR SPECIALTIES 

Hart, Schaffner and Marx Clothes, Stetson Hats, 
Manhattan Shirts, Fownes Gloves, Interwoven Stockings 



F. W. LYDSTON & CO. 



Outfitters for Men & Boys 
PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



JOHN SISE & CO. 
INSURANCE 



8 MARKET SQUARE 

PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



A. P. WENDELL & CO. 

Hardware, Paints and Tools 

Telephone 850 

2 Market Square Portsmouth, N. H- 



PORTSMOUTH MOTOR MART Inc. 

Cadillac Service Station Used Cars for Sale 

Autos for Hire. Accessories and Supplies 

TELEPHONE 22 and 34. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



MEN WANTED 

For the Merchant Marine, 
Enrolling Station at the 

^ &&wo&$L Store, Portsmouth, N. H. 

BOARDMAN & NORTON 

Opp. Post Office 



MEN'S WOMEN'S k CHILDREN'S SHOES 
OF THE BETTER QUALITY 



C. F. DUNCAN & CO. 



9 Market St. 



Portsmouth, N. H. 



SAVE FUEL 

By using Electric Appliances for Cooking 

ROCKINGHAM COUNTY LIGHT AND POWER CO. 

29 Pleasant Street Portsmouth, N. H. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



29 LIFE BUOY 



UNCLE SAM AND YOU 



The United States has put on the grim toggery of war. 'Mid tears 
and cheers our soldiers are leaving for the front. 

Uncle Sam is sounding the call of duty the clearest call he has ever 
sounded. He has begun to battle for the rights of mankind, FOR THE 
FREEDOM OF HIS OWN PEOPLE. 

If chance or circumstance has decreed that you shall not carry a gun, 
IT HAS NOT DECREED THAT YOU SHALL SHIRK A BURDEN. 
To be exempted from the great army at the front means to be drafted 
into the great army at home 

From duty, and responsibility, and service, and real genuine fidelity 
to Humanity and the Cause of Freedom, THERE IS NO EXEMPTION. 
There cannot be. 

The soldier marching to the front leaves extra burdens behind, of 

necessity he leaves extra duties and extra responsibilities. Tasks which 
he is forced to abandon, YOU must take up. 

In spirit we must follow the soldier to the front sustain him with 
food, supply him with ammunition, arm him with equipment and guns 
support him while he lights. 

Industry must reinforce arms. RESOURCES ARK AS NECESSARY 
AS RECRUITS. 

Humming factories mean hurling shells. To speed production is to 
hasten victory. 

Service is the watchword of the hour. 

On the battle front and at home Uncle Sam needs millions of hearts 
and hands. 

Have you given YOUR heart and hand? Are YOU a real soldier'.' 

The Cirele. 



WE ARE PREPARED 

To give vou the best obtainable of MEATS, 
FISH and VEGETABLES in season for CAS 1 1 

SSZg-N. „.- BROWN'S MARKET 

SAFE-KEEPING 



YOUR MONEY taken for SAFE KEEPING 
as well as LIBERTY BONDS 

Savings and checking accounts large or 
small welcomed at this Bank. 

i . . — . 

National Mechanics & Traders Bank 

Portsmouth N. H., 

Open Saturday evenings 7 to 9 



FRUIT AND CONFECTIONERY, ICE CREAM AND SODA, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

TELEPHONE 29 VV CATERING A SPECIALTY 43 CONGRESS STREET 

A SHORT AG E «f CAR S~ 

Buy your OVERLAND "The Thrift Car" Now 

Immediate delivery for a short time on Model 90 
Touring and Country Club Models 

C A. LOWD 

338 Pleasant St. & 25-45 Wentworth: Service Station & Garage 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 





JULY «$ 
AuSftsT 

NAVY YARD, 
PORTS MOUTH, N.H. 



ZZZXZZZZZZZZZZZZ& 



SSX5 




MAKING FRIENDS EVERY DAY 







; 














,,,.■.■ < 



OUR CLOTHES make<FRIENDS in several ways. We have without doubt the largest 
assortment in this part of New England. Our PRICES we know are way under what such 
goods are being sold at in some cities. 

There are some great values in our sis. $20, $22J>0 and $25 Suits for men. When a man 

buys one o( these Suits, he irets something besides so much cloth and making. He gets good 

style and long service. 

We know our Suits are FRIEND-MAKERS and when you've bought here once or' twice 
you will realize it pays to come to Dover and in turn you will speak a good word to some 

friend o\ yours. That is Why this store is to-day doing such a large business. We sell Good 
Shoes as well as Good Clothes. 

LOTHROPS-FARNHAM COMPANY 

Opposite AMERICAN HOUSE, DOVER, N. II. 

Let us have your name so as to send you one of those useful articles. 



1 SAW IT IN THE LIFE Bt'OY" 
(» «f B. 




HasseTT's 

— for QUALITY 

— for SERVICE 

— for Actual MONEY VALUE 



PIANOS and VICTROLAS may be purchased 
on our defered payment plan. We also rent them 
J at reasonable rates. 



We carry a complete line of KODAKS and our DEVELOPING and 
PRINTING is positively perfect. The work of an artist. 

EXCLUSIVE STATIONARY 
I a A T E S T S 1 1 I g B T M U S I C 

HASSETT'S Music & Art Shoppe 

115 Congress St. Portsmouth, N. H. 

OPEN EVERY EVENING 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



Liberty Bond Conversion Privilege 

Holders of Liberty Bonds of the First and Second 
Issues are entitled to exchange their bonds for New 
Bonds Bearing interest at the rate of 4| percent. 

This option must be used before November 9, 
1918 or the privilege is forever lost. 

We are prepared to make this exchange for you 
and place our services at your disposal. 

COMMERCIAL AND SAVINGS 
DEPARTMENTS 

STORAGE AND DEPOSIT VAULTS 

BOXES TO RENT— -$1.00 PER YEAR 

FIRST NATIONAL HANK 

PORTSMOUTH NEW HAMPSHIRE 

United States Depository 
ASSETS 01 'EH TWO MILLION 

SAVI NG 

CONSERVAT1 ON and 

T U D I CT 

WILL WIN THE WAR 



PATRIOTISM DEMANDS THAT THE CITIZENS OF Till': UiNITED STATES 

SPEND LESS and SAVE MORE 



10,000 PEOPLE ARE SAVING THEIR EARNINGS BY THE HELP OF OUR 
INSTITUTIONS. NEW SAVING ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 



PISCATAQUA SAVINGS BANK 

First National Bank Building Portsmouth, N. H. 

"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



LIFE BUOY 




INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 
LIFE BUOY 



Issued monthly for free distribution to employees of the Industrial Department of the 
Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H. 



VOL. I 



NOS. 7&S 



AMERICA'S FUTURE AT STAKE 



BY ROBERT LANSING, 
Secretary of State 



WE must all realize that we are living in 
the most momentous time in all history, 
in a time when the lives and destinies of na- 
tions are in the balance, when even the civili- 
zation, which has taken centuries to build, 
may crumble before the terrible storm which 
is sweeping over Europe. We are not only 
living in this critical period but we, as a na- 
tion, have become a participant in the strug- 
gle. Having cast our lot on the side of the 
powers allied against the Imperial German 
Government, we will put behind our decision 
the full power and the resources of the Re- 
public. We intend to win in this mighty con- 
flict, and we will win because our cause is the 
cause of justice and of right and of humanity. 

I wonder how many of "us comprehend 
what the outcome of this war means to man- 
kind, or, to bring it nearer to each one of us, 
what it means to our country. I sometimes 
think that there prevail very erroneous im- 
pressions as to the reason why we entered 
the war — not the immediate reasons, but the 
deep, underlying reasons which affect the 
life and future of the United States and of 
all other liberty-loving nations throughout 
the world. 

Of course, the immediate cause of our 
war against Germany was the announced pur- 
pose of the German Government to break its 
promises as to indiscriminate submarine war- 
fare and the subsequent renewal of that ruth- 
less method of destruction with increased 
vigor and brutality. 

While this cause was in itself sufficient 
to force us to enter the war if we would pre- 



serve our self-respect, the German Govern- 
ment's deliberate breach of faith and its utter 
disregard of right and life had a far deeper 
meaning, a meaning which had been growing 
more evident as the war had progressed and 
which needed but this act of perfidy to bring 
it home to all thinking Americans. The evH 
character of the German Government is laid 
bare before the world. We know now that 
that Government is inspired with ambitions 
which menace human liberty, and that to 
gain its end it does not hesitate to break 
faith, to violate the most sacred rights, or to 
perpetrate intolerable acts of inhumanity. 

It needed but the words reported to have 
been uttered by the German Chancellor to 
complete the picture of the character of his 
Government when he announced that the only 
reason why the intensified submarine cam- 
paign was delayed until February last was 
that sufficient submarines could not be built 
before that time to make the attacks on com- 
merce effective. Do you realize that this 
means, if it means anything, that the 
promises to refrain from brutal submarine 
warfare, which Germany had made to the 
United States, were never intended to be 
kept, that they were only made in order to 
gain time in which to build more submarines, 
and that when the time came to act the Ger- 
man promises were unhesitatingly torn to 
pieces like other "scraps of paper." 

It is this disclosure of the character of 
the Imperial German Government which is 
the underlying cause of our entry into the 
war. We had doubted, or at least many 



LIFE BUOY 



Americans had doubted, the evil purposes of 
the rulers of Germany. Doubt remained no 
longer. In the light of events we could read 
the past and see that for a quarter of a cen- 
tury the absorbing ambition of military oli- 
garchy which was the master of the German 
Empire was for world dominion. Every 
agency in the fields of commerce, industry, 
science, and diplomacy had been directed by 
the German Government to this supreme end. 
Philosophers and preachers taught that the 
destiny of Germany was to rule the world, 
thus preparing the mind of the German peo- 
ple for the time when the mighty engine 
which the German Government had con- 
structed should crush all opposition and the 
German Emperor should rule supreme. 

For nearly three years we have watch- 
ed the conduct of the Imperial Government, 
and we have learned more and more of the 
character of that Government and of its aims. 
We came very slowly to a realizing sense that 
not only was the freedom of the European 
nations at stake but that liberty throughout 
the world was threatened by the powerful 
autocracy which was seeking to gratify its 
vast ambition. 

Not impulsively but with deliberation the 
American people reached the only decision 
which was possible from the standpoint of 
their own national safety. Congress de- 
clared that a state of war existed between 
the United States and the Imperial Govern- 
ment of Germany, and this country united 
with the other liberal nations of the earth to 
crush the power which sought to erect on the 
ruins of democracy a world empire greater 
than that of Greece or Rome or the caliphs. 

The President has said, with the wonder- 
ful ability which he has to express aptly a 
great thought in a single phase, that "the 
world must be made safe for democracy." In 
that thought there is more than the estab- 
lishment of liberty and self-government for 
all nations — there is in it the hope of an en- 
during peace. 

I do not know in the annals of history an 
instance where a people, with truly demo- 
cratic institutions, permitted their govern- 
ment to wage a war of aggression, a war of 
conquest. Faithful to their treaties, sympa- 
thetic with others seeking self-development, 
real democracies, whether monarchial or re- 
publican in their form of government, desire 



peace with their neighbors and with all man- 
kind. 

Were every people on earth able to ex- 
press their will, there would be no wars of 
aggression, and, if there were no wars of ag- 
gression, then there would be no wars, and 
lasting peace would come to this earth. The 
only way that a people can express their will 
is through democratic institutions. There- 
fore, when the world is made safe for de- 
mocracy, when that great principle prevails, 
universal peace will be an accomplished fact. 

No nation or people will benefit more 
than the United States when that time comes. 
But it has not yet come. A great people, 
ruled in thought and word, as well as in deed, 
by the most sinster Government of modern 
times, is straining every nerve to supplant 
democracy by the autocracy which they have 
been taught to worship. When will the Ger- 
man people awaken to the truth ? When will 
they arise in their might and cast off the yoke 
and become their own masters ? I fear that 
it will not be until the physical might of the 
united democracies of the world has destroy- 
ed forever the evil ambitions of the military 
rulers of Germany and liberty triumphs over 
its archenemy. 

And yet in spite of these truths which 
have been brought to light in these last three 
years I wonder how many Americans feel 
that our democracy is in peril, that our liberty 
needs protection, that the United States is in 
real danger from the malignant forces which 
are reeking to impose their will upon the 
wo .Id, as they have upon Germany and her 
deceived allies. 

Let us understand once for all that this 
is no war to establish an abstract principle of 
right. It is a war in which the future of the 
United States it at stake. If any among you 
has the idea that we are fighting others' 
battles and not our own, the sooner he gets 
away from that idea the better it will be for 
him, the better it will be for all of us. 

Imagine Germany victor in Europe be- 
cause tht. United States remained neutral. 
Who then, think you, would be the next vic- 
tim of those who are seeking to be masters of 
the whole earth? Would not this country 
with its enormous wealth arouse the cupidity 
of an improvished though triumphant Ger- 
many? Would not this democracy be the 
only obstacle between the autocratic rulers 



LIFE HUOY 



of Germany and their supreme ambition? 
Do you think that they would withhold their 
hand from so rich a prize? 

Let me then ask you, would it be easier 
or wiser for this country single-handed to re- 
sist a German Empire, flushed with victory 
and with great armies and navies at its com- 
mand, than to unite with the brave opponents 
of that Empire in ending now and for all time 
this menace to our future? 

Primarily, then, every man who crosses 
the ocean to fight on foreign soil against the 
armies of the German Emperor goes forth to 
fight for his country and for the preservation 
of those things for which our forefathers 
were willing to die. To tho^e who thus offer 
t hem jelves we owe the same debt that we owe 
to those men who in the past fought on 
American soil in the cause of liberty. No, 
not the same debt, but a greater one. It call i 
for more patriotism, more self-denial, and a 
truer vision to wage war 0:1 distant sho.e? 
than to repel an invader or defend one's home. 
1, therefore, congratulate you. young men, in 
your choice of service. You have done a 
splendid thing. You have earned already 
the gratitude of your countrymen and of 
generations of American-, to come. Your 
battle flags will become the cherished tro- 
phic; of a nation which will neve.- forget 
tho>e who bore them in the cause of liberty. 

I know thai some among you may consider the 
Idea thai Germany would attack us. it Bhe won this 
war. to be Improbable; but let him who doubts re- 
member that the Improbable, yes; the impossible, 
has been happening in this war from the beginning. 
if you had been told prior to August, 1914. that the 
German Government would disregard its solemn 
treaties and send its armies into Belgium, would 

wantonly burn Louvain, would murder defenseless 
people, would extort ransoms from conquered cities, 

would carry away men anil women into slavery. 
would, like vandals of old. destroy some of history's 
most cherished monuments, and would with malici- 
ous purpose lay waste Hie fairest fields of France 
and Belgium, you would have indignantly denied 
the possibility. You would have exclaimed that 
Germans, lovers of art and learning, would never 
permit such foul deeds. To-day you know that the 
unbelievable lias happened, that all these crimes 
have been committed,, not under the impulse of 

passion, but under official orders. 

V'.nn. If you had been told before the war 
that German submarine commanders would sink 

peaceful vessels of commerce and send to sudd n 



death men. women, and little children, you would 
have declared such scientific brutality to be im- 
possible. Or, if you bad been told that German 
aviators would fly over thickly populated cities 
scattering missiles of death and destruction with 
no other purpose than to terrorize the innocent in- 
habitants, you would have denounced the very 
thought as unworthy of belief and as a calumny 
upon German honor. Yet, God help us, these 
things have come to pass, and iron crosses have 
rewarded the perpetrators. 

lint there is more, far more, which might be 
added to this record of unbelievable things which 
the German Government has done. I only need to 
mention the attempt of the foreign office at Berlin 
to bribe Mexico to make war upon us by promising 
her American territory. It was only one of many 
intrigues which the German Government was carry- 
in j on in many lands. Spies and conspirators were 
sent throughout the world. Civil discord was en- 
couraged to weaken the potential strength of na- 
tions which might he obstacles to the lust of Ger- 
main's rulers for world mastery. Those of German 
blood who owed allegiance to other countries wore 
appealed to to support the fatherland, which be- 
loved name masked the military clique at Merlin. 

Some day I hope that the whole tale may be 
told. It will be an astonishing tale indeed. But 
enough has been told so that there no longer re- 
mains the shadow of a doubt as to the character of 

Germany's rulers, of their amazing ambition for 

world empire, and of their intense haired for do- 

mocr lcj 

I'lie day has gone by when wo can measure 
Possibilities by past experiences or when wo believe 
that any physical obstacle is so great or any moral 
influence is so potent as to cause the German 
ante /racy to abandon its mad purpose of world con- 
quest. 

1 1 was the policy of those who plotted anil made 
ready for the lime to accomplish the desire of the 
German rulers to lull into false security the great 
nations which they intended to subdue, so that when 
the storm broke they would bo unprepared. How 

wii they succeeded you know. Hut democracy no 

li 11 ;er sleeps. It is fully awake to the menace 
which threatens it. The American people, trustful 
and friendly, were reluctant to believe that im- 
perialism again threatened the peace and liberty of 
the world. Conviction came to them at last, and 
with it prompt action. The American Xation ar- 
rayed itself with the other great democracies of the 

earth against the genius of evil which broods over 
the destinies of central Europe. 

No thought of material gain anil no thought of 



LIFE BUOY 



material loss impelled this action. Inspired by the 
highest motives American manhood prepared to 
risk all for the right. I am proud of my country. 
I am proud of my countrymen. I am proud of our 
national character. With lofty purpose, with patri- 
otic fervor, with intense earnestness the American 
democracy has drawn the sword, which it will not 
sheathe until the baneful forces of abolutism go 
down defeated and broken. 

Who can longer doubt — and there have been 
many who have doubted in these critical days — the 
power of that eternal spirit of freedom which lives 
in every true American heart? 

I am firmly convinced that the independence 
of no nation is safe, that the liberty of no individual 
is sure, until the military despotism which holds 
the German people in the hollow of its hand has 
been made impotent and harmless forever. Ap- 
peals to justice, to moral obligation, to honor, no 
longer avail with such a power. There is but one 
way to restore peace to the world, and that is by 
overcoming the physical might of German imperial- 
ism by force of arms. 

For its own safety, as well as for the cause of 
human liberty, this great Republic is marshaling its 
armies and preparing with all its vigor to aid in rid- 
ding Germany, as well as the world, of the most 
ambitious and most unprincipled autocracy which 
has arisen to stay the wheels of progress and im- 
peril Christian civilization. 

If enthusiasm and ardor can make success sure, 
then we, Americans, have no cause for anxiety, no 
reason to doubt the outcome of the conflict. But 
enthusiasm and ardor are not all, they must be 
founded on a profound conviction of the righteous- 
ness of our cause and on an implicit faith that the 
God of Battles will strengthen the arm of him who 
fights for the right. In the time of stress and peril, 
when a man stands face to face with death in its 
most terrible forms, God will not desert him who 
puts his trust in Him. It is at such a time that the 
eternal verities will be disclosed. It is then, when 
you realize that existence is more than this life and 
that over our destinies watches an all-powerful and 
compassionate God, you will stand amidst the storm 
of battle unflinching and unafraid. 

There is no higher praise that can be bestowed 
upon a soldier of the Republic than to say that he 
served his country faithfully and trusted in his God. 
Such I earnestly hope will be the praise to which 
each one of you will be entitled when the world is 
made safe for democracy. 



FIGHTING SPIRIT. 

The Navy Yard is always glad to hear from 
the front and it is especially glad when this informa- 
tion comes first-hand, so it was no surprise to see 
the large crowd which turned out to hear Lieu- 
tenant J. A. Clark of the Princess "Paf Regiment, 
at the meeting held June 27, 1918. The National 
Service section of the United States Shipping Board, 
Emergency Fleet Corporation, has kindly offered 
to send speakers here from time to time to present 
the present day questions, and when they offered 
to send Lieutenant Clark, their offer was accepted 
with great pleasure. 

Lieutenant Clark is one of the few survivors 
of the Princess "Pat" Regiment, that noble body 
of men who fought to the last ditch, who knew how 
to sacrifice their lives, but did not know how to 
say "surrender." While Lieutenant Clark is very 
modest in speaking of his own part in the war, it 
is not necessary for a survivor of the "Princess 
Pats" to praise himself, for the fact that he is a 
member of that regiment speaks louder than words.' 
Lieutenant Clark's speech is so full of interest that 
it is printed below, as it is believed that every man 
who heard it will be glad to read it now. 

"Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen:- 

I can assure you it is with great pleasure that 
I am here today to say a few words to you and try 
to bring home to you what your countrymen are 
going through in France to keep the Germans from 
you and yours. As the gentleman has just told you, 
I went over with the Original Princess Pats. We 
left in December, 1914, and for the first two weeks 
we were digging trenches about thirty-seven miles 
back of the lines. On the 2nd of January, 1915, 
we received orders that we had to take over the 
front trenches on the night of January 4th, so we 
had to march thirty-seven miles in two days. When 
you consider that our equipment in the early days 
of the war amounted to about seventy-five pounds, 
it is quite a hike. On the evening of the second day 
we halted about five o'clock to have a little bite to 
eat. This consisted of some cold tea and some biead 
and bacon, the bacon so small you could hardly see 
it. 

At eight o'clock at night we received orders 
to go into the front line trenches.. In those days 
there were no communication trenches; it was 
simply a case of getting up any way we could. 
Every now and then the Germans sent up star 
shells and the territory back of the lines was con- 
stantly raked with machine gun and shell fire. 



LIFE BUOY 



When we reached the trenches we relieved a 
French division. We thought the French were in 
a great hurry to get out and when we jumped in 
the trench, we found out the reason. We landed 
In mud up to our waists and stood there for fifty- 
l wo hours. Our food consisted of hully heef and 
biscuit. Do you know what bully beef is? It is 
simply canned beef from the Chicago stock yards. 

During daylight we were completely cut off 
and if a man was wounded he simply had to lie 
there until dark before we could take him back 
to be cared for. After fifty-two hours of that we 
were relieved and we thought we were going some 
distance back of the lines, but we simply went back 
a little way into some dugouts, and there was plenty 
of water in the bottom of them. We remained 
there three days and every night as soon as it was 
dark we went up to the trenches and worked until 
daybreak and then went back to the dugouts. Our 
food was bully beef, biscuits and water. 

Now you WOrkingmen Of America, this is what 
your countrymen are going through today. They 
are going through it every day. and they are the 
linest fellows on earth, your men over there. But 
the winning of this war is not up to them alone, — 
it is up to every one of you here. It is up to you to 
back these men up. It is not enough to clap your 
hands; you want to do it with your hammers. Don't 
let it be said that you are slacking at your work. 
Lots of these fellows are never coming back; there 
are many little crosses over there now Some are 
coming back blind. Some are coming back without 
arms and legs. You don't want to be ashamed to 
face them because you slacked here while they 
went through all that. Kemember this, while you 
idle on your work you help the Germans kill your 
countrymen, I hope none of you will ever do that. 

On April 2. 1915, we went into the trenches 
and about that time the Germans loosed their first 
gas attack against the French, so troops were very 
scarce and we had to stay in the trenches twenty- 
eight days on a stretch. During that time the only 
clothing we took off was when we unrolled our 
puttees and changed our boots and stockings. 
Otherwise we had our clothes on day and night. 
There is not a man here who ever did a day's work 
that amounted to half an hour of that. Then we 
had to retreat to straighten out the line. On May 
Mb the Germans shelled us and we lost one hundred 
and fifty men. Every night we went on working 
parties to the front line. 

We went into the trenches again on the night 
of May 7th with 600 to TOO men in our regiment 
and from 4000 to 5000 in the brigade. On the 
morning of May 8th the Germans opened up with 



artillery about five o'clock and then attacked with 
infantry. We drove them back. At that time we 
were very short of ammunition and only about 
fifteen shells passed over our heads from our ar- 
tillery all day. As soon as their infantry attack 
broke down, they started again with artillery. At 
twelve o'clock the infantry again attacked and at 
two o'clock in the afternoon we had 200 to 250 men 
left in the regiment and about 1200 out of 4000 to 
5000 in the brigade. But we still held the trench. 
One of our officers lying wounded, with his leg 
shattered, sent word that he was proud of what 
we had done, but said: "Die where you are. Don't 
give an inch of ground!'' We said: "We won't 
give any ground. We will hold on." And we did. 
When we were relieved we had 150 men left in the 
regiment and S00 in the brigade. The 150 in our 
regiment had to carry out 100 of our comrades and 
bury them. When we got hack to the billets we 
read in the papers that some of our countrymen had 
been going on strikes in England and hindering 
munition manufacturers. Can you imagine our 
feelings? How would you feel if you had been 
lighting to save your countrymen from the worst 
fiend ever let loose on the earth and then hear that 
your friends and countrymen were holding up the 
manufacture of munitions for a little extra money'.' 
Never let it be said that there was ever a strike in 
this country. You want to send the ammunition 
over. You want to buy Liberty Bonds and War 
Savings Stamps and give to the Red Cross. You 
want to work ten hours a day or even more if they 
ask you to. 

When I was in the hospital at Hamsgate, one 
Sunday afternoon the German planes came over and 
dropped bombs there. A bomb dropped among a 
bunch of children going to Sunday School and 
killed five girls. Don't you think you are lucky to 
be on this side of the Atlantic? Do you know the 
reason these Germans are not over here? It is be- 
cause of the soldiers in France and the American 
ships on the sea. Do you want it said that a ship 
was held up by the lack of a piece of machinery you 
are working on? Never! You want to back up 
the boys over there by your best efforts on your 
work here at home." 

Dr. A. A. Hideout, of Boston, also addressed 
the meeting and his remarks were enthusiastically 
received. He is a forcible speaker who doesn't de- 
pend on the spread-eagle effect to interest his 
hearers; and his remarks were straight to the point. 

We hope that all the speakers who come to 
us will lie in the same class as Lieutenant Clark 
and Dr. Hideout. 



LIFE BUOY 



10 



SHOP GROUP PHOTOGRAPHS 

In this issue appears the first photograph of a 
series of shop group photographs to be taken by 
our Yard Photographer Mr. Staples. The Ship- 
fitter's Shop group of employees was the first group 
to be taken in that the largest number of employees 
are employed in this shop. 

Hereafter, in each future issue of the Lifebuoy 
will be printed one shop group photograph. The 
next photograph will be the Electrical Shop Group. 

It is hoped, that when the announcement is 
issued that the employees of a certain shop group 
are to be photographed, that every employee of 
that requested shop will be present. Sufficient 
time will be given so that everyone may have ample 
time to make arrangements so as to be present 
when the photograph is taken. 

At the time that the photographs are taken 
it is requested that employees do everything possi- 
ble so as to expedite the t ; me of taking the phono- 
graph. Unless orders are obeyed good photographs 
cannot be taken. 



HELPING UNCLE SAM. 

PORTSMOUTH AGAIN' OX THE JOB. 

Habit is a wonderful thing, and one of the 
best habits is the habit of saving. It seems as 
though this habit had strongly taken hold of the 
Portsmouth Yard, for with every campaign for sav- 
ing the results get better. The results of the second 
Liberty Loan were better than the first, and the 
results of the third Liberty Loan were better than 
the second, and then came the campaign for War 
Savings Stamps. The Navy Yard Improvement 
Association took the matter up and a committee of 
Foremen was formed to handle it. Each Foreman 
had full charge of the campaign in his shop, and 
the results show that all shops went "over the top" 
again. 

We have noticed that some Yards have to be 
pushed from behind in order to undertake cam- 
paigns of this kind, but so far the Portsmouth 
Yard has not had to have any outside urging to do 
its duty in this respect. It was feared when the 
campaign was undertaken that so many had bought 
Liberty bonds it would be difficult to sell any War 
Savings Stamps, but this fear was entirely ground- 
less, for within a week's time over $140,000 worth 
of War Savings Stamps were pledged by the Yard 
employees and a very large percentage of these has 
already been purchased. We are waiting to hear 
wild her any other Navy Yard made a better per 
capita showing. 



HELPING HENRY FORD. 

We have all heard of "Tin Lizzies" and of the 
efficiency with which the Ford plant builds them, 
and it is a pleasure to know that the Ford plant is 
asking this Yard, with other Navy Yards, to send 
them some men as instructors and supervisors in the 
construction of the new submarine chasers which 
they are building. They have had to extend their 
force so rapidly in this particular branch that they 
were forced to do the same as this Yard is doing — 
that is, educate their own mechanics — and, natural- 
ly they felt that the place to get good instructors 
is where ships are built and repaired, and we feel 
that the men who have gone from this Yard will be 
a credit to the Yard in I heir work. 

Edmud Whalley is going to help instruct the 
"flivver" builders in shipwright work; Harry Rose 
in machine work; Ben Kimball and Walter Petti- 
grew will show them how to do pipe work. We all 
expect that they will do such a good job at teach- 
ing that they will come back riding a brand new 
"Henry." 



GOVERNMENT HOTELS TO BE OPENED 
AT KITTERY POINT. 

The Government is now making arrangements 
for the purchase of the hotels Champernowne and 
Pepperell at Kittery Point, Maine for the use of \ 
navy yard employees. It is expected that it will be 
possible to open these hotels at an early date and 
every effort will be made to put them in operation as 
soon as practicable; in fact, they may be opened for 
business before this issue of the LIFE BUOY is 
printed. 

Owing to differences in working hours, etc., 
requiring different hours for meals it is contem- 
plated assigning the hotel Pepperell for clerical and 
drafting room employees, and the hotel Champer- 
nowne for men from the shops. Requests for ex- 
ception to this rule will be considered on their 
merits in cases of persons who desire to be together 
for any particular reason. 

Until the operating expenses are definately 
known, it will not be possible to fix permanent 
rates. The following average rates have, however, 
been tentatively fixed and include both room and 
board: 

One person occupying single room without 
bath, $9.50 per week 

Two persons in room without bath (each) 
$8.00 per week. 

One person occupying single room with private 
bath. $12.50 



11 



LIFE lUlOY 



Two persona in room with private bath (each) 
$9.60 

Married couple In room with privi 
(each I, $8.60 per week. 

Children under i wo years of age will be charged 
only « nil the cost of milk taken. 

Children between two and Ave years of age, 
one ion 1 1 ii ol price. 

Children between Hve and eighl years <>r nue, 
one halt price. 

Children trom eighl to twelve yeara ol a^e. 
i hree tourl lis price. 

Children twelve years of age and oyer, full 
price, 

Luncheons will be put up without extra charge 
tor those working in the Yard and paying tull price. 
Fur thoae not regularly taking luncheon, a reduc- 
tion of one dollar per week will be made. This will 

not apply to Isolated days, but only in the ease of 

an employee who desires regularly to obtain his 
mid-day meal elaewhere. 

These hotels are to be operated on a basis ol 

actual cost only. The Foregoing rates are, there 

fore, subject to revision later on as soon as the 

actual cost ol operation is definitely Known. Every 
effort will be made to conduct these hotels In the 
most efficient manner possible and at the lowest 
practicable coat consistent with a reasonable stand- 
ard of i i \ in;;, it is the Management's desire to 

make the prices, service, character of food. olc. 
in accordance with the wishes of the guests as far 
as it is possible to do so. The foregoing rates may 

be taken as an average basis of prices. There may, 

however, be slight departures therefrom based on 
different degrees of desirability of rooms, etc. 

Heat will be installed in all the rooms so that 
the hotels will hi' available tor winter and perman- 
ent uae, 

Rooms may be obtained singly or en suite, as 
may be desired to suit single men or men with 
families. Families will In- given preference in the 

Ignment of rooms with baths. A child occupy 
in:; a single room not a part of a suite will be char:; 
ed extra. 

It is desired to conduct these hotels on a high 



Applications for rooms should be made at the 
Office of the Public Works Superinl endenl . Building 

bath 81, wiere prices in greater detail and any further 
Information deaired may also be obtained, it is re- 
quested that ail those desiring accommodations 

make their reservations or signify their intention 
id' doing so at the earliest possible moment. This 

is in order that the necessary help for operating I he 
hotels, together with an adequate stock of all pro- 
visions, etc., may be obtained in ample time in ad- 
Vance, and in order to avoid confusion and unsatis- 
factory service. Furthermore, in making reserva- 
tions, preference will, of course, be given to those 
tirsi applying. 

Tin' Management has under consideration the 
question of allowing a limited number id' women 
members ol employees' families opportunities to 
assist in the housework, and thereby obtain a re- 
duction in the price of board and lodging. Appli- 
cations for this kind of word should also be made 
at the Office of the Public Works Superintendent, or 

direct to the manager of the hotels. Those Brst 
applying will, of course, be given preference tor 

these positions. 

ll will, id' course, be understood by all that 

these hotels are reserved exclusively for navy yard 

employees and their families, although when practi- 
cable an effort will be made to accommodate guests 

Of employees for limited periods, provided there 
at.' \ acant rooms available. 



It is believed that these government hotels, 
to be run on what is practically a cooperative basis, 
should receive the hearty support and patronage of 

employees desiring good living accommodations. 

It is believed that if these hotels are a success, and 
it is Confidently expected that they will be. they 
cannot help but exercise an important Influence in 

bringing down the general high cost of living in 

this locality. Local prices have, undoubtedly, in 
many cases been boosted above legitimate figures. 

This seems (o be the custom in many eases every 
time the men of the Yard get a raise in pay. By 

patronizing these hotels to the limit of their capaci- 
ties, it is believed that any excessive cost of living 
should be brought down to a reasonable figure, and 
all those who are now being Charged excessive 
standard and all desiring accommodations in them prices are invited to come and try the government 
should hear this in mind, and use every effort to hotels. It is. furthermore, understood that if nee- 
COOperate in this respect, particularly in the matter essary still more hotels will be taken over by the 
Of cleanliness and conduct. Men with families are government. The government will, furthermore, at 
particularly deaired, also single women, who will an early date actively pursue and investigate alleged 

tie given suitable accommodations properly locate, 1. excess prices in this locality. Everything possible 

There will, furthermore, be a matron in charge of will be done to insure a square ileal to all employees 
each hotel, under the direction of the manager. of the Yard. 



LIFE i:nn 



12 



OUR MASTER SfflPFITTER. 

The popularity of Samuel I). Oilkey our Ma tei 
Shipfltter has grown constantly since he first came 
to the Navy Van! some thirteen years ago. At the 
pre ien( moment o( writing Mr. Gilkey's popularity 
is si ill on the ascend and his advice Is constantly 
sought, His one ambition in life so he Bays "Is to 
always treat everyone on the square and to judge 
ac imparl ially." 

At a recent interview which the editor hart 
with Mr, Oilkey the following remark was made by 
Mr Oilkey and well Illustrates why he is so popular. 
He saiii a i i hi i Interview, "I always try to deal with 
the employees In my simp in such a manner thai 
when the work for the day Is over, I can go home 
with an absolutely clear conscience." This is in- 
deed a fine remark and Mr. Gllkey'a motto Is one 
we all should follow tor it simply Is the golden rule 
of "Do unto others as you won pi have thi m do unto 

you." 

A shorl resume of Mr. Gilkey's ira : buslne 
experience In shipbuilding Is herewith added for it 

is one he Is indeed proud of and we might add one 
thai the Yard employees are equally proud of. 

Mr. Samuel I). Cilkey was born in April 4tll, 
1 SOS iii I loullon, Maine, and spent his boyhood d I 
there. His family then moved tO I he West for in 

those days ihe State of Michigan was i he West. Al 
I lie age of fourteen he started to work for Hie F. W. 
Wheeler and Co. of Bay City, Michigan, which plant 
was located on Lake Michigan. He served his 

apprenticeship at this shipbuilding yard and stayed 
with the Wheeler Co. tor sixteen years. At the 

time Of leaving he held the position of General 
Foreman. The Wheeler Co. v. a engaged in build- 
ing tugboats and lake freight boats. Some of these 

lake freight boats were over 400 feel long and at 
thai lime some of the largest boats built. Mr. Oil- 
key's experiences in this company stood him In 
good stead later for he had many Interesting 
problems to meet in those early days when Michi- 
gan then was in the midst of the wild and wooly 
West. 

in i 898 he became affiliated with the Harlan 
and Hollingsworth Co. of Wilmington, Deleware, 
where tie stayed two years as Asst. General Fore- 
man He I lien became an Assistant Inspector for 
the Navy Department and for awhile was stationed 

at this plant. He later was associated tor awhile 
wiiii the .\ew York Shipbuilding t'o. of Camden, 
New Jersey. 

From 1902 until Hon; he held the position of 
Inspector for the Navy Department al the Bath 
Iron Works, Bath, Maine. 



In 1906 he was appointed Master Shipfltter 
al Ihe Portsmouth Navy Yard, and has been here 
ever since ;i period of some thirteen years. With 
such an extensive and thorough experience in hip 
building it is no wonder thai Mr. Gilkey's shop is 
functioning so highly and it is earnestly hoped thai 
he may be with us for a goodly number of yean 

more. 




SHIPFITTER'S SHOP 

in this issue of the Lifebuoy appears the first 
Shop group photograph of employees of this Yard. 
The honor of having Hie firs! group photograph was 
given to the Shipfltter's Shop in that th< larg 
number ol employees are employed in this simp. 

'Ihe supervisory force of Hie Sli iplit I er's Shop 

consists of Samuel it. Gilkey, Master Shipfltter and 
Quartermen Charles M. Sheppard, Joseph II. smith. 

Frederick Heiser, Harry A. Magg, Mallow II. Johns 
and John Shaughnessy. The Leadingmen are 
!](ty.i<-i- W. Cray, far en r >tlm D, Samuel .Yhito- 
hou le, Blake, Harry Culbertson, f. a 'An- nee Grace, 
Walter McDonald, Raymond W. Packard, John E. 
Snook, Joseph Carter, Edward H. Welch, Frank 
Conoyer, John Donlin and Haven T. Fernald. 



13 



LIFE BUOY 




LIFE BUOY 



14, 



AUGUST HAM. 

The distinction of having worked longer than 
any other employee in the Shipfitter's Shop belongs 
to August Ham, for he has been constantly at his 
work for over twenty years. 

Mr. Ham was born in Portsmouth on Sept. 3rd, 
1853, and has lived there ever since. At the pres- 
ent time he has charge of linoleum and tile placing 
en vessels. 

At a recent interview Mr. Ham stated that his 
hobby was his garden and that he stays in the gar- 
den until it is too dark to work or until his Mrs. de- 
cides it is for the best of all concerned that, he quit 
his hobby for that particular day. 




WORK VS. WORRY 
It isn't work that kills men, it is worry. Work 
is healthful. You can hardly put more work on a 



GENERAL FEDERATION OF TRADE 
UNIONS 

Editor's Note — The following appeal to the 
workingmen of America has been sent from Eng- 
land and is self explanatory. 

TO THK WORKMEN AFFILIATED TO THE CON- 
FEDERATION GENERAL DU TRAVAIL 

COMRADES, 

In 1914 Germany plunged the whole world in- 
to war. No sophistries concerning pre-war politics 
can ever obscure this fact. It is so obvious as not 
to need arguing. Britain's entry into the conflict 
was determined by Germany's action, and not by 
warlike ambitions. Hating war, appreciating fully 
the misery and wastefulness of war, and frequently 
attending international conferences to promote 
peaceful relationships between the peoples of dif- 
ferent countries, the British Trade Union movement 
was yet compelled to take its stand at the back of 
any British Government which stood to maintain 
treaty obligations toBelgium and moral obligations 
to France. 

The inevitable results of the annexationist 
policies of Austria, her seizure of Bosnia and 
Herzegovina in 1878, and her efforts to compel 
Serbia to accept "de facto" suzerainty, were always 
provocative of war. Behind Austria lay the tradi- 
tions of Germany, plus Germany's aggressive spirit. 
her materialistic tendencies, her years of prepara- 
tion, her consciousness of military might, and her 
determination to dominate by force of arms. These 
acts and ambitions left the world no chance for 
peace until arms had decided whether Germany, as 
instigator of the policies of the Central Powers, was 
to control the thought and life of the world, or 
whether Germany was to live and have her being 
in common and on the same terms as other nations. 

In 1914, three courses were obviously open to 
British statesmen — they could engineer a "rap- 
prochement" with Germany and share with her the 
spoils that such an alliance might wring from the 
rest of Europe; they could ignore treaty obligations 
and leave Belgium and France and Russia to their 
fate; or they could follow the honourable course 
and join with Belgium, France, Russia, and Serbia 
in resisting the attempt to reduce them to vassalage. 

Britain occupies, and has occupied from the 



man than he can bear. Worry is the rust on the beginning, the position of the citizen who seeks to 

blade. It is not the revolution that destroys the prevent a thief stealing the goods of the citizen's 

machinery, it is the friction. neighbour. It is absurd to suggest that Britain 

- Henry Ward Beecher. stands in the way of peace. 



15 



LIFE BUOY 



The people of Britain entered the war re- 
luctantly and in sorrow. They knew that their 
then existing army was smaller than that of any 
power involved. They were conscious of their lack 
of guns and mechanical appliances, and they knew 
from past experiences how serious would be the 
financial burden the world would expect them to 
carry. 

As the responsibility for the commencement of 
the war rests with Germany, so with her rests the 
responsibility for the continuance of war. During 
three years, this unhappy war has raged, and on all 
the battle fronts women and children have suffered 
physical and mental torture and millions of men 
have died agonising deaths. During the whole of 
this time, Germany has tried to persuade the world 
that she, the aggressor, was waging a war of de- 
fence, and during the whole of this time she has 
talked of peace, but only in vague and general 
terms. Once only, has she made any definite state- 
ment, and that was when the late Imperial Chancel- 
lor declared that Germany's peace terms must take 
cognisance of the map of Europe, — in other words, 
that any terms of peace that Germany would con- 
sider must include political and economic control, 
if not positive annexation, of the territories she has 
invaded. She did, indeed, in September permit a 
neutral power to indicate her desire for peace, but 
she has never replied to Britain's expressed willing- 
ness to consider and to place before the Entente 
Powers any terms she cared to specify. 

Germany has sought to create prejudice against 
Britain by constantly reiterated, but vaguely ex- 
pressed, declarations concerning the freedom of the 
seas. In the days that preceded Germany's declara- 
tion of war upon France, the maritime traffic of the 
whole world crossed the seas without let or hin- 
drance, and the ports of Great Britain were free to 
the ships of all nations. Indeed, so great was this 
freedom that it led to internal controversy; many 
thousands in Britain holding that the freedom ac- 
corded by Britain to the world's ships and merchan- 
dise was prejudicially affecting the interests of 
Britons themselves. Germany, during the last three 
years, has shown by her practices how small is her 
respect for the formula she circulates. Her demand 
for the freedom of the seas is the last word in cyni- 
cism. She has not been satisfied with blockading 
ports, she has closed whole seas and endangered 
all sea routes. Not satisfied with attacking and 
sinking the merchant ships of belligerent countries, 
she has attacked and sunk the ships of every neu- 
tral country, and her attacks have been carried out 
with a ferocity that has turned against her the 



moral feelings of the seafarers of every belligerent 
and neutral nation outside the alliance of the Cen- 
tral Powers. That is why in Britain most people 
believe that the freedom of the seas can only be 
insured by the defeat of Germany. 

To-day the British people are within sight of 
a war debt of six thousand million pounds (£6,000,- 
000,000 sterling). At a four and three-quarters 
per cent. (4% per cent.) interest the annual charge 
on this will be two hundred and eighty-five million 
pounds (£2S5,000,000 sterling), and at least an 
equal additional sum will be necessary to meet the 
ordinary national expenditure, including as it does, 
pensions to the mutilated, and to the old, and con- 
tributions to national sickness and unemployment 
benefits. No democracy would be likely to continue 
a war which threatened to add to these stupendous 
burdens unless compelled to do so by sheer ne- 
cessity. 

Beyond the material and financial difficulties 
lie the moral ones, and centuries of experience made 
the democracy of Britain feel that sooner or later 
this moral burden would also fall upon their 
shoulders; that ultimately everything would de- 
pend upon their tenacity and resolution. 

Just as they were reluctant to commence war, 
so have they been reluctant to continue it, but the 
indefiniteness of Germany's attitude in respect of 
peace has left them no option. 

In December, 1915, the General Federation 
stated that if Germany seriously wished to discuss 
terms of peace that provided restoration, reparation, 
and security, peace need not be delayed one single 
day. Germany has not yet accepted this intimation. 
She is under n,o compulsion to fight; her existence 
is not in danger; no one, at least no one in Britain, 
desires or expects that she shall be utterly destroy- 
ed; no one would even question her right to main- 
tain a military autocracy, to contribute her money 
and her sons towards the maintenance of mili- 
tarism, if these were necessary to her own existence, 
and were used only inside her own borders for the 
defence of her own interests. The only thing that 
Britain, with the rest of the world, seeks to destroy 
is the Prussian autocracy's military power for ex- 
ternal offensives. 

This is what Britain stands for: the right 
of the invaded territories to restoration and 
liberty; the right and the power of the world, act- 
ing in a combination such as outlined by President 
Wilson, to say to Germany, "You shall not trans- 
gress; you shall not outrage; you shall not burn 
and ravage and destroy." No democracy can ob- 
ject to this attitude. 



LIFE BUOY 



16 



The three greatest democracies in the world — 
America, Britain, and Prance, the freest and best 
educated of all peoples, could not, because the souls 
of their peoples would not permit it, continue an 
alliance and a war for purely aggressive and preda- 
tory purposes. It is inconceivable that the de- 
mocracies of America, France, Britain, themselves 
enjoying freedom, and the democracy of Russia 
which is struggling towards freedom should accept, 
while life remains, the terms that are inevitable if 
German autocracy succeeds. 

It is for these reasons, amongst others, that 
the General Federation of Trade Unions urges upon 
the democracies of the Allied Powers the need for 
concentration upon efforts to destroy, not Germany, 
but the militarism which holds even German de- 
mocracy in subjection. 

If there was any probability of securing peace 
by immediate negotiation, the General Federation 
would not hesitate to advise negotiations. Its whole 
history is one of efforts to promote industrial peace 
by negotiation, but in the absence of any definite 
communication from the Governments of the Cen- 
tral Powers, and in the presence of the impotence 
of the democracies of the Central Powers, the free 
democracies must continue the struggle until their 
present and future security is assured. 
(Signed) 

J. O'Grady (Chairman), Furnishing Trades 

Association. 
J. N. Bell, National Amalgamated Union of 

Labor. 
F. Birchenough, Amalgamated Cotton Spin- 
ners. 
Ben Cooper, Cigar Makers' Mutual Associa- 
tion. 
Jas. Crinion, Amalgamated Card and Blow- 
ing Room Operatives. 
Joseph Cross, Northern Counties Weavers. 
Allen Gee, Yorkshire Textile Workers. 
Ivor H. Gwynne, Tin and Sheet Millmen. 
T. Mallalieu, Amalgamated Felt Hatters' 

Union. 
T. F. Richards, Boot and Shoe Operatives. 
Alt. Short, Boilermakers and Iron and Steel 

Shipbuilders. 
John Taylor, Midland Counties Federation. 
Ben Tillett, Dock, Wharf, and Riverside 

Workers. 
John Ward, Navvies, Builders, and General 

Labourers. 
Alex. Wilkie, Associated Shipwrights. 
December LSth, 1917. W. A. Appleton, Secretary. 



EDITORIALS 

"We are all of us Americans, and nothing 
else; we form a part of one people, in the face of 
all other nations, paying allegiance only to one flag; 
and a wrong to any one of us is a wrong to all the 
rest of us." 

— Theodore Roosevelt. 



"To such a task (making the world free) we 
can dedicate our lives and our fortunes, everything 
that we are and everything that we have, with the 
pride of those who know that the day has come 
when America is privileged to spend her blood and 
her might for the principles that gave her birth and 
happiness, and the peace which she has treasured." 

— PRESIDENT WILSON 



Get your happiness out of your work or you 
will ne\ er know what real happiness is. 

—Elbert Hubbard 



GOLDEN MAXIMS 

1. Honor the Manager. There must be a 
head to everything. 

2. Have confidence in yourself, and make 
yourself fit. 

3. Harmonize your work. Let sunshine radi- 
ate and penetrate. 

4. Handle the hardest job first each day. Easy 
ones are pleasures. 

5. Do not be afraid of criticism — criticise 
yourself often. 

6. Be glad and rejoice in the other fellow's 
success — study his methods. 

7. Do not be misled by dislikes. Acid ruins 
the finest fabric. 

S. Be enthusiastic — it is contagious. 

9. Do not have the notion that success means 
simply money-making. 

10. Be fair and do at least one decent act 
every day. 

— Exchange 



17 



LIFE Ml TOY 



STATE SENATOR PAGE'S ATTACK ON US 

No doubt all of us have road in the newspapers 
the unwarranted attack of State Senator Paso on the 
Portsmouth Navy Yard, and we Have been wonder- 
ing what was at the bottom of it and why he chose 
Philadelphia as the place to make it rather than 
the loeal City. 

As tar as we know. State Senator Paso has not 
visited the Navy Yard for many years at least, nor 
has he made inquiries of any responsible official 
Of the Yard in an honest effort to obtain accurate 
information. One would suppose that a clear- 
thlnklng man. with a judicial mind, of the type 
that State Senator Page must be would first obtain 

accurate information before making charges of this 
kind. Ho appears to have obtained at least a part 
of his information from his chauffeur, whom ho 
certified as a machinist for employment on the 
Yard. This chauffeur was taken on as a fifth-class 
machinist, and was employed for a few months at 
the end of the year 191G and early in the year I a I 7. 
at which time he took his discharge, as the Yard 
did not feel justified in giving him any higher rat- 
ing. We have been enable to locate the barber that 

state Senator Page claims was the leadingman 
machinist over his chauffeur, although the father 

of a le ulin .man machinisl had been a barber, and 

the leadingman worked under him in the barber 

shop when a boy. This leadingman, however, ser- 
ved his re -.ul.ir apprenticeship as a machinist in the 
Navy Yard, and lias worked here practically con- 
tinuously for something like fifteen years, and is 
now considered to be specially competent as a tore 
man in charge of important work. This is simply 
an instance of the character o( the attacks of State 
Senator Page. It is not necessary te go into them 
in detail, particularly so as they have already been 
pretty well refuted in the newspapers. His attack 
on the women of the Electrical Shop is considered 
to be particularly unjust. 

The yard wee id welcome a fair investigation 

by anyone competent lo conduct it. We can show- 
beyond all doubt that the efficiency of the Yard has 
ttlj increased, and that we are turning out a 
tremendous amount of important war weak, and 
that the Portsmouth Navy Yard is net by any means 
failing in its part in winning the war. Our activi- 
ties during the War are necessarily mere or less 
secret and are not published in the papers, as was 
the case before the war. State Senator Pane has 
eviden i> jumped to very erroneous conclusions 
without any knowledge or investigation 

I n his part. 



We find it hard to believe that State Senator 
I'. ice was actuated by tiny patriotic motive in mak- 
ing this attack, or by any desire to help the Yard 
in its Important War work. It would have been a 
very simple matter for him lo have come to the 
Yard and to have found out the tremendous amount 
of work we are really doing; also, his atack was 
made in a distant city where we were given no op- 
portunity to present tin adequate and prompt de 

tense 

\\'e realize we are not perfect, no one is, but 
we tire earnestly striving for the maximum possible 
efficiency, and most of us tire working under a strain 
and pressure that is a serious tax on health and 
Strength. We are at all times open to constructive 
criticism. We want it. We want lo improve in 
e.eiy possible way, but we must s Tiously resent un- 
warranted attacks and criticism which cannot but 
hurt tin 1 Yard in its war work and be an actual aid 

to the enemy, in that such attacks and criticism 

cms,' tic I'd,' and controversy, and take up time 
urgently needed for legitimate work. 

We would not take Senator Page's attack seri- 
ously if i were net for the fact that it has been 
prominently published in newspapers of distant 
cities, it is to us simply amusing, because we know 
what we are doing, and s.ate Senator Page evi- 
dently does not. We cannot help wondering what 
he himself is doing to help win this War. 

We do net know on whom this attack was 
made, whether the management, the 'workmen of 

the Sard, or the community as a whole. It is. how- 
ever, calculated to be harmful to till of us. and it 
is the dutj of each one of us who is doing his best 
in the war work to resent and refute it in every 

way, even though the charges are ridiculous and 

principally a source of amusement to us. 

We desire no quarrel with State Senator Page 
We have no time for quarrels or con roversles if 

they can bo avoided. We are trying to give him 
credit for some patriotic motive in making his at- 
tack and to believe that he thought his information 
was correct. We. therefore, extend to him a cordial 
invitation to come ever to the Yard and make i's 
acquaintance and obtain first-hand knowledge ;n 
to w'uit we tire actually accomplishing. We also 
invite constructive criticism from anyone competent 

I e it, but only when such criticism is based on 
facts and accurate knowledge. We will not stand 
for criticism 'eased on hearsay evidence only, or on 
- atements from irresponsible persons. \\v. further- 
more, invi e State Senator Page to cooperate with 
i s and jcin in the war work in tttat our Country 
may come out victorious. 



LIFE BUOY 



18 



0-1 LAUNCHED. 

WILL SOON BK READY FOB SERVICE. 

In spite of statements in the Boston newspaper 
lo the effect that this Yard is doing no work, Sub- 
marine O-l was successfully launched on July 9, 
and will be ready for commission in a comparatively 
short lime. The vessel has been under construction 
in the Franklin Shiphouse where other fighting 
ships have been built. She will soon be out doing 
her bit against the Huns, and if she does not give 
a good account of herself it will not be the fault of 
the Portsmouth Yard or of her crew. 

A large gathering assembled to witness the 
launching both galleries were filled and on the 
sponser's platform there were nearly two hundred 
persons. Practically the whole Yard force was 
lined up outside the building and on the Kittery 
banks. 

At 1.45 Tuesday afternoon, the 0-1 
took the water by sliding gracefully down the ways, 
amid the strains of "The Star Spangled Banner" 



and the cheers of the guests assembled and the 
shrill shrieks of the tugs and other river boats. 

Just previous to the launching Mr?. Cora Isabel 
Adams, wife of our Industrial Manager, Naval Con- 
structor, L. S. Adams, who was sponser, christened 
the O-l with a bottle of American champagne which 
was enclosed in a handsomely engraved silver cas- 
ing. 

Among the guests on the launching stand bo- 
sides Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Adams were Admiral C. J. 
Boush, U. S. N., commandant of the Yard; Gov. 
H. W. Keyes of New Hampshire; Capt. W. R. Rush 
of the Boston Navy Yard and Chief of industries for 
this naval district; Mrs. David R. Francis, wife of 
the U. S. Ambassador to Russia; Mayor and Airs. 
S. T. Ladd of Portsmouth; Mrs. Norman Kirk, wife 
of the commanding officer of the O-l ; Capt. and 
Mrs. Almy; Capt. and Mrs. Wyman; Col. G. W. 
Patterson, U. S. A. and Miss Patterson. 

Immediately after the launching Mrs. L. S. 
Adams wa3 presented by the employees of the Navy 
Yard with a very beautiful gold wrist watch. 





Submarine 0-1 



19 



LIFE BUOY 



ACCIDENT PREVENTION. 

The prevention of industrial accidents is a 
problem worthy of our most serious consideration 
For, comparatively few persons realize how great 
a toll industrial accidents take of our people every 
year. We read of battles in which thousands of our 
allied soldiers are killed and maimed and we are 
deeply moved: yet every year the number of fatal 
vocational accidents to adult male workmen in this 
country is between 30,000 and 35,000. In addition 
to this death rate there occur probably 2,000,000 
non-fatal but more or less serious accidents. These 
figures are based on conservative authority and do 
not include the accidents that befall the great 
number of temporary workers, nor do they include 
the working women, of whom there are some eight 
million. If all these classes were included it seems 
logical to believe that the number of deaths from 
industrial accidents in the United States would 
reach 50,000 per annum. 

Of all this we think but little. However, the 
Navy Department is conscious of this great enemy 
liitht at home and as a result a determined effort 
is being made to overcome this real danger. With- 
out the help and cooperation of every individual 
employee of this Navy Yard we cannot overcome 
the danger. Consequently, it is up to you fellow- 
employees "to do your bit." Just as there is a call 
to service for the soldier or the sailor, so is there a 
call to service to see that precious lives are not 
wasted and that the bodies of precious people are 
not crippled. 

Industrial accidents may be divided ii t > two 
main classes; the first class consists of unavoidable 
accidents, and the second of those accidents due to 
carelessness or ignorance. It has been assumed that 
industrial accidents are chiefly due to the absence 
of safety devices and guards around dangerous ma- 
chines. Closer analysis and examination of indus- 
trial accidents show SO per cent, of such accidents 
are due to the fallowing causes: ignorance, careless- 
ness, unsuitable clothing and poor state of health. 

Ignorance is a word use 1 implying a lack of 
intelligence relative to the sources of danger pres- 
ent . Employees, when assigned to machines with 
which they are unfamiliar, should ask for instruc- 
tions relative to I lie hazards and dangers probably 
existing. Your foreman, quarterman or leadingman 
will gladly inform you regarding the points of 
danger. 

Carelessness is the cause of many of the so- 



called avoidable accidents. Sometimes carelessness 
is nothing more or less than recklessness, although 
generally it is mere indifference or thoughtlessness. 
Employees should realize that their own safety 
depends largely upon their own movements. After 
you have learned the motions to safely perforin 
your allotted work, your acts become instinctive, 
with the result that a false move may often serve 
to warn you of danger. 

Unsuitable clothing is the cause of many acci- 
dents, some of which may prove serious. Moving 
parts of machines cannot always be completely 
guarded or covered in. with the result that an un- 
buttoned ,coat or one with a torn or ragged sleeve 
may become caught and cause a serious if not fatal 
accident. 

Female operatives in this Navy Y'ard who 
operate machines may also be exposed at times to 
danger. Frightful accidents have occurred by the 
hair becoming caught in rotating machinery. You 
women consider your hair as one of your chief orna- 
ments and it behooves you all to see that no strands 
are allowed to fly loosely about. It is recommended 
that nets or caps be worn to ensure complete pro- 
tec' ion. 

Employees in poor state of health are naturally 
more or less susceptible to accidents. Consequently, 
it is urged that employees maintain their health 
and conserve their strength by righteous living. In 
order to be 100 per cent, efficient it is necessary to 
eat good food and get plenty of sleep. j When em- 
ployees feel ill to the point where they realize they 
are aetin; in an indifferent manner they should 
stop work, thereby protecting not only themselves 
but also their fellow employees. 



FOOD ECONOMY 

Food will win the war. Don't waste it. 

Conserve food, especially beef, sugar, fats and 
wheat. 

Use less wheat and meat. Buy local foods. 
Serve just enough. 

He who wastes a crust of bread prolongs the 



war. 



Save the food and help the fighters fight. 
Use substitutes for wheat and help win 



the 



Fat is fuel for fighters. Save it. 
Eat wisely and keep the wolf from the door 
of the world. 

Eat at least one wheatless meal a day. 
Do not eat meat more than once a day. 



LIFE BUOY 



20 



TEETH. 

In order to be in good health it is necessary 
to have your teeth in good condition. Nature gave 
you your teeth for chewing your food and conse- 
quently preparing it for digestion in the stomach. 

Teeth should be kept clean for two reasons: 
first, in order to save them; second, to prevent them 
from becoming breeding places for bacteria or 
germs. The reason that teeth decay or get bad is 
because your food is allowed to lodge between the 
teeth. When food is allowed to remain between the 
teeth it decays and changes and makes an acid 
which eats into the teeth. Moreover, the bacteria 
cir germs always present in the mouth go into the 
cavities or decayed spots eaten by the acid and cause 
further decaying. 

Decayed teeth cause toothache, poisoning of 
the jaw bone and stomach disorders. 

The best way to keep good teeth and keep 
from having bad teeth is to clean them at night 
with a brush and tooth powder. The mouth should 
be rinsed after cleaning the teeth by taking a glass 
of water. If you have bad teeth you should go to 
a dentist at once and have them fixed. A visit to 
a dentist once a year is strongly urged so that all 
cavities may be filled. 



BASEBALL. 

A baseball league has been formed and a schedule of 
games is being arranged. The probabilities are that a 
schedule of two or three games a week will be arrang- 
ed for and much entertainment should result. 

Friendly rivalry between shops will not only result in 
good to the shops but in good to the men. It is hoped 
that the rooters ofeach shop will back their team to the 
limit by coming to all the games. 

The captain who will also be the manager will be elect- 
ed by the players themselves. The money necessary to 
finance the shop teams will be raised thru shop sub- 
scriptions of a voluntary nature. 

Schedule games will probably be played on the dia- 
mond near the Prison. Practice diamonds will be ar- 
ranged for. 

Accounts of games will appear in future issues of the 
Lifebuoy. It may also be arranged so that team pho- 
tographes may be published. 



WHICH? 



Republic 

Government by Ballot 

$75,000 President 

Moral Education 

Free Speech 

Equal Opportunity 

Religious Liberty 

Good Living Conditions 

High Wages 

God 



Monarchy 

Rule by Brute Force 

$250,000,000 Royalty 

Beastial Kultur 

Silent Suffering 

Class Favoritism 

State Coercion 

Miserable Existence 

Slavery 

Kaiser 



HEALTH. 

The laws of health are as inexorable as the 
law of gravitation, as exacting as eternal justice, 
as relentless as fate and their violation is the be- 
ginning and cause of all disease, suffering and sin. 

Health is the most desired of earthly blessings. 
When finally lost it cannot be purchased by un- 
counted millions, restored by the alienist or return- 
ed by the pulpit. 

Human health and human efficiency are the 
two most precious things on earth. If out of this 
awful labor of war a strong health sentiment for 
the entire nation can be born then will our sacri- 
fice not have been in vain. 

R. Blue Sur. Gen'l 

I'. S. Public Health Service 

FOUNDRY HAZARDS 

Accidents occuring in foundries are easily stop- 
ped if careful attention to personal safety is given 
by each individual employee. The reason for such 
a statement is because of the fact that very little 
machinery is found in a foundry in that the art of 
founding depends largely upon the human mechan- 
ism such as the hands and mind. 

Nearly every accident that occurs in our foun- 
dry is due to carelessness on the part of the injured 
employee or on the part of a fellow employee. 

Many molders and helpers wear cotton shirts 
and overalls and should a splash of hot metal strike 
the co* ton it w uld immediately burn through. It is 
recommended that twilled cotton or woolen cloth- 
ing be purchased in the future. Fewer colds will 
also result if heavier clothing is worn. 

Burns on the feet occur frequently and accord- 
ing to statistics every sixth accident in a foundry 
is a foot burn. The reason for this is easily under- 
stood if an inspection is made of the shoes worn 
by foundry employees. Forty percent of employees 
in our foundry wear faulty or cracked shoes and as 
many as eighty percent wear lace or button shoes. 

When a lace shoe is worn it is very easy for 
spilled hot metal to penetrate thru the openings 
and seriously burn the foot. When a Congress shoe 
is worn this possibility of a burn is removed. More- 
over, a Congress shoe may be easily and quickly 
taken off. The Congress shoe fits snugly around 
the ankles whereas the lacings of lace shoes often 
become broken allowing the ankle to be seriously 
exposed. 

Canvas leggings and leggings made of twilled 
cotton are available and it is recommended that 
employees make use of this additional method of 



21 



LIFE BUOY 



protecting their legs. For, canvas leggings are 
light, comfortable and when fastened by Bat clip 
springs there is do danger of any metal ever burn- 
ing thru. 



YOl'K FLAU AND MY FLAG 



HEADACHE 

There are man; causes tor headache and that 
is why they are so common. The most frequent 
causes are: Indigestion, eye strain, on-coming sick- 
nesses and neuralgia, 

When a headache is due to Indigestion the fol- 
lowing symptoms may be notlcable, namely, thai a 
dull aching Bensation is experienced al the back of 
the head and is aggravated when the head is turned 
suddenly. Other signs are slight nausea, loss of 
appetite, constipation and the coating of the tongue 
The proper treatment tor most forms of headache 
is to cure the condition of Indigestion. Care should 
be exercised with regard to the food eaten. 

People who use their eyes constantly and re- 
quire glasses without knowing it are also more or 
loss subject to headaches which may be attributed 
to eye si rain The pain in BUCh form of headache 
is usually localised in the front of the bead and 

often the stomach fools out of or, lor. Sucb head- 
aches ran onh be cured by procuring proper glasses. 

Many sicknesses begin with a headache, in 
other words headaches are a preliminary warning 
that an on-coming sickness may be expected, if 
employees feel sick all over and have a bad head- 
ache, it is urged that thej consult a doctor. 

Headaches due to neuralgia may have the pain 
occuring anywhere In the head - Such headaches 
are usually accompanied by pains which are sharp 

and Cutting and which often jump from place to 
place Neuralgia is often duo to the fact that em- 
ployees are run down, having exposed themselves 

to damp cold weather or cold draughts. Headaches 
due to neuralgia an- best treated by applying heat 
to the aching part, in this case the use of a hot 
water bottle is an excellent media 

The U86 of headache powders or pills is a habit 
that unfortunately is growing in this country. 
Many of the patent headache powders are so power- 
ful that they have a depressing effect on the heart. 
The editor knows of cases where people have been 
BO addicted to the use of headache powders that 
they have lost their sense of hearing. Numerous 
deaths have occurred due to the fact that people 
were ignorant of the danger of these drugs, \o 
headache powder or pills should be used unless 
ordered by a dec: or. 



Bj Wilbur Nesbet 

Your tlag and my Hag. 

And how il Hies today. 
In your land and my land 
And half a w orld away! 
ROBS rod and hlood-rod 

The stripes forever gleam; 
Snow-white and soul white 

The good forefathers' dream. 
Sk\ blue and true blue, With slars to gleam aright 
The gloried guidon of the day; a shelter through 
the night. 

Your tlag and my Bag! 

To every star and stripe 
The drums beat as hearts beat 

And pipers shrilly pipe! 
Your Hag and my Bag 

A blessing in the sky; 
> our hope and m> hope 
It never hid a lie! 
Home land and far laud and half the world around, 
(lid Glory hears our glad salute and ripples at the 
sound. 

Your tlag and my Hag! 

And oh: how much it holds 
Your land and my land. 

Secure within its folds! 
Your heart and my heart 

lie. it quicker at the sight : 
Sun kissed and wind -tossed 
Red and blue and white 
The one flag- the great tlag the flag for me an 1 

you. 
Glorified all else beside The red. the white, the 
blue 



Unbeatable! The business like air of A.mei lea, 

the set jaw of England, the steel nerves of France 

Judge 



Little careless actions, 
Small seeds of neglect ; 
Make human sufform -.. 
And hearts with grief be 



set 



'•Hush Little Thrift Stamp. 
Don't you cry. 
You'll be a War Stamp. 
Bj i' and Bye 

(Trumbull Cheer). 



TAKE A HA'NDFULL 




OF E^STlUEAlSr KOD^K IFTLIMS 
POH YOUR TIMF OFF, ALL SIZKS AT 

MONTGOMERY'S opp. p o. 

THE ORiaiNAL KOD^KI STORE 

Meats of the better kind 
Fish always strictly fresh 
Vegetables from local farmers 
Canned goods of a high quality 
PRICES as low as possible 
What more can you ask? 

Shaw's Cash Market 

18 Pleasant St. - - - - Portsmouth N. H. 

Formerly CLARK'S BRANCH 
"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



23 LIFE BUOY 

NKW Sl'll WAYS. u '' wonder II Wall Perkins la using some thin 3 

>m iiis hair, for 11 is getting considerable lighter 
it's nil oft! Its .ill off! Whal " 

, , every da] 

Tin> hair mi Qeorge Straughua head _ . ,, . . 

We note thai the B and M. have enlarged the 

draw "ii Hi" Portsmouth bridge to meel the re 
Dun Dorothy's new Ford machine la some 

aulrements of Fred Duran who has recently pur- 

FUvver The other night, n la rumored, Dan was 

,, ,, chased a seagoing achooner i>ui ho says ho prefers 

arrested somewhere in the vicinity of Salmon Falls. 

Greal Baj to the Atlantic Ocean, oapeclally when 
When D. in asked why he was arrested 1 1 » « ■ Judge re 

I lie wind dies down. 

plied "Cruelty to animals, For tying a tin can to 



Mien do Koi'iii'iiiuiii recently became quite 
u.. .hi the Vofk Beach merchant and our 



peeved when adoils'ed of eating eleven pork Band 



wlches for Bupper, hut nevertheless admitted thai 
friend sii.nir.ini have a minihi'i' <>i surplus watches, 

. he imlv ate iiiiii' 

B °" ' "'"''" : "" """"""*> 11 Is no wonder .hoy ^^ ^ ^ proapoeta |if ,„„ „„.,„„,,, ,„. , 

k,,,MV ul "'" ' :; " arriVea baseball team In Bldg. 9B with Steve Flanasan as 

now aiiinii your W. S. Stamps hoys; are yon 

Captain and Manager, 11 his plans work out per 

wiih us or against us? . , , ..,, , , , , 

haps Manager l.oud oi Bldg. 80 would conaonl ii> 
The boys are surely backing Qene and work . , 

take on his loam Borne iinv when in n 'oil oi a iiiiio 

on 1 ho stilnunrlno la progressing rapidly. 

pracl Ice, 

LATHE AND FILE CHIPS. SEEN THROUGH THE PERISCOPE. 

The n une of Charles S Ci nlon has been added 

We are very pleased to learn thai Messrs. to the iisi of those thai have joined the service, 

Seavey, Qrapentino and Peterman are upholding the Charlie expects i<> io.no verj shortlj tor Pensacola, 

traditions of Bldg 80, vu< where he will assume the duties ot Machinist's 

Ralph has returned from .1 verj pleasant va Mate In the Aviation Corps, 

cation apeni .11 Dexter, Maine, rene\ tng old ac Austin Qooglns has returned from Boston, 

qualntanoes where he endeavored to join some branch of the 

We expected thai living In Kllol would make service, We are very sorry Austin, i>ni never mind. 

"Eddie" somewhal Bhy and bashful, bul did nol better times coming 

anticipate an} «uoh display of emotion as he ex Thatcher Plnkham spent the week of the fourth 

hlbited when asked tor his time rani in Bath, whioh he says is siiu on the map, 

Many of our Bhopmates intend to avail them- During the absence of Leon Scheirer, Mr 

selves "i the ohance to gel aboard for hotel ac Borden will officiate as pilol of the weight launch, 

<'iiiuiiind.il ions al the Champernowne Fellow contributors, kindly take notice. We 

Mr 11. W, Burke iho very popular bell maker offer tor your perusal the following list from our 

who has charge of the belts In iho maohlne simps, office thai have been "hitched" Bince iho lasi ap 

has recently Invented a unique Instrument whioh pearance of the "Life Buoy." Wedding Bells are 

he rails a helloseope and whleli is Intended to do ringing briskly, and the OUtlOOk is very r.">'^ tor 

awaj wiih an guess work as tar as determining several more before Winter falls on our weary 

strength of belts and heii lacings, When Interview hamlet 

od ai his finely equipped laboratory in Portsmouth, Miss Frances Campbell o( our weight depart 

Mr Burke was loud in his praise of the instrument, ment, and Chief Boatswain William Greene wen' 

which be olaims will revolution! e the belt making uaitod In marriage tho night before the Fourth, and 

Industry The Instrument consists of a series of left the same night for New Fork City, 
miorosooplc and telescopic alghtB, a set ot range and Alfred W Hayward ot the Hull crew and \\> ■ 

light adjustments, with a head gear which enables Dorothy Cook were married In Somerville, Masa., 

Hi,' operator i<> wqrk ih<' Instrument with both on July 3rd, They are now at Old Orchard Beach 

hands The feature of the Instrument however, Is where wo hope they are enjoying a most pleasant 

a verj closely guarded seoret, Known only to iho honeymoon, 

Inventor, He claims thai bj one glance with It Hans P Berna and Miss Sarah Wood aigned up 

propei i> adjusted he ran insianiiy determine the tor it r « - in Fall River, the 29th ot June, They will 

Btrength of anj bell or bell lacing made We all be al Alton Bay tor a while, and after thai will take 

wish Mr Burke the greatest of Buocess with his up their residence In VorU. Maine. 
latest Inventton, Jesse 1.. Philbrlok of the Kitten contingent, 



"A Penny Saved 
Is a Penny Earned" 

We can help you save a 
good many pennies on 

HOUSE FURNISHINGS 


THE "BUSY CORNER" STORE 

But Never Too Busy To Fill Your 
Prescriptions and Fill Them Right 

OUT OF TOWN PATRONS ARE 

WELCOME To WAIT FOR THE 

CAR" AT OUR HOUSE 

BP]RJAMIN GREEN 

THE DRUGGIST 


See Mr. WOOD 

99 Penhallow St. Portsmouth, N. H 


INSURANCE and REAL ESTATE 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

LOWEST RATES BEST FORMS 

G E- TRAFTON 

:i. r . Pleasant St. Opposite Post Office 


vol AUGHT TO KNOW 

DENNET and MCCARTHY'S 

is TOE BUST PLACE TO IIUV 

Overalls, Shirts, Hosiery 


YORK BEACH, MAINE 

and 
THE GOLDENROD 


USE GAS FOR 

LIGHTING, HEATING AND COOK INC 

PORTSMOUTH GAS CO- 

ALWAYS AT YOUR SERVICE 


Clam Chowder, Lobsters, Ice Cream, 
Candies, Soda, Cigars, and Home Bakery, 
Home <>r the famous Goldenrod Kisses, 

over L3 l"ii sold last summer. Made fresh 

every day except Sunday, A pound box 

mailed any place in New England for36c. 



BROOKS MOTOR SALES 

PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

FORD SERVICE 

Flllis BrOS. Men's and Boy's Shoes 

Fine Shoo Repairing CONGRESS ST. TEL. CON. 



i saw it in 'nil-: i .1 !■"!•; iiuoy" 



25 



LIFE BUOY 



;iiul Miss Madeline Moulton Ol Eliot were married 
at the bride's home on the 28th ol June. After 
sojourning tor a low days Jessa returned with that 
smile that won't wear oft. 

Leon W. Schelrer left tor Elmira, N. Y.. on the 
morning of the Fourth, where he will spend a fort- 
night with his folks. Dennis .1 Carey, our eminent 
file-clerk accompanied him as tar as Albany, where 
he will leave Leon, and start on an extended trip 
through New York State. The trip was made in 
Scheirer's Cadillac, and we trust that there were 
no mishaps, for Guggisberg, Chief Mechanician, can 
not be called in at any moment, owing to the fact 
that he is in Minneapolis. 

Mr. Potter of the Mechanical Division has left 
tor a vacation, which he will spend at his home in 
Bath, Maine. 

Nathan Rosen is now on leave, looking over the 
wilds of Boston. \\'o hope "Rosie" don't get lost 
in the crowd. 

"Red" Newton is recuperating at Lyme, Conn. 

K. M. Tattoo is spending a couple of weeks in 
Portland. 

F. Monroe Ray, Jr., has returned from a two 
weeks vacation, which time ho spout at the Atlantic 
Corporation, obtainin •. a further insight in Steel 
ship construction. 

Wo hear that .lack Colllton has a perfectly 
good motorcycle to sell reasonable. You know 
Jack, it pays to advertise, and we sincerely hope 
that this will bring results. Should anyone doubt 
the durability of this machine, he might ask Snow. 
as to its pole-Climbing abilities 

Statistics show that during the last fiscal year, 
ending .Inly 4th. there has been 14 marriages, six 
births, ami six have joined the colors, from the Sub- 
marine Drafting Room. 

There were many guests of the employees here 
at the launching of the 0-1. The boys were all very 
glad to see that the boat is so near completion, and 
wo all wisli her prospective commander. Lieut. N. 
1. Kirk, the best of luck. 

On Tuesday evening, July 2nd. the first "Get 
together" of the Draftsmen of the Navy Yard and 
the Atlantic Corp. was hold in the Colonial room of 
the Rockingham Hotel. Covers were laid for 
twenty-five men. including Mr. 1. c. Hanscom. the 
retiring Chief Draftsman of the Atlantic Corp.. and 
he was one of t ho principal speakers of the occasion. 
In a few well-chosen words, bo reviewed his past 
experiences with the men of both yards, and at the 
conclusion of bis address, all present expressed their 
regrets at his departure and their best wishes for 
his future success 



Mr. Rosen spoke for the Navy Yard men and 
thanked all present for their cooperation in making 
the banquet a success, and assured the vanquished 
Atlantics that the Navy Yard bowlers would give 
them a chance for revenge, sometime in the Fall. 

The bowling-team met and defeated the Atlan- 
tic Corp. how lots in the deciding game of the season 
that settles the supremacy between these two teams. 
and as a result of their victory, their rich reward, 
the banquet, an account of which appears in this 
issue, was ultimately gained. 

We all are earnestly striving to make the 
launching of the S-3 the most successful of all 
launchings, and rest assured that before long it will 
slide gracefully down the ways. 



DITTY BOX SAYINGS. 

Dagan has a large hole in his left arm between 
the elbow and the shoulder: he says it was caused 
by vaccination. The boys say it will lake the word 
of the Medical Officer of the Yard to make them be- 
lieve its anything but a sheep bite. 

Bailey and Sisco have planted a garden on 
shares. Their shoptnates are worried over the 
gathering and dividing of the profits, being a war 
garden. B. and S. are a little shaky themselves. 

The addition to No. 14 is a great improvement. 

Woodbury turned crimson and made scrap tin 
of his Tea Pot when he found one of the men using 
it for an oil can. 

According to reports, the men that went to 
Portland Lightship have nothing on one another, as 
they all were seasick They now say that they don't 
blame Jonah for letting a whale swallow him. 

If there is anyone who thinks the Joiners do 
not earn their money they had better come and see 
what we do. They can then put it down in their 
little memorandum book and turn the Tage down. 

The restaurants in Portsmouth at present are 
said to be allowed to sell — Ice Water, Soft Water, 
Cold Water. Hot Water. Hard Water. Salt Water, 
Boiled Oil, Castor Oil. Hair Oil and Magnolia Balm. 

Our girls earn every cent they receive and in- 
vest a good share of it in Bonds, and there is not a 
slacker in the shop. 



Here's to the Ditty Box, a useful thing. 
With its hinges ami lock and cover trim. 
And here's to the girls who with song all day. 
Up in the attic, labor away. 



HENRY PEYSER &, SON 

16 TO 20 MARKET ST. 

For more than forty years Portsmouth's leading 
Store for Men's and Boys' apparel 

PERFECTION OIL STOVES REFRIGERATORS PORCH FURNITURE 
THE QUALITY STORE 

MARGESON BROS. 



Vaughn St. 



Telephone 570 



PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



FRED B. COLEMAN 

APOTHECARY 

Corner Congress and Vaughn Sts. 
PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



If you desire to buy or sell Real Estate call, 
telephone or write 

II. I. CASWELL AGENCY 

Congress St. TELEPHONE 47H-W Portsmouth 



rrrt The acorn 



IPibiodicm?ubbmy) 



IS Market Square Portsmouth, N. II. 



Stationery of varied grades 
Each the best at the price 



SINCLAIR GARAGE 

HORTON SERVICE 

Telephones 282-W 8411-M 

Corner Richards Ave. & Middle St. 
Portsmouth, N. H. 



S- S- TRUEMAN 



GENERAL CONTRACTOR 



TELEPHONE 651 



83 Bow St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



JOHN O'LEARY 

KITTERYand NAVY YARD EXPRESS 

GENERAL TEAMING 
Tel. Con. Portsmouth, N. H. 

If you want to be dressed up to the Minute 
from head to foot in dress and work clothes 
come in to see 

LOUIS ABRAMS & CO. 

38-40 Daniel St. Portsmouth, N. H. 






The simplest most economical durable modern motor built. Valve in removable head. All valves running 
in oil. Leather faced cone clutch. Floating axles. 2 sizes, 4 cylinders and an eight that is snappy and pretty 
LB any car. It has valve in removable head motor. We also have a beautiful enclosed car for $1060. 

WOO 

Portsmouth N. H. 



r,l to (io How Street 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



27 



LIFE BUOY 



Their arms grow strong and their eyes grow 

bright, 
As they trim every box there is In sight. 
For there's Clara and Mary and Josephine there 

And Lottie and Hertha and little wee Ki'eddie 



BOAT SHOP PUFFS. 

As the Lifebuoy gees to press we have news 
from our Leadingman who has hoen away on his 
vacation for sometime, He is having a hard time 

(.n his mountain trip, has had several breakdowns, 
been lost on the toad, and has almost run over two 
bears that wen' crossing the highway. He says that 

next time be goes on a mountain trip he will carry 

a rifle along tor protection, 

The janitor who sweeps under 'Pucker's desk 
says be will be able to retire soon if there are many 
more bond issues and stamp sales. 

Nave you noticed that Hill Thompson has put 
tape on tin- broom handle':' There's a reason. 

Can you beat it '.' 

A boat is coming down every three days. Look 
out below! 

On the banks of the beautiful liver, 
Not far from Kittery's fair shore. 

Is a building called the Boat Shop. 
That was known in the days of yore. 

Por Bond fame it was noted. 
And then the Red Cross came, 

Aim now it is the War Stamps 

tun you will iinti them always game. 

The latest isn's published 
Hut when it comes to press 

Vnu will And the Boat shop with them. 

Por she always stands the test. 

Boat shop Poet. 

The flageolet solo played by ('apt. lllnns the 
Other evening was a corker It was very artistically 
played and the phrasing was immense. 

lie certainly is a wonderful player and has a 
very bright future before him. It is a pleasure to 
know that we have such a talented artist in the 
Ileal Shop. 

Leadingman Hubbard's staff has been strength 
ened. He has lately enrolled Messrs. Jackson and 
Lewis for service on the upper floor. 

It is rumored that Benny Grace will shortly 
start his berry picking. Those who have a fond- 
ness for blueberries should place their order at an 
early date as Hen always has more orders than he 
can till. 

We ;ne all glad to hear that our friends who 



enlisted from the lloat Shop for oversea duty are 
making good. A letter has come from Wildes, he 
says that Ireland is a line place and all the boys are 
used line. Wildes. Hooper, Godfrey and Littlelield 
are together at one place and Morgan is at another 

liase 

Any person wanting to purchase a good cow 
can do so by applying to E. K. Hayes. "Nemo" 
however, says that the price is too high for a second 
hand cow. Mr. Hayes does not agree with "Nemo." 
He says that Nemo is no farmer and does not know 
what a good cow is. 

Leach is using his car for a bumper. He says 
that it answers the purpose very well, even if It Is 
a Ford. 

Our timekeeper. Mr. Shaw, has enlisted as a 
telegraph operator. We all wish him the best of 
luck and success in his new undertaking. 

The Boat Shop will soon equal the record of 
Henry Kord. Next month we will turn out a com- 
plete lif) ft. Motor Boat every two days. This good 
work is appreciated as you men of the Boat Shop 
can readily see who have read the impels lately. 

Do you know A. W. Wiggin? Do you know 
that he is the champion farmer and truck garden 
man of Dover? He says that he will not take his 
hat off to any man when it comes to gardening. 

PAN MAKERS 
SHEET METAL WORKERS 

Storms may come and winds may blow, but the 
pans go on forever. 

We witnessed another German defeat on July 
9th when the II I was launched and we hope to see 
more soon. 

The workmen have already started on our new- 
elevator. This elevator will be the best thing that 
could be placed in this shop. It is our understand- 
ing that the next problem to be solved will he that 
of good ventilation. 

If that arm on L. Carlisle doesn't get well soon, 
hi' may have to lose it, he says. "It don't amount to 
nothing." 

Now that Mike Crowley has entered the Trade 
School, we expect to hear of all kinds of records. 

Arthur did get a trim at that, didn't he? 

Why does Hyron go in to the office looking for 
stubhs so often? Ask Mary. 

The young ladies of the otllce force keep George 
busy carrying milk. 

Mr. C. P. Drake, our foreman, has returned 
from a few days vacation. 

What was Tom's idea of sending for Miss Kil- 
gore, the timekeeper of this shop? 

Why is Miss Murphy so blue lately? Has he 
left for over there'.' 



WE'LL PAY YOU $1.00 



n>i: yoiii: 



OLD FOUNTAIN PEN 

For ;i short time only. Provided you buy a 

INK-TITE 
SELF-FILLING 

FOUNTAIN I'KN 



Crocker 



(ONLY ONE OLD PEN TAKEN IN EXCHANCK) 
Thia unusual offer is one of our original methods of 
advertising the CROCKER, the most satisfactory self- 
filling pen made. 

ADAMS DRUG STORE 

MAKKKT ST. - - PORTSMOUTH, N. II. 



IT'S NO USE 

Telling you a long story about advancing prices. 

Yon know as much about it as I do. But I want to 
tell you that I have a large stock of CLOTHS, bought 
to secure old yarns and dyes, at a much lower price 
than they can be found today, [f you need a SUIT 
this year BUY IT NOW. 

WOOD, The Tailor 

15 PLEASANT ST. PORTSMOUTH, N. II. 



THE PORTSMOUTH FLOWER SHOP 

A. ('. CRAIG, Manager 

FANCY CUT FLOWERS 

AGENT VICTOR TALKING MACHINES 

•1 Market Street Phone 960 

PORTSMOUTH, NKW HAMI'SHIUK 




The Acorn 

Be sure that you OWN a copy of 

MY FOUR YEARS IN CERMANY 



$2.00 



2 Editions 



75 cts. 



GEO. D. BOU 

FOR LEADING FIRE AND LIABILITY INSURANCE COMPANIES 

GOV. ST. KITTERY, MAINE 



INDIAN HEAD GAKAGK 

REPAIRING, VULCANIZING AND SUPPLIES OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 
YORK BEACH, MAINE 

TEL. CONNECTION 



'WARREN" F. BLAISDELL 

HARDWARE, PAINTS, COOKINC UTENSILS AND MOTOR ACCESSORIES. 

THE DODD SYSTEM OF LIGHTNING PROTECTION. 

Telephone 7 YORK VILLAGE, ME. 



JOHN E. WEARE GROCERIES MEAT AND PROVISIONS 



Tel. 169-2 



AUTO DELIVERY 

YORK IiEACH, ME. 



TYPEWRITERS FOR SALE & RENT 

J. E. DIM1CK 

29 Tanner St. PORTSMOUTH, N. II. 

Telephone 837 M. 



MYERS LUNCH 
CIGARS GOOD SERVICE TOB acco 

YORK BEACH, MAINE 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



29 



LIFE BUOY 



ANVIL SPARKS. 

The O'SuIlivan home was visited by the stork 
reeeutly, and two bouncing baby girls were deliver- 
ed. Congratulations to the fortunate parents. O, 
you daddie! 

Will Lewis is going to equip his buzz wagon 
with a very loud horn. Go to it Bill, blow your 
horn, even if you can't sell things. 

Jack Chapman is now considered the wittiest 
man in the shop. 

Mose Webber has discovered that chickens 
cannot be fed on Arsenate of Lead. Safety first. 

The death of William Bitton was a very sad 
blow for us all. Bill was one of the best boys that 
ever worked In the shop, and we all miss him very 
much. 

George Mcintosh reports that a number of the 
boys have changed Doctors since May 1st. P. Dra- 
per and W. Pernald take notice. 

Captain Lem Davis is to have a new chair as 
the old one is beyond repair. 

Happy Armstrong Is going to equip his new 
Jew Packard with springs so that he can climb 
apple trees with it. 

Mr. Bagley is engaged in giving singing lessons 
to Jerome Baker. 

One of our office girls receives quite a lot of 
mail. We were informed of this by Mr. Flannlgan, 
he ought to know. 

Phil Hughes says we should be very careful 
how we use tooth picks. We wonder why. 

No sir, — Howard Dixon does not live In Dover. 
Very few people know that Mark Reardon is 
mi expert with a plow. 

Bill Tucker had a very narrow escape at Bldde 
ford lately. 



Midnight is not the proper time to be strolling 
through the woods in pajamas. 

It is rumored, Emerson is to wear a hat, for 
fear of having his hair pulled out by his "best" 
girl, should she ever get wise to "Eva." 

With the Locke of the Freeman and the power 
of our worthy Brickman as a support, how did you 
have the Hart to take that picture? How about it 
Dick? At least two of the party are looking for one. 

If Gertie and Adonis fly to the North Pole, what 
will become of Charlie and Emerson? 

Two young boys with a half grown automobile. 

Started out for a New York run. 
Up hill and down hill with a knock and a thump, 

Then stopping short, yet not caused by a bump. 
For they had started out with neither water nor oil. 



WOOD TURNING SHAVINGS. 

WE WONDER :- 

What a certain party In Portsmouth will do 
If Neal is put on the proposed night shift? 

What Hofstra's Lizzie would say If she could 
have seen him the afternoon of the Fourth? 

Why Brickman, Russo and Swift go to Central 
Park so often? 

Have you seen any bears up your way yet 
Angell? 
Story of Smith's Llfe:- 

Off again, on again, gone again, Flanagan. 

The boys of Camp Lookusup were (agreeably?) 
surprised at midnight on July 3rd by a band of 
strolling marauders, who serenaded them sweetly. 



Mary must be quite a lamb, 
For she got Nealle's goat. 
And every time he calls her up, 
Across the river he goes. 

They say she's short and yet quite stout, 
And Nealle should surely know, 
For every morn at two A. M. 
He pays another two cent toll. 

The doctor told Neal that night air wasn't good 
for him, so now he goes home in the morning. 

Vivie is almost a Rip Van Winkle. 

Caruso. Brick and the speed boy, have become 
quite attached to the Invigorating air at Central 
Park. 

Ask Hoffee If he can stand his bonds on end 
yet? 

Put on your hat Sam, you're half clothed. 

How much Interest are you paving on that 
$100. Al? 

THEY SAY:- 

Two of our boys started for New York by auto. 

It was a beautiful Sunday. 

The motor did not run good. 

One of the boys said; What's that knocking? 

The other said; Oh, that's nothing, we are go- 
ing up hill. 

They got "over the top." 

There were two loud bangs and a cloud of 
smoke. 

It was six miles from Worcester. 
The garage auto came and the man said; Boys, 
you have no water and no oil. 



"HOOD" CLOTHE s 



FOOTWEAR 

When you buy shoes or clothing here you may be sure of getting 
the good kind, —the kind you like to wear. And the prices are right 

WALK-OVER SHOES DOROTHY DODD SHOES RALSTON SHOES SPORT AND OUTING SHOES 

ARROW COLLARS HATHAWAY SHIRTS "MASTERCRAFT - ' MENS CLOTHES 
"RIGHT POSTURE" BOYS CLOTHES CHENEY TIES 

N. H. BEANE & CO. 

5 Congress St. Portsmouth 



E. E. V/IIITKIIOUSi; 
BARBER 

Up One Flight Opp. Colonial Theatre 



C. P. CARROLL 

Groceries, Meats and Provisions 

145 PENHALLOW ST. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

Tel. Connection Near A. S. L. Ferry 



YORK COUNTY NATIONAL BANK" 

SERVICE 



Some times it pays to investigate the actual services 
rendered by a BANK before making a connection and 
possibly you would like to know how we can serve you. 

With modern equipment and banking facilities we 
feel that your connection with us would be most 
satisfactory. 

Large Storage Vault and Safety Deposit Boxes for 
rent. Your checking account is solicited. In our 
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT we pay 4 Per Cent 
interest. 



YORK COUNTY NATIONAL BANK 

FORK VILLAGE, MAINE 



:ti 



LIKE BUOY 



SPARS AND BLOCKS 

Qeorgie Qove will surely make a Btriklng Bgure 
in his new uniform, if he wears tiu> smile that he 
litis been wearing the last few days. 

There is s greal demand for bread at noon 
I line in the Spar Shop. Ask l.ona about it. 

We hear that Hasel got Qillum's goat again. 
Ho has got to Hi' himself with something besides 
rope. 

By th<' looks of Uu- liott!<s iii the- office we 
arc beginning to think it must i»> a nursery. 

No wonder 3. looks so healthy. 

Talk about buying War Savings Stamps, yon 
should see the list of pledges from the Spar Shop. 

\\v all feel very proud of our Quarter man, and 

also the men that did their bit in the Launching of 

the 0-1. 

Alberta must have been homesick this last 
week for she was not feeling a hit contented. 

Mr, Jensen is still looking for the other piece 
of that pink rihhon. 

Kilna certainly knows how to make lemon pies. 
We wonder where she got the receipt and how soon 
she will he able to put it to still better use. 



way possible with each other. You will then make 
It easier for your foreman and all others interested. 
When nt leisure talk about your work and compare 
notes as to the different ways of doing things and 
converse about things that will Improve working 

conditions. Don't tell a poor workman the wrong 
way to do things, hut help him all you can or leave 
him alone. Work for your own interests by doing 
as much and as good work as you can, and you will 
hi' working for the host interests of your employer, 
and he helping your country to win this war which 
will be won by the Industrial Workers faithfully 
backing up the hoys in the trenches and the men 
on the ships with their best efforts. He 100 per 

cent, efficient, 

We wonder what Kossley has done with bis 
Automopushcart . It ought to make a good steamer 

for frankforts. 



PAINT MIXTURES. 

If llersotn's steed can step any faster than 
llersom can talk, then he surely can go some 

TOWle admits he must take a few lessons from 
Bangs In order to bo an expert glazier. 

DO your planning for the next Liberty Loan. 
Buy all the bonds you can for the more you buy 
the sooner you will stop having to buy, The boys 
over there are sure going some. We never will 
quit and do not intend to; what do you say? 

The boys in the shop are very much pleased 
with the sanitary cuspidors. Father John says 
prove it and they will save him a lot el' unsanitary 

work, 

Here is a definition of a good painter which 
was promised in a recent Issue: 

A good painter Is the painter that does his 
work well and t lies to Improve, watch for his own 
faults and not see all the other fellows' faults, don't 
knock your fellow workman, but rather have a good 
word for him. Take advantage of all your work 
and you will do more and do it easier and better. 
Don't know it all. let the other fellow know some 
thing, for It is impossible to know everything. Try 
to keep tilings clean, your foreman will notice and 
appreciate it Make your work easy for yourself 
and your fellow workmen, by co-operating in every 



CRUCIBLE SPLASHES. 

Two of our former shopmates, Que Kirwan 
and Jim Kearney, now attached to the North Caro 
Una, dropped in on us the other day when the 
cruiser arrived at this Yard. It was also a pleasure 
for some of the older employees to again meet Lieut . 

Commander Cassidy, a former engineer officer at 

this Yard and now attached to the same ship. 

Pete St. John was Hie most happy man in the 
world when Joe returned to work after a thirty 
days vacation. Mike llerliliy says he can give lis 
the reason for Pete's new lease of life. 

That was some lobster supper. Marion. 

"Avoid danger; wait until the car stops." We 
know that you eould not have seen that sign when 
you hurt your arm the other night. Hill Coyne, but 
Hurley will loan you his glasses for any future car 
rides you go on. 

The coreinakers will miss genial Mr. O'Keefe 
from Philadelphia who will soon leave us to go hack 
home 

We wonder why Dynamite was seen carrying 
his father's dinner in Kittery at midnight not Ion-, 
ago. The office force are wise to you. Kid. and Dan 
told me on the Q. T. that this happens quite often 
now. 

Our recent benedicts have all returned to work 
with a new vim. 

That must have been some lire. George, to end 
in Haverhill. 

If the new draft law takes effect someone will 
be crying tor Danny. 



SPECIAL SALE OF ALUMINUM WARE 

During the second week in August 

L26-128 Market St, 1 1 J ^ SYVKKilSIMv SlOkKi 1',,,-ts ih, N. II. 

A WAX OF OUR SPECIALTIES 

Hart, Schaff ner and Marx Clothes, Stetson Hals, 
Manhattan Shirts, Fownes Gloves, Interwoven Stockings 



F. W. LYI3STON & CO. 



( lutfltters Cor Men & Boys 
PORTSMOUTH. N. II. 



JOHN SISE & CO. 
INSURANCE 

s MARKET SQUARE 

PORTSMOUTH, N. II. 



A. P. WEN DELL & CO. 

Hardware, Paints and Tools 

Telepl - 850 

2 Market Square Portsmouth, N. II 



PORTSMOUTH MOTOR MART Inc. 
Cadillac Service Station Used Cars for Sale 

Autos for Hire Accessories and Supplies 

TELEPHONE 22 & 34 PORTSMOUTH, N. II. 



The Enrolling Station for the 
Merchant Marine is at the 

^g^oJUL Store, Portsmouth, N.H. 

BOARDMAN & NORTON 
Opp. Post Office 



MEN'S WOMEN'S & CHILDREN'S SHOES 
OF THE BETTER QUALITY 



C. F. DUNCAN & CO. 



9 Markd St. Portsmouth, N. II. 



SA VE FUEL 

By using Electric Appliances for Cooking 

ROCKINGHAM COUNTY LIGHT AND POWER CO. 

V) Pleasant Street Portsmouth, N. H. 



"I SAW IT IN THE \AVK IKIOY" 



33 



LIFE BUOY 



Remember, Walter, that the railroad is for 
trains and not flivvers. 

Why did they put Hoffert on nights and leave 
Billy all alone. Even at that. Bill, your pleasant 
smiles through the office windows are making a 
favorable impression on some of the force. 

Let us know when you are going to sing again, 
Margaret. Your last appearance was a decided 
success. 

Why was it that two fellows did not catch the 
last car back from the party at York Beach and get 
to work the next morning, the same as Charley did? 



The number of milk drinking birds in the shop 
is increasing all the time. 

When you are going to make another trip to 
Lowell, Jack, we think it would be to your ad- 
vantage to take your wife's advice and fill your gas 
tank so as not to get caught on the road again the 
way you did last Sunday night. 

Mr. Leach, the constable of Eliot, says that he 
thought you must have been up all night the night 
before the Fourth, Frank, because he had to stop 
you the next morning plowing through that town 
with your cut-out wide open. 




Half Close Your Eyes And Look At It 

Prophetic picture drawn by Louis Weirther 

In The London Graphic. Courtesy of the Boston Post. 



THE ORIGINAL CASH MARKET 

Buy your MEATS, FISH, VEGETABLES and PACKAGE GOODS at 

Congress Street CI CS ^™% % J^# l^fl ' *■■ 

Portsmouth, N. H. *-^ "^ ^^ WW I ^1 *S» Te , 194 



National Mechanics & Traders Bank 

1 Congress St. Portsmouth, N. H. 

Carries Liberty Bonds on partial payment plan 
Commercial Department 



Savings Department 
Agency War Savings and Thrift Stamps 

Open for business Saturday evenings 7 to 9 



FRUIT AND CONFECTIONERY, ICE CREAM AND SODA, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

TELEPHONE 29 w CATERING A SPECIALTY 43 CONGRESS STREET 

\A/hen you say Tires That's us 

GOODYEAR, GOODRICH, FISK, GLOBE AND STERLING 

STERLINC TIRES 5000 MILES GUARANTEE REPAIRS FREE OF CHARGE 

OVERLAND AGENCY 

C. A. LOW!) 

338 Pleasant St. & 25-45 Wentworth St. Portsmouth, N. H. 
"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 




^ ^^r^r^ac^ ^cx^a^uiiJi&LLUJiJ^ 82 *SJC'r?VXG&GG4 



AOWTft^ 



DEPARTMEN 



LIFE BUOY 




■sIa * 



PJlIMii 








MAKING FRIENDS EVERY DAY 




OUR CLOTHES make FRIENDS in several ways. We have without doubt the largest 
assortment in this part of New England. Our Prices we know are way under what such 
goods are being sold at in some cities. 

There are some great values in our $18. $20, $22.50 and $25 Suits for men. When a 
man buys one of these Suits, he gets something' besides so much cloth and making - . He gets 
good style and long service. 

We know our Suits are FRIEND-MAKERS and when you've bought here once or twice 
you will realize it pays to come to Dover and in turn you will speak a good word to some friend 
of yours. That is Why this store is to-day doing such a large business. We sell Good Shoes 
as well as Good Clothes. 

LOTHROPS-FARNHAM COMPANY 

Opposite AMERICAN HOUSE, DOVER, N. H. 
Let us have your name so as to send you one of those useful articles. 



•I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



Increase Your 



Summer Pleasure With A 



VICTROLA 



Add to the 
joy of outdoor 
life the beauty 
of so rigs by the 
world's great- 



est artists, the , m 
thrill of stirr- 




ing bands, the 
gaiety of pop- 
ular music and the mirth of leading entertainers. 

The VICTROLA provides them. It is a genial 
companion wherever you go. 

Stop in and let us give you a demonstration and ex- 
plain our methods of easy payments. 

HASSETT'S MUSIC & ART SHOPPE 
115 Congress St. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

Open Every Evening 

~"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



Liberty Bond Conversion Privilege 

Holders of Liberty Bonds of the First and Second 
Issues are entitled to exchange their bonds for New 
Bonds Bearing interest at the rate of ^percent. 

This option must be used before November 9, 
1918 or the privilege is forever lost. 

We are prepared to make this exchange for you 
and place our services at your disposal. 

COMMERCIAL AND SAVINGS 
DEPARTMENTS 

STORAGE AND DEPOSIT VAULTS 

BOXES TO RENT — $1.00 PER YEAR 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

PORTSMOUTH : NEW HAMPSHIRE 

United sin irs Depository 

ASSETS 01 '/•:// TWO MILLION 

SAVING 

CONSERVATION and 

THRIFT 

WILL WIN THE WAR 



PATRIOTISM DEMANDS THAT THE CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES 

SPEND LESS and SAVE MORE 



±0,OCDO PEOPLE ARE SAVING THEIR EARNINGS BY THE HELP OF OUR 
INSTITUTIONS. NEW SAVING ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 



PISCATAQUA SAVINGS HANK 

First National Hank Building Portsmouth, N. H. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 
LIFE BUOY 



Issued monthly for (rn- distribution to employers of the Industrial Department of the 

Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. II. 



VOL. I 



SEPTEMBER 1<)1 s 



NO. 9 



WHY WE ARE FIGHTING GERMANY. 



By FRANKLIN K. LANK. Secretary of the Interior 
we fighting Germany? The 



|HY are 

brief answer is that ours is a war of self- 
defense. We did not wish to fight Germany. 
She made the attack upon us ; not on our 
shores, but on our ships, our lives, our rights, 
our future. For two years and more we held 
to a neutrality that made us apologists ft r 
things which outraged man's common sense 
of fair play and humanity. At each new 
offense — the invasion of Belgium, the killing 
of civilian Belgians, the attacks on Scar- 
borough and other defenseless towns, the lay- 
ing of mines in neutral waters, the fencing 
off of the seas — and on and on through the 
months we said: "This is war — archaic, un- 
civilized war, but war! All rules have been 
thrown away: all nobility; man has come 
down to the primitive brute. And while we 
cannot justify we will not intervene. It is 
not our war." 

Then why are we in ? Because we could 
not keep out. The invasion of Belgium, 
which opened the war, led to the invasion of 
the United States by slow, steady, logical 
steps. Our sympathies evolved into a convic- 
tion of self-interest. Our love of fair play 
ripened into alarm at our own peril. 

We talked in the language and in the 
spirit of good faith and sincerity, as honest 
men should talk, until we discovered that our 
talk was construed as cowardice. And 
Mexico was called upon to invade us. We 
talked as men would talk who cared alone for 
peace and the advancement of their own 
material interests, until we discovered that 
we were thought to be a nation of mere 



money makers, devoid of all character — until, 
indeed, we were told that we could not walk 
the highways of the world without permis- 
sion of a Prussian soldier; that our ships 
might not sail without wearing a striped uni- 
form of humiliatit n upon a narrow path of 
national subservience. We talked as men 
talk who hope for honest agreement, not for 
war, until we found that the treaty torn to 
pieces at Liege was but the symbol of a policy 
that made agreements worthless against a' 
purpose that knew no word but success. 

And so we came into this war for our- 
selves. It is a war to save America — to pre- 
serve self-respect, to justify our right to 
live as we have lived, not as some one else 
wishes us to live. In the name of freedom we 
challenge with ships and men, money, and an 
undaunted spirit, that word "Verboten" 
which Germany has written upon the sea and 
upon the land. For America is not the name 
of so much territory. It is a living spirit, 
born in travail, grown in the rough school of 
bitter experiences, a living spirit which has 
purpose and pride, and conscience — knows 
why it wishes to live and to what end, knows 
how it comes to be respected of the world, 
and hopes to retain that respect by living on 
with the light of Lincoln's love of man as its 
Old and New Testament. It is more precious 
that this America should live than that we 
Americans should live. And this America, 
as we now see, has been challenged from the 
first of this war by the strong arm of a power 
that has no sympathy with our purpose and 
will not hesitate to destroy us if the law that 



LIFE BUOY 



we respect, the rights that are to us sacred, 

or the spirit that wo have, stand across her 
sot will to make this world bow before her 
policies, backed by her organized and scien- 
tific military system. The world of Christ — 
a neglected but not a rejected Christ — has 
come again face to face with the world of 
Mahomet, who willed to win by force. 

With this background of history and in 
this sense, then, we fight Germany — 

Because of Belgium — invaded, outraged, 
enslaved, inrpoveri -lied Belgium. We cannot 
forget Liege, Louvain, and Cardinal Mercier. 
Translated into terms of American history. 
these name; stand for Bunker Hill, Lexing- 
ton, and Patrick Henry. 

Because of France — invaded, desecrated 
France, a million of whon 1 heroic sons have 
died to save the land of Lafayette. Glorious 
golden France, the preserver of the arts, the 
land of noble spirit — the first land to follow 
our lead into republican liberty. 

Because of England — from whom came 
the laws, traditions, standards of life, and in- 
herent love of liberty which we call Anglo- 
Saxon civilization. We defeated her once 
upon the land and once upon the sea. But 
Australia. New Zealand, Africa, and Canada 

at\' free because of what we did. And they 

are with us in the tight for the freedom of 
the seas. 

Because of Russia — New Russia. She 
must not be overwhelmed now. Not now, 
surely, when she is just born into freedom. 
Her peasants must have their chance; they 
must go to school to Washington, to Jeffer- 
son, and to Lincoln until they know their way 
about in this new. strange world of govern- 
ment by the popular will. 

Becau le of other peoples, with their ris- 
ing hope that the world may be freed from 
government by the soldier 

We are fighting Germany because she 
sought to terrorize us and then to fool us. 
We could not believe that Germany would do 
what she said she would do upon the sea «. 

We still hear the piteous cries of chil- 
dren coming up out of the sea where the 
Lusitania went down. And Germany has 
never asked forgiveness of the world. 

We saw the Sussex sunk, crowded with 
the sons and daughters of neutral nations. 

We saw ship after ship sent to the 
bottom— ships Of mercy bound out of 
America for the Belgian starving: ships 



carrying the Red Cross and laden with the 
wounded of all nations; ships carrying food 
and clothing to friendly, harmless, terrorized 
peoples; ships Hying the Stars and Stripes — 
sent to the bottom hundreds of miles from 
shore, manned by American seamen, murder- 
ed against all law, without warning. 

We believed Germany's promise that she 
would respect the neutral Hag and the rights 
of neutrals, and we held our anger and out- 
rage in check. But now we see that she was? 
holding us oil' with fair promi tes until she 
could build her huge tleet of submarines. For 
when spring came she blew her promise into 
the air, ju ;t as at the beginning she had torn 
up that "scrap of paper." Then we saw 
clearly that there was but one law for Ger- 
many — her will to rule. 

We are fighting Germany because she 
violated our conn lence. Paid German spies 
tilled our cities. Otlicials of her Government, 
received a; the guests of this Nation, lived 
with us to bribe and terrorize, defying out- 
law and the law of nations. 

We are lighting Germany because while 
we were yet her friends — the only great 
power that still held hands off — she sent the 
Zimmermann note, calling to her aid Mexico, 
our : out hern neighbor, and hoping to lure 
Japan, our we tern neighbor,- into war 
again t thi I Nation of peace. 

The nation that would do these things 
proclaims the go pel that government has no 
CO i science. And this doctrine cannot live, or 
el o democracy must die. For the nations of 
the wo 11 must keep faith. There can be no 
living for us in a world where the state has 
conscience, no reverence for the things of the 
spirit, no respect for international law, no 
mercy for tho-e who fall before its force. 
What an unordered world! Anarchy! The 
anarchy of rival wolf packs! 

We are fighting Germany because in this 
war feudali m is making its last stand 
against on-coming democracy. We see it 
row. This is a war against an old spirit, an 
ancient, out-worn spirit. It is a war against 
feudalism — Hie right of the castle on the hill 
to rule the village below. It is a war for de- 
mocracy — the right of all to be their own 
master;. Let Germany be feudal if she will, 
but she must no' spread her system over the 
world that ha; outgrown it. Feudalism plus 
Fcience, thirteenth century plus twentieth — 
this is the religion of the mi taken Germany 



LIFE BUOY 



that has linked itself with the Turk ; that has, 
too, adopted the method of Mahomet. "The 
state has no conscience." "The state can do 
no wrong." With the spirit of the fanatic 
she believes this gospel and that it is her 
duty to spread it by force. With poison gas 
that makes living a hell, with submarines 
that sneak through the seas to slyly murder 
noncombatants, with dirigibles that bombard 
men and women while they sleep, with a per- 
fected system of terrorization that the mod- 
ern world first heard of when German troops 
entered China, German feudalism is making 
war upon mankind. Let this old spirit of evil 
have its way and no man will live in America 
without paying toll to it in manhood and in 
money. This spirit might demand Canada 
from a defeated, navyless England, and then 
our dream of peace on the north would be at 
an end. We would live, as France has lived 
for 40 years, in haunting terror. 

America speaks for the world in fighting 
Germany. Mark on a map those countries 
which are Germany's allies and you will mark 
but four, running from the Baltic through 
Austria and Bulgaria to Turkey. All the 
other nations the whole globe around are in 
arms against her or are unable to move. 
There is deep meaning in this. We fight with 
the world for an honest world in which na- 
tions keep their word, for a world in which 
nations do not live by swagger or by threat, 
for a world in which men think of the ways 
in which they can conquer the common cruel- 
ties to inflict upon the spirit and body of man, 
for a world in which the ambition or the 
philosophy of a few shall not make miserable 
all mankind, for a world in which the man is 
held more precious than the machine, the 
system, or the state. 



INDUSTRIAL YARD BAND. 

An Industrial department yard bund has been 
organized and is practising faithfully with the result 
that good band music is heard coming From build- 
ing No. 2 2. 

The names of the employees from building No. 
79, electrical machine shop, who have signified 
their intention of playing in the band and the in- 
struments they play are: Frank Sullivan, Slide 
Trombone; Arthur Swasey, Cornet; Samuel Gage, 
Cornet; Horace McKenney, Alto; Antoni Tanski, 
Alto; P. Mudget, Cornet; George Chapman, Bass 
Drum ; P. V. McCollum, Symbols; H. Holworth, 



Clarinet; H. E. Hodgdon, Slide Trombone; J. 
Spencer, Drums. The following employees from 
building No. SO machine shop, are playing in the 
bind: .1. 10. Scammcn, Drums; C. A. Pierce, Eb. 
Bass; A. II. Sullivan, Bb. Bass. The employees 
from the shipfitters shop who are playing in the 
band arc: II. E. Butler, Cornet; J. G. Taylor, Trom- 
bone; L. Ferrone, Trombone; S. M. Dolliver, Trom- 
bone; P. II. Ollis, Baritone. .The Building Trades, 
building No. 44 are represented by W. Snow. Cor- 
net; A. 1). Mclntire, Cornet; Ernest Moulton, Cor- 
net; It. S. Weston, Bass Horn. The other em- 
ployees playing in the band are: M. H. Levine, Clari- 
net, bldg. No. 7ti; A. Vincigurra. Trombone, bldg. 
No. 42; C. B. Fogg, Trombone, bldg. No. 14; W. 
E. Messinger, Alio Horn, bldg. No. 14; O. S. llobbs, 
lib. Bass Horn, bldg. No. 4 5; C. M. Band, Eb. Bass 
Horn, bldg. No. 14; 1'. .1. Chabol, Cornet, bldg. No. 
S(i. 

At a recent meeting of the bund Mr. Arthur 
Swasey was temporarily chosen as the Musical Di- 
rector, and Mr. Ernest Moulton as Assistant Di- 
rector. Mr. Horace McKenney was elected Secre- 
tary and Treasurer, and Mr. Merrill Delano Busi- 
ness Manager. The executive committee consists 
of Mr. Merrill Delano chairman, Mr. Samuel Gage 
and Mr. Ernest Moulton. 

The band had its first public demonstration on 
Wednesday, August 14th, when they took the place 
of the Yard Naval Band who were on furlough at i 
the Patriotic Meeting conducted by the National 
Service Section of the United States Shipping 
Board, Emergency Fleet Corporation. 



A FABLE. 

(Apologies to Aesop.) 

Two huskies who had just reached the ago 
where the law refers to them as adults drew lucky 
tickets, and after marching about the town square 
and being presented with roses and a comfort kit, 
got a free ride to a bakery where dough boys are 
needed. 

John .7., Jr. was tilled with the' stuff that 
Marshall Eoch used in making Blue Devils. "Right 
face" and "shoulder arms" were pie for him, and 
before he left for "over there" it was Corporal 
John J., Jr. 

Percival was one of those boobs who had never 
been pinched by his boss for actually loafing on the 
job. but it must be remarked that he kept bis left 
lain]) more closely on the time piece than he al- 
lowed his right window on the job. His whistle 
invariably got dry at four twenty and on the way 
back from the bar he had to read the latest bulletin 



LIFE BUOY 



on the board If he goi bach on the job before the 
whistle shrieked he was disgusted with himsell 
When he hit the big eireus at Yaphonk he found 
he could not make his teel track "haj toot, straw 
foot," as he could nol keep iiis little bright eyes 
off rest parlor In the hut. And whenever Corporal 
John J. Jr. called him for mixing up his teet he 
always got peeved and said the "Corp'* had it In 
for him. When thej shipped tor over there Percival 

nearly lost the train, tor the town clOCh was slow 
anil Perce put more faith in clocks than In Orders 

By the time "Black Jack" had given them the o. o. 

and allowed them to get at the Heinies. John J. Jr. 
was railed sergeant, but l'oree was still low private 
in the rear rank At the Brst get away with Frit/.. 
Sergeant J. dm j. Jr. heard Percival calling another 
dough hoy for Bring too fast, and demanding if he 
wanted to kill all the Kaiserlets in one day Just 

then a busy bertha took off Percy's head as he was 
looking at his wrist watch to see if it was time to 
.ease tire, and he went to his eternal rest. 

Moral: Fire as main shots at the Germans as 
you can ever] day. 

K P. SCHLABACH, 

Shop Supt. 



CLAUDE C. GILLIAM. 



MACHINE SHOP (ELECTRICAL). 

In this issue of the Lifebuoy appears the group 

photograph of the Machine shop (Electrical), The 
employees of this shop are to be especially congratu- 
lated for the promptness and readiness with which 
they co-operated thus helping to make the photo- 
graph an excellent one. 

The Acting Foreman of the Machine Shop 

(Electrical) is Mr. Charles K Marshall. The 
Quartermen are Mr. M. J. Barrett in charge of 
entire Assembling Dept. including supervision over 

some three hundred female operatives; Mr \V. Hill- 
man Jr., in charge of planning division; Mr. j p, 
i.ee in charge of manufacturing and machine work. 
The Leadingmen are Mr 1. \v. Hay ward, T 

M. Morrow. P. J. Rossitter. P. \V Badger, C. 11 

Kehoe. A. K. Irish and the following gentlemen who 
are acting Leadingmen, s. Gage, J A. Coughlin, J 

I' Kelley and M A, Knight. 



REST ROOM BLDG. NO. 79. 

A lest room has been fitted up for the rem 

tort and convenience of the female operatives in 
building No. Tii Machine shop (Electrical). 

The girls wish to thank the Management for 
their thought fulness and trust that the way in 
which this convenience is taken advantage of will 

show their appreciation of the same. 




in the passing of Claude C. 01111am, Quarter- 
man Electrical worker, the Navy Yard loses a faith- 
ful and efficient employee; one w tie was e\ er read) 
to answer the call of duty, and who went to each 
task with a smile. To him. work was a pleasure, 
and no greater reward did he ask than, at the (dose 
of ih- ,l.i\ . to write "finis'' to a task well done. 

To these who were fortunate enough to number 
him among their friends, the loss is irreparable 
Horn and raised under tin- sunny skies of Pixie, 
his whole nature was resplendent with the warmth 
and brightness of the Southland, a laugh, a hand- 
clasp or a cheerful word was his morning's greeting 
Ever ready to help those in trouble, each day found 
someone thankful for a kindly aet from his hand. 

As he was through life. SO Death found him. 
extending a helping hand to one in difficulty, his 
last aet a mute testimonial of the warm heart that 
throbbed for others' woes. 
"Large was his bounty, ami his soul sincere; 
Heaven did a recompense as largely send. 

He gave to misery all he had. a tear. 

lie gained from heaven, 'twas all he wished a 
friend " 

TUBERCULOSIS. 

Tuberculosis is the most destructive and uni- 
versal disease affecting mankind. It has been called 
the "Silent White Plague" for it sei/.es its victims 
slowly and silently. Tuberculosis is found wherever 
human beings are congregated together in fact, 
in all climates, in all conditions of life and in ali 
races 

According to reliable statisties one-fourth id' 
all deaths between I he aues of fifteen and forty re- 
sult from tuberculosis. Consequently, the economic 

loss is great for they die at the most valuable period 
of life. 



LIFE BUOY 




LIFE BUOY 



A few of the early symptoms of tuberculosis 
are: (1) a slight backing persistent cough and. 
(2i expectoration; t '■'• t a loss of weigh! and 
strength; (ll "tired out" feeling; ( f> ) "no pep;" 
(6) poor appetite; (7) slight afternoon fever; (8) 
"night sweats;" (Hi chilly sensation; (10 1 cough- 
ing up a little blood, or a slight hemorrhage. 

Further proof is often found by an examination 
and staining of the sputum to And the genus of 
tuberculosis, by x-ray of the chest; by tuberculosis 
tesls. 

Excesses of all kinds, especially alcohol, lower 
the vitality and prepare a favorable soil for tuber- 
culosis, lnsullicient rest and sleep and worry may 
destroy or weaken the resistance of an otherwise 
very healthy individual. 

At the slightest sign of any trouble it ought 
to be the duty of everyone to be examined by a com- 
petent physician. Take no chances the earlier 
the case is recognized the more certain the cure. 

Tuberculosis can be cured if taken early and 

if treatment is intelligently carried out. Fortu- 
nately no elaborate treatment is required — only a 
few simple rules within reach of all; Rest, Good 
Pood, Sunshine, Fresh Air and Cleanliness. And 

the greatest of all of these is Rest. 

It is not necessary to spend a fortune, or to 
Havel in quest of a cure. The nearer home, the 
better, for increased climatic inducements ace offset 
by the worry and homesickness of the patient if he 
is away from those whom he holds near and dear. 

The only treatment that lias stood the test of 
time is the "Open Air Treatment." Try a sleeping 
porch at home first, or at least sleep with all win- 
dows and doors open all the year round. 



AN APPEAL OF LABOR TO LABOR. 

We are face to face with a world crisis. We 
are in a world struggle which will determine for 
tbi' immediate future whether principles of demo- 
cratic freedom or principles of force shall dominate. 

The decision will determine not only the des- 
tiny of nations hut of every community and of every 
individual. No life will be untouched. 

Either the principles of free democracy "i- of 
Prussian militaristic autocracy will prevail. There 

can be no compromises. So there can be no neu- 
trality among nations or individual- — we must 
stand up and be counted with one cause or the 
other. 

For labor there is but one choice. 
FREEDOM THE HOPE OF LABOR 

The hope of labor lies in opportunity for free- 
dom. The workers of America will not permit 
themselves to be deceived or deceive themselves in- 



to thinking the fate of the war will not vitally 
chan *e our own lives. 

A victory for Germany would mean pan-Ger- 
man empire dominating Europe and exercising a 
world balance of power which Germany will s<H'k to 
extend by force into world control. 

Prussian rule means supervision checks, un- 
freedom in every relation of life. 

i'russianism lias its roots in the old ideal under 
which men sought to rule by suppressing the minds 
and wills of their fellows; it blights the new ideal 
of government without force or chains— -political or 
industrial — protected by perfect freedom for all. 
PRUSSIAN MILITARISTS WILL UNDERSTAND 
FORCE ONLY 

Unless the reconstruction shall come from the 
German workers within that country, it is now- 
plain that an opportunity to uproot the agencies 
of force will come only when democracy has de- 
feated autocracy in the military field, and wins the 
right to reconstruct relations between nations and 
men. 

The peace parleys between Russia and Ger- 
many have shown the futility of diplomatic negotia- 
tions until Prussian militarists are convinced they 
cannot superimpose their will on the rest of the 
world. Force is the basis for their whole organiza- 
tion and is (he only argument they will understand. 

Spontaneous uprisings in Germany in protest 
against the militarist government haye shown that 
the German government is still stronger than the 
movement for German emancipation. German free- 
dom is ultimately the problem of the German peo- 
ple. But the defeat of Prussian autocracy on the 
battlefield will bring an opportunity for German 
liberty at home. 

NATIONS LINKED TOGETHER 

We have passed the period when any one na- 
tion can maintain its freedom irrespectively of other 
nations. Civilization has closely linked nations to- 
gether by the ties of commerce and quick communi- 
cation, common interests, problems, and purposes. 

The future of free nations will depend upon 
their joint ability to devise agencies for dealing 
with their common affairs so that the greatest op- 
portunity for life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness 
may be assured to all. 

This matter of world democracy is of vital in- 
terest to labor. Labor i- not a sect or a party. 

it represents the invincible desire for greater 
opportunity of the masses of all nations. Labor is 
the brawn, sinews and brains of society. It is the 
user of tools. Tools under the creative power of 
muscle and brains shape the materials of civili- 
zation. Labor makes possible every great forward 
movement id' the world. 



LIFE BUOY 



10 



THE STAND LABOR SHOULD TAKE 

But labor is inseparable from physical and 
spiritual life and progress. Labor now makes it 
possible that this titanic struggle for democratic 
freedom can be made. 

The common people everywhere are hungry 
tor wider opportunities to live. They have shown 
the willingness to spend or be spent for an ideal. 
They are in this war for ideals. 

Those ideals are best expressed by their chosen 
representative in a message delivered to the Con- 
gress of the United States January 8, setting forth 
the program of the world's peace. 

President Wilson's statement of war aims has 
been unreservedly indorsed by British organized 
labor. It is in absolute harmony with the funda- 
mentals indorsed by the Buffalo convention of the 
.American Federation of Labor. 

AT WAR FOR LABOR'S IDEALS 

We are at war for those ideals. Our first big 
casualty list has brought to every home the harass 
and the sacrifices of war. This is only the begin- 
ning. 

A gigantic Struggle lies just ahead that will 
test to the uttermost the endurance and the ability 
and the spirit of our people. 

That struggle will be fought out in the mines, 
farms, shops, mills, shipyards, as well as on the 
battlefield. 

Soldiers and sailors are helpless if the pro- 
ducers do not do their part. Every link in the 
chain of the mobilization of the fighting force and 
necessary supplies is indispensable to winning the 
war against militarism and principles of unfreedom. 

WAR SERVICE OP WORKERS 

The worker that fastens the rivets in building' 
the ship is performing .just as necessary war service 
to our republic as the sailor who takes the ship 
across or the gunner in the trenches. 

This is a time when all workers must soberly 
face the grave importance of their daily work and 
decide industrial matters with a conscience mindful 
of the world relation of each act. 

The problem of production indispensable to 
preventing unnecessary slaughter of fellow men is 
squarely up to all workers — aye, to employes and 
employers. Production depends upon materials, 
tools, management, and the development and main- 
tenance of industrial morale. Willing cooperation 
comes not only from doing justice but from receiv- 
ing justice. 

The worker is a human being whose life has 
value and dignity to him. He is willing to sacrifice 



for an ideal but not for the selfish gain of another. 
Justice begets peace. Consideration begets co- 
operation. These conditions are essential to war 
production. Production is necessary to win the 
war. 

TASK FOR THE GOVERNMENT 

Upon the Government and upon employers 
falls the preponderance of responsibility for secur- 
ing greatest efficiency from workers. Standards of 
human welfare and consideration of the human side 
of production are part of the technique of efficient 
production. 

Give workers a decent place to live, protect 
them against conditions that take all their wages 
for bare existence, give them agencies whereby 
grievances can be adjusted and industrial justice 
assured, make it plain that their labor counts in the 
winning a war for greater freedom, not for private 
profiteering, and workers can be confidently ex- 
pected to do their part. Workers are loyal. They 
want to do their share for the republic and for win- 
ning the war. 

This is labor's war. It must be won by labor, 
and every stage in the fighting and final victory 
must be to count for humanity. That result only 
can justify the awful sacrifice. 

RELY ON WORKERS' SPIRIT 

We present these matters to the workers of 
free America, confidently relying upon the splendid * 
spirit and understanding which has made possible 
present progress to enable us to fight a good fight 
and to establish principles of freedom throughout 
the whole world. 

We regret that circumstances make impossible 
continuous close, personal relations between the 
workers of America and those of the Allied 
countries, and that we cannot have representation 
in the interallied labor conference about to convene 
in London. 

Their cause and purpose are our cause and 
purpose. 

We cannot meet with representatives of those 
who are aligned against us in this world war for 
freedom, but we hope they will sweep away the 
barriers which they have raised between us. 

MUST CRUSH AUTOCRACY 
Freedom and the downfall of autocracy must 
come in middle Europe. 

We doubly welcome the change if it comes 
through the workers of those countries. While this 
war shall last we shall be working and fighting 
shoulder to shoulder with fellow workers of Great 
Britain, France, and Italy. 



1 1 



LIFE BUOY 



We nsk the workers <>f Russia to make com- 
mon cause- with us. (or our purpose is their purpose, 
thai limillj tin' freedom-lovers of all countries may 
make the world safe for all peoples to live in free- 

(loin ami salty . 

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
Samuel Qompers, President 
James Duncan, Firsl Vice President. 
James O'Connell, Second Vice President, 
Joseph F. Valentine, Third Vice-President. 
John K. Alpine. Fourth Vice President. 
n. B. Perham, Fifth Vice President. 
Frank Duffy, si\ih Vice-President 
\Ym. Green, Seventh Vice President. 
W IV Mahon, Eighth Vice President. 

Daniel .1 Tobin, Treasurer. 

Frank Morrison, Secretary, 



OIK MACHINK SHOP (ELECTRICAL) 
FOREMAN. 




rhe following words spoken i>y Mr. Charleii 
R, Marshall when Interviewed recentlj by the edltoi 
will illustrate why Mr. Marshall was chosen as the 
Acting Foreman of the Machine Shop (Electrical), 
Building No. 79 tor he said "Give me a hammer, 

chl el and a wrench or tor that matter any me- 
chanic's tools and i am happy " This sentence 
brings out strongly the tact that success can onlj 
be achieved when one is happy and contented with 

his work at hand. Real happiness can only he real 
i ed v, lien each one Of US ge a such happiness out 
Ol his or her own work. The successful way in 
which Mr, Marshall is getting co-operation from 



the Itrass Shop is mainly due to the above stated 
facts tor one can only work efficiently when happy 
and contented. 

The welfare work that is already under way 
such as a Rest Kooin for the female operatives, the 
Lunch Room, hasehall team and Shop Hand as well 
as the welfare work still to he carried out all prove 
Mr. Marshall's theory that one can only realize 
happiness when contented With the work at hand. 

Mr Charles R, Marshall was horn in Roches- 
ter, N. II.. on January II. 1SS4. At the ar,e of 

three his parents moved to Portsmouth and he has 

lived here ever since. The Yard can well feel 
proud Of Mr, Marshall as he is a product of the 
Navj Yard itself so he says for he learned his trade 
on the Yard and has grown with the Yard, 

In 1901 he was accepted as a successful candi- 
date in a competitive examination for apprentices 
ami in 1906 received a diploma after having ser- 
ved his time in the steam engineering department. 

For awhile Mr. Marshall was employed hy the 

Porter-Whidden Co, of East Boston, on marine 
engine experimental work, lie then went to the 
United shoe Machinery Co. of Beverly, Mass., where 

he was employed in the automatic screw machinery 

department 

In Julj 1908 he again came to the Yard as a 
journeyman and has been here ever since, a period 

of twelve years, in his examinations for Leading 

man and Quartorinan Mr. Marshall was always near 
the head of the list. Mr. Marshall was appointed 

a Leadingman Machinist in Sepi 1910 and Quarter- 
man in 1914 and on March 28, 1918 lie was ap- 
pointed Acting Foreman of the Machine Shop 

i Electrical i . 

His hobby and source of amusement is his 
automobile and he says that if one wishes to relax 
pn perly after a hard days' work all ho needs is an 

automobile, it is the editor's understanding that 

this is essentially correct provided the car causes 

no trouble 

Mr. Marshall wishes to have a democratic shop 
ami his aim is to deal fairly with everyone and to 
have those competent get their just rewards. 



A PLEDGE 

J. L. Price 

That my after years bs unmortgaged to regrets and 
rrows and "what might have been." 

That I :i> iv felly share in the bounties of life, 
That 1 an I mine maj lead a cleaner life, a more 
fruitful life, a happier life. 

i PLEDGE MYSELF 

To always think of my Own safety and of the safety 
of my fellow men. 



LIFE BUOY 



12 



To keep my eyes open for unsafe conditions and to 
take proper measures for their remedy. 

To keep the machinery I work with and the tools I 
work with in good order. 

To wear goggles whenever there is a chance of an 
eye injury. 

To attend at once to the most trivial injuries that I 
may sustain, whether in the plant or in the home. 

To he helpful to my fellow man, especially to the 
new man; to show him his work can be done 
properly and safely. 

To be orderly in my habits. 

To lead a clean life, physically and morally. 

To keep my temper. 

To make allowances for the "other man's" weak- 
nesses. 

To consider the day lost in which I failed to Improve 
either myself, or my home, or my work. 

To be cheerful, hopeful, useful, careful. 

To be a loyal employe of the Company for whom I 
work. 

To be a loyal citizen of the United States of America. 



THE UNSEEN GUARDIAN 

By Will Aiken 
My aim is help for all mankind 

And my job is ages old, 
I've played my part, since Adam was 

And the Eden tale was told; 
To me men turn where danger looms — 

And they never turn in vain! 
For with my aid they're spared so much 

Of tears and grief and pain 

Because of me no widow weeps 

Nor mourns a helpmeet dead; 
No mother waits her son in vain, 

No orphans' tears are shed 
From birth to death, but give me though) 

And I shall see man through; 
I ask of him no sordid gold 

My duty freely do. 

Man sees me not, and yet he knows 

I'm ever at his side; 
Though he delve deep 'neath old Earth's crust 

I'm there, whate'er betide. 
I care not where his duty calls, 

On land, on sea, in air, 
I throw about poor mortal man 

My ever watchrul care. 

I've done my bit since dawn of Time 

To lessen Death's grim toll. 
I write the names of heroes high 



On Fame's eternal scroll. 
My only plea: Give me a chance, 

And Fate may do Its worst; 
I serve Mankind, and I conserve- 

For I am Safety First! 



SAFETY RULES FOR ELECTRICIANS 

1. Employees engaged In handling of electri- 
cal circuits are sometimes exposed to hazardous 
conditions and it is urged that they cultivate the 
habit of being very caution 

2. Rubber gloves should be used whenever the 
work is hazardous. However, do not rely upon 
them for absolute protection. Rubber gloves 
should be kepi clean ami free from grease. 

.'!. Always assume that all circuits are ground- 
ed and properly insulate your body against all wires. 

4. Never work alone whenever it is necessary 
to t;i|i a live wire or when working in the vicinity 
of live parts. 

5. As far as possible use only one hand when 
working about electrical circuits and switches. 

6. Never work on circuits with sleeves rolled 
up. 

7. Never trust the insulation on n wire for 
protect ion from a shock. 

8. Switches should be left wide open when In 
the open position and fully closed when in the 
Closed position, 

9. When working on lamp circuits be sure 
that you are well insulated from the ground and ' 
I bat the lamp circuit is open 

In. Do not cut the ends of wires and leave 
them exposed. Always see that the ends are well 

Insulated. 



STRAINS. 

A strain is caused by lifting something which 
is loo heavy or when lifting in a cramped position 
'I lie strain almost always occurs when the man 
knows the thing he is going to lift is too heavy for 
him. He then braces all his muscles and seizing 
the thing to be lifted gives a sudden contraction of 
I be lift ing muscles. 

The first result of strain is pain and sudden 
weakness. Later the pain becomes dull and the 
weakness more marked so that the patient cannot 
use the affected muscles at all. 

The best way to avoid strains is when about to 
lift something heavy to first try it slowly. You 
can then see if it. is easily within your strength; if 
it is not, get someone to help you. 



SPRAINS. 

A sprain is caused by a wrench or similar In- 
jury which stretches or tears the ligaments of a 



13 LIFE BUOY 



loin Swages, Batters, tullers, breaking-down tools 

The best thing for a sprained ioln( Is rest. and tools of various other kinds are frequently 

The nexl best thing is heat struck Bledge-hammer blows wherebj the heads of 

if you sprain your ankle or knee try to gel these respective tools are reduced to a burred con 

home without using the leg any more than la neces- dIUon. Ultimately, these burred projections will 

sarj By off and n is purely a matter of guess relative to 

Remember that a sprain is a serious thing and whether ot not Borne one Is Injured. Tools with 

the joint should be given a good rest and when used burred heads should be dressed or discarded as soon 

be supported bj .1 bandage, and adhesive plaster aa possible. 

straps or it will bo weak lor a long time. Suitable clothing especially good shoos Bhould 

Soak the ankle In as hoi water us you can be worn tor torn clothing may becomecaught In the 

bear tor half an hour and go to bed. machinery such us the trimming presses, etc . 

The same treatment Bhould be uaed for sprain whereas run down shoos cause tripping and Btumbl 

01 anj Joint, applying hoi clothes where the joint ing accidents. 

1 annot ho put Into hot « ater, 



DAYLIGHT. 
HUNT'S FOR WELDERS For four long years the Allies have been travel- 

DON'Tj drop or give oxygen tanks severe | ng tta.ru a tunnel with the Brm and Bteadfast resolu- 

knocks, lion that they ultimately would Bee daylight 

DON'T; oil or lubricate oxygen tank valves, That time is now at hand una ii behooves us 

regulators or any tank parts that are in contact : ,n to Bee thai wo do not get pushed back into the 

wiiii oxygen tunnel, in reality it is up to us to gel as tar away 

DON'Tj sot oxygen or acetylene tanks in the from the tunnel as possible. 
>tot sun or in a place where the temperature maj w,. Ml ,w have :;ooii news and are regaining 

exceed 90 degrees P more confidence than wo have had for Borne time, 

DON'T face oxygen or acetylene gages, when u u1 we should uol allow ourselves to forget thai the 

opening tank valves. job is not over. We are fighting for the right ami 

DON'T; open oxygen or acetylene tank valves, teel confident thai the God of righteousness win see 

before Brsl releasing tension on regulating springs ua through, bul wo still probabl] have troublesome 

by unscrewing regulating screw. times to meet 

DON'T; 1 « iiii t torch before being positive that Only a short time ago we were hoping that wo 

r.asos are properl] connected and that connections could hold the Germans, now we are on the offensive 

and hoses are tight. Watch for leaks. and have taken the Initiative. This turning point 

DON'Tj weld or cut before adjusting gofCRles m ,,y ho attributed directly to the entrance of our 

to your oyos. You have only one pair of eyes ami American army for the morale effect on the French 

cannot get a now sot so ho careful of thom. all ,i English has been wonderful. Moreover, our 

GAS CHARGING sr.\ri(>\ troops have proved their mettle ami are the equal of 

Smoking, carrying of lighted cigarettes, strik- any troops in the world. 
in:-, of matches, carrying of lighted torches or any Despite the good news ana the gain in con- 
naked Bame is strictly forbidden in or around the Bdence wo Bhould nol allow ourselves to gel over 
Gas Charging station Extreme care should ho ex- confident The nexl Liberty Loan Bhould ho backed 
ercised so that no spark from friction or otherwise harder than ever ana should other Red cross, v. M 
may occur. c \ or k of c. drives i>o deemed advisable they 

Persons other than those designated to operate also Bhould ho Btrongly supported 

generator ana compressor must keep out of 

lias Charging Station. 

TVYKXTY 1'HTll ANN1YKRSARY 

On Ug. 1. 1918, Mr. laron 11 Brackett, ot 
SMITH SHOP HAZARDS. Kittery, completed his 26th anniversary as an em- 
Smith Shop employees are subject to the ployee of this navy vara. His follow employees In 
danger of sparks flying from hot metal. Although the Industrial Department presented him for this 
a smith usually taps the bar of iron before hammer occasion, with $20 in gold. Mr. Brackett's ions;. 
ing it ana In order to knock off the oxide, there is faithful service was further rewarded by the In 
often produced a shower of sparks which may burn dustrial Manager, who granted him an Increase In 
the skin or sot tiro to the clothing. salary. 



IJFK BUOY 



14- 



h 




PICKED UP IN 
THE YAW. 



the iiNtm rnf «E_iL«viLflNT nook. 

Mftl/f DP \ j , ,,.i| 

«NMir-.in.' Ury'iKM 
;■ POSHIW.'fl 



< 



TUf HID 7H/JO DUN (at I UNO IN HIS 
Li Cft 5 Tht&OYSIN'dO /\RI. GITTING 
US£0 jo C/6/IK5 WOW. 




HOVJ 17 LOlMb TO A 5TRHN61R AB007 y. 3 1 




"yOU DIDN'f DROP 
yoURCHftK t Hij 

noon : 



/WONDER 
. WHY ? 

^A POPULAR Ml 53 

IN A POPULAR SHOP. 



15 



LIFE BUOY 



WOMEN'S WORK IN WAR TIME. 

Although "Man Power" is rightly accounted 
one of the decisive elements in the world war, 
"Woman Power" should also be not lost sight of in 
the tremendous conflict now raging. 

As we ourselves are now becoming short of 
"Man Power" to fill our industrial ranks it is only 
natural that the huge reservoir of latent human 
energy in women should be utilized to the best ad- 
vantage. What Europe has achieved and what mis- 
takes Europe has made are today of keen interest 
to us, now that we are facing a steadily growing 
shortage of labor. 

Universal tribute should be paid to both the 
spirit and the capacity of the women workers in 
war time for their zeal and deftness are subjects 
of general comment. 

In our own shops particularly the Electrical 
Machine Shop, Sheet Metal Shop and Spar Shop, 
women are being trained to fill the places of men 
called to war and to release men for other more 
important war work. As matters are now shaping 
themselves, female operatives will soon be placed 
in other shops. 

In England (according to Dr. Addison former 
Minister of Munitions), "The widespread employ- 
ment of women has been attended with singularly 
little difficulty for from 60 per cent to SO per cent 
of the machine work on shells, fuses and trench 
warfare supplies is now performed by women." 

In that women are to be employed more and 
more on work in this yard because of the impossi- 
bility of getting men it is necessary to briefly point 
out a few of the issues deemed extremely vital. 
The advisability of a change in dress to a bloomer 
costume is most necessary for three reasons ( 1 I 
Economy. (2) Sanitation, (3) Safety. Women of 
today insist upon wearing flowing skirls, flimsy 
shirt waists and impracticable footwear. All this 
must be eliminated if "safety first" and "cleanli- 
ness" are to be our modern Mottoes. 

A demonstration of blouses and bloomerettes 
was held at each shop recently under the direction 
of the Safety Engineer and it is hoped that each 
female operative will govern herself to the point 
where she will procure a change of garment. 

In that the footwear now worn by most of our 
female operatives is impracticable and unsafe it is 
requested that serviceable footwear be procured. 
Shoes with high heels are extremely dangerous and 
the wearing of the same must ultimately cause 
serious tripping and stumbling accidents. 

The following notice has been issued to each 



female operative now working on the Yard and a 
similar one will be issued to each new female opera- 
tive coming to work on the Yard: 

NOTICE 






Employment of Female Operatives. 

Cognizant of the fact that women and girls 
are more or less susceptible to possible injuries un- 
less properly instructed the following notice has 
been issued and it is hoped that each female opera- 
tive will govern herself accordingly. 

1. It is recommended that all female opera- 
tives, who are working at machines or in the close 
proximity of machinery, should have their hair 
done up tightly, be well secured and preferably con- 
fined by a tight-fitting cap of close net or a hair net 
or some other suitable and efficient material. 

2. Close-fitting overalls or bloomerettes that 
completely cover the dress should bs purchased and 
worn —the said overalls to fasten at the side or 
back and to include sleeves buttoned or otherwise 
secured at their ends. 

3. Belts should be changed by a male super- 
visor and not by the ordinary operative. 

4. Under no circumstance should machines be 
cleaned while running or in motion. 

5. Rings, bracelets, wrist watches and other 
jewelry should not be worn while at work for they 
may be caught in belts, gears or other parts of the 
machinery and cause serious if not fatal accidents. 

6. If you do not understand the functioning 
of the machine do not 1)3 afraid to ask questions, 
fur it is better to be safe than sorry. 

7. Proficiency in work is gained only by ex- 
perience and practice, consequently apply yourself 
to your work diligently and carefully. 

S. An investigation is being made relative to 
determining just what overalls are the most practi- 
cable and serviceable. 



Address by Privatk Lk Fay 

Address made by Private Le Fay. 14th United 
States Engineers, at Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. 
H., Aug. 1 1th. 1918. 

I wan' to make a few remarks before telling 
you of my experiences over there. I came back 
here, not as a speaker, but through th channels of 
the hospital, six hospitals in France and three in 
America, and this is not my line — I am a plumber. 

I went away over a year ago with the Ameri- 
can Engineers. We were all over town in New 
^i (lie for two days before we sailed on liberty and 
I wrote heme and told my foil s the name of the 
vessel and when we were going to sail. A few days 



L1FF. BUOY 



ic 



or a week after that one of the Boston papers pub- 
lished the news that the ship I was on had been 
sunk, the ship carrying American Engineers. Of 
course all the people who had relatives and friends 
on this boat were worried about it. There they 
were, the people at home, worrying about us, and 
we were on the ship enjoying the trip under the best 
of conditions and with the greatest convoy on earth. 
The only ones doing any worrying were the people 
back home. The only worrying we were doing was 
that we wouldn't see a sub to give the boys a chance 
to get them. 

After we landed in England the first thing I 
did was to send a cablegram home. I went up to 
the station to send the message and the man in 
charge there was an old man and I asked him if he 
could get the message off for me. He said, "My 
boy, I have got two sons over there and when I 
hear from them I am pleased, so you bet I will send 
the message for you." I sent the message at 8 
o'clock Sunday night and at 11 o'clock that same 
Sunday night the folks back here got my message 
and the following morning it was published in the 
Boston Post. 

There are some who say that England isn't 
doing her bit. I want to tell you boys that England 
is doing her part. Every man, woman and child 
in England is doing their bit to win the war. The 
things we saw in England were enough to tear your 
hearts out. On every hand you had the war 
brought home to you. You go to any town or city 
and you do not see the women wearing the bright 
colors and dresses that you do here. In England 
they are all in black, and when we marched in Eng- 
land the reople all cried out— Come on Sammy, 
give us a smile, and I want to tell you our hearts 
went out to them. In every city and town of any 
size they have their hospitals crowded with sick 
and wounded and everybody has felt this war. 
Here in this Country the people don't realize yet 
that there is a war. You go to the different beaches 
and different hotels and cafes and the proprietors 
all tell you they are making more money than ever 
before. I tell you the people don't realize we are 
at war, except those who have brothers, sons and 
dear ones in the army; they are the ones who real- 
ize it, but those who have not do not think about 
it; they figure because the Government is sending 
over men in uniform that is all that is required. 
They are waiting for their turn, but I want to tell 
you that is not enough, that the whole country is at 
war, that every man, woman and child in America 
is fighting Germany, that it is just as much your 
war as it is our war. 




PRIVATE LE FAY 
While I was in England I had liberty in town 
and I had a pass to stay until 10:35 at night. Just 
think of it, if some of your dear ones has a few 
hours off here in America you only wish they had 
a few hours more when the time is up for them to 
go, but in England, while I had a pass to stay in 
London until 10:35 at night I took a train at 6 
o'clock back to this camp because of the sights one 
sees, men with their arms and legs gone and other- 
wise wounded, and I would have taken one sooner 
if I could have got one. Those are the things that 
impress you more than anything. I remember see- 
ing many wounded on outings on which they take 
these men, and one in particular comes back to 
me of a small boat going up the Thames with a 
party of these men on an outing; there were forty 
men in this party and in those forty soldiers there 
were only thirty-five arms and legs. Those are the 
things to see that make you realize that we are at 
war. 



17 



LIFE l;U(,Y 



After a short stay in England we sailed for 
France. We received gas instructions for two days 
and then went right up behind the lines. While 
we were going over we were all afraid that it would 
be all over before we got there and we could not 
get there fast enough; and that is the feeling that 
prevails in America today, but I want to tell you 
that it is wrong; we are going to lick them but it 
is going to take some time and everybody has got 
to do their bit, each and every one of you here in 
the Country; the boys over there are all doing 
their's. 

When we were given gas instruction we were 
instructed in the use of two helmets, one the box 
respirator and the P. H. helmet. You have from 
four to five seconds to get on those masks and the 
men can get them on in three or four. The mask is 
hung in front of you and when the gas signal comes 
the mask goes on over your head and covers your 
face and you pinch in your nose and breath through 
a tube. After we had gas instruction we were sent 
right up behind the lines and relieved the Royal 
Engineers; we took over positions that they were 
operating for supplying their lines and bringing 
up ammunition and supplies. We met all kinds 
of men there and from all the colonies. The Scotch- 
men are called the "Jocks;" the Englishmen 
"Tommys;" and we are called "Sammys." I wish 
I could tell you the feeling and spirit that those 
men have. I remember in talking to one Scotchman 
he told me — "Sammy, when you get your gun in 
your hand and you meet a German, the only thin 1 ; 
to give him is to stick him, and when you stick 
him he will grunt just like a pig," and he says, 
"when they get down on their knees and put their 
hands up in the air and holler 'mercy comrade,' 
why stick them and hear them grunt. Sammy, if 
you ever turn your back on one of them when they 
do that, he will stick a bayonet or a knife in." I 
want to tell you that these Scotchmen are all won- 
derful men. Once when we were bringing up 
ammunition for the Lewis guns and bringing clown 
the wounded, we had some of the Scotchmen to 
handle. There was one fellow who was wounded 
and he said to me — "Sammy, give us a fag,'' and I 
gave it to him and I noticed that he was all battered 
up. Then he looked at me and my pants were tore 
away at the leg, and he says — "Sammy, you would 
make a good man in kilts, you have a fine pair of 
knees on you." I tell you that just to show you 
the wonderful spirit of those men, even when they 
are badly hurt. 

You hear a lot about sunny France and I want 
to tell you about that— over there we found that 



the sun shines for about five minutes every day. 
Plenty of the men are working under awful condi- 
tions and every one of them is doing his duty and 
a lot of them are doing more than they are supposed 
to do. In our own regiment about a dozen of the 
boys went up to the front line trenches and went 
over the top with a raiding party and brought back 
a few German prisoners. They are not called on to 
do that but that just shows the spirit of the men. 

Another thing that you hear a lot about is 
that the Germans are wonderful fighters. At Cam- 
brai about 160 of our men met them; we had no 
ammunition, were without guns, nothing but sticks 
and bricks to fight back at the big yellow quitters, 
and yet the Germans ran away from us. Just think 
over the war, think over the preparation Germany 
has been making all these years and how Belgium. 
France and England have gone in without this pre- 
paration and have held them. At some places they 
have made dugouts 65 feet deep in the ground, and 
the Allies have not only held them but have driven 
them out of these places and driven them back. 
Think of all the methods of frightfulness that Ger- 
many has used. Why in twenty minutes 17,000 
Canadians were gassed to death; can you imagine 
that? Think over these things and then you will 
see those wonderful fighters. Why in some of the 
German front line trenches we found over forty 
women and children who had been killed and muti- 
lated. They also make it a habit of dropping bombs 
on Sundays on churches and places of worship. 
Then there are the hospitals, which on all four sides 
have large mounds with a large red cross on them; 
it is just like advertising these places to the Ger- 
mans, because they make it a practice to keep bom- 
barding and dropping their bombs on them. 

I wish you would think of those things when 
you feel like letting up and that it would spur you 
on to doing your best. We are all doing our bast 
over there. Over here when you get through work 
you know your supper is going to be ready for you 
and when you go to bed you know you won't have 
to get up until the alarm goes off in the morning. 
I have been out there time and time again and laid 
down on a nice soft board or a nice piece of soft 
concrete and after lying down there probably ten or 
fifteen minutes we would have to get up and go to 
work again. In fact some of our crew is going up 
to the front all the while. 

The lines we are laying are not toy lines, but 
they are doing wonderful work with them and the 
boys are right up there with them all the time. As 
fast as a rail is blown out or destroyed we have 
another to put right back into place, and we are 



LIFE BUOY 



18 



going all the time. At Cambrai we were bringing 
up ammunition and bringing down the wounded. 
We were following up the New York Engineers and 
they were striking ahead of us. One of the trucks 
came off the track and we had orders to leave it 
there. One of the English Officers said never mind 
that truck, leave it. Our Sergeant said we brought 
that truck up and we are going to take it back, 
and wc did, and they took me back with it, because 
those gas shells came over and I didn't get my mask 
on soon enough. I don't remember much about it. 
It is something that I could not describe; it seems 
to me as if it was like breathing ammonia as strong 
as your lungs will take it and that is all I remem- 
ber, but it is something that I shall never forget. 
I would not be here now but for the wonderful work 
of the Red Cross, they are the ones that have 
brought me here. I have been in a number of 
state3 and around lots of places and you hear that 
same old bumcomb about the Red Cross. A corn- 
men story is about some woman going into a store 
and buying socks or a sweater that somebody else 
knitted for the Red Cross. There are all kinds of 
such yarns spreading throughout the Country, and 



there is nothing to it but German Propaganda; 
they are the ones who are spreading these yarns. 
I want to say for the boys over there that the Red 
Cross is doing a wonderful work for all of them. 

We don't want you all in the Army or Navy 
because if everybody got in the Navy or Army how- 
would the boys get the stuff over there. Just re- 
member you have got to do your share here. Stand 
back of the boys who are over. Keep on your job 
every minute, just as if you were working for your 
own brother, because we are all brothers over there. 
There were two fellows together and they were 
talking and I started to walk in between them, 
when I asked them if they wanted to be together 
and one of them said — "Boy, we are all together 
now." 

We are all together. Everybody in America 
are soldiers; you are soldiers, we are soldiers, and 
we have all got to do our bit, and when I stand here 
and see you all and think of our flag and what it 
means I feel like taking a pledge and I want you 
all to take a pledge to our flag; what do you say? 
(And every man and woman in the audience took' 
the pledge.) 




H', oiio H\ND3 PLEDGED TO UNCLE SAM 



19 



LIFE BUOY 



BASEBALL LEAGUE. 

On Monday, July 29, the opening game of the 
Navy Yard League was auspiciously started when 
some 7 5 employees of the Yard attended the open- 
ing game. 

A parade headed by the Naval Band from the 
cruiser North Carolina started at the Shipfitter's 
Shop and gradually grew in size as it passed shop 
after shop on the way to the baseball diamond near 
the Naval Prison. The delegation from the Electri- 
call Shop was extierr.ely noticfable for some 300 
girls all carrying the American flag helped to make 



the day a memorable one. 

At exactly 4.45 our popular Industrial Man- 
ager, Mr. L. S. Adams, pitched the first ball and the 
game and league was on. 

The teams who drew the fortunate numbers 
to play the opening game were the Shipfitters Shop 
and the Electrical Machine Shop. Although the 
game was somewhat one sided it was nevertheless 
interesting. The pitching of Doll for the Ship.ltteis 
Shop and Abrams for the Electrical Machine Shop 
was well worth going a long way to see. Umpire 
Barker, Asst. Paymaster, was in his prime and um- 
pired an exceptionally fine game. 




INDUSTRIAL MANAGER L. S 
The line up and score of the opening game 
as follows: 

ELECTRICAL SHOP 

AB BH PO A R 
2 



Hackney cf 
Crowley 3b 
Golden ss 
McLawr if 
Connors « 
Haley lb 
Stackpole It 
Abrams p 
P-ay 2 b 

Total 



A 

1 



2 

1 
1 



ADAMS. TOSSING THE FIRST BALL 

vas Fontaine 3b 2 2 

McLaughlin rf 2 2 1 

Owen cf 2 o 

Doll p 2 2 2o 



Morrow If 
Vreeland lb 
Kelley 2b 

Ellis ss 
Murrav c 



14 2 12 5 

SHIPFITTER'S SHOP 

AB BH PO A 
3 1 



R 
1 
1 

1 
1 



E 



1 





Total 22 3 12 fi 10 2 

Innings 12 3 4 

Electrical 1 o o 0—1 

Shipfitters o 5 5-10 

Struck out by Doll, S; by Abrams, 7; Stolen 
bases, Pray 2, Crowley; Sacrifice hits, Golden, 
Doll; Base on balls, Abrams 2, Doll 0; Umpire, 
Barber. 

DUST FROM THE DIAMOND. 

On July 31st the teams representing the Foundry 
and Building Trades crossed bats at Prison Dia- 
mond No. 1, when the former won due to a forfeit 
because the Building Trades played an outside 
player. Were it not for this fact the Building 
Trades would have received the credit in the League 
standing, for they actually won the game by the 
score of 2 to 1. 



LIFE BUOY 



20 



Score by innings 12 3 4 5 
Building Trades 10 10 — 2 

Foundry 10 — 1 

Batteries — Building Trades, Miller p, Fellows c; 

Foundry. Marsh p, Mercer c. 

At Diamond No. 2 the Boat Shop crossed bats 

with the Spar Shop, and the game resulted in a tie, 

8-8 

Score by innings 12 3 4 

Boat Shop 2 4 2—8 

Spar Shop G 1 1 — S 



We must do our share to make this Loan a 
success, and that means that every man and woman 
on the Yard must be interested in it and must work 
for it. 

What's your answer? 

R. P. SCHLABACH, 

Shop Supt. 



FOURTH LIBERTY LOAN. 

The campaign tor the fourth Liberty Loan will 
start Sept. 2Sth and end Oct. 19th. At this writing 
the amount and terms are not known, but it is 
probable that the interest will be the same as on 
the last loan. 

What is the Portsmouth Navy Yard going to 
do? What is the minimum we shall set? We now 
have practically 5000 employees in the yard. Is 
half a million dollars too high to set the minimum? 
I do not believe so. 

Are we going to let any other Yard beat Ports- 
mouth this time? I do not think so. What do you 
think? This Yard has had three vigorous cam- 
paigns, while other Yards did not wake up until 
the last Loan. It is natural some of the other 
Yards should go ahead of us last time, as we had 
had two hard drives before and they had not; but 
this time we are starting on more even terms and 
I expect to see Portsmouth head the list. 

I want to make a suggestion relative to this 
drive. Let us form a "Win-the-War" club in the 
Yard, and let each shop form a local club. Every 
employee who owns a Liberty Bond should be eligi- 
ble for membership. The initiation fee should be 
accompanied by signing a pledge that the "candi- 
date will devote his best efforts toward winning 
the war; that he will be regular in attendance to 
work; that he will offer encouragement and help to 
new employees and that he will help in every 
reasonable way to keep up production." The dues 
should be the fulfillment of the pledge. 

One of the first duties of the Club can be in 
helping to make this Liberty Loan a success. Let 
each shop club elect a Loan Commutes, whose 
duties shall be to see every employee in the shop 
and try to have each one buy one or more Liberty 
Bonds as they are able. Each committee should 
elect a chairman who will be a member of the Cen- 
tral Committee which shall have general charge 
of the drive. The Shop Superintendent's office will 
assist in every way possible, and a representative 
will meet with the Central Committee. 



WITH THE COLORS. 

June 14, 191S. 
Dear friends in the Boat Shop:- 

We have done a lot of traveling from place to 
place, but have settled down for a while. Morgan 
is at another base but Godfrey, Hooper and Little- 
field are at the same base that I am at. Every- 
where I go I find a nice Y. M. C. A. it is wonderful 
the way they have worked to make things comforta- 
ble and homelike for the men. 

Tell the boys to loosen up when the Y. M. C. A. 
or Red Cross ask for help, they would be willing to 
give a whole lot to both if they had only been in 
the service awhile, they don't know what it is to 
sacrifice for their country. It meant a lot of sacri- 
fice for me to come and I am glad that I came. I 
felt that it was my duty to come and I feel better 
because I did. I hope that you are building a lot 
of boats now. I saw one of the Portsmouth 3 5 
footers a few days ago, she certainly looked natural. 
I am at a nice place and we get good chow we have 
got a great cook here. 

Write when you can. 

Richard C. Wildes, C. M. IC. 
Whiddy Island. Ireland 
Care Postmaster New York. 

P. S. Iiemember me to the boys. Hooper is as 
pretty as ever. 



"LIFE WISDOM." 

"Count always your brightest moments your 
truest moments." — Phillips Brooks. 

"If you want to be miserable think about 
yourself." — Chas. Kingsley. 

"Get thy tools ready; God will find the work." 
— Browning. 

"Do the duty that lies nearest thee; the next 
is already clearer." — Carlyle. 

"The only helpless people in the world are the 
lazy." — Gen. Armstrong. 

"You cannot dream yourself into a character; 
you must forge and hammer yourself into one." — 
Fronde. 

"They are slaves who dare not be 
In the right with two or three." 

— Lowell. 



21 



LIFE BUOY 



"No life can be pure in its purpose and strong been complaining of a headache this week. 



in its strife and all life not be purer and stronger 
thereby." — Owen Meredith. 

We never know for what Cod is preparing us 
in his schools, for what work on earth, for what 
work hereafter, our business is to do our work 
well in the present place, whatever thai may be. — 
L. Abbott. 



How "Colonel" Leavitt's wife makes such good sugar 
Cookies in war times? 

Why "Abbie Ka-bibble" comes up stairs so often? 
(Weil Abbie we heard her say you were cute, so now's 
your chance. strike while the iron is hot!) 

Who took Miss Carney's picture the other noon-time? 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT 

.lust because we haven't been represented heretofore, 
we want it understood that we are in favor of the Life 
Buoy and will furnish notes in the future. 

Five new yeowomen from Boston came into the office 
this week. 

Mr. and Mrs William Burns returned this week from 
a trip to their camp at Oxford, Maine. 

The Misses Pauline Hobbs, Nellier Call, and Mildred 
lleeney are planning to spend the first two weeks of 
September at a girl's camp located near Roxbury, Vt. 

Una Badger has been appointed assistant to Leon 
Bobbins. I ' is the wish of all the office force that she 
be successful in her new work. 

Work in the Supply Department seems to be ever in- 
creasing, for nearly every morning we see new desks 
moved in. 

Doris Kaula has returned from a week's vacation 
spent at her Uncle's summer home in New Ipswich, 
Mass. 

Assistant Paymaster Harvey Knight has reported 
aboard the U. S. S. North Carolina for duty. He 
will be greatly missed in the Supply Department. His 
many friends wish him the best of luck in his new field 
of work. 

WE WONDER: 

If "Colonel" Leavitt will look the same when he re- 
turns from New York. We know you love the chickens, 
"Colonel", but we think you're all right just the same. 

Who will be the next victim to fall under's Neighbor's 
hypnotic charm? 

Who's little heart he is breaking now? 

If Roland Shaw ever thinks about the girls in the 
Supply Department? 

If Eddie will fit as strong as Roland did? 

What is the best thing to remove sea sand from the 
hair? 

Why Ernest Saunders prefers Kittery Point to 
Kittery. Carmine is prettj nice. We don't blame you 
much. 

What kind of powder the new Boston girls use? 
"Calamity Jane" and several of the office boys have 



ANVIL SPARKS. 

\ ET TO BE SOLVED 

Is it his winning ways or his pocket book? 

Why Maurice goes to Exeter only on stormy 
days? 

What Walter Fernald does with the Elastic 
Hands he borrows on pay days? 

How's the weather in Barre. Walter? 

The girls in the Office wonder if Levine ever 
has a Pipe Dream. 

Do the Twins keep you walking. Daddy? 

Does Levine get lost in the fog every morning? 

All off the beach at L0.30, Koekendorf. Dixon. 
Sherburne. 

Old chillies bought and sold by Frank Morse 
and Happy Armstrong. Sweaters a specialty. 

Prank LinsCOtt has purchased a new horse, the 
last one was too fast for him. 

Eddie Hammond has decided to walk rather 
than ride with Howard Dixon. 

Cap. Lem is still waiting for a new chair. 

If the girls at Salisbury will make Bill go home 
early he will be able to get up Sunday Morning. 

Elmer Riley and Jack Chapman went to Bos- 
ton recently but we can't seem to find out whether 
it was for business or pleasure. 

Some of our boys would be better off if they 
kept away from Newcastle. 

Ray Brackett has certainly made a hit with 
the girls at York Beach. 

Koekendorf says he should worry about the 
new Salisbury law. He thinks the girls are more 
lovable at Hampton. 

A record of 35 years in the Smith Shop is held 
by .Mr. George Mcintosh. Mr. Mclnlosh is a vereran 
of the Civil War and although not young enough 
to soldier in this war he is doing his soldiering at 
the hammer. At the time he began his work on the 
yard there were no steam hammers, all work being 
done by sledges. Mr. Mcintosh is now rated as a 
Hammer Runner and hi' is an expert at the work. 

Earle Jones reports that Married lite is all that 
it is said to be and then some. 



TAKE A HANDFUL 




OF EASTMAN KODAK! FILMS 

FOR YOUR TIME OFF, ALL SIZES AT 

MONTGOMERY'S opp.p.o. 

THE ORIGINAL KODAK: STORE 

L 

Meats of the better kind 
Fish always strictly fresh 
Vegetables from local farmers 
Canned goods of a high quality 
PRICES as low as possible 
What more can you ask? 

Shaw's Cash Market 

18 Pleasant St. - - - Portsmouth N. H. 

Formerly CLARK'S BRANCH 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



L'.'{ 



LIFE BUOY 



SEEN THROUGH THE PERISCOPE. 

Austin A. Googins, our fair stenographer, is 
;il that popular watering-place, Old Orchard, for 
three weeks. 

Dennis Carey is now at the Syracuse Recruit 
Camp, where he is getting accustomed to the 
numerous thrills of the Army. We hear that he is 
the keystone-sacker for the camp baseball team. 

The following men have returned from their 
vacations; J. E. Borden, who has been summering 
around the favorite resorts of Maine and New 
Hampshire; H. F. Downing, who pulled some of 
that cave-man stuff at some one of Joe Knowles 
places way down in Maine; E. G. Kittredge, who 
delved into the wild haunts of Portland and vicinity. 

Billy Miller is now in New York, where it is 
likely that he is putting in quite a little of his time 
with h's new acquisition, we wonder what it is 

II O. Farrington is now confined to his home 
with a broken arm. which is the result of the back- 
firing of his pet fire-buggy. 

(F. N. Staten has been confined to his horn?) 
with a severe attack of tonsilitis. 

S. E. Wendell has been transfered from the 
Machinist's gang to the Submarine Drafting Room. 

F. S. Snow. E. C. Kimble. K. Y. Wu and L. W. 
Ball have gone out for a respite of two weeks. 

SOME OF THOSE VACATION ECHOES: 

"We had a good time but I broke a rear axle." 
— Hay ward. 

"The cracks in the wall are caused by internal 
stresses, are they not?"— Ray. 

"Bing, bang, biff! The Minneapolis Thunder- 
bolt has arrived." — Guggisberg. 

"I got a flat tire, but I ran on the magneto.'' — 
Scheirer. 

"They wanted me to stay and take the position 
of Chief Draftsman, but- — ," — "Red" Newton. 

"That was some other Pinkham that eloped to 
Bath and got married, not me." — Pinkham. 

"I put in quite a little time fooling around with 
the kid." — Zislin. 
Just a few "WE WONDERS" — 

Why Scheirer and Guggy took an auto ride to 
Boston on the night of August 11. 

Why it is that Hayward is still as tardy as ever. 

If Potter is just as satisfied that the Mrs. has 
not come back as yet. 

If some one has been kidding Colliton and 
Robinson, just ask Hales and Max. 

Why Downing is so worried about the tax on 
three-cent stogies. 

If Scriven has hocked his flivver to buy that 
sparkler. 



What kind of a combination this Zislin-Coffin 
team is. 

Why Coffin is so anxious to get into the service. 
Maybe some fair Physce has got after him. 

If Kimble is indulging in that national pastime 
of garden calisthenics. 

E. J. Proehl has been made Progressman, both 
in the Drafting room and in the shiphouse. 

C. P. Yeomans is now a land-owner in the 
beautiful metropolis of Kittery Point. 

A. V. Curtis, our Chief Draftsman, is again 
back at the helm, and it is with genuine pleasure 
that we welcome him back in our midst, for his 
presence with us assures all the men of such un- 
limited confidence. 

Lieut. Commander J. W. Lewis has added to 
his resources, a horseless-carriage, which he un- 
doubtedly will carry in the Central Operating Com- 
partment of the S-3, for land-foraging. 

During the absence of Austin, Miss Brennan 
and Miss Chamberlain of the Industrial Department 
are officiating at the Underwood. 

Before leaving to join the draft army, Carey 
spent three weeks in the Catskill Mountains, look- 
ing over the selected stock in that region. 

C. B. Steen of Elmira, N. Y., accompanied 
Scheirer back here, and was for a while employed 
in the weight department, but has returned to 
Elmira. 

The Drafting Room Poet contributes the fol- 
lowing ditty: 

IF 

If Kaiser Bill should happen 'round. 

This Navy Yard of ours 
What could we do to help him spend 

A few instructive hours? 
We'd make him run the gauntlet thru 

A hail of molten lead. 
And put him at a naming forge. 

To work till he dropped dead. 
We'd crucify his carcass on 

A bed of rivets hot. 
To burn the curse out of his soul. 

Which has such havoc wrought. 
But we're adverse to torture's stain. 

And Blasphemy so low. 
And all those wicked tricky wiles 

That he is wont to show. 
Of Kultur we know not a thing. 

And selfishness as well; 
Bui when it comes to discipline. 

We sure could give him H . 



"A Penny Saved 
Is a Penny Earned" 

We can help you save a 
good many pennies on 

HOUSE FURNISHINGS 

See Mr. WOOD 

99 Penhallow St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



THE "BUSY CORNER" STORE 



But Never Too Busy To Fill Your 
Prescriptions and Fill Them Right 

OUT OF TOWN* PATRON& ARE 

WELCOME TO WAIT FOR THE 

CAR AT OUR HOUSE 

BENJAMIN GREEN 

THE DRUGGIST 

INSURANCE and REAL ESTATE 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

LOWEST RATES BEST FORMS 

C E. TRAFTON 



35 Pleasant St. 



Opposite Post Office 



YOU AUGHT TO KNOW 

DENNET and McXARTHVS 

IS THE RKST PLACE TO BUY 

Overalls, Shirts, Hosiery 



USE GAS F~OR 

LIGHTING, HEATING AND COOKING 

PORTSMOUTH GAS CO- 

ALWAYS AT YOUR SERVICE 



YORK BEACH, MAINE 

and 

THE GOLDENROD 

Clam Chowder, Lobsters, Ice Cream, 
Candies, Soda, Cigars, and Home Bakery. 
Home of the famous Goldenrod Kisses, 
over 13 ton sold last summer. Made fresh 
every day except Sunday. A pound box 
mailed any place in New England for 46c. 



BROOKS MOTOR SALES 



PORTSMOUTH, 



FORD SERVICE 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



FullS BrOS. Men's and Boys' Shoes 

Fine Shoe Repairing congress st. tel. con. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE RITOY' 



25 



LIFE BUOY 



UNIQUE ENTERPRISE. 

A very unique enterprise was started in huild- 
[ng No. 89 Outside Machine Shop, recently for a 

candy counter has been opened. The profits real- 
ized from the sale of the candy will he given to the 
Red Cross and other charities. 

It is our understanding that the profits real- 
ized from a month's business amounted to nearly 
$ 2 7 r> . This is indeed a creditable showing and one 
we hope will be kept up. The credit for starting 
this enterprise should be given to Mr. Fred Hayes. 
Foreman of the Outside -Machine Shop, and to Mr. 
B. J. Ferrin. 



HAVE YOU? 

Have you been to the Lodge of the "Has Beens" 
In I lie slumbering town of "Slow," 

Where the pessimist howls, 

And the knocker growls. 
And the winds of misery blow ! 

They live on the memories of "I'sed to He." 
And their password is "What's the Use?" 

It would make you sick 

If yen heard them kick. 
For they scatter some rank abuse. 

They meet in the hall room of "Any Place." 
On the street called "Nothing to Me." 

Where the leaves have fled 

And the limbs are dead. 
On the tree of Fraternity. 

If you've never been to the Lodge of "Grouch." 
In the valley of "1 don't Care," 

Don't show your face 

In the dismal place. 
For you'll never be happy there. 

.lust measure yourself by the "Has Been" rule. 
And see about where you stand. 

Then shake off the dust. 

And the "I'sed to Be" rust. 
And hustle to beat the band. 

— Universal Engineer. 



TIN PAN CLIPPINGS. 

Women wanted equal rights. They are getting 
them here at the sheet metal shop alright. 

When are the Bloomerettes going to take the 
place of skirts? 

Several of the helpers and sheet metal workers 
have entered the school to learn shipfitting. 

Miss Kilgore, one of the trio in the office, has 
returned after several weeks' illness. 

Guy is waiting for the right one and then ex- 
pects to have as pretty a helper as any one could 
ask for. 



Chances are pretty good for either a helper 
or mechanic to enter the school of shipfitting un- 
der the present rating, and hold it until able to ob- 
tain a rating as shiptitter. driller, chipper and 
canker or many other ratings carrying a good in- 
crease in pay. 

Have you bought your W. S. S. for this month? 
If not. better get it on the fifteenth and you will not 
miss the cash so much as on a six day pay. 

Many new faces are appearing every morning 
and every noon; both male and female. 

Fred Remick the veteran in the galvanizing 
shop expects to ha\e a female operator for a helper 
before long. 

Hasn't he found those stubbs yet. Mary? 

The writer saw Miss Murphy smile the other 
day. must have received a letter from over there. 

CASTINGSTVND MOULDS. 

Our girls from the shipping room do like to be 
seen with those heartbreakers from the pattern 
shop. They sure made a big splash at the Kittery 
lawn party, regardless of the rain. 

Have has registered as instructor of females in 
moulding during the noon hour. 

Thomas, you certainly make a fine water boy. 
Keep it up. 

The scenery on the Piscataq.ua as seen from 
Portsmouth bridge from 10 to 11 P. M. in a thunder 
storm with the draw raised, is very beautiful. Ask 
Mr. Connors about it. 

Has anybody seen the Dodge brothers out 
( chicken i hunting lately in their new auto? 

We are sorry to have you leave us. John 
Tucker, but we wish you the best of luck. 

Our shopmate and Foundry fashion plate is 
unable to purchase white silk collars in our little 
burg. Tough luck, Gladys. 

Pan seems to like a (plump) girl. Wonder if 
she weighs a (ton). How about it D? 

How hot does it have to be to make Gould 
take off that coat? Last week's hot wave didn't 
affect him a bit. 

Ask Edna why she stays out the morning after 
the night before. 

The night crew will not have to go home with 
a headache for Mike Kennedy is soon going to take 
a vacation. What a relief that will be. 

Mary is some elocutionist. Wonder where she 
gets that wonderful line. 

Dodge says it isn't a Dodge but a Maxwell, 
but Mary and Edna don't care as long as Lester is 
with them. 

Jack Keenan is developing big and fast. Tell 
some of us lightweights how you do it. Jack, so we 
can get a few more pounds. 



HENRY PEYSER & SON 

16 TO 20 MARKET ST. 

For more than forty years Portsmouth's leading 
Store for Men's and Boys' apparel 

PERFECTION OIL STOVES REFRIGERATORS PORCH FURNITURE 

THE QUALITY STORE 

MARGESON BROS. 



Vaughn St. 



Telephone 570 



PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



FRED B COLEMAN 

APOTHECARY 

Corner Congress and Vaughn Sts. 
PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



If you desire to buy or sell Real Estate call, 
telephone or write 

II. I. CASWELL AGENCY 

Congress St. TELEPHONE 478-W Portsmouth 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

DEALERS IN 

BEEF, PORK & PROVISIONS 

COR. DANIEL AND PENHALLOW STREETS 
Telephone Connection Portsmouth, N. H. 



SINCLAIR GARAGE 

HORTON SERVICE 

Telephones 282-W 8411-M 

Corner Richards Ave. & Middle St. 

Portsmouth, N. H. 



S- S- TRUEMAN 



GENERAL CONTRACTOR 



TELEPHONE 651 



83 Bow St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



JOHN O'LEARY 

KITTERY and NAVY YARD EXPRESS 

GENERAL TEAMING 
Tel. Con. Portsmouth, N. H. 

If you want to be dressed up to the Minute 
from head to foot in dress and work clothes 
come in to see 

LOUIS ABRAMS & CO. 

38-40 Daniel St. Portsmouth, N. H. 






The simplest most ecomonical durable modern motor built. Valve in removable head. All valves running 
in oil. Leather faced cone clutch. Floating axles. 2 sizes, 4 cylinders and an eight that is snappy and pretty 
as any car. It has valve in removable head motor. We also have a beautiful enclosed car for $1060. 

OMAS. e. na/oods 

51 to 60 Bow Street Portsmouth N. H. 



27 



LIFE BUOY 



We hear that Dockham's night crew baseball 
nine is very anxious to get a game with the day 
crew's team. We are ready for you, Doc, and hope 
you will arrange the game right away. 

Never mind how much the girls miss you, Tom, 
aeroplane service is much more exciting than office 
work. 

Ask Dick Mullaney why McPherson has to loaf 
so often. 

One of the night crew told us you were a 
quitter, Tom, but I think you must have had good 
reasons for leaving that gang and coming on days. 

Tough luck, Portman. when the office girls 
won't dance with you, but cheer up, she may not be 
as nice as she thinks she is. 

Bill Coyne rendered one of his most pleasing 
solos at the Kittery Lawn party recently. 

Thank you for your financial help to the base- 
ball team, boys. Now come over to the games and 
help to make the league a success. 

Tocchi we hope you will remember that the 
man gave you that halter to hitch the nag by. If 
you had thought of that the other day and not 
thrown it away, you would have saved yourself that 
trip to the grocers for a piece of clothesline. Never 
mind old boy but don't ever get peeved even if 
Frank forgets to call you at 3.30 Sunday afternoons. 



it 



LATHE TURNING CHIPS. 

is with sincere regrets that we announce 



the inability of this shop to place a team on the 
Navy Yard League. This shop gifted with so many 
meritorious players of both minor and major 
leagues, had a team all picked out, but owing to the 
great number of men on the team wTio resided at 
some distance from the yard, they considered it too 
great an inconvenience to their respective families 
to participate. 

The line-up was as follows: 
Charlie Dodge, Catcher. 
Sheldon Manning, Pitcher 
George Kane, (Capt.l, 1st. Base 
Charles Fernald, 2nd. Base 
Oscar Taylor, S. S. 
W. J. M. Hockney, 3rd. Base 
Joe Miner, Left Field 
Fred Prescott, Center Field 
F. A. Staples, Right Field 

Subs: Ross Hanscom, Charles McDaniels. Billy 
Noyes, Mike Leydon, Mgr. R. N. Spinney. 
Close followers of the national pastime will no 
doubt recognize many familiar names in the line-up. 
However, Bldg. SO wishes the league the greatest 
of success and patronage. 



THE KNIGHT OF THE CRANE AND FLIVVER 
Contributed 
John with his quaint hair lip 
Was all dolled up to make a hit, 
But, who took note of this knight of the air 
Surely not one of us who were there. 

Bill at the end of the shop did cry. 
At the gink in the cage of the crane on high. 
But John was not there, at least not in spirit. 
And then what Bill said, 'twas well John did not 
hear it. 

At last he awoke, and he started to go, 
But he couldn't get stopped when Bill shouted whoa. 
The windows shook, and the old building swayed 
And Oh! what a racket Slippery made. 

Now after his days work is done 
Out in the flivver he goes for a run, 
He takes all corners on the high 
And clips the poles as he goes by. 

Now a gent sold the flivver, he wanted the mon. 
And Eddie he bought it, 'cause his car couldn't run 
Then Ed sold the flivver to Slippery for cash, 
And the first time John drove it, he went with a 

smash. 

Mr. Joseph Waitte has returned from a vaca- 
tion passed at the nearby beaches. -During his ab- 
sence, his place was very ably filled by Mr. B. W. 
Burke. Mr. Burke by his willingness and attention 
to all details has made himself greatly liked by all 
whom he has come in contact with since his advent 
as a leather worker. 

Shorty Cahill says that when a man asks him 
to have a drink of cider and then limits him to a 
quart, its pretty small. Nubbins says he didn't 
figure on a tank with cider at $30.00 per bbl. 

Fred Abrams has a new watch, one of the 
latest type and design. It was only with the utmost 
difficulty that he was persuaded to leave it at home 
the other morning. They say that "Big Bens" are 
large and heavy, but "Abe" don't notice a little 
thing like that. 

When it comes to picking out mackerel Bill 
Bartlett can't be fooled, if you don't believe it ask 
Mark Boulter. 

Ross Hanscom has got a great habit of picking 
up the boys of the shop and taking them off on 
long automobile rides evenings, if he don't look out 
he is in for trouble as a great many wives have com- 
plained about his not bringing their husbands home 
until the small hours of the morning. 



PAGE &, SHAWS' 

DURANT'S 

MARIE SAUNDER'S 

AND 

ADAMS of BOSTON CANDIES 

AT 

ADAMS DRUG STORE 

ON 

MARKET STREET 



IT'S NO USE 



Telling you a long story about advancing prices. 
You know as much about it as I do. But I want to 
tell you that I have a large stock of CLOTHS, bought 
to secure old yarns and dyes, at a much lower price 
than they can be found today. If you need a SUIT 
this year BUY IT NOW. 

WOOD, The Tailor 

15 PLEASANT ST. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



THE PORTSMOUTH FLOWER SHOP 

A. C. CRAIG, Manager 

FANCY CUT FLOWERS 

AGENT VICTOR TAI.KTXG MACHINES 

4 Market Street Phone 960 

PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



M. P. ALKON &, CO. 

DEALERS IN 

CHINA, CROCKERY & CLASS WARE 

NO- 27 MARKET ST., PORTSMOUTH. N. H. 



D. BOU 

FOR LEADING FIRE AND LIABILITY INSURANCE COMPANIES 



GOV. ST. 



KITTERY, MAINE 



INDIAN HEAD GARAGE 

REPAIRING, VULCANIZING AND SUPPLIES OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 
YORK BEACH, MAINE 

TEL. CONNECTION 

"W-A^FLETSr E. BLAISDELL 

HARDWARE, PAINTS, COOKINC UTENSILS AND MOTOR ACCESSORIES. 

THE DODD SYSTEM OF LIGHTNING PROTECTION. 

Telephone 7 YORK VILLAGE, ME. 

JOHN E. WEARE groceries meat and provisions 



Tel. 169-2 



AUTO JDELIVEFLY 

YORK BEACH, ME. 



TYPEWRITERS FOR SALE & RENT 

J. E. DIMICK 

29 Tanner St. PORTSMOUTH. N. H. 

Telephone 837-M. 



MYERS LUNCH 

CIGARS UUUU JLrKVILt TOBACCO 

YORK BEACH, MAINE 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



>9 



LIFE P.liOY 



If Cookie only showed as much speed on the 
Hampton Beach boulevard the other night as he 
does going to the lunch room, he would never have 
got caught. 

Bathe is there with the girls at the beach, all 
he lacks is the aeroplane. 

Anyone who has any doubt of the speeding 
powers of John Mogs car should see him go through 
Rye at night. Nothing but a rush of air and then 
a red light quickly fading in the distance. 

Ralph and Hutch gave a dinner party and dance 
to the ladies of the Civil War Association at the 
beach recently. 

It is understood that several of our men in the 
shop have given up smoking on the Yard. At least 
Ken says he is off forever. 

Ned Warburton just can't keep away from 
Hampton Beach; from what we hear of it we don't 
blame Ned or Brownie either. 



ELECTRICAL SPARKS. 

W, H. Little, our popular Shop Tool room at- 
tendant, has been called in the Draft Army. We all 
wish "Bob'' the best of success. He promised to 
get a "Hun" for every person in the shop. Go to 
it Bob. 

"Gertie,'' our pugilist, now the expert on 
matters relating to shop tools, including gigs and 
dies, is right there when it comes to handing out 
the round squares and hard rubber files. Gertie 
says. "You can't kid me." 

Our female operators look wonderfully well 
in their new overalls. 

"Jimmie" the expert on repairs to bench drills 
is right there on a snare drum. He studied under 
"Jocko" King, and another more notable expert 
from York Beach, George Webber. 

The baseball team met defeat at the hands of 
the Shipfitters in the opening game of the Yard 
league. Both shops had good teams, but 79 was 
weak in spots which resulted in a 10-1 defeat. The 
second game was decidedly in our favor, with the 
Trade School on the losing end, 14-1. We expect 
to give a better account of ourselves in the future 
games. 

The industrial band, an organization which 
originated in this shop certainly has won favor 
throughout the yard. Rehearsals are held during 
the noon hour. It has made a decided hit with 
officials as well as employees. The band consists 
of about 25 pieces, we hope to make it 75 pieces 
before next month. 



DITTY BOX SAYINGS. 

I wonder if it wasn't some chan ;e for the boya 
that went on the Zizannia as first class cabin pas- 
sengers, and then got aboard the Lightship No. 74 
and slept in the forecastle, on deck and on top of 
a pile chain. And the grub, don't say a word; 
Jesse says he never ate hash without potatoes in it 
before. They said it was fine to be rocked to sleep 
at the tune of (Home was never like this ?) ac- 
companied by a 12 inch fog whistle and a submarine 
bell. 

We found the old Ship she was all painted Red 
She lay 7 % miles South East off Portland Head 
We all went on board in the rain and fog 
If you want to know the rest you can read our log. 
Jesse put down, just had to stay 
Jesse was brave, he didn't have a sup 
But when he poured out the coffee he couldn't hit 
the cup. 
Now I lay me down to sleep on the lightship deck 
I have a terrible feeling in my neck. 
If I ever get back on the good old soil 
I will never leave my father Boyle. 

However, the boys wish to express their thanks 
for the kindness of the officers of the Zizannia and 
the Hebiscus also to Chief Eng. Eaton and Asst. 
Pinkham of the Lightship No. 74. 

We understand that one of the night crew is 
preparing to stage and act the part of (Hank the 
Iiermie) for a moving picture company. He nas 
already purchased some animals, goats guiena pigs, 
white mice, hens, turkeys, dogs, ducks and a mon- 
key, and is now hunting for a parrot and a bear. 

There is posted in this shop a record made by 
the Liberty Pan Makers of Bldg. No. 74, on May 7th 
and May 2Sth. 

We ditty box makers work every night and 
start with raw material and turn out a finished pro- 
duct, ready to receive its hardware, performing 60 
different machine operations and three hand opera- 
tions. 

Now if the Pan Makers will give an account 
of themselves by the day or week or month and not 
the two best days in a month we will give an ac- 
count of what the ditty box makers have done and 
are now doing. 

Elmer is very much in love, we have to pinch 
him quite often to change his thoughts, he will 
never stand the strain as long as Charlie and Benny 
did. 

There is some talk of tunneling the river, a 
tunnel from Portsmouth to Haverhill would please 
a lot of us. 



LIVE WIRE MEN WANTED 

To get acquainted with a live wire store. A store that KNOWS what men want and 
HAS it. Good, dependable merchandise at right prices, and good service. 



"MASTERCRAFT" AND LEOPOLD MORSES MEN'S CLOTHES "RIGHT POSTURE" BOYS 

CLOTHES ARROW COLLARS HATHAWAY SHIRTS CHENEY TIES 

WALK-OVER AND RALSTON SHOES FOR MEN-LION BRAND WORK SHOES-ARROW 

RUBBER BOOTS-TRIPPLE TREAD RUBBERS 



N. H. BEANE & CO. 



Congress St. 



Portsmouth 



E. E. WHITEHOUSE 


C. P. CARROLL 


BARBEK 


Groceries, Meats and Provisions 

145 PENHALLOW ST. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 


Up One Flieht Opp. Colonial Theatre 


Tel. Connection Near A. S. L. Ferry 



"YORK COUNTY NATIONAL BANK" 

SERVICE 

Large Storage Vault and Safety Deposit Boxes for 
rent. Your checking account is solicited. In our 
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT we pay 4 Per Cent 

interest. 

YORK COUNTY NATIONAL RANK 

YORK VILLAGE, MAINE 



THE 
APOLLO LUNCH 

HOME COOKING 

11 Congress St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



PHILBRICK'S PHARMACY 

AGENCY FOR 
IfiLLE MEAD SWEETS & JERSEY ICE CREAM 
67 Congress St. - - Portsmouth, N. H. 




WAR BOOKS 

The Best, of them on date 
of Publication 



BLUE JACKETS MANUALS 
Deck and Boat Book Ship and 
Gun Drill and many others for 
the Navy 

18 Market Square Portsmouth, N. H. 



HATS & MEN'S FURNISHINGS 
AT 

PARSONS THE HATTER 

PORTSMOUTH. N. H. : : PHONE 867-M 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



31 



LIFE RUOY 



CAMOUFLAGE COLORS 

Flanders finally hit the Invisible ring bolt. 
Poor old Flanders he certainly is seeing things of 
late. 

Smith. Now he is here. Now he's not. 

Johnny Watts will have to take off his hat to 
Rossly the human fly who's greatest hobby is walk- 
ing. Rossly walks most every day between the 
hours of 7.30 and 4.30 P. M. some thirty miles? 

If R's mouth was a paint brush, we would 
have to camouflage a ship every day. 

We wonder if Tolles had an automobile tour 
from August 11 to ISth. 

It is up to Eddie Lutts again. We smoked on 
his wedding now the understanding is we are again 
to participate in a smoke fest. The latest is be- 
cause of the new arrival E. U. Jr. 

Our foreman, Mr. W. L. Ball, who has been 
very sick, is convalescing slowly. Our wishes are 
that he may have a speedy recovery. 

If we can get the old boys together our line-up 
for the baseball team will be, Scott, C; Bangs, P 
Pinder. S S; Smart, 1st B; C. C. Bunker, 2nd B 
W. H. Pike, 3rd B; Connolly, L F; J. F. Pike, C F 
Pray, R F. Foster will umpire the first game. 

When it comes to camouflaging we are right 
there. Too much credit cannot be given to the 
men for their spirit in connection with their work 
on the North Carolina. Let us hope that they have 
the same spirit on all their work. 



SPARS AND BLOCKS. 

We are all glad to see Jensen smiling again. 

Why do Taylor and Nate Amee visit the office 
so much? 

Mr. Given is busy now days "instructing the 
new help. 

Paul's work keeps him out of the shop a great 
deal but still we notice he finds time to visit here 
occasionally. We understand he is thinking of re- 
pairing shoes for a living. 

We all miss Georgie very much and hope he 
will be able to return to work soon. 

If Lona would go to bed earlier Sunday nights 
perhaps she would be able to tell what date of the 
month Monday comes on. 

Have you noticed the new addition to the office 
force? 

Hazel's attention is so taken up at the beach 
she doesn't even recognize her Spar Shop friends 
when she passes by them. What is the great at- 
traction Hazel? 



BOAT SHOP PUFFS. 

Our foreman, Mr. Dixon, took a Sunday trip 



in his auto a week ago. He would have had quite 
a run but his tire burst when he had gone about 
100 yards from home. He was rather peeved and 
after putting on another tire took his machine home 
and called it off. 

Mr. Doolittle says that you can't trust the 
girls any more. It is rather hard Doolie to keep 
track of all the girls you have but brace up, some 
day you will find one that will stick. 

We notice that a good many of the shops have 
quite a few female operators in their force. We 
wonder when the Boat Shop's turn will come? 

It is rumored that "Our Freemie" has recently 
besn seen near the Pattern Shop during his noon 
hour. Come, own up "Freemis," what's the at- 
traction? 

We wonder what our old time artists, Jerry 
Hennessey and Arthur Paul, are going to pull off 
at the entertainment given by the Helper's Union. 

Why such a silence lately in the South West 
part of Bldg. No. 60 top floor? 

We wonder why so many Boat Shop men are 
visiting at York Beach lately? 

Here's to the Boat Shop Baseball Team, the 
winning team of the League. 

The upstairs gang in Bldg. No. 60 dcn't want 
to get too chesty as the down s'airs gang say they 
will trim them on 3 5 footers just as socn as they 
can get a full gang. 

Our Safety Engineer says that the Boat Shop 
boys are some ball players too and he wonders if 
the Boat Shop will fly the Champion flag in the 
Navy Yard League. 

It was on Friday morning 

A telephone message came 
For a leadingman at the Boat Shop 

Hersey was his name. 

On Saturday morning Hersey came 
Dressed up and carrying a grip. 

He was leaving for the mountains 

To bring home his unlucky ship. 

We hope he won't have such bad luck 

As he has had before 
And if he don't forget his gas and oil 

He'll land safe home ones more. 

Now when he gets that old ship home 

If he takes our advice. 
He'll run it out upon the dump and 

Never try the same trip more. 

—Boat Shop Poet. 



FRESER/^INGi- TIME 

WE HAVE EVERYTHING IN JARS, RUBBERS, HOLDERS, LIFTERS, Etc. 

CANNING RACKS, ALSO COMPLETE CANNING SETS 

126-128 Market St. THE SWEliiTSrjR STORE Portsmouth, N. H. 

A FEW OF OUR SPECIALTIES 

Hart, Schaffner and Marx Clothes, Stetson Hats, 
Manhattan Shirts, Fownes Gloves, Interwoven Stockings 



F. W. LYDSTON & CO. 



Outfitters for Men & Boys 
PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



JOHN SISE & CO. 
INSURANCE 

8 MARKET SQUARE 

PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



A. P. WENDELL & CO. 

Hardware, Paints and Tools 

Telephone 850 
2 Market Square Portsmouth, N. H. 



PORTSMOUTH MOTOR MART Inc. 

Cadillac Service Station Used Cars for Sale 

Autos for Hire Accessories and Supplies 

TELEPHONE 22 & 34 PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



TALC JONTEEL 25cts. CAN 
SOLE AGENCY 
BOARDMAN & NORTON 
*t ?exoi&L Store, Portsmouth, N. H. 

Opp. Post Office 



MEN'S WOMEN'S & CHILDREN'S SHOES 
OF THE BETTER QUALITY 



C. F. DUNCAN & CO. 



9 Market St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



SAVE FUEL 

By using Electric Appliances for Cooking 

ROCKINGHAM COUNTY LIGHT AND POWER CO. 

2Q Pleasant Street Portsmouth, N. H. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



33 



LIFE BUOY 



PATTERNS. 

TO THE CAMP 

'Tis a beautiful spot, I cannot forget, 

And a good bunch of fellows as you ever met, 

To both we will give one rousing good cheer, 
In our mem'ries they'll live for many a year. 

There's a glorious fireplace built in the wall, 
And "Old Glory" waves over them all. 

A graphaphone there, and mandolins too, 
But whoever plays them I do wish I knew. 

Now Jim's a Lynn boy, the best you could meet, 
For taking a joke he cannot be beat. 

When she asked him to take her out to the dance, 
He said, "I don't know you, but I'll sure take a 
chance. 

Charlie's another good sport you will find, 

Do you know which Charlie, I now have in mind? 

Are there any more like you in Portland, Me.? 
If so, I'll certainly take the next train. 

Charlie S. is a good kid, and always in trim, 
But someone already has spoken for him. 

Be careful Charlie, to flirt is a sin, 

When you have a nice girl waiting in Lynn. 

Louis says, "There is only one girl in this town 
Who knows me," but I can't swallow that down. 

For in good season you'll have to get up in the morn 
When you get ahead of the boys from Boston. 

Here's to the boy that comes from Hyde Park, 
You'll all have to grow some to reach to his mark. 

Whenever you see Carl he's always the same, 

How could he be otherwise with such a nice 
name? 

Well Romy you see I did not forget you, 

You're one I know would be constant and true. 

If you find the girl whom you like a whole lot, 
Just take her right down to old Windsor Lock. 

Now be a sport Henry and take your share, 
To leave you out would not be quite fair. 

Don't take life so serious its not worth while. 

Oh boy from New York greet the joke with a 
smile. 

Now girls, all take heed, this is Bachelor's Hall, 
At any old time they would welcome a call. 

If you're not fond of walking, just take a car, 
Or else ask Central for 1189R. 



JUST A LITTLE BACK DRAFT: 

-THEY SAY: 

That Coulter claims he is well qualified to 
pitch on the ball team, as he had good experience 
pitching hay on the farm, "back home." 

That Carl's "Hope Chest" is coming along fine. 
He already has a dozen wooden napkin rings and 
has plans made for a clock. 

Charlie Pine's baby boy is beginning to say, 
"Feed Me, Feed Me" and Charlie answers "Cease, 
Cease.'' 

Bill Peaslee, King of the Beach Combers, has 
some queer tales to tell about Old Orchard and 
Hampton Beaches. We believe your tale Bill. 

That Ralph Nelson (Vivian) has hibernated in 
his den, in Kittery, for life.' Come up for air Vivi. 

That Brickman and Chandler have some good 
ideas; but when it comes to poetry they should stick 
to Pattern-Making. 

That Van won't try anything now but a 3 to 1 
shot. 

He claims that if he makes a date with three 
girls in one night that he has a good chance of meet- 
ing one, provided they are not from Eliot. 

That Locke's contribution to the base-ball 
fund will be missed by the receiving teller at the 
Portsmouth Bank. 

That with six years training for the title of 
Pattern Maker, first class, Neal does not compare 
as favorably in the eyes of a certain Portsmouth 
girl, as a year old sailor with the rank of Ensign, 
N. R. F. We advise you to enlist in the Naval Re- 
serve, Neal, and become an Admiral. 

The boys of Camp Lookusup gave a very enjoy- 
able whist and dance at their bungalow on the 
Eliot bank of the Piscataqua, August 2nd. 

There were forty-five guests present and they 
were very lavish in their praise of Mr. Brickman 
for the originality shown in the selection of prizes 
for the whists, and also in the decoration of the 
Camp. 

Mr. McAulay who left us three days after the 
affair, to take up his duties as Instructor of Pattern- 
Making in the Public Schools of Holyoke, Mass., 
was given many thanks for an excellent vocal enter- 
tainment. 

Mr. Talbot of Lynn, Mass., amusingly enter- 
tained by relating some humorous incidents which 
he has witnessed during his many travels both in 
this country and abroad. 

This was the first entertainment that the boys 
have given to their many friends in the vicinity. 
and Ihe affair was such a success that they will 
continue to entertain throughout the season. 



THOSE WHO PAY CASH 

GET BETTER VALUE FOR THEIR MONEY 

Congress Street B D ^% VAV iVI » €X 

Portsmouth, N. H. "-^ "^ ^^ WW I ^i «te? Tel. 194 

FOURTH LIBERTY LOAN 

We are ready to receive applications for the 

FOURTH LIBERTY LOAN BONDS 

$50.00 BONDS $1.00 per week, 

100.00 BONDS " 2.00 per week. 

AGENCY FOR: 

War Savings Stamps and Thrift Stamps. 
Commercial Department. 
Savings Department. 

Open for business Saturday evenings from 7 to 9. 

NATIONAL MECHANICS & TRADERS BANK 

1 Congress St., - - - - Portsmouth, X. II. 



FRUIT AND CONFECTIONERY. ICE CREAM AND SODA, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

TELEPHONE 29 w CATERING A SPECIALTY 43 CONGRESS street 



TIRE CONSERVATION 



Conserve on your tires by having those small cuts and stone bruises repaired 
i time and put a few more miles in the old shoe. Our VULCANIZING DE- 
•ARTMENT is up-to-date. Fine line of new tires. 

OVERLAND AGENCY 
C. A. LOWD 

Service Station & Garage 338 Pleasant St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



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LIFE BUOY 



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At Entrance to Navy Yard 



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21 Meal ticket $6.50; an average of 31 cts. 
for a good meal. Tickets good until used. 

Telephones 349-W. 8449-8443-M. 9301. Residence 349-R. 



SUGRUE'S STORE 



Regal Shoes. Overalls 

Tobacco. Confectionery 

COMPLETE MEN'S OUTFITTER 

J. P. SUGRUE Prop. Kittery, Maine. 



'I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 
- Bf D. 

JAN* 19 J923 



WHY MUSIC TODAY MORE THAN EVER 



Your home made happier 
more restful and inspiring when 
there is music to enjoy, for no 
other force at your command is so 
beneficial physically, mentally, or 
spiritually, as music. 




Like everyone else, you and your family feel 
that love and desire for music-a feeling planted deep 
in every human heart. 



Your visit to our store will 
convince you that music is an 
essential part of the home life. 

Now is an excellent time to 
find bargains in Pianos as the 
Summer rental season is over. 




HASSETT'S MUSIC & ART SHOPPE 
115 Congress St PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



FOURTH LIBERTY LOAN CLUB 



The time has now come when without YOUR co-operation-the 
whole-hearted co-operation of every American-man, woman and 
child— our army cannot fight at maximum efficiency. 

You are a vital part of our war machine. You are but a step 
behind the man in the trenches. It is your task to ensure him the 
unfailing supply of guns, ammunition, all the fighting equipment 
that means victory. 

You receive your income, every dollar of it, in trust, subject to the 
superior needs of the government. What is not necessary for your 
health and efficiency should go to your War Account— for Liberty 
Bonds and War Saving Stamps. 

Join our Liberty Loan Club now and help to put the fourth Liberty 
Loan over the top. 

We are ready to take your subscription on the same weekly pay- 
ment plan that has enabled the Portsmouth Navy Yard to stand at 
the front of the Great Naval Stations of our country in the other 
three Liberty Loan drives. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

PORTSMOUTH : NEW HAMPSHIRE 
United States Depository ASSETS OVER $2,500,000. 

Bank open Saturday evenings from 6 to 9. 

SAV1 NG 

CONSERVATION and 

THRIFT 

WILL WIN THE WAR 



PATRIOTISM DEMANDS THAT THE CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES 

SPEND LESS and SAVE MORE 



10,000 PEOPLE ARE SAVING THEIR EARNINGS BY THE HELP OF OCR 
INSTITUTIONS. NEW SAVING ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 



PISCATAQUA SAVINGS BANK 

First National Bank Building Portsmouth, N, H. 



INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 
LIFE BUOY 



VOL. I 



Issued monthly for free distribution to employees of the Industrial Department of the 
Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H. 

OCTOBER 1918 



NO. 10 



RESPONSIBILITY AND AUTHORITY 



By Frederic G. Coburn 



rHE thesis of these comments is the relation 
between authority and responsibility — not 
;he relation between authority and pay, nor 
;he relation between authority and birth, nor 
my other of the various relations which, un- 
Jer certain circumstances, might be consid- 
ered as giving certain people authority over 
)thers. 

The best example I can think of to illus- 
trate authority and responsibility is that of 
i mechanic and his helper. A workman who 
nas a helper who runs a machine for him 
must see to it that the helper runs the ma- 
mine properly ; and so he is responsible. 
That is to say, he is responsible for seeing 
that the helper runs the machine properly. 
Therefore, we give him the authority to boss 
that helper, or else he could not discharge his 
responsibility. Suppose, for example, that a 
heavy forger had a hammer runner, and had 
no authority over him ; the hammer runner 
would run the hammer to suit himself, and 
not the heavy forger ; but, on the other hand, 
if the heavy forger be given the necessary 
authority to boss the hammer runner, he can 
order the hammer runner to run the hammer 
exactly as he (the forger) wants it done ; and 
the forger cannot do his work properly un- 
less he has that authority. 

I doubt whether there is any authority 
in the industrial world more absolute than 
that of the mechanic over his helper; and as 
for arbitrariness in the use of authority, give 
me every time the manner of a mechanic in 
telling a helper to pass him a wrench, or 
shoulder a piece of pipe. If a foreman should 



speak in such manner to a mechanic, the me- 
chanic would quit. 

That is a particularly clear case of giving 
a man all the authority he needs to discharge 
his responsibility; and it is really a pity that 
this principle has not more general observ- 
ance. 

It would be well to define "responsibility" 
The Standard Dictionary defines it as — "The 
state of being responsible, answerable, ac- 
countable." That, of course, requires the 
definition of "responsible"; which means — 
"Answerable, legally or morally, for the dis- 
charge of a duty, trust, debt, service, or other 
obligation; accountable; subject to obliga- 
tion'.' And since the word "duty" has been 
mentioned, let it be defined as, "that which 
one is bound to pay or do ; that which a par- 
ticular person is required to do; a specified 
obligatory service or function." 

There will be noted a difference between 
"duty" and "responsibility" — a difference 
that is not very generally understood. The 
helper is "responsible" to the mechanic for 
running his hammer; it is his "duty" to run 
hammer. The workman is "responsible" to 
the foreman for doing his work properly and 
for seeing to it that the helper does his work. 
The "duty" of the workman is the perform- 
ance of the work. The workman's load is 
nearly all duty, without much responsibility. 
In the case of a foreman there is found a 
greater preponderance of responsibility; he 
is responsible for seeing that the workmen 
discharge their duties; he is responsible for 
the plant, and for other things. The general 



LIFE liUOY 



executive's load consists altogether of re- 
sponsibilities, usually ; he generally has no 
duties. He discharges his responsibilities 
largely by giving decisions and by thinking 
of things for other people to do ; to put one's 
finger on his duties or specific services 
rendered is an almost impossible thing. 

Between these two cases — the case of 
the workman and the case of the general ex- 
ecutive— there are various mixtures of duties 
and responsibilities and gradations of re- 
sponsibility. A foreman, for example, has 
both responsibilities and duties. It may be 
that he is responsible for the maintenance of 
machinery, and plant, fire protection, etc.; 
and it may be his duty to inspect the ma- 
chinery and plant, and to have fire drills. 

The distinction between duty and re- 
sponsibility is becoming clear more rapidly, 
I think, in military circles than in industrial 
circles. The older idea of military organi- 
zation was one of central authority ; all orders 
were issued by the general to his subordi- 
nates, who were allowed practically no lati- 
tude. The later idea is, to issue orders for 
those things which must be done; and to issue 
instructions for those things which it is de- 
sired to have done, leaving to the responsible 
officer on the spot the authority to deviate 
from tho ;e instructions as may be necessary. 
To the officer on the spot is delegated respon- 
sibility, and complete authority to discharge 
that responsibility. It was the lack of ap- 
preciation of this principle that made so 
much trouble for the British in the Boer War 
in South Africa. 

In the case of a very small plant, with 
but few workmen, it may be that one man 
can retain all the responsibility and all the 
authority; he can look out for everything. 
But when the plant is large, the manager 
cannot be personally in contact with every- 
thing. Then, if he still retains the respon- 
sibility and authority, every matter must go 
to him for decision. If he is not immediately 
available, then delay results, until the de- 
cision is forth coming. This is a condition 
very often met. If the subordinate take a 
chance and make the decision himself, the 
odds are equally good that he will have to 
undo his work. Thus the job is delayed and 
its cost increased. 

It is, therefore, evidently necessary to 
delegate authority and responsibility to those 
near the work; in other words, to authorize 



them to make decisions for that part of the 
work going on under their supervision ; suc- 
cintly, those close to the work should direct 
it. 

The delegation of responsibility is 
strongly opposed by certain managers of the 
old school, because they feel that theirs is 
finally the responsibility, and that they can- 
not trust anybody else. Were this true, it 
would constitute a great defect in the factory 
system ; and a great many so consider it. 
But the delegation of responsibility is really 
a great advantage of the factory system, an 
advantage to society, because it enables a 
man of great entrepreneur ability to swing 
large enterprises, that he could not possibly 
swing singlehanded. 

Now, whilst the supervisory force close 
to the work should have authority to make 
deci ions and should be responsible for those 
decisions, yet in order to insure that they use 
their authority wisely, and to make them 
distinctly feel their responsibility, their 
orders should be subject to review; not, how- 
ever, subject to approval, as is frequently 
the case. 

That is to say, if a foreman or superin- 
tendent give an order to a subordinate, and 
if orders be subject to approval, then, if the 
subordinate does not want to carry out the 
order, he knows that the order is not good if 
he questions it. This condition results in 
dissension, and is subversive of good order 
and discipline; it delays the work and in- 
creases the coU. 

The proper method is to make orders 
subject to review. Then, when the superin- 
tendent or foreman issues an order, it will 
be carried out, "if, as, and when issued." A 
subordinate who thinks he has received a 
wrong order, may, alter carrying it out, take 
it up with the proper officer of the company. 

Since tho^e in subordinate positions are 
working their way up, and are always doing 
a job that is in some respects, at least, new to 
them — perhaps in some respects just beyond 
their present capacity — it may be expected 
that tho;e subordinates will take greater in- 
terest in the work than would the highest 
executive ; because the man at the top has al- 
ready worked his way up; and it is certainly 
a fact that after long years of doing certain 
things they lose their novelty, and the work 
of doing them becomes drudgery. This 
drudgery may not be apparent to the person 



LIFE BUOY 



concerned, but it is there, nevertheless. 

General Goethals understood the princi- 
ple of delegation of authority, as evidenced 
by the success that he enjoyed at Panama. 
Orders were subject to review, not to ap- 
proval. Every Sunday morning, at seven 
o'clock, the General's (then Colonel's) door 
was open to any employee, however low his 
station, who thought he had a grievance, and 
if an assistant, no matter what his station, 
had given an erroneous decision, it was re- 
vised. The assistants knew that their de- 
cisions were subject to this review, and were 
undoubtedly careful in making decisions ; for 
the number of hearings and revisions of sub- 
ordinates' decisions was extraordinarily 
small — almost inappreciable. 

There is such a thing as personal re- 
sponsibility which cannot be delegated to 
another; in the Navy, for example, we dock 
ships ; and the docking officer is held person- 
ally responsible. Disbursing officers in the 
Navy are personally responsible for every 
payment made, not only by themselves, but 
by their assistants. They cannot delegate 
responsibility to their pay clerks, even for 
the petty cash. 

Another condition is not infrequently 
found ; a man is given a responsibility which 
it is impossible to discharge. Likewise a 
man is frequently assigned a duty to per- 
form which is not within the bounds of hu- 
man possibility to do. For example, in a 
large plant a subordinate might be made per- 
sonally responsible for keeping visitors out 
of all the shops. This would be an impossible 
task. Whilst he may be called responsible, 
he cannot watch all the doors. Then, again, 
it might be the duty of the foreman of the 
shop to plan every job that comes in, which 
he cannot do; unless he ceases to be a fore- 
man, and becomes a planner. 

Now, let us define "authority." It is 
"The right to command and to enforce obedi- 
ence; the right to act by virtue of office, 
station, or relation ; also, the power derived 
from individual or moral superiority, from 
reputation, or from whatever else commands 
influence, respect, or esteem." 

If responsibility be carefully placed; if 
exact measure of authority be delegated with 
the responsibility; and if those who receive 
the responsibility are gifted with the power 
derived from individual or moral superiority, 
there need be little giving of orders. 



FAREWELL BANQUET AND BALL. 

On Monday evening, Sept. 16, 1918, a Farewell 
Banquet and Ball was tendered in honor of Com- 
mander R. P. Schlabach, who has been Shop Super- 
intendent of this Yard for the last four years, and 
who has been transferred for duty at Washington. 
D. C. 

At 8:15 P. M. promptly the Industrial Yard 
Band played the opening selection from the bril- 
liantly decorated stage in the new Yard restaurant 
addition. The dining-room was bedecked with 
bunting and Naval flags of all kinds. 

At the table of Honor, was seated Commander 
R. P. Schlabach, Rear Admiral C. J. Boush, Com- 
mander and Mrs. A. C. Almy, Captain and Mrs. L. S. 
Adams. Captain and Mrs. Wyman. Commander and 
Mrs. J. E. Palmer, Commander and Mrs. H. G. 
Howard, Lt. Commander and Mrs. J. W. Lewis, 
Commander and Mrs. E. H. Brownell, Lt. and Mrs. 
R. W. Perrell, Lt. Commander and Mrs. R. J. Boyd. 
Lt. and Mrs. Fogg, Lt. and Mrs. Hilton, Lt. and Mrs. 
Grifl'en, Lt. Jones, Chief Carpenter Floethe. 

At the rear of Commander Schlabach's chair 
was a floral tribute with the word "Godspeed" 
artistically arranged. 

The toastmaster, Mr. Thomas Lynch, ably per- 
formed his assigned task by eloquently and com- 
mendably eulogizing Commander Schlabach. 

The toastmaster, in his wonderful way re- 
lated the glorious work that Commander Schlabach 
had done since his assignment at the Yard. jThe 
eloquence of the toastmaster's remarks relative to 
the glorious work Mr. Schlabach had accomplished 
in the three Liberty Loans, which he personally 
directed, were especially appreciated and heartily 
applauded. 

Not only was a toast offered to Commander 
Schlabach, by each guest but Commander Schlabach 
was instructed through the raising of the hand of 
each guest, to carry a message to Washington to 
the effect that each one of the guests of which there 
were over 450, of their intention of purchasing at 
least one Liberty Bond on the next issue. 

After the Banquet which was ably prepared 
by Messrs. Woodard and Seegar, the guests left the 
Banquet hall and proceeded to the dancing hall on 
the top floor of Bldg. 79. The decorations of the 
dancing hall were not only appropriate for the oc- 
casion, but very artistically and elaborately ar- 
ranged. At 9:30 the first dance music was begun 
and out of courtesy to Commander Schlabach, he 
was allowed to dance with his partner (Miss Reich) 
alone until the first encore was finished. The last 
selection played was "The Star Spangled Banner" 
which selection was played as the Finale at sharp 



LIFE BUOY 



12 o'clock. 

Unusually good music was furnished by the 
Navy Yard Industrial Band both at the Banquet 
and at the Ball. 

The Editor has personally interviewed numer- 
ous persons who were guests of the occasion and 
from the information divulged, he can frankly state 
that it was the opinion of everyone that the Ports- 
mouth Navy Yard never gave an Officer such a fare- 
well reception as was accorded Commander Schla- 
baeh. 



MINSTREL SHOW. 



Plans are being formulated to produce a good 
mixed Minstrel Show. A meeting of the employees 
of this Yard was called at 4:40 on Tuesday after- 
noon, Sept. 24, 1918, when an executive committee 
was chosen to direct the putting on of the Show. 
It is hoped to have as many as a hundred participate 
in the show. The rehearsals will be held on Monday and 
Thursday evenings, beginning at 8 o'clock each week, 
at Loyal Order of Moose Hall, High Street. 

Through efforts of the Safety Engineer per- 
mission was granted by the Allied Theatre Co., 
Portsmouth, N. H., whereby the Portsmouth Theatre 
was offered free of charge on the evenings of 
December 11 and 12. Besides the free use of the 
Theatre itself, the management of the Allied 
Theatre Co. has taken a further interest, in that 
they'are going to print and sell the tickets, provide 
ushers, also the heat and light, free of charge. 

It is expected that the employees of the Ports- 
mouth Navy Yard will realize a profit of $2000. 
Whatever the proceeds may amount to, they will be 
given as a Christmas gift from the employees of 
the Portsmouth Navy Yard to the Red .Cross. 

At a recent meeting of the employees of this 
Yard held in the new Restaurant, the following 
persons were chosen as the executive committee 

to have charge of formulating plans for the Minstrel 

Show, to wit: J. R. Hugelman, Chairman, William 
Hillman Jr.. Arthur L. Hartford and Miss Eleanor 

Reich, Miss Stella ChemberKan Sec. 

Mr. Henry J. Q u j n n of Amesbury has been 

selected as the professional coach and producer. 
The rehearsals will be held in Portsmouth on 

selected evenings and it is requested that employees 

bp prompt in coming early. 

A mixed show is expected to be decided upon 

and a cast as large as 75 will be selected The 

coach will have the final say as to the selection of 

the successful candidates. 




COMMANDER R. P. SCHLABACH. 

Naval Constructor Ross P. Schlabach. U. S. 
N.. was born in Wadsworth, Ohio, on July 22. 1S81. 
In 1899 he was appointed to the Naval Acade- 
my at Annapolis and was graduated in February, 
1903. In April, 1903, he entered Massachusetts 
Insiilute of Technology and was graduated from 
the Institute in 1905. 

On July 28. 1903. while at Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology, Mr. Schlabach was appointed 
Assistant Naval Constructor and on July 28. 1911, 
he was appointed Naval Constructor. 

During the years 1905 to 1908, Naval Con- 
structor Schlabach was assigned to the Navy Yard, 
Norfolk. Va.; during 1908 to 1913. Navy Yard' 
Charleston. S. C. during 1913 to 1915, Inspector 
of Hull Material, U. S. N., Pittsburg. Pa., and from 
1915 to 1918. Navy Yard. Portsmouth. N. H. 



LIFE BUOY 



8 



During the years he has been assigned to the 
Portsmouth Yard, first as Construction Superin- 
tendent and later as Shop Superintendent, Naval 
Constructor Schlabach has been a hard, faithful and 
conscientious worker. He has always had the best 
interests of the yard and its employees at heart. 
He has always been an energetic and tireless worker 
in connection with all war activities at this yard 
and there never was a harder worker for the Liberty 
Loans than (Real Patriotic l R. P. Schlabach. 

It is hard for us to say farewell to Mr. Schla- 
bach, but it is easy for us to say that we envy the 
men who will be his co-workers and subordinates 
at Washington, but words are, after all, inadequate 
to express the sense of personal loss that is felt 
here by all those who have come to know Naval 
Constructor R. P. Schlabach. 

Every now and then some of us have the good 
fortune of meeting and coming in contact with 
some exceptional man whom we immediately chri- 
sen as "white.' From the moment you shake hands 
with him you sense a peculiar something which con- 
veys to you the certainty that everything is all right 
in the world. There is a look in his face, a smile in 
his eyes, and a cherry nod in which you read sympa- 
thy; a desire to understand your troubles and a 
willingness to help you. A talk with this man and 
your problems appear trivial; your doubts are 
scattered and deep in you there is the feeling that 
you have an ally — a powerful ally- who is going 
to see things through with you. The battles which 
you have been fighting alone are no longer uncertain 
as to their outcome. You feel that success is yours 
if you only obey the impulses that are registered in 
your mind by the magnetic personality of the man 
you have just met. 

Such a man is Naval Constructor Ross P. 
Schlabach, U. S. N. 



The final game was won by the Shipfitters Shop 
when Doll singled, knocking in two runs, not only- 
winning this game but likewise the Championship 
of the League. The brand of baseball displayed 
by both teams in the last game, was worth going a 
long distance to see and many close decisions had 
to be made. The Umpires, Mr. Barker and Mr. 
Staples, certainly were on their toes throughout 
the game and were called upon to make close deci- 
sions frequently, which it is needless to say they 
well performed. 

The following is the lineup of both teams for 
the Championship Game. 

BOAT SHOP SHIPFITTER'S SHOP 

Flynn 3rd Morrow 2nd 

Butler Snd Doll p 

Bissell p Coliton ss 

Gurber c Vreeland 1st 

Bunker 1st Hutchins cf 

Cragen ss Remick rf 

Burke If Fontaine 3rd 

Humphreys rf Zeldman If 

Hayes cf Crowley c 

Carby cf Murray c 

LEAGUE STANDING. 



CHAMPIONSHIP GAME. 

On Wednesday, Sept. 11, the final game of the 
Portsmouth Navy Yard League was played. The 
League standing previous to the final game was 
such that both the Club representing the Shipfitters 
Shop, and the Club representing the Boat Shop had 
each six games to their credit and one lost game. 
As a result of this tie, the winner of the final game 
would naturally become the Champion of the 
League, so that an intense rivalry resulted. Al- 
though the rivalry among the Clubs was keen 
throughout the season, it reached its climax in the 
last game. 



1.. 


SHIPFITTERS 


7 


i 


2. 


BOAT SHOP 





•» 


3. 


BRASS 


5 


3 


4. 


PATTERN SHOP 


r, 


3 


5. 


BLDG. TRADES 


4 


•> 


«. 


TRADE SCHOOL 


•1 


.", 


7. 


FOUNDRY 


3 


5 


8. 


SPAR SHOP 


i 


7 


9. 


SMITH 


ii 


S 



WHY WORKINGMEN SUPPORT THE WAR 

By John R. Commons 

This is an American workingmen's war, con- 
ducted for American workingmen, by American 
workingmen. Never before has democracy for 
wage-earners made so great progress as it has in 
the nine months that we have been at war. If this 
continues, American labor will come out of this 
war with the universal eight-hour day, and with as 
much power to fix its own wages by its own repre- 
sentatives as employers have. 

Anybody who says that this is a capitalistic 
war simply does not see what is going on. Capital- 
ists are being controlled in their profits and in the 
wages and hours of laborers by leaders whom the 
workingmen themselves put on various war boards 



9 



LIFE BUOY 



In no other war have the Government and 
organized labor worked together as they are doing 
in the United States today. In every department of 
the Government that employs labor or fixes the 
prices that manufacturers shall charge, there is a 
leading official of the American Federation of Labor 
on the committee who has as much power as the 
representative of the capitalists. The president 
of the United Mine Workers of America is assistant 
to Garfield, the Fuel Administrator. The president 
of the Building Trades Unions is on the Emergency 
Construction Board for building ships. A leading 
organizer of the American Federation of Labor is 
on the great War Industries Board which controls 
all kinds of manufactures. A trade unionist, 
William B. Wilson, is Secretary of Labor. 

These and many other trade union officials 
were placed there by the trade unions themselves, 
because these war boards have become the big em- 
ployers of labor or because they control the wages 
that private employers pay. 

All through these industries President Wilson 
is enforcing, as fast as the boards can get to it, the 
eight-hour day, as well as time and one-half pay 
for overtime work. Moreover, the agreements with 
labor unions provide that wages shall be revised 
upward just as fast as the cost of living goes up. 

Most important of all the agreements with 
trade unions is that which gives the same wages 
and hours to union and non-union workingmen. 

All labor in this country is benefiting because 
organized labor is actually "on the inside" in run- 
ning the Government. 

No wonder that the American Federation of 
Labor, as is shown by the vote at the recent Buffalo 
convention, supports the war almost unanimously 
and stands for fighting it out to the limit. 

The members know that it is really a" war for 
democracy, because they are taking part in it and 
are actually conducting it. 

Never before was a war carried on by work- 
ingmen. Never before, in war or in peace, was the 
voice of labor in government so powerful as it is 
now in America. 

Any workingman who refuses to stand by the 
great majority of his fellow workers in their great 
work for labor is injuring himself and his brothers. 
Wage-earners' democracy is coming, and if it does 
not come as it should the reason will be that some 
wage-earners are misled and don't know democracy 
when they see it. or don't support it when they 
know it. 

A German victory is the only thing that will 
set labor back permanently. If Germany defeats 
England, Germany will take over the British navy, 



and we Americans will be compelled to have a large 
permanent standing army and a huge navy to de- 
fend ourselves from sudden attack. 

A permanent army and navy large enough to 
cope with Germany, besides taking our boys and 
our workingmen every year for military service, 
means low wages, long hours of labor, suppression 
of labor unions, repeal of labor legislation on be- 
half of women and children, suppression of free 
speech, and all the hardships that millions of work- 
ingmen have come to America toi escape. 

Those socialists who want the workingmen in 
this country to give in to Germany are blind and 
inconsistent. The German socialists cannot be 
blamed for supporting their own Government after 
the war had once started. But when the socialists 
of Germany, in 1913, a year before the war started, 
voted for war taxes when other nations were un- 
prepared, they violated their own principles and 
forced the socialists of every other nation to fight. 

The leading socialist of the world, Camille 
Huysmans. international secretary of the Socialist 
Bureau in Holland, has said to the Chicago Daily 
News that the war demands of President Wilson are 
identical with the demands of the International 
socialists. 

The American Alliance for Labor and De- 
mocracy, composed of trade unionists and socialists, 
at its meeting in Minneapolis endorsed and repeated 
these demands. These are America's aims in the 
war: 

Equal rights of all nations, big and little; 

No people to be forced under "a Government 
under which it does not wish to live; 

Freedom of the seas; 

A concert of nations to guarantee peace and 
justice; 

Limintation of armaments on land and sea. 

These are America's demands and the aims of 
American labor in this war. Greatest of all is dis- 
armament, by limitation of armaments on land 
and sea through international agreement. Without 
this, labor cannot be free in this or any country. 
We \\\w>\ fljjht now in order not to tight afterwards. 

Any socialist in America, however honest, who 
tries to weaken the morale of American labor in 
this great crisis, is simply playing the game of the 
German socialists who have sold themselves to the 
Kaiser. 

Rather than listen to such socialists let Ameri- 
can labor join in the magnificent patriotism of the 
American Alliance for Labor and Democracy. Let 
them say, as the Alliance does, that labor will take 
its part in conducting the war, and that the war 
shall be fought to a finish; for upon its success de- 



LIFE BUOY 



10 



pends the freedom and the wages of American labor. 

For forty years Germany has been prepared 
for war. America is trying to do in one year what 
Germany has been doing for forty years. Of course 
there are mistakes. Of course there is delay and 
confusion. Anybody who picks out the mistakes 
and delays can find plenty of material to arouse 
suspicion and encourage dissatisfaction. 

Our Government is building up a great system 
of enployment officers which Germany and Eng- 
land had before the war started. This will do away 
with an immense amount of lost time by workmen 
in hunting jobs. 

The Government is calling in hundreds of ac- 
countants to figure out the costs and profits of 
manufacturers, so that there need be no suspicion 
of excessive war profits. 

The Government is establishing boards of 
meditation to settle all wage disputes as fast as 
possible. 

The Government has started to build houses 
for workmen alongside the new factories working 
for the Government. 

The Government has taken over the railroads 
and will take over other industries as fast as it is 
able to do so, if other methods fail. 

Wherever these new agencies have been set to 
work they have already accomplished good results. 
But they cannot be expected to overcome every diffi- 
culty at once. In view of all that the Government 
is trying to do for labor, labor can and should help. 

Instead of spending increased wages for luxu- 
ries, workmen can buy savings certificates at any 
post-office. 

Instead of shifting restlessly from one job to 
another, workmen can stick to the job where the 
nation needs them. 

Instead of suddenly going out on strike, labor 
can call for the boards of meditation that have al- 
ready been successful in settling disputes. 

Instead of stirring up dissatisfaction, labor can 
work with the Alliance for Labor and Democracy, 
and hold up the hands of the Government in this 
biggest and most difficult job the American people 
were ever forced to undertake. 



team are the following: G. Tyrrell, M. Dreller, F. 
Bathe, R. Spinney, G. Peterman, A. Hering, P. 
Hughes, E. Gorman, J. Murphy, S. Flanagan, A. 
Lowd, E. Plumpton, O. Kelley, J. Herlihy, J. Couhig. 
A. Jarvis, J. Lyons, G. Driscoll, P. Murphy, C. 
Johnson. M. Bedell, J. Gowey, J. Newton, Peterson. 
Pace, C. Barutio, C. Reardon. Besides these em- 
ployees there are numerous other employees who 
undoubtedly will try to make the team. 

The Safety Engineer who is likewise acting as 
welfare manager of the Yard is trying to arrange 
games with the Shattuck Corporation and the 
Atlantic Corporation. 



FOOTBALL TEAM. 

A Football Team to represent the Portsmouth 
Navy Yard is being formed, the players of which 
will be undoubtedly decided upon before this issue 
of the "Life Buoy" conies off the press. It is ex- 
pected that games will be arranged with the Atlan- 
tic Corporation and the Shattuck and other strong 
teams in the vicinity of Portsmouth, N. H. Among 
the candidates who are trying out for the football 



W. S. S. BOOTH. 

A War Savings Stamp Booth, which is unique 
in its design has been placed at the east corner of 
the Spar Shop. Bldg. 45. The cut below is self- 
explanatory. 

It is desired that all employees of this Yard 
purchase their War Savings Stamps at this Booth. 




REV. E. B. HENRY. 

A Catholic Priest, Chaplain Edward B. Henry, 
has been appointed for the Yard. Besides minister- 
ing to the officers and enlisted men he is always 
ready to care for the needs of those who work in 
the Yard. A Chapel has been placed in Building 
22, on the second floor, where Mass is offered each 
week day mornings at 7:30 A. M. and open all day 
for visits to the Blessed Sacrament. 

In case of serious accident to any Catholic, call 
Father Henry at his office, Tel. 16. 



11 



LIFE BUOY 




OUR MASTER MACHINIST. 

It is an old saying on the Yard that whenever 
things need a punching up that Albert S. Spinney 
is the man picked to perform the feat or allotted 
task. Since Mr. Spinney has been placed in charge 
of Building No. 80, Machine Shop, things have be- 
gun to hum. 

At a recent interview which the Editor had 
with Mr. Spinney the fact was brought out that Mr. 
Spinney is a self made man. Mr. Spinney claims 
that the progress he has made may be directly 
traced back to the faithful and conscientious effort 
he has constantly made in applying himself to 
home study courses. Being somewhat handicapped 
in his early training and schooling, Mr. Spinney's 
progress is all the more commendable. 

Mr. Albert S. Spinney was born in South Eliot, 
Maine on June 10, 1871. He spent his boyhood 
days there and graduated from the Eliot Grammar 
School. 



On April 15, 1SS9 Mr. Spinney became an ap- 
prentice at the Portsmouth Machine Co., Ports- 
mouth. N. H. He served his apprenticeship as a 
machinist for this company and stayed there five 
years. 

In IS 9 4 Mr. Spinney received an offer to go 
wkh the Davidson Ventilating Pan Co., of Ports- 
mouth, N. H., which later became consolidated with 
the Massachusetts Ventilating Co. of Cambridge- 
port, .Mass. He stayed six years with these compa- 
nies serving most of the time as an Erecting En- 
gineer engaged in installing ventilation systems in 
plants throughout the country. 

The desire of Mr. Spinney to again get back to 
where his friends were, namely Portsmouth, finally 
proved fruitful so that in May, 1900 Mr. Spinney 
entered the Yard as a machinist. On January, 1910 
Mr. Spinney was appointed a leadingman machinist. 
He was then transferred to the Engineer's Office 
as Estimator and Planner and at the time of the 
reorganization he was appointed Estimator for En- 
gineering work. He then was temporarily appointed 
Ass't Shop Superintendent and later made Fore- 
man of Machine Shop (Electrical) and now has 
charge also of Machine Shop, Building No. 80 as 
Master Machinist. 

Mr. Spinney is married and has three children 
and at the present time is living at No. 419 Richards 
Ave., Portsmouth, N. H. His hobby, so he says, 
"Are literary pursuits." Such a hobby is indeed a 
wise one and much enjoyment and satisfaction can 
be derived from such a selection. 

In the policy of the delegation of responsibility 
to his quartermen and leadingmen, Mr. Spinney has 
adopted a policy that is strictly businesslike for he 
holds his foremen absolutely responsible for the 
work they have in hand. By such a delegation of 
responsibility Mr. Spinney is relieved of a consider- 
able amount of extraneous matter and can function 
so much the better as an executive. The matter of 
grievances that employees in Building 8 may have 
are reported to the Shop Committee who in turn are 
always given audiences. 

By a strict attention to business and by show- 
ing no partiality to any employee over another Mr. 
Spinney has every employee in Building 80 working 
behind him. 



MACHINE SHOP. 

In this issue of "The Lifebuoy" appears the 
group photograph of the employees of building 80, 
Machine Shop. 

The Master Machinist who is also acting 
Assistant Shop Superintendent is Mr. Albert S. 
Spinney. The Quartermen are Mr. Mark E. Boulter, 
Mr. Harold K. Leyden, Mr. Fred J. Gilkey, Mr. 



LIFE BUOY 



12 




L3 



LIFE BUOY 



Fred N Pray, Mr. Ernest Jackson and Mr, Alfred THE RIVETER. 

Berg. The Leadingmen are Messrs. Rorresl T. 

Holbrook, Berl Bucklln, Reginald B. Goldsmith, Rat-a-tat-rat-a-tat-rat-a-tat-tat, 

Fred E. Perkins, Morion Seavey, Daniel H. Gorman, you can near ii trom morn till night. 

Fred T. Abrams, Marshall E, Stlnson and Will F. "Pis tho sound of the riveter's hammer; al work 

Courville. For the cause of right against might. 



"LIFE BUOY" CONTRIBUTIONS. 

in that the "Life Buoy" is published for the 
Interest of the employees of the Portsmouth Navy 
Yard, ii does not seem to the editor that it is asking 

too much tO ask thill employees send ill live shop 
notes each month. Unless shop noles are sent in 
more promptly, it may become necessary to cut 

them out altogether. Such a procedure would work 
Meat hardship to those who are Interested tn the 
"Lite Buoy" and who have tried faithfully to main- 
tain ii iit :i proper standard. 

Any and ail contributions relating to Yard 
activities as well as the activities of the employees 

themselves, is of more or loss concern to everyone 

and it is requested that the same be forwarded to 

the Safely Engineer before the I nth of each month. 



THE HUMAN EYE. 

The eye is I lie mosl valuable organ in the body. 

Loss ol ,. -ye means considerable loss of working 

Capacity, while a delect of one or hot h eyes not only 
Interferes with accurate work, hut by causing un- 
conscious strain produces headache, stomach trou- 
ble and Other sickness. Eye strain is caused hy a 

good eye living to work with a defective one. The 

strain is unconscious in many cases and a man does 
not know that his eyes are defective until he has 

them examined. 

Continued strain gradually wears out the eyes. 

A man who knows that his eyes are defective 
should Consult iin oculist and learn whet her glasses 

are necessarj 

If they are, he should get them anil wear them 

as directed by the oculist. They will not only make 

his work more accurate hut will save his eyes and 
improve his general heall h. 

iii working with grinding wheels, there is great 
danger of small chips of steel or hits of abrasive 

penetrating I he 6J e 

These pieces, unless removed at once bj one 
who is skilled, will produce in lla ma I ion and uleera 
lion which may go on to complete loss of vision 

it removed at once thej cause no harm. 
Delay is dangerous and may result iii ii condi- 
tion Which even an oculist will he unable lo cure. 

The finest of Instruments and strongest of 

light are necessary lo remove these pieces id' sleel 

and abrasive without leaving a Bear 



His mind is intent on the work at hand. 

for a record maker is he. 
And each glowing rivet that he drives in. 

Is one more stroke for Liberty. 

So with ral-a-lal lal he works away. 

Thus binding together the whole. 

His hands are not working alone these days 
Mill in unison wit h his soul. 

lie knows that America's ideals iiiusl he. 
I 'nil ecled hy ov'ry lOJ ill heart . 

And that in the struggle for "Freedom for all." 

Each patriot must do his part . 

He visualizes the hoys "over there," 

And in his rat lal he can hear, 
The sound of machine guns doing their work. 

I'nl il it seems acl ually near. 

As he works he feels that he's in the light too. 

.lust thi' same as the man with a gun; 
for there iiiusl he ships to carry I he I roups, 

And supplies for lighting the Hun. 

lie has in his mind the lurking 1' boat, 
While working away at top speed. - 

lie knows how the Nation depends on him now. 
For 'tis ships and more ships that we need. 

There are visions too in his mind as he works. 

Of a wonderful .Merchant Marine, 
Where I he Slars and Slripes Hying ill ov'ry poll. 

On American ships will he seen. 

And when he has sent the last rivet home, 

Among his workfellows he stands 
When the launching takes place of the sturdy ship. 

Which is partly Hie work of his hands. 

for the riveter's record of work he knows. 

Will redound lo his credit and praise. 
And (hat wilh his help many more sturdy ships. 

Will gracefully glide "off the ways." 

And when peace thru viii'ry again Shall come. 

The words that will gladden his heart, 
Will he those that his conscience will whisper. 

"YOU have faithfully done your pari " 

Rose Villar, 



LIFE BUOY 



14 




LIEUT. COMMANDER R. W. RYDEN 

We welcome Lieut. Commander R. W. Ryderi iii 
our midst. Lieut. Commander Ryden was Imrn in Des 
Moines, Iowa, on Feb. 27, 1882. He was appointed to 
the Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md. from the state of 
Iowa and entered the Naval Academy on Sept. 11, 1N99. 
In 11)03 he was graduated from the Naval Academy and 
for a time served as Passed Midshipman and Ensign on 
hoard the Battleship Maine, Gunboat, and Destroyer 
Truxtun. In Aug. 1905, he was then transferred to the 
Construction Corps. 

Lieut. Commander Ryden was selected to then take 
a special course at the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology from which he was graduated in June 1 90S, 
after graduation he was assigned to the Portsmouth 
Navy Yard, where he remained until 1912. For ap- 
proximately three and one-half years, Lieut. Comman- 
der Ryden was Office and Shop Superintendent at the 
Norfolk Navy Yard, Norfolk, Va. He then was Sta- 



tioned for two and one-half years at the Olangapo 
Naval Station as Construction Officer. Upon his return 
to the United States in the Spring of this year, he was 
ordered to temporary duty in the Bureau of Construc- 
tion and Repair, Washington, D. C. Lieut. Comman- 
der Ryden assumed his duties officially as Shop Superin- 
tendent of the Portsmouth Navy Yard on Sept. 17, 191s. 

In May 1906, he was commissioned as an Ass't. 
Naval Constructor and was appointed Naval Construc- 
tor with the rank of Lieutenant in May 191f>. In Aug. 
191<>, he was given the rank of LieUt. Commander. 

It is sincerely hoped that in his latest and most re- 
sponsihle position that Lieut. Commander Ryden will 
have the co-operation of everybody connected wilh this 
Yard. 



<;as MASK CAR HON 

A nation wide campaign has been launched, which 
demands the loyal cooperation of every one of us. The 
campaign is for the procurement and saving of certain 
kinds of pits, seeds and shells which can be used in the 
manufacture of carbon. This carbon is to be placed in 
the respirators, which is a part of the gas mask used by 
the boys over there. Great difficulty is being ex- 
perienced in procuring sufficient raw materials to pro- 
duce the amount of carbon required to meet the needs 
of the War Department. 

The list of acceptable material is as follows: peach 
pits, prune pits, plum pits, apricot pits, olive pits, cherry 
pits, date seeds, brazil-nut shells, hickory nut shells and 
butternut shells. Other pits, seeds or shells are not 
wanted. 

It is estimated that two hundred peajeh pits or 
seven pounds of nutshells will produce enough carbon 
for one gas mask. Will you do your share, and give at 
least one man the best gas mask'.' 

A centralized collection station will probably be lo- 
cated near the entrance to the Yard. The collection re- 
ceptacle will be suitably painted and labelled. It is hop 
ed that every one will assist in keeping the receptacle 
constantly filled up so that the Red Cross will be busy in 
removing the pits and shells 

It is needless to say that all fruit pits and seeds 
should be thoroughly dried in the oven or in the sun. 

The appeal of the Gas Defense Division for the con- 
servation of fruit pits and nut shells is possibly one of 
the most important that has been presented since this 
country entered the War. What is your answer? 



"LIFE WISDOM" 

The Teaching Force In the College of Life 
Is the Happy Faculty of Friendship. 
The more you get of success, the more you are 
willing for others to share It. 



15 



LIFE BUOY 



Remember, t li<- man with a level head didn't 

gel it from butting In. 

The wise man attaches the parachute ot pru- 
dence to the balloon of enthusiasm. 

It is better to laugh to forgot than to forget 
to laugh. 

Strangely enough, the man who hasn't a leg 

It. stand on usually Kicks hardest. 



YARD ACCIDENTS. 
The number of accidents occurring on this 
Yard, while not Increasing, constitute altogether 
too large a number Fully 80 per cent, of the ac- 
Cldents occurring In this Yard are due directly or 
Indirectly to the carelessness of the employees in- 
jured. Most of the employees injured do not stop 
to think hut act and think when it is too late. 

fooling is altogether too prominently shown to be 
the cause of man; accidents, and In a time of war, 
such nonsense is far from a gentlemanly waj to ad 
it is hoped thai employees will hereafter govern 

themselves tO the end that they will nol allow such 

carelessness to exist in their own ranks 

A GIRL LIKE YOU. 

i He, heated to the mothers, daughters, Bisters 
and sweet hearts remaining behind). 
It's the faith of a little glpl like jrou, 

That counts when the world goes wrong, 

When a fellow's down and mighty blue, 

And his lips can voice no song ; 

When the loneliness seems hard to hear. 

\n,l the scheme Of life proves lame. 

It's knowing SOmehOW, that still you care, 

That makes a fellow game. 

When he wants to Quit in the Mrs! long mile. 

Turn hack in t he grilling race, 

When the goal beyond doesn't seem worth while. 

And he balks at the speedy pace. 

It's then that Hie faith Of a girl like you. 

Makes him reckon the coward's cost, 

And he plays to win as a man should do. 
The ga me he might have lost. 

It's girls like you that keep men straight, 
Keep I hem white clear through and clean. 
It's girls like you thai make men great. 

\ n , 1 nol what they might have been. 
Oh, it's good for the man when all seems night. 
When the clouds hide the goal from view. 

lust to knuckle down and light, yes, light 
For the sake of a girl like you. 

William S. Hughes. 

outside Machine shop. Bldg. No 89 



STICK TO YOUR JOBS. 

The present labor turnover in our Industrial 

ranks is high and if continued can only benefit 
one pnrty and that is the Huns. 

Kinployeos now on this Yard should give care- 
ful consideration and much deliberation whenever 
they contemplate leaving. The reasons advanced 
by employees leaving are numerous and often times 
not sound. Such a reason as "I want to go else- 
where," Is not sufficient. 

It is well recognized by men acquainted with 
industrial affairs thruout. the country, that similar 
conditions of inadequate housing facilities and 
ei her causes for the exessive labor turnover exist 
just as prominently in other cities. The "floater," 
the employee who works a month or a week here 
and then there is a valuable asset to the enemy. 
Who wants to be classed as a "floater?" It there- 
fore behooves us all to stick to our jobs thus bring 
ing the war to a more speedy end and ultimately 
warranting a place for ourselves with the "boys 
over there'' when they return. 

It is predicted thai by July I. L919 we will 
have a grand total of 6,250.00(1 men as actual com- 
batants divided as follows: 4,500,000 in France, 
1,000,000 in training In contonments and 750,000 
in the Navy. To keep these combatants supplied 
with munitions, clothing, food and coal there will 
be required 25,000,000 persons or nearly one 
quarter of our total population which of course 
Includes Children, wives and others who can not be 
counted upon to produce directly 

Our one aim is to win the war decisively and 
to accomplish this successfully and quickly we all 
must stick lo our present jobs. 



COMMON WAYS OF CAUSING INJURIES. 

While reaching under his work in a lathe, the 
dog caught in the rolled up sleeve of an employee 
and cut deep gashes in his arm and chest. 

When tightening a nut, the wrench slipped 
bringing the employee's hands against the sharp 
tool. 

When setting down a casting an employee let 
it drop, without noticing that his toe was beneath 
it I le knew t hen 

While operating a lathe with an air chuck an 
employee carelessly left his linger In chuck and then 
deliberately operated the chuck causing the crush 

inc. and loss of two lingers. 

Round objects like short pieces of pipe or 
shafting, should not he left lying on the floor, as 
thej are responsible for many a man's slipping and 
getting a fall. 



LIFE BUOY 



16 



Shoes with holes in the soles or the wearing of 
sneakers may allow splinters from the floor to enter 
the foot and should not be worn. 

Six employees carelessly got on a platform 
and at the same lime a craneman carelessly allowed 
a heavy plate to strike against the platform causing 
the platform to give way, striking an employee 
working below. 



SMALL NEGLECTS. 

Most accidents occurring in this Yard are 
minor accidents, and are due to the neglect or 
thoughtlessness of some employee, who has become 
so familiar with his work that he has become care- 
less. 

Think over the ways in which you can help to 
make accidents less common and make suggestions 
to the Safety Engineer. 

If you get something in your eye that cannot 
be readily removed with a handkerchief, go Im- 
mediately to the Dispensary. Never allow a fellow 
employee to try to remove anything from your eye 
with a match or other similar material. 

Do not wear a coat or skirt with loose or torn 
sleeves. Torn sleeves, loose long neckties and 
(lowing skirts and other loose parts of I he clothing, 
frequently get caught in gears, belts, or some mov- 
ing parts of ;i machine. Employees working about 
machinery are requested to wear short sleeved 
jumpers. 

Do not "fool" with a fellow employee, or dis- 
tract his attention when he is runnin 5 a machine 
or working at some other danger point. If yon do 
you may be the cause of a serious injury to another 
employee. 

Be careful in going up and down stairs. 



there. When there is inflammation of the wind- 
pipe the nerves are irritated and produce a cough. 

The germs get in, in the first place, because 
there is congestion. Congestion of the nose and 
throat is caused by chilling the skin of the body 
As every one knows, standing in a draught when 
overhealed brings on a cold. In other words il 
causes a congestion of the nose and throat and I be 
germs always present find this jusl the ground to 
enter and irritate. 

The best way lo keep from catching cold is to 
accustom yourself to sudden changes of tempera- 
ture. This can be done by taking a cold sponge 
bath over the front and back of the chest every 
morning. The next best way is to avoid draughts 
and to keep the feet dry. When the feet are wet 
tin' water evaporates quickly and causes a chill 
which makes congestion of the nose, throat and 
chest, 

If you catch cold, try to break it up ai nine by 
taking: 

isi a lmi drink at bedtime. 

2nd Something to move the bowels 

The time to try to break up a cold is when the 
throat feels dry before the Minis! stage Norton 

Co. 



COLDS— SORE THROAT. 

A cold is an intlaniation of the membranes 
lining the nose, throat and sometimes the air lube 
going from the mouth to the lungs. 

The inflammation is due to germs which force 
their way into the membranes and multiply there. 
They throw out poisons which irritate the mem- 
branes and make them overact and produce very 
large amounts of mucous. 

This mucous is what runs out of the nose. 
Ii contains many of the germs which are washed 

out in it. Tlie genus may stay in the mis ■ they 

may travel up a tube leading from Ihe nose to the 
eye; then the eyes "run" for the same reason the 
nose (lid. They may also pass from the throat 
through another lube In the inner ear and set up 
earache, or what is more common they may pass 
down the windpipe setting up an Inflammation 



FIRE PREVENTION. 

When every employee realizes, that his or her 
present position depends upon the fact that it is 
everyone's duty to protect the Yard against the 
possibilities of a fire, then and only then may we be 
assured that our positions are safe. For. should 
an employee carelessly throw a lighted cigar, ciga- 
rette or match inside a building a fire may occur 
which may develop into a conflagration and ulti- 
mately throw everyone of us out of a job anil in ad- 
dition help the Hun jusi that much, 

Every employee can help by keeping Ihe Yard 
clean and free from rubbish 

Under 110 circumstance should papers or rags 
lie 1 brown into corners, where they may not slum 
Rubbish cans are provided and should be used 
Paper or oily waste thrown carelessly or thought 
lessly against steam pipes or ovens may start a hie 

Electric wires should not be allowed to come 
in contact with pipes of any kind. 

Lighted pipes should not be emptied inside a 
shop neither should a lighted cigar, cigarette or 
match be thrown inside a building. Many cases of 
hie have had their origin in just such ways 

It is everyone's duty to help protect our Yard 
against a lire anil in that way assure our own posi- 
11 




' 



*AT6RVUE1 ARSCN 
SAftT* DEfT 



19 



LIFE BUOY 



APPENDICITIS. 



["he appendix is a little worm-like pouch which 
projects from the large bowel on the right side 
near the front of the hip bone. 

This little pouch sometimes gets stopped up so 
that the matter which is constantly passing in and 
out of it cannot get out. 

This matter, consisting of partly digested food 
ferments and the germs which are in fermenting 
Cood attack the wall of the appendix. This makes 
the appendix swell up and it becomes very painful. 
It may burst, if this happens the fermented con- 
tents and pus are thrown into the belly cavity 
among the coils of bowel and peritonitis sets in. 
The symptoms of appendicitis are: 
1st Sudden, sharp, severe pain, first in the pit 
of the stomach, later settling low down in the rlghl 
of the belly. 

2nd Repeated attacks of nausea and vomiting. 

3rd Weakness and general feeling of being 
very sick and feverish. 

The best way to keep from having appendicitis 
la to keep the bowels regular. 

It' yon have a bad pain in your stomach, es- 
pecially on the right side accompanied by vomiting, 
send for your doctor at once. 



various jobs to construct ourselves. Here is where 
the older mechanics showed their patriotic spirit. 
They have all, without exception, put themselves 
out to advise and help us greenhorns, giving us 
benefit of the tricks it had taken them years to 
learn. The excellent instructions and helping hand 
of the older mechanics have enabled several of us 
to do work that has gained our rating. 

I believe the yard and the country at large 
should know of this tine spirit, in the year that I 
have been here, I have not witnessed a single case 
of unfair treatment but have seen every man. who 
tried to do right, rewarded in due time. 

Respectfully, 
A. B. G1NNER. 



1 . 



NEW RESTAURANT. 



CO-OPERATION. 

The following letter, which was received by 

""' safety Engineer, was thought worthy of being 
Printed in The Lifebuoy. It needs no comments as 
» rings clear and true, and is an expression of 
thanks by one who is voicing the minds of many 
successful employees of this yard. 
Editor of the "Life Buoy." 
I 'ear Editor: 

i believe a word or two of appreciation and 

'an- treatment and spirit of co-operation accorded 
a new comer to the yard would be appropriate for 
your excellent publication. 

Coming here without any previous experience 
... the work of this yard. I commenced as general 
helper in the Foundry, where 1 worked live months 

as casting cleaner. 

Hearing of the school tor shipfltters, then be- 
ing held at Shop K. evenings, i api „r a trans- 
fer. Mr. Connors and Mr. Schlabach, both kindly 
-Mli.oved.and las well as a Class of Others received 
good, practical, and as thorough instructions in 
BhlpBttingas was possible in the time allowed from 
Mr. Smith, Quarterman Shipfltter in charge of Mo id 
Loft. 

We helped for awhile and were then given 



The new restaurant which will comfortably 
scat 500 diners was officially opened on the even- 
ing of Sept. Kith, when a farewell banquet was 
given in honor of Commander Schlabach. 

The new restaurant has been laid out along a 
double cafeteria style and employees enter at a door 
located at the remotest distance from the point of 
Irving Employees will form in two lines, one line 
walking along the east side of the building and 
known as "special line," and one line along the west 
side of the building and pasl the stage and known 
as i be "regular dinner" line. Employees will first 
lake a tray and then their knives and forks, napkins 
and bread and butter in order. They then arrive at 
Hie pie and cake counter and slide their tray along 
on a rest or serving board, taking up the various 
courses desired. After receiving the coffee the two 
lines come together at a point where the diners are 
'becked for the amount of food purchased. 

It is requested that any employees having 
grievances lodge the same with the Safety Engineer 
who is likewise superintendent of the restaurant 
and conditions warranting a remedy will be given 
Immediate consideration. 

It is hoped that moving pictures may be shown- 
relating to the safety subjects some time this win- 
ter, for a stand has been built , () hold such a ma- 
chine. 

In accordance with a recent order the door of 
the restaurant will not be open until ll::;, but 
when inclement weather is met the door will be ! 
opened promptly. 

It is requested that employees who avail them, 
selves of the restaurant privileges show patience 
at times. For instance: Employees were quite 
provoked recently because the service was slow 





-THAT 
Pilot of 

THE6IRIS 
AftE GOING 
STRONG PN 
5METYFIMT 
'MOVEMENTS. 
WWi LET'EM 

kid yuh girls! 




-THflr 

HWERHILL ISM 
ONESOIYt /»>> 
&ELGIUMON SAT. 




'-ThaT THOSE 

boys from the: 

JHIPFITTKM& SHOP 

LEAD AT THE. CLOSE 

Of THE yftRD L.EfiGl)L? 



-THAT THCNZM 

WINING ON JOHN 
*blL\P SQUSft. 




-THAT 
THE HOST 
EFFECTIVE, SHOT 

youcftNTHhe 

flTTHt KAI.5ER 

FIRE A FEU/ 




KV.HBlftCHALL 
0106.75 



21 



LIFE BUOY 



These employees were ten hour men who came in Lieut. McCarty has demonstrated that the only 

after 12 o'clock and who had only a half hour for way to fill up the gaps in the Mechanical force of 

luncheon. Had these employees thought first they the yard at this critical time is through the school 

would have readily come to the conclusion that as it is impossible to get trained mechanics from 

most of the help in the kitchen were down ill be- the outside now. 
cause of the recent epidemic. 



THE TRADE SCHOOL. 

Since the school has passed the experimental 
stage and is now recognized as turning over to the 
various shops men who are pretty generally mak- 
ing good, it is not stating it too strongly to say that 
eventually 90 per cent, of the men trained in the 
school will make good. Probably 60 per cent, of 
them have already obtained a rating. 

We wish to express our appreciation and grati- 
tude to Assistant Naval Constructor McCarty, our 
chief, for the masterly and able manner in which 
he is handling the school. 

He has insisted, from the start, that the green 
men whom he has taken in from the farms, from 
the shops, in fact, from everywhere, men who never 
before perhaps have ever seen a ship, much more 
never stepped foot upon a shipbuilding plant, be 
allowed three months intensive training both of 
theory and practice before they are turned over to 
the different trades. The shipfitters, for example, 
are given a prescribed amount of mathematics, a 
short course in Mechanical Drawing (in order to 
understand blueprints) and certain specific in- 
struction in plan reading together with his practi- 
cal work on ship and around the yard under com- 
petent shipfitters. Specific instructions for em- 
ployees going into other trades is likewise given. 
Each man is shifted from job to job as he shows 
proficiency in the same, thus giving him as much 
practical experience as possible during his appren- 
tice-ship. 

When the three months have transpired, the 
man with his record card is turned over to the 
Foreman of the shop to which he is assigned with 
a note from Lieut. McCarty stating that he recom- 
mends that the man be given a suitable try out and 
be given a rating when the Foreman feels that the 
rating is due him. Upon signing up men Lieut. 
Mccarty's final advice to them is "I will give you 
a chance now, go to it, and make good." 

At frequent intervals the instructors and lead- 
ing men of the school are called together and re- 
ports upon progress of work are given and things 
for the good of the school discussed. 

Conferences and advice from the supervisory 
force of the Shipfitters' Shop are also held at stated 
intervals thus combining the two more closely to- 
gether with beneficial results to all. 



A MOTHER'S SMILE. 

There are clouds that must o'ershade us. 
There are griefs that all must know, 
There are sorrows that have made us 
Feel the tide of human woe; 
But the deepest darkest sorrow, 
Though it sear the heart awhile, 
Hope's cheering smile may borrow 
From a mother's welcome smile. 

There are days in youth to greet us 
With a ray too bright to last. 
There are cares of age to meet us 
When those sunny days are past; 
But the past scenes hover o'er us 
And give back the heart a while. 
All that memory can restore us 
In a mother's welcome smile. 

There are scenes and sunny places, 
On which feeling loves to dwell, 
There are many happy faces 
Who have known and loved us well; 
But mid joy or mid dejection, 
There is nothing can beguile, 
That can show the fond affection 
Of a mother's welcome smile. 

William Sumner Hughes. 
Machinist. Outside Machine Shop. 



NOBLE WORK. 

The profits realized from the sale of candy in 
Building 89, Outside Machine Shop, in the last 
three months, have accumulated to the sum of $900. 

The directors of this fund, Mr. Fred Hayes and 
B. J. Ferran, decided recently to allow Dr. Preble, 
head of the United States Public Health Service to 
draw on their account up to $600, the money to be 
spent in providing two nurses for duty in the con- 
tagious hospital recently opened in Portsmouth, N. 
H., and two nurses for outside duty. The cause for 
such a decision by the directors was due to the 
urgent necessity of providing available funds wher- 
ever they might be found, to help in the recent 
Spanish Influenza epidemic that hit this vicinity. 
Other money is being spent in helping destitute 
families living in Portsmouth and vicinity, when- 
ever proper cause can be positively shown to exist. 




PIANOS 

FOR RENT FOR THE WINTER 

GET YOUR ORDER IN EARLY 



MONTGOMERY'S 

MUSIC STORE OPP. P. 0. 

PORTSMOUTH, H. H. 

EVERYBODY'S STORE 

141 CONGRESS ST. - - Y. M. C. A. BLDC. 
PORTSMOUTH, N.H. 

NOW COMES THE WINTER SEASON WHEN EVERYTHING IS MOST NEEDFD 

• We were exceptionally lucky to secure our merchandise at old prices, 
we therefore suggest that Every Man Woman or Child reading this "Ad" 
should not overlook this opportunity of the good values this COMING 
SEASON in Ladies and Men's wearing apparel. 

EVERYBODY'S STORE 

~"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



23 



LIFE BUOY 



DITTY BOX SAYINGS. 

We are all ready for the Fourth Liberty Loan. 

Our shop is having another annex, we are out- 
growing our shop faster than they can build addi- 
tions. 

Sisco certainly put it over on Bailey in dividing 
their gardens, for Bailey had to go to North Anston, 
Maine, to get his winter potatoes. 

Jesse Lord is blending a new cigarette tobacco. 

Hughy's bowling alleys will be open about 
Dec. 1st. (?) 

Willy Lonergan wants the clocks set back in 
the morning instead of at night. 

Andy has returned after two weeks vacation 
spent in Washington, D. C, in the interest of Pro- 
hibition. 



SEEN THROUGH THE PERISCOPE. 

Letters have been received from two former 
members of the Submarine Drafting Room Crew, 
Privates D. J. Carey and K. M. Pattee. They are 
both quite enthusiastic about the army life. Can 
you imagine how they will get the girls in those 
uniforms? 

The first girl draftsman (or is it drafts- 
woman?) has reported for duty. Miss Mildred 
Lane, of Melrose, Mass. We hope to see more 
assistants for Mr. Yeomans. 

We are all glad to see Bobby settle down once 
more and enjoy the quietude of his Broad Street 
home every evening. 

The explanation of the worried look on several 
of the boys' faces is at last discovered; they are all 
wondering where the Chief Draftsman's office will 
be in the new building. 

We should have been in the new drafting room 
by this time, but during the recent rains a large 
number of leaks developed in the roof and now it 
will have to be caulked or the boys will have to 
wear raincoats. 

Another case of War Profiteering: 6c for 5c 
worth of candy at Colliton's Candy Counter. 

Our newly elected Liberty Loan Committee 
composed of Captain E. J. Proehl, R. W. Lord and 
H. G. Brown is very enthusiastic and will put the 
Sub Drafting Room over the top if it can be done 
It is a sure bet that when the final standing is pub- 
lished we will be conspicuous near the top as we 
always have been. 

Congratulations to W. C. White, W. P. Newton 
and G. M. Clark. They were fine cigars, too, boys. 

Mr. Collier looks right at home. "Over the 
board." 

C. S. Conlon is getting impatient waiting for a 



call to active duty. He enlisted some time ago in 
Naval Aviation, but has not been able to get an 
assignment yet. Charley wants that uniform. He 
has so many different girls that it takes all his 
time explaining why he hasn't been drafted. 

The Spanish flooey has raised havoc in the Sub 
Drafting room. Many have been sick, and a lot 
have been sick enough to get sick leave. 
WE WONDER 

When Zislin and Rosen will learn to play cards. 

Where all the janitors come from. 

When Scriven will pass around the cigars. 
Why the delay Earle? The boys are getting anx- 
ious and rents are getting scarcer all the time. 

When Hales will pay Zislin that cigar. 

When Rosen will take a long trip in his gas 
buggy. Cheer up Rosie, you may have a good one 
some day. 

Why Wright's table was moved down in the 
corner. Hard luck Vim. We thought you were 
making a hit. 

If Rosie's Ramblers will be seen on the alleys 
when the ten-pins begin to fall. 

If Charley Guiggesburg is still chasing Trans- 
portation. 

If Googins ever gets tired of calling some of 
the boys to the telephone. 

How Coffin manages to get a letter every day. 

If Lee Scheirer has had any experiences doctor- 
ing the Spanish influenza lately. 



ANVIL SPARKS. 

See Walter Clark for your Liberty Bonds. 

Fred Reckendorff visits Boston quite often 
lately, we wonder why? 

Several of the boys who visited Boston lately 
have not recovered yet. 

Pete Draper is now actively engaged in making 
Soap Powder. 

We wonder why Frank Marshall changed his 
mind about that dance. 

Maurice has very sore hands but a stout heart. 

One of our young men had better stay away 
from Lowell as the air is very dry down there. 

Big Sam and Dixon are a pair of Helpers hard 
to beat. 

Congratulations to Mr. Blake. A boy, 10 
pounds. 

Did you ever have any experience as a helper? 
Yes sir. Where? Three years in High School. 

Congratulations to Mr. H. M. Forbush, also to 
Mr. Richards who will be the next in our Shop. 

See Mr. Chaffe about your War Savings Stamps. 
Only three months in which to make good your 
pledges. 



"A Penny Saved 
Is a Penny Earned" 

We can help you save a 
good many pennies on 

HOUSE FURNISHINGS 
See Mr. WOOD 

99 Penhallow St. Portsmouth, N. H 



THE "BUSY CORNER" STORE 



But Never Too Busy To Fill Your 
Prescriptions and Fill Them Right 

OCT OF TOWN PATRONS ARE 

WELCOME TO WAIT FOR THE 

CAR AT OCR HOUSE 

BENJAMIN GREEN 

THE DRUGGIST 

INSURANCE and REAL ESTATE 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

LOWEST RATES BEST FORMS 

C E- TRAFTON 



35 Pleasant St. 



Opposite Post Office 



YOU AUGHT TO KNOW 

DENNET and McXARTHY'S 

18 THE HK8T PLACE TO BUY 

Overalls, Shirts, Hosiery 



USE GAS F~OR 

LIGHTING, HEATING AND COOKING 

PORTSMOUTH GAS CO- 

ALWAYS AT YOUR SERVICE 



Dr. S. F. A. Pickering 

- - DENTIST - - 

i 

TELEPHONE CONNECTIONS 

OFFICE HOURS 32 CONGRESS STREET 

8 TO 12 A. M. 2 TO 5 P. M. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



BROOKS MOTOR SALES 

PORTSMOUTH NEW HAMPSHIRE 

FORD SERVICE 

Fill IS BrOS. Men's and Boys' Shoes 

Fine Shoe Repairing congress st. tel. con. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



LIFE BUUY 



SUPPLIES. 

With all apoligiese to Ensigns Harrison and 
Knight, it seems rather Rood (o see Captain Arms 
back again. 

Miss Ellen Bowden lias returned from a fifteen 
days trip to Buffalo, New York City, Cleveland and 
.Niagara Falls. 

Bernard Paul and Mr. Chesley have returned 
from a Western trip. They report thai they had 
a wonderful time. 

Ernest Sanders ami Eugene Lavangee leave 
Wednesday, the twenty-fifth for Durham, where 
they will train for the Army. 11 is (he wish of all 
i lie olliee force (hat they he successful in their new 
duties. They will be greatly missed by the girls. 

Miss Lucy Morgan relumed to work on Tues- 
day, last, after a fifteen day furlough spent at 
Lawrence, Mass. 

Miss Ethel Sanford is undergoing an operation 
at the Sacred Heart Hospital, Manchester, N. H. 

Several new yeowomen reported for duty this 
week. 

WE WONDER: 



has 



If Miss M. knows how many stripes a Sergeant 



Why Mr. Robbins enjoys his daily work so 
much, also why he likes to work overtime. 

Why Blaisdell went to church one Sunday re- 
cently. 

Why a certain young lady is called ■•.Sister" by 
one of the heads 

Why "Pa" takes so many half days off. 

Why a certain young lady refused an invita- 
tion from a Naval Officer— Perhaps she was afraid 
some one would tell Maxie 

What kind of a bird the cuckoo is. and where 
'i can be found— Ask Long— fellow. 

Where Rosie gets all her Page and Shaw's. 

Who one office girl gets to direct her envelopes 
and why. 

Who gets all the profits from the candy 
drawers. Certainly not the one who deserves it. 

Why some people never look into a mirror. 

Why Rosie got that vacant stare when she re- 
tailed to the powder-puff. 

Why it looks so nice and tidy around "Pa's" 
desk. 

How they get that way.— Even Lucy is wear 
ing fancy stockings! 

WE'VE HEARD: 

That the best looking girls may be found in 
the Supply Department. Well, anyway we notice 
there is more vigor and determination to succeed 
than ever before. 



That a certain young fellow in the office wrote 
a letter to a girl but lost his courage and did not 
send it. She's a "B" Eddie, but she wouldn't sting 
you. 

That all the girls admire a fellow who wears a 
uniform. — Even "Little Polly." 

That one doesn't have to go outside the office 
to see "camouflage." 

Thai Lucy and Abbie's little affair has broken 
up on account of our remark in a recent copy of 
the "Life Buoy"— We didn't mean to hurt your 
feelings — Can't you take a joke? 

That the men in this Department are partial 
to lavender waists,— better keep your eyes open. 
"Bernie." 

That a certain Rye girl is thinking of joining 
a circus as she is very fond of THE TENT. 

That Colonel Leavitt doesn't object if all the 
young fellows are drafted, as we hear him sing oc- 
casionally— "Oh the old men will have a fine time 
when the young men go away." 

That Blaisdell sold his Buick recently. Are 
you planning to buy a carriage now? 

That the girls in the Purchasing Section don', 
know where they are at these days 
Now you're here, 
Now you're there, 
In fact we see you everywhere! 
(Cheer up, girls, learn all you can and when the 
men leave you will be able to fill their places). 

That the rotund tile clerk in the Purchasing 
Section was passing around nuts recently, the 
genial one says they were raised in -his vard on 
Echo Street. One of the young ladies in that sec- 
tlon says that nuts of that kind do not grow in 
Kittery — What say, Steve? 

That it pays to advertise. Neighbor. 



ELECTRICAL.SPARKS. 

We hear that the town of York was well repre- 
sented at the recent banquet and ball. 

Our F. O's. from York are there on the "gild- 
ing." They acquire their aptitude from excessive 
practice at the dances held in York Town Hall. 

The Baseball team from this Shop has closed 
its (very successful) season. The boys are now 
spending their dinner hour kicking the "pigskin " 

We are wondering why Phyllis always forgets 
her badge. 

The report of the Chairman of the lunch room 
Committee is as follows: Since May 1, 191s 
$4139.34 has been turned into the bank. We have 
on hand in the bank $150, and J200 worth of stock 
with no unpaid bills. We are arranging to send 



HENRY PEYSER &, SON 

16 TO 20 MARKET ST. 

For more than forty years Portsmouth's leading 
Store for Men's and Boys' apparel 

RUGS, DRAPERIES, FURNITURE COVERINGS 

THE QUALITY STORE 

MARGESON BROS. 



Vaughn St. 



Telephone 570 



PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



FRED B. COLEMAN 


If 


you desire to buy or sell Real Estate call. 


APOTHECARY 




telephone or write 


Corner Congress and Vaughn Sts. 


II 


. I. CASWELL AGENCY 


PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 


Congress St. TELEPHONE 478-W Portsmouth 


PEOPLE'S MARKET 




SINCLAIR GARAGE 


DEALERS IN 




HORTON SERVICE 


BEEF, PORK &. PROVISIONS 




Telephones 282-W 841 1-M 


COR. DANIEL AND I'ENHALLOW STREETS 




Corner Richards Ave. & Middle St. 


Telephone Connection Portsmouth, N. II. 




Portsmouth, N. 11. 



S- S- TRUEMAN 



GENERAL CONTRACTOR 



TELEPHONE 651 



83 Bow St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



JOHN O'LEARY 

KITTERYand NAVY YARD EXPRESS 

GENERAL TEAMING 
Tel. Con. Portsmouth, N. H. 

If you want to be dressed up to the Minute 
from head to foot in dress and work clothes 
come in to see 

LOUIS ABRAMS & CO. 



38-40 Daniel St. 



Portsmouth, N- H. 





U 
R 

S 
T 

R 
E 



ENLIST ACAINST THE HIGH COST OF LIVING 

"TRADE AT THE CO-OPERATIVE STORli" 

Clean, fresh meat, groceries and provisions at reasonable 
prices. 

Every stock holder has equal rights, and the store is man- 
aged for the benefit of all workmen. 

CO-OPERATIVE ASSOCIATION INC. 



Market St. 



Portsmouth, N. H 



ONE 
FOR 
ALL! 

ALL 
FOR 
ONE 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



21 



LIFE BUOY 



boxes of candy, cigars and cigarettes to our former 
shopmates who have been called into service. 

A service flag for this shop would contain 
stars for the following former employees: K. M. 
Pattee, C. R. Hall, H. P. Fisher, J. J. Connors, N. 
I Hogue, W. H. Parks, John How. Charles Prince, 
\Y 11. Little, \V. L. Thompson. I). P. Walker, S. B. 
Wood. O. Olsen, J. S. Hoyt, C. Fortune, Geo. Carr, 
Henry King, Oscar Hebert, Harry Brown, Roger 
I, add and Carl Hanscom. 

The output for the month of August was 
$120,000, over $25,000 more than the second highest 
month. 

The 4th Liberty Loan drive will surely go 
"over the top" in 79. 

"Jocko" has purchased a new $50. winter suit. 
You can't beat "Jocko" on style. 

One of our employees residing in York has had 
his uniform cleaned and pressed, his badge is also 
polished. He "is waiting for Next Year's Field Hay. 
Go to it George. 

"Duke" has been enjoying a vacation spent at 
his home in the suburbs of Kittery. 

Temperatures are running high in 79. One 
Female Operator, returning from the dispensary 
reported her temperature as ill. 

Birchall sure is some cartoonist. Wonder 
what his next one will be. 

They say Miss Kane surely did enjoy herself 
at the banquet and ball recently held as a farewell 
to. Commander R. 1'. Schlabach. 



who is a non-swearer and a non-smoker. 

Mott Hoyt is anxious to know how many red 
ears of corn he can raise. 

The single fellows are going fast; there are 
only seven left. 

Dr. Smith has three patients with prospects 
of more if he doesn't weaken. 

Several fellows in the shop wish that the 
creek was nearer the Kittery side of the river. 

If no more lay offs occur that the Pattern- 
makers are going after the bowling championship 
of the Yard. 



PATTERNS. 

With [our years at sea Jim might be able to 
tie his boat up properly. 

Twitchell was very much pleased with the re- 
sults of his ad for a room. As yet he is undecided 
whether he will room in North Hampton as a 
christian, non-smoker and non-swearer, or with a 
happy black family of three in Portsmouth 

We wish to advise Van that he would be great- 
ly appreciated by a certain Eliot girl if he wore a 
Marine uniform. 

With the close of the summer season, the boys 
ol Camp Lookusup and many friends, will run a 
straw ride to Greenland where a huskingbee will be 
held at Hoyt Farm. 

Now that Mr. Malmquist is satisfied with ship- 
litting. it is believed that he will submerge for the 
winter and next spring enjoy a honeymoon trip to 
the ruins of Germany. 
THEY SAY THAT:- 

Twitchell has drawn the color line. 

The Camp now contains a christian young man 



BOAT SHOP PUFFS. 

Great credit is due to our baseball team for 
the excellent showing which they made in the re- 
cent series. Altho we did not win the pennant we 
made a good try for it. It is hoped that with the 
excellent material which we now have that we will 
have a team in the field the coming season. Out- 
most excellent manager and Captain Heinie Cragen 
has accomplished wonders in a short space of time. 
Some times old men come back altho Steam 
Roller Bunker and Grandpa Humphreys tried their 
best, we could plainly see that their age was against 
them. 

There was quite an interesting sight on the 
Dover train after the game. It was noticed by 
several that our ladies' man Mr. Condon was in his 
glory. He was not seated with one girl but with 
many. 

Strictly business is the reason Uncle Ed 
doesn't catch any small lobsters. He has a sign 
on all of his lobster traps — No admittance except 
on business — 

We are all very sorry to learn of Mr. Ford's 
misfortune, but very glad it was no worse. 

One of the Navy Yard travelling cranes made 
a good slide for the Boat Shop Bldg. No. 60 this 
morning but by some good fortune no one was hurt. 
The boom tore a large hole in the wall and splinter- 
ed a large door on the back of the building. 

Woman. Woman, long you've waited for that 
dream, that dream that ne'er came true, but at last 
it can be toasted, Willie's pants will soon fit you. 
On a clear September evening not many moons ago, 
Mr. Tucker crossed the river in a boat that was not 

slow. 
He was somewhat in a hurry with his basket full of 

eggs. 
Not thinking of a tumble as he stepped upon the 

edge. 
His legs they were not steady as he jumped upon 
the stage. 



A. D. S. 



BVfi 



AT 



Adams Drug Store 

ON 
MARKET STREET 



rrs no use 

Telling you a long story about advancing prices. 
You know as much about it as I do. But I want to 
tell you that I have a large stock of CLOTHS, bought 
to secure old yarns and dyes, at a much lower price 
than they can be found today. If you need a SUIT 
this year BUY IT NOW. 

WOOD, The Tailor 

15 PLEASANT ST. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



THE PORTSMOUTH FLOWER SHOP 

A. C. CRAIG, Manager 

FANCY CUT FLOWERS 

AGENT VICTOR TATKTIVG MACHINES 

4 Market Street Phone 960 

PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



M. P. ALKON &, CO. 

DEALERS IN 

CHINA, CROCKERY & CLASS WARE 

NO- 27 MARKET ST , PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



D. BOU 

AGENT 

FOR LEADING FIRE AND LIABILITY INSURANCE COMPANIES 



GOV. ST. 



KITTERY, MAINE 



^W-A-FLFLEHSr F. BLAISDELL 

HARDWARE, PAINTS, COOKINC UTENSILS AND MOTOR ACCESSORIES. 

THE DODD SYSTEM OF LIGHTNING PROTECTION. 

Telephone 7 YORK VILLAGE, ME. 




Congress and Fleet Sts. 



We can furnish a house from cellar to attic. 
Prices right in every branch of our business. 
Why not step into our store and look over 
our many styles of furniture. It costs 
nothing to look, and it might be beneficial 
for us both D. H. MC INTOSH 

PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



TYPEWRITERS FOR SALE & RENT 

J. E. DIMICK 

29 Tanner St PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

Telephone 837-M. 



E. PERCY STODARD 

INSURANCE 

REAL ESTATE 
7 Market Square PORTSMOUTH 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



29 



LIFE BUOY 



And down he went upon his knees with' the basket 

and the eggs. 
We do not know eggs-actly but it was very safe to 

say 
Thai li«' prefers eggs scrambled to any other way. 

Keep up courage Joe. we can almost see it now. 
A i i lie present time hair lips aren't very popular 
with the Boat Shop girls but we don't know the 
sentiment of the Tin shop. 

Helen says she has learned one check number 
6259 



DRILLINGS, BORINGS AND TAPPINGS. 

At the invitation of Mr. and Mrs. Mark E. 
Boulter, the supervising force of this shop were 
very pleasantly entertained at their home on the 
Fernald Road, Kittery, Saturday, August 31, 1918. 
Upon arrival dinner was served, the tables being 
set on the veranda and very prettily decorated, and 
the menu consisting of everything good in the 
edible line. A trip around the farm and the enjoy- 
ment of games, passed the afternoon hours all too 
quickly. The return trip was made In the early 
evening and all present declare that as host and 
hostess Quarterman and Mrs. Boulter are without 
peer 



OUTSIDE MACHINE SHOP BLIKJ. NO. 89. 

CAMOUFLACK 

Telephone, Burr-r-r-r. 

Foreman answers, 

Deep bass voice on other end. "is Miss — 
there?" 

Foreman, "Yes." "Miss - you are wanted 
on the phone." 

Miss -- Hello, yes, no (Alice?) I am going 
over to Annies tonight, good-bye. (Alice?) 

The directors of the candy fund, Mr. Fred 
Hayes and Mr. B. F. Ferrin, are to be congratulated 
on the Quickness with which they allowed Dr. Preble 
of the United States Public Health Service to draw 
on the fund up to $G00. The money was to be ex- 
pended in reimbursing four nurses who were en- 
gaged to help tight the recent Spanish influenza 
epidemic. 

Mr. Thomas .1. Lynch certainly performed s 

wonderful piece of work when he acted as toast- 
master at the recent farewell banquet and ball 
teudered former Commander Schlabach. Mr. 
Lynch's remarks were not only appropriate, but 
were well received and applauded. His toast to 
Commander Schlabach was exceptionally well done. 



METAL SPLASHES. 

WE WONDER 

Why Mike does not leave as early as formerly 
in order to get a reserved seat on the train. 

If Dynamite still plays the game. 

If Mr. Gould is well versed on the latest songs, 
for the last one we heard him sing was "K-K-Katy." 

Why the Foundry boys are so popular at the 
new hotel. 

How often Mrs. Carter has birthdays. 

If .lack has received his million dollars yet. 

If Marion enjoyed her intermission at the re- 
cent banquet. 

Why Lawless watches the mail messenger so 
much of late. 

If Donnely had any automobile trouble the 
night Of the Banquet. 

Why Charlie is always complaining about the 
cold weather, taking into consideration the fact 
that he is surrounded by a bunch of live wires. 

Why Dan does not wait until the moon shines 
for bis midnight marauding. 

Why the girls in the Office located in the lean- 
to. wear their heavy coats and hats while working. 



TRADE SCHOOL. 

The class in shipfitting which meets in tin- 
Mold Loft every Tuesday and Friday night at 7:30 
is progressing nicely. All who can avail themselves 
of the opportunity of attending these night lectures 
should not fail to do so. 

Last week a large delegation of newcomers ar- 
rived from Vermont. They surely are making good 
and it is requested that they try and induce then- 
friends to come down. 

"Chet" Emery, according to Mr. Brackett. 
lives in a place where custard pies are made to 
perfection. Brackett says "A bully pie." 

The "Count's" observation of the School upon 
his return from New York. "To one returning from 
a leave of a few days the Trade School surely pre- 
sented a different aspect. The same faces greeted 
me but somehow things were different. Mr. Emery 
held his accustomed place near the doorway, his 
eagle eye seeing everything. Mr. Keene bobbed 
thru the door so quickly that all I could hear was 
the dying away of a "Hello." Mr. Stevens appeared 
as usual in his red sweater; while Robbie wore a 
smile The chalk lines appeared heavier than 
usual. What a vast change there has been, a huge 
board <> feet by :! feet held the numbers so close to 
one another that when 1 removed my check from 
the hook the check next to mine rolled on the floor. 
This has happened before and such a search that I 



LIVE WIRE MEN WANTED 

To get acquainted with a live wire store, A store that KNOWS what men want and 
HAS it. Good, dependable merchandise at right prices, and good service. 



•MASTERCRAKT" AND LEOPOLD MOKSKS MEN'S CLOTHES "RIGHT POSTURE" BOYS 

CLOTHES ARROW COLLARS HATHAWAY SHIRTS CHENEY TIES 

WALK-OVER AND RALSTON SHOES FOR MEN I, ION BRAND WORK SHOES-ARROW 

RUBBER BOOTS-TRIPLE TREAD RUBBERS 



N. H. BEANE&CO. 



5 Congress St. 



1*01-18111011111 



R. E. BANNAFORD 

FLORIST - - - 



CUT FLOWERS, DESICNS & DECORATIONS 
152 RICHARDS AVK. tki.kciiomc con. 



C. P. CARROLL 

Groceries, Meats and Provisions 

145 PENHALLOW ST. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

Tel. Connection Near A. S. L. Ferry 



'YORK COUNTY NATIONAL RANK" 

SERVICE 

Large Storage Vault and Safety Deposit Boxes for 
lent. Your checking account is solicited. In our 
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT we pay 4 Per Cent 
interest. 

YORK COUNTY NATIONAL RANK 

FORK VILLAGE, MAINE 



THE 
APOLLO LUNCH 



-000{SJ<»0- 



HOME COOKING 

17 Congress St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



PHILBHICK'S PHARMACY 

AGENCY FOR 

BELLE MEAD SWEETS & JERSEY ICECREAM 
67 • ' 'ii rress St, - Portsmouth, N. 1 1 




The ACORN 



is h('M(|(|Uill1lTS I'c >[' 



Ship and Gun Drill Books on Machine Shop Practice 

.Mariners Hand l!n<.k Books on Naval Architecture 
Deck and Boat Book Books on Ship Building 
Blue Jackets Manuals Hunks on Navigation 
1« Market Square Portsmouth.N. II 



HATS & MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

AT 

PARSONS THE HATTER 

PORTSMOUTH. N. II. : PHONE 867-M 



"1 SAW IT IN THE LIFE IJUOY' 



31 



LIFE BUOY 



was compelled to go thru before I located my 
rambling check. Talk about signs! First I en- 
countered. "Please do your business thru the win- 
dow hereafter," then "The following men only are 
entitled to use this office." Not finding my name 
on the list. 1 quietly closed the door. 

Two girls sitting at the desk busily en- 
gaged in assorting cards was the next point of in- 
terest. At the tool room 1 was introduced to a Mrs. 
Rounds, who has won the distinction of being called 
the "Good Housekeeper." Mr. Gilker then appeared 
in the doorway, looking me over with quick, nervous 
glances. To close my observation I will say that the 
mosl familiar voice of all to greet me was that of 
Mr. Bracket the square root esquire, who as you 
all know is our Mathematics professor, saying "Now 
men we will take up the square root this morning:" 

The boys who played on the baseball team are 
now thinking of starting a basketball team. 



willing to send in a few notes for the next issue of 
the "Life Buoy." 

Fiora, who is engaged in camouflaging most of 
the time, surely can throw other things besides 
paint.. 

Haddock surely knows what good chocolates 
are when he sees them If you don't believe it. ask 
E. E. P. 

It is claimed thai tilings look serious for Mr. 
1 *:i ii 1 noontimes. How about it, Georgie? 

Marion either actually buys Stamps, or else 
she is trying to buy the seller. 



SUBMARINE BUILDERS. 

Our boys certainly played a line brand of base- 
ball We knew that we were going to win the 
League Championship after the first game was 
played, when it comes to vim and a spirit of de- 
termination, we hope the same will be displayed in 
our work of constructing subs as was displayed in 
the baseball league. 

It is our understanding that our efficient time- 
keeper K. Penwell and 11. Colliton Of the new Sub- 
marine ways. Bldg. 11"). tried to join the Navy. 
The reason given for a refusal must be guessed at. 

R. Briddle recently asked the young lady in 
the tool room for some so;ipsi one. tor which lie pre- 
sented a job order stub. The next time Ralph came 
for more soap stone, the young lady pleasantly 
asked him for a Job order number. The question is 
whether Ralph got the soap stone or not. 

If anyone would like a nice little verse or 
sweet little song for their scrap book, the claim has 
been advanced that Hartford would be only too 
glad to write it. Art is surely full of it. 
WE WONDER 

When R. Fernald will slop asking Sam Gard- 
ner about the time he has got coining to him. 

If George Williams is learning to knit during 
the noon hour. He frank. George, in your answer. 

Why Mildred Adams is so willing to run or. 
errands outside the shop. 

If some of our fellow employees wouldn't be 



LATHE TURNING CHIPS. 

The passing of the beach season is sincerely 
regretted by most of the boys in the shop. Hill. 
Ralph, Ray. Frank. Brownie and Ned especially. 
We will now be better enabled to understand the 
little week end trips to the neighboring cities and 
the late returns on Monday. 

Mr. Morton Seavey reports that on a good clear 
day he can make out the top masts of his blockade 
runner from his house top, when she enters the 
harbor. 

The workmen's band made a decided hit at 
the farewell dinner tendered to Commander 
Schlabach on the evening of Sept. ltith. 

All right "Appetite" I'll try to remember next 
I i mt'. 

Gay Caswell has got his shot gun ready for 
any midnight prowler; this notice is intended for 
the benefit of all Haverhill parties who might be 
tc mpted to wake Gay up on their way home. 

With this month's issue of the Lifebuoy ap- 
pears a picture of the men of Building .so. From 
all^ accounts the boys have long anticipated this 
important event and have prepared for if. 

Charlie Pierce don't mind the extra money for 
the toll as long as he arrived whole in Portsmouth. 
Railroad wrecks have no terrors for him, but to 
ride with "Slippery" ill his go-cart is something to 
give the bravest of men serious thoughts as to their 
personal safety 

Norrls Wiggin says that driving rivets, making 
ditty boxes, electrical fittings and baking pans is 
cliilds play compared to balancing propellers. "Wig" 
ought to know about it too. 

Dan Wardwell says that times have certainly 
changed since the first appearance of that coal burn- 
ing chariot at East Boston to the twelve cylinder 
machine of today. 

We understand that Hill Hackney is seriously 
contemplating the purchase of a farm. 



120-128 Market St 



FOR HEATING 

WOOD AND COAL STOVES, OIL HEATERS 

THE SWEETSER STORE 



Portsmouth, N. H. 



A FEW OF OUR SPECIALTIES 

Hart, Schaffner and Marx Clothes, Stetson Hats, 
Manhattan Shirts, Fownes Gloves, Interwoven Stockings 

F. W. LYDSTON & CO. ( 5SSSS^S , *.5 r ' 



JOHN SISE & CO. 
INSURANCE 

8 MARKET SQUARE 

PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 


A. P. WENDELL & CO 

Hardware, Paints and Tools 

Telephone 850 

2 Market Square Portsmouth, N. H. 



PORTSMOUTH MOTOR MART Inc. 

Cadillac Service Station Used Cars for Sale 

Autos for Hire Accessories and Supplies 

TELEPHONE 22 & 34 PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



THE VERY BEST IN RUBBER GOODS 

"KANTLEEK" 

GUARANTEED FOR 2 YEARS 

BOARDMAN & NORTON 
ffie^ciiL Store, Portsmouth, N.H. 

Opp. Post Office 



MEN'S WOMEN'S & CHILDREN'S SHOES 
OF THE BETTER QUALITY 



C. F. DUNCAN & CO. 



9 Market St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



SAVE FUEL 

By using Electric Appliances for Cooking 

ROCKINGHAM COUNTY LIGHT AND POWER CO. 

2<) Pleasant Street Portsmouth, N. H. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



33 



LIFE BUOY 



\ TRIBUTE TO OSCAR BY H. E. T. 

All is quiet In the shop 
\V nen dear old "Nub" is not on the spot. 
An hour of rest is quite nice I've been told 
But a day without Taylor is better than gold. 
As we glance at the paper when our day is done 
To see what our boys have done to the Hun. 
There comes to our mind a thought o'er and o'er 
The wrestle that Taylor had on the tloor. 
Now wrestling's instructive and lighting is good 
If you're not a quitter and fight with hard wood. 
Hermle has the manners of a dandy 
Hut, Oil can't he swear when someone takes his 
candy. 

if "Blueberry" don't put a silencer on that 
oar of his the residents of Kennebunk will lynch 
him. He had better take Howard along with him 
in case of trouble. If any trouble should occur 
don't be too hasty about settling it. 

M. L. McManus alias "Chuck" the grape mer- 
chant of Dover, has extinguished himself by his 
actions towards one of the fair sex, with whom he 
endeavored to make ;i hit; of OOUrse living In BUCh 
a metropolis us the up river city, one cannot know 
every resident of the place. However, the men of 
gallery No. 2 declare that "Marty" made a mistake, 
and if he don't like his name, why not go to court 
and have it changed. 

Carl Bragg's wife says she is sorry that they 
did not move to Hampton two years ago and Dutch's 
wile says she wishes that they had. 

Ulen deRochmont our special tool maker has 
instructed his wife that if she hears any strange 
i, .uses iii the night to investigate the trouble while 
he gets his revolver and he will do the rest. 

We are grieved to learn that some of our shop- 
mates pay little heed to the request of the Fuel Ad 
ministrator in regards to the use of autos Sundays. 

Hill has warned "Hoody" not to leave any- 
thing else at Bennett's for him. 

Manning refuses to be seen in the town of 
Kittery with that Newburyport tank again. 

Snappy" we hear lias bought a new set of 
high speed tools "at-a-boy." 

Uosie and her lady friends from No. 7'.' will 
miss the Saturday noon rides with our genial Eddie 
Grant from Bldg. No. 80 

If anyone on the Yard has a $800.00 horse to 
sell Ed. Plumpton stands ready to give $65.00 cash 
for it if the halter will be thrown in for good 
measure. 

Ed I'liiinpioii is also thinking ol buying a car. 



But under no conditions would he own or ride in 
a car like Maguire's. Dick says he'll stack his car 
against any Simplex or Packard on a run to Nashua. 



PAN KOASTINGS. 

It is the understanding of the girls in the Shop 
that Julia Connors has given them the slip, in that 
she intends to become married. She has the best 
wishes of all the girls who have been associated 
with her and who had the pleasure of knowing her. 

It certainly was a surprise to see some of the 
boys coming into the Shop with a draft card in their 
hands 

The moving of the sawmill from the lower floor 
of the Sheet Metal Shop has released much needed 
floor space. Over 60 per cent, of the men who were 
working on the second floor have been transferred 
to the first floor. 

It is said that Fords can be found almost any- 
where— guess it's so — for we have one in the Pan 
Gang. 

Wallace Dickson is said to lie enjoying a much 
longed for vacation. 

The forced absence of Miss Kilgore of the 
Office force, because of illness is regretted and it 
is hoped that she soon will convalesce to the point 
that she may be able to resume her duties 

In that the new elevator has not as yet been 
Installed, the unique performance of seeing the 
female Operatives pass pans down the stairs has 
taken place. 

BLOCK SHOP. ■ 



It is claimed that our leading lady surely has 
made a marked impression on the minister, so much 
so that George, our storeman is getting somewhat 
excited. 

The Shop is wondering why Hersey takes walks 
so frequently around the Band Stand. Own up 
Hersey. Who is that with you? 

Lona stated that she misses her work and 
hopes she soon will be able to resume her duties. 

It is claimed that Helen, our Star Comedienne, 
attended the farewell Banquet and Ball. By the 
way, Helen, who was your escort? 

It certainly takes our elevator operative to talk 
back to our plump machines!. What did she say. 
Guyette? 

Hazel, in accordance with an explanation from 
last month states that she little realized that 
William was taking up so much of her attention, 
and hopes that hereafter she will be able not to 
pass her Spar Shop friends up. 



THOSE WHO PAY CASH 

GET BETTER VALUE FOR THEIR MONEY 



Congress Street 3 E^ £^ \fof |>ffl 5» Tel. 194 

Portsmouth, N. H. m ~ m " 



KERWIN SYSTEM SHOE STORES 
Portsmouth, Roxbury, Dorchester, Fall River, 

Framingham, (2) 

You have many advantages when you buy SHOES of 

THE KERWIN SYSTEM SHOE STORES 

WE BUY AND SELL FOR CASH FOR SIX LARCE 
NEW ENGLAND STORES 

Cash discounts from manufactures, no charge accounts, no trading 
stamps, less profits: -All combine to make our prices the lowest possible. 

KERWIN-LEACH CO. 

PORTSMOUTH, N. H. - - - - 45 CONGRESS ST., 



FRUIT AND CONFECTIONERY, ICE CREAM AND SODA, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

TELEPHONE 29 w CATERING A SPECIALTY 43 CONGRESS street 



TIRE CONSERVATION 

Conserve on your tires by having those small cuts and ^]»™""*^ 
in time and put a few more miles in the old shoe. Our VULCANIZING DE- 
PARTMENT is up-to-date. Fine line of new tires. 

OVERLAND AGENCY 
C, A. LOWD 

Service Station & Garage 33 8 Pleasant St. Portsmouth, N. H. 
"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 




CARTER'S OVERALLS 

(Union Made) 
MEANS 

"A Heap o' Satisfaction" 

TO THE WEARER 

CARTER'S OVERALLS for men give the most service. Made from th e best quality 
denims, perfect fit, big and roomy. 

A STURDY OVERALL 

CARTER'S BLOOMERETTS for women. Made of fine quality KHAKI cloth, best for 
factory workers, protects the clothing, promotes safety. 

Look for the CARTER label. 

H. W. CARTER & SONS 

LEBANON, : : : NEW HAMPSHIRE 

THE OLDEST MANUFACTURERS OF OVERALLS IN THE U. S. A. 




^ssxs^sutn^j^Aiajjux^uxje&secziaai^ 



^OUSTJ^ 



DEPARTMENT^ 
LIFE BUOY 




^^ AVY YAR 
^PORTSMOUTH, 



■ mJ^g. 1 " - ' ! -' a*-' 



SUGRUE'S HOTEL 

At Entrance to Navy Yard 



Get your Dinner here. Buy a Meal ticket. 
Tickets Good until used 

Telephones 349-W. 8449-8443-M. 9301. Residence 349-R. 



Sugrue's Store 



Regal Shoes. Overalls 

Tobacco. Confectionery 

COMPLETE MEN'S OUTFITTER 

J. P. SUGRUE, Prop. Kittery, Maine. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 







Start in right now to 
enjoy the world's beat 
music. 

Wiih a Victrolo you 
can hear at will the kind 
of music you like best — you can have dance music whenever you want 
to dance, you can have the most famous bands entertain you with their 
stirring music — you can hear any music you want to hear. 

This genuine Victrola will play for you any of the more than 5000 
records listed in the Victor Record catalog. 

It is handy for both outdoor and indoor use Convenient for the 
porch, the lawn, in camp, in the canoe — wherever you want to Sake it, 
And in (he home it is easily moved from one room to another as occasion 
may require. 

Give Ua llic wor<J to put tliiti Vittrolu In your liome — on eu«y uuymentM. if you 
prefer. Or cull for u demount rution. 

HasseTT's 

MUSIC & ART SHOPPE L15 Congress St 

PORTSMOUTH. N. II. 



■Ik 

■ K ',u 






fBJBJBf 




■'■wiuviia 

— * — 




FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

PORTSMOUTH : NEW HAMPSHIRE 

United States Depository Commercial and Savings Departments 

Storage and Deposit Vaults 

BOXES TO RENT $1.00 PER YEAR 

Liberty Bonds held for safe keeping without charge 

Capital and Surplus over 260,000.00 

Deposits over 2,000,000.00 

Total Assets over 3,000,000.00 



SAVI NG 

CONSERVATI ON and 

WILL WIN THE WAR 



TH Rl FT 



PATRIOTISM DEMANDS THAT THE CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES 

SPEND LESS and SAVE MORE 



10,000 PEOPLE ARE SAVING THEIR EARNINGS BY THE HELP OF OUR 
INSTITUTIONS. NEW SAVING ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 



rise AT AQUA SAVINGS BANK 

First National Bank Building Portsmouth, N. H. 

"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 






INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 
LIFE BUOY 



Issued monthly for free distribution to employees of the Industrial Department of the 
Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H. 



VOL. I 



NOV. & DEC. 1918 



NOS. 11 & 12 



ADDRESS BY SECRETARY OF THE NAVY 



Honorable Josephus Daniels 



ON October 31st, 1918 the Yard was pleas- 
antly surprised by a visit and address by 
the Honorable Josephus Daniels, Secretary 
of the Navy. The Honorable Secretary spoke 
from the steps of the Commandant's resi- 
dence. Over 5,000 employees turned out to 
hear the Secretary and they were i ot dis- 
appointed by any means for the address was 
a stirring and appealing one and touched 
everyone deeply. 

The Hon. Joaephus Daniels, Secretary of 
the Navy, was introduced by Commandant C. 
J. Boush, Rear Admiral, (Ret.) U. S. N. 

The address made by the Secretary of the 
Navy, was as follows: 

I could not get to New England without 
giving myself the pleasure of spending a 
short time, at least long enough to look into 
your faces, and to bring to you the greetings 
and thanks which all America owes to the 
men at the Portsmouth Yard for the splendid 
work they have done in making ready the un- 
conquerable Navy of the United States. 
[Applause.] 

We are giving proper and due honor to 
our brave sailors on the destroyers and the 
transports and the ships; we are giving 
honor to our brave soldiers in France, win- 
ning the way to victory and to liberty, but 
when the hour comes — that glad hour when 
American arms, allied with the arms of other 
free nations, has made impossible for the 
placing of Von Tirpitz or Von Hindenburg or 
ony other Von in power, we will take off our 



hats and look to the men in the navy yards 
who have made possible those ships that are 
winning us victory. 

[Applause.] 

I wish to express my own and the Coun- 
try's appreciation, not only for this real ser- 
vice you have rendered, but that you have 
put your patriotism and your character and 
your love of country in your work, so that as 
the ships have come here and gone out they 
have borne the impress that you have placed 
upon them. 

You know gentlemen, whatever is the 
product of our hands is also the product of 
our character. I remember I heard of a man, 
he was a weaver in a mill, and the product of 
his shuttle was so perfect that any man who 
bought from that mill the product that this 
man's part of the factory made, ordered more 
and more, so that this became the staple pro- 
duct and brought reputation to the factory, 
and so the head of the factory sent for this 
man, — a quiet, modest man never known out- 
side of his own home and small circle of ac- 
quaintances, and said the company wishes to 
express to you their appreciation and give 
you some recognition and honor for the splen- 
did work you have done. Why, he said, 
gentlemen I have been in this factory a long 
time, I have not been working for you, I have 
not been working for the money I have re- 
ceived (though I must have it to support my 
family) but every day when I have gone to 
my work I have put my religion and my char- 
acter into my work and I know that they 
must stand approved on the last day. So 



LIFE BUOY 



every one of us, no matter what our task and 
whether it be the young boy learning in this 
Yard or the newest recruit in the Navy, 
everything we do we put our character into 
it, and if we have the right appreciation, 
splendid work is the result of high charact- 
er; flimsy work is the result of the lack of this 
kind of character that has stuff and stamina 
and will stand the approval of time and 
eternity. 

I rejoiced when I heard from Portsmouth 
that you gentlemen, and you ladies (there 
was a time you know girls when the Navy 
thought it could get along without the girls, 
nobody but men in the Navy a few years 
ago, but when war came we found we could 
not run the Navy without the girls [Ap- 
plause.] and I give you as one of the reasons 
w hy the Navy is the most popular institu- 
tion in the world is that we have had an in- 
jection of the enthusiasm and fine spirit of 
the women in the Navy and I look to see 
the day when they will not only be in the 
Navy but when they will go to the ballot box 
and be our partners in running this Govern- 
ment.) I say I rejoiced to hear of Ports- 
mouth when the Liberty Loan was being sub- 
scribed. We hear about people "Going Over 
tlie Top" and the men in France are putting 
their lives in jeopardy to "Go Over the Top;" 
your brothers and your neighbors, and you 
who are forging the instruments of warfare 
that they must have to win, you went "Over 
the Top," made sacrifices and put your sav- 
ings in equipping the Navy and Army to 
preserve liberty for you and liberty for the 
world. 

1 wish to tell you that exhibition showed 
that you were enlisted in the war, not only 
with your skill, not only with your services, 
but with your money and with all you have. 

Last April, after the March drive, when 
the Germans almost reached Paris, the world 
stood breathless and feared the worst. Lloyd 
George said, — It is a race between Hinden- 
burg and Wilson. Well, Wilson has won. 
[Applause.] and he has won because back 
ot Woodrow Wilson, our Commander in 
Chief, has stood the men on the ships, on the 
battlefields, in the navy yards, and together 
we have been mobilized and have highly re- 
solved that we would expend every energy 
every ounce of power to the end that Auto- 
cracy should be wiped off the face of this 

earth - ". or d. 

JAN 19 f92Q 



I always love to come to Portsmouth. 
When I die, if I cannot go to heaven I would 
like to come to this Yard and look on these 
beautiful scenes, and I envy you the privil- 
ege and opportunity here to be serving your 
Country, and I thank you for serving it so 
efficiently and so faithfully, and I go back 
to Washington with a new touch of pride and 
inspiration when I look into your faces and 
see the spirit there and reflect on what you 
have done and what you are doing. 

Some people are asking the question, — 
if this war is over soon, and I pray God it 
may be over just as soon as we can destroy 
Autocracy. [Applause.] They ask wheth- 
er the Navy will go back to a little small 
concern and whether the great Naval work 
will continue? The answer I can make to 
that question is this: Last week the Presi- 
dent of the United States, who is now re- 
garded, not only in America, but wherever 
free men live, as the greatest man of the 
world [Applause.] sent to Congress recom- 
mendations for a three year building program 
which will be the biggest building program 
any nation ever entered upon, and we are go- 
ing to build it boys, whether the war ends or 
the war does not end, [Applause.] and to 
your skill and helpfulness we shall look to 
carry on this great work until our Navy is so 
powerful that in a League of Nations we will 
furnish so many units that none of our 
children or children's children will ever see a 
king or emperor or autocrat dare to stir the 
the peace of the world. I thank you. 

Thereupon the Secretary was given three 
rousing cheers. 



PORTSMOUTH NAVY YARD GOES OVER 

THE TOP IN THE FOURTH 

LIBERTY LOAN 

ONCE again the employees of the Ports- 
mouth Navy Yard have loyally responded 
to the call of the nation and have come 
through 100 per cent American. The em- 
ployees of this Yard have marked up another 
wonderful record in the Fourth Liberty Loan 
drive smashing all their former splendid pa- 
triotic achievements. 

This record is the more commendable 
when consideration is given to the fact that 
Commander R. P. Schlabach, U. S. N., until 
recently our Shop Superintendent was not 



LIFE BUOY 



here to direct the drive. It is indeed regret- 
ted that we loit his leadership for the 
Fourth Loan, for during the last three loans 
the success of the Portsmouth Yard was to a 
large extent the result of his efforts. Al- 
though handicapped at the start, the Liberty 
Loan Committee of each shop decided it 
would overcome this handicap by using forced 
draft from the start of the Liberty Loan cam- 
paign which began on Sept. 28, 1918, and con- 
tinued until its very end at mid-night Oct. 
18th, 1918. Chairman of the shop commit- 
tees met previous to the opening of the cam- 
paign and decided upon a quota which the 
employees of the Industrial Department 
should raise if they were to meet the mark. 
The amount decided upon was $400,000, this 
really being about sixty per cent, more than 
would have been the quota of a similar num- 



ber of employees in any other city or town 
in the country. The employees instead of 
subscribing the allotment of $400,000 not 
only went over the top but well beyond into 
the enemy's trenches by raising the large 
sum of $624,400. This in itself was an excel- 
lent achievement for the average employee 
subscribed $119.49, whereas subscription of 
the officers of the department was $348.38. 
It is with great pride that we can record the 
fact that each and every employee of the 
entire department subscribed. According to 
the latest available information the Ports- 
mouth Navy Yard ranked second in the list 
of the Navy Yards in this country relative 
to average civilian employee subscription. 

Every shop responded nobly and sub- 
cribed more money than was alloted to it. 
The woodworking group finally won out in 






Have YOU Boug 




LIFE BUOY 



the race with the Metal Trades group, the 
Boat Shop as usual headed the list of the 
shops in percentage of their alloted subscrip- 
tion. 

The final standing for the shops is shown 
in the excellent photograph of the Liberty 
Loan Bulletin which was erected on the Green 
in the center of the Yard and will undoubt- 
edly be of interest to every employee of the 
Yard. Each person should feel justly proud 
of the Industrial Department in the Fourth 
Liberty Loan and of the part they have taken 
of bringing about these results. 

Lieut. R. W. Ferrell, U. S. N., Chairman 
of the Liberty Loan Committee, who suc- 
ceeded Commander R. P. Schlabach, U. S. N., 
worked hard and successfully carried through 
the campaign. Too much credit cannot be 
given to his untiring and devotional efforts 
and he is indeed a worthy successor to Com- 
mander R. P. Schlabach. 

The employees of the Boat Shop by sub- 
scribing on the average of $1016.14 for the 
Four Liberty Loans claims the distinction 
of being the Liberty Loan Champions. Al- 
though Mr. C. F. Tucker, chairman of the 
Boat Shop committee does not have much 
to say, he is nevertheless anxious to find out 
if any shop at any other Navy Yard or for 
that matter at any Industrial Plant can boast 
of a better record. To date he has been un- 
successful in his attempt to find this out. 

The following letter was sent out by 
Capt. H. L. Wyman, Acting Industrial Man- 
ager: 

Navv Yard, Portsmouth, N. H. 
October 20, 1918 
Employees of Ihe Industrial Department 

1. Representing the Industrial Manager 
in his absence, the undersigned desires the 
privilege of most sincerely congratulating 
each employee of the Industrial Department 
on the notable achievement of this Yard in 
the FOURTH LIBERTY LOAN. 

2. Lieutenant Ferrell, Chairman of the 
Liberty Loan Campaign at this Yard, informs 
me that against the goal set for the Ports- 
mouth Yard of $460,000., the final total is 
$827,350. Toward this splendid result the 
men and women of the Industrial Department 
are responsible for $621,300., and best of all 
is the fact that in this sum each and every 

r and employee, without exception, has 
a pergonal share. 



3. The NAVY slogan for this loan was : 
"Fight or Buy Bonds — The Navy does both." 
This slogan you have each and all taken unto 
yourselves, to you it means — WORK and 
Buy Bonds— WE do both. 

4. The Country's Goal for the FOURTH 
LIBERTY LOAN, double that of the THIRD, 
has gone "Over the Top." The Industrial 
Department employees have a real share in 
this, and the one hundred per cent, record of 
subscriptions is the one in which you may 
well take pride in. You men and women 
who have bought bonds in this manner, as 
the Management knows, are the kind who are 
right behind our Navy at sea, doing day by 
day your best in the way of the day's work. 
It cannot but be a source of gratification and 
pleasure to each one of us of the Manage- 
ment to serve with employees so loyal. 

H. L. WYMAN, 

Captain U. S. Navy 
Industrial Manager, Acting 



THANKSGIVING FOR ONE. 

"Good evening," said the Fairy. "We hear you 
are the happiest man in the world!" 

"Who, me?" said the Man. "Come Fairy, 
you're joking. I work like thunder from morning 
to night, seldom get a day off, make just enough 
money to support my family, and that with difficul- 
ty. Huh! Guess you've come to the wrong place!" 

"Very strange," said the Fairy gravely. "How- 
ever, it doesn't matter. The Fates have arranged 
that you shall be the happiest man in the world, so 
I must fix it up. You shall change places with any- 
one you want." 

"Great." cried the Man. "Come on, and we'll 
pick him out." 

So they went out into the world, and soon 
they came upon a very rich man riding in his great 
automobile, all wrapped in costly furs. His was a 
great name — known all over the world, and the 
Man recognized him. 

"I'll change places with him," cried the Man 
excitedly. "Fifty millions — whew! — what I won't 
do with it!" 

"As you wish," said the Fairy calmly. "It is 
only fair to tell you however, that he suffers every 
day with an incurable ailment, and that he is to die 
next \ve>k." 

"Just a minute," said the Man hurriedly. "Let's 
look a little further." 

"There! That's the man," he said finally. They 
had reached the place of government, and he was 



LIFE BUOY 






8 40000 
jfr, 8 3&0S0* 

.' 83ga52 






WW 






LIBERTY LOAN BULLETIN. 



keel. 



WSBURSBIiVOfnCE 



DISPENSARY 



JHOSPITAL 



MARINES 



•>'JJilJ')Vi^'nEin?^Tr!^- ^i)i : u ; ^ B [j u ^j a 




ISSEOaI 



50UTHERY 



INDUSTRIAL DEPt 



II ISUftiiiiJ 



I BOILER SHOP .1 <5S\ 



DRAFTIN6 ROOM "811 Z7 



MDRAFTING ROOM "89 4 



II ELECTRICAL (1ACH. SHOP \ 7S0\ 



I ELECTRICAL SHOP I /Si I 



V6 ESTIMATORS ' £7 



A3 FOUNDRY A 23. 



21 JOINERS SHOP /? 

../O MACHINE SHOP "86 42' 

II MACHINE SHOP"^ . 



2> , I OFFICERS M J/ I 



/ I OFFICE EMPLOYEES ?o. 



6M PATTERN SHOP Jo 1 



■3 PAINTSHOP : 



/OO ■ 



/OO ZSOO 7W< 



/OO UOO \/2fSO \E3sf 



wit.mwrJL'PuMmvnsmfviifii 



\/00 4200. \2o750 [474, 



JoO Z.Z10O 32ooo \I34.4 



ZMMSESMMm-M 



1/00 0900 \/2oOO \3ol.6 



\/0O \2sl000- \7000O \/37-2 



\/00 /3ooO\/<?600 \/601 



IfESBKESBKtfenMKlM 



\/C0 tfSOO\2Zt,5o- \//6.l 



/OO /2 c ioo \/6%oq \/ZZ4 



6 00.000 

o 

'YARD 

\ 811356- 



■$%& 



14 SAIL LOFT 

20 SHEET METAL SHOP 



1 SHIP FITTERS SHOP . 7o7 



14 \ SHIP-WRIGHT SHOP^I OW 
22 \ SMELTING PLANT 2>2 



l.j . SMITH SHOP , //6 



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LIFE BUOY 



pointing to the head of it all — a man young, power- 
ful, who had before him a life of greatness. 

•'Very well," said the Fairy. "But it is only 
fair to tell you that he is so great he can have no 
friends, can trust no one, and is the loneliest man in 
the whole world." 

"Hum," said the Man reflectively. "Perhaps I 
had better not change places with him. Come. 
Fairy. Pick out someone for me. Find me a man 
who is rich, powerful, loved, wise — who is to live 
long — who is good, and doing a great work in the 
world. Find me him." 

And without a word the Fairy led him to a 
place where the man was who answered all these 
qualifications. 

"Good!" cried the Man. "I'll change places 
with him." 

"As you will," said the Fairy, looking at him 
with searching eyes. "But remember this. When 
you are that man you will no longer have the wife 
who has stood by you through thick and thin, the 
children you have brought into the world, and the 
friends you love." 

There was a long silence. "Fairy," said the 
Man at length, "you were right. Take me back. 
I am the happiest man in the world — only I didn't 
know it." 

"It is often so," said the Fairy, his grave face 
lighting into a smile. "My work in the world is do- 
ing with millions of men what I have done with 
you — for they are all the happiest people living, 
only they don't realize it!" 

"Good bye! A happy Thanksgiving!" 

And he was gone. 

Critique. 



OUR STRUCTURAL SHOP FOREMAN. 

The qualities that a foreman should possess 
such as reliability, conscientiousness and fairness 
are all well exemplified in the case ■'8i Mr. Frank 
Dennett. For, if any one man on the Yard stands 
out more prominently than any other as a man pos- 
sessing 'the 'above stated qualities, that man would 
be Mr. .Dennett. The minute the word "go" is 
uttered'Mr. Dennett Is off and the job underway. 
It is with little wonder that with such a start Mr. 
Dennett is able to always give complete satisfaction 
in the work coming under his jurisdiction. There 
is probably not a more hard working man on the 
Yard than he. The record that Mr. Dennett pos- 
sesses of having been on the Yard fifteen years 
without losing a muster is one that anyone of us 
might well be proud of. 

Mr. Frank Dennett was born in Buxton, Maine. 
on the second of November. 1S69. where he lived 




until he was seventeen years old. In 1 8 S (j Mr. 
Dennett began his apprenticeship with Woodnum 
and Robinson, contractors and builders at West- 
brook, Maine, ami with which firm he remained four 
years. In 18 90 Mr. Dennett took charge of the 
Woodworking Department for Foster and Brown, 
paper machine manufacturers. He remained with 
this firm some eight years during which time he had 
charge not only of the pattern and woodworking 
department but also of machine installation. Mr. 
Dennett then went into general constructing work 
and spent three years in Boston and vicinity and 
three years as foreman for various contractors in 
Portsmouth and for a while in business for himself. 
On the nineteenth of November, 1902, Mr. 
Dennett received a call to duty at the Yard. He 
showed such proficiency in his work that after only 
being on the Yard six months he was appointed 
Leadingman; he then took his examination for 
QuaJterman- and was appointed foreman of the 
Structural Shop at the outbreak of the war. 






LIFE BUOY 



10 



Mr. Dennett is very deeply attached to his 
family which consists of his wife, daughter and a 
son whom he is naturally proud of, for his boy is 
in the Engineer Corps and has been across for over 
a year. Mr. Dennett states that his hobby is auto- 
mobiling but that he would rather work than eat, 
which everyone in the Yard that has the good for- 
tune of being acquainted with Mr. Dennett knows, 
as the truth. 

In order to be fair to the men coming under 
his jurisdiction relative to ratings, Mr. Dennett has 
organized a board which meets every six weeks. 
This board consists of Leadingmen and Quartermen 
and whenever a man wishes a change of rating it is 
taken up by the board. In this way Mr. Dennett 
claims that every man that has ever worked in his 
shop who has been granted a higher rating, has 
been given his rating because of his merits. 



SAFE CLOTHING. 

For Men and Women in Industry. 

1. Men and women clothe their bodies to 
satisfy their needs for protection and to gratify 
their desires for comfort, style, color and adapta- 
bility to season and circumstances, but few working 
people select their clothing to meet best the require- 
ments of SAFETY. The accident hazards found in 
many industries demand careful study in selecting 
the clothing best adapted to the comfort and 
SAFETY of the worker. 

2. The war is forcing many women into in- 
dustry. The use of steam, electricity and fast-mov- 
ing machinery must continue. Women's clothing 
should change, when necessary, and conventions 
be modified. If skirts, and shirtwaists with loose 
sleeves are to be worn, and long braids or loose hair 
remain unrestrained or unprotected, many lives will 
be sacrificed needlessly. Convention and prudery 
must give way to the conservation of human lives. 
Women who do men's work must wear a modifica- 
tion of men's clothing. Convince them that this is 
necessary by proving that accidents are caused by 
unsuitable clothing; make it attractive and easy 
for them to purchase and wear SAFE clothing. 

3. The attitude of the human mind toward 
clothing is largely affected by its appearance to 
others. If we think we look well to others in the 
clothing we wear, we feel better and do better work. 



WORKING GARMENTS. 

4. Men or women operating machines, climb- 
ladders or doing heavy manual labor, should wear 
safe work garments combining overalls and jump- 
ers. The garment should be reasonably snug, par- 
ticularly about the neck, wrists and ankles; there 



should be no loose flaps or strings, and pockets 
should be few and rather small. In occupations 
requiring the use of a limited number of tools — 
too few to require a tool-bag — it may be desirable, 
especially for male workers, to add a special belt 
into which the tools can be fitted and carried. 

5. Sleeves offer a measure of protection from 
splashed cutting compound, flying chips, and sharp 
points and edges and should be worn in operations 
where they do not cause a more serious hazard. 
If they are worn, the opening at the wrist should be 
short. If sleeves are not desired, they should be re- 
moved at the shoulder, or at the point to which 
they would be rolled up, for they offer considerable 
resistance if caught in machinery through mishap. 
Neckties should be prohibited unless enclosed and 
held by the outer garments. 

6. Employees operating boring machines, 
drill presses, lathes, etc.. where machine parts or 
materials revolve, should not be allowed to wear 
neckties while at work. 

7. Garments may be made of any material 
desired. The usual color for men is blue or khaki; 
women very frequently use khaki, plain black or 
striped material. The weight of the garments may 
be varied to avoid wearing during the hot summer 
months the thick, heavy garment suitable for win- 
ter. 

8. Safe clothing is comparatively inexpensive, 
and, to encourage employees to .wear them they 
may be obtained at cost price. 



CAPS. / 

1. Caps are necessary for safety in many op- 
erations in which women are engaged, and they are 
desirable in practically all industrial operations. 
For women, caps are necessary to bind down the 
hair to prevent its being caught in the moving parts 
of machinery or by belts, gears, chains, etc. Neg- 
lecting this precaution, through oversight or other- 
wise, has resulted in many serious accidents. 

2. Men with long hair should wear caps for 
the same reason. For ordinary operations, in which 
it is unnecessary to protect the head from possible 
blows or falling objects, a light cap with an elastic 
band is sufficient to secure the hair in place. 

3. When hazards warrant it, heavy helmets 
are desirable to break the force of a blow or the 
weight of a falling object. Under other conditions 
caps with transparent visors are desirable; but in- 
flamable material such as celluloid should not be 
used. Under still other conditions, skull caps with 
goggles attached are provided, or a face mask 
which can be swung up when not r.e q u i r e d 
Employes in shops, factories, and factory yards 



11 



LIFE BUOY 



should be encouraged to wear caps, even if nec- 
essary only from the standpoint of cleanliness. 



SHOES. 

1. In the absence of industrial accident haz- 
ard, special designs of shoes are not required to 
protect the feet Lou broad heels and stout soles 
should be used. Industrial operations Involving 
the handling Of molten metal, hot liquids or danger- 
ous substances of any kind i such as hot cinders, 
acids or caustics) require that the "Congress" or 
other special types of shoes be worn. These shoes. 
it worn with leggings, will resist heat and prevent 
hot substances, or acids, from reaching the flesh. 
Work shoes should have reinforced toes to protect 
the feet, should heavy articles fall on them. The 
reinforced toe type of shoe has become standard in 
steel plants and foundries. 

:'. The supervisory force in every industry 
should be reminded to inspect frequently the 
shoes worn by employes, to make sure that they are 
of the proper type, kept in good repair and suitable 
to working conditions. Slipping accidents are like- 
1\ to occur when shoes with badly runover heels 
are worn, and a projecting nail is more likely to 
penetrate a thin "paper thick" sole than a good 
stout one. National Council of Safety. 



applies so well to today's conditions. The truth 
is the same yesterday, today, and tomorrow." 

"No hour goes by but our hearts are haunted 
by the scenes of long lines of emaciated women 
ami children who today and for three years have 
gathered in Belgium for their daily bread from 
America. That pittance — their all — represents 
scarcely the wastes from American tables. This 
u inter these lines have, for the first time during 
the war. gathered in the poorer sections of England. 
France and Italy. Not only should this pull at our 
hearts, but beyond this, it is a menace to our very 
safety. In the presence of a common enemy we sit 
at a common table." — Herbert Hoover. 



WAR FOR HUMANITY. 

"War. in a good cause, is not the greatest evil 
which a nation can suffer War is an ugly thing. 
liut not the ugliest of things; the decayed and de- 
graded state of moral and patriotic feeling which 
thinks nothing worth a war is worse. When a 
people are used as mere human instruments Cor 
tiring cannon or thrusting bayonets, in the service 
lor the selfish purposes of a master, such a war de- 
grades a people. A war to protect other human be- 
ings against tyrannical injustice: a war to give 
victory to their own ideas of right and good, anil 
which is their own war. carried on for an honest 
purpose by their free choice, is often the means of 
their regeneration. A man who has nothing which 
lie is willing to tight for. nothing which he cares 
more about than he does about his personal safety, 
is a miserable creature who has no chance of being 
tree, unless made and kept so by the exertions of 
better men than himself. As long as justice and 
injustice have not terminated their ever-renewing 
right for ascendancy in the affairs of mankind, hu- 
man beings must be willing, when need is, to do 
battle for the one against the other." John Stuart 
Mill 

"This was written a half century and more 
ago, but it might have been written yesterday, it 



NEW EMPLOYEES WELCOME. 

When you go into a country or a* s: range place 
you are grateful to the man who extends to you the 
hand of fellowship, to the one who makes you feel 
at home. 

Remember the new employees on the job. 
They are strangers within our gates. Especially at 
this time when we are increasing our force are we 
afforded an opportunity of showing new employees 
that we are interested in them and that we are 
anxious for them to be satisfied. A little effort on 
your part can make the newcomers feel at home and 
will show them the feeling of co-operation you have 
helped to build up. You can do more in five min- 
utes to establish the right spirit while their im- 
pressions are forming than you can in many days 
after they had formed their opinions of you and 
our company. 

It is the privilege of every American at this 
time to make the strangers from other lands feel 
that we appreciate their help in winning this war. 

Treat them with the same courtesy and kind- 
ness that you would desire if YOU were a stranger 
in a foreign country. 



STRUCTURAL SHOP. 

In this issue of the Life Buoy appears the 
group photograph of the employees working in the 
Structural Shop. The co-operation which the em- 
ployees of this shop showed in the readiness and 
promptness with which they did their part was es- 
pecially appreciated. 

The foreman of the Structural Shop is Mr. 
Frank Dennett. The Quartermen are Mr. Ralph F. 
Ham and Mr. Charles E. Brooks. The Leadingmen 
Joiners are Messrs. Clarence G. Grant, A. D. Spin- 
ney, W. R. Weston, E. N. McNabb. The Leading- 
men Carpenters are Messrs. George A. Sebra, A. F. 
Barr. and Klwin H. Reed. The Leadingman Mason 
is Mr. Ernest J. Moulton and Mr. E. A. Williams is 
Acting Leadingman. 



LIFE BUOY 



12 




13 



LIFE BUOY 



MIXED MINSTREL SHOW 

The first rehearsal of the employees of this 
Yard who are trying out for the parts in the mixed 
Minstrel Show, the performances of which are to be 
given in the Portsmouth theatre on the evenings of 
December 11 and 12, was held on Friday evening, 
October 25, when a large number of employees par- 
ticipated. 

At this meeting it was decided to hold the re- 
hearsals on Monday and Thursday evenings begin- 
ning at S o'clock promptly. The place of meeting 
tor the rehearsals will be at the Loyal Order of 
Moose hall, High street, Portsmouth, N. H. 

Plans have not only been formulated but suf- 
ficiently promulgated to the end that the Show is 
beginning to round out. The cast are all working 
conscientiously and faithfully and there is no ques- 
tion but that the performances will be delightful 
and worth going a long distance to see. 

As is undoubtedly understood by all employees 
of the Portsmouth Navy Yard the proceeds realized 
from the two performances will be given as a 
Christmas gift from the employees of the Ports- 
mouth Navy Yard to the Red Cross. 

At a recent meeting of the executive committee 
it was decided to draw the line of demarcation to 
the end that no free tickets of any kind will be dis- 
tributed, in that the Red Cross is to be given the 
benefits of the money realized. The matter of sell- 
ing tickets will be taken up shortly and it is hoped 
that each and every employee will respond by buy- 
ing tickets in the same proportion that they have 
responded on other great work. 

Mr. Henry J. Quinn the professional director 
and producer is a man of magnetic personality and 
one whose inspiration is carrying the rehearsals 
along in a fine manner. The cooperation given by 
the cast is one worthy of mention. 

In that the employees who are taking part in 
the show are giving their time and talents free of 
charge, it is little enough to expect that the em- 
ployees of this Yard should perform a double duty, 
that of first standing solidly in back of their fellow 
employees and secondly of supporting the Red Cross 
whose noble work is alleviating the sufferings of the 
hovs "Over There." 



It is not the friendship only, 

That glows in the summer's rays, 

But the friendship that abideth 

Through the winter's chilling days. 

We will find our friends are many, 
When our skies are bright and clear; 

But when the storm-clouds thickly gather. 
Few remain to lift and cheer. 

But the true friends will not fail us, 

Though the world should scorn and shun, 

They will stand by, from the dawning 
Till the setting of life's sun. 

Without the bright smile of friendship, 

The years would wearily roll; 
And darkened would be our pathway. 

Fears and doubts oppress our soul. 

"Love one another," you remember 
Was Christ's commandment new. 

"Do unto others as you would 
That they should do unto you." 

The cup our neighbor drinks to-day, 

E'en to the dregs of sorrow, 
May come to us as it did to him 

It may be our turn to-morrow. 

We are not staying in this world, 

We are only passing through; 
Let us banish all anger and strife, 

Just be loyal, good and true. 

"Judge not that ye be not judged," 

Is a wisely ordered plan, 
And never base your friendship 

On the outward garb of man. 

Ofttimes the old and threadbare coats 

May wrap true hearts of steel: 
Just as the old and weather-worn husks 

May the perfect grain conceal. 

Sometimes the love for our native land 
Might change to another clime; 

But this great truth doth still apply, 
A true friend loves all the time. 



FRIENDSHIP. 

What is the meaning of friendship. 
In it's truest sense and worth? 

It's the loving smile and kindly aid 
When we need it here on earth. 



"How fondly doth memory cherish 
In the depths of her gilded urn, 

The dust of the friendships departed, 
And the joys that can never return. 



LIFE BUOY 



14- 



The "Damon and Pythian" friendship, 
Those worthy knights of old, 

And that of "David and Jonathan". 
Do not need to be retold. 

Mother's friendship changes never. 

Regardless of what we do, 
And the friendship of our fathers 

Is ever staunch and true. 

Our boys are proving! their friendship, 
These nephews of "Uncle Sam," 

They enlisted for the purpose 
Of helping their fellow man. 

With the Allies they are fighting, 
In the Old World not the New, 

But they're fighting for their country 
They are fighting for me and you. 

Can you hear the martial music. 

As it rolls from wave to wave? 
Is there a friendship stronger than, 

"His life for another he gave?" 

Oh! The welcome that awaits them 
When their mission is fulfilled! 

Flags will wave, and our hearts rejoice. 
When "Autocracy" is killed. 




Then the principles of the U. S. A. 

Will be known throughout the world. 
And o'er all the countries there should be 
A "Friendship Flag" unfurled. 

LIDA HELEN WATERHOUSE 

Navy Yard Employee. 



WHERE DO YOU TRADE? 

Concerns who advertise in the "Life Buoy" 
should receive the support of all "Life Buoy" read- 
ers for, they pay good money for the privilege of 
seeking your business and they ask for your trade 
When you have made up your mind relative to what 
you wish to purchase, look in the "Life Buoy" and 
see if you cannot get it of one of the advertisers. 
When you make your purchase, it is recommended 
that you mention that you saw the advertisement 
in the "Life Buoy." This will please the advertiser 
in that he will realize that employees of this Yard 
do not only read the news but likewise the ad- 
vertisements. Our motto should be, "Do something 
for the advertiser, for he in turn is doing something 
for us in keeping the paper going." 



GASSED. NO! 

If peach stones and pits of prunes, plums, 
olives etc., are saved, our American soldiers will 
probably escape death from the deadly gas attacks 
that are so frequently launched by the Germans. 

The pits should be saved and deposited in the 
centralized collection station which has been erected 
in front of the Sheet Metal Shop, bldg. 74. This 
collection station as above shown is suitably label- 
led and camouflaged so as to call everyone's atten- 
tion to it. It is requested that the barrel which is 
located in the station be kept filled. Very little ef- 
fort on any employee's part is required in getting 
the fruit pits from the home to the collection sta- 
tion. Forgetfulness in bringing in the fruit pits is 
something that no one of us should be guilty of. 

When the gas alarm sounds those boys who 
have gas masks can readily adjust them and save 
themselves. However, unless the boys are provided 
with a gas mask respirator properly filled with car- 
bon, they do not have this chance. 

Carbon obtained from fruit pits is an essential 
element for the carbon helps to neutralize the fatal 



15 



LIFE BUOY 



poison gases. More and more fruit pits are needed 
to save the lives of our American boys. With such 
a notice, anyone throwing away fruit pits is funda- 
mentally guilty of not only committing a so-called 
misdemeanor but is acting the part of an ally of the 
Germans. 



WORLD'S RECORD. 

The world's record for Female Operatives in 
driving rivets is claimed by Miss Annie Toby of 
Eliot, Maine, who is employed in the Electrical Ma- 
chine Shop, Building 79. 

On October 11th. 1918, Miss Toby drove 264 
1-2 in. x 3-16 in. cold copper rivets in two hours. 

Miss Annie Toby not only claims the world's 
championship but is willing to compete against any 
other Female Operative in this country or abroad. 

More power to Miss Toby. 



FRED W. PIERCE. 

The many friends of Mr. Fred W. Pierce, who 
was a molder by trade and worked in the Foundry, 
will be surprised to hear of his decease. Mr. Pierce 
died of pneumonia during the past month. 

The following poem is dedicated to the memory 
of Fred W. Pierce. 

FRIENDS. 

Friend after friend departs; 

For who hath not lost a friend? 

There is no union here of hearts. 

That finds not here an end; 

Wore this frail world our only rest, 

Those departed would be greatly missed 

Beyond the flight of time; 
Beyond this vale of life. 
There surely is some blessed clime 
Where life is not a breath, 
Where friends shall meet again. 
And life shall have no end. 

There is a world above; 

Where parting is unknown. 

A whole eternity of love. 

Before our Maker's Throne. 

And faith beholds our loved ones here. 

Departed to that happier sphere. 

For what are all the joys of earth; 
Compared with joys up there, 
Many a friend we used to greet. 
Here on earth no more we meet, 
But where saints and angels reign, 
There we'll meet our friends again. 

WILLIAM S. HUGHES, 

Outside Machine Shop. 



"GOD BLESS OUR DAD." 

We happened in a home the other night and 
over the parlor door saw the legend worked in 
letters of red: "What is Home without a Mother?" 
A.cross the room was another brief, "God Bless Our 
Home." 

Now what's the matter with "God Bless Our 
Dad?" He gets up early, lights the fire, boils an 
egg, and while many another is sleeping, wipes off 
the dew of the dawn with his boots. He makes the 
weekly handout for the butcher, the grocer, the 
milkman and baker, and his pile is badly worn be- 
fore he has been home an hour. 

If there is a noise in the night, dad is kicked 
in the back and made to go down stairs to find the 
burglar and kill him. Mother darns the socks, but 
dad bought the socks in the first place and the 
needles and the yarn afterward. Mother does up 
the fruit; well, dad bought it all, and jars and sugar 
cost like mischief. 

Dad buys the chicken for the Sunday dinner, 
carves it himself and draws the neck from the ruins 
after everyone else is served. "What is Home with- 
out a Mother?" Yes, that is all right; but what is 
home without a father? Ten chances to one it's a 
boarding house, father is under a slab and the land- 
lady is a widow. Dad, here's to you — you've got 
your faults — you may have a lot of 'em — but you 
are all right, and we will miss you when you are 
gone. — Sparks 



WORLD'S LIBERTY BOND SUBSCRIP- 
TION RECORD. 

The Boat Shop has undoubtedly achieved the 
distinction of holding the world's record in Liberty 
bond subscriptions. On the first issue $25,550 was 
subscribed by 160 men. On the second issue $54,- 
450 was subscribed by the same number. In the 
third issue ISO men subscribed $41,950. The 
crowning climax however, came in the fourth issue 
when the enormous sum of $71,750 was subscribed 
i>y 258 men. The average subscription per man for 
the four issues is $1025. This is all the more com- 
mendable when it is understood that only two larger 
subscriptions than $500 were received in these 
issues, one of $3000 being subscribed in the second 
and one of $4000 in the fourth issue. 

It is needless to say that each and every man 
in the Boat Shop subscribed to each and every issue 
Miul too much credit cannot be given to each and 
every employee of this Shop. The untiring efforts 
of Mr. Charles Tucker, Shop Captain, also helped 
materially in gaining this world's distinction. 



LIFE BUOY 



16 




17 



LIFE BUOY 



TEETH. 

The teeth are very important to the general 
health. Nature gave the teeth for chewing food 
and thus preparing it for digestion in the stomach. 

The saliva or spit which comes in the mouth 
when chewing is going on, moistens the food and 
partly digests some parts of it, even before it gets 
to the stomach. 

The teeth must be kept clean; first, in order to 
save them; second, to prevent them from becoming 
breeding places for germs. Teeth decay because 
the food is allowed to stay between them. Food 
between the teeth becomes changed and makes an 
acid which eats into the teeth, then the germs which 
are always present in the mouth go into the hole 
the acid has eaten in the tooth and cause the decay- 
ing. 

This may go on until the whole tooth is de- 
stroyed, or it may go even further and pass into the 
jaw, causing poisoning of the bone. This is a seri- 
ous condition. 

Decayed teeth are bad to have: 

1st — Because they cause toothache. 

2nd — Because they become useless for chewing. 

3rd — Because they may cause poisoning of the 
jaw bone. 

4th — Because they catch food and germs and 
these get mixed with the saliva and are swallowed. 
This may cause stomach sickness. 

The best way to keep from having bad teeth is: 

1st — Clean them at night with a brush and 
tooth powder. 

Brush up and down, not across the 



"It is not a matter of pride or prejudice, I 
am sure," says Dr. Mott, "but there never has been 
as clean an army, one so efficient in morale and one 
from which springs so spontaneously the conquer- 
ing spirit, as the U. S. Army. I say this deliberate- 
ly because I have studied the physical facts and 
observed the spirit of our troops in France, their 
physical, mental and moral efficiency. 

"There must be causes for this. Our Govern- 
ment has had no uncertain policy in this respect. 
Morale is admittedly the chief factor in warfare, 
but we do not always give sufficient study to what 
produces it. Our Government, however, has fav- 
ored both obligatory and voluntary measures to 
uphold the morale of American soldiers and 
sailors." 



(a) 



teeth. 



(b) 
(O 



Do not brush hard. 
Brush to remove the food which has 
collected during the day, not just to clean. 

2nd — Rinse the mouth after cleaning the teeth 
with a teaspoonful of cooking soda in a glass of 
water. 

3rd — Go to a dentist once a year and let him 
fill all holes in the teeth. 

If you have bad teeth, go to the dentist at once 
and have them fixed up, then follow above direc- 
tions. 



AN INSPIRING MESSAGE FROM 

DR. J O H X R . MOTT. 

Dr. Mott, who is General Secretary, Inter- 
national Committee of the Y. M. C. A. has visited 
all the armies on both sides of the European con- 
flict, spending many months in Germany and Aus- 
tria, among allied prisoners before the United 
States entered the war. He knows the morale of 
every army, has made a study of the psychology of 
troops. 



NAVY YARD ORCHESTRA 

A Navy Yard orchestra has been formed and 
will play the musical numbers in the mixed Min- 
strel show, the performances of which will be held 
in the Portsmouth theatre on the evenings of Dec- 
ember 11 and 12. The manager of the orchestra, 
who likewise plays the cornet, in the orchestra, is 
Mr. S. B. Gage. The following persons are candi- 
dates for positions in the orchestra: 

Messrs. E. Moulton, cornet; H. Hodgdon, trom- 
bone; R. Howarth, clarinet; E. J. Rivals, violin; 
Downing, violin; Scammon, traps; Carter, traps; 
Bailey, clarinet; Burridge, violin; Kittredge, flute; 
Schoef, violin; Miss Dorothy Cotton, piano. 

There are many others who have -signified their 
intentions of trying out for the orchestra. 

The rehearsals of the orchestra will be held 
on the same evenings that the rehearsals for the 
minstrel show are held. These rehearsals will be 
held on Monday and Thursday evenings, beginning 
at S o'clock promptly at the Loyal Order of Moose 
hall. High street. Portsmouth, N. H. 



THE NEW EMPLOYE. 

Do you remember the time when you were a 
New Employe? Perhaps it was not so long ago, or 
possibly it was many years ago, but every workman 
here was a New Employe at some time. Didn't 
everything seem strange to you at that time — the 
plant, the machinery, the men? Perhaps there 
was one man in the department who greeted you 
with a smile and who occasionally gave you a point- 
er on how to do your work more easily. At noon 
this same man took you to our Lunch Room and 
showed you around. And at night he showed you 
th'e best way to get to the street. 



LIFE BUOY 



18 



You learned to like this man and looked to him 
for any information you needed about your work. 
And if he told you the safe way to do a dangerous 
job you paid as much attention to it as if a safety 
inspector had told you about it. 

In these days when we have a large number of 
New Employes coining into the plant, every old 
employe has a great opportunity and duty to per- 
form toward these men. Treat them as you would 
like to be treated if you were in their place (The 
Golden Rule). Show them where they can "think 
Safety First" and avoid getting hurt and set a good 
example by being careful yourself. 

It has been said that a New Employe is as dan- 
gerous as an unguarded machine, for he is likely 
through lack of knowledge of his new surroundings, 
to injure others as well as himself. This is true 
until the new man has been made to realize the 
safety helps connected with his occupation. The 
sooner you help him realize this, the sooner will he 
and you be safe from accidents. 

Give the New Employe the Glad Hand! 



Co-operate and assist — not criticise and find 

fault. < Fra - Elbertus) 

Every hour of lost time is a chance of future 

misfortune. (Napoleon I) 

The Kaiser may get the American's goat, but 

if he does it will be the "butter end." 

That which is worth doing is worth doing well. 

(Buffalo Express) 
Every effort we make, every sacrifice we make, 
automatically shortens the war. 

Get your happiness out of your work or you 
will never know what real happiness is. 

Energy and persistence conquer all things. 

(Franklin) 
"The man in the trenches is all-important. He 
is making great sacrifices and taking great risks. 
We are proud of him. But the man in the shop has 
also become an important factor in carrying on 
modern warfare, and our industrial problems have 
become more intense by virtue of the fact that the 
man in the shop and the man in the field are both 
vitally essential to the successful conduct of our 
campaign." 

Secretary of Labor Wilson. 



EDITORIALS. 

It is our actual work which determines our 
value. (George Bancroft) 

There is no such thing as a "50-50" American. 
(Theodore Roosevelt) 

I know what pleasure is for I have done good 
work. (Robert Louis Stevenson) 

Our duty is to stand together night and day 
until the job is finished. (Pres. Wilson) 

"With firmness in the right, as God gives us to 
see the right, let us strive on to finish the work wo 
are in." (A. Lincoln) 

To take a day off is easy, to put it back is im- 
possible. (The Houghton Line) 

Our flag never has and never will be hauled 
down except at sunset. (Rear Admiral McGowan) 

Genius is only the power of making continuous 

efforts. 

"Only engage and then the mind grows heated: 

Begin it, and the work will be completed." 

(Carlyle) 

It is want of diligence rather than want of 
means that causes great failure. (Alfred Mercier) 

The quickest way to win the war is to put in- 
to the struggle every ounce of our will, intelligence 

and power. 

(David Houston. Secretary of Agriculture) 
Get the victory punch into your work. 
The most unnecessary luxury accorded to spies 
in this country is the last "n" in intern. 

(Theodore Roosevelt) 



THE FRIENDLY HAND 

When a man ain't got a cent, 

An' he's feelin' kind o' blue, 
An' the clouds hang dark and heavy, 

An' won't let the sunshine through, 
It's a great thing, O my brethren, ' 

For a feller just to lay 
His hand upon your shoulder 

In a friendly sort o' way. 

It makes a man feel curious; 

It makes the teardrops start ; 
An' you sort o' feel a flutter 

In the region of the heart; 
You can look up an' meet his eyes, 

You don't know what to say, 
When his hand is on your shoulder 

In a friendly sort o' way. 

Oh, the world's a curious compound, 

With its honey and its gall, 
With its cares an' bitter crosses — 

But a good world after all; 
An' a good God must have made it — 

Leastways, that is what I say, 
When a hand rests on your shoulder 

In a friendly sort o' way. 

— James Whitcomb Riley. 



19 



LIFE BUOY 



ANONYMOUS LETTER REGARDING 

OUTSIDE MACHINE SHOP AND 

ELECTRICAL MACHINE SHOP 

l. An anonymous letter has been received by 
the Manager making an attack upon the bosses and the 
men of the outside machine shop and also attacking the 
conduct of some of the bosses andthe women of the 
electrical machine shop, [f the writer of this letter 
will appear before the management ani l submit further 
details or proof of his charges, the matter will be gi\ 
en the fullest possible investigation, as conditions 
Buch as he alleges exist at this yard will not be toler 
ated, 

2. On the other hand, anonymous letters, where 
the man for one reason or another will not make his 
identity known, are looked upon with the greatest sus- 
picion ami manifestly cannot be taken seriously, it is 
found that such letters are very often the resultofper 
sonal animosity and it is believed that in most eases 
the anonymous charges are without any real foundation, 

3. The management stands ready at all times to 

receive fair and reasonable complaints and grievances 
and also to receive all constructive suggestions and 
criticism to improve the efficiency of the yard. If any 
employee has any honest complaint or criticism to 

make, he need not hesitate to present it in person or 
over ins own signature and the Management will see 

that no man is discriminated against on account of any- 
such action. It is hoped that all those in authority are 

broad enough to desire constructive criticism and' also 
honest charges of misconduct or inefficiency that may 
com,' io the attention of anj employe. 

■i. It is the desire of the Management to admin- 
ister tin- yard with fairness and justice to all. An 
attack in the dark is a cowardly attack and cannot be 
given consideration and anonymous charges will remain 

unbelieved unless the person making such charges will 

come forward and submit proofed' them. No employee 
need fear to do this if his chare.es are honest ones. In 

fact the Management wants to encourage all such 
honest charges and constructive criticism but cannot 

seriously consider anonymous communications. 



NEW YEAR PROSPECTS 

Now that hostilities have ceased and that etner 

gency war work has been reduced, the question natur- 

all] arises as to what the future prospects of the Yard 
are. Briefly, the answer to this is it depends on us 
and OUT ability to make good. There is plenty of work 

in sight, and we shall undoubtedly get our share of u 

il we "deliver lb.' goods." The competition under 

peace conditions will, no doubt, be keener but if we 

all get together and prove that we are at least as good 
or better, than the other fellow, our future prospects 
are believed to be particularly bright 



1 was only a few years ago when the present In- 
dustrial Manager Inst came to duty at this Yard that 
I He normal force ol employees was only about eight or 

nine hundred rhrough our own efforts and by makina 

good on OUT job, more and more work was 'assigned 
here until, at t he outbreak of hostilities, the Yard had 
a torce ol nearly tWO thousand employees The 
demands ot (he war emergency brought this up to a 

maximum during the war of nearly live thousand son en 
hundred, and we would have employed considerably 

more than this had we been able to obtain them The 
cessation o I hostilities very naturally brought about a 
'eduction m emergency war work, and today the civil- 
ian employees number between four thousand eight 
hundred to tour thousand nine hundred. This is be 
lieved to be a reasonably normal working fore under 
existing conditions, but this is almost wholly dependent 

Upon Ourselves and our ability to ■•deliver 'the goods- 
Hi competition with others. There seems no reason 
why we Should ever drop appreciably below this figure 
On the contrary, ,t is believed that We should increase 
it in he future. \\ bile the working force is now pretty 

well balanced, we still need more laborers and general 

Helpers, and also something like one hundred more skill- 
ed machinists, who will be taken on as soon as they ap- 
ply for work. ' p 

The increase in the Nav\ as a whole during the 
war and the latest large building program can only 

mean the assignment of additional ships to the Yard's 
wat can satisfactorily and quickly turn out the work 
Portsmouth should certainly come in for its share of 
these ships, but we want our main work to be that of 

building new vessels and also the making of various 

manufactured articles and small boats which it is U n 

deist,. mI ,s the policy of the Administration towards 

this Yard Also, during the war a very considerable 
sum ot money has been expended on improvements and 
additions to the Yard. We have now SIX sets of mod- 
ern building ways with overhead cranes. These are 
at present I ully occupied with our large order of sub- 
marine construction. If we continue to make good in 
this work m competition with others, ami show that 
our aim is toward constantly increasing efficiency it is 

not believed that these building ways will be allowed 

'" '"'ee.ino idle. (hi the contrary, under the con 

templated large building program they will undoubted- 
ly be kept Idled by one class of vessel or another We 
prefer submarines, as we have specialized in that 
work; but. il submarines are not available, we shall go 
alter other classes of vessels. New construction of 
tins kind lends to provide a more constant and less 
fluctuating working force. 

There has recently been appropriated by Cm- t 
gross money lor a large addition io i he Machine Shon 

Also, money to extend the Foundry to take in the 
present Spar Shop and to make a new Spar Shop out of 
Building No. 42 with a large addition to it Ms,, 
money tor extensive improvements and additions to the 
power plant. Heretofore, we have constructed onh 
the hulls ot submarines and have installed the main and 
auxiliary machinery which has been purchased else- 
where. While the additions to the Machine Shop and 
Foundry are needed for our normal work, it is believed 
that after these additions are completed there is no 
reason why we should not take up the construction of 
the mam machinery for submarines and other vessels 
I his will, ol course, mean a larger working force than 
at present 






LIFE BUOY 



While our manufactures have been reduced in vol- 
ume, they will, undoubtedly, continue to be a large fac- 
tor even under normal conditions. We have specialized 
in this work, particularly m the manufacture of electri 
calfittings on a large scale for all the Yards of the Coun- 
try. There seems no reason why our manufactures 
should not continue so long as we can beat private firms 
in this work. Originally we obtained our manufactur- 
ing orders on that basis, and there seems no reason 
why we should not continue to do so and even enlarge 
on this class of work. 

The question has also been brought up as to what 
the prospects are for the continuation of the employ- 
ment of women on the Navy Yard. The Manager 
believes that women have come to stay for certain 
classes of work, and that hereafter we shall always 
have a considerable number of them, both in the offices 
and in the shops, where they have fully proved their 
worth. Their employment has been on comparatively 
light work requiring no trade knowledge and for which 
women are peculiarly fitted and which is not suited to 
men. It is emphatically not the policy to employ wom- 
en to take the place of men on real men's work. On the 
other hand in work for which they are specially suited 
they will find ample opportunity for personal improve- 
ment and advancement. 

In making the recent reduction in the force, every 
effort was made to make the discharges in strict just- 
ness and with the least hardship to all concerned. Man- 
ifestly, we could not keep on anyone who did not know 
his ji>b or efficiently perform his work but, other things 
being reasonably equal, preference was given to men 
having families or dependents to support or owning 
homes or under burdensome financial obligations. The 
same general rule was applied in the discharges of 
women. 

In conclusion, the Manager wishes to invite the 
continued cooperation and good feeling on the part of 
all employees and the mutual confidence all of which 
are so necessary to contentment and efficiency. He 
asks that each do his best to promote the efficiency of 
the Yard which, in turn, reflects to the credit and pros- 
perity of all concerned and the whole local community. 
We may think we have done well, but there is nothing 
under the sun that cannot be improved, and our aim 
and spirit should lead us to continual progress. The 
Manager wishes to thank the Yard force for its coopera- 
tion and its work in the past, and to wish to each and 
every memberof it a Prosperous and Happy New Year. 

L. S. ADAMS 
Captain, Construction Corps, U. S. N., 
Industrial Manager. 



TEAM-WORK. 

It ain't the gun nor armament, 
Nor funds that they can pay, 

But the close co-operation 

That makes them win the day. 

It ain't the individuals, 
Nor the army as a whole, 

But the everlasting team-work 
Of every bloomin' soul. 



- -Kipling 



WHAT THE NAVY YARD 

HAS BEEN DOING 

DURING THE 

WAR. 

During the war the activities of the Navy Yard 
have necessarily been kept more or less secret so 
that the community as a whole has had no ade- 
quate opportunity of learning of the work the Yard 
has been doing. This has no doubt led to some er- 
roneous conclusions based on lack of knowledge 
or on inaccurate or irresponsible information 
which in turn has resulted in some cases of ill- 
advised criticism Willi evidently no knowledge of 
the facts. 

Now that the armistice has been signed and hos- 
tilities have practically ceased, there seems no lon- 
ger any need for such secrecy, and it is believed 
that it will be of general interest to give a brief 
account of some of the main work and activities of 
our Navy Yard, in order that the uninformed mat 
know something of our efforts and achievements 
and so that the local community may rightly have 
a feeling of pride in its Navy Yard. Even so, it is 
not yet possible to tell all. Some things must still 
remain untold. 

On our entrance into the war and during its pro- 
gress ;i tremendous volume of work was thrown 
(i\ all Navy Yards, and the demands in all cases 
far exceeded the combined capacity. The maximum 
possible output was required, and even»that was 
far from enough. The impossible was demanded 
in the face of many obstacles that seemed insur- 
mountable. Every job seemed an urgent one and 
more urgent than all the others. Briefly, that is 
what we were up against. Maximum effort and 
energy were required of each one of us. How the 
Yard has met the demands upon it can be best 
judged after the facts are given. Individual in- 
stances of constant and consistent, hard and pat- 
riotic work are too great in number to be men- 
tioned in an article of this kind. These are, how- 
ever, generally known and appreciated by the 
Management. While in any large body of men there 
are ordinarily found some slackers and some that 
do not measure up to the standard or grasp the 
seriousness of the situation, and while we have not 
been entirely free from such an element, this ele- 
ment at this Navy Yard was exceedingly small, and 
the vast body of the employees, men and women, 
may take a just pride in what they have accom 
pushed. Each person's own conscience should tell 
him whether or not he has done his full duty by 
his country at war. 



B 



LIFE BUOY 



\i the beginning of tiu> war the Yard was faced other work, particularly submarine construction 

wiih a greal shortage of help in practically ail which called for the same class of skilled men 

trades ami lines of work. At that time we had During the nineteen months Of hostilities Hi.' Yard 

slighily under 2000 employees, ami additional has mad,' more or less extensive repairs and al- 
lium, both Skilled and unskilled, were exceedingly leralions on something like 122 vessels of various 
difficult to Obtain, in view of the general shortage kinds, not including I he small Yard craft. War 
throughout the entire country lo meet Hie extra alterations in many eases called for work ol con 
ordinary demands of I lie war. Just before the sign- siderable magnitude, 
Ing of the armistice we had ver> nearly 6700 em- 



ployees. This Increase was made only with the 
greatest difficulty, We started in by organizing a 
Trade School on a comparatively large scale, and 
as far as practicable, We tOOk all unskilled men 
from I he various shops in I he Yard and also as 
many men as w e could obtain outside and placed 
them in the Trade School under instruction. The 
lighter classes of unskilled work were given to 
women, and the Yard finally reached a force Of 
Slightly more (ban 1000 women on Ibis work. The 

women as a whole have Culls met the demands 

made upon them and may take pride in the pari 



Just previous to our entering the war the Yard 
bad received very extensive orders for submarine 
Construction, and this has been our biggest job. 
Since the declaration of hostilities Submarine I. s 
lias been completed at a cost considerably below her 
contract price and placed in service nearly a year 
ago. The 0-1 was launched in July L918 and cm 
pleted and left the Yard in December which was 

on.' month ahead ot her contract time. Submarine 

S-8 was launched December 21. L918 and is now 
practically completed and will go into commission 
Shortl) after the middle of the present month. All 
the details of the design of Ibis vessel have been 



they have played in the winning ol the war, both .)„.,„],.,,„, 1 ,,„ . ,,, ,, 

' aeveloped and all the working plans have been 
in the offices and in the shops, through our Trade 

School We have educated a great many green men 



and boys and have taught them useful trades SO 
that they could be id' real service to the country. 
The work of the Trade School including the in 
struclors can not be spoken of loo highly. These 
were I be men I hat we had to depend on lor prac 

ticallj an Hie extensive structural repairs ami ,ii 

terations on vessels. Our very lew really skilled 
shiptltters and other Structural workers had to be 
reserved for the more skilled work of submarine 
Construction that is, the lew we bail left after 
private yards bad Induced as main' 10 leave us as 
they could get by Offering considerably higher com 
pensation than We were permitted to give. 

Even al Hie .'iid the Yard did not have anything 



prepared by the force of Ibis Navy Yard. When 
this large amount of submarine construction was 

ordered at this Yard, the Industrial Manager 

as an estimate to the Secretary of the Navy that 

eighteen months would be required tor the com 

pletion Of the lirst boat ready for trials and com 
missioning, this time to count from the arrival ol' 
the Structural material. The structural material 
began lo arrive in June 1 !l 1 7 and by September 
1917 about ninety eight per cent, of it had been 
received. Assuming that there was enough on hand 
ill July or early August to begin work in earnest, 

it will be seen that we have fulfilled our original 
estimate to the Secretary of the Navy tor the com 

pletion of this boat, even though the estimate I. :,i 



been made on the basis of tin adequate working 

like the number ot employees that were required force under peace conditions Furthermore 
for the demands upon it. We could have taken on ,his time for construction Is remarkably short In 

a. leas. 1000 more if we could have obtained them, comparison will, what has been done in the past by 
and we me. many obstacles and got into several private builders ,n spite of the fact thai this was a 
kinds 01 .rouble and received much unjust crlti- considerably larger submarine than .hose hereto 

cism in our efforts to obtain the,... ,,„,, completed and that it was an entirely new 

On the outbreak ol .he war the Yard was uat- design, containing manv features different' from 

" 1:lllv HOOded With a number of additional ves our oilier submarines. The construction of , sub 

sels including many large ones. These vessels had marine that is a duplicate of another is one thing 

■erne iron, the Pacific Coast and elsewhere. This The developing of a new and complicated design 

added greatly to the general repair and alteration and the building of such a vessel in , short , 

work on ships and threw an additional burden on is an entirely different matter which furthermore 

the Yard and Its Inadequate working force. In can no, ,„ any way be compared to simple mer 

many cases three shuts were demanded in order chant ship construction. The difference between it 

''' ""' ws "' ls '"" "» th « Shortest possible time and a simple merchant ship isanalagous to that be 

and three full shifts require three times the nor tween a delicate and expensive Watch and an ordl 

This of course hampered nary clock. Tins work has be,',, accomplished over 



nial force for 111.' work 



LIFE BUOY 



man; obstacles < o>> numerous to relate In this ar- 
ticle. 11 is Sufficient Id say thai under adverse con- 
ditions the Yard lias fulfilled its promise to I lie 
month and made good on Ihis difficult Job. The ten 
oilier submarines Of lliis same class are new well 
along and in various degrees of coniplol Ion. 

Along Willi Increases in oilier work there came 
a demand for greatly increased production of man 

ufactured articles which the Yard has met, as fol- 
lows, Our Electrical Machine shop was established 

some years ago and has boon making a great many 

different kinds of electrical fittings for all the 

Yards of the country. In 1916 I lie average output 

amounted In value to $6700 per month with an 

average of IL'S employees On the work. During 
I '.1 I 7 the average monthly output had increased six 
limes tO $34,250 per month With only about twice 
lie' number of employees, the actual average being 
258, As the invoiced prices of the articles turned 
OUt from Ihis shop had been left practically un- 
changed, the total values afford therefore direct 
comparisons in output. Ill 1 ill 8 the prices on many 
articles were reduced in spite of large increases in 
Wages and rising costs of raw materials. Ity com 

puting the 1918 output on the 1916 prices we find 

that during the Mrs! nine months of L918 the OUt 
put averaged 1 a . 7 times the average for 1 !l 1 ti and 
with onlj 4.3 limes the average number of em 
ployees on the work. For July, August and Sep 
tember L918 the average monthly output was 
$110,395, Or an increase of 111. I linn's, whereas I he 

average number of employees was 663, an Increase 

of only 5.2 limes that of 1 II III. 

in the itrass Foundry the average monthly out- 
put of good castings during I he first six months in 
1916 was 2:i.. r >74 pounds with an average number 
of .'Hi men on Ihis work. In 1 II 1 ti the average 
monthly OUtpUt had increased to 64,100 pounds of 
good castings Willi an average of lid employees. 
Imiing the first nine months of IHIS the average 
monthly oulpul of good castings was ^117. NIL' 
pounds, an increase of lL'.fi limes that of 1915 With 
an increase of employees to 221, Which was only 
ti.l times the average number in the shop in I II I ;, 

During .inly. August, ami September of 1918 the 
average monthly output of I he Foundry was :: I .• 
998 pounds, an increase of 13.4 limes that of 1 II 1 a 
Willi an average number id' employees of -.Mi which 
was only about seven times that of 1915. 

In the Heal Shop in 1916 we had an average of 
only 86 men employed. During thai year, in ail 

• in i < hi to miscellaneous repair work, there were 

Seventeen high speed thirty live anil fori y fool mo 

tor boats completed In the shop. During the first 

te onlhs of IHIS. with an average Of only about 

2na men on the work, the shop turned out seventy 



eighl of these boats, or at the rale of about ninel\ 
four per year. This was In addition to an incrc.i e,l 
amount of general repair work, .lusl before the 

signing of the armistice the shop was turning em 
these boats at the rale of about fifteen per month. 

It will thus In- seen Ihal with only 2.4 limes the 
number of employees the mil put for 1918 as a 
whole was live limes Ihal of llllli. and Ihal til I he 
end of ibis lime we were turning out boats just 
about ten times as fast with practically no further 

increase in employees. 

it might be mentioned also that the thlrtj five 

and forty fool motor boals thai have been made a 

specially ai this Yard are of the Yard's own design 

and this design has now become standard for the 
Navy. This design was accepted only after com- 
petitive trials of several different designs, two id' 
I hem being from a private designer who had been 
designing commercial speed boals on a large scale. 
This type Of boal has become very popular with 
the Fleet, and particularly so for aviation and 
torpedo work on account of its high speed. Strength 
and Seaworthiness. Many of these boals have been 
shipped to France and England during Ihe war. A 
short lime ago Ihe Yard was called upon lor a 

complete set of lines and detailed plans of these 

boals for the British t level n nienl . It seems, there 
lore, Ihal at leasl one of our Allies in Ihe war has 

recognized the merit of these boats which were de- 

Signed and developed at Ihe local Navy Yard. 

Similar increases in production have taken place 

till along the hue. Early in 1917 we were turning 

OUl wood rigging blocks of various sizes and kinds 
al the rale of about I mi per monlli. "During Ihe 

first ion months of mis the Yard's output of these 
blocks was about 86,200 which reached a maximum 
ei 18,500 during, ihe month of August, Similarly, 

during (he first ten months of IHIS the Yard 

turned out 7,480 waterbreakers, 6,930 camp 

chairs, 16,290 camp slools, :i7.SS(l ditty boxes, and 
80,850 bread and roasting pans. The manufacture 

of these articles before Ihe war had 1) i in com 

paratively small numbers, The productions of 
franklin life buoys, boal spars, boal fittings, small 
steam engines, hose nozzles, and many other art i 
Cles of various kinds, have shown similarly large 
increases. 

H might be Inferred that these large increases in 

production With Comparatively small increases in 
the men on the work are due to Ihe economy el' 

fecied b> quantity production. This is only partlj 

line. The increases have been obtained voi\ large 
ly through improved methods and In I lie pal riot 

i: in ami increased effort of the employees them 

selves, working under Ihe knowledge of Ihe war 
emergency. Many of these articles have been made 



LIFE BUOY 



wholly or largely by women, the men having been 
transferred to more skilled work. One of many in- 
stances of reduced cost through Improved methods 
and individual effort on the part of the employees 
may be found In the case of the men of the Boat 
Shop. With little or no change in the number of 
employees the Boat Shop labor cost to construct a 
thirty-five foot motor speed boat was reduced from 
an average of $2649 to an average of $1761 in 
about six mouths. This was in spite of increases in 
wages amounting to nearly 40%. This is a reduc- 
tion of nearly thirty-four per cent, in cost in spite 
of the increased wages and should speak for itself. 
'The direct result was increased speed of produc- 
tion. 

In addition to the foregoing, there have been 
many extensive Improvements made in t he Yard it- 
self by Yard labor. The most important only are 
mentioned. Pour extra building ways for large 
submarines, together with overhead cranes, hax ■ 
been constructed. A good sized extension has been 
placed on the main Machine Shop and a small ex 
tension mi the Foundry. A new wing has been add- 
ed to the Industrial Olllce Building, increasing its 
capacity by about fifty per cent. A large number of 
additional machine tools have been obtained and 
installed, also additional cranes, engines, etc.. and 
extensive Improvements and additions to the rail- 
road tracks have been made. Many additional 
storage buildings have been erected and import- 
ant and extensive Improvements and additions 
have been made to the Power Plant, A submarine 
lit ting out basin ami wharf have been completed. 

It might be mentioned also that with all the 
ships overhauled at this Yard during the period of 
the war we have not been a day late on our proin- 
i ,ed .1.11 e ill I'OUiplel ion lei am ..I I lieni i hi I he 
contrary, we have several times completed them in 
advance of the promised dates. We have never re- 
celved any complaint regarding the work done. On 
the contrary, we have received many complimen- 
tary and appreciative statements regarding it. For 
instance, we gave the machinery of the Montana a 
very extensive overhauling. She left Hie Yard and 
cruised more than 50,000 miles on the severest 
kind of war work, after which she returned to 
the Navy Yard for certain other work but with 
verj little work on her machinery and nothing on 
any of the main items that bad been repaired here 
at her previous visit. Ask the Captain of any ship 
that has been here. He will tell you what the Yard 
lias done for bis vessel and how well it has done 
it. 

Our work has been accomplished only after over- 
coming a great many obstacles which are too nu- 



merous to mention in delail in this article. It 
seemed to us that every big thing we had to do had 
a big obstacle thrown in its way, and there was a 
continual light to obtain needed action and satis 
factory results. 

If some shops and many items of Important and 
commendable work have been omitted from this 
article it is simply because there is no space for 
any more except that it is believed the work of the 
submarine drafting force and the office and draft 
ing tones as a whole deserve special mention for 
their earnest and patriotic work. 

The Life Buoy believes that with relatively few 
exceptions the men and the women of the Yard 
have not only met but exceeded the war time de- 
mands made upon them, and we of Hie Navy Yard 
feel that we have the right to be a bit boastful of 
what we have done and of our contribution to- 
wards t lie winning of the war. 



FATE 

We cannot grasp the mighty key. 
That opens the chest of mystery; 
We cannot read our Maker's mind. 
Or loose the many cords that bind. 

We cannot tear away the years, 
That brings joys or scalding tears; 
We cannot break the giant chains, 
Of sin-cursed blood within our veins. 

We cannot pierce the gauzy veil,- 
To even see wherein we fail: 
We cannot understand the plan, 
Whereby man grinds his fellow man. 

Yet safe, and calm, our minds can rest, 

For whatsoever is, is best! 

And He who made and moulded man 

Can surely carry out His plan. 

So be ye bond or be ye free. 

What Is to be, will always be. 

William P. Young 

Structural Shop 



KNEW WHAT THEY'D CATCH. 

The twins had gone in swimming without 
mother's permission, and they anticipated trouble. 

"Well," said Tommy, philosophically, "we're 
both in the same boat, anyhow." 

"Yes," returned Ray, the humorist of the 
family, "but I'm afraid it's a whaleboat." — Boston 
Transcript. 



LIFE BUOY 



20 



DRIVING THE FIRST RIVET 
SUBMARINE S-8 



The riveting gang was composed as follows; — 

Capt. F. W. F. Wieber, Medical Corps) U. S. N., and 

Com. R. W. Ryden (Construction Corps) U. S. N. were 

At 10:30 Saturday, November 9, 1918, the first the riveters. Lieut. H. F. McCarthy, (Construction 

rivet was driven in the keel of Submarine S-8. The Corps) U. S. N. was holder-on. Our Industrial Mana- 

construction of Submarine S-S v/ill be carried out in the ger's son, Mr. Lawrence S. Adams, Jr. was rivet passer. 

Franklin Ship House. The rivet heater was Mr. Joseph Lebenski. 




KKJHT ON 



world that he can. 



It's fun to tight when you know you are right and 
your heart is in it, too, 

Though the fray be long and the foe be strong and 
the comrades you have are few. 

Though the battle heat bring but defeat, and the 
weariness makes you reel, 

There's joy in life that can know such strife and the 
glory and thrill you feel. 

When the wise ones pant that you simply can't, it's 
fun for a fighting man 

To laugh and try with a daring eye. and prove to the 



And if you stick till your heart is sick, and lose when 
the game is done, 

It's fun to know that the weary foe paid dearly for 
what they won. 

It's fun to dare in the face of despair when the last 
lone chance seems gone, 

And to see hope rise in the angry skies like a prom- 
ise of rosy dawn; 

For victory's sweet when it crowns defeat, and you 
learn this much is true, 

It's fun to fight when you know you're right and 
your heart is in it, too! — Exchange. 



21 



LIFE BUOY 



SAFETY IN CRANE WORK. 

The use of cranes is necessarily attended by 
danger, but most of the accidents are avoidable, if 
proper preventions are taken. 

The craneman should never permit any em- 
ployee to ride on the load nor on the slings or hooks. 
Slings, chains, cables or hooks should never be al- 
lowed to drag along the floor of the shop and the 
crane should never be started until the chains, 
hooks or slings are entirely clear of the floor or 
ground. Slings or hooks may become caught on 
some obstruction and cause an accident. — Crane- 
men should never try to straighten a load by swing- 
ing it against a car, building or wall. 

When a heavy load is to be handled, the crane- 
man should first raise it a few inches to find out if 
it is well balanced and to make sure no undue stress 
is thrown upon any part of the slings. If anything 
is wrong with the brakes or with the adjustment of 
the slings, the load should be lowered at once. 

Hookers should avoid trying to loosen a cable 
by pulling it down on the inruuiiing side of the 
block. Fingers may be caught between the sheave 
and the chain or cable and be cut off or badly 
crushed. It is far safer to grasp the outrunning 
side and pull up and away from the sheaves or 
pulleys. Hookers should keep well away while the 
chains or cables are being withdrawn from under 
the load. 



The old man. however, was equal to the oppor- 
tunity. He at once left the platform, went down to 
the boy and threw his arms about him, as soon 
as he knew his mistake. Then the boys cheered 
both the professor and the cripple. From that day 
on all were the best of friends. 

Most of the troubles of life are misunderstand- 
ings. All the conflicts between employers and em- 
ployees would clear themselves if each understood 
the other's point of view. It's all a question of mis- 
understanding. Neither side knows the facts. 

Like the old professor, your employer doesn't 
know your troubles. He's cross because some of 
you men are not producing more and he is too busy 
to inquire the reason. You — on the other hand — 
know why these fellow-workmen of yours are not 
doing more; but you have not taken the trouble to 
tell your employer. 

Capital and labor today are just where the old 
professor and his class were when he was insisting 
that the cripple boy put up his right hand, and the 
class were getting ready to hiss. I am sure that if 
both sides could understand each other, both would 
work together as did the professor and his class 
after they got together. 



THE OLD PROFESSOR. 

John Stewart Blacking was a famous professor 
in a boys' college at Edinburg, Scotland. As he got 
old, he often became cross and very impatient with 
his pupils. 

At the opening session, one year, he asked all 
the boys who had notebooks to raise their right 
hand. One chap raised his left hand. Old Pro- 
fessor Blacking, seeing this, repeated his request 
by calling out again, but much more loudly: "All 
you who have notebooks raise your RIGHT hand!" 

Again the same one boy raised his left hand. 

At the sight of this, the old professor burst out 
in anger to the boy: "Hold up your RIGHT hand, 
not your left!" 

To this the boy murmured something, but still 
persisted in holding up his left hand. Then the 
professor became furious and yelled to the boy: 

"You stubborn fool! Put down your left hand 
and hold up your right ! " 

This command the boy obeyed, but he held up 
only a stump. He had been born without any right 
hand. As he held up this withered arm the other 
boys hissed the professor. They had known all the 
time why their comrade had not held up his right 
hand as the professor had demanded. They could 
hold out no longer. They simply exploded. 



Let me be a little kinder, let me be a little blinder, 
To the faults of those about me, let me praise a 
little more, 
Let me be, when I am weary, just a little bit more 
cheery. 
Let me serve a little better, those that I am striv- 
ing for. 
Let me be a little braver, when temptation bids me 
waver. 
Let me strive a little harder, to be all that I 
Should be. 
Let me be a little meeker, with the brother that is 
weaker, 
Let me think more of my neighbor, and a little 
less of me. 

— F. B. SILVERWOOD. 



HUMAN BODY MUST HAVE PLENTY OF 
IRON 

Rat plenty of spinach and egg yolks," says 
the doctor. 

His languid patient is pale-cheeked and evi- 
dently needs a tonic. There is reason to suspect 
that her blood is lacking in iron. 

A few years ago the physician in such a case 
would have written a prescription for tincture of 
iron, to be taken three times a day. but the medical 
science is getting away from drugs. 

White of egg is almose pure albumen, but the 
yolk is a highly complex substance, the iron it con- 
tains being doubtless provided for the benefit of 



LIFE BUOY 



22 



the developing chick. If only the press of this country would con- 
Lean beef, the cereal grains, beans and peas, sistently take up its true position and stand for the 
apples, prunes and dandelion greens are rich in unity of the principle of good, as against party 
iron. Milk contains it, else young babies would politics and personal conflict, then we should be end- 
soon die. Beef juice is good for children a little ing the strife within march calmly and steadfastly, 
older, partly on account of the iron there is in it. one and all, along the road to victory. 



One naturally asks. What is the iron for? 



It is time that another voice should be heard 



The answer is that it seems to be essential to above the storm, the still, small voice of truth; 



healthy cell growth. But first and foremost it is 
required by the red corpuscles of the blood, which ear 
are the carriers of oxygen. If the supply of it be 
not adequate, the lack is made manifest by the 
pale lips and cheeks. There is a condition of "an- 
emia." 

- -Philadelphia Public Ledger. 



that voice which is ever ready to guide the listening 
'this is the way; walk ye in it." 

— Chicago Daily News 



TRUST THAT GIVES LIFE 

Freedom's sons go forth to fight for the cause, 
and in their hearts there is not the fear of death, 
but the belief that they must die. We are told 
"Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make 
you free.'' 

The truth is that we are to live for freedom, 
not to die for it. Freedom divorced from truth Is 



RAILROADING HAZARDS. 

One of the most important duties of engine- 
men is to keep a close and constant watch on the 
track ahead. 

Every engineer should personally inspect his 
engine before leaving the roundhouse; gagecocks 
should be tried from time to time and too much re- 
liance should not be placed upon the waterglass. 
The bell should always be rung before the engine is 
started and likewise rung at all points where re- 
quired. 

If it becomes necessary to go under the engine 
at any time, the lever should be placed in the 



an impossibility. The thought that we hold in 
our minds — that happens sooner or later. To go centra i position, the cylinder cocks should be open- 
forth to fight for a cause, to face death fearlessly, edi and aI1 ot her possible mechanical preventions 



and yet expect to die — that is manly bravery of a 
high order. 

But to go forth to fight for a cause and to 
know and trust that there is a power which can 
keep you alive, even though you were in the midst 
of death — that is sublime faith and courage, which 
both protects and multiplies the actual strength of 
the fighter. 

If the difference between these two ideas could 
be realized by all those who go to the firing line, 
and by their mothers, wives and sisters, and friends 



should be taken. 

Switchmen should never stand between the 
rails when about to board a moving engine. 

When making up. brakemen should not go be- 
tween cars to couple them, nor attempt to kick the 
drawbars into place, nor to push them into place 
by hand when the cars are about to come together. 

Never crawl under a car when passing from 
one part of the yard to another as the cars may 
start suddenly. 

All conditions that are likely to cause accidents 



at home, then we should find that victory is crown- snou]d be promptly reported to the Safety Engineer. 

ed, not with a roll of honor which tells of death but Suggestions are requested. 

with a roll of honor whose members live to see the 

first fruits of their faith. 

The most faithful mother, wife or sister is she 
who is able to silence her great anxiety, and who 
believes and trusts that our soldiers can be returned 
to us living whole. 

If these thoughts could be made to become a 



AN IMPOSSIBLE AMOUNT. 

Some negroes were discussing the death of a 
small darky. 

The cause of the disaster was clear enough to 



part of the daily life of the whole nation, that is one of the men. 



the greatest war service which can be offered by 
any individual to his government, because the good 
faith of the nation would be making a direct and 
sincere appeal to that unseen power which shapes 



"De po chile died frum eatin' too much watah- 
million," he explained. 

One of the others looked his doubts. 

"Huh," he grunted scornfully, "dar ain't no 



our ends only for good. The result would show in such thing as too much watah-million." 

each person's work, and the collective influence "Well, den," remarked the first, "dar wasn't 

would appeal as an inspired "whole." enuff boy." 



23 



LIFE BUOY 



UNITED WE STAND. 

At the request of President Wilson, a United War 
Work Campaign has been formulated and perfected and 
between the days of November 11th and 18th, 1918. an 
opportunity will be presented to all employees of this 
Yard to subscribe towards a fund which is to be used 
for providing comforts and welfare work for the boys 
over there. 

The Cooperating Organization are as follows: 
National War Work Council of the Y. M. C. A. 
War Work Council of the Y. W. C. A. 
National Catholic War Council (K. of (' ) 
.lewish Welfare Hoard 
War Camp Community Service 
American Library Association 
Salvation Army 

Even though actual peace should occur, which every 
one of us sincerely hopes may quickly transpire, it will 
probably take from one to two years before "our boys" 
over there return. In the meantime the hoys over 
there must be kept interested by welfare work which 
can only be carried successfully on, through the in- 
dividual subscription of each of us over here. When 
one considers what "our boys" are doing for those re. 
maining behind, it is little enough for us to subscribe. 

In keeping with the real American spirit of the hour. 
it is sincerely hoped that each and every employee will 

give freely. 



DON'TS FOR PIPE FITTERS 

Don't fail to warm steam lines thoroughly be- 
fore turning on pressure. 

Don't fail to open all drips in order to drain 
line. 

Don't do any work on steam, air or gas lines 
under pressure. Reduce the pressure until there 
is no danger of an explosion. 

Don't fail to lock valve or hang a danger sign 
on valve when working on steam, air or gas lines. 

Don't draw the bolts on one side of a joint as 
it causes an uneven strain, which may cause an ex- 
plosion. 

Don't open a joint in any line until you are 
positive all pressure is off. 

Don't put full weight of body on chain tongs 
or wrench when working overhead, as should chain 
break or wrench slip, you might fall. 

Don't work on loose planks, resting in danger- 
ous positions. Examine scaffolds and ladders care- 
fully. He sure thej are safe. — Safety Bulletin, In- 
land Steel Co. 



"And still they gazed and still the wonder grew 
That one small head could carry all he knew." — 

Brooks. 
"His thoughts are in the rugged rocks, 
'Tis best to listen when he talks." — Smith. 
"He trudged along unknowing what he sought, 
And whistled as he went for want of thought." — 

Clough 
"He loves to chat with the girls, I know. 
'Tis the way with men, they are always so." — 

Hinkley. 
"The tongue is like a race horse which runs the 
faster the less weight it carries." — 

Helen Waterhouse 
"Sang in times of deep emotion, 
Songs of love and songs of longing. "- 

.Mary .Murphy. 
She has two eyes so soft and brown. 
Take care! 
She gives a side glance and looks down. 
Beware! Beware!" — Marion Leach. 
"Happy am I. from care I am free. 
Why aint they all contented like me?" 

Alberta Le Blanc, 
"Can you tell me of some good plan. 
For me to win a nice young man?" Edna Kane. 
"Her very frowns are fairer far, 
Than smiles of other maidens are." 

Margaret Keardon. 
"We join ourselves to no party that does not carry 
the (lag and keep step to the music of the I'nion." 

Yard Master'sOf fire 



QUOTATIONS APPLIED. 



SUPPLIES. 

COME ONE— COME ALL 

PUBLICITY MANAGER. BARNEY PAUL 

PROGRAM 

Messrs. Ford and Robins present their Inimit- 
able and farcical, Nigger Minstrel Show direct from 
a three minute run on Government Street. Kittory. 
Maine. Thanksgiving Day at two-thirty, for the 
benefit of those who cannot see. 

OLIO 

The Old Home Town (small town farce) Mes- 

sers Rohhins. F o r d 

Sprague. Misses Heeney. 

llobhs. Jennings. (From 

actual life as experienced 
in Kittery. I 
FIRST ATT 
End Men Mrs Whitcomb an 1 Mr. 

Quimby 

Miss Badger and I'M 

Chesley 



"Who st, mIs my purse, steals trash " .1. II Interlocutor 



Rose 



Miss OamiH Collins 

Steve Williams. Chi 



LIFE BUOY 



24 



Banjo Solo 
Nigger Folk Dance 



Cook and Bottle Washer. 
Mrs. Whitcomb. 
Mr. Quimby. 
(Miss Mulcahy, pianist.) 
"Little Myrtie," Song Miss Manson. 
"The Files," Recitation Miss Hegner. 
Scotch Folk Song Miss Mulcahy. 

"There's a Lock on a 

Chicken Coop Door" Beatrice Hanna. 
LOCALS, QUIBS, ETC. 
Misses Badger and Collins and Mr. Chesley 
"When Barney Kissed the Blarney Stone," Song 

Miss Badger 
"Our Section," Patriotic Song Ensemble 

"Meat Me in the Back Yard, Johnny, That's Where 
I Hang Out" "Sister 

SECOND ACT 
Nigger Town Jazz Band Miss Jordan, Mrs. Her- 
bert, Miss Langill, Mrs. 
Curran, Miss Mulcahy, 
Miss McCarthy. 
LOCAL QUIBS 
"Little Bright Spot," Song Miss Badger 

"When the Mrs. Burned the Bacon." Recitation 

Mr. Robbins 
"Oh for the Life of the Rolling Main," Song 

Miss Price 
"I'm the Sweetheart for a Sailor Boy," Song 

Miss Wilson 
Whistling Piece, Ensemble Mrs. Herbert, leading 
FINALE 
CURTAIN 
"Pa" certainly does enjoy his daily visits to 
the apple orchard. May we come, "Pa?" 

We have heard that the banjo player of the P. 
B. section is a jim dandy. 

Do you believe you are capable of keeping 
your feet out of each other's way in that nigger 
folk dance, "Quim?" 

"Myrtie" and Miss "Forget-me-Not" are very 
effic ; ent filers and are to be corr.plimented on 
the fine way in which the files are kept. 

"Barney" sure is some Publicity Manager, but 
our well known rotund figure of the Purchasing 
section surpasses him as a collector. 



BOAT SHOP NOTES 

In speaking of work we are doing some, 
These days system just begun, 
In Bernard's crew there are some men 
Who do their bit from end to end. 

There is Mr. Clifford, who has left us now, 
But his memory still is on our brow. 



There is Mr. Plaisted, old and gray, 
Does three day's work in just one day. 
The rest of the time he planes the decks. 
Or is stuffing putty in weather checks. 

There is Mr. Trott, who is seventy-one, 
If you can out do him you're going some, 
For when he is out on some other case, 
It takes two men to fill his place. 

The little "Mink" works all the while, 

And on his face he wears a smile, 

I cannot get this quite to rhyme, 

But he always moves on schedule time. 

There is Uncle Sim he puts on brass, 

His songs are sweet but they cannot last, 

Of the other boys, I'll make no note, 

But they are always ready for the other boat 

I hope and pray they'll do their best. 

To win this war and perfect rest. 

Things down stairs are going smooth, 
But we hope sometime it may improve. 
That I've been sent one flight below. 
I'm sorry the truth to know. 

"Down Easter." 
WE WONDER: 

If Sam has an automobile. 

If Evelyn ever hurries. 

What the shop store will do without Mr. Paul. 

When Lura stops chewing gum. 

What do you say, Bobbie, have a chew? 
A man from the boat shop named Lear, 

Was very fond of his B 

One night Bob sat, 
On his new silk hat. 

And his wife took him home by the ear. 

Tuesday, October 28, 1918, is a day that will 
long be remembered by the employees of the Boat 
Shop. The Liberty Loan Champion flag was pre- 
sented by Constr. Ferrell who in a few well chosen 
words expressed his appreciation to the employees 
of this shop. Our shop captain Mr. Charles F. 
Tucker accepted the flag for the Boat Shop and 
gave us all some sound advice on our bonds which 
we have bought. It is hoped that we all will follow 
this advice and not dispose of our bonds until nec- 
cessity compels us to. Great credit is due our 
Shop captain for his untiring efforts towards the 
success of the Boat Shop in this loan and he can 
rest assured that they are appreciated by the boys 
of the Boat Shop. This was readily shown by the 
good will expressed in the three cheers which were 
given him at the close of the presentation. His 
Honor Governor Keyes of New Hampshire, gave us 
a very interesting and instructive talk. His re- 



25 



LIFE BUOY 



marks were timely and were well taken by all of 
us. He was followed by Col. Bartlett of Portsmouth 
whom we all know. He gave us some good advice 
which it is hoped we all can follow. At the close 
of Mr. Bartlett's remarks, Governor Keyes, Con- 
gressman Burroughs, Colonel Bartlett and the 
Honorable Mr. Moses, ex-Minister to Greece held 
a reception. The boys of the Boat Shop formed a 
line and had the pleasure of meeting and shaking 
hands with the above mentioned guests. It has 
been a long time since the Boat Shop has had such 
a pleasant meeting and we will always remember 
it as such. 



SHORT CIRCUITS 

The Fourth Liberty Loan drive is now over 
and it certainly did go over the top in 79. 

Our patriotic parade was a decided success. 
It was led by Mr. Marshall who convulsed his audi- 
ence with his fancy steps. He was followed by Mrs. 
Gray who carried the flag, assisted by Miss Kane 
and Miss Fenton. The other members of the Liber- 
ty Loan Committee were next in line and after them 
came the Shop band. Mr. Marshall made a speech 
concerning the drive which was received with great 
enthusiasm. Mrs. Gray sang the Star Spangled 
Banner in a very pleasing manner. 

ADVICE to the two Annas. Don't cry and 
don't fall down when the procession goes by. 

They say the Dover girls are saucy. How 
about it Miss Fenton? You know you shouldn't 
get hot-headed when they ask you questions. 

What's the difference between Bill O'Brien 
and Roy Abrams? Roy throws some ball and Bill 
throws the Claremont Gazette. 

On the afternoon of Oct. 17, a flag raising was 
held at the main entrance to the Buffing Room of 
this shop. This flag contains three stars in honor 
of Carl Hanscom, Samuel Wood, and Nelson Hogue. 



Ed. called special attention to the usefulness of the 
shoes, demonstrating how water, while entering the 
top, could be let out by passing through a hole in 
the bottom. Mr. Riley has styled these shoes Self- 
Bailers, and has already applied for a patent for 
same. 

At the conclusion of Mr. Riley's speech, Mr. 
O'Leary stepped to the center of the room, and in 
a few well spoken words presented Mr. Jenkins with 
a wrist watch with inscription on the back which 
read, "From the gang." With the watch, a fountain 
pen was also presented to Mr. Jenkins. 

Cliff, was much surprised, but after recovering, 
responded in a few words, thanking one and all con- 
cluding in saying: "They can't get the Kaiser any 
too soon for me, so I can again be back with the 
gang." Good luck Cliff. 

Two days later we received the sad news that 
Gordon Barter, another one of our members was 
called for immediate service to report at New York 
for the Flying Corps. On his departure, Mr. Barter 
was presented with a sum of money. Gordon Eliott 
left with the best wishes of all. A safe and speedy 
return, Gordon. 



RADIO FLASHES ELECTRICAL SHOP 
BUILDING 89 

On the morning of October 23rd. the Electrical 
room at the Franklin Ship House was the scene of 
a very sad occasion, the departure of Clifford Jen- 
kins from our midst being the cause. Before leav- 
ing for Fort Williams, where he has been called to 
enter the service of his Country, he was remember- 
ed with a few choice gifts which were presented to 
him by Mr. Edward Riley. Among the gifts were 
some very useful implements of War, including a 
gun, canteen, helmet, and last but not least, a pair 
of trench shoes which Mr. Riley himself has worked 
on from the beginning of the war trying to perfect. 



CAMOUFLAGE MIXTURES. 

The question has been asked frequently of late 
relative to whom has been given the charge of the 
painting on the O-l. Which one is it, John Hoffman 
or George Young? 

It is sincerely hoped that our Shop Clerk, Miss 
Gertrude O'Brien, will come through with flying 
colors when she takes her examinations. 

If a few more men like Buck had taken bonds 
on the same plan as he followed we would have been 
still going over the top. 

We all came across as usual in the same old 
way when we were asked to double up. The ans- 
wer from every man was. "Sure, I will dig." 

We wish to congratulate the Boat Shop and 
the Submarine Drafting Room on the most excel- 
lent showing they made. 



ANVIL SPARKS. 

Bill Critch tells us that there are no clams dug 
from South Boston Flats. 

Dan Cupid is certainly working over time. Mr. 
Richards and Mr. Forbush are the Happy Men. 

J. Baker is next on the list also one of our 
Quartermen. 

William Flanigan is to take a few lessons in 
the art of cooking. 

One of the Office girls had a birthday recently. 
We wish they would come oftener Peggy, the candy 




DO IT NOW ! 
WHAT? 

BUY THAT NEW PIANO 
AND SAVE MONEY 

Pianos are scarce at the factories. They will be SCARCER SOON 
^KTD THEY'E GOING UP 

DO IT NOW AT 

MONTGOMERY'S M SI{> C P ST g RE 

PIANOS FOR RENT 

EVERYBODY'S STORE 

141 CONGRESS ST. - - Y. M. C. A. BLDC. 
PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

NOW COMES THE WINTER SEASON WHEN EVERYTHING IS MOST NEEDED 

We were exceptionally lucky to secure our merchandise at old prices, 
we therefore suggest that Every Man Woman or Child reading this "Ad" 
should not overlook this opportunity of the good values this COMING 
SEASON in Ladies and Men's wearing apparel. 

EVERYBODY'S STORE 

"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



27 



LIFE BUOY 



was excellent. 

At next election Edna will be old enough to 
vote. 

Mark Redmond reports that he is always ready 
to help the girls eat their lunch. 

Some of the boys took too much medicine and 
others not enough. 

Hank Linscott is preparing for a very hard 
winter. 

The girls say that although Walter is a smart 
boy he does not know everything yet. 

The boys who called on Mr. and Mrs. Richards 
recently appreciated the hospitality shown them. 

Now that the Liberty Loan went over the Top, 
make sure fellows, you push the War Savings 
Stamps over also. 

Did you ever keep her waiting Flanigan, as you 
did Soule? 

It must have been a long lonesome trip to 
Lowell, Prank. 



DITTY BOX SAYINGS 

We feel proud of our success during the fourth 
Liberty Loan drive, for we proved 100 per cent 
loyal. This is the more commendable for we have 
done without the aid of overtime. 

Our Shop is a busy place, has been since the 
War began, and will be until the Kaiser becomes 
just a plain Bill. 

If a man is forty-five until he is forty-six, how 
old is a new born babe? 

Information wanted: Where the saving of 
coal comes in by lighting fires and lights one hour 
earlier under the daylight saving plan, if the time 
were not to be changed. 

Hughy says it isn't a bowling alley and we are 
unable to say what it is for the inside finish does 
not reveal the secret. 

William recently went about the Yard and on 
the Ships as usual — when it came bedtime and he 
sat down to take his shoes off — behold, he had his 
slippers on! 

Last spring when the clock was set ahead an 
hour. Jim forgot he had done it and got down to 
the station an hour ahead of time. It is hoped Jim 
will not forget to push the hands back, otherwise, 
you might lose a day Jim. 

We have a man in the Shop who never makes 
a mistake, so he told someone in the Shop recently. 
However, the inevitable happened, for while he was 
recently taking out two dollars' from a five dollar 
bill that was owed to him. he returned seven dollars 
instead of three. When informed of his mistake, he 
tried to get out from under by saying it was a cleri- 



cal error. 

Every time a tax is put on anything, you hear 
the old bugbear — the consumer has got to pay It. 
Naturally, he has — for the consumer pays for every- 
thing but his funeral expenses. 



SUBMARINE BUILDERS. 

Too much credit for the successful way in 
which Building 9 2 went over the top in the recent 
Liberty Loan drive, cannot be given Mr. Gardiner 
and his assistants. 
HEARD IN THE SHOP. 

"Is Grace in today?" 

"I'm going to ask for more money." 

"What do you say to going to Haverhill to- 
morrow?" 

"How does he get away with it?" 
'Why does Smith need gloves?" 

"When will a young lady take Winn's place in 
the Weigh House?" 

"The Liberty Bond sales are over, I wonder 
what Ralph is after today?" 

"Have you seen the chap with the white 
pants?" 
WE WONDER. 

Why G has moved to Dover. 

Where Nick, our leading man riveter got that 
new suit. 

Why two of the youn? ladies in our office take 
a walk every noon. "Fess" up, girls. 

Who hit Swan? 



KNOTS AND SPLICES, BLDG. 7. 

Since the entrance of the girls in Building 7. 
there has been a marked change in our policy, for 
hereafter we intend to send in "Life Buoy" notes 
every month. 

According to 1 Mr. Gilker, "That callous has not 
started yet." How perfectly horrid of him to say 
this! 

There appears to be a novelty dancer here in 
Building 7. She perforins during the noon hour. 
How about it Mrs. M? 

A collection is to be taken shortly to buy a 
muffler for Kitty. 

According to Leavitt, there are a lot of girls in 
Kittery whom he likens to "strawberry blonds." 

Building 85 is sure some busy place. Mrs. 
Tarbox has surely got the others beaten. 
WE WONDER 

Who the gentleman is that Kitty rides home 
with. 

Why the girls in the Riggers Room are so 
popular. 



"A Penny Saved 
Is a Penny Earned" 

We can help you save a 
good many pennies on 

HOUSE FURNISHINGS 
See Mr. WOOD 

99 Penhallow St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



THE "BUSY CORNER" STORE 



But Never Too Busy To Fill Your 
Prescriptions and Fill Them Right 

OUT OF TOWN PATRONS ARE 

WELCOME TO WAIT FOR THE 

CAR AT OUR HOUSE 

BENJAMIN GREEN 

THE DRUGGIST 

INSURANCE and REAL ESTATE 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

LOWEST RATES BEST FORMS 

C E. TRAFTON 



35 Pleasant St. 



Opposite Post Office 



YOU AUGHT TO KNOW 

DENNET and MCCARTHY'S 

is tiiis'rkst place to buy 

Overalls, Shirts, Hosiery 



use: gas f-or 

lighting, heating and cooking 

PORTSMOUTH GAS CO- 

ALWAYS AT YOUR SERVICE 



Dr. s. F. A. Pickering 
- - dentist - - 

TELEPHONE CONNECTIONS 

OFFICE HOURS 32 CONGRESS STREET 

8 TO 12 A. M. 2 TO 5 P. M. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



BROOKS MOTOR SALES 

PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



FORD SERVICE 



Flllis BrOS. Men's and Boys' Shoes 

Fine Shoe Repairing congress st. tel. con. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



29 



LIFE BUOY 



What Mary, Frances, Anna and Laura have 
hidden away. 

Why Hazel from the Rigging room changed 
her name to Helen. 

Why Harold objects to perfumery. 

When Frances will learn to make a knot. 

What the attraction in New Durham is for 
Agnes. 

Why T. goes home so often. 

When Sam is going to get his change of gar- 
ment. 

Why Michael is missed. 

Why Elizabeth likes to wear that jumper. 

When our timekeeper will stop talking politics. 

Why Rose likes the Riggers loft better than 
the Electrical Shop. 

Why the boss hates to go home when the 
whistle blows. 

Why "Blondie's" eyes ache. 

When Bill is going to get his annual haircut. 

Why Jonesy stopped wearing trouserettes. 

Why the men are in so much apparent con- 
fusion in our Shop. 

When Walter will have his pearls fixed. 
To Our Dear Friend Marie. 
'Tis sweet to be remembered, 
And a pleasant thing to find, 
That though you may be absent, 
You still are kept in mind. 



the rope should not have been there. 

Mary thinks that Louie is right there on dem- 
onstrating the gentle art of making love. 

Dan Cupid has shot his arrow into the heart 
of Ellen White, now she is receiving the congratu- 
lations and well wishes for a happy married life. 

It is reported our friend from Epping has given 
little Willie the mitten, but she produced the gloves. 

Viola has her ups and downs along with her 
troubles on the elevator. 

We wonder why the U. S. S. Bridgeport is "over 
there" so long, Mary is getting anxious. 

Good morning Sweetness. Does that sound 
familiar Catherine? 

Well boys, have you met our new office girl? 

We are all sorry to hear of the forced absence 
of our Timekeeper, Miss Abbott, we hope she is im- 
proving. 

The employees of the shop extend their sympa- 
thy to Leadingman E. B. Austin. 

We enjoyed a call a few evenings ago on our 
new President at his home, true hospitality marked 
the evening's pleasure. 

All hope soon to make another good time sure 
to come. 

When we learn that the apples have been 
pressed, a charter for the green car from the owner 
is in order, merrily climb the hills to So. E — . H. 
L. S. host of the evening. 

When you call to see us in shop C. "Notice the 
sparks fly." 



PAN ROASTINGS 

The many friends of A. I. Burke a sheet metal 
worker were sorry to learn of his death, the first of 
this month. Mr. Burke was a man of good charac- 
ter and well liked by the many employees of this 
shop. 

P. E. Foster has the sympathy of the employees 
of Shop No. 74 in his recent bereavement. 

Ira Coleman is improving from his recent ill- 
ness. 

The Association in the shop is getting started 
and the officers have been elected. 

There are a great many calls for both men and 
women for our shop at the present time. 

The girls in the Sheet Metal Shop say that the 
riveters in the Electrical Machine Shop have nothing 
on them for driving rivets. Just come over and watch 
us work. 

The Inspector said that the quality can't be 
beat. 

We understand that some folks think the girls 
are a little behind in some things, but we can cer- 
tainly do some hard knocking. 

Catherine had better watch her step, of course 



SHIPFITTERS SHOP. 

Shop K held two very enthusiastic rallies in 
support of the Fourth Liberty Loan, subscriptions 
amounting to $23,000, were collected at these meet- 
ings, whereby our final total was raised to 128 a 
rate that we have never before reached on any loan. 
Amounts that looked large in former loans were 
duplicated and larger subscriptions were received 
than ever before. A great spirit of patriotism was 
shown, and every one helped the cause along. Dur- 
ing the Saturday Noon Rally, Mrs. Gray sang the 
Star Spangled Banner, while the audience joined 
in on the chorus, while later, a band of fellow 
workers played patriotic and popular music. 

Mr. Sheppard, as one of the committee spoke 
of the results that were wanted and the shop went 
over the top with a "bang." During a little lag in 
enthusiasm Mr. J. R. Philbrick gave a very stirring 
call to duty for the cause, and so many men wanted 
the honor of being the last subscriber that we called 
the same a draw. 

Kittery answered the call through J. Philbrick, 



HENRY PEYSER &, SON 

16 TO 20 MARKET ST. 

For more than forty years Portsmouth's leading 
Store for Men's and Boys' apparel 

RUGS, DRAPERIES, FURNITURE COVERINGS 

THE QUALITY STORE 

MARGESON BROS. 



Vaughn St. 



Telephone 570 



PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



FRED B. COLEMAN 

APOTHECARY 

Corner Congress and Vaughn Sts. 
PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 


If you desire to buy or sell Real Estate call, 
telephone or write 

H. I. CASWELL AGENCY 

Congress St. TELEPHONE 478-W Portsmouth 


PEOPLE'S MARKET 

DEALERS IN 

BEEF, PORK & PROVISIONS 

COR. DANIEL AND PENHALLOW STREETS 
Telephone Connection Portsmouth, N. H. 


SINCLAIR GARAGE 

HORTON SERVICE 

Telephones 282-W 81205 

Corner Richards Ave- & Middle St. 

Portsmouth, N. H. 


S- S- TRUEMAN 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 


JOHN O'LEARY 

KITTERY and NAVY YARD EXPRESS 

GENERAL TEAMING 
Tel. Con. Portsmouth, JM. H. 


TELEPHONE 651 

83 Bow St. Portsmouth, N. H. 


If you want to be dressed up to the Minute 
from head to foot in dress and work clothes 
come in to see 

LOUIS ABRAMS & GO. 

38-40 Daniel St. Portsmouth, N- H. 



U 
R 

s 

T 

R 
E 


ENLIST ACAINST THE HICH COST OF LIVING 

"TRADE AT THE CO-OPERATIVE STORE" 

Clean, fresh meat, groceries and provisions at reasonable . 
prices. 

Every stock holder has equal rights, and the store is man- 
aged for the benefit of all workmen. 

M. T. C. CO-OPERATIVE ASSOCIATION 

Market St. Portsmouth, N. H. ;i 


ONE 
FOR 

all: 

ALL 
FOR 
ONE 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



31 



LIFE BUOY 



J. Grant, C. Miles, Kimball and others. 

Redden recited a very sentimental piece of 
poetry, but his voice changed and the crowd could 
not get it. 

It took Miss Hilton to sell bonds to a few Dover 
boys; Pete's hand went up awful slow though, and 
Libby tried to find a hole in the floor. 

Littlefield and Roy Moody certainly placed 
Moody, Maine on the Map. 

Tufts answered every time he was called on. 

Quite a number of notables "holed" in the tool 
room, but they had to make a noise like pledging 
when the smoke was too thick for them. 

A certain quarterman had his head all swarth- 
ed in bandages, Saturday afternoon, after he had 
totaled his pledges, he could not seem to remember 
how he went so far, but the pressure was there and 
he was under it. 

The Portsmouth crowd threw pocketbooks, 
bank books, old stockings, and all their other saving 
paraphenalia on the platform. 

Altogether it was a great get together meeting. 

There are about 700 reasons why the regular 
identifier likes his job at the "Shop K" gate. There 
was no pleasure for the substitute identifier, with 
the glass below freezing, and only "B. V. D'S" and 
the smiles of the "700 reasons" to keep him com- 
fortable. 



PATTERNS. 

Although the baseball challenge that the sub- 
marine draftsmen issued to the pattern shop did 
not materialize, perhaps they would be just as an- 
xious to take a chance with the bowling team that 
is soon to be formed. 

At last O'Connor's weakness has been discover- 
ed. They say it is girls whose first names are Mary. 
He has been interested in several lately, and this 
is one reason why he hurries from the shop so fast 
at 11.30 A. M. 

After learning that the girls in Kittery do not 
care for long walks, Brickman has now become in- 
terested in South Berwick. 

With the daily instructions from a girl in the 
Boiler Shop, Jim believes himself qualified for the 
U. S. Signal Corps. 

During the epidemic we all noticed that Neal 
acted as helper for the pattern shop undertaker. 

We wish to announce that our brother, H. Brit- 
ton, has started a primitive life similar to the one 
which Joe Knowles led. Brit has been camp- 
ing in the Eliot woods and already can hardly be 
recognized with his beard of three weeks growth. 

When you see Charlie Smith walking around 
the ship-house with an open book in his hand don't 



think that he is loafing, as he is trying to find the 
duties of a real ship-fitter from the "Ship-fitters 
Blue Book." 

VanHam was a little previous about setting 
the clocks ahead, and consequently found himself 
at the main gate the other morning at 6.15. Then 
Marion brought Van out of his trance and he had 
an hour to get his wind back after his run from the 
Camp. 

Jim Nelson is looked upon with much favor 
by an Eliot girl (even if he is a shipfitter). We 
think he must have profited by Van's mistake and 
bought a second hand Marine's uniform. 

Don't look forward to the invitations boys, as 
Carl has called the honeymoon trip to Germany off. 
(We will put it that way, as she will not see any 
more Life Buoys now) and is going to remain a 
Free Lance. His trips to Boston have ceased and 
he has even forgotten where the Kittery Postoffice 
is. 

Favorite Songs of the Boys. 

O, How I Hate to Get UP in the Morning — Twitchell 

With All Her Faults I Love Her still — Malmquist 

Long Boy — Cressey 

Put On Your Slippers and Fill Up Your Pipe— Hosfra 

Oh, Frenchy, Frenchy — Britton 

So Long Mary — O'Connor 

Buy a Liberty Bond for the Baby — Foye 

I didn't Raise My Boy to be a Soldier — Googins 

I'm a Twelve O'clock Fellow in a Nine O'clock Town 

— Metelli 
Down at the Husking Bee — Pray 
Aladdin had a Wonderful Lamp — Locke 
On the Back Seat of a Henry Ford — Pope 
Just a Small Town Sweetheart is the Girl For Me — 

Coulter 
Sometimes You Get a Good One and Some imes You 
Don't — Smith . 

If He Can Fight Like He Can Love — Nelson 
Some Day Somebody's Going to Get You — Peasley 
I Sent My Wife Away for a Rest — Pine 
I'm Old Enough for a Little Loving — Brickman 
To Europe on a Cattle Boat — Chandler 
WE WONDER: 

How so much dust gets on Eva's Skirt. 

How Pine likes bachelor life at Kittery Point? 

Why Bill likes to go to the Foundry so of en? 

What the attraction is in Haverhill for 
Lempke? 
Why Carl has become so quiet lately? 

What Bill Peasley and Cressey will do now 
that the beaches are closed? 

What's the matter with Pray's upper lip? 

Why South Berwick i3 such an interesting 
place for Neal and Van? 



A. D. S. 



IVI 



AT 



Adams Drug Store 

ON 

MARKET STREET 



IT'S NO USE 

Telling you a long story about advancing prices. 
You know as much about it as I do. But I want to 
tell you that I have a large stock of CLOTHS, bought 
to secure old yarns and dyes, at a much lower price 
than they can be found today. If you need a SUIT 
this year BUY IT NOW. 

WOOD, The Tailor 

15 PLEASANT ST. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



THE PORTSMOUTH FLOWER SHOP 

A. C. CRAIG, Manager 

FANCY CUT FLOWERS 

AGENT VICTOR TAI KTXG MACHINES 

4 Market Street Phone 960 

PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



M. P. ALKON & CO. 

DEALERS IN 

CHINA, CROCKERY & CLASS WARE 
NO- 27 MARKET ST , PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



BOU 

AGENT 

FOR LEADING FIRE AND LIABILITY INSURANCE COMPANIES 



GOV. ST. 



KITTERY, MAINE 



VSTE .A.RE AT YOTJP, SERVICE 

F. A. GRAY & CO. 

PAINTERS AND DECORATORS, 

30 & 32 DANIEL STREET, PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

"WALL PAPERS ancL PAINT SUPPLIES 



* 


. LOOK HERE 


m 


r A MINUTE! 


^M 



Congress and Fleet Sts. 



We can furnish a house from cellar to attic. 
Prices right in every branch of our business. 
u Why not step into our store and look over 
our many styles of furniture. It costs 
nothing to look, and it might be beneficial 
for us both. D. H. MC INTOSH 

PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



TYPEWRITERS FOR SALE & RENT 

J. E. DIMICK 

29 Tanner St. PORTSMOUTH. N. H. 

Telephone 837-M. 



E.PERCY STODDARD 

iisr su p,AnxroE 

REAL ESTATE 

7 Market Square PORTSMOUTH 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



33 



LIFE BUOY 



Outside Patternmakers or Student Ship-fitters. 

We thought the members of our outcast band 
were to be exempt from the sarcastic witticisms of 
our inside brothers, now that we have severed our 
connections with the Pattern Shop, and pull our 
checks in the Trade School. Judging from this 
column in last month's issue we will still continue 
to be knocked, but we are gone but not forgotten. 
Do your worst we are quite used to them now, as 
they have been coming hard and fast for the past 
two months. 

Swift, Talbot and Hanabury, who could not see 
the gold in this (Golden Opportunity) to learn a 
new business, have gone to the Fore River Plant as 
Patternmakers, and wish to be remembered to all 
their friends in the shop and about the Yard. 

Big Ed. Brickman, the young fellow from Wor- 
cester, has notified all his friends that they will not 
see much of him this winter as he is going to sub- 
merge every night. He claims that he needs a lot 
of sleep, as he is still growing. (Poor kid, I don't 
think we will ever raise that boy). The boys think 
it is the growth of his bank account which he is 
thinking of mostly. 

Romeo's morning salutation to his friends in 
the ship house, — Er-r-r Gee, ain't it k-ker-ker-cold; 
as he rushes to the heater boy's fire, crying 
("Kamerade.") 



SEEN THROUGH THE PERISCOPE. 

SUBMARINE DRAFTING ROOM. 

The Submarine Drafting Room sure is going 
over the top in the drive for the Fighting Fourth. 
At the date of writing, October 9, we are leading 
the yard with 159 per cent, which represents a total 
subscription of $5850. Owing to the fact that this 
room isn't considered as a shop, we are not en- 
titled to the Liberty Loan flag, but nevertheless 
the boys are quite enthusiastic, and the appearances 
lead to our running up over 200 percent before the 
close of the campaign. 

G. M. Clark has left for Durham, where he has 
enrolled in the Students Army Training Corps. 

C. S. Conlon of the U. S. Naval Aviation Forces 
is at present at Guifport, Miss., where he has started 
in training as a Machinist's Mate. 

D. J. Carey, former file-clerk, is now in the 
Chemical Warfare Service, and is now situated at 
Long Island City, N. Y. 

C. P. Yeomans is spending his vacation at his 
home in New Jersey. 

T. H. Weston is at his home in Broad Cove, Me., 
where he is gathering in the bountiful apple crop 
nn his farm. 



W. F. Newton, W. G. White and G. M. Clark 
are now the proud fathers of baby girls, Penelope, 
Althea and Virginia. 

J. B. Colliton has been out for two weeks 
respite, owing to the illness of his wife. 

Miss Mildred Lane of Melrose, Mass., has been 
employed as a Copyist Draftsman in this office. We 
sincerely hope that there will be a few more fair 
Draftswomen in the near future. 

Miss Frisbee of Kittery is now assisting Don- 
dero on the filing work. 

Scheirer has a new assistant in the person of 
Mrs. H. C. Preble of Ann Harbor, Mich. Mrs. Preble 
intends to take a two weeks trip to her home in a 
few days. 

Austin Googins has been acting Chief Ste- 
nographer during the absence of D. J. Long and A. 
H. Robinson. 

It is with pleasure that we learn of the pro- 
motion of Lieutenant-Commander H. S. Howard, 
Supt. of New Construction, to the rank of Com- 
mander. 

In all probability we will be moved very short- 
ly to new quarters in Building 81. There are just 
a few more things to do there to make the place 
ready for occupancy. 

It is expected that the Submarine O-l will be 
ready to be put into commission before a great 
while. 

Work is going right along on the S-3, and it 
seems that it will be launched sometime next month. 

Lieut-Commander N. L. Kirk has been out for 
a while with the Grippe. 

C. C. Coffin was confined to his home in Man- 
chester with the influenza for two weeks. 

Lieut. -Commander J. W. Lewis has been quite 
ill at his home. 

Commander H. S. Howard was out for a few- 
days feeling rather indisposed. 

Mr. Bacon has returned to the office, after be- 
ing subjected to the discomforts of influenza. 

W. F. Newton has been at his home in East 
Lyme, Conn. 

R. E. Potter was also caught in the spread of 
the prevailing epidemic. 

Ensign Parker of the O-l has been ill for some- 
time. 

Robinson, Wright, and Davidson of the Hull 
Drafting Room have been transferred here. 

M. S. Stephenson and K. Y. Wu were out sick, 
but have returned to work. 

WE WONDER — 

Who got THE rabbit when Scheirer, Powers 
and Grant went hunting a while ago. 



LIVE WIRE MEN WANTED 

To get acquainted with a live wire store, A store that KNOWS what men want and 
HAS it. Good, dependable merchandise at right prices, and good service. 



'MASTERCRAFT - ' AND LEOPOLD MORSES MEN'S CLOTHES "RIGHT POSTURE" BOYS 

CLOTHES ARROW COLLARS HATHAWAY SHIRTS CHENEY TIES 

WALK-OVER AND RALSTON SHOES FOR MEN-LION BRAND WORK SHOES-ARROW 

RUBBER BOOTS-TRIPLE TREAD RUBBERS 



N. H. BEANE&CO. 



5 Congress St. 



Portsmouth 



R. E. HANNAEORD 
FLORIST - - - 



CUT FLOWERS, DESICNS & DECORATIONS 

452 RICHARDS AVK. XKLEPnONJK CON. 



C. P. CARROLL 

Groceries, Meats and Provisions 



145 PENHALLOW ST. 
Tel. Connection 



PORTSMOUTH. N. H. 
Near A. S. L Ferry 



Hir, 



YORK COUNTY NATIONAL BANK" 

SERVICE 

Large Storage Vault and Safety Deposit Boxes for 
rent. Your checking account is solicited. In our 
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT we pay 4 Per Cent 
interest. 

YORK COUNTY NATIONAL BANK 

YORK VILLAGE, MAINE 



THE 
APOLLO LUNCH 



-oooggooo— 



HOME COOKING 

17 Congress St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



PHILBRICK'S PHARMACY 

AGENCY FOR 

BELLE MEAD SWEETS & JERSEY ICE CREAM 

67 Congress St. - - Portsmouth, N. H. 




The ACORN 



18 Market Square, Portsmouth, N. H. 



Is now ready to show its patrons the finest and rich- 
est assortment of Holiday Gifts in its history. 



Books, 

Stationery, 

Cai-ds, 

Magazine Subscriptions > wel1 P acked for mailin S 



I Particularly Suited to send 
to friends at a distance and 



HATS & MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

AT 

PARSONS THE HATTER 

PORTSMOUTH. N. H. : : PHONE 867-M 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY' 



35 



LIFE BUOY 



If Powers thought he could catch Maine rab- 
bits with salt. 

Why there has to be a few to be hammering 
all the time about the H. C. L. 

Why there should be any hesitation on the part 
of anyone in the Yard as to subscribing to the 
Fighting Fourth. 

Why Kittredge is always hanging around the 
water-tank. 

If that fur coat attracted Scheirer. 

Why Miller has such bad luck in playing whist. 

If he wouldn't get along much better if he 
dropped that anchor (Guggisberg). 

What Preble and Lord struck lately. 

If Ray has got his hay all in. 

If Stiansen will ever subdue his taste for those 
race-track neckties. 



SUPPLIES. 

The third time never fails, so here goes for 
our third attempt. 

There have been so many of the office force out 
sick that those who wero fortunate enough to es- 
cape the prevailing epidemic have been taxed to the 
utmost with work. 

Assistant Paymaster Shaw and Ensign Harvey 
Knight returned to work Monday after two weeks 
illness. 

Chief Yeoman Blaisdell has left this office and 
taken a position down stairs under En.,ign Harrison. 

Frances Brackett and Pauline Hobbs returned 
to work this week after an attack of the Spanish 
influenza. 

Louise Carney has taken a position down stairs, 
lieing employed by Lee Minard. 

There are quite a few new messenger boys, 
most of whom are school boys. 

Ellen Bowden still remains quite ill at her 
home on Commercial Street. It is the wish of her 
many friends here that she will soon be fully re- 
covered and able to report back to duty. 
WE WONDER:- 

VVhy Billie Burke always wears that happy 
smile. He must be thinking of that song "You're 
In Style When You're Wearing a Smile!" — Is that 
right Billie? 

What Little Polli will do now that the boys at 
the Fort are restricted, and Pierce Hall is closed. 

Who neighbor Blaisdell finds to tease down 
stairs — Whoever you are we sympathize with you. 
fair friend! 

Why Eddie looks so lachrymose of late — Cheer 
up, friend Eddie, some day you may be a lieutenant 
too, and then she will like you. 

How they get that way. — Its the oil heaters! 



It will certainly be fine when the pipes are up 
and the heat turned on. 

Why "Izzy" had the weeps last Wednesday 
when the Seattle went out. Cheer up, "Izzy" you 
will see him soon in New York. 

Why Rosie comes over on the eight o'clock 
boat. 

Why Mr. Robbins makes his girls work over- 
time. 

How our school teachers like their new posi- 
tions. 

Why the Colonel always drinks two cups of 
coffee. 

Where the coffee bags went to. 

Why "Pa" eats so many gum drops. 

If the Chief will name his son "Jr." 

How long Isabelle will be a seaman. 
SHAFTS OF LIGHT. 

It will soon be time to take off the jersey suits 
and slip on sweaters and put on the old-fashioned 
georgette and crepe de chine waists. 

It is impossible to eliminate the GERM in Ger- 
many without leaving ANY. 

Headlines from a New York paper — "Girl 
Drowned on the North Shore" — (Didn't she even 
get her feet wet?) 

It takes a very clever man to fool his wife dur- 
ing two long years of happy married life. 

It costs very little to get married, but it costs 
a whole lot more to stay married. 

One clever girl says — Would you rather be a 
colonel with an eagle on your collar, or a private 
with a chicken on your knee? 

Did you ever hear of a clock striking for 
shorter hours? 

The less said about the fuel situation the 
better; just saw wood. 

Speaking of substitutes, — the best substitute 
for a newspaper is a barber shop. 

She's a peculiar sort of girl who hasn't a fel- 
low at the front these days. 

If they stop the manufacture of pleasure auto- 
mobiles, the horse should worry. 

Monkey fur is said to be the latest novelty on 
suits — Fashion Notes. Quite appropriate, too. no 
doubt. 

The boys would play war oftener, but its so 
hard to get any of the gang to assume the role of 
the German Army. 

Let us not be up and doing. 
Rather let us bow to fate, 
If there is no street car coming, 
Let us stand and wait and wait. 

In the good old days, a cow and some chickens 
used to keep the family well supplied, but nowadays 



ALL KINDS OF STOVES FOR HEATING 

WOOD STOVES, COAL STOVES, OIL STOVES ETC. 

126-128 Market St. T HL b W LL1 oLR blOKL Portsmouth, N. H. 

A FEW OF OUR SPECIALTIES 

Hart, Schaffner and Marx Clothes, Stetson Hats, 
Manhattan Shirts, Fownes Gloves, Interwoven Stockings 

F. W. LYDSTON & CO. ^SoumS.S* 8 



JOHN SISE & CO. 
INSURANCE 



8 MARKET SQUARE 

PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



A. P. WENDELL & CO. 

Hardware, Paints and Tools 

Telephone 850 
2 Market Square Portsmouth, N. H. 



THEATRE SODA FOUNTAIN AND PORTSMOUTH FANCY BAKERY 

18 CONCRESS STREET 

Try our Hot Chocolate and a Jelly Doughnut -- Cream Puffs 

Cream Pie and all Kinds of Loaf Cake 

BALDWIN A. REICH, PROPRIETOR 



THE VERY BEST IN RUBBER GOODS 

"KANTLEEk" 

GUARANTEED FOR 2 YEARS 

BOARDMAN & NORTON 
^ fexcdflL Store, Portsmouth, N. H. 

Opp. Post Office 



MEN'S WOMEN'S & CHILDREN'S SHOES 
OF THE BETTER QUALITY 



C. F. DUNCAN & CO. 



9 Market St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



SAVE FUEL 

By using Electric Appliances for Cooking 

ROCKINGHAM COUNTY LIGHT AND POWER CO. 

V) Pleasant Street Portsmouth, N. H. 

~"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



37 



LIFE BUOY 



it takes a family to keep a cow and some chickens 
well supplied with feed at five cents a pound. 

Our idea is that if the draft act, fixing the ages 
between 18 and 45 were made to apply to women, 
we would be startled at the number of women in 
this country nearer 18 than 45. 

Now that Caruso is married he probably will 
have occasional spells when his harmony will be 
more or less discord. 



Since Mrs. Edgerly has changed her seat 
Hiram has been able to get out more blocks. 

If Anna, on table nine, makes many more 
button holes in men's pants during her noon hour, 
she will have all the boys in 79 coming to her in 
their time of need. 



SHAVINGS. 

Be careful Grant when you make another bet. 

Lost — a bicycle, return to Public Works De- 
partment. 

We wonder how Snooky and Cub have refrain- 
ed from dancing during the epidemic ban. 

Civil Service problem — If Kierman stays out 
two days on soft C, how long will he stay out when 
it is hard C? 

That camouflage stuff in the corner must be 
cut out 



SPARS AND BLOCKS. 

Mary, do tell what is so attractive around the 
ball ground during the noon hour. 

We are all wondering why Ruth likes to work 
with Harold, and why he is so attentive to her, own 
up Harold. 

Catherine says she would like especially well 
to go aboard the Southery, do tell us why Catherine? 

We would like to know why Carl visits Dover 
so often, and who the sweet little girl is he takes 
out to supper. Come now Carl tell us who she is. 

Why is it that Eva visits the Supply Depart- 
ment so often? 

What is ttie matter with Marion, we fear it is 
because she has lost her friend Carl. 

We all miss George, especially Lona. No one 
knows what the Office force saw on his last day 
with us. 

We are all very glad to have Hazel back with 
us again. 

How about the gunning party last week? We 
haven't seen any venison as vet Ask "Sid" Little- 
field, he usually knows about deer (dears) 

We hear the girls under 16 years of age are to 
be dismissed from the Yard, lets hope Florence will 
improve her time and rest, so when she becomes 16 
and again joins us, we can tell which way she is 
going. 

We wish to call your attention to the speed of 
Mary, the elevator girl, when the bell rings. 

If Veronica is seen coming with pencil and pad 
lor money, the men will be few and far apart in the 
future, so lets choose someone else for the next one. 



METAL SPLASHES. 

WE WONDER 

In what part of the Shop Springer really works 
for he seems to be everywhere. 

Why they closed the bond drive at the 7 5th. 
"Ask Edna." 

Why Mary was so excited after the Liberty 
Bond rally. 

Why Mr. Staples would like the job as watch- 
man at the depot. 

Why Mr. Strong shines his badge so often. 
What Alberta carried in the suit case. 
Why Mr. Palfrey transferred the bonds to Miss 
Elliot. 

Why our leadingman from Dover spends his 
Sunday evenings in Dublin. 

When Carey is going to demonstrate a little 
foot work as well as putting on the gloves. 
Why Billie is so downhearted. 
If Mack thinks the Government is going to buy 
him shoes. 

The Foundry mourns the loss of some of its 
most popular boys who died during the present 
epidemic. 

Congratulations are being extended to out- 
Chief on his return from his recent illness. 
Gingerbread, gingerbread. 
We're nearly dead from gingerbread; 
Oh, Mr. Hoover, hear us plead! 
And kindly change poor Charlie's feed. 
Mr. Frank Dennett as structural foreman has 
charge of the following work: 

In charge of all repairs, alterations, etc., to 
buildings and quarters. 

In charge of all excavation, blasting, grading, 
paving, concrete and brick work, pile driving, wharf 
building, street and sidewalk repairs and construc- 
tion etc. 

Operation of stone crusher, road roller and 
concrete mixer. 

In charge of yard crematory. 
In charge of farriers and farrier work. 
This division will handle, in general, all work 
outlined above pertaining to the trades of wood- 
workers, masons, stone cutters, plasterers, slaters, 
•farriers, helpers and laborers under the Bureau of 
Yards and Docks. 



THOSE WHO PAY CASH 

GET BETTER VALUE FOR THEIR MONEY 

Congress Street B p g m ^ \W |%J 9 <5» 

Portsmouth, N. H. ■-* ^^ V^ WW i^i «=9 Tel 194 

~ KERWIN SYSTEM SHOE STORES 
Portsmouth, Roxbury, Dorchester, Fall River, 

Framingham, (2) 

You have many advantages when you buy SHOES of 
THE KERWIN SYSTEM SHOE STORES 

WE BUY AND SELL FOR CASH FOR SIX LARCE 
NEW ENGLAND STORES 

Cash discounts from manufacturers, no charge accounts, no trading- 
stamps, less profits:— All combine to make our prices the lowest possible. 

KERWIN-LEACH CO. 

Portsmouth, N. H. - - - - 45 Congress St., 



FRUIT AND CONFECTIONERY, ICE CREAM AND SODA, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

TELEPHONE 29 w CATERING A SPECIALTY 43 CONGRESS street 



TIRE CONSERVATION 



Conserve on your tires by having those small cuts and stone bruises repaired 
n time and put a few more miles in the old shoe. Our VULCANIZING DE- 
TRIMENT is up-to-date. Fine line of new tires. 

OVERLAND AGENCY 
C. A. LOWD 

Service Station & Garage 338 Pleasant St. Portsmouth, N. H. 
"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



CARTER'S OVERALLS 

(Union Made) 
MEANS 

U A Heap o' Satisfaction" 

TO THE WEARER 

CARTER'S OVERALLS for men give the most service. Made from th e best quality 
denims, perfect fit, big and roomy. 

A STURDY OVERALL 

CARTER'S BLOOMERETTS for women. Made of fine quality KHAKI cloth, best for 
factory workers, protects the clothing, promotes safety. 

Look for the CARTER label. 

H. W. CARTER & SONS 

LEBANON, : : : NEW HAMPSHIRE 

THE OLDEST MANUFACTURERS OF OVERALLS IN THE U. S. A. 




!*.i,w.-:!,:!i. 



£55535SSS355S33355-asCCE£ 




I \ 



INDUSTRIAL DEPAMMNT 

LIFE BUOYi 





NAVY YARD 
PORTSMOUTH, N.H 



JANUARY and FEBRUARY, 1919 



tamimiiimiMim 



pgagasa a s ss aacs 

...... I. .'.... i .... i . ■-.....■. .i-.-V 





GARMENTS OF STYLE AND QUALITY 

Our preparations for Spring are made with unusual care this 
season— every fabric is critically judged for quality, every model 
selected from the standpoint of highest fashion without being extreme 
—and every garment tailored to the high standard this store requires. 
These are reasons why garments selected here give the utmost satisfac- 
tion in style, in wearing quality, and in price consistent with these high 
standards. 

Ladies Suits, Coats and Dresses, Waists, 
Skirts and Petticoats 



GEO. B. FRENCH CO. 

37 to 41 MARKET ST. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



'I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 




TTiewor/d? 

fiestmmie 

for ev&tjr fiome 



The magnificent voices of Caruso, De Luca, 
Farrar, Galli-Curci, Gluck, Homer, Melba, Schumann-Heink, 
McCormack, and the other great singers of the opera and concert stage. 

The masterful playing of Elman, Jascha Heifetz, Paderewski, Powell, 
Zimbalist and other noted instrumentalists. 

The Philadelphia Orchestra, Sousa's Band, Pryor's Band and other bands 
and orchestras of world-wide renown. 

All are yours right in your own home on the 



Victrola 



Come and select your Victrola today! Learn about our deferred payment plan. 



HasseTT's n 



MUSIC&ARTSHOPPE 
5 Congress St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

PORTSMOUTH : : NEW HAMPSHIRE 



United States Depository 
Resources Over Three Million Dollars 



THE BANK OF SERVICE 

We welcome new accounts and place the service of a 
modern bank at your disposal. 



BANKING HOURS: 



Daily 9 A. M. to 2 P. M. Saturdays 9 A. M. to 1 P. M. 

Saturday Evenings 6 to 9 



SYSTEMATIC 

swim; 

sri:iJ;s 

SUCCESS. 



Weekly deposits bring about the most satisfactory results. 

One Dollar opens an account. Home Banks furnished free 
to depositors. 



PISCATAQUA SAVINGS BANK, 

First National Bank Building. : : Portsmouth, N. H. 

Open Saturday Evenings 6 to 9 

"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 
LIFE BUOY 



Issued monthly for free distribution to employees of the Industrial Department of the 
Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H. 



VOL. II 



JAN. & FEB. 1919 



NOS. 1 & 2 



HISTORY U. S. NAVY YARD 

Portsmouth, N. H. 



The facts contained in this brief resume 
of the historj of the United States Navj 
Yard, Portsmouth, N. II., were abstracted 
from a hunk prepared by order of the Hon- 
orable Secretarj of the Navy, under the di- 
rection df the Bureau of Yards and Docks bj 
Mr. George Henry Preble, Rear Admiral, 
I. S. N. 

The firs! European visitor to the waters 
hi' the Piscataqua, mi which the Portsmouth 
in- Kitterj Navj Yard is located, of which we 
have anj knowledge was Martin Pring. In 
the spring of Kin:;. Martin Pring in com- 
mand nl two Vessels Of Small Size, Hie Speed- 
well and the Discoverer, left Bristol, Eng 
land, and after discovering Penobscot Hay 
and the York River, he continued his voyage 
and arrived at the Piscataqua River, which 
he railed "Westernmost River." 

In L605, Samuel de Champlain sailed from 
Havre de Grasse, in France, and on the 15th 
uf July following sighted the Isles of Shoals 
and the "Cape of I he Isles," now known as 
( Minnie's Point. 

Captain John Mason, a merchant of Lon- 
don, arrived al Hie Piscataqua in the month 
uf May, 1621, and erected a posl house at 
( Minnie's Point, which was named "Mason 
Hall." This is supposed In have been Hie 
first house built in New Hampshire. The 
second house was constructed by Humphrey 
Chadbourn in 1631, near the banks of the 
river and within Hie Limits of whal is now 
the City of Portsmouth. Other buildings 
were rapidlj erected. 

On September 6, 1030, Sir Perdinando 
Gorges, who was granted by Charles I, King 
nl' England, a vasl portion i>( the country of 
America, commonly called New England, 



commissioned Richard Vines Ins steward- 
general. Richard Vines, mi Maj ::, L645, 
granted the two islands now known as 
Vi\\ Yard and Seavey's Island and mi which 
the United States-Navj Yard in Portsmouth 
Harbor is situated, In Thomas Purnell, ship- 
wright, for a yearlj renl of two shillings and 
-i\ pence. 

Shipbuilding was an early and an exten- 
sive branch ni' industrj mi the Piscataqua. 
In thai foreign merchants could build vessels 
here al a lower price than elsewhere, d was 
natural thai Hie governmenl stypuld avail 
itself of Hie facilities offered. Surveys were 
made nl' the harbor and as early as L650 

there arc records of timber for masts being 
selected as the propertj <<i the < Irown. 

The Falkland, a 54-gun ship built in L690 
by Mr. John Taylor, bj order of the British 
Government, was the first ship of war built 
on this side of the Atlantic. The nexl vessel 
of war built al Portsmouth, was the Bedford, 
32 guns, fifth rale, buill in 1696, and also 
by Mi'. John Taylor. The America, 44, 
launched May 4, 1749, was Hie third vessel 
nf war launched al Portsmouth, insofar as 
we have any knowledge. A model uf the 
America is mm preserved in the cabinet of 
I he Portsmouth Atheneum. 

( in Hie 13th n( liecemher, I77r>, Congress 
authorized and passed an ad for the building 
of thirteen cruisers. The first, ship built for 
Ihc Continental Navy al Portsmouth was the 
Raleigh, 32. On the 2 1st nf March. 1776, 
Hie keel of Hie Raleigh was laid and the 
construction of this boal proceeded so imp 
Mix Hud il was launched mi May 'Jlsi nf the 
same year. 



LIFE BUOY 



The next ship built at Portsmouth tor the Dennetl on the 12th day of June, 1800, for 

Continental Navy was the Ranger, a sloop of the sum of $5500. 

war mounting 16 6-pounders. 11 was this | n 1803 a house was erected for a dwell- 

vessel with which the lame of Paul Jones is lllt ., a barracks for marines and a bell-tower 

identified. On the 14th of February, 1778, built. In 1806 J. M. Gamble, first lieuten- 

Paul Jones, who was in command of the an t of marines, with a guard consisting of 

Ranger, received the Rrsl salute to the Stars one sergeant, two corporals, fifteen privates 

and Stripes of the United States of America. and | NVO musicians, was ordered by the Navy 

other vessels of war constructed in Ports- Department as a garrison for the protection 

mouth in I he earlj days were the America, of the Government property. 
Crescent. Portsmouth, Scammel and Con- When war broke out with Great Britain in 

gress. 1812, it became necessary to inaugurate a 

Immediately following the creation of the new policy with regard to the Portsmouth 
Navj Department ami the appointment of a Navy Yard and it was placed in charge of an 
Secretarj of the Navy il was recognized that officer of the Navy. Lieut. Thomas Mac- 
Ihe Governmenl should own its own Navy Donough was selected for its command, sub- 
Yards for the building and equipping of its jecf to the orders of the commandant of the 
vessels of war. In accordance with these Boston Station. 

views the Secretary of the Navy, on the 25th On the 1st of April, 1813, Commodore 

oi April, 1800, suggested to the President \\ n }\ assumed command of the Portsmouth 

that investigations and surveys be made for Yard, it having been decided to build one of 

the purpose of acquiring permanent yards, the frigates at Portsmouth. 

All timber purchased for use in the eon- On the 9th of April, 1813, the Secretary of 

struction of the first six frigates, authorized h,,. Navj for the first tunc addressed Isaac 

by the Act of February 25, 1799, was or- n,,!, as Commandant of the Navy Yard, 

dered deposited at Portsmouth, N. II., Bos- Portsmouth, N. H. 

ton, Mass., New York NY., Philadelphia, A disastrous fire broke out in the town of 

Pa-, Norfolk, Va., and Washington D. C. p ort smouth on the 22nd of December, which 

The secretary furthermore, stated that as in eigh1 hours destroyed 180 dwellings and 

Ih.' \ard ol Mr. Langdon was hired to,' the 64 „,,„.,. buildings, covering an area of 15 

construction ol the frigate al Portsmouth, acreg Tht , va||u , of ||u . proper tj destroyed 

he bcluvcd d the truest economy to provide was estimated al from $250,000 to $300,000. 

al once a permanenl yard An island fer- Commodore || uM Captain Smith of the Con- 

nald's he stated could be purchased for gresS) various crews i n port and fire appara- 

$6000. in-, under their command rendered essential 

l'n \ - to these views of the Secretary, service. By their exertions much propertj 

which were submitted to the President, the was sav ed. 

Secretarj had directed Joshua Humphries During the year 1814, the coast between 

Esq., chief naval constructor oi the United Portsmout h and Boston was blockaded bj a 

States, in an order dated Ji arj 29 1800, squadron of British vessels of war. These 

to examine several eastern ports. The fol- vesse i s we re often in sight, between the 

lowing is his summary of ; some of the iad- mainland and tKe Isles ,,i Shoals. Many 

vantages o a naval establishment al l oris- l;ils(1 al . n . ins NVl ,,. e „, V(1|1 and much apprehen . 

mouth, N. H.: sion existed as to the safety of the 74 frig 

1st. "The harbor can be fortified al -mall . lU . under construction^. Commodore Hull 

expense. -hared these fears and wrote to Hie Secre- 

2nd. "Quick al and from sea: being bul a tary of the Navy, strongly representing the 

shori distance. defenseless stale of Portsmouth and urged 

3rd "Funnels (Fernald's) Island, belong- the necessity of additional fortifications and 
i ng t Mr Dennett, supposed to contain 15 a military force for its defense. On the 14th 
acres price $6000) is the best and most of May, the Secretary uilormed Ihe Corn- 
suitable place for a dock or building yard of mandant that Col. Walbach had been or- 
any other in Portsmouth Harbor — dered to command Ihe troops stationed here. 

4th "There is on this island a sufficient In July, 1815, the frigate 7 'i was christ- 

quantitj of -lone lor any building thai may cued Ihe Washington and launched. The 

he though! necessary, also a suitable place Washington was tilted out immediatelj as 

for docking limber" the flagship of Commodore Chauncey, who 

The result of Ibis report and Ihe Secre- was ordered to command our squadron in 

tarv's recommendation was the purchase of lb- Mediterranean. 

Fefnald's Island from William and Sajah^f p. (To be continued.) 

jan 19 1923 



LIFE BUOY 




LAUNCHING OF THE SUBMARINE S-3. 



SUBMARINE S-3 LAUNCHED PRAC- 
TICALLY COMPLETE. 

The Submarine S-3 was successfully launched "ti 

S.ilunl .i\ :illcrlii , I lecember - 1 . a! L'.-lfi. 

As (he Submarine started gracefully to slide on 
the ways. Mis. William I.,. Hill, the sponsor, broke 8 
bottle of champagne mi the bow ami christened the 
submarine tie' S-3. 

Tie' tii-si attempt to launch He- S-3 was made on 
Monday, December L6, bul due i" the poor quality of 
the tallow used the submarine refused to move fur- 
ther than 36 inches. Although this was Eomewhal <>t 
a disappointment to the officials U was quicklj for- 
gotten on Saturday afternoon, for it Ls questionable 
if any big submarine ever slid as gracefully as the 
S-3 did when it finally took the water. 

The S-3 is indeed a credit to the Yard for she is 
one of the largest American submarines ever con- 
structed. The displacement of the S-3 is S00 tons and 
v . i ,ii launched was practically ready for trial, for she 

, id her batteries and engines in place and there is 

vers little work left to be accomplished. It is staged 



on rood authority that the S-3 is He- nearest to com- 
pletion of any submarine ever launched in this coun- 
try. When it is considered that the submarine has 

1 " under const ruction only seventeen month ii maj 

be easilj understood that a Cea1 has been accom- 
plished bj the Vard when consideration is taken of 
the size of the boat and the quality of its construction 

and workmanship. 

i hi Monday, December 23, a prayer was offered by 
the Knights of Columbus chaplain, Rev. Edward D. 
Henry, and the prayer was as follows: 

"O, Almighty and Everlasting God, who exercises 
Thy supreme dominion, not only over the empyrean 
vault of the Heavens but also in the unsounded depths 
of ocean, we bow down before Thy might and majesty 
in profound adoration, praise and thanksgiving. 
\ ouehi afe, O God, to bless all those here present, who 
with wonderment behold the successful termination 
of a work which has tried the ingenuity, the skill and 
the patience of men who toil. Eternal Father, grac- 
iously deign to pour forth Thy choicest blessings on 
all those who in any way, proximate or remote, con- 
tributed to the accomplishment of this herculean task 
requiring brain as well as brawn. And as of old Thou 



LIFE BUOY 



didsl cleave asunder the tumbling billows of the deep 
■I Thj chosen people might pass dryshod and safe 
while the waters walled them on each side, so now 
and forevermore protect from all danger this sub- 
marine which amid scenes of joy and festivity we are 
lo launch this day. Shield from all harm the men 
who entrust their precious liyes and property to its 
keeping. May this day of cloudless sunshine be a 
prophetic harbinger of her successful career. Maj 
no unworthy quest, motive those who guide its des- 
tinies, but may her errands on and under the deep 
sea, be those which further the ends of peace and 
justice, humanity and Christian civilization. Through 
Jesus Christ, our Lord. Amen." 

The history of the bottle of champagne used by 
Mrs. Hill in christening the S-3 is so unique that it 
has been considered well enough to give the facts of 
this history. It seems that Lieut. W. L. Hill, while 
cruising in the summer of 1S85 near the mouth of the 
Magdi lena River. State of Colombia, helped in assist- 
ing the saving of the British Steamer "Historian," 
which had run ashore. As a token of his appreciation 
the Captain of the "Historian" gave Mr. Hill a basket 
of champagne. Mr. Hill kept one of the bottles after 
distributing the others among his messmates and it 
was this bottle which had been in his possession for 
some thirty-three years that was used by Mrs. Hill in 
christening the S-3. 

The full crew of the submarine as well as Com- 
mander .1. W. Lewis, who will have charge of the S-3, 
were on deck when the big submarine gracefully slid 
down the ways and struck the water with such a 
splash that a wave was sent to the Kittery shore. 



SAFETY ORGANIZATION 

The first meeting of the various safety shop com- 
mittees was held in the Yard restaurant on the after- 
noon of January 7. The Safety Engineer lectured on 
the value of the safety committee with particular 
reference to its value to the men. 

The origin of the safety movement In foreign coun- 
iries and its introduction into the United States was 
discussed. Emphasis was laid on the fact that the 
safetj movement was not "a one man job," but that 
in order to have the movement a success it was neces- 
sary to have systematic and energetic team work. 
The value of a safety committee from a humanitarian 
as well as an efficiencj viewpoint was likewise dis- 
cussed. 

The two essential elements in accident prevention 
are safeguarding and education. The government for 
over a year has been putting the physical condition of 
this plant into shape. By a study of statistics it is 
noted that only 5 per cent of accidents can be elim- 
inated by putting the plant into a good physical and 
safe condition. Only through the education of "human 
element" can the other 95 per cent of accidents be 
reduced 

The duties of the shop committees consist of (a) 



making of weekly inspections and the rendering of 
written reports; (b) investigating of accidents occur- 
ring in their shop; (c) instructing new men relative 
to the safe practice and handling of machinery, ma- 
terials, etc.; td) spreading of safety ideas through 
personal contact. 

It is hoped to shortly start a keeping of the accident 
record in each shop with the hope of stimulating an 
increased interest. A "No Accident Day" is likewise 
to be tried shortly. 

A book entitled "Foremen and Accident Prevention" 
was distributed to each one of the committee-men. 
who were asked if they would not familiarize them- 
selves with the contents therein. Among the subjects 
covered in this book are the following; Belting. Blast- 
ing. Blood Poisoning, Boilers, Carelessness, Chipping. 
Cleanliness, Clothing and Hair, Compressed Air, Con- 
struction Work, Discipline, Doors, Electrical Apparatus 
as well as numerous other subjects. The book con- 
tains ninety-three pages and was published by the 
Travelers Insurance Company which concern has 
probably done more in the line of the education of 
employees in accident prevention than any other com- 
pany in this country. Through the courtesy of the 
Travelers Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn., 
5000 copies of the book entitled the "Employee and 
Accident Prevention" have been given to the Safety 
Engineer free of charge. These booklets will be 
shortly distributed by the committees. 
■ Many of the suggestions that are made in this com- 
panion book are simple and readily understood. If 
employees of the United States would give heed to 
the suggestions contained in this little book there 
would be more than 10,000 of the workers of the 
United States alive a year from today. 

The names of the employees who are on the safety 
committee from the various shops are as follows: 
Shiprnters' Shop, Ben Sturgeon, B. C. Magoon. L. A. 
Miles. A. E. Kimball. W. A. Cheney, P. T. Patey; 
Paint Shop, Joseph H. Morrill, S. A. Boston; Boat 
Shop. George Humphreys. John I >odge, Phillip Brooks. 
Hiram Tobey. Jr.;, Joiner Shop, Mr. Blomberg, Mr. 
Walker. Mr. Thing; Master Machinist. Sidney Rand. 
O. E. Taylor, L. E. Hawkins, C. S. Lovell; Sheet Metal 
Shop, W. T. Burro wes, C. H. Prime; Pattern Shop. 
John H. Foye; Yardmaster. Fred Dyer. Fred Langley; 
Riggers' Shop, J. Pruett. William Laird; Trade School. 
T. G. Havener. J. Keene. L. J. Allen. A. F. Wildes, C. 
Gerton; Pigging Plant, John L. Leavitt; Building 
Trades, F. A. Briggs. G. L. Smith, H. C. Maker, A. J. 
Smith. W. S. Philbrick, F. S. Babb; Machine Shop 
Electrical, E. C. Berry. W. J. Bureau; Smith Shop. 
Walter Clark, David M. Swenson; Spar Shop, Milton 
E. Healey. Ralph Lutts, C. T. Winslow, Fred Wilson. 
.1. Quirk; Outside Machine Shop, John B. LaFleur. 
Alonzo Wildes. Michael F. Cronin; Foundry, C. H. 
Garver, T. Massey; Outside Electricians and Power 
Plant. T. Ruxton. C. Pike. 

It is hoped to change this personnel after three 
months' trial, so that new men will he automatically 
taken in. 



LIFE BUOY 



8 




MR. CHARLES F. DRAKE 

MR. CHARLES F. DRAKE HAS 
"GONE WEST." 

On the afternoon of Monday, December 9, 1918, Mr. 
Charles Drake, foreman of the Sheet Metal Shop, was 
suddenly attacked by apoplexy and before he reached 
the Dispensary he had passed on to the other world 
from whence no man ever returns. 

Mr. Charles Fabyan Drake, the son of the late 
Fabyan P. and Elizabeth Elkans Drake, was born in 
South Boston, Mass., February 10, 1874. At the age 
of 10 years Mr. Drake's parents moved to Kittery, Me., 
where he has resided ever since. Besides attending 
the public school in Kittery he took a course of three 
years at the Kittery High School. 

When only 16 years old Mr. Drake was called on the 
Navy Yard as an apprentice plumber. Through his 
conscientiousness and love for his work he quickly 
passed through the ratings of leadingman and quar- 
terman and at the time of his death was foreman of 
the Sheet Metal Shop as well as the plumber and 
coppersmith departments. 

The loss of Mr. Drake is the more keenly felt for he 
was a citizen who interested himself considerably in 
school, church and social life matters. He was held 
in high esteem, not only by everyone who came in 
contact with him on the Yard, but likewise by the 
townspeople of Eliot, where he had resided since 
1898. At the time of his death he was chairman of 
the Community Local Red Cross in Eliot. 

Mr. Drake's death will mean a great loss to the 
Yard and to the community as a whole for there is no 
greater honor that can be paid to a man nowadays 
than to say that he was "white" throughout. Mr. 
Drake's kindly nature as well as his fair-mindedness 
and square dealing could not help but reflect on his 
associates. It is stated on good authority that the 
co-operation shown by the employees coming under 
Mr. Drake's departments was as fine an example of 
any co-operation that could possibly be hoped for. 
The suddenness of Mr. Drake's passing onward was 



a surprise to everyone for he seemed to be more jovial 
and in better health than his friends had seen him 
for years. It is stated by one of his friends that he 
had frequently expressed himself to the end that he 
hoped "that when he died he would pass away quietly 
and quickly," and thus was his desire granted. 

In the death of Charles Fabyan Drake, the Yard 
has lost one of its greatest workers. Mr. Drake never 
put himself in the limelight but was always contented 
to be a servant to useful suggestions and ideas when- 
ever offered. Although Mr. Drake did not stand out 
as a man who performed spectacular feats, he did 
stand out nevertheless conspicuously for the efficient 
way in which the work given to him was carried out. 
In filling his duties as Foreman of the Sheet Metal 
Shop, particularly during the war. he did not spare 
himself but labored hard and long and performed his 
duties to the entire satisfaction of all. 

He was a genial and companionable man. who made 
friends easily and likewise retained their respect and 
admiration. Conscientious in his work, he expected 
equal conscientiousness in others; but he could exiusr 
^ortcomings if he knew they were not due to care- 
lessness and he always was ready with encourage- 
ment. 

A man of Mr. Drake's type is not soon forgotten. 
His loyalty and enthusiasm were an inspiration and 
will be a lasting and wor-thy monument to his memory. 
His death closes the career of a man who will always 
be remembered for the work he did during his twenty- 
eight years on the Yard. 



WILLIAM HILLMAN, JR. 

The many friends of William Hillman, Jr., will 
probably be both pleased and sorry to learn that he 
has tendered his resignation as Assistant Shop 
Superintendent of this Yard. Pleased to learn that 
he is taking a more responsible position elsewhere, 
sorry to learn that he is going to leave us. Mr. Hill- 
man was graduated from Colgate College and previous 
to coming on the Yard was connected with the Nashua 
Manufacturing Company as a production and efficient 
engineer. 

Mr. Hillman's first duties began on November 26th. 
1917, when he was assigned to the Electrical Machine 
Shop with the rating of Quarterman Machinist. For 
over a year Mr. Hillman labored in the Electrical 
Machine Shop perfecting schemes and systems where- 
by the efficiency of the shop was increased. The in- 
stallation of a planning department was the most 
important work. 

The Yard activities he was particularly interested 
in was the Navy Yard Baseball League, Theatrical 
Show and miscellaneous welfare work in Building 79. 

At the farewell reception tendered to Mr. Hillman. 
he was presented by the employees of the Electrical 
Machine Shop with a gold watch and chain, a travel- 
ing bag and tourist's set. 

The popularity of Mr. Hillman extended throughout 
the Yard, and his many friends extend to him their 
wishes for his future success in his new work. 



LIFE BUOY 



ORGANIZATION— INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 

In this issue of the "Life Buoy" there appears a group photograph of the officers and employees work- 
ing in Building 81, cur Industrial Department offices. The organization is as follows: 

I IFPICERS. I kFFICE. 

L. S. Adams, Capt. (C. C.) U. S. N Industrial Manager 

H. L. Wyman, Capt., U. S. N Assistant Manager 

.1. E. Palmer, Commander, r. S. N. (Ret.) Engineering Superintendent. 

E. II. Brownell, Commander (Civ. Eng.) r. S. N Public Works Superintendent. 

1; W. Ryden, Commander (C. C.) U. S. N Shop Superintendent. 

11 S. Howard, Commander (C. C.) I'. S. N New Construction Superintendent. 

I • T Wright, Lieut Comdr., U. s. X \sst. to -New Const r. Supt. 

H. T. Sandlin, Lieut. Comdr. (Paj Corps) U.S.N Accounting Superintendent. 

i D. Sloane, Lieut. Comdr., U. S; N., I Retired) Asst. to Engineering- Superintendent. 

M. N. Usina, Capt. of Engineers, U. S. C. G Asst. to Engineering Superintendent. 

R. J. Boyd, Lieul Comdr., (C. C), r S N. R. F Construction Superintendent. 

R. W. Ferrell, Lieut. (C. C), I'. S. N \sst. to New Constr. Supt. 

A. K. Fogg, Lieut., Civ Eng., r. S N i.sst to Public Works Superintendent. 

II I-' McCarty, Lieut if. C), (T.), U. S. N Vsst. to Shop Superintendent. 

.1. S. Junes. Lieul. (C. C.) TIM. I'. S. X Asst. to Shop Superintendent. 

James Fife, Jr., Lieut, r. S. N Asst. to New Constr. Supt. 

T. !•'. O'Brien, Lieut, i < '. f .). 1\ S. X Asst. to Construction Superintendent. 

W. A Sullivan, Lieut. (C. C), I'. S. X \sst. to Construction Superintendent. 

S. Floathe, Lieut (C, C). ''■ S. X.. (Retired) Asst. to Shop Superintendent. 

II. E. Kershaw, Lieul. (T.i. I*. S. X (Retired) Vsst to Engineering Superintendent. 

Otto Johnson, Lieut. (T.), r. s. x Inspection ( (fficer. 

H. B. Heath, Lieut. ( T. ». c. s. x Surveying Officer. 

11. L. Hilton. Lieut. (Civ. Eng.), I S N. R. F \sst. to Public Works Superintendent. 

\V. S. Edsall, Lieut., I'. S. X R. F \sst. to New Constr. Supt. 

R. B. Horning, Lieut, (j - i . I s x. It. F Asst to Engineering Superintendent. 

G. I. Wright, Lieut, (j. g:), U. S N R. F \.sst. to New Constr. Supt 

K. lie id. Lieut (j. g.) if. C), U. S. X \s. t. Const.-. Supt. 

!-'. W. Rasch, Ensign (T.). r. s. X Asst. to Shop Superintendent. 

A. 1 1. Barker, Ensign (P. C), IT. S. X. R. F Asst. t,. Accounting Superintendent. 

P. 1 1 Loom is. Gunner, r. s. x Asst. to New Constr. Supt. . 

C. R. Marshall, Carpenter, r. S. x Asst. to shop superintendent 

CIVILIAN HEADS OF SECTIONS. 

C. R, Wasgatt Chief Clerk of Department. 

a. S Rundlett Material clerk. 

ll. i ' Twombly ( !hief Clerk Accounting. 

R. G. Rowe Recorder of Labor Hoard. 

A. H. Robinson Chief Stenographer. 

T. S. Mardcn Assistant Inside Superintendent. 

.1. C. Dolan loh Order Clerk. 

J w Woodward File Clerk 

.1 I*. Flanagan Time Clerk. Account ins. 

W. A. Densmore Report Clerk. Accounting. 

J. W. Marcous < !os t Clerk. Accounting. 

A. .1 M. Con ri Chief Estimator. 

i R ll ugelman Safety Engineer. 

D. J. Leahy ' Inspector of .Manufacture 

T. K. Hilderbrand Mfrs. clerk. 

I i l . Li msr . .1 'ersonnel clerk. 

G. E. Hammond P, W. Clerk. 

W, F, Harris .Timber Inspector, 

CHIEF DRAFTSMEN. 

A V. Curtis Sul i marine Construction. 

A. I .. Case Machinery I )ivision. 

F I! Currier - < instruction and Repair 1 >ivision. 



LIFE BUOY 



10 




11 



LIFE BUOY 



MIXED THEATRICAL SHOW 
Pleased Large Audiences. 

On the evenings of December 19 and 20, the em- 
oloyees of the Navy Yard, who took part in the 
"Mescalanza," or mixed theatrical show, scored un- 
doubtedly the biggest social success ever made by 
employees of the Yard. For. on these two evenings 
the Portsmouth Theatre was packed and by the way 
the encores were demanded there can be no question 
but that everyone, who was fortunate in seeing the 
show, was pleased and delighted. The fine manner in 
which everyone spoke of the show and the fine ac- 
counts appearing in the Press should make the cast 
all feel proud that their efforts and talents were 
appreciated. 

According to the Press the show scored a decided 
hit and it was stated that the show was the best 
amateur production ever given in this part of the 
country. In that the show was so well balanced by 
such fine talent it is very difficult to give any one of 
the cast any more cerdit than any of the others. The 
entire company showed exceptionally good training 
and sang unusually well. The first part minstrel was 
a tremendous success and the different numbers were 
finely rendered. 

The show was produced under the personal direc- 
tion of Mr. Henry J. Quinn of Amesbury. Mass. It 
was mainly due to his untiring efforts that the show 
proved such a success. Although he has produced 
shows for thirty years this was his first attempt in 
Portsmouth and it seems quite likely that he may be 
called upon again. 

The performances were given for the benefit of the 
Portsmouth Red Cross and the total sale of tickets 
n mounted to $1458. The expenses incurred amounted 
to $522. fi5. leaving a net balance of $935.35. which 
amount was sent to the Portsmouth Red Cross by the 
Industrial Manager, Mr. I,, S. Adams. It is stated 
ui)on good authority that this is the largest amount 
of money ever collected for charity in two nights by 
any organization in Portsmouth. The expenses were 
kept unusually low because of the fact that the Allied 
Theatres Company of Portsmouth granted the free 
use of the Portsmouth Theatre and also paid for the 
heating and lighting of the theatre. The furniture 
used was kindly given by the Portsmouth Furniture 
Company. Through the courtesy of the Loyal Order 
of Moose no charges were made for use of their home 
in holding the twenty-one rehearsals. 

The entire organization, a cast of some 135, with the 
exception of one soloist, is employed on the Yard, this 
including the orchestra, all of the principals, a large 
chorus, the pony ballet and the young lady ushers. 

The opening medley overture proved unquestion- 
ably to be the finest overture ever produced by ama- 
teurs in this vicinity. The dancing of the pony ballet 
was ;i caution and these dancing dolls certainly made 
a hit in their red, white and blue costumes. 

The difficult part of interlocutor was well handled 
by Mr. Thomas Lynch and showed he possessed re- 
markable ability along these lines. The solo ballads 



offered by Miss Marie Hill and Mr. Thomas J. Bren- 
nan were well received and encored. Tom Brennan of 
Building SO, who sang for the first time in Portsmouth, 
has an exceptionally fine voice and it is small wonder 
he is so popular in Dover. 

There were two sets of active ends, C. Carlton 
Coffin and Wallace Richardson; Thomas J. Mullen 
and Clifford Picott. It is very difficult to give any one 
of the ends more credit than any of the others for 
they all sang and performed to perfection. Mr. Mullen 
scored a big hit with his song. "Beatrice Fairfax. 
Tell Me." His local hits especially the one directed 
to Mr. Bartlett, the newly elected governor, who was 
in a box. on the new Portsmouth-Kittery Bridge 
proved a feature. His remarks on Mayor Ladd and 
Mayor-elect Hislop likewise took well. So many 
encores were demanded from Mr. Mullen that at the 
end he could hardly whisper. Picott also had some 
good jokes and his song, "When I Gets Out in No 
Man's Land." was well rendered and applauded. In 
this song Master Donnell Butler was featured and 
this shaver danced and turned cartwheels like an old- 
timer and to the great delight of the audiences. 
Richardson and Coffin were also good and their jokes 
and songs were well handled and rendered. Miss 
Nellie Barron and Mr. Frank Brannigan, who sang 
the duo. "I'd Like to Sail to Loveland," was not only 
well received but likewise encored quite a few times. 
The way Ernest Heywood broke in with his part was 
a caution and his Slippery Elm Tree song entitled, 
"Woodman, Spare That Tree," might well stand any 
married man in good stead. 

The entre act, a one act sketch written by Claude 
O. Whitley of Building SO, and acted by Messrs. 
Whitley. Haekett and Duran, proved to be an act 
which is a credit to Mr. Whitley. It was well acted 
and applauded. 

The condensed musical comedy. "In Quarantine," 
was offered as the second part of the show and those 
taking part in the ' cast performed their work de- 
cidedly well. If any of the cast stood out somewhat 
better than the others, mention should be made of 
Miss Dorothy Philbrick, who took the part of Mollie. 
Miss Eleanor Reich, who took the part of Margaret, 
Joseph Taylor, who took the part of Johnny, and 
Aleck Zubkus, who took the part of the organ grinder. 

Mr. Joseph Taylor, who took the part of Johnny 
and who sang the songs. "Give Me the Moonlight." 
"The Ro~e of No Man's Land." and the duo "Don't 
You Tell," (with Miss Eleanor Reich), was probably 
the most decided hit of the evening. The musical 
numbers which he sang were unusually good. Mr. 
Taylor's naturalness on the stage was likewise par- 
ticularly noticeable and commented upon. 

Miss Reich scored heavily in her two songs and 
particularly in the duo with Mr. Taylor entitled "Don't 
You Tell." The feature of this song proved to be her 
generosity in throwing pinks, a bouquet of which 
were presented to her on the stage, to various per- 
sons in the audience. 

Mr. Wallace Richardson, who took the part of the 
sergeant in the cast and who san? the song. "Amer- 



LIFE BUOY 



12 



ica." likewise sang well. A tableau scene, not only 
delightful but exquisite, was worked in conduction 
with the singing of the song "America." The grand 
chorus brought the show to a close with a bang. The 
final scene showing the statute of Liberty holding the 
burning torch and the full company, some 150 people, 
brought down the house. 

The electrical display work showing the Portsmouth 
Red Cross and other electrical effects were well ar- 
ranged and credit should be given to Mr. Jack Pethic. 

Few people were aware of the fact that the or- 
chestra which rendered the music was not organized 
until two weeks before the show. The orchestra 
played unusually well, considering the short time that 
they were together. Miss Dorothy Cotton, who played 
at the rehearsals and likewise in the orchestra, was 
remembered by the cast when she was presented with 
a pearl brooch. The cast also remembered Mr. Quinn 
for he was pleasantly surprised by being presented 
with a diamond studded Elk's pin. 

It may well be said that the show was a most de- 
cided success and that each and every person taking 
part in the show performed so w'ell that it was very 
difficult to give any special credit to any one. 

The following are the members of the company: 

Interlocutor — Mr. Thomas Lynch. 

Soloists — Miss Marie Hill, Mr. Thomas J. Brennan. 

Ends — Thomas F. Mullen. C. Carleton Coffin, Ernest 
Heywood, Nellie Barron, Theresa Renner. Theresa 
Paul, Marie Pauze, Florence Garland, Mabel Pinkham, 
Clifford O. Picott. Wallace Richardson, Master Donnell 
Butler, Frank Brannigan, Albert Dockum, Stephen 
Catlin. Paul Schoolcraft, Frank Preston, Albert Fer- 
guson. 

Pony Broilers — Doris Lomas, Ethel Barrett, Lulu 
Fernald. Gladys Moore, Jennie McLaughlin, Gladys 
Butler, Madeline Backus. 

Chorus — Lena Driscoll, Helen Moran, Ellen Welsh, 
Katherine Herlihy, Mary Kilroy, Mary Jordan, Flor- 
ence Warshaw, Isabel Craig, Lillian Miller, Una 
Badger. Mary Kirvan. Ralph Verity, John Locke, 
George Kane. Charles Parker. Fred Henderson, Harold 
Fernald. Hollis B. Cole, Nellier Call, Grace Rand, 
Helen Kusky. Clementena Kane, Gladys Moore, Nora 
Dwyer, Ella Hammond, Gertrude Rossley, Katherine 
Thompson, Lucille Simonds, Ellen Keith, John Downs, 
Wilbur Fernald, Arthur Cate. Clinton Durant, Karl 
Chick, John Morrill. E. J. Rivais, Eva Cooney, Mabel 
Trueman, Gertrude Perry, Josephine Roberge, Helen 
Kelliher. Theresa Woods, Mildred Brown, Frances 
Go-nyer, Marion Wilson. Pearl E. Foust, Beatrice 
Chandler, Clyde Fiske, Paul Crockett, Raymond Mou- 
telle. Alphonse Vinciguerra, Peiiey A. Whitney. R. E. 
Trefethen. 

MINSTREL PROGRAM. 
Opening Medley Overture (Potpourrie), Popular 

191S Melodies Ends, Ponies and Company 

End Song— "Blue Ridge Blues" C. Carlton Coffin 

Solo — Selected Thomas J. Brennan 

End Song — "You'll Find Old Dixie Land in France" 

Wallace Richardson 



Duo — "I'd Like to Sail to Loveland" 

Nellie Barron, Frank Brannigan 

Topical Song — "Beatrice Fairfax, Tell Me" 

Thomas J. Mullen 

Specialty — "Woodman. Spare That Tree" 

Ernest Heywood 

Soli) — Selected Miss Marie Hill 

End Song— "When I Gets Out in No Man's Land".. 

Clifford Picott 

Mi dley— Patriotic Finale ' Entire Company 

ENTRE ACT. 
A One-Act Sketch. "A Good Fellow." 

Bcb Layton Claude Whitley 

Harry Thome Earle Hackelt 

Jack Blake A. C. Duran 

SECOND ACT. 
Musical Comedy, "In Quarantine." 

Mollie Miss Dorothy Philbrick 

Margaret Miss Eleanor Reich 

The Widow Miss Stella Chamberlain 

Johnny Joseph G. Taylor 

Tom Claud,' ( I. Whitley 

Lawrence Earl Hackett 

Joshua Frye ; Harold R. Quimby 

Bud Frye. his son Harry Smith 

I Irgan Grinder Aleck Zubkus 

The Spoiled Child Harold M. Vincent 

Sergeant Wallace Richardson 

Hotel Attendants. .Frank Brannigan, Paul Schoolcraft 

Coal Man. . . A. C. Duran 

Chauffeur Winfield O. Sprague 

Spirit of 76 — Charles F. Parker, Wilbur A. Fernald. 

Karl B. Chick. 
Spirit of 81— H. S. Call, T. Entwistle, W. H. Smith. 

Abraham Lincoln Arthur W. Cate 

Slaves Samuel Palmer. William Palmer 

Spirit of 9S— L. B. Colburn. J. P. Kelley. W. Scully. 

"SPIRIT OF IMS- 
General Pershing Thomas Lynch 

Columbia. Mrs. Albert Craig 

Uncle Sam Perley A. Whitney 

Liberty Nellier A. Call 

Color bearers, sailors and soldiers. 

Red Cross Nurses — Miss Frances Gonyer, Mrs. 
Noah O. Foust, Miss Mary J. Jordan, Miss Florence 
Warshaw, Miss Mary Kilroy, Miss Lillian Mulcahy, 
Miss Marion Wilson. Miss Ethyl M. Ryan, Miss Ellen 
Keefe, Mrs. C. J. Herbert, Miss Una Badger, Miss 
Lillian Miller. 

MUSICAL NUMBERS 
"Give Me the Moonlight". . .Joseph Taylor and Ponies 

Special — Skating Act Buren B. Roberts 

"There's a Service Flag at Our House" 

Eleanor Reich 

"Rose of No Man's Land" Joseph Taylor 

"Don't You Tell" Eleanor Reich. Joseph Taylor 

A-m-e-r-i-c-a Wallace Richardson and Company 

Stage Manager — Herman G. Crompton. 

Assistant Stage Manager — Arthur L. Hartford. 

Master of Properties — C. C. Washburn, Howard 
Crompton. 



13 



LIFE BUOY 



Electricians — Jack Pethic, Clifford Pike. 

Stage Carpenter— Joseph Taylor. 

Orchestra— Messrs. S. B. Gage, E. Moulton, M. 
Sehoeph W. Burridge, E. J. Kitteridge. S. \V. Bailey, 
R. Howarth, H. E. Hodgon, J. E. Scammon, Miss D. 
Cotton, s. Meserve. 

The executive committee were: John R. Hugelman. 
chairman; Miss Eleanor Reich, Miss Stella Chamber- 
lain, Mr. Arthur Hartford, Mr. Charles Tucker. Mr. 
Thomas Hilderbrand. 

The young lady u hers were: Misses Little. Could. 
Bragg, Hodgkins, Brewer, Earle, Bracj and Dether- 
idge. 



PEERLESS ORCHESTRA 

An orchestra, the director of which is Mr. S. B. 
Gage, has been formed on the Yard, and have decided 
to call themselves the Peerless Orchestra. The other 
members of the orchestra are: E. Moulton, M. 
Schoeph, \V Burridge, E. J. Kitteridge, S. W. Bailey, 
R. Howarth, H. E. Hodgon, J. E. Scammon, Miss D. 
Cotton, H. Mieott and S. Meserve. 

Ii was this orchestra that played so well at the 
evening performance of the Me: calan/.a given by the 
employees of this Yard at the Portsmouth Theatre 
on December 19 and 20. 

The orchestra, according to Mr. Gage, are open for 
engagements and expect to hold a dance some time 
in March. This dance will be strictl) for Yard Em- 
ployees and their friends. 



EMPLOYEES TAKING PART IN SHOW 
VOTE OF THANKS 

1. The Executive Committee, who had charge of the 
Mixed Theatrical Show, wish to herewith express 
their appreciation and sincere thanks for the tine 
spirit of co-operation shown by all employees taking 
part in the show. 

2. It is needless for the Committee to say thai the 
rhow was a grand success, for this has been already 
voiced by those fortunate enough to see the show and 
by the press. 

3. A good sized check, somewhat over $900.00, will 
be shortly given to the Portsmouth Branch of the 
Red CrOSS. This is. indeed, .1 ui.ist splendid gift, and 
employees taking part in the show should feel honored 
in that the offering of their services and talents made 
this gift possible. 

4. The Executive Committee furthermore wish to 
send their best wishes for a Happy and Prosperous 
New Year. 

.1. R. HUGELMAN, chairman. 
MISS ELEANOR W. REICH. 
MISS STELLA B. CHAMBERLAIN'. 
MR. ARTHUR L. HARTFORD. 
MR. CHARLES TUCKER. 
MR. THOMAS HILDEBRAND. 




MR. CHARLES A. WENDELL 



MR. CHARLES A. WENDELL 

FOREMAN SHIPWRIGHT 

The announcement of the death on Dec. 16th of Mr. 
Charles A. Wendell. Foreman of the Spar and Block 
Shop, and Master Shipwright, will he received with 
deep sorri w by those within the circle of his intimate 
associates as well as by the many employees on the 
Yard. Mr. Wendell was a companionable man and 
always retained the respect of the friends he made. 

He first began work on the Navy Yard in 1861 as 
an apprentice and his first employment was on the 
Frigate Kearsrarge, which was launched during the 
Civil War. After he had finished his apprenticeship 
and in order to better fit himself he took a course as 
Sparmaker in the yard of William R. Martin. For 
two years he was employed as a sparmaker at Young's 
Spar Yard at Boston, Mass 

In 1S7J Mr. Wendell again came to Portsmouth and 
accepted a call to the Yard as an expert sparmaker. 
He showed such proficiency in his work that in 1872 
he was appointed Foreman Spar and Block Maker. 
In 1913 the Shipwright department was assigned to 
him and he was given the title of Foreman Ship- 
wright. Under his supervision the manufacture of 
boat spars, blocks, cooperage, and numerous other 
articles used in outfitting ships was carried on. 

In point of service he was the oldest Foreman on 
the Yard for since the time of his appointment as 
Foreman Spar Maker in 1874. Mr. Wendell was only 
away from the Yard for a short time. 

Mr. Wendell was greatly esteemed by all who knew 
him. He was always loyal to the Government and the 
work he did will be a lasting monument to his 
memory. 



LIFE UUOY 



14 



UNITED WAR WORK CAMPAIGN 

This yard finished in fifth place in the United War 
Work Campaign, the total pledges for the Yard 
amounting to $13,873.04. This credit was made up as 
follows: 
Civil employees — 

Pledged at Yard $11,059.24 

Pledged outside Yard 902.56 

Officers and men 1,912.04 

The subscriptions from the civil force were credited 
to the allotment of the home towns of the subscribers. 
It is interesting to note that 115 cities and towns were 
represented, reaching from Vinal Haven, Me., to 
Washington, D. C. 

Chaplain Rountree was designated by the Comman- 
dant to have general supervision of the drive and 
John C. Dolan acted as chairman for the civilian force. 

The Industrial chairman concluded his report with 
the following summary: 

"While the total number of contributors was not as 
large as expected, the generous amounts donated by 
the large number of contributors made it possible for 
the Yard to retain its record for doing big things. 

"Credit is due the Shop Chairmen and their as- 
sistants for the hearty co-operation and untiring ef- 
forts in carrying this drive to such a successful con- 
clusion." 



Shop. 


o 
« 

c 
o 

6 


•a 

O 3 


o 
<5 


■a 
to** 

E 


CD 

a> en 
a, O 

E 


c 

ID 

u 

u 

ft 




?36 


198 


$411 


$831.29 


$ 


202 


Office 


81 


58 


250 


226.54 


58.00 


114 


Comdt. Of. (Ind.) 




20 


22.00 




110 


Elec. No. 89. . . 


.161 


134 


497 


438.51 


107.50 


110 


Smelter 


30 


30 


81 


85.00 




105 


Paint 


SO 


74 


257 


217.50 


56.25 


104 


Smith 


117 


104 


356 


332.28 


28.00 


101.2 


Boiler 


54 


50 


146 


139.97 


29.50 


101.1 


Boat 


•>.!?, 


272 


S13 


705.46 


115.81 


101 


Spar & B 


325 


325 


967 


870.00 


100.00 


100.3 


Drafts. (Sub.) . 


. 46 


46 


179 


179.31 


2.00 


100 


Drafts. (H. M.) 














& I'. W.). 


. 29 


19 


108 


80.50 


20.00 


93 


Pattern 


30 


27 


105 


82.00 


12.00 


89.5 


Lab. & Rig 


.189 


150 


474 


349.00 


50.00 


84.2 


Estimators . . . 


. 65 


25 


168 


134.86 


13.00 


82.7 


Trade School. 


.262 


200 


517 


317.17 


105.00 


82 


Sheet Metal. . . 


.289 


260 


763 


624.07 




81 


Machine (Out.)279 


200 


888 


688.00 




77.5 


Power Plant. . 


. 76 


55 


227 


172.90 




76 


Elec. Mach. . . . 


868 


430 


2046 


1510.52 




73.3 


Transportation 


70 


35 


172 


92.00 


32.00 


72 


Sail Loft 


25 


20 


69 


52.00 




71 


Shipfitter 


384 


300 


2125 


1314 00 




72 






263 


961 


554.25 


73.50 


64.5 


Mach. (In.) 














Bldg. No. 80. 


.431 


360 


1380 


511.96 


100.00 


44.3 



Joiner' 179 100 

Foundry 232 190 



486 

678 



278.09 
250.00 



43 
37 



Totals 3722 $15421 $11059.24 $902.56 

Total credit for Yard, $11, 961. SO. 



SUGGESTIONS FOR SAFETY OF 
MACHINISTS 

Exercise care in keeping jackets, sleeves, etc., but- 
toned or properly fastened. Loose clothing should not 
be worn around machinery. Your safety will be con- 
stantly menaced if you wear torn or ragged clothing. 

It is your duty to keep all safeguards in place on 
gears, pulleys, and other moving parts of machinery, 
and to see that others do the same. By so doing you 
may justly feel that you are preventing injury to 
yourself or to a fellow-employee. 

Oiling, repairing or cleaning machinery should 
never be attempted while the machinery is in motion. 

It is important that you so place tools or material 
that they can not be jarred down on a fellow-workman 
or on yourself. 

Serious tripping hazards occur where materials or 
tools are allowed to lie in passageways. You should 
never be guilty of such carelessness. 

It is to your own advantage to see that all ladders 
and scaffolds on which you may be called to work are 
in safe condition before using them. 

Ruptures and severe strains are often caused by 
lifting heavy materials. Should you desire to move 
machinery or other heavy objects, you should either 
obtain sufficient help or use proper hoisting apparatus. 

Do you realize that defective wrenches have caused 
many serious accidents? Be sure your wrenches are 
in good working order. 

If you value your eyesight, never fail to wear gog- 
gles when there is danger of chips or other material 
striking the eyes. Chipping, grinding, turning, rivet- 
ing, milling and babbitting all present eye hazards. 

Flying chips from "mushroomed" tools have often 
resulted in injuries. All such tools should be turned 
in to the tool dresser. 

Proper treatment should be given to bruises and 
cuts. Tobacco juice and spit can not be classed as 
satisfactory agents. They may cause serious infec_ 
tion. 

Fooling and horseplay should have no place in the 
shop or around work. Your own safety demands that 
you prevent them. Compressed air apparatus should 
never be directed to a fellow-workman. It has caused 
painful and sometimes fatal injuries. 

Be sure and block securely all articles on which you 
have to work. This is especially necessary in laying 
out holes on metal parts with high center of gravity. 

Hoisted loads should not be worked on until they 
are securely blocked. Your safety is endangered 
when you use defective hoisting apparatus. 

When you have to work at a height above the 



15 



LIFE BUOY 



ground, do not (ail to provide a "Danger Men Above" 
sign as a warning u> those below. 

Remember thai safety precautions pay the best kind 
of dividends in tin- \v:i> of life Hs.-ll. 




MR. FRED F. HAYES 

OUR MASTER MACHINIST (AFLOAT) 

Our Master Machinist (Afloat), who for twentj 
years has been al work on the Portsmouth Navj 
yard, needs no introduction for practical]} every our 
knows Mr. Fred l". Hayes. Mr. Hayes is practically 
.1 yard-made man and lie has worked on this yard 
ever since the time when he first was called as a 
third-class machinist. 

Mr Fred Frosl Hayes was born In the city of 
Chicago, ill., on the fourth day of May, 1874, and spent 
the first pari of his life in Chicago. Winn about thir- 
teen years of age, Mr. Hayes' familj moved to Ports- 
mouth, N. il He was graduated from the grammar 
and high schools of Portsmouth, and for three years 
look a mechanical engineering course al the Now 
Hampshin State College, at Durham, N, II 

(in tin twenty.sixth of May. 1899, Mr. Hayes was 
railed on the STard as a third-class machinist, and 
ids work was so exceptionallj good that he was i ited 
up to a leading man in num. Showing further marked 
proficiency In his work, he was appointed as quarter- 
man in 1901. Some time In 1911, after being a quar- 
terman for some ten years, Mr. Hayes was appointed 
Master Machinist (Afloat), which appointment he 
still hold 

As Master Machinist (Afloat), Mr. Hayes lias charge 
of the engine, boiler and ordinance work on ships 
which make their home at the Portsmouth Navy 



Yard. The machine and ordinance work on all sub- 
marines has been assigned as the duties of the Mast. u 
Machinist (Afloat). 

The maintenance and inspection of all the elevators 
and cranes on the yard, as well as the machines In 
the shops likewise come under the jurisdiction of Mr. 
I [ayes. 

Under Mr. Hayes' supervision forced lubrication 
systems were placed on numerous cruisers and the 
installations proved so highly satisfactory, that a 
consider l1 le amount of credit and good will have been 
established for the Portsmouth Navy Yard. Special 
mention should be made of the forced lubrication 
system which was installed on the battleship New 
Hampshire, for the work performed was carried out 
in less time, al a less east and Willi better workman- 
ship than at other yards and so successfully, that 
even the New York Yard was beaten. This is indeed 
a record that Mr. Hayes is rightly proud of. 

Numerous utters of commendation from command- 
ing officers have been sent in the Industrial Manama- 

plimenting upon the quality of work performed 

by the men employed under the Master Machinist 
i Afloat i. 

Mr. Hayes, when questioned by the editor as to 
the one big event in his life incidental to his work 
on this Yard, stated that he thought it was "the 
taking of the gunboat 'Don Jaun De Austin-' to De 
troit, Michigan." It seems that the gunboat was cap 
tured from the Spanish at Manila, and sent to the 
Portsmouth Navy yard for repairs. Mr. Hayes was 
ordered to take the boat to Detroit, Michigan. His 
crew consisted of the Michigan Naval Reserves, who 
were temporarily assigned. Mr. Hayestook the gun 
boat to Detroit via the St. Lawrence river and the 
Welland Canal. 

The policy of our Master Machinist (Afloat) in his 
dealings with his employees, to use his own words, Is, 

"to give a man a square deal as long as he proves 

himself white." Employees striving for increa: ed 
ratings are granted the same when found duly quali- 
fied and before designated in.-. -tlllgs of the q ll.'l rt erilien 

and leadingmen, coming under Mr. Hayes' juri.ii. 
tion. 

As a .spoilsman. Mr. Hayes has few equals in this 
part of the country for his hobby is fishing and 
gunning. He claims that he has travelled nearly 
everj foot of the Maine and New Hampshire woods, 
and that in- rarely returns without bringing something 
to prove that he can fish and gun as well as work. 



OUTSIDE MACHINE SHOP 

In this issue of the "Life Buoy," appears the group 
photograph of the employees of Building 89, Outside 
Machine Shop. The master machinist is Mr, Fred 
l' Hayes; the quartermen are Messrs. ll .1 Chandler 
and YV. II. Falconer, who are in charge of work on 
1 he . submarines; S. R. Caswell, who is in charge of 
piping work on ships; W. M. Fife, quarterman in 
charge of machine work on ships, and F. H. I.eavitl. 
quarterman in charge of work in Building 89 The 



LIFE BUOY 



16 



leadingmen are Messrs. G. A. Cate and R. B. Ward 
in charge of piping work on ships, H. L. Rose and 
W. P. I I.i.ms, and W. F. Hester in charge of machine 
work on ships; C. B. Bridges, K. F. Hayes, J. Keene, 
Jr., II. II Gile, who are in charge of machine work on 
submarines; C. A. Becker, in charge of piping work 
on submarines, and B. J. Ferrin, in charge of repair 
work on cranes and elevators. 



ACCOMMODATIONS AT GOVERN- 
MENT HOTELS 

The attention of Navy Yard employees is invited to 
the fact thai there are a limited number of good 
rooms now available at the Government Hotels Cham- 
pernowne and Pepperrell at Kittery Point, owing to 
the departure of a number of employees whose homes 
are in other localities and who came here simply for 
the War emergency, a number of rooms in these 
hotels have become vacant. In order to avoid operat- 
ing the hotels at a loss, it was found necessary to tem- 
porarily close the Hotel Parkfleld, the smallest of the 
three, as the other two hotels are now able to meet 
existing demands for accommodations. The Hotel 
Parkfleld may later on be put into operation again if 
the demand for accommodations is sufficient to justify 
it. 

Employees desiring good board and lodging at rea- 
sonable rates should make early application. In 
order that the cost may be kept as low as possible, 
the hotels should be operated at all times near their 
maximum capacity. Rates at these hotels are based 
on actual cost. The Government does not make any 
profit on them. It is understood that the rates are 
very much lower than for similar accommodations 
and service at private establishments. 



APPRECIATION 

It is well said that a word of appreciation goes a 
long way towards transforming a hard, exacting task 
into something bright and attractive. Perhaps one 
reason for the unfailing and efficient work of the 
repair section at this Yard is to be found in the fact 
thai the word of appreciation has not been withheld, 
as witness the following letter, one of many received 
in the offices of the Industrial Department: 

"U. S. S. St. Louis, 
"January 20, 1919. 
"Captain T. E. Palmer, U. S. N., Engineering Super- 
intendent, Portsmouth Navy Yard. 
"Dear Sir — I am writing as I said I would to lot you 
know of the performance of the Starboard High 
Pressure piston valve which you so thoroughly over- 
hauled for us. 

'To date we have driven this engine up to 100 RPM. 
and have had not the slightest trouble. The valve has 
functioned perfectly, there has been no warming of 
the guide, ei< . 

"I thank you again for your many kindnesses. 
"P. G. KUTZ, 
"Senior Engineer Officer." 
Particular gratification is derived from the fact 
that the repair referred to had been undertaken, 
without success, at three other places prior- to the 
arrival of the St. Louis at this Yard. 



A REMARKABLE PROPHECY 

Written by Victor Hugo in 1880, only nine years 
utter France's military defeat by Germany. With the 
brotherly co-operation and inspiration of America 
this vision is now being realized, and its full signifi- 
cance is World Democracy. 

"Then France will suddenly arouse herself. She 
Will become formidable. She will regain Alsace and 
Lorraine. Is it enough? No! No! She will cap- 
ture — listen!— Treves, Mainz, Cologne, Coblenz. And 
you shall hear France cry: 'The clock strikes my 
hour! Germany hear me! -Am I thine enemy? No, 
I am thy sister! I have taken all from thee. I return 
all to thee upon one condition: thai we shall no longer 
be a divider] people; that we shall be one united 
family, one republic. I will demolish my fortresses, 
thou thine — my vendetta is brotherhood. No more 
frontier. The Rhine, mine and thine 

"'We shall be the liberty of Europe. And now 
let us clasp hands, for we have rendered each a 
reciprocated service. Thou hast freed me from my 
emperor. I will free thee from thine! 



JUST WATCH YOURSELF GO BY. 

Just stand aside and watch yourself go by 
Think of yourself as "he" instead if "I" 
Note closely, as in other men you note, 
The bagged-kneed trousers and the seedy coat 
Pick flaws; find fault; forget the man is you 
And strive to make your estimate ring true 
Confront yourself and look you in the eye 
Just stand aside and watch yourself go by. 

Interpret all your motives just as though 

You looked on one who's aims you did not know, 

Let undisguised contempt surge through you when 

you shirk 
O commonest of men! despise your cowardice, 
Condemn whate'er you note of falseness in you 

anywhere, 
Define not one defect that shames your eye. 
Just stand aside and watch yourself go by. 

And then, with eyes unveiled to what you loathe, 
To sins that with sweet charity you'd clothe. 
Back to your self walled tenement you'll go. 
With tolerance for all who dwell below; 
The faults of others then will dwarf and shrink 
Love's chain grow stronger by one mighty link; 
When you, with "he" as substitute for ."I" 
Have stood aside and watched yourself go by. 




THIS IS THE HOME OF C. 




ELESSNESS. KEEP AWAY 



23 



LIFE BUOY 



DRIVING THE FIRST RIVET 
SUBMARINE S-9. 

At 3.00 o'clock in the afternoon of January 20, 1919, 
the first rivet was driven in the keel of Submarine S-9. 
The construction of Submarine S-9 will be carried out 
in the Franklin Ship House. 



The riveting gang was composed as follows: The 
riveters were Commander F. E. Porter, Medical Corps, 
U. S. N., and Lieut. Commander T. M. Osborne, U. S. 
N. R. F. The holder-on was Lieut. G. I. Wright, U. 
S. N. R. F. Page Bacon was the rivet passer and the 
rivet heater was Charles Martin. 




DRIVING THE FIRST RIVET, SUBMARINE S-9. 

EDITORIALS 

mutual trust, make your house 



"Sympathy, love 
a home." 

"Most of the shadows of life are cau ed by standing 
in our own sunshine." Emerson. 

■■i iur greatest glory is not in never falling, but in 
rising every time we fall." Goldsmith. 

"Tlu> man who borrows troubles will never lend 
smiles." 

"What do we live for if it is not to make life less 
difficult for others':" — George Elliott. 

"Let every dawn of morning be to you as the begin- 
ning of life." Kuskin. 

"Peace is such a precious jewel that I would give 
anything for it but truth." m Henry. 

"It is the surmounting of difficulties that makes 
heroes." — Kossuth. 

"God's best gifts to us are not things, but oppor- 
tunities" — Alice W. Rollins. 



MY COUNTRY. 

By DR. FRANK CRANE. 

1 am an American. 

I belong to the United States of America, and 
am proud of it, because my country is great and 
strong, and its ideals are just and humane. 

I love my country because it stands for liberty 
and against all forms of slavery, tyranny, and un- 
just privilege. 

I love my country because it is a democracy, 
where the people govern themselves, and there is 
no hereditary class to rule them. 

I love my country because the feeling of the 
people is against all classes, and what classes we 
have are constantly mingling and breaking up. 

I love my country because it never wishes 
conquer any other country, nor to annex any terri- 
tory that does not belong to it without the consent 
of the people who live in such territory. 



LIFE BUOY 



24 




25 



LIFE BUOY 



I love my country because the only use it has 
for an army and navy is to defend itself from un- 
just attack and to protect its citizens. 

I love my country because it is founded on the 
principle of federation and not of empire. 

1 love my country because it is ready to join 
with the other nations of the world in a World Fed- 
eration, and thus do away forever with war, when- 
ever the other nations are willing. 

I love my country because it has always been 
foremost in settling international disputes by arbi- 
tration. 

1 love my country because it asks nothing for 
itself it would not ask for all humanity. 

I love my country because it is the land of op- 
portunity; the way to success is open to every per- 
son, no matter what his birth or circumstances. 

I love my country because the oppressed of 
other countries are welcome here, and have all 
rights and privileges of native citizens if they obey 
our laws. 

I love my country because every child in it can 
get an education free in its public schools, and more 
money is spent on training children here than in 
any other country. 

I love my country because women are respected 
and honored. 

I love my country because the workers are con- 
stantly striving to improve their conditions, wages 
are higher here than anywhere else in the world, 
and men, women, and children have more to eat 
and are better clothed. 

I love my country because it is considered here 
honorable to work, and those people who do no use- 
ful labor are looked upon with disfavor. 

I love my country because life is protected 
order is maintained, and property is secure. 

I love my country because if any one is dis- 
satisfied with things as they are he can change 
them, if he can induce enough to agree with him. 

I love my country because we have free speech 
and a free press. 

I love my country because it interferes with no 
person's religion. 

I love my country because its people are indus- 
trious, energetic, independent, friendly, and have a 
sense of humor. 



THE BOLT THAT WENT WRONG 

A Safety Fable. 

(Bj EL S. Bonsib, District Safety Engineer, United 

States Shipping: Board, Emergency Fleet 

Corporation.) 

"I'm afraid it's a bad case of fractured skull," said 

Old Doctor Wise, as he completed his preliminary 

examination of Unlucky Charlie. 



Charlie lay in a deathlike stupor, with fare as white 
as chalk; his eyes were glassy an d blood trickled 
from his nose and ears. Just above the right eye u ls 
a narrow blue line .the only visible reminder of the 
disas ter. 

Nearbj st lareless ike and Thoughtless Bill— 

Pals of ('h:ul,e from childhood. They had gone swim- 
ming and fishing together, raided watermelon patches 
robbed orchards and made life exciting for the hi-h 
gazabo in the little red schoolhouse at the crossroads 
As they grew older, they each got a job with the 
Hurtalot Machine Company, the main Industry of 
their home town. 

It was. therefore, only natural when the cry went 
forth that Uncle Sam needed men to build ships and 
more ships to send our armies and supplies "Over 
There" to take the Will out of Wilhelm, that the in- 
separable three should get in the great industrial 
army and fight for World Democracy. 

Careless Ike and Thoughtless Bill were given jobs 
as bolter-ups, while Unlucky Charlie became a hold- 
er-on. 

A few days after they became links in the ship- 
building chain, a safety engineer from the Shipping 
Board blew into the yard and gave a little talk during 
the noon hour on the danger of leaving bolts, nuts 
tools, wedges and other material laying around loose 
and the importance of keeping all stagings clear. 

Careless Ike gave Thoughtless Bill a knowing wink 
and in a stage whisper said: "Hey. Bill, listen at the 
Highbrow rave. Where does the stiff, white-collared 
gink get that stuff, anyhow? If he'd come and follow 
us around for a while, he'd see that we ain't got time 
to keep picking up junk or putting bolts and nuts in 
boxes and buckets. It's too much trouble and work, 
anyhow." 

"You said it, Ike," yawned Bill. "If a guy ain't got 
sense enough to look out for himself, he'd better get 
a job in a bank. 

One day Careless Ike dumped a sack of bolts onto a 
staging in order to get a bunch in a hurry. A few 
minutes later Thoughtless Bill came along,' stumbled 
over Ike's monument of carelessness and knocked 
several bolts off the staging. Poor old Unluckj 
Charlie happened to be working just below and ai 
usual was the goat. 

You already know the result. 

We'll skip the next few chapters and jump in at 
the finish. Unlucky Charlie went over the Great 
Divide without ever knowing that his old pals were 
the guys that put him out of business and robbed 
Uncle Sam of a shipbuilder. 

Bill and Ike were the chief mourners at the funeral 
of their victim, but they were changed men. Charlie's 
death had not been in vain, because it had given his 
buddies such a jolt that to this day they are the most 
active safety boosters in the Buildem Fast Shipyard 
Moral: It's better to lose a little time picking up 
loose bolts, nuts and tools than it is to kill a fellow 
workman. Then, too, clean stages are one of th< 
deadliest enemies the undertaker has. Toe-board- 
also help a little. 




DO IT NOW ! 
WHAT? 

BUY THAT NEW PIANO 
AND SAVE MONEY 

Pianos are scarce at the factories. They will be SCARCER SOON 
^KTD THEY ^IFLE GOING UP 

00 IT NOW AT 

MONTGOMERY'S M Srf IT E 

PIANOS FOR RENT 



EVERYBODY'S STORE 

141 CONGRESS ST. - - Y. M. C. A. BLDC. 
PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

NOW COMES THE WINTER SEASON WHEN EVERYTHING IS MOST NEEDED 

We were exceptionally lucky to secure our merchandise at old prices, 
we therefore suggest that Every Man Woman or Child reading this "Ad" 
should not overlook this opportunity of the good values this COMING 
SEASON in Ladies and Men's wearing apparel. 

EVERYBODY'S STORE 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



27 



LIFE BUOY 




**#$. 




DEPTH CHARGES 



can be digested by a strong stomach a chemical 
change may take place frequently causing the pro- 
duction of gas. This gas In turn distends the 
stomach, giving one the sensation of nausea and 
causes pressure on the nerves of the stomach. 

When a person overloads the stomach by tak- 
ing a large amount of food, the following symptoms 
are likely to develop as nausea, followed by vomit- 
ing, for the stomach when overloaded must reject 
the food it cannot digest properly. 

Improper combination of foods, use of alco- 
holic drinks irritate the lining of the stomach and 
may cans' a iliseise. This disease may vary from 
a simple catarrh to ulcer or cancer of the stomach. 
In order lor one to get relief under such conditions, 
i' is necessary thai careful diagnosis be made by a 

reputable physician and that the proper treatment 

be given. 

Nervousness affects the digestive system lor 
the glands do not secrete naturally and 111.' stomach 
fails to pass the food along in a normal way. 

To avoid indigestion tin- following suggestions 
should be carefully followed- Chew your food 
thoroughly. If you are nervous, do not eat until 
you have i chance to quiet down. Eat wholesome 
food and study the combination best suited for 
your individual case. For instance, a grapefruit 
in the morning with a later portion of a cereal and 
1 "ii or milk is quite likely to cause an excess 
amount of acid tending to cause indigestion. 

if you have indigestion it is recommended 

that a cathartic be taken at night and that a cup 

oi hot water with a teaspoonful of (saleratus) cook 
Ing soda dissolved in it be taken at once. Very 
little food should be" eaten until the patient feels 
better, if indigestion persists a doctor should be 
consulted. With the hurry and bustle of our life 
under the present abnormal conditions it behooves 
each one of us to study ourselves minutely the 
b 'iter to enable us to become as efficient as possible. 



INDIGESTION. 

Indigestion may be caused by food unsuited 
for ligestion. As for instance greasy foods, me he was a-kts; g you 

fried I 1 anil pastry. Although this type of food 



ROMANCE! 

One on Pa 

Parent Maria, what was you and youns Gas- 
sim doin' last night when your little brother caught 
you? 

Clever daughter Nothing, pa, except quietly 
discussing practical experimentation of oscillatory 
theories. 

Parent And that precious young rascal tidd 



Baltimore American. 



"A Penny Saved 
Is a Penny Earned" 

We can help you save a 
good many pennies on 

HOUSE FURNISHINGS 

See Mr. WOOD 

99 Penhallow St. Portsmouth, N. H 



THE "BUSY CORNER" STORE 



But Never Too Busy To Fill Your 
Prescriptions and Fill Them Right 

OUT OF TOWN PATRONS ARE 

WELCOME TO WAIT FOR THE 

CAR AT OUR HOUSE 

BENJAMIN GREEN 

THE DRUGGIST 
INSURANCE and REAL ESTATE 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 
LOWEST RATES BEST FORMS 

C. E. TRAFTON 

35 Pleasant Street Opposite Post Office 



YOU AUGHT TO KNOW 

DENNET and MCCARTHY'S 

IS THE BEST PLACE TO BUY 

Overalls, Shirts, Hosiery 



USE GAS F"OR 

LIGHTING, HEATING AND COOKING 

PORTSMOUTH GAS CO- 

ALWAYS AT YOUR SERVICE 



Dr. s. F. A. Pickering 

- - DENTIST - - 

TELEPHONE CONNECTIONS 
OFFICE HOURS 32 CONGRESS STREET 

8 TO 12 A. M. 2 TO 5 P. M. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



BROOKS MOTOR SALES 

PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



FORD SERVICE 



FllliS BrOS. Men's and Boys' Shoes 

Fine Shoe Repairing congress ST. tel. con. 



'I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



29 



LIFE BUOY 



"IT CAN BE DONE" 

No man with spirit will take it for granted 
that the thing untried is beyond him. 

"1 can" brought man out of the caves and 
jungles, and enabled him to stand in the clearings. 
It charted the seas, pierced the mountains, bridged 
the chasms, chained the waterfalls. It captured 
the lightning from the clouds, and used its mysteri- 
ous power to flash the thought of man around the 
world. 

To strands of wire it gave a soul, and to disks 
a glue of living voice. 

And always the human obstacles to progress 
crowded the way and blocked the passages. Al- 
ways the onward struggle was over the loud pro- 
tests of "You Can't.'' 

The life that is fightless is worthless. The 
proudest privilege of man is to match his soul 
against the forces of adversity and plead with scars 
his right to be immortal. 

Somebody dreams and does. Somebody wills 
and wins. Somebody tries and towers. There is 
no real majesty but will. There is no true nobility 
but courage. 

Somebody said "It Couldn't Be Done." Some- 
body toiled and did it. — Selected. 



WIRELESS 



Tony Motto, plumber and fitter, and Phinny 
Muldroon, ship's cook, were arguing about the re- 
spective merits of Italy and Ireland. "In Italy," 
said Tony, "they tore down a castle which had been 
standing for a hundred years and underneath it 
they found a lot of wires, showing that a hundred 
years ago Italy had telegraph wires in use." 
"That's nothing at all,'' answered Phinny. "In Ire- 
land they tore down a castle and found no wires at 
all, showing we had wireless telegraphy in Ireland 
a long time before that wop, Macaroni, discovered 
it." — Judge. 



SAFETY SUGGESTIONS FOR PIPE 
FITTERS 

Don't fail to warm steam lines thoroughly before 
turning pressure on. 

Don't fail to open all drips in order to drain line. 

Don't do any work on steam, air or gas lines under 
pressure. 

Reduce the pressure until there is no danger of an 
explosion. 

Don't fail to lock valve or hang a danger sign on 
valve when working on steam, air or gas lines. 



Don't open a joint in any line until you are positive 
all pressure is off. 

Don't draw the bolts on one side of a joint, as it 
causes an uneven strain which may cause an explo- 
sion. 



PANNINGS 

A general feeling of sorrow prevails among the 
employees of Building; 74 and 76 due to the sudden 
death of Foreman C. F. Drake. 

The happiest, busiest bunch on the Yard, "The girls 
in Bldg. 74." 

Wonder who will be chairman of the next visiting 
committee. 

E. P. Lawrence passed another mile stone in life. 
Cheer up. Percy, we all have them. 

After many days the Sheet Metal workers have 
come into their own for a large sign has been placed 
in the center of the front of Bldg. 74. The letters are 
so large that he who runs may read, "even Harry 
Wyman." 

It is reported that C. G. Robie came very near being 
burned out of house and home the other night. 

One of our office girls, Miss Murphy, celebrated 
her birthday recently. The decorations were in orien- 
tal style. 

The Heeney brothers of the Public Works Depart- 
ment spent a very pleasant day recently fishing. It 
was said a most excellent catch occurred (?) 

Did you notice the way the windows in our office 
shine lately? 

It is no use. girls, we cannot get them to take their 
hats off. 

We wonder if Mary is still intere ted in Bridgeport. 
We understand he is coming home soon. Is this so, 
Mary? 



METAL SPLASHES 

The bowKnj team from the Foundry would like to 
hear from some of the other teams on the Yard, 
especially the Pattern Shop. 

We would all like to know why the office force did 
not take the trip to Boston that they had contem- 
plated. 

If Mr. Lawless visits the office much more, the 
girls will be so excited listening to his experiences 
that they would never leave Boston if they once got 
there. 

We wonder who the mysterious person was who was 
seen with G. R. P. recently. 

We wonder when .Jim Maddox will get his bond. 

We all hope that Marion makes good with No. 270. 

He springs here, he ^ prings there; we've got a job 
to keep him from springing everywhere. 

We all wish we knew how Mary M. gets her red 
fire on pay days. 

We are all rorry that Dynamite was refused admis- 
sion recently. 

We would all be building houses soon if we con- 



HENRY PEYSER &, SON 

16 TO 20 MARKET ST. 

For more than forty years Portsmouth's leading 
Store for Men's and Boys' apparel 

RUGS, DRAPERIES, FURNITURE COVERINGS 

THE QUALITY STORE 

MARGESON BROS. 



Vaughn St. 



Telephone 570 



PORTSMOUTH. N. H. 



FRED B. COLEMAN 

APOTHECARY 

Corner Congress and Vaughn Sts. 
PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



If you desire to buy or sell Real Estate call, 
telephone or write 

H. I. CASWELL AGENCY 

Congress St. TELEPHONE 478-W Portsmouth 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

DEALERS IN 

BEEF, PORK & PROVISIONS 

COR. DANIEL AND PENHALLOW STREETS 
Telephone Connection Portsmouth, N. H. 



SINCLAIR GARAGE 

HORTON SERVICE 

TELEPHONES 282-W, 81205 

Corner RICHARDS AVE. and MIDDLE STREET 
PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



S- S- TRUEMAN 



GENERAL CONTRACTOR 



TELEPHONE 651 



83 Bow St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



JOHN O'LEARY 

KITTERY and NAVY YARD EXPRESS 

GENERAL TEAMING 
Tel. Con. Portsmouth, N. H. 

CENTRAL LAUNDRY GO. 

FINE LAUNDRY WORK IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 
7i Pleasant St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



o 

u 

R 

S 
T 

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ENLIST AGAINST THE HICH COST OF LIVING 

"TRADE AT THE CO-OPERATIVE STORE" 

Clean, fresh meat, groceries and provisions at reasonable 
prices. 

Every stock holder has equal rights, and the store is man- 
aged for the benefit of all workmen. 

M. T. 0. CO-OPERATIVE ASSOCIATION 



Market St 



Portsmouth, N. H, 



ONE 
FOR 
ALL: 

ALL 
FOR 
ONE 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



'M 



LIFE BUOY 



linued to listen to Franks, who has been planning one 
.ill winter. 

We are all glad to have our ex-soldiers hack again. 

We wonder who it is that it calling our blond girl 
on the phone so often. 

We wonder why Jake leaves his luncheon every 
noon. 



MACHINE SHOP 



Bldg. No. 80. 

liana Kail and Mark Boulter have gone into the 
fish business. We sincerely hope that they will leave 
a tew in the Pond for the rest of the fellows. 

"Dutch" Loud and Marshall Stimson are the 
champions of the Gnat Baj district. "Stim" can cut 
a hole ni the ice that is a geometrical wonder. Ask 
him how ho does it'.' 

Tom Malady has returned from a visit to Cleveland, 
cihio. While there Tom told them all how to build 
and launch submarines. Out there they think that he 
is a regular deep-water man. 

"Jim" Bowe — Where'U 1 meet clia, Tom? 

Tom — In the Butcher Shop. 

['red Perkins was presented with a very suitable 
present recently by his gang, it being the fiftieth 
anniversarj of his birth. Although taken completely 
by surprise Mr. Perkins was very eloquent in his 
response. We have known him for a long time but 
never before have we given him credit for such ora- 
torical ability. 

Prank Bathe, Gustave Peterman, John Mog, Ralph 
Spinney, Ulan Loud are the gentlemen responsible 
tor Hi, scarcity of game up country. While we don't 
know just how many deer, bears, etc., that each 
hunter is entitled to, we have a strong suspicion that 
they all exceeded their limits, though of course they 
would not want it generally known. 

The bowliag team from Building SO is practicing 
constantly ami although they meet a setback once in 
a while, their determination to be the very best in this 
vicinity mows day by day. 

Harold Morris, ,11 has received a very flattering offer 
from the director of the Metropolitan Opera Company 
nel Is considering it very seriously. Perhaps he can 
take "I'liet" along with him. 

The many friends of Jim Jackson are greatlj 
pleased to see him at work again after such a long 
absence. 

There is no need of a refrigerating plant in this 
shop these cold mornings. If you want proof ask 
Charlie I.ovell. 

Here, — then gone, here, — then gone, a thousand 
times a day. (John Watts). 

R. Nathaniel has quit chewing, Bathe also. As these 
are only New Year's resolutions you may take them 
for what they are worth. 

Vic Zetterberg returned a week ahead of time. 
Wonder what's the matter — homesick for her? 

According to the number of smelts Fred Pray 



caught and the pounds they weighed, they averaged 
sixteen pounds each. Some smelts. This is even 
better than Chuck Fernald or Al Marshall ever could 
do and Chuck has fished Great Bay for over sixty 
years. 

Jennie Jones has returned with a smile on his face 
and as happy as can be. May he never have cause 
to regret. 

I ud anyone take notice of "Beauty" in the Minstrel 
Show? He was there strong. 

We hope that Chase and Brad Fernald will call on 
us some day and we will introduce them to the gang 
in the Shop. They have worked nights so long that 
they cannot accomplish any thing except in artificial 
light. 

Anyone who has an electrically heated aeroplane 
suit will confer a great favor upon Mel Fall by loan- 
ing the same to him this winter. Mel's position is 
such that he enjoys (?) a wealth of fresh cold air 

Gaj Caswell says that if any man displays one half 
of the intelligence that the average man is gifted with, 
he is sure to bring home a deer or two. 
■ Ned Warburton and Brownie Caswell fill their 
pockets with sand every Saturday night during the 
winter just to help carry out the spirit of the thing. 



ELECTRICAL FLASHES 

In the first issue of the "Life Buoy" we stated that 
during the year 1918 our production would reach the 
million dollar mark. This prophecy came true for we 
closed litis with considerable over one million dollars. 

The largest single month was December with 
$149,000. 

We wonder why it takes some young ladies one day 
to prepare for a ball and one to two days to recuper- 
ate from its effects. 

We are wondering what kind of cider they make 
at Christian Shore when the residents see red bats. 

"George" is certainly in strong with some of the 
girls. We are wondering if it is his "divine shape" 
or leather puttees that is making them fall. Never 
mind. George, you have our sympathy. 

We hope that the next time you go to I 'over. Gertie. 
you will be able to find the Folsom Street Station 
without walking to Durham first. It is understood 
you got the I lover train on the hot_f0Ot 

We are miking arrangements to build a portable 
dressing room for our Leadingman Electroplate!- 

The chairman of our Bunch Room Committee is 
right there as a bowler and wrestler. However, I un- 
derstand that he met his Waterloo at Manchester. 
N. H., some time ago. 

We understand, from good authority, that the 
skating is very good at York, and Cape Neddick, and 
especially at "Cider Hill." 

We wonder why a member of the time force delights 
in going back to her old desk by the window to eat 
her lunch. There's a reason, isn't there, Mary? 



A. D. S. 



sva 



AT 



Adams Drug Store 

ON 
MARKET STREET 



IT'S NO USE 



Telling you a long story about advancing prices. 
You know as much about it as I do. But I want to 
tell you that I have a large stock of CLOTHS, bought 
to secure old yarns and dyes, at a much lower price 
than they can be found today. If you need a SUIT 
this year BUY IT NOW. 

WOOD, The Tailor 

15 PLEASANT ST. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



THE PORTSMOUTH FLOWER SHOP 

A. ('. CRAIG, Manager 

FANCY CUT FLOWERS 

AGENT VICTOR TALKING MACHINES 

4 Market Street Phone 960 

PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



M. P. ALKON & CO. 

DEALERS IN 

CHINA, CROCKERY & CLASS WARE 
NO- 27 MARKET ST., PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



>. BOU 

FOR LEADING FIRE AND LIABILITY INSURANCE COMPANIES 

G0V . ST. KITTERY, MAINE 



-we ".Xre'-A-t your service 
F. A. GRAY & CO. 

PAINTERS AND DECORATORS, 

30 & 32 DANIEL STREET, PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

WALL IP^FEPS and IP^IHSTT SUPPLIES 

We can furnish a house from cellar to attic. 
Prices right in every branch of our business. 
Why not step into our store and look over 
our many styles of furniture. It costs 
nothing to look, and it might be beneficial 
for us both. D. H. MC INTOSH 




Congress and Fleet Sts. 



PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



TYPEWRITERS FOR SALE & RENT 

J. E. DIMICK 

29 Tanner St- PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

Telephone 837-M. 



E.PERCY STODDARD 

IN SUR-A-NOE 

REAL ESTATE 

7 Market Square PORTSMOUTH 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



33 



LIFE BUOY 



K SHOP 

WE WHNDUR 

Win it la Joe likes to (jo down ill the office so 
often Which one, Joe? 

ir Smith will exchange his bicycle tor an automobile 
,11 the spring. 

\Yh:it Henrj Plante will try to Invenl next. 

Wlii'ii Kenneth is going to start his Ash market 

Why I 1 ' puis on a broad smile when Miss 
comes up to the mold loft. 

ir Heiser Intends to ship a cargo while he is gone. 

it" Mr. F ever gets tired of arguing with a young 
Ldj in our office 

Why Bridle forgets to drop his check so often, 

Have you noticed how Chenej drags ins anchor 
when he sits Heiser In the office? 

Have you noticed how "Genteel" the language is In 
ihr office since the ladles joined the Steel Gai 

Billle Emery Is sporting a collar and necktie oi 
late We wonder If he has received a commission. 

At last the Pilgrim Joiner is assuming the rights 
and is receiving the due respects of a leadingman 
shlpfltter 

Bill Earle says he would like to know who stole the 
elder, V.sk Asm. 

Come on, Raynes, tell us which girl the candj Is 

lor. 

ffe will be [lad to see smiling Rilej back on the 

■ i [air 

\ i Gunnison says that thej have a new kind of 
shellac for broom handles now 

Brownelle appears to be weak In the knees from 
pumping on that new piano. 

Being lured bj the horticulturists, George Mclntlre 
is about to enter the raising of plums. 

What say, Willie, whj not soil the Ford and buy 
.in automobile this year? 

Viola, with the red tamo, saj that she likes to 
ride in .'in I lakland Six < ih, Boy! 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT 

NEWS AND NOTES. 

The book keeping girls have left us! li was thought 
best to place each girl in the building where the stock 
listed on her book is kept. 

Mr. Rivals' l i' man, "Blllie Burke," left us previous- 
ly to answer his call in the s< r\ Ice, 

BUI Burns, the Assistant Purchasing Agent, has 
returned from hi! camp down In .Maine where he 
, M |oj ed .i hunl Ing trip. 

Chief i'eoman Blaisdell has a bouncing baby girl 
at his home. 

Messrs. Badger and Curtis are verj lonesomi with 
,.ni the «irls. 

HEARD IN THE SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 

Charlie !-• lo> • d his boss. 
He was sorry to see him go 



The girls enjoyed selling tickets tor the Charitj 

Ball. 
There's a reason. 

Miss Vamp made out verj well with Ensign Mullen. 
That's why he made a retreat to the tall timbers. 
Louise N". is very .u l : u I now that she is In town. 

Well, Louise we don't blame you much, he is cer 

tainly a nice looking chap, 

Eddie is making quite a good thing on the eanti in 
"Mj speclaltj is to re arrangi Building 118." si.u 
"Betty, what time are you going home tonight?" 
"i >li ! u ouldn't j "a jo i io\ e to go to Fram ■ ■ 
Neighbor Is getting plentj of exercise walking a1 

night! 

"Say, Colonel, don't you think "A thing of ART is 

a Joj forever'?" 

l [eard through a kej hole 
"Please, Just one." "No." 
"Prettj please." "No." 
"Oh, Steve, whj don't you shave!" 

WE WONDER: 

if Beatrice H. can tell us the receipt for Love 
Makli 

ir the Ensigns who celebrated the men victory tin 
night before ii was really won felt much like work 
the following morning. 

if Manager Bill enjoyed his waltz with the widow 

if Bill B. ^ot another dear on this hunting trip. 

Whj Steve will not soil; In the famous Eddie Quar- 
tet. 

Whj the Boston girls go home everj Saturday night 
is n the b iked beans or merelj to see the boj 

When Hie next stormy day will come. We lovi ti 
watch Ensign Shaw and Edie bet on the weather toi 
candj 

If the "Robbln" has lost his sweet little voice, or it 
he's gone down south tor the winter. 

Why the mail clerk recommended our yeogirl tor 
promotion. What's the idea, Eddie? 

Whj Steve Williams doesn't talk of Dovei as much 
of late, lias she given you the cold shoulder, Steve, 
or has someone cut you out '.' 

If Ensign Mullen is doing his Xmas work early? 
We are n a loss to know whj he is cutting out tho e 
small squares of blotting paper, unless it Is for 
i "in istmas calendars. 

why Mr. Anketelle is so popular with Mr. Chaney's 
stenographer. 

Where Miss Qonyer spent her Thanksgiving holiday, 

Whj i' mm, gave us that tunny look when we asked 
her if she was married and all the time we know 

she was LT-ON. 

if the girls know "You'll Find Old Dixie Land In 
Fran,. 

if it can be the Blue Ridge nines that makes Izzie 
so sad oi late. 

Who pays the hills when Louise goes to Boston. 

n ,i certain chief storekeeper shed'anj tears when 
he learned thai his friend. Miss Marshall, was to be 

married, 



LIVE WIRE MEN WANTED 



To get acquainted with a live wire store, A stoic that KNOWS what men want and 
HAS it. Good, dependahle merchandise at right prices, and I service. 



'MASTERCRAFT" AND LEOPOLD MOKSKS MKN'S CLOTHES "RIGHT POSTURE" BOYS 

CLOTHES ARROW COLLARS HATHAWAY SHIRTS CHENEY TIES 

WALK-OVER AND RALSTON SHOES FOR MEN LION BRAND WORK SHOES ARROW 

RUBBER BOOTS TRIPLE TREAD RUBBERS 



N. H. BEANE&CO. 



5 Congress St. 



Portsmouth 



H. E. BANNAFORD 
FLORIST - - - 



CUT FLOWERS, OESICNS & DECORATIONS 
452 RICHARDS ATMS. Tiu.i:ein>\ i ><>s. 



C. P. CARROLL 

Groceries, Meats and Provisions 

145 PENHALLOW ST. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

Tel. Connection Near A. S. L. Ixrrv 



"YORK COUNTY NATIONAL BANK" 

SERVICE 

Large Storage Vault and Safely Deposit Boxes for 
rent. Your checking account is solicited. In our 
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT we pay 4 Per Cent 
interest. » 

YORK COUNTY NATIONAL BANK 

YOKK VILLAGE, MAIM; 



THE 
APOLLO LUNCH 



-oocfljo»- 



HOME COOKING 

17 Congress St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



THE ACORN 




PORTSMOUTH , 
N. H. 



PHILBRICK'S PHAHMACY 

AGENCY FOR 

BELLE MEAD SWEETS & JERSEY [CE CREAM 

<;t Congress St. - - Portsmouth, N. II. 



HATS & MKN'S FURNISHINGS 
AT 

PARSONS THE HATTER 

PORTSMOUTH, N. II. : : PHONE 867-M 



'I SAW IT IN TIIK LIFE BUOY" 



35 



LIFE BUOY 



SEEN THRU THE PERISCOPE 

SUBMARINE DRAFTING ROOM, BUILDING 81 

Everything is all set for a most successful New 
rear, and u is the sincere wish oi all the men In the 
Submarine Drafting Room thai the progress on the 
will be as marked tins year as il was lasl yeai 

U is the intention of Commander .1. \V. Lewis to 
have Hi,' S-3 read} tor trials sometime this month, 
and thai only is possible bj the heart} co-operation 
■ if .ill engaged on that work. Although there was a 
linlc difficult! at first in launching the boat, n slid 
off the ways shortlj after, completing a verj pleasing 
performs i i 

M. s. Stephenson has returned to his home in 
u i consin, intending to further his endeavors in his 
line of work, in the Western States. 

C. i\ Guggisberg left recently tor Louisiana, where 
he will assume the duties of mechanical engineer on 
! hip consti notion. 

C. W. Nutter resigned his position here to take a 
ion at the Atlantic i lorporation. 

M o Davidson, aftei spending some time in Beth- 
lehem, Pa., is now working ai the Atlantic Corpora- 
tion. 

Max Zeigher obtained a transfer to the Brooklyn 
Navj Yard. 

Louis Zislin spent two week: in Philadelphia during 
the latter part oi I >eci mber. 

H. F. Downing was rusticating at Norway, Me., 
ovei the Christmas holida] s. 

L. W. Scheirer spent a few days at his home in 
E'lmira, X. V. 

C. S. Conlon, I'. S. N. A., lias resume, 1 his position 

after putting in several months at Gulfport, 

Miss., in the Naval Aviation (•'one-. From what is 

i ,1 from Charlie's trials anil triumphs there, it 

though there were not manj southern belles 
thai escaped his attention. 

\\ .i ido Mat ii hi v. ho has bei n in I lharle ton S C, 

in the Naval Aviation, is now with us. 

K. M Pattee is bach aft ing through many 

exciting • in and around New York City. He 

was connected with the Army Aviation Corps. 

Our esteemed former file-clerk, D. J. Carey, was 

home tor a week Christmas, and Dennie says that the 

le sure are hospitable in the big town (New 

i'ork), but he thinks that Dover is enticing enough 

for his com er\ a I ive tastes. 

ll C. Sweetser, recently di charged from duty as 
instructor in Drawing at Dartmouth S A. T. C. is 
now engaged in that work here. 

WE HEAR 
That Ball is coasting considerable down New Fork 

way. 

That Brown got pinched the other night. 
That Bill Miller hailed him out. 
That Preble had a sociable part] New Fear's Eve 
That "Pop" Lord lias moved again. 
That Rosen is already looking for bargains on last 
year's tires. 



That Etiansen has planted some green pea.^ in his 
dr. i \\ ing- room window . 

Thai Klttredge is thinking of taking that thrilling 
leap. Who is she. Kitty '.' 

That, after all, what an uninteresting world this 
would be if there were not any pikers. 

WE WONDER 

Why Scheirer is so forlorn lately. Mehhe some 

has gone, mebbe, one never knows. 

If the Draftsmen's raises got sidetracked some- 
where. 

if we will get them in time to buy a cold-storagi 
turkey next Thanksgiving. 

Who put the carpel tacks on the ways of s-3. 

When Colliton will retire. 

Who got stuck when Lonnie went awaj 

Why Pinkham goes to Bath every Saturday night. 

If n isn't about time tot some of the crabs around 
here to dispel the gloom, and help out the cause, bj 
being pleasant once in a while, even if it does hurt. 

\\ i otter for your approval a series of sketches of 
some of the distinguished people in our room under 
the idle of 



A HOPELESS CASE 

"This," said the asylum attendant, pointing to 
the patient in a padded cell who was dodging back 
and forth, "is what we consider a hopeless case." 

"What's the matter with him?" inquired the 
visitor. 

"lie thinks he is continually dodging automobiles 
and roller skates." 

V GENERAL I TIL1TY SUIT 

Salesman — "Yes sir. we have some very nice 
suits. What color would you like?" 

Buyer "Well. I look after my own car. So I 
guess I will get something as near grease as possi- 
ble." — Master Nuggets. 

THE THINGS THI1V ASK FOR 

A woman living in tin aristocratic suburb a mile 
and a half from her grocer, went to the phone: 

"This you. central? 4")4. please. This you. Mr. 
L? Please charge and send ten cents' worth of ani- 
mal crackers, and pick out the elephants, as the 
baby is afraid of them." — Re-Saw. 

THE ANSWER 

An English militant crusader strolled into a barn 
where a young man was milking a COW. With a 
snort, she asked. "How is it that you are not at the 
front, young man?" 

"Because, ma'am," answered the milker, "there 
ain't no milk at that end."- Atlantic Journal. 



World's Finest Line of Aluminum Ware 

MIKKO ALUMINUM 

Beauty, Quality, Workmanship and Durability 

The Sweetser Store Portsmouth, n. h. 



126-128 Market St. 



A FEW OF OUR SPECIALTIES 

Hart, Schaffner and Marx Clothes, Stetson Hats, 
Manhattan Shirts, Fownes Gloves, Interwoven Stockings 



F. W. LYDSTON & CO, 



Outfitters for Men & Boys 
PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



JOHN SISE & CO. 
INSURANCE 

8 MARKET SQUARE 

PORTSMOUTH, N. 



H. 



A. P. WENDELL & CO. 

Hardware, Paints and Tools 

Telephone 850 

2 Market Square Portsmouth, N. H. 



THEATRE SODA FOUNTAIN AND PORTSMOUTH FANCY BAKERY 

18 CONCRESS STREET 

Try our Hot Chocolate and a Jelly Doughnut — Cream Puffs 

Cream Pie and all Kinds of Loaf Cake 

BALDWIN A. REICH, PROPRIETOR 



ONA 

A Combination of Iron, Malt, Manganese and 
Cod Liver Oil Extract 

A tonic and body builder, beneficial in con% r alesence. 
Price $1.00. 



MEN'S WOMEN'S & CHILDREN'S SHOES 
OF THE BETTER QUALITY 



BOARDMAN & NORTON 
3 fe*od2lL Store, Portsmouth, N.H. 

Opp. Post Office 



C. F. DUNCAN & CO. 

9 Market St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



SAVE FUEL 

By using Electric Appliances for Cooking 
ROCKINGHAM COUNTY LIGHT AND POWER CO. 
2Q Pleasant Street Portsmouth, N. H. 



'I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



37 



LIKE BUOY 



OUTSIDE MACHINE SHOP 

ECHOES FROM THE OFFICE 

"Is he mat ried '." 

The analog] thai was recently made about .1 friend 
of Marjorie's with reference to the tall pines of Maine 
certainl) struck hi me. 

Although Ralph M. claims that he purchased an 
Overland racer, Jerrj and Hegan state thai ii is their 
belief Ralph has purchased nothing but .1 disabled 
farm tractor. 

How are they percolating, Pat? 

Did Herman call them all up Christmas morning' 

Becker says that anyone can get a deer, once they 
make up their minds to go after one. 

According to Sam, the .Maxwell thai he knows about 
was recent]] beaten In a race to the Yard by a Flivvet 

Johnnj Waiis is back again, having been out with 
a broken wrist, the result of the kick back of his iv. 

Although the housing conditions In Portsmouth are 
Milh congested, the latest teat In obtaining accommo 
dations was accomplished by our too) room Keeper, 
li seems that on Christma evening he went to church 
and tell asleep. If It had hot been tor his heavj sleep 
the sexton would not have found him. 

According to a friend of Ms. she is learning to 
dance, she. however, needs considerable more prac- 
tice before she will become proficient. 

Ever) one undoubtedly noticed the great represen- 
tation that Building S9 had in the Navj Yard mixed 
theatrical show We always knew we had a bunch 
of actors. 

You could easily see that Tom Lynch had been th«r« 
before. 

\ ,1 then there was Arthur "Abe" Cate. 

Claude Whitley, the author of the-sketch, "A Good 
Fellow," which he so successful!) staged and acted 
in the mixed theatrical show, has resigned. He has 
purchased a large laundrj In Dover, x. It. He carries 
with him the best wishes of the shop for he certainl) 

was a good fellow. 

Richardson, the end man. was surel) rich. 
The candy store showed the Christmas spirit when 
• was donated to the poor of Portsmouth, x ll. 



SPARS AND BLOCKS 
Such a Christmas tree as was 10 be found in the 
Among the presents distributed was a pearl 
necklace for Lona and a hois,, tor Mr, Jensen. 

it is our understanding thai Sid will have a large 
income tax to pa: . 

\ certain young ladj in the office is sparkling a 
Tiffanj however not the one she received on the 
Christmas tree 

The gentleman who makes ins dailj appearance noon 
times in order to thaw out is some wrestler. Ask the 
party to whom he applied the giant swins. 



DITTY BOX SAYINGS 
GOOD-BYE, GIRLS 
Our shop iii- been Riled with pretty airls. 

Some had dimples, some had eurls. 

Some wore bloomers, some won- skirts. 



I hate like time lo see lllem go, 
Id rather see four feet of snow. 

Vdolph, it is claimed, had a verj interesting time a 
tew mornings ago. it seems that ins watch had 

stopped and thai he Kid up bj the 1 ide. lie hurried to 
work and just as he arrived at the Kitlery 1'ost Office 

the ClOCk ill the steeple slruek li\e 

iii,. boys ate singing the old tune, "One bj One We 
are Passing Away." Unless we get more work soon 
this will, indeed, prove true. 

Some "f our boys are still celebrating New Year's 

or el e they have stra\ ed aw ttj 

If Hie late BuO) continues to he issued we shall 

have 10 change our shop title from "Dittj Box Saj 

in-is'' 10 "The Together shop." 



LAUNCHES 



Captain Miles certainly cut some figure on the 

Peace Daj parade when he wore his fireman's uniform 

Wanted a moustache grower. Appl) to Sammj 

Voung Mohan, while driving rivets in the Keel on 

the top floor of Building 60, pounded ins finger. He 

was naturally a little provoked, so he let go of the 
hammer and then wanted us lo believe that his hand 

was perspiring. 

We notice that Calamity .1. of the Boat simp 
machinists lias made quite a liii with the ladies "Oh 
yes, May, I will shine your badge " 

ll is e, niinon law that a man who receives stolen 
property is just as guilt) as the man who sells il. 
Now the question is: Did Blaisdell get the dollar for 
the chest that ho sold to Wiggin which "Joe Knowles 
had or does the chest belong 10 Brigham Young? 

W'e cannot help noticing how much faster the work 
is progressing since Mr. Gourville has been made a 
quarterman. 

Have you seen Jack with his new auto? 

Ileillle says he is tired of high ones anil would like 
lo Il\ a few low ones. 

Clark. Young and a, Paul, the Boat shop chefs, are 
now giving the boys a treat during the lunch hour. 
coffee topped off with cream snowballs is served 

Chef Paul insists on putting the milk in the coffee 

while ii is boiling. Consequently we get coffee high 

hails with large curdled snow drops ail for tive cents. 

It seems strange that when a man gets in a little 
difficult plaee that someone should have to happen 
along, l.asi Saturday a man came to the Boat shop 
with a cart for a load of wood, on his way home 
the wheel of the cart got mixed up on the ear track 
and broke. .lust then a man came along and said. 
"Hello. Knos." 

idle of the pipe titters whose name begins with I: 
had hotter not try to make the Boat Shop Liirls think 
he is married. He might lose the little hair that he 
now possesses. 

The) tell us 1h.1t Mr. Page, our mill man. is hardlx 
ever interested in the female sex. lie might, however. 
change his view now that men are so scarce. 



THOSE WHO PAY CASH 

GET BETTER VALUE FOR THEIR MONEY 

Congress Street B E3 f% \A/ TK2 * Ci 

Portemouth, N. H. "— » r ^ C V^ W^T i ^ «^^ Te] ,,, 4 

KERWIN SYSTEPvl SHOE STORES 
Portsmouth, Roxbury, Dorchester, Fall River, 

Framingham, (2) 

You have many advantages when you buy SHOES of 
THE KERWIN SYSTEM SHOE STOKES 

WE BUY AND SELL FOR CASH FOR SIX LARCE 
NEW ENGLAND STORES 

Cash discounts from manufacturers, no charge accounts, no trading 
stamps, less profits:— All combine to make our prices the lowest possible. 

KERW1N-LEACH CO. 

Portsmouth, N. H. - - - - 46 Congress St., 



FRUIT AND CONFECTIONERY, ICE CREAM AND SODA, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

TELEPHONE 20 w CATERING A SPECIALTY 43 CONGRESS STREET 

WHY NOT 

Place your order for your Overland NOW. Its only a short time before 

the spring riding commences. 
Model 90 Touring $985 F. 0. B. Factory and they are GOING FAST. 
There will be a shortage on some size tires this spring better order now. 

C. A. LOWD 
OVERLAND AGENCY 

Service Station & Garage 338 Pleasant St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



'I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



CARTER'S OVERALLS 

(Union Made) 
MEANS 

"A Heap o' Satisfaction" 

TO THE WEARER 

CARTER'S OVERALLS for men give the most service. Made from th e best quality 
denims, perfect fit, big and roomy. 

A STURDY OVERALL 

CARTER'S BLOOMERETTS for women. Made of fine quality KHAKI cloth, best for 
factory workers, protects the clothing, promotes safety. 

Look for the CARTER label. 

H. W. CARTER & SONS 

LEBANON, : : : NEW HAMPSHIRE 

THE OLDEST MANUFACTURERS OF OVERALLS IN THE U. S. A 



WW^fWSWW^Wl 



^rpaaBg^u.-mxry n^ ^ 



y&iMfxM ' Sl!) 



"wf "il" iil 



GJiSKSSKXSi' 



INDUSTRIAL DEPARTM 



LIFE BUOYi 





g 



SS3XSX33SSS35^££^3X5ZaSE55EZ5X£S332S5S72^K333 




NAVY YARD 
PORTSMOUTH, N.H 



MARCH and APRIL, 1919 




■ > 





i 






L ■ ■—■■■* 



B^B*** 




al 




Charming Fabrics for Spring 

Our dress goods section fairly sparkles with tasteful designs, . beautiful 
colors and dainty weaves that lend themselves so satisfactorily to garments 
for Ladies. Misses and Children— Prices too are lower in Ginghams in plain 
colors, pretty plaids and checks— 29c, 35c to $1.35 yard. 

Plain color Voiles in white and delicate shades— 44 inches wide— 59c yard. 
Light, medium and dark colors in figured Voiles— 55c, 65c yard. 

Plain Colored Mercerized Poplins, Silk Muslins, Wool 
Goods, Silks, Georgette Crepe 



GEORGE B. FRENCH CO. 



37 MARKET STREET 



PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



WOODROW WILSON 

SAYS 

"The man who disparages music as a luxury and 
non-essential is doing the nation an injury. Music 
now, more than ever, is a present national need. 
There is no better way to express patriotism than 
through good music/' 

Every Home Should Have a Piano or Victrola 



We carry the finest pianos made, 
both high and medium priced. Such 
famous makes as the 

PEASE, HAINES BROS., Wm. 

BOURNE & SONS, LESTER, 

and many others. 

These Pianos may by purchased 
on our easy payment plan. 



Our Victrola Department is most 
complete. The EDISON DIAMOND 
DISC, VICTROLA, COLUMBIA, 
SONORA,, and BRUNSWICK may 
be heard in our demonstration booths. 

We are always glad to try them 
for you. 

These may also be purchased on 
our easy payment plan. 



T-T a corTT'c MUSIC AND 

llAooilil 1 O ART QROPPI 



ART SHOPPE 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



VICTORY LOAN CLUB 



Back up the boys in France. 
Let your dollars follow our army to Berlin. 
Help "carry on" until the boys come home. 

SUBSCRIBE NOW 



We are prepared to receive your subscription and care 
for it on the same plan as all other Liberty Loans. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 

PORTSMOUTH, N. 11. 

United States Depository. Assets over Throe Million Hollars. 

SYSTEMATIC 

SAVING 

SPELLS 

SUCCESS. 



Weekly deposits bring about the most satisfactory results. 

One Dollar opens an account. Home Hanks furnished free 
to depositors. 



PISCATAQUA SAVINGS BANK, 

First National Bank Building. : : Portsmouth, N. H. 

Open Saturday Evenings (i to ^ 



••1 SAW IT IN THK LIFE BUOY" 



INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 
LIFE BUOY 



i monthly for free distribution to employee of the Indu trial Department of the 
Por( mouth '"'ivy Sfard, Pori imouth, .'• II 



VOL. II MA IK II & APRIL, 1919 NOS. 3 

AMERICA'S UNFINISHED TASK 

B/ Rev. A. Z. Conrad, D. D., Boston 

Ami he -i ri;xl J j u'J"- among the nations, and shall rebuke many people hall beat their 

xrords into ploug resandtl resii oprui nghool i:na dl not lift up sword ag 

nation, neither shall they learn war any more. Ina. 11:1. 

Citizens ol America, attention! The their pari in winning the war. Gold 

eyes of the world are on the United was transmuted into heroes who 

si. iii-- of America. Our wealth is Hi'- lounded the world with their deeds ol 

surprise ol the age. The culminating valor. 

miracle ol the centurie i I le imme i,, the excitements and enthusiasms 
diate and heartj response to the call for f war people respond with readi 
billions. The miracle consisl nol in to anj rational appeal. In (be quiel 
the fabulous amounl ol monej repr< routines ol peace there i- danger ol .. 
sented in America's response, bul in lessening appreciation of the magnitude 
the fad thai Dm- monej if nol for the ,,i \ mi ?rea | task. To complete 
aggrandizemenl ol our own country, ,,,,,• task the Governmenl musl have 
not for commercial supremacy, nol for more billions. The people are the 
power i<- command or :ontroi, bul lor ..„, ernment. Whatever the ta 
the i,i-ii. hi .-nnl blessing "i other belongs to every one of us. In furnish- 
tions. These billions have been raised j„g the monej to carry on. we are fur- 
to make righteouf a reality among the nishing ii therefore to maintain our 
nations of the earth. professed ideals and to continue our 

II i- not long since American citizens on to humanity. I 1 ■-< •nm- 

stood amazed ;ii Hi'- thought ol ■> <<\ money to accomplish readjustments 

"billion dollar Congress." It -'••■m<-o and restoration. Tin- tremendous mo 

indicative ol prodigality to the poinl ol mentum ol this nation, calling for the 

profligacy. Pour times within eighteen accumulated power of her entire <-iii- 

months the nation has '--» I l*^-*l upon her zenship, cannol Ik- stopped in ■< momenl 

citizens in terms of billions, and un- of time. With two million- of men 

hesitatingly l h<-> have answered with a across the sea, a large number ol them 

superabundance. necessarily remaining wliii<- p< 

Step by step the nation has risen to negotiations are on, and with large war 

the higher levels ol humanism. Al a contracts which could nol be cancelled 

strategic momenl our billions supplied with the stroke of a pen without doing 



LIFK BUOY 



greal injustice, with the multitude of fluence and energj in urging people to 
responsibilities incident to the greal subscribe for bonds in the Victor} Lib- 
struggle which h ;i - closed, vast sums of ertj Loan. No greater service can be 
mone} are imperative^ demanded to rendered bj men and women in in 
maintain the honor of this nation. flnential positions than Lo persuade 

The Victor} Libert} Loan is aboul to their friends thus to ally themselves 

i"' launched. Whal shall be our answer with the Government in her magnificent 

I" this call? Ever} condition of righi lasks. Ministers and churches should 

'Mill ilni\ mill honor demands thai Am- heartil} cooperate, 

erican citizens shall promptl} take up When a nation has undertaken ri'v 

this loan. New nations have recentl} l. mi things in which her honor is in 

arisen which will require protection and volved she musl plow straight through 

direction. Multitudes ol i pie have to the end of the rurrow. II is not a 

been lefl hopelessl} destitute, and Mn^ matter of choice, bul a matter of 

countr} is called upon to render <in\ necessity. The billions now called for, 

ernmental assistance enlirel} apart the Government musl and will have, il 

from voluntar} philanthropic enter- not h} bond subscriptions, then li\ laxa- 

prizes. lion in which ever} one will have to 

There is another all sufficienl reason participate. Her good name, her hon- 
wh} lln> loan should be taken care ol orable reputation as a nation demand 
wiili promptness in this il affords the that we put over this loan. Our sol- 
best possible opportunil} for safe in diers have fought to maintain the glor} 
vestment. Without doubt Lhe succes- of her flag. Man} have died for whal 
sive Libert} Loans' have been of incal- her banner represents. We cannol do 
culable benefit m cultivating Lhe habil Less in expression of our appreciation 
of thrift. H has also led multitudes of of the sacrifices made b} America's 
people in practice economj againsl the noble sons than to carr} to completion 
ihi\ ni necessity, who li.nl never in their our greal undertaking, 
lives saved .1 dollar of their earnings, We are entering upon an era ol greal 
There i- no place on earth where prosperity. We can safel} venture, 
monej can be more safel} placed with the certaint} ol winning out. Re 
than with the Government of the member, your investment introduces 

I 111 Led Stales. Thousands ol 1 pie no hazard. An> bank will accept gov- 

are easil} misled in the matter of in- ernment bonds as collateral ii mone} 

vestment, and the losses which are ~nv is desired. An} investment house will. 

Ii id b} ; pie "i moderate means nrr in an hour's time, change your IhhuI 

>ini|il\ pitiful. Government bonds are into mone} if the circumstances require 
always equivalent to cash in cases ol it. There musl be no failure, for fail- 
emergency. America's opportunity for ure would bring a shadow upon our 
aggressive self-developmenl was never national record. We will lml<l up our 
so greal as now. With adequate flnan- heads in self-respecl l>> sustaining the 
rial supporl the Govern men! will be Government in her present appeal. Our 
able in iniilil up a greal merchant patriotism, our pride, and even our self- 
marine, and can make available im- interest must insure the success of the 
mense natural resources. Victor} Liberty I. nan of the United 

Ever\ publicist should use his in- Slates. 

J "« in |y2J 



I JFK BUOY 




THE FLOATING DRY DOCK 
Completed 1851, sold May 1907, destroyed later at Revere Beach, Main. 



HISTORY U. S. NAVY YARD 

Portsmouth, N. II. 

(Continued from last irt.sue) 

An interesl ing incident al the time of 
the Launching of the Washington was 
the arresl of a young man in undr< 
uniform who was suspected ui being a 
British spy, but upon examination 
I • r o\ i'i] in iir ,-i \ ounger brol her ol Com 
modore Chauncj . 

The fitting out of the Washington 
was somewhal delayed by a sirikr 
among the workmen which occurred in 
August, 1815. Tin- strike appears to 
have been caused bj the inw paj re- 
1 1 n ril bj I in' men, owing to I he fai I 
thai Treasury notes had greatly depre- 
ciated in value. In a letter to i he Com 
mandant, the Secretary oi the Navj 
stated thai as soon as the Washington 
could be sufficiently equipped to permit 
her to go to New York, she would do so, 
and informed him thai ii was most 
likely thai in the future all Naval opera- 
tions and equipment would be trans 
fei red from the Northern to the Middle 
and Southern States, where Treasury 



notes were equal to those in gold and 
silver. This letter had the efTecl of 
causing the men to return to work, and 
I he Washington was completed ai this 
"i ard, and in October of 1 8 l 5 sailed for 
Europe. 

Prom 1815 to 1818, there was prac 
tically no ship work done al the Yard, 
and in consequence the number of 
workmen employed was reduced to a 
very small number. In 1818 no more 
than fifty mechanics were employed, 
and thej were al work upon ^ ard im 
provements. About this time, the house 
which had been fitted Cor the Com 
mandant from the ul<l building origin- 
allj on the island, was remodeled and 
rebuilt, and the grounds were also en 
closed. This is the house that is at 
pr< '-ui occupied i • > the Commandant, 

On July is. 1818, Captain Charles 
Morriss succeeded Commodore McDon 
ough .i- Commandant. 

The severity of di scipline in the old 
Navj i- shown l>> an entrj in the Yard 
Journal made in 1820, which i 
follows : 

"Dyas received twelve la hi on the 



LIFE BUOY 



naked back, agreeablj to Lhe rules and 
regulations of the Navy for smuggling 
spirituous liquors into the Yard." 

II is slill rmii rarj to the regulations 
of the Navy In bring spirituous liquors 
into the Yard, bu1 the punishment now- 
adays differs considerablj from thai 
administered al thai time. 

An excellent record in shipbuilding 
was made at this time when the build- 
ing and equipping of the Schooner Por- 
poise was accomplished in a hllli' over 
four months. She was a small vessel, 
Iml nevertheless the time of building 
hei was much shorter than usual for 
wood vessels of her size. The vessel 
was urgentlj needed for an expedition 
againsl the Pirates thai infested the 
West imiies. Soon after leaving lliis 
Yard, she had attacked and captured 
six piratical vessels on the Coasl of 
Cuba. Her life was nol long, however. 
lui she was lusl iii the West Indies in 
1833. 

II is interesting to note the wages 
received bv employees in the Navj 
Yard at this period. Carpenters re- 
ceived from $2.00 to $1.00, average 
$1.38; sawyers from $1.33 to $1.16, 
average $1.25; joiners from $1.50 to 
$1.00, average $1.27; blacksmiths from 
$2.25 In $ 1.00. The number of men 
employed in the Yard at this Lime was 
In the neighborhood of one hundred. 

The first brick building erected in 
the Yard was begun in Isl'1 and was 
used, when completed, as a storehouse 
ami for offices. This is still used as a 
Storehouse, being Building No. I. 

In Maj . 1 82 l . application w as made 
to the State of Maine "for cession of 
Hit jurisdiction of the island mi which 
the Navj Yard at Portsmouth is sit 
uat.ed," and on the -ml of February, 
1822, il was granted hy the following 
Act of the State Legislature: 
"STATE OF MAINE' 

"In the year of our Lord one thous- 
and eight hundred and twenly-lwo an 
act to cede to the United States the 
jurisdiction of Dennetts Island, so 
called, in Piscataqua River: 

"Be il enacted by the senate and 
house of representatives in legislature 



assembled, That there be, and hereby 

is, eeded lo lhe United States the juris- 

dieli ver Dennetts Island, so called, 

on the easl side of Piscataqua River, 
within the State of Maine, now belong- 
ing to the United States, and occupied 
as a navy-j ard : 

"Provided, however, Thai this State 
shall have ciinciirrenl jurisdiction with 
the United States over said island, so 
far as that all civil and criminal process 
issued under authority of this State maj 

In executed On any pari ol said island, 
or in anv building creeled on lhe same; 

and thai all persons residing thereon, 
nol being in the military or marine ser- 
vice of the United States, shall be 
holden lo do militarj duly in lhe militia 

Of the State in the same waj and man- 
ner as il the jurisdiction had not been 
ceded as a foresaid." 

On September •»':.'. 1822, the bridge 
connecting Portsmouth with Kittery 
was completed so that il was open for 
passengers, and the ferry between the 
two towns discontinued. The bridge 
between the Navy Yard Island and Kit- 
tery was not built, however, for several 
years. On Pebruarj 21, I 825, Congress 
appropriated $3,000 for improvements 

and repairs in lhe Yard, and during Ibis 
year a bridge lo Kittery was built al a 
cost of $2373. The Commandant made 

propositions to the owners ol the land 
adjoining the bridge lo cul a road lead- 
ing lo lhe main highway ol' Killcrv. The 
owners of the land objected lo such a 

mad, although lhe Government offered 

lo purchase their laud lor Ibis purpose. 
finding that nothing could be effected 
by negotiation, application was made lo 
lhe Selectmen of Kittery, with lhe as- 
surance thai lhe damages would be 
pan! by lhe Government. The road was 

then laid Out by them according lo lhe 
laws. of lhe State and became a low n 
way. The damages were paid by lhe 

United Slab's. Thus, laud communi- 
cation was opened with Portsmouth 

during lhe summer of 1825. 

The Masl and Spar Shed, now Build- 
ing No. 7, was finished in IS-J.">. In 
1826 considerable work in improving 
lhe Yard was done. Work on the 



LIFE BUOY 



Marine Barracks was begun in Septem- 
b< r, the site selected being the extreme 
Dortheastern point of the island. Many 
hi the wooden buildings and > h c< I s were 
demolished, especially those in the vi- 
cinitj hi the shiphouses. The new 
brick quarters lor Warrant Officers 
were also commenced. Toward the end 
ni I in- year the force employed al the 
Yard was considerably reduced, being 
as low as twenty-five on the first of 
November. Naval Constructor John 
Floyd was added to the establishment 
of the Yard, being the firs! Naval Con- 
structor regularlj attached to it. He 
remained here mi dutj until In- death 
in 1838. 

The status of women in the Navy 
Yard was vastlj differeni in those days 
than todaj when they are employed nol 
only in clerical positions hut in the 
sini|is a> well. In 1826 the Secretarj 
ni the .\a\> wrote the Commandant: 
"That it is contrary to the regulations 
ami pracl ice of 1 he sen ice to allow I he 
names ot women to appear on the mus- 
ter roll, and, however inconvenient M 
maj be to the officers who require ser- 
vants to emploj men, the rule must be 
adhered to." 

During the years from 1826 to 1832, 
there was little work of consequence 
done al llif Yard. During 1832 the 
Vincennes and the Concord arrived al 
the Yard, and the crews were paid off; 
these were the lirsl two ship- to be 
paid nil al the Yard since the war of 
1X12. In 1827 the keel of the Sloop of 
War Concord was laid al this Yard, and 
at about the same time I he Philadelphia 
Yard began to build a sister ship, the 
Vandalia, and the Hu-lun Yard another 
ship, the Falmouth. There was con- 
siderable rivalry in building these ships 
al the several Yards, and accurate ac- 
counts of their cost were kept and 
exchanged between lhe Commandants. 
The Concord, built at Ihi- Yard, cost 
$5659 less than the Boston built ship. 
The cost ui I he Philadelphia built ship 
is not known. During is:i^ and 1833 
the Officers' Quarters "C," "D," "E" 
and "F" were built. 

The Franklin Shiphouse, Building 



No. 53, was begun in 1834 and com- 
pleted in 1838. The first ship to be 
liuill in il was the Sloop of War Preble. 
As soon as thai vessel was launched, 
preparations were made to build a 
Frigate to be railed the Congress on the 
same ways under the new Shiphouse. 
She was much larger than the old Con- 
gress, which was launched from Lang- 
don's Island nearby, August 15, 1799. 
The new Congress was quicklj com- 
pleted; her first cruise was to the Medi- 
terranean in is ',2 and 1843. This 
Frigate had a fine record, and as she 
was une ui the earlier vcitims ui the 
Civil War, a -Imrl description of her 
last fight ma\ he ui interest. She was 
burned in Hampton Roads, Virginia, in 
action with the Confederate Ironclad 
Merrimac, March 8, 1862, while under 
command of Joseph B. Smith, her First 
Lieutenant, her Captain being absent on 
duty. The following description given 
bj Boynton serves to describe the de- 
si ruel ion ul' I his noble ship : 

"Al a little past 2 \>. m. Lhe huge 
mailed frigate had approached the Con 
press within grape shot distance; ami 
then every man in in- place, Hie guns 

trained to lhe proper elevation, the 
lanyards in the gunner's hand, scarcelj 
a sound was heard throughout the de- 
voted ship while they awailed lhe al- 
laek ul the dreaded foe. A putf of 
smoke from one of her bow guns, and 
everj breath stopped an instant till a 
storm of grape swept over the deck and 

rallied on her sides. A long lirealh of 

relief that il was no worse. Keeping 
on her course, she was passing the 
Congress at less than une fourth of a 
mile distanl heading for the Cumber 
land. Al thai distance the Congress de- 
livered her broadside. Her heaviest 
-hoi glanced harmles- from lhe side of 
lhe mailed mon-ler. and all fell that 
lhe battle was already decided, and that 
nothing remained but to surrender or to 
he destroyed with their ship. The re- 
turn lire of the Merrimac only con- 
firmed their worst fear-. Her shells 
came crashing through lhe sides of 
their -hip, spreading death ami ruin mi 
every side. They knew thai success 



8 LIFE BUOY 



was hopeless, escape impossible, and The Electrical Shop contains a lab- 
resistance rum. Yet an American fifty oratorj where all sorts of navigational 
gun ship could not be surrendered thus, optical and electrical instruments are 
so the strong hearted martyrs stood by overhauled, repaired, and calibrated 
their flag and to their guns. But it was 

no! the intention of the rebel com- Tms Shop has a competent force of 

mander to finish his work then. Pass- mechanics skilled in the installation and 

ing the Congress at a distance of about kestin 8 of radio outfits. II has equipped 

three hundred yards, he ran direcl for • |I " M|1 sixty ships of the Emergency 

the Cumberland." I '' l,,, ' ! Corporation with radio outfits, and 



(To be concluded in next issue) 



has done considerable work on the 
radio systems of the Shore Stations in 
the First Naval District. 

ELECTRICIANS SHOP BUILDING 'V ; "f-!' '""'' '"' ""' work being done 

«« i.,^ r»~, • ""' Wectrical Shop is iii connection 

89 AND POWER PLANT with the construction of Submarines at 

BUILDING 72. this Yard - Tne main switchboards and 

,. ... . . ,-, , numerous small panels are being built 

Until about a year ago the Electrical ,,„,,, Electrical work on Submarines is 

Shop was located ,n Building 79 where ex tremelj difficult and requires me- 

' ,l1 kinds '" electrical work, including ehanics of the highesl order 
the manufacture of electrical fittings 

for the Navy, was carried mi. At thai ' '"' Power Plant force is charged 

time the manufacture work had become with ""' operation of the Power Plant, 

so great in volume that it was deemed which supplies electricitj for light, heat 

advisable to separate it from the repair and power, compressed air for (he op- 

and installation work ami place the two eration id' machinery and tools in the 

activities under separate foremen. Ac- "hops and on board ship, ami heal for 

cordingly, the Electrical Shop was practically all the buildings of the Yard, 

transferred to the second floor of Build- This force has charge id' the mstalla- 

ing 89 ami placed under Mr. T. F. Plan- ll "" "' sno P '""tors, 'Sard transmission 

agan, the Master Electrician in charge '"""•• •"" l piping for (he distribution 

ol the Power Plant. This shop has not systems lor heat, air, and water. A 

yet been completely equipped with crew from the Power Plant force cares 

machinery, hut ever since (he transfer '"' ; ""' operates lite <\r\ dock pumping 

was made, ii has earned on a large machinery and the machinery in the dry 

volume of work. dock caisson. About seventy-five men 

The Electrical Shop is charged with p^ l " VM '"' '''"l' 1 "^'' 1 '■' the Power 
the manufacture, installation, overhaul, 

ami repair of electrical appliances on The organization of the Outside Elec- 

board ship. The machinery on hoard a trical Shop ami Power Plant is as fol- 

modera ship is principally electrical, lows: 

except the main propelling machinery ,, ,,, . . . 

and that, too, - electrical on some of Master Electrician, I. F. Flanagan, 

the verj latest ships. Work on com- Electrical Shop, Bldg. 89— Quarter- 

munication systems, wireless appara- men J - A - p ethic, L. I. Williams; Lead- 

tus, lighting systems, storage hatler.es. "'/'h"'"' \" » „ v/" H ' Jenklns - J - R - 

switchboards, etc, is necessary also, ? let hroade, E. It. Harvey. A. II. Hun- 

and lor such work a highly skilled force 00 "' E " "/ 8 * 8n *l h - L " E " French > & 

of employees is necessary. The num- ' Frary ' A - U ' Pisher . M. W. Thomp- 

ber employed in this Shop is 2i6. l*p son " 

1(1 ""' present, no reduction in force has Power Plant. Bldg. 72 — Quarterman 

resulted from the cessation of war H. C. MeKenney; Leadingmen F e! 

activities. Dinsmore, T. B. Ruxtori, J, V. Gerry. " 



LIFE BUOY 







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10 LIFE BUOY 



THE SAFETY HABIT to a certain degree, hut what, availeth il 

in a man it' his peace of mind becomes 
so disturbed thai he becomes disgrun- 
tled and cynical. The old adage of 
"Experience teaches" when applied to 



Ever since the time when the cloud 
li> daj .nut the pillar of fire bj night led 
the children of Israel l<> the safety of 



the Promised Land, mankind lias re- an accidenl often exacts a terrific paj 
.[uired constanl warnings the better to men! and is never worth the cost, 
enable it from keeping out or away Only when each and every employee 

from danger. f the strange truths so practises safety thai il becomes in- 

of life is fact that man requires the culcated in his every movement and 

mosi guidance for his safety, notwith- 
standing the fact thai man calls himseli 
the most intelligent of all animal-. The 
lower animals, for example, have 



thought can the result we are all striv- 
ing for— the elimination of accidents 
causing poverty, woe and misery — be 

attained. The safely habit is not easily 
earned l hroug h experience or from in- , .. ,, ,', , ,. 

1 acquired for things that are easj ol ac 



tinci to proteci themselves from the 
wiles of man or to resist the attack of 
other animal-. During the past few 



complishment are not vividly impressed 
upon us. Only by a systematic thought- 
ful safety altitude can the safety habit 

years an extensive campaign has been , ,, ■ , 

1 ' be reallj acquired. 

w aged in factories !>\ mean- oi bulle 

tins, signs, safetj literature and through Hv the erection of safeguards such 

safetj organizations in order to assure as hoods over emery wheels, guards 
the employee's safety. around moving belts and pulleys as well 

as li\ numerous other safetj devices, 
iiiiU a small reduction in the number 



The fundamental wav to make men 



a 



change i heir habit of doing things in an 
unsafe wax ,- to train them to see dan- "' accidents can be expected. The hulk 
gerous conditions before accidents hap- '"' accidents arc due to carelessness, 
pen. The prevention of accidents ma; thoughtlessness, ignorance and chance- 
be a new thing Ui main employees and taking. 

the mailer ol posting safetj bulletins, Negligence ol an employee in wear- 
signs, and the issuing of safetj litera- ing safetj goggles max cos! that em- 
ture doc- not accomplish much unless ployee the loss of an eye if no! the loss 
practised faithfully. of total vision. Who wants to think 
Many employees are still of the opin- '"' Possi'blj becoming momentarily or 

ion that no matter what precautionary Permanently blind becaus ie was 

measures arc taken, accidents arc careless in nol using the goggles pro- 
bound to happen. The old saying that, vided - A " employee maj carelesslj 

•I have 1 ii doing this for years and h ' ;n '' a l "" 1 '"' ; ' portion of his work in 

have never been injured, and therefore. such ;l Position that a fellow-employee 

I can nol see why I should change to a ""' knowing about the same may push 

safer method," is easilj proven to be a h s0 tha1 a death ma >' resultl 

false standard when consideration is There is practically not an employee 

given to available statistics showing lost on the Yard who would willfully com- 

time figures. An employee who loses mil a thoughtless act; nevertheless 

an eye, a leg or an arm is recompensed thoughtless aids do occur because em- 



LIFE BUOY 



11 



ploj ees do not think. For instance, an 
employee maj be carrying a long iron 
bar and be thinking <>f sunn: rng;ige 
ment or entertainmeni he intends going 
in. wherebj he loses his sense of cau 
linn and strikes another employee 
inflicting possiblj a serious injury. 
( lonstanl at tention to l he work one has 
in hand requires a certain amount of 
e Hurl linl do you no! expecl H of l he 
other fellow. Consequently, whal is 
fair in one is fair to I he ol her. 

\ 1 1 it ma n\ acciden I s and when l he 
cause of the accidenl is determined i1 
i- often found thai ignorance was to 
blame. When employees are not cer- 
tain and positive as to w hat l hej are re- 
quired in do thej should no! hesitate 
In ask their Leadingman. Thai is wh> 
the Leadingman holds his position. 
When employees of necessity are re- 
quired In do things they are ignoranl of 
they should immediately stop the work 
and seek advice as to whal thej do not 
understand. 

Chance-taking has cost a goodly 
number of men the loss of their lives. 
Short cuts are always dangerous and 
should never be taken. The saying, 
"The longesl waj round is the sweet 
est way home to the loved ones," should 
never be forgotten. Manj men are 
fortunate in taking chances, iml when 
once practised a bad habil is acquired 
and ultimately an accident is bound to 
happen. To take a concrete case, an 

employee maj I ngaged in lining a 

ceftain piece of work and nol being 
sure he has rigidly fastened his work 
he taV es a chance ral her I han expend- 
ing a little extra effori to make sure the 
hitch is correct, with the result the 
work falls, possibly killing someone 
who may be working directlj under- 
neath Hi' 1 load. 




LIEUT. JACKSON COMES TO 
THIS YARD FROM BOSTON 

Lieut, (j. g.) Frederick ('•. Jackson, 
U. s. V H. F., graduated from Harvard 
College in 1903. He studie<J»advanced 
chemistrj in the Harvard Graduate 
School and for a \ ear in < rermanj . He 
has had the unusual experience of Inn- 
ing visited Heligoland in 1907 as a I ' 

ist. Hi' taughl chemistry for three 
j ears al Purdue and N'orl h I lakota Uni- 
versities and has had a wide industrial 
chemical experience throughout the 
Middle West, including a year and i 
half wilh the Illinois Steel Company in 
( ihicagi '. 

Foreseeing whal was coming, Lieut. 
Jackson enlisted in the Naval Reserve 
on March 18th, 1917, as a gunner's 
mate, third class. He was called April 
1 8th and sent to Marblehead Training 
Stat ion. < m May 30th he was senl to 
the I '. s. s. Part henia, a steam yacht 
being converted for patrol duty. He 
later obtained a transfer to the chemical 
laboratorj of the Boston N'avy Yard and 



12 



LIFE BUOY 



was made yeoman, tirst class, Oct. 1st. 
\ month later he was made chief yeo- 
man and commissioned technical en- 
sign, chemical engineer, Feb. 8th, 1918. 
in the summer, the laboratory was 
moved to much larger quarters and a 
physical testing laboratory added un- 
der Ensign Jackson's direction, Nov- 
ember 13th he was made Lieutenant 
(j. g.) and on Feb. 31st, L919, lie was 
detached and ordered to Portsmouth 
\.i\> Yard. 

Lieut. Jackson has been assigned to 
dutj at this Yard, under the shop 
Superintendent, in connection with the 
installation of a laboratory for bronze 
,i iid brass anah sis. 



expert Electrical Officer of this Yard, 
so thai all here might, profit by his 
knowledge and ability in this important 
branch of Naval Engineering. 

Immediately after signing of the 
armistice the president of the General 
Electric Company asked him to request 
that he be plaeed on an inactive status 
ai a- earlj a date as possible, so thai he 
might resume his former work with 
them. As soon as his services could be 
dispensed with at this Yard lie was 

placed on an inactive status, and left 
I lie Yard March 15, 1919, to resume 
work with the General Electric Com- 
pany. 



LT. R. B. HORNING, U. S. N. R. F. 

I.I. It. B. Horning, U. S. Y It. P., who 
was born in Schenectady, .\. Y., was 
graduated from I'cnn. State College in 
191 I. Sin rtly after lea\ nig college he 

went lo work for the General Electric 
Company in their plant at Schenectady, 
where he remained until he hail ac- 
quired a thorough technical Knowledge 
ill all the electrical machines built by 
the company, lie then entered their 
sales department and rose steadily until 
at ilic beginning of 1917 he was sales 
manager for the Philadelphia district. 
When thd United States declared war 
in April oi that year lie was one of the 
first hi mii i ■ i t i i • i • an en\ lable position 
with a good salarj and accept a com- 
mission as Lieutenant j. g. I in the 
\a\al Reserve force. lie was at oner 

assigned to duty as Electrical Officer of 
the protected cruiser Seattle, convoj 
mi: troop -hips through the submarine 
zone. Lieut. Horning showed such 
marked ability and zeal in his work 
that lie was promoted lo the rank of 
Lieutenant ami assigned lo duty as 



PERSONALS 

Carpenter Charles I!. Marshall, U. S. 
N., has been ordered detached from this 
Yard to report aboard the U. S. S. Trov 
al New York. 

Mr. C. C. Rausch, former Safety En- 
gineer at the Yard, now connected with 
The Institute of Safety at New York, 
was a visitor to the Yard Saturday, 

March S. 

Mr. Iliigelmaii. our Safety Engineer, 
was confined lo his home with a slight 
attack of the grippe during the latter 
pari of Februarj . 



DR. TIBBETTS LEAVES YARD 

(hi February I. CM'.'. Lieutenant. 
Raymond Richard Tibbetts was placed 
on the inactive li-l of I he l rnited stale- 
Na\al Reserve Force. He has returned 
to his home in Bethel. Maine, where he 
expects to resume his practice. 

While on dutj here he made a host of 
friends and has the best wishes of all 
I he officials ami employees of this Yard. 



LIFE BUOY 



13 




Ii'IIhw worker, a man always readj and 
willing to respond to anj call upon him 
from anj source. 



WALTER LaFOREST BALL 

On February 22, 1919, the Ports- 
mouth Navj Yard losl one of its oldest 
and mosl respected employees, when 
Waller Ball passed away at his home in 
Kittery. Mr. Ball was born al Somers- 
worth, \. II., Dec. 10, 1855, the son of 
John R. and Mary Homans Ball. The 
family came to Kitterj in 1868 and Mr. 
Ball gained iiiu-i iif his educal ion in I he 
public schools of Kittery. In in? I Mr. 
Ball began liis service al the Ports- 
mouth Navj Yard as a painter's appren- 
tice, advancing to the position of 
leadingman painter acting in charge of 
the Yards and Docks painting crew in 
1892, lu foreman painter Construction 
and Repair Departmenl and was finally 
made Master Painter in I '. > 1 7 . Mr. 
Ball was married August, 1 m 7 : '. . to Miss 
Ella P. Lewis, daughter of Joseph 
Lewis. Mr. Ball was ,-, member of 
Riverside Lodge, No. 72. I. ( I. 0. F. 
\ui onlj has Kitterj losl a good neigh- 
bor and citizen, bul we of the Ports- 
mouth Navj Yard have losl a good 



II 'In/ we Iki re <i " I 'ictory" 
Liberty Loan 

We of the United States entered the 
war because we had to. The ruthless 
murder of our own people compelled us. 

We went into war enthusiastically, 
determined that, as it had to be done, we 
would do it thoroughly. 

Our allies, after three years of tensest 
strain, were weary. The fresh troops 
we poured into Europe put hope and 
assurance into their hearts and dismay 
into the hearts of the Boche. His hour 
had struck. 

To gather, equip, maintain, train and 
transport overseas, our army and navy, 
required great sums. The unparalleled 
outpouring in the First and Second Lib- 
erty Loans furnished these sums and also 
kept the Allies in the field. The Third 
and Fourth Loans, with theifstill greater 
offerings, made possible the accomplish- 
ment of marvelous tasks. 

By December 15, 1918, the money 
raised by the Fourth Liberty Loan was 
spent. There still remain the gigantic 
tasks of demobilization, the maintain- 
ance of an army of occupation, the care 
of the wounded, and the finishing of the 
ships. In order to bring the war to a 
successful conclusion we must lend more 
money, and "finish the job." 

This in why we are having a 
" Victory" Liberty Limn 

Patriotism is in abiding force in every 
American heart. The efforts which 
made the earlier loans so successful will 
never leave this job unfinished. The 
Victory is ours, and we will pay for it by 
subscribing to the "Victory" Liberty 
Loan. We will "finish the job." 
New England Liberty Loan Committee. 



14 LIFE KUOY 



BOAT SHOP have been few and far between where 

The boys who left the Boal Shop and '"> discord has arisen among workmen 

enlisted for overseas dutj are graduallj '"' v '" tnis sho P all(1 M seems '"" bad 

returning lo us. We have been verv ,hal xv '" have had '" break "P '""' op - 

interested in the experiences of MessrJ. -"" ' ' ; "" i have so man J ,; " " leave 

Hooper, Wildes and Littlefield. The us ' 

•" ''" liMl '" lil|1|r ' xperiences while on Hats fl ,,, ,,,,,. mos | excellenl and 

dutj al one Naval Stations in Ireland efficient oiler! We do not see hov we 

have proved vers interesting to us could get along should she leave us. II 

especiallj the pictures which ihe> is hard to tell lhe ;lllll) mi| , monej 

« M back '" l|v - There are now which she has saved Uncle Sam since 

two of the boys still remaining in Ire- ghe has carr ] e d the oil can. An> time 

land, uamels G-odfrej and Morgan. No ,,, , hl> you can see her ,„.,.,. ,,,,,, on Ml( , 

doubl thes will be back soon. top of one of the big band saws ,,,. yo „ 

A number of the former emplos^ees pan . find her beneath the saw. she is 

of the Boal Shop w ho un ace il of the always i n the job. 

lack ol work were furloughed and wen I We all wonder whs Mr. Gourville has 

In their homes in the Wesl are writing such a sad expression Latelj '.' 

in us. Thes all have .1 g I word for .. . . ,, . . , ,, 

It 1- suggested thai we lake a collec 
lhe tilil Mnai Shop and wish lhe\ were , .. ,,., , ,. . . 

lion for a mnlller forSam s T111L12 

back again wilh us. Some ni Ihese men ,, .. , ., ,. ,. , 

II is said in \ork I hat the uexl hnie he 

bad never seen 1 he sal 1 w ater or I he , . , ... , . ... 

enine- I here he rerlaml\ w ill he 'pulled 

an in Iheir lives ami il certamls w as 

in. 
quite an experience I" come Easl and 

lake in the sights on this coast. To " is said tha1 '""' '" '""' apprentice 

some il will be an experience long to be i,m - wno lives '" Kiltery is vers fond 

remembered. An> time an> of the of the girls and he is very fond of danc- 

Boal simp fellows think of traveling m - a1 -'- 

through the Western States be sure to due of our formerJemployees who is 

gel in touch with some of the boys who no\s a Carpenter in the U. S. Navy, was 

worked here during lasl summer and a recent visitor here. Carpenter Water- 

lhe\ will be onl\ too glad to -how you worth has had duly in a large Naval 

the sights in their country. Mr. Leo f) ase ,,, England. He has had all the 

Morion Young, whose home is in Ar- work and upkeep on Lhirtj six Suh- 

kansas, extends an invitation to his marine Chasers and on Ins visit here 

home any time at his cabin on the plain. told us mans interesting incidents in 

There 1- "no lock on lhe door and the connection with his duties abroad. Since 

latch string is out." the Armistice was signed he has been 

Without boasting the workmen of '" Frailce and Belgium, returning to 

the Boat Shop have always been a this countrs bul recently. 

happy family, as s*ou mighl say, and we Mr. Fritjof Ammundson, who was 

do not think there is ans -hop an\ where transferred from ihis Yard to the New 

where the men have worked together so York yard, has written to n-. lie likes 

harmoniously and with such good feel- New York and his work, bul wishes he 

ing a- prevailed here. The occasion's was back with the boys here. 



LIFE BUOY 



15 



We have also heard from our appren- 
tice boj , Ii. C. Garland, who some time 
ago lefl here to spend the winter in 
Florida. He says thai the worst scare 
he ever got, was when a large snake 
curled around his I <• ^ when he was 
working in a cane field. II did no! take 
him long In "jack up" that job. He is 
now working on the railroad and likes 
\rr\ much. 

The question has been asked by a 
good many on I h <• Yard, "Can or will 
the Imi> - come across with the flfl h loan 
and keep up the standard of this yard 
thai is dow recognized al Washington 
ami which has and will help this Yard 
in the future?" Some say, "Thej are 
no! selling al par." The Boal Shop's 
answers to these two questions are 
first, "The facl thai you have boughl so 
many bonds and paid for them during 

the War make-, you worth thai much 

more than when you started to Imy and 
are better able to buy the fifth than I he 
first." Second, "Selling below par." 
You did no! buy with the understand- 
ing thai you were to sell as soon as you 
had fchem paid for. If you did you are 
a "Quitter." .Now il i*- very little for 
any employee on lh"- Yard to cry when 
he is getting interesl on par value and 
the besl companj in the world. Uncle 
Sam. i- back of it. W'hal aboul the young 
man thai wcni across .' Did he gel the 
investmenl you did .' Would you 
change places with him? Think this 
over, boys, and let us show them in 
Washington thai we are with them. 



NOT TO BE FLATTERED 

We've come from the mud ana the dirl and the 

Klime of it. 
Out of the t .] < .cjri and the hurt and the crime of it, 
Some of u.s limping on crutches, and ome 
Minus an eye or an arm or a thumb, 
More or less shattered by shrapnel and battered, 
SUII for all that we don't want to be Mattered 



We've known the Hilck of the steel ana 

brum ol ii 
Heard md grown Ich "i I hi quea I al the I 

ol a; 
Wallowed In bloi id that out - omi ide had 
i 'air led i in- woundi 6 and burled t he dead . 
Bullets have spattered around us and clattered. 
Still (or all Hi at we don'l want to be Battered 

While with a song oi a cheer we all went over, 
Manx a strong waited here to be sent over; 
They would have shared each triumphant ad- 
vance— 
Suffered and died, too; thej • irned for the 

chance; 
Pate enl u to It, bul now thai we're through it 
■ >i er us a little, bul don't overdo it. 

The Navy STard Emplo 



STRUCTURAL SHOP, BLDG. 44 

A pall of gloom, hangs o'er our .shop. 
Prom apex to foundation prop; 
a ml count Ii are I hi tin ut I ered sighs, 
Am 1 dimmed with tears are ma n i i 

I EOWed are our heads. Willi dl I 

For Janet' or in eight daj l< ivi 

Mar. in-ioad of squandering his hard 
earned income in riotous living, is do- 
ing far worse. He is expending il for 
printed copies ol the Rev. Myers' ser- 
mons. 

Mr. Riley, the only and original "Mr. 
Riley, thej speak of so highly," is again 
with us. and the shop now seems 

nal Mi'al. 

The genial Charles Brooks i 
presenl busily engaged in enacting the 
drama entitled, "ttui again, in again." 
May he -non be with us permanently. 

Roger ' tul wail i- confined bj illness 
in his residence on State Street. He 
has the besl wishes of us all for a 
speedy recovery. 

A-k Neal who experimented with his 
tea. 

Children, nexl month perhaps I'll tell 

of "Uncle frank" and our dear "Aunt 
Noll." 



1(5 



f™\~ 



INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 

LIFE BUOYi 



llic matter will be referred to ilu' In- 
dustrial Manager for final acl ion. 

:!. The Life Buoy is intended as a 
magazine of general and useful infor- 
mation for all employees of the Indus- 
trial Uepartmenl and in bring us all 
together and to promote good feeling 
ami cooperation and general efficiency. 
Good uatured jokes are desired, l>ul 
articles detrimental to anj employee or 
which would in anj waj cause annoj 
ance to anj member of the Yard force 
arc mil wanted and will be refused 

Editor-in-chief R. W. Ryden publication. Confidential matter and 

Editor J. K. Hugelman 

Associate Editor ll. L. Hartford '"formation whirl, ,1 is m.l de Sl ra to 

Associate Editor and give out to the public are also pro 

Business Manager M. o. Richards hibited 

"cENSORSHIP~OF THE LIFE . V tu^ZiTV^ 8 ™ "*•"*? 

Ii'imii ail cmiiiiiv co. I ins magazine i*- 

BUOY, INDUSTRIAL DEPT. „„. I(l „ employees as a whole a> , the 

MAGAZINE interest of them and the work of the 

In order to clearly define duties as re- Nav - X Yard " |s desired thai all co- 

gards ccnsi.rsl.il,. of those charged with °P erate to '■"" l """' "* successfu - 



tlu" publication of the Life Buoy, the 

Industrial Manager has issued the fol- 
lowing order. 

1. II i- directed thai hereafter the 
instructions for the censorship of the 
Li fe Buoj be modified as follow s : 

2. The articles will be obtained and 
prepared for publical ion l>\ I he lone of 
the Safetj Engineer and under his 
super\ ision. All mallei' will l hen be 
submitted to the Safetj Engineer, Mr. 
.1. It. Hugelman, and his assistant, Mr. 
II. L. I larl ford, for censorshi p. The 
Safet\ Engineer will then transmit I be 



heal Kin. Us col ll mil-- are open l<> mal 

lers in connection wdh clubs, associa- 
tions, ami unions of employees, and 
contributions ol this kind will be 
welcomed. 

L. S. ADAMS, 
Captain, Construction Corps, IT. S. N. 

Indiisl rial Manager. 



CRITICISM—AN ASSET OR A 
LIABILITY 



"Criticism is either an assel or a lia- 
ulity. Never listen to a critic who can- 
articles proposed for publication, to not suggest something to take the place 

gether with anj comn I rrom the of the thing he would tear down." 

censors, either oral or written, to the Criticism should never be destructive. 

Shop Superintendent, who will then ll should be given with the idea of help 
pass final judgment on them and auth- ing the one being criticised. The besl 
orize or prohibil their publication ac- criticism should be constructive — it 
cording to his judgment, excepi thai in should suggesl something to take the 

ea^es of douhl or differences of opinion place of Ihe acl com mil I ed ralher than 



LIFE I'.UOY 



17 



in simplj saj il should mil have been 
done. 

Evepj ambitious man everj man 
who i- trying to improve himself and 
Ins work will gladl) accept a sugges- 
tion. When he reaches s point in his 
life or in- work where no one's sugges 
inm will be accepted, he is sure to stand 
still. Ill' will soon In 1 in i in' i in r. for 
Ins colleagues are r\*'f moving forward. 

Listen to suggestions, no matter from 
whom i hej maj come. E\ en I he nil ice 
bus maj suggesl something thai maj 
in- hi greal assistance in you. II ha 
been done l hal 's whj 50 manj former 
office boys are now in managers' chair 

^ mi will li ml men who a pe contin 
11. ilk criticising someone, bui wilhonl 
.1 suggestion for the improvemenl of 
limits Mr conditions. These same men 
would iiiw er tell j ou you p ow n faul I s, 
lull are al w aj - eager to tell 1 he ol her 
fellow. This kind of criticism never 
1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 - . ■ 1 1 1 > 1 1 1 n ■ . 

M you wun hi build 11 |i 11 ml ln'l i> your 
neighbor, tell him whepe in- action is 
wrong and al the same time sugge 1 
something to improve him and Ins 
wopk. This kind of criticism is always 
upbuilding. 

1 1 ri'ii ics would I urn i he sea pchl ighl 
upon l hemselves and l heir own w opI 
I hej would find l hal sel I cpil ir.ism is 
always in opdep and manj times ol gpeal 
\ alue. 

There 1- hardlj a daj goes bj bul 
whal some ■ > x ■ » ■ says : "1 - 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 have 
<li mi' 1 hal ." [f it stops I here l he poinl 
i- lost. < 'n the other hand, 1 1 you sug 
gesl In yourself whal should have been 
cluiH'. you profll li> your own criticism. 

I ilmi'l believe in 3aying "Whj did I 
fail '" bul pal hep, "Why did I succeed '.'" 
In handling big affairs you will be 1 ■ r« ■ 



pa nil 1 11 ini'i'l - 1 in il.ir riniil il inns, slum hi 

thej arise. I k to your succe 

pal hep 1 Inm in your fail ures. 

This is mil ,1 daj hi Leaping dow 11 and 
discouraging bj criticism, bul one ol 
upbuilding and imppo\ ing bj sugge 
Lion. I consider evepj 'suggestion for 
mi ppo\ ing mj sel 1 or mj w opk an as el 
and mil ;i liability. 

Lei I Ins be a motto for you : "Criti- 
cism with suggestions solicited." Sin 
Joaquin l.ij-'lil and Power Mngassine. 




WAR WORK BADGE 

The returning soldier displays on his 
sleeve the badge ol his "miliii" with 
considerable ppide and we, as members 
Hi llic Kii'si Naval District, are offered 
■ 1 sim ilar opporl unitj to w ear 1 he 
bj'onze badges imw being sold in .ill 1 1<- 
pari menl - of tins Yard. 

The nominal sum charged is onlj 
sn ll ini'iil in defraj the cosl ol design 
ing and making 1 he badges. II 
originallj intended In distribute the a 
badge - I ree bul since 1 here w a - no a p 
proprial ion a\ ailable to de fraj 1 he cost 
hi them il was impossible to ra rpj mil 
the original intention. This facl al 11 
we believe was responsible ror the de 
laj in placing 1 he e badge al 1 he dis 
I"' al hi l In' members of I be I'ii-I \a\ al 
District. 

These badges can be purchased fpom 
1 he Libertj Loan col lecloi in .ill I he 
Shops. 



18 



LIFE BUOY 



MACHINE SHOP, BLDG. 80 

Manager A. R. Loud of the shop 
baseball team and his staff of assistants 
held a meeting in Boston recently at 
the Gopley-Plaza. Secretary John 
Monday missed the special train, but 
followed on the next local. Upon ar- 
riving in Boston, John was confused by 
so many tall buildings, and wenl into a 
temporary coma, at the Pemberton 
Street station. His official card was 
found upon his person and after great 
efforts mi the pari of "Boston's Finest," 
Manager Loud was finally located at the 
"Old Howard." Upon learning of the 
sad accident to Sec. Monday, Mgr. 
Loud directed that he he taken at once 
to the Copley Plaza, where he soon 
recovered sufficiently In attend to his 
necessary duties. 

Running a pipe from three wells lo 
three houses without crossing a pipe is 
play, compared to making out one's in- 
come tax return. 

Ralph Spinney has returned from a 
few days' visit to Concord, N. 11. While 
there Ralph gave his audi a complete 
overhauling, to be able to carry out his 
usual summer program. 

If anyone should hear of a consign- 
ment of shipping tags that have be- 
come lost in transit, they will confer a 
great favor upon Dan Hayes by notify- 
ing him. 

Why is it that Harry likes to go lo 
Hampton every Saturday and Sunday? 
Is it because he wishes to be all ready 
for summer? 

It is understood that Donald B. is 
planning to spend the summer in the 
Maine woods, far, far away from the 
wild women at the beaches. 

Freeman's Hall, March 12, 1010. 
There's that gang of rough necks from 



Bldg. 80. R. Nathaniel, J. R. Munday, 
Pete and Smiling Mog. 

After all due consideration a man 
married and with a family has the edge 
on the boys as far as income taxes are 
concerned. Anyone having any doubt 
on this subject, consult any single 
young man who worked overtime in 
tins. 

From all recent returns our shop 
bowling team has given up the ghost. 
Hard luck, too, when they showed such 
promise at the start of the season. 

We all hope that on the very next 
consignment that "Bill" receives, he 
will do some entertaining. 

All this time, and we have had a 
Nazimova in our midst and never sus- 
pected it. 

Duration of time and seasons are 
figured by some fellows in this shop 
from the closing of the beach season 
until il opens. When closed, it is win- 
ter, when opened it is summer. 

With the grade they now sell, and 
the capacity of the average man, five 
pints, it is wonderful what amazing 
persistency some folks display trying 
to get the kick from it. 

II makes everyone wonder what (he 
trouble is when they see "Brad" in 
Portsmouth on a Saturday evening. 

We all wonder if Chase has got his 
box of clams yet. 

Everyone in the tool department is 
anxious to know if Emery will ever 
learn to play bid whist. Perhaps the 
"FrOg" can tell us. 

Francis X. Bushman in all his splen- 
dor could never approach Walter for 
looks, especially when Walt gets into 
the old "soup and fish." 

Place: Any dry community. Prin- 
cipal questions of the day. 

How's the jug coming along? 



LIFE BUOY 



19 



Does il really make a good drink? 

I)n you have to bud it hard for five 
hours or only for two? 

Do yiu know of anyone who has 
tried it? 

How much are hops? 

Whal does the yeasl do? 

How long before it's lil for use? Etc., 
etc., etc., and several more of like char- 
acter, lad Ihe one admonition which 
accompanies all replies, as one of our 
esteemed shopmates says, "Be sparing 
of I he water." 



SUPPLY OFFICE 

The Supply Office of Portsmouth 
claims Ihe record for small demurrage 
charges during the war. In the fiscal 
year of 1918, 3016 cars were unloaded 
with the toal demurrage charge of $70, 
ami in the fiscal year of [919, up to 
February, ^ 1 u:j cars were unloaded 
with a demurrage charge of $34. Such 
i record reflects credit upon I he whole 
Supplj Departmeni as well as on Mr. 
Harwood, Bos'n Jefferj and Mr. Duffy, 
who had I he wurk in charge. 

Twelve officers, besides Captain I'. 
T. Arm-, the Supply Officer, have 
served in the General Store during the 
war. There are now five officers on 

duly besides the Supply Officer, lln 

<il whom are \;a nl Reserves. 

The work of the Electrical Section 
was made I he subjed of an arl icle by 
Captain I-'. T. Arms, which was printed 
in the I. S. Naval Institute Proceedings, 
Volume 44, Numbers, Whole Number 
IX(i, of August, 1918, in which by com- 
paring the prices at which certain arti- 
cles had been boughi with the latesl 
bids ui outside concerns, il was figured 
thai iine-half a million dollars had been 
saved. As the number >>t fixtures has 
been greath increased since Ihe writing 



of trie article and the prides of the later 
purchases being lower than the first, it 
is estimated thai these savings now 
have amounted to well over a million 
dollars. 

Ensign H. O. Shaw, Pay Corps, is the 
latest Officer to be detached from the 
Supply Office. He was here about six 
months and made many friends. On 
February 10, 1910, he left for his home 
in Miami, Florida, via Schenectady, N. 
Y., where he has interests in the General 
Electric Company. He has now returned 
to Miami, Florida, where he is Vice- 
President of the Georgia Lumber Com- 
pany. While in Portsmouth Mr. Shaw 
took great interest in the historical 
points of I he city.- I n a recenl letter re- 
ceived from him he states that now 
there is big business going on in Miami 
and prospects were never so brighl as 
al present. While Mr. Shaw was al- 
ways vers optimistic concerning the 
In I ure nl' Miami the Supply Departmeni 
feels sure that whether bus-iTiess is good 
or bad, Mr. Shaw will prosper, and 
wishes him the besl of luck as he leaves 
the service to enter the business Held 
again. 

Col. John Leavitl of the Stores Sec- 
tion, who has been mi sick leave for 
several days on accounl of an attack of 
sciatica, has resumed his duties. 

Pauline Herbert and Marina Wilson, 
Yeomen !•' . who have been employed 
in the Public HilN Section of this office, 
have been transferred to Washington, 
D. C. 

William Burns and Edwin Rivias have 
returned from a vacation in the Massa- 
chusetts woods. 

Ethel R. Sand bird and Ellen A. Bow- 
den, Yeomen (F), have passed the Civil 
Service Examination and received ap- 
pointments al Fori Constitution. These 



20 LIFE BUOY 



appointments have not yet been ac- ELECTRICAL MACHINE SHOP 
cepted. NO. 79. 

Mr. and Mrs. Winfleld Sprague are Much sympathy lias been expressed 

receiving congratulations on the birth for "Louie" in his recenl illness, 
of a daughter. We wonder if there will he a Rase 

hall Leasrue mi the Navj 'Sard this sum- 



mer. We will he there with a pennant 
winning aggregation. 

Our Hush League catcher has been 



The Yeomen (F) at this Yard are 

verj wide-awake and we think il i- 

about lime some one related their deeds 

of prowess, especiallj if it can he done 

. ' ,, . , . , limbering up his salary arm. As von 

through the "Life Buoy, in which we ,, , . . , .. ... 

all know, lie was tanious tor Ins wild 
are all keenlj interested ami whose 

throws to second. His endeavor to re- 
pages all enjoj . , • , ,1 ■ . 

gain control is his reason tor the mid- 
Last summer when Boston was cele- winter training. 
brating Navj Day, and invited all en Much Wll ,. lv nas DeeD d one f or the 
listed personnel to contesl in water S | 1(ip an( j i ne Life Buoy by our artist, 
sports on the Charles River, a rowing Birchall. 

crew was formed, and although they \y,, WO nder who snapped the lock? 

did not gel together soon enough for \^ )>,,, 

an> real practice until about two weeks | t |s now generally known al Cape 

before Lhe eventful day, thej came in Neddick that the Armistice has been 

fourth oul of ten entries. signed. 

A basketball learn is now the excuse We wonder what makes While Leg- 

for much excitement. Thej have horns lay brown eggs. They must be 

played various high school teams; a drinking Bevo instead of water, since 

team from Berwick which had the the town went dry. 
record of never having been beaten The "Bulsheviki" has hit York Coun- 

before ; and a game with Boston Yeo- iy. The result of a recent uprising is 

men (F . The scores are as follows: the declaration of war by Ogunquil on 

Yeomen (P . 22; Portsmouth II. S. 10. c.ape Neddick, We wonder who will 

Yeomen F .7; Portsmouth, II. S., 10. lead Ogunquit's army. 
Yeomen . F . 10; Portsmouth II. S., 5. 

Yeomen F), 12; Boston Yeomen BY MERCURY LIGHT 

F . 10. Charlie is hoping it will rain soon so 

Yeomen F 1 1 ; Newburyport U.S.. 10. in* ran wash the windows in the blue 

Yeomen F . 12; Berwick, 10. print room. 

Yeomen F . 'i : Berwick, 2. Moore is wishing for windy weather. 

The spirit of get-together i- very His eyes are very weak. 
Strong here and all feel that these past Why are the mercury lights so al- 

Iwo years have been most eventful; and tractive? How about it. Celia? 
now that the time draws near for dis- We're hoping the submarines will 

enrolling a feeling of regret at separat- go Out soon SO Lou will work more 

ing is experienced, and not only will a contentedly. 

League of Nations but also a league of Looks as if Anna would be leaving 

friendships be the result of lhe cause lhe mercury lights pretty soon to live 

which brought us together. ■' by the seaside. 



THE 



ARIONOLA 

HAS MADE GOOD 



there are a number of 
good phonographs on the 
market but only one that 
will make you think you 
are listening to the actu- 
al voices of the world's 
greatest artists, hear 
all kinds of talking ma- 

$20.00 to $200.00 



chines then come in and 
listen to Galli-Curci, 
John McCormack or Har- 
ry Lauder, there's a 
reason. you'll under- 
stand it after you hear 
the Arionola. 




Model 9, Price $150.00. 



MONTGOMERY'S MUSIC STORE opp. p. o. 

EVERYBODY'S STORE 

141 CONGRESS ST. - - Y. M. C. A. BLDC. 
PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

New Windows, New Fixtures, New Goods. 
The Same Low Prices, The Same Service. 

EVERYBODY'S STORE 



"1 SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



22 LIFE BUOY 



PATTERN SHOP NOTES Alice M. just can't make her eyes 

li i> rumored thai the Income Tax behave, 

nicked oft quite a slice of one young It's a bad case. Harold, bul > i>u 

(single) Patternmaker. should nol steal a sweetheart of .1 -"I 

Bill says he is burning the midnight 

oil trying to figure out whether il will Alice M - certainly likes tea. What 

paj better to remain single or gel kind is it, Jonesey? 

spliced. What makes Mrs. 1». laugh so much? 

. 1111 1 ,1 Where ilul she go on the llili of 
Anyone w ho has had experience both 



ways, and is willing to talk about it with 
riggers to bark up their statements, 
-lioulil take him in hand before il is too 



March? 

How did you tiki' Hie moonlight 
walk. It—? 



, , An\ eelgrass m the dorks. Hill? 

late. 



lb- says the waj he makes il 'twill 

take « wife and about 17 kids to stand SHIPFITTER SHOP 

off the Collector. Can anyone imagine Cheney with a 

Come on, girls, while he is wavering, moustache? 

See M. M. Hoyl for Fruit and Orna- Wll > is Doris so sleepj mornings ' 
mental Nurserj stork. Ornamental Fern aid has a regular hour tor get- 
Shrubbery, Boses, Plants and Bulbs, ting that candy. 
B. F. D. No. l. Greenland Boad. Tel. The steel gang is getting prettj well 

3 2. Ady. 3 31 19 k-i-10 adjusted and the work shows decided 

II is about time for one of onv mem- improvement, 

bers to show his curly locks. That is a n as anyone noticed how much neater 

sure sign ol Spring. the shop is lately. 

We wonder why Bill forgets Ins er- He hear the S-3 put it all over the 

rands when sent to the Foundry. Is s- 1 on speed, submerged. 

Mai'} responsible for the absent mind? We wonder: — 

Uoes our friend "Nick" need a valet When Dave Moiilloif ot the bull gang 

or a wife, or is he jus! getting read) for is to be married. 
the Summer, as he has forgotten his [f Bridle need- a Martingale, 
collar for the past few days? I hear he if Stanley has bought the new ma- 
is going to enter a race. chine yet to carry that 10-lb. boy. Good 

We hear thai one o( our crew has luek. 

become an orator. How about it, "Al" ? If Barnabee isn't some pitch player. 

When do we get our stump speech? Whal we all would like to know, is 

Bussell Wood? 

We hear thai Brother Joy is taking 

KNOTS AND SPLICES up a collection for an ear trumpet, he 

Thai's a bad one for you, Shapleigh! doesn't quite get all that little "Billy" 

You know. Pussj Willows. has to say. 

Oh Fudge! Mr. Pinkham. Hartford would like to know whether 

That was some fudge, Miss n — . John Duggan has found his goal yet. 

When it comes to entertaining, Mrs. gill Bedden has bought a mileage 

J — . is aee high. .' book, via the front door for hot brick. 



"A Penny Saved 
Is a Penny Earned" 

We can help you save a 
good many pennies on 

HOUSE FURNISHINGS 

See Mr. WOOD 

99 Penhallow St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



THE "BUSY CORNER" STORE 



But Never Too Busy To Fill Your 
Prescriptions and Fill Them Right 

OUT OF TOWN PATRONS ARE 

WELCOME TO WAJ'I FOR THE 

CAR AT OUR HOUSE 

BENJAMIN GREEN 

THE DRUGGIST 

INSURANCE and REAL ESTATE 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 
LOWEST RATES BEST FORMS 

C. E. TRAFTON 

35 Pl-asant Street Opposite Poat Office 



YOU AUGHT TO KNOW 

DENNET and Mc'CARTHY'S 

IS THE BEST PLACE TO BUY 

Overalls, Shirts, Hosiery 



use: gas for 

lighting, heating and cooking 

PORTSMOUTH GAS CO- 

ALWAYS AT YOUR SERVK E 



Dr. S. F. A. PlGKERING 
- - DENTIST - - 

TELEPHONE CONNECTIONS 
OFFICE HOI 32CONGRESS STREET 

8 TO 12 A. M. 2 TO 5 P. M. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



BROOKS MOTOR SALES 

PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



FORD SERVICE 



FllHs BrOS. Men's and Boys' Shoes 

Fine Shoe Repairing congress st. tel. con. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



24 LIFE BUOY 



BREEZES FROM BOILER SHOP true stride. Let us hope thai he profits 

We wonder why a certain prettj '•> P*s1 experience, 

young fellow fell so hard for the Salis- Gertrude says, "1 should worry, I've 

burj parties. DonM blush, Murray. gol thirtj days' vacation due me." 

There is a rumor around that the girl Our foreman, Mr. Waller L. Ball, 

iu the office is breaking more than one who recently died, is sadly missed by 

l 1( , ar i one and all. One really does nol real- 

When are the bells going to ring, lzt ' ;i man's good qualities until he is 

Kathrvn? gone. Mr. Joseph Morrill, who is acl- 

Whai is the attraction from Bldg. 80? ing roreman in charge, is well liked by 

Ask Prances. a " ;uu ' ' s a ,1UIS ' fitting man for the 

Whj is it thai Kingsbury likes to roll position lefl vacanl by Mr. Hall's death, 

oranges in the office door? Yidd J Simmonds is righl there when 

Louie, our heartbreaker, is soon to l[ comes to trading, [f you don't be- 

presenl the girls with a 1-2 lb. box of L»eve it, ask Smith or Boston. 

chocolates. The girls saj to make it NV <' ll,,;i1 ' thai our old friend Rossley 

Page i^ Shaw's. ' s going to train with one of the noted 

Anyone who would like a midnighl wrestlers. He is looking for a return 

feed al the "Chinks" should notifj <;. match with Farrier Boston. Old 

Mclntyre, who is righl there with the scores? 

•• t .;il- •• We nuss our friend Eddie Ames, who 

\\ e wonder if it is Webster's dis- died recently with pneumonia, lie was 

tionarj rrom which Walker obtains his XV1,11 llk,,(l oj al1 his shopmates and his 

fanc\ words companj is sadly missed. 

Anyone wishing to obtain lessons in " 'S the wish of every one that on;- 

"shimmie" dancing should firsl notify old friend, Roger Outwait, maj have a 

our expert dancer Emery. speedj recovery from his recenl illness. 

We hear that there is soon to be a Ntl squarer man than Roger ever han- 

wedding in Newburyport. died a paint brush. 

What are you going lo play next, 

t.hukie BUILDING NO. 7 

We wonder how Knighl is enjoying WE WONDER: 

his vacation. Why Kiko and Joe were so busy 

Wanted — Overalls to mend, by lei- chewing gum after that Lawrence trip, 

lows who are rather handy with the Whj Yvonne left her apron home, 

needle and thread. Isn't this true. M ike If Laura ran tell the difference be- 

and Speed? Iween a doughnul and a turnover. 

Whj Kiko and Elizabeth are not on 

PAINT SHOP speaking terms. 

Buck has returned to the fold. He Why Miles doesn'1 go fishing. He 

sa\s there is nothing like good old Kit- has a good line. 

lery. When St. Clair will get his new frock 

Work is getting scarce, which ae- and overalls. 

counts for so main new bitumastic Whj Marj is so l< some lately. 

painters. W 1 1 > the loft was so quiet Monday. 

Poor old Smythy at last has found his How aboul it. girl-'.' 



HENRY PEYSER &, SON 

16 TO 20 MARKET ST. 

For more than forty years Portsmouth's leading 
Store for Men's and Boys' apparel 

RUGS, DRAPERIES, FURNITURE COVERINGS 



THE QUALITY STORE 

MARGESON BROS. 



Vaughn St. 



Telephone 570 



PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



FRED B. COLEMAN 

APOTHECARY 

Corner Congress and Vaughn Sts. 
PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 


If you desire to buy or sell Real Estate call, 
telephone or write 

II. I. CASWELL AGENCY 

Congress St. TELEPHONE 478- W Portsmouth 


PEOPLE'S MARKET 

DEALERS IN 

BEEF, PORK & PROVISIONS 

COR. DANIEL AND PENHALLOW STREETS 
Telephone Connection Portsmouth, N. H. 


SINCLAIR GARAGE 

HORTON SERVICE 

TELEPHONES 282-W. 81205 

Corner RICHARDS AVE. and MIDDLE STREET 
PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 


S- S- TRUEMAN 


JOHN O'LEARY 

KITTERY and NAVY YARD EXPRESS 



GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

TELEPHONE 651 
83 Bow St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



GENERAL TEAMING 
Tel. Con. Portsmouth, N. H. 

CENTRAL LAUNDRY CO. 

FINE LAUNDRY WORK IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 
7i Pleasant St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



o 
u 

R 

S 
T 

R 
E 



ENLIST ACAINST THE HICH COST OF LIVING 

"TRADE AT THE CO-OPERATIVE STORE" 

Clean, fresh meat, groceries and provisions at reasonable 
prices. 

Every stock holder has equal rights, and the store is man- 
aged for the benefit of all workmen. 

M. T. G. CO-OPERATIVE ASSOCIATION 



Market St 



Portsmouth, N. H, 



ONE 
FOR 
ALL: 

ALL 
FOR 
ONE 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



26 I, IKK r.l'OY 



SPAR SHOP NOTES Googins doesnM try to secure bache 

Sum.' of the boys are seeing squil- or apartments at Pierce Hall. 



gees in their sleep. Whj not, when 

thej turnout 1,000 per day? SMITH SHOP 

Lona is enjoying a hard earned vaca- Prank Armstrong, with the help of 

tion. She is taking a rest, bj hanging Walter Clark, has discovered the Foun- 

wall paper somewhere in Dover. ,:,i " of Youth. 



Tobej never knew there was so much 
sawdusl hi the world, until he operated 
the new sawmill. 

Quarterman Caswell is a busy man 
these days, between laying deck on the 
Frisco and work on the Roanoke. 



The barber al York who ml Eli Pick- 
ering's hair tells us he gol enough hair 
to make a hair mattress. Eli has had a 
cold ever since. 

Tommy K> nchej is to delh er a lec- 
ture on the Benefits of Paying an In- 

The employees will all be glad when |( ' |s rumored tha1 Jack chapman is 

thej gei in their new shop, whirl, thej |u wn|t . |mm> s|n| . 1( . s ((|| . |hi , Ki||i , | . y 

understand will be erected in the near ., . . . 

future - due '" ""' congested condition Red Ghamberlain has a new kllu | of 

'" ""' l" Vs '' Ml sh °P- There are """' s an auto to sell. The chief feature of 
when :| compass is necessarj in order thig mill ., |im . is „,.,, ,, n|1|s bj hul air 
to navigate through building No. 15. ||a , |k Linscot1 has purchase d another 

horse. IT another auto runs into him 
PUFFS FROM 81 he will have to have a new wagon. 

WHY: The veteran dam digger, hill Critch, 

tells ii-- thai in- expects in make a -record 
digging dam- from the South Boston 
Hal-- nexl week. According in Hill the 
cla m as a brain food is hard in bea I . 
Elmer Rilej is in trj in perfect a new 
anl called ihe Prohibition Potato. If 



A certain stenographer i- singing 
Lohengrin's Wedding March so much 
of late. 

Mr. It. doesnM smoke Patimas anj 

mure. 



The dictionarj in ihe Safetj Engin- „ ig a succesg , ns |n| . lm|( , ig made 

eer's office is ihe besl excuse. Mrg Margaren1 [reland is spen ding 

A Pord i- labelled "a hunch of junk" | lt ,,. thirty days' leave with her husband 

after ihe owner has spenl pari of the in Philadelphia. 11 is rumored thai -he 

night shining 'er up. NVI H ao \ Pe turn, hul we all hope thai 

A young ladj m ihe Material Section when her month is up. we shall see 

is so dazzled. PeggJ in her usual place. 

Ensign Rasch wear- a "Sunny Jim" Miss Doris McKinnon, Mrs. Ireland's 

-mile. COUSin, has left Ihe office and gone to 

Tin' inkwell in Ihe Estimating Sec- her home in South Boston. Miss Mo- 
tion i- always dry. Kinnon dues nol expeci to return to the 

The two little girls in blue lind Ihe simp. We wish her all success where 

dry dock so attractive. ever she may he. 

Mr. Bracket! isn't round shouldered Miss Alice Miller is taking Mrs. [re- 

from carrying such thick letters to one land's place in the office during- Mrs. 
of the Labor Hoard assistant-. ' Ireland's leave of absence. 



A. D. S. 



IVI 



AT 



Adams Drug Store 

ON 

MARKET STREET 



IT ALWAYS PAYS 

YOU CAN MAKE UP YOUR MIND THAT THE 

MONEY YOU SPEND FOR GOOD CLOTHES 
(SUCH AS WE MAKE HERE) IS AN EXCELLENT 
INVESTMENT. IT INSURES EXCELLENCE OF 
FIT, SMARTNESS OF STYLE, AND LONG SER- 
VICE. 

SEASONABLE GOODS ALWAYS ON HAND. 
WE ARE ALSO MAKING THE NEW NAVAL 
OFFICERS' UNIFORM COATS. 

C. J. WOOD, Naval & Civilian Tailor. 



THE PORTSMOUTH FLOWER SHOP 

A. C. CRAIG, Manager 

FANCY CUT FLOWERS 

AGENT VICTOR TAT,KTXG MACHINES 

4 Market Street Phone 960 

PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



M. P. ALKON & CO. 

DEALERS IN 

CHINA, CROCKERY & CLASS WARE 
NO. 27 MARKET ST., PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



BOU 

AGENT 

FOR LEADING FIRE AND LIABILITY INSURANCE COMPANIES 

GOV. ST. KITTERY, MAINE 



■V^E ARE AT YOUR SERVICE 

F. A. GRAY & CO. 

PAINTERS AND DECORATORS, 

30 & 32 DANIEL STREET, PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

"WALL, PAPEPLS SLTid PAINT SUPPLIES 



1 

■ I If 

lb i ■ 

HJL1 


^EmS 


a 1 J*I Ilfe'^'^l 


i 





Congress and Fleet Sts. 



We can furnish a house from cellar to attic. 
Prices right in every branch of our business. 
Why not step into our store and look over 
our many styles of furniture. It costs 
nothing to look, and it might be beneficial 
for us both. D. H. MC INTOSH 

PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



TYPEWRITERS FOR SALE & RENT 

J. E. DIMICK 

29 Tanner St. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

Telephone 605-W. 



E.PERCY STODDARD 

insrsuprL^^nsroE 

REAL ESTATE 

7 Market Square PORTSMOUTH 



'I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY' 



28 LIFE BUOY 



SEEN THRU' THE PERISCOPE H. C. Sweetser and ll. II. Ericson, 

K. C. Bousch, former Asst. Outside navin 8 successfully passed the Civil 

Supt., has accepted a position in a Du- Service examination for Copyisl Drafts- 

Inlh shiDvard man, have received their appointments. 

II. D. Bacon, Outside Supt., is now m The draftsmen have received a mosi 

charge of construction al the Ma, •lion- welcome increase in wages. The rat- 

al-Duluth shipyard in Duluth. in * s were based "" the pecen1 Mac * 

Board award, which was accepted by 

the ,\a\\ Department. The change in 

eligibility rules made it possible lor the 

following copyists In In' promoted In 

llu' rating of draftsmen: E. (i. Kil- 

tredge, E. C. Kimble, and B. T. Newton, 





M. E. Nicholls has also accepted a 
posit urn wil li Mr. Bacon. 

Ensign E. II. Bruce, l". S. N.. has re- 
ceived In- discharge from active duty, 
and i- now employed in tin* Submarine 



Drafting Room. His presence no doubt |( , s|n| , Draftsmen; ami c . ,;. ,;,,„•„, ,,, 
wil1 hel P the chances of the baseball Marine Engine and Boiler Draftsman. 



Irani, as he was on lasi year's Dai 

nicnil h Varsity team. 

II. R. Weaver of [thaca, N. Y., ha 

started under Mr. Yeomans in the llul 

Divisi in Why Conlon is such a Silas Marner. 

Ll. Commander P. T. Wrighl has NVIl > Kittredge doesn'i gel more 



"Oh It-li me, learned Oracle — " 
Where Patteo gets thai seeming drag 
willi I he females. 



taken Commander Lewi-" plan' as as 



sleep. 



sistanl to Commander Howard. Before When Ray's unexhaustible line will 

coming here he was assigned to dutj ever gel tangled up. 

al the Lake Torpedo Boa! Co. ■ ■■ Berna wouldn't like to get-into it 

The S-3 has been oul several times good old 5 & 10 game. 

under llu ' '•"""nan, I of Commander J. When Pop Lll| ,, wj|1 ever muvt , again 
\Y. Lewi-. A-ide from several minor 



II Preble will ever learn to plaj whist. 
I [ Collier ever has nighl mares. 



repairs the boai is in verj good condi- 
tion, and will undoubtedly go to Prov- 
incetown very shortly lor her trials. Wl| v Colliton does nol promote a 

T. B. Pinkham of the Machinery In- Championship match, 
vision has lefl to take up a position with 



the Bath Iron Work-. N( ,i victorj ,,, M ,|,_ |MI | over st .i (> ex _ 

While on the way to the restaurant p reS ses true libertj and democracy, 
the other day, L. W. Scheirer was the 
recipient of a mosi undesirable gift, in 

the form of a fairsized stone. Some Fellowship is the mosi lender and 
brainless jester evidently though! thai S entle > >''' exacting force in the lim- 
ine i, round here was getting hore-ome, V«rse- -always finding expression in the 

and decided to liven things up by prac- G° lde n '■"■''• 
ticing throwing hand grenades. How- 
ever it quite upset Scheirer's peaceful The hole you make in giving is the 
frame of mind, as i) required the ser- hole you musl receive through. You 
vices of the Dispensary surgeon to re- cannot receive with a closed hand — you 
pair his denied dome. .• must open up first. 



LIVE WIRE MEN WANTED 

To get acquainted with a live wire store, A store that KNOWS what men want and 
HAS it. Good, dependable merchandise at right prices, and good service. 



'MASTERCRAFT" AND "LEOPOLD MORSE'S" MEN'S CLOTHES "RIGHT POSTURE" BOYS 

CLOTHES ARROW COLLARS HATHAWAY SHIRTS CHENEY TIES 

WALK-OVER AND RALSTON SHOES FOR MEN-LION BRAND WORK SHOES-ARROW 

RUBBER BOOTS TRIPLE TREAD RUBBERS 



N. H. BEANE&CO. 



5 Congress St. 



Portsmouth 



R. E. BANNAFORD 
FLORIST - - - 



CUT FLCWERS, DESIGNS & DECCRATICNS 
452 KlClIAIfDS AVK. l KI.l l-iiosi. CON. 



C. P. CARROLL 

Groceries, Meats and Provisions 

145 PENHAILOW ST. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

Tel. Connection Near A. S. L. Ferry 



"YORK COUNTY NATIONAL BANK" 

SERVICE 

Large Storage Vault and Safety Deposit Boxes for 
lent. Your checking account is solicited. In our 
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT we pay 4 Per Cent 

interest. 

YOKK COUNTY NATIONAL DANK 

YORK VILLAGE, MAINE 



THE 
APOLLO LUNCH 



-OOO^OOO— 



HOME COOKING 

17 Congress St. Portsmouth, N. H. 



PHILBRICK'S PHARMACY 

AGENCY FOR 

BELLE MEAD SWEETS & JERSEY ICE (REAM 

67 Congress St. - - Portsmouth, N. H. 




PORTSMOUTH. 

n h. 



HATS & MEN'S FURNISHINGS 
AT 

PARSONS THE HATTER 

PORTSMOUTH. N. H. : : PHONE 867-M 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



30 LIFE BUOY 



Roster of Labor Organizations Whose Street. •I<>^«'[>h H. Goodwin. Kittery 
Members Work at the Ports- ' ,l 'l'"'- Me., Secretary. 



mouth Navy Yard. molders 

Local No. 403, I. M. U. of N. A., meets 
2nd and ith Thursday, al Socialisl Hall, 
Congress Street. Carl II. Garver, Box 
'i 19, Kittery, Me., Secretary. 



PORTSMOUTH METAL TRADES COUNCIL 

Metal Trades Council meets everj 
Fridaj al Odd Fellows' Hall, \. II. Fire 
Insurance Companj Building, Congress 

Street, Portsm h. President, II. L. sheet metal workers 

Hartford; George A. Gate, 123 Richards Local No. 352, si I Metal Workers, 

Ave., Secretary. A. S. M. W. N. A., meets 2nd and ith 

Thursdaj al (i. A. R. Hull, Daniel Street. 



Charles I!. Quimby, Kittery, Me., Sir 
relarv. 



BLACKSMITHS 

Rockingham Local No. 230, I. B. o 

B. <\ II.. i sts M and 3rd Mondaj 

7.30 p. in., .il Painters' Hall, Free- Affiliated Locals 

man's Block, Congress Sti t. M. 0. carpenters and joiners 

Richards, 7:' s mer Street, Secretary. Local No. 021, Carpenters and Join 



BOILER makers 



its, meets <'\crx Tuesday, 8 p. in., al 

, , v ,,.- ... r d a, t a n a. Painters' Hall, Freeman's Block, Con- 
Local \i>. US/, I. 1 ■» . nl U. &. I . a . , n. *». 

gress Street. George Whittemore, 13 
Markel Street, Secretary. 



II. ni A., meets r\rf\ Wednesday, al 
K. of P. Hall, Freeman's Block, Con- 
gress Street. John A. Quinn, The Is- coopers 
lington, Islington Street, Secretary. Coopers meel everj second Monday 

al (i. A. I!. Hall. Daniel Street, -Ports- 



ELECTRICAL WORKERS 

Local Nil 502, meets Isi and 3rd 
Wednesday al s p. m., al Moose Mall. 
Higli Street, Portsmouth, N. II. M. L. 
Schwarz, I ."> I High Sired, Secretary. 

FOUNDRY EMPLOYEES 



mouth, N. II. .1. P. Armstrong, 504 
Middle Street, Corresponding Secre- 
tary. 



CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 

Local No. 1982, Carpenters ami Join- 
ers, meets Isi and 3rd Thursdaj al 
Local No. r,s - Foundrj Employees, Pa i nt ers' Hall, Freeman's Block, Con- 
meets second Mondaj al N. E. <>. P. gress street . Walter N. Meloon, '.:> 
Hall, Daniel Street. Jeremiah Crowley, Rogers stre et, Secretary. 
7 McDoi gh Street, Secretary. 

FEDERAL EMPLOYEES 
MACHINISTS Loca] No (|() , nt ,,.| s | s | , |||( | 3r( j W ed 

Ranger Lodge, No. 836, I. A. of M., nes day, X. E. < ». I'. Hall. Daniel Street. 

meets everj Wedriesdaj al s p. m., al Aiiss ste n a B chamberlain, 101 Miller 

Odd Fellows' Hall. N. II. Fire Insurance .\\r.. Secretary. 

Companj Building, Congress Street. A. 

R. Garland, 161 Austin Street, Secre- 

Local No. 351, I. B. of S. F. 

& ().. meets Is! and 3rd Sunday, "-' p. m., 

metal polishers ; ,| Socialisl Hall, Congress Street. 

Local No. H»7 meets Lsl and :u-t\ Sun- Frank II. Davis, fin? Sagamore Avenue, 

day, 6 p. m., al <'.. A. R. Hall, Daniel' Secretary. 



BEFORE BUYING SEE OUR FULL LINE OF 

BALDWIN REFRIGERATORS 

More Than 100 Styles to Choose From 
126-128 Market St. The Sweetser Store "lis The Plate to Go." 

A FEW OF OUU SPECIALTIES 

Hart, Schaffner and Marx Clothes, Stetson Hats, 
Manhattan Shirts, Fownes Gloves, Interwoven Stockings 



F. W. LYDSTON & CO. 



Outfitters for Men & Boys 
PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



JOHN SISE & CO. 
INSURANCE 

MARKET SQUARE 

PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



A. P. WENDELL & CO. 

Hardware, Paints and Tools 

Telephone 850 

2 Market Square Portsmouth, N. H. 



THEATRE SODA FOUNTAIN AND PORTSMOUTH FANCY BAKERY 

18 CONCRESS STREET 

Try our Hot Chocolate and a Jelly Doughnut — Cream Puffs 

Cream Pie and all Kinds of Loaf Cake 

BALDWIN A. REICH, PROPRIETOR 



MAKES YOUR OLD STRAW HAT LOOK LIKE NEW 


F. C. REMICK & CO. 


ELKAY'S STRAW HAT DYE 


11 CONGRESS ST. 


16 Colors, all the Popular Shades 
25 Cents a Bottle 


Co-operative Shoes, 


BOARDMAN & NORTON 


Emerson, Florsheim, 


ffieyqi&» Store, Portsmouth, N.H. 


Ground Grippers. 


Opp. Post Office 


The Best of Work Shoes and Rubbers. 



SAVE FUEL 

By using Electric Appliances for Cooking 

ROCKINGHAM COUNTY LIGHT AND POWER CO. 

29 Pleasant Street Portsmouth, N. H. 

"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



32 LIFE BUOY 



painters Financial Secretary .1. Walls 

Local No. 81, meets 2nd ami 4th Fri- Treasurer E. V. Wilcox 

days at Painters' Hall, Freeman's Block, The Treasurer, Mr. E. V. Wilcox, 

Congress Street. Frank T. Cox, 170 states for the benefit of the members of 

dales Street, Secretary. the Association thai there is $387.49 in 

the treasurj of the Portsmouth Navy 



Yard Improvement Association. 



DRAFTSMEN 

Local No. 'i meets Isi and 3rd Mon 
days al N. E. 0. P. Hall, Daniel Street. 

W. B. Collier, 19 Orchard Street, Sec PORTSMOUTH NAVY YARD 

retary. MASTER MECHANIC'S ASSOCIA- 

PATTERN MAKERS TION. 

Pattern Makers' League of N. A. President T. F. Flanagan 

meets Ith Tuesdaj each month al \. E. Secretary and Treasurer S. D. Gilkey 
0. P. Hall. Daniel Street. J. E. Nichol- 

'" Kl "" N Me " "' ' ' U> WHAT IS YOU STATE OF MIND? 

RIGGERS , 

II \ mi I linik \ (Mi re beaten, > mi arc ; 

LOCal \<>. •-.'.">'•». I. A. Ill B. S. <.\ II. I.. I, y QU || 1|||k y0U dare ,,,,1^ yOU (Jqq.J . 

W. & I!., meets On. I and Ith Tuesday, h ,,,,,•, | like ,,, Nvjl)i buJ y(llI , hjllk >nll 

G. A. R. Mall, Daniel sired. William can't, 

Palfrey, 302 Marcj Street, Secretary. [f s a lmos1 :1 rm ,.|i you W on't. 

WOODWORKERS' HELPERS 

. „. , . , , - , ., i If you think you'll lose, you're lost, 

Local No. mot , meets M and 3rd • J ' - 

Mondaj al Woodworkers' Hall, dm ' '"' "»' »' the w ..rM we find • 

gress Street. Thomas Benfleld, Fleel Success begins with a fellow's will — 

Street, Secretary. It's all In ihc state of mind. 



CLUBS AND ASSOCIATIONS 



If you think you're outclassed, you arc! 

You've go! In think high In rise; 
You've goi In lie sine of yourself before 

Vim can e\ it win a prize. 



LEADINGMEN AND QUARTER 

MEN'S ASSOCIATION 

Leadingmen and Quartermen's Asso- Life's battles donM always go 

elation meets the second Fridaj of To the stronger or faster man ; 

even month al ii. A. It. Hall, Daniel But soon or late the man who wins, 

Street. Presidenl A. .1. McCourt; John Is the fellow who thinks he can. — Ex 
Foye, Box v 19, Kittery, Me., Secretary. 



A GOOD CITIZEN 
PORTSMOUTH NAVY YARD A g , ,.„„„„ ls man who ,,,„„ 

IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION. .,,„,!, and consciously accommodates 

Presidenl T. F. Flanagan his conducl and his business to Ihc 

t<l Vice Presidenl E. I.. Ghanej rights of others and in ihc interests of 

Viul Vice Presidenl H. M. chandler Hie community. 

Becording Secretarj V. J. Rossiter' Presidenl Woodrow Wilson. 



THOSE WHO PAY CASH 

GET BETTER VALUE FOR THEIR MONEY 

Congress Street 19 p y. f\ \]k# |»WH J *•"» 

Portsmouth, N. H. ■-^ ^^ V^ WW II W ^9 Te l. 194 



KERWIN SYSTEM SHOE STORES 
Portsmouth, Roxbury, Dorchester, Fall River, 

Framingham, (2) 

You have many advantages when you buy SHOES of 
THE KERWIN SYSTEM SHOE STORES 

WE BUY AND SELL FOR CASH FOR SIX LARCE 
NEW ENGLAND STORES 

Cash discounts from manufacturers, no charge accounts, no trading 
stamps, less profits:— All combine to make our prices the lowest possible. 

KERWIN-LEACH CO. 

Portsmouth, N. H. - - - - 45 Congress St., 



FRUIT AND CONFECTIONERY, ICE CREAM AND SODA, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

TELEPHONE 29 w CATERING A SPECIALTY 43 CONGRESS street 

WHY NOT " 

Place your order for your Overland NOW. Its only a short time before 

the spring riding commences. 
Model 90 Touring $985 F. 0. B. Factory and they are GOING FAST. 
There will be a shortage on some size tires this spring better order now. 

C. A. LOWD 
OVERLAND AGENCY 

Service Station & Garage 338 Pleasant St. Portsmouth, N. H. 
"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 




BRIGHTEN YOUR HOME 

with one of the many little touches you may choose 
from our well filled departments. It's a good time to 
buy now with prices reduced from the higher war 
levels. Let us show you the many attractive 
RUGS, LINOLEUMS and MATTINGS, SHADE 
CURTAINS and DRAPERIES, LACE, SCRIM and 
MUSLIN CURTAINS, CRETONNES, SILKOLINES 
SUNFAST DRAPERIES 



OUR CHINA DEPARTMENT 

will furnish the new China and Glassware, Aluminum 
and Nickel Utensils, Bath Room Fixtures, Mirrors, 
Tinware, and Enameled Ware, Wire Goods and 
Woodenware. 



GEO. B. FRENCH GO. 



37 MARKET STREET 

PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



HasseTT's 



MUSIC AND 
ART SHOPPE 



PORTSMOUTH'S MUSICAL CENTER 




Pianos and 
Player Pianos 

At no other store in this vi- 
cinity will you find as large 
an assortment of excellent 
pianos. 

If you are interested in a 
Piano do not fail to visit our 
warerooms. It will be worth 
while. BOURNE, PEASE, 
LESTER, HAINES, etc. 



The Only Complete Victrola Shop in Town 

V1CTROLA EDISON DIAMOND DISC COLUMBIA 

BRUNSWICK SONORA 



Kodaks 

Large and complete line of Kodaks and Supplies. 
Developing and Printing. 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 
"The Stationery of a Gentleman" 



Piano Tuning 



Picture Framing 




115 Congress Street 



Portsmouth, N. H. 



"I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



Convert Your Bonds 

The privilege of converting First and Second 
four per cent Liberty Bonds has been extended. 

We are prepared to exchange your fours 
for four and a quarter per cent Bonds. 



Liberty Bonds may be left with us for safe-keeping without charge. 



Commercial and Savings Departments. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 
United States Depository. Assets over Three Million Dollars. 

SYSTEMATIC 

SAVING 

SPELLS 

SUCCESS. 



Weekly deposits bring about the most satisfactory results. 

One Dollar opens an account. Home Banks furnished free 
to depositors. 



PISCATAQUA SAVINGS BANK, 

First National Bank Building. : : Portsmouth, N. H. 

Open Saturday Evenings 6 to 9 



'I SAW IT IN THE LIFE BUOY" 



INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 
LIFE BUOY 



Issued monthly for free distribution to employees of the Industrial Department of the 
Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H. 



VOL. II 



MAY, 1919 



NO. 5 



LIBERTY LOAN RALLY 

Address by Congressman Weaver 



Back in the earlj days of the Civil 
War, up in Massachusetts or down in 
Massachusetts, or wherever il was, 
I here was an old fellow bj I he name of 
Artemus Ward; and thej were having a 
meeting here and their boys were going 
to the front to whip the Rebels and 
save the Union; and some of them sug- 
gested to old Artemus Ward the pro 
prietj of his volunteering and going 
into the Army. "Well," he said, "do 
you know I feel powerfully prompted; 
I feel an awful strong impulse to go, 
Inil really when I begin to lliiuk of it, I 
am just overwhelmed with a sense of 
my own unworthiness; I feel thai some 
worthier man oughl to go, and really I 
don't know anj family in the whole 
world that is as fine a family as my 

wife's kin lo go, including II hi ladj 

and her mother." 

Hiil I am mil Inn pr I lo fight, bul 

am getting mosi I Id in fight, anil I 

wanl lo tell you boys I hat I have made 

a glorious coiil I'iliut inn to Ihi- cause. I 

have three <>\' the fines! girls down in 

Oklahoma. Iicaul i fill as a dream of 

Michael Angelo carved in stone; and do 
you know one of those girls was a greal 
studeni and there was a fellow do\* n 
there who was jusl crazj about her and 
hanging around mj house like a yellow 
dog, and I actually had to run him off. 
she loved books and didn'l think much 
nl I hal fellow until he told me that he 

had enlisted and was to Sail across, and 
Mien they were married the verj ue\l 

day. 



And the example was a g I one, 

and mj second daughter, Amelia, was 
in love with a great football star, and 

whj thej didn'l hardly wail two linurs 
when the boj had enlisted in the 

Marines and I see -nine of thei I 

there, the bravest of the brave, God 
bless I hem : Applause . 

And mj youngest daughter, Lucy. 
why l here was a great big boj six feet 
three, and he was just crazj about' her; 
she was but seventeen years old; he 
joined the Navj and went over seas. He 
hasn't come back yet, but when he does 
come back, blessed be find, there is a 
wonderful surprise down 111 Oklahoma 
for him ; we ha\ e got l he prel l iest little 
blue-eyed boy in the whole world. (Ap- 
plause , . What do you think of mj 
contribution to the good cause, 

I want to tell you boj - about a trip I 
had about a j ear ago down in Kentucky 
for the Liberty I. nan. They had a spe- 
cial train, and I don't know how thej 
came to invite me. They had some 
real speakers, a lol of manly soldier 
boys from Camp Zachary Taylor and 
some fine young officers, and preachers 
so thick that I heir legs had to hang out 
of the windows, and speakers <>( all 
sorts; why some of them honestlj 
couldn't speak as good as I can. Wil h 

-nine of Idem -llence was gulden and 

for -nine of them speech-making was a 

crime ami some could slir you to the 

very depths, bul I feel sure thai we all 
had jusl one message we have al 
ready gone over the top^because all 



LIFE BUOY 



Kentuckj had risen in the Third Liberty time — the presidenl of the United 

Loan Campaign, as of old upon the hills States, Woodrovs Wilson. Applause), 

of Scotland the plaided warrior arose And whal did he say: "Our foreign 

al llif sign ni the flerj cross, and everj policj is compounded of bul two ele- 

speaker was cheered. Thej cheered ments, peace and our own honor." 

the pooresl speakers the most. Whal Why, Germanj claimed to be a friend 

were they cheering; whj mil the talk- of ours, and we were good friends to 

ers; thej were cheering the Flag and the German people. Thousands of them 

the cause and the Libertj Loan and this had settled in our Country and made 

greal Country thai we love and tin good citizens. We sent our boys <<\rr 

Spiril of Libertj and the forty-eighi there to be educated in their greal 

indestructible States of an Indivisible Universities because we revered the 

Union. And now a year has gone, a genius of the German mind. There was 

year of momentous history, and they a Germanj of our dreams; il was the 

-ay thai the fires of patriotism thai Germanj thai gave birth In men such 

burned on everj hearthstone in the land as Beethoven, Luther, Mozart, ami 

a year ago when the boys wenl over Schiller. Bui the living Germany of 

seas thej saj thai the fires of patriot- 1914 was bloodstained ami brutal ami 

i-iii are burning low ami dying down thej